Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Tharsday

July 20
1950

Priteeé:
FIVE CENTS

Yerr 535





FRESH U.S. TROOPS LAND IN KOREA —















oh zm ‘4 = GUARD OF HONOUR FOR THE GOVERNOR | R d R B til .
1
Not Guilty” Verdict heds nenew battite
In The St. Phili . r ej
x e
e BI
“9 Selecting | Kor Taejon
M .
urder Trial | H-Bomb BY LIONEL HUDSON,

; LPHONSO BRATHWAITE, young man of Sea View. ta : ; Saas
x St. Pillip, eee ~, if he did not believe it was Sit Te art Amphibious Poree, Pohang, Dong
rue, and then stepped slowly out of the dock of the Court ae , ORE: se 4e
of Grand Sessions a free man yesterday. A jury had is 1 e€ ne KOREA, July 19
=— him of the murder of Lionel Carter of the same WASHINGTON, July 19 tgp ih ler by Americ an a a ee aoe
ocality. Site for the plant to build the aircraft, advance units of the nited Siates
wide Sal tie tee ed i seative, trong, well ASMEAtettan alone Eee] Amphibious foree today moved inland after es
eae — ye see are of the Town Hall where tent tockey ie kine tablishing a bridgehead here. The bridgehead
or a day and a half he had sat on trial for his life.





had been consolidated by dawn and more troops

Commutice of the American Con-



















































In ‘Floating Corpse” Trial























: ! | gress. The Sub-Committee said ippine i the ¢ ay, The
__Carter died as the result of a{ Mr. Dear then posed a number | Tee? teh sitet artabt corer ace: oan then landed slipping into the calm bay. They
Easter SUanad cine ie hung Jest |of questions to the jury. The first | ae 80,000 hectares came from ships which disgorged hundreds of

aster Sunday night, April 9 after} Was, had Louise Maynard been : : se Wad me
what witnesses described as a|really on the scene when tha The statement while not spe landing craft fresh from Far Fast bases,
short struggle between himself struggle took place? Her version | cifically mentioning the hydroger 7 It was white dracArthor’s
and Brathwaite. Dr, Tappin said|of the affair did not agree with | bomb said: “of course, the new ° e fresh trdops were pouring in
it was @ sharp-edged weapon|that of the other witnesses, and | alonen ey e, constructed and He Russia Will through the beachhead without
which caused the wound, But the |I'r. Tappin’s evidence ave the lie igned to carry out the President's Hinoaltiéh that th the ”
Crown produced no weapon. The] to her statement that the two men lirective of January 1, 1950." On ° ee i ca < pris Rea
Prosecution called 13 witnesses;| were face to face when the blow hat date President Truman an- ithe raw [78 ee PrOKe “Tae Mee, aye
the Defence none, was struck, /nounced he had told the Atomic ull by opening up massive gun

“You are discharged and may It was not part of his duty | Commission to go ahead with the | barrages and flinging their
go,” His Honour the Acting Chief] to prove who killed Carter, but | H-bomb. No hint was given as ti SAYS US. GENERAL fighters into the air battle
Justice, Mr. G. L, Taylor, tgld Louise Maynard, according to jthe site of the plant except to agnin
Brathwaite, and adjourned the her own evidence, had as good THE GOVERNOR, accompanied by Capt. D. R. Perkins, inspects the Guard of Honour at Com j Say that “one of the most import HEIDELBERG. July 19 At the same time thetr infan
Court until 10 a.m. today. an opportunity to kill him, -or havhiese' Séhool yaslanday ant criteria” in its selection wil’ Lieutenant General A Van var ted ‘hs tim a ri :

Prosecution perhaps a better one than any- : : ra : i ae bay te pales be the need to “minimise its vul- § Fleet former United States Com- |! a ou ig see oe

The case for the Prosecution one else, 3 ee nerability to enemy attack.” mander in Greece predicted here vas : ‘ i royght there Tri
was conducted by Mr, Frank How did Carter get the wound? 4 i 1 | ‘ Y > D I I i shentir, to-day that Russia will withdraw} Where drove out southern
Fields, Acting Attorney General.]!{ there was any doubt, Brath- ugar ounel Jj l / Ma kK 4 eae her support from Korean Com-j “°f! ts :

Brathwaite was represented by wie was entitled to be acquitted m2 | ee munists as soon as they lose their} |, \ 2 hundes wie — ae
Mr. J. S, B. Dear. . The Attorney General in his tt 5 ’ T 1| ) initiative in the battle vit tle . shter overhead = pilayec

Hearing of the case started | 0Utline, when dealing with the ommiuttee Ol ONIA [ P 1R] L {ME NI Nehru Renews American troops \ e to what may prove

Monday, and as it continued | question of provocation, had said * | 4 L A | P LT, End I saw it happen in Greece and] 'h fateful battle . wAr

yesterday Dr. L. S. Tappin was|that the nature of the weapon M t A | roposa 0 Enc it sure will happen in Korea, Van] thur cle'med Iecesse or hi

recalled. He said in answer ‘to]¥US€¢d was important. But the ! ee Ss gam In London E ii : 4 Feet sald, diving short’ ston} United -Matlins fores

Mr. Fields that it was possible} Prosecution had produced no (From Our Own Correspondent) | Korean Crisis here. The General is on his way} And an air official statme:

but highly improbable that affer] Weapon. The doctor had said it LONDON, July 19 4 . from Greece to Baltimore wher>'said that British and American

receiving the stab in the lung} W@S a sharp edged instrument, so A special committee of the In- (From Our Own Correspondent) WASHINGTON, July 19 he will take command of the/aireraft knocked out or damaged

Carter would have been able to iar te had a wide ae ternational Sugar Council resum- LONDON, July 19. India’s Prime Minister eka Sig States Second Army. He/45 North Korean planes yesterday

traverse the distance spoken of | decide from — razors, cane bills, |eq its meeting to-day after an\ r > ep x ‘aad hes oie ty ' Nite gmaneteiaas


by some of the witnesses. eutlasses innumerable types of tiabeitas : he ce . ee - The THE SETTING UP of a Consultative Assembly on Neheu se wed his proposal t(# had beon “startled” eden daw. today-at:inaheepolieeina

He clarified what he meant when | knives ete. Committee is considering a dr Colonial Affairs is urged by Mr. R. L. M. Kirkwood, mem- United eee China into the| intervention in Korea tit la line stretching from the Yellow
on Monday he had said collapse Where Was Site ? agreement to fix the werld sug ber of the Jamaican Legislative Council in a letter to The SALA ae as i step towar { ha fav kat Sih. deeisnthnd? het Mee to tha Bence . a8 hens
would have taken place in a couple The next question was, where | price at agreed levels, which was Times this morning. dit Nehr : Sea aa . a said, “Russia made it positic after American troops established
iter tne we ne Si had Evelyn Shepherd been that! prepared by a working party set He thinks it incredible that nothing similar to the Strasbouty | once to Pacbéte oat - : o clear. when it said t ut i not} their bridgehead

r of seconds, not necessarily j 9 : } > 6 . a} v4 » s rejection terfere “internal” afta f
tre tanoshiins n i. on didbibeecar Be fad Meee ye at ; the a on of the} Assembly is being attempted to bring together political leaders 6! [the iden Of -aeatiug “Gamumorist tips pe oy itern ir Two tresh. Ameridan “Bivinons
+ ’ . ‘ yuncil on June ¢ . 4 : ‘ dah eal nto the b .

The Chief Justice remarked} Maynard whom he submitted was oh will, be recalled that the, Britain and her colonies. China as a preliminary to a possi Yan Wiset. said that’ ther we 4: je into i ° eae pice
that one of the witnesses had put! merely a woman who wanted | Cuban proposal that the world In 1949, British exports to Brit-|ble settlement of the Korean War.Jeng ehance whatsoever’ th Th ir task was, to ‘carry yut i
the distance traversed after the! publicity as star witness for the price—be mat lose than three avd’ lish colonies and protectorates, he |throush the Security Couneil Russia would seek to foment] Pier TASK was fo carry out
struggle at the distance between | Prosecution. Shepherd had said]; 41) cat t: F.O.B SPORTS points out, greatly exceeded her ‘ - Be heal ale further fightin Sonat Pig | PONE meation, sins coma nae
the witness stand and the jury | that he had up a lot of rum, aha hot ohne aie. mint exports to the “Council of Europe’) {na new note to the Ameri-TGieek armed Forces aré how in| eanithaaea a: ¢ thc Ron's, the
box. In answer to Mr, Fields Dr. If he did not know exactly | hair cents onan dite Geainas countries, ; can Se retary of State the Indian fing shape’ he asserted, “and| 70 ee wha eataKItabed the
Pappin said that was possible and | where he had been or what had basis of the liscussions for a draft N He begins by saying that “as Lwader eauee POR: ROK SBIOR. OF hthey will prove to be a real fore bridgeh 1,000 strong in it
probable. happened, he could not be blamed. agreement 7 | Se things stand, there are indications Communist China as demande | fo). peace in south-ea Burope". seri: ethees ‘and: with ‘relisobte.

Replying to.Mr. Dear, the doc- | But every witness had said Shep- y uhaerstoid however, that other] This aheracen aes Pole that many British eae woul by Soviet Russia would not | . He admitted that the econormt: mente: still vvriving——the latest at-
tor said that a left handed man|herd was present when the proposals beside the Cubans have wetite 4b the teaseieiee. chauatll if granted freedom of action, leave |“an encouragement of aggression outlook in Greece was gloomy but| tack meat in. eagle. bestiam ot
could only have inflicted such a}struggle took place, while Shep- since been put forward—in par-|'} Club. will he. Pastor vel Bers. @ the Empire. - ealf-covernment | ie said that in making this ap-}said that he thought conditions| fre in the grim Peninsula wat
wound standing behind his vietim. | herd said he was not there. Seek Por Dtwitan ropGeal=ab cudas and Police vs. Snappers. The drive tor self-government proach to America and Russia,{would improve as Marshall Plan
A right handed man could have} There was another question: | cular é sede train Act nile ‘Snappers "who have only f {ras found active support in the |india was seeking to “strengthen| Aid increased. —Reuter Expected Flare Up

, i ' that the present draft agreemen Woe” Bheopers WAP | have’ Cary colonies but once self-government t fat ‘palatine
done it both ways. how far did the deceased run after “an inno way be said to repre- played once, drew their game , 4 Gr dicny the United Nations in resisting

By ‘a couple of seconds” he he was stabbed? They could not nent tie -orivtial Cuber proposal with Flying Fish what ten? Wulltiens céccacae to | @eeression .” —— In the north of the battle grea,
treant a “very short time.” H@ accept the doctor’s evidence and |5°"! SOR CA Ate A® SHEET GA Bain _ nhould Bonditas win their match oe Sore soe ag lg dl | —Reuter + am 4 is 5 a small forve was waiting in Tae-
certainly did not mean two min- accept the witnesses’ stories at fhe} The full meeting of the Coun this afternoon they put themselves the markets of Great Britain on | US. Start Call Up ion, advance headquarters of the
utes same time. To convict a man on|¢il of over 70 delegates will be atin de ie A preferential terms, the majority of | American forces, for a battle for

= a : , 1orrow, and a communi- ae oe British colonies would soon becom: . { enected flare y at

the stories of the witnesses on that | held tomorrow, anc : ¢ jfhe city expected to flare up a
Not Cause of Death point would be equal to convicting | ue is expected to be leued | insolvent, a condition ety con=| Pakistan Supports Oo Reservists | us diene
aie scihilities : a? —Reuter sistent with the United Kingdom’: , ? itensified artillery fire was in-

To the Court Dr, Tappin said ie 2 oe bere cue Prot 4 | undertaking to improve colonial S ise it a C il WAS HINGTON, Juiy 19 te ee ) : Nee A st ars
that the thigh wound he had also} jeceased had already got the|"PM.. * | S orl In 7 he living standards,” Kirkwood says.| S@CUPITY JOUTICI United States Delent repay'= | PLR a cee aa ne
found on Carter could not have| wound when he ran, then it was raine ang | pp Colonial subjects had no say in ee ae tat ment announced to-d \ vedi: ubtmele. Bhi aia Ait
been the cause of death. improbable that the ateused had | . the choice of the British Govern- | es) dete HI a i 19, Army and Air Fore * ¢ intitle: replied. te

Mr. Dear addressing the jury} jngi 3 7 , | C ment, which ruled their destiryy. | Pakistan Prime Minister Liaqu a limited number of reservist sins es Fs trikes were
made it clear that ce was not inflicted it O a oteurs f ommongs Ministers charged with the duty | ésli Khan said here to-night that, active dut immediate 1) me iat ied Slain tg Na
basing his defence on a plea -of There was no agreement on of watching colonial interest on tan nperted ie United} announcement said that Navy as ai af planes 30. Sais

in in i N ¢ “ : 1 sider what Nations Security Council resolu-[ would aise tart minediate . 'p - ; Pa
provocation reducing the offence how the accused and deceased s LONDON, July 19 must primarily con ider what hitgeee die : +P wou art t battle
from murder to manslaughter.| had been standing during the enaces av England's emasing 1-0 ‘los to) Uieir constituents will TDR, Bnd NOt ae ot kita ili tt een ve vecell: of reserve pe The American defenders were
His strong point was that the evi-| struggle, nor was there any sug- the United States in the world |what the United Kingdom con- | Interest of maintaining peace as}sonnel. The Defence Departmés!| vig on undeterred by news
dence given by Prosecution’s wit- gestion as to how the deceased PORTSMOUTH, July 19 Soccer tournament was cited in [sumer will say tg other decision was possible for} said that steps wer: bei ‘v0 | that leading North Korean force
nesses was so unsatisfactory that had got the other wounds that British naval and military In-|Parliament on ‘Tuesday as one Thus,” he goes on, far-reach- | Pakistan by the Army and Air Fore unde) eee noprosching the ontekifts of
it was bound to leave them in the doctor had described. telligence chiefs were to-day | reason for the need of sports J.E ae nied = waned a eg Tne object of establishing the at D 7 ; ere ie. Seares ~pthe cit ind throwing out a wide
that state of reasonable doubt by Mr. Dear in conclusion sub-|believed to be working on tho Haire, Labour, told the Commons ae, hand fi . Piacrrrt +4 pe @8- | united Nations was to solve con ? ofc i ) mi pe < =e aN of roling > movement “ated
which they would be bound, ac— mitted that there was only one|theory that a gang of trained tha the flop in soceer, and along ata nietaretan level ye ve flicts between nations by peaceful ii ah Soniean dite: of. the | ulling them off
cording to British Law to acquit) verdict which the jury could|<>_)uteurs was threatenin,!With setbacks in golf, tennis, box Pt i eeeaution hould be to | means, he said.—Reuter. isskh ‘situation eater ; —Reuter
the accused of any offence at all — ieee of not guilty | Britain's Navy Last Friday’: jing, ane creas, Ree pre een aed 6g la be JP | ’ atic

: , of any offence. ada ye are : : arbour, |i2 a blue e US. soccer } @ i . |

He however, toid the jury to Mr. Fields replying, admitted Dactantsti ee ye pour vic tory was such a shock to Bri- | ter-political powers of Great Brit Bib | ==

assume for a moment that}that there were discrepancies in}),))... ae t ot 4} tain, that many newspapers print-{4in and her colonies, To this end | STOCK MARKET |

Brathwaite did inflict the fatal) the stories of the witnesses for barges Oo a ammuni ion os wy ed the story inside a black border, |] one possible solution would be the cad 4 |

wound. If that was found, his|the Prosecution. But there was for the Far East was ‘to Owed | on the morning after the tgurney | setting up of a consultative assem ry rea v

submission was that he had] never a criminal case and hardly by the announcement of suspecte1 | hich was held in Brazil and end- | bly on colonial affair: represent- PRICES GO Up

been subjected to that degree of|a civil one, in which there were sabotage on board the destroyer | oq jast Sunday ing the members of “the Mother Anan zt | . i

provocation which would re-| not discrepancies in the evidence, |“ C@vendisb Two other cases : f Parliaments” and of the legisla -

duce the offence. All the wit- The struggle described in the case of suspected sabotage on destroy Haire said that the Government tures of British colonies LONDON, July 19

nesses — and they were Proge-/ had not been a pre-arranged act|@rs have been reported unoffi-} as a form of wee ial service, should This Assembly, meeting annual Price howecd some quite sub

cution’s witnesses — had said|at which the Prosecution had | cially ) Oe the training of promis~Tly, would discuss subjects of mu- | stantial rises in many sections at AN

that Carter had been _ tthe|asked witnesses to take a front row Naval Security Police to day hel Me eae er ee face tual import such as trade and de-/ th. latest news from the Korean 4

attacker. No evidence had been| seat and te down everything |Switched their inquiries to civil-|no'G up Ms head again In Inter- }fence. The joint committees drawn | pattlefront and the usual enthu

given to show that Brathwaite eocutately, she Skah nie . ians formerly employed at the ger eo. ss i. from the United Kingdom and Co- } in m for advanc ing quotatior 8 Yar 1

had done anything to provoke imsi y Portsmouth dockyards, Britain’s 4, re nd “mee Took = \Ilonial Parliaments could be set up | at the start of a new account

hee ae Wiieierees ores a|main naval bases Hundreds of dim vie wi of the plan and said by the Assembly to study the par lhelped London’s stock exchans

“T bmitti i id Mr ence ounse ac alke per : tovees have been hould have thought it would be |tjeqjay problems of wraphiecal 4. r tal lowe of J J

am submitting, said MYr.| about doubt. But the doubt must}|present employees na t|much more important to raise the }groune of the Colonic: o-da renera wnes ;
Dear, “that the evidgore is ee de be a reasonable doubt and not ajscreened since Friday's vier general standard than to cultivate | * ps oO i m , cealings did ae damage to the
fective, that Your Honour should | whimsical one. The Prosecution }explosions when a secret nava\oon rae > market Speculative upport

= , , s a. s ? $ specialist He said that Britons ; *
direct the Jury that there is nO} was asking them to say that in|Court of Inquiry met here again consider that they touched the|$],.222M TO COMBAT &abled the foreign bond section FOR Y OUR
evidence on which they could! the cir é chic 5 —day. One theory being inves- | t Eee dhenek andes ,to make another spurt, Buying
convict a man of any crime what- had Sook Was Geet it cone Oe ee estes is that a ‘depth charge | “Other coin iabeme Tikes COMMUNISM epeeeg > ek ean ee
soever,” sul n j ic ath- re at with delayed action fuse ave ha dt - fe é attributed in some quarters to

“Some Are Lying” ‘ait. Oe eee ae Anche : is that 1 cigar bomb meade iia ctor Penan tear: WASHINGTON, July 19 Ropes of early eee at - ‘ ’ - D A 4 1¢ ‘ aT ER

Some of the witnesses for the “Your duty is to sift the evi- {again with time fuse was dropped] can, Lee Savold, over British title- Responding swiftly to President | ‘e' bi, jbeh Peau! amen Te 0 5 L qe k a
Prosecution may have been mis- dence,” Mr. Fields said- “Evelyn |in one of the lighters. The third|holder Bruce Woodcock for the |‘fruman’s call for action” without fc unc foo De . am yA ir “ye
taken, Mr. Dear said. But it Was; Shepherd, for example, is not|j: that some highly inflammable) British European version of the delay” Congress today authorised | found the day's best, Oil shi
clear that some of sham were telling you the truth when he] jaterial was left in a lighter to World Heavyweight title; detent at} $1,222,500,000 worth of militar amet, eta en ings ‘price

ying, and he was submitting that; said he had not been at Eugene} work slowly. At Rosyth on the|the hands of the West Indies in|aidq to free nations to combat Cor mx eae” Ree ae m
the Jury were entitled to discard) Ward’s place. But that does|Gcottish east coast, inquiries|cricket, the defeat by Italy in the } munism abroad avis Te speigy dievevcinent | } PROCEEDS PAYA BLE IN
their evidence. @ on page 5 continued to-day into the casejfirst match of the European Zone} passed earlier by the Senate, the | ™ ritie mbed quietiy ‘higher |i)
ae Me tMovendiah” Davis Cup challenge round, the}; y ecurits BNeO Gv y ?
of the destroyer “Cavendist 3 ; Bill goes to the White House for 4 os sla the seOUNc
oreign sweep of titles the % a fand Industrials held their grou poi
It w believed that pieces of foreign sweep of tiles inghe Wik the President's signature Heavy | sort} f Id t f | } INST Al M EN1I s
2 = jag belie that p : bled , ¢ Chat re 2s s ont's gni Heavy! South African gold became firms ; ‘
SODOMY, POISON AND) |see.283.2023 2828.2 S084] American victory by Prank Start | House approval of the Bill fol=/on oth ‘cape “ana toeat suppor {| YEARLY INSTALME
9 L - engine room machinery ther | shan in the British Amateur Goit [owed closely on Truman’s mes- | though the turnover failed to show |{}f
destroyer eee a gg . d ae tournament, and a South African Pinte ca tes oa a ara o «| much aaa oe : wei ; rep it Y E ARS HE NCE
MURDER CLAIMS CRO had a blocked oi pipe, aeod a {victory Chis second in a row) by nas cn = a ay’s amoun ghti the mining section copp iW} 10 0 / ‘ NCE
W N and bolts were wrongly fitted ON) Bobby Locke in the British Open 1 be jus e beginning howed firmnes but \
- , third —Reuter, Golf Tournament.—(CP) —Reuter, | quiet.—Reuter,

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 19.

Philbert Peyson, whose dead
body found floating off Bayshore
on April 20 was last seen alive by
his sister and niece on the night of
April 13 when he visited them,
Crowg Prosecutor C. T. W. E. Wor-
rel] told the Assize Jury hearing
“floating corpse” murder tfial in
which Boysie Singh and four de-
fendants are charged with wilfui
murder of Peyson.



to making an arrest was expecte¢
to give evidence that he accom-
panied Peyson who is also known
as “Bumper”, “Hardy”, Theophilus

Bumper in Singh’s motor vehicle

accompanied by Singh and four

others and went to the western WASHINGTON, July 19

main road waterfront where President Truman to-day asked
Peyson, Singh and others left Ali| Congress to provide hir with
sitting in the vehicle $10,000 million, unlimited power

Ali’s testimony wag that he saw | of conscription and other sweeping
into the which

Singh go boat














in powers in the Korean crisi Ir

Eviden¢e however is being led|he returned ashore and saw other], mess ige to Congress, President
that Peyson alive on the following! men knock Peyson down. He saw!Truman asked for all st ory
night April 14 was seen leaving | comething tied to him and Pe SON} limits on the size of the Armed
Singh’s club, 55 Queen Street, in j was placed in the boat which went| Forces to be removed
company with Singh and the other |+5 sea from which voyage Peyson | He said that the increases it
four defendants and an Indian never returned manpower and material were re
boy Rahamit Ali alias “Loomat Other witnesses are expected to} quired t y to de ith the
with whom the Crown was alleg- lsay that they saw Singh and the | situati Korea 4 ist
ing that Peyson was intimately |other defendants with Peyson at iftee. né ociated with the
friendly. | the waterfront that day | United to augment f

“This was a case of sodomy and Police reveal that Sing! a} militar 1
poisoning ‘ulminating in mur | statement following the The President said t e had
der,” Worrell told the jury lof Peyson’s body, i e Serre f De-

Ali, whom the police took in|dead man and al > nte ervie
protective custody prelimin vi @ On page 7 a ona a units

and
teserve

Navy

as



many individuals
Forces of the
Air Force as

of the
Army
and may be
required

He said he would
Congress in the next
pecific requests for

the amount
$10,000 million
these new military
Truman propose
front mobilisation
be r price control

now But the
he would not he
1 if
necessary
laid
5,500 wor
Senate ar Ho rey

det what

send the
few days
appropria-
of approx-





- With :

e

me
part

Th
or
President

0

ate



arp price r
made ther



an down his

amme ji




aii OF

pened in Korea, and why the
United States again was fighting
thousands of miles from home
“The attack upon the Republic
of Korea”, Truman said “make
it plain beyond all doubt that
international Communist move
ment is prepared to use armed



invasion to conquer independent
nations We must therefore re
cognise the possibility that armed
aggression may take place
other areas”







Followi ; the partial text of
Presiden fruman’ message to
Congre to-day

I am reporting to Congre on
the situatior hict eer
create Kore 4 r

hi hi ation ha

Truman Asks For $10,000,
For Korean Crisis

000,000









meet this situation. I am also |a)
ing before Congress my view
concerning the significance of
these events for this nation and
the vorld and certair recor
mendations for legislative actio
vhich I believe should be taken
it’ thi
Fift of 59 member na
tions have ipparted the Unite
Natior iction to restore peace in
Korea Only a few countfic
ive failed to upport commo
tion to restore peace. Most im-
int of these is the V
Unior
Since the Soviet repre
tive had refused to particiy
the meeting regard K
United States brought t
@ On Page 3





Rates will be

application to the office ol

THE BARBADOS MUTUAL
LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY ©

or

on

furnished

lo

J.N. WALCOTT ) :

Canvassing Agents. _ }}}

DENIS ATKINSON )



fe

PAGE TWO



IR GEORGE SEEL, K.C.M.G
Head of Devel
Welfare n the West
returned b B.G A é
Tuesday from Dominic He w:
away tor one kK

Just Finished the

Subsidiary Exams

R. JOHN ti1UMPHREY lett
yesterda ternoo er St!

Lucia by B.W.LA. A student



Lodge School, he is spending |
long holidays with his parent
in St. Lucia. His father is

Captain in the St. Lucia Polic

Force and their home is in Vigie
John has just finished sitting
the Subsidiary Examinations

The Man With 2,000

Friends!

R. E. J. FOWLER from Van

couver, B.C., is in Barbados
visiting some of his 2,000 friends
whom hehas never seen,

For over twenty years he hi
been a keen wireless enthusias',
or what is familiarly known ¢s
—A Wireless ‘Ham’. He has
friends in over 200 countries to
whom he has often talked and
feels fully acquainted with them

To enable him to meet some
of these friends in person, he
has travelled from Vancouver to
about twenty-five edintries, in
cluding England, France, Norway,
Sweden, Denmark, Germany,
Spain, Italy, Brittany, Normandy,
Belgium, Holland, Algeria,
Morocco, Malta, Tunisia, Gibral-
tar, Egypt, etc.

He is now in Barbados and is
a guest at Cacrabank. From here
he is planning to visit Trinidad,
British Guiana, MacKenzie,
Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador.
Peru and Buenos Aires,

All through the war Mr,
Fewler was with the R.A.F. in
England. He is now with T.C.A.
in Vancouver in charge of Radio
Communications, Instrument and
Electronical equipment.

Since his arrival here he has
met seven of his “aerisg) friends”,
Aubrey Archer, VP6YB; Fred

Olton, VP6FO; Aubrey Lashley,
VP6AL; Sidney Lashley, VP6SD
Freddie North, VP6CDI; Cecil
Sampson, VP6CS; John Wise,

VP6SJ, and by now he has prob
ably met some others.

He tells me that the hospitali-
ty in Barbados has to be experi-
enced to be believed and he con
not thank all of his friends
enough for the ‘swell’ time he
has had here.

To-morrow

HAT Cake Sale I was telling
you about in aid of the new
Y.W.C.A. is to-morrow morning
at Messrs. G. W. Hutchinson
and Co., Ltd.

Here for A Few Days

R. MALCOLM

Chief Accountant of B.W.!
Airways in Trinidad arrived on
Tuesday afternoon by B.W.LA
from Trinidad. He is here on a
few days’ visit.

Back from Trinidad

Holiday
RS. W. H. E. JOHNSON and

BARCANT,



her daughter Maureen re-
turned from their short holiday
in Trinidad by B.W.LA. 9)

Tuesday afternoon

Spent Two Weeks Here

R. WILTON GATES, who
has been spending two
weeks’ holiday with the Donald

Scott's at “Sherbourne”, Two
Mile Hill, left on Tuesday morn-
ing for Puerto Rico en route to
the U.S., where he lives in New
York. City.



SUET, Esq., so much ot
whose time is spent in
trying to improve what he call.
routine details of co-operational
interdepartmentalism, is working
on a new filing system
Briefly the idea is to strike an
alphabetical average by a sub-
division of subject-categories.
Where a name and a subject over-
lap, they are combined under the

letter of the subject except in
cases where the letter of the
name has been previously in-

cluded in the
The success of
pends largely on

subject-category .
the system de-
intelligent sec-

retarial work, as the working
out of the average may lead to
indescribable confusion, and the

decision to be made about over-
lapping is often redundant inso-
far as the checking of new cate-
gories is involved
Working It Out
UET spent most of yesterday
explaining the new system to

SOC SOO OFA GF



_ FOR

Its - -

J«R

ENRICHED

Car

DPRCOSOPIOSS





MRS, POWER
London Express Serviee.
Mrs. ‘tyrone Power ex-
starlet Linda Christian has for

two months been touring the Far
East. She arrived in London jn
time to meet her husband, who
arrived in England this month,
Mrs. Power’s auburn hair fis ar
ranged in peruke style to em-
phasize a perfect profile

She speaks six languages, has
three serious interests: studying
more languages, learning to paint
and finding materials for her
dresses. In London she meats
te study Russian |

And She Can Cook

She has a trunk full of bro-
cades and heavy silks in exotic
colours. One material of vivid
rec silk—her favourite colour-—
has already been made into 3
cocktail suit. It has a bared back
beneath a detachable jacket. She
just bought her 20-piece
in and winter wardrobe kh

has
autumn
Rome

Also on her
jade which
into necklace,
bracelet of her

Although she loves fashions,
Mrs, Power is domesticated. ‘I
was taught te cook, sew and run
a house. I am shocked to find
that girls now are not interested
in these things. How are thtey
going to make a home?”

bought
made
and

she
been
clips

own design.

tour
has
ear

rare





Attcnded Public Health

Course
ISS GWENDOLYN JOSEPH

HACKETT and Miss -A.
Walters, two Barbadian nurses
who attended the Public Health

Course in Jamaica returned home
on Sunday evening by B.W.LA
Most of their time there, was
spent at the Training School in
Kingston, but they also went on
tours of the rural areas. They
were away for about ten months.

Leaving Barbados Shortly

R, GEOFFREY RAMSEY who
recently returned from
Trinidad where he was stationed
with the Port-of—Spain Branch
of Cable and Wireless (W.1)
Ltd., tells me that he has resigned
his job here and is leaving Barba~
dos towards the middle of the
month. He is going to Canada to
settle.

Also leaving Barbados shortly
Carib understands, is Mr. Roy
Colina. He too was with Cable
and Wireless and is going to a
new job in Trinidad,



BY THE WAY —By Beachcomber

his secretary, Miss Myra
When it was found that the H
file contained nothing but four
applications for g licence to use
bicycle clips for wedging open
incubators, from a man named
Easton, Suet said, “You see how
easy it is to make mistakes.”
“Indeed, i

Boddis



yes”, replied Mis:
Boddis. “I find that Mr. Farni-
val’s correspondence with us

about sinking g well is in the M
file.” “That comes.” said Suet,
“of not striking the alphabetical
average before dividing into
categories.” “Does it?’ replied
Miss Boddis, who seemed by no

means convinced
Vothing Doing
PT HE great question in the

world of entertainment is
how long the Filthistan Trio can
hold) out against offers. Hog-
wasch made another attempt the

ENERGY

FOR ENJOYMENT



5

«

3%

3

OS

g
&
e
Pa
-

b Calli |

of

of “Dunkirk”,

. . . 5t' f
SSOSS9SSS G99 DBY SSE POVOSSOSSIOD SSF SO 9SS Or;

FOR STRENGTH



In September—Canada

R. PETER KING,
of Dr. and Mrs
Barbarees, St
eaving Barbados
Sth for Canada. Peter is going to
McGill University to study En
gineering

eldest son
Ralph Kirg
Michael will be
on September

Another
Canada in
Mr. “Tony”
of Mr. and

Barbadian leaving for
early September is
Johnson, eldest son
Mrs. Alban Johnson
Hastings. Tony
will be returning to McGill,
where he has been studying med-
icine. He thought at one time
that he might have had to go to
England to continue his studies,
but he recently received news
that he has been re-accepted at
McGill.

After Short Visit

R. DAVID EVANS Snr.,

of Messrs. T. R. Evans re-
turned from his shert visit to St.
Kitts on Monday afternoon by
B.W.LA.

For One Week

M R. GEORGE RODDAM of the
Colonial Development Cor-
poration in Jamaica left on
Tuesday morning by B.G. Air-
ways for Dominica He expects
to be there for one week

Nut Review

NOTED recently a review by

Arthur Lewis, the St. Lucia
born Professor of Political Econ-
omy at Manchester University.
published in the “Observer.”

Professor Lewis, who is ac-
knowledged to be one of the lead-
ing economists in Britain, discuss-
ed “The Groundnut Affair’ by
Alan Wood, If the thirty million
pounds spent at Kongwa concludes
the Professor, had been used to
help the Nigerian groundnut far-
mers, the results would have been
spectacular.

An American Looks

At Britain

[” SURE you've heard about the

English journalist who asked a
visiting American what struck him
most about life in “our tight little
island; and—having already, I sup-
pese, pencilled in “policemen, won-

derful” got the shattering reply;
“Your warm beer and your cold
bedrooms!”
She Likes A Pipe!
PRETTY dark-haired girl

was waiting in London for an
aeroplane to take her
New York the other day—and she
smoked a pipe. She was 28-year-
old Mary Jennson,
globe-trotting parents,
self has been round the world
once, ‘Her pipe came from Ja-
maica. “You can get them out

there for about four-pence,” she
them
mend the roads lead-

says. “Old
while they
ing up to the Blue Mountains.”

women smoke

Not Talking!
NTRANSIT from Grenada by
B.W.I1.A. yesterday on his

way to St. Lucia was Mr. Patrick
Labrie, Caribbean Representative
of T.C.A. Mr, Labrie arrived in
Barbados by T.C.A. on Saturday
and went on to Trinidad.

What was he going to St. Lucia
for? Mr. Labrie would not say.

Here for Two Weeks

a Nurse at
Hospital at the
Trinidad arrived here yesterday
afternoon from Grenada by
B.W.1.A. to spend two weeks’
holiday as a guest of Mr. and Mrs

Point Fortin
U.B.O.T. in

home to

daughter of
who her-

|

ISS AUBREY IFILL, who is! james














BARBADOS ADVOCATE
LILI MARLENE





| Housewives’ Guide

Prices for String Beans
and Artichokes in the local
market when the “Advocate”
checked yesterday were

String Beans: 20 cents per
Ib

Artichokes 16 cents per
Ib. |

|
| ————_
'B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME |

JULY WW, 1950
Commentary on

THURSDAY

6.15 am, to 1.45 p.m y
Third Test 7.00 a.m, The News. 7.10
am, News Analysis, 7.15 am. Jane
Eyre. 7.30 a.m. The Piano For Pleasure
7.45 a.m. Generally Speaking. 8.00 a.m
From The Editorials 8.10 am, Pro-
gramme Parade; 8.15 a.m, England vs
West Indies £30 am. Books To Read
845 am. The Arts 9.00 am, Close
Down 12.00 noon The News. 12.10 p.m
New Analysis 12.15 p.m, Programme
Parade. 12.18 p.m Listeners Choice
12.45 p.m. England vs. West Indies, 1.00
p.m. Taxiing Around Britain with Herbert
Hodge. 1 if p.m. Radio Newsreel. 1.30
p.m. Much Binding In The Marsh.
p.m. The News. 2.10 p.m. The Daily
Service. 2.15 p.m. Sports Revie 2.30
p.m, Ring Up The Curtain. # o p.m
Twenty Questions, 4.00 p.m, The ews
4.10 p.m, The Daily Service, 4.15 p.m
Love From Leighton Buzzard, 4.45 p.m
Mona Liter Quartet. 5.00 p.m. England
vs. West Indies. 5.05 p.m, Interlude. 5.15
p.m, Programme Parade. 5.30 p.m Listen-
ers Choice. 6.00 p.m, Jane Eyre. 6.15 p.m.







Pride And Prejudice. 645 p.m. Mer-

chant Navy Newsletter 7,00 p.m. The

News. 7:10 p.m. News Analysis. 715

p.m. to 7.45 p.m. Cricket Report on Third

Test 8.00 p.m. Radio Newsreel 8.15

o.m, Taxiing Around Britain with Her-

bert Hodge 8.30 p.m. Troise and His

Banjoliers. 8.55 pom. From The Editori- |
als. 9.00 p.m. A: Provincial Lady. 9.56

p.m. Interludes 10,00 p.m, The News.





Too Young |

To Remember

PENZANCE, ENG.
Britain’s Princess Margaret was
born too late.
During a visit to North Corn-
wall, the King, Queen, and Prin-



THE PERFECT SMILE, ringlets on her shoulder. A necklace of | cess’enjoyed the famed local dish
diamonds with emeralds. Her gown is signed by designer Whit- of clotted cream and raspberries—
taker. Her name ? It is Lisa Daniely, beautiful French actress a oe eee owing to
who is to play Lili Marlene in that film, now being made in Said "he Cuban }
England. —London Express Service. “How delightful. I had almost



forgotten the taste of real cream
like this.”

Said Princess Margaret, regret-
fully:

‘I don’t even remember it!”

Lady’s Leg Lost

LONDON.

For Sale Cap’n Kidd's
Treasure Map

received by Mrs. Dick for the map. The lost property book at Lon-

A Frenchman once wrote he: |.ion's Golders Green police station

“Send me the map and I will send | re. ‘ently received the following

you $15.” To date, however, Mrs. | ontry:

Dick has rejected all bids for the “Found in Gloucester Gardens,

map. Golders Green, a Lady’s artificial
Among other of Kidd's relics to}ieg, black shoe attached.”



EASTBOURNE, ENG.
A slightly soiled parchment map
drawn in red ink which reportedly
belonged to the pirate Captain
William Kidd will be sold by pub-
lic auction in Eastbourne, Sussex
County, next week

Kidd was hanged in 1701, and be auctioned are muskets, cut- pins
the map which the British Mu- lasses, brass pistols, chest of draw- Blame ry

ers, daggers and pieces of eight.

Almost everything associated i OHIO.
ports to show the position of hid- with the pirate will come under Next term all the pupils of
cen treasure on an island in ‘he the hammer. More than 50 copies|Cleveland schools will be kept in
South China Seas of “Treasure Island’ are to be]}an extra hour. They will be ex-

The map belongs to Mrs. Eliza- auctioned in bundles of 15. pected to do the homework they
beth Dick of Eastbourne who is A dirk once owned by Ann Bol-|no longer do at home because of
selling it together with many other ley, the woman _ pirate, will also} '?V during that hour.
ot th> pirate’s treasures because be offered for sale, as will a long-
of heavy taxation demands handled axe used by pirate Cap- FRESH FRUIT

She inherited the map and trea- tain Teach to behead treacherous -
sures from her late employer, Hu- {members of his crew. LONDON

Fresh fruit fashion note:
Women in some of the smarter

scum authorities recognize as once
being the pirate’s properly, pur-

bert Palmer, who died last July I.N.S.
Palmer, who lived in Eastbourne

for many years, was a collector





; " ive Mayfair restaurants are wearing
t pirates relics F i
‘ aky offers’ trons all parts of SKELETON eee as earrings and on
the world including $8,400 from CROSSWORD ae aces,

ao American syndicate, have beer








Jee chs
’ —}--framg- t+

Proud

‘Love In Disguise



ee a of all
\ Patt | your.
Is Good Food eae rooms?

AN unusual cookery book has
recently been published and in the
BBC's “Letter from London” pro-
gramme George Pondle told lis-
teners something about it It is
ealled “Receipts and Relishes” and
is a collection of regional recipes
‘com all parts of the British Isles,
vith their local and colourful
There is a dish called
“Love in Disguise,” which is the
name given to a method of cook-



‘.eep your lavatory spotlessly clean. It's
smple. Shake some * Harpic’ into the bowl,
ave overnight, then flush. ‘Harpic’ will

CLUES ACKOSS

1 By means of which one ca
make time stand still ?

ing a calf's heart in Herefordshire 8 a gene? ooh Sid) CeCdOrNS the WhDIe Han = even
[here are others with such fas-] 9: A zoological barker here 90 brush: Cen reeGh.
cinating names as ““E Pud- il. Stony product of someone +



labour.
14. Creatures of



HARPIC

ding,” “Ginger Husbands,” ‘Thun-

intelligence 1





A. G. Rocheford of ‘Mirriville,’ a and Lightning" and “Fat Ras- we hear ? moo.
Black Rock. ‘als,’ and descriptions of how to V3. Sager, In & sense THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER
: ook pigs’ faces and “Cold Water 3 SOF Tt, Banas, aRF ARPES -———; ——
Miss Ifill spent part of he-:| Willies.” Then there is “Star] !7 U.S. soldier seizea 4 tee o
holiday in Grenada and_ the|Gazy Pie’ which conjures up ideas By OS Ww threes’

remainder she is spending here

41 Voitatre’s river
22. Laboratory answers, maybe
23 Flier usually seer a

vf a light airy-fairy concoction
of stars and moonbeams and turns
rut to be herring pie. The recipe

ROYAL (Worthings)

Last Show To-day 4.30

move--




















sads, “Clean and bone six her-| 24 —about thts time Republic Action Double
ings, mackerel or pilchards, and} %° G/otls makes nent SODAS: oe
ason with salt, pepper and chop- words). ne hates ees “BEHIND THE NEWS”
, hed parsley. Do not cut off the ULURS DOWN And
other day to get them into the |fishes’ heads. Place the fish in a t. it's divine :
musical film about the Loves of | pie-cish lined with fat and bread- : , nes Mountains % “ROLL ON TEXAS
Tolstoy. The Persians thought crumbs, with heads facing in- 4 rap strop M N”
he was talking about Tosti, and wards Pour three or four eggs 5. 1 st to the elevator. | 00)
kept shouting, ‘“Goo’bye. Tosti! be ate n in tarragon Vinegar or poe are place wth, nen t ToNite at 640
Hogwasch said, “All you guys/¢ream over them. Put a pastry) 8 it may display boring ads MADAM O’LINDY and
ven | OVE . pe ; : ‘ ie ke Hea ia ike
would do is to work your seesaw Sn iee i ene ‘ hole in ? tee noth over vid under the TROUPE in: —
in q garden while er “Vout. thie ae Sh ae Suck | 10. Us, the fourth pook of the “CAR
clares his love. Hoffmann’s Bar- ae OF abou, one hour 16 rt Which counts ACAS NIGHT”
€ erate Je ace parsley One snagram of mites
«iroll would be played. Just the papier cd rah E 7 Rassley 7. SHOG AT Wbae eRe
rhythms for seesaw.” “No room], PO ts: is of the fish before 18 [t's waded by bar
for Hoofman or his Barkiroll S°&V08 {49 at vertsiw measures EMPIRE
hon seesaw,” said Ashura. “Nor Last 9 Shows TO-DAY
Tosti, too,” said Rizamughan

“Goo'bye, Hoofman,” shouted Kaz-
bulah, with a grin, Hogwasch
had them shown out.

Printer’s Frolic

There is no more attractive
sight to the young today than a
widow bursting with cakes, buns,
crumpets, pastries and other con-
fectionery.

(Evening paper.)

Or

LLL OOOO

a

my

MRS, HOUSEWIFE



GAITETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES





Wikisediets isin TO-DAY — 8.30 p.m oi nean GARFIELD
ARNER'S THRILLING DOUBLE |
Ronald REGAN — Shirley TEMPLE in CHELINE PRELLE

In



°° TEL.

John WAYNE

47 MAGEN GIRL”

AND
DUKE”

“UNDER MY SKIN”
Starting Friday 2,30 & 8.30
“THE BIG LIFT”



and The Miracle Horse in

“MAUNTED GOLD”















ROXY
TO-DAY
Final

4.45 & 8.15

Inst. Columbia Serial

| 4.45 & 8.30

20th Ceniury Fox Presents
“THE VIGILANTE”
Starring |
Ralph Byrd Lyle Talbot

Starting Friday 4.45 & 8.15
“THE GUNFIGHTER”

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY Only 4.30 & 8.15



Check up and Replace your

HOUSEHOLD CROCKERY

We Have A Full Range of ...





TEA CUPS & SAUCERS LUNCH, BREAKFAST and

TEAPOTS | DINNER PLATES ;

United Artist Double
MILK & 3008 SOUP PLATES
me CREAM JUGS | SO PLATTERS came Seeteo
SUGAR BOWLS | Leo Carrillo in

VEGETABLE DISHES

PORRIDGE BOWLS SAUCE BOATS

“VALLIANT HOMBRE”

Inspect these at our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT =
Telephone 2039. “NANOOK OF THE
‘ NORTH”



=>
Starting Friday 4.45 & 8.15

“DRUMS ALONG THE
AMAZON”

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD.





|





'fooee

PLAZA

WARNER'S EXCITING DOUBLE
Joan LESLIE & Robert HUTTON in ‘*Too Young To Know’’

;



















I




When Miranda is safely parcelled
the four friends hurry over the
common and are lucky enough to
meet Jennifer neat her cottage in the
dell, She can hardly believe the

of the wonderful journey to

the Palace and Rupert has to tell it
i “Well,

splendid of you to find her,’’ she

all over again.









couGHS -




MIGHT






AQUATIC CLUB CINE



Commencing Friday



Ss

COLDS
BRONCHITIS - CATARRH
CATARRHAL ASTHMA
CHESTY 9 COLDS

COUGHS
CHILDREN’S COUGHS

STOP THAT.

=r

TOOK SOME VENOS/

it coughing it’s time you took some
Thening. COUGH MIXTURE. This world-famous
LY medicine comforts, eases and

THURSDAY,

was

JULY 20, 1950

gfe

Miranda—#6

** Miranda

was
now | think she is
the most lovely doll in the whole

sighs happily,
naughty once, Bur
| shall always keep her.’
iranda keeps
speaking nor
looking quite con-

world,
Rupert smiles, and
very still, neither
moving, but

tented. :
THE END
ALL KIGHTS RESERVED

ITS TIME YOU

protects.
and Soreness are soothed away. Cough-

Â¥,\\ ing attacks are relieved. That constant irritation

in the throat is allayed. Relied upon for over 50



Get some To-day!

=VENOS~

LIGHTNING

COUGH MIXTURE







TONIGHT TO THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
George BRENT; Bette DAVIS; Mary ASTOR: Lucille WATSON

in THE GREAT LIE”

Only The Fiery Genius of’ Bette DAVIS could bring so frank a

Betty HUTTON

Portrayal to the Screen!

Victor MATURE

in ‘RED HOT and BLUE”
A Paramount Picture
SPECIAL MATINEE SATURDAY MORNING at 9.30 o'clock

mm

Robert MITCHUM & Teresa WRIGHT in



FRID -

SAT

SUN

JIMMY WAKELY

“SPRINGTIME IN TEXAS”

A Monogram Picture



TO-DAY — 5 & 8.30 p.m

BILL!

“PURSUED”

~ 5 & 8.30 P.M. (RE-ISSUED)

THE GREATEST CLASICSIC THE SCREEN HAS EVER SHOWN !

“Anthony Adverse’’ by Hervey ALLEN with Fredric MARCH



Walter

RONNIL

PIDGEON



TODAY ONLY 5.00 & 8.30 P.M.
Esther WILLIAMS

LOCAL TALENT ON

ERRO!J. BARNETT Singing
AUSZIN CLARE... Sir
ALVA AXTHU Sir
WILSON Si:
TOM KING Sir sir
CLYDE KING Singing ...
Guest Star :

Janet
LEIGH

ing ..

Xavier CUGAT

“ON AN ISLAND WITH YOU"

OPENING TOMORROW, 5.00 & 8.30 P.M.

“RED DANUBE”



Ethel
BARRYMORE

Plus :
PARADE

Mr. ROY PARRIS

Master of Ceremonies : Mr. ALGY SYMMONDS

Save your 4 TICKETS and win a CAM'TON of JEFFREY’S Beer
uF =NO INCREASE IN PRICE!

AT
THESE PRICES

BUY Now

Flush Switches .... 55¢ each
Tumbler Switches.. 66¢ ,,
Through Switches 52¢ ,,
Lampholders ...... es
Ceiling Roses ..... 22¢
Connecting Boxes.. 34¢ _,,

Electric Iron Plugs 69¢_,,
Wood Blocks
—35c., 49e., 54c., & 70¢ ,,
Insulating Tape
(Roll) 52¢ ,,
: also :
1 CONNOR WASHING
MACHINE $220.00



PLANTATIONS LTD.



MLA (Members Only)

.. “DAY BY DAY”
. “BEWILDERED”
. “NO ORCHIDS FOR MILADY”
. “MY FOOLISH HEART”
“SERENADE IN BLUE”
“MY LOVE LOVES ME”



















THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1950

Speech Day

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE
quired much new equipment im- their and have shown a pro-
ported from England--games gear fit. of cncouraging proportio

KOREAN

At




























of every description, vaulting over tne period under revie
Pee : balancing benches and not- Visual Aids YY
ably a new portable boxing ring. t nia , 7
7 In the teaching of Geograph)
The hold-fasts for the latter are 2 ound j stent f d i
uite unobtrusively fixed in the tt De oe. ee
floor of the Hall and we owe a tien of successful teaching had
orm eC] Vr J debt to the Colonial Engineer, Mr, D&€n lad by Mr. L. L. Webster ‘i nectia Mt oo om § ‘
T. B. Went, for undertaking the Di geal jacil i sites % oe pein Sov ies Gaadeatiant as. ies 7 need the str of
. task of fitting them when he was 2? record the debt owed by ° * ss + une in Moscow
MAJOR NOOTT, Headmaster of Combermere School, could be loosened, and the in charge of the interna) re-con- COmbermere Schoo] to the work OP {une 27, we requested | the
reviewed the work of the School during the past two years, °P€"ed fer them to proce — work here in Decerrber Of e aa Batt — he ewes ‘cea ceehinns Wak
in é teres 7 Jrece vec aie - ’ places Higher Education -nd January last Our annnat e argely negiected mn Cw ae ; .
ee address vesterday. a a r overse.s. medical examination, thanks. to Islfmd, It is to confidence in- North Korean regime, to use in-
; - e sald, “ Wher I 4 incil had Ld. Dr Scott's kind co-operation, is spired in me by Mr. Webster fluence to have the invaders with
The floods of August 31st—Sep- fields of Classical and Scientific yp Cc yiyey Schcol } aw matter of routine, provid- teuching that 1 feit encouraged to craw at once, — , f
tember Ist 1949 with their un pursuits but I do now see the follow safely Toe Council hed YS Us with valuable data about embark on the establishment of The Soviet Government in it:
foreseen consequences and unfor- distinet possibility opening up biased the tral fos Phe award- ©" Pupils recorded on the indi- &@ Geography Room To Mr. reply on June 29 and in gubse-
tunate interruptions in the con- before us of breaking new Be ee ate A as “te ° vidual health carde Webster who retired in April last Guent statements has taken the
pelled ust ,P dante 4 seve sateen > seul wen @8F ell and Mr. B. C. St. John in Musi year after over 30 years’ service P¢sition that the attack launchec
Hed us lo postpone our Speech pas! carefully; ae es eek pO ee eee eee ee Music to the School, you will all wish by North Korean forees was pro-
Day from December last. It is Modern and Commercial 1946 3945 | respectively, en- ; +, to jain me in extending our mogt Voked by the Republic of Korea %& Remember BOVRIL
- on reason that we celebrate Studies, I can see a happy mar- sping Ute 407. 9e His protes~ . re thi Mus scat’ Apprecia- Cordial wishes for a long and and that the actions of the Unt-
o-day the achievements of two riage “im the future blessed in °/0%2! trai it the London In- (on Rave this year reached their jonny retirement. To ‘returp— ted Nations Security Council were makes excellent
Academic Years viz 1948 and 1949. their union with a BarBados “'! taiter: Spe deve eee Three-Year ‘yc ‘will, 1 hope visit the Gco- illegal E
he occa: als : : * . . Dil a say Dae) Course hey are i ' b il rT s > Gto- ‘ :
The occasion 11so marks the con Scholarshi presented by a to take a two-year specialist & i >, eee even = — graphy Projection Room and see “These Soviet claims are flatly sandwiches, and
clusion of a period of four years benevolent G Physical Educat Course at **rm Theatre Lecture three , -
personal tenure of office Le severnment. I : hbc ro are colts M ur times a week-—Year I of the f@r Yourselves the furniture and disproved by facts
This review of School Organ- ae Sie Een i jbas eile ae Course including all Third Forms, Sitting installed and adinire the — “In addition to dirget military impeoves-oli dishes.
From 460 to 600 isation has reached the Fourth ; iin J g last *h Year II all Fourths, and Year Il Visual aids equipment—the 16 effort we and other members oj
. =¢ Je ary ast av e ‘ ‘ z eo " r > ‘ J
At the beginning of the present Forms and covers all boys ad- sated 1 $ Di a : t Re o tek ell the Fifths. We are building up ™™ Bell_and Howell Projector the United Nations are making
Academic Yesr in January, the mitted into the School from 1947 he J m hy ¢ Bauer ea - ap a Library of Gramophone records and the Episeope—combined epi~ in Korea, the outbreak of ag:
numbers attending the School onwards. I have still to deal with {'¢ [mstitute = ‘iucation. In 1949 to illustrate the Course and our diascope and film-strip projector gression there requires us to con-
reached the recurd number of over the pre-1947 entries, These boys Mr. J. ¢ qs I rakes wa Scorn first consignment has already been newly ene ad wr ve bees a es
600. When I arrived in Septem- are ta be found in my Fifth Forms, “* ®" Unceroraduate at the Lat geceived he Governing Body 1rounds throughout the world. The at-}| @m&#
iz : - ‘orms, os ; , > mk
ber 1946 at the beginning of the and last December virtually have in addition authorised the Hitherto, our poliey of develop- tack Upon the Republic of Korea aiahinaeiemnleinsiclarennigilt
third term of the Academic Year Marked the end of that period of ~ purchase of a suitable machine, ing our grounds has been ve- Makes it plain beyond all doubt eqn resi eannaamaneeN renege
there were approximately 460 Upper School congestion to which and in the meantime the British sricted by the lack of enclosures that an international Communist
pupils on the roll of the Sehool. | drew your attention in both my Council have kindly helped us to protect against the ravages of movement is prepared to use a 4,
At the corresponding time in previous reports. In December with the weekly loan of the elec- goats and sheep, We were re- @rmed invasion to conquer in- e £ ho & J, OTIGY
September next—we shall main- 1948 that Upper Schoo! congestion tric gramophone, Mr. Hudson has gtricted, therefore to limited en- Gependent nations.” We must € VOUP
tain’ a strength of nearly 580 produced 88 candidates for the Feen responsible for the instruc closures and that policy has pro- therefore recognise the possibiti-
pupils. I am often asked how this School Certificate | Examination = wie oa on shes and T guced the Garden, the Court of tY that armed aggression may 2
a been made possible, despite and in December 1949 68 candi- oe oe = sea 4 eaten Our Honour and the lesser courts in take place in other arcas SRY Ki
the fact that three classrooms dates. The numbers this year are oot rag yee at bed i the immediate vicinity of our in, view. OF Wiis T have: already
1ave been converted to special down to more reasonable propor- Relation Cteee anc - oy School buildings. This year Gov- directed that United States forces
uses as Art Room, Library and tions viz. 46. These numbers are ainie in the Chon ane Trock. ernment are transferring to us i) Support of the Philippines be \
Fextbook and Stationery Store- impressive but they imposed a fe - ‘the c —— ne bi ron the pasture to the east of the #tr@ngthaned and that military j ;
room respectively. The answer is strain both on accommodation and fe dae A a hie A bp Harrison College field. We pro- 4&sistance be speeded up to tae (}
twofold—tirstly classroom accom- staffir is the obvievs wealth of endow- Phu » G 2 S
modation for the Preparatory De " The ment both for enjoyment and ex- Pose to chclose our eastern ap- ee Bt", SSO Ormmeas “AS: Se ‘
partment comprising 83 pupils has pressure exerted by ecution ehioved by many of our proaches from the junetion of the associate themselves with Indo “& f

parents for opportunities to be
provided for a School Certificate
type education has a social and
economic significance we can-
not ignore. But the results have

been installed in this Hall and
secondly the strength of our Junior
School is maintained on the basis
of four_stream entry with four
paralley First and four

a

P ] \ parallel an educational
second Forms with 30 pupils in from which I anet ante cota
ach Form making a total of 240 conclusions,

pupils. The policy
classrooms to meet
of the curriculum is

of converting
special needs
not yet com-

In 1948 we obtained 33 Certifi-
cates, one Class I, thirteen Class
Il, and nineteen Class III; in 1949

pleted. You will visit for your- we obtai i

ple . e ained 35 Certificates, t
elves to-day, I hope, the new Class J renty-
Geography - Projection R oo m four Class afte Se oo a

Which has just been re-furnished candidate was 7th one oe

and equipped for the teaching of jn 1949 W , i
“eography. At the end of the dichteticns” ond Kins = B. ath
the tipcaee “A ee with 4 distinctions were our out-
ibrary so as te € standing s sandidé
equivalent of two (instead of the in 1940 Porte i Pon
present one) classrooms, whilst a amination whilst not yet 15 years

third room must be earmarked

oe te arts , ns of age and obtained a Class
tes use as a Model Office in con- Certificate being placed 37th i 7
ection with our proposed de- " rede

Island. Both Porte and King are
now at Harrison College. But
what about the other candidates?

velopments in Commercial Educa-
lion. These conversions will not
diminish our numbers though

they will prevent any further ex- she Mone ee et
ansi 5 m we tale
pansion School, and 40 were rejected; in

1949, 4 did not sit for similar rea-
sons and 29 were rejected, These
are the plain facts — even if a
few of the rejected candidates
were on the borderline, there is
no doubt that the majority was
unsuitable for a School Certificate
teachers and myself canalise them Course. 1 point this out to sen
in60 = uh efi ania! wana a eae the case for the provision of a
(Academic), “C” (Commercial) or much wider range of instructional

Three Streams
At 13 plus the pupils are tester
for intelligence, for skill in num-
hers and for facility in the use of
heir mother tongue. These tests
are used in conjunction with their
attainment records and _ their

“M’ (Modern) facilities than the School at pr
cs ent poms and these facilities
1e organisation so set up in Must include laboratories
the Middle School began in 1949 workshops. eer eeae
and has now reached the level of

the Fourth Forms. We have then London Chamber of

a IVa and a Illa, (Academic); a Com

IVe and a IlIe (Commercial). I The results beetle’ te the pro-
have had to create a Lower IVec as gramme are for three consecutive
a holding form for some i, boys examinations November 1948
(out of 28) of the 1949 IIfe who and July and November 1949, I
have been unable to keep up with the November examinations baie

the pace. The IiIm is treated as ,., ta 7

a Hemove Form, if at the end of candidates from the Alpha
the year a boy reveals himself as Stream, are weak in quality and
a late developer he is transferred Yet Such results as they achieve
to the “A” or “C” Stream, but °* ntinue to justify the policy of

the majority qualify for the Alpha S4Ving them from superannuation.
Stream where their curriculum is Thus in 1948 Henry E. E. did very
still further modified and they em- well to pass in six subjects with
bark on a two-year Course ter- one distinction, whilst in November
minating in Form IValpha and 1949 Holder, A. H. and Rudder Ss.
leading to the examination of the did quite well to pass in four
London Chamber of Commerce in subjects with a distinction each.
one or more subjects 4 The July 1949 entry is a different
(por the “A” and “C” Streams kettle of fish. These candidates are
the examinations objectives were fifth formers, either taking the
be the School Certificate and L.C:C, in the . os *
the full certificate of the London he ete stride towards hs
Chamber of Commerce reapective- December School Certificate or else
ly. I found that whilst the former completing a full certificate after
was acceptable for the “A” Stream, # previous partial success. The
the London Chamber of Com- C.C, committee awarded cash
merce has met with considerable Prizes to Henry E. EB. in 1948 and
criticism from parents and pupils to Cave L. G. V., Forde K. A,,
alike. It has a limited value in Lewis L. V. H., and Marshall A.
the employment market. This has in 1949. The L.C.C hag served
caused me much anxiety but I an important function in our edu-
believe that the Staff and myself cational system, but it will pro-
have found a satisfactory solution ably recede in importance for
to the problem in the proposed Combermere School when it is
new General Certificate of Educa- displaced by the General Certifi-
cate of Education of London Uni-



to



tion. We wanted one reauirement
to meet our specific needs, an Ex-

amining Body whose scheme of V°!S!ty as the objective of the “Cc”
Examinations would be sufficient- Stream as well as of the “A”
ly broad to include Commercial Stream

Studies. We have found this in Staff

the scheme of examinations of the
University of London and with
the approval of our Governing
Body and of the Director of Edu-

If the boys are the raw material
for which our administrative
schemes and plans are devised, the
Staff are the skilled attendants on

cation we are working out our .. . ; \
detailed plans—curriculum, text- whom we depend to infuse life
books lists etc—to enable us to and spirit into them, Only their
effect this switch-over. adequacy in numbers and quali-

The switch-over cannot be im- fcations will carry a school on to
mediate. Certainly the present Success. Recent legislation has
IV A, and possibly, tho’ perhaps done much to improve the lot of
ot so certainly the present II] A, the teacher. T should like particu-
have been oriented in terms of larly to place on record the grati-
curriculum and = text-books, to- fication felt by everyone associ-
vards the overseas School Certifi- ated with the School at the recent
cate of the Cambridge Syndicate. yecognition given by the Govern-
IV A will certainly take the Cam- ment to the outstanding services
bridge Examination in due course. to this School and to the cultural
and it is improbable therefore that 4ife of the community of Mr.
we can present our first candidates Col1ymore, our well-loved Deputy-
for the General Certificate before teadmaster, promoting him to the
1952. For the “C” Stream it is conior Graduate Seale for Ist and
more important that we should try 2nd Class Honours Degrees, “Colly”

und effect a ees at an as he ig affettionately ‘known to
net oo sessibility’ with my everyone was practically born and
ining this possibility with my . :
Staff, without delay are * Sampeemers and many
' ' more generations of schoolboys
ae ema pid the ng set have come under his influence than
Certificate for Combermere he may perhaps care to recall, but
School, Our educational role is they would all wish to join me, I
at once defined and restricted by know, on this well-deserved re-
the Education Act of 1890 which cognition of his services. ;
defines a Second Grade Second- Now you have all been hearing
ary School as one providing a about the problems of staffing in
Course of Studies leading to the our schools. [n the case of Har-
School Certificate Examination rison College and Lodge School
only. This could enable a boy or it was the loss of well-qualified
irl to qualify for admission to a and well-tried members of the
University provided they obtained Staff to Trinidad that created the
Matriculation Exemption crisis. We, too, have a Staffing
The new Scheme of Examina- problem but very different in
tions, not only by change of nature. True we lost Mr. Cameron
nomenclature but more important- tudor to British Guiana in the
ly by requiring for University ad- \i1q exodus, and I confess that he
mission at least two subjects at jo 3 gap that has not been easy to

Advanced Level gr ym fill. Our problem was this—that
ee eae be roe aas we had a large number of young

and capable but unqualified and
untrained—members of the Staff
After a short period here I came
to the conclusion that handicapped

i er by domestic and financial circum-
aceadietie Pc gy onl stances, _they all had valuable
petition with the First Grade contributions to make to Educ.-
Schools in their well cultivated tion, if only bonds that tied them

barriers placed by the Education
Act in the path of further develop-
ment of the Second Grade
Schools




China and the force
Indo-China

boys, and this has been revealed bowadary in the south-east corner of France it

in the singing of the Choir you With the Park to Roebuck Street



have heard this afternoon, in the in the north. Planning and lay- | 1, nave also ordered United
reputation of our Glee Club and out of running tracks, tennis ©l@tes Seventh F leet to prevent
in the suceess achieyed by both in courts, miniature range for the @â„¢Y attack upon Formosa and
the Musical Festival held in Raster Cadets, hockey pitch can move "ave requested the Chinese Gov-
1949, when the Choir tied with boldly forward and to this end ©PAment on Formosa to cease all
Queen’s College for first place in Government have admitted in the “!" and sea operations against
Division IIT and the Glee Club current year’s estimate a sum of 'e Mainland. These stops were
was first in Division IV. The tale $4,000 for Grounds Development t once reported to the Uniter
of Music has not vet all been told ‘ Nations Security ¢ ouneil, Our ae-
The theory of musie is taught for Welfare And Scholarships tion in regard to Formosa wat
MAJOR NOOTT ene lesson a week in each Form matter of elementary seeurity

throughout the Prep and First and It is with real pleasure that I Peace and Stability of the Paci
versity College of ihe West Indies, Second Forms, and I hope in Jan- ean tell you today of the response fic area had been violently dis
Jamaica, where he is reading for uary next to select 20—80 boys given by the Vestries to my ap- turbed by the attack on Korea
duis degree in Naturai Sciences. In who will prepare and offer music peal, early in 1949, to improve the Attacks elsewhere in the Pacific

the recent bereavement which has in their Public Examinations. conditions of their Scholars here. area would have enlarged the
robbed Mr, Drakes so unexpectedly Moreover, we acquired 10 violins, In the case of practically all Ves- Korean crisis thereby rendering
and so tragically of his father. 1 stands, ete., last year and a small try Scholars and scholars appoint- much more difficult the carry-

know you would wish me to exteng SToup of promising and interested ed by benevolent bodies the value ing out of our obligations to the

our very deepest sympathy. In Youngsters have started to receive of a scholarship includes all United Nations in Korea,

the same year Mr. Sealy was ‘tuition. Anytime from 8.00 a.m.. tuition and games fees, t»xt-books,

offered a vacancy at Erdiston Col- Wards you may hear weird stationery, a meal in the School In order that there may be

lege and he returns to us in Sep- {0UNds issuing from Combermere canteen, and in some ¢ases some no doubt in any quarter about LAST

tember next. Mr. G .A. Holder School as these enthusiastic voung- assistance with travelling expens- our intentions regarding Formosa, . :

has been recommended by the i tune up for an hour of orae- es, This has in effect enhanced 1 wish to state that the United GOYA—Perfumes, Colognes
Governing Body to take a similar tmnt before morning school To the value of a Scholarship from States has no territorial ambi- Powder (Face ana sath) ;
vacancy there in September next. implement this develooment in the former nominal sum of $24 a tions whatever concerning that A very beautiful assortmen

evr Musie nraeramme we invited



emacy, PaO pPeE M > to a sum ranging from $60 island nor do we seek for our- to choose from

re se dev. Moore takes up resi- Mr, J A. Millington to serve as to $96 a veut, _ elves any ‘Apecta) mosltion or

men as Durham Seen n'a visiting Master. He accented A scholarship is no longer a jy rivilege for Formosa THE COSMOPOLITAN
7 mF nae and wil ee - end wg ee _—_ en ranialy snare and a delusion, where the The present military neutrali-

years—on in completing US seeured a place forshimself in the scholar came half ashamed to sation of Formosa is without pre- re

degree course which he had form- " scholar ci . : a is 1out pre DAY PHONES %o41 & 4441

affections end esteem of the pupils
ond Staff than he has. }

Art and Handicraft

school and unable very often te judice to political questions affect-
obtain for himself the books and ing that island, Our desire is that
stationery — the very tools of bis Formosa become not embroiled

: ‘ ; NIGHT PHONE 41-41
erly started at Codringion College,
and the second year in profession-

al training. Mr. H. Brewster takes













; ’ ; . education and without which,he in hositilities disturbing to the |"7 eee oe

up residence at Loughborough ne ie ne deve'op- remained hopelessly lost. To those peace of the Pacific and that all ie POLE APCS x
Training College, where he follows andl te ft v Sphere of art and scholarships awarding authoritjes questions affecting Formosa be|% &
in Mr. St. John’s footsteps, in a (3 mews ou will recollect who have adopted these enlighten- settled by peaceful means as en- | % 9 x
two-year Physical Education s feet ese last. visited us on a eq terms, | know parents and visaged in. the charter of the % 66 %
Course. Mr. G. E. Solomon has *Peech Day that you saw a vivid pupils alike would wish to join United Nations x %
left to take up a four-year course and colourful display of work me in heartfelt gratitude, @ On Page 7 > 2
at Columbia University. Mr, 1, “one Py the Junior Forms in art %
a ’ vrapian pe. Under Mr. Collymore’s guidance. Nothing can contriPute to the 7 7 WV 1 99 ¢@
a. Sf. Hill, School Librarian, re- tHe confided in me that whilst he sheer joy of a youngster at school Pi li. J : e ‘. N, x
presents Combermere School at the was flattered by the success ail day than the joy of a tuckshop- OULICE US. Air , *
ummer School to be held in achieved, he did not feel compe- canteen. Far from perfect though s z :
Trinidad in August on the teach- tent to take them any further, our own remains, the Governing S lers s$
ing of Caribbean History. All He then suggested that I should Body are doing everything in their mugs R x
these instances I nave quoted have meet Mr. Broodhagen, and | power to add to its amenities, as An unequalled preparation fer combating Malaria and x
been dealt with most generously have never regretted that meet-. Witness last year the new furni- LONDON, other Fevers, skilfully compoutuled from tested Drugs, Fever %
by the Governing Body when my ing. What pleasure he has given ture and this year the installation Air police may shortly be caused by Chills ¢tc, respond readily to this effective %
eae aoe reese inp. 2 cannot tell you and his re- of gas a a eae ich patrolling the skies of Britain}® preparation %

e them for sion on pro- ward in the responses he has boiler — it is an ' Europe to combat air smug- .
tracted study leave. Meanwhile awakened in so Slee ails rte the School is justly proud and ana oisad $ sae ace oe i ee au >
Mr. Goddard and Mr. St. Hill have whom, till then, School had re- the object of envy on the part of “Bot, the British and Frenct : Remember it is a “RECTOR'’S PRODUCT” Obtainable ati— gy
both taken their extertal, Aagpoes mained rather an arid occupation, cane ee aie oe oe, police authorities are understooc | % , { %
—Mr. Goddard taking a 3rd Class must b s ~ i i under rs, aloney anc Fs » dard ans r the |} M '« B k 1 , I) Nt Mu | { | %
Honours Geography at his first at- him. a Easter ter aes Gittens, make a great contribution Cr any tm a % CSS ‘ 00 er S (B DOS) ru Ores i { . %
tempt; and Mr St. Hill securing ening Body furnished and equip- life at School by their cheerful this purpose ? s Broad Street and Alpha Pharmacy, Hastings x
u General Degree. The sum total ped a Class-room for Art and 224 able service they render “"ny4” ‘British squadrons are |% : x
of this endeavour to improve stat- Handicraft and such has been ‘e?. expected to be manned by form- ALLL AS AGEL CPP APPEL AL APA LLL
us atid qualifications, and of as- Mr. Broodhagen's success that in Cadets and Scouts er Royal Air Force police off- | (> == SESS FER SS,
sistance and encouragement to the League of Empire Competi- cers,
participate in it by the Govern- fijon jn

May last Combermere
School gained the First Prizes in
both divisions, the Senior prize
with a set of most admirable
posters advertising the attractions
of Barbados and the Junior prize
with a project scheme entitled,

Under Captain Perkins assisted
by Lieutenants Gittens and
Brewster, the Cadet Company is
# Vigorous organisation in our
midst, They have assisted -in
ecremonials at the King’s Birth-
day Parade and at Empire Day to fly contraband from abroad.

ing Body is, I submit, a formidable
achievement and without parallel
anywhere in the Caribbean. The
folowing table shows how the
composition of the Assistant Staff
in tems of qualifications ‘has

During the past two years al
smuggling has greatly increased
and the British authorities estim-
ate that hundreds of smali air-
eraft are presently being usec

WE OFFER



NAIL SCISSORS
TWEEZERS







*
changed since 1946: “The Landing at Holetown.” Celebrations. They were ee, Six Ri 4
: inspected by the Commissioner o ings FILES
Trained Grads ag Untrained Gradu tots ae ee ek > Police and received an exeellent The mbites sl { © LES
4 Jd Non-G : ; of , - yeport for which we all congratu- 1e British customs and police Ss ING ISHES
w Overseas 0. Unqualined 20; 'etai te their needs to Staff and late the Company Commander. A authorities say six large smug © SHAVING BRUAHES
2 Buildings. I pointed out in con- humber of senior Cadets @ue gling rings are working from the @ RAZORS
1950 nection with the School ‘Certifi- aicso serving in the Barbados Continent, and they estimate
shar tee Geet, J eanntorei Be creee. cate results that many of our Regiment and are showing a high about $8,400,000 worth of contra- | |
1; Overseas — 1, Unqualified — 13; Total DOYS are compelled to embark on sense of civic duty by so doing. band is flown into Britain yearly. |) CALL IN TO-DAY AT
= a Course of Studies for which they goto camp in the Garrison Some smugglers ; a ae : A

flying from



7” ‘ A they are not suited. Now that " July, and we wish F; to Britain leave offi-
The following are (or will be a" at the end of July, ‘rance an ’
; . Bav je, May be partly due to the soctal them a happy and successful ial with clearance for |!

daar, Wate my Sty‘ io he wat Se a agaist Storatte ts: || COLLINS’ DRUG STORES
Holder and Solomon, Moreover ®@ to it by the parents. But even ‘The Scouts under Messrs. Pi- pic! etheir freight before || Broad and Tudor Stree
as vacanies have arisen the Govy- /f that were not so I could do prim and Brathwaite continue to cross! e channel , road and Tudor Streets,
erning Body have appointed men "0thing else about it—for with- flourish and they have a suecessful Once over Britiin the cargo |}
suitably qualified for the post, 0¥t laboratories and workshops year’s record behind them is dropped off and the plane flie
thus it is that Messrs Adams, ™¥ hands are tied and this School — [py sports and athletics we have on to register an official landing

as an educational force can only
work at rather less than half
pressure, so to speak. We have

had two Satisfactory years. I know
that in the brilliant records of the
West Indies cricket team, the

Smith, Wellington and Herks have
joined the Staff and to those at-
tending their first Speech Day I

—LN.8.





extend this cordial welcome to taken steps to ensure one eer name of Worrell will = ms ine

our School Community. In con- of our Staff securing qualifica- spiration to every boy who play are ite

formity with this policy we are tions to teach Science, Mr. the game at Combermere School PAGING THE |

strengthening the teaching of Drakes will return from Jamaica P

Modern Studies — particularly in September, 1952. I must have Distant and Not So Distant DOCTOR

History—with the appointment of at least one General Science Prospects a | nel
Mr. R. A. Hughes who joins the laboratory for him to teach in NEW YORK Enar ,
Staff in September next. Mr. by that time. In the matter of | What can we expect from. the New York

Starting soon, the
doctor will always be at his pa-
tient’s call even when he is at the

Hughes is an old boy of Lodge
School, was formerly on the Act-
ing Staff here, and has just been

future? In our present form
further development is limited and
consolidation will be the key-nate

workshops I must depend on the
decision of Government to imple-

ment the recommendations of the . i theatre or playing golf. He will
awarded a 2nd. Class Honour’ Technical Education Committee. 1 have referred to the work of Mr. 16 reachable through a new short- a“
Degree at Toronto University. Mr Broodhagen and can justly de- wove radio service. Each doctor OI
Broodhagen who joined our staff Equipment seribe it as the cloud no bigger will be given a code number, And
in 1949 will * Pe = Our Library is growing apace than a wate a dee in oe every time he is wanted urgently
many of you. His work in the and its function as the contro! Sky over Combermere, it may be 4 transmitter will broadcast hi 1
oer of oe Aes banderas. has centre of intellectual develop- that the shape of its shadow may jumber at least every matdite The RAPID DRYING
en a revelation to us and many

be the shape of things to sOn6. doctor will carry a pocketsized |
If in the fleld of manual dexterity radio receiver which will pick up
talents, still lying hidden hike 4 the broadcasts within a 25-mile
rich vein of ore, are to be alse « radius of New York, When he is |
ee one ee er we caer we shee just |
wi P 0 G lave to telephone eadquarters |
and aeten, The Penmaes of and find out which patient is wor- |
education has no meaning Unless pied over his symptoms

the child is the centre and purpose . :

ment in the School places a heavy
responsibility on our Librarian. I
have every confidence in his abil-
ity to discharge that duty and
shall, therefore, recommend to my
Governing Body without hesita-
tion that money spent in ex-
panding and furnishing it will be

2 boy labelled a dolt and a dull-
ard in the class-room comes to
life under his lively guidance in
the art Room.

(4 hours maximum)

————





These absences on protracted
study leave make us dependent
upon the services of a number of

CLEAN BRIGHT COLOURS



masters serving for varying peri- money well spent. The number of it. 1 know too well after four

ods in an Acting Capacity. To of volumes—starting from scratch iin vartek and frustra— a fy

Mr. F. G. Smith, who served so in 1946—is now approaching the a py pig trent omen leaving Show Business DURABILITY AND GLOSS

nobly in“class and om the cricket 3.000 mark, with over £100 Of (i),bermere School with failed i
field {or twelve months until his jhe current year’s grant UN- Gehool Certificate as his. paper HOLLYWOOD

departure in September last to touched. Our objective is 6,000 | \alification Hollywood is trying to tempt Si CONSISTENT U A ry ' F

ee eto Sait ie ort volumes, and I hope eventually Character and technicalities are Laurence Olivier to make a fili | Al! 1 Y

re 2 u va vis

to extend the loan system

throughout the entire school.
With the establishment of the

‘ficial text-book scheme on July

not incompatible and a signilicant there at
percentage of our young men at Leigh is working in “A Streetca
Combermere are better endowed Named Desire” The only re
‘for practical skills than they are son Clark Gable is not sailing

future success. We welcome Mr the same time Vivier

Taitt and Mr. Jordan from Har-
rison College, and Mr. Pelew and

Mr, Brow*e from Combermere i

REASONABLE PRICE









: s , , lst last year, the finance prob- for an Academic Course. Or England with his new wite, former
ae biceet has tee dias ter lems were largely at an end. You Saviour did not find it one w't) Lady Sylvia Ashley, is that he j
ined by consolidation—the re- Will be surprised, I think, to (emeaning to serve as a carpenter too busy film-making
farmed curriculum of the Junior leafn that even before the estab- and if we could but follow His Crooner Frank Sinatra, a flop re- Look for the Spitfire on each
School has made steady strides vont > x ee coed example eee ane be saitite core pn radio, looks ike oeing
; Sahin an int nin 4 ad bui up the text-book that in character and in tr £ big suecess as a result of his
Necniety soot has now vesmnad @ stock to a value of over $3,000 the boys of Combermere Schpol first appearance with Bob Hope lithographed tin
Fourth Forms a Physical Edu- Which I was able to do by Lnk- would be proud of amd happy in Only Hollywood would «

nati , ave achieve: sid- ing the domestic text-book scheme the subsequent roles they would 25-year-old Corinne Calvert of
psec ee ee en = with the stationery scheme. Both have to play in the service of the France as the mother of 18~year-
John’s guidance We have s-- have flowrished, have achieved Community oid John Barrymore, junior

Agents: Frank B. Armstrong Ltd

a et a





PAGE FOUR



nay -3

THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1950



Backwards Or Forwards?

THE preoccupation of the Headmaster of
Harrison College to-day is a satisfying an-
swer to the question how to maintain
quality in education in face of the pressure
of quantity.

With the Headmaster of Combermere the
position is more acute.

What will happen unless quantity ceases
to despise utility?

The Registrar of the University College
of the West Indies has stated that the pur-
pose of university education is to produce
educated men and women. It is not intend-
ed to fit men and women for jobs.

' This is a good definition with which no
one can quarrel provided that one agrees
on a definition of education.

But there are few Barbadian parents or
children who would subscribe to the view
that education is the end and not the
means.

Major Noott is aware of the crisis.”

His appeal to carpenters to take pride in
the holiest of all professions—a profession
whose best Carpenter was the Creator of
carpenters—ought not to be necessary in
an island which has for long professed its
allegiance to the Cross as a symbol of hope

: for all men.
In fact that appeal is only too necessary
to-day.

In an island where there are not enough
jobs for all the candidates there are always
a number of jobs vacant for men of the
* right type but men and women of the right
ts type are few and far between.

The reason is that in an effort to raise

; themselves to a social level which knows no
bounds children of parents are being taught
to despise manual labour of all kinds

The result is that the economy of the
island is being threatened insidiously.
Young men and young women who have
been to schools which are above the aver-
age in common opinion, are, as a result of
their good fortune more likely to succeed
in certain manual jobs that require a basis
of theory in addition to practical aptitude.
In fact any employer of skilled labour in
Barbados will agree that there is always a
shortage of applicants from the class
schools for jobs requiring the use of hands
and brains.at the same time.

The disease is far more acute than most
of the others which hit the headlines of the
newspapers. It is the problem on which all
other problems depend.

Character and technicalities are not in-
compatible as,Major Noott so well says, He
adds: “a significant percentage of our
young men at Combermere are better
endowed for practical skills than they are
for an academic course.”

Any Headmaster of Harrison College or
the Lodge of the past and present is likely
to endorse these sentiments.

Itjis an evil of long standing and now
that the need for skilled operators in all
fields of Barbadian industry is growing in
excess of the demand for clerks who possess
a smattering of education and little else,
the position is acute.

Already the middle classes of Barbados
have seen the red light and most of their
children are being equipped with a tecfini-
eal education which will enable them to
continue to offer their other qualities of
good breeding and good manners to a com-
He munity which has suffered somewhat in
i these respects in recent years.

' Unless the parents of children realise
that they are hampering and not helping
their children by encouraging them to
despise those holy professions ordained by

‘

elt tae

tb

‘a ae

ie



by Himself in a way that none of us can
hope to emulate, then we do not progress.
We go backward. It is to the parable of the
talents that we must look for guidance.
Major Noott has reminded us of that. The
community will thank him for the service.

OUR READERS SAY:



Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetowa.
———$——

the Creator of the Universe and performed

| BERLIN,
| Through the square-framed
|} window the Red Square glowed

The Kremlin's onion-domes were
cut against the sky. In the fore-
ground, massive in its solemnity,
rose the bulk of Lenin's tomb.
But the darkened room in which
| I stood was not in Moscow. It was
| the inner shrine of Russia's new
| House of Culture, which stands,
with all the authority of fresh,

white paint, amid the ruins of
Berlin.
If you cannot get a visa to

| Russia there is nothing to stop you
| from crossing into the Soviet sec-
tor of Berlin.

Once there, much may be learn-
ed at slight cost and slighter risk
by mixing with the East Germans
and their Russian masters, who,
for all serious purposes, are com-

| mon subjects of the Soviet Union.

| The black god-=-

Stalin's House of Culture is in
Unter den Linden, behind the Ger-
‘man Unknown Soldier's tomb of
World War One. I walked un-

_ |-challenged up the steps, joined a

group in the lobby, and then
urned right, into a room marked
| “Lenin.”

One object on which the eye
could focus—a black marble bust
of Lenin, the Soviet god

In the next room was another
world, strident with heroic murals
—frenzied athletes driving piles,
reaving at ropes, marching, fight-
ng. And, in the centre, titanic,
| he crimson-backed figure of
| jtalin bearing this meaningful
| egend: “Stalin is the Lenin of

o-day.”

Along the corridors pictures of
| angy British lions, corrupt
American warmongers and—

orrors—Marshal Tito lead back
o the entrance.

=-And a white

At the head of the staircase you
see a vast dazzling white statue of

BARBADOS

iy Charles Foley

Stalin which appears as if by some
convulsion of nature, to have been
thrown up by the living rock.

Be calm. Below it, in gold letters
on red, are the words of the god-
of-to-day “My purpose is peace.
I bring you peace. Fight for
peace.”

And how do we fight for peace?
Upstairs I found the Soviet House
filled with youngsters in the vivid
blue shirts of Democratic Youth
They had heard a lecture. “Reac-
tionary - bourgeois - stience - and-
culture - the - service - of -Ameri-
can-imperialism,” followed by a
film.

Now they were sitting on the
terrace, eating and drinking in
surroundings as fine as any im-
perialist could wish for.

Next—Fight for Peace. They
pour out into Unter den Linden,
line up before the statue of
Frederick the “~--* -7=' *teqin,
with banners, ti

The goal is the Lustgarten, the
great square before the former
Kaiser's palace. From all parts
of dusty, Democratic Berlin pro-
cessions weave their way to this
point.

It is easy to move up to the
front through the limp crowds on
whose ears the loudspeakers all
round the square clatter, us they
did in 1938, when I heard Goebbels
ranting there.

Up on the speakers’ stand are
a dozen Peace leaders—members
of the Soviet-appointed sovereign
Democratic German Government.

A tidal wave

A week ago these men signed a
treaty with Democratic Czecho-
slovakia accepting the expulsion of
2,000,000 Germans from Sudeten-
land.

A fortnight ago they signed a
treaty with Democratic Poland
accepting the loss of one-fifth of



ADVOCATE



DT Was Stalin’s Pupil For Why Vot BWI
An Hour-In Berlin

the Fatherland. To-day? To-day
they are supporting Democratic
Korea.

I cannot forget the face of the
pretty Berlin policewoman aged
perhaps 19, flax-blond hair, china-
blue eyes, waiting with tingling
palms for every crescendo in the
unending speeches to throw up
her arms above her head.

Then—clap, clap, clap, the new
signal of the Democratic Youth, in
slow unison, like breakers on the
shore, then faster and faster until
it is a tidal wave of sound sweep-
ing across the square

There is a pause, an announce-
ment, a storm of cheers. John
Peet, head of a British news
agency in Berlin, who has gone
over to Democracy, is the star
speaker to-day. He receives a
special salute

When Peet finished speaking I
climbed up on the platform to
question him. He recalled that we
last met when he was looking for
a job on the Daily Express. but
that was before he decided to de-
sert the warmongers

He admitted it was two years
since his last visit to England, so
that perhaps the dockworkers
might not refuse, as he had claim-
ed to load arms for Korea.

Certainly he had kept his Brit-
ish passport and would go back to
England when he had delivered
his message to all who wanted to
hear it.

But not yet, not yet.

How many in the crowd? Per-
haps a hundred thousand. Com-
rade Eisler, the German Com-
munist leader from America, said

yes, 100,000. (Next day Eisler’s
Press said 350,000 filled the
square.)

We drive back down Unter den
Linden. A couple of Russian sen-
tries. A notice board- “You are
now leaving the Democratic sec-
tor,” and the journey—Moscow
without a visa—is done.

—London Express Service.



| Scientists Explore Under-Sea

WASHINGTON, July 15.

Science is getting ready for its
most searching look at the mys-
terious “pastures” of the ocean—
the drifting meadows of micro-
scopic fodder on which all sea
life depends for existence.

The National Geographic Society
has announced that it would spon-
sor a broad research program in
cooperation with the University
of Miami to study these little-
known ocean organisms The
work is to be on a year around
basis in the Atlantic between
southern Florida and the Bahamas

It is expected the research will
produce important contributions
in the field, of marine biology,
develop data of general value to
commercial fisheries in the Carib-
bean-Gulf or Mexico area, and
yield new information on_ the
behavior of the Gulf Stream, which
affects the continent of Europe as
well as North America

Dr. F. G. Walton Smith, head
of the Marine Laboratory at the
University of Miami, has been
named director of the long-range
research program, His associate
director will be Dr. Hilary B.
Moore, another of the top-ranking
oeceanographers on the Labora-
tory’s staff.

Weird Subject
Matter

Under a high-powered micro-
scope the sea creatures to be
studied in the program present a
weird assortment of odd shapes
often delicately beautiful coloring
a surrealist menagerie of infinite
variety.

The scientific name for them 1s
plankton, derived from the Greek
word for -'wandering” which de-
scribes the drifting life of these
minute organisms incapable of
swimming against a current, .
single quart of sea water ma
Gifain as many as 100,000 of
them, Some are _ plantlike in
character (photoplankton). Others
are animal-like (zooplankton)
and feed on the vegetable plank-
tom, Both, in turn, provide forage
for sea fife from the smallest of
fishes to species of whales who
wax to a 70-ton maturity on 4
few years of such diet.

To the fishes of the sea, large

or small, plankton is as indis-
pensable to survival as the
grasses and cereals are to the
animals which range the land.

When plankton pastures dwindle,
the fish are fewer When they












Pastures

are lush, the fish teem And
when they become too bountiful,
they seem to acquire a poisonous
Borgia touch, and the fish die.

How do these plankton
meadows materialize? Why do
they migrate from time to time,
drawing the fish population away
with them? What relation do
these migrations have to climate
changes? These are only a few
of the multiple questions to which
the projected research program
hopes to find answers

Ocean Research
Neglected

Science discovered
ton about a century
nus remained a
circumscribed field of marine
research, especially in oceanic
work. Considerable study has been
given to the patchy pastures
found inshore, and to those which
feed the fish of the inclosed seas
of the world. The open ocean,
however, has been subjected to
random samplings only, and its
secrets remain to be disclosed.

The research _ site for the
National Geographic Society -
University of Miami program is
believed made to order for the
oceanographic scientist because
the northeastward surging Gulf

the plank-
ago, but it
relatively



WELL, SURELY YOU DIDN'T EXPECT
ME TO COME AWAY WITHOUT
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FOR THE WINNINGS HE OWES ME



Stream obligingly funnels the
ocean waters into the chosen
proving grounds.

Plans call for the University

of Miami’s research ship, “Mega-
lopa”, to ply this proving ground
for regular seinings to bring out

plankton from various depth
levels down to 400 fathoms.
During each seining systematic
observations will be made of
water and light conditions, tem-
perature and other factors.

In_ addition, the boat will
periodically spend 24 hours on
station to give an around-the-

clock check on the way the plank-
ton pastures move up toward the
surface with clock-like regularity
at nightfall and descend again
to lower depths with the coming
of day. The false echoes caused
by this shift of infinitesimal
creatures gave trouble to the
Navy’s electronic sound-ranging
instruments during World War II
submarine hunting.

Plankton On Rye

There has been speculation
from time to time about tapping
the plankton supply of the ocean
for human food. It is possible!
The University of Miami scien-
tists say your plankton sandwich
would taste something like one

ilied with shrimp paste, and
slightly on the salty side. It
would be quite palatable and

nourishing

However, extracting plankton
on a scale large enough for human
consumption would be an enor-
mously expensive operation. The
uncanny economy of the ocean
does a far more efficient and
quicker job transforming these
micro-organisms into food for
humanity in the form of fish, Dr.
Walton Smith points out.

In administering the coming
research program, Dr. Walton
Smith will have a former college
associate working with him. Both
he and Dr. Moore are graduates
of the University of London.

Dr. Walton Smith has been
Director of the Marine Biology
Department at the University of
Miami since 1940. The previous
four years he was connected with

the Bahamas Sponge Fishery
Investigations.
Dr. Moore did reseach work

at the Plymouth Marine Labora-
tory, England; the International
Biologic Station in Bermuda, and
the Woods Hole (Mass.) Ocean-
ographic Institute before joining
the University of Miami faculty.
















manage new export businesses. Numero DEMERARA CASAREEP—per bottle .. $ .66
eendtae ie . nmerous |? QUAKER CORN FLAKES—per package . 39
ready are interested in these MUFFETS — per package ......... ies 37
opportunities. What they lack is official HEATIES — per package ............. We
. ‘ DALTON’S CEREAL FLAKES .— ackage... ‘
ee in _ form of Government under- oe RA — 4) packages erg nis wi rv
‘takings to facilitate the distribution in thi By POR HT nore nie eee ste eet ne ees 25
petra ees this 1 K.W.V, PAARL TAWNY — per boitie 2.16
a wh 0 Sepia natural and processed foods BWV. SOUSSRNE — per bottle .. 2.10
which would be made available t i r — ber bottle sereee es 4.50
0 Canadians. |! pRUNES IN SYRUP — per tin . fees aNd ee

THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1950

«
oe





TO-DAY'S ‘SPECIALS
at the COLONNADE

D, V. SCOTT

& CO., LTD.








Usually Now

Investments ?

| Jars Prepared Mustard

Editorial appearing in “The Toronto | Jars Peanut Butter
PP 1S

Globe and Mail”, Wednesday, July 12th | Bottles Jeffrys Beer

1950. (With Acknowledgements.)





WELCOME as any arrangement for the
restoration of trade between Canada and the| |
British West Indies may be, the mere exten-| |
sion of credits from Canada to finance im-|
ports from us is far from adequate. By the
Washington agreements of last September, | '
when Canada and Britain discussed trade and |
currency problems with the United States, |
this country is committed to a programme of |
investments abroad.

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that exports would provide hard currency
income. Out of dollars thus earned, the un-
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dollar countries. Canada’s endorsation of
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More Delighttal |

The proposed extension of credits to the
B.W.I., laudable so far as it goes, still is an
evasion of the larger and more constructive
view. The Caribbean colonies, now working
toward Dominion status within the Common-
Wealth, are a wide-open field for constructive
investment. They are ideally located to be-
come Canada’s winter garden for a wide
variety of produce. They are eager to co-
operate with Canadian entrepreneurs who
would modernize plantation methods, con-
struct and operate processing plants and





















Serve these to-day .« eYere



It is true that dollar capital would be em-
ployed in the creation of sterling assets, and
that earnings from new B.W.I. enterprises
would be in sterling. There is no reason why
Canada cannot accept that situation and
acquire a vested interest in Caribbean pro-

duction which would be of enduring value to
us both as a consuming nation and as an
exporter. A planned investment programme
would greatly enhance the income of B.W.I.
agriculture. Canada’s dollar investments
would very rapidly be liquidated in terms of
modern machinery which we could sell to
bring plantation and processing methods up
to high efficiency standards. We could per-
manently avoid the drain on our reserves of
United States dollars through winter imports
of fresh fruits and vegetables and their pack-
aged products.

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO., LTD.















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The extension of more liberal credits to

assist B.W.I. imports from us may have a
place as an interim stimulant. It does not
even touch the larger problem of creating a
permanent trade link between Canada and

our fellow Britishers of the highly productive
Caribbean islands.

stimulant

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Ore
But neither in
medicine nor in trade can it take the place of

well established health. The strengthening
of a permanent economic link between
Canada and the West Indies offers such obvi-
ous advantages to both parties that it should
become a fixture in our trade policy. It is not
a matter for emergency treatment in a time

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: “Tespi ‘ is sionsdwWindling influence of the Executiv . i i : x g

Delinquency Despite alarmist effusions © : wxecutive Committee. The Juveniles are classified into ‘ ai ; og

i quency contributed periodically to the eas. paces eee _ Board has now been working Training Groups according to See onan orretios of $
The Editor, The Advocate local Press, the incidence of a e vocate stated: — for three years, It meets at individual ability. Club and com Al bye eee . *

~ SIR, ax! Juvenile Delinquency here i Today four years after the least once a quarter. Members The amount of time spent at to unem tegen tae See BISCUIES JAMS and <
In your issue of 15th July, 1950, cannot be said to havefa !ssue of the Report the Institu- of the Board represent the the school desk has been in- and aya the oys and girls ‘ ves x

appeared a leader headed “Delin- reached the dangerous pro-y tons are working under the Judiciary; the Legislature, the creased, and backward Club under the euaplensot thel® 2 ; , JELLIES >

quency” which criticised the portions reported from other same system which has been the Public and the Government. juveniles are specially coached Police, The Sens the 2b Tins CARRS BISCUITS ee ee x
Government for the little that has parts of the world... .Out of Subject of strong public Criti- Members of the Board have The Department of Education the deonatian ae nt SHORT CAKE, MARIE, BRAMBLE JELLY in Bots. g

been done since the issue four a population of nearly 40,000! aca maintenance of worked out a rota whereby has made recommendations heel hohfived, Be Gia “ase DIGESTIVE, GINGER NUT, BLACK CURRAN gee a

8 years ago of the Report on the children and young persons si antation system with the three members make un- for the school curriculum ployment of thay full-time PETIT BUERRE re SRANT JELLY x
Reorganisation of the Government coming within the Juvenil aim otf reform would continue anounced visits to the Schools which are being carried out. male officers and a full-time At $1.80 ti in Bottles x

: Industrial Schools. The following Court Age Group, only anff to defeat the endeavours of every month. At these visits An entire new set of school woman officer ae Seen Perit APRICOT JAM S.A. in Tins
comments on some of tH state- average of 216 approximately Government. Despite the terms all staff and boys have books has been provided. As I have the honour to be PINEAPPLE JAM S.A, %

@ ments in the leader should give are found guilty each year of the Report and the merits of free access to the Mem- vacancies occur on the staff, Sir ee JUICES in Tins in Tins %
: your..readers a more accurate and most of these charges the suggestions made, nothing bers of the Visiting they are being filled by Your obedient servant : g
3 picture of the state of juvenile concern minor assaults andg bas been done. Committee. qualified elementary school E. J. PETRIE, TOMATO JUICE $
delinquency a f what is being batteries resulting fro as . j S ; nas ae 7 . < ; >
Fe ae Et et acre Oates anitt,, WO, oeveta that the (2) The Administration of the! (sechere reommmended by the sting Colonial Secretary, 16 ox and 20 on, Sires TEAS :
ain aie oe See | . answer to the problem was the ool has been separated ; . * , CARROTS in Tin : 7 OR x

1. The Advocate stated: — finitesimal percentage 2 introduction of the Borstal sys- from the administration of the (4) There is no Acting Superin-— Policewomen’s Band : hee Z CHOYCE TIP TEA x

offences by juveniles reach 7 : BEANS in Tins “p ¥ : sy

“Lack of reform at the G.I. that degree of seriousness t€™ but that owing to the lack plantation since May 17th, tendent. Major O. F. C. To The Editor, The Advocate SPINACH in Ti LYPTON TEA x

Schools has been put down as which if Saeniwitied by. efulls of trained personnel, this should 1948, and the School Superin - Walcott was appointed SIR,—Through the facilities of ey CH in Tins MYRNA TEA x

one of the contributing factors would bring them into thi be postponed until someone tendent .now controls only Superintendent on the Ist of YOur paper, please grant me the KALE in Tins BLUE X TEA ~

: to. an increasing number of indictable class.’ could be imported for the job. eight acres where gardening April, 1950. Space to say thanks to the Com- x
2 young people finding themselves sad “Today there is an Acting etc, is taught. When the (5) The Interim Advisory Board ™SSjener of Police, for his institu- J. & R. FRUIT CAKES . ~_ ‘ x
2 eharged in the Courts of the The Chief Probation Officer then Superintendent of the Govern Attorney was appointed to has made recommendations to Bavsed wane s Police Force in : i CROWN DRINKS, 7 Flavours %
= Island. . Government itself goes on to point out that the abovely ment Industrial Schools. run the Plantation, the sys- Government, which are still a : oe one arees pon. o Energy for tl 4 x
2 would appear to accept this facts do not mean there is room|: The facts are; — oo whereby ver ape as under consideration, for the near kin ORE RPE Ie, Soe mOeEEY FOr the. Children Try a Bottle of 3 -year-old x
8 frequency as normal The in- for Complacency, and lists thefd(1) One of the main recommenda- abourers in the fields was provision of a third Institu— as i i ge + *
: crease of juvenile delinquency factors which contribute to delin-} tions of the report was tha: stopped, tion for Borstal Age boys. wae oh eer ee coo. 5 RAISINS lé6e. per Ib Gold Braid WR asun ¥
~ has been publicly discussed and quency as poverty, bad hous-} an Interim Advisory Board (3) The Boys’ and Girls’ time- (6) The problem of juvenile Women’s Police band. W, have %
2 could not have failed to com» ing, cheap crime literature of the’ be set up to advise Govern tables and programme of delinquency is being tackled girls here quite capable or being ¢
= to the notice of Government.” strip variety, the cinema, a lack) ment how to carry out the daily work have been entirely as a whole. Reorganisation of members of a band which will be %
5 The following is an extract of respect for other people’s rights recommendations of the Re reorganised to allow of Voca— the Schools has been part only a credit to themselves as well as a
3 from the Chief Probation Officer’s and property which is disguised ° port which were agreed in tional Training which is given of a system which included the colony x
Fe report dated 31st March, 1950:— as “independence”, and _ the: principle by the Governor-in- from 12 to 3 p.m., daily. the creation of a good Proba- 5 MUSIC LOVER €4.6669600064 OS e6esososee 3

> 7 “ <
PPPPELELLLS LCL LLL

s





JI ier Error

THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1950



Two May Be Enabled OC Girls Want ‘Combermere Is Becoming | St. Philip

To Attend U.C.W.L.

TWO STUDENTS will be able to read for degrees in}
Arts at the University College of the West Indies if the|
Legislative Council concurs in a resolution passed by the}
House of Assembly at their meeting on Tuesday for the
sum of $5,000 for the purpose of making the enabling loans

Report Will
Be Released
On Saturday

A REPORT of the meeting of
the Incorporated Chambers of
Commerce which was held in
Trinidad earlier this month, will
be released to the public in all the
colonies concerned on Saturday.
The two delegates from the local
Chamber who attended the meet-
ing, Mr. H. A. C. Thomas and Mr.
G. D. Bynoe, gave a report of the
meeting to members of the cham-
ber at their meeting yesterday.

Members made passing com-
ment on matters which were
raised by Mr. A. R. Toppin and
will be discussed at the Annual
General Meeting. There are four
items Mr. Toppin has for con-
sideration.

All To Be Invited

They are: That all members of
the Chamber be invited to attend
meetings of the Council to listen
to the discussions; (b) That new-
comers to the island wishing to
join the Chamber should be re-
quired to reside here for two years
before election; (c) Release from
all controls of items in free sup-
ly from the Sterling area; (d)

he lack of Commercial represen-
tation on the Legislative Council.

Mr. A. &. Bryden and Mr. G. H.
King, members of the Chamber,
asked for and were granted four
months’ leave of absence. The
period begins on August 1. The

Hon. V. C. Gale was chairman
yesterday.
Members present were Hon.

Vv. C. Gale, Mr. T. O. Dowding,
Mr. H. A. C. Thomas, Mr. G. D.
Bynoe, Mr. D. A. Lucie-Smith, Mr,
Cc. A. Proverbs and Mr. R. M.
Cave.

‘Local Folk
Ruined By
Vulgar Dances’

AT the corner of Dayrells Road
and St. Matthias Gap there is a
building which carries the sign
“Edmonton Dramatic and Social
Club and Headquarters of the
Landship “Renown”. The sign is
weather beaten but according to
Mr. Dan Brathwaite, the Manager
of the Club, “drama is still going
on”

The Club has produced many
plays, the latest “The Girl Going
to Market” having been staged in
November last year. It was formed
in 1946 and the local boxer Kenny
Seaman, who recently lost to Al
Hinds, learnt his boxing on these
premises.



Vulgar Dances

One of Mr. Brathwaite’s recent
ideas is to introduce the Scottish
Lancers, Caleddnians and Qau-
drilles dances to local dance fans
because he feels “local folk are
ruining themselves with vulgar
dances nowadays.”

At first the Club started with
over 100 members but now it only
has about 26. The seating capacity
of the building is over 1,000. All
the players in the dramatic di-
vision are trained at the Club and
at Christmas they staged the Pas-
sion Play. This was well attended.

Mr. Brathwaite still has some
of the costumes that were used
in past plays. Apart from the
dramatics, other activities of the
Club are handbalancing, boxing,
weight lifting and indoor games



IMPORTS
YESTERDAY

FIVE cases of tyres, 5 cases of
tractor parts, one case of brazing
rods, 67 bundles of iron rods, 22
bars of iron rods, two packages of
valves and other pieces of equip-
ment arrived in the island from
were
for use in the construction of the

Trinidad yesterday, They
new runway at Seawell.
The equipment was the cargo

of the schooner Gardenia W

Other general cargo arriving by

this vessel included cedar boards,

cylinders of gas, Angostura bitters

and rayon piece goods.

ARRIVING from British Guiana | jp
yesterday by the 76-ton schooner

Timothy A. H
a quota of 1,000 bags of rice.

This ship has brought the week's | their services

first supply of rice for the island

~~)

Vansluytman Was! the students

Mr. Adams said tnat te Frin-
cipal of tne University Couege o1

tne West indies naa notufiea the
| Government Wiat among tne can-
;didates who ileceuiy sar me
jsecnolarship e@Xamimauen of we

Universny Cojiege, tnose two stu-
agents we:e suitable lor University
eaucation botn Dy Weir menial

aDulty and persoual cnaracceris-
ucs.
ane University College was

glad to include iwose stuaents in
we admissions of Octover 195u,



‘Lo Meet Island
Cricket XI

—OF GIRLS

UBREN’S COLLEGE GIRLS are
hard at work preparing

the visit of girls representing the
Bishop's High School of Trinidad
On Tuesday these girls
cricket match on their grounds
The game was between a side
skippered by M. Wood and Rosa
lind Hutson’s XI. Hutson’s team
won the match but Grace Cum
berbatch of Wood’s XI
a batting display and scored
Outstanding bowlers

Wood, Rosalind Hutson and



but tnrougn lack of tinancial re-
fources, neither of nem would be
able to attend tne College. ‘The
courses whicn they wouia like to
take will be of tnree years’ au-
ration ana the estimated annual
cost for each student was $1,200.
The University College was pre-
pared to offer them a grant-in-
aid of $480 per annum tor three
years.

As both of the students were
minors, the usual agreements for
the repayment of the loans will
be entered into between their
parents or guardians and_ the
Government.

Urgent

He said that the University Col-
lege wanted a reply almost im-
mediately and therefore the matter
was urgent. The principle which
he thought the Government should
adopt was to reward ability.
| He was aware of the fact that
the granting of loans to the two
students was creating a precedent



but he felt that there was no
danger in establishing that pre-
cedent.

Mr. Mottley (E) said that deal-
ing with the question of higher
education, he would be the last

person to stand in the way of
anyone getting help.
He believed that it was not

higher education that mattered so
much but some education that
mattered. As he understood it,
Barbados had awarded two schol-
arships to the West Indies Uni-
versity. These two persons had
sat this examination and had fail-
ed to win. But they had done so
well that the Principal of the WJ
University made those recommen-
dations

Duty ot Government

He did not intend to vote for
the resolution but had changed his
mind after hearing Mr. Adams
say “it was the duty of the Gov-
ernment to assist people in getting
higher education for their children
the same as it was the duty of the
Government to assist people in
repairing their houses or pur-
chasing or repairing fishing boats.”

If that was the policy the Gov-
ernment was going to pursue, it
was all well and good, provided
that they were not going to make
flesh of one and stone of tha
other, But if the Government was
merely lending money to students
because they were recommended
by the Principal of the West Indies
University College, he would say
ao because it must be borne in



mind that Barbados, beside
awarding two scholarships to the
West Indies University, also
awarded four Barbados scholar-

ships and two Island Scholarships
It might well be said that the
candidates who competed for other

scholarships in the West Indies
University College, might reach
exhibition or open scholarship

standard, and could thereby ben-
efit from University education,
The parents of these students
might be in such straitened cir-
cumstances that they could ill
afford to send them

If Government was prepared to
consider other cases from time
to time, he was prepared to sup-
port the resolution though it was
creating a precedent. Finally Mr.
Mottley suggested that some pro-
vision be made in the agreement
whereby these students, when
sualified, would return to Barba-
dos at least for a period of three
vears to heln now that there was
a shortage of snecialist masters.

Mr. Allder (L) said that the
Government should use discre-
tion in giving such help only in
case of neediness. He was in
| sympathy with the two students
| and was prepared to vote for
the resolution. The Government
should take care in spending
money in that direction to help
those at the bottom before
spending mones to heln those
who were in better financial
positions. :

Mr. Crawford (C) said that he
wanted to clarify the point made
by Mr. Mottley before the resolu-
>! tion was voted for. He did not
‘|‘want the Government to make
the loan becninse of the recom-
+| mendations of the Princinal of the
University College of the West
Indies, hut merely to give assist-
anee to the two students who were
need of it.

He was also of the opinion that
should be made ‘to
eame back to the colony and give
if needed





It was berthed in the inner ae Reece Wants Fish

of the Careenage where it wil
begin unloading to-day.

The Vansluytman also brough
1,100 bags of charcoal, 61 tons o

firewood, 425 pieces of

greenheart and 112 wallaba posts



‘“Manuata”’
Leaves Dock

SCHOONER Manuata was low
ered off dock yesterday after un

dergoing a few days’ repairs. It

is expected to leave port for Brit
ish Guiana on Satundday.

sawn|_ AN _ Address

t| Shed Erected

f

tabled by Mr.
Reece in the House of Assembly
;on Tugsday draws the attention of
His Excellency the Governor to
the fact that a shed for the use
of fishermen and vendors of fish
is needed at Silver Sands in the
parish of Christ Church.
. The House asks the Governor to
.|take such steps as are necessar:’
to send down a resolution for a
.-|sum of money to the House ot
Assembly to provide for the cost

Going on dock in place of this! of erecting at Silver Sands, Christ

vessel was the Lord Combermere.
The vessel has been docked main-
ly for scraping and painting of its

hull.



What’s on Today

Court of Grand Sessions
10,00 a-m.

Meeting of Christ Church
Vestry, 2 p.m.

Mobile Cinema at St. Philip.

TT



Church, a shed to be used for the

purposes mentioned above,
Another Address

tabled



'need of more Post Offices and Li-
braries in the rural districts of
this Island.






















which was

His Excellency the Governor the

Atwell. Atwell bowls
action of a man and keeps a
good length. She demand
respect from the batsmen of the
opposing side.

Mrs. G. H. Adams, a
of Queen’s College, told th2
“Advocate” yesterday that
thought the standard of the game
was very high and she is of
the opinion that the Queen’s
College girls, in a cricket match,

with the

mistress

will stand a good chance agains: |

any other local girls* team and
also against the Bishop’s High
School.

This was only a practice match
but many Queen’s College girls
told the “Advocate” yesterday
that they would like to meet an
island XI of girls.

‘WO SUDDEN DEATHS occur-

red recently. Louis Campbell,
a watchman of the Department of
Highways & Transport, died in
his hut at Baxters Road at about
8 o'clock on Monday night. The
body was removed to the Public
Mortuary where a post mortem
was later performed’ by Dr. Kerr.
Death was attributed to natura!
causes,

On Tuesday 36-year-old Ken
neth Gaskin of Fitts Village, St.
James, died suddenly at his home
An autopsy was performed by
Dr. Kirton and again death was
attributed to natural causes

URTON BEST is now detained

at the General Hospital suf-

fering from a broken leg. Best a

resident of Douglin Village, St.

Andrew was attacked by a bull
at Walkers Bay recently.

M&: HAROLD KIDNEY of
Strathclyde, St. Michael, re-
ported to the Police that the Pick-
wick Pavilion at Kensington Oval
was broken and entered between

Saturday and Monday and a
quantity of cricket balls, cig-
arettes and cash, total value

$31.81, were removed, They are
the property of the Pickwick
Club.

-NIGHT the Mobile Cinema

will give a show at Edge-
combe Plantation yard mainly for
residents of the Edgecombe area of
St. Philip.

ARENTS OF BOYS and girls
of the Barbados Youth Move-
ment were told of future plans of
the movement at a meeting held
recently at the Youth Centre in
Bridge Road.
After a discussion many parents
promised to support the move-
ment,

HE POLICE BAND, under
Capt. C. E. Raison, will be
playing at the Elementary School
Singing Festival which will be
held at the Combermere School

Hall, at 430 o'clock on Friday
evening.
This Festival takes the form

of a Concert given by the Massed
Choirs of Wesley Hall Boys’ and
Girls’ and St. Mary’s Boys’ and
Girls’, and is a means of encour-
aging Community Singing between
the schools.

A Concert similar to this one
took place recently by the massed
choirs of eight of the 11 schools of
St. George and it was a great suc-
cess. It was held at the St.
George’s Boys’ School.

The programme is as follows:—
(1) Grand Maren Youth of

Erie Coates. (Dedicated
Princess Elizabeth).
(2) Community Song of Festival:
Song of the Music Makers
(3) Combined Choirs
ta) Old English, Air
ib) “The Drummer

Empire-
to H.R.





and the Cook”

(4) Soprano Sole by Keith Lawrence:
‘Bless This House’ Brake,

(5) Overture: A Children's Overture
Roger Quilter. (By Band)

(6) Combined Choirs:

(a) “A Shepherd Kept Sheep.”

(Cadet Boy Grant)
e) Old English Air. (Boy
19) Combined Choirs
(al The Lord's My Shepherd
ranged by Gordon Jacobs,
(hb) Welsh Air All Through
Night
(ce) Spiritual
Land of Hope and Glory;
The King.

Halloway)

ple who did not
about the heat yesterday
Tuesday was also hot,

on the week. The
temperature yesterday was 89
Fahrenheit compared with Tues
day’s 87°.

Perhaps the persons who fel
the heat most were the police
men on duty in the

surrounded school

and adults

by

there was more wind with th

of their reclining o

beach

part day

the

The House asks that the need

for |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

A Senior Partner In
Barbadian Education’
—Says Governor at Speech Day

“FROM being a poor relation, Combermere is becom-
ing a senior partner in education in Barbados. But there



held a}

gave ai

were M.}
Fay |




she |






















“O No, John!"

(b) “Standin’ in the Need of Prayer.”

His Corps which on a recent occasion
Band | provided, as today, a really effic-

(7) Soprano Solo by Desmond Harris
“Christopher Robin is saying
Prayers.”

8) Instrumental Divisions by
Cadets
‘al The Willow Song Coleridge

Taylor. (Boy Farnum)
(b) Berceuse di Jocelyn Goddard,

‘Are
The] Bet

The Wails of Jericho.
God Save

HERE WERE VERY FEW peo-

complain your eyes in front of you as the
Although gentlemen pass and if I catches
yesterday
was easily the hottest day so far
maximum

streets
directing the traffic and prevent-

heat than experienced in Bridge-

y . i town, people on holiday staying
FE ig poopie beg at Bathsheba spent the greater

should be drawn to the attentioo
of the Governor - in — Executive
Committee and asks the said Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee |
|
}

Assize Diary

TODAY
No. 8—R. v. Dennis Walcott
No. 17—R. v. Shirley
Franklyn

rend gown to the House of Assem-
bly a resolution for such sums of
money as the Governor-in-Execu-
j tive Committee thinks necessary
| to establish such Post Offices andj
Libraries in the rural districts of
this Island

FRIDAY
No, 32—R. y. Milton Phillips

| is much more to do,” His

| terday.
a Speech Day celebrating t
years—1948 and 1949.

Excellency the Governor Mt

| A. W. L. Savage told pupils at Combermere School yes-
His Excellency was addressing the gathering at

he occasion of two academic

Mr. Savage said that Major Noott had referred to the
Report on Technical Education and if only some of the

recommendations were implemented they would certainly

require the further development of Combermere for which

| “there is a legitimate public

His Excellency, accompanied |
by Mrs. Savage and Mr. W. Lam-
bert, Private Secretary, arrived at}
the School shortly after 2.30 p.1n.|
| They were met by Major Noott, |
;members of the Governing Body!
jand the Lord Bishop }

Accompanied by Mr. H. A
Tudor, and Mr. C. A. Coppin
His Excellency took the Royal
| Salute from the Guard of Hon-
our under the command of Capt
D. R, Perkins. He then inspect-
ed the Guard

Mr. H. A. Tudor, C
his opening remarks

18';rman, in
suid that it



was a pleasure for him ‘to extend
to His Excellency and Mrs
Savage, on behalf of the Gov-
erning Body of

their great thanks for the attend-
ance of both on that day ano
‘to Your Excellency to con-
senting to distribute the ?rizes,”



demand”,

I regret that the end of term
being so near, it is not possible
for the School to be given the
usual Speech Day holiday this
week but I hope, Major Noott,
at a convenient time early next
term you will be able to make
the arrangement to honour the
present occasion,

In the last few days, 1 have
been reflecting on the probability
that the majority of .the boys and
girls I have addressed will be alive
when the year 2,000 dawns

Some of you will recall that
there was quite a fuss at the
opening of the present year 1950
t seemed something rather spec-

Combermere, |ial that we had reached 1950—half
way
though some mathematicians tried
to spoil the fun by pointing out
that the half century mark would

through the century—even

The’ Headmaster then reaa not really be reached until the
his Report after which His|Pesinning of 1951 :
Excellency presented the But any fuss over a half cen-
prizes and gave his address tury will be nothing to what will
A vote of thanks was. given happen when the “1” of the 20th

g s was g ’
by Mrs. E. S. Burrowez, the|Cemtury becomes the “2” in the
newest member of the Gov-|year 2,000,
erning Body. ‘
Cn the lighter side were songs 1,000 — 2,000 A.D.

by the School Choir conducted ‘There was as a matter of
by Mr. Gerald Hudson The teys}fact tremendous excitement in
is 8 the schoo! Sor’." | Purope at the coming of the year
See followe d by a greup!].000. I say Europe because Amer-
oe Sous es i we oe “ica and Australia had not been
Se, altzing Matilda, “| discovere on é very little
Australian Folk Song, they wei discovered then and very 1

loudly applauded and apart fror

the variations the boys pronounced |‘

wag known about the greater part

of Asia and Africa

the words to this slightly con ne Seen ee wes
fusing song splendidly. sheves P WOPK as 4
OT) PR, SRS 7 ing to an end in 1,000 A.D. and
Arts And Crafts many farmers refused to sow crops

since they felt that there would

The programme climaxed with It
parents and friends visiting the
done by the boys. Visits were
combined
Room where a
film was shown
screen

demonstration

on the daylight

demonstrating the
phases of Physical
in a boy's career
mere School was
by boys between
8 to 18.

The Police

various

Educatior
at Comber- |é
also given
the ages of

Band under Capt
C, E. Raison was in attendance
and while the guests were en-
tertained to Tea on the Lawn
the Band played popular tunes
for others.

In his address
said,”

His Excellency

His First

“On the 23rd of July, 1947,
Major Noott presented his first
report as Headmaster of Comber-
mere. In it he analyzed the fac-
tors that weave the.complex pat-
tern of a school and he indicated
a programme of development té
be built on the foundations so well
laid by the late Mr. Burton
by Mr. Armstrong

and

Today he has reported the
progress and the results of that
programme of development and

on your behalf I congratulate him
and his staff of the School on
their achievement,










From being a poor relation,
Combermere is becoming 4
senior partner in education in
Barbados. But there is much
more to do. Major Noott has
referred to the report on Tech-
nical Education and if only some
of the recommendations are im-
plemented they will certainly
require the further develop-
ment of Combermere for which
there is a ‘egitimate public
demand

“I take this opportunity to apolo-
gize for my past neglect in not
referring to the School Cadet

ient Guard of Honour on my ar-
rival at the School

When I was a School Cadet we
had a Guardsman to
Corps. I was more afraid of him
than of the Headmaster. 1 for-
many of his bellowed and
oft-times crude words of instruc-
tions, but one lesson remains in
my memory.

When rehearsing for a Guard
of Honour, he used to say “Keep

train the

you watching them I'll wear your
feet to stumps in Defaulters Par-
ade!” I think his voice must
have been heard at Combermere
today as there was not a flicker
in the eyes of your Guard of
Honour today.

“T also congratulate the School
Choir on its singing. I am very

2

t

ing congestion in the busiest}fond of singing but I am not en-
areas of the City couraged by my family. Often in

In nearly every street of the|Church anc elsewhere . used u
City snow ball carts were always hear a stage whisper “Mummy

seen parked at the side of the tell Daddie to sing quieter.”
streets and they were constantly

1 have always put this critic-
children|ism down to petty jealousy, but
perhaps it would have beer

In the country districts although] avoided if I had had the benefit

elof Mr. Gerald Hudson's tuition
when I was younger

Mr. Hudson is one of the most
modest men I know, but you will
agree that the standard of singing
and the appreciation of music in
this island owes much to his tire-
less energy and patience

Purchase Work

“I should like
|tribute to the
\the work of Mr. Broodhagen, It
jis not late for the Govern-
jment er a public benefactor
purchase k
presentation to
Museur

n



also to add
Headmaster’s

my



too

ome of h Ww



the



Geography-Projection | since then,

underlining and that
sentially,
A Physical Education display ;taken
progress

last 150 of them

2e no one to reap them
It is very hard to think oneself

Exhibition of Art and Handicraft | back to those days and to consider
the
also paid to the Library and the changes

colossal
that

magnitude of
have taken

the
plice
















But one point is T think worth
is that, es-
the changes have not
place by a steady rate of
throughout the whole
but have quickened to
ly fantastic extent in the

1,000 ye
a positiv



One might even make a rough
and ready generalization and say
that the world of 1800 A.D, was
more like the world of 1000 A.D
than that of 1950 was like that of
1800.

“Just consider one point
From the dawn of history until
about 1800 the fastest speed at
which a man could travel was
the speed of a galloping horse
Today jet propelled aircraft can
now go so fast that they run
right away, so to speak, from
the sound of their own engines
and travel through absolute
silence. Man can send his
thoughts at far greater speed
still—in fact at the speed of
the electric current which travels
at the rate of 186,000 miles a
second.

In 1800 the Governor of Barba-
dos kept up communications with
Iondon by means of despatches
sent by sailing vessels. Today he
can exchange a dozen telegrams
within a day with Whitehall if he
is so inclined or even get them on
the telephone if he prefers to do
BO,

Improvement ?

“We need not at this point @%
juto the question of whether jhe

present arrangements are or are
not an improvement on the old
ones

I am just using this illustratipr
to point out the incredible natiyre
of the developments that have
taken place im the last 150 years
And I need scarcely add that it is
not only in the realm of communi-
cations that these developments
have taken place

The whole world has been trans-
formed since 1800 the process
is going on every day and every
hour and as far as we cal
see will continue to go on, and
probably with increased. speed
until the year 2,000 and beyond

It has been so in Barbados bu
I do not propose to recite its his
tory and development as you all
know it better than I do, but
would mention one basic factor
{a 1850 the Government for the
first time appointed an Educatior
Committee and placed at its dis
posal a grant of £3,000 to assist
Education

Today the expenditure |:
£300,000 And the ne
years will see further chang iy
developments, and you, the boy
uf Combermere, will) be callec
mpon to play an increasingly 14)
portant part in he future
Barbados

Many of you

over
\te
arty



5 aru

will be working it



public service and some of

serving in one branch or ancthe’
of the Legislature. How can you
prepare yourself for these respyn-

sibilities?

The answer is to begfound beth
in education and in, the eternal
verities that do not change ir
the character of individuals as ex-
pressed in courage and love and
truthfulness — and above all in
the Christian revelation from
which we date all our years

May I in conclusion adapt scm
well known lines to the present
occasion :—



“I said to the man who stood
At the crossroads of the ce
Give me a light that T ms
Tread vafely into the unknow

And he replied
Go out into the darkne
Ar t your hand t
H God
Tr al t «
Tha 2
Ar e a *

Sart penne

Murder Trial |

@ from page 1

not mean that all the witnesses

for the Prosecution are lying. |

You must look at each bit of |

evidence and balance one)

against the other.”

The Prosecution was submitting
that the accused and the deceased
had met at Eugene .Ward's place
The deceased, apparently, did not
like the idea of the accused or any
other man visiting the place
and no wonder because he had a}
young daughter there. The Prose-
cution was also submitting that
there was no other way in which
the deceased could have met his
death, in the circumstances they
had heard, except by the hands of
the accused.

No Explanation

Who else had come into close
contact with him? A _ suggestion
had been made about Maynard
having an opportunity to kill him
But no explanation had been given
as to why she should wish to do
s0



PAGE FIVE





os’ et te a ns en oe a ee

FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR

PUES sig 110s enters, °

a PURINA LICE POWDER and a

PURINA INSECT KILLER

H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.
Distributors.



He agreed that if they had a
reasonable doubt the accused | G6GGGGGG65FGFGG55FF6GS9F 9F5F FG SSS 5 FF FG GOS TOD
should be given the benefit of that | 4 %
doubt. If. they felt that the x câ„¢ $
deceased had met his death at the} > » ity >
hands of the accused, but that x Vo ‘ (fy * ong a ‘4 »
“re were extenu: + circum- | of # , . »
there were extenuating circum “ vid 4 & NEED | .
stances which would reduce the} % ae POS s o\ 2 .
crime to one of manslaughter, | % y Y we hr . on
they were entitled to return such | & HE BRAND You RV
a verdict x
Theirs was a duty which should |
not be shirked. They should give |.

that they had given to the evi-
dence, and return the verdict
which they thought was the right
one.

to it the same care and the ev

The Acting Chief Jutice sum-

eo



REXALL |



‘
s
Â¥
’ . rare rp ‘ 1 a
ming up to the Jury, defined | % RE NOW KD THE WOR LD OVER $
murder and explained “malice
aforethought ‘eupoenned im % AGAREN COMPOUND GLYCERINE and %
plied.” Where expressed malice | ‘’& BISMAREX POWDER z THYMOL COMPOUND 8
was concerned, he recalled the CHEMICAL FOOD x
evidence of Louise Maynard | ‘soon LIVER EMULSION KAOLIN POULTICE

about a threat which she said

accused had used to deceased,|* KIDNEY & BLADDER MILK OF MAGNESIA
and suggested that it was too PILLS

loose and vague an expression COLD and INFLUENZA SYRUP OF

to amount to expressed malice, MIXTURE HYPOPHOSPHITES

If they found that when the
accused and deceased were strug-
gling or that when the deceased

‘
pursued the accused the latter | KNIGHTS DRUG STORES
stabbed him, that would be suffi- 2
cient basis on which they could} %

imply malice and return a verdict
of guilty of murder, provided of
course, that the accused had no}
just cause or reason for stabbing
It was for the Prosecution to prove
malice and it was for the Jury
to say whe-her it had been estab-
lished |
Provocation |
The Acting Chief Justice told
the Jury that there had been a
certain amount of provocation on
the part of the deceased, It was |
his duty to tell them, however,
that there was not that evidence
of provocation which would justify
the Court in leaving it to the Jury
to decide whether or not the
offence was one of manslaughter |
assuming that the accused had!
plunged a knife into the Aeceased. |
It was established that the!
deceased had received «a wound|
which caused his death. But there |
was no direct evidence as to how |
he had got that wound They |
would therefore have to fall back
on circumstantial evffence, and
he would direct them that accord- |
ing to the law, they could only
convict on circumstantial evidence |
if they were satisfied that the
facts that they arrived at could
only be explained by saying that)
the accused was guilty If those!
facts could be explained either by
the guilt or innocence of the ac
cused, they had no grounds for the
burposes of convicting
After reviewing salient points
of the evidence and reminding
the Jury of the submissions
made by both counsel, the Act- |
ing Chief Justice told them they
were the sole judges of the fact. !
They must be satisfied beyond)
all reasonable doubt, they must
have a moral conviction of the
gullt of the accused before they
could find him guilty, }
The Jury retired at 12-23 ana re-











LEE APECE LOE EOL LEE ESA EE



. POOLS te ty te toe oo 4 OO oe OF LOO SAPO SOCSO> 200%



Obtainable from all Branches of

LLL LCS

Someone's



WIN WITH

CPALDIN

OVER 70 YEARS OF SPORT







turned to Court ac 1.40 with a ee
verdict in favour Arann | be veed A. G. SPAL DIN G & BROS. LTO }
———— el ——— oo = So



LAMP SHADES

Made of washable material
and suitable for ceiling lights,
wall Fixtures or Table Lamps.
Beautiful Pastel colours.

$3.50 to $1120

Prices from



Cave SHEPHERD & Co, LD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

RIDE THE NEW MOTOR

CYCLE MARVEL

Oelocette

THE NEW MODEL L.E. 149 C.C. is different from the conventional
type motor cycle—in fact it’s the nearest approach to a motor car.

WATER-COOLED,

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and NOISELESS

For Simplicity, Economy and Riding Pleasure, Choose a. .

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ROBERT THOM LTD.

COURTESY GARAGE WHITEPARK ROAD





PAGE SIX
































BARBADOS ADVOCATE i eS, AS OT
a Ee a
uesaeey BY CARL ANDERSON

CAN YOU
RELAX ?

: | jorne people find it impos-
___ ano} |
WALT DISNE

ihie, because their nerves
are strung up to such a pitch
that it is a physical and
mental impossibility They
are jumpy and irritable all
the time and feel perfectly
miserable. They can naither
eat nor sleep and séeff to
have lost all interest in life.
If you are in this unfortun-
ate condition you should
take a course of

NUTROPHOS

This preparation, formerly
known as THIOPHOS, is an
excellent nerve food. It is
widely prescribed by
Physicians, who know. that
you will EAT WELL, SLEEP
WELL, and FERRI. WELL
when you take

NUTROPHOS

STOKES & BYNOE LTD.

AGENTS.

c T KNOW NOU LIKED DRIED PRUNES)
aaa < aT AND APPLES, PETE!
MOK NEAR. TSS are

N NEGETARIAN! GOOD FOI
SIR ee ME HEALT!!

ihe |
J Rie gence % ay ps |







ae —we ne

BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG

Lp, oll) Foe. WE i. leees.e || “FERGUSON FABRICS”











SIGN



STOCKED BY THE

LEADING STORES.

_ Benen Eireann a Bs PS PVR











THE







NOW WEE GOT TO DODGE THE
LAW WHILE WE FIND OUT WHY A
KILLER CAME TO TOWN!



YOU'RE UNDE

WANTED FOR MUR













Zo Hot — _._| Marmalades,
— alk Syrups, Ete.

Golden Syrup .... or 3









Brechin Castle G. Syrup

Household
Kequisites, Ete.

Vaseline Hair Silver Shred Marmalade

Tonic ...... * . BAHAMA Hart: Marmalade .....

Limacol ......... p PINEAPPLE JUICE Coopers OE ENR be
Pkgs. Brillo Soa — §B8¢ Little Chip Marmalade 5

Pads: oo. 6... 6 1Se.

Heney ... ; 0c.

Golden Shred Marmal-
ade




















| (9 SIGNOR CANNON? MY APOGOGIES BUT We FIND ———
NECESSARY TO TAKE PRECAUTIONS. 1 ToLp /_/ SO THIS IS
= YO ONE EXCEPT MY DAUGHTER THE INGLES!
i YOUR COMING . PERMIT ME 70 SIGNOR CANNON
tor |

50 YOU AND YOUR DAUGHTER Jf BECAUSE | THINK THIS GANG
ARE THREATENED BYA iS LED BY AN ENGLISHMAN.
MURDER GANG WHO HAVE THEIR METHODS ARE SO UN-
MADE ATTEMPTS ON YOUR ITALIAN!..THE PISTOL! THE

THEY OO NOT KILL
IN HOT BLOCD!
THERE iS ICE IN





Pkgs. Lux Soap










INTRODUCE TO YOU MY DAUGHTER > LIVES ?.. BUT WHY CALL ME? MM STILETTO! THOSE 1 CAN ae vias iN —... _ ORANGE & GRAPE Custard Powder,
me Pe) ~ CARAMELLA.. / WHY NOT CALL THE POLICE? UNDERSTAND..BUT THOSE Fj s! OE ie thy $1.03, 75e.
oe ah FIENDS DO NOT WORK y Desserts, Ete
Boa oe ‘i P oy MTHAT WAY I... Windolene ........ 25c. FRUIT JUICE 28¢ | s so
a 4 a ieiie:s. 80c.. 47e. aM at en fh hn cd Birds Cus: Powder ....
E Re Chivers Cus: Powder 52c.,
Vid Shinio ........... 36¢,

Chivers Table Jellies ..
JAMAICA i Jelly Cream ....

Extracts, ORANGE JUICE... 4d¢ | rts

Condiments, Ete. Hartleys Jelly Crystals
S..cetreex Marshmellow

Bovril .. $1.60, 90c., 60c. BOTTLES OF & Chocolate 55. =




Been. oe








ee ee ant pe ha Mel ee A Nc NM kt rot. RUT Se eae er fh Mee Mie SSE Ee ES Se oh SS OED i: gama ace'
le | HI All! A GRAND Kw | { Oxo veeeee $1.62, S5c.
| seeseese.| INS |
Cy Ill Sane ano | Marmite 97c., 60c., 32c. ¢
Ja || Feesu atey (7! |e | et sae fa oto

Wines. Li E
Ground Mix Spice 4lc. ines. 1quers, (¢.
Ginger .. 37. Gilby’s (Empire Red)

) WORE jewsna sy. eas $2.52
Celery Salt ...... soc. | BOTS. OF CLAYTON'S gree oe ee eae

Cerebos T. Salt 36e. LEMON BARLEY 9 S.A. Paarl Tawny Port 2.165 =
Paprika .......... 5%e. g =

nm ee Bols Apricot Brandy .. 4.002
Creme de Cacao 4.008





Ge
















. tore ~~ » Peach Brandy .. 4.00=
RIP_ KIRBY a BY ALEX RAYMOND Canned CLAYTON'S LEMON Simmonds Milk Stout 30
| { (7 DOES SEEM STRANGE, RIP... COME ON... YOU SAID YOU] | YES...0ES ORIiw FIVE THOUSAND COLLARS :
ee DESMOND USUALLY 1S SO ea MET DESMOND IN FRONT | | IN CASH. ORDINARILY HE CHATS WITH ME..







OF THE BANK... |
I WANT TO
HAVE A TALK

THIS TIME HE SEEMED PREOCCUPIED AND ;
| HURRIED. AWéy’,.. I’ SORRY, MR. KIRBY...
; THAT'S ALL I KNOW!

Meats, tt. | JUICE CORDIAL_93¢ | ““""™"

Ham Loaf ........ 45e.

Se ee Pickles & Sauces, Ete. 2

HH 5 | a ela JERSEY Mor: ro Onions .71 =
| MH “ie | » Gherkins......... 0
1 | TTY C. & B. Breakfas =
hf # Roll ‘9g ‘ ie . 400. T MAT Morton’s Chow Chow... 53
1 — 1 {/ / eee ees ”
| / i
Tina TY F |















Danish Cocktail C. & B, Cocktail Onions

Sausages ....... 99c. Heinz Pickled Walnuts .74

» Stem Ginger .... 1.21
SETTLER’
Kraft Cheese & R's » Salad Cream .... .46

snc" =< TOMATO JUICE

— Farnes Meat Paste 20c.






YOU TWO WANT TO EARN ¥
EXTRA CASH BY ACTING 24
YOU WON'T HAVE ppm WITH BLANK =
WORDS TO SAY. WAP aia) | CARTRIDGES.)”







BY LEE FALK & RAY M

1 DIDN'T I TELLYOU 2S
OUR CHANCE WOULL
COME? THIS IS IT?







28 ¢ » Mayonnaise ..... -
een “ NMA

NOW, IN THIS SCENE THE BAD MEN
TRY TO STEAL THE GIRL FROM THE
JUNGLE MAN. HMM, LUNEEDA FEW

_ 7 EXTRAS,




















Wn cenit PR ye



THURSDAY, JULY

20,

1950



CLASSIFIED ADS.

seiinihadin- FOR SALE







AUTOMOTIVE |
—_—_———_

CAR—Vauxhall. Velox 18 h.p. Per
fect Condition two one paint work)
trunk specially fitted for the better |
carrying of more luggage. Ring R. S








Nicholis Office 3925 Home 8324
28.6.50—t.f.n
CARS— (2 1947 Morris 10 saloons. |
Very fine condition. (1) 1947 Morris 8. |

(1) 1947 Vauxhall 10
(1) 1936 V—8 Ford
overhauled. (1)
(1) 1948 Singer
GARAGE Ltd

Perfect condition. |
Just completels
1935 Chevrolet Sedan

Sports. FORT ROYAL |
Phone 4504



20.7.50—3n





TRUCK-—(1/1948 Morris 5 ton truck
Excellent condition. FORT ROYAL
GARAGE LTD. Phone 4504

20.7.50—3n

VAN—New (1) ton Morris Van. Im-
mediate delivery. FORT ROYAL GAR-
AGE LTD. Telephone 4504

20.7,.50—-3n



BENDIX WASHERS6—Another § ship-
ment just received Book your order}
without delay. Dial 3878. DaCosta &
Co. Ltd., Electrical Department

15.7.50—6n





—
CEILING FANS—110 Volts, 5” Blades
with Speed Controller Dial 3878. Da.
Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical Depart-
ment 15.7.50—6n |



—$—$<—<—<— —$——$___—__—_ ————— — |

ELECTRIC FITTINGS — A large selec-
tion for you to choose from at reasonable
prices. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.,
Electrical Department.



15.7.50.—6n.

—_
ELECTRIC WASHERS — “Mayfair”
with Spindrier Can do your weekly
washing within 2 hours They solve
your washing problems and clothes dasty
|

PUBLIC SALES





AUCTION

AUCTION SALE
This serves to notify the general pub-
lic that the sale of the house calied
MAYARO”, at Rockley, Christ Church,
which was set up for sale on the 13th
July, was postponed and will now take
place next Thursday the 20th, at 2
o'clock
This house is in very good condition,
with pine floors and a shingled roof. It
has open verandah 7 by 22, drawing room



OF MAYARO

} 12 by 23, dining room 12 by 23, two (2)

bedrooms each 11 by 19, both with basins,
back verandah 7 by 19, toilet with box

and bowl. The only thing to lose in
removing this house is the lath and
pilaster. Terms cash. It is your interest

to inspect house before the date of sale.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,

Auctioneer.

.7.50.—4



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

BY recommendations of Lioyds Agents
we will sell on FRIDAY 2ist at Ss. P.
MUSSON SON & Co, Ltd Warehouse,
Pierhead, 20 BAGS PLASTER PARRIS

Sale 12.30 O'clock. Terms Cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers



20.7. 50—2n.



MARISTOW At Maxwell's
overlooking the Sea, having 4 bed-
rooms, delightful Balconi ete, with
all modern conveniences Private
Beach, safe bathing, for quick sale
£3,500. or fully furnished £4,000
Possession within one month
viewing Phone 4683 or 8402

20.7.50—4n

“SANDGATE”, ings, standi on
2.940 square feet of land on the ens
of Hastings Road.

Coast







longer. Quite a number in use all giv- The House contains, drawin, in-
ing satisfactory results. May oo pat ing room, enclosed ee er ee
Cash or on Terms. JOHN F. HUTSON |! sides, two bedrooi

Ltd. Shepherd St 20.7. 50—2n ee eek hein cae



ELECTRIC STOVES—With Hotpiates
on top and full size Oven and Warm-
ing Drawer Ideal for the new Home;


























builder. May be had Cash or on terms
JOHN F. HUTSON Ltd, Shepherd St

20.7.50—2n
—_—

—_——————
REFRIGERATOR-—Canadian Leonard




2 years old 7 Cubic Ft. Guarantee 5
years, Transferable, in new ¢ idition
Lady leaving island Cook, “Dunoon”
St. Lawrence Gap Telephone 8493

20.7.50-—2n



REFRIGERATOR — English Electric-
cal, 6.4c ft Purchased July 1949,
used up to May 14950, five years guaran~-









tee, transferable to purchaser Apply
W. M. Goodman, Phone 2042.
18,7,.50—3n
LIVESTOCK
GOAT—Pure bred Alpine (British)
with young kid, Martin Griffith, Four
Winds, St. Peter
20.7.50—2n
HORSE —! One Stud Horse Apply
Evans Morris at Curiosity Village, St.
James. 18.7.50—3n.
MECHANICAL
TYPEWRITER — One Underwood long
carriage 18 inches Typewriter in good
condition. Dial 3920 or 4455
20.7.50—I1n.



TREADLE SINGER MACHINE



and



Motor attached. Phone 3159.
19.7.50.—3n.
MISCEL) ANEOUS
—<—$—<——$
AMERICAN KEROSENE OIL STOVE
—18 months old Cabinet style with
Draft proof front and Cupboard, in
good condition Cook, “Dunoon” St





Lawrence Gap Telephone 8493
20.7 .50--2r
CHANDELIER—One four branch
Chandelier, cut glass prisms Dial
3950. 18.7.50—2n

—————— peach
CALYPSO RECORDS, forty eight
titles, only ten each, come and get
them.
A. BARNES & CO. LTD
15.7.50—T.F.N

—————$—$ $—
DWARF COCONUT PLANTS—Apply

Hill's Dairy, Fontabelle. Dial 3728
18.7. 50—Sn.

DUCKHAM’S ADCOIDS—Save petrol,
reduce engine wear and promote per-
formance especially when inferior petrol
has to be used. Of great assistance when
running-in new or rebored engines.
Simple and inexpensive to use. Obtain-
able from all leading Garages and Ser-
vice Stations. H. Jason Jones & Co. Lid
Agents & Distributors. 16.7.50—6n.

——_————————————

GALVANIZE Pipes 1%, and 2 inches
also Galvanize flexible conduit in sizes
linch and 1% inches. Enquire Auto
Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone
2696. 8.7,50—t.f.n.



LOLLYPOPS for the
several Delicious Flavours !Ask for:
“BEATALL LOLLIES” at all the lead-
ing Drug Stores Made by the famous
“Trebor” Confectioners. 19,7 .50—3n

children, in





wishes to
Child's
Law-

LADY LEAVING ISLAND
sell Triang perambulator, Toys,
Cook, “Dunoon” St

Tricycle
rence Gap Telephone 8493

O.K COFFEE!—Fresh shipment of
this much preferred Packaged Coffee
has arrived and may now be had from
your Grocer. 20.7.50—2n

TYRES—HENLEY Bus and Truck
Tyres 32 x 6 which render the 34 x 7
unnecessary We have had these
operating here with extra heavy work
since 1947 without a single complaint
being made. Drop in and see them
The price is as attractive as the quali-
ty of the tyre, JOHN F. HUTSON Lid
Shepherd St 20.7.50—2n





PERSONAL





The public are hereby warred
against giving credit to my wife, Ruth
Chapman, ‘nee Bruster) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me
Signed CONRAD CHAPMAN,
Martindales Road,
St. Michael
19.7.50—2n

|

——_.

WANTED





HELP

cookK—Must
ferences. Apply to Fernihurst,
Road, Black Rock, between 5
p.m, Friday to Sunday



have
















satisfactory re-
Deacons
and 6

| rooms, kitchenette, toilet and bath up-
lownstairs and

two flights of. steps,

wo ts of st .

Electric and W: me ams eye
Inspection day b

Phone: No. 2868. > oe ener,
The above will be set up for sale to

public competition at our office on Friday

the 2lst day of July 1950 at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street. |

11-7.50—10n |

wabntaes!

NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH

Sealed tenders, (marked on the outside
of the envelope ‘Tender for Loan"),
will be received at my Office up to 3.00
p.m. on Monday 24th July, 1950 for a
loan of £1,500 at a rate of interest not
exceeding 4% to be repaid in annual
instalments of £150 each, The first
oh instalment to be paid in the year
1955.



i ae









WOOD GODDARD,
Clerk to the Commissioners
of Highways,
Christ Church.
13.7.50—6n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Inez Allman of
Branchbury, St. Joseph for the pur-
chase of Liquor License No. 961 of
1950 granted in respect of a board and
galvanize shop at Branchbury, St

Joseph to remove such license to a
board and galvanize shop at Parris
Hill, St. Joseph
Dated this 18th day of July, 1950.
To J. R. Edwards,
the Police Magistrate, Dist. “F”
Signed INEZ ALLMAN,
Applicant
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Police Court, District “F", on
Friday the 28th day of July, 1950 at
11 o'clock, a.m
Police Magistrate, Dist. :



J. R. EDWARD:

NOTICE’ = ~-

Re Estate of
ALICE FEDORA HAREWOOD
(Deceased .)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claims
against the Estate of Alice Fedora Hare~-
wood, deceased, late of Richmond Gap,
in the Parish of St. Michael in this
Island, who died in this Island on the
18th day of January, 1950, are requested
to send in particulars of their claims
duly attested to the undersigned Johns
W. B. Maynard c/o Yearwood & Boyce,
Solicitors, James St., on or before the
15th day of September, 1950, after which
date I shall proceed to distribute the
assets of the deceased among the parties
entitled thereto, having regard only to
such claims of which I shall then have
had notice and I will not be liable for
the assets or any part thereof so gis-
tributed to any person of whose debt
or claim I shall then have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay.

Deted this fth dav _of Julv, 1950
JOHN WALTER BATSON MAYNARD,
Qualified executor of the Estate of

Fedora Harewood, deceased.





6.7.50.—4n.
NOTICE
Re Estate of
FITZ HERBERT REID,
decd.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim upon

or affecting the estate of Fitz Herbert
Reid late of the Garden
on the 17th day of May, 1949,
of their ckaims, duly attested, to
undersigned c/o
James Street, Bridgetown,

after which date we shall

and that we shall not be liable

assets so

tion.

estate are requested to settle

eccounts without delay.

Dated this 15th day of June, 1950.
HAROLD ATHELSTAN
ELIEN LOLITA BLACKMAN,
ALFRED TAYLOR REID,

Qualified Executors,
Est. FitzHerbert Reid, decd
17 6.50—4n



Resisting

Temptation
CHICAGO.

weekend anywhere except

his wife.

SIS spend it with another woman.
SALES GIRL — Required with a
knowledge of spanish if possible
State salary. Apply Post Office Box
No. 241, Bridgetown. T HE

18.7.50—6n 7

16 THAT Your New

rane We TO @O WITH THE HAT
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED
TO RENT:—Bungalow with two or

three bedrooms, furnished or
nished, Hastings or Worthing P.O. Box
278, Bridgetown. 19.7.50.—2n



£20 MONTHL

EASILY earned at home in
dealing in stamp: No
necessar,

experience
Suitable er

ex









also contact you h §
Colonies and Dominions fo
respondents Enclose 2% $s
Mail only take fews day

ton, Prospect House, 329 Wigar
Leigh Lancs , England

20.7.50.—30n

unfur-



spare tims

Road, |



SEEMS bed
GiLLvy TO Me)
Tee way You &
WOMEN O0RESS UP
TO GO PACING Ff

UMAN ASKS FOR

in the parish
of Saint James who died in this Island
are
hereby required to send in particulars
the
D. Lee Sarjeant of
Solicitor, on
or before the 20th day of August, 1950,
proceed to
distribute the assets of the said estate
among the parties entitled thereto hav-
ing regard to the debts and claims only
of which we shall then have had notice,
for
distributed to any person of
whose debt or claim we shall not have
had notice at the time of such distribu-

AND all persons indebteu to the said
their

TUDOR,

—|the strength of certain other free) the agricultural setllements who

A court order forbids a Chicago
bus driver to spend his Whitsun
with
Mrs. Gerda Westenber-
ger told the Judge that the long
holiday might be too much of a
“temptation” for her husband to

oress

‘BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HARBOUR LOG:

In Touch With Barbados |
Coastal Station |



| $10,000, 000,000

@ From Page 3.

{| “With peace re-established even
the most complex political ques-
tions are susceptible to solution,
In the present brutal and unpro-
voked aggression, however, these
questions may have to be held in

“Steps which we must take to
support the United Nations action .
in Korea and to increase Our own ine aatieartian Rigs through their
strength and common defence Of|dos Coast Station
the free world will necessarily
have repercussions upon our
domestic economy. 7

West
comr

Ltd.
unicate with
Barba

Indies)

Cable and Wireless
they

SS. Papendrecht, SS. Yamhill, SS
ondon Statesman, S.S. Bisham Hill, 5.S
astantis. S.S. Opequon, 8,8. Dolores






| abeyance in interest oi the es-',,, Bs Reenter g ? ecad Rea ea seem 5g rae 38
sential security of all page abesig! BBO. er Francesco Morisini.. S.S. Historia

in military terms alone. Our power | Kollskess, S.5. Maria De Larrinaga, S.s
to join in the common defence of } Cottica, S.S. Panamante, S.S, Buccaneer

aie S.S. Kyma, S.S. African Pilot, 5.5
peage rests fundamentally OM} Ar onec, SS. Elizabeth, M.V. Prospector,

the productive capacity and eM-]3's. Alcoa Pennant, 8.8. Alcoa Cavalier
c ergies of our people. In all that]$.s. Mar Cantabrico, S.S. S. Rosa, S.S
of free nations in other parts of| we do therefore, we must make | Kratos, S.S. Hora, 5S. Elizabeth A
the world. The attack on the;sure that the economic strength Flanigan. S.S. Argentina, 8.5. Esito, SS

Borgesund, S.S Ambrigo Vespucci
Republic of Korea gives addedj| which is at the base of our secur-

; > } o . S.S. Atlantian, S.S. Lady Rodney, S.S
urgescy to the efforts of free | ity, is not impaired, but continues | Spurt, $.S. P. and T. Trader
nations to increase and to unify |‘ ;

grow WEL 1
their common strength in order to} SEA

With this enormous economic

deter any potential aggressor. ctrength new and necessary Pro"

“To be able to accomplish es! ae Tam rt re ARRIVALS BE BoP t-A-t-
objective, the free nations must | S22? ahaa ais Sane From Trinidad:
inhintain -auticlent defeliive milla |}°oo ke ee hea md. | pMtiss Maureen Johnson, | Miss Violet
tery strength i “~/emy to bear the strains involv Johnson. Mr. E. Bynoe, Miss V. Bazzey,
ax ia oes a ns —_ - Nevertheless, the magnitude of] Mrs. R. Vincent, Malcolm Barcant, Wil-
Vv ortant solid basis ¢
economic strength capable of rapid

demands fcr military purposes{ liam Butland, Evelyn Butland, Bsther
mobilisation in event of emergency,

Laifook, Patrick Wallbridge, Marcos
that are now foreseeable in econ- Shaden, Sylvia Barrow, Andrew Durate,

“Strong co-operative efforts thet
have been made by the United

omy which is already operatingy Vida Marshall
States and other free nations since

“The outbreak of aggression in
the Far East does not of course
lessen, but instead, increases the
importénce of the common strength







at very high level will requir?’ ie ee '
cubstantial redirection of economic |<,’ mAs a maak te

resources.

K.CMG.,,
Nolan

Reginald

the end of the World War II to re-| Under the programme for in- DEPARTURES BY B.W.LAL.
store economic unity to Europe} creasing military strength which

and@ other parts of the wofld and|1 have outlined above, military] Fer Trinidad:



. = Mr Millicent Clarke, Mr. James
co-operative efforts we have begun and related ns will nate wWiekiem, Mr John Hunte, Miss Lorna
ii order nerease ‘ive{to be expanded at a more api) Brathwaite, Mr Joseph Brown, Mr
oa Cig e ae Parabens rate than the total production can} George McCullough, Miss Ernesto Baiz,
capacity of undeveloped areas are i Caen Mr. Clifford Gittens
extremely important ¢ io ve - = 4 For St. Vincent:
to asi i Sent eontens ser Some materials were in short Mr. Cyrit amin, Mrs. Camillus Mulder

s iB DOCORIAG. aIFEN@ER Or supply even before the Korean| Cmdr, Roy Frith, Mr. Edward Elliott

« s' jal] Mr. Arthur Farmer
Substantis For San Juan:

Mr. Wilton Gates, Miss Barbara Cronk,

all tree nations, and will be of! citation developed
even greater importance in the | Cyeed-up of military procurement

future. win intensify these shortages.| Mr, “Jemerson Archer, Miss Winifred

“We have been increasing our; Action must be taken to ensure] Parris, Mr. Owen Dougias, Mrs. Hildred
common defensive strength unaer|that these shortages do not in- rae oa a a Bar. WAHAB
the Treaty of Rio de Janeiro and|terfere with or delay materials] For Dominica:

and supplies needed for national] Mr. G. Roddam, Miss Vivian Hollaway

the North Atlantic Treaty which
defence —-Reuter. Mr. Gordon Crawford

are collective security arrange-
ment within the tramework of the









PAGE SEVEN

ee LD LLL LLL LLL LLL LLL LLL

BARBADOS GENERAL HOSPITAL
LAUNDERING OF NURSES’ UNIFORMS
SEALED TENDERS

o'clock noon on T








ORIENTAL

SE HABLA ESPANOL
CURIOS, IVORY, TEAK, SANDAL
JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP
ESTRIES, GLOVES, PERFUMES

KASMVWERE

Hospital up to
for the laundering of Nurses’
Jniforms for a period of 8 1950

Tender forms will t l the Secretary,
General Hospital, and tenders will not be entertained unless they are
on forms supplied by the Hospital

Persons tendering must submit, at the time of tendering, letters
from two persons known to possess property, eXpressing their will-
ingness to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of the contract

Further particulars may be obtained from the Secretary

W. GOODMAN,

Secretary

receive at the
, 1950

from |st





sday, <







August,
on application to
















ARRIVED)

_ (
NEW WORLD GAS COOKERS



A have been booked
CALL st Gas 5
19.7.50—8n st

SHIPPING NOTICES

SEE them before the








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\dciaide May 19th. Melbourne June

will

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uly/August. Brisbane early August
Melbourne mid July. N. Queensland
Sydney mid August arriving Trinidad
aeut 9th September,

These vessels have ample space for
billed, hard frozen and genera) cargo
Cargo accepted on through bills of
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ritish Guiana, Barbados, Wineé-yvers
eeward Islands,



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26th July lth Aug







BOOKS













United Nations charter. We have ONSCRIP1 Ss NEW YORK SSRVICK |
= ae action to bolsier mili- ISRAEL C vy. 5B |
ary defenses of individual tree ‘ “ - 4 Ju
corwcsts| BOYS AND GIRLS = | 38 cs ee A_FINE
and Iran. | T “Defences of the North Atlantic | CANADIAN SERVICE SELECTION

reaty area were considered a mat- > BURG | SOUTHBOUND |
ter of gseat urgency by the ‘North By RAE. — TEL AVIV, Nawis ‘of MAL soenne Sails Arrives =.”
Atlantic Council jn London this r cig h of 18-year old conscripts to Israel’s | 3.8. “ALCOA PILGRIM" June 26th June Soth Say tite : |
spring. Recent events make it The first batch o y " ’ ~y training | #5: “ALCOA PENNANT” July 7th July 10th July sand ADVOCA |
even more: urgent than it was at} army are to be called up shortly for a military we PERS +B, (ALCS Dotan” ppg 4 July 24th Aut 5th }
that time to build and maintain programme which is probably unique m the world. ee , ere si ara A
these defences. For not only- are all 18-yeamy settling Gown im their MEOW COUN | F

“Under all citcumstances it is|olds called up, regardless of sex.]@&y- NORTHBOUND
apparent that the United States is| They also are called upon to serve Married women are not being a
required to increase its military| part of their two-year term as called up for training in the peace-| 5.5 «aLcoa POLARIS" July 4th For Montreal

time army.

Plans also are being prepared
for the reserve training of men of
the 30 to 49 class who were exemp|
during the war.

Ultimately, therefore every man
and woman in Israel will under-
go military training and will be
enrolled in the reserves.

All men and women discharged
from the army after their two-

workers. in settlements

strength and preparedness not only | farm
along Israel’s bgrders.

to deal with aggression in Korea, | strung

but also to increase our common The programme of the “Nahal”
defence with other free nations| (Fighting Pioneer Youth), as the
against further aggression. army conseript organization 1s
“The increased strength which is called, is based upon thengradi-
needed falls into three categories. tions of the underground Haganah
“In the first place to meet the situ- and Palmach of the Mandate days.
ation in Korea we shall need to|A* that time, the defense of the

se) ; lms a i" Jewish sector of the Country was
send additional men, equipment organised by the Jewish Agency

and supplies to General MacAr-], tobe artnti year conscription service will be
thur’s command as rapidly as pos- mee ae ne So ein required to report for a month's
sible. the Haganah’s elite striking refresher course each year (on

“In the second place the world| force, established during the army pay) and also will have to
situation requires that we increas€| Second World War, drew its report for a day's duty each month

Former officers and N.C.O.s will
serve an additional ween a year.

Israel is a small country and her
main towns and cities are no great
distance from her borders: One
of her main means of defence,
therefore, will be speedy mobili-
zation of the army reserve while
the regular army and_ border
settlements hold off attacks,

The High Commanda’s plans call
for full mobilization within a few
hours.—INS.

substantially the size and material] strength from the collective set-
support of four armed forces over] (lements which had borne the
and above the increases which are] main brunt of the Arab attacks)
needed in Korea. during the disturbances of 1921
“In the third place we must] 1929 and 1936.
assist the free nations associated After lengthy debates in the
with us in cammon defence, to} Knesset (Parliament), it was de-
augment their military strength. cided to kill two birds with one
Of the three categories I have|stone—to carry on the Palmach
just enumerated, the first two in- tradition, and to forge a link be-
volve increases in our own military | tween. Israel’s youngsters and the
‘manpower and in material support | and, in the hope that they would
that our men must have. later Yoresake the town for the
“To meet the increased require- country and become farmers.

ments ‘or military manpower, I The 1932 class is now to be
have authorised the Secretary of called to basic training depots for



Archer vs

military training identical with

Defence to exceed the budgeted} that given remit army recruits
strength of military personnel for] tis“ will be supplemented by G l _
Army, Navy, and Air Force and|iectures on general topics and O er
tc use the selective system to such|oamp-fire talks, so that the
extent as may be required in|“Nahal” will serve as a sort of LONDON
order to obtain the increased “university” for youngsters of; Golfers on a south-west England
strength which we must have. yaried backgrounds. After their) links rubbed their eyes and swore

“Increases in the size of our initial training the boys and girls cf the 19th forever when they
armed forces and additional sup-|Wwill be divided into groups of) sim M Hie OE Se ee See

plies and equipment which will be|50 to 60 (two-thirds of each arrows instead of the orthodox

needed will require additional ap- | sroup will be boys) and sent to
propriations. Within the next few | special camps near villages where
days I will transmit to Congress their agricultural training will be
specific requests for appropriations | carried out.

in the amount of approximately They will still be under military
$10,000 million dollars discipline, and will need leave or

pill. |
A check-up revealed the 4



was no apparition but a partici-
pant in am unusual Archer versus
Golfer game to match respective
skills.




























“These requests for appropria- ee ae Despite the fact that English-
tions will be eadrusied. 6 the rgd rote Y ¥ yoty town,| men were once weaned on the
needs of our own military forces. Just oe though they were still in| jong-bow, the golfer Norman
Earlier 1 referred to the fact that |®™ S7my camp. Lewis won with three up and

Each month, all “Nahal” agri-| two to go having holed the course
in 77.

The archer, David Davidson,
ucing a steel bow with a 54-pound
pull, handicapped himself to the
extent of a penalty, stroke for
each time he got in the rough or
bunkered. The envy of most
enlookers, he avoided all bunkers,
“roughed” twice only and com-
pleted the course in 81.

Davidson's longest shot was 230

we must also assist other free na- .
tions in the strengthening of our cultural trainees will be recall-
common defences. The action we|@@ to military depots for five
must take to accomplish this is days’ army.training.
just as important as the measures Atter a year of this military-
required to strengthen our own cum-agricultural work, the con-
forces. scripts will be given the choice
The authorisation Bill for the|of becoming farmers and settling
mutual defence and assistance|in a border settlement, of — 14
programme for 1951 now before] ihey wish later to return to the
the House of Representatives is an|towns—of completing their two-
important and immediate step to-; year military training in normal



wards the strengthening of our) army units vee On oe soeaees ne nee
collective security. It should be ss p x .y| Within six inches of the hole—
enacted without delay. If they choose the former they which by prior agreement was

will immediately become civilian

regarded as the
farmers.

having holed out. -
The archer played three holes
in “Bq@gey” and at all five short
heles reached the green in one
IN

“But it is now clear that the equivalent -of
free nations of the world must : ; . ;
step up their own security pro- During the year’s agricultural
gramme. Other nations associated truining, the Israel Ministry of
with us in the mutual defence; Defence will be repaid by the
and assistance programme like settlements for all work carried
ourselves will need to divert addi-|out by the conscripts on the vil-







tional economic resources to de-| lage basis. The settlements will F x
fence purposes. In order to en- thus receive security reinforce- loating Corps »
able the nations associated with|ments and extra farm handg at 7

@ From page 1
was used as a decoy by one of the
defendants Durant to get him
down Point Cumana,

Dr. John Me Dougall who per-
formed the post mortem stated
that when the body was found
the skin was already peeled and
the body was blue with gasses

us to make their maximum con-|one ard the same time.
tribution to our common defence, The officer cadres for the first
further assistance on our part will| batch of conscripts, who have just
be required. Additional assistance’| completed their training, were
may also be needed to increase; chosen from among members of

nations whose security is vital to| ore deferred from military ser-

wn. '
mo eae vice uuring the war.

In aadition to tne 18-year olds
tic area, these requirements will ; now being teken into the army for
reflect consultations now going on | two-year periods, the government
with other nations associated with! is inducting all men and women
us in the North Atlantic treaty. As| between the ages of 20 and 30 who
soos as it is possible to determine | were exempted from service dur-
what each nation will need to do,| ing the war for any reason other
I shall lay before Congress a re- than medical.

quest for such funds as are shown New immigrants between these
to be necessary to the attainment) ages are given a year’s grace after
and maintenance of our common] arrival in Israel before being call-
strength at an adequate level. ed up to give them a chance o

“In c.c case of the North Atlan-



ed that he was unable to get a
fingerprint because the skin on the
hands peeled off like gloves anid
he was only able to identify by



and comparing with police finger-
print records.
The hearing is continuing.
—(Can, Press)





Quite A FING

mM
: — VEN

in ANASGCOT SUT
1 90 GAÂ¥ $0
MYSELE

ANDO THS iS YouR
? Sut. VE AiR

iT FROM YOUR TAILOR
ANO HE SAID IT'LL FIT
YOU PERFECTLY

NOW, GFORGE .
HAVE NO MORE NONSENSE

GEORGE. M
Sweet -
won't

MAN ON THE

which caused decomposition, The
police fingerprint expert explain-

cutting off the skin from the hand










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PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS





ADVOCATE



West Indies Must Win Third Test Mateh French Racer

Today

’s Game Crucial

One Of Present Series

(By E. L.

COZIER)
NOTTINGHAM, July 19

THIS THIRD TEST MATCH between England and th

West Indies is, in my opinion, the really crucial

the present

repeat to win-—a draw will
In this view I confess to some
surprise at finding myself a trifle
lonely. Several critics appear to
feel that the best policy would be
to play for a draw then try
to win at thes Oval

One sports writer, a former
England player, goes so far as to
suggest that both teams play “as
safe at Nottinghagp as their differ-
ing natures all with every in-



and



tention of making the Ovai
(where the wicket is invariably
responsive to spin) the scene of
the decider I could not disagrer
more, and 1 fervently hope tha
Goddard has not read this column
or if he has, remains uninfluehced

by the suggestion
Play to Win
30th sides must play to win
This seems as plain as a pikestafi
As far as England is concerned,
the defeat at Lord’s was too hu
miliating to be redeemed by u

mere draw now, and besides she
needs victory to gain more confi-
dence in her quest for the ashes
which begins in the far too im
minent future

The West Indies need victor:
just as much The Imperial
Cricket Conference is evidently
unimpressed by our recent per-
formances. We shall have to drive

home our claims for greater con-
sideration in world cricket pro-
grammes at Nottingham and the
Oval. Who khows that two de-
cisive wins now may not produce
a bilateral arrangement for an

Australian-West Indian series in
1953? And that is whr+ we really
want.

Again, if England is allowed to
achieve a draw at Trent Bridge,
her determination not to lose at the
Oval will be doubled and I have
a very healthy respect for the
defensive fiehting qualities of the
English. Let us win this match
and England will be forced on the
attack in the final.

One Problem

As fa s today’s team is con-
cerned, Goddara has only one
problem to soive: What to do
about Roy Marshail’? Clearly
neither Stolimeyer nor Rae ean
be sacrificed, and equally ciearly
Roy deserves a piace. One news-
paper columnist called his Leices-
tershire innings “the best opening
display | have witnessed in a long
career,” and his average at the
moment is over 60. Christiani, too,
underlined his worth to the team
at Chesterfield and there can be
no suggestion of his omission
What then is the solution?

For my part I would drop
Jones. This is a very grave de-
cision to take on a notoriously
fast and perfect pitch, and it is
a course I would never advo-
cate had our fast bowling been
in any kind of form. This, in
fact, is the test for the pace men
but they have failed. Jones has
looked a good, lively, stock

but certainly not devas-
tating. Johnson's ability to give
of his best is gravely in doubt
although his two great qualities
of real speed and a sharp-shoot-
er’s accuracy are just what we
want.

Pierre, until his success at Liv-
erpool, had taken a_ negligible
number of wickets for an impos-
ing number of runs. With the
Lord’s team, except Marshall for
Jones, Goddard could use Worrell
and Gomez with the new ball,
Valentine and Ramadhin for the
spin, and himself and Marshall as
rellef workers. Six bowlers are
ample these days of 65 overs to
the ball I should hove

One alternative to this was sug-
gested to me over the week-end
by a commentator (West Indian)
It is a suggestion with which I
entirely disagree: that Goddard
should drop himself. True, he
has been in no particular form
with the bat but his medium
paced bowling will undoubtedly
be most useful to his side. His
spirit is infectious and he_ has
every man on this team solidly
behind him.

No other member of the six~
teen could do as good a job as
Goddard is doing, and this state-
ment is no reflection on any of
them.





England’s Team
England’s team you know
Yardley is again Captain much to

the disappointment of the jour-
nalists, who almost unanimously
were advocating the captain for
the Australian tour, for this
match. Yardley as you know has
declined that honour, and the
writing men felt that the new

leader should be given charge of
these two Tests to season him for
the Antipodean tour. The riters





Do THEY EVER LOoK
OUT THE WINDOW ¢NO!
THEY ALWAYS ASK THE
WALL TROLLEY MAN

WHO'S BEEN SEALED |
UP INSIDE ALL DAys. |







ame olf

series, and John Goddard and his men must
leave the Trent Bridge pavilion determined to
not be enough

win I

Test Pitch!
Damaged

NOTTINGHAM, July 19



Reuter’s Correspondent writing
from Nottingham says the pitch
for the Third Test match between
England and the West Indies,
commencing at Trent Bridge here
tomorrow, damaged on top
follawing vecent rain and the
weather remains unsettled. The
Test pitch which has not been
played on since the First ast



against the Australians two yea

ago may help bowlers at the
start. A special police guard will
patrol the playing area during
the night

The West Ind‘es players arrived
at Nottingham today and soon
visited the ground. The England
party were expected to arrive
later this evening

John Goddard the West Indie
Captain will not decide upon his
team until hortly before the
match. “I have sixteen players
all of them fit from whom to
choose the side” he said, “Every
thing will depend upon the

weather”
Our Own Correspondent cable
threatening

to say that rain

the city where the Third Test is
due to start tomorrow. Unless it
comes, there promises to be one

of the greatest run-getting orgie
in first class cricket, and I for
one would not like to predict a
definite result being obtained

In the words of the Notts
groundsman, Fred Kershaw, “the
wicket should be a_ batsman’s
paradise from the first hour”

With all members of the team
fit for nearly the first time on
the tour, the West Indies selec-
tors deliberated some time before
deciding whom to leave out

Obviously they did not want to
change the winning side and Mr
Jack Kidney (Manager)—jokingly
said to me that Yardley might be
asked if he would object to both
sides batting 16 and fielding 11

John Goddard who slipped on
the stone steps outside his hotel
this afternoon and fell heavily
on his back told me he would be
quite fit tomorrow.

The problem—of who must be
left out appears slightly easier for
England selectors

Harold Gimplett,
chosen 13, arrived at
tonight with his neck
bandaged—the result of a
boil.

He had great difficulty in turn-
ing his head and seemed hardly
likely to be fit for the match

Deen nee a

however were far from unanimous
as to who that leader should be.
The eight papers I botjght on
Sunday each advocated a differ-
ent candidate. The “Sunday Dis-
patch” headlined their comment:
“Let Washbrook skipper England
at Trent Bridge.”

Jack Hobbs in the “Sunday Ex-
press” warned: “Don't risk a pro-
fessional captain” and entered a
claim for F. R. Brown, “Not too
old at thirty-nire.”

Fred Root, another former Test
player was most emphatic: “One
man stands out alone for the
captaincy in my opinion, M. Dol-

one of the
his hotel

heavily
bad

lery.” The “Sunday Post” wanted
Hutton
Denis Compton writing in the

“Sunday Empire News” felt that
Edrich should be the man; Alan
Fairfax in “The People” chose
Doug Insole of Essex, because he
is a born fighter and has the price-
less asset of nursing enthusiasm
into his team. The “News Chron-
icle’ ran a pool on the captaincy
and according to them Wilfred
Wooler of Glamorgan is the pop-
ular choice.
No wonder
haven't been
decision.
Much The Same
As far as I can the new
team is much of a muchness with
the Lord’s eleven if you think ot
it as Shackleton for Bailey, Hol-
lies for Wardle, Simpson for Dog-
gert, Insole for Kenyon = and
Gimblett for Edrich. The selec-
tors clearly feel that two left-
handers would lie heavily on
Yardley's hands on the perfect
Trent Bridge wicketw as indeed
they did at Lord’s. T would not
even be surprised {f Berry re-
mained in the pavilion but that
would depend on the weather,
—Reuter.

selectors
reach

the poor
able to



see,

Registered Uk Seen) OMe



ORNING "WHAT \-=

KING OF WEATHER
fe ARE WE HAVING OU
.



‘THE OPPOS



NG SKIPPERS



N. YARDLEY J. GODDARD



W.1. Marksmen Put Up
Good Scores At Bisley

LT -COL. J. CONNELL, Major J. E. Griffith, Capt.
C. R. E. Warner, and Lt. J. Cave, have done best of the
Barbados marksmen on the West Indies team now shooting

at Bisley

First Trent
Bridge Test
Opens To-day

Today the West Indies will be
playing their first Test match
ever at Trent Bridge, and if the
pitch lives up to its reputation of
being “full of runs,” there sbould
be a lot of tall scores before the
won and lost.

Regarding the performances a!
Bisley, His Excellency the Goy
ernor, Mr. A. W. L "Bavese. re
ceived the following cable from
the Secretary of State :

“West Indies Rifle team Rut
up good scores at Bisley on July
15th and general standard of
shooting reported to have been
good. Despite rain and bad
visibility at 600 yards in Alex-
andra Competition eight scores
of 45 recorded, apart from those
whose names appeared in prize
list
Following got into prize list—

The Donnegal (200 yards highest
pessible score 50).

game is
The ‘ists had ¢ ‘e than CC. Crooks (Trinidad) , 48
ee Seasiate ti a ret pitt | Major F.T.'Maniey in

respectable knock on ree D. B. St. Aubyn (Br. Guiana) 48

turf when they scored 525 for ¢

wickets against Nottinghamshire, ate bial ees,

and won the game by an innings C. Basrow. (Prinided) ... a“
But it will not be on the identi- E. Riehardson (Trinidad) ‘ a

cal strip of turf on which they Sy Col a Connell (Barbados) 47

ih cara ; Sngland Major J. B. Griffith (Barbados) 47

will engage the might of England 11") “cave “Barbedos) i

today. This wicket, says yester- COUNIED OUT

day’s reports has not been played Major J. Reid (Trinidad) 7

on since 1948, when the Aussies G. K. Ridley (Br. Guiana) 41
Capt. C. R. E. Warner (Barbados) 47

played there.

John, and his boys, however,
ld or new wicket, will be bent on
winning if they can.

THE CONAN DOYLE
(0 Vards — H.P.S. 50)
Major F. L. Patterson (Jamaica) 46
Major F. T. Manley (Br. Guiana) 46
THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

Since the W. I. played their (300 Yards — HLP.S

e ; ye ‘ — HLP.S. 50)
first Test in England in 1928, Dr. EF. Richardson 49
all their games with England, § Prooks pci 48
co ee i. camsden, (Trinidad) 48
have taken place on three yyiioe FP. T. Manley 48

grounds, Manchester, the Oval.
and Lord’s. Today they break
in more than one

Capt. C. R. E. Warner +i
THE ALEXANDRA
(00 Yards — H.P.S, 50)

new ground 2. Divas: I Guan i
‘espec : : is 4 ’ ulana)

respect, for not only is it thir W. op. Sangster, Jamaicn) :

initial Test struggle at Trent capt. C. R. E. Warner 47

Bridge, but they enter the fray ¥, Crooks “6
i st victory behind them + Cave 46

with a Test victory b ' G. BE. Waddington (Jamaica) 46

I chatted on Monday with a
couple of lads who were fortunate (Ageresate of the Donnegal and
enough to see two days of play Conan Doyle)
ef the second Test at Lord’s, It (Mor Ft. Manly o
was an inspiring sight to watch = "1

y THE SATURDAY AGGREGATE
our boys going abcut the business (Aggregate of All Events on July 15)

THE CLEMENTI-5SM



ef winning that game, said one ere, ¥ Manley (Br. Guiana) 48
man, He assured me, that the Gin ee eee ae
West Indies players, are quietly §E. Crooks 186
confident and without much show (4th in M. Class:
are looking forward to the Test au Barrow . 183
which begins today. Wetec eee AEE in prize Let
These lads, by the way were G. K. Ridley 181
seamen off the Harrison Liner ey anEeaet . 180
ATLANTIAN, which was in Eng- 5°" Soe 4B Warne 180

St. Aubyn 181
_E. Richardson 179

British Guiana and Trinidad
cach scored 816 in a match for the
Anchor Cup. Jamaica was third
— 813 and Barbados fourth with
188

The team

land at the time, and arrived here br. E
on Saturday,

So to today’s game, The strwug-
gale will be keen — by its very
nature it is bound to be, but *
hope to have our fair share of

luck and good fortune, very often are due to shoot in

essentials for victory which we the KOLAPORE CUP on July 22
hope will be ours egainst Rhodesia, Canada and
—B. M. Channel Islands”



Maple Welcome Harvards

i ANTIGUA,
THREE HUNDRED attended a cocktail party in hon-

our of the Harvard Sporss Club of Trinidad at igua’s
Maple Sports Ground on Saturday. reer

Among those present were the Nobrig: c
: ga and Ernest 2} Ss ¥
Acting Governor and Mrs. Mac- La Salle W. oe mate
ele the A.D.C. Major Denis The Maple Sports C‘up are
ae Mr. Hugh Burrowes, Ad- entirely responsible for thei:
re rator of St. Kitts, Mr. visit to Antigua and have ar-
larlesworth Ross, Acting Ad- ranged a_ series of football
ministrator of Antigua and Mrs. matches. The Maples celebrat
Ross, Mr. Basset, Acting Commis- ft cca

their fifth anniversary in August

sioner of Montserrat, and Mr and they feel that the visit. of

Cruickshank, Commissioner of the

Virgin Islands. the Harvard team is a grand
vane nineteen members of the pea to mark their an-
Harvard team are essrs Ste ; y.
hen Lee-Lung Sreaaen Saree t Judging by looks the Harvard
vice oF ee ak! grad yoyS are a strong bune >
“de ig gg Jardine, Peres enjoyed their Aluht see Lae
am rde, vag Huggins, Patriek uit coniblained a tH é a ‘gua
Massy, John O’Neil, Lenox But- ‘ peas ne. RuMpe
ler, Vincente Mosca, Andrew tee eve which eaused
Sheehan. Caste Dore, Hubert] -pyo cg = a ee
oore, Victor Assee, Lenox : : hatch = was
e De scheduled to begin yesterday.











The Maple team is as follows:
Basil Pestaina (Captain) P
Kirnon (Vice Capt), Cecil Kel-
Sick, E. Manix, J. Kirnon, C
Hewlett, C. Walter, L. Oliver,

P,P v

grr

a






SEE BIG HEALTH

To Try Car



MAYS
—Aged 52

(By BASIL CARDEW)

SOMMER
—Aged &

RHEIMS.
Raymond Sommer, wealthy
Sportsman and champion racing
uriver of France, has been asked
‘o test the British B.R.M. racing
car in England.

He is expected to drive it on
a secret airfield near Bourne in
Lincolnshire, where the B.R.M
was built,

This invitation « a foreigner
to drive the car which more than
100 British motor and component
manufacturers have helped to
build is likely to cause surprise
among our own drivers.

Sommer, now 46 years old and
the Maurice Chevalier of Euro-
pean motor racing—he is always
gay—was delighted to get the
offer

When he stepped from his blue
Talbot car after retiring from the
French Grand Prix with engine
trouble today, he said: ‘This is
a handsome tribute.”

British drivers here were ask-
ing whether the calling in of Som-
mer means dropping the pilot—
52-year-old Raymond Mays, the
man who conceived the idea of
the B.R.M. ir 1939,

—L.E.S.

[The B.R.M, car is expected to make
its first appearance at the Daily Express
International Trophy race meeting, to be

staged at Silverstone on August 26.)
—L.E.S.



Racing Notes:



JULY 20, 1950

THURSDAY,



Pre-Entry Gallops Revealing

Watercress Likely Derby Favourite

Due to the fact that entries for
the B.T.C. August meeting close
to-day trainers took the oppor-
tunity to give some of their charg-
es fairly testing work yesterday
morning. The race track was
open outside the barrels and the
going was on the soft side. Nev-
ertheless some good times were
returned in one or two casés and
best for the morning over the
box to box route (6 furlongs 47
yards) was Mr. S. A. Walcott’:
Flieuxce. This French bred mare
has never won a race since com-
ing out to the West Indies bu’
her time of 1.24 4-5 for the box
to box may be an indication that
she will run into form at the
present meeting.

Another impressive gallop for
the morning was done by Hon.
J.D. Chandler’s filly Watercress.
winner of the first Barbados
Guineas. By doing such a splen-
did opener this small half sister
of the famous Pepper Wine has
fairly installed herself as a hot
favourite for the Barbados Derby.

Others orthy of special men-
tion were Mr. Cyril Barnard’:
two new two-year old fillies Best
Wishes and Flame Flower, who
although doing only thrée fur-
longs, did so in the good time of
39 secs on the bit.

Those who worked in respecta-
ble time before I left the pad-
dock at 8.30 were as follows:

Watercress and Battalion: box
to box in 1.25 1-5. Battalion was
not allowed to slouch at any time
by Crossley but Watercress, wh«
was on the outside, held on well
and they finished strong. The fil-
ly looks full of beans.

Foxglove did a rather slow box
to box in 1.31.

Joint Command did a smart five
in 1.07 4-5.



COLD WAR IN SPORT

NEW YORK.

{t occurs to us that politics could
learn something from sport.

There has been an international
cold war going on in sports as
there has been in politics.

But the frigid ice in sports is
gradually being melted under the
warm sun of better understanding,
tolerance and good will.

We noted the first real break
in better international relations
when the International Tennis
Federation voted re-admission to
Germany and Japan, thus clearing
the way for them to take part in
ihe 1951 Davis Cup competition.

It appears probable now that the
International Olympic Committee
will follow suit, perhaps in time
to allow, Germany and Japan to
send teams to the 1952 games.

Willing

We understand that Avery Brun-
dage and other American members
of the Olympic Committee are
willing to vote in favour of rein-
statement if that is the desire of
other nations,

The road blocks to reinstate-
ment have gradually been cleared
away in other sports.

Recently we had a team of
gymnasts competing in Japan.
Japan sent some swimmers over
here and we will have a baseball
team playing in T>kyo this fall.

Thus the bars are being low-
ered gradually.

Golf never has had a ban
against either Japs or Germans.
Both nations have been free to en-
ter our tournaments if they se
jesired.

Japan was taking strongly to
golf just before the war and had
18 or 20 courses in operation. But
Germany never did take to the
game, and it is only a minor sport
there. We never have had a Jap
or a German compete in any of our
major golf tournaments.

There will be no difficulty about
getting Japan back in the internat-
ional sports field. As of today,
all the Japs need to send a team
into international competition is
a permit from General Douglas
MacArthur.

Benefit

And since the General has spent
years trying to teach the Japanese
the meaning of the word demo-
cracy, it is not likely that he



G. Dowe, G. Thomlinson, A.
yoatha and G. Flax,

A great effort hcs been made
to conceal] the Antigua Recrea-
‘ion Grounds in order to collect
gate receipts. Normally the
grounds are completely exposed
but apart from putting up a
high wire fencing all around the
grounds cocoanut leaves have
been tacked to the fencing. Hera
and there a chink can be found
so the cops will have a_ busy
time keeping out those in search
of a free view.





ATS Arable

make children
grow taller!





BENEFITS WITH?

Boil 2 cups of water. Add
sale. When boiling, add 1
cup of Quaker Oats.
Cook it, stirring, for 26
minutes. That's all.
























4
~

would object.

of race, colour or creed.

Leaders in various sports say
Japan and Germany both would
have been restored to internation-
al athletic competition long since
had it not been for Russia.

Russia stands aloof from the
rest of the world in sports as it
does in politics, The Russians even
refused to compete in the last
Olympic games but they sent what
they called observers.

And since they themselves re-

fused to play with the others it
is unlikely that they will permit
that part of Germany now under
their thumb to have any repre-

sentation in the yA Ee.









“SUPPER & DANCE

at the

B'DOS AQUATIC CLUB
(Members Only)

Saturday, July 22nd

Cold Buffet Supper will be
served in the Ballroom
from 7.30 to 9.30 p.m.

Price $1.50 each

Please Dial 4461
Reservations

for



DANCING from 10 p.m.
to 2 a.m.
18.7.50—5n.






BARGAINS

Prints — washable, 40c. yd,
Calico—36” wide—49ec. yd.
Plastic Raincoats—$2.18 ea.
Rubber Sandals — 50c. up
Boys’ Socks — 12¢. a pair
Anklets — — 15c. up

Vests (Gents. & Ladies)
—2 for $1.00 |

Panties —39¢. ea.

(Plastic)
36c. ea.

Children’s Vests — 30c. ea.

Ladies’
Children’s Panties

Boys’ Caps — — 24e. ea.
Khaki Drill — 59, yd.
White Drill — 8c. yd.

Thousands of Bargains in §
Woollens, Shoes & Hats, §

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Henry &
Swan Sts.
SHPO NCO BOS





@
For the full flav~-
our of the word is best savoured
in sports which knows, or at least
should know, no barrier becausé



By Bookie







Epicure did a half but we could ing win again. Her presence
only time her over the last three is about the only breath of fresi
in 41 air in the D class races

Dulcibe!lla looking more pow- The cheeky and evergres
erful than usual did a very re Mopsy did her usual chip-chip
strained five in 1.08 half mile in 55) Kidstead and

Best Wishes and Flame Flower Beacon Bright were allowed to
did 3 in 39 with the former pull- run doing a box to box in 1.26
ing up and looking into the stand. 2/5, and five in 1.08 2/5. Kid-
Flame Flower although small ap- stead is g much improved mare
péars to be a handy filly and had the better of the gallop

“Flieuxce did her box to box Sun Queen and Pepper Wine
comfortably and her time as re- did five in 1.05 3/5. Sun Queen
corded above is therefore worthy looks in much better shape than
of note he was last March.

Brown Girl did a box to box

Gun Site as usual was >ushed jn 1.27 3/5. Postscript did a box

and even given a tap cr two with to box in 1.30. Starry Night went





the whip before he could get UP with the three r old Mai
alongside of Colleton. But at the Ann over four it s. Ability
two it looked as if he was wait- proved little too much for Anti
ing on the latter nd they came pPiem who finished behind her
back over the bex to box in ‘ The former’s time for the hal
9-5. A trying gallop for Colleton was 57
Tiberian Lady did five in 1.08 — Perfect Set had a good opener
1-5. her with Infusion who finished easier
Eliabethan did a mile, picking oyer a five in 1.06 1/5
up slow coach Southern Cross a
the judge box. Elizabethan’s tim Bowmanston started with River





for the mile was 1.56 3-5 ar Mist who only did three furlongs
the box to box was done in 1.30 Bowmanston continued on over
2-5. five in 1.09, ‘
Storm’s Gift was not allowed Viountbatten was too good for
to do much but managed a box to Fac ions and finished lengths



box in 1.273. ir front of him doing five in 1.09

Vixen, blowing more than ey Cross Roads and Wilmar did

did five in 1.11 only three furlongs. Their time
was 41}

Another blower, Suntone, had Roly-poly Vanguard showed
Fair Contest for a companion that in spite of his fat he can
over a box to box, which the run and did four pulling up at
did in 1.27. Suntone’s blowing the finish in 57. His companion
not as bad as it was in June. Joan’s Star was left very much
She is therefore not a hopeless behind
case and I look forward to se April Flowers did a half in 584.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

THIRSDAY Jll.Y !. 19511 Speech Day At Combermere School BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACF i ii K i r .1 V 1949 uK NOOTT. Headmaster of Combermere gTchoo I !he work of the School during the pan two \< i I %  iterdav .i.d. field* ,,l C b,v..al and -, k.iil.l,. IMII-Iill. lull I d HUM — t .. u.-i.iM i ,„,v.ii.ilii> opening up before u, f breaking ur* M,.UIUI \\ r K*II %  h %  m*mm rateiuii> bm hi M..,lrru Md ('omnrrrlil ' -ludla., Ifuiiri happv mar rlagr la ihr lulurr blfsM-d in wtth a BarBad... be loownc.i. I (n then kill. 1 lucnccs .ind unforunaie interruptions in thr conI hool life comM-llrd u* u, postpone oui Bo* Dars*nhog h.st ii [] i f<1 %  %  %  UCB new %  |UUM pci.cii .'( %  n, M u i.i ...... %  v, : %  UnctiUj benches nn t | ably a new p-iuiWr boxing -dng. _ lalt i Ml H %  • Red it. thi *. *' ••* • SJ,,' if it io ihe Colonial CncinMr i r Went, rn, undertaking the RMh| Ihein when hMl •" %  11 tin intotiN n oik bare In Dare< n i I TII %  l„>( .i. %  %  bnjd M-opmttan, Is %  •" %  %  "i>oruoi" ... Visual \id* ographv .ml com nice—fyl -i b) Mi i ;. Weaatai hi opporT. I • at UM •i. nl 10 ihe v, Wcbt> t of ?** Lug. w neglected In i KOREAN CRISIS m rram MM I 0 1f I ul two vi/ I94S and 1949 nk••.. pn .. ichol ...I %  %  %  t|>r. *. m. ,1 eeent ngriir—MBt. l>. This review of School Qrgajlr-runi 1*0 to WH nation ha* readied the Fourth I %  'in* of the present Fotms and covers atl boy* adAcademic \ear In January, the milled into thr School from 1947 number.* attending the School onwards I have still io deal with i*aciu.d the recurd number .if ovai 'he pre-1947 cntriea. These boyi BOO When I arrived In s. pUn nrg to be found in mj Fifth Forms, al the beginning of thr ->d U*l December virtuall. ,,ll '• n naria the. end of that period ol %  HI approximately 4<>U Upper School ivnitrMioii I.win. I: roll nf UM BdMM) i "iv* Koui iitentii Ai UM x'U'vaooi.ihm i ... I.|.,I> in Decembei Septembei next .,.ahall mainiMt thai Upper Senool en lo lak.' I %  %  Mi %  %  %  ..r i .i with valual k M vi.l1*1 Bilarl %  lull .11 i e I %  T.H'V .,, i inta and ii,,. Jan lakei %  In I94 I ItiHkCi ....1 Vp| i read Tl.l. : glVM th. lunenl ol I M %  .,n wtah IIN*l i |.ilr and in Uccei %  to special down i., m ul Mt Room, Library jnd tu.iu. vi/ 46. Mry MoraiNapratHve b answer Li ->•-—— MI accom.. :oi the Praparal u Dr Una a:i pupiU baa ". Hall ..lid %  %  trei Jiei inaiiitaiiMd on the basis ircam entry with four %  %  %  I nmi with 30 pupils ir. n total ..i m Thi poll i ..f i nvertlruj %  %  %  f ihr eurrieulun %  teat, the mi %  n o n in n re-furnisbed 'hirrt %  %  rlnpmmt %  or: Til lunlnuh .lid leata Exuminalu iber 1B49 68 can,l imbers this year a reasonable prOfH These number* .i mpraaaive but thr. impose,i drain both on ac.oniniodal.oii Bl itasnag, Thr arrsaurr p^rrlrd IMlrhlv lot ,,,,,„,, lun.n. Io lie (•ruvidrd for a School 1'etUficalr l>pe niii, 4h„i, i,.,* social and mi, sliiiificaiicr ur iannul Ignore. Bui thr rr-. U ll have an educational sltiiillcance Irom which I musi draw rrlain conclusions. In 1948 wtf obtained 33 Cciliii1. thirteen Class inctcen Class III u [Ml we obtained 35 Certittcates, |v.y : rune Class II and twcni.foui Class III in 1944 our h> %  a spw g a aii" Kui t K D -in, %  '—"*i 4 distinctions were our out" reet iding Jiuccesses. One candidate rouuixi Mr. Drake: 94*1 — Forte. H. E. sat the Ex*"wi *w tranically II. (tii. h.i %  riUi Th, addllh ire. Huh. Gtan rnui| n.-i. tutherlaed th. suitable raaeb bM ni 11 ...iiiiuc MM Urili-n ni. -... %  .it. balped he weakl) loan 11 % %  ubooe Mr Hudson ha* stii.',-< ' P**** % %  %  u ikiin i -i in tneaa would like to nipn MI', real %  raUtuda tor the wi ik be Idnin| t-.ih In the ApIII eoeal (iroua-iDttt pOlaQ %  I t.-\.-..| rUM 1-ecn t\ %  aaabui '! %  ravaajra .i ,i dheeti w. vera io Umiiad en.i II %  1^.1 . hM pel % %  %  I duced it..Qacdan u i I I "' Ha m UM bawej cotirl it Ihc iii,ii:.i...-. '. i>l OUI S.h—1 buildliia> Thii real O I to u* .,; ae th MrajUsUl pn ap _.. ..1 the IU . and ii. I ick atreai looo-Chiuo ti.-id W< ...i .-.I %  .. i 11 ieh d tennis \l Iho end of th. : propOM cxpandniit the Library to u to take in the .', • ni of two (Instead of the n nt one) classrooms. whiUt UalnLni n th. C*> Ii oral lunh, School on. D r ,.i .,( Utu mib|eet ''"' > Mil ithe i i.vi. u .:.iiii ot i n.i !" %  III.I.I boll. (01 ni...rurul mi •' %  | man. nl OUT %  *' Bl i. .< and tin. i,;. been revealed bound *i ol thi elm,, rou w "" "" |l -" k l bav. heard thhi nfiern.^n n, the tn Iha north I 1 reputouon .f out Ola* Club an.i .*n ol i in the ruoton arruavad h) both In court %  %  the Mu*ical Pettlval held m nattiCadeti ho kc> pttt h 1049. when the Choi ite.l with hol-ll t iward and t Oureii'* College for first place in OiWerninaol MVO Kin DJvl Ion m and the Oler C!ub eurrrnl veai w "2, nr *' ''' nivirioi. IV The tale j4 IHHI for Ol D pf Muak hanot "-i all been toh> Th,. fheorj of mualo is tniftht for Welfare And Seholurvliips me len. ( .-, week in each Form Mir-wliiHit the Prep and First and ll ll with real plea*ui<' UM I i % %  %  "' ^ nmi Foim ,I,.I i hope in Jancan tell you today of MM raaporaa "I..U be is reaslWI loi urn MM to wlect 20—30 hovs i.ivcn bv the Vestries to my *p• •" N u Scianei In tt-ho will prepare and otTer music peal earlv in 1949. to improve the it bereavement which hay in their Public Examination* conditions y i their Scholars here. ii.cxpecte.ily Moreo. er. we acquired 111 violin* |n tie ,.,-. .f practically all Veire > ocnt in a June n and m subaehaa lakan th. position that the attack Uunche. R .van uroof Kore. and that | ihe Unt rcunty C %  &OS kH .Unii' %  %  .: %  i nfluar) Bar) we m i otbi > inoainon D 'I,.. Unlb I N itJon are makiui \a K. n .. iba ouibn ..i %  ImnllralhaM I peaei %  : ihe world Th.atI .1 Korea I..ak. .: plain beyond all doubt Iha! .,n .. :imiumst i n (ni ..i bj aai .itii.ii av ,. t. ...ii pi natu ii Wi musi ttu lefM n %  thai lalu puwa tn DOMI an %  in He.* ,ii i.ni havi ll ,t. toreM wjpp.nl of the Itiiln a^;i.ai,..i ,l ti, I %  aSSCt ll ile. Iltan I hi l etopmi ^srss SHSBiSr^ r room i .. Model St" .! ^' h ? "^ln{Km R 'a?J 9tSiT^SS eT 1 S'EJS& l CoC ll in B IT H, ^ candidate.*' u lllU r |1>XI ^ Q A „ e Fxaimna in ,ncn Uilll -V;< -as been recommended by the 1M9. 4 did not rj| for s.mda, ,, ^'^'"ibe. next. •ons and 29 were related These Ml C a V Moore *•" %  u i> "•* %  ant the plain fact* — even If a dlfnc "' ""'"a" 1 Inivei.ity In DM <-l the rejected candidates October "**i -'" '•" *P"i *• were on ihe bordetlme. there la )"*—One In iompletinij his UM that the majontv was degree course winch he hut formunsuitable (or a School Certificate *''> lUUrtad at i_odi.-ia.on CoU.*e. Course. I point this out to stress •"d "'e second yeai in pi .iic-ionthe case^for the provision of a al training Mr. II Urewster takes residence at LouKhborough riing Collide whenhe folk Three Streams At I] plut UM puplul are teste-1 1 %  foi skill m numind for fadll %  '... %  ... ue These tests lunction with their Md their tid mrsalf ran.,' that %  thrav vtie:iin-A" %  — %  — (T.'i,!' ,an eo "">-f orae. m Th •lee liefore mnrning ehnol niplrmetil UUl develomner -Mf Mustr %  •"" %  •nt.>me we Invited Mr. .1 A MHIInetrai ••. -en-e v "i.ftin^ Maater TI. <.,,, 0 d rd no mie eouM h-"-o •*. •-oil-llv %  "i.-I n Dlnee terjiknm/lt hi the arm.*!**--nd ertemn of the pupils i (Mall than h.ha' lered i L Ufa] ..nth Fleet ..!.. ttiaek upori r^araaorg and I %  riune'.t mi Formosa so orMtaiicai i not n ported la '!* %  UnUai n rd ti I in in.'i o| eletneni irj -tuul. : %  .1 he FBI 1 .ni been vloeantly .uIIIIIM.I n> Hi. alta.k on Kmeii Uie pact area %  rould hava anlaiaVd Ifeai Kort rendertru much more .iittimit UM earn Inn out of our obhgaUon to Ue in K.irei i io doubt ei go tat up In %  %  M • %  '. %  tca n In imp. ...: %  %  We have UMB !'. 111... (Academic); %  IVi IHC (Commercial.. I Lowai IV. as %  :: boyg 28 -f ihe 1949 ill* wh. g Io keep up with i TI e dim ig tn %  U .r. UM end himself !>'.' % % %  .. include rkshni.s I is) Lniidun Chamhcr Coninteree The results recorded In I %  .in. for thr bw IfMfJ 1949 In a a o m l n a i longa*Novei and July and Novarobl th* November cxamm candidates f i „ n ihe Alpha •' •* In quallt) and %  -. %  %  -. geluavc \ ..i C" Bligaaii but BOOtlnua to justify the policy of ilify for the Alpha ^'^"f them nom superannualion Stream irrlctllum Is Thu, In I9-4B Henry R K did vcr (acihtirs to Mr. St. John's footsteps, atorlcs and two-year Physical Education Course. Mr. G. E. Solomon ha* left to take up a four-year course at Columbia University. Mr. 1. C Si Hill. School librarian, represents Combermere School at the Summer School to be held in Trinidad In August on the teachArt nnrt llandirraft The other outstanding developnient is in the sphere of art and handicraft You will recollect when you last visited us on a Speech I>ay that you saw a vivid nd a small try s.hui.ns %  raj geboli md interested cd by benevolent bodies the valuliulafriilp inrlutlag u I'mr. Bfta %  %  . a meal in tn* SehooJ ind in H i>> MlBa with travaUlni attpaiu.... has In effect enhann-.i To UM value ol a BcJiotanbio iioi In th-. forrnar nominal sum of $24 -' yMf i sum mngjni from so fu J6 i year A il I i is no lonucr a snare gild a dclUMon. wheie the scholni coma half asliamed t MltlOII school gnd unable vary often to luCtlet obUln foi hlmaelf the books and inj. Utal Idl stationeiy the vety tool* Of InForTOOM Income b. BiaUi HI. on i aboul dioa Forii Ih.it ihe UlllUxl hatevai lllol.. or.11 inn.. ek foi .,1.1 thai and Oil l rful display Of edueatl remain schoM who ha ..I tei pupils id witho'uT which .he it hopelessly lost. To thoae tllpg nwardiiiK ..ullicnt)cs .. .dopled Iho eel Uithlcn. ng, I know parents and vbMJM in W ild wisii to join United Nation' i.. ...I poail for Formosa I'h. pie rill inllitai. nmi of Forrnoaa U wtUwui pra%  thai broiled .itiht.es dislurhliiB to thr %  ace of the Paclllc and that nil .ilTecting Formosa he liled by peaceful m.-i %  >( tl>. ork m e in heartfelt gratitude nder Mr. Collymore* guidance Nothing can contribute to she He confided In me that whilst he "beer joy of a youngster at school was flattered by the success •' day than the joy rsf a tuckshop%  ehieved. he did not feel compecanteen. Far from perfect though take them any further our own remains, the Governing nd thi. nd th ..i i .in-.' tei i. % % %  IValpha gnd can don of the %  lhamber of Commerce in one or man -n.je.ts FIH UM A" OI %  %  %  %  to ixUM School CertiQeate ind 'he full certificate of ihe London m merca reapecUvelv. r found thai Whilsl the former .v.o ...iptable tor UM "A" Btraam of Comfrom parents and pupils •11 to pea meets with nisi IN November IMS Ilokir,. A H. and Rudder S Jld quite will to pagg m four letlon each. The July iiH9 ,.„ ll% ls „ different kcltle of llsh Th. %  liftli lormritnnar taking the UCJ irlde I m ..'.. oi el i a (ni; cerUAcate after ing of CaribOean Illstoiy All \ lr n< n suggested that I should Body are doing everylhin K in th UMso Instances J nave quoted have meet Mr Broodhagen and I "<•'* '" add to Its amenities, a been dealt with most generously have never rear vi ted that meet wilneat. lasl yen ihr new fund by the Governing. Body when my ,ng What pleasure he has given ^commendations have been placed me I cannot tell you and his rein lor.them (or decision on prowa rd ,n the responses he hi U-acted study leave Meanwhile awakened m so many pupils for Mr. (Joddard and Mr St Hill have whom, till then. School had reboth taken Uieir external degrees malnesl rather an arid occupaUon, —Mr. C.oddard taking a 3rd Class must be a source of Inspiration to Honours Geography at his rlrst athim In Easter 1949 the Govtt-mpt; and Mr Si Hill securing oiniiig Body furnished and equip; ial Degive. The sum total ped a Class-room foi Art and Oj %  : •ndcavoui io improve slatHandicraft and such has been us and qualifications, and of a*Mr Broodhagcn's succ.-ss that in and encouragement to the League of Empire Competipartlcipfliie in it by the Governiiu1 j n May lost Conibermp*-' dig Body is, 1 submit, a formidable School gained the First Prlres in istallatioi .. _jid dsial purposr boiler It is an amenity of whhli Ihjf S. boo] ) % %  jnsth proud "nd Ihe object of envy on the part ol other schools Th* canteen stall, undei Mrs. Maloney and Mr Gittcns. make a great contribution Io life at School bv thanelseartul and able scivm they leiuhn Ibare Cadets and Scouts Under Captain Perkins assisted Ueutenants GHten: and Frencl undnetoni fo SCWtyiaaaai and wlUiout parallel both divisions, the Senior prize Bre water, the Cadet Com pa i nd alike It hag i limited value in Lawll I the employment market This has in 1949 but l i Stall "id myself solution In the proposed % %  of Educ.i%  %  *ed i . home <>t woul %  iflV % %  '.i .: stream Wo have tound thu In F of i umlnaUona of the 0| London and with 1. O V Foide K A. V H and Marshall A. The L.CC ha* served % %  nt function In our edu%  UctUll %  -> stem, bul it will probabry reeade In iiuportance for I !..-! when It Is by the Gcneial Certillcate of Bd nilon Ulll%  nl the "C" ..s of tinA' nipositlon of Ihe AJ .n taanu of irtatitidati.it liiangrd since 1B46 The with a set of most admirablo the posters advertising the attraction* .isla.ui Staff of Barbados and the Junior prize > ia with a project scheme entitled "The Landing at Holetown i sagai MM ..i .. %  -__ 11 j.:. a %  M. TaUl igorou' organisation n midst They hnve Aaustad -ui ceremonial* at the Kinft's Btrtliday Parade and ol Empire Hay Celebrations. Thev weie recently inspected by the CommlMiionei ..I Police and received an excallr-i.t leport for which we all conEratnlote Oie Company CommoiM>r. A number of senior Cadets .!• lull Reg.i ving thi Stal are the raw t 1 ol the Directoi of BduigUon are ira working out our .'.us—curriculum, texli to enable us to effect thi The switch-over cannot be imCcitainlv the present -ill lx %  Moore, Moraovi i i the Govninted men the post, Adams. i and Herks have and to thoi ,Q1 Communitv %  Miengtl.. In M Jan Studies particular^ If the bo> r.u v.,ieh schemes and plan. .,,. %  devised, th. Staff are the skilled attendants on a/hom we depend Io infuse life and splnl into them. Only their adequacy In numbers and qualifications will carry a school on to luccess. Recent legislation has V A. and possibly, tho' perhaps done much to bnpri trtainly the pr e aani m \ 11 %  lasstt I should like particu.iciitad ,n terms of lark I niaag pa Bgcord Iha gratiinri.ulum and text-books, tolicatlon felt by everyone associnrtratal School Certiliated with Ihc School at the. recant Hislorv—'..dn the BppOUItmaal I i. CambrlOaM Syndleata. recognition sivcn by the GovernMr R A Hughes who joins the IV A ,MII 'eitainly take the Camment to the outstanding service-. Staff In September next. Mr. K\.,iT,inalion in due course )n ihi s School and to the cultural !|uphe is un old boy of l^xlg... improbable therefore thai |, fl „f ,[„. community of Mr. School. %  the Aclve can present our first candidates collvmore. our well-loved Deputylr.g Staff here, and hajust been lor the General Certificate before Headmaster a-romoting him to tiiawarded a 2nd. CUws Honour1952. For the "(T Stieam H is ni ,. r ( ; rnr |„T,|. Scilc (..i 1st gnd ">Kree =i Toronto IJim ,,.oie mpoitant that we should try d „, HoiiRurs Degrees "CoUv" Broo*mm .-arlier dale and I propose exom" "' „,.," ..,., many of you. HIwork in Iha .rung this possibility with my V\"^ CSISSSMUT^JS fl ,d of nn ; ""' '^'"""^ '"' •staff, withoutdelay brpd %  Combermere and many bM n ft j^,,,^ ,„ UB nnd manv 1 should like to say a word about ^ J'" c !" S" 1 .f."""! T;' hoy labelled g dolt and I dullthe ^portancc of the General have come under his influence than ar( | lU he da^.rrsnm w^ x „ Certificate for Combermere "* may perhaps care to recall, but | ifp uri0 > r hW llve i v guidaj.ee in School Our educational role is 'hey would all wish to Join me. I ,|,e ar? Boom at once defined and restricted by know, on this well-deserved reB *--, !" the Education Act of 1890 which cognition of his services. studv leave make Second Grade SecondNow vou have all been hearing *" rt > ; ary School as one providing %  about the proelerni of staffing In p ", '.,. .„ Course of Siudies leading to the our chook In the rate of II,r, r A( ., in£ CapaeUy* T< School Ccrtiiicate Examinalion riann College and I-odge School M| F G Snillh wBo ^gn-md so only This could enable a boy or it was the loss of weU-quVilined u BI a ^ lhe cricker ;irl to qualify for admission to a and well-tried members of the months until hlr 1 rovided they obtained staff io Trinidad that created the .,. .. j rnber last to I nplion efam We. loo. have Itaflll • •[.,. bjgnj of Court Tinneu Scheme of Examineproblem but very different In a i hes for hi* lions, not only by change of nature True we lost Mr Cameron future lUccM We welcome Mr nomenclature but more importantTudor to British Guiana in the Taitt and Mr Jordan from Haresodus, and I conies* UM ;!'•and Mr Ptlew and mlsaMB at least two subjects at | rI n £np m at has not been %  •' !" *r !" ""Vf" "" !" a _\ ftelmol ment ot the Second Grade Af er a short period he ir-I cam. tP intrndurt(1 m to the roneliiwn thai hiindicapped imiarv ft4T ha nnw pgaMbH the 1 am not promising or v domestic and (Innn -ial_ei; nroiir1h Form | n Physical Ed' threatenuig n> eater lalo eemprtlllon ulth the First Grade schools in Uselr well culllrased I warn to review certain defects in the curriculum, and relate Iheir needs to Stall am Buildings. I pointed out in con nection with the School CerUll cate results that many of our bog ..: % %  compelled to embark a Course of Studies for which TH*. ^ lo ",-,i M Kiev aie not suited No* that ; „ ,*,,,. ,.,„, lf Ju j may be paitly due to the socal UMjin I happv and economic importance alta.hwr ek ed to it by the patent* But even The Scouts under Mesars if that were not so I could do rr |m and BiathwalM contln nothing else about it—lor withCnurish and they have a suro out laboratories and workshop>t jr \ record behind them my hands are ti.-d and ihis Scliool i„ !>oits and athletics we hav as nn educntional force can only had garo *al|afactor) real I kuv ork at raUiar lees than half mat ui Uie biilllant rectirds of thi Indies cricket team, thi 4 WoiTeil The following u b\ October > on M Drakes. I( leldei and Soloi ui* vacanies have i ernmg Body have suitably qualified %  : It I that Sin.th Wellingloi joined the Staff m landing iheh flr*t Speech Day I pressure, so to speeK. We hav, \ y | .oicnal welcome to taken steps to ensure one member HiirbMJo* II/ a high b> -. doing the tiarriaoii and we With id lajccesahll PilBJl Police vs. Air Smugglers LOMDOW, Air iK>Ilce may shortly In patioHin,; the skies of Hntalu and I iri pa la ...mbal air smug lilni Both Ihe British IKilic authorities an to be drawing up | formation of a pok this pin pose The British squadrons art expected to be manned by former Royal Air Foi cr police officers During the past DVa yean an smuggling has greatly increased and the Britiah authoiilies estiniate Uiat hundreds of small alreroft are presi-ntly I>eiiig — to f> confrabgrid from abraad atix Kings Tii' Hi,tu.li cii-Ion. and poll.' ButfanrtUea lay sto large unug l uni rings a-, working from Hit r'ontlnent, and they estlmat. about JI.400IKIO *oith of .oiitrahand is flown into Britain yearly Some smuggler* Hying from France to Britain leave an official *MUiU\ vlth eleurance nn eajafM pi-.n. puitgW^ their crosiSig the rhai Onca over Hi U dropped off an on to register an Thetieight before %  I iha puna Bh :!..i.., Ian din i Nowadays you need the strength of BOVRIL a>rrMrM<-OVtfL laaaai • < eJ f*af a aaaV f ches, and d.S*ea. J am* &m ****** luulA-.-.tKiAMl MILK RECTOR'S FEVER MIXTURE An uneqtfc .. ( ,. r, tor eon i,. i Fevi i ... till aipoi .i from I I Fevei uned by L'iuii respond epaiation it RICTOR'S PltODUi 1 i ? Messrs Bookers (B-DOM Drug SI ores lid. Hni.li, Slnrl -lid Alidi. tieedl WE OFFEB • \AII. S< ISM IKS • TWEKEEMB • MI.KS • SHAVIVfi IIKIMUS • IM/ORS n"f %  of Drake* Stall s-iuuing qualificateech Science Mr dom Ja %  la I'i.li.( I ill be an in .„ %  who play HUM, Stln Septetnber. 1962 1 must at least one General Science laboratory for hlin to UMeh II by that time. In the malter of workshops 1 must depend on Iha decision of Government to Implement the recommendations of ihe Technical Education Committee Kquipineiit Our labrary is growing apai .and its funcUon ;> %  the ccenrol i en ire of intellectual de%-elopiM-nt in llMSchool places n heavy M-^i-His.b.llty on our librarian I -iave every confidence in his ability to discharge Iha! duty and shall, therefore, recommend to my in protraclc' Governing Body without hesilaas dependent tion that money spent in ex • a number ot pending and furnishing it will bvarung penmoney well spent The number ~ of volumes—starting from scratch m 1944)—is now approaching the :i,000 mark, with over C100 ol l>.stain und Wot So Dtatttl Prospects What can we oxpael from lh" futuie' 1 In our presont fo| PAGING THE DOCTOR lUrtlna BOOB, doetoi iii ila .i v. raBx ... i.. theatre or playing Roll Hi elU new short, %  ratdte %  rtca lath e It as llM cloud m i.,f,. than a man'hai. •Ky over Cawbaiinaio, it may bo that the shape of its shadow BM) lie ihe shape of things to .emr [i | SM tield of manual deMentv i.der.u. i.II bins bUJdsM i -,. i ti.h vent of ore. are to • I ciad. than wood ami metal •vorksiiops must IKbuilt. aqtUMMd navt u ui-leptMine h.-aoViuart :-nd elaffed. Ttu? paraphernalia of and rlll ,| l>u wn ieh ; edu.ation has no meaning ualeaa „ (! .., M1 ymptnmi Ihe i hil.i H the aontre and purpose of ii I know 100 well after I —— veai; thr heart-burn and fnisira i,on for a young man leaving fon.D.iineK -' %  •'' la.le.1 School Certiftcate a hi pspei quaUsscaUofl Ch.i-.toi and not incompatible and a suunlirai't peroeattoa* ..* on young me Cbniberuiecr ara battai for practical > Shou Hit in--in Holly %  • l^urence Olivier i there at the sam la-igh is working i Nan.ed Desire" Clark Gable ii The only s Academic Couree ..,,... (l iur did not flnu .... amiaC SO serve g B CMPUttl l.ln.-n.uku,*; but follow His Crooner Fro* B ihing of ihe Government Fund, txamp ell 1 had built up the text-book that m diimctsr and in training big TV lueeau ll a ri .lock in a value of over 13.00'The 'ov' of CCanbannera Se>i()nl first appearHnce with H*-

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p.vr.i: TWO X UAKH.MHtS ADVllC \T|: THURSDAY, Jil.v -u. ln-.ii Qahib QaUinq S IR QB K.C M G H WelL... w\ rrlurr Tuesi %  was i Just Finished the Subsidiary Exams M R. JOHN [lUafPHKaT %  Lucia W \ Lodge S long holldavs with in Si Lima. Hli tSjUrts Captain bi the St Lucia Polk. Force John has iusi t n la ho d ittUai the Subi. Sweden. Denmark. Oertnan\. Spain. Italy. Brittany, NormanuV Belgium. Holland, Algeria. Mrwi-cco. Malta, Tunisia. Glbral tar. Egypt, etc. He Is now in Barbados and is a guest at Cacrabank. From herho is planning to visit Trinidmi. British Guiana. MacKenzic Venezuela. Colombia, Ecuador Peru and Buenos Aires. AH through the war Mr F<-wler was with the R.A.F. Ii England. He is now with T.CA. in Vancouver in charge of ftadlo Communications. Instrument ami Electronical equipment. Since his arrival here he hut. met seven of his "aerial friends". Aubrey Archer. VP8YB; rred Olton, VP6FO; Aubrey Ijiihlev. VPflAL; Sidney Lashlcv. VPflSD Freddie North. VTHKTH; Cecil Sampson. VP6CS: John Wi". VPfiSJ. nnd by now he has probably met some -.tln-iHe tells me that the hospitality in Barbados has to be expen enced to be lielieved and he coo not thank nil of his friend enough (or tin••well" time h.has had here In September—Canada M R PETER KING, eldest so 1 %  I Di and MiRalph KICK M Michael will be %  ivfeag Barbado on September '• r.n snada Petal i. going tr. McOUJ Unlvaratt) to study En fineering Another Barbadian leaving f.i September .* f Johnson, eldest aan f Mr. and Mrs Alban Johnson f "Dunkirk*. Hastings Tonv .11 be returning To McGlll, %  net* he has been studying mod %  % %  thought at one time %  .ight have had to go tc r .ngland to continue his studio*. ut he recently received new hat he has been re-accepted a vi K: iii After Short Visit M R DAVID EVANS Sin of Mwrs T. R. Eva..* roIMI ,eil (torn his short visit to St Kit'n Monday afternoon b> iI W 1 A I II I 11 \IGI I M M For One Week R GEORGE IIODDAM of the 1 11. vein| :-. %  %  .• i %  SOD in Jamaica left or. r..mlng by B.C. Aires, (..i r> inlnlca Ho aspects bsj there for one week MRS POWIR Nut Review h %  NOTED recently B Ifff Mrs ijrnnc Power — exI Arthur Lewta, the St LUel starlet I BB has fir born iTofggBOl of Pol it %  two. anni -rtauj the Far can) at Manciu-iii Unlvei East She arrived in London Hi published in the "Observer lime to meet her husband, who ..ILOJ ,., Fiiiii-ir^ii ihn month Professor lx"wis t who is ai ranged In peruke style to era!" P TW ,; r „, milnul Atrai( Bhnghjl I %  r "' P !" e M a „ Wood If the thirl> mill '"' oMl .„ Alar. Woo,! If the thirl) ml She %  peaks stx languages ha^ t nl KonBWa COIK .| three saTimii interests; studying n. ( re b nguages, lea rn i n g to paint and finding materials for her dresses. In I.tmlon she means t.study n %  And Wie CU Coot She has a trunk full of broeadMi and heavy silks In exotic colours. One material of vivid red. silk—her favourite colourhas already boon made into J tin it has ;. bared beak detachable jacket sh the Professor, had been used •elp the Nigerian groundnut farmers, the icsult* would have been spectacular An American Looks At Britain I 'M SURE you've bat English journalist who asked a visiting American whnl struck him most about life in "our tight little has Jus) bought her 20-pier* island; and—having already. I autumn and inn* I ;u-d la "policemen, wonderful' got the shattering reply. Also on hei tour she bought -Your warm beer and I %  bedrooms"* into necklace, aai clips and bracelet of her own design. Although She loves fashion-. Mrs Pears* Is doraaatseatad 'I was taught tco->k. sew and run 1 am shocked tn find To-morrow T HAT Cake Sale I was telling bOUt in aid of the new Y.w c A is toHnorrow morning at Messrs Q W Hutchlnson and CLtd Here for A Few Days M | MALCOLM BARCANT, 1 %  ft ntanl of BW! Aim a) 1 in Trinidad 1 Tuaedtu afternoon bj H w I A from Trinidad He thai Irl She Likes A Pipe-! A PRETTY dark-haired girl was waiting in London for ai aaroplana t<> lake her beoa t interested New York the other day—n in these things. How arw thtey s mokc' %  •-" '•"" f, re ISO mm ThPiano for f*^"''" I sm 0i.nn> P-"" •• m Prop) Tw gdrtfwwl*. *W srn Proin,m Pr. %  14 a m E.-sUind %  Mam B-%  %  U a.m. TV *• ••" n £*•"* l>,o ll<" 1 % %  % %  mo P"> \ -Iviii II IS pn. PruStaii.iiw |>.,al It If P "i l***Un*t* ChoM*^ EnsUnd < %  ww Uidr • .lain Her'. '. WHtn Mifinds at stkly parIJC snd Rupert hi. 10 tall U .11 ov *m. "WIK * 1 T*unji VvonS Brllal 1 %  1 iT r -. Radio Much Blndina In Tir M">h IOC Thr N-w. 110 pn. TIW D.l> VSSS 1 l P" apo'U Rvww tx 1 Rina Up Th* Curtain *>• P"' -.iy OuMlion' 4 00 pn. Th* ftjew* I pm Th Onilv Srtvu. IS p m it rron. Ithtn Buuanl * p rn n* Liter Quarfl S t* p m Cnataid Wt Indie10 pm lnterh-le 5 15 proaramint pid* iiopm uifn ETre • IS P m ugh* hppily. Mu|hty once, bur no* i mm" (he mctt lovely doll in the world. I dull Jlwiy* keep Rupc: tm.kti. id M.r.ndi -ety mil. neithei speaking movini, but looking guile ajasW THli END *u MtOHTM srsiaiic* •hole her." keep. IU i IN pn N. -. 11" %  N-w. AlyU 1.4*1 "i HrporlHi H Trit IN pm Ra4*> N.w.nl %  .m Taallra AIOIIIMI OtlUin -ilh 1 %  *n Modae IN p.m. Trow .nd naM>1lee* !> %  • Pmm The Edit (' %  SOB pn. A Pr.vir.tan l*d Irxtorlude. MWpw TheNrw. I i„ lilt ri Itm 1 N>1H-IrlnalrU on her shoulder. A nerhlace of diamonds with rmrraldv Her own b. slned b> dovbinrr Whit lakrr Her name f ll Is !> %  ** Itanielv. beautiful French artresa who U to pU> I.HI d iii. r.. tn thit film no boin> made In Incland. — l,ondon Kxpreas Ser\leo For Sale Cap Vi Kidd's Treasure Map Attended Public Health Course M ISS GWENDOLYN JOSEPH IIACKETT and Iflss A Walters, two Barbadian nurgei who attended the Public Health Course in Jamaica returned home on Sundaj evening by HW.I.A Must of their time there. Wl |.i|> mend the roads lending up to the Hiue Mountalni BA8TBOURNE, BNO A slightly sOttad parchment map drawn in rod ink which rerportadl] belonged to tht pirate Captain William Kldd will be sold b> public aucUoi County, next work Kid.i v*.,-. hanged In noi. and the map which tin Brill I M %  cum aiitlinntir.s reenenl/e as once being tii< pirate'i property, purm of hldoen treasure on an island in he South China Seas The map bolong.s u> Mit Ellzabeth Dick -if Enstboutne who Is %¡ ftthei with many "thn v. aaures because nf heavy biutauon dstrnanda She Inherited the map and treasures from her late eBipto; sr, rlubert Palmar, Who died last July. Palmar, who lived In Et ir many years, wgd a COUectol i pirater relics Many i.rrrt^ tram ill parts of the world including $.40(l from American %  ) ndlcate, I bean loceivcd bs Mrs Di.K for the map A Frenchman once wiote her: the map and 1 will send you $15." To date, however. Mrs !>irk has rejected all *"d* lot 'he Among other of Kidd's relics to be aucuonad an* nBUskata, cut* %  M platols, chest of drawars, daggers and pieces of eight. Almost everything associated with the pimte will tome under ST. More than 50 copies of "Treasure Island' are to he auctioned in hundles of 15. A dirk once owned by Ann Bolley, the woman pirate, will also be offered for sale, as will a longhandled IH used by pirate Captain Teach to behead treacherous embers of his crew. I .V S. Too Yoiin|£ To Htniombrr PENZANCE. ENG Britain's Princess Margaret was born too late. During a visit to North Cornwall, the King. Queen, and Princess enjoyed the famed local dish %  if clotted cream and raspbernesoff the menu since 1938 owing to wartime restrictions. Said the Uueon: How delightful I had almost forgotten the taslo of real cream hl-e this." Said Princess Margaret, regretfully: '1 dont even remember it!" Lady's Leg Lost LONDON The lost property book at Lono I'S Golders Green police station v ontly received the following %  ntry %  •Found in Gloucester Gardens. Golden Green, a Lady's artificial e. btacM -.'i i sttaehed Blame TV OHIO. Next term all the pupils of Cleveland schools Will be kept in an extra hour They will be expected to du the homework they no longer do at home beca 7V during that hour. STOP THAT C0 U G H V w ITS TIME Y< TOOK SOME VENOS/ rm keep cougJung it's Uma you took nan* VBM %  YOU UftrtnMg COUCH HIXTUU. Wt FaVirLT ossdtdaa %  ad protacUlloarMOfea as* aaaaneas are sootbed w.y. Coogblug aiucas are rabeead. That coost*ot IrrltaUoB t he throat %  agarwL Rabsd upoa lor ovw 50 s^ar 7B IDCAI. rseasdr far 1 I COUGHS COLD seoeicmiis • UTsM f caraggHAL ASTHMA I CHESTY .COLDS i HIGHI C0U4H\ 1 } CHIIDSEW'S C0UCHS 1 l I G H T N I N G Not Talking! I NTRANSIT from Grei BWI.A yesterday ay to St Lucia was Mr. Ida by hi Back from Trinidad Holiday M RS. W H E. JOHNSON and her daughtei Maureen re turned from their short holldnv 111 Trinidad by It W I A Tuesday att.-rno ,n Spent Two Weeks Here Patrick ntatlv ,,,„:„,,„ sShsfSjai. rx?s. w s^ KI„Kl..n. bul they lw worn un ,„ T c A M| |ri lours of Ihc rural in They Ilnrluld „ bv T ( A m s„„ rd .„. were ia, ! IDoul . monun mi w „„ u|1 U) Trimd d . n 1 1 01 .1 Whin w.ts hp Koine lo SI l.uri. Leavinf Barbados Shortly tori Mr Ubrlt would 1.01 ny. love 111 Disguise' Is Good Food COUGH MIXTURE AOI VI H I'l.l'H CINESSA |M. B W I A to spenil two \.< k h illduy as a guest of Mr and MrA G Hoeheford of Mirriville Black Rock. Miss lllll spent part of ht. holiday In Grenada and Ih" temalnder she is spending here BY THE WAY -By Beachcomber C SUET. Es net them into the whose time is spent in When it w.ts found that the It musical film about the Uves <>t trying to Improve what he rail. Big nothing but four Tolstoy The |'crsians_ "WUghl routine iletails of CO-epavatlonal application tot Ikenee t.> use he wus talking about Tosli ir.terdi'partmentaliMi wnrkini! ll •'' %  elloi ttH wedging DDgO on a new filing system incubators, from a man named Briefly tha Idea ito strike an niton. Buel said, "Vou see how alphabetical average by a subeasy it is to make nustaki •* ct-esi t eaao r lai indeed, yes", rapliad KL lame and a subiect overItod(1(5 .., Ijn( thl „ Mr Farm val's correipondes all parts of Ihe British Isles. and colourful .. dish called nethod of eooh1 (I. i.l.irdthlre "ith such fasPudlap. they are combined latter Of the Subject except in cases where the letter of Ihe name has been previously included in the subjoct-eategorj The* success nf the system depends largely ..., IntatUl rctarlal work. ;iv the working out of the average may lead to Indescribable confusion, and the decision to be made gboul overlapping Is often redundant Insofar as the Cheeking of new categories is Involved Working ll Out S UET spent meal of yesterday h 0 ty I Ihe mw system to kept shouting. "Goo'byc. Tost!' Hogwasch said, "All you guys would do is to work your seesaw in „ garden while Tolstoy declares his love. Hoffmann'Bai • •iron would bs played Just Ihe rhythms for seesaw" 'No I for Hoofman or his Barkiroll hon seesaw." said Ashura. "Nor TOftl too/' said R^amughan '(iiHi'bvi. Hoof rnan ,' 1 shouted Ka/1 bulah, with a gnu. Hogwasch had them shown out. trine Printer'* Fruliv nmn U0tM$ Tlu-f,ll atiracrlt) T l l' treat ijuestioi world if en hart a Inni onl ong the Fllthlslan Trio can out against offers. Hog* %  u nu rluht lo ihe uouuy todau than a gOU biirsllny inih cakrt. buns. ruin pets, pastries and serhraert). p.\ ipi %  r v.-. .',-,-.-. %  ,:—.: %  .: -.-,-,-.-,-.-.w-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. .-.. '.-.•.•.••-.-.-.•.'.'--.-.V^sv-'.v>--v.v^ FOR STRENGTH FOR ENERGY r FOR ENJOYMENT its J&R ENRICHED • Ith then local n.mi. There Is "Love in Disguise name given to a %  kng i i .it s heart li I here are others u Thuni .ui Ugni ilng and "Fai Hasal>. ,.r. Bok Bigs' fact i Cold Water ItSH Oas> Pie' which i orujirai up Idaas nl a light alrj •fall) rtcoctloi .f st.ii -. and moonbeanu and turns ut b be hen li i i DM redpi I can .urn bom six herH ken I in pilchards, and ason a ll sppei ind i hopDa not mi oil the Place the llsh in a lined with fat and bread%  ith beads radng inwards. Pour three or four eggs Bt .'ten In tarragon Vtaegai 01 i them. I'm a pastrv I hole in t. e middle for the heads to stick i ika f.u about one hour V • %  parsley %  moutl %  (.. llsh before %  t.AII TV (The Garden) ST. JAMES in DAY %  > |. % %  WAK.VHM-i TllHIIJ |M. IH)||ll.r. Kn.ki KI:;A.N Stilrlev TRMPIX in "THAT H.UiE.X UIHI." J..>m WAVM. MS (MfKSP Thf Mliscle Hone "H.UXTKU 1iOI.lt" MRS. HOUSEWIFECheck up and RepUee your HOUSEHOLD CROCKERY Wr Have A Full Ranm <>/... TKA Cl'PS f SAVftRS TtAPOTU Mll.K A CREAM J1T.S RVGAK Blinis I'OI:I:IIH.I BOWLH Imptrl these ai our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT THrplu.nr MM. BARBADOS CO-OPCRATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD.



PAGE 1

PAC.F. F.ir.HT BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tlll'KSDAV. Jl'l-V 2". 1*50 H Hmtm West Indies Must Win Third Test Match French Racer *~*m To Try Car p re -Eiitry Gallops Revealing Today's Game Cruciul One Of Pre.sent Series (By ft 1. COZIrK) NOTTINGHAM, .1 THIS THIRD TEST MATCH betwei n England and tli Wl Indies Is in my opinion, the realK CTUI I his men musl leave tl:> illon determined t > win I repeat tu win—a draw will not i Teat Pitch! Damaged NOT! 'IB Reuter's I THE OPPOSING SKIPPERS In ihi? view l feel that the best polity would be la play (or draw uid tbcn tiy u> arm IIT the One i %  :• %  • %  i-' England player, goes M> for as to suggest UUt Kith U'juii play "as safe al NntUnghajp a* their dli M soys the pltrh for Ihe Thtrri Test match between labiy Enoljiid indie-. ^ „ r .ornnnri. %  I %  lentloti of making the Ova. ihe %  upaitloa ptapne oi unca UM Hrd Tai I*la> to Win Boih ... ,. ian ma) >> ip boarlan Tide seems as pi A* fai at. EIIKIMI.'I IWJ fWarWd, patrol Ihi % %  during the dot* M too huthe night miliatint lo ba rede* mod bj ; %  .'. mere draw now. and Fm;land Watercress Likely Derby Favourite Due to the fact thai entries foi the B T.C August meeting close to-day tiainers took the opportunity to give some of their charges fairly testing work yesterda> corning The race track was outside the barrels and the KliEIMS "'in Soinmtr, wealth.* n> and champion racing if Franc*, haa been askei [nc British BR.M. racing England. going was on the soft side Nevdid 3 in i wiln the former puil4rthe(es-> some good time* werr mg up and looking Into ::. returned in one or two cases an" Flame Flower alth> beat lor the morning, over the peon to be a handy f Hy Koe.kie %  — ...I ihi thTM Is about IB) 0* fre-.r> the D class races. Dulell alia lookli errul than usual dd a Live in 1.08 Best Wi'hes and Fiarr The rhealrj and evergreei ehtp'Cti p half mile in l*J Kiti-tead ar.n Beacon Bright were allowed I. boat In IM and (He in 1.08 2 I K. nil ;ipiteaid ta j much unproved mare nd had the better "f the gallop %  V \ \l.hl IS J (."l.nirii the W.I. Marksmen Put Up Good Scores At Bisley gpaeted ... .. | .. .i d, Bfi i li die* i ,,,,! decide upon hb team until hortb before 'l" match "1 have ixtaan player ."i i.r •! i i.' y i. Ihlng will depand upon th. ()ui Own Correspondent cablei u a rhlrd Teal u First Trent Bridge Test Opens To-day Today the WCJ 1 inhMll be mated it the %  which begin-. m the lai DUAent rutun The weai i IHI.. I imperial Cricket Conference ievident!', I ptffwianaai We anal] have lo ami home our • liiun f< elder atlon in a/OI pr. inir.r M N Ittaahan nd Uk Oval who g&v % %  that I M i it produce ,i bilateral .irrangemen' (••< an U it Ah: eraalb conwa, than i> |,, msp "'* w nnt of the greatest run-gelting org 1 —. Again, if England is aium-d m In Brat cjas. trtekal and I foi pglai > >•'" gSmJim achieve a draw al TMB1 BrldM one would not like to predict %  -'.%  %  l.ei.t I.nn.bar deterraloatlor m I to la lt< reouh i>eing nbtaitn>d Peli Uw %  up to y.ww*y"r: tow in ihe aronli -' '' %  K^&T^Ll^ZStol Tha Do • h2tni rasped I %  Ki tow, tha bi "'" M 11 '^ M n ,no !" l.S? v. B all mamben nt the teats raopaetablo knock fit for naarb the flrat tune on tors deliberate ' iwore AK lur ;iv lodsw-a laam la eao dacidJni whom to leave out carbad, Ooddara haa out} omOtMouab jhaj did not *"' problem to ioiva what to chanpa tha wlnjUnc da iDd about Ru> uarsl • Clenrlj Jack Kidney (Manaajrr)^oUngl) ueanet Stollmeyi R i aan BM t* me thai YardUv might rxnftcod, and equally ciearl) aaked if ba would oqan to own ; i ... barttlUJ 16 and tleldmg H paper columnist called hi LeteoaJohn <<-"• %  fd arno slipped on tershire innings "the beat opening \\ xr % %  i %  %  holei displav 1 have witne^wd in long ,(,is afternoon and fell haavttj earear,'' and nta awnja at the ,.„ his hack told me he would be moment is over 6ti Christian!, too. ,. u it P nt tomorrow underlined hi* worth in tlie loam The proWam ol who must 1H' at Chesterfield and ihere can be i,.,, out tppaan slightly cajler for no suggestion ol his omission Eni ,i Bn rt s eU^tor What then 1 Harold tiimbictt. one of tha For my part I would drop tl(ispn JJ airived at his hotel Jone.. This K a very grave de, iinjtf) w)th m neck I Bavl bandaged—the result of a bod dellghte.1 get the the MauiiVe Chevalier of Eurofavourite for the Barbad pean motor racing—he is alway iTCoi J 00NNBLL, Maj-uj. E. Qrifltta, Cyy. gsg-wai C i; t Wa ei .unM.i J. Cvaj, hathf done ***£* Bed bad* mai kamnn on lh Wen Indias learn now shootin : W he.. he stepped f i %  box to box route l "furlongs ' Flieuxce did her box to box Sun Queen and Pepper Wine yard*) was Mr. S A Walcott'. rrrmfr.-n'>ly and her thTM • '05 3 5 Sun Queen Flieuxce. This French bred marc corded above is therefore worthv looks in much better shape than has never won a race since comnf note -he was last March. ma out to the Weal Indies bu" . Brown Girl did a box to box U ejected lo drive It on her time of 1 24 4-5 for the box Oun S tC M %  P ..t a box ret airfield near Bourne in to box may be an indication that and even ^ a .£*".,'? ,i ' *^ X i" ' ****** N 'f hl vV"' LtTMlnakUra where the BRM -he will run into form at the The whip hrtjrtbai~UMg£*.&£* v.av built iirvsetit meeting alongside of to letr.n Hut p ,. [our in U ^:-cs Ability This LPVitaUon a IMpM Another Impressive gallop ,to two j lo drive the car which more than the morning was done by "' ',' J .. r .i,',. . b inn Brillsh motor and componeiit J D Chandler's filly Waterc.esJWhOWl the box have hvlped to winner of the first Barbado. I-ft. A OUlnaat. By doing such a splenTib. did opener this small half sister 1-5 of the famous Pepper Wine ha. Kl..d..thun did i. mile, picking 46 years old and lalrly installed herself as a hoi up slow coai manufacturers baiUd is likely among our own drlv Summer, i 1 did five In 1-08 mix h ir.i Ani. Dum who Rnlabi Tin forn ar"a ihe hM %  Perfect Set had a good with Infusion who finished easier I.I-I and perfect pitch, and It K a course I would never ad' rate had our tat howling been In any kind of form This, in tael. In the test for the pace men but they have failed. Jones hss looked a aood. lively, stock bowfer hut certainly not devastating. Johnson's ability to gl%*e of his best Is gravely in doubt : boii H had great difficulty ID tsinsI., %  ,-,.; %  1 %  I'V. I. 'I" ,. bo b] fll for the match rsuaectabte knock on this bit'of tuif whan they scored 525 for* wickets against Nottinghamshire. and won the game by an innings llni it will not be on the identi. trta ol turf on which thay will engage the might <ent on winning if ihay can Since the W I played their tlrsl Taat In Eaiglaiul in 192H all thrtr games with England. have taken place on three grounds. Uaneneatar, tha oval and Lord's TfJda) they break BUM) in nun 'ban Otie rag p act, for not only iv 11 their initial Test struggle at Tntnl Drldgv. but they enter the frs> with a Test victory behind them I chaMed on Monday with a couple of lads who were fortunate enough to see IWO dayi M play %  ( the second Test al Lord's, ll was an Inspiring sight to watr.s our boys going nInmt the buslfHMsl %  f winning that game. *^ild ime man. He assured me, that Ihe Wost Indies player an quieil Regarding tlu performances abisley. Hi< Kxi*tleu7 the os trnor, Mr. A W L fcavage, re reived the lollowiiig cable iron Mi. S..retar> of State : West Indies Hille tesns pu; up od scores at Bisley on July lMh and general Mamiaid o na reported to hava beet good baapeta rain and uad visibility at 600 yards fan Alexandra Competition eight scores of 45 recorded, apart from those whose names appealed in priie list Following got into priae lislicaai 1200 yardi higii„*' ble score 50). C crook* iiiiiuaxt* ** M)or V T Manlev ISI Ii II %  • Aubyn igv Otilsiiai Ut s blue Talbot car after retiring from tht the judge box. F.li for the mile w the box t, hmt old fillies Best 2-5. Flame Flower, who Storm to do m Derby Others orthy of special men lion were Mr Cyril Barnard" two new two-yeai WL although douig only tine.I. longs, did so In the good time 1 56 3-5 French Grand Prix svtlh engine 39 -*,., on Ihe btl. trouble today, he s ald: i. handsome irlbut* %  Thi. iskBrltish drivers here w mg whether the calling in <>f Som%  am dropping the pilot— old Raymond v man who conceived the idea of the B R M if 1939 —L.E.S %  ta. IM •- n -iMjwa u sssaHf a... ..S..r. n r. .1 lb. D.ll, .r. I-.I-.".II....I TrT 111. nmtini 1. sThose who worked In respeelab'e time before I left the paddock at 8 30 were as follows Watercress and Battalion: box to oox in 1 25 1-5 Battalion was not allowed to slouch al any time by Crowley but Watercress, wh< was on the outside, held on well nnd they finished strong The nllv looks full of beans. Foxglove did a rather slow box to box in 1.31. Joint Command did a smart llv*, in 1.07 4-5. Bo* NDO started with R.vei 1:1 long*. %  1 onaimM 01 awi five in i.o M at ten was too good foi IH length'. 11 Crofit of Inn. iioing live In 10'.' Cross Roads and Wiluiar did nnly three furlong* Then time waa 41 j ither blowei. Bun poly ahawad Contest tor a companion m>t in -pitr of \ns fat he can 3 box to box. which t' %  ,1, pulling up al 127 SIIMCIIHA I HI I'lpanion I ,h hot box m 1.27|. Vixni. blowing more U did five In 111 An Pair over did COLD WAR IN SPORT ma di-ALu-ira .— Tiol. — II % I. HI Barrow iTtimUad' lliihjwdwn rin.Ki-l Cxi J Ci.MlHI iBiltlldnii IK j a (.MfTiih n.m i,iii' 1 Cave Rartaaooi. (.'OUNHS.U *JU"I •II J Hald IinHii^a. K H-llr> iB. (...in-,. Mim f 1 M. I*. in I. ... rut UAii.v riisoKtm IJM Vsrs* — H.r.s. SSI Dr F. R it lunlaun KEW YORK ll occurs to us that politics could K B W.rne, IMS AIIIANlllt %  T.fS. n.r.%. . %¡ a WBdai ijassi *-ould object For the full flavJI of Ihe word is best savoured g learn something from sport W iports whlch J^ I .' 1 •? h.uae S There has been an international should know, no barrier because 1 old war aeaag on in sports as U Psoa, aalajaT ay apa* ^ s asKsiffifsM a^isisg warm sun of better understanding, al athletic ^"J J" nrt tolerance and good will had it not been lor "_ We noted the first real break Btisaia fc ,land ./l 00 ^Laaataas it in better international relations rest of the worldlie.. aport. aafl . when the International Tennia doja m politic*. The Russian* < Federation voted re-ad miss ion to refused to 2 (Jermany and Japan, thus clearing Olympic gai v ihe way for them lo take part in they called aaailiwa. % %  19* havi 1 .; petlt.on And since Ihey I 'era ... it ippeara probable now that the fused to play •; fSLjJ S hilernational Olympic Committee b unltVw> f cat ahj *.g5B *' will follow suit, perhaps in time that part or Germany no 5 to allow, Germany and Japan to thtlr thumb to haye an. send learns to the 1952 games aenlatl* compete m the ie% but they sent what %  re looking forward lo the Test ehtch begins today Tliese lads, by the way wen ndav Exi-eamen off the Harrison Line ATLANTIAN. which was in En land at Hie time, and arrived hen on Batuniay. So to todav's Hie wit) I* keen — by its nature 1! Is bound hi DO. IsUI %  hava our fair share o luck and good fortune, very oftei rssentlals for victory whtrh wi hope will be Q 11 ruyen l • n Ear from unanimous .1t<> wno tint la adai *houid be The eight papers I l<-itj(lt on although his two gresl quallUea Sunday each advocatod B diner..f resl -peed and a harp-shoolen) candldaU The Sundav DU>< .indent er'a accuracy are hast slut we t, ti headlined then comment want Let Washbiook skippei Dlglana PsaiTt, until his nKoapJ at Uvat Trent Bridge." erpool. had t.';ken a neglrglb'e Jack llobbs in the "Si number of wickets for nn impospress" warned *l>iu t risk a pioing number of runs With the fcssional captain" and entered LOOT lawn, except Marshall foi claim for P 11 Brown Not UKJ Jones, Goddard could UM Worrell old at thlriy-rni.V and Gomel with the new hull. Fred Hoot, another foi met Teal Valentine and Ramadhln for Uw player waa moat emphatic: "One spin, nnd himself and Marshall as man etanda out alone for the relief worttets Six r-'wler" ore eaplainci in my opinion. M Dolumple these davol 83 ovora 10 lan '* The "Sunday Post" wanted the ball I should h 1 > %  Mutton One alternative to this was sugDenis Compton wilting Ul the K ited to me over the week-end "Sunda> Bmptre Kawf PHI thai a commentator (Wi-t Indian) Fdrich >hnuld t>e the man. Alan It Is n suggestion with which t Fairfax In The People" .hose disagree that Goddard Doug Insole of K should drop himself True he i4Thorn tighiei and ruu tha prtea. has been in no particular form less asset ol nurslna enthusiasm Wtttl the hat but his medium into hiteam The News Chronpaced Isowling will undoubtedly Icla" nn %  pool on the capUlnc' be most useful to his |de Hif and accoiding to IhatO Wilfie.l %  putt la infectious and he ha* Wooier of Glamorgan 1. the popeverv man on thJa INRI solidly ular choice behind him. No wonder the poor selectors No other member of the fixhaven't been able to reach .. teen could do as good a i"h Goddard is doing, and this ~tateMuch The Sniiument is no reflection on nnv nt fa f ar „„ | ri „, tM, the nev Ihein. team is much ol a muehne ihe lord's elevsn if you think 01 %  %  Shackleton f. 1 H.nl. llolUV I B/ardh Simpson to. Dog. .. it. Insole for Ken yon Gimblett foi Kdrlcfa TinMljaj iriy feel that two lefiwould lie heavily on hands on the iH'rfect M.JIW r T ahssli M a K PI.UH ti rxi. •Airimv AuostOATS '''• •' * St'SU • %  J.I. in IS> aiir.ial* T kyo this fall The striK %  %  < seuml 816 In a match for the Thus the bars are being lowAnchor Cup Jamaica waa third eted grBdually. A ith 813 and ltarl>ados fourth with Golf never has had a ban '•86 against either Japs or Germans. Ihe lean, aie due to shoot in Both nations have been free lo enthe KOLAPORE CUP on July 22 ter our tournaments it they is 1 gaiis.1 Rhodesia. Canada and lesired i hannel Islands" under reprethe Olympic games INS Bnlish IVlanle Welcome Harvards AN'TKJUA THRKK HUNDRED attended a cocktail narty m honour of the Harvard Spors. Club of Trinidad al Anliguas MapleSpurts fJruund on Saturday. Among those present were the Sohrigi. and En.e.t Nuncs C 141 Halle. W. I'enco. Knifland's Team England's team you know again Cuptaln much 10 the disappointment of Ihe journalists, who almost unanimously ...eating the captain fm (umden the Australian leur. for this y tr j| e !!lH*i'^'.L'^V'* V,IU *"'? 1 .!' s P"n llt 1 '" "rfefcti BI deelaned that honour, and the „„. v ,,„, _,, u Tll ; wo||W m „ writing man fell thai the n-w mvm ,,. .,,. ,.., „ „,. ri Acting Governor and Mrs. Mac Donald, the ADC. Major Deihs Vaughn. Mi Hugh Bunowes, Admuilatrator of si. Kitts, Mi ChariaawOrfh Itoss, Acting Administrator of Antigua and Mrs Itoss. Mr. Basset. Acting CommisBioner ol Monhstrrat, ami Mi *. 1 nnckshaiik. Commissioner of th %  ""' Virm lalan.l. Virgin Islands. The nineteci Harvard team hen Laa-Lung Rockard OtVa BM k. Ragato John o'Neii. 1* ineillhels ol the ire Messrs Step President, Lance I Jardinc. I.n Huggmv. Patrick II„I the DShV leader should bt' given charge of maiiied' hi "the "pavillon'bui thai hw. VTnctnta Mosca. And these'iwo Tests to season him fnWOmd () e,>end on the sveather Abraham. Oirlton Dore, Hubert the Antipodean tour. Tha tutors -aeuler MoCf, Victor Assee Let Japan was taking slrongly to golf Just before the war and had th or 20 courses in operation But Germany never did take to the game, and it is only a minor sport there We never have had a Jap or a German compete In any of our major golf tournaments. There will be no difficulty about gdting Japan back in the International sports Held. As of today. nil tha Japs need to send a team into international competition it Maple Spom ptlO -re pc !" ' '" General Oouglae entirely responsible for then Mat Arthur, visit to Antigua and have arItem-In ranged a series of football And since the General has spent matches The Maplecelebrate years trying to teach the Japanese their Hfth anniversary In August Iha ineaiiin K of ihe word demnand they fee] that the visit ol cracy, it is not likely that he ihe Harvard team is a grand >^_ opportunity t mark their nn0 ttowe, () Thomlinsnn. A -"wrnrr. r.oatha and G Flax Judging by looks the Harvard A fre at effort hCI been made ix'.vs are ., -trong hunch The* lo conceal the Antigua Hccreaenmyed 'hen flight io Antigua -,01, Grounds in order to collect bul ..nijilamed of the bumps gate receipts. Normally the rat Antigua which eause.l grounds are completely exposed (W0 of ihe (earn to be sick. but apart from putting up s The first cricket match hedulad to begin yesterday. Maple team Is as follows: Be s.l Pestaina (Captain) P Khnon 'Vice Capt 1. Cecil Kel'i.l. I Kanlx, j. Klrnon. C rtawietL C Walter, L 01 high wire fencing all around th grounds cocoanut leaves hav been lacked to the fencing. Her* and there a chink can be found so the rops will have a bu*< lime Keeping out those in BeatCh .iawl 1 I %  is therefore not l and 1 look lorwa Jun %  %  %  behind April Flo left much did a half in 58l. SUPER SALE BARGAINS i'rdii. — washable, 4ac. > J_ t-alleo—3tsrta>—4ae. TT Plsstle Rainreota—SlIB ** %  Rubber Sandals — &0r. op Beys' Socks — I2e a pair Anklets — — lie. up Veeta (Genta A Ladlesl —I lor II.to Ladles' Panties —3fe. es thlUtrea's Panties (Plsstle) Sge. es. Childrens Vests — 3ve. es. Boys' Caps — — Me. eeKhakl nrdi — 59e. yd. White Drill — lie. yd Thoussnds ef Barcaina In Woollrns. Shoes A Hats, Ureas GoodA Household Departments THAWS Pr. Wm. Swan Henry St.. i VAUl*XArV.*'.V.*WW IPOK YOUR BEST v-s Your hair will be handsomer by far when you treat it ti. Vaseline' Hair Tonic; Just use a tew drops a day... then see the difference! Buy a bottle today! Vaseline"^ ,. sr mrrj?.""^. I ONIC Tailored in London .... Worn in Barbados Ready made EVENING DRESS PANTS Black Vicuna with Zip Fly Fastener dtoo Per pair CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street. Elders & Fyffes Line. T. S. S. G0LFIT0 I* iiuila arrive hare on SATl'RDAY MORNING. 22nd July and will leavithe same allerin*un for Trinidad She haa ample accummodation for pasMntfwfl I.'i Tlmidaii MINIMUM FABS s-1 ui. Apply lo AGENTS WILKINSON & HAYNES C*., Lid.



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TIUR-.I1 \Y. Jl'I.Y BARBADOS AI>\<>< Ml CLASSIFIED ADS. TRUMAN ASKS FOR $10,000,000,000 IOII ft A LI. l B l III 14 SATIS AUTOMOTIVE CAR -V.iKlH.ll v fort CondlUon two Uui* rprclally *'i carrying ol moii W Narhoi,. Off.,, -v:. i UM '0 loloonB i IIM: Morn. %  .1 :H: VsuKhall io I'llI i Mi IW V—• Fort JuM rornplrtriy overhauled 111 IV* Chevrolet Sedan U> IBM S.nawi p.>n% Fv>RT IU.YA1 OARAGE Ltd 1'hon* UM THUCK -I1MI Morn. I Ion truck BKCOOeril condition FOR OAHAUF LTD Phnn* UM VAN irn-rti. M AW 1.1 ion Morru V.r. In.. OVAL GAR. mm ELECTRICAL without drtn* I r .1 Book vour ord*r ,1 Hit biCotU I l>*p.riii.-iil S> ITMM 1**1 e 3 "attl V, peace |v5bll complex poUU R nunM | ouro wji t.ons are au-ceplible I • -**• ? In the present brutal and u '" "••• ._^*.lvoiwd aggression. hOW. "" %  "Ji-"'Vr!""' I *Vh""7 1 qu MUOfU "' % %  > "**• ,0 be tl <| iV t i'taT'itooir tSuul abeyance in interest ol ;o. i.. ,> of all "The outbreak ol aggression W live Far £ul does not of lessen, mil 'case* the import/m. of Iree nations in other part' the world. The attack on Republic of Korea gives added I < till". AI Of MM l" .%  •loured and will Ttiui.daV the %  %  in MO food condition ,,..f ii %  In vrrandali T by 13. drawing room 1 W U %  en II by 1*. both with baa dan 1 t.> I*. i.niei with i Th* only thlna to low iBfBM coiti ll II vour intrrc. % %  law before the daw of >al* D ARCY A SCOTT. A..i"i i„*r UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER I cj to the efforts of HO MB il; upon our iconomy. — W. must continue to recognise %  n military Umi alone Our power mmon defence ol )cap rests fundamentally on tbt productive capacity and enemies of our people In all that • do therefore, we must make • %  %  atoml) -iiiigti> .., %  ; %  i.. %  tba ban f our m cur> i not impaired, but continue* H.lv rTliINf. FANS110 Volt*. M" Blade. ulth Speed CentroUat Di.i JUTS Da. Coat* & Co Lid Eertilcal Departmen! %  *•" ELECTRIC FITTINGS — A Mlc*< Dial JSTS. Do CoaU A Co Lid KJertric.1 Depertnwnt .. „ Htit nf wAstiiaut -HarMi with Spindntr fan do your weekly -SAN DC ATE". HarUna*. waahins wiihm 1 hour* Thru lores .'MO *n.if feet of land you' waoima aeaMSBM and clothe* Ual of Hiri.-,*. Road Ion art Quit... i.iinlber in u.* all *.' %  •The Hi.uw contain*, drawing and or lUHV tuimihrd C4.000 PtMMUion wmuii UIIP monlh Fot .--%  I. piian* *u ii ••• JO 1 JO—4n Ltd %  I HHIIIul" \H'H WW]t-AT( 1< l-i'' 1 **. r.,.. aaa-a 1 ly IMS. uaat i May •A0 ftvo root loo. frank AMI) Bh> W H.T in OOAT PUI witn N "nut Wind >' IIUHSI: Ev.rui MomM Jamoa MECHANICAL Ti'-rTWHITTJI On* Uiaiarwond I camuiio I* U KflW T-intrr Ul Bond ; JD 1 S0—1 MACHINE an I US. itT S! MISCEU ANEOUS AMERICAN KFIIl* —II nwMitha old tat Draft proof Brest • good so>id ilio" < poma. kltchonotto loilM and bath up•tain with usual rooma downatatri ac-1 two fllfhta of aiopa to ara G*> KifttHc and Wator Intvoction ary day by appomunrat Tho abovo will bo ott up for oaio M public rocnpwUUon at our offlco on Friday „_., Itan tha >l*t day of July 1*60 at j p.m. **"" ir" CAJUUNGTUN a. 8XALY. Defence^53t!Trc.l.re ations to increase and to unify their ,onimon sirength in order to Mil .my potential sitxresjor. Tii l* able lo aetompliMi ih... ufatnUve, the free nations mutl in sufncient defensive mililivnuth In being, and irn en more important solid bam* >• economic strcn£tli lapablc of rapid QlobualgiUoo in event ol emei sajni y, %  Strong co-operative cfWis ih i ..i %  m moot ii-. tba. Doited Slates ar.il other free nation.* k ince w ,i H torei.iniui unity b mid other parLt of tne *KaTid %  nd co-i-peral;\. .! ..".. \>to lOCrM I prooucUv* rtinrifj ol illWawl pod aroas at* sj xtt w n olj Importal i ">n:ributioiLv to gnwing ccunuiin slicnglli 01 i. -: even greater imporl Tifaiy of Kio atJaneiro and tbl NortB A4lOAtaC Ircaly WtuOb i.urily arrangenuni WltDifl UM ll'gtfnowotfe ii inc United NOUOM charier IMMVl also taken action to uolsier military oVtAflJOl 11 f uMUVMual iree nations such H Qrooot, Turkey. In Touch With Barbados CoaaUl Sution Oaast aWaBSB << Hl>a. It.il U OprdDHO. S.S Do) %  'aniabnoo. S.S S Ham, SS Fluabath With thll enormous economic , and necessary pro: in: in A ii. (immcnding ba undertaken srtth conri.t rtv of our eeon mv to bear the glratM involvecl • ir mngnttude of demands f r rnUltaO purposes thai are now. foreseeable in econiWlf which 1* already %  I verv high level will retiuir'* J rdinviion i.r economic UlllkM On prugrnmme lor in. ,. • million rrtrtofth %  haw •b0%, nnlH.iiv ^.nd n-lnie.1 pi.KUiemenl will nee.1 •, t i \p.itided ;it a more rapm rata UJ n ibe tola] production can be expr. title*' ._. IOBJM malerl-ils were in StMJTl ..,.„. the Korean Mtuatto snbstentW cp-aarVup „f mUH ; .. proeuremenl Action m '" "W" 3 portages Jo^inlarlara w th or dais; ,nd .i ppUo needM v ,i. ttruter SEA WELL !• %  > I ,.,.'.. I %  J Oaj — M'. V. M. 1 1" %  M .V R. i kn % %  %  " lo S ( ii on Monday Mlh July, ISW to) n of CI.SSO at a rato of InloroM not •odlnf A'', lo bo ropald in an lalmenU of aTIM raid Tho h initiilmriil lo bo paid in thr V WOOD CiODDAItn. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Tha oivliralion of Inn Allman III .IT.. hr>'..> M i*-4, gtantag u* Joorph for II.. p Uronio No Ml i-ropei-t of a buaid at Branehbury. of July. naUonal BARBADOS GENERAL HOSPITAL LAUNDERING OF NURSES' UNIFORMS • %  • -i forms WlU \..ned unless they are %  Persons ssnfjal an in poaaaaa pi bigness to become bound s sun iu.nl .it Usf aontract Further tiiirtuulars %  W GOODMAN. SHIPPING NOTICES 40NISIAI. O'Tlllll NS* l*W0 UMB LTO .(MANX I s -CITY or DDerrcul< toHla Moy nd Sydnry Juno 14th. i t at Trinidad abut Julv SS -PORT WHUMITON tily Auaual BrUba.no rarlv Am Molbouina aud July N I M AnaMtt atmmi r. asM ih Mptambar Thow il—ii hava ampla 'iw• in-l hard frvion and aonrral ,ai Corgo ooropsod an tin.-. tail'i* "\ lii llaaalnlra ; daW Of olalm I ahall lhan have hod nolle* And all ponon* Indebted to the MM •out* are r*qiie*t*d to aeltle their inilalay n •"! .h,. %  -•, %  .of Julv iu "HTN WALTER BATSOH MAYNARD. LI. Ilfl-d * i.ri,i.-ruineil c'o D Leo Sor]oanl i Jam*. Street, nrldfetown. Solicilor. on. ir before tha lOUt day of Auguit. ivoo. Itb data wa ahall proceed lo uUUibut* tho aaaet. of the said eataU among the partlaa antltlerl Utareto RS*> li,l recard lo the dabta and elalma only v ) which we ahall then hate had notice. „nd Ih-l — .h-H not be liable lor %  • %  eti to diatributed to any poroon of whoaa debt or claim wo ahall not have l-id notice at th* lime of ueh dmnbuAND all persona ItidObteU to tho aald nun are roqu**tad to settle 'heir j,ml. without debay aled thla ISth day of June. :*> %  IIAHULP ATrOBLOTAH TCDOH. IJ.1KN 1-OIJTA BIACKMAN. AI FRED TAYLOR REID. Qualified BuraUHw. V-l'ill.Ti~Tt BaM fMSS 17 • S0-*. of the North Allantic vcre considered a mutof i/cal urgency by the "North 'Atlantic Council ,n l-ondon this spring. Hevent events make it urgent lhan it was at that uma to build and maintain tbaaa iiefences. %  Under all clrcumslat> I %  ppaaoBt mat the United required lo increase Its military strength and preparedness not only ti. daal with aggression In Korea. but also to increase our conunou delence with olher frw nations against further aggression. "The increased ||nfO#tb whkfa 11 needed falls into three categories. "In the tirst place lo meet the situation in Korea W0 shall need lo send additional men, eipupiueut and supplies %  Qaoaral NtacArthur's command as rapidly as pusraosa "In the second place the world situation requires that wi." increase substantially the site and support of four annex! forces over and above the UMa*0aa which ,ne oat ,. %  i ii. Koraa the third place n assist the free nations associated with us In cttmmon defence, augment their military strength. Of the three Ostejjorta. I til ,wl enumerated, the flrst two involve mi leases in our own military mSMpOwaf and In material sup|K>rt that our men must havi "To meet the increased requirements *or military rnanpower, I hav authorised the SoerotaT) Defence to exceed the budgeted itrength of military personnel for Army. Navy, and Air Force and h .SKAKI. GlNSBCKI^ uiv Th. firsi baich ol 18-ycar old comcrlpti lo >-' % %  ] which a probably oruqu. hi tta world ,a->.' WANTED Hap 'OOK-Mml have utmartmi re%  De-con. „l Black Rock, between S and m Friday lo Bunda*. Resisting Temptation CHICAGO A court order forbids a Chicago us driver to spend his Whitsun cekend anywhere excenl with Hi Oorda Wostanborger told the Judge that the long holiday might be too much of a lion" for her husband to pend it with another womsr SAIXR QIIU. — Banul k> ledge ol jnanwh %  Biat* •alajT Apply Po NJ S.%. BUdgetown wards the stnengthenim: "I OW collective security. It should he enacted without delay. But it I* now clear that the frea nation:, ol thi world must stap up their own security programme. Other nations associated ith us In the mutual defence and assists nee programme like ourselves will neod to divert addltional economic M-n.n.i'<> defence purposes. In ordei to able the nations asooclated with is to make their maximum conribtitlon In our cnniinun d'-tVme %  i aoolttgnrr on our part anil be required. Additional may also be needed lo increase the strength of certain other fraa nations IVbOM security is vital to our own. in i .. OBM Oa the North Atlantic ares, these requirements will leflecl consultations now going on with other nations associated with us in (he North Atlantic :•. si aoofl ..-. ii is possible lo determine notion i %  %  I shall bi -"** a r *quest for such funds as < to be necessary to the attainment and maintenance of our common gth at an adequat* piogrammc i. '• only are all olds called up. ie.ard.ess ol sex rhi %  also are called UpOl Dart of their two-year tano iam. workers m sOttlOmonU rtruill -long Israel's bnrttora. The progtaminc ol (he nanaj (Fighting 1'ioneei YOOtn M %  urmv conscript organi/ation il ..illcil. hi iNised upon lluNJradilion; ol the underground Haganah and Palmach of the Mandate days At that lime, the defense of the Jewish sector of the Country was anised by the Jei>h Agency and entrusted lo pait-tinic volunteers, The palmach. Oat llagar.uhs elite -trikm,; torci. ranabuahed durlni '! %  %  OOOnd *orld War. dm nstiength from the collective selarbieh had borne tba main biunt of the Arab attacks durinj the disturbances of 1921 i 1936. After lengthy debate* In the K at i parluunent), Il arm >^ cideii to kill two blrdi It* i w %  i r ,.,, i, ,.,, tba Palmai h tradition, and lo lorge a link hc'.i.iI i.iel'.\ rneruiti Irill will w Mippleim*nted by locturoi |pan< ral UM namp-lire talks. so thai lln %  'Nalial" will serve a. %  ! Of group will be boysi and sent i< special camps near \ill.n" i.iiltural training will be ouL They will still be under nulilai; daednUno, and will need leave or passes to ^o Into town. just as tho igta in %  ivtn st'ii In an army coup Each monUi. all Nuhal" agricultural irainee* will be recalled to military depots foi BV0 nn %  _'-! uiiing. Alter a year ot this milllarycum-agricullural wuiK. Uk 000 %  CTtpta wi.l be ol bowrnlnj fwrnen and lattllni in .i border selllemeiil. ol — u Uaaj niah latsr to raturn to tbe towns—of completing meir two>-.' military training in norm.il .iimy units. If they choose the former lb ill immediately become civilian settling down i then nev> fcryMarried women ai called up for training time army. Plans also are being prepared foi the I al VI trainitsg of men of the i" lo U class who were exenipi doung Ihe war and womitn in Israel will imdei go military training and will b. • iunlled in the reserves All men and women diwhaigen rrom UM aim> aftei Iheir twoni i i iption seit :i %  will I" raqiiirad to rapoii toi a monthrefresher course each year (on army pav) and also will have iraootl (or a day's duty each month Former omceri and N.COJ artl icrve an additional wen .i real ; i.n-1 is a small counti> and hei .mi towns and cities ale no grrai Horn her Ixirders One her main means ol iiiNni. therefore, will )>e I p iedj "< Wh/ation of the aim\ n eivi ,\ lull the rasulu ,uiny and oordai Mtllemenls hold off attai k Thc High Command's plain call for full mobiliialioti within a few hmii* —INS. fan UM HBI ..gucullur,. IbO Israel Ministry o Dafi oca i 111 he ro] aid by tiv .settlemcnls for .ill work earned out by Ihe conscripts on the %  i %  menu and extra farm hand, tbi %  ..line tima Tba oni %  i ma in %  batch oi %  havo ju-t Kinpl.li'd then ll. ng. were chosen from an Ihe agricultural settlements wl were deferred from military se rina tbe war. In and it ion lo me IB-year ol now being icken Inlo the army f"P two-year periods, tha government is inducting all men and women tM'tween Ihe ages of 20 and 30 %  .. mpted fiom InJJ 'he war for any •dan medical. New immigrants between these ages are given a year'* grace aflt arrival in Israel rastotl being % %  %  up lo give them a 'chance i OlhlT alto contooi ra Colonloa and Domini iarss u -*ssr Archer vs Golfer 1AINI IN OoUera on .. iouth-eVaal Enclanii Uftka niblyed then eve and iWOre (ff Ihe 19th fotever whin tJUB siW a man holing in our adth i.rrews instead of th 1hOdo> : .d A ehe hotel In "Bajgey" and nt all five short ',.< %  .,. I -1 -..,.. IN a 11 VI I'll III. till! PAHI1A 1 | I %  it 1 rni a.M nil %  CAfTTBaW "i 1 n MO siLvan PI H 1 .ROI .Mill -.1 III! INI %  %  %  %  tlfOCl V. i PlftlNG .HAIRS Ma ,-.', .11 NA 1 AIIIM 1 I'Allt %  AJW Hot KIRS N.PAW it IOOANY BOOK I AM II %  % %  WASH i ran nLAun I AIM I I ,1,1 I I DHBhKINU 1 .Mil I. I • iM.i i urn Mf mil nCorpse 9 From page I il used as a decov by one Ol tba dafandante i)ur,.ni t.. (inwn Point Cuinana Dr John Me Dougall who pertoraMd the iit mortem statel thai when the body was found me skm wi raadj i-elad and the budy was bluo With gass's hich caused dacompoattlon Tho police lingerprint exi>ert aamuined that he was unable to gi" %  > itigfiprmt becsiise Ihe skin on the hands pealed off like i %  lentify DJ i ultink off Ihe -kin fron ^nd comparing wllh police flnge. %  % %  %  The hearing is continuing — (Can Frr%-i Keep Your In Fine Trim!! We are offering the following DUNLOP ACCESSORIES BIlAKr RLIH'KS Mil* laassffl I VRF I I \ l \:IIANP < .1(11'-FCDAL KL'BBERM SAIIULEM HIM TAFEH PATCH STRIPS 2*r s RFAIIIFIX I \ I" HI uma AMI Mini. 11 OUTFITS VALVE i i i-.i'.i i: SPECIAL PRICES LARCiK AND HMALL Sfil.l'TION I'L.MPH I'l Ml' \\ laOBBI ( IIROME-I'LATEII RIMH KIIAIISIFK COVFRH AMI TI B:s 2S* r Y~iT i RAt INti OOVaaU AND 11 aajf 2g~ % P 4 f AKTIKR COVERS A'.iD TIBES 2B IH" DEALERS ECKSTEIN BROTHERS STREET DIAL 4269 'TO HO AC.wf>



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F.V.i -:v R1RRWHIS ADVOCATf THURSDAY. Jt'I.V 20, 1S0 THK LONF. RANGER S^RICP T^iMK Wp BETTER G€TAW!] (co*e ON.^IVER') C WE KIU. -USA .-^^ %  — ^ A > S t <. /JE'.'E SOT TO OCCsr • %  € ) \."i WLE WE FINO OUT v*v . Mar mile 97c.. COc.. 32c. Ground Mix Spice 41c. Ci liter 37c. Celery Sull 30c. Cmlm T. Salt 36c. Paprika 53c. I aimed Meals. Etc. ii.in Loal V, .,1 l..,af .. \H'itii:i Sausages C. & II Breakfast Roll Danish Cocktail Sausages •Be. 47c 26c 9Sc Meal Paste 20c. Krafi Cheese & Macaroni BAHAMA PINEAPPLE JUICE. J3< ORANGE & GRAPE FRUIT JUICE .28^ JAMAICA ORANGE JUICE .44^ BOTTLES OF APPLE JUICE 76x BOTS. OF CLAYTON'S LEMON BARLEY. ...93^ CLAYTONS LEMON JUICE CORDIAL 93< JERSEY TOMATO JUICE. 25* SETTLER'S TOMATO JUICE 28*^ Marmalades. J Syrups, tie. | Golden Nvruu IK § Brerhilt C'u-lle G. Syrup Haq I'.c Golden Shred MarmalHi Silver Shred Marmalade IT. Hart: Marmalade Ha Coopers „ i,;,. Little Chip Marmalade Hi Custard Powder, Desserts, Etc. KM .is (us: Powder HI Olivers Cu*.: Powder He Ha. Olivers Table Mlfttt 22c Jelly Cream 20c Monk & Glass T. Jelly Id RowatiMi T. i'iiv Its ILniley. Jelly Crystals 20c S-.-.i-Ireei Martbmellow & Chocolle Si.lli Wines. Liquers, Elr. Gilbv's (Empire Red) Porl 52.52 Gilhvs Invalid Port LSI 1.S2 S.A. Paarl Tawny Porl Ml Bolt Apricot Braud> 1.00 Creine de Cacao 4110 Peach Brandy 1.00 Simmonds Milk Stout .:io Jeffrey's Beer .'! Pickles & Sauces. Etc. Mor: Silverskin Onions Tl Gherkins. II Morton's Chow Chow .-.3 C. & B. Cocktail Onions 7" Heim Pkkled Walnuts Tl Stem Ginger 1.21 Salad Cream 1. Mayonnaise Is ^ % % % %  lllllllllllllMllllllllllllilllll ra&





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Tlll'RSD.W Jl'l.V 2il. 19SU BAKBAOOS AliVOC.XTI. PAGt. I ivi Two May Be Enabled QC Girls Waul 'Gombermere Is Becoming To Attend U.C.W.I. I******* A *<< *"*** In TWO STUDENTS will be ablt lo read (or ti. iiy College u( the West Indies if Ihi Legislative Council concurs in a resolution passed bj thi House ol Assembly at their —tini OD Tuesday foi the sum of $5,000 for (he purpose of making the enabling loans Mr. A..m IM IM "cipai or in** UuiVafaiu l imBgai oi lint *ni irwiirs nan IMXIBM IM Oovwiiawmi uiai amon* UM aiaatea WI10 u'Wiii) HI IM tup cxjinin-.in.il ui mi Umv*rsiij C^*ti*| Members made passing comi f cmn n,.r' on MI.UTCJ..Inch were, Aa ^^ ol U|C M^O^M, W( IC raised by Mr A. R. Toppin and mllluls> Uu U UH | Hltr eenieiit. lor General Meeting There are four ^ vnlcrcii llto telween Ihcii ty Colk ge WH UM00 ItlHMfltB i>' %  l.l'l UrtO, out torougn lack of nnanciai reaanrcea, II.-IUIPI ol inem would M able lu altena tne LOtsHJi Tt couiscs wnicn the> WOUIO like b take will ba Ol UWM yean lUmn ana UM estimated annual cost for earn lUMsMl was $1,200 Cullege wsta pitgrant -InItanM Hi Topnan slderatloi) All To He I for V 111 .i They are: That all members of the Chamber be Invited to attend meetings of the Council to listen to the discussions; (bi Thai newcomers to the island wishing to join the Chamber should be required lo reside here for two ptMUf before election; (ci tU a B BB e DrOUl all controls of items in free supfrom the Sterling area; (d) The lack of Commercial reprcsen. icdent parents or guardians ami the ( %  oviiiLineiit 1/rgenl Hi aid that tne University College wanted a repl> almost ImmiiH.itrl> jiid theicloic the mattci waurgent The principle which he thought the Government should adopt was to reward ability lie was aware of the fact that the granting of loans to the two students was creating a (MOcadenl but he felt that there was no dangci in establishing thai M< lation on the Legislative Council Mr. A. M. Brydcn and Mr. G. H. King, members of the Chamber, asked for and were granted four months' le.iv. of %  PMfsCO, Tha E Tiod begins on August 1. The MI. V. C. Gale was chairman yesterday. Meml>er.s present were Hon. V. C, Gale. Mr. T. O. Dowdtng, Mr H A. C Thomas. Mr G D. Ilyiioe. Mr D. A Lucic-Smilh. Mr. C. A Proverbs and Mr. It M. Cave. 'Local Folk Ruined By Vulgar Dances' AT the corner of Dayrells Road and St. Matthias Gap there is a building which carries the sign "Edmonton Dramatic and Social Club and Headquarters ol UM Landship %  Renown". The sign is weather beaten but according to Mr. Dan Bralluvaile. the Manager of the Club, "drama is still going The Club has produced many plays, the latest "The Girl Going to M.irket" having been staged In November last year It was formed In 1946 and the local boxer Kenny Seaman, who recently lost to Al Hinds, learnt his boxing on these premises. Vulgar Dances One of Mr Brathwaite's recent Ideas is to introduce the Scottish Lancers. Caled : >nui. and 4,iudrlues dances lo local dance fans because he feels "local folk are ruining themselves with vulgar dances nowadays." At first the Club started with over 100 members but now It only has about 26 The sealing capacit. of the building is over 1.000. All the players in the dramatic division are trained at Ihe Club and at Christmas they staged the Passion Play. This was well attended. Mr Bralhwiiile still has some of the costumes that were used in past plays Apart from the dramatics other activities of the Club .ire handtealnncing. boxing. weight lifting and indoor games Cricket \I -OF GIRLS 0 1 r\N C'OLLElil I.IHI hard al I guls repreaennng the! %  %  • M girls hold kfcai ni..uh tin then grounds The game was between a side I skippered by M. Wood -• %  llnd Hutson's XI i the match But Grace Cum beruateh if Wood's XI good Killing OBtpiej |j Outstanding bowlers were M H H '• %  Swell Atw-ct! i tion of a man tad %  ngth She demand 'roni the baUiiit m ,.1 side. Mrs G H Adams. %  nuatrei •t Quean's College, told 111 'Advocate" raatardaj that ahthtmght thl w.,> vera hlfli and riM Is el the oplnloB thai the ii: i 11 iiVi-i match, rill stand ,i nod chaaco again*. ny other local girls* team and also against the Blfhop'i Hig • School This was only a pnetlea match but many Queen's Col:. told the "Advocate" yasatrdaj th.it IMS would Uka la Island XI of girls Barbadian Education —Says Governor al Speech Daj H FROU baing .. pooi relation, Combarmera uuj a lenlor partner m education In Baxfaadoa Bui bi much mora i . His Bxcellenc) tht G (vernoi Mi A W 1. SavaM ,0 '*' P'IP 1 '^ •" Conibarmara School jrad terday Hbl Bwellen> y was addraaVlnfl tha Kathenng at Spae d D] rxlateatini; tha • yean i* and 1JM9 Mi Savaga said that llajor N.Hitt had rafarrad to thi Report on Technical Education and if only v>nu raconunan lationa •* %  *• toupsamantad thay would carl ilnlj require the further develtipinent ,.f CombanaaTC for whui "tlu'ii is a le^itunale public demand". Mr. MotUey IB) said thai dealing with the quo il lon of huther education, he would be the last person to stand in the way l the OovaffDJnent U) assist people in cpoirimt their houses or purhasing or repairing tlshing Ixiats If that was the policy the Government was going lo pursue, tt II well and good, provided that they were nol going to n flesh of one and stone of uther. But if the Government maraly landing; money to students l-ecause they were recommended by the Principal of the West lAdl*. University College, he would say ,o because it must be borne li m i n d that Barbados, beside Awarding two schniar^hips to the West Indies University. lUM aworded four Barbados scholarships and two Island Scholarships It might well l>e said lhat the eaiUUdatai who competed for olhei •cholarships in the West IndieUniversity College, might reach .'Xhibition OT open scholarship standard, and could thereby benefit from University education. The parents of these students might be in inch straitened clrmmstancai thai Ihey could IM afford to and them u Oovarnmenl %  ->• %  prcpafad lo censidt r other cases from time to time, he was preuared lo support the resolution ihoneh it was creating a precedent. Finally Mr M "i. uggetted that some provision be made in the agreement where 1 'v these students WTMTI lualhled. vnold return to Barbados at lei^t for a period of three reai U iii no Ihal then wi a shortage of i necialist masters Mr. Alldrr with the |D students and was prepared to vote for Ihe resolution. The Government shi.uU take rare In spending memrv in ili.il dlreellon to help ttMaa al Ihe hollo m before siK'iulnii mine* In heln thn*'" vth were in beller linanrii* MMiUons. Mr. Crawford (01 said that he wanted In rlarifv the point mnde t>\ Mr Mottley before 'he raaoluvoted for. He did nol want the Government to make the In-ui becniue of lh" reeomnd itlntu %  •' thi Prlnelnal of Una tlniversilv Collet;, of the West Iiulies. hut merel\' l" gil .n.e to the iwo %  tudanti who won ARRlvlNfi from British Oulana i,.,<.,.,! of it. vesterday by the 76-ton schooner He walso of the opinion thnt Timothy A H Vonsluidniori was t ri r students should be made so a quota of 1.000 bags of rtca .-me hark tn th* eotoriv and givi This ship has brought the week'si their services if needed (Irst supply of rice for the island.! It was berthed in the inner basin of the Careenage where it will Itegin unloading to-dav. The Vonshiurwion also brought 1.100 bags of charcoal, 61 Ions of firewood. 42S pieces of sawn greenheart and 112 wallaba ix>y^s T WO si IH.FN IWATIIS occurred recently. Louis Campbell. .atehnian of the Dep:ntment of Highways & Transport, died in his hut at Baxters Rti.tr •clock on Monday night Th, body was ramovad to the Public Mortuary what* ;i i-'st mortem ; later performed" by Dr Ken. Death was ittrlbutad la cause* On Tuaaru • M ni i old Kan neth Goskln of Fills Village. Si James, died suddenly at nil home An lutoptj wai parfornMd i>> h Knt .it ami again death was Itribuled to natural causes His Excellent > %  M s..'. IM ud Mi w. Lambert, l'i:\ the School shortb aftei 1*0 pjn he j They were mat bj M-ior Nootl ung Bod) %  n i DN Lord Matron Aooompt ii A %  nd Mi ' A O HI ts.tii.nt> UMh tha Royal Baluia from tht Quard of Honour under UM totnm.ind of Capl D II Perkins ||. id. %  ed the Guard. Mi H A Tudor, ('.'a-mar. In BU opg gun i on arl was a plaaiua lor bun to His Esceltency and Mrs Savage, on behalf of he Qovrming Body of Comberniere. • |1 Ih.lllks fui il .• itui • 1 tutth on that day aim Your Fxcellcn.y i •<• eonling to distribute Ihe 'r IV M" T IMPORTS YESTERDAY FIVE cases of tyres. S cases of tractor parts., one case of brazing rods. 07 hundles of iron rods, 22 bars of iron rods, two packages of valves and olher pieces of equipment arrived in the island from Trinidad yesterday They were for use In the construction of the new runway at Sea well. The equipment was the cargo of Ihe scht-tm-r Garde.no W Other general cargo arriving by this vessel included cedar boards. ryUndan ol x.i^ Anmtan i bitters and rayon piac> t'RTON BEST U DOW detained at the General Hospital suffering from .i broken leg Best a utent of Doughn Village. St Andrew was attacked by a bull t Walkers Bay recently R HAROLD KIDNEY of Strathclyde. St Michael, reported to Ihe Police that the Pickiek Pavilion at Kensington Oval as broken and entered between Saturday and Monday and a tity of cricket balls, rig arettes and rash, total value S3I 81, were removed. They aie property of the Plckwles Club. • NIGHT the Mohile Cinema will I'.IVC .i shm at Ednembc Plantation yard mjunl] bR residents of the Edgei'ombe area of St Philip P ARENTS OF BOYS and girl: of ihe Barbados Youth Mov men! were told of future plans of the movement at a meeting held %  I ihe Youth Ccnlre m Bridge Road. After a discussion many parents promised lo support the movement T HE l-OI.HE BAND. un-i. i Capt. C K RalfOn, will be playing at the Elementary School Singing Festival which will be held at the Combcrmere School Hall, al 4 30 o'clork on Friday waning This Festival UUUM UM form %  I ncarl gtvan by the Massed %  i w. ley Hall Boy.--' and Girls .mil St Marys Boys' and i is a means of enct iKlng Community Singing bet* the schools Conceit similar to this took place recently by the massed choirs of eight of the 11 schools of St. George and it was a great suecaM It was held at the St George's Boys' School The programme is as follows: — II Grand M... V n B| Empire Brit < %  •• 1.1 %  .-.-1 i.. 11 ll U The Headmagtar u-en read hla Raport afiai wh oh Hu %  %  A VOtC 0) 'I BI ll bj Mirs Burrowa.1 UM r of UM UA %  ernliuj Bod) On the Ibjhta i the Bchoo) Choh condu led by Mi. Oarald Hudaon The ••>llrsl sang the s, ho Tha was followi four songs For the thud 't Wnit/inK Matilda,' n \ -i Folk M-y wet %  loudly aprlaudcd and apart the variations the bOJ words lo this lUghl fusing song spleiulidU Arts And t raftThe programme .limased itl E irrnts and friends visiting ih< uhlbltion of Art and HRndh i lone by Ihe bOM BBM paid lo tha Ubrai i ind eombuied Oaograpny I Room where ., ilcnioiisti.il film w-iis shown .„> UM A Physical BducaUoB rU*| daoMgutnuna tha firlom phaai %  Pnj % %  il Bdui n in a bo) s cataai it I Sou mere School w.c ibm gjvei by !".> %  batan i the 8 lo 18. The PoUce Ban.) under Capt C K liaison was in allcndatin and while the guests were entertained to Tea on the Lawn the Hand played popular tune lor others. In his Bd In 'I Kx.ellcntv Hiv Kirsl On Major report mere ihe i'.i.;t 23rd ol July Noott pi< BI Heaorruuttai ->i c in it he analyaad the fa< plea pal tern ol a school and lie indiraled a programme ol dgrValOpnM be built tin UM %  UM late Mi B by Mi AM, Today he has report progress and the ra tu ll ol utal programmiof oV on your behalf I ODOoTahllale bin %  nd his staff of the School or thei ,ent 3. Combined Clw.ir ..• Thr Dr Suvrano Sob %  O No. JunnHo "Uaniiifta" Leaves Dock SCHOONER Mamiata was lowered off dock yesterday after undergoing a few days' repairs It Is expected to leave port for British Guiana on Satunday. Going on dock in place or this vessel was the Lord Combermere. The vessel has been docked mainly for scraping and painting of its hull. What's on Today Grand Session* w.ae %  %  Meeting of Christ C harrh Vestry. 3 p.m. Mobile Cinema at M Philip •• % %  Uatll" %  %  \ Btti M bi Btandu n ftvptantt a*hl I: %  t'r. r %  IssW %  %  lal i .. %  Tho 1 ..) t. %  lt ,i..„ Ja lh Wrlth All h Niahl %  %  l i .-. M U Th* K na Reece Wants Fish Shed Erected AN Address tabled, by Mr. Reece In the House of Assembly on Tu£*d'iy Hriw Ihe attention of His Exrelleney the Governor to the fact lhat a shed for the use of fishermen and vendors of nsh needed al Silver Sands in lh parish of Christ Church The House asks the Governor b take such steps as are necessar to send down a resolution for .um of money to the House o Assembl> to provide for the cost of erecting at Silver Sands. Christ Church, a shod to be used for UM purposes mentioned above. Another Address which was tabled country districts iltboulb there was more wind with the heat than experienced in Bridge town, peoi "UivinB Halhsheba spent li-.' grealet of their das n IU raj i n the l>each Assize Diary TODAY No 8—It v. Dennis VWlc No. II—B v Hhirle* 1 RID AY it— R v. Milton Phillipli being a pour relalluii. Combermere I* beeomlm ;> senior parlner in rduratlon lit I'..IT %  ..!.. But there U murli more to do. Malor Nooll hareferred to Ihe report on Ter h nlral Education and If onl> torn. of Ihe recommendation* are Implemented <' %  win eertaaal) rrqulre Ihe further develuu merit of t'omhermere for whirl there b a Vgllimale publit demand "I take this opportunity to BpOtoi > past negit-' rlerring to the School Cade! Corps which on a recent occasion provided, as today, a really efficient Guard of Honour on my arrival at Ihe School When I was a School Cadet %  • bad .i < luai I ">. %  Corps i nt % %  ra lian of ihe iu admaster. I foi.1 man) ol hti betlo n-iiinirude ol UsStruetions. but one lesson Ml nty memory. When rahaaralni lor a Guard of Honour, he uaed to say Keep your eyes in front of you .>* Ihe gentlemen pass and if I catches •tchlng them I'll wear your feet to stumps in Defani'' I Pi .ti<" I think his voice must have been heard at COM • today as Ihere was not a tlickei in the eyes of your Guaid of Honour today. i confraUdate lite Bofaool I fond of s'nging but 1 am not en family Of:en in Church BDC hear a stage whisper "Mummy tell Daddie lo sing quletai I have ;ilw,ty pul this crlUclsm down lo petty Jealousy, but perhaps it would hav e been avoided if I had had the ttenefli of Mr. Gerald Hudson's luit when I was younger Mr Hudson is one of ti modest men I know, but you will agree that the gtaaid prid the appreciation of this Island owes much la Purchase Work I should like also b tribute lo the Headfr .. the work of Mr. Brooot U not too late for UM maul i a pul purchase some of his presentation to the I regrel thai Ihr rod i lerm being MI OOar, it U nol possible for the leastel lo be (Urn Ihe ..-mi Sperrh Day holiday tab week bul I hope. YI.H.M NOOIL al a eonvenlenl lime earl* nrxt %  erm '"ii will Init'llto make Ihe .ii i .* mii-iii' II I l< honour Ihr HI. — Ill l. .-I.IO ir. ihe KM kM las I luwa <. ting on the probabun3 i ial the inajoi iiy oi UM DO) BOd mils I have Btidroaead will be allvi .' %  hen the yaar I NO lawn Some uf you will recall thai there was quite a II. 0BBOBUJ 01 UM prea an l year lP0 l % %  %  .i M sontething rather pee* ial that we had reacluM lMi hall way through the cagktui) even though some rnauataiatti poll the fun by poUll that the half century nark arould not reaUj be raachad until the befinnlnj i hot gay fus-. i'1'i .i ball can* tury viii be rMthuuj lo whal will iptn when : Century baconuM the .%  .ii I MM 1 OOII |jf|| A.I). Than was as a mallei l iwaodoui am lh ; .. pi 'i. :, . I ihe pear i ooo. i H . N America and Australia had MI baaa then ami very litlle known BOOUl UM KIIMU I part I And Africa Foi one UlUUX it WBI • I h ll believed Iliat Ihe woi Ul was i %  ng lo an end in IJMO A l> BOd man] farmers n-iu^i io -t> t roi'they felt thai da n enul I be aa one to reap than It is vn> hart lO think outsell I. iek to tht INI c OIIMII'-I the t loaeal magltitude Qg Ihithai have taken pl.ee •since *an Bul one point is I think wotfrl lundarllnlni and anal i* uiat. esloeniially. the changes haV* not taken plat ah] %  .i tl B0U1 the whole um ,.-.,, bul nave quickened to iveiv ranis ll extern In the I. • 180 <>f them t ma OUght even ItMke %  '""gh %  i rend} generalization "iiri say al the world of IHC0 A l> WI ON like Ihe woi Id of 1000 A.l> than thai ol I960 wa like lhat ol I BOO 'Jusl consider one poinl I im Ihe liiun of bKlor> until 4I1011I IStlll the fjslel peeil ->t win. h a man t.oild travel wag the speed of 4 KallnoinK horic 1 < so la-sl thai lhe\ run right away, so lo sOakak, Irom Ihr sound of Ihelr own eagtBJ 4111I tra\rl %  1 ahsolul' silenee. Man ran send lii lluiuchts at ftr srealer si^rrl .till in f.irl 41 Ihe speed ..I the f-leili ir lurrenl whiih travel" Bl Ihe r4le of ItMM mihs | Baeeeat h. IHIIO tha • dot kepi %  1 > communlcatl 1 i| i, rpati hi s oiiiim: vaaaeai Today ba 1 .MI exchanaa %  doaan lalegrs within 1 da) with Whitehall if he .heo incUnad %  avan get them on -. . hone .1 I,on Ii SI. Philip Murder Trial itt mean Ih4l .11 ihr witnesses. tt Ihe I'Misr, ui are lying 1 i>ii must look Bt each bil ol evidence and balance one ...MUM the other" %  ibmitting %  .-.. % %  had met al Eugene Wauls place 1 aaaad, a pparenuj like the I ?'ii thei man vi.siting the place %  Od B0 WOnder because in be I ng daughter there The PneeCUttOn was also suUinitting thai theie WOI BO other wa] U which %  .-ed could have met his ieath. m the circumstanns tlie> I heard, except by UM the aceuaed No txplanatinn Who else had OOBM ont.u t w nil bint' A 1 had been made about BUytUU I ing an opfMrtualtj to kill him no explanaUoo bad bean given %  should wish to .1 B0 %  aV FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR PETS USE I'HIIM I I" I IMin III II antl IM I.WMT KM I I It II. JASON JONES & CO. LTD Distributor, I %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  litBCned that if thes had ii dOUhl the houl.i Ingiven the bat %  rOUbt II IbO] felt that the %  bhl .It.till .it UM .in.'1.1 iin ... euaad but thai ... gtenunUng olreuan % %  ..our, which would ntehaM UM ime to one of manslaughter. Ihey were entitled to rctuin njch rardict Theirs was a duty which should nol be shnketl They Bit 0 it the same cart.imi aHaaaOB hai thai bad givan to %  ni ..I.,) leturn th. huh ihaj Ihought was the rightI Ihe \rlini Ihlef Julhe sum mini: Up lo the Jurt ilelmrd murder and rsplaiurd "niallif (lorelhouchl expressed or lm plied Where rsprrssrd nulur uu coiieerned. he recalled Ihe rsideuce ol lulsr Mi>ium alhiul 4 threat which she said Beeoead had used lo deceased. and suiceslrd th.il II was BM hnise and >*iur 411 ekpreolon lo amaunl lo expressed malice. 0 5 jLtfUS?>M>& 1 \ I REXALL j RENOWNED THE WORLD OVER If they id Tli.it tin UM etruguaed end aa gluuj or th.it whan lb puraued the BI I Luad Ihg lattai stabbed him. thai would be sufll-I OB which tlie> could kmpl) malice and retui n 1 ol guilt) ol murder, provided .; that the accused had no %  on foi slabbing II was for the Prosecution to prove 1 il .t foi the Jurj -.^ who hai ii bad been 1 ial li-hetl Provocation The Acting Chnl Juatl 1 Jury thai than bad ban %  it.01. .inn.uni ii provocation dn the pari ol ihe deceaeed 11 was dut] io iilit-. t lliein that .„, m 1 ng to the law. UJMy COUl il, •onvnt on .in unutai II .1 Bt nl.-n. f they weie satisfied thai lh. %  UM) ..II,-. I ..1 ...til.1 plj •>•* OX] ,. mg lhat 1 td was guilts. |f Hi,,,,. BCU could be explained eithai bi ha guilt en innocence ol Ihe ... Is for ( Al>|-lt I'll.l R 1 OU Bad IM 1 1 1 N/ \ MIX 11 III >>bi itemajM t i.l VI t KIM and IIIVMill 1 IIMIMM MB K XOI.IN TIM I.IK I Mil K 01 MAQNI si \ st KI r 01 ll\ I'OI'MOsl'IIITrS ill Branches of KNIGHTS DRUG STORES S omeone's III!. ..I %  Iiii|irn\eiiieiil ? . 1 to th,. cpiostion of : inaernanti it ,m impi Uf Haold Alter ravknabai autaal %> iol Uie evldrme .ind 1 ndin Ihe Jury ul Ihr submlss|.no made b> bulh tounsel. the Act III! Chief Juslirr told IIIMII the* ere Ihr sole judge* or Ihe fail Ihrv must he s-.li.hrfl hrt.iinl 4II rrjsonjhlrdoubt lhe must have a moral foiivictlon of Ihr ulli af the accused before tin 1 rould t.n.1 him guflty. TheJun retired al 1113 and n WIN WITH SPALDING OVER 70 YfcARS OF SPORT rdii 1 fav Of the .in . SPALDING I ..m |ual ming thu II ntrat|; to point oul Ihe baendlble nauj. •• UM davelopnvanti that have %  in ihe leal IM nan And I naad scarcely add that it r nol only in the realm ot 1 .!.• aioutiMBb plan The whole world has lieen trans. forrnad rinn isoo ihe prncens is gouajt on every day and every 1 as far Bg .,--. %  probably i* Ith until tinyeoi 1,000 and I II ha' %  %  i %  la rectta ,\. kua t.n \ an.1 developnierd km* u batter than 1 d aid mention % % % %  ',.. : %  1 Bl il 'hs I 1 a grant of CJ Iducauot Today thi i goandltun C300.000 And UM • V vears will pM further ha %  H ( % %  tn la w i iM i ai will b upon to puq an I'M. 1 l pan In ha %  publu Bert I %  %  to beetound briJi %  %  : 10 II %  •• %  ->' %  i U| -hai do not change 11 •he character of IndlvidUl uresaed In louragc and inUhfulnew — and above all In the Christian revelalu which we date all um % %  %  eonctiMtoo %  %  occasion — "I M lo lh* m*n who Mi—I Al lh crooirnadol Oh "Or** aw lishi fl And n replWd. %  And 1%  i MM %  LAMP SHADES Made ol washable material and suitable lor ceiling lights, wall Fixtures or Table Lamps. Beautiful Pastel colours. Piices Irom $3.50 to $11.20 CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., LID. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street ### till: VIII MOHHI VYCLB Mint 11. O&loc&its. g Till: NEW MODEL I..K 141 ( t .. rfiil. l>piniiilor ryrlp—in In. I it's ihr ni'tifi': WATER-COOLED HAND-STABTED and NOISELESS l|ir in. li in ii nm.i.l inr. SII.M1 I1KIVKN I'nr Simplifil>. Ii-iinniii .mil Itiflmi: IMi-iiMiri'. \H


Tharsday

July 20
1950

Priteeé:
FIVE CENTS

Yerr 535





FRESH U.S. TROOPS LAND IN KOREA —















oh zm ‘4 = GUARD OF HONOUR FOR THE GOVERNOR | R d R B til .
1
Not Guilty” Verdict heds nenew battite
In The St. Phili . r ej
x e
e BI
“9 Selecting | Kor Taejon
M .
urder Trial | H-Bomb BY LIONEL HUDSON,

; LPHONSO BRATHWAITE, young man of Sea View. ta : ; Saas
x St. Pillip, eee ~, if he did not believe it was Sit Te art Amphibious Poree, Pohang, Dong
rue, and then stepped slowly out of the dock of the Court ae , ORE: se 4e
of Grand Sessions a free man yesterday. A jury had is 1 e€ ne KOREA, July 19
=— him of the murder of Lionel Carter of the same WASHINGTON, July 19 tgp ih ler by Americ an a a ee aoe
ocality. Site for the plant to build the aircraft, advance units of the nited Siates
wide Sal tie tee ed i seative, trong, well ASMEAtettan alone Eee] Amphibious foree today moved inland after es
eae — ye see are of the Town Hall where tent tockey ie kine tablishing a bridgehead here. The bridgehead
or a day and a half he had sat on trial for his life.





had been consolidated by dawn and more troops

Commutice of the American Con-



















































In ‘Floating Corpse” Trial























: ! | gress. The Sub-Committee said ippine i the ¢ ay, The
__Carter died as the result of a{ Mr. Dear then posed a number | Tee? teh sitet artabt corer ace: oan then landed slipping into the calm bay. They
Easter SUanad cine ie hung Jest |of questions to the jury. The first | ae 80,000 hectares came from ships which disgorged hundreds of

aster Sunday night, April 9 after} Was, had Louise Maynard been : : se Wad me
what witnesses described as a|really on the scene when tha The statement while not spe landing craft fresh from Far Fast bases,
short struggle between himself struggle took place? Her version | cifically mentioning the hydroger 7 It was white dracArthor’s
and Brathwaite. Dr, Tappin said|of the affair did not agree with | bomb said: “of course, the new ° e fresh trdops were pouring in
it was @ sharp-edged weapon|that of the other witnesses, and | alonen ey e, constructed and He Russia Will through the beachhead without
which caused the wound, But the |I'r. Tappin’s evidence ave the lie igned to carry out the President's Hinoaltiéh that th the ”
Crown produced no weapon. The] to her statement that the two men lirective of January 1, 1950." On ° ee i ca < pris Rea
Prosecution called 13 witnesses;| were face to face when the blow hat date President Truman an- ithe raw [78 ee PrOKe “Tae Mee, aye
the Defence none, was struck, /nounced he had told the Atomic ull by opening up massive gun

“You are discharged and may It was not part of his duty | Commission to go ahead with the | barrages and flinging their
go,” His Honour the Acting Chief] to prove who killed Carter, but | H-bomb. No hint was given as ti SAYS US. GENERAL fighters into the air battle
Justice, Mr. G. L, Taylor, tgld Louise Maynard, according to jthe site of the plant except to agnin
Brathwaite, and adjourned the her own evidence, had as good THE GOVERNOR, accompanied by Capt. D. R. Perkins, inspects the Guard of Honour at Com j Say that “one of the most import HEIDELBERG. July 19 At the same time thetr infan
Court until 10 a.m. today. an opportunity to kill him, -or havhiese' Séhool yaslanday ant criteria” in its selection wil’ Lieutenant General A Van var ted ‘hs tim a ri :

Prosecution perhaps a better one than any- : : ra : i ae bay te pales be the need to “minimise its vul- § Fleet former United States Com- |! a ou ig see oe

The case for the Prosecution one else, 3 ee nerability to enemy attack.” mander in Greece predicted here vas : ‘ i royght there Tri
was conducted by Mr, Frank How did Carter get the wound? 4 i 1 | ‘ Y > D I I i shentir, to-day that Russia will withdraw} Where drove out southern
Fields, Acting Attorney General.]!{ there was any doubt, Brath- ugar ounel Jj l / Ma kK 4 eae her support from Korean Com-j “°f! ts :

Brathwaite was represented by wie was entitled to be acquitted m2 | ee munists as soon as they lose their} |, \ 2 hundes wie — ae
Mr. J. S, B. Dear. . The Attorney General in his tt 5 ’ T 1| ) initiative in the battle vit tle . shter overhead = pilayec

Hearing of the case started | 0Utline, when dealing with the ommiuttee Ol ONIA [ P 1R] L {ME NI Nehru Renews American troops \ e to what may prove

Monday, and as it continued | question of provocation, had said * | 4 L A | P LT, End I saw it happen in Greece and] 'h fateful battle . wAr

yesterday Dr. L. S. Tappin was|that the nature of the weapon M t A | roposa 0 Enc it sure will happen in Korea, Van] thur cle'med Iecesse or hi

recalled. He said in answer ‘to]¥US€¢d was important. But the ! ee Ss gam In London E ii : 4 Feet sald, diving short’ ston} United -Matlins fores

Mr. Fields that it was possible} Prosecution had produced no (From Our Own Correspondent) | Korean Crisis here. The General is on his way} And an air official statme:

but highly improbable that affer] Weapon. The doctor had said it LONDON, July 19 4 . from Greece to Baltimore wher>'said that British and American

receiving the stab in the lung} W@S a sharp edged instrument, so A special committee of the In- (From Our Own Correspondent) WASHINGTON, July 19 he will take command of the/aireraft knocked out or damaged

Carter would have been able to iar te had a wide ae ternational Sugar Council resum- LONDON, July 19. India’s Prime Minister eka Sig States Second Army. He/45 North Korean planes yesterday

traverse the distance spoken of | decide from — razors, cane bills, |eq its meeting to-day after an\ r > ep x ‘aad hes oie ty ' Nite gmaneteiaas


by some of the witnesses. eutlasses innumerable types of tiabeitas : he ce . ee - The THE SETTING UP of a Consultative Assembly on Neheu se wed his proposal t(# had beon “startled” eden daw. today-at:inaheepolieeina

He clarified what he meant when | knives ete. Committee is considering a dr Colonial Affairs is urged by Mr. R. L. M. Kirkwood, mem- United eee China into the| intervention in Korea tit la line stretching from the Yellow
on Monday he had said collapse Where Was Site ? agreement to fix the werld sug ber of the Jamaican Legislative Council in a letter to The SALA ae as i step towar { ha fav kat Sih. deeisnthnd? het Mee to tha Bence . a8 hens
would have taken place in a couple The next question was, where | price at agreed levels, which was Times this morning. dit Nehr : Sea aa . a said, “Russia made it positic after American troops established
iter tne we ne Si had Evelyn Shepherd been that! prepared by a working party set He thinks it incredible that nothing similar to the Strasbouty | once to Pacbéte oat - : o clear. when it said t ut i not} their bridgehead

r of seconds, not necessarily j 9 : } > 6 . a} v4 » s rejection terfere “internal” afta f
tre tanoshiins n i. on didbibeecar Be fad Meee ye at ; the a on of the} Assembly is being attempted to bring together political leaders 6! [the iden Of -aeatiug “Gamumorist tips pe oy itern ir Two tresh. Ameridan “Bivinons
+ ’ . ‘ yuncil on June ¢ . 4 : ‘ dah eal nto the b .

The Chief Justice remarked} Maynard whom he submitted was oh will, be recalled that the, Britain and her colonies. China as a preliminary to a possi Yan Wiset. said that’ ther we 4: je into i ° eae pice
that one of the witnesses had put! merely a woman who wanted | Cuban proposal that the world In 1949, British exports to Brit-|ble settlement of the Korean War.Jeng ehance whatsoever’ th Th ir task was, to ‘carry yut i
the distance traversed after the! publicity as star witness for the price—be mat lose than three avd’ lish colonies and protectorates, he |throush the Security Couneil Russia would seek to foment] Pier TASK was fo carry out
struggle at the distance between | Prosecution. Shepherd had said]; 41) cat t: F.O.B SPORTS points out, greatly exceeded her ‘ - Be heal ale further fightin Sonat Pig | PONE meation, sins coma nae
the witness stand and the jury | that he had up a lot of rum, aha hot ohne aie. mint exports to the “Council of Europe’) {na new note to the Ameri-TGieek armed Forces aré how in| eanithaaea a: ¢ thc Ron's, the
box. In answer to Mr, Fields Dr. If he did not know exactly | hair cents onan dite Geainas countries, ; can Se retary of State the Indian fing shape’ he asserted, “and| 70 ee wha eataKItabed the
Pappin said that was possible and | where he had been or what had basis of the liscussions for a draft N He begins by saying that “as Lwader eauee POR: ROK SBIOR. OF hthey will prove to be a real fore bridgeh 1,000 strong in it
probable. happened, he could not be blamed. agreement 7 | Se things stand, there are indications Communist China as demande | fo). peace in south-ea Burope". seri: ethees ‘and: with ‘relisobte.

Replying to.Mr. Dear, the doc- | But every witness had said Shep- y uhaerstoid however, that other] This aheracen aes Pole that many British eae woul by Soviet Russia would not | . He admitted that the econormt: mente: still vvriving——the latest at-
tor said that a left handed man|herd was present when the proposals beside the Cubans have wetite 4b the teaseieiee. chauatll if granted freedom of action, leave |“an encouragement of aggression outlook in Greece was gloomy but| tack meat in. eagle. bestiam ot
could only have inflicted such a}struggle took place, while Shep- since been put forward—in par-|'} Club. will he. Pastor vel Bers. @ the Empire. - ealf-covernment | ie said that in making this ap-}said that he thought conditions| fre in the grim Peninsula wat
wound standing behind his vietim. | herd said he was not there. Seek Por Dtwitan ropGeal=ab cudas and Police vs. Snappers. The drive tor self-government proach to America and Russia,{would improve as Marshall Plan
A right handed man could have} There was another question: | cular é sede train Act nile ‘Snappers "who have only f {ras found active support in the |india was seeking to “strengthen| Aid increased. —Reuter Expected Flare Up

, i ' that the present draft agreemen Woe” Bheopers WAP | have’ Cary colonies but once self-government t fat ‘palatine
done it both ways. how far did the deceased run after “an inno way be said to repre- played once, drew their game , 4 Gr dicny the United Nations in resisting

By ‘a couple of seconds” he he was stabbed? They could not nent tie -orivtial Cuber proposal with Flying Fish what ten? Wulltiens céccacae to | @eeression .” —— In the north of the battle grea,
treant a “very short time.” H@ accept the doctor’s evidence and |5°"! SOR CA Ate A® SHEET GA Bain _ nhould Bonditas win their match oe Sore soe ag lg dl | —Reuter + am 4 is 5 a small forve was waiting in Tae-
certainly did not mean two min- accept the witnesses’ stories at fhe} The full meeting of the Coun this afternoon they put themselves the markets of Great Britain on | US. Start Call Up ion, advance headquarters of the
utes same time. To convict a man on|¢il of over 70 delegates will be atin de ie A preferential terms, the majority of | American forces, for a battle for

= a : , 1orrow, and a communi- ae oe British colonies would soon becom: . { enected flare y at

the stories of the witnesses on that | held tomorrow, anc : ¢ jfhe city expected to flare up a
Not Cause of Death point would be equal to convicting | ue is expected to be leued | insolvent, a condition ety con=| Pakistan Supports Oo Reservists | us diene
aie scihilities : a? —Reuter sistent with the United Kingdom’: , ? itensified artillery fire was in-

To the Court Dr, Tappin said ie 2 oe bere cue Prot 4 | undertaking to improve colonial S ise it a C il WAS HINGTON, Juiy 19 te ee ) : Nee A st ars
that the thigh wound he had also} jeceased had already got the|"PM.. * | S orl In 7 he living standards,” Kirkwood says.| S@CUPITY JOUTICI United States Delent repay'= | PLR a cee aa ne
found on Carter could not have| wound when he ran, then it was raine ang | pp Colonial subjects had no say in ee ae tat ment announced to-d \ vedi: ubtmele. Bhi aia Ait
been the cause of death. improbable that the ateused had | . the choice of the British Govern- | es) dete HI a i 19, Army and Air Fore * ¢ intitle: replied. te

Mr. Dear addressing the jury} jngi 3 7 , | C ment, which ruled their destiryy. | Pakistan Prime Minister Liaqu a limited number of reservist sins es Fs trikes were
made it clear that ce was not inflicted it O a oteurs f ommongs Ministers charged with the duty | ésli Khan said here to-night that, active dut immediate 1) me iat ied Slain tg Na
basing his defence on a plea -of There was no agreement on of watching colonial interest on tan nperted ie United} announcement said that Navy as ai af planes 30. Sais

in in i N ¢ “ : 1 sider what Nations Security Council resolu-[ would aise tart minediate . 'p - ; Pa
provocation reducing the offence how the accused and deceased s LONDON, July 19 must primarily con ider what hitgeee die : +P wou art t battle
from murder to manslaughter.| had been standing during the enaces av England's emasing 1-0 ‘los to) Uieir constituents will TDR, Bnd NOt ae ot kita ili tt een ve vecell: of reserve pe The American defenders were
His strong point was that the evi-| struggle, nor was there any sug- the United States in the world |what the United Kingdom con- | Interest of maintaining peace as}sonnel. The Defence Departmés!| vig on undeterred by news
dence given by Prosecution’s wit- gestion as to how the deceased PORTSMOUTH, July 19 Soccer tournament was cited in [sumer will say tg other decision was possible for} said that steps wer: bei ‘v0 | that leading North Korean force
nesses was so unsatisfactory that had got the other wounds that British naval and military In-|Parliament on ‘Tuesday as one Thus,” he goes on, far-reach- | Pakistan by the Army and Air Fore unde) eee noprosching the ontekifts of
it was bound to leave them in the doctor had described. telligence chiefs were to-day | reason for the need of sports J.E ae nied = waned a eg Tne object of establishing the at D 7 ; ere ie. Seares ~pthe cit ind throwing out a wide
that state of reasonable doubt by Mr. Dear in conclusion sub-|believed to be working on tho Haire, Labour, told the Commons ae, hand fi . Piacrrrt +4 pe @8- | united Nations was to solve con ? ofc i ) mi pe < =e aN of roling > movement “ated
which they would be bound, ac— mitted that there was only one|theory that a gang of trained tha the flop in soceer, and along ata nietaretan level ye ve flicts between nations by peaceful ii ah Soniean dite: of. the | ulling them off
cording to British Law to acquit) verdict which the jury could|<>_)uteurs was threatenin,!With setbacks in golf, tennis, box Pt i eeeaution hould be to | means, he said.—Reuter. isskh ‘situation eater ; —Reuter
the accused of any offence at all — ieee of not guilty | Britain's Navy Last Friday’: jing, ane creas, Ree pre een aed 6g la be JP | ’ atic

: , of any offence. ada ye are : : arbour, |i2 a blue e US. soccer } @ i . |

He however, toid the jury to Mr. Fields replying, admitted Dactantsti ee ye pour vic tory was such a shock to Bri- | ter-political powers of Great Brit Bib | ==

assume for a moment that}that there were discrepancies in}),))... ae t ot 4} tain, that many newspapers print-{4in and her colonies, To this end | STOCK MARKET |

Brathwaite did inflict the fatal) the stories of the witnesses for barges Oo a ammuni ion os wy ed the story inside a black border, |] one possible solution would be the cad 4 |

wound. If that was found, his|the Prosecution. But there was for the Far East was ‘to Owed | on the morning after the tgurney | setting up of a consultative assem ry rea v

submission was that he had] never a criminal case and hardly by the announcement of suspecte1 | hich was held in Brazil and end- | bly on colonial affair: represent- PRICES GO Up

been subjected to that degree of|a civil one, in which there were sabotage on board the destroyer | oq jast Sunday ing the members of “the Mother Anan zt | . i

provocation which would re-| not discrepancies in the evidence, |“ C@vendisb Two other cases : f Parliaments” and of the legisla -

duce the offence. All the wit- The struggle described in the case of suspected sabotage on destroy Haire said that the Government tures of British colonies LONDON, July 19

nesses — and they were Proge-/ had not been a pre-arranged act|@rs have been reported unoffi-} as a form of wee ial service, should This Assembly, meeting annual Price howecd some quite sub

cution’s witnesses — had said|at which the Prosecution had | cially ) Oe the training of promis~Tly, would discuss subjects of mu- | stantial rises in many sections at AN

that Carter had been _ tthe|asked witnesses to take a front row Naval Security Police to day hel Me eae er ee face tual import such as trade and de-/ th. latest news from the Korean 4

attacker. No evidence had been| seat and te down everything |Switched their inquiries to civil-|no'G up Ms head again In Inter- }fence. The joint committees drawn | pattlefront and the usual enthu

given to show that Brathwaite eocutately, she Skah nie . ians formerly employed at the ger eo. ss i. from the United Kingdom and Co- } in m for advanc ing quotatior 8 Yar 1

had done anything to provoke imsi y Portsmouth dockyards, Britain’s 4, re nd “mee Took = \Ilonial Parliaments could be set up | at the start of a new account

hee ae Wiieierees ores a|main naval bases Hundreds of dim vie wi of the plan and said by the Assembly to study the par lhelped London’s stock exchans

“T bmitti i id Mr ence ounse ac alke per : tovees have been hould have thought it would be |tjeqjay problems of wraphiecal 4. r tal lowe of J J

am submitting, said MYr.| about doubt. But the doubt must}|present employees na t|much more important to raise the }groune of the Colonic: o-da renera wnes ;
Dear, “that the evidgore is ee de be a reasonable doubt and not ajscreened since Friday's vier general standard than to cultivate | * ps oO i m , cealings did ae damage to the
fective, that Your Honour should | whimsical one. The Prosecution }explosions when a secret nava\oon rae > market Speculative upport

= , , s a. s ? $ specialist He said that Britons ; *
direct the Jury that there is nO} was asking them to say that in|Court of Inquiry met here again consider that they touched the|$],.222M TO COMBAT &abled the foreign bond section FOR Y OUR
evidence on which they could! the cir é chic 5 —day. One theory being inves- | t Eee dhenek andes ,to make another spurt, Buying
convict a man of any crime what- had Sook Was Geet it cone Oe ee estes is that a ‘depth charge | “Other coin iabeme Tikes COMMUNISM epeeeg > ek ean ee
soever,” sul n j ic ath- re at with delayed action fuse ave ha dt - fe é attributed in some quarters to

“Some Are Lying” ‘ait. Oe eee ae Anche : is that 1 cigar bomb meade iia ctor Penan tear: WASHINGTON, July 19 Ropes of early eee at - ‘ ’ - D A 4 1¢ ‘ aT ER

Some of the witnesses for the “Your duty is to sift the evi- {again with time fuse was dropped] can, Lee Savold, over British title- Responding swiftly to President | ‘e' bi, jbeh Peau! amen Te 0 5 L qe k a
Prosecution may have been mis- dence,” Mr. Fields said- “Evelyn |in one of the lighters. The third|holder Bruce Woodcock for the |‘fruman’s call for action” without fc unc foo De . am yA ir “ye
taken, Mr. Dear said. But it Was; Shepherd, for example, is not|j: that some highly inflammable) British European version of the delay” Congress today authorised | found the day's best, Oil shi
clear that some of sham were telling you the truth when he] jaterial was left in a lighter to World Heavyweight title; detent at} $1,222,500,000 worth of militar amet, eta en ings ‘price

ying, and he was submitting that; said he had not been at Eugene} work slowly. At Rosyth on the|the hands of the West Indies in|aidq to free nations to combat Cor mx eae” Ree ae m
the Jury were entitled to discard) Ward’s place. But that does|Gcottish east coast, inquiries|cricket, the defeat by Italy in the } munism abroad avis Te speigy dievevcinent | } PROCEEDS PAYA BLE IN
their evidence. @ on page 5 continued to-day into the casejfirst match of the European Zone} passed earlier by the Senate, the | ™ ritie mbed quietiy ‘higher |i)
ae Me tMovendiah” Davis Cup challenge round, the}; y ecurits BNeO Gv y ?
of the destroyer “Cavendist 3 ; Bill goes to the White House for 4 os sla the seOUNc
oreign sweep of titles the % a fand Industrials held their grou poi
It w believed that pieces of foreign sweep of tiles inghe Wik the President's signature Heavy | sort} f Id t f | } INST Al M EN1I s
2 = jag belie that p : bled , ¢ Chat re 2s s ont's gni Heavy! South African gold became firms ; ‘
SODOMY, POISON AND) |see.283.2023 2828.2 S084] American victory by Prank Start | House approval of the Bill fol=/on oth ‘cape “ana toeat suppor {| YEARLY INSTALME
9 L - engine room machinery ther | shan in the British Amateur Goit [owed closely on Truman’s mes- | though the turnover failed to show |{}f
destroyer eee a gg . d ae tournament, and a South African Pinte ca tes oa a ara o «| much aaa oe : wei ; rep it Y E ARS HE NCE
MURDER CLAIMS CRO had a blocked oi pipe, aeod a {victory Chis second in a row) by nas cn = a ay’s amoun ghti the mining section copp iW} 10 0 / ‘ NCE
W N and bolts were wrongly fitted ON) Bobby Locke in the British Open 1 be jus e beginning howed firmnes but \
- , third —Reuter, Golf Tournament.—(CP) —Reuter, | quiet.—Reuter,

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 19.

Philbert Peyson, whose dead
body found floating off Bayshore
on April 20 was last seen alive by
his sister and niece on the night of
April 13 when he visited them,
Crowg Prosecutor C. T. W. E. Wor-
rel] told the Assize Jury hearing
“floating corpse” murder tfial in
which Boysie Singh and four de-
fendants are charged with wilfui
murder of Peyson.



to making an arrest was expecte¢
to give evidence that he accom-
panied Peyson who is also known
as “Bumper”, “Hardy”, Theophilus

Bumper in Singh’s motor vehicle

accompanied by Singh and four

others and went to the western WASHINGTON, July 19

main road waterfront where President Truman to-day asked
Peyson, Singh and others left Ali| Congress to provide hir with
sitting in the vehicle $10,000 million, unlimited power

Ali’s testimony wag that he saw | of conscription and other sweeping
into the which

Singh go boat














in powers in the Korean crisi Ir

Eviden¢e however is being led|he returned ashore and saw other], mess ige to Congress, President
that Peyson alive on the following! men knock Peyson down. He saw!Truman asked for all st ory
night April 14 was seen leaving | comething tied to him and Pe SON} limits on the size of the Armed
Singh’s club, 55 Queen Street, in j was placed in the boat which went| Forces to be removed
company with Singh and the other |+5 sea from which voyage Peyson | He said that the increases it
four defendants and an Indian never returned manpower and material were re
boy Rahamit Ali alias “Loomat Other witnesses are expected to} quired t y to de ith the
with whom the Crown was alleg- lsay that they saw Singh and the | situati Korea 4 ist
ing that Peyson was intimately |other defendants with Peyson at iftee. né ociated with the
friendly. | the waterfront that day | United to augment f

“This was a case of sodomy and Police reveal that Sing! a} militar 1
poisoning ‘ulminating in mur | statement following the The President said t e had
der,” Worrell told the jury lof Peyson’s body, i e Serre f De-

Ali, whom the police took in|dead man and al > nte ervie
protective custody prelimin vi @ On page 7 a ona a units

and
teserve

Navy

as



many individuals
Forces of the
Air Force as

of the
Army
and may be
required

He said he would
Congress in the next
pecific requests for

the amount
$10,000 million
these new military
Truman propose
front mobilisation
be r price control

now But the
he would not he
1 if
necessary
laid
5,500 wor
Senate ar Ho rey

det what

send the
few days
appropria-
of approx-





- With :

e

me
part

Th
or
President

0

ate



arp price r
made ther



an down his

amme ji




aii OF

pened in Korea, and why the
United States again was fighting
thousands of miles from home
“The attack upon the Republic
of Korea”, Truman said “make
it plain beyond all doubt that
international Communist move
ment is prepared to use armed



invasion to conquer independent
nations We must therefore re
cognise the possibility that armed
aggression may take place
other areas”







Followi ; the partial text of
Presiden fruman’ message to
Congre to-day

I am reporting to Congre on
the situatior hict eer
create Kore 4 r

hi hi ation ha

Truman Asks For $10,000,
For Korean Crisis

000,000









meet this situation. I am also |a)
ing before Congress my view
concerning the significance of
these events for this nation and
the vorld and certair recor
mendations for legislative actio
vhich I believe should be taken
it’ thi
Fift of 59 member na
tions have ipparted the Unite
Natior iction to restore peace in
Korea Only a few countfic
ive failed to upport commo
tion to restore peace. Most im-
int of these is the V
Unior
Since the Soviet repre
tive had refused to particiy
the meeting regard K
United States brought t
@ On Page 3





Rates will be

application to the office ol

THE BARBADOS MUTUAL
LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY ©

or

on

furnished

lo

J.N. WALCOTT ) :

Canvassing Agents. _ }}}

DENIS ATKINSON )
fe

PAGE TWO



IR GEORGE SEEL, K.C.M.G
Head of Devel
Welfare n the West
returned b B.G A é
Tuesday from Dominic He w:
away tor one kK

Just Finished the

Subsidiary Exams

R. JOHN ti1UMPHREY lett
yesterda ternoo er St!

Lucia by B.W.LA. A student



Lodge School, he is spending |
long holidays with his parent
in St. Lucia. His father is

Captain in the St. Lucia Polic

Force and their home is in Vigie
John has just finished sitting
the Subsidiary Examinations

The Man With 2,000

Friends!

R. E. J. FOWLER from Van

couver, B.C., is in Barbados
visiting some of his 2,000 friends
whom hehas never seen,

For over twenty years he hi
been a keen wireless enthusias',
or what is familiarly known ¢s
—A Wireless ‘Ham’. He has
friends in over 200 countries to
whom he has often talked and
feels fully acquainted with them

To enable him to meet some
of these friends in person, he
has travelled from Vancouver to
about twenty-five edintries, in
cluding England, France, Norway,
Sweden, Denmark, Germany,
Spain, Italy, Brittany, Normandy,
Belgium, Holland, Algeria,
Morocco, Malta, Tunisia, Gibral-
tar, Egypt, etc.

He is now in Barbados and is
a guest at Cacrabank. From here
he is planning to visit Trinidad,
British Guiana, MacKenzie,
Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador.
Peru and Buenos Aires,

All through the war Mr,
Fewler was with the R.A.F. in
England. He is now with T.C.A.
in Vancouver in charge of Radio
Communications, Instrument and
Electronical equipment.

Since his arrival here he has
met seven of his “aerisg) friends”,
Aubrey Archer, VP6YB; Fred

Olton, VP6FO; Aubrey Lashley,
VP6AL; Sidney Lashley, VP6SD
Freddie North, VP6CDI; Cecil
Sampson, VP6CS; John Wise,

VP6SJ, and by now he has prob
ably met some others.

He tells me that the hospitali-
ty in Barbados has to be experi-
enced to be believed and he con
not thank all of his friends
enough for the ‘swell’ time he
has had here.

To-morrow

HAT Cake Sale I was telling
you about in aid of the new
Y.W.C.A. is to-morrow morning
at Messrs. G. W. Hutchinson
and Co., Ltd.

Here for A Few Days

R. MALCOLM

Chief Accountant of B.W.!
Airways in Trinidad arrived on
Tuesday afternoon by B.W.LA
from Trinidad. He is here on a
few days’ visit.

Back from Trinidad

Holiday
RS. W. H. E. JOHNSON and

BARCANT,



her daughter Maureen re-
turned from their short holiday
in Trinidad by B.W.LA. 9)

Tuesday afternoon

Spent Two Weeks Here

R. WILTON GATES, who
has been spending two
weeks’ holiday with the Donald

Scott's at “Sherbourne”, Two
Mile Hill, left on Tuesday morn-
ing for Puerto Rico en route to
the U.S., where he lives in New
York. City.



SUET, Esq., so much ot
whose time is spent in
trying to improve what he call.
routine details of co-operational
interdepartmentalism, is working
on a new filing system
Briefly the idea is to strike an
alphabetical average by a sub-
division of subject-categories.
Where a name and a subject over-
lap, they are combined under the

letter of the subject except in
cases where the letter of the
name has been previously in-

cluded in the
The success of
pends largely on

subject-category .
the system de-
intelligent sec-

retarial work, as the working
out of the average may lead to
indescribable confusion, and the

decision to be made about over-
lapping is often redundant inso-
far as the checking of new cate-
gories is involved
Working It Out
UET spent most of yesterday
explaining the new system to

SOC SOO OFA GF



_ FOR

Its - -

J«R

ENRICHED

Car

DPRCOSOPIOSS





MRS, POWER
London Express Serviee.
Mrs. ‘tyrone Power ex-
starlet Linda Christian has for

two months been touring the Far
East. She arrived in London jn
time to meet her husband, who
arrived in England this month,
Mrs. Power’s auburn hair fis ar
ranged in peruke style to em-
phasize a perfect profile

She speaks six languages, has
three serious interests: studying
more languages, learning to paint
and finding materials for her
dresses. In London she meats
te study Russian |

And She Can Cook

She has a trunk full of bro-
cades and heavy silks in exotic
colours. One material of vivid
rec silk—her favourite colour-—
has already been made into 3
cocktail suit. It has a bared back
beneath a detachable jacket. She
just bought her 20-piece
in and winter wardrobe kh

has
autumn
Rome

Also on her
jade which
into necklace,
bracelet of her

Although she loves fashions,
Mrs, Power is domesticated. ‘I
was taught te cook, sew and run
a house. I am shocked to find
that girls now are not interested
in these things. How are thtey
going to make a home?”

bought
made
and

she
been
clips

own design.

tour
has
ear

rare





Attcnded Public Health

Course
ISS GWENDOLYN JOSEPH

HACKETT and Miss -A.
Walters, two Barbadian nurses
who attended the Public Health

Course in Jamaica returned home
on Sunday evening by B.W.LA
Most of their time there, was
spent at the Training School in
Kingston, but they also went on
tours of the rural areas. They
were away for about ten months.

Leaving Barbados Shortly

R, GEOFFREY RAMSEY who
recently returned from
Trinidad where he was stationed
with the Port-of—Spain Branch
of Cable and Wireless (W.1)
Ltd., tells me that he has resigned
his job here and is leaving Barba~
dos towards the middle of the
month. He is going to Canada to
settle.

Also leaving Barbados shortly
Carib understands, is Mr. Roy
Colina. He too was with Cable
and Wireless and is going to a
new job in Trinidad,



BY THE WAY —By Beachcomber

his secretary, Miss Myra
When it was found that the H
file contained nothing but four
applications for g licence to use
bicycle clips for wedging open
incubators, from a man named
Easton, Suet said, “You see how
easy it is to make mistakes.”
“Indeed, i

Boddis



yes”, replied Mis:
Boddis. “I find that Mr. Farni-
val’s correspondence with us

about sinking g well is in the M
file.” “That comes.” said Suet,
“of not striking the alphabetical
average before dividing into
categories.” “Does it?’ replied
Miss Boddis, who seemed by no

means convinced
Vothing Doing
PT HE great question in the

world of entertainment is
how long the Filthistan Trio can
hold) out against offers. Hog-
wasch made another attempt the

ENERGY

FOR ENJOYMENT



5

«

3%

3

OS

g
&
e
Pa
-

b Calli |

of

of “Dunkirk”,

. . . 5t' f
SSOSS9SSS G99 DBY SSE POVOSSOSSIOD SSF SO 9SS Or;

FOR STRENGTH



In September—Canada

R. PETER KING,
of Dr. and Mrs
Barbarees, St
eaving Barbados
Sth for Canada. Peter is going to
McGill University to study En
gineering

eldest son
Ralph Kirg
Michael will be
on September

Another
Canada in
Mr. “Tony”
of Mr. and

Barbadian leaving for
early September is
Johnson, eldest son
Mrs. Alban Johnson
Hastings. Tony
will be returning to McGill,
where he has been studying med-
icine. He thought at one time
that he might have had to go to
England to continue his studies,
but he recently received news
that he has been re-accepted at
McGill.

After Short Visit

R. DAVID EVANS Snr.,

of Messrs. T. R. Evans re-
turned from his shert visit to St.
Kitts on Monday afternoon by
B.W.LA.

For One Week

M R. GEORGE RODDAM of the
Colonial Development Cor-
poration in Jamaica left on
Tuesday morning by B.G. Air-
ways for Dominica He expects
to be there for one week

Nut Review

NOTED recently a review by

Arthur Lewis, the St. Lucia
born Professor of Political Econ-
omy at Manchester University.
published in the “Observer.”

Professor Lewis, who is ac-
knowledged to be one of the lead-
ing economists in Britain, discuss-
ed “The Groundnut Affair’ by
Alan Wood, If the thirty million
pounds spent at Kongwa concludes
the Professor, had been used to
help the Nigerian groundnut far-
mers, the results would have been
spectacular.

An American Looks

At Britain

[” SURE you've heard about the

English journalist who asked a
visiting American what struck him
most about life in “our tight little
island; and—having already, I sup-
pese, pencilled in “policemen, won-

derful” got the shattering reply;
“Your warm beer and your cold
bedrooms!”
She Likes A Pipe!
PRETTY dark-haired girl

was waiting in London for an
aeroplane to take her
New York the other day—and she
smoked a pipe. She was 28-year-
old Mary Jennson,
globe-trotting parents,
self has been round the world
once, ‘Her pipe came from Ja-
maica. “You can get them out

there for about four-pence,” she
them
mend the roads lead-

says. “Old
while they
ing up to the Blue Mountains.”

women smoke

Not Talking!
NTRANSIT from Grenada by
B.W.I1.A. yesterday on his

way to St. Lucia was Mr. Patrick
Labrie, Caribbean Representative
of T.C.A. Mr, Labrie arrived in
Barbados by T.C.A. on Saturday
and went on to Trinidad.

What was he going to St. Lucia
for? Mr. Labrie would not say.

Here for Two Weeks

a Nurse at
Hospital at the
Trinidad arrived here yesterday
afternoon from Grenada by
B.W.1.A. to spend two weeks’
holiday as a guest of Mr. and Mrs

Point Fortin
U.B.O.T. in

home to

daughter of
who her-

|

ISS AUBREY IFILL, who is! james














BARBADOS ADVOCATE
LILI MARLENE





| Housewives’ Guide

Prices for String Beans
and Artichokes in the local
market when the “Advocate”
checked yesterday were

String Beans: 20 cents per
Ib

Artichokes 16 cents per
Ib. |

|
| ————_
'B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME |

JULY WW, 1950
Commentary on

THURSDAY

6.15 am, to 1.45 p.m y
Third Test 7.00 a.m, The News. 7.10
am, News Analysis, 7.15 am. Jane
Eyre. 7.30 a.m. The Piano For Pleasure
7.45 a.m. Generally Speaking. 8.00 a.m
From The Editorials 8.10 am, Pro-
gramme Parade; 8.15 a.m, England vs
West Indies £30 am. Books To Read
845 am. The Arts 9.00 am, Close
Down 12.00 noon The News. 12.10 p.m
New Analysis 12.15 p.m, Programme
Parade. 12.18 p.m Listeners Choice
12.45 p.m. England vs. West Indies, 1.00
p.m. Taxiing Around Britain with Herbert
Hodge. 1 if p.m. Radio Newsreel. 1.30
p.m. Much Binding In The Marsh.
p.m. The News. 2.10 p.m. The Daily
Service. 2.15 p.m. Sports Revie 2.30
p.m, Ring Up The Curtain. # o p.m
Twenty Questions, 4.00 p.m, The ews
4.10 p.m, The Daily Service, 4.15 p.m
Love From Leighton Buzzard, 4.45 p.m
Mona Liter Quartet. 5.00 p.m. England
vs. West Indies. 5.05 p.m, Interlude. 5.15
p.m, Programme Parade. 5.30 p.m Listen-
ers Choice. 6.00 p.m, Jane Eyre. 6.15 p.m.







Pride And Prejudice. 645 p.m. Mer-

chant Navy Newsletter 7,00 p.m. The

News. 7:10 p.m. News Analysis. 715

p.m. to 7.45 p.m. Cricket Report on Third

Test 8.00 p.m. Radio Newsreel 8.15

o.m, Taxiing Around Britain with Her-

bert Hodge 8.30 p.m. Troise and His

Banjoliers. 8.55 pom. From The Editori- |
als. 9.00 p.m. A: Provincial Lady. 9.56

p.m. Interludes 10,00 p.m, The News.





Too Young |

To Remember

PENZANCE, ENG.
Britain’s Princess Margaret was
born too late.
During a visit to North Corn-
wall, the King, Queen, and Prin-



THE PERFECT SMILE, ringlets on her shoulder. A necklace of | cess’enjoyed the famed local dish
diamonds with emeralds. Her gown is signed by designer Whit- of clotted cream and raspberries—
taker. Her name ? It is Lisa Daniely, beautiful French actress a oe eee owing to
who is to play Lili Marlene in that film, now being made in Said "he Cuban }
England. —London Express Service. “How delightful. I had almost



forgotten the taste of real cream
like this.”

Said Princess Margaret, regret-
fully:

‘I don’t even remember it!”

Lady’s Leg Lost

LONDON.

For Sale Cap’n Kidd's
Treasure Map

received by Mrs. Dick for the map. The lost property book at Lon-

A Frenchman once wrote he: |.ion's Golders Green police station

“Send me the map and I will send | re. ‘ently received the following

you $15.” To date, however, Mrs. | ontry:

Dick has rejected all bids for the “Found in Gloucester Gardens,

map. Golders Green, a Lady’s artificial
Among other of Kidd's relics to}ieg, black shoe attached.”



EASTBOURNE, ENG.
A slightly soiled parchment map
drawn in red ink which reportedly
belonged to the pirate Captain
William Kidd will be sold by pub-
lic auction in Eastbourne, Sussex
County, next week

Kidd was hanged in 1701, and be auctioned are muskets, cut- pins
the map which the British Mu- lasses, brass pistols, chest of draw- Blame ry

ers, daggers and pieces of eight.

Almost everything associated i OHIO.
ports to show the position of hid- with the pirate will come under Next term all the pupils of
cen treasure on an island in ‘he the hammer. More than 50 copies|Cleveland schools will be kept in
South China Seas of “Treasure Island’ are to be]}an extra hour. They will be ex-

The map belongs to Mrs. Eliza- auctioned in bundles of 15. pected to do the homework they
beth Dick of Eastbourne who is A dirk once owned by Ann Bol-|no longer do at home because of
selling it together with many other ley, the woman _ pirate, will also} '?V during that hour.
ot th> pirate’s treasures because be offered for sale, as will a long-
of heavy taxation demands handled axe used by pirate Cap- FRESH FRUIT

She inherited the map and trea- tain Teach to behead treacherous -
sures from her late employer, Hu- {members of his crew. LONDON

Fresh fruit fashion note:
Women in some of the smarter

scum authorities recognize as once
being the pirate’s properly, pur-

bert Palmer, who died last July I.N.S.
Palmer, who lived in Eastbourne

for many years, was a collector





; " ive Mayfair restaurants are wearing
t pirates relics F i
‘ aky offers’ trons all parts of SKELETON eee as earrings and on
the world including $8,400 from CROSSWORD ae aces,

ao American syndicate, have beer








Jee chs
’ —}--framg- t+

Proud

‘Love In Disguise



ee a of all
\ Patt | your.
Is Good Food eae rooms?

AN unusual cookery book has
recently been published and in the
BBC's “Letter from London” pro-
gramme George Pondle told lis-
teners something about it It is
ealled “Receipts and Relishes” and
is a collection of regional recipes
‘com all parts of the British Isles,
vith their local and colourful
There is a dish called
“Love in Disguise,” which is the
name given to a method of cook-



‘.eep your lavatory spotlessly clean. It's
smple. Shake some * Harpic’ into the bowl,
ave overnight, then flush. ‘Harpic’ will

CLUES ACKOSS

1 By means of which one ca
make time stand still ?

ing a calf's heart in Herefordshire 8 a gene? ooh Sid) CeCdOrNS the WhDIe Han = even
[here are others with such fas-] 9: A zoological barker here 90 brush: Cen reeGh.
cinating names as ““E Pud- il. Stony product of someone +



labour.
14. Creatures of



HARPIC

ding,” “Ginger Husbands,” ‘Thun-

intelligence 1





A. G. Rocheford of ‘Mirriville,’ a and Lightning" and “Fat Ras- we hear ? moo.
Black Rock. ‘als,’ and descriptions of how to V3. Sager, In & sense THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER
: ook pigs’ faces and “Cold Water 3 SOF Tt, Banas, aRF ARPES -———; ——
Miss Ifill spent part of he-:| Willies.” Then there is “Star] !7 U.S. soldier seizea 4 tee o
holiday in Grenada and_ the|Gazy Pie’ which conjures up ideas By OS Ww threes’

remainder she is spending here

41 Voitatre’s river
22. Laboratory answers, maybe
23 Flier usually seer a

vf a light airy-fairy concoction
of stars and moonbeams and turns
rut to be herring pie. The recipe

ROYAL (Worthings)

Last Show To-day 4.30

move--




















sads, “Clean and bone six her-| 24 —about thts time Republic Action Double
ings, mackerel or pilchards, and} %° G/otls makes nent SODAS: oe
ason with salt, pepper and chop- words). ne hates ees “BEHIND THE NEWS”
, hed parsley. Do not cut off the ULURS DOWN And
other day to get them into the |fishes’ heads. Place the fish in a t. it's divine :
musical film about the Loves of | pie-cish lined with fat and bread- : , nes Mountains % “ROLL ON TEXAS
Tolstoy. The Persians thought crumbs, with heads facing in- 4 rap strop M N”
he was talking about Tosti, and wards Pour three or four eggs 5. 1 st to the elevator. | 00)
kept shouting, ‘“Goo’bye. Tosti! be ate n in tarragon Vinegar or poe are place wth, nen t ToNite at 640
Hogwasch said, “All you guys/¢ream over them. Put a pastry) 8 it may display boring ads MADAM O’LINDY and
ven | OVE . pe ; : ‘ ie ke Hea ia ike
would do is to work your seesaw Sn iee i ene ‘ hole in ? tee noth over vid under the TROUPE in: —
in q garden while er “Vout. thie ae Sh ae Suck | 10. Us, the fourth pook of the “CAR
clares his love. Hoffmann’s Bar- ae OF abou, one hour 16 rt Which counts ACAS NIGHT”
€ erate Je ace parsley One snagram of mites
«iroll would be played. Just the papier cd rah E 7 Rassley 7. SHOG AT Wbae eRe
rhythms for seesaw.” “No room], PO ts: is of the fish before 18 [t's waded by bar
for Hoofman or his Barkiroll S°&V08 {49 at vertsiw measures EMPIRE
hon seesaw,” said Ashura. “Nor Last 9 Shows TO-DAY
Tosti, too,” said Rizamughan

“Goo'bye, Hoofman,” shouted Kaz-
bulah, with a grin, Hogwasch
had them shown out.

Printer’s Frolic

There is no more attractive
sight to the young today than a
widow bursting with cakes, buns,
crumpets, pastries and other con-
fectionery.

(Evening paper.)

Or

LLL OOOO

a

my

MRS, HOUSEWIFE



GAITETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES





Wikisediets isin TO-DAY — 8.30 p.m oi nean GARFIELD
ARNER'S THRILLING DOUBLE |
Ronald REGAN — Shirley TEMPLE in CHELINE PRELLE

In



°° TEL.

John WAYNE

47 MAGEN GIRL”

AND
DUKE”

“UNDER MY SKIN”
Starting Friday 2,30 & 8.30
“THE BIG LIFT”



and The Miracle Horse in

“MAUNTED GOLD”















ROXY
TO-DAY
Final

4.45 & 8.15

Inst. Columbia Serial

| 4.45 & 8.30

20th Ceniury Fox Presents
“THE VIGILANTE”
Starring |
Ralph Byrd Lyle Talbot

Starting Friday 4.45 & 8.15
“THE GUNFIGHTER”

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY Only 4.30 & 8.15



Check up and Replace your

HOUSEHOLD CROCKERY

We Have A Full Range of ...





TEA CUPS & SAUCERS LUNCH, BREAKFAST and

TEAPOTS | DINNER PLATES ;

United Artist Double
MILK & 3008 SOUP PLATES
me CREAM JUGS | SO PLATTERS came Seeteo
SUGAR BOWLS | Leo Carrillo in

VEGETABLE DISHES

PORRIDGE BOWLS SAUCE BOATS

“VALLIANT HOMBRE”

Inspect these at our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT =
Telephone 2039. “NANOOK OF THE
‘ NORTH”



=>
Starting Friday 4.45 & 8.15

“DRUMS ALONG THE
AMAZON”

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD.





|





'fooee

PLAZA

WARNER'S EXCITING DOUBLE
Joan LESLIE & Robert HUTTON in ‘*Too Young To Know’’

;



















I




When Miranda is safely parcelled
the four friends hurry over the
common and are lucky enough to
meet Jennifer neat her cottage in the
dell, She can hardly believe the

of the wonderful journey to

the Palace and Rupert has to tell it
i “Well,

splendid of you to find her,’’ she

all over again.









couGHS -




MIGHT






AQUATIC CLUB CINE



Commencing Friday



Ss

COLDS
BRONCHITIS - CATARRH
CATARRHAL ASTHMA
CHESTY 9 COLDS

COUGHS
CHILDREN’S COUGHS

STOP THAT.

=r

TOOK SOME VENOS/

it coughing it’s time you took some
Thening. COUGH MIXTURE. This world-famous
LY medicine comforts, eases and

THURSDAY,

was

JULY 20, 1950

gfe

Miranda—#6

** Miranda

was
now | think she is
the most lovely doll in the whole

sighs happily,
naughty once, Bur
| shall always keep her.’
iranda keeps
speaking nor
looking quite con-

world,
Rupert smiles, and
very still, neither
moving, but

tented. :
THE END
ALL KIGHTS RESERVED

ITS TIME YOU

protects.
and Soreness are soothed away. Cough-

Â¥,\\ ing attacks are relieved. That constant irritation

in the throat is allayed. Relied upon for over 50



Get some To-day!

=VENOS~

LIGHTNING

COUGH MIXTURE







TONIGHT TO THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
George BRENT; Bette DAVIS; Mary ASTOR: Lucille WATSON

in THE GREAT LIE”

Only The Fiery Genius of’ Bette DAVIS could bring so frank a

Betty HUTTON

Portrayal to the Screen!

Victor MATURE

in ‘RED HOT and BLUE”
A Paramount Picture
SPECIAL MATINEE SATURDAY MORNING at 9.30 o'clock

mm

Robert MITCHUM & Teresa WRIGHT in



FRID -

SAT

SUN

JIMMY WAKELY

“SPRINGTIME IN TEXAS”

A Monogram Picture



TO-DAY — 5 & 8.30 p.m

BILL!

“PURSUED”

~ 5 & 8.30 P.M. (RE-ISSUED)

THE GREATEST CLASICSIC THE SCREEN HAS EVER SHOWN !

“Anthony Adverse’’ by Hervey ALLEN with Fredric MARCH



Walter

RONNIL

PIDGEON



TODAY ONLY 5.00 & 8.30 P.M.
Esther WILLIAMS

LOCAL TALENT ON

ERRO!J. BARNETT Singing
AUSZIN CLARE... Sir
ALVA AXTHU Sir
WILSON Si:
TOM KING Sir sir
CLYDE KING Singing ...
Guest Star :

Janet
LEIGH

ing ..

Xavier CUGAT

“ON AN ISLAND WITH YOU"

OPENING TOMORROW, 5.00 & 8.30 P.M.

“RED DANUBE”



Ethel
BARRYMORE

Plus :
PARADE

Mr. ROY PARRIS

Master of Ceremonies : Mr. ALGY SYMMONDS

Save your 4 TICKETS and win a CAM'TON of JEFFREY’S Beer
uF =NO INCREASE IN PRICE!

AT
THESE PRICES

BUY Now

Flush Switches .... 55¢ each
Tumbler Switches.. 66¢ ,,
Through Switches 52¢ ,,
Lampholders ...... es
Ceiling Roses ..... 22¢
Connecting Boxes.. 34¢ _,,

Electric Iron Plugs 69¢_,,
Wood Blocks
—35c., 49e., 54c., & 70¢ ,,
Insulating Tape
(Roll) 52¢ ,,
: also :
1 CONNOR WASHING
MACHINE $220.00



PLANTATIONS LTD.



MLA (Members Only)

.. “DAY BY DAY”
. “BEWILDERED”
. “NO ORCHIDS FOR MILADY”
. “MY FOOLISH HEART”
“SERENADE IN BLUE”
“MY LOVE LOVES ME”
















THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1950

Speech Day

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE
quired much new equipment im- their and have shown a pro-
ported from England--games gear fit. of cncouraging proportio

KOREAN

At




























of every description, vaulting over tne period under revie
Pee : balancing benches and not- Visual Aids YY
ably a new portable boxing ring. t nia , 7
7 In the teaching of Geograph)
The hold-fasts for the latter are 2 ound j stent f d i
uite unobtrusively fixed in the tt De oe. ee
floor of the Hall and we owe a tien of successful teaching had
orm eC] Vr J debt to the Colonial Engineer, Mr, D&€n lad by Mr. L. L. Webster ‘i nectia Mt oo om § ‘
T. B. Went, for undertaking the Di geal jacil i sites % oe pein Sov ies Gaadeatiant as. ies 7 need the str of
. task of fitting them when he was 2? record the debt owed by ° * ss + une in Moscow
MAJOR NOOTT, Headmaster of Combermere School, could be loosened, and the in charge of the interna) re-con- COmbermere Schoo] to the work OP {une 27, we requested | the
reviewed the work of the School during the past two years, °P€"ed fer them to proce — work here in Decerrber Of e aa Batt — he ewes ‘cea ceehinns Wak
in é teres 7 Jrece vec aie - ’ places Higher Education -nd January last Our annnat e argely negiected mn Cw ae ; .
ee address vesterday. a a r overse.s. medical examination, thanks. to Islfmd, It is to confidence in- North Korean regime, to use in-
; - e sald, “ Wher I 4 incil had Ld. Dr Scott's kind co-operation, is spired in me by Mr. Webster fluence to have the invaders with
The floods of August 31st—Sep- fields of Classical and Scientific yp Cc yiyey Schcol } aw matter of routine, provid- teuching that 1 feit encouraged to craw at once, — , f
tember Ist 1949 with their un pursuits but I do now see the follow safely Toe Council hed YS Us with valuable data about embark on the establishment of The Soviet Government in it:
foreseen consequences and unfor- distinet possibility opening up biased the tral fos Phe award- ©" Pupils recorded on the indi- &@ Geography Room To Mr. reply on June 29 and in gubse-
tunate interruptions in the con- before us of breaking new Be ee ate A as “te ° vidual health carde Webster who retired in April last Guent statements has taken the
pelled ust ,P dante 4 seve sateen > seul wen @8F ell and Mr. B. C. St. John in Musi year after over 30 years’ service P¢sition that the attack launchec
Hed us lo postpone our Speech pas! carefully; ae es eek pO ee eee eee ee Music to the School, you will all wish by North Korean forees was pro-
Day from December last. It is Modern and Commercial 1946 3945 | respectively, en- ; +, to jain me in extending our mogt Voked by the Republic of Korea %& Remember BOVRIL
- on reason that we celebrate Studies, I can see a happy mar- sping Ute 407. 9e His protes~ . re thi Mus scat’ Apprecia- Cordial wishes for a long and and that the actions of the Unt-
o-day the achievements of two riage “im the future blessed in °/0%2! trai it the London In- (on Rave this year reached their jonny retirement. To ‘returp— ted Nations Security Council were makes excellent
Academic Years viz 1948 and 1949. their union with a BarBados “'! taiter: Spe deve eee Three-Year ‘yc ‘will, 1 hope visit the Gco- illegal E
he occa: als : : * . . Dil a say Dae) Course hey are i ' b il rT s > Gto- ‘ :
The occasion 11so marks the con Scholarshi presented by a to take a two-year specialist & i >, eee even = — graphy Projection Room and see “These Soviet claims are flatly sandwiches, and
clusion of a period of four years benevolent G Physical Educat Course at **rm Theatre Lecture three , -
personal tenure of office Le severnment. I : hbc ro are colts M ur times a week-—Year I of the f@r Yourselves the furniture and disproved by facts
This review of School Organ- ae Sie Een i jbas eile ae Course including all Third Forms, Sitting installed and adinire the — “In addition to dirget military impeoves-oli dishes.
From 460 to 600 isation has reached the Fourth ; iin J g last *h Year II all Fourths, and Year Il Visual aids equipment—the 16 effort we and other members oj
. =¢ Je ary ast av e ‘ ‘ z eo " r > ‘ J
At the beginning of the present Forms and covers all boys ad- sated 1 $ Di a : t Re o tek ell the Fifths. We are building up ™™ Bell_and Howell Projector the United Nations are making
Academic Yesr in January, the mitted into the School from 1947 he J m hy ¢ Bauer ea - ap a Library of Gramophone records and the Episeope—combined epi~ in Korea, the outbreak of ag:
numbers attending the School onwards. I have still to deal with {'¢ [mstitute = ‘iucation. In 1949 to illustrate the Course and our diascope and film-strip projector gression there requires us to con-
reached the recurd number of over the pre-1947 entries, These boys Mr. J. ¢ qs I rakes wa Scorn first consignment has already been newly ene ad wr ve bees a es
600. When I arrived in Septem- are ta be found in my Fifth Forms, “* ®" Unceroraduate at the Lat geceived he Governing Body 1rounds throughout the world. The at-}| @m&#
iz : - ‘orms, os ; , > mk
ber 1946 at the beginning of the and last December virtually have in addition authorised the Hitherto, our poliey of develop- tack Upon the Republic of Korea aiahinaeiemnleinsiclarennigilt
third term of the Academic Year Marked the end of that period of ~ purchase of a suitable machine, ing our grounds has been ve- Makes it plain beyond all doubt eqn resi eannaamaneeN renege
there were approximately 460 Upper School congestion to which and in the meantime the British sricted by the lack of enclosures that an international Communist
pupils on the roll of the Sehool. | drew your attention in both my Council have kindly helped us to protect against the ravages of movement is prepared to use a 4,
At the corresponding time in previous reports. In December with the weekly loan of the elec- goats and sheep, We were re- @rmed invasion to conquer in- e £ ho & J, OTIGY
September next—we shall main- 1948 that Upper Schoo! congestion tric gramophone, Mr. Hudson has gtricted, therefore to limited en- Gependent nations.” We must € VOUP
tain’ a strength of nearly 580 produced 88 candidates for the Feen responsible for the instruc closures and that policy has pro- therefore recognise the possibiti-
pupils. I am often asked how this School Certificate | Examination = wie oa on shes and T guced the Garden, the Court of tY that armed aggression may 2
a been made possible, despite and in December 1949 68 candi- oe oe = sea 4 eaten Our Honour and the lesser courts in take place in other arcas SRY Ki
the fact that three classrooms dates. The numbers this year are oot rag yee at bed i the immediate vicinity of our in, view. OF Wiis T have: already
1ave been converted to special down to more reasonable propor- Relation Cteee anc - oy School buildings. This year Gov- directed that United States forces
uses as Art Room, Library and tions viz. 46. These numbers are ainie in the Chon ane Trock. ernment are transferring to us i) Support of the Philippines be \
Fextbook and Stationery Store- impressive but they imposed a fe - ‘the c —— ne bi ron the pasture to the east of the #tr@ngthaned and that military j ;
room respectively. The answer is strain both on accommodation and fe dae A a hie A bp Harrison College field. We pro- 4&sistance be speeded up to tae (}
twofold—tirstly classroom accom- staffir is the obvievs wealth of endow- Phu » G 2 S
modation for the Preparatory De " The ment both for enjoyment and ex- Pose to chclose our eastern ap- ee Bt", SSO Ormmeas “AS: Se ‘
partment comprising 83 pupils has pressure exerted by ecution ehioved by many of our proaches from the junetion of the associate themselves with Indo “& f

parents for opportunities to be
provided for a School Certificate
type education has a social and
economic significance we can-
not ignore. But the results have

been installed in this Hall and
secondly the strength of our Junior
School is maintained on the basis
of four_stream entry with four
paralley First and four

a

P ] \ parallel an educational
second Forms with 30 pupils in from which I anet ante cota
ach Form making a total of 240 conclusions,

pupils. The policy
classrooms to meet
of the curriculum is

of converting
special needs
not yet com-

In 1948 we obtained 33 Certifi-
cates, one Class I, thirteen Class
Il, and nineteen Class III; in 1949

pleted. You will visit for your- we obtai i

ple . e ained 35 Certificates, t
elves to-day, I hope, the new Class J renty-
Geography - Projection R oo m four Class afte Se oo a

Which has just been re-furnished candidate was 7th one oe

and equipped for the teaching of jn 1949 W , i
“eography. At the end of the dichteticns” ond Kins = B. ath
the tipcaee “A ee with 4 distinctions were our out-
ibrary so as te € standing s sandidé
equivalent of two (instead of the in 1940 Porte i Pon
present one) classrooms, whilst a amination whilst not yet 15 years

third room must be earmarked

oe te arts , ns of age and obtained a Class
tes use as a Model Office in con- Certificate being placed 37th i 7
ection with our proposed de- " rede

Island. Both Porte and King are
now at Harrison College. But
what about the other candidates?

velopments in Commercial Educa-
lion. These conversions will not
diminish our numbers though

they will prevent any further ex- she Mone ee et
ansi 5 m we tale
pansion School, and 40 were rejected; in

1949, 4 did not sit for similar rea-
sons and 29 were rejected, These
are the plain facts — even if a
few of the rejected candidates
were on the borderline, there is
no doubt that the majority was
unsuitable for a School Certificate
teachers and myself canalise them Course. 1 point this out to sen
in60 = uh efi ania! wana a eae the case for the provision of a
(Academic), “C” (Commercial) or much wider range of instructional

Three Streams
At 13 plus the pupils are tester
for intelligence, for skill in num-
hers and for facility in the use of
heir mother tongue. These tests
are used in conjunction with their
attainment records and _ their

“M’ (Modern) facilities than the School at pr
cs ent poms and these facilities
1e organisation so set up in Must include laboratories
the Middle School began in 1949 workshops. eer eeae
and has now reached the level of

the Fourth Forms. We have then London Chamber of

a IVa and a Illa, (Academic); a Com

IVe and a IlIe (Commercial). I The results beetle’ te the pro-
have had to create a Lower IVec as gramme are for three consecutive
a holding form for some i, boys examinations November 1948
(out of 28) of the 1949 IIfe who and July and November 1949, I
have been unable to keep up with the November examinations baie

the pace. The IiIm is treated as ,., ta 7

a Hemove Form, if at the end of candidates from the Alpha
the year a boy reveals himself as Stream, are weak in quality and
a late developer he is transferred Yet Such results as they achieve
to the “A” or “C” Stream, but °* ntinue to justify the policy of

the majority qualify for the Alpha S4Ving them from superannuation.
Stream where their curriculum is Thus in 1948 Henry E. E. did very
still further modified and they em- well to pass in six subjects with
bark on a two-year Course ter- one distinction, whilst in November
minating in Form IValpha and 1949 Holder, A. H. and Rudder Ss.
leading to the examination of the did quite well to pass in four
London Chamber of Commerce in subjects with a distinction each.
one or more subjects 4 The July 1949 entry is a different
(por the “A” and “C” Streams kettle of fish. These candidates are
the examinations objectives were fifth formers, either taking the
be the School Certificate and L.C:C, in the . os *
the full certificate of the London he ete stride towards hs
Chamber of Commerce reapective- December School Certificate or else
ly. I found that whilst the former completing a full certificate after
was acceptable for the “A” Stream, # previous partial success. The
the London Chamber of Com- C.C, committee awarded cash
merce has met with considerable Prizes to Henry E. EB. in 1948 and
criticism from parents and pupils to Cave L. G. V., Forde K. A,,
alike. It has a limited value in Lewis L. V. H., and Marshall A.
the employment market. This has in 1949. The L.C.C hag served
caused me much anxiety but I an important function in our edu-
believe that the Staff and myself cational system, but it will pro-
have found a satisfactory solution ably recede in importance for
to the problem in the proposed Combermere School when it is
new General Certificate of Educa- displaced by the General Certifi-
cate of Education of London Uni-



to



tion. We wanted one reauirement
to meet our specific needs, an Ex-

amining Body whose scheme of V°!S!ty as the objective of the “Cc”
Examinations would be sufficient- Stream as well as of the “A”
ly broad to include Commercial Stream

Studies. We have found this in Staff

the scheme of examinations of the
University of London and with
the approval of our Governing
Body and of the Director of Edu-

If the boys are the raw material
for which our administrative
schemes and plans are devised, the
Staff are the skilled attendants on

cation we are working out our .. . ; \
detailed plans—curriculum, text- whom we depend to infuse life
books lists etc—to enable us to and spirit into them, Only their
effect this switch-over. adequacy in numbers and quali-

The switch-over cannot be im- fcations will carry a school on to
mediate. Certainly the present Success. Recent legislation has
IV A, and possibly, tho’ perhaps done much to improve the lot of
ot so certainly the present II] A, the teacher. T should like particu-
have been oriented in terms of larly to place on record the grati-
curriculum and = text-books, to- fication felt by everyone associ-
vards the overseas School Certifi- ated with the School at the recent
cate of the Cambridge Syndicate. yecognition given by the Govern-
IV A will certainly take the Cam- ment to the outstanding services
bridge Examination in due course. to this School and to the cultural
and it is improbable therefore that 4ife of the community of Mr.
we can present our first candidates Col1ymore, our well-loved Deputy-
for the General Certificate before teadmaster, promoting him to the
1952. For the “C” Stream it is conior Graduate Seale for Ist and
more important that we should try 2nd Class Honours Degrees, “Colly”

und effect a ees at an as he ig affettionately ‘known to
net oo sessibility’ with my everyone was practically born and
ining this possibility with my . :
Staff, without delay are * Sampeemers and many
' ' more generations of schoolboys
ae ema pid the ng set have come under his influence than
Certificate for Combermere he may perhaps care to recall, but
School, Our educational role is they would all wish to join me, I
at once defined and restricted by know, on this well-deserved re-
the Education Act of 1890 which cognition of his services. ;
defines a Second Grade Second- Now you have all been hearing
ary School as one providing a about the problems of staffing in
Course of Studies leading to the our schools. [n the case of Har-
School Certificate Examination rison College and Lodge School
only. This could enable a boy or it was the loss of well-qualified
irl to qualify for admission to a and well-tried members of the
University provided they obtained Staff to Trinidad that created the
Matriculation Exemption crisis. We, too, have a Staffing
The new Scheme of Examina- problem but very different in
tions, not only by change of nature. True we lost Mr. Cameron
nomenclature but more important- tudor to British Guiana in the
ly by requiring for University ad- \i1q exodus, and I confess that he
mission at least two subjects at jo 3 gap that has not been easy to

Advanced Level gr ym fill. Our problem was this—that
ee eae be roe aas we had a large number of young

and capable but unqualified and
untrained—members of the Staff
After a short period here I came
to the conclusion that handicapped

i er by domestic and financial circum-
aceadietie Pc gy onl stances, _they all had valuable
petition with the First Grade contributions to make to Educ.-
Schools in their well cultivated tion, if only bonds that tied them

barriers placed by the Education
Act in the path of further develop-
ment of the Second Grade
Schools




China and the force
Indo-China

boys, and this has been revealed bowadary in the south-east corner of France it

in the singing of the Choir you With the Park to Roebuck Street



have heard this afternoon, in the in the north. Planning and lay- | 1, nave also ordered United
reputation of our Glee Club and out of running tracks, tennis ©l@tes Seventh F leet to prevent
in the suceess achieyed by both in courts, miniature range for the @â„¢Y attack upon Formosa and
the Musical Festival held in Raster Cadets, hockey pitch can move "ave requested the Chinese Gov-
1949, when the Choir tied with boldly forward and to this end ©PAment on Formosa to cease all
Queen’s College for first place in Government have admitted in the “!" and sea operations against
Division IIT and the Glee Club current year’s estimate a sum of 'e Mainland. These stops were
was first in Division IV. The tale $4,000 for Grounds Development t once reported to the Uniter
of Music has not vet all been told ‘ Nations Security ¢ ouneil, Our ae-
The theory of musie is taught for Welfare And Scholarships tion in regard to Formosa wat
MAJOR NOOTT ene lesson a week in each Form matter of elementary seeurity

throughout the Prep and First and It is with real pleasure that I Peace and Stability of the Paci
versity College of ihe West Indies, Second Forms, and I hope in Jan- ean tell you today of the response fic area had been violently dis
Jamaica, where he is reading for uary next to select 20—80 boys given by the Vestries to my ap- turbed by the attack on Korea
duis degree in Naturai Sciences. In who will prepare and offer music peal, early in 1949, to improve the Attacks elsewhere in the Pacific

the recent bereavement which has in their Public Examinations. conditions of their Scholars here. area would have enlarged the
robbed Mr, Drakes so unexpectedly Moreover, we acquired 10 violins, In the case of practically all Ves- Korean crisis thereby rendering
and so tragically of his father. 1 stands, ete., last year and a small try Scholars and scholars appoint- much more difficult the carry-

know you would wish me to exteng SToup of promising and interested ed by benevolent bodies the value ing out of our obligations to the

our very deepest sympathy. In Youngsters have started to receive of a scholarship includes all United Nations in Korea,

the same year Mr. Sealy was ‘tuition. Anytime from 8.00 a.m.. tuition and games fees, t»xt-books,

offered a vacancy at Erdiston Col- Wards you may hear weird stationery, a meal in the School In order that there may be

lege and he returns to us in Sep- {0UNds issuing from Combermere canteen, and in some ¢ases some no doubt in any quarter about LAST

tember next. Mr. G .A. Holder School as these enthusiastic voung- assistance with travelling expens- our intentions regarding Formosa, . :

has been recommended by the i tune up for an hour of orae- es, This has in effect enhanced 1 wish to state that the United GOYA—Perfumes, Colognes
Governing Body to take a similar tmnt before morning school To the value of a Scholarship from States has no territorial ambi- Powder (Face ana sath) ;
vacancy there in September next. implement this develooment in the former nominal sum of $24 a tions whatever concerning that A very beautiful assortmen

evr Musie nraeramme we invited



emacy, PaO pPeE M > to a sum ranging from $60 island nor do we seek for our- to choose from

re se dev. Moore takes up resi- Mr, J A. Millington to serve as to $96 a veut, _ elves any ‘Apecta) mosltion or

men as Durham Seen n'a visiting Master. He accented A scholarship is no longer a jy rivilege for Formosa THE COSMOPOLITAN
7 mF nae and wil ee - end wg ee _—_ en ranialy snare and a delusion, where the The present military neutrali-

years—on in completing US seeured a place forshimself in the scholar came half ashamed to sation of Formosa is without pre- re

degree course which he had form- " scholar ci . : a is 1out pre DAY PHONES %o41 & 4441

affections end esteem of the pupils
ond Staff than he has. }

Art and Handicraft

school and unable very often te judice to political questions affect-
obtain for himself the books and ing that island, Our desire is that
stationery — the very tools of bis Formosa become not embroiled

: ‘ ; NIGHT PHONE 41-41
erly started at Codringion College,
and the second year in profession-

al training. Mr. H. Brewster takes













; ’ ; . education and without which,he in hositilities disturbing to the |"7 eee oe

up residence at Loughborough ne ie ne deve'op- remained hopelessly lost. To those peace of the Pacific and that all ie POLE APCS x
Training College, where he follows andl te ft v Sphere of art and scholarships awarding authoritjes questions affecting Formosa be|% &
in Mr. St. John’s footsteps, in a (3 mews ou will recollect who have adopted these enlighten- settled by peaceful means as en- | % 9 x
two-year Physical Education s feet ese last. visited us on a eq terms, | know parents and visaged in. the charter of the % 66 %
Course. Mr. G. E. Solomon has *Peech Day that you saw a vivid pupils alike would wish to join United Nations x %
left to take up a four-year course and colourful display of work me in heartfelt gratitude, @ On Page 7 > 2
at Columbia University. Mr, 1, “one Py the Junior Forms in art %
a ’ vrapian pe. Under Mr. Collymore’s guidance. Nothing can contriPute to the 7 7 WV 1 99 ¢@
a. Sf. Hill, School Librarian, re- tHe confided in me that whilst he sheer joy of a youngster at school Pi li. J : e ‘. N, x
presents Combermere School at the was flattered by the success ail day than the joy of a tuckshop- OULICE US. Air , *
ummer School to be held in achieved, he did not feel compe- canteen. Far from perfect though s z :
Trinidad in August on the teach- tent to take them any further, our own remains, the Governing S lers s$
ing of Caribbean History. All He then suggested that I should Body are doing everything in their mugs R x
these instances I nave quoted have meet Mr. Broodhagen, and | power to add to its amenities, as An unequalled preparation fer combating Malaria and x
been dealt with most generously have never regretted that meet-. Witness last year the new furni- LONDON, other Fevers, skilfully compoutuled from tested Drugs, Fever %
by the Governing Body when my ing. What pleasure he has given ture and this year the installation Air police may shortly be caused by Chills ¢tc, respond readily to this effective %
eae aoe reese inp. 2 cannot tell you and his re- of gas a a eae ich patrolling the skies of Britain}® preparation %

e them for sion on pro- ward in the responses he has boiler — it is an ' Europe to combat air smug- .
tracted study leave. Meanwhile awakened in so Slee ails rte the School is justly proud and ana oisad $ sae ace oe i ee au >
Mr. Goddard and Mr. St. Hill have whom, till then, School had re- the object of envy on the part of “Bot, the British and Frenct : Remember it is a “RECTOR'’S PRODUCT” Obtainable ati— gy
both taken their extertal, Aagpoes mained rather an arid occupation, cane ee aie oe oe, police authorities are understooc | % , { %
—Mr. Goddard taking a 3rd Class must b s ~ i i under rs, aloney anc Fs » dard ans r the |} M '« B k 1 , I) Nt Mu | { | %
Honours Geography at his first at- him. a Easter ter aes Gittens, make a great contribution Cr any tm a % CSS ‘ 00 er S (B DOS) ru Ores i { . %
tempt; and Mr St. Hill securing ening Body furnished and equip- life at School by their cheerful this purpose ? s Broad Street and Alpha Pharmacy, Hastings x
u General Degree. The sum total ped a Class-room for Art and 224 able service they render “"ny4” ‘British squadrons are |% : x
of this endeavour to improve stat- Handicraft and such has been ‘e?. expected to be manned by form- ALLL AS AGEL CPP APPEL AL APA LLL
us atid qualifications, and of as- Mr. Broodhagen's success that in Cadets and Scouts er Royal Air Force police off- | (> == SESS FER SS,
sistance and encouragement to the League of Empire Competi- cers,
participate in it by the Govern- fijon jn

May last Combermere
School gained the First Prizes in
both divisions, the Senior prize
with a set of most admirable
posters advertising the attractions
of Barbados and the Junior prize
with a project scheme entitled,

Under Captain Perkins assisted
by Lieutenants Gittens and
Brewster, the Cadet Company is
# Vigorous organisation in our
midst, They have assisted -in
ecremonials at the King’s Birth-
day Parade and at Empire Day to fly contraband from abroad.

ing Body is, I submit, a formidable
achievement and without parallel
anywhere in the Caribbean. The
folowing table shows how the
composition of the Assistant Staff
in tems of qualifications ‘has

During the past two years al
smuggling has greatly increased
and the British authorities estim-
ate that hundreds of smali air-
eraft are presently being usec

WE OFFER



NAIL SCISSORS
TWEEZERS







*
changed since 1946: “The Landing at Holetown.” Celebrations. They were ee, Six Ri 4
: inspected by the Commissioner o ings FILES
Trained Grads ag Untrained Gradu tots ae ee ek > Police and received an exeellent The mbites sl { © LES
4 Jd Non-G : ; of , - yeport for which we all congratu- 1e British customs and police Ss ING ISHES
w Overseas 0. Unqualined 20; 'etai te their needs to Staff and late the Company Commander. A authorities say six large smug © SHAVING BRUAHES
2 Buildings. I pointed out in con- humber of senior Cadets @ue gling rings are working from the @ RAZORS
1950 nection with the School ‘Certifi- aicso serving in the Barbados Continent, and they estimate
shar tee Geet, J eanntorei Be creee. cate results that many of our Regiment and are showing a high about $8,400,000 worth of contra- | |
1; Overseas — 1, Unqualified — 13; Total DOYS are compelled to embark on sense of civic duty by so doing. band is flown into Britain yearly. |) CALL IN TO-DAY AT
= a Course of Studies for which they goto camp in the Garrison Some smugglers ; a ae : A

flying from



7” ‘ A they are not suited. Now that " July, and we wish F; to Britain leave offi-
The following are (or will be a" at the end of July, ‘rance an ’
; . Bav je, May be partly due to the soctal them a happy and successful ial with clearance for |!

daar, Wate my Sty‘ io he wat Se a agaist Storatte ts: || COLLINS’ DRUG STORES
Holder and Solomon, Moreover ®@ to it by the parents. But even ‘The Scouts under Messrs. Pi- pic! etheir freight before || Broad and Tudor Stree
as vacanies have arisen the Govy- /f that were not so I could do prim and Brathwaite continue to cross! e channel , road and Tudor Streets,
erning Body have appointed men "0thing else about it—for with- flourish and they have a suecessful Once over Britiin the cargo |}
suitably qualified for the post, 0¥t laboratories and workshops year’s record behind them is dropped off and the plane flie
thus it is that Messrs Adams, ™¥ hands are tied and this School — [py sports and athletics we have on to register an official landing

as an educational force can only
work at rather less than half
pressure, so to speak. We have

had two Satisfactory years. I know
that in the brilliant records of the
West Indies cricket team, the

Smith, Wellington and Herks have
joined the Staff and to those at-
tending their first Speech Day I

—LN.8.





extend this cordial welcome to taken steps to ensure one eer name of Worrell will = ms ine

our School Community. In con- of our Staff securing qualifica- spiration to every boy who play are ite

formity with this policy we are tions to teach Science, Mr. the game at Combermere School PAGING THE |

strengthening the teaching of Drakes will return from Jamaica P

Modern Studies — particularly in September, 1952. I must have Distant and Not So Distant DOCTOR

History—with the appointment of at least one General Science Prospects a | nel
Mr. R. A. Hughes who joins the laboratory for him to teach in NEW YORK Enar ,
Staff in September next. Mr. by that time. In the matter of | What can we expect from. the New York

Starting soon, the
doctor will always be at his pa-
tient’s call even when he is at the

Hughes is an old boy of Lodge
School, was formerly on the Act-
ing Staff here, and has just been

future? In our present form
further development is limited and
consolidation will be the key-nate

workshops I must depend on the
decision of Government to imple-

ment the recommendations of the . i theatre or playing golf. He will
awarded a 2nd. Class Honour’ Technical Education Committee. 1 have referred to the work of Mr. 16 reachable through a new short- a“
Degree at Toronto University. Mr Broodhagen and can justly de- wove radio service. Each doctor OI
Broodhagen who joined our staff Equipment seribe it as the cloud no bigger will be given a code number, And
in 1949 will * Pe = Our Library is growing apace than a wate a dee in oe every time he is wanted urgently
many of you. His work in the and its function as the contro! Sky over Combermere, it may be 4 transmitter will broadcast hi 1
oer of oe Aes banderas. has centre of intellectual develop- that the shape of its shadow may jumber at least every matdite The RAPID DRYING
en a revelation to us and many

be the shape of things to sOn6. doctor will carry a pocketsized |
If in the fleld of manual dexterity radio receiver which will pick up
talents, still lying hidden hike 4 the broadcasts within a 25-mile
rich vein of ore, are to be alse « radius of New York, When he is |
ee one ee er we caer we shee just |
wi P 0 G lave to telephone eadquarters |
and aeten, The Penmaes of and find out which patient is wor- |
education has no meaning Unless pied over his symptoms

the child is the centre and purpose . :

ment in the School places a heavy
responsibility on our Librarian. I
have every confidence in his abil-
ity to discharge that duty and
shall, therefore, recommend to my
Governing Body without hesita-
tion that money spent in ex-
panding and furnishing it will be

2 boy labelled a dolt and a dull-
ard in the class-room comes to
life under his lively guidance in
the art Room.

(4 hours maximum)

————





These absences on protracted
study leave make us dependent
upon the services of a number of

CLEAN BRIGHT COLOURS



masters serving for varying peri- money well spent. The number of it. 1 know too well after four

ods in an Acting Capacity. To of volumes—starting from scratch iin vartek and frustra— a fy

Mr. F. G. Smith, who served so in 1946—is now approaching the a py pig trent omen leaving Show Business DURABILITY AND GLOSS

nobly in“class and om the cricket 3.000 mark, with over £100 Of (i),bermere School with failed i
field {or twelve months until his jhe current year’s grant UN- Gehool Certificate as his. paper HOLLYWOOD

departure in September last to touched. Our objective is 6,000 | \alification Hollywood is trying to tempt Si CONSISTENT U A ry ' F

ee eto Sait ie ort volumes, and I hope eventually Character and technicalities are Laurence Olivier to make a fili | Al! 1 Y

re 2 u va vis

to extend the loan system

throughout the entire school.
With the establishment of the

‘ficial text-book scheme on July

not incompatible and a signilicant there at
percentage of our young men at Leigh is working in “A Streetca
Combermere are better endowed Named Desire” The only re
‘for practical skills than they are son Clark Gable is not sailing

future success. We welcome Mr the same time Vivier

Taitt and Mr. Jordan from Har-
rison College, and Mr. Pelew and

Mr, Brow*e from Combermere i

REASONABLE PRICE









: s , , lst last year, the finance prob- for an Academic Course. Or England with his new wite, former
ae biceet has tee dias ter lems were largely at an end. You Saviour did not find it one w't) Lady Sylvia Ashley, is that he j
ined by consolidation—the re- Will be surprised, I think, to (emeaning to serve as a carpenter too busy film-making
farmed curriculum of the Junior leafn that even before the estab- and if we could but follow His Crooner Frank Sinatra, a flop re- Look for the Spitfire on each
School has made steady strides vont > x ee coed example eee ane be saitite core pn radio, looks ike oeing
; Sahin an int nin 4 ad bui up the text-book that in character and in tr £ big suecess as a result of his
Necniety soot has now vesmnad @ stock to a value of over $3,000 the boys of Combermere Schpol first appearance with Bob Hope lithographed tin
Fourth Forms a Physical Edu- Which I was able to do by Lnk- would be proud of amd happy in Only Hollywood would «

nati , ave achieve: sid- ing the domestic text-book scheme the subsequent roles they would 25-year-old Corinne Calvert of
psec ee ee en = with the stationery scheme. Both have to play in the service of the France as the mother of 18~year-
John’s guidance We have s-- have flowrished, have achieved Community oid John Barrymore, junior

Agents: Frank B. Armstrong Ltd

a et a


PAGE FOUR



nay -3

THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1950



Backwards Or Forwards?

THE preoccupation of the Headmaster of
Harrison College to-day is a satisfying an-
swer to the question how to maintain
quality in education in face of the pressure
of quantity.

With the Headmaster of Combermere the
position is more acute.

What will happen unless quantity ceases
to despise utility?

The Registrar of the University College
of the West Indies has stated that the pur-
pose of university education is to produce
educated men and women. It is not intend-
ed to fit men and women for jobs.

' This is a good definition with which no
one can quarrel provided that one agrees
on a definition of education.

But there are few Barbadian parents or
children who would subscribe to the view
that education is the end and not the
means.

Major Noott is aware of the crisis.”

His appeal to carpenters to take pride in
the holiest of all professions—a profession
whose best Carpenter was the Creator of
carpenters—ought not to be necessary in
an island which has for long professed its
allegiance to the Cross as a symbol of hope

: for all men.
In fact that appeal is only too necessary
to-day.

In an island where there are not enough
jobs for all the candidates there are always
a number of jobs vacant for men of the
* right type but men and women of the right
ts type are few and far between.

The reason is that in an effort to raise

; themselves to a social level which knows no
bounds children of parents are being taught
to despise manual labour of all kinds

The result is that the economy of the
island is being threatened insidiously.
Young men and young women who have
been to schools which are above the aver-
age in common opinion, are, as a result of
their good fortune more likely to succeed
in certain manual jobs that require a basis
of theory in addition to practical aptitude.
In fact any employer of skilled labour in
Barbados will agree that there is always a
shortage of applicants from the class
schools for jobs requiring the use of hands
and brains.at the same time.

The disease is far more acute than most
of the others which hit the headlines of the
newspapers. It is the problem on which all
other problems depend.

Character and technicalities are not in-
compatible as,Major Noott so well says, He
adds: “a significant percentage of our
young men at Combermere are better
endowed for practical skills than they are
for an academic course.”

Any Headmaster of Harrison College or
the Lodge of the past and present is likely
to endorse these sentiments.

Itjis an evil of long standing and now
that the need for skilled operators in all
fields of Barbadian industry is growing in
excess of the demand for clerks who possess
a smattering of education and little else,
the position is acute.

Already the middle classes of Barbados
have seen the red light and most of their
children are being equipped with a tecfini-
eal education which will enable them to
continue to offer their other qualities of
good breeding and good manners to a com-
He munity which has suffered somewhat in
i these respects in recent years.

' Unless the parents of children realise
that they are hampering and not helping
their children by encouraging them to
despise those holy professions ordained by

‘

elt tae

tb

‘a ae

ie



by Himself in a way that none of us can
hope to emulate, then we do not progress.
We go backward. It is to the parable of the
talents that we must look for guidance.
Major Noott has reminded us of that. The
community will thank him for the service.

OUR READERS SAY:



Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetowa.
———$——

the Creator of the Universe and performed

| BERLIN,
| Through the square-framed
|} window the Red Square glowed

The Kremlin's onion-domes were
cut against the sky. In the fore-
ground, massive in its solemnity,
rose the bulk of Lenin's tomb.
But the darkened room in which
| I stood was not in Moscow. It was
| the inner shrine of Russia's new
| House of Culture, which stands,
with all the authority of fresh,

white paint, amid the ruins of
Berlin.
If you cannot get a visa to

| Russia there is nothing to stop you
| from crossing into the Soviet sec-
tor of Berlin.

Once there, much may be learn-
ed at slight cost and slighter risk
by mixing with the East Germans
and their Russian masters, who,
for all serious purposes, are com-

| mon subjects of the Soviet Union.

| The black god-=-

Stalin's House of Culture is in
Unter den Linden, behind the Ger-
‘man Unknown Soldier's tomb of
World War One. I walked un-

_ |-challenged up the steps, joined a

group in the lobby, and then
urned right, into a room marked
| “Lenin.”

One object on which the eye
could focus—a black marble bust
of Lenin, the Soviet god

In the next room was another
world, strident with heroic murals
—frenzied athletes driving piles,
reaving at ropes, marching, fight-
ng. And, in the centre, titanic,
| he crimson-backed figure of
| jtalin bearing this meaningful
| egend: “Stalin is the Lenin of

o-day.”

Along the corridors pictures of
| angy British lions, corrupt
American warmongers and—

orrors—Marshal Tito lead back
o the entrance.

=-And a white

At the head of the staircase you
see a vast dazzling white statue of

BARBADOS

iy Charles Foley

Stalin which appears as if by some
convulsion of nature, to have been
thrown up by the living rock.

Be calm. Below it, in gold letters
on red, are the words of the god-
of-to-day “My purpose is peace.
I bring you peace. Fight for
peace.”

And how do we fight for peace?
Upstairs I found the Soviet House
filled with youngsters in the vivid
blue shirts of Democratic Youth
They had heard a lecture. “Reac-
tionary - bourgeois - stience - and-
culture - the - service - of -Ameri-
can-imperialism,” followed by a
film.

Now they were sitting on the
terrace, eating and drinking in
surroundings as fine as any im-
perialist could wish for.

Next—Fight for Peace. They
pour out into Unter den Linden,
line up before the statue of
Frederick the “~--* -7=' *teqin,
with banners, ti

The goal is the Lustgarten, the
great square before the former
Kaiser's palace. From all parts
of dusty, Democratic Berlin pro-
cessions weave their way to this
point.

It is easy to move up to the
front through the limp crowds on
whose ears the loudspeakers all
round the square clatter, us they
did in 1938, when I heard Goebbels
ranting there.

Up on the speakers’ stand are
a dozen Peace leaders—members
of the Soviet-appointed sovereign
Democratic German Government.

A tidal wave

A week ago these men signed a
treaty with Democratic Czecho-
slovakia accepting the expulsion of
2,000,000 Germans from Sudeten-
land.

A fortnight ago they signed a
treaty with Democratic Poland
accepting the loss of one-fifth of



ADVOCATE



DT Was Stalin’s Pupil For Why Vot BWI
An Hour-In Berlin

the Fatherland. To-day? To-day
they are supporting Democratic
Korea.

I cannot forget the face of the
pretty Berlin policewoman aged
perhaps 19, flax-blond hair, china-
blue eyes, waiting with tingling
palms for every crescendo in the
unending speeches to throw up
her arms above her head.

Then—clap, clap, clap, the new
signal of the Democratic Youth, in
slow unison, like breakers on the
shore, then faster and faster until
it is a tidal wave of sound sweep-
ing across the square

There is a pause, an announce-
ment, a storm of cheers. John
Peet, head of a British news
agency in Berlin, who has gone
over to Democracy, is the star
speaker to-day. He receives a
special salute

When Peet finished speaking I
climbed up on the platform to
question him. He recalled that we
last met when he was looking for
a job on the Daily Express. but
that was before he decided to de-
sert the warmongers

He admitted it was two years
since his last visit to England, so
that perhaps the dockworkers
might not refuse, as he had claim-
ed to load arms for Korea.

Certainly he had kept his Brit-
ish passport and would go back to
England when he had delivered
his message to all who wanted to
hear it.

But not yet, not yet.

How many in the crowd? Per-
haps a hundred thousand. Com-
rade Eisler, the German Com-
munist leader from America, said

yes, 100,000. (Next day Eisler’s
Press said 350,000 filled the
square.)

We drive back down Unter den
Linden. A couple of Russian sen-
tries. A notice board- “You are
now leaving the Democratic sec-
tor,” and the journey—Moscow
without a visa—is done.

—London Express Service.



| Scientists Explore Under-Sea

WASHINGTON, July 15.

Science is getting ready for its
most searching look at the mys-
terious “pastures” of the ocean—
the drifting meadows of micro-
scopic fodder on which all sea
life depends for existence.

The National Geographic Society
has announced that it would spon-
sor a broad research program in
cooperation with the University
of Miami to study these little-
known ocean organisms The
work is to be on a year around
basis in the Atlantic between
southern Florida and the Bahamas

It is expected the research will
produce important contributions
in the field, of marine biology,
develop data of general value to
commercial fisheries in the Carib-
bean-Gulf or Mexico area, and
yield new information on_ the
behavior of the Gulf Stream, which
affects the continent of Europe as
well as North America

Dr. F. G. Walton Smith, head
of the Marine Laboratory at the
University of Miami, has been
named director of the long-range
research program, His associate
director will be Dr. Hilary B.
Moore, another of the top-ranking
oeceanographers on the Labora-
tory’s staff.

Weird Subject
Matter

Under a high-powered micro-
scope the sea creatures to be
studied in the program present a
weird assortment of odd shapes
often delicately beautiful coloring
a surrealist menagerie of infinite
variety.

The scientific name for them 1s
plankton, derived from the Greek
word for -'wandering” which de-
scribes the drifting life of these
minute organisms incapable of
swimming against a current, .
single quart of sea water ma
Gifain as many as 100,000 of
them, Some are _ plantlike in
character (photoplankton). Others
are animal-like (zooplankton)
and feed on the vegetable plank-
tom, Both, in turn, provide forage
for sea fife from the smallest of
fishes to species of whales who
wax to a 70-ton maturity on 4
few years of such diet.

To the fishes of the sea, large

or small, plankton is as indis-
pensable to survival as the
grasses and cereals are to the
animals which range the land.

When plankton pastures dwindle,
the fish are fewer When they












Pastures

are lush, the fish teem And
when they become too bountiful,
they seem to acquire a poisonous
Borgia touch, and the fish die.

How do these plankton
meadows materialize? Why do
they migrate from time to time,
drawing the fish population away
with them? What relation do
these migrations have to climate
changes? These are only a few
of the multiple questions to which
the projected research program
hopes to find answers

Ocean Research
Neglected

Science discovered
ton about a century
nus remained a
circumscribed field of marine
research, especially in oceanic
work. Considerable study has been
given to the patchy pastures
found inshore, and to those which
feed the fish of the inclosed seas
of the world. The open ocean,
however, has been subjected to
random samplings only, and its
secrets remain to be disclosed.

The research _ site for the
National Geographic Society -
University of Miami program is
believed made to order for the
oceanographic scientist because
the northeastward surging Gulf

the plank-
ago, but it
relatively



WELL, SURELY YOU DIDN'T EXPECT
ME TO COME AWAY WITHOUT
SOME ORT OF BECURITY
FOR THE WINNINGS HE OWES ME



Stream obligingly funnels the
ocean waters into the chosen
proving grounds.

Plans call for the University

of Miami’s research ship, “Mega-
lopa”, to ply this proving ground
for regular seinings to bring out

plankton from various depth
levels down to 400 fathoms.
During each seining systematic
observations will be made of
water and light conditions, tem-
perature and other factors.

In_ addition, the boat will
periodically spend 24 hours on
station to give an around-the-

clock check on the way the plank-
ton pastures move up toward the
surface with clock-like regularity
at nightfall and descend again
to lower depths with the coming
of day. The false echoes caused
by this shift of infinitesimal
creatures gave trouble to the
Navy’s electronic sound-ranging
instruments during World War II
submarine hunting.

Plankton On Rye

There has been speculation
from time to time about tapping
the plankton supply of the ocean
for human food. It is possible!
The University of Miami scien-
tists say your plankton sandwich
would taste something like one

ilied with shrimp paste, and
slightly on the salty side. It
would be quite palatable and

nourishing

However, extracting plankton
on a scale large enough for human
consumption would be an enor-
mously expensive operation. The
uncanny economy of the ocean
does a far more efficient and
quicker job transforming these
micro-organisms into food for
humanity in the form of fish, Dr.
Walton Smith points out.

In administering the coming
research program, Dr. Walton
Smith will have a former college
associate working with him. Both
he and Dr. Moore are graduates
of the University of London.

Dr. Walton Smith has been
Director of the Marine Biology
Department at the University of
Miami since 1940. The previous
four years he was connected with

the Bahamas Sponge Fishery
Investigations.
Dr. Moore did reseach work

at the Plymouth Marine Labora-
tory, England; the International
Biologic Station in Bermuda, and
the Woods Hole (Mass.) Ocean-
ographic Institute before joining
the University of Miami faculty.
















manage new export businesses. Numero DEMERARA CASAREEP—per bottle .. $ .66
eendtae ie . nmerous |? QUAKER CORN FLAKES—per package . 39
ready are interested in these MUFFETS — per package ......... ies 37
opportunities. What they lack is official HEATIES — per package ............. We
. ‘ DALTON’S CEREAL FLAKES .— ackage... ‘
ee in _ form of Government under- oe RA — 4) packages erg nis wi rv
‘takings to facilitate the distribution in thi By POR HT nore nie eee ste eet ne ees 25
petra ees this 1 K.W.V, PAARL TAWNY — per boitie 2.16
a wh 0 Sepia natural and processed foods BWV. SOUSSRNE — per bottle .. 2.10
which would be made available t i r — ber bottle sereee es 4.50
0 Canadians. |! pRUNES IN SYRUP — per tin . fees aNd ee

THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1950

«
oe





TO-DAY'S ‘SPECIALS
at the COLONNADE

D, V. SCOTT

& CO., LTD.








Usually Now

Investments ?

| Jars Prepared Mustard

Editorial appearing in “The Toronto | Jars Peanut Butter
PP 1S

Globe and Mail”, Wednesday, July 12th | Bottles Jeffrys Beer

1950. (With Acknowledgements.)





WELCOME as any arrangement for the
restoration of trade between Canada and the| |
British West Indies may be, the mere exten-| |
sion of credits from Canada to finance im-|
ports from us is far from adequate. By the
Washington agreements of last September, | '
when Canada and Britain discussed trade and |
currency problems with the United States, |
this country is committed to a programme of |
investments abroad.

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COMPASS SAWS—12 in. and 14 in.

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The purpose of such investments is to

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to bolster local production for sale abroad so
that exports would provide hard currency
income. Out of dollars thus earned, the un-
developed areas could in turn obtain a
larger volume of necessary imports from the
dollar countries. Canada’s endorsation of
the tripartite agreement so far has amounted

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More Delighttal |

The proposed extension of credits to the
B.W.I., laudable so far as it goes, still is an
evasion of the larger and more constructive
view. The Caribbean colonies, now working
toward Dominion status within the Common-
Wealth, are a wide-open field for constructive
investment. They are ideally located to be-
come Canada’s winter garden for a wide
variety of produce. They are eager to co-
operate with Canadian entrepreneurs who
would modernize plantation methods, con-
struct and operate processing plants and





















Serve these to-day .« eYere



It is true that dollar capital would be em-
ployed in the creation of sterling assets, and
that earnings from new B.W.I. enterprises
would be in sterling. There is no reason why
Canada cannot accept that situation and
acquire a vested interest in Caribbean pro-

duction which would be of enduring value to
us both as a consuming nation and as an
exporter. A planned investment programme
would greatly enhance the income of B.W.I.
agriculture. Canada’s dollar investments
would very rapidly be liquidated in terms of
modern machinery which we could sell to
bring plantation and processing methods up
to high efficiency standards. We could per-
manently avoid the drain on our reserves of
United States dollars through winter imports
of fresh fruits and vegetables and their pack-
aged products.

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO., LTD.















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f NOW IN STOCK - - -
The extension of more liberal credits to

assist B.W.I. imports from us may have a
place as an interim stimulant. It does not
even touch the larger problem of creating a
permanent trade link between Canada and

our fellow Britishers of the highly productive
Caribbean islands.

stimulant

STRAINERS,
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TOWEL BARS. BREAD TINS
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CAN OPENERS

Administration
is often useful.

Ore
But neither in
medicine nor in trade can it take the place of

well established health. The strengthening
of a permanent economic link between
Canada and the West Indies offers such obvi-
ous advantages to both parties that it should
become a fixture in our trade policy. It is not
a matter for emergency treatment in a time

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Delinquency Despite alarmist effusions © : wxecutive Committee. The Juveniles are classified into ‘ ai ; og

i quency contributed periodically to the eas. paces eee _ Board has now been working Training Groups according to See onan orretios of $
The Editor, The Advocate local Press, the incidence of a e vocate stated: — for three years, It meets at individual ability. Club and com Al bye eee . *

~ SIR, ax! Juvenile Delinquency here i Today four years after the least once a quarter. Members The amount of time spent at to unem tegen tae See BISCUIES JAMS and <
In your issue of 15th July, 1950, cannot be said to havefa !ssue of the Report the Institu- of the Board represent the the school desk has been in- and aya the oys and girls ‘ ves x

appeared a leader headed “Delin- reached the dangerous pro-y tons are working under the Judiciary; the Legislature, the creased, and backward Club under the euaplensot thel® 2 ; , JELLIES >

quency” which criticised the portions reported from other same system which has been the Public and the Government. juveniles are specially coached Police, The Sens the 2b Tins CARRS BISCUITS ee ee x
Government for the little that has parts of the world... .Out of Subject of strong public Criti- Members of the Board have The Department of Education the deonatian ae nt SHORT CAKE, MARIE, BRAMBLE JELLY in Bots. g

been done since the issue four a population of nearly 40,000! aca maintenance of worked out a rota whereby has made recommendations heel hohfived, Be Gia “ase DIGESTIVE, GINGER NUT, BLACK CURRAN gee a

8 years ago of the Report on the children and young persons si antation system with the three members make un- for the school curriculum ployment of thay full-time PETIT BUERRE re SRANT JELLY x
Reorganisation of the Government coming within the Juvenil aim otf reform would continue anounced visits to the Schools which are being carried out. male officers and a full-time At $1.80 ti in Bottles x

: Industrial Schools. The following Court Age Group, only anff to defeat the endeavours of every month. At these visits An entire new set of school woman officer ae Seen Perit APRICOT JAM S.A. in Tins
comments on some of tH state- average of 216 approximately Government. Despite the terms all staff and boys have books has been provided. As I have the honour to be PINEAPPLE JAM S.A, %

@ ments in the leader should give are found guilty each year of the Report and the merits of free access to the Mem- vacancies occur on the staff, Sir ee JUICES in Tins in Tins %
: your..readers a more accurate and most of these charges the suggestions made, nothing bers of the Visiting they are being filled by Your obedient servant : g
3 picture of the state of juvenile concern minor assaults andg bas been done. Committee. qualified elementary school E. J. PETRIE, TOMATO JUICE $
delinquency a f what is being batteries resulting fro as . j S ; nas ae 7 . < ; >
Fe ae Et et acre Oates anitt,, WO, oeveta that the (2) The Administration of the! (sechere reommmended by the sting Colonial Secretary, 16 ox and 20 on, Sires TEAS :
ain aie oe See | . answer to the problem was the ool has been separated ; . * , CARROTS in Tin : 7 OR x

1. The Advocate stated: — finitesimal percentage 2 introduction of the Borstal sys- from the administration of the (4) There is no Acting Superin-— Policewomen’s Band : hee Z CHOYCE TIP TEA x

offences by juveniles reach 7 : BEANS in Tins “p ¥ : sy

“Lack of reform at the G.I. that degree of seriousness t€™ but that owing to the lack plantation since May 17th, tendent. Major O. F. C. To The Editor, The Advocate SPINACH in Ti LYPTON TEA x

Schools has been put down as which if Saeniwitied by. efulls of trained personnel, this should 1948, and the School Superin - Walcott was appointed SIR,—Through the facilities of ey CH in Tins MYRNA TEA x

one of the contributing factors would bring them into thi be postponed until someone tendent .now controls only Superintendent on the Ist of YOur paper, please grant me the KALE in Tins BLUE X TEA ~

: to. an increasing number of indictable class.’ could be imported for the job. eight acres where gardening April, 1950. Space to say thanks to the Com- x
2 young people finding themselves sad “Today there is an Acting etc, is taught. When the (5) The Interim Advisory Board ™SSjener of Police, for his institu- J. & R. FRUIT CAKES . ~_ ‘ x
2 eharged in the Courts of the The Chief Probation Officer then Superintendent of the Govern Attorney was appointed to has made recommendations to Bavsed wane s Police Force in : i CROWN DRINKS, 7 Flavours %
= Island. . Government itself goes on to point out that the abovely ment Industrial Schools. run the Plantation, the sys- Government, which are still a : oe one arees pon. o Energy for tl 4 x
2 would appear to accept this facts do not mean there is room|: The facts are; — oo whereby ver ape as under consideration, for the near kin ORE RPE Ie, Soe mOeEEY FOr the. Children Try a Bottle of 3 -year-old x
8 frequency as normal The in- for Complacency, and lists thefd(1) One of the main recommenda- abourers in the fields was provision of a third Institu— as i i ge + *
: crease of juvenile delinquency factors which contribute to delin-} tions of the report was tha: stopped, tion for Borstal Age boys. wae oh eer ee coo. 5 RAISINS lé6e. per Ib Gold Braid WR asun ¥
~ has been publicly discussed and quency as poverty, bad hous-} an Interim Advisory Board (3) The Boys’ and Girls’ time- (6) The problem of juvenile Women’s Police band. W, have %
2 could not have failed to com» ing, cheap crime literature of the’ be set up to advise Govern tables and programme of delinquency is being tackled girls here quite capable or being ¢
= to the notice of Government.” strip variety, the cinema, a lack) ment how to carry out the daily work have been entirely as a whole. Reorganisation of members of a band which will be %
5 The following is an extract of respect for other people’s rights recommendations of the Re reorganised to allow of Voca— the Schools has been part only a credit to themselves as well as a
3 from the Chief Probation Officer’s and property which is disguised ° port which were agreed in tional Training which is given of a system which included the colony x
Fe report dated 31st March, 1950:— as “independence”, and _ the: principle by the Governor-in- from 12 to 3 p.m., daily. the creation of a good Proba- 5 MUSIC LOVER €4.6669600064 OS e6esososee 3

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PPPPELELLLS LCL LLL

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JI ier Error

THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1950



Two May Be Enabled OC Girls Want ‘Combermere Is Becoming | St. Philip

To Attend U.C.W.L.

TWO STUDENTS will be able to read for degrees in}
Arts at the University College of the West Indies if the|
Legislative Council concurs in a resolution passed by the}
House of Assembly at their meeting on Tuesday for the
sum of $5,000 for the purpose of making the enabling loans

Report Will
Be Released
On Saturday

A REPORT of the meeting of
the Incorporated Chambers of
Commerce which was held in
Trinidad earlier this month, will
be released to the public in all the
colonies concerned on Saturday.
The two delegates from the local
Chamber who attended the meet-
ing, Mr. H. A. C. Thomas and Mr.
G. D. Bynoe, gave a report of the
meeting to members of the cham-
ber at their meeting yesterday.

Members made passing com-
ment on matters which were
raised by Mr. A. R. Toppin and
will be discussed at the Annual
General Meeting. There are four
items Mr. Toppin has for con-
sideration.

All To Be Invited

They are: That all members of
the Chamber be invited to attend
meetings of the Council to listen
to the discussions; (b) That new-
comers to the island wishing to
join the Chamber should be re-
quired to reside here for two years
before election; (c) Release from
all controls of items in free sup-
ly from the Sterling area; (d)

he lack of Commercial represen-
tation on the Legislative Council.

Mr. A. &. Bryden and Mr. G. H.
King, members of the Chamber,
asked for and were granted four
months’ leave of absence. The
period begins on August 1. The

Hon. V. C. Gale was chairman
yesterday.
Members present were Hon.

Vv. C. Gale, Mr. T. O. Dowding,
Mr. H. A. C. Thomas, Mr. G. D.
Bynoe, Mr. D. A. Lucie-Smith, Mr,
Cc. A. Proverbs and Mr. R. M.
Cave.

‘Local Folk
Ruined By
Vulgar Dances’

AT the corner of Dayrells Road
and St. Matthias Gap there is a
building which carries the sign
“Edmonton Dramatic and Social
Club and Headquarters of the
Landship “Renown”. The sign is
weather beaten but according to
Mr. Dan Brathwaite, the Manager
of the Club, “drama is still going
on”

The Club has produced many
plays, the latest “The Girl Going
to Market” having been staged in
November last year. It was formed
in 1946 and the local boxer Kenny
Seaman, who recently lost to Al
Hinds, learnt his boxing on these
premises.



Vulgar Dances

One of Mr. Brathwaite’s recent
ideas is to introduce the Scottish
Lancers, Caleddnians and Qau-
drilles dances to local dance fans
because he feels “local folk are
ruining themselves with vulgar
dances nowadays.”

At first the Club started with
over 100 members but now it only
has about 26. The seating capacity
of the building is over 1,000. All
the players in the dramatic di-
vision are trained at the Club and
at Christmas they staged the Pas-
sion Play. This was well attended.

Mr. Brathwaite still has some
of the costumes that were used
in past plays. Apart from the
dramatics, other activities of the
Club are handbalancing, boxing,
weight lifting and indoor games



IMPORTS
YESTERDAY

FIVE cases of tyres, 5 cases of
tractor parts, one case of brazing
rods, 67 bundles of iron rods, 22
bars of iron rods, two packages of
valves and other pieces of equip-
ment arrived in the island from
were
for use in the construction of the

Trinidad yesterday, They
new runway at Seawell.
The equipment was the cargo

of the schooner Gardenia W

Other general cargo arriving by

this vessel included cedar boards,

cylinders of gas, Angostura bitters

and rayon piece goods.

ARRIVING from British Guiana | jp
yesterday by the 76-ton schooner

Timothy A. H
a quota of 1,000 bags of rice.

This ship has brought the week's | their services

first supply of rice for the island

~~)

Vansluytman Was! the students

Mr. Adams said tnat te Frin-
cipal of tne University Couege o1

tne West indies naa notufiea the
| Government Wiat among tne can-
;didates who ileceuiy sar me
jsecnolarship e@Xamimauen of we

Universny Cojiege, tnose two stu-
agents we:e suitable lor University
eaucation botn Dy Weir menial

aDulty and persoual cnaracceris-
ucs.
ane University College was

glad to include iwose stuaents in
we admissions of Octover 195u,



‘Lo Meet Island
Cricket XI

—OF GIRLS

UBREN’S COLLEGE GIRLS are
hard at work preparing

the visit of girls representing the
Bishop's High School of Trinidad
On Tuesday these girls
cricket match on their grounds
The game was between a side
skippered by M. Wood and Rosa
lind Hutson’s XI. Hutson’s team
won the match but Grace Cum
berbatch of Wood’s XI
a batting display and scored
Outstanding bowlers

Wood, Rosalind Hutson and



but tnrougn lack of tinancial re-
fources, neither of nem would be
able to attend tne College. ‘The
courses whicn they wouia like to
take will be of tnree years’ au-
ration ana the estimated annual
cost for each student was $1,200.
The University College was pre-
pared to offer them a grant-in-
aid of $480 per annum tor three
years.

As both of the students were
minors, the usual agreements for
the repayment of the loans will
be entered into between their
parents or guardians and_ the
Government.

Urgent

He said that the University Col-
lege wanted a reply almost im-
mediately and therefore the matter
was urgent. The principle which
he thought the Government should
adopt was to reward ability.
| He was aware of the fact that
the granting of loans to the two
students was creating a precedent



but he felt that there was no
danger in establishing that pre-
cedent.

Mr. Mottley (E) said that deal-
ing with the question of higher
education, he would be the last

person to stand in the way of
anyone getting help.
He believed that it was not

higher education that mattered so
much but some education that
mattered. As he understood it,
Barbados had awarded two schol-
arships to the West Indies Uni-
versity. These two persons had
sat this examination and had fail-
ed to win. But they had done so
well that the Principal of the WJ
University made those recommen-
dations

Duty ot Government

He did not intend to vote for
the resolution but had changed his
mind after hearing Mr. Adams
say “it was the duty of the Gov-
ernment to assist people in getting
higher education for their children
the same as it was the duty of the
Government to assist people in
repairing their houses or pur-
chasing or repairing fishing boats.”

If that was the policy the Gov-
ernment was going to pursue, it
was all well and good, provided
that they were not going to make
flesh of one and stone of tha
other, But if the Government was
merely lending money to students
because they were recommended
by the Principal of the West Indies
University College, he would say
ao because it must be borne in



mind that Barbados, beside
awarding two scholarships to the
West Indies University, also
awarded four Barbados scholar-

ships and two Island Scholarships
It might well be said that the
candidates who competed for other

scholarships in the West Indies
University College, might reach
exhibition or open scholarship

standard, and could thereby ben-
efit from University education,
The parents of these students
might be in such straitened cir-
cumstances that they could ill
afford to send them

If Government was prepared to
consider other cases from time
to time, he was prepared to sup-
port the resolution though it was
creating a precedent. Finally Mr.
Mottley suggested that some pro-
vision be made in the agreement
whereby these students, when
sualified, would return to Barba-
dos at least for a period of three
vears to heln now that there was
a shortage of snecialist masters.

Mr. Allder (L) said that the
Government should use discre-
tion in giving such help only in
case of neediness. He was in
| sympathy with the two students
| and was prepared to vote for
the resolution. The Government
should take care in spending
money in that direction to help
those at the bottom before
spending mones to heln those
who were in better financial
positions. :

Mr. Crawford (C) said that he
wanted to clarify the point made
by Mr. Mottley before the resolu-
>! tion was voted for. He did not
‘|‘want the Government to make
the loan becninse of the recom-
+| mendations of the Princinal of the
University College of the West
Indies, hut merely to give assist-
anee to the two students who were
need of it.

He was also of the opinion that
should be made ‘to
eame back to the colony and give
if needed





It was berthed in the inner ae Reece Wants Fish

of the Careenage where it wil
begin unloading to-day.

The Vansluytman also brough
1,100 bags of charcoal, 61 tons o

firewood, 425 pieces of

greenheart and 112 wallaba posts



‘“Manuata”’
Leaves Dock

SCHOONER Manuata was low
ered off dock yesterday after un

dergoing a few days’ repairs. It

is expected to leave port for Brit
ish Guiana on Satundday.

sawn|_ AN _ Address

t| Shed Erected

f

tabled by Mr.
Reece in the House of Assembly
;on Tugsday draws the attention of
His Excellency the Governor to
the fact that a shed for the use
of fishermen and vendors of fish
is needed at Silver Sands in the
parish of Christ Church.
. The House asks the Governor to
.|take such steps as are necessar:’
to send down a resolution for a
.-|sum of money to the House ot
Assembly to provide for the cost

Going on dock in place of this! of erecting at Silver Sands, Christ

vessel was the Lord Combermere.
The vessel has been docked main-
ly for scraping and painting of its

hull.



What’s on Today

Court of Grand Sessions
10,00 a-m.

Meeting of Christ Church
Vestry, 2 p.m.

Mobile Cinema at St. Philip.

TT



Church, a shed to be used for the

purposes mentioned above,
Another Address

tabled



'need of more Post Offices and Li-
braries in the rural districts of
this Island.






















which was

His Excellency the Governor the

Atwell. Atwell bowls
action of a man and keeps a
good length. She demand
respect from the batsmen of the
opposing side.

Mrs. G. H. Adams, a
of Queen’s College, told th2
“Advocate” yesterday that
thought the standard of the game
was very high and she is of
the opinion that the Queen’s
College girls, in a cricket match,

with the

mistress

will stand a good chance agains: |

any other local girls* team and
also against the Bishop’s High
School.

This was only a practice match
but many Queen’s College girls
told the “Advocate” yesterday
that they would like to meet an
island XI of girls.

‘WO SUDDEN DEATHS occur-

red recently. Louis Campbell,
a watchman of the Department of
Highways & Transport, died in
his hut at Baxters Road at about
8 o'clock on Monday night. The
body was removed to the Public
Mortuary where a post mortem
was later performed’ by Dr. Kerr.
Death was attributed to natura!
causes,

On Tuesday 36-year-old Ken
neth Gaskin of Fitts Village, St.
James, died suddenly at his home
An autopsy was performed by
Dr. Kirton and again death was
attributed to natural causes

URTON BEST is now detained

at the General Hospital suf-

fering from a broken leg. Best a

resident of Douglin Village, St.

Andrew was attacked by a bull
at Walkers Bay recently.

M&: HAROLD KIDNEY of
Strathclyde, St. Michael, re-
ported to the Police that the Pick-
wick Pavilion at Kensington Oval
was broken and entered between

Saturday and Monday and a
quantity of cricket balls, cig-
arettes and cash, total value

$31.81, were removed, They are
the property of the Pickwick
Club.

-NIGHT the Mobile Cinema

will give a show at Edge-
combe Plantation yard mainly for
residents of the Edgecombe area of
St. Philip.

ARENTS OF BOYS and girls
of the Barbados Youth Move-
ment were told of future plans of
the movement at a meeting held
recently at the Youth Centre in
Bridge Road.
After a discussion many parents
promised to support the move-
ment,

HE POLICE BAND, under
Capt. C. E. Raison, will be
playing at the Elementary School
Singing Festival which will be
held at the Combermere School

Hall, at 430 o'clock on Friday
evening.
This Festival takes the form

of a Concert given by the Massed
Choirs of Wesley Hall Boys’ and
Girls’ and St. Mary’s Boys’ and
Girls’, and is a means of encour-
aging Community Singing between
the schools.

A Concert similar to this one
took place recently by the massed
choirs of eight of the 11 schools of
St. George and it was a great suc-
cess. It was held at the St.
George’s Boys’ School.

The programme is as follows:—
(1) Grand Maren Youth of

Erie Coates. (Dedicated
Princess Elizabeth).
(2) Community Song of Festival:
Song of the Music Makers
(3) Combined Choirs
ta) Old English, Air
ib) “The Drummer

Empire-
to H.R.





and the Cook”

(4) Soprano Sole by Keith Lawrence:
‘Bless This House’ Brake,

(5) Overture: A Children's Overture
Roger Quilter. (By Band)

(6) Combined Choirs:

(a) “A Shepherd Kept Sheep.”

(Cadet Boy Grant)
e) Old English Air. (Boy
19) Combined Choirs
(al The Lord's My Shepherd
ranged by Gordon Jacobs,
(hb) Welsh Air All Through
Night
(ce) Spiritual
Land of Hope and Glory;
The King.

Halloway)

ple who did not
about the heat yesterday
Tuesday was also hot,

on the week. The
temperature yesterday was 89
Fahrenheit compared with Tues
day’s 87°.

Perhaps the persons who fel
the heat most were the police
men on duty in the

surrounded school

and adults

by

there was more wind with th

of their reclining o

beach

part day

the

The House asks that the need

for |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

A Senior Partner In
Barbadian Education’
—Says Governor at Speech Day

“FROM being a poor relation, Combermere is becom-
ing a senior partner in education in Barbados. But there



held a}

gave ai

were M.}
Fay |




she |






















“O No, John!"

(b) “Standin’ in the Need of Prayer.”

His Corps which on a recent occasion
Band | provided, as today, a really effic-

(7) Soprano Solo by Desmond Harris
“Christopher Robin is saying
Prayers.”

8) Instrumental Divisions by
Cadets
‘al The Willow Song Coleridge

Taylor. (Boy Farnum)
(b) Berceuse di Jocelyn Goddard,

‘Are
The] Bet

The Wails of Jericho.
God Save

HERE WERE VERY FEW peo-

complain your eyes in front of you as the
Although gentlemen pass and if I catches
yesterday
was easily the hottest day so far
maximum

streets
directing the traffic and prevent-

heat than experienced in Bridge-

y . i town, people on holiday staying
FE ig poopie beg at Bathsheba spent the greater

should be drawn to the attentioo
of the Governor - in — Executive
Committee and asks the said Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee |
|
}

Assize Diary

TODAY
No. 8—R. v. Dennis Walcott
No. 17—R. v. Shirley
Franklyn

rend gown to the House of Assem-
bly a resolution for such sums of
money as the Governor-in-Execu-
j tive Committee thinks necessary
| to establish such Post Offices andj
Libraries in the rural districts of
this Island

FRIDAY
No, 32—R. y. Milton Phillips

| is much more to do,” His

| terday.
a Speech Day celebrating t
years—1948 and 1949.

Excellency the Governor Mt

| A. W. L. Savage told pupils at Combermere School yes-
His Excellency was addressing the gathering at

he occasion of two academic

Mr. Savage said that Major Noott had referred to the
Report on Technical Education and if only some of the

recommendations were implemented they would certainly

require the further development of Combermere for which

| “there is a legitimate public

His Excellency, accompanied |
by Mrs. Savage and Mr. W. Lam-
bert, Private Secretary, arrived at}
the School shortly after 2.30 p.1n.|
| They were met by Major Noott, |
;members of the Governing Body!
jand the Lord Bishop }

Accompanied by Mr. H. A
Tudor, and Mr. C. A. Coppin
His Excellency took the Royal
| Salute from the Guard of Hon-
our under the command of Capt
D. R, Perkins. He then inspect-
ed the Guard

Mr. H. A. Tudor, C
his opening remarks

18';rman, in
suid that it



was a pleasure for him ‘to extend
to His Excellency and Mrs
Savage, on behalf of the Gov-
erning Body of

their great thanks for the attend-
ance of both on that day ano
‘to Your Excellency to con-
senting to distribute the ?rizes,”



demand”,

I regret that the end of term
being so near, it is not possible
for the School to be given the
usual Speech Day holiday this
week but I hope, Major Noott,
at a convenient time early next
term you will be able to make
the arrangement to honour the
present occasion,

In the last few days, 1 have
been reflecting on the probability
that the majority of .the boys and
girls I have addressed will be alive
when the year 2,000 dawns

Some of you will recall that
there was quite a fuss at the
opening of the present year 1950
t seemed something rather spec-

Combermere, |ial that we had reached 1950—half
way
though some mathematicians tried
to spoil the fun by pointing out
that the half century mark would

through the century—even

The’ Headmaster then reaa not really be reached until the
his Report after which His|Pesinning of 1951 :
Excellency presented the But any fuss over a half cen-
prizes and gave his address tury will be nothing to what will
A vote of thanks was. given happen when the “1” of the 20th

g s was g ’
by Mrs. E. S. Burrowez, the|Cemtury becomes the “2” in the
newest member of the Gov-|year 2,000,
erning Body. ‘
Cn the lighter side were songs 1,000 — 2,000 A.D.

by the School Choir conducted ‘There was as a matter of
by Mr. Gerald Hudson The teys}fact tremendous excitement in
is 8 the schoo! Sor’." | Purope at the coming of the year
See followe d by a greup!].000. I say Europe because Amer-
oe Sous es i we oe “ica and Australia had not been
Se, altzing Matilda, “| discovere on é very little
Australian Folk Song, they wei discovered then and very 1

loudly applauded and apart fror

the variations the boys pronounced |‘

wag known about the greater part

of Asia and Africa

the words to this slightly con ne Seen ee wes
fusing song splendidly. sheves P WOPK as 4
OT) PR, SRS 7 ing to an end in 1,000 A.D. and
Arts And Crafts many farmers refused to sow crops

since they felt that there would

The programme climaxed with It
parents and friends visiting the
done by the boys. Visits were
combined
Room where a
film was shown
screen

demonstration

on the daylight

demonstrating the
phases of Physical
in a boy's career
mere School was
by boys between
8 to 18.

The Police

various

Educatior
at Comber- |é
also given
the ages of

Band under Capt
C, E. Raison was in attendance
and while the guests were en-
tertained to Tea on the Lawn
the Band played popular tunes
for others.

In his address
said,”

His Excellency

His First

“On the 23rd of July, 1947,
Major Noott presented his first
report as Headmaster of Comber-
mere. In it he analyzed the fac-
tors that weave the.complex pat-
tern of a school and he indicated
a programme of development té
be built on the foundations so well
laid by the late Mr. Burton
by Mr. Armstrong

and

Today he has reported the
progress and the results of that
programme of development and

on your behalf I congratulate him
and his staff of the School on
their achievement,










From being a poor relation,
Combermere is becoming 4
senior partner in education in
Barbados. But there is much
more to do. Major Noott has
referred to the report on Tech-
nical Education and if only some
of the recommendations are im-
plemented they will certainly
require the further develop-
ment of Combermere for which
there is a ‘egitimate public
demand

“I take this opportunity to apolo-
gize for my past neglect in not
referring to the School Cadet

ient Guard of Honour on my ar-
rival at the School

When I was a School Cadet we
had a Guardsman to
Corps. I was more afraid of him
than of the Headmaster. 1 for-
many of his bellowed and
oft-times crude words of instruc-
tions, but one lesson remains in
my memory.

When rehearsing for a Guard
of Honour, he used to say “Keep

train the

you watching them I'll wear your
feet to stumps in Defaulters Par-
ade!” I think his voice must
have been heard at Combermere
today as there was not a flicker
in the eyes of your Guard of
Honour today.

“T also congratulate the School
Choir on its singing. I am very

2

t

ing congestion in the busiest}fond of singing but I am not en-
areas of the City couraged by my family. Often in

In nearly every street of the|Church anc elsewhere . used u
City snow ball carts were always hear a stage whisper “Mummy

seen parked at the side of the tell Daddie to sing quieter.”
streets and they were constantly

1 have always put this critic-
children|ism down to petty jealousy, but
perhaps it would have beer

In the country districts although] avoided if I had had the benefit

elof Mr. Gerald Hudson's tuition
when I was younger

Mr. Hudson is one of the most
modest men I know, but you will
agree that the standard of singing
and the appreciation of music in
this island owes much to his tire-
less energy and patience

Purchase Work

“I should like
|tribute to the
\the work of Mr. Broodhagen, It
jis not late for the Govern-
jment er a public benefactor
purchase k
presentation to
Museur

n



also to add
Headmaster’s

my



too

ome of h Ww



the



Geography-Projection | since then,

underlining and that
sentially,
A Physical Education display ;taken
progress

last 150 of them

2e no one to reap them
It is very hard to think oneself

Exhibition of Art and Handicraft | back to those days and to consider
the
also paid to the Library and the changes

colossal
that

magnitude of
have taken

the
plice
















But one point is T think worth
is that, es-
the changes have not
place by a steady rate of
throughout the whole
but have quickened to
ly fantastic extent in the

1,000 ye
a positiv



One might even make a rough
and ready generalization and say
that the world of 1800 A.D, was
more like the world of 1000 A.D
than that of 1950 was like that of
1800.

“Just consider one point
From the dawn of history until
about 1800 the fastest speed at
which a man could travel was
the speed of a galloping horse
Today jet propelled aircraft can
now go so fast that they run
right away, so to speak, from
the sound of their own engines
and travel through absolute
silence. Man can send his
thoughts at far greater speed
still—in fact at the speed of
the electric current which travels
at the rate of 186,000 miles a
second.

In 1800 the Governor of Barba-
dos kept up communications with
Iondon by means of despatches
sent by sailing vessels. Today he
can exchange a dozen telegrams
within a day with Whitehall if he
is so inclined or even get them on
the telephone if he prefers to do
BO,

Improvement ?

“We need not at this point @%
juto the question of whether jhe

present arrangements are or are
not an improvement on the old
ones

I am just using this illustratipr
to point out the incredible natiyre
of the developments that have
taken place im the last 150 years
And I need scarcely add that it is
not only in the realm of communi-
cations that these developments
have taken place

The whole world has been trans-
formed since 1800 the process
is going on every day and every
hour and as far as we cal
see will continue to go on, and
probably with increased. speed
until the year 2,000 and beyond

It has been so in Barbados bu
I do not propose to recite its his
tory and development as you all
know it better than I do, but
would mention one basic factor
{a 1850 the Government for the
first time appointed an Educatior
Committee and placed at its dis
posal a grant of £3,000 to assist
Education

Today the expenditure |:
£300,000 And the ne
years will see further chang iy
developments, and you, the boy
uf Combermere, will) be callec
mpon to play an increasingly 14)
portant part in he future
Barbados

Many of you

over
\te
arty



5 aru

will be working it



public service and some of

serving in one branch or ancthe’
of the Legislature. How can you
prepare yourself for these respyn-

sibilities?

The answer is to begfound beth
in education and in, the eternal
verities that do not change ir
the character of individuals as ex-
pressed in courage and love and
truthfulness — and above all in
the Christian revelation from
which we date all our years

May I in conclusion adapt scm
well known lines to the present
occasion :—



“I said to the man who stood
At the crossroads of the ce
Give me a light that T ms
Tread vafely into the unknow

And he replied
Go out into the darkne
Ar t your hand t
H God
Tr al t «
Tha 2
Ar e a *

Sart penne

Murder Trial |

@ from page 1

not mean that all the witnesses

for the Prosecution are lying. |

You must look at each bit of |

evidence and balance one)

against the other.”

The Prosecution was submitting
that the accused and the deceased
had met at Eugene .Ward's place
The deceased, apparently, did not
like the idea of the accused or any
other man visiting the place
and no wonder because he had a}
young daughter there. The Prose-
cution was also submitting that
there was no other way in which
the deceased could have met his
death, in the circumstances they
had heard, except by the hands of
the accused.

No Explanation

Who else had come into close
contact with him? A _ suggestion
had been made about Maynard
having an opportunity to kill him
But no explanation had been given
as to why she should wish to do
s0



PAGE FIVE





os’ et te a ns en oe a ee

FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR

PUES sig 110s enters, °

a PURINA LICE POWDER and a

PURINA INSECT KILLER

H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.
Distributors.



He agreed that if they had a
reasonable doubt the accused | G6GGGGGG65FGFGG55FF6GS9F 9F5F FG SSS 5 FF FG GOS TOD
should be given the benefit of that | 4 %
doubt. If. they felt that the x câ„¢ $
deceased had met his death at the} > » ity >
hands of the accused, but that x Vo ‘ (fy * ong a ‘4 »
“re were extenu: + circum- | of # , . »
there were extenuating circum “ vid 4 & NEED | .
stances which would reduce the} % ae POS s o\ 2 .
crime to one of manslaughter, | % y Y we hr . on
they were entitled to return such | & HE BRAND You RV
a verdict x
Theirs was a duty which should |
not be shirked. They should give |.

that they had given to the evi-
dence, and return the verdict
which they thought was the right
one.

to it the same care and the ev

The Acting Chief Jutice sum-

eo



REXALL |



‘
s
Â¥
’ . rare rp ‘ 1 a
ming up to the Jury, defined | % RE NOW KD THE WOR LD OVER $
murder and explained “malice
aforethought ‘eupoenned im % AGAREN COMPOUND GLYCERINE and %
plied.” Where expressed malice | ‘’& BISMAREX POWDER z THYMOL COMPOUND 8
was concerned, he recalled the CHEMICAL FOOD x
evidence of Louise Maynard | ‘soon LIVER EMULSION KAOLIN POULTICE

about a threat which she said

accused had used to deceased,|* KIDNEY & BLADDER MILK OF MAGNESIA
and suggested that it was too PILLS

loose and vague an expression COLD and INFLUENZA SYRUP OF

to amount to expressed malice, MIXTURE HYPOPHOSPHITES

If they found that when the
accused and deceased were strug-
gling or that when the deceased

‘
pursued the accused the latter | KNIGHTS DRUG STORES
stabbed him, that would be suffi- 2
cient basis on which they could} %

imply malice and return a verdict
of guilty of murder, provided of
course, that the accused had no}
just cause or reason for stabbing
It was for the Prosecution to prove
malice and it was for the Jury
to say whe-her it had been estab-
lished |
Provocation |
The Acting Chief Justice told
the Jury that there had been a
certain amount of provocation on
the part of the deceased, It was |
his duty to tell them, however,
that there was not that evidence
of provocation which would justify
the Court in leaving it to the Jury
to decide whether or not the
offence was one of manslaughter |
assuming that the accused had!
plunged a knife into the Aeceased. |
It was established that the!
deceased had received «a wound|
which caused his death. But there |
was no direct evidence as to how |
he had got that wound They |
would therefore have to fall back
on circumstantial evffence, and
he would direct them that accord- |
ing to the law, they could only
convict on circumstantial evidence |
if they were satisfied that the
facts that they arrived at could
only be explained by saying that)
the accused was guilty If those!
facts could be explained either by
the guilt or innocence of the ac
cused, they had no grounds for the
burposes of convicting
After reviewing salient points
of the evidence and reminding
the Jury of the submissions
made by both counsel, the Act- |
ing Chief Justice told them they
were the sole judges of the fact. !
They must be satisfied beyond)
all reasonable doubt, they must
have a moral conviction of the
gullt of the accused before they
could find him guilty, }
The Jury retired at 12-23 ana re-











LEE APECE LOE EOL LEE ESA EE



. POOLS te ty te toe oo 4 OO oe OF LOO SAPO SOCSO> 200%



Obtainable from all Branches of

LLL LCS

Someone's



WIN WITH

CPALDIN

OVER 70 YEARS OF SPORT







turned to Court ac 1.40 with a ee
verdict in favour Arann | be veed A. G. SPAL DIN G & BROS. LTO }
———— el ——— oo = So



LAMP SHADES

Made of washable material
and suitable for ceiling lights,
wall Fixtures or Table Lamps.
Beautiful Pastel colours.

$3.50 to $1120

Prices from



Cave SHEPHERD & Co, LD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

RIDE THE NEW MOTOR

CYCLE MARVEL

Oelocette

THE NEW MODEL L.E. 149 C.C. is different from the conventional
type motor cycle—in fact it’s the nearest approach to a motor car.

WATER-COOLED,

HAND-STARTED, SHAFT-DRIVEN
and NOISELESS

For Simplicity, Economy and Riding Pleasure, Choose a. .

| Oelocette

ROBERT THOM LTD.

COURTESY GARAGE WHITEPARK ROAD


PAGE SIX
































BARBADOS ADVOCATE i eS, AS OT
a Ee a
uesaeey BY CARL ANDERSON

CAN YOU
RELAX ?

: | jorne people find it impos-
___ ano} |
WALT DISNE

ihie, because their nerves
are strung up to such a pitch
that it is a physical and
mental impossibility They
are jumpy and irritable all
the time and feel perfectly
miserable. They can naither
eat nor sleep and séeff to
have lost all interest in life.
If you are in this unfortun-
ate condition you should
take a course of

NUTROPHOS

This preparation, formerly
known as THIOPHOS, is an
excellent nerve food. It is
widely prescribed by
Physicians, who know. that
you will EAT WELL, SLEEP
WELL, and FERRI. WELL
when you take

NUTROPHOS

STOKES & BYNOE LTD.

AGENTS.

c T KNOW NOU LIKED DRIED PRUNES)
aaa < aT AND APPLES, PETE!
MOK NEAR. TSS are

N NEGETARIAN! GOOD FOI
SIR ee ME HEALT!!

ihe |
J Rie gence % ay ps |







ae —we ne

BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG

Lp, oll) Foe. WE i. leees.e || “FERGUSON FABRICS”











SIGN



STOCKED BY THE

LEADING STORES.

_ Benen Eireann a Bs PS PVR











THE







NOW WEE GOT TO DODGE THE
LAW WHILE WE FIND OUT WHY A
KILLER CAME TO TOWN!



YOU'RE UNDE

WANTED FOR MUR













Zo Hot — _._| Marmalades,
— alk Syrups, Ete.

Golden Syrup .... or 3









Brechin Castle G. Syrup

Household
Kequisites, Ete.

Vaseline Hair Silver Shred Marmalade

Tonic ...... * . BAHAMA Hart: Marmalade .....

Limacol ......... p PINEAPPLE JUICE Coopers OE ENR be
Pkgs. Brillo Soa — §B8¢ Little Chip Marmalade 5

Pads: oo. 6... 6 1Se.

Heney ... ; 0c.

Golden Shred Marmal-
ade




















| (9 SIGNOR CANNON? MY APOGOGIES BUT We FIND ———
NECESSARY TO TAKE PRECAUTIONS. 1 ToLp /_/ SO THIS IS
= YO ONE EXCEPT MY DAUGHTER THE INGLES!
i YOUR COMING . PERMIT ME 70 SIGNOR CANNON
tor |

50 YOU AND YOUR DAUGHTER Jf BECAUSE | THINK THIS GANG
ARE THREATENED BYA iS LED BY AN ENGLISHMAN.
MURDER GANG WHO HAVE THEIR METHODS ARE SO UN-
MADE ATTEMPTS ON YOUR ITALIAN!..THE PISTOL! THE

THEY OO NOT KILL
IN HOT BLOCD!
THERE iS ICE IN





Pkgs. Lux Soap










INTRODUCE TO YOU MY DAUGHTER > LIVES ?.. BUT WHY CALL ME? MM STILETTO! THOSE 1 CAN ae vias iN —... _ ORANGE & GRAPE Custard Powder,
me Pe) ~ CARAMELLA.. / WHY NOT CALL THE POLICE? UNDERSTAND..BUT THOSE Fj s! OE ie thy $1.03, 75e.
oe ah FIENDS DO NOT WORK y Desserts, Ete
Boa oe ‘i P oy MTHAT WAY I... Windolene ........ 25c. FRUIT JUICE 28¢ | s so
a 4 a ieiie:s. 80c.. 47e. aM at en fh hn cd Birds Cus: Powder ....
E Re Chivers Cus: Powder 52c.,
Vid Shinio ........... 36¢,

Chivers Table Jellies ..
JAMAICA i Jelly Cream ....

Extracts, ORANGE JUICE... 4d¢ | rts

Condiments, Ete. Hartleys Jelly Crystals
S..cetreex Marshmellow

Bovril .. $1.60, 90c., 60c. BOTTLES OF & Chocolate 55. =




Been. oe








ee ee ant pe ha Mel ee A Nc NM kt rot. RUT Se eae er fh Mee Mie SSE Ee ES Se oh SS OED i: gama ace'
le | HI All! A GRAND Kw | { Oxo veeeee $1.62, S5c.
| seeseese.| INS |
Cy Ill Sane ano | Marmite 97c., 60c., 32c. ¢
Ja || Feesu atey (7! |e | et sae fa oto

Wines. Li E
Ground Mix Spice 4lc. ines. 1quers, (¢.
Ginger .. 37. Gilby’s (Empire Red)

) WORE jewsna sy. eas $2.52
Celery Salt ...... soc. | BOTS. OF CLAYTON'S gree oe ee eae

Cerebos T. Salt 36e. LEMON BARLEY 9 S.A. Paarl Tawny Port 2.165 =
Paprika .......... 5%e. g =

nm ee Bols Apricot Brandy .. 4.002
Creme de Cacao 4.008





Ge
















. tore ~~ » Peach Brandy .. 4.00=
RIP_ KIRBY a BY ALEX RAYMOND Canned CLAYTON'S LEMON Simmonds Milk Stout 30
| { (7 DOES SEEM STRANGE, RIP... COME ON... YOU SAID YOU] | YES...0ES ORIiw FIVE THOUSAND COLLARS :
ee DESMOND USUALLY 1S SO ea MET DESMOND IN FRONT | | IN CASH. ORDINARILY HE CHATS WITH ME..







OF THE BANK... |
I WANT TO
HAVE A TALK

THIS TIME HE SEEMED PREOCCUPIED AND ;
| HURRIED. AWéy’,.. I’ SORRY, MR. KIRBY...
; THAT'S ALL I KNOW!

Meats, tt. | JUICE CORDIAL_93¢ | ““""™"

Ham Loaf ........ 45e.

Se ee Pickles & Sauces, Ete. 2

HH 5 | a ela JERSEY Mor: ro Onions .71 =
| MH “ie | » Gherkins......... 0
1 | TTY C. & B. Breakfas =
hf # Roll ‘9g ‘ ie . 400. T MAT Morton’s Chow Chow... 53
1 — 1 {/ / eee ees ”
| / i
Tina TY F |















Danish Cocktail C. & B, Cocktail Onions

Sausages ....... 99c. Heinz Pickled Walnuts .74

» Stem Ginger .... 1.21
SETTLER’
Kraft Cheese & R's » Salad Cream .... .46

snc" =< TOMATO JUICE

— Farnes Meat Paste 20c.






YOU TWO WANT TO EARN ¥
EXTRA CASH BY ACTING 24
YOU WON'T HAVE ppm WITH BLANK =
WORDS TO SAY. WAP aia) | CARTRIDGES.)”







BY LEE FALK & RAY M

1 DIDN'T I TELLYOU 2S
OUR CHANCE WOULL
COME? THIS IS IT?







28 ¢ » Mayonnaise ..... -
een “ NMA

NOW, IN THIS SCENE THE BAD MEN
TRY TO STEAL THE GIRL FROM THE
JUNGLE MAN. HMM, LUNEEDA FEW

_ 7 EXTRAS,

















Wn cenit PR ye



THURSDAY, JULY

20,

1950



CLASSIFIED ADS.

seiinihadin- FOR SALE







AUTOMOTIVE |
—_—_———_

CAR—Vauxhall. Velox 18 h.p. Per
fect Condition two one paint work)
trunk specially fitted for the better |
carrying of more luggage. Ring R. S








Nicholis Office 3925 Home 8324
28.6.50—t.f.n
CARS— (2 1947 Morris 10 saloons. |
Very fine condition. (1) 1947 Morris 8. |

(1) 1947 Vauxhall 10
(1) 1936 V—8 Ford
overhauled. (1)
(1) 1948 Singer
GARAGE Ltd

Perfect condition. |
Just completels
1935 Chevrolet Sedan

Sports. FORT ROYAL |
Phone 4504



20.7.50—3n





TRUCK-—(1/1948 Morris 5 ton truck
Excellent condition. FORT ROYAL
GARAGE LTD. Phone 4504

20.7.50—3n

VAN—New (1) ton Morris Van. Im-
mediate delivery. FORT ROYAL GAR-
AGE LTD. Telephone 4504

20.7,.50—-3n



BENDIX WASHERS6—Another § ship-
ment just received Book your order}
without delay. Dial 3878. DaCosta &
Co. Ltd., Electrical Department

15.7.50—6n





—
CEILING FANS—110 Volts, 5” Blades
with Speed Controller Dial 3878. Da.
Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical Depart-
ment 15.7.50—6n |



—$—$<—<—<— —$——$___—__—_ ————— — |

ELECTRIC FITTINGS — A large selec-
tion for you to choose from at reasonable
prices. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.,
Electrical Department.



15.7.50.—6n.

—_
ELECTRIC WASHERS — “Mayfair”
with Spindrier Can do your weekly
washing within 2 hours They solve
your washing problems and clothes dasty
|

PUBLIC SALES





AUCTION

AUCTION SALE
This serves to notify the general pub-
lic that the sale of the house calied
MAYARO”, at Rockley, Christ Church,
which was set up for sale on the 13th
July, was postponed and will now take
place next Thursday the 20th, at 2
o'clock
This house is in very good condition,
with pine floors and a shingled roof. It
has open verandah 7 by 22, drawing room



OF MAYARO

} 12 by 23, dining room 12 by 23, two (2)

bedrooms each 11 by 19, both with basins,
back verandah 7 by 19, toilet with box

and bowl. The only thing to lose in
removing this house is the lath and
pilaster. Terms cash. It is your interest

to inspect house before the date of sale.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,

Auctioneer.

.7.50.—4



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

BY recommendations of Lioyds Agents
we will sell on FRIDAY 2ist at Ss. P.
MUSSON SON & Co, Ltd Warehouse,
Pierhead, 20 BAGS PLASTER PARRIS

Sale 12.30 O'clock. Terms Cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers



20.7. 50—2n.



MARISTOW At Maxwell's
overlooking the Sea, having 4 bed-
rooms, delightful Balconi ete, with
all modern conveniences Private
Beach, safe bathing, for quick sale
£3,500. or fully furnished £4,000
Possession within one month
viewing Phone 4683 or 8402

20.7.50—4n

“SANDGATE”, ings, standi on
2.940 square feet of land on the ens
of Hastings Road.

Coast







longer. Quite a number in use all giv- The House contains, drawin, in-
ing satisfactory results. May oo pat ing room, enclosed ee er ee
Cash or on Terms. JOHN F. HUTSON |! sides, two bedrooi

Ltd. Shepherd St 20.7. 50—2n ee eek hein cae



ELECTRIC STOVES—With Hotpiates
on top and full size Oven and Warm-
ing Drawer Ideal for the new Home;


























builder. May be had Cash or on terms
JOHN F. HUTSON Ltd, Shepherd St

20.7.50—2n
—_—

—_——————
REFRIGERATOR-—Canadian Leonard




2 years old 7 Cubic Ft. Guarantee 5
years, Transferable, in new ¢ idition
Lady leaving island Cook, “Dunoon”
St. Lawrence Gap Telephone 8493

20.7.50-—2n



REFRIGERATOR — English Electric-
cal, 6.4c ft Purchased July 1949,
used up to May 14950, five years guaran~-









tee, transferable to purchaser Apply
W. M. Goodman, Phone 2042.
18,7,.50—3n
LIVESTOCK
GOAT—Pure bred Alpine (British)
with young kid, Martin Griffith, Four
Winds, St. Peter
20.7.50—2n
HORSE —! One Stud Horse Apply
Evans Morris at Curiosity Village, St.
James. 18.7.50—3n.
MECHANICAL
TYPEWRITER — One Underwood long
carriage 18 inches Typewriter in good
condition. Dial 3920 or 4455
20.7.50—I1n.



TREADLE SINGER MACHINE



and



Motor attached. Phone 3159.
19.7.50.—3n.
MISCEL) ANEOUS
—<—$—<——$
AMERICAN KEROSENE OIL STOVE
—18 months old Cabinet style with
Draft proof front and Cupboard, in
good condition Cook, “Dunoon” St





Lawrence Gap Telephone 8493
20.7 .50--2r
CHANDELIER—One four branch
Chandelier, cut glass prisms Dial
3950. 18.7.50—2n

—————— peach
CALYPSO RECORDS, forty eight
titles, only ten each, come and get
them.
A. BARNES & CO. LTD
15.7.50—T.F.N

—————$—$ $—
DWARF COCONUT PLANTS—Apply

Hill's Dairy, Fontabelle. Dial 3728
18.7. 50—Sn.

DUCKHAM’S ADCOIDS—Save petrol,
reduce engine wear and promote per-
formance especially when inferior petrol
has to be used. Of great assistance when
running-in new or rebored engines.
Simple and inexpensive to use. Obtain-
able from all leading Garages and Ser-
vice Stations. H. Jason Jones & Co. Lid
Agents & Distributors. 16.7.50—6n.

——_————————————

GALVANIZE Pipes 1%, and 2 inches
also Galvanize flexible conduit in sizes
linch and 1% inches. Enquire Auto
Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone
2696. 8.7,50—t.f.n.



LOLLYPOPS for the
several Delicious Flavours !Ask for:
“BEATALL LOLLIES” at all the lead-
ing Drug Stores Made by the famous
“Trebor” Confectioners. 19,7 .50—3n

children, in





wishes to
Child's
Law-

LADY LEAVING ISLAND
sell Triang perambulator, Toys,
Cook, “Dunoon” St

Tricycle
rence Gap Telephone 8493

O.K COFFEE!—Fresh shipment of
this much preferred Packaged Coffee
has arrived and may now be had from
your Grocer. 20.7.50—2n

TYRES—HENLEY Bus and Truck
Tyres 32 x 6 which render the 34 x 7
unnecessary We have had these
operating here with extra heavy work
since 1947 without a single complaint
being made. Drop in and see them
The price is as attractive as the quali-
ty of the tyre, JOHN F. HUTSON Lid
Shepherd St 20.7.50—2n





PERSONAL





The public are hereby warred
against giving credit to my wife, Ruth
Chapman, ‘nee Bruster) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me
Signed CONRAD CHAPMAN,
Martindales Road,
St. Michael
19.7.50—2n

|

——_.

WANTED





HELP

cookK—Must
ferences. Apply to Fernihurst,
Road, Black Rock, between 5
p.m, Friday to Sunday



have
















satisfactory re-
Deacons
and 6

| rooms, kitchenette, toilet and bath up-
lownstairs and

two flights of. steps,

wo ts of st .

Electric and W: me ams eye
Inspection day b

Phone: No. 2868. > oe ener,
The above will be set up for sale to

public competition at our office on Friday

the 2lst day of July 1950 at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street. |

11-7.50—10n |

wabntaes!

NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH

Sealed tenders, (marked on the outside
of the envelope ‘Tender for Loan"),
will be received at my Office up to 3.00
p.m. on Monday 24th July, 1950 for a
loan of £1,500 at a rate of interest not
exceeding 4% to be repaid in annual
instalments of £150 each, The first
oh instalment to be paid in the year
1955.



i ae









WOOD GODDARD,
Clerk to the Commissioners
of Highways,
Christ Church.
13.7.50—6n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Inez Allman of
Branchbury, St. Joseph for the pur-
chase of Liquor License No. 961 of
1950 granted in respect of a board and
galvanize shop at Branchbury, St

Joseph to remove such license to a
board and galvanize shop at Parris
Hill, St. Joseph
Dated this 18th day of July, 1950.
To J. R. Edwards,
the Police Magistrate, Dist. “F”
Signed INEZ ALLMAN,
Applicant
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Police Court, District “F", on
Friday the 28th day of July, 1950 at
11 o'clock, a.m
Police Magistrate, Dist. :



J. R. EDWARD:

NOTICE’ = ~-

Re Estate of
ALICE FEDORA HAREWOOD
(Deceased .)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claims
against the Estate of Alice Fedora Hare~-
wood, deceased, late of Richmond Gap,
in the Parish of St. Michael in this
Island, who died in this Island on the
18th day of January, 1950, are requested
to send in particulars of their claims
duly attested to the undersigned Johns
W. B. Maynard c/o Yearwood & Boyce,
Solicitors, James St., on or before the
15th day of September, 1950, after which
date I shall proceed to distribute the
assets of the deceased among the parties
entitled thereto, having regard only to
such claims of which I shall then have
had notice and I will not be liable for
the assets or any part thereof so gis-
tributed to any person of whose debt
or claim I shall then have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay.

Deted this fth dav _of Julv, 1950
JOHN WALTER BATSON MAYNARD,
Qualified executor of the Estate of

Fedora Harewood, deceased.





6.7.50.—4n.
NOTICE
Re Estate of
FITZ HERBERT REID,
decd.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim upon

or affecting the estate of Fitz Herbert
Reid late of the Garden
on the 17th day of May, 1949,
of their ckaims, duly attested, to
undersigned c/o
James Street, Bridgetown,

after which date we shall

and that we shall not be liable

assets so

tion.

estate are requested to settle

eccounts without delay.

Dated this 15th day of June, 1950.
HAROLD ATHELSTAN
ELIEN LOLITA BLACKMAN,
ALFRED TAYLOR REID,

Qualified Executors,
Est. FitzHerbert Reid, decd
17 6.50—4n



Resisting

Temptation
CHICAGO.

weekend anywhere except

his wife.

SIS spend it with another woman.
SALES GIRL — Required with a
knowledge of spanish if possible
State salary. Apply Post Office Box
No. 241, Bridgetown. T HE

18.7.50—6n 7

16 THAT Your New

rane We TO @O WITH THE HAT
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED
TO RENT:—Bungalow with two or

three bedrooms, furnished or
nished, Hastings or Worthing P.O. Box
278, Bridgetown. 19.7.50.—2n



£20 MONTHL

EASILY earned at home in
dealing in stamp: No
necessar,

experience
Suitable er

ex









also contact you h §
Colonies and Dominions fo
respondents Enclose 2% $s
Mail only take fews day

ton, Prospect House, 329 Wigar
Leigh Lancs , England

20.7.50.—30n

unfur-



spare tims

Road, |



SEEMS bed
GiLLvy TO Me)
Tee way You &
WOMEN O0RESS UP
TO GO PACING Ff

UMAN ASKS FOR

in the parish
of Saint James who died in this Island
are
hereby required to send in particulars
the
D. Lee Sarjeant of
Solicitor, on
or before the 20th day of August, 1950,
proceed to
distribute the assets of the said estate
among the parties entitled thereto hav-
ing regard to the debts and claims only
of which we shall then have had notice,
for
distributed to any person of
whose debt or claim we shall not have
had notice at the time of such distribu-

AND all persons indebteu to the said
their

TUDOR,

—|the strength of certain other free) the agricultural setllements who

A court order forbids a Chicago
bus driver to spend his Whitsun
with
Mrs. Gerda Westenber-
ger told the Judge that the long
holiday might be too much of a
“temptation” for her husband to

oress

‘BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HARBOUR LOG:

In Touch With Barbados |
Coastal Station |



| $10,000, 000,000

@ From Page 3.

{| “With peace re-established even
the most complex political ques-
tions are susceptible to solution,
In the present brutal and unpro-
voked aggression, however, these
questions may have to be held in

“Steps which we must take to
support the United Nations action .
in Korea and to increase Our own ine aatieartian Rigs through their
strength and common defence Of|dos Coast Station
the free world will necessarily
have repercussions upon our
domestic economy. 7

West
comr

Ltd.
unicate with
Barba

Indies)

Cable and Wireless
they

SS. Papendrecht, SS. Yamhill, SS
ondon Statesman, S.S. Bisham Hill, 5.S
astantis. S.S. Opequon, 8,8. Dolores






| abeyance in interest oi the es-',,, Bs Reenter g ? ecad Rea ea seem 5g rae 38
sential security of all page abesig! BBO. er Francesco Morisini.. S.S. Historia

in military terms alone. Our power | Kollskess, S.5. Maria De Larrinaga, S.s
to join in the common defence of } Cottica, S.S. Panamante, S.S, Buccaneer

aie S.S. Kyma, S.S. African Pilot, 5.5
peage rests fundamentally OM} Ar onec, SS. Elizabeth, M.V. Prospector,

the productive capacity and eM-]3's. Alcoa Pennant, 8.8. Alcoa Cavalier
c ergies of our people. In all that]$.s. Mar Cantabrico, S.S. S. Rosa, S.S
of free nations in other parts of| we do therefore, we must make | Kratos, S.S. Hora, 5S. Elizabeth A
the world. The attack on the;sure that the economic strength Flanigan. S.S. Argentina, 8.5. Esito, SS

Borgesund, S.S Ambrigo Vespucci
Republic of Korea gives addedj| which is at the base of our secur-

; > } o . S.S. Atlantian, S.S. Lady Rodney, S.S
urgescy to the efforts of free | ity, is not impaired, but continues | Spurt, $.S. P. and T. Trader
nations to increase and to unify |‘ ;

grow WEL 1
their common strength in order to} SEA

With this enormous economic

deter any potential aggressor. ctrength new and necessary Pro"

“To be able to accomplish es! ae Tam rt re ARRIVALS BE BoP t-A-t-
objective, the free nations must | S22? ahaa ais Sane From Trinidad:
inhintain -auticlent defeliive milla |}°oo ke ee hea md. | pMtiss Maureen Johnson, | Miss Violet
tery strength i “~/emy to bear the strains involv Johnson. Mr. E. Bynoe, Miss V. Bazzey,
ax ia oes a ns —_ - Nevertheless, the magnitude of] Mrs. R. Vincent, Malcolm Barcant, Wil-
Vv ortant solid basis ¢
economic strength capable of rapid

demands fcr military purposes{ liam Butland, Evelyn Butland, Bsther
mobilisation in event of emergency,

Laifook, Patrick Wallbridge, Marcos
that are now foreseeable in econ- Shaden, Sylvia Barrow, Andrew Durate,

“Strong co-operative efforts thet
have been made by the United

omy which is already operatingy Vida Marshall
States and other free nations since

“The outbreak of aggression in
the Far East does not of course
lessen, but instead, increases the
importénce of the common strength







at very high level will requir?’ ie ee '
cubstantial redirection of economic |<,’ mAs a maak te

resources.

K.CMG.,,
Nolan

Reginald

the end of the World War II to re-| Under the programme for in- DEPARTURES BY B.W.LAL.
store economic unity to Europe} creasing military strength which

and@ other parts of the wofld and|1 have outlined above, military] Fer Trinidad:



. = Mr Millicent Clarke, Mr. James
co-operative efforts we have begun and related ns will nate wWiekiem, Mr John Hunte, Miss Lorna
ii order nerease ‘ive{to be expanded at a more api) Brathwaite, Mr Joseph Brown, Mr
oa Cig e ae Parabens rate than the total production can} George McCullough, Miss Ernesto Baiz,
capacity of undeveloped areas are i Caen Mr. Clifford Gittens
extremely important ¢ io ve - = 4 For St. Vincent:
to asi i Sent eontens ser Some materials were in short Mr. Cyrit amin, Mrs. Camillus Mulder

s iB DOCORIAG. aIFEN@ER Or supply even before the Korean| Cmdr, Roy Frith, Mr. Edward Elliott

« s' jal] Mr. Arthur Farmer
Substantis For San Juan:

Mr. Wilton Gates, Miss Barbara Cronk,

all tree nations, and will be of! citation developed
even greater importance in the | Cyeed-up of military procurement

future. win intensify these shortages.| Mr, “Jemerson Archer, Miss Winifred

“We have been increasing our; Action must be taken to ensure] Parris, Mr. Owen Dougias, Mrs. Hildred
common defensive strength unaer|that these shortages do not in- rae oa a a Bar. WAHAB
the Treaty of Rio de Janeiro and|terfere with or delay materials] For Dominica:

and supplies needed for national] Mr. G. Roddam, Miss Vivian Hollaway

the North Atlantic Treaty which
defence —-Reuter. Mr. Gordon Crawford

are collective security arrange-
ment within the tramework of the









PAGE SEVEN

ee LD LLL LLL LLL LLL LLL LLL

BARBADOS GENERAL HOSPITAL
LAUNDERING OF NURSES’ UNIFORMS
SEALED TENDERS

o'clock noon on T








ORIENTAL

SE HABLA ESPANOL
CURIOS, IVORY, TEAK, SANDAL
JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP
ESTRIES, GLOVES, PERFUMES

KASMVWERE

Hospital up to
for the laundering of Nurses’
Jniforms for a period of 8 1950

Tender forms will t l the Secretary,
General Hospital, and tenders will not be entertained unless they are
on forms supplied by the Hospital

Persons tendering must submit, at the time of tendering, letters
from two persons known to possess property, eXpressing their will-
ingness to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of the contract

Further particulars may be obtained from the Secretary

W. GOODMAN,

Secretary

receive at the
, 1950

from |st





sday, <







August,
on application to
















ARRIVED)

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BOOKS













United Nations charter. We have ONSCRIP1 Ss NEW YORK SSRVICK |
= ae action to bolsier mili- ISRAEL C vy. 5B |
ary defenses of individual tree ‘ “ - 4 Ju
corwcsts| BOYS AND GIRLS = | 38 cs ee A_FINE
and Iran. | T “Defences of the North Atlantic | CANADIAN SERVICE SELECTION

reaty area were considered a mat- > BURG | SOUTHBOUND |
ter of gseat urgency by the ‘North By RAE. — TEL AVIV, Nawis ‘of MAL soenne Sails Arrives =.”
Atlantic Council jn London this r cig h of 18-year old conscripts to Israel’s | 3.8. “ALCOA PILGRIM" June 26th June Soth Say tite : |
spring. Recent events make it The first batch o y " ’ ~y training | #5: “ALCOA PENNANT” July 7th July 10th July sand ADVOCA |
even more: urgent than it was at} army are to be called up shortly for a military we PERS +B, (ALCS Dotan” ppg 4 July 24th Aut 5th }
that time to build and maintain programme which is probably unique m the world. ee , ere si ara A
these defences. For not only- are all 18-yeamy settling Gown im their MEOW COUN | F

“Under all citcumstances it is|olds called up, regardless of sex.]@&y- NORTHBOUND
apparent that the United States is| They also are called upon to serve Married women are not being a
required to increase its military| part of their two-year term as called up for training in the peace-| 5.5 «aLcoa POLARIS" July 4th For Montreal

time army.

Plans also are being prepared
for the reserve training of men of
the 30 to 49 class who were exemp|
during the war.

Ultimately, therefore every man
and woman in Israel will under-
go military training and will be
enrolled in the reserves.

All men and women discharged
from the army after their two-

workers. in settlements

strength and preparedness not only | farm
along Israel’s bgrders.

to deal with aggression in Korea, | strung

but also to increase our common The programme of the “Nahal”
defence with other free nations| (Fighting Pioneer Youth), as the
against further aggression. army conseript organization 1s
“The increased strength which is called, is based upon thengradi-
needed falls into three categories. tions of the underground Haganah
“In the first place to meet the situ- and Palmach of the Mandate days.
ation in Korea we shall need to|A* that time, the defense of the

se) ; lms a i" Jewish sector of the Country was
send additional men, equipment organised by the Jewish Agency

and supplies to General MacAr-], tobe artnti year conscription service will be
thur’s command as rapidly as pos- mee ae ne So ein required to report for a month's
sible. the Haganah’s elite striking refresher course each year (on

“In the second place the world| force, established during the army pay) and also will have to
situation requires that we increas€| Second World War, drew its report for a day's duty each month

Former officers and N.C.O.s will
serve an additional ween a year.

Israel is a small country and her
main towns and cities are no great
distance from her borders: One
of her main means of defence,
therefore, will be speedy mobili-
zation of the army reserve while
the regular army and_ border
settlements hold off attacks,

The High Commanda’s plans call
for full mobilization within a few
hours.—INS.

substantially the size and material] strength from the collective set-
support of four armed forces over] (lements which had borne the
and above the increases which are] main brunt of the Arab attacks)
needed in Korea. during the disturbances of 1921
“In the third place we must] 1929 and 1936.
assist the free nations associated After lengthy debates in the
with us in cammon defence, to} Knesset (Parliament), it was de-
augment their military strength. cided to kill two birds with one
Of the three categories I have|stone—to carry on the Palmach
just enumerated, the first two in- tradition, and to forge a link be-
volve increases in our own military | tween. Israel’s youngsters and the
‘manpower and in material support | and, in the hope that they would
that our men must have. later Yoresake the town for the
“To meet the increased require- country and become farmers.

ments ‘or military manpower, I The 1932 class is now to be
have authorised the Secretary of called to basic training depots for



Archer vs

military training identical with

Defence to exceed the budgeted} that given remit army recruits
strength of military personnel for] tis“ will be supplemented by G l _
Army, Navy, and Air Force and|iectures on general topics and O er
tc use the selective system to such|oamp-fire talks, so that the
extent as may be required in|“Nahal” will serve as a sort of LONDON
order to obtain the increased “university” for youngsters of; Golfers on a south-west England
strength which we must have. yaried backgrounds. After their) links rubbed their eyes and swore

“Increases in the size of our initial training the boys and girls cf the 19th forever when they
armed forces and additional sup-|Wwill be divided into groups of) sim M Hie OE Se ee See

plies and equipment which will be|50 to 60 (two-thirds of each arrows instead of the orthodox

needed will require additional ap- | sroup will be boys) and sent to
propriations. Within the next few | special camps near villages where
days I will transmit to Congress their agricultural training will be
specific requests for appropriations | carried out.

in the amount of approximately They will still be under military
$10,000 million dollars discipline, and will need leave or

pill. |
A check-up revealed the 4



was no apparition but a partici-
pant in am unusual Archer versus
Golfer game to match respective
skills.




























“These requests for appropria- ee ae Despite the fact that English-
tions will be eadrusied. 6 the rgd rote Y ¥ yoty town,| men were once weaned on the
needs of our own military forces. Just oe though they were still in| jong-bow, the golfer Norman
Earlier 1 referred to the fact that |®™ S7my camp. Lewis won with three up and

Each month, all “Nahal” agri-| two to go having holed the course
in 77.

The archer, David Davidson,
ucing a steel bow with a 54-pound
pull, handicapped himself to the
extent of a penalty, stroke for
each time he got in the rough or
bunkered. The envy of most
enlookers, he avoided all bunkers,
“roughed” twice only and com-
pleted the course in 81.

Davidson's longest shot was 230

we must also assist other free na- .
tions in the strengthening of our cultural trainees will be recall-
common defences. The action we|@@ to military depots for five
must take to accomplish this is days’ army.training.
just as important as the measures Atter a year of this military-
required to strengthen our own cum-agricultural work, the con-
forces. scripts will be given the choice
The authorisation Bill for the|of becoming farmers and settling
mutual defence and assistance|in a border settlement, of — 14
programme for 1951 now before] ihey wish later to return to the
the House of Representatives is an|towns—of completing their two-
important and immediate step to-; year military training in normal



wards the strengthening of our) army units vee On oe soeaees ne nee
collective security. It should be ss p x .y| Within six inches of the hole—
enacted without delay. If they choose the former they which by prior agreement was

will immediately become civilian

regarded as the
farmers.

having holed out. -
The archer played three holes
in “Bq@gey” and at all five short
heles reached the green in one
IN

“But it is now clear that the equivalent -of
free nations of the world must : ; . ;
step up their own security pro- During the year’s agricultural
gramme. Other nations associated truining, the Israel Ministry of
with us in the mutual defence; Defence will be repaid by the
and assistance programme like settlements for all work carried
ourselves will need to divert addi-|out by the conscripts on the vil-







tional economic resources to de-| lage basis. The settlements will F x
fence purposes. In order to en- thus receive security reinforce- loating Corps »
able the nations associated with|ments and extra farm handg at 7

@ From page 1
was used as a decoy by one of the
defendants Durant to get him
down Point Cumana,

Dr. John Me Dougall who per-
formed the post mortem stated
that when the body was found
the skin was already peeled and
the body was blue with gasses

us to make their maximum con-|one ard the same time.
tribution to our common defence, The officer cadres for the first
further assistance on our part will| batch of conscripts, who have just
be required. Additional assistance’| completed their training, were
may also be needed to increase; chosen from among members of

nations whose security is vital to| ore deferred from military ser-

wn. '
mo eae vice uuring the war.

In aadition to tne 18-year olds
tic area, these requirements will ; now being teken into the army for
reflect consultations now going on | two-year periods, the government
with other nations associated with! is inducting all men and women
us in the North Atlantic treaty. As| between the ages of 20 and 30 who
soos as it is possible to determine | were exempted from service dur-
what each nation will need to do,| ing the war for any reason other
I shall lay before Congress a re- than medical.

quest for such funds as are shown New immigrants between these
to be necessary to the attainment) ages are given a year’s grace after
and maintenance of our common] arrival in Israel before being call-
strength at an adequate level. ed up to give them a chance o

“In c.c case of the North Atlan-



ed that he was unable to get a
fingerprint because the skin on the
hands peeled off like gloves anid
he was only able to identify by



and comparing with police finger-
print records.
The hearing is continuing.
—(Can, Press)





Quite A FING

mM
: — VEN

in ANASGCOT SUT
1 90 GAÂ¥ $0
MYSELE

ANDO THS iS YouR
? Sut. VE AiR

iT FROM YOUR TAILOR
ANO HE SAID IT'LL FIT
YOU PERFECTLY

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GEORGE. M
Sweet -
won't

MAN ON THE

which caused decomposition, The
police fingerprint expert explain-

cutting off the skin from the hand










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PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS





ADVOCATE



West Indies Must Win Third Test Mateh French Racer

Today

’s Game Crucial

One Of Present Series

(By E. L.

COZIER)
NOTTINGHAM, July 19

THIS THIRD TEST MATCH between England and th

West Indies is, in my opinion, the really crucial

the present

repeat to win-—a draw will
In this view I confess to some
surprise at finding myself a trifle
lonely. Several critics appear to
feel that the best policy would be
to play for a draw then try
to win at thes Oval

One sports writer, a former
England player, goes so far as to
suggest that both teams play “as
safe at Nottinghagp as their differ-
ing natures all with every in-



and



tention of making the Ovai
(where the wicket is invariably
responsive to spin) the scene of
the decider I could not disagrer
more, and 1 fervently hope tha
Goddard has not read this column
or if he has, remains uninfluehced

by the suggestion
Play to Win
30th sides must play to win
This seems as plain as a pikestafi
As far as England is concerned,
the defeat at Lord’s was too hu
miliating to be redeemed by u

mere draw now, and besides she
needs victory to gain more confi-
dence in her quest for the ashes
which begins in the far too im
minent future

The West Indies need victor:
just as much The Imperial
Cricket Conference is evidently
unimpressed by our recent per-
formances. We shall have to drive

home our claims for greater con-
sideration in world cricket pro-
grammes at Nottingham and the
Oval. Who khows that two de-
cisive wins now may not produce
a bilateral arrangement for an

Australian-West Indian series in
1953? And that is whr+ we really
want.

Again, if England is allowed to
achieve a draw at Trent Bridge,
her determination not to lose at the
Oval will be doubled and I have
a very healthy respect for the
defensive fiehting qualities of the
English. Let us win this match
and England will be forced on the
attack in the final.

One Problem

As fa s today’s team is con-
cerned, Goddara has only one
problem to soive: What to do
about Roy Marshail’? Clearly
neither Stolimeyer nor Rae ean
be sacrificed, and equally ciearly
Roy deserves a piace. One news-
paper columnist called his Leices-
tershire innings “the best opening
display | have witnessed in a long
career,” and his average at the
moment is over 60. Christiani, too,
underlined his worth to the team
at Chesterfield and there can be
no suggestion of his omission
What then is the solution?

For my part I would drop
Jones. This is a very grave de-
cision to take on a notoriously
fast and perfect pitch, and it is
a course I would never advo-
cate had our fast bowling been
in any kind of form. This, in
fact, is the test for the pace men
but they have failed. Jones has
looked a good, lively, stock

but certainly not devas-
tating. Johnson's ability to give
of his best is gravely in doubt
although his two great qualities
of real speed and a sharp-shoot-
er’s accuracy are just what we
want.

Pierre, until his success at Liv-
erpool, had taken a_ negligible
number of wickets for an impos-
ing number of runs. With the
Lord’s team, except Marshall for
Jones, Goddard could use Worrell
and Gomez with the new ball,
Valentine and Ramadhin for the
spin, and himself and Marshall as
rellef workers. Six bowlers are
ample these days of 65 overs to
the ball I should hove

One alternative to this was sug-
gested to me over the week-end
by a commentator (West Indian)
It is a suggestion with which I
entirely disagree: that Goddard
should drop himself. True, he
has been in no particular form
with the bat but his medium
paced bowling will undoubtedly
be most useful to his side. His
spirit is infectious and he_ has
every man on this team solidly
behind him.

No other member of the six~
teen could do as good a job as
Goddard is doing, and this state-
ment is no reflection on any of
them.





England’s Team
England’s team you know
Yardley is again Captain much to

the disappointment of the jour-
nalists, who almost unanimously
were advocating the captain for
the Australian tour, for this
match. Yardley as you know has
declined that honour, and the
writing men felt that the new

leader should be given charge of
these two Tests to season him for
the Antipodean tour. The riters





Do THEY EVER LOoK
OUT THE WINDOW ¢NO!
THEY ALWAYS ASK THE
WALL TROLLEY MAN

WHO'S BEEN SEALED |
UP INSIDE ALL DAys. |







ame olf

series, and John Goddard and his men must
leave the Trent Bridge pavilion determined to
not be enough

win I

Test Pitch!
Damaged

NOTTINGHAM, July 19



Reuter’s Correspondent writing
from Nottingham says the pitch
for the Third Test match between
England and the West Indies,
commencing at Trent Bridge here
tomorrow, damaged on top
follawing vecent rain and the
weather remains unsettled. The
Test pitch which has not been
played on since the First ast



against the Australians two yea

ago may help bowlers at the
start. A special police guard will
patrol the playing area during
the night

The West Ind‘es players arrived
at Nottingham today and soon
visited the ground. The England
party were expected to arrive
later this evening

John Goddard the West Indie
Captain will not decide upon his
team until hortly before the
match. “I have sixteen players
all of them fit from whom to
choose the side” he said, “Every
thing will depend upon the

weather”
Our Own Correspondent cable
threatening

to say that rain

the city where the Third Test is
due to start tomorrow. Unless it
comes, there promises to be one

of the greatest run-getting orgie
in first class cricket, and I for
one would not like to predict a
definite result being obtained

In the words of the Notts
groundsman, Fred Kershaw, “the
wicket should be a_ batsman’s
paradise from the first hour”

With all members of the team
fit for nearly the first time on
the tour, the West Indies selec-
tors deliberated some time before
deciding whom to leave out

Obviously they did not want to
change the winning side and Mr
Jack Kidney (Manager)—jokingly
said to me that Yardley might be
asked if he would object to both
sides batting 16 and fielding 11

John Goddard who slipped on
the stone steps outside his hotel
this afternoon and fell heavily
on his back told me he would be
quite fit tomorrow.

The problem—of who must be
left out appears slightly easier for
England selectors

Harold Gimplett,
chosen 13, arrived at
tonight with his neck
bandaged—the result of a
boil.

He had great difficulty in turn-
ing his head and seemed hardly
likely to be fit for the match

Deen nee a

however were far from unanimous
as to who that leader should be.
The eight papers I botjght on
Sunday each advocated a differ-
ent candidate. The “Sunday Dis-
patch” headlined their comment:
“Let Washbrook skipper England
at Trent Bridge.”

Jack Hobbs in the “Sunday Ex-
press” warned: “Don't risk a pro-
fessional captain” and entered a
claim for F. R. Brown, “Not too
old at thirty-nire.”

Fred Root, another former Test
player was most emphatic: “One
man stands out alone for the
captaincy in my opinion, M. Dol-

one of the
his hotel

heavily
bad

lery.” The “Sunday Post” wanted
Hutton
Denis Compton writing in the

“Sunday Empire News” felt that
Edrich should be the man; Alan
Fairfax in “The People” chose
Doug Insole of Essex, because he
is a born fighter and has the price-
less asset of nursing enthusiasm
into his team. The “News Chron-
icle’ ran a pool on the captaincy
and according to them Wilfred
Wooler of Glamorgan is the pop-
ular choice.
No wonder
haven't been
decision.
Much The Same
As far as I can the new
team is much of a muchness with
the Lord’s eleven if you think ot
it as Shackleton for Bailey, Hol-
lies for Wardle, Simpson for Dog-
gert, Insole for Kenyon = and
Gimblett for Edrich. The selec-
tors clearly feel that two left-
handers would lie heavily on
Yardley's hands on the perfect
Trent Bridge wicketw as indeed
they did at Lord’s. T would not
even be surprised {f Berry re-
mained in the pavilion but that
would depend on the weather,
—Reuter.

selectors
reach

the poor
able to



see,

Registered Uk Seen) OMe



ORNING "WHAT \-=

KING OF WEATHER
fe ARE WE HAVING OU
.



‘THE OPPOS



NG SKIPPERS



N. YARDLEY J. GODDARD



W.1. Marksmen Put Up
Good Scores At Bisley

LT -COL. J. CONNELL, Major J. E. Griffith, Capt.
C. R. E. Warner, and Lt. J. Cave, have done best of the
Barbados marksmen on the West Indies team now shooting

at Bisley

First Trent
Bridge Test
Opens To-day

Today the West Indies will be
playing their first Test match
ever at Trent Bridge, and if the
pitch lives up to its reputation of
being “full of runs,” there sbould
be a lot of tall scores before the
won and lost.

Regarding the performances a!
Bisley, His Excellency the Goy
ernor, Mr. A. W. L "Bavese. re
ceived the following cable from
the Secretary of State :

“West Indies Rifle team Rut
up good scores at Bisley on July
15th and general standard of
shooting reported to have been
good. Despite rain and bad
visibility at 600 yards in Alex-
andra Competition eight scores
of 45 recorded, apart from those
whose names appeared in prize
list
Following got into prize list—

The Donnegal (200 yards highest
pessible score 50).

game is
The ‘ists had ¢ ‘e than CC. Crooks (Trinidad) , 48
ee Seasiate ti a ret pitt | Major F.T.'Maniey in

respectable knock on ree D. B. St. Aubyn (Br. Guiana) 48

turf when they scored 525 for ¢

wickets against Nottinghamshire, ate bial ees,

and won the game by an innings C. Basrow. (Prinided) ... a“
But it will not be on the identi- E. Riehardson (Trinidad) ‘ a

cal strip of turf on which they Sy Col a Connell (Barbados) 47

ih cara ; Sngland Major J. B. Griffith (Barbados) 47

will engage the might of England 11") “cave “Barbedos) i

today. This wicket, says yester- COUNIED OUT

day’s reports has not been played Major J. Reid (Trinidad) 7

on since 1948, when the Aussies G. K. Ridley (Br. Guiana) 41
Capt. C. R. E. Warner (Barbados) 47

played there.

John, and his boys, however,
ld or new wicket, will be bent on
winning if they can.

THE CONAN DOYLE
(0 Vards — H.P.S. 50)
Major F. L. Patterson (Jamaica) 46
Major F. T. Manley (Br. Guiana) 46
THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

Since the W. I. played their (300 Yards — HLP.S

e ; ye ‘ — HLP.S. 50)
first Test in England in 1928, Dr. EF. Richardson 49
all their games with England, § Prooks pci 48
co ee i. camsden, (Trinidad) 48
have taken place on three yyiioe FP. T. Manley 48

grounds, Manchester, the Oval.
and Lord’s. Today they break
in more than one

Capt. C. R. E. Warner +i
THE ALEXANDRA
(00 Yards — H.P.S, 50)

new ground 2. Divas: I Guan i
‘espec : : is 4 ’ ulana)

respect, for not only is it thir W. op. Sangster, Jamaicn) :

initial Test struggle at Trent capt. C. R. E. Warner 47

Bridge, but they enter the fray ¥, Crooks “6
i st victory behind them + Cave 46

with a Test victory b ' G. BE. Waddington (Jamaica) 46

I chatted on Monday with a
couple of lads who were fortunate (Ageresate of the Donnegal and
enough to see two days of play Conan Doyle)
ef the second Test at Lord’s, It (Mor Ft. Manly o
was an inspiring sight to watch = "1

y THE SATURDAY AGGREGATE
our boys going abcut the business (Aggregate of All Events on July 15)

THE CLEMENTI-5SM



ef winning that game, said one ere, ¥ Manley (Br. Guiana) 48
man, He assured me, that the Gin ee eee ae
West Indies players, are quietly §E. Crooks 186
confident and without much show (4th in M. Class:
are looking forward to the Test au Barrow . 183
which begins today. Wetec eee AEE in prize Let
These lads, by the way were G. K. Ridley 181
seamen off the Harrison Liner ey anEeaet . 180
ATLANTIAN, which was in Eng- 5°" Soe 4B Warne 180

St. Aubyn 181
_E. Richardson 179

British Guiana and Trinidad
cach scored 816 in a match for the
Anchor Cup. Jamaica was third
— 813 and Barbados fourth with
188

The team

land at the time, and arrived here br. E
on Saturday,

So to today’s game, The strwug-
gale will be keen — by its very
nature it is bound to be, but *
hope to have our fair share of

luck and good fortune, very often are due to shoot in

essentials for victory which we the KOLAPORE CUP on July 22
hope will be ours egainst Rhodesia, Canada and
—B. M. Channel Islands”



Maple Welcome Harvards

i ANTIGUA,
THREE HUNDRED attended a cocktail party in hon-

our of the Harvard Sporss Club of Trinidad at igua’s
Maple Sports Ground on Saturday. reer

Among those present were the Nobrig: c
: ga and Ernest 2} Ss ¥
Acting Governor and Mrs. Mac- La Salle W. oe mate
ele the A.D.C. Major Denis The Maple Sports C‘up are
ae Mr. Hugh Burrowes, Ad- entirely responsible for thei:
re rator of St. Kitts, Mr. visit to Antigua and have ar-
larlesworth Ross, Acting Ad- ranged a_ series of football
ministrator of Antigua and Mrs. matches. The Maples celebrat
Ross, Mr. Basset, Acting Commis- ft cca

their fifth anniversary in August

sioner of Montserrat, and Mr and they feel that the visit. of

Cruickshank, Commissioner of the

Virgin Islands. the Harvard team is a grand
vane nineteen members of the pea to mark their an-
Harvard team are essrs Ste ; y.
hen Lee-Lung Sreaaen Saree t Judging by looks the Harvard
vice oF ee ak! grad yoyS are a strong bune >
“de ig gg Jardine, Peres enjoyed their Aluht see Lae
am rde, vag Huggins, Patriek uit coniblained a tH é a ‘gua
Massy, John O’Neil, Lenox But- ‘ peas ne. RuMpe
ler, Vincente Mosca, Andrew tee eve which eaused
Sheehan. Caste Dore, Hubert] -pyo cg = a ee
oore, Victor Assee, Lenox : : hatch = was
e De scheduled to begin yesterday.











The Maple team is as follows:
Basil Pestaina (Captain) P
Kirnon (Vice Capt), Cecil Kel-
Sick, E. Manix, J. Kirnon, C
Hewlett, C. Walter, L. Oliver,

P,P v

grr

a






SEE BIG HEALTH

To Try Car



MAYS
—Aged 52

(By BASIL CARDEW)

SOMMER
—Aged &

RHEIMS.
Raymond Sommer, wealthy
Sportsman and champion racing
uriver of France, has been asked
‘o test the British B.R.M. racing
car in England.

He is expected to drive it on
a secret airfield near Bourne in
Lincolnshire, where the B.R.M
was built,

This invitation « a foreigner
to drive the car which more than
100 British motor and component
manufacturers have helped to
build is likely to cause surprise
among our own drivers.

Sommer, now 46 years old and
the Maurice Chevalier of Euro-
pean motor racing—he is always
gay—was delighted to get the
offer

When he stepped from his blue
Talbot car after retiring from the
French Grand Prix with engine
trouble today, he said: ‘This is
a handsome tribute.”

British drivers here were ask-
ing whether the calling in of Som-
mer means dropping the pilot—
52-year-old Raymond Mays, the
man who conceived the idea of
the B.R.M. ir 1939,

—L.E.S.

[The B.R.M, car is expected to make
its first appearance at the Daily Express
International Trophy race meeting, to be

staged at Silverstone on August 26.)
—L.E.S.



Racing Notes:



JULY 20, 1950

THURSDAY,



Pre-Entry Gallops Revealing

Watercress Likely Derby Favourite

Due to the fact that entries for
the B.T.C. August meeting close
to-day trainers took the oppor-
tunity to give some of their charg-
es fairly testing work yesterday
morning. The race track was
open outside the barrels and the
going was on the soft side. Nev-
ertheless some good times were
returned in one or two casés and
best for the morning over the
box to box route (6 furlongs 47
yards) was Mr. S. A. Walcott’:
Flieuxce. This French bred mare
has never won a race since com-
ing out to the West Indies bu’
her time of 1.24 4-5 for the box
to box may be an indication that
she will run into form at the
present meeting.

Another impressive gallop for
the morning was done by Hon.
J.D. Chandler’s filly Watercress.
winner of the first Barbados
Guineas. By doing such a splen-
did opener this small half sister
of the famous Pepper Wine has
fairly installed herself as a hot
favourite for the Barbados Derby.

Others orthy of special men-
tion were Mr. Cyril Barnard’:
two new two-year old fillies Best
Wishes and Flame Flower, who
although doing only thrée fur-
longs, did so in the good time of
39 secs on the bit.

Those who worked in respecta-
ble time before I left the pad-
dock at 8.30 were as follows:

Watercress and Battalion: box
to box in 1.25 1-5. Battalion was
not allowed to slouch at any time
by Crossley but Watercress, wh«
was on the outside, held on well
and they finished strong. The fil-
ly looks full of beans.

Foxglove did a rather slow box
to box in 1.31.

Joint Command did a smart five
in 1.07 4-5.



COLD WAR IN SPORT

NEW YORK.

{t occurs to us that politics could
learn something from sport.

There has been an international
cold war going on in sports as
there has been in politics.

But the frigid ice in sports is
gradually being melted under the
warm sun of better understanding,
tolerance and good will.

We noted the first real break
in better international relations
when the International Tennis
Federation voted re-admission to
Germany and Japan, thus clearing
the way for them to take part in
ihe 1951 Davis Cup competition.

It appears probable now that the
International Olympic Committee
will follow suit, perhaps in time
to allow, Germany and Japan to
send teams to the 1952 games.

Willing

We understand that Avery Brun-
dage and other American members
of the Olympic Committee are
willing to vote in favour of rein-
statement if that is the desire of
other nations,

The road blocks to reinstate-
ment have gradually been cleared
away in other sports.

Recently we had a team of
gymnasts competing in Japan.
Japan sent some swimmers over
here and we will have a baseball
team playing in T>kyo this fall.

Thus the bars are being low-
ered gradually.

Golf never has had a ban
against either Japs or Germans.
Both nations have been free to en-
ter our tournaments if they se
jesired.

Japan was taking strongly to
golf just before the war and had
18 or 20 courses in operation. But
Germany never did take to the
game, and it is only a minor sport
there. We never have had a Jap
or a German compete in any of our
major golf tournaments.

There will be no difficulty about
getting Japan back in the internat-
ional sports field. As of today,
all the Japs need to send a team
into international competition is
a permit from General Douglas
MacArthur.

Benefit

And since the General has spent
years trying to teach the Japanese
the meaning of the word demo-
cracy, it is not likely that he



G. Dowe, G. Thomlinson, A.
yoatha and G. Flax,

A great effort hcs been made
to conceal] the Antigua Recrea-
‘ion Grounds in order to collect
gate receipts. Normally the
grounds are completely exposed
but apart from putting up a
high wire fencing all around the
grounds cocoanut leaves have
been tacked to the fencing. Hera
and there a chink can be found
so the cops will have a_ busy
time keeping out those in search
of a free view.





ATS Arable

make children
grow taller!





BENEFITS WITH?

Boil 2 cups of water. Add
sale. When boiling, add 1
cup of Quaker Oats.
Cook it, stirring, for 26
minutes. That's all.
























4
~

would object.

of race, colour or creed.

Leaders in various sports say
Japan and Germany both would
have been restored to internation-
al athletic competition long since
had it not been for Russia.

Russia stands aloof from the
rest of the world in sports as it
does in politics, The Russians even
refused to compete in the last
Olympic games but they sent what
they called observers.

And since they themselves re-

fused to play with the others it
is unlikely that they will permit
that part of Germany now under
their thumb to have any repre-

sentation in the yA Ee.









“SUPPER & DANCE

at the

B'DOS AQUATIC CLUB
(Members Only)

Saturday, July 22nd

Cold Buffet Supper will be
served in the Ballroom
from 7.30 to 9.30 p.m.

Price $1.50 each

Please Dial 4461
Reservations

for



DANCING from 10 p.m.
to 2 a.m.
18.7.50—5n.






BARGAINS

Prints — washable, 40c. yd,
Calico—36” wide—49ec. yd.
Plastic Raincoats—$2.18 ea.
Rubber Sandals — 50c. up
Boys’ Socks — 12¢. a pair
Anklets — — 15c. up

Vests (Gents. & Ladies)
—2 for $1.00 |

Panties —39¢. ea.

(Plastic)
36c. ea.

Children’s Vests — 30c. ea.

Ladies’
Children’s Panties

Boys’ Caps — — 24e. ea.
Khaki Drill — 59, yd.
White Drill — 8c. yd.

Thousands of Bargains in §
Woollens, Shoes & Hats, §

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Henry &
Swan Sts.
SHPO NCO BOS





@
For the full flav~-
our of the word is best savoured
in sports which knows, or at least
should know, no barrier becausé



By Bookie







Epicure did a half but we could ing win again. Her presence
only time her over the last three is about the only breath of fresi
in 41 air in the D class races

Dulcibe!lla looking more pow- The cheeky and evergres
erful than usual did a very re Mopsy did her usual chip-chip
strained five in 1.08 half mile in 55) Kidstead and

Best Wishes and Flame Flower Beacon Bright were allowed to
did 3 in 39 with the former pull- run doing a box to box in 1.26
ing up and looking into the stand. 2/5, and five in 1.08 2/5. Kid-
Flame Flower although small ap- stead is g much improved mare
péars to be a handy filly and had the better of the gallop

“Flieuxce did her box to box Sun Queen and Pepper Wine
comfortably and her time as re- did five in 1.05 3/5. Sun Queen
corded above is therefore worthy looks in much better shape than
of note he was last March.

Brown Girl did a box to box

Gun Site as usual was >ushed jn 1.27 3/5. Postscript did a box

and even given a tap cr two with to box in 1.30. Starry Night went





the whip before he could get UP with the three r old Mai
alongside of Colleton. But at the Ann over four it s. Ability
two it looked as if he was wait- proved little too much for Anti
ing on the latter nd they came pPiem who finished behind her
back over the bex to box in ‘ The former’s time for the hal
9-5. A trying gallop for Colleton was 57
Tiberian Lady did five in 1.08 — Perfect Set had a good opener
1-5. her with Infusion who finished easier
Eliabethan did a mile, picking oyer a five in 1.06 1/5
up slow coach Southern Cross a
the judge box. Elizabethan’s tim Bowmanston started with River





for the mile was 1.56 3-5 ar Mist who only did three furlongs
the box to box was done in 1.30 Bowmanston continued on over
2-5. five in 1.09, ‘
Storm’s Gift was not allowed Viountbatten was too good for
to do much but managed a box to Fac ions and finished lengths



box in 1.273. ir front of him doing five in 1.09

Vixen, blowing more than ey Cross Roads and Wilmar did

did five in 1.11 only three furlongs. Their time
was 41}

Another blower, Suntone, had Roly-poly Vanguard showed
Fair Contest for a companion that in spite of his fat he can
over a box to box, which the run and did four pulling up at
did in 1.27. Suntone’s blowing the finish in 57. His companion
not as bad as it was in June. Joan’s Star was left very much
She is therefore not a hopeless behind
case and I look forward to se April Flowers did a half in 584.

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PAGE 1

Ikursil... • ill' 20 BmrbaJms IJwwcate Prlrf: ptvt CKNTS v. *r ..1 FRESH U.S. TROOPS LAND IN KOREA . Not Guilty" Verdict In The St. Philip Murder Trial A LPHONSO BRATHrVAITK. yoong man of Be* View. SI. Philip. hcunaled M if he did nol believe il ua. true, and then stepped slowI> out of the dock of the Court of Grand Session* %  free inan yesterday. A jurv had jtisi acquitted him of the murder of Lionel Carter of the same locality. There was the usual crowd of relatives, friends, well wishers and the merely curious waiting in the courtyard to escort him from the precincts of the Town Hall when' lor a day and a half he had sat on trial for his life. 4.1 AHO or IIOXOI 11 1 on rut: I.OVIIIVOII dM a. lite result of a IJL wound in the left lun* last taster Sunday night. April 9 after what wlUMMBa described as 1 short struggle between himself and Braihwalte. Dr. Tappin sold ll was a sharp-rdged weapon which caused the wound. Cut the Clown produced no weapon. The Prosecution called 13 witnesses; uu Defer* %  "You andischarged and may K0." His Honour the Acting Chief .fustice. Mr. G. L. Taylor, fid Hrathwaite. and adjourned Aie Court until 10 a.m. today. Prosecution The case for the Prosecution was conducted by Mr. Frank Fields, Acting Attorney General. IlraUiwaile was reu-tsented ly Mr. .1 S II Hear. HearuiK m the case *tartele but highly improbable that after receiving the stab in thlung Carter would have been ;.Me to traverse the distance spoken of by tome of the witnesses He clarified what he meant whe-i on Monday he had said collapse would have taken place in a couple of seconds He said he meant a matter of seconds, no' necessanlv two seconds. The Chief Justice remarked that one of tha witnesses had put Mr. Dear then posed a number of uuesUons to the Jury The Ural was, had Louuc Maynard been really 00 the eeane when dm struggle took place? Her version of the affair did nol agree with that of the other wltnesaes. an.-1 IT. Tappin's evidence gav 0 tha Ihl to her statement that the two men were face to faao when the blow was struck. It was not part of hU itUO to prove who killed ( Louise Maynard, according to her own evidence, had as good an opportunity to kill him, at perhaps a better one than anyone else How did Carter gel the wound" If there was any doubt, liutli Watt* was ciilitlcil ti> be acquitted The Attorney Gcm-ral m hi outline, when dealing with the question of provocation, had said that the nature of the weapon used was important. But the Prosecution had produced nn weapon. The doctor had said it was a sharp edged instrument, so that they had a wide choice to decide from — razors, cane bilk. nit lasses innumerable types of knives ear Where Was Site ? The next question was, where had Evelyn Shepherd been that night* He would not he as hard on Shepherd as he had been on Maynard whom he submitted was merely a woman who wanted the distance traversed after the p„blicil> as star witness for the Reds Renew Battle llli: GOVtRNOK. jrrontiMiiieil h> 1 ipt turnierc S< hind ve*lerda> 1: 1'erkinv iiMpecU UM Oaard si Hea m Sugar Council JAMAICA!* WOULD LIKE Coinmitlee Meets Again struggle at the distance between the witness stand and the Jury box. In answer to Mr Fields Dr Tappin said that was possible and probable. Replying to.Mr Dear, the doctor said that a left handed man could only have Inflicted such a wcund standing behind his victim A right handed man could have done It both ways. By "a couple of second* recant a "very short time certainly did not mean two minute*. Not Cause of Death To the Court Dr. Tappin said that the thigh wound he had also found on Carter could not have Leen the cause of death. Mr, Dear addressing the Jury made it clear that he was not basing his defence on a plea -of provocation reducing the offence from murder to manslaughter 1 His strong point was that the a*d. iience giver, by Prosecution's wit-1 iiisses was so unsatisfactory tr;n* it was bound to leave them in 1 tata of reasonable doubt bv which they would be bound, according to British Law to acquit the accused of any offence at all He h owev er, toid the jury to assume for a moment that Braihwalte did inflict the fata' wound. If that was found, his submission was that he had been subjected to that degree of provocation which woiild reduce the offence All the witn* %  and they were Prosecution's witnesses — had sold that Carter had been tsie attacker. No evidence had been given to show that Braihwalte had done anything to provoke him. "I am submitting," said Mr. Dear, "that thp evidence is so defective, that Your Honour should direct the Jury that there is no evidence on which they could convict a man of any crime whetroever." "Some Are Lying" Some of the witnesses for thi Prosecution may have been mist-ken. Mr Dear said. But It wa clear that some of them were lying, and he was submitting thn' the Jurv were entitled to discard their evidence Prosecution. Shepherd had said that he had up a lot of rum. If he did not know exactly where he had been or what had happened, he could not be blamed. Hut everv witness had said Shepherd was present when the struggle took place, while Shepherd said he was not there. There was another question: how far did the deceased run after he he was stabbed" They could not He accept the doctor's evidence and accept the witnesses' stories al (he same time To convict a man on the stories of the witnesses on that point would be equal to convicting him on bare possibilities If they >,uc1 11 was improbable thai the deceased had already got the around Whafl he ran, then it was improbable that the accused had inflicted it There WM i.u aitreemeul ,m hou (he accused and deceased had been standing during the %  •truffle, nor was there an* suggestion a* la how the deceased had got the older wounds that the doctor had described Mr. Di-ii in conclusion submitted that thrre waa onl> one verdict which the Jur> could return — a verdlrl or not guilty of any ofY>iu-e Mr. Fields replying, admitted that there were discrepancies the stones of the witnesses for the Prosecution But there was never a criminal case and hardly %  civil one. in which there were not discrepancies in the evidence The struggle described in the case had not been a pre-arranged act at which the Prosecution had asked witnesses to take a front row seat and write down everything accurately. No Whimsical I' %  % %  I %  %  Defence Counsel had tnlked about doubt But the doubt must be a reasonable doubt and not a whimsical one. The Prosecution • asking them to say that in the circumstances in which Carter had met his death it was the result of a wound inflicted by Braihwalte "lour duly is to lift the evidence." Mr. Fields said "Evelyn Shepherd, for example, b not .%  Hi TIyou the truth when he said he had not been at Eugene Ward's place. But that does • on pate 5 at—1 LONDON. Jiil> lit tee ol the InCouoi il retuniafter an interval TIM Commltti 1 agreement to Al the vati 1 prepared D) %  working up at tin 1 Bating of the M on June an will be recalled thai iba Cuban proposal that U %  • F O B d not rmii Ithan Us hall %  HI %  %  i mei thi original basis of thi for a draft .. n %  an) denial %  ill .,.!.• Iiiiv. 1 in particular .in American proposal—so that the i \ %  can in no nay bfl Mid sent the original Cuban proposal The full martins of 1 1 ni ..( i.-.i i' held tomorrow, and a communique is expected to 1 law) d —Rruter COLONIAL PARLIAMENT In London (From Our Own t or respond** nil LONDON, July lit THE SETTING UP ul u Consultative Assembly On Colonial Affairs is urged by Mr. R I,. M. Klrkwood men bti 'l tin* Jamaican LPRISIJ'IVI 1 Council In a uittei to The Times this morning. itihlnk* It incredible thai muhiiit raaaaaW M UH MlaBwavJ Assembly is being attempted 1o hrtns toccthrr 1 '. %  %  1 leaders |l Britain and her colaiiles. IMg MlillMi %  1 lllif SPORTS WINDOW cudai an Pollr* VI Sr*pp*n Btamta. are >S fm .mb+Mii while SnaDpcr> ho havr onl 1 1 n>h r •MI ikej DUI raeaiawM olonics and protector ales, hv poiou out, greatly exceeded her the Counctl of I \* untrtaa He bafBQf i-v *aying that a* ungi. stand, there are U that many British colonies would. If granted freedom of action, leave Trained Gang Sport In The Of Saboteurs Commons Menaces Navy SODOMY. POISON AM) MURDER CLAIMS CROWN In "Floating Corpse" Trial l*ORTSMOUTH, July lit Bi II %  naval and on 11 telligence chiefs were io-d,iv Iwllavij T11 HIwoiking on th1 %  %  %  Ihai 1 lang oj trained %  I itenlnj Britain's Havv, i-i: Prlday'i explosions In Goapon Ponnnouth, whieb blew up nine baxfai of anununJtle ftw tha Par Kam wag Mlowed by the announcement of sus|iectel raboaiaji on board tha h lab". Two other caaal %  ed aabotaga on destroy*rs have lx*en re|iort• / 'ion fuse Another i* thai ;: %  time fUM w in one of the hehtcrThe third Is that some big: l> nflammahle material %  1 ''ifhier to work glov ''I rontlnuc-' f the deal %  steel hii't I engine room macnlnorj %  %  and boiti vie wrongh %  ihlrrt -Heater LONDON J 11 %  Blau 1 Parliament on Tuesd oorti .1 y. H : t d II1 ' %  %  1 ..nil %  long) ii its IF. n<.it lennli boat1 Ins, and ul iint.iin funk TinU B %  k to lln1 .. %  !..( %  iek bord*r, 1 ifter 'Jie tojarner arhti h was bald In waul and and%  Haln said ih it the ... 1 %  MItrail ; • I %  0 That Britain can hold up its head again In Itlb 1 on %  iition %  Mlnistsa ties i.-.k dim view of the plan and Said I %  iva thought ir ore Importani ti ... 1 ndard thi lie -.airt that Brltoni CiiMder that the) Ibuchad tha bottom in their soccer dafi 1 HI %  1 a ishmg things, which have happened to them thi* eaai %  I Lei Savold, ovi t British Utje holder llrure Woodcock l pi I I -. %  %  ..-., %  tha Waal Indlea he defeat by Italj In II .:m Sot 1 uJanaja round, ti bledon Tcnnii Chaain 1 I' ink Strai %  ban In 'he Hrltiih Amateur Ootf tournament, and a South Afrlr:i %  • %  Bril Selecting H-Bomb Site %  \su: -. 1 ihe plant ir> build U11 bomb H balm etacb ta tn %  Aim-i 1. an Atoral woord -i %  rtati 1 the Al \ %  rhe Bub-Conn Itw 1 1 1 %  j %  %  HD.IIOO Met m la not ^\ %  %  nenttocuni ih. | .1 -.f rourat, the rsm tructad and da. irrj oul Uv Pi i January I 1980." On %  > PreaMani Truman aiiI had tOld th r Atomi. rtlth thf No bin) wa* given as In Ihg -ire of tha planl %  aj thai %  n %  I Ihe 1 oal impoi am critei 11 • Krutrr Mvhru Renew* Proposal To End Kormrn Crisis WABHUfQ r< IN, Jut* iv %  li'l.f.M | .. ., it| Oornrnunutl Chin %  %  NatlG %  "IMIII; U %  Kon an erisf 1 . . H 1 "im il For Taejon Bi LIONEL HUDSON, U h 1 InXnieiii.iM Antphll I line PdSUUIS, Don. Beach Head. KOKKA, JlU] PROTECTED by American Md Bnl aircraft, advanc units ol the b Amphibious force today moved InUad tablishing a bridgehead here. Tlie bridgehead had been consolidated by dawn and mare tl were then landed lUpplllg Into the calm briy. They came from ships which disRorped hundreds of landing craft fresh fr*>m F;ii nrautl bUM it mi n %  Irtkari ;freh irn.pwere ponrlnt ort in tfte ftlomes but once sclf-govcriimrr.i was giaiite'l to a Crown Colony uhiif then' 1 Without rccourw t> marketof On B praferential larms, tha msioi ity 01 British floBonaai awuld %  •olvent. 11 eondltion turn sistcnt with the United >undertaking to improve colonial vmg standWdS( M Khrfcv Colonial ubjerii h id %  11 hotee of the I ment. which ruled thell • 1 with the dulv d walcluni! colonial interests 1 ... UM itltuenl 1 II what the ii i'-1 I MJ 1 1 arc handle 1 trial. n 'I 1 % %  departmental II 1 The aehi< vi1 li tervpoliuV powei Qreal Bril and her roJot k bl %  •'!• % %  i %  %  a-oul —'ting up of a conaultattvi %  nj -he mi ml n % %  f Parllamei U I tl %  %  would dla bjecta of mu lal Import ind da' % %  1 th. from the Unitcl Kll 1..! Paillamenr %  % %  .Id I I the A a aarnM) Ueulai problemi -if gcigrnphicit I'.iki-lan Sii|i|iorls S*Tiiril\ (loilllril KAKMIII. July W. 1 tei Uaqu J] Khan I here 1 nlsht thai r,. (ed lions S %  ell n %  |) in lh • .1 m 1 % % %  %  1 %  in othei iiPtklAan %  %  United N.'tioi %  t naai ild Baaasa 1 Russia Will WUhdraw SAYS US GENERAL HBIDI LBBP Ueulenanl General A Van Kiwi (orm 1 % % % % %  l rnandei in Ireem predicb 10 thai Rum 1 "Hi K %  %  %  %  %  .1 horl slop I : %  .. n Greece %  Baltl %  \)ni\ II<%  d 11 seemed 1 ii..d be< 11 1 tei vcntloi \ ,1 ... aid. 'I(i. ...it 1' would not 1', %  %  Van n* %  Rianua to P llllthei ..Ml %  lad HMD will 1 ve to I-1 real r.-i im I*\II 1 1 1 south aa Burop) Hi 1 -niitt.it that (ha utiMik in Green was .IH 111 it 1 %  ,.| 1 would mprovi Hat 1 h ill PI r^ulrr theh infjii •lankiiiit Ch broughl then t.. In ban %  i..nil whi.<-l played %  \ .1 %  • % %  U& Start Call I /> Of Itvsvrrisls HI %  led Deli %  a.-lice Hi.1 I 1 %  aele< Uv I'll-.. sr.Mi thai I > Ihe Aim) ,iml An FOTl %  in d'. 1 Ivei % %  tl)i %  ... % %  .. 1 . %  .... Rruler I I .laid thm British .inn I I North K %  %  %  . Veil. .. IH houn can ti : which %  %  %  Phi '1 %  • 1 %  K.'i the I bed tha reinforce* latent at... I-. I .pi. led I lure I'll lOe area, I in Tae%  ... %  1 _' ... Itaeh 01 An tl %  ikes 11 %  %  m a vain ihe northern I U l.l. I ..'I'' %  it a 1.em off. —ReaT STOCK MARKET PRICES GO UP 1 |<)NDOr1 .,111 %1222M TO COMBAT COMMUNISM WASHINGTON, Jul heapondini swiftly lo 1 Tniinan 1 wlthoel uthoi M 1 si 22a.sonnon wortl a.'i to free %  %  f'.. ul 1 iuliii h, 1 vi the white n UM I' • Idi nl Ifeavj RouBi ippn %  BUI Mlowed 1 his*-l> Of Iron %  %  aSB to Coin::hinted that loda .nt might le Just the begun-mg. — ReuU-r %  i-.i .ll .Tl'hll tart 1 10 . %  ;.... lid Uttli Ian %  %  %  %  liVi ...I.. ted 10 some qti %  %  %  1 .: ij found ftao • ll -1 %  %  1 1 %  1 ir srouni South Aft though Mi. %  • . %  Krnlrr. PORT-OF-SPAIN. July IS Philbert reyshme on April 20 wa last seen alive bv his sister and niece on tne mgnt o.' April 13 when he visited them. Crowfi Prosecutor C T W. E Worirll told the Ass!?!" .Iur> hearing 'floating corpse" murder trial In which Boytle Singh and four ditndants are charged with wilfui murder of Peyson. Evidence however B being led that Peyson alive on the following night April 14 was seen halvi n g Singh's club, 55 Queen Street, in company with Singh and the other four defendants and an Indian bov Rahamit AH alias "l-nomat" with whom the Crown was alleging that Peyson nM Intimately friendly 'This was a caae of . Bg ^.Iminatmg in murder." Worrell told the All. whom the police took in protective custody preliminary naking nn am I t.i give evidence thai > 1 %  as "Bumiier", "Hardy". Theopnllus Bumper m Smgh'^ motor vehicle ccompanled by Singh others and wnt to tin main road waterfront wheri> 'son. Blub ..nd othei left All sitting in th*. vehicle ill's testimony wn n. • Singh go into the bot he returned athore and -uiw other men knock Peyson dowi ted to him II was placed In the boat which went i never returned. Other %  It sj\ that they saw Stnfll other defendant* with Peyson a front that day Police reveal that statement fr)|nwit:K the rf Peyson'* bed; dead man and allege • Oa pace 7 Truman Asks For $10,000,000,000 For Korean Crisis WASHINGTON. Julv I* •Di Tmmnn to-' %  I I %  : a mensage to fnngrei* P .vked for ill limits on the si/. %  IO.-I-WN in %  % %  quired m I %  tatefl I military it %  ... I (as many National Guard units and a< many mdivldu... Raaarvt Forces of the Arrr..-. d Air Force as may k ie i i-iuinil d hiwould send UM in the next few .] . r^uaati for nppropT.i'h.. nn.ount of nppri c%  %  With these new rnlUtai unnn propose |^r* il .o-.i I %  Honing now But the I'-. %  . %  i < m necessarv Truman laid %  %  to the Senate and House, report'-'.ail on what has happened in Korea, and %  Bin wa fighting %  "Thp Httack ii K it plain ir 1 ment la j invasion .ognise thr poseJI %  %  iraaa" %  I'madent Truman's na "1 am r'-porti'ig to Congress on %  %  %  which this nation has taken as J member of the United Nations IQ i also it "ngre my view thr significance of %  lha wort %  at this %  t % %  %  ..f thrr is *l %  %  %  matter a> On Pace 1 VI All I \OW EDUCATIONAL POLICY i on yoUB iOH[ r IIAMallTEII PROCEEDS rvvMill: IN YEARLY INSTALMENTS Hi YEARS BENCE Ratal will Infurnished on application to the office of IHL BARBADOS \ltll\l. LIFE ASSURANCE S0CIF1V or in J. N. WALCOTT 1 DENIS ATKINSON Canvaning Agrnts.



PAGE 1

PACE FOl'R BARBADOS ADVOCATE llll lis|i\. II I V -' I'' -. rrt.i.d *> UM *d....i. la L.M B<>S SI-. SWHUrtwm. TIIIRSPAY. JULY 20. IIM RurkriMrdn Or FNMil! THE preoccupation Harrison Colhga to-daj H -" satisfying answer lo Hal %  l,,w 10 maintain quality in education m face of the pressure of quantity, With the Headmaster of Combermere the position is more acute What will happen unless quantity ceases to despise utility? The Registrar of the University College of the West Indies has stated that the purpose >f university education is to produce educated men and women. It is not intended to it men and women for jobs. This is a good definition with which no one can quarrel provided that one agrees on a definition of education. But there are few Barbadian parents or children who would subscribe to the view that education is the end and not the %  Men* Major Noott is aware of the crisis His appeal to carpenters to take pride in the holiest of all professions—a profession whose best carpenter was the Creator of carpenters—ought not to be necessary in an island which has for long professed its allegiance to the Cross as a symbol of hope for all men. In fact that appeal is only too necessary to-day. In an island where there are not enough jobs for all the candidates there are alwavs a number of jobs vacant for men of the right type but men and women of the right ire few and far between. The reason is that in an effort to raise themselves to a social level which knows no bounds children of parents are being taught to despise manual labour of all kinds The result is that the economy of the island is being threatened insidiously. Youn; men and young women who have been to schools which are above the average in common opinion, are, as a result of their nood fortune more likely to succeed in certain manual jobs that require a basis Of theory in addition in practical aptitude. In fact any employer of skilled labour in Barbados will agree that there is always a shortage of applicants from the class schools for jijbs requiring the use of hands and brains at the same time. The disease is far more acute than most of the others which hit the headlines of the newspapers. It is the problem on which all other problems depend. Character and technicalities are not incompatible as Major i\'uoti so well says. He adds: "a significant percentage of our young men at Combermere are better endowed for practical skills than they art for an academic coin .... %  Any Headmattai ol Harrison College or the Lodge of the past and present is likely to endorse these sentiments. It is an evil of lung standing and now that the need for skilled operators in all fields of barbadian industry is growing in excess of the demand for clerks who possess a mattering "' education end little else, the position is acute. Already the middle classes of Barbados have seen the red light and most of their children are being equipped with a technical education which will enable them to continue to offer their other qualities of good breeding and good manners to a community which has suffered somewhat in these respects in recent years. Unless the parents of children realise that they are hampering and not helping their children by encouraging them t< despise those holy professions ordained by the Creator of the Universe and performed by Himself in a way that none of us can hope tn emulate, then we do not progress. We go backward. It is to the parable of the talents that we must look for guidance Major Noott has reminded us of that. The community will thank him for the service. I Was Stalin's l'ii|iil For An Hour—In llVHiii UFRLIN. ||, I hiirlrs fr'nlr* %  fatherland To-do>* To-day Through the iqua re-framed • • rung Democratic Bquara glowed stalm which appears as if by some '• The Kiemlm's onion-dome* were convulsion of nature, lo have been I cannot n > %  of the cut against the sky In the torethrown up j,, ui e living rock. pictl> Berlin >.lieewoman aged ground, massive in it* solemnity. Becalm Below it. in gold letters perhaps 19 (la >-blond hair, chinarose the bulk of Lenin's tomb. „ n ted< are t he words of the godblue eye*, wailing with tingling But the darkened room in which 0 f.to-day "My purpose is peace palms for swrj I bring vou peace Tight for unending; speeches to &m up peace." her arms above her head And how d 0 we fight for peace'' Then—clap .lap. dap the new Upstairs 1 found the Soviet House |* ^ < Oiled with Aoungster* in the vtd % '* unison. %  blue shirts of Democratic Youth *>ore. then fasts* and fa. Thev had heard a lecture "Reac tidal ave of sou. tionary bourgeou. science andingacro-1 stood was not in Moscow It the inner shrine of Russia's new House of Culture, which stands, with all the authority of fresh. Srhtts paini. *,'imid the ruins of Berlin. If you cannot get % %  Russia there is nothing to stop y from crossing into the Soviet seccultu p of Berlin can-impena. Once there much may be learnn i m ed at slight cost and slighter risk :h the East Germans Now they the service of -Amerifollowad by of and their Russian masters, for all serious purposes, are < mon subjects of the Soviet Union Thr 1.1 .. k U...IStalin's House of Culture is in Inter den 1-inden. behind the German Unknown Soldier's tomb of World War One. I walked un-hallenged up the steps, joined a jroup in the lobby and then urned right, into a room marked Lsssln One object on which the eye could focus—a black marble bust of Lenm. the Soviet god In the next room was another sitting ho. terrace, eating and drinking >msurroundings as fine as any union periahst could wish for. Next—Fight for Peace. They pour out into 1'nter den Llndsn. line up before the status; of Frederick the -" "In. with banners, ti The goal Is the Lustgarten. the great square before the former Kaisers palace From all parts of dusty, Dem efssttc Berlin processions weave tru point. There ment. a stoim Peet. head of tnr agency in I an announcec beers. John British news -hii has gone over to Den -raty. II the star speaker to.He I special salut. When Pee' finished speaking I climbed up m the platform to question hirr He recalled that we last met whan he was looking for a Job on the Daily Express, but that was befire he aecided to desert the warmongers He admitted A was two years since his last VSH to England, so way to this that perhaps the dockworkers might net refuse, as he had claimed to load arms tor K"in Certainly he had kept hu British passport and would go back to England when he had delivered his message to all who wanted to hear it. But not yet. not 'el How many m the crowd" Perhaps a hundred thousand Comrade Eisler. the German ComDMsnW leader from America, said yes. 100.000 (Next dav Eisler Press said 350.000 fillet the It is easy to move up to the ont through the limp crowds on hose ears the loudspeakers nil world, strident with heroic murals round the square clatter, u* the_v —frenzied athletes driving piles, did in 19S8. when I heard Goebbels leaving at ropes, marching, rightranting there. ng And. in the centre, titanic. Up on the speakers' stand are he crimson-backed figure of a dozen Peace leaders—members Italin bearing this meaningful of the Soviet-appointed sovereign egend "Stalin is the I-enin of Democratic German Government o-day Along the corridor* pictures of .\ tidal Wja.tr tangy British lions, corrupt \inerican warmongers and— A week ago these men signed a Often—Marshal Tito lead back treaty with Democratic CzechoWe drive back down Unter den 0 the entrance Slovakia accepting the expulsion of Under). A couple of Russian sen2.000.000 Germans from SudetenlM „ A notice board "You are-,., -Anal it Millie ltd .___._._. the Democratic sec-1 **" %  n a wide-open field for construct WhyNotBWI Investments ? D.V.SCOTT TODAY'S SPECIALS A CO.. LTD. at the COLONNADE MfsVi ran • %  sfaft Jtilv gtsttansfi ap/MHiriiiF in I,I.,IH ami Mail". B *•*/ I'tjO. f/H ilk \rkii'>nlfil/fin''nh.) ME as any arrangement for the raatoratson of trade between Canada and the '< st Indies may be. the mere extension of credits from Canada to finance im• m us is far from adequate. By the Washington agreements of last September, j when Canada and Britain discussed trade and j ;urrency problems with the United States. ihis country is committed to a programme of investments abroad. The purpose of such investmer.create productive enterprises in exactly such ireas as the B.W.I, islands. The objective is to bolster local production for sale abroad so that exports would provide hard currency income. Out of dollars thus earned, the un developed areas could in turn obtain a larger volume of necessary imports from the dollar countries. Canada's endorsation of ihe tripartite agreement so far has amounted o nothing much beyond an agreement in onnciple. The proposed extension of credits to the B.W.I.. laudable so far as It goes, still is an evasion ol the larger and more constructive view. The Caribbean colonies, now working toward Dominion status within the Commonfortmght ago they signed a tor." and the journey—Mc At the head of the staircase you treaty with Democratic Poland without a Visa— is done ee a vast dazzling white statue of accepting the loss of one-lifth of —London Fxprca* Service. WASHINGTON. July 13 Science is getting ready for its Mat searching look at the mysTlous '•pastures" of the ocean— are '" h Uie the drifting meadows of micro'hcn they be copic fodder on which all sea 'hey seem to life depends fur existence. Borgia touch. The National Geographic Society has announced that it would sponScientists lAplorr Pastures I'M tie r-Nea Btrl am obligingly He : %  i ads** afe ihasc broad research program in m ^ K l w ,l P mit *r?" U *!' .operation wuh the University *** i !" 1 *?"*./! ^ < ,.—, ., „.,.,4., •*,,<, HIII. drawing the fish populatnm |Wg] £3M. O !" ".*;~; .rois: ,h h r r.ri ,r, -^" ,v s 22 At'ai.ti, iMtween ,ru ""w' These are only | few of the n.uiti,.!.questions lo Which the projected research piogrnrn It Is expected the research will hopes to find answer* produce Important contributions In the held of marine biologv. Ueeilll lleM'iin h 1 IHI.I of general value to COnunar ci al ilsheries In the Carib!\ei^leetel bean-Gulf r Hilary B ' 'he world T of the top-ranking however, has be* funnels the the chosen proving grounds. Ugfl And plan., cal for the University too bountiful, of Mlaml'i researcta -hn>. Me K aonoug lopa". to ply this proving giound the tlth die f,„ i,...i., r sind to bring ou; ,i, Mllt .pUinktcsn fitun various depth £" h,in rmS OOWl t., 400 fathoms. 7J ,(„„ During each s.-in:ng .v-i.Tnatn observatknui will bo made of water and llghl pi ratura an In addition the boat will pertodica M BOUI <>: %  station to give .111 .innind-threlock Check cxi the way the plankton pasture* move up toward the uif.ice with Uoek-Uka rasjularUy 1' niglitlall and deecend auijin tn lowei depths with the coming of d.i> The false echoes caused by shll shift of infinitesimal V?' *j! a .? k r. creatures gave trouble to the Navy's •'lertronic sound-ranging Instruments during World War II mbmartne hunung. PloiikloH On llr Moore, anothoi eeunographei .,,'s staff. the Lulora\%t irtl Sulijet I .Mullrr high-p. Their bag been speculation from time to time about tapping The open oeeon. lni plankton supplv of ihe oc —biccled to for human food. It Is possible' The I'niveistty of Miami scicnplankton sandwich would taste something like one if led with shrimp paste. and slightly t 1 Ida It would be quite palatable and nourishing Under a high-powered microscope the MM ( re.itures to !• studied In the program present a weird assortment of odd shapes often delicalelv beautiful ctHOrlBl ,1 mi realm menngerli' of infinite variety. The scientific name for tliem is plankton, derived from the Greek word for wandcnng" which describes Ine drifting life of those minute orgnnisins incapable of swimming against a Current nglo quart of see water "lay contain as many as 100.000 of • i ,, %  lama ara plantlike m aneb i (photoplanktiml. Others are anlmal-hk,. tzooplanktin and Eaad HI ,u vegetable pllinktOK Both. In turn, provide forage ,.., 1 Ufa Hon. tho smallest of it hea i" gpadaa % %  ( gfnaiai amo wax to a 10-ton maturity 00 •' .1 %  \eirs of uch diet To the Lethal Of the BBS, l'i' ,r small, plankton I* * Indispensable to survival as the glasses and cereals arc to the animals which rouge the land When plankton postures dwindle. Ml M fewer When thev andom samplings only, and It' secrets remain to be disclosed The research site for th* National Geographic I • University of Miami program la believed made to order for the oceanngraphte sc eoUSt beenus-the northeastward surging Gulf TMfr 0AMBOL5 WEU ?Ul?fLV VOU OiON^ ElftCT MtV TO COMf AWV WlTWXir HOM? 40CI OS CtCUCiTV UC£ tMfc WlNNiNc, HiOWt^ t However, extracting plankton on a scale large enough for huma Consumption would be an enorn operation Th economy of the o-can tag more off* quicker |ob transforming these micro-organiNms into food for humanity in the form of fish. Dr Walton Smith point* out In adnnnintcurig the comlns research program. Dr W,,lton South will have a former college -orking with him Both he and Dr Moore are graduated of the University of Ixindon Dr Walton Smith has been Director of the Marina Bloaogj Department at the Univeid l: in HWKsAVtS and Rl.4l>ts PLAM> -la In ..nd •> in ind HUM K I'l.ANt.S BKBAST and HAND HKll.i.s SPOKE SHAVES RATCHET ami PLAIN Bit ACES < ARPrATUls and ENGINEERS' HAMMERS CARPENTERS' Kills i sues (AKI'l.Simv I M'ls .in/ and fc I \l'l I Mis (ilMI.ITs — H -iiirs HATCHES No. I. | 4 nd S M.lsON TROHII.s tf and Itl' I.ASPS I"! In II In and U in. ami I Mtlfll It It \SPs._l |„ KOI Nil RASPH—1and I \\\ r III S WILKINSON A IIAVNIS t<> I.T1—Successors to C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. nvestment. They are ideally located to become Canada's winter garden for a wide variety of produce. They are eager to cooperate with Canadian entrepreneurs who would modernize plantation methods, construct and operate processing plants and manage new export businesses. Numerous Canadians already arc interested in these opportunities. What they lack is official backing in the form of Government undertakings to facilitate the distribution in this country of the natural and processed foods which would be made available to Canadians It is true that dollar capital would be employed in the creation of sterling assets, and that earnings from new B.W.I, enterprises Would be in sterling. There is no reason why Canada cannot accept that situation and cquire a vested interest in Caribbean production which would be of enduring value to us both as a consuming nation and as an exporter. A planned investment programme would greatly enhance the income of B.W.I. agriculture Canada's dollar investments would very rapidly be liquidated in terms of modem machinery which we could sell to bring plantation and processing methods up to high efficiency standards. We could permanently avoid the drain on our reserves of United Stales dollars through winter imports of fresh fruits and vegetables and their packaged products. The extension of more liberal credits to assist B.W.I, imports from us may have a place as an interim stimulant. It does not even louch the larger problem of creating a permanent trade link between Canada and our fellow Britishers of the highly productive Caribbean islands. Administration of a stimulant is often useful. But neither in medicine nor in trade can it lake Ihe place of well established health. The strengthening of a permanent economic link between Canada and the West Indies offers such obvious advantages to both parlies that it should become a fixture in our trade policy. It is not a matter for emergency treatment in a time of crisis. It is a matter of permanent gam for all concerned. Ol II Itl Mil Its SAY: D*-lini/u>-nrv The Editor. The Adrortk sf R, 1 rissue of 15th July, 1980, appeared a leader hcd. %  quency" v. huh t nticised the Government for the littla baan tfaai i inei tin lasts yean ago of the Report on the Reorganisation of ihe Government Indutlrial Bchoota The follow la g eomn.ents on aom menu in the leader should give I an ii... picture of the slate ol juveni! %  delinquency and or arnal is besot done to OOBlbal neliiini.i 1. The Advocate stated — "Lack of reform a' |] Schools has been put one of the contributing factors to an IncroaalDsj numi*r ol younn %  %  ant itseil !i| appear to tl freqin %  ... and lists the crease of juven.ie delinquency factor* which contribute lo deUnhas been publicly discussed and ojuoncy %  poeor ty bad hous-j could not ban % % % %  ii • ing. cheap crime literature of the to th'r.p varietthe cinema, a lack The following Is at peoples' rights from the Chief Probation Officer's and property which U disguised report dated 31 March, 1950 — ; 'iridepenuVn. e" and the -Despite alarmiet effusion*"* w d '' t contributed per.odicall.v to iheaf' h r !" local Press, the incidence of Juvenile Delinquency here cannot be said to havi reached the dangerous pro portSoM leiMirtcd from nthei parts of the world Out ol I population of nearlv 40.0011 children and young peraonsj coming uithin the Juvi Court Age Croup, only %  aaraag ol 216 appmximatel> .oc founil guilty each year and most of these eharSH concern minor assaults and batteries resulting from childish quarrels. Only flnltesimal percentagi %  by )uvenlle; that degree of ser which if committed by ndulU would bring their indictable class." *a Tn. thief Probation Officer then goes on to point out that the above I an there is room .nfluence of tho 2 The Advociite stated: — "Today four years after th. issue of the Report the Institutions are working under the "n which has been the %  ubject "' stroni pubuc cnti clam.. .The maintenance taUon system with the aim ol reform would continue to defeat the endeavours of Government Despite the termof ihe Report and the merits ol the suggestions made, nothing beet '1one Executive Committee. The Board has now been working for three years. It meets at least one* ., quarter. Member., H the Board represent the Judiciary; the Lcgislatui< (he Public and the Government Members of the Board have worked out a rota art* et>> three metnliers make unanouiiced visits to the Sc> ools every month At these \ lsit< all staff and boys have free access to the Mem bers of the V i s i t n ( %  mniittee at of 1 ltl th' I "It was agreed that the answer to the problem was the introduction of the BM to! tem but that owing to the lack of trained personnel, this should be postponed until someone could be imported for the )oh "Today there is an Act.nt So|"rmtcndenl of the Govern merit Industrial Schools" The facts are — (1) One of the main MCOEflRIBtsda ttOoa of the report enM lha ,,n [ntoriro Aavtaory Board be set up to advi.'i 1 ment bow t,i enrry out th' 11 'vommer.dations of the He port which were agreed In principle by the QovOl (2i The Administration of Ihe School has been separated from the administration of Ihe plai/. May 17th. 1MB. and the School Supcrin tendent now controls only eight acres where gardening etc.. is taught. When Hal I Attorney run the Plantation, the 11 tem Whereby boys worke.l ;.labourers in the llelds was slopped. (.1) The Boys* and Girls' nme'• tablet and programme of daily work have been I reorganised to allow of VOM tional Training which is given from 12 to 3 pin, daily Juveniles are classified into Training Groups according to individual ability. The amount of time spent a*. %  boo) desk has been in creased. and backward juveniles are specially coached The Dcpaitmem of Education has made recommendations lot Ihe school curriculum winch are being can.. An entire new set of actwol io,.l.h.ii.'.-i, pi,. video A vacancies occur on the staff. they are being (Hied bv qualified elementary school l-acherv ic.omniended by the Department of Education. (4) There is no Acting Superintendent. Major O F. C. Walcott w a appointed Superintendent on the 1st of 1950. The Interim Advisory" Board has made recommendations to Government, which are still under consideration, for the Ion Os* a third Institution for Borstal Age boys The problem of juvenile delinquency is being tackled lion Service; the creation of group movements to offer Club and communal activities to unemployed boys and girb and even the opening of %  Club under the auspices of the Police. The strengthening o. the Probation Service has been achieved by the i ployment of three full-time male officers and a full-ti woman officer. I have the honour lo be. Sir. Your obedient serv.mt. E 1 PET1UF. AcUng Colonial Secretary Polirrmmivii ' Hmut To The Editor. The Adeocofe SIR.—Through the facilities of your paper, please grant me Ihe space to say thanks to the Commissioner of Police, for his institution of a Women's Police Force in Barbados. It is a great boon to many of our unemployed young Kin in:\ i H:\SILS From DACOSTA'S Where You'll find the Rigl.l Items at the Right Prices .VOM' IN STOCK %  -. STRAINKKS, (AN OPKNBBS Sl-ATULAS URIP TINS. ROM. HOI.1)1 K-, TOWBL BARS. BROAD TINS ROTARV BOO BEATERS KITCHEN FORKS .m,l SPOONS. ETC., ETC. %  HOMA A DRY GOODS OEPI Hl. I am also hoping, Sir. in the future to see the birth of a Women's Police band. We have girls here quite capable of beine H .i whole ftm.rgamsatlon of members of a band which will be ha* been part only a credit lo themselves as well as of a system which included the eol I '.on of a good PmbaLOVER HIM FITS 2tb Tin* 0AUI BIW I I I I MOM < Vhl M w:tl DKH RITE, GINOn M I PRIT Bl RKI —AI SI.HII prr tin JTJICEi in Tin*. TOMATO .11 If! IB oi. jnd 2n of. Mp^ CARROTS in Tin* HI \\. in Tin. EMU \ Ener> for Ihr < hlldirn I US1NS li„ |.r. Ill ike J-insAi ai youA J&a (pa)dy JAMS i.,,,1 %  Ml I.IIS U/UtBU II 111 ,„ Bol,. %  LAI K i i I:I: w i JI |xi .II Bulllr. ^ %  'H Id v m rtra I IM WU JAM \ in Tin. TBAt I BOTI I TIP TEA LTTTON ISA wn \ TEA l>l IT X TEA < tOWH MDOU I Bum t*l 4 l!,i-i, „| ; y Mr .Id <>lil Hi ml Hum L GODDARDS