Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Saturday

22

July
1950



U.N. PLANES

Islande

Emigrate To |

rs Must

The Mainland —

To Solve Population Problems

|

—Says C.D.C. Report

(From Our Own

“THE POPULATION PROBLEM

Correspondent )

has become so acute in

the West Indian Island colonies that ii is generally
agreed the solution to economic problems must include

some reduction of population by

British Guiana or British

Star Police
Witness Comes
To Court

In “Floating Corpse” Case

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 20.
Boysie Singh, still smiling hap-
pily but no longer nattily dressed
as when he first appeared at the
start of the trial on Wednesday,
witnessed the brief appearance of
star Police witness Rahamat Ali
alias “Loomat” who is held by
Police in protective custody.

Loomat was brought by the
Police for the first public appear-
ance since the end ot April when
he was taken to the British naval
base of Staubles where he was
held- A squad of Police armed
with batons kept back huge
crowds attempting to surge into
the Court at the bay.

Loomat was brought into Court
to enable another witness to iden-
tify him as one seen leaving
Singh’s club, Queen Street, to-
gether with Singh, four co-de-
fendants, and Philbert Peyson —
in connection with whose death
Singh and four men are charged
with murder in the “Floating
Corpse” murder case.

Loomat, a tall thin boy entered
Court boldly and the crowd gaped
to see the youngster with whom
Peyson was allegedly intimately
connected.

Singh on Thursday morning
appeared immaculately attired
with Sinatra knot in his tie which
matched his blue tinted suit, his
fourth in the four days’ trial.

This morning Robert Wilkie

ear

who gave evidence yesterday of
having seen Singh, Peyson, Loom-
at, and Singh’s four co-defendants
leaving Singh’s Club on Queen
Street together, was under cross-
examination all morning, during
which he admitted having served

jail sentences,
—Can. Press.

BUNDESTAG
PRESIDENT
BREAKS DOWN

BONN, July 21.
Herr Erich Koehler, President
of the West German Bundestag,
collapsed shortly after entering
the Bundestag chamber to open
to-day’s sitting. Koehler was im-
mediately taken to hospital for
treatment for nervous breakdown.
He has been a target. of strong
criticism from Democrats, Com-
munists and some Government
supporters ever since he took
office at the first meeting of the

Bundestag last autumn.
—Reuter.



i
|
LONDON, July 21. |

emigration—possibly to}









B.G. Applies For

Marshall Aid —

HIS MAJESTY’S GOVERNMENT are
application from British Guiana for Marshall Aid under |
what is known as economic co-operation administration.
The Government's Financial Secretary and Treasure:
Edwin F. McDavid gave this information in the Legislative

when speaking

Council this afternoon
expansion and development
in the debate on the second



—_——

Sugar Cane
Newspapers

LONDON, July 21.
The use of waste material from
sugar cane in the manufacture of
newsprint is suggested by H. Alan
Walker, Managing Director of the
West Indies Sugar Company. He
says this would not only solve
Britain’s newsprint shortage —
newspapers have already been cut
- help economic development
in West Indies.
ting to the Times to-day
Walker says the United States
have already successfully experi-
mented with newsprint made from
megasse the residual fibre from

sugar eane after the juice has
been extractel
Newsprint produced by this

method was not up to the standard
at present used by newspapers in
Britain but further research would
no doubt achieve the desired end

He hoped British paper manu-
facturers would consider subsid-
iary interest in the British West
Indies to assist the supply position
ang help the economic develop-
ment of the colonies

existing Rice Marketing Board Ordinance.

GEORGETOWN, July 20, |
Supporting an

° on the question of
projected for the rice industry,
reading of a bill to amend an

He indicated Clause seven of
the Bill was intended to pave the
way for operations of a new com-
pany envisioned. The share capital
of this would be around $10,500,
000, public asset, being about
$4,500,000, and Colonial Develop-
ment Coporation some $6,000,000,

The application for Marshall Aid
would eover the cost in United
States eurrency of all machinery
and @quipment for two “central”
rice mills —one for Corentyne and
one for Essequibo. |

Under the application Britain
would provide a deposit of an
equivalent amount in sterling, and
if the application succeeded it
would mean Britis) Guiana would
be receiving a gift of machinery
and equipment something like |
$1,000,000 U.S. in value

The Secretary of State for the
Colonies has recently been re-|
viewing the possibility of expand. |
li rice production in colonial |

jing
| dependencies, and has reached, the|
|





jconclusion that opportunities for

jexpansion are nowhere greater

than in British Guiana
—Can. Press.



= x

sein a—etnerenenrrmenmen eal ni,







































It goes on to discuss the difficul-






























|
unlikely )
Co-operation
MEN'S DOUBLES | Worrell further revealed his com- be limited in the first place to lit
ties Baldwin’s successor will face Court df SR > ; plete domination of the situation hold 50 miles of Alpine foothills QO s as
in creating an atmosphere in which pes % a ae r a Fahy by giving as scientific an exhi-]on Italy’s northeastern frontier— |/ 4 ua y i
harmonious co-operation between E.R. Atkinson bition of farming the bowling, as|obvious point of attack for any |} ship ed to
administration and representatives fi Court ee aside {has probably ever been witnes: ‘d | aggressor from the east ,
of various local interests can be : Willan on favrian igainst an international Test at-! “The most complete element on |) f t e \{
i 1 i \. Williams and L Harrisc | ate es ° ; | I a ( ;
developer : COURT NO 4 tac t would be interesting to) Italy's detensive apparatus ig her 4) Leg, ° (
Kenneth Blackburne, Governor- Men's Singles know how ofter, he scored singles |g7,.990-ton fleet which next month 4 West Indies )
lesignate fron Director of W. A. S. Crichlow M P ff fae ‘eae ball ? 0 : 4! = 1
ces Bye ont , . ihaks a shale, off one o ie las vo balls o on page ? , ‘ )
Information Services of ae Colo- ; Court Ne, 4 an over, but this is an academi ate cow K for the \
nial Office, sai i Fecen ~ ‘. c are atchesS best of et undertaking unlikely to have been " i i)} past fifty )))
to eet ee See ; attempted by the most earnest of & ‘ Couneil i} ~ t
nial people , “ natal cricket statisticians Already to-} ko u ar ED ) ears \
Sz the Colonist Fortunately ;
Mr. Bl ick r possesses quali | day creating a record score for 7 i n}
ms toa CAS BEE ag ge feat did ° $ West Indian batsman in a Test R as | ag }
»s whi should stand him in | Pad pak Os ? » »
sod aaa Peake th. respects Limit On U.S. in’ England, Worrell is now with- eac 1es )) t)
end conadeénce Of Metvents which} in sight of Headley's 270 made at i i
s : : ; t], luct E $ » fourth Test te 2 t )) )
are at present apparently reluc -| i i King ton in the fourth ma Agreemen )) ih)
ant to co-operate | Ff rme orees in 1935 } \
| New Mark LONDON, July 21 |
‘ e A new international sugat { s f
Communism Removed His partnership with Weekes agreement on world supplies and { These include }
promises to set a new mark for price is now being submitted } }
< e any West Indian test partnership. the Governments of 25 countries MN]
Is Losing WASHINGTON, July 2) The present record is 267 madefthe International Sugar ( oun il if i
The Senate Armed Services}by Clyde Walcott and Gerry}unnounced ¢ day the ot vr ce if — ~ rec )
Committee voted unanimously to-| Gomez for the fourth wicket at|thi agreemn« nt i fhe be see the \ II Bk \ & i
roun |day to remove all restrictions on}New Delhi in November, 1948 Jmecting here in June o “t ca § ba =A kK )})
i “ae 2 + ~ ave ¢ “1 241 and{ ment repregentatives and observ~ é / ))
the size of armed forces and t o far the have added 241 anc ee ; hate file biased. ti th
i l > e , ye ny 4 f , “st to- “rs VnoO a e ann rt
¢ lengthen all enlistments by onejit ‘s hoped that a good re subrnit 1¢ th theie Clo cereiitente tot
SAYS CHURCHILL ear. The House Armed Services!|night will send them back re- a a a Octimes ik a tt} r
LONDON, July 21 Committee also voted to keep all] freshed for really big things to- Thi es eh a a ai ah (1 Hi
Mr. Wins Churchill told ajregular army soldiers in service} morrow. (As an aside, | MAY bonded b vagethentatives fron tH i
United Europe Rally here tonight.| for a year after their enlistments | Say that the Pe ecomadat of hee the Governments of South Africa, | ()} i}
“The Europe we re planning} expire It was still considering | ingham > peas i, ; 'S} Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Cuba, } (
must ultimately unite all European} President Truman's request for end They have } Sones z oe tes Czechoslovakia, Dominic an Re-|} . 5s “ -
peoples including the peoples noW}| removal of ceilings on the siz jturbing nocturnal ¢ eG 1} public, France, Haiti, Netherland & S| i hi RR Y i
behind the iron curtain,” , |of forces. Republican representa-| i City Hall clock, opposite the} peru, ‘Philippines, Poland, Portu- | }}} ™m & 4 )
“There no doubt that Com-| 4 ve Harry Towe cast the only|#lack Boy Hotel where the West] oa) United Kingdom l hited ) \
i : , : x ae 13 ; . Indian team is staying } and Yugoslavia, while Can- A rt}
munism as an ideology is losing} yote against extending enlist-| !* ? . aeite ae lia d
ground in all the countries where | ments The Senate Committee Rae Too t ( reas tat poe f aoe {i You can enjoy i}
free speech is allowed and par~| agreed to strike out one of two | a s at . ares i} th ; 2 is i}
Cee Te ere in| Dlls providing that Che stfengib| Aisnough Worrell. was more in ee ee ale em again in )
told the gathering.. Mr. Churchill! of the regular matine corps would the spotli ay’ orf lbscthiine Coa we , : al : (i)
t etin: : ¢ _|the spotlight in today’s perform Nations and Food and Agricultural {i mi {
n's huge’ Albert] juthorised stae Pot the’ reguine| 40ces, Rae and Weekes. deserve Maun atone. oti dutcerdea the {ft greater quantity
ihn der ey outa norised size of the regular! their full share of the Kudos Sinfarence ) i
1 ace - o 4 hate navy | Rae's was a solid innings worth]. For several years now. the for- {
a ae ae 5 The action suspended definite-|far more than the number of run8|/mer international sugar agreement | }) Agents
a wded as M the present limitations jrecordea against his name by scor-|drawn up, in 1937 for a period of | }) i}
entative armed forces to 2,005,182 mer ler Fer or It is after all thelfive years, ha in ex ' x
py Yew age af oon iy Ah pong pened ggg bao yl Bee ge ge gece RE GABUINER AUSTIN Co,Ltd. j)
teppe to} Arr and Air Forces officers hadjjob of truction and the big|for one year at a time wa =e 4} i
they would probebly lose/total now being built was well that the ones, Se es {i i}
1%| 193,000 trained soldjers next year|entrenched by the two West Indian mnemen Soman a a w t}
irati national agreemer es ‘
through the expiration of volun- nationa ; ss pater a : ae :
@ on page 3 tary enlistments.—Reuter @ on page & s





i

BLAST ,SEOUL AND TAEJO

Price:
VE CENTS

=

Year 55 ,

e ¢
tenance





1

'Wreck Red Communications *

|



LEOPOLD
RETURNS
TODAY

BRUSSELS. July 21

selgium celebrating today
t 119th anniversary of the
vning of her first king was
ensely awaiting the return of,

weopold III, expected at any hour
ifter six bitter lonely years of
vile from his people. Parliament
authorised his recall last night.

Supporters of King Leopold
1ope that now he has been re-
alled to the throne, it will end










defensive plans would therefore









“Enemy”
By ROY

| MacArthur Moves\Against

* Refugees

MacARTNEY)

(MacArthur’s Korean Headquarters) .

July 21.

BOTH ABANDONED CAPITALS, Seoul and

Taejon, rocked fr

Arthur's airmen kept

om high explosives as Mac
up their aggressive raids

Headquarters announced that superfertresses 500-
pound bombs had blasted all movement to a stand
still in Seoul rail marshalling yards and damaged
engine and waggon plants

Ove shattered Taejon,



















) Standard of

Mustangs were out with bombs



























ee rs “egypt ty nd / ican equip-
and rockets swooping in to fire abandoned America 1
the succession of tragedies which . aint aad te saving a fire trail to
Honduras. 0 far has marked: his life. Leo- ment in the city’s warehouse and le gi: u
id Ill, eldest son of Albert | mark their route. : ei
This is stated in the second pant ind Elizabeth, was the _fourtt anen , the sks a mush-
nual report of the Colonial Devel- | king of the Belgian Coburg dyn > * ey : Soha -e yy Bag Mus-
opment Corporation published | asty since the foundation of ths Belgium we tar wkets struck home
here this evening. | | }elgian kingdom He was borr > Phot raraters ‘
The report says increased food | Tiers ie hes sae 3, 1901, a ee rai i 1
production and increased yields | | le his father was sti row! j | » » | » SO beaut tle wou y
from the land are essential first | | Prince and living unostentatious! naependenc¢ crit botnbn trik
steps towards raising the deplor- | }'n a small pee oe & the ) “2 aid nai i}
ably low living standards. In cer- | n capita € became Crowt 1: P | < ae 1 ve is i ict
tain islands, it had proved im-| Prince himself in December 1906 ay a © Y . ; impossible ol
possibla4 to purchase ‘estates at hen Albert I ascended th ine ie FN : ir I even a
an economie price on which a start ‘rone on the death of Leopol : BRUSSELS, July 21 heavy i ike I
could be made with improved ! i II From then his education wa Crowd standir t dec apse
methods, and this difficulty had ) directed to the royal functions h heered the military } Gene MacArtbur’s last com-
prevented the Corporation from was to assume When in 1934 hx celebrate to-day’s annivet munique claimed that his troop
entering directly into the sphere ame to the throne after hi te gum’ Independence hed found the answer to the most
of agricultural produ-tion. father’s death, Leopold wa inder the Cinquante morale-lowerlng fact in the
The d j ng already an experienced statesmar uilt in 1906 to commemorate Korean war—infiltration of north
e development of services to 30th anniversary of th eign o aime idhad ees
primary producers appeared pres- His marriage to Princess Astric | ae ‘Leep id it Sigenth and. Sand persona
ently to be the main field for the of Sweden in 1926 has been ; OO} omy ' igorous sonal
: 2 t ttention \ Americar Cor
Corporation’s activities in the popular one largely because their] — yy) Mt formatic { . } ; ‘ Jeneral W
islands. The Corporation’s devel- vedding had been decided not! re “f 1 : } i t oer ‘Thee had ce ae es wield o
opment schemes for the mainland miy hy necessities of State, but) jrsnty omn ult arte id. Ir.filtra-
colonies were based en adequate heart. Their lock of ostenta : oy rtillery, li eur : Sy ccartant naan sie
and efficient agricultura) industry ion and readiness to share in th al rt i : . . vane ee
a é alst rr the neopl Ww wee SY
to Seve the oie ee he ea ne I vuple ante rsal ani Cant 5 Chea Wt i i! mr
absorb immigrants from island ‘ {The lare} | Generis thur is n )
colonies th moment of Leopold’ Ij va a trite: Vii ing: Wo \ andtmnaberkah ~
The rate at which development SUrrenge Helgium = was split Albert de Vieeshauwer, who said |ayea ab 100 miles from east
could be pushed forward would rime Minister Pierlot declared earlier t*is waek that it ha vest United Nations trooy
depend more upon construction of it ‘elf th ‘ : a eed aware othing to do with King Leo fall viv to a line whic
a spe EMiNers than upon any |: sr at asa ene oe ‘did not old's return. “Boys want to be} will protest tl viaxi a foo
oe, oO é « b . : oe hold which can be hek mtil ve
bind the country,” In his own] seen and peopl ant ; : :
: bn re! _ 2 ~ pec ter-offensi started Li
It was hoped to fing new mar- ; ‘ c ’ | account of the surrender last } their _boys he ~~ : But he Sate ‘ cs ‘cn ao kites
kets in Caribbean colonies for FRANK WORRELL, record-breaking W.1. batsman, is seen in top picture executing a @ On Page 3 oe che oacage oe Nee ro| forces of flanks to north and west
timber from British Guiana to aracteristic pp T i » second Test hile below, Evert Week his bat- stage less than 24 heurs before ae yee ; ;
characteristic pull to leg off Wardle in the second Test, while ow, Everton eekes, h a shi vill be fighting over steep moun-
: 7 ow of}' ;
ee en ae rendens 1S ag ting patiner jin yesterday's 241-run fourth wicket stand, is shown as he hit Jenkins to the She ge boyy - 9 pk Dian bi tain escapements in dusty treeless
o e Governments P
< wi ritis 5 P. leg boundary in the second Test also Worrell scored 239 yesterday in a brilliant display, oe Reuter country
Trade with the British West In g : a 7 e Ss Elements of seven diyigions to-
dies had been handicapped by in- while Weekes helped himself to b08 They continue batting today.—Central Press y p p del “eisaeded Gun A inks of Gen
adequate shipping facilities, and alboeibnains echinee — —_—_—-— . : ; ! ‘
: f 1} MacArthur United Nation
high freights. A d EF (ere a
This matter was receiving the T o. fH rme orces French Troop |i vos ote Be swe ov
Corporation’s attention. a “ir eS : > E- i Aanks ind south, Thrusting
The Corporation also reported e e ROME, July 21 e lat the walle of this vast “streng-
tr ape og IS hau oleae ne heen | a Brame jek OS et ome
transfer of representative func- | ——_ - 170,000 to 250,000 men, the limit up atetaion acoording to Mac»
tions from their regional subsid- cf “Day, 10 imposed by the Peace Treaty, De ihre tya' aid : tu
; , Se , ; ’ | Arthur’s battle map itl 0
iary companies to specially ap- ° ) fence Minister Randolfo Packerdi | ; | Ar = eee tee idtaens
I i 66 9 AZTOUNC ase
i i ° ai £ " p imore in reserve hoo !
pointed representatives in certain a win-— { 4 2 e Pacciardi announced today. This < Ry a land the Ban Rive
colonies. | B af - * number would include carabinieri ae *» Mac Arthur’
’ alter ne an s Ow ing is well as troops, he said. The ADEN. July 2 Red: ara Satay ht ke
, as a) ‘ . é MIN, Ju ' n ove of the North
as: An tll-Advised - Minister made the announcement —~ 7 t : { on , eee ,
| ‘ € & The 7097-ton French mo v I orenr ush south ond southeast of
| ‘ ; an pu i 1
ry | j at the end of a six-hour Cabinet el “Doba’” was abandoned off ( lc ) miles Southwest of Tae
| _ ~_ —_” ‘ : Sade one as a ned 4 honju 4 ile outh we of ut
Film Storage I xperiment” | ENGLAND 223 S oomeiatik Vaeoving "te Guardati Somaliland tonight af jon—deepe officially admitted
, ' i “oO a OV t : } '
. . 460 troops bound from Haiphor list penetration
Vault Destroyed EST INDIES 3 kt } i 479 a tion taken by the United States to Dunkirk were taken off one North Korean diviston
OWN COLONIST ™ ot ee jin Korea “It sald people in Tal rapeee tee Aaguaias Wee are
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent) | SA YS CR | | Supported “energetic intervention ‘Doba" wa ushed re { | tb. of Taejon another is marked
} ; ‘ (From Our Own Correspondent) (By E. L. COZITER) jof President Truman and defen- mnder erir outh wind in the battle map as pushing east
GEORGETOWN, BG., July 21 re) TRENT BRIDGE, Nottingham. July 21 sive and precautionary measure: : eae rs : ie a hale ta se.) Tlie. tebe
The Government film_ storage LONDON, July 21 | isis T eros cole ini _ ee oe ; | taken by other nations to halt the | W285 !a@ ae’ oe. th re Paani t. Ae ar eet ch feli_ on
vault at Fort William Frederick | The resignation of Lord Baid-| 1 CALLED YESTERDAY a black day for England | extension of the conflict in Korea,” apsizing. All troops ar er ¢ south 9 he cit rich fe on
on the sea wall was lestroyed | win trom the Gover orship of the | iat was true but today the darkness reached a stygian! ftalian Minister of the Interior, }Of 58 were reported safe 7 a
about 3.30 on Friday morning. A |)¥!" !! ted | : : TAs] . na eing —Reuter. | ® On
; Yell be ee ne. “AlLeeward Islands was voneolona | aensity as the old country. felt the full weight of the Wést! Mario Scelba, told the Cabinet
sudden explosion was followed by lon strongly by the Crown Colonist RS TR ru iia pe { the| about measures he planned to|_ een -seeemamiaamte =~ -
a mountain of flames rising sky | ite Meadibe laiticle tosday, Uh- Indies batting strength. These stalwart successors o the “guarantee peace and order in the |= ms eS
high awakening the city residents.| der the heading ‘Lhe End of an {| two great Georges piled up the runs to the tune of 479 | country in face of the (Commun-
bt) Brigade turned out but the | i1-advised Experiment,” the Colo- for three wickets to place the West Indies im an absolutely | ist). Fifth Column, the commupi- 9
es' — was complete in a few |). says “Lord Baldwin was the! impregnable position in this’ third Test mateh que said,
Seconds. 4 jsurvivor of a trio of politicians | The Cabinet decided to rein- ])
The total loss is unknown but | appointed to Colonial Governor- | It was largely Worrell's day. | force 75,000 armed carabinieri at |)
several reels of documentary films ship> by the wish of Mr. Attlee. | Inexorably and methodically, he the Minister's disposal, The Min- ) .
and Smeal reels belonging to the Lord Winster was. frustrated in ye battered the English bowling to. isters also” dis security { ? - {
Government Public Information Cyprus: the lack of wisdom of SPOR ls all parts of this beautiful Trent] measures necessary “in view of } PRES Res ‘|
Office were destroyed also Warner lother choices was made painfully Bridge ground, No bowler escaped | the international situation.” Mi \i 4)
Brothers Adventures of Robin apparent by Sir Francis (noy | his almost heartle assault One official pointed out that }/) See )
pr
Hood,” Pa t's “Heiress” | appar | 5 . ) a
ood, ramount's “Heiress” and |p, ron) Douglas in Malta and by } He pulled, hooked, drove and|peace treaty besides imposing \ ” , 5
several others from M.G.M | ; i imitati .
: :. on ‘G-M\the calculated indiscretions of } F ack: cut with the minimum of energy |numerical limitations, stipulated |) : : pa? ;
R.K.O. and Columbia Studios. | an) , av rh ufternoon at the Strat : ; M { {
The Police is investi ating the |Lord Baldwin a ye} ago clyde Lawn Tennis-Club the ops | and the maximum of result. Loose | that Italy's armed strength |} â„¢ shaintain
p > Eee & Me) The experiment is tc ent run by the Barbado | balls especially, were severely|should be of a aefensive nature. |) ut , .
matter F ’ Wy ‘
. be repeated 1 nis Amateur Assottetior treated, two carrying well intol|it was understood that Italian |! m4 same 1 )
| te SS eerie jthe spectators for punitive sixes )











PAGE TWO



IS Excellency
and Mrs. Savage, accompanied
by Capt. W. Lambert attenc the
Speech Day at the Alleyne School

the Governor





St. Andrew's on Thursday after-
fioon. Mrs. Savage presented the
prizes

Journalists Meet

R. LOUIS GALE, Editor of

the “Advocate’ who has now
aimost entirely recovered from his
recent operation, had lunch in
London last week h My. Hugh
Astor, son of the chairman of “The
Times” the Hon. J. J. Astor. With
them was Mr. Oliver Woods, the
Special Correspondent who toured
the Caribbean for “The Times
earlier this year

Now Nurse

ISS THELMA ROCK a former

member of the Acvocate staff
is now training to nurse at
« hospital near London



be a
Wher
she first went over, Thelma was a
domestic help at a Bristol hospital,
but was lucky enough to be chosen
for training to be a nurse almost
immediately. After general train-
ing she hopes to specialise either
in child nursing or midwifery

Mr. Myer Gets Around

RRIVING on Thursday morn-

ing from Trinidad by B.W.LA
intransit from New York was Mr.
Guy Myer, Banker of New York
and Seattle, Washington He is
here looking for a house in which to
spend January, February and
March of next year, with his wife
and family

“The family”, Mr. Myer told
Carib, “consists of my daughter,
her family, my sister-in-law and a
few others. Now you understand
why I want a house

He left for New York yesterday
afternoon via Trinidad. Since he
started flying, whether on business
or pleasure, he has flown some
2,700,000 miles. On arrival at New
York he leaves almost immediate-
1; for California, after which he
will fly back to Seattle

Mr. Myer certainly gets around.

Here For Two Months

RRIVING on Thursday after-

noon by B.W.LA. from B.G.
were Mr. Richard Parris and Mr.
Derrick Sinson.

Derrick, who is here for two
months is staying with Richard at
“Black Bess,” St. Peter, Richard
however will only be here for
about three weeks.

Both of them are at Diamond
Estate on the East Bank of the
Demerara River.

For Barbados Holiday

R. AND MRS. Alfred de
Freitas and their daughter
Margaret Rose arrived from Brit-
ish Guiana on Thursday afternoon
by B.W.I.A. to spend about two
months’ holiday in Barbados, stay-
ing at Accra Rockley. Mr. de
Freitas is the proprietor of De
Freitas and Co., in Georgetown.

Returned
LSO arriving from B.G
Thursday by B.W.LA.
Mr. Sam Ashby.
On Last Lap of Survey
OL. H. V. G. Bloodworth C,B.E.,
who is making a Telephone
Survey of the Windward and Lee-
ward Islands left yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.1LA. for Antigua and
will also visit Montserrat and St.
Kitts. Col, Bloodworth who is
with Cable and Wireless Ltd.,, is
working in conjunction with the
Colonial Office and this trip winds
up his survey, which began in
February when he first came to the
West Indies.

He will be returning to Barbados
on August the 6th and will leave
for London at the end of August.
His next trip will be to Cyprus
which begins in the middle of
September.

Enroute to the U.S.
RS. FRANCIS HAWKINS who
left yesterday morning for
Antigua by B.W.1A. will take Pan
American Airways from there to
the U.S.A. where she is going to
visit her daughter and son-in-law.



on
was

1E OWNER of an_ historic
mansion who charges _ for
admission complained the other

day that new people in the bus-
iness had created competition,
and so receipts were falling off

I wonder if there any con-
nection between this and an ex-

traordinary advertisement which
coincides with Captain Foul-
enough’s absence from London

On making inquiries I find that
a gentleman calling himself Lord

Plantagenet Maucierc has taken
an old mansion which he says
belonged -to his ancestors. He is

inviting the public, at five bob a
go, to see the spot in his grounds

where William Rufus died, the
room in which Queen Elizabeth
ordered the English fleet to
attack the Armada, Cromwell’s
hat, Drake’s drum, _ Raleigh’s
pipe, the original draft of the
Treaty of Westphalia, Dr. John-

son’s snuff-box. Shakespeare’s

THE NEW MODEL L.E, 149 C.C, is different from the conventional
type motor cycle—in fact it’s the nearest approach to a motor car.

WATER-COOLED,

For Simplicity, Economy and Riding Pleasure, Choose a... |

COelocette

ROBERT THOM LTD.

COURTESY GARAGE

aub ¢



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

a



*Jusi as one was begmning

to jeel that France was her

self again with three Govern

ments a week, those wretched

Korean must ad go and
tert a rival ecrists.

nee



Farewell Party

HERE was a Dinner Party on
Thursday night at the Bar-
bados Aquatic Club in honour of
Miss Betty Archer, who is due to
leave for Canada this morning by
T.C.A. Among those present were
Mr. and Mrs. Colin McKenzie, Mr
and Mr Edward Archer, Miss
Sheila MeKenzie, Mr, Ronnie Me-
Kenzie, Mr. Pat Connor, Miss
Kathleen Connor, Miss Nancy
Went, Miss Maggie Fields, Miss
Marjorie McKenzie, Mr Lou
Stoute, Mr Delbert Jannister,
Miss Cynthia Phillips, Miss Nancy
Southwell and Miss Molly South-
vell, After dinner the party was
joined by Mr. Frederick Stone,
Mr. Michae! Stone, Mr. Pat Anton
and Miss June Gaskin, and the
entire crowd then danced in the
ballroom until shortly after 11
pm
Betty is goine to Canada to join
her relatives who are living there



Managing Director

Returns
ETURNING to Trinidad on
Thursday afternoon by
B.W.LA. after a short visit to
Barbados were Mr. Arthur de

Lima, Managing Director of Messrs
Y. De Lima and Company Limited
and his mother Mrs, Rosario De
Lima.

A few days before they left they
icted as proxy god-parents to Mr

and Mrs. G. Yvonet’s baby son
The god-parents were Mr. Jack
De Lima who is in Trinidad and

and Miss Clarita De Lima who is
in the U.S.

Home for long Holidays

OUNG Peter Wallbridge was
on the B.W.1, Airways flight
B.G. on Thursday after-
noon, Peter goes to school in B.G
and has come over to Barbados
to spend the long holidays with
his parents.

Returned Yesterday

R. PERCY VINCENT, retired

Accountant of the Royal

Netherlands Steamship Company
in Trinidad returned to Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.1A.
He was here for health reasons

from

Resting !
HE BROAD STREET Ticket
seller with the loud voice
who has affectionately named his
rather dilapidated bicycle, “War
Lord” which he rides around
Bridgetown every day was walking
through town shouting his lucky
numbers yesterday
Where was “War
parently resting for

meeting

=



Lord?”
the

Ap-
August

By The Way

HILE Carib was driving
along Rockley Road yester-
day morning, there was a small
open jitney in front of him with
these words on the back, “Electri-
eal Services,” “Radio Refrigera-
tor and wiring contractors.”
And what was the van carrying,
a brand new Oil Stove!!

pen, William ‘Tell’s bow, and
other interesting family heir-
looms.

Animals to do the fighting
HE rout of Communist forces
in Cambodia by stone-throw

ing apes may lead to conscription
for apes, and even for all animals,
And I foretell a fine row when
that bear is called up, and the
public sends in mammoth peti-
tions, pleading for his exemption,
or begging that he may be given
an office job.

What Mrs. Parsons saw
RS. PARSONS, called as a
witness for the prosecution,

said hastily, “I come along by
there, like, and what do I see?
Why, I come along by there like,
and I see—absolutely I see—I see
two men, as you might say, as I
come along by there, and them
both hoisting that garter, that’s

HAND-STARTED,
and NOISELESS

SHA





of packing

on August 4th

WHITEPARK ROAD

Back From Flying Visit

AJOR BOB ROBERTS of

Messrs Cole and Compan
returned yesterday by B.W.1LA
from Trinidad intransit from the
U.K He was away for about
eighteen days on a fiving visit to

1d

Antigua Art Exhibition
NTIGUA’S Art Exhibition has
4 been fixed for the end of
August, and members of the Arts
nd Crefts Society here are send-

ing paintings to this exhibition
The British Council is in charge
and shipping the
paintings, which are to be sent in
to their headquartcrs At Wakefield



About Steel Bands
XNAMUEL SELVON, 27-year-old
Trinidadian writer and poet
of Indian parentage, has a stor
in London’s popular magazine,
Lilliput”, this month. It is enti
tled ‘Ping-Pong, Kittle and Boom"
and traces the chequered history
of Port-of-Spain’s steel bands
Selvon went to England recently
in search of “broader scope.” H
first job was in the oilfields. Ther
e joined the West Indian branch
of the Royal Navy as a wireles:
operator. After he was demobbed

€elvon joined the staff of the
“Trinidad Guardian.” He has hed
stories and poems published in

West Indian magazines and broad-





est by the B.B.C.
Cellar Party

I ORD BALDWIN, ex-Governor
.- of the Leeward Islands, was
one of a hundred guests at a party
given in a Bermondsey wine-
cellar in London last week Other
guests included Dr. Jose Brilej
the Yugoslav Ambassador and
over 25 M.Ps. To the strains of
music ty a ltunearian three-
pieve band the company drank

and ate among barrels containing



thoucend of gallons of wi

Reason for this Bohemian cele-
hretion; to further British trade
yelations with Yugoslavia which

is exporting wine to England
Missing List
I EARIE CONSTANTINE is hav-

« ing a spot of bother, In spare
time from reading at the Bar, he
entertains the Students’ Cricket
Club of Inns of Court and his team
is not quite sure which opposing
teams they should be playing this
summer. The former secretary of
the Club, George de Cabral, als:
a West Indian, passed his final
exams and went home taking the
team’s fixture list with him

Arriving Today
XPECTED to arrive from Eng-
land via Canada this mor-
ning by T.C.A. are Mr. Jimmy
Emtage, his wife and baby and
Mr. Lisle Emtage.

Carib understands that Jimmy
is going to work with Messrs Law
end Connell, while Lisle is join-
ing the staff of the Water Works.

After 27 Years

FTER being in the U.S. for

twenty seven years, Mrs
Gwen Walton returned to Barba-
dos recently to spend six weeks’
holiday staying with Mrs. E
Beckles of Britton’s Cross Road

Film Work

, R. JOHN TURNER-SMITH,

who went to school at the
Lodge School in Barbados left
London last week for a month's
holiday in Geneva. When John
went to England from the West
Indies in 1944, he joined the RAF
Last year he was demobbed and
is now working as a technician in
a film studig in London. He lives
with his mother in Hampstead

And Boxer?

ee Ernest Moll and

his fiancee Sheilah were ip
London last week. Ernest is now
doing a colonial agricultura’
course in Cambridge and expects
to go to the Imperial College in
Trinidad in August. He will take
Sheilah with him—as his wife
Their wedding takes place at the
beginning of August, when Moll’s
parents arrive from the West
Indies. Sheilah’s problem at the
moment is what to do with her
boxer dog since there is a three
months’ quarantine period i
Trinidad

ag BY THE WAY sb Beachcomber

what I see.”

Gooseboote: Would you say
that this flag called attention t
any particular brand of garter, ot
garterette?

Mrs. ParSons: | tell you I come
along by there, like, and I see
this ruddy great garter hoisted
as you might say, that’s what
see. If that isn’t calling attention
d’you expect ‘em to fire cannon
from the roof?

Snapdriver: Would you de
scribe what you saw hoisted a
a flag?

Mrs. Parsons : | never saw ne
flag, only that garter. Not a ree
garter, of course, but a painted
one,

Gooseboote: Painted on what?

Mrs, Parsons: How do I know”
I come along by there, like, and
what do I see? I —

Cocklecarrot: Thank you,
Parsons, Cal! Henry

Mrs
Howlem.

FT-DRIVEN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ae
i





















*

FEDERICK STARKE’S jacket-dress with bloused top in black

and pink check.

The skirt is tight-fitting in black.

Beauty Hints

Try the One-Two-Three tech
nique which soon develops into a
smooth routine

One: CLEANSE off the day's
make-up, by putting on the cream
generously with a wad of damp
cottonwool, applying it with an
upward and outward movement,
net forgetting the neck and ears.

Use: Salon cold cream for nor-

mal or young skins

Dry Skin cleanser for dry
skins,

Liquefying Cleansing
cream for oily skius

Two: STIMULATE the tissues
with skin tonic. Pat it on with a
wad of cottonwco! wrung vut first
in cold water.

Use: Orange flower skin lotion
for normal, dry or sensi-
tive skins
Texture lotion for oily
skins.

Oily skin lotion in special
cases for excessively oily
skins.

Three NOURISH with a lu-
bricating night cream. Massage
this carefully into the skin with
‘he fingertips, taking care not to

tretch the skin under the eyes,

Use Special dry skin mixture
for dry or normal skins.
Sensitive skin cream
Extra Rich skin cream for
older dry skin.

Suppling cream for the
oily skin (also often suit-
ed to the teenager skin)
In the morning, repeat steps one

and two before putting on your \

make-up. If you are addicted to
soap and water, still cleanse with
and



cream afterwards e how
much grime comes away. This
tream and tonic technique will

help to soften and smooth your
complexion until it gradually be-
gins to resemble the “flower petal

look” so beloved by poets (and

advertising agents). i
Do try and ignore preparations

with endearing names—and go for |

those with functional titles. If
you can resist sniffing them first,
it is all to the good. Many an in-
ferior cream has sold widely be-
cause of an alluring perfume at-
tached to it.

try to realise that it is not pos-
sible to cover up a skin that has
dozens of blemishes, and enlarged
pores. A special medicated pow-
der to suit all skins will help mat-
ters. Known as Pore Grains, it is
an excellent treatment. Shake a

few in the palm of your hand, mix |
paste with water or |
skin tonic, then apply with finger- |

to a gritty

tips to the affected area in small

circular movements. Wash _ off
when dry with cool water. You |
should not use these grains on}

your cheeks.

CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:
AXYDLBAAXR

is

LONGFELLOW

One latter simply stands for another, In this example A fs used

for
trophies,

the three L's, X for the tw

o O's, ete. Single letters, apos-

the length and formation of the words are all hints

lwach day the code letters are different.

A Cryptogram Quotation

GK GKIWS

BR se Woe ee REG. Go
NYDQ: JDPDCHR ,ABRER BNA WE AGSOwWIL
BON: ORF SAS eee BP A Ae W. OR CR

BOP NA

Cryptoquote:

MAN WHO IS NOT WISH, AT

AND HE IS OFT THE WISEST

ALL—-WORDSWORTH.

TO-NIGHT

DINE AND DANCE

AT

\ \’S CLUB MORGAN
THE WEST INDIES MOST POPULAR NIGHT CLUB.

DELICIOUS STEAK DINNERS
Served throughout the Night

Dial 4000 for

—

MRS. HOUSE

Reservations

Check up and Replace your

HOUSEHOLD

We Have A Full Range of...

TEA CUPS & SAUCERS
TEAPOTS

MILK & CREAM JUGS
SUGAR BOWLS
PORRIDGE BOWLS

CROCKERY

LUNCH, BREAKFAST and
DINNER PLATES

SOUP PLATES

MEAT PLATTERS

VEGETABLE DISHES

SAUCE BOATS

Inspect these at our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

Telephone 2039.

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD.





Leen ne EEE EEEEEIEE EEE

Housewives’ Guide

Prices in the loca: mar cet
for Dry Peas and English
Potatoes when the “Adveo-

cate” checked yesterday
were:
Dry Peas: 18¢, per pint

English Potatoes: 16c. per tb.

B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME

SATURDAY, JULY 22, 1950
ne 145 p.m. Commentary on

Test; 7.00 am. The News, 7.10
rite News Analysis 7.15 a.m oe
MacPherson At The Theatre Organ; i”
am. From The Third Programme;
am. From The Editorials; £2) oe
Programme Parade; 8.15 a.m =e
Vs, West Indies; 8.35 4.m. Inter! 3
$45 a.m Colonial Questions; 9. .
a.m, Close Down. 10.30 a.m. Englan
Vs West Indies; aa Pi genom Close

own; 12,00 noon e ews
oe News Analysis; 12.15 p-m. Char
lie Kunz At The Piano; 12.30 p.m.
England Vs West Indies; 1.00 pers
English Eloquence, 1.15 p.m. R&i -
Newsreel; 1.30 p-m. Anything

Declare; 2.00 p.m. The News; 2.10
p.m. Home News From Britain; 2.15
pom Interlude; 2.25 p.m. Henry
Wood Promenade Concerts; 2.30 p.m.
God Save The King; 3 15 p.m. Inter-
jude; 3.30 p.m. Sports Review; 4.00
p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service; 4.15 p.m, Jack Train's Record
Variety Bill; 5.00 p.m. England Vs
West Indies; 5.05 p.m Interlude; 5.15
p.m Programme Parade; 5.30 p.m
Dance With Me; 6.30 p.m. From The
Third Programme; 7.00 p.m. The News;
7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m.
1.45 p.m. Cricket Report On Third
Test; 8.00 p.m, Radio Newsreel



6.15



CROSSWORD



1. Plain, (9)
7 This snake wants T for o cratt.
(3) 8. Song of praise. (5)
0. Honeur. (7)
1. This ts unusual. (8)
4 Spun reeds for a sock. (9)
5 Smal! dwellings. (4
. Short current me . (9)
Sort of mortar, (6)
Abbreviated statement. (
To be this in is to be do
Adriatic port. (4)
This ts fundamental. ¢9)
Down
Chis ciue 1s to confuse. 4
Mineral. (4)
Haul to excavate, (6)
. Cheese, (8)
[ts cathedra) 1s famous, (@)

(9)
Edge. (3)
Presh-sounding mammel, s)
Ordinary seaman, (2)
Indian State. (5)
Stone trom 24 Across, (@
Stop or stay! (4)
Wartime service, (3)
Lengthen. (3) 21. Portion. @0

Solution of Savurday'’s :
1, Piddlers Invoice; ooh 1
13, Cur, 14 med; 15,

18 t ‘Trite; 21, Ui

25° Separates, Dowm: 4,
(nundate: 5, Dges 4.
6. Ream; 7, Street:

12. Guy
ly. Sut



1.
2
$
a
u
6. Well-known order.
v
i)
2

te

o~





b, 22, See.



This week’s
GADGET

By JOAN DALE

GRE LL OLO






PIT I

A
clea
mop can be used
high walls and ceilings and

useful aid
ing, this

to spring-
pliable wall
to clean

ARMA OLE ROP LPL EAE APE PPA

will bend into the ost
difficult corners.
Price 14s. 9d.

PRIOR POOP



a Expr

— —— —————

ROYAL (Worthings)

| Today 5 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing

Columbia Pictures Present



Robert Young, Barbara Hale
in

“AND BABY MAKES
THREE”
with
Robert Hutton, Janis Carter



Extra—2 Reel short
“Training for Trouble”

EMPIRE

TODAY 2.30 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing



20th Ceniury Fox Presents

Montgomery CLIFT
Paul DOUGLAS

in

“THE BIG LIFT”

with Cornell BORCHERS
Bruni LOBEL

ROXY

Today 4.45 & 8.15 p.m.
and Continuing



Fox presents
Gregory PECK
Helen WESTCOTT

in

20th Century

“THE GUNFIGHTER”

with Millard MITCHELL
Jean PARKER

OLYMPIC

Today 4.45 & 8.15 p.m.
Sun, 4.45 & 8.45 p.m.



Republic Pictures present

George Brent. Vera Ralston
in
“DRUMS ALGNG THE
AMAZON”

with Brian Aherne,
Constance Bennett



———








13, Grates: i4. P





99

“s,

JULY 1950

SATURDAY,



to catch butterflies. Will you come
and join me?” Rupert thinks a

“

Rupert hurries forward and sees
that the other little figure is young

% illy,”” ly you won't

Billy Goat. Hi, Billy,” he calls, moment. But sure ou

” Y haven't seen you for ages. catch any butterflies yet, re

What's that | you're carrying? laughs. ‘* There arent any. Se

Where are you going?" “ Hullo, too early - ci you, ~ aa
rt,” says Billy. “ r thi lank. ‘‘Oh, deag, never thoug!

Rupert,”’ says Billy. “* Look at this blan = > ae neve Ot





net that my Grannie

n our attic. I’m just of



+



WHEN SOMEONE SPRAYS
HIS GERMS ON YOU...

WITH

LISTERINE
ANTISEPTIC

AS SOON AS YOU CAN



LISTERINE Antiseptic, full strength, kills
millions of germs on throat surface. It
attacks these germs associated with colds
before they attack you ... keeps them
from starting serious trouble. Take the
sensible precaution against cold compli-
cations—gargle with LISTERINE Anti-
septic, full strength!



IN TESTS OVER A 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS
OF LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COLDS!



GATETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, 8.30 P.M
MATINEE : SUNDAY, 5.00 P.M.
Twentieth Century Fox Present .
JOHN GARFIELD in:

“UNDER MY SKIN”











eae

PLAZA A 3-DAY SPECIAL!

FRIDAY, SAT., SUN. MAT.
Warner's Classic

NITE 8.30
(Re-issued)

6 p.m

Academy Award Winners
Fredric
MARCH

Olivia
HAVILLAND

IN
ANTHONY ADVERSE

(By Hervey Allen)
DON’T MISS IT!

DE

‘labeled?











AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE : TODAY AT 5.00 P.M.
TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
Paramount's New Picture
“RED HOT AND BLUE”

Starring BETTY HUTTON VICTOR MATURE
WILLIAM DAMEREST JUNE HAVOC
“Red, Hot and Blue” is joyous, tuneful and happy-go-lucky

SPECIAL MATINEE: THIS MORNING AT
9.30 O'CLOCK
Monogram presents :
JIMMY WAKELY
“SPRINGTIME IN TEXAS” }











ae z=
GLOB
a E
TODAY 5.00 and 8.30 P.M. TO TUESDAY

“THE RED DANUBE"

| Walter Ethe Peter
| PIDGEON BARRYMORE LAWFORD

LOCAL TALENT AUDITION
GLOBE THEATRE, 9.30 A.M.

WM Wy

SOLE AGENTS:—

MANNING & CO., LTD.





ATURDAY, JULY 22,

Keep Children Away

1950

From Cinemas













































‘WINDOW ON EU

Hy





























BARBADOS ADVOCATE
ROPE:



GUNNINGHAM











Australian

GERMANY AND KOREA Homes tn

Short Supply

SYDNEY, Australia







PAGE THREE





“Accessories
Are Also
Guilty”

Leopold
Returns

To-day

senna?





















































2 nd Ti P j DO = . from page 1
Headmistress ells aren. —— ae 2 LON N. Europe These have strengthenedout Germany, their forces may |, Greatest social problem in Au October, Pecpoid 4 intained he —SAYS ACHESON
j 1 HE a. positior of Germany, political and economic bonds not be strong enough for this ee to-day is the housing}nad advised the British and
' mincially divided and ruled by between the Grotewohl Govern- The inclusion of German troops in }5°! tage : 7 ieee 4 WASHINGTON, J 0
= . I AT two Governn , F < I sin a . French of the possibi ipitu- ‘
: AT THE URSULINE CONVENT last evening Mother |, hee eee one Communist- ment and the satellites (though Western defence, therefore, may | ,/" 1947, there was a deficiency }lation as early as M Conerens Pee
Teresita the Headmistress in her report on the work of + tutels ph eae og — no German could ever welcome soon,be inevitable es 197,000 homes, At the end of He counter-charged tha he bys - iy @
: : er utelage, inevitably evokes the sign away aman ters ast year, the deficiency had{[British failed nform tt ; Ose i e North
the Main Schoc . = 7 x , ? i ae ee lea a ; signing away of German terri- f ritish failed? ta inform the Be
a a Scho 1 for 1949—50 thanked the parents of pupils, | Comparison with Korea, The West tory involved in the frontier pacts Pactics Over Austria grown to an estimated 212,000. }gian High Command their’ in-| *' 1 ce rear ‘
ies Sacer the past year, “have generously co-operated Germans are consequently exhi- with Poland and Czechoslovakia) In New South Wales—largest| tention to evacuate their forces | 8h! legally o earded as hav
with us in matters involving certain changes in view of |y"% Signs of uneasiness, and, The Austrian Treaty negotia-}St#te in the Commonwealth—the from the Continent. ‘The British | #98 Committe Sena
the welfare of the children.” Pe ae the Western Powers are Finally, the elections in East- tors met in London this week and |S%O'tage increased from 79,000 in}and French charges that Le« pold | aren : espondent
1 “0 ° rents Renin o ~ ath i . - 7 Acheso ¢ r
95 ath, iillie RM Ae _} ‘thank-you’ before they leave sa, | Ot Monae Fned. Events in Korea ern Germany next October will, as usual, adjourned without ac-|/947 to 90,000 at the end of 1949, | failed to tell them his intention | aa te Tiras
“to the a ee she said! and to offer them our good Wishes | intentions cleo oun. te Russian -heoretically, make the puppet comptishing anything. Once again although 60,392 new homes were[to surrender, have been denied by | “S® "°C"4 nent
: proposal which we mude| for success te tha eee spheres | mere likely then Gort, V2er? Government an independent one. the Soviet Deputy introduced the | OUit during the period. many people, among them Admiral} | 2)" ,
rare — November, when we} of work : *; more likely than German The Communists have already red herring of Trieste iaite the Equally disturbing is the in-[Lord Keyes, head of Special) >" khe
irs as > r ¢ . & st t ~ohaa r so a
‘hang ska you to consider a Do Not Give I |, sre, the similarity between ‘ecided that they will have a discussions that have dragged on{St@ased cost of building. A house] Mission to the King at the time] (0) 18d
‘ ange of school hours. For some I now Suen te Ate € } Menge | the two situations is more appar- Preponderance of seats in the pow for over four vane, : His here that cost £1,000 ($2,400), f Surrender Bonen’
ime we had been contemplating . > you, the Parents tent than real. Weste+n troops have ratio of 7 to 3. But this “in- tactics ‘a Siplus £250 for land September. J, Churchill's second volume of ‘+
this: ch Cf our pupils, to ask your further ps have tactics, during this time, have}? r land, in September . s ;
mus Change, owing to the benefits} ¢¢ -operation in that m: rturther | not been withdrawn from Ger- dependence” is bound to lead to shown clearly that Russia is de-| 1039. Pow costs £2,500 his “Seconé World War” last year |}
which we realised would be de- importance B pep hey roe) of vital! many as American troops were 4 fresh claim, on its part, to be liberately stallin a sa ts Ce- 1 £2,750, plus £500 for land gave a versie the evidence of | jrorea
~ Bee C nce, — the tr : = oy . tely s ae: as r . ’ ‘ é othe aca ‘
fein a school time-table| cider girls. To quoly the wore from South Koree. Germany is the Government of all Germany. tentior of cignitte a Treaty until The figures cover the averaye roe Mg a ee ee |
2x ei Ss. s a aie ie ‘i ° § a aty } a - shee 's f nents ¢«
ound en pert a ae of ' Reverend Mother Prioress | ie REC Te Cente - me a war, Dr. Adenauer is reported to it suits her. Equally clear, until oer home in Sydney or tat gh ae at, en na 1 at
* » instead o tole ri sTi 7 sone earher 9y the Senate have r , om " ba ; : ‘Wwase? 2 “lk rne cons 5 ; . . Of Com ’
12 and 1 to 3 in thas. biases tates Ceneral of the Ursuline Order, in| whereas -icorea ‘© relativeles © Alin renewed his request to the NOW, has been the West's desir: pes “Vv aE of two bel-t munications were largely respon- | Se wa
Our ‘pedphies ‘i aft on. | her book entitled, “Ursuline|\.. 04... 5 : relatively, Allied High Commission for a ‘© conclude an agreement quick- 4°00, ving room, din ng}sible for alleged ill-fait! , Of aggression
: plan was, as it] Method of Education’’, “Education | ° ons ar i ter s An invasion gtiarantee of German security. ly. But recent events may well ;'00™ kitehen, bathroom, laundry After capitul ti a oe } rephed i va
cemed, welcomed by you, for! should make of young girls com- ct Western Germany either by The reply of Mr McCloy, the reverse this situation | a t .,and sun porch or verandah. It} turned tot “cig ‘al eRe h j principle in law. He 1 that
ii \ too, clearly understood that} piete Catholic women, women ot Russia or by the Russian-sponsor- U.S High Commissioner. iain Powers. It woul ns —— ~ [is constructed on a lot of abou withdrew: ante ca bl “life “ law one could be ‘ ry bef
itth vork po ae . . h t ¢ arn te 4 3 + Ss : os : oO e s . ” ™ 7 : ibhe ife anc r+ ‘ BY 4
2 7 work accomplished by a] integrity, integral Catholics." |‘ i _ bare military units’ of the that such a guarantee was un- prising in fact f Britain, |20 feet by 150 feet and connect lived as a virtual prisoner a i ifs after the f
perv ite — two hours of | What should be done to help each aah Ret bl would immedi- necessary as an attack on West France nd America a dines: See gas, water and electricity the four veats of aa 1 ation ; On He id the N .orea
afternoon school. : n ately unleash’ ; £ “2 wn Lp pe said ee oe ‘ em-~ , & io ote i oaks “ee - asior iad be +)
0 of the pupils to develop her lnahiveon'faans ee where? ul war Ge rmany would automatically ployed delaying tactics at the | The shortage —due to shorta [September 11, 1940, he married . ST a na b ‘ : “ fu
We thank you very much for integral worth, the natural ans : . . hean* An attack on the Western conference table. The signing of |°! Materials and skilled wor Madamoiselle Mary-iiliane Baels. |. ae - Ripa ii le
: . hs a ‘ ca 2 sais Mette eal ~ § . av . as suppose to overwt t
your generous" co-bperdtion th Sapepapural nergies that she ha Nevarthelics Western taxi Pow ers _This is undoubtedly ‘true, a Peace Treaty would mean the oe is aie for some alar commoner and daughter of former }icorea in a vers er rhs lm ; put
that matter, in spite of the in- a 0 tO render herself capable | many’s nervousness is understand- 24! !t can hardly have satisfied withdrawal of occupation troops ogi socint: fehden ces Home Affairs Minister The Bel-tiiad been it tant ‘ i sae.
cenvehilences” whith oh eae of the great and holy duties of a able. It has not been éased by = German Chancellor, He has from Austria — an event that ee newlyweds have to lin Jgian people did not hear Of. ThE cote seanbete to “ote ae ig-
echenié ‘lige Guisamd’ ts aes aie “3 malic Nene and Mother, capable [certain Soviet actions directed ames for the authority to create might have dangerous consequen- ee as Seale for at least severa foie until December of the ftione Security Council. 7 ie United
ents, and we can truly say that} 9 eee ae maysruniiaine jagainst the West recently. The 3, cera police of 30,000 in place ces in the light of what happened aaa as : ter marriage. Psycho! > ot pate ii a pastorel letter Nations had met this case of ag.
the change is proving beneficial] eiforts were limited to. t f our!Czech Note accusing the United f ne veaene decentralized police j), Korea, Russia, on the other |” ae divorce courts say ‘thi: Doe d's wife SHE ae Sale’ [gression learly 1 squarely
to the pupils: More and better i Cromer ge + ne eg ae States of dropping Colorado of the ander. In view of the hand, could hardly have anticipa- ws responsible for many divorcees elon wi appro the rank [Phere wa: the’ United statis oF
work is accomplished during all] \.ould be only information. wr beetles by aircraft on Czech soil Rhea in Masern Germany, of ted President Truman's sttong ac- Red Gate ih wrt oe Panes ould’ en} +e ) het enlaren the world behind the United Na
the hours of the present arrange- THE intellect of tie Bhi , fis the third official protest from ®?™med police units, equipped with tion on behalf of U.N.O. She may, Rete Social workers say titi 4 aby nati os “ 4e rights. i tions, and in America itself there
ment, and at 1 o’clock the girls] be trained, but the ‘child. MUS! I the Communists on this subject pict Pong howitzers and therefore, think it best to keep eee immorality ase : was united natio behind United
can go home for a good meal. only gifted with intelligence; aa The first two Notes were from the han ws iy 100,00 ’ mer now, negotiations with the West open at otbe ot > eater hee. bene In June 1944, after the Allied | Natio — aoe
oan » § Soviet Government, with Eastern , riy Ne men now, \ 2 prolongec yecause no authority |: s Le ld and hi i —-
. : has also receive » V s . . the monent ag she did when the z ) ivasion, Leopold at is family
265 Pupils great faculty BY wilt = ana Germany as the territory alleged a ia does not western Rehare showed _ they oe to demolish any dwelling} were taken to internment at a e
, ; g, z me “ * by , seem unreasonable ace, howeve cre : fort in § : THEY Wwére tran l :
This year the school has num-|'™#2"’S moral worth is the value o have been “sabotaged” by these Thi sti meant business over the Berlin $ dn > na lone. one ae a RS on ae er A rgentine
ered 265 ls. 1 t ,Jof his will, The child is her formidable potato pests. (The us question of a West Ger- jiockade in 1948 Sydney alone, there are an esti- rred to Strobl, near Salzburg in < ov eC
have Gad) ns p 4 of whom own responsibility a’ free Pie wa fact that the beetles infest South ™an federal police was discussed - : ‘ mated 40,000 houses which health} Austria, where they were liberated e
ontemauel "Pre ao sp wie hence the importat ce of Te rniee West Germany as well was con- & the recent meetings in London Peace Music ‘uthorities say are unfit for habi-Sby the American Seventh Army De Dui ties
ree a ti and reparatory De- to will and to will arash arning veniently forgotten) . These Of the study group on Germany. There is no saying to what lengths} tation. Many families are living]in May 1945 «
ber "ee 35 at oe, num-! Children must of necessity either |@bsurd propaganda charges would Tt is probable that Dr. Adenauer’s the Communists will go in theirjin = make-shift dwelling-terts, Leopold’s brother Charles con ; :
eee i ee Rated Wel 1 ov on honant — According to | hardly deserve attention if’ they W)sh will be granted. If the in- campaign for “peace,” They have | shacks and trailers tinued to act as Regent for the Agree
73 ae ach an the five forms! God's law. it is the dure ct Miter did not seem a pretext—to prepare ternational _ situation .Worsens, even enlisted the support of music To cope with the problem, the] ing, writing that il health pre- 5
rovid ‘; ain School. We have] +, honour their parents by obedi- | ,case, perhaps, for interfering German nationalism will, in any In the current edition of the Rus- government ig encouraging imr)|-| Vented his immediats return to . .
} 2, 0, mine feat ’ s - a J 2 S30 me . * . » The ale soc « _
} ided accommodation for 80] ence We are then striving to| With the Western air-route to case eventually insist that Ger- sian art review, “Sovietskoie Is-|grants with building experiet. -¢ Belgium. The Belyi ocialists First Time In Years
girls who have been boarders at} inculcate irito the Faron’ hearts Berlin many nag such a force. And in koustvo,” there appears a letter/and restricting construction “6| WhO have steadfastly opposed the BUENO '
a f ove nt; some of these are’ of your girls this spirit of Pubmies More serious was the cutting off View of Korea the Western Pow- ‘from Soviet musicians addressed to |home-building and essential work ing return, demand d his abdi For the { . t t ares oUhy a
Soe Venezuela and _ British] sion and obedience to authority, {of Water and electricity to the ers I think, may at an early gate, their foreign colleagues—particu-|In Sydney for example, no new erp Leopold replied that he the Arse: i , ce oe SO Seared
uiana, and others are from the] which is the basis of all content. | Western sectors of Berlin. This be compelied to revise their pres- larly in Britain, France and Am-Joffice buildings have been built nie on rece abandoning | | heots Atl pam of Depu
neighbouring islands of Trinidad,} ment in life. A spirit of insub-|™Might be the first measure in a ent policy of German nonrearma- erica. “We Soviet musicians,” con-jsince before the war and there |s sf parone at Taeal te, bls eum inte Hews gnc oar heard
Antigua, St. Lucia, and Guade-| ordination exists among many] Progressive blockade of the city ment. Only by a_ situation of cludes)the letter, “ask you this lan acute shortage of office he ing eh nidboore “sj pd in 1 en ian "Gideiiah noe eee
> ~ 3 ” : . » face spreod “s yh ibe oppo t 1 it
Tans young girls today. We beg of you, | Such as happened in'1948. Another strength”, by, for instance, rein- what have you done to strengthen | commodation. Ralgivin, apd wtiled wt Pregny,jatained « ured : Ce
The standard of work of the] the parents, to co-operate with us| Significant move have been the forcing Western Germany, can peace? Where are your songs.| State and Federal government Switeerland E ; ’ au ‘ted S Wennou e when if
; ‘ eae ei : * : . nl : é . adopted A resolutic reaffir >
pupils of the school has, through-|in exacting from your girls 2|pacts concluded recently between they hope to prevent further your cantatas and your sympho-|have sent missions abroad to exam) It was learned Inte: that when|ti ts pari Miah ane S -.
out the year, been quite satis-| prompt, loyal, and filial obedience, | Eastern Germany and the Com- Communist aggression. But the nies dedicated to the struggle for ine pre-fabricated houses which] the Socialist delevat “called attr SE meee LAG NRTA
factory, and good progress has] Vo not give in to their every wish;] munist countries of Eastern Western Powers know that, with- peace?” will be imported duty-free and, in| the palace earlier toiay to. “talk |ridoetes: Tite hectare eee
de to, 4 Ms i 1 4 . & e * : . , . ~ " . Pi S or. it ‘ lj.
ea mn effected Special mention] Go ney attempt to satisfy their ail some cases, under government sub-j leave” of Prince Charles, they [ton ah ind ald il He :
owever, must be made of the| every desire; it is very good for sidy, Prices are high, however,}| were told the Pri was indls. , De aE en See
; : ABS , : : i gh, As longed, belor |
keen and intelligent spirit of}/them to receive sometimes a ‘ e _ . f sper re-fe sed and ld re Y? : will belong
ge hi Q i ¢ and experts view the pre-fabs as posed and could pol receive therm we. Bin :
a woe has arate among refgsal. aa = : P Plane Ss Blast Nine Answer Call k or Aid little more than a stop-gap pro-| The gent reseen, 1» official said pee es se
1¢ members = o orms IV}_, ; am away from the ‘ * eram j “is that Prince Charles does not Ay Sy mae SA
and V. These pupils have taken|C!memas which, owing to the low Seoul and Taejon . ry" : Sin want to receive the Catholic dele- |f8erically repudiate the project of
an intelligent interes i t standards of morality, the excess- n ?; r gation also due to call on him.” a member of t British Parlia~
thett sonia. a oie Saas 3 io! Smotlonsiamn-nhd-eenitican.) @ From page 1. n orea ar oe ee ND | Referring to his repor , od if npan {ment (who proposed that Byitain
: ave ; nik reseed | tality, and the play assions ' a spokesman close to th tired [protest against the ret f the
¢ have unanimously expressed shore exhibited a eras ees Another enemy division con- WASHINGTON, July 21. The reply mentioned 26,000 Philip- LOSI G GROU a nen — + ar retnee Satine vr Behera " or hi
he opinion that the girls havel of evil for young girls today Give | fronts the South Korean’ force], U.N. Secretary-General Trygve pine scouts who were willing to From page 1 Sn UEYeTE AO Eile coer Aiea Tee coktade SELON ctehoce chem
worked — splendidly We have], Vong e SAhs togay. Give bas ‘ line f he |Lie said at a press conference to- serve in Korea peech Monsieur Paul Reynaud | 4" aceldent to his eye Anti-Leo~ [as postage British stamps bearing
- yveur children healthy pleasures at| holding a rough line from the : " ; ; old Socialists and Communists, [the inseriptio Falk! lfinds,”
reason to expect good results in] },orn¢ ; ‘ American right flank northeast-{@@y that nine countries had so far ex-Prime Minister of France, | hee ten Cabinet ¢ vi an-4 Stab th, $6 be dan Kaa
the School Certificate Ex«mina- , s rard td the Vicinity of Hamchong.|ZeSPonded to his appeal for aid to 2, Norway, said she could send} warned the = meeting: “Soviet | Cespite a \ivbine commurigve an~ }considering it to le au unfrfendby
en mn It is sad to find in many young] o Mie Witinity Ob SeMcRene. he orea hui none had bitered ground no tr but offered at yf Russia to-day possessed the |MOUNcing King Leopold's likely fact prejudicial to Argentine sov-
Tk aun Meanie aie eee zirls a spirit of selfishness, of self-| Two more enemy divisions ar8|forces, ‘The story that the Secre- space ee le tne in the world, 170 {return for Suttrday, persisted that |eteignty' arid requests the Covert
Aft the Oxford and Cambridge eking: and we teel sure that developing a drive down the et enna ar a ve secre- space : Strongest army in the world, 1% ho might stilt make suforish : f ‘ ) mw Govern.
Sehéb! Certificate Examination] selfishness | is d * Haman high tariat was secretly organising a — 3, Denmark, offered one Danish, infantry divisions. 35 armoured | ; ee a prise ap- tnient not to accept the British pro-
] J 4 ation) selfishness is one of the basic] Mungyang-Ha ong highway | volunteer army had “not a word Red Cross ambulance unit divisions, 60 artillery divisions.” | Pearance at the Independence Day {test which it was proposed to make
ahaa ily 1949, the five can-| causes of the ruptures in family} confronted by the Sixth © South | of truth in it”, Lie said. He added 4. Sweden "said it ce im- M. Sewn auc 208 tinued: “She js | Parade to be staged in Brussels} Although membe: age th ae
didates who were suctessful,} fe today. Our work, then, is to | Korean Division midway between |that the whole question of ¢ sible to send aid tut| working night ao this afternoon. Tait Ste: Gardeuniaees
obtained good results : fixe a. oe : h e question of an In- possible to send military aid but} working night and day, Sundays at . sition joined with the Government
ain ood results: hetp rue form your girls into | the tWo towns. ternational Volunteer Legion was offered to equip and pay for alas well, to rearm. Millions of . prea et peep, ismed benchers for the first time itt ap-
+ , 7 valian iristian women, — gen- % L i saat Re 7 s “d : 7 xy parties urging their fe wers '
Lucille Grace—3 credits; efdus: gubiiiaaton Grusi i ote United Nations ships and planes oem ie oe Soo Command Swedish field hospital, ; prisoners, enslaved men, women |, > orb ’ nny pe ae proving the above text they voted
Madge Quesnel—3 credits and] gqerif ap Fi Basck: amicog be to-day d the stubborn re-]9"d the Security Council. 5. Peru, made no offer of mili-}] and children, are toiling at this | cesay veces, jagainst the part of the te hich
acrif Ps tes > share o-day covere e stu m . iy ; sady t le § . COE K pat f text whi
; ; sacrificing; — women of character, » “Neither I nor any r ber of tary aid but announced her will- rk.” ready to demonstrate if neces-
! tinction ; of high ‘iples. of preat ideale | treat of ground troops back to the : ly member of sar) ; work. sary.” In most centres throug “welcomes the firm and decidéd on
3 f high principles, of great ideals. the United Nz S 3s t snter bile Ai . 5, $ ‘ ary n most centres throughout
Christine Gordon—4 credits ad} who pwill be trode. fetes: | tine of hard resistance” from Nations.Secretariat has ingness to enter into bilateral ne- People might regard Korea 45| qnij-Leopoldist Wallonia highly |the policy of President Peron who
+t Alatitichon i a ead) ce sacrifice, which’ General Mae Arthur will done anything about it,” he said. gotiations with the Unified Com- | far away, M. Reynaud said. “But fee ustiiott Ay , fans! a Pin, Jalways unfailing! ntatnea’ the
; : a “e 6 5} = Wak tat) A eal . Te Abert f ae : : alisec anch = speAking | olw ung y main C
Rosemarie Clege—6 credits: Hen She will be etron: hs a jJaunch his counter offensive, But Menke Pepe ao contrny nor ming Sopcenting other types of /1 would remind you of what) provinces in the soutt “Ar tneiright of the Argentiie nation, to
. _ : f 5 =e © - ; J ste assistance ond a letter: shoi , Lis - ‘ on
Charmian Henzeil—4 credits] azeous enough to face and combat | 0" the right flank, the allied front American conkeduan. that ek 6 A ” 4 : ae vom M snout Pe en ; country the Belgian flag wasjtie Malvinas Ist ind more
and 4 distinctions, with ex-| the dangers and obstacles to happi- near the east coast, United Nations dential offers of grotnd Poors ae ae eens, apnea’ het was ee eae hie of - is I being fown at half mast today. pecially for the refusal to accept
n ; : : 3 $ s ante rec in 5 e y and] A .
emption from Matriculation] ness which will lie in their path|8tound troops went over to theleen made by several countries, gotiations with the Unified Cam. | Celeutta.” mg, ¥" | —Reuter, © British stamp —Reuter
when they leave school; valiant offensive after naval guns had “I do not know whether " d an \ ‘ init spat ‘Karlie .!
In the school curriculum, Art,! women who later will be the Wi laid down a murderous curtain of | ¢ have’ bi nether ground mand through Washington, but} Earlier Mr, Churchill had poi }
‘ ; ‘ \ ate 2 > res ces a p » specifie ‘ . . a ‘
have had an important place, as} ead who wil See eeeee, | closed: whethe: Ss who went ave been ‘. France, placed at the United | Paul Ramadier and Paul Reynatid,
ace, as}; Will be the leaven to raise | Closed whether troops who went/put I know there are i s N s di ¢ as , rer
well as the other usual academic] tie standard of family life ani forward towards Yongdok 25] going on about it,” be ee ie ee aeeitee | —— a ne Win) Sty be oh
ubjects, and very good work has] maintain its dignity and unity, and | Miles north of the point where|General said. i "the Far East r eB Belgie oe a Premier” tte , rial |
been achieved in Art and Music.| who will thus’ help to re-~| America’s First Cavalry Division] Nine replies were from the fol- 8. Brazil, offered to enter into fo aia pip cada } view
At the examinations of the Asso-| Christianise society, and bring God | !anded a few days ago were}lowing countries: negotiations about all aid within Wane catiny of to im moe -
ciated Board of Music—Theory and] beck to the world and to men American or South Korean. Smoke} 1. The Philippines, which said her means iifone in Union which did . t |
nna ce ve q ve ide © T > 2 . i ‘ ry . ry + r ‘ Ms me F | a
Practical—the 13 candidates who This is our aim, the subject of | from _the guns of two cruisers—jshe was prepared to enter into 9. Greece, said she would send include. Germahy was bound to
entered, were all successful. At] Our prayer, and for this end do we, | 9M British and one American—|direct consultation with the Uni- no troops but offered to contribute fvil? he said. But even with
the examinations of the Trinity]! our Ursuline method of educa- | Still hung thick in the dusty air as|/fied Command. The Philippines six transport planes, Germany “Ineluded “we must

College of Music the 8 candidates

who entered were likewise, all
successful In view of encour-|§
aging a greater appreciation of} ‘
good music we have, this term,
formed a Musical Society at the
chool. Already, several good
vramophone records have been

added to the school collection, and
some enjoyable hours have been
spent in listening to and appreciat-
ing the symphonies of Beethoven
and Mozart, and the compositions
of Chopin, and other Masters

During the past year numerous
ditions have been made to the
School Reference Library, and to

the Form Libraries We are
leased to be able to say that the
School Reference Library now
ontains many books of value. The
tem of Form Libraries, as well
weekly library
erio the time-table, have
ved well the purpose of encour-
the girls to read much

the special



aging

In the sphere of games, a keen
pirit has been maintained
throughout the year, and many an
enthusiastie inter-house match has
been played to decide the winners
f the cups for Netball, Tennis,
Rounders and Table Tennis, An
enthusiastic ‘house’ spirit was also
displayed on Sports Day last Oc-

I
tober. when St. Augustine’s House,












—~Blue House-won the Sports
Cup
‘he Senior Netball and Junior
Ror ers Teams have had the |
pleasure of playing matches
neainst Codrington High School.
th here at the Convent and at
he High School. On both cecas-
the schools shared the
tory, — the Codrington team
nning t Netball, and the
suline girls at Rounders
I v take this opportunity to



s my gratitude to the mem-
the staff for their loyalty,
their devotedness to duty in
eir work for the children, Thei: |
active and willing co-operation has



of
ind



made it possible for us all, closely
united, to work for the good of}
cur pupils. At the beginning of
the school year we were Very
pieased to welcome back Miss;
Marv Harford who kindly offered |













her valuable services for yet
another year, — her ninth year
We re sorry that we shall be|
losing both her and Miss Doreen |
Roberts from the School Staff this |
yea Miss Roberts has bee vith |
l s for the past four year Wea j
truly 1 to them both |
the they rende
iC and t heart!

courage your girls in all that

ion, instruct, enlighten, and en-

is
sood, great, noble, beautiful, hon.
surable; and God-like in life,



The Weather

TODAY

Sun Ris 5.39 a.m,

Sun Sets: 6.21 p.m.

Itigh Water: 9.25 a.m.,
9.41 pum.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) Nil
Total for Month to Yester-

day: 1.61 ins.



the infantry attack began.

On the Korean front near the
burning and abandoned Taejon
former provisional capital, Amer-
ican soldiers were taking up new
prepared defence positions.
South of the town fired by allied
bombers in a farewell blitz as the
Americans pulled out in the face
of heavier armour, United States
24th Division, weard from long
fighting dug in for another delay-
ing action.

In the centre front, South
Koreans struck a few offensive
blows in the general picture of a
| desperate bid to stall for time
; while United Nations reinforce—
ments are built up.



Temperature; (Max.) 85.0°F

Temperature: (Min.) 73.5°F

Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E,
(3 p.m.) E

Wind Velocity: 10 miles per
hour

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.976,
(3 p.m.) 29.931






FOR COLDS!

of

LOOK OUT

They were reported mopping up

{two Communist battalions at
{Pungni between Tanyang and
| Yongju while 15 miles further
jsouth other South Korean units

| hit back in the area of Yechon the
| key town to the valley corridors
| which has changed hands several
| times in the past tew days.
—Reuter.






@ Got the sniffles? Starting to sneeze? Feel a

dry, rasping seasation in your throat? Cold

coming on? G

argle Listerine Antiseptic im-

mediately. Doing so prompuy and frequently

may keep a col





of germs. So, a

25h

d from getting serious or help

ward it off. Listerine Antiseptic reaches way
back on your throat surfaces—kills millions

t the first sign of a cold, gargle

Listerine and keep it up—it may save you a

nasty, expensive siege:

Li STE Rt i nt F Antiseptic




Government was allowing its
nationals to volunteer for service
with Korean forces but to safe-
guard national defence no Gov-
ernment troops would be sent.

Lie said it was “too premature”
to pass judgment on whether the
United Nations appeal was a suc-
cess or a failure.

@ on page 5

Nae vw ee ene.

OO ree

Specially designed tor Barb

is

Brown/White

icading stores.

made by





Two-tone brogue in Black/White and
now on sale at the

never forget that—half of Europe
still remains outside.” “United
Evrope” he said, is one of thi
indispensable pillars of world
peace.-Reuter,

ba an

ados, this

JOHN WHITE ©

|














aie SVARKLING drit I i 8
~ * effecti laxative t ! I ( ,
pee H Andrews combines both these req 1 vr
4 he daily round mor heerful, to promote % !
vodily health
Vhis ideal form of lax i aul ul
| he stomach and t ip t Finalls
} rently clears the bowel “neuri te
FRVESCEN! Cleantin
( Just take one teaspoonful of Ar 1 f
| % ater, and you have immediately a zzy {rink ¢
f efresh you at any time of the da
« {
<=") ANDREWS
Sy LIVER SALT
: THE IDEAL FORM OF LAXATIVE
K.1965/50
May we have the pleasure of
- :
supplying you with one of the
| following Motor Wehicles
|
1
|
|
{
} The STANDARD VANGUARD
| 68 h.p. 6 seater Saloon
The STANDARD 12 ewt. PICK-Ui
The STANDARD DELIVERY VAN
The STANDARD ESTAT ‘AR
The TRIUMPH RENOWN 2 Litr
The TRIUMPH MAYFLOWER
38 h.p. 4 seater Saloon
| .
| This ne model is expected in 3 mont
CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LTD.
Agents Trafalgar Street
Versa rs + SST = = =z = SE = Ss







ee

SOOO

_——— oe
ne —— SE





*

PAGE FOUR



p ADVOGATE

== {sees ce)

Printed by the Advorate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown.







SATURDAY JULY 22, 1950

PROBATION

THE purpose of punishment is one on
which jurists, criminologists and sociolo-
gists cannot agree, but three reasons have
been adduced for punishment. One is that
it should act as a deterrent to others who
would essay to tread the paths of crimin-
ality. The second is that it should be an
expression of society’s vengeance against
those who have offended against society's
eode and thirdly that it should act as re-
formative treatment by which the offender
may be persuaded to give up a life of crime
to become a useful member of the com-
munity.



Within recent years the last of these has
received especial attention and the system
of probation has become an established
feature of a modern and progressive com-
munity. In his report of 3lst March 1950
Capt. T. H. Brooks, the then Probation
Officer writes, “Probation has been de-
scribed as a process of social reconstruction
under the guidance of the Court and the
Probation Officer. It is not a remedy com-
pounded of sentiment and wishful think-
ing. It is more than a gesture of leniency.
It is the means of giving persons who lack
training and educational advantages the
benefits of a firm, friendly and understand-
ing guidance, together with discipline and
training.”

In Barbados real Probation began with
the coming into operation of the Juvenile
Offenders Act, 1932. Under that Act the
Governor. was given power to appoint Pro-
bation Officers and to make rules regarding
their duties. The officers of the Salvation
Army who had been doing good work along
similar lines and who were eminently
suited to carry out Probation duties were
invited to assume responsibility for this
work throughout the island.

No praise can be too high for the officers
of the Salvation Army who attended the
infancy of the Probation Service in Barba-
dos. So conspicuous was their success that
in 1945 the Legislature enacted the Proba-
tion of Offenders Act which gave to adults
as well as juveniles the benefits of the
Probation system. The Salvation Army
were asked to provide a full-time officer
and the appointment of Capt. T. H. Brooks
in May 1946 coincided with the Proclam-
ation of the Act.

In the years that have passed and mainly
due to the zeal and energy of Capt. Brooks,
the Probation System has grown consider-
ably and the staff of the office has had to be
incfeased. Capt. Brooks relinquished his
office earlier this year and the Probation
Office will no longer be staffed by members
of the Salvation Army. Mr. Huraphrey
Walcott who acted as assistant to Capt.
Brooks and who is now under-going train-
ing in England will be returning later in
the year to fill the vacancy occasioned by
the departure of Capt. Brooks.

Recognition of the great work done by
ithe Probation Officers is reflected in the
eagerness with which Judicial Officers have
taken advantage of their services and by
the manner in which the legislature seeks
to extend the scope of their duties in cases
in which children and matrimonial affairs
are concerned.

a * “7 ean $a ' (a
The time has come, however, when the
Government should not only increase the
work of'the Probation Officers but should
Also enact legislation to facilitate their
work and give to the Officers status and
salaries commensurate with the important
and onerous nature of their duties.

Highest on the priority list of legislation
should: be a Children’s and Young Persons
Act as was recommended by the Commit-
tee. which sat under the chairmanship of
Mr. G. H. Adams. The recommendations of
this Committee which were made in 1946
have not yet been implemented.

The Acting Colonial Secretary has
pointed out that juvenile delinquency in
Barbados has not reached the alarming
proportions which it has done in the United
Kingdom but in view of the widespread
poverty and poor housing conditions of so
large a percentage of the population a vigi-
lant watch must be maintained and steps
taken to ensure that juvenile delinquency
does not attain a more serious character.

It appears that a greater liaison could
exist with advantage between the Proba-
tion Service and the Social Welfare Office.
The work which they perform have much
in common and if their joint resources were
utilised in the establishment of Hostels
and Youth Centres the work of both de-
partments would be rendered easier.

Mr. Walcott will continue the good work
so ably begun by the Salvation Army with
the aid of his assistants Messrs F. H.
O’Neale and B. Bourne and Miss H. Weekes.
It will be their task to persuade the Gov
ernment to enact the necessary measures
to enable them to deal with their increas-
ing duties.

The problem of delinquency is of vital
importance to the community and all sup-
port should be given to those who are
attempting to tackle the problem in a con-
structive way.

‘| the month;

Hy ¢.

Weather conditions during the
month of June were favyourabie
} for the growth of all field crops.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

(. Skheete (Director of

Class The Rally, which was
conducted along similar lines to
last year's, was very well attend-

| "The rainfall was well above the ed indeed, and the contcdst keen-

| average and, in the great majority
j of districts, there were approxi-

mately twenty days on which rain and St.

| fell
| 3rd.,

| 4th.,

llth and 23rd.

ly contested. The silver challenge
cups were won by the St. Thomas
Lucy teams in the Dairy

The heaviest falls occurred o1 Cattle and Mutton Sheep Classes,

respectively. In addition, six

According to the rainfall returns individual prizes and several cer-

received irom 32 stations situated tificates of merit were awarded to

}in areas typical of all rainfall
categories, the average total fall
for the Island for the month was
10.99 inches as compared with 6.13
inches for June 1949; the average
for June for the past 100 years
was 5.39 inches,

The highest total fall for June
1950 at any of these stations was
13.20 inches recorded at a station
in the St. George’s valley and the
lowest was 8.28 inches measured
at a station in the parish of St.
Philip. The average total rainfall
for the Island for the six month
period January to June, 1950 is
approximately 30 inches, the
average total for the correspond-
ing six months for the past 100
years was 18.17 inches.

Sugar Cane. The harvesting of
!the 1950 crop was completed dur-
ing the month, and fields and
factory yields have, in general,
exceeded crop estimates made
|earlier in the year. The latest
estimate of the crop is the equiva-
lent of 158,000 tons of sugar.

The young cane crop, both plant
canes and ratoons, made excellent
growth during the month. The
plant canes, in some areas, are
so advanced in growth that diffi-
culty was experienced in the ap-

| olication of the nitrogenous fer-
| tilizers

Food Crops. The planting of the
vam crop was continued during
some fields were also

nlanted in eddoes, maize, and
| ;weet potatoes. There was an ade-
| tuate supply of yams and eddoes

om the market, but sweet potatoes
vere difficult to obtain

Peasant
Agriculture

Food Crops. Good rains through-
out the month contributed towards
producing ideal conditions for the
growth of all food crops, As a
result, yams, corn, sweet potatoes,
cassava as well as garden vege-
tables are all growing well.

Sugar Cane. Both plant and
ratoon canes are making remark-
ably good growth and tillering
well. Many cultivators applied
sulphate of ammonia during the

month.

Cotton. The Close Season ended
on the last day of June. Seed dis-
tribution for the new planting
season began on the 28th of the
month, and indications are that
the increased price will result in a
larger acreage being planted this
year.

Tree Crops. Breadfruit, papaw,
mangoes, coconuts, bananas and
limes were obtainable in the mar-
ket during the month. Pear trees
which had been giving promise
ee good crops later in the year

have shed large numbers of their
young fruit.

Pests and Diseases. The princi-
pal pests and diseases reported
affecting economic crops in June
were the cabbage white butterfly
in vegetable gardens scale insects
on fruit trees, the army worm in
corn and the moth borer in sugar
cane. Slugs were also a source of
worry in the wetter districts. The
Peasant Agricultural Instructors
continued to give every possible
assistance in effecting control.

Peasant Livestock. The contin-
ued shortage of Balanced Animal
Feed caused some anxiety among
livestock owners. Supplies of oats
were, however, available, and

green fodder could easily be ob-
tained.

Extension Work. Six hundred
and forty-eight peasant holdings
and twenty-nine school gardens
were visited by the Peasant Agri-
cultural Instructors in June.

Difficulty in securing labour has
been one of the main obstacles in
the way of peasants undertaking
contour cultivation in their hold-
ings. Nevertheless, ten soil con-
servation projects were completed
during the month, Others are in
hand,

Irrigation. Progress was contin-
ued with installations and exten-
sions of irrigation units under the
Colonial Development and Welfare
Schemes. During the month
peasants were assisted with com-
plete windmill pumping units as
well as galvanised pipe and stor-
age tanks.

The average rainfall at the six
agricultural stations for the first
half of the year was 28.33 inches,
or approximately 138 per cent.
more than that for the same period
in 1949.

Crop tMusbandry. Cultivation
and planting programmes were
proceeded with at all stations dur-
ing the month. Ploughing opera-
tions at “The Home” and “Hag-
gatts” were interrupted by rains.
At the latter station an effort was
made to combat the weed menace
by spraying with a weedicide.
About 4 acres were sprayed; the
Department's high-powered trac-
tor-drawn pressure sprayer being
used for the purpose. The work
of re-organisation to provide for
the establishment of peasants’ in-
vestigational units at four of the
stations was continued,

Livestock. The number of head
of livestock at the six stations at
the end of June was 125. compris-
ing stud animals, cattle, goats,

sheep, pigs and equines. Five
hundred and ninety-nine gallons
of milk were produced, Thirteen

young pigs were sold.

Stud services paid for at the
stations amounted to 396. These
were as follows: —bulls 148, bucks
110,

Judging Ring Rally. The
Beouad Annual Island-wide Dairy
Cattle and Mutton Sheep Judg-
ing Ring Rally took place on the
grounds of the Boys’ Foundation
School,

rams 63 and boars 75.

Christ Church, on Thurs-
day, 8th June. Every parish
was represented in one or afi-
other of the two competitions. In
all, each consisting of
and women com-
8 teams in the Dairy Cattle
and 9 in the Mutton Sheep

17 teams,
young men
& ted;
Class

early in June.

rington. These will
with mosaic disease to ascertain
whether oo oe susceptible or
resistant.

tings of Ba.11569 and B.H.
have also been planted to serve
as check plants, and for further
experiments
of mosaic

outstanding competitors. The
keenness of some of these young
people is sufficient reward for the
hard work put in by the Peasant
Instructors in training them. Fur-
ther development of this aspect

of our extension work is being
given careful consideration
Hotaniecal

First Year Seedlings. The

nursery and Short Season First
Year Trials planted at Codring-
ton at the end of May is now well
established. These seedlings will
be the B.s. 51’ and B. 52’ hn

A short season first year seedling

trial was planted at C

The seedlings in
this trial will be |; ene
ever necessary, wee continu-
ous growth. They will be cut at

the end of the 1951 crop.

Mosaic Diseas¢. Five single
eye cuttings of each of the select-
ed seedlings of the B.47’ series
have been planted in pots at Cod-
be inoculated

y single-eye cut-
10(12)

on the transmission

Economic Trees Propagation

and Distribution: One hundred
and two
mandarin trees were budded dur-
ing the month.
ered from Codrington were
follows: —

lime and_ twenty-five
Fruit trees deliv-

as

\

Orange
Lime
Lemon
Shaddock
Ne Salve teense ees chy
Water Lemon
Guava
Grape
Grapefruit
Mandarin
Pomelo
ME, nS evil yeah ba vet
Golden Apple

Cherry i
Breadnut



RK OnNAwWAOCWONeE

188
Eight hundred and five orna-

mental plants of different species
were distributed.

Afforestation. In addition to

the above, 2,819 casuarina trees

were also distributed. Two hun-

dred and sixteen casuarina trees
were felled and sold for firewood

to Glendairy Prison.

Entomological

Control of Moth Borer. During
June 76,610,000 egg parasites
Trichogramma were bred up in
the laboratory, and of these
67,034,000 were made available
for distribution to planters for
their young plant canes. Planters
continued to call for their quota
of parasites readily. So far a total
of 268,179,000 parasites have been
liberated,

The rearing of the lixophaga
fly parasite which attacks the
moth borer Diatraea was contin-
ued with the co-operation of man-
agers who sent in dead hearts,
from which the larvae could be
obtained to carry on this work.
During the month 274 fly parasites
Lixophaga were liberated.

One consignment totalling fifty
Lixophaga puparia was sent by
air to the Superintendent of the
Department of Agriculture in
Grenada, with the hope that they
establish themselves in that Island.

Counts were made of moth
borer Diatraea egg deposition and
parasitism in the entomological
cane plots at Codrington

The breeding of the pupal para-
sites Pteromalus which attack the
P, Monuste puparia of cabbages
and cauliflower, continued during
the month, and 7,645 parasites
were bred up, and the greater
portion of these were lib-
erated; this brings the total for
the year bred up to 104,105
Pteromalus parasites.

Wood Ant Control, During
June, four inspections and treat-
ments for wood ants were carried
out on Government property, and
four inspections and treatments
of private properties were made.

Chemical

Soils. Forty-two samples of
soil were analysed for Organic
Carbon in conjunction with the
soil treatment investigations at
present underway.

Six soil extracts for total base
determination were made in con-
junction with the investigation of
methods for base exchange capac-
ity of coral soils.

Visits were paid to estates in
connection with contour and cul-
tivation work.

Two visits were made to the
new airstrip at Seawell where,
under the coral rock surface,
pockets of soil of two colours
have been found. It is thought
that examination of samples
taken may yield a clue to the
soil forming process in Barba-.
dos, Eleven samples were taken.

A visit was paid to Spring Vale
plantation to inspect the 2. per
cent. graded contour layout on the
area there subject to geological
slippage. This cultivation method
is not a satisfactory one for pre-
venting this slippage, and further
experimental techniques need to
be tried out on this type of land.

Sugar Cane Manurial Trials.
Fertilizers, sulphate of ammonia,
were applied to the manurial tri-
als at Pool, Wakefield, Mangrove,
and Staple Grove Plantations.
Potash was also applied to the
late dressing treatments at the
last three estates

The crop was so far advanced
at Fisherpond plantation due to
the early rains, that it was not
possible to apply the nitrogen-
ous fertilizer to the phosphate
trial there. This trial will be ,
abandoned.

Foliar Diagnosis samples were

Agriculture)

taken from the manurial trial plots

at Pool and 3ulkeley They

will be stored until analysis can! comes more vital to U.S.

Phosphate® was
23 cane

be carri@q out
determined in

extracts. This is investigation-
al work continued from last
crop.

Feeds and Fodders Plots have
been reaped of the perennial

fodder frial -at the Pine and sam-
ples for ang is submitted.
Guatemala, Merker, Uganda,
plots of 2 feet high were all cut.
The feeding trial with dairy
cattle at the Pine is proceeding.



Milk analyses have been carried

out, individual milk yields _ re- : y

corded, and a_ periodic check ist This key city has many aspects of a natural
being kept on the quality of ¢ i 4 i 3 ee
foddet band: silage fed_by. taking fortress, notes the National Geographic
samples for analysis. In the Society. It is enclosed by steep, bare hills
Laboratory the following fodder

analysis was completed:—
Moisture determination, 16

samples, Phosphate determina-
tion, 2 samples, Complete analy-
sis (fodder) 8 Uganda grass
samples, 1 Cane top sample ana
1 Silage sample.

Milk The routine milk analy-
sis of Pine samples was carried
out. Twenty-four
submitted this month, with the
addition of twenty- four samples
from the experimental animals.

Mean butter fat percentage in
milk is.4.1 per cent., mean

solids not fat percentage in milk
is 8.5 per cent

samples were

for this month

The Spekker Spectrophoto-
meter was out of use because of
a breakdown to the Galvano-
meter. This has been air-
freighted back to the United
Kingdom for immediate atten-
tion. It has resulted in con-
siderable hold up to work under-
way, and necessitated a change
of plans in the Laboratory re-
garding analysis work.

The use of Sesbania as a crop
source of protein perennial feed-
ing has been abandoned. Poor
germination was obtained in the
field also

The first of a series of vege-
table crop manurial trials was
laid down at a selected horticul-+
tural garden. There were :

liminary trials with string beans,

carrots and beets to test the
effect of a fixed dressing of
N.P.K. and V.G.M

Two visits were paid to the
office premises of Messrs. Mus-
son Son & Co., Ltd., to investi-
gate the source and type of gas
issuing from the ground level
into the office. This was traced
to gas given off by stale sewage,'
and the matter is in the hands



of the Sanitary Inspector. The
second visit was in connection;
with the oozing of r-rel

substances through the floor
the office and thought to ba
connected with the escape of gas
previously investigated.

One hundred and_ forty-two
samples were received for exam-
ination, They comprise:—

Milks, cocoa essences and edi-
ble oil submitted under the
Food and Drugs Act.

Kerosene, gasolene, tinned
meat and animal concentrates
submitted by the Customs Au-
thorities for classification.

Rum, B.A.F. and liquids sus-
pected of poison submitted by
the Police Authorities fcr
analysis.

E. C. Water, Fancy Molasses
for analysis, tinned salmon and
herrings in oil for examination
for fitness for human consump-

tion submitted by official de-
partments.
Fertilizers, water, soap, lin-

seed meal and wine submitted
for analysis by private individ-
uals or concerns.

— eee

Plant Diseases

Eight returns were received
during June, under the Mosaic
Disease (Eradication) Act, 1943-

22. No infected holes were report-
ed. Owners and occupiers are
reminded that the returns for the
July inspection are due and the
necessary return forms can be
obtained on application from the
Office of the Department of Agri-
culture,

Cotton Inspections. Inspection
of the cotton growing areas was
continued and a very good clean
up of the cotton plots was observ-
ed. Owners and occupiers had to
be constantly reminded that the
roots had to be dug up and not
left to spring again,

The search for
trees was continued,
were found scattered
Island,

wild cotton
and several
about the

Visheries

During the month a sum of
$1,299.69 was repaid on loans, this
brings thé total paid in on all
loans issued to $48,519.74. Inter-
est collected for the same period
amounted to $11.87, making a
total of $577.97 in interest to date.

A sum of $272.00 was loaned to
boat owners during the month
making a total of $88,065.43 loan-
ed to date.

The newly erected fish market

at Oistins, Christ Church, was
officially opened on the 6th of
June. Two thousand, two hundred
and forty pounds of: fish were
marketed through this centre
during the remainder of the
month,

Catches of fish around the
Island have been smaller as the
end of the flyir& fish season
approaches, Many boats have
been hauled up for repairs and
refitting.

The Fishery Experimental Boat
“Investigator” continues to oper-
ate. Attention will be given to
pot and net fishing during the
hurricane season, |

Returns of fish at the Bridge-
town Fish Market for the month
amounted to 38,288 lb. and at the
rural market sheds to 31,364 Ib.

Experimental
Cotton Spinning

Plant

Production during the month
Was 1,460 Ib. of 18's count cotton
yarn, which was packaged in cone
form and delivered to the West
Indian Knitting Mills.

et



ee



NOTES ON AGRICULTURE RON! DOOR IN PUSAN’
cz

WASHINGTON
PUSAN, largest port in South Korea and |
traditional “front door” of the nation, be-|

juice | Of bitter fighting.

Department of Defense officials have indi-|
cated that the bulk of MacArthur’s troops |
and supplies are entering Korea through |

Pusan on the southeast coast. It has the only
good harbour not held by the enemy; more-
over, Pusan is the southern terminus of the

major railroad which is the transport lifeline
of the defenders.

that crowd the coastline and could be ad-
vantageous to a perimeter defense. The com-
mercial heart of Pusan is constricted between
the walls of one narrow pass. Rugged terrain
screens the city so well that only a fraction
of it is visable even from the waterfront.

The harbour itself also is well protected by
nature. Outside the entrance is Mok To, an
island four miles long and a mile and a half
wide, which incoming ships must skirt in
order to reach anchorage. There are two re-
iatively narrow passages between island and
mainland, and both are overhung by high
rock walls.

Current maps list Pusan and its environs
as a fortified area, a status which the city has

S. forces with each day



had in varying degree for centuries. It was

old Korea’s sentinel outpost against the Jap-
anese, who tried numerous thrusts there

before they succeeded in establishing a well
guarded trading post. In modern times the
Japanese made Pusan (then called Fusan)
their main point of entry and developed its
port and installations.

Modern Pusan is Korea’s third largest city.
The 1940 census placed its population at
nearly 250,000 a total exceeded only by the
fallen capital of Seoul and the northern
metropolis of Pyongyang. Since then esti-

mates give Pusan more than 300,000 people.
Although the city is important industrially,

its growth is due mainly to the excellent
harbour and good rail connections.

Pusan’s strategic importance to the U.S.
military is emphasized by the fact that it is
the only port in friendly hands which will
take heavy-draft ships. It has four good piers
with lighters, cranes and other equipment.
Additional berthing space is provided by
quays between the piers. Shipyards are avail-
able for repairs to moderate sized vessels.

The piers and warehouses are connecteé by
spur tracks to the important double-track,
standard-gauge railroad that runs from
Pusan northwest to Taegu, and thence to Tae-
jon, the provisional capital, to Seoul and
beyond. It is only 77 rail miles from Pusan to

Taegu, and 100 miles from that point to
Taejon.

Pusan has an oil refinery, textile mills,
gas manufacturing plant, and factories for the
production of matches, rubber goods, soap
and other commodities. These enterprises,
and the city’s many modern buildings, can
be attributed primarily to the Japanese, who
placed emphasis on the development of
Pusan because of its nearness to Japan, with
which it is linked by cable and other commu-
nications.

The city is located at the southeast tip of

the Korean coast. From there it is only 135
miles across Korea Strait to the Japanese

port of Shimoneseki on the island of Honshu
There has been no indication whether GI’s
have been using Shimoneseki as a point oj
embarkation for Korea, but it was so used by
the Japanese for many years.

There are three other South Korean ports
which, though not adequate for heavy ships
or extensive traffic, may be of some help in
the supply effort. These are Masan and Yosu
on the southern coast, and Mokpo on the
southwest. All three have single-track,
standard-gauge rail connections with the
interior,



MANGOES

Mr. Peter Smithers last week asked the
Secretary of State for the Colonies what
action is being taken to investigate the possi-
bility of growing mangoes in the Colonial
Empire for sale in the United Kingdom and
elsewhere; and how far the problems con
nected with their transport and marketing
have been brought to the attention of the
appropriate departments.

Mr, Cook: The Colonial Primary Products
Committee investigated this matter two years
ago. They felt that the practical and economic
difficulties involved in packing and shipping
this fruit for export were likely to remain a
handicap to the development of anythin;
more than a luxury trade. My right ho:
Friend proposes, }sswever, to have a fresh
inquiry made into (ne market possibilities.

Mr. Simithers: Will the Minister bear in
mind that this is a matter of some urgency, as
the American interests concerned are making
rapid progress?

Mr. Cook: We are looking into it.

Dr. Morgan: Did my hon. Friend satisfy
himself before he started, that dehydrating
facilities were available forthe mangoes to be
exported for food?

Mr. Cook: That is another question.

|




SATURDAY, JULY

D, V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.




Usually

Jars Prepared Mustard
Jars Peanut Butier .. 55

Bottles Jeffirys Beer

>
-

9
ms

Now

1950



TO-DAY'S SPECIALS
at the COLONNADE













|
a

:








WE HAVE JUST RECCIVED

SPARE PARTS

FOR

COLEMAN Products

We will be pleased to repair your LAMPS, LANTERNS,
STOVES and IRONS if you bring them to us.

ALSO
A Shipment of

SNOWCEM

in the following Colours :
White, Cream, Pink, Yellow, and Terracotta
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.—Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

: 4687, 4472.

*Phones

SMOKER'S
CHOICE!!

Here's a wide

variety









PLAYERS CIGARETTES—Pkgs. 2
PLAYERS CIGARETTES—Tins 50
CAPSTAN CIGARETTES—Tins 50 ..
GOLD FLAKE CIGARETTES—Tins 50
COUNTRY LIFE CIGARETTES—Tins 50 ..
ARDATH CORK TIPPED CIGARETTES—Tins 50
CRAVEN A CIGARETTES—Tins 50 .
PLAYERS CLIPPER CIGARETTES—Per Pkg.
PLAYERS CLIPPER CIGARETTES—Per Carton
TRUMPETER CICARETIES—Fer Pkg.
TRUMPETER CIGARETTES—Per Carton



SEE US FOR OUR NEW RANGE OF;

INTERNATIONAL (NON CHALKING)

QUALITY PAINT

LAGOMAT (Flat Oil Paint) in these attractive shades

of Pale Blue, Pink, Grey, White, Cream
LAGOLINE (Non Chalking)

In Undercoatings and Finish

In Light Stone : Light Buff : Teak : Ivory

Grass Green : Mayfair Green : Sea Green

i French Grey : Lead Colour

{ALUMINIUM PRIMERS FOR WOOD
YELLOW PRIMOCON (Primer
CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER

: White :
: Navy Green :



for Aluminium)

2

BECKWITH STORES

2

10

‘DANBOLINE (Anti-corrosive) in Red, Grey, Green

‘PROPELLOR Light Red for Shingles

f DaCOSTA & Co. Lid.

Agents





.

Es POSES

OPPS OPS PPSPODOOO

156, 68,

OOS 66%

JAMS

BISCUITS
2Ib Tins CARRS BISCUITS
SHORT CAKE, MARIE,
DIGESTIVE, GINGER NUT,

PETIT BUERRE
—At $1.80 per tin

in Bottles
APRICOT JAM

PINEAPPLE JAM S.A,

in Tins

JUICES in Tins
TOMATO JUICE

16 02. and 20 oz. Sizes
CARROTS in Tins
BEANS in Tins

SPINACH in Tins
KALE in Tins

LYPTON TEA
MYRNA TEA
BLUE X TEA

J. & R. FRUIT CAKES
Energy for the Children

RAISINS l6c. per th

TEAS

CHOYCE TIP TEA

and
JELLIES

BRAMBLE JELLY in Bots.
BLACK CURRANT JELLY

S.A, in Tins

CROWN DRINKS, 7 Flavours

Try a Bottle of 3-year-old

Gold Hraid Rum

-GODDARDS |

,
PPRSOP PPPS ORS P°DSSSSSS

the Finest

. “6 $6,6,65,6,5666666665
POSS OOOO COSO OO OOOS SAMA . GOD COPE EEE EEE PE














4.

eo



SATURDAY, JULY 22,

“The Devil
Quarrelled

With His Wife”

—YESTERDAY

NTERMITTENT SHOWERS

were mainly responsible for the
cool spell in the City yesterday.
During the morning the heat was
intense but shortly before mid-
day rain feil and the temperature
wnich was 86° Fahrenheit in the
shade dropped to 85°.

Most of tne managers and
planters visiting the City yester-
day had a smue on their faces.
Some were hoping that it was
also raining in thew districts be-
cause all are wishing for a bumper
crop next year.

Rain was not only experienced
in Bridgetown, but at Trent
Bridge, where the Third Test 1s
being played, rain fell during the
early morning.

Perhaps by the time the West
Indies were ready to resume their
first innings the rain had travelled
in this direction.

During Thursday and up to six
o'clock yesterday morning 14
perts of rain fell in St. Andrew
and three in St. Philip.

What was a queer thing yester+
day is that although the rain was
falling the sun was still shining.
When this happens many local
folk use the expression “the devil
is quarrelling with his wife.”
M** PARENTS and children

could be seen at Harrison
College yesterday morning. Some
of the children were taking their
entrance examinations for admis-
sion to the School,
ieee LECTURES, one entitled
“Tuberculosis” and the other
on “Public Health and the Com-
munity” will be given at the St.
John’s Mixed School on Tuesday,
July 25 at 7.30 p.m,

The first speaker will be Dr.
A. E. S. Kinch, Acting P.M.O.,
who will talk on “Tuberculosis”
while the other speaker, Mr. W. A.
Abrahams, will talk on “Public
Health and the Community.”
' LOSS of a Raleigh Bicy-

cle valued $60 was reported
Walters of Dayrells
Road, St. Michael. He told the
Police that it was removed from
Mahons Alley, near Broad Street,
on Thursday.

RENE LAWRENCE of Jessamy

Lane reported that the “Inter-
national Resort” situated at Fair-
child Street, Bridgetown, was
broken and _ entered between
Wednesday and Thursday and a
quantity of cigarettes, liquors and
$8.40 in cash, total value $20.55,
were removed.

WO MOTORISTS were charg-

ed yesterday with failing to
stop at Major Roads. Many serious
accidents can be caused by ve-
hicles failing to stop at Major
Roads and for this offence Police
Constables are very strict with
both motorists and cyclists.

One motorist was charged for
driving in a dangerous manner and
another for driving without reas-
orable consideration.

A cyclist was also charged for
holding on to a moving vehicle
and another for riding with both
hands off the handle bars.

N ACCIDENT occurred on

- Chapel Street, City, between |
the motor car M—940, owned by
Charles Chapman of Bank Hall
Road and driven by George Lewis
of Harmony Hall, Barbarees Hill,
and a bicycle owned and ridden
by Frank Burton of White Park
Road.

The left front fender of the car
was slightly damaged.

INCENT JORDAN of Mile and

Quarter, St. Peter, a pedes-
trian, was injured after he was
involved in an accident recen Fy. |
Also involved was the motor car
X-~-738 owned by W. Johnson of
the Aquatic Club and driven by
Norris Thomas of Nicholas, St. {
Peter. The radiator of the car was |
slightly damaged

T 8 O'CLOCK TONIGHT

there will be a Concert in the
Naval Hall at the Y.M.C.A.

A Religious Service will be
given to-morrow when the speaker
will be Mr. K. L, Sealy.

by Vernon





Pile-Driving
Stops After
6 Months

Engineers of the Public Works
Department were yesterday driv-
ing down the four last piles to
the southern section of the wharf
in the outer basin of the Careen-
age.

“This work will be completed
today and the pile-driving plant
is expected to be taken down on
Monday after six months of steady,
operation.

New steel piles have been put
down from the beginning of the
wing just above the dock and
have been extended right up to
the Chamberlain Bridge. These
piles are for strengthening the
sides of the wharf.

They are so made that they
dovetail, forming. a sort of pail
ing so that water cannot ge
through. ‘ "

The pile-driving plant is equip-
ped with a boiler. Some 12 men
are employed to operate it while
another 18 or so are employed to
make repairs to the concrete of
the wharf. ;

The foreman of the engineers
told the “Advocate” that the re-
pairs to the concrete will be com-
pleted in another month. He felt
that the steel piles now being
used are better than the green-
heart piles.

IMPORTS
YESTERDAY

Around day-break
the 87-ton Schooner “Philip
Davidson” arrived
bags of rice from British Guiana
for the island.

|

t



‘asooaiie

This made a total of 3,000 bags|;oborated her daughter’s evidence
arrive {as to the part she had taken

commodity to
the week.

Other West Indian produce
arriving in the island yesterday
included 120 drums of diesel fuel,
firewood, charcoal, cedar boards
and wallaba posts

Also supplies of
cocoanuts, copra,
pumpkins. These were the
goes of the three
“Reginald N. Wallace,”
Louise”, “Lydina

of this
during

fresh

wood”

school,

cott was sitting when she passed

at him,
she went on for her water. When

yesterday | affair which

with 2,000) charged him with the offence

fruit,| with a chisel and a piece of wood
plantains,|in his hand
ear-|if he struck her with the wood
schooners |she would stab him with the tool

Princess|she had in her hand.
A” and motor|away for a short period and when
vessels “Lady Joy” and “Daer- ; she looked towards them again

1950

| SHALL WE GO
WIMBLEDON OR CRICKET 9

|



ANO SEE THE
TENNIS



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Joiner Guilty Of §KEEP HIGH STANDARD

Wounding Girl

DENNIS WALCOTT a 27-year-old joiner of Lodge
Road, Christ Church, was found guilty at the Court of
Grand Sessions yesterday of unlawfully and maliciously
wounding 18-year-old Madeline Forde. After nearly an
hour’s deliberation, a jury ignored the first count, wound-
ing with intent, and returned a verdict on the second
count. His Honour Mr. G. L. Taylor, Acting Chief Justice,
before whom the case was heard, postponed sentence.

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C. Solicitor »hond from
General, prosecuted the case on] said the
behalf of the Cr while Mr.
Ward represented alcott.

The case for the prosecution
was that last April 17, about
11 a.m. Madeline Forde pajsed in
front of Walcott’s Workshop on her
way to the pipe, sucking a piece of

Forde’s side. Forde
it since he had stabbed her
it would not end in that way
Bertram Lovell who was near
the workbench when Forde threw
the peel at Walcott, said that
Forde rubbed the rasp and then
the chisel along Walcott's back
and continued to do so even after

eane. She and Walcott were he he ¢

! ae : * had told her to stup. He saw
friends and when she got near his} when Walcott run after her but
pterrenatt, she threw a piece of} he said that Walcott did not have
cane peel at him. When she re-| a chisel in his hand when he
we she put down her bucket did so
with the water at the side of the Giving evidence ; >
road and went near the work- © ae memes ea ee

detence, Dennis Walcott told the

bench where Walcott was work- Court how Forde had struck him

ing. She picked up a rasp and! with a ;
_ Picker ' : a piece of cane peel and how
pute over his back after they] che had rubbed the rasp and chise)
ad talked for some while. He ever his back.
a ee ees ie did not. He said that after he ran behina|
ards picked up a chisel] ),¢) and caught up with her, he

end rubbed that too along his put out his hand to take the chisel

back,
but she 7 . Jay z ‘ » £
He got up and went towards her sweep soit daaen on wee

and she ran. He eventually caught] jj. chin, “Pho ne res
up with her and stabbed her with craks nae han Pp
the chisel when she had given it told him that he had cut her and

to him. she would tell her mother.

The case for the defence was i
7 ; Addressing the jury, Mr. Ward
that the wounds were received told them that the qiestion was

Mnigding tee the chisel. The de- | “hether the wounds inflicted were
fence counsel also based his argu-|‘"flicted maliciously or _accident-
ments on the discrepancies of the| ally, ‘ Pema: that Forde hac
witnesses for the prosecution, | deniec having rubbed the rasp
Madeline Forde, needleworker | and chisel along Walcott’s back
of Lodge Road, said that she knew! “ile other witnesses ‘for the
Walcott since’ she was going to| P’oSecution had said she had dona
Walcott was a joiner and|S°:. That proved Forde to be a

had his workbench near his home| !@" and since only she and
underneath a tree. On April 17, Walcott knew about how the
she was going at the pipe for eee ha oe ey os
. i 5 . . ot accept her story. \It would be
water, eating cane the while. Wal- most unsafe, he told them, to

convict Walcott on her evidence

He pointed out that Forde was
in a skylarking mood on that day
ana Walcott’s whole bearing was



and she threw a piece of cane peel
He called after her but



she returned he called her again e
and this time she stopped. She | of the utmost placidity. He put
went near the workbench and they | !0"Ward strongly that the wounds
talked. She took up a chisel and\@USt have been received during
rubbed it on a tree while he work- the struggle and said that Wal-
ed on a chair with another. cott’s demeanour never suggested
He pushed the one he had in his|'?@t_ he bore any animosity
‘and at her and she moved away. | wards Forde. :
He followed her and told her to| Mr. Reece stressed the impos-
put the chisel she had down, She} “ibility of the wound in the
did not do so and he ran after her,| Shoulder being caused during a
When he caught up with her he struggle and thus held that Wal-
raised his hand to strike her with | ©°*t had been stabbing. He saic
the piece of wood he had brought that Walcott’s going to the police
along with him. She attempted to|®@"d reporting the matter might
ward it off with the chisel and he only have been a wise move on
got cut on his chir. his part.

Stabs

She exclaimed that he had made
her do it. He pushed his hand at
her to take the chisel and she gave
it to him. Taking it he stabbed
her on her left shoulder and on
her right side. She ran away and
he, closing in on her, stabbed her
again on her right side.

He then left. She refilled her
bucket and went home, She felt
sick and went to bed; blood gush-
ing from her side. When her
mother came home she took her to
Dr. Ward who sent her to the hos-
pital. She remained at the hos-
pital durirg three weeks.

Dr. E, L, Ward, P.M.O., said that
about 1.15 p.m on April 17, Walcott
came to his office and he put three
stitches in a trivial wound he had
on his chin. The wound could have
been caused by a chisel, but it
was no stab wound,



Bound Over

Allan Fields who pleaded guilty
of having been in possession of a
forged bank note was yesterday
bound over for 18 months in the
isum of £25 at the Court of Grand
Sessions, His Honour Mr. G. L.
Taylor, Acting Chief Judge, told
him that he had done a foolish
thing. When one came geross a
note of that kind, the safest thing
to do was to take it to the police,

ry e ry

lrhief To Keep Peace
Shirley Franklyn, of Wiltshire

Tenantry, was yesterday put on a

£50 bond on a surety for a simi-

lar sum to keep the peace for 18

: hs at the Court of Grand

Half an hour later Madeline mens : ais he
Forde came to his officé. She had ores “| ag nad . ge
three stab wounds which could] $%!\Y ©@rlier in the Sessions o

house-breaking and larceny, The
case was heard before the Acting
Chief Justice, Mr. G. L. Taylor,

have been caused by a sharp in-
strument. One on her left should-
er was half of an inch long and
a quarter of an inch deep. An-
other wound was above the right
hip bone and a third was over the
tenth rib. Blood was spouting
from the third wound. She was
suffering from shock and loss of
blood at the time. The first two
wounds were trivial but the third
seen and her situation was criti-
cal.

While the two wounds about the
side could have been caused dur-
ing a struggle, the one on the
shoulder could not be so easily
caused,

Dr. Copland said that on April 17
Madeline Forde went to the hos-
pital suffering from the wounds
Dr. Ward had described. She gave
her an injection and sent her to
a hospital ward.

Dr. Kinch said that an X-Ray
was ordered for Forde when she
came into the hospital and fluid
was found in the right cavity.

Dr. H. A. Massiah, visiting sur-
geon of the hospital, corroborated
Dr. Ward's evidence as to the
wounds.

Set. Howell said that on April
17, Walcott came to the station
and gave him a chisel and made a
statement about the wounding
had taken place
earlier during the day, He later



MAN STABBED

Twenty-three-year-old Darnley
Jones of Bay Land, was taken to
the General Hospital yesterday
afternoon suffering from a_ stab
wound in his chest. He was de-
tained. Jones ‘is employed as a
porter at Messrs. Barnes & Co.,
Bridge Street,

Gwendolyn Rock, a 21-year-old
resident of the same address, was
later arrested by the Police in
connection with the incident and
a charge of grevious bodily harm
has been laid by Inspector T.
Franklyn



CanadaEndsSubsidy
To Merchant Marine

OTTAWA, Canada.

Transport Minister Lionel Chev-
rier, told the Canadian House of
Commons there is no possibility of
the Dominion’s government ex-
tending its subsidy to the Cana-
dian Merchant Marine beyond the
end of the current fiscal year.

He told Opposition member
Howard Green that when Prime
Minister Louis St. Laurent an-
nounced $3,000,000 subsidy for
the Merchant Marine Dec. 9 last
it was made clear the subsidy
would be for one year only. There
had been no change in that de-
cision,

Nine ships now are tied up com-
pared with 42 prior to announce-
ment of the subsidy. No money
has yet been paid to Canadian ship
operators but applications for as-
sistance by more than 30 have been
approved

Chevrier said 95 Canadian-
owned ships have been transferred
tu United Kingdom registry

Clerisa Forde, hawker of Lodge
Road and mother of Madeline, cor-
a

Barbara Greenidge (21) of
Lodge Road said that she knew
both Forde and Walcott. On
April 17 she saw when Forde
threw the peel at Walcott and
iater saw when he ran after her

Forde told him that

She looked

she saw Walcott withdrawing hi

OF BEHAVIOUR

Governor Tells Parents

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor speaking at the Prize
Giving Day function held at the Ursuline Convent School
yesterday told Catholic parents and girls that they had to
keep up a high standard of behaviour in a community
where a large number of non Catholics thought that Catho-
lics were peculiar people

|

Weatherheads Win |





“I pray that you may keep that
Standard up,” the Governor said
The Governor was speaking
after Mrs. Savage had distributed



P, \ the prizes and after the Head-
harmacy Week mistress had reported on the pro-
eg? gress of the school for the past
Competition year, He was speaking too after



be had seen the story awatha’'s
Messrs. Bruce Weatherhead Ltd ma ep erory of Hiavaiie

(Barbados Pharmacy) were the |>irth. childhood, adolescent ex-

winners of the show window com- |P/0!ts and 3 edit lifted ree

petition staged by the various|#enry Longtellow’s poem and

drug stores during Pharmacy |Prought to life on the school’s

Week which started on Sunday Stage, . .

and ended on Friday. The presentation of Hiawatha
It is the second year the Drug- |Was arranged in tableau, recita-

gists’ Pharmaceutical Society has

tion and dance by H
staged the event, and it is reported

Its characters were J

A. Donald

Scott as the

to have been # great success Narrator; E. Boyack, Nokomis; I.
Tt got underway on Sunday!De Verteuil, Little Hiawatha: M
evening with a talk over Radio

Chabrol, Iagoo; A. Fletcher, Young
Hiawatha; M. Krogh, Hiawatha:
M. Navarro, the Arrowmaker; C
Vanden Branden, Minnehaha; R.
Knight, PauPukKeewis; C. Mc-
Lean Chibiabos; and Braves
Squaws, Children and Musicians

Distribution by Mr. Fred S. Olton,
President of the Society, on the
subject, Penicillin

Lectures

Then followed two lectures, the
first of which was given by Dr
Chas. Manning on Tuesday, on the
subject Tuberculosis and the other
on Wednesday evening by Dr,
Simon who spoke on Diabetes,
Both lectures were given at the
Y.M.C.A. and attracted appre-| phere of the forest, and further
ciably large gatherings w h o| atmosphere was lent by the
showed keen interest throughout, ! presence of the wigwam repre-

Mr. Fred S. Olton presided at senting that one where old Noko-
both lectures. He thanked the mis nursed little Hiawatha “by
lecturers and also the audience for) the big sea water.”
their attention and interest and The presentation reached a
suid that he hoped the third} climax with the wedding of Hia-
Pharmacy Week would be an even! watha and Minnehaha, fairest of

from feathered
mocassins were
was the acting.

The costumes
headdresses to
realistic and so
The fir tree branches on the
stage lent some of the atmos-

vreater success than the present ;jthe Dakota women, and here
On Thursday evening a Social! | lagoo the bouster had a chance to

was given at Queen’s Park for the boast, PauPukeewis the dancer

Medical and Pharmaceutical Fra- had a chance to dance’ and

ternity along with several friends Chibiabos, the singer had a

and well-wishers and a very en- chance to sing love songs to

joyable time was spent by all . |make the marriage banquet
Pharmacy Week closed on Fri- more joyans



day with a show of films at the
MO A. given through the

In addition to telling parents
courtesy of The British Council

and children of the high stan-

Lantana as dards they had to keep, the
Governor told those’ present
that the presentation of the

play was first class. As regards
the Headmistress’ speech, he
said, he felt that it was not
one that should be applauded.
It was one that was addressed
to the heart, and he himself
had been really touched by it
The Governor also said thank
for the bouquet that had been

Dangerous |
Riding: 5/-

The decision of Mr. G. B
Griffith Magistrate of District
“A” who imposed a fine of 5/-
and 1/- costs to be paid in seven

days or seven days’ imprison-j Presented to Mrs. Savage, It was
ment on Edgar Phillips of Green| pretty one indeed, and as a
Hill, St. Michael, for riding the matter of fact he had never seen
kécycle M-7388 on Spooners Hill, as road Bae ie ee ined
on April 21, in a dangerous man- ' eee Saphesy a e “i Bean

ner to the public, was confirmed whe va iM ae ‘ im ie at
yesterday by Their Honours Mr ernor and Mrs. savage e oo
it a ae Chenery and Mr,| Paid tribute to those who wer

H. A. Vaughan Judges of the| '@sponsible for the presentation



Assistant Court of Appeal of the play, and said he was sure



Phillips was also ordered to| hat everyone had enjoyed it
pay the costs of appeal which] thoroughly
amounied to 3/6.

Philups was seen riding down | Nine Answer Call

Spooners Hill about 7.15 a.m 2
on April 21 by Cpl. Green. The| For Aid In
bicycle was going at a fast rate,|
and when Phillips was ordered} 7
to stop he did not do so immed- | Korean War
iately
S . >, q
Philt in ea. Lerceemanend Asked a tetera ‘are you
lillips submitted that the evi-| .4)° ae ’
et . St {still confident you will get troops?
ee * hs are be ntl He replied: “I do not know about
1ough = for ir nours tO) that. My personal opinion is that

take and pointed out that Phillips





: it is too early to tell,”
could have been travelling at a The Secretary-General who had
fair rate of speed and still fail) « {wo-hour conference with Amer
to stop when Cpl. Green waved ican delegation members yesterday
to him. ___|said he was being kept informed
Their Honours told Phillips | about what was going on In Wash

that they have paid due atten-

a ington
tion to all that his counsel had

He would not comment on recent

told them but they must accept] dedication efforts by Indian Prime |

the evidence that
them.

was pul belore|Minister Pandit Nehru

— Reuter

URSULINE CONVENT
PRIZE LIST

PRIZES AWARDED IN THE MAIN
SCHOOL FOR THE YEAR 1949—1950
RRIZES AWARDED IN FORM I

ne For Christian Doctrine:
Helen



Marenlene Krogh, Mary Vaughn, Rose
mary King, Lilia Peter, Joy Netto, Hosa
{mund Field, Patricia Cools
Certificate Prize for passing the Oxford

Tucker, Joyce Moore, Alma| and Cambridge School Certificate Ex
Gordon {| amination in 1949 Lucille Grace,
Prizes For Study: Prizes Awarded For Art:
Helen Tucker, Anne Rock, Maureen Norma Mathias, Edwina Parsons,

Weatherhead
Prizes For Application To Study:
Lorna Spencer, Margaret Gooding
Prizes For Good Conduct:
Lorna Spencer, Jean Rock
PRIZES AWARDED IN FORM II
Prizes For Christian Doctrine:

Prizes Awarded For Music:
Mercedes Navarro, Judith Dalton

Prices Awarded for Needlework:
Roseraary Solis, Angele Sarkis

Prizes Awarded For Goo
Elizabeth Gooding, Charmaine Goddar



Prizes Awarded to the Winners of the



Judith Dalto Mary Helen Stone, | Literary Competition in the Main School
Marjorie do Sil Shirley Walton, June Knight
Prizes For Study: Prise Awarded for Welpfuiness and
Patricia Walibridge, Yvonne Robert Devotedness to Duty

Judith Dalton
Prizes For Application To Study:

Julieta Mirabal
Prizes Awarded for Efficient Performance

Heather Gardier, Yvette Xavier of Vice-Prefects’ Duties:
Prizes For Good Conduct: Helen Tucker Mary Craig, Marilyn
Maureen Foster, Joyce Berry Chabrol, Rosalie Knight

PRIZES AWARDED IN FORM III
Prizes For Christian Doctrine:

Marilyn Chabrol, June Grainger, Janet |
Scott.
Prizes For Study:

Marilyn Chabroi
June Grainger

Prizes Awarded for Efficient Performance

of Prefects’ Duties
Rosamiind Field

Cools

| Prizes Awarded for Fidelity to Duty as
House Captains:

Joy Netto, Patrica

Rosemary Atherley



Marenlene Krosh Captain of St
Prizes For Application To Study Augustine’s House Rosemary King
Lourdes Lyon, Janet Scott | Captain of St. Ursula’s House
Prizes For Good Conduct; ize Awarded for Fidelity to Duty as



Marilyn Chabrol, June Grainger

PRIZES AWARDED IN FORM IV
Prizes For Christian Doctrine

Marie-Antoinette Nieves, F

| Games Captain of the School—Lilia Peter

| Prize Awarded for Fidelity to Duty
School Captain Mary Vaughn

| The Sports Cup has been won by

ances Bel

mar, Marilyn Netto St. Ursula's House Red House
Prizes For Study: The Netball Cup has been won by
Greta Rock, Evadne Adar Kathleen St. Ursula's House—Red House
Boucaud The Rounders Cup has been won by both
Prizes for Application to Study St. Augustine's Blue House; and St. !
Julieta. Mirabal, Kathleen Boucaud, | Ursula’s Red House

Angela Perkins

The Tennis Cup ha
Prizes For Good Conduct:

St. Ursula’s Hous

been won for
Red House,




by







Rosalie Knight, Emmeline Bovack Marie-Antoinette Nieves
PRIZES AWARDED IN FORM V The Table Tennis Cup has been won for
Prizes For Christian Doctrine s Ursula House Red House, by
Mareniene Krogh, Rosemary King,| Norma Mathias
Mary Vaughn, Lilla Peter The Study Cap has been won by:
Prizes For Application To Study 3 Angela House Green House







| Village Cricket ||

Dying In
England

—Says BRUCE BLUNT

ABRESFORD, Hants

The lamp-post and the tree are
| the two traditional wickets on
| which Test cricketers were rear-
| ed. It looks as though the lamp-
post will soon be the only nurs-
ery left for the Comptons and the
Bedsers of the future. Cricket
under the trees is dying out.

The prophets of doom foresee
the end of village cricket in about
five years time, This may be
exaggerated pessimism, but if the
present death-rate of village
clubs continues it will be very
diMeult to argue with these dis
mal seers,

Within a
from this
clubs have

radius of five
village eight cricket
Vanished in the last
few years. Some of them never
got started again after the war.
and some of them have fallen by
the wayside since the peace. Two
more have gone this year
High Cests

miles

The causes of decline are ther:
for all to see. One of them is
the high cost of sports equip
ment.

Once we had £15 to spend on
gear. After we had bought two
bats (£6 19s. 4d.), two pairs o
batting gloves (£2 17s. 4d.), one
pair ot wicket-keeping gloves
(£3 8s. 6d.) and one cricket bal’
(£1 11s, 6d.) we had 8s. 4¢
hange

Any club needs at least six
new balls in a season, an
should earry a stock of half
jozen bats. So far we have beet
relying on pre-war bats Thre
have been rebladed (£1 19s. 4d
each), but five of them are spl
and one heroic pre-war viatag
bat remains

When large-scale replacement

have te be made, as must happer
soon, the outlook will be regret
tably unsettled,

The usual subscription for
playing member to a village clu
before the war was 2s. 6d. 11
now varies from 5s. to 10s., and
most villages have to increase the

amount every season.

Our club, at 4s. 6d. a playing
member must be one of the
cheapest in existence. There are
16 playing members, about ten
supporters who pay 2s, 6d, or a

little mor’, and a handful of local
benefactors who still produce the
annual guinea each,

Then there is entertaining to
be done. You would be surpris-
ed at the laws which are broken
by village clubs in a= frantie
search for beer-money

They raffle packets of cigarettes
at 3d. a time. They sell a pack
of cards in local pubs for 6d
acard, Then another pack is cut,
and the tortunate buyer of th»
card exposed receives 10s. This,
you will notice, leaves a profit of
16s. for the fund,

The Big House

One of the village clubs which
came to an end this year has
| done so because the big house
\stands empty and its staff, which
|was the core of the team, has
| gone.

Many such houses
now, or have been
hostels for students
So earnest-minded planners
the world now pace the
where the village blacksmith once
hit his care-free sixes,

are empty
turned int»
or hiker
OL



Then the coaches and buses
earry modern youth to the sea-
side and the cinema Oh, ye:

a lot of them prefer the cinema
to the cricket field even on
afternoons

ny summer
And one can hardly blame
generation which hag had few
| opportunities of Jearning cricket
‘ Our large and much-vaunted
| secondary schools provide fields

and sports equipment and mow-
ing-machines, but very few
{teachers of cricket.

| At some of them the boys are
| just left to break bats at casual
practice, and when they leave
school at the end of their stupid-
ily extended time, they forget the
bats, and take to the more easily
junderstood motor-cycle

| They Won't Work



Educational experts have ‘not
}yet realised that no one learn
anything useful until after he

has left school. So they might at
| least teach the boys cricket. It is
| after all, a form of manners,

|subject which is conspicuously

absent from the modern school
| curriculum
Even when the youngsters of

| to-day play cricket, they are not
| very fond of working for it

They leave the ground as soon
jas the game is over. They do
jnot think of the work which wiil
|be needed on it before another
}gume can be played Village
jericket cannot survive without
}communal effort

To start a new club, with the
} ground and all necessary equip

ment, £200 would go nowhere

So at the present rate of de-
cline—and by the laws of arith-
metic, there can only be one end
to it allb—that the end of
cricket on the green. —L.E.S

is



flel« |

PAGE FIVE







BARGAINS :=
MANILLA ENVELOPES 61
PAD LOCKS







"x 3%”

$3.50 per 1000
from 12¢. each

JOHNSON’'S STATIONERY AND HARDWARE






PLLOLO ELSES LOC CCPL LL SEELE LLL LSS

‘BACK AGAIN

: |




REXALL

RENOWNED THE WORLD OVER

AGAREX COMPOUND
BISMAREX POWDER
CHEMICAL FOOD
COD LIVER EMULSION
KIDNEY & BLADDER

GLYCERINE and
THYMOL COMPOUND

KAOLIN POULTICE
MILK OF MAGNESIA

PILLS
COLD and INFLUENZA SYRUP OF
MIXTURE | HYPOPHOSPHITES

Obtainable from all Branches of
x

* KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

PAPA LOLA LOO OCOD A Ate PALO OST









SACK-TRUCKS

ALL STEEL — 1,000 Ibs CAPACITY
With Cast Iron Wheels ... $14.59
With Rubber Wheels 20.09



ALL METAL
WHEEL-BARROWS

STRONG AND DURABLE — 3 cubic feet capacity
SUITABLE FOR CONTRACTORS, ETC.

ONLY SI4.51 EACH

“RUBEROID”
ROOFING FELT

GREEN MINERALIZED SURFACE

A Low Priced, Long Lasting, Efficient





Waterproof Cover for all Roofs

92 CENTS PER SO. YARD



HARRISON'S —tHardware Specialists

Broad Street



THREE STARS



hree Stars

| SWEDISH

poe









\

YET STYLISH ENOUGH FOR GOOD TASTE

SUEDETTE SHOES

For Gentlemen,

4

In White, Fawn and Brown

$4.68

Monks and Gibsons.

Per Pair





| CAVE SHEPHERD & (0. LID.

10, 11,12 & 13 Broad Street














BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON

MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY

) (So aee T- ( MicKeE! You’ ae

4 me Sy ——=—————_|_ SAFE! >
YOU PMURDERER! Nee oy? Se



, a” OLA ———_
a] ”) a TRATTER OF
\ y ? MA
tt] ') (FB Pa



— IT'S OKAY, NOW-:
I PUT ON ONE BLACK
SHOE AND ONE BROWN Ja Vas

— || SHOE TO MATCH yi \f




GBYE, OEAR!
I HAVE JUST ONE 2] @
MINUTE a, CATCH












I'VE GOT AN INSIDE TRACK |F
SHERIFF 1S OEAD, LLL GE!
| JOB. THEN LCAN RUN 7
TOWN MY Way

Li







oe |

BA. @. CANNON ee ce RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS
7 er an

THANK YOU -
GRATIE.. YOU







i



QUICK?! TELL ME* NO
ELSE 1S IN THE CASTLE
APART FROM vouR

SORRY ' NO TIME
FOR EXPLANATIONS

Wh

WITTED! YOU
SEE THEIR ~
TACTICS, SIGNOR 2A).








OH! MAGGIE - COME
HERE / T THINK VE
UNCOVERED SOME
OLO RELICS THAT
YER GRANDDAD ___

ae —\‘pe Zh

y »
MY Peys 7 pS
S OX eh 4
rss noe

TITHE ONLY RELIC I
REMEMBER SEEIN’
AROUND HERE
WAS HIS WIFE’

\( THEN THAT MUST
___.BE WHERE
Gy OES IS



ES... AND HERE'S ‘ RIP, SHE LOOKS
SOME MORE L®CK, HONEY! \ 'B NICE... AND
A PICTURE .SIGNEO WITH } ATTRACTIVE. MAYBE

LOVE, JULIET!’ / WE'RE WORRYING
F . Ne 3 ABOUT DESMOND
mf (4 a2 ; é TUT T NEEOLES@Y...



I HOPS SO...6UT I LBARNED ) =
LONG AGO NEVER TO JUDGE | a

ae E y ; f
wie | : 7 ~— ‘jaar a ¥ Na /|
SRC! i: C i — chs \ AL a
j Yee | i. Mf] 7; |
| \
* \
wy ’

A

om
“SZ





__PHANTC:1

TS TRH [Pi A~ GOMEBODVE USING RM
AED AES | REAL BULLETS INGTEAD fnew:

t Né | [OF BLANKe? ay f \

| —~—
li NAL% STOP \\ Ts
THE CAMERA <




STOP THE CAMERA? WHATS GOING-
ON HERE? THATS NOT im

iN THE SCRIPT? gong WW

Ngee
J Yr years”
) DG ’
/ Re ‘
.

Saat




4G, AS THE PicTUP
FING FILMEDs«



i



eee rece SERENE DY










446665¢

ADVOCATE





with it!

The call for “Black & White” continues to grow

all over the world, for connoisseurs agree that it
is a Scotch in a class all its own.

Blended in the spe@ial “Black & White” way it

is a splendid drink at all times and for all

occasions,

‘BLACK: WHITE’

SCOTCH WHISKY

the Blending

Seotch Whisky Distillers

Whe Secerk th tn

2
ee
By Appointment ved



to H.M, King George Vi

JAMES BUCHANAN









..elt's the improved
Chase and Sanborn!

Mere words can’t describe it. You'll have to taste
\od when you lift a cup of this new Chase and
orn to your lips, you'll exclaim with delight!

u'll agree with those who
it “the
vy can buy!’ Geta can

iay—-vacuum-packed, from

wr grocer,

finest coffee

| PLE a We)



NAIL SCISSORS
TWEEZERS

FILES

SHAVING BRUSHES
RAZORS



CALL IN TO-DAY AT

COLLINS’ DRUG STORES |

Broad and Tudor Streets.

TSS ee SS
= SSS
aoe 6

= SSS = SS SS = SS
+ ane OLAS SS EPSPS SE SSESESESSS SSS SS POSSSSSS

**RECTOR’S
FEVER MIXTURE *





1 preparation for combating

Malaria and
ull

compounded from tested Drugs, Fever
respond readily to this effective



Remember i RECTOR’S PRODUCT” Obtainable at

Messrs Booker’s «@p0s) Drug Stores Ltd.

Broad Street and Alpha Pharmacy, Hastings,

»
s




James Buchanan & Co, Led.

& CO. LTD., GLASGOW, SCOTLAND





6654,4
LLL LCL LE EPO PPP PPPP PPPOE
>
=
LLL PLE LEPESSSOCESEOSOCESEOEY, =

POLIO SIPS STOO FOSS FOOT SO OSCE SOUS SOSSSOSSSSESS {





SATURDAY, JULY 22, Yd

$e






&

Contains

D.D.T.
Large, medium and small size Tins
Bae

+ One tees



ee BEETLES
Fees Oe

LEE PEPP PPPS SSE

% HAVE YOU GOT A

* COLD or COUGH 3
IF SO TRY

BROWNE'S
CERTAIN COUGH
* CURE







que Remedy for Coughs,

SCOTCH waisey Bronchitis, Sore Throat,





& » Bronchial Asthma,
misey Whooping Cough, Disease of the
Rasen Chest and Lungs, ete., ete.







C. CARLTON BROWNE
Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813

6$5990$$55999559999 9455 8065585900"

i









THE MARK

OF DISTINCTION

|
S&S |
| in RUM |
|

|
| Blended & Bottled by }
| STUART & SAMPSON

LID.









These tough 5 tonners

CAN TOKE 477

@ forward control
large capacity truck.

Turse robust, heavy-duty trucks are congete;

providing low-cost transportation for 7

operators all over the world. Planned and

constructed for scientific weight distri-

bution to safeguard the load . . . to reduce

tyre wear... to keep maintenance

charges down to the minimum. Petrol or Pai

* diesel engine. Left or right-hand ~ y,

drive, Normal or forward contro!

Add one of these 5 tonners to your fleet,

it will soon prove its investment value.
* Manufactured ::der



rot go elba.
uch, § @rg, *% no, _
he, #e cap gor mar r

y



Ss ‘Or,
Sorwe~ whe

wa, lb
Cni¢ wie revert,

ler, "toy

Saurer license

MORRIS-COMMERCIAL

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

St





SATURDAY, JULY 22, 1950

CLASSIFIED ADS. |

|

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HARBOUR LO



PAGE SEVEN

em

Rheumatism, Ankles Puify,







Public Notices=—Contd

Britain Want:







!
|
{

Telephone 2508.

|























































































































































































































































































































































































































ony nseneaneenesenpmneeniroanh Toe * 1, SS. Adelanto, SS ‘ s
=F Lert anenesprenee £20 MONTHLY In Carlisle Bay Fig re ss Spec ale s.s ni dc j oO Know ie os ‘
‘ La Plak, SS. Regent J a ss t ;
DIED ex uu i ’ eeTick EASILY earned at home in spare time | Sch. Lady Noeleen, Yacht Leander, | perial Toronto, re diene oa ac ac e icne $ i
FOSTER — E late Clerkess . . dealing in ——— No sername Frances W Smith, Sch. E M.| Salinas; S.S. Rio Orinoco; S Ss. Mor LONDON, July 21 v s
of DaCosta) at h -¢ Lightfoot’s necessary uitable for either sex | Tannis, Se anuata, Sch urma maecguif, S.S. Theobal §.S. Llanis " ae ae. ' i ‘ ft ‘ :
Cross Lane. Her | seneed Weer ts sto ccniact you with Students in| Sch. Turtle Dove, M.V. Blue Star, Sch | en, a ee ae oe 8S le ee United | 0s you re ioe hee Guinean Wecroue [pocuer rarriroeuie
residence at 4.30 o'clock afterr N Colonies and Dominions for pen cor-|W. L. Eunicia; Seh. Rosarene; Sch | Golfito, S.§. Historian, |8.8. Thirby States for advice about what | ness, Backache, Leg Paias, Swollen Ankies.| prove
for Westbury Cemetery OTICE respondents. Enclose 2% stamp. Air Phyllis Mark; Seh. Gardenia W.. Sch §.§. San Rosa, SS. Blizabeth, S.s |further a\i can be given in the | Rheumatism Burning Passages, Fx No Benetit—No Pay
Friends are invited Sm the aah Mail only take fews days. F. Parting-| Timothy A. H Vansluytman S.S. Nidardal, S.S. Arkansas, 8S. Esei.| Korean campaign the tabloid Acidity, or Loss of Ene and feel old The ve first 4 Cystex go¢
Beryl o e estate of ton, Prospect House, 329 Wigan Road ¥ ARRIVALS . Marques de Comillas, 8.8. EH. Blin ee . A | fore your time, Kidney Trouble is the true | '° %
WALTER
— | Leigh Lancs, England pl. Lady Joy, Go tons net, Cart-'8 8. Alcoa Sennant, 8.8. fen Mor |newspaper “Daily Mirror report- | cause
) ‘ 2 arsons, from St Lucia s < 5S Casadi as | “ “ Wrong foods and drinks, wo I '
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ai! | ___ 20.7.0. —90n.| “MV.” Daerwood. 9 tons net, Capt 25. ee See Be hae | aa iierwatk Was crakin un unvech at wi Cyatex
IN MEMORIAM ae eg or ml YMCA oS St, Lucha. tone net, | Liss 8-8 Spurt; $5. Comedian, $S-|phag be a aa ~ wis ashes eS and place a heavy strain on your ki pletely '
o! . on - - a choone: neess pulse, s t.} c s : 3s C en se € as oO aut e ne the yY and ne e
Holder, deceased, late of V. eo mas! Ail Members, Subscribers and Friends| co5¢ Mitchell, from St. Lucia | Temple Arch, 8-8. Fort Richelieu, §-§.) | niy hs he aes JU | to properly purity your blood and ma | ently ate
e enture in the| of the Association are invited to attend Noravind, S.S. Uinios, S.S. Raban, S.S.]no reply had yet been received. | health and energy package and wet y back
In loving memory of my Beloved] Pavish of Saint John in this Island who | an important Meeting in the Seevell oe ne, Se tone pe, Capt | Mormacstar: M.S. Hera, $.S. Trajanus A possibility that the term of " ¢ | Cystex tex) }
husband, CUTHDERT ALLEYNE, who] Wed on the 19th day of August 1949,| tial, Headquarters, Pinfold Street, on Stephen: from GMO at tome | Sere, Se hie, soeombol. 8S. serv efor Britist aw Delp Kidneys Doctor's Way roa ee in :
fell acisep on the 22nd of July, 1949. intestate, are requested to send in par-| Friday the 28th July, 1950, at 4.30 p.m Schooner Sy avidson, 87 tons | Gyrotoma, §.S. Hyeres, S&. Bowmonte | S€FVice Tor ritish and western you, so buy your treat o~
“My sorrow and heartache ragga of ee ee, Soe attested far the purpeue cf receiving trom the| “si, cener Seely, Se Se ede ait | European conscripts will be ex- | ,, Many doctors have discovered by scien: | for
N p ca 1e) un »ctors Ponce: * * A ; clinical tes a otus orac e| : as
tg, SS A Saget os age Coa Meee Sees Ceca eee ea] Sam Ce Wate Som tended wee mentioned in other {ties sive wettsyeras across Rewis: | Qo BOOM «oer
No one can heal No. 2’ Swan Street, Bridgetown, on oF | Wakefield and Plans for the expansion| “Schex net ee SEE & cclincthcal’ brevated eeensniatice ee oe oo
My Dear one has yone, beaters ara oe of July, 1950, after, of the new premises ere ane é . so ; In Britain conscripted soldiers a scientifically prepared prescription | Tee CUARANTFED Remedy RHEUMATISM
though not jar av whic proceed to distribut ; ap bert, from § =. D
i eae eae Teele: lie masete of the Genenned aminig the A BAe : DEPARTURES af serve 18 months. In most Western | ——- pee tee ale
in atedanide- gach parties entitled thereto having regard HERBERT H.W | Schooner Phillis Mark. weteomd European countries the term of
fi ach day oniy to such claims of which I shali 2 ILLIAMS,| Capt. McQuilkin, for St. Lucia | i Thi
Wil! ever be remembered by his lov-] then have had notice and 1 hn “eee General Secretary MV. Blue Star, 130 tons net, Capt service is one year, This morn-
ing Wife—Iris Alleyne eee liable for the ‘ameets of any part| 22.7.50—2n.| fergusson, for Trinidad | ARRIVALS BY BWIAL = ——— a — a gen
ria 7hs ther so uted to any person of GIRL y | FROM TRINIDAD eral extension o wo years was
whose debt or claim I shall not then me eared, UNION In Touch With ' — a oat Maraj, Cre funder review, following proposals SOUTARAL, ADOwRAGE > RENEE - - =
have had notice. i P e ve Olsen, ta Young, Hugh Cummins, Guv 5 , toh ¢ 5 L, USTRALIA, NEW ZEA- Se :
. estate are requested to settle their) ene - big 2 See: oe Be Barbados Coastal Station | Niger s, Ernest Tibbits, Julian Mitchel! = by BR rings Foggy Ret anoe LAND LINE LTD., (M.A.N 2. LINE
FOR SALE indebtedness without delay. | Monday, 24th July, at 5 p.m "| “Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd FROM ST. KITTS 4 etence inisters, Mr. Shinwe SS “PORT WELLINGTON” sails Met The MV wood” will |
Dated this Ist day of June, 1950. “'G. WILIAMS, dvise that they can now communicate Archibald Penchoew, Leonie Per and M. Pleven bourr mid-July, North Queensland accept Cargo r
of Walter Thomas Holder, deceased. Genera i " cth the following ships through their choew, Bonie Penchoew Extension of the term of service | J!) wust, Brisbane early August, St. Lucia, St neent, Grenada,
IDA ROSAMUND HOLDER, Heneral Secretary. | oe ados Coast Station. FROM BRITISH GUIANA eg , are Sydney id- AX arriving Trinidad Aruba, sailing Thursday, 27th
Qualified Administratrix of the Estate 22.7.50—In. | Barbados Coss! “cP Anistal, S.$. Petter Peter Wallbrdige, Alfred De Freitas in Britain was understood here to | qpproximately 9th September July
AUTOMOTIVE 5.6.80-4n —— X s | Carenentte ae. yttae ose De Pty eitas |be one of the many proposals un=| 55S. “GLOUCEST replaces “Devor The M.V : ,
——————SS ‘illiam utteny, eatrice witter CAR--1942 Austin 10 Saloon, very} - =e a acees -| NOTICE | Hyacinth Callender, James Alexander Ne for — st carly Genteriier: Metbauehe Ree hall, Cargo and Passengers for Do
good condition, Phone Barbados P hii NJ 1 s—C ntd. | Derlick Sinson, Richard Parris, Marjorie Ish Getence plans and programmes Sydney second half, Brisbane September ca, Antigua, M rrat. St. Kitts-
me 4 ceria | : iy Cy ale o | Stanford, Veronica Stanford, Angela .e current situation Oth, arriving at Trinidad October 28th Nevis, sailing Friday, 28th July
sae ens ee TAKE NOTICE | IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF ; Seabee EE CP enemisl fo he SHENOY Blue [ee eehe These vessels have ample “space | for ENGI
STATION WAGON for ise? in a-wWikdimins Son Sa | Josenh, Herbert Rooers, Samuel Ashby chilled, hard frozen, and general cargo e 1 will
i as Phare see , : Y's pensation Act, 1943 Beatrice Feast Cargo accepted on through Bills of accept Cargo and f
Sean ee rane ee es < = me MULLARD | Notice is hereby given that Lambert HOUSE & S=:ED ROOF—One (1!) eee enone ST. LUCIA \ = Lading with transhipment oa Trinidad St. Lucia, St. Vincent Grae F }
Whale te MtnSit.” at fe Par oh THAT MULLARD ELECTRONIC PRO-| Green, of Bel Air, St. George, em-| goard & Shingle House and Shedroo!) Geraldine Murray, Aubrey Doula Ttal Ste s U ox Barbados, British Guiana, Windward ailing Wednesday, 19th July |
5 ae sii nace é ee _ ee™ sa Can, ee Ss p labourer at Leat’s Plan-! i x 10ft, at Kew Road, Bank Hall | smith, Sydmey Lee Lum, Elaine Catwei ry P P a“ ear, yertient B.Wil
‘i whose trade or business a SS - | tation, was injured whilst ¢ : . nae! ~ e Catw : ov further particulars apply:— ; Se “Tr e |
3 Ate the Sotatnationel, Basel tury House, Shaftesbury Avenue, Lon- | breaking stone in a ‘yy ene St. Michae\- wire. EUNICE artuur, | OO"? CN Ou VENEZUELA Armed Forces FURNESS. WITHY & CO "UTD Associ ion is eee
VAN—One International Panel Van,| don, WC 2, England, has applied for | section of the side of the quarry broke nate Brage's Hill Amador Octauio, Mary Octoulo, Agents, Trinidad ; eeeren ae
in good order and runs well Alleyne.| we registration ot a trade mark in Part} away and fei ; 2 ; i . , ; . Consignee; Dial; 4047
; ~ res, y ell om him and he died as St. Joseph rigo, Octauio, Andres Octauio, Hut a, DA COSTA & CO TD
Arthur & Co,, Ltd., High Street. "A" of Register in connection with Elec-]@ result of the injuries. sustained and Matthes, Jnes Matthes, Marie Ann Ma @ + From page 1 Agents, Barba ery |
Phone 4260 2.7.50--9n_| tronic discharge tubes, radio and televis-! (4: Com;cnsation has beeit paid int sr an acre offthes, Henrique Barzilay, — Uluiaws will join in combined manoeuvres i, ee So —————
ion receiving and transmitting apparatus | Court pas i“ LAND—One quarter = beside | Barzilay, Lily Barzilay, Elisabeth Blaci he re i . A
Farvall H. Tractor and Grass Cutter| and equipment, electric incandescent.) jj dependents ~¢ land at Kendall Hill, Ch. Ch., tent ; oe 7 em an Sone in the Adriatic Sea with the Brit- tee eae
226 D B. I. Apply to M.D” Eilfor,| fluorescent and discharge lamps, commu-) cerned eh ta pend: persone cbRal the main 7580 with water and light | stone, rtnur Jack stone a ish Mediterranean Fleet and
Ashford Plantation, St. John nications and amplifying equipment, | , hereby enticas te hes es available. Price $700.00 are ot er | Sihexerone American naval units. pa: i oe
a.” de a 4 y , > Oo Appear a mM axw a N ° =
ial sg Ste Er pee cas Bes ¥-Poeete oamnOas ray ee ee etat afl prensa sion of ‘Appeal’ on Wednes. Thelma Grifith, Maxwell 22.7.50—2n ek” rAt With the increase in man pow- SAGUENAY TERMINALS Bae! eT
the aforesaid goods. Electric lighting | |. ne 9th day of August, 1950, at 10) — .___ —_—_— — ‘ er of the army, it is iev , = ra ae . ast fee i}
LIVESTOCK fittings, magnets, electric shaving appara- | Sock a.m MARISTOW At Maxwell's Coast | Wilfred Alston, Luts DeLima, M ot ! th redipd. it is beli ved Italy SS SS SN
fitting’. jay apparatus and tubes, high-| Dated this 20th day of July, 1950 averlooking the Sea, having 4 bed- Rosario. DeLima, Stephen Lai Fox {will urge the speeding up delivery ~
GOAT Pure bred Alpine (British) | frequency heating apparatus, and will be | I. V. GILKES, nVEClOOKING Ae Salconies,, ste. wan | Cdeee Weeks, Make Seowne f of American arms under the At- SOUTHBOU . aa
with young kid. Martin Griffith, Four | be entitled to register the same after one | Ag. Clerk Assistant i modern conveniences Private | Dowich. | Janette Buchanan, Mee antic Pact Four shiploads of . UND SAILINGS
Winds, St. Peter | month from the 19th day of July 1950 Court of Appeal.| Reach, safe bathing, for quick | sale Bareant, Louis Fisher, William Bryder 7 ‘ th From Montreal, St. Jo} : Ne
20.7.50--2n., Whless some person shall in the mean- 22.7.50-—-3n | p'sod, or fully furnished | £4,000 Pupert Bion, Berman Marshall yr, Jarms have so far arrived but the al, St. John, N.B., Halifax, N.S
= j e ive re D r . a ile . oN ny 7
. , ay omioe apotion te edule, $2 arses a Possession within one month , FOr) ut me Reatrice Feast, Marie. Robinson rate of delivery is well behind the To Barbados, T rinidad, Demerara, B.G }
nee ee oer One (1) Saanen {ign The trade mark can be seen on viewing Phone 4683 or es at FOR BRITISH GUIANA promised schedule, according to ‘ ean ic
E ge mth, W nt oid) iz Apply to Mr./ aplication at my office. NOTICE = Elizabeth Birkett, Patricia Birke Italian sources. It was understood Loading Dates Expected }
©. Griffith ellington Street. *-ehsa8 Dated this 19th day of July, 1950 wen, met oaey ee ims that Britain, besides giving licenses Montreal Arrival Dates S
Pte H. WILLIAMS, s hereby giv ‘ a ‘ een «6 ore | Bdghil, mes | Greatheac dan , ‘ Z m |
is Rieicnus ct Geion Werks, [eral Mastic of tue Yous denis. Precl RRORERTY—inat / AMEEDS, property | paetbhunl, Doreen Schuler, Angsla Fe |for construction of jet fighters, SS. “MARIA Barbados
POULTRY 21.7.50--3n-| gresaive: Club will be held-on We Pro] eee Rose Hill’ at Sarjeant’s Village. | reira, Ritcher Fung. Wendolin Baro) ] will supply other arms and equip- De LARRINGA"]| 28th June grad Jul loth J
= | day 20rd A . 2 a hee ns Wwetnae It consists of a substantially built two) Marguerite Baron, Jane Dalton, Stews't} ment whict sahnot be supplied S.s POLYCREST’ lath July 19th Ju 4th August
POULTRY—A I the a A August, 1950 at 8.30 p.m. at storey stone house which has front and |Allen, Esau Khan, John Dare, Annet c ch ce ae PP ss BRUSH Mth July Bist July 16th, August
white Legh fh Pullets 1 an ate TAKE NOTICE Michael. Notoer Pe eae Saint} back verandah, drawing and dining Burgess, May Crease, Hepeare Crease,; by America. It was indicated au- — 4
t veghe ets ing 8372 ne s of all motions intend-| —* r sedrooms, study, water Clarice Gomes, Lloyd ‘oster, Alison] thoritativery to-day that these
sirens “ LA” Meeting Salt ee ite Sees rooms, three pewrepath, ‘kitchen and |Grogan, Reginald Lopes, Thelma Hinds) snoties would be nataatiods PLANTATIONS LIMITED— ELECTRICAL STEL undersigned C/O Sarringtan te oe electricity Mivqutiots acd Tere Peter Deverteville, Sarai Devertevills , : —Reuter.
8 A MP COMPANY | lucas Street, Bridgetow Placed Ge cares * Francis DeGale, Wilfred DeGale, Williay :
-—- YIREHOED, po HE eter whose | than seven days ore Oat iuee Liban, "bus passes the door vias oe Rhos: Lionel Williams. Nellie McFarlan-’ OPPO PSPOSD eennenererets X
WASHING MACHINE—One (1) Elec-| trade or business address 1s Winchel- Dated this 19th aay of July, 1950 extremely low is only § a iy to| Hilary McQuilkin, Viola St. Hilaire “well-known U.K anufactur- 9
trie Washing Machine. Dial 3471 sea Road, Harlesden, N.W. 10, London, R. C. CHAPMAN spection and other particular ven’ FOR ANTIGUA 4 BK mee ys
7,50—2n.| England, has applied for the registra- Hi | D'Arcy A. Scott. 331 DM Francia Hawkins, Bloodworth, Frank|%& e's of English Floor Polishes and %& i
Eng . PP 8 ony. Secretary eo ¥
wacAee ts ——— | tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of field Gall, Edmond Charlwood, Edward Greer | & Cleaning Preparations require the 4
MACHINE—One (1) Electric Sewing] Register in connection with instal- PROPERTY — At_ Bridgefield, be FOR SAN JUAN % services of an Established Agent, »
Machine. Dial 3471 Intions for lighting more _ perticilarly a eg) Spee cae a Se Ae. RS Paul Nolan. with personal connections, to sell ¥
22.7.50—2n ‘ ane 5 . c wall house & shop us > + ae 7 : sar ‘,
Syne Seen Ne beara incandescent sind Glecharse lamps: Stee. OFFICIAL NOTICE | crawine & dining rooms, two bedrooms, X these products to traders and a
electric lighting fittings, shades and re- water toilet & shower bath, kitchen % other Customers, Liberal Com- Wf
MISCELI ANEOUS flectors; capacitors, ballasts and starters ae aoa bigs water, vogetes wit ad watch, te % mission to right applicant. Write: x
ARTISTS MATERIALS — including | 07, discharge lamps: eirtand Wonans SISTANT COURT OF | Siinted with canes. Good place for MAIL NOTICE TUE SHIP CO, LTD., Bridsend, *
oil and water colours, brushes and | torches; cycle dynamo lighting sets, parts (Equitable Jurisdiction) business and raising stocks. Price fixed M for Tri tin 38 Goin > Glamorgan, U.K.” ¥ ee ee
pipette ekene Save ae see Sanaa Se Ree a sae e CYRIL BRUCE wee to D'Arcy A. Scott will be Siosed tt tbe Gene : Poest OMe ; ¥ ASCO OOOO POLS 6600" OUTWA F
Ps y stencils ave ust ¢ Nl] reflectors and rearlights; dynamos for BROOKS pply to y mow : , ’ AEE SEO POSES /ARD q " . UNI" c } .
opened at C, F. HARRISON'S SHOW-| cycle lighting sets, and will be entitled Plaintiff 22.1,50—an. | as_under:- ae SSS SSS ROM THE UNITED) KINGDOM
ROOM, 22.7.50—2n.|to register the same after one month CLIFTON HOWELL INNISS ee Parcel Mat, Regiapaeed Mat. ant
from the 19th day of July 1950 unless Defendant TOWER GARAGE —_ Standing on | Ordinary | Mail at 10.15 a.m. on the Vessel Frem Leaves Due
BOARD—About ten thousand feet. Deal | some person shall in the meantime give 5,445 square feet of land at St, Mate | 22nd July, 1980 ii NEW. ARRIVALS Barbados
Boards. Contact The C. H. Kinch Co., | notice in duplicate to me at my office of} IN pursuance of an Order in the] thias Gap, Christ Church. Mails for British Guiana by the Sch. , S.S. “COMEDIAN” Liverroo! 8 28rd July
Ltd., No. 1 Palmetto St. 21.7.50—-3n | opposition of such registration, The trade | Court in the above action made on th rat, Gyniding is one recently erected | Francie W. Smith will be closed at th uC /NAMO SETS SG) NEPRCT ar) eee O08 th July 28rd July
_ -— mark can be seen on application at my | 16th day of June, 1950, I give notice is and built of stone and the site Is an General Post Office as under: L CAS DY MO SETS 5.8. “SPECIALIST M/Brough &
CALYPSO RECORDS, forty _ eight | office. all persons having any estate, right or| excellent one for a garage. One, itt is tele Sat tn Gre ard CYCLE BATTERY SETS London Sth July 25th July
See tae ong Get} Dated thie 10h Gay ee Ta tALan,. Siectne atl Th eee te ea eee eee building also lends itself | for suly, 1900. yea CYCLOMETERS S.S. “RIVERCREST” London 15th July 30th July
em. Hl q cting a at certal re to a private dwel- rT ea ‘LE : “ ~ ‘ ¥ ,
A. BARNES & CO. LTD. dgiitas'ut Trade stitten: [of land stusta Be Glapbars tn ike tesa linehouse, ry n CYCLE Re OT INS SS, “NATURALIST Liverpool 28th July 11th Aug
15.7,50—T.F.N. 21,7.50—3n. Siete ee and island aforesaid con-} By Public Auction on Thursday 27th PUMPS & CONNE .
———— ya easurement one rood and July at 2 p.m. at the office of the . :
DUCKHAM'S ADCOIDS—Save Petrol ere eet perches be the same more} undersigned from whom further par- US. CORRESPONDENT NEWSAM & co. HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM:
reduce engine wear and promote per- same being formerly part| ticulars and conditions of sale can be |,
formance especially when inferlor petrol TAKE NOTICE of a larger area of land alee ask obtained MISSING IN KOREA Vessel BK
has to be used. Of great assistance when ’ admeasurement one acre one and one R. 8S. NICHOLLS & CO., S.S. “TACTIC ” 1 O° Closes in Barbados
Biot end jap sa Se porte feotane HARWOOD S aaa ee Rerne: and vounding to- 151, 152 Roebuck Street NEW YORK, July 21. S's. pevcratain . Greenock 24th July
imple and inexpensive to use. n- ‘aad ea a s the North on ls ie CO TS ai iE 9 i
able from all leading Garages and Ser- That Duncan Harwood and Cormpany ae that’ Wakes seoeal gw ee aM Telephone No: 2925 Wilson Fielder, Junior, Time ORIENTAL London 29th July
3 : : Limited, a corporation duly organized ugusta 1.7.8 beer ;
vice Stations, H. Jason Jones & Co, Ltd. }| Tiniteds & | SuMoaNGhe Dominion of Walkols. deanaead. tonecte the Bat’ on Magazine correspondent, has been For further particulars apply to
Agents & Distributors, 16.7.50—6n, Under MSvhose trade of business ad- Pepe Loy, ce thee of Mise Acéline Yard,| —— —.|reported missing on the Taejon ounine fone eer ener
" sea?’ Se t, in e uth on lands of Rockley 1,200 shares of $1.00 each 4 BAR- \ J * » VRAK, SANDAL
MIRROR—Cheval mirror. Owen T.| dress is 8,000, Shaughnessy Stree Golf and Country “Club and. towarde| BADOS CO-OPERATIVE BANK LIM- front, the New York office@ \of JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP- DA COSTA & CO., LTD—Agents
T. Allder, Roebuck Strect, . Dial sag9. | the City, of | Vans eer canada, |e, West on lands formerly of Felix | ITED S ie above wit be set up tor |7ime and LAfe, said |B tsrnins, cloves, rerrum :
7 5 um bia, an _ . . :
eee ee "epee for the registration of a oe 7 Waioort but now of Clifton} sale to public competition on iday |tonight. Fielder aged 33, was re- = = -
DIL STOVES—2 Burner Perfection. | trade mark in part “A” of Register in meyell Toss Or: Dowever else, thas Seaaltame von ea nee 2pm. at out] ported the retreat of the American KASH MERE
‘ . 7 “lo nC " 1 hi beverages 3 utt and bound to bring before] office in Lucas Street. ¢ Seriat
4 Burner Valor & others. (Like new). | connection with alcoholic ie me an account of their said claims ‘ARRINGTON SEALY 24th Division.
Owen T. Allder, Roebuck Street. Dial] and will be entitled to register the| with their witnesses, document 4 c. & SEAL . —Reuter .
3299 2%.7.50--In, | Same after one month from the 18th day | vouchers, to be examined Be ee a haat a ; eamah 0.
item pein sit gine iia al aha SP July. 1980, unless some Person snail any Tuesday, or Friday between the le
‘ TYRES | AND BATTERIN. Sizes 94 x pee Dee at er ane of ‘opposition nents of 12 (noon) and 3 o'clock in the ARRIV ED
* . 5 and other sizes, also} SO'* © tea afternoon, at the Office of the Clerk
Oldham 17 plate batteries. Guaranteed of ain ramaipenon « aus rene i of the Assistant Court of Appeal at the GOVERNMENT NOTICE Inc.
inquire Auto Tyre Company Trafalgar eat 7 a em ¥| Court House, Bridgetown, before the Another shipment of the popular
Street, Phone 2696. 21.7,50—t.f.n. | © aa iia oe a rengatou 6th day of September, 1950, in order NEW WORLD GAS COOKERS NEw on : 10
VG cia valle, OWE a nis ai WILLIAMS 50. | that such claims may be yanked accord- ees ik ital All have been booked, but af: PLGANS: SER» AOR
alises. | EN i. ) ing to the nature and priority thereat} Wacant Post of Specialist Physician, General Hospital, . AL ge : arr.
at N.O.
ALLDER. Roebuck Street, a 3290 Registrar of Trade Marks. | respectively; otherwise such persons will Barbad. CALL : your Gas Showroom, ALCOA RANGM ar eh U'dor
.7.50—1n 21.7,50—3n | be i ar! OS. tuy St AL IER 2th July 25th July
precluded from the benefit of the * > ‘ : ALCOA ROAMER 26th July I
TRUCK CHASSIS—One Austin truck me Decree, and ne, deprived of all APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Specialist Physician, SEE pe fore they are ALCOA RUNNER oth “Auge! i AE sat
ston ae a ad : claim on or against the said property. ; r ; delivered .
Sonoita ee trend ek pated en, TAKE NOTICE Clainants ‘ae also notified thet thay | @cneral Hospital, Barbados. Applicants should be registered quan ORDER one from our next NEW YORK SSBVICw
Owners bought another Austin, Alleyne,| aura iyi Sanaa Eto es attend the said Court on Wednes-| medical practitioners; post-graduate hospital experience essential. shipment salle Are.
‘s é s 3 . e al 5 i.
Quhne & Con, Lid, High Street, Phone] on AT, Come tn Altred Bittmad, | at 10 e, oth day of September, 1950.) The post is non-pensionable on contract for three years, renewable. i: 5 a tia s re “a
- 3 > é m, 7 Zist Ju 31s
conrrriemnisioeenumnimasnenearsnnaes der are ig Mel n oe etre! nee ‘endivid- eae will bt Se ee th Salary will be on scale of $4,800 x 480 — $6,240 per annum, plus half | soe pee oe OOOO OOOO OEY | BYFJORD” ith ‘August ist ‘August
ORE, CASE Guin. Mansa Sis wpointed by the Probate Court of yaiven, under my hand this 16th day of fees for private patient care within the Hospital and half consulta- See TITAN ReavION Oe
OWEN T. “ALLDER, “Roebuck | Sire | Merrimack County State of New Hamp- L v. GitKes, | tion fees within and without the Hospital; otherwise private practice GIBBS’ Bis mae ,
ri . _ ed ‘Ss ay . q ; i i IND
ania OE Sree ioe Meter Bo bae tee Ag. Clerk of the Assistant Court. lis not allowed. Position in scale determined by experience and x : faci as .
Eddy, whose trade or business address 21.6.50—3n | qualification. PROVISION GROCERY & % as rate re Montreal Halifax savecdes
is 107, Falmouth Street, Boston 15, ; ; i ~~ r : 5.8. “ALC R" July 2ist 2 r
FOR RENT oS te actin United’ Uealke of AIneEI : Rent-free furnished quarters will be provided but until these are LIQUOR STORE % | 5.8. “ALCOA POLARIS" Aus. 4th Aug. “th Aus: aith
ca have applied for the registration of available an allowance at the rate of 10% of salary will be payable. Offers Y«
e vu eS
a trade mark in part “A” of Register ‘ " | m % _ _
SS OOM=I Large Fur-| in ‘connection “with printed — books, OFFICIAL SALE Passages, not exceeding $960 each way, of officer ene es ia, NORTHBOUND
nished Room. Cool and airy at Bel] magazines, publications, and Bible les-| ,, p14) payable on appointment and on expiration of contract. Small ‘ arte and Artives
Air, Richmond Gap. Dial 22"7,00—2n. | ings’ Bhonograph reco ei and will| IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OP The Specialist Physician shall be responsible for the public medi~| & Smoked Herrings 8.8, “ALCOA PILGRIM" Jorn July For Montreal and Quebe:
x "| be entitled to register the’ same after racks eee i cal service of the Institution, shall perform such other departmental Peanuts rich in vitamins | 36c. Ib Wligey: Sdenkea Save. lies lded. seubek aati
HIGH WINDS, Cattlewash, from Octo-]| one month from the 18th day of July, quitable Jurisdiction) . i i Superior Quality Br. Vinegar eS: BROT EET See re
it etenda. Dial Seb. 1950, unless some person in the mean- CYRIL BRUCE BROOKS duties as may be required of him from time to time and shall act under ie, pt pei rg vines oo
—21,7.50—3n. | time gives notice in duplicate to me at Plaintiff the general superintendence and direction of the Director of Medical Hartley's Green Peas one ; i 5 :
CLIFTON HOWELL INNISS . tin Apply DA COSTA & CO,, LTD,-—Canadian Service
SNUG CORNER’,—PALM BEACH eae ak eee eae ert aah Defendant Services. 2 Soups (75) varieties : ROBERT THOM LTD,.-New York and Gulf Service
.—PAL! f i ; ; i ‘ idne Pail, Cele :
HASTINGS, ideally situated on the SEA,| on application at my office. at a8 See Siven that by Satie Applications accompanied by two testimonials should be addressed Pane amaaoeiy erent? aoe a ei
7 in ‘ z 7 ',
Srawinng, Siciee aut onewn Goaeant OI eRe a Sue ‘Appeal dated the 16th day of June. 1990,|to the Colonial Secretary, Bridgetown, Barbados, and should be sub- and the famous
with Running Water, all modern con- Regitar Wi iede Marks, | there will be set up for sale to the) mitted not later than the 3ist of July, 1950. GIBBS’ GOLD RIBBON PASSAGES TO IRELAND
veniences, Kitchen, Servants’ Room and 21,7.50—3n. re Ce eeet at Scant 24.6.50.—3n RUM Antilles I
Garage. Available from ist. August je at , 3 ntilles Products toses é “+r 4 BERTHS
‘Apply: C. BE. Clarke, 7 Swan Street at the Court House, Bridgetown, be- Try to Dubl 1" M. DUA tegen Rtg Rede oa
or i : "99 Sn. tw hi of noon) and ry it ublin per M.V JUALA”, sailing from Roseau 26th July.
Dial 2631 or 3029. 22,7.50—5n TAKE NOTICE een the hours at ‘ : Single F. » : : df
% o/clock in tha. atvernoon | os Friday, Vacant Posts of Medical Officer, General Hospital, Delivery by Ven en Oyile Single Fare £70, usual reductions for children
OAKITE ine hat Sertain piece or parcel of 1and Barbados. Dial 118 eee er ere
rt 4
si it laph: in the parish of i ate sdical
WANTED THAT OAKITE PRODUCTS INC,, a SUE oN courted teand Aria rae APPLICATIONS are invited for five vacant posts of Medica PSEA DONOR Te one
, corporation organized and under Officer, General Hospital, Barbados. Applicants must be registered - SONIA SASS

Oo

HELP









The public are hereby warned agains
giving credit to my wife IRIS TODD
(nee Sobers)









er signed by me
Signed FITZ HERBERT BRATHWAITE
Upper Collymore Rock
St. Michael
22.7.50—2p







as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone unless by a
written order signed by me she having
left my home and protection without my

existing
the laws of the State of New York, United
States of America, whose trade or busi-
ness address is 22m Thames Street, New
York 6, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registration



TAKE NOTICE
JANIT

That Jamaica Knitting Mills Limitea,
a company duly incorporated under the

t

consent. laws of Jamaica, whose trade or busi-
By order, ness address is (Number 9 West Street

(Sea) ALBERT L. TODD, in the parish of Kingston, Island of

Upper Bay St., Jamaica, British West Indies has ap-

. Gas Co. plied for the registration of a trade

21.7.50—2n. | mark in part “A” of Register in con-

i En — | section with knitted goods and will be
The public are hereby warned against | entitled to register the same after one
giving credit to my wife, Dorothy| month from the 18th day of July, 1950
Doreen Brathwaite (nee Wilcher) as 1] unless some person shall in the mean-
do not hold myself responsible for her| time give notice in duplicate to me
or anyone else contracting any debt or| at my office of opposition of such
debts in my name unless by a written | registration The trade mark can be

seen on application at my office.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1950
H WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
21.7.50—3n.

|









taining by admeasurement one rood and
thirty eight perches be the same more
or less (the same being formerly part
of a larger area of Jand containing by
admeasurement one acre one and one





COOK—Must have satisfactory re- “AN half perches) butting and bounding to-
ferences. Apply to Fernihurst, Deacons eotiare, Pe Se ng ect wards the North on lands now or late
Road, Black Rock, between 5 and 6/ compounds having water-softening qual- of the Estate of Henrietta Augusta
p.m. Friday to Sunday. itles, recommended for all cleansing, Walcott, deceased towards the East on

20.7.50—4n. } washing, and polishing purposes, particu- | lands now or late of Miss Adeline
larly for use in the kitchen and in the | Yard, towards the Gouth on lands of

SALES GIRL — Required with a/household generally, and for use in| Rockley Golf and Country Club and to-
knowledge of ‘Spanish if possible. | laundries, garages, dairies, and industrial | wards the West on lands formerly of Felix
State salary. Apply Post Office Box plants of all kinds; also recommended | 0’D. Walcott but now of Clifton Howell
No. 22413, Bridgetown. for lubricating, heat absorbing, cutting, Inniss or however else the same may

18.7,50—6n. | grinding, stamping, drawing, stripping | butt and bound, and if not then sold th
ne | Surfaces of paint, varnish, enamels, said property will be set up for sale on
| Japans, lacquers, and other surface | every succeeding Friday between the

MISCELLANEOUS | finishes; anti-rusting, neutralizing, and |same hours until the same is sold for a

ae deodorizing; also neoornst Sau? aad sum not less than £50, 0. 0.
COOLERATOR: Owen er, | ization, commercial and household, suc
Roebuck Street, Dial 3209. as sterilizing bottles and other contain- Dated this 16th day of June, 1950.
22.7.50—Injers; also recommended as a scale re- 1, V. GIL ' ‘
_— | mover, milkstone remover, acid inhibitor, | Ae. Clerk of the Assist. Court of Appea
FNGLISH Gentleman, 44, arriving | bactericide, fungicide, and for use in wet | 22.6 50.—3n.
Barbados October, desires post as Head | finishing operations of textiles, and will
Waiter or in a similar CePA sate be equines to register the same ater — Senna ans
experience — good references. ‘urther| month from the 18th day of July
‘\euculars from C. Fletcher, Villiers | unless some person shall in the meantime PUBLIC SALES
Hotel, Douglas, Isle of man.” give notice in duplicate to me at my
21.7.50—Sn, | office of opposition of such registration
The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office.
o 1) “ovated this 18th day of July 1950. AUCTION
PERSONAL hagiues ee teks 1 have been instructed by the Com- |
21,7.50—3n. | Missioner of Police to set up for sale
‘| by public auction at Central Station,
on Monday next the 24th, beginning et

2 o'clock the below mentioned arti-
cles:—

(1) skillet
cold storage door,
quantity of motor mechanic tools, (1)
large screw driver, (1) motor vehicle
hub cap, (36) crocus bags

Terms strictly cash,

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Govt. Auctioneer
21.7.50—3n

containing paint oil, (1)

(2) Havetsacks, A

7



REAL ESTATE

BELVOIR,—Fitz Village,
Solid Stone wall, Three
| Drawing & Dining, Kitchen,
Bath, Garage. On Seaside

;z McKay



St
Bedrooms,
Toilet &
Apply H

SS

| LANG ~~» Desirable building site at

| Graeme Hall Terrace Dial 3430.
1,7,80—t.f.n,

e|payable on appointment and on expiration of contract.

Medical practitioners.

Posts are non-pensionable, on contract for three years, renewable.
Private practice not permitted. Salary will be on the scale of $3,600
x 240 — $4,800 per annum and position in scale determined by ex-
perience and qualification,

Rent-free furnished quarters will be provided but until these
are available an allowance at the rate of ten per cent of salary will
be payable.

Passages, not exceeding $960 each way, of officer and fami.’

Duties are general and in their performance the Medical Officer
shall act under immediate supervision and control of such Superior
Officers as Medical Superintendent, Specialist Surgeon, and Specialist
Physician and unde rgeneral direction of the Director of Medical
Services.

Applications accompanied by two testimonials should be addressed
to the Colonial Secretary, Bridgetown, Barbados, and should be sub-
mitted not later than the 3lst of July, 1950.

24,6.50.—3n. |



Vacant Post of Medical Superintendent, General Hospital,
Barbados. |

APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Medical Superintend- |
ent, General Hospital, Barbados. Applicants should be male regis-
tered medical practitioners with experience in Hospital administration.
The post is non-pensionable, on contract for three years, renewable. |
Salary will be at rate of $5,760 per annum. Private practice not)
allowed. |
Rent-free furnished quarters are provided.
Passages not exceeding $960 each way, of officer and family pay- |
able on appointment and on expiration of contract.

The Medical Superintendent shall act under the general super-

intendence and direction of the Director df Medical Services, and |
shall be responsible generally for the) supervision and management of |

|

James |the Hospital, shall perform such other departmental duties as may be}

required of him from time to time.
Applications accompanied by two testimonials should be addressed

ay =. to the Colonial Secretary, Bridgetown, Barbados, and should be sub-

Imitted not later than the 3ist of July, 1950
24.6.50.—3n. ,







|

| 8 acres of excellent building |









LAND
FOR SALE

land at St. Peter. 180 feet |

road frontage with right

of way Ao sea,
4% cents per square foot.
JOUN
M.
BLADON

Real Estate Agent
Phone 4640



4
(

Plantations Building




{Christian Science p
( fivading Room '

1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS
(Broad Street)
Hours: 10 am.—2 p.m,
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

Fridays.
10 a.m.—12 o'clock.
Saturdays.
4t this Room the Bible and
the Christian Science text-book,

Selenee and Heaith wita Key w)

the Seriptares by MARY BAKER

EDDY may Ye read, borrowed,
or pur based

Visitors Are Welcome ,
ee ee

THE HANDIEST THING WE HAVE SEEN FOR
DURAGLIT

METAL POLISH
oe «€6TRY A TIN TODAY
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
(CENTKAL FOUNDRY LTD. Proprictors)
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets

A TIME










4 4 o
P°ROEPOLOPR PO POOOLEIPOD BOPP APIT'S

CHECK THESE VALUES!

DIRECT FROM FACTORY 10 WEARER.

POPOL

SCGGOSS

4<¢

° g

OF

>
o
@PUMPS in White, Brown, Giack, Blue 75e,, 85e, $1.15 $4.4
@BALLERINAS in Red Sizes 3—8 $1.
@ LADIES’ CANVAS RUBBER SHOES

@ LADIES’ CANVAS CASUALS in White, Red, Blue
@ LEATHER SANDALS WITH RUBBER SOLES







OCS













Children's $1.60, $1.90; Ladies’ $2.35; Men’s 8.15

@ LADIES’ CREPE SOLED SIFOES $3.95 to 5.80

MEN’S WORKING SHOES—Brown or Black $4.30 5.05

@ MEN'S SOCKS ‘s 42 48c., 50c., 53c., 74c
@ CHILDREN’S and LADIES’ ANKLE

32c., 36c., 38e., 40c., 41c.

@ SHOE POLISHES, SHOE BRUSHES, SUEDE CLEANERS



: SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD §
& es O00O0009009 9904005059 055509000555566 So.

|






PAGE EIGHT



W.L. 479—3 In Third Test

@ From page 1.

opening ~ batsmen Add
fact the undoubted nuisance value
of a left-handed opening batsman

to this

and you will appreciate the real
worth of the Jamaican’s perform-
ance.

Weekes—well Weeke was
Weekes t is a pleasure to watch

him play all types of bowling but
I particularly like to see him deal
with the shortish fastish ball
Few men, especially lacking
height, can punch it through
the covers, cut it down to third
man, or hook it to leg as vicious-
ly as Weekes can Both he
and Worrell too are able to lean
away from the leg break coming
across the wicket and despatch
it to the boundary.

This is cricket at its best, quick
runs and a beautiful style With
so formidable an assault against
them, the English team did well in
the field. They must have been
extremely tired men by the end of
the day, but at no time was this
evident to the onlookers. No par-
ticular name can be mentioned as
outstanding, the day was not one
for giving an opportunity of bril-
liant performance, such as is pos-
sible close under the bat or in tl
slips. Suffice it to say that every
man did his job in the field well.

New Figures

The West Indies score is
within easy reach of their own
highest score against England in
England, 498 at the Oval in 1939,
and there would seem to be no-
thing to prevent them reaching the
535 made by their predecessors at
Kingston in 1935 It would of
course be even more satisfying to

now

set a mark for all England—West

Indies innings but that is a tall

order—849. Still let us keep aim-

ing at the stars, we may hit a

great deal more than tree tops
The Play

There had been some light rain
during the morning here, and the
skies were still overcast when the
West Indies resumed their first in-
nings. The sun was trying to break
through and there were blue
patches scattered in the canopy of
clouds. The weather man’s pro-
phecy was fair periods, scattered
showers and thunderstorms with
the outlook warm. Most morning
papers were severely critical of
what one writer called “England’s
Palsied Batsmen,” and nearly all
disagree with Umpire Chester on
the manner of Insole’s dismissal
by Ramadhin.

The Umpire's explanation must
be without parallel in the game
He claimed that in the split second
between the ball striking the pads
and hitting the wicket the bowler
appealed _and he replied to that
appeal. Remarkably quick think-
ing, what?

Shackleton bowled the first over
this morning from the pavilion
end, and Bedser shared the attack.
Shackleton’s was a maiden, but
Christiani took four off Bedser’'s
first delivery with beautifully
crisp square cut,

Hollies replaced Shackleton
after fourteen runs had been add-
ed to the overnight total in eight
overs. He bowled a maiden to Rae
Two more maidens followed and
when the clock showed mid-day
only fifteen had been added, the
extra single coming from a leg
bye.

Lucky

Christiani received the kind fav-
our of a life when he was eight
He cut at one outside the off stump
from Bedser, failed to cover it and
the ball flew off the edge to Insole
at first slip. The Essex amateur
failed to hold the comparatively
easy catch.



After bowling eight overs, which
cost the same number of runs and
included four maidens, Bedse:
gave way to Shackleton, who thus
switched ends, The new bowler
met with immediate success, for
Christiani went into his wicket in
an attempt to force tne ball away,
was struck and returned to the
pavilion clearly legbefore, He had
made ten and the score was now
ninety-five for two.

The British Guiana player had
found runs difficult to obtain this
morning in the face of good length
bowling. This appeared to rattle
him a bit, and his resultant daring
cost him his wicket. Worrell came
out and was immediately off the
mark turning Shackleton off his
body to the fine leg boundary.
Next over from the same end he
sent the hundred up, lifting
Shackleton dangerously near to
Washbrook at midwicket for three,
Three figures had taken up exactly
two hours.

Rae Hits Out

Worrell reached 25 and at this
point Rae seemed to take this as a
challenge. He had been batting
seventy five minutes this morning
for only six runs, and now sud-
denly opened his shoulders to Hol-
lies and hoisted him deep into the
long field for a lofty four. A mere
fraction more weight would have
allowed the ball to clear the white
line

At 127, Yardley took the
from Shackleton and himself as-
sumed charge of the Radcliffe end
The batsmen were unperturbed by

| They'll Do It Eve
r lass A

ball

fate

THING ELSE BUT-~---



» kins’

Piette

PRACTICE THEIR MUSIC? THAT'S
WHAT THE KIDS WILL DO »EVERY-

SHALIMAR! SEDLITZ!
COME IN THIS MINUTE
AND PRACTICE YOUR MUSIC
LESSON! SHALIMAR!!
SEDLITZ! COME BACK!



ALAN RAE

the change and Yardley tried an-
other at 144, bringing Jenkins from
the pavilion end vice Hollies. The
partnership reached fifty off Jen-
first offering which Worrell
turned neatly around to fine leg
for two. Of this joint contribution
Worrell’s share was, 37. Worrell
despite the not inappreciable
handicap of 115 minutes reached
his half century one run ahead ot
Rae, with a jubilant six deep into



the crowd off a full toss from
Jenkins. The gay trip had taken
him just one hour of dazzling
craftsmanship

Next over Rae also moved, up
to the half century mark His

had been an innings in the great-
est contrast to that of his partner
Worrell is one of the West Indies
Panzer Divisions, Rae is our de-
fence in depth. Both are essentigi
to victorious warfare. When lunch
was taken the score was 173 for
two with Rae 55 and Worrell 59.
After Lunch

After lunch Yardley called for
the new ball and brought on his
same bowlers. Worrell and Rae
had been together exactly one
hundred minutes when their asso-
ciation entered three figures. It
was just a few balls later when
Worrell straight drove Shackleton
to the rails to send up the two
hundred. The innings had been
in progress 212 minutes at this







stage

With the score unchanged,
Evans appealed for a_ stumping
against Rae, but umpire Chester
found for the defender. Yardley
now made his first post lunch

change, bringing on Hollies instead
of Shackleton. Next over the
England skipper took off Bedser
and put back Shackleton at the
Radcliffe end. With Rae taking
a sharp single off the fifth ball,
Worrell reached his century while
his partner was still in the sixties.
He had hit fourteen fours, in the
two hours at the wicket and the
boundary with which he reached

three figures also sent the West
Indies’ total past that of their
opponents

Rae Out
Yardley himself replaced Shac-
kleton at 238 and was forthwith
responsible for the downfall of
Rae, Evans stumping the Jamaican

as he went to meet the third
delivery on the half volley. The
third wicket was down at 288,

Rae’s share being 68 and Worrell
undefeated with 110.

Weekes started his account
with a couple of masterly
boundaries. The partnership
between the two W's added 50
in 25 minutes, Weekes limping
badly, content to play diminu-
endo for 16 of these runs,

Worrell remained in his pug-
nacious mood and punched off
Yardley and Hollies indiscrim-
inately to reach his 150 in 175
minutes,

The 300 went up when Jenkins
replaced Yardley, Worrell taking
a brace from his first ball.

Bedser relieved Hollies at 308.
The two batsmen went merrily on
and set up a new West Indian
versus England Test partnership
for the fourth wicket. The part-
nership produced 100 runs in 58
minutes and only at one stage did
they enjoy a spot of good luck
This came with the score at 334
when Worrell was nearly run out
He off drove Bedser straight to
Insole and began to run. Weekes
did not move but Insole’s return
to the wicket-keeper was wide
The tea interval found the seore
at 339, Worrell 173, Weekes 35.

After Tea
Bedser and Yardley handled the
attack after tea. Runs came ac-
cording to plan—the batsmen’s
plan, that is—and the 350 was
hoisted in a matter of fifteen min-
utes or so, during which the bats-

men took things comparatively
quietly. The score then mounted
mercilessly and Weekes reached

his fifty with a burning off drive
which went clean through Insole
at extra cover. The batsman fol-
lowed this shot with another four
Straight past the bowler, Bedser.

These two were making the
bowling look simple enough and
undoubtedly the opposition, toil-

Time












ing all day and eatching nothing,
had lost its sting

Weekes, strangely subduing his
play to that of Worrell, had taken
ninety minutes for his half cen-
tury, but he never once looked
anything but perfectly set and
camfortable Apart from three
attempts to sweep Yardley char-
acteristically around to the square
leg boundary without connecting,
his stroke play was flawless.

Worrell’s Double

After just four hours at the
crease Worrell reached his first
double century in Test cricket

with a forcing back drive off Yards
ley to the mid-wickei boundary

Right after the 400 was regis.
tered, and Yardley after bowling
himself for a full hour which
yielded the regulation run a
minute, brought Hollies on from
the Radeliffe end. Worrell greet-
ed the slow bowler with an ex-
press drive through the covers
which reached the crowd almost
before any of the four men in the
off side platoon could change for-
mation

At 412 Shackleton came on in-
stead of Bedser who left the field
for a brief absence after an hour's
gruelling toil from the Pavilion
end. A clean shot off the pads to
square leg by Weekes set up 200
for the partnership, and Worrell
had soon himself attained the Eng-

land total at which time he was
exactly half of his own team’s
score

The 450 came inevitaly. The
innings was now 395 minutes old

Weekes In

Ten runs later Yardley with
the new ball due brought back
Bedser in place of Hollies, and
Weekes helped himself to two

fours from the old ball to reach
his own century after two hours
and forty minutes

Although limping noticeably,

Weekes’ stroke play was unaf-
fected by his knee trouble. There
may have been possibilities for
a few more singles but these
batsmen were not looking for
singles to-day. The flash which
distinguishes his batting from
the more graceful style of Wor-
rell was there in full scale to-
day, and one particular off drive
travelled so fast through the
covers that Washbrook did not
even worry to take his hands
from his weary knees,

As it turned out Yardley did not
bother to bring out the new leath-
er preferring to have something
to give his seam bowlers to work
on when they return fresh to the
fray to-morrow morning.

When the bails were removed
at the end of play the total was
479 for 3 wickets. “Worrell 239
and Weekes 108 had already add-
ed more than any other pair had
ever done against England, 24]
against the 228 made by Karl
Nunes and George Headley at
Kingston in 1935. So far Worrell
had hit two sixes and thirty one
fours, and Weekes sixteen fours.

Scores
ENGLAND 1ST INNINGS
Simpson ¢ Waleott b Johnson
Washbrook c¢ Stollmeyer b Worrell
Parkhouse c Weekes b Johnson

Dewes ¢ Gomez b Worrell 0
Yardley ec Goddard b Valentine 41
Insole 1.b.w, Ramadhin 21
Evans b Ramadhin..,..... 32
Shackleton b Worrell... . 42
Jenkins b Johnson. . us ol 39
Bedser ¢ Stolilmeyer b Valentine. 13
Hollies not out 2
Extras lb. 12, n.b. 1 13
TOTAL 223

Falt of wickets: 1—6, 2—18, 3-23,





4 a 5-15, 6-105, 7—147, 8—174;
9 ‘
BOWLING ANALYSIS
9° M R Ww
Johnson 25.4 °5 59 3
Worrell 17 4 40 3
Gomez 3 1 9 0
Goddard e 3 10 0
Ramadhin 29 2 49 2
Valentine 18 6 43 2
W.sI. 18ST INNINGS
Rae stpd Evans b Yardley 68
Stollmeyer ¢ & b Jenkins 46
Christiani |.b.w., b Shackleton 10
Worrell not out 239
Weekes not out 108
Extras b 2, Ib 6 8
Total (for 3 wkts), 479
Fall of wickets: 1—77; 2—95; 3—234
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R, W,
37 8 91 0
leton 37 5 108 1
( 27 3 82 1
Jenkins 13 0 13 1
Hollies 37 6 ny 0
—Reuter
e
Olympia Beat

Queen’s College
At Net Ball

There was an exciting Netball
Match on Wednesday afternoon
between Olympia Club and
Queen’s College Netball team at
Queen’s College. The match wus
keenly contested before an en-
thusiastic audience. Olympia Club
emerged victorious after fighting
every inch of the way. The first

pass was made by Mrs. H. A.
Talma, and almost immediately
Olympia scored 3 goals. QC.
was not long in equalising and
then taking the lead. Olympia
then drew even and half time

found the score equal at 8 all. O
resumption Olympia took the lead
and eventually carried off th:
Match 19 goals to 14,

By Hatlo



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Modern High
School Holds
Sports Day

By winning the
440 yds, in class
became Victor Ludorum, when
the Modern High School held
\heir annual sports meeting at
Kensington yesterday. In spite
of the heavy track, six records
were broken Set “B" with a
total of 78 points was Set
champion. In class (11) for boys,
A. Clarke and C. Chandler tied
for first place, while CG. Clarke
and M. Hinds were ¢hampions
in. classes (2) and (3).

In the girls @ivision, Worrell,
Crichlow, Jones and Walker

100, 220, and
(1) V. Skeete

were champions in divisions (1)
(2), (3), and (4).
The new records were set up

by, Lorna Jones, of div: (3) who
did the 100 yds in 12 1/5 secs
V. Skeete who broke his own
records in the 220 and 440 yds,
the times being 24 2/5 and 59 1/5
secs. respectively, Clarke who
did the 220 yds. in class (11) in
28 2/5 sees, and L. Holder and
Lowe who did the high jump
with 4ft, llins. and 4ft. 2ins
There were two cycling events
one of which was won hy Cyril
Haynes and the other by L. Bar-
row. The old boys race was car-
ried off by L. Best, and Miss J

Collymore easily won the. old
girls’ race.
Mr. J. W. B. Chenery pre-

sented the prizes to the various
winners, before a large gather-
ing of parents and friends.

Today’s
hed :
Cricket

. TO-DAY is the final day of play
in First Division and Intermediate
cricket fixtures in the island while
it opens a new series in the Second
Division competition.

The matches with their respec-
tive grounds are as follows: —

Ist Division

Pickwick vs. Combermere at
Kensington.

Lodge vs. Callege at Lodge.

Carlton vs. Police at Carlton,

Spartan vs. Wanderers at Park.

Intermediate Division

Empire vs. Cable and Wireless
at Bank Hall.

Y.M.P.C. vs. Mental Hospital
at Beckles Road.

Windward vs. Spartan at Wind-
ward.

Wanderers vs. Pickwick at Bay

2nd Division

Combermere vs. Y.M.P.C.
Combermere.

College vs. Lodge at College.

Foundation vs Police at Founda-
tion.
Leeward vs. Pickwick at Foster’s.

Central vs. Empire at Vaucluse.

Regiment vs. Carlton at Garrf-
son

Arthur Peall says:
YOU CAN'T GET OUT OF
THIS SNOOKER TRAP

you can & way out of my
with a FAIR
So far



at





|





Biyitit.t

yellow ball “

} without incurring
@ foul,
Endiess

snookers and

‘free ball’ leaves

are possible here

if common sense
not allow

striker to smash

up the position,

That seems the
right thing to do
Hit to scatter the
balls and = give
the next man @
fair shot on
yellow,

The stroke wii!
be a foul, and it
is deliberate
nder the rules—

must go on and what
done ?

® purposes, the cannon

—v
but the

can

Pottin

left is useful with red and black

Lng and in line along the ton
mn.

Play a

+ Moderate strength because
the colour will not travel far and
black would be useful in break

3. By DC-6

tions available)

For full information see :
Tel. 3113

WORLD'S FIRST AIRLINE
1919 - 1950

Fly KLM to
ALL EUROPE

4 Flights weekly

3 Routes to choose from

1. By Constellation Curacao — New York — Europe (no
USA visa required)

2. By Constellation Curacao—Havana—Montreal—-Europe
Curacao—Caracas—Paramaribo—Dakar

—Europe (limited sleeper accommoda-

Whichever route you choose, the major cities of
Europe are but a day away by KLM.

By special arrangement, KLM will fly your family,
friends, or business associates out of Eu
pay the fare here... KLM does the rest

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO.,

POLO THIS
AFTERNOON

At about 4.30 this afternoon,
members of The Barbados Polo
Club will be meeting at the Ga
rison Savannah for their usuai
round of chukkers. Some of these
players drive about seventeen
miles for their game and bring
their horses by motor truck
while most of the other mounts
have to do a distance of about
five miles to get to the field.

They usually arrive at the
Garrison about 2 p.m. where they
are unsaddled and given a rub
down and rest before their stren-
uous task. The games this season
are much faster owing to the
improved ground and it is hoped
that the referees will be very
strict about crossing and danger-
ous riding off, as naturally the
freater the speed the more nece¢s-
sary will it be to stick to rules
and team work.

On Wednesday last quite a
number of spectators turned out.
Cars entering the ground should
pass through the east gate, turn left
behind the goal posts following
the border lIne of the playing
field and then park on the east
and south of the rope enclosure.
Seats are provided within the
enclosure for members’ friends
and Hotel guests. Every care
should be taken by parents to
prevent children from playing
near the horses as it is quite
impossible for players or grooms
to keep them away while on the
job of shifting saddles, fixing
gear and going through the reg-
war preparations for each
chukker,



County Cricket
Results

LONDON, July,
At Swansea Lancashire beat
Glamorgan by 48 runs, Lanca-
shire 137 (G. Edrich 50, Watkins
4 for 27) and second innings 105,
(E. Davies 5 for 31), Glamorgan
96, (Tattersall 7 for 28) and sec-
ond innings, 98 (Hilton 6 for 55,
Tattersall 3 for 33).

At Birmingham, Somerset beat
Warwickshire by 10 wickets; War-
wickshire 261, (Dollery 150,
Conibere 4. for 66) and second

145, (Hazell 6 for 36),
Somerset 371, (Tremlett 109) and
second innings 36 for no wickets.

At Bristol, Surrey beat Glou-
cestershire by 5 wickets; Glou-
cestershire 187, (Laker 8 for 45)
and second innings 173, (Laker 4
for 41); Surrey 151, Constable not
out 58, Cook 4 for 15) and sewond
innings 211 for 5, (Constable 86,
Fishlock not out 91).

21.

At Dudley, Worcestershire beat
Hampshire by 164 runs; Worces-
tershire 342, (Kenyon 163, Walker
4 for 13) and second innings 167
‘or 5 decl'd, Dewes not out 101),
Hampshire 246, (Rogers 57), and
second innings 99, (Howorty 7 for
35).

Heart Troubl
ts eH
Blood Pressure

It 7s have @ hear!









.
‘above oye:



ue 8 ny or sur
a meee anes ea!
ear, oaused
by Sur "Thus ie o
i eauses More

eal t @anoer, because th:

symp! are 80 usual
m' some ent. |



1a
treatment a'

ould, bart

Pressure end mak feet
er ine few days. Get Noxoc
| 2

ae ones ¢ ay. it te fy :
make you feel wi

oi suoney on mys
package.







. You

(_f











ROYAL DUTCH
AIRLIMES |



coo ure ————————_ ee ee ee .0000O"O"”""”-E"ETETN-

<

SPELL POPES LEELA LSE LESSEE SLEEP PS PTES AAA

W.I. Ae



SATURDAY,

hieve

JULY 22, 1950



‘Dominion

Status’’ At Bisley

(From Our Own Correspondent)
BISLEY, July 21.

The second stage of the King's
Prize—the “King’s Hundreds”—
which included West Indians, was
shot off this morning in driving
rain. The West Indians who
were not accustomed firing under
such conditions found the going
extremely difficult. Despite this
fact however one of them,
E. Crooks of Trinidad, obtained
the second highest score with
142, two less than the top scorer.
Crooks indeed has been the oui-
standing shot of the B.W.I. con-
tingent. Yesterday in the finals
of St. George’s Challenge vase—
considered second only in import-
ance to the King’s Prize—he was
placed fourteenth and received
the National Rifle Association St.
George’s Badge. To-morrow he is
one of eight selected to repre-
sent the West Indies in the Senior
Kolapore. Three other West
Indians were finalists in the
King’s Hundreds: Major F. T.,

Manly (British Guiana)
Stuart, (Jamaica), C. Barton
(Jamaica). The four West

Bisley.

posite team in the senior Mac-
Kinnon, Tt meant that the NR.A
was according to the B.W.I
“Dominion” status

Never having shot before on
900 or 1,000 yards ranges the
teams naturally found themselves
somewhat handicapped in these
longrange events though occa-
sionally some outstanding scores
were recorded.

J. A. Sutton (B.G.) C. Barton
(Jamaica) and E. Crooks (Trin-
idad) were three who did par-
ticularly well.

Varying winds, ana poor visi-
bility on certain occasions—due
chiefly to a very wet July—are
what have troubled West Indians
most at Bisley.

They liked the ranges otherwise,
and they like their quarters, two
long camp rooms—thankful they
are not in tents as many are.

The general

impression our

A. S.gcorrespondent obtained was that

e West Indians were enjoying
Captain R. Johnstone,

Indians will fire for the King’s] Commandant of the B.W.I. teams

Prize at ranges 900 and 1000
ards tomorrow.

r The weather cleared up during
the afternoon for the MacKinnon
Cups. Sun shone brightly over
the range and quite a crowd
gathered to watch what is one of
the biggest events of the Bisley
meeting. There were few on-
lookers in the rain this morning.

There are two MacKinnon
Cups, senior and junior,

Trinidad, Jamaica, Barbados
and B.G. each had a team of
four entered for the junior
event but it was the first time
in history the West Indies was

invited to compete as a com-
29SSSB9SS9S9S9SSSSSSOSSS$
v

Helic Everybody

4
All Roads lead to the Fox Club, \

the Garden, St. James to that x
Grand Dance

— Sponsored by —
Messrs. John D. L. Bridgeman
and Campbell Wilkinson on
Tuesday night the 25th July.
1950 Mr c B Browne's

Orchestra will supply the Music
Admission 2 Refreshments on
gal

Leeward Buses leave the Lower

Green at 9 p.m

22.7.50—In

96556 GGGSSOSIOOSO SANG”
PELSSLLE LLL ort

CONCERT

(Under the Distinguished
Patronage of His
Excellency the Governor
Mr. A. W. L. Savage, C.M.G.,
and Mrs, Savage)

by the

BARBADOS CHORAL
SOCIETY

at the

COMBERMERE HALL

On Thursday, 27th July
1950 at 8.30 p.m.

Guest Artists:

Miss JEAN LAWSON,
L.R.A.M, (Pianist)

Mr. P. A. K. TUCKER,
(Baritone)
Tickets may be obtained at
the Advocate Stationery
or from Members of the
Society at the following

prices:—
RESERVED $1.00

UNRESERVED :: 60¢. & 36c.

Copies of the Programme
and Book of words may
be obtained from the Ad-
vocate Stationery.

PRICE 6d. each

SOE LAO COE



LPL LLLLE LLL LEELCEEPLPPL LEPPARD EP






*
Se




SUPPER & DANCE

at the

B’'DOS AQUATIC CLUB
(Members Only)

THIS EVENING

Cold Buffet Supper will be
served in the Ballroom
from 7.30 to 9.30 p.m.

Price $1.50 each

Reservations up to Noon
on Saturday

Please Dial 4461 or 4311

DANCING from 10 p.m.
to 2 a.m,
18.7.50—5n,












+

8

s

=

%

Calico—36” wide—49c. yd.
Plastic Raincoats—$2.I8 ea.
Rubber Sandals — 50c. up
Boys’ Socks — 12c. a pair
Anklets — Ee up

ea.
Drill te. ya"
_ . ya.
Children’s Vests — 30c. ea.
Khaki Drill — 59c. yd.
Boys’ Caps — 24c. ea.
Vests (Gents. & Ladies)
Children’s Panties (Plastic)

Thousands of Bargai i
Departments Rice



THANI'S

Dress Goods & Household
Pr. Wm. Henry &

Swan Sts.

SELLA SDLPEL CLP EE

$ |BIGGEST

Very chic and excellent

are having at present. Blue

Sizes 34 to 38

for

who shot at Bisley several times
before the war for Trinidad, told
me:

“The general standard of shoot-
ing has far exceeded my expecta-
tions, even though I had a high
opinion of West Indian teams
before they came here. They are
an exceptionally fine lot of men
to have under my command.

“The absence of island insular-
ity has been particularly marked;
they have all worked as one co-
ordinated team.”

The foilowing will represent
the West Indies in the Senior
Kolapore to-morrow—most im-
portant event of the Bisley meet-
ing: E. Crooks (Trinidad) Lt
Colonel J. Connell (Barbados),
Superintendent J. Reid (Trinidad),



Major F. T. Manly (B.G.) D. B
St. Aubyn (B.G N. J. Driver
(B.G.), G. E. Waddington (Ja-
meica), Sgt Ww F Sangster
(Jamaica)

Captain Johnstone will captain
the team and also act as wind
coach.

LACE

TRIMMED
NIGHTIES

these hot nights we

Green, Lemon

$3:60

Cave Snepuerp & Co., Lr.

10, 11,





THE
"EXPECTING

HOWL IN

PICTURE!

| YOUNG-

ROBERT HUTTON - JANIS CARTER BILLIE BURKE ”

Story and Screen Play by Lou Bresiew and Joseph Hoffman
ASANTANA PRODUCTION - Directed by HENRY LEVIN + Produced by ROBERT LORD

TOWN THIS WEEK-END!

12 & 13 Broad Street.






leechee nuts!




COLUMBIA PICTURES
presents

Robot Barbara

HALE









BOWR

ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT

Iron and Steelwork cannot corrode beneath a coat of
BOWRANITE. Proof against heat or cold, the corrosive
air of big cities, salt spray and sea-water, BOWRANITE
is used by engineers, shipping lines, dock authorities,
industrial contractors everywhere,

and public and
YOU SHOULD

Tough, flexible,

Stocked in :—

Permanent Green, Red, Grey, Black and

Super Black (Heat

in tins of Imperial Measure.

ONE GALLON WILL COVER 1,000 SQ. FT.

"PHONE 4456

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.



yet non-
made in many attractive shades.

~~

(



ANITE

USE IT. TOO
cracking, BOWRANITE is
Resis'

ng)

AGENTS











Full Text


Saturday

22

July
1950



U.N. PLANES

Islande

Emigrate To |

rs Must

The Mainland —

To Solve Population Problems

|

—Says C.D.C. Report

(From Our Own

“THE POPULATION PROBLEM

Correspondent )

has become so acute in

the West Indian Island colonies that ii is generally
agreed the solution to economic problems must include

some reduction of population by

British Guiana or British

Star Police
Witness Comes
To Court

In “Floating Corpse” Case

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 20.
Boysie Singh, still smiling hap-
pily but no longer nattily dressed
as when he first appeared at the
start of the trial on Wednesday,
witnessed the brief appearance of
star Police witness Rahamat Ali
alias “Loomat” who is held by
Police in protective custody.

Loomat was brought by the
Police for the first public appear-
ance since the end ot April when
he was taken to the British naval
base of Staubles where he was
held- A squad of Police armed
with batons kept back huge
crowds attempting to surge into
the Court at the bay.

Loomat was brought into Court
to enable another witness to iden-
tify him as one seen leaving
Singh’s club, Queen Street, to-
gether with Singh, four co-de-
fendants, and Philbert Peyson —
in connection with whose death
Singh and four men are charged
with murder in the “Floating
Corpse” murder case.

Loomat, a tall thin boy entered
Court boldly and the crowd gaped
to see the youngster with whom
Peyson was allegedly intimately
connected.

Singh on Thursday morning
appeared immaculately attired
with Sinatra knot in his tie which
matched his blue tinted suit, his
fourth in the four days’ trial.

This morning Robert Wilkie

ear

who gave evidence yesterday of
having seen Singh, Peyson, Loom-
at, and Singh’s four co-defendants
leaving Singh’s Club on Queen
Street together, was under cross-
examination all morning, during
which he admitted having served

jail sentences,
—Can. Press.

BUNDESTAG
PRESIDENT
BREAKS DOWN

BONN, July 21.
Herr Erich Koehler, President
of the West German Bundestag,
collapsed shortly after entering
the Bundestag chamber to open
to-day’s sitting. Koehler was im-
mediately taken to hospital for
treatment for nervous breakdown.
He has been a target. of strong
criticism from Democrats, Com-
munists and some Government
supporters ever since he took
office at the first meeting of the

Bundestag last autumn.
—Reuter.



i
|
LONDON, July 21. |

emigration—possibly to}









B.G. Applies For

Marshall Aid —

HIS MAJESTY’S GOVERNMENT are
application from British Guiana for Marshall Aid under |
what is known as economic co-operation administration.
The Government's Financial Secretary and Treasure:
Edwin F. McDavid gave this information in the Legislative

when speaking

Council this afternoon
expansion and development
in the debate on the second



—_——

Sugar Cane
Newspapers

LONDON, July 21.
The use of waste material from
sugar cane in the manufacture of
newsprint is suggested by H. Alan
Walker, Managing Director of the
West Indies Sugar Company. He
says this would not only solve
Britain’s newsprint shortage —
newspapers have already been cut
- help economic development
in West Indies.
ting to the Times to-day
Walker says the United States
have already successfully experi-
mented with newsprint made from
megasse the residual fibre from

sugar eane after the juice has
been extractel
Newsprint produced by this

method was not up to the standard
at present used by newspapers in
Britain but further research would
no doubt achieve the desired end

He hoped British paper manu-
facturers would consider subsid-
iary interest in the British West
Indies to assist the supply position
ang help the economic develop-
ment of the colonies

existing Rice Marketing Board Ordinance.

GEORGETOWN, July 20, |
Supporting an

° on the question of
projected for the rice industry,
reading of a bill to amend an

He indicated Clause seven of
the Bill was intended to pave the
way for operations of a new com-
pany envisioned. The share capital
of this would be around $10,500,
000, public asset, being about
$4,500,000, and Colonial Develop-
ment Coporation some $6,000,000,

The application for Marshall Aid
would eover the cost in United
States eurrency of all machinery
and @quipment for two “central”
rice mills —one for Corentyne and
one for Essequibo. |

Under the application Britain
would provide a deposit of an
equivalent amount in sterling, and
if the application succeeded it
would mean Britis) Guiana would
be receiving a gift of machinery
and equipment something like |
$1,000,000 U.S. in value

The Secretary of State for the
Colonies has recently been re-|
viewing the possibility of expand. |
li rice production in colonial |

jing
| dependencies, and has reached, the|
|





jconclusion that opportunities for

jexpansion are nowhere greater

than in British Guiana
—Can. Press.



= x

sein a—etnerenenrrmenmen eal ni,







































It goes on to discuss the difficul-






























|
unlikely )
Co-operation
MEN'S DOUBLES | Worrell further revealed his com- be limited in the first place to lit
ties Baldwin’s successor will face Court df SR > ; plete domination of the situation hold 50 miles of Alpine foothills QO s as
in creating an atmosphere in which pes % a ae r a Fahy by giving as scientific an exhi-]on Italy’s northeastern frontier— |/ 4 ua y i
harmonious co-operation between E.R. Atkinson bition of farming the bowling, as|obvious point of attack for any |} ship ed to
administration and representatives fi Court ee aside {has probably ever been witnes: ‘d | aggressor from the east ,
of various local interests can be : Willan on favrian igainst an international Test at-! “The most complete element on |) f t e \{
i 1 i \. Williams and L Harrisc | ate es ° ; | I a ( ;
developer : COURT NO 4 tac t would be interesting to) Italy's detensive apparatus ig her 4) Leg, ° (
Kenneth Blackburne, Governor- Men's Singles know how ofter, he scored singles |g7,.990-ton fleet which next month 4 West Indies )
lesignate fron Director of W. A. S. Crichlow M P ff fae ‘eae ball ? 0 : 4! = 1
ces Bye ont , . ihaks a shale, off one o ie las vo balls o on page ? , ‘ )
Information Services of ae Colo- ; Court Ne, 4 an over, but this is an academi ate cow K for the \
nial Office, sai i Fecen ~ ‘. c are atchesS best of et undertaking unlikely to have been " i i)} past fifty )))
to eet ee See ; attempted by the most earnest of & ‘ Couneil i} ~ t
nial people , “ natal cricket statisticians Already to-} ko u ar ED ) ears \
Sz the Colonist Fortunately ;
Mr. Bl ick r possesses quali | day creating a record score for 7 i n}
ms toa CAS BEE ag ge feat did ° $ West Indian batsman in a Test R as | ag }
»s whi should stand him in | Pad pak Os ? » »
sod aaa Peake th. respects Limit On U.S. in’ England, Worrell is now with- eac 1es )) t)
end conadeénce Of Metvents which} in sight of Headley's 270 made at i i
s : : ; t], luct E $ » fourth Test te 2 t )) )
are at present apparently reluc -| i i King ton in the fourth ma Agreemen )) ih)
ant to co-operate | Ff rme orees in 1935 } \
| New Mark LONDON, July 21 |
‘ e A new international sugat { s f
Communism Removed His partnership with Weekes agreement on world supplies and { These include }
promises to set a new mark for price is now being submitted } }
< e any West Indian test partnership. the Governments of 25 countries MN]
Is Losing WASHINGTON, July 2) The present record is 267 madefthe International Sugar ( oun il if i
The Senate Armed Services}by Clyde Walcott and Gerry}unnounced ¢ day the ot vr ce if — ~ rec )
Committee voted unanimously to-| Gomez for the fourth wicket at|thi agreemn« nt i fhe be see the \ II Bk \ & i
roun |day to remove all restrictions on}New Delhi in November, 1948 Jmecting here in June o “t ca § ba =A kK )})
i “ae 2 + ~ ave ¢ “1 241 and{ ment repregentatives and observ~ é / ))
the size of armed forces and t o far the have added 241 anc ee ; hate file biased. ti th
i l > e , ye ny 4 f , “st to- “rs VnoO a e ann rt
¢ lengthen all enlistments by onejit ‘s hoped that a good re subrnit 1¢ th theie Clo cereiitente tot
SAYS CHURCHILL ear. The House Armed Services!|night will send them back re- a a a Octimes ik a tt} r
LONDON, July 21 Committee also voted to keep all] freshed for really big things to- Thi es eh a a ai ah (1 Hi
Mr. Wins Churchill told ajregular army soldiers in service} morrow. (As an aside, | MAY bonded b vagethentatives fron tH i
United Europe Rally here tonight.| for a year after their enlistments | Say that the Pe ecomadat of hee the Governments of South Africa, | ()} i}
“The Europe we re planning} expire It was still considering | ingham > peas i, ; 'S} Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Cuba, } (
must ultimately unite all European} President Truman's request for end They have } Sones z oe tes Czechoslovakia, Dominic an Re-|} . 5s “ -
peoples including the peoples noW}| removal of ceilings on the siz jturbing nocturnal ¢ eG 1} public, France, Haiti, Netherland & S| i hi RR Y i
behind the iron curtain,” , |of forces. Republican representa-| i City Hall clock, opposite the} peru, ‘Philippines, Poland, Portu- | }}} ™m & 4 )
“There no doubt that Com-| 4 ve Harry Towe cast the only|#lack Boy Hotel where the West] oa) United Kingdom l hited ) \
i : , : x ae 13 ; . Indian team is staying } and Yugoslavia, while Can- A rt}
munism as an ideology is losing} yote against extending enlist-| !* ? . aeite ae lia d
ground in all the countries where | ments The Senate Committee Rae Too t ( reas tat poe f aoe {i You can enjoy i}
free speech is allowed and par~| agreed to strike out one of two | a s at . ares i} th ; 2 is i}
Cee Te ere in| Dlls providing that Che stfengib| Aisnough Worrell. was more in ee ee ale em again in )
told the gathering.. Mr. Churchill! of the regular matine corps would the spotli ay’ orf lbscthiine Coa we , : al : (i)
t etin: : ¢ _|the spotlight in today’s perform Nations and Food and Agricultural {i mi {
n's huge’ Albert] juthorised stae Pot the’ reguine| 40ces, Rae and Weekes. deserve Maun atone. oti dutcerdea the {ft greater quantity
ihn der ey outa norised size of the regular! their full share of the Kudos Sinfarence ) i
1 ace - o 4 hate navy | Rae's was a solid innings worth]. For several years now. the for- {
a ae ae 5 The action suspended definite-|far more than the number of run8|/mer international sugar agreement | }) Agents
a wded as M the present limitations jrecordea against his name by scor-|drawn up, in 1937 for a period of | }) i}
entative armed forces to 2,005,182 mer ler Fer or It is after all thelfive years, ha in ex ' x
py Yew age af oon iy Ah pong pened ggg bao yl Bee ge ge gece RE GABUINER AUSTIN Co,Ltd. j)
teppe to} Arr and Air Forces officers hadjjob of truction and the big|for one year at a time wa =e 4} i
they would probebly lose/total now being built was well that the ones, Se es {i i}
1%| 193,000 trained soldjers next year|entrenched by the two West Indian mnemen Soman a a w t}
irati national agreemer es ‘
through the expiration of volun- nationa ; ss pater a : ae :
@ on page 3 tary enlistments.—Reuter @ on page & s





i

BLAST ,SEOUL AND TAEJO

Price:
VE CENTS

=

Year 55 ,

e ¢
tenance





1

'Wreck Red Communications *

|



LEOPOLD
RETURNS
TODAY

BRUSSELS. July 21

selgium celebrating today
t 119th anniversary of the
vning of her first king was
ensely awaiting the return of,

weopold III, expected at any hour
ifter six bitter lonely years of
vile from his people. Parliament
authorised his recall last night.

Supporters of King Leopold
1ope that now he has been re-
alled to the throne, it will end










defensive plans would therefore









“Enemy”
By ROY

| MacArthur Moves\Against

* Refugees

MacARTNEY)

(MacArthur’s Korean Headquarters) .

July 21.

BOTH ABANDONED CAPITALS, Seoul and

Taejon, rocked fr

Arthur's airmen kept

om high explosives as Mac
up their aggressive raids

Headquarters announced that superfertresses 500-
pound bombs had blasted all movement to a stand
still in Seoul rail marshalling yards and damaged
engine and waggon plants

Ove shattered Taejon,



















) Standard of

Mustangs were out with bombs



























ee rs “egypt ty nd / ican equip-
and rockets swooping in to fire abandoned America 1
the succession of tragedies which . aint aad te saving a fire trail to
Honduras. 0 far has marked: his life. Leo- ment in the city’s warehouse and le gi: u
id Ill, eldest son of Albert | mark their route. : ei
This is stated in the second pant ind Elizabeth, was the _fourtt anen , the sks a mush-
nual report of the Colonial Devel- | king of the Belgian Coburg dyn > * ey : Soha -e yy Bag Mus-
opment Corporation published | asty since the foundation of ths Belgium we tar wkets struck home
here this evening. | | }elgian kingdom He was borr > Phot raraters ‘
The report says increased food | Tiers ie hes sae 3, 1901, a ee rai i 1
production and increased yields | | le his father was sti row! j | » » | » SO beaut tle wou y
from the land are essential first | | Prince and living unostentatious! naependenc¢ crit botnbn trik
steps towards raising the deplor- | }'n a small pee oe & the ) “2 aid nai i}
ably low living standards. In cer- | n capita € became Crowt 1: P | < ae 1 ve is i ict
tain islands, it had proved im-| Prince himself in December 1906 ay a © Y . ; impossible ol
possibla4 to purchase ‘estates at hen Albert I ascended th ine ie FN : ir I even a
an economie price on which a start ‘rone on the death of Leopol : BRUSSELS, July 21 heavy i ike I
could be made with improved ! i II From then his education wa Crowd standir t dec apse
methods, and this difficulty had ) directed to the royal functions h heered the military } Gene MacArtbur’s last com-
prevented the Corporation from was to assume When in 1934 hx celebrate to-day’s annivet munique claimed that his troop
entering directly into the sphere ame to the throne after hi te gum’ Independence hed found the answer to the most
of agricultural produ-tion. father’s death, Leopold wa inder the Cinquante morale-lowerlng fact in the
The d j ng already an experienced statesmar uilt in 1906 to commemorate Korean war—infiltration of north
e development of services to 30th anniversary of th eign o aime idhad ees
primary producers appeared pres- His marriage to Princess Astric | ae ‘Leep id it Sigenth and. Sand persona
ently to be the main field for the of Sweden in 1926 has been ; OO} omy ' igorous sonal
: 2 t ttention \ Americar Cor
Corporation’s activities in the popular one largely because their] — yy) Mt formatic { . } ; ‘ Jeneral W
islands. The Corporation’s devel- vedding had been decided not! re “f 1 : } i t oer ‘Thee had ce ae es wield o
opment schemes for the mainland miy hy necessities of State, but) jrsnty omn ult arte id. Ir.filtra-
colonies were based en adequate heart. Their lock of ostenta : oy rtillery, li eur : Sy ccartant naan sie
and efficient agricultura) industry ion and readiness to share in th al rt i : . . vane ee
a é alst rr the neopl Ww wee SY
to Seve the oie ee he ea ne I vuple ante rsal ani Cant 5 Chea Wt i i! mr
absorb immigrants from island ‘ {The lare} | Generis thur is n )
colonies th moment of Leopold’ Ij va a trite: Vii ing: Wo \ andtmnaberkah ~
The rate at which development SUrrenge Helgium = was split Albert de Vieeshauwer, who said |ayea ab 100 miles from east
could be pushed forward would rime Minister Pierlot declared earlier t*is waek that it ha vest United Nations trooy
depend more upon construction of it ‘elf th ‘ : a eed aware othing to do with King Leo fall viv to a line whic
a spe EMiNers than upon any |: sr at asa ene oe ‘did not old's return. “Boys want to be} will protest tl viaxi a foo
oe, oO é « b . : oe hold which can be hek mtil ve
bind the country,” In his own] seen and peopl ant ; : :
: bn re! _ 2 ~ pec ter-offensi started Li
It was hoped to fing new mar- ; ‘ c ’ | account of the surrender last } their _boys he ~~ : But he Sate ‘ cs ‘cn ao kites
kets in Caribbean colonies for FRANK WORRELL, record-breaking W.1. batsman, is seen in top picture executing a @ On Page 3 oe che oacage oe Nee ro| forces of flanks to north and west
timber from British Guiana to aracteristic pp T i » second Test hile below, Evert Week his bat- stage less than 24 heurs before ae yee ; ;
characteristic pull to leg off Wardle in the second Test, while ow, Everton eekes, h a shi vill be fighting over steep moun-
: 7 ow of}' ;
ee en ae rendens 1S ag ting patiner jin yesterday's 241-run fourth wicket stand, is shown as he hit Jenkins to the She ge boyy - 9 pk Dian bi tain escapements in dusty treeless
o e Governments P
< wi ritis 5 P. leg boundary in the second Test also Worrell scored 239 yesterday in a brilliant display, oe Reuter country
Trade with the British West In g : a 7 e Ss Elements of seven diyigions to-
dies had been handicapped by in- while Weekes helped himself to b08 They continue batting today.—Central Press y p p del “eisaeded Gun A inks of Gen
adequate shipping facilities, and alboeibnains echinee — —_—_—-— . : ; ! ‘
: f 1} MacArthur United Nation
high freights. A d EF (ere a
This matter was receiving the T o. fH rme orces French Troop |i vos ote Be swe ov
Corporation’s attention. a “ir eS : > E- i Aanks ind south, Thrusting
The Corporation also reported e e ROME, July 21 e lat the walle of this vast “streng-
tr ape og IS hau oleae ne heen | a Brame jek OS et ome
transfer of representative func- | ——_ - 170,000 to 250,000 men, the limit up atetaion acoording to Mac»
tions from their regional subsid- cf “Day, 10 imposed by the Peace Treaty, De ihre tya' aid : tu
; , Se , ; ’ | Arthur’s battle map itl 0
iary companies to specially ap- ° ) fence Minister Randolfo Packerdi | ; | Ar = eee tee idtaens
I i 66 9 AZTOUNC ase
i i ° ai £ " p imore in reserve hoo !
pointed representatives in certain a win-— { 4 2 e Pacciardi announced today. This < Ry a land the Ban Rive
colonies. | B af - * number would include carabinieri ae *» Mac Arthur’
’ alter ne an s Ow ing is well as troops, he said. The ADEN. July 2 Red: ara Satay ht ke
, as a) ‘ . é MIN, Ju ' n ove of the North
as: An tll-Advised - Minister made the announcement —~ 7 t : { on , eee ,
| ‘ € & The 7097-ton French mo v I orenr ush south ond southeast of
| ‘ ; an pu i 1
ry | j at the end of a six-hour Cabinet el “Doba’” was abandoned off ( lc ) miles Southwest of Tae
| _ ~_ —_” ‘ : Sade one as a ned 4 honju 4 ile outh we of ut
Film Storage I xperiment” | ENGLAND 223 S oomeiatik Vaeoving "te Guardati Somaliland tonight af jon—deepe officially admitted
, ' i “oO a OV t : } '
. . 460 troops bound from Haiphor list penetration
Vault Destroyed EST INDIES 3 kt } i 479 a tion taken by the United States to Dunkirk were taken off one North Korean diviston
OWN COLONIST ™ ot ee jin Korea “It sald people in Tal rapeee tee Aaguaias Wee are
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent) | SA YS CR | | Supported “energetic intervention ‘Doba" wa ushed re { | tb. of Taejon another is marked
} ; ‘ (From Our Own Correspondent) (By E. L. COZITER) jof President Truman and defen- mnder erir outh wind in the battle map as pushing east
GEORGETOWN, BG., July 21 re) TRENT BRIDGE, Nottingham. July 21 sive and precautionary measure: : eae rs : ie a hale ta se.) Tlie. tebe
The Government film_ storage LONDON, July 21 | isis T eros cole ini _ ee oe ; | taken by other nations to halt the | W285 !a@ ae’ oe. th re Paani t. Ae ar eet ch feli_ on
vault at Fort William Frederick | The resignation of Lord Baid-| 1 CALLED YESTERDAY a black day for England | extension of the conflict in Korea,” apsizing. All troops ar er ¢ south 9 he cit rich fe on
on the sea wall was lestroyed | win trom the Gover orship of the | iat was true but today the darkness reached a stygian! ftalian Minister of the Interior, }Of 58 were reported safe 7 a
about 3.30 on Friday morning. A |)¥!" !! ted | : : TAs] . na eing —Reuter. | ® On
; Yell be ee ne. “AlLeeward Islands was voneolona | aensity as the old country. felt the full weight of the Wést! Mario Scelba, told the Cabinet
sudden explosion was followed by lon strongly by the Crown Colonist RS TR ru iia pe { the| about measures he planned to|_ een -seeemamiaamte =~ -
a mountain of flames rising sky | ite Meadibe laiticle tosday, Uh- Indies batting strength. These stalwart successors o the “guarantee peace and order in the |= ms eS
high awakening the city residents.| der the heading ‘Lhe End of an {| two great Georges piled up the runs to the tune of 479 | country in face of the (Commun-
bt) Brigade turned out but the | i1-advised Experiment,” the Colo- for three wickets to place the West Indies im an absolutely | ist). Fifth Column, the commupi- 9
es' — was complete in a few |). says “Lord Baldwin was the! impregnable position in this’ third Test mateh que said,
Seconds. 4 jsurvivor of a trio of politicians | The Cabinet decided to rein- ])
The total loss is unknown but | appointed to Colonial Governor- | It was largely Worrell's day. | force 75,000 armed carabinieri at |)
several reels of documentary films ship> by the wish of Mr. Attlee. | Inexorably and methodically, he the Minister's disposal, The Min- ) .
and Smeal reels belonging to the Lord Winster was. frustrated in ye battered the English bowling to. isters also” dis security { ? - {
Government Public Information Cyprus: the lack of wisdom of SPOR ls all parts of this beautiful Trent] measures necessary “in view of } PRES Res ‘|
Office were destroyed also Warner lother choices was made painfully Bridge ground, No bowler escaped | the international situation.” Mi \i 4)
Brothers Adventures of Robin apparent by Sir Francis (noy | his almost heartle assault One official pointed out that }/) See )
pr
Hood,” Pa t's “Heiress” | appar | 5 . ) a
ood, ramount's “Heiress” and |p, ron) Douglas in Malta and by } He pulled, hooked, drove and|peace treaty besides imposing \ ” , 5
several others from M.G.M | ; i imitati .
: :. on ‘G-M\the calculated indiscretions of } F ack: cut with the minimum of energy |numerical limitations, stipulated |) : : pa? ;
R.K.O. and Columbia Studios. | an) , av rh ufternoon at the Strat : ; M { {
The Police is investi ating the |Lord Baldwin a ye} ago clyde Lawn Tennis-Club the ops | and the maximum of result. Loose | that Italy's armed strength |} â„¢ shaintain
p > Eee & Me) The experiment is tc ent run by the Barbado | balls especially, were severely|should be of a aefensive nature. |) ut , .
matter F ’ Wy ‘
. be repeated 1 nis Amateur Assottetior treated, two carrying well intol|it was understood that Italian |! m4 same 1 )
| te SS eerie jthe spectators for punitive sixes )








PAGE TWO



IS Excellency
and Mrs. Savage, accompanied
by Capt. W. Lambert attenc the
Speech Day at the Alleyne School

the Governor





St. Andrew's on Thursday after-
fioon. Mrs. Savage presented the
prizes

Journalists Meet

R. LOUIS GALE, Editor of

the “Advocate’ who has now
aimost entirely recovered from his
recent operation, had lunch in
London last week h My. Hugh
Astor, son of the chairman of “The
Times” the Hon. J. J. Astor. With
them was Mr. Oliver Woods, the
Special Correspondent who toured
the Caribbean for “The Times
earlier this year

Now Nurse

ISS THELMA ROCK a former

member of the Acvocate staff
is now training to nurse at
« hospital near London



be a
Wher
she first went over, Thelma was a
domestic help at a Bristol hospital,
but was lucky enough to be chosen
for training to be a nurse almost
immediately. After general train-
ing she hopes to specialise either
in child nursing or midwifery

Mr. Myer Gets Around

RRIVING on Thursday morn-

ing from Trinidad by B.W.LA
intransit from New York was Mr.
Guy Myer, Banker of New York
and Seattle, Washington He is
here looking for a house in which to
spend January, February and
March of next year, with his wife
and family

“The family”, Mr. Myer told
Carib, “consists of my daughter,
her family, my sister-in-law and a
few others. Now you understand
why I want a house

He left for New York yesterday
afternoon via Trinidad. Since he
started flying, whether on business
or pleasure, he has flown some
2,700,000 miles. On arrival at New
York he leaves almost immediate-
1; for California, after which he
will fly back to Seattle

Mr. Myer certainly gets around.

Here For Two Months

RRIVING on Thursday after-

noon by B.W.LA. from B.G.
were Mr. Richard Parris and Mr.
Derrick Sinson.

Derrick, who is here for two
months is staying with Richard at
“Black Bess,” St. Peter, Richard
however will only be here for
about three weeks.

Both of them are at Diamond
Estate on the East Bank of the
Demerara River.

For Barbados Holiday

R. AND MRS. Alfred de
Freitas and their daughter
Margaret Rose arrived from Brit-
ish Guiana on Thursday afternoon
by B.W.I.A. to spend about two
months’ holiday in Barbados, stay-
ing at Accra Rockley. Mr. de
Freitas is the proprietor of De
Freitas and Co., in Georgetown.

Returned
LSO arriving from B.G
Thursday by B.W.LA.
Mr. Sam Ashby.
On Last Lap of Survey
OL. H. V. G. Bloodworth C,B.E.,
who is making a Telephone
Survey of the Windward and Lee-
ward Islands left yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.1LA. for Antigua and
will also visit Montserrat and St.
Kitts. Col, Bloodworth who is
with Cable and Wireless Ltd.,, is
working in conjunction with the
Colonial Office and this trip winds
up his survey, which began in
February when he first came to the
West Indies.

He will be returning to Barbados
on August the 6th and will leave
for London at the end of August.
His next trip will be to Cyprus
which begins in the middle of
September.

Enroute to the U.S.
RS. FRANCIS HAWKINS who
left yesterday morning for
Antigua by B.W.1A. will take Pan
American Airways from there to
the U.S.A. where she is going to
visit her daughter and son-in-law.



on
was

1E OWNER of an_ historic
mansion who charges _ for
admission complained the other

day that new people in the bus-
iness had created competition,
and so receipts were falling off

I wonder if there any con-
nection between this and an ex-

traordinary advertisement which
coincides with Captain Foul-
enough’s absence from London

On making inquiries I find that
a gentleman calling himself Lord

Plantagenet Maucierc has taken
an old mansion which he says
belonged -to his ancestors. He is

inviting the public, at five bob a
go, to see the spot in his grounds

where William Rufus died, the
room in which Queen Elizabeth
ordered the English fleet to
attack the Armada, Cromwell’s
hat, Drake’s drum, _ Raleigh’s
pipe, the original draft of the
Treaty of Westphalia, Dr. John-

son’s snuff-box. Shakespeare’s

THE NEW MODEL L.E, 149 C.C, is different from the conventional
type motor cycle—in fact it’s the nearest approach to a motor car.

WATER-COOLED,

For Simplicity, Economy and Riding Pleasure, Choose a... |

COelocette

ROBERT THOM LTD.

COURTESY GARAGE

aub ¢



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

a



*Jusi as one was begmning

to jeel that France was her

self again with three Govern

ments a week, those wretched

Korean must ad go and
tert a rival ecrists.

nee



Farewell Party

HERE was a Dinner Party on
Thursday night at the Bar-
bados Aquatic Club in honour of
Miss Betty Archer, who is due to
leave for Canada this morning by
T.C.A. Among those present were
Mr. and Mrs. Colin McKenzie, Mr
and Mr Edward Archer, Miss
Sheila MeKenzie, Mr, Ronnie Me-
Kenzie, Mr. Pat Connor, Miss
Kathleen Connor, Miss Nancy
Went, Miss Maggie Fields, Miss
Marjorie McKenzie, Mr Lou
Stoute, Mr Delbert Jannister,
Miss Cynthia Phillips, Miss Nancy
Southwell and Miss Molly South-
vell, After dinner the party was
joined by Mr. Frederick Stone,
Mr. Michae! Stone, Mr. Pat Anton
and Miss June Gaskin, and the
entire crowd then danced in the
ballroom until shortly after 11
pm
Betty is goine to Canada to join
her relatives who are living there



Managing Director

Returns
ETURNING to Trinidad on
Thursday afternoon by
B.W.LA. after a short visit to
Barbados were Mr. Arthur de

Lima, Managing Director of Messrs
Y. De Lima and Company Limited
and his mother Mrs, Rosario De
Lima.

A few days before they left they
icted as proxy god-parents to Mr

and Mrs. G. Yvonet’s baby son
The god-parents were Mr. Jack
De Lima who is in Trinidad and

and Miss Clarita De Lima who is
in the U.S.

Home for long Holidays

OUNG Peter Wallbridge was
on the B.W.1, Airways flight
B.G. on Thursday after-
noon, Peter goes to school in B.G
and has come over to Barbados
to spend the long holidays with
his parents.

Returned Yesterday

R. PERCY VINCENT, retired

Accountant of the Royal

Netherlands Steamship Company
in Trinidad returned to Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.1A.
He was here for health reasons

from

Resting !
HE BROAD STREET Ticket
seller with the loud voice
who has affectionately named his
rather dilapidated bicycle, “War
Lord” which he rides around
Bridgetown every day was walking
through town shouting his lucky
numbers yesterday
Where was “War
parently resting for

meeting

=



Lord?”
the

Ap-
August

By The Way

HILE Carib was driving
along Rockley Road yester-
day morning, there was a small
open jitney in front of him with
these words on the back, “Electri-
eal Services,” “Radio Refrigera-
tor and wiring contractors.”
And what was the van carrying,
a brand new Oil Stove!!

pen, William ‘Tell’s bow, and
other interesting family heir-
looms.

Animals to do the fighting
HE rout of Communist forces
in Cambodia by stone-throw

ing apes may lead to conscription
for apes, and even for all animals,
And I foretell a fine row when
that bear is called up, and the
public sends in mammoth peti-
tions, pleading for his exemption,
or begging that he may be given
an office job.

What Mrs. Parsons saw
RS. PARSONS, called as a
witness for the prosecution,

said hastily, “I come along by
there, like, and what do I see?
Why, I come along by there like,
and I see—absolutely I see—I see
two men, as you might say, as I
come along by there, and them
both hoisting that garter, that’s

HAND-STARTED,
and NOISELESS

SHA





of packing

on August 4th

WHITEPARK ROAD

Back From Flying Visit

AJOR BOB ROBERTS of

Messrs Cole and Compan
returned yesterday by B.W.1LA
from Trinidad intransit from the
U.K He was away for about
eighteen days on a fiving visit to

1d

Antigua Art Exhibition
NTIGUA’S Art Exhibition has
4 been fixed for the end of
August, and members of the Arts
nd Crefts Society here are send-

ing paintings to this exhibition
The British Council is in charge
and shipping the
paintings, which are to be sent in
to their headquartcrs At Wakefield



About Steel Bands
XNAMUEL SELVON, 27-year-old
Trinidadian writer and poet
of Indian parentage, has a stor
in London’s popular magazine,
Lilliput”, this month. It is enti
tled ‘Ping-Pong, Kittle and Boom"
and traces the chequered history
of Port-of-Spain’s steel bands
Selvon went to England recently
in search of “broader scope.” H
first job was in the oilfields. Ther
e joined the West Indian branch
of the Royal Navy as a wireles:
operator. After he was demobbed

€elvon joined the staff of the
“Trinidad Guardian.” He has hed
stories and poems published in

West Indian magazines and broad-





est by the B.B.C.
Cellar Party

I ORD BALDWIN, ex-Governor
.- of the Leeward Islands, was
one of a hundred guests at a party
given in a Bermondsey wine-
cellar in London last week Other
guests included Dr. Jose Brilej
the Yugoslav Ambassador and
over 25 M.Ps. To the strains of
music ty a ltunearian three-
pieve band the company drank

and ate among barrels containing



thoucend of gallons of wi

Reason for this Bohemian cele-
hretion; to further British trade
yelations with Yugoslavia which

is exporting wine to England
Missing List
I EARIE CONSTANTINE is hav-

« ing a spot of bother, In spare
time from reading at the Bar, he
entertains the Students’ Cricket
Club of Inns of Court and his team
is not quite sure which opposing
teams they should be playing this
summer. The former secretary of
the Club, George de Cabral, als:
a West Indian, passed his final
exams and went home taking the
team’s fixture list with him

Arriving Today
XPECTED to arrive from Eng-
land via Canada this mor-
ning by T.C.A. are Mr. Jimmy
Emtage, his wife and baby and
Mr. Lisle Emtage.

Carib understands that Jimmy
is going to work with Messrs Law
end Connell, while Lisle is join-
ing the staff of the Water Works.

After 27 Years

FTER being in the U.S. for

twenty seven years, Mrs
Gwen Walton returned to Barba-
dos recently to spend six weeks’
holiday staying with Mrs. E
Beckles of Britton’s Cross Road

Film Work

, R. JOHN TURNER-SMITH,

who went to school at the
Lodge School in Barbados left
London last week for a month's
holiday in Geneva. When John
went to England from the West
Indies in 1944, he joined the RAF
Last year he was demobbed and
is now working as a technician in
a film studig in London. He lives
with his mother in Hampstead

And Boxer?

ee Ernest Moll and

his fiancee Sheilah were ip
London last week. Ernest is now
doing a colonial agricultura’
course in Cambridge and expects
to go to the Imperial College in
Trinidad in August. He will take
Sheilah with him—as his wife
Their wedding takes place at the
beginning of August, when Moll’s
parents arrive from the West
Indies. Sheilah’s problem at the
moment is what to do with her
boxer dog since there is a three
months’ quarantine period i
Trinidad

ag BY THE WAY sb Beachcomber

what I see.”

Gooseboote: Would you say
that this flag called attention t
any particular brand of garter, ot
garterette?

Mrs. ParSons: | tell you I come
along by there, like, and I see
this ruddy great garter hoisted
as you might say, that’s what
see. If that isn’t calling attention
d’you expect ‘em to fire cannon
from the roof?

Snapdriver: Would you de
scribe what you saw hoisted a
a flag?

Mrs. Parsons : | never saw ne
flag, only that garter. Not a ree
garter, of course, but a painted
one,

Gooseboote: Painted on what?

Mrs, Parsons: How do I know”
I come along by there, like, and
what do I see? I —

Cocklecarrot: Thank you,
Parsons, Cal! Henry

Mrs
Howlem.

FT-DRIVEN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ae
i





















*

FEDERICK STARKE’S jacket-dress with bloused top in black

and pink check.

The skirt is tight-fitting in black.

Beauty Hints

Try the One-Two-Three tech
nique which soon develops into a
smooth routine

One: CLEANSE off the day's
make-up, by putting on the cream
generously with a wad of damp
cottonwool, applying it with an
upward and outward movement,
net forgetting the neck and ears.

Use: Salon cold cream for nor-

mal or young skins

Dry Skin cleanser for dry
skins,

Liquefying Cleansing
cream for oily skius

Two: STIMULATE the tissues
with skin tonic. Pat it on with a
wad of cottonwco! wrung vut first
in cold water.

Use: Orange flower skin lotion
for normal, dry or sensi-
tive skins
Texture lotion for oily
skins.

Oily skin lotion in special
cases for excessively oily
skins.

Three NOURISH with a lu-
bricating night cream. Massage
this carefully into the skin with
‘he fingertips, taking care not to

tretch the skin under the eyes,

Use Special dry skin mixture
for dry or normal skins.
Sensitive skin cream
Extra Rich skin cream for
older dry skin.

Suppling cream for the
oily skin (also often suit-
ed to the teenager skin)
In the morning, repeat steps one

and two before putting on your \

make-up. If you are addicted to
soap and water, still cleanse with
and



cream afterwards e how
much grime comes away. This
tream and tonic technique will

help to soften and smooth your
complexion until it gradually be-
gins to resemble the “flower petal

look” so beloved by poets (and

advertising agents). i
Do try and ignore preparations

with endearing names—and go for |

those with functional titles. If
you can resist sniffing them first,
it is all to the good. Many an in-
ferior cream has sold widely be-
cause of an alluring perfume at-
tached to it.

try to realise that it is not pos-
sible to cover up a skin that has
dozens of blemishes, and enlarged
pores. A special medicated pow-
der to suit all skins will help mat-
ters. Known as Pore Grains, it is
an excellent treatment. Shake a

few in the palm of your hand, mix |
paste with water or |
skin tonic, then apply with finger- |

to a gritty

tips to the affected area in small

circular movements. Wash _ off
when dry with cool water. You |
should not use these grains on}

your cheeks.

CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:
AXYDLBAAXR

is

LONGFELLOW

One latter simply stands for another, In this example A fs used

for
trophies,

the three L's, X for the tw

o O's, ete. Single letters, apos-

the length and formation of the words are all hints

lwach day the code letters are different.

A Cryptogram Quotation

GK GKIWS

BR se Woe ee REG. Go
NYDQ: JDPDCHR ,ABRER BNA WE AGSOwWIL
BON: ORF SAS eee BP A Ae W. OR CR

BOP NA

Cryptoquote:

MAN WHO IS NOT WISH, AT

AND HE IS OFT THE WISEST

ALL—-WORDSWORTH.

TO-NIGHT

DINE AND DANCE

AT

\ \’S CLUB MORGAN
THE WEST INDIES MOST POPULAR NIGHT CLUB.

DELICIOUS STEAK DINNERS
Served throughout the Night

Dial 4000 for

—

MRS. HOUSE

Reservations

Check up and Replace your

HOUSEHOLD

We Have A Full Range of...

TEA CUPS & SAUCERS
TEAPOTS

MILK & CREAM JUGS
SUGAR BOWLS
PORRIDGE BOWLS

CROCKERY

LUNCH, BREAKFAST and
DINNER PLATES

SOUP PLATES

MEAT PLATTERS

VEGETABLE DISHES

SAUCE BOATS

Inspect these at our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

Telephone 2039.

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD.





Leen ne EEE EEEEEIEE EEE

Housewives’ Guide

Prices in the loca: mar cet
for Dry Peas and English
Potatoes when the “Adveo-

cate” checked yesterday
were:
Dry Peas: 18¢, per pint

English Potatoes: 16c. per tb.

B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME

SATURDAY, JULY 22, 1950
ne 145 p.m. Commentary on

Test; 7.00 am. The News, 7.10
rite News Analysis 7.15 a.m oe
MacPherson At The Theatre Organ; i”
am. From The Third Programme;
am. From The Editorials; £2) oe
Programme Parade; 8.15 a.m =e
Vs, West Indies; 8.35 4.m. Inter! 3
$45 a.m Colonial Questions; 9. .
a.m, Close Down. 10.30 a.m. Englan
Vs West Indies; aa Pi genom Close

own; 12,00 noon e ews
oe News Analysis; 12.15 p-m. Char
lie Kunz At The Piano; 12.30 p.m.
England Vs West Indies; 1.00 pers
English Eloquence, 1.15 p.m. R&i -
Newsreel; 1.30 p-m. Anything

Declare; 2.00 p.m. The News; 2.10
p.m. Home News From Britain; 2.15
pom Interlude; 2.25 p.m. Henry
Wood Promenade Concerts; 2.30 p.m.
God Save The King; 3 15 p.m. Inter-
jude; 3.30 p.m. Sports Review; 4.00
p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service; 4.15 p.m, Jack Train's Record
Variety Bill; 5.00 p.m. England Vs
West Indies; 5.05 p.m Interlude; 5.15
p.m Programme Parade; 5.30 p.m
Dance With Me; 6.30 p.m. From The
Third Programme; 7.00 p.m. The News;
7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m.
1.45 p.m. Cricket Report On Third
Test; 8.00 p.m, Radio Newsreel



6.15



CROSSWORD



1. Plain, (9)
7 This snake wants T for o cratt.
(3) 8. Song of praise. (5)
0. Honeur. (7)
1. This ts unusual. (8)
4 Spun reeds for a sock. (9)
5 Smal! dwellings. (4
. Short current me . (9)
Sort of mortar, (6)
Abbreviated statement. (
To be this in is to be do
Adriatic port. (4)
This ts fundamental. ¢9)
Down
Chis ciue 1s to confuse. 4
Mineral. (4)
Haul to excavate, (6)
. Cheese, (8)
[ts cathedra) 1s famous, (@)

(9)
Edge. (3)
Presh-sounding mammel, s)
Ordinary seaman, (2)
Indian State. (5)
Stone trom 24 Across, (@
Stop or stay! (4)
Wartime service, (3)
Lengthen. (3) 21. Portion. @0

Solution of Savurday'’s :
1, Piddlers Invoice; ooh 1
13, Cur, 14 med; 15,

18 t ‘Trite; 21, Ui

25° Separates, Dowm: 4,
(nundate: 5, Dges 4.
6. Ream; 7, Street:

12. Guy
ly. Sut



1.
2
$
a
u
6. Well-known order.
v
i)
2

te

o~





b, 22, See.



This week’s
GADGET

By JOAN DALE

GRE LL OLO






PIT I

A
clea
mop can be used
high walls and ceilings and

useful aid
ing, this

to spring-
pliable wall
to clean

ARMA OLE ROP LPL EAE APE PPA

will bend into the ost
difficult corners.
Price 14s. 9d.

PRIOR POOP



a Expr

— —— —————

ROYAL (Worthings)

| Today 5 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing

Columbia Pictures Present



Robert Young, Barbara Hale
in

“AND BABY MAKES
THREE”
with
Robert Hutton, Janis Carter



Extra—2 Reel short
“Training for Trouble”

EMPIRE

TODAY 2.30 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing



20th Ceniury Fox Presents

Montgomery CLIFT
Paul DOUGLAS

in

“THE BIG LIFT”

with Cornell BORCHERS
Bruni LOBEL

ROXY

Today 4.45 & 8.15 p.m.
and Continuing



Fox presents
Gregory PECK
Helen WESTCOTT

in

20th Century

“THE GUNFIGHTER”

with Millard MITCHELL
Jean PARKER

OLYMPIC

Today 4.45 & 8.15 p.m.
Sun, 4.45 & 8.45 p.m.



Republic Pictures present

George Brent. Vera Ralston
in
“DRUMS ALGNG THE
AMAZON”

with Brian Aherne,
Constance Bennett



———








13, Grates: i4. P





99

“s,

JULY 1950

SATURDAY,



to catch butterflies. Will you come
and join me?” Rupert thinks a

“

Rupert hurries forward and sees
that the other little figure is young

% illy,”” ly you won't

Billy Goat. Hi, Billy,” he calls, moment. But sure ou

” Y haven't seen you for ages. catch any butterflies yet, re

What's that | you're carrying? laughs. ‘* There arent any. Se

Where are you going?" “ Hullo, too early - ci you, ~ aa
rt,” says Billy. “ r thi lank. ‘‘Oh, deag, never thoug!

Rupert,”’ says Billy. “* Look at this blan = > ae neve Ot





net that my Grannie

n our attic. I’m just of



+



WHEN SOMEONE SPRAYS
HIS GERMS ON YOU...

WITH

LISTERINE
ANTISEPTIC

AS SOON AS YOU CAN



LISTERINE Antiseptic, full strength, kills
millions of germs on throat surface. It
attacks these germs associated with colds
before they attack you ... keeps them
from starting serious trouble. Take the
sensible precaution against cold compli-
cations—gargle with LISTERINE Anti-
septic, full strength!



IN TESTS OVER A 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS
OF LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COLDS!



GATETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, 8.30 P.M
MATINEE : SUNDAY, 5.00 P.M.
Twentieth Century Fox Present .
JOHN GARFIELD in:

“UNDER MY SKIN”











eae

PLAZA A 3-DAY SPECIAL!

FRIDAY, SAT., SUN. MAT.
Warner's Classic

NITE 8.30
(Re-issued)

6 p.m

Academy Award Winners
Fredric
MARCH

Olivia
HAVILLAND

IN
ANTHONY ADVERSE

(By Hervey Allen)
DON’T MISS IT!

DE

‘labeled?











AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE : TODAY AT 5.00 P.M.
TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
Paramount's New Picture
“RED HOT AND BLUE”

Starring BETTY HUTTON VICTOR MATURE
WILLIAM DAMEREST JUNE HAVOC
“Red, Hot and Blue” is joyous, tuneful and happy-go-lucky

SPECIAL MATINEE: THIS MORNING AT
9.30 O'CLOCK
Monogram presents :
JIMMY WAKELY
“SPRINGTIME IN TEXAS” }











ae z=
GLOB
a E
TODAY 5.00 and 8.30 P.M. TO TUESDAY

“THE RED DANUBE"

| Walter Ethe Peter
| PIDGEON BARRYMORE LAWFORD

LOCAL TALENT AUDITION
GLOBE THEATRE, 9.30 A.M.

WM Wy

SOLE AGENTS:—

MANNING & CO., LTD.


ATURDAY, JULY 22,

Keep Children Away

1950

From Cinemas













































‘WINDOW ON EU

Hy





























BARBADOS ADVOCATE
ROPE:



GUNNINGHAM











Australian

GERMANY AND KOREA Homes tn

Short Supply

SYDNEY, Australia







PAGE THREE





“Accessories
Are Also
Guilty”

Leopold
Returns

To-day

senna?





















































2 nd Ti P j DO = . from page 1
Headmistress ells aren. —— ae 2 LON N. Europe These have strengthenedout Germany, their forces may |, Greatest social problem in Au October, Pecpoid 4 intained he —SAYS ACHESON
j 1 HE a. positior of Germany, political and economic bonds not be strong enough for this ee to-day is the housing}nad advised the British and
' mincially divided and ruled by between the Grotewohl Govern- The inclusion of German troops in }5°! tage : 7 ieee 4 WASHINGTON, J 0
= . I AT two Governn , F < I sin a . French of the possibi ipitu- ‘
: AT THE URSULINE CONVENT last evening Mother |, hee eee one Communist- ment and the satellites (though Western defence, therefore, may | ,/" 1947, there was a deficiency }lation as early as M Conerens Pee
Teresita the Headmistress in her report on the work of + tutels ph eae og — no German could ever welcome soon,be inevitable es 197,000 homes, At the end of He counter-charged tha he bys - iy @
: : er utelage, inevitably evokes the sign away aman ters ast year, the deficiency had{[British failed nform tt ; Ose i e North
the Main Schoc . = 7 x , ? i ae ee lea a ; signing away of German terri- f ritish failed? ta inform the Be
a a Scho 1 for 1949—50 thanked the parents of pupils, | Comparison with Korea, The West tory involved in the frontier pacts Pactics Over Austria grown to an estimated 212,000. }gian High Command their’ in-| *' 1 ce rear ‘
ies Sacer the past year, “have generously co-operated Germans are consequently exhi- with Poland and Czechoslovakia) In New South Wales—largest| tention to evacuate their forces | 8h! legally o earded as hav
with us in matters involving certain changes in view of |y"% Signs of uneasiness, and, The Austrian Treaty negotia-}St#te in the Commonwealth—the from the Continent. ‘The British | #98 Committe Sena
the welfare of the children.” Pe ae the Western Powers are Finally, the elections in East- tors met in London this week and |S%O'tage increased from 79,000 in}and French charges that Le« pold | aren : espondent
1 “0 ° rents Renin o ~ ath i . - 7 Acheso ¢ r
95 ath, iillie RM Ae _} ‘thank-you’ before they leave sa, | Ot Monae Fned. Events in Korea ern Germany next October will, as usual, adjourned without ac-|/947 to 90,000 at the end of 1949, | failed to tell them his intention | aa te Tiras
“to the a ee she said! and to offer them our good Wishes | intentions cleo oun. te Russian -heoretically, make the puppet comptishing anything. Once again although 60,392 new homes were[to surrender, have been denied by | “S® "°C"4 nent
: proposal which we mude| for success te tha eee spheres | mere likely then Gort, V2er? Government an independent one. the Soviet Deputy introduced the | OUit during the period. many people, among them Admiral} | 2)" ,
rare — November, when we} of work : *; more likely than German The Communists have already red herring of Trieste iaite the Equally disturbing is the in-[Lord Keyes, head of Special) >" khe
irs as > r ¢ . & st t ~ohaa r so a
‘hang ska you to consider a Do Not Give I |, sre, the similarity between ‘ecided that they will have a discussions that have dragged on{St@ased cost of building. A house] Mission to the King at the time] (0) 18d
‘ ange of school hours. For some I now Suen te Ate € } Menge | the two situations is more appar- Preponderance of seats in the pow for over four vane, : His here that cost £1,000 ($2,400), f Surrender Bonen’
ime we had been contemplating . > you, the Parents tent than real. Weste+n troops have ratio of 7 to 3. But this “in- tactics ‘a Siplus £250 for land September. J, Churchill's second volume of ‘+
this: ch Cf our pupils, to ask your further ps have tactics, during this time, have}? r land, in September . s ;
mus Change, owing to the benefits} ¢¢ -operation in that m: rturther | not been withdrawn from Ger- dependence” is bound to lead to shown clearly that Russia is de-| 1039. Pow costs £2,500 his “Seconé World War” last year |}
which we realised would be de- importance B pep hey roe) of vital! many as American troops were 4 fresh claim, on its part, to be liberately stallin a sa ts Ce- 1 £2,750, plus £500 for land gave a versie the evidence of | jrorea
~ Bee C nce, — the tr : = oy . tely s ae: as r . ’ ‘ é othe aca ‘
fein a school time-table| cider girls. To quoly the wore from South Koree. Germany is the Government of all Germany. tentior of cignitte a Treaty until The figures cover the averaye roe Mg a ee ee |
2x ei Ss. s a aie ie ‘i ° § a aty } a - shee 's f nents ¢«
ound en pert a ae of ' Reverend Mother Prioress | ie REC Te Cente - me a war, Dr. Adenauer is reported to it suits her. Equally clear, until oer home in Sydney or tat gh ae at, en na 1 at
* » instead o tole ri sTi 7 sone earher 9y the Senate have r , om " ba ; : ‘Wwase? 2 “lk rne cons 5 ; . . Of Com ’
12 and 1 to 3 in thas. biases tates Ceneral of the Ursuline Order, in| whereas -icorea ‘© relativeles © Alin renewed his request to the NOW, has been the West's desir: pes “Vv aE of two bel-t munications were largely respon- | Se wa
Our ‘pedphies ‘i aft on. | her book entitled, “Ursuline|\.. 04... 5 : relatively, Allied High Commission for a ‘© conclude an agreement quick- 4°00, ving room, din ng}sible for alleged ill-fait! , Of aggression
: plan was, as it] Method of Education’’, “Education | ° ons ar i ter s An invasion gtiarantee of German security. ly. But recent events may well ;'00™ kitehen, bathroom, laundry After capitul ti a oe } rephed i va
cemed, welcomed by you, for! should make of young girls com- ct Western Germany either by The reply of Mr McCloy, the reverse this situation | a t .,and sun porch or verandah. It} turned tot “cig ‘al eRe h j principle in law. He 1 that
ii \ too, clearly understood that} piete Catholic women, women ot Russia or by the Russian-sponsor- U.S High Commissioner. iain Powers. It woul ns —— ~ [is constructed on a lot of abou withdrew: ante ca bl “life “ law one could be ‘ ry bef
itth vork po ae . . h t ¢ arn te 4 3 + Ss : os : oO e s . ” ™ 7 : ibhe ife anc r+ ‘ BY 4
2 7 work accomplished by a] integrity, integral Catholics." |‘ i _ bare military units’ of the that such a guarantee was un- prising in fact f Britain, |20 feet by 150 feet and connect lived as a virtual prisoner a i ifs after the f
perv ite — two hours of | What should be done to help each aah Ret bl would immedi- necessary as an attack on West France nd America a dines: See gas, water and electricity the four veats of aa 1 ation ; On He id the N .orea
afternoon school. : n ately unleash’ ; £ “2 wn Lp pe said ee oe ‘ em-~ , & io ote i oaks “ee - asior iad be +)
0 of the pupils to develop her lnahiveon'faans ee where? ul war Ge rmany would automatically ployed delaying tactics at the | The shortage —due to shorta [September 11, 1940, he married . ST a na b ‘ : “ fu
We thank you very much for integral worth, the natural ans : . . hean* An attack on the Western conference table. The signing of |°! Materials and skilled wor Madamoiselle Mary-iiliane Baels. |. ae - Ripa ii le
: . hs a ‘ ca 2 sais Mette eal ~ § . av . as suppose to overwt t
your generous" co-bperdtion th Sapepapural nergies that she ha Nevarthelics Western taxi Pow ers _This is undoubtedly ‘true, a Peace Treaty would mean the oe is aie for some alar commoner and daughter of former }icorea in a vers er rhs lm ; put
that matter, in spite of the in- a 0 tO render herself capable | many’s nervousness is understand- 24! !t can hardly have satisfied withdrawal of occupation troops ogi socint: fehden ces Home Affairs Minister The Bel-tiiad been it tant ‘ i sae.
cenvehilences” whith oh eae of the great and holy duties of a able. It has not been éased by = German Chancellor, He has from Austria — an event that ee newlyweds have to lin Jgian people did not hear Of. ThE cote seanbete to “ote ae ig-
echenié ‘lige Guisamd’ ts aes aie “3 malic Nene and Mother, capable [certain Soviet actions directed ames for the authority to create might have dangerous consequen- ee as Seale for at least severa foie until December of the ftione Security Council. 7 ie United
ents, and we can truly say that} 9 eee ae maysruniiaine jagainst the West recently. The 3, cera police of 30,000 in place ces in the light of what happened aaa as : ter marriage. Psycho! > ot pate ii a pastorel letter Nations had met this case of ag.
the change is proving beneficial] eiforts were limited to. t f our!Czech Note accusing the United f ne veaene decentralized police j), Korea, Russia, on the other |” ae divorce courts say ‘thi: Doe d's wife SHE ae Sale’ [gression learly 1 squarely
to the pupils: More and better i Cromer ge + ne eg ae States of dropping Colorado of the ander. In view of the hand, could hardly have anticipa- ws responsible for many divorcees elon wi appro the rank [Phere wa: the’ United statis oF
work is accomplished during all] \.ould be only information. wr beetles by aircraft on Czech soil Rhea in Masern Germany, of ted President Truman's sttong ac- Red Gate ih wrt oe Panes ould’ en} +e ) het enlaren the world behind the United Na
the hours of the present arrange- THE intellect of tie Bhi , fis the third official protest from ®?™med police units, equipped with tion on behalf of U.N.O. She may, Rete Social workers say titi 4 aby nati os “ 4e rights. i tions, and in America itself there
ment, and at 1 o’clock the girls] be trained, but the ‘child. MUS! I the Communists on this subject pict Pong howitzers and therefore, think it best to keep eee immorality ase : was united natio behind United
can go home for a good meal. only gifted with intelligence; aa The first two Notes were from the han ws iy 100,00 ’ mer now, negotiations with the West open at otbe ot > eater hee. bene In June 1944, after the Allied | Natio — aoe
oan » § Soviet Government, with Eastern , riy Ne men now, \ 2 prolongec yecause no authority |: s Le ld and hi i —-
. : has also receive » V s . . the monent ag she did when the z ) ivasion, Leopold at is family
265 Pupils great faculty BY wilt = ana Germany as the territory alleged a ia does not western Rehare showed _ they oe to demolish any dwelling} were taken to internment at a e
, ; g, z me “ * by , seem unreasonable ace, howeve cre : fort in § : THEY Wwére tran l :
This year the school has num-|'™#2"’S moral worth is the value o have been “sabotaged” by these Thi sti meant business over the Berlin $ dn > na lone. one ae a RS on ae er A rgentine
ered 265 ls. 1 t ,Jof his will, The child is her formidable potato pests. (The us question of a West Ger- jiockade in 1948 Sydney alone, there are an esti- rred to Strobl, near Salzburg in < ov eC
have Gad) ns p 4 of whom own responsibility a’ free Pie wa fact that the beetles infest South ™an federal police was discussed - : ‘ mated 40,000 houses which health} Austria, where they were liberated e
ontemauel "Pre ao sp wie hence the importat ce of Te rniee West Germany as well was con- & the recent meetings in London Peace Music ‘uthorities say are unfit for habi-Sby the American Seventh Army De Dui ties
ree a ti and reparatory De- to will and to will arash arning veniently forgotten) . These Of the study group on Germany. There is no saying to what lengths} tation. Many families are living]in May 1945 «
ber "ee 35 at oe, num-! Children must of necessity either |@bsurd propaganda charges would Tt is probable that Dr. Adenauer’s the Communists will go in theirjin = make-shift dwelling-terts, Leopold’s brother Charles con ; :
eee i ee Rated Wel 1 ov on honant — According to | hardly deserve attention if’ they W)sh will be granted. If the in- campaign for “peace,” They have | shacks and trailers tinued to act as Regent for the Agree
73 ae ach an the five forms! God's law. it is the dure ct Miter did not seem a pretext—to prepare ternational _ situation .Worsens, even enlisted the support of music To cope with the problem, the] ing, writing that il health pre- 5
rovid ‘; ain School. We have] +, honour their parents by obedi- | ,case, perhaps, for interfering German nationalism will, in any In the current edition of the Rus- government ig encouraging imr)|-| Vented his immediats return to . .
} 2, 0, mine feat ’ s - a J 2 S30 me . * . » The ale soc « _
} ided accommodation for 80] ence We are then striving to| With the Western air-route to case eventually insist that Ger- sian art review, “Sovietskoie Is-|grants with building experiet. -¢ Belgium. The Belyi ocialists First Time In Years
girls who have been boarders at} inculcate irito the Faron’ hearts Berlin many nag such a force. And in koustvo,” there appears a letter/and restricting construction “6| WhO have steadfastly opposed the BUENO '
a f ove nt; some of these are’ of your girls this spirit of Pubmies More serious was the cutting off View of Korea the Western Pow- ‘from Soviet musicians addressed to |home-building and essential work ing return, demand d his abdi For the { . t t ares oUhy a
Soe Venezuela and _ British] sion and obedience to authority, {of Water and electricity to the ers I think, may at an early gate, their foreign colleagues—particu-|In Sydney for example, no new erp Leopold replied that he the Arse: i , ce oe SO Seared
uiana, and others are from the] which is the basis of all content. | Western sectors of Berlin. This be compelied to revise their pres- larly in Britain, France and Am-Joffice buildings have been built nie on rece abandoning | | heots Atl pam of Depu
neighbouring islands of Trinidad,} ment in life. A spirit of insub-|™Might be the first measure in a ent policy of German nonrearma- erica. “We Soviet musicians,” con-jsince before the war and there |s sf parone at Taeal te, bls eum inte Hews gnc oar heard
Antigua, St. Lucia, and Guade-| ordination exists among many] Progressive blockade of the city ment. Only by a_ situation of cludes)the letter, “ask you this lan acute shortage of office he ing eh nidboore “sj pd in 1 en ian "Gideiiah noe eee
> ~ 3 ” : . » face spreod “s yh ibe oppo t 1 it
Tans young girls today. We beg of you, | Such as happened in'1948. Another strength”, by, for instance, rein- what have you done to strengthen | commodation. Ralgivin, apd wtiled wt Pregny,jatained « ured : Ce
The standard of work of the] the parents, to co-operate with us| Significant move have been the forcing Western Germany, can peace? Where are your songs.| State and Federal government Switeerland E ; ’ au ‘ted S Wennou e when if
; ‘ eae ei : * : . nl : é . adopted A resolutic reaffir >
pupils of the school has, through-|in exacting from your girls 2|pacts concluded recently between they hope to prevent further your cantatas and your sympho-|have sent missions abroad to exam) It was learned Inte: that when|ti ts pari Miah ane S -.
out the year, been quite satis-| prompt, loyal, and filial obedience, | Eastern Germany and the Com- Communist aggression. But the nies dedicated to the struggle for ine pre-fabricated houses which] the Socialist delevat “called attr SE meee LAG NRTA
factory, and good progress has] Vo not give in to their every wish;] munist countries of Eastern Western Powers know that, with- peace?” will be imported duty-free and, in| the palace earlier toiay to. “talk |ridoetes: Tite hectare eee
de to, 4 Ms i 1 4 . & e * : . , . ~ " . Pi S or. it ‘ lj.
ea mn effected Special mention] Go ney attempt to satisfy their ail some cases, under government sub-j leave” of Prince Charles, they [ton ah ind ald il He :
owever, must be made of the| every desire; it is very good for sidy, Prices are high, however,}| were told the Pri was indls. , De aE en See
; : ABS , : : i gh, As longed, belor |
keen and intelligent spirit of}/them to receive sometimes a ‘ e _ . f sper re-fe sed and ld re Y? : will belong
ge hi Q i ¢ and experts view the pre-fabs as posed and could pol receive therm we. Bin :
a woe has arate among refgsal. aa = : P Plane Ss Blast Nine Answer Call k or Aid little more than a stop-gap pro-| The gent reseen, 1» official said pee es se
1¢ members = o orms IV}_, ; am away from the ‘ * eram j “is that Prince Charles does not Ay Sy mae SA
and V. These pupils have taken|C!memas which, owing to the low Seoul and Taejon . ry" : Sin want to receive the Catholic dele- |f8erically repudiate the project of
an intelligent interes i t standards of morality, the excess- n ?; r gation also due to call on him.” a member of t British Parlia~
thett sonia. a oie Saas 3 io! Smotlonsiamn-nhd-eenitican.) @ From page 1. n orea ar oe ee ND | Referring to his repor , od if npan {ment (who proposed that Byitain
: ave ; nik reseed | tality, and the play assions ' a spokesman close to th tired [protest against the ret f the
¢ have unanimously expressed shore exhibited a eras ees Another enemy division con- WASHINGTON, July 21. The reply mentioned 26,000 Philip- LOSI G GROU a nen — + ar retnee Satine vr Behera " or hi
he opinion that the girls havel of evil for young girls today Give | fronts the South Korean’ force], U.N. Secretary-General Trygve pine scouts who were willing to From page 1 Sn UEYeTE AO Eile coer Aiea Tee coktade SELON ctehoce chem
worked — splendidly We have], Vong e SAhs togay. Give bas ‘ line f he |Lie said at a press conference to- serve in Korea peech Monsieur Paul Reynaud | 4" aceldent to his eye Anti-Leo~ [as postage British stamps bearing
- yveur children healthy pleasures at| holding a rough line from the : " ; ; old Socialists and Communists, [the inseriptio Falk! lfinds,”
reason to expect good results in] },orn¢ ; ‘ American right flank northeast-{@@y that nine countries had so far ex-Prime Minister of France, | hee ten Cabinet ¢ vi an-4 Stab th, $6 be dan Kaa
the School Certificate Ex«mina- , s rard td the Vicinity of Hamchong.|ZeSPonded to his appeal for aid to 2, Norway, said she could send} warned the = meeting: “Soviet | Cespite a \ivbine commurigve an~ }considering it to le au unfrfendby
en mn It is sad to find in many young] o Mie Witinity Ob SeMcRene. he orea hui none had bitered ground no tr but offered at yf Russia to-day possessed the |MOUNcing King Leopold's likely fact prejudicial to Argentine sov-
Tk aun Meanie aie eee zirls a spirit of selfishness, of self-| Two more enemy divisions ar8|forces, ‘The story that the Secre- space ee le tne in the world, 170 {return for Suttrday, persisted that |eteignty' arid requests the Covert
Aft the Oxford and Cambridge eking: and we teel sure that developing a drive down the et enna ar a ve secre- space : Strongest army in the world, 1% ho might stilt make suforish : f ‘ ) mw Govern.
Sehéb! Certificate Examination] selfishness | is d * Haman high tariat was secretly organising a — 3, Denmark, offered one Danish, infantry divisions. 35 armoured | ; ee a prise ap- tnient not to accept the British pro-
] J 4 ation) selfishness is one of the basic] Mungyang-Ha ong highway | volunteer army had “not a word Red Cross ambulance unit divisions, 60 artillery divisions.” | Pearance at the Independence Day {test which it was proposed to make
ahaa ily 1949, the five can-| causes of the ruptures in family} confronted by the Sixth © South | of truth in it”, Lie said. He added 4. Sweden "said it ce im- M. Sewn auc 208 tinued: “She js | Parade to be staged in Brussels} Although membe: age th ae
didates who were suctessful,} fe today. Our work, then, is to | Korean Division midway between |that the whole question of ¢ sible to send aid tut| working night ao this afternoon. Tait Ste: Gardeuniaees
obtained good results : fixe a. oe : h e question of an In- possible to send military aid but} working night and day, Sundays at . sition joined with the Government
ain ood results: hetp rue form your girls into | the tWo towns. ternational Volunteer Legion was offered to equip and pay for alas well, to rearm. Millions of . prea et peep, ismed benchers for the first time itt ap-
+ , 7 valian iristian women, — gen- % L i saat Re 7 s “d : 7 xy parties urging their fe wers '
Lucille Grace—3 credits; efdus: gubiiiaaton Grusi i ote United Nations ships and planes oem ie oe Soo Command Swedish field hospital, ; prisoners, enslaved men, women |, > orb ’ nny pe ae proving the above text they voted
Madge Quesnel—3 credits and] gqerif ap Fi Basck: amicog be to-day d the stubborn re-]9"d the Security Council. 5. Peru, made no offer of mili-}] and children, are toiling at this | cesay veces, jagainst the part of the te hich
acrif Ps tes > share o-day covere e stu m . iy ; sady t le § . COE K pat f text whi
; ; sacrificing; — women of character, » “Neither I nor any r ber of tary aid but announced her will- rk.” ready to demonstrate if neces-
! tinction ; of high ‘iples. of preat ideale | treat of ground troops back to the : ly member of sar) ; work. sary.” In most centres throug “welcomes the firm and decidéd on
3 f high principles, of great ideals. the United Nz S 3s t snter bile Ai . 5, $ ‘ ary n most centres throughout
Christine Gordon—4 credits ad} who pwill be trode. fetes: | tine of hard resistance” from Nations.Secretariat has ingness to enter into bilateral ne- People might regard Korea 45| qnij-Leopoldist Wallonia highly |the policy of President Peron who
+t Alatitichon i a ead) ce sacrifice, which’ General Mae Arthur will done anything about it,” he said. gotiations with the Unified Com- | far away, M. Reynaud said. “But fee ustiiott Ay , fans! a Pin, Jalways unfailing! ntatnea’ the
; : a “e 6 5} = Wak tat) A eal . Te Abert f ae : : alisec anch = speAking | olw ung y main C
Rosemarie Clege—6 credits: Hen She will be etron: hs a jJaunch his counter offensive, But Menke Pepe ao contrny nor ming Sopcenting other types of /1 would remind you of what) provinces in the soutt “Ar tneiright of the Argentiie nation, to
. _ : f 5 =e © - ; J ste assistance ond a letter: shoi , Lis - ‘ on
Charmian Henzeil—4 credits] azeous enough to face and combat | 0" the right flank, the allied front American conkeduan. that ek 6 A ” 4 : ae vom M snout Pe en ; country the Belgian flag wasjtie Malvinas Ist ind more
and 4 distinctions, with ex-| the dangers and obstacles to happi- near the east coast, United Nations dential offers of grotnd Poors ae ae eens, apnea’ het was ee eae hie of - is I being fown at half mast today. pecially for the refusal to accept
n ; : : 3 $ s ante rec in 5 e y and] A .
emption from Matriculation] ness which will lie in their path|8tound troops went over to theleen made by several countries, gotiations with the Unified Cam. | Celeutta.” mg, ¥" | —Reuter, © British stamp —Reuter
when they leave school; valiant offensive after naval guns had “I do not know whether " d an \ ‘ init spat ‘Karlie .!
In the school curriculum, Art,! women who later will be the Wi laid down a murderous curtain of | ¢ have’ bi nether ground mand through Washington, but} Earlier Mr, Churchill had poi }
‘ ; ‘ \ ate 2 > res ces a p » specifie ‘ . . a ‘
have had an important place, as} ead who wil See eeeee, | closed: whethe: Ss who went ave been ‘. France, placed at the United | Paul Ramadier and Paul Reynatid,
ace, as}; Will be the leaven to raise | Closed whether troops who went/put I know there are i s N s di ¢ as , rer
well as the other usual academic] tie standard of family life ani forward towards Yongdok 25] going on about it,” be ee ie ee aeeitee | —— a ne Win) Sty be oh
ubjects, and very good work has] maintain its dignity and unity, and | Miles north of the point where|General said. i "the Far East r eB Belgie oe a Premier” tte , rial |
been achieved in Art and Music.| who will thus’ help to re-~| America’s First Cavalry Division] Nine replies were from the fol- 8. Brazil, offered to enter into fo aia pip cada } view
At the examinations of the Asso-| Christianise society, and bring God | !anded a few days ago were}lowing countries: negotiations about all aid within Wane catiny of to im moe -
ciated Board of Music—Theory and] beck to the world and to men American or South Korean. Smoke} 1. The Philippines, which said her means iifone in Union which did . t |
nna ce ve q ve ide © T > 2 . i ‘ ry . ry + r ‘ Ms me F | a
Practical—the 13 candidates who This is our aim, the subject of | from _the guns of two cruisers—jshe was prepared to enter into 9. Greece, said she would send include. Germahy was bound to
entered, were all successful. At] Our prayer, and for this end do we, | 9M British and one American—|direct consultation with the Uni- no troops but offered to contribute fvil? he said. But even with
the examinations of the Trinity]! our Ursuline method of educa- | Still hung thick in the dusty air as|/fied Command. The Philippines six transport planes, Germany “Ineluded “we must

College of Music the 8 candidates

who entered were likewise, all
successful In view of encour-|§
aging a greater appreciation of} ‘
good music we have, this term,
formed a Musical Society at the
chool. Already, several good
vramophone records have been

added to the school collection, and
some enjoyable hours have been
spent in listening to and appreciat-
ing the symphonies of Beethoven
and Mozart, and the compositions
of Chopin, and other Masters

During the past year numerous
ditions have been made to the
School Reference Library, and to

the Form Libraries We are
leased to be able to say that the
School Reference Library now
ontains many books of value. The
tem of Form Libraries, as well
weekly library
erio the time-table, have
ved well the purpose of encour-
the girls to read much

the special



aging

In the sphere of games, a keen
pirit has been maintained
throughout the year, and many an
enthusiastie inter-house match has
been played to decide the winners
f the cups for Netball, Tennis,
Rounders and Table Tennis, An
enthusiastic ‘house’ spirit was also
displayed on Sports Day last Oc-

I
tober. when St. Augustine’s House,












—~Blue House-won the Sports
Cup
‘he Senior Netball and Junior
Ror ers Teams have had the |
pleasure of playing matches
neainst Codrington High School.
th here at the Convent and at
he High School. On both cecas-
the schools shared the
tory, — the Codrington team
nning t Netball, and the
suline girls at Rounders
I v take this opportunity to



s my gratitude to the mem-
the staff for their loyalty,
their devotedness to duty in
eir work for the children, Thei: |
active and willing co-operation has



of
ind



made it possible for us all, closely
united, to work for the good of}
cur pupils. At the beginning of
the school year we were Very
pieased to welcome back Miss;
Marv Harford who kindly offered |













her valuable services for yet
another year, — her ninth year
We re sorry that we shall be|
losing both her and Miss Doreen |
Roberts from the School Staff this |
yea Miss Roberts has bee vith |
l s for the past four year Wea j
truly 1 to them both |
the they rende
iC and t heart!

courage your girls in all that

ion, instruct, enlighten, and en-

is
sood, great, noble, beautiful, hon.
surable; and God-like in life,



The Weather

TODAY

Sun Ris 5.39 a.m,

Sun Sets: 6.21 p.m.

Itigh Water: 9.25 a.m.,
9.41 pum.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) Nil
Total for Month to Yester-

day: 1.61 ins.



the infantry attack began.

On the Korean front near the
burning and abandoned Taejon
former provisional capital, Amer-
ican soldiers were taking up new
prepared defence positions.
South of the town fired by allied
bombers in a farewell blitz as the
Americans pulled out in the face
of heavier armour, United States
24th Division, weard from long
fighting dug in for another delay-
ing action.

In the centre front, South
Koreans struck a few offensive
blows in the general picture of a
| desperate bid to stall for time
; while United Nations reinforce—
ments are built up.



Temperature; (Max.) 85.0°F

Temperature: (Min.) 73.5°F

Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E,
(3 p.m.) E

Wind Velocity: 10 miles per
hour

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.976,
(3 p.m.) 29.931






FOR COLDS!

of

LOOK OUT

They were reported mopping up

{two Communist battalions at
{Pungni between Tanyang and
| Yongju while 15 miles further
jsouth other South Korean units

| hit back in the area of Yechon the
| key town to the valley corridors
| which has changed hands several
| times in the past tew days.
—Reuter.






@ Got the sniffles? Starting to sneeze? Feel a

dry, rasping seasation in your throat? Cold

coming on? G

argle Listerine Antiseptic im-

mediately. Doing so prompuy and frequently

may keep a col





of germs. So, a

25h

d from getting serious or help

ward it off. Listerine Antiseptic reaches way
back on your throat surfaces—kills millions

t the first sign of a cold, gargle

Listerine and keep it up—it may save you a

nasty, expensive siege:

Li STE Rt i nt F Antiseptic




Government was allowing its
nationals to volunteer for service
with Korean forces but to safe-
guard national defence no Gov-
ernment troops would be sent.

Lie said it was “too premature”
to pass judgment on whether the
United Nations appeal was a suc-
cess or a failure.

@ on page 5

Nae vw ee ene.

OO ree

Specially designed tor Barb

is

Brown/White

icading stores.

made by





Two-tone brogue in Black/White and
now on sale at the

never forget that—half of Europe
still remains outside.” “United
Evrope” he said, is one of thi
indispensable pillars of world
peace.-Reuter,

ba an

ados, this

JOHN WHITE ©

|














aie SVARKLING drit I i 8
~ * effecti laxative t ! I ( ,
pee H Andrews combines both these req 1 vr
4 he daily round mor heerful, to promote % !
vodily health
Vhis ideal form of lax i aul ul
| he stomach and t ip t Finalls
} rently clears the bowel “neuri te
FRVESCEN! Cleantin
( Just take one teaspoonful of Ar 1 f
| % ater, and you have immediately a zzy {rink ¢
f efresh you at any time of the da
« {
<=") ANDREWS
Sy LIVER SALT
: THE IDEAL FORM OF LAXATIVE
K.1965/50
May we have the pleasure of
- :
supplying you with one of the
| following Motor Wehicles
|
1
|
|
{
} The STANDARD VANGUARD
| 68 h.p. 6 seater Saloon
The STANDARD 12 ewt. PICK-Ui
The STANDARD DELIVERY VAN
The STANDARD ESTAT ‘AR
The TRIUMPH RENOWN 2 Litr
The TRIUMPH MAYFLOWER
38 h.p. 4 seater Saloon
| .
| This ne model is expected in 3 mont
CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LTD.
Agents Trafalgar Street
Versa rs + SST = = =z = SE = Ss







ee

SOOO

_——— oe
ne —— SE


*

PAGE FOUR



p ADVOGATE

== {sees ce)

Printed by the Advorate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown.







SATURDAY JULY 22, 1950

PROBATION

THE purpose of punishment is one on
which jurists, criminologists and sociolo-
gists cannot agree, but three reasons have
been adduced for punishment. One is that
it should act as a deterrent to others who
would essay to tread the paths of crimin-
ality. The second is that it should be an
expression of society’s vengeance against
those who have offended against society's
eode and thirdly that it should act as re-
formative treatment by which the offender
may be persuaded to give up a life of crime
to become a useful member of the com-
munity.



Within recent years the last of these has
received especial attention and the system
of probation has become an established
feature of a modern and progressive com-
munity. In his report of 3lst March 1950
Capt. T. H. Brooks, the then Probation
Officer writes, “Probation has been de-
scribed as a process of social reconstruction
under the guidance of the Court and the
Probation Officer. It is not a remedy com-
pounded of sentiment and wishful think-
ing. It is more than a gesture of leniency.
It is the means of giving persons who lack
training and educational advantages the
benefits of a firm, friendly and understand-
ing guidance, together with discipline and
training.”

In Barbados real Probation began with
the coming into operation of the Juvenile
Offenders Act, 1932. Under that Act the
Governor. was given power to appoint Pro-
bation Officers and to make rules regarding
their duties. The officers of the Salvation
Army who had been doing good work along
similar lines and who were eminently
suited to carry out Probation duties were
invited to assume responsibility for this
work throughout the island.

No praise can be too high for the officers
of the Salvation Army who attended the
infancy of the Probation Service in Barba-
dos. So conspicuous was their success that
in 1945 the Legislature enacted the Proba-
tion of Offenders Act which gave to adults
as well as juveniles the benefits of the
Probation system. The Salvation Army
were asked to provide a full-time officer
and the appointment of Capt. T. H. Brooks
in May 1946 coincided with the Proclam-
ation of the Act.

In the years that have passed and mainly
due to the zeal and energy of Capt. Brooks,
the Probation System has grown consider-
ably and the staff of the office has had to be
incfeased. Capt. Brooks relinquished his
office earlier this year and the Probation
Office will no longer be staffed by members
of the Salvation Army. Mr. Huraphrey
Walcott who acted as assistant to Capt.
Brooks and who is now under-going train-
ing in England will be returning later in
the year to fill the vacancy occasioned by
the departure of Capt. Brooks.

Recognition of the great work done by
ithe Probation Officers is reflected in the
eagerness with which Judicial Officers have
taken advantage of their services and by
the manner in which the legislature seeks
to extend the scope of their duties in cases
in which children and matrimonial affairs
are concerned.

a * “7 ean $a ' (a
The time has come, however, when the
Government should not only increase the
work of'the Probation Officers but should
Also enact legislation to facilitate their
work and give to the Officers status and
salaries commensurate with the important
and onerous nature of their duties.

Highest on the priority list of legislation
should: be a Children’s and Young Persons
Act as was recommended by the Commit-
tee. which sat under the chairmanship of
Mr. G. H. Adams. The recommendations of
this Committee which were made in 1946
have not yet been implemented.

The Acting Colonial Secretary has
pointed out that juvenile delinquency in
Barbados has not reached the alarming
proportions which it has done in the United
Kingdom but in view of the widespread
poverty and poor housing conditions of so
large a percentage of the population a vigi-
lant watch must be maintained and steps
taken to ensure that juvenile delinquency
does not attain a more serious character.

It appears that a greater liaison could
exist with advantage between the Proba-
tion Service and the Social Welfare Office.
The work which they perform have much
in common and if their joint resources were
utilised in the establishment of Hostels
and Youth Centres the work of both de-
partments would be rendered easier.

Mr. Walcott will continue the good work
so ably begun by the Salvation Army with
the aid of his assistants Messrs F. H.
O’Neale and B. Bourne and Miss H. Weekes.
It will be their task to persuade the Gov
ernment to enact the necessary measures
to enable them to deal with their increas-
ing duties.

The problem of delinquency is of vital
importance to the community and all sup-
port should be given to those who are
attempting to tackle the problem in a con-
structive way.

‘| the month;

Hy ¢.

Weather conditions during the
month of June were favyourabie
} for the growth of all field crops.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

(. Skheete (Director of

Class The Rally, which was
conducted along similar lines to
last year's, was very well attend-

| "The rainfall was well above the ed indeed, and the contcdst keen-

| average and, in the great majority
j of districts, there were approxi-

mately twenty days on which rain and St.

| fell
| 3rd.,

| 4th.,

llth and 23rd.

ly contested. The silver challenge
cups were won by the St. Thomas
Lucy teams in the Dairy

The heaviest falls occurred o1 Cattle and Mutton Sheep Classes,

respectively. In addition, six

According to the rainfall returns individual prizes and several cer-

received irom 32 stations situated tificates of merit were awarded to

}in areas typical of all rainfall
categories, the average total fall
for the Island for the month was
10.99 inches as compared with 6.13
inches for June 1949; the average
for June for the past 100 years
was 5.39 inches,

The highest total fall for June
1950 at any of these stations was
13.20 inches recorded at a station
in the St. George’s valley and the
lowest was 8.28 inches measured
at a station in the parish of St.
Philip. The average total rainfall
for the Island for the six month
period January to June, 1950 is
approximately 30 inches, the
average total for the correspond-
ing six months for the past 100
years was 18.17 inches.

Sugar Cane. The harvesting of
!the 1950 crop was completed dur-
ing the month, and fields and
factory yields have, in general,
exceeded crop estimates made
|earlier in the year. The latest
estimate of the crop is the equiva-
lent of 158,000 tons of sugar.

The young cane crop, both plant
canes and ratoons, made excellent
growth during the month. The
plant canes, in some areas, are
so advanced in growth that diffi-
culty was experienced in the ap-

| olication of the nitrogenous fer-
| tilizers

Food Crops. The planting of the
vam crop was continued during
some fields were also

nlanted in eddoes, maize, and
| ;weet potatoes. There was an ade-
| tuate supply of yams and eddoes

om the market, but sweet potatoes
vere difficult to obtain

Peasant
Agriculture

Food Crops. Good rains through-
out the month contributed towards
producing ideal conditions for the
growth of all food crops, As a
result, yams, corn, sweet potatoes,
cassava as well as garden vege-
tables are all growing well.

Sugar Cane. Both plant and
ratoon canes are making remark-
ably good growth and tillering
well. Many cultivators applied
sulphate of ammonia during the

month.

Cotton. The Close Season ended
on the last day of June. Seed dis-
tribution for the new planting
season began on the 28th of the
month, and indications are that
the increased price will result in a
larger acreage being planted this
year.

Tree Crops. Breadfruit, papaw,
mangoes, coconuts, bananas and
limes were obtainable in the mar-
ket during the month. Pear trees
which had been giving promise
ee good crops later in the year

have shed large numbers of their
young fruit.

Pests and Diseases. The princi-
pal pests and diseases reported
affecting economic crops in June
were the cabbage white butterfly
in vegetable gardens scale insects
on fruit trees, the army worm in
corn and the moth borer in sugar
cane. Slugs were also a source of
worry in the wetter districts. The
Peasant Agricultural Instructors
continued to give every possible
assistance in effecting control.

Peasant Livestock. The contin-
ued shortage of Balanced Animal
Feed caused some anxiety among
livestock owners. Supplies of oats
were, however, available, and

green fodder could easily be ob-
tained.

Extension Work. Six hundred
and forty-eight peasant holdings
and twenty-nine school gardens
were visited by the Peasant Agri-
cultural Instructors in June.

Difficulty in securing labour has
been one of the main obstacles in
the way of peasants undertaking
contour cultivation in their hold-
ings. Nevertheless, ten soil con-
servation projects were completed
during the month, Others are in
hand,

Irrigation. Progress was contin-
ued with installations and exten-
sions of irrigation units under the
Colonial Development and Welfare
Schemes. During the month
peasants were assisted with com-
plete windmill pumping units as
well as galvanised pipe and stor-
age tanks.

The average rainfall at the six
agricultural stations for the first
half of the year was 28.33 inches,
or approximately 138 per cent.
more than that for the same period
in 1949.

Crop tMusbandry. Cultivation
and planting programmes were
proceeded with at all stations dur-
ing the month. Ploughing opera-
tions at “The Home” and “Hag-
gatts” were interrupted by rains.
At the latter station an effort was
made to combat the weed menace
by spraying with a weedicide.
About 4 acres were sprayed; the
Department's high-powered trac-
tor-drawn pressure sprayer being
used for the purpose. The work
of re-organisation to provide for
the establishment of peasants’ in-
vestigational units at four of the
stations was continued,

Livestock. The number of head
of livestock at the six stations at
the end of June was 125. compris-
ing stud animals, cattle, goats,

sheep, pigs and equines. Five
hundred and ninety-nine gallons
of milk were produced, Thirteen

young pigs were sold.

Stud services paid for at the
stations amounted to 396. These
were as follows: —bulls 148, bucks
110,

Judging Ring Rally. The
Beouad Annual Island-wide Dairy
Cattle and Mutton Sheep Judg-
ing Ring Rally took place on the
grounds of the Boys’ Foundation
School,

rams 63 and boars 75.

Christ Church, on Thurs-
day, 8th June. Every parish
was represented in one or afi-
other of the two competitions. In
all, each consisting of
and women com-
8 teams in the Dairy Cattle
and 9 in the Mutton Sheep

17 teams,
young men
& ted;
Class

early in June.

rington. These will
with mosaic disease to ascertain
whether oo oe susceptible or
resistant.

tings of Ba.11569 and B.H.
have also been planted to serve
as check plants, and for further
experiments
of mosaic

outstanding competitors. The
keenness of some of these young
people is sufficient reward for the
hard work put in by the Peasant
Instructors in training them. Fur-
ther development of this aspect

of our extension work is being
given careful consideration
Hotaniecal

First Year Seedlings. The

nursery and Short Season First
Year Trials planted at Codring-
ton at the end of May is now well
established. These seedlings will
be the B.s. 51’ and B. 52’ hn

A short season first year seedling

trial was planted at C

The seedlings in
this trial will be |; ene
ever necessary, wee continu-
ous growth. They will be cut at

the end of the 1951 crop.

Mosaic Diseas¢. Five single
eye cuttings of each of the select-
ed seedlings of the B.47’ series
have been planted in pots at Cod-
be inoculated

y single-eye cut-
10(12)

on the transmission

Economic Trees Propagation

and Distribution: One hundred
and two
mandarin trees were budded dur-
ing the month.
ered from Codrington were
follows: —

lime and_ twenty-five
Fruit trees deliv-

as

\

Orange
Lime
Lemon
Shaddock
Ne Salve teense ees chy
Water Lemon
Guava
Grape
Grapefruit
Mandarin
Pomelo
ME, nS evil yeah ba vet
Golden Apple

Cherry i
Breadnut



RK OnNAwWAOCWONeE

188
Eight hundred and five orna-

mental plants of different species
were distributed.

Afforestation. In addition to

the above, 2,819 casuarina trees

were also distributed. Two hun-

dred and sixteen casuarina trees
were felled and sold for firewood

to Glendairy Prison.

Entomological

Control of Moth Borer. During
June 76,610,000 egg parasites
Trichogramma were bred up in
the laboratory, and of these
67,034,000 were made available
for distribution to planters for
their young plant canes. Planters
continued to call for their quota
of parasites readily. So far a total
of 268,179,000 parasites have been
liberated,

The rearing of the lixophaga
fly parasite which attacks the
moth borer Diatraea was contin-
ued with the co-operation of man-
agers who sent in dead hearts,
from which the larvae could be
obtained to carry on this work.
During the month 274 fly parasites
Lixophaga were liberated.

One consignment totalling fifty
Lixophaga puparia was sent by
air to the Superintendent of the
Department of Agriculture in
Grenada, with the hope that they
establish themselves in that Island.

Counts were made of moth
borer Diatraea egg deposition and
parasitism in the entomological
cane plots at Codrington

The breeding of the pupal para-
sites Pteromalus which attack the
P, Monuste puparia of cabbages
and cauliflower, continued during
the month, and 7,645 parasites
were bred up, and the greater
portion of these were lib-
erated; this brings the total for
the year bred up to 104,105
Pteromalus parasites.

Wood Ant Control, During
June, four inspections and treat-
ments for wood ants were carried
out on Government property, and
four inspections and treatments
of private properties were made.

Chemical

Soils. Forty-two samples of
soil were analysed for Organic
Carbon in conjunction with the
soil treatment investigations at
present underway.

Six soil extracts for total base
determination were made in con-
junction with the investigation of
methods for base exchange capac-
ity of coral soils.

Visits were paid to estates in
connection with contour and cul-
tivation work.

Two visits were made to the
new airstrip at Seawell where,
under the coral rock surface,
pockets of soil of two colours
have been found. It is thought
that examination of samples
taken may yield a clue to the
soil forming process in Barba-.
dos, Eleven samples were taken.

A visit was paid to Spring Vale
plantation to inspect the 2. per
cent. graded contour layout on the
area there subject to geological
slippage. This cultivation method
is not a satisfactory one for pre-
venting this slippage, and further
experimental techniques need to
be tried out on this type of land.

Sugar Cane Manurial Trials.
Fertilizers, sulphate of ammonia,
were applied to the manurial tri-
als at Pool, Wakefield, Mangrove,
and Staple Grove Plantations.
Potash was also applied to the
late dressing treatments at the
last three estates

The crop was so far advanced
at Fisherpond plantation due to
the early rains, that it was not
possible to apply the nitrogen-
ous fertilizer to the phosphate
trial there. This trial will be ,
abandoned.

Foliar Diagnosis samples were

Agriculture)

taken from the manurial trial plots

at Pool and 3ulkeley They

will be stored until analysis can! comes more vital to U.S.

Phosphate® was
23 cane

be carri@q out
determined in

extracts. This is investigation-
al work continued from last
crop.

Feeds and Fodders Plots have
been reaped of the perennial

fodder frial -at the Pine and sam-
ples for ang is submitted.
Guatemala, Merker, Uganda,
plots of 2 feet high were all cut.
The feeding trial with dairy
cattle at the Pine is proceeding.



Milk analyses have been carried

out, individual milk yields _ re- : y

corded, and a_ periodic check ist This key city has many aspects of a natural
being kept on the quality of ¢ i 4 i 3 ee
foddet band: silage fed_by. taking fortress, notes the National Geographic
samples for analysis. In the Society. It is enclosed by steep, bare hills
Laboratory the following fodder

analysis was completed:—
Moisture determination, 16

samples, Phosphate determina-
tion, 2 samples, Complete analy-
sis (fodder) 8 Uganda grass
samples, 1 Cane top sample ana
1 Silage sample.

Milk The routine milk analy-
sis of Pine samples was carried
out. Twenty-four
submitted this month, with the
addition of twenty- four samples
from the experimental animals.

Mean butter fat percentage in
milk is.4.1 per cent., mean

solids not fat percentage in milk
is 8.5 per cent

samples were

for this month

The Spekker Spectrophoto-
meter was out of use because of
a breakdown to the Galvano-
meter. This has been air-
freighted back to the United
Kingdom for immediate atten-
tion. It has resulted in con-
siderable hold up to work under-
way, and necessitated a change
of plans in the Laboratory re-
garding analysis work.

The use of Sesbania as a crop
source of protein perennial feed-
ing has been abandoned. Poor
germination was obtained in the
field also

The first of a series of vege-
table crop manurial trials was
laid down at a selected horticul-+
tural garden. There were :

liminary trials with string beans,

carrots and beets to test the
effect of a fixed dressing of
N.P.K. and V.G.M

Two visits were paid to the
office premises of Messrs. Mus-
son Son & Co., Ltd., to investi-
gate the source and type of gas
issuing from the ground level
into the office. This was traced
to gas given off by stale sewage,'
and the matter is in the hands



of the Sanitary Inspector. The
second visit was in connection;
with the oozing of r-rel

substances through the floor
the office and thought to ba
connected with the escape of gas
previously investigated.

One hundred and_ forty-two
samples were received for exam-
ination, They comprise:—

Milks, cocoa essences and edi-
ble oil submitted under the
Food and Drugs Act.

Kerosene, gasolene, tinned
meat and animal concentrates
submitted by the Customs Au-
thorities for classification.

Rum, B.A.F. and liquids sus-
pected of poison submitted by
the Police Authorities fcr
analysis.

E. C. Water, Fancy Molasses
for analysis, tinned salmon and
herrings in oil for examination
for fitness for human consump-

tion submitted by official de-
partments.
Fertilizers, water, soap, lin-

seed meal and wine submitted
for analysis by private individ-
uals or concerns.

— eee

Plant Diseases

Eight returns were received
during June, under the Mosaic
Disease (Eradication) Act, 1943-

22. No infected holes were report-
ed. Owners and occupiers are
reminded that the returns for the
July inspection are due and the
necessary return forms can be
obtained on application from the
Office of the Department of Agri-
culture,

Cotton Inspections. Inspection
of the cotton growing areas was
continued and a very good clean
up of the cotton plots was observ-
ed. Owners and occupiers had to
be constantly reminded that the
roots had to be dug up and not
left to spring again,

The search for
trees was continued,
were found scattered
Island,

wild cotton
and several
about the

Visheries

During the month a sum of
$1,299.69 was repaid on loans, this
brings thé total paid in on all
loans issued to $48,519.74. Inter-
est collected for the same period
amounted to $11.87, making a
total of $577.97 in interest to date.

A sum of $272.00 was loaned to
boat owners during the month
making a total of $88,065.43 loan-
ed to date.

The newly erected fish market

at Oistins, Christ Church, was
officially opened on the 6th of
June. Two thousand, two hundred
and forty pounds of: fish were
marketed through this centre
during the remainder of the
month,

Catches of fish around the
Island have been smaller as the
end of the flyir& fish season
approaches, Many boats have
been hauled up for repairs and
refitting.

The Fishery Experimental Boat
“Investigator” continues to oper-
ate. Attention will be given to
pot and net fishing during the
hurricane season, |

Returns of fish at the Bridge-
town Fish Market for the month
amounted to 38,288 lb. and at the
rural market sheds to 31,364 Ib.

Experimental
Cotton Spinning

Plant

Production during the month
Was 1,460 Ib. of 18's count cotton
yarn, which was packaged in cone
form and delivered to the West
Indian Knitting Mills.

et



ee



NOTES ON AGRICULTURE RON! DOOR IN PUSAN’
cz

WASHINGTON
PUSAN, largest port in South Korea and |
traditional “front door” of the nation, be-|

juice | Of bitter fighting.

Department of Defense officials have indi-|
cated that the bulk of MacArthur’s troops |
and supplies are entering Korea through |

Pusan on the southeast coast. It has the only
good harbour not held by the enemy; more-
over, Pusan is the southern terminus of the

major railroad which is the transport lifeline
of the defenders.

that crowd the coastline and could be ad-
vantageous to a perimeter defense. The com-
mercial heart of Pusan is constricted between
the walls of one narrow pass. Rugged terrain
screens the city so well that only a fraction
of it is visable even from the waterfront.

The harbour itself also is well protected by
nature. Outside the entrance is Mok To, an
island four miles long and a mile and a half
wide, which incoming ships must skirt in
order to reach anchorage. There are two re-
iatively narrow passages between island and
mainland, and both are overhung by high
rock walls.

Current maps list Pusan and its environs
as a fortified area, a status which the city has

S. forces with each day



had in varying degree for centuries. It was

old Korea’s sentinel outpost against the Jap-
anese, who tried numerous thrusts there

before they succeeded in establishing a well
guarded trading post. In modern times the
Japanese made Pusan (then called Fusan)
their main point of entry and developed its
port and installations.

Modern Pusan is Korea’s third largest city.
The 1940 census placed its population at
nearly 250,000 a total exceeded only by the
fallen capital of Seoul and the northern
metropolis of Pyongyang. Since then esti-

mates give Pusan more than 300,000 people.
Although the city is important industrially,

its growth is due mainly to the excellent
harbour and good rail connections.

Pusan’s strategic importance to the U.S.
military is emphasized by the fact that it is
the only port in friendly hands which will
take heavy-draft ships. It has four good piers
with lighters, cranes and other equipment.
Additional berthing space is provided by
quays between the piers. Shipyards are avail-
able for repairs to moderate sized vessels.

The piers and warehouses are connecteé by
spur tracks to the important double-track,
standard-gauge railroad that runs from
Pusan northwest to Taegu, and thence to Tae-
jon, the provisional capital, to Seoul and
beyond. It is only 77 rail miles from Pusan to

Taegu, and 100 miles from that point to
Taejon.

Pusan has an oil refinery, textile mills,
gas manufacturing plant, and factories for the
production of matches, rubber goods, soap
and other commodities. These enterprises,
and the city’s many modern buildings, can
be attributed primarily to the Japanese, who
placed emphasis on the development of
Pusan because of its nearness to Japan, with
which it is linked by cable and other commu-
nications.

The city is located at the southeast tip of

the Korean coast. From there it is only 135
miles across Korea Strait to the Japanese

port of Shimoneseki on the island of Honshu
There has been no indication whether GI’s
have been using Shimoneseki as a point oj
embarkation for Korea, but it was so used by
the Japanese for many years.

There are three other South Korean ports
which, though not adequate for heavy ships
or extensive traffic, may be of some help in
the supply effort. These are Masan and Yosu
on the southern coast, and Mokpo on the
southwest. All three have single-track,
standard-gauge rail connections with the
interior,



MANGOES

Mr. Peter Smithers last week asked the
Secretary of State for the Colonies what
action is being taken to investigate the possi-
bility of growing mangoes in the Colonial
Empire for sale in the United Kingdom and
elsewhere; and how far the problems con
nected with their transport and marketing
have been brought to the attention of the
appropriate departments.

Mr, Cook: The Colonial Primary Products
Committee investigated this matter two years
ago. They felt that the practical and economic
difficulties involved in packing and shipping
this fruit for export were likely to remain a
handicap to the development of anythin;
more than a luxury trade. My right ho:
Friend proposes, }sswever, to have a fresh
inquiry made into (ne market possibilities.

Mr. Simithers: Will the Minister bear in
mind that this is a matter of some urgency, as
the American interests concerned are making
rapid progress?

Mr. Cook: We are looking into it.

Dr. Morgan: Did my hon. Friend satisfy
himself before he started, that dehydrating
facilities were available forthe mangoes to be
exported for food?

Mr. Cook: That is another question.

|




SATURDAY, JULY

D, V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.




Usually

Jars Prepared Mustard
Jars Peanut Butier .. 55

Bottles Jeffirys Beer

>
-

9
ms

Now

1950



TO-DAY'S SPECIALS
at the COLONNADE













|
a

:








WE HAVE JUST RECCIVED

SPARE PARTS

FOR

COLEMAN Products

We will be pleased to repair your LAMPS, LANTERNS,
STOVES and IRONS if you bring them to us.

ALSO
A Shipment of

SNOWCEM

in the following Colours :
White, Cream, Pink, Yellow, and Terracotta
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.—Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

: 4687, 4472.

*Phones

SMOKER'S
CHOICE!!

Here's a wide

variety









PLAYERS CIGARETTES—Pkgs. 2
PLAYERS CIGARETTES—Tins 50
CAPSTAN CIGARETTES—Tins 50 ..
GOLD FLAKE CIGARETTES—Tins 50
COUNTRY LIFE CIGARETTES—Tins 50 ..
ARDATH CORK TIPPED CIGARETTES—Tins 50
CRAVEN A CIGARETTES—Tins 50 .
PLAYERS CLIPPER CIGARETTES—Per Pkg.
PLAYERS CLIPPER CIGARETTES—Per Carton
TRUMPETER CICARETIES—Fer Pkg.
TRUMPETER CIGARETTES—Per Carton



SEE US FOR OUR NEW RANGE OF;

INTERNATIONAL (NON CHALKING)

QUALITY PAINT

LAGOMAT (Flat Oil Paint) in these attractive shades

of Pale Blue, Pink, Grey, White, Cream
LAGOLINE (Non Chalking)

In Undercoatings and Finish

In Light Stone : Light Buff : Teak : Ivory

Grass Green : Mayfair Green : Sea Green

i French Grey : Lead Colour

{ALUMINIUM PRIMERS FOR WOOD
YELLOW PRIMOCON (Primer
CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER

: White :
: Navy Green :



for Aluminium)

2

BECKWITH STORES

2

10

‘DANBOLINE (Anti-corrosive) in Red, Grey, Green

‘PROPELLOR Light Red for Shingles

f DaCOSTA & Co. Lid.

Agents





.

Es POSES

OPPS OPS PPSPODOOO

156, 68,

OOS 66%

JAMS

BISCUITS
2Ib Tins CARRS BISCUITS
SHORT CAKE, MARIE,
DIGESTIVE, GINGER NUT,

PETIT BUERRE
—At $1.80 per tin

in Bottles
APRICOT JAM

PINEAPPLE JAM S.A,

in Tins

JUICES in Tins
TOMATO JUICE

16 02. and 20 oz. Sizes
CARROTS in Tins
BEANS in Tins

SPINACH in Tins
KALE in Tins

LYPTON TEA
MYRNA TEA
BLUE X TEA

J. & R. FRUIT CAKES
Energy for the Children

RAISINS l6c. per th

TEAS

CHOYCE TIP TEA

and
JELLIES

BRAMBLE JELLY in Bots.
BLACK CURRANT JELLY

S.A, in Tins

CROWN DRINKS, 7 Flavours

Try a Bottle of 3-year-old

Gold Hraid Rum

-GODDARDS |

,
PPRSOP PPPS ORS P°DSSSSSS

the Finest

. “6 $6,6,65,6,5666666665
POSS OOOO COSO OO OOOS SAMA . GOD COPE EEE EEE PE














4.

eo
SATURDAY, JULY 22,

“The Devil
Quarrelled

With His Wife”

—YESTERDAY

NTERMITTENT SHOWERS

were mainly responsible for the
cool spell in the City yesterday.
During the morning the heat was
intense but shortly before mid-
day rain feil and the temperature
wnich was 86° Fahrenheit in the
shade dropped to 85°.

Most of tne managers and
planters visiting the City yester-
day had a smue on their faces.
Some were hoping that it was
also raining in thew districts be-
cause all are wishing for a bumper
crop next year.

Rain was not only experienced
in Bridgetown, but at Trent
Bridge, where the Third Test 1s
being played, rain fell during the
early morning.

Perhaps by the time the West
Indies were ready to resume their
first innings the rain had travelled
in this direction.

During Thursday and up to six
o'clock yesterday morning 14
perts of rain fell in St. Andrew
and three in St. Philip.

What was a queer thing yester+
day is that although the rain was
falling the sun was still shining.
When this happens many local
folk use the expression “the devil
is quarrelling with his wife.”
M** PARENTS and children

could be seen at Harrison
College yesterday morning. Some
of the children were taking their
entrance examinations for admis-
sion to the School,
ieee LECTURES, one entitled
“Tuberculosis” and the other
on “Public Health and the Com-
munity” will be given at the St.
John’s Mixed School on Tuesday,
July 25 at 7.30 p.m,

The first speaker will be Dr.
A. E. S. Kinch, Acting P.M.O.,
who will talk on “Tuberculosis”
while the other speaker, Mr. W. A.
Abrahams, will talk on “Public
Health and the Community.”
' LOSS of a Raleigh Bicy-

cle valued $60 was reported
Walters of Dayrells
Road, St. Michael. He told the
Police that it was removed from
Mahons Alley, near Broad Street,
on Thursday.

RENE LAWRENCE of Jessamy

Lane reported that the “Inter-
national Resort” situated at Fair-
child Street, Bridgetown, was
broken and _ entered between
Wednesday and Thursday and a
quantity of cigarettes, liquors and
$8.40 in cash, total value $20.55,
were removed.

WO MOTORISTS were charg-

ed yesterday with failing to
stop at Major Roads. Many serious
accidents can be caused by ve-
hicles failing to stop at Major
Roads and for this offence Police
Constables are very strict with
both motorists and cyclists.

One motorist was charged for
driving in a dangerous manner and
another for driving without reas-
orable consideration.

A cyclist was also charged for
holding on to a moving vehicle
and another for riding with both
hands off the handle bars.

N ACCIDENT occurred on

- Chapel Street, City, between |
the motor car M—940, owned by
Charles Chapman of Bank Hall
Road and driven by George Lewis
of Harmony Hall, Barbarees Hill,
and a bicycle owned and ridden
by Frank Burton of White Park
Road.

The left front fender of the car
was slightly damaged.

INCENT JORDAN of Mile and

Quarter, St. Peter, a pedes-
trian, was injured after he was
involved in an accident recen Fy. |
Also involved was the motor car
X-~-738 owned by W. Johnson of
the Aquatic Club and driven by
Norris Thomas of Nicholas, St. {
Peter. The radiator of the car was |
slightly damaged

T 8 O'CLOCK TONIGHT

there will be a Concert in the
Naval Hall at the Y.M.C.A.

A Religious Service will be
given to-morrow when the speaker
will be Mr. K. L, Sealy.

by Vernon





Pile-Driving
Stops After
6 Months

Engineers of the Public Works
Department were yesterday driv-
ing down the four last piles to
the southern section of the wharf
in the outer basin of the Careen-
age.

“This work will be completed
today and the pile-driving plant
is expected to be taken down on
Monday after six months of steady,
operation.

New steel piles have been put
down from the beginning of the
wing just above the dock and
have been extended right up to
the Chamberlain Bridge. These
piles are for strengthening the
sides of the wharf.

They are so made that they
dovetail, forming. a sort of pail
ing so that water cannot ge
through. ‘ "

The pile-driving plant is equip-
ped with a boiler. Some 12 men
are employed to operate it while
another 18 or so are employed to
make repairs to the concrete of
the wharf. ;

The foreman of the engineers
told the “Advocate” that the re-
pairs to the concrete will be com-
pleted in another month. He felt
that the steel piles now being
used are better than the green-
heart piles.

IMPORTS
YESTERDAY

Around day-break
the 87-ton Schooner “Philip
Davidson” arrived
bags of rice from British Guiana
for the island.

|

t



‘asooaiie

This made a total of 3,000 bags|;oborated her daughter’s evidence
arrive {as to the part she had taken

commodity to
the week.

Other West Indian produce
arriving in the island yesterday
included 120 drums of diesel fuel,
firewood, charcoal, cedar boards
and wallaba posts

Also supplies of
cocoanuts, copra,
pumpkins. These were the
goes of the three
“Reginald N. Wallace,”
Louise”, “Lydina

of this
during

fresh

wood”

school,

cott was sitting when she passed

at him,
she went on for her water. When

yesterday | affair which

with 2,000) charged him with the offence

fruit,| with a chisel and a piece of wood
plantains,|in his hand
ear-|if he struck her with the wood
schooners |she would stab him with the tool

Princess|she had in her hand.
A” and motor|away for a short period and when
vessels “Lady Joy” and “Daer- ; she looked towards them again

1950

| SHALL WE GO
WIMBLEDON OR CRICKET 9

|



ANO SEE THE
TENNIS



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Joiner Guilty Of §KEEP HIGH STANDARD

Wounding Girl

DENNIS WALCOTT a 27-year-old joiner of Lodge
Road, Christ Church, was found guilty at the Court of
Grand Sessions yesterday of unlawfully and maliciously
wounding 18-year-old Madeline Forde. After nearly an
hour’s deliberation, a jury ignored the first count, wound-
ing with intent, and returned a verdict on the second
count. His Honour Mr. G. L. Taylor, Acting Chief Justice,
before whom the case was heard, postponed sentence.

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C. Solicitor »hond from
General, prosecuted the case on] said the
behalf of the Cr while Mr.
Ward represented alcott.

The case for the prosecution
was that last April 17, about
11 a.m. Madeline Forde pajsed in
front of Walcott’s Workshop on her
way to the pipe, sucking a piece of

Forde’s side. Forde
it since he had stabbed her
it would not end in that way
Bertram Lovell who was near
the workbench when Forde threw
the peel at Walcott, said that
Forde rubbed the rasp and then
the chisel along Walcott's back
and continued to do so even after

eane. She and Walcott were he he ¢

! ae : * had told her to stup. He saw
friends and when she got near his} when Walcott run after her but
pterrenatt, she threw a piece of} he said that Walcott did not have
cane peel at him. When she re-| a chisel in his hand when he
we she put down her bucket did so
with the water at the side of the Giving evidence ; >
road and went near the work- © ae memes ea ee

detence, Dennis Walcott told the

bench where Walcott was work- Court how Forde had struck him

ing. She picked up a rasp and! with a ;
_ Picker ' : a piece of cane peel and how
pute over his back after they] che had rubbed the rasp and chise)
ad talked for some while. He ever his back.
a ee ees ie did not. He said that after he ran behina|
ards picked up a chisel] ),¢) and caught up with her, he

end rubbed that too along his put out his hand to take the chisel

back,
but she 7 . Jay z ‘ » £
He got up and went towards her sweep soit daaen on wee

and she ran. He eventually caught] jj. chin, “Pho ne res
up with her and stabbed her with craks nae han Pp
the chisel when she had given it told him that he had cut her and

to him. she would tell her mother.

The case for the defence was i
7 ; Addressing the jury, Mr. Ward
that the wounds were received told them that the qiestion was

Mnigding tee the chisel. The de- | “hether the wounds inflicted were
fence counsel also based his argu-|‘"flicted maliciously or _accident-
ments on the discrepancies of the| ally, ‘ Pema: that Forde hac
witnesses for the prosecution, | deniec having rubbed the rasp
Madeline Forde, needleworker | and chisel along Walcott’s back
of Lodge Road, said that she knew! “ile other witnesses ‘for the
Walcott since’ she was going to| P’oSecution had said she had dona
Walcott was a joiner and|S°:. That proved Forde to be a

had his workbench near his home| !@" and since only she and
underneath a tree. On April 17, Walcott knew about how the
she was going at the pipe for eee ha oe ey os
. i 5 . . ot accept her story. \It would be
water, eating cane the while. Wal- most unsafe, he told them, to

convict Walcott on her evidence

He pointed out that Forde was
in a skylarking mood on that day
ana Walcott’s whole bearing was



and she threw a piece of cane peel
He called after her but



she returned he called her again e
and this time she stopped. She | of the utmost placidity. He put
went near the workbench and they | !0"Ward strongly that the wounds
talked. She took up a chisel and\@USt have been received during
rubbed it on a tree while he work- the struggle and said that Wal-
ed on a chair with another. cott’s demeanour never suggested
He pushed the one he had in his|'?@t_ he bore any animosity
‘and at her and she moved away. | wards Forde. :
He followed her and told her to| Mr. Reece stressed the impos-
put the chisel she had down, She} “ibility of the wound in the
did not do so and he ran after her,| Shoulder being caused during a
When he caught up with her he struggle and thus held that Wal-
raised his hand to strike her with | ©°*t had been stabbing. He saic
the piece of wood he had brought that Walcott’s going to the police
along with him. She attempted to|®@"d reporting the matter might
ward it off with the chisel and he only have been a wise move on
got cut on his chir. his part.

Stabs

She exclaimed that he had made
her do it. He pushed his hand at
her to take the chisel and she gave
it to him. Taking it he stabbed
her on her left shoulder and on
her right side. She ran away and
he, closing in on her, stabbed her
again on her right side.

He then left. She refilled her
bucket and went home, She felt
sick and went to bed; blood gush-
ing from her side. When her
mother came home she took her to
Dr. Ward who sent her to the hos-
pital. She remained at the hos-
pital durirg three weeks.

Dr. E, L, Ward, P.M.O., said that
about 1.15 p.m on April 17, Walcott
came to his office and he put three
stitches in a trivial wound he had
on his chin. The wound could have
been caused by a chisel, but it
was no stab wound,



Bound Over

Allan Fields who pleaded guilty
of having been in possession of a
forged bank note was yesterday
bound over for 18 months in the
isum of £25 at the Court of Grand
Sessions, His Honour Mr. G. L.
Taylor, Acting Chief Judge, told
him that he had done a foolish
thing. When one came geross a
note of that kind, the safest thing
to do was to take it to the police,

ry e ry

lrhief To Keep Peace
Shirley Franklyn, of Wiltshire

Tenantry, was yesterday put on a

£50 bond on a surety for a simi-

lar sum to keep the peace for 18

: hs at the Court of Grand

Half an hour later Madeline mens : ais he
Forde came to his officé. She had ores “| ag nad . ge
three stab wounds which could] $%!\Y ©@rlier in the Sessions o

house-breaking and larceny, The
case was heard before the Acting
Chief Justice, Mr. G. L. Taylor,

have been caused by a sharp in-
strument. One on her left should-
er was half of an inch long and
a quarter of an inch deep. An-
other wound was above the right
hip bone and a third was over the
tenth rib. Blood was spouting
from the third wound. She was
suffering from shock and loss of
blood at the time. The first two
wounds were trivial but the third
seen and her situation was criti-
cal.

While the two wounds about the
side could have been caused dur-
ing a struggle, the one on the
shoulder could not be so easily
caused,

Dr. Copland said that on April 17
Madeline Forde went to the hos-
pital suffering from the wounds
Dr. Ward had described. She gave
her an injection and sent her to
a hospital ward.

Dr. Kinch said that an X-Ray
was ordered for Forde when she
came into the hospital and fluid
was found in the right cavity.

Dr. H. A. Massiah, visiting sur-
geon of the hospital, corroborated
Dr. Ward's evidence as to the
wounds.

Set. Howell said that on April
17, Walcott came to the station
and gave him a chisel and made a
statement about the wounding
had taken place
earlier during the day, He later



MAN STABBED

Twenty-three-year-old Darnley
Jones of Bay Land, was taken to
the General Hospital yesterday
afternoon suffering from a_ stab
wound in his chest. He was de-
tained. Jones ‘is employed as a
porter at Messrs. Barnes & Co.,
Bridge Street,

Gwendolyn Rock, a 21-year-old
resident of the same address, was
later arrested by the Police in
connection with the incident and
a charge of grevious bodily harm
has been laid by Inspector T.
Franklyn



CanadaEndsSubsidy
To Merchant Marine

OTTAWA, Canada.

Transport Minister Lionel Chev-
rier, told the Canadian House of
Commons there is no possibility of
the Dominion’s government ex-
tending its subsidy to the Cana-
dian Merchant Marine beyond the
end of the current fiscal year.

He told Opposition member
Howard Green that when Prime
Minister Louis St. Laurent an-
nounced $3,000,000 subsidy for
the Merchant Marine Dec. 9 last
it was made clear the subsidy
would be for one year only. There
had been no change in that de-
cision,

Nine ships now are tied up com-
pared with 42 prior to announce-
ment of the subsidy. No money
has yet been paid to Canadian ship
operators but applications for as-
sistance by more than 30 have been
approved

Chevrier said 95 Canadian-
owned ships have been transferred
tu United Kingdom registry

Clerisa Forde, hawker of Lodge
Road and mother of Madeline, cor-
a

Barbara Greenidge (21) of
Lodge Road said that she knew
both Forde and Walcott. On
April 17 she saw when Forde
threw the peel at Walcott and
iater saw when he ran after her

Forde told him that

She looked

she saw Walcott withdrawing hi

OF BEHAVIOUR

Governor Tells Parents

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor speaking at the Prize
Giving Day function held at the Ursuline Convent School
yesterday told Catholic parents and girls that they had to
keep up a high standard of behaviour in a community
where a large number of non Catholics thought that Catho-
lics were peculiar people

|

Weatherheads Win |





“I pray that you may keep that
Standard up,” the Governor said
The Governor was speaking
after Mrs. Savage had distributed



P, \ the prizes and after the Head-
harmacy Week mistress had reported on the pro-
eg? gress of the school for the past
Competition year, He was speaking too after



be had seen the story awatha’'s
Messrs. Bruce Weatherhead Ltd ma ep erory of Hiavaiie

(Barbados Pharmacy) were the |>irth. childhood, adolescent ex-

winners of the show window com- |P/0!ts and 3 edit lifted ree

petition staged by the various|#enry Longtellow’s poem and

drug stores during Pharmacy |Prought to life on the school’s

Week which started on Sunday Stage, . .

and ended on Friday. The presentation of Hiawatha
It is the second year the Drug- |Was arranged in tableau, recita-

gists’ Pharmaceutical Society has

tion and dance by H
staged the event, and it is reported

Its characters were J

A. Donald

Scott as the

to have been # great success Narrator; E. Boyack, Nokomis; I.
Tt got underway on Sunday!De Verteuil, Little Hiawatha: M
evening with a talk over Radio

Chabrol, Iagoo; A. Fletcher, Young
Hiawatha; M. Krogh, Hiawatha:
M. Navarro, the Arrowmaker; C
Vanden Branden, Minnehaha; R.
Knight, PauPukKeewis; C. Mc-
Lean Chibiabos; and Braves
Squaws, Children and Musicians

Distribution by Mr. Fred S. Olton,
President of the Society, on the
subject, Penicillin

Lectures

Then followed two lectures, the
first of which was given by Dr
Chas. Manning on Tuesday, on the
subject Tuberculosis and the other
on Wednesday evening by Dr,
Simon who spoke on Diabetes,
Both lectures were given at the
Y.M.C.A. and attracted appre-| phere of the forest, and further
ciably large gatherings w h o| atmosphere was lent by the
showed keen interest throughout, ! presence of the wigwam repre-

Mr. Fred S. Olton presided at senting that one where old Noko-
both lectures. He thanked the mis nursed little Hiawatha “by
lecturers and also the audience for) the big sea water.”
their attention and interest and The presentation reached a
suid that he hoped the third} climax with the wedding of Hia-
Pharmacy Week would be an even! watha and Minnehaha, fairest of

from feathered
mocassins were
was the acting.

The costumes
headdresses to
realistic and so
The fir tree branches on the
stage lent some of the atmos-

vreater success than the present ;jthe Dakota women, and here
On Thursday evening a Social! | lagoo the bouster had a chance to

was given at Queen’s Park for the boast, PauPukeewis the dancer

Medical and Pharmaceutical Fra- had a chance to dance’ and

ternity along with several friends Chibiabos, the singer had a

and well-wishers and a very en- chance to sing love songs to

joyable time was spent by all . |make the marriage banquet
Pharmacy Week closed on Fri- more joyans



day with a show of films at the
MO A. given through the

In addition to telling parents
courtesy of The British Council

and children of the high stan-

Lantana as dards they had to keep, the
Governor told those’ present
that the presentation of the

play was first class. As regards
the Headmistress’ speech, he
said, he felt that it was not
one that should be applauded.
It was one that was addressed
to the heart, and he himself
had been really touched by it
The Governor also said thank
for the bouquet that had been

Dangerous |
Riding: 5/-

The decision of Mr. G. B
Griffith Magistrate of District
“A” who imposed a fine of 5/-
and 1/- costs to be paid in seven

days or seven days’ imprison-j Presented to Mrs. Savage, It was
ment on Edgar Phillips of Green| pretty one indeed, and as a
Hill, St. Michael, for riding the matter of fact he had never seen
kécycle M-7388 on Spooners Hill, as road Bae ie ee ined
on April 21, in a dangerous man- ' eee Saphesy a e “i Bean

ner to the public, was confirmed whe va iM ae ‘ im ie at
yesterday by Their Honours Mr ernor and Mrs. savage e oo
it a ae Chenery and Mr,| Paid tribute to those who wer

H. A. Vaughan Judges of the| '@sponsible for the presentation



Assistant Court of Appeal of the play, and said he was sure



Phillips was also ordered to| hat everyone had enjoyed it
pay the costs of appeal which] thoroughly
amounied to 3/6.

Philups was seen riding down | Nine Answer Call

Spooners Hill about 7.15 a.m 2
on April 21 by Cpl. Green. The| For Aid In
bicycle was going at a fast rate,|
and when Phillips was ordered} 7
to stop he did not do so immed- | Korean War
iately
S . >, q
Philt in ea. Lerceemanend Asked a tetera ‘are you
lillips submitted that the evi-| .4)° ae ’
et . St {still confident you will get troops?
ee * hs are be ntl He replied: “I do not know about
1ough = for ir nours tO) that. My personal opinion is that

take and pointed out that Phillips





: it is too early to tell,”
could have been travelling at a The Secretary-General who had
fair rate of speed and still fail) « {wo-hour conference with Amer
to stop when Cpl. Green waved ican delegation members yesterday
to him. ___|said he was being kept informed
Their Honours told Phillips | about what was going on In Wash

that they have paid due atten-

a ington
tion to all that his counsel had

He would not comment on recent

told them but they must accept] dedication efforts by Indian Prime |

the evidence that
them.

was pul belore|Minister Pandit Nehru

— Reuter

URSULINE CONVENT
PRIZE LIST

PRIZES AWARDED IN THE MAIN
SCHOOL FOR THE YEAR 1949—1950
RRIZES AWARDED IN FORM I

ne For Christian Doctrine:
Helen



Marenlene Krogh, Mary Vaughn, Rose
mary King, Lilia Peter, Joy Netto, Hosa
{mund Field, Patricia Cools
Certificate Prize for passing the Oxford

Tucker, Joyce Moore, Alma| and Cambridge School Certificate Ex
Gordon {| amination in 1949 Lucille Grace,
Prizes For Study: Prizes Awarded For Art:
Helen Tucker, Anne Rock, Maureen Norma Mathias, Edwina Parsons,

Weatherhead
Prizes For Application To Study:
Lorna Spencer, Margaret Gooding
Prizes For Good Conduct:
Lorna Spencer, Jean Rock
PRIZES AWARDED IN FORM II
Prizes For Christian Doctrine:

Prizes Awarded For Music:
Mercedes Navarro, Judith Dalton

Prices Awarded for Needlework:
Roseraary Solis, Angele Sarkis

Prizes Awarded For Goo
Elizabeth Gooding, Charmaine Goddar



Prizes Awarded to the Winners of the



Judith Dalto Mary Helen Stone, | Literary Competition in the Main School
Marjorie do Sil Shirley Walton, June Knight
Prizes For Study: Prise Awarded for Welpfuiness and
Patricia Walibridge, Yvonne Robert Devotedness to Duty

Judith Dalton
Prizes For Application To Study:

Julieta Mirabal
Prizes Awarded for Efficient Performance

Heather Gardier, Yvette Xavier of Vice-Prefects’ Duties:
Prizes For Good Conduct: Helen Tucker Mary Craig, Marilyn
Maureen Foster, Joyce Berry Chabrol, Rosalie Knight

PRIZES AWARDED IN FORM III
Prizes For Christian Doctrine:

Marilyn Chabrol, June Grainger, Janet |
Scott.
Prizes For Study:

Marilyn Chabroi
June Grainger

Prizes Awarded for Efficient Performance

of Prefects’ Duties
Rosamiind Field

Cools

| Prizes Awarded for Fidelity to Duty as
House Captains:

Joy Netto, Patrica

Rosemary Atherley



Marenlene Krosh Captain of St
Prizes For Application To Study Augustine’s House Rosemary King
Lourdes Lyon, Janet Scott | Captain of St. Ursula’s House
Prizes For Good Conduct; ize Awarded for Fidelity to Duty as



Marilyn Chabrol, June Grainger

PRIZES AWARDED IN FORM IV
Prizes For Christian Doctrine

Marie-Antoinette Nieves, F

| Games Captain of the School—Lilia Peter

| Prize Awarded for Fidelity to Duty
School Captain Mary Vaughn

| The Sports Cup has been won by

ances Bel

mar, Marilyn Netto St. Ursula's House Red House
Prizes For Study: The Netball Cup has been won by
Greta Rock, Evadne Adar Kathleen St. Ursula's House—Red House
Boucaud The Rounders Cup has been won by both
Prizes for Application to Study St. Augustine's Blue House; and St. !
Julieta. Mirabal, Kathleen Boucaud, | Ursula’s Red House

Angela Perkins

The Tennis Cup ha
Prizes For Good Conduct:

St. Ursula’s Hous

been won for
Red House,




by







Rosalie Knight, Emmeline Bovack Marie-Antoinette Nieves
PRIZES AWARDED IN FORM V The Table Tennis Cup has been won for
Prizes For Christian Doctrine s Ursula House Red House, by
Mareniene Krogh, Rosemary King,| Norma Mathias
Mary Vaughn, Lilla Peter The Study Cap has been won by:
Prizes For Application To Study 3 Angela House Green House







| Village Cricket ||

Dying In
England

—Says BRUCE BLUNT

ABRESFORD, Hants

The lamp-post and the tree are
| the two traditional wickets on
| which Test cricketers were rear-
| ed. It looks as though the lamp-
post will soon be the only nurs-
ery left for the Comptons and the
Bedsers of the future. Cricket
under the trees is dying out.

The prophets of doom foresee
the end of village cricket in about
five years time, This may be
exaggerated pessimism, but if the
present death-rate of village
clubs continues it will be very
diMeult to argue with these dis
mal seers,

Within a
from this
clubs have

radius of five
village eight cricket
Vanished in the last
few years. Some of them never
got started again after the war.
and some of them have fallen by
the wayside since the peace. Two
more have gone this year
High Cests

miles

The causes of decline are ther:
for all to see. One of them is
the high cost of sports equip
ment.

Once we had £15 to spend on
gear. After we had bought two
bats (£6 19s. 4d.), two pairs o
batting gloves (£2 17s. 4d.), one
pair ot wicket-keeping gloves
(£3 8s. 6d.) and one cricket bal’
(£1 11s, 6d.) we had 8s. 4¢
hange

Any club needs at least six
new balls in a season, an
should earry a stock of half
jozen bats. So far we have beet
relying on pre-war bats Thre
have been rebladed (£1 19s. 4d
each), but five of them are spl
and one heroic pre-war viatag
bat remains

When large-scale replacement

have te be made, as must happer
soon, the outlook will be regret
tably unsettled,

The usual subscription for
playing member to a village clu
before the war was 2s. 6d. 11
now varies from 5s. to 10s., and
most villages have to increase the

amount every season.

Our club, at 4s. 6d. a playing
member must be one of the
cheapest in existence. There are
16 playing members, about ten
supporters who pay 2s, 6d, or a

little mor’, and a handful of local
benefactors who still produce the
annual guinea each,

Then there is entertaining to
be done. You would be surpris-
ed at the laws which are broken
by village clubs in a= frantie
search for beer-money

They raffle packets of cigarettes
at 3d. a time. They sell a pack
of cards in local pubs for 6d
acard, Then another pack is cut,
and the tortunate buyer of th»
card exposed receives 10s. This,
you will notice, leaves a profit of
16s. for the fund,

The Big House

One of the village clubs which
came to an end this year has
| done so because the big house
\stands empty and its staff, which
|was the core of the team, has
| gone.

Many such houses
now, or have been
hostels for students
So earnest-minded planners
the world now pace the
where the village blacksmith once
hit his care-free sixes,

are empty
turned int»
or hiker
OL



Then the coaches and buses
earry modern youth to the sea-
side and the cinema Oh, ye:

a lot of them prefer the cinema
to the cricket field even on
afternoons

ny summer
And one can hardly blame
generation which hag had few
| opportunities of Jearning cricket
‘ Our large and much-vaunted
| secondary schools provide fields

and sports equipment and mow-
ing-machines, but very few
{teachers of cricket.

| At some of them the boys are
| just left to break bats at casual
practice, and when they leave
school at the end of their stupid-
ily extended time, they forget the
bats, and take to the more easily
junderstood motor-cycle

| They Won't Work



Educational experts have ‘not
}yet realised that no one learn
anything useful until after he

has left school. So they might at
| least teach the boys cricket. It is
| after all, a form of manners,

|subject which is conspicuously

absent from the modern school
| curriculum
Even when the youngsters of

| to-day play cricket, they are not
| very fond of working for it

They leave the ground as soon
jas the game is over. They do
jnot think of the work which wiil
|be needed on it before another
}gume can be played Village
jericket cannot survive without
}communal effort

To start a new club, with the
} ground and all necessary equip

ment, £200 would go nowhere

So at the present rate of de-
cline—and by the laws of arith-
metic, there can only be one end
to it allb—that the end of
cricket on the green. —L.E.S

is



flel« |

PAGE FIVE







BARGAINS :=
MANILLA ENVELOPES 61
PAD LOCKS







"x 3%”

$3.50 per 1000
from 12¢. each

JOHNSON’'S STATIONERY AND HARDWARE






PLLOLO ELSES LOC CCPL LL SEELE LLL LSS

‘BACK AGAIN

: |




REXALL

RENOWNED THE WORLD OVER

AGAREX COMPOUND
BISMAREX POWDER
CHEMICAL FOOD
COD LIVER EMULSION
KIDNEY & BLADDER

GLYCERINE and
THYMOL COMPOUND

KAOLIN POULTICE
MILK OF MAGNESIA

PILLS
COLD and INFLUENZA SYRUP OF
MIXTURE | HYPOPHOSPHITES

Obtainable from all Branches of
x

* KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

PAPA LOLA LOO OCOD A Ate PALO OST









SACK-TRUCKS

ALL STEEL — 1,000 Ibs CAPACITY
With Cast Iron Wheels ... $14.59
With Rubber Wheels 20.09



ALL METAL
WHEEL-BARROWS

STRONG AND DURABLE — 3 cubic feet capacity
SUITABLE FOR CONTRACTORS, ETC.

ONLY SI4.51 EACH

“RUBEROID”
ROOFING FELT

GREEN MINERALIZED SURFACE

A Low Priced, Long Lasting, Efficient





Waterproof Cover for all Roofs

92 CENTS PER SO. YARD



HARRISON'S —tHardware Specialists

Broad Street



THREE STARS



hree Stars

| SWEDISH

poe









\

YET STYLISH ENOUGH FOR GOOD TASTE

SUEDETTE SHOES

For Gentlemen,

4

In White, Fawn and Brown

$4.68

Monks and Gibsons.

Per Pair





| CAVE SHEPHERD & (0. LID.

10, 11,12 & 13 Broad Street











BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON

MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY

) (So aee T- ( MicKeE! You’ ae

4 me Sy ——=—————_|_ SAFE! >
YOU PMURDERER! Nee oy? Se



, a” OLA ———_
a] ”) a TRATTER OF
\ y ? MA
tt] ') (FB Pa



— IT'S OKAY, NOW-:
I PUT ON ONE BLACK
SHOE AND ONE BROWN Ja Vas

— || SHOE TO MATCH yi \f




GBYE, OEAR!
I HAVE JUST ONE 2] @
MINUTE a, CATCH












I'VE GOT AN INSIDE TRACK |F
SHERIFF 1S OEAD, LLL GE!
| JOB. THEN LCAN RUN 7
TOWN MY Way

Li







oe |

BA. @. CANNON ee ce RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS
7 er an

THANK YOU -
GRATIE.. YOU







i



QUICK?! TELL ME* NO
ELSE 1S IN THE CASTLE
APART FROM vouR

SORRY ' NO TIME
FOR EXPLANATIONS

Wh

WITTED! YOU
SEE THEIR ~
TACTICS, SIGNOR 2A).








OH! MAGGIE - COME
HERE / T THINK VE
UNCOVERED SOME
OLO RELICS THAT
YER GRANDDAD ___

ae —\‘pe Zh

y »
MY Peys 7 pS
S OX eh 4
rss noe

TITHE ONLY RELIC I
REMEMBER SEEIN’
AROUND HERE
WAS HIS WIFE’

\( THEN THAT MUST
___.BE WHERE
Gy OES IS



ES... AND HERE'S ‘ RIP, SHE LOOKS
SOME MORE L®CK, HONEY! \ 'B NICE... AND
A PICTURE .SIGNEO WITH } ATTRACTIVE. MAYBE

LOVE, JULIET!’ / WE'RE WORRYING
F . Ne 3 ABOUT DESMOND
mf (4 a2 ; é TUT T NEEOLES@Y...



I HOPS SO...6UT I LBARNED ) =
LONG AGO NEVER TO JUDGE | a

ae E y ; f
wie | : 7 ~— ‘jaar a ¥ Na /|
SRC! i: C i — chs \ AL a
j Yee | i. Mf] 7; |
| \
* \
wy ’

A

om
“SZ





__PHANTC:1

TS TRH [Pi A~ GOMEBODVE USING RM
AED AES | REAL BULLETS INGTEAD fnew:

t Né | [OF BLANKe? ay f \

| —~—
li NAL% STOP \\ Ts
THE CAMERA <




STOP THE CAMERA? WHATS GOING-
ON HERE? THATS NOT im

iN THE SCRIPT? gong WW

Ngee
J Yr years”
) DG ’
/ Re ‘
.

Saat




4G, AS THE PicTUP
FING FILMEDs«



i



eee rece SERENE DY










446665¢

ADVOCATE





with it!

The call for “Black & White” continues to grow

all over the world, for connoisseurs agree that it
is a Scotch in a class all its own.

Blended in the spe@ial “Black & White” way it

is a splendid drink at all times and for all

occasions,

‘BLACK: WHITE’

SCOTCH WHISKY

the Blending

Seotch Whisky Distillers

Whe Secerk th tn

2
ee
By Appointment ved



to H.M, King George Vi

JAMES BUCHANAN









..elt's the improved
Chase and Sanborn!

Mere words can’t describe it. You'll have to taste
\od when you lift a cup of this new Chase and
orn to your lips, you'll exclaim with delight!

u'll agree with those who
it “the
vy can buy!’ Geta can

iay—-vacuum-packed, from

wr grocer,

finest coffee

| PLE a We)



NAIL SCISSORS
TWEEZERS

FILES

SHAVING BRUSHES
RAZORS



CALL IN TO-DAY AT

COLLINS’ DRUG STORES |

Broad and Tudor Streets.

TSS ee SS
= SSS
aoe 6

= SSS = SS SS = SS
+ ane OLAS SS EPSPS SE SSESESESSS SSS SS POSSSSSS

**RECTOR’S
FEVER MIXTURE *





1 preparation for combating

Malaria and
ull

compounded from tested Drugs, Fever
respond readily to this effective



Remember i RECTOR’S PRODUCT” Obtainable at

Messrs Booker’s «@p0s) Drug Stores Ltd.

Broad Street and Alpha Pharmacy, Hastings,

»
s




James Buchanan & Co, Led.

& CO. LTD., GLASGOW, SCOTLAND





6654,4
LLL LCL LE EPO PPP PPPP PPPOE
>
=
LLL PLE LEPESSSOCESEOSOCESEOEY, =

POLIO SIPS STOO FOSS FOOT SO OSCE SOUS SOSSSOSSSSESS {





SATURDAY, JULY 22, Yd

$e






&

Contains

D.D.T.
Large, medium and small size Tins
Bae

+ One tees



ee BEETLES
Fees Oe

LEE PEPP PPPS SSE

% HAVE YOU GOT A

* COLD or COUGH 3
IF SO TRY

BROWNE'S
CERTAIN COUGH
* CURE







que Remedy for Coughs,

SCOTCH waisey Bronchitis, Sore Throat,





& » Bronchial Asthma,
misey Whooping Cough, Disease of the
Rasen Chest and Lungs, ete., ete.







C. CARLTON BROWNE
Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813

6$5990$$55999559999 9455 8065585900"

i









THE MARK

OF DISTINCTION

|
S&S |
| in RUM |
|

|
| Blended & Bottled by }
| STUART & SAMPSON

LID.









These tough 5 tonners

CAN TOKE 477

@ forward control
large capacity truck.

Turse robust, heavy-duty trucks are congete;

providing low-cost transportation for 7

operators all over the world. Planned and

constructed for scientific weight distri-

bution to safeguard the load . . . to reduce

tyre wear... to keep maintenance

charges down to the minimum. Petrol or Pai

* diesel engine. Left or right-hand ~ y,

drive, Normal or forward contro!

Add one of these 5 tonners to your fleet,

it will soon prove its investment value.
* Manufactured ::der



rot go elba.
uch, § @rg, *% no, _
he, #e cap gor mar r

y



Ss ‘Or,
Sorwe~ whe

wa, lb
Cni¢ wie revert,

ler, "toy

Saurer license

MORRIS-COMMERCIAL

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

St


SATURDAY, JULY 22, 1950

CLASSIFIED ADS. |

|

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HARBOUR LO



PAGE SEVEN

em

Rheumatism, Ankles Puify,







Public Notices=—Contd

Britain Want:







!
|
{

Telephone 2508.

|























































































































































































































































































































































































































ony nseneaneenesenpmneeniroanh Toe * 1, SS. Adelanto, SS ‘ s
=F Lert anenesprenee £20 MONTHLY In Carlisle Bay Fig re ss Spec ale s.s ni dc j oO Know ie os ‘
‘ La Plak, SS. Regent J a ss t ;
DIED ex uu i ’ eeTick EASILY earned at home in spare time | Sch. Lady Noeleen, Yacht Leander, | perial Toronto, re diene oa ac ac e icne $ i
FOSTER — E late Clerkess . . dealing in ——— No sername Frances W Smith, Sch. E M.| Salinas; S.S. Rio Orinoco; S Ss. Mor LONDON, July 21 v s
of DaCosta) at h -¢ Lightfoot’s necessary uitable for either sex | Tannis, Se anuata, Sch urma maecguif, S.S. Theobal §.S. Llanis " ae ae. ' i ‘ ft ‘ :
Cross Lane. Her | seneed Weer ts sto ccniact you with Students in| Sch. Turtle Dove, M.V. Blue Star, Sch | en, a ee ae oe 8S le ee United | 0s you re ioe hee Guinean Wecroue [pocuer rarriroeuie
residence at 4.30 o'clock afterr N Colonies and Dominions for pen cor-|W. L. Eunicia; Seh. Rosarene; Sch | Golfito, S.§. Historian, |8.8. Thirby States for advice about what | ness, Backache, Leg Paias, Swollen Ankies.| prove
for Westbury Cemetery OTICE respondents. Enclose 2% stamp. Air Phyllis Mark; Seh. Gardenia W.. Sch §.§. San Rosa, SS. Blizabeth, S.s |further a\i can be given in the | Rheumatism Burning Passages, Fx No Benetit—No Pay
Friends are invited Sm the aah Mail only take fews days. F. Parting-| Timothy A. H Vansluytman S.S. Nidardal, S.S. Arkansas, 8S. Esei.| Korean campaign the tabloid Acidity, or Loss of Ene and feel old The ve first 4 Cystex go¢
Beryl o e estate of ton, Prospect House, 329 Wigan Road ¥ ARRIVALS . Marques de Comillas, 8.8. EH. Blin ee . A | fore your time, Kidney Trouble is the true | '° %
WALTER
— | Leigh Lancs, England pl. Lady Joy, Go tons net, Cart-'8 8. Alcoa Sennant, 8.8. fen Mor |newspaper “Daily Mirror report- | cause
) ‘ 2 arsons, from St Lucia s < 5S Casadi as | “ “ Wrong foods and drinks, wo I '
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ai! | ___ 20.7.0. —90n.| “MV.” Daerwood. 9 tons net, Capt 25. ee See Be hae | aa iierwatk Was crakin un unvech at wi Cyatex
IN MEMORIAM ae eg or ml YMCA oS St, Lucha. tone net, | Liss 8-8 Spurt; $5. Comedian, $S-|phag be a aa ~ wis ashes eS and place a heavy strain on your ki pletely '
o! . on - - a choone: neess pulse, s t.} c s : 3s C en se € as oO aut e ne the yY and ne e
Holder, deceased, late of V. eo mas! Ail Members, Subscribers and Friends| co5¢ Mitchell, from St. Lucia | Temple Arch, 8-8. Fort Richelieu, §-§.) | niy hs he aes JU | to properly purity your blood and ma | ently ate
e enture in the| of the Association are invited to attend Noravind, S.S. Uinios, S.S. Raban, S.S.]no reply had yet been received. | health and energy package and wet y back
In loving memory of my Beloved] Pavish of Saint John in this Island who | an important Meeting in the Seevell oe ne, Se tone pe, Capt | Mormacstar: M.S. Hera, $.S. Trajanus A possibility that the term of " ¢ | Cystex tex) }
husband, CUTHDERT ALLEYNE, who] Wed on the 19th day of August 1949,| tial, Headquarters, Pinfold Street, on Stephen: from GMO at tome | Sere, Se hie, soeombol. 8S. serv efor Britist aw Delp Kidneys Doctor's Way roa ee in :
fell acisep on the 22nd of July, 1949. intestate, are requested to send in par-| Friday the 28th July, 1950, at 4.30 p.m Schooner Sy avidson, 87 tons | Gyrotoma, §.S. Hyeres, S&. Bowmonte | S€FVice Tor ritish and western you, so buy your treat o~
“My sorrow and heartache ragga of ee ee, Soe attested far the purpeue cf receiving trom the| “si, cener Seely, Se Se ede ait | European conscripts will be ex- | ,, Many doctors have discovered by scien: | for
N p ca 1e) un »ctors Ponce: * * A ; clinical tes a otus orac e| : as
tg, SS A Saget os age Coa Meee Sees Ceca eee ea] Sam Ce Wate Som tended wee mentioned in other {ties sive wettsyeras across Rewis: | Qo BOOM «oer
No one can heal No. 2’ Swan Street, Bridgetown, on oF | Wakefield and Plans for the expansion| “Schex net ee SEE & cclincthcal’ brevated eeensniatice ee oe oo
My Dear one has yone, beaters ara oe of July, 1950, after, of the new premises ere ane é . so ; In Britain conscripted soldiers a scientifically prepared prescription | Tee CUARANTFED Remedy RHEUMATISM
though not jar av whic proceed to distribut ; ap bert, from § =. D
i eae eae Teele: lie masete of the Genenned aminig the A BAe : DEPARTURES af serve 18 months. In most Western | ——- pee tee ale
in atedanide- gach parties entitled thereto having regard HERBERT H.W | Schooner Phillis Mark. weteomd European countries the term of
fi ach day oniy to such claims of which I shali 2 ILLIAMS,| Capt. McQuilkin, for St. Lucia | i Thi
Wil! ever be remembered by his lov-] then have had notice and 1 hn “eee General Secretary MV. Blue Star, 130 tons net, Capt service is one year, This morn-
ing Wife—Iris Alleyne eee liable for the ‘ameets of any part| 22.7.50—2n.| fergusson, for Trinidad | ARRIVALS BY BWIAL = ——— a — a gen
ria 7hs ther so uted to any person of GIRL y | FROM TRINIDAD eral extension o wo years was
whose debt or claim I shall not then me eared, UNION In Touch With ' — a oat Maraj, Cre funder review, following proposals SOUTARAL, ADOwRAGE > RENEE - - =
have had notice. i P e ve Olsen, ta Young, Hugh Cummins, Guv 5 , toh ¢ 5 L, USTRALIA, NEW ZEA- Se :
. estate are requested to settle their) ene - big 2 See: oe Be Barbados Coastal Station | Niger s, Ernest Tibbits, Julian Mitchel! = by BR rings Foggy Ret anoe LAND LINE LTD., (M.A.N 2. LINE
FOR SALE indebtedness without delay. | Monday, 24th July, at 5 p.m "| “Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd FROM ST. KITTS 4 etence inisters, Mr. Shinwe SS “PORT WELLINGTON” sails Met The MV wood” will |
Dated this Ist day of June, 1950. “'G. WILIAMS, dvise that they can now communicate Archibald Penchoew, Leonie Per and M. Pleven bourr mid-July, North Queensland accept Cargo r
of Walter Thomas Holder, deceased. Genera i " cth the following ships through their choew, Bonie Penchoew Extension of the term of service | J!) wust, Brisbane early August, St. Lucia, St neent, Grenada,
IDA ROSAMUND HOLDER, Heneral Secretary. | oe ados Coast Station. FROM BRITISH GUIANA eg , are Sydney id- AX arriving Trinidad Aruba, sailing Thursday, 27th
Qualified Administratrix of the Estate 22.7.50—In. | Barbados Coss! “cP Anistal, S.$. Petter Peter Wallbrdige, Alfred De Freitas in Britain was understood here to | qpproximately 9th September July
AUTOMOTIVE 5.6.80-4n —— X s | Carenentte ae. yttae ose De Pty eitas |be one of the many proposals un=| 55S. “GLOUCEST replaces “Devor The M.V : ,
——————SS ‘illiam utteny, eatrice witter CAR--1942 Austin 10 Saloon, very} - =e a acees -| NOTICE | Hyacinth Callender, James Alexander Ne for — st carly Genteriier: Metbauehe Ree hall, Cargo and Passengers for Do
good condition, Phone Barbados P hii NJ 1 s—C ntd. | Derlick Sinson, Richard Parris, Marjorie Ish Getence plans and programmes Sydney second half, Brisbane September ca, Antigua, M rrat. St. Kitts-
me 4 ceria | : iy Cy ale o | Stanford, Veronica Stanford, Angela .e current situation Oth, arriving at Trinidad October 28th Nevis, sailing Friday, 28th July
sae ens ee TAKE NOTICE | IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF ; Seabee EE CP enemisl fo he SHENOY Blue [ee eehe These vessels have ample “space | for ENGI
STATION WAGON for ise? in a-wWikdimins Son Sa | Josenh, Herbert Rooers, Samuel Ashby chilled, hard frozen, and general cargo e 1 will
i as Phare see , : Y's pensation Act, 1943 Beatrice Feast Cargo accepted on through Bills of accept Cargo and f
Sean ee rane ee es < = me MULLARD | Notice is hereby given that Lambert HOUSE & S=:ED ROOF—One (1!) eee enone ST. LUCIA \ = Lading with transhipment oa Trinidad St. Lucia, St. Vincent Grae F }
Whale te MtnSit.” at fe Par oh THAT MULLARD ELECTRONIC PRO-| Green, of Bel Air, St. George, em-| goard & Shingle House and Shedroo!) Geraldine Murray, Aubrey Doula Ttal Ste s U ox Barbados, British Guiana, Windward ailing Wednesday, 19th July |
5 ae sii nace é ee _ ee™ sa Can, ee Ss p labourer at Leat’s Plan-! i x 10ft, at Kew Road, Bank Hall | smith, Sydmey Lee Lum, Elaine Catwei ry P P a“ ear, yertient B.Wil
‘i whose trade or business a SS - | tation, was injured whilst ¢ : . nae! ~ e Catw : ov further particulars apply:— ; Se “Tr e |
3 Ate the Sotatnationel, Basel tury House, Shaftesbury Avenue, Lon- | breaking stone in a ‘yy ene St. Michae\- wire. EUNICE artuur, | OO"? CN Ou VENEZUELA Armed Forces FURNESS. WITHY & CO "UTD Associ ion is eee
VAN—One International Panel Van,| don, WC 2, England, has applied for | section of the side of the quarry broke nate Brage's Hill Amador Octauio, Mary Octoulo, Agents, Trinidad ; eeeren ae
in good order and runs well Alleyne.| we registration ot a trade mark in Part} away and fei ; 2 ; i . , ; . Consignee; Dial; 4047
; ~ res, y ell om him and he died as St. Joseph rigo, Octauio, Andres Octauio, Hut a, DA COSTA & CO TD
Arthur & Co,, Ltd., High Street. "A" of Register in connection with Elec-]@ result of the injuries. sustained and Matthes, Jnes Matthes, Marie Ann Ma @ + From page 1 Agents, Barba ery |
Phone 4260 2.7.50--9n_| tronic discharge tubes, radio and televis-! (4: Com;cnsation has beeit paid int sr an acre offthes, Henrique Barzilay, — Uluiaws will join in combined manoeuvres i, ee So —————
ion receiving and transmitting apparatus | Court pas i“ LAND—One quarter = beside | Barzilay, Lily Barzilay, Elisabeth Blaci he re i . A
Farvall H. Tractor and Grass Cutter| and equipment, electric incandescent.) jj dependents ~¢ land at Kendall Hill, Ch. Ch., tent ; oe 7 em an Sone in the Adriatic Sea with the Brit- tee eae
226 D B. I. Apply to M.D” Eilfor,| fluorescent and discharge lamps, commu-) cerned eh ta pend: persone cbRal the main 7580 with water and light | stone, rtnur Jack stone a ish Mediterranean Fleet and
Ashford Plantation, St. John nications and amplifying equipment, | , hereby enticas te hes es available. Price $700.00 are ot er | Sihexerone American naval units. pa: i oe
a.” de a 4 y , > Oo Appear a mM axw a N ° =
ial sg Ste Er pee cas Bes ¥-Poeete oamnOas ray ee ee etat afl prensa sion of ‘Appeal’ on Wednes. Thelma Grifith, Maxwell 22.7.50—2n ek” rAt With the increase in man pow- SAGUENAY TERMINALS Bae! eT
the aforesaid goods. Electric lighting | |. ne 9th day of August, 1950, at 10) — .___ —_—_— — ‘ er of the army, it is iev , = ra ae . ast fee i}
LIVESTOCK fittings, magnets, electric shaving appara- | Sock a.m MARISTOW At Maxwell's Coast | Wilfred Alston, Luts DeLima, M ot ! th redipd. it is beli ved Italy SS SS SN
fitting’. jay apparatus and tubes, high-| Dated this 20th day of July, 1950 averlooking the Sea, having 4 bed- Rosario. DeLima, Stephen Lai Fox {will urge the speeding up delivery ~
GOAT Pure bred Alpine (British) | frequency heating apparatus, and will be | I. V. GILKES, nVEClOOKING Ae Salconies,, ste. wan | Cdeee Weeks, Make Seowne f of American arms under the At- SOUTHBOU . aa
with young kid. Martin Griffith, Four | be entitled to register the same after one | Ag. Clerk Assistant i modern conveniences Private | Dowich. | Janette Buchanan, Mee antic Pact Four shiploads of . UND SAILINGS
Winds, St. Peter | month from the 19th day of July 1950 Court of Appeal.| Reach, safe bathing, for quick | sale Bareant, Louis Fisher, William Bryder 7 ‘ th From Montreal, St. Jo} : Ne
20.7.50--2n., Whless some person shall in the mean- 22.7.50-—-3n | p'sod, or fully furnished | £4,000 Pupert Bion, Berman Marshall yr, Jarms have so far arrived but the al, St. John, N.B., Halifax, N.S
= j e ive re D r . a ile . oN ny 7
. , ay omioe apotion te edule, $2 arses a Possession within one month , FOr) ut me Reatrice Feast, Marie. Robinson rate of delivery is well behind the To Barbados, T rinidad, Demerara, B.G }
nee ee oer One (1) Saanen {ign The trade mark can be seen on viewing Phone 4683 or es at FOR BRITISH GUIANA promised schedule, according to ‘ ean ic
E ge mth, W nt oid) iz Apply to Mr./ aplication at my office. NOTICE = Elizabeth Birkett, Patricia Birke Italian sources. It was understood Loading Dates Expected }
©. Griffith ellington Street. *-ehsa8 Dated this 19th day of July, 1950 wen, met oaey ee ims that Britain, besides giving licenses Montreal Arrival Dates S
Pte H. WILLIAMS, s hereby giv ‘ a ‘ een «6 ore | Bdghil, mes | Greatheac dan , ‘ Z m |
is Rieicnus ct Geion Werks, [eral Mastic of tue Yous denis. Precl RRORERTY—inat / AMEEDS, property | paetbhunl, Doreen Schuler, Angsla Fe |for construction of jet fighters, SS. “MARIA Barbados
POULTRY 21.7.50--3n-| gresaive: Club will be held-on We Pro] eee Rose Hill’ at Sarjeant’s Village. | reira, Ritcher Fung. Wendolin Baro) ] will supply other arms and equip- De LARRINGA"]| 28th June grad Jul loth J
= | day 20rd A . 2 a hee ns Wwetnae It consists of a substantially built two) Marguerite Baron, Jane Dalton, Stews't} ment whict sahnot be supplied S.s POLYCREST’ lath July 19th Ju 4th August
POULTRY—A I the a A August, 1950 at 8.30 p.m. at storey stone house which has front and |Allen, Esau Khan, John Dare, Annet c ch ce ae PP ss BRUSH Mth July Bist July 16th, August
white Legh fh Pullets 1 an ate TAKE NOTICE Michael. Notoer Pe eae Saint} back verandah, drawing and dining Burgess, May Crease, Hepeare Crease,; by America. It was indicated au- — 4
t veghe ets ing 8372 ne s of all motions intend-| —* r sedrooms, study, water Clarice Gomes, Lloyd ‘oster, Alison] thoritativery to-day that these
sirens “ LA” Meeting Salt ee ite Sees rooms, three pewrepath, ‘kitchen and |Grogan, Reginald Lopes, Thelma Hinds) snoties would be nataatiods PLANTATIONS LIMITED— ELECTRICAL STEL undersigned C/O Sarringtan te oe electricity Mivqutiots acd Tere Peter Deverteville, Sarai Devertevills , : —Reuter.
8 A MP COMPANY | lucas Street, Bridgetow Placed Ge cares * Francis DeGale, Wilfred DeGale, Williay :
-—- YIREHOED, po HE eter whose | than seven days ore Oat iuee Liban, "bus passes the door vias oe Rhos: Lionel Williams. Nellie McFarlan-’ OPPO PSPOSD eennenererets X
WASHING MACHINE—One (1) Elec-| trade or business address 1s Winchel- Dated this 19th aay of July, 1950 extremely low is only § a iy to| Hilary McQuilkin, Viola St. Hilaire “well-known U.K anufactur- 9
trie Washing Machine. Dial 3471 sea Road, Harlesden, N.W. 10, London, R. C. CHAPMAN spection and other particular ven’ FOR ANTIGUA 4 BK mee ys
7,50—2n.| England, has applied for the registra- Hi | D'Arcy A. Scott. 331 DM Francia Hawkins, Bloodworth, Frank|%& e's of English Floor Polishes and %& i
Eng . PP 8 ony. Secretary eo ¥
wacAee ts ——— | tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of field Gall, Edmond Charlwood, Edward Greer | & Cleaning Preparations require the 4
MACHINE—One (1) Electric Sewing] Register in connection with instal- PROPERTY — At_ Bridgefield, be FOR SAN JUAN % services of an Established Agent, »
Machine. Dial 3471 Intions for lighting more _ perticilarly a eg) Spee cae a Se Ae. RS Paul Nolan. with personal connections, to sell ¥
22.7.50—2n ‘ ane 5 . c wall house & shop us > + ae 7 : sar ‘,
Syne Seen Ne beara incandescent sind Glecharse lamps: Stee. OFFICIAL NOTICE | crawine & dining rooms, two bedrooms, X these products to traders and a
electric lighting fittings, shades and re- water toilet & shower bath, kitchen % other Customers, Liberal Com- Wf
MISCELI ANEOUS flectors; capacitors, ballasts and starters ae aoa bigs water, vogetes wit ad watch, te % mission to right applicant. Write: x
ARTISTS MATERIALS — including | 07, discharge lamps: eirtand Wonans SISTANT COURT OF | Siinted with canes. Good place for MAIL NOTICE TUE SHIP CO, LTD., Bridsend, *
oil and water colours, brushes and | torches; cycle dynamo lighting sets, parts (Equitable Jurisdiction) business and raising stocks. Price fixed M for Tri tin 38 Goin > Glamorgan, U.K.” ¥ ee ee
pipette ekene Save ae see Sanaa Se Ree a sae e CYRIL BRUCE wee to D'Arcy A. Scott will be Siosed tt tbe Gene : Poest OMe ; ¥ ASCO OOOO POLS 6600" OUTWA F
Ps y stencils ave ust ¢ Nl] reflectors and rearlights; dynamos for BROOKS pply to y mow : , ’ AEE SEO POSES /ARD q " . UNI" c } .
opened at C, F. HARRISON'S SHOW-| cycle lighting sets, and will be entitled Plaintiff 22.1,50—an. | as_under:- ae SSS SSS ROM THE UNITED) KINGDOM
ROOM, 22.7.50—2n.|to register the same after one month CLIFTON HOWELL INNISS ee Parcel Mat, Regiapaeed Mat. ant
from the 19th day of July 1950 unless Defendant TOWER GARAGE —_ Standing on | Ordinary | Mail at 10.15 a.m. on the Vessel Frem Leaves Due
BOARD—About ten thousand feet. Deal | some person shall in the meantime give 5,445 square feet of land at St, Mate | 22nd July, 1980 ii NEW. ARRIVALS Barbados
Boards. Contact The C. H. Kinch Co., | notice in duplicate to me at my office of} IN pursuance of an Order in the] thias Gap, Christ Church. Mails for British Guiana by the Sch. , S.S. “COMEDIAN” Liverroo! 8 28rd July
Ltd., No. 1 Palmetto St. 21.7.50—-3n | opposition of such registration, The trade | Court in the above action made on th rat, Gyniding is one recently erected | Francie W. Smith will be closed at th uC /NAMO SETS SG) NEPRCT ar) eee O08 th July 28rd July
_ -— mark can be seen on application at my | 16th day of June, 1950, I give notice is and built of stone and the site Is an General Post Office as under: L CAS DY MO SETS 5.8. “SPECIALIST M/Brough &
CALYPSO RECORDS, forty _ eight | office. all persons having any estate, right or| excellent one for a garage. One, itt is tele Sat tn Gre ard CYCLE BATTERY SETS London Sth July 25th July
See tae ong Get} Dated thie 10h Gay ee Ta tALan,. Siectne atl Th eee te ea eee eee building also lends itself | for suly, 1900. yea CYCLOMETERS S.S. “RIVERCREST” London 15th July 30th July
em. Hl q cting a at certal re to a private dwel- rT ea ‘LE : “ ~ ‘ ¥ ,
A. BARNES & CO. LTD. dgiitas'ut Trade stitten: [of land stusta Be Glapbars tn ike tesa linehouse, ry n CYCLE Re OT INS SS, “NATURALIST Liverpool 28th July 11th Aug
15.7,50—T.F.N. 21,7.50—3n. Siete ee and island aforesaid con-} By Public Auction on Thursday 27th PUMPS & CONNE .
———— ya easurement one rood and July at 2 p.m. at the office of the . :
DUCKHAM'S ADCOIDS—Save Petrol ere eet perches be the same more} undersigned from whom further par- US. CORRESPONDENT NEWSAM & co. HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM:
reduce engine wear and promote per- same being formerly part| ticulars and conditions of sale can be |,
formance especially when inferlor petrol TAKE NOTICE of a larger area of land alee ask obtained MISSING IN KOREA Vessel BK
has to be used. Of great assistance when ’ admeasurement one acre one and one R. 8S. NICHOLLS & CO., S.S. “TACTIC ” 1 O° Closes in Barbados
Biot end jap sa Se porte feotane HARWOOD S aaa ee Rerne: and vounding to- 151, 152 Roebuck Street NEW YORK, July 21. S's. pevcratain . Greenock 24th July
imple and inexpensive to use. n- ‘aad ea a s the North on ls ie CO TS ai iE 9 i
able from all leading Garages and Ser- That Duncan Harwood and Cormpany ae that’ Wakes seoeal gw ee aM Telephone No: 2925 Wilson Fielder, Junior, Time ORIENTAL London 29th July
3 : : Limited, a corporation duly organized ugusta 1.7.8 beer ;
vice Stations, H. Jason Jones & Co, Ltd. }| Tiniteds & | SuMoaNGhe Dominion of Walkols. deanaead. tonecte the Bat’ on Magazine correspondent, has been For further particulars apply to
Agents & Distributors, 16.7.50—6n, Under MSvhose trade of business ad- Pepe Loy, ce thee of Mise Acéline Yard,| —— —.|reported missing on the Taejon ounine fone eer ener
" sea?’ Se t, in e uth on lands of Rockley 1,200 shares of $1.00 each 4 BAR- \ J * » VRAK, SANDAL
MIRROR—Cheval mirror. Owen T.| dress is 8,000, Shaughnessy Stree Golf and Country “Club and. towarde| BADOS CO-OPERATIVE BANK LIM- front, the New York office@ \of JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP- DA COSTA & CO., LTD—Agents
T. Allder, Roebuck Strect, . Dial sag9. | the City, of | Vans eer canada, |e, West on lands formerly of Felix | ITED S ie above wit be set up tor |7ime and LAfe, said |B tsrnins, cloves, rerrum :
7 5 um bia, an _ . . :
eee ee "epee for the registration of a oe 7 Waioort but now of Clifton} sale to public competition on iday |tonight. Fielder aged 33, was re- = = -
DIL STOVES—2 Burner Perfection. | trade mark in part “A” of Register in meyell Toss Or: Dowever else, thas Seaaltame von ea nee 2pm. at out] ported the retreat of the American KASH MERE
‘ . 7 “lo nC " 1 hi beverages 3 utt and bound to bring before] office in Lucas Street. ¢ Seriat
4 Burner Valor & others. (Like new). | connection with alcoholic ie me an account of their said claims ‘ARRINGTON SEALY 24th Division.
Owen T. Allder, Roebuck Street. Dial] and will be entitled to register the| with their witnesses, document 4 c. & SEAL . —Reuter .
3299 2%.7.50--In, | Same after one month from the 18th day | vouchers, to be examined Be ee a haat a ; eamah 0.
item pein sit gine iia al aha SP July. 1980, unless some Person snail any Tuesday, or Friday between the le
‘ TYRES | AND BATTERIN. Sizes 94 x pee Dee at er ane of ‘opposition nents of 12 (noon) and 3 o'clock in the ARRIV ED
* . 5 and other sizes, also} SO'* © tea afternoon, at the Office of the Clerk
Oldham 17 plate batteries. Guaranteed of ain ramaipenon « aus rene i of the Assistant Court of Appeal at the GOVERNMENT NOTICE Inc.
inquire Auto Tyre Company Trafalgar eat 7 a em ¥| Court House, Bridgetown, before the Another shipment of the popular
Street, Phone 2696. 21.7,50—t.f.n. | © aa iia oe a rengatou 6th day of September, 1950, in order NEW WORLD GAS COOKERS NEw on : 10
VG cia valle, OWE a nis ai WILLIAMS 50. | that such claims may be yanked accord- ees ik ital All have been booked, but af: PLGANS: SER» AOR
alises. | EN i. ) ing to the nature and priority thereat} Wacant Post of Specialist Physician, General Hospital, . AL ge : arr.
at N.O.
ALLDER. Roebuck Street, a 3290 Registrar of Trade Marks. | respectively; otherwise such persons will Barbad. CALL : your Gas Showroom, ALCOA RANGM ar eh U'dor
.7.50—1n 21.7,50—3n | be i ar! OS. tuy St AL IER 2th July 25th July
precluded from the benefit of the * > ‘ : ALCOA ROAMER 26th July I
TRUCK CHASSIS—One Austin truck me Decree, and ne, deprived of all APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Specialist Physician, SEE pe fore they are ALCOA RUNNER oth “Auge! i AE sat
ston ae a ad : claim on or against the said property. ; r ; delivered .
Sonoita ee trend ek pated en, TAKE NOTICE Clainants ‘ae also notified thet thay | @cneral Hospital, Barbados. Applicants should be registered quan ORDER one from our next NEW YORK SSBVICw
Owners bought another Austin, Alleyne,| aura iyi Sanaa Eto es attend the said Court on Wednes-| medical practitioners; post-graduate hospital experience essential. shipment salle Are.
‘s é s 3 . e al 5 i.
Quhne & Con, Lid, High Street, Phone] on AT, Come tn Altred Bittmad, | at 10 e, oth day of September, 1950.) The post is non-pensionable on contract for three years, renewable. i: 5 a tia s re “a
- 3 > é m, 7 Zist Ju 31s
conrrriemnisioeenumnimasnenearsnnaes der are ig Mel n oe etre! nee ‘endivid- eae will bt Se ee th Salary will be on scale of $4,800 x 480 — $6,240 per annum, plus half | soe pee oe OOOO OOOO OEY | BYFJORD” ith ‘August ist ‘August
ORE, CASE Guin. Mansa Sis wpointed by the Probate Court of yaiven, under my hand this 16th day of fees for private patient care within the Hospital and half consulta- See TITAN ReavION Oe
OWEN T. “ALLDER, “Roebuck | Sire | Merrimack County State of New Hamp- L v. GitKes, | tion fees within and without the Hospital; otherwise private practice GIBBS’ Bis mae ,
ri . _ ed ‘Ss ay . q ; i i IND
ania OE Sree ioe Meter Bo bae tee Ag. Clerk of the Assistant Court. lis not allowed. Position in scale determined by experience and x : faci as .
Eddy, whose trade or business address 21.6.50—3n | qualification. PROVISION GROCERY & % as rate re Montreal Halifax savecdes
is 107, Falmouth Street, Boston 15, ; ; i ~~ r : 5.8. “ALC R" July 2ist 2 r
FOR RENT oS te actin United’ Uealke of AIneEI : Rent-free furnished quarters will be provided but until these are LIQUOR STORE % | 5.8. “ALCOA POLARIS" Aus. 4th Aug. “th Aus: aith
ca have applied for the registration of available an allowance at the rate of 10% of salary will be payable. Offers Y«
e vu eS
a trade mark in part “A” of Register ‘ " | m % _ _
SS OOM=I Large Fur-| in ‘connection “with printed — books, OFFICIAL SALE Passages, not exceeding $960 each way, of officer ene es ia, NORTHBOUND
nished Room. Cool and airy at Bel] magazines, publications, and Bible les-| ,, p14) payable on appointment and on expiration of contract. Small ‘ arte and Artives
Air, Richmond Gap. Dial 22"7,00—2n. | ings’ Bhonograph reco ei and will| IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OP The Specialist Physician shall be responsible for the public medi~| & Smoked Herrings 8.8, “ALCOA PILGRIM" Jorn July For Montreal and Quebe:
x "| be entitled to register the’ same after racks eee i cal service of the Institution, shall perform such other departmental Peanuts rich in vitamins | 36c. Ib Wligey: Sdenkea Save. lies lded. seubek aati
HIGH WINDS, Cattlewash, from Octo-]| one month from the 18th day of July, quitable Jurisdiction) . i i Superior Quality Br. Vinegar eS: BROT EET See re
it etenda. Dial Seb. 1950, unless some person in the mean- CYRIL BRUCE BROOKS duties as may be required of him from time to time and shall act under ie, pt pei rg vines oo
—21,7.50—3n. | time gives notice in duplicate to me at Plaintiff the general superintendence and direction of the Director of Medical Hartley's Green Peas one ; i 5 :
CLIFTON HOWELL INNISS . tin Apply DA COSTA & CO,, LTD,-—Canadian Service
SNUG CORNER’,—PALM BEACH eae ak eee eae ert aah Defendant Services. 2 Soups (75) varieties : ROBERT THOM LTD,.-New York and Gulf Service
.—PAL! f i ; ; i ‘ idne Pail, Cele :
HASTINGS, ideally situated on the SEA,| on application at my office. at a8 See Siven that by Satie Applications accompanied by two testimonials should be addressed Pane amaaoeiy erent? aoe a ei
7 in ‘ z 7 ',
Srawinng, Siciee aut onewn Goaeant OI eRe a Sue ‘Appeal dated the 16th day of June. 1990,|to the Colonial Secretary, Bridgetown, Barbados, and should be sub- and the famous
with Running Water, all modern con- Regitar Wi iede Marks, | there will be set up for sale to the) mitted not later than the 3ist of July, 1950. GIBBS’ GOLD RIBBON PASSAGES TO IRELAND
veniences, Kitchen, Servants’ Room and 21,7.50—3n. re Ce eeet at Scant 24.6.50.—3n RUM Antilles I
Garage. Available from ist. August je at , 3 ntilles Products toses é “+r 4 BERTHS
‘Apply: C. BE. Clarke, 7 Swan Street at the Court House, Bridgetown, be- Try to Dubl 1" M. DUA tegen Rtg Rede oa
or i : "99 Sn. tw hi of noon) and ry it ublin per M.V JUALA”, sailing from Roseau 26th July.
Dial 2631 or 3029. 22,7.50—5n TAKE NOTICE een the hours at ‘ : Single F. » : : df
% o/clock in tha. atvernoon | os Friday, Vacant Posts of Medical Officer, General Hospital, Delivery by Ven en Oyile Single Fare £70, usual reductions for children
OAKITE ine hat Sertain piece or parcel of 1and Barbados. Dial 118 eee er ere
rt 4
si it laph: in the parish of i ate sdical
WANTED THAT OAKITE PRODUCTS INC,, a SUE oN courted teand Aria rae APPLICATIONS are invited for five vacant posts of Medica PSEA DONOR Te one
, corporation organized and under Officer, General Hospital, Barbados. Applicants must be registered - SONIA SASS

Oo

HELP









The public are hereby warned agains
giving credit to my wife IRIS TODD
(nee Sobers)









er signed by me
Signed FITZ HERBERT BRATHWAITE
Upper Collymore Rock
St. Michael
22.7.50—2p







as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone unless by a
written order signed by me she having
left my home and protection without my

existing
the laws of the State of New York, United
States of America, whose trade or busi-
ness address is 22m Thames Street, New
York 6, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registration



TAKE NOTICE
JANIT

That Jamaica Knitting Mills Limitea,
a company duly incorporated under the

t

consent. laws of Jamaica, whose trade or busi-
By order, ness address is (Number 9 West Street

(Sea) ALBERT L. TODD, in the parish of Kingston, Island of

Upper Bay St., Jamaica, British West Indies has ap-

. Gas Co. plied for the registration of a trade

21.7.50—2n. | mark in part “A” of Register in con-

i En — | section with knitted goods and will be
The public are hereby warned against | entitled to register the same after one
giving credit to my wife, Dorothy| month from the 18th day of July, 1950
Doreen Brathwaite (nee Wilcher) as 1] unless some person shall in the mean-
do not hold myself responsible for her| time give notice in duplicate to me
or anyone else contracting any debt or| at my office of opposition of such
debts in my name unless by a written | registration The trade mark can be

seen on application at my office.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1950
H WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
21.7.50—3n.

|









taining by admeasurement one rood and
thirty eight perches be the same more
or less (the same being formerly part
of a larger area of Jand containing by
admeasurement one acre one and one





COOK—Must have satisfactory re- “AN half perches) butting and bounding to-
ferences. Apply to Fernihurst, Deacons eotiare, Pe Se ng ect wards the North on lands now or late
Road, Black Rock, between 5 and 6/ compounds having water-softening qual- of the Estate of Henrietta Augusta
p.m. Friday to Sunday. itles, recommended for all cleansing, Walcott, deceased towards the East on

20.7.50—4n. } washing, and polishing purposes, particu- | lands now or late of Miss Adeline
larly for use in the kitchen and in the | Yard, towards the Gouth on lands of

SALES GIRL — Required with a/household generally, and for use in| Rockley Golf and Country Club and to-
knowledge of ‘Spanish if possible. | laundries, garages, dairies, and industrial | wards the West on lands formerly of Felix
State salary. Apply Post Office Box plants of all kinds; also recommended | 0’D. Walcott but now of Clifton Howell
No. 22413, Bridgetown. for lubricating, heat absorbing, cutting, Inniss or however else the same may

18.7,50—6n. | grinding, stamping, drawing, stripping | butt and bound, and if not then sold th
ne | Surfaces of paint, varnish, enamels, said property will be set up for sale on
| Japans, lacquers, and other surface | every succeeding Friday between the

MISCELLANEOUS | finishes; anti-rusting, neutralizing, and |same hours until the same is sold for a

ae deodorizing; also neoornst Sau? aad sum not less than £50, 0. 0.
COOLERATOR: Owen er, | ization, commercial and household, suc
Roebuck Street, Dial 3209. as sterilizing bottles and other contain- Dated this 16th day of June, 1950.
22.7.50—Injers; also recommended as a scale re- 1, V. GIL ' ‘
_— | mover, milkstone remover, acid inhibitor, | Ae. Clerk of the Assist. Court of Appea
FNGLISH Gentleman, 44, arriving | bactericide, fungicide, and for use in wet | 22.6 50.—3n.
Barbados October, desires post as Head | finishing operations of textiles, and will
Waiter or in a similar CePA sate be equines to register the same ater — Senna ans
experience — good references. ‘urther| month from the 18th day of July
‘\euculars from C. Fletcher, Villiers | unless some person shall in the meantime PUBLIC SALES
Hotel, Douglas, Isle of man.” give notice in duplicate to me at my
21.7.50—Sn, | office of opposition of such registration
The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office.
o 1) “ovated this 18th day of July 1950. AUCTION
PERSONAL hagiues ee teks 1 have been instructed by the Com- |
21,7.50—3n. | Missioner of Police to set up for sale
‘| by public auction at Central Station,
on Monday next the 24th, beginning et

2 o'clock the below mentioned arti-
cles:—

(1) skillet
cold storage door,
quantity of motor mechanic tools, (1)
large screw driver, (1) motor vehicle
hub cap, (36) crocus bags

Terms strictly cash,

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Govt. Auctioneer
21.7.50—3n

containing paint oil, (1)

(2) Havetsacks, A

7



REAL ESTATE

BELVOIR,—Fitz Village,
Solid Stone wall, Three
| Drawing & Dining, Kitchen,
Bath, Garage. On Seaside

;z McKay



St
Bedrooms,
Toilet &
Apply H

SS

| LANG ~~» Desirable building site at

| Graeme Hall Terrace Dial 3430.
1,7,80—t.f.n,

e|payable on appointment and on expiration of contract.

Medical practitioners.

Posts are non-pensionable, on contract for three years, renewable.
Private practice not permitted. Salary will be on the scale of $3,600
x 240 — $4,800 per annum and position in scale determined by ex-
perience and qualification,

Rent-free furnished quarters will be provided but until these
are available an allowance at the rate of ten per cent of salary will
be payable.

Passages, not exceeding $960 each way, of officer and fami.’

Duties are general and in their performance the Medical Officer
shall act under immediate supervision and control of such Superior
Officers as Medical Superintendent, Specialist Surgeon, and Specialist
Physician and unde rgeneral direction of the Director of Medical
Services.

Applications accompanied by two testimonials should be addressed
to the Colonial Secretary, Bridgetown, Barbados, and should be sub-
mitted not later than the 3lst of July, 1950.

24,6.50.—3n. |



Vacant Post of Medical Superintendent, General Hospital,
Barbados. |

APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Medical Superintend- |
ent, General Hospital, Barbados. Applicants should be male regis-
tered medical practitioners with experience in Hospital administration.
The post is non-pensionable, on contract for three years, renewable. |
Salary will be at rate of $5,760 per annum. Private practice not)
allowed. |
Rent-free furnished quarters are provided.
Passages not exceeding $960 each way, of officer and family pay- |
able on appointment and on expiration of contract.

The Medical Superintendent shall act under the general super-

intendence and direction of the Director df Medical Services, and |
shall be responsible generally for the) supervision and management of |

|

James |the Hospital, shall perform such other departmental duties as may be}

required of him from time to time.
Applications accompanied by two testimonials should be addressed

ay =. to the Colonial Secretary, Bridgetown, Barbados, and should be sub-

Imitted not later than the 3ist of July, 1950
24.6.50.—3n. ,







|

| 8 acres of excellent building |









LAND
FOR SALE

land at St. Peter. 180 feet |

road frontage with right

of way Ao sea,
4% cents per square foot.
JOUN
M.
BLADON

Real Estate Agent
Phone 4640



4
(

Plantations Building




{Christian Science p
( fivading Room '

1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS
(Broad Street)
Hours: 10 am.—2 p.m,
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

Fridays.
10 a.m.—12 o'clock.
Saturdays.
4t this Room the Bible and
the Christian Science text-book,

Selenee and Heaith wita Key w)

the Seriptares by MARY BAKER

EDDY may Ye read, borrowed,
or pur based

Visitors Are Welcome ,
ee ee

THE HANDIEST THING WE HAVE SEEN FOR
DURAGLIT

METAL POLISH
oe «€6TRY A TIN TODAY
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
(CENTKAL FOUNDRY LTD. Proprictors)
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets

A TIME










4 4 o
P°ROEPOLOPR PO POOOLEIPOD BOPP APIT'S

CHECK THESE VALUES!

DIRECT FROM FACTORY 10 WEARER.

POPOL

SCGGOSS

4<¢

° g

OF

>
o
@PUMPS in White, Brown, Giack, Blue 75e,, 85e, $1.15 $4.4
@BALLERINAS in Red Sizes 3—8 $1.
@ LADIES’ CANVAS RUBBER SHOES

@ LADIES’ CANVAS CASUALS in White, Red, Blue
@ LEATHER SANDALS WITH RUBBER SOLES







OCS













Children's $1.60, $1.90; Ladies’ $2.35; Men’s 8.15

@ LADIES’ CREPE SOLED SIFOES $3.95 to 5.80

MEN’S WORKING SHOES—Brown or Black $4.30 5.05

@ MEN'S SOCKS ‘s 42 48c., 50c., 53c., 74c
@ CHILDREN’S and LADIES’ ANKLE

32c., 36c., 38e., 40c., 41c.

@ SHOE POLISHES, SHOE BRUSHES, SUEDE CLEANERS



: SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD §
& es O00O0009009 9904005059 055509000555566 So.

|



PAGE EIGHT



W.L. 479—3 In Third Test

@ From page 1.

opening ~ batsmen Add
fact the undoubted nuisance value
of a left-handed opening batsman

to this

and you will appreciate the real
worth of the Jamaican’s perform-
ance.

Weekes—well Weeke was
Weekes t is a pleasure to watch

him play all types of bowling but
I particularly like to see him deal
with the shortish fastish ball
Few men, especially lacking
height, can punch it through
the covers, cut it down to third
man, or hook it to leg as vicious-
ly as Weekes can Both he
and Worrell too are able to lean
away from the leg break coming
across the wicket and despatch
it to the boundary.

This is cricket at its best, quick
runs and a beautiful style With
so formidable an assault against
them, the English team did well in
the field. They must have been
extremely tired men by the end of
the day, but at no time was this
evident to the onlookers. No par-
ticular name can be mentioned as
outstanding, the day was not one
for giving an opportunity of bril-
liant performance, such as is pos-
sible close under the bat or in tl
slips. Suffice it to say that every
man did his job in the field well.

New Figures

The West Indies score is
within easy reach of their own
highest score against England in
England, 498 at the Oval in 1939,
and there would seem to be no-
thing to prevent them reaching the
535 made by their predecessors at
Kingston in 1935 It would of
course be even more satisfying to

now

set a mark for all England—West

Indies innings but that is a tall

order—849. Still let us keep aim-

ing at the stars, we may hit a

great deal more than tree tops
The Play

There had been some light rain
during the morning here, and the
skies were still overcast when the
West Indies resumed their first in-
nings. The sun was trying to break
through and there were blue
patches scattered in the canopy of
clouds. The weather man’s pro-
phecy was fair periods, scattered
showers and thunderstorms with
the outlook warm. Most morning
papers were severely critical of
what one writer called “England’s
Palsied Batsmen,” and nearly all
disagree with Umpire Chester on
the manner of Insole’s dismissal
by Ramadhin.

The Umpire's explanation must
be without parallel in the game
He claimed that in the split second
between the ball striking the pads
and hitting the wicket the bowler
appealed _and he replied to that
appeal. Remarkably quick think-
ing, what?

Shackleton bowled the first over
this morning from the pavilion
end, and Bedser shared the attack.
Shackleton’s was a maiden, but
Christiani took four off Bedser’'s
first delivery with beautifully
crisp square cut,

Hollies replaced Shackleton
after fourteen runs had been add-
ed to the overnight total in eight
overs. He bowled a maiden to Rae
Two more maidens followed and
when the clock showed mid-day
only fifteen had been added, the
extra single coming from a leg
bye.

Lucky

Christiani received the kind fav-
our of a life when he was eight
He cut at one outside the off stump
from Bedser, failed to cover it and
the ball flew off the edge to Insole
at first slip. The Essex amateur
failed to hold the comparatively
easy catch.



After bowling eight overs, which
cost the same number of runs and
included four maidens, Bedse:
gave way to Shackleton, who thus
switched ends, The new bowler
met with immediate success, for
Christiani went into his wicket in
an attempt to force tne ball away,
was struck and returned to the
pavilion clearly legbefore, He had
made ten and the score was now
ninety-five for two.

The British Guiana player had
found runs difficult to obtain this
morning in the face of good length
bowling. This appeared to rattle
him a bit, and his resultant daring
cost him his wicket. Worrell came
out and was immediately off the
mark turning Shackleton off his
body to the fine leg boundary.
Next over from the same end he
sent the hundred up, lifting
Shackleton dangerously near to
Washbrook at midwicket for three,
Three figures had taken up exactly
two hours.

Rae Hits Out

Worrell reached 25 and at this
point Rae seemed to take this as a
challenge. He had been batting
seventy five minutes this morning
for only six runs, and now sud-
denly opened his shoulders to Hol-
lies and hoisted him deep into the
long field for a lofty four. A mere
fraction more weight would have
allowed the ball to clear the white
line

At 127, Yardley took the
from Shackleton and himself as-
sumed charge of the Radcliffe end
The batsmen were unperturbed by

| They'll Do It Eve
r lass A

ball

fate

THING ELSE BUT-~---



» kins’

Piette

PRACTICE THEIR MUSIC? THAT'S
WHAT THE KIDS WILL DO »EVERY-

SHALIMAR! SEDLITZ!
COME IN THIS MINUTE
AND PRACTICE YOUR MUSIC
LESSON! SHALIMAR!!
SEDLITZ! COME BACK!



ALAN RAE

the change and Yardley tried an-
other at 144, bringing Jenkins from
the pavilion end vice Hollies. The
partnership reached fifty off Jen-
first offering which Worrell
turned neatly around to fine leg
for two. Of this joint contribution
Worrell’s share was, 37. Worrell
despite the not inappreciable
handicap of 115 minutes reached
his half century one run ahead ot
Rae, with a jubilant six deep into



the crowd off a full toss from
Jenkins. The gay trip had taken
him just one hour of dazzling
craftsmanship

Next over Rae also moved, up
to the half century mark His

had been an innings in the great-
est contrast to that of his partner
Worrell is one of the West Indies
Panzer Divisions, Rae is our de-
fence in depth. Both are essentigi
to victorious warfare. When lunch
was taken the score was 173 for
two with Rae 55 and Worrell 59.
After Lunch

After lunch Yardley called for
the new ball and brought on his
same bowlers. Worrell and Rae
had been together exactly one
hundred minutes when their asso-
ciation entered three figures. It
was just a few balls later when
Worrell straight drove Shackleton
to the rails to send up the two
hundred. The innings had been
in progress 212 minutes at this







stage

With the score unchanged,
Evans appealed for a_ stumping
against Rae, but umpire Chester
found for the defender. Yardley
now made his first post lunch

change, bringing on Hollies instead
of Shackleton. Next over the
England skipper took off Bedser
and put back Shackleton at the
Radcliffe end. With Rae taking
a sharp single off the fifth ball,
Worrell reached his century while
his partner was still in the sixties.
He had hit fourteen fours, in the
two hours at the wicket and the
boundary with which he reached

three figures also sent the West
Indies’ total past that of their
opponents

Rae Out
Yardley himself replaced Shac-
kleton at 238 and was forthwith
responsible for the downfall of
Rae, Evans stumping the Jamaican

as he went to meet the third
delivery on the half volley. The
third wicket was down at 288,

Rae’s share being 68 and Worrell
undefeated with 110.

Weekes started his account
with a couple of masterly
boundaries. The partnership
between the two W's added 50
in 25 minutes, Weekes limping
badly, content to play diminu-
endo for 16 of these runs,

Worrell remained in his pug-
nacious mood and punched off
Yardley and Hollies indiscrim-
inately to reach his 150 in 175
minutes,

The 300 went up when Jenkins
replaced Yardley, Worrell taking
a brace from his first ball.

Bedser relieved Hollies at 308.
The two batsmen went merrily on
and set up a new West Indian
versus England Test partnership
for the fourth wicket. The part-
nership produced 100 runs in 58
minutes and only at one stage did
they enjoy a spot of good luck
This came with the score at 334
when Worrell was nearly run out
He off drove Bedser straight to
Insole and began to run. Weekes
did not move but Insole’s return
to the wicket-keeper was wide
The tea interval found the seore
at 339, Worrell 173, Weekes 35.

After Tea
Bedser and Yardley handled the
attack after tea. Runs came ac-
cording to plan—the batsmen’s
plan, that is—and the 350 was
hoisted in a matter of fifteen min-
utes or so, during which the bats-

men took things comparatively
quietly. The score then mounted
mercilessly and Weekes reached

his fifty with a burning off drive
which went clean through Insole
at extra cover. The batsman fol-
lowed this shot with another four
Straight past the bowler, Bedser.

These two were making the
bowling look simple enough and
undoubtedly the opposition, toil-

Time












ing all day and eatching nothing,
had lost its sting

Weekes, strangely subduing his
play to that of Worrell, had taken
ninety minutes for his half cen-
tury, but he never once looked
anything but perfectly set and
camfortable Apart from three
attempts to sweep Yardley char-
acteristically around to the square
leg boundary without connecting,
his stroke play was flawless.

Worrell’s Double

After just four hours at the
crease Worrell reached his first
double century in Test cricket

with a forcing back drive off Yards
ley to the mid-wickei boundary

Right after the 400 was regis.
tered, and Yardley after bowling
himself for a full hour which
yielded the regulation run a
minute, brought Hollies on from
the Radeliffe end. Worrell greet-
ed the slow bowler with an ex-
press drive through the covers
which reached the crowd almost
before any of the four men in the
off side platoon could change for-
mation

At 412 Shackleton came on in-
stead of Bedser who left the field
for a brief absence after an hour's
gruelling toil from the Pavilion
end. A clean shot off the pads to
square leg by Weekes set up 200
for the partnership, and Worrell
had soon himself attained the Eng-

land total at which time he was
exactly half of his own team’s
score

The 450 came inevitaly. The
innings was now 395 minutes old

Weekes In

Ten runs later Yardley with
the new ball due brought back
Bedser in place of Hollies, and
Weekes helped himself to two

fours from the old ball to reach
his own century after two hours
and forty minutes

Although limping noticeably,

Weekes’ stroke play was unaf-
fected by his knee trouble. There
may have been possibilities for
a few more singles but these
batsmen were not looking for
singles to-day. The flash which
distinguishes his batting from
the more graceful style of Wor-
rell was there in full scale to-
day, and one particular off drive
travelled so fast through the
covers that Washbrook did not
even worry to take his hands
from his weary knees,

As it turned out Yardley did not
bother to bring out the new leath-
er preferring to have something
to give his seam bowlers to work
on when they return fresh to the
fray to-morrow morning.

When the bails were removed
at the end of play the total was
479 for 3 wickets. “Worrell 239
and Weekes 108 had already add-
ed more than any other pair had
ever done against England, 24]
against the 228 made by Karl
Nunes and George Headley at
Kingston in 1935. So far Worrell
had hit two sixes and thirty one
fours, and Weekes sixteen fours.

Scores
ENGLAND 1ST INNINGS
Simpson ¢ Waleott b Johnson
Washbrook c¢ Stollmeyer b Worrell
Parkhouse c Weekes b Johnson

Dewes ¢ Gomez b Worrell 0
Yardley ec Goddard b Valentine 41
Insole 1.b.w, Ramadhin 21
Evans b Ramadhin..,..... 32
Shackleton b Worrell... . 42
Jenkins b Johnson. . us ol 39
Bedser ¢ Stolilmeyer b Valentine. 13
Hollies not out 2
Extras lb. 12, n.b. 1 13
TOTAL 223

Falt of wickets: 1—6, 2—18, 3-23,





4 a 5-15, 6-105, 7—147, 8—174;
9 ‘
BOWLING ANALYSIS
9° M R Ww
Johnson 25.4 °5 59 3
Worrell 17 4 40 3
Gomez 3 1 9 0
Goddard e 3 10 0
Ramadhin 29 2 49 2
Valentine 18 6 43 2
W.sI. 18ST INNINGS
Rae stpd Evans b Yardley 68
Stollmeyer ¢ & b Jenkins 46
Christiani |.b.w., b Shackleton 10
Worrell not out 239
Weekes not out 108
Extras b 2, Ib 6 8
Total (for 3 wkts), 479
Fall of wickets: 1—77; 2—95; 3—234
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R, W,
37 8 91 0
leton 37 5 108 1
( 27 3 82 1
Jenkins 13 0 13 1
Hollies 37 6 ny 0
—Reuter
e
Olympia Beat

Queen’s College
At Net Ball

There was an exciting Netball
Match on Wednesday afternoon
between Olympia Club and
Queen’s College Netball team at
Queen’s College. The match wus
keenly contested before an en-
thusiastic audience. Olympia Club
emerged victorious after fighting
every inch of the way. The first

pass was made by Mrs. H. A.
Talma, and almost immediately
Olympia scored 3 goals. QC.
was not long in equalising and
then taking the lead. Olympia
then drew even and half time

found the score equal at 8 all. O
resumption Olympia took the lead
and eventually carried off th:
Match 19 goals to 14,

By Hatlo



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Modern High
School Holds
Sports Day

By winning the
440 yds, in class
became Victor Ludorum, when
the Modern High School held
\heir annual sports meeting at
Kensington yesterday. In spite
of the heavy track, six records
were broken Set “B" with a
total of 78 points was Set
champion. In class (11) for boys,
A. Clarke and C. Chandler tied
for first place, while CG. Clarke
and M. Hinds were ¢hampions
in. classes (2) and (3).

In the girls @ivision, Worrell,
Crichlow, Jones and Walker

100, 220, and
(1) V. Skeete

were champions in divisions (1)
(2), (3), and (4).
The new records were set up

by, Lorna Jones, of div: (3) who
did the 100 yds in 12 1/5 secs
V. Skeete who broke his own
records in the 220 and 440 yds,
the times being 24 2/5 and 59 1/5
secs. respectively, Clarke who
did the 220 yds. in class (11) in
28 2/5 sees, and L. Holder and
Lowe who did the high jump
with 4ft, llins. and 4ft. 2ins
There were two cycling events
one of which was won hy Cyril
Haynes and the other by L. Bar-
row. The old boys race was car-
ried off by L. Best, and Miss J

Collymore easily won the. old
girls’ race.
Mr. J. W. B. Chenery pre-

sented the prizes to the various
winners, before a large gather-
ing of parents and friends.

Today’s
hed :
Cricket

. TO-DAY is the final day of play
in First Division and Intermediate
cricket fixtures in the island while
it opens a new series in the Second
Division competition.

The matches with their respec-
tive grounds are as follows: —

Ist Division

Pickwick vs. Combermere at
Kensington.

Lodge vs. Callege at Lodge.

Carlton vs. Police at Carlton,

Spartan vs. Wanderers at Park.

Intermediate Division

Empire vs. Cable and Wireless
at Bank Hall.

Y.M.P.C. vs. Mental Hospital
at Beckles Road.

Windward vs. Spartan at Wind-
ward.

Wanderers vs. Pickwick at Bay

2nd Division

Combermere vs. Y.M.P.C.
Combermere.

College vs. Lodge at College.

Foundation vs Police at Founda-
tion.
Leeward vs. Pickwick at Foster’s.

Central vs. Empire at Vaucluse.

Regiment vs. Carlton at Garrf-
son

Arthur Peall says:
YOU CAN'T GET OUT OF
THIS SNOOKER TRAP

you can & way out of my
with a FAIR
So far



at





|





Biyitit.t

yellow ball “

} without incurring
@ foul,
Endiess

snookers and

‘free ball’ leaves

are possible here

if common sense
not allow

striker to smash

up the position,

That seems the
right thing to do
Hit to scatter the
balls and = give
the next man @
fair shot on
yellow,

The stroke wii!
be a foul, and it
is deliberate
nder the rules—

must go on and what
done ?

® purposes, the cannon

—v
but the

can

Pottin

left is useful with red and black

Lng and in line along the ton
mn.

Play a

+ Moderate strength because
the colour will not travel far and
black would be useful in break

3. By DC-6

tions available)

For full information see :
Tel. 3113

WORLD'S FIRST AIRLINE
1919 - 1950

Fly KLM to
ALL EUROPE

4 Flights weekly

3 Routes to choose from

1. By Constellation Curacao — New York — Europe (no
USA visa required)

2. By Constellation Curacao—Havana—Montreal—-Europe
Curacao—Caracas—Paramaribo—Dakar

—Europe (limited sleeper accommoda-

Whichever route you choose, the major cities of
Europe are but a day away by KLM.

By special arrangement, KLM will fly your family,
friends, or business associates out of Eu
pay the fare here... KLM does the rest

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO.,

POLO THIS
AFTERNOON

At about 4.30 this afternoon,
members of The Barbados Polo
Club will be meeting at the Ga
rison Savannah for their usuai
round of chukkers. Some of these
players drive about seventeen
miles for their game and bring
their horses by motor truck
while most of the other mounts
have to do a distance of about
five miles to get to the field.

They usually arrive at the
Garrison about 2 p.m. where they
are unsaddled and given a rub
down and rest before their stren-
uous task. The games this season
are much faster owing to the
improved ground and it is hoped
that the referees will be very
strict about crossing and danger-
ous riding off, as naturally the
freater the speed the more nece¢s-
sary will it be to stick to rules
and team work.

On Wednesday last quite a
number of spectators turned out.
Cars entering the ground should
pass through the east gate, turn left
behind the goal posts following
the border lIne of the playing
field and then park on the east
and south of the rope enclosure.
Seats are provided within the
enclosure for members’ friends
and Hotel guests. Every care
should be taken by parents to
prevent children from playing
near the horses as it is quite
impossible for players or grooms
to keep them away while on the
job of shifting saddles, fixing
gear and going through the reg-
war preparations for each
chukker,



County Cricket
Results

LONDON, July,
At Swansea Lancashire beat
Glamorgan by 48 runs, Lanca-
shire 137 (G. Edrich 50, Watkins
4 for 27) and second innings 105,
(E. Davies 5 for 31), Glamorgan
96, (Tattersall 7 for 28) and sec-
ond innings, 98 (Hilton 6 for 55,
Tattersall 3 for 33).

At Birmingham, Somerset beat
Warwickshire by 10 wickets; War-
wickshire 261, (Dollery 150,
Conibere 4. for 66) and second

145, (Hazell 6 for 36),
Somerset 371, (Tremlett 109) and
second innings 36 for no wickets.

At Bristol, Surrey beat Glou-
cestershire by 5 wickets; Glou-
cestershire 187, (Laker 8 for 45)
and second innings 173, (Laker 4
for 41); Surrey 151, Constable not
out 58, Cook 4 for 15) and sewond
innings 211 for 5, (Constable 86,
Fishlock not out 91).

21.

At Dudley, Worcestershire beat
Hampshire by 164 runs; Worces-
tershire 342, (Kenyon 163, Walker
4 for 13) and second innings 167
‘or 5 decl'd, Dewes not out 101),
Hampshire 246, (Rogers 57), and
second innings 99, (Howorty 7 for
35).

Heart Troubl
ts eH
Blood Pressure

It 7s have @ hear!









.
‘above oye:



ue 8 ny or sur
a meee anes ea!
ear, oaused
by Sur "Thus ie o
i eauses More

eal t @anoer, because th:

symp! are 80 usual
m' some ent. |



1a
treatment a'

ould, bart

Pressure end mak feet
er ine few days. Get Noxoc
| 2

ae ones ¢ ay. it te fy :
make you feel wi

oi suoney on mys
package.







. You

(_f











ROYAL DUTCH
AIRLIMES |



coo ure ————————_ ee ee ee .0000O"O"”""”-E"ETETN-

<

SPELL POPES LEELA LSE LESSEE SLEEP PS PTES AAA

W.I. Ae



SATURDAY,

hieve

JULY 22, 1950



‘Dominion

Status’’ At Bisley

(From Our Own Correspondent)
BISLEY, July 21.

The second stage of the King's
Prize—the “King’s Hundreds”—
which included West Indians, was
shot off this morning in driving
rain. The West Indians who
were not accustomed firing under
such conditions found the going
extremely difficult. Despite this
fact however one of them,
E. Crooks of Trinidad, obtained
the second highest score with
142, two less than the top scorer.
Crooks indeed has been the oui-
standing shot of the B.W.I. con-
tingent. Yesterday in the finals
of St. George’s Challenge vase—
considered second only in import-
ance to the King’s Prize—he was
placed fourteenth and received
the National Rifle Association St.
George’s Badge. To-morrow he is
one of eight selected to repre-
sent the West Indies in the Senior
Kolapore. Three other West
Indians were finalists in the
King’s Hundreds: Major F. T.,

Manly (British Guiana)
Stuart, (Jamaica), C. Barton
(Jamaica). The four West

Bisley.

posite team in the senior Mac-
Kinnon, Tt meant that the NR.A
was according to the B.W.I
“Dominion” status

Never having shot before on
900 or 1,000 yards ranges the
teams naturally found themselves
somewhat handicapped in these
longrange events though occa-
sionally some outstanding scores
were recorded.

J. A. Sutton (B.G.) C. Barton
(Jamaica) and E. Crooks (Trin-
idad) were three who did par-
ticularly well.

Varying winds, ana poor visi-
bility on certain occasions—due
chiefly to a very wet July—are
what have troubled West Indians
most at Bisley.

They liked the ranges otherwise,
and they like their quarters, two
long camp rooms—thankful they
are not in tents as many are.

The general

impression our

A. S.gcorrespondent obtained was that

e West Indians were enjoying
Captain R. Johnstone,

Indians will fire for the King’s] Commandant of the B.W.I. teams

Prize at ranges 900 and 1000
ards tomorrow.

r The weather cleared up during
the afternoon for the MacKinnon
Cups. Sun shone brightly over
the range and quite a crowd
gathered to watch what is one of
the biggest events of the Bisley
meeting. There were few on-
lookers in the rain this morning.

There are two MacKinnon
Cups, senior and junior,

Trinidad, Jamaica, Barbados
and B.G. each had a team of
four entered for the junior
event but it was the first time
in history the West Indies was

invited to compete as a com-
29SSSB9SS9S9S9SSSSSSOSSS$
v

Helic Everybody

4
All Roads lead to the Fox Club, \

the Garden, St. James to that x
Grand Dance

— Sponsored by —
Messrs. John D. L. Bridgeman
and Campbell Wilkinson on
Tuesday night the 25th July.
1950 Mr c B Browne's

Orchestra will supply the Music
Admission 2 Refreshments on
gal

Leeward Buses leave the Lower

Green at 9 p.m

22.7.50—In

96556 GGGSSOSIOOSO SANG”
PELSSLLE LLL ort

CONCERT

(Under the Distinguished
Patronage of His
Excellency the Governor
Mr. A. W. L. Savage, C.M.G.,
and Mrs, Savage)

by the

BARBADOS CHORAL
SOCIETY

at the

COMBERMERE HALL

On Thursday, 27th July
1950 at 8.30 p.m.

Guest Artists:

Miss JEAN LAWSON,
L.R.A.M, (Pianist)

Mr. P. A. K. TUCKER,
(Baritone)
Tickets may be obtained at
the Advocate Stationery
or from Members of the
Society at the following

prices:—
RESERVED $1.00

UNRESERVED :: 60¢. & 36c.

Copies of the Programme
and Book of words may
be obtained from the Ad-
vocate Stationery.

PRICE 6d. each

SOE LAO COE



LPL LLLLE LLL LEELCEEPLPPL LEPPARD EP






*
Se




SUPPER & DANCE

at the

B’'DOS AQUATIC CLUB
(Members Only)

THIS EVENING

Cold Buffet Supper will be
served in the Ballroom
from 7.30 to 9.30 p.m.

Price $1.50 each

Reservations up to Noon
on Saturday

Please Dial 4461 or 4311

DANCING from 10 p.m.
to 2 a.m,
18.7.50—5n,












+

8

s

=

%

Calico—36” wide—49c. yd.
Plastic Raincoats—$2.I8 ea.
Rubber Sandals — 50c. up
Boys’ Socks — 12c. a pair
Anklets — Ee up

ea.
Drill te. ya"
_ . ya.
Children’s Vests — 30c. ea.
Khaki Drill — 59c. yd.
Boys’ Caps — 24c. ea.
Vests (Gents. & Ladies)
Children’s Panties (Plastic)

Thousands of Bargai i
Departments Rice



THANI'S

Dress Goods & Household
Pr. Wm. Henry &

Swan Sts.

SELLA SDLPEL CLP EE

$ |BIGGEST

Very chic and excellent

are having at present. Blue

Sizes 34 to 38

for

who shot at Bisley several times
before the war for Trinidad, told
me:

“The general standard of shoot-
ing has far exceeded my expecta-
tions, even though I had a high
opinion of West Indian teams
before they came here. They are
an exceptionally fine lot of men
to have under my command.

“The absence of island insular-
ity has been particularly marked;
they have all worked as one co-
ordinated team.”

The foilowing will represent
the West Indies in the Senior
Kolapore to-morrow—most im-
portant event of the Bisley meet-
ing: E. Crooks (Trinidad) Lt
Colonel J. Connell (Barbados),
Superintendent J. Reid (Trinidad),



Major F. T. Manly (B.G.) D. B
St. Aubyn (B.G N. J. Driver
(B.G.), G. E. Waddington (Ja-
meica), Sgt Ww F Sangster
(Jamaica)

Captain Johnstone will captain
the team and also act as wind
coach.

LACE

TRIMMED
NIGHTIES

these hot nights we

Green, Lemon

$3:60

Cave Snepuerp & Co., Lr.

10, 11,





THE
"EXPECTING

HOWL IN

PICTURE!

| YOUNG-

ROBERT HUTTON - JANIS CARTER BILLIE BURKE ”

Story and Screen Play by Lou Bresiew and Joseph Hoffman
ASANTANA PRODUCTION - Directed by HENRY LEVIN + Produced by ROBERT LORD

TOWN THIS WEEK-END!

12 & 13 Broad Street.






leechee nuts!




COLUMBIA PICTURES
presents

Robot Barbara

HALE









BOWR

ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT

Iron and Steelwork cannot corrode beneath a coat of
BOWRANITE. Proof against heat or cold, the corrosive
air of big cities, salt spray and sea-water, BOWRANITE
is used by engineers, shipping lines, dock authorities,
industrial contractors everywhere,

and public and
YOU SHOULD

Tough, flexible,

Stocked in :—

Permanent Green, Red, Grey, Black and

Super Black (Heat

in tins of Imperial Measure.

ONE GALLON WILL COVER 1,000 SQ. FT.

"PHONE 4456

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.



yet non-
made in many attractive shades.

~~

(



ANITE

USE IT. TOO
cracking, BOWRANITE is
Resis'

ng)

AGENTS












PAGE 1

BAT1 l.l>\\ .11 1 V J.' 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGF SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. ^ !" ——*"' HARBOUR LOG Britain Wanta Rheumatism, Ankles Put y r Backache, Kidneys Strained! romi i < i i i fimt I*"' It" lurrrjIN MEMORIAM % %  IMP on me m.' 1 %  .. ... %  Mill SAMv AUTOMOTIVE %  STATION WAOOM I tianl* •pe* ed at Craw Where by JJV*'! I %  Wmd* St Pel* •*• III.K ISO III ES NOTICE £20 MONTHLY EASILY *UIK •*•• 1U 4r*l.ng In itamp. No eaperien. occeueiy Suitable lot either * .ito coiUfl you -ith Student. Coionln and Dominion. Bar pen o leapondemt Enclose 1'. *t*n-.p Ma.l onl> take lew. da>In Carlisle Bay M l eign Lane* In(l. Noncr u mm' GIVEN that .*. %  %  mm having any debt or claim. r>mn ih Batata of Walter Thorn*. Holder. Art *a*cn' lit* ot Vxit . *h of Saint John in thia Island h' on tint IflUt day of August I** intealat*. an requested to send In pea ileulara of thouclaim* duly aitoatou M the uiulat.iai.nl Ida Bnaamuml II. Id.r. r o lUynaa A (,n(f. Solicitor' No 1 Swan Street, B r i dg etown, on or nadir Ihe list day Of July. IMA. attai u hieh data I anal) pracNd lo dlBU-lbule ; the % %  all ot tna deceased anweig thr parti** entailed thereto having regard only to such tlal-na o* which I h*li turn hava had notice and 1 will not t-. liable for the asset, or any p*u" __ tr...eo ao dlatrtbuted lo any peraon of .MM debt or claim 1 ahall not than hava had notice. The ggtab* are requeued to etiu* thgtr HM i'i.eli'-dnria without daUy EM DaMfi tin* in day rf June. MM. I Waltar Thomaa Holder. dc***ed. IDA ROSAMUND HOLDER. A.lmlnmratrl* ot th* BUB rue* A.I Member*. Bubecriber* and Eiiandi o( lh* AwmiaTion are laWIMd Art. Lad* HMlna :. %  ,>. ; y V I. ,War Set 1 .....cia. Beh Ito" %  I ft.Ilia Marl! Set. Cu-deni. VM T.matin A II VMM AFUUVAIH M V I %  M V Daeriaouil H ton. net t s#l %  ran a* UB*i* ... .. ,,. |1. •< %  % %  Cipt Mitchell, from 01 Lucia ...nan W bM -aa*. (at.. %  < %. ... ,. p*nss n i Headquarter*. Put tha a* ol WaHrlWld and Plan* lor the n a n nilB W %  A K ARMSTRONG iitamritr H will ISM|* ., %  '... I %  a:** in IRIS INIM'STRIM I NIOH wit IAMJ %  % %  *• >% % %  %  '. OIW li B %  Guiana I Davidson. S7 to*' ...i N Wallace. Ill Wallace, from Bellieh S NOTICE TAKr. NOTICB MULLARD f Kl.Kt THAT MUUAR r-> 1 IMITBD. _ kd. or bullIMM ddl "..bury A I 2. r • u rMMtrMton \ H Hfll--.tr ic PBO ..mpany. m, Lonland. ha. -I-I.I...! *M k in Pin ith Klec,1--. radio aiwl Ml* and trmtinnitlxil d |aiatu< BM equipment, elec'rlc nwaiiddacant. fluoiorent *nd dlachwrnc Uunpa. r liahtit,* BCMta, electric aiuviim IOTfr>\ I] .p |H iiat.i* and tub*-. IUn•-atina appatatu'. and will be %  irfciJi i IN THE ASSISTANT tX>URT 0* tflW R.WockDiei%  Cmpariiatiun AM, 1U ,un that L-mbert ttrj'AHTVHJa* MM M Ion. ne! In Touch With Barbadoi Coattal SUtion PuMir ^itle-J-Contd b.eakiTut .1 %  %  Way and I %  All dap.mW.il nwmm -h uir %  •cherrb) raqt A-i.t..m labour*! at Leal %  Ptan,:M-1 .!:. .1 .lubtun,: .ud in • quarry when a aide ol tha quart* brvue on htm and he died — clock am dai Otlaai i l.'h I ma h am: %  hall aliel • of July I %  POULTRY v Don white Let' B li 1 J-—2n ELECTRICAL WASinNG HTACmNl trie Wadiiim Hash o II e 111 Elet1 3*71 12 ? 10 In KACHINi: One .! %  Machine Dial MTI I %  Sawin* B T ->n %  ISCEU UlEOUt chemtttiy R % %  BOARD About ten thouaand fact Deal Board. Contact The C H Kliich CO Lid No I Palmetto SI. 11 1 SB—* CALYPSO til let. only them HrcORM, feat" eiht DI1KI1AMS ADCOIDS -Save pt formance c.peclaUy whrn I ha. to he uted. Of areat a.M-tance i i .niH'.i in new or reoorad ena Rimple and Inexpensive to ii". Ob !.> Ii.nn all Icadina Oaraiei and Recvl.e Station. H Ja...n Joiiea %  Co Ltd Aarnti A Dtttnbuior* laf.Bd— m. d KII eata I ..flt.e * r.ppo.ll-Hi of .U£h lealitra ..,, AM ma %  .*!* MM i* "*" : at my office ltd tail 11 Jui>. wall u %  MflJaUar of Trac>Mai li i a* Bl b IraMJ la -I'prar n< Ui< if Appeal •••• Wrdnea l at 1 1 I .v. ia*i I V CILKIS. it Clark Aralatanl Conn \ NOTICE TAKE NOTICE "STELLA" THAT STELLA LAMP COMTANY ] 1MITMI BtHUh Company, who— .rd. < bu.*. Mtd.e. :-.'• %  • tea Boad. Harleaden. N W 10. London. Entltnul. hat applied for the "Cl*'"lion of a Hade maik in I'..' .* "I Reflate! In conn| Ulio.it for lighting mory p-tn.-.il-ily incandeacent and ditchaigc Umpa. elector uae in photoaraphy. astral iiahimg flHina*. thade. and r. ipariion, baiiaiit and turner, lor dlachaiaa lampt: alaetne torche.. Including pocket lamp* and hand dviiamo .. dynamo hahtina % %  <>. pan. thereof and accettorlea lhriet Including teflectnrt and rearlighta; dynamoa for i,a acl.. and will be entitled "i.ainc after n month ftnm th* lth day of July law unit— .on* peraon .hall In the meantime give .phcale to me at my ,r.fnce of .ipr-MHu.ii of nuch realttrallon. Th trade mark ran be seen on application at my Dated (fit* Itth day ol July. 1*90. II WILLIAMS Hegltlrar ol Trade Maik. SI 7 to in. r fJ | Meeting areuiv Club iaa %  i.i Aui DM I i Ba am He*k In i be propoaad i V/dnai I W l> m al Koad. Kami i.l mullon. intrnu mum De tubmlltcd lo th. •derugned C o Cainngion t, laaly nca. Street, Bridgetown, not l.le *•'•> day. fi-n the dale hereol Oaled thH IMh ^y ol Jul.. IBM R C CHAPMAN. Hony Secielirv OFFICIAL NOTICE IiARHAnoS IN THF IMI.I1M (Ol T Or APPI;AI. 'EqulUbla JurladlcHoni CYRIL ORUCE BROOKS OIL STOVES Burti" Owen T Allder H— k Uet Dial 33 1 -In TYRES AND BATTERIES Si/.-. M x 7. 33 x II JO 5 and other gUM. al-" Old ham 17 plate Iiatterlea Ouaiantred Enquire Auto Tvr.C.mpanr Trafalgar Street. Phone Mi* 11 7.30—1 UWEN TRUCK CHASSIS—One A., chaatU complele with C-b. running order, tyre, and bat 1 %  %  : 'light aiKithec AutHi Arthui 1 Co Lid High Sir 3*1 Al %  •MI.VIOLIN" A CASf 1 OWEN T ALIJJEH. Roa.ick Sti FOR RKKT TAKE NOTICE HARWOOD'S .. Dual .i, Haiwood and Company cd, a cortwallott dul] IW %  the Uw, of the D-imlnlon ..I ,1. arfeOM trade oi bu.lnaa. d,. %  .too. Wiaughneary Sueet. in CM) %  ValliaWMar. Provin-e ol III it I.'I C-.lumbi-.. Dominion of C tt loi trade BUkT. In IWt "A" ol Regi*er in t-lton itilh alcoholic beverage* ill be entitled to regUter the after one month from the lain day |v. HBO, unlea. Mime pemon unall dtipli IN pui.nanre of an Ordei '•url In the above aelton ma* ath day ol Juno. IftU, I give notice to 1' PQ— ona having any estate, right or nlereit in or any lien Bf incumbrancr irtectina all thai cerialn pMoe or n > %  land ntuate al Clapham In the pi il Chn.t Chuich and Uland aloraaaid lamina bv admeaiiuremciit BBkf mid Ihlrty eight perchea be the Bama i >r lea* ilhe tame lieing former I v part il a larger area of land •If i and mdlng i nheii bulling hard* the North on of the Ealata of Henrietta Au.i>1 Waleoll. deceaard toward, the F* .. bind* now or late of Mlaa Adeline Yard, in* aid. the South on landi of Hi.kley Oolf and Conntiv Club and Inward* the Waal on land, former Iv of rel OD Waleolt but now of CUtb II..v.. II I. %  !,-r however elae the Mi nuia butt and bound la bring twtoc* me an account of their aald claim. v.iLichet.. lo be examined by rm anyTuecday. or Friday between hour* of 11 moon* and 1 o'rlorH Ir me at my office ol oppoMtloo -ftl The trade mark ^ ^ XfaaWara* CkjUrt (Jt Appeil EUNICE ARTHUI*. ram '' St Jimph floifiu. S S HJtarUTi Baai Baaa I mi.'il t Vidatdai. S ^ I %  i %  -. CaaaBea %  Palnvt as .. s ajj %  -^ %  renu.le Ann S rteH Hi.t--.ieu S S • 4 Uutkia. S S Raban. S S MS Hera S % Tralen.i. IR I tAin Vallr* SS Si I Ov roiatna. S S Hverea. S aiWOlBiata AHJIIVALai BY B 1 I 1'K.iM IH H.i.rv ltotoeriIVtuu Mara| t' I JulIBi Mitchell K MOM ST KtTTS Ar.Mli-ld Pe.h.* I'll. I %  I FTt.iM BPtTLSH Otfl V v %  Vter Wallbrdige. AllrcW De Fieu n %  I a r. .. % %  • .i i VeronicWanl.ud. Am Slanloru llnlklll IU--ett. Samuel Aat*To Know %  v an i" MM K.ni.in ..imii.i.. 'spapri %  %  M liad tRBl bre-i. A possihllilv '. i win ba t'xIBaetMd w •' ii'inlii^ru'ii in other newKpni i in Rrit.un eon %  arva is awWath* ir no I w*aattn Kuropt''" 1 •"v>utitni> '.' %  • %  '"in ol arftea iDM roar r rtuBaorn* Inf's n-ptift.naSkT %  .*i Mloa of tWO t/BBtl >v a uitrfrr revi.-v.. following proptisals %  da i j MM lunisii ana Rajaeti Drfeiu-f Ministers. Mr unit M rif\Hi bu lion ol tha tana ol larrko iri III it.iiInone i't BM imtiv vropoaala union f,.i raaUatnjj BntIan ti.'i. ii..pii BJ and proBtenaanai tuatton —R ruler %  %  lai No Benefit—No Pay %  %  %  health aad rn-n %  %  Ht> KHfrHrvt Oacnw', Way Hun a quid n>leaa Mth a MM Gystex, KeiMl.ll Hill C* Tin . Mawwo* >"" "" I7i 1 111 1' %  %  C—t MABUarovi At iffamv ^eelnoklna the Sea. having %  "".aUihi -. "'iJSS -""T.v.,X.""'l.. vie month re' puaae.'ton *nhln Ph.me m %  30 %  > ., aealrable property ai sarjcui rnagi A ibtantial1> BMBI '•' lajBjti|| h-t leanl -"'d FROM ST OeraMmc Mu.ra.. %  i . i .. Carol* Ca'-'ii l-ROM VENFl/lH V Amador 0.-tauio M-r. Oet rid". Octauia. Andre* octaiim I M.Hhe. JRM M.lll... Mane Ann I H.nriqiie Itarnla. I'm llarillx. Ml M-ii.i-H.iietii in .tone. A.ti...i Bint---.. Hlack.tone nn'Mnnu> n\ u t* i \ FOR THINII1AI' witarad %  -i i..t Tilll Weekt. Edith BrownDonilili Janetl Hmlnn. M Itarcant la"l> Either t* M Hrrnum Mar-h.ll hi WhBataia William MhHaitd. E N,l "d H.."-' !"• %  -' M"~ !•"' %  rtLB BRITISH OVtANA Elllabeth Blrkelt PB* I I Wendv Edglull ttB8| BB|hin. Jamet (.redhead Vi i Turnbull. Doreen Vhulei i raJra. wnihe* rung War B • atei extiemely loi rpectlon and D'Arey A S _*ing bedroom.. >tud> kitchen ei^i oughout One quarter with on-hard Qonerai BBM I'riee which la only •!.• '"• "' other piirtu-uler -W"lv "* ,ii B 7 PHOl'ERTY -homa*. one ubat. .all houea ">op at dining r. ii.ilci i B'tdgrflrld SL ntially built ttonOHouir h< I %  nma. two bedrooma. • % %  tth, kitchen Eaan Khan. John Dare. Am Mav I* .loVd I ana7ar RealnaW l-nea Thelina Hilt UIUSNAHA l-eter DeVerteville Haiel DeVeii. Fraudtletlale Wilfred Del i.l. . Bnaa, Uonel William-. Nellie M.r... Hilary MrQiillkln. Viola SI Hil-uPOH ANTItll'A FtancU Ha-bliw. Bloodworth. 1 Hill. Edmond Charlaood. E.l-nl •• FOR SAN JI'AN I'..,I Nlan ...... together wih one A aop ,,, „l a...I arable Und wl.nl. i.,-• with caneGuud place for ic and railing .toek. Price fixed I.44S IVER OARAGE Standing %  quaie leeol land al St Gap Chrt Church a private dwei ecently eeocleit and buIR ot etone and the alte la an excellent on* for a garage The building eaiy eonverrion llnghouae Or Public Auction on Thuraday Hi' July at t p m at the office of Uu ungeraigiieil irom whom lurther par %  tlculara and condltlona of IBM "n br B 8 NICHOLIJt k CO Ikl t 1st Roebuck Slraet Telephone No •* %  t i Ba ijBB aharea of *1 <" earh Hi BAH BABOO (ii OPERATIVE BANK UMrrED The above wtfl be .et ut. lor ui> to nuhlie inmfaatHton on PTda MAIL NOTICE M-ll KeKl.iered M-ll l-r hltmh Guiana by the I i.mit W Smith will be rk*d al ...t.,l P...I llfti Hide. Panel Mall. Rrgl.tered Mall Hall at 10 IB a m on the July. IfAO Italy Slops Op AMUHI Faroes # from pagr 1 ill jinn in enrobti i tha Adriatic Baa with Iba Brit%  I. Mtvilh-rr .. Fleet Aitietuan nwv.il units. With tha % %  • %  BIBD i"'.i oi tlif army, tt I* believed Hal MI urge (InNpeeiiuiK up deliver f Aim-ii..n. arnu IBBMV the Atnntie I "lift rurns have >o far arrived but the r.nte of deUvcry la well behind lh-' prontUci achodulo, according to ii.ili.ui -Miirccs. It wag understood %  i\ Hiit.un. .' •rintioii of Jet llghUT-.. will suppl> oll'l I Mi I i .<| u| mem whkh oafenot bo wppUM ba AmeruM n was UidlraMd • %  thoritativ.iv tO-aa) that the** NupplUa wuuii i>. paaacuva —Reuli JHIPPING NOTICED I. Mi..I-....1 I '. I %  %  %  \a-u.g' MetbaarM Ribaa< i kaktad O. abet Jan. frl b a i paitlratar. • %  *<• URNBOO wrniv A ... LTD Agenta. TrliMil.d DA CtlBTTA a CD urn Age.ii. narfaaOoe R w i seiinoiK i Dwncra Aaa.H Ulinii In. f-auilume ||..| : in: 5ACUENAY TERMINALS • i BBJB Wlm Iniraf Preparnii." .h .~i S Sill IIIIIIIIMl V ore Ha btt 9 1'.. Bubtd Trinidad, SAUJNfiS X B II %  : l>i. EBferl.a Arrltal H.I. Reraad*. PLANTATIONS LIMITED—/l 9 .li SRGUENflV TERMINALS C A RBI NO TON US CORRESPONDENT MISSING IN KOREA PtEW YORK. July 11. Wilaoii Fielder. Junior. Tim. Magazine coirofpondent. haa boon irporied fnisaHiK on thO Taojon (ronL the New York office*) <>{ nm and U/a, IncoriRaratod, aald tonight, fielder aged S3, waa H IKirted the retreat of the A met i. 14th Wvi-lon —Rruter 5 llh.i.l Camtj J .1.1.. i. Mihi %  aoaaaa*. aTHaW \ •!!• -uir 00 "" M.lg*ad. vj *.'.',:::'*;:' %  '*•*'•' %  ••' %  '• '>''••'•'''•' NEW ARRIVALS LOOM D TWAafO haCTJ CYOLI 11 Mil lt^ BETR ( V( IIIMl IIRS C'V* 1-t Bft.B IIOBN"* I-IMI'S A (irty. Claimant, ae alao notified thai they iu..t attend the> aald Court on Wedne.. lay. the ith day of September. IBB*, t 10 o'clock a m when theli lalm. will bt ranked Olven under my hand Ihu Iflth day of lii.e. IBM. I V '.IIKIAg Clerk ot the A-Ulanl i-urt ol Appeal ll.a t-3n MIVIIIMIIM MHIIIS Aimi% i II HELP fonK-Mutt Rave aaBeaBBta frrrr|ie< Apple to rernlhur.t. Dearnna R ii k< ic Bock, between 5 and • i I,,.,... to fcaaay. „, ,. SAIJW GIRL kiicalcdge of i Bute .alary APII No BO, Bridget.iw B'I^CFLLANHOUS — good ... trom < i M D ota rb M. Lie UIc vlcrenreFurther rtetRaar. VU*r PERSONAL TAKE NOTICE OAKITE THAT OAKITE PRODUCTS INC corporBUijn organlxed and exiting undei tha Uw* of tha SUM of New York. United Sta'e* ol America, whos* trade or tiuai. nmaddra** U .n Tli.me. SUeet. New York , New York. United State* Of Amenta, ha* applied for th* leai.lratlon ,.l a Had* mark In Part "A" ot lb* Reguiter In connection with rhem,eat (.impound, having waier-ltenlng qualitie-, recoenmend*d tor all eleauaui*. *M alao ie-omm*nded at a *cai* I m...er. milk.tone remover, acid inhibit. bacterM-Lde. fungicide, and %  n-tiirig operation! of textile*, and i* e entitled tn regular the tame alter o .ontli from In* ltih day of July IBM nlew ome penon shall In the meai >ve notce in duplicate to rr' a) .<> fflte Of oopoailion ol tuch reaitlrat->n %  he trade mark can lie seen on applicaK. Dated tail lath day ol July IBM. II WIU.IAMS. Regt.trar of Trad* Mark. OFFICIAL SALE BARBADOS IN IBB AaaiaTAKT tot RT tr* AITEAI. 'Equitable Jurladktlonl CYRIL I1RUCE BROOKS PI..muff CLIFTON HOWEli. 1NNIBR nelendant NOTICE 1. hereby given lhat by virtue ..( an Order ol the AtaMiant Court o Appeal dated the IBIh day of June. IBM there will be *et up lOT **le to lh. rdgheat bldd*f at the Oflke nf Ul. Clerk of the A**l*t*nt Court ol Appeal at th* Cour" HUK Bridgetown, t tween th* hour* ot II inoont a 1 o'clock In th* afternoon on rnn, Bib day of September. Vacant Post of S|>cci-ili-l Physician, t.eneral Huspilul, Barbados. APPUCATIONS are invited for the post of Specialist Physician. General Hospital. Barbados Applicants should be regiBteied gcn.ul medical uiactiUoners; poat-gntduatc hospital experience esacnUul. The post is non-pensionable on contract for three yOaVa, renewable. Salary will be on scale of M.oOO % 4BU $6,240 per annum, plus hall fees for private patient care Within the Hot-pital and h-lf consultation foes within and without tht Hospital, otherwise private practice is not allowed. Position in scale determined by experience ami qualification. Rent-free furnished quarters will be provided but until these of available an allowance at the rate of 10% of. salary will be payable Passages, not exceeding (10 each way. Off officer and Tamil: — iible on appointment and on nili m Uvrrponl Sth Jtilv latii Jui-v 3"th Juh Due M.irl-.nlot MH -h:lv 1'lth Jlllv 30th July llttl xU| IHIMEWAKI) FOR T1IK UNITED KINGDOM VesMl 'TACTICIAN" %  citArrsM AN for Gil. %  Mo. I. narbudoi ill .inly "IT paiUculiiia apply to DA COSTA & CO., LTD—Airnti. \^*JnA /l£oocu StseunAhip ft>* 9nc GIBBS PROVISION OBOOUl I.MM OH MORI. i iMNcru i iniAMrM i HI NM:H NO. July July Aiim B'tto* 1 Hi i A.ia saw ...i. NT. sai %  'Sill I B'Oaa ..t July ll.L AugUit All I iltuate at Clapham %  •hrl* Church and li -lining by admeanin %  l of lai lh* pariah • rood an tight pin-che* be Ihe *ame nw-e th* *ai ea.ureriient i_..i I-%  .-> b ward, the Nort the Eatate %  %  I | I sui--i..i. QuaWl i Naaie al Sblf SH AIX-tlA POINTER s BXOOA I-ULABIS" Ball. Maati'al July Hit Aug 4th Ha Aug 1* 7th HirM.i A .„ Mh Aug inn SOBTBBIM SO | s ALOOB I'HOHIM Aril... Harli.e.1 ;UI'h July %  II.',' ,nd toil reli. Howril landt Henrtelta Augueta ._red* Hie Eart on land* now or 1*1* * Mia. Adeline Yatd toward* Ihe South on I H, ... tiolf and Country Club rdi the W**t on land, formerly n" W-lco.t but now ..( Cult.,. InnOB or however el* the aa butt and hound, and II not llwwiI tn* ^ld property will be -t Up lor tale on %  wary luceeedlng Friday between the % %  me hour* unlll the BM M aold lor a .urn not IOBB than CM • m a* ... v ^sa.~Aa. Ckrrk of the At*it. Court ol Appeal : IM1IIII SALES Vacant Posts of Medical Officer, General Hospital, Barbados. APPLICATIONS are Invited for five vacant posts of Medi Officer, General Hospital. Barbados Applicants must be iegjste Medical practitioners. .•osta arc nun-pensionable, on contract for three jraara, rBBWiDM ...... ..-.. not permiU.-tl Salary will be on the scale of $3,000 X 240 14.800 per annum and position in scale determined by exiKTieim and qualification. IL-r.i-free furnished quarters will be provided but until il* ,ire nvaihibltan allowance al Ihe rate of ten per cent Of laiarj will be payable. Passages, not exceeding *9*0 each way. of officer and %  %  '" %  payable on appointment and on expiration of 'ontiact. Dulles are general and in their performance the Medical Officer shall act under immediate supervision and control of such Superior Offlcrr-; an Medical Superintendent. Specialist Surgeon, and Specialist Physician and unde rgeneral direction of the LrsraetOl Of Madical Service?. Applications accompanied by two testimonials should be addr."sea 10 the Colonial Sccrelarj. Bridgetown. Barbados, and should be Bab* mitted not later than the 31it of July. 1*M0. 14.6.So lO GOLD Itl *tl ;*,'.*.'.*-'-*-'.•,-,-.-. '.-.'.--•PASSAG ES TO IR ELAND Anlill. ProdUi I I.I.I !'. .a. Di %  i Dublin pei '.IV rit'Al.A' .oi.i.n froi July Single l-arr j; 7M. unual rrdy-liuna Ur ilnldnn Bar KipU linin.ill>l>li 11 K..|Uii.-I AUCTION .Ihle lor her or anyone unl*aa by a I by me .he haelna t home and protection without my ALBERT I. TODD. Uppar Bay at Op OB* Co ll.TBO—2r. rreby warned egain*! my wife. Dorothy bar) •• 1 1 BM i--"Hi%  r...ld i .a anyone eta* contracting any debt or .nleea by %  written Signed FTT7 HEBBEBT 1"' C'li""" " " al %  1.11 .TAKE NOTICK JANIT Jamaica Knitting Mil" Limn duly incorporated under I neat addre^" 1* Number t Weal Bireet .. ih ol Klngiton. I.iand ol Jamaica. BrIUah WeM Indie* piled lot th* real*tratton ot part -A" of BegUte. .•ecti'.n with knitted good* arid Will be entitled to rrgMtor Ihe ami altar one monlh from the 18th day ol J.l>. l*v un,e*a tome person ahall in lh. time give r.otiee in duplicate at my office of opposition %  reg**tr*tlon The "ad* mark •een on application at my office Dated "hi. itth day of July. IBM H BT7LLIAMS ol Trde Maik 11 7 Sft-1 I have be.t'v i.e Comj eat up for sale public a*arUon *t Ceatral start M'indan*t the lOi. I^s.inina .r I o'clock the below mentioned arilel". .. %  I. skillet containing pain! o"L •!• cold atorag* door. auaatMa ••' large screw driver. Hi motor v*nic hub cap, WH croc..* bag* D ABCY A BCOTT. B %  A ., %  BBta* II 7 SB—1 mechanic tool*. HEAL ESTATE (TJ.VOIR. FlU Village. I Id Btona wall. Thro. awing a> Dining. Kitchen ne'luth Oarage On Seaald* E McKay I LANT. Dealrabl* building sit* Orarm* Hall Terrace Dial MS* Vacant Post of Medical Superintendent. GaajaaaJ Hospital. Barbados. APPLICATIONS are Invited for the post of Medical Superintendant, General Hospital. Barbados Applicants should be male regitercd medical practitioners with experience in Hospital administration The post is non-pensionable, on cntiact for three years, renewable Salary will be at rate of a5.T60 per annum Private pra allowed. Rent-free furnished quarter* arc provided Passages not exceeding fOOO each way, of officer and famil-. i %  able on appointment and on expiration of contract The Medical Superintendent shall act under the aanafa] intendence and direction of the Director dT Medirnl Services, and | ,hall be responsible generally for 'he supervision and management of i the Hospital, shall perform such other departmental duties ai may be required of him from time to time Applications accompanied by two testimonials should be addressed to the Colonial Secretary. Bridgetown. Barbados, and should be submitted not later than the 3lt of July, 1K50 24 %  .50.— 3n KAMI FOR SALK :t acre, nt rv.re.lent buddimt land si M, I'eter. 1*0 feel rnad Irontagf MHII right uf v.a> Mi aea. 4 1 rent* per iujr.|aafl JOHN M. III.AIIO.X Real laUte Xr-.ii P i 4041' PUitUtlnn* Buil'IniE III) IIWIill IT niiNf. v\i ii w i --I i s i OH i rno M li t Ul. II I'OI.ISH IIN fODAI l>ll*Oltll M Mil:. I III |'r.|.ij.-t.n-i oid and fffjiof W rag a i MKTAL 1RV A llll f I Mil \r CHECK THESE VALUES! Ulill I I I HIIU I II I ttllt III ill VIII II. (Christian Sripuce \ \ \ In-ailing iiiiuiii f f g Visitors Are Welcome a ;i„i. Ill.i. :ea 3— $ ilMH i While. M*f, Blac Mir. .11 > U |1 I llourt: l'J am.—2 p.m Tuoadays, Wednesday*, iridaya 10 a.m.—12 o'clock: Saturdays. |ii Ml'in u %  I'll'. \l.l.l KIN IB nt Kt-tl gl Mill H' I \N\ \H Itl Kit) I I I Mill 1 I \\\ \I tSI',1 I |ll Mill It aANDALfl \MIII HI lllll It SOLI Children'. SI 1.0. SI I idsOS M Mea'1 v l.\IHIi t 1(1 VI. -OLID Mi'lls N i" |MEN WOKKINf. HIIOKH *7*TOWn


PAGE 1

PAfil i: \I:I: M •• > Win \il .sATl'ltlm. Jll.V -'-'. !/•"• HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE ("M C SHE8IH 'S wir. I THEN [ CAN RUN I Mi K. O. fA.WOX . ^ ->^(--~ V > THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS *?%*t** \\~ RRING'NG UP FATHER £r IT v*>jpg-?RX TO TV**; l/v >bBAHOn,lt**JT& LMSQ [ I r> £k*7T JACv OF 1 tfS MANY CX.O CJSO MBBSP '. \ MA SOCKED UU ,WTTW rrr BY GEORGE MC.MArJOS "TMG ONUV BEH_ I WBWGMBBP 56Gi^ AtKXND MSB* WAS M6 WIFE* %  OLD BBLC-... THAT .• ,;-.\, %  >A TCCA(jeED I ; Kl,,bY S3* MOM LBC-. uCsEv! I "VSri L^vE ICT! BMCE... AsO ACTivf. WAVA. '3UT c*S:.\o-JO .... r PHANTC.I ALEX RAYMOND LEE FALK & RAY MOORES We can* I rah11 up with ii! The call fur "Black & White M continues to grow all over the world, lor connoisseur; agree thai u i a Scotch in a dan all its own. Blended m the tpeojll "Black & White" way it is a -ple.idid Junk at all tunes and for all occasions. BLACK&WHITE SCOTCH WHISKY Oiit S'ettifiS in //if B/fiu/itie/ 1HH %  >( Go( i <*—>* w* ik> Dili"*. •Vhtn.n § C JAMtS BUCHANAN A CO. LTD.. GLASGOW. SCOTLAND HEATINGS KILLS \ HAVE YOU GOT A J; I COLD or COUGH IF SO TRY BROWNE'S I CERTAIN lOliuH I ItM 1'I..I iv lUmW, rM Cough*, i MM Sore ThnM. Hn.rn-. Bitftxhlal AIUH, WMBPW ro.ig!i. n~.v of UM I -lc etf. C CARLTON BROWNE l> U!i..l.-u.i^ Rrtjtl Itrufds* § IM, Korhutk Si. Dikl 2113 S THE MAKK OF lilSTIN'CTIO.N in HI i>l Hlpi-JeU A Bottled b> mm & SAMPSON LID. A coffee hit! %  It's the improved Chase and Sanborn I Mac WOfdl CU1*I dcicribc il. You'll have to UIR 1 it .i. upoTihii new Chase and i I p, you'll exclaim with delifhll %  uk ihoM who 1 %  i ii->i rolfee 1 ] % % %  ' iri a ran %  %  >:.:•" |>a krd.rrom %  HI i .. These tough S formers '•1M-Wkt4lba>. .......... Tat far*.. f-_ r, mn> i M Lwj rh providt T Inw^of Matlpai limn for oprirr. itU onr UM work rUr.iu-j am) Irdlot Kicnrttk buiion 1 MffpiJlJ Ihf Ion. 10 rrJu.e ryrcwr r .. to fcetp miinirmncr L har,;* town m t;iminim m I'eirolor •difKl njlne. I -fi or nhi-lunJ drive. .•rmUort**rd.i •ninil Add OB .', (new 5 tonnerv o .....i fleet. KWlllt. ion i-iitrr in n %  nem value. •Af*taAiw... irrr ;,. ii "*"•-.. • MORRIS-COMMERCIAL FORT HOYAI. 4.AIIA4.I LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributor! Phone 4504 \iJUtkai WE OFFER NAII. S< ISMIKS TWEFZKRS Fll IS Sll VVINC. UK I -III %  RAMBS CALL IN TOII.W AT COLLINS' DRUG STORES %  road and Tudor Slrreis. MTBLUI IMIIII. iXNDtVN a fcOMOM • nil II\A(1VIU RECTORS FEVER MIXTURE lea prroaraimn tor ronilMiini Malaria ana pounded from lefled Druei. rerer %  ll t-VM.lv |Ml %  IIFfmRS PRODUCT' Obtainable nt:Messrs BookeniB DOS, |)ru^ Mores l.ld. I Br.ad SlnM ,„d Alpha Ph.rn..,,. HaMtai,. s rituisoii. SON e co no 1.11.00s


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EOE4GN2G7_H2XLL6 INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T14:58:35Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02240
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

SATURDAY. JVI.Y 22. 1950 RARBADOS ADVOCATK •The Devil THC-OAMBpLC PAGF FIVE Quarrelled With His Wife* -YESTERDAY I MTCUOrrTDfT IIOWIII were mainly re*poi.*.o:* for I* During HI,, morning tne heai MM itiiftiw bui abort!) b> I ia>rain (oil jnu m* tsenpsrature 1 bmi in ihe toll*, %  t istting lbs . %  ,.,.> I..id ., MIIIU on ihvu lace. SumiWere tWDUf !r dug in iiu-ii dutrfeta bs> ruunv all art' WrlstUng (lor J bumper • rop nsxl hum wm no) MU> txpericncd in Hi L.IKI-!,.AH. but a: TUMI; Bridge, whsr, Ibe Third Test brim pl->'fd, rain IYI1 during thi* morning Ptrhnpi l>> UM lime the West i rs rand) la resume their lirsl Innings the rain hud travelled in this dlrnctton. During Thursday and up to six o'clock ysstsrdai morning 14 pj rt_* of rain fell in Si. Andrew %  nd ihrft In st Philip What was .1 que-r thlikK yesterday is that although ihe rain wai tolling 'I '.11 shining When (hi* happens many local folk u*^ UM aaprssalon "thr itril M -. %  arrrllim Mith hi. wife. M ANY PARKNTS and children could be teen at h Col lone yesterday morning. Some f the children were taking their entrance examinations for admission to the School. npnjfO LECTl'RES. one entitled M. "Tui-enuloMv" and Ihe other on "Public Health ami the Community" will be given at the St John's Mixed School on Tofsday. I at 7 30 p.m. The first -poaker will he Dr A F S Kinrli. Acting PM O.. Who will talk on "Tuberculosis" while the other speaker. Mi VV A Abrahams, will talk on "Public Health and tits Community" *-pHi: LOSS of a Raleigh BlcyI ,le valued $> was reported bv Vernon Walters of Dayrella Road. St Muhacl lie told the Police thai it MM removed from Mahons Alley, near Broad Street. on Thursday. I RENE LAWRENCE of Jesse my Lane reported that the • %  International Resort" situated at Fairchild Street. Bridgetown, was broken and entered between Wednesday and Thursday and a quantity of cigarettes, liquors and gB.40 in cash, total value $20.55. were removed. T WO MOTORISTS were charg. sterday with failing to stop at Major Roads Many serious ran be caused by ve— bisk* falling to stop at Major Roads and for this offence Police Constables are very strict with both motorists and cyclists. One motorist was charged for n .1 dinMRW manner and t.other for driving without reas01 ibta ("iwdcration. A 1 relist was also charged for holding on to a moving vehuiei and another for riding with both hands off the handle bars. A N ACCIDENT occurred on ( banal Street, City, between the motor car M—940. owned by !. %  •-•..,, %  .., ii...,k ii„:i Road and driven by George Lewis of Harmony Hnll, Barbarees Hill, iwned' and ridden l.\ Frnuk Burton of White Park Rood The left front fender of the car ..; %  I V INCENT JORDAN of Mile and Quarter. St Peter, a pedestrian, was Injured after he w involved in an accident reeen /V. Abo involved was the motor ..-,: II would 1 Bertram Lovell wo. the workbench when rordg thiew the peel at WaU-trft. -aid thai Ftorda rubber! tax %  .. %  and than uie chisel along H %  van aftei he had loin her to itop, He eg* when Walcoll ru n aftei her bul he said thai Walcott did not have a chisel U h band whc „ n did so. ( %  %  %  rnoa tu hut own l,,l,: %  % %  l*eimU U air oil : ,ui tinCouii now gnick him wlih a piece u| raue peel and hou %  he had mbi^d UM rasp and .in-..' ever his back. Ha nid that after ha ran behind Mr and caught up \wt! put out his band to take the chisel bui ina pulled away and mada .1 Veto at his lace and cut htm or nu run Thoj began to wreatle lOT the chJarl After a while ,-Jn lold him Uial he had cul her and ana would loll bar mother Addressing the jury. Mr Ward t"'-! hem that tile question wa-. whether Ihe wounds iniliCttd were IRBIctad maliciously or accidentally He argued that Forde had Having rubbed the raa|: -I along Walcott s baek Whlla other witnesses for the prosecution had said she had dona W-. That proved Forde to be :i •11a,. ..111% she and Walcott knew about how the wounds were produced, thev could : hei story. It would be niost unsafe. I. 1..U1 Uiem. t,. nvicl Walcott on hei fl Ha noint. t thai Forde was ti a sky la 1 king n>od on 'ha ( day *he returned he called her again noa Walcolfs whole bearing wu id this lime she stopped. She '' ,h< u,,no 1 pl*tulity. He put went near the workbench and they rorwa !" 'tiomily ihat the wounds She took up a chisel and,'. !" h ''" '" %  > r^eu.^i during tree while he workl back He goi up and went towards her and she ran He eventually caught up with her and stabbed her with the chisel when she had given it to him The case for the defence was thai the wounds were received hilc Forde and Walcott were struggling for ihe chisel. The defence counsel also based his arguments on ihe discrepancies of theItnaaaaa for ihe prosecution. Madeline Forde. needleworkcr of Lodge Road, said that she knew Walcott since she was going to hool Walcott was a joiner and ad nil workbench near his home underneath a tree. On April 17. she was going at ihe pipe for water, eating cane ihe while. Walcott was sitting when she passed and she threw a piece of cane peel at him. He called afler her bul %  she went on for her water Whi talked rubbed it on ed on a chair with another. He pushed the one he had in his 'land nl her and she moved away, He followed her and told her to put Ihe chisel she had down. She did not do so and he ran after her. When he caught up with her he raised his hand to strike her with Ihe piece a' wood he had brought along with him. She atlempted to ward n off with the chisel and he got cut on his chle. Pile-Driving Stops After 6 Months Engineers of the Public Work.. Dapartmenl wertyesterday driving down tinfOUT last piles to the aoutbern section of the wharf in the outer besfal Of lbs CareenThis work will be completed today and Ihe pile-driving plant is expected to be laken down on Monday afler six months of steady operation. New steel pile, have been i>" 1 down from Ihe beginning of the wing Just above Ihe dock and have i>een extended right up to lln Bridge These 1 for strengthening th" ( the wharf. They are so made Ihat they forming n son of palling so that water cannot get %  through. TI"' nilo-driving plant is equipped with l boiler. Some 12 men %  M',1 t.> operate it while another IB or so are employed to make repairs to the concrete or Ihe wharf The foreman of the engineers told the "Advocate" that the repairs to the concrete will be completed In another monlh He felt thai the steel piles now being used Bra betler UUUI the greenhear: pileIMPORTS YESTERDA Y Around day-break yesterday the 87-ton Schooner "Philip H Davidson" arrived with 2.000 bags of rice from British Gui. for the island This made a total of 3.000 bags of this commodity to arrive during Ihe week. Other West Indian produce I In ihe island yesterday included 120 drums of diesel fuel. firewood, charcoal, cedar boards ..ml wallaba posts Also supplies of fresh fruit, cocoanuls. copra. plantains pumpkins. These were the ear| the three schooners "Reginald N Wallace.'* princess Louise**, "Lydina A" and motor vessels "Lady Joy" and "Daerwood" Stabs She exclaimed thai he had made her do It He pushed his hand at as her lo lake Ihe chisel and she gave it to him. Taking n he stabbed her on her left shoulder and on her right side. She ran away and he. closing in on her, stabbed her again on her right side. He then left. She retllled hei bucket and went home. She fell sick and went lo bed; blood gushing from her side. When her mother came home she took her to l)i Ward who sent her to the hos pilal. She remained at the hos / pn.il duri"? three weeks. Dr. fc. L Ward. P.M.O sod that about ll&p.mon April 17. Walcott cama to hta oflka and he put three stitches in a trivial wound he had 00 his ehm The wound could have been caused by a chisel, but il as no stab wound. Half an hour later Madeline Forde came to his office. She had three stab wounds which could have been caused by a sharp instrument. One on her left shouldwas half of an Inch long and quarter of an inch deep Another wound was above the right hip bone and a third was over the tenth rib. Blood was spout mi: from the third wound. She was suffering from shock and JoM of blood at the lime. The first two wmda were trivial but the third 'iious and her situation was critical While the two wounds about the ide could have bean caused durng a struggle, the one on the noulder could not be so easily a used. Or. ( •aland said that on April 17 Madeline Forde went to the hospital suffering from the wounds Dr. Ward had described She gave her an injection and sent her to hospital ward. Dr. Kiaeh said that an X-Ray as ordered for Forde when shecame into the hospital and fluid i 111 the right cavjtv Dr H. A. Maaslah. visiting surgeon of Ihe hospital, corroborated Dr. Ward's evidence as to the %  Si! How ell mid that on April 17 waKOtt came to UM I and gave him a ihl-.il and mole I statement about Ihe wounding %  flair which had taken plan earlier during the day. He bits' charged him with the offence Clerisa FeraV. hawker of Lodgi Road and mother of Madeline, cor roborated her daughter's evidence as to the part she had taken Barbara Cireenldge 121 > Ixidgc Road said thai UM ki both PWds and W.. April 17 she saw when Forde threw Ihe peel at Walcott : ijler saw when he ran after her with a chisel and a piece of wood Jn his hand Forde told him that If he struck her with ti ihe would stab him with the tool •he had in her hand. She looked away for a short period and wh she looked towards them again she saw Walcott withdrawing hb struggle and said ihat Walrou's demeanour never suggested thai he bore any animosity towards Forde. Mr, Reece rtrssssd Ihe impos•iiuiity ,,f ine around in the abouldsr being caused during a struggle and thus held Ihat Walcott had been slabbing. He Bald thai Walcolfs going to ihe polico and report ing Ihe matter might only hav,. bssn .. arlss move cm his part. Bound Over A :..' PleldS who pleaded fulltj of having been In pose I forged bank note was vcstcrdm bound over for 18 months In Uu sum of £25 at the Court of Grant Basstoni His Honour Mr Q L Taylor. Ad in* Chief Judge, told him Ihat he had done a foolish Ihing When one came across a note of that kind, the safes! thing lo do was to take it to the police Thief ToKeepPtMee Kianklyn. of MflltShlr .ayaatecdai put on a £5u bond on a surety for a slmi%  %  %  ep UM peace for \H I the Cour^t of Grand s He hud been foun.1 KUlltj earlier in Ihe Se-n.n. ,,( hOUSe-breaking and larceny. The Msrd before the Acting Chief Justice, Mr O L Taylor. /IMA STABBED Twenty-threey ear-old Dsrnlej is* i..... uiuni to lbs General Hospital ysaterday afternoon ufferlng fron .i atel wound in lo. chsst, He wag detained. Jones is employed as a Bridge Street Gwendolyn Rock, a 21-year-old resident of the same addre*. w at later arraatad i>v the PoUca In mneciion with Ihe incident and charge of grevious bodily harm is been laid hv Inspector T. Franklyn KEEP HIGH STANDARD OF BEHAVIOUR Governor 1Mb Parents HISKXCBLLENC*! p diving Hay fuiu'tu %  I %  Q liV( .,., t S .-M.W V'stenlin tuUICatholu : K (JuH they rd to H U P ,ll Kh standard of behaviour Ui a community wheree larye numlwr vi n..,, Catl • thai CathoUCI WTO peculiar people i prag lhal i rnoa Mid The Govern %  peaking an Mrs, Savage had dhrtrlbuteo Uie prires and aftei |hs Head dams bad leportsd on ihe pro* ... >• ai He arai ipi akuig io.> aftoi %  %  %  lory ol Hiawauia binh. c h ild h ood, i %  Hei r, Longtelb brought lo life on lb) The prSSSntaUon Ol Hiawatha .i anaaaad In tableau, redtaBon and dan.e b] n \ Donald let mrs J Scott ..^ UM I Doyack, Nokomla; i Da Verteull, Little Hiawatha; M Chabroi. lagoo: A Plstcher, Young Hiawatha. M Krogh. Hiawatha M Navarra UM krrow den Brandon, Minnehaha; R. Knight. PsuPukKsewli c MeLean Chlblabos; and Bravsi Bquswi Children and M tumss trora Nstherad headdresseii to mocas>inv wen rsauSUc and n was lbs seuni The hi ti.-.branches on the %  tags lent aonM or the aunoa hurthst aUnosphere was lent by the S Of the w igw.uii njin %  snthuj ti on nursed little Hlswatha *'• %  the big wa aratst The \ %  • nan had %  > i itti the am ktln i of H • i Ulnnshsha I the Dakota women, and here %  i I itei had %  %  I PauJhiksswl uM danci i had a chance to dance and Chlblabos, the ilngsr had a chsnes ii. -mg loviaansji % %  make ihe rnai i >. ge banquet \ i I luge Criekel Dying In Knglaixl -Say. BRUCE BLUNT ARRESFORD, Hani* The lamp-port i„„| ue tree ar %  ' ken oi, %  %  keb : ed. II looks as though Ihe lampilv nurssry ban for the Comptons and the Bedsers of UM future Cricket under the tree* is dying out. The prophets of doom foresee UM and of Hhuy nvs rean Urns Thi* ms> he i nt d ih-prassni dsath-rats ol vluaas •iub oonunuss il win bs ran W eaiherheadtt W in Pharmacy Week Competition Hi %  Bract West] i • %  (Harbados Hharmac>) were the winners of Ihe show window competition -t.ij.eo bi the various drug Btorea duuug Pharmacy Week which started en and ended on Frlda) ' psai ihe DingP %  .:. .il S.~ lety has staasd Ihe ev< nt, and It la reported to have bssn r great success h got undtrwai on Bundai evening with a tslh ovei Radio Distribution by Mi Pred B I '. i rssJ km! %  ., the Society, on the subject. Penicillin Luhuee Then foUoWSd tWO MM first of which was given oy Hi Chas Manning on Tuaada] subject Tubcrculojus ami U %  on Wednesday evening bv I>r Simon who spoke on Dlaln-tet Both lectures were given al the Y M C.A. and attracted appreciably large gathering! %  bowed keen Interest Uu Fred S. Oltou presiih ,ii both IscturSS, He thankeil Ihe lecturers and also the audieme f, their attention and Intsri ._ Ihat he hoped the thir>l Itiarnmcy Week would be an even rreatei auecssa th UM the present On Thursday evening a Social wsa given at 0ue< n i Parti i<>< the lledlcal and PhsrmscsuUcal Frstermt> SJOng with several friends and well-wuhers and a very enjoyable time ws spent by all Pharmacy Week closed on Friday with a show of BJini Bl IhS Y M C A given Ihroufih the M irta ni The British Count II Dangerous Ruling: 5/The decision of all Q B Criftlth Mngislrate ol DtttrlCl %  A" who unposad ., i ami 1 costs lo be pan. days or a ran uu Impri %  Edgar I .t Oraei Hill. St Michael, for riding the Vtsft Is M-7MS on Bpt % % %  i BUD, on April 21 in a dangeious manner lo the public, was confirmed %  by Their Honours Mr J W II Cheiiery and Mr H A Vaughim Judges ol Ihe AsMsi.in' Court of Appeal Phillips was also ordt i I PS9 the cost* o[ appeal which amounted to 3 i> I'luu.ps was aaen rkhn doi Spooners Hill al>out 7 15 am on Ami si by Cpl. Green Phi bicycle wss going ai %  and when Phillips arai ordered %  ilnl not (In lately Mr. Deai win. repn Phillip* submitted that the evidence nf Cpl, Groan enough for Thetl H lake and pointed OUl thai PhllUpS could have been travelling at a fair rats ••• speed and still fail to stop when Cpl. Ocean wave.1 U> him Their Honours told Phillip! that they have paid 0US attSfl lion to all that his counsel had told them but thev mUSl BCespt %  : % %  pul before them diltlcull to mal seers. Within a from this i-iub, have ngus itti the: radius "i %  crtcket Bed m the lakl ... got vt..iv.i again after the -jr and some of them have fallen be the ansysals SUMS the i-eace Tw %  nioie naVS BMM thiraSI High f< sis The eau %  ,. :, ; ,r. there 'or all to see One ,,f ihcm iUie high cost of sports eatUO, %  -i.L Ones we had cir. to gpand a gear After wc had Uu K |]i |wi< bats (M IPs 4d ), two Id >. nil Pan Of w lekct-keeln, £3 8G• %  %  • last it was made clear the subsidy would be tot one year only There had been no change in that deNine ships now ire Usd up ct pared with 42 prior to announcement of the subsidy No money has yet been paid to Canadian ship operators but applications for assistance by more than 30 have been approved Chevner said 93 Canadi owned ships have been transferred to I'nited Kingdom registry in diiuion I.I i. iiuii. pwaata SBd children had lo keep, the Uara n sii 1..1.1 u,.,,,,.-.,, 1 thai Ihe inrMiii.iinni iii ihe ate) uu flrnt ela* Ai rnirdIhe II..olnii.ii. -.j.e., 1, he said, he fell thai II ana nl one lhal should he .ippljutled Il wa* one lhal was addrrnse I In the hrarl. and hr himsili ii4 be dona Vou arould IK> nirprii cd ai the laws which are broke.. in v lings l bibs in ii frante ,,r, f i i %  i i TIM) i.ittii aCkSta •' cigarette at 3d a HUM They sail a pack in local '" lot Bd ben anothei p u k ml .tul Ihe loi'lunule buyei of |h • i i ..... ,i M.eivclog. This, rou will noUcs isev ei %  profit ol I6s for Uie fund The Big IL:. One of the vfltegS 'lobs which <..ine ti an end Ultl year ha pi %  at .. H the big house %  tends empty and its staff, which M I the team, hsi gone Man' such h PUBS! are empl' now, or have been turned int i boatsl f"i udeatl or hiker i minds i planners ol lbs world no pace UM Beld where the VlllsgC hlackamith one hit his caiv-fnc Then UM lo ,md buses .any puxtern routfa li. • -Hie aiiil Ihe .inema Oh. y-. • lot Of IliCin prefer Ihe CUMtn I to the nu % %  (Mil • %  ny aumm.I And mi. an hard!) lion which ha, had few opportunll i can lean Ooi large and much>vauntod prOA ide held,; nid porta eoulpUMni ami mowIng-mschlnss, bul rarj fa teacherol i rli RSI At some of them UM • %  brsak bat ai and when UM ft bOOl '! the and <>t their stupid%  || %  forgst UM bat. an i teas lo the i re < nouH %  i It The* Won Work Edn %  •< that ;• %  URSULINE PRIZE eiil/l. tStRllID IX IN M*l\ >••* t*t IIAR IMS—IKM MUXBS AWARDED IN FORM I "'" '"" < "iiim U*rlilB> iifku TudHr, ]<,>,* Moare, AI!" CONVENT LIST aw t-t -*. I'llhrlirid M... I„l ,.,.,|„„ 1 t. At.. M s BMSri %  .-.. Ki I. I, I ..I %  %  .1.1 Pain )..o rtw* tvatsaS i, ii' Judu v.. ... ". %  IM Mo %  Mathl.t. M|, PHIM V -.,-. •-, Ma.lc %  imrti, Judith Dalt'i i ...v-i.<'( n.i s.-ao-...i i. %  .... --,i.. AT. an.. CM.. \.... 4 %  •> ".—a BwiwfUM rio-i.. • alw aod Prtaai \-.,.i.. ... ihr Mo. i I liarari i .„..„-I,I,.., ,,. u.* Pro* i D*v*U •tad. Wallln.dff .i'..t, r.i... I.r \ P .iu.i„„ j. M**Jt Hr.lh., Oaidlr. V.il X*lM em.. %  ,. i...a < % % %  • %  !. %  tMfjaji rvstar, JfM 1'I.IZES AWARDED IN fORH III Ptli.. far Ca rMB — n— I>I> Marilyn Chabroi j inr Orainax. Jant 1-ip.fji.,. m f.r Aaallr.iun T MsSfl %  MM r..n. i ... :„4 i .i r.l.,.,1 I'HIZES AWARDED Itf t'lRM IV P..i I.r larUIHn u,.\,,*, Maria-A. Uarl Pttaaa far AllraMaa la J.iiroi Miiaba: KartM . p. Prlaai Far l.aad 1 aada'l i %  Kainu-ri. K.. nU2BS AWARDED . rlaaa ••• • h>l>lt* I>a*Kla> MarrnUnr •. larv Vauchn. Ulta I-.... ...r. Eat All.O.n Ta 4 •.!..i r.n.iMi al l-..i...a.a la. lid.Ill) la ()•!( <• % % % %  lalaia> K • % %  %  Captain of I 1-r.ula'i Hnuaa Prtaa >-..". i i.. i .i M n.,.. ...... I >n.,„ ... ia. O.IIMI— uila Vr i... IwarSad 'nt i.a.m. i. Dili Mka*l I aaialM..Vauchn i i >a<.u t IB aw baen ' r %  s.. h-v _.„ }l. .1 II. ,.. Il %  Kaandft. I aa Bt A Wuatlna'i niiH~IW. ..H f> .... H '-"I. <• ha. bn-n m !"- Houaa. h ... •. . ' t „. h B b~n won lui I V'llnil Mlll.iK Tl>siada r.a hi. be-n -on bSi A... r „ HH* anything useful until iftei ht I might least || after all. .. form "I RUU I SI •juhicrt which i conspicuously absent ft.>io ths inodsri funiciihnn Even when UM '..nnuj^ters Of to-da.v play cricket, Uiej %  tn % %  i of working f. [round lbs I led on II bsfore anothsi be plays I viliase nnot i in Ivs srttheul %  innmiinal sfloii i a nsn club, with the %  i. equip men!. f:"in would go n So at tl ..I le1 %  (hs ktw" of ..I itii %  nutie. IhSTC r,.n only bS one snd to II all that is tn end ol LBS WI/.M/W>i wu i \ i w 11 on v i PAD I tu K-IOIINSON S s| \IIo\HIi \MI II\RII>V.\KI: 'y*w#v*^&e/ REXALL RENOWNED THE WORLD OVER Ali \i:l v OOaVOI MO Hi-.*i kgi \ rowon I Ml Mil al I nun COD l.lVl.R l Ml LOON KIDNKI A Hi \I>IIME I'll. I.s I ill. II and IMIII\/\ MIXTI HI Oteani h i.l rCBUNB nd lll\MOI ( OMI'IM Ml h \l'l.l\ IMH I.THI uu.K Off MAr.\:xi\ ma r u r Hvroriiosi>HiT:s all hrauehe* of KNIGHTS DRUG STORES J H AIIIII-.'UJVS SACK-TRUCKS All. BTGXL — I.IWI MM til'ACITY Hull Cm itini WhaM *H.M um. Kui.i... Whaah 20.09 ALL METAL WHEEL-BARROWS BTBONG AMI 111 IB Ami: :i cubic hat iii|mllj SI'ITOII.I: I'dll ( (IMIIAI 1IIKS KTC. O.M.I U4M K.%111 "RUBEROID" ROOFING FELT .Hl:i\ MISI KAI.I/I II SI KFACK A l.iiw Mat l^inu l.u>lini.. Klllrirnl \V;ilr.p...,.( (ov.r lor nil (tools es caerrs ni sov.um HARRISON'S Hardware Sp.ciali.l. Broad Street BACK AGAIN Three Stars SWEDISH Matches. ;$Yit\KvS eO€KKT W.f HTVUSII I Mil fill Mill C.OOI) TASTff SUEDETTE SHOES Fee OeaSaaauaa in Whlla ii~n ami Bessia Monk, and OaaMMM PSf l-.r S4.(fS CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10. II, 12 & 13 Broad Slreat



PAGE 1

PACE FOIK BARBADOS ADVOCATE BATUMI i\ 'I I V 21. 1950 **# $*&*$ I^OTES OI\ M.ICK I I B 1 HI FRONT DOOR IN PISAN C... IA4., Bt. M. n.t.iM. SATIRDAV JILY 22. 19j lIUIIYIIO\ Tilt I which jurists, criminologbtfl and sociologists QU but three reasons have fawn adduced for punishment. One is that it should act as a deterrent to oil %  would essay to tread the paths of criminality T:.r MOOBd is that it should be an expression of society's vtngMMi against those who haw offmded agatnal code and thirdly that it should Ml formative treatment: by which the offend i may be persuaded to give Up a Hit of crime to become a useful member of the community. Witl.iI thfl last O. llM received especial attention and thsy-t< m of probation DM htrfttllt an established feature of a modern and pCOgNMlVO community. In all report ot 31st lit! Capl T. 11 Brooks, the then Probation Officer Writes, Probation DM been described as a pi"< ll MCOMlfUCUOn under the guidance Ol the Cowl and the Probation Otlicer. It is not a remedy compounded of sentiment and wishful thinking. It is more than a gesture of leniency. It is the means of giving persons who lack training and educational advantages the benefits uf a firm, friendly and understanding guidance, together with discipline and training." |D Barbados real Probation began with the coming into operation of the Juvenile Offenders Act, 1932. Under that Act the Qovtmor was given power to appoint Probation Officers and to make rules regarding their duties. The oflcega of the Salvation Army who had been doing K wd work along similar lines and who were eminently suited to carry out Probation duties were invited to assume responsibility lor this work throughout the island. No praise can be too high lor thr ofteafl of the Salvation Army who attended the infancy of the Probation Servite In Barbados. So conspicuous was their success that in 1945 the I-egislaturc enacted the Probation of Offenders Act which gave to adults aa well as juveniles the benefits of the Probation system. The Salvation Army Were asked to piovide a lull-time officer and tlie appointment of Capt. T. H. Bruoks in May 1946 coincided with the Proclamation of the Act. In the years that have passed and mainly due to the zeal and energy uf Capt. Brooks, the Probation System has grown considerably and the staff of the office has had to be increased. Capt. Brooks relinquished his office earlier this year and Ihe Probation Office will no longer be staffed by members of the Salvation Army. Mr. Humphrey Walcott who acted as assistant to Capt. Brooks and who is now under-going training in England will be returning later in the year to fill the vacancy occasioned by the departure of Capt. Brooks. Recognition of the great work done by the Probation Officers is reflected in the eagerness with which Judicial Officers have taken advantage of their services and by the manner in which the legislature seeks to extend the scope of their duties in eases in which children and matrimonial affairs are concerned. ' '-'% m The lira** has come, however, when the Government should not only increase the work of the Probation Officers but should also enact legislation to facilitate their work and give to the Oflicers status and salaries commensurate with the important and onerous nature of their duties. Highest on the priority list of legislation should'be a Children's and Young Persons Act as was recommended by the Committee which sat under the chairmanship of Mr. G. H. Adams. The recommendations ol this Committee which were made m I94l> have not yet liven implemented. The Acting Colonial Secretary has pointed out that juvenile delinquency in Barbados has not reached the alarming proportions which it hM done in the United Kingdom but In view of the widespread poverty and poor housing conditions of ao large a percentage of the population a vigilant watch must be maintained and steps taken to ensure that juvenile delinquency does not attain a more serious character. It appears that a greater liaison could exist; with advantage between the Probation Service and the Social Welfare Office. The work which they perform have much in common and if their joint resources were utilised in the establishment of Hostels and Youth Centres the work of both departments would be rendered c.tsiei Mr. Walcott will continue the good work so ably begun by the Salvation Army w nh the aid of his assistants Messrs K II OWaata and B Bourne and Miss H. Weekes It will be their ';isk to persuade the (i ,\ ernment to enact the necessary measures to enable them to deal with their increasing duties. The problem of delinquency is of vital Importance to the community and all support should be given to those who are attempting to tackle the problem in | constructive way. By C C. %keri> n.!< %  %  ..r .,. \ U iMtii(nM| Weather conditions dunine the CUi The Rj.il>-. which >vas i month of JUM | ..long similar lines lc growth "i all field crop* las) Q attend. fall n wt-11 above mm cd indeed, and The u In addltiai A.coriiiiiK to th> rainfall tflurns individtj.il priaai and stvi i .rwm 32 ttahoni. xtuutrd ttflcatas of merit wore awarded to i in areas typical of all rainfall outstanding competitor* The .". the average total fall Keenness of aoine of these young fr the Island for the month was people is sufficient reward for the %  MM a* compared with 6 13 h""d work put in by the Peasant inches for June 1949; the average ""trueto" in training them. Pur'... June for the past IKv .trs ,h '* r development of tf-is aspect was 5 39 Inchm oi oul extrnsion work i. txin* The hiithMt total fall Id JUDf *""" •"•" %  CtaMiM :50 at any of these %  taUofU I •• f %  %  i at a station Iioijiinriil th Bl o(rr\ valll? and the — ,. „, __ ](i1 rlnl Year Seedling*. The t;.*cn from the manunal trial plots at Pool and Rulkele. The) %  .•Tie juice .--"tigation%  WASHINGTON PUSAN, largest port in South Korea and traditional "front door" ot the nation, becomes mure vital to US. forces with each day of bitter lighting nanl ol Dassaaa oOdab have indicated that the bulk of MaeArthur's troops j and supplies are entering Korea through r*usan on the southeast coast. It has the only Sood harbour not held by the enemy; moreover, I'usan is the southern terminus ot the major railroad which is the transport lifeline of the defenders. sfSsL'ntIS' PhUip TT .venae tol.l rainfall Y * r T " g ""If '} tod n for ,ho Und Mr thr .,x month '" '' S2,"4S! M *LS,! ,ow wc IMlod Januarv U June. 150 l< Ji ,^,i "S .^f^'-V^S^'" approximate! v 30 inrhrs. the A short .nil B 52' urMa first year year, wax IS 17 inrhes ^ |n-] wil[ Sugar C'anr The harvesting of the 195H irop was completed during the month, and Aelds and factory yields have, in general. crop ever necessary „ nunuuu-i growth, l'hey will be rut at ihe end of the 1951 crop. Ma a a k Ula^ase. Five single eye cuttings oi each of the aatasU •*xeeeded crop estimates made I UM v-„r The latest ed* aeXSin^ V "the B'ir Kl £i ma IUMST f rOP "* *l'v-havr b€Q planted in pot.s at Codlent of 158.000 tons of sugar rmgton. These wlU be inoculat.d The young cane crop both pant W1 n mm^ disease to I eanes and ratoons. made excellent whether they an nuneptible or growth during the month. The resistant Fifty iintfc-eve cutplant canes in some areas, are i,,,*., ,.f Ha.USU and R !! 10(12) o advanced in growth that difflhave SJM been planted to serve •ulty was experienced In the apas check plants, and for further %  illcntion of the nirrogenou* ferexperiments on ihe Iransi %  ili/ers Food (raps. The planting of th" am croo was continued during he month: some fields were also >lanted In eddoes. maize, and %  weot potatoes There was an adeiuate supplv of yams and gdtdot %  iri the market, but sweet potatoes vere difflciil* to • rd< 4a Fodder* ,eii of the perennial • %  i %  • .nd uni%  GuatsanaU, Marker, Uganda. plots Of 2 fee: hotl. were all cut The Jatdl n a trial -.'h dairy cattli %  Milk an;. I i %  >i cameout, Individual milk yields rerarded, and a ey city has maov aspects of a natural fSSr'Si — "Olthe NMtoMl c ; .„ K ruph,c In the Society. It is enclosed by steep, bare hills that crowd the coaatlme and could be advantageous to a perimeter defense. The commercial heart of Husan is constricted between the walls of one narrow pass. Rugged terrain screens the city so well that only a fraction sf it is visable even from the waterfront. The harbour itself also is well protected by nature. Outside the entrance is Mok To, an island four miles long and a mile and a hall Aide, which incoming ships must skirt in order to reach anchorage There are two relatively narrow passages between island and mainland, and both are overhung by high, rock walls. Laboratory the following fodde analysis was comptrK I Moist.; ..'.ion. li samples. Phosphate determina tion, 2 samples. Complete analy samples, I Cane top .. 1 Silage sample. Milk Thi ratlttaa snlUt analysts of line nmpk* was carried out. Twenty-four samples were submitted this month, with th< nty-four samples from the experimental Mean butter fat percentage in milk is 4 l per cent., moan solids not fat percentage m milk is 8.5 per i eiit for till I .-.li.urn. Trees Propagation and Ilislrlbulion: One hundred and two lime and twenty-five mandarin trees were budded during the month Fruit trees delivered from Codrington were as follows Pea***.! Agriculture Food Crops. Good rainthroughjut the month contributed towards jrodueing ideal conditions for the growth of all food crops As a result, yams, corn, sweet potatoes. -aasava as well as garden vegetables are all growing well Huiar Cane. Both plant and making remark.bi> food growth and tnierau well. Many cultivators applied ulphit" ..f ammonia during the month CatUm. The Close Season ended OH the last day of June. Seed distribution for the new planting leason began on the 28th of the month, and indications are th;n the increased price will result in a larger acreage being planted this year Tree Crops. Breadfruit, papaw. %  nangoes, coconuts, bananas and times were obtainable In Ihe market during the month Peni tre which had been giving promise if good crops Inter in the year have shed large numberof thaif %  oung fruit Pests and ii-. • % % % % %  The prineinal pests and diseases reported ifTecting oconomk HOn ID June were the cabbage while butterfly in vegetable gardens scale insect in fruit trees, the army worm in com and the moth borer In sugar cane Iblga were also a source of worry in the wetter districts. The Peasant Agririiltural Instructors continued to give every possible lama in effecting control. Peasant Livestock. The continued shortage of Balanced Animal Ki • .. i .Hi-. %  .if .n. MI '.imi.n;: livestock owner* Supplies of oats were, however, available, and green fodder rould easily he obtained. P.xtenslon Work. Six hundred md forty-eight peasant holdings and twenlv nine %  CDofll gardens were visited by the Peasant Agricultural Instructors In June. Difficulty In securing labour has been our of the main obstacles in QW sraj of peasants undertaking contour cultivation In their holding*. Nevertheless, ten soil conservation projects were completed during the month Others are In hand Irrigation. Progress was continue.! with installations and extensions of irrigation units under the Colonial Development and Welfare Schemes. During the month peasants were assisted with complete windmill pumping umu as well as galvanised pipe and storage tanks. The avarafg ratatfall it the six agricultural station! for the first half of the year was 28 33 Inches, or approximately 138 per rent more than that for the same pcuud in 194 Orange 64 Lime 54 t Shaddock 11 Pear 10 H % %  i Lemon 1 Guava . 2 Grape 3 Grapefruit IS Mandarin ; Pomelo 3 1'apaw Golden Apple 7 2 Cherry 3 Breadnut .... .. 1 Eight hundred and five oraamental plants of different |" were distributed AfTaresUUuN In addil on to the above, 2,819 casuarina %  %  were also distributed Twr hundred and slxtes'ii casuarin. tn. were felled and sold for fir ewood to C.lendalrv Prison. Crop Husbandry. Cultivation and planting progranun. proceeded with at all station-, dining the month Ploughing operations at "The Homeand "Hi.gfatts" were interrupted hv rains At the lattei station an aftorl WM nade to combat the weed menace by spraying with g weedicide About 4 acrea were sprayed; the Deparunent's liigh-powerod tractor-drawn pressure sprayer being used foi the purpose. The work of re-oigaiusatiou to provide for the establishment of peasants' lnveMlgational units at four of the stations was continued IdMaasck, Ttie number of head of livestock at the six stations at the end of June was 125. comprising stud animals, cattle, goats, sheep, pics and cquincs. Five hundred and mnetv-nine gallons .f milk were pioduced Thirteen Mini pits were sold. Stud -i i\ i..i%  : i .,• :,, ITAOUlltaq to 396. These e as follows:—bulls 148. bucks 110. rams id and Uurs 75. Judging it..; Kally. The Second Annual Island-wide Dairy 'attle and Mutton Sheep Judging Ring Itally took plat e on tM grounds of the Boys' Foundation Sehoot, Christ Church, on Thursd.i'. Hth June Every parish "sentcd In one or afiUW two competitions In Hi. IT teams, each consisting of men and women comln the Dairy Cattle 1 It In the Mutton Sheep KailwiaaatloKiral Control of Moth Borer. During June 76,610,000 egg parasites Tnehoyrammo were bred up In the laboratory, and of these 67,034.000 were made available for distribution to planters for their young plant canes. Planters continued to call for their quota of parasites readily. So far a total of 268.179.000 p.ir.isites have been liberated The reartna Of the lirophauu fly parasite which attacks the moth borer Diairum was continued with the co-opsj-atkn of managers who sent In dead hearts. from which the larvae could Inobtained to GUT) 00 OILtfQrft Durin| the month 274 fly parasites XXrophayo were liberated. One consignment totalling fifty Lixophaoa puporia was sent by air to the Superintendent of the Department of Agriculture in Grenada, with the hope that they establish themselves in that Island. Counts were made of moth borer Diairaca egg deposition and paraattlsm in the entomological cam plots .it Codrington The breeding of the puj g] pg| .sites Pfrrofiialns which attack the /' BfonWMi puparla "f cabbages i'!"'i, continued during the month, and 7.645 parasites were lued up. and the greater iirtn.n out ol use because of %  meter. freighted back to the United, Kingdom foi inunadlati ittaa tion It h,i* resulted m considerable hold up to work underway, and necessitated a change. of plans m the Laboratory regarding ..'. %  !' uroi H of Sfshama as a crop 1 source of protein perennial feeding has been abandoned Poor germination was obtained in the Held also The firs* of a series of vegetable crop manunal trials wie. laid down at a selected horticultural garden There were preliminary 'rials with string beans, carrots and beets to test the effect of a fixed dn N P K and V.O.M Two visits were paid to the office ntamiatj son Son & Co., Ltd.. to gate the aourea and type of gas issuing from the ground level into ''.<* DfBct This was traced to gas given off by stale sewage, and the matter Is in the hands of ihe Sanitary Inspector The second, vi .* % % %  :., in connection Mitt] UM oo/llIK Of geUili'KuiS substances through the floor of the office and thought to be with the escape of gas previously imrfjfUgatad One hundred and forty-two .'f :• '% %  i. ..,..,.!,, ,.,;:,ination. They cimpruie:— osaaneai and edi. submitted under the Food and Drugs Act. Kceojdgft, ga.-olene. tinned meat and animal concentrates till Customs Authorities for classification. Hum. BAF and liquids sus• of poison submitted bv FoUre Authorities f< i E. C Water. Fancy Molasses for analysis, tinned salmon and I in Oil for examination for fitness for human ronsumpbmltted ki partn sal Fertill.'-r ogp, hnaal and wlno submitted for ansiyi* by private Individuals or concerns. ITnil Mis. is. s Eight returns were received during June, under the Mosaic Itlon) Act. 1943-!2 No infected bolea were reported. Owners and occupiers are %  %  Bf for the %  d. In peetlOfl are due and the ' return forms' can be obtained on application from the Office of the Department of Agriculture. Cotton Inspection*. Inspection Of trie t itton i.; continued and a very good clean up of the cotton plots was observed. Owners and occupiers dad to he constants reminded that the to be dug up and not rt i prioa The taircn tor wild cotton ii ntJi kitd, .dui Mvaral ittared about the Island rislirrir** During the montfa B sum of $l.299 M repaid on loans, this brlngitbi total paid in on all loans Issued to $48,519.74. Interest collected for the same [wind amounted to SI 1.87. making a total of SA77.97 In interest to date. A sum of $372.00 was loaned to boal OWaara during the month making %  total of $88.06543 loaned to date. The newly erected fish market at Oistins. Christ Church, was official!) opened on the 6th of June Two thousand, two hundred pounds of fish were through toil during the remainder of the month. of fish around the Island h.v %  ,:!. i H UM end of the flvinfc ttsh season approaches Many boats have been hauled up for repairs and relltting I MicnmctU.il Beat "Investigator" continues to operate. Attention will bo rivoa ix.t and net rtshing during the hurricane season. >1 thl Hr.dui' town Fish Market for the month amounted to 38.288 lb and at the rkat shed, to 31,364 n> Iv\p4-riiu-iit4al • olio.i *>|. inning IMaiH tion during the month 111 count cotton %  h was packaged in cone I delivered to the West Indian Knitting Mills. Current maps list Pusan and its environs as a fortuied area, a status which the city has had in varying degree for centuries. It was old Korea's sentinel outpost against the Japanese, who tried numerous thrusts there before they succeeded in establishing a well guarded trading post. In modern limes the Japanese made Pusan (then called Fusan) their main point of entry and developed us port and installations. Modern Pusan is Korea's third largest city. The 1940 census placed its population at nearly 250,000 a total exceeded only by the fallen capital of Seoul and the northern metropolis of Pyongyang. Since then estimates give Pusan more than oOO.OOO people. Although the city is important industrially. Ita growth is due mainly to the excellent harbour and good rail connections. Pusan'a strategic importance to the U.S. military is emphasized by the fact that it is the only port in friendly hands which will lake heavy-draft ships. It has four good piers with lighters, cranes and other equipment Additional berthing space is provided by quays between the piers. Shipyards are available for repairs to moderate sized vessels. The piers and warehouses are connected* by spur tracks to the important double-track, standard-gauge railroad that runs from Pusan northwest to Taegu, and thence to Taejon. the provisional capital, to Seoul and beyond. It is only 77 rail miles from Pusan lo Taegu. and 100 miles from that point to Taejon. Pusan has an oil refinery, textile mills, a gas manufacturing plant, and factories for the production of matches, rubber goods, soap and other commodities. These enterprises and the city's many modern buildings, can be attributed primarily to the Japanese, who placed emphasis on the development o! Pusan because of its nearness to Japan, with which it is linked by cable and other communications. The city is located at the southeaat tip of the Korean coast. From there it is only 135 miles across Korea Strait to the Japanese port of Shimoneseki on the island of Honshu There has been no indication whether Oft have been using Shimoneseki as a point nl embarkation for Korea, but it was so used b\ the Japanese for many years. There are three other South Korean port. 1 which, though not adequate for heavy ship or extensive traflic. may be of some help it the supply effort. These are Masan and Yosu on the southern coast, and Mokpo on the southwest. All three have single-track, standard-gauge rail connections with the interior. MANGOES Mr. Peter Smithen last week asked U Secretary of State for the Colonies wh.v action la being taken to investigate the poaal bility of growing mangoes in the Colonia Empire for sale in the United Kingdom anil elsewhere; and how far the problems con nected with their transport and marketing have been brought to the attention of the appropriate departments Mr. Cook: The Colonial Primary Products Commute*investigated this matter two vea: ago. They felt that the practical and cconomi.duncultlea involved in packing and sinppii. this fruit for export were likely lo remain a handicap to the development of anythin more than a luxury trade. My righl ho Friend proposes, however, to have a fre: v I inquiry made into AM market poevtbUitt Mr. Vjiiithen.: Will the Minister bear u mind that this is a matter of some urgencv. ai the American interests concerned are makinj; %  apid progress? Mr. Cook: We are looking into It. Dr. Morgan: Did my hon. Friend satisfy himself before he started, that dehydrating facilities were available for the mangoes to bf exported for food? Mr. Cook: That is another question. a v. SCOTT TO-DAY'S SPECIALS a CO.. LTD. at the COLONNADE L'siuilly Now J.H-. Prepared Mustard !• 15 Jiirs Peanut Butler %  II Bottles Jeflryi Baac 211 U SPARE PARTS COLEMAN Products He will be pleaaed l<> repjir >ur LAMPS, LANTFKVSTOVI-s .md IKONS it >u lit inIhrm lu us. A Shipment nl SNOWCEM in thi following Colours White. Cream, rink. Vrlluu. gag laiiailUa WILKINSON & II WNKS CO, LTD —Sureessors n, C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. Phonetii:. Mil Bll KW1TH M-OKr.N AYfcRH { Hi \KI 1 II S—Pk,i II.Wilts ( HiARKTTFS—Tin* .". CAPSTAN CIGARi:T1 -Tin* IP GOLD PLAKB t KIAKI I li run :. COUNTRY LIFE Cli.Wtl MIS Tina 50 AKDATII COKK TIPPED < IG \ Pi i I" PLAYERS CLIPPER ( It.ARt I 1 1 B Pel < TRUMPETER CTGAJtETTES—Per Pfcg, TKI'MI'ITCI! (K.AKIIIIN p, T <..||..n % 4U 1 K 1 III 1 ao 5 1J .93 l • <4 11 STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO.. LTD. ^\IIU1I0N4 £ SKI: IS FOR on; NEW BANGE OF: INTERNATIONAL INON CHALKIHG) QUALITY PAINT LAOOMAT (Flal Oil Paini) in then attractive I KlM of P;tl.Blut, 1' -.. Ony, W H Cl LAGOIJNE (N.m a i.i. i III UndiTcoatmijs and nnUh In Ligln BtOM Uchl Hull T.nk Won %  Wblto (; %  %  Gtll t modi HI i. Colour 'ALI'MISUM I'ltl.MIKS KIK WOOD YK1.LOW PBIMOCON (Primer tor Aluminium) CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER 'DANBOI.INE (Anti-corru,!! Qrey, Qreen I'ROPEI.l.OR Light Red li SI j Da COSTA A (., Lid. Arnls at QJOUA JSea paAfy JAMJ a,.,| %  I II. 1.1IV nisei us 2lb Tin. I IKrts BUOUfll SHORT CAME. MAKH. MQSVUft, ODfOni NIT. PFTIT Bl I Kill —At Sl.80 vr Un JVUBi in I ins TOMATO Jl irr. is o. tMI in oi. asas ( \KBOTS in Tim BBANfl In Tins -1INMil In Tim KAI.f: in Tin. J. A R I'KIIT CAKI %  SflVgl l>r Uir f'hlldrrn RAISINS Hi, prr Ih u unu in.iv in BOI. BLAI K 1 I HRWT JIL1 V In Kiilllr. Xl'KHOT JVM | |„ Tin. I'lM Mill I \>l in Tin. TEAK < norci TIP TEA I.VI'TOV 11 \ MVIINA II \ "I.I I X TEA c ROHN DUNKS),: Smsa %  Botllc ol ^ yrsr-old *->•!( Ili'.iiil •( % %  in GODDARDS



PAGE 1

S H I u r %  i %  July 22 I !.-.( BarbaJujsiWftuticate o* 4 — trice: HVK (i:\rs Vt %  .• / U.N. PLANES BLAST .SEOUL AND TAEJON Islanders Must Emigrate To The Mainland To Solve Population Problems — Says C.D.C. Report (flSgaj Our Own C'orrvpstndenl > LONDON, Julv 21. T*HK POPULATION PKOBLFM has become s acute in Ihe We*1 Indian Ulund colonies thai ii is (VMnlh agreed ihe solution to economic problem* mast include some reduction of population by emigration—po>siblv l British Guiana off British Honduras. Star Police Witness Comes To Court In "Floating Corpse" Case PORT-OF-SPAIN, July ft). Boysie Singh, still smiling happily but no longer nattily dressed as when he first appeared at the Mart of the trial on Wednesdav. witnessed the brief appearance ol Mar Police witness Rahamat Ali alias "Loomat" who is held bv Police in protective custody. Loornat was brought by the Police for Ihe first public appearance since ihe end ol April when he was taken to iho British naval base of Staubles where he was held A squad of Police armed with baton* kept back huge rrowds attempting to surge Into ihe Court ut the bay Loomat was brought into Court 1 (0 enable another witness lo identifv him as one seen leaving Singh's club. Queen Street, together with Singh, four co-defendants, and Philheit Peyson — in connection with whose death Singh and four men are charged with murder in the "Floating Corpse • murder case. Loomat, a tail thin boy entered Court boldly and the crowd gaped to see the youngster with whom Peyson was allegedly intimately connected. Singh on Thursday morning appeared immaculately attired with Sinatra knot in his tie which matched his blue tinted suit, his lourth in the four davs 1 trial. Thli morning Robert Wilkie who gave evidence yesterday of having seen Singh. Peyson. Loomat. and Singh's four co-defendanfs leaving Singh's Club on Queen Street together, was under crossexamination all morning, during which he admitted having served mil sentence* —Can. Press. BUNDESTAG PRESIDENT BREAKS DOWN BONN, July 11, Herr Erich Koehtet. President of the West German Bundestag. DOUaBMd shortly after entering the Bundestag chamber to open to-day's sitting. Koehler immediately taken to hospital for treatment for nervous breakdown He bag been a target of aUoug criticism from Democrats. Communists and some Government supporters ever since he took uffice at the tlrst meeting of the Bundestag last autumn —Renter This is stated in the second annual report ol Ihe CCsOIUal Development Corporation published here Ihli evetuog. The report suys Increased food production and increased weldfrom the land ate oaeonUaJ Ural steps towards raising the deplorliving standan.t.nn Islands, it bad proved impos-slbUI to purchasi %  an economic price on w hlcll j itaj could be made with methods, and this difficulty had prevented the Corporation fron entering directly tnto the sphere of agricultural production The development of v r primary producers appeared pn •fitly to be the main Held for the Corporiitmn's activitiss „, ;,,, Islands The Corporation* levelnpment -. hefnes (or the maudar colonies were based on adequate and efli.unt agricultural induatrv U> feed lot„i populating, ind sis to pave the way fm the absorii immigrants from islam) The rale at irttretl das %  could he pushed forward Would depend mom upoi: eonatnteUon of Dd railways than upon anv other single factor It was hoped to Sad M %  I acts in Caribbean colonli r..i timber from British Guiana to niake them less dependent on timber from dollar sources. Trade with the British West Indies had been handicapped bv inadequate shipping facilities, and high freights. This matter was receiving the Corporation! atti %  The Corporation also reported they have decided on the gradual transfer of representative fun.-m from their regional suhsldry companies to specially ap pointed representatives in certain 00 lord ll Film Storage Vault Destroyed GEORGETOWN, UG.. July 21 The Government lllrn gtogggn vault at Fun William Frederick on the sea wall was leetfpved about 3.3U on ffridaj morning, A sudden explosion was followed by a mountain of flames rising tkv hjgh awakening the city ri sMI The Brigade turned out but th sever..! oUstn from M G M R K.O and Columbia Studios The Police is investigating the matter Wreck Red Com in u n lea lions Mac 1 rth H r Hoves\ Igain si "Enemy" Refugees FRANK MOIUCM.l rrrnrd hfaahlai U I MiMM, IS srrii in Up pl.lur* % %  !IlIlM rlunrlnhli. mill I,. I, ,.n \1 „ t |„ .„„„.| T ,_, „ h ,|, h,,,,,, ,,.„,„, H „.,„ ,,,. ,,,, Un paitur In >.l,rd.,\ llliun fuurlh WltlM .land. I. .I„..i. m |„ hll Iri.kln, I., Ih, In bi.uiid^t, in Ih. -rcond T-M als.i Horrrll wurrd tit LEOPOLD RETURNS TODA ) BRUSSIUI Jul] :i relebratl IIH lltth anniversar) of ih> i I %  %  king :t siting the :..-. %  % % % % %  ,%  i • i" t %  I'arllamen! I hi* recall last night Supporter! nf King LeopoKi I'' if" he hi' lieen re %  ailed lo the throne, n %  -ion n( n-nedies whteh I.II hai wrlied his ltd i H •Old III t fcH I MO .1 Albert I LM fourll kin i.i :i %  ibOrg d>n %  Mi sm.. th.raundaUon of tn< Belgian kingdom He %  w rl ISO! ei Bruseel %  %  i tin ii.,: '' in"' .mi in big unoslenutloual n .i mall prrrata houei Prince hlrnaali In Decembti 1901 In n Ubtrl i rended th< %  I eopol 'i Prom then in education m %  ':. I -. "... la %  ssurae When n n.;n u. the throne after hiitl < k ill Leopold w. gpeg lenced i net Utri n 1IN I U l-een -. %  I kded ii' i %  : %  i li ire in th pie ron IN %  %  f 1 i opold lelgiu i %  gpll declared king .... %  %  i without ie tal value end did noi %  | %  %  In his own sOCOUJll nf the -.ni.-ndei l,isi • on pege i B.G. Applies For Marshall Aid application from British Guiana for Marshall Aid under wliot is known as economic co-oi>eration administration Council this al.ernoon when speakjn K on the question of expansion and development projected for the rice industry in the debate on the second reading of a bill to amend an ""n| Bjc. Marketing Board Ordinance Sugar Cane Newspapers LONDON, July 21 Lord Baldwin ICiHl "i ]. II i dtr the heading 1 ill % %  Miivu.ii %  ., prto ..i poUtld ma QOVI Hi": %  Mi AtUee I. | W|i % %  • %  ,, n Onrui it i i tat. of %  • %  i sn Prai %  Baroi D Ub t The .-v: I lik.-U I. %  Co-operulion i %  ... %  A 111 fil.C iweet %  administration and ntpn %  | %  Kennet'i Bis* kl 'designate lion Son %  %  jnlal pool : i Mi itl.n i (lies whi.' Q %  %  %  %  %  i Si %  .rr-si Oar 0„ („„.,„„*.„! i IX3NDON. Julv 21 The use of waste material from ugar cane in ihe manufacture of lewtprint is suggested bv H. Alan •Valker. Managlnp Direvtm of 'tie '.Ven Indie. Sugar Campem He •ays this would not only solve 'trktaln's newsprint shortage -itwspspeM ha\e already been -ui but help economic de\-elopment i-; the West Indies writtnj; In the Tim*- to-day Walker says the United Slate* %  ive already successfully enperi:iiented with newsprint made from metrasee the residual Tbre from .-ugar cane after the Juice has I .een cxiractel Newsprint produced hy this method was not up to the standard, ;it present used by new Britain but further resent no doubt achieve the desired end He hoped British paper manufacturer* would consider subsidiary intereet In the British WeW Indies to assist the ,iHi' Po e itscoj end help the econorr.ir rnent of :he colonies He indicated Clause the Bill was Intended to pave th* v/gy for operations of a new COOV pony envisioned The share capital of tills would be around gin ,tm 000. public asset., kgtfngi .,,..,• •4.000.0IKI. and ColooW development Coporatlon some Sg.OOfi.ooo The application for Mar-hall Aid ould rover the cost m United St.des currency of all machinery end equTpmen* for two •centre!" rice mills.—one drr Corentyne and one for Ktsequiho. I'r.d.-i th-|,|.h would provide a aWpeest equivalent amount in -terlint and if the application stsfsM would mean British Guiana would be receiving a glfl of machinery and equipment something like $1,000,000 US in value The Secretary of State for the Cotonle* has recently been reviewing the possibility of expand. rice production in colonial dependencies, and has re i that opportunities for exaansiM are nowhere greater than In British Guiana SPORTS WINDOW I -..I Ma. I MO .!,! O %  ISSM H .1 L i oi ST MO i III -i-.i.. S < r*l„* Comm un ism Removed Is Losing Ground SAYS CHURCHILL IJON. July 21. l told a 'The Bui must ultln peoples lncludii | I n curtain." / that Communism as an i %  grouiul in all the countries where fiee speech .aUowod liamentaiv told the got Churchill was Chairman Ixmdor.'s huge Albert Hall to it • ra| public i %  %  %  ..: —Can. Press. The Hall was i Churchill with i %  Ii l European countries stepped on to •;orm. "79 (Bj I I. COXIKKl TRENT HitUKJK. Nottingham, Julv LM ; CALLED YESTERDAY .. black day for! I I.i v/.'is true but today the darknev. reached "• ai the "id country (ell the lull weight <•! the We)ei htdle battlnj itrength Tin-^stalwart tucci I } %  1 % %  pil< >i 'ii the runs to the tune ol 479 l clgeta to place the Wesl Indus Hi able position in thin tim-d Teal mateh, II v*.ii.nc. i %  Worrell lm .i.d.i. and baUi red the ga ..i h bowling u II paH %  Cil Trei.i %  Ho ptdV %  .it v.in, me minimum ol itMrB) and the in.ixiinuin ..f n Ull LOO* i balls especially, were *el| into ''ive sixes Worrell furtlk I i > %  BOS | i by giving as %  ctenttnw an easing the Ixiwling, us has probably ever been witnesM-l .HI international Teat attack it weald be mi. %  %  ,.if one nf tin I,, t two iwils nf I III • ly to have been % %  %  %  i . rae i i . ,. %  ... 1 a w**l lad a in a Tesi m Knglao'i Worn H n.ade Kingston In the four! m IW35 New Murk His partnership with Weeke* promises t<> set „ new mark I'll %  Indian test partnership The piesent record is 267 mail. by Clyde Wal. %  ','.' %  im is staying Kae Too nil was more in the spotlight in today'-, pattogsa' kae deserve -hare of Ihe K IfOga worth 1 than the numb' ana by B corf. Is after all the 'hat b) important in any DM U.K total now iteing built i bff *ne IW0 W# en page 1 Italy Slops Up Armed Forces ROUE, July 21 Italy %  II mv from i7fl.iMi(i ;,. I'.-rti.mm men, the llinr the Peeci Treaty, i. fence Minister Randolfo Packerh explosives a:. Ma. Arthur's airmen kept up their aggressive i Headquarters announced that .uipurfu*U*esses 500 pound bombs had blasted all movement to a stand still in Seoul rail marshalling yards and damaged engine and waggon plants l\ti shattered Tiiejoii. MIIMHI-N WSIS "Ut ullh boSSBt .mil rockets IWe)0|ssngj ill tn lire .ili;iiidnuc OrVBI Milan liii the pnrad.> i..,eta | beior the Klng*a return as a show of he Qovi n %  %  %  %  •ngin Ri utei French Troop Ship Runs Aground AJMuN ... %  Guardati I. i Dunl n *Doba H a n dei .i i ol M were n it, .ii ntr 1 %  IN ven i U Limit On U.S. Armed Forces WASHINGTON. July 21 %  aate Armed %  stele Committee voted unanimously lo%  %  I irmsd forces and '.. lengthen all enlistments bv on* %  d Servi '.t.mmittti* also voted regular grogy soldiers kg r gfear their anUgami ,. i quest (oi % %  leiluigs On Ihe si/. II' publican representative Harry Tewe cast U %  mt extending aoual The Senate Committ.-e %  strike out line of two bills providing that the stretixl'i gular marine eorp. erould • Od 20 per cent of the %  d *lre of the regular The action suspended dedrnt. present limitations of to -M05.Ig2 met The committee acted aTtei %:, %  Air Forces olTlcers had •jid they would probrbly loM :i3.'KK) trained solders next real through the expiration of voluntary enlistments —Renter .t> Kiiiii loluaan ih. H The Cabinet decided t<> i-m%  %  irn "i n imleri I the Muiisteis disposal. The Mm i. i 1 in "in view of manorial situation One official pointed out that peace treaty besides Imposlni; ll limitations, stipulated >t It..]v %  urn. i strength tould lol (tensive, nature it was undenit'iod that Italian IN would therefore IM limited in lbs llrat ISBM t.. hold so mileof Alpine foothills I' v MorUieaatern frontierobvious print of attack lor any I %  the i 1 4 Oggopleie element on r.iapparatus la her 67.000-' .n llc>et which next month a> "ii pate 1 Sugar Council Reoches Agreement agreement LONDON. July 21 Internationa t world supplies and being subi I "' IS Dtriee 1 The draft o' • %  in .hill.' ^t QOVI r ; .'.%  and ohasrvgta ei. H %  i %  %  I was HI%  %  %  itlvi fron ol South Afrieu, . Braall, I uba I. % %  ,! %  .. public. I Pol %  ., %  .:. | i' | tan sent observers. rood and Agricultural i I the f ot drawn pp, in 193? for %  • i %  fence b) I •iluauon detnanoed ,. new inlerment —Keuter %  %  ...., %  Arthur's batth moi %  %  ind the H .,. ',i %  1 %  thwest of T admltte I 1 ,mei %  ... (urthei %  outk ol the ell i Hi' I % %  a> on Page 3 GILBEYS Spn:t;h Wanes 1 Maintain ihe j same High Slumlord of L Quulity as .J shipped to v ihe /'-,-; \V!'sl Indies *&*% for foe If. past fifty C5|*'l years s. These include GILBEYS PORT A SHERRY You can enjoy them again In grealei quantity lasSf lu\UUI\EH AliSTIMi CII Mil.



PAGE 1

r.\r.r TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. IIH * %  " Qwdb QaUinq H is rrmHwnj the <• %  Ml Savage, accompanied • W Lambert ut tended the Speech Day ul ihe Alleyne School %  iv afternoon Mrs S I %  Journalists Meet M R. LOUIS GALE, Editor ot • almost entirely n recent operation, had lunch in : AD Mi Ollvei Woods, the ; who Utured bbMO lor Thi earlier ihls year. Now Nurse M ISS THEl.MA ROCK a former member ot if' teftwaaas lafl Is no** training to be %  i. hospital r.citr London. When she first went over. Thelma was a help '>: .i Brut i icky enough t<> bo eJwtn toe training to !*• a nurse almost U ing the hope.to specialise either iii child nurlng or mldwlfarj Back From Flying Visit M AJOR BOB ROBERTS I I MMcn Colt uid I i returned 11 W I A • from tnt* (J KM. 1 Cngland Antigua Art Exhibition \ NTIGUAS An Exhibition haa een fixed for ihe end of August, and memlxrs <>( tinAM' I'Inc pain!.%  xhibition T>.> British Council Is In ch*rg. || K and -.hipping the %  %  tu their headquarter. SI v Aiiuuji |U |*SJ * %  .. telt auain ntlh I tin Farewell Party Mi •> % %  '"' %  About Steel Band* S AM l El. SELVON. T. Trinid.idian wnKr I of Indian parentage, ha> I in London'* popular B Ijllipul". thai month. It is ent> tied 'Ping-Pong, Kmuand Boom" and tract) UM I Mquori d bsstoi • o| i" %  < (Si aln'i steal band" Sclvon went lo En*!'"!-! remit), i i .mil uf "broader scope" H>* ..is in Hit' oUfteidS Thi i tin W'M Indian hrniu h ( the Royal Navy as .1 rrlvsjM parator. Alter h was d) %  ivi.n lotaed the staff of n Tnmd'id Guardian lie has bad stories and poems PUbUlhed ll .111 magaiinc* and broad st ov ihe B II C. Cellar Party I ORD HAI.DWIN. n-Oovaraor of tha L—w ar d islands, KM f hundred guasjti at a party IAV— r.. A. n .. n ,< T^IEHK .... %  Dtanoi party on Mr. Mycr Gets Arounc. f n>ul „,„ nl((ht tll Ul) ,,„,. MA itim INU on rnursday mornhadoi Aquatic Club m honour of 'Ing from Trinidad by H.W.I A .;, r • %  who li Mvi 1 Banker of Now Yori TCA Antong tboiw prWMnl ware and BcnttW. Washington Hi Mi %  Mi Colin MeKsnxle, Mi -.mg ic>i ,1 bouga In whh it Ira Edward A A %  pflDd January, Fcbm-i* and SnelU McKeiule, Mr Ronnie McMarch of MXl year, with his wife "'' %  ^hT'iamdv" Mr Myer Went. MM stags* Pti I %  -, in % %  Bcmondawj The family Mr. Myer low M „„ McKtnxl Ml L ,„. ,,,,.,, m London Is* ** Othsa Carlb. consists of my dM*1 ar, s „., itr M r Dtlbert I t.er family, my siter-in-iaw a in ,_v -. Vugoalav lUn b a — d MW others. Now you undets Molly 8outhover SB M l'> To the itTS Aftei dinner the party wmusic %  1 Ian tbrnt" Ho left tor Mow Yorti roaterdaj prerlet stow band Uv companj drank nfttfinoon Via Trinl %  < < %  Mr Pat Anton uid ate imnng ban (vhether on bualn and tha *hou nd I wtna pleasure, be ha flown on* • Ui en danced In lh< te a aon foi ihl Boh" *• :'.700.000 mihs On arrival at New bailroort until shortl] aftei n >. linn; to rurthet Britr-h trade Yorti ha leaves almost Immadiateprji lelatlons with Yui"i I 1 i living there .M.m.ij-m,' Director Returns R K It fur California, after which will l!y back to Seattle Mr. Mycr certainly gcU around. Here For Two Months A RRIVING on Thursday afternoon by U.VV.LA, from B.G were Mr. Richard Parris and Mr. Derrick Simon. Derrick, who 1 months is staying lila.k lltss.' St Peter. Richard V. D*. Lima and Coinp.nn LbnitM however will only he here for and his mother Mrs Rosario IX' about Utrce weeks. Lima Both of them are at Diamond A few day* lieiir. they left thev Estate on the East Hank of the "; I f ,l a "_ pr S xy ..'! !" 1 _"ii? ,cnU ^ M Oemcrara River. For Barbados Holiday M R. AND MRS. Alfred de Prcitas and their daughter Margaret Rose arrived from Brittsh Guiana on Thursday afternoon by B.W.I.A id portllW Wini 10 Eni Missing List I EARIE CONSTANTIM ing %  spot of bothai ir, pari time from reading Bl lha IV"'. W antertalni tinstudents' cricket ETUKNING to Trinidad (N) club of Inns of Court ;.nl 1.1 taaji) Thursday afternoon bv ,, nol quite suie which opposing. UW.IA after a short visit lo trams thev should be playing this here for two 1 an Mr Arthur . Oaorga da Cabral %  '! HoiirH'ui\'s' Guitlr I'n.r. in Ihr Imai nui*n far IM> Paaa *nd EMttab INIil.^s nH'n Ih^ "Advarate" cherhed >ffctetd*> r Peasr IsV. per pie' n' Vi W*M ,n *"^_ Chl U; A iik * tfc. gj gas ... utriia*. OssVasai Qti-"*— w %  W m Hi II 1) am Oo— .. Tt• raaaswTv. Wla-?-: s w Ruptn hutrsii forwjrd ind i thai tht othf hrh &tur* n r"i>l -Hi. B.ily." h. eaK Kn VOU tc *S; •-a: io caich butiariWa j-H io>a ss?" BuptK nwmrnt. But urtly **h %  nr butwdwt kasgas. 3 Tht srao't too early is rh y*B bt*nh. "Oh. 6rti, I %  m Horn* H r m loUTlud*. M'uud Ptotn •••*• iud, s *• a m IS p m I IS P n> B*i:' | T( AiijUUO* rrn Briuui. Utir> .11. I p m tot' Stoi'i Kve* 4 10 u m r* D"> (.. Train. Ban.rd 1 pm Bnglwui \p m Intwlud*. B 11 vas*s*j Bin ST 'rSS-n-ie SWSSSW £^c With M. ass pm rroai. T Third PTWW—anc; T 00 pm Jha M T l p m N Anb-aa; P_ 1 S p m Crkkrt RcpoiS On Ttoi Tr-1 B OS P %  > RaiO I* !" m> big at Accra Rockley M Fredas is the proprietor of 1> Freilas and Co.. In Georgetown Returned A LSO arriving from B.G o: Thursday b] ti w LA. wa Mr Sam Ashby. On Laat Lap of Survey f OL H. V. G. Bloodwurth C.B.E. ,. West Indian, passed his final %  ,.,111 mill went home taking 'I %  gtura lift wtth him Arriving Todu> id Mm? G.-Yvoncts baby son L^'' FI !" M "" l : '" l-partnb Wn Mr' Jack %  -' '""<' via Canada L "* '' Ot I %  who is III Trinidad and "i"K b v TCA. are Mr. Jimmy and Miss Cl.iiit.. Pa Lima who iEmlafcc. his wife and Iwihy n-i ,, the U B Ml 'lslc Emtage. Carlb utnii islands that Jimmy I. KuillK lo WOrtl With Misis Law end Conned, while Lisle is joining the staff of the Watei Woiks Alter 27 Years school In BG AFTER l>eing in the IS fOT i to Barbado* £\ t.,\ Gwen Walton ictuiTn.' U) It.ui.' pal U rtos recently lo spend -iy weeks' Returned Yesterday holiday staying with Mrs F. : PERCY VINCENT, retired B^*" .,* KS" !"JESa^SA£S By The W.y ft.gS.JS S' t SSS! M ^Ti^ W HILE Canb w.o dnvm,; si.nlah with him as his wife along Rockley Ituad yWJtSf. Th.-it wcddniK lakes plaol ti 0 day mosnlng, there wa .. mall u>Kinmiv< of August, when MoUN open |ltney in front of hln with parents arrive from the Wes' these words on the back. "ElcctriIndies. Sheilah's problem at th 1 ,il Oar vices," "Radio Rcfngeramoment Is what to do with h tor and wiring contractors." on August for London at the end of August. His next trip will be to Cyprus which begins In the middle of September Enroute to the U.S. M RS FRANCIS HAWKINS who left veslerday morning for Antigua by RWI A will Like pan Amer Airways from there to li'xei dog since there Is a three And what u.is the van carrving, months quarantine iierlnd r the US A. where she to going to bran( „ 0 „ s ovr . Trinidad visit her daughter and goo-in-law BY THE WAY-yBe" charges for admission complained the Other day that new paopla in the business had created competition, and so receipts were falling off I wonder if there is any conneetlon between this and an extraordinary advertisement which coincides with Captain Foulenough's absence from 1 On making inquiries I find that * 'here, and them both hoisting that garter, that's what 1 see." %  %  •—• %  Would you sa; that this flag called attention 1 any particular brand of garter, o garterette? Mrs. rar*n: I tell you I C0JDI along by there, like, and I se this ruddy great garter holstec as you might say. that's what • ee If thai |gs*1 calUng atteniioi d'you expect "em to lire cannon from the roof Snapdrlver: Would fOU g ..ribe what you saw hoisb d a ;' %  Hag, only thai gaitci Nol .1 ree I inn Of course, btd a palDUd ioo*eb*ole: Painted "" whal Mrt. I'jrsonx; How do I know* 1 aoma along by user*, like, ai what do I see? I — CssfltoSSIISll Thank VOU, M Parson* Call Henrv Howlcni II llHtK K s|.\RKES fftghSI ilnl anil pink check The skirl i with bloued UP In black 1 t.. id i.iuti in hlsrk Beauty Hints Try Ihl On DlOUS which sooi smooth routine One: CLEANS! make-up. by putting on the crcai Of dam cottonwool) applying It with ., upward and outward nwven*! Suppling cream for tl'c oily skin (also often suited to the teenager skin 1 !n the morning, repeat steps one nd two tiefore putting on youi aaJM-up If you arc addicted lo eon and water, slffl c to a n e irlth ,f,M irOS and see how ncVtoraiWffiS *" ner* and ears much grtau raw awry, TWa Use; Salon cold cream for n-wcream and Ionic technique will help to soften and smooth your lirv Skin t leanser for dry complexion until t gradually betklM gins lo resemble the "flower petal big Cleansing look" so beloved by poets (and cream for <>ih skins sdvertlslng agents). SI (Ml ATE the tissues Do *> a" d '*nore preparations .nic Pat it on wltn with endearing names-and go for ad rf ,.„.„,...' wrung tMt first those wth uncl ^ n '; 1 .*",!"-_,, fold •water Vou can resist sniffing them nr(. it Ll all to the good. Many an In%  Q| %  in lotion frnor cream has sold widely be1 niM of an alluring jierfume utUve skins i to H Texture loimn for oily gajpj try to rsnUsa that it not posOilv skin lotion In special sible to cover up a skin that has 1 ;ises foi exi 1 f blemish" 0 enlarged ft iiecial medicated pow. ,. to on all skins will help matThnM NOURISH with %  luters Known as Pore Grains. It Is Mass.ge an excellent treatment. Shake a carefulh Into tlw skin with few in the palm of your hand, mix .. %  to to a gritty paste with w.dti TO-M(.IIT DINE AND DANCE AT CLUB MORGAN Mii WEST INDIES MOST POPULAR NIGHT CUB. DELICIOUS STEAK DINNERS Served throughout the Night Dial 4000 (or HesiTvatio ## TtlK MEW MOTUR irtl.K MAMVEL OQIDCQUS. 1 THE NEW .MODEL I.E. 149 It', is different from the <-onveiitionnl type motor eycle—in fuel it's the nearest approach to a motor ear. WATER-COOI U>. IIASD-STAHTII). SllAFT-DKIVKN and NOISELESS For Simplieity. Eronomy anil Kidinc Pleasure, ChMH a . U&loc&tta ROBERT THOM LTD. COIRTESY GARAGE — WWTEPARK ROAD MRS. HOUSEWIFE!<• Have A full Ran^e of TEA CUPS SAUCERS TEAPOTS MILK & CREAM JUGS St GAR BOWES PORRIDGE HOWES I.UNCII BREAKFAST and DINNER PLATES SOUP PLATES MEAT PLATTERS VEGETABLE DISHES SAUCE BOATS Inspect these at our HARDWARE DEPARTMEST Telephone 2IS9. BARBADOS CO-Or'ERATIVrT TOTTON FACTORY LTD CROSSWORD Lr T ri4^ r .LU n —i i j i~ i rti — • SI S. SODS lu floiwur. til 11 I in. is untwuai. ISl i* 3pvui rwU lor s SOOB. 4*1 j'. msi' dwri;iiiis. til IS Shoil current DMuttn. (S) I i iort i>f mortar. IS) .i AbDrp*it*d %  tsUtnwH(W _, •13. To oe thu muion dor*. *i •/* Ad'iB.ic port. <*i ^a mw w fund*nSBai. i IN)>D l rjua iiui i lo ranlUM. ** j UlnrreL (i t Haul to laotitu. ISl i. Clusse. (SI :. timtiifsitoi i ussons. tm B. weu-xaowii order. ISI m rn*niwuiuiiii* Mtmnw. H j (iMitmn n^niwi. iSl u Iittii.ni aisle. ii |nw 2* *T< 17 SU.p l>t mlT I I*).. iS Wartime *ervic. I jo Lrnt[iliti). Sjtau If IISTERINE Antisspflc, full Ucnglh. kill* millions of germ* on throat surface. It attacks these germs assotijied with colds before tbey attack you . keep* ihem from starting serious trouble. Take the sensible precaution against cold complicstioni-gargle with L1STLKINE Ami septic, full strength! IN TESTS OVER A 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS OF LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COLDS! In .inder the eyes. skin tonic, then apply with lingerU Special in 'km mixture .II '<> the affected uica m small, for dry or normal skins circular movements. Wash off i Senstties skin cream when dry with eooi water Tool Extra Rich *km erenm fir ahnuld not use these grains on older dry ski... your checks UKVPI'tMil'OTF— Hrrr'a hou to work tt: AXYDLBAAXH l LORtPILLO W One latter simply slamla for another. In this example A (s use, )p run be used r ( i hii tiuit> iniil i N bend in'o Hit io$: I diffnilr r Prfes Na jd. IIOYAL (Worthing*) Tods* 5 ii 830 p m. %  nd Conllnulns Columbia Pictures Present Robert Young. Barbara Hale 'AMI BABY ICAKIJ THREE" with Robert Hutton. Janis Carter Exlra 2 Reel short "Training for Trouble" IMIMIII TODAY J.30 & 8 30 pm and Conlinuina 20th Century Fox Presents Montgomery CLIFT Paul DOUGLAS THE BIG urr With Cornell HORCHEKS Bruni I.ODEL ROXY Tod it 4.U A 8-IS p m. and Coatinalng 20th Centur> Fox present* Gregory PECK Helen WESTCOTT In •THE C.UNnC.HTER ( llt Millanl MITCHELL Jean PARKER OI.YMPU Today 4.45 A Ml P ">. Sun. 4.45 A s 45 B m. Ralston VliASLA A 3-DAY SPECIAL! FHIDAV. ^AT. SUN MAT 6 i> in Nil Aititmj AoaiS Hinnrr* UK HAVIll.AND A XTHO.X y A n VEMS §•: (By Henrv Allen) DON'T MISS IT : AQUATIC 1MB MMMA (Momben Only) MATINEE : TODAY AT 5 0O P M TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30 Panunounl'b New Picture KID HOT AND BLUE" Starring IJETTY HUTTON — VICTOR MATUKE WILLIAM DAMEKEST — JUNE HAVOC "Red. Hoi and Blue" la Joyous, tunelul and happy co lucky SPECIAL MATINEE : THIS MORNING AT M O'CLOCK Monogram presents : JIMMY WAKELY in "SPRINGTIME IN TEXAS" Republic Picture: George Bre-nt. Ver: in "DRL'MS ALONG THE AMAZON" with Brian Aherne, Constance Bennett GLOBE I' 5.00 and 8.30 P M TO Til THE RED DANUBE TODAY 5.00 and 8 30 P M TO TUESDAY Waltei Ethel PIUUEON UARRYMORE J.,net LAWPORD LEIGH LOCAL TALENT AUDITION TOMORROW, i.l nm I'HEAIHE. !t 311 A M SBgflKft-!-'' II URR AYS J MILK STOUT ""IgSMP^ 1 -'EDINBURGH SCOTLAND SOLE AGENTS:MANNING & CO., LTD. •.





PAGE 1

SATI BOAT, JII.Y 22. 195(1 IIM:IIMH)> Mi\iK vii .1 rilREE , HI\IMW 0\ B• HOPE: Keep Children Away GERMANY Am KOREA From Cinemas Headmistress Tells Parents* vr THE 1-MSl'LlNF. CONVENT I,evenlu Moth*, ,,. *Ua the HeadmwtresB .11 her icpurt on the work ... mcv.tabl, hool for 1949-50 thanked theparentg of pupil* K .. wfto, during the past year, "h,,-, ,. optftttt % % %  %  %  with us m matters involving certain changes in view of the welfare of the children. ,r n >IHII\II <.i \\i\<.ii \>i LONDON l %  the other unda 1 Wi tEurope These If— Mmigiimndniii political and economic boisd f thi between the Grotewohl GovernThe raafaaafcon of (imnin troop* In mem and the satellite, (though Weal 411 could ever welcome -eon be Inn I '-'!.! especially" she sail to IM proposal which we mud last November, when wi on to cuiuider OOl hours For norm. bMn emit em plating HUB change, owing 10 the benefits which He realised would be de nvcjl fiom a school lime-tabli over the morning bod of 9 10 to 3 i n the aficrni nod by vou. for %  : %  uiKii'i-Mood thai %  : much for 11 1-0-oprrntion in .1 the Inrush this new 1 %  • % %  %  auaed to some par. rats, and Q..,. • proving beneliciil to the pupK Hore and better pllshed during all 01 the pteseut ar railKCId ill 1 o'clock the girl* Mfno for ;i good me,.! ol u;ir.-iiif, and %  ., %  %  lhai fcM the Itafllni awa> 1 %  Q lorj involved m the I with Poln d *lhank-you' before they leave us. and to offer them our good wishes for success in their new spheres of work Do Not Ohrfj In irn to you, Ihe parents r further non in that matter of vital the words •rend Motbur ftiocagi Cenvral Of the I'rsuline Order. In her book entitled. "Ursuliiie Education sKe nj young girls comA omen Ol Bgral Catholics V. hut should be done 'o help each %  lop hei worth, the natural atv< %  %  Kle> thai she ha %  under hersell capabl,. %  1 Hie great and hots duties of a 'I t ain loo* .^r n - % %  IBOril wee limited to the Taciic* Over luatrig . %  %  %  .: finally, ihe elections In Eastiocs met In London Una weak and usual, adjourned without a.be puppet romp si m anything Once again ^ Deputy intrad h*W elrewdD red mi, led lhai they w.ll h;ve .1 diseuoant.. that hav •'t'l %  ** %  %  vei foui %  <"? -in. uwu, :(11 . imr n fresh claim, on tu pan. to I ..„ ,,, '"• *•" 0" -'i T.ci .1 Dr Adenauer U SUB"** fe^SPP-". 1 '* to .be now. has been the West', de*,. Vu.slruliun Homes lu Sliorl Suppl} ... em in A %  1 I in iw:. than was %  %  %  1 %  h4Mnes. At id. agaj ; aaty had an estimated 1U.H %  South Wales—tar*, si %  dth ic ."creased from 7*\000 in IMT to 90.000 at the end of lr4 although 60,39? new home* 1 >. 1 period I irtolng is the it ol building A he - beM thai — n 00Q ($2,4(1 Septoml 1 1939. now costs C2.5UO tu* CiW fa The figures i el bourne consisting ol iw (P 1Leopold Returns To-day able %  irvoui It has not directed 1 Western 1 %  %  '• rence tab* tern <,. nu* wurntoubtgdBjr t*ue, • Peaea Treat) would understandK 'X v "" h l^ l> h BV *•** %  • withdrawal ,.: the Oerman Chanccllnr He has BM au'.fv.iiTv 10 create gmn K %  orn Austria — an event that Ight ha\ioaaq .,.,, 14 tlu> present deeentralired police K R of dropptni Colorado '" "* l ^ n "n It. view of thKl u m ? ^ K %  ur %  "" %  '" !l Ctech Mil ("••"•'H-. iBaayrn Oermany, ,, (M| p,., 11 the third official prolesi fron ll ^V d i"' 1 '" %  *! •V*PP*I wH IN Pupill 1 boot hai 10 ol wnom ittendancc In the J'reparalory Ue. %  nd an average tiuni* r Of ] idled UH I the rive forms .Mam s.hool W nodatlon for 80 i" have iK-en boarders at the Convent; some ,.• %  %  nc/uela and Brilish and olhers are from the neighbouring islands of Trinidad. Antigua. St. Lucia, and Guadeloupe. The t.iiuiard of work of the kupils or the school has. through%  • UV rear, bean quite uosjood progress has Klal meiiiion %  da of ihe 1 d InteUlftnl • orfc wl :,. [bed amonfl tmhtra of FormIV The-pupils have taken li lllgeni intertat In ail %  Od their mistress have unanimously expressed that th Red lendldl) w. havt ffxpei l Hi"*! results u %  %  1 1',.,. ate 1 In pi %  1 tl 1 1 1 : %  1 and Cambridge 1 imlnutlon 940 r . % %  1 Qraci %  el—4 ci Ml Cordon-4 I ' tictlon; ... ... %  %  With exM '1 iculatlon. In ihe lum. An. King and Mi,-" 11. Lmportani plan-. a> • ie other usual aeadkunb : ,\ork hat lileved HI Art and Music ;he Assoi lated Board ol Music—1 %  -the 13 candid entered, were all successful A1 ;hc examination* of .he Trinity College of Music the 8 candidates tared wenlika i '. ,.1 cour.ijii.k %  greater appreciation of %  %  -'i UH m al Boctet} el the %  cflool. Airead] . %  %  i some enjoyable houri have bean %  pent in listening to ind ng the rymphonles of lleethnven %  '.. -,l Chopin, and other Masters %  1 numerous have been n %  > ; tferencd Libra! j % %  \,. pot %  I . : %  We are 1 1 be able to say that the -i-hool Reference Library now many book* of value The %  Form Ubrarli pai usl weekly libiar> 11, tin ,'%  .. %  i] the purpose oi encour|ng it. i much. In the sphere of games, %  kaan pint has been mfl lit the year, and many an e match has e winners ,, ;. %  Netfa ill, Tenott, Rounders and T,.., EennJ \ % %  %  '' iber, when s* Aufumne'i Route, Blue Hows*.—WOTi 'he Snort.' '.. • I i %  %  %  . ihe 1 %  llish School I Cedi ington leajn ;.. : .. .,1 %  %  I now %  '.unity W 1 -.he memlaff I their loyalty. i their devote ; k lor the children Thcid willing co-operation ha made it possible for u.1 tinted, to work for the Rood ol ur pupilsAl the beginning of ihe school year we were ejej to welcome 1 Rorfoi %  W< losing t. %  Kiss Doreen Ihi School St-ifT thi-. %  lilily g: rervlce-they hove ould tu only information r th. -ulu .... %  ; onihe dill lly gif.ed with Ultelllgl ha am ao m God the Ity of wining. arti man*i moral worth i%  11 The child is. on hoi v. ,1 freiwnii: %  %  : leamlni t.. will and to will well. Children must of neee*Mly either ci ininaud. — According 10 : children to honour .heir parents bv obedience We are then driving to nto the "duds and hearts %  1 %  Mon and at %  ion., %  .. authority, which is .he b;t>i* of all contentnieiit in Ufc A pun of insubarnong many fr.ung girls today. We beg of you. Ihe parents, to co-operate with us in exacting from your girls n prompt. I..hedir-nce • %  %  .. sttempl 10 an-:s ihe i %  la ver> good for %  . 10 ihe lOJW i| moi illty, thi f. of emotlonahsni and •setuinienr of 1 there exhibited %  real source* laj : 1.61 In*. lemperalure i.Max.) KA-t r" Te a apar a Hsre; (Mini 73.5 F Hind Direction: iff a.m.! g, fl p.m 1 F Wind Velocity. | ,,,,!.. |wr hour Hironfler: (S a.m.! 29.976. i3 p.m.) 29.931 Ihe Co lists on th 1 %  Dtkii %  idem TVunuuVi strunx %  %  kehalf of UJt.O The first two Notes were from the lank *i u1 numbenn|. il .. Soviet Government, with Eastern ">ated nearly 100.000 men now, esl: Germany as the territory alleged Dr Adenauer's requr to have been sabotaged bv these *** m u l^ a 0 '' >'• dose howttaen. and ,h*re#or. think it beM ivtth the Wi : a 11. t when the Wes.en Power" showed Ihe) meant (1 1948 Peace Musk rhen no saying lo what lenuth | me Oammunutta iii 10 In their campaign (or "peace Tl 11 enlisted the Mipt formidable potato pests (The Tn "' question of a West fact lhat the heelles infest Sou.h n federal police was discussed Weal Qenftany as well was COB%  Inr recrnt meetings in London veiuentlv forgotten). These "' ""' study group o n Germany absurd propaganda charges would ,s probable that D. Adenauer's hardly deserve attention if thev *'h will be granted If .he Indid no. seem a pretext—in prcpartjrna.ional sttuaUon worsens. n case, perhaps, for interfering ''''''man nationalism will, m anv If the current edition of the Huswlth the Western air-route to ras '' eventually insist that Oernan art review 9 Betlm many naj such a force And in kotHdvo.' there More serious was .he culling off viaw of Korea the Western Pow '-.in Su\ iet our 1. of water and electricity to th. ers 1 think, may at an early aJbte, their tore Ileaguei partlcu Western sectors of Berlin This tw compelled to rev 1^. 1 heir pre*larly in BrlUIn, Franc might be the llrst measure in n *ni policy of German nonrcarmaerica We Soviet mu li I progressive blockade of the city merit Only by a situation of eludes the letter, a k you Ihta such as happened In 1948 Another strength', by. for ins.ance. reinwhat Its significant move have been Ibe forcing Western Cennan>. can paaaief Where are youi nacts comluded recently lietween they hope to present furlher your cantatW and ) ill symphoEaftern GermHny and the ComCommunist aggrosjluu Hut .he nles defl rated I 1 thi nisi countries of Eastern aVestero Powers know that, withpeaceT" l.\. Plunts Blast Seoul uud Taejim a> From page 1 Anotbei •; en ii.i.tthe souih Korean rotoi holding a lough Una from Die American ligin Hank m rthea waid to the vicinity nf Hainchong. wo more onetny di. i | developing a drive down ihe Mung>i>ajgi-Maiiirhong hlgtiway <-onfronted by the Sixth S..11U1 Ken an Division tpidiwu between the two towns. United Nations ships and planes to-day covered the stubborn treat of ground troops back to the %  'line of hard resistance" from which General Mac Arthur will launch his counter offensive. But in the right flank, the ullled front tear ihe east coast. United Nations ground troops went over to the iffenMve altai naval gin laid down a murderous curtain of are before them. It was not disvhethei troopwho went forward towards Yongdok 25 miles north of the point where Kii-t Cavalry Dlvlsio landed a few days ago were American or South Korean. Smoke from the guns of I wo cruisers— me British and one American— till hung thick in the dusty air us Ihe infantry attack began On the Korean front near the burning and abandoned Taejon former provisional capital. American soldiers were taking up newprepared defence positions. South of the town fired by allied bombers in a farewell hlit? as the Americans pulled out In the face f heavier armour. United Slat 24th Division, wearied rrom long flgh'ing dug in for another delaying action In the centre front. South Kocpann struck a few offensive blowi in the general picture of a %  pet il* bid to Mali for time while United Nations reinforcements are built up They wenreported mopping up mmuniM battalions al PungnJ between Tanyang and Yongju while !•"> miles further south other Souih Korean units bit hark in the ami of Yectrnn the Iny town to the valley corridor* which has changed hand. veu] times In the past taw days. —Renter LOOK OUT FOR COLDS! Nine Answer Call For Ai Id -*od 1 ". %  Ml hipping WASHINGTON. July 21. There) UN Secretary-General TTygVf plw in In aid at a piess conference to%  eTVP III day that nine countries had so far responded to hli ippeal f"i lid t,. 2 N<> Korea but none had ottered gTOUnd 1 %  forces The -tore lhai the s..i.. ,., turibl was secretly organising B S l), n.,1 ,.11,,, ,.,. rplUnteei had "not a word Kcd Ci ,n id. 1,1 or tnith In It*. Ue aald. He added t | 'hit the whole question of an Inpossible tn ternalional Volunteer U>gion was offered l nip ,.1 ,. foi I a matter for the Unified Command Swedish Held hosnrtel, and Ihe Security Council 5 IVru. made no offei Of tnUI Neiilier I nor any rnemlxr of lary :iid but announced her willthc United Nations Se.retarlai has Inane* tn entei li m done anything about It." he said. gotiatlons with the Uniiled C Lie would neither confirm DOI matid concerning othei deny the statement made by an nssisiance American sjaaknsman thai cooA6 Argonilna, announced hei dcn.ial offei-s of gmund troops had readiness .0 entei Into direct ns> "" %  •' l :| ''> aBvoral counuies gotlatloni will IIM UnlBed Com1 do not know whether ground mand through Washington, hut I skilled blamed for ..: U I DSSSl If Hoat nen lywedi h i • to li %  vt ilh Ul-lsjWl for at It .1 months after mai 1 !* I dlVoi, irrlagi DMed Social wot %  tj 1 1 ,iit. The llfg ,,f ohl h.-.is. has been prolong! lemollsh sn> dwell! L ojace howevei decrepli it is in gydrn done, than il> health say aie unnl for hal>stai %  !• %  llvlrg oi.,kc-,tuft dwelUi trallen To tope with .he problem, i ng Imi fxpencr. < %  lion B tlaj wo li Bydi ej foi 1 N HI pie. no Ki w fin e buildin have been bt H since before the an acute shortage ol office I iminodatit>n state end rederaj $\ \< rtunei 1 have enl nlafloii abi 1 esti IT < %  pre~fabrl( ited ho iset whl I .-ill be nnpi.rte,! 1I1,1 s free and. r tment MI %  • %  Id) prlei .11.1 rapert > tew the I 'Hi re than a •'. -KBP in had eth %  lation .. thai the Bi %  tan Mlgl aantion to i trom the Conttnei 1 and %  < %  • failed to tell :'. toi aaan. pBOpH Admim' Lord Keyea, head 1 lll-sn n (O ttbs K11 of in rendei Churchill's set %  \< 1 v ga\. vora %  which .n man* raj) v .• %  .... nuinMauona wen sihle foi elk Af.er capitulate turned to the pal withdrew iron 1 %  %  etion, i in h %  .. H 1 Hi \;i %  guui peoDta did on. h u ol ih mai 1 uige until I N Follow oi!. reai toral letu 1 signed bj the Piimate Thti taid I^opold's wife i' iv if Queen, and thai tin children would enjoj b, -.. %  [fa I in June al %  Allied %  rt in Sexoi Btn %  \ ia-i %  nth Army in Ma; 1945 Leopol • King wuiing lhat in health pre> ronvsd tu una e I eturn to Itelgiuio Hi. I I K 1 %  n da in ins gbdj cation l^opold 1.1 thai he had un in'. 11 ndonini in throne But In re up hu idea ,il 1, .1 inn. the lacs %  1 inreat •*Acr\ssUnited Nations appeal w.. guard national defence no Govtes01 a failure eminent troop* would be sent A on —— -, tuning to nee*e? Fesl a dry, rs*ping BMHinOB la >"r ibrosi> Cold coming on' Garglr Li.ierJDe .\n.i*cp(ic iaasesVasalr. DOM V. pcoaad) .nd iiequcaiiy may kerp cold from grtnog %  s ri oo l or help ml it ,ig. l.McrifMVit xpti. rtaciMt wsr beck ea pow ibtoa .. :-.r^-kill milbooi of germ.. So, -1 dM H llgB of ..old.gwgls UsaariM tad k*p h up—k mar nee yaw a LISTER INE 4nt!i*pt:c %  COMMUNISM IS LOSING GROUND l'rom ,r I maleui I 1 %  *rime Minlstei .-f Fiam if mo ling . . • liougesi aiio\ in the woi kJ il In fa nth dlvl ii iu SS irmouri I no .n till. 1 | division M Roynaud coi llnued! "She \ working nigh, and aajr, sretX '" icann. Millions ol ....d children, are tolling ol Ihi vorh People mtahi regard Korea w 1;. pnatid I would remind you of wflll Id In a lettei: the 1 way from Moscow to I'.'i I'eklng. Tcvky.. ( I. iilln H 1-niiei Mr Churchill had p 1 Irlbute to French Fx-Prernl. I'liul Rnmndier and Paul Rrynim,) i-rth or whom were on thpi %  form, and tM Paul Hei rt Bp llelglan ex-l'reiiuer Re ll %  wtli oiued • b] parttai urging iheli tollowen to assemble m ( "read) lo demonstrate il necea%  arj In IO irg&ntine Deputies igpee -First Time In Yean %  hai the Oral nine m 1 argume ii %  %  %  t. ,,. %  %  %  %  %  'I j %  • ...rMeiidly %  U.enl not %  %  AHhoufl %  1 Ing thi |< %  railing! Ihe At ill) 1 —geuler %  %  lag %  %  %  %  Specially designeJ ior Barbados, this Two-tone brogue in Black/White and Brown/White is now on sale at the leading scores. made by JOHN WHITE %  -ANDREWS LIVER sAii •i .. 1 •"'*W ''•' SUMS thv /ili'aiuri' i" HUppiffiifi if,,ii ,1 ill, „,,< %  r ll,,fullnu-inu Multtr I •# irlt-s ^ros %  n aaaa^ INI iRD V/ IRD MU P I -on. OfDABO 13 ITANDASD DEI \:>.w\ v \-. The STANDARD iI The TRIUMPH It.:.' N I 1 b> run MFU M \i fi 1 m 38 h p I Ti.. 1. %  raped CHELSEA GARAGE |1950| LTD. AfieM



PAGE 1

PAGE F.1C.HT IIARBADOS ADVOCATE W.L 479-3 In Third Test Modern flu Sctiool Holds Sparta Day B \: i RDAY, JULY 22. 19541 i Add lo this fact *Ji*' undoubti of a left-handed opening batsman and you will nag worth of in. JM ance. Week**— well WWl Weekes %  inn play all type"' bowling but i putleulMly life with lb. i, b,.ll l>w men. espri IrlouaI* as Weeke* ran Both he >".i Horrrll to are *b|r lo |r ii) Irom Hi" lr break lumlnt across* the wkkct and il.spai. n n to the boundary. Thai is cftckat I runs and a beautiful ftyla With no formidable an assault against them, the Engli-h Itam did well In UM held They must ha%* bcn IIR Hawaii lirad :i Ihe day. but at no tune was this No par. "iiin.'Hi as the change ami Y %  outstanding, UM W otbtr at IM. brtnali fur giving an o pportu ni ty "i brilit"* pa td non and irici Hoibe* The .-.-*t's. a* ranger. 'UIIUUIT-H I J -l had tak %  Minutes for Rl hoU M • %  ,.• . b % %  H if. i llv set a: iruj all at u rate) %  lutrm his ploy U) that of Worrell, had taken *nMtoad and rtoblApart from three . .. %  < i 'nall> at mind to the *i ( uare sx-rtar %  .rSHEE Horrrll D.,1,1, %  \Mr Mat four hour* at th* crease Wurrell reached hia first double century m Test cricket In* bach) drive off Viird. %  mM-wlckat i % %  Might aftM the 400 was r*gi*. POLO THIS AFTERNOON l about 4 )0 thih | emb*rs of The Ban... flub will be meeting aj :?.. Qa i isen Savannah for their usual round of rhukkrrs Some ol theirs drlva about ha tlieir gam gad i-ir horse., by motor nlc mot ol th. "ii W.L Achieve "Dominion Status" At Bis ley r..*> o.. Oo i .r f..,..,.i BISLEY. July 21 The second stag* af the Kind's tru.k Pr.re the %  King's Hundreds"-hich included West Indians, w posite team in the senior MacKinnon It meant that the NJtA was uncording to the B.W.I Domini.,n" status ALAN KAt ospartnership n %  Jenend. A el id Yardlaj afU'i bowling '.i ion haui Ahirh ridded tht %  • gulation run a .' tte, brourM Hollies on from Worrell greet• i '• <• slow U.wler with an enprva* drive through U > which reached the irowrl almost before any of the four men In the off side platoon could change formation At 412 Shackleton came on inItaad of Reds*r who left Ih* field Ii r a brief absence after an hours gruelling toil from the Pavilion B| winning the 100. 220. MO. _,.<,. i n vimM {U v skn-re |>1 Vwtai Luatarum; when asUai the Modem High School h. '.heir aiinuai si. or is meetimt %  pit' h-ovy A, Clarke and C Chandler nod are unsaddled and g.ven nb fact „„{,„,,_, of thrrii lor first place, whila C. Clark, down and rest before their .-tre.,? c ,^Z '( Trimdad ohU.mJ 1 SULW-5*i fc *1 l ;i" "H. TXr m ",nS l \r^ ^^nd 0 ;,^*^^ iTS gi-Yvkian, Wurra... a^^g^SS JffttAS* S^JZ^^&TZ Cnchlow. Jones and Walker that the i.feree* will be ,. hampions in dtv.aJona ill tn.i ..l-r ,.i danger%  0 i at Bislev several time* • Trinidad, told to do a distance of about shot off this morning in driving <-t to the Held rain. The West Indians who were not accustomed firing undvi Never fa BOO or 1,000 yards teams natural! Pxndard of ahooting i... m y expectabvfure 0 iHough I had a high anges the opinion of Waal Indian team. lselves tefore they came here They artha-.' ..iiy line lot of men longraiiK. avanta though occato have undar my command. sionaily some outstanding scores were recorded -The absence ol ratand insularJ. A. Sutton (B.Q.) C. Barton ,tv has been particularly marked; (Jamaica) and E Crooks (Trin|bgt| have all worke I ai one CO* (2). (3). and (4>. The new ren rdwere sat o 1. HI Jones, of tin : (3) art) did the 100 yds m |J 1 5 secV Sheet* who broke his ow records In the 220 and 440 vd the tune* being 24 2/5 and 50 l.S C sees, respectively. Clarki did the 220 yds. in class (III idadi were three Ocularly welf. hot ofl UM pad tag by Weeke* set up 200 Th. hunt pel fin sible dose andci slips. Suf .' avari \""' far Um PBrlnafahJp, and W' man did his job in the held well ''" rn..iti.^ had soon himself attained the Eng\r I ...r,., Worrells share was. 3.. Worrell )amt ola ;iI which u N M Isia mie e s ni h „ v h|Uf ot hu ^ ,„ m ., I.owe who lib 4ft. Mins us riding off. as naturally th* raster the sawed Hie n : i sory wlU it be to slick to rules work. On Wednesday last quite | number of spectators turned out. entering the ground should through the east gale, turn lefl 1 the goal posts following Vary 11 winds, ana poor vial isilam occauons—duo i %  :,•., utes old Worrells ahan wag 37 W. within easy reach of their men hu „„,, ( „ l(| fUn n ^ 498 a the Oval in i I ,„ , oft p Uu ,n and there would aaam io ue nojankiin in. m irip had taiaan Hung to prevent then, reaching me ,,,,„ JUsl Q,^ nour o| dawilin,' 535 made by their piadacaaaon ut craftamaj Kingston Ifl !:> It would ol .. (1MI movcd U p t iontr.it i., thai of his partner order—649 Still let us keep aimWorrell U 0M Of the West Indies mi at the stars, w. Raa is our degreat deal more than tre.* topi '-' Jotll an s-sentl # ) T L, anw< to victorious warfare When lunch There had been some light rain wo wl(n Rae 55 and WorrtU u nuriajt the morning here, and the ( %  t ,„ F i t sfe*JffWSS i fr ,, £ % %  SsS patches scanered n the canopy of haa n lo lh exactly one clouds Th. *eathe> %  m..te5 when their assophecy w ,l "S l( r "' 1 1 U^M • 1 I, Showers and thunderstorms with was M few balls tatar;when the oullrH.k warm M.*l morning *"'• %  "f"**' ajra KUK*l*ton papers wen i .,1 of • " '•"'L, 10 ">? up the two what on* writer called England's hundred The innings had been bother to bring out the new ]*athPaltied Batsmen." and nearlv all m P"*"" 3'Z minutes at thier preferring to have something The 450 inning' .as now 35 m Wrekea In Ten runs later Yardlev with "" m i bag doe baagagaj bagh H-IS.-I in piaca of rlgflta Weekes helped himself to two •n the old ball to rench his own century nfter two hours and fort) I Although limping noticeably. W aafcag troki pi..* .,,, liril ,f. fectcd by his knee trouble There may have been possibilities f or and L. Holder an i |ha tmrdn line of the playing [ did the high jump nJeld :ind then iark on the Mtf and Mmtli if the rope emlo-.ue s..,'. ara pnrrldad within Uaa _f .r memlers' friends ?.__' and Hotel guests. Every car should be taken by parents I. prevent children from playm near the horses as it Is quit mpossible for players or gr and 4ft 2in~ ara two cycUng ever. one ol which was Won bj I'yi | Haynes and the other by L. Barwas row The old boys race was carim's ried off by L. Best, and Miss J Collymore easily won the old The girls' standing shot of the B.W.I contingent. Yesterday in the flgggi of St George's Challenge vaae— considered second only in importbilit ;.nee to the King's Prize—he was chiefly to a very placed fourteenth and received what have troubled West Indian the National Rifle Association St moat at Blsley George's Badge To-morrow he ts Thev liked the ranges %  one nf eight selected to repreand they like their quarters, two sent the West Indies in the Senior long camp rooms—thankful (hev Kolapore. Three other We*t are not in tents n. manv are. were finalists in the King**. Hundreds: Major F. T The general impr Manly (BriUrh Guiana) A. S 4corrc*|>ou....beat -oa> me Hash which it opens a new series in the Second Glamorgan by 48 runs. Lancaii'tmgimne* his batting from Division competition shire 137 (G Ednch 50. Watkin• %  re graceful styj,. of WorThe matches with their respec 4 for 27f and second Innings 105. ill stale toti\e grounds are as follows %  — fF. Da vies 5 for 11). Glamorgan lat Division 96, (Tatlersall 7 tor 28) and secPickwick vs Combermere at ond innings. 98 (Hilton 8 for 55. rell day. and one particular off'drive travelled so fast through the covers thai Washbrook did not even worry to take his hands from his waary knees. As It turned out Yardlev did hoi disagree with Umpi the manner of Inaokri aismissni by Jlamadhin The Umpires explanation must be without parallel In the gnme ,:. ad that pllt between the ball slriking the pads and hitting the wnkei UM bowlai '-' •naaMatoa appealed _atiIfl Uwl England skippe stage With the score unchanged. Bvang appealed for a ktumping fray to-morrow morning' against Hae. but umpire Chealei When the bails were removed found fot the defender Yardlev at (he end of plav (kg total was now made his llrst post lunch I'fl for 3 wickets Worrell 239 hang*, bringing un Hollies imlcad and Weekes 108 had already addNext ov*r the ad more than any other pair had took off Bedser ever done against Englind. 241 Kensington Lodge vs College at Lodge Carlton vs Police at Carlton Spartan vs Wanderers at Park Intermedia!* DivhuMi to give his seam bowlers to work Em P* vs Cable and Wireless on when they return fresh to the al .. B n \A ,n Y M.P.C. vs. Mental Hospital it Heckles Road (Hill (3). the 228 nd George TOTAL appeal Hemark.ihK niuk tl.r I back Shackleton at the against ing whaf BadCilffa end With Rae laklng Nunes Shackleton bowled the lirst over • sharp Ungta oil the llfth ball. Kingslon In 1935 ~Ro far Worrell this morning from the pavilion Worrell reached lus century while had hit two sixes and thirty one end. and Hedm-shared the attack. l' partner was still In the sixties 'our-. ..nd Weekes sixteen fours Shacklaton's WBI a maiden, bid He had hit fourteen fours, in the s, ,,., Christian! b->k foul ofl Bada***] two houil at the wicket and the rani^ND iaT iNNnvns first deliverswith a bMUttfullf bOUndao With which he reach*.! i"!?"" w .?' r ,? M b i ot £ nn crisp square cut. ihre.I i enl the West f'tf !" ? ,'" W^K AJL""" ,' Hollies replace.1 Shackleton Indies" total past Uiat of theh **• OHXM b Wueill '" j after fourteen runs bad l--en addoppirtient .'"llT'. '. G d ^' rt b V-a-no,,, 4 \ •d to the overnight total in eight Kae Out I.£2 .; '^"m-aMn"* '"" overs. He bowled | maiden to Rae Yardley himself replaced Shacawkta... Worrrti Two more maidens followed and kletmi at 238 and wag forthwith t" 1 *!" b .. J h '* !" %  when the clock showed mid-day responsible for Ih* downfall of i£?,Z. nor^T""' "' Hae. Evans slumping tlie Jainukaii EtnM i i> II. n.b 1 m .i nt lo meet the thud delivery on the half volun Tlw third wicket waa down % %  2M. rag Rat 1 han balag G8 and Woneii if. t.-d with no. '"' Weekes -i.itid his iiccount with a couple of masterly Ma boundaries The parinershlp iM-tween ll.e Iwo H"i added SH ,ZM.',.1 In 35 minutes, tteekes lliuplna I'wi h..dl>. r-nilent to pUy iliminii v ' ei.do for li, of these runs. .""" iNNmns Worrell remained In hi, pa> gwstaM^SwTS l*3£i "* mood and punched art %  %  %  n.i" i i, si Yardlev and Hollies M,. lnalel> lo reach his 15a In 17.'. minutes. The ami went up when Jenkim enlaced Yardlev. Worrell taking i brae* from bis first ball. %  % %  ; %  -.>:< m tt^-ssrzj&rs; oonwnanoa .„„, „., ap ., n( w WcBt |ndiari Windward vs Spartan at Wlndard. Wanderers vs. IVkwiek at Bav 2nd Division Comber mere vs Y M.P.C. at H by Karl Combermere Headley at College vs. laxlge at College. Tattarsall 3 for 3! At Birmingham. Somerset beat Warwickshire by 10 wickets Warwickshire 281. (Dollery 150, ilbere 4 for 68} and second Jag* 14*. iHasaU 6 for 36). mersct 371. (Tremlett 100) and stcond innings 36 for no wicket* At Bristol. Surrey beat Gloucestershire by 5 wickets; Gloucestershire 187. (Laker 8 for 45) and second innings 173. (Laker 4 for 41); Surrey 151. Constable not out SB, Cook 4 for 15) and seapiul mrungs 211 for 3. (Constable 86. Priw at ranges yards tomorrow. The weathvr cleared up during the afternoon tor the MacKinnon Cups Sun shone brightly over th* range and quit* a crowd nathered to watch what ts one of the biggest eventa of th* Biskry meeting There were few onlookers in the rain thia morning. There are two MacKinnon Cups. s*nior and junior. Trinidad. Jamaica. Barbados and B.G. each had a team of IJUT entered for the junior event but It was the first time In history the West Indies was invited to compete as a comSxicoi onffAka Wesl Indlai Bisley. Captain K Jotuistone. Commandant of the It.W.I. teamwill lepreaent • Kotapon to-morrow—most im, ,rc portant event of the Bisley m**lI) U Colonel J Connell (Bai Superintendent J It Major F I G.) D. 1 Bt. A Dn.. i (BG i. ': K Waddlngton (J %  naica), St W f Jai %  I tlon. I. Poundalion vs Police at Foundar 'i*hlock not out 91) 'un. r-cward vs. Pickwick at Poatar's At Dudley, Worcestershire beat Central va. Empire at Vauelusc. Hampshire b> 164 runs; WorcesReglment vs Carlton at GarrIlershire 342. (Kenyon 163. Walker 1,1 4 for 13) and second Innings 167 %  'or 6 de-Id Drwn not out 101). Hampshue 246. (Rogers 57). and second innings 99. (HoWOTt g l 7 for I only fifteen had been aildi-d. the extra single coming from a leg bye. Lanky Christianl received the kind t.ivour of a life when he was eiglit He cut nt one outside ihc off stump from Bcdaer, failed to cover it and the bail flew off the edga to Intuit at first slip The 1 failed to hold Ihg COBIDnl ltlV*l) easy catch Altai bowling alght ovara, whii fa cost the same nun.i.i of run: and included four rnoideiut, Beib.ii gav* way to Sha.kletun. who thus switched ends. The new bowlai met with immediaie BUCC* I I t?hristiani went into his WlcKol In an attempt to foi.e tie ball i vs ;< s. was struck and returned to the aaaasf f*a *ay i Vtl CAN'T GET OUT OF THIS SNOOKER TRAP (>rand Dauee John D rantpMH AdinlIO<. Iltl W/.W/.V'V'V.V/''.' .-%  -*,-. | CONCERT I (Under the Distinguished Patronage of His S Excellency the Governor ^ W. L Savage. CMC. ^ nd Mrs Savage) \ Mr by the found runs difficult to obi un thll morning In the face of good length ide ten and |h T„ c BrltW. u. !" p;m h£ u, ,,„. ,„„„„ ^,. k ^ n „. p; t ,., rhlup produrrd 100 rum In U nutf nod only at i.nr stage did him b,t. ;,i„l ,„ ,riii 213 £g IJttjLS!'* M. SfSBSLtS • % %  *Z$$2Z2S\£% ftis^ttVKM'ItU: rlld not move but Insule's return to the wicket-keepei was wide The tea interval found the score Bl 339. Worrell 173, Weekes 35 Dainty! SILK LACE TRIMMED NIGHTIES v. i eiccUenl 'or these hot night? nre having at present Blue. Green. L*H Sizes 34 to 38 it) CAVE SHEPHERD &. Co., LTD. 10. ||, 12 & 13 Broad Street. After Tea bed*,; attack after kes 33 Thar. Match tUad In* batwaai Queen's ataman's 3M) was Queen's keenly tluifdast %  I 1, PRACTICE THEIR MUSIC? T*-ATS WHAT TriE KlDS WiLL DO -.-SvEQyTMINg ELSE BUT ''SHALIMARISEPUTZJI -. cov.s. is THIS M SUTE -\ I—r %  -)V |, MsD PWCTCE VOUR tmsxrl "" 'A**, LESSOS' SHALIM4R!! k f ~\ SEPUTZ'. COME BACK'. I g '^iVCOME IN HERE. 1 .' -i They'll Do It Ever)' Time body to the line leu bounds Next over from the same end he sen! the hundred up, lifting Shackleton dangermish naaf Washbrooh at midwicket for three. Three figures had taken U| two hours Kae Hits Out Worrell reached 2S ami at this cording lo plan-th point Rue seemed to take this as a plan, that is—and challenge He had been batting hoisted in a mutter of nftee seventy five minutes this morning utes or so, during which the batsfor only six runs, and now sudmen took things comparauYaty danly opened his shoulders to Hoiquietly The score then mounted lies and hoisted him deep into the mercilessly and Weekes reached long field for | Mb four A mere his fifty with a burning off drive fraction more weight would have which went clean through Insole w " no1 ,on ln equalising allowed the ball to clear the while at extra covet The h.i:an in fol ''"'" taking the lead Olympic n f i •• lowed thh shot with another four lhc drew even and halt tlmo At 127. lardlcv look the ball straight past the bowler. U*ds*r. f""'"' the -.core equal at fl all. O from Shackleton and himself a-These two war* making the i.Mimptio-i Olvmpia took the lead sumed charge of the Hadcllrte end bowling l-.k UmpU enough and "" eventually carried off th The batsmen were unperturbed bv undoubtedly the opposition, tollMatch 19 goals to 14.