Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


bY

|
|

cet

a mea eT

Tuesday
July 25
19350





— Ravbados Se Aduorate °

Cabinet Will
Discuss Korea

P®i™Me MINISTER CLEMENT

LONDON, July 24.
ATTLEE ‘today unexpeci-

edly summoned a spetial meéting of the Cabinet to
pave the way for important statements on the defence of

Korea which he and the

ence Minister Emanuel Shin-

well, will make to Parliament on Wednesday.



U.K. Prepares

For General

Election
LONDON July 24.

Political tipsters 6h both sides
of the fence predict now that the
thin Socialist control of Britain's
affairs will last at least until next
Spring.

Some say the new election may
not come even that soon

Conservative foes of Prime Min-
ister Attlee have candidates lined
up to run for almost every seat
in the House of Commons, but
palitical chiefs who guide the
party still have no coherent pro-
gramme on paper. They don’t
think they’ll need one for several
more months.

The Labour Party is going full
speed ahead with a new platform

which stresses a slowdown on
public ownership plans.

Preliminary Plan

A preliminary plan has beer
drawn. It will get its final polish-
ing from Labour’s Executive
Committee this Wednesday and
then will be moved on to local
parties in each constituency fo
discussion. The final programme
will be ready by mid-October. Iu
that month they will also get

going over from the Labour
Party’s Annual Convention
The Prime Minister has the|

power to ask the King at any
time to dissolve Parliament and
call an election, but Labour Party
informants say Attlee is in no
mood to chance a test at the
polls yet and probably wont be
before next spring.

Last February’s balloting which
cut Labour’s majority from an
overwhelming control of | the
Commons to a shaky working
majority of nine showed political
sentiment evenly split in the coun-
try. Persistent tapping of popular
feeling has shown no convincing
swing to either Party.—(C.P.)

H.M.
£1,025,000 To
Rebuilding Castries



Govt. Gives

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
ST. LUCIA, July 24.
Subject to the approval of Par-
liament, His Majesty’s Govern-

The Cabinet is due to hold a
long session tomorrow to consider
the reports of the Department
Ministers and experts on how Bri-

tain. can give more concrete aid
in Korea,
Observers suggested that to-

day’s meeting was hurriedly sum-
moned to consider whether any
new steps had been considered by
Britain which would involve
emergency legislation before Par-
liament rises for the summer re-
cess this week

Colour was lent to this view by
the presence at a mecting of the

Attorney - General, Sir Hartley
Showcro and William Whiteley,
Chief Government Whip, who

would be consulted over any such
legislation.—Reuter.

11,500 U.S.





ment will provide the additional|taken to Brunswick.

sum of £189,000, making a petal

contribution to the reconstruction

of Castries of £1,025,000.
The announcement was

the Governor this morning to
Legislative Council, which

made
by
the
puid tribute to a strong presen-
tation of the case to the Colonial

Office by a delegation comprising | ,,

the Administrator, Mr. J. K. Stow,
the Hons. Garnet Gordon, Francis
Carasco, and Clive Beaubrun,

The delegation is leaving Eng-
land on Tuesday by the Maure-
tania via New York en route to
Castries where plans are already
under way to give the delegation
a rousing welcome home.

The Governor also afnounced
further success of the delegation
in obtaining a further grant of
£150,000 from the Colonial Devel-
cpment and Welfare reserves to-
wards roads and agriculture de-
development, and the Colonial
office is sending a committee of
experts to advise on the develop-
ment schemes with
of further Colonial
and Welfare

a possibility
Development
assistance,











TAX INCREASE IN U.S.

PRESIDENT TRUMAN to-day discussed with Congres-
sional Leaders the advisability of an immediate emergency

tax increase on both individual incomes and business firms naval f
House Speaker Sam Raeburn told reporters afterwards] "i

that the matter was “still in the conversation stage.”

Marines
Increased
60 Per Cent

WASHINGTON, July 24
An immediate 60 per cent.
increase is planned for the fight-
ing strength of the United States
Marine Corps, usually re fiable
Congressional sources said te-day.
They also said the Navy was

preparing
three—more
duty as quic
House m
plans after
Armed Serv s Committee, wit
Admiral Sherman, Chief of Naval

two—and
aircraft
kly

nber

possibly
carriers
possible
told

losed session of the

for





of these








ive told t n that an increase

about 57,000 men would be

nade the Marines’ strength

which on June 30 was reported

75,000

The air squadrons, would be
inereased from 12 to 18,

—Reuter.





reported to}







|
|
|

|

pies



PHOTO SHOWS : South Korea
front in the Suwon area.



from North Korea.—Express.













n troops making their way on foot and
Suwon has now fallen into the hands of the





















by lorry









Communist



a

THREE

| sa

PAGE





CLAIM FALL OF
VITAL U.S. BASES

ie (With MacArthur’s Headquarters in Korea)
Nehru Sends

, duly 24
ORTH KOREAN Communist forces today
A Secret
Message

claimed the capture of Yongdong, main high
way town on the road to Taeju, and the heart of
the American forces defence area sinee the with
drawal from Taejon. ;

|
WASHINGTON, July 24 The North Korean claim, brdadcast by Moscow
‘ as reported to-day 19 pave oer’ | radio, put North Korean tanks and infantry 22 air
&@ secret personal appeal to the} miles down the high road from the former South
cdi io 5 Ein. Chaat | Korea temporary capital, and more than half way
have Communist China “seates’ | to Kumchon, vital rail and road junction town on

in the United Nations

the direct route to the United Nations main supply

The message has been w ek |
from pablinntinn e Pelee | base at Pusan.
request, the report said. Diplo | The claim of the capture of Yongdong was made in a
matic offic dale told a 7 t North Korean communique. The last communique of Geu
aaa tae Ob ti eetetns eral MacArthur's Headquarters said American troops bad
proposal made to both Americ: | successfully defied frontal assaults in their defence lines
towards the battle and Russia on July 13 that Com-} in the Yongdong area, effectively blasting repeated waves
forces invading munist China be admitted to the of infantry attacks.
|


































United Nations with the hope that | ———_.__ ae ri MacArthur Communique
ae inher sdets. a5 . Russia would co-operate to en: — ald 1 issault in ithe Yongdong
TROOPS IN the Korean fighting | @6 Reds’ Sta e ector began after a hours artil-
5) Nehru's secret message wi | ; = £ lery and mortar bombardmen of
BRITAIN Sabotage At fi l A 350 3 reported to explain his motive - ao ir os {em . Me me
| if} an = n making the proposal, and we Manoeuvres | ¢ merican gun topped 1
- } . | aults in their track
ip rently intended to foresta’ | J ‘ ul ‘
Pri HEIDEN, Sy 24 Portsmouth & , n imminent American rejectio: | r Yongdong lie pe ye rant San
oe kept inister Attlee told | e Nehru was reported to hav : B67, new capita ee
Parliament today that the United SAYS ATTLEE | I T, irged that America abandon her | IN ROME | aor am : . ae net mee ar
States had 180 aireraft, 10,000 Air | 1 eS iemand that North Koreans muet ; ‘ a is f '
Force men and 1,500 naval men | “ withdraw to the 38th parallel be } ROME, July 24. ne
in Britain , LONDON, July 24 | (By E. L. COZIER) fore China's membership of — the Strong forces of invading “Red Southwest Tip
Airmen were in three medium Prime Minister Clement Attlee 1 NOTTINGHAM, July 24 United Nations could be consider. | troops reinforced by tanks ar North Korean forces have swe\
bomber groups. Attlee was reply-| told Parliament today that the ENGLAND ‘ viges tan mga te Hada Ei ed. Officials said he contended that armoured cara were today ade ye unceposdl eee eer ae
ing to a request for information| blowing up of nine ammunition - put up a good hight today against tremendous if America agreed to admit Com | vancing "t . Ua ene aes west tip of the Korea Peninsula
by Leftwing Labour member| barges at Portsmouth on July 14,{ Odds and until the last hour of the afternoon it looked very} munist China to the — United rough “ppt ey i ca General MécArthuré Headauat
Stephen Davies, who has been| Was due to sabotage. much as though the Dunkitk spirit would bring her through] Nations, and Russia then petined siuhvauvhes staged ber tealy tines | tere alac-enndlnded
critical of the Government's foreign It had not yet been possible to| to save the third Test match, Fortunately for the West Indies, ad oa ne ee oan the war \ midnight Communique issued
policy. Opposition members cheer-| establish who did it Yardley and Insole failed’ at the crucial moment and the | 2°, 2&4 tor Russi fficials were} More than 20,000 Italian troops,;here said the tank and infantry
ed Attlee’s statement and Labour Attlee said it was a miracle that ? : oe opinion American officia watched by the Italian Defence] teams of the invading norther:
s 3 cae Sainte Tne rospect for tomorrow is that the five last men must hold sased «to. «know more about | “4 et ‘ d reached the South K
Member Seymour Cocks said it|there was not serious loss of life , plea c ., | Minister, Randolfo Picciardi, were | ami ad reach e South fF
was better to have Allied armed|among workers in the Armament on for England at least until tea time and score at a ru Nehru’s motives, but i toking part in a three-day exer~[fean oaval base at MORPO, close
forces in Britain than enemy|Depot, and among their families minute, or remain out there even longer if their rate of{ | not expected to change their po cise which was being held in the {t@ the southern coastal road to
° : . : : = Pp { I w United Nation
armed forces,—Reuter. living near to Bedenham Harbour, scoring is lower, in order to Save the situation itio Reuter Tuscan Appening ee iz pet :. Me ! alo ilatined
where the explosion occurred, ; So Of the English batsmen today, Invading and defence troops the naval base f Mokpo was al-
The explosion damaged nearly Parkhouse, although he did not 3 nva + ay ‘ i 0 ave i o k vas i
9 S eelts 14: taht . P ll on Re vere equipped with Italy late ready occupied
wt Held In Uranium Tver building within more than Formosa make as much as Washbrook « 7 . weapons, including military sup The North Korean Army today
5 a mile of the blast but no one was Simpson, impressed me most fa\ Should B.G. Join plic ent by the United State: [thrust forward from Kwangju, the
Smuggling Charge seriously injured ourably. He is a closer APproxi=j , under ithe Atlantic Pact southernmost town they have yet
Answering Anth ony Eden, Awaits Red mation to the West Indian idea of i B W l Ky deration? Defending troops, the “Blue taken, only 31 miles from South-
HELMSTEDT, British zone Deputy Opposition Leader, Attlee @ batsman—a man who make +) . of e r ire composed of 12,000 men” of | East Korea
July ‘a4 said that extra precautions had Yuns at the same time that he is | fe Stirs Bee eee edanadieis the Friuli Division backed — b But.on the central front Ameri-
West German border police to-\been taken at the Admiralty nvasion. rae beautifOi strokés, not get LONDON, July 24 units of the Italian Air Force can troops backed by artillery
day said they had arrested two\Establishment for some weeks. oe the bat to the ball howevei | Whether British Guiana. should Military observers from Britain }threw back a tank supported at
2 aa . i scri e’s state- : e can | si ‘edera- | the United States, France, Greece | tack near Yongdong, 25 mile
sastapghe sen ARIS on i. ¥ Soe ch ates ao indeela” TAIPEI, Formosa, July 24 The Masters ee eee Giviectiond and Ronis oa South East of Taejon
i i Peet rat C ‘ ader { the A Defence Ministry spokesman Thi sb rg { tion wed eee Crear atow vatching the manoeuvres Reuter
into the Soviet Zone of Germany,|Clement Davies, Leader o ef: t is is batting in the tradition! respondent lately in Georgetown | \Wvé a eu This is whete the reconhaigsance
; , Rote soee se ae « -|said on Monday a number o s ; eet 7
Uranium valued at several| Liberals, said it disclosed a “very junks were approaching Quemoy of Hammond, Hobbs, and the other jin The Times today s tteemiicinilaletd ta tiitiic ik had reveale 1 Communist
million marks was confiscated startling situation”. Attlee said, : pp “hinese| Masters, so is that of Hutton: so,| Though many in BG. realisé forces massing in “cOnsidérable
or : avr gs Pa. aches {sland under cover of Chinese + titede ie The identities of the arrested|the facts he gave today were the Communist artillery barrage leve, is that of Compton, so] that self-Government is not } . ik strength” for the offensive dow:
men were not disclosed, interim report of the Board of it Way be. the fong-expected g oy of pawsrer, though whyjble in the aren in ae U.S. L risoners jthe main road towards the pro-
7 . seatide!) ectwaanll iw on . ee 3 : at , ney do not play Joe, still making} packets", the writer says “An ele sions 50 1 ca of Taeiu
] oF an So a sea ean = ci fp a enn attempt Lt, ge me plenty of Site Tt oad Me the raat of ‘intransigent Demararian ryt cn the ‘Bast ee aa ‘ue 2 he
ast Friday after the police here | plosion—Reuter. Nationalist-held island used as} jvapc oa. : f ; 6! otherwise They fear that Marched Throu hi : ee t i
had b “t off” by a third - averages, is more than I and | fee otherwi 'North Korean ire still holding
cael a ten ee e sar 2s “ya blockade base against the Reds.| others— can understand isuch a union would result in the | 7 j the recantured port of Yongdak. a
pe k for f tyes aS sti ming ce 5 ' The spokesman said National- Of course, the opening pair did} uncontrolled influx of immigrants | Seoul Streets j little more than 31 miles from the
ak ee ee, ae Raat ef U.K. Brokers Fear ist forces on Quemoy just off the} everything that was expected of }from the islands : | American beach-head at Pohang
ne Be are aut td ne | r mainland port of Amoy were them, more in fact; didn’t they set| The opponents of a One OR KOREA, Ju no news of battle had reached
led officials here said it was} ° : adequate to meet the expected uD : 5 Arann ees j win 24 tal of B.G's continenta . A win baad ees ‘ 1 .
“ ’ | P a néw record and make more | also ain Fifty American prisone here
seudiat oe a New Taxation Red attack, than any English opening pair Se destiny” which is ee excep! paraded through the streets o Reports of growing Communist
s Ss Ss § Ped ¥ a» 9 » sense that the intensifica : 10) ‘ 5
¢ _ . . 7 done in the last 12 years in the sense a Seoul by Communists to show jconcentrations building up for a
It_was later disclosed that wo | Stock Market Dull He said they would be suppor- But they “made “it by dogged] tion of trade with the interior of | vorthern ‘superiority’ according | Major offensive brought the Allied
es aceon ee iy De téd by locally-assigned National-| determination rather than by| Brazil would be mutually profita to a Korean doctor who escapea {Air Forces out in some of their
LONDON, July 24. J ist air and naval units classy cricket. Both produced the | ble 3 ( : from the forme? capital biggest raids today as skies clear-
~ Mesvousaras, reparipe. is Communist artillery began}rare occasional flash. but to West Racial Considerations The doctor said today some|°4 4nd gave Australian and Amer-
Sorean situation anc inisteria’ | bombarding the town of Guanau Indian eyes it was pretty « These “ws, argues a Times ih : ican airmen their chance to ham-
a ; Nie a ” AVES as . dull. 1 ese view rg souls Seoul believed th
Leopold Back On te ee ae eet pet eg Ty on Quemoy’s northeast coast at] would rather see J match lost |correspondent, are — affec td by erm ae ae fe enpeta ct bun [Mer away at fo of Com-
possible increase = ¢ juli. | Lt p.m. on Sunday. The spokes-} than suffer to see W ‘ll, Weekes. [racial considerations Africans |-P@! ‘ . munist strenget!
= defence expenditure created dull- : r at er to see orrell; weekes, [eee : Nadert be- | Russians dressed in American
Postage Stamps ness tt ; the London Stock Conde Tiras vie at = SRE aeeet: Stollmeyer Marshall, j'¢ a ene rey Pons ia {|} uniform. He walked from Seoul Unopposed
- yi x i "hr Trestre +] ce > é i artec . ‘ .
3 July og Exchange to-day : Bonn tntatitst “eal id ‘the viein ty j ind ef a 7, eee eee, we B.G. would one day be dominated | in ten days disguised as « peasan It wax learnéd here that North-
BRUSSELS, July 24, Amon the overseas issues ; einitys kind of game : ; elaritt Indians He said he saw one “reaction- |.) e Buahed iiaci ,
thal Le ld Ill & of Quemoy would pass the island by an Indian majorit rn troops pushed cautiously and
A portrait of King Leopold Japanese bonds —_ encountered | f° *! Mriict. atts = an : 7 hes etd on the other hand feared absorp- | ary” executed, almost unopposed towards the
ill re-appear on Belgian postage heavy selling and declined by itt i a) iy ack on Formosa | Rae—English Approach ition in a mainly African dominion Seoul was flooded with pictures | woot coast t. sated et
stamps tomorrow, postal authori- some five points, European bonds be OOKS PAs Quemoy is going tof Only Rae has this English ap of three millions of which thejof Stalin and the northern leader thisadtentis f rr the y ye
ties announced here today, _ were lower where they were their target, he said ; {proach to the game and althougt combined Indian populations of} Kim Irsun, he sald ae i Kare POM, .f " . oe
The series to be issued will be changed with Germans and Aus- —Can. Press.| 1 readily admit that we badly |}Guiana and Trinidad would hard (Reuter.) [ou ae aha ss
the same as that sold immediate=' trians one to two points off iy acualsa tenth formed by tre provisional capital
ly re the wart ie ieee i Oil shares were dull, Anglo- { @ On Page 7 The necessity of providing iatentisenciltabeie | Taeju, the supply por oh, I —
jserics of stamps Will be issue in Iranian lost 5.32 at 5 13-16 . ‘ " ed for minorities ap ind the American beach head at
the ‘near future with a portrait/and recent upward move-| New Constitutions fet the whole of the Carib-| Canadian Minister |? ;
a pe a ne oe. ment in the commodities shares F 4 1 i 8 Y Ol | SI { b ( It was one of the 4 , Today action near Yongdor
ie authorities said.—Reuter. shacke rial shares » : ret Soke ; 7 on the central front in whic
was checked Industrial shares or oO on es ear c 10o0ts mak Kaaers a he recent A | . I
; ‘ f ain reaso why 1 Be FOS |": : eo
lost ground, but there was_firm- SC. AC. Report insisted on the Drow ns Al sap ~ | Aémericar roop iecessfull
t ness in shipbuilding, aircraft and a . J : : I tae a checked both frontal assaults anc
TIGHTEN UP selected beavy industries having The Colontit Bae te * Mother:F ather, ailed tu _ bY ee et S oni 7s -“ NIGERIA, July 24 flanking att gro
e ; y an- ure of a seconc rambe eiteda Skielton, Canad .
; ce war potential Hit ; ee rs . ~ , ete ; ws Alexander Ski co-operat
WASHINGTON, July 24. South African gold shares eased | MOUnced changes in the constitu- JONESBORO ARKANSAS sisting of nominated members} peouty Trade Minister, wa he ta
President Truman today ordered oh some selling which was main- tions of four colonies of the July 24 Therein concludes the corre rowted in Lawos’ lakoon while
the Federal Bureot of Investiga~ ly from local sources. Diamonds|Wimdward Islands in the West A seventy-two year old father] pondent, “may lie a solution for} iit yachting late on Frida { Communist tration tact
tion to tighten its programme were improved on the assumption Indies ive his small son a hurried lesson [British Guiana too rhe police authoritic id this | dition heoaten of clan beret
against “espionage, sabotage and c ; . oo #he A rksmanship then ordered hin Por ¥ that his body ha ‘ ' tua
8 Pi) BL s that there would be a sharp in “ : Aabiciininirtitdlanad iorning that } hetween V8 ut roop
re cae F crease in the United States demand The Legislative Gouneils wil} \to shoot his mother police said to een found the air force
e called on citizens to give the oe vd y . consist of 14 members, including| ‘ay ’ F Kiel te 3 ere to inve —"
" trial diamonds._-Reuter ist o members, including : Skielton, 43, v here ‘ wo tive. On v tr
Bureau all possible help.—Reuter,|for industrial , presidents who will be island| Mrs Jewel White 42, was now Captured U.K. igate the allocation bet aaa oe ae: Se ve ul
Administrators and not Governors.} i" hospital with a bullet wound ir A lorth and South Nigeria in the |formed of their movemen 5
Sj i » g ti : ‘ Headquarter corfirmed th
7 > rs “gf | Eight members will be elected by| er right lung and her husband Officer Safe ew constitution ghee Flea tie
TRUMAN WANTS INCOME \_ U.S. Will Defend |i rr si ee i sd Sate Se An‘economist ine headed Cana. [five or six North Korean, ta
giving a cleafer majority. to kill—-even though the shot wi LONDON, Jup 24 i's Cornmmittee set up in 1948 to| were knocked out. One more
Pescadores Th n nity by his eight year old Captain Vyvian Holt, a Briti uide Canada’s role in the Euro-| reported out of action this mor
; e remainder wi consist of} Billy Minister in Seoul, captured whe an Pecover Programme ing and po ly another
WASHINGTON, July 24 three ex-officié mernbers who will Breagd said nae White pere this |North Korea forees entered tl! Reuter, / Reuter
: : I 9 The State Department said to-]retain the right to vote until the] ¢xplanation er a quasrel with |oity earlier this. month, is safe
WASHINGTON, July 24. day that the Pescadores Islands | ministerial system can be estab- her, her husband handed Billy a The Foreign Office to-day ar ‘
off the southwest coast of Formosa }lished and three be nominated] 22 calibre rifle took him into the |nounced it had received a. eal ny ‘ ]
would be defended by’ American | pjembers. back yard and showed him how to |from him reporting that he as ] HA IL N 7 i e+ 79
orces if Chinese Commu- The life of the Councils will be hoot They retu 1 to the house two members of his staff wer Z ao
sts attacked them. tnree years. There will be no yhete the father t “if she don't jnow near Pyongyang, the Nort! ay HT NG Wh N
At a news conference, the State} jiterary test for voters. Executive] °°,'i#ht shoot her Korean capital J [ 7 / a
) Department spokesman said the | ouneils Way hich the Governor| ,â„¢Mts, White and her husband] A Foreign Office spokesma 9
Hearings began in Congress to- Pescadores Islands fell in the | -QUMCuS i ¥ sid ri ill be tarted fighting. He swung at hei | said he could not say how Cay Er ATICCPae Thly 94
‘day on thé Government Home| general. area of Formosa which|Will continue to abet Fc qoe| with @ Cane and she at him with a|tain Holt had managed to sene LAKE SUCCESS July 24
| Front Programme ‘ President Truman at the outbreak |™Made more el ged swe BN a om piece of wood. During the strug- | eable THAILAND has informed the United Nati that
. W. Stuart Sympington described of the Korean War said would be]clusion of three members elected | vie Mrs. White heard her husband It was stated last Saturday tl eet to the King’s approval, she will offer a combat te:
this programme to a Committee defended by the American Fleet |by the Legislative Councils. torder “shoot her son” and the boy !ritain was taking steps to sex J ' 0 ‘fi . te ‘ 1 men to fieht with tl} 1
as aimed to “take profiteering out —Reuter. —Reuter. fred.—Reuter. Captain Holt’s release —Reuter Si ‘i OY tite % in K ~~: .
of war". Sympington is Chairman Nations’ forces in Korea ae
of the National Security Resources . orn en temaye { — . , This was the first oft
3oard which has the job of plan- | received here Im respons :
sn fcr rons ove Pa Red ‘Fifth Column’”’ Strikes Tee Ts ee euns te
ontrols and Civi ence in the appeal,
event of war e tgs ls The United Natior Headqu
The Government Controls Bill Of ficial U.N. ters also disclosed aa
does not involve the price controls | gv ‘Les pobiet: pie e cee etter py
or controls over man-power. But Commanzider In Chief Unites Nevons ty a setter to
[ Secre Gener
Sympington told Senators these . s ieee, : eee ovat yee .
things were under consideration ; # ' KOREA, July 24 ioe ae d
and might be requested later “£| STUTTGART. American Zone, Germany “somewhere in the over, Brunswick, Oldenburg an o take place in Germany since S communique from General! eo! " .
| needed July 24 Soviet Zone.” : Hremen in Northern Germany Hitler ame to power in 1983 lacArthur toda iid that i t €
Sympingtor also id there These “agents”, he said were Espionage groups were being today cussed the Federation’s| inited Nation ) ur th
| would an effort avoid e@ Herr Hans Jahn, chairman of coming to West Germany mainly -et up to operate along the East- call for boycott of Argentine; jeneral Headquarter loky : indovs
| piecer de of emergency |the German Transport Workers via Switzerland Vest German zone border if ship jhas been officially « ed ' , me
{measures used in World War IT Union, today appealed to the In- Frankfurt — Centre cessary, he said Helgessen, President of the! yqearthur cor nder
| —Reuter jternational Transport Workers Jahn described Frankfurt a: In France Swedish Transport Workers, criti-| .pijeg
| | Federation for help in fighting the centre of the Communist un- Andre Lafond, Secretary of the cised the dockers affiliated to ia Gene AY 1 th I
. y . . oie oie “Communist infiltration into West derground movement in West Ger yndicate of the French railway Federation who had so far failed ‘bie Gene .
° f > t rib i
FISH AND CHIE Ss CLI E |Germany.” Speaking at the Fed- many and Dusseldorf as “its orke aid the Communist ipport of the Feder 2 Or 5 G t
9 LONDON, Monday jeration’s C here, he said organisation headquarters.” He “Fifth Column” were increasingly tior lecision to bach triking | he 1
| A 20-year separation ended/this infiltra was becoming also claimed knowledge of planned active in France. “Concentrating” Argentine seamen ons Co wn
when Miss Lay Ma s0timore and more serious He sabotage acts primarily against in the transp« ysterr vhict His criticisms were believec The er reiterat it M
in touch with a sister in the mid-| alleged that former German Ajit stallations of West German reil- i t t \ f ! be directed among o Brit ‘
lands after seeing her ame 1- | Force General Kurt Henschel was w: ys at Essen and Dortmund in pplie time f wa which née ’ NY W Va
tioned in a new ner pédltraining Commun*st espionage the r, Munich Rothenburg The Congres f big inter punce the attitude . . ; Reuter Reuter
around meal of fish-a up isk West an buehl in Bavaria, Han- or Trade n nferer ~—Reuter .







that. this

PAGE_ SIXTEEN
STEEL



e

members and friends of the immediate family were on hand for the simple double-ring cereinony.
bride’s father, Philip R. Mather, a prominent steel and real estate man of Boston,

his daughter away



HEIRESS WEL

BRIDGEHAMPTON, NEW YORK:



Ac tals
ps has

4 at
3a

a

Steel heiress Ann

Mather,
Montero, 40 year-old negro director of New York's Urban League Fund, are shown after their wedding
ceremony at the seashore home of Mrs. Charles F,. Brush, Jr., in an exclusiv> section of Bride ban

Their romance stemmed from their common interest in fighting racial discrimination. Some twenty odd

30,

AMERICANS PREPARE
FOR WORLD STRUGGLE

The home front, at this

NEW YORK, July 23.
early stage of the Korean war,

was to-day occupying more of the minds of Americans than

the actual fighting thousands of miles away. )
of food, clothes and other goods likely to be short in a high- “hite, man starts lite wit

Panic buying

ly mobilised war effort, reflected the feeling that the majori-
ty of families were thinking of the months, perhaps vears

ahead,

It also created artificial
shortages and high prices. The
sales of nylon stockings on the
WcSt Coast had risen by 400 per
cent. Throughout the country
pr.c@B Yor tocds had begun ta
recket. Scme shops were com-
pletely sold out of sugar

.
sngulf The World
Americans were prepaiing to
pirdthernsalves for a struggle that
might engulf the world and not



merely settle a United Na ion’:
peaineple. They were not pleased
by the slowness of the nation’s

ty Council’
words with

Secu
backing

supporting the
veSautions in



ceeds

The majcrity seemed ready tu
believe that the support’ would
come in the: end Only a tiny
minority cf Americans, 150,000,000
people thought that the ' United
States could nave done anything
clse than what it did

Feelings of patriotic pride swept
the country on ihat — fateful
Saturday night of June 24, when
they first heard of the North
Korean invasion on the'r radios.
The United States had carried out
lis pledge. Every statement and
vetion of their President since
then had been warmly supported
Shocked Surprise
war news was stil] read
casily. The casualty lists, still
small, but ail too big for the
«fected families, were appearing
in their daily newspapers

The

Shocked surprise at the puny
forces the United States could im-
mediately deploy to meet the
invaders was the original reaction
to vivid frontline dispatches
splashed on the front pages

But as more forces went into
action, as the American and
Australian air squadrons . bom-

barded North Korean concentra-
tions, as the American and British
Commonwealth warships proved
they controlled the regions of the
narrow seas, confidence began to

return,
Americans knew to-day that
the situation was. still s rious,

that the American way of lite was
foing to be temporarily shattered,
that the danger of a wider con-
fiect was apparent.

Gut the voice of opposition was
«il but stilled as their leaders
went about the business of win-
ning a war,—Reuter,



MORE MOLASSES
FOR TRINIDAD

call
vessel

port
load of

Making its third
week,’ the motor
Kuby® arrived in

take another
pan molasses for Trinidad

The vesse! completed its load-
ing yesterday and will be leaving
some time today for Trinidad. This
last load made a total of approxi-
mately 378.000 gallons of molasse
has taken here
for Trinidad during the week

for the
“Athel
yesterday

vacuum

The “Athel Ruby" is expected
to make another quick call for
molasses.

[ Theyil Do it Every Time



40 --

\ih us UNCLE JOHNNY’S GOT HIS GUN,
THE FISH ARE JUMPING ss.

BUT GAME--THERE'S NoNE!!



HM.S. “Sparrow ig

*
Coming
H.M.S. “Sparrow” will visit
arbados from the llth to the
.oth of September.
H.M.S. “Sparrow” is one of

‘he Biack Swan class of frigates
built for convoy protection. She
is of approximately 1,450 tons
displacement and carries six 4
inch guns in addition to a num-
ber of smaller close range anti-
aireraft guns. Her anti-submar-
ine equipment includes depth
charges, Her complement is eight
«fficers and 180 men,

H.M.S, “Sparrow” was built
on the river Clyde in Scotland,
and launched early in 1946. She

was first commissioned for service
in the Royal Navy in December,
1946, joining the America and
Weos lidies Squadron two months
later.

During her first commission,
which ended in May, 1949, at
Devonport, England, she steam-

ed over 65,000 miles. She visited

piaces as diverse as Vancouver,
8.C., Montevideo, Miami and
Jamaica; she also steamed 1,000

miles up the Amazon to Manaos
end spent three months in the
Welkland Islaid Dependencies
south of Cape Horn. Since her re-
turn to the America and West In-
ales Station in October, 1949, she
has already steamed 25,000 miles
in the Caribbean and to Brazil,
Uruguay and Argentina.

H.M.S “Sparrow is the
eighth ship of the Royal Navy to
bear the name “Sparrow.” The
first “Sparrow” was captured
irom the Dutch in 1653, the
second spent part of the Napo-
‘eonic Wars on the West Indies
Station and the fourth was sta-
tioned in South American waters
for over five years from 1837.

Captain Boord

Her present Commanding Offi-
cer is Captain S. J. S. Boord

Captain Boord entered the
Royal Navy through the Royal
Navy College. Osborne. in Janu-
cry, 1918, and first went to sea
in the autumn of 1921 as a
Cadet in the training battleship
“Thunderer.” He subsequently
rerved in, the battleships “Royal

Oak" (on two oceasions). “Royal
Sovereign”, “Malaya”, and in the
destrover “Valhalla”, loth in the

Atlantic and Mediterranean fleets
until he was selecte’ to special-
ise in gunnery in 1929.



He was then employed = on
sunnery duties in all classes of
rhips including the Ist Submar-

ine and the 19th Destroyer Flot-



illas in the Mediteryanean, the
cruisers, “Curacao” in China and
the “London” in the Mediterran-
ean the Chilean © battleship
“Almirante Latorre’ whilst that
ship was being rearmed, and

finally in the battleship “Rodney”
in the Home Fleet from 1938
1940; during these periods he
also served on the instructional
staffs of al! three naval gunnery
schools in England when he was
able to keep in with
modern development

In 1940—1942 he was at
Admiralty engaged in the

touch

the
pro-






=







SS NEGHO DIRECTOR



ae

OW HE'S
SO THE FISH STAY ;
AND LOOK WHAT’S oOuT !

bs






Le
wae
”

and her husband Frank Curie

The
was on hand to give
Erpres

White Or
Coloured
All Start Level

WE are all
Yello

brothers
brown, black or
th the

unae





skin
samé inborn capacities tor good or
evil, achievement or failure
‘Ynat is what a group
world’s leading scientists say
day in a report described by the
Ministry o: Education as “the
nos. lar-reaching and competent
pronouncement of its kind ever
made
The



t
to-

public
London

of

report, made
Unesco simultaneously in
and Paris, starts with a series
denials. For instance

Chere is NO biological founda-
tion for rac.al discrimination

there is No proof that groups
of mankind differ in intelligence
or temperarment-—the range of
mental capacity in all races is











mu-h ihe same a
A* al Myth
There is NO evidence that race

mix ures produce biologically bad

iesults and there is NO hiological

justification for banning inter-
racial! marriage-—“The social re-
sults of race mixtures are to be
iracved to social factors

The report, noting that ‘People
who live in Iceland or England or

India are not races,’ goes on

“Race is less a biological fact
than a social myth. As a myth it
has in recent years taken a heavy
toll in human lives and suffering
and still keeps millions of persons
from normal development, and
civilisatign from the full use of

the co-operation of productive
minds

“Tests have shown essential
similarity in mental characters
among all human racial groups



All human beings possess educ



bility and adaptability, the traits, |

which more than all others have
permitted the development of
men’s mental capacities.”

Just to underline this,
laude Levi-Strauss, one of phe
tuthors of the report told a stéry
n Paris last night. He said:—

“Fifteen years ago Professor
Vellard, professor of biology at
Lima, Peru, went into the jungle |
of Paraguay in search of a ‘Stone |
Ave" tribe

“The natives fled, leaving a
baby girl two years old. Professor
Vellard took her back to Lima
She is now a brilliant biology stu-

dent, and the personal ¢ stant of



her adoptive father.” | re
‘uction of new equipment to
Coucdac the tnreat from the air,

at the end of which he was re-
Woieed by in appolstment for
nection with assault
dhe Mediterranean



wah 4 ‘ ce
landings in



where he had served for so many |

earn

Algiers, E

he was present at Oran,

Tripoli and Zuara





(Libya), ily and finally

a3 a Local Naval Commander

iv the victorious sault = at |
1 erne in September, 1943. He

then returned to ihe “Rodney

as Second-in-Commuand, where

curing two years that fine olc

ship was employed in the Medi
tervanean, the North Atlantic, at
Murmansk, and for bombarding
shore targets in the assault o
Normandy and at Alderney

\t the conclusion of the World

War, Captain Boord was Com |
mander of the Royal Naval Bar- |
racks at Portsmouth where his
principal task was the speedy |
return of large numbers of war-
time sailors to civilian life, He
has recently filled g staff ap- |
pointment in the naval aviation, |

and assumed Command of H.M.S
“Sparrow” in August, 1949

Jimmy Hatlo |

AFTER BASS OR TROUT

IN-—~











OPPS PEE

GOSSS

*

by |

Professor |

|
|
he |
|
}

SUNDAY



THE BRIDGETOWN PLAYE?

swe Ro



f

———
. 7,7,7575* peo oto
EEA SOE AS AOE

DANCE NOTICE }
1°"): Biecest ! *

WILTON PONNET'S
COTTON Dts: jANCI

Nites
2nd, 1350

Sa urdcy eptem-er

Mus‘ec by Ciivie G.tlens



Â¥
‘

‘

BAR SOLID v
ss

\

.

Sabscription 3

POPC 0 tne te |

SSE
———————————————

ci ina |



ore ——

ANNUAL. DANCE |







—————
SSSSSSSO9VS POFFO

3} SUPER SALE
BARGAINS











‘
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%
‘
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v }
i » |
} % Vrints — washable, 40c, yd. » |
. Fase ace ie tab wa. SI
e 36° wide—49c, yd. » |
* Plastic Raincoats—-$2,18 ea. 9
| < Rubber Sandals — 5c. up % |
| » Boys Socks — 12c. a pair y
, ‘Anklets — — lic. up ¥
: to ea. &
| s Woollens, Shoes & Hats, ¥
| * White Drill i8e. ya ¥ i)
» Children’s Vests —- 20¢. ea. ¥ | ii
* Khaki Drill yd. | {
. Boys’ Caps — fe. ea. \ | )
s Vests (Gerts. & Ladies) P| \
| % Children’s Pantics (Plastic) ¥ I
+m x
re * : .
|. Thousands of Bargains in x 1K
s Dress Goods & Housebold % |
hae Departments. Q |
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$ ¥ {
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” v

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FoF tel lalate tht (otal OO





S



|
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The
Beast

0. C. S. Makhei
& Co., Ltd.
Jop Scorors in
Jailonring

ADVOCATE

C. B. RICE & Co.

a Silver Cup, and $25.00 in cash, Presented by Cow & G
SPFCOND PRIZE—S10.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate, Ltd

THIRD PRIZE— and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate and (9)



OF

TROPICAL SUITINGS

IN STOCK

AT

OF

BOLTON LANE

. " ee PRIzrs
FIRST PRIZE—The Cow and Gate Silver Challenge Row! to keep for one (1) year,



Souvenir Gifts

1 All babies mast be under

RULES:





2 years of age on October

A postcard size photograph of baby must be sent in

tins of Cow
$ Parents

& Gate Milk Pood

agree to abide by the selections of the

final judges

The twelve (12) lesding babies will be selected by a Board of Judges for final judg-

The names of the selected twelve wiil appear in the “Sundey Advocate” of
November

ine.

Indu,

ysteard
L certify
enciose

COW & GATE Milk

ENTRY FORM

ESLIE & CO.,

P.O. Box

LTD.,

216,

Representative
Collins’ Budding



enter my baby for Barbado

lids taken from

Food

tee and Judues

Baby's
Born on
Weight
Parents
Address

Signature

Date

COW & GAT

| eens te een
ere

at Birth

Name

of Parent of Guardian

THIS IS YOUR ENTRY FORM—C

Spreial

th and the final judging will take place on Saturday

Bonniest Daby

I agree to ahide by the deci







The





Something You Will Appreciate



e
LADIES’ PLASTIC RAINCOATS—: size $2.20 eact
MERCERIZED BD LIN( UIE @ 90c. per Yd



GARBADINE in Emerald Green, Pink, Red, Gold, Lime Green
and White @ $1.30 per yd.

SHANTUNG in Blue, Rose, Cream, Pink & Gold @ $1.16 per yd.
1950 STYLES LADIES SHOES in White, Black & Brown Suede
Prices ranging from $11.36 to $12.37 —Cuban Heels.

Also DRESSES, SUNSUITS, SHORTS & SLACKS Etc., Etc.

ROADWAY DRESS SHOP.

—





BOW RANITE
ANTLCORROSIVE PAINT
a lil tails bine Wess ittnls «ont





\NITE, Proof against heat or co d, t
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ta public and industrial contractcrs cverywhere,
YOU SHOULD TSE VEL TOO
Tough, flex ble, yet non-craci.in: BOWRANITE is

made in many attractive shades

Stocked in:
Permanent Green, Red, Cirey, Boa
Super Black (Ileat Resis ing)
in tins of Imperial NI

k and
sasure
WILL COVER 1,000 SQ. PT.

ONE GALLON

AGENTS

CO. LTD.

"PHIONE 41456

WILKINSON & HAYNES











chmen
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Suitable fcr wat

Nade

Black
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to mateh

S137





Cave Suepnerp & Co. Lap.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.



Bonniest Baby

search for Barbados’

Bonnies: Baby ef 1950 is

on, and mothers are invited to enter Lacie babies for
Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contzst of 1950. Barbados’
Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babi.s and

this competition is open to all babics {J

1} on Cow &

Gate Milk Food, the Food of Royal Babies and che
Best Milk for Babies when Natura! Feeding fails.

» Ltd.



Bist, 1930,
gether with

Pommittee

Cow & Gate Ba

the Specia



Tr our

‘4 lids from

and the

18th November,

Co



ENTRIES CLOSE ON SEPTEMBER 30. 1950

of 19502



and 1]
ns of

minit If you are not yet using Cow & Gate for your Baby, don't

delay Get a tin from your nearest dealer and put baby on

GATE Milk Food, the Best Milk for babies when

Natural Pee@ing Fail Cow & Gate Milk Peod is free from

all disease germs, Inetuding tubercle, dipthétia and typhoid

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MILK
FOOD
(

THE COW & GATE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL





Tuesday.
July 25
19350



REDS SWE
Cabinet Wiilj |
Discuss Korea |

LONDON, Jiily 24.
ATTLEE today unexpeci-



RIME MINISTER CLEMENT

edly summoned a 5s meeéting of the Cabinet to
pave the way for important stat ts on the defence of |
Korea which he and the Defence inister Emanuel Shin.
well, will make to Parliament on Wednesday.

Se The Cabinet is due to hold a
U.K. Prepares



long session tomorrow to consider
the reports of the Department {
Mibisters and experts on how Bri-









tain. can give more eonerete aid
For General |"
Observers Suggested that to-

day’s meeting was hurriedly sum-
to consider whether any
new stens had been considered by
Britain which would involye
emergency legislation before Par-
liament rises for the summer re-
cess this week,

Colour was lent to this view by
the presence at a meeting of the
Attorney - General, Sir Hartley
Showcross, and William Whiteley,
Chief Government Whip, who
would be consulted over any such
legislation.—Reuter.

Election
LONDON July 24.
Political tipsters 6n both sides
of the fence predict now that the
thin Socialist control of Britain’s
affairs will last at least until next
Spring.
Some say the new election may
not come even that soon.
Conservative foes of Prime Min-
ister Attlee have candidates lined






































PHOTO SHOWS : South Kore.





Rarbad

KP SO
























an troops making their Way on foot and by

















SoUTH KOREANS MARCH TO BATTLE

7























Aduncate -
UTH TOWA

9

THREE

| a

PAGE

1

~

RDS PUSAI





- CLAIM FALL OF

VITAL U.S. BASES

| Nehru Sends
A Secret |
Message

WASHINGTON, July 24

Indian

was reported to-day to have sen
& secret personal

(With MacArthur’s Headquarters in Korea)
, duly 24

NORTH KOREAN Communist forces today

claimed the capture of Yongdong, main high
way town on the road to Taeju, and the heart of
the American forces defence areg since the. with
| drawal from Taejon. ;
The North Korean claim, brdadcast by Moscow
| radio, put North Korean tanks and infantry 22 air
| miles down the high road from the former South

Prime Minister, Nehru

appeal to the

Athenee ib See ‘irort' | Korea temporary capital, and more than half way
Acheson in a ur er emo t | : . . ;

have Communist China “seates’} to Kumchon, vital rail and road Junction town on
in the United Nations hnen | the direct route to the United Nations main supply

The message has been withhel

ro ublication at Nehru | base at Pusan.
calnedie ie. aman sate Dink The claim of the capture of Yongdong w as made ina
matic oMcials told reporters t North Korean communique.. The last communique of Gen
Sibdee We tee cn at aii ' eral MacArthur's Headquarters said American oat i
ainibent made to both Americe | suecessfully defied frontal assaulis in their defence lines



































lorry towards the battle- and Russia on July 13 that Con in the Yongdong area, effectively blasting repeated waves
up to run for almost every seat front in the Suwon area. Suwon has now fallen into the hands of the Communist forces invading munist China be re ge to pal of infantry attacks, vgs rhe MacArthur Communique
in the House of Commons, bu: Tl BY //) CS. from North Korea.—Express, United mations with vet! er we et. id assault in the Yongdong
political chiefs who guide the : eere shad ee te 1 ‘ a a iter en é o8 ectoy began after 24 hours artile
party still have no coherent pro- the Korean fighting pela rs R ' 1 St ge lery and mortar bombardments of
sramme on paper. They don’t TROOPS IN a oO e R ak: eaninio. tie ead } ec Ss Ww a miinibica? sovition gt aid
think they’ll need one for several - t eported to é ‘ | American guns stopped the as-

Y » ft opostr é 1 ‘ H . -

more months. BRITAIN | ngian - privet intended ts toress’ | Manoeuvres | ies: ii 2%

The Labour Party is going full Ports th iprarently inten ed ae, | | Yongdong lies 50 air miles from
Speed ahead with a new platform 5 LONDON, July 24 mou + ‘ in imminent American “ “ae : | eju, new capital of the South
Which stresses a slowdown on = rae Minister Attlee told | © eee ae sg arpa hee | IN ROME | araan Government, and 100 ui
public ownership plans. ariament today that the United j r irged that America 4 ae at} miles from the tal supply por
I PP States had 189 aireraft, 10,000 Air SAYS ATTLEE | ie oe that ea oe ROME, July 24 of Pusan

Preliminary Plan Force men and 1,500 naval men ” withdraw to the 38th’ pars ne |. Sttong forces of invading “Rea’ ;
* in Britain , LONDON, July 24 (By E. COZIER) fore China’s peta Harektp ae trogbe Weinfeccea hy tadhe andl Southwest lip

a preienaey nae ae eg Eo eae ne io joo fae tthe NOTTINGHAM July 24 a on paar pen abaodae that /armoured = car were today ad mere een iat Tee ol 1

aw i i ish- ]b 5 f > was 1 , arli 4 a : ec 'CHAIS Sa eal le ina fy 4 50, ack | Dearly unopposec ilo the south
drawn. It will get its final polish pomber groups. Attlee was reply- Me sal Par' meee today ora 7 ENGLAND put up a good fight today against tremendou: if America agreed to admit Com | Vancing in a two pronge 1 piace west: tip of the Kored: Bonini,
ing from Labour’s Executive ing to a request for information| blowing up of nine ammunitio dds and til the last ho f the afternoon i looked very] munist. China to the United ; through — the Appenines towart General MacArthur's Headquat
Committee this Wednesday and| by Leftwing Labour member | barges at Portsmouth on July 14, odds and un ur oO ne a 100N it Kk ane ver) Nations ind Russia then refused|Florence in the biggest army rh ai ann hii tod
then will be moved on to ‘local Stephen Davies, who has been| Was due to sabotage. ; much as though the Dunkirk spirit would bring her through ot end the “ighting, it would | manoeuvres staged by Italy since . mato Onis ities
parties in each constituency for |critical of the Government's foreign} It had not yet been possible to| to save the third Test match, Fortunately for the Wes; Indies, be han for Russia before world | the war 20,000 Italian t here sald the tank and infantry
discussion, The final programme policy. Opposition members cheer.| establish who did it Yardley and Insole failed at the crucial moment and t1 opinion. American officials were an rae vith alii a Betton teams of the invading norther
will be ready by mid-October. Injed Attlee’. Statement and Labour} Attlee said it ate recle: Gist Prospect for tomorrow is that the five last men must hold] pleased to know more about Mirviste R. as if Blostuvas were} armies had reached the South Ko-
that month they will also get} Member Seymour Cocks said it|there was not Shit ag gle on for England at least until tea time and score ata run a] Nehru's motives, but they were taicing oe Cin 1 three-day ‘exer=|reun naval base. at Mokpo,. close
going over from the Labour Was better to have Allied armed among workers in the Armament a: e ; ve cane | } “wate {} not expected to change their pos eite which was “being held in the }t0 the southern coastal road to
Party’s Annual Convention. forces in Britain than enemy] Depot, and among their families minute, or remain out there even longer if thei; rate of tne 9 7 eee F Pusan, ig: major United Nation

The Prime Minister has the| armed forces.—Reuter. living near to Bedenham Harbour, seoring is lower, in order to Save the Situation Mc —Retter. ve base. Pyongyang radio claimed
power to ask the King at any where the explosion occurred. ——-—___— Of the English batsmen today, Invading aid defence troops} the naval base of Mokpo was al-
time to dissolve Parliament and 9 H Id I U * The explosion damaged nearly Parkhouse ay ake be did not - were equipped with Italy's tat ready gecupied ‘ ses
call an election, but Labour Party |: e every building within more than F make aS much as ashbrook ¢ * weapons, including military sup te North Korean Atmy today
informants say Attlee is in no| e ni ranium a mile of the blast but no one was ormosa ene, seryeeeed me most fay Should RB. G. Join nlie ont py the United State barat forw are. eee nee ae
mood to chance a test at the , s {seriously injured : ourably e ig.a closer approxi { 4 under the Atlantic Pact , | Southernmost town the ave ye
polls yet and probably wont be Smuggling Charge Answering Anth ony Eden, Awaits Red mation to the West Indian idea of | B W. 1 Federation? Defending troops, the “Blue taken, only 31 miles from South-

i iti 1 & batsman—a man who makes . ofe » ire composed of 12,000 men’ of} East Korea
before next spring. HELMSTEDT, British zon Deputy Opposition Leader, Attlee a | D : t ead:

Last February’s balloting which 4 . rh said that extra precautions had "uns at the same time that he al tari Pour Gi Ceedndens ‘he. Friuli. Division” backed But.on the central front 4 im Le
~ , ’ i July 24, fe 5 a he Admiralt . Voting beautifal strokes, not get aie LONDON, July 24 units of the Italian Air Force can troops backed by artifler
cut Labour’s majority from an West German border police to-\been taken at the miralty ting the bat to the ball however | , aed satu ahaha Military observers from Britain | threw back a tank supported ai-
overwhelming control of . the day said they had arrested two'tEstablishment for some weeks. he Gort | Whether British we aera the United States. Franen Greece [tack near Yongdong, 25 miles
Commons fo a shaky working! en here suspected of trying to| Eden described Attlee’s state- TAIPEI, Formosa, July 24 je can. ultimately join a B.W.1 a ake Bwitectlend ang Botte cats MEAT that éf Taner
majority of nine showed political 1 5 kil > , ment as “very grave indeed”. ’ ’ The Masters | tion is discussed by a specta c . es i + he s
sentiment evenly split in the coun- fatten Sovi ry sy eae Clement Davies, Leader of the} A Defence Ministry Ownae n This is batting in the tradition | respondent lately in Georgetown | Watching the manoeuer ROOT chi in whete the reconnaissance
: into the Sovie ne of Germany, aVvies; mber o ; Fs » thea ie” T di ad eantn t
try. Persistent tapping of popular Uranium valued at ‘ several | Liberals, said it disclosed a “very pi “TA teleksinne Quemoy | °f Hammond, Hobbs, and the other|in The Times today. ahaa earl —_ . had revealed the ommunist
feeling has shown no convincing million marks was confiscated startling situation”. Attlee said, Island under cover of Chinese Pane so spat ee SO , Teeny, oe, fs thot possi forces maash qin Pa ys la
atert 4 is ) hae * 7 ; ‘. te ie av n a 4 7 Plieve, is at o ompton, so hat self-Gove) ! , 7 } stre e offens > wn
Swing to either Party.—(C.P.) The identities of the arrested |the facts he gave tay ors es Communist artillery barrage. is that of Hardstaff, though why|ble in the Caribbean in “penny us Prisoners |the main road towards the pro-

em vip eeanot penne. ante a £ he ae +a It may be the long-ex pected they do not play Joe, still making packets”, the writer says “An ele : | Visional Southern capital of Taeju
The men who were arrested / Inquiry set up to } e eX" | invasion attempt agzinst the slenty of runs and way u . ent of ‘intransigent Demararians NY j. From the Kast coast where the

i i i s ‘ i. é Ne Pp in the} ment o ansigen M - :
H M Govt. Gives last Friday after the police here | plosion.—Reuter. Nationalist-hel@ island used as aeeenna is more than | ane fee! otherwise They fear that arched Through |, °° Koreans are still holding
bibi had been “tipped off” by a third blockade base against the Reds others— can understand }such a union would result in. the . ec the recaptured port of Yongdok. a
1 025 000 T person were taken today to Bruns- The spokesman said National- Of course, the opening pair did| uncontrolled influx of immigran Seoul Str eels jlittle more than 31 miles from the
a ¥ British out eee tuestioning me UK Brokers Fear ist forees on Quemoy just off the everything that was expected of}from the islands : at |American beach-head at Pohang

; ‘Lda: eg | British Public Safety authorities, | ae - mainland port of Amoy were them, more in fact; didn’t they set The opponents of — ones tr KOREA, Juy 24 no news of battles had reached
Rebuilding Castries Allied officials here said it was | TW ati , adequate to meet the expected[ up a new record and make more|also talk of B.G fe can pie + ‘ Fifty American prisoners were | here .

; “one of the greatest attempted | New axation Red attack than any English opening pair has ae men a ante Sae8 paraded through the streets o Re por 2! arowing ( omminiat

(Barbados Advocate Corresponaent) smuggles of this kind so far’. | done in the last 12 years? in the sense a > « = Seoul py Communists to show | coneen ra ions suing up for a

ST. LUCIA, July 24, It was later disclosed that two | He said they would be suppor- t they made it by doggeq|tion of trade with the interior of northern “superiority” accordin major offensive brought the Allied

Subj é yal of Par- | toc arke; u . ; Bu he; te it logged 2 yould be mutually profita- I A Force it some of their
_ Subject to the ptt Govern- | Women had also been arrested and - téd by locally-assigned National- determination rather ‘than by | Brazil would be f to a Korean doctor who escaped \ aI saat ‘ fat int ae ¢ fat ;
liament, His Majesty's ‘itional {taken to Brunswick. | LONDON, July 24. fist air and naval units classy cricket. Both produced the|ble git’ a hha ; from the former capital and Gave Merny ns skies, efter
ment will provide the additiona Nervousness regarding t he Communist artillery besan ré occasional fi: tit to Wes Racial Considerations ‘he doctor said today some|@d and gave Australian and Amer-
sum of £189,000, making a total ervous if 8 i Ministerial horns rat th a : rare occasional flash, but to West i Reid 5 We The doctor sai ican airmen their chance to hame
s Pad, aa tas Be i orean situation anc § ombarding the town of Guanau Indian eyes it was pretty dull. J These views, argue 7 | people in Seoul believed the at hare se eteed ine yo Sail
ot comin {21025000 Leopold Back On hints of new taxation to meet 2 }on Quemoy's northeast coast at! would rather see a match lost|correspondent, are eae parade was not of Americans, but aa Wiig at a
O The cen uate was made possible ames of saa ae 11 p.m. on Sunday, The spoker-| thar suffer to see Worrell, Weekes, racial ie omaha ition be- | Russians dressed in American

2 : iat defence expenditure crea c - ex pressed ibt th re- ‘ale. ‘ , arshi tended to favour Feder: er . ms Seoul ,
by the Governor this morning to Postage Stamps | ness KF Pthe London = Stoek sani a te . oa “A tr; tf . ett Stolimey pained yt cause they feared that isolated | uniform He walked a ee i Unopposed
the Legislative Council, which ia tozhise porte: farge = =concentra ton = orf Christiani, or Trestrail play that B.G. would one day be dominated|in ten days disguised as a peasan It was learnéd here that North-
paid tribute to a strong presen- BRUSSELS. july 24, er my ct overseas issues | COMMunist craft in the Vicinity} kind of game a Paden materi Indians He said he saw one “reaction rn troops pushed cautiously and
tation of the case to the Colonial A portrait of King Leopold III Tevariese bends encountered | of Quemoy would pass the island y : a A athe hiridectea tae absorp- ary” executed, almost unopposed toward the
Office by a delegation comprising | .i}] re-appear on Belgian postage|} oi vy “selling and declined by | for a direct attack on Formosa Rac—English Approach “ion in a mainly African dominion{ Seoul was flooded with picture West coast to capture Kwangju
the Administrator, Mr. J. K. Stow, stamps tomorrow, postal authori- some five points, European bonds It looks as if Quemoy IS going tol Only Rae has this English ap of three millions of which the | of Stalin and the northern leader, threatening from the West the
the Hons. Garnet Gordon, Francis ties announced here today. Worer. lower ohare they were | be their target, he said ‘ | proach to the game and althougt combined Indian populations of] Kim [rsun. he said South Korean defence triangle
Carasco, and Clive Beaubrun, The series to be issued will be changed with Germans and Aus- —Can. Press.j.1 readily admit that we badly |Guiana and Trinidad would hard- (Reuter, |? tmed by the provisional expital

The delegation is leaving Eng- the same as that sold immediate=| trians one to two points off y equal a tenth Taeju, the ipply port of Pusa
land on = By the ant ly before the war. New Leopold Oil shares were dull, Angas it @ On Page 7 The necessity of providing and the American beach head at
tania via New York en route °'serics of stamps will be issued in Iranian lost 5-32 at 5 13-1 . ‘ feguards for minorities ap ‘ ® ss Pohang
Castries where plans are already tithe near future with a portrait}ang recent upward move- New Constitutions plies to the whole of the Carib Canadian Minister Pode, action near Yongdor
under way to ‘give the delegation taken from a recent photograph, ment in the commodities shares Y - ( ‘ » | bean. area It was one of the oh. the. centéal front i ton,
a rousing welcome home. the authorities said.—Reuter. cked Industrial shares 8 ear Id Shoots main reasons why the recent eg FOS |‘ : one

was che 2 1 AZOS | Americ vop uecessfull

The Governor also ears = lost ground, but there was firm- i S.C.A.C. Report insisted on the rowns | * oe Ph NS Seale oe
further success of the delegation P Haat Eh shipbuilding, aircraft and LONDON, July 24 Mother:Father Jailec nelusion in the Federal Legisla et eas #4 4 checked bot ontal assau a
i su s § ’ ; ’ ’ ) § > NIGERIA, July 24 lanking atiac iw air-grou
in obtaining a further grant of TI HTEN UP selected heavy industries having The Colonial Office today an-|> . ture of a second Chamber con- ia’g |Hanking atta , |

‘ 8 avy an- a si . xander Skielton Canada orn{ thting
£150,000 from the Colonial Devel- ara ial d y ok . beta d geY Alexan le | * | co-operati« h ,
z . aad ar potential. nounced changes in the constitu- JONESBORO ARKANSAS, sisting of nominated members , ade Minister wa ;
opment and Welfare peamyea : Nat iene ii, South African gold shares eased tions of tome colonies of the July 24 Therein,” concludes the corres- ae, a "kit lagoon while} tt b¢
,, 2 Kectcle: : 4 r 1 thie , - . S v 4 "
wards roads and ween San President vo S rds .|on some selling which was main Windward Islands in th West A seventy-two year old father ] pondent may lie a solution for ut yachting late on Friday Communist filtration cti
fice te entainan’ the Colonial tthe Federal Bure: mp vests ly from local sources. Diamonds i . re ve his small son a } sd Less tritish Guiana too.” The police authorities said thi o-operat
office is sending a committee ofjtion to tighten its programme were improved on the assumption | [ndies ve era, Sea oe moet ritish Guiane The police au ior ne {failed because of close DO ra
experts to advise on the develop- | against “espionage, sabotage and that there would be a sharp in- aA . . : in Py Phi Soke en Nee anid ar iiss like te ae morning gh his body ha between US. grout roop
ment schemes with a possibility |subversive activities”. " crease in the United States demand| The Legislative Couneils will} day, HS mother police said to : “Bavaro 43, was here to inves- | he, air force
of further Colonial Development| He called on citizens to Bive the) 4° industrial diamonds “Reuter | consist of 14 members, including "hin wel White 49. % ‘ Captured UK. Seer ea ere tirana Headquarters are constantls |
and Welfare assistance, Bureau all possible help.—Reuter presidents who will be Island Mrs. Jewe ile 42 as no imate the allo itto u the {formed of their movement
——————— Administrators and not Governors hi poe wi a 7 te Wiebe os O icer Sa e orth ane ae Nigeria in Headquarters corfirmed tha
5 i are wt Q ,) her righ ung ane ler husbanc by ‘ " ew constitution . th Korean. tar
Te 7, v2 of " Eight members will be elected by i, HF 4 fad’ 9 Rees te ue fi fe sconomist, he headed Cana-|five’ or six North Korean \
TRUMAN W ANTS INCOME U.S. Will De end universal adult Suffrage, tM to 4 ill. in “heun te aft LONDON Jupy 24 mar Senmntttes set os th 1948 to} were knocked out One more \
P cadores cing & clearer eee ired by his eight vear old sor Captain Vyviay Holt, a Briti uide Canada’s role in the Euro- reported out 4 marae mo
TAX INCREASE IN U. S. ve The remainder will consist ot - ‘i wf Minister in Seoul, captured whe an Recovery Pr mrariras t jt & and possibly a ’ Wisin,
e e 9 j *olice said Mrs. White gave this | py re es entered th cule
3 24. |three ex-officié members who will 9 & North Korea forces enter
Halk Beckstnunt ate to-|retain the right to vote until the! explanation After # quagrel wit! city earlier this month, is safe silica aia
WASHINGTON, July 24. 5 dae te Pescadores, Islands ministerial system can be estab-| !¢r, her husband handed Billy a! The Foreign Office to-day an va ‘ l
t . a ay a 2 etd . = = x ye - > » . + at’ a . j
PRESIDENT TRUMAN to-day discussed with Congres- fe ee coast of Formosa|lished and three be nenietnca ‘59 caliore ee fim ite the nounced it had received a abl TH 4/] 4 ND OFT ERS U.N.
\ sional Leaders the advisability of an immediate emergency] would be defended by ppeecenn niembers, Z ¢ t hoot “They returned to the house Sars wearduied of vhs taff wer Z f r
tax increase on both individual incomes and business firms naval forces - 2 pause pee THe ig ail, 4m hd vhere the father said ‘ if she don't now near Pyongyang, the Nort! 7 HTING VMVEN
| House Speaker Sam Raeburn told reporters afterwards| nists attacked nferehes, the Gtate (tree pene. ae PAP decrighit atoot her Korean capital 4 000 [Vly { 4
i that the matter was “still in the conversation stage.” roe esas sae . a said the |iterary test {or voters, eure Mrs. White and her husban« A Foreign Office spokesma 9
i E: o eer Piedtinwes ved: einai to- | Department spo esma i the | Councils over which the Governor tarted fighting He swung at hei said he could not say how Cay AKE SUCCESS July 24
er ; ate ae tea a re | Pescadores Islands fe 2 te hich | Will continue to preside, will be with a cane and she at him with a tain Holt had managed to send Lid E S eee ee
7 ey t Pro rahe oe Rae ase iwi vee tbreak made more responsible by the in- piece of wood. During the strug- ] cable THAILAND hag informed the 1 nited Nations that si
arines | W. eae, ‘Sympington described ae te neat Was cat Gea be|clusion of three members elected | sie Mrs. White heard her husband It wa ated last Saturday tha jeet to the King’s approval, she will offer a combat tex
F litiy: inecananne a Commits | Of tie otéean Wab: said 1 by the Legislative Councils, order “shoot her son” and the boy ! Britain was taking steps to seeiire ho tie 1 men to fight with the Unit
is programme to a Committee defended by the American Fleet Reuter fitted, ctwet ‘aptain Holt’s release Reutec of about 4,000 offieers and 1
Increased ee ae ake prone Mi oa dint. — Beate an —.| Nations’ forces in Koren t
OF war”. Sympington is Chairman 1. SSE maa os This was the first official
- of the National Security Resources ; lreeeived here in response
i yi, Board which has the job of plan- e ' _ Secretary-Genera [rygve L
60 Per Cent |? ries os copye ? Oey. MacArthur ts Sersit (0
WASHINGTON, July 24 {Controls and Civil Defence in the e l O amn l eS oi The United Nations He
i An immediate 60 per cent./ vent of war B Official U.N. {ters also disclosed ony ul
; i ih The Government Controls Bil! jchief Dutch representative to
ing stre a ae ae United Shes does not involve the price controls C d » I Ch ief | United Nations ir letter to
i ig strength of the hi EA pict * ‘ /LOommMarnder in Ch \Macratacrctionetal’ akin ta
j . ally rl or controls over man-power. But Secretary-G
4 Marine Corps, usually re fiable E ( 6 { led d
{ Congressional sources said te-day. Sympington oa Senators these 7 | KOREA, July 24 err.nent h id deci eC it gic

They also Said the Navy was | thing: bee et ead ea tater | ; iden 3 Germany “somewhere in the over, Brunswick Oldenburg and to take place in Germany since A eommunique fron General |! nchage ai Ar
preparing two—and possibly ean “jae S6 SPU Sea a , Sone TART, Meaiiric ctr ah Soviet Zone.” sremen in Northern Germany Hitler ame to power in 1933, lacArthur today iid that a]
three—more aircraft carriers for hace gees ‘tac aid tte .| 5 These “agents”, he said were Espionage groups were being today discussed the Federation’s|\inited Nations ‘command ie thas
duty as quickly as possible “4 yo pington oo Bere oe . oe eae chairman of coming to West Germany mainly et Up to Operate along the Fast- call for boycott of Argentine} jeneral Headquarter n Tokyo} fer Indone

a ; , 4 } would be an effort » avoid ¢ Herr Hans Jahn, chairma omit oe oe “ . js ; Fleas navate tan ii +h |

House members told of Eee tannin act basi sr th ; Transport Workers via Switzerland Ve German zone border ; hip is been officially established 1 ao I 1 ‘
plans after closed session of the | Piecemeal fo ag of emergency ne German eriey i FE furt Cent ecessary he said Helyvessen President of the AacArthur cormmander ee ¢ ' Ne
pla alter e l t Whe. ei@adures used in World War IT Union today appealed to the In- rankfurt — entre é 2 sessen, . gl: la ut jue for _re 1 r I
Armed Services Committee, wit j Reuter ternational Transport Workers Jahn described Frankfurt as In France swedish Transport Workers, eriti- | chief eat ‘

Admiral Sherman, Chief of mayely [Federation for help in fighting the centre of the Communist un. Andre Lafond, Secretary of the cised the dockers affiliated te fhe Genéral MacArtt mnoun hout: the ction of

Operations, who was reported to 4 '“Communist infiltration into West derground movement in West Ger yndicate of the French railway Federation who had so far fai ed} sent dbachibied Gener he adde

have told them that a1 increase | FISH AND CHIPS CLI |Germany.” Speaking at the Fed- many and Dusseldorf as “its workers, said the Communists to ac Ror sgl ad SR a ak hyd We OR et ab One from Gene: t

of gpout 57,000 men would. be } LONDON, Monday jeration’s Congress here, he said organisation headquarters.” He “Fifth Column” were increasingly tion decision to back URIS | oa tehates of the U N ft

made in the Marines’ strength} A 20-year eparation ended/this inf Itratiom was becoming also clairned knowledge of planned active in France. “C oncentrating Argentine ae sre believed to} tions Command.’ vers to t appea it

which on June 30 reported 'when Miss Lavina Mallaro and more serious He sabotage acts primarily against in- on the transport syster vhict Ais ae ape) WE aha . t Brit-| The order reiterated that Ma -| Several ce : , for Kare
be 75,000 in touch with a sister in the n 'G-! alleged that former German Ait Stallations of West German rail- as the best ay of paralysing the _ or tle Mi es 5 een an-| Arthur had assumed comr land ofthe unif wieetteuen cit. Bekele

The air squadrons, would be lands after secing her name men- | Force General Kurt Henschel was ways at Essen and Dortmund in «1 pplie. time of war.” — Ose My eh 7M yet to ¢ the new United Nations Head-/through Was ringto
increased from 12 to 18 tioned in a ney oped | training Communt “espionage the Ruhr, Munich vara ee The ¢ ongress, first big. inter- nounce their attitude cinladiae Pa —ieater Reuter

—Reuter. around meal hips. groups” { thei: task in West and Dinkelsbuehl in Bavaria, Han- national Trade Union con ererice



‘
a





Oo

IS EXCELLENCY THE GOV-
ERNOR will attend a lecture

given by Mr. Maurice Connor at
the Y.M.P.C. on Thursday, Au-
gust 10th, at 8.30 p.m

Mr. Connor who is blind, is a
student of the Canadian National

Institute for the Blind, and he re-
cently arrived from Canada to
spend a holiday with his parents
before he returns there to do a
four-year course in Art, at Dal
housie University in Halifax

The subject of his lecture will
be, “A West Indian’s View of Life
and Work at the Institute.”

His lecture comes in the middle
of what should be a very enter-

taining programme, especially
the. second number, which .is a
piano solo by Maurice himself,

Also on the programme are songs
by Mr. E. A. B. Deane, Mr. Her-
bert Cheeseman, and a violin
solo by Mr. Maurice Fitzgerald.

Blood Donors

TN CONNECTION’ with the

recent appeal made by Mrs
Savage for blood donors, His
Excellency the Governor, Mr

Savage and others attended the
General Hospital yesterday for
samples of their blood to be taken
for testing. ‘

It is understood that many more
persons are requifed to come
forward as blood donors.

Those desiring to do so are
asked to send their names to Mrs,
Savage, Government House.

Arrived over the week-end

RRIVING by the Golfito over
the week-end from England
were Mr. and Mrs. David R
Young and their daughter Sheila.
Mr, Young, who is the Manager
oj the Barbados Gas Company

has been in England for four
months.
Mrs, Young and Sheila how-

ever, have been away for about
a year, which was spent in Canada
and England.

Lucky Cake Winner

R. R. CELETTE, a visitor to

the island who is staying at
the Paradise Beach Club had, a
pleasant surprise yesterday, He
was informed that he was the
winner of the Prize Drawing run
by Mrs. Ben Moore and Mrs.
Archie Edwards.

The prize was a very tasty look.
ing cake, which should make a
very enjoyable ‘Tit-Bit’ for this
aiternoon’s tea,

Worked Wonders

RNEST LAWS, a young Jamai-,;

teacher, has gone to
British methods

can
Lundon to study
of dealing with juvenile delin-
quency. He comes from the
Kingston “Boys Town”, where 250
maladjusted boys are taught
trades. Laws has worked wonders
in one village in Jamaica. When
he went there as a teacher it was
poor and-the people demoralised.
He changed all that. Now_ the
village has a flourishing local
trade, a well-attended school and
a children’s play centre.
Free Breakfast
ATROLLING in an_ aircraft
last week, on the lookout for
intruders, was Geoffrey de Freitas,
West Indian-born Under Secretary
for the Home Office. He was
taking part in an aerial game
which flying clubs play with each
other. One club announces that
all its members will be patrolling
around its aerodrome at a par-
ticular time. It challenges oppos-
ing clubs to attempt to land on
the aerodrome without being
observed. Mr. de Freitas, who is
a member of the Herts and Essex
Club, was defending his aero-
drome at Broxbourne last Sunday.
Tf an intruder lands without a
defender taking his aircraft
number, he wins a free breakfast.
If his number is taken, he forfeits
half a crown. De Freitas has won
two breakfasts so far—-as an
intruder,



BY THE

GOING INTO POLITICS , GEORGE



On Visit

R. RAY T. SOPER, Matineals

Co-ordination Standard Oil
Company of New Jersey (Creole
Petroleum Corporation), is here

on a visit from Venezuela.

Bishop Of New York
MONG the distinguished visit-
ors to this colony during the
last week were the Rt. Rev. Charles
F. Boynton, Suffragan Bishop of
New York and the Rev, Mr, Don-
ald Dow of Puerto Rico. They are
guests at the Ocean View Hotel.
Bishop Boynton was the Preach-
er at St. Mary’s Church at 9 a.m.
on Sunday while the Rev. Dow
occupied the puplit at Evensong.

Was Staying With

His Parents

R. AND MRS. John Simmons

and four children returned to
Venezuela over the week-end by
B.W.I1.A. after about four months’
holiday, staying with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs, E. K. Simmons in
Fontabelle. Mr. Simmons is with
Socony Vacuum in Venezuela and
was here last year on holiday.

Will Film Caribbean For

Visual Education
JPR ETURNING to Canada on
Saturday morning by T.C.A.
were Mr. and Mrs, Dick Bird, who
have been here for about two
weeks taking pictures both still
and movie for T.C.A.

Dick told me shortly before he
left, that he hopes to return to
the West Indies next year to do
a series of films about the Carib-
bean for use in Canadian Schools
in their Visual Education Depart-
ment. This course will nave to be
planned very carefully beforehand,
as it will be in great detail touch-
ing mainly on the industrial side

of the islands, The films will
definitely not be from a_ tourist
angle.

Chief Engineer T.C,A.
R, JOHN DYMENT, Chief En-
gineer of 'T.C.A. in Montreal,
arrived from Canada on Saturday
morning by T.C.A.

He was accompanied by his
two sons John Jr., and Paul. Mrs.
Dyment and their youngest son
David arrived here last Saturday
and they are all staying at “The
Camp,” St. Lawrence.

Mr, Dyment will only be stay-
ing here for three weeks, but Mrs,
‘Dyment and the family will remain
on for a longer holiday.

On ‘‘Package Tour”’
R. G. BISHOP, who is on a
two-week “Package Tour”
from Montreal, arrived from Can-
ada on Saturday morning by
'T.C.A. Mr. Bishop is Personnel
Supervisor of the Bell Telephone
Company in Montreal and this is
his first visit to Barbados, He is
a guest at the Crane Hotel.

N all the welter of fun they were more together than
I promised for the Festival, the others, and their tone was
from coal] mines to messages less damnable,
from the moon, I miss one de-

light: a band contest:

It should be held under the old
Brunswick-square rules, with all
the bands playing different pieces
and all at the same time. Believe
me, it was every band for itself
in the Brunswick-square contest
and no aesthetic nonsense, Mr.
Gerald Barry «and I, acting as
judges, were put to the pin of our
collars to know what the devil
it was all about. A whisper of
Manola from the Waisall Aeoli-
ans would be drowned by a
thunderous Pere la Victoire from
Jeffcote Park. Half the Middles-
brough team got mixed up with
Shepton Mallet, and a_ small
Bradford Clarinet fell backwards
off the dais on to the Cirencester

Style Counted

HERE was an eccentric char-

acter playing for Slatts
Mills. He stuffed his trombone
with sacking to get richness of
tone. In the excitement of a
forceful passage in Light Cavalry
the sacking was blown out of the
mouth of the trombone, which
emitted a sudden roar. We took
off two marks for noise, but
awarded one for emphasis, whicn
led to a dispute with Sandhills
Royal, who got their emphasis by
concealing two extra French
horns behind a packing-case. I
remember Mr. Barry saying to
me, during a lull, “I can’t make
out what any of them are play-
ing.” For answer I pointed to
the very stylish Nuneaton Band.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Carib Calling —

Special Order

MONG recent visitors to Eng-
land has been Mr. Walter
Rice, President of Reynolds
Jamaica Mines Limited. He is
over there to place orders for
machinery and equipment, includ-
ing a special self-unloading ship
of about 13,000 tons to carry sup-
plies of bauxite from Jamaica to
the United States. Mechanised
unloading from the new ship will
take about ten hours instead of the

usual three days.

Black Eyes For Fun!
OUNG BILL SCHMIDT,
twelve-year-old Lodge boy
who left for Venezuela yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. arrived at
Seawell with a very ‘respectable’
black eye!

How did he get it? Using Bill’s
own words, “We were having a
little fun over the week-end.” The
“tun” was a few rounds of boxing.
“You should see the other fellow’s

eye,” said Bill “His looks a lot
worse than mine.”
Bill, who is an American has

been living in Venezuela for some-
time now, his father is a pilot
with T.A.C.A de Venezuela.
Another American boy also
returned to Venezuela yesterday.
He was Brian Jakob. He too is
a pupil at Lodge School and is
going to Venezuela for the long
holidays. His father works with
Shell Oil Company in Venezuela

On Flying Visit
ISS MOLLY O’DONNELL,
B.W.1.A. hostess arrived
from Trinidad yesterday morning
by B.W.I.A. to spend about a
week with her good friend Joyce
King at Rockley. She will be
returning to Trinidad on Monday.

Wedding
HITEPARK Pilgrim Holiness
Church was the scene of a
pretty wedding on Saturday when
Mr. Ralph C. Haynes of Britton’s
Hill, took as his bride Miss Cyn-
thia O. Parris of “Martinique”,
My Lord’s Hill.

The ceremony was performed by

Rev. I. M. Wickham,

The bride who was given in
marriage by Mr. James F. Brath-
waite looked charming in a dress
c{ brocaded georgette. Her head-
dress was of beads and she wore
silver shoes, She carried a bouquet
of pink rose buds and Queen
Anne’s Lace.

The duties of bestman fell to
the bridegroom's brother-in-law
Mr. Victor S. Lawrence.

Miss Doreen Parris and Miss
Carmen Best were the Maids of
Honour and wore dresses of white
stamped organdie, white crinoline
hats trimmed with gold tinsel
ribbon and gold shoes.

The bridesmaids were Miss Lin-
douise Brathwaite and Miss Maur-
een Holder. They wore dresses
of blue sheer with hats to match
and gold shoes,

There were eight flower girls
the Misses Beatrice Alleyne, Fern
Maynard, Hazel Parris, June
Hunte, Esta Clarke, Harriet Thom-
as, Pamela Walters and Pauline
Bishop. Four different colours of
sheer—blue, white, pink and peach
—were worn by these, two each
wearing the same colour, The
page boys were the brothers
Parker and Barton Lawrence,

The church was nicely decorated
for the occasion.

The ceremony
throughout with
Clarke at the organ.

After the ceremony the happy
couple and their guests motored
to the home of the bridegroom’s
brother-in-law ‘“Wingrove,” Ist
Avenue, Bank Hall, where a re-
ception was held, This concluded,
the couple journeyed to Bath-
sheba to spend the honeymoon

choral
Oswald

was
Mr.

W AY —By Beachcomber

grown tired and ragged after the
first hour, Also, they were next
to Barnsley, who played like
maddened elephants.

They Inter:upted His
Dream
A*

a poet living near by wrote
: when it was all over:—
Those long, remorseless hours of
hideous din

Which loosened plaster and blew
windows in,

Taught me, a lover, quite enough
to prove
That not all music is the food of
love.
Midnight at Pontefract
He kept a dairy, not down

each' day the things that struck
him.

(Morning paper,)
OR instance, churns thrown
by angry dairymaids. Let us

still has another



| ine day we
caught 6ib.
of caviare
« _ a *

by John Codley

PAHLEVI (lran).
cn HE came on board and
a flopped in the bottom of
> e boat; a long, grace-





ful lady, a shimmering flash
of silver blotched with black
Sne weigned 24lb. nad a long
: 4d nose, a thrashing tail

ust 18 years old



ipertant For this was
urseon whose eggs pro-
world with tts most famous
20d —caviare And no stur
iare until she is 14






1 nad got up at three a.m. to join
he viare fishermen. Nine boats
vs ‘d:awn up by the tideless waters
“aspian at Astara — Jron
iilage on the frontiers ot
ana Russia and 90 miles fom





Tough and wiry

£ oh Cost was Manned by tour or
tive Azerbatjanis, tough, small, and



wiry men in ragged shirts, serge
trouvers, and jong scamen's boots
An hour's steady rowing

erougnht us to the fishing grounds
a mile off-shore.

Ths sun rose across the sea, Li
was fine and warm. We rose and
fell gently on the swell,











it. was seven-thirty and Worth, in a good year, about
it seemed that ne would be *Â¥00.000.
returning with nothing in our .
nats Nice work if...
> What does tie iisnelman make
We all pulled out of this? He carns 13s. a day
Suddenly the look-out noticed seven months of the year
ling waters ahead. The oars- What is a geod catch? Ours
pulled in their blades. We was average, but sturgeon have
gan to pull in the net. been landed weighin
There she was, That long A fish of this size ca
graceful lady—with six pounds of caviare worth £840
caviare the fish sells at 3s. 6d. a ;
The fish was carried to the Total value; more than £1
factory and cut open After So one giant sturge
washing and sieving, the caviare 0€ man’s wages for seven yea
was mixed with salt and boric Nice work—if you can get
acid (preservative) and left for %’¥feeon.
two days in ice. Then it was dohn Godley, Retr of Lord

packed into tins and shipped w
Russia, who control tne fishing
rights in this profitable business—*

Housewives’ Guide

Prices in the local market |
for Pumpkins and Plantains
when the “Advocate” check-

ed yesterday were

|
Pumpkins 8 cents per lb. |
Plantains 8 cents each.





Still has another

5 weeks here
. R. JOSEF ADAMIRA_ who
4 was in Trinidad for a few
days’ visit returned yesterday by
53.W.1I.A. He tells me that he
five weeks here
before he leaves for Trinidad.
Mr. Adamira has been Acting !
Manager of the Bata Shoe Stores
here for some months, and ng
that the new manager has on
appointed, he will be returning
to his former post in Trinidad.

Light Under A Bushel

© herd PAUL WILKINS Show,

which‘ brings to the fore |
some local talent, is a good one |
and should be encouraged. And |
the best way to encourage this |
show is by way of constructive |
criticism. We welcome such artists |
as Eddie Bohne and Ben Gibson, |
But these are men who have little
need to show their mettle at this
age. Where is the young talent in
Barbados? |

There should be more young
artists in the island who are aspir-
ing to greater heights. These are
the ones to be encouraged.

And in this young brigade there
is one member who is outstand-
ing, and not given the best oppor-
tunity.

This youngster is Cedric Phil-
lips who is so to speak overbur-
dened with talent. And he is
wasted behind a piano, Give youth
a chance.



Poor Prospect!
R. R. G. MENZIES, Austra-
lia’s Prime Minister, and
Sir Pelham Warner watched a
game of cricket together last
Saturday. Mr. Menzies is in|}
England for Cabinet talks on}

Imperial Defence, but cricket, this
day, had a stronger pull for him
than Whitehall. He saw the Eton
vs. Harrow match at Lord’s where |
he was received by “Plum”
Warner, President of the M.C.C. |
They sat in the President’s box.

At the Australia Club’s dinner
to the Commonwealth Premier
last week, the two men again met, |
In. the course of his speech, Mr.
Menzies foreshadowed an Austra-
lia of 12 or 15 million people.
“Not much ofa prospect for our
future Tests!” Sir Pelham inter-
polated gloomily.”

Kilbracken, on his way to New

Zealand, ts reporting on the

Strange lives o;
nds

people in many
tai

a




























“That long, graceful lady” .. . 18 years, 241d. . .

Wives Prefer Nylons

LONDON,
Norman Dodds, Labour M.P. for
Dartforth, Kent, told the House
of Commons the other day that

|
|
|
|
|
|
some women prefer nylons to food



@ SLIPPER-CLOGS e



e
Helder, in a blue and whi
brings a new footnote to




are of wo
ot white “uede.
ing the® guard-changing
mony at Buckingham Palace.
London Ezpress Service

FEEL






and drink, even to husbands —
and some even think they are vital
in getting a husband.

—Can Press.



ROYAL (Worthings)

TO-DAY 5 & 8.30

Final Inst. Columbia Seria
“THE VIGILANTE”
starring
Ralph BYRD Lyle TALBOT



| Wednesday Night at 8.30

“CARACAS NIGHT”



EMPIRE

TO-DAY Last 2
4.45 & 8.30

20th C-Fox presents .

CLIFT
Paul DOUGLAS

Shows

Montgomery

in
“THE BIG LIFT”

with



a
Visitor from Sweden, Barbro
outfit,
ondon:
heel-less slipper clogs. The soles
and the uppers are
She was watch.
cere.

[

Cornell BORCHERS
Bruni LOBEL

ROXY

TO-DAY 4.45 Only
20th C-Fox presents . ..

“THE GUNFIGHTER”





TO NITE at 8.30

MADAM O’LINDY
AND TROUPE

in
“CARACAS NIGHT”

OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
4.45 & 8.15

Ist Inst. Republic Serial . .

“DAREDEVILS OF THE
RED CIRCLE”

starring

Charles QUIGLEY
David SHARPE



Herman BRIX
Carole LANDIS





THE PAIN-GO






TUESDAY,

| Debutantes

ELEVEN American debutantes
on a six weeks’ European coming-
out tour are jfinging London a
shock to their purses. Their
pocket money allows them £4 a
day for their five days here.

Says one of their two organiser-
|chaperons, Mrs. J. Baker; “The
girls were shocked to find that
dinner in a West End restaurant
cost them more than £2 each.
| Not that that is much more ex-
;pensive than in New York—it is
just that the girls have never paid
their own bills before.”

Five are
brunette; only
their teens.

Crop-haired Nancy Lee Clark,
20, from Cleveland, and 19-year-
“—— - . wn

blonde, six are
two are out of





WEDNESDAY

upert and

* BLACK

4

o),

JULY 1950

From U.S.

old Mary Alice Miller, of New
Jersey, are shopping here for cash-
meres, china and cheeses “We

were told cheeses are good here,”
hey explain

£100 A Week

Cost of the tour for each girl
is about £1Q0 a week. They can
go anywhere in town each eve-
ning, but if they have “dates”
they must go in pairs. The
“date” must be introduced to the
tour organisers. And the name
of the escort must go down in a
tour log-book. ’ :

Second chaperon with the girls
is Miss Mary K. Browne, who in
1926° won the Wimbledon doubles
championship.

—London Express Service.
pe"

— a






Gg

GAHTETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

and THURSDAY

20th Century Fox Presents .
Tyrone Power and Maureen Ohara

nm

SWAN”







—-o

PLAZA



Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

Errol Flynn, Barbara Stanwyck in “CRY WOLF”

Me Crea,

and
Brenda Marshall in

“ESPIONAGE AGENT"

A Warner Double



Bette Davis in

“A STOLEN LIFE”

and

Dennis Morgan in “CHEYENNE”





A Paramount Picture

————























“NEPTUNE S

“THE THREE

JOHN FORD'S
PICTURE OF: THE




Joel
Wed, & Thurs, 5 & 8.30 p.m, Another Warner Action Double!

TODAY 5 and 8.30 (Last Showing)

“THE RED

Peter LAWFORD
TOMORROW ONLY 5 and 8.30

Sy

John Ford and Marian C. Cooper present

JOHN WAYNE - JOANNE DRU - JOHN AGAR

Story by JAMES WARNER BELLAH: Screen Play by PRINK NUSENT
nd \AURENCE STALLINGS + Produced by ARGOSY PICTURES CORPORATION



AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT at 8.30
Paramount’s New Picture

“RED, HOT AND BLUE”

Starring BETTY HUTTON—VICTOR MATURE—WILLIAM
DAMAREST
“RED, HOT and BLUE” is joyous, tuneful and happy-go-lucky



WEDNESDAY at 5 & 8.30 p.m.
THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
BING CROSBY—RHONDA FLEMMING—WILLIAM
BENDIX
in “CONNECTICUT YANKEE” in Technicolor

DANUBE”

— Janet LEIGH



DAUGHTER"

Esther WILLIAMS — Red Skelton



‘THURSDAY 27TH ONLY 5 and 8.30

MUSKETEERS”

Van HEFLIN—Gene KELLY Lana TURNER
OPENING FRIDAY 28TH - - -
















with VICTOR McLAGLEN
DRED NATWICK + GEORGE O'BRIEN « ARTHUR SHIELDS

ovvected by JOHN FORD



Dletribvied by RKC RADIO PICTURES












drum. Five Southport men Quite clearly one could hear bits Ope he emulated Cobbett, who,
pulled him into their band and of Aida. They all blew together, when a stockjobber threw one at On Short Visit |
gave him a trumpet. We were and at their loudest, while less Dim, picked up a second and FF on a short visit to Puerto |
often asked afterwards why we experienced bands wasted time hurled it back, crying, “One good O Rico on Saturday by B.W.1.A
awarded the Mrs. Melhuish Cup with lullaby stuff. They would churn deserves ‘another.” (See > lan, who return- “Mentholatum’ relieves pain so
te Teleton, The béas 5 eRe Mente ae he C ina i Canon Frazer’s “Cobbett: The W?§ Mr. Paul Nolan, who return
iverton, e reason was that have won the Cup had not they : n€ ed from Bermuda a few weeks

qui-kly that it seems almost like
magic. You can feel its cooling,
soothing touch begin at once to ease
the painfulthrob, And it is so simple
to use ‘Mentholatum’. Just rub it
where the pain is and the pain goes,
That is all you have to do to bring
speedy relief from Headache, Nerve
Pains, Paceache and Aching Limbs.
Get some of this wonderful balm and
stop that pain right away. Make
sure you get genuine ‘ Mentholatum’,
(Ask for MEN-THO-LAY-TUM).

Man,” Ch. 6.)

ago.




SESS SSO

PERFUMES THAT
' LAST

GOYA—Perfumes, Colognes
Powder (Face and Bath)
A very beautiful assortment
to choose from

THE COSMOPOLITAN

DAY PHONES 2041 & 4441
NIGHT PHONE 81-41



























YOUR HOME

It is wonderful the difference that can be made to a Room
by putting a smart piece of Linoleum on the floor. The Room

immediately looks cleaner and brighter. Come and see our

range of attractive designs. We have them in the following
sizes:—






















We can Supply

FIREBRICKS
FIRECLAY
FIRE CEMENT
STEAM PIPE & FITTINGS
BAR IRON
PORTLAND CEMENT







Something You Will Appreciate

LADIES’ PLASTIC RAINCOATS—all sizes @ $2.20 each.
MERCERIZED PRINTED LINGERIE aD ote. nar Yd, .
GARBADINE in Emerald Green, Pink, Red, Gold, Lime Green





Rolls

Squares



3 Feet and 6 Feet Wide
7 Ft. 6 Ins. x 9 Ft.




Stocked by our Plantation Supplies Department





and White @ $1.30 per yd, 9 Ft. x 9 Ft.
SHANTUNG in Blue, Rose, Cream, Pink & Gold @ $1.16 per yd. Telephone No, 4657 10 Ft., 6 ins. x 9 Ft.
1950 STYLES LADIES SHOES in White, Black & Brown Suede e 12 Ft. x 9 Ft.



Prices ranging from $11.36 to $12.37 —Cuban Heels.
Also DRESSES, SUNSUITS, SHORTS & SLACKS Etc., Ete.

BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.







BARBADOS





CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD.

in Tins and Jars. Made only by
@ The Mentholatum Co., Ltd. (Estd. 1889), Slough, England, ®
Also at Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A.




PLANTATIONS LTD.



—-



TUESDAY, JULY 25,

Philippines
Have War
Jitters

By FRANK EMERY
TOKYO
_The progress of the
Korean Communist invaders ha
shocked the Philippines
war jitters are getting More anc
more serious today

I have spent
Manila and at no

departure for Tokyo.

Those fears were reflected by
They say the
Pat-
the situation when
thought Japan
foolish as tq
ttacl Philippines but the
Filipinos worried about it never-

many Filipinos.
current situation is
terned after
Americans once
would not be so
attack the

theless.

_ Filipinos who remember the
fall of Bataan feel they have good

reason to be frightened about Red
@ggression in view of their own
problem of Communist guerrillas,
the Hukbalahaps.

Also, more than ever before,
it is feared that Chinese Com-
munists have established a supply
tine to smuggle arms and ammu-
nition to the Filipino rebels,

In addition, there are reports
about Chinese Communist leaders
from Peiping who visit the
Filipino Communist guerrillas to

give them lessons in guerrilla
warfare.
Frightening
Equally frightening is the Red

radio network which links the
Filipino and the Chinese Com-
munists and permits those at
Peiping to set the Pace for Com-
munist propaganda in the Philip-
pines.

| Those things, backed by the
ampact of news of the invasion

ct South Korea, have frightened
ay Filipinos, perhaps more
an

they were frightened t
before Pearl Harbour. ad

The first news of the Commun-
‘st invasion led Filipino defence
Officials to alert al) arms of the
Philippines defence forces and
call for the mobilization of several

thousand reserve officers and
men.

It led some officials to hope

privately that the United States
Will rush more troops to American
bases in the Philippines instead
of concentrating on American
power for Korea.
It led other officials to hope
that more and more arms and
ammunition will be sent to equip
more Filipino soldiers.

The Korean war has even led
the man ‘in the street to talk about
building public air raid shelters
and whether the Philippines have
‘industrial targets that might draw
Communist atomic bombs.

Tried To Beat Them

Filipino attention has been
focussed more and more on the
prospects of Huk raids. But the
Filipino rebels, guided by Peiping
have now showed their hand.

Commenting on the absence of
nébel raids since the North Kor-
é&n invasion, the Philippines de-
fence office said:

“We have tried to beat them
to the draw by launching an
all-out drive to smash guerrilla
strength before they can celebrate
the invasion of South Korea.”

The new anti-Communist offen-
sive scotched the hopes that
Pilipino troops might be sent to
Korea. But a token forces of
four military observers is being
assigned to watch the North
Korean Communists battle the
Americans and South Koreans.

Filipino defence officials hope to
get a first hand picture of Com-
munist tactics in Korea, knowing
they may be faced with the same
problem some time in the : a

—IN.S.

North

where

15 months in
time was fear
of another world war more appar-
ent than just. before my recent

1950



s



= . ' 7
}

4 Suppose we ALL said we weren't going to do any more weeding until we saw who won the war-—what then?”

Premature Explosion Is

H-Bomb’s Greatest Danger

(By FRANK B. ALLEN)

The Congressional Atomic

the greatest danger in hydr

WASHINGTON.
Committee has reported that

ogen bomb construction lies in

a possible premature explosion that would destroy both the

bomb and its makers,

————" The committee said that it is

Red Officers
In U.K. Camp

HOHNE, British Zone, July 24,

Two parties of Russian officers
today illegally visited the British
Army training areas near here
where joint British, Danish and
Norwegian manoeuvres were to
begin tomorrow.

“They must be got rid of,” the
senior British officer said. “If they
ere found, they must be tactfully
arrested.”

Later it was reported that the
Russians, who came from the
Soviet Military Mission to the Bri-
tish Rhine Army at Salzuflen, had
left the area.

They were in two cars with the
British Zone registration plates
and were in uni¥orm.

The senior British officer said
the units had been alerted to look
out for them. “They may come
back,” he said.

Members of the Soviet Military
Mission have permits to fo any=
where in the British Zone except
to restricted training areas.

The training area for tomor-
row’s manoeuvres is near Luene-
burg, only 25 miles from the
Soviet Zone border.—Reuter,

_—__ ...__..,

SUSPEND JAR
PUBLICATIONS

TOKYO, July 24.

Japan’s Attorney-General today
ordered the suspension, for an in
definite period, of 107 publications
which were being issued in six
prefectures of Western Japan as
substitutes for a banned Commu-
nist Party organ “Akahata” (Red
Flag).—Reuter.

Pyongyang—Now
Target For Bombs

Rapid commercial growth

WASHINGTON.
in modern times has over

shadowed the glorious ancient past in Pyongyang, the Com.

munist North Korea capital

bombings by both U.S. and B

A battleground of the Sino-
Japanese war in 1894 and again in
the Russo-Japanese conflict in
1904—5, this historic town grew
almost fabulously during the years
of, Japanese overlordship in Korea,
it}second only to Seoul among all
Kbrean cities, notes the National
Geographic Society,

Pyongyang, known as Heijo
while Japan rules, lies on the 39th
parallel, the latitude of Washing-
ton, D.C. It is thus one degree—
about 69 air miles—north of the
now famous 88th parallel that has
become Korea’s tragic dividing
line.

The city has good railroad and
fair highway and water approach-
ea> It is 160 miles and 118 air
miles northwest of Seoul, and
about 145 rail miles southeast of
Antung, Manuchurian border
port at the mouth of the Yalu
River across the Korean north-
west corner.

Where The Bombs Fall

Shallow-draft cargo boats and
ferries ply the Taedong River at
Pyongyang. Substantial modern
rail and highway-trolley bridges
are targets of current bombing
runs. The old city with its parks
and public buildings sprawls on
blufflike hills on the northwest
bank of the river. Modern factories,
workers’ homes, and a military
airfield form a striking contrast
on the level plain of the opposite

Fertilizers, cement, sugar,
rubber and leather are among
Pyongyang industries. Lying with-
in 25 miles of the Yellow Sea at
a neck where the Korean Penin-
stla is little more than 100 miles
wide, the city is a consuming and
distributing centre for the farm
products of the fertile surround-
ing plains and for coal from the
mountains to the east.

Pyongyang’s port for heavy
commerce is Chinnampo, thirty
fowr miles southwest by ral
anil somewhat farther by wa-
ter, at the Taedang’s mouth
on the Yellow Sea. popenieting

ongyang’s peninsular cross-
ae. both railroad and
highway meander eastward along

now the target of systematic
ritish air arms.
narrow mountain valleys to the
port of Wonsan (Genzan) on the
Coast of the Japan Sea,

Kingly Palace

Ki-tze, Chinese scholar gener-
ally credited as the founder of
Korean civilization, built himself
a kingly palace at Pyongyang
about 1120 B.C., and the spot
served as the country’s capital
for centuries thereafter. Memori-
als built to him 2,000 years later
still stand, defying time. Parts of
a city wall—nearly five miles long,
13 feet high, and pierced by six
ates—survive their royal build-
er of a millennium ago.

In the wall’s largest gate, at the
river’s edge, hang pieces of the
anchor chain of an_ ill-fated
American schooner. In 1866, when
Korean hostility toward Chris-
tians had reached its most vio-
lent stage, the General Sherman
sailed up the Taedong River to
Pyongyang, where it ran aground.
The crew was massacred and the
vessel destroyed.

Counted among the most beau-
tiful views in the’ world is that
from Peony Point (Botan-dai) on
the heights at Pyongyang’s north-
ern edge. It looks out on distant
mountains, vast plains, the mean-
ering river split by a long green
island, and the city itself. Jack
London, visiting the region dur
ing the Russian-Japanese War,
grew lyrical in proclaiming the
seene’s great beauty.—IN.S,

Troops Prepare
For Exercises

MUNISTELANGER, British Zone,
July 24.

Ten thousand British, Norwe-
gian and Danish troops were today
moving into positions under grey,
storm-swept skies for exercises
near here about 25 miles from the
Soviet Zone.

These exercises, timed to begin
at noon tomorrow and to last four
days, will be primarily a move-
ment for units operating for the
first time on full-scale manoeu-
vres, e

The troops will use jet Vampires
with Mosquito and Spitfite fight-
ers for support —Reuter.

necessary to create heat similar
to that of the interior of the sun
in order to get an explosion.

The report added:

“The difficulty of producing
such a reaction before the assem-
bly flies apart and while the
temperature is adequately high
accounts for much of the uncer-
tainty that exists as to whether
hydrogen weapons are feasible,”’

Before it issued the committee
report, which was carefully gone
over by Security officials, Chair-
man McMahon (D) Connecticut,
said:

“Atomic plants in the United
States and Russia continue to turn
out competing stacks of atomic
weapons, and both countries move
closer to the hydrogen bomb.

“Control of these dreadful
weapons is still the heart question
of the peace, the overriding ques -
tion which, unless solyed, leaves
nothing fundamentally sound.”

Detection Difficuli

Much of the report was given
over to a discussion of whether
the proposed United Nations’ plan
will be effective in controlling the
ingredients of the hydrogen bomb.

The committee pointed out that
deuterium can be made by a
simple process which can be
carried out in small plants scatter-
ed throughout a nation — which
would make their detection diffi-
cult. ‘

There are three possible basic
bomb materials — deturium-
deuterium, tritium-tritium and
déuterium-tritium,

Tritium. the committee, said,
may be produced in nuclear reac-
tors. Deuterium is simple to
obtain.

The hydrogen bomb explosion
takes place by the union of two
nuclei under extremely high tem-
peratures.

If it can be made to work, the

‘world’s supply of hydrogen bombs

will be limited only by the supply
of uranium.

The uranium bomb as used as
the “trigger” which provides the
initial heat make the union of
nuclei possible.

It might be possible, the com-
mittee said, to build an H-bomb
whose blast damage in a 10-mile
radius would compare with that
caused by an atomic bomb in a
one-mile radium at Hiroshima.

The committee did not try to
answer the question — which it
raised—of whether the hydrogen
bomb would be “militarily deci-
sive.”

Exaggeration

It merely cited two rival state-
ments. They were those of Nobe)
Prize winner Harold Urey, that
it would be militarily decisive and
that of former Atomic Commis-
sioner Robert Bacher, who took
the view that “while the H-bomt
is a terrible weapon, its effective-
ness seems to have been grossly
exaggerated in the minds of lay-
men.”

The report said that heat effects
will “depend on atmospheric con-
ditions” and that the range of a
destructive H-bomb blast would
be many times above that of an
A-bomb.

But the hazard of radioactivity
would not be “significant”
although the committee adder
that it might be possible “to so
design and use an H-bomb thar
dangerous contamination would
be produced locally.”—I.N.S.



The Weather
TODAY

Sun Rises: §.39 a.m.
Sup Sets: ¢.21 p.m.

High Water: 1142 am.
12.59 p.m,

Moon: (Full) 28th.

YESTERDAY: «

Rainfall (Codrington) .12 in.
Total for Month up to Yes-
terday: 2.13 ins.
Temperature
(Max.) 86.0 ° F.
Temperature
(Mir) 73.5 ° F.
Wind Velocity: 17 miles per
(3 pam.) E. by N.
Wind eVliocity: 17 miles per
hour.
Barqgmeter (9 a.m.) 30.038.
(3 pam.) 29.981.

ater enti eetentortarremraets estate anne

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Red Subs, _
Seen Off

Newfoundland

OTTAWA, July 24.

The navy believes there is little
doubt a submarine or submarines
Sighted off Newfoundland’s grand
banks last week, come from Russia.
It has taken action to investigate,
a Naval spokesman said. A
check with London and Washing-
ton disclosed neither the Royal
nor United States Navies had any
Submarines in the area.

Russia is believed to be the only
other country which could logical-
ly have a submarine off the
Atlantic Coast of Canada. The
Navy has an aireraft carrier, two
or three destroyers, and some
smaller vessels at its disposal at
Halifax.

These may be sent to sea to
investigate. Most have modern
anti-submarine equipment. In
addition the N.C.A.F. has an anti-
sub squadron based in Nova Sco-
tia. The submarine story broke on
Saturday, The St. John’s Sunday
Herald, Newfoundland weekly
newspaper, said submarines be-
lieved to have been Russian, had
been sighted off the Grand Banks,
New Brunswick.

A fisherman said he had also
seen one. Naval authorities here
said they have been investigating
similar reports, a senior Naval
officer said there is little doubt the
submarine seen off Newfoundland

was Russian.
—Can. Press.



10 Years Jail For
Ritual Murder

SWAZILAND, July 24.

A European farmer on whose
land the remains of a ten-year-old
African boy’s body was found was
gaoled here for 12 years for being
accessory after the fact in an
African ritual murder.

The African Chief Silwane
Nxumalo, cousin of Paramount
chief of Swaziland, was sentenced
to death.

The farmer, Carl Werner of
Hlatikulu, Swaziland, was found
guilty of receiving £30 from
Silwane after the ritual murder of
the ten-year-old boy had taken
place in his farm.

Parts of the boy’s body were
used for “medicine” and the
remains buried in an ant-bear
hole.

Two African witch doctors
were found not guilty of the crime
and were discharged.

if —Renter.

34 Dead In
Air Crash

MYRTLE BEACH, South Caro-
lina, Monday.



The death rol] of servicemen ia fy neneonanenecsenEneeRToneRRNCERRRR MDS

+ RECTOR’S

an Air Force transport plane crash
near here yesterday was to-day
known to be 34. There were 30

National Guardsmen _ returning
from manoeuvres and a crew
of four. The plane _ plung-

ed into swampland and exploded
shortly after taking off from the
Municipal airport. Earlier reports
gave the total dead as 33.
—Reuter.

Peacetime Recovery

KIRKENES, Norway.
Reconstructed and modernized
iron mines in this northern Nor-
way area are expected to produce
at the rate of 500,000 tons of ore
for export by the end of 1951. The



mines were badly damaged
‘uring the Second World War.
—Can Press.



Giant Sugar Mill

KARACHI.

The largest sugar mill in Asia,
situated in the Mardan district of
Pakistan will go into production
in November. The mill took four
years to complete and has a
crushing capacity of more than
8,000 tons of cane daily which
will yield about 350 tons of fine
sugar.—Can., Press.



FISH LOCATER

GRIMSBY, England.
Tests are being made by an East
England firm of equipment which
will aid fishermen not only to
locate fish deep in the seas, but
also to identify their species. It

in the “hush hush” stage of
development,—Can Press.
—Can Press,







London Exvrass Service

V2 TEST
ON MONDAY

COCOA, Florida, July 24

The first giant V-2 missile to be
fired from this east coast proving
round may zoom into the air on

Onday. Experts were optimistic
over the chances of firing the
rocket after the first missile fiz-
zied on the launching platform
last Wednesday

They set 9 a.m EDT for the
test of the main part of the mis-
sile

The captured German V2 rock -
et will use 10 tons of fuel jn
approximately one minute It
will be fired vertically, but short-
ly after the take-off a gyroscopic
steering device will turn it to go
horizontally. By the time the main
part of the missile is spent, a
700-pound rocket known as “WAC
Corporal”, riding on its nose,
will take off. The V2 will come
down at sea and the “WAC Cor-
poral” will continue its flight.

Both will send information
back to the base by radio
“WAC Corporal” is a scientific
missile rather than a_ military
weapon. Experts said it may go

as far as 250 miles
—(Can Press).



Radio Guides Ship
On Mercy Mission

MELBOURNE, July 24...
Radio was today guiding a ship
on a merey mission to a young
doctor stricken with appendi-
citis on lonely Heard Island,
2,480 miles from Australia’s west
coast,
" Dr. Serve Udovikoff, thé only
doctor with the Austrian Antare-
tic expedition on the
ready to risk using a
himself if the British freighter
Perthhire does not reach the
island in time. The Perthhire was
today steaming at 15 knots, hop-
ing to reach Heard Island in two
days’ time if not delayed by fogs
Medical advice was wirelessed
from Sydney in case Dr. Udovi-
koff had to operate on himself. It
was understood that at least one
of the expedition’s two biologists
would be able to assist him.—
Reuter. .

knife on



29 Jamaicans
In London

From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON.

Twenty-nine Jamai¢an — arti-

sans and labourers arrived in
London this week—to look for
jobs. They flew by B.O.A.C;

from: Kingston, paying £94 each

My
: my, le struction, RUDGE-WHITWORTH BICYCLES have a patented
for their passage. One of them rok Thief-proof locking device positively securing the steering of
a _ carpenter, said of Jamaica: , c the Bicycle in any one of three positions, operated by a key:
‘No place can be as hard as| Zvery Bicycle has a different key.
that little rock.” Other batches
following by air

are stated to be
Shortly because

‘ passage by
is unobtainable,

sea









FEVER

caused by Chills

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Remember it is a “RECTOR’S PRODUCT” Obtainable at:-

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Broad and Tudor Sireets,

PAGE THREE

, (Gums Bleed?

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
Teeth mean that you hav Pyorrhea
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad diseas:
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amesan stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the t
fuarantee. Amosan must make yoar
mouth well and save your teeth or

Cte emt

CANADA
MOURNS

For MacKenzie King









OTTAWA, July 24
Canada on Monday mourned the
loss of one of her most illystrioi





. - money back on return of empty Pack
ons, William Lyon MacKenzie age Get Amosan trom your chemis
Kir \ . > > 1 today. The guar
King, whose influe NCE largely Amosan antee Protects
Shaped the country's destiny in you

the last 50 years

The veteran statesman-bachelor
who was Prime Minister longe:
than any other man in any Britis
Commonwealth, died late Satur
day evening.

His life which began in what
how is Kitehener, Ontario, 75
sears ago last December, was the
story of Canada’s growth to
nationhood in the first half of th:
century .

Prime Minister St Lauren,
chosen by Mr. King as his suc-
cessor when he left public life in}
1948, said: “death marks the end
ef what historians will call the!
MacKenzie King Era”

Mr. King died at his summer
home at Kingsmere, a lakesid
ommunity in the Gatineau Hills
of Quebec about 20 miles from
Ottawa. He had been ill since hi
heart and cireulation ailment sent
him to bed for a month while bh
was attending the Conference ot!
the Commonwealth Prime Minis
ters in London in the fall of 1948
but there had been periods sine»
when he seemed to have recov sred
much of his former vigour ard he
was trying to write his memoirs

For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth

6 Catia

@

Boby









Jast Thursday when he had a) . 2 ,
recurrence of the pulmonary dis | 4 an D OTHELE
turbances which had bothered —e ‘ » -
him for years, developed nae ITEMS eu LE
pheumonia and soon passed into

a coma

His attending phyNcian at first |
thought he would rally as he bad
many times, but at Saturday noon

REQUIRE !!

es Tyres and tube

h's condition was critical. At 9.42 :
p.m. EDT. on Saturday he died Cycle pumps, clips, locks, bells, rit poke
without regaining consciousness. Valve rubber, solution
Tributes came om capitals of Ribbed rubber mattin
the world Air hose
The King and Queen sent a Garden hose and f{ittir

message of sympathy saying Mr
King’s lifelong service would
ensure him a place in the a

Garden tap adapters
Garden pruning shear
Air horns, chrome plat«
Copper tubing
Reversing lamps
Torchlights and batteri
‘Tools—hand drills, calips rs,

panners, ir ete
Electrical fittings
Electric vulcanising machines and patches

ind black enamel
of his country.

In Washington President
Truman expressed personal sorrow
and said Mr. King was an un-
warring champion of freedom and
democracy .—(C,P.)

hollow puneher feele; fe8



Fleets Strengthened
Against Air Attack

SAN DIEGO, California.
American, Pacific ang Atlantic
fleets are to be strengthened
against a possible submarine and
air attack on the United States
Admiral Forrest P. Sherman the}
Chief of Naval Operations told a

Press Conference here

“We have been concerned for a
long time about the mumber of
Russian submarines and have giv-
en a great deal of thought to
countering them, if need arises.

—Reuter.

LOOK YOUR

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PAGE FOUR



=== S={oseS 4

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.





Tuesday, July 25, 1950



Welfare

y

THE WORK and progress for the year
1949/50 of the Barbados Women’s Social
Welfare League and its Affiliated Societies
has been recorded in an interesting report
just published. In a community where
there are few really rich people and where
work of a social nature is still in its infancy
the report shows that there are still people
who, with their daily round to pursue and
in many instances struggling themselves to
earn a livelihood, find time to minister to
the needs of their fellows.

One general criticism which has not been
without foundation is that organised
charity in Barbados would be of more value
to community life than the promiscuous
help doled out and of which many have
taken advantage. The Report under review
shows that charity is becoming more organ-
ised and is having good results. The
progress of this work can be estimated from
actual investigation.

The League of which the Hon. Mrs. Han-
schell is President has been able to enlist
the support of many other organisations
throughout the island and in this way has
given an island wide interest to the work.
Branches in St. Peter and St. Philip have
published reports showing excellent work.

The Twentieth Annual Report of the Fam-
ily Welfare Society with Mrs. Hanschell as
President and Miss Sybil Chandler as Hon-
orary Secretary includes in its Council
' people from almost every walk of life and

the subscribers’ list includes individuals
and institutions of varied interests. Sub-

scriptions and donations amounted to
$4,459 and disbursements were $4,088.

Family circles, and individuals have bene-
fited from this and the Order of St. John
Eye Fund shows an excellent record of
work, Pupils of Secondary Schools in need
of assistance have been helped by the
Bridgetown Players through this Society.

~The work of the Civie Circle which has
overcome many obstacles has now ex-
tended to Seawell Airport and although
the work here has been suspended until the
alterations there are complete, it is clear
that Miss Barbara Young and her support-
ers are prepared to spread the gospel of
beauty and pleasant surroundings to the |
country districts.

The Christ Church Baby Welfare League,
the Children’s Goodwill League, the Baby
Welfare League, (monument to the late
Mrs. Florence Brown), the Royal and Mer-
chant Navy Welfare League, the Barbados
Registered Nurses’ Association, the Girls’
Friendly Society, the Girls’ Industrial
Union and the St. Philip Welfare Centre,
all find place under the aegis of the bigger
association.

It is indeed good fortune for the League
that Mrs. Savage has consented to become
Patroness and that the Central Council
still consists of a collection of ladies drawn
from varied strata of society. The straight-
forward and earnest approach of the
Patroness to problems and her engaging
manner should win support for the work
which will surely benefit not only those
dependent upon it but those who have been
called upon to make it their share of public
contribution.

But if the work of the Family Welfare
Society supplies without the fanfare of
publicity, a much needed job of work, that
of the Nurses’ Association is extremely in-
teresting and on its record invites public
support of every kind. The total member-
ship is 77 and during the year the Private
Nurses’ Co-operation was able to help the
General Hospital during the Shortage in
its staff and the District Nursing Service
gave treatment and advice to 16,435 people.
It now plans an island-wide Visiting Nurs-
ing Scheme including midwifery; and this
is indeed a laudable endeavour,

OUR READERS SAY:

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Pentagon Snaps

THE PENTAGON—biggest building in the world—is U.S. Defence
headquarters. A man who works there said yesterday: “They bank
my money here; they clean my shoes: they shave me. You don’t have
to go out—because they feed you here—the luncheon lawn in the
centre is crowded every day. You don't have to go shopping be-
cause the shops are all here, and they'll deliver to Room 3C421

when I want my toothpaste.

By Vincent Evans
WASHINGTON,

GENERAL Carl Spaatz, who rooms who is not doing something
States that will have a direct bearing on

commanded United
bombers against both Germany
and Japan, bounced down a
corridog of the Pentagon and
asked me: “How many people
d’you think work in this building?”

I said I didn’t know, Spaatz
exclaimed: “Half the so-and-so’s,”
and stumped off.

It was a joke, of course.
Twenty-four thousand people
work here. There are never fewer
than 2,000 people in its vast acres
--even when 200 janitors take over
at night.

It is the biggest office building
in the world. A man who works
here said that he had never seen
his boss, General Omar Bradley.

Nor need anyone else, theoreti-
vally. For the people in the Penta-
gon make 100,000 telephone calls
to each other daily.

Negro cycle messengers wait
outside doors to carry files.

The Pentagon is focal point of
the focal city of the world today
because it houses the top planning
and policy building agencies of
the United States.

General Bradley’s joint chiefs
ef staff have their offices here,
too, Around them is the mammoth
filing and control machinery for
the whole of America’s armed
forces,



But they won’t let me have a drink.”

Joe's Back

Tonight there is scarcely a
person in the Pentagon's 4,000

the war in Korea or the events
that will follow it

One reason for this new urgency
is that General “Lightning Joe”
Lawton Collins is back from Japan,
And most people in the Pentagon
move faster when “Lightning
Joe” is around

Collins has not brought any
pessimism back with him. Nor
have the men he and General of
the Air Force Hoyt Vandenberg
brought back with them.

What they ‘have’ brought back
is a furious fire-cating insistence
that everyone shell work.

As soon as Collins sat down he
sent a flurry of orders round the
building. So did Vandenberg.

They wanted to know the size
of the reserves in their services.
They wanted r-ports from tech-
nicians abou. the technical men
they needed.

The Inquest
By this afternoon they had
ready the draft cf a report they
will send to Mr. Truman. On that
report depends whether young
men from New Mexico and North
Dakota will be getting a summons
into the army or navy or air force

in the next couple of weeks.
There is a huge green brown,

Out Of It

and white map of Korea lining
the walls of the room newspaper-
men call the “Barometer Room.”
Official army and navy spokesmen
come there daily to tell the world’s
journalists how the war is going—

sometimes up and sometimes
down.
On the map, a series of red

arrows are creeping down day by
day.

This morning, when we went
there, the main red arrow had
driven through the little section
of the “line of no retreat.”

The spokesman drew another
line across the middle of the map
south of Taejon and said? ‘It is
important, if we can, to hold
along this main ridge, This would
give us a large compartment
between Pusan and the main
ridge for our beachhead.

“We are gathering strength as
we go back. They are getting

weaker. Their momentum is
slowing down.” =
New Mood

Up in the room next door to
the chiefs of staff you have only
got to switch a handle and
London, Paris, Tokyo or Berlin
headquarters would be on the
wire.

The conference phone will cut
any Cabinet Minister Bradley
wants into the conversation.

Light-hearted jocularity, which
characterised the days w it
was thought the North Koreans
were going to be taken for an
easy ride by bombing planes, has
gone.

There is a new mood in the
Pentagon tonight. ~

—L.E.S.

We Go Hunting Guns
In Tricky Waters

As interest in the East switehes from troubled lands to
dangerous waters=joins a smuggling check off jungle shores...

MALACCA STRAIT,

THE eight sampans look like a
caravan of camels on a desert
skyline as they move in file across
the sunset.

OUR OWN COURSE is set Nor
west.

OUR SHIP: HM. Frigate
Mounts Bay (Captain J. H. Unwin,
DS.C.).

HER PRESENT VOYAGE: A
500-mile patrol of the coast from
Singapore to North Malaya

HER TASK: To halt and search
sll ships within the three-mile
limit, and see that no man or gun
bomb is run ashore the
bandit forces in the jungle

Since the tragiition and practice
of smuggling in these parts is as
olg as Cornwall's, it requires
respectful study

Towing the other seven sam-
pans is a battered antique ditts
decorated with fearsome fishhead
paintings, and fitted with am out-
coard engine.

To her Mounts Bay's loud-hailer
brusquely calls across the water
in Malay: “Berhenti, berhenti
(Stop, step)!" The caravan comes
untidily to rest

Down goes the Mounts Bay
whaler, seven oarsmen and a
coxswain in lifeboats, and an officer
with revolver at beit.

The ‘Admiral

QUICKLY we are alongside and
aboard the “flagship” of the sam-
pan fleet. The “admiral” wears a
scanty loincloth and a _ large
conical hat, and smokes a cheroot,
the last two of which he politely
removes as he produces his own
and the ships’ papers.

All okay. So is the identity
ecard of every occupant of every
other sampan in his fleet.

So the whaler is soon home.

As many of our 160 men as can
sleep in hammocks slung on the

cr to

Hy Frank Owen

open deck, or lie on the deck itself.
The night is clear, but the stars
seem infinitely far off.

At two a.m. the engine-room
bells awaken me. On the bridge
is Captain Unwin, watching
through binoculars two tall, ghost-

like red sails, swaying in the beam

of his searchlilght.
Whaler Again
AT the side of the bridge st
a sailor with mounted Bren ¢
He watches, too. Two decks be-
lew, the whaler crew stand



by

“Berhenti, berhenti!” commands
the loud-hailer
Baul dewm sail).”

Down come their sails. Aut
down gee, cur whaler again, cur
seacrhlights ginning the junk om
the spearpoint of their beams.

in
mam J. Winter. 2. tern at
Pancras, Lendon, Sut tater
am early age Oy hip mother w
rubber plan‘ation in Sarawait.

John is the ship's mvaluabic
Malay lingeist. But he is no good
temight, for neither of the two mer
nor the boy m the drst sam
we board understands one wor
beimg Chinese from
Island.

av

32r

am





any kind. Thoroughly we se

pulling up deck boards, peering oo

bilges. But we find no bandits
and no contraband

“Search number two. Tell both
to wait while you return.”

When we draw a blank in
number two, we go to the frigate’s
side and pick up the captain's
Chinese steward, smiling Mr.
Leung.

All Found
NOW Mr. Leung is a mainland
Chinese, and has no affinity what-



“Jatek layat —

sur S@at goes Leading Sea- ~ ;

ever with the Hainan mariners’
Chinese, Still, all Chinese people
understand certain things, like the
British abroad. And very soon,
squatting on the deck by the light
of a lamp, Mr. Leung conjures
forth from his countrymen identity
zards, ship’s registration and fish-
ing licence

th sm



jokes (still unin-
salutes all round,
back

ghting warns of a
0 radar picks up
. er motor-driven






















renching rain,
a swelling sea.
ome alongside
keep in touch
e
be “gone over’
ighiy. too. For while
see far from satis-
her “mixed sargo™ ex-|
mixed. even for}
er midmight: it}
beer

[ee cloth. |









ent, rope,




i
ude Upton does
cally as Ronnie Howe
Yard
there is a curious half-
ge between the light and
ulackness, like a rainbow
m a cavern. And then
smugglers’ scene there
glides a long, low merchantman,
and passes slowly, silently by.
“She was a Japanese,”
Lieut.-Commander Sangster,





of mist
into thi

this



Says

tongkan friend in tow and into
Custody, to hand over to the police.
“But she came so near and seemed
so inquisitive, I thought she must
be a Russian,.”—L.E.S.

Never a Dull Mexico Minute

DANE CHANDOS built himself
a house in Ajijic, Mexico. When

the house was finished, Dane
Chandos was broke.

So he wrote his best-selling
-‘Village in the Sun”, about

Ajijic, and turned his house into
an hotel.

Amateur hotel-keeping’ gave
him the material as well as the
need for another best-seller.
From the proceeds of this new
book—"“HOUSE IN THE SUN”
(Michael Joseph, 10s. 6d.)—he
should be able to build an Ajijic
holiday camp, for ‘House in the
Sun” is one of the most con-
tinously delightful books I have
ever read,

Exasperating

No doubt the hotel’s guests and
servants were sometimes exasper-
ating. The dieting professor had
to have his meals so precisely to
time that Candelaria, the cook,
had to sleep with a huge red

alarm clock clutched to her
bosom,
The Mexican family, however,

ate at all times, They sat down
at 3.30 p.m.—all but one, who
drifted in at 4.45 p.m., and could
cnly eat tinned sardines.

e&

Book of the Day ... by

J.P.W. Mallalieu, M.P.

When the hotel had stocked
enough sardines for a month the
family thanked Chandos for their
delightful stay, and said they
were leaving in an hour,

The old German’ engineer—
“the Senor of the Oven”—gave
trouble, too, He had to have a
stove specially built on which he
could bake his own meals, his
parrots bit children, and he at
last married one of the maids.
Whatever he did, he wrote notes
about it to Chandos,

But in Mexico you must learn
to be surprised at nothing. You
eatch the bus for Guadalajara
at 8.30 a.m. Whe bus starts at
11.30 a.m. and goes instead to
El Chante.

All the passengers for Guada-
lajara decide that El Chante will
do just as well, except one
whose mother has had a fit and
needs attention. He will wait
for tomorrow's bus .

When Avelino offers to sell you
some land you find that the deeds
are in his daughter’s name,

He comes back next day with
the deéds properly signed, and

jater mentions casually that his
daughter has been dead three
months, “I wrote her name
yesterday myself, with great care,
in the presence of my _ friend,
Don Prisciliano Perez, who wit-
nessed it,” says Avelino.

Authority is as inconsequent as
the citizen, The best way of
finding the black market is to
ask a policeman.

Soldiers who came to arrest the
local buteher search his house
but do not kpther to search the
outhouse, where they know he is
hiding. “What business is it of
theirs if the man is not at home?

Out of Nowhere

Dane Chandos begins his book
with an Indian and his burro,
“appearing out of nowhere and
vanishing into nowhere, With no
fixed rules or directions, nothing
beginning, anywhere in particular
or stopping anywhere in particu-
Jar, lost in the prodigious land-
scapes and the broken hills and
the long lilac distances.”

That is Mexico; and that is
“House in the Sun.” Read it
these holidays. It will delight

you.
.—L.E.S.

our
frigate’s Number One, when we
got back at last, having taken our

EVERY 5 MINUTE

By FRANK EMERY
A U.S. AIR BASE IN KOREA, July.

A NEW miracle happens every five min-
utes at this muddy, dirty, flat place in Korea
where Americans live in pup tents and
American equipment forms a jungle of boxes,
trucks, plankings and engines.

For out of this chaos every five minutes a
trim, neat mustang fighter rises and ‘points
its nose toward the enemy only 20 minutes
away.

How it happens is one of those miracles
Americans use to win their wars.

A week ago this was a wilderness where
the Japs once had an airstrip. It was over-
grown with brush and weeds.

Now it is a bustling base run by dirty,
tired men who don’t get a chance to bathe,
who don’t eat anything but C rations, who
sleep on muddy ground under pup tents, and
who cling hopefully to a rumour that they
may get cots before too long.

The base is being built by an Air Force
engineering outfit from Okinawa with Korean
labour doing the heavy work.

For a time the field was frequently attack-
ed at night by North Korean guerrillas..
Finally the Americans decided that some of
the Koreans who worked on the strip by day
led the snipers in by night. Now all Koreans
who work on the base in the daytime must
sleep at the base at night. That is a condi-
tion of employment.



Col. Robert W. Witty is commanding the
base which looks like an unfathomable mess
but which is accomplishing its job by putting
aircraft into the sky.

Witty was aboard a ship ready to sail for
the United States June 25th when the
Korean war broke out and the Far East Air
Forces recalled him immediately to go to
work in Korea.

His job was to provide a base which will
eliminate the long, gas-consuming haul for
fighter planes operating from bases in Japan.

The job is already done and now Witty is
trying to make the base a cleaner and more
efficient place.

Rough Korean roads for miles around the
base are clogged with all kinds’ of heavy
equipment moving into the air base.

Veterans say the base looks like Henderson
Field on Guadalcanal. It is almost the same
kind of operation except that Red guerrillas
in the area are not so formidable as the
Guadaleanal Japs were.

Brig. Gen. Crump Garvin, commanding the
Pusan Base in South Korea, flew to the air-
field Tuesday to co-ordinate the supply prob-
lem. Stepping from his airplane into a maze
of equipment and sweating workmen, Garvin
asked where he could get transportation
quickly and who was the transportation
officer.

A GI answered : “Lieutenant Garvin, sir.”

So the General went looking for his son to
arrange a ride.

Everybody is busy on the base, but Capt.
Richard Ryan of Lincoln, Neb. is a strong
candidate for the title of busiest of all.

Ryan flies mustang combat missions. Be-
tween missions he helps to build the camp as
a regular assignment and runs the jerry-’
built post exchange which doles out two cans
of hot beer to each man at 5 o’clock every
afternoon. 4

Another base builder is Capt. Lee Kelly,
Jr. of Holyoke, Colo. who evacuated from
Seoul and still is mighty unhappy about
$6,000 worth of clothing, furniture and other
possessions he lost there.

Kelly has had about enough war trouble
in his family. In the Philippines, just after
the Pacific War, he married the former
Marian McCarthy of Los Angeles, who serv-
ed 31 months at Santo Tomas as a prisoner
of the Japs.

Mrs. Kelly was evacuated from Seoul
where Kelly was a member of the Korean
military advisory group, Kelly learned
through Stars and Stripes that she has re-
turned to the United States.

Americans in Korea are hungry for the
Stars and Stripes and any other news publi-
cations they can get their hands on. Cpl.
William White of Bainbridge, G. who landed
in Tokyo the day after the Korean War start-
ed, said :

“I don’t mind eating C rations all the time.
But I’d sure like to get a newspaper that’s
newer than five or six days so I can find out
what's going on in this Korean War.”

Ss eee
Ce UU a dyEI EEE SSIES IEEE

Life Depends on Trees
To the Editor, the Advocate
SIR,—Please allow me, through
the medium of your newspaper
to call to the attention of the men
and women of the island the
deplorable condition of our trees.
will mention a few of them
which are a shocking sight!

The Evergreen tree in Trafal-
gar Square, near the Broadway

' Dress Shop, has been mutilated
and slowly killed. The Tree
Guard from around it was re-

moved and the people have driven
nails.into it and cut off bits of
the bark for kindling. A box has
been nailed to it and a barber's
shop has been established aroun:

Evergreen trees planted by my
Uncle, Mr. Sam Manning in Fair-
child Street, There were seven;
one is dead, one is slowly dying,
and the other five are very sick
trees. Soon we shall have no trees
at all there, Nails are driven into
these trees and wallets and
buckets ete., are hanging on them,
Boxes, quite large ones, are placed
among the branches for safe
keeping, and these trees are used
as urinals by the people who work
in Fairchild Street.

= Then the Evergreen tree in the
Triangle in the Garrison, facing
Highway No. 7 and near to Dr,
Klevan. Two posts, one belonging
to the Electric Company and one
to the Gas Company have been

Agriculture has most kindly given is there anyone who is pushing
the Civic Cirele several hundred ahead for this to be made easier
trees and shrubs for distribution to the U.S.A. and countries that
to the Elementary schools. When our people prefer? I have seen
I think of the way we are defraud-,Barbadians work admirably in
ing our children and what they America, and why can’t they be
will say of us in the next twenty helped to get out to large coun-
or thirty years, I shudder. What tries: America will benefit by
can we do to bring to men’s West Indian emigration and will
minds the realisation of their strengthen our fraternity with

dependence upon trees and the Uncle Sam.
urgent importance of uniting for There should also be some dis-
their protection and replenishment tinction made for our young
for those that come after us? women who are sent to the U.K.
The very air we breathe is I do not see how they can pay
purified by trees. Trees enrich the back the Government out of small
soil and enable food to be grown. wages. After all, women first, and
Trees affect our water supply. help should be given free to the

Trees are God's Cathedral. weaker sex.
NELL MANNING. There is great dissatisfaction

the roots. Two posts belonging erected close to the tree in this No. 15, Block A., that there is so much red tape to

to” the Electric Company have small triangle and the side of the Garrison, getting out to free countries.

been “erected close to it so that tree to the Highway is cut straight + Michael 17 COUNTRYMAN.

the wires are entangled in its up, as if it were a hedge, so that

branches and the tree is trimmed the light from the Gas can illum- Women And Tape Thanks

to the liking of this company inate Highway No. 7, The tree To the Editor, the Advocate To the Editor, the Advocate

whenever it chooses to do so. s there first. “qe SIR—In the many talks about SIR—We ave deeply apprecia-
Next, please note the line of ! know that the Director of emigration and its urgent need, tive of the public spiritedness dis-

4 t

played by the Barbados Electors
Association for the present of one
set of boxing gloves offered to tha
winner of our recent Intercolonial
Middleweight bout held at Brigh-
ton Sports Club.

Our thanks are also due to Capt.
Arthur Jones, secretary of e
Association, through whom the
present was obtained.

LIGHTFOOT KID
EVERTON LAMPITT
Promoters,

Hard

To the Editor, the Advocate
SIR,—Please allow me to write
on behalf of “poor shoppers” who
are told in some of the large
Groceries that they cannot buy

one pound of sugar or half pound
ef butter, it must be a larger
amount,

We are already hit hard by the
prices we have to pay for our
daily food, and this makes it

harder yet. If we have a
to spend our merchants
realise the need and also sell
their goods in small quantities
so that the poor man may bc
able to get a taste of what others
buy in double ®
R MAN,

Russia’s Move

To the Editor, the Advocate

SIR,— acorns grow, I hope this
plea’ may bear fruit.

Fires of antagonism are burn-
ing in Korea, lovers are
praying, and all nations tc
bring about a peaceful settlement.

Let us pray that Russia will
distinguish herself by calling a
halt on North Koreans and their
atrocities. We are not cowards.
but peace and progress go to-
gether for “mothers weep, and the
earth shall shriek, if men by war
must die.”

ANTI-BLOODSHED

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TUESDAY, 25,

JULY

1950





Lorry Driver Pleads ‘Not
Guilty’? Of Manslaughter

Case Resumes Today

J

ULIAN GREENIDGE, middle aged lorry driver, pleaded
“not guilty” of the manslaughter of 70-year-old Rosa

Small, as the July sitting of the Court of Grand Sessions
continued yesterday. Hearing of the case occupied the
attention of the Court all day, and will be resumed at
10 a.m. today. The jury who are trying the case went
yesterday evening to see the scene of the accident which
caused Small her life on March 11 this year.

His Honour the acting Chief Justice, Mr. G. L. Taylor, is
presiding over the Court. Defence Counsel is Mr. E. K.
Walcott, K.C., associated with Mr. J. S. B. Dear. Mr. W. W.
Reece, K.C., Solicitor General, is conducting the case for

the Crown.
Rosa Small was fatally inj

ured on Howell’s Cross Road

after the ‘bus from which she had just alighted was struck
by a lorry coming in the opposite direction.

Alvin Shepherd one of the wit-}when the accident occurred. She

nesses for the Prosecution did not
conclude his evidence in reply to
Mr. Walcott’s cross-examination,
He was allowed to leave the stand
after he began to sway as if he
would faint.

Mr. Reece outlined the case to
the Jury, after which Sgt Nathan-
iel Gaskin took the witness stand.
He said he had been to the scene
soon after the accident occurred,
and there had seen the ’bus X-994
drawn up facing the direction of
Two Mile Hill and the lorryM-1180
on the opposite side of the road—
the left—facing the direction of
Belle Gully. The lorry was laden
with canes some of which had
dropped on the road.

Smelled Alcohol

He talked to the accused and
smelled alcohol on him. He took
him to Dr. Massiah later, and the
accused also saw his own doctor,
Dr. Scott.

The ’bus was damaged to the
right front part, and the lorry on
the left front fender. He saw a
spot of blood on the wall. Witness
then gave details of the measure-
ments of the road, the vehicles and
a tyre mark. Continuing he said
that accused had seen Dr. Massiah
about 2.50 p.m. the same day, and
Dr. Massiah had next day per-
formed a post mortem examination
of the body of the deceased.

Dr. H. Massiah told the Court
that Small had been extensively
injured. Describing some of the
injuries, he mentioned a large con-
tusion of the left side of the abdo-
men and pelvis; numerous other
small lacerations and bruises, a
contusion of the right side of the
skull; the small intestine was
ruptured in many places; the
liver and spleen were both rup-
tured; the skull was fractured and
so was the neck.

In his opinion death was due
to shock and haemmorhage follow-
ing the injuries.

He had also examined the
accused. He smelled of alcohol,
but he (witness) could not say
that he had been incapable of
managing a motor vehicle.

To Mr. Walcott: Accused when
I examined him had contra-
indications of drunkenness. His
speech was steady, and he could
answer me coherently, He talked
quite well. The tongue was clean
and moist. He recognised me, call-
ing me, “Mr. Hal” and he was
able to explain the accident to me.

Son's Evidence

Wilfred Small, son of the
deceased, said he had last seen his
mother alive at 11 o'clock on
Marchi 11, 1950, He identified her
body to Dr. Massiah for purposes
of the post mortem examination.

Verona Odessa McClean
of Gittens Road, My Lords
Hill, Headteacher of Belmont
Girls’ School, said that on
March 11, she was going
home in a Route 20 ’bus about
1,30 to 1.45 p.m. As the ’bus
reached Howell’s Cross Road
it stopped a little before it
reached the bus stop. The
road curves at that point. She
believed it curved to the
right.

“I was sitting in the second
long row behind the driver on
the extreme right. I knew the
deceased very well. When I
got in the ’bus I saw her in
the back seat. I presumed the
bus stopped to deliver a
parcel. As soon as it stopped
I heard Rosa tell me boodbye.

I replied.

Lorry Travelling Quickly

“IT saw a lorry laden with canes
coming from the opposite direction
—that of Howell’s Cross Road, In
the twinkling of an eye, I heard
the sound of breaking glass
The lorry was fairly close to the
*bus when I first saw it. I can
only say it was travelling quickly.

The ’bus was standing on the
left and the impact took place on
the right.

“The position of the lorry was
such that I thought it would have
been a head-long collision. I held
in the passenger next to me. We
both screamed. When I looked up
I saw Rosa Small lying in the
right gutter. Her foot seemed to
have been injured. I remained
where I was until the police’came.
Then I walked home.

“At the time of the impact the
‘bus was stationary. The lorry wes
travelling. The bus did not move
after the impact. The lorry was
laden with canes. I saw a few in
the road when I got out of the
*bus. I did not know the driver of
the lorry.

To Mr. Walcott: I only presume
that the bus stopped to deliver a
parcel.

Lorry Jammed Into Seat

Miss Harding, a Seamstress, said
she was a passenger in the ’bus



What’s on Today

Court of Grand Sessions
and Police Courts 10 a.m
Speech Day and Prize
Giving at Coleridge School
2.30 p.m.
Meeting of the House of
| Assembly 3 p.m.



had been in the same seat as Mrs.
McClean. She had not seen Rosa
Small in the ’bus, but she heard
her voice when she said “good-
bye Mrs. McClean.”

The lorry had jammed into the
seat of the *bus where the driver
was, The ‘bus was stationary on
the right side of the road, Each
vehicle was on its proper side.
The lorry was driving swiftly,

Mr. Reece: If both were
travelling on their proper side
how did they collide.

Witness: I do not
suppose it was the speed.

To Mr Walcott: The lorry came
around a “blind” curve.

Ernest Johnson who works on
the Government’s Waterboat was
another passenger in the "bus. He
said he had seen Rosa Small in
the "bus. She was in the rear seat
also. He did not know why the
*bus stopped, but it stopped about
10 yards away from the pole.

Lorry On Left Side

“Small got out of the ’bus and
passed to its rear. She reached
the post on the opposite side of the
‘bus. I saw the lorry coming from
the direction of Howell’s Cross
Road. When I saw it first, it was
about 15 feet away, driving on the
left side. The right part of the
lorry struck the right side of the
"bus. It came round the corner
swiftly. After it had passed I saw
the woman lying in the gutter.

“I knew the accused by sight
before that date. I assisted with
putting Rosa Small into the police
van. The old lady was near the
steps of a home belonging to one
Miss Shepherd. Some canes drop-
ped off the lorry onto the road.
I went with Rosa Small to the
Hospital. When the accident oc-
curred, the ‘bus was still station-
ary. It was very close—about a
foot from the gutter.

After the lorry came to a stand-
still it did not move until the
police came.

To Mr. Waldaott: Before the
crash came, the ‘bus driver had
just “revved” up the engine. The
‘bus was facing directly ahead.
The ’bus was about 18 feet from
the curve. The curve is one you
cannot see around. You could see
the canes as the lorry was
coming, The ’bug pole was clear
around the curve. I told the
Magistrate that the lorry was
travelling “at a fairly fast rate.”
That is correct. I did not have
much time to judge the rate.

Stopped 30 Yards From
Main Road
Next witness was Samuel Rouse,
licenced driver of a motor vehicle.
He was the driver of the "bus in-
volved in the collision. He said:
“I was travelling along Howell’s
Cross Road. I heard the noise of
an engine, and I decided to stop.
I stopped about 30 yards from
Pelle Gully main road.
“When I first heard the engine
I did not see the vehicle, but it
appeared in no time. It was an
Austin truck laden with canes, It
was dead on my side. The truck
came around a curve. The curve
was about 35 yards away from

know. I

the bus. I had not come to the
stop pole yet.
Mr. Reece: Why could you not

see the lorry before it was more
than 18 feet away, if you could
see the curve at the distance you
indicated?

Witness: “I saw the Iorry when
it appeared around the corner. I
heard a crash. I had lowered
away my head. The lorry hit my
right front fender. Glass on the
right side of the bus was smashed.
I heard that a woman was dead.

“T got out and saw nosa Small

lying in the gutter. I saw the
accused in the road, and he told
me he was the driver, The lorry
was dead on my side. I guess
that the lorry was about three
feet on my side.

Heard Hum Of Engine
To Mr, Walcott:

a curve ahead of the ’bus.

tee nietesnunsn sana

I told the
Magistrate that at the point
where the "bus stopped, there *
said that around the curve there

stop long enough for an old woman
to get out—not in my opinion.

“If I believe that danger is
ahead I will pull up anywhere.
The police measured that I pulled
up three feet from the gutter. The
stop pole on the other side of the
road would not be far from where
I stopped.

The curve is a deep curve. You
can come around it dead on the
left according to the speed at which
you are driving.

Seven Miles Per Hour

Re-examined: I would say one
could go around that curve at
about seven miles an hour to
keep on one’s left side.

Fitz-Gerald Reece, a painter of
} Howell’s Cross Road, another of
the passengers on the bus said he
was sitting in the same seat as
Rosa Small. He told about Small’s
getting out after the bus had
stopped, and of hearing the rolling
of a vehicle. He first saw the
lorry when it was about 30 yards
away.

After the lorry hit the bus,
witness said, it drove on a few
yards away. He got out and saw
Small lying in the gutter. The
police came and took her away.
He did not see when Rosa Small
was actually hit.

“When I first saw the lorry it
was off its side. I did not hear a
horn blow. The lorry was travel-
ling fairly fast

Both Kept Left

To Mr. Walcott: Before the
Magistrate I pointed to a distance
which was agreed upon as 25 te 30
feet. I think the distance of 25 to
30 feet is right. I told the Magis-
trate that the lorry was on its left
side, and the bus was on its left
side. That is correct. Rosa Small
was sitting in the middle of the
rear seat. She said goodbye Miss
Mc Clean. She had to climb over
about two people after taking up
two baskets and then she had to
get out of the bus and walk be-
hind the bus to the other side of
the road. I think the. bus must
have been stationary for about five
minutes before the lorry arrived.

At this stage Mr. Walcott sug-
gested that the jury be allowed to
visit the scene of the accident.

Mr, Reece agreed.

The Court adjourned for lunch-
eon,

On resumption Evans Elcock, an
agricultural labourer, told his ver-
sion of the accident. He was on
the lorry at the time. There were
ten people In the canes and one
was inside the hood with Green-
idge.

Slid Off Platform

When the accident occurred, he
slid off the platform and canes
came behind, On the trip down
from Christ Church the driver
stopped at a shop. The truck came
across Howell's Cross Road very
fast. The driver quarrelled with
Doris for using bad language.
Doris and his (witness’) wife
were quarrelling. The driver did
not tell anyone that if they did
not behave he would not take
them,

The lorry travelled about 20 feet
after the canes hit the old lady. He
ran back to his step because he
felt it would hit the bus. It turned
the corner wide.

Alvin Shepherd of Belle Gully
said he left home to catch a bus.
He saw a bus coming up. When
he came out from home he saw
Rosa Small standing on the
opposite side of the road from
where the bus was, She was
against the kerb,

He saw a motor lorry coming
around the corner-—M, 1180-—
coming from Two Mile Hill side
He saw the canes on vhe lorry
hit the bus. He had run back toi
his steps when he saw the lorry. }

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Bonito
Replace
Flying Fish

During the present lull in the

flying fish season the Fishery
Department is hoping to launch
the Ring Net with a view to

capturing bonito in large numbers
Up to the moment, however, these
fish have only been seen in
shallow water where it is not
possible to use the net as it would
be badly mangled on a rough and
shallow bottom,

This information was given by
the Fishery Officer when inter-
cures by the “Advocate” yester-
ay.

THE COST OF LIVINC
Clerks’ Union last night wh
Cemmissioner, spoke on La

250 SING AT
MUSIC FESTIVAL
The seeond of a series of Schoo.

concerts orgafused by teachers o1

auementary Scnools was held av
Combermere on rriday iast. A

He said that the present luli !*!F ot 200 children Was seiecteu
usually takes place about this irom amongst the pupils of the
time of the year on the approach| Vesiey Halt Boys’, ine Wesiey

of the hurricane season, usually
regarded by fishermen as from
July 15 to October 10.

Only 30 Boats Fishing

At this time about 95 per cent
of them haul their boats up on the
beach and this only leaves roughly
about thirty boats to go after
bream and snappers. At this time
too, extensive potting is usually
started with a view to selling the
fish to the poorer classes of per-
sons, bream and snappers being
more within the buying capacity
of the other groups.

What might make up in some
measure for the fish shortage that
will now be experienced due to
the drastic decrease in the num-
ber of fishing boats in use, said
the Fishery Officer, is the sea egg
season which gets underway in
another six weeks’ time.

Research Work

The “Investigator”, he said, will
be carrying out research work
throughout the year with the
exception of a short spell for
docking It was hoped during
this work to augment the island's
fish supply by, any captures that
might be made. An important
phase of this research work would
be the charting of inshore fishing
banks known and unknown.

Consideration was being given
for the importation of gill net
mesh suitable for the capture of
flying fish, said the Fishery OM-
cer, and boat owners desirous of
placing orders for such meshing
should communicate with him as
soon as possible.



Separation Bill
In House Today

When the House of Assembly
meet today members may resume
debate on the second reading of
a Bill to amend the Dog License
Act, 1902.

They may also resume debate
on the second reading of a Bill
to amend the law relating to Sep-
aration and Maintenance.

Another matter that may be
considered is a _ Resolution to
approve of the Book of Reference
and Plan of the proposed extension
of waterworks in the Parish of
St. Michael.

Under Private Members’ Busi-
ness Mr. Smith will move the
passing of an Address to His
Excellency the Governor relating
to the use of Tractors by the
Peasantry.

Mr. Mapp may also move the
passing of an Address to His
Excellency the Governor relating
to the fixing of a minimum wage
for employees sufficient to ensure

them a reasonable standard of
living.
Mr. Garner may move the

passing of an Address to His
Excellency the Governor request-
ing a greater release of hard cur-
rency in order that more of our
essential supplies may be pur-
chased outside the sterling area.



Gittens Acts For
Auditor General

Owing to the retirement of Mr.

Kosa Small also tried to get UP; f. A. Newsam, Auditor General,

and pulled her back into vhe road,

to his steps but the canes hit |
1

Witness III |

At this stage the witness be-
| came ill.

Doris Carter of Collymore Rock
was travelling on the _ lorry.
She saw the bus standing station-
ary. She heard the crash, and
when Greenidge pulled his brakes
she fell off. When she gov up
she saw an old woman lying on

the road. She (Witness) got her
foot and eye hurt. She went to
nospital

To Mr. Walcott: I did not go

into the shop, so I do not know
if anybody drank rum, Elcock’s
wife cursed me when we were
coming down in the vruck, The
driver threatened to put off
Elecock and his wife, Greenidge
biew the horn before he came
around the corner.

Re-examined. Both Elcock and
his wife were cursing.

Fitz Gerald Walcott, Rock
Blaster Supervisor at the Pine
Quarry, said he was travelling on
vhe bus on the day in question.
He told a similar story to that
told by other witnesses.

At this stage further hearing
was adjourned, and the jury went
vo the scene of the actident.

are two walls, one on each side.

I stopped the
hand side.

around the curve.

feet away from where I stopped.

I pointed and indicated the dis-
A policeman suggested

tance.
18 feet.

“I read my statement before the
I cannot remember
reading the words “eighteen feet.”
I stopped

Magistrate.

I told the Magistrate
| because I heard the humming o
}an engine. I saw the lorry as soo!
as it came around the curve.



| from the witness stand

| dock.
“I did not know that Rosa Sma:

to

got out. I did not hear anyone|

|say boodbye Miss McClean.
| did not stop to deliver a parcel

I just had the time to stop when

the lorry came around. I did no

*bus on the left
I heard the hum-
iming of an engine but I could
not see what it was at this stage.
I then saw a lorry coming
I did not
actually say the curve was 18

stopped my bus about the distance
the}



Payment Deferred)
In Corfu Channel
° ° ca
Mining Dispute
LONDON, July 24
Britain’s Foreign Under-Secre-
tary Ernest Davies told the House
of Commons to-day that discus-
sions with Albania about payment
damages for mining British ships
in the Corfu Channel had so far
been “inconclusive”’.
if The International Court award-
,,ed Britain £843,000 for the min-

jjing in 1946 of two destroyers in
which 44 men lost their lives.

He said a third discussion be-
tween the two countries’ represen-
tatives took place on July 17.

]

His Excellency the Governor has
been pleased to give directions for
the appointment in an acting
capacity of Mr. C. D. Gittens,
Senior Clerk, Audit Office, to the
post of Auditor General, with
effect from the 23rd of July, 1959.



2,000 NEW
LICENCES
In Christ Church

OVER 2,600 bicycle licences
have been sold in Christ Church
during the present year. That
number is only just below a third
of the 8,574 licences which have
been sold in St, Michael, but the
parochial Treasurer of that parish
told the Advocate today that there
is every indication that a record
number will be sold this year.

This time last year only 2,100
had been issued and the total
number had been 2,700.

In St. George 1,451 have been
issued so far,

8,346 Drivers

Licences Issued

'

| EIGHT thousand, three hun-
dred and forty six drivers’
licences have been issued to driv-



—

ers since June 21 and 206 con-
ductors’ licences, The Traffic
Department which issues the

licences is crowded throughout the
day and the duty policemen have
a busy period.

os. BaSerzuerre

| este een a ees eo ea a ee
a FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR
PETS ......

PURINA LICE
| a

Another meeting would take}
I) place shortly and the British a
would have to consider “turning e a

}to other remedies” if this also w

l Reuter.

iclusive

PURINA INSECT KILLER
H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.

Hail Girls’, the St. Mary's Boys
and the St. Mary’s Giris’ Schools.

The Police Band under the
direction of Captain C. E, Raison,
wl.B.E., A.R.C.M., accompameu
the singing of the Choir and also
contributed a numoer of Instru-
mental items to the Programme,

The items were well renderea
and well received by the audience,
but those given the greatesi
applause were : “A Shepherd Kept
sSneep”, a modern composition by
fric H. Thiman, and two Negro
Spirituals “Standin’ in the Neeu
of Prayer” and “Jericho”. The
last named was given an encore

Poor Attendance

The attendance, however, was
rather disappointing,

At the close of the programme,
Mr. L. T. Gay moved a vote of
thanks making special mention ot
Captain Raison and of the teachers
and pupils who had worked so
hard in order to stage the concert
He spoke of Captain Raison who
not only loved music, but also
people and especially children
He ventured to suggest that the
West Indies should make use of
Captain Raison’s .services as
Director of Musical Education.
He also expressed the hope that
the love of community singing
which was widespread forty o1
fifty years ago would be awakened
in Barbados, This was one of the
objects of the Music Festival

The audience included Major
C. Glindon Reed and Mrs. Reed,
Mr. E. C. M. Theobalds, Miss
B. Arne, Mr. W. H. Carter, Mr
Douglas Carter, Mr and Mrs. H
A. Tudor, Mrs. E. D. Mottley,
Mrs. D. C. Moore, Mrs. L. T
Gay, Rev. and Mrs. E. New, Mr.
A. G. Jordan, Miss M. Griffith,
Miss Balgobin, Miss I, Alleyne,
Miss G. Denny and Mr. G. Hudson.

B.T.C. Has
Triple Tickets

Prize Over $38,000

Sweepstake tickets in triple
series will be sold this Mid-
Summer Meeting for the first time
in the history of the Barbados
Turf Club, Mr, G. A. Lewis,
Secretary, told the “Advocate”
yesterday.

The Turf Club completed the
selling of Series YY yesterday and,
will begin to sell Series ZZ today.

On the completion of YY, the
first prize is estimated to be in
the vicinity of $38,148.

Only 11 days are left for the
selling of tickets at the Turf Club.
Ticket vendors are working hard
to sell as much as they can before
the races start on Monday, August
‘







DECISION
OF 10/- FINE
CONFIRMED

The decision of Mr. S. H
Nurse, Magistrate of District “E”,
who imposed a fine of 10s. anc
3s. costs in seven days or in
default 14 days’ imprisonment
with hard labour on Alphonza
Rowe of Half Moon Fort, St.
Lucy, for unlawfully assaulting
Doris Jackson of Sutherland Hil)
St. Lucy, on April 4 was con-
firmed yesterday by Their Honour
Mr. H. A. Vaughan and J. W
B. Chenery, Judges of the Assis
tant Court of Appeal.

Rowe was also ordered to pay
the costs of appeal which amount
ed to 8/4.

Pays $4.80 For
Stealing 53 Cents

William Beckles a
year-old labourer of
Land, wag fined 20s. or in defaul!
sentenced to one month's impris
onment with hard labour, wher
he appeared before Mr. H. A
Talma, City Police Magistrate



nineteen-

for the larceny on July 24 of 53

cents, the property of Edwir
Bailey. Beckles was also finec
10s. for resisting Constable Mapry
when given into custody



Case Dismissed

The case in which Beatrice Roet

| Blackguarding
|

Mr

0

fined 30s. and 2s. costs by
; L. Walwyn, Magistrate
{District “A” for blackguarding ot
Barbarees Hill on November 7



1949 was dismissed on its merits

yesterday by Their Honours Mr
J. W. B. Chenery and Mr. H
A. Vaughan, Judges of the Assis-
tant Court of Appeal.

te sees USE
POWDER

Distributors.

SSenrpepeeeerspuagaes
o\) @ SS SRRBSBSSEHBBRBaae



Holder’: |

of Thorne Gap, St. Michael was |



To |C.0.L. Index Has

Limitations

+ INDEX was explained to the

en Mr. E. S. Burrowes, Labour |

bour Statistics.

There are two types of Cost of Living Indices he said

|

(i) Those comparing living
costs at different times in
the same place and

(ii) Those comparing living
costs in different places at
the same time.

The purpose of the first cost of

living index is to measure changes s
in retail prices, not in the stand-|%

ard or level of living. To em-

phasise this the name of the Cost x
of Living Index in the United|\

Kingdom has been changed to *
“Index of Retail Prices” and in the|/% a, en aa : bs
United States of America to “Con- x AGAREX COMPOUND GLYCERINE and
sumers Price Index”. \ BISMAREX POWDER THYMOL COMPOUND
During the war and the years x CHEMICAL FOOD
following it, such indices have), COD LIVER EMULSION KAOLIN POULTICE
been used for other purposes in| KIDNEY & BLADDER MILK Of MAGNESIA
addition to the function of meas-]%& PILLS
uring price changes. They have % 5 Vi eee ao
been useful in indicating the]\ COLD and INFLUENZA SYRUP OF
success or failure of price con-] MIXTURE HYPOPHOSPHITES
trol. % Obtainable from all Branches of
Indices have been watched to} \
see that they did not move, be-|sS
cause of the changes in wages % KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

which would have followed such

movement.
Food items included in the
index have been subsidised to

keep down their retail prices. In
such cases the indices have ceased
to reflect the general movement
of the prices of all items, but they
continue to reflect the movement
of the prices of the items included
in the index

Statistics

As far back as 1925, a resolution
of the second International Con-
ference of Labour Statisticians,
said: “In each country statistics
should be published showing
changes in the cost of living.

They should cover the food,
clothing, heating and _lighting,!
rent and miscellaneous groups.

Each group should include the
most important items of consump-
tion, and especially those articles
the price changes of which may
be taken as representative of
changes in the prices of articles
not included.”

Another resolution read: “In
view of existing inadequacy of
statistics of consumption, the most
satisfactory method of determin-
ing the weights of the different
items and groups appears to be
that based on a standard family
budget obtained as the result of
an enquiry into the average ex-
penditure of a number of families
during a given period

Where statistics of family
budgets are not available, statis-
tics of aggregate consumption may
be of some value in the determin-
ation of the relative importance of |
certain articles of consumption in
the country as a whole, account
being taken of the fact that cer-;
tain articles are used for purposes |
other than human consumption

Theoretical budgets computed
from all information available
may also be used,”

The .weights in

cost of living
indices are now

based usually

PAGE FIVE





———

|| Boys Here's A Bargain...

| PENKNIVES
CHEAP !! CHEAP !!

ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 3301—High Street

















|






*

—LPLEE LPP














Is :
A MUST with ty
. : eS
* ” ah ; . a Ne »
s [ te
7 THE BRAND YOU
s :

s
md
*

J

.

‘
.

REXALL

RENOWNED THE WORLD OVER

.

“+

oA EAE



SSPE AAA PLO

HABITS UN S—s0000 seco
SACK-TRUCKS

ALL STEEL — 1,000 Ibs CAPACITY
With Cast Iron Wheels
With Rubber Wheels







ALL METAL
WHEEL-BARROWS

STRONG AND DURABLE — 3 cubic feet capacity
SUITABLE FOR CONTRACTORS, ETC.

oe

ONLY $14.51 EACH



“RUBEROID"
ROOFING FELT

GREEN MINERALIZED SURFACE
A Low Priced, Long Lasting,, Efficient

Waterproof Cover for all Roofs

92 CENTS PER SQ. YARD





enauiries; and the standard
which the cost of living index
usually relates is that of the wage-
earner group.

The Process

In most countries an index is
first instituted for the capital city
and covers wage-*arners and
sometimes clerical workers and
salaried employees. Then particu-
lar cities are covered, and after-
wards farmers and other groups.

With farmers usually only cash
»xpenditure is taken; items pro-
duced are not taken into account
Sometimes there is a special index
for a group e.g. the East Indians
on Sugar Estates in British
Guiana

The consumption habits of sal-
aried employees may be different
to such a degree that a special
index is desirav‘e

Requirements for all special
index numbers must, however, be

onsidered in relation to funds
available Finally there is a
national index for the whole
population weighted either by
otal consumer purchasers or on
an average of the trends in the
ities and other localities for
@ On Page 7












'



||] Seenery Luncheon
Cloth each . $10.00

Scenery Luncheon

Cloth (linen) $13.00
| Scenery Guest
| Towels $ 2.00
Ladies’ Scenery
Belts $ 3.00



upon the results of family nye |
to

Such beautiful scenery!

HARRISON’'S—Hardware Specialists

road Street

eo OF eee

for evecy

occasion
tt A ney,

on sale at the
| leading Stotes






Such beautiful hand work!

SCENERY LINEN HANKY
SCENERY LINEN

SACHETS—Ea. $3.50
HANDKERCHIEFS—Each $1.50

CAVE SHEPHERD & C0., LID.

10, 11,12 & 13 Broad Street



































PAGE SIX



HENRY














BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, wy 3
BY CARL -ANDERSON if |
“eesas a





>)

" Ww
NOT JUST aba

| |
| BAD LUCK! ;- a

Troubles can be foreseen and

prevented when one is forearmed

with knowledge. We know that grazing

cattle will pick up intestinal worms,

which cause anaemia, loss of condition,

and scouring. These parasites

can be controlled by routine dosing A. Ie
with ‘Phenovis’ brand Phenothiazine. __ ~<~xa=q

eee TT
D

THE MARK
OF DISTINCTION

' im ROM
Diended & Bottled by

| STUART & SAMPSON
H LID.

ib
1 4¢
ee









BY WALT DISNEY





a























WE'LL WATCH FOR A MASKED
MAN AND AN INDIAN,
SHERIFF.

OUT Now,

DON'T WANT fy
SLEEPER.

=) ANYONE TO
HAVE REASON TO
THINK T HAD AHAND

Nager 'N HIS DEATH, |



GIVES ME AN (DEA!

i. O CANNON...

—

YES, MY.DEAR, THANKS TO.SIGNOR.. “WELL, WHOEVER DID IT,
CANNON, BUT YOU ARE MISTAKEN, ] THEY"VE WASTED NO TIME-
CANNON, iN SUSPECTING ALBERTO. / SO NEITHEI? MUST WE. i'M











“TOR FATHER?
ARE VOU

(i







ALL RIGHT? HE HAS BEEN WITH ME FORA OFF 70. Ju: ANGLO-ITALIAN
\MANY VEARS. ran NLU Lt BE
" =< i A BACK LATER,
Ae he
. iS pL (200 S r

BOY’ THIS FARM LIFE ISNT

| BAD-I'M GONNA JUST
DOWN HERE AND TAKE

( GOOD SNOOZE :



f






8





\ ny"
Wt dy





RIP KIRBY

acuity
~ © { 44! HERE IT 1S, RIP,..THE WHOLE
Do! STORY... THE JULIET IN YOUR

OTO IS BINGO JULIE!
ED HER. IN A LONELY

THE COPS ALMOST HAD HER ON A MURDER RAP...

SHE HOOKED’ A CHUMP IN A MAIL ORDER ROMANCE...

HE DISAPPE-\RED... EVERYTHING
POINTED TO JULIE, BUT SHE
WAS TOO SMART... THEY
COULON'T PINI IT ON HERI



—

LARRY,
I'D LIKE TO
SEE ALL YOUR
CLIPS ON BINGO
; JULIE!

WE ONLY WOE
NAGS. I'LL GET RID OF

THE REST+>

eineee

“ht

THE SHERIFF (S LOOKING FOR A MASKED
MAAN AND AN INDIAN. HE THINKS THEY
KILLED’ THE BARBER. THAT

| TAD.

oa. S iy

(ESS A ; i
4)



ty

‘ CO) Wyatt hy
y






Lia
Mint) 4
y li My ( ee
“ir,










ory ey | PROCS SPIOOSGIS PSG POOe
llssia vation OSS 7) i? g
(Pr ABAD. : , ;
lo, J.| | (*PHENOVIS SS |
MEF UK) Pe eo 7 — oe r
See AZOARD | TRADE MARK ean : |
aay ak BRAND PHENOTHIAZINE —= qe Xt

|



SE



Ay
¢
\ ‘

RODUCT

*PHENOVIS”

AN LCL.






GROUND BLACK PEPPER!
Daily Powdered Whole Milk
Allson’s White Rolled Oats
Kraft Prepared Mustard
Cheese with Macaroni
Jelly

SSOVOCSS ISSO AFOSR

”
» Flavouring Essences
Moir's Custard Powder

| BRAND PHENOTHIAZONE :

34e, oz.
| The most certain Worm Killen Ths bea ee
| Yet Discovered. ea ne (Salted)

INCE & Co., Ltd.

“BUCK $7

SOLE IMPORTERS and DISTRIBUTORS IN LARBADOS

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) LTD.

POPEPPOESEFSOSOOSS

2720 = R

S9OSOSSSGOO
9995S 99S 9SS9F SS FESS CS 9999S SOS PIGS SSS OSSF

o

Messrs





ala

SOOO SOS OOCSOCE SS OSCE.












YOU'LL BE IN THE CLEAR, SLEEPER

Cleanse the system from blocd
THE SHERIFF WILL DIE AM’ THE

impurities; many sufferers froin
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and
minor skin ailments, can derive great
benefit from this well-known medicine.



HEALTH BENEFIT

* CONTAINS VITAMIN A & D
IN A DELICIOUS FORM

%* INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS
* ENSURES STRONG LIMBS

Im LIQUID or TABLET FORMA

Your Backache
may be due to sluggish Kidney Action

CUNRLES |
FIMIVERS






@
tol a. [F® IS NOT s0 when you
THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS AO SOUND TEETH IH OHHOREN | te eel ets aati
if WELL, IF IT ISN'T ALBERTO, t : muscles and joints, 7
IT 4S SOMEONE WHO common urinary




KNOWS HIS WAY ABOUT
THIS PLACE! S'LL HANG











vo comfort when might

AROUND THE CLUB AND eee relief by taking Doan’s

KEEP MY EARS OPEN. Kidney Pills. stimulate and
cleanse sluggish kidneys and 0 them t rid

the blood of excess uric acid and

which otherwise might collect in the and

cause distress. Doan’s Pills have helped i

let them help you.
HALF A CENTURY of success in relieving
ailments due to inadequate kidney action, is the
proud record of Doan’s Pills. Grateful men and
women of all ages use and recommend this i
diuretic and urinary untiseptic to their frie
and neighbours.

{ oe
Ask your % Pa,,
7 DOANS 5

EXPECTANT MOTHERS/

Haliborange

The nicest way of taking
HALIBUT LIVER OIL

Made by ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD., LONDON







TH’OLD MACHIN: For river...

MAKES ALOT OF










/
?

7 =) NOISE -I GUESS IT |
Sop ee - Make baby strong—so he oan be
) \ parmemmparsie edn



an important future citizen
need A&D Vitamins
. srg bones and a tod hal
your stamins en
Score’ , i‘ :
more than [ust a tonle=
it's POWERFUL NOURISHMENT

Scott’s Emulsion is « scientific ‘

tonic, rich in natural A&D
Vitamins, derful when


















Y

sb,





BY ALEX RAYMOND

OKAY, RIL I'LL \ IT’S A PROMISE...YOU'LL
SEND FOR THEM, } GET YOUR SCOOP,,.BUT
BUT I WANT AN I HOPE IT WON'T BE
EXCLUSIVE ON iT A MURDER .




Wie

SCOTT'S EMULSION

HIGH ENERGY FGOD TONIC

:
i wien
ee ang

Lvery Morris Marine engine

I dite the accumulated
nee of marine engineering
That is one reason
have achieved world-

© for their sturdy trust-
Lhe ability to keep on
ering power without a falter
the worst weather

a a
t the



OUTSTANDING MORRIS FEATURES
%& Low initial cost: low running cost

ondition %& High Power output: low fuel consumption

of their economy too,

easy maintenance you

se to instal one. There

fs a choice for the Job you have in

mind—- Petrol, Paraffin or Diesel
»perated

Â¥& Sturdy, year-after-year reliability
& Quickly accessible for maintenance
*& Approved by Lloyds for open sea service

Your dealer has details of the variety of equipment available, and will be
happy to give you advice and information On all special problems he has
the Morris Specialists behind him






PETROL: PARAFFIN ‘DIE SEL
Marine Engines

WALPAMUAS




;





tH
Walpamur Agents

$.P.MUSSON,SONSCOLTD- BARBADOS

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
| Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 |







TUESDAY, JULY





es SUNDAY ADVOCATE



CLASSIFIED ADS.

5 om ‘Telephone ‘2508.
THANKS

WE gratefulh

return thanks to all

who attended the Funeral of the late,
MRS. RETA FORDE, sent wreaths, |
flowers etc. or in any way expressed
their sympathy with us in our Bereave- |
ment

George Forde (Husband) Fiain and
Horace Sans (Step children!

25. 50-11

MRS. B. SMITH and family gratefully |
return thanks to all who attended the
funeral, sent wreaths or in any other



way expressed sympathy with them on |
the occasion of the passing of her dear
Husband JOHN WEEKS



25.7.50—In

———$_—_— an

IN MEMORIAM



In loving and never fading memory
of our dear beloved daughter and sis
ter, ELSIE HOPE, who fell asleep in}
Jesus on July 25th, 1948.

Out of a world of sorrow,

Into a heaven of rest,

God must have a beautiful garden,
For He always chooses the best

The flowers we place upon her grave



Will wither and decay,
But her memory will alway linger
In our hearts from day to day

Ever to be remembered by the Hope's

family .
25.7.50—In
IN LOVING MEMORY otf ISAAC
WHITE who died on 25th July 19

“To live in hearts, we've left behind,
Is not to die.”

Miss Daisy Hooper 25.7 .50—Ir





FOR SALE

ee

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR-
Saloon,
and in
Co., Ltd



H.P. 1948 four door
Driven, low mileage
condition Cole &

25.7.50—4n

Morris 8
Owner
first class

1934 Chevrolet Truck
Herbert, 55
25.7.50—2n

TRUCK—One (1)
A 1 condition, Apply to Cc.
Tudor St. City

CAR
Apply R. E Taylor

1948 Packard 17,000, miles
Hotel Royal
25.7.60—3n

CAR—1947 Austin 10 Saloon,

good condition, Phone 8225

very
22,.7.50—2n.

CARS. (2) 1947 Morris 10 saloons.
Very fine condition, (1) 1947 Morris 8.
(1) 1947 Vauxhall 10, Perfect condition,
qa) 1936 V—8 Ford Just completely
overhauled. (1) 1935 Chevrolet Sedan
(1) 1948 Singer Sports FORT ROYAL
GARAGE Ltd. Phone 4504

20.7.50—3n

EE aTrE
Farmall H. Tractor and Grass Cutjer
22.6 D. B. H. Apply to M. D Elliot.

Ashford Plantation, St. John
22.7.50—in

ee
MOTOR TRUCK—Ford, V-8 Truck 1941
model, in excellent condition, with new

tyres, and new Platform, Has latély
been completely overhauled, Price
$1200.00, J. R. Alleyne, Ebworth, St
Peter. 23.7 ,50—3n

PARSONS MARINE ENGINE
excellent condition, Court
Dial 4616 or 4569.

in
Garage
25.7.50—3n




——___————_ ————
TRUCK—(1)1948 Morris 5 ton_truck.
Excellent condition. FORT ROYAL

GARAGE LTD. Phone 4504.
20.7.50—3n.

VAN—New (1) ton Morris Van. Im-
mediate delivery. FORT ROYAL GAR-
AGE LTD, Telephone 4504.

20.7, 50—3n.





ELECTRICAL

REFRIGERATING UNIT—One 5 inch
by S-inch Twin Cyl. “Frick” Combined
Refrigerating unit with driving motor,
tubular condenser-receiver and with
freezing coils for 7,900 cu. ft. refrig-

eration capacity, all complete in work-

ing order Central Foundry Ltd
25.7.50—3n
EE
LIVESTOCK
MARE AND FOAL—The_ half bred
Mare “Dagmar”, by “O.T.C." out of a
H.B. Mare by “Silky”, with a Colt by
“Battlefront” 5 months old at_ foot



Mare has again been covered by “‘Battle-
front” this season, is very quict, and
well suited to plantation work. Price
£200. J, R Alleyne, Ebworth, St
Peter. Phone 91-20 23.7 .50—3n

POULTRY

POULTRY—Pure Bred Barred Ply-
mouth Rocks, from Cup Winning Exhibi-
tion Strain. Cockerels $5.00 each
Pullets 3'2 months old $4.00 each, Hens



$6.00 each. J. R. Alleyne, Ebworth
St. Peter, Phone 91-20. 23.7 .50—2n
MECHANICAL

—$—$——_—_-

TYPEWRITERS — Remington Portable
Typewriters limited number only.
Phone 4675, 23.7 .50—3n
——_—_—
MISCEL) ANEOUS
—_—<—<—<$$— $—— ————

CALYPSO RECORDS, forty eight
titles, only ten each, come and get
them.

A. BARNES & CO. LTD.
15,7.50—T.F.N.

ee

GRAMOPHONE SPRINGS — All sizes,
Reproducers, Electric Pick-up Arms
(Magnetic) at New Market Store, Cheap-
side, Dial 4579 25.7,.50—In

———————————

TYRES AND BATTERIES. Sizes 34 x
7, 32 x 6, 30 x 5 and other sizes, also
Oldham 17 plate batteries. Guaranteed
Enquire Auto Tyre Company ‘Trafalgar
Street. Phone 2696. 21,7,50—t.f.n.





PERSONAL





THE public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife GARDINE
SI > (nee Thomas) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed

by me
Sed. EDGETON SKEETE,
Spring Garden Village,
St. Lucy
25.7.50—2n

LE

Barbados Youth Movement

1937—1950

Now the police are becoming inter-
ested in boys, and coming forward to
do their part, this is now your oppor
tunity to help the Barbados Youth
Movement with 14 years of continued
success to its credit. Activities include
Religious and general knowledge; Unity

and Culture; Motto: Lord help us, lest
we fall.
Rev. L. BRUCE-CLARKE; Founder.
Rev. J. B. GRANT; Chaplain
Mrs. OLGA BROWNE,, Gen, Secty
24.9.50—in

————_ ——————

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of ANITA LOWE,
holder of Liquor License No. 1000 of
1950, in respect of premises viz:— A
board and shingle shop attached to
residence situated at Cleavers Hill, St
Joseph, for permission to use said Liquor
License at the following premises viz
A board and shingle shop attached to
residence, Bonwell, St. Josey.

Dated this 2ist day of July
To:—J. R. EDWARDS, Esq

Police Magistrate, Dist. “F"’

1960

Signed ALFRED GREENE |

Applicant
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “F”’, on Tuesday
Ist August 1950 at 11 o'clock, aur
J. R, EDWARDS,

Police Magistrate, Dist “F”
26.7.50—in.

























































i

‘om



FOR RENT





HOUSES

ROOTH-—One five
for forthcoming
running foot,
Club



foot Booth space
Meeting at $3.00 per
Apply Barbados Turf
23.7.50—3n



“GRANDALE,” St. Matthias Gap,
Hastings. Unfurnished, two-storey stone-



wall, 3 bedrooms, etc., garage, Servants*,
room. Available August Yst © Ferreira
2881 23.7.50—2n
nsec coneeial Ceerienrianeete

ROOMS—Large furnished rooms, very
cool running water With or without
board. Terms moderate. 10 minutes

walk to Clubs or City. Dial 3356.
25.7.50—t .f.n

—_——_——_—

ROOM-—Large Furnished Room, Cool



and airy at Bel Air, Richmond Gap
Dial 3663 22.7.50-—-2n
ROOMS Large furnished Rooms,
very cool running water. With or with- j
out board. Terms moderate. Ten et

utes walk to Clubs or City. Dial 3356. |
25.7,50—t.f.n

ee

THERSISDON—Maxwells Coast Road

Fully furnished, Linen and Cutlery can
be supplied. Apply Mrs. B. Lashley,
Dial 8417 33.7.50—in

TWO HOUSES - At Hastings, fur-
nished and unfummished, one having, 3
bedrooms and the other 4 bedrooms,

vith all modern conveniences Apply
Madam Ifill), “Elise Court’, Hastings.
235.7. 50—1.f n. |





HELP

—_——--

|
COOK—Someone who can cook well}

and do a small portion of housework
Apply to Mrs. Colin Goddard, Marine

Manor, Marine Gardens
23.7.50—2n



BOARDERS—At Private home in Hast-
ings. Rates reasonable. Phone 3317.
25.7.50—2n





PUBLIC NOTICES







£20 MONTHLY

EASILY earned at home in spare time
dealing in stamps. No experiences
necessary Suitable for either sex, 1
also contact you with Students in
Colonies and Dominions for pen cor-
respondents Enclose 2% stamp. Air
Mail only take fews days. F. Parting-
ton, Prospect House, 329 Wigan Road,
Leigh Lanes, England.

20.7.50.—30n.

























UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST
INDIES ECONOMIC RESEARCH

APPLICATIONS are invited for ap-
pointments to the research staff of the
above Institute from persons with #4
food honour's qualification in economics,
statistics, sociology or other allied social
sciences and with some experience iv
research Investigations may need to ve

undertaken in any part of the Brit/sh
Caribbean
Apoointments will be made a? an

appropriate point in the scale £400 x 25
—£500 or £600 x 25—£800, acer ording
to qualifications and experiengvs. One
appointment will be on the scale £800 x

25-—£1,000. There will be children’s
allowance of £50 p.a. for each child
up to a maximum of £150. Super-

annuation under F.9.S.U, Appoint-
ments will normally be for three years
in the first instance. Free passages are
provided.

Applications (six copies) giving names
ef three referees and full particulars
21 qualifications and experience should
be sent as early as possible to the
Director, Institute of Social and
Economic Research, University College
of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica,
B.W.I OR The Secretary, Inter-
University Council for Higher Education
im the Colonies, 1, Gordon Square,
London, W.C.1I. Further _ particulars
may also be obtained from the Director,
Institute of Social and Economic
Research, University College of the
West Indies 23.7.50—2n.

nl

NOTICE

THE MAYFAIR GIFT SHOP annoyn-
ces a new shipment of Dorothy Gray's
Beauty Preparationmay we help you to
choose your requirements.

25.7,.50—3n.

OFFICIAL NCTICE

BARBADOS
IN THE

(Equitable Jurisdiction)
PETER NIGEL HUAN JOHNSON— ‘
Plaintiff
MAUDE ETHELINE ST, CLAIR
BUTCHER .° ; Defendant

IN pursuance of an Order in this Court
in the above action made on the 16th
day of June, 1950, I give notice to all
persons having any estate, right or in-
terest in or any lien or incumbrance af-
fecting ALL that certain piece or parcel
of land (formerly part of the lands of
Hagegatt Hall Plantation) situate at Hag-
gatt Hall, Upper Cutting, in the parish
of Saint Michael and island aforesaid con~
taining by admeasurement one acre eight
and one half perches be the same more
or less (of which area eight and one half
perches are in a portion of a road in
common forming two of the boundaries
of the said parcel of land) butting and
bounding on lands now or late of J.
Wharton, on lands now or late of
Banfield and on two sides on the road
in common hereinbefore mentioned lead-
ing to the public road called Mapp Hill
or however else the same may butt and
bound., to bring before me an account of
their said claims with their witnesses,
documents and vouchers, to be examined
by me on any Tuesday, or Friday be-
tween the hours of 12 (noon) and 3
o'clock in the afternoon, at the Office of
the Clerk of the Assistant Court of Ap-
peal at the Court House, Bridgetown,
fore the 30th day of August, 1950, in order
that such claims may be ranked accord-
ing to the nature and priority thereof
respectively: otherwise such persons will
be precluded from the benefit of the said
Decree, and be deprived of all claim on
or against the said property.

Claimants are also notified that they
must attend the said Court on Wednes-
day, the 20th day of August, 1950, at 10
o'clock a.m, when their said claims will

be ranked.
Given under my hand this 16th day of
I. V. GILKES,

“ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPEAL

June, 1950,
Ag. Clerk of the Asst. Court of Appeal.





OFFICIAL SALE

BARBADOS
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPEAL
(Equitable Jurisdiction)
PETER NIGEL HUAN JOHNSON

MAUDE ETHELINE ST. CLAIR
BUTCHER ......:. ..... Defendant
NOTICE is hereby given that by virtue
of an Order of the Assistant Court of
Appeal dated the 16th day of June 1950,
there will be set up for sale to the high-
est bidder at the Office of the Clerk of
the Assistant Court of Appeal at the
Court House, Bridgetown, between the
hours of 12 (noon) and 2 o'clock in_the
afternoon on Friday, the Ist day of Sep-
tember 1950.

ALL that certain plece or parcel of land
(formerly part of the lands of Haggatt
Hall Plantation) situate at Haggatt Hall,
Upper Cutting, in the parish of Saint
Michael and island aforesaid containing
by admeasurement one acre eight and

Plaintiff

one half perches be the same more
or less (of which area eight and
one half perches are in a portion of

a road in common forming two of the
boundaries of the said parcel of land)
butting and bounding on lands now or
late of J. Wharton, on lands now or late
of V. Banfield and on two sides on the
road in common hereinbefore mentioned
leading to the public road called Mapp
Hill or however else the same may butt
and bound.

And if not then sold the said property
will be set up for sale on every succeed-
ing Friday between the same hours until
the same is sold for a sum not less than
£208. 6. 8

Dated this 16th day of June, 1950.

I. V. GILKEs,

Ag. Clerk of the Asst. Court of Appeal.

22.6.50.—3n.

o'clock a.m.



|

S. S. Alcoa Ranger,
Capt. Perry, from

4,819 tons net,
Aruba,

In Carlisle Bay

Yacht Leander, Sch. E, M. Tarnis Schooner Emanuel C, Gordon, 63 tons
Sch, Manuata, Sch. Burma D., Sch.| net, Capt. Patrice, from Cariacou,
Turtle Dove, Sch. W. L. Eunicia, Sch S.S. Comedian, 3,162 tons net, Capt’
Rosarene, Sch Gardenia W., on Wells, from Liverpool.

Timothy A, H._ Vansluytman, ‘ S.S. Tactician, 3,753 t Capt.
ae dey: an. BAe ‘actician, 3, ons net,

Smart, from Trinidad
Schooner Mary M. Lewis, 69 tons net,
Capt. Marshall, from British Guiana.
Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt.

Philip H. Davidson,
Sch. Reginald N. Wallace, Sch. Lydina
A

ARRIVALS
































Motor Tanker Rufina, 1,856 tons net, — A
St. Lucia. .
Ca nee From Schooner Lady Noeleen, 41 tons net,
anadian Cruiser, 3,935 tons) Capt. Noel, for Dominica.
net, Capt .O'Hara, from St. Lucia Schooner Wonderful Counsellor, 38
we net, Capt Alexander, for St
ucia
Schooner Frances W. Smith, 74 tons
PUBLIC ALES net, Capt. Hassel, for British Guiana
Passengers arriving by the SS
“Comedian” were-—-from Liverpool
M. J. Bhavmai, A. A. Feldman.
REAL ESTATE Passengers arriving by the Motor
Vessel “Canadian Cruiser'’ were
HOUSE & SMED ROOF—One (1) | from Dominica — Matilda William

Board & Shingle House and Shedroof

16fi. x 10ft. at Kew Road, Bank Hall S
St. Michael
Apply to: Mrs. EUNICE ARTHUR, CAWE
Bragg’s Hill,
ae. save ARRIVALS — By B.W.LAL

From TRINIDAD









LAND Desirable building site 4 | Molly O'Donnell, Josef Adamira, Nor-
Graeme Hall Terrace Dial 3430. bert Romeo, Mohomed Hosein, William
1.7,50—t.£.9. | Kauffman, Constance Clarke, Christine

—_-—— aaa ETT McLeod, Jennifer Siddall, Nel Skin

1,200 shares of $1.00 each ww B.

nivos COOPERATIVE BANK LIM- ner, Phillip Skinner, Granville mer,

Hyman Speyer, Frank Nothnagel, Claude

ITED The above will be set up for] Gaidry, Corenne, Gaidry, Thomas Bell
sale to public competition on Friday| Mrs. Bell, Miltom Cato, Silvia Criteh
next the 28th instant at 2 p.m. at OUP) jow, Joyce Smith, James Nicoll, Alex-
office in Lucas Street. ander Turner, Joan Reece, Robert
CARRINGTON & SEALY. Hutchinson, Soper Tinsler, Gloria Ban-
22.7.50—6n. | nister
From HAITI:

—
1 Acre 34 perches of land at Pilarim
Road, Christ Church.
The above parcel of land will be set | prom JAMAICA
up for sale by Public Competition at William Bailey, Robert Gregg, Eyria-
our Office No. 14 James Street, OM | cos Tzanidis. -,
Friday 28th July 1950 at 2.30 p.m. From GRENADA
The above parcel of land is the proper-

Arnold S. Khan

Harry Drew, Lionel Williams, Joshua
ty of Mr. f00n, CeOOD & BOYCE Thorne, Elma Da Breo, Esme Cum
Solicitors. ming, George Hanson, Patricia Jordon,
21.7.50—6n Neville Babb, Edward Powell
‘| From PUERTO RICO
TOWER GARAGE — Standing on| Odessa Gittens,
5,445 square feet of land at St. Mat-

From CARACAS:

Eric Emberson, Helen
Craig Emberson, Lillian
sel Ireland, Jennifer Ireland,
Dolanyi, Atilia Dolanyi, W.
Romer, Jose Alamo, Dolores
Huco Montes, Manela Montes, Ilz
Berko, Herrera Miguel, Ayel Boelcke,
Ludwik Molken, Anthony Schras,
Flsye Sehras, Hendryhus Schras, Elsye
Sehras, Jnr

DEPARTURES
For TRINIDAD:
Marilyn Netto, Mrs. Netto, John
Wooding-Deane, Mary Craig, Ignacita
Van den Branden, Carmencita Van den
Branden, Walter Hudson, Marguerite
nnn | Lyder, Shirley Marquez, Elsie Lume
PROPERTY—Tnas den, David Western, Marjorie Headley

fesirable property z
CL “cee Bul at. Marieant'’s “Village. | Satie’ Seen’ Lucien” eee

It consists of a substantially built two | sweeney, Patricia Sweeney Benny

thias Gap, Christ Church

The building is one recently erected
and built of stone and the site is an
excellent one for a garage

The building also lends itself for
easy conversion into a private dwel-
linghouse.

By Public Auction on Thursday 27th
July at 2 p.m. at the office of the
undersigned from whom further par-
ticulars and conditions of sale can be
obtained.

Emberson,
Ireland, Rus
Hedwig
Gerald
Alamo,

R. S. NICHOLLS & CO,, By. BN Aste

151, 152 Roebuck Street.
Telephone No. 7925.
71.7..0—8n.

storey stone house which has front and

back verandah, drawing and _= dining BRON ennai. Hiceiy a
rooms, three bedrooms, study, water | yyonne Perrin, Czarina Lathuillerie,
toilet and shower-bath, kitchen and] Norma Finning, Grace Viera, Roy
sete Pecoae aie ge Viera, Kenneth Sampson Stephen
acre of lan wi orchar yeneral ‘i

‘bus passes the door Price which is Sampson, Dorothy Cole, Janis Cole
extremely low is only £1400, For in- | For GUADELOUPE:

spection and other particular apply to

Angele Sarkis,
D'Arcy A. Scott. 22.7.50—2n. nee Td

marie Sarkis,
Sarkis
For ANTIGUA:
Joan Lake, Cecelia Ferrara.
For ST. LUCIA:
James Humfrey, Anthony Mitchell

one In Touch With
SWEEPSTAKE icuanien _ series pp| Barbados Coastal Station

0037. Finder please return same to the
Advocate Advtg. Dept Reward offered.
25,.7.50—1n.;

— ss

Agnes Sarkis,
Josette Sarkis,

Rose
Hugette





LOST & FOUND

—— =



Cable and Wireless (W.1I.) Ltd. advise
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through their Barba-
dos Coast Station:—





NOTICE S.S. Canadian Challenger, Bacha-
quero, Battle Mountain, Esso Charlotte,

Barbados Tagaland, Stony Point, Maria de Lar-
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF rinaga, Rufina, Aicoa Pennant, Lord
APPEAL Church, Esso Amsterdam, Regent Pan-

Re Workmen’s Compensation Act, 1943.| ther, Alcoa Partner, Athenic, S. Rosa,

Notice is hereby given that Lambert Cavina, Brazil, Powder River, S. Paula,
Green, of Bel Air, St. George, em- S. Mateo, Isle of Re, Esso Avalia,
ployed as a labourer at Lear’s Plan- Agathi, Sundale, Dageid, Canadian
tation, was injured whilst grubbing and| Cruiser, Imperial Toronto, Giovanni
breaking stone im a quarry when & Amendola, S._ Vulfrano, Lady Rodne~,
section of the side of the quarry broke Mormacreéd, Frances, Sass, Sunvalley,
away and fell on him and he died as| 114, Fort de France, Monte Altube,
a result of the injuries sustained and Corrientes, Cottica and Imperial Quebec,





that Compensation has been paid into
Court. eT
All dependents and persons con-

cerned with the above-named deceased
are hereby required to appear in the;
Assistant Court of Appeal on Wednes-~
day the 9th day of August, 1950, at 10

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for the United Kingdom and
Amsterdam by the S.S. Willemstad will
be: cinned at the General Post Office as
under:

Parcel! Mail at 12 (noon) Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 3 p.m.
on the 25th July, 1950.

Dated this 20th day of July, 1950,
I. V. GILKES,
Ag. Clerk Assistant

Court of Appeal.

22.7.50—3n.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES







GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, ST. VINCENT
Vacancy for Binder

Applications are invited for the post of Binder in the Government
Printing Office St. Vincent.

The post, which. is pensionable, carries salary in the scale $480 x
$24—$576 per annum. A temporary cost of living bonus at the rate of
$109.20 per annum at $480 rising by $1.80 for every $24 to $116.40
per annum at $576 is also payable, and there are facilities for over-
time work. Salary at a higher point than $480 will be granted, if
necessary to a qualified candidate.

Applicants must possess a full knowledge of binding and ruling
and must produce particulars to that effect.

Applications should be addressed to the Government Printer,
Government Printing Office, St. Vincent, and should reach him not
later than the 31st July, 1950.



VACANCIES FOR TWO ASSISTANT AGRICULTURAL
SUPERINTENDENTS, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

BRITISH GUIANA.
Applications are invited for two vacant posts of Assistant Agricul-
tural Superintendents in the Department of Agriculture, British

Guiana.
Particulars of the post are as under:—
Salary
£500 per annum rising to £4825 per annum by annual incre-
ments of £25.

Qualifications ana Experience

Applicants must hold either—

(i) a degree or diploma in Agriculture, and have some experi-

ence in agricultural extension or farm management; or

(ii) the Associateship of the Imperial College of Tropical Agri-

culture or a degree or dip’»ma in Agriculture with post
graduate training at an Agricultural College.
Allowances

Travelling and subsistence allowances will be paid in accordance

with the Government Regulations in force.
Probatio: Period

Appointment to the posts will be on twelve months probation.
When confirmed in the appointment the officers will be placed on the
pensionable establishment, and will be liable to contribute to the Brit-
ish Guiana Widows and Orphans Fund at the rate of 5% of the maxi-
mum salary of the post by monthly deductions from salary. '

2. The successful candidates will be engaged in the extension
service of the Department of Agriculture or on projects operated by
the Department.

3. Applications giving full name, age and details of qualifica-
tions and experience, accompanied by two recent testimonials, should
be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Agricul-
ture, Georgetown, British Guiana, marked “ASSISTANT AGRICUL-
TURAL SUPERINTENDENT” and should reach him not later than
31st July. 1950.

4. Applicants already employed in a Department of Agriculture
in the West Indies, should submit their applications through the nor-
mal official channels.

| 15.7,50—8n.






















































England—
W.1. Test

From page 1

need him to give the cake some
weight—after all we cannot use
all yeast—I cannot pretend to
enjoy watching him. I am pleased)
to say that our bowling today did
not falter, although from time to
time the men in the field appeared
to lack that extra verve which is
necessary to get to vhe ball passing
a few yards to the right or left

Goddard tried even more than
usual to upset his opponents by

@ from page 5
which information is available

ried out


















several articles bought
and the cost,

by

ers or housewives how
plete the forms,

to

varying his attack and to some expenditure of each family for
extent he succeeded, True, the several weeks spread over a
seam bowlers had three new balls period of twelve months. {
to try their fingers on, and didj , 72°, results are tabulated to}

not succeed, but they tried very
hard. The fact that they reaped
nothing is just that today was not
their day.

Valentine, Ramadhin and God-
dard himself pegged away untir-
ingly and shared the wickets as
they deserved to do.

items of food, clothing, fuel
light, rent and miscellaneous
Foundation

Once again I have to bring into mentioned. We also know their
the report an excerpt from the esenen prices per lb. or other!
English press. Jack Kidney, anc measure or quantity during the

John Goddard both expressed in-
dignation to me this morning whe

ost iv >
I sought their confirmation of : cae a orate tae

COST OF LIVING INDEX
HAS LIMITATIONS

A — budget enquiry is car-|is actually paying by weight.
y asking householders

to record on a form (daily in the
ease of food) the Quantities of the
them

Investigators advise household-
com-}

A large number of budgets are
collected showing the income and

show the proportion of the total}

expenditure spent on the several; weight or factor belonging to the
and

It is in these proportions that
weights are allotted to the several
items in the groups which | have

base year, so we have a frame-
work on which we can buiid our
The price in

c e ; the base year = 100.
story appearing in a Sunday news- It is essential that new en
aper. " : i
pape Chall + uiries into consumption should
il a enge—Fishy e undertaken every five or ten
is story claimed that aj, ears, because the tendency is for
challenge had been sent to i

Australia on behalf of the West
Indies by Mr. Kidney. The story
sounded very fishy tome. I know,
as the writer must have known,
that such a challenge would have |
to come from the West Indian |
Cricket Board of Control and |sumption
would have to be chet Con-|



gure.

index numbers to overstate

is changing and
through the Imperial Cricket Con-
ference,

This was the story: Apparently, |
the West Indies cricketers, cock-
a-hoop over their test lessons to
England, yesterday sent a chal-
lenge to Australia. We, the report
said, will

‘s necessary, frequent sma
ample surveys are advisable.



tem is not available



elias play you anywner | veights are based upon estimates
5 ve . {of total consumption of or ex-
ee the West Inc *S penditure on the principal food
Paivfox)’ nae en ees stuffs and other items during a
a SS ve :
challenge through Walter Robin: ere
the Australians’ representative in Caiculation
England, Now let us see how a cost of
5 as living index figure is calculated
Obviously if this story were true, Bat race eo
Mr. Kidney would heae aber every month, You will readily

acting ultra vires, I hurried to hin
to get it confirmed and asked John
Goddard to come along to the

on every single item consumed

figures such

I was, he said, at the lunch
table with R. W. V. Robins, the
English amateur who represents
Australia at the Imperial Cricket
Conference,

“I think you fellows should take
on the Australians now, Mr
Robins said. Kidney’s reply was
“Well, Robby, we haven’t had an
invitation.”

Robins then said that he was
ut that moment writing a two page
letter to Bradmaf, and that he
was going to add a footnote to the
effect that he felt that it would
@ om vage 8

ENGLAND'S CASUALTIES

LONDON, July 24

W. J. Edrich England and Mid-
dlesex cricketer, who is wearing a
plaster jacket following a back
injury, is receiving treatment from
an orthopaedic surgeon in London,
Middlesex is leaving him out of
their team selections until he is
fit to play. Len Hutton and Denis
Compton, other England invalids,
are also having treatment for their
ailments, Hutton is due to play in
the Gentlemen vs. Players game
starting on Wednesday at Lords,
and Compton is expected to make
his return to first class cricket in
the Surrey—-Middlesex match next
Saturday.

tendency.

should be carefully

price collecto
taken from the





time every month,



of article is not obtainable

stituted, comparison has to











stitute in the previous month.

AUCTION SALE

WEDNESDAY August 2nd

—Reuter. at 11 a.m.



NITURE & HOUSEHOLD
EFFECTS

BELVEDERE

Welches, Ch, Ch.
(% mile Oistins side of
Parochial Treasurer)

Instructions have been received



County Cricket Results

LONDON, July 24
Cricket results: At Oval York-
shire beat Surrey by 7% wickets.
Surrey 127 (Coxon 5 for 51, Apple-





yard 4 for 47) and secondly 97, from Dr. R. C. Price to sell the
‘ valuable furniture and
(Wardle 6 for 25), Yorkshire 149 slats, which are almost. without



aks 5 for 44) and secondly 79 outstandingly good
or 3.
At Folkestone, Kent beat Leices-

tershire by five wickets; Leices

exception, in
condition

Upholstered Couch and Easy
Chairs, 4 Steel Framed Chairs
upholstered in Red leather, China

















tershire 155 (Martin 7 for 53) and Cabinet, Antique Wall Bracket,
se : La . Frases Tray and Table, Large
goconeny 102 (Wright 6 for 16 bare Table, 6 Dining Chairs,
me oe eee 186, (Hern Sideboard. Bookstand, Double Ene
, Parker ‘or 36) and secondly ed Settee, Side Jane

4 7, ir , Glass Topped Table,

72 for 5 (Wooller 4 for 34), Thiaid. ‘table, “Modern Bedroom
—Reuter furniture in Birch, Double and

PLP OOO Divan Beds with Spring Filled and




















































COOH

THE HANDIEST THING WE HAVE SEEN FOR A TIME
DURAGLIT

METAL POLISH
oe TRY A TIN TODAY

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

THE

(CENTKAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets

cost of living numbers calculated’) a me:
on a fixed base to depart more and
more as time passes from the true
The tendency is for such
the
true increase in the cost of living

To ascertain how the actual con-

to

indicate when a full scale enquiry

11

There may be substitutions when
imilar items may be purchased
nore cheaply or when the original

In some countries cost of living

appreciate that to base an index

in

@ year, and to calculate monthly

interview, Kidney’s explanation ||" on i a detailed base
is simple and reliable. would be a large task. 2

The True St Therefore, the most important

le Story items are tnhken, Items are also

taken as representatives of a group
of items the prices of all of which
can be expected to show the same

All the items in the base index
specified.
Quality, brand, type and quantity
niust be fixed, and known to the

Prices shoyld be
ame representative
shops or outlets at about the same

If the specific brand or quality
and
some other brand has to be sub-
be
made with the price of the sub-
In
some places articles are actually
boux.1t by price collectors; in BG.



Dunlopillo Mattresses, Ladies and
Gents Dressing Tables, Bedside
CONCERT Sih ie Seite is
Press, Painted Furniture, alnw
Und istinguist Table, Murphy Portable" Record
nae s s tadio «Table, Portable Reco’
( oe Distinguls ted - Player (Plays 8) Singer Sewing
atronage of His $ Machine with electric motor (as
Excellency the Governor New), Quantity ood Records,
Mr. A. W. L. Savage, C.M,.G., % Record Cabinet, Gallery Furniture,
re , dare a 2 a s, e .
and Mrs, Savage) $ Wall Brackets with Glass Candle
, Shades, Stokes Electric Cooker,
by the % Hotpoint Electric Cookers, Small
g Valor Stove, Frigidaire, Electric
BARBADOS CHORAL . Mixers, Fan Toaster ane ron
Many kitchen requis ies @ n
qOere excellent order. Kitchen Dresser,
: bles, Chairs, Mats, Iron-
at the Larder, Ta’ h
ing board Mahogany Trays,
( large ar lection of Glass
M RE HALL Very fine Cut Glass Set
Champagne, Water, Port; meer
ursda, Liqueur Glasses & Finger Bow |s,
= 7, 27th July Collection Iridescent Glass, Ruby
1950 at 8.30 p.m. Glass, Large quantity Miscel
laneous Glass, Pyrex Ware; Cut
Guest Artists: Glass Decanters, China | includes
Crown Ducal, Minton, Marigold,
Miss JEAN LAWSON, Eggshell and sexerel aay Ja
i examples of 22 Carat Go
Mr. P. Ign eee” Piates-Royal mover in ts
. 7 ° 2 , wood, lac night, ete.,
(Baritone) Silver Bracket Lamps with Glass
kets ma: Candle Shades, Plated Fruit Stands
— 7 be sptained s¢ Gare Basket, Entree Dish, Ment
Advocate Stationery Cover, Chafing Dish, Candelabria,
or from Members of the % Cardtray etc; Mirrors, Axminster;
Socie' owin: fayptian and other Carpets anc
ty at the foll e x | Rugs, Cushions, eg? po tone
rices: | Lawn Mower, 75 feet plastic Hose,
eee es QB) Npprox, Theft. Lengths “in.
RESERVED $1.00 % | G1. Pipe, 3 Rolis Matting, Potted
UNRESER , | Palms, Liles, Ferns and numerous
a + | other useful items. |
- VED + 600, & 36¢. %! | r Viewir ¢ Morning of and Day
—— at “ne Programme x prior to Lee
an ook of words may ¢$ “a |
|
re Se the Ad- x | John 4. Biadon
Sin / (AF S., FV.A,) |
PRICE :: 6d. each % Phone 4640, Plantations Building







PAGE SEVEN

weights and finding
figure is then repeated

The index number of any item
can be found by dividing the price
by the price in the base year and
multiplying by 100.

Grouping

Usually separate index numbers
are calculated for each group of
items; food, clothing; tuel and
light; rent; and miscellaneous.
Group percentages are multiplied
by group weights, the total is
divided by the sum of the group

veights and the percentage in-
crease or decrease is added to or
subtracted from 100 to give us
the composite index figure. This
is what we call the cost of living
index,

Special techniques are used to
change the base and recompute an
index, and sometimes for splicing
two series not. on the same base.
This, however, is subject to error.

Shortages and devaluation of
currency affect the interpretation
of cost of living indices, and there
are several pitfalls in regard to
price figures to which I have not
referred. For example, the rela-
tionship between a rise in prices
and a fall in purchasing power,
or the choice of the right method
of taking an average

Statistics shed light in dark
corners, but we must understand
what they mean and appreciate
their limitations,

the index

they weigh the loaves of bread to
find out how much the consumer
In
big countries local agents collect
the prices. In some places where
|}the price of an article is controlled
the legal maximum price is taken
Where the control is not strict or
the article is only readily obtain-
ble in the black market such a
method will obviously not show
@ true price trend.

When the new prices have been
collected the percentage increase
or decrease in the price of each
item is calculated. Each percent-
age figure is then multiplied by the



1a

item, and the products are added
together,

The total is then divided by the
sum of the weights—often 100 for
convenience—and this gives us the
percentage increase or decrease
for the month. The percentage in-
crease or decrease is added to or
subtracted from 100 as the case
may be to give us the index figure.

The following month, prices are
again collected and the percentage
increases or decreases on the price
in the base year are calculated.
The process of multiplying by the





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early September, Melbourne first half,
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Cargo accepted on through Bills of accept Cargo and Passengers for
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad St, Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada,
for Barbados, British Guiana, Windward sailing Wednesday, 19th July.
and Leeward Islands,

For further particulars apply:— B.W.I, Schooner Owners



FURN , WITHY & CO, LTD,,
Agents, Trinidad.

DA COSTA & CO. LTD., |
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S.S. “ALCOA POL R” July 2ist July 24th Aug sh
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ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service.



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PAGE EIGHT

—$——



England—W.I.

@ From page 7





335,







i € the n han-
an exceilient thir lat icay nder which the innings
cricket for the A wetihad begun. Dewes reached his 50
the West Indie e earliest] with a ot very pretty four
possible time, and he would sug-Ifine leg He had not been par-
gest that such an invitation be ex-}ticuiarly impressive and, like
tended many handed batsmen, seem-
To this \ir. Kidney replied: }|e« 1) at the ball from a crouct
That's up to you, Robby io
The newspaper version makes it i, beautiful or ugly, it mat
uppear that the West Indies were} ered not a whit, the 60 runs wer
boasting aud Goddard in the Daily} ere--and more than weleortie
Despatch Uris morning points this] 4¢¢e to plan, the partner-

out to the British public

“Such a statement as this,
others to the effect that
going to score 1,000 rung in
innings and beat all records,
immense harm.”

England—Iil Luck
Parkhouse came in and was off
the mark with a three between the

and
are
an
do us

we

ciose stand slip fielders. But more
ill-luck was in store for England
Simpson who had been standings

Stationary and stubbornly at 93
for several overs turned Valentine
around the corner leg
Rae covering the ground well,
picked up keenly and shied in for
Walcott to put the wicket down
with the batsmen far from home
on his way to a second run
Simpson shared fully with Wast
brook in the honours of th»
opening stand. He had marched
head and head with -his partner
in compiling the handsome total

to fine

and, if anything, had*been the

more attractive of the two.
He had seemed strangely re-
oo



CYRIL WASHBROOK

Juctant—or unable—to punish
even the shortest ball with any
real vim and had only collected
six fours in his five and a half
hours innffigs.
Dewes joined Parkhouse and
looked the picture of discomfort
against both bowlers as he jitterly
began his innings
These however stayed together
until tea when Parkhouse with 31
runs to his credit, was going very
well.
Placid—For A Time
Things became placid for a time
and Dewes once called Gomez to
chase two pigeons from the pitch.
When play was resumed after tea,
Johnson bowled an over with the
old ball and Ramadhin sent one
down from the other end before
giving way to Worrell for the new
balL ,
This proved just as ineffective
as the two earlier new balls and
Parkhouse was particularly
punishing against the pace men.
After the shock attack had con-
ceded 34 runs without success,
Goddard brought back the
spinners. The third 100 was quiet-
ly registered as the two young
Englishmen settled themselves to
stay as long as possible although
both were more willing to accept
the odd chance to score from any
loose. deliveries than their pre-
decessors, !
Goddard at 317 again took
charge of one end and switched
Valentine to take over from Rama-
dhin. The partnership reached 100
off Valentine's first offering from
his new end, Parkhouse sweeping
it to the leg boundary. The pair
had then been together for only
110 minutes, a much better scor-
ing rate than the first wicket pair
had achieved at any stage.
Goddard—Success
Goddard was soon to reap some
suceess for his perseverance, get-
ting Parkhouse }.b.w. for 69 with
the score reading 326, The Gla-
morgan player had shown us bet-
ter strokes than either of the two
whe had preceded him. Particu-
larly favouring the late cut, he
also gave some powerful off drives
and neat drag side play. Nor did
he appear so uncomfortable to the
two spin bowlers, and he was the
first player to venture out of his
crease to meet Valentine
Yardley, the English captain,
joined his last minute recoup and
Goddard soon brought back
Ramadhin to join Valentine in the
effort to dissolve the amateur
partnership Yardley took some
little time to get off the mark but
eventually did so with a sharp
cut for 4 off Valentine, which car-

| They'll Do It Every Time
















ship was soon broken Ramadgin




howled Yardley who played dowr
the line toa good length off
break and missed Anothe!
amateur Doug Insole, came out.
A wag in the crowd remarked
‘Co along, we need an Insole,
for are one of the Uppers’

Unfortunately the newcomer
did nothing to help the situation
but was stumped by Walcott off
Ramadhin before he had scored
At this point, stumps were drawn
with the core 350 for 5 and
Dewes 55 not out

The Match

When the Test Match continued
here today, Ramadhin who had
bowled one ball on Saturday
afternoon before rain stopped play
resumed mis interrupted over from
the pavilion end and sent down a
maiden to Simpson. Johnson came

on from the Radcliffe end. Accord-
ing to the boundary flags there
was iair wind blowing across
the pitch in a direction to help
his outswingers None, however,
vorricd Washbrook who took two
Curing, the over

Making every effort to Save the
game for England, the two
opener settled down and the
hundred went up in 20 minutes
This first eentury had been con-
tributed in two hours and 35
minutes

The opening attack provided
little hope for the West Indians

although when he was 45 Simpson
glided one from Johnson at which
Walcott dived. It was just too far

and the batsman got a four, the
only consolation for the bowler
wa that it was dangerous
stroke. Valentine now joined
Ramadhin and Simpson took

single off the first delive ry,

short pitched offbreak which he
turned sently and with the
greatest of ease to square leg to
reach his individual 50. Next ball
similarly dropped back, Wash-
brook hit for four to join his

partner at the half hundred mark

30th men had now been batting
165 minutes and neither had
shown any sign of hurry Wash-
brook was as comfortable as he
might have liked against Ram-
adhin. The new ball was taken
at 122, Johnson and Worrell
sharing the attack

First Hour
At the end of the first hour's
play the batsmen were still to-
gether gallantly defending and
adding 44 to the overnight total.
Washbrook took a lovely four
to the left ef cover off Worrell to

reach his thousand runs for the
s@ason.
Goddard now reverted to his

spin once again. The score was 143
and Washbrook greeted Valen-
tine’s first delivery with a mighty
hook for tour to the square leg
boundary. The 150 went up in the
same over when the innings was
220 minutes underway

In Ramadhin’s second over
Simpson lifted him weakly wide
vf Valentine standing about mid-
way between square leg and mid-
wicket. A little anticipation and
the fielder would have made ut,
for it was a very weak scoopshot,
Scoring slowed down consider-
ibly as the luncheon interval ap-
proached with neither Simpson
10r Washbrook showing any real
inclination to hit the ball hard.
Goddard continued to excel close

in to the wicket and Christiani
made a very good one handed
pickup in the covers to turn a

possible Simpson four into a sin-
gle,
Washbrovuk
aver against
three from
slips went
Weekes,

Lunch was taken at 168, five
runs short of the highest first
wicket stand of 173 held jointly
by the two countries, At least one
West Indian supporter had revived
the uncomfortable recollections of
the stand by Tarilton and Chal-
‘enor in the famous 1927 “seven-
hundred” tournament when Bar-
bados was faced with the abso-
lutely identical situation in their
match against Trinidad.

It was the third over after
lunch before the batsmen sent up
the new first wicket record stand,
Previously this had stood at 173,
both England and the West Indies

had one unhappy
Ramadhin and a
his bat through the
perilously close to

having a similar effort to their
credits. : J
George Gunn and Andie

Sandham had done it at Kingston
in 1930 and Carew and Gan-
teaume did it at Port-of-Spain in

A

Registered US Palen! Oftee











T@MAKES
= MWe
FAST

WON THA

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



OUTRIGHT

EMPIRE and Y.M.P.C

and Pickwick when the
Cricket series ended last Sat

Walcott Was
“Missing”
(Barbados Advocate Correspordent)

NOTTINGHAM, July 24.

“Walcott is unfit and not likely
to take any further part in the
match”

That was the rumour that
swept around Trent Bridge
ciicket ground this morning when
the West Indies cricketers arrived
for the fourth day of the Third
‘Test here,

The cry
the team got out
which had brought them from
the hotel it was naticed that
| Walcott was not among the party.
| The explanation was really

when
cars

because
of their

arose

,| (uite simple however. Clyde had

heen writing a letter in his room
and came downstairs just too
lite to catch the remainder ot
the team,

It was several minutes before
he realised they had gone but
then he quickly caught a taxi in
Ume to rejoin them at the ground,

The West Indies chances of
victory were still quite substan-
tially decreased during play this
morning. Johnson despite a
bruised arm which he hurt when
falling on Saturday declared
himself fit to open the bowling
and well though he bowled,
neither he nor any of the others
could make any impression on
Simpson and Washbrook who by
Staying together until lunch
heightened England’s hopes of
forcing a draw,



to switch them around,

Scoring now practically came
to a dead stop and six overs pro-
duced only two runs until Simp-
son woke up to straight drive
Ramadhin for four, ashbrook
imitated his colleague by off driv-
ing Valentine to the fence, the
best stroke of his innings, to carry
his total to 98 and just after
Simpson sent the score past the
double century.

40 Runs An Hour
He sent a full toss from
Ramadhin to the square leg
boundary. England had _ been

scoring at a rate of forty runs an
hour, excusably behind the clock
in view of the back to the wall
fight. Washbrook _ stonewalled
stoically through 23 more balls
before he managed another single
to get 99

Twelve deliveries later he
reached his century with a brace
to fine leg,

It had taken him five and a
quarter hours to achieve the dis-
tinction. It was just a few balls
later when he opened up to Val-
entine and gave Worrell at point
a catch which the fielder ran for-
ward to hold. England thus lost

their first wicket at 212 with
Washbrook's contribution, its
value inestimable, 102.

He had only hit nine fours

alomy the road to his century and
had taken an awfully long time
to get there, but the slowness was
well warranted by the game's pos-
ition and the crowd, well satisfied
with the magnificent start he had
helped to establish, gave the bats-
man a warm cheer.

ENGLAND Ist innings 23
WI ist Innings S58
ENGLAND SECOND INNINGS
Washbrook c Worrell b Valentine 162
Simpson run out ;
Parkhouse |_b.w. b Goddard 69
Dewes not out 85
Yardley b Ramadhin 7
Insole stpd, Walcott b Ramadhin 9
Extras 23
Total ‘for 5 wkts.) 35)

Fall of wkts; 1-212, 2—220, 3—996

4-346, 5--950,

1948 BOWLING ANALYSIS
Ramadhin and Valentine were ao -M F W
; ; Johnson 20 ¢ ‘@ at
still doing the bowling from the Worrell 19 8 40 6
Pavilion and Radcliffe end respec- Gomes oe as 4 Wel
tively but Goddard at 179 bowl- Raniah in 858 16 101 4
ed himself for an over in ordet qoddard 12 6 18 1



By Jimmy Hatlo_



O.crocus CROESUS
HAD THE GARDENER
GO ALL OUT IN
THE FLORAL
DEPARTMENT
THIS SPRING =~











o>
=
—< J,

Se





Ni

_ "THE FLOWERS ARE BLOOMING
NOW, SO WHERE'S J. CROCUS2

\ OFF FOR HAPPY Days AT
~ SEAWEED POINT*+:











STO ENJOY LIVING 4



ANYTHING



S'LONG,MAC ++sSEE YOU IN
SEPTEMBERsIF YOU NEED

AT THE BEACH HOUSE =:

MS HUMUS “WE WANT YOU TO OUTDO V bELeyINiuMg © |
YOURSELF ON THE GARDEN THIS
YVEARSLOTS OF COLORâ„¢L WANT

7 MERE AND PRIZE ]
ROSES OVER THERE.
THEN BEGONIAS
AND MAYBE SNAP-





ERE:s

















Y'CAN REACH US

Intermediate Cricket:

gained outright victories over Cable
& Wireless and Mental Hospital respectively and Wind.|the Second Division Cricket Com-
ward and Wanderers first innings tead b

first round of the

2nd Division Cricket;

EMPIRE, Y.M.P.C. GAIN Rain Hampers

VICTORIES

Most Games

THE second series of games in

petition got underway last Satur-
day. Rain again interfered with
same of the games but some bright
cricket was still played.

At Vaucluse, Empire winning
the toss went in to bat on a per-
tect wicket and knocked up 201
against Central. L. Bynoe top-
scoring with 58, F. Taylor 32 and
E. McLeod 30.

Lampitt took three of the Empire
wickets for 26.

points over Spartan

Intermediate
urday.

Empire made a brilliant recov-
ery last Saturday after being 72’
runs behind Cable & Wireless in
their first innings, Cable and
Wireless scored 144 and 58, and
set with the task of making 131
runs to win, they scored a hurri-
cane 139 for the

loss of seven ‘
wickets, Topscoring with 81 Rev. A. RF.
Y.M.P.C. bowled out Menta) | Simmons helped Leeward to
Hospital for 70 anid 48 in their|score 171 against Pickwick at Fos-

two innings and scored 71 for 9
declared and 52 for two wickets.

In Mental Hospital second in-
nings, 1. Burke took five wickets
for 22 runs and E. Branker three

ters and at the end of play Pick-
wick had lost two of their wickets
in their first innings for 52 runs

At Foundation Police got a first
innings lead over Foundation by

for 24. When play ended|scoring 53 for 3 in reply to 47.
Y.M.P.C’s H. Webster was not out} ‘The results are:- a
with 20. Leewerd and Pickwick at

V. Lewis topscored in the Wan-
derers second innings with 65 out
of their 230 for 7 wiekets declared.
Pickwick's pace bowler, R, Clarke
took four wickets for 47 runs.

For Wanderers, fast bowler
Greenidge claimed 7 wickets for
49 runs during a spell of 17 overs .

At Windward, the home team aut Combermere _
secured Ist innings lead against| Combermere 80 (R. Richards
Spartan, Spartan just failing to} 23, King 18 not out, Burke 4 for
clinch outright victory by 28 rung|11, Austin 2 for 4),
at_time call. College and Lodge

Windward in their first innings at College
scored 123 for 7 declared and} College 124 for 4 (C. Thorpe 36
bowled out Spartan for 40. Wina- not out, H. Simmonds 53).

ward in their second turn scored ‘ i
105 for 7 declared giving Spartan oes ae

188 runs to make to win in 180 ;

minutes, At time call Spartan| Foundation 47 (N. A. Yarde 20,
were 160 for the loss of 8 wickets. |C. Neblett for for 6).

Police 53 for 3.

Regiment and Carlton at

Garrison

Fosters

Leeward 17! (Rev
mons 81, D. Frost 20).
Pickwick 52 for 2 wickets
King n.o, 18, M



A. E. Sim-

(D.
Foster n.o. 17).

Combermereé and Y.M.P.C.

Y.M.P.C, vs. MENTAL HOSPITAL

Mental Hospital 70 & 48



L MENTAL HOSPIEAL and INNINGS.” |, Regiment 133 (M, Mayers 47,
N. Burrowes e Porter b Burke 6 | Pinder 24 not out)
E. Quintyne b Branker 3 | Carlton 4 for no wicket.
S Beet ¢ Greenidge b Burke 1
“a Chanaiey mot out Pee 2 Empire and Central at
C. Hope b Branker ° Vaucluse
C. Boyce ¢ Archer b I. Burke 0 .
V. Carter b I. Burke P 5 Empire 201 (L. Bynoe 58, F.
Batson not out © | Taylor 32, E, McLeod 30, L. Lam-
c Knight b Branker 2 |pitt 3 fer 26)
ixtras ; . . ae
es =} Central 48 for 1 (R. Shepherd
Total 48 |16 not out).
Fall of Wickets: 1—6, 2—7, 3-95, 4—26,
5—41, 6-41, 7—46, 8—46, 9—48.
ROWLING ANALYSIS B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME
L Burk a oY ¥
ls urke : ! tes }
TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1950
E. sen Gana aatiing 4 3s 6.15 a.m,—1.45 bm. Commentary on
S. Greenidge ¢ Batson b Boyce 23 ee ao Bf a.m. rhe News. 2:30 an,
B. Hoyos b C. Knight 2 s nalysis. 7.15 a.m, Trent's Last
C. Me Kensie not out 1 sates ai ape Hymns We Sing, ae
: am. Generally Speaking. 8 a.m, From the
H, Webster not out ... 20 | Ediforials. 8.10 a.m. Programme Parate
Total for (2) wits.) 5a | 8,15 a.m. England v West Indies, 8.35 a.m.

12
boa

Freneh Orchestral Music

| 9 am. Close

aye 12 angot The News. 12.10 p.m

ews Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Musie from

WAND aEERs vs: PICK WIOK Grand Hotel. 12.45 p.m. England v_ Wes!

9 Indies. 1 p.m. On the Job. 1.15 p.m. Radio

H. Alleyne ¢ Moore b Clarke Newsreel. 1,30 p.m. Memories of Musical



2

oP roan ° Putter © Clarae 21 | Comedy, 2 p.m, ‘The News. 2.10
; 2 ody, "| m p.m,
y petis ited ees $ Home Weve fram Britain, 2.15 p.m. Sports
Hh. Rartady 6 Wipe ba Claties 93 | Review. 2.30 pm. Radio Theatre. 3.45
M. Mayers ¢ Hoad b Peterkin 4 pm, z Accordeon Interlude. 4 p.m The
M. Clarke not. out 3 News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily Service. 415
J. Massiah b Clarke 6 | om, From the Promenade Concerts. 5
M 'G sam idge t t o Um, England v West Indies, 5.05 p.m, In-
; a @ , lerlude. 5.15 p.m, Programme Parade
extras, : ~ {5.30 p.m. Welsh Magazine. 6 p.m. Trent's
Total (for 7 wkts. dec.) 39 | Last Case. 6.15 p.m. Twenty Questions

6.45 p.m. Letter from London. 7 p.m. The
News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis. 7.15 p.m

7.45 p.m. Cricket Report on Third Test
8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. On the
Job. 8.30 p.m. Regent Orehestra, 8.55 Pm.

Fall of wkts, 1-32, 2-74, 3123, @—124,
5—178, G—179, 7—195,



BOWLING ANALYSIS From the Editorials. 9 pm. Tip Top
Oo. M. R, W.! Tunes 9.30 p.m. Meet the Common-
R. Clarke 20 0 47 4 wealth. 10 p.m, The News. 10.10 p.m, In-
O. Lashley bat 3 13 © | terlude. 10.15 p.m, On the Sweeter Side
J. Goddard |: 7 2 0 0 | 10.45 p.m. Report from Britain. 11 p.m
Peterkin 4 0 30 1 | BBC Scottish Orchestra
Wells ll 0 63 2











g. pRICKWICK—Ist INNINGS Se ee ee x
Cc. E. Edwards Greenidge y ~~
J, S, Goddard b Qreenidge 28 UPER SALE g
— ee ‘cae € poeanidee 18 *
‘oster ¢ Clarke b Ramsay ’ y ‘ %
R. D, Clarke c wkt. b Greenidge 4 B &IG
z Hoad 8 Greenidge 3 Al AIN 8
fearwood not out . 2
Peterkin. I.b.w. Greenidge 2 Prints — washable, 40c. yd.
8 Hoare b Greenidge 4 Calico—36” wide—4Oe. yd,
Yells b Massiah
Lashley ¢ Proverbs b Clarke ¢ oan. ae ee =
Extras : - .
oie — Boys’ Socks — 12c. a pair
Total 108 Anklets — —— 15e. up
Fall of wkts ; 1—32, 2—45, 3—61, 4—@3, 360 ea. %
3-72, 6-75, 779, 8-79, 9-79. weetees, Shoes & Hats,
ite rill — %8o, yd. ¥
ROWEENG ARATE. wilh Galeitls Vesls — 966, Se.
Massiah a 2 Sa Khaki Drill — 59, yd.
Greenidie 1S ge ee Boys’ Caps — — 24¢, ea.
fhm 2
Warness ; a Vests (Gents. & Ladies)

Children’s Panties (Plastic)
WANDERERS--2nd INNINGS

|



Lewis ¢ Evelyn b Goddard 4 oe of Bargains in
A. Proverbs b Lashley ......... 4 ress Goods & Household
N. G. Mayers ¢ Foster b Lashley 5
N. B. Proverbs not out 9 Departments.
L. Greenidge not out §

Extras: Y

be v

Total (for 3 wits.) 26
at PICKWICK 2nd INNINGS
cdwards not out 4 y
Goddard e& b Maseinh 8 Pr. Wm. Henry and
Evelyn not out 16 | Swan Streets

Total (for 1 wkt.y ae AAR AALS

¢ PLEPPLDPVEPR?P PCCP LLL PLAS SLM S59
*

* CHECK THESE VALUES!
< DIRECT FROM FACTORY Fe WEARER.

e

% @ PUMPS in White, Brown, Black, Blue 75¢., 85c., $1.15 $1.20
% @BALLERINAS in Red. Sires 3—8. . $1.45
% @LADIES’ CANVAS RUBBER SHOES... 1,95
@LADIES’ CANVAS CASUALS in White, Red, Blue 2.95
X= = @ LEATHER SANDALS WITH RUBBER SOLES
st Children’s $1.60; $1.90; Eadies’ $2.35; Men’s 3.15
% @ LADIES’ CREPE SOLED SHOES... $3.95 to 5.80
= @ MEN'S WORKING SHOES—Brown or Black $4.30 5.05
% @MEN'S SOCKS ....... sei-+s... Me, 480., 500. 58e., 740,
@ CHILDREN’S and LADTES' ANKLETS

S2e-, 36e., 500., 40c., dle,

@ SHOK POLISHES, SHOR BRUSHES, SUEDE CLEANERS

%,
=

SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD.

é 64°

LLDCS SEO SEES GHGS GSS GS GOSS SUES EET

4 O44 48

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UNION MEETING

MEMBERS OF THE
CARIBBEAN WORKERS
UNION

are reminded of a Meeting
to be held on Thursday
Night, July 27th, 1950, at 8
o'clock at Headquarters:
Synagogue Buildings,
Synagogue Lane,
Bridgetown.
Business:

General Report and
Election of Officers.



LPS. SHORTHAND
EXAMINATION

The next I.P.S. Short-
hand Examination takes
place on Saturday next, 29th
inst., at the Combermere
School, commencing at 11
a.m, Fees may be paid on
the spot.

The next Typewriting
Examination will take place
at the end of August (last
Saturday) .

The next Book-keeping

4) Examination will take place
)) in September (last Satur-
day).

C. B. ROCK, F,I.P.S.

Local Representative

HOUSEWIVES

When ordering your essen-
ces, demand .

VIVLA Brand

manufactured by Messrs J.
N. Nichols & Co., Ltd.,
England, Manufacturing
Chemists.

These essences are sold in
handy one-ounce _ bottles
which are hermetically seal-
ed making it free from any
possible dilution and bring-
ing the particular flavour
required at its best.

AGENTS: Messrs Zephir-
in's Ltd, and obtainable at
present from Messrs Stuart
& Sampson Ltd., John D.
Taylor & Sons Ltd., and S.
Gibbs.

A trial will convince you.
25.7.50—I1n.








MICROSCOPE YOU
MUST KAT

JAR
ENRICHED
BREAD
| VINCED IT’S THE

| BEST QUALITY
BREAD BAKED.

|
YOU CAN’T SEE THE
QUALITY THROUGH A |

DAILY TO BE CON:|























| 25.7.50—In.


















































































!



4








TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1950



pe

OCS j

FREE HOOK

?
3
§
:

VCO 9 PS POOPROOS

Openimg EIPIRE

FRIDAY 28TH

which makes

“GOD'S WAY OF
SALVATION
PLAIN”

Flease write fer «one io
Samuel Koberts,
Book and Trast Service,
30, Central Avenue, Ban
gor N. Ireland.’

|

oy ro

208 per

OCONEE Le





POOR EPSP HOO FIEOO i |

%,

‘y

»,

a

: For Sale

cae aime ee.
% MOUNT PLEASANT dunia
S PLANTATION, VICTORY Reader's
% ST. JOHN. Digest
& story!

>

One (1) 2 K.W. Belt

driven D.C. Dynamo £40

< 4,4
ote 15% iS toy AoA AME * LSS LES or









Â¥,
One (1) Switch Board 15
% One (1) Steam Engine
x 6% x 10 ae 45
$
xg One (1) Aspinall pan |
x 4’ 0” dia. Disc 35 %
x A)
x One (1) Juice Heater x
x 300 sq. ft. } i0 XS
Â¥ .
x One (1) Jnice Heater %
* 500 sq. ft. 59 &
‘
§ One (1) 8’ x 12’ Muit %
‘ tubular Boiler 59 ¥}
’,
One (1) 7° x 127 Multi. %
tubular Boiler aE 5) }
’
z Apply: st}
, %D. M. SIMPSON '& CO *
*
POSER GE OOUOAEUELEE 666
Piri fi

Suitable for watchmen
porters etc. Made of the
best weather resisting
materials

$11.42

Black

Souwester
Hats

to match

$1.37





Cave SHEPHERD & Co., Ltn.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.



GARBADOS ELECTRIC
CORPORATION

SUPPLY
LTD.

NOTICE

As the Manufacturers have decided that repairs to one of
our Engines can no longer be delayed, the Cotayany has in
consequence had to put this Generating Set (900 K-W.) out of
commission and, owing to the reduction of standby Plant now
available as a result, may find it necessary to shed load at {
intervals during the next few months, ie

{
Our Consumers are asked to co-operate by exercising the ;
utmost economy in the use of Electricity, particularly during f
the Peak period between 6.30 and 8.30 p.m. until further notice. }

Vv. SMITH,
General Manager.

20th June, 1950.





BOWRANITE

ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT



Iron and Steelwork cannot corrode beneath a coat of
BOWRANITE. Proof against heat or cold, the corrosive
air of big cities, salt spray and sea-water, BOWRANITE
is used by engineers, shipping lines, dock authorities,
and public and industrial contractors everywhere.

YOU SHOULD USE IT. TOO

Tough, flexible, yet non-cracking, BOWRANITE is
made in many attractive shades

en eee

Stocked in :—
Permanent Green, Red, Grey, Black and
Super Black (Heat Resisting)
in tins of Imperial Measure.

ONE GALLON WILL COVER 1,000 SQ. FT.

ee ee



‘PHONE 4456 Seieteiy AGENTS
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. ;

== ==



sens

acti ils ttt ce a





Full Text

PAGE 1

T u • s d .. ^^ Jul; 3 3 l.0 BarbaJina #uucate n %  TI1BKI n € MDS^WEEP^SOUTH TOWARDS PUSAN m *- am-. J %  aT %  •' %  '"• %  a* a k • .% %  -_. %  ^ Cabinet Will Discuss Korea psiMi: M.NISTI-R ei.K .IENT MnSE.1! !, I In,' Ueaarlmei.l! 'Xperti on how Bnj. ---%  •%  more ranerei, .,, gamed uiai i„. • • % %  iii'.!. K !" i.'T'."'" " ant STWIISIL n,, "' "" alent lo Oil, view h, > meeting or tn • ll.lllf '.' ;', Govern Whip, wh„ would ixrcnjultM „.,., Jr,',. *"." n -Keotrr. c SOI Til KOHtVVS HAIM II T HATT.I LI.A.I reparesk For General Election __,. . LONDON JuK 24 Pohnrnl tl„n>„ a „„,„ w ,., or tne retire nrodlrt now thai |n v %  Km So,,,!,,, control „, Britain's %  ggn Mil lag. ai leaai ,„„.,,„ ., %  OB I ;>\ tl„. new rle. 1 HOC rang even that soon Conservative toes r>r Prime Minuter Altlee have candidates line,, up to run (or almost every ml 'n the Houae or Common, but POUIIc.1 chlers who guide the party still have no coherent pro C J/ ,mnu on P*Per Thrv ,1,,,," •rnnk they'll need one for .evcral more month*. The Labour Party la gem. Mil -peed ahead with a new platr,.,., '.0,,,l, stresses ii owdo. n „„ public ownership plans I'reliminarv Plan A prebminary plan has been drawn. It will get Id final pol|, h ing rrom Labour'* Executiv. lommlttee thla Wednesdgi and inert will be moved on to local parties m each connltuencv tat .liscussion The final programs, WU im ready by mid-October In that month they will aim net going over rrom the Laboui I any s Annual Convention The Prime Minister has the power to ask th. King at any time lo dissolve Parliament anH call an election, but Labour Partv informants soy Attlce la In no mood to chance a test al the polls yet and probably wont be Detore next spring. Last February's balloting which cut Labour's majority Irom an overwhelming control or the Commons to a shaky working majority or nine showed political •mtimant evenly split in the coun'.'• Persistent t,ppi„, nf popular reeling has shown nn convincing -wing to either Partv. — (C.P • II.r,oo U.S. TROOPS IJV MtlTAIN irONLHJN, July X\ Pariianri^'iL,^'',;,,:;; 1 ; ETSJViSr. • %  >* -* m-n A "" were in three medium bomber group, Agttog g—%y *k. Labour member no !" Ji. ,h e "overnmcnl. foreign policy Opposition member, cheeT. Memoir. *"" men """ L "bur member beymour Cocks said it armed force, —Renter CLAIM FALL OF VITAL U.S. BASES filom-non. rroal in u from Nonh Korea— Erpnru % %  I Souih Koican Ironps making their wav on f,..t 2 Held In Uraiiiu,,, ^muggliii^ Charge Sabotage At Portsmouth SAYS ATT LB E I-ONDON. ttmw .Mi!;..:i Clrmi lold Parliamrnt tOdav fuly U II Alllr. Ihai ih. H.M. Govl. Gives £l,02r>.(MM) To Kebuilcling Cu^triis -B.ib aU , Advocate Qsrri ST. LUCIA. July 24. Subject lo !h approval of P-irllament. Mis Majrtity'i Governitient will provide Ihp nddilloiiiil sum of C189.00, injkinvi a MA %  •oiUribuUon lo Ihc irconstructioi. of Ctttnei of J_i.u25.uoo. The juinouncetTUMiI wan mudp D) Ihe Governor ihis morninjt to UM LrCKlslative Council, which ptiid tribute 10 a strong presrnluilon of ilif OMI to the Colonial twice by a delegation comprlurk the Administrator. Mr. J. K. Stow, the Horn, Garnet Gordon, Francis Carasco, and Clive Beaubrun. The delegation is leaving England on Tuesday bv the Mauritania via New York en route lo Castne* where plans arc ulreadv inder way to give the delegation J rousing welcome home. The Governoi also announced further sutcess o Uflhtei ita programme Winst 'espionage, snbotane and bvet >\ %  m ih it %  He called on citizens to give the Pureau all po*st'>le help Rrelcr blowing up of nine ammunition l "" >;^ %  '" i Jul) 14, %  ..s due to sabotage It had not yet been ponMg to e-tabh*h who did it Atllee said It wv a miracle that Uicre was not serious los* of life among workers In the Armament Depot, and among their families vlng near to Bcdenham Harbour. nere the explosion occiirred Tin .xelosion damaged nearly >i> budding within more than die of the blast bill HO one was rlouili ii.. Answering Anlh o nv Eden, Deptilv Onpo*itinn I^.-der. Attlee said thai extra precautions had to.been taken at the Admiralty Establishment for some week* Eden described Altlee'.* statement i,-very grave indeed" Clement Davles. Leader of the Liberals, said it disclosed a "very startline •IfiiaTioti". Altler said, the flirtshe gave today were the interim rewtrt of the Board of Inquiry Ml up lo probe •!!.> o\-H fitter England 350-5 In Third Test (B> K. L (U/.IKK) on for Knsland , !,„, un „| „,, „„„.' \' minute, or | remain out there ,,,,, j ,„,,., senng is lowe r, in ord,, u ,.„, ,,„. „;„.,. .., ,, ','' '''' ' I tOdSjt •*' ,s %  w %  t u \ U.K. Bnkers fear New Taxation Stock Market Dull LdMbCAt, Julj M Nervousness regarding t h e Korean situation and Ministerial hints of new taxation lo meet a poKsibie inmate ,.f Britain defen expenditura created dullness in the !^>ndon Stock Exchange in-dav Among the overseas issues Japanese bonds encountered heavy selling and declined by some tlve points. European bonds were lower where they were changed with Germans and Austrian* one to tWO points <>fl Oil ahara */en dull, AngioIranian lost S-32 at 5 13-18 and recent upward movement in the commodities sharer ( was checkc-l Industrial shares lost ground, but there was firmness In shipbuilding., aircraft and elcted heavy industries having war potential South African gold shares eased on some selling which was mainly fr..tn torsi sources Diamonds were improved on the assumption that than would be a sharp inrre.iie in the United Stutes demand Uiai diamonds Reuler Formosa Awaits Red Invasion TAIPEI. Formosa. July IN A Defence Ministry 'pokesun ild on Monday a number lunks were approaching Quernc Island under cover ot Chin.-. Communist arldlery barrage It may be the lonf-expecti invasion ntt-,Tipt M NetMnalM-held island used htockade base gjgalntl thl Ri I The spokesmai i \ ist force* on Qtientov u *t off the mainland port of Arnoy were adetfiiate to meet thr e'xp<-ctrd Rel attack Nehru Sends A Secret Message WASHING los | """an I'rim. \! '(....|r,| (,,.,!.,, ;,, 1; . a secret personal appeal to the Seerttar> •• turthej • %  !" *ve t'onimnnriil Cfllna % %  %  vithh. I at Neluti be rep. %  %  %  'a* that he aatlt ihe note • %  !" it lo bach up in,,iign,. %  i both Amern ... on July 1.1 that I imini-l China la ihe Nth parallel u lor. Chit i i % %  %  hip ..( n • %  ed OfficialId %  %  I I I lo the United IH "icti refuse I 1.. I.elp tM,j (he -Ighting. it woul'l lie i-jif f0> Russia oefore wofll opinion Arnericaii ..frklaU a-are la know more abom motives, hut they wci %  oi expei lad U i hai m then no it.. —Reuler (With MacArthwr's Headquarters in Korea) NJORTH KOREAN Communist torces^rfay claimed the capture of Yongdonc. main high way town on the road to Taeju, ^d the heart ol 'ne American forcer, deffiu, i dntf from Taejon. The North Korean claim, broadcast by Moscow radio, put North Korean tanks and infantry 22 air miles down the high road from the former South Korea temporary capital, and more than half way to Kumchon, vital rail and road junction town on lie direct route to the Unitad Nations main supply base at Pusan. The claim of (he capture ol Vmitilon,. WM ,.,.„. ^•.ih Korean romm ic The last iunit)uc nl (., r. rral MftrAtihurs Headquarters vi.d \merlean iraoM bud e.sfullv dffled froilt.il nvsmilN i„ their defence line. .'ll MM In the Yongri.uig area, eltecllvel) blaWlllu re nf infan|r> atlaclu. i < aeaasealuei %  %  %  %  and UMI ap "Reds" Stage Manoeuvres IN ROMC TRUMAN WANTS INCOME TAX INCREASE IN U.S. PRESIDENT TRUMAN uS^S^i J ." | Hearings Mgan In c iy on ihrOovarmratni Homr -or.l ProgLnnnir 3 thai not go' ling thr bl In II. ball In ,,. he can The Masters batting ft, in, | >nd. Ilnhhs. and Ihc .it 10 is that ,.r nun,.,, — • thai ,,t Camnton. go f th.,! ,,l Mai.lsl.rr, though wb) thi-> .1,. ,„,i plu j M h || h %  t' 1 '"'' "' and „ average* „ „,„„. h ,„ |_, I"' ,,,n understand ,.,.?,' I'," 1 ""^"" %  ">* %  "">" u lid Ildn't th, • and make more ,"•'" ."tv Kngli-t, %  • done in th,. last II Jlut ulej made it b) duggi',1 that, l„ ... ,,,„,., n„.h i '' mal flash. Ian n, w%\ !" ?V"". "'• ''"" i [ %  Ut I, SJ* ^IhMr*. Ma. i n. Trestrail „l„, lhal "" nr ganir Ru.— Kiiglish spprnarh In l\ Urn ',.,, I, !, %  In, a.,„ %  „i, it lhal w, ia„ii. Marines Increased 60 Per Cent WASHINnTOK. Julv 24 An immediate 60 pe, cent ''." %  l'""'ned ror the nght•ng strength or the Unlttd State-, Manna Corna. .isuallv r< lahle Co hfrats,onal .sources said ts-day They also said the Naw was nre-.aring two—and posalblv three—more alrerar) , %  1 plans alter a rl„.,.n ..... Admiral Sherman, chid oi Naval have to. or about 57.00O on June 30 wa. irDortel 75.000 (•aimed to "lake profile. ,! .. s v "lP"iton is Chairman ecurit 1 hing f"' PI, %  • Hi, F m „Conlrols nd Civil Inf. event al Th '' f Iroki Bill does not involve the prtre controls */,-)„, a. n,.Swnpingtuii t.,I„ Senators these .. '" ded' ltd there measures used in Wort, ,t i ketiter I KM \\l) ( mi's cum LONDON '" • hen Mis. Laving The a.r sc,u.dron.. would be and !" '* eT'scnc' icreased Irom 12 to Ig .*._... ^'"H ber name menU.& Wilt Defend Pescadores WASHINGTON. July The State Drpnrlmcnt *aid lo%  Ihi I'extadnre* I-sland* ofl the lUtbweat coast of Formu^j WOUld be defended by American naval foreei if Chinesf rommuntaeked them. At a new* conference, the State. ke-n.d .,,•: ihi I ll fell in the Formo-ii which < Truman at the outbreak "f Th, Ki rean W %  U\ (he New ConslitutionsFor 4 Colonies LONDON. July if* The Colonial Office noumed change, ,n the ( -oosi.| U ions of four colonies of the Wmdward l, lBn d, in ,h r w,., On Pair 7 The UgUlattve Ununi a j comii.t of 14 mambrrs. I,,,!,,,!,,,. %  %  • who will be IM.,,5 Admiiiiatiatoro and not (iovernon Kight rMfMen will be elected ny nve.v,,) 1( Juh gMtragg, |nuf vinx a clearer majority. Tli. .n, llimt ier will cgfulsl V three ex-offlelO member* wtiwill retain the right to vote until th ministerial syatem enn be e*tabushaa an Councils will be ireo years There will i,,. no literary test fr> r voters Councils over which the Ooverno. will continue lo preside, will inK iade more responsible by the in. would be I elusion of three memben elected lean Fleet |'y Ihe Legislative Councils Keuter IT'nlr-r | Year Old Shook Mo.hr:lnlhrr.|ailtl JONEflBORO ArTKAJ .iii lathi i •..ve h,s i!l ,l !" man hl .n "" %  to ahool his rntrfhi M,i. .... ,, I .. though %  •',iu '\'"" ' ''' %  u %  iove ihu i %  Mu %  (Uavrel vMtt bar, net husband handed Bill) .. • ii;tooit hltn into ihe %  m rard and bowed htm no. i„ Wot li,. sturned l , %  lo right ih.H.i her" Mi White and hi tarted fighting He •vith a cane anrl she -t him with ,, %  eee of wood Dui et ;' %  • R "''' II l I %  lr II., I" IH Ij lei. is, inelilin iiuht.ii i mi -I'i he An..,,!,, P.,,, '" '"' %  '"->!" Ml.' %  ill.ie "'" 1 lha Italian A,, 1 %  I .IV", I I •;' %  %  r, Bwitrcrlani • the manoeuvre) R>i> %  Th. ..iicnt are arTe. tad b] rod m \fi it... H 1 I HI l'Vili-| .it %  u* %  I., j % %  ired thai laolated it<; would one day be d-mlnateil Indian majorltj Indian* ... -ither hand fc.ie.l .livn;.. ilnl) \frii .in dominion ..! ihrei rnlllioni <%i which font bin Cuiun i Indian population! ... ind Trtiiidii.i would I ird, %  da ."i m t i the -I.,i. .,i %  %  %  h i.. i.i SCAC Ri (ed mi ihr %  I %  i /, la • %  ol tcond i %  II b. i ".I %  member! i %  ma* i. RrDM, nmana loo" Captured U.K. Officer Safv DOM JIIB. ;i la Holt % %  %  i i| % %  %  ... rhs rorotgi on i I a eal %  %  rung, thai he ,.i %  I %  1 on ,.i American prl MllUUgh in.. s I Conaaaiaalsti lo afci n..rth.,t, wpenotln %  jj„ W .*. K'.iean OJOCtOI wi .,, '" !• former capital %  dO I"i ,i.l ,.-!... peopa. MI Seoul btUi M not of AM i Rua an .in HR| h uniform He walked fro. in ifN days diagulaad %  Hi -I.I h. asw one "i ary" esacutad, Seoul wu noo.tHi -,ti .,, %  ,,f s 'afld M:.. northern leadei Kim inuo "e paid I baler %  SoulhtvMl i ip K PI i %  I Insula, a|ai I %  I'amuliaii Minim, r Drttuns \l Lagofl Al, I Skielto %  Deputj t M Initial i "' tag ah Prldaj % %  %  % %  ii foun i i South Mtajerl An ecofv 11 IM4H t.. nide CunaduN role in th> i %  Itriili | III < oilMHUNlsiue g arinie. n., % %  i f ., .1 i ute. ba %  the nnvnl | i i • "gin. the %  i. 1 .'. mllei 1 i gtrangth for th u> pri %  vi.tonal H i i %  at ,, Here %  %  i %  at %  ind Auteii ... f Mo*ogd ISly and drnoai ,,i..., towan K :iJllll ': I.ingle 'i*i capital %  i %  %  BCh head Bl VonajdjH fully %  %  fl.nklni i % %  %  batweei u i Htadq %  He,.,i i 1 %  were Ii H |"Hl. I 0U Ol ... Rratri IfintA Capti Li i waa taking steps • ""H'* release Rmtrr ii. YTUTTOAnT. Am Red "Fifth Column Strikes Deep Into France. Germany Amenean|ZOO* !" ?*3******* Ifei v., fc^gwiek i,, fl( llfll|f .,, ,.,.,. MM R'-UliT. noneri in n new I meal Gennanv "somevvh"r Soviet Zone." u „ Thea* "agenU". b i. Han Jahn. cnairman of coining to West German* the German Transport Work-r via Switzerland led to tne InFrankfurt — Onir, ternphon^l Tr;.n.,port Woike,, Jlth n described Fr-mJS -,' .king at the Fen. m .„, .nd Dumelilnrt &%&^2Sss lenbun % %  N. u German. M.U,.", I. wen i-.. ;;t up to operate along UU Ea %  ea :.i. he *„i In France Askdre LafOttd, Seeretarv of the railway '•' Ihe Commuiuats' .... . etive in rrance n the transpor%  Congress, first hig Inter77/ i IE M) OFFERS U. \. 4,000 FIGHTING ME\ TI, LAKE I i 1HAII..,M, ,. ig informed th. Unite JI-CI t,, Ihe King %  approval ,i %  tt ill i',.,"": 1 '" 1 '" """ %  %  '' ."nl mi Nalinns f„i,es ,, K MmArllnir Is Official I .\. Comnuutder In Chief Tl„ "The %  nice rte 1-. power m 10ST ussed tha Tt i Of Argentine KORI A rtmrmiHHtu.. %  %  I larters in Tokyo .. ilacAi-t'iiir %  ihicf i.ient wgl %  %  | |. %  i'. ,,•• % %  • .itlineriliom.1 Trade L'n.or. col %  %  %  ll of the I ranspon Work. •so th. %  I %  triklnt Argentine seamen l oe dlreetM | %  Union, wbicb have -et -,.'tthur had %  I <><* new %  %  • Untti hat chief 111,'. I I %  %  Indulge. %  %  I theh —Renter %  —Reuier Renter % 




bY

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cet

a mea eT

Tuesday
July 25
19350





— Ravbados Se Aduorate °

Cabinet Will
Discuss Korea

P®i™Me MINISTER CLEMENT

LONDON, July 24.
ATTLEE ‘today unexpeci-

edly summoned a spetial meéting of the Cabinet to
pave the way for important statements on the defence of

Korea which he and the

ence Minister Emanuel Shin-

well, will make to Parliament on Wednesday.



U.K. Prepares

For General

Election
LONDON July 24.

Political tipsters 6h both sides
of the fence predict now that the
thin Socialist control of Britain's
affairs will last at least until next
Spring.

Some say the new election may
not come even that soon

Conservative foes of Prime Min-
ister Attlee have candidates lined
up to run for almost every seat
in the House of Commons, but
palitical chiefs who guide the
party still have no coherent pro-
gramme on paper. They don’t
think they’ll need one for several
more months.

The Labour Party is going full
speed ahead with a new platform

which stresses a slowdown on
public ownership plans.

Preliminary Plan

A preliminary plan has beer
drawn. It will get its final polish-
ing from Labour’s Executive
Committee this Wednesday and
then will be moved on to local
parties in each constituency fo
discussion. The final programme
will be ready by mid-October. Iu
that month they will also get

going over from the Labour
Party’s Annual Convention
The Prime Minister has the|

power to ask the King at any
time to dissolve Parliament and
call an election, but Labour Party
informants say Attlee is in no
mood to chance a test at the
polls yet and probably wont be
before next spring.

Last February’s balloting which
cut Labour’s majority from an
overwhelming control of | the
Commons to a shaky working
majority of nine showed political
sentiment evenly split in the coun-
try. Persistent tapping of popular
feeling has shown no convincing
swing to either Party.—(C.P.)

H.M.
£1,025,000 To
Rebuilding Castries



Govt. Gives

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
ST. LUCIA, July 24.
Subject to the approval of Par-
liament, His Majesty’s Govern-

The Cabinet is due to hold a
long session tomorrow to consider
the reports of the Department
Ministers and experts on how Bri-

tain. can give more concrete aid
in Korea,
Observers suggested that to-

day’s meeting was hurriedly sum-
moned to consider whether any
new steps had been considered by
Britain which would involve
emergency legislation before Par-
liament rises for the summer re-
cess this week

Colour was lent to this view by
the presence at a mecting of the

Attorney - General, Sir Hartley
Showcro and William Whiteley,
Chief Government Whip, who

would be consulted over any such
legislation.—Reuter.

11,500 U.S.





ment will provide the additional|taken to Brunswick.

sum of £189,000, making a petal

contribution to the reconstruction

of Castries of £1,025,000.
The announcement was

the Governor this morning to
Legislative Council, which

made
by
the
puid tribute to a strong presen-
tation of the case to the Colonial

Office by a delegation comprising | ,,

the Administrator, Mr. J. K. Stow,
the Hons. Garnet Gordon, Francis
Carasco, and Clive Beaubrun,

The delegation is leaving Eng-
land on Tuesday by the Maure-
tania via New York en route to
Castries where plans are already
under way to give the delegation
a rousing welcome home.

The Governor also afnounced
further success of the delegation
in obtaining a further grant of
£150,000 from the Colonial Devel-
cpment and Welfare reserves to-
wards roads and agriculture de-
development, and the Colonial
office is sending a committee of
experts to advise on the develop-
ment schemes with
of further Colonial
and Welfare

a possibility
Development
assistance,











TAX INCREASE IN U.S.

PRESIDENT TRUMAN to-day discussed with Congres-
sional Leaders the advisability of an immediate emergency

tax increase on both individual incomes and business firms naval f
House Speaker Sam Raeburn told reporters afterwards] "i

that the matter was “still in the conversation stage.”

Marines
Increased
60 Per Cent

WASHINGTON, July 24
An immediate 60 per cent.
increase is planned for the fight-
ing strength of the United States
Marine Corps, usually re fiable
Congressional sources said te-day.
They also said the Navy was

preparing
three—more
duty as quic
House m
plans after
Armed Serv s Committee, wit
Admiral Sherman, Chief of Naval

two—and
aircraft
kly

nber

possibly
carriers
possible
told

losed session of the

for





of these








ive told t n that an increase

about 57,000 men would be

nade the Marines’ strength

which on June 30 was reported

75,000

The air squadrons, would be
inereased from 12 to 18,

—Reuter.





reported to}







|
|
|

|

pies



PHOTO SHOWS : South Korea
front in the Suwon area.



from North Korea.—Express.













n troops making their way on foot and
Suwon has now fallen into the hands of the





















by lorry









Communist



a

THREE

| sa

PAGE





CLAIM FALL OF
VITAL U.S. BASES

ie (With MacArthur’s Headquarters in Korea)
Nehru Sends

, duly 24
ORTH KOREAN Communist forces today
A Secret
Message

claimed the capture of Yongdong, main high
way town on the road to Taeju, and the heart of
the American forces defence area sinee the with
drawal from Taejon. ;

|
WASHINGTON, July 24 The North Korean claim, brdadcast by Moscow
‘ as reported to-day 19 pave oer’ | radio, put North Korean tanks and infantry 22 air
&@ secret personal appeal to the} miles down the high road from the former South
cdi io 5 Ein. Chaat | Korea temporary capital, and more than half way
have Communist China “seates’ | to Kumchon, vital rail and road junction town on

in the United Nations

the direct route to the United Nations main supply

The message has been w ek |
from pablinntinn e Pelee | base at Pusan.
request, the report said. Diplo | The claim of the capture of Yongdong was made in a
matic offic dale told a 7 t North Korean communique. The last communique of Geu
aaa tae Ob ti eetetns eral MacArthur's Headquarters said American troops bad
proposal made to both Americ: | successfully defied frontal assaults in their defence lines
towards the battle and Russia on July 13 that Com-} in the Yongdong area, effectively blasting repeated waves
forces invading munist China be admitted to the of infantry attacks.
|


































United Nations with the hope that | ———_.__ ae ri MacArthur Communique
ae inher sdets. a5 . Russia would co-operate to en: — ald 1 issault in ithe Yongdong
TROOPS IN the Korean fighting | @6 Reds’ Sta e ector began after a hours artil-
5) Nehru's secret message wi | ; = £ lery and mortar bombardmen of
BRITAIN Sabotage At fi l A 350 3 reported to explain his motive - ao ir os {em . Me me
| if} an = n making the proposal, and we Manoeuvres | ¢ merican gun topped 1
- } . | aults in their track
ip rently intended to foresta’ | J ‘ ul ‘
Pri HEIDEN, Sy 24 Portsmouth & , n imminent American rejectio: | r Yongdong lie pe ye rant San
oe kept inister Attlee told | e Nehru was reported to hav : B67, new capita ee
Parliament today that the United SAYS ATTLEE | I T, irged that America abandon her | IN ROME | aor am : . ae net mee ar
States had 180 aireraft, 10,000 Air | 1 eS iemand that North Koreans muet ; ‘ a is f '
Force men and 1,500 naval men | “ withdraw to the 38th parallel be } ROME, July 24. ne
in Britain , LONDON, July 24 | (By E. L. COZIER) fore China's membership of — the Strong forces of invading “Red Southwest Tip
Airmen were in three medium Prime Minister Clement Attlee 1 NOTTINGHAM, July 24 United Nations could be consider. | troops reinforced by tanks ar North Korean forces have swe\
bomber groups. Attlee was reply-| told Parliament today that the ENGLAND ‘ viges tan mga te Hada Ei ed. Officials said he contended that armoured cara were today ade ye unceposdl eee eer ae
ing to a request for information| blowing up of nine ammunition - put up a good hight today against tremendous if America agreed to admit Com | vancing "t . Ua ene aes west tip of the Korea Peninsula
by Leftwing Labour member| barges at Portsmouth on July 14,{ Odds and until the last hour of the afternoon it looked very} munist China to the — United rough “ppt ey i ca General MécArthuré Headauat
Stephen Davies, who has been| Was due to sabotage. much as though the Dunkitk spirit would bring her through] Nations, and Russia then petined siuhvauvhes staged ber tealy tines | tere alac-enndlnded
critical of the Government's foreign It had not yet been possible to| to save the third Test match, Fortunately for the West Indies, ad oa ne ee oan the war \ midnight Communique issued
policy. Opposition members cheer-| establish who did it Yardley and Insole failed’ at the crucial moment and the | 2°, 2&4 tor Russi fficials were} More than 20,000 Italian troops,;here said the tank and infantry
ed Attlee’s statement and Labour Attlee said it was a miracle that ? : oe opinion American officia watched by the Italian Defence] teams of the invading norther:
s 3 cae Sainte Tne rospect for tomorrow is that the five last men must hold sased «to. «know more about | “4 et ‘ d reached the South K
Member Seymour Cocks said it|there was not serious loss of life , plea c ., | Minister, Randolfo Picciardi, were | ami ad reach e South fF
was better to have Allied armed|among workers in the Armament on for England at least until tea time and score at a ru Nehru’s motives, but i toking part in a three-day exer~[fean oaval base at MORPO, close
forces in Britain than enemy|Depot, and among their families minute, or remain out there even longer if their rate of{ | not expected to change their po cise which was being held in the {t@ the southern coastal road to
° : . : : = Pp { I w United Nation
armed forces,—Reuter. living near to Bedenham Harbour, scoring is lower, in order to Save the situation itio Reuter Tuscan Appening ee iz pet :. Me ! alo ilatined
where the explosion occurred, ; So Of the English batsmen today, Invading and defence troops the naval base f Mokpo was al-
The explosion damaged nearly Parkhouse, although he did not 3 nva + ay ‘ i 0 ave i o k vas i
9 S eelts 14: taht . P ll on Re vere equipped with Italy late ready occupied
wt Held In Uranium Tver building within more than Formosa make as much as Washbrook « 7 . weapons, including military sup The North Korean Army today
5 a mile of the blast but no one was Simpson, impressed me most fa\ Should B.G. Join plic ent by the United State: [thrust forward from Kwangju, the
Smuggling Charge seriously injured ourably. He is a closer APproxi=j , under ithe Atlantic Pact southernmost town they have yet
Answering Anth ony Eden, Awaits Red mation to the West Indian idea of i B W l Ky deration? Defending troops, the “Blue taken, only 31 miles from South-
HELMSTEDT, British zone Deputy Opposition Leader, Attlee @ batsman—a man who make +) . of e r ire composed of 12,000 men” of | East Korea
July ‘a4 said that extra precautions had Yuns at the same time that he is | fe Stirs Bee eee edanadieis the Friuli Division backed — b But.on the central front Ameri-
West German border police to-\been taken at the Admiralty nvasion. rae beautifOi strokés, not get LONDON, July 24 units of the Italian Air Force can troops backed by artillery
day said they had arrested two\Establishment for some weeks. oe the bat to the ball howevei | Whether British Guiana. should Military observers from Britain }threw back a tank supported at
2 aa . i scri e’s state- : e can | si ‘edera- | the United States, France, Greece | tack near Yongdong, 25 mile
sastapghe sen ARIS on i. ¥ Soe ch ates ao indeela” TAIPEI, Formosa, July 24 The Masters ee eee Giviectiond and Ronis oa South East of Taejon
i i Peet rat C ‘ ader { the A Defence Ministry spokesman Thi sb rg { tion wed eee Crear atow vatching the manoeuvres Reuter
into the Soviet Zone of Germany,|Clement Davies, Leader o ef: t is is batting in the tradition! respondent lately in Georgetown | \Wvé a eu This is whete the reconhaigsance
; , Rote soee se ae « -|said on Monday a number o s ; eet 7
Uranium valued at several| Liberals, said it disclosed a “very junks were approaching Quemoy of Hammond, Hobbs, and the other jin The Times today s tteemiicinilaletd ta tiitiic ik had reveale 1 Communist
million marks was confiscated startling situation”. Attlee said, : pp “hinese| Masters, so is that of Hutton: so,| Though many in BG. realisé forces massing in “cOnsidérable
or : avr gs Pa. aches {sland under cover of Chinese + titede ie The identities of the arrested|the facts he gave today were the Communist artillery barrage leve, is that of Compton, so] that self-Government is not } . ik strength” for the offensive dow:
men were not disclosed, interim report of the Board of it Way be. the fong-expected g oy of pawsrer, though whyjble in the aren in ae U.S. L risoners jthe main road towards the pro-
7 . seatide!) ectwaanll iw on . ee 3 : at , ney do not play Joe, still making} packets", the writer says “An ele sions 50 1 ca of Taeiu
] oF an So a sea ean = ci fp a enn attempt Lt, ge me plenty of Site Tt oad Me the raat of ‘intransigent Demararian ryt cn the ‘Bast ee aa ‘ue 2 he
ast Friday after the police here | plosion—Reuter. Nationalist-held island used as} jvapc oa. : f ; 6! otherwise They fear that Marched Throu hi : ee t i
had b “t off” by a third - averages, is more than I and | fee otherwi 'North Korean ire still holding
cael a ten ee e sar 2s “ya blockade base against the Reds.| others— can understand isuch a union would result in the | 7 j the recantured port of Yongdak. a
pe k for f tyes aS sti ming ce 5 ' The spokesman said National- Of course, the opening pair did} uncontrolled influx of immigrants | Seoul Streets j little more than 31 miles from the
ak ee ee, ae Raat ef U.K. Brokers Fear ist forces on Quemoy just off the} everything that was expected of }from the islands : | American beach-head at Pohang
ne Be are aut td ne | r mainland port of Amoy were them, more in fact; didn’t they set| The opponents of a One OR KOREA, Ju no news of battle had reached
led officials here said it was} ° : adequate to meet the expected uD : 5 Arann ees j win 24 tal of B.G's continenta . A win baad ees ‘ 1 .
“ ’ | P a néw record and make more | also ain Fifty American prisone here
seudiat oe a New Taxation Red attack, than any English opening pair Se destiny” which is ee excep! paraded through the streets o Reports of growing Communist
s Ss Ss § Ped ¥ a» 9 » sense that the intensifica : 10) ‘ 5
¢ _ . . 7 done in the last 12 years in the sense a Seoul by Communists to show jconcentrations building up for a
It_was later disclosed that wo | Stock Market Dull He said they would be suppor- But they “made “it by dogged] tion of trade with the interior of | vorthern ‘superiority’ according | Major offensive brought the Allied
es aceon ee iy De téd by locally-assigned National-| determination rather than by| Brazil would be mutually profita to a Korean doctor who escapea {Air Forces out in some of their
LONDON, July 24. J ist air and naval units classy cricket. Both produced the | ble 3 ( : from the forme? capital biggest raids today as skies clear-
~ Mesvousaras, reparipe. is Communist artillery began}rare occasional flash. but to West Racial Considerations The doctor said today some|°4 4nd gave Australian and Amer-
Sorean situation anc inisteria’ | bombarding the town of Guanau Indian eyes it was pretty « These “ws, argues a Times ih : ican airmen their chance to ham-
a ; Nie a ” AVES as . dull. 1 ese view rg souls Seoul believed th
Leopold Back On te ee ae eet pet eg Ty on Quemoy’s northeast coast at] would rather see J match lost |correspondent, are — affec td by erm ae ae fe enpeta ct bun [Mer away at fo of Com-
possible increase = ¢ juli. | Lt p.m. on Sunday. The spokes-} than suffer to see W ‘ll, Weekes. [racial considerations Africans |-P@! ‘ . munist strenget!
= defence expenditure created dull- : r at er to see orrell; weekes, [eee : Nadert be- | Russians dressed in American
Postage Stamps ness tt ; the London Stock Conde Tiras vie at = SRE aeeet: Stollmeyer Marshall, j'¢ a ene rey Pons ia {|} uniform. He walked from Seoul Unopposed
- yi x i "hr Trestre +] ce > é i artec . ‘ .
3 July og Exchange to-day : Bonn tntatitst “eal id ‘the viein ty j ind ef a 7, eee eee, we B.G. would one day be dominated | in ten days disguised as « peasan It wax learnéd here that North-
BRUSSELS, July 24, Amon the overseas issues ; einitys kind of game : ; elaritt Indians He said he saw one “reaction- |.) e Buahed iiaci ,
thal Le ld Ill & of Quemoy would pass the island by an Indian majorit rn troops pushed cautiously and
A portrait of King Leopold Japanese bonds —_ encountered | f° *! Mriict. atts = an : 7 hes etd on the other hand feared absorp- | ary” executed, almost unopposed towards the
ill re-appear on Belgian postage heavy selling and declined by itt i a) iy ack on Formosa | Rae—English Approach ition in a mainly African dominion Seoul was flooded with pictures | woot coast t. sated et
stamps tomorrow, postal authori- some five points, European bonds be OOKS PAs Quemoy is going tof Only Rae has this English ap of three millions of which thejof Stalin and the northern leader thisadtentis f rr the y ye
ties announced here today, _ were lower where they were their target, he said ; {proach to the game and althougt combined Indian populations of} Kim Irsun, he sald ae i Kare POM, .f " . oe
The series to be issued will be changed with Germans and Aus- —Can. Press.| 1 readily admit that we badly |}Guiana and Trinidad would hard (Reuter.) [ou ae aha ss
the same as that sold immediate=' trians one to two points off iy acualsa tenth formed by tre provisional capital
ly re the wart ie ieee i Oil shares were dull, Anglo- { @ On Page 7 The necessity of providing iatentisenciltabeie | Taeju, the supply por oh, I —
jserics of stamps Will be issue in Iranian lost 5.32 at 5 13-16 . ‘ " ed for minorities ap ind the American beach head at
the ‘near future with a portrait/and recent upward move-| New Constitutions fet the whole of the Carib-| Canadian Minister |? ;
a pe a ne oe. ment in the commodities shares F 4 1 i 8 Y Ol | SI { b ( It was one of the 4 , Today action near Yongdor
ie authorities said.—Reuter. shacke rial shares » : ret Soke ; 7 on the central front in whic
was checked Industrial shares or oO on es ear c 10o0ts mak Kaaers a he recent A | . I
; ‘ f ain reaso why 1 Be FOS |": : eo
lost ground, but there was_firm- SC. AC. Report insisted on the Drow ns Al sap ~ | Aémericar roop iecessfull
t ness in shipbuilding, aircraft and a . J : : I tae a checked both frontal assaults anc
TIGHTEN UP selected beavy industries having The Colontit Bae te * Mother:F ather, ailed tu _ bY ee et S oni 7s -“ NIGERIA, July 24 flanking att gro
e ; y an- ure of a seconc rambe eiteda Skielton, Canad .
; ce war potential Hit ; ee rs . ~ , ete ; ws Alexander Ski co-operat
WASHINGTON, July 24. South African gold shares eased | MOUnced changes in the constitu- JONESBORO ARKANSAS sisting of nominated members} peouty Trade Minister, wa he ta
President Truman today ordered oh some selling which was main- tions of four colonies of the July 24 Therein concludes the corre rowted in Lawos’ lakoon while
the Federal Bureot of Investiga~ ly from local sources. Diamonds|Wimdward Islands in the West A seventy-two year old father] pondent, “may lie a solution for} iit yachting late on Frida { Communist tration tact
tion to tighten its programme were improved on the assumption Indies ive his small son a hurried lesson [British Guiana too rhe police authoritic id this | dition heoaten of clan beret
against “espionage, sabotage and c ; . oo #he A rksmanship then ordered hin Por ¥ that his body ha ‘ ' tua
8 Pi) BL s that there would be a sharp in “ : Aabiciininirtitdlanad iorning that } hetween V8 ut roop
re cae F crease in the United States demand The Legislative Gouneils wil} \to shoot his mother police said to een found the air force
e called on citizens to give the oe vd y . consist of 14 members, including| ‘ay ’ F Kiel te 3 ere to inve —"
" trial diamonds._-Reuter ist o members, including : Skielton, 43, v here ‘ wo tive. On v tr
Bureau all possible help.—Reuter,|for industrial , presidents who will be island| Mrs Jewel White 42, was now Captured U.K. igate the allocation bet aaa oe ae: Se ve ul
Administrators and not Governors.} i" hospital with a bullet wound ir A lorth and South Nigeria in the |formed of their movemen 5
Sj i » g ti : ‘ Headquarter corfirmed th
7 > rs “gf | Eight members will be elected by| er right lung and her husband Officer Safe ew constitution ghee Flea tie
TRUMAN WANTS INCOME \_ U.S. Will Defend |i rr si ee i sd Sate Se An‘economist ine headed Cana. [five or six North Korean, ta
giving a cleafer majority. to kill—-even though the shot wi LONDON, Jup 24 i's Cornmmittee set up in 1948 to| were knocked out. One more
Pescadores Th n nity by his eight year old Captain Vyvian Holt, a Briti uide Canada’s role in the Euro-| reported out of action this mor
; e remainder wi consist of} Billy Minister in Seoul, captured whe an Pecover Programme ing and po ly another
WASHINGTON, July 24 three ex-officié mernbers who will Breagd said nae White pere this |North Korea forees entered tl! Reuter, / Reuter
: : I 9 The State Department said to-]retain the right to vote until the] ¢xplanation er a quasrel with |oity earlier this. month, is safe
WASHINGTON, July 24. day that the Pescadores Islands | ministerial system can be estab- her, her husband handed Billy a The Foreign Office to-day ar ‘
off the southwest coast of Formosa }lished and three be nominated] 22 calibre rifle took him into the |nounced it had received a. eal ny ‘ ]
would be defended by’ American | pjembers. back yard and showed him how to |from him reporting that he as ] HA IL N 7 i e+ 79
orces if Chinese Commu- The life of the Councils will be hoot They retu 1 to the house two members of his staff wer Z ao
sts attacked them. tnree years. There will be no yhete the father t “if she don't jnow near Pyongyang, the Nort! ay HT NG Wh N
At a news conference, the State} jiterary test for voters. Executive] °°,'i#ht shoot her Korean capital J [ 7 / a
) Department spokesman said the | ouneils Way hich the Governor| ,â„¢Mts, White and her husband] A Foreign Office spokesma 9
Hearings began in Congress to- Pescadores Islands fell in the | -QUMCuS i ¥ sid ri ill be tarted fighting. He swung at hei | said he could not say how Cay Er ATICCPae Thly 94
‘day on thé Government Home| general. area of Formosa which|Will continue to abet Fc qoe| with @ Cane and she at him with a|tain Holt had managed to sene LAKE SUCCESS July 24
| Front Programme ‘ President Truman at the outbreak |™Made more el ged swe BN a om piece of wood. During the strug- | eable THAILAND has informed the United Nati that
. W. Stuart Sympington described of the Korean War said would be]clusion of three members elected | vie Mrs. White heard her husband It was stated last Saturday tl eet to the King’s approval, she will offer a combat te:
this programme to a Committee defended by the American Fleet |by the Legislative Councils. torder “shoot her son” and the boy !ritain was taking steps to sex J ' 0 ‘fi . te ‘ 1 men to fieht with tl} 1
as aimed to “take profiteering out —Reuter. —Reuter. fred.—Reuter. Captain Holt’s release —Reuter Si ‘i OY tite % in K ~~: .
of war". Sympington is Chairman Nations’ forces in Korea ae
of the National Security Resources . orn en temaye { — . , This was the first oft
3oard which has the job of plan- | received here Im respons :
sn fcr rons ove Pa Red ‘Fifth Column’”’ Strikes Tee Ts ee euns te
ontrols and Civi ence in the appeal,
event of war e tgs ls The United Natior Headqu
The Government Controls Bill Of ficial U.N. ters also disclosed aa
does not involve the price controls | gv ‘Les pobiet: pie e cee etter py
or controls over man-power. But Commanzider In Chief Unites Nevons ty a setter to
[ Secre Gener
Sympington told Senators these . s ieee, : eee ovat yee .
things were under consideration ; # ' KOREA, July 24 ioe ae d
and might be requested later “£| STUTTGART. American Zone, Germany “somewhere in the over, Brunswick, Oldenburg an o take place in Germany since S communique from General! eo! " .
| needed July 24 Soviet Zone.” : Hremen in Northern Germany Hitler ame to power in 1983 lacArthur toda iid that i t €
Sympingtor also id there These “agents”, he said were Espionage groups were being today cussed the Federation’s| inited Nation ) ur th
| would an effort avoid e@ Herr Hans Jahn, chairman of coming to West Germany mainly -et up to operate along the East- call for boycott of Argentine; jeneral Headquarter loky : indovs
| piecer de of emergency |the German Transport Workers via Switzerland Vest German zone border if ship jhas been officially « ed ' , me
{measures used in World War IT Union, today appealed to the In- Frankfurt — Centre cessary, he said Helgessen, President of the! yqearthur cor nder
| —Reuter jternational Transport Workers Jahn described Frankfurt a: In France Swedish Transport Workers, criti-| .pijeg
| | Federation for help in fighting the centre of the Communist un- Andre Lafond, Secretary of the cised the dockers affiliated to ia Gene AY 1 th I
. y . . oie oie “Communist infiltration into West derground movement in West Ger yndicate of the French railway Federation who had so far failed ‘bie Gene .
° f > t rib i
FISH AND CHIE Ss CLI E |Germany.” Speaking at the Fed- many and Dusseldorf as “its orke aid the Communist ipport of the Feder 2 Or 5 G t
9 LONDON, Monday jeration’s C here, he said organisation headquarters.” He “Fifth Column” were increasingly tior lecision to bach triking | he 1
| A 20-year separation ended/this infiltra was becoming also claimed knowledge of planned active in France. “Concentrating” Argentine seamen ons Co wn
when Miss Lay Ma s0timore and more serious He sabotage acts primarily against in the transp« ysterr vhict His criticisms were believec The er reiterat it M
in touch with a sister in the mid-| alleged that former German Ajit stallations of West German reil- i t t \ f ! be directed among o Brit ‘
lands after seeing her ame 1- | Force General Kurt Henschel was w: ys at Essen and Dortmund in pplie time f wa which née ’ NY W Va
tioned in a new ner pédltraining Commun*st espionage the r, Munich Rothenburg The Congres f big inter punce the attitude . . ; Reuter Reuter
around meal of fish-a up isk West an buehl in Bavaria, Han- or Trade n nferer ~—Reuter .




that. this

PAGE_ SIXTEEN
STEEL



e

members and friends of the immediate family were on hand for the simple double-ring cereinony.
bride’s father, Philip R. Mather, a prominent steel and real estate man of Boston,

his daughter away



HEIRESS WEL

BRIDGEHAMPTON, NEW YORK:



Ac tals
ps has

4 at
3a

a

Steel heiress Ann

Mather,
Montero, 40 year-old negro director of New York's Urban League Fund, are shown after their wedding
ceremony at the seashore home of Mrs. Charles F,. Brush, Jr., in an exclusiv> section of Bride ban

Their romance stemmed from their common interest in fighting racial discrimination. Some twenty odd

30,

AMERICANS PREPARE
FOR WORLD STRUGGLE

The home front, at this

NEW YORK, July 23.
early stage of the Korean war,

was to-day occupying more of the minds of Americans than

the actual fighting thousands of miles away. )
of food, clothes and other goods likely to be short in a high- “hite, man starts lite wit

Panic buying

ly mobilised war effort, reflected the feeling that the majori-
ty of families were thinking of the months, perhaps vears

ahead,

It also created artificial
shortages and high prices. The
sales of nylon stockings on the
WcSt Coast had risen by 400 per
cent. Throughout the country
pr.c@B Yor tocds had begun ta
recket. Scme shops were com-
pletely sold out of sugar

.
sngulf The World
Americans were prepaiing to
pirdthernsalves for a struggle that
might engulf the world and not



merely settle a United Na ion’:
peaineple. They were not pleased
by the slowness of the nation’s

ty Council’
words with

Secu
backing

supporting the
veSautions in



ceeds

The majcrity seemed ready tu
believe that the support’ would
come in the: end Only a tiny
minority cf Americans, 150,000,000
people thought that the ' United
States could nave done anything
clse than what it did

Feelings of patriotic pride swept
the country on ihat — fateful
Saturday night of June 24, when
they first heard of the North
Korean invasion on the'r radios.
The United States had carried out
lis pledge. Every statement and
vetion of their President since
then had been warmly supported
Shocked Surprise
war news was stil] read
casily. The casualty lists, still
small, but ail too big for the
«fected families, were appearing
in their daily newspapers

The

Shocked surprise at the puny
forces the United States could im-
mediately deploy to meet the
invaders was the original reaction
to vivid frontline dispatches
splashed on the front pages

But as more forces went into
action, as the American and
Australian air squadrons . bom-

barded North Korean concentra-
tions, as the American and British
Commonwealth warships proved
they controlled the regions of the
narrow seas, confidence began to

return,
Americans knew to-day that
the situation was. still s rious,

that the American way of lite was
foing to be temporarily shattered,
that the danger of a wider con-
fiect was apparent.

Gut the voice of opposition was
«il but stilled as their leaders
went about the business of win-
ning a war,—Reuter,



MORE MOLASSES
FOR TRINIDAD

call
vessel

port
load of

Making its third
week,’ the motor
Kuby® arrived in

take another
pan molasses for Trinidad

The vesse! completed its load-
ing yesterday and will be leaving
some time today for Trinidad. This
last load made a total of approxi-
mately 378.000 gallons of molasse
has taken here
for Trinidad during the week

for the
“Athel
yesterday

vacuum

The “Athel Ruby" is expected
to make another quick call for
molasses.

[ Theyil Do it Every Time



40 --

\ih us UNCLE JOHNNY’S GOT HIS GUN,
THE FISH ARE JUMPING ss.

BUT GAME--THERE'S NoNE!!



HM.S. “Sparrow ig

*
Coming
H.M.S. “Sparrow” will visit
arbados from the llth to the
.oth of September.
H.M.S. “Sparrow” is one of

‘he Biack Swan class of frigates
built for convoy protection. She
is of approximately 1,450 tons
displacement and carries six 4
inch guns in addition to a num-
ber of smaller close range anti-
aireraft guns. Her anti-submar-
ine equipment includes depth
charges, Her complement is eight
«fficers and 180 men,

H.M.S, “Sparrow” was built
on the river Clyde in Scotland,
and launched early in 1946. She

was first commissioned for service
in the Royal Navy in December,
1946, joining the America and
Weos lidies Squadron two months
later.

During her first commission,
which ended in May, 1949, at
Devonport, England, she steam-

ed over 65,000 miles. She visited

piaces as diverse as Vancouver,
8.C., Montevideo, Miami and
Jamaica; she also steamed 1,000

miles up the Amazon to Manaos
end spent three months in the
Welkland Islaid Dependencies
south of Cape Horn. Since her re-
turn to the America and West In-
ales Station in October, 1949, she
has already steamed 25,000 miles
in the Caribbean and to Brazil,
Uruguay and Argentina.

H.M.S “Sparrow is the
eighth ship of the Royal Navy to
bear the name “Sparrow.” The
first “Sparrow” was captured
irom the Dutch in 1653, the
second spent part of the Napo-
‘eonic Wars on the West Indies
Station and the fourth was sta-
tioned in South American waters
for over five years from 1837.

Captain Boord

Her present Commanding Offi-
cer is Captain S. J. S. Boord

Captain Boord entered the
Royal Navy through the Royal
Navy College. Osborne. in Janu-
cry, 1918, and first went to sea
in the autumn of 1921 as a
Cadet in the training battleship
“Thunderer.” He subsequently
rerved in, the battleships “Royal

Oak" (on two oceasions). “Royal
Sovereign”, “Malaya”, and in the
destrover “Valhalla”, loth in the

Atlantic and Mediterranean fleets
until he was selecte’ to special-
ise in gunnery in 1929.



He was then employed = on
sunnery duties in all classes of
rhips including the Ist Submar-

ine and the 19th Destroyer Flot-



illas in the Mediteryanean, the
cruisers, “Curacao” in China and
the “London” in the Mediterran-
ean the Chilean © battleship
“Almirante Latorre’ whilst that
ship was being rearmed, and

finally in the battleship “Rodney”
in the Home Fleet from 1938
1940; during these periods he
also served on the instructional
staffs of al! three naval gunnery
schools in England when he was
able to keep in with
modern development

In 1940—1942 he was at
Admiralty engaged in the

touch

the
pro-






=







SS NEGHO DIRECTOR



ae

OW HE'S
SO THE FISH STAY ;
AND LOOK WHAT’S oOuT !

bs






Le
wae
”

and her husband Frank Curie

The
was on hand to give
Erpres

White Or
Coloured
All Start Level

WE are all
Yello

brothers
brown, black or
th the

unae





skin
samé inborn capacities tor good or
evil, achievement or failure
‘Ynat is what a group
world’s leading scientists say
day in a report described by the
Ministry o: Education as “the
nos. lar-reaching and competent
pronouncement of its kind ever
made
The



t
to-

public
London

of

report, made
Unesco simultaneously in
and Paris, starts with a series
denials. For instance

Chere is NO biological founda-
tion for rac.al discrimination

there is No proof that groups
of mankind differ in intelligence
or temperarment-—the range of
mental capacity in all races is











mu-h ihe same a
A* al Myth
There is NO evidence that race

mix ures produce biologically bad

iesults and there is NO hiological

justification for banning inter-
racial! marriage-—“The social re-
sults of race mixtures are to be
iracved to social factors

The report, noting that ‘People
who live in Iceland or England or

India are not races,’ goes on

“Race is less a biological fact
than a social myth. As a myth it
has in recent years taken a heavy
toll in human lives and suffering
and still keeps millions of persons
from normal development, and
civilisatign from the full use of

the co-operation of productive
minds

“Tests have shown essential
similarity in mental characters
among all human racial groups



All human beings possess educ



bility and adaptability, the traits, |

which more than all others have
permitted the development of
men’s mental capacities.”

Just to underline this,
laude Levi-Strauss, one of phe
tuthors of the report told a stéry
n Paris last night. He said:—

“Fifteen years ago Professor
Vellard, professor of biology at
Lima, Peru, went into the jungle |
of Paraguay in search of a ‘Stone |
Ave" tribe

“The natives fled, leaving a
baby girl two years old. Professor
Vellard took her back to Lima
She is now a brilliant biology stu-

dent, and the personal ¢ stant of



her adoptive father.” | re
‘uction of new equipment to
Coucdac the tnreat from the air,

at the end of which he was re-
Woieed by in appolstment for
nection with assault
dhe Mediterranean



wah 4 ‘ ce
landings in



where he had served for so many |

earn

Algiers, E

he was present at Oran,

Tripoli and Zuara





(Libya), ily and finally

a3 a Local Naval Commander

iv the victorious sault = at |
1 erne in September, 1943. He

then returned to ihe “Rodney

as Second-in-Commuand, where

curing two years that fine olc

ship was employed in the Medi
tervanean, the North Atlantic, at
Murmansk, and for bombarding
shore targets in the assault o
Normandy and at Alderney

\t the conclusion of the World

War, Captain Boord was Com |
mander of the Royal Naval Bar- |
racks at Portsmouth where his
principal task was the speedy |
return of large numbers of war-
time sailors to civilian life, He
has recently filled g staff ap- |
pointment in the naval aviation, |

and assumed Command of H.M.S
“Sparrow” in August, 1949

Jimmy Hatlo |

AFTER BASS OR TROUT

IN-—~











OPPS PEE

GOSSS

*

by |

Professor |

|
|
he |
|
}

SUNDAY



THE BRIDGETOWN PLAYE?

swe Ro



f

———
. 7,7,7575* peo oto
EEA SOE AS AOE

DANCE NOTICE }
1°"): Biecest ! *

WILTON PONNET'S
COTTON Dts: jANCI

Nites
2nd, 1350

Sa urdcy eptem-er

Mus‘ec by Ciivie G.tlens



Â¥
‘

‘

BAR SOLID v
ss

\

.

Sabscription 3

POPC 0 tne te |

SSE
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ci ina |



ore ——

ANNUAL. DANCE |







—————
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3} SUPER SALE
BARGAINS











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%
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} % Vrints — washable, 40c, yd. » |
. Fase ace ie tab wa. SI
e 36° wide—49c, yd. » |
* Plastic Raincoats—-$2,18 ea. 9
| < Rubber Sandals — 5c. up % |
| » Boys Socks — 12c. a pair y
, ‘Anklets — — lic. up ¥
: to ea. &
| s Woollens, Shoes & Hats, ¥
| * White Drill i8e. ya ¥ i)
» Children’s Vests —- 20¢. ea. ¥ | ii
* Khaki Drill yd. | {
. Boys’ Caps — fe. ea. \ | )
s Vests (Gerts. & Ladies) P| \
| % Children’s Pantics (Plastic) ¥ I
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re * : .
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s Dress Goods & Housebold % |
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FoF tel lalate tht (otal OO





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The
Beast

0. C. S. Makhei
& Co., Ltd.
Jop Scorors in
Jailonring

ADVOCATE

C. B. RICE & Co.

a Silver Cup, and $25.00 in cash, Presented by Cow & G
SPFCOND PRIZE—S10.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate, Ltd

THIRD PRIZE— and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate and (9)



OF

TROPICAL SUITINGS

IN STOCK

AT

OF

BOLTON LANE

. " ee PRIzrs
FIRST PRIZE—The Cow and Gate Silver Challenge Row! to keep for one (1) year,



Souvenir Gifts

1 All babies mast be under

RULES:





2 years of age on October

A postcard size photograph of baby must be sent in

tins of Cow
$ Parents

& Gate Milk Pood

agree to abide by the selections of the

final judges

The twelve (12) lesding babies will be selected by a Board of Judges for final judg-

The names of the selected twelve wiil appear in the “Sundey Advocate” of
November

ine.

Indu,

ysteard
L certify
enciose

COW & GATE Milk

ENTRY FORM

ESLIE & CO.,

P.O. Box

LTD.,

216,

Representative
Collins’ Budding



enter my baby for Barbado

lids taken from

Food

tee and Judues

Baby's
Born on
Weight
Parents
Address

Signature

Date

COW & GAT

| eens te een
ere

at Birth

Name

of Parent of Guardian

THIS IS YOUR ENTRY FORM—C

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th and the final judging will take place on Saturday

Bonniest Daby

I agree to ahide by the deci







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GARBADINE in Emerald Green, Pink, Red, Gold, Lime Green
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SHANTUNG in Blue, Rose, Cream, Pink & Gold @ $1.16 per yd.
1950 STYLES LADIES SHOES in White, Black & Brown Suede
Prices ranging from $11.36 to $12.37 —Cuban Heels.

Also DRESSES, SUNSUITS, SHORTS & SLACKS Etc., Etc.

ROADWAY DRESS SHOP.

—





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ANTLCORROSIVE PAINT
a lil tails bine Wess ittnls «ont





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Stocked in:
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Super Black (Ileat Resis ing)
in tins of Imperial NI

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10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.



Bonniest Baby

search for Barbados’

Bonnies: Baby ef 1950 is

on, and mothers are invited to enter Lacie babies for
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Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babi.s and

this competition is open to all babics {J

1} on Cow &

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Best Milk for Babies when Natura! Feeding fails.

» Ltd.



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gether with

Pommittee

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‘4 lids from

and the

18th November,

Co



ENTRIES CLOSE ON SEPTEMBER 30. 1950

of 19502



and 1]
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delay Get a tin from your nearest dealer and put baby on

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(

THE COW & GATE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL


Tuesday.
July 25
19350



REDS SWE
Cabinet Wiilj |
Discuss Korea |

LONDON, Jiily 24.
ATTLEE today unexpeci-



RIME MINISTER CLEMENT

edly summoned a 5s meeéting of the Cabinet to
pave the way for important stat ts on the defence of |
Korea which he and the Defence inister Emanuel Shin.
well, will make to Parliament on Wednesday.

Se The Cabinet is due to hold a
U.K. Prepares



long session tomorrow to consider
the reports of the Department {
Mibisters and experts on how Bri-









tain. can give more eonerete aid
For General |"
Observers Suggested that to-

day’s meeting was hurriedly sum-
to consider whether any
new stens had been considered by
Britain which would involye
emergency legislation before Par-
liament rises for the summer re-
cess this week,

Colour was lent to this view by
the presence at a meeting of the
Attorney - General, Sir Hartley
Showcross, and William Whiteley,
Chief Government Whip, who
would be consulted over any such
legislation.—Reuter.

Election
LONDON July 24.
Political tipsters 6n both sides
of the fence predict now that the
thin Socialist control of Britain’s
affairs will last at least until next
Spring.
Some say the new election may
not come even that soon.
Conservative foes of Prime Min-
ister Attlee have candidates lined






































PHOTO SHOWS : South Kore.





Rarbad

KP SO
























an troops making their Way on foot and by

















SoUTH KOREANS MARCH TO BATTLE

7























Aduncate -
UTH TOWA

9

THREE

| a

PAGE

1

~

RDS PUSAI





- CLAIM FALL OF

VITAL U.S. BASES

| Nehru Sends
A Secret |
Message

WASHINGTON, July 24

Indian

was reported to-day to have sen
& secret personal

(With MacArthur’s Headquarters in Korea)
, duly 24

NORTH KOREAN Communist forces today

claimed the capture of Yongdong, main high
way town on the road to Taeju, and the heart of
the American forces defence areg since the. with
| drawal from Taejon. ;
The North Korean claim, brdadcast by Moscow
| radio, put North Korean tanks and infantry 22 air
| miles down the high road from the former South

Prime Minister, Nehru

appeal to the

Athenee ib See ‘irort' | Korea temporary capital, and more than half way
Acheson in a ur er emo t | : . . ;

have Communist China “seates’} to Kumchon, vital rail and road Junction town on
in the United Nations hnen | the direct route to the United Nations main supply

The message has been withhel

ro ublication at Nehru | base at Pusan.
calnedie ie. aman sate Dink The claim of the capture of Yongdong w as made ina
matic oMcials told reporters t North Korean communique.. The last communique of Gen
Sibdee We tee cn at aii ' eral MacArthur's Headquarters said American oat i
ainibent made to both Americe | suecessfully defied frontal assaulis in their defence lines



































lorry towards the battle- and Russia on July 13 that Con in the Yongdong area, effectively blasting repeated waves
up to run for almost every seat front in the Suwon area. Suwon has now fallen into the hands of the Communist forces invading munist China be re ge to pal of infantry attacks, vgs rhe MacArthur Communique
in the House of Commons, bu: Tl BY //) CS. from North Korea.—Express, United mations with vet! er we et. id assault in the Yongdong
political chiefs who guide the : eere shad ee te 1 ‘ a a iter en é o8 ectoy began after 24 hours artile
party still have no coherent pro- the Korean fighting pela rs R ' 1 St ge lery and mortar bombardments of
sramme on paper. They don’t TROOPS IN a oO e R ak: eaninio. tie ead } ec Ss Ww a miinibica? sovition gt aid
think they’ll need one for several - t eported to é ‘ | American guns stopped the as-

Y » ft opostr é 1 ‘ H . -

more months. BRITAIN | ngian - privet intended ts toress’ | Manoeuvres | ies: ii 2%

The Labour Party is going full Ports th iprarently inten ed ae, | | Yongdong lies 50 air miles from
Speed ahead with a new platform 5 LONDON, July 24 mou + ‘ in imminent American “ “ae : | eju, new capital of the South
Which stresses a slowdown on = rae Minister Attlee told | © eee ae sg arpa hee | IN ROME | araan Government, and 100 ui
public ownership plans. ariament today that the United j r irged that America 4 ae at} miles from the tal supply por
I PP States had 189 aireraft, 10,000 Air SAYS ATTLEE | ie oe that ea oe ROME, July 24 of Pusan

Preliminary Plan Force men and 1,500 naval men ” withdraw to the 38th’ pars ne |. Sttong forces of invading “Rea’ ;
* in Britain , LONDON, July 24 (By E. COZIER) fore China’s peta Harektp ae trogbe Weinfeccea hy tadhe andl Southwest lip

a preienaey nae ae eg Eo eae ne io joo fae tthe NOTTINGHAM July 24 a on paar pen abaodae that /armoured = car were today ad mere een iat Tee ol 1

aw i i ish- ]b 5 f > was 1 , arli 4 a : ec 'CHAIS Sa eal le ina fy 4 50, ack | Dearly unopposec ilo the south
drawn. It will get its final polish pomber groups. Attlee was reply- Me sal Par' meee today ora 7 ENGLAND put up a good fight today against tremendou: if America agreed to admit Com | Vancing in a two pronge 1 piace west: tip of the Kored: Bonini,
ing from Labour’s Executive ing to a request for information| blowing up of nine ammunitio dds and til the last ho f the afternoon i looked very] munist. China to the United ; through — the Appenines towart General MacArthur's Headquat
Committee this Wednesday and| by Leftwing Labour member | barges at Portsmouth on July 14, odds and un ur oO ne a 100N it Kk ane ver) Nations ind Russia then refused|Florence in the biggest army rh ai ann hii tod
then will be moved on to ‘local Stephen Davies, who has been| Was due to sabotage. ; much as though the Dunkirk spirit would bring her through ot end the “ighting, it would | manoeuvres staged by Italy since . mato Onis ities
parties in each constituency for |critical of the Government's foreign} It had not yet been possible to| to save the third Test match, Fortunately for the Wes; Indies, be han for Russia before world | the war 20,000 Italian t here sald the tank and infantry
discussion, The final programme policy. Opposition members cheer.| establish who did it Yardley and Insole failed at the crucial moment and t1 opinion. American officials were an rae vith alii a Betton teams of the invading norther
will be ready by mid-October. Injed Attlee’. Statement and Labour} Attlee said it ate recle: Gist Prospect for tomorrow is that the five last men must hold] pleased to know more about Mirviste R. as if Blostuvas were} armies had reached the South Ko-
that month they will also get} Member Seymour Cocks said it|there was not Shit ag gle on for England at least until tea time and score ata run a] Nehru's motives, but they were taicing oe Cin 1 three-day ‘exer=|reun naval base. at Mokpo,. close
going over from the Labour Was better to have Allied armed among workers in the Armament a: e ; ve cane | } “wate {} not expected to change their pos eite which was “being held in the }t0 the southern coastal road to
Party’s Annual Convention. forces in Britain than enemy] Depot, and among their families minute, or remain out there even longer if thei; rate of tne 9 7 eee F Pusan, ig: major United Nation

The Prime Minister has the| armed forces.—Reuter. living near to Bedenham Harbour, seoring is lower, in order to Save the Situation Mc —Retter. ve base. Pyongyang radio claimed
power to ask the King at any where the explosion occurred. ——-—___— Of the English batsmen today, Invading aid defence troops} the naval base of Mokpo was al-
time to dissolve Parliament and 9 H Id I U * The explosion damaged nearly Parkhouse ay ake be did not - were equipped with Italy's tat ready gecupied ‘ ses
call an election, but Labour Party |: e every building within more than F make aS much as ashbrook ¢ * weapons, including military sup te North Korean Atmy today
informants say Attlee is in no| e ni ranium a mile of the blast but no one was ormosa ene, seryeeeed me most fay Should RB. G. Join nlie ont py the United State barat forw are. eee nee ae
mood to chance a test at the , s {seriously injured : ourably e ig.a closer approxi { 4 under the Atlantic Pact , | Southernmost town the ave ye
polls yet and probably wont be Smuggling Charge Answering Anth ony Eden, Awaits Red mation to the West Indian idea of | B W. 1 Federation? Defending troops, the “Blue taken, only 31 miles from South-

i iti 1 & batsman—a man who makes . ofe » ire composed of 12,000 men’ of} East Korea
before next spring. HELMSTEDT, British zon Deputy Opposition Leader, Attlee a | D : t ead:

Last February’s balloting which 4 . rh said that extra precautions had "uns at the same time that he al tari Pour Gi Ceedndens ‘he. Friuli. Division” backed But.on the central front 4 im Le
~ , ’ i July 24, fe 5 a he Admiralt . Voting beautifal strokes, not get aie LONDON, July 24 units of the Italian Air Force can troops backed by artifler
cut Labour’s majority from an West German border police to-\been taken at the miralty ting the bat to the ball however | , aed satu ahaha Military observers from Britain | threw back a tank supported ai-
overwhelming control of . the day said they had arrested two'tEstablishment for some weeks. he Gort | Whether British we aera the United States. Franen Greece [tack near Yongdong, 25 miles
Commons fo a shaky working! en here suspected of trying to| Eden described Attlee’s state- TAIPEI, Formosa, July 24 je can. ultimately join a B.W.1 a ake Bwitectlend ang Botte cats MEAT that éf Taner
majority of nine showed political 1 5 kil > , ment as “very grave indeed”. ’ ’ The Masters | tion is discussed by a specta c . es i + he s
sentiment evenly split in the coun- fatten Sovi ry sy eae Clement Davies, Leader of the} A Defence Ministry Ownae n This is batting in the tradition | respondent lately in Georgetown | Watching the manoeuer ROOT chi in whete the reconnaissance
: into the Sovie ne of Germany, aVvies; mber o ; Fs » thea ie” T di ad eantn t
try. Persistent tapping of popular Uranium valued at ‘ several | Liberals, said it disclosed a “very pi “TA teleksinne Quemoy | °f Hammond, Hobbs, and the other|in The Times today. ahaa earl —_ . had revealed the ommunist
feeling has shown no convincing million marks was confiscated startling situation”. Attlee said, Island under cover of Chinese Pane so spat ee SO , Teeny, oe, fs thot possi forces maash qin Pa ys la
atert 4 is ) hae * 7 ; ‘. te ie av n a 4 7 Plieve, is at o ompton, so hat self-Gove) ! , 7 } stre e offens > wn
Swing to either Party.—(C.P.) The identities of the arrested |the facts he gave tay ors es Communist artillery barrage. is that of Hardstaff, though why|ble in the Caribbean in “penny us Prisoners |the main road towards the pro-

em vip eeanot penne. ante a £ he ae +a It may be the long-ex pected they do not play Joe, still making packets”, the writer says “An ele : | Visional Southern capital of Taeju
The men who were arrested / Inquiry set up to } e eX" | invasion attempt agzinst the slenty of runs and way u . ent of ‘intransigent Demararians NY j. From the Kast coast where the

i i i s ‘ i. é Ne Pp in the} ment o ansigen M - :
H M Govt. Gives last Friday after the police here | plosion.—Reuter. Nationalist-hel@ island used as aeeenna is more than | ane fee! otherwise They fear that arched Through |, °° Koreans are still holding
bibi had been “tipped off” by a third blockade base against the Reds others— can understand }such a union would result in. the . ec the recaptured port of Yongdok. a
1 025 000 T person were taken today to Bruns- The spokesman said National- Of course, the opening pair did| uncontrolled influx of immigran Seoul Str eels jlittle more than 31 miles from the
a ¥ British out eee tuestioning me UK Brokers Fear ist forees on Quemoy just off the everything that was expected of}from the islands : at |American beach-head at Pohang

; ‘Lda: eg | British Public Safety authorities, | ae - mainland port of Amoy were them, more in fact; didn’t they set The opponents of — ones tr KOREA, Juy 24 no news of battles had reached
Rebuilding Castries Allied officials here said it was | TW ati , adequate to meet the expected[ up a new record and make more|also talk of B.G fe can pie + ‘ Fifty American prisoners were | here .

; “one of the greatest attempted | New axation Red attack than any English opening pair has ae men a ante Sae8 paraded through the streets o Re por 2! arowing ( omminiat

(Barbados Advocate Corresponaent) smuggles of this kind so far’. | done in the last 12 years? in the sense a > « = Seoul py Communists to show | coneen ra ions suing up for a

ST. LUCIA, July 24, It was later disclosed that two | He said they would be suppor- t they made it by doggeq|tion of trade with the interior of northern “superiority” accordin major offensive brought the Allied

Subj é yal of Par- | toc arke; u . ; Bu he; te it logged 2 yould be mutually profita- I A Force it some of their
_ Subject to the ptt Govern- | Women had also been arrested and - téd by locally-assigned National- determination rather ‘than by | Brazil would be f to a Korean doctor who escaped \ aI saat ‘ fat int ae ¢ fat ;
liament, His Majesty's ‘itional {taken to Brunswick. | LONDON, July 24. fist air and naval units classy cricket. Both produced the|ble git’ a hha ; from the former capital and Gave Merny ns skies, efter
ment will provide the additiona Nervousness regarding t he Communist artillery besan ré occasional fi: tit to Wes Racial Considerations ‘he doctor said today some|@d and gave Australian and Amer-
sum of £189,000, making a total ervous if 8 i Ministerial horns rat th a : rare occasional flash, but to West i Reid 5 We The doctor sai ican airmen their chance to hame
s Pad, aa tas Be i orean situation anc § ombarding the town of Guanau Indian eyes it was pretty dull. J These views, argue 7 | people in Seoul believed the at hare se eteed ine yo Sail
ot comin {21025000 Leopold Back On hints of new taxation to meet 2 }on Quemoy's northeast coast at! would rather see a match lost|correspondent, are eae parade was not of Americans, but aa Wiig at a
O The cen uate was made possible ames of saa ae 11 p.m. on Sunday, The spoker-| thar suffer to see Worrell, Weekes, racial ie omaha ition be- | Russians dressed in American

2 : iat defence expenditure crea c - ex pressed ibt th re- ‘ale. ‘ , arshi tended to favour Feder: er . ms Seoul ,
by the Governor this morning to Postage Stamps | ness KF Pthe London = Stoek sani a te . oa “A tr; tf . ett Stolimey pained yt cause they feared that isolated | uniform He walked a ee i Unopposed
the Legislative Council, which ia tozhise porte: farge = =concentra ton = orf Christiani, or Trestrail play that B.G. would one day be dominated|in ten days disguised as a peasan It was learnéd here that North-
paid tribute to a strong presen- BRUSSELS. july 24, er my ct overseas issues | COMMunist craft in the Vicinity} kind of game a Paden materi Indians He said he saw one “reaction rn troops pushed cautiously and
tation of the case to the Colonial A portrait of King Leopold III Tevariese bends encountered | of Quemoy would pass the island y : a A athe hiridectea tae absorp- ary” executed, almost unopposed toward the
Office by a delegation comprising | .i}] re-appear on Belgian postage|} oi vy “selling and declined by | for a direct attack on Formosa Rac—English Approach “ion in a mainly African dominion{ Seoul was flooded with picture West coast to capture Kwangju
the Administrator, Mr. J. K. Stow, stamps tomorrow, postal authori- some five points, European bonds It looks as if Quemoy IS going tol Only Rae has this English ap of three millions of which the | of Stalin and the northern leader, threatening from the West the
the Hons. Garnet Gordon, Francis ties announced here today. Worer. lower ohare they were | be their target, he said ‘ | proach to the game and althougt combined Indian populations of] Kim [rsun. he said South Korean defence triangle
Carasco, and Clive Beaubrun, The series to be issued will be changed with Germans and Aus- —Can. Press.j.1 readily admit that we badly |Guiana and Trinidad would hard- (Reuter, |? tmed by the provisional expital

The delegation is leaving Eng- the same as that sold immediate=| trians one to two points off y equal a tenth Taeju, the ipply port of Pusa
land on = By the ant ly before the war. New Leopold Oil shares were dull, Angas it @ On Page 7 The necessity of providing and the American beach head at
tania via New York en route °'serics of stamps will be issued in Iranian lost 5-32 at 5 13-1 . ‘ feguards for minorities ap ‘ ® ss Pohang
Castries where plans are already tithe near future with a portrait}ang recent upward move- New Constitutions plies to the whole of the Carib Canadian Minister Pode, action near Yongdor
under way to ‘give the delegation taken from a recent photograph, ment in the commodities shares Y - ( ‘ » | bean. area It was one of the oh. the. centéal front i ton,
a rousing welcome home. the authorities said.—Reuter. cked Industrial shares 8 ear Id Shoots main reasons why the recent eg FOS |‘ : one

was che 2 1 AZOS | Americ vop uecessfull

The Governor also ears = lost ground, but there was firm- i S.C.A.C. Report insisted on the rowns | * oe Ph NS Seale oe
further success of the delegation P Haat Eh shipbuilding, aircraft and LONDON, July 24 Mother:Father Jailec nelusion in the Federal Legisla et eas #4 4 checked bot ontal assau a
i su s § ’ ; ’ ’ ) § > NIGERIA, July 24 lanking atiac iw air-grou
in obtaining a further grant of TI HTEN UP selected heavy industries having The Colonial Office today an-|> . ture of a second Chamber con- ia’g |Hanking atta , |

‘ 8 avy an- a si . xander Skielton Canada orn{ thting
£150,000 from the Colonial Devel- ara ial d y ok . beta d geY Alexan le | * | co-operati« h ,
z . aad ar potential. nounced changes in the constitu- JONESBORO ARKANSAS, sisting of nominated members , ade Minister wa ;
opment and Welfare peamyea : Nat iene ii, South African gold shares eased tions of tome colonies of the July 24 Therein,” concludes the corres- ae, a "kit lagoon while} tt b¢
,, 2 Kectcle: : 4 r 1 thie , - . S v 4 "
wards roads and ween San President vo S rds .|on some selling which was main Windward Islands in th West A seventy-two year old father ] pondent may lie a solution for ut yachting late on Friday Communist filtration cti
fice te entainan’ the Colonial tthe Federal Bure: mp vests ly from local sources. Diamonds i . re ve his small son a } sd Less tritish Guiana too.” The police authorities said thi o-operat
office is sending a committee ofjtion to tighten its programme were improved on the assumption | [ndies ve era, Sea oe moet ritish Guiane The police au ior ne {failed because of close DO ra
experts to advise on the develop- | against “espionage, sabotage and that there would be a sharp in- aA . . : in Py Phi Soke en Nee anid ar iiss like te ae morning gh his body ha between US. grout roop
ment schemes with a possibility |subversive activities”. " crease in the United States demand| The Legislative Couneils will} day, HS mother police said to : “Bavaro 43, was here to inves- | he, air force
of further Colonial Development| He called on citizens to Bive the) 4° industrial diamonds “Reuter | consist of 14 members, including "hin wel White 49. % ‘ Captured UK. Seer ea ere tirana Headquarters are constantls |
and Welfare assistance, Bureau all possible help.—Reuter presidents who will be Island Mrs. Jewe ile 42 as no imate the allo itto u the {formed of their movement
——————— Administrators and not Governors hi poe wi a 7 te Wiebe os O icer Sa e orth ane ae Nigeria in Headquarters corfirmed tha
5 i are wt Q ,) her righ ung ane ler husbanc by ‘ " ew constitution . th Korean. tar
Te 7, v2 of " Eight members will be elected by i, HF 4 fad’ 9 Rees te ue fi fe sconomist, he headed Cana-|five’ or six North Korean \
TRUMAN W ANTS INCOME U.S. Will De end universal adult Suffrage, tM to 4 ill. in “heun te aft LONDON Jupy 24 mar Senmntttes set os th 1948 to} were knocked out One more \
P cadores cing & clearer eee ired by his eight vear old sor Captain Vyviay Holt, a Briti uide Canada’s role in the Euro- reported out 4 marae mo
TAX INCREASE IN U. S. ve The remainder will consist ot - ‘i wf Minister in Seoul, captured whe an Recovery Pr mrariras t jt & and possibly a ’ Wisin,
e e 9 j *olice said Mrs. White gave this | py re es entered th cule
3 24. |three ex-officié members who will 9 & North Korea forces enter
Halk Beckstnunt ate to-|retain the right to vote until the! explanation After # quagrel wit! city earlier this month, is safe silica aia
WASHINGTON, July 24. 5 dae te Pescadores, Islands ministerial system can be estab-| !¢r, her husband handed Billy a! The Foreign Office to-day an va ‘ l
t . a ay a 2 etd . = = x ye - > » . + at’ a . j
PRESIDENT TRUMAN to-day discussed with Congres- fe ee coast of Formosa|lished and three be nenietnca ‘59 caliore ee fim ite the nounced it had received a abl TH 4/] 4 ND OFT ERS U.N.
\ sional Leaders the advisability of an immediate emergency] would be defended by ppeecenn niembers, Z ¢ t hoot “They returned to the house Sars wearduied of vhs taff wer Z f r
tax increase on both individual incomes and business firms naval forces - 2 pause pee THe ig ail, 4m hd vhere the father said ‘ if she don't now near Pyongyang, the Nort! 7 HTING VMVEN
| House Speaker Sam Raeburn told reporters afterwards| nists attacked nferehes, the Gtate (tree pene. ae PAP decrighit atoot her Korean capital 4 000 [Vly { 4
i that the matter was “still in the conversation stage.” roe esas sae . a said the |iterary test {or voters, eure Mrs. White and her husban« A Foreign Office spokesma 9
i E: o eer Piedtinwes ved: einai to- | Department spo esma i the | Councils over which the Governor tarted fighting He swung at hei said he could not say how Cay AKE SUCCESS July 24
er ; ate ae tea a re | Pescadores Islands fe 2 te hich | Will continue to preside, will be with a cane and she at him with a tain Holt had managed to send Lid E S eee ee
7 ey t Pro rahe oe Rae ase iwi vee tbreak made more responsible by the in- piece of wood. During the strug- ] cable THAILAND hag informed the 1 nited Nations that si
arines | W. eae, ‘Sympington described ae te neat Was cat Gea be|clusion of three members elected | sie Mrs. White heard her husband It wa ated last Saturday tha jeet to the King’s approval, she will offer a combat tex
F litiy: inecananne a Commits | Of tie otéean Wab: said 1 by the Legislative Councils, order “shoot her son” and the boy ! Britain was taking steps to seeiire ho tie 1 men to fight with the Unit
is programme to a Committee defended by the American Fleet Reuter fitted, ctwet ‘aptain Holt’s release Reutec of about 4,000 offieers and 1
Increased ee ae ake prone Mi oa dint. — Beate an —.| Nations’ forces in Koren t
OF war”. Sympington is Chairman 1. SSE maa os This was the first official
- of the National Security Resources ; lreeeived here in response
i yi, Board which has the job of plan- e ' _ Secretary-Genera [rygve L
60 Per Cent |? ries os copye ? Oey. MacArthur ts Sersit (0
WASHINGTON, July 24 {Controls and Civil Defence in the e l O amn l eS oi The United Nations He
i An immediate 60 per cent./ vent of war B Official U.N. {ters also disclosed ony ul
; i ih The Government Controls Bil! jchief Dutch representative to
ing stre a ae ae United Shes does not involve the price controls C d » I Ch ief | United Nations ir letter to
i ig strength of the hi EA pict * ‘ /LOommMarnder in Ch \Macratacrctionetal’ akin ta
j . ally rl or controls over man-power. But Secretary-G
4 Marine Corps, usually re fiable E ( 6 { led d
{ Congressional sources said te-day. Sympington oa Senators these 7 | KOREA, July 24 err.nent h id deci eC it gic

They also Said the Navy was | thing: bee et ead ea tater | ; iden 3 Germany “somewhere in the over, Brunswick Oldenburg and to take place in Germany since A eommunique fron General |! nchage ai Ar
preparing two—and possibly ean “jae S6 SPU Sea a , Sone TART, Meaiiric ctr ah Soviet Zone.” sremen in Northern Germany Hitler ame to power in 1933, lacArthur today iid that a]
three—more aircraft carriers for hace gees ‘tac aid tte .| 5 These “agents”, he said were Espionage groups were being today discussed the Federation’s|\inited Nations ‘command ie thas
duty as quickly as possible “4 yo pington oo Bere oe . oe eae chairman of coming to West Germany mainly et Up to Operate along the Fast- call for boycott of Argentine} jeneral Headquarter n Tokyo} fer Indone

a ; , 4 } would be an effort » avoid ¢ Herr Hans Jahn, chairma omit oe oe “ . js ; Fleas navate tan ii +h |

House members told of Eee tannin act basi sr th ; Transport Workers via Switzerland Ve German zone border ; hip is been officially established 1 ao I 1 ‘
plans after closed session of the | Piecemeal fo ag of emergency ne German eriey i FE furt Cent ecessary he said Helyvessen President of the AacArthur cormmander ee ¢ ' Ne
pla alter e l t Whe. ei@adures used in World War IT Union today appealed to the In- rankfurt — entre é 2 sessen, . gl: la ut jue for _re 1 r I
Armed Services Committee, wit j Reuter ternational Transport Workers Jahn described Frankfurt as In France swedish Transport Workers, eriti- | chief eat ‘

Admiral Sherman, Chief of mayely [Federation for help in fighting the centre of the Communist un. Andre Lafond, Secretary of the cised the dockers affiliated te fhe Genéral MacArtt mnoun hout: the ction of

Operations, who was reported to 4 '“Communist infiltration into West derground movement in West Ger yndicate of the French railway Federation who had so far fai ed} sent dbachibied Gener he adde

have told them that a1 increase | FISH AND CHIPS CLI |Germany.” Speaking at the Fed- many and Dusseldorf as “its workers, said the Communists to ac Ror sgl ad SR a ak hyd We OR et ab One from Gene: t

of gpout 57,000 men would. be } LONDON, Monday jeration’s Congress here, he said organisation headquarters.” He “Fifth Column” were increasingly tion decision to back URIS | oa tehates of the U N ft

made in the Marines’ strength} A 20-year eparation ended/this inf Itratiom was becoming also clairned knowledge of planned active in France. “C oncentrating Argentine ae sre believed to} tions Command.’ vers to t appea it

which on June 30 reported 'when Miss Lavina Mallaro and more serious He sabotage acts primarily against in- on the transport syster vhict Ais ae ape) WE aha . t Brit-| The order reiterated that Ma -| Several ce : , for Kare
be 75,000 in touch with a sister in the n 'G-! alleged that former German Ait Stallations of West German rail- as the best ay of paralysing the _ or tle Mi es 5 een an-| Arthur had assumed comr land ofthe unif wieetteuen cit. Bekele

The air squadrons, would be lands after secing her name men- | Force General Kurt Henschel was ways at Essen and Dortmund in «1 pplie. time of war.” — Ose My eh 7M yet to ¢ the new United Nations Head-/through Was ringto
increased from 12 to 18 tioned in a ney oped | training Communt “espionage the Ruhr, Munich vara ee The ¢ ongress, first big. inter- nounce their attitude cinladiae Pa —ieater Reuter

—Reuter. around meal hips. groups” { thei: task in West and Dinkelsbuehl in Bavaria, Han- national Trade Union con ererice
‘
a





Oo

IS EXCELLENCY THE GOV-
ERNOR will attend a lecture

given by Mr. Maurice Connor at
the Y.M.P.C. on Thursday, Au-
gust 10th, at 8.30 p.m

Mr. Connor who is blind, is a
student of the Canadian National

Institute for the Blind, and he re-
cently arrived from Canada to
spend a holiday with his parents
before he returns there to do a
four-year course in Art, at Dal
housie University in Halifax

The subject of his lecture will
be, “A West Indian’s View of Life
and Work at the Institute.”

His lecture comes in the middle
of what should be a very enter-

taining programme, especially
the. second number, which .is a
piano solo by Maurice himself,

Also on the programme are songs
by Mr. E. A. B. Deane, Mr. Her-
bert Cheeseman, and a violin
solo by Mr. Maurice Fitzgerald.

Blood Donors

TN CONNECTION’ with the

recent appeal made by Mrs
Savage for blood donors, His
Excellency the Governor, Mr

Savage and others attended the
General Hospital yesterday for
samples of their blood to be taken
for testing. ‘

It is understood that many more
persons are requifed to come
forward as blood donors.

Those desiring to do so are
asked to send their names to Mrs,
Savage, Government House.

Arrived over the week-end

RRIVING by the Golfito over
the week-end from England
were Mr. and Mrs. David R
Young and their daughter Sheila.
Mr, Young, who is the Manager
oj the Barbados Gas Company

has been in England for four
months.
Mrs, Young and Sheila how-

ever, have been away for about
a year, which was spent in Canada
and England.

Lucky Cake Winner

R. R. CELETTE, a visitor to

the island who is staying at
the Paradise Beach Club had, a
pleasant surprise yesterday, He
was informed that he was the
winner of the Prize Drawing run
by Mrs. Ben Moore and Mrs.
Archie Edwards.

The prize was a very tasty look.
ing cake, which should make a
very enjoyable ‘Tit-Bit’ for this
aiternoon’s tea,

Worked Wonders

RNEST LAWS, a young Jamai-,;

teacher, has gone to
British methods

can
Lundon to study
of dealing with juvenile delin-
quency. He comes from the
Kingston “Boys Town”, where 250
maladjusted boys are taught
trades. Laws has worked wonders
in one village in Jamaica. When
he went there as a teacher it was
poor and-the people demoralised.
He changed all that. Now_ the
village has a flourishing local
trade, a well-attended school and
a children’s play centre.
Free Breakfast
ATROLLING in an_ aircraft
last week, on the lookout for
intruders, was Geoffrey de Freitas,
West Indian-born Under Secretary
for the Home Office. He was
taking part in an aerial game
which flying clubs play with each
other. One club announces that
all its members will be patrolling
around its aerodrome at a par-
ticular time. It challenges oppos-
ing clubs to attempt to land on
the aerodrome without being
observed. Mr. de Freitas, who is
a member of the Herts and Essex
Club, was defending his aero-
drome at Broxbourne last Sunday.
Tf an intruder lands without a
defender taking his aircraft
number, he wins a free breakfast.
If his number is taken, he forfeits
half a crown. De Freitas has won
two breakfasts so far—-as an
intruder,



BY THE

GOING INTO POLITICS , GEORGE



On Visit

R. RAY T. SOPER, Matineals

Co-ordination Standard Oil
Company of New Jersey (Creole
Petroleum Corporation), is here

on a visit from Venezuela.

Bishop Of New York
MONG the distinguished visit-
ors to this colony during the
last week were the Rt. Rev. Charles
F. Boynton, Suffragan Bishop of
New York and the Rev, Mr, Don-
ald Dow of Puerto Rico. They are
guests at the Ocean View Hotel.
Bishop Boynton was the Preach-
er at St. Mary’s Church at 9 a.m.
on Sunday while the Rev. Dow
occupied the puplit at Evensong.

Was Staying With

His Parents

R. AND MRS. John Simmons

and four children returned to
Venezuela over the week-end by
B.W.I1.A. after about four months’
holiday, staying with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs, E. K. Simmons in
Fontabelle. Mr. Simmons is with
Socony Vacuum in Venezuela and
was here last year on holiday.

Will Film Caribbean For

Visual Education
JPR ETURNING to Canada on
Saturday morning by T.C.A.
were Mr. and Mrs, Dick Bird, who
have been here for about two
weeks taking pictures both still
and movie for T.C.A.

Dick told me shortly before he
left, that he hopes to return to
the West Indies next year to do
a series of films about the Carib-
bean for use in Canadian Schools
in their Visual Education Depart-
ment. This course will nave to be
planned very carefully beforehand,
as it will be in great detail touch-
ing mainly on the industrial side

of the islands, The films will
definitely not be from a_ tourist
angle.

Chief Engineer T.C,A.
R, JOHN DYMENT, Chief En-
gineer of 'T.C.A. in Montreal,
arrived from Canada on Saturday
morning by T.C.A.

He was accompanied by his
two sons John Jr., and Paul. Mrs.
Dyment and their youngest son
David arrived here last Saturday
and they are all staying at “The
Camp,” St. Lawrence.

Mr, Dyment will only be stay-
ing here for three weeks, but Mrs,
‘Dyment and the family will remain
on for a longer holiday.

On ‘‘Package Tour”’
R. G. BISHOP, who is on a
two-week “Package Tour”
from Montreal, arrived from Can-
ada on Saturday morning by
'T.C.A. Mr. Bishop is Personnel
Supervisor of the Bell Telephone
Company in Montreal and this is
his first visit to Barbados, He is
a guest at the Crane Hotel.

N all the welter of fun they were more together than
I promised for the Festival, the others, and their tone was
from coal] mines to messages less damnable,
from the moon, I miss one de-

light: a band contest:

It should be held under the old
Brunswick-square rules, with all
the bands playing different pieces
and all at the same time. Believe
me, it was every band for itself
in the Brunswick-square contest
and no aesthetic nonsense, Mr.
Gerald Barry «and I, acting as
judges, were put to the pin of our
collars to know what the devil
it was all about. A whisper of
Manola from the Waisall Aeoli-
ans would be drowned by a
thunderous Pere la Victoire from
Jeffcote Park. Half the Middles-
brough team got mixed up with
Shepton Mallet, and a_ small
Bradford Clarinet fell backwards
off the dais on to the Cirencester

Style Counted

HERE was an eccentric char-

acter playing for Slatts
Mills. He stuffed his trombone
with sacking to get richness of
tone. In the excitement of a
forceful passage in Light Cavalry
the sacking was blown out of the
mouth of the trombone, which
emitted a sudden roar. We took
off two marks for noise, but
awarded one for emphasis, whicn
led to a dispute with Sandhills
Royal, who got their emphasis by
concealing two extra French
horns behind a packing-case. I
remember Mr. Barry saying to
me, during a lull, “I can’t make
out what any of them are play-
ing.” For answer I pointed to
the very stylish Nuneaton Band.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Carib Calling —

Special Order

MONG recent visitors to Eng-
land has been Mr. Walter
Rice, President of Reynolds
Jamaica Mines Limited. He is
over there to place orders for
machinery and equipment, includ-
ing a special self-unloading ship
of about 13,000 tons to carry sup-
plies of bauxite from Jamaica to
the United States. Mechanised
unloading from the new ship will
take about ten hours instead of the

usual three days.

Black Eyes For Fun!
OUNG BILL SCHMIDT,
twelve-year-old Lodge boy
who left for Venezuela yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. arrived at
Seawell with a very ‘respectable’
black eye!

How did he get it? Using Bill’s
own words, “We were having a
little fun over the week-end.” The
“tun” was a few rounds of boxing.
“You should see the other fellow’s

eye,” said Bill “His looks a lot
worse than mine.”
Bill, who is an American has

been living in Venezuela for some-
time now, his father is a pilot
with T.A.C.A de Venezuela.
Another American boy also
returned to Venezuela yesterday.
He was Brian Jakob. He too is
a pupil at Lodge School and is
going to Venezuela for the long
holidays. His father works with
Shell Oil Company in Venezuela

On Flying Visit
ISS MOLLY O’DONNELL,
B.W.1.A. hostess arrived
from Trinidad yesterday morning
by B.W.I.A. to spend about a
week with her good friend Joyce
King at Rockley. She will be
returning to Trinidad on Monday.

Wedding
HITEPARK Pilgrim Holiness
Church was the scene of a
pretty wedding on Saturday when
Mr. Ralph C. Haynes of Britton’s
Hill, took as his bride Miss Cyn-
thia O. Parris of “Martinique”,
My Lord’s Hill.

The ceremony was performed by

Rev. I. M. Wickham,

The bride who was given in
marriage by Mr. James F. Brath-
waite looked charming in a dress
c{ brocaded georgette. Her head-
dress was of beads and she wore
silver shoes, She carried a bouquet
of pink rose buds and Queen
Anne’s Lace.

The duties of bestman fell to
the bridegroom's brother-in-law
Mr. Victor S. Lawrence.

Miss Doreen Parris and Miss
Carmen Best were the Maids of
Honour and wore dresses of white
stamped organdie, white crinoline
hats trimmed with gold tinsel
ribbon and gold shoes.

The bridesmaids were Miss Lin-
douise Brathwaite and Miss Maur-
een Holder. They wore dresses
of blue sheer with hats to match
and gold shoes,

There were eight flower girls
the Misses Beatrice Alleyne, Fern
Maynard, Hazel Parris, June
Hunte, Esta Clarke, Harriet Thom-
as, Pamela Walters and Pauline
Bishop. Four different colours of
sheer—blue, white, pink and peach
—were worn by these, two each
wearing the same colour, The
page boys were the brothers
Parker and Barton Lawrence,

The church was nicely decorated
for the occasion.

The ceremony
throughout with
Clarke at the organ.

After the ceremony the happy
couple and their guests motored
to the home of the bridegroom’s
brother-in-law ‘“Wingrove,” Ist
Avenue, Bank Hall, where a re-
ception was held, This concluded,
the couple journeyed to Bath-
sheba to spend the honeymoon

choral
Oswald

was
Mr.

W AY —By Beachcomber

grown tired and ragged after the
first hour, Also, they were next
to Barnsley, who played like
maddened elephants.

They Inter:upted His
Dream
A*

a poet living near by wrote
: when it was all over:—
Those long, remorseless hours of
hideous din

Which loosened plaster and blew
windows in,

Taught me, a lover, quite enough
to prove
That not all music is the food of
love.
Midnight at Pontefract
He kept a dairy, not down

each' day the things that struck
him.

(Morning paper,)
OR instance, churns thrown
by angry dairymaids. Let us

still has another



| ine day we
caught 6ib.
of caviare
« _ a *

by John Codley

PAHLEVI (lran).
cn HE came on board and
a flopped in the bottom of
> e boat; a long, grace-





ful lady, a shimmering flash
of silver blotched with black
Sne weigned 24lb. nad a long
: 4d nose, a thrashing tail

ust 18 years old



ipertant For this was
urseon whose eggs pro-
world with tts most famous
20d —caviare And no stur
iare until she is 14






1 nad got up at three a.m. to join
he viare fishermen. Nine boats
vs ‘d:awn up by the tideless waters
“aspian at Astara — Jron
iilage on the frontiers ot
ana Russia and 90 miles fom





Tough and wiry

£ oh Cost was Manned by tour or
tive Azerbatjanis, tough, small, and



wiry men in ragged shirts, serge
trouvers, and jong scamen's boots
An hour's steady rowing

erougnht us to the fishing grounds
a mile off-shore.

Ths sun rose across the sea, Li
was fine and warm. We rose and
fell gently on the swell,











it. was seven-thirty and Worth, in a good year, about
it seemed that ne would be *Â¥00.000.
returning with nothing in our .
nats Nice work if...
> What does tie iisnelman make
We all pulled out of this? He carns 13s. a day
Suddenly the look-out noticed seven months of the year
ling waters ahead. The oars- What is a geod catch? Ours
pulled in their blades. We was average, but sturgeon have
gan to pull in the net. been landed weighin
There she was, That long A fish of this size ca
graceful lady—with six pounds of caviare worth £840
caviare the fish sells at 3s. 6d. a ;
The fish was carried to the Total value; more than £1
factory and cut open After So one giant sturge
washing and sieving, the caviare 0€ man’s wages for seven yea
was mixed with salt and boric Nice work—if you can get
acid (preservative) and left for %’¥feeon.
two days in ice. Then it was dohn Godley, Retr of Lord

packed into tins and shipped w
Russia, who control tne fishing
rights in this profitable business—*

Housewives’ Guide

Prices in the local market |
for Pumpkins and Plantains
when the “Advocate” check-

ed yesterday were

|
Pumpkins 8 cents per lb. |
Plantains 8 cents each.





Still has another

5 weeks here
. R. JOSEF ADAMIRA_ who
4 was in Trinidad for a few
days’ visit returned yesterday by
53.W.1I.A. He tells me that he
five weeks here
before he leaves for Trinidad.
Mr. Adamira has been Acting !
Manager of the Bata Shoe Stores
here for some months, and ng
that the new manager has on
appointed, he will be returning
to his former post in Trinidad.

Light Under A Bushel

© herd PAUL WILKINS Show,

which‘ brings to the fore |
some local talent, is a good one |
and should be encouraged. And |
the best way to encourage this |
show is by way of constructive |
criticism. We welcome such artists |
as Eddie Bohne and Ben Gibson, |
But these are men who have little
need to show their mettle at this
age. Where is the young talent in
Barbados? |

There should be more young
artists in the island who are aspir-
ing to greater heights. These are
the ones to be encouraged.

And in this young brigade there
is one member who is outstand-
ing, and not given the best oppor-
tunity.

This youngster is Cedric Phil-
lips who is so to speak overbur-
dened with talent. And he is
wasted behind a piano, Give youth
a chance.



Poor Prospect!
R. R. G. MENZIES, Austra-
lia’s Prime Minister, and
Sir Pelham Warner watched a
game of cricket together last
Saturday. Mr. Menzies is in|}
England for Cabinet talks on}

Imperial Defence, but cricket, this
day, had a stronger pull for him
than Whitehall. He saw the Eton
vs. Harrow match at Lord’s where |
he was received by “Plum”
Warner, President of the M.C.C. |
They sat in the President’s box.

At the Australia Club’s dinner
to the Commonwealth Premier
last week, the two men again met, |
In. the course of his speech, Mr.
Menzies foreshadowed an Austra-
lia of 12 or 15 million people.
“Not much ofa prospect for our
future Tests!” Sir Pelham inter-
polated gloomily.”

Kilbracken, on his way to New

Zealand, ts reporting on the

Strange lives o;
nds

people in many
tai

a




























“That long, graceful lady” .. . 18 years, 241d. . .

Wives Prefer Nylons

LONDON,
Norman Dodds, Labour M.P. for
Dartforth, Kent, told the House
of Commons the other day that

|
|
|
|
|
|
some women prefer nylons to food



@ SLIPPER-CLOGS e



e
Helder, in a blue and whi
brings a new footnote to




are of wo
ot white “uede.
ing the® guard-changing
mony at Buckingham Palace.
London Ezpress Service

FEEL






and drink, even to husbands —
and some even think they are vital
in getting a husband.

—Can Press.



ROYAL (Worthings)

TO-DAY 5 & 8.30

Final Inst. Columbia Seria
“THE VIGILANTE”
starring
Ralph BYRD Lyle TALBOT



| Wednesday Night at 8.30

“CARACAS NIGHT”



EMPIRE

TO-DAY Last 2
4.45 & 8.30

20th C-Fox presents .

CLIFT
Paul DOUGLAS

Shows

Montgomery

in
“THE BIG LIFT”

with



a
Visitor from Sweden, Barbro
outfit,
ondon:
heel-less slipper clogs. The soles
and the uppers are
She was watch.
cere.

[

Cornell BORCHERS
Bruni LOBEL

ROXY

TO-DAY 4.45 Only
20th C-Fox presents . ..

“THE GUNFIGHTER”





TO NITE at 8.30

MADAM O’LINDY
AND TROUPE

in
“CARACAS NIGHT”

OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
4.45 & 8.15

Ist Inst. Republic Serial . .

“DAREDEVILS OF THE
RED CIRCLE”

starring

Charles QUIGLEY
David SHARPE



Herman BRIX
Carole LANDIS





THE PAIN-GO






TUESDAY,

| Debutantes

ELEVEN American debutantes
on a six weeks’ European coming-
out tour are jfinging London a
shock to their purses. Their
pocket money allows them £4 a
day for their five days here.

Says one of their two organiser-
|chaperons, Mrs. J. Baker; “The
girls were shocked to find that
dinner in a West End restaurant
cost them more than £2 each.
| Not that that is much more ex-
;pensive than in New York—it is
just that the girls have never paid
their own bills before.”

Five are
brunette; only
their teens.

Crop-haired Nancy Lee Clark,
20, from Cleveland, and 19-year-
“—— - . wn

blonde, six are
two are out of





WEDNESDAY

upert and

* BLACK

4

o),

JULY 1950

From U.S.

old Mary Alice Miller, of New
Jersey, are shopping here for cash-
meres, china and cheeses “We

were told cheeses are good here,”
hey explain

£100 A Week

Cost of the tour for each girl
is about £1Q0 a week. They can
go anywhere in town each eve-
ning, but if they have “dates”
they must go in pairs. The
“date” must be introduced to the
tour organisers. And the name
of the escort must go down in a
tour log-book. ’ :

Second chaperon with the girls
is Miss Mary K. Browne, who in
1926° won the Wimbledon doubles
championship.

—London Express Service.
pe"

— a






Gg

GAHTETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

and THURSDAY

20th Century Fox Presents .
Tyrone Power and Maureen Ohara

nm

SWAN”







—-o

PLAZA



Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

Errol Flynn, Barbara Stanwyck in “CRY WOLF”

Me Crea,

and
Brenda Marshall in

“ESPIONAGE AGENT"

A Warner Double



Bette Davis in

“A STOLEN LIFE”

and

Dennis Morgan in “CHEYENNE”





A Paramount Picture

————























“NEPTUNE S

“THE THREE

JOHN FORD'S
PICTURE OF: THE




Joel
Wed, & Thurs, 5 & 8.30 p.m, Another Warner Action Double!

TODAY 5 and 8.30 (Last Showing)

“THE RED

Peter LAWFORD
TOMORROW ONLY 5 and 8.30

Sy

John Ford and Marian C. Cooper present

JOHN WAYNE - JOANNE DRU - JOHN AGAR

Story by JAMES WARNER BELLAH: Screen Play by PRINK NUSENT
nd \AURENCE STALLINGS + Produced by ARGOSY PICTURES CORPORATION



AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT at 8.30
Paramount’s New Picture

“RED, HOT AND BLUE”

Starring BETTY HUTTON—VICTOR MATURE—WILLIAM
DAMAREST
“RED, HOT and BLUE” is joyous, tuneful and happy-go-lucky



WEDNESDAY at 5 & 8.30 p.m.
THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
BING CROSBY—RHONDA FLEMMING—WILLIAM
BENDIX
in “CONNECTICUT YANKEE” in Technicolor

DANUBE”

— Janet LEIGH



DAUGHTER"

Esther WILLIAMS — Red Skelton



‘THURSDAY 27TH ONLY 5 and 8.30

MUSKETEERS”

Van HEFLIN—Gene KELLY Lana TURNER
OPENING FRIDAY 28TH - - -
















with VICTOR McLAGLEN
DRED NATWICK + GEORGE O'BRIEN « ARTHUR SHIELDS

ovvected by JOHN FORD



Dletribvied by RKC RADIO PICTURES












drum. Five Southport men Quite clearly one could hear bits Ope he emulated Cobbett, who,
pulled him into their band and of Aida. They all blew together, when a stockjobber threw one at On Short Visit |
gave him a trumpet. We were and at their loudest, while less Dim, picked up a second and FF on a short visit to Puerto |
often asked afterwards why we experienced bands wasted time hurled it back, crying, “One good O Rico on Saturday by B.W.1.A
awarded the Mrs. Melhuish Cup with lullaby stuff. They would churn deserves ‘another.” (See > lan, who return- “Mentholatum’ relieves pain so
te Teleton, The béas 5 eRe Mente ae he C ina i Canon Frazer’s “Cobbett: The W?§ Mr. Paul Nolan, who return
iverton, e reason was that have won the Cup had not they : n€ ed from Bermuda a few weeks

qui-kly that it seems almost like
magic. You can feel its cooling,
soothing touch begin at once to ease
the painfulthrob, And it is so simple
to use ‘Mentholatum’. Just rub it
where the pain is and the pain goes,
That is all you have to do to bring
speedy relief from Headache, Nerve
Pains, Paceache and Aching Limbs.
Get some of this wonderful balm and
stop that pain right away. Make
sure you get genuine ‘ Mentholatum’,
(Ask for MEN-THO-LAY-TUM).

Man,” Ch. 6.)

ago.




SESS SSO

PERFUMES THAT
' LAST

GOYA—Perfumes, Colognes
Powder (Face and Bath)
A very beautiful assortment
to choose from

THE COSMOPOLITAN

DAY PHONES 2041 & 4441
NIGHT PHONE 81-41



























YOUR HOME

It is wonderful the difference that can be made to a Room
by putting a smart piece of Linoleum on the floor. The Room

immediately looks cleaner and brighter. Come and see our

range of attractive designs. We have them in the following
sizes:—






















We can Supply

FIREBRICKS
FIRECLAY
FIRE CEMENT
STEAM PIPE & FITTINGS
BAR IRON
PORTLAND CEMENT







Something You Will Appreciate

LADIES’ PLASTIC RAINCOATS—all sizes @ $2.20 each.
MERCERIZED PRINTED LINGERIE aD ote. nar Yd, .
GARBADINE in Emerald Green, Pink, Red, Gold, Lime Green





Rolls

Squares



3 Feet and 6 Feet Wide
7 Ft. 6 Ins. x 9 Ft.




Stocked by our Plantation Supplies Department





and White @ $1.30 per yd, 9 Ft. x 9 Ft.
SHANTUNG in Blue, Rose, Cream, Pink & Gold @ $1.16 per yd. Telephone No, 4657 10 Ft., 6 ins. x 9 Ft.
1950 STYLES LADIES SHOES in White, Black & Brown Suede e 12 Ft. x 9 Ft.



Prices ranging from $11.36 to $12.37 —Cuban Heels.
Also DRESSES, SUNSUITS, SHORTS & SLACKS Etc., Ete.

BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.







BARBADOS





CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD.

in Tins and Jars. Made only by
@ The Mentholatum Co., Ltd. (Estd. 1889), Slough, England, ®
Also at Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A.




PLANTATIONS LTD.



—-
TUESDAY, JULY 25,

Philippines
Have War
Jitters

By FRANK EMERY
TOKYO
_The progress of the
Korean Communist invaders ha
shocked the Philippines
war jitters are getting More anc
more serious today

I have spent
Manila and at no

departure for Tokyo.

Those fears were reflected by
They say the
Pat-
the situation when
thought Japan
foolish as tq
ttacl Philippines but the
Filipinos worried about it never-

many Filipinos.
current situation is
terned after
Americans once
would not be so
attack the

theless.

_ Filipinos who remember the
fall of Bataan feel they have good

reason to be frightened about Red
@ggression in view of their own
problem of Communist guerrillas,
the Hukbalahaps.

Also, more than ever before,
it is feared that Chinese Com-
munists have established a supply
tine to smuggle arms and ammu-
nition to the Filipino rebels,

In addition, there are reports
about Chinese Communist leaders
from Peiping who visit the
Filipino Communist guerrillas to

give them lessons in guerrilla
warfare.
Frightening
Equally frightening is the Red

radio network which links the
Filipino and the Chinese Com-
munists and permits those at
Peiping to set the Pace for Com-
munist propaganda in the Philip-
pines.

| Those things, backed by the
ampact of news of the invasion

ct South Korea, have frightened
ay Filipinos, perhaps more
an

they were frightened t
before Pearl Harbour. ad

The first news of the Commun-
‘st invasion led Filipino defence
Officials to alert al) arms of the
Philippines defence forces and
call for the mobilization of several

thousand reserve officers and
men.

It led some officials to hope

privately that the United States
Will rush more troops to American
bases in the Philippines instead
of concentrating on American
power for Korea.
It led other officials to hope
that more and more arms and
ammunition will be sent to equip
more Filipino soldiers.

The Korean war has even led
the man ‘in the street to talk about
building public air raid shelters
and whether the Philippines have
‘industrial targets that might draw
Communist atomic bombs.

Tried To Beat Them

Filipino attention has been
focussed more and more on the
prospects of Huk raids. But the
Filipino rebels, guided by Peiping
have now showed their hand.

Commenting on the absence of
nébel raids since the North Kor-
é&n invasion, the Philippines de-
fence office said:

“We have tried to beat them
to the draw by launching an
all-out drive to smash guerrilla
strength before they can celebrate
the invasion of South Korea.”

The new anti-Communist offen-
sive scotched the hopes that
Pilipino troops might be sent to
Korea. But a token forces of
four military observers is being
assigned to watch the North
Korean Communists battle the
Americans and South Koreans.

Filipino defence officials hope to
get a first hand picture of Com-
munist tactics in Korea, knowing
they may be faced with the same
problem some time in the : a

—IN.S.

North

where

15 months in
time was fear
of another world war more appar-
ent than just. before my recent

1950



s



= . ' 7
}

4 Suppose we ALL said we weren't going to do any more weeding until we saw who won the war-—what then?”

Premature Explosion Is

H-Bomb’s Greatest Danger

(By FRANK B. ALLEN)

The Congressional Atomic

the greatest danger in hydr

WASHINGTON.
Committee has reported that

ogen bomb construction lies in

a possible premature explosion that would destroy both the

bomb and its makers,

————" The committee said that it is

Red Officers
In U.K. Camp

HOHNE, British Zone, July 24,

Two parties of Russian officers
today illegally visited the British
Army training areas near here
where joint British, Danish and
Norwegian manoeuvres were to
begin tomorrow.

“They must be got rid of,” the
senior British officer said. “If they
ere found, they must be tactfully
arrested.”

Later it was reported that the
Russians, who came from the
Soviet Military Mission to the Bri-
tish Rhine Army at Salzuflen, had
left the area.

They were in two cars with the
British Zone registration plates
and were in uni¥orm.

The senior British officer said
the units had been alerted to look
out for them. “They may come
back,” he said.

Members of the Soviet Military
Mission have permits to fo any=
where in the British Zone except
to restricted training areas.

The training area for tomor-
row’s manoeuvres is near Luene-
burg, only 25 miles from the
Soviet Zone border.—Reuter,

_—__ ...__..,

SUSPEND JAR
PUBLICATIONS

TOKYO, July 24.

Japan’s Attorney-General today
ordered the suspension, for an in
definite period, of 107 publications
which were being issued in six
prefectures of Western Japan as
substitutes for a banned Commu-
nist Party organ “Akahata” (Red
Flag).—Reuter.

Pyongyang—Now
Target For Bombs

Rapid commercial growth

WASHINGTON.
in modern times has over

shadowed the glorious ancient past in Pyongyang, the Com.

munist North Korea capital

bombings by both U.S. and B

A battleground of the Sino-
Japanese war in 1894 and again in
the Russo-Japanese conflict in
1904—5, this historic town grew
almost fabulously during the years
of, Japanese overlordship in Korea,
it}second only to Seoul among all
Kbrean cities, notes the National
Geographic Society,

Pyongyang, known as Heijo
while Japan rules, lies on the 39th
parallel, the latitude of Washing-
ton, D.C. It is thus one degree—
about 69 air miles—north of the
now famous 88th parallel that has
become Korea’s tragic dividing
line.

The city has good railroad and
fair highway and water approach-
ea> It is 160 miles and 118 air
miles northwest of Seoul, and
about 145 rail miles southeast of
Antung, Manuchurian border
port at the mouth of the Yalu
River across the Korean north-
west corner.

Where The Bombs Fall

Shallow-draft cargo boats and
ferries ply the Taedong River at
Pyongyang. Substantial modern
rail and highway-trolley bridges
are targets of current bombing
runs. The old city with its parks
and public buildings sprawls on
blufflike hills on the northwest
bank of the river. Modern factories,
workers’ homes, and a military
airfield form a striking contrast
on the level plain of the opposite

Fertilizers, cement, sugar,
rubber and leather are among
Pyongyang industries. Lying with-
in 25 miles of the Yellow Sea at
a neck where the Korean Penin-
stla is little more than 100 miles
wide, the city is a consuming and
distributing centre for the farm
products of the fertile surround-
ing plains and for coal from the
mountains to the east.

Pyongyang’s port for heavy
commerce is Chinnampo, thirty
fowr miles southwest by ral
anil somewhat farther by wa-
ter, at the Taedang’s mouth
on the Yellow Sea. popenieting

ongyang’s peninsular cross-
ae. both railroad and
highway meander eastward along

now the target of systematic
ritish air arms.
narrow mountain valleys to the
port of Wonsan (Genzan) on the
Coast of the Japan Sea,

Kingly Palace

Ki-tze, Chinese scholar gener-
ally credited as the founder of
Korean civilization, built himself
a kingly palace at Pyongyang
about 1120 B.C., and the spot
served as the country’s capital
for centuries thereafter. Memori-
als built to him 2,000 years later
still stand, defying time. Parts of
a city wall—nearly five miles long,
13 feet high, and pierced by six
ates—survive their royal build-
er of a millennium ago.

In the wall’s largest gate, at the
river’s edge, hang pieces of the
anchor chain of an_ ill-fated
American schooner. In 1866, when
Korean hostility toward Chris-
tians had reached its most vio-
lent stage, the General Sherman
sailed up the Taedong River to
Pyongyang, where it ran aground.
The crew was massacred and the
vessel destroyed.

Counted among the most beau-
tiful views in the’ world is that
from Peony Point (Botan-dai) on
the heights at Pyongyang’s north-
ern edge. It looks out on distant
mountains, vast plains, the mean-
ering river split by a long green
island, and the city itself. Jack
London, visiting the region dur
ing the Russian-Japanese War,
grew lyrical in proclaiming the
seene’s great beauty.—IN.S,

Troops Prepare
For Exercises

MUNISTELANGER, British Zone,
July 24.

Ten thousand British, Norwe-
gian and Danish troops were today
moving into positions under grey,
storm-swept skies for exercises
near here about 25 miles from the
Soviet Zone.

These exercises, timed to begin
at noon tomorrow and to last four
days, will be primarily a move-
ment for units operating for the
first time on full-scale manoeu-
vres, e

The troops will use jet Vampires
with Mosquito and Spitfite fight-
ers for support —Reuter.

necessary to create heat similar
to that of the interior of the sun
in order to get an explosion.

The report added:

“The difficulty of producing
such a reaction before the assem-
bly flies apart and while the
temperature is adequately high
accounts for much of the uncer-
tainty that exists as to whether
hydrogen weapons are feasible,”’

Before it issued the committee
report, which was carefully gone
over by Security officials, Chair-
man McMahon (D) Connecticut,
said:

“Atomic plants in the United
States and Russia continue to turn
out competing stacks of atomic
weapons, and both countries move
closer to the hydrogen bomb.

“Control of these dreadful
weapons is still the heart question
of the peace, the overriding ques -
tion which, unless solyed, leaves
nothing fundamentally sound.”

Detection Difficuli

Much of the report was given
over to a discussion of whether
the proposed United Nations’ plan
will be effective in controlling the
ingredients of the hydrogen bomb.

The committee pointed out that
deuterium can be made by a
simple process which can be
carried out in small plants scatter-
ed throughout a nation — which
would make their detection diffi-
cult. ‘

There are three possible basic
bomb materials — deturium-
deuterium, tritium-tritium and
déuterium-tritium,

Tritium. the committee, said,
may be produced in nuclear reac-
tors. Deuterium is simple to
obtain.

The hydrogen bomb explosion
takes place by the union of two
nuclei under extremely high tem-
peratures.

If it can be made to work, the

‘world’s supply of hydrogen bombs

will be limited only by the supply
of uranium.

The uranium bomb as used as
the “trigger” which provides the
initial heat make the union of
nuclei possible.

It might be possible, the com-
mittee said, to build an H-bomb
whose blast damage in a 10-mile
radius would compare with that
caused by an atomic bomb in a
one-mile radium at Hiroshima.

The committee did not try to
answer the question — which it
raised—of whether the hydrogen
bomb would be “militarily deci-
sive.”

Exaggeration

It merely cited two rival state-
ments. They were those of Nobe)
Prize winner Harold Urey, that
it would be militarily decisive and
that of former Atomic Commis-
sioner Robert Bacher, who took
the view that “while the H-bomt
is a terrible weapon, its effective-
ness seems to have been grossly
exaggerated in the minds of lay-
men.”

The report said that heat effects
will “depend on atmospheric con-
ditions” and that the range of a
destructive H-bomb blast would
be many times above that of an
A-bomb.

But the hazard of radioactivity
would not be “significant”
although the committee adder
that it might be possible “to so
design and use an H-bomb thar
dangerous contamination would
be produced locally.”—I.N.S.



The Weather
TODAY

Sun Rises: §.39 a.m.
Sup Sets: ¢.21 p.m.

High Water: 1142 am.
12.59 p.m,

Moon: (Full) 28th.

YESTERDAY: «

Rainfall (Codrington) .12 in.
Total for Month up to Yes-
terday: 2.13 ins.
Temperature
(Max.) 86.0 ° F.
Temperature
(Mir) 73.5 ° F.
Wind Velocity: 17 miles per
(3 pam.) E. by N.
Wind eVliocity: 17 miles per
hour.
Barqgmeter (9 a.m.) 30.038.
(3 pam.) 29.981.

ater enti eetentortarremraets estate anne

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Red Subs, _
Seen Off

Newfoundland

OTTAWA, July 24.

The navy believes there is little
doubt a submarine or submarines
Sighted off Newfoundland’s grand
banks last week, come from Russia.
It has taken action to investigate,
a Naval spokesman said. A
check with London and Washing-
ton disclosed neither the Royal
nor United States Navies had any
Submarines in the area.

Russia is believed to be the only
other country which could logical-
ly have a submarine off the
Atlantic Coast of Canada. The
Navy has an aireraft carrier, two
or three destroyers, and some
smaller vessels at its disposal at
Halifax.

These may be sent to sea to
investigate. Most have modern
anti-submarine equipment. In
addition the N.C.A.F. has an anti-
sub squadron based in Nova Sco-
tia. The submarine story broke on
Saturday, The St. John’s Sunday
Herald, Newfoundland weekly
newspaper, said submarines be-
lieved to have been Russian, had
been sighted off the Grand Banks,
New Brunswick.

A fisherman said he had also
seen one. Naval authorities here
said they have been investigating
similar reports, a senior Naval
officer said there is little doubt the
submarine seen off Newfoundland

was Russian.
—Can. Press.



10 Years Jail For
Ritual Murder

SWAZILAND, July 24.

A European farmer on whose
land the remains of a ten-year-old
African boy’s body was found was
gaoled here for 12 years for being
accessory after the fact in an
African ritual murder.

The African Chief Silwane
Nxumalo, cousin of Paramount
chief of Swaziland, was sentenced
to death.

The farmer, Carl Werner of
Hlatikulu, Swaziland, was found
guilty of receiving £30 from
Silwane after the ritual murder of
the ten-year-old boy had taken
place in his farm.

Parts of the boy’s body were
used for “medicine” and the
remains buried in an ant-bear
hole.

Two African witch doctors
were found not guilty of the crime
and were discharged.

if —Renter.

34 Dead In
Air Crash

MYRTLE BEACH, South Caro-
lina, Monday.



The death rol] of servicemen ia fy neneonanenecsenEneeRToneRRNCERRRR MDS

+ RECTOR’S

an Air Force transport plane crash
near here yesterday was to-day
known to be 34. There were 30

National Guardsmen _ returning
from manoeuvres and a crew
of four. The plane _ plung-

ed into swampland and exploded
shortly after taking off from the
Municipal airport. Earlier reports
gave the total dead as 33.
—Reuter.

Peacetime Recovery

KIRKENES, Norway.
Reconstructed and modernized
iron mines in this northern Nor-
way area are expected to produce
at the rate of 500,000 tons of ore
for export by the end of 1951. The



mines were badly damaged
‘uring the Second World War.
—Can Press.



Giant Sugar Mill

KARACHI.

The largest sugar mill in Asia,
situated in the Mardan district of
Pakistan will go into production
in November. The mill took four
years to complete and has a
crushing capacity of more than
8,000 tons of cane daily which
will yield about 350 tons of fine
sugar.—Can., Press.



FISH LOCATER

GRIMSBY, England.
Tests are being made by an East
England firm of equipment which
will aid fishermen not only to
locate fish deep in the seas, but
also to identify their species. It

in the “hush hush” stage of
development,—Can Press.
—Can Press,







London Exvrass Service

V2 TEST
ON MONDAY

COCOA, Florida, July 24

The first giant V-2 missile to be
fired from this east coast proving
round may zoom into the air on

Onday. Experts were optimistic
over the chances of firing the
rocket after the first missile fiz-
zied on the launching platform
last Wednesday

They set 9 a.m EDT for the
test of the main part of the mis-
sile

The captured German V2 rock -
et will use 10 tons of fuel jn
approximately one minute It
will be fired vertically, but short-
ly after the take-off a gyroscopic
steering device will turn it to go
horizontally. By the time the main
part of the missile is spent, a
700-pound rocket known as “WAC
Corporal”, riding on its nose,
will take off. The V2 will come
down at sea and the “WAC Cor-
poral” will continue its flight.

Both will send information
back to the base by radio
“WAC Corporal” is a scientific
missile rather than a_ military
weapon. Experts said it may go

as far as 250 miles
—(Can Press).



Radio Guides Ship
On Mercy Mission

MELBOURNE, July 24...
Radio was today guiding a ship
on a merey mission to a young
doctor stricken with appendi-
citis on lonely Heard Island,
2,480 miles from Australia’s west
coast,
" Dr. Serve Udovikoff, thé only
doctor with the Austrian Antare-
tic expedition on the
ready to risk using a
himself if the British freighter
Perthhire does not reach the
island in time. The Perthhire was
today steaming at 15 knots, hop-
ing to reach Heard Island in two
days’ time if not delayed by fogs
Medical advice was wirelessed
from Sydney in case Dr. Udovi-
koff had to operate on himself. It
was understood that at least one
of the expedition’s two biologists
would be able to assist him.—
Reuter. .

knife on



29 Jamaicans
In London

From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON.

Twenty-nine Jamai¢an — arti-

sans and labourers arrived in
London this week—to look for
jobs. They flew by B.O.A.C;

from: Kingston, paying £94 each

My
: my, le struction, RUDGE-WHITWORTH BICYCLES have a patented
for their passage. One of them rok Thief-proof locking device positively securing the steering of
a _ carpenter, said of Jamaica: , c the Bicycle in any one of three positions, operated by a key:
‘No place can be as hard as| Zvery Bicycle has a different key.
that little rock.” Other batches
following by air

are stated to be
Shortly because

‘ passage by
is unobtainable,

sea









FEVER

caused by Chills

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PAGE THREE

, (Gums Bleed?

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
Teeth mean that you hav Pyorrhea
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad diseas:
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amesan stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the t
fuarantee. Amosan must make yoar
mouth well and save your teeth or

Cte emt

CANADA
MOURNS

For MacKenzie King









OTTAWA, July 24
Canada on Monday mourned the
loss of one of her most illystrioi





. - money back on return of empty Pack
ons, William Lyon MacKenzie age Get Amosan trom your chemis
Kir \ . > > 1 today. The guar
King, whose influe NCE largely Amosan antee Protects
Shaped the country's destiny in you

the last 50 years

The veteran statesman-bachelor
who was Prime Minister longe:
than any other man in any Britis
Commonwealth, died late Satur
day evening.

His life which began in what
how is Kitehener, Ontario, 75
sears ago last December, was the
story of Canada’s growth to
nationhood in the first half of th:
century .

Prime Minister St Lauren,
chosen by Mr. King as his suc-
cessor when he left public life in}
1948, said: “death marks the end
ef what historians will call the!
MacKenzie King Era”

Mr. King died at his summer
home at Kingsmere, a lakesid
ommunity in the Gatineau Hills
of Quebec about 20 miles from
Ottawa. He had been ill since hi
heart and cireulation ailment sent
him to bed for a month while bh
was attending the Conference ot!
the Commonwealth Prime Minis
ters in London in the fall of 1948
but there had been periods sine»
when he seemed to have recov sred
much of his former vigour ard he
was trying to write his memoirs

For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth

6 Catia

@

Boby









Jast Thursday when he had a) . 2 ,
recurrence of the pulmonary dis | 4 an D OTHELE
turbances which had bothered —e ‘ » -
him for years, developed nae ITEMS eu LE
pheumonia and soon passed into

a coma

His attending phyNcian at first |
thought he would rally as he bad
many times, but at Saturday noon

REQUIRE !!

es Tyres and tube

h's condition was critical. At 9.42 :
p.m. EDT. on Saturday he died Cycle pumps, clips, locks, bells, rit poke
without regaining consciousness. Valve rubber, solution
Tributes came om capitals of Ribbed rubber mattin
the world Air hose
The King and Queen sent a Garden hose and f{ittir

message of sympathy saying Mr
King’s lifelong service would
ensure him a place in the a

Garden tap adapters
Garden pruning shear
Air horns, chrome plat«
Copper tubing
Reversing lamps
Torchlights and batteri
‘Tools—hand drills, calips rs,

panners, ir ete
Electrical fittings
Electric vulcanising machines and patches

ind black enamel
of his country.

In Washington President
Truman expressed personal sorrow
and said Mr. King was an un-
warring champion of freedom and
democracy .—(C,P.)

hollow puneher feele; fe8



Fleets Strengthened
Against Air Attack

SAN DIEGO, California.
American, Pacific ang Atlantic
fleets are to be strengthened
against a possible submarine and
air attack on the United States
Admiral Forrest P. Sherman the}
Chief of Naval Operations told a

Press Conference here

“We have been concerned for a
long time about the mumber of
Russian submarines and have giv-
en a great deal of thought to
countering them, if need arises.

—Reuter.

LOOK YOUR

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PAGE FOUR



=== S={oseS 4

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.





Tuesday, July 25, 1950



Welfare

y

THE WORK and progress for the year
1949/50 of the Barbados Women’s Social
Welfare League and its Affiliated Societies
has been recorded in an interesting report
just published. In a community where
there are few really rich people and where
work of a social nature is still in its infancy
the report shows that there are still people
who, with their daily round to pursue and
in many instances struggling themselves to
earn a livelihood, find time to minister to
the needs of their fellows.

One general criticism which has not been
without foundation is that organised
charity in Barbados would be of more value
to community life than the promiscuous
help doled out and of which many have
taken advantage. The Report under review
shows that charity is becoming more organ-
ised and is having good results. The
progress of this work can be estimated from
actual investigation.

The League of which the Hon. Mrs. Han-
schell is President has been able to enlist
the support of many other organisations
throughout the island and in this way has
given an island wide interest to the work.
Branches in St. Peter and St. Philip have
published reports showing excellent work.

The Twentieth Annual Report of the Fam-
ily Welfare Society with Mrs. Hanschell as
President and Miss Sybil Chandler as Hon-
orary Secretary includes in its Council
' people from almost every walk of life and

the subscribers’ list includes individuals
and institutions of varied interests. Sub-

scriptions and donations amounted to
$4,459 and disbursements were $4,088.

Family circles, and individuals have bene-
fited from this and the Order of St. John
Eye Fund shows an excellent record of
work, Pupils of Secondary Schools in need
of assistance have been helped by the
Bridgetown Players through this Society.

~The work of the Civie Circle which has
overcome many obstacles has now ex-
tended to Seawell Airport and although
the work here has been suspended until the
alterations there are complete, it is clear
that Miss Barbara Young and her support-
ers are prepared to spread the gospel of
beauty and pleasant surroundings to the |
country districts.

The Christ Church Baby Welfare League,
the Children’s Goodwill League, the Baby
Welfare League, (monument to the late
Mrs. Florence Brown), the Royal and Mer-
chant Navy Welfare League, the Barbados
Registered Nurses’ Association, the Girls’
Friendly Society, the Girls’ Industrial
Union and the St. Philip Welfare Centre,
all find place under the aegis of the bigger
association.

It is indeed good fortune for the League
that Mrs. Savage has consented to become
Patroness and that the Central Council
still consists of a collection of ladies drawn
from varied strata of society. The straight-
forward and earnest approach of the
Patroness to problems and her engaging
manner should win support for the work
which will surely benefit not only those
dependent upon it but those who have been
called upon to make it their share of public
contribution.

But if the work of the Family Welfare
Society supplies without the fanfare of
publicity, a much needed job of work, that
of the Nurses’ Association is extremely in-
teresting and on its record invites public
support of every kind. The total member-
ship is 77 and during the year the Private
Nurses’ Co-operation was able to help the
General Hospital during the Shortage in
its staff and the District Nursing Service
gave treatment and advice to 16,435 people.
It now plans an island-wide Visiting Nurs-
ing Scheme including midwifery; and this
is indeed a laudable endeavour,

OUR READERS SAY:

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Pentagon Snaps

THE PENTAGON—biggest building in the world—is U.S. Defence
headquarters. A man who works there said yesterday: “They bank
my money here; they clean my shoes: they shave me. You don’t have
to go out—because they feed you here—the luncheon lawn in the
centre is crowded every day. You don't have to go shopping be-
cause the shops are all here, and they'll deliver to Room 3C421

when I want my toothpaste.

By Vincent Evans
WASHINGTON,

GENERAL Carl Spaatz, who rooms who is not doing something
States that will have a direct bearing on

commanded United
bombers against both Germany
and Japan, bounced down a
corridog of the Pentagon and
asked me: “How many people
d’you think work in this building?”

I said I didn’t know, Spaatz
exclaimed: “Half the so-and-so’s,”
and stumped off.

It was a joke, of course.
Twenty-four thousand people
work here. There are never fewer
than 2,000 people in its vast acres
--even when 200 janitors take over
at night.

It is the biggest office building
in the world. A man who works
here said that he had never seen
his boss, General Omar Bradley.

Nor need anyone else, theoreti-
vally. For the people in the Penta-
gon make 100,000 telephone calls
to each other daily.

Negro cycle messengers wait
outside doors to carry files.

The Pentagon is focal point of
the focal city of the world today
because it houses the top planning
and policy building agencies of
the United States.

General Bradley’s joint chiefs
ef staff have their offices here,
too, Around them is the mammoth
filing and control machinery for
the whole of America’s armed
forces,



But they won’t let me have a drink.”

Joe's Back

Tonight there is scarcely a
person in the Pentagon's 4,000

the war in Korea or the events
that will follow it

One reason for this new urgency
is that General “Lightning Joe”
Lawton Collins is back from Japan,
And most people in the Pentagon
move faster when “Lightning
Joe” is around

Collins has not brought any
pessimism back with him. Nor
have the men he and General of
the Air Force Hoyt Vandenberg
brought back with them.

What they ‘have’ brought back
is a furious fire-cating insistence
that everyone shell work.

As soon as Collins sat down he
sent a flurry of orders round the
building. So did Vandenberg.

They wanted to know the size
of the reserves in their services.
They wanted r-ports from tech-
nicians abou. the technical men
they needed.

The Inquest
By this afternoon they had
ready the draft cf a report they
will send to Mr. Truman. On that
report depends whether young
men from New Mexico and North
Dakota will be getting a summons
into the army or navy or air force

in the next couple of weeks.
There is a huge green brown,

Out Of It

and white map of Korea lining
the walls of the room newspaper-
men call the “Barometer Room.”
Official army and navy spokesmen
come there daily to tell the world’s
journalists how the war is going—

sometimes up and sometimes
down.
On the map, a series of red

arrows are creeping down day by
day.

This morning, when we went
there, the main red arrow had
driven through the little section
of the “line of no retreat.”

The spokesman drew another
line across the middle of the map
south of Taejon and said? ‘It is
important, if we can, to hold
along this main ridge, This would
give us a large compartment
between Pusan and the main
ridge for our beachhead.

“We are gathering strength as
we go back. They are getting

weaker. Their momentum is
slowing down.” =
New Mood

Up in the room next door to
the chiefs of staff you have only
got to switch a handle and
London, Paris, Tokyo or Berlin
headquarters would be on the
wire.

The conference phone will cut
any Cabinet Minister Bradley
wants into the conversation.

Light-hearted jocularity, which
characterised the days w it
was thought the North Koreans
were going to be taken for an
easy ride by bombing planes, has
gone.

There is a new mood in the
Pentagon tonight. ~

—L.E.S.

We Go Hunting Guns
In Tricky Waters

As interest in the East switehes from troubled lands to
dangerous waters=joins a smuggling check off jungle shores...

MALACCA STRAIT,

THE eight sampans look like a
caravan of camels on a desert
skyline as they move in file across
the sunset.

OUR OWN COURSE is set Nor
west.

OUR SHIP: HM. Frigate
Mounts Bay (Captain J. H. Unwin,
DS.C.).

HER PRESENT VOYAGE: A
500-mile patrol of the coast from
Singapore to North Malaya

HER TASK: To halt and search
sll ships within the three-mile
limit, and see that no man or gun
bomb is run ashore the
bandit forces in the jungle

Since the tragiition and practice
of smuggling in these parts is as
olg as Cornwall's, it requires
respectful study

Towing the other seven sam-
pans is a battered antique ditts
decorated with fearsome fishhead
paintings, and fitted with am out-
coard engine.

To her Mounts Bay's loud-hailer
brusquely calls across the water
in Malay: “Berhenti, berhenti
(Stop, step)!" The caravan comes
untidily to rest

Down goes the Mounts Bay
whaler, seven oarsmen and a
coxswain in lifeboats, and an officer
with revolver at beit.

The ‘Admiral

QUICKLY we are alongside and
aboard the “flagship” of the sam-
pan fleet. The “admiral” wears a
scanty loincloth and a _ large
conical hat, and smokes a cheroot,
the last two of which he politely
removes as he produces his own
and the ships’ papers.

All okay. So is the identity
ecard of every occupant of every
other sampan in his fleet.

So the whaler is soon home.

As many of our 160 men as can
sleep in hammocks slung on the

cr to

Hy Frank Owen

open deck, or lie on the deck itself.
The night is clear, but the stars
seem infinitely far off.

At two a.m. the engine-room
bells awaken me. On the bridge
is Captain Unwin, watching
through binoculars two tall, ghost-

like red sails, swaying in the beam

of his searchlilght.
Whaler Again
AT the side of the bridge st
a sailor with mounted Bren ¢
He watches, too. Two decks be-
lew, the whaler crew stand



by

“Berhenti, berhenti!” commands
the loud-hailer
Baul dewm sail).”

Down come their sails. Aut
down gee, cur whaler again, cur
seacrhlights ginning the junk om
the spearpoint of their beams.

in
mam J. Winter. 2. tern at
Pancras, Lendon, Sut tater
am early age Oy hip mother w
rubber plan‘ation in Sarawait.

John is the ship's mvaluabic
Malay lingeist. But he is no good
temight, for neither of the two mer
nor the boy m the drst sam
we board understands one wor
beimg Chinese from
Island.

av

32r

am





any kind. Thoroughly we se

pulling up deck boards, peering oo

bilges. But we find no bandits
and no contraband

“Search number two. Tell both
to wait while you return.”

When we draw a blank in
number two, we go to the frigate’s
side and pick up the captain's
Chinese steward, smiling Mr.
Leung.

All Found
NOW Mr. Leung is a mainland
Chinese, and has no affinity what-



“Jatek layat —

sur S@at goes Leading Sea- ~ ;

ever with the Hainan mariners’
Chinese, Still, all Chinese people
understand certain things, like the
British abroad. And very soon,
squatting on the deck by the light
of a lamp, Mr. Leung conjures
forth from his countrymen identity
zards, ship’s registration and fish-
ing licence

th sm



jokes (still unin-
salutes all round,
back

ghting warns of a
0 radar picks up
. er motor-driven






















renching rain,
a swelling sea.
ome alongside
keep in touch
e
be “gone over’
ighiy. too. For while
see far from satis-
her “mixed sargo™ ex-|
mixed. even for}
er midmight: it}
beer

[ee cloth. |









ent, rope,




i
ude Upton does
cally as Ronnie Howe
Yard
there is a curious half-
ge between the light and
ulackness, like a rainbow
m a cavern. And then
smugglers’ scene there
glides a long, low merchantman,
and passes slowly, silently by.
“She was a Japanese,”
Lieut.-Commander Sangster,





of mist
into thi

this



Says

tongkan friend in tow and into
Custody, to hand over to the police.
“But she came so near and seemed
so inquisitive, I thought she must
be a Russian,.”—L.E.S.

Never a Dull Mexico Minute

DANE CHANDOS built himself
a house in Ajijic, Mexico. When

the house was finished, Dane
Chandos was broke.

So he wrote his best-selling
-‘Village in the Sun”, about

Ajijic, and turned his house into
an hotel.

Amateur hotel-keeping’ gave
him the material as well as the
need for another best-seller.
From the proceeds of this new
book—"“HOUSE IN THE SUN”
(Michael Joseph, 10s. 6d.)—he
should be able to build an Ajijic
holiday camp, for ‘House in the
Sun” is one of the most con-
tinously delightful books I have
ever read,

Exasperating

No doubt the hotel’s guests and
servants were sometimes exasper-
ating. The dieting professor had
to have his meals so precisely to
time that Candelaria, the cook,
had to sleep with a huge red

alarm clock clutched to her
bosom,
The Mexican family, however,

ate at all times, They sat down
at 3.30 p.m.—all but one, who
drifted in at 4.45 p.m., and could
cnly eat tinned sardines.

e&

Book of the Day ... by

J.P.W. Mallalieu, M.P.

When the hotel had stocked
enough sardines for a month the
family thanked Chandos for their
delightful stay, and said they
were leaving in an hour,

The old German’ engineer—
“the Senor of the Oven”—gave
trouble, too, He had to have a
stove specially built on which he
could bake his own meals, his
parrots bit children, and he at
last married one of the maids.
Whatever he did, he wrote notes
about it to Chandos,

But in Mexico you must learn
to be surprised at nothing. You
eatch the bus for Guadalajara
at 8.30 a.m. Whe bus starts at
11.30 a.m. and goes instead to
El Chante.

All the passengers for Guada-
lajara decide that El Chante will
do just as well, except one
whose mother has had a fit and
needs attention. He will wait
for tomorrow's bus .

When Avelino offers to sell you
some land you find that the deeds
are in his daughter’s name,

He comes back next day with
the deéds properly signed, and

jater mentions casually that his
daughter has been dead three
months, “I wrote her name
yesterday myself, with great care,
in the presence of my _ friend,
Don Prisciliano Perez, who wit-
nessed it,” says Avelino.

Authority is as inconsequent as
the citizen, The best way of
finding the black market is to
ask a policeman.

Soldiers who came to arrest the
local buteher search his house
but do not kpther to search the
outhouse, where they know he is
hiding. “What business is it of
theirs if the man is not at home?

Out of Nowhere

Dane Chandos begins his book
with an Indian and his burro,
“appearing out of nowhere and
vanishing into nowhere, With no
fixed rules or directions, nothing
beginning, anywhere in particular
or stopping anywhere in particu-
Jar, lost in the prodigious land-
scapes and the broken hills and
the long lilac distances.”

That is Mexico; and that is
“House in the Sun.” Read it
these holidays. It will delight

you.
.—L.E.S.

our
frigate’s Number One, when we
got back at last, having taken our

EVERY 5 MINUTE

By FRANK EMERY
A U.S. AIR BASE IN KOREA, July.

A NEW miracle happens every five min-
utes at this muddy, dirty, flat place in Korea
where Americans live in pup tents and
American equipment forms a jungle of boxes,
trucks, plankings and engines.

For out of this chaos every five minutes a
trim, neat mustang fighter rises and ‘points
its nose toward the enemy only 20 minutes
away.

How it happens is one of those miracles
Americans use to win their wars.

A week ago this was a wilderness where
the Japs once had an airstrip. It was over-
grown with brush and weeds.

Now it is a bustling base run by dirty,
tired men who don’t get a chance to bathe,
who don’t eat anything but C rations, who
sleep on muddy ground under pup tents, and
who cling hopefully to a rumour that they
may get cots before too long.

The base is being built by an Air Force
engineering outfit from Okinawa with Korean
labour doing the heavy work.

For a time the field was frequently attack-
ed at night by North Korean guerrillas..
Finally the Americans decided that some of
the Koreans who worked on the strip by day
led the snipers in by night. Now all Koreans
who work on the base in the daytime must
sleep at the base at night. That is a condi-
tion of employment.



Col. Robert W. Witty is commanding the
base which looks like an unfathomable mess
but which is accomplishing its job by putting
aircraft into the sky.

Witty was aboard a ship ready to sail for
the United States June 25th when the
Korean war broke out and the Far East Air
Forces recalled him immediately to go to
work in Korea.

His job was to provide a base which will
eliminate the long, gas-consuming haul for
fighter planes operating from bases in Japan.

The job is already done and now Witty is
trying to make the base a cleaner and more
efficient place.

Rough Korean roads for miles around the
base are clogged with all kinds’ of heavy
equipment moving into the air base.

Veterans say the base looks like Henderson
Field on Guadalcanal. It is almost the same
kind of operation except that Red guerrillas
in the area are not so formidable as the
Guadaleanal Japs were.

Brig. Gen. Crump Garvin, commanding the
Pusan Base in South Korea, flew to the air-
field Tuesday to co-ordinate the supply prob-
lem. Stepping from his airplane into a maze
of equipment and sweating workmen, Garvin
asked where he could get transportation
quickly and who was the transportation
officer.

A GI answered : “Lieutenant Garvin, sir.”

So the General went looking for his son to
arrange a ride.

Everybody is busy on the base, but Capt.
Richard Ryan of Lincoln, Neb. is a strong
candidate for the title of busiest of all.

Ryan flies mustang combat missions. Be-
tween missions he helps to build the camp as
a regular assignment and runs the jerry-’
built post exchange which doles out two cans
of hot beer to each man at 5 o’clock every
afternoon. 4

Another base builder is Capt. Lee Kelly,
Jr. of Holyoke, Colo. who evacuated from
Seoul and still is mighty unhappy about
$6,000 worth of clothing, furniture and other
possessions he lost there.

Kelly has had about enough war trouble
in his family. In the Philippines, just after
the Pacific War, he married the former
Marian McCarthy of Los Angeles, who serv-
ed 31 months at Santo Tomas as a prisoner
of the Japs.

Mrs. Kelly was evacuated from Seoul
where Kelly was a member of the Korean
military advisory group, Kelly learned
through Stars and Stripes that she has re-
turned to the United States.

Americans in Korea are hungry for the
Stars and Stripes and any other news publi-
cations they can get their hands on. Cpl.
William White of Bainbridge, G. who landed
in Tokyo the day after the Korean War start-
ed, said :

“I don’t mind eating C rations all the time.
But I’d sure like to get a newspaper that’s
newer than five or six days so I can find out
what's going on in this Korean War.”

Ss eee
Ce UU a dyEI EEE SSIES IEEE

Life Depends on Trees
To the Editor, the Advocate
SIR,—Please allow me, through
the medium of your newspaper
to call to the attention of the men
and women of the island the
deplorable condition of our trees.
will mention a few of them
which are a shocking sight!

The Evergreen tree in Trafal-
gar Square, near the Broadway

' Dress Shop, has been mutilated
and slowly killed. The Tree
Guard from around it was re-

moved and the people have driven
nails.into it and cut off bits of
the bark for kindling. A box has
been nailed to it and a barber's
shop has been established aroun:

Evergreen trees planted by my
Uncle, Mr. Sam Manning in Fair-
child Street, There were seven;
one is dead, one is slowly dying,
and the other five are very sick
trees. Soon we shall have no trees
at all there, Nails are driven into
these trees and wallets and
buckets ete., are hanging on them,
Boxes, quite large ones, are placed
among the branches for safe
keeping, and these trees are used
as urinals by the people who work
in Fairchild Street.

= Then the Evergreen tree in the
Triangle in the Garrison, facing
Highway No. 7 and near to Dr,
Klevan. Two posts, one belonging
to the Electric Company and one
to the Gas Company have been

Agriculture has most kindly given is there anyone who is pushing
the Civic Cirele several hundred ahead for this to be made easier
trees and shrubs for distribution to the U.S.A. and countries that
to the Elementary schools. When our people prefer? I have seen
I think of the way we are defraud-,Barbadians work admirably in
ing our children and what they America, and why can’t they be
will say of us in the next twenty helped to get out to large coun-
or thirty years, I shudder. What tries: America will benefit by
can we do to bring to men’s West Indian emigration and will
minds the realisation of their strengthen our fraternity with

dependence upon trees and the Uncle Sam.
urgent importance of uniting for There should also be some dis-
their protection and replenishment tinction made for our young
for those that come after us? women who are sent to the U.K.
The very air we breathe is I do not see how they can pay
purified by trees. Trees enrich the back the Government out of small
soil and enable food to be grown. wages. After all, women first, and
Trees affect our water supply. help should be given free to the

Trees are God's Cathedral. weaker sex.
NELL MANNING. There is great dissatisfaction

the roots. Two posts belonging erected close to the tree in this No. 15, Block A., that there is so much red tape to

to” the Electric Company have small triangle and the side of the Garrison, getting out to free countries.

been “erected close to it so that tree to the Highway is cut straight + Michael 17 COUNTRYMAN.

the wires are entangled in its up, as if it were a hedge, so that

branches and the tree is trimmed the light from the Gas can illum- Women And Tape Thanks

to the liking of this company inate Highway No. 7, The tree To the Editor, the Advocate To the Editor, the Advocate

whenever it chooses to do so. s there first. “qe SIR—In the many talks about SIR—We ave deeply apprecia-
Next, please note the line of ! know that the Director of emigration and its urgent need, tive of the public spiritedness dis-

4 t

played by the Barbados Electors
Association for the present of one
set of boxing gloves offered to tha
winner of our recent Intercolonial
Middleweight bout held at Brigh-
ton Sports Club.

Our thanks are also due to Capt.
Arthur Jones, secretary of e
Association, through whom the
present was obtained.

LIGHTFOOT KID
EVERTON LAMPITT
Promoters,

Hard

To the Editor, the Advocate
SIR,—Please allow me to write
on behalf of “poor shoppers” who
are told in some of the large
Groceries that they cannot buy

one pound of sugar or half pound
ef butter, it must be a larger
amount,

We are already hit hard by the
prices we have to pay for our
daily food, and this makes it

harder yet. If we have a
to spend our merchants
realise the need and also sell
their goods in small quantities
so that the poor man may bc
able to get a taste of what others
buy in double ®
R MAN,

Russia’s Move

To the Editor, the Advocate

SIR,— acorns grow, I hope this
plea’ may bear fruit.

Fires of antagonism are burn-
ing in Korea, lovers are
praying, and all nations tc
bring about a peaceful settlement.

Let us pray that Russia will
distinguish herself by calling a
halt on North Koreans and their
atrocities. We are not cowards.
but peace and progress go to-
gether for “mothers weep, and the
earth shall shriek, if men by war
must die.”

ANTI-BLOODSHED

|
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TUESDAY, 25,

JULY

1950





Lorry Driver Pleads ‘Not
Guilty’? Of Manslaughter

Case Resumes Today

J

ULIAN GREENIDGE, middle aged lorry driver, pleaded
“not guilty” of the manslaughter of 70-year-old Rosa

Small, as the July sitting of the Court of Grand Sessions
continued yesterday. Hearing of the case occupied the
attention of the Court all day, and will be resumed at
10 a.m. today. The jury who are trying the case went
yesterday evening to see the scene of the accident which
caused Small her life on March 11 this year.

His Honour the acting Chief Justice, Mr. G. L. Taylor, is
presiding over the Court. Defence Counsel is Mr. E. K.
Walcott, K.C., associated with Mr. J. S. B. Dear. Mr. W. W.
Reece, K.C., Solicitor General, is conducting the case for

the Crown.
Rosa Small was fatally inj

ured on Howell’s Cross Road

after the ‘bus from which she had just alighted was struck
by a lorry coming in the opposite direction.

Alvin Shepherd one of the wit-}when the accident occurred. She

nesses for the Prosecution did not
conclude his evidence in reply to
Mr. Walcott’s cross-examination,
He was allowed to leave the stand
after he began to sway as if he
would faint.

Mr. Reece outlined the case to
the Jury, after which Sgt Nathan-
iel Gaskin took the witness stand.
He said he had been to the scene
soon after the accident occurred,
and there had seen the ’bus X-994
drawn up facing the direction of
Two Mile Hill and the lorryM-1180
on the opposite side of the road—
the left—facing the direction of
Belle Gully. The lorry was laden
with canes some of which had
dropped on the road.

Smelled Alcohol

He talked to the accused and
smelled alcohol on him. He took
him to Dr. Massiah later, and the
accused also saw his own doctor,
Dr. Scott.

The ’bus was damaged to the
right front part, and the lorry on
the left front fender. He saw a
spot of blood on the wall. Witness
then gave details of the measure-
ments of the road, the vehicles and
a tyre mark. Continuing he said
that accused had seen Dr. Massiah
about 2.50 p.m. the same day, and
Dr. Massiah had next day per-
formed a post mortem examination
of the body of the deceased.

Dr. H. Massiah told the Court
that Small had been extensively
injured. Describing some of the
injuries, he mentioned a large con-
tusion of the left side of the abdo-
men and pelvis; numerous other
small lacerations and bruises, a
contusion of the right side of the
skull; the small intestine was
ruptured in many places; the
liver and spleen were both rup-
tured; the skull was fractured and
so was the neck.

In his opinion death was due
to shock and haemmorhage follow-
ing the injuries.

He had also examined the
accused. He smelled of alcohol,
but he (witness) could not say
that he had been incapable of
managing a motor vehicle.

To Mr. Walcott: Accused when
I examined him had contra-
indications of drunkenness. His
speech was steady, and he could
answer me coherently, He talked
quite well. The tongue was clean
and moist. He recognised me, call-
ing me, “Mr. Hal” and he was
able to explain the accident to me.

Son's Evidence

Wilfred Small, son of the
deceased, said he had last seen his
mother alive at 11 o'clock on
Marchi 11, 1950, He identified her
body to Dr. Massiah for purposes
of the post mortem examination.

Verona Odessa McClean
of Gittens Road, My Lords
Hill, Headteacher of Belmont
Girls’ School, said that on
March 11, she was going
home in a Route 20 ’bus about
1,30 to 1.45 p.m. As the ’bus
reached Howell’s Cross Road
it stopped a little before it
reached the bus stop. The
road curves at that point. She
believed it curved to the
right.

“I was sitting in the second
long row behind the driver on
the extreme right. I knew the
deceased very well. When I
got in the ’bus I saw her in
the back seat. I presumed the
bus stopped to deliver a
parcel. As soon as it stopped
I heard Rosa tell me boodbye.

I replied.

Lorry Travelling Quickly

“IT saw a lorry laden with canes
coming from the opposite direction
—that of Howell’s Cross Road, In
the twinkling of an eye, I heard
the sound of breaking glass
The lorry was fairly close to the
*bus when I first saw it. I can
only say it was travelling quickly.

The ’bus was standing on the
left and the impact took place on
the right.

“The position of the lorry was
such that I thought it would have
been a head-long collision. I held
in the passenger next to me. We
both screamed. When I looked up
I saw Rosa Small lying in the
right gutter. Her foot seemed to
have been injured. I remained
where I was until the police’came.
Then I walked home.

“At the time of the impact the
‘bus was stationary. The lorry wes
travelling. The bus did not move
after the impact. The lorry was
laden with canes. I saw a few in
the road when I got out of the
*bus. I did not know the driver of
the lorry.

To Mr. Walcott: I only presume
that the bus stopped to deliver a
parcel.

Lorry Jammed Into Seat

Miss Harding, a Seamstress, said
she was a passenger in the ’bus



What’s on Today

Court of Grand Sessions
and Police Courts 10 a.m
Speech Day and Prize
Giving at Coleridge School
2.30 p.m.
Meeting of the House of
| Assembly 3 p.m.



had been in the same seat as Mrs.
McClean. She had not seen Rosa
Small in the ’bus, but she heard
her voice when she said “good-
bye Mrs. McClean.”

The lorry had jammed into the
seat of the *bus where the driver
was, The ‘bus was stationary on
the right side of the road, Each
vehicle was on its proper side.
The lorry was driving swiftly,

Mr. Reece: If both were
travelling on their proper side
how did they collide.

Witness: I do not
suppose it was the speed.

To Mr Walcott: The lorry came
around a “blind” curve.

Ernest Johnson who works on
the Government’s Waterboat was
another passenger in the "bus. He
said he had seen Rosa Small in
the "bus. She was in the rear seat
also. He did not know why the
*bus stopped, but it stopped about
10 yards away from the pole.

Lorry On Left Side

“Small got out of the ’bus and
passed to its rear. She reached
the post on the opposite side of the
‘bus. I saw the lorry coming from
the direction of Howell’s Cross
Road. When I saw it first, it was
about 15 feet away, driving on the
left side. The right part of the
lorry struck the right side of the
"bus. It came round the corner
swiftly. After it had passed I saw
the woman lying in the gutter.

“I knew the accused by sight
before that date. I assisted with
putting Rosa Small into the police
van. The old lady was near the
steps of a home belonging to one
Miss Shepherd. Some canes drop-
ped off the lorry onto the road.
I went with Rosa Small to the
Hospital. When the accident oc-
curred, the ‘bus was still station-
ary. It was very close—about a
foot from the gutter.

After the lorry came to a stand-
still it did not move until the
police came.

To Mr. Waldaott: Before the
crash came, the ‘bus driver had
just “revved” up the engine. The
‘bus was facing directly ahead.
The ’bus was about 18 feet from
the curve. The curve is one you
cannot see around. You could see
the canes as the lorry was
coming, The ’bug pole was clear
around the curve. I told the
Magistrate that the lorry was
travelling “at a fairly fast rate.”
That is correct. I did not have
much time to judge the rate.

Stopped 30 Yards From
Main Road
Next witness was Samuel Rouse,
licenced driver of a motor vehicle.
He was the driver of the "bus in-
volved in the collision. He said:
“I was travelling along Howell’s
Cross Road. I heard the noise of
an engine, and I decided to stop.
I stopped about 30 yards from
Pelle Gully main road.
“When I first heard the engine
I did not see the vehicle, but it
appeared in no time. It was an
Austin truck laden with canes, It
was dead on my side. The truck
came around a curve. The curve
was about 35 yards away from

know. I

the bus. I had not come to the
stop pole yet.
Mr. Reece: Why could you not

see the lorry before it was more
than 18 feet away, if you could
see the curve at the distance you
indicated?

Witness: “I saw the Iorry when
it appeared around the corner. I
heard a crash. I had lowered
away my head. The lorry hit my
right front fender. Glass on the
right side of the bus was smashed.
I heard that a woman was dead.

“T got out and saw nosa Small

lying in the gutter. I saw the
accused in the road, and he told
me he was the driver, The lorry
was dead on my side. I guess
that the lorry was about three
feet on my side.

Heard Hum Of Engine
To Mr, Walcott:

a curve ahead of the ’bus.

tee nietesnunsn sana

I told the
Magistrate that at the point
where the "bus stopped, there *
said that around the curve there

stop long enough for an old woman
to get out—not in my opinion.

“If I believe that danger is
ahead I will pull up anywhere.
The police measured that I pulled
up three feet from the gutter. The
stop pole on the other side of the
road would not be far from where
I stopped.

The curve is a deep curve. You
can come around it dead on the
left according to the speed at which
you are driving.

Seven Miles Per Hour

Re-examined: I would say one
could go around that curve at
about seven miles an hour to
keep on one’s left side.

Fitz-Gerald Reece, a painter of
} Howell’s Cross Road, another of
the passengers on the bus said he
was sitting in the same seat as
Rosa Small. He told about Small’s
getting out after the bus had
stopped, and of hearing the rolling
of a vehicle. He first saw the
lorry when it was about 30 yards
away.

After the lorry hit the bus,
witness said, it drove on a few
yards away. He got out and saw
Small lying in the gutter. The
police came and took her away.
He did not see when Rosa Small
was actually hit.

“When I first saw the lorry it
was off its side. I did not hear a
horn blow. The lorry was travel-
ling fairly fast

Both Kept Left

To Mr. Walcott: Before the
Magistrate I pointed to a distance
which was agreed upon as 25 te 30
feet. I think the distance of 25 to
30 feet is right. I told the Magis-
trate that the lorry was on its left
side, and the bus was on its left
side. That is correct. Rosa Small
was sitting in the middle of the
rear seat. She said goodbye Miss
Mc Clean. She had to climb over
about two people after taking up
two baskets and then she had to
get out of the bus and walk be-
hind the bus to the other side of
the road. I think the. bus must
have been stationary for about five
minutes before the lorry arrived.

At this stage Mr. Walcott sug-
gested that the jury be allowed to
visit the scene of the accident.

Mr, Reece agreed.

The Court adjourned for lunch-
eon,

On resumption Evans Elcock, an
agricultural labourer, told his ver-
sion of the accident. He was on
the lorry at the time. There were
ten people In the canes and one
was inside the hood with Green-
idge.

Slid Off Platform

When the accident occurred, he
slid off the platform and canes
came behind, On the trip down
from Christ Church the driver
stopped at a shop. The truck came
across Howell's Cross Road very
fast. The driver quarrelled with
Doris for using bad language.
Doris and his (witness’) wife
were quarrelling. The driver did
not tell anyone that if they did
not behave he would not take
them,

The lorry travelled about 20 feet
after the canes hit the old lady. He
ran back to his step because he
felt it would hit the bus. It turned
the corner wide.

Alvin Shepherd of Belle Gully
said he left home to catch a bus.
He saw a bus coming up. When
he came out from home he saw
Rosa Small standing on the
opposite side of the road from
where the bus was, She was
against the kerb,

He saw a motor lorry coming
around the corner-—M, 1180-—
coming from Two Mile Hill side
He saw the canes on vhe lorry
hit the bus. He had run back toi
his steps when he saw the lorry. }

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Bonito
Replace
Flying Fish

During the present lull in the

flying fish season the Fishery
Department is hoping to launch
the Ring Net with a view to

capturing bonito in large numbers
Up to the moment, however, these
fish have only been seen in
shallow water where it is not
possible to use the net as it would
be badly mangled on a rough and
shallow bottom,

This information was given by
the Fishery Officer when inter-
cures by the “Advocate” yester-
ay.

THE COST OF LIVINC
Clerks’ Union last night wh
Cemmissioner, spoke on La

250 SING AT
MUSIC FESTIVAL
The seeond of a series of Schoo.

concerts orgafused by teachers o1

auementary Scnools was held av
Combermere on rriday iast. A

He said that the present luli !*!F ot 200 children Was seiecteu
usually takes place about this irom amongst the pupils of the
time of the year on the approach| Vesiey Halt Boys’, ine Wesiey

of the hurricane season, usually
regarded by fishermen as from
July 15 to October 10.

Only 30 Boats Fishing

At this time about 95 per cent
of them haul their boats up on the
beach and this only leaves roughly
about thirty boats to go after
bream and snappers. At this time
too, extensive potting is usually
started with a view to selling the
fish to the poorer classes of per-
sons, bream and snappers being
more within the buying capacity
of the other groups.

What might make up in some
measure for the fish shortage that
will now be experienced due to
the drastic decrease in the num-
ber of fishing boats in use, said
the Fishery Officer, is the sea egg
season which gets underway in
another six weeks’ time.

Research Work

The “Investigator”, he said, will
be carrying out research work
throughout the year with the
exception of a short spell for
docking It was hoped during
this work to augment the island's
fish supply by, any captures that
might be made. An important
phase of this research work would
be the charting of inshore fishing
banks known and unknown.

Consideration was being given
for the importation of gill net
mesh suitable for the capture of
flying fish, said the Fishery OM-
cer, and boat owners desirous of
placing orders for such meshing
should communicate with him as
soon as possible.



Separation Bill
In House Today

When the House of Assembly
meet today members may resume
debate on the second reading of
a Bill to amend the Dog License
Act, 1902.

They may also resume debate
on the second reading of a Bill
to amend the law relating to Sep-
aration and Maintenance.

Another matter that may be
considered is a _ Resolution to
approve of the Book of Reference
and Plan of the proposed extension
of waterworks in the Parish of
St. Michael.

Under Private Members’ Busi-
ness Mr. Smith will move the
passing of an Address to His
Excellency the Governor relating
to the use of Tractors by the
Peasantry.

Mr. Mapp may also move the
passing of an Address to His
Excellency the Governor relating
to the fixing of a minimum wage
for employees sufficient to ensure

them a reasonable standard of
living.
Mr. Garner may move the

passing of an Address to His
Excellency the Governor request-
ing a greater release of hard cur-
rency in order that more of our
essential supplies may be pur-
chased outside the sterling area.



Gittens Acts For
Auditor General

Owing to the retirement of Mr.

Kosa Small also tried to get UP; f. A. Newsam, Auditor General,

and pulled her back into vhe road,

to his steps but the canes hit |
1

Witness III |

At this stage the witness be-
| came ill.

Doris Carter of Collymore Rock
was travelling on the _ lorry.
She saw the bus standing station-
ary. She heard the crash, and
when Greenidge pulled his brakes
she fell off. When she gov up
she saw an old woman lying on

the road. She (Witness) got her
foot and eye hurt. She went to
nospital

To Mr. Walcott: I did not go

into the shop, so I do not know
if anybody drank rum, Elcock’s
wife cursed me when we were
coming down in the vruck, The
driver threatened to put off
Elecock and his wife, Greenidge
biew the horn before he came
around the corner.

Re-examined. Both Elcock and
his wife were cursing.

Fitz Gerald Walcott, Rock
Blaster Supervisor at the Pine
Quarry, said he was travelling on
vhe bus on the day in question.
He told a similar story to that
told by other witnesses.

At this stage further hearing
was adjourned, and the jury went
vo the scene of the actident.

are two walls, one on each side.

I stopped the
hand side.

around the curve.

feet away from where I stopped.

I pointed and indicated the dis-
A policeman suggested

tance.
18 feet.

“I read my statement before the
I cannot remember
reading the words “eighteen feet.”
I stopped

Magistrate.

I told the Magistrate
| because I heard the humming o
}an engine. I saw the lorry as soo!
as it came around the curve.



| from the witness stand

| dock.
“I did not know that Rosa Sma:

to

got out. I did not hear anyone|

|say boodbye Miss McClean.
| did not stop to deliver a parcel

I just had the time to stop when

the lorry came around. I did no

*bus on the left
I heard the hum-
iming of an engine but I could
not see what it was at this stage.
I then saw a lorry coming
I did not
actually say the curve was 18

stopped my bus about the distance
the}



Payment Deferred)
In Corfu Channel
° ° ca
Mining Dispute
LONDON, July 24
Britain’s Foreign Under-Secre-
tary Ernest Davies told the House
of Commons to-day that discus-
sions with Albania about payment
damages for mining British ships
in the Corfu Channel had so far
been “inconclusive”’.
if The International Court award-
,,ed Britain £843,000 for the min-

jjing in 1946 of two destroyers in
which 44 men lost their lives.

He said a third discussion be-
tween the two countries’ represen-
tatives took place on July 17.

]

His Excellency the Governor has
been pleased to give directions for
the appointment in an acting
capacity of Mr. C. D. Gittens,
Senior Clerk, Audit Office, to the
post of Auditor General, with
effect from the 23rd of July, 1959.



2,000 NEW
LICENCES
In Christ Church

OVER 2,600 bicycle licences
have been sold in Christ Church
during the present year. That
number is only just below a third
of the 8,574 licences which have
been sold in St, Michael, but the
parochial Treasurer of that parish
told the Advocate today that there
is every indication that a record
number will be sold this year.

This time last year only 2,100
had been issued and the total
number had been 2,700.

In St. George 1,451 have been
issued so far,

8,346 Drivers

Licences Issued

'

| EIGHT thousand, three hun-
dred and forty six drivers’
licences have been issued to driv-



—

ers since June 21 and 206 con-
ductors’ licences, The Traffic
Department which issues the

licences is crowded throughout the
day and the duty policemen have
a busy period.

os. BaSerzuerre

| este een a ees eo ea a ee
a FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR
PETS ......

PURINA LICE
| a

Another meeting would take}
I) place shortly and the British a
would have to consider “turning e a

}to other remedies” if this also w

l Reuter.

iclusive

PURINA INSECT KILLER
H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.

Hail Girls’, the St. Mary's Boys
and the St. Mary’s Giris’ Schools.

The Police Band under the
direction of Captain C. E, Raison,
wl.B.E., A.R.C.M., accompameu
the singing of the Choir and also
contributed a numoer of Instru-
mental items to the Programme,

The items were well renderea
and well received by the audience,
but those given the greatesi
applause were : “A Shepherd Kept
sSneep”, a modern composition by
fric H. Thiman, and two Negro
Spirituals “Standin’ in the Neeu
of Prayer” and “Jericho”. The
last named was given an encore

Poor Attendance

The attendance, however, was
rather disappointing,

At the close of the programme,
Mr. L. T. Gay moved a vote of
thanks making special mention ot
Captain Raison and of the teachers
and pupils who had worked so
hard in order to stage the concert
He spoke of Captain Raison who
not only loved music, but also
people and especially children
He ventured to suggest that the
West Indies should make use of
Captain Raison’s .services as
Director of Musical Education.
He also expressed the hope that
the love of community singing
which was widespread forty o1
fifty years ago would be awakened
in Barbados, This was one of the
objects of the Music Festival

The audience included Major
C. Glindon Reed and Mrs. Reed,
Mr. E. C. M. Theobalds, Miss
B. Arne, Mr. W. H. Carter, Mr
Douglas Carter, Mr and Mrs. H
A. Tudor, Mrs. E. D. Mottley,
Mrs. D. C. Moore, Mrs. L. T
Gay, Rev. and Mrs. E. New, Mr.
A. G. Jordan, Miss M. Griffith,
Miss Balgobin, Miss I, Alleyne,
Miss G. Denny and Mr. G. Hudson.

B.T.C. Has
Triple Tickets

Prize Over $38,000

Sweepstake tickets in triple
series will be sold this Mid-
Summer Meeting for the first time
in the history of the Barbados
Turf Club, Mr, G. A. Lewis,
Secretary, told the “Advocate”
yesterday.

The Turf Club completed the
selling of Series YY yesterday and,
will begin to sell Series ZZ today.

On the completion of YY, the
first prize is estimated to be in
the vicinity of $38,148.

Only 11 days are left for the
selling of tickets at the Turf Club.
Ticket vendors are working hard
to sell as much as they can before
the races start on Monday, August
‘







DECISION
OF 10/- FINE
CONFIRMED

The decision of Mr. S. H
Nurse, Magistrate of District “E”,
who imposed a fine of 10s. anc
3s. costs in seven days or in
default 14 days’ imprisonment
with hard labour on Alphonza
Rowe of Half Moon Fort, St.
Lucy, for unlawfully assaulting
Doris Jackson of Sutherland Hil)
St. Lucy, on April 4 was con-
firmed yesterday by Their Honour
Mr. H. A. Vaughan and J. W
B. Chenery, Judges of the Assis
tant Court of Appeal.

Rowe was also ordered to pay
the costs of appeal which amount
ed to 8/4.

Pays $4.80 For
Stealing 53 Cents

William Beckles a
year-old labourer of
Land, wag fined 20s. or in defaul!
sentenced to one month's impris
onment with hard labour, wher
he appeared before Mr. H. A
Talma, City Police Magistrate



nineteen-

for the larceny on July 24 of 53

cents, the property of Edwir
Bailey. Beckles was also finec
10s. for resisting Constable Mapry
when given into custody



Case Dismissed

The case in which Beatrice Roet

| Blackguarding
|

Mr

0

fined 30s. and 2s. costs by
; L. Walwyn, Magistrate
{District “A” for blackguarding ot
Barbarees Hill on November 7



1949 was dismissed on its merits

yesterday by Their Honours Mr
J. W. B. Chenery and Mr. H
A. Vaughan, Judges of the Assis-
tant Court of Appeal.

te sees USE
POWDER

Distributors.

SSenrpepeeeerspuagaes
o\) @ SS SRRBSBSSEHBBRBaae



Holder’: |

of Thorne Gap, St. Michael was |



To |C.0.L. Index Has

Limitations

+ INDEX was explained to the

en Mr. E. S. Burrowes, Labour |

bour Statistics.

There are two types of Cost of Living Indices he said

|

(i) Those comparing living
costs at different times in
the same place and

(ii) Those comparing living
costs in different places at
the same time.

The purpose of the first cost of

living index is to measure changes s
in retail prices, not in the stand-|%

ard or level of living. To em-

phasise this the name of the Cost x
of Living Index in the United|\

Kingdom has been changed to *
“Index of Retail Prices” and in the|/% a, en aa : bs
United States of America to “Con- x AGAREX COMPOUND GLYCERINE and
sumers Price Index”. \ BISMAREX POWDER THYMOL COMPOUND
During the war and the years x CHEMICAL FOOD
following it, such indices have), COD LIVER EMULSION KAOLIN POULTICE
been used for other purposes in| KIDNEY & BLADDER MILK Of MAGNESIA
addition to the function of meas-]%& PILLS
uring price changes. They have % 5 Vi eee ao
been useful in indicating the]\ COLD and INFLUENZA SYRUP OF
success or failure of price con-] MIXTURE HYPOPHOSPHITES
trol. % Obtainable from all Branches of
Indices have been watched to} \
see that they did not move, be-|sS
cause of the changes in wages % KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

which would have followed such

movement.
Food items included in the
index have been subsidised to

keep down their retail prices. In
such cases the indices have ceased
to reflect the general movement
of the prices of all items, but they
continue to reflect the movement
of the prices of the items included
in the index

Statistics

As far back as 1925, a resolution
of the second International Con-
ference of Labour Statisticians,
said: “In each country statistics
should be published showing
changes in the cost of living.

They should cover the food,
clothing, heating and _lighting,!
rent and miscellaneous groups.

Each group should include the
most important items of consump-
tion, and especially those articles
the price changes of which may
be taken as representative of
changes in the prices of articles
not included.”

Another resolution read: “In
view of existing inadequacy of
statistics of consumption, the most
satisfactory method of determin-
ing the weights of the different
items and groups appears to be
that based on a standard family
budget obtained as the result of
an enquiry into the average ex-
penditure of a number of families
during a given period

Where statistics of family
budgets are not available, statis-
tics of aggregate consumption may
be of some value in the determin-
ation of the relative importance of |
certain articles of consumption in
the country as a whole, account
being taken of the fact that cer-;
tain articles are used for purposes |
other than human consumption

Theoretical budgets computed
from all information available
may also be used,”

The .weights in

cost of living
indices are now

based usually

PAGE FIVE





———

|| Boys Here's A Bargain...

| PENKNIVES
CHEAP !! CHEAP !!

ROBERTS & CO.—DIAL 3301—High Street

















|






*

—LPLEE LPP














Is :
A MUST with ty
. : eS
* ” ah ; . a Ne »
s [ te
7 THE BRAND YOU
s :

s
md
*

J

.

‘
.

REXALL

RENOWNED THE WORLD OVER

.

“+

oA EAE



SSPE AAA PLO

HABITS UN S—s0000 seco
SACK-TRUCKS

ALL STEEL — 1,000 Ibs CAPACITY
With Cast Iron Wheels
With Rubber Wheels







ALL METAL
WHEEL-BARROWS

STRONG AND DURABLE — 3 cubic feet capacity
SUITABLE FOR CONTRACTORS, ETC.

oe

ONLY $14.51 EACH



“RUBEROID"
ROOFING FELT

GREEN MINERALIZED SURFACE
A Low Priced, Long Lasting,, Efficient

Waterproof Cover for all Roofs

92 CENTS PER SQ. YARD





enauiries; and the standard
which the cost of living index
usually relates is that of the wage-
earner group.

The Process

In most countries an index is
first instituted for the capital city
and covers wage-*arners and
sometimes clerical workers and
salaried employees. Then particu-
lar cities are covered, and after-
wards farmers and other groups.

With farmers usually only cash
»xpenditure is taken; items pro-
duced are not taken into account
Sometimes there is a special index
for a group e.g. the East Indians
on Sugar Estates in British
Guiana

The consumption habits of sal-
aried employees may be different
to such a degree that a special
index is desirav‘e

Requirements for all special
index numbers must, however, be

onsidered in relation to funds
available Finally there is a
national index for the whole
population weighted either by
otal consumer purchasers or on
an average of the trends in the
ities and other localities for
@ On Page 7












'



||] Seenery Luncheon
Cloth each . $10.00

Scenery Luncheon

Cloth (linen) $13.00
| Scenery Guest
| Towels $ 2.00
Ladies’ Scenery
Belts $ 3.00



upon the results of family nye |
to

Such beautiful scenery!

HARRISON’'S—Hardware Specialists

road Street

eo OF eee

for evecy

occasion
tt A ney,

on sale at the
| leading Stotes






Such beautiful hand work!

SCENERY LINEN HANKY
SCENERY LINEN

SACHETS—Ea. $3.50
HANDKERCHIEFS—Each $1.50

CAVE SHEPHERD & C0., LID.

10, 11,12 & 13 Broad Street
































PAGE SIX



HENRY














BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, wy 3
BY CARL -ANDERSON if |
“eesas a





>)

" Ww
NOT JUST aba

| |
| BAD LUCK! ;- a

Troubles can be foreseen and

prevented when one is forearmed

with knowledge. We know that grazing

cattle will pick up intestinal worms,

which cause anaemia, loss of condition,

and scouring. These parasites

can be controlled by routine dosing A. Ie
with ‘Phenovis’ brand Phenothiazine. __ ~<~xa=q

eee TT
D

THE MARK
OF DISTINCTION

' im ROM
Diended & Bottled by

| STUART & SAMPSON
H LID.

ib
1 4¢
ee









BY WALT DISNEY





a























WE'LL WATCH FOR A MASKED
MAN AND AN INDIAN,
SHERIFF.

OUT Now,

DON'T WANT fy
SLEEPER.

=) ANYONE TO
HAVE REASON TO
THINK T HAD AHAND

Nager 'N HIS DEATH, |



GIVES ME AN (DEA!

i. O CANNON...

—

YES, MY.DEAR, THANKS TO.SIGNOR.. “WELL, WHOEVER DID IT,
CANNON, BUT YOU ARE MISTAKEN, ] THEY"VE WASTED NO TIME-
CANNON, iN SUSPECTING ALBERTO. / SO NEITHEI? MUST WE. i'M











“TOR FATHER?
ARE VOU

(i







ALL RIGHT? HE HAS BEEN WITH ME FORA OFF 70. Ju: ANGLO-ITALIAN
\MANY VEARS. ran NLU Lt BE
" =< i A BACK LATER,
Ae he
. iS pL (200 S r

BOY’ THIS FARM LIFE ISNT

| BAD-I'M GONNA JUST
DOWN HERE AND TAKE

( GOOD SNOOZE :



f






8





\ ny"
Wt dy





RIP KIRBY

acuity
~ © { 44! HERE IT 1S, RIP,..THE WHOLE
Do! STORY... THE JULIET IN YOUR

OTO IS BINGO JULIE!
ED HER. IN A LONELY

THE COPS ALMOST HAD HER ON A MURDER RAP...

SHE HOOKED’ A CHUMP IN A MAIL ORDER ROMANCE...

HE DISAPPE-\RED... EVERYTHING
POINTED TO JULIE, BUT SHE
WAS TOO SMART... THEY
COULON'T PINI IT ON HERI



—

LARRY,
I'D LIKE TO
SEE ALL YOUR
CLIPS ON BINGO
; JULIE!

WE ONLY WOE
NAGS. I'LL GET RID OF

THE REST+>

eineee

“ht

THE SHERIFF (S LOOKING FOR A MASKED
MAAN AND AN INDIAN. HE THINKS THEY
KILLED’ THE BARBER. THAT

| TAD.

oa. S iy

(ESS A ; i
4)



ty

‘ CO) Wyatt hy
y






Lia
Mint) 4
y li My ( ee
“ir,










ory ey | PROCS SPIOOSGIS PSG POOe
llssia vation OSS 7) i? g
(Pr ABAD. : , ;
lo, J.| | (*PHENOVIS SS |
MEF UK) Pe eo 7 — oe r
See AZOARD | TRADE MARK ean : |
aay ak BRAND PHENOTHIAZINE —= qe Xt

|



SE



Ay
¢
\ ‘

RODUCT

*PHENOVIS”

AN LCL.






GROUND BLACK PEPPER!
Daily Powdered Whole Milk
Allson’s White Rolled Oats
Kraft Prepared Mustard
Cheese with Macaroni
Jelly

SSOVOCSS ISSO AFOSR

”
» Flavouring Essences
Moir's Custard Powder

| BRAND PHENOTHIAZONE :

34e, oz.
| The most certain Worm Killen Ths bea ee
| Yet Discovered. ea ne (Salted)

INCE & Co., Ltd.

“BUCK $7

SOLE IMPORTERS and DISTRIBUTORS IN LARBADOS

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) LTD.

POPEPPOESEFSOSOOSS

2720 = R

S9OSOSSSGOO
9995S 99S 9SS9F SS FESS CS 9999S SOS PIGS SSS OSSF

o

Messrs





ala

SOOO SOS OOCSOCE SS OSCE.












YOU'LL BE IN THE CLEAR, SLEEPER

Cleanse the system from blocd
THE SHERIFF WILL DIE AM’ THE

impurities; many sufferers froin
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and
minor skin ailments, can derive great
benefit from this well-known medicine.



HEALTH BENEFIT

* CONTAINS VITAMIN A & D
IN A DELICIOUS FORM

%* INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS
* ENSURES STRONG LIMBS

Im LIQUID or TABLET FORMA

Your Backache
may be due to sluggish Kidney Action

CUNRLES |
FIMIVERS






@
tol a. [F® IS NOT s0 when you
THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS AO SOUND TEETH IH OHHOREN | te eel ets aati
if WELL, IF IT ISN'T ALBERTO, t : muscles and joints, 7
IT 4S SOMEONE WHO common urinary




KNOWS HIS WAY ABOUT
THIS PLACE! S'LL HANG











vo comfort when might

AROUND THE CLUB AND eee relief by taking Doan’s

KEEP MY EARS OPEN. Kidney Pills. stimulate and
cleanse sluggish kidneys and 0 them t rid

the blood of excess uric acid and

which otherwise might collect in the and

cause distress. Doan’s Pills have helped i

let them help you.
HALF A CENTURY of success in relieving
ailments due to inadequate kidney action, is the
proud record of Doan’s Pills. Grateful men and
women of all ages use and recommend this i
diuretic and urinary untiseptic to their frie
and neighbours.

{ oe
Ask your % Pa,,
7 DOANS 5

EXPECTANT MOTHERS/

Haliborange

The nicest way of taking
HALIBUT LIVER OIL

Made by ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD., LONDON







TH’OLD MACHIN: For river...

MAKES ALOT OF










/
?

7 =) NOISE -I GUESS IT |
Sop ee - Make baby strong—so he oan be
) \ parmemmparsie edn



an important future citizen
need A&D Vitamins
. srg bones and a tod hal
your stamins en
Score’ , i‘ :
more than [ust a tonle=
it's POWERFUL NOURISHMENT

Scott’s Emulsion is « scientific ‘

tonic, rich in natural A&D
Vitamins, derful when


















Y

sb,





BY ALEX RAYMOND

OKAY, RIL I'LL \ IT’S A PROMISE...YOU'LL
SEND FOR THEM, } GET YOUR SCOOP,,.BUT
BUT I WANT AN I HOPE IT WON'T BE
EXCLUSIVE ON iT A MURDER .




Wie

SCOTT'S EMULSION

HIGH ENERGY FGOD TONIC

:
i wien
ee ang

Lvery Morris Marine engine

I dite the accumulated
nee of marine engineering
That is one reason
have achieved world-

© for their sturdy trust-
Lhe ability to keep on
ering power without a falter
the worst weather

a a
t the



OUTSTANDING MORRIS FEATURES
%& Low initial cost: low running cost

ondition %& High Power output: low fuel consumption

of their economy too,

easy maintenance you

se to instal one. There

fs a choice for the Job you have in

mind—- Petrol, Paraffin or Diesel
»perated

Â¥& Sturdy, year-after-year reliability
& Quickly accessible for maintenance
*& Approved by Lloyds for open sea service

Your dealer has details of the variety of equipment available, and will be
happy to give you advice and information On all special problems he has
the Morris Specialists behind him






PETROL: PARAFFIN ‘DIE SEL
Marine Engines

WALPAMUAS




;





tH
Walpamur Agents

$.P.MUSSON,SONSCOLTD- BARBADOS

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
| Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 |




TUESDAY, JULY





es SUNDAY ADVOCATE



CLASSIFIED ADS.

5 om ‘Telephone ‘2508.
THANKS

WE gratefulh

return thanks to all

who attended the Funeral of the late,
MRS. RETA FORDE, sent wreaths, |
flowers etc. or in any way expressed
their sympathy with us in our Bereave- |
ment

George Forde (Husband) Fiain and
Horace Sans (Step children!

25. 50-11

MRS. B. SMITH and family gratefully |
return thanks to all who attended the
funeral, sent wreaths or in any other



way expressed sympathy with them on |
the occasion of the passing of her dear
Husband JOHN WEEKS



25.7.50—In

———$_—_— an

IN MEMORIAM



In loving and never fading memory
of our dear beloved daughter and sis
ter, ELSIE HOPE, who fell asleep in}
Jesus on July 25th, 1948.

Out of a world of sorrow,

Into a heaven of rest,

God must have a beautiful garden,
For He always chooses the best

The flowers we place upon her grave



Will wither and decay,
But her memory will alway linger
In our hearts from day to day

Ever to be remembered by the Hope's

family .
25.7.50—In
IN LOVING MEMORY otf ISAAC
WHITE who died on 25th July 19

“To live in hearts, we've left behind,
Is not to die.”

Miss Daisy Hooper 25.7 .50—Ir





FOR SALE

ee

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR-
Saloon,
and in
Co., Ltd



H.P. 1948 four door
Driven, low mileage
condition Cole &

25.7.50—4n

Morris 8
Owner
first class

1934 Chevrolet Truck
Herbert, 55
25.7.50—2n

TRUCK—One (1)
A 1 condition, Apply to Cc.
Tudor St. City

CAR
Apply R. E Taylor

1948 Packard 17,000, miles
Hotel Royal
25.7.60—3n

CAR—1947 Austin 10 Saloon,

good condition, Phone 8225

very
22,.7.50—2n.

CARS. (2) 1947 Morris 10 saloons.
Very fine condition, (1) 1947 Morris 8.
(1) 1947 Vauxhall 10, Perfect condition,
qa) 1936 V—8 Ford Just completely
overhauled. (1) 1935 Chevrolet Sedan
(1) 1948 Singer Sports FORT ROYAL
GARAGE Ltd. Phone 4504

20.7.50—3n

EE aTrE
Farmall H. Tractor and Grass Cutjer
22.6 D. B. H. Apply to M. D Elliot.

Ashford Plantation, St. John
22.7.50—in

ee
MOTOR TRUCK—Ford, V-8 Truck 1941
model, in excellent condition, with new

tyres, and new Platform, Has latély
been completely overhauled, Price
$1200.00, J. R. Alleyne, Ebworth, St
Peter. 23.7 ,50—3n

PARSONS MARINE ENGINE
excellent condition, Court
Dial 4616 or 4569.

in
Garage
25.7.50—3n




——___————_ ————
TRUCK—(1)1948 Morris 5 ton_truck.
Excellent condition. FORT ROYAL

GARAGE LTD. Phone 4504.
20.7.50—3n.

VAN—New (1) ton Morris Van. Im-
mediate delivery. FORT ROYAL GAR-
AGE LTD, Telephone 4504.

20.7, 50—3n.





ELECTRICAL

REFRIGERATING UNIT—One 5 inch
by S-inch Twin Cyl. “Frick” Combined
Refrigerating unit with driving motor,
tubular condenser-receiver and with
freezing coils for 7,900 cu. ft. refrig-

eration capacity, all complete in work-

ing order Central Foundry Ltd
25.7.50—3n
EE
LIVESTOCK
MARE AND FOAL—The_ half bred
Mare “Dagmar”, by “O.T.C." out of a
H.B. Mare by “Silky”, with a Colt by
“Battlefront” 5 months old at_ foot



Mare has again been covered by “‘Battle-
front” this season, is very quict, and
well suited to plantation work. Price
£200. J, R Alleyne, Ebworth, St
Peter. Phone 91-20 23.7 .50—3n

POULTRY

POULTRY—Pure Bred Barred Ply-
mouth Rocks, from Cup Winning Exhibi-
tion Strain. Cockerels $5.00 each
Pullets 3'2 months old $4.00 each, Hens



$6.00 each. J. R. Alleyne, Ebworth
St. Peter, Phone 91-20. 23.7 .50—2n
MECHANICAL

—$—$——_—_-

TYPEWRITERS — Remington Portable
Typewriters limited number only.
Phone 4675, 23.7 .50—3n
——_—_—
MISCEL) ANEOUS
—_—<—<—<$$— $—— ————

CALYPSO RECORDS, forty eight
titles, only ten each, come and get
them.

A. BARNES & CO. LTD.
15,7.50—T.F.N.

ee

GRAMOPHONE SPRINGS — All sizes,
Reproducers, Electric Pick-up Arms
(Magnetic) at New Market Store, Cheap-
side, Dial 4579 25.7,.50—In

———————————

TYRES AND BATTERIES. Sizes 34 x
7, 32 x 6, 30 x 5 and other sizes, also
Oldham 17 plate batteries. Guaranteed
Enquire Auto Tyre Company ‘Trafalgar
Street. Phone 2696. 21,7,50—t.f.n.





PERSONAL





THE public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife GARDINE
SI > (nee Thomas) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed

by me
Sed. EDGETON SKEETE,
Spring Garden Village,
St. Lucy
25.7.50—2n

LE

Barbados Youth Movement

1937—1950

Now the police are becoming inter-
ested in boys, and coming forward to
do their part, this is now your oppor
tunity to help the Barbados Youth
Movement with 14 years of continued
success to its credit. Activities include
Religious and general knowledge; Unity

and Culture; Motto: Lord help us, lest
we fall.
Rev. L. BRUCE-CLARKE; Founder.
Rev. J. B. GRANT; Chaplain
Mrs. OLGA BROWNE,, Gen, Secty
24.9.50—in

————_ ——————

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of ANITA LOWE,
holder of Liquor License No. 1000 of
1950, in respect of premises viz:— A
board and shingle shop attached to
residence situated at Cleavers Hill, St
Joseph, for permission to use said Liquor
License at the following premises viz
A board and shingle shop attached to
residence, Bonwell, St. Josey.

Dated this 2ist day of July
To:—J. R. EDWARDS, Esq

Police Magistrate, Dist. “F"’

1960

Signed ALFRED GREENE |

Applicant
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “F”’, on Tuesday
Ist August 1950 at 11 o'clock, aur
J. R, EDWARDS,

Police Magistrate, Dist “F”
26.7.50—in.

























































i

‘om



FOR RENT





HOUSES

ROOTH-—One five
for forthcoming
running foot,
Club



foot Booth space
Meeting at $3.00 per
Apply Barbados Turf
23.7.50—3n



“GRANDALE,” St. Matthias Gap,
Hastings. Unfurnished, two-storey stone-



wall, 3 bedrooms, etc., garage, Servants*,
room. Available August Yst © Ferreira
2881 23.7.50—2n
nsec coneeial Ceerienrianeete

ROOMS—Large furnished rooms, very
cool running water With or without
board. Terms moderate. 10 minutes

walk to Clubs or City. Dial 3356.
25.7.50—t .f.n

—_——_——_—

ROOM-—Large Furnished Room, Cool



and airy at Bel Air, Richmond Gap
Dial 3663 22.7.50-—-2n
ROOMS Large furnished Rooms,
very cool running water. With or with- j
out board. Terms moderate. Ten et

utes walk to Clubs or City. Dial 3356. |
25.7,50—t.f.n

ee

THERSISDON—Maxwells Coast Road

Fully furnished, Linen and Cutlery can
be supplied. Apply Mrs. B. Lashley,
Dial 8417 33.7.50—in

TWO HOUSES - At Hastings, fur-
nished and unfummished, one having, 3
bedrooms and the other 4 bedrooms,

vith all modern conveniences Apply
Madam Ifill), “Elise Court’, Hastings.
235.7. 50—1.f n. |





HELP

—_——--

|
COOK—Someone who can cook well}

and do a small portion of housework
Apply to Mrs. Colin Goddard, Marine

Manor, Marine Gardens
23.7.50—2n



BOARDERS—At Private home in Hast-
ings. Rates reasonable. Phone 3317.
25.7.50—2n





PUBLIC NOTICES







£20 MONTHLY

EASILY earned at home in spare time
dealing in stamps. No experiences
necessary Suitable for either sex, 1
also contact you with Students in
Colonies and Dominions for pen cor-
respondents Enclose 2% stamp. Air
Mail only take fews days. F. Parting-
ton, Prospect House, 329 Wigan Road,
Leigh Lanes, England.

20.7.50.—30n.

























UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST
INDIES ECONOMIC RESEARCH

APPLICATIONS are invited for ap-
pointments to the research staff of the
above Institute from persons with #4
food honour's qualification in economics,
statistics, sociology or other allied social
sciences and with some experience iv
research Investigations may need to ve

undertaken in any part of the Brit/sh
Caribbean
Apoointments will be made a? an

appropriate point in the scale £400 x 25
—£500 or £600 x 25—£800, acer ording
to qualifications and experiengvs. One
appointment will be on the scale £800 x

25-—£1,000. There will be children’s
allowance of £50 p.a. for each child
up to a maximum of £150. Super-

annuation under F.9.S.U, Appoint-
ments will normally be for three years
in the first instance. Free passages are
provided.

Applications (six copies) giving names
ef three referees and full particulars
21 qualifications and experience should
be sent as early as possible to the
Director, Institute of Social and
Economic Research, University College
of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica,
B.W.I OR The Secretary, Inter-
University Council for Higher Education
im the Colonies, 1, Gordon Square,
London, W.C.1I. Further _ particulars
may also be obtained from the Director,
Institute of Social and Economic
Research, University College of the
West Indies 23.7.50—2n.

nl

NOTICE

THE MAYFAIR GIFT SHOP annoyn-
ces a new shipment of Dorothy Gray's
Beauty Preparationmay we help you to
choose your requirements.

25.7,.50—3n.

OFFICIAL NCTICE

BARBADOS
IN THE

(Equitable Jurisdiction)
PETER NIGEL HUAN JOHNSON— ‘
Plaintiff
MAUDE ETHELINE ST, CLAIR
BUTCHER .° ; Defendant

IN pursuance of an Order in this Court
in the above action made on the 16th
day of June, 1950, I give notice to all
persons having any estate, right or in-
terest in or any lien or incumbrance af-
fecting ALL that certain piece or parcel
of land (formerly part of the lands of
Hagegatt Hall Plantation) situate at Hag-
gatt Hall, Upper Cutting, in the parish
of Saint Michael and island aforesaid con~
taining by admeasurement one acre eight
and one half perches be the same more
or less (of which area eight and one half
perches are in a portion of a road in
common forming two of the boundaries
of the said parcel of land) butting and
bounding on lands now or late of J.
Wharton, on lands now or late of
Banfield and on two sides on the road
in common hereinbefore mentioned lead-
ing to the public road called Mapp Hill
or however else the same may butt and
bound., to bring before me an account of
their said claims with their witnesses,
documents and vouchers, to be examined
by me on any Tuesday, or Friday be-
tween the hours of 12 (noon) and 3
o'clock in the afternoon, at the Office of
the Clerk of the Assistant Court of Ap-
peal at the Court House, Bridgetown,
fore the 30th day of August, 1950, in order
that such claims may be ranked accord-
ing to the nature and priority thereof
respectively: otherwise such persons will
be precluded from the benefit of the said
Decree, and be deprived of all claim on
or against the said property.

Claimants are also notified that they
must attend the said Court on Wednes-
day, the 20th day of August, 1950, at 10
o'clock a.m, when their said claims will

be ranked.
Given under my hand this 16th day of
I. V. GILKES,

“ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPEAL

June, 1950,
Ag. Clerk of the Asst. Court of Appeal.





OFFICIAL SALE

BARBADOS
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPEAL
(Equitable Jurisdiction)
PETER NIGEL HUAN JOHNSON

MAUDE ETHELINE ST. CLAIR
BUTCHER ......:. ..... Defendant
NOTICE is hereby given that by virtue
of an Order of the Assistant Court of
Appeal dated the 16th day of June 1950,
there will be set up for sale to the high-
est bidder at the Office of the Clerk of
the Assistant Court of Appeal at the
Court House, Bridgetown, between the
hours of 12 (noon) and 2 o'clock in_the
afternoon on Friday, the Ist day of Sep-
tember 1950.

ALL that certain plece or parcel of land
(formerly part of the lands of Haggatt
Hall Plantation) situate at Haggatt Hall,
Upper Cutting, in the parish of Saint
Michael and island aforesaid containing
by admeasurement one acre eight and

Plaintiff

one half perches be the same more
or less (of which area eight and
one half perches are in a portion of

a road in common forming two of the
boundaries of the said parcel of land)
butting and bounding on lands now or
late of J. Wharton, on lands now or late
of V. Banfield and on two sides on the
road in common hereinbefore mentioned
leading to the public road called Mapp
Hill or however else the same may butt
and bound.

And if not then sold the said property
will be set up for sale on every succeed-
ing Friday between the same hours until
the same is sold for a sum not less than
£208. 6. 8

Dated this 16th day of June, 1950.

I. V. GILKEs,

Ag. Clerk of the Asst. Court of Appeal.

22.6.50.—3n.

o'clock a.m.



|

S. S. Alcoa Ranger,
Capt. Perry, from

4,819 tons net,
Aruba,

In Carlisle Bay

Yacht Leander, Sch. E, M. Tarnis Schooner Emanuel C, Gordon, 63 tons
Sch, Manuata, Sch. Burma D., Sch.| net, Capt. Patrice, from Cariacou,
Turtle Dove, Sch. W. L. Eunicia, Sch S.S. Comedian, 3,162 tons net, Capt’
Rosarene, Sch Gardenia W., on Wells, from Liverpool.

Timothy A, H._ Vansluytman, ‘ S.S. Tactician, 3,753 t Capt.
ae dey: an. BAe ‘actician, 3, ons net,

Smart, from Trinidad
Schooner Mary M. Lewis, 69 tons net,
Capt. Marshall, from British Guiana.
Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt.

Philip H. Davidson,
Sch. Reginald N. Wallace, Sch. Lydina
A

ARRIVALS
































Motor Tanker Rufina, 1,856 tons net, — A
St. Lucia. .
Ca nee From Schooner Lady Noeleen, 41 tons net,
anadian Cruiser, 3,935 tons) Capt. Noel, for Dominica.
net, Capt .O'Hara, from St. Lucia Schooner Wonderful Counsellor, 38
we net, Capt Alexander, for St
ucia
Schooner Frances W. Smith, 74 tons
PUBLIC ALES net, Capt. Hassel, for British Guiana
Passengers arriving by the SS
“Comedian” were-—-from Liverpool
M. J. Bhavmai, A. A. Feldman.
REAL ESTATE Passengers arriving by the Motor
Vessel “Canadian Cruiser'’ were
HOUSE & SMED ROOF—One (1) | from Dominica — Matilda William

Board & Shingle House and Shedroof

16fi. x 10ft. at Kew Road, Bank Hall S
St. Michael
Apply to: Mrs. EUNICE ARTHUR, CAWE
Bragg’s Hill,
ae. save ARRIVALS — By B.W.LAL

From TRINIDAD









LAND Desirable building site 4 | Molly O'Donnell, Josef Adamira, Nor-
Graeme Hall Terrace Dial 3430. bert Romeo, Mohomed Hosein, William
1.7,50—t.£.9. | Kauffman, Constance Clarke, Christine

—_-—— aaa ETT McLeod, Jennifer Siddall, Nel Skin

1,200 shares of $1.00 each ww B.

nivos COOPERATIVE BANK LIM- ner, Phillip Skinner, Granville mer,

Hyman Speyer, Frank Nothnagel, Claude

ITED The above will be set up for] Gaidry, Corenne, Gaidry, Thomas Bell
sale to public competition on Friday| Mrs. Bell, Miltom Cato, Silvia Criteh
next the 28th instant at 2 p.m. at OUP) jow, Joyce Smith, James Nicoll, Alex-
office in Lucas Street. ander Turner, Joan Reece, Robert
CARRINGTON & SEALY. Hutchinson, Soper Tinsler, Gloria Ban-
22.7.50—6n. | nister
From HAITI:

—
1 Acre 34 perches of land at Pilarim
Road, Christ Church.
The above parcel of land will be set | prom JAMAICA
up for sale by Public Competition at William Bailey, Robert Gregg, Eyria-
our Office No. 14 James Street, OM | cos Tzanidis. -,
Friday 28th July 1950 at 2.30 p.m. From GRENADA
The above parcel of land is the proper-

Arnold S. Khan

Harry Drew, Lionel Williams, Joshua
ty of Mr. f00n, CeOOD & BOYCE Thorne, Elma Da Breo, Esme Cum
Solicitors. ming, George Hanson, Patricia Jordon,
21.7.50—6n Neville Babb, Edward Powell
‘| From PUERTO RICO
TOWER GARAGE — Standing on| Odessa Gittens,
5,445 square feet of land at St. Mat-

From CARACAS:

Eric Emberson, Helen
Craig Emberson, Lillian
sel Ireland, Jennifer Ireland,
Dolanyi, Atilia Dolanyi, W.
Romer, Jose Alamo, Dolores
Huco Montes, Manela Montes, Ilz
Berko, Herrera Miguel, Ayel Boelcke,
Ludwik Molken, Anthony Schras,
Flsye Sehras, Hendryhus Schras, Elsye
Sehras, Jnr

DEPARTURES
For TRINIDAD:
Marilyn Netto, Mrs. Netto, John
Wooding-Deane, Mary Craig, Ignacita
Van den Branden, Carmencita Van den
Branden, Walter Hudson, Marguerite
nnn | Lyder, Shirley Marquez, Elsie Lume
PROPERTY—Tnas den, David Western, Marjorie Headley

fesirable property z
CL “cee Bul at. Marieant'’s “Village. | Satie’ Seen’ Lucien” eee

It consists of a substantially built two | sweeney, Patricia Sweeney Benny

thias Gap, Christ Church

The building is one recently erected
and built of stone and the site is an
excellent one for a garage

The building also lends itself for
easy conversion into a private dwel-
linghouse.

By Public Auction on Thursday 27th
July at 2 p.m. at the office of the
undersigned from whom further par-
ticulars and conditions of sale can be
obtained.

Emberson,
Ireland, Rus
Hedwig
Gerald
Alamo,

R. S. NICHOLLS & CO,, By. BN Aste

151, 152 Roebuck Street.
Telephone No. 7925.
71.7..0—8n.

storey stone house which has front and

back verandah, drawing and _= dining BRON ennai. Hiceiy a
rooms, three bedrooms, study, water | yyonne Perrin, Czarina Lathuillerie,
toilet and shower-bath, kitchen and] Norma Finning, Grace Viera, Roy
sete Pecoae aie ge Viera, Kenneth Sampson Stephen
acre of lan wi orchar yeneral ‘i

‘bus passes the door Price which is Sampson, Dorothy Cole, Janis Cole
extremely low is only £1400, For in- | For GUADELOUPE:

spection and other particular apply to

Angele Sarkis,
D'Arcy A. Scott. 22.7.50—2n. nee Td

marie Sarkis,
Sarkis
For ANTIGUA:
Joan Lake, Cecelia Ferrara.
For ST. LUCIA:
James Humfrey, Anthony Mitchell

one In Touch With
SWEEPSTAKE icuanien _ series pp| Barbados Coastal Station

0037. Finder please return same to the
Advocate Advtg. Dept Reward offered.
25,.7.50—1n.;

— ss

Agnes Sarkis,
Josette Sarkis,

Rose
Hugette





LOST & FOUND

—— =



Cable and Wireless (W.1I.) Ltd. advise
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through their Barba-
dos Coast Station:—





NOTICE S.S. Canadian Challenger, Bacha-
quero, Battle Mountain, Esso Charlotte,

Barbados Tagaland, Stony Point, Maria de Lar-
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF rinaga, Rufina, Aicoa Pennant, Lord
APPEAL Church, Esso Amsterdam, Regent Pan-

Re Workmen’s Compensation Act, 1943.| ther, Alcoa Partner, Athenic, S. Rosa,

Notice is hereby given that Lambert Cavina, Brazil, Powder River, S. Paula,
Green, of Bel Air, St. George, em- S. Mateo, Isle of Re, Esso Avalia,
ployed as a labourer at Lear’s Plan- Agathi, Sundale, Dageid, Canadian
tation, was injured whilst grubbing and| Cruiser, Imperial Toronto, Giovanni
breaking stone im a quarry when & Amendola, S._ Vulfrano, Lady Rodne~,
section of the side of the quarry broke Mormacreéd, Frances, Sass, Sunvalley,
away and fell on him and he died as| 114, Fort de France, Monte Altube,
a result of the injuries sustained and Corrientes, Cottica and Imperial Quebec,





that Compensation has been paid into
Court. eT
All dependents and persons con-

cerned with the above-named deceased
are hereby required to appear in the;
Assistant Court of Appeal on Wednes-~
day the 9th day of August, 1950, at 10

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for the United Kingdom and
Amsterdam by the S.S. Willemstad will
be: cinned at the General Post Office as
under:

Parcel! Mail at 12 (noon) Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 3 p.m.
on the 25th July, 1950.

Dated this 20th day of July, 1950,
I. V. GILKES,
Ag. Clerk Assistant

Court of Appeal.

22.7.50—3n.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES







GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, ST. VINCENT
Vacancy for Binder

Applications are invited for the post of Binder in the Government
Printing Office St. Vincent.

The post, which. is pensionable, carries salary in the scale $480 x
$24—$576 per annum. A temporary cost of living bonus at the rate of
$109.20 per annum at $480 rising by $1.80 for every $24 to $116.40
per annum at $576 is also payable, and there are facilities for over-
time work. Salary at a higher point than $480 will be granted, if
necessary to a qualified candidate.

Applicants must possess a full knowledge of binding and ruling
and must produce particulars to that effect.

Applications should be addressed to the Government Printer,
Government Printing Office, St. Vincent, and should reach him not
later than the 31st July, 1950.



VACANCIES FOR TWO ASSISTANT AGRICULTURAL
SUPERINTENDENTS, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

BRITISH GUIANA.
Applications are invited for two vacant posts of Assistant Agricul-
tural Superintendents in the Department of Agriculture, British

Guiana.
Particulars of the post are as under:—
Salary
£500 per annum rising to £4825 per annum by annual incre-
ments of £25.

Qualifications ana Experience

Applicants must hold either—

(i) a degree or diploma in Agriculture, and have some experi-

ence in agricultural extension or farm management; or

(ii) the Associateship of the Imperial College of Tropical Agri-

culture or a degree or dip’»ma in Agriculture with post
graduate training at an Agricultural College.
Allowances

Travelling and subsistence allowances will be paid in accordance

with the Government Regulations in force.
Probatio: Period

Appointment to the posts will be on twelve months probation.
When confirmed in the appointment the officers will be placed on the
pensionable establishment, and will be liable to contribute to the Brit-
ish Guiana Widows and Orphans Fund at the rate of 5% of the maxi-
mum salary of the post by monthly deductions from salary. '

2. The successful candidates will be engaged in the extension
service of the Department of Agriculture or on projects operated by
the Department.

3. Applications giving full name, age and details of qualifica-
tions and experience, accompanied by two recent testimonials, should
be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Agricul-
ture, Georgetown, British Guiana, marked “ASSISTANT AGRICUL-
TURAL SUPERINTENDENT” and should reach him not later than
31st July. 1950.

4. Applicants already employed in a Department of Agriculture
in the West Indies, should submit their applications through the nor-
mal official channels.

| 15.7,50—8n.






















































England—
W.1. Test

From page 1

need him to give the cake some
weight—after all we cannot use
all yeast—I cannot pretend to
enjoy watching him. I am pleased)
to say that our bowling today did
not falter, although from time to
time the men in the field appeared
to lack that extra verve which is
necessary to get to vhe ball passing
a few yards to the right or left

Goddard tried even more than
usual to upset his opponents by

@ from page 5
which information is available

ried out


















several articles bought
and the cost,

by

ers or housewives how
plete the forms,

to

varying his attack and to some expenditure of each family for
extent he succeeded, True, the several weeks spread over a
seam bowlers had three new balls period of twelve months. {
to try their fingers on, and didj , 72°, results are tabulated to}

not succeed, but they tried very
hard. The fact that they reaped
nothing is just that today was not
their day.

Valentine, Ramadhin and God-
dard himself pegged away untir-
ingly and shared the wickets as
they deserved to do.

items of food, clothing, fuel
light, rent and miscellaneous
Foundation

Once again I have to bring into mentioned. We also know their
the report an excerpt from the esenen prices per lb. or other!
English press. Jack Kidney, anc measure or quantity during the

John Goddard both expressed in-
dignation to me this morning whe

ost iv >
I sought their confirmation of : cae a orate tae

COST OF LIVING INDEX
HAS LIMITATIONS

A — budget enquiry is car-|is actually paying by weight.
y asking householders

to record on a form (daily in the
ease of food) the Quantities of the
them

Investigators advise household-
com-}

A large number of budgets are
collected showing the income and

show the proportion of the total}

expenditure spent on the several; weight or factor belonging to the
and

It is in these proportions that
weights are allotted to the several
items in the groups which | have

base year, so we have a frame-
work on which we can buiid our
The price in

c e ; the base year = 100.
story appearing in a Sunday news- It is essential that new en
aper. " : i
pape Chall + uiries into consumption should
il a enge—Fishy e undertaken every five or ten
is story claimed that aj, ears, because the tendency is for
challenge had been sent to i

Australia on behalf of the West
Indies by Mr. Kidney. The story
sounded very fishy tome. I know,
as the writer must have known,
that such a challenge would have |
to come from the West Indian |
Cricket Board of Control and |sumption
would have to be chet Con-|



gure.

index numbers to overstate

is changing and
through the Imperial Cricket Con-
ference,

This was the story: Apparently, |
the West Indies cricketers, cock-
a-hoop over their test lessons to
England, yesterday sent a chal-
lenge to Australia. We, the report
said, will

‘s necessary, frequent sma
ample surveys are advisable.



tem is not available



elias play you anywner | veights are based upon estimates
5 ve . {of total consumption of or ex-
ee the West Inc *S penditure on the principal food
Paivfox)’ nae en ees stuffs and other items during a
a SS ve :
challenge through Walter Robin: ere
the Australians’ representative in Caiculation
England, Now let us see how a cost of
5 as living index figure is calculated
Obviously if this story were true, Bat race eo
Mr. Kidney would heae aber every month, You will readily

acting ultra vires, I hurried to hin
to get it confirmed and asked John
Goddard to come along to the

on every single item consumed

figures such

I was, he said, at the lunch
table with R. W. V. Robins, the
English amateur who represents
Australia at the Imperial Cricket
Conference,

“I think you fellows should take
on the Australians now, Mr
Robins said. Kidney’s reply was
“Well, Robby, we haven’t had an
invitation.”

Robins then said that he was
ut that moment writing a two page
letter to Bradmaf, and that he
was going to add a footnote to the
effect that he felt that it would
@ om vage 8

ENGLAND'S CASUALTIES

LONDON, July 24

W. J. Edrich England and Mid-
dlesex cricketer, who is wearing a
plaster jacket following a back
injury, is receiving treatment from
an orthopaedic surgeon in London,
Middlesex is leaving him out of
their team selections until he is
fit to play. Len Hutton and Denis
Compton, other England invalids,
are also having treatment for their
ailments, Hutton is due to play in
the Gentlemen vs. Players game
starting on Wednesday at Lords,
and Compton is expected to make
his return to first class cricket in
the Surrey—-Middlesex match next
Saturday.

tendency.

should be carefully

price collecto
taken from the





time every month,



of article is not obtainable

stituted, comparison has to











stitute in the previous month.

AUCTION SALE

WEDNESDAY August 2nd

—Reuter. at 11 a.m.



NITURE & HOUSEHOLD
EFFECTS

BELVEDERE

Welches, Ch, Ch.
(% mile Oistins side of
Parochial Treasurer)

Instructions have been received



County Cricket Results

LONDON, July 24
Cricket results: At Oval York-
shire beat Surrey by 7% wickets.
Surrey 127 (Coxon 5 for 51, Apple-





yard 4 for 47) and secondly 97, from Dr. R. C. Price to sell the
‘ valuable furniture and
(Wardle 6 for 25), Yorkshire 149 slats, which are almost. without



aks 5 for 44) and secondly 79 outstandingly good
or 3.
At Folkestone, Kent beat Leices-

tershire by five wickets; Leices

exception, in
condition

Upholstered Couch and Easy
Chairs, 4 Steel Framed Chairs
upholstered in Red leather, China

















tershire 155 (Martin 7 for 53) and Cabinet, Antique Wall Bracket,
se : La . Frases Tray and Table, Large
goconeny 102 (Wright 6 for 16 bare Table, 6 Dining Chairs,
me oe eee 186, (Hern Sideboard. Bookstand, Double Ene
, Parker ‘or 36) and secondly ed Settee, Side Jane

4 7, ir , Glass Topped Table,

72 for 5 (Wooller 4 for 34), Thiaid. ‘table, “Modern Bedroom
—Reuter furniture in Birch, Double and

PLP OOO Divan Beds with Spring Filled and




















































COOH

THE HANDIEST THING WE HAVE SEEN FOR A TIME
DURAGLIT

METAL POLISH
oe TRY A TIN TODAY

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

THE

(CENTKAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets

cost of living numbers calculated’) a me:
on a fixed base to depart more and
more as time passes from the true
The tendency is for such
the
true increase in the cost of living

To ascertain how the actual con-

to

indicate when a full scale enquiry

11

There may be substitutions when
imilar items may be purchased
nore cheaply or when the original

In some countries cost of living

appreciate that to base an index

in

@ year, and to calculate monthly

interview, Kidney’s explanation ||" on i a detailed base
is simple and reliable. would be a large task. 2

The True St Therefore, the most important

le Story items are tnhken, Items are also

taken as representatives of a group
of items the prices of all of which
can be expected to show the same

All the items in the base index
specified.
Quality, brand, type and quantity
niust be fixed, and known to the

Prices shoyld be
ame representative
shops or outlets at about the same

If the specific brand or quality
and
some other brand has to be sub-
be
made with the price of the sub-
In
some places articles are actually
boux.1t by price collectors; in BG.



Dunlopillo Mattresses, Ladies and
Gents Dressing Tables, Bedside
CONCERT Sih ie Seite is
Press, Painted Furniture, alnw
Und istinguist Table, Murphy Portable" Record
nae s s tadio «Table, Portable Reco’
( oe Distinguls ted - Player (Plays 8) Singer Sewing
atronage of His $ Machine with electric motor (as
Excellency the Governor New), Quantity ood Records,
Mr. A. W. L. Savage, C.M,.G., % Record Cabinet, Gallery Furniture,
re , dare a 2 a s, e .
and Mrs, Savage) $ Wall Brackets with Glass Candle
, Shades, Stokes Electric Cooker,
by the % Hotpoint Electric Cookers, Small
g Valor Stove, Frigidaire, Electric
BARBADOS CHORAL . Mixers, Fan Toaster ane ron
Many kitchen requis ies @ n
qOere excellent order. Kitchen Dresser,
: bles, Chairs, Mats, Iron-
at the Larder, Ta’ h
ing board Mahogany Trays,
( large ar lection of Glass
M RE HALL Very fine Cut Glass Set
Champagne, Water, Port; meer
ursda, Liqueur Glasses & Finger Bow |s,
= 7, 27th July Collection Iridescent Glass, Ruby
1950 at 8.30 p.m. Glass, Large quantity Miscel
laneous Glass, Pyrex Ware; Cut
Guest Artists: Glass Decanters, China | includes
Crown Ducal, Minton, Marigold,
Miss JEAN LAWSON, Eggshell and sexerel aay Ja
i examples of 22 Carat Go
Mr. P. Ign eee” Piates-Royal mover in ts
. 7 ° 2 , wood, lac night, ete.,
(Baritone) Silver Bracket Lamps with Glass
kets ma: Candle Shades, Plated Fruit Stands
— 7 be sptained s¢ Gare Basket, Entree Dish, Ment
Advocate Stationery Cover, Chafing Dish, Candelabria,
or from Members of the % Cardtray etc; Mirrors, Axminster;
Socie' owin: fayptian and other Carpets anc
ty at the foll e x | Rugs, Cushions, eg? po tone
rices: | Lawn Mower, 75 feet plastic Hose,
eee es QB) Npprox, Theft. Lengths “in.
RESERVED $1.00 % | G1. Pipe, 3 Rolis Matting, Potted
UNRESER , | Palms, Liles, Ferns and numerous
a + | other useful items. |
- VED + 600, & 36¢. %! | r Viewir ¢ Morning of and Day
—— at “ne Programme x prior to Lee
an ook of words may ¢$ “a |
|
re Se the Ad- x | John 4. Biadon
Sin / (AF S., FV.A,) |
PRICE :: 6d. each % Phone 4640, Plantations Building







PAGE SEVEN

weights and finding
figure is then repeated

The index number of any item
can be found by dividing the price
by the price in the base year and
multiplying by 100.

Grouping

Usually separate index numbers
are calculated for each group of
items; food, clothing; tuel and
light; rent; and miscellaneous.
Group percentages are multiplied
by group weights, the total is
divided by the sum of the group

veights and the percentage in-
crease or decrease is added to or
subtracted from 100 to give us
the composite index figure. This
is what we call the cost of living
index,

Special techniques are used to
change the base and recompute an
index, and sometimes for splicing
two series not. on the same base.
This, however, is subject to error.

Shortages and devaluation of
currency affect the interpretation
of cost of living indices, and there
are several pitfalls in regard to
price figures to which I have not
referred. For example, the rela-
tionship between a rise in prices
and a fall in purchasing power,
or the choice of the right method
of taking an average

Statistics shed light in dark
corners, but we must understand
what they mean and appreciate
their limitations,

the index

they weigh the loaves of bread to
find out how much the consumer
In
big countries local agents collect
the prices. In some places where
|}the price of an article is controlled
the legal maximum price is taken
Where the control is not strict or
the article is only readily obtain-
ble in the black market such a
method will obviously not show
@ true price trend.

When the new prices have been
collected the percentage increase
or decrease in the price of each
item is calculated. Each percent-
age figure is then multiplied by the



1a

item, and the products are added
together,

The total is then divided by the
sum of the weights—often 100 for
convenience—and this gives us the
percentage increase or decrease
for the month. The percentage in-
crease or decrease is added to or
subtracted from 100 as the case
may be to give us the index figure.

The following month, prices are
again collected and the percentage
increases or decreases on the price
in the base year are calculated.
The process of multiplying by the





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PAGE EIGHT

—$——



England—W.I.

@ From page 7





335,







i € the n han-
an exceilient thir lat icay nder which the innings
cricket for the A wetihad begun. Dewes reached his 50
the West Indie e earliest] with a ot very pretty four
possible time, and he would sug-Ifine leg He had not been par-
gest that such an invitation be ex-}ticuiarly impressive and, like
tended many handed batsmen, seem-
To this \ir. Kidney replied: }|e« 1) at the ball from a crouct
That's up to you, Robby io
The newspaper version makes it i, beautiful or ugly, it mat
uppear that the West Indies were} ered not a whit, the 60 runs wer
boasting aud Goddard in the Daily} ere--and more than weleortie
Despatch Uris morning points this] 4¢¢e to plan, the partner-

out to the British public

“Such a statement as this,
others to the effect that
going to score 1,000 rung in
innings and beat all records,
immense harm.”

England—Iil Luck
Parkhouse came in and was off
the mark with a three between the

and
are
an
do us

we

ciose stand slip fielders. But more
ill-luck was in store for England
Simpson who had been standings

Stationary and stubbornly at 93
for several overs turned Valentine
around the corner leg
Rae covering the ground well,
picked up keenly and shied in for
Walcott to put the wicket down
with the batsmen far from home
on his way to a second run
Simpson shared fully with Wast
brook in the honours of th»
opening stand. He had marched
head and head with -his partner
in compiling the handsome total

to fine

and, if anything, had*been the

more attractive of the two.
He had seemed strangely re-
oo



CYRIL WASHBROOK

Juctant—or unable—to punish
even the shortest ball with any
real vim and had only collected
six fours in his five and a half
hours innffigs.
Dewes joined Parkhouse and
looked the picture of discomfort
against both bowlers as he jitterly
began his innings
These however stayed together
until tea when Parkhouse with 31
runs to his credit, was going very
well.
Placid—For A Time
Things became placid for a time
and Dewes once called Gomez to
chase two pigeons from the pitch.
When play was resumed after tea,
Johnson bowled an over with the
old ball and Ramadhin sent one
down from the other end before
giving way to Worrell for the new
balL ,
This proved just as ineffective
as the two earlier new balls and
Parkhouse was particularly
punishing against the pace men.
After the shock attack had con-
ceded 34 runs without success,
Goddard brought back the
spinners. The third 100 was quiet-
ly registered as the two young
Englishmen settled themselves to
stay as long as possible although
both were more willing to accept
the odd chance to score from any
loose. deliveries than their pre-
decessors, !
Goddard at 317 again took
charge of one end and switched
Valentine to take over from Rama-
dhin. The partnership reached 100
off Valentine's first offering from
his new end, Parkhouse sweeping
it to the leg boundary. The pair
had then been together for only
110 minutes, a much better scor-
ing rate than the first wicket pair
had achieved at any stage.
Goddard—Success
Goddard was soon to reap some
suceess for his perseverance, get-
ting Parkhouse }.b.w. for 69 with
the score reading 326, The Gla-
morgan player had shown us bet-
ter strokes than either of the two
whe had preceded him. Particu-
larly favouring the late cut, he
also gave some powerful off drives
and neat drag side play. Nor did
he appear so uncomfortable to the
two spin bowlers, and he was the
first player to venture out of his
crease to meet Valentine
Yardley, the English captain,
joined his last minute recoup and
Goddard soon brought back
Ramadhin to join Valentine in the
effort to dissolve the amateur
partnership Yardley took some
little time to get off the mark but
eventually did so with a sharp
cut for 4 off Valentine, which car-

| They'll Do It Every Time
















ship was soon broken Ramadgin




howled Yardley who played dowr
the line toa good length off
break and missed Anothe!
amateur Doug Insole, came out.
A wag in the crowd remarked
‘Co along, we need an Insole,
for are one of the Uppers’

Unfortunately the newcomer
did nothing to help the situation
but was stumped by Walcott off
Ramadhin before he had scored
At this point, stumps were drawn
with the core 350 for 5 and
Dewes 55 not out

The Match

When the Test Match continued
here today, Ramadhin who had
bowled one ball on Saturday
afternoon before rain stopped play
resumed mis interrupted over from
the pavilion end and sent down a
maiden to Simpson. Johnson came

on from the Radcliffe end. Accord-
ing to the boundary flags there
was iair wind blowing across
the pitch in a direction to help
his outswingers None, however,
vorricd Washbrook who took two
Curing, the over

Making every effort to Save the
game for England, the two
opener settled down and the
hundred went up in 20 minutes
This first eentury had been con-
tributed in two hours and 35
minutes

The opening attack provided
little hope for the West Indians

although when he was 45 Simpson
glided one from Johnson at which
Walcott dived. It was just too far

and the batsman got a four, the
only consolation for the bowler
wa that it was dangerous
stroke. Valentine now joined
Ramadhin and Simpson took

single off the first delive ry,

short pitched offbreak which he
turned sently and with the
greatest of ease to square leg to
reach his individual 50. Next ball
similarly dropped back, Wash-
brook hit for four to join his

partner at the half hundred mark

30th men had now been batting
165 minutes and neither had
shown any sign of hurry Wash-
brook was as comfortable as he
might have liked against Ram-
adhin. The new ball was taken
at 122, Johnson and Worrell
sharing the attack

First Hour
At the end of the first hour's
play the batsmen were still to-
gether gallantly defending and
adding 44 to the overnight total.
Washbrook took a lovely four
to the left ef cover off Worrell to

reach his thousand runs for the
s@ason.
Goddard now reverted to his

spin once again. The score was 143
and Washbrook greeted Valen-
tine’s first delivery with a mighty
hook for tour to the square leg
boundary. The 150 went up in the
same over when the innings was
220 minutes underway

In Ramadhin’s second over
Simpson lifted him weakly wide
vf Valentine standing about mid-
way between square leg and mid-
wicket. A little anticipation and
the fielder would have made ut,
for it was a very weak scoopshot,
Scoring slowed down consider-
ibly as the luncheon interval ap-
proached with neither Simpson
10r Washbrook showing any real
inclination to hit the ball hard.
Goddard continued to excel close

in to the wicket and Christiani
made a very good one handed
pickup in the covers to turn a

possible Simpson four into a sin-
gle,
Washbrovuk
aver against
three from
slips went
Weekes,

Lunch was taken at 168, five
runs short of the highest first
wicket stand of 173 held jointly
by the two countries, At least one
West Indian supporter had revived
the uncomfortable recollections of
the stand by Tarilton and Chal-
‘enor in the famous 1927 “seven-
hundred” tournament when Bar-
bados was faced with the abso-
lutely identical situation in their
match against Trinidad.

It was the third over after
lunch before the batsmen sent up
the new first wicket record stand,
Previously this had stood at 173,
both England and the West Indies

had one unhappy
Ramadhin and a
his bat through the
perilously close to

having a similar effort to their
credits. : J
George Gunn and Andie

Sandham had done it at Kingston
in 1930 and Carew and Gan-
teaume did it at Port-of-Spain in

A

Registered US Palen! Oftee











T@MAKES
= MWe
FAST

WON THA

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



OUTRIGHT

EMPIRE and Y.M.P.C

and Pickwick when the
Cricket series ended last Sat

Walcott Was
“Missing”
(Barbados Advocate Correspordent)

NOTTINGHAM, July 24.

“Walcott is unfit and not likely
to take any further part in the
match”

That was the rumour that
swept around Trent Bridge
ciicket ground this morning when
the West Indies cricketers arrived
for the fourth day of the Third
‘Test here,

The cry
the team got out
which had brought them from
the hotel it was naticed that
| Walcott was not among the party.
| The explanation was really

when
cars

because
of their

arose

,| (uite simple however. Clyde had

heen writing a letter in his room
and came downstairs just too
lite to catch the remainder ot
the team,

It was several minutes before
he realised they had gone but
then he quickly caught a taxi in
Ume to rejoin them at the ground,

The West Indies chances of
victory were still quite substan-
tially decreased during play this
morning. Johnson despite a
bruised arm which he hurt when
falling on Saturday declared
himself fit to open the bowling
and well though he bowled,
neither he nor any of the others
could make any impression on
Simpson and Washbrook who by
Staying together until lunch
heightened England’s hopes of
forcing a draw,



to switch them around,

Scoring now practically came
to a dead stop and six overs pro-
duced only two runs until Simp-
son woke up to straight drive
Ramadhin for four, ashbrook
imitated his colleague by off driv-
ing Valentine to the fence, the
best stroke of his innings, to carry
his total to 98 and just after
Simpson sent the score past the
double century.

40 Runs An Hour
He sent a full toss from
Ramadhin to the square leg
boundary. England had _ been

scoring at a rate of forty runs an
hour, excusably behind the clock
in view of the back to the wall
fight. Washbrook _ stonewalled
stoically through 23 more balls
before he managed another single
to get 99

Twelve deliveries later he
reached his century with a brace
to fine leg,

It had taken him five and a
quarter hours to achieve the dis-
tinction. It was just a few balls
later when he opened up to Val-
entine and gave Worrell at point
a catch which the fielder ran for-
ward to hold. England thus lost

their first wicket at 212 with
Washbrook's contribution, its
value inestimable, 102.

He had only hit nine fours

alomy the road to his century and
had taken an awfully long time
to get there, but the slowness was
well warranted by the game's pos-
ition and the crowd, well satisfied
with the magnificent start he had
helped to establish, gave the bats-
man a warm cheer.

ENGLAND Ist innings 23
WI ist Innings S58
ENGLAND SECOND INNINGS
Washbrook c Worrell b Valentine 162
Simpson run out ;
Parkhouse |_b.w. b Goddard 69
Dewes not out 85
Yardley b Ramadhin 7
Insole stpd, Walcott b Ramadhin 9
Extras 23
Total ‘for 5 wkts.) 35)

Fall of wkts; 1-212, 2—220, 3—996

4-346, 5--950,

1948 BOWLING ANALYSIS
Ramadhin and Valentine were ao -M F W
; ; Johnson 20 ¢ ‘@ at
still doing the bowling from the Worrell 19 8 40 6
Pavilion and Radcliffe end respec- Gomes oe as 4 Wel
tively but Goddard at 179 bowl- Raniah in 858 16 101 4
ed himself for an over in ordet qoddard 12 6 18 1



By Jimmy Hatlo_



O.crocus CROESUS
HAD THE GARDENER
GO ALL OUT IN
THE FLORAL
DEPARTMENT
THIS SPRING =~











o>
=
—< J,

Se





Ni

_ "THE FLOWERS ARE BLOOMING
NOW, SO WHERE'S J. CROCUS2

\ OFF FOR HAPPY Days AT
~ SEAWEED POINT*+:











STO ENJOY LIVING 4



ANYTHING



S'LONG,MAC ++sSEE YOU IN
SEPTEMBERsIF YOU NEED

AT THE BEACH HOUSE =:

MS HUMUS “WE WANT YOU TO OUTDO V bELeyINiuMg © |
YOURSELF ON THE GARDEN THIS
YVEARSLOTS OF COLORâ„¢L WANT

7 MERE AND PRIZE ]
ROSES OVER THERE.
THEN BEGONIAS
AND MAYBE SNAP-





ERE:s

















Y'CAN REACH US

Intermediate Cricket:

gained outright victories over Cable
& Wireless and Mental Hospital respectively and Wind.|the Second Division Cricket Com-
ward and Wanderers first innings tead b

first round of the

2nd Division Cricket;

EMPIRE, Y.M.P.C. GAIN Rain Hampers

VICTORIES

Most Games

THE second series of games in

petition got underway last Satur-
day. Rain again interfered with
same of the games but some bright
cricket was still played.

At Vaucluse, Empire winning
the toss went in to bat on a per-
tect wicket and knocked up 201
against Central. L. Bynoe top-
scoring with 58, F. Taylor 32 and
E. McLeod 30.

Lampitt took three of the Empire
wickets for 26.

points over Spartan

Intermediate
urday.

Empire made a brilliant recov-
ery last Saturday after being 72’
runs behind Cable & Wireless in
their first innings, Cable and
Wireless scored 144 and 58, and
set with the task of making 131
runs to win, they scored a hurri-
cane 139 for the

loss of seven ‘
wickets, Topscoring with 81 Rev. A. RF.
Y.M.P.C. bowled out Menta) | Simmons helped Leeward to
Hospital for 70 anid 48 in their|score 171 against Pickwick at Fos-

two innings and scored 71 for 9
declared and 52 for two wickets.

In Mental Hospital second in-
nings, 1. Burke took five wickets
for 22 runs and E. Branker three

ters and at the end of play Pick-
wick had lost two of their wickets
in their first innings for 52 runs

At Foundation Police got a first
innings lead over Foundation by

for 24. When play ended|scoring 53 for 3 in reply to 47.
Y.M.P.C’s H. Webster was not out} ‘The results are:- a
with 20. Leewerd and Pickwick at

V. Lewis topscored in the Wan-
derers second innings with 65 out
of their 230 for 7 wiekets declared.
Pickwick's pace bowler, R, Clarke
took four wickets for 47 runs.

For Wanderers, fast bowler
Greenidge claimed 7 wickets for
49 runs during a spell of 17 overs .

At Windward, the home team aut Combermere _
secured Ist innings lead against| Combermere 80 (R. Richards
Spartan, Spartan just failing to} 23, King 18 not out, Burke 4 for
clinch outright victory by 28 rung|11, Austin 2 for 4),
at_time call. College and Lodge

Windward in their first innings at College
scored 123 for 7 declared and} College 124 for 4 (C. Thorpe 36
bowled out Spartan for 40. Wina- not out, H. Simmonds 53).

ward in their second turn scored ‘ i
105 for 7 declared giving Spartan oes ae

188 runs to make to win in 180 ;

minutes, At time call Spartan| Foundation 47 (N. A. Yarde 20,
were 160 for the loss of 8 wickets. |C. Neblett for for 6).

Police 53 for 3.

Regiment and Carlton at

Garrison

Fosters

Leeward 17! (Rev
mons 81, D. Frost 20).
Pickwick 52 for 2 wickets
King n.o, 18, M



A. E. Sim-

(D.
Foster n.o. 17).

Combermereé and Y.M.P.C.

Y.M.P.C, vs. MENTAL HOSPITAL

Mental Hospital 70 & 48



L MENTAL HOSPIEAL and INNINGS.” |, Regiment 133 (M, Mayers 47,
N. Burrowes e Porter b Burke 6 | Pinder 24 not out)
E. Quintyne b Branker 3 | Carlton 4 for no wicket.
S Beet ¢ Greenidge b Burke 1
“a Chanaiey mot out Pee 2 Empire and Central at
C. Hope b Branker ° Vaucluse
C. Boyce ¢ Archer b I. Burke 0 .
V. Carter b I. Burke P 5 Empire 201 (L. Bynoe 58, F.
Batson not out © | Taylor 32, E, McLeod 30, L. Lam-
c Knight b Branker 2 |pitt 3 fer 26)
ixtras ; . . ae
es =} Central 48 for 1 (R. Shepherd
Total 48 |16 not out).
Fall of Wickets: 1—6, 2—7, 3-95, 4—26,
5—41, 6-41, 7—46, 8—46, 9—48.
ROWLING ANALYSIS B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME
L Burk a oY ¥
ls urke : ! tes }
TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1950
E. sen Gana aatiing 4 3s 6.15 a.m,—1.45 bm. Commentary on
S. Greenidge ¢ Batson b Boyce 23 ee ao Bf a.m. rhe News. 2:30 an,
B. Hoyos b C. Knight 2 s nalysis. 7.15 a.m, Trent's Last
C. Me Kensie not out 1 sates ai ape Hymns We Sing, ae
: am. Generally Speaking. 8 a.m, From the
H, Webster not out ... 20 | Ediforials. 8.10 a.m. Programme Parate
Total for (2) wits.) 5a | 8,15 a.m. England v West Indies, 8.35 a.m.

12
boa

Freneh Orchestral Music

| 9 am. Close

aye 12 angot The News. 12.10 p.m

ews Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Musie from

WAND aEERs vs: PICK WIOK Grand Hotel. 12.45 p.m. England v_ Wes!

9 Indies. 1 p.m. On the Job. 1.15 p.m. Radio

H. Alleyne ¢ Moore b Clarke Newsreel. 1,30 p.m. Memories of Musical



2

oP roan ° Putter © Clarae 21 | Comedy, 2 p.m, ‘The News. 2.10
; 2 ody, "| m p.m,
y petis ited ees $ Home Weve fram Britain, 2.15 p.m. Sports
Hh. Rartady 6 Wipe ba Claties 93 | Review. 2.30 pm. Radio Theatre. 3.45
M. Mayers ¢ Hoad b Peterkin 4 pm, z Accordeon Interlude. 4 p.m The
M. Clarke not. out 3 News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily Service. 415
J. Massiah b Clarke 6 | om, From the Promenade Concerts. 5
M 'G sam idge t t o Um, England v West Indies, 5.05 p.m, In-
; a @ , lerlude. 5.15 p.m, Programme Parade
extras, : ~ {5.30 p.m. Welsh Magazine. 6 p.m. Trent's
Total (for 7 wkts. dec.) 39 | Last Case. 6.15 p.m. Twenty Questions

6.45 p.m. Letter from London. 7 p.m. The
News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis. 7.15 p.m

7.45 p.m. Cricket Report on Third Test
8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. On the
Job. 8.30 p.m. Regent Orehestra, 8.55 Pm.

Fall of wkts, 1-32, 2-74, 3123, @—124,
5—178, G—179, 7—195,



BOWLING ANALYSIS From the Editorials. 9 pm. Tip Top
Oo. M. R, W.! Tunes 9.30 p.m. Meet the Common-
R. Clarke 20 0 47 4 wealth. 10 p.m, The News. 10.10 p.m, In-
O. Lashley bat 3 13 © | terlude. 10.15 p.m, On the Sweeter Side
J. Goddard |: 7 2 0 0 | 10.45 p.m. Report from Britain. 11 p.m
Peterkin 4 0 30 1 | BBC Scottish Orchestra
Wells ll 0 63 2











g. pRICKWICK—Ist INNINGS Se ee ee x
Cc. E. Edwards Greenidge y ~~
J, S, Goddard b Qreenidge 28 UPER SALE g
— ee ‘cae € poeanidee 18 *
‘oster ¢ Clarke b Ramsay ’ y ‘ %
R. D, Clarke c wkt. b Greenidge 4 B &IG
z Hoad 8 Greenidge 3 Al AIN 8
fearwood not out . 2
Peterkin. I.b.w. Greenidge 2 Prints — washable, 40c. yd.
8 Hoare b Greenidge 4 Calico—36” wide—4Oe. yd,
Yells b Massiah
Lashley ¢ Proverbs b Clarke ¢ oan. ae ee =
Extras : - .
oie — Boys’ Socks — 12c. a pair
Total 108 Anklets — —— 15e. up
Fall of wkts ; 1—32, 2—45, 3—61, 4—@3, 360 ea. %
3-72, 6-75, 779, 8-79, 9-79. weetees, Shoes & Hats,
ite rill — %8o, yd. ¥
ROWEENG ARATE. wilh Galeitls Vesls — 966, Se.
Massiah a 2 Sa Khaki Drill — 59, yd.
Greenidie 1S ge ee Boys’ Caps — — 24¢, ea.
fhm 2
Warness ; a Vests (Gents. & Ladies)

Children’s Panties (Plastic)
WANDERERS--2nd INNINGS

|



Lewis ¢ Evelyn b Goddard 4 oe of Bargains in
A. Proverbs b Lashley ......... 4 ress Goods & Household
N. G. Mayers ¢ Foster b Lashley 5
N. B. Proverbs not out 9 Departments.
L. Greenidge not out §

Extras: Y

be v

Total (for 3 wits.) 26
at PICKWICK 2nd INNINGS
cdwards not out 4 y
Goddard e& b Maseinh 8 Pr. Wm. Henry and
Evelyn not out 16 | Swan Streets

Total (for 1 wkt.y ae AAR AALS

¢ PLEPPLDPVEPR?P PCCP LLL PLAS SLM S59
*

* CHECK THESE VALUES!
< DIRECT FROM FACTORY Fe WEARER.

e

% @ PUMPS in White, Brown, Black, Blue 75¢., 85c., $1.15 $1.20
% @BALLERINAS in Red. Sires 3—8. . $1.45
% @LADIES’ CANVAS RUBBER SHOES... 1,95
@LADIES’ CANVAS CASUALS in White, Red, Blue 2.95
X= = @ LEATHER SANDALS WITH RUBBER SOLES
st Children’s $1.60; $1.90; Eadies’ $2.35; Men’s 3.15
% @ LADIES’ CREPE SOLED SHOES... $3.95 to 5.80
= @ MEN'S WORKING SHOES—Brown or Black $4.30 5.05
% @MEN'S SOCKS ....... sei-+s... Me, 480., 500. 58e., 740,
@ CHILDREN’S and LADTES' ANKLETS

S2e-, 36e., 500., 40c., dle,

@ SHOK POLISHES, SHOR BRUSHES, SUEDE CLEANERS

%,
=

SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD.

é 64°

LLDCS SEO SEES GHGS GSS GS GOSS SUES EET

4 O44 48

PBL PR PPP LD









UNION MEETING

MEMBERS OF THE
CARIBBEAN WORKERS
UNION

are reminded of a Meeting
to be held on Thursday
Night, July 27th, 1950, at 8
o'clock at Headquarters:
Synagogue Buildings,
Synagogue Lane,
Bridgetown.
Business:

General Report and
Election of Officers.



LPS. SHORTHAND
EXAMINATION

The next I.P.S. Short-
hand Examination takes
place on Saturday next, 29th
inst., at the Combermere
School, commencing at 11
a.m, Fees may be paid on
the spot.

The next Typewriting
Examination will take place
at the end of August (last
Saturday) .

The next Book-keeping

4) Examination will take place
)) in September (last Satur-
day).

C. B. ROCK, F,I.P.S.

Local Representative

HOUSEWIVES

When ordering your essen-
ces, demand .

VIVLA Brand

manufactured by Messrs J.
N. Nichols & Co., Ltd.,
England, Manufacturing
Chemists.

These essences are sold in
handy one-ounce _ bottles
which are hermetically seal-
ed making it free from any
possible dilution and bring-
ing the particular flavour
required at its best.

AGENTS: Messrs Zephir-
in's Ltd, and obtainable at
present from Messrs Stuart
& Sampson Ltd., John D.
Taylor & Sons Ltd., and S.
Gibbs.

A trial will convince you.
25.7.50—I1n.








MICROSCOPE YOU
MUST KAT

JAR
ENRICHED
BREAD
| VINCED IT’S THE

| BEST QUALITY
BREAD BAKED.

|
YOU CAN’T SEE THE
QUALITY THROUGH A |

DAILY TO BE CON:|























| 25.7.50—In.


















































































!



4








TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1950



pe

OCS j

FREE HOOK

?
3
§
:

VCO 9 PS POOPROOS

Openimg EIPIRE

FRIDAY 28TH

which makes

“GOD'S WAY OF
SALVATION
PLAIN”

Flease write fer «one io
Samuel Koberts,
Book and Trast Service,
30, Central Avenue, Ban
gor N. Ireland.’

|

oy ro

208 per

OCONEE Le





POOR EPSP HOO FIEOO i |

%,

‘y

»,

a

: For Sale

cae aime ee.
% MOUNT PLEASANT dunia
S PLANTATION, VICTORY Reader's
% ST. JOHN. Digest
& story!

>

One (1) 2 K.W. Belt

driven D.C. Dynamo £40

< 4,4
ote 15% iS toy AoA AME * LSS LES or









Â¥,
One (1) Switch Board 15
% One (1) Steam Engine
x 6% x 10 ae 45
$
xg One (1) Aspinall pan |
x 4’ 0” dia. Disc 35 %
x A)
x One (1) Juice Heater x
x 300 sq. ft. } i0 XS
Â¥ .
x One (1) Jnice Heater %
* 500 sq. ft. 59 &
‘
§ One (1) 8’ x 12’ Muit %
‘ tubular Boiler 59 ¥}
’,
One (1) 7° x 127 Multi. %
tubular Boiler aE 5) }
’
z Apply: st}
, %D. M. SIMPSON '& CO *
*
POSER GE OOUOAEUELEE 666
Piri fi

Suitable for watchmen
porters etc. Made of the
best weather resisting
materials

$11.42

Black

Souwester
Hats

to match

$1.37





Cave SHEPHERD & Co., Ltn.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.



GARBADOS ELECTRIC
CORPORATION

SUPPLY
LTD.

NOTICE

As the Manufacturers have decided that repairs to one of
our Engines can no longer be delayed, the Cotayany has in
consequence had to put this Generating Set (900 K-W.) out of
commission and, owing to the reduction of standby Plant now
available as a result, may find it necessary to shed load at {
intervals during the next few months, ie

{
Our Consumers are asked to co-operate by exercising the ;
utmost economy in the use of Electricity, particularly during f
the Peak period between 6.30 and 8.30 p.m. until further notice. }

Vv. SMITH,
General Manager.

20th June, 1950.





BOWRANITE

ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT



Iron and Steelwork cannot corrode beneath a coat of
BOWRANITE. Proof against heat or cold, the corrosive
air of big cities, salt spray and sea-water, BOWRANITE
is used by engineers, shipping lines, dock authorities,
and public and industrial contractors everywhere.

YOU SHOULD USE IT. TOO

Tough, flexible, yet non-cracking, BOWRANITE is
made in many attractive shades

en eee

Stocked in :—
Permanent Green, Red, Grey, Black and
Super Black (Heat Resisting)
in tins of Imperial Measure.

ONE GALLON WILL COVER 1,000 SQ. FT.

ee ee



‘PHONE 4456 Seieteiy AGENTS
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. ;

== ==



sens

acti ils ttt ce a








PAGE 1

BARBADOS ADVOCATE TtF.SDAV JULY X. a> Qtvuh Calliwf H IS FXCFLI.KNCY THE GOVFlA'i ffl • :!' ittMld %  lecture given tv Ul Maurice Cmmw i the Y M P.I on rhui gu*t 10th. al 8 30 pni Mr CMUUH "'. %  k blind, is a Mudent of the Canadian National Bund, and he recently arrived from Canada to apend a holiday with hit ; %  %  %  ttlure he returns there to do a four-year COW* In Aft, H EM h .usic University in Halifax The subject of his lecture uil. be. "A West Indian's View of Lift and Work at the Institute." His lecture connin U i ntlddU of what should be n vny rntei ttlawfl i" Iran %  !" %  eapeelaOj Ihc second numlH-i. piano solo by M*urn r himull Also on the programmeam songs by Mr.*. A B Dc..n Mi H. bert Choescmati. and a violin F-MO by Mr Maun.e Fitzgerald Blood Donora IN CONNhCTION with the recent appeal made b) Ml SaVIJI for blood donors. Excellency thi Governor, M. Savage and othori ittended tn THEGAMBOLS VOU CAN HMMT \tn# i0fA Of60iN6 IsTTO POiniCS 6C0ftf On Vi.it M R. RAY T SOPER Co-ordlE Matiiml! Standard Special Order A MONG recent visitors to England hat been Mr Walter Rice %  'resident of Reynold* Jamaica Mines Limited. He is %  ra t place order* for machinery and equipment, including a special self-unloading ship •f about 13.000 tons to carry supplus of bauxite from Jamaica to Us,United States. Mechanised unloading from the new ship will take about ten hours instead of the 1 m ul three days Black Eyes For Fun! Y OCNG BILL SCHMIDT twelve-year old Lodge boy .•.ho left (or Venezuela yesterday morning by B W I A arrived at Soawell with a very 'respectable' black eye! How did he get It? Using Bill's own words. "We were having a little fun over the week-end. 1 The fun" was a few rounds of box in K You should nee the other fellow's eye." said BUI "His looks a lot worse than mine Bill, who is an American has • hs may we caught 61b. of caviare C HE _HJI ''\ John Codlcy PAHI.EVI tlrull) %¡ b .i' i>f New Jersey (Creole been living In Venezuela for somesamples of their blood lo be taken for testing. It Is understood that many more persons are requited to come forward as blood donors. Those desiring to do so are asked to send their names to Mrs. Savage. Government House. Arrived over the week-end A RRIVING by the GofjUe over the week-end from fcaiiglanu were Mr and Mrs. David H Young and their daughter Sheila lr. Young, who is the Manager oi the Barbados Qu Cmnp.ui> has been In England for foui months. Mrs. Young and Sheila ho* i rpontk Q), is here time now, his father veil (rom V.IU/IU-I.I pilot ith T.A C.A de Venezuela. Another American hoy BBW Bishop Of New York returned to Venezuela yeslerday. A MONG the distinguished visitHp wa Brian Jakob. He too is A to this colony during the a P"P Lodge School and Is ,i. the Rt. Rev. Charles *; n lo Venoatuela for the long ton, Suffrauai. Bishop of H^K. ,s 5S" w rk S,? New York and the Hev Mr DonShP 0|1 ^mpany In Venezuela %  Id Dm "f Puerto Rico. They are %  *l, at the Ocean View Hotel. Bishop Btiynton wa* the Preachi at SI MarvV Church at 9 am u$h and wiry I it was manned oy lour m lOUgh small. 4iw n tn racKfd slilrU. aeigi %  Ml lent seamen's boots .11 | v-.nl, vum ui ID '# nahim grounds .: Insun rose across in.sea. 1< tod *arm We losenni in the swell. ELZVaW Amartcan on a six weeks' European comingout tour are .nna^ng London a shock to their purses. Their pocket money allows them £4 a day for their five days here. Says one of their two organlserchaperon*. Mrs J Baker. "The girls were shocked to find that dinner in a West End restaurant cost them more than £2 each. Not that thai Is much more expensive than in New York—It i< just that the girls have never paid their own bills before." Five are blonde, six are brunettes only two are out of their teens. Crop-haired Nancy 1-ee Clark. 20. from Cleveland, and 19-year11 W I from Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I A to spend about %  week with her good friend Joyce King at Rockley She will lie returning to Trinidad on Monda\ less arrival l >-' 4|I n.tthins M" Wu Staying With Hi. Parents lit AM) MRS. Jofin Simmons %  and four children returned to ever, nave been IW1) lor about Venezuela over the week-end by V.rEuU.'ad'*""""" 'T,' >""•;'" %  •"'""]• %  "ty weodn/onslrdlr-hen n.l Lniland holiday. *uiyinn with his narenln. ' . .,,,„.,„ „. n M ,,,...-. Lucky Cake Winner Mr M. I: K Btmmon. m Su ._r.. u,."i !" .i.... r "," M H R CELETTE, a visitor l. IWHaDeUa. Mr Simmons is with the uland who Is stayinj al Bacon Vacuum in Veneruel. and BM ParadiseBMCH flub had a was here last year on holidaj SjrSL^E. 1 .?^-*2: Will Film Caribbean For winner of the ltize Drawing run Visual Education by Mrs, Ben Moore and Mrs. -|-j ETUitNiNG to Canada Archie Edwards. Saturday morning by T.C.A. Wedding W HITEPAHK Pilgrim Holiness < Hill, look as his bride Mis* Cynthia O. Parrls or "Martinique'. My Lord's Hill. The ceremony wn* performed I v Rev I M. Wiekhum The bride who was given .r< marriage by Mr. James F. Urat.i.^ ... waite looked charming in a dress The prize was a very tasty louKW( re Mf a)1(J Mfs 1J(C(l Uird wjm f broca< !ed georgette Her heading cane, which should make u ^v,. u t .„ lwn tw JOOUI wu drws wa „ ot beads and she wore very enjoyable 'Tit-liil for His MiH( mKing pictures both still silver shoes. She carried a bouquet aiicrnoon's tea u ,. (1 muviv ivr T C .A. of pink rose buds and Queen Worked Wonder* 1 Dkk told me shortly before h ArtnsrH I-ace. E RNEST LAWS, a young Jamai-.i left, llial he hopes to return lo The duties of beslmnn fell to ean teacher, has gone to the West Indie,, next year to do ihe bridegroom's brothi i--m-law London to study British methods u aeries of 111ms about the CaribMr Victor S. laawrence. Of dealing with juvenile dellnbean fur use in Canadian Schools Miss Doreen Parrls and Mitv quencv. He comes from the in their Visual Education DepartCarmen Best were the Maids of Kingston "Boys Town", where 25U menl. This course will nave lo be Honour and wore dresses of while maladjusted boys are taught planned very carefully beforehand, stamped organdie, white crinoline trades. Lows has worked wonders -M u wl [| i*. HI great detail touchhats trimmed with gold HIIMI In one village in Jamaica. When lnj mainly on uie industrial side ribbon and gold shoes. ol the islands. The films will The bridesmaids were Miss Ijndclinitely not be from a tourist douise Itrathwalte and Miss Mauriigle. ten Holder. They wore dresse* „. -!-*-• of blue sheer with hats lo match Chief bngineer I.l.A. and gold shoes. M K. JOHN OYMENT, Chief Engineer of T.C.A. in Montreal. There were eight flower girl* PATROLLING in an aircraft arrived from C.mada on Saturday the Mi*es Beatrice Alleyne, Pern last week, on the lookout for morning by T.C.A. Maynard, Hazel Parns. June ; Huntc. Esta Clarke. Harriet ThomWe all pulled Sudden!.!, uif looa-.,u: IMICV-I %  wirUng ait-rs ahead Iheogrs. :-d in Ui?ir bin: R all Degan lo DI)H in ihe nei There he was. That long Kracrlul lad. -with six pounds ot %  Vail %  The li*n WU.S earned u> Uie fac'or. and cut open After wa'h.ng and sMvini Ui earls* ased nh .iit and Ourli acid ipreservaUvvi and lefi lyr two days in ice. Then it wu packed into Una and ship.iea \, Rusila. ho con:rol irtr r.snui,' rlghls In ibis proaia-Me Lji.nejs Housewives' Guide Prices in the local market lot Pumpkins and Plantguu when The "Ail\m ,i|c" heck• .: ,. I. I l.l. ACM"T'.at long, graceful lady" %  *orUi. in a Bood >rar about KQfJRt, Nice work if... v.n . i..ui maks out ol thu? lit-arm 13s. a day seven monUii u: the vear What is a good catch ? Ours luraeon ion. A fish of this sue carries 3i if -nviorc worth £UQ 'I'll' .r the fish sells at Ss. 6d .. ML I'oal vatuI more than ftl So one ginn: nuifeoh i pay one man's wages for set .. > ITS, N ce wont—if >ou can g: %  'ou'" ,urgeon. iota frm.ry trlt o/ J"d Kimrtcktn. u 11 H •> %  ' >'> —! -,. ,—a,, ^ —p. ap-.* i-5 igJLgJgVga VK 4tnlr K luaM furMfd iaal Waiaa hd, aB d ia mkau aboM M • .r V M *>-• ahanh aaiaadiiaw oil luhioi "WK ha, la Pumpkins Plantains l h. • SLIPPER CL0CS • he went then as a teacher it poor and the people demoralised He changed all that Now the village has a nourishing local trade, a well-attended ictlOOl and a children's play centre Free Breakfast PATROLLING in an uircrafl last week, on the lookout for morning by T.C.A. Intruders, was Geoffrey de Freites. He was accompanied by his West Indian-born Under Secretary two sons John Jr., and Paul. Mrs. as. Pamela Walters and Pauline for the Home Office. He was Dymcnt •nd their youngest son Bishop. Four different colours of taking part in an aerial game David arrived here last Saturday sneer -blue, white, pink and peach which Tying clubs play with each oml ihey ore till staying at "The —were worn by these, two each other One club announces that Cainp." St. Lawrence. wearing Ihe same colour. The all its members will be patrolling Mr Dyment will only be staypage boys were Ihe brotheraround Its aerodrome at a parj n „ ilvJl for ti irw wo eks, but Mrs. Parker and Barton Lawrence. tlculnr time It challenges opprwnymrnl and the family will remain The church wa, nicely dc.or..te or,hone Avenue. Bank "all where a rehalf a crown. De.flf.tns has .>n Comj-any in Montreal and this is .option was held. This conclude.1. two breakfasts n fir M an lua 0 !" visit lo Harbados. He is ihe couple Journeyed to BathIntruder. a Hues' ut the Crane Hotel. .sheba to spend the honeymoon clubs to attempt to land on the aerodrome without being observed. Mr. de Freitas, who is a member of the Herts and Ess* Cluh. was defend inn his aerodrome at Broxbourmlast Sunday If an Intruder lands without a defender taking his aircraft BY THE WAY-By Beachcomber Still hag another 5 weeka here M R JOSEF ADAM1RA l. was m Trinidad for I ft days' visit returned yawMrdaj I D W.I A He taUa me that he %  till has anotliei five weeks here before he leaves for Trinidad. Mr. Adamtra has lieen Actnm Manager of the Bata Shoe Stores her,? for some months, and UMW| ih.it the new manager has Been appointed, he will be reluming lo his former post in Trinidad. Light Under A Buihel T"MIK PAUL WII.KINS Show, ^ which brings to Ihc fore oine Iocs) talent. Is a good one and should be encouraged. And the best way to encourage thi* show is by way ,,[ oonatructtTSj irlticlsm We welcome such artists as Eddie Holme and Ben Gibson. But these are men who have little need to show their mettle at this •fB, Where is Ihe young talent In Barbados? There should be more young %  rturtj .II the island who are aspiring lo greater heights. These Bribe ones lo be encouraged. Ami In this young brigade there s one member who Is outstanding, and not given the best opportunity. This youngster is Cedric Phillip, who is so tu speak overburdened sritll talent And he %  led behind a piano. Give youth I N all the welter of fun promised for the Festival, from coal mines to messages from Ihe moon. I miss one delight: a band contest: It should be held under the old Brunswick-square rules, with all Ihe bands playing different pieces and all ot Ihe same lime. Believe Da*, it was every band (of H*eU in Ihe Brunswick-square contest and no aesthetic nonsense. Mr. Gerald Barry and I, BOOnf K judges, weie put lo the pin of our collars to know what the devil it was all about. A whisper of Manola from the W.osall AtoUnns would be drowned bar %  thunderous perr la Victolre from Jeffcote Park Half ihe Middlesbrough team got mixed up with Shepton Mallet, and a small Bradford Clarinet Ml backwards off the dais on to the Clrenet Mr drum. Five Southport men pulled him into their hand and gave him %  truni)>et Wa •ran often ukad afterward* wnj *re awarded the Mis Melhubtl CUB to Tiverton. Tho reason wathai PERFUMES THAT LAST GOYA—Perfumes. Coloinn Powder (Face and Balh) A very beautiful aasortmrut to choose from THE COSMOPOLITAN they were more together than the others, and Iheir lone was less damnable. Slrlf Counted T 'lERE was an eccenlric charinter playing for Slatts Mills He stuffed his trombone with sacking lo get richness of lone. In the exuteinent ot a forceful passage-in Light Cavalry the lacking was blown out of the ol Ihe trombone, which emitted u sudden roar We look <>IT two marks for noise, buL uwarded one lor emphasis, whim led to ,i dispute with SandhillIf> %  •.. 1. who gut their emphasis by fonreallllg two extra French horns behind a packing-case. I 11 % %  in nber Mr Barry saying to in., during J lull. "I can'l make out what any of them are playIng." For answer I pomteci to ihe very stylish Nuneaton Band. Quite clearly one could hear bits ..f Alda. They all blew logllhar, and nt Iheir loudest, while less % %  iced bands wasted lime with lullaby stuff They would have w<ii Pelhani Warner watched a Rame of cricket together last aoturdaU Mr Munrtes is 111 England for Cabinet talks on Imperial D el enee, but erleka i thai At/, had a stronger pull for him lhan Whitehall. He saw the Eton vs. Hailow match at I-ord's where he was received by "Plum" Warner. President of the M.C.C. They sat in the President's box At the Australia Club's dinner to the Commonwealth Premier last week, the two men again met In the course of his speech. Mr. Meiuies foreshadowed an Australia of 12 or la million people %  Not much of M prospect for our future Tests!" Sir Pelham interpolated gloonwh '• On Short Viait O FF on a short visit lo Puerto Rico on Saturday by 11 I A was Mr Paul Nolan, who rclurneu from Bermuda a few KM ks .- v. ^.. Mm u 4 T'-feA W (' •fjp^^ '' %  / W ioL BBB1 %  res i W] 1 flAr-jL m if-' IP '•' FnaV* m ^ajt^Hl VKIInr from Swedea," tsarbrit llrlder. In a bloc tad whh> not At li; in. a i' tooloata tn Loadasi heel less slipper Uocs. The tuilea are ol n 1 and Ihe upp. r. irr •I whllr -ucdr. >hi-,. ,|, h Ih.St .,.' %  !. n„M! IIC. .i IJ.i.-k.ru-iiiMPalaca. './Ill III^BS. many HOV.lla (Worthings) TO-DAY 5 8.3 Final Ini>l. Columbia Sena TIIK VIOILANTL'' : tar ring llalph BVHD LjleTALUOT Wednesday Ni|ht at 8.31 I AHACAS NIGHT" EMPIRE TODAY Last 2 shows 4.45 A 8 30 2Ulh C-Fox presentMontgomery CL1FT Paul DOUCLAS "THF BIG LIFT" with Cornell UOKCHERS Bruni laOHEL ROXY TO-DAY 4.43 Only 'Hi C-Fox presents • . TIIK GINFIGHTKK" TO NITi: al H 30 MADAM OLINDY AND TROUPE CARACAS NIGHT' OLYMPIC Laal 2 Showa TO-DAY 4.43 & 8.13 isl lust. Republic Serial . 'DAKCDFVILS OF THfc RtD CIRCLE" ties LjUIGLEY David SHARPB Herman BR1X Carole LANDIS i* Al i: TV (The Garden) ST. JAMES WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 2th Century Fox Presents . Tvrone Power and Maureen Ohara •• III W A SH.1.V FEEL THE PAIN GO Stntfthiu qui %  l\ thai ii sccm^ almost like nuj >. You can feel its cooling, sow iing touch begin ;it once to ease %  IK ;\tint'ul Hi '(>. And n is so simple u< Mcniholaium'. Just rub U • ihc pain is and the pain joes. I i all you have lo do lo bring sp cJj relief from Headache, Nerve I'.t %  . Faceache and Aching Limbs. Gen .'v,e i'M liis ^vtndcrful balm and atop that pain righi away. Make sure \ou gel genuine Mcniholaium'. (Ask Tor MLN-THO-LAY-TUM). a^7 %  .'l^^!MI^II'.l The Mentbolitum Co., Lid. (lUtd. 1889), SU-jgh, tjiglaiid. Also ai Buffalo. NY.. U.S.A. AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Member. Only) TO-NIGHT al 8.30 Paramount* New f'lrlure "RED. HOT AND BLUE" SUrrinc BETTY HI'TTON—VICTOR MATURE— WILLIAM DAMAREST "RED. HOT and BLUE" la joyous, tuneful and kappv~io-lurkj WEDNESDAY at 5 & 8.30 pjn. THURSDAY NIGHT at B.30 BING CROHBY RHONDA FI.KMMING—WILLIAM BENDLX In "CONNECTICUT YANKEE' In Teehnirolor A I'.n inii.Liiu Deluxe GLOBE TODAY 5 and 8.30 (Laal Shnwinij) THE RED DANUBE" Potor 1.AWFORD Jane: LEIGH TOMORROW ONLY 5 and 8.30 -NEPTUNE'S DAUGHTER" Esther WILLIAMS — Red Skelton THURSDAY 27TH ONLY 5 and 8.30 'THE THREE MUSKETEERS Vm; iEFLIN—Clone KELLY Lana TURNER OPKN1NC '-RIPAY 28TII JOHN FORDS ttW AND FINEST PICTURf OF. IHf/lGHTING CAVALRY! My ,Oi ai iw > n ADD TO THE BEAUTY OF YOUR HOME WITH LINOLEUM It i B wonderful the difference that can be made to s Room by putting a smart piece ol Linoleum on the floor. The Room immediately looks cleaner and brighter. Come and see our range of attractive design-;. We have them in the following sizes:— Rolls 3 Feet and 6 Feel Wide Squares 7 Ft.. 6 Ins. x 9 Ft 9 Ft. x 9 Ft 10 Ft.. 6 ins. x 9 Ft. 12 Ft. x 9 Ft. PLANTATIONS LTD.



PAGE 1

PACE SIXTEEN SI \l>\\ M(V(i( ATI: Mill III mi ss \\ i IN \i:iai iiiin i ion -I Mm. .11 LI 8, IMt HI EH) F. HAMPTON NEW YORK SUwl tieira** Ann Mallitr. :K>. and her hii-band Frank C-irl. Mantero. t" year old negro dtreirtor Of Now York* Urban L**KHI' Fund, ar how.i it!' n cremoity at the wiiabcn* Home of Hrv Cbaik. F Bruah. Jr in an exclmlv i HMH if %  Taau romanc* iteaund fiom then i.ommoii iiit*r*t ui fightlnc racial di-crimnn.lioii Saatl iw.-nty edd MM'inv and Intnd* ot the immediate family ware on hand for the -implr double tU| art**'IHUei Pl.ilip R Mather %  prominent t**l and real eitate man or Bcstm. • on li.ii.il |a i[iv.> klk daughter ..way AMERICA NS PREPARE FOR WORLD STRUGGLE NKW YORK. Jul% 28 I mill, at this early .stae of the KoTwSul war. wa.-. i" day occupying more < %  ( the minds of Americans than Iht i' .. %  lighting thousands "f miles away Panic buying • >\ food, clothes and other nds likely t.j In>heri in . high ly i'.effort, reflected the feeling thai the majority of fomllii A re thinking of the months, perh| It rested artificial >hertet;cv and high prices. Thi -..>• ol i \ ki lo. Itli *s i thf \ 400 per %  r uea I'I r i cajrt %  %  ingulf The World rspniuuj i lor :i 5t rugate tha* might Tfiulr the world and no' L.OICK i tile United N Ion". ..i pleased i i ly i 'ouncil %  %  Tin i • beUeva uiat th r tup) i tunic In thl • %  •ui only n uny j*uputhought thai the United %  anything ,ic than what it did. *i lotlc pride SWnpt i he countrj mi thai latctut M 14, when rd OJ the North i on thi radio Phe United Slates had earned out Ui plMigL Every sUU I it inn v' "hen President sine i ... %  ivari %  Shocked Surprise The w.n new* was still read .-ily Thicasualty lisu. still 4g lot thf fun fill a aw %  appearln i ih.i %  i %  ..(--r • Shot k. i mi ,i I i %  ) th,. pu,i\ i I lotted States c aild lm mediately deploy u> mw the < %  < ligln.-il rrarliiii. i'i vivid Frontline daipa t chei : on tha from pajei i But as mote forces went Into action, ai the American and Australian squadron* bom1'iirdcd North Korean toncentraI.I.IIS. .i> 'inAmerican md British %  i-.iiih warahipt pi ovad they controlled th.region* of the %  tin %  %  ..ntiili-ni-e hpgan U. leturn. AJMi .t %  | i) lh I I 'nous. tmerlcan way of liir wa. i ng t.> br temporarily shattered, ;.T the danger of u wider conWai i.ut tii,voice ol opposition *•> %  but .oiled .is their loaders (in jitutii ih t bualneu <>f winng a war Renter ..il MORE MOLASSES FOR TRINIDAD Making .i %  %  in. • el "Athe in pon v> :,-,..... ; vacuum %  Trtnl The vi p| omplile i it. loaddav .md will i • leaving % %  i Trinidad. ThU l. si load made a total of approxin itety ITI hai tuken here ] i ng Mi.week Th.* -Athel Ruby' >to mak' anothei i|ui< k call (or laaaai. //.V..S. "Sparrow" Coming H M s gparroa Marbadoa from th.Mih to ihi' nh of September. H.MS 'Sparrow i ne Diaca Swan clan of approximately 1,450 ion? dtaPUUacaant and carries MX 4 inch Ruitn In addition to a number ui smaller etoaa rang! anu..ii-rait un Her anU*tubmarLna i i|uipiii.'nt In rl ltd i deptli i iiargi H.I complement w eight < fflccrs and* 180 men. II MS "Sparrow" wai built ..t, ih iivcr Clyde In S^-olland, and launched early in mti She was lint ConutuHloncn for icrvice in ihr Hoyal Navy in Ih*ceniber, 1X46. joining (lit America and .,.. looiea aqnadron two nmntn.s latei During *i*** iir-.t eonui kaaloa wnicn endeil in May, 104V. at Devooport Knglan-l the -.tearned ovei 65.000 miles She vlalted l. ..' % % %  ax illvnse .. %  Vaiicouvrt ii c Kontavioao, Miami and Jamaica; she alto steamed 1,000 miles up ihe Amazon to Manaoa Btfed Ipent three month.in thVl Ikland I'lrtM.i Dependencies •outl of ('M|MMom Sum bar return to Ihe AmeiKj ami West Inales Station m October, 1949. aho li.s alieady steamed ZblHKI milen i" the Caribneari and to Braail, %  nd Argentina H U 9 Span m b tha eUjhth ihlp of lh.' Soya] Navy to IM JI %  .. .. S| i Tha Aral 'Sparrow' 1 wii captured iron tinDutch In I Ml, tha M'lond spent part Dl ihe Napo'. ,.iiuWmon ti.. ffi t Indlei Station and Ihe fourth was alutli ned In South American waters lir over live years from 1837. Captain B>rd ii* i pntaenl Commandina omcer is Ua-tain S J S It,.,., i Captain flooid entered the Poyal Navy througu the Royal Navy Coll.K. Otbome In Jam. ;i> 1918. and rltei went io s.-^ i*< the autumn of IMl H I Cadet in the training h.itth^luj. "Tlumdcrer He II ll 1*11 WII Hi i vi-.' in the battle-diii** "Hoval Oak"' (on two not i*Royal Sovereign". Malaya' and In the delrovn"ValhaMa'*. Uilh in the Atlantic Irtd Medlten -i. |rb ( %  •itli hi was •elee'pH u> speciailae in |annery ui 1929. lie \-HS ihe i employed "" ; i-itli* ry dUtlei in .ill [IBMCS of ;ht|>r including th, |.i Subtnarthe VMU Daftreyi I i mi ii i mean, the 1 In Chin .i tha i/.iiituii* in id. Medtterran* • in t n %  Chilean batUeardp Almlranta Latorre" whilst that %  hip waueniK re a rn wd and finally in tha battlehip "Rodney" \n ih Rente Fleet from 1H38 ittii. during DMBC perioda tie ;.'-<> served on Uw ipatrpallenal -lidr*f all thr-e n.val gunnerv schools in Bngland when he wan able i" keep in touch with modern developmi In 1940— IW4? he WM at the Admiralty engaged In the proWhile Or Coloured MISlaii Level j %  kin yellow, I -• white in. II With lh. ivii. ach i evement %  failure ;. el thf :%  " ed b) the I mot let-reei hi i| and pnuWMincemi mad) i,., i... public by nd Pi tari %  lloinrii I eeniali %  %  i li rhar* i NO bl< ,i latlon Lhera No prool thai m mankai't dinei in in ...... • i | i I %  \ -Surial Hfy and still kern!* million-, of person* tn.in not II • in. and civllisuttoii from the hill use <.f the co-operation of pi mind* %  TejitB have shown ,i similarity in mental .1 Klelip:All human beings pOBBM i bility anil adiiptahillU. ihe trails whlrh more than all otheis have permitted tha deve'opmeni ..i miis mental eai %  'Ml !< %  I til I %  '( %  md.' Lei I-.ST. „,.. %  mm oj tfun '..n intd n ardiri; phi M, Mid I 1 Veil,.;.i. profeaaoi ol bloli %  i' mi.ihe junule of I'aragn... m U ol A Tii. natlvea fled, babi '-'•' %  l %  ...i old Ptofi %  '.i %  >>k her hack to Limn in .id..ui LMoJoaj Muleni I Ihe pei tonal ul latant ol her adoptive fitthei 1, %  S Bill i ol nev. equipment t.> .•-.. .„ it,. Uueat hum the air. ..i the end of which he WIM rc%  <•. .. I-.. .. II a' p Uitmeni KT ui onnecthui with aaaaull landing! In djie Medite rran ean "lu-re lie laid served for so many .!.. i.. arm pre* On AlgMaTB, Egypt, 1 --11>.'I; .in.! /.u.ii.. tLibyal, Si.il> and finally he mmander ti'. irb ....it .! %  run in Bei •' mb i 1941 Hi ii,.i returned to %  i ... i ... during iwa roan I Una oli employed In the Madl< h ranean the No %  %  k, rnbardln inon targeti In tha aaaaull OJ Nonnandv and .tt Aldi-ine* ui :in Dam li IUN ol H I v ,.i. Captain it ,i .< • %  ndai ol the Royal Naval Bai Ida -t rartsmouth where Ins principal task wai tha ipaad) return of lama numberi of war* n • -.1,1mtn Ivllian Ufi H talT apjM.inim.-m in th it i ivuiUon %  HMS In August, 194B MAGNIFICENT COLD DANISH BUFFET SUPPER SERVED SUNDAY NIGHT Stum thine, I dan Mill .Xppwriulv ... I.\t:0\lil\l i,i ti—raid ClCVCn, Pink. Krd. l.old. lame l.rrni and White g sl :0 per .d MIAN I IM, in Itlur. It..,, t :r..n. pBafe A I...1,1 I 51 II |.. >J r%  •! --I VI.I i. \nll-. sHOI's in vVhlle Blaeh .v Brown s L ede I'M." rajaftnj from Sll.ie U> |1U1 — uban lleela \IM, |II:I-V|S -IN. in-. sllORTS A SLACKS Kit., Etc. ;iu>\.mA> MKI.SS MIOIV From 7 to i •**•*" 5 Si I'I It VIM ^ BARGAINS S i ...!-, waahaMa, 40r. yd J t iRea lh wldi lie. >d. 5 pia-.ii. gataaaali U i> aa Kaliber Sandal* — n n Beaha He a pat ; Aaddeta — — li. WooUens. Sluies g Data, White lr;'l '.AC. v.t I hlldrens V|g rgC M Khaki Drill :.'r. yd. ; Bar*' > lie. ci Vr. .(ire's | LadlOB) Chttdren'i Paatlca (Plaatte) Thousand-, of Harming '<•> Dteaa '.>'i%  ReaaahaM i •• i >> %  i t MARINE B AlL ROOM liOWRANITE tNTI-CORROSIVE PAINT '">'. U W TI •W. MB. ,. rTf " %  %  r./j %  nurtwerh eanaet eerrad b a eaal of : oWIt'.Mil I rof a:alnt hrat rntlve ill -P. .. .--. %  a IMU r ... : Ipp . ,.i .. %  .... pu-Mli -',1 III dea11lal nil ivervwhtre, \4H SIIOI 1.11 I VE IT. TOO loi.-i. it ikb, 4t .n.Hi (I .i. u. new: .Mil .s madr in IIMIIN aliia< the vluil.Slockrd In I Permanent Greco, gad < %  >• %  %  > -nd BO[M| Blach 'Heal R-i in i III tu.. al I.,.: .; %  %  ONE *.\i i ON WII LCCVBS 1 <0 I I. I ll"M 14 :: — At;i'NTS WILKINSON & HAYNE3 CO. LTD. A FINE ASSORTMENT OF TH *NI S I TROPICAL SUITINGS ,'.C*.'.'.'.','.-.*.'.'-'y Tluvii Do I, Lvcr yjrimc By Jimmy llatlo Ail "-* |J 4C E -OHNNVS GOT HIS 6M, THE FiSH ^RE JUMPING — -TWERES NONE!! l^tO'.v HES A=TER BASS OR TROjT-1 L ^ 1 SO THE FISH STAY INASD LOOK WHAT'S OJT !' 4* 6>. cS mtgtd & Co., lid. Jop ScofiQM in Jailo/iinq \ IN STOCK AT C. B. RICE & Co. OF BOLTON LANE Si i! blc I .tchmn porter v li. Mr-cl' cf ihe best \*<;ith:r resisting in .1' i ItLiek %  %  %  vJI^R Semwaater II a in mw to mutch si.:7 i CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., LTD. 10, II. 12 , 13 Brood Street. i^fiWfj •I'ifo #. %  *' liiirbado8* iion §i £*>st Ka bf§ aby Cont:st of 1950. Barbados Bonniest Babies arc of course Cow & Gsta 3abi s and this competition is open to all babies .* .'. on Cow X: Gate Milk Food, the Food of Royal Babies and ate Best Milk for Babies wh.n NstUrgJ Feeding fiilj. E.vrnnis ti.osi: .\ >#.###;## /(K #W#J# I ball*ni* HUHI U I'i P %  >"' II ."* •• I % % %  l.*l. IIJ n" lap r*>*"i'a i„ „ u a Oat* I %  %  I II* pre, %  „(.,I 1.1 l.u A Oat n,J .*' hnltf [in I,.*.,,, b^b". ..II i., nieeiM > PMRI t rh%  • -f UM wMN ivil-a -..i .,.|.... „. rM '•"'" -"• ma ihr n.^i MMN IU >a> Mui •>, .* ladaei i-i %  >. % %  •• %  liar* tl ..j,. am Hm aii' el IIKI. %  suit roun J %  ; B9| it , pOUS H.-P" W P.O. Bku n i : £. u 1 QATI i %  awtad %  Kara i. %  . %  Oals n .i %  -4 1 ' %  <* %  .i .-„ i !" --i lag •* 1 .,1 UM SJWC.I C 1 " BIHI -' • Baby. Nam* loin on •aajhl m fi.Lii, %  H. lata THE COW &GATE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL ii kl "" '-"•>"" -i-r aai MI hwf aa urn A. OATS ana ...... h ... sun ,„, ,.. M „ wh „ %  I '•'" wn PM .U; 1... %  -..raHaaaai Haw aii, jajttirai SM Hahi4 ra a ..tia i. r! %  — % %  Oaa 0*H raa*t praaaai %  wm UMl LI ihHM taran an % %  Hrif iimaial whiui *nu -al-fc bal.> rms is viitK INTHV FORM— cin IT ot r COW AV GATE^f



PAGE 1

I'M.I III.IK UA8BADOS ADVOCATK EiiglumJ—W.I. Test • FI-MH Mt 7 %  %  tn* tv.-t ii dii %  eei th..' %  .,!.„„ be w MMH Tu ihi Tin.' %  xppeai ,, fasMMUngj Bud GoaVtti u. th.-ih.ti* lieapateh lM> momlu cut to lb* III. h "Suefi tins, and e*ber> in th* %  %  to score l , and I around the cornet tn rimleg Rac CW i LlDd we'll. picked up keenly and allied in for % % %  •.., A with the batsmen tai on hfa "... Simpson shared fullv with Want brook in tbf openinx %  h in compiling the hnnflnome totil and. if anything, had been the I two Hi had sei1 strangely ( 1 i:h H ASHHKOOk juctBM a unable to punLxh even the %  hortesl ball with any raal Vhn and had only mlleeted six lours in hli live nnd a half hour* Inning Dewos joined I'arkhoupe and looked the picture of discomfort he Jitterlv began his inn. These however Hayed together until tea whan Purkhouse with Si turn to hicredit, wai well. I'lac i.l —IW A Time Thing.. i„ %  | add for a time ,uid Dawaa one* called Qomei i chase two plgaoni from the pitch When play wai r e aumdd after laa. bowled .01 over with thv i.Id ball and Ranudhm sent on" down from the othei end bafon living way lo Worrell for the new balL This proved just as inenViinv as the two earlier new ball* and t'arkhou-e was particularly punishing again.-t the pace mm After tho shock attack had con..•.led 34 runa without success, OoddVd l-i ought buck the ii..third 100 wai quiet ly niBjIgHlTtHl .ithe two yountl Riiglisliinen sftlled l>>< m-elviN : %  • stay as long as possible although both wen more Milling lo an.pl the odd cliaiiii' to score Iroin anv looaa dellverlei than Iheti peedecessors ciortdai.i .it 3i; again took charg* ol one end and %  tti at I F to take "Hi from Hamauhln. Ttie ixjrinctsiuu rea i.fT Valentine's fir l offering from PIS new cud. ParkhoiiM gBJCja p Ing it to the let boundary. The pair had then been t.ajelher for only till minutes. ;, much better scoring rate than the ilrsl wicket pair nod achieved ol any stage. (.odd.1111—Surer** Goddard was soon to reap some at into, getling Parkhousr j.b.w. for 60 with re reading 9M The Olamorgan player bad shown U '-'tcr strokes than either p who had preceded hun PaiticuUuly favouring the late rut. I also gave some powerful off ilnvi and neat drag snip plaj Not did table to the two spin bowlers, and i-.. first player to vm • crease to mcei VaJaatlM • the BngUsh captain. mined his last minute recoup and Ooddard soon brought back Ramadhin to mm Valrrefort to dissolve the amateur %  ip Yardlcy wok some to L-<-i ofT the mark but • %  111> did % %  %  II i iiai ; • f.: ofl Valentin which earI score past 331, 'rcmendous hanI %  with a not eerj pretty fon %  i like 0 .. H at th* %  %  %  alai • %  %  %  ....I,I,.-. to a jood length oil Anothei amateur Doug Ii ... A wag IffM 'Come al m %  %  • did nothing tc i. I,, u, WaleoH off %  rare drawn %  out. The Match p Teat atab R II,. (thin who had bowien one h-ni on nnuiiiatj %  %  ii lonpad put) reaumed ni ,< %  trim, o down a :-...' %  undary nags there .II ALL., biowlnfj across tirection to help %  %  %  %  %  %  %  i,f %  brook whe i.mk t %  ovei %  gam. ror Kngland. the : down and the worn up m I'd minutes, In two hour, and ar. i,i %  The ermring attack provided %  %  Indlau % %  % % %  ia Simpson vad ii wai lust ,,., u „ n lot %  four, the tai an i 8 mp %  %  i %  leliven %  Mil V,tl| || ndtvldual 00. Next > .)I gmuarh dropped back, Wash1 '"i (oar to loin hi the hall hundred ma* m had now i aan battlha lutea and neither had Of hurry WashI able H h [•vo liked Bfjalnat Ram. rne new hall was taken i -h.hnson and Worrell uvtng lha attack. I irst Hour AT *• the Brat bourN l"av tn, iMtsnirn wm% .till 1,1defending and '; Uw ovarmthi total. fc lOOfe | lovely four to the 1.1oi eover ofl fforrtll to reach his thousand runs fol iht %  I Ooddard now ravortad to hi* Che score was 143 1111 wi %  woo* reeted Valendcotean vriUi a mighty % %  •ok roi i. oi to tha %  man bM boundarj The iso went up la tfi '' when the inning* wm 220 miniite-i underwa • In Romad bin's second over HRed inm weakly wide if Valentine standing about midway between square leg and mldkct A little anticipation and the fielder would have made I, tot ii WH a very weak % %  Scoring slowed dowi bly us the luncheon n proa, ried with ucilhei Simps. W.i %  :..,.!, !,.,.-,. %  ., ,,„! nellnatton to hit the hall hard. Goddard continued to excel do*> the wicket and ChrtaUanl made a very good one handed pickup in the covers to turn a possible Simpson four Into a singU Waahbrouh had one unhappy %  i' Unai it inuvdhli) ana a three tnnn bis l>ut through the slips went perilously close to Wwke Lunch was taken at lB. five runs short of the highest first wickel stand of 173 held Jointly by the two countries At laaat MM West Indian supponer had revived 'he uncomfortablp recollect ions of the stand by Tarlllon and Cholicnor in the famous t27 "sevenhundred" tournament when Barbados was fncrtl with the absolutely identical situation In their %  tti Inat Trinidad It was the third DVOI afUM lunch before the batamen lent up U it %  • i, kef record ManX :. Ibis had stood at ITS, %  the west indJea having a rimllai afforl to thatf %  Geoige flunn and Andie Sendham had done it ;it Kinntod 1930 and Cm* Bl teaumc did it .i* IMfl Ramadhin and Valentine f/era still doing the howling fumi the Pavilion and Han. int.and reapeelively but Ooddard at ITH bowt ad Mmaall lot ii i --!i\^ JULY :*:.. ItM IV.VVVAV.V.V/AV/,-/,. MIKi: H4MIK | whi'h mskr> 5 GODS WAY OF SALVATION PLAIN" •II* fnr ..... ... K. ..r, ..,, _.. %  l._ !•. rnl.jl \,, ,., |;. I* N Irrlau.l.' v^A*.'.-.*.'--.-.? • .'.-.'.S __ I For Sale In.rrmedfcm. Trlrhel, ] 2 „ tf g,^ ofchfc EMPIRE, Y.M.P.C. GAIN Rain Hampers OUTRIGHT VICTORIES Most Games EMPmt OIKI Y M PC B „ln,d outright viclorira 0T*f Cable %  i.'lws and Mental Hospital respectively and Wind w„id and Wanderers first innings lead points "over Spartan nn.l Piekwtck when the first n.und of the Int.rmedm'e t ricket series ended last Saturday. Enipirr mn.l. | brilliam IB". brook IlllKlH % alcoll Was "iMissing" MirifNOHAM, July 24 Walcott U unlit and not likeb iher part in ih< i.it.ir Tli.it ...||ia rmikour thii! wi-pi around Tram Brtdgi in kit around nis atoralni whe: hi Waal Indies crickrtiTs arrive. loi the fnuith dav of the Thud 'lest here The cry arose l>ecause when not out of their %  • % %  -lich had liroughl them from the h'ttel ll was noticed thul Walcott was not among the part. The ( >x|ilaiiution was really %  pie I owi v, %  dyde had ' n a i lung a letter in his r< and came downstairs just lute to FOtCh the remainder Die team It was several minutes before 'i 'hey had gone but then he quickly enught n taxi i imc to rejoin them at th e groum The We*t Indict chance* ( vi, lory were still quite stibstan Mallv dpcreased during play this iuf>rning. Johnton despite hrulsed nrm which he hurt whe railing, on Saturday declared himself fit to open the bowling and WOll thouah he bowled neither he nor any of the otherr add make any impression or Simpson and Wasbbrook who by stuying together until lunch Bd England'* hopes of ii ina draw. to switch them around. Scoring now practically came '" %  <<• i"> %  -,' .md -ix ovei, produced only two runs until Simpson woke up to straight drive Ramadhin Tor four. washbrook imitated his colleague by off driving Valentine to ,lhe fence, the best stroke of his innings, to cefjfj Mi Uatad to m nnd just after .Simpson sent the score past the double cenlury 40 linn. An Hour Me sent a full toss from Itamadhin to the square leg boundary. England had been onaldt i -! scoring ai a rate of forty runs an 1 op>f hour, excusably behind the clock -— In vieu of the back to the wall fight Washbruok stonewalled stoically thiouah 23 more balls before he "l.niaged anotlter single to get : .tl for 3 tn reply to 47. I'M. ills 1.1-4 %  %  : rd and Pirkwirk at Ftkatttl Id %  a rd 17! (Rev A E. SlmD Frost 2; Pickwick 52 for 2 wkkete )D ing n.o 1ft. M roster ii" ITi l> n'ranl Total I "I wir-krli nOWLIKO ANAt.VOia V M PC Ii„l INNIWT.S %  nii c n*i...n b n,.^, Kalatu (nmhiimere nnd Y.M.P.C. ill < Ii-imnr ('omhermerc 80 (R. Richards %  King IH not out. liurkc 4 for 11. Austin 2 for 4i. College and I.odjjr at College College 124 for 4 (C. Thorpe 3ft net out. II. Simmond* 53) Police and Foundation al Foundation Foundation 47 (N. A Yorde 20 C Mcblett for for 6). Police 53 for 3 Kceitncnt and Carlton at Garrison Regiment 133 Ov TO a-as KITS, p>N vsB.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME Ttue Test, t 1 *!'•> An.l-.M 730 am %  •II* Sprain* %  %  _"" %  '" rrmttmnw Fmoand Wwt Indie.. | Freiwh OrrTir-tral Down II N Anal., Th newi pw IN 1 Th, N, .... %  TaV* li ThM The nain Blllin 4 1 Tom ",. %  P *M. Concert. %  land v Wr" I lull.. V n.in Ii m Wrl.h Viiih,., S p in Trent %  •, t l\ p m Twmli QtiMOoi111 l*ur from LoruUm. 7 1* pm N,. Analyi t 111 trraauM Krport on Third 11 ,1 Mtwweal S IS pm On ir* i" i> 111 lUveet urcn—11*. a V, p.„. FidiuriaU t p.rA Tip T*p ti Thr 1 Ml llv Co 1 11. I,. ItAIH. \I>S I frlntji — washable, 41V. yd, ? talieu—3ide 49r yd. Plastic Rainroals—-gt.18 eo. %  libber Sandals — Mc Boys' ftoeki — 12e a pUr I Anklcl. — % i€k op 1 Woolleiu, Shoen j Ha&a, While Drill — 78c. yd Children* Vesta — 3er. ea Khaki Drill — 3e. yd Boys' Caps — — j^. ea \eata (GenU Ladle*) Children', l>anll. (Plastlr) Thaiuamtn r Barfalna In Hi-. floods A llou*ehold I depart menu. THANIS Vm Henry a van sireeU MIMHIKS OF Tllfc CARIBBEAN V\IIKKIK> IMON are reminded of a Meeting 4o be held on Thursdaj Niaht. July 27th. 1950. at 8 o'clock at HeadquartersSynagogue Building. Synagogue Lane. Bridgetown Business General Report and Beetion of ameer-. I.P.S. SHORTHAND EXAMINATION The next IPS Shorthand Examination takes place on Saturday next. 29th inat.. at the Cnmbcrmere Sehooi. commencing at 11 a.m. rees may be paid on the apot. The next Typewriting Examination nil] take place at ihe end of August (last Saturday). Ihe next Book-kcepint; examination will take plae,ni Septambar (Inat Saturday ) C B. ROCK, F.I.P.S L-H'al Hf hJ-seiu.il i. 25.7 50— in When ordering your esuenVIVLA Brand manufactured by Messr* J. N Nichols & Co., Ltd., E n g I a nd. Manufacturm e { Chemists. These esaences ore sold in hand> one-ounce bottkH which are hermetically sealed making it free from any possible diluUon and bringing the particular flavour required of its best. AGENTS: Messrs ZephirIn'l Ltd, and obtainable al present from Messrs Stuart & Sampson Ltd., John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd., and S. Glbbs. AT MOUNT PLEASANT PLANTATION ST. JOHN I One ui 2 KW. Belt driven DC. Dynamo i | One fl) Switch BoiM | One (1) Steam Engine <11 Asphiali ,-ii %  o" di n (I) Jnice Heitei 300 e^aaaaa S I Wt-IRI FRIDAY 28TH TRUE 10-llf DRAMA If I WOMAN'S BITTER VOW CUM/viVfVG. SCOTT LYNN H AlJVAliisHU^ r. ** Suitable for watchmen porters, etc. Made of the belt weather resisting materials $11.42 II lack NOIIMCNICIHats to match $1.37 OH XO! MADAM '.V//.',V,V,v,v,i r vvrt W /. CHECK THESE VALUES! %  iRKHMmumin %  < >.>. H IH • I'l >ll's l„ Hhllr. Broli BUrh Blur :.-.. #LAII|fS CANVAS RIBBC* SIIOKs • I Aims < I WAS ( ASI Al.s In Hh|„. R,d Blur i i MIIPI: SANDALS WITH I:I MI-.M: SOUS l-hliarrn'. l 60: l M: t,Hic.' *: 35; >],„• •LAiiffis' vmrr. mini KBOIS S3 M 1O • lvs WOBKISO it... „, Black M M • MP\ SHOCKS 4!c 4r ,\T # find It nereeaarr to shed lead al Inter-i'* ilm mthe next fe mon(h*i. ? >.^--*^<^%VUV^^'--'.'^^V-,^^*^*^*V4VtVO<^V^-.V,-,-,-,-. V ;. YOU CAN'T SEE THE QUAUTY THROUGH A MICROSCOPE you MUST EAT J A II I MIKHKIr Kill All DAILY TO HE CONVINCED ITS THE BEST Ol-ALITY BREAD BAKED Our ( .iii.iirn. ijr %  tmeal reonanu in ih the r.-4k iirrind l|n r.:t ?0th Jimr. 'A>:.l) iked |o i. : %  i., Ii exerelslnf Uie *:ieetrlflty, ,,.,-(.. u!. lt I. during I H in p m. unlit further notlre. V. SMITH. <.i n.-r ii Manacer. BOWRANITE ANTI-CORIIOSIVi: PAINT Iron and .Steelwork rinitm nrrode beneath a rojt of llimH WITf. I'ruoi iriiiiKt heat at cold. Ihe n-rrmlve aireTUaelthw aallaprai analaea-mrter. wmctMii i> Bcri in englneera, shipptnc lines dork aaitwrtttei, and aiihlle and Indiiiirlal •unlriilars evervwhere. VOI SllitE I II I SI IT. TOO loath flexlhle. M-I nnn-erarkim MHMtAMITB t nude In mam jiii.mr slude% Stoeked la I— rerminent Creei. II rd C.rei. Bl.i. k and %  sgati iiu.k (Baal ReaMfeag) In inis of Imperial M'.Mir. ONI f.MiiiN UII.I. com l.ooo an, t~r. TIK.NF4456 ;: ^ fMMMtl WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.



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TIESDAV. JVLY 25. IM BARHWHIS \ll\lll Wl PACE rrVF. Lorry Driver Pleads "ISot Guilty' Of Manslaughter Case Resumes Today JULIAN (.1(1 I Ml M.I.. middle aged lurry dm.-r. plead. U "nul guilty" of the munslttughlrr of "ll-year-o.rl Rosa Small, as the July sitting of the Court of Grand Session* continued yesterday. Hearing of the case occupied the attention of the Court all day, and will he resumed at 10 a.m. today. The jury who are trying the ease went yesterday evening to see the scene of the accident which caused Small her life nn March 11 this year. His Honour the acting Chief Justice. Mr. CJ. L. Taylor. Is K siding over the Court. I>*fence Counsel Is Mr. E. K. Icott, K.C.. associated with Mr. J S. B. Dear Mr W. W Reece. K.C., Solicitor General, is conducting the case for the Crown. Rosa Small was fatally injured on Howelis Cross Road after the 'bus from which she had just alighted was struck by a lorry coming in the opposite direction. hen the accident occurred. She had been in the same seat as Mrs. McClean. She had not seen Rosa Small in the 'bus, but she heard her voice when she said "good> 'c Mrs. McClean." The lorry had jammed into the %  at of the 'bus where the driver was. The bus was stationary on the right side ot the road. Each vehicle was on lU proper side. The lorry was driving swiftly. Mr. Reecc: If both were avelling on their proper side how did they collide. Witness: I do not know. I suppose 11 was the speed To lb Walcott: The lorry came around a "blind" curve. Ernest Johnson who wotk a on the Government's Waterboat was another passenger In the "bus He said he had seen Rosa Small In the 'bus. She was In the rear seat also. He did not know why the 'bus stopped, but it stopped about 10 yards away from the pole. Lorry On Left Side "Small got out of the 'bus an.) passed to its rear. She reached the post on the opposite side of the "bus. 1 saw the lorry coming from the direction of Howell's Cross Road When I saw It first. It was about 15 feet away, driving on the left side The right part of the lorry struck the right side of the bus ]t came round the corner swiftly. After It had passed I saw the woman lying in the gutter. Alvin Shepherd ont^ of the witnesses for the Prosecution did not conclude his evidence in reply to Mr. Waleott's cross •examination. He was allowed to leave the .stand after he began to sway as if he would faint. Mr. Reece outlined the case to the Jury, after which Sgt Nathaniel Cask in took the witness stand. He said he had been to the scene soon after the accident occurred, and there had seen the bus X-994 drawn up facing the direction of Two Mile Hill and the lorryM-1180 on the opposite side of the road— the left—faring the direction of Belle Gull v. The lorry was laden with canes some of which had dropped on the road Smelted Alcohol He talked to the accused ana smelted alcohol on him. He took him to Dr. Massiah later, and the accused also saw his own doctor. Dr. Scott. The 'bus was damaged to the right front part, and the lorry on the left front fender. He saw a spot of blood on the wall. Witness then gave details of the measurements of the rood, the vehicles and a tyre mark. Continuing he said that accused had cen Dr. Massiah about 2.50 p.m. the same day. and Dr. Massiah had next day performed a peat mortem examination of the body of the deceased. Dr. H. Massiah told the Court that Small had been extensively Injured. Describing some of the injuries, he mentioned a large contusion of the left .side of the abdomen and pelvis; numerous other small lacerations and bruise contusion of the right side of the skull; the small intestine ruptured in many places; the liver and spleen were both ruptured; the skull was fractured and so was the neck. In his opinion death was due to shock and haemmorhage following the injuries. He had also examined the accused. He smellod of alcohol, but he (witness) could not say that he had been incapable of managing a motor vehicle. To Mr. Walcott: Accused wh> I examined him had contraindications of drunkenness. Ids speech was steady, and he could answer me coherently. He talked quite well. The tongue was clean and moist He recognised me, mg me. "Mr. Hal" and he was able to explain the accident to Son's Evidence Wilfred Small, son of deceased, said he had last seen his mother alive at 11 o'clock on! March" 11. 1850. He identified her body to Dr. Masiiah for purposes of the post mortem examination. Verona Odessa McClean of Olttcns Rood. My Lords Hill, Headteacher of Belmont Girls' School, said that on March 11, she was going home in a Route 20 'bus about 1 30 to 1.45 p.m. As the 'bus reached Howell's Cross Road It stopped a little before It reached the bus stop. The road curve* at that point. She believed it curved to the right. "I was sitting in the second long row behind the driver on the extreme right I knew the deceased very well. When I got In the 'bus I saw her In the back teat. I presumed the bus stopped to deliver a parcel. As soon as it stopped I heard Rosa tell me boodbye. I replied. Lorry Travelling Quickly "I saw a lorry laden with canes coming Irom the opposite direction —that of Howell's Cross Road. In the twinkling of an eye, I heard the sound of breaking glass The lorry wag fairly close to the 'bus when I first saw It. I can only at] il a*ai travelling quickly. The 'but was standing on the left and the Impact took place on the right. 'The position of the lorry waj such that I thought It would have been a head-long collision. I hell In the passenger next to me. We both screamed When 1 looked up I saw Rosa Small lying In the right gutter. Her foot seemed to have been injured. I remained where I was until the police came. Then I walked home. "At the time of the impact the 'bus was stationary. The lorry was ti.ivel.mg The bus did not mov after the Impact The lorry Wl laden with canes. I saw a tew in the road when I got out of th'bus. 1 did not know the driver of the lii iv To Mr Walcott: I only prtMM that the bus stopped to deliver J parcel. Lorry Jammed Into Seat Miss Harding, a Seamstress, said she was a passenger in the "bus "I knew the accused by sight before that date. I assisted with putting Rosa Small into the police The old lady was near the steps of a home belonging lo one Miss Shepherd. Some canes dropped off the lorry onto the road. went with Rosa Small to the Hospital. When the accident occurred, the 'bus was still stationIt was very close—about a foot from the gutter. After the lorry came to a standstill il did not move until the police came To Mr. Walootl: Before the eraah came, the boa driver had just "revved"' up the engine The bus was facing directly ahead. The "bus WM about 18 feet from Ihe curve. The curve is one you i riii.it arc around. Yon could the canes aa the lorry was coming. The 'bus pole was clear around the curve. I told the Magistrate that the lorry was travelling "at a fairly fast rate." That Is correct. I did not have rh time to judge the rate stop long enough foi io get gm not in nay natolOfi *lf I believe that dangi-i hi ahead 1 will pull up am when The police measured that I pulled up three feel from the gutter. Tinstop pole on the other side of th> road would not be far from where 1 (Topped. The curve is a deep curve You van come around It dead on the left according to the speed at which you are driving. Seven Miles Per Hour Re-examined: 1 would say one could go around that curve at about seven miles an hour to keep on one's left side. Fn/-Gcrald Reece, .. painter ..I < Cross Road, auothct o4 the passengers on the bus said he as sitting in the same seat us Rosa Small. He told about Small's getting out after the bus had stopped, and of hearing the rolling vehicle. He first saw the lorry when it was about 30 yards away. After the lorry hit the bus itness said, it drove on a few yards away. He, gut out and saw Small lying In the gutter The pobce came and took bit. Ml) He did not see when Rosa Small was actually hit. When 1 first saw the lorry it s oft its side I did not hear a horn blow The loirs was travelling fairly fast Both Kept Left To Mr Walcott : Before the Magistrate 1 pointed to a distance %  'hich was agreed upon as 25 to 30 feet I think I lie distance of 2.1 to 30 feet is right. I told the Magistrate thai the lorry was on its left side, JI, 1 the bus was on its left side. That is correct. Rosa Small sitting in the middle of the seat She said goodbye. Miss McClean. She had to climb over about two people after taking up baskets and then she had to get out of the bus and walk behind the bus to the other side of the road 1 think the bus must have been stationary for about live minutes before the lorry arrived. At this stage Mr. Walcott suggested that the jury be allowed to visit the scene of the accident. Mr Reece agreed. The Court adjourned for luncheon. On resumption Evans Elcock, an igricultural labourer, told his version of the accident He was on the lorry at the time There were ten people In the canes and was inside the hood with G am Slid Off Platform When the accident occurred, he slid off Ihe platform and CUM l-liind. On the trip down Iioni i hiist Church the driv Stopped at a shop The truck came across Howell's Cross Road very fast. The driver quarrelled with Doris for using bad language. Doris and his (witness'I Win 'inai idling The driver did not tell anyone that if they did not behave he would not take them. The lorry travelled about 20 feel after the canes hit the old lady. He ran back to his step because he tell it would hit the bus II turned the corner wide. Bonito To Replace Flying Fish During the present lull in the flying ash season UM I Department is hoping to the Ring Net .win %  I to -aptunng bonito in large number* Up to the moment, howevci these fish have only been aaga hi shallow water where it is not possible to use the net as it anmld be badly mangled on a rough and shallow bottom. This information was given bv the Fishery Officer when Interviewed by the "Advocate" yesterday He said that the present lull usually takes place about this time of the year on toe approach M tfie hurricane season, usualh egarded by fishermen as from uly 15 to October 10. Only HI It,, .iKi-hmc At this time about 9f> aj f them haul their boats up on the beach and this only leaves roughly about thirty boats to go after bream and snappers At UsU tUM lOO, extensive potting Is usually started with a view to selling the fish to the poorer classes of prisons, bream and snappers being more within the buying caitaclly nf the other groups. What might make up in some easure for the fish shortage tha' will now lie experienced due to the drastic decrease in the number of fishing boat* in use, said the Fishery Officer. Is the sea egg ion which gets underway in another nix weeks' time. Research Work The "Investigator", he said will Be carrying out research work throughout Ihe year with the exception of a short spell for docking It was hoped during thiwork to augment the Island's fish supply by any captures that might be made. An important phase of this research work would l>e the charting of Inshore fishing banks known and unknown nnslderation was being given for the importation of gill net mesh suitable for the capture (lying fish, said the Fishery Officer, and boat owners desirous of placing orders for such meshing should communicate with him soon as possible. C.O.L. Index Has Limitations THK COST OF LIVING LKDSX mm MplktlMd t.i the Cleiks' Union last Right WIHMI MI I S Bin 11 W LttboUl Commaninimi. spoka %  n Labour statistics. There aiv two types ol Cost of Living Indie 280 SING AT ML SIC FESTIVAL II Bovs Here's A Bargain . 1* 1 \ K \ 1 V 1 S CHEAP ROBERTS & 11 CO.—DIAL CHEAP .1.101 High Street Of SK-II Stopped 30 Yards From Main Road Next witness was Samuel House, licenced driver of a motor vehicle. He was the driver of the 'bus involved in the collision. He said: "I was travelling along Howell's Cross Road. 1 heard the noise of an engine, and 1 decided to stop 1 stopped about 30 yards from I'elle Gully main road. Separation Hilt In House Today When the House of Aaten l>l meet today members may rcsuni debate on the second readmit ol a Dill to amend the Dog been* Act, 1802. They may also resume debaU on the second reading of %  BUI to amend the law relating to Beparatkm and Maintenance. Another matter that ma> be considered Is a Resolution to approve of the Book of Rtfvrenet and Plan of the proposed e\uof waterworks in the Ports.of St. Michael. Under Private Member-' HUMness Mr. Smith will I passing of an Address t" His Excellency the Governor relating to the use of Tractors bx. the Peasantry. Mr Mapp may also move the passing of an Address (0 His Excelleno Itan Qovornor relating to the fixing of a minimum wage for employees sufficient to eiwn. them a reasonable standard of living Mr. Garner may move the passing of an Address to His Kxcelleney the Governor requesting a greater release of hard currency in order that more of our essential supplies may bo pur chased outside the sterling area The second of a i Concerto oigafiised by -• < ..i> Hcoooai wag t oiiiOrimere on 1 1 Mat last A %  %  iioni amongst the pup is m in< ii ..i BOQ MM •* Ml %  Hail Girls', the at M. thi %  %  out those given the groa tatl applause were "A Slicpli.id Kent aneep". a modern COanpoottaOB > %  Brig H Tinman, and two Negro Spirituals "Standbi' in the Nev-.i %  I I'MMI aad "Joracbo" i M last named was given an encore Poor Attendance The attendance, how.vei, am rather disappointing. At the close of the piograintr.e. Mr. L. T. Gay moved a vote of thanks making special mention ol Captain Haisoii and of the teachers iind pupils who had worked M hard in order to stage the sou.. 11 He spoke of Captain Rataon who not only loved music, but also People and especially children Me ventured to suggest that the Weat Indies should make use of Captain Raison'services UrODtor of Musical Eduent; He also expressed the hope that Hie lOVa of enmniunlly Singing which was widespread forty Oft) ream ago would !* %  gayokentfl ni Barbados. This was one of objects of the Music Festival The audience included Ma|or C Gllndon Reed and MiRood Mr B CM. Theobalds. Mis. B Arne, Mr. W. H. Carter. Mr Douglas Carter, Mr and Mrs. II A. Tudor. Mrs. E D. Mottloy, Mrs. D. C Moon-, Mrs L T Gay. Rev. and Mrs. E New. Mr A G. Jordan. Miss M i.utmt, Miss llalgohin. Miss I Alleyne. Miss G. Denny and Mr Q Hudson. Alvin Shepherd of Ilell e Gully .-aid he leit home to catch a bus. lie saw a bus coming up When he came out from home he saw Rosa Small standing on the opposite sM| ol 'he road from where 1hc bus was. She was againsl the kerb. He taw a motor lorry coming around the corner M 1180coming from Two Mile Hill side Hi saw the canes on the lorry hit the bus He had run back to his steps when he saw the lorry j o* mg to the retiremen: of Mi "When I first heard the engine i.osa Small also tried to get up.g ^ Newsam, Auditor General, I did not see the vehicle, but it to his steps but the canes hit herln,, Kxcellency the Governor has appeared In no time. It wag an liul pulled her back into .he road, jjjpjn pleased to give directions for I the appointment in an acting B.T.C. Has Triple Tickets Prize Over $38,000 Sweepstake Ii. kels in tnul. v neWill be sold tin M Summer Mecling DM the lintt tUlU in the history of Ihe Bjofbodp Turf Club. Mr. G. A l^wis, BotTOtOrjl, aOM the "Advocate ytatardav. The Turf Club completed th selling of Series YY yesterday and will begin to sell Series ZZ today, (Hi the completion of YY. the Ilrst pme Is estimated to be in the Vicinity of $3,I4H Only II days are left for the %  elUni of tickets at the Turf Club Ticket vendors are working hard to sell as much as they can liefore thg raeM slait OB Monday, August Gittcns A'tn For Auditor General What's on Today Court or Grand Sessions and PeHee Courts 10 a.m Speech DJV and Prise Giving at ColerWif Sehol Z.30 D m Meeting of the House of Assembly 3 p.m Austin truck laden with canes. It was dead on my side. The truck came around a curve The curve 1 was about 35 yards away from the bus. I had not come to the stop pole yet. Mr. Reece. Why could you not see the lorry before It was more than 18 feet away. If you could see the curve at the distance you indicated? Witness. "I saw the lorry when it appeared around the corner. I heard a crash. 1 had lowered away my head. The lorry hit my right front fender. Glass on 0JM right side of Ihe 'bus was smashed heard that a woman was dead. "1 got out and saw Hosa Small lying in the gutter. I saw the aroused in the road, and he told lie was the driver. The lorrydead on my side I guess that the lorry was about three feet on my side. Heard Hum Of Engine To Mr WaleoU: I told the Magistrate that at the point where the bus stopped, there is a carve ahead of the 'bus. 1 said that around the curve there are two walk. oa* on each side. I stopped """ lM "" "" '''" hand side. I heard the humnniir of an engine but I eoutd not see what It was at this stage. I then saw a lorry coming around the curve. 1 did no* actually say the carve waa 18 feet away from where I stopped. I pointed and Indicated the dr. tanee A policeman susiealed IB feet "I read my statement before the Magistrate. 1 cannot remember reading the words "eighteen foot." I told the Magistrate I stopped because I heard the humming of an engine I saw the lorry as soon |aa It came around the curve. 1 stopped my bus about the distance from the witness stand to the dock "I did not know that Rosa Sma.l got out I did not hear anyone say boodbye Miss McCl< .m did not nop to deliver a parcel I Just had the time to stop when thelorry came around I did DO) Witness III At tins stage the witness be( .i::,. ill Doris Carter of Collymore Rock BS travelling on the lorry. She saw the bus standing stationary She heard the crash, and when Gretnidge pulled his brakes he fell off When she gov up siie saw an old woman lying on he road She (Witness) got her fool and eye hurt She went to nospital To Mr Walcott: I did not go alto the shop, so I do not know if anybody drank rum. Elcock'* wife cursed me when we woro coming down in the ivuek The dnver threatened lo put off Elcock and hi* wife. Oroonldge blow the horn before he came %  iiiid the corner. Re-examined Both Elcock and %  :ic were cursing. FiU Gerald Walcott. Rock Plaster Supervisor at the Pine Quarry, said he was travelling on iht bus on the day in question Sic told a similar story to that told by other witnesses At this stage further hearing was ad(ourned. and the jury weir,' ii the scene of the accident capacity of Mr. C I). Gitlen*. Senior Clerk. Audit Office, to th Auditor General, With from the 23rd of July, 1M0 2,000 NEW LICENCES In Christ Church OVER 2.600 bicycle licences have been sold in Christ Church during th,. present year That number is only just lielou I third Of the R.r.74 licence* which hove been sold in St. Michael, but the I arOCbiaJ Treasurer of that parish told the Advocate today tl it thcro is cvciv indication that a record number will be sold this year This lime last year only 2.100 had been issued and me total lumber had been 2,700 In St George 1.451 have been i*sued so far DECISION OF 10/FINE CONFIRMED The decision of Mr S II Ffurae, Magistrate of District %  Y." mho imposed a fine of 10s. ant in seven day* or in (•'fault it days' unpriooomoDi with hard labour on Alphnnr.i Howe of Half Moon Fort. S: Liny, for unlawfully assaulting Doris Juckson or Sutherland Hill Lucy, on April In firmed yesterday by Their Horn i Mr. H A Vaughan and .1 W li Chencrv. Judges or the Assis ton) Court of Appeal ROWO was also ordered to i>" the costs of appeal which amount ed to 8/4. (I) Those compaiu* living I BgH .it datsaVOI : Uffl— U) the aaagaa place and in) Those comparing bvtBI COStt In ditlerent ; the same time. The (lurpose of the In living index is t-> measure changes in retail prices, not in the standard or level of living 1. • %  <•..phasisc this the MSM Of th* COPl of Living Index in the Cnited K has been changed to 1 iiet.ol Tiiv and m the t 111I..1 St.itcs of Amen..i to "Conimers Ptice Index" tinafor gnd following t. Men mdici I rw I f,.i other put, addition to the function uriiig priiichanges They have DOOB u Mil in indi.ating the failure of 01 trol. Indues ii.iVv been u.itiln.l '.r ,.,thai U I nuse of the change* In ..k>-.hub would have followed such '.oveniflit Food items included in the ndex have been BasaaJdaMd to i.nji down thou rot nil prlcoi In .-.. %  .,., od .. refloat the ge n e r al movement or tho prices ir all items, but they ontinue to relict tha movoiMnl d the prteoi of tho Itonu included tha Dadjn Statistic* As far back ..s 1B2.V a resolution •( the second International Conference of Labour Statistician*, id "In each country statistics! should be published changes in the cost of living Thoj ih< uid coves the food.| lothmg, heating and lighting,! rent and mlaWOUacMOUl groupg Bach group should Includo tho must important items of i-onsumpand especially those .nti.ir the price changes of which may I be taken as representative off changes in the prices of articles 1 not included Another resolution rend "In I ,. • ,.( .-\: uo| inodi statistics of consumption, the most. Mtatnwtory method of donmnln mg the w. ights of UM ililTn-n! items Had groups appears to be n...bfl I d "'' %  > %  I.ind,nd I..O..Ibudget obtained as the result or .01 enquii> into the nvciMge c\ UOngtHUTg of .< number of families during a glvon period Where statistics of family nm not at dial Ic tatti %  lies of aggregate consumption ma> mo value in the determination of Ihe relative UnpOrtaOMO ot certain artieles Of consumption in Lho i ountrj .. .< vnoko n i ounl bejnf (..ken of the faci Hut cer Ii li-s nee used lot .ML. i ii.,m ioiiu.ni ooni umpUon • gnsutod from .ill information ,i\;olidl. DU ..I .o \>* U I The n t of living indletM aie now based .i,nll. Unon lho results ,,f fimilly budget %  inir i. and the stand.n.l lo which the i ..,t ,i iivnn: .i, . nlathatof earner group. The Truces* In most counlii. s an 11,,1,-v | 1.1 st inautu f d (oi UM eonttaj eft} %  ml %  .. ,,,,,. .,, .| %  .. . h %  a turo !%  t.iken. Iton i ra duced are not t.iken into account Sometimes there is a special index tor a group eg the Raid Indian* BtsCH Estates | n llritisb '"EKltlMi KM) if REXALL RENOWNED THE WOULD OVER AOABH COMPOl M Bll \HI \ I'OWDHt < III MICA1, IXIOII II' IK I'll I.SION KIIINKV s\ m Vl'in i: PILLS COLO and IMtl EN/A MIXTIKI: Dbli.ll.tlile t.l.VCERINE and IMIMOI COMPOl Ml KAOLIN POI LTICE Mll.K Off MAGNESIA STRIP OF IIM'OrililsflllTES .ill Itrsnche. ..I : KNIGHTS DRUG STORES HAHHISDIVS —Broad Strett SACK-TRUCKS ALL STEEL — 1.0*0 111* CAPACITY Wilh CM) Iron WhrrU IU.U With Kubhrr Wh.i'U 20.09 ALL METAL WHEEL-BARROWS STHONIi AND 111 KAHI.K — :l cubic fM capacity SUITAIH.K KOK CONTRACTORS, ETC. O.M.Y SI I..11 I.AI II "RUBEROID" ROOFING FELT QattatN MINI K\IJ/KI> KlfKFACK A l.ov\ I'IIHII. 1 oni; l.astine. I.lliiienl \\ ii. i i>-! % % %  <'o\er for nil Knnfs fV2 (IMS P| II sJ. VAIIII IIAIIIIISON'S-Hardw.re Specinli.U Broad Street : habits of talI be different at a special I Ol Tho • orawrnptlo i lod ampl such dogno index l| II %  Requirements for all sueclal mdex numbori must, however, be i In relation to fundl FlnaUy i here Is a li;itloniil llldeH foi the whole population wetnMod eithn i.> ..tal .onsuinoi | i .. avoragi of UM In nda In tho Ml arid other localities for • On I'age 7 Payment Deferred i In Corfu Channel' Mining Dispute LONDON July 24 Bnlains Foreign Undcr-Secreary Ernest DavUfl told the House if Commons to-day that discussions with Albania about payment 1 damages lor mining Hntish ships In tho Corfu Channel hod so f-r been "inconclusive". The International (Kurt awardfc843.000 f„i the nulling In 1946 of two destroyers In which 44 men lost their lives. He said a third discussion between Ihe two countrie*' representatives took place on July 17. Anolhci '.id take place shortly nnd the British would have to consider also was Keater. 8,3*16 Driv< rs LifflH-CK I — mil BIGHT thousand, tnroi hi dred and forty six dnvi have boon Isaued to dr ers since June 21 and 206 ductors' UMnCOB. Th* Tr;iflic Depurtment which issues the licences Is crowded throughout the OOJ and the ilutv policemen lj. a busy period Pay* W-80 Por atealing %  *>.* CenU William Heckles a nineteeni-.n-otd labourn "f Holder 1 and, wag lined 20*. or In %  'ii"i"'il to one month' nment with Iwrd labour, whet 00 appeared liefore Mr. II. A Talma, City Polite Mngistrnte for tho larceny on July 24 of U cents. Ihe property of Edwli Bailey. Heckles was also flnif 10s. for resisting Constable M-pi when given Into custody Blackguarding Case Dismissed The case in wbi fa Thnrne (i;,p. St MM I U lined Ml and 2l. costs by Mr C L. Walwyn, Magistral.' u Matrtel .rding M BatlMirt'es Hill M 1049 was dismissed on 1I> merits sesteid.i. by Tlieir Hon.nir* Mr .1 W II Chenery and Mr II A Vjiighitn. Judges of the As.aTt Of Appeal s m tot evety occasion on Sale at the leadina StoteS •VeVaV.VaV.V.V. r ;V. I FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR %  PETS „ USE PIIIIINA UM I'HU MMl %  IMIIIM l.\SI(T Kll I I II %  H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD Distributor* .V.\ Such beautiful scenery! Such beautiful hand work! SciMH'rV I i in IMIUI Clolh curb $111 Ml S-.-nrrv 1 .11111 In mi Cloth (linen) $130" Scrnrrv Guaai Ton.-1. S tM I.MIII.'S' Srent-rv !: %  l BCENBBV I.IN1.N BANKS SACIIKTS—Ka. $3.50 SCKSKRY LINKS HANDKERCHIEFS— Kuril $150 CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Slreat j



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July i .". l!.'.lt Sarbabns; locate %  \\ %  TlliiF.I C5 REDS SWEEP SOUTH TOWARDS PUSA\ Cabinet Will Discuss Korea paiME Mimnai CLBAONT ATTLJ? JLwp, ll> summonrd a -p. rial mutclllg ui lha tabinrt pai in,way lor Imaortunt •lalrmcnLi on ihidrfencc Korea uhirh he and iluIkefrncr Minister Fmanurl Mi well, uill innkr lo Parliament on Wi'dm-Mlay UN U.K. Prepares For General Election LONDON Julv 24 radical tipster* 67> both iMefl of Ihc frnro piedtr! now that the thill Socialist control of Britain'-! ,,f I until next 8prln. Some nj UM new election may not MfM even that soon Coneenallia foes of Prime Minister Attire have candidate* Un up to run for almost every Mai in the Mouse of Commons, but political chiefs who guide the I party alill have no coherent pro gramme on paper. They don't think they'll need on.for several :nore month.* The Labour Parly is going full peed ahead with a new platter .1 which stresses a slowdown on public ownership plans Preliminary Plan A preliminary plan has beer, drawn It will get its final polishing from Labour's Executiv. Committee thii Wednesday and then will be moved on lo local parties in each constituenttoi discussion. The final programme wlU be ready by mid-October. Ill that month" they will also get going over from the Labour Party*! Annual Convention The Prime Minister has the power lo nsk the King at am time to dissolve Parliament and rail an election, but Labour Party .nformants say Attler is in no mood to chance a test at the polls yet and probably wont be before next spring. Last February's balloting which cut Labour's majority from an overwhelming control of the Common* to a shaky working majority of nine showed political %  nntimtnt evenly split in the countrv Persistent tapping of popular feeling has shown no convincing swing to either Partv —(CP) binet is ,iue to hold %  loiip eccton tomorrow to considi-i '" %  "' rti ol the Depart met.I 1 and experts on how Bnl^in can give more concrete Korea meatni titai %  sting was hurrtedb ui monert to ronaidai whetbei an steps had been considered b HrliHin which would Involve emergency iceisiation before p^iliament rbM for ;he .ummrt teweek Colour was lent to this view hv g of th,. ,.. Whltelov, %  lp, whe % ould %  *• consulted ovei anv such denier 11,500 U.S. TROOPS IN BRITAIN LOMUOJVJuH Jl %  in..aOniatei Anir, IMM Parliament today thai th r L'mte I Mates had iso elngraft, iu.ouo An "i and 1.500 navnl men in Britain Airmen wenin (hree medium bomber groups Attlee was replying to a request for information b.v Lett wing Labour member Stephen Davles. who has been critical of the Government's foreign policy. Opposition members cheered Attlee'* statement and Labour Member Seymour Cock? said It was better to have Allied armed forces in Britain than enemv armed force*.—Reuter CLAIM FALL OF VITAL U.S. BASES PHOTO Minus a i front in the Butvoi uaa from North Korea.—Express. Sabotage At Portsmouth SAYS ATT LB E H.M. Govl. Gives £1,025,000 To Rebuilding Castries "* ST LUCIA. July 34. Subject to the jppro\jl of Parliament, Mia Majesty's Government will provide the additional sum of £lB9.l-Oo, mjking a toial contribution tu the reconstruction of Castries of £1.025.000. The announcement wn< mada 1>> the Ciovernor this morning lo the laajilatlvo council, which paid tribute to a strong presentation nl the cuse tv the Maoretanla via New York en route to %  i triai where plans are already under way to give the delegntint. j rousing welcome home. The Governor also announced further success of the delegation in obtaining %  further grant of C ISO.not) from the Colonial [level< pment and Welfare reserves towards road* .n .-. development, and ii. :' ending a cOOwnittaa <•-. experts to advise on the developmi nt schemes with a possibility ol further Colonial Development .tii Weir rr t Held In I Vaniiirn Smuggling CliurgtHELMSTEDT. British Zone. July 24, West German border police today said they had arrested t m, n %  >.i.-,vic i ..' :i, nig smuggle one kilogram of Uranium men! into the Soviet Zone L'raniiim valued million marks was cooBaeatad The identities of the arrested men were not disclosed. The men who were arrested last Friday after \hv polka Mere hod been "tipped oft" by a third person were taken today to Brunswick fur further questioning bv British Public Safety authorities. Allied onVlall here said it was "one of the greatest attempted smuggles of this kind so far". It was later disclosed that two women had also been arrested and t:iken to Brunswick. l-ONDON. July 2A Prime MUUatei Clemen) Attiittold Parliament today that the blowing up of nine ammunition dar^es at PoftanMUlh 0*1 Julj 14. U due to sabotage It had not yet been pc>tble to tabllah who did II At tie* said it was a miracle that there was not seriou.s loai a| till among workers in ihe Armament Depot, and among their families %  'inn near to Bedenham Harbour. %  explosion occurred Ilia aKpioalon damapad naari] an imilding within more than mile of the blast but no one was Injured Answering Anlh o ny Eden, Deputy OppOattlOn leader. Attlee extra precaution' had n at the Aumiralty Establish men I for vome weeks Eden described Attlee'statevery grave indeed", of Germany. JC'lcmi-it Davies. Wader of the vend I Liberals, said it disclosed n "verjstat-tUn* slliiatiun" Attle,. said. IW five tl!th A 20-vear set uhich on June 30 was reports 1 V-hen Miss Uvina M;. %  %  3.000 In touch Witn | The air squadrons, would be lands after tioned in U.S. Mill Defend Pescadores V) iSHINOTON, J 1 ,tartmenl the Pescadore %  %  ...-.... t ily 24 Islands if Formosa would be defended naval I I Cameae c<>mmu-iked them At a news conference, the State !> p u tmt i isoketman said the i lands fell In tin S ol Formosa which Truman at the outbreak nt tn, Kf-rcan W;.r ttU would be %  the American Fleet -Renter. England 350-5 In Third Test (By I). L COZIES] , NOTTINOHAM Jul) M KNIil.AND pul up a Hood Jijjli; t.la\ .i. : ,,i...: tremendoli! odds and until the last hour ol the (flernoon n looked w murh as though the Dunklfk spun would In IT' n save the third Test mateh. K..i i in.iteK To,• m, u Yardlej' and Insole (ailed at the crucial i and ti proapect (or tomorrow u that Ihe tiv,. last must hold on (or England at least until tea lima and tci minute, or remain out there even Ion • (Ilu scoring is lower, in order to -s.t\,' HITHI i "' Ihi Engiuli i il P I ittjM. althouch IK' I (irniosa Awaits Red Invasion today, TAIPEI. Formosa. July ^4 A defence Ministry spokesman said on Monday a number ol lunks were approaching Quemos Island under cover of Chine-e Communist artillery barraxe It may be the Ion* invasion attempt against lhNattonaJhrt-heid islam' use i hiockade bsse agalnti the Reds The apeHatman .< N ist forceon Qnenv.v post off (he mainland port of Amoy were adequate tn meet thr expect) Red attack He mild (he) would tp ted by loeally-asslaned N I Ist air nnd nsva| unit Communist artllhtrj be an bombarding the town of Quanau on Quemoy's northi i pm. on Sunday fhe spoke*n Mpraaard doubt that a reported large concentration #>i Communist erafl in the vicinity of Quemoy would pas. the Island -'k on Formosa It looks as if goin), •, he their t.ireet. he raid NI VCi Bimpeoi pi aurabl) |fe s ., %  ,, West | %  a batsman-- man !. iravkcs %  i %  < tht amjj nun : >Mng bsauttftn >ti % %  ) %  %  ting the bat to the boll however 1 ., The Maaien This i> batting m the tradition of Hammond. Hobba, and the other maeu i -., Ik thai ..r H I belli vt ik thai of O thai Ol HardstaTT. thuuich s/h) Om do Dl plaj lot till making plenty of umsnd averages, is mora than i and OUMN %  cs iiitderatai Of course, n. opening paii ri I mrythlni thai %  %  expect then more in fai I; did up a new rei ord and n than any Knglli i. lh,. last I:they made it bv dotfifcd efhei than bv i h kei Both | nt to West 11 %  dull i ither see ,t match loot %  II, Weekes, Sl. llmo'.-! M,I ,h.,|| Nehru Sends A Secret Message WASHINGTON Julv : %  Indlai %  a secret personal appeal to ;h> American Serrrtary hirthai effori U l^ave CommunMt Chin.. ItOd Nations vdhlt. 1 frora publteatton .•: Neiuu i Dtp Iflcts In thai ha sant ihe note i \ • i to back up hi .... unai %  la a I I lhat Cam • hum be admitleil l> ti %  United Hatioru lUt the trate I Koreai iithtinu reported to explain rtfl mottt %  %  %  i immtnenl American %  .i y,-,, . ,i indori hi i i-mand that North Korean irlthdrav. Ui the Mth parallel i %  • % %  nded lha mil COST the United i.t then rafuaa SBd 'In Ightlnft d woul I %  lor Ru i %  fnre world nun Amem HI officials ttVe U) know more about % %  M bul they were 51 txpot tad '" i' % %  e their po —Reiiln \ew Corif4titiili(iiisFor 4 Colonies l-ONDO.N. .luK .t < %  ' i ilonlal OfTi.e %  nounced changes in th. c.mMitutions of four cotonie-. ol Windward Island, In the West Indies The U-Kislstlv. Council^ will consist of 14 members. Including presidentwho will be Island Aiiiniiu-tia'.oi> and not Oovcrnorit Kight mamben win i* elected by universal adult suffrage, thuf gltrlng a clearer majority. The lein.nn.i.i i|l cafcsUI ..I three ex-olli-16 member" who will retain the right to vote until thr ministerial system con be established and three be aomlnatad t,.embers. The life of the Councils will be iv raaiThere will be no literary test h tppru'iih ; %  roach to ihe game and I • fin Pase 7 p| lha It Yew Old SIHMI> MolhtT:Ka.lirJa.lr di %  %  ton t ,IIns.,T|| i.. | -penal CO. ,i latel.v in tieorgatnw in The Time* lodaj Though many In B.C realuw that aelf-Govi i nn < i I I oh II irs Caribbean In "pann* packet % %  An eli men) % %  [ Intran igenl Den Pru Hurt In tt %  % %  %  pponeni I FedaraUon ,., B.G ranUnenl il dextin^ winit If llluao nae thai the li u Don ..... %  i rtuig %  %  •. | I spltal . %  .. %  ii. ml %  %  managed %  %  Btll WM taking stei Captain Hoif. release Rewir.(With MacArthur's Headquarters in Korea) July 24 KJOBTH KOREAN Communiat forces today claimed the capture of Yongdon^. main high way town on the road to Ta.'ju, BJMI lh.hcirt ol 'he American forces defence ares, lf*ee keM wttl tlraval from Taejon The North Korean claim, broadcast by Moscow radio, put North Korean tanks and infantry 22 air miles down the high road from the former South Korea temporary capital, and more than half way U) Kumchon, vital rait and road junction town on the direct route to the Unitod Rations main supply base at Pusan. The i I.mn of the rupture "I Ynni;iluiii. u.iI North Korean communique The IIIM coinnitiniiiui' n| Gen rral MacAHhur'i Headquarter*, -mi Imortean lroo|H fa ii %  Ui I %  -sfulK defied lronl.1 nialHl m ttmit d. l.-n. %  l:n.. In UM \ < iiiidoni; area, affect I velj blaatlni rapontetj > I\*J ui iiifwiitr\ affaeju — The M %  \. ( fniiiuiniMHr "KIMIS" Stagt IMaiKM'iivrcs IN ROME vadlng it)-. %  ROME Strong • ol troop reinforced bj ren % %  da ..••ii .1 II rougl Ihi App* %  ine I warti PI I aged hi [1 %  tfl, vs.,, M n HUM W.OSt Italian Irooi wHt.be.i b) u • %  Italian Def it in %  i lardl, mt .. i: in ., Hi,,. which was b> Ine cut In Itl | in I] :mllltarj ii sill sis h Albotli, l'.„i i i ling t (i* n„ BIIH tnpo i la.or* i of Ihe italiun Ah %  %  '••Iron Brll %  • i Si tti fti Irei %  i land and N %  tin manoeut rei Reate' ftei J i %  I %  Ins Korej of I',, an Southweal i II in Kon %  i %  iiu ..f ihi Korea P> %  • N %  i i %  i \ Inlghi "'imm*in.!•• Mi 1 I %  .. I I uthein I %  in. North K. r %  I Nui lo II I ba th.., lb. thru .' takei I tm. %  I from Ameri/ .S. Prisoners March ed 7 /# rough Seoul Slreels KOREA .i.i > ^t Etftj An i ii prtao H througj %  %  %  • laou i ommui to iho northi i .1 up* lorlt to a Kon from Ihe former capital . lotto, laid lodaj peopfci in Seoul baih %  not of *jnei i dreeaad In uniform li and Dusseldorf %  Hen the G I'nion todn %  Federation ni*' infiltration into West dV .. Efdmi Jahn. eneinnan of Transport Workerappealed To the lnWoikei.x help m Tight) 1 man) Hitlei %  ip ....-i. bell i la Oern u BO In France ifond, Se-relarv of the %  .11 fOI %  in .ui. siiir> rynimiml-lir vei m ISM %  of Argentine ,,., -• .creased from 12 to lg. —R.-aler. ere. he m was becor 'lerman oraanisation headquartern II< mg also claimed knowledge %  ( ; He sabotage acts pnmanU against InAir stallations of West Cerrn.in rrllat F"r nnd Dortmund in rke Ci a newsn:r .. • e^pi^nage the" Ruhr. Vunieh Tfnthenburr lor thei. task m W. buehl in Bavaria. Han%  entratlng* 1 %  %  flrel hig inter.dtional Tragt; L'I • of Ihe %  .'. eise>l lh. fai failed I -' bk r. havi %  —Kreler. %  %  """T^e United N I %  chief Dub l Bi i %  U I %  %  %  .. %  %  he nee -Prater Heuler %  % 



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PACK MX BARBADOS ADVOCATE H£NRY BY CARL ANDERSON HEALTH NOT JUST BAD LUCK! In .iblcs LJII he lorcseen and ptv enl ad when one i .oreanncd ..ill y nowledgc Wc know thai grazing Ofttlk ill pick up intestinal worms, which cauw anaemia, lost ft condition. and scouting These parasites tun IKcontrolled by routine dosing with 'Phenovis brand Phenothiazine. 'PHENOVIS* TADI MARK 8KAND PHENOTHIAZINE AW M.C. I. RODLCT TUESDAY, JULY 219S S A S Tlli *AKK or UM1IHOH0M in HI m : %  J : Jj II. lllrd h| SlT.ttl & SAMPSON LID. ', -.-'s,~ r e f e r WS-'*'SS2 {$$$ PHENOVIS BRAND PHENOTHIAZONE : 11 Thv most > i-iitiiit II inni tiitlvri Yt'l lHs* tn i-it-d. SOLE IMPORTERS and DISTRIBUTORS IN BARBADOS Mem A. S. BR.DEN & SONS (Barbados) LTD. • CONTAINS VITAMIN A & 0 IN A DELICIOUS FORM • INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS • ENSURES STRONG LIMBS AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN Haliborange The nice* way of taking HALIBUT LIVER OIL lldt by UlCN MINIUMS LTD.. 10*00 IROl'M) BLACK PEPPER! # Uailv Powdered Whole MUk J -\IIaona White Rullcit Oata J* Kraft PrrtMr.d Mitatard X Cbreae with Marugni Jelly X Flavouring i...-m <->. f HIII* CutUrd Powder \ 34c oi. X Chase .1 Saabor' Coflci tl-lb Tln>> 5 OuinH'i Cocktail N.II,.,.. rVanoU § ,V; CE & Co. Ltd S '-v.. :, ... %  <. w • p CLARKE'S "BLOOD MIXTURE" f < Cleanse the system from blood impurities ; many sufferers Iro.n rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago. "' ^I^neuritis, pimples, bolls, sores and y'S minor skin ailments, can derive great W£SS|ig| benefit from this well-known medicine (• LIQUID .r raai.fr loau Ypur Backache may b du. to sluggish Kidnoy Action T IFE IS NOT io apod when you *arc troubled with backache, rheumatic paint, •tiff, achina mutclea and fointt. lumbago or cccnmcn urinary disorder* doe to tluniih kidney i why pui i pui up with pain tnd djcomfon when you might get happy relief br taking Doan't Backache Kidney PtlU. They tumulave and I Line) %  and M help then to rid esceu uric acid and other impurtrica wtucn omerwiie might wllect in the ryttem and CRUK dim-en. P.-ii POU hayc helped rfirn—ai4i t Wc ibem balp you. HALF A CENTURY of tuuui n %  ifiii %  aflawiu dm to tnadtqujit kidney action, a Om proud record o/ Doan'i PilU. Otatrftd MI md tn ofail agfi iaj* and mommtnj rku (fftamt 'tie and unnarv uniiteMc u iknr frwwdr neighbour,. ^~ 8 "Ba.Juch Kidney P.1I, ^pouter you contrast I -•'. -n. : %  .. tenamw uu line Thar* a. —._ at %  —~—^. • • %  Ttraaa %  • Hllll I "Mil .tLoa i M tM k>* lUQUacl. %  fIMn.'. awVMi law tail ai ,. AS.ludt.tM •n>t-. M 1,1a. t „ • Quiaij •->ni (or ma.wnutr AMMWd l-tofl. lor ..ptn "}*•*"' EXPECTANT MOTHERS/ Maka baby a\ lajin.. a wuodcrftil bafa wfcan ,aal it If. ooomlc^ pod Klaj. aaato. i,„a„„„ „, u,, „,„„. ofMUIBM1 „ .„„.„,. M I '"f"..""? ""J. 1 "' 0 !" 1 "" " '" Hani l^l-n„ |, \Marine Engines FOIIT ROYAL 4.AHAI.E LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributor! Phone 4504 ^ SCOTT S EMULSION H/GH ENERGY FOOD TONIC



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TIT.SDAY Jll.Y SUNDAY ADVOCATE I'M.I sl.M S CLASSIFIED ADS. roH RKINT WB >•' who attended I UBS BETA rwntir Mr>rr< Mr their *rrr*>aih> %  ment Gntl' F*^JHia-beou Mps u SMITH .1 (return than*.. In all wM> funeral. ami •U en pie*, til lb* occe..n i>' Husband JOHN V. Fl'JCS foot Booth 1'nf -.rnuried. TWO t vail. 3 bedroom*, etc (an mom Available Au*ru*i atjitlMe* Gip. England— I COST OF LIVI\G INDEX W.LTest HAS LIMITATIONS f> From P-cr I need him lo give ihr cake oi weight—after .ll an I %  ill yeast—I cannot pretend In Carli.le By %  ST. *r*t, Menuata. ; .rtie nv Bt Hoaarene. Brh THnMhj A 1 L.iuytasan. M V IN MEMORIAM a HOP! *!> % %  fell a.leeu i Jr.il. on J..l> 2-Mh. l**Out ol a world of IBB Into a heaien >f <"•• % % %  Ood mix !'•>" • beaut: t Tor He alway* cftooae* the be* ItM BWM I "• l' ; -" •" %  '"'' '' "'' Will wither and decay. Put her memory-111 alway* Inner In our heart, from d> E k rr M M TmcmhrrM l>> ""' ""I" board Tertn* moderate walk to Club* or City Dial r-tii.. HOOM Lai*Arh Hratnald : WJIU.. AKItlVALS |gg Tanker Buflna. 1.SM ton. net Hrun, From S* Lucia .' Canadian Cruiaet. J.S35 ton CaM O'llara. from St Lucia | I %  „ Large furniabed rtoona laTHj water With ... ith Term* moderate Tm nun lo Club. CMS I'-l ***• I'lHIH SALES REAL ESTATE %  1 IN i.ovr. I HI n %  %  % %  To ttVe I -1 ,., IMl, I on SALE AUTOMOTIVE TRUCK I a, l condition APPIV Tudor Cv THFJISISI*-*. hU %  .i.hed la..1 Cutler, c* Mr Dial 84 IT > ; W In Shedioo' K. i H.-ed. I |„ JfNlCB ABTHtH HraM • HlU. St Joaeoh LANL. D4.u-blebu.ioiM an* Graeme Hall Terrace Dial __, WANTED •one who can I.L pfMI ..' i. Colin GortdJi < Garden. Acre 31 perche* ol land at Pilai lioad. ennet Churcn Tlabove parcel <>f land will be set for Kale by Public Competition at .r QftVce No 14 Jam*Street, on Friday afUi July 1IM ai 3Jg p.m. TIN above parcel of land t. Ihr proper.,1 Mi ".ron Callender. VEARWOOD A rMlVCt 5,.lir1U.ri 1 J 3i |M7 Morrl. lo aloon. ItMin III INI Morrl* %  all in Petfl condition Toed Ju.t complelelv M 'li ItBft Che\Tolel SrtUn i Rlhfer Bpoila *X>BT ROVAI. GAHAflE I .id Phone *• CAM Very fcw I til 1*T V(II l*M V fereai %  Far-rail H Tractor ai 12 % %  B H Apply i Ajhford FUnUlk-n. W T So—?n PIHI.ll MIIH IS £20 MONTHLY IILY •arnad al home In .pare Urn. X in .tamp* No experience* Suitable (or either .OH. 1 alao contnel you with Student. In Colnnlei and Dominion, for pen corErrloM m *tamp. Air Mail only lake fewa day* F Partlneton. Peoapect Houea. 31* winn lload Leigh Uonc E.u|Und HTM-JOn. MOTOI1 TKVCK Tort V-l Truck 1MI Kmrnrajp** I % % %  1 1 ftO—3n PABMMI MARINt EMJINr: "' TRrCK .ii-HMa Moni* t Excellent condition FORT GAItAGK LTD Phone 4504 VAN ew ELECmiCAL RBrniC.FHATlNC. UNIT by 3-lni-h Tuiri He(n*ci.tlnB unit wltn tubular ronden.errecc fieeili.K coll* for '.• eralion rapacity, all 041 Inff order Cenlral Fnt line, of 1 "o each n. PA" ,-.. -OPEHATIVft BANK U CARB1NOTON fWALY H n Alcui Baruier tilt ton. ••. Capt Perry, 'torn Ar-ha %  khaoaer Kmar.oel C Gordon. fO art r*pi Patrice, mm Cariacou. S rninli.in. HO ton* net. dpi Kelhv from Liverpxol fl S Tactician. I.ISS ton* net Car* Smart, from Trinidad oneMaiv M l* la. (• ton* -W. v.,,-.. p %  %  rKk* a %  Beh ( iiean 44 ion* net. Capt Kir* from m Vincent l>IPARTUPJ Schooner l.ady Noeleen. 41 tona nat Capi Noel, (or DeeqtoKa Schooner Wonderful CounarlW-r. 3 tona net Capt Alexander, for tt N.hOoner France* W *mllh 74 to'i r*"f*ieiamvuui by ine S S CoKirdian' wera -from Uierpn.il fa J rna*-ai A A FrWfman IViitr. arrKIIUI b) tke Mol" Veaarl 'Canadian Cruietr ware mm Dom.ni. a M-tilda WHI.am Sea well AKHIVALS Bv B 1 A I. (,.., rhlNIDAD \l.. | i> IV>nnrll. J.wrl Adamira. Nur.. htohomed BMM .r. %  .. %  Ctark* CPaaBInt Mileml Jennifer ftlddall. NclljSki" iier Itilllip dktntiei lli-nvillr ftpo.ii--: Kyman fapeyer. Frank N..thnarl. CU-d. Oajktr) OaMfeM DfH '"* '• Mr* BaU. Miiio .they weigh tto* lotJVM of bresd to hich intormAtionisavAil-i'U' land -ul how much the consumer A famiU bud* | i'ying by weight. 1" .it by asking householders i but countries local agents collect enjoy watching him 1 am [ilen.eJ. to record on a lorm : %  : ^ome placet where lo *ay that our bowling today disease of f.toii) the ffUamtw-. if the trH > price or an article H Ms, (alter, although frOBB UaM vlaeveral artscles bought b) them thl Wg t] m aimum price U taken UBM ihe men in the Held appeared lanil the cost. 1 Investigators advise hew •rs OR housewives how t<. etMB>> plete the forms. A large number of budgets .ire collected showing the Income and CXpendiliin ol IJ.II i.innl. for aeveTrfl weeks epre.id period of twelve months \... AI.: in The buildiim I ,„.i i.,,,.' .,( -i. nrellrnl one loi The build ins rary eonventoit llr.Kl...L.*r n* Public Am July al 1 P m ii'drr.trmd Hoi tkrnJan "^ ,|1 Tiiunday Itlh r o(lca> of the m further parft NICIIOI.LB a CO ill, 1*3 Roebuck street Telephone No *3S •I 7 .d-an skjgasn •r and with ArPIICATIOSS i.i-iInvilnl foe ap nointmenl* to tht reteareh *taff of thi •bovF Iiiatitulr from pee-onwith I lr*l Q ..llllciilii.ii in economic! %  inlidle*. aoelolosv or other allied *ociKleere. and with mmr rperinu-e H i, lonrrh In ve.t I sal Ion. may nerd lo r undertaken in any port of Ihr BrlVih Ap_wlr.tn.enla will be made a ;-'int in the aralr C4O0 — £500 or tnDO %  -£ % %  >. orrji to qualification* and perlen*v Ona I I will be on the Kale £SO0 SJ nor.. There will be chlldreei .Mloaame "f £9* pa for each child tip to a minimum of IM fiupero.niiii'.i..ii i.nrtrr P S U Appotnlmenta will normally be lor three yrat. In the nr*t iruHance Ftae panage* are provided Applicationi*l cople*i givinn nime-f Ihree loferer* and full particular* ?t dualltVationi and eupmrner -hould be wm a* enrtv aa potalblr lo the Ml ice tor. Institute of ftnclal and EconMrlB Rraearch. Unlvantly Collear ol ike Wet* Indie*. Mali. Jamaica. |1 W I OR The Secretary. imertV.nct.ll.Council for Hlajier Education IT. Hie Cotonia*. I Gordon Souare. Lnttdon, W C.l Further particular* r... aim be obtained (l PHOFFRTY-Tna. e*irable prop rt e.lle.1 Boar Hill' t %  BfttaM VllUgr II comlal* of a rubatanlially mull two %  tore* %  tona hou*e which ha. front and |..„ l. ver-imLih. dlawlnl M m"M room., threa badrooma. tfudy. walrrloild .ind hower-lrtilh. klt.iien and rlmrlclty throusho.it. One Quarter .1 with orchard General •bu [nase* tha door Price which U. e.lremrlv low la only reward Powell Fi... Pt'EBTO RICO Odeirn ailtert* F-.m CARACAS Erie onbmwi. Call KmberwMi. 1> %  lirl.mil Ji-iiiiltVt Inland. Ilr0i* PoUnyl, Alilla Dolanyi. *. OeraUl PuNirr. Jo*e AUntO. Dolor*. Alamo %  \... 'rt. Uariela M -i.tr.. 1 garba llnrc.ii Miguel. Ayel Bttolckr. UnrWUi Molker. Anthony ftchia. %  ISM gsksas, Hendryhu. Schra*. Ft.ya Mm, JrjliKPAHTt'HFS R) B W 1 A L For TRINIDAD Marilyn Netto. Mr*. Hrtto. Jol Woodm Deanr. Mar, Crait. U"' Van den Branden. Car mane ita Van d Uranden. B'alirr Hudwn. ra'argurr Lydrr. Shirley Marque'. gWf I in drn. David Western. Maijort* I lead It SiMarlri ll.Hirmai n \i. HIM In LIVESTOCK MAM" AND FOAl.-fhe Mare "Dasmar". bv i>Tt II B Mar* by "Bui %  B.-,ltlefronf IV .nith* old al loo Mare haa again been covered by naltli frontttil. *ea*on. I* vrrv qurft. r well euitrd to plantation •— £Mo J R UriM cb; Pater Phone Sl-SD 1 If bred Coll by ,-orth. Si I 1 W—3" ml hSg It.-. rally Collage of tha NOTICE THE MAYFAIR OUT SHOP SB ce* a new ahipment of Dorothv i Beauty Preparation may we help J chooe your retiulremmU POULTRY POULTRY Pure Itred l^rrad mouth Rc-' don, Cup Win lion Strain Cockerel. 45 00 • Pullets 3', month, old M 00 each. MOO r-rh J II *<"*"'+'*! 81. retw Thone !- 33 T.W MECHANICAL TYI'FWIIlimS Typewr %  Phone 4tti MISCEU ANEOUS OFFICIAL NCTICE MUM. [Qullabr! Jurlwlicliom tilL 1IUAN JOHNSON %  LOST A IOIMI LOST WrXPBTAKK TICKHT NOTICE %  wrbada THB ABBlBTAhrr COUBT OF API'KAI. Re Workmen'a Compenulion Art. 1*41 Notice t hereby given that U"""' Grean. o( Bel Air. Rt oaorse. — ployed a* a labourer at latlon. wa. injured neFrrila*. J Swrenry. Palrl.ia Sweeney. BMIIK R.-oT-lalh. Patrick Anton Edwar.i Croda. Julian Mllrhell. Krllv Pain.' Yvonne Pert in. Cxaiina lalhuiiln Nointa Finning. Olate Virra. Ri Vlera. Kenneth nampaan. Ateph.i Sampann. Dorothy Cole. Jama Cole For GUADELOUPE: Angela Sarhl*. Agne. Barkis, Bo marte f-rkK. J.neltr fta.ki.. Ilugrtn Sarkl. For ANTIGUA Joan Lake. Crcrtl* F-rr.u For AT I.VC1A: Jame. Ilumfrey. Anthonv Mllchrll In Touch With Barbados CoasUl Station to lack that extra verv.mil —arj to get to i*ie ball passuir. a few yards to the rlgp Coddard tried even more lli.u. usual to upaet his opponents b) varying his attdck and I .tent he succeeded True, the seam bowlers had three new ball> to try their lingers on. and did not succeed, but they hard. The fact that they reaped nothing is Just that today was not their day. V.iu-iiiine. rWmadhin and Goddard himself pegged away untiringly and shared the BrfMkttg %  they deserved to do. One* again 1 have to bring int. the report sn excerpt hrufB UM Knglish press Jack Kidne. .m. Jonii Goddard both expresM'd m dignalion to me this morning whati I siHight their coiiIlrmrtti.in ,-t story appearing in a Sundn> Mm paper. Challenge—Fishy This slory glgjgfwd thai challenge hwd been -nil u Australia on behalf o( the We Indies by Mr Kidney The gtorj sounded very fishy to me 1 know as the writer must have kim-i that such a challenge would huvc to come from the West Indian < ticket Board of OOBtrol and would have to be submitted through the Imperial Cricket Conference. This was the slory: Apparent I > the West Indies cricketers, cocka-hoop over their MM lessons to Kngland, yesterday sen' %  fSMBl t.i Australia. We. the raport .nd. will piny you anywtn-tr untune Mr. Kidney, the We.! |n<: %  manager, told me (write* Alat Fairfax) that he bad challenge through Walter Rot tlie Aiitnilians' rt'presenlitiM i, England* Obviously if this storv weic IrW Mi Kidney would ban utiiiK "'tni vires I rntfrtad to htr to gel it loiulmied and asked Johi. Goddard lo come along to Itw interview. Kidney's explanation .simple and reliaTjle. The True Slory I was, he said, at tinlunch table with K. W V. Itoblns. U HUigllsh amateur who represents Australia at the Impeiial Cricket Conference. "I think you fellows should tak i the Australians now. Mi Robuis said. Kidney's rapt) % %  Well, Hobby, we haven't had ai nvtUtlon." Robins then said th.it he was it thai moment writing a two nag* I'llri to Bmdiiia/I, and ih.it b< wns going to add a footnote to the •tTect lhat he felt that it would g> -m oage k The result, show the pnportli pendlture spent OH tie s.-verai items of footi. ilotinng. tael and light, rent and Foundation II i in it.i MprOfiOl ions thai eights are allotted lo the v rajral ems In the gn>u|-s which 1 have mentioned W, alst. kn.. their erage prices per It uitity during the base year, so we have ,i Irainevurk on wbjcfa m ost o( living index The pr||. In the base year 100. it i aaaanttal thai ild %  %  %  the u I control is not 'i .. : %  .ible in the black market such inalhod will obviously not show p true price trend. When the new prices have been .ollcctcd the percentage iucrcase | or rjtrraatn* in the price o( each tabulated u> item IN calculated. Each pi*egfr> f the tut.d ;.,,;,. figure n then multiplied by the t eight or factor belonging to the item, and the product* are added toKetht-r ran divided by the Wtm Pi Uif weights-often IM It* riot—and this gives us the BCraa I I decrease for the month The pereenlage In crease or decrease Is added to or .• i (mm 100 as the case may be to give us the index liguic The followiim month, prices are %  jaBjun QOlaSCtad iinrt the peicviit.i^ w fjMnaaai on the pne In tba baaa %  •-.r in ealeujatad The process of multiplving by the weights and finding ihe Index tlgure is then repeated. The index number of any item ,n be found by dividing %  by the price in the U* fl ultiplying by 100. Grouping Usually separate index numbers ate calculated for each group of items, food, clothing, luel and light, rent; and miscellaneous Group percentages are multiplied by group weixhts. 0M total is divided by the sum of the group weights and the paroan t BiM ln(tease or decrtaose la added to or rfubtractasl from 100 to give us the composite Index figure This hat wc call the coat of living index. Special leehniiiuej are used to :hange the base and recompute an ndex. and sometimes for splicing two aeries not on the same base Thla. however, is subject to error. Shortages and dcvaUi.i' .jrroncy affect the interpretation tif cost of living indices, ami thenseveral pitfalls in regard to price llgures lo which I have not referred Tor example, the relationship between a rise in prices and a (all In purchasing power. or the choice of the right method f taking an average Stalistics shed light in dark as* we must understand what they mean and appreciate then liniitali. n 1,. %  %  more a* time ptaat Hire The tendency i, (or such rdas number* to oveislate the irua Ineraasa in tba coat or living To .i-.eil.nn luiw lhi.ntu.it consumption is chatiguiK and to i. in ita when .i hill at ala mall .impie survayi ara adt I'hete ru.iy be Mib>titutiou.. when Imuar Kam auiy bo p nore cheaply or when t!.. lobla In some | of living . '. %  :.!! consumption Qg oi m> lenditnre on the pginctnal fo.nl tiifT.iiul otli.. SHIPPING NOTICES .iisruu, Alt UNO LIN1 *D S S -IHlhT -.4.. Cable and Wlrelr*. hat thrv can now lie following .hip. t UDE ETHgLlNB ST. CLAIH BU III. Drfeadaal %  .. uni TYBRS AND nATTF-HIF-S Sir %  of an Order action inada day of June, I9M, I Slve nonce io WBMI* having any e.tatc. IBM or terettin or any Ben o. incumbranee _. bHUM ALL that cerUin ptrea er lsal .1 land (o.merly part ot the land"i of Haas'" "ll I'lantatlonl .ituate at ItaSH.<| 11*11. Upper Cutting. "J "*• 1 Pf r ~ 0t Saint Michael and l.laml alorewld eoiitainms by admeasurement one wm elahl and one half perche. ^.^*^ l, gg nr lea* 'Of which area rlSht and one half nriiiir. are In a portion ot a road in rnmmoti l.irmlng two of the boundaries 04 the va.d parcel ol la.idl bulllns .and bounding on land, now i ml on two -id** t i hereinbefore i public road cl . Ptan. ibbing and I c*^ !" Quarry when a rftlloii of Ihe .Ida ot Uie quarry broke away and (ell on him and he died < a remit of the tnjurie. .u.tained and that ComprniaUon ha* been paid Into Court. All dapandenta and prr*on concr.Tcl wnh the Bbova-named deeeaaed are hereinrequired 10 appear In Uir A.'Ulant Ccurl of Appeal on Wnlne. AaIhe 9th day of AugUlt. 1BW. at 10 D.itrd ihn 30th day of JulT. I"*" I V GILKF.S. Ag Oer* Aaalatant Cotm nf Appeal li> liraitajpi Ihrlr Baf4xi s".""c'arTadUn Challenc" Bach* .OSfO, Battle Mountain. Earn Charlotte rnsuland. Stonv Point. Maria de Lai unaga Ruflna. Alcoa Pennant, lawd I'rrurch. SMo Amatrrdam. Radeni J'an %  Lher. Akoa Partna*. Athrnlc A Baaa, Bavkss. Bf at U. Powder Biver. s Pauto. 0 ktatee. Ile of Be. BBM> A valla. Agalhl. Aundale. Dageid k Canadian liter Imperial Toronto. Giovanni endol* S VuKrano. 1-dv llodnt-. rn^rrrd. Fiance.. Baa*. Sii...alle.. Fbrl de Prance, Monle Allube. i aMBB Mkl Imperial Wuabec MAIL NOTICE i pet % %  I 'Devon A4*t*M *M M. gffSt hall I halt IUIIUDI SepteM'tiei .1 Trlaiaad >. I.-I* i tros %  mpU. in.umii innof ,-nt at Trinidad ulana. Wlnd-a.iT.l Panel Hall al II inooni P Mall al 1 p n Ordinary Mail i on ihe **th July. ISM. tNGUtiffS CASUALTIES LONTX>N, Ji J. Ednch England i dlesex cricketer, who i. u plaster jacket following injury. Is receiving treatir n orthopaedic surgeon in Middlesex is leaving him out their team selections until he tit lo play. Len Hutton in.I Dag Compton. other Eniilaiul tnvalh ore also having treatment for the %  ibnanla, Hutton is due to play In the Gentlemen vs. Players gam starting on Wednesday at l-ord' and Compton is expected to mak his return to first class cricket i the SurreyMiddlesex match net Saturday. —Motor. Calculation ... •'•• %  how .i t Uving index rjguri veiv iiionth You will ii "lit ippraelato that to i'.'1 an uidai i.ii evarj -mule item conaumad B %  year, and In calciil.ite iifnithl; llgures on Mich .i .i.t.ule | bag AOIIIII IKa large task. Therefoie. the rnoal import ant i ttiken I'eni .lie .n D • I e:i ., i. %  ; %  :. % %  i -.1 .live..I ., ^l up Of item. Ihe prkg oi .'II Of wiiuii BJD he \j.e. t.,i lo show the same %  rktont ) All the Hems in the base index lion) i l I'.HI'I brand, typa ••"<' Quantity niUgt be llxed. and known to the prtea eoliei tot rim shoiiU be I..hen from the same icpiesent.itivc rhops or outleLs at about time every month. If the specillc I.land m qiialily ,1 .,i1,ele Ls not oht.iifl.ihle and %  otna oilier brao litute.1. comparison ha llilde With the pine ,.f the sub%  %  /. ii the previous month In omn place irili It -I" m dQ I by price collectors; In Il.O hill. Carao acrrpted on lading with t.*n-i.,i a*. lUihwdo.. Ilrltiu* in.l l.rewanl laland* t.i f.ilk.r pa'Ucalar* apply.FI-IINOM, wrniY a co. LTD Agenka. Trinidad DA COStTA A CO. LTD Agent.. Barbada The at.V. "C largo and Pa.engrr l-.r IXimiril .a. Antigua. MnnU-rrat. St. KltHNrvi-. sathn* Ptiday. MUt JutFW.I Hcbtmner OBTUTS Aaaeetoteon Ine Csatalgnee. Itial 4*47 V Jtax. Ianof lanfleld PERKONAL GAMDINB I do not hold rr>or.TON BaOnm Spring Qardrn VllU.ge. Bt. I-.c> T5tt-an Hie road jd leadlied Mapp HHI „. !" n iay bolt and •nd k) bring before me an aceo unl tsl ilr Mid claims with iheir wiine**e. ^tmrnt. and v.inhri. to be r.aminad me t*n any Tueaday. or Friday t „„ tnc hour* of 13 .noon, and lock in tha artemoon. at UtaJ-** 8 __ r clrrk o( the AaaUtant Courl of Ap%  1 .it the Court Houar. Bndaeiown. ne'e the th nav ol Auimi. IK*, in order .. _.rf. ftalBM may be ranked accord ,nd priority lliereof LTetarh pc-na ' ..let! Horn the beneM of the .aid Dcciea. and be drprlved of all claim on _jjiii-t tti* *aid iin'pcrt)' CU.ZnUlirT sBo ne^Uned thai thay mmt atl.n.1 the aaid Court on W g, the 30th day of Auro.t, HIM. n-ctocfc am. -hen ihrlr aald cUln "cuen'onde. m, hvd trda llth d.y of Junr. HBO. v anjaBi AN Clerk ol 4he Ant. Couit of Appeal GOVERNMENT NOTICES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, ST. VINCENT Vacancy for Binder Applications are Invited for the peat of Binder in the Government Printing OfTrcc St. Vincent Tho post, which is pensionable, carries salary In the stale *8G X $24—*S76 per annum A temporary cost of living bonus at the rale of •109 20 per annum at $480 rising by I.B0 for every S24 to 116.40 per annum at 576 is also payable, and there are facilities for .vf Urn* work. Salary at a higher point than $4Bo will be granted, necessary to a qualified candidate Applicants must possess a full knowledge of binding and and must produce particulars lo that effect. Applications should be addressed to the Government l*nnter Government Printing Office. St. Vincent, and should reach him t later than the 31it July. 1950. ruling will County Cricket Results LONDON, July 24 Cricket results: At Oval V..ikahtre beat Surrey by ". wickets Surrey 127 MT (Wardle 6 for 2ft). Yorkshire 149 (Laker S for 44) and secondly for 3. At Folkestone. Kent btal LolC tershire by five wicket*. Late hire 153 (Martin 7 for 53) I :>ndly 102 (Wright 6 for Martin 3 for 30). Kent 181. (II 54, Parker 3 for 3b> and seron 72 for & (Wooller 4 for 34). _ReuUr CONCERT (Under the Distinguished Patronage of His Excellency the Governor Mr. A. W. L. Savage, C M.G and Mrs. Savage) Barbados Youth Movement No in? it the poUce are becoming and coming forward lo do iheir pan. Ihii M now your opportunity lo help 'he Barbado* Votrth Movement n.th 14 year, of continued %  uecea* lo It* credit Acllvnieinclude Religion* and general knowledge. Unity and Culniie. Motto Lord i. Rev L BBUCB-CIAHKr Founder. Rev J B GRANT. Chaplain Mr* OI.GA BROWnF... Gen, feety OFFICIAL SALE ,AB |N A TIia ASSISTANT COtBT OF ArriAL .rumhle Juriadlcltoni PFTIR NIOEL HUAN JOHNBON ,.,.,.„. MAtDE irrHgLIrnt BT. C1-A1B nUTCMEn OefraSael NOTICE i. hereto given mat br *J !" # of in Order of Ihe AaaliUnt court ol Ai.rv.il dated Ute lath day of J|j" there will be wt up (or tak> lo uie higheat btddar al the GnVe o( Ihe ClerS ol Ihe Ami.tant Court of Appeal Court Ilouae, Brtdgrto; •i %  i ef Hai %  'l.i LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Tha application of ANTTA lOWE. holder of Uquor Uernae No 1400 1S*0. In reepeet of premlaea via:— A board and *hlnle hop attached r<*ldcncr •ituated al Clntver* Hit), r.. Jr-**ph. for permlaalon to uar *iild Liounr I „.!.. ..i ihe following premiw* ** %  A board and ahlnsle ahop atlached to reaklrnce. Ronwrll. *11 Jca*. i D-.rd thl* Slat day of JdV IBM TV I M nWAHi*. Eaq Police Maglrlrate. Dirt %  r fMSTHl A4J1VD OrSSaWF. Appliranl X n -ThH application wlU be con%  loered at a Llcen.ing Court u> be h*fc at Police Court DM tit AugUlt 1B60 Pol.ce acre eight and pel we Jr u ,. Jd 1 oclock gftemoon on Friday, the HI day of Bep. lembcr ISM ALL that f % %  %  rj | Hall Planlai Mich**) and laland be admeaaiirrment on one half perche. be — or" 1 -ol which are. eight and on* half perche. are In a portion of rnad in common (ormlnd tWS of the urdarie. nf Ihe uld parrel ol land) MkM and bounling on land, now or te ol J Wharton. on land* now or late ..( V Banlleld and on two %  road in common hereinbefore leading to Ihe public road called Mapp Hill or however elw Ovr **me may butt and bound. And %  not Ihen *ntd the aald property •rttl i* %  'up lor ule on every succeeding Fndav between the *am* hour. iir.Hl tr> .am* 1* told (or a stint not lea* than £ Da.ed %  hta 14th daj %*%££ %  Ag Clerk ol the Aaat. Court at VACANCIES FOR TWO ASSISTANT AOSMtOnTSAI. 8UPEEINTENDEHTB, DEPARTMENT OP AORIOULTORE BRITISH GUIANA AppUcaUon. are tavltl I two v.can. poal. cl AaaWtnl Aricullu.al SupcrlnlpndrnU In llio Dapartmml <* Arlrullurp, Br.Uah Guiona. rjrlicular!. of ihe post ar as under:— Salary £500 por annum t.in to r5 per annum by annual increments ol £23. Qi...'.iili .i. -ns ana Experience Applicant must hold either— (I) a dejree or diploma In Ajriculture. and have aome experience In agricultural extension or farm management, or (,i) the Aasoclatoh.p of the Imperial College ot Tropical Agriculture or a degree or d,i .ma In Agriculture with po* graduate training at an Agricultural College Allowancai Travelling and subsistence allowances will be paid In accordance ith the Government Regulations In force. Appointment to tt po** MB bt on twelve months probation When conflrmed In the appointment the omcera will be placed on the pensionable establishment, and wl be liable lo contribute to.the Brit„h Guiana Widow, and Orphan. Pund at the rate of 5% of Uie maximum salary of the port by monthly deduction, from aalarj.. 2 The successful candidates will be engaged In the extension service of the Department of Agriculture or on projects operated by 2 Application, giving full name, age and details of qualifications and experience, accompanied by two recent testimonials, .hould be addressed lo the Director of Agriculture. Department of Agriculture Georgetown. British Guiana, marked ASSISTANT AGRICULTURAL SUPr.rllNTENDENT" and should reach him not later Hum Jin Zulu. 1S0. ._. ,. 4. Applicants already employed in a Department of Agriullure in the Writ Indies, should submit their applications through the normal official channels. by the It Mill UMII Mill'. M SOCIETY HiMlii.KMII!, HAIL On Thuraday, ::u. July ltM .ii %  ;< %  i> "i Guest Artists Miss JEAN LAWSON, Lit A M (llnnisl) Mr P. A. K. TUCKKK. (Karitone) Tickets may be obtained al the Adv. %  i. Stationer.. ; or from Members of the ,. society at Ihe followtn* ; Brioaa.— KKHERVKD II.M > iMtiMiiuii :: 6e. 36< Copkks of the I > rograrnni'' and Book of words may be obtained from the Advocate Stationery. MICK :: gd. each '.VAV/r*/V/,V,V,V,V.V. .p.7.50—tnS(W IIRLEANI lllrln atvl* A*r. M.O. B'tlea UAToa nANoaa Md'A KUAMBB Mi'i < IIUNNEB inn July Mth July -tn Aug.i.1 JMh July llth Aug. I3i i>l AiigW.l MSN IOBB •' %  Uir aalla B.. FBI %  a THIILWnVFJ.iltDIl.t July llth Augu-I iiii juir %  i.t Augu.i I 4.VADIAN sraVM'F %  .iit THRUINU -ii, aVtJIa Artreaa Naat* Ol Ship S -All "A |-i>lNTll MA "AIX'OA roLABIB" M......I -al—a July 31.t Joir Win ll.rl.a4*. Aug Ith AUd ITtB Aug 4th Aug TU. Miirisuisii Afrtraa SH AletllA PIIARIMWA Boi Montreal and Oneber th..r Vasaafj ba.r urn t.g %  ataaaaga* .... %  a.agallaa Apply UA COHTA A CO LTD. Can*. ii.iiUrT THOM UK New York and G %  K e,vi,. 7$& Afat Mat y/rr me AA?*** V mote t/e/f'c/ouf lAo/ne-fa/btc/ 6c/ns ^ 9 When you hake al tMittir. al*.... I ur Plritrhmann'a Kaat If King Dry Yratt — I tie ii.i.t-1 II lai.kilitc liv i.vrr. I hut guc* ../u i|. m haking rraaitt. fgu Wl. . Olla|T. This an.ii.nig. nr* gr.mile .'.... full %  fjtngtfa (>" arBBsaoa iroof pontj htU Crl M-i.ehin-nii'. P-tl RsiaBf l>fy Hara'a aB yadai 1. ju.t .r-inklr into lukewarm wnter 1 Lei *taml in aUB* %  %  naa .to Wl.'i.tl.ia.Jve.l. ood ran .use gfMgtfj on* .ufn|.m*rd yea.t if Stays fash wrthout refrigeration TIIF HAM.llsr lllivt. HI HAVE SKIN K>H A TIME III It I til. IT METAL POLISH WT TRY A TIN TOIIAY THF. fEVrRAI. EMPOHII-.M (CENTKAf. lOI'VDHV LTD. I'roprktorsi Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets Added energy for the entire family with... Kellogg's CORN FLAKES SCRVI KILLOGO'I CORN FLAKIS -tssty IMU M.k*. . com .. hM breeblast, teppn %  -< lui-t." wn i brn.i* . with on* oeckaae ol thu delicioei <.*.l you pro-.d* in* gBtek %  % %  wrtK a lood rlah In ra>-..di*al .. ... ro* tars i %  %  "• asd % % % % % % %  '*.-. iK.y'ie in.td la a !•ircondi, hora til* packaea into Ihd bowl bo-Hut ol Kellon't Cain rUkat mlh raillt or eam .nd itrfar 10 lathi it "tore noumlv a| ihsa a* oft 4nd cottt Itw 1Mb, 4l -.. ids* l-liy dip .o-m gtd i J .* lore Ikon For safe ever^wKere



PAGE 1

PACE FOIR BARBADOS AllVOCATK. Tl'ESDAV II IV IS, i,, BARBADOS & ADVOCATE fer.1 -^Tif. .1 m>l*4 br l*. *iT.r.u C... LM %  •••. St., BrMlaMOB. Tuesday. July 25. 19.'i0 Welfare THE WORK and progress for the year 1M9.50 of the Barbados Women's Social Welfare League and its Affiliated Societies has been recorded in an interesting report just published. In a community where there are few really rich people and where work of a social nature is still in its infancy the report shows that there are still people who, with their daily round to pursue and in many instances .struggling themselves to earn a livelihood, find time to minister to the needs of their fellows. One general criticism which has nut been without foundation is that organised charity in Barbados would be of more value to community life than the promiscuous help doled out and of which many have taken advantage The Report under review shows that charily is becoming more organised and is having good results. The progress of this work can be estimated from actual investigation. The League of which the llun. Mrs. Hanschell is President has been able to enlist the support of many other organisations throughout the island and in this way has given an island wide interest to the work. Branches in St. Peter and St. Philip have published reports showing excellent work. The Twentieth Annual Report of the Family Welfare Society with Mrs. llanschell as President and MLSS Sybil Chandler as Honorary Secretary includes in its Council people from almost every walk ol life and the subscribers' list includes individuals and institutions of varied interests. Subscriptions and donations amounted to $4,459 and disbursements were $4,088. Family circles, and individuals have benefited from this and the Order of St. John Eye Fund shows an excellent record of work. Pupils of Secondary Schools in need of assistance have been helped by the Bridgetown Players through this Society. The work of the Civic Circle which has overcome many obstacles has now extended to Seawell Airport and although the work hero has been suspended until the alterations there are complete, it is clear that Miss Barbara Young and her supporters art* prepared to spread the gospel of beauty and pleasant surroundings to the country districts. The Christ Church Baby Welfare League, the Children's Goodwill League, the Baby Welfare League, (monument to the late Mrs. Florence Brown), the Royal and Merchant Navy Welfare League, the Barbados Registered Nurses' Association, the Girls' Friendly Society, the Girls' Industrial Union and the St. Philip Welfare Centre, all find place under the aegis of the bigger association. It is indeed good fortune for the League that Mrs. Savage has consented to become Patroness and that the Central Council still consists of a collection of ladies drawn from varied strata of society. The straightforward and earnest approach of the Patroness to problems and her engaging manner should win support for the work which will surely benefit not only those dependent upon it but those who have been called upon to make it their share of public contribution. But if the work of the Family Welfare Society supplies without the fanfare of publicity, a much needed job of work, that of the Nurses' Association is extremely interesting and on its record invites public support of every kind. The total membership is 77 and during the year the Puvate Nurses' Co-operation was able to help the General Hospital during the shortage in it staff and the District Nursing Service gave treatment and advice to 16,43;) people. It now plans an island-wide Visiting Nursing Scheme Including midwifery; and this is indeed a laudable endeavour. The Pentagon Snaps Out Of It EVERY 5 MINUTES THl PENTAGON—Mffpatt buitdi u in ihi .rld ivtrs Dcfenank they clean my shoe: ihc> shave me. You don't have to go ouibecause they feed you here the luncheon lawn la UM centre i* crowded ever\ day. You don'! have to go shopping because the shops are all here, and they'll deliver to Room 3C421 ml my toothpaste But they won't let me have a drink." Jtf\ Hark Tonight then U scarcely a person in I he Pentagon's 4.000 rooms who is not doing something thai will have a direct bearing on the war In Korea or the events that will follow it One reason for this new urgency Is that General "Lightning Joe" I .aw ton Collins is back from Japan. And most people in the Pentagon move faster when "Lightning Joe" ia around Collins has not brought any pesaimism back with hint. Nor have the men hinnd General of the Air Force Hoyt Vandenber* brought back with them. Whai they h%  <-•' brought back Is a furious flrc.iting insistence that everyone sh. II work. As soon as Co 1 -ma sat down he sent .i flurry of "rders round the building. So did Vandenberg. They wanted :<> know the size of the reserves In their services They wanted r i-orta from technicians abou. the technical men they needed. %  lee tmmmmA Hy this afternoon Ihcy had ready the draft %  f a report they will send to Mr. Truman. On that report depends whether young men from New Mexico and North Dakota will be getting a summons into the army or navy or ulr force in the next couple of weeks. There is a huge green brown, Hj* iil III I -..HIS WASHINGTON, GENKHA1. Carl Spaolz, who (ommaiided United Slate, bombers against both Germany and Japan, bounced dowi. a corridor of the Pentagon and .rces. %  Ad white B) Ql K. ft the walls of tl • room new.papertnei call the Barometer Room." u :iy ..iid navy spokesmen ra daily to tell the world's journalist* how the war ia going— somctime-i up and sometimes down, Dg down day by This morning, when we went there, the main red arrow had driven through the little section of the "line of no retreat." The spokti-inaii drew another line acroas the middle of the map south of Tatjon and said* 'It is important, it we can, to hold along this main ridge Thli would give us a large compartment between Pusan and the main ndge for our beachhead. "We are gathering strength i* we go back They are getting weaker T) cir momentum i* %  lowing down MtMMl Up in the room next door to the chiefs of -latT you have only got to switch a handle and London. Paris. Tokyo or Berlin headquarter would bt on the wire. The conference phone will cut ny Cabinet Minister Bradley wants into the conversation. Light-hearted Jocularity, which characterised the days whjm it wa. thought the North Koreans were goin; to bo taken for an easy ride by bombing planes, ha. gone. There Is a new mood in the Pentagon tonight —L.E.S. We tail Hunting Guns In Tricky Waters Aw inn n si in I lie t-'.nst sn ilrht-s from li onlili il I.mils li> rrteu<. i. Hi i-s-joins u mu|f|{linit rhe-ck off juntflr ohorro... By I i-mik 0*i THE MAI-ACVA STRAIT. If, |' rall L <>.% %  'i l'li U Hainan manner. ighl aampans look like a "• % %  !" .. m .people i .iravan o( canicb on a desert open deck, or Ue on the deck itaelf understand certain imngs. liki' :he >iove in rile acrou The night ia clear, but the star. British abroad. And vert soon. item inonltely lar off. squatting on the deck by the hghl OIK OWN COIUSE is Mt Not" At two ajn. the engine-room ot a lamp Mr. Leung conjures bells awaken me. On the bridge forth from ha countrymen Identity OCR SHIP: HM. Frigate is Capuin fr.win. watching rants, snip", registration and tlshMount. Bay (Captain 1 H. Unwin. through binocular, two %  ghoating licence I'S.C) uke red sails swaying in the beam With armies. Jokes (still uninIII:. r-KISENT VOVAGEi A o! his MarchlUghU teUig-.bW). -no. salutes all round. .">10-imlc patrol of the coast freer. asVhaila*B" n.ttatBea -'" crrw • •' back Singapore to North Malaya. **""*" •*• %  %  ; laatataaaj ml nn TASK: To halt and seasreh ^Jto J!? ** "^I T **"* eeanUt, atom, our radar picks up ill ships within the three-mile *. —**" : .—~ — %  ****-*? %  *; a Urge aangkan. or motor-driven Halt, and see that 00 nan or gun 5^^*?*^J*1, *• **" "T boat, lying ir^hon. I r bomb la run ashore to Hat ~ " "~" •" By Xow lfc>t a drenching rmin forces m the jungle. ** * %  -. . .— a trtTawg ermd and a swelling see Since the tradition aM prnctare .. ^"T? 7 _" %  ., F. •> net e.y to come alongside • smuggling m these rang at at rZ . —I •**"* *""* onr laweat eLeat. or keen an touch < Id at CorrnraU-g, n najiiiiat ^TT, *" a J. .. -^ tnth aav aawatl there :cspectfjl study lata sa. eat satatjaw_ aa att. Agat Trt gto iaa gag to be-tyirat wret' Towtng the other seven gaga-?. %  % %  — **1 um -. w _. >ars:g=.T. too. For -tale pan. at a batarrtd aawantat era. %  ." **"-" %  !* ?'*', ~ ?** m her aaaatr, are far front antatcecorated wltk f a. r. ana, gm.il *"_' 'l l .i.L "**;***?'• ^_ a.-urr er %  -jed ^nrta>u 7***" t ,, i,~T — a t ia -rnnr ra rall y at Beanie How. with revolver at belt ****. ^"aaaaa arena tar 1 1 M ajmriari. yard -ra, -ii fi _jr "zrvszzrxsi JsrZtZz,^^ !" ^ gL'ICKLY we are alongside and ""JL^ J*??* £ **"* "*• the ntt cMckans. like a rainbow boarri the -flag.hip'of the samJ 1 ^* {if L'^ ck bc ? f, ?p ?* > *j? of msst in a cavern. And then l„an fleet The 'admiral" %  canty loincloth and : : p.. large ,i.'.'l : %  • '-'I m IsSSSsMl ronlcal hat, and smokes a cheroot. Search number two Tell both >ni* sat 1 ..t \. .1 %  it. Miiunt; n .a iivi %  rs\* > (he last two of which he politely w 11 hl1 *< murn h remove, as he produce, hu own When we draw .blank in and the ships' parpen. ^^ **** "> X ">* m *. All okay So Is the identity *** • ,nd P lck up *,,. P card ot every occupant of every Ch-nese steward, smiling Mr other sampan In his fleet Leung So the whaler is soon home. All rountl Aa many of our 100 men as can NOW Mr Leung is a mainland sleep in hammock.** 'lung on the Chinese, and ha into this amugglersscene th glides a long, low merchantman. and passe., slowly, silendy by. She %  %  Japanese." say* Lieut.-Commander Sangster. our frigates Itumber One. when we got back at last, having uk> tongkan friend in tow and Into Custody, to hand over to the police. "Bui she came so near ind seemed go inquisitive. I thought she must affinity whatbe a Russian.'—LJUL Never a Hull Mexieo iMiiiuie DANK CIIANDOS built himself a house In Ajljii-, Mexico. When the house was finished. Dune Cnandos was broke. So he wrote his beat-telling Village in the Sun", about Ajijic, and turned his house Into an hotel Amateur hotel-keeping' gave lum the maleruil as well as the i aed for another beat-teller Prom the uroroeds of this new Look—"HOrSE IN THE SUN" I Michael Joseph. 10s. d.)— he s lould be able to build an Ajijic holiday camp, for "House In the Sun" is one of the moat continoutly delightful books I have i-\er read. KxatHperuliiiU No doubt the hotel's guests ami M ivaiits were sometimes exasperating. The dieting professor had |o have his meals so precisely 10 tuna that Candelaria, the cook. had to sleep with a huge red alarm clock clutched to her boMsTB The Mexican family, however, Bta -t all times. They sat down at a.30 p m —all but one. who drifted in al 4.43 p.m., and could (nly eat tinned sardines. Book of the Day . by J.P.W. MalUlieu, M.P. When the hotel had stocked enough nardinos for a month tin' family thanked C'handot for their delightful stay, and said they were leaving in an hour. The old German engineer— "the Senoi of the Oven"—gave trouble, loo. He had to have I stove specially built on which he K.uld bake his own meAls. ms parrots bit children, and he at last married one of the maids. Whatever he did. he wrote note* nbout it to Chundos. But in Mexico you must lean to be surprised al nothing. You catch the bus for Guadalajara at 8.30 ii.m. The bus starts at 11.30 a.m. nnd goes instead to El Chante All the passengers for Gundalajara decide thai El Chnnte will do just as well, except one* whose mother h;is had a lit and needs attention. He will w.i.t for tomorrow's bus When Avellno offers to sell you seme land you Hud that the deeds .ii' in his daughter's name. He comes back next day with the deeds propeily signed, and later mentions casually that hi daughter has been dead three months "I wrote her name yesterday myself, with great care, in the presence of my friend. Don Pri.sctllano Pore?., who witnessed H," says Avelino. Authority is as inconsequent 'he dttnQ, The beat way of finding the black market is to .i"k a policeman Soldier* who came to arrest the local butcher search his house but do not luthcr to search thti outhouse, where they know he is hi.ling What business is it of • hi'iiii the man is not at home' On I ofc" IN'owlirre li.nn' Chandos begins his book with an Indian and his burro, "appearing out of nowhere and nnJahJni into nowhere, with lixed rules or directions, nothing beginning anywhere in particular or stopping anywhere in particuJ.ir, lost in the prodigious landscapes and the broken hills and the long lilac distances." That La Mexico; and that ii "House in the Sun." Read I these holidays. It will delight you. .—L.E.S By FRANK KMERY A U.S. AIR BA.SE IN KOREA. July. A NEW miracle happens every rive min utes at this muddy, dirty, flat place in Korea where Americans live in pup tents and American equipment forms a jungle of boxes, trucks, plankings and engines. For out of this chaos every five minutes a trim, neat mustang lighter rises and points its nose toward the enemy only 20 minutes away. How it happens is one of those miracles Americans use to win their wars. A week ago this was a wilderness where the Japs once had an airstrip. It was overgrown with brush and weeds. Now it is a bustling base run by dirty. tired men who don't get a chance to bathe, who don't eat anything but C rations, who sleep on muddy ground under pup tents, and who cling hopefully to a rumour that they may get cots before too long. The base is being built by an Air Force %  ngineering outfit from Okinawa with Korean labour doing the heavy work. For a time the field was frequently attacked at night by North Korean guerrillas. Finally the Americans decided that some of the Koreans who worked on the strip by day led the snipers in by night. Now all Koreans who work on the base in the daytime must sleep at the base at night. That is a condition of employment. Col. Robert W. Witty is commanding the base which looks like an unfathomable mess but which is accomplishing its job by putting aircraft into the sky. Witty was aboard a ship ready to sail for the United States June 25th when the Korean war broke out and the Far East Air Forces recalled him immediately to go to work in Korea. His job was to provide a base which will eliminate the long, gas-consuming haul for lighter planes operating from bases in Japan. The job is already done and now Witty is trying to make the base a cleaner and more efficient place. Rough Korean roads for miles around the base are clogged with all kinds of heavy equipment moving into the air base. Veterans say the base looks like Henderson Field on Guadalcanal. It is almost the same kind of operation except that Red guerrillas m the area are not so formidable as the Guadalcanal Japs were. Brig Gen, Crump Garvin. commanding the Pusan Base in South Korea, flew to the airfield Tuesday to co-ordinate the supply problem. Stepping from his airplane into a maze of equipment and sweating workmen, Garvin asked where he could get transportation quickly and who was the transportation officer. A GI answered : "Lieutenant Garvin. sir." So the General went looking for his son to arrange a ride. Everybody is busy on the base, but Capt Richard Ryan of Lincoln, Neb. is a strong candidate for the title of busiest of all. Ryan flies mustang combat missions. Between missions he helps to build the camp as a regular assignment and runs the jerrybuilt post exchange which doles out two cans of hot beer to each man at 5 o'clock every afternoon. Another base builder is Capt. Lee Kelly. Jr. of Holyoke, Colo, who evacuated from Seoul and still is mighty unhappy about $6,000 worth of clothing, furniture and other possessions he lost there. Kelly has had about enough war trouble in his family. In the Philippines, just after the Pacific War, he married the former Marian McCarthy of Los Angeles, who served 31 months at Santo Tomas as a prisoner Of the Japs. Mrs. Kelly was evacuated from Seoul where Kelly was a member of the Korean military advisory group. Kelly learned through Stars and Stripes that she has returned to the United Stales. Americans In Korea are hungry for the Stars and Stripes and any other news publications they can get their hands on. Cpl. William White of Bainbridge, G. who landed in Tokyo the day after the Korean War started, said : "I don't mind eating C rations all the time. But I'd sure like to get a newspaper that's newer than five or six days so I can find out what's going on in this Korean War." D.v.scorr TO-DATS SPECIALS a CO.. LTD. at the COLONNADE Uiuully Now c. c. Tins Challenge Peas 20 17 Highnioor eraaBTa Jrllv 67 M „ Pilchards H>: HAVt JI'ST RECKIVIU SPARE PARTS FOIt COLEMAN Products We will be P IP*SI to NfBttr -.our LAMM. .Ultt*LUM, STOVES and IRONS if >ou biing them to us. A Shipment of SNOWCEM In the following Colours : While, (.'ream. I'ink. Yrllow. and Trrrarutla WILKINSON & 1IAYNKS CO. LTD.—.SucrrsM,!-* lo C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. I'honr-. : 46S7. Uli. KM krtllll l< U.I \llKUIfl iht'SIMit-M.s far Vaur m m M | • tl> tltioti ,!,,,! Jack Straws— ^r^kT !" !" *' !" Bridal Caster Sugar—1 lb. pkc .32 Banquet Caster Sugar—I lb pkg 22 Ham Sausage—2 lb. tins ] 7a Table Butter—5 lb. tins. Salted Peanuts—per tin 38 Carrs Cumberland Cakes—per tin ... tM Australian Pears—per in. 37 Proper!* Universal Cream. Bluck, Tan—prr bo( 40 Oats |>rr 2 lbs Dutch Apple Snuce—per tin dilvan MUM r, Have u \^\\UmHAi SEX US FOR OL'K NKW RANGE OF: INTERNATIONAL (N0N CHALKING) QUALITY PAINT LACOMAT (flat Oil Paint) in these attractive shades of Pale Blue. Pink, Grey. Whit.-. Cream LAGOL1NE (Non Chalking) In Undctcoating. and Finish In Light Stone : Light UUIT : Teak Ivory : White : Grass Green : Mayfair Green ; Sea Green : Navy Green : French Grey : Lead Colour ALUMINIUM PRIMERS FOR HOOD YELLOW PRIMOCON (Primer tor Aluminium) CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER DANBOLINE (Anti-corrosive) in Red. (Jrev, liieen PROPELLOR Light Red for Shingles Da COSTA A to., Ltd. Agariils %  y^^^^'^^^^s'^^^^^^*'^^/'^'*^'^ f ^>>**'''****^^^'*'^^^^^^^^^£ wuiLAppaec.ATe T HESE *AJL MEATS Ol II III \lll lis HAY l.ifv iiy>< 11,( tm TrvTo the EdKor. tlie advocate SIR,—Please allow mo, through th? medium ot your 1 to call to the attention ot uV man and women of th. lalaad tbf deplorable condition of our trees I will manttoa .1 raw of then, which are a shocking sight: The Evergreen tn-o in Trafalgar Square, near the B Unas Shop, has been mutilated and slowly killed. The Tree Guard from around It was removed and the people have driven nails into It and cut • the bark for kindling. A box has been nailed to it and a barter's shop has been wilabllshed ai % %  ..11 the roots Two post?, btl to the Electric Company have been erected close to It so that the wires are entangled in It branches and the tree is trlmme.1 hking of this compan> whenever it chooses to do so. Next, please note the line vf Bvaijraaa trees planted h. m> Uncle. Mr. Sam Manning in Fairchlld s:i.t -t. Tiici,iron M\#U. one Idead, one is ilowlj .i>n.g, 1 1 <.itier live are verj sick trees. Soon we shall have no tree at all there. Nails are driven into these trees and wallets said buckets etc are liangtug nn ttam lloxes. quite large ones, ore place! among the bianche-. for safe Rod these tree* are used us urinals by the people who work in Kiiirchlld Street. Then the Evergreen tree in the rrungu in the Garrison facing Highway No. 7 and near to Dr. Two ports, one belonging to the Electric Company and one to the Gas Company have been WtCttd will say of us in the next twenty or thirty years, I shuddci Whit can we do to bring to men's minds the realisation of their dependence upon trees and the urgent Importance of uniting for their protection and rcplcmshmci.'. tor those that come after us? Thevery air we breathe U purified by trees. Trees enrich the soil and enable food to be grown Trees affect our water supply Trues arc God' Cathedral. NELL MANNING No. IS. Block A., Garrison. Bt. Michael 1? Wnmvn Anil Tape To the Editor, the Adfocr.fr SIR.—In the many talks about I, and its urgent nerd. ix there anyone who is pushing .ihead foi this to be made assjsH to the U.S.A. and countries tort our people prefer? I tutv seen .Burbadlans work ndmu.. .h In .America, and why c.in'l tic, lnhclped to get out to large countries: America will bcudlt by West Indian emigration and will sliengthen our fraternity with Uncle Sam. There should also be soioe distinction made for our jrotUil women who are sent to the U.K. 1 do not see how they ..in pej back the Government out of small wages After all, women first, and help should be given free to th; weaker sex. There Is great dlssat. B Hi a that there is so much rod tape t<< getting out to free countries. COUNTRYMAN. r*Ji*Vj To the Editor, the Advocate SIR.—We are deeply appreciative of the public spliitcdness displayed by the nirbados Electors harder yet. If we have a dollai Association for the present of one to upend our merchants should set of boxing gloves offered to thI: IAI RAISINS .. .18 per lb GINGER 21 per pkg FISH KIPPERS AMI KOVICS 111 bottle! FISH PASTES PISH St-PREME %  SARDINES HEAT SEPT. '. SALMON HAIilMK'K KIPPERS MACKEREL '•-,:;:;;;::;:::;::%: l.Ol.n HUMII :; III -rl win* rvrry lime : * liODDARDS V'-W*-*,V*',-,CV,***V'-*a.'-'-'.'•'.



PAGE 1

Mi-mv. jn.y 25. mn Philippines Have War Jitters Bv FR\NK KMFRY TOKYO riie progress of the Norn, • east communist invaders haslio.k,-,l Ih.Philippine who „. iu jitlers „• „tt in mo „ „,.; iii'.re seiious toda;' I have spent 13 months in Manila and al no Urn. waa tear of another world war more apparent than ,u,t before my rVient %  ; jrture for Tokyo. rr.any F.liplno. They say the current situation la doaely patt'-ined after the eltuation when Amenc.na onre thought Japan ,,-i ?;" £. * oo1 "" *a oltack th,Philippine, hn, „,, l^idplnoa worried about it neverFilipinos who remember the iall of Bataan feel they have food reason to be frightened about Red •ggresslon In view of their own ;.„? u"! Jf Communist fuerrlllas, '•' %  Hukbalahaps Also, more than ever before I' is feared that Chinese Communists have established a supply in..lo smuiojlo arms and ammunition to the Filipino rebels In addition, there are report %  Hoot Chinese Communist Leaders "om Peipin, who visit th" rilipmo Communist guerrillas to warta "*"*" '" iwrrllla FriifhteDini* Kuually frightening is the Red radio network which links the Ulipino and the Chinese Communists and permits those at l"eiping to net me pace lor Communist propaganda in the PhltlpThose Icings, backed by the %  %  •port of new, of the invasion 'intum Kxttnm aWvlce Premature Explosion Is '^H-Bomb's Greatest Danger Red Subs. Seen Off Newfoundland The i Red Officers In U.K. Camp HUi OTTAWA. July 24 ground vy believe* there is little Mon,,,., f ,_.,.. submarine or submarine* OVi sighted off Newfoundland'* grand rocket banks last week, come (rum Russia, ''wl "i base* in (he Philippine* instead Mmy '""" ol rancMtnttng on American l PWtT for Koruti II led other offlciali to hope mat more and more arm* and .iijiinuniti<.n will |>e sent to equip more Filipino soldiers. The Korean war has even 1,-d %  heman -in the street to talk about Ru^w bBlIdlng public air raid shelter^SM'II FRANK B. ALLEN) -„ , WASHINGTON •The Congressional Atomic Committee has reported that ihe greatest danger in hydrogen bomb construction lies in a possible premature explosion that would destroy both the Russia is believed to be the only temperature is adequately high • ,tnp "" country which could loglcalhave a submarine off the l > ; f '" "'' take-off a gyroacopk. ntir Coast of Canada. The *"*<"" levlce will turn n u. go .• %  here juiiU British. Danish and v drogen weapons are feasible K*vy has an aircraft earner. |w 0 "jOMnjally, By the tlm* u,e mai.. Norwegian manoeuvres were to Boforo it laaued the commute.' " three destroyers, and some '"*" "' lhp nilsaiUIt J( ,-nt a Ix'iyn tomorrow. report, which was carefully gone smaller vessels at Its disposal at 7n 0-pound rocket known %  tt.\! "They must bo sot rid of." the -Wr by Security officials ChairHalifax. Oflttorar*, riding on |b nose, British officer said-"If they man McMahon (D) Connecticut These may be sent to sea to Wl ,,jk "' n Th " v *UI MBW itigate. Moat have modern dow a l ** a"l "'<' WAc* Corporal OTTAWA. .1 %  i on Mondav mouriwM %  '• "1 ne %  ( hei n oat axillla I ..." MaKanii< %  • lalfc. :. u ihe ...iiin:.'The veteran statesn.au-bai-heh who was Prime Minister long. lhan any other man in any Brttts t ommniiwealth, died late Satui da) evening H I i.I.wlml. began in what tiw is Kitchener. OuUrlo, 7^ i -• %  n.vember. was tie Of Canada's growth %  atiitiihciod in the flr-t half of th lentury. Prime Minister St I^uren* thuaeii by Mr King as his su< Cttnr when he left pui-h, Ufa I iMi. said"death marks the en i of what historians will C aD th. t-.Ken/ie King Kra" Ur King died at hi; home at Kingsmere, a l.kesld ommunity in the Galiiicau Hilt "f Wutht. t>out 20 it.ih-. rm He %  -i,i been ill *i >een periods inc %  when he seemed to have 11-.. ri I much of his former vigour aid ho | to write Ml laM Thursday when he h.id -. of the pulmim.M di lurbanees wln.h had LsOUwred i. HI foi years. devel..pe.l .out. Df uniDm.i gnd %  "-'i > iK OA KlotMl juh M ' '""•' ; ,-:l.. to b. ". aUendlng pltate.an at that B> "in MSI coast pt.iv.nr "w-tgi.1 he w.Njld nillv -. he l. • I00D into the air on many tun.-s. hul at Saim ,i.i. tV optlmlsttc '' l condition wasrrttleal At 942 ring th> p m H)T osj Saloid.iv ha dlv>l mssile ii/wiihout ivgainnig ronat^oyansSl apltals % %  V2 TEST ON MONDA Y IIUHNK. British Zon.-. I Uu July 24. I.M en v.-ill rush mor'.ti'^pT'l'o AiwrTrail" da> '"'Hally visi't.-d the Bnllsn c r '> unl . tor much of Ulr'unccrlj luve a submarine ofl th licrt1 J "U' "uil MUa as lo avhethri *' TI„,.,.„ |:1 v „ k WM JssSg ' %  will in* 10 ton. -Hal ,, ,'~u'" '"'". a %  %  • %  "I' '"'• "'<"" inpraalmeUb m mlnut? t '","" "3 I Sfll be Sired teruSlfa IZ ,,„„,. '" w ln| !" I) atf. the uk,-,,il ,;.;..,. !. *<—* %  ""-' % % %  £ MW9MI check with London and Washinf,r ' "' sbe .,, disclosed neither the Hovjl fc leptured Qt ere found, ihey milel be li.ilfilllv iirt.-iled said Mr. Kin* was airing champion of Freed areXras v —(C.P.) Laler it 'Atoniic plants In the United anti-submarine equipment. In reported that the Slate, and Russia continue to tun. adultlon the M.C A.F has an anllirv MisMon tIr?C ari' '"" rom wU ? •>*• <* "tomi. sub squadron uase.1 In Nova Seoi— — .ish Rhine Army at Salrullen hid 22?* ""J 1 b f h ''"""• ">•> %  " The submarine story broke on I target, that might draw |, f. "he are.. s """ ,en 'i* 1 closer to the hydrogen bomb Saturday. The St John's Hunda. Communist atomic bombs Th ey „„e in two car. with th. c ""' r l • "* uteadlul Berald. Newtoundland w^ekl) Tried To Be.l Them British Zon. registration plate. VP n '" •"" %  heart question newspaper, said submarines beFilipino attention has been ami were In uniform rhf P* 40 *' ,h e overriding ques lieved lo have been Russian, hail rocussed more and more on the The senloi British orTlcer said ""! *• %  *. "nhns solved, leavebeen sighted off the Grand Bank.. A lluk raids. But the the uniln had been alerted to look nntnin K fundamentally sound" New Brtinswli-k ,'.'''-'"'';• %  • :uUl "' " PciiJnr "in tol il,.-, II. .,,, ,.„,, Ileletliun Difiiculj A "Sherman said he had also e now showed their hand back.-he said Ulleclion DUIlcull „, 0D Naval aulhorltle. here Members of the Soviet Military Much of UM report was givei sjrserJt ***^*r?s^^^V srAuvR&ffS :,,.'t^ ... .^ '" %  fZ"','^ """'"" "."\ l"ee.,veiuconUoll.,„ P ,„ indust We now showed their hand Commenting on the absence of '* %  • %  '! I ill %  the N.rt.i KirOBJ! ILback "WAC imv. wrapoi as far wll lolltlllur il* (lifcli! Will -end informal!..i tinbase l-> i ..uj'j furporal" U ;. ..in. rather than a militate Experts said il may g' i 250 mil.s — Kan Press.). V\e have tried to bet Uiem 10 the draw by launching an .iil-i.i:! drive to smash guerrill-. bur tSoviet Z, The n4b,i n *"".; "*" "* """"V 6 " cooUullmg th. 4SS,,T n tom r '"^^"'nta of the hydrogen b'mb uvres Is near LueneTho ,. !" im ,.. „._.JS L _. I.v 25 border—Reuter. JiU-fiigth UtTore they can calebi

mwhich were LeVnt. munis! tactics in Korea, knowing prefectures of Westi they may be faced with the same substitute, for a ba„ ..roblorn some time m Ihe future, njs, Partv organ ^Akahata -1 N.S. Flag) -Renter Pyongyang—Now Target For Bombs the committee pointed out thai KiglS "** **""" can be made raid they have been investlgatip,' %  imilar reports, a senior Naval officer said there is little doubt *e •ubmarlne seen off Newfoundland was Russian —Om. Press. Radio Guides Ship On Mt'rey Mission by SUSPEND JAP PUBLICATIONS TOKYO. July 24. Japan s Attorney-General today deoio. -ideied the suspension, for un inneui **7 publications Trlt issued in Com simple process which can be carried out In small plants scattered throughout a nation — which would make their detection difficult Then are three possible basic bomb materials — detunumdeuterium, trltium-tritlu um-tritium. 10 Yean Jail For Ritual Murder Rapid commercial Kfowth -u, i j Ii . nui*-iit times nas () ahaduwKl the glorious ancient past in Pvoncyani; the C r~w No h u Kore c.pit.1 now !he UrgeY ,, WASHINGTON miKlcrn times has over Com MELBOURNE, Jul> 24 IVM today guiding a ship on ii morey uus.i.m lo a young doctor stricken wltli appendicitis on lonely Heard Island. 3.480 DB)IM from AuntraluV west i. atM 1>. BtTVa Udovikoff. ihe only co. tor with Uie Austrian AntarcUc expedition on the island, is rejidy to risk using .< knif,. un SWAZILAND, July M i.m, a II ,f Hit British !I.,.M., A European farmer on whose I'erlhhlre does not reach the land the remains of a ten-year-old blond In Umi Ti. l Deuterium is simple to African ritual murder. Medical advice was wirelessed n u : obtain. The African Chief SUwanv %  •"" Sydney in coat l Udoviinea The hydrogen bomb explosion Nxumalo, cousin of paramount k "" •""' to operate on himself 1 takes place by the union ot two chief of Swaziland, was sentenced %  ; understood that at least nuclei under extremely high ternto death .'_ Ir ^•"•'V!"" 1 =two biologist* pcratures. The farmer, Carl Werner of If it can bo made to work, th.Hlatikulu, Swaziland, was found world's supply of hydrogen bombr guilty of receiving C30 from will be limited only by the supply Sllwane after the ritual murder of of uranium. the Wn-yoar-old boy had taken The uranium bomb as used as place In his farm. the "trigger" which provides the Parts of the boy's body were initial heat make the union of used for "medicine" and th. nuclei possible. remains burled In an ant-bc..i ight be possible, the comhole Ffeetl Stniipth.iii'dj VaUii.il-. Air Allui-k SAN IHBtio, i .ihfunua American. Pacific and Atlantic floats are tn le stiengtlvened against a possible submarine and attack on the I'm,mi Stal'" Admiral Forrest 1* Sherman Uie ( luc* of Naval iJi-'Kitiuns told n Press t'onfereiml. hose blast damage In a 10-mlle wert slcmatic radius would compare with tha' and caused by an atomic bomb In a • one-mile radium at Hiroshima. The committee did not try to answer the question — which it raised—of whether the hydrogen ib would be "militarily declo African witch doctors found not guilty of the crimA'ere discharged. —Beater. si ye 34 Dead In Air Crash Kxacgcratinn %  ^SiEE by J"^ U S ond Brl, sh % % %  arms A battleground of the Slnonarrow mountain valley, lo the gy g*-—I '" N ">1 %  t.M. RM ,1 Wonsani "'"' .* Japanese overlordihlp ,n Korea JL? St.n??"*' .!?'"$*' """', Pyongyang, known as Hcijo served as the country's: catatal ?*£& ciUd lwo rlval taU 2gJfti**J u SS J' ftM* for untunes thereafter Memor.gff? rhe w e SfiW, u( Nobc '' Air "> transport plane crash parallel, the latitude of Washingals built to him J.000 years latei ""' %  " Harold Urey, that near here vestcraar wa to-day ton. DC. It Is thus one degree— still stand, defying time Parts of would be militarily decisive and known to be 34 There were 30 about 68 air miles—north of the city wall—nearly five miles long lnal ' 'o-roor Atomic Comm'sNational Guardsmen returning now lamous Mth parallel that has IS feet high, and pierced by six ^onor Robert Bacher, who look from manoeuvrev and a crew become Korea's tragic dividing giste*—survive their royal buildxiiC v tw ln> t "while the H-bomr of four The plane plungUnr. f r of a millennium ago. %  > terrible weapon, its effectiveed jnio swampland and aaVaadj '1 The city has good railroad and ,n lh e wall's largest gate, at the ''*•seems to have been grossly shortly after taking otT from the iair highway and water approachriver's edge, hang pieces of the exaggerated in the minds of lavMunicipal airport. Richer -U* 1 ., ... is IB .a. a -ihekA. *.. aja .a? ... ..a aa. %  __ a v lb a a i aaa. UlNlKlN Twanly-nlne Jamalcai. artisans and labourers Of l I v ial |a l^.Joii thiw.ek to look for iOb They flew by II O AC from Kingston, paying £M each foi thru paaugaj, cue „t them a CarpOOtOT said of Jamaica i i...,. eon be as haid a. that httio rock %  other batches stated to ov f 0 U 0W njt „ y air Uf beoa ua e passage by sea %  obtainable ib use \l3se\mem HAIR m TDMlCii/ .IYFTLE IIEAC'H. South Caiollna, Monday The death roU of servleemen 1.1 ..,-.•.-...... I Force transport plane crash vw/../,.,v/w///,.,v//,v,v//,v,VAH./,i I'Af.F. TIIRr-.l Gums Bleed! Amosan >"e sfllgtll % %  > x.siv •jrtt ask for r .l.Vf* Oil// It II'MS VtHi.l. II KOI I HI-; ! ilc, .. Itil.be,! rubhei i Air k0M (iurdefi h. .. I tianlei, I Garden prunlBj rl. 1 "" lopiH-r Hilling 1 i Might. ..ii.i belt, .1 I %  '' 1 '"'". l .""."* n •. UM and pMekei KM IMISY .All M.| Whi| ep .rk Rd. ROBERT THOM LTD. Di,M391 Wra. FOGARTV LTD. (Inc. in British Uuiuna j Mtiii,. „ -inTMBGE" % %  %  TAIN'S IMS) Hit VIII Th. lliidge-WlulK ,11 • ..r ii,.. II.I. • ., '' %  "' " %  "' Rutbje .:.:," %  ;. .!:.;,*;:." The Sloaan -BRI1 \INS BEST hn vi \.\r ,,, |^. nn „ v '"'I,""-,'' ] 'k "" d % %  ne Bicycle in any one k v : i Iluyele has a different key. !*>t Ynur nvxt Hike* imm "IIMW,/:" OhUiimlile ut : HM HKiMll V LTD, It~is 160 miles and 118 air nchor chain of an ill-fated men inlle^ northwest of Seoul, and £ m n can schooner In 18. when The report said that heat effect about 14ft rail miles southeast of Koroar i hostility toward Chriswill 'depend on atmospheric eon Antung, Manuchunan border i" 1 5 rc ^ c "*. m t v| odltions" and that the range of port at the mouth of the Yalu l"i~tV?',E?££2* ***—* destructive H-bomb blast gav the total dead i .13 Reuter Rlver across t e Korean northwast corner. Where The Bomb* Fall Shallow-dratt cargo boats and ferries ply the Taedong Rlvo lent :;>iled up the Taedong River to Pvei.Bv.mg. where it ran aground. The crew wa* massacred and the vessel destroyed Counted among the most beau•iful Vltfws In the world is that Pyongyang Substantial modern fiom Peony Point (Botan-dait on rail and highway-trolley bridges %  % %  heighm .-,r Py-ongyang's northare targets of current bomblnjt ern edge. It looks out on distant runs. The old city with its parka rrnuntalns. vast plains, the meanand public buildings sprawls on ''•ring river split bv a lonjt green tloffnke hills on the northwest '''"rid. and the ritv Itself Jack bai.k of the river. Modern factor'c*. Lonrl^n. visiting the region dQrmany times above that of an A-bomb. Hut the hazard of radioactivity would not be "significant" although the committee addd that it might be possible "to so design nnd use an H-bomb th:.clangorous contamination WOOld n. produced locally "—I lA workers' homes, and a military airfield loim a striking contrast .>n the level plain of the opposite bank. Fertilizers. cement, sugar. rubber and leather are among Pyongyang Industries. Lying within 25 miles of the Yellow Sea at a neck, where the Korean Peninsula is Hlllc more than 100 mlli-s wide, the cil> is a consuming and the Russian-Japanese War grow lyrical in proclaiming the aMOra great beauty.—1.W.1V Troops Prepare for Exercises V M^TFLANGER. British Zone. July 24 Ten thousand British, Hoi distributing centre for the farm man and Danish troops were today products of the fertile surroundmoving into positions under fray. Ing plains and fjr coal from the storm-swept skies for exercises mountains to tne east j Off here about 23 miles from th*" Pyongyang's port for heavy Soviet Zone (Ommerce is Chinnampo, thirty Thr "" exercises, timed to begin four miles southwest bv rail al noon wmorrow and to last four and somewhat farther by wa*j* w 11 •**, primarily a move%  T Bt the Taedang's mouth n%\[ !" "ffT" 111 for **• on the YeUow Sea. Completing fjj) m !" 'M-aaaal manoeurs for support —Reuter. highway meander eastward along The Weather TODAY Lam Rise*: U am saa VeU C?l pm. High Water: 114? a.m. i : --:< p r„ Moon: (Fulli 2lh VKHTPilHV: Rainfall 'st'odiingtoNi I? In Total lor Month up lo \ i-r,I.,, s.ll las l-lnl—r-lurr 4JHax.) M0 r. tempera lure faatr't 714 F Ulna Velocity: 1. male-, per (2 i. II > i by N. Wiad eVloeily: II nales per hour. Hjrtimeter (•< s.m 30.031 area are expected to produce it the rale of aOO.OOO tons of ore for 0*pOI1 by the end of IMI. The mines were badly damaged .'iirlng the Second World War. —Can Frees. Giant Sugar Mill KARACHI Th* large-: ^ar mill In Asia, situated in the Mardan district of Pakistan will go into production In November The mill took four reara to complete and has a rapacity of more than J.000 ion* of cane dallv which will yield about 350 tons of fine -ugar —Can. Praam. FISH LOCATER ORIMSbY. England Tests are being mad.by an East England llrm of equipment which will aid fishermen not only to locate fish deep In the see*, but also to Identify their species. It tt in the "hush hush" stage of M — C* Preas. "RECTOR'S FEVER MIXTURE An unequalled preparation for combating M;< I oOaer Fevers, skilfully eouipouiided from test. 11 DrugFevn aused by Chilis etc. respond readily lo Hill effeetlvi preparation. iVV-,-,V',','.-X-',V^*,V',->^*'; '*'*'*''*•'•'•'>'•'*'*• %  '.•.•*;:•.'.-, .'.',',', %  K ter ItfeXTOH'S Pi.-ourcrou Messrs Booker's (BTXJ Drai Stores Ltd. Broad Nlrrel ami Alpha I'lurmiM n,. %  ,. % % %  FIT A PR AM Oil •i I Hevdt E OFFER NAII. SCISS.IKS TWKFZEBS raaa SHAVIMiBUXSIIrS RAZORS FILTER um COMPIETI mm nwmm WE CARRY TYPES FOR ALL POPULAR ENOUSH AND AMEH1CAN CARS AND TRUCKS # .KIM HILL SAVI: SOU BftEABDOWNS, TOIL AM) ItlONKV It has now been proved by pm tinStaple, oddilicin nl a FRAM. Ih* lid ca m b mn o n laglD* ou i... tnbli nlUUj nduced and Hfliu i-Hii %  n-iicy increased CALL IN TO DAY AT COLLINS' DRUG STORES *TEiN BROTHERS f BAY STREET DIAL 42G9 '''-'-'''''-'-''*-"---*.'-''-.*'--*-'-'.*.'.*.-.'.'.'.'.',-.'.'.-,'.-,*,-,-,-,.>