Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Saturda

Sully 15

1950

y-



Fifteen Years For \YanksPrepa

a

North Korean Troops Cross Kum River
ALLIED PLANES

Attempted Murder

*TWENTY-FOUR-YEAR OLD GEORGE SKEETE was
yesterday sentenced to 15 years in prison by His

Honour Mr. G. L. Taylor, Acting Chief Justice.

He had

pleaded guilty to the charge of “attempted murder” fol-
lowing the death of George Hunte, a fisherman of Redman’s
Gap, Westbury Road, on March 27, 1950.

Skeete was charged with murder but pleaded guilty of

attempted murder. Mr, F. E. Fields, Acting Attorney



yen-

eral, appeared on behalf of the Crown and Mr. J. S. B. Dear

for the accused.





Chamber Of
Commerce

Talks End

{From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 14.

A five-day special conference of
Directors of the Chambers of Com-
merce of the British Caribbean
which opened here on Monday,
ended today. The conference was
summoned primarily to study the
economic aspect of the proposed
Federation of the British West In-
dies but the opportunity was taken
to discuss the inadequate passen-
ger accommodation by steamship
between the Colonies and the
United Kingdom as well as trade
with Canada.

G. M. DaCosta, Vice-President
of the Incorporated Chambers
presided at the talks. He told re-
porters today that when they left
for their respective colonies. thee
knew they would be faced with
decisions momentous, both in vol-
ume and significance.

As the businessmen said, they
were viewed by certain Govern-
ments with suspicion because they
worked in an atmosphere of keen
competition, Mr. DaCosta prafsed
the delegation for the extremely
good manners which prevailed
throughout the talks. The dele-
gates leave over the week-end.

MARSEILLAISE
STOPS DEBATE

BRUSSELS, June 14,
Meeting for the fifth day in a
joint session designed to vote on
the repeal of the Regency Law
which bars King Leopold from the
throne, both Belgian Houses of
Parliament were forced to suspend
debate to-day when the Sociualists
Tose and sang the Marseillaise.
They were protesting against
the speech by Joseph Pholien,
Catholic Senator, who alleged that
accusations according to which
King Leopold committed felony
by surrendering to the Germans
in 1940, were part of the anti-
Leopold plot waged by foreigners
in retaliation against Belgium’s
prewar policy of neutrality.

Poland Protests

CAIRY, July 14.

Poland today protested against
the Egyptian Government’s re-
fiusal to open credit for her to
supply iron and steel to Egypt.
The protest was delivered by
Stanislav Bartnik, Polish Charge
d’Affaires to Abdul Rahman Hak-
kay Bey, Egyptian Under-Secre-
tary for Foreign Affairs.

Accerding to an agreement
signed between the two Govern-
ments last month, iron and steel
were to be shipped from Poland
to Egypt on July 1. But Mohamed





Bey, Under - Secretary at the}
Ministry of Finance, afterwards
refused to open credit on the}

grounds that Poland was under aj
regime considered by Egypt to be
“subversive”.—Reuter.



dence taniailintinaity t

After accepting the plea, Mr.
Fields said that he had taken into
consideration the circumstances
of the case, particularly the med-
ical evidence.

He said that undoubtedly there
was a difference in the testimony
of the doctor who performed an
operation at the General Hospital
and the one who performed the
Post mortem.

At some period in the proceed-
ings he or the accused’s counsel
would have been forced to put to
the jury the fact that if they be-
lieved one doctor they would be

asked to disbelieve the other in
certain respects.
Lesser Offence
It appeared that from the

wounds it was possible that the
deceased might have recovered
and in view of that difference in
the medical evidence, he felt it
was his duty to accept the plea
of guilty of the lesser offence.
The evidence of the witnesses
some nine of them, could leave no
doubt in the minds of the court
that the accused had intended to
do serious injury to the deceased
It was true that most of the wit-
nessess were related in some re-
spect to the deceased, but never-
theless that did not prevent them
from being witnesses of truth.



Other witnesses gave evidence
before the Magistrate, evidence
which tended to show that the ac-
cused had entertained some ani-
mosity against the deceased al-
though they were on friendly
terms before the offence had taken
place, and used to go fishing to-
gether.

He could not stress too heavily
how serious the offence was.
There were many of those types
of offences and His Honour was

bound to take that into consider-
ation before imposing any sen-
tence.

His sentence had to be one that
would not only punish the ac-
cused, but would also deter others
who had similar tendencies, Pun-
ishment should be adequate and
in that case, for it to be adequate,
it would have to be severe. There
were no circumstances as far as
he could see, which would justify
his doing otherwise. The severest
penalty which the law allowed for
that offence, he said, should be
and was the adequate and proper
penalty.

Abhorence
|

Mr. Dear said that the law had
always regarded offences against
the person with great abhorence
and particularly a crime such as



that which the accused had |
pleaded guilty of having com- |
mitted, the law rightly dealt |

with great severity.

His Honour had had quite a lot
of experience in that Court and he
would know that in the lives of
the people, many little things
might join together to produce a
catastrophe such as that which
confronted the court.

He would not attempt in
way to minimise the gravity of}
the offence which his client had |
committed, but on his behalf he
would ask that His Honour should |
temper justice with mercy

any



German Prisoners

WASHINGTON, July 14.

The United States to-day asked Russia to permit an|
International body to investigate the fate of German prison-

ers of war known to have been in Russ
note delivered in Moscow to-day.

Belgians Keep
Up “Warning
Strikes”

BRUSSELS, July 14.

A series of scattered 40-hour
sirikes were staged _ to-day
throughout the “Borinage,” great
coal mining belt in Southern Bei-
gium, as a “warning” against the
return of the provisionally exiled
King Leopold to the throne.

Union officials said according to
early reports stoppage was fairly
widespread,

According to later reports, the
stoppage 4vas general in coal mines
throughout the area. Glass works
and leather work were also affect-
ed. Trams and buses were off the
streets, Train, telegraph and tele-
phone lines were normal. Public
utility undertakings were also
working normally.

This is the second series of “Stop

Leopold” warning strike to be
staged in Belgium’s French-|
speaking Wallon provinces this
week.

To-morrow workers I aT
large Wallon centres of Liege and
Namur, plan to join the move-{

ment by staging a 24-hour strik«
~——Reuter

ian custody, in a|
The United States said it senmisl
the “shock and concern” of the |
German people over the recent |
Russian announcement that the
repatriation of German prisoners |
of war had been completed with |
the exception of persons concerned |
in grave war crimes.

It is unable to give credence to!
the Russian statement that only
13,546 German prisoners of war
remained in its custody,

“These figures are completely at
variance with information in the
possession of the Government of
the United States’, it said

1948 Has Passed

The note, referring to the Big}
Four Moscow agreement in April |
1947 for repatriation before the
end of 1948, said America, Britain,
and France had repatriated their
prisoners before that date.

It said arbitrary reclassification
of prisoners of



war as civilians
did not relieve Russia of its obliga-
tion to return these persons to

their homes

The United States suggested that
Russia should: (1) Furnish full
information on the identification of
prisoners acknowledged
her custody

(2) Provide 1
ber, identity, date of

to be in

informat





nur 1 f
and place of burial of ; ner
and internees who had died ir

captivity.—Reuter.

| formation

U.S. Asks Fate Of.

thi





re
To Evacuate
Istanbul

ISTANBUL, July ;

The American Consulate-Ge
eral in Istanbul today issued i:
structions to his staff and to men
bers of the American colony
for their evacuation from the
in case of emergency.

These instructions issued on the
ground af “delicate geographical
position” of Istanbul which
great anxiety among all classeg
throughout the city.—Reuter

WASHINGTON, July

The State Department
today that American Consulates
standing instructions to be pre-
pared for evacuation of all Ameri-
can residents in case of an emer-

here

city

cause

i4
said



gency were sent more than two
years ago

Statements were in response to
questions about despatches from
Istanbul saying that the Ameri-
can Consulate-General had dis-
tributed a circular telling resi-
dents and Americans what to do

in the event of trouble

Officials here said so far as they
knew no such action had been
taken elsewhere since the Korean
crisis arose. The local Consulates
were authorised to take precau-
tionary measures at their discre-
tion though the State Department
was usually consulted

Such measures had been worked
out in advance and were put into|
effect promptly in South Korea

Emergency plans were operated
also when Shanghai fell to Com-
munists and during the fighting at
Jerusalem and rioting in Colombia
they said.—Reuter.

Nehru Keeps
In Touch With

Korea Crisis

NEW DELHI, July 14

Nehru, Prime Minister
of India. had been “in direct and
close touch” with British Prime
Minister Clement Attlee on ‘he
Korean situation, it jas an
nounced here today

The External Affairs Ministry
reported that India’s Ambassadors
in Moscow and Washington had
conveyed messages from Nehru to
Stalin and American Secretary of
State Dean Acheson.

A Press note issued by the Ex-
ternal Affairs Ministry said: “Re- |
presentations for speedy and
peaceful settlement of the Korean
dispute have been made by India
through normal diplomatic chan-
nels in London, Washington and
Moscow from time to time since
hostilities commenced

“On July 12, India’s Ambassa- |



Pandit

dors in Moscow and Washington !
were instructed to convey per-
sonal messages from Prime Min-

ister Nehru to Marshal Stalin and
Dean Acheson Nehru has also
been in direct and close touch with
Attlee, British Prime Mfhister.”
—Reuter,





W. German Govt.
Suffer Defeat

BONN, July 14,

The West German Government |
suffered a heavy defeat in Par-|
liament to-day. The House adopt-
ed a Social Democrat motion!
requiring the Government to con-
tinue existing flour subsidies to
prevent a rise in the price of bread



Social Democrats and other!
Ipposilion parties voted solidly
for the motion while m Gov-
ernment supporters abstained
Politicians considered to-day’s

vote the biggest setback the Gov-
ernment had received since its|
last autumn.—Reuter



— .
Slovak Resigns
A! . - .
National Council
‘ PRAGUE, July 14. |
It was officially announced to-|
night that Dr. Karol Smidke,
Chairman of the Slovak National
Council in Bratislava had resigned,
He has been succeeded as Chair-}
man by Frantisek Kubac, the Vice-|
Chairman.
Smidke confessed to “National}
Bourgeois deviation” during the}
May Congress of the Slovak-Com. |
munist Party, but it was announced
that his self criticism not
considered sufficient

It was also officially announced
night that Smidke had resigned

membership of the Council.

—Reuter.



wa

te



HON



H. A. CUKE, C.B.E., returning from the London Sugar Talks

Sugar Delegation
Achieved Success

Hon. H. A. Cuke C.B.E.,

HON

H. A. CUKE, C.B.E.,

Returns

one of the Barbados dele-

gates at the recent London Sugar Talks arrived in Barbados

yesterday at 9.16 am. by B.W.1

Airways early flight from

Piarco, intransit from England



SPORTS
WINDOW

The first fixture of the
t which
ados
iatior
fternoon
Club,

It is hoped that the
give this local
whole-hearted
t » fee

Tourna
is being held by the
Amateur Lawn Tennis
will be played this
Strathelyde Tennis

n






A

at

public
tournament their
support. The er
will be 1/- and play
4.30, The fixtures are

will










DOUBLES
Court No Umpire Di. Skeets
c ning and E. P. Tay
j Dear and D. W
es—be et
ourt Ne pir D.. .W
Dr A Cat d | ! r
' Ww A. 8. Crichlow ar
k R Atkinson-—best of five



Labour M.P’s

Mr. Cuke and the Trinidad dele-
gates left London on Tuesday, Due
to bad weather in New York, how-
ever, they had to land at New

| Foundland and did not arrive in

| dad

Want U.S. To |

Quit Formosa |

i4
memt ers
presented

LONDON, July
Twenty-three Labour

of Parliament to-day

a

, motion asking the British Govern-

ment to urge the withdrawal
United States forces from Formosa
and secure the admission of Chin-
ese Communists to the Security
Council

The motion sent down in
name of Sidney Silverman,
22 other members also asked
Government to prepare the

of

the

|
!
the ,

and |

way!

for a settlement by using its best |

and the mediation in Korea under
authority of the United Nations:

endeavours to (J) limit the area
|or conflict in Korea, (2) bring |
about the cessation of hostilities,

(3) take the initiative in bringing |

about an early meeting of the great
powers, including India to consid-
er what action could be taken on
United Nations Secretary General
Trygve’s proposals or otherwise
to strengthen the United Nations,
and to end the cold war
4 —Reuter.

a



Jamaica Shoe Factory
Closing Down

KINGSTON, Jea., July 14
Foreign competition, ‘chiefly
from Canada, is given as the
reason for the coming closing
down of the Jamaica Shoe Co,,
which employs 80 to 100 workers
with production of 1,000 pairs

of shoes weekly.—Can., Press.

a



Terrific



Ex



plosions Rak

New York until Wednesday. With-
in the hour they had left for Trini-
but the plane developed
engine trouble and had to divert
to Miami

Leaving Miami at 7.30 a.m. on
Thursday, they arrived in Trini-
dad on Thursday afternoon at ap-
proximately 3 o'clock. Mr. Cuke
spent the night at Mr. Harold
Robinson's home

Success

In an interview with the Advo-
cate, shortly after his arrival
Mr, Cuke speaking for the B.W.I
and British Guiana Sugar Dele-
gation said ‘it our opin-
on that the Delegation has
ichieved a remarkable success
when it is remembered that they
were very bluntly told that there
was no use their coming to Eng
land as the British Government
had decided that the offer to the
British West Indies Sugar Associa-
tion was final Moreover, up to
the last written reply to the dele
gation, which was dated 30th June
the Ministers stated that they
would be willing to grant a fur
ther interview if the delegation
wished, but that His

Majesty's

Government did not intend to alter jihi

their view that the offer was final

Yet four days after (4th July) and
eight weeks after their arrival in
England they agreed to the com-

promise which has beer

accepted
by the delegation

it may be asked why this
change of heart at the eleventh
hour. The answer is that both
the Ministers and their officials

are conscious of the strength of
their bargaining powe and the



veakness of the Colonies. They
know that the West Indies are
financially weak and economi-
cally dependent They know
that the West Indies have no
market except the United King
dom and that this gives the

United Kingdom strong bargain-

ing power

3ut they are beginning to real-
ise from the two visits of repre-

sentatives of the British West
Indies Sugar Association last
year and the visit of the present
| political delegation, that there can
be strength in weakness when your
cause is a just one

Worked Together

Another memorable achieve-
ment is the able manner in which
the delegation, composed of poli-
tical figures in their respective
Colonies, but dominated by a un-
animity of purpose which was most
@ on page







e

Portsmouth Naval Base

PORTSMOUTH, July 14
Britain’s biggest naval base at
Portsmouth was shaken tonight by






two big explosions and everal
ismaller ones in ammunition
s at Gospor 1 the pposite
side of the harbour
These caused several casualtie
started a big fire, and damaged
building
Two firemen were knowr
among the casualties
Barge Blew Up
barge

mmmunition
Ge



big as the first. As a huge mush-
room of dense smoke soared into
the blue sky, fire sirens wailed
alarms throughout southeast
Hampshire

Several Blasts

A Hampshire fire officer said

enact

READ WHAT THE

1
LORDS SAID ABOUT
FEDERATION in |
—Sunday’s “Advocate”



there have been





everal explo-

ior imong about x ammuni-

tion barges, and a serious fire has

tarted

The fire involved not only the

pier but also tarted several

nor fires along the foreshore,

Eyewitnesses in Gosport aid

people ru into the streets as

ts hé their wisdows

n Ryde, Isle of

fe way across the

d they felt the explo-

oh and saw smoke ibout
800 feet }

The barges were attached to a

yyal armament depot at Gosport

Reuter

so |

|

|



Price:
FIVE CENTS

Year 55



BOMB BASES

_ Lie Asks For
‘Troops To Aid

South Korea

| I

Lie said he had sent an urgent

to supply “ground forces.”

The appeal made after formal
‘onsultations with members of
the American delegation had been
sent to 53 of the 59 member





coun
tries
Lie said that since Egypt's vote
the Council her Prime Minis
ter had made a further statement
on his country policy
The letter to the 53 member
nations made these points
Lie had been informed that
the United States which un-
der the July 7 Security Coun-
eil Resolution was made
responsible for appointing a
United Nation Commander
’ now prepared to engage
in tir corultation about
co-ordination of assistance
which would be weleomed by
Member Governments
2 The unified command had in
formed Lie that idditional
effective Issistance via ur
gently needed
This assistance should include
combat forces, in particular
ground forces Offers were
to be made to the United
Nation Secretary -General
These offers however should
be couched in “general terms
leaving detailed arrangements
to future bilateral negotiations
with the unified command
Letters were identical to all
nations except Nationalist China
Lie in his letter to the Chinese

Nationalist Government disclosed
he had been informed by the Uni-
fied Command that the initial aid

offer made | Chinese

that they
assistance

He ruled out any
attempts on his part at this time
in reference to Nehru’s reported
crsonal appeal to Premier Stalin
ind Dean
jhave

hould give effective

mediation

Acheson. Lie said
no official information
I have great admiration and
pect the strong influence
peace expressed by the
Minister

“y
about
re for
for Indian

Prime Reuter





Czechs Set Up
New Ministry

TO PROTECT REGIME

appeal to United Nations members |

ry National-
ists “has been received and it will
receive further offers
The Unified Command will take
up with you specific detailed
negotiations” he wrote
Effective Assistance
Lie in answer to a query ex-
pressed Bhe hope that the war
ould be confined to Korea A
reporter then asked whether his
‘communication to the Chinese
Nationalists implied that the
United States had accepted their
initial offer of 335000 ground
troop
He replied that he did not know
Asked if he thought the United
Nations members should contrib-
ute only “token forces” to South
Korea the Secretary-General re-
plied “no my personal opinion Is

!

AKE SUCCESS, July 14

| Trygve Lie, Secretary-General

told reporters to-day he had ap- |
}pealed to all United Nations

members who supported the Se

curity Council Resolution on

Korea to send troops to aid South

Korea



(By LIONEL HUDSON)
TOKYO, July 15.
AMERICAN TROOPS dug in along tieir Kum
River line of “no retreat’’ yesterday, hurled
back a North Korean effort to breach the line and
waited for what they thought would be a mass
attack. The invaders—tanks, infantry and gueril
las—had splashed across the muddy Kum River
yesterday and for a time established several ‘‘small
pockets’’*on the south bank of the river which

guards the temporary capital, Taejon.











Despite American-Australian
| strafing transports as they crossed
GONE FROM LORDS ithe river, 12 tanks apd about a
j company « f infantry got ashore, An
LONDON jarmy spokesman at the front later
Buliiom dealers and pawn- | announced that all crossing at-
brokers have been warned to jtempts had beer repulsed”
keep . ookout for the fam \Earlier, infantry guerilla dis-
ous golden guinea which has | suised in American fatigue
disappeared from Lord's uniforms had been spotte.
Cricket) Ground It was | otin with the defer sr :
stolen from tts glass case in | Gene iL MacArthur cone
the “long room of the munique earl’ thi thoraini
pavilion The coin, dated (Satureas anid thet. Ame :
1787 and bearing the head of ar a ein eat erin
. in the Kum bulge, still “consider-
George U1, was used for the ; id
toss-up in important matches tbl SUSAUMPeree by North
Can. Press Korean vere employing le-
fensive and delaying actions”
Farther east a North Korean
second division crossed the Pogang
R | River a (ributary of the Kum—
» _ Mu st and = penefrated South Korean
e¢ Ss Ss r forces near Chungiu, 18 miles
a rorth of Taejon
’ In the entre f ne rt
Withdraw [ics es cet
under northerr thrust in the
1 % ] aebak Mountain
i k iW ‘ r The invaders apparently hoped
O Yin a . | to open the way for a drive on
Kumehon ,the road and rail tows
’ ’ , Tk c : ' wit th
Says State Dept. na rn nt = i outl
WASHINGTON, July 14 Ameri Australian aire
Che State Departmen mid. be raft tinued to blaze away
ay that the minimum conaltlo it nerthern troops movements
for the solution of Korea is for we
A 4 ‘ ind base The Seoul-Taejon
yorthern ( mmut ' or ) : states the mais
iaghting and vilhdra Lo eit . : :
wn territory upply routes for Communists
"Nhe Department spokesman alse forming the Kum were at+
rid that the proper forum” for tacked in numerous sorties
trying to end the ri the Observers believed that the next
United Nations, and that it is not 1 hours night prove a crucial
1 matter tor direct negotiati age of the battle of South Korea
with Moseoyv Americans had used a lull in the
These ba point ef poli west which preceded the Kum
vere brou®ht out ut a news con- assault for a rapid buildup of re-
ference while Secretary of State | inforcements Northern forces
Dean Acheson was still con idex Were also incressitio thotr reserve:
ie Cine "M ita — nai Following was the disposition of
naan ca Alieke a troops along the Korean war front
Nehru, on the crisis
Reuter tonight, latest Reuter reports in-
dicated
niatbinaencmeniiann | Western Sector:—North Koreans
* \force tank infantry rnd
Seamen Want guerillas-—thrust across the Ameri
jcan-held Kum River it Kongju,
tbut later were said to have been
Reds Ousted jrepulsed The attack was pre-
SYDNEY, July 14 [eeded by an artillery barrage
Two hundred seamen t la j slightly to the east i i
demanded the resignation of the| Central Secter orth Koreans
Communist-dominated I t jwere exerting heavy pressure on
Executive of the Australian S« |the South Korear outh of
men’ Union for banning the |Chungiu, apparently eeking to
transport of war material Jonen the wa for a thrust at
Korea {Kunchon, vital uphlv link be
While the seamen were meetin, een the eanpital of Taejon and
the Union Executive announce the Port of Pusan
it would call a general meeting Fostern Sector: Fiehtir wa
tnembers on July 18 to diseu | cattered and apparently on a
the ban.—Reuter, mall seale—Renter

il
tt

1 iil

|
|
\
|

|

PRAGUE, July 14

The overall task of the new
Czech Ministry of National Secur
ity is to protect the regime and
he frontier ensure the security
f persons and property, and main
tain public order

Within this general framewor)
the Ministry is given competence
in a wide range of security mat
‘ers, all of which were formerly
the concern of the Ministry of the
Interior

The power of the week
old Ministry were defined tonight
by Government Decree

3esides taking over the (SNP
(Security Police), the new Minis-
try is given the right 9n principle
to set up and run any kind of|
security force’. It will also direct
the control of foreigners.

The Security Ministry takes over
the management and running of
Czechoslovakia’s forced labour
camps, retained as a penal insti

tution under
approved by

ago.— Reuter

the new criminal law
Parliament tw«

» day



Canada May Spend
$50 Million More
On Defence





i

OTTAWA, July 14

Canada is preparing, in view
of the Korean war, to spend more
on defence and the speedy growth
of her airpower this year, accord
ing to reliable sources here

A recor $425,000,000 Defence
Budget, passed by Parliament re-
ee y, | now expected to be
markedly inereased by supple-
mentary estimate No figures are
vet lable but it j ticipate
the | I heyond $50,000,000

Increased orders f

he head of the list. R

and other r c
naval k be ‘ 1





lS

—
<<

aii sia sealant



TRUMPETER
CIGARETTES
ARE ALWAYS

FRESH

FOR 12 CENTS.





PAGE TWO



Among the passengers leaving for Ferto Rico yesterday morning by B.W.1.A. were left to right:

in Puerto Rico, Comdr, John Alexander, Station Man
ager of B.O.A.C., in Miami, Mr. Edward Behn, President of Behn Bros., Mrs. Johnston and Mr. A Ww.

They were all intransit from the B.W.I’s Branch
Percy Taylor, Branch

Leslie Rogers, Vice-President of Behn Bros

Johnston, Sales Manager of B.O.A.C. in New York
Managers’ Conference held recently in Port-of-Spain. Mr. J
B.W.LA., Barbados, is also in the picture, (third from right.)

‘IR EDWARD CUNARD leaves Left Ye ,
S Barbados this morning for Attended Branch RS.O. P sterday
England via Canada by T.C.A : a 1ughter. Barbar

~ aughter. Barbara
For Two or Three Months Managers Conference been in Barbados on

ae 4 abe EAVING _yesterd: orning tW° weeks, returned
IR JAMES RAE, formerly L bs Tanat ins rl aay : x yesterday afternoon by B.W
: * Mrs. Bennett

Chief Justice of the Leeward
Islands, now retired and living in Were Mr. and Mrs. Andrew W Mr. Bennett
Antigua, arrived by the “Lady Johnston, Comdr John Alexan- B: a4 i
Rodney” yesterday morning from der, Mr. Edward Behn and Mr 7 9 bados
Antigua. Lady Rae accompanied Leslie Roger Mr. Johnston is the Races.



: bats . ated > . Barbara who is on the San Fer-
kim. They expect to be in Barba- Sal Manager of B.O.A.¢ an ‘ ha Ms
dos for two oe three months, and New York and Comdr John Alex~ nando staff of Barclays Bank
they are staying at Stafford ander is Station Manager of on two weeks

House B.O.A.C., in Miami. The other Haas i
it two are President and Vice Presi- lo Join Husband
Arriving by the ‘‘Golfigo’’ dent respectively of Behn Bros RS. BETTY

* ‘ ’ ‘ n Puerto R Bel 3 are
HE “Golfito,” which left Eng- ! Pu “ A090, Seo Bros are
eh B.W.I. Airways agents in San
land on Thursday, is expect- re * ; P
. . "i Juan They were all intransit
ed to arrive in Barbados on Sat- th > —
ak o> through Barbados from Trinidad
urday, July 22nd Among the | here they attended the recent
ssengers ar r Barbe r ; ; ; _c
Soeernrese on board for Barbados pra neh Managers’ Conference at
Ss $ Ȣ arters i > -
Mrs. H. W. Challenor, Mr, and Mr B Ww I.A Headquarters in Port
G. W. Cresswell, Miss E. G. Cummins, Of-Spain
Mrs. Q. ©. Gilman, Mr. A. C. Gral
Mrs. E. Hardma Mrs. E. B
Miss J. O Mr. and Mr
Neynoe, Mr. and Mrs. R. Norri





from England

Agriculture

Mr. J. Perey Taylor, Branch already
Manager, B.W.1.A. here, was at but Mrs
Seawell to see them off





Mrs. C. A. Potter, Mr Fr
Mr. and Mrs. E. H. ¢ Rol
Nanda Robinson, Mr Vv

G





Ward and two children, Mr Barbados Museum in the ney
Miss R. M. J. Walker, Mr. N. Wren, gallery, are a variety of prints of

Mr. and Mrs, D. R. Young and Miss tne West Indies, most of which
Young

have been ient for the occasion

Trinidad for

Left By ‘‘Rodney”’ by Hon, J.D, Chandler, M.L.C., ered as a builder

He was responsible
Codrington

1 ti fi shandlei
R. and Mrs, Harry st. Hii Mr. and Mrs, J. W. Chandler, | ging of
M and their two children also Sir Edward Cunard and Mr. Vc

returned to St. Vincent last tor Marson, One of the prints is p paca g lek
night by the “Lady Rodney.” They "produced in this column, and is
arrived here on June 27th by the @ picture of the coast road neat
“Lady Nelson” to spend a holiday Worthing.

with Mr. St, Hill's parents

Bridge and

turned to Barbados after
three months’ visit to the U.S.
He arrived on Wednesday from

To Puerto Rico For

A Week
M JEAN IVERSEN, Manager
of the Marine Hotel, and
his wife left yesterday morning
for Puerto Rico by B.W.1A. They
expect to be away for a week.
Here For Iwo Weeks
M* and Mi Cecil Hope Ross
from Port-of-Spain arrived
from Trinidad yesterday morning
by B.W.1.A. to spend two weeks’
holiday in Barbados. They are
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.
They were accompanied by
young Rolf Smeliie.
Was Visiting Her Son
RS. MOLLY ADAMS, who
has been staying with Mr
and Mrs. D. D. Johnson at Spen-
cer’s Plantation for three months,
left yesterday for Puerto Rico by
B.W.1.A., intransit to the U.S.,
where her home is in Atlar
Georgia. She has been visiting West Indies which are at present on show



her son, Mr. Jimmy Adams, who Museum, This print was done in 1835. drawn from
by Lt. J. M. Carter. It is near Worthing, Barbados

is Mr. and Mrs. Johnson’s son- by
in-law. on Stone



CRITIC who fears that comic Vita Brevis a ring which

strips may have ; bad effect purchased for eightpence from a
on the appreciation of art is evi- man with a tray outside the “Eight
dently a serious-minded fellow. sells.” Two evenings later while
Perhaps we shall have serials at ghe was out at a theatre. | :
a ‘ as at : atre. he broke f he ; t
the Academy—“Half a Haddock ' Ea Attached to his ha

in and stole it. She offered a re-



and Two Pears on a Plate’ will be warg for its return. A friend of A laundress comes to
shown for one week, to be Foulenough took back an inferiot Crying “Hiya, fella!’
followed by ‘The other half of the fourpenny ring and claimed the And the courtly Asiatic
Haddock and three more Pears on ¢5 yeward. That made £2 10s Raises hat/and umbrella.
a Plate.” Then “The Mayor of ;. each They then sold the eight-

might run for a long time—his penny ring for 9s. 6d Down by the

trousers, his waistcoat, his tie, his



hat, and so on, to draw out the Prodnose: Surely the ladv knew They buried Jack Manatta
excitement The whole thing the rings were trash. In his student’s overalls,
might be shown as one complete atone ‘
picture later on. but I don’t care. Myself: Oh, yes. They were all Tail-piece
a am in it together. The story of the — O you stop
Making Ends Meet robbery, the reward and the re- asked a tady on a No, 9 bus
FWHE other day Captain Foule- turned ring got her a paragraph in “Indeed, yes f d
nough presented to the lovely two evening papers, tor. “But incognito, of course

999899089999 99989990985

PPLE LPP PS FP PPO PPA PLP PPP PPLE IEPA POD

CHECK THIS NEW LIST



*
g
g *
>
UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN
? By M. G. Geberhart
% CASES IN COURT

By Sir Patrick Hastings
TREASURE IN THE CARIBBEAN
By 4. W. Aeworth
NATHANIEL

By Shaw Desmond
(| iv | THE MALICE OF MONDAY

By Eric Burgess
THE VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN COOK
By Christopher Lloyd

GOGSSS

THE COMPLETE SWIMMER
By Sid. G. Hedges

: STORE

GOCSSSSEO64
GPSS POOOSOSC COCO FOO FCC GOS 9S 9S 8S9098F



BENNETT and her |

cotton garlanded

annual leave.

HANSCHELL

and two
night for St. Vincent by the Lady
Rodney. With
family, she has

1 enormously



on long leave.

Mr. Hanschell, who is with the
Department
returned
. Hanschell
two children, Mr. J, F. Odie, Mr. and * here for a month

i. “ti At The Museum After Kight Years

A MONG ,
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. ©. Skinner, Mr r present on exhibiton at the A 1ONG ihe
C. D. D. Spencer, Dr. and Mrs. L. S the week

Allamby who had
the past e.ght years
Mr. Allamby will
in tnis island.

entertainment
remarkable lady in talks and
programmes in both sound

and in a special
whic
the younger gé

eration of radio



= : referring to Mada
fire in 1926, Speightstown

something of the making and ex-

waxen images. Two
thousand years ago

Reservoir Among
work was the Tuberculosis Wards
Someone has suggested, that it and Hotel Royal
> se ‘ . ¢ ses were eve During his stay

Back From U.S. Visit pt 1 ES te sont of ts ‘ane was with the 7
Mec WINSTON WARD has re- ?“' © eet f

much the same
those employed to-

road, shutting off the beautiful Company until
view of the sea and the coast line which he was seriously injured by
which must have been possible in a motor lorry

‘ ) y f «it the days when this picture was some months.
See ” dena at oe done The Exhibition continues He is a guest of his brother at
ager of the Paradise Beach Club, until the end of the month Brandon's Beach.

ons and in all

One of the

waxworks,





LURG TWGGWN TW4IJ

PDWTPW: Mee gd,
PICTURED here is a reproduction of one of the prints of the



BY THE WAY By BEACHCOMBER

he had The Golden Rainbird

Alone on Sunset Boulevard
A Chinaman and his cat,
And a little plastic wmbrella

Mockawanee,
And East of Harris Falls

said the conduc-

‘

oS

For your Health's
Sake
SLEEP in COMFORT

MATTRESSES & SPRINGS
BEDSTEADS—3 ft., 3 ft. 6ins.,



‘fing ADVOCATE STATIONERY

BARBADOS

666664644
LLL LL LLL LLLP LLL LL

*

3} § <
POD SOOEE OOO SOSE COC OOSSEH





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

bre



HARTWELL’S “Savannah’—-blue and
with field flowers and decorated with navy blue
perfect for garden parties.

Madame Tussaud

a hundred years ago 1793 Madame Tussaud
Tussaud, founder dered to make
remarkable exhibition of Marie Antoinette, her patron anc
in England. Her frien@d who had

popularity has that morning.
over the years forced to make

porting and

ntenary of 11s

h three of



tars, Dick Be
d Jimmy
veiling”
wax In a
amme Dennis





better modeller



that she spent



work, also told
the revolution
Lysistratus of

bition neglected



vax casts from

most well-read ried Francois

know, made wax had two sons

enemies and when she was

There was sorted company

the early Tus- she stands, a monument
for in Paris in skill and determination



DAILY CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work It:

AXYDLBAAXR
is LONGFELLOW

One letter simply stands for another, In this example A is used
three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos-
the length and formation of the words are all hints
ch day the code letters are different.

A Cryptogram Quotation

TO-NIGHT
DINE AND DANCE

AT

CLUB MORGAN
THE WEST INDIES MOST POPULAR NIGHT CLUB,

DELICIOUS STEAK DINNERS

Served throughout the Night
Dial 4000 for Reservations



4 ft. 6 ins.

— also —

COTL SPRINGS complete with Rails & Lugs for Mahogany
Bedsteads—3 ft. 6 ins. and 4 ft. 6 ins,
Obtainable from our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

Telephone 2039

FACTORY LTD.

Analysis, 7.15 a.m. Sandy MacPherson

7 p.m. The







death mask o!
weekend and holiday Louis XVI and the sculpt Marat
long queues waiting to as he lay in his bath after being
filled with waxen stabbed to death
famous and the Corday Such
Kings and Queens became part of the job to Marie
famous murder- Tussaud who took
Chamber of Horrors, tasks in her stride
the é
vorlc The BBC
OEY Phe a She was born
; vhere she lived with her mother
and uncle, a doctor who modellec
in wax as a hobby and eventu-
ally opened an exhibition of life-
size figures in Paris
unexpectedly successful, the King,
Queen and Court took les
the little girl, who was an ever

Switzerland,
+ A rail at us—trom down under +

-<

ous

-Biultover eyo, cer | EDMOND O'BRIEN » ROBERT STACK » JOHN 2

2. 045 degrees. (2)



became so popular

companion and
the King’s sister



friend of the Royal Family,
threwn into prisomuaand the exhi-

released she was deeply in debt
and had to work for nine years to
clear it, by which time she mar-

WM OBOML NE

Solution of yesterday's puzzle. —Acress:
Eventually, : 9,2
seventy-five,
pins, when the established a permanent
immediately fell down tion in London
earliest known last at the age
waxwork in Eng- Visitors who go
with the fear- to insect the *herita
Mrs. Death and left c&n see her
indeed, a certain there, a frail old
frozen features bonnet, surveying

Cur; 15, Masticate
Aspen; 27, Desk Down; 1. Unmanned;

. c
Cased; 14 Tillage: 18. Mesh: 20. Ohip





GURY
GQ HRFF GUW
DMUG LDGU FOWWH?—GEFFWN.

Saturday's Cryptoquote: WE ARE UNFIT FOR ANY TRUST
MLL WE CAN AND DO OBEY—MACDONALD.





CO-OPERATIVE COTTON

John Payne Sunny Tufts

SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1950

—s



B.B.C. Radio
Programme

SATURDAY JULY 15, 1950




a.m The News, 7.10 a.m News |




From









Dodging behind the heavy cure here?’’ “1 came because the toy

{ sain the a toe ‘ wn Bio back for

tains, e pa xe —

| sliding pane! and then r the ake

stone wall bet p ie Re t.

} : .

spiral staircas ° a

— moonlight ot ve tower e e 2 8 soun

m, ye : Well, here we Mirand s The auto-gyro

15 p.n Jack Train’s Record V vy ‘ ea = se sek catslon
p.m. Listeners’ Choict 15} bur why did o ¢
Programme Parade, 5.30 p.m. | ieee
Dance with me, 6.30 p.n From the] LOPES PPPOE POLES LPP AP PSL 9 VPOPFO VES
Third Programme, 6

0 p.m. Interlude

oo IIHEY THUNDERED THEIR

Indic 8 Pp



es : Swe: MIGHT ACROSS THE

» News, 10.10 p.m

| Isteriude, 10:18 p.m. Thi” World | <¢] HEAVENS!

Music, 11 p.m The idea of a Universi



peat ns Pp] AZ A YOUR POPULAR
Housewives’ CINEMA ....

* - eee
Guide
PRICES for Pines and

KKK RK KK
Cucumbers in the local mar- «ke ae
ket when the “Advocate r The Flyin*est

checked yesterday were:
ae, ae aaa RNER :
se MBROS, ~» Fun Lovin-est
Adventures that ®

Ever Zoomed

Across the t 4

















Cucumbers: 6 cents per
Ib.



CROSSWORD









Across

' ii IN COLOR OF | fe
(9) " fe
Essex town with Spaniara (17) \\ T E HNICOLOR >
Show. for the ast part of ¥ wy

Across. (9) 13. Brightened (3 .

Honour. (3) 16 Hastened (: PoC as — a
Straighten, (6) Vy)
Without beginning without ena-

(3)
See Sources. (2 as TOM DANDREA*HENRY HULL ney SETON 1. MILLER cs

4 } RAS HALO
- Confused scrap (5)
. Lies—to repair the place? (9) NOW 5& 8 30 p-m. and
Down inui i
t
Where shrubs are growa () Continuing Daily

Hoots. (8)
Containing salt, (6) 4. Heel. (4)

Initially sure shield. (2)
" 7 66,6,5666668
Hocorns iat I ‘Matarai:e) POCO OOOO ELLA OPAL PPLLES

4 oe
All sorts of guns. (Â¥) ve
Obscure. (3) 12. Stack. (6)
Swell out. (5) 17. Impelled. (5)



Renown, (4) AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE: TO-DAY AT 5 p.m
TONIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT AT 8.30



gly, 6, Lamp Nee; 10, Era; 12
15. Artist: 16 Sit
Den
26



Bolt; 18, M

» No clue; 21,
Exhausted:

Errol FLYNN—Olivia De HAVILLAND

in “THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE’

Filmed by Warner Bros. from Lord Tennyson’s masterpiece with a cast
of 1,000's headed by Patric KNOWLES—Henrty STEPHENSON—Nigel BRUCE
A Salute to the Gallant ‘600' Who Rode “Into the Jaws of Death" that
a Comrade Might Live for Love !



Deign: 25. Her:

Gear boxes: 3. Lest: 4, Ye; 5, Grist
Mutineers, 8 Pretends;: 11 Act: 12

Tee

ee
===.





DANCE
TO-NIGUT |
CASUARINA —
CLUB

ADMISSION: — 2/-

GANETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

SATURDAY, SUNDAY—8.30 p.m, Matinee Sunday 5 p.m.
Warner's Thrilling Drama!
JOHN GARFIELD in his Greatest Role in

“DUST BE MY DESTINY”’
with Priscilla LANE—Alan HALE—Others

Monday and Tuesday 8.30 p.m
LOVE AND LEARN & SINGAPORE WOMAN

TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. and continuing
M-G-M's BIG ADVENTURE ROMANCE!

© 4 © SPENCER TRACY: JAMES STEWART
a é VALENTINA CORTESA ‘

i ~



The Menu features Black Pudding
and Souse for this evening and
to-morrow morning























ROYAL (Worthings)

To-day & To-morrow 4.30
& 8.30
Republic Double
EVELYN ANKERS—
RICHARD FRASER







in
“THE FATAL WITNESS” |









ane LXTRA!
John Wayne, Vera Ralston british Movie Tone News
in
“DAKOTA’ and
Universal American News
EMPIRE
and
To-day 4.45 & 8.20 and ’ . "
contin’ Let’s Agitate (Shorts)
20th Century Fox Presents sain ionciiiiaemiianee
John GARFIELD |
Micheline PRELLE TO-MORROW 9.30 A.M.
in
“UNDER MY SKIN” LOCAL TALENT AUDITION
with
Luther ADLER
Orley LINDGREN
Also the Short
“THE BATTLE FOR
KOREA”
To+Day 4.30 & 8.15 and ,

Continuing
Columbia Big Actior
Double
Ron Rendel
Devera Burton
in
“OMOO OMOO”"
AND
“CHINATOWN AT
MIDNIGHT”
with

HURD HATFIELD
JEANE WILLES

OLYMPIC
To-day to Monday

4.30 & 8.15
United Artists Big Double

Pegg) a John Dali MURRAY & C

“DEADLY IS THE
FEMALE” |
AND
“THE CROOKED WAY” |
|
{







o L° EDINBURGH SCOTLAND



SOLE AGENTS:—

MANNING & CO., LTD.

with

Ellen Drew





SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ct

PAGE THREE

rip ry
Meat Talks J¢’s Wet In Korea
WiENOt | ver sveminonnn'AStet

ally the









“Sugar Isn't as
News’ —Or
Is It?

THE GAMBOLG
6 AE

J EINE GROWN NER
FRAME




launched their armoure pe




















































IT in the West Indies. That prin t} a ] is
ae e reprod Bie th - ~_- across the pal el at ne ) nnir Sor
rtisement which appeared j nd Soon season
( mer uch appeared in
: American nm agazine dated orrer i i “
June 2 95 1k ae : r 7 7 ’ = =—
cies ans World Wars and BUENOS AIRES, July 14 gre.srequent over, K , : Serer
their aftermaths sugar becam > Anglo-é ntine discussions —|June throug! ear Mok pe
Page One new in terre of “the ee mee paneer eee Societ es nw "9
crisis in supplies for our Armed end financial issues involved — dies Reese se con;
Forces and for the home front t a ueore to carry on for a long roads in ‘ illy “ : i
At the time of World War I we HANG \T ’ THERES THE = ) me, according to sources close to rushing freshets. J ig]
had a_ national sugar policy TELEPHONE RINGING — AND ® British Embassy month for rain. and A
, based on tariff protection. By the GAYE'S CUT SHOPPING — LAST RACE AT Meanwhile meat ‘ most likely time for the
time of World War II we had VLL HAVE TO ANSWER (tT ~ (NEWMARKET TO-DAY ceedin ase ae loading is pro- devastating typhe
developed a national sugar pro- — I rit hg aithough the price which across the peninsula
gram combining tariff, processing . ~ asians: se a to Ras yet been ; ; rec
tax, subsidies and quota controls ‘ / : ie while Argentina was soon'’s—Good (over I
vcquaiiuectuccn. Delegation We Must THE END OF A. vich cee isa aa] domo see 7
plicated program was suspended ,| ] 2 See a first = agreement] advantage of surt
ulme nr ately after Pearl y e il are enced on June 30, the}fgured that the
ioe ie wis'getites ss =©=AChieved Learn Hygiene se chances are’ tno lune, 20 the eurea that th
THE SUGAR ACT OF 1943 rl ea ol cir ing all other com-|South Korean defer
WHICH CONTINUES TO CON- S At S I l / aites will decline during the} having k effect u :
TROL TO THE LAST POUND uccess c 100 Fritien year, thereby affecting mechanized nd Pou {0 Months
THE AMOUNT OF SUGAR THAT ., ‘ritish exports to Argentina as a|forces. In any even\. freque
CAN COME INTO OUR MARKET @ from page 1 —CHIEF INSPECTOR By Pierre J. Huss ioe of diminished Argentine * mt — MAEECS al Soe f the
RACH TEAR > a E sta 2 a Sterling earnings dilit ave been giving em goor pital o pieture
. Might eee. we are entering the striking, worked togetner as a The Chis Sanitary Inspecto 9; ; LAKE SUCCESS, NEW YORK, Although meat price diseus- | SOV"! EAA a 4 a vn
season of peak sugar consumption Body. All the memoranda sent to St. Michael told the “Advocate The majority of U.N. delegations no longer care wheth- sions ith Uruguay are still yn-| Uniques indicate that va
with a quota for the year, that ae Whately ip actctiiecde yesterday that the sanitation «! er Russia stays in U.N. clarified, because of the slowness + it meee cts a :
is substantially below our knowa word fee word be the Hoes Poet tokcd we ee The cold war deadlock beforg the Koreai explosion © the Anglo-Argentine negotia-| and Navy.
italia G a 7 e cl} looked ) > Sani- pink: ciel 2 a : . ton are , @ ; .
"ee Chovaaiitiead te aurtinios ins They agreed to appoint Mr. Gomes tary Department, “Ths streets : a ee erly a political earthquake ~either of ap- otis tt, Mectant ms, me muna oe ‘ had i
in talks in Londen about a possi” as their Spokesman and at all the were thoroughly cleaned on morn. pease nent on one side or aggression on the other—could Uruguay becoming ioe ~, , a x he result of
Bee oa iretabnktiaret meni Phang eee with Ministers the line ings, but then the skins of man- have brought a solution. fnpavesrit an Sear Be 8 I a. ~ ern win wit
Kibountest: Whilek wnatiaean we oe. nim to take and the arguments goes, bananas, ety were deposited As things now stand, the ruling the story of const: rnatidn, confu- . Pt cee t ae oa ‘ 5 , ar
: ; tary ys yt © be used were carefully discuss- in the gutters by hawkers during tendency among non-Cominform sion and dismay which the sweep- For thstan luring . } ees es ag t 3 <
sais yee ook he tigre eg on the ed before-hand and approved the day. This was an undesir- delegates is that {f the choice is ing counter-action of the Western July 1049 to June 1980 Ur ere th a Abin! bri aa or I T
can! and prices o e sugar At the meetings no. member of -. re a tw Sener ie eee ene sacrificing U.N world to the North Korean shipped nearly ¢ 900 Se ee it tanita ue the | tah | AAT it ‘ ee ;
And the Congressional candi- the delegation spoke and _ this in ok khen wa eatablighsa. 4 world organisation. then the 1 Sin tan move spread among froze meat comparec with | Produce rain nusual for 10 tir as
dates whom we shall listen to this 0'derly and very fitting manner of ™ As it. was now everythin “pos- of peace and the security of, orks travellirs. ee a ee shipments of only 40,000 y i Act July as in
ummer and elect in November ¢°ducting affairs was due to the sible was being done to PO nations is best served by keeping ‘They ate nev tons, while chances are she will + Figtires Head nor Januar rt : pit
vill constitute the 82nd Congress [act that every member of the ‘ho tuisance. Even the co-opera- U.N. as the strong peace force of on the Kremlin, ‘If theit thoughts “MP between 100,000 and 120,000] US. Weather Bur Pane ! h, Winter is th
WHICH WILL BE CHARGED {elegation knew beforehand the tio, of the Police had beer ens the allied nations can be read at Lake Success thes t88 during the coming — year, Riana ace el seman OF,
WITH EXTENDING, REVISING, ee a Gomes would take—al- listed and with telling effect. _ In other words, the pussy-foot- hope for ome Hapeet ait a sae while Argentine loadings to Brit- Peeeeae ieee “ ee y x ae . KK “—
OR REPLACING THE SUGAR i we eaeee he would use— What was of greater concern ing days in favout of Russia and margin by which the rae es ain because of augmente en pte vg ft 2 A ‘ oO « ional
\CT OF 1948 which, along with ee Ha = one an the negotia~ «1 the moment, he said, were tha the shush-shtsh of anyone who Communism can be rgised to its Argentine internal tmeit —con- holitte te the abea bes 38th 1 I n thi n that
t Congress, will end 6H Decerhi= wen Be vax. 2 ere fie insanitary practices of some peo- Spoke out of turn at U.N. are gone. old heights and recapture the ini- “U™Mption are liable to sium, parallel indie ites th 1 or it shcons aie haen Mnet ne th mee
er 31, 1952. 3 the Sat ates "Avda! aa ee ple travelling along the streets. Russia—Bated Breath tiative it held in the cold war to a mere 200,000 ton: nany weather head wait originate in the vieinit f ‘the
fhe soft drink industry is com- resulted 8 » Breat harmony These people spat anywhere and The diplomats still say that the They go home at night to sit by ) . ‘ ‘ American forces Vi onsider Mariana Islat }
osed of some 6,000 bottling plants “Tt can ‘be said, therefore, that al- ''"eW. the skins of fruit, paper Soviet Union can Hang around and the radio and listened for the : Kt for the first time Utuiguay- | jhose average figure he full rt to the ( :
ell distributed throughout the though there was only one spokes- and the like on the roadway. keep a seat at U.N. But nowadays signal in the form of a challenge ‘ 1 Smpments might reach 50 per | iwo decades before recut eu
ation, most of them being small man each and every member of School’s The Place no one sits around the big lounge to U.N. and the West so vast and cope of | Argeiitine exports at An observation poit Pusan, oss the Korean are pei
‘amily businesses. Together, they the delegation contributed fully to This came within the category {HY mote waiting with bated formidable that the Korean blun- “%@#0St 10 per cent. in the past Jon the eouthenet cone rted a it experiences these
employ over 80,000 persons on a the success of the mission. The ©f personal hygiene, and he areath sche afbe, appearance of der can be overshadowed and for- Furthermore because Uruguay | July rainfall averaging more than severe storms. ¢ ’ ‘ ‘
car-round basis, use better than visit of the delegation has, no thought that for the benefit of et Ren pte Jdcob Malik or a gotten. They think the Politburo 4S maintained purchases of goods | {1 inches. (‘The avera lv pre te N
50,000 tons of sugar, and are doubt, completely convinced both the coming generation the best "ag a at Tae a whole. will come up with something be- fom Britain and allow ed finan-
npertant pufchasers of special- Ministers and their officials that Place at which this Could be im- the he iy eatita i roe fore the end of summer, if only cial remittances, it is possible
ed machinery, trucks and acces- in the future the West Indies, pressed on them was the school. at UN ie Yon can f ate oping be#ause they sense that the honey- Hritain might concede to her
ries, bottles, wooden cases and while most anxious to co-operate At present District Nurses gave it. oF lume ” 1 take it, leave ee is over and the mailed glove more favourable trading term:
per ¢artons promotional materl- with Hie Majesty's Government in periodic lectures dt the elemen- ‘the Rita bes init las been tossed down,—1,.N.S than to Argentina —Reuter
idvertising space and time all matters, will no longer tolerate tary schools om the subject and Cominform propaganda mackit RD Pa ge sienge
other things required in the being pushed around, and have it was evident that their work have come out of the dise San cin Y ~y
nduct of a billion-dollar busi- decisions, which vitally affect was bearing fruit. i seeking to foist Upon the. public JA ANESE NAME IDE iL
Like all the other food pro- them, made by Ministers without Another problem was housing {h¢ impression that the Unitea wd io 4é
ing industries which depend prior consultation, fn the slum areas. There wad States committed aggression in y p Y
sugar as sweetener and pre Mr. Robinson, Mr. Kirkwood and need for clearance in these areas, Korea. NE WS APE R
erver, and like every American myself acted as technical advisers Lut here again the District Nurs That propaganda line is easier sit
sewife, We bottlers have a and Mr. McCowan of British West were doing a good job in cheCK- to sell than to explain away the
interest in national sugar Indies Sugar Association perform- ing up on the condition’ of the fact that the United Nations is 1 "i : TAKASAKI, Japan,
ation and its administration, €4, the duties of Secretary of the health of the people and offering conducting the military interven- The editors of Japan’s first hometown weekly news-

at will dssure us of dependable





delegation.”









sound hygienic advice.





tion against a Communist ageres-

paper went about asking tow





































tos 77% nspeople ¢ j r neg .
ipplies of sugar at a reasonable Cricket He thought that the state of 501 and to do so has mobilized they wanted—and got an eartit’ ple what kind of paper
ce under any and all conditions ‘ sanitation in this colony com- two-thirds of the world’s govern- he first issue f th Tak: Bit risak
that can be anticipated Mr. Cuke also said that Dr. pared most favourably with ments behind General Douglas .. fe oF the Takasaki Citizen, a four-page tabloid,
at ci é . Cummins had left London before others, and was com- MacArthur Carries the results of this pre-publication poll whicl
IT IS IMPORTANT THAT AN lhe did, and was at present in New sidered by those most competent Everything indicates that the embraced a cross-section of Takasaki’s 95,000 people fr
INFORMED PUBLIC OPINION York for a few days; he was not to judge, as better than many. U.N Security Council's prompt the station master to the Cl bus oh peopit rom |
PARTICIPATE IN DEVELOPING sure when he would be returning. invoking of the hitherto moribund Said Station Maste Ki ‘ lamber of Commerce janitor, | f r ir )
OUR NATIONAL SUGAR POLI- Turning to the subject of cricket ER Chapter VIf on breaches of peace Tauji: wy anegor ne wspaper that does not help the] }
CY FROM HERE OUT ~ said Ly the West Indies were WORLD SOCC Con fat ta nh def Of all to the “Give an interesting news ii , | f
“Inside” and _ editorial sige Playing “glorious cricket”, and it ‘ tientic to stigir duting Cie was 4 pleasure to sit and watch CUP FINAL ism’s fellow travellers, paper that's easy to read, if you school teacher, said she wanted | |
rp ‘od vy well prevent "sugar them and listen to the comments RIO DE JANEIRO, July 14 World—Peace Crusade ‘ats use words of foreign origin, the paper to “avoid just finding |
pam ae Meeahe nas ae trom ‘hastens. Mr. George Reader, of Britain, It is recalled that in the so hm Mae bik mean. Give us fault with people, Leave scahdal
oe = 35 has been chosen to officiate in the cajjeg ; ro complete and unbiased repotts on m r ; Nhe, ee
disaster news ‘ radi Ususuas called peace offensive launched in the doings o 4 iN mongering alone |
é : : _——_— razil-Uruguay World Soccer Cup gto. ; : ne doings of the City Coun ie oes err : |
Washington 6, D.¢ ; Final match here on Sunday. Mr tpg eho}m under Cominform and of the Chamber of ¢C Me ob ie oe kaseki. Citizen the first |
eo 1980 ‘66 . 99 i p 3 ;), Suidance. the goal was the gather- Ae $> x om~ of its type of newspapers encour-
Jun R Co Van Der Meer, of Holland, will ; 8 merce pal neour
erican Bottlers of ney mes referee the Sweden-Spain match .v8 et fe ae millions of — Zentaro Ozeki, 40, wi aged by the Occupation, is|
oe iad oR ‘ nv, © . ' Signatures against war in all eo ling «dae earns a financed by the sale of stock |
Corbonated Beverage: And Goes ir. Sao Paulo.—Reuter. countries. Party members and fel- ] ving peddaling a “pedicab”—the the community, It ; pen f |
WEA Meade atioat BAG low | travellers everywhere were boos mah’s a in Japan—said; 20,000 copies of its first isgue but
WH¢ > IN OUR & WAN BAG i a arenes ce = ° mobilized into actio Ac wont read a newspaper th: ans ¢ : ; neaTae 4
ares : steve OTSA D1 highteein passengers arrived in C action, cardinal , oe paper that plans a regular circul:
ind WHAT PRICE SUGAR! are ine island yesterdas when the SS ounty Cricket slogan woven into the movement 8 dull and dificult to read. Give }.ooo . circulation re i
vailal on request>. Lady Rodney” dropped anchor was that the people of the world US 4 newspaper that w ll serye ' ; :
4adiy ’ ped anchor peor e world ‘ b é ill sery In addition to the townspeople}
in port. They were from Boston, esults were demanding support of the {ot Something besides wrapping comment on dint thes capeelon
_ St. Kitts, Antigua, Montserrat U.N. in. its peace crusade among Paper.” from a community weekly the ‘ !
U S Govt and Dominica LONDON, July 14, the cold war powers, Miss Shizuko Yamaguchi, 22 a Takasaki Citizen carried i ts i
e e e The “Rodney” sailed out about ee aT RRPRREREDEES: BOs Somer- On that basis, the Cominform bank clerk, laid stress on the need first issue a stor? cae aa Pe ae | EX PO RT ‘
ey | F. 9 p.m. for British Guiana, via ~ Warwickshire 466 for 5 declared; Gard- oy teal tee hae Sea for 1 good staff. She explained: can soldiers who Tasried Taka.
o St. Vincent, Grenad: Trini-ggver not out 215, Lord 84, ary G a ryfve Lie as the i athe by Wey 7 . Gaa@ | 4
watts for Bt inom, sence sae ‘tromlf, Somerset 216 and secondly 124; Hollies outstanding peace champion next less Ber cae atin i pat girls; @ report on an. abacu: | Bb exsont }
ne & 4 asse : 7 for 48 an ‘ to Stalin. Lie was praised, cited are hewspapermen who contest among school children | em, iS «? }
More Wheat Duta its short stay, the ‘“Rod-ey 1 bee Teepe enn aie and pointed out as "the crusader hark ciao ne F Soon i ane felt tie Pee of Perio. | _
y? inate tet ia, Yorkshire 314 for 9 declared; Yardley against the “war m ” 4 laving a good time. Such people ment from Takasaki who left t | |
wey” discharged a cargo of bale votre 49, End segondly i438 for a by t. Pickets a ae ee an the are incapable of writing good attend : ng arene eit : ; |
of feed ickled meat, herrings west. Pickets in the U.S. carried 7 f 3 attend a Moral Re-armament con | |
WASHINGTON, July 14 hetnion ; dha eges from ‘Canada Beaten 188; Edwards 64, and secondly Si8ns demanding that Secretary of pone wich will ead readers to ference at Caux sur Montreux ¢ :
The United States Government giong with fruit from the British[y72, Wardle 6 for 10 " State Dean Acheson allow Lie to a better life wey spapermen Switzerland, and a lengthy fea- \ |
today called for a larger wheat Northern Islands. By 183. cat Surrey beat Gloucestershire appear before Congress on behalf should be gentlemen . ture of modern “feather cut” \ !
crop next year, The Agriculture Mangoes were in a good supply Surréy 278; Pafker riot out 13%, ana Ofspeace, : 4 Oe tee mblhara, a physician, pairdos | \ i
Department set a 195! production among the fruit landed by thispasecondly 262, Eric Bedser 78, Mcintyre gapen, game the Korean explo- rey ang yn ney Shapers car Something New |
goal of 1.150,000,000 bushels, or vessel. large heads of cabbagesiltioicester iat: exer 4 thr 42 ind Hot. U.S. spokesmen unreserved- Sonik ie ve ne oe jpoods be- tt alld cartied 2 weekly Borde
193,000,000 more than this year’s were also among the cargo secondly 210; Alien 65, Emmett 52, Laker 3», 00W Praise Lie for quick and Yond the teach of the common pilation of marrlages, deaths and !
indicated crop, and 119,000,000 P 6 for 56, . determined action. He made it people births z ethi ? aes ”
more than 1948-49 average :[., At Derby, Derbyshire-Hampshire mateh possible for the Security Counci] She said: er, jomething new Orr
‘ The Agency said more wheat E F Pt pattie 269; Warker 65, Hall 5 for rO meet. ona few hours’ notice, jouch ads create resentment Magy pel le ede? f th
was needed to assure the Nation's SHOWERS STOP WORK 7]60 and secondly i71, Richardson 4 for Lhey say his driving energy as- ‘mong housewives find mothers. j Alban tht ete re at i 1€ |
“safe” margin for food needs 4430, sured the speedy and legally cor- Miss Shigeko Mogi, 22, a restau- ?8P! nese i opacto Monopoly to 4 |
Si li 900 c} . shi Np Derbyshire 224, Kelly 71, and secondly rect inv *hapter . "¢ r ss, said she \ > e bingo parlour
for possible increasés in exports ,, Sipping was held up for about 4s ek Beat ¢ fen and secon te er oe rg mntet VII pro- rant waitress, gid she wanted the ! fone Mec uisli dijlishot 6F th |
and for feed to produce more 2? pailtutes sterday | by a lig i At Nottingham, Nottinhamshire-Kent YeSiOns granting rent | member ie tedinde on be one Me Taek. CONTRI a weekly] |
7 . . om shower of rain which began about"gmatch drawn. > “nts . ant to hurl air, big brother to us fe want it to é yr . Aoe ‘WS, a week
meat, milk, and Poultry 11.45 Nottinghamshire 407; Winrow 127, Har- séa and land forces into the battle : . ender.” newspaper in Newton, Kan, was
This goal would petthit shar 408.m, ; ris 113, Sime 54, Wright 7 for 106 : tile. be our defender, par .
cna n in the l f i rah i Lighters which were discharg-M ont ais, Amis bd, Clarke 69 and sec. Lie—Unkindest Cut Janitor Sanhhiro Sone, 98, Sent to Japan by the Department] | ‘
Se eee ah oF wheat TO ing their cargoes along the water-Mondly 324 for 3, Pag# 65, Ames not out Reaction among the Soviet- expects the Citizen to help the Of the Army to advise in thef | ie
i ed ed k 6 ae ae reo front were covered over with tar-! NR eh Ot ee ca cead ehhh controlled Eastern groups and the underdog. He said; establishment of weeklies . |
seine me early Stages of World paulifis during the shower. Ships sek. match drawn “- fellow travellers at U.N. was that Help Underdog He reported that in addition t fi Cay \
rif in the harbour also made use off Middlesex 355; | Robertson 107, Sharp the Lie role in swinging all U.N “People talk a lot about dem- Takasaki, four cities in Kyushu] | mE | \
that time the Government tarpaulins to cover their hatches. (15, Jenkins 6 tot 142 And secondly 144 support to action of the U.S. was Gakaey Pit ‘old wi fe 4 till pr _ were also working toward the / ‘Bu | ,
ae » available ; ed r - oe agai for 7 declared, Robertson 52 j z ; “racy, »| stoms e- : 7 } / , j
rcle upplies available for feed Phe un wa out again Coe Worcestershire 330; 8. Cooper 40, the unkindest cut of all. vail in government and business ©! blishment of similar weekly | boned f “ j
at cut rate prices the evening and work went backAyoworth 84, Jenkins not out 50, and Long faces and bitter tone: offices. I can have no use for a MeWspapers devoted entirely tof |
—Reuter. to normal secondly 123 for 5.—Reuter among themselves accurately told : . ag: WAG LOLS community news. —€1.N.S.) | -
pe AL SN — = cig eh aera i,
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SOLSSOOSLOCPOOCH ACO OLS





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PAGE FOUR



~ BARBADOS GD ADVOCATE |

Sa SoS fase:

ae by the Advocate Co., Lid,, Broad St.,

July 15, 1950

DELINQUENCY

IN 1946 the Governor appointed a Com-
mittee to enquire into and report on the

working of the Government Industrial
Schools and to make recommendations for
their reform. Today, four years after,
those institutions are working under the
same system which had been the subject
of strong public criticism.

The Committee on which members of
the Social Welfare Department served,
reported and it is typical of Barbados that
despite the terms of the report and the
merits of the suggestions made for reform,
nothing has been done.

It had been pointed out in this news-
paper on several occasions that the main-
tenance of the “plantation” system with
the aim at reform would continue to defeat
the endeavours of the Government. The
Committee too shared the view that until
the two were divorced little progress
could have been made. This view was
generally accepted. It was agreed that the
answer to the problem was the introduc-
tion of the Borstal System but that owing
to the lack of trained personnel, this
should be postponed until someone could
be imported for the job. Today there is
an acting Superintendent of the Govern-
ment Industrial Schools and it is the good
fortune of the Government that the choice
has fallen on an officer who on his own
initiative has done much to change the
“prison” atmosphere of the institution.

Since that Committee was appointed and
the report submitted to the Government,
there have been long and interesting public
discussions on the increase of juvenile
delinquency and the need for remedial
measures. Not even the example of a few
energetic individuals could have stirred the
Government to unearth the Report and to
make some attempt in assisting with the
problem.

It is known that the lack of reform at the
Government Industrial Schools has been
put down as one of the contributing factors
to an increasing number of young people
finding themselves charged in the Courts of
this island. There are instances on record
where young people have served more than
one term at the Government Industrial
School and many others where a term at
the Government Industrial School has been
but a preliminary for a sentence at Glen-
dairy.

The Government itself would appear to
accept this frequency as normal. Undoubt-
edly someone will object but what then is
the explanation for the fact that whenever
a young person has been discharged from
the Government Industrial School, an im-
mediate report must be made to the Gov-
ernor of the Prisons.

The action of the Government in this
matter deserves strong condemnation for
two reasons, The increase of juvenile
delinquency has been publicly discussed
and could not have failed to have come
to the notice of the Government; and
during the four years which have elapsed
there was ample opportunity to have sent
some officer or officers to some training
centre to become acquainted with modern
methods of reform.

The teaching profession has sent two
mistresses, the Parochial Authority has
sent a matron for the Children’s
Home, the Police have sent one
and are now about to send two
more, the Government itself has sent one
from the Public Works Department. This
action is direct contradiction to the state-
ment that there were not sufficient people
in the Civil Service able to make full use
of scholarships. It can still be done and
it is in the interest of the community that
it be done. The care of our youth is the
concern of every member of society and
it is time that the Government give the
Government Industrial School special
attention.

Our Readers Say:
Muslim



Bridgetown.





Saturday,





Conference

Dear Sir,

Under the guidance of His Eminence Moulana
Muhammad Abdul Aleem Siddiqui, the Anjuman
Sunnat-ul-Jamaat Association, Inc. proposes to
organise a conference of representatives from the
Muslim communities of Trinidad and neighbour-
ing colonies, including British Guiana, Dutch
Guiana, Barbados, Jamaica, Cuba, Panama, etc.
It is proposed that the objects of the conference
will include:—

1. To create closer relationship and co-opera-
tion among the Muslim communities of these
territories.

2. To consider the educational, social, econo-
mic, moral and religious problems of the Muslims
of these areas; and to take adequate steps for
attending to such problems

3. To form a Regional Muslim Organisation.

The association is interested in getting in touch
with all persons and organisations interested in
participating in this conference, which is expected
to be held about the end of July, 1950. All inter-
ested persons or organisations are requested to
communicate with the undersigned without
delay.

WAHID ALI,
Hon. Secretary,
Anjuman Sunnat-ul-Jamaat Assoc., Inc.,
JAMA MASJID,
Cor. Queen & Piccadilly Sts., Port-of-Spain,
Trinidad, B.W.I

AN event of considerable im-
| portance has taken place. Derek

Valcott has published a play in
verse, an historical drama of the
turbulent times in Haiti after the
death of Toussaint Louverture. I
believe this play is bound to have
three gratifying effects: first,
those, like myself, who admired,
were ofttimes bewildered by, and
sometimes annoyed at, his lyrics,
will be able to discern in this fine
objective verse the genius—I use
the word without exaggeration—
of the young poet; second, the play
will shake, thrill and delight its
readers and later its audiences;
and, third, it will entice many to
read the histories of the times and
the people it portrays.

It is a fine play, full of the
drama of the clash of wills and
ambition, Elizabethan in the pro-
digality of its bloodshed, conscious
of the overwhelming infiuence of
its historical milieu on its char-
acters, while in the background,
Time, like Nemesis, twists and
corrupts men’s ideals, weakens
their bodies and their wills, and
finally does them to death. One
is tempted to say that Time is one
of the main characters of the play,
often made articulate in the old
general Sylla.

With



‘voussaint’s death, Dessa-
lines and Christophe, also ex-
slaves, become the inevitable
leaders of Haiti, with Petion and
Sylla to support them, The coun-
try is in utter desolation.

the peasants have identified liberty

with idleness;

The fallow fields cropless; the old
plantations,

Plaine du Nord, Morne Rouge,
Quartier Morin,

Are like grass widows, unweeded,

growing thorns
And bristles, dry seeds on a parching

wind
[ quote that because I like the
{romantic sounds of the place,

| but I feel Christophe’s description
jis more beautifully vivid:

|
The old plantations
Stand haggard as prisoners, the
windmills have broken arms,
The soldiers not sent home, murmurs
mounting,
While the king wastes blood like

money .
The hatred and jealousy between
the blacks, mulattoes and whites
are fiercer than ever, Dessalines
assumes kingship, rules with ruth-
less tyranny and Christophe, jeal-
ous; has him murdered and as-
sumes the crown. But he too suc-
cumbs to the potent draught of
power and, hated and feared by
his people, he kills himself in the
face of Pétion’s rebellion. That, in
bald terms, is the theme of the
play; but how well does Walcott
handle it!

Walcott divides the play into
two parts, the first part compris-
ing four scenes and the second
three. In Part one the sweep is
wide, sketching the historical
background in quick, deft touches,
apprising us of the political situa-
tion. and its chief actors, and
showing us the bloody course of
Dessalines and the patient
triguing of Christophe,

In seene one we see the gener-
als Sylla, Pétion, Deqalines and

in-

the French Bishop Brelle—the
only white man in the play—
waiting for news of ‘Toussaint.
We get more than a glimpse of the
disorder in the country, the deadly
rivalry between the leaders, the
violence of the colour hatred. In
scene two we are introduced to
Christophe and his reception of
the news of Toussaint’s death and
Dessalines’ assumption of author-
ity. We get an evocation of the
fr. Toussaint by Christophe:

‘
I cannot list
tell
that

his braveries; I can
only

Things the memory shudders
to remember,

Hurt by its love
nations,

He disrupted intrigues,
wars .

He held his generals,

were refractory
and an imagined picture of his
death in a French prison:

He broke three
curbed civil

although they





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HENRI CHRISTOPHE | I Caribbean

»



DEREK “""*" OCT

he,
Crucified
nails,
An old man dancing on a stick of
time, all skin and groan,
Died, coughing on a stone floor.

made limp in spirit,
in «a winter's stubborn

The majority or the characters
some alive at once. There is Pé-
tion, moderate and reasonable. but
rather dimly seen, I feel; Sylla,
feeling the weight of his years and
looking forward to a life of quiet
and plenty:

I had hoped for, first, faith,
People singing, eating leisurely
Under the green ease of councils,



a federation
Of complexions

and disillusioned and almost fatal-
istic before the cruelty of Dessa-
lines. There is something admir-
able and touching about this self-
less but tired old revolutionary
who had thought that, the revolu-
tion being successful, he would be
able to enjoy a quiet retirement.
But in the light of events, in his
old man’s wisdom, he sees that
their real enemy is not the whites,
not black rivals, but time’s cor-
roding power, nothing less. Brelle,
the Bishop, is a type — a good
point, I think—representing the
white element, pious, moderate,
but hiding ambition and jealousy
beneath a cloak of reason; Chris-
tophe, powerful, cunning, cruel,
idealistic, waiting for the time
when Dessalines shall outrun
himself. History has not been
kind to Dessalines. It has re-
corded him as violent, unscrupu-
lous, egoistical, deceitful, primi-
tively courageous. Walcott has
not been unfaithful to history.
Dessalines intrigues, he lies, he
murders with the joy that other
men take in a feast. He kills and
kills, ‘martyring children with a
tired sword’ till everyone in hor-
ror turns from him. He % horri-
fied at himself when he finds that
he cannot stop:

Have I yone mad after long war?
Does murder grow like habit in the
hand, infection

In the fingers and the skull?

Dessalines is very powerfully
drawn. The scene in which he
himself is killed—the only prose
scene—is a study in horror. What
depths they are in young Wal-
cott’s mind! Two murderers, a
man and a boy, wait in the wood
through which Dessalines, de-
serted by his suborned escort, will
have to pass, and as they wait the
first murderer sketches the plan
of execution and gives advice.
Asked for hints on how to become
an expert in the trade, he says:
“First, be a vegetarian; second, be
kind to animals; third, keep in
practice.” One will smile, vill
laugh, in this scene but not from
fun; it will be a laughter of acute
discomfort, of relief from the hor-
ripilic tension it creates. When
Dessalines comes upon them he
realises their purpose at once. He
is not afraid, however. He tries
to talk reasonably with them but



A play by Derek Walcott (Advocate Co. Lid.) 59p.
$1.20, 2.00 1.50 (Reviewed by G. A. Holder)





ne ~ adivances calmly towards
him, saying, “Sir, let’s be quiet
about this,” while the boy, over-
come With horror at this regicide,
covers his face with his hands and
prays hysterical to whatever
gods he owned It is a scene of
tremendous power

Par, two deals chiefly with
Christophe as king. Here the
artist, the psychologist, the
tnoralist, will tind much that ws
fascinating. In this part the

poetry leaps to near Magnificence,
as when Christophe, in a moment
egoistic vision, describes the place
where he will build his castle at

now-famous La Ferriere:

The air is thin there, the balding
rocks

Where the last yellow grass clutch
whitening in sun

And the steep pass below the sea,
knocking

Like & madman om the screaming
sand,

And the wind howling down the

precipices like a tunatic

Searching a letter he never wrote—

against these rocks,

Wind, sand, cold, where the sharp
cry of gulls beats faintly on the
ears,

And in the green groves a milk of
doves—what army

Would bend its head against the .
wind to reach?
Or when Vastey, Christophe’s

secretary, instructs the Attendant

how to trap Archbishop Brelle
While he is whispering hypocrisies
to heaven

With penny candles humble in his
eyes.
Phrases, too, leap at you from

the page, haunting the memory—
when Vastey talks of “drinking
remorse in a spoonful of soup” or
of Petion coming “waving a new
constitution”, or wWwilfen, finding
Brelle dead on the floor, he says:
“IT stumbled on his sprawled
pride in the corridor.”

One watches Christophe change
with his success: his ideals fall
‘to dust; hia self-restraint
weakens; his hands, like Dessa-
lines’, succturab to the infection of
murder: paralysis lays hold_ of
his limbs and his will. Povger
has corrupted him; it has been
the flame of his life and it is
the cause of his death. One is
moved by the fate of this. tr
figure who, with his great poten-
tialities and his sorry weaknesses,
finds himself a pawn in the hand

of time, committing murder by
habit, hated by the police for
whom he thought

To build citadels for this complexion
Signed by the sun.

Yet he cannot regret, this man
who at length finds himself
deserted by everyone. He segs:

1 cannot ripen compunction by

rosaries, ‘

Or pray to Damballa, or broken



Histony, breaking the stalk she grew
herself,

Kills us like flies, wings torn, held
up to light,

Burning biographies like rubbish

And as the drums of Petion

come nearer, heralding a new

rebellion all alone, in maniacal

laughter and despair, Christophe
shouts:
Tell Petion I leave
monarchy,
The gra
of silence :
and he puts the pistol fo this head.
The play is not without
blemishes. Scene five, is, I think
faulty in construction, the hand-
ling of the crowd suggests un-
certainty, looking several ways
simultaneously, as though the
dramatist were trying to do too

him this dark

of children,



and years

much at once. The prolonged
use of rhymed, couplets in the
early scenes is apt to become
tiresome, Nevertheless, the play

is gq remarkable achievement, for
any modern dramatist. It is many
things to the pathologist, it is
a study in neurosis; to the politi-
cal philosopher, a lesson in the
inevitably evil results of power;
to the moralist, an implacable
reminder of the relationship of
means to ends; to the literature,
a joy, an inspiration and a land-.
____mark | in West Indian literature





THE WAR IN ASIA

Chiang Must Be Disarmed

RY DAVID TEMPLE

taken up the challenge of aggres-
sion in Korea it has been com-
monly said that in 1950 we are
profiting from the mistakes of
the League of Nations and acting
decisively, as the Western Allies
should have acted against Hitler
when he marched
Rhineland in 1936.

This is a fine sentiment, and
should give the United Nations
much-needed self-confidence. But
the comparison needs to be used
cautiously .

in to the

In Europe in the 1930's, Britain,
France, Czechoslovakia, and their
friends were called on to defend
themselves in or around their own
were
these countries them-
selves. But in Asia in the 1950's
the struggle is between Soviet
Communism with its far-spread-
ing influence, and United States
commerce, with its great wealth
and energy. The battle, it seems,
will be joined, directly or by
remote control, in the countries
of other people. The struggle for

countries. Hitler's threats
against

LONDON, July 13.
Since the United Nations has

influence in Asia threatens to
develop in lands inhabited by
Koreans, Chinese, Formosans,
Japanese, Vietnamese, Malayans

and Burmese. The United States,
the Commonwealth countries and
all others that have supported the
United Nations resolution on
Korea, should not be carried away
by the exhilaration of action to
such an extent that they cease
thinking what they are doing in

Asia. ,
The United States and _ its
associates, can win the struggle

against Communism in Asia so
long as they conduct their resis-
tance to Soviet penetration with
the interests of the aspiring mil-
lions of Asia always first in mind.
No military consideration is
important as these
responsibilities. ;

as
political

the expense of the Formosans, This
is an immediate test of the good
faith of the United States toward
the people of Asia, President
Truman has ordered the U.S. 7th
Fleet to prevent Communist in-
vasion of Formosa. To show that
the United States is conducting the
world struggle for the sake of
humble and suffering millions it
is essential that Chiang Kai-shek
should be, immediately, shorn of
political power, He rules nobody,
but the unhappy Formosans; he
represents nothing but his own
ambition,

There are tnree tasks before the
United States in dealing with the
remnants of the Nationalist Kuo-
mintang regime.

The first is to take the civil
administration of Formosa entirely
out of Chiang’s control. This
would be a logical step following
the declaration that Formosa is
regarded as still Japanese territory
“pending a peace treaty.” Formosa,
then, would seem to be a respons!-
bility of General MacArthur's
command, in Tokyo.

The second task is the termina-
tion of the international status of
the Nationalist regime His con-
tinued representation in the Se-
curity Council is aiding the Soviet
Union in her prime interest in the
Far East—to keep Chinese Com-
munists without any friends save
in Moscow. The United Nations
cannot play its proper part of ro-
flecting world opinion and resoly--
ing world tension while it pre—
serves, within itself the outworn
fiction that the Kuomintang group
speaks for the millions of China.
To remove the Nationalist Chinese
rump from international councils
is politically perilous. A weak U.S.
government could not dare attempt
it. But since President Truman’s
declaration the United States gov
ernment has consciously gained
prestige, Now, surely, is the time
to bring the Security Council (and

* Russia) face to face with reality

Chiang Kai-Shek, who dominates
the island of Formosa, must not
be permitted, any longer, to
oppress the islanders and to quar-

ter his army on that rich island at

The third duty is to disarm, and
gradually to disperse Generalis
simo Chiang Kai-shek’s armies in
Formosa, The island is now, in
reality, defended by the United

ROBERTS

States Navy. The British Royal
Navy could be associated with this
task, The Nationalist Generalis-
simo’s command, could not be
more hated than it is by the
islanders, Its exsistence remains a
constant threat to a peaceful settle—-
ment. Generalissimo Chiang is one
of the few powers in the world
admitted to have an interest in the
outbreak of a Third World War.
He threatened recently to declare
war on the Soviet Union. His army,
navy and air force should not be
allowed to remain an organised
unit under irresponsible command.
But there are indeed, grave diffi-
culties. Most of Chiang’s troops
would like to return to their main-
land homes. All except high
officers would have, probably,
little to fear from Chinese Com-—
munism, But they might, it is true,
be a foot loose multitude ready to
swell the Chinese Communist
armies. It is hard to believe that
the reported demobilisation of
these armies does not still leave
room for trained men. And if they

were disarmed in Formosa and
their pay from Chiang’s gold
hoards ceased, they would turn

te marauding through the island.
In any event they present a prob-
lem, But the problem must be
faced, Chiang’s command must be
removed and his forces controlled
or disposed of. By grounding the
eir force, taking over the Chinese
navy and forming “interim de-
fence corps’ of some troops in
Formosa the job can be done. T. V
Soang is already in the United
States; his sister and her husband
might join him on condition that
they do not attempt a “Govern-
ment-in-Exile.”

Prompt and forceful action is
needed in Formosa to emphasise
that the United States is acting in
the cause of freedom in Asia. The
emergency decision to patrol the
sea between Formosa and _ the
mainland, terminating both the
blockade and the possibility of
Communist invasion of Formosa
was in the right direction. But it
must be followed by firm political
demonstrating that the
States is not giving aid
cour to Chiang Kai-shek

action
Unit





















Federation

(Continued from Advocate, Friday, July 14)





t “ ae
aac « ‘ ‘ v

s peep Abt Bk pry anne Ceneuae Heew
WadbaGad LO Chae AKERS LD. She eeasewe sraseasnete,
wie AS PeopUlsi Vie Luk Wuae ElabvsCeilicase Vb Cveeeeine
MEA ars AIEEE Me A AER Cot We tee nb enew SH eeeeâ„¢
wslicn, > Cos CAkAeL PeopusosOasey diduot
Prebeay ae Pes ettlCathas A copesosbarery,
v Cfo an ie CULUiIeS Citta beer
Watad FOR Ueki tae a prover

Apect lo sale steve their iteceutet ‘They

avbek bee y

Ces bate eee UU five, ded aa askin

auClais DacKing aS olmer exporters to the United
sawugdom receive Pom weir GUveriinerits,

hace, accuiVe

Ad ila Over yuLe Wail tel Uappser Wises Wie WSL
tne Dominions, can look to their own
wovernment in negouaung wiin tue Guvessaiticty OL
sne United Kingaom, because are ail anx.0Uus
wat peopie in tne Colomes wno export tneir goods
o us should receive tne lalrest possipie consiuera-
uon. No less important will be tne help tnat a
central Government can give the West indies in
planning the economic development of the wholq
«egion. Everyone agrees that these territories are
still far too dependent on a single export crop, but
the present unbalanced economy cannot be success-
fully diversified without the most careful co-ordin-
ation of development plans. The size and location
of secondary industries, such as textiles and cement,
both of which I saw in the initial stages when I
was in the West Indies last year, and the planting
of additional cash crops should be centrally planned
in relation to markets and production costs. The
attempt to achieve a better balanced economy
without some degree of supervision at the centre
would lead, I fear, to business failures and the im~
poverishment of the region. Other important eco-
nomic functions of a central administration would,
of course, be concerned with Customs and currency.
[ should hope it would be possible to maintain the
British Caribbean as an area of internal free trade,
a recommendation which was made by the recent
Customs Commission. Of course, that would impose
a common tariff, related to the preferential margin
for Commonwealth goods, on imports from outside
the region. It might also be possible to issue a
common currency, based on the West Indian dollar,
which would be of considerable convenience for
travel and trade.

As I have already remarked, a great deal of
regional economic co-operation is possible, and will
continue to be possible, without political union, but
this is only so long as the whole area remains with-
in the jurisdiction and under the influence of the
Colonial Office. The larger territories are rapidly
moving towards self-government, and it is most
unlikely that even the present amount of joint con-
sultation and common action will continue in future
unless they join a Caribbean federation. I think
it is fair to say, without claiming too much, that
although federation in itself could not make the
West Indies more prosperous it would at least pro-
vide the most favourable political conditions for the
best use of the region’s economic resources,

4 shouid now like to pass for a moment tu te
polllical case Lor leuerauion, It 1s interesting to note
«nat in alming at a lederal centre as the next slage
vt their evolution towards Dominion status, tng
west Indian ieaaers have cnosen a slep familar in
ene conslutuuuonal history of the Briusn Common-
wealth, ‘he same path has been successfully 1015
sowed in times past by Canada, Australia, Soutn
Africa, India and takistan, Federation has provid-
ed the cement needed to build self-governing com-
munities, which have since become ‘strong and
united nations, out of social groups too small and
too weak to stand alone. There is every reason to
suppose that in similar circumstances federation
will serve in the future the same nation-building
purpose as it has served so well in the past.

The present circumstances of the West Indian
territories are, broadly and very roughly, similar
to those which led the Australian States and the
Canadian Provinces to unite before they reached
full nationhood and economic partnership as self-
governing members of the British Commonwealth.
Not one of the West Indian Colonies, save possibly
Trinidad—and even that only so long as it can find
oil—could possibly afford to pay for an indepen-
dent Administration. The wide range of social
services which the Welfare State has added to the
cost of administration and defence are far beyond
the means of any of these poverty-stricken commu-
nities, Their revenue may become unbalanced after
a single hurricane or drought, and of course they
are always exposed by their single-crop economies
to the fluctuations of the world’s markets for prim-
ary products. This means that unless they can cut
their administrative costs by sharing the cost of
nationhood with their neighbours, by pooling the
costs which self-government would impose upon
them, they would find themselves as soon as they
became self-governing, dependent on other countries
for services now rendered to them by the United
Kingdom. It is inevitable that these small com-
munities when they emerge, as emerge they will,
from Colonial status, should combine for survival
with some larger group. The only alternative two
federation would be a special relationship with
some power on the American Continent. But they
know full well that in such a relationship they
would lose the substance of their political inde-
pendence. That is why they are looking to federa-
tion as the only hope of combining genuine self-
government with equality of status in the Com-
monwealth and among the nations of the world.

I will not labour the political or economic case
for federation, as I believe that the principle is
widely accepted. What I would ask your Lordships
to consider for a few moments is the timing of this
constitutional advance. Should it come now, imme-
diately, or would it be better if it came in the

aunaies, like

we

near future? Would it be better still if it werg|
postponed for a fairly long period of years?
I admit that this question would be an

extremely impertinent question to ask, if I were |

siiggesting that the House should form a final
opinion without waiting to hear what the West
Indian Legislatures have to gay on the subject. I
have no doubt that their views will greatly influ-
ence whatever is decided about the introduction of
a federal Constitution. I cannot imagine Parlia-
ment’s refusing to sanction the introduction of fed-
eration, if all the West Indian Legislatures decide
that they want it, or trying to force the recalcitrant
territories into a form of political association which
they actively dislike. At the same time, everyone
agrees that it is vital to the success of federation
that its introduction should come at the right
moment, It seems a suitable time now, before any
territory has committed itself to a definite date, to
form at any rate a provisional opinion about the
time when federation could be launched without
incurring the possibility of shipwreck

(To Be Continued)


































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JULY 15, 1950



TO-DAY'S. SPECIALS
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Black currant Jam in B'tles

Bramble Jelly .... in B’tles.

Strawberry Jam ..in B’tles.

Raspberry Jam .. in B'tles.

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Carrots, Celery, Turnips,
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——

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———___.
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Royal ‘ Chocolate
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Plums
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Strawberries
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Currants
Frozen Salmon
Milk fed Chickens
Sweet Breads

Crown Drinks are the best

ORDER NOW FROM GODDARDS.





SATURDAY, JULY

15,

1950



Fire Gutted
4 Houses On
Thursday

OUR HOUSES were complete-

ly destroyed by fire on Thurs-
day. One at Dovers Gap, Christ
Church destroyed a double-roof-
ed boarded and shingled house
valued $1,000 and furniture to the
value of $800 belonging to Beulah
Nicholls. She was occupying the
house at the time of the incident.

The Fire Brigade turned out,
but on arrival on the scene it
was discovered that the flames

‘ already had complete control of
the building,

The second fire occurred at
Bridge Cot, St. George, and de-
stroyed a boarded and shingled
rouse with shed roof and kitchen
attached, valued $1,440. It is the
property of Inez Pollard.

Neighbours tried hard to con-
trol the blaze but, were unsuc-
cessful.

It is alleged that a spark from
a coal pot started the fire. Pol-
lard told the Police that she was
ironing clothes. She left the coal

pot at the entrance of the shed-
roof and went about 50 feet
away. Shortly after her grand-

daughter called her and told her
that the house wags on fire.

The other fire occurred at Wes-
ton, St.’ James, at about 2.45. p.m.
it destroyed a boarded and shin-
gled house belonging to Louise
Marshall. This fire also caught
and destroyed a double _ roofed
house valued $800 belonging to
Edna_ Clayton, Both houses
were occupied by their owners.

The Fire Brigade turned out
under the command of Superin-
tendent Grant.

O FAR 8,050 DRIVERS and

197 conductors have renewed
their licences. A clerk at the
Traffic Department told the
Advocate yesterday that they are
still expecting more within the
next few weeks.

ATHERS AT GRAVESEND

make full use of the Bath
Shed especially on Thursdays and
Sundays. This Shed was for-
merly situated at the southern
end of the beach but the Head-
auarters of the First Barbados
Sea Scouts has taken its place.

The Bath Shed is now at a
central position in easy reach of
everyone using the area to bathe,

Standing at Gravesend, be-
tween a group of casuarina trees,
is an old one-roofed house which
many years ago was used as a
bath shed.

Before the erection of the new
bath shed many bathers made use
of this one, but now that all have
deserted it, it has a weather
beaten appearance. It may only
be a short time before it topples
over and becomes an eyesore to
the casuarina walk around it.

UGUSTA GREEN of Water-

ford Tenantry reported the
loss of $205 from the same home
between the 3rd and 10th of this
month.

ORK on the new St. Joseph

Post Office is progressing
rapidly. Recently the building
was being painted and it is
understood that it will be opened
shortly.

R. C. W, RUDDER, Police

Magistrate of District “B,”
recently imposed fines of 10/- and
one shilling costs, each on two
motorists and two women who
were reported by Cpl. G. Cyrus.

Sgt. Inniss prosecuted for the
Police.
They were: Gerald Dyal of

Kensington New Road, St. Mich-
ael, who was fined for driving
the motor lorry G—133 on South
District Road, St. George, on May
11 with canes projecting 20
inches on the right side,

Herman Forde of Brereton, St.
Philip, was fined for driving the
motor lorry G—272 on South Dis-
trict Road on May 11 with canes
projecting 20 inches on the left
side.

Finally, Evalina King and Eur-
rie Smart of South District were
fined for making a disturbance on
South District Road on May 11.

ANY MEMBERS and friends
are expected to turn out at
the Y.M.C.A., on Sunday at 4.45
p.m. when Mr. Frank Moore will
be the speaker at a _ Religious
Service.
ANY YEARS AGO Barbados
had a Y.W.C.A. but it was
closed in 1921 after the building
in which it was situated was sold.
On that occasion the Y.W.C.A.
was at Trafalgar Street and the
late Mrs. Edith Trimingham was
tne Secretary
At present a group of local
Social Workers are getting ahead
with plans to form another

Y.W:C.A.

ABS ARE GOING
4 date and there is very little
work in that line for the coach
kuilders. Mr, R. L. Harper, a
coach builder and blacksmith of
Greenfield, told the Advocate yes-
terday that occasionally he would
receive a few cabs to repair, but
“they are gettiig old fashioned
with Barbadians.” The shop in
which he works was situated in
Greenfield for 40 years,
Another blacksmith of Bedford
Lane, Greenfield, said that nowa-

OUT of

days there is very little work for)

the blacksmith. He was a black-
smith for 25 years and used to
do a lot of repair work to ‘
ders” and hand carts.

He said that the majority of
repair work at present is done to
bread-cart wheels and “as for
horse shoeing, there is actually
none of that.”

RICKET FANS always like to

/ see large scores on the score-
board but how many of them
ever tried to find out where, how,
and when the score tins are
made?

A man was seen under a shed
at Greenfield yesterday painting
some of these tins. They are for
a new scoreboard at Carlton
Cricket Club.

|
VERTON MAYNARD of Cane

Garden, St. Andrew, rermrted
the loss of a pocket watch valued
$10. He told the Police that it
was removed from his
residence at the sarne address
tween 7.30 p.m. and 10.30 p.m
Wednesday.

be-

|
}
;





spi-|



mother’s if

on | very
’ taili
failings.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Pleads Governor At

Queen's College Speech Day

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor, speaking at Queen’s
College Speech Day yesterday, called for an end of “this
snobbery of colour by nearly all shades of the community.”
The Governor’s plea was endorsed by the Lord Bishop
when he moved a vote of thanks later in ‘the function.

The performance of

selections from Gilbert and

Sullivan’s “Mikado” was one of the highlights of the pro-
gramme, and Nell Hall, June Smith, Shirley Clarke, Gillian
Reed, Joan Drayton, Shirley Seale, Mary Brathwaite and
Ann Raison did some acting that drew rounds of applause

from the audience.
The costumes were lavish,
and reflected the resplendent

barbarity of the Orient to an

extent that should have made

any photographer present

wish he had a_ technicolor

camera

The programme opened with
the playing of the National

Anthem as the Governgg arrived
attended by his Private Secretary.

!Seated on the platform with the |
Governor, were the Lord Bishop,

Mr. Glindon Reed Director of
Education, Mrs. Donald Wiles,
Mr. D. S. Payne and Miss L. N.
Trimingham, Acting Headmis-
tress. The Governor and Miss
Trimingham was each presented
with a bouquet. ;

The school song, “Fiat Lux”
was followed by a song sung by
the Middle and Junior School,
“Count Your Blessings”.

Mr, Reed, who was Chair-
man, welcomed the Governor
on what was the latter’s first
official visit to the school. He
@xpressed regret that Mrs.
Savage was. suffering from
chill and was unable to attend
He wished her a speedy recov-
ery.

—
Scope Widened
The Governing Body were
pleased to see so many parents
present, Mr. Reed said, and added
that he had intended to use the
opportunity to tell them how the
scope of education was being
widened, so that it would be a
preparation for more interesting
life in the future, He realised,
however, after seeing the attrac-
tive bill of fare that Miss Trim-
ingham had prepared, that it was
unnecessary for him to labour
that point.

He then requested her to deliver
her report.



Mrs. ‘Trimingham delivered
her report, which was often
punctuated by the applause of
listeners, especially when she
dealt with the achievements of
pupils of the school.

The Games Captain also re-

ported on matters in her sphere.

Prizes and certificates were
presented by the Governor, and
then the Governor delivered his

address. He said: — $
Governor’s Speech!
He said the report on the

School year by Mrs. Trimingham
reflects the deep devotion to duty
of an overworked staff owing to
constant changes of personnel,
the usual high standard of
academic results and the success-
ful ancillary activities of a school
of this kind. When we realize
that these achievements have
been won in spite of a back-
ground of inadequate accommo-
dation, we have good reason to
congratulate sincerely all those
who by individual effort have
helped to maintain, and indeed
enhance, the reputation of
Queen’s.

You would wish me, I know,
to make a special mention of the
work of Mrs. Trimingham, In
studying the records, I find that
this is not the first occasion on

which she has acted as Head-|

mistress.’ I know from personal
experience the difficulties arising
from an extended period of act-
ing in someone else’s shoes and
also arising from a shortage of
staff.

But rest assured, Madam, that
when Mrs. Corbin returns she
will find the College has made
all the progress in her absence
she would have wished if she had
been here herself.

Perhaps little irrelevantly,
the present plethora of Speech
days has reminded me of the
story from Canada of a man sit-
ting at dinner in a hotel.

He noticed another man sitting
alone who first laughed, and then
cried and finally waved his hand
and he kept on repeating the
process,

Curiosity got the better of the
observer and he walked across
to the other table and said, “Ex-
cuse me, you are a stranger here.
Can I help you?’

The man replied, “No, thank
you. The truth is that I lead
a very solitary life in the back-
woods and have formed a habit
of telling stories to myself. When
they are amusing, I laugh, and
when they are sad, I shed tears.”

a

“I understand” said the ob-
server, “but what is the waving
of the hand indicate?”

“Oh,” said the man, “I do that
when I have heard the story be-
fore"

Something New

You will appreciate the diffi-
culty of a Governor endeavouring
to say something new and to a

purpose on Speech Days. But on|

this occasion when the lack of
accommodation prevents the girls

from being inside this building,
IT shall take the opportunity to
speak primarily to parents.

The influence of a home on
the younger generation can-
not be overestimated and
there can be no doubt that
the standards of truth, justice,
patience and affection which
we parents practice in our
lives and in our homes do not
pass unnoticed by our chil-
dren.

If we fail to respect each other
we are hasty in our judgments.
we criticise’ our neighbours or
repeat rumours, our children are
liable to develop similar

f
if

But if we are just in

all our words



and actions our
children will be fair in their
dealings.
| 1880, 1910—
|
° 6
Different?
Also, adapt yourselves to
modern developments as they

affect your children. I remem-
ber my great grandmother say-
ing how different the girls were
| in 1880 compared with those in
} 1910

I heard a similar criticism by
my grandmother and my mother.
And now you and I are saying
exactly the same thing. Our
children have greater opportuni-
ties for development than we
had.

Many of us are making sacri-
fices in order to give our chil-
dren the best education we can
afford, but I beg you not to re-
| Jax your efforts when they leave
school. You must encourage
them to continue their learning
in every way open to them, The
more they learn the less they
will be bored the more in-
terest they will take in what is
going on and still more they
will play a part in the develop-
ment of the good in Barbados and
in the suppression of evil,

I realise that to mention
colour in Barbados may be in-
viting criticism and by a new-
comer perhaps it is dangerous.
But I do plead for an end to
this snobbery of colour by
nearly all shades of the com-
munity, No good can come of
it. Cast it out from your
hearts and your homes and
teach your children that as the
children of God they are no
better in His eyes than any
other children. I know it is
infecting school life in some
degree and it must be removed
for it is insidious in its growth
and development,

As there are no pupils listening,
may I mention in conclusion the
important matter of a holiday to
celebrate this occasion. I have not
taken legal advice in the matter,
but from the prospectus of Queen’s
College included in the Education
Act of 1890 it states merely that
there shall be one whole holiday
given at the middle of each term.

But there is no provision in the
law for any supplementary holi-
days. However, if you, Mrs.
Trimingham, are willing to risk
spending a period in prison with
;me, I hope you will give the girls
the usual holiday at an opportune
time.

The Lord Bishop moving the
vote of thanks complimented Mrs.
Trimingham on her report and
said he hoped that all the things
she had asked for for the school
would be granted in due course.
He hoped that when a hall was
granted it-would be large enough
to accommodate both parents and
teachers on Speech Days,

The Bishop then thanked the
Governor for presenting the
prizes and for delivering an ex-
cellent address, Where the ques-
tion of colour snobbery was
concerned he endorsed every-

thing that the Governor had
said.

Headmistress’
Report

At the beginniag of the School
Year, Queen’s College was still fill-
ed to capacity with 368 on the total
roll. In the Junior School there
were 74, in the Main School 294.
The number in the VIth Form
has risen to 29, and this increase
will continue, since Queen's Col-
lege has become a centre for pre-
piring girls from other Schools
for the Advanced Course, and
University Entrance and Scholar-
ship Examinations, We are very
glad to have a_ flourishing VIth
Form, but it becomes an impossi-
ble task for one Mistress to deal
satisfactorily with three sections
jot it at the same time, that is,
j with #irls rapging from Scholar-
jship candidates to new entries
jfrom the Vth Form, Some girls
are bound to suffer, and a teacher
will tend to feel that the Scholar-
snip candidates have the priority
to her attention.

On the whole, this year has
been a difficult one where staffing
has been concerned, Mrs. Whe-
well came to help us during Mrs.
Corbin’s absence, but was forced
to leave in February, in order to
accompany her husband to Eng-
land. During the short time she
was with us, she endeared herself
to everyone, and identified herself
with Queen’s College interests in
la tr-ly remarkable ay Since
her departure, ave had a
bewilderine number of helpers.












we

he











“Colour Snobbery Is Affecting
~ Sehool Life—Cast It Out!” |

j

Training and Games
| College since Mrs
|}Although Miss Hope
ja much more lucrative
town, she loyally decided
jr at Queen's College
j}we could obtain a qualified G
nastics Mistress, We are all very)
happy to be welcoming Mrs.
Wotton back in September, and
we rejoice that Miss Hope has
been accepted for a three years’|
Course at Bedford Physical
Training College in England

The Old Girls’ Association has
decided to show its appreciation
of all that Miss Hope has done for
Quec.a’s College by presenting her
with the interest on its Scholar-
ship Fund, which has been ac-
cumulating for many years, and
hes now reached the sum of £100.
This seems a unique opportunity
for some further award or exhi-
bition, as Miss Hope has been
admitted to the College, only on
the strength of an undertaking
that she will return to teach in
Barbados.

Miss Gwen Cumberbatch,
has been on the Staff of
College .in an acting

at Que
Wotton
was offered!

post in

n-








who
Queen's
position

since 1948 has this term been
appointed to the Staff of the
Church of England High School,
Grenada, We miss her buoyant
spirit, but congratulate her, and
wish her every success in her

future career, Miss Gloria Cum-
mins, B.A., hag been appointed to
fill the vacancy at Queen’s College
in September, and is now in Eng-
land completing her training for
the London Teacher’s Diploma
We shall welcome her back
one of our most gifted Old Girls
Meanwhile, Miss Patricia Moore,
B.Sc. from McGill University, has
joined the Staff as a_ relieving
teacher until the end of this term
while Miss Patricia Zephirin,|
tome on vacation from McDonald
College of McGill University, is
also helping us. Miss Sheila Pil-
grim hag been on a year’s study
leave, training for a Teacher's
Diploma at Erdiston Training
College, and during her absence
Miss Patricia Hope has given alje
and loyal service in an_ actif
position on the Staff of Queen's
College. Miss Patricia Hope has
secured an entrance into the l'ni-
versity College of the West Indies,
and I understand that a scheme
under consideration by the
{Government to inaugurate a loan
lfund to assist promising stucents
{from Barbados, so we do hope
}that it will be made possible for
her to read for a degree there

is



re

is



In the absence of Mrs. Corbin and
Miss Sheila Pilgrim, noble work
has been done by Miss Daphne
Hackett in the organisation and

teaching of Senior French

A year such as this, tests the
Staff to the maximum and I
should like to record my grateful
jthanks for the faithful, resource-
ful attitude they have adopted in
al! emergencies, with special
mention of Mrs. Adams for the able
and ever-cheerful way she has
helped me and the School as Act-
ing Deputy Headmistress. The
support of the Staff has not only
sustained me _ personally, but
augurs well for the continuance
of the high standard set by
Queen's College,

We have again had a successfu)\
year. in Examination results
Twenty-nine girls out of thirty-
two entries passed the Cambridge
School Certificate Examination,
with varying Distinctions in Eng-
lish Language, History, Geogra-
phy and French, details of which
may be seen in the Programme
|Five gained Exemption from the
| Matriculation of the University of
London, while three others com-
pleted their Exemption, two, by
adding Distinction, and one by
adding Credit in English Lan-
guage, to their 1948 Certificates.

Three girls out of four obtained
the Higher Certificate of the Ox-
ford and Cambridge Joint Board,
jtwo of them, Austin Clarke and
| Daphne Pilgrim, reaching Exhibi-
| tion standard with Distinctions in
| Histcry, and Melnese Bridgeman
has passed the Entrance Examina-
tion to the University College of
the West Indies. To crown this
year’s Academic successes, Dahne
, Pilgrim has gained an Open Schol-
| arship, awarded by the University
of the West Indies, The University
offered six scholarships for the
whole of the West Indies and
Daphne was the only girl and the
only Barbadian, to obtain a schol-
arship. Both Barbados and
Queen’s College are proud of the
honour she has brought to us, and
; we have deep pleasure in congrat-
ulating Mr. and My Pilgrim
{ being the parents of the second
girl in the Island to secure an out-
Standing scholastic achievement
In 1946, Elsie Pilgrim was the
first girl to gain the Barbados
i Scholarship and has this year been
awarded a further grant from the
Barbados Government to carry on
research work for her History M.
Litt at Girton College, Cambridge
Another of our Queen’s College
Old Girls, Pamela Fox, is also at
Cambridge doing research work in
| History, for her History Ph.D.
after having obtained her





for

and various Distinctions at McGiil
University. Elsie and Pamel:
studied together in the VIth Form
at Queen's College and, after go-
ing divergent ays, have met us
room-mates

both engaged
torical research.







‘Girton
Advanced

at
in

College,
His-



Ne

ern one ee

In The Courts Vesterday :

Woman Fined £2 For
“Abominable Language”

THE DECISION of Mr. I
trict “A” who ordered Euger
pay a fine of £2 and 3/- cos

{. A. Talma, Magistrate of Dis-
1e Watson of Passage Road to
ts to be paid in seven days or

in default one month’s imprisonment with hard labour for

using indecent language nea
confirmed by their Honours
H. A. Vaughn, judges of th
yesterday.



in St. Peter:

Fishermen
Net Large
Catches

ISHERMEN WERE returning
to the beaches and market of

Speightstown with big catches of
pot fish during the week

At various spots along the beach
crowds could be seen gathered
around “moses” to get their home |
supply

Ningnings, cooks, snappers
grunts and other kinds of small
fish mixed together brought the
fishermen 16 cents for each pound

Once or twice during the week
the housewife couki change the
dish with jacks which were
caught in good numbers by the
Seine Boat.

Flying fish were not in abun-
dunce as they were a few weeks
m@_O

R SSIDENTS OF Speightstown
complain of the untidiness of
the streets and dustbins which
line the sidewalk |

Gutters of the principal streets}
jike Church Street, Queen Street,



|

Round-the-Town = and Orange |
Street are swept once or twice}
per week

During the other five days, fruit}
skins, small stones, leaves, bits of
paper and other bits of refuge lit-}
ter the streets. ;

The dustbins are emptied on
Sundays only, when the majority
of them are full to overflowing
They are not too enticing in odour,
especially when rain falls. Flies}
are encouraged to swarm around |
them

I] N DISTRICT “E” Police

Courts, His Worship Mr. S
H. Nurse imposed few fines dur-
ing the week

The highest of them were two
20s. fines imposed on Westerman
Bowen of Cave Hill, St, Lucy
He was convicted for blackguard-
ing on Queen's Street, St. Peter,
and for resisting Island Constable
Elder Whitehead

Set Connell

case

prosecuted the

CART DRIVEN by Gladston
Smith of St. John was in-
volved in an accident with a bi-
cycle ridden by K. Bayley of Cane
Garden, St Joseph, yesterday
about 2.30 p.m. on Wakefield
Road, St. John
The cycle was
Bayley injured
LADEEN SMALL of
Hall, St. Joseph, was in-

jured when she was involved in
an accident with the bicycle own-

damaged and

Drax |

r Halls Road on April 18 was!

Mr. J. W. B. Chenery and Mr
re Assistant Court of Appeal

Their Honours told Watson that
the language she used was abom-
inable and she could be sent to
prison. They however hoped that
she will not reappear before them
on such a charge.

Another case brought by Watsoy
against Vivian Barrow of Passage
Road for using indecent language
to her and which was dismissed on
its merits by the same Magistrate
was also confirmed by Their Hon-
ours, Both were ordered to pay
the costs of appeal, Barrow 7/-
and Watson 8/4.

THEIR HONOURS MR. J. W. B.
CHENERY and Mr. H. A. Vaughn,
Judges of the Assistant Court of
Appeal yesterday confirmed the
decision of His Worship Mr. C. L.
Walwyn who put Irvine Brewster
of Bush Hall on a bond for six
months for making threats to Ger-
trude Sealy on April 24.

Sealy in her evidence said that
she was in her shop at Bush Hall
on April 24. Brewster came in and
purchased some red _ herrings
Brewster did not like the herrings
offered to him and a dispute fol-
lowed in which he promised to
shoot her and leave the island

Brewster was also ordered to pay
the costs of appeal which amount-
ed to 5/8.

THREE PERSONS WERE Y&S-
TERDAY placed on personal bonds
ranging from £2 to £5 for bodily
harm and assault when these cases
were brought up for hearing in the
Police Courts at District “A”.

Seventy-six years old Mary
Baptiste of Dash Road was yester-
day placed on a bond for 3 months
in the sum of £5 when Magistrate
G,. B. Griffith found her guilty of
inflicting bodily harm on Vicklyn
Griffith on June 19, Baptiste, who
said that her sight was bad, was

| seated in a chair when placed in

the dock. Before passing sentence
the Magistrate asked her to re-
spect her age and to see that no-
thing of that sort should happen
again,

A similar bond was placed on
Vicklyn Griffith of the same local
ity when she pleaded guilty of in-
flicting bodily harm on Mary Bap-
tiste on June 19

FOR ASSAULTING AND
BEATING Prince Gill, 18-year-o'«
Livingstone Belgrave of Harmony
Hall Road was placed on a bond
for 3 months in the sum of £2,
when he appeared before Magis
trate H. A .Talma.

MAGISTRATE G, B. GRIFFITH
yesterday dismissed the case
which was brought by the police
against Theophilus Dyal for ex-
ceeding the speed limit with the
bus M 1028 along Black Rock on
April 10. Dyal was represented
by Mr. J. E. T. Brancker.

gardener of Eckstein Village ap-
peared before Magistrate C. L
Walwyn on
were valued

rots which



ed and ridden by Ashby Phillip
of St, George, about 4.52 p.m
yesterday on Church View Road. }
Road

eer na
eB uw

PETS |.

a PURINA LICE POWDER and s
PURINA INSECT KILLER

; on July 14, the

FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR



“ase was dismissed

and Donelly was subsequently dis-

charged

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| To all of them we are grateful Best Wishes % ora e activities of the Statue s Patent Dancing Shoes $6.45
jespecially to the Old Girls of fix
Gueen’s College who have rallied We offer our best wishes to them | R * ear FOR LADIES:
jround us in our need. But even|both, and to all who have one x of Our Lady of Fatima from the |
|Queen’s College Old Girls cannot| forth from Queen’s College to] % 2 ' Dress Court toe-less Shoes Black or White $5.40
jall be philanthropists, and after | win success, especially remember- | X time of arrival at Seawell— | Crepesoled Loafers in Brown $5.80
a little while they have drifted|ing Denise Watson, who has just | $ ' FOR CHILDREN:
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town where it i yjossible to|for the highest marks in the Final | ¢ ‘ ' Many new styles for be r irls
secure a salary of twies th» almost | Examinations at the Royal Victoria | § Orders are being taken now— nee ne ayes
|regligible amount offere+ to be-| Hospital, Montreal. To Miss |X FOR BABIES:
ginners at Queen’s Cellese! These | Zleanor Nurse, Old Girl of Queen’s $ ? ad
2 = ene as e Sta} College, and a most energetic and | % . ‘repesoled Strap Shoes in Pink, Blue, Red and
ae ere: i a Ane faithful member of the Staff, we | & Come in and look them over at ¥ | White, Sizes 3, 4, 5 $1.80
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with Miss Mould in her efforts to London B.A. General Degree (it | & %
maintain a high ndard in the jis fitting that Miss Nurse has been | $$ % 4
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of these drawbac re, I/lege at a most important three] & K NIC HTS LY D ‘IS
must pay a_ glo to| weeks’ Summer School in Trini- | . % % SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD
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I cessfully organised the Ph al @ on page 7 PPP PEP MAA AM A\L AA LPL LLLP LEED PLE LPL SN







1

4



PAGE SIX



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON
























Se el eed |

MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY
ar __{ YEAU... AND, BROTH UNDY ae riarey | i
AM I GLAD SE OF OM =



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WITH WHICH HE LOADED a HER MIND AT REST
i

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Dy Weoni aetee betes Sadeoenena Lemna ore ee en tet, PET a
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HIS EAR, THAT LONG-HAIRED GENT FLEW OUT
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Ex] ° back if you return the empty
= package. Act now!

Cystex:::!');
sa BLADDER

The CUARANTEED Remedy RHEUMATISM





ileal
ey Wi
AA rN





Cocoa going overside
from a ship in the Port
of London Docks with D
what looks like little or is the most difficult,
ceremony, but the staff it is safest in the experi-
of the Port of London enced hands of the Port
Authority know the de- of London Authority—
sree of care required there it has the added
to handle this valuable advantage of reaching
commodity. Whethera the latgest consumer
product is easy to off-load matket in the world.



My eyes often used to smart and

At the Club Jim said “You're
sone after a day's work Sometim probably suffering from a touch of
leven had to stay late to get finished eye strain. Why not try Optrex?”






5) 2
So I took Jim's advice Every day *“No-eye strain now!” | said to Jim
1 used Optrex—washed away dirt later. “Thanks to you and Optrex!
and germs, toned up eye muscles Vil never be without it again.”

PROTECT YOUR EYES wzzé

pr

Al









|
|
|
i
|



EMM esee





SATURDAY, JULY 15,



1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.

Telephone 25/8.









IED
BRATHWAITE D serdé at Layr
Road Brittons Hil MARGA
AUGUSTA The funer leaves
late res ri 4 o'e' oc t ning
for the Ch Missior cle
and thence to the Westb |
Friends are invited
Joseph Lar F c :
M
15.7. 5¢ |
MORRISON —Y¢
centenary Host Ge F
retired Hieadr
Boys’ Schoc Feie
me Saint Matt «



ings, at 3.30 o'clock
past Three) and 4
service will proceed io the West
Cemetery

Ethel Morrison ‘wife



Constance
“ Morrison
hi.dren Dr







who was cz
July 1939
and Quietly sleeping
green 1



Lies the one we
One we loved and
To you who have
Cherish her
For you nev
Until you see her
May she rest in peace
Ever remembered by
Aubrey



and
in







FOR SALE



AUTOMOTIVE

CAR — 1947
working order,



Vauxhall Car,
18,000 miles

in perfect
Dial 8412
14,7.50—3n

CARS—One 1942 Dodge Car, one 1938
Morris (10 H.P.) in good condition
Apply to Cosmopolitan Garage, Magazine
Lane. Dial 3915 15,7.50—2n.





CAR One Morris 8 H.P. Saloon Car

Apply S. F. Clarke, Ainy Hill,, St. John
14.7,50—3n

CAR—Vauxhall, Velox 18 h.p. Per

fect Condition two tone paint work



trunk specially fitted for the better

carrying of more luggage. Ring R. S

Nicholls Home 8324
28.6.50—t.f.n

Office 3925



PLYMC H
sound mechanic condition,
also licensed Can be
Service Station, St

STATION WAGON - in



good tyres,
seen at Rocklyn
Andrew

14.7.50—3n



ELECTRICAL

BENDIX WASHER#— ment just received. Book
without delay. Dial 3878
Co. Ltd.,

ship-

your order

DaCosta &
Department
15.7.50—6n

Electrical







CEIL ING FANS 110 Volts,
with Speed Controller Dial
Costa & Co., Ltd
ment



Electr ae Depart-

5.7,.50—6n





ICE CREAM DEEP FREEZER In “good
at Ralph Beard's Auction
Open Daily
14.7. .50—3n

working order,
Rooms,
8 a.m

Hardwood
to 4 p.m

Alley



PLANT—One Petrol Electric Lighting
Plant 110 volt DC 500 Watt.
H, M. Lampitt,
John,

Apply
College Savannah, St.
13.7.50—3n



REFRIGERATOR—Canadian
2 years old 5
perfect condition
Cook

Leonard,
guarantee, in
leaving island

years
Lady
Telephone 8493

14.7.50—2n

FURNITURE

Very



Reea Fibre Settee
settee; 2 Rockers,

Removable Up-
Price $75.00

attractive

Suite, consisting of
Armchair, End Table
holstered Spring Cushions.
Phone 3331 after 4.30 p.m.
14.7.50—3n



MECHANICAL

B.S.A. BICYCLES, Ladies and Gents,
various Models. REDMAN & TAYLOR’S
GARAGE LTD

BICYCLE — Ladies Raleigh Sports
Model in good condition. Tyres almost
new. Light Model — Easily ridden
uphill Phone 3437





























ELECTRIC F FITTINGS — A large selec-
tion for you to choose from at reasonable
prices. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.,
Electrical Department

15.7.50.—6n.





SINGER TREADLE MACHINE—Can
be seen at Brick House, Bay Street,
opposite Beckles Road. Phone 2968
15.7.50—In

TYPEWRITERS—"Olympia” portable
typewriters — standard keyboard. Price
$120.00. A. G. St. Hill, James Street.

13.7,50—In

LIVESTOCK

cow One milch cow, 3rd calf, 14
days old. Giving 40 pints daily. Apply
to F. E. C. Bethel, Friendship, St.
Michael Dial 4184







14.7.50—3n

“TWO HORSES—Mares both over 15
hands, vewy quiet and are accustomed
to Plantation work. For price etc
Apply: J. C,. Payne, Harrow or phone
3344. 15.7.50—Bn.
ee

MISCEL) ANEOUS



AVON —Silent Tyres for Motor Cars,
no crying on Corners, also TRUCK
HEAVY DUTY TYRES. All sizes..

REDMAN & TAYLOR'S a at:

7.50—
f ‘BATTE! RI 2S— Oldham, these are sold
with a Guarantee. REDMAN & TAY-
LOR'S GARAGE LTD. 14.7,.50—3n



RECORDS—Ne hipment
just received $1.05 also Music, Music,
Music with Theresa Brewer and The
Dixiland All Stars

LASHLEYS LIMITED





CALYPSO



- Pr. Wm. Hy. St

15.7.50,—2n.
forty eight
and get.



CALYPSO RECORDS,
titles, only ten each, come
them

A. BARNES & CO. LTD
15.7.50—T.F.N

‘ESCHALOT “Special price for large
quantities Apply JOHN D. TAYLOR
& SONS LTD. Dial 4335.

13,.7,50—3n

———$——_
GENT’S BLACK EVENING SUIT —
English made, in good condition. Height
5 feet 10 inches, Chest 38 inches, Also
two Dress Shirts, Practically new
16-inch Collar. Phone 4215
3.7,.50—3n.
———
GALVANIZE Pipes 1%, and 2 inches
also Galvanize flexible conduit in sizes
linch and 1% inches. Enquire Auto
Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone
2696 . 8.7.50—t.f.n

JACKS-—For Cars and
One Ton to Twelve Tons

Trucks, from
REDMAN &





TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD
14.7.50-—3n
JUICES—Pineapple, Orange Orange
end Grapefruit, Tomato and Orange
Earley Water. W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck
Street. Dial 3489 4.7.50—2n
JAMS AND MARMALADE—Peach,
Pineapple Plum, in 2lb tins, Golden
Shred, Scotch Orange and Silver Thread

Glass Jars. W. M
Dial 3489
14.7, 50—2n
LADIES PLASTIC RAIN COATS—In
plain colours and fancy designs $2.18
and $3.98 each Thani Bre Pr. Wm
Henry and Swan Street

Lemon in 1lb Forde,

35 Roebuck Street

14.7.50—3n

———
OIL COOKER American perfectior
draft proof front 4 cupboard, almost
new. Lady leaving island. Cook. Tele-
phone 8493 14.7, 50—2r



“ONE (1 Large Div th B
Cc be used as a bed Dias

15.7.50—In





HOUSES

BENSTONHURSE

rom the Ist



Marine
August. For part



t

14.7.50-—3n

FULLY FURNISHED

BUNGALOW
On the seaside,

( Prospect, St. James
3 bedrooms. From Ist August to ap-
Froved tenant. Not less than 4 months.
for particulars ring 2759

11.7,.50—3n

———$—
Pine

nid St0 embe
ion Phor. e














LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series 9
Oto4 Finder please return same

Sydney Sickier, C/o Central \Foundry's
vVeck Yard





iOL ATC With
at the back of the case are the
BFL Reward oifered to
Advocate Advtg. Dept

initials
finder at

15.7.50-—-2n
re

PERSONAL

The pub3Zc = 86 are herqoy
against giving credit to my wife Mary
Best ‘nee Weekes) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or amyone
else contracting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a written order
signed by me

Signed SAMUEL BEST
JONES LAND
Black Rock
St. Mic! 1
15.7,.50—2n







warned









NOTICES





NOTICE

“S.P.C.A — meeting of the Society, for members
only, is to be held at the Y.M.C.A.,

Pinfold Street, at twelve noon on Satur-
day 15th July, 1950. Purpose; to
consider an amendment to the society's
constitution 13.7.50—2n



NOTICE

TENDERS for conveying paupers
{a) From any part of the Parish to the
Almshouse.
(b) From the Almshouse to the General
Hospital will be received by me up to
July 18th 1950





W. U. GOODING,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip.
11.7.50—6n,



NOTICE

The last day for reveiving Tenders
for constructing a residence for a Paro-

chial Medical Officer on lands at
Edghill, St. Thomas, will be TUESDAY
Ist August 1950. The original date of
July 17th has been changed.
Rr. F. PILGRIM,
Parochial Treasurer.
15.7.50—2n





BARBADOS.
TRADE MARK CAUTION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
HENRY MASON (SHIPLEY) LIMITED
of Victoria Works, Shipley, Yorkshire,
England; Worsted Spinners and Manu-
facturers; are the owners and exclusive
proprietors of the following Trade

Mark:-
LANATEX

used upon “Cloths and Stuffs of Wool,
Worsted and worsted and Alpaca’, in
connection with the business of the
above named Company in selling the
said goods, that the said Trade Mark
has been registered in the Register of
Trade Marks kept under the Trade
Marks Act, 1938, (Imperial), and is
protected by law in certain British Pos-
sessions and Foreign States; and that
any infringement, fraudulent imitation
or improper application of the said
Trade Mark or violation of the rights of
the aforenamed Company in_ respect
thereof within Barbados will be dealt
with under the Merchandise Marks Act
1889 to amend the law relating to fraudu-
lent marks on merchandise or otherwise
as the Law directs
Dated this 13th day of July, 1950.
REGINALD W. BARKER & CO.
British and Foreign Patent and
Trade Mark Agents,
61 Cheapside,
London, E.C.2. England
for and on behalf of
HENRY MASON (SHIPLEY) LIMITED.
14.7. .50—3n



NOTICE

Re estate of
Deceased
JULIAN EGBERT BRATHWAITE

NOTICE is hereby given that all per-
sons having any debt or claims against
the Estate of JULIAN EGBERT BRATH-
WAITE, deceased late of Four Roads,
in the parish of Saint Philip in this
Island who died on the 15th day of
October 1948, intestate are requested to
send in particulars of their claims
duly attested to the undersigned Ettina
frcille Brathwaite, C/o Messrs. Haynes
& Griffith Solicitors No. 2 Swan Street,
Bridgetown, on or before the 31st day
of July, 1950 after which I shall produce
to distribute the assets of the deceased
among the parties entitled thereto
having regard only to such claims
of which I shall then have had notice
and I will not be liable for the assets
or any part thereof so distributed to
any person of whose debt or claim 1
shall not then have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their said
indebtedness without delay.

Dated this 3lst day of May, 1950.

ETTINA ERCILLA BRATHWAITE,
Qualified Administratrix of the Estate of
Julian Egbert Brathwaite, deceased.

2.6.50—4n





FOR

PANTS —
and made
Stripe Flannel:

SALE

Gents Pants ready made
to order in Grey & Pin
$6.20, & $7.05 per Pair
STANWAY STORE,
Lucas Street
15.7.50—2n







POOLE POTTERY—Now on display
in our Showroom comprises a delightful
assortment of hand decorated tea and
coffee sets, vases, cigarette boxes and
ash trays together with beautifully
modelled animal figures and sea bird
wall plaques. See them at
HARRISON & CO 12.7

MULLARD INCANDESCENT “BULBS,
Serew or Bayonet from 15 watts to 150
watts priced below popular brands

LASHLEY’'S LIMITED, Pr. Wm. Henry
Street. 15.7.50—2n





MULLARD
6 tube
Show
Street

RADIOS—See the NEW
Mullard Radio on display in our
Room at Prince William Henry
LASHLEY'S LIMITED.
15.7.50—2n

TABLE BU UTTER 1lb. tins and Sib





tins Nabo. See us for prices. John D
Taylor & Sons Ltd 185.7.50—2n
ee
TINNED FRUIT Grapes, Prunes
Apricots, Apples, Pineapples, Plums and
Strawberries in Tins, W, M. FORD
Dial 3489, 35 Roebuck Street
14.7.50—2n
WHITE E? MELLED WATER
COOLER 3 capacity useful in
Offices tions e, 12 only ir
stock a portations are
t ait t 7
oO $16.87 eact ob* n
HARRISON'S BROAD STREET
Dial—2364 7,50—2n





Gold band, |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



—

PUBLIC SALES

AUCTION

I have been instructed py whe Com-
missioner of Police to sell at Central
Station, on Monday 17th July at 2 p.m ‘ ta.
Twenty-nine (29) old cushion covers, tea = as







Advanced Course, in the VIth









C0) Obl: cdeliinkin, tees Gy agretciers. bean eas which .s being held ) Form. Furthermore, like Harrison
two (2) Telescopes, and several other |iN August under the auspices of |College, we need proper changing
items of interest : the Extra - Mural Department of |rooms for Games, and showers.
cdceraal a eaetee the University College of the West jand a Canteen. Girls indeed are

“13.7. 50—4n Indies in association with the His- |apparently more hungry than

| sie scabies _.. jtorical Society of Trinidad and | boys, for Mr, Hammond spoke of
Al CTION SALE OF MAYARO Tobago.) To Mrs. Hooper, former-|the boys round about 1.15 p.m
gine yc By oir ee abe onigy ly Miss Daly, our Science Mis- |“eating a sandwich which has
\“MAYARO", at Rockley, Christ Chu tress, we offer our felicitations on | spent the last five hours in a bag”,




which was set up for sale on the
July, was postpened and will now
Place next Thursday the 20th, at
o'clock

This house is in very good condition,
with pine floors and a shingled roof. It
has open verandah 7 by 22, drawing room
12 by 23, dining room 12 by 23, two +2:
bedrooms each 11 by 19, both with basins, |
back verandah 7 by 19, toilet with box
and bowl The only thing to lose in
this house is the lath and
Terms cash. It is your interest
to inspect house before the date of sale

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,

Auctioneer

but at Queen’s College I have had
\the pathetic story brought to me

her recent marriage to Mr. Hooper |
of the Cable & Wireless, Ltd. and |
wish her every happiness in her |of a girl destitute of any lunch.
rew life, hoping she will long re- ‘because she had eaten all her
nain with us on the Staff at |sandwiches at 11.15 a.m,

Queen's College.
. | This Year



Needs :
This year, the gfris have been
I now propose to follow Mr. |as enthusiastic as ever about their
|Hammond’s example, when speak- Ranger and Guide Companies,
ing of the needs of Harrison Col- and Brownie Pack. You will find
15.7.50.—4n. lege, and enumerate the very|an account of their activities i»
pressing needs of Queen’s Col- College Magazine, but I would
|lege. We also, need so many thing,|‘ike to take the opportunity of
UNDER THE SILVER —foremost a Hall large enough |thanking Mrs. Glindon Reed f»

|to accommodate the girls of jall her help with the Guides, and
HAMMER | Queen’s College as well as their

Miss Hazel Clarke with the
}parents on Speech Day! Secondly | Brownies. I understand that if
ten at {2 Reference Library and VIti|more Guiders were forthcoming,
“|Form Class rooms are required. | another Guide Company would be

4 pieces Spun is any odd corners of the Sghool

1 = formed at Queen's College? Inter
Carton Lux Carton | you may stumble upon VIth Form |House Sports have been keen!)





|
;
Fi

By recommendations of Lloyds
we will sell on TUESDAY, the
Mart High Street

33° Hats,
3 Cartons

3 Umbrellas,
Vim, 1




Rinse 101 pkgs, One O One, 9 Do :

Teething Powders 25 ting Sweet Bie |Students, even driven to seek |contested, and later the Game
13 Coalpots 44 Iron Pots, 14 prs | qQuietude under the trees — a new | Captain will give you her Report
also 1 G.E. Radio, 1 Gent: |“species of birds’ at Queen’s Col- The spiritual side of School lit

Bicycle and 40 Doz. Gal. Buckets

lege, as the “Collegian” so aptly | has not been neglected and we owe

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO..





Queen’ s College Speech Day ee

PAGE SEVEN





\



SALE



eir continual help, not or |
m ng arrangements for M
Fuller’s visit and in showing ed i
cational films to the
Main School,
erous gift of
prizes
During the visit of Her Rey
Highness, Princess Alice, to Bur-
ados, Queen’s College received $1
great honour when the Royal C:
|



weekly, and we are deeply grat
| tut to all those who 40 willingly
come to inspire us with their talks
} At the end of the December term,
the Scripture Union presented the
beautiful Christmas Mystery pla)
“Eager Heart,” and the production
was as helpful to those who had
the privilege of taking part in ii
as to those who came to see it
The proceeds from the perform-
ances of “Eager Heart” were giv
en to charities, and the girls, as
usual, brought toys and garmenis



Upper and
but also for the gen
valuable



boo



ORIENT
INTAL

CURIOS. voRY
JEWE LEERY
ESTRIES,



TEAK. SANDAL
RRASSWARE, TAP
GLOVES PERFUMES.
drove along through the ground KASHRMERE
imidst the ringing cheers of the
girls, and pausing by the cover-





to be distributed to the poor at /ed—way, gave Jocelyn Wiles time
Christmas. to present a Victorian posy to Her
Interesting Royal Highness. The occasion was

“SUNBEAM”

Leads the way with .

celebrated by a half-holiday, at
the gracious request of Her Royal
Highness

The Literary and Debating Soci-
,ety has continued to hold inter
Jesting meetings, sometimes accept-

ing invitations from the Actor



nd Science Clubs of Harris : 5 oe” $e
: ei ion 7 wes
College. Mr. Douglas-Smith, the Murderer W eeps CONTROL on Handlebars

Resident Tutor at the Extra~Mural

Only One (1)
Department of the University Co!-

ST. KITTS

George Herman Grey of Basse- — pmaining -
lege of the West Indies, honoured } torre want as the Judge pro- een oe
the History Vith Form with a/nounced his death sentence after Tuspection Invited

most interesting lecture on Ger-
many and has this week given a
special talk to some of the Senior
girls. We appreciate his visits and
his genial kindliness, more than
we can say, and are indeed sorry
that he is not able to be with us
this afternoon, Other visitors dur-
ing the past year include’ the
famous baritone, Mr.

the jury had found him guilty of
wilfully murdering Arthur Glas-
ford one hundred feet east of the
Folice Station on June 11, this
year

Grey who had no witness on his
behalf. although represented by
two counsellors, admitted that he
inflicted the fatal wound after be-

ee ee

«(hr ian Science }





|
|
i
i









; Frederick 7: yoke 5 » exte
styles e, a debt of gratitude to the Rever- . ‘ling provoked to some extent
Aucinadees — — cppertanities ty: be laen Cae er Wwosdsdot taking lou: Fuller, and the College Heralds, The quarrel arose over a young 4 hivading oom 6
wd “ih opened up for girls in the Vth aman Class, and to His who both gave song recitals to the | girl who claimed tpat she was
Ptah Form who have shown definite Lordship the Bishop for making girls, We owe a great debt of 8ra:- | friendly with Glasford for a short g 1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS >
REAL ESTATE ability for Science, to enable them {the arrangements. The Scripture itude to the British Council for period. (Broad Street)

A SMALL STONE BUNGALoWw..|to continue their studies in the !Union has continued to mec! Hours; 10 a.m.—2 p.m. b
Called Beverly at Britton’s Hill, with Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
enough land for flower and kitchen SHIPPIN ( Fridays
garden. .

Apply D'ARCY A. SCOTT ; OTICES 10 a.m.—12 o'clock.

15.7.50—2n

COLLEEN

Bedrooms, Dining and

Toilet and Bath,
walk to sea

interested





HARBOUR LOG

In Carlisle Bay

Situated in Worthing, 3
Drawing Room,
Kitchen. Two minutes
Special price to one
Apply: Apartment 5 Strath-



ARRIVALS—By

BWLAL



more, Worthing Guest House Gap Sch. Lady Noeleen, Yacht Leander, From TRINIDAD—E. Ford, F Johu
15.7.50-—2n, | Sch. Emanuel C. Gordon, Sch. Mary M.} son, J, Johnson, M. Johnson, R. Rei

- ~~~ -——____—_— —- —- Lewis, Sch. Philip H. Davidson, Sch |man, W Hudson, W Hudson, M
LANL Desirable building site at | Manua Burma D., Sch. Henry | pamdin, G. Yvonnet, E. Baiz, J. Wick
Graeme Hall Terrace Dial 3430 D Ww Sch. Harriet Whittaker, ham, R. Field, E. Holder, M. De Mont
1.7.50—t.f.n.| Sch. Turtle Dove, M.V. Blue Star, M.V brun, J, De Montbrun, M. De Mont

Caribbee, Sch. W. L
United

Eunicia, Seh./ pbrun, M. De

Mabel Boyce, Walter Bennett, R

\E Montbrun, L Fisher
ONE DESIRABLE PROPERTY at Pilgrims, Sch Zoileen, Sch Stone









Bridgefield, St. Thomas. It consists of | Frances W. Smith, Sch. Rosarene, Yacht] 4 stone, E. Benjamin
a stone wall house and shop, both in | Tern ILI From DOMINICA—Sheilla — Etienne
good condition. The house has water Bernice Etienne, Colonel Bloodworth
toilet and shower and stands,on 1% ARRIVALS From TRINIDAD—D Hive, R o
acres of land which is at present planted a f. A N. Gokool, P, Taylor,
with canes. friced fit to sell. Can be S.S. Lady Rodney, 4,907 tons net, ne OF Banfield, Martin,
seen ony day Capt. LeBlanc, from Dominica F. O'Neill, 1. Artherly, W. Wiltshire
DARCY A. SCOTT ; N. Patel ‘
15.7.50—2n DEPARTURES From La GUAIRA—Miriam — Lacie
eecee —— > S g wucie Ss h, R "
SANDGATE", Hastings, standing on Schooner Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 (tons (anny yohn Tater Lessing wages
2.940 square feet of land on the seaside| "€t. Capt. Every, for British Guiana From ST, LUCIA—Wilfred Cave, Doris
ot Hastings Road, schooner Adalina, 50 tons net, Capt Cave, Leonard James, Basil Barnes
The House contains, drawing and din-| Flemming, for St Lucia Ruth Barnes, Ida Fogelson
ing room, enclosed gallery on three}, Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt. | Eom spt. KITTS—Mr. Carl Blanchette,

King, for St. Vincent,

sides, two bedrooms with dressing
rooms, kitchenette, toilet and bath up-
stairs with usual rooms downstairs and
two flights of steps to sea. Gas,
ere and Water.

nspection y day by a intment
Phone: No. 2868 Pare tee “2

The above will be set up for sale to
public competition at our office on Friday

Miss R. Sprott.
From ANTIGUA—Winston Ward
Intransit For TRINIDAD—June Howes,

Clement Francis
From SAN JUAN-—Richard

Jocelyn Warren
DEPARTURES—By B. W. 1
For TRINIDAD—Mana M

Meza, Charles Lee, Grac

Passengérs arriving yesterday by the
S.S. “Lady Rodney” were from Boston
Ernest Alleyne, Claris Gipson, Clarence
King, L King, Neville King, Edith
Laurence. From St, Kitts-—Inez Malone
From Antigua—James Rae, Helen Rae
From Montserrat—John Eid, Annoe Eid,

Warren,

|

te

1s
EEN SN







the 2ist day of July 1980 at 2 p.m. | Prrold Eid. From Dominica—Augustine | a aina Taylor, Olive MacKay, ;

CARRINGTON & SEALY, | Defreltas, | George | Florant, LeRoy! macKay, Herbert Rogers, | Maicos

Lucas Street. | \yarchall. Era Rawle ? Shadack, John Peazer, Margaret Lewis,

11.7.50—10n r oT Brian Lewis, Gerald Lewis, Anthony

. euy 2 i , Lewis, Meriel Kinch, Nellie Massyn,

A Delightful Residence at TOP ROCK, | ,, Passengers lneving the island last night

pee Three Bedrooms with connecting

ollet and Baths, Breakfast Balcony ia sae 4 ay For ST. VINCENT -Edaline Neverson,

Large Sun Baleony, Modern Kitchen, ein ae ne 7 = ae Fred Thomas, Mildred Browne, Basil

Large Lounge/Dining Room. Outside } ) ; 7 . ‘| Browne, Margaret Manning, Gordon

* 3 p Dayis,
Two-Car Garage, Three Servants’ Rooms, aes a ie Wiitiishee Ride s Santor,

Toilet and Bath, Gardens well laid out
Fully Enclosed.’ For Viewing Ring 4683 | y47,,and Mrs. Wo A
or 8402. 14.7.50—3n | Mr, C.’ S. Durant,

S. A. Walke. For British Guiana—-Mr
and Mrs. K. KB. McKenzie, Mr. and

Mrs. K. R. Hunte, Mr. W. K. Atkin-
WANTED son, Mr, A. DeL. Inniss, Mr. 8S. J

Bernstein.

Crawford, Susan Coultas, Emma Coultas,
Else Thaysen.

For La GUAIRA—Aaron Schor, Norma
Otero, Luz del
Otero, Luz Otero,
sendra Savorgnan,
Roderic Savorgnan

For ST. LUCIA—Geraldine Murray,
George French, John Simmons, Aubrey
Douglas Smith.

For ST. KITTS—David Evans, Carmen
Miriam

W. A. Hadley, Mr, R
For Grenada-

For Trinidad—Mr Carmen Otero, Mlsa

Pablo Otero, Ales-
Rosette Savorgnan,









Ie



=

ELP .

A qualified NURSE for St.
Almshouse at a

Williams,
Flaharty.
Yor BRITISH GUIANA—Mr

Wilma Heyliger,

In Touch With Barbados

Joseph's

y the £ Rodney” were—for St, | James Grosvenor, Sylvia Grosvenor,
Vincent—Mrs. A. G. Hanschell, Miss | James Francis, J, Lane, A, Lane
Charles





salary of $60.44 :, . Burton, Mrs. Zoe Burton, Mr. John
month. Applications with Gartidenio’ te Coastal Station Gutch, Miss Lilian Shepherd, Mrs
be forwarded to the Parochial Medical Irene Miller, Mrs, Pearl Peters, Mrs
Officer, “Ellangowan,” not later than Cable and Wireless (West Indies) | Hettie Milby
Monday, 17th July, 1950. Limited advise that they can now com- For CIUDAD TRUJILLO-Richard Hart,
Any Further Particulars can be ob-| â„¢Mmunicate with the following ships | Gustavo Tolentino
tained from the P.M.O. through their Barbados Coast Station:— For GRENADA-—Rev Fr Patrick
A. A. B. GILL, S.S. Fort Townshend, S.S. Beech | Moore, Mr Joseph Harkness, Mr
Clerk, Poor Law Guardians, | Hill, S.S. Lady Rodney, S.S_ Stanbell, | George Roberts, Mr. Peter Jaffe, Mr
t St. Joseph S.S. Leme, S8.S. S. Mateo, David Outcalt
8.7.50—7n, | S.S. Temple Arch, S.S. Pa » § For ANTIGUA—Harry Drew
—_eaenmmed | icon Pennant, §.8, Elizabeth, 8.8 Arrivals by B. W. 1. A. on Thursday
“DEPUTY MANAGER—Required for | Sundale, S.S. Oakhill, S.S. Arkansas,}from B.G.—Mr. Jack Marson, Mrs. ;
small Sugar Estate in St. Vincent. |S-S. Silver Walnut, S.S. Patao, 5.S.| Stephanie Marson, Miss Mary Marson,
Young, energetic well educated man re- | Santa Ana, S.S. Esso Shreverport, SS. | Mr Francis D’Almada, Mr Donald
quired Future prospects good", Trajanus, S.S Franca Fassio, 5.8 Armstrong, Mrs Letitia Armstrong,
Apply to Mount Bentinck Estates Ltd Canadian Challenger, S.S. Maurienne, | Miss Elaine Evans, Mr. John Blanchard,
Kingstown, St. Vincent. $.S, Gascogne Mr. Robert Jaisingh

12.7.50—Tn
GOOD EXPERIENCE GENERAL



ais





Se Pee ih asttor GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Cave Hill, St. Michael.
14.7.50—2n.
TENDERS FOR PURCHASE OF GAS COOKING
MISCELLANEOUS APPARATUS



GAMES—One (1) Badminton Set. One
(1) Croquet Set. One (1) Deck Tennis
Set. Phone 3753—3421.

Tenders are invited for the purchase of one (1) No. 6 standard
electrically driven AEROGEN Petrol Gas Generator with 1/3 H.P.
motor wound for 110 volts. 50 cycles, single phase supply: complete
with burners and stove. The equipment is at present housed at
Erdiston Teachers’ Training College, and may be inspected by appoint-
ment with the Principal.

15.7.50—1n 2. The original cost of the apparatus was $2,609.70. In addition
"WANTED IMMEDIATELY to the price tendered, the purchaser will be required to pay Customs

PUPS—Good breed. Pair preferrea,/ duty amounting to $262.
Dial 2525 , 15.7.50—1n 3. Tenders should be forwarded in sealed envelopes addressed
to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so as to
reach the Colonial Secretary's Office not later than 4 p.m. on Friday
the 28th of July, 1950. The envelopes should be clearly marked
“Tender for Gas Cooking Apparatus”,

OLD SEWING MACHINES—Out of 4. The Government does not bind itself to accept the highest or

use, of any make. Apply: Mrs. |any tender.
Vaughn, King’s Street or Fairchild and : §.7.50—2
Probyn Street. 15,7.50—2n eee a

11.7.50—3n,
Retired elderly man seeks position, can

assist in office and be of some value in
many other ways Some experience in
hotel business.

M. E. M. C/o Advocate







HOUSE, furnished or unfurnished
near the sea, Minimum 5 to 6 bed-
rooms within easy reach of town,
Reply H. G. c/o Advocate.

16.7.50—3n .











VACANCIES FOR TWO ASSISTANT AGRICULTURAL
SUPERINTENDENTS, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BRITISH GUIANA.

Applications are invited for two vacant posts of Assistant Agricul-
tural Superintendents in the Department of Agriculture, British
Guiana,

Particulars of the post are as under: —

Salary

rising to £625 per annum by annual incre-

is Wise!

£500 per
ments of £25

annum

Qualifications and Experience
Applicants must hold either—
(i) a degree or diploma in Agriculture, and have some experi-
ence in agficultural extension or farm management; or
(ii) the Associateship of the Imperial College of Tropical Agri-
culture or a degree or diploma in Agriculture with post
graduate training at an Agricultural College.
Allowances
Travelling and subsistence allowances will be paid in accordance
with the Government Regulations in force.
Probationary Period
Appointment to the posts will be on twelve months probation. |
When confirmed in the appointment the officers will be placed on the
pensionable establishment, and will be liable to contribute to the Brit- |
ish Guiana Widows and Orphans Fund at the rate of 5% of the mnxi- |
mum salary of the post by monthly deductions from salary. ; |
2. The successful candidates will be engaged in the extension |
service of the Department of Agriculture or on projects operated by |
the Department, |
Applications giving full name, age and details of qualifica- |



She has Gas for Cooking

High Blood Pressure
Kills Men & Women

Twice as many women as
fer from High Blood Pressure, which
is a mysterious disease that starts
| about the time of Change of Lite amd and
| is the real cause of much
and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
| mon symptoms of High Blood Pres-
| sure are: Nervousness, headaches at
top and back of head and above
pressure in head, dizziness, 3
breath, paing in heart, tation, ’









this Room the Bible: and

is Christian Science text-book,

=



MONTREAL,
LAND



AUSTEKALIA, NEW
LINE LTD., (M.A.N.Z. LL ,
SS. cone Ge. tae M.V. “DAERWOOD”

sails The ,
Adc laide May 19th. Melbourne June will accept Cargo and Pas
ind, Sydney June Mth, Brisbane June sengers for St. Lucia, St.



Selence and Heaith wika Key to

the Scriptures by MARY BAKER
BDDY



may Ye read,
or pun hased

Visitors Are Welcome

borrowea



4th arriving at Trinidad about July 2ist Tince lren: a i
S.S. “PORT WELLINGTON" » sails ea renada, and

July/August. Brisbane early August ruba, ate of Sailing to

be given

Melbourne mid July N. Queensland
The M.V-. “CARIBBEE"

Shnets inid August arriving

Sout 9th § bl

ou h September. will accept Cargo and Pas-
An-



Trinidad



These vessels have ample spuce tor Yr
chilled, hard frozen and general cargo u e Offer
-

sengers for Dominic
Cargo accepted on through

tigua, Montserrat, Nev



and *



SS









bills of
‘acing with transhipment at Trinidad for St Kitts Sailing "ride
in s s Sz g Friday ¢ ™ rre
British Guiana, Barbados, Windwvaesel and ih fish, ; | 2-lb, Tins DANISH HAMS
W.L Sch TY
FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD., lines ee 14 ozs, Tins APPLES (Irish)
ents, Trinidad %, i

DA COSTA & CO. LTD., Consignee; Dial: 4047 Tins MIXED VEGETABLES
Agents, Barbados. edie. ; a
r

» CHIVER’S BEETROO"

» FRUIT SALAD

HARRISON LINE

I OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM:

_—

SiVAR? & SAMP



ON

Vessel



From Leaves Due

* “ATLA i Barbados LTD.
ee “GORE .» London Ist July 14th July Headquart
ss. “mp a .: Liverpoo! Sth July 19th July ae ee eee

S. ECIALIST M/Brough & : j

London 8th July 27th ; ; ere

S.S. “HISTORIAN” Silas July 23nd Jul SeeoneCer ey
38. ! ; aszow 8th Jul 2: ; ss POCOP SOK POCO
S.S. “RIVERCREST” .. London 15th jay sath ie

HAVE YOU GOT A

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM:

Dea corecrnatey ror Closes tn Barbados COLD or COUGH
“TAC N” 1 tentil haks on
: “CRAFTSMAN” London. 20th July IF SO TRY



22nd July
For further particulars apply to

DA COSTA & CO., LTD—Agents.

7“ Steamship Co.

BROWNE'S
CERTAIN COUGH
CURE







“7 a +4
OO Pe











ey ‘The Unique Remedy for Coughs,
Colds, Bronchitis, Sore Throat,
Noi ur seness, 1chial Asthma,
Ync. g Wha 1 Disease of the
ss Chest and Lungs, etc., ete,
NEW ORLEANS SER,10K x
al”
‘
ALCOA MUMMER aut dus * See TON ENO Wem
. . 2 y une
ALCOA SANGER 12th July 25th July { Wholesale & Retail Druggist
a 20th July Lith Aug % 136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813
4s
& y \
fn YORK 65 aly GOCCEILEOS
‘ N.Y. s dos - —
3S “BYFJORD" Brahe | 30th June 12th July
THULIN 12th July Bist July

FOR

SALE

ee



CANADIAN SERVICE

can ee
|

SOUTHBOUND
Sails















Sails Arrives
sia) Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Barbados
8.8 “ALCOA PILGRIM" June 26th June 30th July ith
8. “ALCOA PENNANT” July 7th July 10th July 22nd
S.S. “ALCOA POINTER" July 2ist July 24th Aug Sth
8.8. “ALCOA POLARIS" Aug, 4th Aug 7th Aug. 17th
ies ponacal IN NEVIS
NORTHBOUND
Arrives ‘ \
Barbados 248 Acres, Animals & Cotton
8.8. “ALCOA POLARIS" July 4th For Montreal Ginnery, Dwelling House — con~
twining 4 Bedrooms, Drawing
These vessels have limitedpassenger accommodation. Dining & Breakfast Rooms,
Kitchen, Lavatory & Bath,
————e with running water Flectric
Apply: DA COSTA & CO, LTD.—Can adian Servire. throughout, Store Build-

ROBERT THOM LUTD,.—New York and Gulf Service.

{ Apply to R. R
Wm. Fogarty Ltd

Neen

Light
ings in yard
For further particulars:—
(
MALONEY
t





SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS
From Montreal, St. John, N.B., Halifax, N.S.




























REAL ESTATE







To Barbados, Trinidad, Demerara, B.G.
Loading Dates Expected JOL me
Montreal Halifax Arri Dates
Barb
S.S. “MARIA
De LARRINGA 28th June 3rd July | 19th July Ly |

S.S. “POLYCREST”’ Mth July | 19th Jul 4th August e
S.S. “BRUSH” 26th July sist July 16th August

BLADON

AFS

PLANTATIONS LIMITED—Agents
,FVA
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

PINE ESTATE—Modern 2 torey
property ound t ted of
coral block tone with steel
casement window Verandat
lounge breakfast mm large
kitchen, 3 be toilet and

Fence P This

most new





ne



PASSAGES TO IRELAND

Antilles Products Ltd., Roseau, Dominica, offer passages to
Dublin per M.¥V “DUALA”, next sailing from Roseau about
20th June, and thereafter about every thirty-three days.

Single fare, £70, usual reductions for children.

Apply direct.






unable

for

LEE-TON-ON-SEA

A start

bui onto. a. sand
with excetlent
There i 1
extending
bedrooms
I haped
bar, kitct
quarter








bathing fac
wide front ver

BARGAINS :=—
MANILLA ENVELOPES 614” x 394’
PAD LOCKS

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY AND HARDWARE



$3.50 per L000
from 12c, each



SILVER SPRAY er
tone built
alow with large
and wide vheh

Sands.
droom





WE'VE GOT THEM ...



poor sleep, ioss of memory energy, i 5 2g > srience, accompanied fF w pce ag) ials, should |
Gasily excited, fear and worry, If sem | One and experience, accompan »y two recent testimonials, should |

|

|

suffer any of these symptoms, dea’t | be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Agricul- |
your life may te Intdasesr tenes |ture, Georgetown, British Guiana, marked “ASSISTANT AGRICUL- |

| (formerly known as Hynox), a sew | TURAL SUPERINTENDENT” and should reach him not later than |

| medical discovery, reduces Blood

| Pressure with the first dose, takes a | 3st July. 1950

wae fouk pokne de meee Ske 4. Applicants already employed in a Department of Agriculture

| Gee Noxco from your chemist ez. in the West Indies, should submit their applications through the nor- |
aud trong of malar — toa mal official channels

l z 15.7,.50—3n. |



DECCA & BRU INSWICK RECORDS

All the latest hits

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Foundry Ltd.—Proprietors)

for quick sale




REAL ESTATE AGENT
Auctioneer & Surveyor
PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640

(Central
Cnr. Broad & Tudor Streets






Saturdays. h
4

SS



}
i)

{
i

\

O44 4448 Oe
AMAA

+
na Loy

(eo tet

LLSSS















,



* PAGE EIGHT

W.I. Gain Another
Decisive Victory

Ramadhin And Valentine
| Bowl Out Leicestershire

WEST INDIES (for 2 wkts. dec.) 682
LEICESTERSHIRE 352 and 8]
LEICESTER, July 14

Taking full advantage of a rain affected pitch, Sonny
Ramadhin and Alfred Valentine the West Indie
bowlers, completely demoralised the Leicestershire bats-
men here to-day. Following a spate of rungetting on the
first two days during which 989 runs were scored for the
loss of 6 wickets, Leicestershire to-day lost sixteen wickets
for 126 runs in 3 hours and the West Indies had an unex-

eee

fctonaomemet § BG. Wins
Anchor Cup

Al Bisley







spi



trotted casually to the wicket and
tos$ed up a subtle variety of bre:
so-well concealed that the Leices-
tershire batsmen were forced to
laugh at their own mistakes
Charles Palmer, for instance, was
outwitted twice in the match by
the same type ball, a vicious off-
break which on both occasions he



made no attempt to play LONDON, July 14
A bright sun, which helped to British Guiana won the Anchor
dry the pitch, assisted the spin Cup Competition, organised by the
bowlers to such an extent that West Indies Rifle Association and
even when the new ball was used fired at the Bisle ranges in
for Leicestershire’s second inn- Surrey today
ings, Valentine was brought on British Guiana and _ Trinidad
with his leg-breaks after only twe tied with 816 points each, but
overs, 3ritish Guiana were declared the
Beautifully controlled length and winners be ause they had _ the

Spin repeatedly deceived the bats-
men, and Ramadhin’s second inn-
ings performance of 6 for 27
brought his day’s total to ® for
43 and in the match he took ten
for 117.

Leicestershire added only 45 to

highest score at the longer range
Jamaica scored 813 and Barba
dos 788
Teams from all four colonies
competed in the event, over 300,
500 and 60D yards, which is nor-
mally held in each colony in turn

their first innings this morning, ; t ir r es
Valentine at one point taking 3 me as rar = aig tA ah a
wickets for no runs with prodi- °°Or® © < won the Wogal up
gious leg-breaks. The only pair for the highest individual score
to offer resistance in the county i" the match after a tie—shoot
second innings were Palmer, stay- With Mr. E. Crooks, (Trinidad)

ing 65 minutes for 20 and Walsh —Reuter

Their stand of 27 was the best ate ee
The Play 13 Ti *
Valentine and Ramadhin took eams

complete control for the first time
im the innings this morning, their
spinners moving viciously off a
pitch slightly affected by rain
Batsmen made mistakes in thetr
attempts to master the spin. Val-
entine, off whom no run was
scored in the first forty three min-
utes, took three for 14 im jrfinet
overs and Ramadhin two for 16

Play To-day

An unprecedented field of thir
teen couples filed entries for the
mixed-foursomes which will start
at the Rockley Golf and Country
Club to-day, with many of the
high handicap competitors prom-

Following on, eee ising to make the matches com-
avoided further = or nad pletely unpredictable. The drav
eet seule. Rbdgived an itt made Thursday night, includes

een able to axe > aR seven husband-and—wife combin
a oe i gg ations, one father-and—daughter

erry to try & i >

peir and one.engaged couple
The father and daughter team

E. Shirley Atwell and Miss Faye

Atwell, with a combined handi-

finished in Walcott’s hands in for-
ward fine leg position. After two
overs by Gomez, Valentine came
bn with the ball still new and had

cap of 44, came out at the top of

Watson caught also by Walcott. ; aes 7 ae
Beautifully controlled length tl e draw and will mec t John
é N Grace and Miss Katy Lenagan,

and spin, with the batsmen re-

tedly deceived, brought an- Whose handicaps total 32, in the
ea : seived, i : ~” Sgt no

Biner collapse, half the side being i e Meares "Cpattetiee, ie an
dismissed for thirty three. Mar- © 7 5 allenor, 1



gaged couple, who have an aggre-
gate handicap of 16, meet Mr. and
Mrs, J. C. Hotchkiss, who have
just returned from B.G

shall caught Tompkin very nearly
on the boundary, and the skilful
Jackson, drawn into a bad stroke
gave Jones an easy catch, Then
Lester was entirely beaten by one

of Ramadhin’s astonishing off- Other Games







Other first round matches bring
peas. wo Smiths fell to succes- together Mr. and Mrs, L. J. Mas-
sive balls from Ramadhin, Ken kell and Col. and Mrs. Richards
became the first legbefore victim Vidmer, the former, pair having a
of the match and his namesake total handic ap of 25 against the
played the next delivery on to his latter's 12; Major Denis Lenagan
stumps. and Mrs, W, MacIntyre, handicap

Walsh had his escapes but sur- 35, against Mr. and Mrs. H. V



iv: / > ogged Palmer King, handicap 42; and E. J. Petrie
wnat a. eae this point, 13 and Mrs. Brenda Wilson, handicap
wickets had fallen for eighty-nine 25 gainst James O'Neal and Miss
runs to-day and Ramadhin’s Winnie Barnes handicap 50, These
second innings figures were 10—6 matches must be completed on ox
a 808: before next Tuesday, July 18

Mr. and Mrs
and Mrs, N, T.

Jean Iverson, Mi

» innings lasted only half an
ape nriogs nee Williams and Mr

hour after lunch and West Indies

innings = 249 r >» D. McDermott all

y an innings and 249 run and Mrs. f ‘
a ove the + ings a dying drew byes and will not go into
kick by taking eight in an over action until the second round,
from Valentine and then lifting which will be completed on next

him for six. Saturday

Palmer having stayed 65 min-
utes for twenty was again bowled
by a ball he did not attempt to
touch from Ramadhin, who also
coolly took the final eatch from

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R W
Jone 21 ; 55 1



ar si screen, tO Gomes 7 “1 0
Sperry near the neem a rform- Ramadhin 403 14 90 4
set the seal on a great perform- (iene ce’ ee ant
ance. His eight Ti aes Worrell i9 2 _ ®
uns ¢£ is total] bag Was) Marshall 2 a6
eost 43 runs and hi " “LEICESTERSHIRE 2nd INNINGS

10 for 117.

"es: Berry
Following are the scores c

Wat

Walcott b Jones 5
e Walcott b Valentine 6





: Tompkin ec Marshall b Ramadhin i
Ist INNINGS (for 2 wkt Palmer b Ramadhir 20
bis vane’) : Jackson ¢ Jones b Ramadhin 1
Lee yalentne ssc LK Smith b Ramadnin :
> & b Valentine : ama 2
ita ¢ Goddard b Jones n J. Smith b Ramadhin 0
} ae b Marshall 7 Walsh not out 24
pone, eens b 9 Wooller stpd. Christiani b Valentine 4
Palmer b Ramadhin Ps t
Jaekson b Valentine 56 Sperry e Ramadhin b Valentine L
8 a Extras ;
Lester b Ramadhin
K. Smith not out a ack “i
J. Smith ec Walcott _b Valentine a

Walsh c Marshal} b Valentine







“ 0 Fall of wkts. 1 for 10, 2 for 14, 3 for 24,
Woollen b sae . 16 4 for 26, 5 for 33, 6 for 41, 7 for 41,
Sperry b ah rh. 3 24 «68 for 68, 9 for 7
Extras b. 16, , BOWLING ANALYSIS

352 Oo. M RW

Total Jones 7 2 13 1

3 for 166, 4 for 263, 5 for 317, 6 for 317, Ronadnin $6 ace PG
7 for 216, 8 for 318, 9 for 318 —Reuter,









= arenes eer ER RS oe ent

| They Do it Every Time

Dociviernd Uf Motes OMen





/ ANOTHER ONE! AREN'T THEy )
( A-DORABLE? SO NEAT
| AND CLEAN“ EIT FOR
Racha
ro

SK ANY MOTORIST:

THE CABINS YOu
PASS ALL DAY ARE
SPIC, SPAN AND VERY
INVITING **s5



/ BUT WE'VE 6OT TO.
STOP HERE. THE GUY AT
THE GAS STATION SAID
IT’S THE ONLY ONE FOR 2
NINETY MILES prop

Bur WHEN IT STARTS
my TO GET DARK: WHAT
VO YOU FIND, IF LUCKY?

THANK TO

“A FRIEND”

ROCHESTER,
») of NY



= one eee

(2

i. Ai y










tHE
table

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ENTRANCE OF THE MIKADO. The picture shows part of the caste which delivered a credi-
performance of Gilbert and Sullivan's “The Mikado” at Queen’s College Speech Day yesterday.
‘The central figure is Ann Raison, representing the Mikado of Japan.

The figure bowing at the left

is Shirley Clarke, who played the role of Koko, the Lord High Executioner

STOUTE STILL TABLE
TENNIS CHAMPION

LOUIS STOUTE of Barna

crown when he defeated Fr
the odd set in five in their Table tennis tournament at the

Y.M.C.A. last night.

but service changed at 16—14 in
Willoughby’s favour.

Service later changed at 18—17
again in Willoughby’s favour and
soon after a series of beautiful
forehand slams by Willoughby and
well timed “cut” returns by Stoute
brought great applause, Willough-
by eventually won 21—18 to put
himself a

Club retained his “A” Class
ank Willoughby of Pelican by

game nearer to the
crown,

Willoughby, who exhibited a series of well timed and actu- | Stoute played with more con-

rately placed smashes, carried off the first two games but :idence in the thitd game. While

Stoute, the more experienced, played calmly and won the

last three

His Excellency
accompanied by Mr
Private Secretary,
His Excellency
trophies

At the conclusion of
tev. A. E. Armstrong,
of the Y.M.C.A,,
Excellency

the Governor,
W. Lambert,
attended and
presented the

the games
President
thanked His
for attending and said
that he was glad that the tennis
His Excellency had seen was of
such a high standard,

He pointed out that it was the
first time he had the opportunity
of witnessing a Table Tennis tour-
nament and had enjoyed the eve-
ning

He

said that there will be
forthcoming changes in the
Y.M.C.A. and he hoped that when
they attended the tournament next
year it would be in a more spa-
cious hall
Hon. Robert Chailenor, Patron

of the B.T.T.A., said that the bovs
had put up a good show for Kis
Excellency He was attending
these tournaments for many years

and this was the best he had s
He congratulated Stoute and s
that he had seen Stoute playing
at the Y.M.C.A. for so many years
that perhaps Stoute must be older
than he. Mr Challenor said that
he would like to see more schools
taking an interest in the game

Thought He Was Good
His Excellency then said that
he had always liked table tennis





because it was a game that he
and his family enjoyed. Prior to
seeing last 1 1's games he was

of the opinion that he was a good

table tennis player but he has to
think differently now He regret-
ted that Mrs. Savage could not

attend because she was not fee)-
ing well

He then presented the trophies

Of the other three sets that
were played last night. Harper of
the Modern High Schoo) became
Boys’ Champion, Corbin “B” Class
Champion and Greenidge by de-





feating Norman Gill. the “Handi-
cap” Champion The last men-
tioned set was hard fought. Both
players gave s00od ~=performances
but Greenidge was more steady

In the first t—the Boys’
Championships, Harper of the
Modern High School met Nurse of
the James Street Youth Club.

Nurse won the first game 21-17
but Harper played more confi-
dently in the second and won
21-18 to bring honours even

yin the third and final game ser-
vice changed at 9—6 in Harper's

favour By the time 25 points
were played Harper was five
points in the lead Nurse man-
aged to cui down some of the
lead but Harper however won

21—-17 to become the local Boys’
Champion

In the next set Norman Gill of
Everton met Campbell Greenidge
of Barna for the Handicap crown,

Gill started out very aggressive
beating Greenidge with+ some
well-placed forehand slams but

Greenidge, with his strong defence,
returned a few Gill however
kept up a steady and fairly accur-
ate atts and went on to win
21—15





=

Delights Crowd

In the second game Greenidge
took an early lead and _ service
changed at 10—5 in his favour,
He delighted the crowd with many
of his forehand flicks, especially
one which he brought from well
below the table
Greenidge had now

by gained

By

Jimmy Hatlo |





































Willoughby did the smashine he
returned them. He took an early
tead and service changed at 8—2
confidence and sprinkied his stub- (np his fave he kept this lead
born defence with a few surpris- 21—10 to open his ac-

slams.

us
and won

ing He won this game count

21—-13 to equalise the score I'he third game saw Stoute
He took the lead from early tn again playing defensively while

the third game Service changed Willoughby smashed. Service

at 15--10 in his favour. Gill’s again changed at 8—2 in his

forehand slams were now going favour Many of Willoughby’s

wide of the board but he however forehand slams were going wide

managed to come from 17—13 of their mark

and bring the score even. Green- Both players were very tired

idge took the lead but again they
equalised at 19 each. From here
it was all Gill and he won the
game 21—-19 to regain his tead in

but Stoute, who_is many pounds
lighter, appeared in better con-
dition, Willoughby recovered lost
ground anid service changed at



the set. 10 cuttin v 's
7 . ' sihie 4 —10, g down Stoute’s
The fourth game saw both play- lead by three points. However

ers on the defence. Greenidge Willoughby was never able to

again took an early lead. Service

P equalise the game and Stoute won
changed at 8—7 in his favour and 1 . 8

vos ial baled ii lena bY 21—17 to equalise the set.

he later increased this eat y Willoughby settled down in the
four points. He kept this lead fal game and took four points
and won 21-—-16 to even honours. cut of the first five. Stoute soon

Gill started attacking from, ftey equalised and went into the
early in the final game with his lead \
well placed forehand slams. Ser- Service later changed at 9—6
nee changed at five all but in Stoute’s favour but the first
Greenidge soon after took the/ 9) points were evenly divided.
lead, Greenidge was later leading When service changed at 17—13
by five points. He kept and won it was in Stoute’s favour, From

21—14 becoming Handicap Champ.
Next set was for “B” Class
Champ and in this Harold Corbin
of Abbey Marines met Phillips
The first game started very slow
Corbin had the edge and took an

here he gained confidence and 2t

20—18 he smashed his way through

to victory to retain his crown,
The results were:—

Boys’ Championship

early lead. Phillips threw away Harper beat Nurse 21—17, 21—

most of his points by inaccurate] jg 9) )7

smashing. Corbin won 21—15. He a .

finished the game with a brilliant b> Handicap .

Pe ‘ Greenidge beat Gill 15—21, 21

back hand flick, 13, 19-21, 21-16, 21-14
Corbin played defensively in the “2s , ae pee Yi

second game. He allowed Phillips
to do most of the smashing while
he made confident returns.

On one or two occasions Phillips
however bored through this de-

CONCERT |








fence but Corbin remained calm.

His cool disposition caused him to (Under the Distinguished
increase his lead when he won the Patronage of His
second game 21—18 Excellency the Governor

Mr. A. W. L. Savage, C.M.G.,
and Mrs. Savage)

After a tough battle Corbin won
the third game 21—19 to become
‘B’ Class Champ and guaranteeing





his promotion to the “A” next by the
vert ae BARBADOS CHORAL
The set of the night—‘A” Class SOCIETY



Championship match—was played
next. In this Louis Stoute of
sarna last year’s ‘A’ Class Cham-
pion, met Frank Willoughly of
Pelican

at the

(OMBERMERE HALL °

On Thursday, 27th July
1950, at 8.30 p.m.



Good Smashes

Early in the first game Stoute
lid the attacking with his hard
forehand smashes but Willoughby
played defensively and returned
the majority of these

Service changed at 7—3 in Wil-
loughby’s favour. Willoughby later
delighted the spectators with his
back hand flicks which he varied





Guest Artists:

Miss JEAN LAWSON,
L.R.A.M, (Pianist)

Mr. P. A. K. TUCKER
(Baritone)



round the table He kept the Hihteate hie air 7
lead and won 21—15, finishing Tickets may be obtained at

the Advocate Stationery
or from Members of the
Society at the following
prices:—

RESERVED
UNRESERVED ::

with a hard fore hand slam which
just bounced off the table

In the next game Willoughby’s
smashing was good and his timing
excellent On some occasions
Stoute could only watch the ball
go by without being able to make
in attempt to return the smash

Willoughby was leading but
Stoute equalised at 13 each. The
following two points were divided




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WEST INDIES PLAY |
DERBYSHIRE TODA

Derbyshire will be hosts to the
West Incies team to-day at Ches-
terfield, and they like many others

no doubt, realize that the visiting
combination is quite a good one,
that takes a lot of stopping, when
it gets started.

This is the final game, before
the West Indies enter on the third
Test Match, and everyone will
be putting the finishing touches
on their test match form, whoever
hey be

Seventh

This will be the seventh sixture
with Derbyshire since the initial
game in 1900, and only once have
the West Indies defeated the
county side. Not even in 1933,
when George Headley, then reign-
ing prince of West Indian bats-
men, scored an immaculate 200
not out did the visitors triumph
That game like three others were
drawn,

A quick look back reveals
that the 1900 game was drawn.
The scores were: Derby 234 and
182 for 6 wickets; West Indies
300 and 45 for 2 wickets. In the
W.I. first innings Percy Good-
man played a glorious knock of
104 not out, the only other
three figure innings made by a
W.1. batsmen,

Six years later the West Indies
were beaten by 5 wickets. This
was a remarkable game in that
C. A. Ollivierre, a member of the
1900 West Indies team to England
was then playing for Derbyshire,
and took a leading part in de-
feating his erstwhile colleagues.

The scores were W.I, 233, and
242; Derby 217, and 250 for 5
wickets. In the County’s last
innings Ollivierre’s 64 not out did
the winning trick.

Rain

The 1923 game was drawn. Rain
interfered considerably and small
scores prevailed. First the W.1I.
made 97 of which Leary Constan-



AUSTRALIA
LEADS CANADA

MONTREAL, July 14.

Australia gained a 2—0 lead
over Canada when their North
American Zone Davis Cup match
opened here to-day. Australian
Champion Frank Sedgman beat
Betnard Bracken 7-—5; 6—2;
6—1 and Ken McGregor defeat-
ed Lorne Main 6—1; 6—2; 7—5

—Reuter,

“B” Class
Corbin beat Phillips 21—15, 21
18, 21—19.
“A” Class
Stoute beat Willoughby 13—21
18—-21, 21—10, 21—17, 21—18.
Scorer: Mr. K. Herbert.

SSSSS .

Yh G

ANNUAL SPORTS
MEETING



on
Thursday, July 20th., 1950

at
1.15 p.m.

Final date for closing Entries
Monday 17th July.

SSOCSESSSS ROSES

COME ONE!
COME ALL!
























SATURDAY, JULY 135,

1950





666606464

PEF ITE

PEELE EEE

TO-NIGHT





.
x
tine made 60 not i l t 1%
replied wit I me is
bowling by ne ar P 1%
The W.I. had got 36 for 2 ets|@
when the allotted end of the game|%
arrived % y
The lone W.I. victor jate}R
came in 1928 and wa a keen % ° e e 6
contest from start to finish. Der -
led off with 159, and the W.r.|%
answer to this 155. Dert %

second try gave

l E vig
ground was ¢ tested >















64,.66,560600"

6,4

, 660M
104, tlt ADP LPP POPPE PO







e WI. to get
inch of the 5
and the West Indie Y N
8 wickets %
. ,
: % Arnold Meanwell’s Ovr-
Headley’s 200 %
This was the last decisive I 1g chestra will supply the
up to now. In 1933 the West
dies batted first and scored l Music
iVLUS1
Derby topped this by collecting 319\% ee
but when the W.1I it in again i?
George Headley dispiayed all his 4 ss Hi ‘
artistry in geiting 200, and the|% Come and Enjoy Yourself
W.I. declared at 319 for 9. Time x
was an important factor and the; & at the:
county had scored 125 for 2 when|%
time for drawing if imps | %&
arrived e ,
And so in 1939 when Derby had} Y M. P C
first knock and raised 309. W.1.|% ° ok eNico
scored 264, and the county got/%
104 in their second venture. West % Beckles Road
Indies had lost 6 wickets for 54/¢
wher the end of the game was ¢
signalled. % 3 :
: ~ on SATURDAY, July 15
30 to-day the West Indies, after °
their smashing victory over|X Se 1
Leicestershire might well x tole ADMISSION 2/-
add yet another win to heir|%
growing list, and take the lead in]% Dancing 9 p.m. to 2 a.m,
triumphs in these fixtures with g
ree ea | tonsesoosooosssssesesse <
ads.
B.M.
40 Such pretty fashions
‘ES. <4 can be followed

with...













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INGEST IEID E8F8ZQ35M_95CEG7 INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T15:14:31Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02234
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Saturda

Sully 15

1950

y-



Fifteen Years For \YanksPrepa

a

North Korean Troops Cross Kum River
ALLIED PLANES

Attempted Murder

*TWENTY-FOUR-YEAR OLD GEORGE SKEETE was
yesterday sentenced to 15 years in prison by His

Honour Mr. G. L. Taylor, Acting Chief Justice.

He had

pleaded guilty to the charge of “attempted murder” fol-
lowing the death of George Hunte, a fisherman of Redman’s
Gap, Westbury Road, on March 27, 1950.

Skeete was charged with murder but pleaded guilty of

attempted murder. Mr, F. E. Fields, Acting Attorney



yen-

eral, appeared on behalf of the Crown and Mr. J. S. B. Dear

for the accused.





Chamber Of
Commerce

Talks End

{From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 14.

A five-day special conference of
Directors of the Chambers of Com-
merce of the British Caribbean
which opened here on Monday,
ended today. The conference was
summoned primarily to study the
economic aspect of the proposed
Federation of the British West In-
dies but the opportunity was taken
to discuss the inadequate passen-
ger accommodation by steamship
between the Colonies and the
United Kingdom as well as trade
with Canada.

G. M. DaCosta, Vice-President
of the Incorporated Chambers
presided at the talks. He told re-
porters today that when they left
for their respective colonies. thee
knew they would be faced with
decisions momentous, both in vol-
ume and significance.

As the businessmen said, they
were viewed by certain Govern-
ments with suspicion because they
worked in an atmosphere of keen
competition, Mr. DaCosta prafsed
the delegation for the extremely
good manners which prevailed
throughout the talks. The dele-
gates leave over the week-end.

MARSEILLAISE
STOPS DEBATE

BRUSSELS, June 14,
Meeting for the fifth day in a
joint session designed to vote on
the repeal of the Regency Law
which bars King Leopold from the
throne, both Belgian Houses of
Parliament were forced to suspend
debate to-day when the Sociualists
Tose and sang the Marseillaise.
They were protesting against
the speech by Joseph Pholien,
Catholic Senator, who alleged that
accusations according to which
King Leopold committed felony
by surrendering to the Germans
in 1940, were part of the anti-
Leopold plot waged by foreigners
in retaliation against Belgium’s
prewar policy of neutrality.

Poland Protests

CAIRY, July 14.

Poland today protested against
the Egyptian Government’s re-
fiusal to open credit for her to
supply iron and steel to Egypt.
The protest was delivered by
Stanislav Bartnik, Polish Charge
d’Affaires to Abdul Rahman Hak-
kay Bey, Egyptian Under-Secre-
tary for Foreign Affairs.

Accerding to an agreement
signed between the two Govern-
ments last month, iron and steel
were to be shipped from Poland
to Egypt on July 1. But Mohamed





Bey, Under - Secretary at the}
Ministry of Finance, afterwards
refused to open credit on the}

grounds that Poland was under aj
regime considered by Egypt to be
“subversive”.—Reuter.



dence taniailintinaity t

After accepting the plea, Mr.
Fields said that he had taken into
consideration the circumstances
of the case, particularly the med-
ical evidence.

He said that undoubtedly there
was a difference in the testimony
of the doctor who performed an
operation at the General Hospital
and the one who performed the
Post mortem.

At some period in the proceed-
ings he or the accused’s counsel
would have been forced to put to
the jury the fact that if they be-
lieved one doctor they would be

asked to disbelieve the other in
certain respects.
Lesser Offence
It appeared that from the

wounds it was possible that the
deceased might have recovered
and in view of that difference in
the medical evidence, he felt it
was his duty to accept the plea
of guilty of the lesser offence.
The evidence of the witnesses
some nine of them, could leave no
doubt in the minds of the court
that the accused had intended to
do serious injury to the deceased
It was true that most of the wit-
nessess were related in some re-
spect to the deceased, but never-
theless that did not prevent them
from being witnesses of truth.



Other witnesses gave evidence
before the Magistrate, evidence
which tended to show that the ac-
cused had entertained some ani-
mosity against the deceased al-
though they were on friendly
terms before the offence had taken
place, and used to go fishing to-
gether.

He could not stress too heavily
how serious the offence was.
There were many of those types
of offences and His Honour was

bound to take that into consider-
ation before imposing any sen-
tence.

His sentence had to be one that
would not only punish the ac-
cused, but would also deter others
who had similar tendencies, Pun-
ishment should be adequate and
in that case, for it to be adequate,
it would have to be severe. There
were no circumstances as far as
he could see, which would justify
his doing otherwise. The severest
penalty which the law allowed for
that offence, he said, should be
and was the adequate and proper
penalty.

Abhorence
|

Mr. Dear said that the law had
always regarded offences against
the person with great abhorence
and particularly a crime such as



that which the accused had |
pleaded guilty of having com- |
mitted, the law rightly dealt |

with great severity.

His Honour had had quite a lot
of experience in that Court and he
would know that in the lives of
the people, many little things
might join together to produce a
catastrophe such as that which
confronted the court.

He would not attempt in
way to minimise the gravity of}
the offence which his client had |
committed, but on his behalf he
would ask that His Honour should |
temper justice with mercy

any



German Prisoners

WASHINGTON, July 14.

The United States to-day asked Russia to permit an|
International body to investigate the fate of German prison-

ers of war known to have been in Russ
note delivered in Moscow to-day.

Belgians Keep
Up “Warning
Strikes”

BRUSSELS, July 14.

A series of scattered 40-hour
sirikes were staged _ to-day
throughout the “Borinage,” great
coal mining belt in Southern Bei-
gium, as a “warning” against the
return of the provisionally exiled
King Leopold to the throne.

Union officials said according to
early reports stoppage was fairly
widespread,

According to later reports, the
stoppage 4vas general in coal mines
throughout the area. Glass works
and leather work were also affect-
ed. Trams and buses were off the
streets, Train, telegraph and tele-
phone lines were normal. Public
utility undertakings were also
working normally.

This is the second series of “Stop

Leopold” warning strike to be
staged in Belgium’s French-|
speaking Wallon provinces this
week.

To-morrow workers I aT
large Wallon centres of Liege and
Namur, plan to join the move-{

ment by staging a 24-hour strik«
~——Reuter

ian custody, in a|
The United States said it senmisl
the “shock and concern” of the |
German people over the recent |
Russian announcement that the
repatriation of German prisoners |
of war had been completed with |
the exception of persons concerned |
in grave war crimes.

It is unable to give credence to!
the Russian statement that only
13,546 German prisoners of war
remained in its custody,

“These figures are completely at
variance with information in the
possession of the Government of
the United States’, it said

1948 Has Passed

The note, referring to the Big}
Four Moscow agreement in April |
1947 for repatriation before the
end of 1948, said America, Britain,
and France had repatriated their
prisoners before that date.

It said arbitrary reclassification
of prisoners of



war as civilians
did not relieve Russia of its obliga-
tion to return these persons to

their homes

The United States suggested that
Russia should: (1) Furnish full
information on the identification of
prisoners acknowledged
her custody

(2) Provide 1
ber, identity, date of

to be in

informat





nur 1 f
and place of burial of ; ner
and internees who had died ir

captivity.—Reuter.

| formation

U.S. Asks Fate Of.

thi





re
To Evacuate
Istanbul

ISTANBUL, July ;

The American Consulate-Ge
eral in Istanbul today issued i:
structions to his staff and to men
bers of the American colony
for their evacuation from the
in case of emergency.

These instructions issued on the
ground af “delicate geographical
position” of Istanbul which
great anxiety among all classeg
throughout the city.—Reuter

WASHINGTON, July

The State Department
today that American Consulates
standing instructions to be pre-
pared for evacuation of all Ameri-
can residents in case of an emer-

here

city

cause

i4
said



gency were sent more than two
years ago

Statements were in response to
questions about despatches from
Istanbul saying that the Ameri-
can Consulate-General had dis-
tributed a circular telling resi-
dents and Americans what to do

in the event of trouble

Officials here said so far as they
knew no such action had been
taken elsewhere since the Korean
crisis arose. The local Consulates
were authorised to take precau-
tionary measures at their discre-
tion though the State Department
was usually consulted

Such measures had been worked
out in advance and were put into|
effect promptly in South Korea

Emergency plans were operated
also when Shanghai fell to Com-
munists and during the fighting at
Jerusalem and rioting in Colombia
they said.—Reuter.

Nehru Keeps
In Touch With

Korea Crisis

NEW DELHI, July 14

Nehru, Prime Minister
of India. had been “in direct and
close touch” with British Prime
Minister Clement Attlee on ‘he
Korean situation, it jas an
nounced here today

The External Affairs Ministry
reported that India’s Ambassadors
in Moscow and Washington had
conveyed messages from Nehru to
Stalin and American Secretary of
State Dean Acheson.

A Press note issued by the Ex-
ternal Affairs Ministry said: “Re- |
presentations for speedy and
peaceful settlement of the Korean
dispute have been made by India
through normal diplomatic chan-
nels in London, Washington and
Moscow from time to time since
hostilities commenced

“On July 12, India’s Ambassa- |



Pandit

dors in Moscow and Washington !
were instructed to convey per-
sonal messages from Prime Min-

ister Nehru to Marshal Stalin and
Dean Acheson Nehru has also
been in direct and close touch with
Attlee, British Prime Mfhister.”
—Reuter,





W. German Govt.
Suffer Defeat

BONN, July 14,

The West German Government |
suffered a heavy defeat in Par-|
liament to-day. The House adopt-
ed a Social Democrat motion!
requiring the Government to con-
tinue existing flour subsidies to
prevent a rise in the price of bread



Social Democrats and other!
Ipposilion parties voted solidly
for the motion while m Gov-
ernment supporters abstained
Politicians considered to-day’s

vote the biggest setback the Gov-
ernment had received since its|
last autumn.—Reuter



— .
Slovak Resigns
A! . - .
National Council
‘ PRAGUE, July 14. |
It was officially announced to-|
night that Dr. Karol Smidke,
Chairman of the Slovak National
Council in Bratislava had resigned,
He has been succeeded as Chair-}
man by Frantisek Kubac, the Vice-|
Chairman.
Smidke confessed to “National}
Bourgeois deviation” during the}
May Congress of the Slovak-Com. |
munist Party, but it was announced
that his self criticism not
considered sufficient

It was also officially announced
night that Smidke had resigned

membership of the Council.

—Reuter.



wa

te



HON



H. A. CUKE, C.B.E., returning from the London Sugar Talks

Sugar Delegation
Achieved Success

Hon. H. A. Cuke C.B.E.,

HON

H. A. CUKE, C.B.E.,

Returns

one of the Barbados dele-

gates at the recent London Sugar Talks arrived in Barbados

yesterday at 9.16 am. by B.W.1

Airways early flight from

Piarco, intransit from England



SPORTS
WINDOW

The first fixture of the
t which
ados
iatior
fternoon
Club,

It is hoped that the
give this local
whole-hearted
t » fee

Tourna
is being held by the
Amateur Lawn Tennis
will be played this
Strathelyde Tennis

n






A

at

public
tournament their
support. The er
will be 1/- and play
4.30, The fixtures are

will










DOUBLES
Court No Umpire Di. Skeets
c ning and E. P. Tay
j Dear and D. W
es—be et
ourt Ne pir D.. .W
Dr A Cat d | ! r
' Ww A. 8. Crichlow ar
k R Atkinson-—best of five



Labour M.P’s

Mr. Cuke and the Trinidad dele-
gates left London on Tuesday, Due
to bad weather in New York, how-
ever, they had to land at New

| Foundland and did not arrive in

| dad

Want U.S. To |

Quit Formosa |

i4
memt ers
presented

LONDON, July
Twenty-three Labour

of Parliament to-day

a

, motion asking the British Govern-

ment to urge the withdrawal
United States forces from Formosa
and secure the admission of Chin-
ese Communists to the Security
Council

The motion sent down in
name of Sidney Silverman,
22 other members also asked
Government to prepare the

of

the

|
!
the ,

and |

way!

for a settlement by using its best |

and the mediation in Korea under
authority of the United Nations:

endeavours to (J) limit the area
|or conflict in Korea, (2) bring |
about the cessation of hostilities,

(3) take the initiative in bringing |

about an early meeting of the great
powers, including India to consid-
er what action could be taken on
United Nations Secretary General
Trygve’s proposals or otherwise
to strengthen the United Nations,
and to end the cold war
4 —Reuter.

a



Jamaica Shoe Factory
Closing Down

KINGSTON, Jea., July 14
Foreign competition, ‘chiefly
from Canada, is given as the
reason for the coming closing
down of the Jamaica Shoe Co,,
which employs 80 to 100 workers
with production of 1,000 pairs

of shoes weekly.—Can., Press.

a



Terrific



Ex



plosions Rak

New York until Wednesday. With-
in the hour they had left for Trini-
but the plane developed
engine trouble and had to divert
to Miami

Leaving Miami at 7.30 a.m. on
Thursday, they arrived in Trini-
dad on Thursday afternoon at ap-
proximately 3 o'clock. Mr. Cuke
spent the night at Mr. Harold
Robinson's home

Success

In an interview with the Advo-
cate, shortly after his arrival
Mr, Cuke speaking for the B.W.I
and British Guiana Sugar Dele-
gation said ‘it our opin-
on that the Delegation has
ichieved a remarkable success
when it is remembered that they
were very bluntly told that there
was no use their coming to Eng
land as the British Government
had decided that the offer to the
British West Indies Sugar Associa-
tion was final Moreover, up to
the last written reply to the dele
gation, which was dated 30th June
the Ministers stated that they
would be willing to grant a fur
ther interview if the delegation
wished, but that His

Majesty's

Government did not intend to alter jihi

their view that the offer was final

Yet four days after (4th July) and
eight weeks after their arrival in
England they agreed to the com-

promise which has beer

accepted
by the delegation

it may be asked why this
change of heart at the eleventh
hour. The answer is that both
the Ministers and their officials

are conscious of the strength of
their bargaining powe and the



veakness of the Colonies. They
know that the West Indies are
financially weak and economi-
cally dependent They know
that the West Indies have no
market except the United King
dom and that this gives the

United Kingdom strong bargain-

ing power

3ut they are beginning to real-
ise from the two visits of repre-

sentatives of the British West
Indies Sugar Association last
year and the visit of the present
| political delegation, that there can
be strength in weakness when your
cause is a just one

Worked Together

Another memorable achieve-
ment is the able manner in which
the delegation, composed of poli-
tical figures in their respective
Colonies, but dominated by a un-
animity of purpose which was most
@ on page







e

Portsmouth Naval Base

PORTSMOUTH, July 14
Britain’s biggest naval base at
Portsmouth was shaken tonight by






two big explosions and everal
ismaller ones in ammunition
s at Gospor 1 the pposite
side of the harbour
These caused several casualtie
started a big fire, and damaged
building
Two firemen were knowr
among the casualties
Barge Blew Up
barge

mmmunition
Ge



big as the first. As a huge mush-
room of dense smoke soared into
the blue sky, fire sirens wailed
alarms throughout southeast
Hampshire

Several Blasts

A Hampshire fire officer said

enact

READ WHAT THE

1
LORDS SAID ABOUT
FEDERATION in |
—Sunday’s “Advocate”



there have been





everal explo-

ior imong about x ammuni-

tion barges, and a serious fire has

tarted

The fire involved not only the

pier but also tarted several

nor fires along the foreshore,

Eyewitnesses in Gosport aid

people ru into the streets as

ts hé their wisdows

n Ryde, Isle of

fe way across the

d they felt the explo-

oh and saw smoke ibout
800 feet }

The barges were attached to a

yyal armament depot at Gosport

Reuter

so |

|

|



Price:
FIVE CENTS

Year 55



BOMB BASES

_ Lie Asks For
‘Troops To Aid

South Korea

| I

Lie said he had sent an urgent

to supply “ground forces.”

The appeal made after formal
‘onsultations with members of
the American delegation had been
sent to 53 of the 59 member





coun
tries
Lie said that since Egypt's vote
the Council her Prime Minis
ter had made a further statement
on his country policy
The letter to the 53 member
nations made these points
Lie had been informed that
the United States which un-
der the July 7 Security Coun-
eil Resolution was made
responsible for appointing a
United Nation Commander
’ now prepared to engage
in tir corultation about
co-ordination of assistance
which would be weleomed by
Member Governments
2 The unified command had in
formed Lie that idditional
effective Issistance via ur
gently needed
This assistance should include
combat forces, in particular
ground forces Offers were
to be made to the United
Nation Secretary -General
These offers however should
be couched in “general terms
leaving detailed arrangements
to future bilateral negotiations
with the unified command
Letters were identical to all
nations except Nationalist China
Lie in his letter to the Chinese

Nationalist Government disclosed
he had been informed by the Uni-
fied Command that the initial aid

offer made | Chinese

that they
assistance

He ruled out any
attempts on his part at this time
in reference to Nehru’s reported
crsonal appeal to Premier Stalin
ind Dean
jhave

hould give effective

mediation

Acheson. Lie said
no official information
I have great admiration and
pect the strong influence
peace expressed by the
Minister

“y
about
re for
for Indian

Prime Reuter





Czechs Set Up
New Ministry

TO PROTECT REGIME

appeal to United Nations members |

ry National-
ists “has been received and it will
receive further offers
The Unified Command will take
up with you specific detailed
negotiations” he wrote
Effective Assistance
Lie in answer to a query ex-
pressed Bhe hope that the war
ould be confined to Korea A
reporter then asked whether his
‘communication to the Chinese
Nationalists implied that the
United States had accepted their
initial offer of 335000 ground
troop
He replied that he did not know
Asked if he thought the United
Nations members should contrib-
ute only “token forces” to South
Korea the Secretary-General re-
plied “no my personal opinion Is

!

AKE SUCCESS, July 14

| Trygve Lie, Secretary-General

told reporters to-day he had ap- |
}pealed to all United Nations

members who supported the Se

curity Council Resolution on

Korea to send troops to aid South

Korea



(By LIONEL HUDSON)
TOKYO, July 15.
AMERICAN TROOPS dug in along tieir Kum
River line of “no retreat’’ yesterday, hurled
back a North Korean effort to breach the line and
waited for what they thought would be a mass
attack. The invaders—tanks, infantry and gueril
las—had splashed across the muddy Kum River
yesterday and for a time established several ‘‘small
pockets’’*on the south bank of the river which

guards the temporary capital, Taejon.











Despite American-Australian
| strafing transports as they crossed
GONE FROM LORDS ithe river, 12 tanks apd about a
j company « f infantry got ashore, An
LONDON jarmy spokesman at the front later
Buliiom dealers and pawn- | announced that all crossing at-
brokers have been warned to jtempts had beer repulsed”
keep . ookout for the fam \Earlier, infantry guerilla dis-
ous golden guinea which has | suised in American fatigue
disappeared from Lord's uniforms had been spotte.
Cricket) Ground It was | otin with the defer sr :
stolen from tts glass case in | Gene iL MacArthur cone
the “long room of the munique earl’ thi thoraini
pavilion The coin, dated (Satureas anid thet. Ame :
1787 and bearing the head of ar a ein eat erin
. in the Kum bulge, still “consider-
George U1, was used for the ; id
toss-up in important matches tbl SUSAUMPeree by North
Can. Press Korean vere employing le-
fensive and delaying actions”
Farther east a North Korean
second division crossed the Pogang
R | River a (ributary of the Kum—
» _ Mu st and = penefrated South Korean
e¢ Ss Ss r forces near Chungiu, 18 miles
a rorth of Taejon
’ In the entre f ne rt
Withdraw [ics es cet
under northerr thrust in the
1 % ] aebak Mountain
i k iW ‘ r The invaders apparently hoped
O Yin a . | to open the way for a drive on
Kumehon ,the road and rail tows
’ ’ , Tk c : ' wit th
Says State Dept. na rn nt = i outl
WASHINGTON, July 14 Ameri Australian aire
Che State Departmen mid. be raft tinued to blaze away
ay that the minimum conaltlo it nerthern troops movements
for the solution of Korea is for we
A 4 ‘ ind base The Seoul-Taejon
yorthern ( mmut ' or ) : states the mais
iaghting and vilhdra Lo eit . : :
wn territory upply routes for Communists
"Nhe Department spokesman alse forming the Kum were at+
rid that the proper forum” for tacked in numerous sorties
trying to end the ri the Observers believed that the next
United Nations, and that it is not 1 hours night prove a crucial
1 matter tor direct negotiati age of the battle of South Korea
with Moseoyv Americans had used a lull in the
These ba point ef poli west which preceded the Kum
vere brou®ht out ut a news con- assault for a rapid buildup of re-
ference while Secretary of State | inforcements Northern forces
Dean Acheson was still con idex Were also incressitio thotr reserve:
ie Cine "M ita — nai Following was the disposition of
naan ca Alieke a troops along the Korean war front
Nehru, on the crisis
Reuter tonight, latest Reuter reports in-
dicated
niatbinaencmeniiann | Western Sector:—North Koreans
* \force tank infantry rnd
Seamen Want guerillas-—thrust across the Ameri
jcan-held Kum River it Kongju,
tbut later were said to have been
Reds Ousted jrepulsed The attack was pre-
SYDNEY, July 14 [eeded by an artillery barrage
Two hundred seamen t la j slightly to the east i i
demanded the resignation of the| Central Secter orth Koreans
Communist-dominated I t jwere exerting heavy pressure on
Executive of the Australian S« |the South Korear outh of
men’ Union for banning the |Chungiu, apparently eeking to
transport of war material Jonen the wa for a thrust at
Korea {Kunchon, vital uphlv link be
While the seamen were meetin, een the eanpital of Taejon and
the Union Executive announce the Port of Pusan
it would call a general meeting Fostern Sector: Fiehtir wa
tnembers on July 18 to diseu | cattered and apparently on a
the ban.—Reuter, mall seale—Renter

il
tt

1 iil

|
|
\
|

|

PRAGUE, July 14

The overall task of the new
Czech Ministry of National Secur
ity is to protect the regime and
he frontier ensure the security
f persons and property, and main
tain public order

Within this general framewor)
the Ministry is given competence
in a wide range of security mat
‘ers, all of which were formerly
the concern of the Ministry of the
Interior

The power of the week
old Ministry were defined tonight
by Government Decree

3esides taking over the (SNP
(Security Police), the new Minis-
try is given the right 9n principle
to set up and run any kind of|
security force’. It will also direct
the control of foreigners.

The Security Ministry takes over
the management and running of
Czechoslovakia’s forced labour
camps, retained as a penal insti

tution under
approved by

ago.— Reuter

the new criminal law
Parliament tw«

» day



Canada May Spend
$50 Million More
On Defence





i

OTTAWA, July 14

Canada is preparing, in view
of the Korean war, to spend more
on defence and the speedy growth
of her airpower this year, accord
ing to reliable sources here

A recor $425,000,000 Defence
Budget, passed by Parliament re-
ee y, | now expected to be
markedly inereased by supple-
mentary estimate No figures are
vet lable but it j ticipate
the | I heyond $50,000,000

Increased orders f

he head of the list. R

and other r c
naval k be ‘ 1





lS

—
<<

aii sia sealant



TRUMPETER
CIGARETTES
ARE ALWAYS

FRESH

FOR 12 CENTS.


PAGE TWO



Among the passengers leaving for Ferto Rico yesterday morning by B.W.1.A. were left to right:

in Puerto Rico, Comdr, John Alexander, Station Man
ager of B.O.A.C., in Miami, Mr. Edward Behn, President of Behn Bros., Mrs. Johnston and Mr. A Ww.

They were all intransit from the B.W.I’s Branch
Percy Taylor, Branch

Leslie Rogers, Vice-President of Behn Bros

Johnston, Sales Manager of B.O.A.C. in New York
Managers’ Conference held recently in Port-of-Spain. Mr. J
B.W.LA., Barbados, is also in the picture, (third from right.)

‘IR EDWARD CUNARD leaves Left Ye ,
S Barbados this morning for Attended Branch RS.O. P sterday
England via Canada by T.C.A : a 1ughter. Barbar

~ aughter. Barbara
For Two or Three Months Managers Conference been in Barbados on

ae 4 abe EAVING _yesterd: orning tW° weeks, returned
IR JAMES RAE, formerly L bs Tanat ins rl aay : x yesterday afternoon by B.W
: * Mrs. Bennett

Chief Justice of the Leeward
Islands, now retired and living in Were Mr. and Mrs. Andrew W Mr. Bennett
Antigua, arrived by the “Lady Johnston, Comdr John Alexan- B: a4 i
Rodney” yesterday morning from der, Mr. Edward Behn and Mr 7 9 bados
Antigua. Lady Rae accompanied Leslie Roger Mr. Johnston is the Races.



: bats . ated > . Barbara who is on the San Fer-
kim. They expect to be in Barba- Sal Manager of B.O.A.¢ an ‘ ha Ms
dos for two oe three months, and New York and Comdr John Alex~ nando staff of Barclays Bank
they are staying at Stafford ander is Station Manager of on two weeks

House B.O.A.C., in Miami. The other Haas i
it two are President and Vice Presi- lo Join Husband
Arriving by the ‘‘Golfigo’’ dent respectively of Behn Bros RS. BETTY

* ‘ ’ ‘ n Puerto R Bel 3 are
HE “Golfito,” which left Eng- ! Pu “ A090, Seo Bros are
eh B.W.I. Airways agents in San
land on Thursday, is expect- re * ; P
. . "i Juan They were all intransit
ed to arrive in Barbados on Sat- th > —
ak o> through Barbados from Trinidad
urday, July 22nd Among the | here they attended the recent
ssengers ar r Barbe r ; ; ; _c
Soeernrese on board for Barbados pra neh Managers’ Conference at
Ss $ Ȣ arters i > -
Mrs. H. W. Challenor, Mr, and Mr B Ww I.A Headquarters in Port
G. W. Cresswell, Miss E. G. Cummins, Of-Spain
Mrs. Q. ©. Gilman, Mr. A. C. Gral
Mrs. E. Hardma Mrs. E. B
Miss J. O Mr. and Mr
Neynoe, Mr. and Mrs. R. Norri





from England

Agriculture

Mr. J. Perey Taylor, Branch already
Manager, B.W.1.A. here, was at but Mrs
Seawell to see them off





Mrs. C. A. Potter, Mr Fr
Mr. and Mrs. E. H. ¢ Rol
Nanda Robinson, Mr Vv

G





Ward and two children, Mr Barbados Museum in the ney
Miss R. M. J. Walker, Mr. N. Wren, gallery, are a variety of prints of

Mr. and Mrs, D. R. Young and Miss tne West Indies, most of which
Young

have been ient for the occasion

Trinidad for

Left By ‘‘Rodney”’ by Hon, J.D, Chandler, M.L.C., ered as a builder

He was responsible
Codrington

1 ti fi shandlei
R. and Mrs, Harry st. Hii Mr. and Mrs, J. W. Chandler, | ging of
M and their two children also Sir Edward Cunard and Mr. Vc

returned to St. Vincent last tor Marson, One of the prints is p paca g lek
night by the “Lady Rodney.” They "produced in this column, and is
arrived here on June 27th by the @ picture of the coast road neat
“Lady Nelson” to spend a holiday Worthing.

with Mr. St, Hill's parents

Bridge and

turned to Barbados after
three months’ visit to the U.S.
He arrived on Wednesday from

To Puerto Rico For

A Week
M JEAN IVERSEN, Manager
of the Marine Hotel, and
his wife left yesterday morning
for Puerto Rico by B.W.1A. They
expect to be away for a week.
Here For Iwo Weeks
M* and Mi Cecil Hope Ross
from Port-of-Spain arrived
from Trinidad yesterday morning
by B.W.1.A. to spend two weeks’
holiday in Barbados. They are
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.
They were accompanied by
young Rolf Smeliie.
Was Visiting Her Son
RS. MOLLY ADAMS, who
has been staying with Mr
and Mrs. D. D. Johnson at Spen-
cer’s Plantation for three months,
left yesterday for Puerto Rico by
B.W.1.A., intransit to the U.S.,
where her home is in Atlar
Georgia. She has been visiting West Indies which are at present on show



her son, Mr. Jimmy Adams, who Museum, This print was done in 1835. drawn from
by Lt. J. M. Carter. It is near Worthing, Barbados

is Mr. and Mrs. Johnson’s son- by
in-law. on Stone



CRITIC who fears that comic Vita Brevis a ring which

strips may have ; bad effect purchased for eightpence from a
on the appreciation of art is evi- man with a tray outside the “Eight
dently a serious-minded fellow. sells.” Two evenings later while
Perhaps we shall have serials at ghe was out at a theatre. | :
a ‘ as at : atre. he broke f he ; t
the Academy—“Half a Haddock ' Ea Attached to his ha

in and stole it. She offered a re-



and Two Pears on a Plate’ will be warg for its return. A friend of A laundress comes to
shown for one week, to be Foulenough took back an inferiot Crying “Hiya, fella!’
followed by ‘The other half of the fourpenny ring and claimed the And the courtly Asiatic
Haddock and three more Pears on ¢5 yeward. That made £2 10s Raises hat/and umbrella.
a Plate.” Then “The Mayor of ;. each They then sold the eight-

might run for a long time—his penny ring for 9s. 6d Down by the

trousers, his waistcoat, his tie, his



hat, and so on, to draw out the Prodnose: Surely the ladv knew They buried Jack Manatta
excitement The whole thing the rings were trash. In his student’s overalls,
might be shown as one complete atone ‘
picture later on. but I don’t care. Myself: Oh, yes. They were all Tail-piece
a am in it together. The story of the — O you stop
Making Ends Meet robbery, the reward and the re- asked a tady on a No, 9 bus
FWHE other day Captain Foule- turned ring got her a paragraph in “Indeed, yes f d
nough presented to the lovely two evening papers, tor. “But incognito, of course

999899089999 99989990985

PPLE LPP PS FP PPO PPA PLP PPP PPLE IEPA POD

CHECK THIS NEW LIST



*
g
g *
>
UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN
? By M. G. Geberhart
% CASES IN COURT

By Sir Patrick Hastings
TREASURE IN THE CARIBBEAN
By 4. W. Aeworth
NATHANIEL

By Shaw Desmond
(| iv | THE MALICE OF MONDAY

By Eric Burgess
THE VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN COOK
By Christopher Lloyd

GOGSSS

THE COMPLETE SWIMMER
By Sid. G. Hedges

: STORE

GOCSSSSEO64
GPSS POOOSOSC COCO FOO FCC GOS 9S 9S 8S9098F



BENNETT and her |

cotton garlanded

annual leave.

HANSCHELL

and two
night for St. Vincent by the Lady
Rodney. With
family, she has

1 enormously



on long leave.

Mr. Hanschell, who is with the
Department
returned
. Hanschell
two children, Mr. J, F. Odie, Mr. and * here for a month

i. “ti At The Museum After Kight Years

A MONG ,
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. ©. Skinner, Mr r present on exhibiton at the A 1ONG ihe
C. D. D. Spencer, Dr. and Mrs. L. S the week

Allamby who had
the past e.ght years
Mr. Allamby will
in tnis island.

entertainment
remarkable lady in talks and
programmes in both sound

and in a special
whic
the younger gé

eration of radio



= : referring to Mada
fire in 1926, Speightstown

something of the making and ex-

waxen images. Two
thousand years ago

Reservoir Among
work was the Tuberculosis Wards
Someone has suggested, that it and Hotel Royal
> se ‘ . ¢ ses were eve During his stay

Back From U.S. Visit pt 1 ES te sont of ts ‘ane was with the 7
Mec WINSTON WARD has re- ?“' © eet f

much the same
those employed to-

road, shutting off the beautiful Company until
view of the sea and the coast line which he was seriously injured by
which must have been possible in a motor lorry

‘ ) y f «it the days when this picture was some months.
See ” dena at oe done The Exhibition continues He is a guest of his brother at
ager of the Paradise Beach Club, until the end of the month Brandon's Beach.

ons and in all

One of the

waxworks,





LURG TWGGWN TW4IJ

PDWTPW: Mee gd,
PICTURED here is a reproduction of one of the prints of the



BY THE WAY By BEACHCOMBER

he had The Golden Rainbird

Alone on Sunset Boulevard
A Chinaman and his cat,
And a little plastic wmbrella

Mockawanee,
And East of Harris Falls

said the conduc-

‘

oS

For your Health's
Sake
SLEEP in COMFORT

MATTRESSES & SPRINGS
BEDSTEADS—3 ft., 3 ft. 6ins.,



‘fing ADVOCATE STATIONERY

BARBADOS

666664644
LLL LL LLL LLLP LLL LL

*

3} § <
POD SOOEE OOO SOSE COC OOSSEH





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

bre



HARTWELL’S “Savannah’—-blue and
with field flowers and decorated with navy blue
perfect for garden parties.

Madame Tussaud

a hundred years ago 1793 Madame Tussaud
Tussaud, founder dered to make
remarkable exhibition of Marie Antoinette, her patron anc
in England. Her frien@d who had

popularity has that morning.
over the years forced to make

porting and

ntenary of 11s

h three of



tars, Dick Be
d Jimmy
veiling”
wax In a
amme Dennis





better modeller



that she spent



work, also told
the revolution
Lysistratus of

bition neglected



vax casts from

most well-read ried Francois

know, made wax had two sons

enemies and when she was

There was sorted company

the early Tus- she stands, a monument
for in Paris in skill and determination



DAILY CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work It:

AXYDLBAAXR
is LONGFELLOW

One letter simply stands for another, In this example A is used
three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos-
the length and formation of the words are all hints
ch day the code letters are different.

A Cryptogram Quotation

TO-NIGHT
DINE AND DANCE

AT

CLUB MORGAN
THE WEST INDIES MOST POPULAR NIGHT CLUB,

DELICIOUS STEAK DINNERS

Served throughout the Night
Dial 4000 for Reservations



4 ft. 6 ins.

— also —

COTL SPRINGS complete with Rails & Lugs for Mahogany
Bedsteads—3 ft. 6 ins. and 4 ft. 6 ins,
Obtainable from our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

Telephone 2039

FACTORY LTD.

Analysis, 7.15 a.m. Sandy MacPherson

7 p.m. The







death mask o!
weekend and holiday Louis XVI and the sculpt Marat
long queues waiting to as he lay in his bath after being
filled with waxen stabbed to death
famous and the Corday Such
Kings and Queens became part of the job to Marie
famous murder- Tussaud who took
Chamber of Horrors, tasks in her stride
the é
vorlc The BBC
OEY Phe a She was born
; vhere she lived with her mother
and uncle, a doctor who modellec
in wax as a hobby and eventu-
ally opened an exhibition of life-
size figures in Paris
unexpectedly successful, the King,
Queen and Court took les
the little girl, who was an ever

Switzerland,
+ A rail at us—trom down under +

-<

ous

-Biultover eyo, cer | EDMOND O'BRIEN » ROBERT STACK » JOHN 2

2. 045 degrees. (2)



became so popular

companion and
the King’s sister



friend of the Royal Family,
threwn into prisomuaand the exhi-

released she was deeply in debt
and had to work for nine years to
clear it, by which time she mar-

WM OBOML NE

Solution of yesterday's puzzle. —Acress:
Eventually, : 9,2
seventy-five,
pins, when the established a permanent
immediately fell down tion in London
earliest known last at the age
waxwork in Eng- Visitors who go
with the fear- to insect the *herita
Mrs. Death and left c&n see her
indeed, a certain there, a frail old
frozen features bonnet, surveying

Cur; 15, Masticate
Aspen; 27, Desk Down; 1. Unmanned;

. c
Cased; 14 Tillage: 18. Mesh: 20. Ohip





GURY
GQ HRFF GUW
DMUG LDGU FOWWH?—GEFFWN.

Saturday's Cryptoquote: WE ARE UNFIT FOR ANY TRUST
MLL WE CAN AND DO OBEY—MACDONALD.





CO-OPERATIVE COTTON

John Payne Sunny Tufts

SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1950

—s



B.B.C. Radio
Programme

SATURDAY JULY 15, 1950




a.m The News, 7.10 a.m News |




From









Dodging behind the heavy cure here?’’ “1 came because the toy

{ sain the a toe ‘ wn Bio back for

tains, e pa xe —

| sliding pane! and then r the ake

stone wall bet p ie Re t.

} : .

spiral staircas ° a

— moonlight ot ve tower e e 2 8 soun

m, ye : Well, here we Mirand s The auto-gyro

15 p.n Jack Train’s Record V vy ‘ ea = se sek catslon
p.m. Listeners’ Choict 15} bur why did o ¢
Programme Parade, 5.30 p.m. | ieee
Dance with me, 6.30 p.n From the] LOPES PPPOE POLES LPP AP PSL 9 VPOPFO VES
Third Programme, 6

0 p.m. Interlude

oo IIHEY THUNDERED THEIR

Indic 8 Pp



es : Swe: MIGHT ACROSS THE

» News, 10.10 p.m

| Isteriude, 10:18 p.m. Thi” World | <¢] HEAVENS!

Music, 11 p.m The idea of a Universi



peat ns Pp] AZ A YOUR POPULAR
Housewives’ CINEMA ....

* - eee
Guide
PRICES for Pines and

KKK RK KK
Cucumbers in the local mar- «ke ae
ket when the “Advocate r The Flyin*est

checked yesterday were:
ae, ae aaa RNER :
se MBROS, ~» Fun Lovin-est
Adventures that ®

Ever Zoomed

Across the t 4

















Cucumbers: 6 cents per
Ib.



CROSSWORD









Across

' ii IN COLOR OF | fe
(9) " fe
Essex town with Spaniara (17) \\ T E HNICOLOR >
Show. for the ast part of ¥ wy

Across. (9) 13. Brightened (3 .

Honour. (3) 16 Hastened (: PoC as — a
Straighten, (6) Vy)
Without beginning without ena-

(3)
See Sources. (2 as TOM DANDREA*HENRY HULL ney SETON 1. MILLER cs

4 } RAS HALO
- Confused scrap (5)
. Lies—to repair the place? (9) NOW 5& 8 30 p-m. and
Down inui i
t
Where shrubs are growa () Continuing Daily

Hoots. (8)
Containing salt, (6) 4. Heel. (4)

Initially sure shield. (2)
" 7 66,6,5666668
Hocorns iat I ‘Matarai:e) POCO OOOO ELLA OPAL PPLLES

4 oe
All sorts of guns. (Â¥) ve
Obscure. (3) 12. Stack. (6)
Swell out. (5) 17. Impelled. (5)



Renown, (4) AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE: TO-DAY AT 5 p.m
TONIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT AT 8.30



gly, 6, Lamp Nee; 10, Era; 12
15. Artist: 16 Sit
Den
26



Bolt; 18, M

» No clue; 21,
Exhausted:

Errol FLYNN—Olivia De HAVILLAND

in “THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE’

Filmed by Warner Bros. from Lord Tennyson’s masterpiece with a cast
of 1,000's headed by Patric KNOWLES—Henrty STEPHENSON—Nigel BRUCE
A Salute to the Gallant ‘600' Who Rode “Into the Jaws of Death" that
a Comrade Might Live for Love !



Deign: 25. Her:

Gear boxes: 3. Lest: 4, Ye; 5, Grist
Mutineers, 8 Pretends;: 11 Act: 12

Tee

ee
===.





DANCE
TO-NIGUT |
CASUARINA —
CLUB

ADMISSION: — 2/-

GANETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

SATURDAY, SUNDAY—8.30 p.m, Matinee Sunday 5 p.m.
Warner's Thrilling Drama!
JOHN GARFIELD in his Greatest Role in

“DUST BE MY DESTINY”’
with Priscilla LANE—Alan HALE—Others

Monday and Tuesday 8.30 p.m
LOVE AND LEARN & SINGAPORE WOMAN

TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. and continuing
M-G-M's BIG ADVENTURE ROMANCE!

© 4 © SPENCER TRACY: JAMES STEWART
a é VALENTINA CORTESA ‘

i ~



The Menu features Black Pudding
and Souse for this evening and
to-morrow morning























ROYAL (Worthings)

To-day & To-morrow 4.30
& 8.30
Republic Double
EVELYN ANKERS—
RICHARD FRASER







in
“THE FATAL WITNESS” |









ane LXTRA!
John Wayne, Vera Ralston british Movie Tone News
in
“DAKOTA’ and
Universal American News
EMPIRE
and
To-day 4.45 & 8.20 and ’ . "
contin’ Let’s Agitate (Shorts)
20th Century Fox Presents sain ionciiiiaemiianee
John GARFIELD |
Micheline PRELLE TO-MORROW 9.30 A.M.
in
“UNDER MY SKIN” LOCAL TALENT AUDITION
with
Luther ADLER
Orley LINDGREN
Also the Short
“THE BATTLE FOR
KOREA”
To+Day 4.30 & 8.15 and ,

Continuing
Columbia Big Actior
Double
Ron Rendel
Devera Burton
in
“OMOO OMOO”"
AND
“CHINATOWN AT
MIDNIGHT”
with

HURD HATFIELD
JEANE WILLES

OLYMPIC
To-day to Monday

4.30 & 8.15
United Artists Big Double

Pegg) a John Dali MURRAY & C

“DEADLY IS THE
FEMALE” |
AND
“THE CROOKED WAY” |
|
{







o L° EDINBURGH SCOTLAND



SOLE AGENTS:—

MANNING & CO., LTD.

with

Ellen Drew


SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ct

PAGE THREE

rip ry
Meat Talks J¢’s Wet In Korea
WiENOt | ver sveminonnn'AStet

ally the









“Sugar Isn't as
News’ —Or
Is It?

THE GAMBOLG
6 AE

J EINE GROWN NER
FRAME




launched their armoure pe




















































IT in the West Indies. That prin t} a ] is
ae e reprod Bie th - ~_- across the pal el at ne ) nnir Sor
rtisement which appeared j nd Soon season
( mer uch appeared in
: American nm agazine dated orrer i i “
June 2 95 1k ae : r 7 7 ’ = =—
cies ans World Wars and BUENOS AIRES, July 14 gre.srequent over, K , : Serer
their aftermaths sugar becam > Anglo-é ntine discussions —|June throug! ear Mok pe
Page One new in terre of “the ee mee paneer eee Societ es nw "9
crisis in supplies for our Armed end financial issues involved — dies Reese se con;
Forces and for the home front t a ueore to carry on for a long roads in ‘ illy “ : i
At the time of World War I we HANG \T ’ THERES THE = ) me, according to sources close to rushing freshets. J ig]
had a_ national sugar policy TELEPHONE RINGING — AND ® British Embassy month for rain. and A
, based on tariff protection. By the GAYE'S CUT SHOPPING — LAST RACE AT Meanwhile meat ‘ most likely time for the
time of World War II we had VLL HAVE TO ANSWER (tT ~ (NEWMARKET TO-DAY ceedin ase ae loading is pro- devastating typhe
developed a national sugar pro- — I rit hg aithough the price which across the peninsula
gram combining tariff, processing . ~ asians: se a to Ras yet been ; ; rec
tax, subsidies and quota controls ‘ / : ie while Argentina was soon'’s—Good (over I
vcquaiiuectuccn. Delegation We Must THE END OF A. vich cee isa aa] domo see 7
plicated program was suspended ,| ] 2 See a first = agreement] advantage of surt
ulme nr ately after Pearl y e il are enced on June 30, the}fgured that the
ioe ie wis'getites ss =©=AChieved Learn Hygiene se chances are’ tno lune, 20 the eurea that th
THE SUGAR ACT OF 1943 rl ea ol cir ing all other com-|South Korean defer
WHICH CONTINUES TO CON- S At S I l / aites will decline during the} having k effect u :
TROL TO THE LAST POUND uccess c 100 Fritien year, thereby affecting mechanized nd Pou {0 Months
THE AMOUNT OF SUGAR THAT ., ‘ritish exports to Argentina as a|forces. In any even\. freque
CAN COME INTO OUR MARKET @ from page 1 —CHIEF INSPECTOR By Pierre J. Huss ioe of diminished Argentine * mt — MAEECS al Soe f the
RACH TEAR > a E sta 2 a Sterling earnings dilit ave been giving em goor pital o pieture
. Might eee. we are entering the striking, worked togetner as a The Chis Sanitary Inspecto 9; ; LAKE SUCCESS, NEW YORK, Although meat price diseus- | SOV"! EAA a 4 a vn
season of peak sugar consumption Body. All the memoranda sent to St. Michael told the “Advocate The majority of U.N. delegations no longer care wheth- sions ith Uruguay are still yn-| Uniques indicate that va
with a quota for the year, that ae Whately ip actctiiecde yesterday that the sanitation «! er Russia stays in U.N. clarified, because of the slowness + it meee cts a :
is substantially below our knowa word fee word be the Hoes Poet tokcd we ee The cold war deadlock beforg the Koreai explosion © the Anglo-Argentine negotia-| and Navy.
italia G a 7 e cl} looked ) > Sani- pink: ciel 2 a : . ton are , @ ; .
"ee Chovaaiitiead te aurtinios ins They agreed to appoint Mr. Gomes tary Department, “Ths streets : a ee erly a political earthquake ~either of ap- otis tt, Mectant ms, me muna oe ‘ had i
in talks in Londen about a possi” as their Spokesman and at all the were thoroughly cleaned on morn. pease nent on one side or aggression on the other—could Uruguay becoming ioe ~, , a x he result of
Bee oa iretabnktiaret meni Phang eee with Ministers the line ings, but then the skins of man- have brought a solution. fnpavesrit an Sear Be 8 I a. ~ ern win wit
Kibountest: Whilek wnatiaean we oe. nim to take and the arguments goes, bananas, ety were deposited As things now stand, the ruling the story of const: rnatidn, confu- . Pt cee t ae oa ‘ 5 , ar
: ; tary ys yt © be used were carefully discuss- in the gutters by hawkers during tendency among non-Cominform sion and dismay which the sweep- For thstan luring . } ees es ag t 3 <
sais yee ook he tigre eg on the ed before-hand and approved the day. This was an undesir- delegates is that {f the choice is ing counter-action of the Western July 1049 to June 1980 Ur ere th a Abin! bri aa or I T
can! and prices o e sugar At the meetings no. member of -. re a tw Sener ie eee ene sacrificing U.N world to the North Korean shipped nearly ¢ 900 Se ee it tanita ue the | tah | AAT it ‘ ee ;
And the Congressional candi- the delegation spoke and _ this in ok khen wa eatablighsa. 4 world organisation. then the 1 Sin tan move spread among froze meat comparec with | Produce rain nusual for 10 tir as
dates whom we shall listen to this 0'derly and very fitting manner of ™ As it. was now everythin “pos- of peace and the security of, orks travellirs. ee a ee shipments of only 40,000 y i Act July as in
ummer and elect in November ¢°ducting affairs was due to the sible was being done to PO nations is best served by keeping ‘They ate nev tons, while chances are she will + Figtires Head nor Januar rt : pit
vill constitute the 82nd Congress [act that every member of the ‘ho tuisance. Even the co-opera- U.N. as the strong peace force of on the Kremlin, ‘If theit thoughts “MP between 100,000 and 120,000] US. Weather Bur Pane ! h, Winter is th
WHICH WILL BE CHARGED {elegation knew beforehand the tio, of the Police had beer ens the allied nations can be read at Lake Success thes t88 during the coming — year, Riana ace el seman OF,
WITH EXTENDING, REVISING, ee a Gomes would take—al- listed and with telling effect. _ In other words, the pussy-foot- hope for ome Hapeet ait a sae while Argentine loadings to Brit- Peeeeae ieee “ ee y x ae . KK “—
OR REPLACING THE SUGAR i we eaeee he would use— What was of greater concern ing days in favout of Russia and margin by which the rae es ain because of augmente en pte vg ft 2 A ‘ oO « ional
\CT OF 1948 which, along with ee Ha = one an the negotia~ «1 the moment, he said, were tha the shush-shtsh of anyone who Communism can be rgised to its Argentine internal tmeit —con- holitte te the abea bes 38th 1 I n thi n that
t Congress, will end 6H Decerhi= wen Be vax. 2 ere fie insanitary practices of some peo- Spoke out of turn at U.N. are gone. old heights and recapture the ini- “U™Mption are liable to sium, parallel indie ites th 1 or it shcons aie haen Mnet ne th mee
er 31, 1952. 3 the Sat ates "Avda! aa ee ple travelling along the streets. Russia—Bated Breath tiative it held in the cold war to a mere 200,000 ton: nany weather head wait originate in the vieinit f ‘the
fhe soft drink industry is com- resulted 8 » Breat harmony These people spat anywhere and The diplomats still say that the They go home at night to sit by ) . ‘ ‘ American forces Vi onsider Mariana Islat }
osed of some 6,000 bottling plants “Tt can ‘be said, therefore, that al- ''"eW. the skins of fruit, paper Soviet Union can Hang around and the radio and listened for the : Kt for the first time Utuiguay- | jhose average figure he full rt to the ( :
ell distributed throughout the though there was only one spokes- and the like on the roadway. keep a seat at U.N. But nowadays signal in the form of a challenge ‘ 1 Smpments might reach 50 per | iwo decades before recut eu
ation, most of them being small man each and every member of School’s The Place no one sits around the big lounge to U.N. and the West so vast and cope of | Argeiitine exports at An observation poit Pusan, oss the Korean are pei
‘amily businesses. Together, they the delegation contributed fully to This came within the category {HY mote waiting with bated formidable that the Korean blun- “%@#0St 10 per cent. in the past Jon the eouthenet cone rted a it experiences these
employ over 80,000 persons on a the success of the mission. The ©f personal hygiene, and he areath sche afbe, appearance of der can be overshadowed and for- Furthermore because Uruguay | July rainfall averaging more than severe storms. ¢ ’ ‘ ‘
car-round basis, use better than visit of the delegation has, no thought that for the benefit of et Ren pte Jdcob Malik or a gotten. They think the Politburo 4S maintained purchases of goods | {1 inches. (‘The avera lv pre te N
50,000 tons of sugar, and are doubt, completely convinced both the coming generation the best "ag a at Tae a whole. will come up with something be- fom Britain and allow ed finan-
npertant pufchasers of special- Ministers and their officials that Place at which this Could be im- the he iy eatita i roe fore the end of summer, if only cial remittances, it is possible
ed machinery, trucks and acces- in the future the West Indies, pressed on them was the school. at UN ie Yon can f ate oping be#ause they sense that the honey- Hritain might concede to her
ries, bottles, wooden cases and while most anxious to co-operate At present District Nurses gave it. oF lume ” 1 take it, leave ee is over and the mailed glove more favourable trading term:
per ¢artons promotional materl- with Hie Majesty's Government in periodic lectures dt the elemen- ‘the Rita bes init las been tossed down,—1,.N.S than to Argentina —Reuter
idvertising space and time all matters, will no longer tolerate tary schools om the subject and Cominform propaganda mackit RD Pa ge sienge
other things required in the being pushed around, and have it was evident that their work have come out of the dise San cin Y ~y
nduct of a billion-dollar busi- decisions, which vitally affect was bearing fruit. i seeking to foist Upon the. public JA ANESE NAME IDE iL
Like all the other food pro- them, made by Ministers without Another problem was housing {h¢ impression that the Unitea wd io 4é
ing industries which depend prior consultation, fn the slum areas. There wad States committed aggression in y p Y
sugar as sweetener and pre Mr. Robinson, Mr. Kirkwood and need for clearance in these areas, Korea. NE WS APE R
erver, and like every American myself acted as technical advisers Lut here again the District Nurs That propaganda line is easier sit
sewife, We bottlers have a and Mr. McCowan of British West were doing a good job in cheCK- to sell than to explain away the
interest in national sugar Indies Sugar Association perform- ing up on the condition’ of the fact that the United Nations is 1 "i : TAKASAKI, Japan,
ation and its administration, €4, the duties of Secretary of the health of the people and offering conducting the military interven- The editors of Japan’s first hometown weekly news-

at will dssure us of dependable





delegation.”









sound hygienic advice.





tion against a Communist ageres-

paper went about asking tow





































tos 77% nspeople ¢ j r neg .
ipplies of sugar at a reasonable Cricket He thought that the state of 501 and to do so has mobilized they wanted—and got an eartit’ ple what kind of paper
ce under any and all conditions ‘ sanitation in this colony com- two-thirds of the world’s govern- he first issue f th Tak: Bit risak
that can be anticipated Mr. Cuke also said that Dr. pared most favourably with ments behind General Douglas .. fe oF the Takasaki Citizen, a four-page tabloid,
at ci é . Cummins had left London before others, and was com- MacArthur Carries the results of this pre-publication poll whicl
IT IS IMPORTANT THAT AN lhe did, and was at present in New sidered by those most competent Everything indicates that the embraced a cross-section of Takasaki’s 95,000 people fr
INFORMED PUBLIC OPINION York for a few days; he was not to judge, as better than many. U.N Security Council's prompt the station master to the Cl bus oh peopit rom |
PARTICIPATE IN DEVELOPING sure when he would be returning. invoking of the hitherto moribund Said Station Maste Ki ‘ lamber of Commerce janitor, | f r ir )
OUR NATIONAL SUGAR POLI- Turning to the subject of cricket ER Chapter VIf on breaches of peace Tauji: wy anegor ne wspaper that does not help the] }
CY FROM HERE OUT ~ said Ly the West Indies were WORLD SOCC Con fat ta nh def Of all to the “Give an interesting news ii , | f
“Inside” and _ editorial sige Playing “glorious cricket”, and it ‘ tientic to stigir duting Cie was 4 pleasure to sit and watch CUP FINAL ism’s fellow travellers, paper that's easy to read, if you school teacher, said she wanted | |
rp ‘od vy well prevent "sugar them and listen to the comments RIO DE JANEIRO, July 14 World—Peace Crusade ‘ats use words of foreign origin, the paper to “avoid just finding |
pam ae Meeahe nas ae trom ‘hastens. Mr. George Reader, of Britain, It is recalled that in the so hm Mae bik mean. Give us fault with people, Leave scahdal
oe = 35 has been chosen to officiate in the cajjeg ; ro complete and unbiased repotts on m r ; Nhe, ee
disaster news ‘ radi Ususuas called peace offensive launched in the doings o 4 iN mongering alone |
é : : _——_— razil-Uruguay World Soccer Cup gto. ; : ne doings of the City Coun ie oes err : |
Washington 6, D.¢ ; Final match here on Sunday. Mr tpg eho}m under Cominform and of the Chamber of ¢C Me ob ie oe kaseki. Citizen the first |
eo 1980 ‘66 . 99 i p 3 ;), Suidance. the goal was the gather- Ae $> x om~ of its type of newspapers encour-
Jun R Co Van Der Meer, of Holland, will ; 8 merce pal neour
erican Bottlers of ney mes referee the Sweden-Spain match .v8 et fe ae millions of — Zentaro Ozeki, 40, wi aged by the Occupation, is|
oe iad oR ‘ nv, © . ' Signatures against war in all eo ling «dae earns a financed by the sale of stock |
Corbonated Beverage: And Goes ir. Sao Paulo.—Reuter. countries. Party members and fel- ] ving peddaling a “pedicab”—the the community, It ; pen f |
WEA Meade atioat BAG low | travellers everywhere were boos mah’s a in Japan—said; 20,000 copies of its first isgue but
WH¢ > IN OUR & WAN BAG i a arenes ce = ° mobilized into actio Ac wont read a newspaper th: ans ¢ : ; neaTae 4
ares : steve OTSA D1 highteein passengers arrived in C action, cardinal , oe paper that plans a regular circul:
ind WHAT PRICE SUGAR! are ine island yesterdas when the SS ounty Cricket slogan woven into the movement 8 dull and dificult to read. Give }.ooo . circulation re i
vailal on request>. Lady Rodney” dropped anchor was that the people of the world US 4 newspaper that w ll serye ' ; :
4adiy ’ ped anchor peor e world ‘ b é ill sery In addition to the townspeople}
in port. They were from Boston, esults were demanding support of the {ot Something besides wrapping comment on dint thes capeelon
_ St. Kitts, Antigua, Montserrat U.N. in. its peace crusade among Paper.” from a community weekly the ‘ !
U S Govt and Dominica LONDON, July 14, the cold war powers, Miss Shizuko Yamaguchi, 22 a Takasaki Citizen carried i ts i
e e e The “Rodney” sailed out about ee aT RRPRREREDEES: BOs Somer- On that basis, the Cominform bank clerk, laid stress on the need first issue a stor? cae aa Pe ae | EX PO RT ‘
ey | F. 9 p.m. for British Guiana, via ~ Warwickshire 466 for 5 declared; Gard- oy teal tee hae Sea for 1 good staff. She explained: can soldiers who Tasried Taka.
o St. Vincent, Grenad: Trini-ggver not out 215, Lord 84, ary G a ryfve Lie as the i athe by Wey 7 . Gaa@ | 4
watts for Bt inom, sence sae ‘tromlf, Somerset 216 and secondly 124; Hollies outstanding peace champion next less Ber cae atin i pat girls; @ report on an. abacu: | Bb exsont }
ne & 4 asse : 7 for 48 an ‘ to Stalin. Lie was praised, cited are hewspapermen who contest among school children | em, iS «? }
More Wheat Duta its short stay, the ‘“Rod-ey 1 bee Teepe enn aie and pointed out as "the crusader hark ciao ne F Soon i ane felt tie Pee of Perio. | _
y? inate tet ia, Yorkshire 314 for 9 declared; Yardley against the “war m ” 4 laving a good time. Such people ment from Takasaki who left t | |
wey” discharged a cargo of bale votre 49, End segondly i438 for a by t. Pickets a ae ee an the are incapable of writing good attend : ng arene eit : ; |
of feed ickled meat, herrings west. Pickets in the U.S. carried 7 f 3 attend a Moral Re-armament con | |
WASHINGTON, July 14 hetnion ; dha eges from ‘Canada Beaten 188; Edwards 64, and secondly Si8ns demanding that Secretary of pone wich will ead readers to ference at Caux sur Montreux ¢ :
The United States Government giong with fruit from the British[y72, Wardle 6 for 10 " State Dean Acheson allow Lie to a better life wey spapermen Switzerland, and a lengthy fea- \ |
today called for a larger wheat Northern Islands. By 183. cat Surrey beat Gloucestershire appear before Congress on behalf should be gentlemen . ture of modern “feather cut” \ !
crop next year, The Agriculture Mangoes were in a good supply Surréy 278; Pafker riot out 13%, ana Ofspeace, : 4 Oe tee mblhara, a physician, pairdos | \ i
Department set a 195! production among the fruit landed by thispasecondly 262, Eric Bedser 78, Mcintyre gapen, game the Korean explo- rey ang yn ney Shapers car Something New |
goal of 1.150,000,000 bushels, or vessel. large heads of cabbagesiltioicester iat: exer 4 thr 42 ind Hot. U.S. spokesmen unreserved- Sonik ie ve ne oe jpoods be- tt alld cartied 2 weekly Borde
193,000,000 more than this year’s were also among the cargo secondly 210; Alien 65, Emmett 52, Laker 3», 00W Praise Lie for quick and Yond the teach of the common pilation of marrlages, deaths and !
indicated crop, and 119,000,000 P 6 for 56, . determined action. He made it people births z ethi ? aes ”
more than 1948-49 average :[., At Derby, Derbyshire-Hampshire mateh possible for the Security Counci] She said: er, jomething new Orr
‘ The Agency said more wheat E F Pt pattie 269; Warker 65, Hall 5 for rO meet. ona few hours’ notice, jouch ads create resentment Magy pel le ede? f th
was needed to assure the Nation's SHOWERS STOP WORK 7]60 and secondly i71, Richardson 4 for Lhey say his driving energy as- ‘mong housewives find mothers. j Alban tht ete re at i 1€ |
“safe” margin for food needs 4430, sured the speedy and legally cor- Miss Shigeko Mogi, 22, a restau- ?8P! nese i opacto Monopoly to 4 |
Si li 900 c} . shi Np Derbyshire 224, Kelly 71, and secondly rect inv *hapter . "¢ r ss, said she \ > e bingo parlour
for possible increasés in exports ,, Sipping was held up for about 4s ek Beat ¢ fen and secon te er oe rg mntet VII pro- rant waitress, gid she wanted the ! fone Mec uisli dijlishot 6F th |
and for feed to produce more 2? pailtutes sterday | by a lig i At Nottingham, Nottinhamshire-Kent YeSiOns granting rent | member ie tedinde on be one Me Taek. CONTRI a weekly] |
7 . . om shower of rain which began about"gmatch drawn. > “nts . ant to hurl air, big brother to us fe want it to é yr . Aoe ‘WS, a week
meat, milk, and Poultry 11.45 Nottinghamshire 407; Winrow 127, Har- séa and land forces into the battle : . ender.” newspaper in Newton, Kan, was
This goal would petthit shar 408.m, ; ris 113, Sime 54, Wright 7 for 106 : tile. be our defender, par .
cna n in the l f i rah i Lighters which were discharg-M ont ais, Amis bd, Clarke 69 and sec. Lie—Unkindest Cut Janitor Sanhhiro Sone, 98, Sent to Japan by the Department] | ‘
Se eee ah oF wheat TO ing their cargoes along the water-Mondly 324 for 3, Pag# 65, Ames not out Reaction among the Soviet- expects the Citizen to help the Of the Army to advise in thef | ie
i ed ed k 6 ae ae reo front were covered over with tar-! NR eh Ot ee ca cead ehhh controlled Eastern groups and the underdog. He said; establishment of weeklies . |
seine me early Stages of World paulifis during the shower. Ships sek. match drawn “- fellow travellers at U.N. was that Help Underdog He reported that in addition t fi Cay \
rif in the harbour also made use off Middlesex 355; | Robertson 107, Sharp the Lie role in swinging all U.N “People talk a lot about dem- Takasaki, four cities in Kyushu] | mE | \
that time the Government tarpaulins to cover their hatches. (15, Jenkins 6 tot 142 And secondly 144 support to action of the U.S. was Gakaey Pit ‘old wi fe 4 till pr _ were also working toward the / ‘Bu | ,
ae » available ; ed r - oe agai for 7 declared, Robertson 52 j z ; “racy, »| stoms e- : 7 } / , j
rcle upplies available for feed Phe un wa out again Coe Worcestershire 330; 8. Cooper 40, the unkindest cut of all. vail in government and business ©! blishment of similar weekly | boned f “ j
at cut rate prices the evening and work went backAyoworth 84, Jenkins not out 50, and Long faces and bitter tone: offices. I can have no use for a MeWspapers devoted entirely tof |
—Reuter. to normal secondly 123 for 5.—Reuter among themselves accurately told : . ag: WAG LOLS community news. —€1.N.S.) | -
pe AL SN — = cig eh aera i,
_— i}
4)

PZ: 07
72



WE OFFER

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ter WINCARNI

>

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Broad and Tudor Streets.



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SOLSSOOSLOCPOOCH ACO OLS


=

hy

PAGE FOUR



~ BARBADOS GD ADVOCATE |

Sa SoS fase:

ae by the Advocate Co., Lid,, Broad St.,

July 15, 1950

DELINQUENCY

IN 1946 the Governor appointed a Com-
mittee to enquire into and report on the

working of the Government Industrial
Schools and to make recommendations for
their reform. Today, four years after,
those institutions are working under the
same system which had been the subject
of strong public criticism.

The Committee on which members of
the Social Welfare Department served,
reported and it is typical of Barbados that
despite the terms of the report and the
merits of the suggestions made for reform,
nothing has been done.

It had been pointed out in this news-
paper on several occasions that the main-
tenance of the “plantation” system with
the aim at reform would continue to defeat
the endeavours of the Government. The
Committee too shared the view that until
the two were divorced little progress
could have been made. This view was
generally accepted. It was agreed that the
answer to the problem was the introduc-
tion of the Borstal System but that owing
to the lack of trained personnel, this
should be postponed until someone could
be imported for the job. Today there is
an acting Superintendent of the Govern-
ment Industrial Schools and it is the good
fortune of the Government that the choice
has fallen on an officer who on his own
initiative has done much to change the
“prison” atmosphere of the institution.

Since that Committee was appointed and
the report submitted to the Government,
there have been long and interesting public
discussions on the increase of juvenile
delinquency and the need for remedial
measures. Not even the example of a few
energetic individuals could have stirred the
Government to unearth the Report and to
make some attempt in assisting with the
problem.

It is known that the lack of reform at the
Government Industrial Schools has been
put down as one of the contributing factors
to an increasing number of young people
finding themselves charged in the Courts of
this island. There are instances on record
where young people have served more than
one term at the Government Industrial
School and many others where a term at
the Government Industrial School has been
but a preliminary for a sentence at Glen-
dairy.

The Government itself would appear to
accept this frequency as normal. Undoubt-
edly someone will object but what then is
the explanation for the fact that whenever
a young person has been discharged from
the Government Industrial School, an im-
mediate report must be made to the Gov-
ernor of the Prisons.

The action of the Government in this
matter deserves strong condemnation for
two reasons, The increase of juvenile
delinquency has been publicly discussed
and could not have failed to have come
to the notice of the Government; and
during the four years which have elapsed
there was ample opportunity to have sent
some officer or officers to some training
centre to become acquainted with modern
methods of reform.

The teaching profession has sent two
mistresses, the Parochial Authority has
sent a matron for the Children’s
Home, the Police have sent one
and are now about to send two
more, the Government itself has sent one
from the Public Works Department. This
action is direct contradiction to the state-
ment that there were not sufficient people
in the Civil Service able to make full use
of scholarships. It can still be done and
it is in the interest of the community that
it be done. The care of our youth is the
concern of every member of society and
it is time that the Government give the
Government Industrial School special
attention.

Our Readers Say:
Muslim



Bridgetown.





Saturday,





Conference

Dear Sir,

Under the guidance of His Eminence Moulana
Muhammad Abdul Aleem Siddiqui, the Anjuman
Sunnat-ul-Jamaat Association, Inc. proposes to
organise a conference of representatives from the
Muslim communities of Trinidad and neighbour-
ing colonies, including British Guiana, Dutch
Guiana, Barbados, Jamaica, Cuba, Panama, etc.
It is proposed that the objects of the conference
will include:—

1. To create closer relationship and co-opera-
tion among the Muslim communities of these
territories.

2. To consider the educational, social, econo-
mic, moral and religious problems of the Muslims
of these areas; and to take adequate steps for
attending to such problems

3. To form a Regional Muslim Organisation.

The association is interested in getting in touch
with all persons and organisations interested in
participating in this conference, which is expected
to be held about the end of July, 1950. All inter-
ested persons or organisations are requested to
communicate with the undersigned without
delay.

WAHID ALI,
Hon. Secretary,
Anjuman Sunnat-ul-Jamaat Assoc., Inc.,
JAMA MASJID,
Cor. Queen & Piccadilly Sts., Port-of-Spain,
Trinidad, B.W.I

AN event of considerable im-
| portance has taken place. Derek

Valcott has published a play in
verse, an historical drama of the
turbulent times in Haiti after the
death of Toussaint Louverture. I
believe this play is bound to have
three gratifying effects: first,
those, like myself, who admired,
were ofttimes bewildered by, and
sometimes annoyed at, his lyrics,
will be able to discern in this fine
objective verse the genius—I use
the word without exaggeration—
of the young poet; second, the play
will shake, thrill and delight its
readers and later its audiences;
and, third, it will entice many to
read the histories of the times and
the people it portrays.

It is a fine play, full of the
drama of the clash of wills and
ambition, Elizabethan in the pro-
digality of its bloodshed, conscious
of the overwhelming infiuence of
its historical milieu on its char-
acters, while in the background,
Time, like Nemesis, twists and
corrupts men’s ideals, weakens
their bodies and their wills, and
finally does them to death. One
is tempted to say that Time is one
of the main characters of the play,
often made articulate in the old
general Sylla.

With



‘voussaint’s death, Dessa-
lines and Christophe, also ex-
slaves, become the inevitable
leaders of Haiti, with Petion and
Sylla to support them, The coun-
try is in utter desolation.

the peasants have identified liberty

with idleness;

The fallow fields cropless; the old
plantations,

Plaine du Nord, Morne Rouge,
Quartier Morin,

Are like grass widows, unweeded,

growing thorns
And bristles, dry seeds on a parching

wind
[ quote that because I like the
{romantic sounds of the place,

| but I feel Christophe’s description
jis more beautifully vivid:

|
The old plantations
Stand haggard as prisoners, the
windmills have broken arms,
The soldiers not sent home, murmurs
mounting,
While the king wastes blood like

money .
The hatred and jealousy between
the blacks, mulattoes and whites
are fiercer than ever, Dessalines
assumes kingship, rules with ruth-
less tyranny and Christophe, jeal-
ous; has him murdered and as-
sumes the crown. But he too suc-
cumbs to the potent draught of
power and, hated and feared by
his people, he kills himself in the
face of Pétion’s rebellion. That, in
bald terms, is the theme of the
play; but how well does Walcott
handle it!

Walcott divides the play into
two parts, the first part compris-
ing four scenes and the second
three. In Part one the sweep is
wide, sketching the historical
background in quick, deft touches,
apprising us of the political situa-
tion. and its chief actors, and
showing us the bloody course of
Dessalines and the patient
triguing of Christophe,

In seene one we see the gener-
als Sylla, Pétion, Deqalines and

in-

the French Bishop Brelle—the
only white man in the play—
waiting for news of ‘Toussaint.
We get more than a glimpse of the
disorder in the country, the deadly
rivalry between the leaders, the
violence of the colour hatred. In
scene two we are introduced to
Christophe and his reception of
the news of Toussaint’s death and
Dessalines’ assumption of author-
ity. We get an evocation of the
fr. Toussaint by Christophe:

‘
I cannot list
tell
that

his braveries; I can
only

Things the memory shudders
to remember,

Hurt by its love
nations,

He disrupted intrigues,
wars .

He held his generals,

were refractory
and an imagined picture of his
death in a French prison:

He broke three
curbed civil

although they





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HENRI CHRISTOPHE | I Caribbean

»



DEREK “""*" OCT

he,
Crucified
nails,
An old man dancing on a stick of
time, all skin and groan,
Died, coughing on a stone floor.

made limp in spirit,
in «a winter's stubborn

The majority or the characters
some alive at once. There is Pé-
tion, moderate and reasonable. but
rather dimly seen, I feel; Sylla,
feeling the weight of his years and
looking forward to a life of quiet
and plenty:

I had hoped for, first, faith,
People singing, eating leisurely
Under the green ease of councils,



a federation
Of complexions

and disillusioned and almost fatal-
istic before the cruelty of Dessa-
lines. There is something admir-
able and touching about this self-
less but tired old revolutionary
who had thought that, the revolu-
tion being successful, he would be
able to enjoy a quiet retirement.
But in the light of events, in his
old man’s wisdom, he sees that
their real enemy is not the whites,
not black rivals, but time’s cor-
roding power, nothing less. Brelle,
the Bishop, is a type — a good
point, I think—representing the
white element, pious, moderate,
but hiding ambition and jealousy
beneath a cloak of reason; Chris-
tophe, powerful, cunning, cruel,
idealistic, waiting for the time
when Dessalines shall outrun
himself. History has not been
kind to Dessalines. It has re-
corded him as violent, unscrupu-
lous, egoistical, deceitful, primi-
tively courageous. Walcott has
not been unfaithful to history.
Dessalines intrigues, he lies, he
murders with the joy that other
men take in a feast. He kills and
kills, ‘martyring children with a
tired sword’ till everyone in hor-
ror turns from him. He % horri-
fied at himself when he finds that
he cannot stop:

Have I yone mad after long war?
Does murder grow like habit in the
hand, infection

In the fingers and the skull?

Dessalines is very powerfully
drawn. The scene in which he
himself is killed—the only prose
scene—is a study in horror. What
depths they are in young Wal-
cott’s mind! Two murderers, a
man and a boy, wait in the wood
through which Dessalines, de-
serted by his suborned escort, will
have to pass, and as they wait the
first murderer sketches the plan
of execution and gives advice.
Asked for hints on how to become
an expert in the trade, he says:
“First, be a vegetarian; second, be
kind to animals; third, keep in
practice.” One will smile, vill
laugh, in this scene but not from
fun; it will be a laughter of acute
discomfort, of relief from the hor-
ripilic tension it creates. When
Dessalines comes upon them he
realises their purpose at once. He
is not afraid, however. He tries
to talk reasonably with them but



A play by Derek Walcott (Advocate Co. Lid.) 59p.
$1.20, 2.00 1.50 (Reviewed by G. A. Holder)





ne ~ adivances calmly towards
him, saying, “Sir, let’s be quiet
about this,” while the boy, over-
come With horror at this regicide,
covers his face with his hands and
prays hysterical to whatever
gods he owned It is a scene of
tremendous power

Par, two deals chiefly with
Christophe as king. Here the
artist, the psychologist, the
tnoralist, will tind much that ws
fascinating. In this part the

poetry leaps to near Magnificence,
as when Christophe, in a moment
egoistic vision, describes the place
where he will build his castle at

now-famous La Ferriere:

The air is thin there, the balding
rocks

Where the last yellow grass clutch
whitening in sun

And the steep pass below the sea,
knocking

Like & madman om the screaming
sand,

And the wind howling down the

precipices like a tunatic

Searching a letter he never wrote—

against these rocks,

Wind, sand, cold, where the sharp
cry of gulls beats faintly on the
ears,

And in the green groves a milk of
doves—what army

Would bend its head against the .
wind to reach?
Or when Vastey, Christophe’s

secretary, instructs the Attendant

how to trap Archbishop Brelle
While he is whispering hypocrisies
to heaven

With penny candles humble in his
eyes.
Phrases, too, leap at you from

the page, haunting the memory—
when Vastey talks of “drinking
remorse in a spoonful of soup” or
of Petion coming “waving a new
constitution”, or wWwilfen, finding
Brelle dead on the floor, he says:
“IT stumbled on his sprawled
pride in the corridor.”

One watches Christophe change
with his success: his ideals fall
‘to dust; hia self-restraint
weakens; his hands, like Dessa-
lines’, succturab to the infection of
murder: paralysis lays hold_ of
his limbs and his will. Povger
has corrupted him; it has been
the flame of his life and it is
the cause of his death. One is
moved by the fate of this. tr
figure who, with his great poten-
tialities and his sorry weaknesses,
finds himself a pawn in the hand

of time, committing murder by
habit, hated by the police for
whom he thought

To build citadels for this complexion
Signed by the sun.

Yet he cannot regret, this man
who at length finds himself
deserted by everyone. He segs:

1 cannot ripen compunction by

rosaries, ‘

Or pray to Damballa, or broken



Histony, breaking the stalk she grew
herself,

Kills us like flies, wings torn, held
up to light,

Burning biographies like rubbish

And as the drums of Petion

come nearer, heralding a new

rebellion all alone, in maniacal

laughter and despair, Christophe
shouts:
Tell Petion I leave
monarchy,
The gra
of silence :
and he puts the pistol fo this head.
The play is not without
blemishes. Scene five, is, I think
faulty in construction, the hand-
ling of the crowd suggests un-
certainty, looking several ways
simultaneously, as though the
dramatist were trying to do too

him this dark

of children,



and years

much at once. The prolonged
use of rhymed, couplets in the
early scenes is apt to become
tiresome, Nevertheless, the play

is gq remarkable achievement, for
any modern dramatist. It is many
things to the pathologist, it is
a study in neurosis; to the politi-
cal philosopher, a lesson in the
inevitably evil results of power;
to the moralist, an implacable
reminder of the relationship of
means to ends; to the literature,
a joy, an inspiration and a land-.
____mark | in West Indian literature





THE WAR IN ASIA

Chiang Must Be Disarmed

RY DAVID TEMPLE

taken up the challenge of aggres-
sion in Korea it has been com-
monly said that in 1950 we are
profiting from the mistakes of
the League of Nations and acting
decisively, as the Western Allies
should have acted against Hitler
when he marched
Rhineland in 1936.

This is a fine sentiment, and
should give the United Nations
much-needed self-confidence. But
the comparison needs to be used
cautiously .

in to the

In Europe in the 1930's, Britain,
France, Czechoslovakia, and their
friends were called on to defend
themselves in or around their own
were
these countries them-
selves. But in Asia in the 1950's
the struggle is between Soviet
Communism with its far-spread-
ing influence, and United States
commerce, with its great wealth
and energy. The battle, it seems,
will be joined, directly or by
remote control, in the countries
of other people. The struggle for

countries. Hitler's threats
against

LONDON, July 13.
Since the United Nations has

influence in Asia threatens to
develop in lands inhabited by
Koreans, Chinese, Formosans,
Japanese, Vietnamese, Malayans

and Burmese. The United States,
the Commonwealth countries and
all others that have supported the
United Nations resolution on
Korea, should not be carried away
by the exhilaration of action to
such an extent that they cease
thinking what they are doing in

Asia. ,
The United States and _ its
associates, can win the struggle

against Communism in Asia so
long as they conduct their resis-
tance to Soviet penetration with
the interests of the aspiring mil-
lions of Asia always first in mind.
No military consideration is
important as these
responsibilities. ;

as
political

the expense of the Formosans, This
is an immediate test of the good
faith of the United States toward
the people of Asia, President
Truman has ordered the U.S. 7th
Fleet to prevent Communist in-
vasion of Formosa. To show that
the United States is conducting the
world struggle for the sake of
humble and suffering millions it
is essential that Chiang Kai-shek
should be, immediately, shorn of
political power, He rules nobody,
but the unhappy Formosans; he
represents nothing but his own
ambition,

There are tnree tasks before the
United States in dealing with the
remnants of the Nationalist Kuo-
mintang regime.

The first is to take the civil
administration of Formosa entirely
out of Chiang’s control. This
would be a logical step following
the declaration that Formosa is
regarded as still Japanese territory
“pending a peace treaty.” Formosa,
then, would seem to be a respons!-
bility of General MacArthur's
command, in Tokyo.

The second task is the termina-
tion of the international status of
the Nationalist regime His con-
tinued representation in the Se-
curity Council is aiding the Soviet
Union in her prime interest in the
Far East—to keep Chinese Com-
munists without any friends save
in Moscow. The United Nations
cannot play its proper part of ro-
flecting world opinion and resoly--
ing world tension while it pre—
serves, within itself the outworn
fiction that the Kuomintang group
speaks for the millions of China.
To remove the Nationalist Chinese
rump from international councils
is politically perilous. A weak U.S.
government could not dare attempt
it. But since President Truman’s
declaration the United States gov
ernment has consciously gained
prestige, Now, surely, is the time
to bring the Security Council (and

* Russia) face to face with reality

Chiang Kai-Shek, who dominates
the island of Formosa, must not
be permitted, any longer, to
oppress the islanders and to quar-

ter his army on that rich island at

The third duty is to disarm, and
gradually to disperse Generalis
simo Chiang Kai-shek’s armies in
Formosa, The island is now, in
reality, defended by the United

ROBERTS

States Navy. The British Royal
Navy could be associated with this
task, The Nationalist Generalis-
simo’s command, could not be
more hated than it is by the
islanders, Its exsistence remains a
constant threat to a peaceful settle—-
ment. Generalissimo Chiang is one
of the few powers in the world
admitted to have an interest in the
outbreak of a Third World War.
He threatened recently to declare
war on the Soviet Union. His army,
navy and air force should not be
allowed to remain an organised
unit under irresponsible command.
But there are indeed, grave diffi-
culties. Most of Chiang’s troops
would like to return to their main-
land homes. All except high
officers would have, probably,
little to fear from Chinese Com-—
munism, But they might, it is true,
be a foot loose multitude ready to
swell the Chinese Communist
armies. It is hard to believe that
the reported demobilisation of
these armies does not still leave
room for trained men. And if they

were disarmed in Formosa and
their pay from Chiang’s gold
hoards ceased, they would turn

te marauding through the island.
In any event they present a prob-
lem, But the problem must be
faced, Chiang’s command must be
removed and his forces controlled
or disposed of. By grounding the
eir force, taking over the Chinese
navy and forming “interim de-
fence corps’ of some troops in
Formosa the job can be done. T. V
Soang is already in the United
States; his sister and her husband
might join him on condition that
they do not attempt a “Govern-
ment-in-Exile.”

Prompt and forceful action is
needed in Formosa to emphasise
that the United States is acting in
the cause of freedom in Asia. The
emergency decision to patrol the
sea between Formosa and _ the
mainland, terminating both the
blockade and the possibility of
Communist invasion of Formosa
was in the right direction. But it
must be followed by firm political
demonstrating that the
States is not giving aid
cour to Chiang Kai-shek

action
Unit





















Federation

(Continued from Advocate, Friday, July 14)





t “ ae
aac « ‘ ‘ v

s peep Abt Bk pry anne Ceneuae Heew
WadbaGad LO Chae AKERS LD. She eeasewe sraseasnete,
wie AS PeopUlsi Vie Luk Wuae ElabvsCeilicase Vb Cveeeeine
MEA ars AIEEE Me A AER Cot We tee nb enew SH eeeeâ„¢
wslicn, > Cos CAkAeL PeopusosOasey diduot
Prebeay ae Pes ettlCathas A copesosbarery,
v Cfo an ie CULUiIeS Citta beer
Watad FOR Ueki tae a prover

Apect lo sale steve their iteceutet ‘They

avbek bee y

Ces bate eee UU five, ded aa askin

auClais DacKing aS olmer exporters to the United
sawugdom receive Pom weir GUveriinerits,

hace, accuiVe

Ad ila Over yuLe Wail tel Uappser Wises Wie WSL
tne Dominions, can look to their own
wovernment in negouaung wiin tue Guvessaiticty OL
sne United Kingaom, because are ail anx.0Uus
wat peopie in tne Colomes wno export tneir goods
o us should receive tne lalrest possipie consiuera-
uon. No less important will be tne help tnat a
central Government can give the West indies in
planning the economic development of the wholq
«egion. Everyone agrees that these territories are
still far too dependent on a single export crop, but
the present unbalanced economy cannot be success-
fully diversified without the most careful co-ordin-
ation of development plans. The size and location
of secondary industries, such as textiles and cement,
both of which I saw in the initial stages when I
was in the West Indies last year, and the planting
of additional cash crops should be centrally planned
in relation to markets and production costs. The
attempt to achieve a better balanced economy
without some degree of supervision at the centre
would lead, I fear, to business failures and the im~
poverishment of the region. Other important eco-
nomic functions of a central administration would,
of course, be concerned with Customs and currency.
[ should hope it would be possible to maintain the
British Caribbean as an area of internal free trade,
a recommendation which was made by the recent
Customs Commission. Of course, that would impose
a common tariff, related to the preferential margin
for Commonwealth goods, on imports from outside
the region. It might also be possible to issue a
common currency, based on the West Indian dollar,
which would be of considerable convenience for
travel and trade.

As I have already remarked, a great deal of
regional economic co-operation is possible, and will
continue to be possible, without political union, but
this is only so long as the whole area remains with-
in the jurisdiction and under the influence of the
Colonial Office. The larger territories are rapidly
moving towards self-government, and it is most
unlikely that even the present amount of joint con-
sultation and common action will continue in future
unless they join a Caribbean federation. I think
it is fair to say, without claiming too much, that
although federation in itself could not make the
West Indies more prosperous it would at least pro-
vide the most favourable political conditions for the
best use of the region’s economic resources,

4 shouid now like to pass for a moment tu te
polllical case Lor leuerauion, It 1s interesting to note
«nat in alming at a lederal centre as the next slage
vt their evolution towards Dominion status, tng
west Indian ieaaers have cnosen a slep familar in
ene conslutuuuonal history of the Briusn Common-
wealth, ‘he same path has been successfully 1015
sowed in times past by Canada, Australia, Soutn
Africa, India and takistan, Federation has provid-
ed the cement needed to build self-governing com-
munities, which have since become ‘strong and
united nations, out of social groups too small and
too weak to stand alone. There is every reason to
suppose that in similar circumstances federation
will serve in the future the same nation-building
purpose as it has served so well in the past.

The present circumstances of the West Indian
territories are, broadly and very roughly, similar
to those which led the Australian States and the
Canadian Provinces to unite before they reached
full nationhood and economic partnership as self-
governing members of the British Commonwealth.
Not one of the West Indian Colonies, save possibly
Trinidad—and even that only so long as it can find
oil—could possibly afford to pay for an indepen-
dent Administration. The wide range of social
services which the Welfare State has added to the
cost of administration and defence are far beyond
the means of any of these poverty-stricken commu-
nities, Their revenue may become unbalanced after
a single hurricane or drought, and of course they
are always exposed by their single-crop economies
to the fluctuations of the world’s markets for prim-
ary products. This means that unless they can cut
their administrative costs by sharing the cost of
nationhood with their neighbours, by pooling the
costs which self-government would impose upon
them, they would find themselves as soon as they
became self-governing, dependent on other countries
for services now rendered to them by the United
Kingdom. It is inevitable that these small com-
munities when they emerge, as emerge they will,
from Colonial status, should combine for survival
with some larger group. The only alternative two
federation would be a special relationship with
some power on the American Continent. But they
know full well that in such a relationship they
would lose the substance of their political inde-
pendence. That is why they are looking to federa-
tion as the only hope of combining genuine self-
government with equality of status in the Com-
monwealth and among the nations of the world.

I will not labour the political or economic case
for federation, as I believe that the principle is
widely accepted. What I would ask your Lordships
to consider for a few moments is the timing of this
constitutional advance. Should it come now, imme-
diately, or would it be better if it came in the

aunaies, like

we

near future? Would it be better still if it werg|
postponed for a fairly long period of years?
I admit that this question would be an

extremely impertinent question to ask, if I were |

siiggesting that the House should form a final
opinion without waiting to hear what the West
Indian Legislatures have to gay on the subject. I
have no doubt that their views will greatly influ-
ence whatever is decided about the introduction of
a federal Constitution. I cannot imagine Parlia-
ment’s refusing to sanction the introduction of fed-
eration, if all the West Indian Legislatures decide
that they want it, or trying to force the recalcitrant
territories into a form of political association which
they actively dislike. At the same time, everyone
agrees that it is vital to the success of federation
that its introduction should come at the right
moment, It seems a suitable time now, before any
territory has committed itself to a definite date, to
form at any rate a provisional opinion about the
time when federation could be launched without
incurring the possibility of shipwreck

(To Be Continued)


































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Royal Caramel
Royal Vanilla
Royal Custard Powder
Sago
Pineapple
Plums
Guavas
Prunes
Strawberries
Raisins
Currants
Frozen Salmon
Milk fed Chickens
Sweet Breads

Crown Drinks are the best

ORDER NOW FROM GODDARDS.


SATURDAY, JULY

15,

1950



Fire Gutted
4 Houses On
Thursday

OUR HOUSES were complete-

ly destroyed by fire on Thurs-
day. One at Dovers Gap, Christ
Church destroyed a double-roof-
ed boarded and shingled house
valued $1,000 and furniture to the
value of $800 belonging to Beulah
Nicholls. She was occupying the
house at the time of the incident.

The Fire Brigade turned out,
but on arrival on the scene it
was discovered that the flames

‘ already had complete control of
the building,

The second fire occurred at
Bridge Cot, St. George, and de-
stroyed a boarded and shingled
rouse with shed roof and kitchen
attached, valued $1,440. It is the
property of Inez Pollard.

Neighbours tried hard to con-
trol the blaze but, were unsuc-
cessful.

It is alleged that a spark from
a coal pot started the fire. Pol-
lard told the Police that she was
ironing clothes. She left the coal

pot at the entrance of the shed-
roof and went about 50 feet
away. Shortly after her grand-

daughter called her and told her
that the house wags on fire.

The other fire occurred at Wes-
ton, St.’ James, at about 2.45. p.m.
it destroyed a boarded and shin-
gled house belonging to Louise
Marshall. This fire also caught
and destroyed a double _ roofed
house valued $800 belonging to
Edna_ Clayton, Both houses
were occupied by their owners.

The Fire Brigade turned out
under the command of Superin-
tendent Grant.

O FAR 8,050 DRIVERS and

197 conductors have renewed
their licences. A clerk at the
Traffic Department told the
Advocate yesterday that they are
still expecting more within the
next few weeks.

ATHERS AT GRAVESEND

make full use of the Bath
Shed especially on Thursdays and
Sundays. This Shed was for-
merly situated at the southern
end of the beach but the Head-
auarters of the First Barbados
Sea Scouts has taken its place.

The Bath Shed is now at a
central position in easy reach of
everyone using the area to bathe,

Standing at Gravesend, be-
tween a group of casuarina trees,
is an old one-roofed house which
many years ago was used as a
bath shed.

Before the erection of the new
bath shed many bathers made use
of this one, but now that all have
deserted it, it has a weather
beaten appearance. It may only
be a short time before it topples
over and becomes an eyesore to
the casuarina walk around it.

UGUSTA GREEN of Water-

ford Tenantry reported the
loss of $205 from the same home
between the 3rd and 10th of this
month.

ORK on the new St. Joseph

Post Office is progressing
rapidly. Recently the building
was being painted and it is
understood that it will be opened
shortly.

R. C. W, RUDDER, Police

Magistrate of District “B,”
recently imposed fines of 10/- and
one shilling costs, each on two
motorists and two women who
were reported by Cpl. G. Cyrus.

Sgt. Inniss prosecuted for the
Police.
They were: Gerald Dyal of

Kensington New Road, St. Mich-
ael, who was fined for driving
the motor lorry G—133 on South
District Road, St. George, on May
11 with canes projecting 20
inches on the right side,

Herman Forde of Brereton, St.
Philip, was fined for driving the
motor lorry G—272 on South Dis-
trict Road on May 11 with canes
projecting 20 inches on the left
side.

Finally, Evalina King and Eur-
rie Smart of South District were
fined for making a disturbance on
South District Road on May 11.

ANY MEMBERS and friends
are expected to turn out at
the Y.M.C.A., on Sunday at 4.45
p.m. when Mr. Frank Moore will
be the speaker at a _ Religious
Service.
ANY YEARS AGO Barbados
had a Y.W.C.A. but it was
closed in 1921 after the building
in which it was situated was sold.
On that occasion the Y.W.C.A.
was at Trafalgar Street and the
late Mrs. Edith Trimingham was
tne Secretary
At present a group of local
Social Workers are getting ahead
with plans to form another

Y.W:C.A.

ABS ARE GOING
4 date and there is very little
work in that line for the coach
kuilders. Mr, R. L. Harper, a
coach builder and blacksmith of
Greenfield, told the Advocate yes-
terday that occasionally he would
receive a few cabs to repair, but
“they are gettiig old fashioned
with Barbadians.” The shop in
which he works was situated in
Greenfield for 40 years,
Another blacksmith of Bedford
Lane, Greenfield, said that nowa-

OUT of

days there is very little work for)

the blacksmith. He was a black-
smith for 25 years and used to
do a lot of repair work to ‘
ders” and hand carts.

He said that the majority of
repair work at present is done to
bread-cart wheels and “as for
horse shoeing, there is actually
none of that.”

RICKET FANS always like to

/ see large scores on the score-
board but how many of them
ever tried to find out where, how,
and when the score tins are
made?

A man was seen under a shed
at Greenfield yesterday painting
some of these tins. They are for
a new scoreboard at Carlton
Cricket Club.

|
VERTON MAYNARD of Cane

Garden, St. Andrew, rermrted
the loss of a pocket watch valued
$10. He told the Police that it
was removed from his
residence at the sarne address
tween 7.30 p.m. and 10.30 p.m
Wednesday.

be-

|
}
;





spi-|



mother’s if

on | very
’ taili
failings.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Pleads Governor At

Queen's College Speech Day

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor, speaking at Queen’s
College Speech Day yesterday, called for an end of “this
snobbery of colour by nearly all shades of the community.”
The Governor’s plea was endorsed by the Lord Bishop
when he moved a vote of thanks later in ‘the function.

The performance of

selections from Gilbert and

Sullivan’s “Mikado” was one of the highlights of the pro-
gramme, and Nell Hall, June Smith, Shirley Clarke, Gillian
Reed, Joan Drayton, Shirley Seale, Mary Brathwaite and
Ann Raison did some acting that drew rounds of applause

from the audience.
The costumes were lavish,
and reflected the resplendent

barbarity of the Orient to an

extent that should have made

any photographer present

wish he had a_ technicolor

camera

The programme opened with
the playing of the National

Anthem as the Governgg arrived
attended by his Private Secretary.

!Seated on the platform with the |
Governor, were the Lord Bishop,

Mr. Glindon Reed Director of
Education, Mrs. Donald Wiles,
Mr. D. S. Payne and Miss L. N.
Trimingham, Acting Headmis-
tress. The Governor and Miss
Trimingham was each presented
with a bouquet. ;

The school song, “Fiat Lux”
was followed by a song sung by
the Middle and Junior School,
“Count Your Blessings”.

Mr, Reed, who was Chair-
man, welcomed the Governor
on what was the latter’s first
official visit to the school. He
@xpressed regret that Mrs.
Savage was. suffering from
chill and was unable to attend
He wished her a speedy recov-
ery.

—
Scope Widened
The Governing Body were
pleased to see so many parents
present, Mr. Reed said, and added
that he had intended to use the
opportunity to tell them how the
scope of education was being
widened, so that it would be a
preparation for more interesting
life in the future, He realised,
however, after seeing the attrac-
tive bill of fare that Miss Trim-
ingham had prepared, that it was
unnecessary for him to labour
that point.

He then requested her to deliver
her report.



Mrs. ‘Trimingham delivered
her report, which was often
punctuated by the applause of
listeners, especially when she
dealt with the achievements of
pupils of the school.

The Games Captain also re-

ported on matters in her sphere.

Prizes and certificates were
presented by the Governor, and
then the Governor delivered his

address. He said: — $
Governor’s Speech!
He said the report on the

School year by Mrs. Trimingham
reflects the deep devotion to duty
of an overworked staff owing to
constant changes of personnel,
the usual high standard of
academic results and the success-
ful ancillary activities of a school
of this kind. When we realize
that these achievements have
been won in spite of a back-
ground of inadequate accommo-
dation, we have good reason to
congratulate sincerely all those
who by individual effort have
helped to maintain, and indeed
enhance, the reputation of
Queen’s.

You would wish me, I know,
to make a special mention of the
work of Mrs. Trimingham, In
studying the records, I find that
this is not the first occasion on

which she has acted as Head-|

mistress.’ I know from personal
experience the difficulties arising
from an extended period of act-
ing in someone else’s shoes and
also arising from a shortage of
staff.

But rest assured, Madam, that
when Mrs. Corbin returns she
will find the College has made
all the progress in her absence
she would have wished if she had
been here herself.

Perhaps little irrelevantly,
the present plethora of Speech
days has reminded me of the
story from Canada of a man sit-
ting at dinner in a hotel.

He noticed another man sitting
alone who first laughed, and then
cried and finally waved his hand
and he kept on repeating the
process,

Curiosity got the better of the
observer and he walked across
to the other table and said, “Ex-
cuse me, you are a stranger here.
Can I help you?’

The man replied, “No, thank
you. The truth is that I lead
a very solitary life in the back-
woods and have formed a habit
of telling stories to myself. When
they are amusing, I laugh, and
when they are sad, I shed tears.”

a

“I understand” said the ob-
server, “but what is the waving
of the hand indicate?”

“Oh,” said the man, “I do that
when I have heard the story be-
fore"

Something New

You will appreciate the diffi-
culty of a Governor endeavouring
to say something new and to a

purpose on Speech Days. But on|

this occasion when the lack of
accommodation prevents the girls

from being inside this building,
IT shall take the opportunity to
speak primarily to parents.

The influence of a home on
the younger generation can-
not be overestimated and
there can be no doubt that
the standards of truth, justice,
patience and affection which
we parents practice in our
lives and in our homes do not
pass unnoticed by our chil-
dren.

If we fail to respect each other
we are hasty in our judgments.
we criticise’ our neighbours or
repeat rumours, our children are
liable to develop similar

f
if

But if we are just in

all our words



and actions our
children will be fair in their
dealings.
| 1880, 1910—
|
° 6
Different?
Also, adapt yourselves to
modern developments as they

affect your children. I remem-
ber my great grandmother say-
ing how different the girls were
| in 1880 compared with those in
} 1910

I heard a similar criticism by
my grandmother and my mother.
And now you and I are saying
exactly the same thing. Our
children have greater opportuni-
ties for development than we
had.

Many of us are making sacri-
fices in order to give our chil-
dren the best education we can
afford, but I beg you not to re-
| Jax your efforts when they leave
school. You must encourage
them to continue their learning
in every way open to them, The
more they learn the less they
will be bored the more in-
terest they will take in what is
going on and still more they
will play a part in the develop-
ment of the good in Barbados and
in the suppression of evil,

I realise that to mention
colour in Barbados may be in-
viting criticism and by a new-
comer perhaps it is dangerous.
But I do plead for an end to
this snobbery of colour by
nearly all shades of the com-
munity, No good can come of
it. Cast it out from your
hearts and your homes and
teach your children that as the
children of God they are no
better in His eyes than any
other children. I know it is
infecting school life in some
degree and it must be removed
for it is insidious in its growth
and development,

As there are no pupils listening,
may I mention in conclusion the
important matter of a holiday to
celebrate this occasion. I have not
taken legal advice in the matter,
but from the prospectus of Queen’s
College included in the Education
Act of 1890 it states merely that
there shall be one whole holiday
given at the middle of each term.

But there is no provision in the
law for any supplementary holi-
days. However, if you, Mrs.
Trimingham, are willing to risk
spending a period in prison with
;me, I hope you will give the girls
the usual holiday at an opportune
time.

The Lord Bishop moving the
vote of thanks complimented Mrs.
Trimingham on her report and
said he hoped that all the things
she had asked for for the school
would be granted in due course.
He hoped that when a hall was
granted it-would be large enough
to accommodate both parents and
teachers on Speech Days,

The Bishop then thanked the
Governor for presenting the
prizes and for delivering an ex-
cellent address, Where the ques-
tion of colour snobbery was
concerned he endorsed every-

thing that the Governor had
said.

Headmistress’
Report

At the beginniag of the School
Year, Queen’s College was still fill-
ed to capacity with 368 on the total
roll. In the Junior School there
were 74, in the Main School 294.
The number in the VIth Form
has risen to 29, and this increase
will continue, since Queen's Col-
lege has become a centre for pre-
piring girls from other Schools
for the Advanced Course, and
University Entrance and Scholar-
ship Examinations, We are very
glad to have a_ flourishing VIth
Form, but it becomes an impossi-
ble task for one Mistress to deal
satisfactorily with three sections
jot it at the same time, that is,
j with #irls rapging from Scholar-
jship candidates to new entries
jfrom the Vth Form, Some girls
are bound to suffer, and a teacher
will tend to feel that the Scholar-
snip candidates have the priority
to her attention.

On the whole, this year has
been a difficult one where staffing
has been concerned, Mrs. Whe-
well came to help us during Mrs.
Corbin’s absence, but was forced
to leave in February, in order to
accompany her husband to Eng-
land. During the short time she
was with us, she endeared herself
to everyone, and identified herself
with Queen’s College interests in
la tr-ly remarkable ay Since
her departure, ave had a
bewilderine number of helpers.












we

he











“Colour Snobbery Is Affecting
~ Sehool Life—Cast It Out!” |

j

Training and Games
| College since Mrs
|}Although Miss Hope
ja much more lucrative
town, she loyally decided
jr at Queen's College
j}we could obtain a qualified G
nastics Mistress, We are all very)
happy to be welcoming Mrs.
Wotton back in September, and
we rejoice that Miss Hope has
been accepted for a three years’|
Course at Bedford Physical
Training College in England

The Old Girls’ Association has
decided to show its appreciation
of all that Miss Hope has done for
Quec.a’s College by presenting her
with the interest on its Scholar-
ship Fund, which has been ac-
cumulating for many years, and
hes now reached the sum of £100.
This seems a unique opportunity
for some further award or exhi-
bition, as Miss Hope has been
admitted to the College, only on
the strength of an undertaking
that she will return to teach in
Barbados.

Miss Gwen Cumberbatch,
has been on the Staff of
College .in an acting

at Que
Wotton
was offered!

post in

n-








who
Queen's
position

since 1948 has this term been
appointed to the Staff of the
Church of England High School,
Grenada, We miss her buoyant
spirit, but congratulate her, and
wish her every success in her

future career, Miss Gloria Cum-
mins, B.A., hag been appointed to
fill the vacancy at Queen’s College
in September, and is now in Eng-
land completing her training for
the London Teacher’s Diploma
We shall welcome her back
one of our most gifted Old Girls
Meanwhile, Miss Patricia Moore,
B.Sc. from McGill University, has
joined the Staff as a_ relieving
teacher until the end of this term
while Miss Patricia Zephirin,|
tome on vacation from McDonald
College of McGill University, is
also helping us. Miss Sheila Pil-
grim hag been on a year’s study
leave, training for a Teacher's
Diploma at Erdiston Training
College, and during her absence
Miss Patricia Hope has given alje
and loyal service in an_ actif
position on the Staff of Queen's
College. Miss Patricia Hope has
secured an entrance into the l'ni-
versity College of the West Indies,
and I understand that a scheme
under consideration by the
{Government to inaugurate a loan
lfund to assist promising stucents
{from Barbados, so we do hope
}that it will be made possible for
her to read for a degree there

is



re

is



In the absence of Mrs. Corbin and
Miss Sheila Pilgrim, noble work
has been done by Miss Daphne
Hackett in the organisation and

teaching of Senior French

A year such as this, tests the
Staff to the maximum and I
should like to record my grateful
jthanks for the faithful, resource-
ful attitude they have adopted in
al! emergencies, with special
mention of Mrs. Adams for the able
and ever-cheerful way she has
helped me and the School as Act-
ing Deputy Headmistress. The
support of the Staff has not only
sustained me _ personally, but
augurs well for the continuance
of the high standard set by
Queen's College,

We have again had a successfu)\
year. in Examination results
Twenty-nine girls out of thirty-
two entries passed the Cambridge
School Certificate Examination,
with varying Distinctions in Eng-
lish Language, History, Geogra-
phy and French, details of which
may be seen in the Programme
|Five gained Exemption from the
| Matriculation of the University of
London, while three others com-
pleted their Exemption, two, by
adding Distinction, and one by
adding Credit in English Lan-
guage, to their 1948 Certificates.

Three girls out of four obtained
the Higher Certificate of the Ox-
ford and Cambridge Joint Board,
jtwo of them, Austin Clarke and
| Daphne Pilgrim, reaching Exhibi-
| tion standard with Distinctions in
| Histcry, and Melnese Bridgeman
has passed the Entrance Examina-
tion to the University College of
the West Indies. To crown this
year’s Academic successes, Dahne
, Pilgrim has gained an Open Schol-
| arship, awarded by the University
of the West Indies, The University
offered six scholarships for the
whole of the West Indies and
Daphne was the only girl and the
only Barbadian, to obtain a schol-
arship. Both Barbados and
Queen’s College are proud of the
honour she has brought to us, and
; we have deep pleasure in congrat-
ulating Mr. and My Pilgrim
{ being the parents of the second
girl in the Island to secure an out-
Standing scholastic achievement
In 1946, Elsie Pilgrim was the
first girl to gain the Barbados
i Scholarship and has this year been
awarded a further grant from the
Barbados Government to carry on
research work for her History M.
Litt at Girton College, Cambridge
Another of our Queen’s College
Old Girls, Pamela Fox, is also at
Cambridge doing research work in
| History, for her History Ph.D.
after having obtained her





for

and various Distinctions at McGiil
University. Elsie and Pamel:
studied together in the VIth Form
at Queen's College and, after go-
ing divergent ays, have met us
room-mates

both engaged
torical research.







‘Girton
Advanced

at
in

College,
His-



Ne

ern one ee

In The Courts Vesterday :

Woman Fined £2 For
“Abominable Language”

THE DECISION of Mr. I
trict “A” who ordered Euger
pay a fine of £2 and 3/- cos

{. A. Talma, Magistrate of Dis-
1e Watson of Passage Road to
ts to be paid in seven days or

in default one month’s imprisonment with hard labour for

using indecent language nea
confirmed by their Honours
H. A. Vaughn, judges of th
yesterday.



in St. Peter:

Fishermen
Net Large
Catches

ISHERMEN WERE returning
to the beaches and market of

Speightstown with big catches of
pot fish during the week

At various spots along the beach
crowds could be seen gathered
around “moses” to get their home |
supply

Ningnings, cooks, snappers
grunts and other kinds of small
fish mixed together brought the
fishermen 16 cents for each pound

Once or twice during the week
the housewife couki change the
dish with jacks which were
caught in good numbers by the
Seine Boat.

Flying fish were not in abun-
dunce as they were a few weeks
m@_O

R SSIDENTS OF Speightstown
complain of the untidiness of
the streets and dustbins which
line the sidewalk |

Gutters of the principal streets}
jike Church Street, Queen Street,



|

Round-the-Town = and Orange |
Street are swept once or twice}
per week

During the other five days, fruit}
skins, small stones, leaves, bits of
paper and other bits of refuge lit-}
ter the streets. ;

The dustbins are emptied on
Sundays only, when the majority
of them are full to overflowing
They are not too enticing in odour,
especially when rain falls. Flies}
are encouraged to swarm around |
them

I] N DISTRICT “E” Police

Courts, His Worship Mr. S
H. Nurse imposed few fines dur-
ing the week

The highest of them were two
20s. fines imposed on Westerman
Bowen of Cave Hill, St, Lucy
He was convicted for blackguard-
ing on Queen's Street, St. Peter,
and for resisting Island Constable
Elder Whitehead

Set Connell

case

prosecuted the

CART DRIVEN by Gladston
Smith of St. John was in-
volved in an accident with a bi-
cycle ridden by K. Bayley of Cane
Garden, St Joseph, yesterday
about 2.30 p.m. on Wakefield
Road, St. John
The cycle was
Bayley injured
LADEEN SMALL of
Hall, St. Joseph, was in-

jured when she was involved in
an accident with the bicycle own-

damaged and

Drax |

r Halls Road on April 18 was!

Mr. J. W. B. Chenery and Mr
re Assistant Court of Appeal

Their Honours told Watson that
the language she used was abom-
inable and she could be sent to
prison. They however hoped that
she will not reappear before them
on such a charge.

Another case brought by Watsoy
against Vivian Barrow of Passage
Road for using indecent language
to her and which was dismissed on
its merits by the same Magistrate
was also confirmed by Their Hon-
ours, Both were ordered to pay
the costs of appeal, Barrow 7/-
and Watson 8/4.

THEIR HONOURS MR. J. W. B.
CHENERY and Mr. H. A. Vaughn,
Judges of the Assistant Court of
Appeal yesterday confirmed the
decision of His Worship Mr. C. L.
Walwyn who put Irvine Brewster
of Bush Hall on a bond for six
months for making threats to Ger-
trude Sealy on April 24.

Sealy in her evidence said that
she was in her shop at Bush Hall
on April 24. Brewster came in and
purchased some red _ herrings
Brewster did not like the herrings
offered to him and a dispute fol-
lowed in which he promised to
shoot her and leave the island

Brewster was also ordered to pay
the costs of appeal which amount-
ed to 5/8.

THREE PERSONS WERE Y&S-
TERDAY placed on personal bonds
ranging from £2 to £5 for bodily
harm and assault when these cases
were brought up for hearing in the
Police Courts at District “A”.

Seventy-six years old Mary
Baptiste of Dash Road was yester-
day placed on a bond for 3 months
in the sum of £5 when Magistrate
G,. B. Griffith found her guilty of
inflicting bodily harm on Vicklyn
Griffith on June 19, Baptiste, who
said that her sight was bad, was

| seated in a chair when placed in

the dock. Before passing sentence
the Magistrate asked her to re-
spect her age and to see that no-
thing of that sort should happen
again,

A similar bond was placed on
Vicklyn Griffith of the same local
ity when she pleaded guilty of in-
flicting bodily harm on Mary Bap-
tiste on June 19

FOR ASSAULTING AND
BEATING Prince Gill, 18-year-o'«
Livingstone Belgrave of Harmony
Hall Road was placed on a bond
for 3 months in the sum of £2,
when he appeared before Magis
trate H. A .Talma.

MAGISTRATE G, B. GRIFFITH
yesterday dismissed the case
which was brought by the police
against Theophilus Dyal for ex-
ceeding the speed limit with the
bus M 1028 along Black Rock on
April 10. Dyal was represented
by Mr. J. E. T. Brancker.

gardener of Eckstein Village ap-
peared before Magistrate C. L
Walwyn on
were valued

rots which



ed and ridden by Ashby Phillip
of St, George, about 4.52 p.m
yesterday on Church View Road. }
Road

eer na
eB uw

PETS |.

a PURINA LICE POWDER and s
PURINA INSECT KILLER

; on July 14, the

FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR



“ase was dismissed

and Donelly was subsequently dis-

charged

el n*a” a nets ete”

“=
» ase USE

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SSaUeRBaegear as aaa seen
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BA MSOF OO Oe,

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WHEN BAPTISTE DONELLY, »

a charge of the un-
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at 16/8,

PAGE FIVE





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JOCKEY SHORTS, Otis and
Activity Brands in White,
Sizes 30 to 44

$1.24 & $1.39

TOOTAL HANDKERCHIEFS
Plain White & White with
Coloured Borders
Each




Pair

ste tater ta

BROAD STREET.





*5e5e,
PLAPVALPPPPPL PPLE PPL OFO

Some of our New Arrivals.
FOR MEN:









5.
>
%
%
%
%
> sis
g g
% % |S
X% f ll h % | SS Black or Brown leather sole shoes $5.05
Pra S a iio eg ee ° t iviti Y Leather Bedroom Slippers $5.15
| To all of them we are grateful Best Wishes % ora e activities of the Statue s Patent Dancing Shoes $6.45
jespecially to the Old Girls of fix
Gueen’s College who have rallied We offer our best wishes to them | R * ear FOR LADIES:
jround us in our need. But even|both, and to all who have one x of Our Lady of Fatima from the |
|Queen’s College Old Girls cannot| forth from Queen’s College to] % 2 ' Dress Court toe-less Shoes Black or White $5.40
jall be philanthropists, and after | win success, especially remember- | X time of arrival at Seawell— | Crepesoled Loafers in Brown $5.80
a little while they have drifted|ing Denise Watson, who has just | $ ' FOR CHILDREN:
away to office work in Tridae-]obtained the Mabel Hersey Award | ¥ a oN:
town where it i yjossible to|for the highest marks in the Final | ¢ ‘ ' Many new styles for be r irls
secure a salary of twies th» almost | Examinations at the Royal Victoria | § Orders are being taken now— nee ne ayes
|regligible amount offere+ to be-| Hospital, Montreal. To Miss |X FOR BABIES:
ginners at Queen’s Cellese! These | Zleanor Nurse, Old Girl of Queen’s $ ? ad
2 = ene as e Sta} College, and a most energetic and | % . ‘repesoled Strap Shoes in Pink, Blue, Red and
ae ere: i a Ane faithful member of the Staff, we | & Come in and look them over at ¥ | White, Sizes 3, 4, 5 $1.80
baa oe ae ie th = q 3 car aiid offer our warmest congratulations x
ie a : f 7 Dy on her outstanding achievement in | % _
eee oe - ca See eh at obtaining by Correspondence & THE CITY PHAR ACY ¢
jyet to be felt Ve ymnpathize | -. ’ 2 a a oe MM
thee vee ;}Course, a First Division in the | ¥ M %
with Miss Mould in her efforts to London B.A. General Degree (it | & %
maintain a high ndard in the jis fitting that Miss Nurse has been | $$ % 4
Preparatory Department spite |chosen to represent Queen’s Col- | % ’ x1% .
of these drawbac re, I/lege at a most important three] & K NIC HTS LY D ‘IS
must pay a_ glo to| weeks’ Summer School in Trini- | . % % SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD
|Miss Grace Hope \ ~|dad on “The Teaching of Carib-|\ oI
ror th %} 7 6. -
I cessfully organised the Ph al @ on page 7 PPP PEP MAA AM A\L AA LPL LLLP LEED PLE LPL SN







1

4
PAGE SIX



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON
























Se el eed |

MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY
ar __{ YEAU... AND, BROTH UNDY ae riarey | i
AM I GLAD SE OF OM =



DISEASE? DOES YOUNG














oe



AGENTS.



e + « « « « WITH WHISPER IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE

ttt
| KNEW THE CARTRIDGES *4 IT 1S CURIOUS ,M'SIEU CANNON, WHENEVER
CARESSE USED WERE

THERE 1S TROUBLE - 1 ALWAYS SAY ‘CHERCHEZ

BLANK ,VIDOCQ, BECAUSE ee “/ LA FEMME’! AH OUI, THAT
BRAD MITCHELL SHOWED 1 ' REMINDS ME 1 MUST FIND
( CARESSE LACROIX AND PUT

ME THE BOX OF BLANKS 4
WITH WHICH HE LOADED a HER MIND AT REST
i

hee GUN HE LENT HER...




| | BON SOIR M’MSELLE \ f
WHISPAIRE BON SOIR, rae
M'SIEU CANNON. yOu
TWO VOUNG PEOPLE /
WILL NOT WANT AN /
OLD POLICEMAN
AROUND






















Dy Weoni aetee betes Sadeoenena Lemna ore ee en tet, PET a
'E LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER
AS SOON AS I MENTIONED THE BULLET NICK IN | ,

HIS EAR, THAT LONG-HAIRED GENT FLEW OUT
LIKE HE WAS SHOT FROM A BOW,







YOU WO HAD BETTER GET TO THE CAFE
WHERE YOU'LL HAVE AN ALIBI, WHILE I GO
TO TUE WELL AND GET THAT INDIAN
AND THE BARBER, v













Wolpomur Agents





BY GEORGE MC.MANUS



ALOT OF SYMPATHY
YOU GIT AROUND HERE!
I CAN'T EVEN FIND IT IN
THE DICTIONARY-AS I
CAN'T SPELL IT-




|
|











Kewl! i

/ agree this

2 ‘ie . /
i (ts features...) way | este

| | f
4 Compare / in tts class!



Ane tC OE 1990 Range Renin Syrian he



L JUST CAN'T UNDER=
STAND DESMOND’
, COMING TO Tow






(WE'LL BE IN NORVALE )~]
IN FIVE MINUTES, eS |

1 \ xs MY OBAR... FIVE
SIRa.

THOUSAND OOL!.ARS IN
/ CRISP NEW BILLS... AND
YOU SHALL HAVE YOUR
LITTLE COT c /
~ VERY SOON



















séats 5

in comfort. 41 h.p. engine, Independent




_ BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

/ TSURE Lied YOU IN # |YIPPEE, COWBOY
THAT MOVIE, ‘COWBOY CAL, gare LO








‘ront wheel suspension for a smoother ride. Steering

THE PHANTOM
EF NTI Ress

ey we ey rt
ae yt Fa R
ie ee C

E ACHES THE JUNGLE
{

column gear shift. Body and chassis built as a single
‘l) WHAT, CARY? AFTER STARRING
MEL IN TWELVE WESTERNS?








unit for lightness and Sreater strength. Luggage



KIN | HAVE YOUR :



compartment of 10 cubic feet. Special rustproof finish.



WE GORY CAR
10 RIDE ON HORSES



Built to give enduring new car performance



re

MORRIS Ord

SEE THESE FINE CARS AT

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

——— a ae ee ee ee ee ean
[ CMILOREN wil “OE RC el gl |
FLOWBR | Se chia Nit} ——
| 6 | OS
TODAY # | \ } \ —, .
| | ——E | Ay, fe | CQ. (4
| | BRING Your t9, | SAy ex cae | | By \ j a
|| FAVORITE ~ ( | at 2 | Remember this label /
| SPE NS ae
j G4 } “Gy 7 | .
1 | Se i iil
| os \ ry |
8 Qe if

Ls SATURDAY, JULY 15
Se eels senescent





Le DR.BROWN GET ‘
- G1, wee is } IT IS ONLY PLACED ONGOODS OF FIRST QUALITY
: =X TIME 7 Always ask for
-——— MORTON

‘ | |

j A '
ie be PEARL

ONDIE ,

BARLEY

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (Bidos) LTD.







5, 1959



9 Se SS
a 5
}
For MARL, SAND
GARDEN MOULD
LIME and
BLOCK STONE

Dial 4503





|

and Backactfe
Gone in 1 Week

| Flush Kidneys With Cystex and You'll Feel Fint

Cystex—the prescription of a famous doctor—
ends all troubles due to faulty kidney actian in
double quick time, so, if you suffer from Rheu-
| metism, Sciatica, Neuritis, Lumbago, Backache.
Nervousness, Leg Poins, Dizziness, Circles unde:
Eyes, frequent Headoches and Colds, Poor En-

nd Appetite Puffy Ankles, Burning,
Smarting Pa: es, OF have frequently to Get
up Nights, go to your chemist today for Cystex
and be fit and well next week

Cystex Helps Nature 3 Ways

¢ The Cystex treatment is highly scientific, being
Specially compounded to soothe, tone and clean

Taw, sore, sick kidneys and bladder and to re-

move acids and poisons from your system safely

quickly and surely, yet contains no harsh,

harmful or dangerous drugs. Cystex works in

these 3 ways to end your troubles :—

| (1) Starts killing the germs which are attack-
ing your Kidneys, Bladder and urinary sys-
tem in two hours, yet is absolutely harmless
to human tissue

(2) Gets rid of health destroying, deadly poi-
sonous acids with which your system has

| become saturated

| (8) Strengthens and reinvigorates the kidne ys,
protects you from the ravages of disease-

i | attack on the delicate filter organism, and

| stimulates the entire system

:

9 Weeks in Hospital—Now Well
“I have suffered for five years with Kidney and
Bladder trouble, also Rheumatic pains and Stig
Joints. | was not able to raise my arms and
spent nine weeks in hospital. They said I would
not be able to work, but after Cystex | feel years
younger, well and strong.”"—(Sgd.) J, A. P

»° Health Improved in 2 Days

“I had not felt really well for ages and suffered
continually from backaches and headaches i
had tried almost everything but could not get
lasting relief. Finally I decided to give Cystex a
trial, and wish I had tried it long ago and saved
myself much pain and erpense, it has improved
my health more in two or three days than other
Wrings have done for months.’ —Mrs. B

“"\Guaronteed to Put You Right ‘
or Money Back i

i

) Get Cystex from your chemist
today. Give it a thorough test,
Cystex is guaranteed to make
you feel younger, stronger,



better in every way, In 24

hours and to be completely
Cay, { well in 1 week or your money
Ex] ° back if you return the empty
= package. Act now!

Cystex:::!');
sa BLADDER

The CUARANTEED Remedy RHEUMATISM





ileal
ey Wi
AA rN





Cocoa going overside
from a ship in the Port
of London Docks with D
what looks like little or is the most difficult,
ceremony, but the staff it is safest in the experi-
of the Port of London enced hands of the Port
Authority know the de- of London Authority—
sree of care required there it has the added
to handle this valuable advantage of reaching
commodity. Whethera the latgest consumer
product is easy to off-load matket in the world.



My eyes often used to smart and

At the Club Jim said “You're
sone after a day's work Sometim probably suffering from a touch of
leven had to stay late to get finished eye strain. Why not try Optrex?”






5) 2
So I took Jim's advice Every day *“No-eye strain now!” | said to Jim
1 used Optrex—washed away dirt later. “Thanks to you and Optrex!
and germs, toned up eye muscles Vil never be without it again.”

PROTECT YOUR EYES wzzé

pr

Al









|
|
|
i
|
EMM esee





SATURDAY, JULY 15,



1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.

Telephone 25/8.









IED
BRATHWAITE D serdé at Layr
Road Brittons Hil MARGA
AUGUSTA The funer leaves
late res ri 4 o'e' oc t ning
for the Ch Missior cle
and thence to the Westb |
Friends are invited
Joseph Lar F c :
M
15.7. 5¢ |
MORRISON —Y¢
centenary Host Ge F
retired Hieadr
Boys’ Schoc Feie
me Saint Matt «



ings, at 3.30 o'clock
past Three) and 4
service will proceed io the West
Cemetery

Ethel Morrison ‘wife



Constance
“ Morrison
hi.dren Dr







who was cz
July 1939
and Quietly sleeping
green 1



Lies the one we
One we loved and
To you who have
Cherish her
For you nev
Until you see her
May she rest in peace
Ever remembered by
Aubrey



and
in







FOR SALE



AUTOMOTIVE

CAR — 1947
working order,



Vauxhall Car,
18,000 miles

in perfect
Dial 8412
14,7.50—3n

CARS—One 1942 Dodge Car, one 1938
Morris (10 H.P.) in good condition
Apply to Cosmopolitan Garage, Magazine
Lane. Dial 3915 15,7.50—2n.





CAR One Morris 8 H.P. Saloon Car

Apply S. F. Clarke, Ainy Hill,, St. John
14.7,50—3n

CAR—Vauxhall, Velox 18 h.p. Per

fect Condition two tone paint work



trunk specially fitted for the better

carrying of more luggage. Ring R. S

Nicholls Home 8324
28.6.50—t.f.n

Office 3925



PLYMC H
sound mechanic condition,
also licensed Can be
Service Station, St

STATION WAGON - in



good tyres,
seen at Rocklyn
Andrew

14.7.50—3n



ELECTRICAL

BENDIX WASHER#— ment just received. Book
without delay. Dial 3878
Co. Ltd.,

ship-

your order

DaCosta &
Department
15.7.50—6n

Electrical







CEIL ING FANS 110 Volts,
with Speed Controller Dial
Costa & Co., Ltd
ment



Electr ae Depart-

5.7,.50—6n





ICE CREAM DEEP FREEZER In “good
at Ralph Beard's Auction
Open Daily
14.7. .50—3n

working order,
Rooms,
8 a.m

Hardwood
to 4 p.m

Alley



PLANT—One Petrol Electric Lighting
Plant 110 volt DC 500 Watt.
H, M. Lampitt,
John,

Apply
College Savannah, St.
13.7.50—3n



REFRIGERATOR—Canadian
2 years old 5
perfect condition
Cook

Leonard,
guarantee, in
leaving island

years
Lady
Telephone 8493

14.7.50—2n

FURNITURE

Very



Reea Fibre Settee
settee; 2 Rockers,

Removable Up-
Price $75.00

attractive

Suite, consisting of
Armchair, End Table
holstered Spring Cushions.
Phone 3331 after 4.30 p.m.
14.7.50—3n



MECHANICAL

B.S.A. BICYCLES, Ladies and Gents,
various Models. REDMAN & TAYLOR’S
GARAGE LTD

BICYCLE — Ladies Raleigh Sports
Model in good condition. Tyres almost
new. Light Model — Easily ridden
uphill Phone 3437





























ELECTRIC F FITTINGS — A large selec-
tion for you to choose from at reasonable
prices. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.,
Electrical Department

15.7.50.—6n.





SINGER TREADLE MACHINE—Can
be seen at Brick House, Bay Street,
opposite Beckles Road. Phone 2968
15.7.50—In

TYPEWRITERS—"Olympia” portable
typewriters — standard keyboard. Price
$120.00. A. G. St. Hill, James Street.

13.7,50—In

LIVESTOCK

cow One milch cow, 3rd calf, 14
days old. Giving 40 pints daily. Apply
to F. E. C. Bethel, Friendship, St.
Michael Dial 4184







14.7.50—3n

“TWO HORSES—Mares both over 15
hands, vewy quiet and are accustomed
to Plantation work. For price etc
Apply: J. C,. Payne, Harrow or phone
3344. 15.7.50—Bn.
ee

MISCEL) ANEOUS



AVON —Silent Tyres for Motor Cars,
no crying on Corners, also TRUCK
HEAVY DUTY TYRES. All sizes..

REDMAN & TAYLOR'S a at:

7.50—
f ‘BATTE! RI 2S— Oldham, these are sold
with a Guarantee. REDMAN & TAY-
LOR'S GARAGE LTD. 14.7,.50—3n



RECORDS—Ne hipment
just received $1.05 also Music, Music,
Music with Theresa Brewer and The
Dixiland All Stars

LASHLEYS LIMITED





CALYPSO



- Pr. Wm. Hy. St

15.7.50,—2n.
forty eight
and get.



CALYPSO RECORDS,
titles, only ten each, come
them

A. BARNES & CO. LTD
15.7.50—T.F.N

‘ESCHALOT “Special price for large
quantities Apply JOHN D. TAYLOR
& SONS LTD. Dial 4335.

13,.7,50—3n

———$——_
GENT’S BLACK EVENING SUIT —
English made, in good condition. Height
5 feet 10 inches, Chest 38 inches, Also
two Dress Shirts, Practically new
16-inch Collar. Phone 4215
3.7,.50—3n.
———
GALVANIZE Pipes 1%, and 2 inches
also Galvanize flexible conduit in sizes
linch and 1% inches. Enquire Auto
Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone
2696 . 8.7.50—t.f.n

JACKS-—For Cars and
One Ton to Twelve Tons

Trucks, from
REDMAN &





TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD
14.7.50-—3n
JUICES—Pineapple, Orange Orange
end Grapefruit, Tomato and Orange
Earley Water. W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck
Street. Dial 3489 4.7.50—2n
JAMS AND MARMALADE—Peach,
Pineapple Plum, in 2lb tins, Golden
Shred, Scotch Orange and Silver Thread

Glass Jars. W. M
Dial 3489
14.7, 50—2n
LADIES PLASTIC RAIN COATS—In
plain colours and fancy designs $2.18
and $3.98 each Thani Bre Pr. Wm
Henry and Swan Street

Lemon in 1lb Forde,

35 Roebuck Street

14.7.50—3n

———
OIL COOKER American perfectior
draft proof front 4 cupboard, almost
new. Lady leaving island. Cook. Tele-
phone 8493 14.7, 50—2r



“ONE (1 Large Div th B
Cc be used as a bed Dias

15.7.50—In





HOUSES

BENSTONHURSE

rom the Ist



Marine
August. For part



t

14.7.50-—3n

FULLY FURNISHED

BUNGALOW
On the seaside,

( Prospect, St. James
3 bedrooms. From Ist August to ap-
Froved tenant. Not less than 4 months.
for particulars ring 2759

11.7,.50—3n

———$—
Pine

nid St0 embe
ion Phor. e














LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series 9
Oto4 Finder please return same

Sydney Sickier, C/o Central \Foundry's
vVeck Yard





iOL ATC With
at the back of the case are the
BFL Reward oifered to
Advocate Advtg. Dept

initials
finder at

15.7.50-—-2n
re

PERSONAL

The pub3Zc = 86 are herqoy
against giving credit to my wife Mary
Best ‘nee Weekes) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or amyone
else contracting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a written order
signed by me

Signed SAMUEL BEST
JONES LAND
Black Rock
St. Mic! 1
15.7,.50—2n







warned









NOTICES





NOTICE

“S.P.C.A — meeting of the Society, for members
only, is to be held at the Y.M.C.A.,

Pinfold Street, at twelve noon on Satur-
day 15th July, 1950. Purpose; to
consider an amendment to the society's
constitution 13.7.50—2n



NOTICE

TENDERS for conveying paupers
{a) From any part of the Parish to the
Almshouse.
(b) From the Almshouse to the General
Hospital will be received by me up to
July 18th 1950





W. U. GOODING,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip.
11.7.50—6n,



NOTICE

The last day for reveiving Tenders
for constructing a residence for a Paro-

chial Medical Officer on lands at
Edghill, St. Thomas, will be TUESDAY
Ist August 1950. The original date of
July 17th has been changed.
Rr. F. PILGRIM,
Parochial Treasurer.
15.7.50—2n





BARBADOS.
TRADE MARK CAUTION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
HENRY MASON (SHIPLEY) LIMITED
of Victoria Works, Shipley, Yorkshire,
England; Worsted Spinners and Manu-
facturers; are the owners and exclusive
proprietors of the following Trade

Mark:-
LANATEX

used upon “Cloths and Stuffs of Wool,
Worsted and worsted and Alpaca’, in
connection with the business of the
above named Company in selling the
said goods, that the said Trade Mark
has been registered in the Register of
Trade Marks kept under the Trade
Marks Act, 1938, (Imperial), and is
protected by law in certain British Pos-
sessions and Foreign States; and that
any infringement, fraudulent imitation
or improper application of the said
Trade Mark or violation of the rights of
the aforenamed Company in_ respect
thereof within Barbados will be dealt
with under the Merchandise Marks Act
1889 to amend the law relating to fraudu-
lent marks on merchandise or otherwise
as the Law directs
Dated this 13th day of July, 1950.
REGINALD W. BARKER & CO.
British and Foreign Patent and
Trade Mark Agents,
61 Cheapside,
London, E.C.2. England
for and on behalf of
HENRY MASON (SHIPLEY) LIMITED.
14.7. .50—3n



NOTICE

Re estate of
Deceased
JULIAN EGBERT BRATHWAITE

NOTICE is hereby given that all per-
sons having any debt or claims against
the Estate of JULIAN EGBERT BRATH-
WAITE, deceased late of Four Roads,
in the parish of Saint Philip in this
Island who died on the 15th day of
October 1948, intestate are requested to
send in particulars of their claims
duly attested to the undersigned Ettina
frcille Brathwaite, C/o Messrs. Haynes
& Griffith Solicitors No. 2 Swan Street,
Bridgetown, on or before the 31st day
of July, 1950 after which I shall produce
to distribute the assets of the deceased
among the parties entitled thereto
having regard only to such claims
of which I shall then have had notice
and I will not be liable for the assets
or any part thereof so distributed to
any person of whose debt or claim 1
shall not then have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their said
indebtedness without delay.

Dated this 3lst day of May, 1950.

ETTINA ERCILLA BRATHWAITE,
Qualified Administratrix of the Estate of
Julian Egbert Brathwaite, deceased.

2.6.50—4n





FOR

PANTS —
and made
Stripe Flannel:

SALE

Gents Pants ready made
to order in Grey & Pin
$6.20, & $7.05 per Pair
STANWAY STORE,
Lucas Street
15.7.50—2n







POOLE POTTERY—Now on display
in our Showroom comprises a delightful
assortment of hand decorated tea and
coffee sets, vases, cigarette boxes and
ash trays together with beautifully
modelled animal figures and sea bird
wall plaques. See them at
HARRISON & CO 12.7

MULLARD INCANDESCENT “BULBS,
Serew or Bayonet from 15 watts to 150
watts priced below popular brands

LASHLEY’'S LIMITED, Pr. Wm. Henry
Street. 15.7.50—2n





MULLARD
6 tube
Show
Street

RADIOS—See the NEW
Mullard Radio on display in our
Room at Prince William Henry
LASHLEY'S LIMITED.
15.7.50—2n

TABLE BU UTTER 1lb. tins and Sib





tins Nabo. See us for prices. John D
Taylor & Sons Ltd 185.7.50—2n
ee
TINNED FRUIT Grapes, Prunes
Apricots, Apples, Pineapples, Plums and
Strawberries in Tins, W, M. FORD
Dial 3489, 35 Roebuck Street
14.7.50—2n
WHITE E? MELLED WATER
COOLER 3 capacity useful in
Offices tions e, 12 only ir
stock a portations are
t ait t 7
oO $16.87 eact ob* n
HARRISON'S BROAD STREET
Dial—2364 7,50—2n





Gold band, |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



—

PUBLIC SALES

AUCTION

I have been instructed py whe Com-
missioner of Police to sell at Central
Station, on Monday 17th July at 2 p.m ‘ ta.
Twenty-nine (29) old cushion covers, tea = as







Advanced Course, in the VIth









C0) Obl: cdeliinkin, tees Gy agretciers. bean eas which .s being held ) Form. Furthermore, like Harrison
two (2) Telescopes, and several other |iN August under the auspices of |College, we need proper changing
items of interest : the Extra - Mural Department of |rooms for Games, and showers.
cdceraal a eaetee the University College of the West jand a Canteen. Girls indeed are

“13.7. 50—4n Indies in association with the His- |apparently more hungry than

| sie scabies _.. jtorical Society of Trinidad and | boys, for Mr, Hammond spoke of
Al CTION SALE OF MAYARO Tobago.) To Mrs. Hooper, former-|the boys round about 1.15 p.m
gine yc By oir ee abe onigy ly Miss Daly, our Science Mis- |“eating a sandwich which has
\“MAYARO", at Rockley, Christ Chu tress, we offer our felicitations on | spent the last five hours in a bag”,




which was set up for sale on the
July, was postpened and will now
Place next Thursday the 20th, at
o'clock

This house is in very good condition,
with pine floors and a shingled roof. It
has open verandah 7 by 22, drawing room
12 by 23, dining room 12 by 23, two +2:
bedrooms each 11 by 19, both with basins, |
back verandah 7 by 19, toilet with box
and bowl The only thing to lose in
this house is the lath and
Terms cash. It is your interest
to inspect house before the date of sale

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,

Auctioneer

but at Queen’s College I have had
\the pathetic story brought to me

her recent marriage to Mr. Hooper |
of the Cable & Wireless, Ltd. and |
wish her every happiness in her |of a girl destitute of any lunch.
rew life, hoping she will long re- ‘because she had eaten all her
nain with us on the Staff at |sandwiches at 11.15 a.m,

Queen's College.
. | This Year



Needs :
This year, the gfris have been
I now propose to follow Mr. |as enthusiastic as ever about their
|Hammond’s example, when speak- Ranger and Guide Companies,
ing of the needs of Harrison Col- and Brownie Pack. You will find
15.7.50.—4n. lege, and enumerate the very|an account of their activities i»
pressing needs of Queen’s Col- College Magazine, but I would
|lege. We also, need so many thing,|‘ike to take the opportunity of
UNDER THE SILVER —foremost a Hall large enough |thanking Mrs. Glindon Reed f»

|to accommodate the girls of jall her help with the Guides, and
HAMMER | Queen’s College as well as their

Miss Hazel Clarke with the
}parents on Speech Day! Secondly | Brownies. I understand that if
ten at {2 Reference Library and VIti|more Guiders were forthcoming,
“|Form Class rooms are required. | another Guide Company would be

4 pieces Spun is any odd corners of the Sghool

1 = formed at Queen's College? Inter
Carton Lux Carton | you may stumble upon VIth Form |House Sports have been keen!)





|
;
Fi

By recommendations of Lloyds
we will sell on TUESDAY, the
Mart High Street

33° Hats,
3 Cartons

3 Umbrellas,
Vim, 1




Rinse 101 pkgs, One O One, 9 Do :

Teething Powders 25 ting Sweet Bie |Students, even driven to seek |contested, and later the Game
13 Coalpots 44 Iron Pots, 14 prs | qQuietude under the trees — a new | Captain will give you her Report
also 1 G.E. Radio, 1 Gent: |“species of birds’ at Queen’s Col- The spiritual side of School lit

Bicycle and 40 Doz. Gal. Buckets

lege, as the “Collegian” so aptly | has not been neglected and we owe

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO..





Queen’ s College Speech Day ee

PAGE SEVEN





\



SALE



eir continual help, not or |
m ng arrangements for M
Fuller’s visit and in showing ed i
cational films to the
Main School,
erous gift of
prizes
During the visit of Her Rey
Highness, Princess Alice, to Bur-
ados, Queen’s College received $1
great honour when the Royal C:
|



weekly, and we are deeply grat
| tut to all those who 40 willingly
come to inspire us with their talks
} At the end of the December term,
the Scripture Union presented the
beautiful Christmas Mystery pla)
“Eager Heart,” and the production
was as helpful to those who had
the privilege of taking part in ii
as to those who came to see it
The proceeds from the perform-
ances of “Eager Heart” were giv
en to charities, and the girls, as
usual, brought toys and garmenis



Upper and
but also for the gen
valuable



boo



ORIENT
INTAL

CURIOS. voRY
JEWE LEERY
ESTRIES,



TEAK. SANDAL
RRASSWARE, TAP
GLOVES PERFUMES.
drove along through the ground KASHRMERE
imidst the ringing cheers of the
girls, and pausing by the cover-





to be distributed to the poor at /ed—way, gave Jocelyn Wiles time
Christmas. to present a Victorian posy to Her
Interesting Royal Highness. The occasion was

“SUNBEAM”

Leads the way with .

celebrated by a half-holiday, at
the gracious request of Her Royal
Highness

The Literary and Debating Soci-
,ety has continued to hold inter
Jesting meetings, sometimes accept-

ing invitations from the Actor



nd Science Clubs of Harris : 5 oe” $e
: ei ion 7 wes
College. Mr. Douglas-Smith, the Murderer W eeps CONTROL on Handlebars

Resident Tutor at the Extra~Mural

Only One (1)
Department of the University Co!-

ST. KITTS

George Herman Grey of Basse- — pmaining -
lege of the West Indies, honoured } torre want as the Judge pro- een oe
the History Vith Form with a/nounced his death sentence after Tuspection Invited

most interesting lecture on Ger-
many and has this week given a
special talk to some of the Senior
girls. We appreciate his visits and
his genial kindliness, more than
we can say, and are indeed sorry
that he is not able to be with us
this afternoon, Other visitors dur-
ing the past year include’ the
famous baritone, Mr.

the jury had found him guilty of
wilfully murdering Arthur Glas-
ford one hundred feet east of the
Folice Station on June 11, this
year

Grey who had no witness on his
behalf. although represented by
two counsellors, admitted that he
inflicted the fatal wound after be-

ee ee

«(hr ian Science }





|
|
i
i









; Frederick 7: yoke 5 » exte
styles e, a debt of gratitude to the Rever- . ‘ling provoked to some extent
Aucinadees — — cppertanities ty: be laen Cae er Wwosdsdot taking lou: Fuller, and the College Heralds, The quarrel arose over a young 4 hivading oom 6
wd “ih opened up for girls in the Vth aman Class, and to His who both gave song recitals to the | girl who claimed tpat she was
Ptah Form who have shown definite Lordship the Bishop for making girls, We owe a great debt of 8ra:- | friendly with Glasford for a short g 1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS >
REAL ESTATE ability for Science, to enable them {the arrangements. The Scripture itude to the British Council for period. (Broad Street)

A SMALL STONE BUNGALoWw..|to continue their studies in the !Union has continued to mec! Hours; 10 a.m.—2 p.m. b
Called Beverly at Britton’s Hill, with Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
enough land for flower and kitchen SHIPPIN ( Fridays
garden. .

Apply D'ARCY A. SCOTT ; OTICES 10 a.m.—12 o'clock.

15.7.50—2n

COLLEEN

Bedrooms, Dining and

Toilet and Bath,
walk to sea

interested





HARBOUR LOG

In Carlisle Bay

Situated in Worthing, 3
Drawing Room,
Kitchen. Two minutes
Special price to one
Apply: Apartment 5 Strath-



ARRIVALS—By

BWLAL



more, Worthing Guest House Gap Sch. Lady Noeleen, Yacht Leander, From TRINIDAD—E. Ford, F Johu
15.7.50-—2n, | Sch. Emanuel C. Gordon, Sch. Mary M.} son, J, Johnson, M. Johnson, R. Rei

- ~~~ -——____—_— —- —- Lewis, Sch. Philip H. Davidson, Sch |man, W Hudson, W Hudson, M
LANL Desirable building site at | Manua Burma D., Sch. Henry | pamdin, G. Yvonnet, E. Baiz, J. Wick
Graeme Hall Terrace Dial 3430 D Ww Sch. Harriet Whittaker, ham, R. Field, E. Holder, M. De Mont
1.7.50—t.f.n.| Sch. Turtle Dove, M.V. Blue Star, M.V brun, J, De Montbrun, M. De Mont

Caribbee, Sch. W. L
United

Eunicia, Seh./ pbrun, M. De

Mabel Boyce, Walter Bennett, R

\E Montbrun, L Fisher
ONE DESIRABLE PROPERTY at Pilgrims, Sch Zoileen, Sch Stone









Bridgefield, St. Thomas. It consists of | Frances W. Smith, Sch. Rosarene, Yacht] 4 stone, E. Benjamin
a stone wall house and shop, both in | Tern ILI From DOMINICA—Sheilla — Etienne
good condition. The house has water Bernice Etienne, Colonel Bloodworth
toilet and shower and stands,on 1% ARRIVALS From TRINIDAD—D Hive, R o
acres of land which is at present planted a f. A N. Gokool, P, Taylor,
with canes. friced fit to sell. Can be S.S. Lady Rodney, 4,907 tons net, ne OF Banfield, Martin,
seen ony day Capt. LeBlanc, from Dominica F. O'Neill, 1. Artherly, W. Wiltshire
DARCY A. SCOTT ; N. Patel ‘
15.7.50—2n DEPARTURES From La GUAIRA—Miriam — Lacie
eecee —— > S g wucie Ss h, R "
SANDGATE", Hastings, standing on Schooner Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 (tons (anny yohn Tater Lessing wages
2.940 square feet of land on the seaside| "€t. Capt. Every, for British Guiana From ST, LUCIA—Wilfred Cave, Doris
ot Hastings Road, schooner Adalina, 50 tons net, Capt Cave, Leonard James, Basil Barnes
The House contains, drawing and din-| Flemming, for St Lucia Ruth Barnes, Ida Fogelson
ing room, enclosed gallery on three}, Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt. | Eom spt. KITTS—Mr. Carl Blanchette,

King, for St. Vincent,

sides, two bedrooms with dressing
rooms, kitchenette, toilet and bath up-
stairs with usual rooms downstairs and
two flights of steps to sea. Gas,
ere and Water.

nspection y day by a intment
Phone: No. 2868 Pare tee “2

The above will be set up for sale to
public competition at our office on Friday

Miss R. Sprott.
From ANTIGUA—Winston Ward
Intransit For TRINIDAD—June Howes,

Clement Francis
From SAN JUAN-—Richard

Jocelyn Warren
DEPARTURES—By B. W. 1
For TRINIDAD—Mana M

Meza, Charles Lee, Grac

Passengérs arriving yesterday by the
S.S. “Lady Rodney” were from Boston
Ernest Alleyne, Claris Gipson, Clarence
King, L King, Neville King, Edith
Laurence. From St, Kitts-—Inez Malone
From Antigua—James Rae, Helen Rae
From Montserrat—John Eid, Annoe Eid,

Warren,

|

te

1s
EEN SN







the 2ist day of July 1980 at 2 p.m. | Prrold Eid. From Dominica—Augustine | a aina Taylor, Olive MacKay, ;

CARRINGTON & SEALY, | Defreltas, | George | Florant, LeRoy! macKay, Herbert Rogers, | Maicos

Lucas Street. | \yarchall. Era Rawle ? Shadack, John Peazer, Margaret Lewis,

11.7.50—10n r oT Brian Lewis, Gerald Lewis, Anthony

. euy 2 i , Lewis, Meriel Kinch, Nellie Massyn,

A Delightful Residence at TOP ROCK, | ,, Passengers lneving the island last night

pee Three Bedrooms with connecting

ollet and Baths, Breakfast Balcony ia sae 4 ay For ST. VINCENT -Edaline Neverson,

Large Sun Baleony, Modern Kitchen, ein ae ne 7 = ae Fred Thomas, Mildred Browne, Basil

Large Lounge/Dining Room. Outside } ) ; 7 . ‘| Browne, Margaret Manning, Gordon

* 3 p Dayis,
Two-Car Garage, Three Servants’ Rooms, aes a ie Wiitiishee Ride s Santor,

Toilet and Bath, Gardens well laid out
Fully Enclosed.’ For Viewing Ring 4683 | y47,,and Mrs. Wo A
or 8402. 14.7.50—3n | Mr, C.’ S. Durant,

S. A. Walke. For British Guiana—-Mr
and Mrs. K. KB. McKenzie, Mr. and

Mrs. K. R. Hunte, Mr. W. K. Atkin-
WANTED son, Mr, A. DeL. Inniss, Mr. 8S. J

Bernstein.

Crawford, Susan Coultas, Emma Coultas,
Else Thaysen.

For La GUAIRA—Aaron Schor, Norma
Otero, Luz del
Otero, Luz Otero,
sendra Savorgnan,
Roderic Savorgnan

For ST. LUCIA—Geraldine Murray,
George French, John Simmons, Aubrey
Douglas Smith.

For ST. KITTS—David Evans, Carmen
Miriam

W. A. Hadley, Mr, R
For Grenada-

For Trinidad—Mr Carmen Otero, Mlsa

Pablo Otero, Ales-
Rosette Savorgnan,









Ie



=

ELP .

A qualified NURSE for St.
Almshouse at a

Williams,
Flaharty.
Yor BRITISH GUIANA—Mr

Wilma Heyliger,

In Touch With Barbados

Joseph's

y the £ Rodney” were—for St, | James Grosvenor, Sylvia Grosvenor,
Vincent—Mrs. A. G. Hanschell, Miss | James Francis, J, Lane, A, Lane
Charles





salary of $60.44 :, . Burton, Mrs. Zoe Burton, Mr. John
month. Applications with Gartidenio’ te Coastal Station Gutch, Miss Lilian Shepherd, Mrs
be forwarded to the Parochial Medical Irene Miller, Mrs, Pearl Peters, Mrs
Officer, “Ellangowan,” not later than Cable and Wireless (West Indies) | Hettie Milby
Monday, 17th July, 1950. Limited advise that they can now com- For CIUDAD TRUJILLO-Richard Hart,
Any Further Particulars can be ob-| â„¢Mmunicate with the following ships | Gustavo Tolentino
tained from the P.M.O. through their Barbados Coast Station:— For GRENADA-—Rev Fr Patrick
A. A. B. GILL, S.S. Fort Townshend, S.S. Beech | Moore, Mr Joseph Harkness, Mr
Clerk, Poor Law Guardians, | Hill, S.S. Lady Rodney, S.S_ Stanbell, | George Roberts, Mr. Peter Jaffe, Mr
t St. Joseph S.S. Leme, S8.S. S. Mateo, David Outcalt
8.7.50—7n, | S.S. Temple Arch, S.S. Pa » § For ANTIGUA—Harry Drew
—_eaenmmed | icon Pennant, §.8, Elizabeth, 8.8 Arrivals by B. W. 1. A. on Thursday
“DEPUTY MANAGER—Required for | Sundale, S.S. Oakhill, S.S. Arkansas,}from B.G.—Mr. Jack Marson, Mrs. ;
small Sugar Estate in St. Vincent. |S-S. Silver Walnut, S.S. Patao, 5.S.| Stephanie Marson, Miss Mary Marson,
Young, energetic well educated man re- | Santa Ana, S.S. Esso Shreverport, SS. | Mr Francis D’Almada, Mr Donald
quired Future prospects good", Trajanus, S.S Franca Fassio, 5.8 Armstrong, Mrs Letitia Armstrong,
Apply to Mount Bentinck Estates Ltd Canadian Challenger, S.S. Maurienne, | Miss Elaine Evans, Mr. John Blanchard,
Kingstown, St. Vincent. $.S, Gascogne Mr. Robert Jaisingh

12.7.50—Tn
GOOD EXPERIENCE GENERAL



ais





Se Pee ih asttor GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Cave Hill, St. Michael.
14.7.50—2n.
TENDERS FOR PURCHASE OF GAS COOKING
MISCELLANEOUS APPARATUS



GAMES—One (1) Badminton Set. One
(1) Croquet Set. One (1) Deck Tennis
Set. Phone 3753—3421.

Tenders are invited for the purchase of one (1) No. 6 standard
electrically driven AEROGEN Petrol Gas Generator with 1/3 H.P.
motor wound for 110 volts. 50 cycles, single phase supply: complete
with burners and stove. The equipment is at present housed at
Erdiston Teachers’ Training College, and may be inspected by appoint-
ment with the Principal.

15.7.50—1n 2. The original cost of the apparatus was $2,609.70. In addition
"WANTED IMMEDIATELY to the price tendered, the purchaser will be required to pay Customs

PUPS—Good breed. Pair preferrea,/ duty amounting to $262.
Dial 2525 , 15.7.50—1n 3. Tenders should be forwarded in sealed envelopes addressed
to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so as to
reach the Colonial Secretary's Office not later than 4 p.m. on Friday
the 28th of July, 1950. The envelopes should be clearly marked
“Tender for Gas Cooking Apparatus”,

OLD SEWING MACHINES—Out of 4. The Government does not bind itself to accept the highest or

use, of any make. Apply: Mrs. |any tender.
Vaughn, King’s Street or Fairchild and : §.7.50—2
Probyn Street. 15,7.50—2n eee a

11.7.50—3n,
Retired elderly man seeks position, can

assist in office and be of some value in
many other ways Some experience in
hotel business.

M. E. M. C/o Advocate







HOUSE, furnished or unfurnished
near the sea, Minimum 5 to 6 bed-
rooms within easy reach of town,
Reply H. G. c/o Advocate.

16.7.50—3n .











VACANCIES FOR TWO ASSISTANT AGRICULTURAL
SUPERINTENDENTS, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BRITISH GUIANA.

Applications are invited for two vacant posts of Assistant Agricul-
tural Superintendents in the Department of Agriculture, British
Guiana,

Particulars of the post are as under: —

Salary

rising to £625 per annum by annual incre-

is Wise!

£500 per
ments of £25

annum

Qualifications and Experience
Applicants must hold either—
(i) a degree or diploma in Agriculture, and have some experi-
ence in agficultural extension or farm management; or
(ii) the Associateship of the Imperial College of Tropical Agri-
culture or a degree or diploma in Agriculture with post
graduate training at an Agricultural College.
Allowances
Travelling and subsistence allowances will be paid in accordance
with the Government Regulations in force.
Probationary Period
Appointment to the posts will be on twelve months probation. |
When confirmed in the appointment the officers will be placed on the
pensionable establishment, and will be liable to contribute to the Brit- |
ish Guiana Widows and Orphans Fund at the rate of 5% of the mnxi- |
mum salary of the post by monthly deductions from salary. ; |
2. The successful candidates will be engaged in the extension |
service of the Department of Agriculture or on projects operated by |
the Department, |
Applications giving full name, age and details of qualifica- |



She has Gas for Cooking

High Blood Pressure
Kills Men & Women

Twice as many women as
fer from High Blood Pressure, which
is a mysterious disease that starts
| about the time of Change of Lite amd and
| is the real cause of much
and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
| mon symptoms of High Blood Pres-
| sure are: Nervousness, headaches at
top and back of head and above
pressure in head, dizziness, 3
breath, paing in heart, tation, ’









this Room the Bible: and

is Christian Science text-book,

=



MONTREAL,
LAND



AUSTEKALIA, NEW
LINE LTD., (M.A.N.Z. LL ,
SS. cone Ge. tae M.V. “DAERWOOD”

sails The ,
Adc laide May 19th. Melbourne June will accept Cargo and Pas
ind, Sydney June Mth, Brisbane June sengers for St. Lucia, St.



Selence and Heaith wika Key to

the Scriptures by MARY BAKER
BDDY



may Ye read,
or pun hased

Visitors Are Welcome

borrowea



4th arriving at Trinidad about July 2ist Tince lren: a i
S.S. “PORT WELLINGTON" » sails ea renada, and

July/August. Brisbane early August ruba, ate of Sailing to

be given

Melbourne mid July N. Queensland
The M.V-. “CARIBBEE"

Shnets inid August arriving

Sout 9th § bl

ou h September. will accept Cargo and Pas-
An-



Trinidad



These vessels have ample spuce tor Yr
chilled, hard frozen and general cargo u e Offer
-

sengers for Dominic
Cargo accepted on through

tigua, Montserrat, Nev



and *



SS









bills of
‘acing with transhipment at Trinidad for St Kitts Sailing "ride
in s s Sz g Friday ¢ ™ rre
British Guiana, Barbados, Windwvaesel and ih fish, ; | 2-lb, Tins DANISH HAMS
W.L Sch TY
FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD., lines ee 14 ozs, Tins APPLES (Irish)
ents, Trinidad %, i

DA COSTA & CO. LTD., Consignee; Dial: 4047 Tins MIXED VEGETABLES
Agents, Barbados. edie. ; a
r

» CHIVER’S BEETROO"

» FRUIT SALAD

HARRISON LINE

I OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM:

_—

SiVAR? & SAMP



ON

Vessel



From Leaves Due

* “ATLA i Barbados LTD.
ee “GORE .» London Ist July 14th July Headquart
ss. “mp a .: Liverpoo! Sth July 19th July ae ee eee

S. ECIALIST M/Brough & : j

London 8th July 27th ; ; ere

S.S. “HISTORIAN” Silas July 23nd Jul SeeoneCer ey
38. ! ; aszow 8th Jul 2: ; ss POCOP SOK POCO
S.S. “RIVERCREST” .. London 15th jay sath ie

HAVE YOU GOT A

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM:

Dea corecrnatey ror Closes tn Barbados COLD or COUGH
“TAC N” 1 tentil haks on
: “CRAFTSMAN” London. 20th July IF SO TRY



22nd July
For further particulars apply to

DA COSTA & CO., LTD—Agents.

7“ Steamship Co.

BROWNE'S
CERTAIN COUGH
CURE







“7 a +4
OO Pe











ey ‘The Unique Remedy for Coughs,
Colds, Bronchitis, Sore Throat,
Noi ur seness, 1chial Asthma,
Ync. g Wha 1 Disease of the
ss Chest and Lungs, etc., ete,
NEW ORLEANS SER,10K x
al”
‘
ALCOA MUMMER aut dus * See TON ENO Wem
. . 2 y une
ALCOA SANGER 12th July 25th July { Wholesale & Retail Druggist
a 20th July Lith Aug % 136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813
4s
& y \
fn YORK 65 aly GOCCEILEOS
‘ N.Y. s dos - —
3S “BYFJORD" Brahe | 30th June 12th July
THULIN 12th July Bist July

FOR

SALE

ee



CANADIAN SERVICE

can ee
|

SOUTHBOUND
Sails















Sails Arrives
sia) Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Barbados
8.8 “ALCOA PILGRIM" June 26th June 30th July ith
8. “ALCOA PENNANT” July 7th July 10th July 22nd
S.S. “ALCOA POINTER" July 2ist July 24th Aug Sth
8.8. “ALCOA POLARIS" Aug, 4th Aug 7th Aug. 17th
ies ponacal IN NEVIS
NORTHBOUND
Arrives ‘ \
Barbados 248 Acres, Animals & Cotton
8.8. “ALCOA POLARIS" July 4th For Montreal Ginnery, Dwelling House — con~
twining 4 Bedrooms, Drawing
These vessels have limitedpassenger accommodation. Dining & Breakfast Rooms,
Kitchen, Lavatory & Bath,
————e with running water Flectric
Apply: DA COSTA & CO, LTD.—Can adian Servire. throughout, Store Build-

ROBERT THOM LUTD,.—New York and Gulf Service.

{ Apply to R. R
Wm. Fogarty Ltd

Neen

Light
ings in yard
For further particulars:—
(
MALONEY
t





SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS
From Montreal, St. John, N.B., Halifax, N.S.




























REAL ESTATE







To Barbados, Trinidad, Demerara, B.G.
Loading Dates Expected JOL me
Montreal Halifax Arri Dates
Barb
S.S. “MARIA
De LARRINGA 28th June 3rd July | 19th July Ly |

S.S. “POLYCREST”’ Mth July | 19th Jul 4th August e
S.S. “BRUSH” 26th July sist July 16th August

BLADON

AFS

PLANTATIONS LIMITED—Agents
,FVA
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

PINE ESTATE—Modern 2 torey
property ound t ted of
coral block tone with steel
casement window Verandat
lounge breakfast mm large
kitchen, 3 be toilet and

Fence P This

most new





ne



PASSAGES TO IRELAND

Antilles Products Ltd., Roseau, Dominica, offer passages to
Dublin per M.¥V “DUALA”, next sailing from Roseau about
20th June, and thereafter about every thirty-three days.

Single fare, £70, usual reductions for children.

Apply direct.






unable

for

LEE-TON-ON-SEA

A start

bui onto. a. sand
with excetlent
There i 1
extending
bedrooms
I haped
bar, kitct
quarter








bathing fac
wide front ver

BARGAINS :=—
MANILLA ENVELOPES 614” x 394’
PAD LOCKS

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY AND HARDWARE



$3.50 per L000
from 12c, each



SILVER SPRAY er
tone built
alow with large
and wide vheh

Sands.
droom





WE'VE GOT THEM ...



poor sleep, ioss of memory energy, i 5 2g > srience, accompanied fF w pce ag) ials, should |
Gasily excited, fear and worry, If sem | One and experience, accompan »y two recent testimonials, should |

|

|

suffer any of these symptoms, dea’t | be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Agricul- |
your life may te Intdasesr tenes |ture, Georgetown, British Guiana, marked “ASSISTANT AGRICUL- |

| (formerly known as Hynox), a sew | TURAL SUPERINTENDENT” and should reach him not later than |

| medical discovery, reduces Blood

| Pressure with the first dose, takes a | 3st July. 1950

wae fouk pokne de meee Ske 4. Applicants already employed in a Department of Agriculture

| Gee Noxco from your chemist ez. in the West Indies, should submit their applications through the nor- |
aud trong of malar — toa mal official channels

l z 15.7,.50—3n. |



DECCA & BRU INSWICK RECORDS

All the latest hits

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Foundry Ltd.—Proprietors)

for quick sale




REAL ESTATE AGENT
Auctioneer & Surveyor
PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640

(Central
Cnr. Broad & Tudor Streets






Saturdays. h
4

SS



}
i)

{
i

\

O44 4448 Oe
AMAA

+
na Loy

(eo tet

LLSSS












,



* PAGE EIGHT

W.I. Gain Another
Decisive Victory

Ramadhin And Valentine
| Bowl Out Leicestershire

WEST INDIES (for 2 wkts. dec.) 682
LEICESTERSHIRE 352 and 8]
LEICESTER, July 14

Taking full advantage of a rain affected pitch, Sonny
Ramadhin and Alfred Valentine the West Indie
bowlers, completely demoralised the Leicestershire bats-
men here to-day. Following a spate of rungetting on the
first two days during which 989 runs were scored for the
loss of 6 wickets, Leicestershire to-day lost sixteen wickets
for 126 runs in 3 hours and the West Indies had an unex-

eee

fctonaomemet § BG. Wins
Anchor Cup

Al Bisley







spi



trotted casually to the wicket and
tos$ed up a subtle variety of bre:
so-well concealed that the Leices-
tershire batsmen were forced to
laugh at their own mistakes
Charles Palmer, for instance, was
outwitted twice in the match by
the same type ball, a vicious off-
break which on both occasions he



made no attempt to play LONDON, July 14
A bright sun, which helped to British Guiana won the Anchor
dry the pitch, assisted the spin Cup Competition, organised by the
bowlers to such an extent that West Indies Rifle Association and
even when the new ball was used fired at the Bisle ranges in
for Leicestershire’s second inn- Surrey today
ings, Valentine was brought on British Guiana and _ Trinidad
with his leg-breaks after only twe tied with 816 points each, but
overs, 3ritish Guiana were declared the
Beautifully controlled length and winners be ause they had _ the

Spin repeatedly deceived the bats-
men, and Ramadhin’s second inn-
ings performance of 6 for 27
brought his day’s total to ® for
43 and in the match he took ten
for 117.

Leicestershire added only 45 to

highest score at the longer range
Jamaica scored 813 and Barba
dos 788
Teams from all four colonies
competed in the event, over 300,
500 and 60D yards, which is nor-
mally held in each colony in turn

their first innings this morning, ; t ir r es
Valentine at one point taking 3 me as rar = aig tA ah a
wickets for no runs with prodi- °°Or® © < won the Wogal up
gious leg-breaks. The only pair for the highest individual score
to offer resistance in the county i" the match after a tie—shoot
second innings were Palmer, stay- With Mr. E. Crooks, (Trinidad)

ing 65 minutes for 20 and Walsh —Reuter

Their stand of 27 was the best ate ee
The Play 13 Ti *
Valentine and Ramadhin took eams

complete control for the first time
im the innings this morning, their
spinners moving viciously off a
pitch slightly affected by rain
Batsmen made mistakes in thetr
attempts to master the spin. Val-
entine, off whom no run was
scored in the first forty three min-
utes, took three for 14 im jrfinet
overs and Ramadhin two for 16

Play To-day

An unprecedented field of thir
teen couples filed entries for the
mixed-foursomes which will start
at the Rockley Golf and Country
Club to-day, with many of the
high handicap competitors prom-

Following on, eee ising to make the matches com-
avoided further = or nad pletely unpredictable. The drav
eet seule. Rbdgived an itt made Thursday night, includes

een able to axe > aR seven husband-and—wife combin
a oe i gg ations, one father-and—daughter

erry to try & i >

peir and one.engaged couple
The father and daughter team

E. Shirley Atwell and Miss Faye

Atwell, with a combined handi-

finished in Walcott’s hands in for-
ward fine leg position. After two
overs by Gomez, Valentine came
bn with the ball still new and had

cap of 44, came out at the top of

Watson caught also by Walcott. ; aes 7 ae
Beautifully controlled length tl e draw and will mec t John
é N Grace and Miss Katy Lenagan,

and spin, with the batsmen re-

tedly deceived, brought an- Whose handicaps total 32, in the
ea : seived, i : ~” Sgt no

Biner collapse, half the side being i e Meares "Cpattetiee, ie an
dismissed for thirty three. Mar- © 7 5 allenor, 1



gaged couple, who have an aggre-
gate handicap of 16, meet Mr. and
Mrs, J. C. Hotchkiss, who have
just returned from B.G

shall caught Tompkin very nearly
on the boundary, and the skilful
Jackson, drawn into a bad stroke
gave Jones an easy catch, Then
Lester was entirely beaten by one

of Ramadhin’s astonishing off- Other Games







Other first round matches bring
peas. wo Smiths fell to succes- together Mr. and Mrs, L. J. Mas-
sive balls from Ramadhin, Ken kell and Col. and Mrs. Richards
became the first legbefore victim Vidmer, the former, pair having a
of the match and his namesake total handic ap of 25 against the
played the next delivery on to his latter's 12; Major Denis Lenagan
stumps. and Mrs, W, MacIntyre, handicap

Walsh had his escapes but sur- 35, against Mr. and Mrs. H. V



iv: / > ogged Palmer King, handicap 42; and E. J. Petrie
wnat a. eae this point, 13 and Mrs. Brenda Wilson, handicap
wickets had fallen for eighty-nine 25 gainst James O'Neal and Miss
runs to-day and Ramadhin’s Winnie Barnes handicap 50, These
second innings figures were 10—6 matches must be completed on ox
a 808: before next Tuesday, July 18

Mr. and Mrs
and Mrs, N, T.

Jean Iverson, Mi

» innings lasted only half an
ape nriogs nee Williams and Mr

hour after lunch and West Indies

innings = 249 r >» D. McDermott all

y an innings and 249 run and Mrs. f ‘
a ove the + ings a dying drew byes and will not go into
kick by taking eight in an over action until the second round,
from Valentine and then lifting which will be completed on next

him for six. Saturday

Palmer having stayed 65 min-
utes for twenty was again bowled
by a ball he did not attempt to
touch from Ramadhin, who also
coolly took the final eatch from

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R W
Jone 21 ; 55 1



ar si screen, tO Gomes 7 “1 0
Sperry near the neem a rform- Ramadhin 403 14 90 4
set the seal on a great perform- (iene ce’ ee ant
ance. His eight Ti aes Worrell i9 2 _ ®
uns ¢£ is total] bag Was) Marshall 2 a6
eost 43 runs and hi " “LEICESTERSHIRE 2nd INNINGS

10 for 117.

"es: Berry
Following are the scores c

Wat

Walcott b Jones 5
e Walcott b Valentine 6





: Tompkin ec Marshall b Ramadhin i
Ist INNINGS (for 2 wkt Palmer b Ramadhir 20
bis vane’) : Jackson ¢ Jones b Ramadhin 1
Lee yalentne ssc LK Smith b Ramadnin :
> & b Valentine : ama 2
ita ¢ Goddard b Jones n J. Smith b Ramadhin 0
} ae b Marshall 7 Walsh not out 24
pone, eens b 9 Wooller stpd. Christiani b Valentine 4
Palmer b Ramadhin Ps t
Jaekson b Valentine 56 Sperry e Ramadhin b Valentine L
8 a Extras ;
Lester b Ramadhin
K. Smith not out a ack “i
J. Smith ec Walcott _b Valentine a

Walsh c Marshal} b Valentine







“ 0 Fall of wkts. 1 for 10, 2 for 14, 3 for 24,
Woollen b sae . 16 4 for 26, 5 for 33, 6 for 41, 7 for 41,
Sperry b ah rh. 3 24 «68 for 68, 9 for 7
Extras b. 16, , BOWLING ANALYSIS

352 Oo. M RW

Total Jones 7 2 13 1

3 for 166, 4 for 263, 5 for 317, 6 for 317, Ronadnin $6 ace PG
7 for 216, 8 for 318, 9 for 318 —Reuter,









= arenes eer ER RS oe ent

| They Do it Every Time

Dociviernd Uf Motes OMen





/ ANOTHER ONE! AREN'T THEy )
( A-DORABLE? SO NEAT
| AND CLEAN“ EIT FOR
Racha
ro

SK ANY MOTORIST:

THE CABINS YOu
PASS ALL DAY ARE
SPIC, SPAN AND VERY
INVITING **s5



/ BUT WE'VE 6OT TO.
STOP HERE. THE GUY AT
THE GAS STATION SAID
IT’S THE ONLY ONE FOR 2
NINETY MILES prop

Bur WHEN IT STARTS
my TO GET DARK: WHAT
VO YOU FIND, IF LUCKY?

THANK TO

“A FRIEND”

ROCHESTER,
») of NY



= one eee

(2

i. Ai y










tHE
table

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ENTRANCE OF THE MIKADO. The picture shows part of the caste which delivered a credi-
performance of Gilbert and Sullivan's “The Mikado” at Queen’s College Speech Day yesterday.
‘The central figure is Ann Raison, representing the Mikado of Japan.

The figure bowing at the left

is Shirley Clarke, who played the role of Koko, the Lord High Executioner

STOUTE STILL TABLE
TENNIS CHAMPION

LOUIS STOUTE of Barna

crown when he defeated Fr
the odd set in five in their Table tennis tournament at the

Y.M.C.A. last night.

but service changed at 16—14 in
Willoughby’s favour.

Service later changed at 18—17
again in Willoughby’s favour and
soon after a series of beautiful
forehand slams by Willoughby and
well timed “cut” returns by Stoute
brought great applause, Willough-
by eventually won 21—18 to put
himself a

Club retained his “A” Class
ank Willoughby of Pelican by

game nearer to the
crown,

Willoughby, who exhibited a series of well timed and actu- | Stoute played with more con-

rately placed smashes, carried off the first two games but :idence in the thitd game. While

Stoute, the more experienced, played calmly and won the

last three

His Excellency
accompanied by Mr
Private Secretary,
His Excellency
trophies

At the conclusion of
tev. A. E. Armstrong,
of the Y.M.C.A,,
Excellency

the Governor,
W. Lambert,
attended and
presented the

the games
President
thanked His
for attending and said
that he was glad that the tennis
His Excellency had seen was of
such a high standard,

He pointed out that it was the
first time he had the opportunity
of witnessing a Table Tennis tour-
nament and had enjoyed the eve-
ning

He

said that there will be
forthcoming changes in the
Y.M.C.A. and he hoped that when
they attended the tournament next
year it would be in a more spa-
cious hall
Hon. Robert Chailenor, Patron

of the B.T.T.A., said that the bovs
had put up a good show for Kis
Excellency He was attending
these tournaments for many years

and this was the best he had s
He congratulated Stoute and s
that he had seen Stoute playing
at the Y.M.C.A. for so many years
that perhaps Stoute must be older
than he. Mr Challenor said that
he would like to see more schools
taking an interest in the game

Thought He Was Good
His Excellency then said that
he had always liked table tennis





because it was a game that he
and his family enjoyed. Prior to
seeing last 1 1's games he was

of the opinion that he was a good

table tennis player but he has to
think differently now He regret-
ted that Mrs. Savage could not

attend because she was not fee)-
ing well

He then presented the trophies

Of the other three sets that
were played last night. Harper of
the Modern High Schoo) became
Boys’ Champion, Corbin “B” Class
Champion and Greenidge by de-





feating Norman Gill. the “Handi-
cap” Champion The last men-
tioned set was hard fought. Both
players gave s00od ~=performances
but Greenidge was more steady

In the first t—the Boys’
Championships, Harper of the
Modern High School met Nurse of
the James Street Youth Club.

Nurse won the first game 21-17
but Harper played more confi-
dently in the second and won
21-18 to bring honours even

yin the third and final game ser-
vice changed at 9—6 in Harper's

favour By the time 25 points
were played Harper was five
points in the lead Nurse man-
aged to cui down some of the
lead but Harper however won

21—-17 to become the local Boys’
Champion

In the next set Norman Gill of
Everton met Campbell Greenidge
of Barna for the Handicap crown,

Gill started out very aggressive
beating Greenidge with+ some
well-placed forehand slams but

Greenidge, with his strong defence,
returned a few Gill however
kept up a steady and fairly accur-
ate atts and went on to win
21—15





=

Delights Crowd

In the second game Greenidge
took an early lead and _ service
changed at 10—5 in his favour,
He delighted the crowd with many
of his forehand flicks, especially
one which he brought from well
below the table
Greenidge had now

by gained

By

Jimmy Hatlo |





































Willoughby did the smashine he
returned them. He took an early
tead and service changed at 8—2
confidence and sprinkied his stub- (np his fave he kept this lead
born defence with a few surpris- 21—10 to open his ac-

slams.

us
and won

ing He won this game count

21—-13 to equalise the score I'he third game saw Stoute
He took the lead from early tn again playing defensively while

the third game Service changed Willoughby smashed. Service

at 15--10 in his favour. Gill’s again changed at 8—2 in his

forehand slams were now going favour Many of Willoughby’s

wide of the board but he however forehand slams were going wide

managed to come from 17—13 of their mark

and bring the score even. Green- Both players were very tired

idge took the lead but again they
equalised at 19 each. From here
it was all Gill and he won the
game 21—-19 to regain his tead in

but Stoute, who_is many pounds
lighter, appeared in better con-
dition, Willoughby recovered lost
ground anid service changed at



the set. 10 cuttin v 's
7 . ' sihie 4 —10, g down Stoute’s
The fourth game saw both play- lead by three points. However

ers on the defence. Greenidge Willoughby was never able to

again took an early lead. Service

P equalise the game and Stoute won
changed at 8—7 in his favour and 1 . 8

vos ial baled ii lena bY 21—17 to equalise the set.

he later increased this eat y Willoughby settled down in the
four points. He kept this lead fal game and took four points
and won 21-—-16 to even honours. cut of the first five. Stoute soon

Gill started attacking from, ftey equalised and went into the
early in the final game with his lead \
well placed forehand slams. Ser- Service later changed at 9—6
nee changed at five all but in Stoute’s favour but the first
Greenidge soon after took the/ 9) points were evenly divided.
lead, Greenidge was later leading When service changed at 17—13
by five points. He kept and won it was in Stoute’s favour, From

21—14 becoming Handicap Champ.
Next set was for “B” Class
Champ and in this Harold Corbin
of Abbey Marines met Phillips
The first game started very slow
Corbin had the edge and took an

here he gained confidence and 2t

20—18 he smashed his way through

to victory to retain his crown,
The results were:—

Boys’ Championship

early lead. Phillips threw away Harper beat Nurse 21—17, 21—

most of his points by inaccurate] jg 9) )7

smashing. Corbin won 21—15. He a .

finished the game with a brilliant b> Handicap .

Pe ‘ Greenidge beat Gill 15—21, 21

back hand flick, 13, 19-21, 21-16, 21-14
Corbin played defensively in the “2s , ae pee Yi

second game. He allowed Phillips
to do most of the smashing while
he made confident returns.

On one or two occasions Phillips
however bored through this de-

CONCERT |








fence but Corbin remained calm.

His cool disposition caused him to (Under the Distinguished
increase his lead when he won the Patronage of His
second game 21—18 Excellency the Governor

Mr. A. W. L. Savage, C.M.G.,
and Mrs. Savage)

After a tough battle Corbin won
the third game 21—19 to become
‘B’ Class Champ and guaranteeing





his promotion to the “A” next by the
vert ae BARBADOS CHORAL
The set of the night—‘A” Class SOCIETY



Championship match—was played
next. In this Louis Stoute of
sarna last year’s ‘A’ Class Cham-
pion, met Frank Willoughly of
Pelican

at the

(OMBERMERE HALL °

On Thursday, 27th July
1950, at 8.30 p.m.



Good Smashes

Early in the first game Stoute
lid the attacking with his hard
forehand smashes but Willoughby
played defensively and returned
the majority of these

Service changed at 7—3 in Wil-
loughby’s favour. Willoughby later
delighted the spectators with his
back hand flicks which he varied





Guest Artists:

Miss JEAN LAWSON,
L.R.A.M, (Pianist)

Mr. P. A. K. TUCKER
(Baritone)



round the table He kept the Hihteate hie air 7
lead and won 21—15, finishing Tickets may be obtained at

the Advocate Stationery
or from Members of the
Society at the following
prices:—

RESERVED
UNRESERVED ::

with a hard fore hand slam which
just bounced off the table

In the next game Willoughby’s
smashing was good and his timing
excellent On some occasions
Stoute could only watch the ball
go by without being able to make
in attempt to return the smash

Willoughby was leading but
Stoute equalised at 13 each. The
following two points were divided




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WEST INDIES PLAY |
DERBYSHIRE TODA

Derbyshire will be hosts to the
West Incies team to-day at Ches-
terfield, and they like many others

no doubt, realize that the visiting
combination is quite a good one,
that takes a lot of stopping, when
it gets started.

This is the final game, before
the West Indies enter on the third
Test Match, and everyone will
be putting the finishing touches
on their test match form, whoever
hey be

Seventh

This will be the seventh sixture
with Derbyshire since the initial
game in 1900, and only once have
the West Indies defeated the
county side. Not even in 1933,
when George Headley, then reign-
ing prince of West Indian bats-
men, scored an immaculate 200
not out did the visitors triumph
That game like three others were
drawn,

A quick look back reveals
that the 1900 game was drawn.
The scores were: Derby 234 and
182 for 6 wickets; West Indies
300 and 45 for 2 wickets. In the
W.I. first innings Percy Good-
man played a glorious knock of
104 not out, the only other
three figure innings made by a
W.1. batsmen,

Six years later the West Indies
were beaten by 5 wickets. This
was a remarkable game in that
C. A. Ollivierre, a member of the
1900 West Indies team to England
was then playing for Derbyshire,
and took a leading part in de-
feating his erstwhile colleagues.

The scores were W.I, 233, and
242; Derby 217, and 250 for 5
wickets. In the County’s last
innings Ollivierre’s 64 not out did
the winning trick.

Rain

The 1923 game was drawn. Rain
interfered considerably and small
scores prevailed. First the W.1I.
made 97 of which Leary Constan-



AUSTRALIA
LEADS CANADA

MONTREAL, July 14.

Australia gained a 2—0 lead
over Canada when their North
American Zone Davis Cup match
opened here to-day. Australian
Champion Frank Sedgman beat
Betnard Bracken 7-—5; 6—2;
6—1 and Ken McGregor defeat-
ed Lorne Main 6—1; 6—2; 7—5

—Reuter,

“B” Class
Corbin beat Phillips 21—15, 21
18, 21—19.
“A” Class
Stoute beat Willoughby 13—21
18—-21, 21—10, 21—17, 21—18.
Scorer: Mr. K. Herbert.

SSSSS .

Yh G

ANNUAL SPORTS
MEETING



on
Thursday, July 20th., 1950

at
1.15 p.m.

Final date for closing Entries
Monday 17th July.

SSOCSESSSS ROSES

COME ONE!
COME ALL!
























SATURDAY, JULY 135,

1950





666606464

PEF ITE

PEELE EEE

TO-NIGHT





.
x
tine made 60 not i l t 1%
replied wit I me is
bowling by ne ar P 1%
The W.I. had got 36 for 2 ets|@
when the allotted end of the game|%
arrived % y
The lone W.I. victor jate}R
came in 1928 and wa a keen % ° e e 6
contest from start to finish. Der -
led off with 159, and the W.r.|%
answer to this 155. Dert %

second try gave

l E vig
ground was ¢ tested >















64,.66,560600"

6,4

, 660M
104, tlt ADP LPP POPPE PO







e WI. to get
inch of the 5
and the West Indie Y N
8 wickets %
. ,
: % Arnold Meanwell’s Ovr-
Headley’s 200 %
This was the last decisive I 1g chestra will supply the
up to now. In 1933 the West
dies batted first and scored l Music
iVLUS1
Derby topped this by collecting 319\% ee
but when the W.1I it in again i?
George Headley dispiayed all his 4 ss Hi ‘
artistry in geiting 200, and the|% Come and Enjoy Yourself
W.I. declared at 319 for 9. Time x
was an important factor and the; & at the:
county had scored 125 for 2 when|%
time for drawing if imps | %&
arrived e ,
And so in 1939 when Derby had} Y M. P C
first knock and raised 309. W.1.|% ° ok eNico
scored 264, and the county got/%
104 in their second venture. West % Beckles Road
Indies had lost 6 wickets for 54/¢
wher the end of the game was ¢
signalled. % 3 :
: ~ on SATURDAY, July 15
30 to-day the West Indies, after °
their smashing victory over|X Se 1
Leicestershire might well x tole ADMISSION 2/-
add yet another win to heir|%
growing list, and take the lead in]% Dancing 9 p.m. to 2 a.m,
triumphs in these fixtures with g
ree ea | tonsesoosooosssssesesse <
ads.
B.M.
40 Such pretty fashions
‘ES. <4 can be followed

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PAGE 1

PACK Fore BARBADOSADVOCATh SATlllllW JI'IV > %  %  BARBADOS fislAmtKHTF. p.. H f -1 r.i-i-a i-. <>•< Salurriay. July 1-V 19.10 m:i.i.\Qii:.\(V IN 1MB DM I i Dintad a Comjriitte*' U) iiiquirtn. Ft 00 the working of the GovenuiMiil biduittial Schools and to make recommendations fur their reform. Today, four years alter. those Institution! are working under the same system which had been the subject Of strong public criticism The Committee on which membtl the Social Welfare Department served, reported and it is tvpical of Barbados ttiat he terms of the report and the menu ol the MI. geitioiii made for reform, nothing has been dOM It had been pointed out in this newspaper on several occasions that the maintenance of the "plantation" system with the aim at reform would continue to defeat the endeavours of UM Government. The Committee too shared the view that until the two were divorced little progress could have been made. This view was generally accepted. It was agreed that the iMRtr to the problem was the introduction of the Borstal System but that owing to the lack of trained personnel, this should be postponed until someone could be Imported for the job. Today there is an acting Superintendent of the Government Industrial Schools and it is the good fortune of the Government that the choice has fallen on an officer who on his own initiative has done much to change the "prison" atmosphere of the institution. Since that Committee was appointed and the report submitted to the Government, there have been long and interesting public discussions on the increase of juvenile delinquency and the need for remedial measures. Not even the example of a few energetic individuals could have stirred the Government to unearth the Report and to make some attempt in assisting with the problem. It is known that the lack of reform at the Government Industrial Schools has been put down as one of the contributing factors to an increasing number of young people finding themselves charged in the Courts of this island. There are instances on record whenyoung people have served more than one term at the Government Industrial School and many others where a term at the Government Industrial School has been but a preliminary for a sentence at Glendairy. The Government itself would appear to accept this frequency as normal. Undoubtedly someone will object but what then is the explanation for the fact that whenever a young person has been discharged from the Government Industrial School, an immediate report must be made to the Governor of the Prisons. The action of the Government in this matter deserves strong condemnation for two reasons. The increase of juvenile delinquency has been publicly discussed and could not have failed to have come to the notice of the Government; and during the four years which have elapsed there was ample opportunity to have sent some officer or officers to some training centre to become acquainted with modern methods of reform. The teaching profession has sent two mistresses, the Parochial Authority has sent a matron for the Children's Home, the Police have sent one and are now about to send t w o more, the Government itself has sent one from the Public Works Department. This action is direct contradiction to the statement that there were not sufficient people in the Civil Service ahle to make full use of scholarships. It can still be done and it is in the interest of the community that it be done. The care of our youth is the concern of every member of society and It is time that the Government give the Government Industrial School special attention. A ftmj by lli-r-b W a tm m tt |Adrac*to ... laaL) .!p. 81.211. 2.00 I.. !" will be able lo discern in Ihn fine vans ihe Hf-niii-. i o ihc word without axaasaratton %  %  %  '. the plaj will %  hake, thrill and dtljghl Ita in, lab r ii: mdfancn in.d. third, ii will entire many to read UM hlatorfai of the time* and inpeople it portray* It is .i tin.play, full of the drama of the clash of wills and unUtton, Dlsabathan in the progallty of Us bloodshed, conscious f the nvi'twhHminu influence of -.i nUlau en iis Charbale in the background. II""'. UM Nemesis, twists and corrupts men's Ideals, weaken? their DOdMO anil their wills, and finally does them to death. One Is tempted to say that Time is one if Thi main characters of the play, often made articulate in the old %  arnral Byfli Willi louMtalnts deain, DeiaaUncs and Chrislophe, also extlaves, become the inevitable d In* quiet %  .i .). %  it i %  :1y with Chnstophtr as kinx Hi MM psychologist. the id much that is It* In ihU part the >\>f to near max: %  '..( %  n. %  %  when it.will bu %  iv-famou La 11 i iiif BM tl.ntin an I Cna-iRad Hi nails, A', old liiti.i.t-. ill akil l>ii. oouah". The majority 01 UM characters KMM alive at once. There Is Pttnm, moderate and reasonable but m* '.inn Hi in And tha.l.r|. mm l->low II knochliw Mud. And f. lunatic %  •">" W fatal. -l-T t.„. pal i Ma famiK m %  t-n And in id. t— fciw wiiai m ^.rov. m. icB of Would band iu M ..1 ....: .• toadeia Of Haiti with Pel Jon and rfl h ;. r d m y ^^ „,,_ s ,,,., r when Vttstcy. Christopher cretary. instruct* the Attendant m to trap Archbishop lirelle — %  In* hvpocrlalfi Syll.i lo support them. The try is in utter desolation. TTl* pr-H.nl. Date IdMillflrd HbnU with idleneai. The tallow fW-M* • fovlra*. the old plantation! PUM du Hard. Ham Rouar. Quartlrr Morii Arc Uk araai artdows. unw—dad. HiolnK lh.n And tirimlm dry vrdi on %  panhlnK fiiliiu: the weight of his years and looking forward to a life of quiet id plenty: %  Mi I had hoped lor. Ilrt lailh. PWo4a ilnglni. ratine I. Undai the parn • % %  • •>< a f..!.-i..i.. ., U cotndoi romantic sounds of the place, able and touching about this selfOn e watches (nnsioph. nut 1 feel Chrlstophe's description w
* ' reason; Chnsmmri the crown. Hut he too sue£phf. powerful, cunning, cruel. Oar Reader*. Sny: Muxlim Cun/iTi-nrv Dear Sir. Under the guidance of His Eminence Moulana Muhainnuul Al.lul Aleem Siddiqui, the Anjuman Sunn;t-ul-Jamaat Association, Inc. proposes to organise a confcrim-e of repiesenlatlves from UM Muslim communities of Trinidad and neighbouring colonies, includini: British Guiana, Dutch Guiana. Uarbodos. Jamaica. Cuba, Panama, etc. If Is proposed that the objects of the conference will include:— 1. To create closer relationship and co-operation among the Muslim communities of these territories. 2. To consider the educational, social, economic, moral and religious problems of the Muslims of these areas; and to take adequate steps for attending to such pnWaftl 3. To form a Regional Muslim Organisation. The association is interested In getting in touch wilh all persons and organisations interested In participating in this conft ranci which is expected to be held about the end of July. 1950. All interested persons or organise' oonummieate with UM undersigned without delay. WAHID ALI. Hon. Secretary, Anjuman Sunnnt-ul-Jamnat Asioc [nc :\ MASJID. Cor. Queen A1'i.tadiilv Sts Port-of-Spoiii, Tunidad. BWJ Th* old plantation* SUnd liaaa*id -^ |.ri^*.i-n HtitdrT.ilu hiivr brohi arma. i, hut ho had thoughl that. the'revoTu,0 du "*^ hul w j*" r *l lr, n1 tion being successful, he would be weakens; his hands, like Dessaable to enjoy a quiet retirement But in the light of events, in his old man's wisdom, he sees thai their real enemy is not the whites. not black rivals, but time's corThe hatred and jealousy tfetwasn '"dim* power, nothing Ml I the blocks mulatloes anil whites tnc i"'hop, is „ type „ goo-l are tierce, than eve, D,^ ,es !""" %  th.nk-representlng the HifU Who. with hi* ITaatpot succtu ib to the infection o' murderi paralysis lays hold of nil limbs and his will I'oV.-r hai corniptad him. it has been tno tlanic of his life and it is the cause 0f hi> death One i* oved by the tat) ot thli najic umbs to llw potent dr.ufht o( l*lluc. wanm a i i . tirhnn tout ...... for the time power and, hated and feared by wnen „ De Jf'" lM •" %  outrun his people, he kills himself In the """**'' %  ""lory has not bean face of Psion's rebellion. That, In kind to Dessahnes ll has rebald terms, is the theme of the corded him as violent unscrupuplay; but how well does Walcoti "? %  "• •**. deceitful, prlmlhandlc It' lively courageous Walcott has not been unfaithful to history. Walcott divides the play into Dessalines intrigues, he lies, he two parts, the lir>t yjirt roinprismurders with the Joy that other ig four seemand the second men take in .i l.1 He "ills ami three In Par! one the sweep Is kills, martyring children with %  Is, sketchini; the historical "red sword' till everyone in horbaekgroiimi In quick, deft touches, ror turns from him Ha£ horriapprising us of the political situa"ed at himself lion and Us chief actors, und he cannot stop itewtnsj us the bloody course of and the patient inoSm mmSt a ItUaa and hi Anna hlmsU ;i pawn in tbo hand i ( tima. committing murde,by habit, hated by |M pollCi for v.hom he thmiuht To build cHiidi-Li for ihlt complexion SlgEart bv Uw MSPV -t hi' .o who at length finds himself . tad by everyone H I < inntj) rlpM Ml sumrtlon by roearta.. Or pray to Daioliallt.. or broken •ahlna iha (talk he traw X .Ll %  if, i Ilka I HgtH, hen he Sndfl lh.it *** al Xhe conM nea relM'lllon atlaT lonf like r...l.ii >hmits: Tel Pi • aMMtq The r-v.. WUhBI lorn, held like ii.niii.it drums of Pet ion infl a new alone, in maniacal lespalr. Christophi and ttlgulng of Chrislophe. hand. ii.iwn.m In scene one we see .the gencri "" %  *niri and ine abuir ah Sylln, Petion. Def|alines and Dessahnes is very powerfully Ihe French Bishop Brelle—the drawn. The scene in which he only while man In Ihe play— himself is rlUtd tha only prose and he puts tli waiting for news of Toussalnt. scene—Is a study In horror. What The play We get more than a glimpse of the depths thev are m young W.diliM.rdei iu the country, the deadly eott's niuul' Two iiuirderara, . rivalry ba t w a QP UM leaders, the man ami .i boy. wail In Ihe WI-KI violence of the colour hatred. In through which Dessaliiif. % %  it.ne two we are Introduced to sorted by his MbOTMd OKOrt, will Chrlstnphe and Ml rtCtption of have to pass, and as they wuit the the news of Tnussainl's death and Hrat murder.r skei.hes the plan essallnes' assumption of authorof execution and gives ndvn. | We ftt ;,„ evocation of the Aski-d for hints on how to become %  great Toussainl by Chrislophe: on expert in the trade, ' 'Kit .'. b. .i i,:.-• iii.ii.. i %  kind tu animals, third, keep in I'la'iKi' %  One will smile, will laugh, in this tetna but not fnun fun; It will IH 1 %  lauahtat of acute discomfort, of relief from the I : rlpillc tension it creates When Dessalines room upon them he realises their purpose at him M ti rasn Oitiddrra Mr buike Ihrae .!! %  . nil. they r held Ms aenerali were refracliiry I an Imagined picture of his is not afraid."however He trie; death In n French prison: to talk reasonably with them but pistol |o this head %  i t h o u t M five, is, 1 thUik faulty .n construction; UM bandunj I the League of Nations and acting vasion of Formosa To show that ,., %  * a peaceful settledecisively, as the Western Allies the United States is conducting the blanf tl one >hmild have acted ugainst Hitler worlil Mruggle for the Mike ( if ; n-, wv. pOWCn in the world Whan hi marched 111 to the humble and sunYring millions it „ ...... InWregt In UM Hhmeland in 1936 i* essential that Chiang Kai-shek outbreak of a Third World War. This is a line sentiment, and should be. iiniiiedutU-l>, shorn of ||c thi-.t.i.. : recently to declare war on the Soviet Union. His army. navj IM ill force shouU not be allowed to remain an organised unit under |rn ipe lalble tuniinand. ln) Hut thenare indeed, grave dlfncultMo Most of Chlana*a troops would line lo return lo their mainland homes. All except high would have, prohah .should give the Uniled Nations political power lie rules nobody, rh-needed self-confidence. But but the unhappy Formoean: the comparison need* to Ku-et) repii-Sfiils nothing but his own ambitus In Kuiope in the iy3U's, llriliun. There IM UVTW lashIxf. France, Chechoslovakia, and their United States In doulinic vvitb Ihl (1 nn.Is were called on to defend remnants of the Nationalist KM themselves in or around their own mlntang remnic countries Hitler's threats were The first is tn take the civil ... against these countries themadministration of Formosa entirely "'*,;;'" 0^,^ V' .T But in Asia in the 150' Mil Of Chiangs ,„ntr„l This '"''''^.^i 1 ? *' "T' truggle is between Sovlel would be I logical sU-p following ,H ' l M '] L'^ 1 VL^J!! ,, ", V "" U ', Communism with its far-spreadthe declaration that Formosa is *!? '^Al^T 1 mg influence, and United Slates regarded a stillJupam-s*ierritur> ;' lllir "' 5 h "^ U ', with its g.eid wealth -iH-ndin.; a peace lreat> K..t,.., £• mwrlCKl demob lisatlon of and energy The bailie. It seems, then, would Mam to be a respons ,,UM """^V !" *" 1^ x 2 JF* 11 i>e joined, d.rvetlv or b) bulty of General Mac Arthur's room ^25??% remote control, in the countries command. In Tokyo rn *bsarmed In torn.,, end &2SL l ^^ t a^ 'Z ?• —' -k IUtarnun. KSrd ' m.'h?n In lands I ,habited I liu "' ,h ntenatiOIial status of le inar.tud.ng through the .slund tHESL r£EL Fnrcmamai; l c ****** "'"<"' * %  COBIn an} -vent thev present %  probVietn-mMf* fiTuIvans U 'MA pgawaUtloo la tha Belean But the problem mus, be \ietu 1 ,mese^ Malayans ^ Counc „ ls ilidl ln Snvil f „, M cManVa commai %  The Unile.1 Side. Vakn ^^ ,„ 1|)tl nv c|( M ,„ ,„. ,,..,„,,„ m condition that The United States and il s|Mks for the millions ,,( China "' n l | attampl .1 Oovern%  i ilnacgM To remove the MatloDauat Chlnai %  ' against Communism in Asia so rump from international counril. Pmmnl anA fnreofni Ul ->.. u twin poUUMH.pwiioui.it JSZ iitrmSTt lance t>> Bo> IM penetration with Kovernment could not dare nltempt n „, Ihll i-^it !" c, ntm ,. 0 ~i„, !" • 01 the aspiring milI. Hut -nice President Truman', !', %  \ ilwan first in mind declaration the United Italy consideralion is ta emment has eonselousl. Important as the*USM NOW, surelv. is ti.. %  %  %  II to patrol the m Formosa and the ... tawnUnauitl both the .: the Security .... )lld i hP py,,. 1 Russia) face to face with reality .f Formoea K .i-Shek. whodomlnatai The third dutj is to disarm, ami WM ui The right dirc-tinn But it the Island of Formoaa must not gradu.. ti' iiermltted, any longer, to simo Chiam: Kal ihek's armies lnal ^^ quarFormosa. The island It irlng nld tee his army on that rich Island at reality, defended by the Unit. I ijnil Kai-shek. one UM Dominions, ni HI nesjoiiaunsj wiu UM >".i....nsiit o. 0 Limed rviuguom, betauc we -iv .... %  in UM Colonies wno exiwrt tneir good* ue aiiouid recerve UM lairaet posati .11 No less impuriunt will be tnc help uiat a ntijl Goveinmeiil can give ihe West indies in olaniiiui: UM eioiiomu devciopnient ol UM wnolo c^jion Everyone agrees that these lerritorio, ua •till far too dependent on a single export crop, but the present unbalanced economy cannot be successfully diversilied without the moat careful co-oidinition of developmenl plans The itM and location of secondary industries, such as textiles and cement, both of which 1 MM In UM initial stages when I was in the West Indies last tot. and Ihe planting if additional casli crops should be centrally planned n relation lo markets and production coals. The attempt to achieve a better balanced economy without some dearee ol ntpervleion at UM centre: %  Kniad lead. I feat, to busine;f.aluies and the liu%  .it of UM region. Other Important vco~ ion.it toN.tion* of a central administration would. 1 mad with Customs and currency. should hope it would be possible to maintain the 1 .1 itibcan as an area of internal free trade, commendation whirh was made by the recent Customs Commission. Of course, that would impose common tariff, related to the preferential margin for Commonwealth goods, on imports from ouUide the tenlon. It might also be possible to issue a common currency, based on the West Indian dollar. hlch would be of considerable convenience for travel and trade As I have already remarked, a great deal of regional economic co-operation is possible, and will tinue to be possible, without political union, but this is only so long us the whole area remains within Ihe jurisdiction and under the influence of the Colonial Office. The larger territories are rapidly moving towards self-governmenl, and It is most unlikely that even the present amount of Joint conullatlon and common action will continue in future unless they join u Caribbean federation. I think it Is fair to say, without claiming too much, that lthough federation In itself could not make the West Indies more prosperous it would nt least provide the most favourable political condition, for the best use of the region's economic resources 1 should uuw anc lu pass lor a moment i u UM ooutieai cast 101 lauantMo, it is. inMrasjuoi to noio .nut in aiming at a leuvial centre as Hie next stago ji tneir evolution towards Dominion status, tnu rVOtl initlaii iiauei.. n.iVi 08)0000 I step lainlliar 111 ana constitutional mstoij ut UM llriiu>n CoinmonaTOsUlD Hie same path ftM U-eu UlimenillJ lol.ov.es. in tunes p., i bv t anada, Australia, BoutO Africa, India and 1'a K is tan. Federation has provided Uie cement needed to build self-governing communities, wluch have B uiee become Mrong uud united nalloiLs, out of social groups too small and too weak to aland alone. There is every reason to suppose that in similar circumstances fetieiation will setve in the future UM same nation-building purpose as It has served so well in the past. The present circumstances of the West Indian territories are, broadly and very roughly, similar lo those which le*l the Australian Stales and tha Canadian Provinces to unite before they reached full nationhood and economic partnership as selfgoverning members of the British Commonwealth. Noi one of the West Indian Colonies, save possibly Trinidad and even thai only so long us It can Hud %  uld possibly afford lo pay for an independent Administration. The wide range of social services which the Welfare State has added to the OOat of administration and defence are far beyond the means of any of these poverty-stricken commudtli DM!! revenue may become unbalanced after a single hurricane or drought, und of course they are always exposed by their single-crop economies to the fluctuations of the world's markets for primary products. This means that unless lhe> can eol their administrative cosls by sharing ihe cost of nationhood with their neighbours, by pooling th" cosls which self-government would impose upon them, they would And themselves as soon as thev became self-governing, dependent on other countries for services now rendered to ihem by the United Kingdom It is inevitable thai these small comities when they emerge, as emerge they will. from Colonial status, should combine for survival with some larger group. The only alternative u federation would be a special relationship with some power on the American Continent. But they know full well that in such a relationship they would lose the substance of their political independence That Is why they are looking to federation as the only hope of combining genuine selfcovernment with equality of status In the Commonwealth and among the nations of the world I will not labour the political or economic case for federation, as I believe that the principle is widely accepted. What I would ask your lordship* lo consider for a few moments is the timing of this constitutional advance Should it come now. immeiiatelv. „ r would U be better If It came In the near future" Would it be better still if i* sraiej postponed for a fairly long period of year* ? 1 admit that this question would be an extranet* impertinent question to ask. If I were satagesting that tht House should form a final opinion without waiting to hear what the West Indian legislatures have lo gay on the subject I have no doubt that their view*, will greatly influence whatever is decided about the introduction of 1 federal Constitution I cannot Imagine Parliament's refusing to sanction the introduction of fed•ration if all the West Indian Lcgislnt':that they want it. or trying to force the recalcitr.\-.t tenHortOl into a form of political association which •hey actively dislike At the same time. evat i C IM >grees that it is vital to the success of federation 'hat its introduction should come at the right moment It seems a suitable time now. before an\ territory ha* committed itself to a definite date, to form at any rate a provisional opinion about the Mine when federation could he launched without incurring the poettblllty of h (Te Be CMUMW4) BATHROOM LOW-DOWM turns HIGH-UP SUITES CAbT-lilON BOXES W.C PANS "S" & %  P" TRAPS WHITE LAVATORY SEATS BASINS—22 liw. x 16 ins. & 25 bu. x 18 ins (with or without Pedestal,) SINGLE ami DOUBLE DRAIN BOARDS and SINKS SINGLE ALUMINUM DRAINHOAIIDS ALUMINUM SINKS--24 ins. x 10 ins A 3.1 ins x 18 ins. GALVANISE SINKS PORCELAIN SINKS COPPER PIPE II. s. and FITTINGS WILKINSON £ IIAVNKS CO. LTD. srnT..SSOKS TO C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. Dial 4.72 46X7 BM KHITH STOKES. p.i tin 1-lh.tin Mb, i in |MT tin -In. Bur .34 .24 .22 .92 4.01 1.39 .29 .28 1.56 1.75 BRITISH HERRINGS IN TUMAT' I SAUCE NORWEGIAN KIPPEKEIl IIKKKIM.-. SARDINES IN TOMATO SAUCE SMEDLEYS TOMATO SOUP NUTRICIA POWDERED MILK NUTR1CIA POWDERED MII.K JACOBS (REAM CRACKERS TERRYS MII.K CHOCOLATI TERIIYS ALMOND RESSERT CHOCOLATE t-lh Bar CHASE ft SANRORNES COKFKE l-lli tin TENDER LEAF TEA l^RJS. 5EH"5!§ 5HH2H CAXB (with AI KEII.I.ERS DUNDEE CAKES (with AlnviniK \Fiuili p-ih tins AMKW on ... Nutplcltt Viilt. Stansleld Scott & Co., Ltd. eT^S SMART MEN WEAR A Small shipment of these superb TROUSLUJ in attractive materials and colours now in stock. j %  TAILORED tit ^nl^B l SIMPSONS llaYoYI A A lo., Lid. DRY GOODS DIPT tx.sisr Anchor ALWAYS!! ANCHOR TABLE BUTTER ANCHOR MILK POWDER ANCHOR EVAPORATED MILK MARMALADE lib. 2lb. :ih Tii><. in.i. ~ currant Jan lit in %  I. Jr>||> Mrauhrrry Jam i:.-i >..f. Jam l.rmun curd Carrob., Olrry. I-fllurr in Vtlee in %  jTOea. ... ii. in B h> in BTIPTurnip^. Tr> JAR < i.n.T KM Ln >..jp OMH siiS OnU esch SCRIBB-. \M\KIM \ DESSERTS Ko*.l ClWnlatr lli.y;il Vanilla Roval i ti.i.ni! i'.iil. t Praeee straw rH-rrlr-> t inr.inl-. I'roifn Salmon Milk frd < %  lrkfn S>.^rt BIT ids it""' Drinks arr the bi-*l ORDER NOW FROM GODDARDS.



PAGE 1

SATIRDAY. JOLT IV 195.1 IIARBADOS ADVOCATf. PAf.l SKVLV CLASSIFIED ADS. DIED RRlTMH MM I : ion UDVT Mo. .1 % %  IMS, ..• :; %  n It 1.... %  .i.,.,.m 14 t M. Jn I -.-.lit h BUNG IAW On the seaudr. Prosvccl 1 Wdraomi rraui 1*1 Augual to an i..,.e MUM Nol le*. than lOI Particular* I tug IJM 11 T M—S.i 1 i %  1 4 ins I A MM .111 IN MEMORIAL LOST is** In a ft) I I I. % %  I I %  %  May ihe r< i %  • i on SALB Working on. %  Apply 8 i H ,., (Ml |>| Ul! | ',1 | CAR Vaushall feel Colidll %  ". I' trunk specially I Office W. Home I'l.YMOtTll STATION WAGON — l> aounrt nir. i tf.wxl Uin •~l Can be -Ti. at Rocklyr A.tdte* BKNUIX WASI1FW. A MM |uM IM) .-i Bat %  Ithout del* v Dial 3871 I .."Ic.l [Vp-i 1.,.-. %  | | 7 %  -. I %  I HUNO PAHS 110 Volt*. Hitii "HH-.I i Dul asta m t..• %  .\ < : %  i IS T.50—i ICE CREAM DWT rrlUZEH I" good <>iktru| order, -I K-ilpli Be..lldwtMd Allev trpen Daily I • m to 4 p m M 1 SO—an WANT On. Prlrol Elect nc Lighting Plant 110 volt DC MO Will Apply II M 1-ampllt. College Savannah. St. John IS 1 -3n REPIUOERATOK Car •n.,.....Keen Fibre Sr isiaung lit %  I-%  %  %  • Removable "'. Splliil Cumhlom I "rice ITS 00 MECHANICAL USA iiicYi i.r.i i-..h. 1 OHM %rIoua Models REDMAN TAVLOB GARAOE LTD 14 1 90— In 1. ladies Rakish Sport. Modal In good condition. .lyreo almost Mff, l.lfht Modrl Easily ridden uphill Phone 14X7. IS.f.tB—* l. bo'i l toilet With In. !'.. I -, to loae I* m lath ami II DARCY A SCOTT UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER %  1 1 ,,-.'. M ll.i. 3 rnsbrellaa. > Cartons Vim. I Carton Rlna* 101 pkg.. on. O .1 Tcelhing Pii.Jri, tm> 1 Poll. 14 pri Shoe* atoo 1 G V Radio 1 tir-i t DM a lIKWkUt TROTMAN X CO Aurtlaftrera REAL ESTATE II KI.M MIIM *.S I Mil u.' r.iouh land lor flnwc* TARCY A SCOTT I 303>i NOTICE -S P C A A %  tnrvtln* of tlir Hocirty only, U to be held at Pinfold Straat. al iwelva aay 13th July. 1*30 Y M C A .--. .... Mi %  Purpo.r NOTICE inc TEXTIttlS fot lai rrom any part Almahouta it.1 rront tha Alnuhotuo to t lloapltal will hr rn-ivn] by July Itlh 1H0 W U GOOD1NG. Parochial Tr**.ur l Phil NOTICE Tha laat day for r. THY me Trodrn for rontiriHiing a raMdant* for a Paiochkal Mtdtral Offlcar on land, ul RdKhlll. Rt Thoma. "Ill b* TtTESDAY lit AiiauM IfOO Th* original date een al Url.k %  T .. kl.II..ad Pti.me MOB TYPHWHITBR %  Olyiopl.poHabl^ ivp*n.'titer> -tandjrd keyboard PrW 1110 00 A G Si Hill. June-. Street Ore milch cow. 3rd calf. U Giving 40 plnU dally Appli : C lletheT, FTlandahlp. Bt Dial lie I 14 1 SO—0f< TWO HOKflKF Mai land*, vo#v quirt 10 Planlailon , Applv; J C Pay 3344 si both MISCEU ANEOUS AVON -Btlmt Tren for HOtdff C-rt. no rrvinf on Cotner. -l-i TRI'CK HEAVY DL-n' TYRES All alul HEI>MAN A TAY1/>R S liAKAr.F. HATTLl'Tl llEDMAN* IdtH-n OARAGB LTD 1* %  VCALYPSO RECORDS—New ahipment jum received II alao Mui.r. MuaK. Muuc with Thar**. Rrewet and Tha nmland All StarI AMilm UMITtn I'l w !" J i y _£! CALYPSO them'. forly elgri K1IA1/>T SpacUl ptk-a Apply JOHN D SONS LTD Dial 4JM U I OETiT-S BI-ACK EVENING SL'IT ErujIUh made. In good r ruin IB I S (aat 10 Inches. Chaf 31 inchea Alo two Drata Shim PiMlieally n I-lnch ColUr Phone 4113 13 ? 10-an GALVANITE Plp*w 1>.. and 1 Inchai alao Oalvanlie Hralble conduit in ilia loieh and 1-, Incho mqulra Aut. TlT*> CMIipai". TTal*lf.tr Slr-et Phnni MM. %  T M Mr JACKS TM C.i> One Ton t.i Twelve I U Alt AGE LTD JVim Pineapple. Orange. 1 Bailey Waler W Street Dial 34M 14 JAMS AND MAKMAI-ADf. IV % %  (* Plnaappla Plum. In lib tin*. Gok*-T. Shrad, Scotch Orange ;nd Silver Thread ill, t;in Jar. W H Forde. %  14 t 30-ln %  : %  %  %  and fane and O M each Thanl Henry an-t 1 %  m 1 t> 11 M 1 v. %  .1 rit. fraudulr pa* application of the u Trad* Mark or violation of the rights 1 1 'Mil-. .,>) ,„ Worthing. : a n. II I Kite** !'-o nUnulei ." to ont lnterr*ted Apt>l>\ Apartment 3 Strath. v. 11. 1 „. (j,p U I HI T. LANL Daaiiable building .He r,-aeme Hall Tatrace Dial 1430. I 1.M-I f 1 UrTMK-AHlj; I'lUIITJtTY nl Id SI Thomas It rUglllU .,( Wall house and shop, both In land which 1. at prevent planted liked Al lo aell Can he 1 I'.UKV A %  SANDGATE-. KaatinM. ataadlng an .•040 square feat of land on the seaside of Huntings Road The House contain, drawing and dining room, enclosed gallery on three %  Idea, two bedrooms with dressing looms, kitchenette^ toilet and bath upU.rs wilh uaual rooma downatalri and flights of Heps . %  inand Water spectlon any day by a Oai. 1." which ..> in-iiL^ bsf) 1 111 August under the uuspicea ol tha Extra Mural De,v. USJfi of ;he W*1 Indies In association with the Hli %  loriral %  ocltlj <>i Trinidad and Tssbtaio ) To MrHooper, former^ %  -* 11 ..-N: II (elititationon ht recent marriage to Mr. Hoopt-r of the Cable %  Wirelrss. I.nl BOd .-very happinesa in he : %  ew lite, hoping n the S-.irt | ljueen's 'Jolle.e ISfMii I now propoae to follow Mt ll-mmond* example, when speak mg of the needs of Harrison College, and enumerate the ver> I'twalng needs of Queen's College. We also, need so many •tUngs -foremost a Hall large enough to accommodate the girls of Queen's College as well as th*ir .1 BpfMC h Ds\y: Secon.iu rtatereocfl Ubrurj and Vlt | Form Class rooms are require i In any odd corners of the Sfhii >uu tatty stumble upon VHh Foun students, even driven to seek quietude under the trees — a new "species of birds" at Queen's ft lege, ns the "Collegian" so aptly %  Mem'' We need opportunities to be pencil up for girls in the Vth Form who have shown dehnrc ithility (or BctimcC, U fMUbsf sheBl ronliniie their studies m the Form Fuflhrnn College, we need proper changing rooms for Games, and showers and a Canteen 11 %  mora Lnuu Mi llammoiul s|>ke .1 the boys rOiUMl stboui I !* P IM %  gsMtsffch rl spent the last five hours in a bout", but at Queen's Colatgf I %  : of a girl destitute of ani, lum i because she had e..ten all I" %  andWlcht* at 11.13 a.m. This Yrtr This year, the gtrls have bfstd as enthusiastic as ever about their Ranger and Oul h %  ad Brownie rSttk Yw BB account of their ;u'i l.iCollege Magazine, but 1 won' ike to take the opportunity i i *i ..iiikirn; Mis (iliudon Reed f II .ill her help with the Grill Miss Hazel Clarke with t; I understand that if i .i.lers were torthcomim;. .mother tiuide Company would IK' formed at Queen's Colle..* Intl House Sports have lieen keenl. . %  '.-:. -1 ..no l.,'...| v : Captain wQl give rou The spiritual side Og School Ul has not been neglectetl and we owe <• debt of gratitude to the Hevei end O. 11 axel wood for taking out C'oiitlrmation Clan, and to Ili> I.ot.Kh.ip the Bishop for ntikii the arrangements. The Scriptutv Union has continued lo m>'< %  ful to all those a % %  %  l-eautiful Christmas Mysb 1 the prn Ua %  is to thiiv.. arha i ROM %  %  en to chsU fsTBt, usual, br.ii %  % %  lalswtsssM IrilercMioi; The l.itei.uv and [),.. et> has continuoi to bold lntoi estlng me. %  i nnd Science Clubs of Harrison College Mr. Douglas-Smith, U • %  % %  i g| LM V Ktn Mm..I Department ol UM Unlvtl Mt. i HtfO of tha West I History Vlth Form with a teturt "ii <; %  !%  ilk to Mine oi o A relate his gein.il kmilli: %  .i la tn bo with in :in> tfsssfnooi Othi mg the past >ear in, i arttOM Mi Vre-lfii* %  Fuller, ami tinCouoga Haraldi who bot> ... %  .its to the h iih Wi owi tbt ni ira itude tc the Itiitish COUneJJ for ntii ,il •In HARBOUR LOG In t irlir.1.Bay I...-.I. I'and.i Sch Lady %  d lo MaK PnlDB H Pavldion. Si- B irnuj II Sch Hern' D Wallace. Sch Harriet Whilt.ikrt Sch Turtle Dove. M.V Blue Slar. M V Caribbee. flch W I. Runirla. *kh %  IMS HI fdatrVAM liir.kRtl assl Schooner Maiion BelUWolfe. 14 let. Capt Kverv. for llnli.i. OKsU Sk-hooner Adah—.. M Nfe I Schooner Oesqui 44 Mi. CM ur offln on Friday • oi JL.LV IM0 at 1 p.m CARHLNOTON Si SCALY. Local Street II T St—lfta A Dclighlful Residence at TOP ROCK. RaVIBg Three Bedrooms with loniiecling Toilet and Hatlia. Break fait Bakonv Large Hun Bakoto Modeco Kitchen. Larga Lounge Dining lloom Outside Two-Car Garage. Three Servants' Rooms. Toilet and Ualh Gardens well laid out Full. Enclosed Flu Viewing Ring oS? or SsOl if 7 so .i„ WANTED HELP A qualified NURSE for at %  •,he afoi med Coi thereof within Barbados, will bv dealt i under Ihe Mcrrliiindlse Marks Ait to amend the law relating to frauduknt marks on merchandu* or otharwlie %  .llrecta Doled this 13th day of July. ISfW IIEC.1NAU) W BARKER Si CO Btiii.ii Mjd Foreign Patent and Trade Mark Agenla. •I Chaapilde. l^.ndo.1 E C > Engisnl I.a and on behalf of HP-NRY MASON .SHIItiY. UMITH' 14 T Sn aslary of ISO 44 per month Application! with Certificate to b forwarded lo Ihe Parochial Medkal Officer. "Ellangowari not later than Monday. ITth July, ISM. Any Purthar PartlcuUri can ba oblaincd rrom tha P M O A. A. a. anA-. Clerk. Pvor law GuardUm. SI Joseph I T W> In DEI'lTY MANAGER -Required for . %  Eitate In St Vincent %  nergelk well oduratM man re Future prospect*, good" 10 Mount Bcntlnck Estates IJd St Vm 11 1 I NOTICE Re elate of In. cure I JULIAN EGBERT HHATIIWAITE NOTICE l. hereby given thai all perms having any debt or claims agalnsl tha Eatate of Jii IAH EtiBERT BRATMWAITE. .l-r-i-1 lala of Four Roadi in the parish of Saint Philip in IhiUland who diad on tha 13'h day of October lOsa. inlaatata are requested to %  and In parlkulara of thatr claim, duly ottntad to Ihe underilgnad Ettlna Fjcilla Brothwalta. Co Maaara Haynes a Grlfflih Solicllon No 3 Swan Shraat. iila-etown. on or before the 31st day of July. ISM altar which 1 shall produce lo ilisln'i.i'e the assets of the deceased HITHIIIC ihe paitles entitled thereto having ragard only to auch claims ol which I shall than have had notice and I -.11 not ba liable for the asset. or an* part thereof so dutnbuted to MOP person of whose debl or claim 1 •hall not then have had notice And all persons indebted to the said estate ale requested to aattla their said indetrledncM without delay. Dated thH Hit day of Kay. If90. ETTINA EKCILLA BRATHWAITE. V.i.illned AdmlnlrtratrtN of the Eatate of Ji:..ai Cgbert Itrathwaltr, JtCMSad I I 30-an SERVANT before 10 Cave Hill. CX'TJmM'i; i. for family of i... to Mr Scaif.la < SI Mich,, el 14 1 sraupa. 30—Sn WiSCELUNEOUS OAMFS (taS (II nadminbat Sal Ona III Croquet Set One III Deik Tennl. Bet Phone 3731 14] I ^ II T SO In ( B*tbad aldarlr man mU poBUoa. eu many other wayi Sotne ekperiesne u loiel business M t; M C o Advocate 13 7 M It WANTED IMMEDIATELY I'l')-* Cood breed Pair preferred Dial ISM |5 i BO—i, lie. of any make Apply Mr* iTnuglm Kinr* Street or ralrrhlld am Probyn Strut 13 so 3r. i. wi.,-: FOR SALE rated i-.fTee sets uses, cigarette l.>grther with modelled animal ngurea ar. wall plaquei Sea them HARRISON A CO 11 ? br !" b Vii I She hat Gat for Cooking \HU_\WJ INCANDESCt-NT KI'I.Hf. I .rj :. perfection I frsmt *f*d (upboa'd aimort new IsM pMJfM BM I* *•—" MIUAHII HADH* BM %  tube Milliard Radio on dliplay Show Room al Prince William Street LAAiaEYS IJMTTEn I .in BUTTsCM lib un • ins Nairn Baa us lor prlcei %  High Blood Pressure Kills Men & Women 14 sr WHITl ENAMELLED f.-.iih i OaUM eafMctl Importationi un %  d Don't wait %  bad D.#. HARRISONS BROAD STriFEl IS I M—In. Dial—33S4 IMJO-lnsngati imving vMtaraay by nu 1 ., i. II, (Hi BM1 fium Bost.n AHe.nc. 1 laris tilpioiL Clare-. L King, Nes/Hla King. Esi.'i r f-rom SL KillIne* Ma lot <• Antigua Jamea Hae. Helen K... I ..tin EHI. Ann.— F Eld Frafa Domimva Augusl.i George rioranl. l>h William Mcllwalne. Jai. • Pauengsr. l-.-vu.g Ihe IsJaiai 1 . II. 1M>! .re loi II lo.eol Mi> A C llaiva-hrll V U II. artat I. M .it., M r. II. hell. Ml and Mis II II St II Mi*. II Si Hill. Mr T II Da... H A Wi!llama. Miss H. Nanl.,. ^nd Mis W A Hadl-V Ur S ..as. Mr. C Caeaar for Oread.. C S Duiont roc Trinidad Mt i WalkF Km Billlsh OulanaMl Mrs K. B MiKensle, Mr and K H llurrle. Mi W K AlhtrlMr A. DaL Innias, Mi s J IVin-lcin In Touch With Barbados CoaaUl Station i ii uii-ii Wir iWi l„l.Ihry rate with tne following ahipa gi, Iheir Ba'badvs Coast Ktallan rort Townihend. S S Beech 8 B lady Rodnev. B S Btanbell. Lei. .. S S S M ,'.s B S Teni|.kArch. S S ." Akoa Pennant. B B Dlsabetri S •. Bun-lair. 8 8 Oakhill. SS Arkanaa* Walnut. S B P-taO. b S Santa Ana. 8 B Eaan Shreverport. 8.S Trajanui. S B Franca F-saio. 8 S Cn-ill-i, Cnalleisgr*. 8 8 Mauitanne. i... .,: %  i ARRlVAlf* 11. B V t A I riom TltlNU'AP I I rd II J-' PHI, J lldUIMn, M J..hi.-,n R HI n .. %  .. W Hudson. M Bankdin, G Yvonnel E Ban. J WK* ham. B rield. T Ib-klei H Mud. J De MosiPirun. M IV Mon, bum. M De Montbro., 1. Fl^-t Mabel H*ce Wallei ll.i,,..n II BSem A Stone. F. ll..,|..i.i.i rrom DOMINICA Sluul.i Eileiini I. .-lenne. Colonel Il:.-..iw..rll. | IIIMPAM Ii II:.. It Mu. M Ai-nne. N Ook...l P Taw H BanBald <> lUnltrld F Mailn F i> Null 1 A Uriel A %  N r %  I'n.i,, I-. OUAIBA Mi . I Bmlth. John l.u. i. i ST LUCIA Will ted (a%. BMI n.. Ilaii.es. Ida PVigel • i Kin-, MI Carl B i aa e iw u i Miss R Sprotl rrom ANTII11A Winston Ward li.ti,.osil For TRINIDAD JulMII..-.. ClemeiH Francl. l-rom BAN JUAN Hi. I i JoMlra Wane., liKI'AKTVREr. I.. I W I A I For TstlNlDAD Mana Me.a, Dieg, BUM ii.ilel*e. Glare T-U Theio.a tarasr, Ottn MaK... Wan* MacKay. Ilert-.rt ll„.iv Ma c. Shadack. John IVaier. Margaret la-wls. Brian ie-iOavaM Lewat ftasnaai LaillMortal Kmch. Nrtlle Maasyn, Jamas Grnsvaavor, SyUia Giosvennr, Jura-. Elancli. J I—n. A LfMM PM ST VINCEN1 I-I..H.. Hed lliiiliu. Mlld.-l Bn Browne. Maigarel M g Ml Bsg, %  • %  % % % %  Crawford. Buaan Coullas. Bmma Coultas. Llsr Tha)M" Fur lai Ol'AJIIA Aaron Srhor. Noni.a Otaro. lall del Cairo*., UWro. BsM Otaro. Lu Otaro. TalHo OMTO, A. aandra Savorgnan. Roaelli Rodrrlr Savorgnan For ST lAICIA-Oairiidliia Mun George Prrmh. John hlinmon*. Aubn Doujtlaa Smith. Tor ST KiTTB—DavliI Evans Carl* Williams. Wllnta lleyllgei Mill* rianart* ... IIIMTISII GUIANA Mr Chall /. % %  Burl Mr Jol Mas Lilian Shrpl.i .1 Ml •BUT, Mil l"earl .'•. II.IT,.Mill,. I.,i Clt'DAII TRt'JII I <• Hi.hai.1 IU< NAIM Pr Patrick Jaffa, Mr I., • in Por ANTIOU Arrival* BV Ii W 1 A on Thursday flom BO Mr Ja.k Maraoti. Mia strph.i.i. MaiMS, Mo. M-ry Maiaun. Mr rrancn D'Almada. Mi PBaald Ainistioiig Mr. 1 Titias Ai o.sli.,', Misa Elaine l...ns. Mi Jol I 1 Ml Hobrit rranjj I 1 of vaUial.liDuring the vl r %  t.. Edi %  %  %  I ttsi groumi %  . %  %  isy to He rj . i by a half-bo FO.'. SALE I Murdvrt'r \\ ,'c/w KITTS nai Qi BsTg sVacd. .... in. Jil : bad found him gmii. of llvilh nuildeu'in Ailhiti lit %  ford on* nundrod fift • i 11. till! M-.ir Urw who had no wltni U'li-.lf ilihonn %  •round after bn ; % %  tni who cLalnvad \r •' %  i LH-I RkfJ SHIPPING NOTICES i I IM II I'lTY le May IAS/ I IM Mell-air i m llrl l-OHT WFJ1 IN.. iilv Auarust Brtabanr aattv August Melboiiiiia mi. I Jul* N %  ydBsyj mid August waving TlUitda-l own Hh Baptarnbar tliaae .esss-ls have ample space BM • olllad. hard fro.en and general cargo Cargo accepted . IhlsMagti bill, ol transhipment at Trimda.l loi Itiitish (iuUina. Uarbadua. Wi leeward FtllNEBH WTTIIY fe CO Agssnu. Trinidad DA COBTA A CO 1 Til Agrnli. Il4.l.l... The M.V "DAGHWOOD" %  i i | Pi SI I.in I.I. s* Vincent, Q i ii Aniba, Date ..f BaUlng hi hi given The M V "CAHIUHKK" will acecpt Cargo and I'as%  sBCdjarg for lhnnmic.i. An •u:u.i. BfjaB ta a iia l, N< 11 an i st Km.. Si.iiinc rtlday iiiti ,n • It U I SchtKiiirr Uunrrs f.modalhin Inc CoMklinee: DUI ti|T 'SUNBEAM" the i"i rwui our • i BTKD I om nu i eh„. Onl 0th 1 — Remaining IH-IH-.UOII lnii,.| MWMM *V to \< i irisiiaii Science | | in-aiiiii" liiMiiii I I r ) ... % Ilka *..<> %  •!.. b, MAB1 i%  Houn : 10 a.m.—3 p.m. Tuasdavs, Wednesdajg. Fti.i.i>. 10 a.m.—12 !..;... Saturdava. > HARRISON LINE OUTWARD rilOM THF. UNITED KINGDOM •HISHHtlAN" "HIVEKCKEST" Fn>m liondon llVrl J -,' M Broufh & : • '.I, .• London Leaves i I Jah Sth July Mh full 8th July 15th Jul) HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM" Due flurboilo* Mth July I nth July 27th July Sand July :""li July Visitors Arc Welcome n 2-lh Tin HAMSH HAMS ii %  %  III Mi'; IN CMgh. I.KS CHIVFlt'S HFKIlt'K.T .. RavlT SALAD j S.lJAKT k SAMPSON LTD >'e'e'-',V.-.'--,' Vessel S^i "TACTICIAN" SS "CRAFTSMAN" For i., II M-irhntlo 20th Jul. 2tnd Ji-u For further particulars apply to DA COSTA a CO., LTD-AgcnU. 9nc j HAVE YOU GOT A I COLD or COUGH ; IF SO TRY IIROnMS ;i CERTAIN COUGH \ rJURI GOVERNMENT NOTICES TENDERS FOR PURCHASE OF 0A8 COOKING APPARATUS Tenders are Invited lor ihe purchase of one (I) No. • at electrically driven AEROOIN l'otrol Gas Gciieuloi wtlh I, :i III' motor wound for 110 VOltl 50 c\clcs. single phase tuppl> eonplltl with burners and stove The equipment in at present housed at Erdiston Teachers' Training College, and inav be mspe. led b) BpfOl ment with Ihe Principal 2 The original cost of the upparatus was $2,609.70. In o-Midor, to the price tendereil. -.lie pun BgaMI will be required to pay Customs duty amounting lo $262 3 Tenders should IKforwarded in sealed envelopes addressed to the Cotoolal Sirret.iry (and not to any officer by nainel so as to reach the Colonial Secretary's Office not later than 4 p.m. on Friday the 28th of July, 1850. The envelopes should be clearly marked 'Tender for G;i-. <'.>okln.! Apparatus". I Tin (i-.veri --ul dinimt hind itself to ;o'i|il the highest or any tender. IS.7.50 2n VACANCIES FOR TWO ASSISTANT AGRICULTURAL SUPERINTENDENTS DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BRITISH GUIANA Appli. ations are in\ :il Superintendents two vacant posts uf Assistant A.mulrja-partnaant of Agrlcullur". Mttan P iculars of tbg pot) :.ie as under: — Salary g to £625 per j nual II BKptriL 500 per annurr menls of CfJJ Qii.'i.ri' ..-: %  .: and Experience Applicants must hold either— (I) a degree or OUptoma %  Agriculture, antl have ence in agricultural extension or farm management, or (II) the Associateship i f the Imperial College of Tropical Agnculture or a degree or diploma in Agriculture with post graduate training at an Agricultural College AUowancta Travelling and subsistence allowances will be paid in atH M with the Government Regulations in force. i' % %  ..-,.: Period, Appointment to the post* will be on twelve months i>i in the appointment the offlcera will be placed on the '.le establishment, and will be liable to contribute to ItM llntIU Widows and Orphan Fund Bl ttH rate of 5% of it I mum salary of the post by monthly deductions from salary. 2 The successful candid;^. ...11 be engaged In the exten i.,n "TVK. of the Department of AgTunilUin 01




PAGE 1

Saluratai .IMI 1.1 HISS BuTbautis Iftuncate Prlrr: | I I VI. (IMS Ifar 3 5 North Korean Troops Cross Kum River ALLIED PLANES BOMB BASES Fifteen Years For YankaPrcpam A ttemptedMurder bta.X.T 'pWKNTY-FOLR-YKAK <>U> GBOftOE skll.il m veMerdav M-iiicM.nl In 15 pMH in BfftoOB b\ Hill u nun r Mr. <;. I,. Tavlor. Acting Chief Justice. Ha had pleaded Kuillv to the rhurue of "alienipud murder" fl IOWIIIK llir death of (ivurKr lluntc. .. fisherman of Redman's (Jap. WaanaVf R.md. on March 27, 1930. Skeetc was charged with murder hut pleaded ntOh of attempted murder. Mr. F. K. Fields. Acting (illlWaai t'ien eral. appeared on hehalf of the Crown and Mr. J. S. H. Daaui fur the accused. -•' After accepting the plea. Mr. Field* Mid that he had taken int. consideration the circumstances of the caw. particular!) II leal evidence. He said that undoubtedly there was a difference in the %  ., %  of the doctor who performed an uperation at the General Hospital and the one who performed the aaM itiorlem. At KMria period in the proceedingInor the accused's counsel would have been forced to put to the |ury the fan that If they believed one doCtOI tliev would be asked to disbelieve the other In cerlHin respects. Chamber Of Commerce Talks End PORT-OF-SPAIN. July 14. A five-day special conference of Directors of the Chambers of Comiroree of the British Caribbean hieh opened here on Monday, ended today. The confer summoned primarily to eonomic -i&pcct of the proposed repa rati on of the British West Indies but the opportunity was taken to discuss the inadequate passenger accommodation by steamship between the Colonies and the I'nitcd Kingdom .is well as trade ith Canada. G. M. DaCosta. Vice-Piesident of the Incorporated Chambers presided at the talks. He told reporters today thru when they left ftir their respective colonies the* knew they would be faced with n.'cislons momentous, both in volume and significance. As the businessmen said, they • wed by certain Governments with suspicion because they worked In an atmosphere of keen competition Mr DaCostn pressed the delegation for the extreme! v good manners which prevailed throughout the talks. The delegates leave over the week-end. MARSEILLAISE STOPS DEBATE BRUSSELS, June 14. Meeting for the tilth day in a join; cession designed lo vote on the repeal of the Regency Law which bars King Leopold from the throne, both Belgian Houses of Parliament were forced to suspend debate to-day when the Socialists rose and sang the Marseillaise They were protesting against the speech by Joseph Ptiolien. Catholic Senator, who alleged thai uccusatlons according to which King Leopold committed felony by surrendering to the 0 %  tw ang In 1940, were part of the antiLeopold plot waged by foreigners in retaliation against Belgium's prawn policy of neutrality Poland Protests Lesser Offence It appeared that from the unds It was possible thai the deceased might have and in view of that difference in the medical evidence, he felt it was his duty to accept the plea oTjultQ of the leaaar offence t evidence of the wv %  gOUM HUM of them. OOUld doubt in the minds of the court that the accused had intended to do serious Injury to the deceased. It was true that most of the witnesses* were related in some respect to the deceased, but nevertheless that did not prevent thorn from being witnesses of truth Other witnesses gave evidence before the Magistrate, evidence which tended to show that the accused had entertained some animosity againvt the deceased although they were on friendly termbefore the offence hud taken place, and used to go flahltlfi together. He could not sires* too heavily how serious the offence was. There were many of those types of offences and His Honour was bound to take that Into consideration before imposing any senHis sentence hud to he one that would not only punish the accused, but would also deter others who had similar tender i> | ishment should be adcqu in that case, for it to be adequate it would have to be severe Then were no circumstances as far as he could see. which woul his doing otherwise. The severest penalty which the law allowed for thai offence, he said, should l>e and was the aaaOjUOb penalty. Abhoreru-e LAIItO, July 14. Mr Dvur sai,t ,ni "* '" w had Poland tod-v protested against always regarded offences against he Egyptian Government's re,hp Pson with great %  bhorance fmal to open credit for her to "" d particularly a crime such sj supply Iron i;nd steal to Egypt. ,ha which the amaM had The protest was delivered by P'^ded Kuilt-. of having Fianislav Bartnik, Polish Charge nntled. the lawnghtl> deal) d'Affalre lo Abdul Itahman Hakwith great peverlty k.y Bey, En.*, ptlan L'nder-SecrcHis Honour h., i law foi Foreign Affairs. experience In that Coui i end h According to an agreement would know that in thlivesigned between the two Goxernthe people, many little thing i cits bag month, iron and steel might join together to produce i uere to be ^nipp-d from Poland catastrophe such as thai which 1" Egypt on July l But Mohamed confronted the court Bey, Under Seeretary at thu He would not attempt in Ministry of Finance, afterward: w ..\ • %  nilnlmlaa the p refused to open credit on the the offence which (rounds That Poland e/ni undei %  conunilted, bin on hli behalf he r"gfme considered by Egypt to I>e would ask that Hi • %  subversive"—Renter. temper justice wW) mercy U.S. Asks Fate 01 German Prisoners _. „ , „ WASHINGTON. Julv 14. I he United Slates to-day asked Russia to permit an International body to investigate ihe fate of German prison ers of war known to have been in Russian cuitudv in a note delivered in Moscow to-day the United States said it shared Ihe "shock and concern" of the German people over the recent Russian announcement that the repatriation of Germar. of war had been completed with the exception of personin grave Wai et Tl N JUl> or a in i itati i %  %  bai f the A %  vaeuaUea from Ihe -n> %  t emergency Th.-se instructli i ground of "deUcasI position" of Istanbul wtl great anxiety among al throughout the city Reuter WASHINGTON, Julv 14 i i.. > -. % %  today that Ann %  i standing btttfUctti pared for evacuation of all American residenls in CSai of an eui"i% %  DC3I won sent more M %  Si i i %  %  %  it rrori Istanbul saying that (he Amencan Consul;ttc-(;''n'r.it had distributed a circular tV dents and Americans vrll I ill UM event of trouble Omcuil' lien r knew no Rich Koreai r The local (' were BUthi %  tionarv measures at their discretion though the State !) %  -. /as usually contulead Buoh rneaaurce bad tie. %  i ke ui m advance and war* i it Beet prompti] th (Core % %  n Shanghai fell mUPltta and dunns the lighting at and Holing It i Ihe said Renter Nehru Keeps In Touch With Korea Crisis NEW DELHI Jub n Paadh Nehru, Prhm Wnlstei %  %  f India had l>ecn "in dlre<-t and %  Minister Clemetll \tili i hi Korean glti .' %  nounceti here today. Tin 1 %  reported th.it India's Ambassadors H and Washington had nnveie.t messages from fa I Stalin .... retary ol State De;ifi AcheOOlL tha Bx tcrnal Al!.. u<): "Representations foi pea h u i peaceful ittleinanl of the Korean tnsputi havi bean n i Inela throuKh normal Aptotn neis in London, waahlngl Hme since hostilities rinlin.i r i I "Otl July 12. Ii dl J In M M wenInatructed lo ran tonal messagei from Prime MmU Stalin and hecn in direct and close % %  Atti... Britl I P,.:, i Mr* % %  —Rruter Sugar Delegation Achieved Success lion. //.A. Cuke C.B.EL, Returns HON H A ci'KK. C.B.C., me ol ITM Baxbe4oa dale gat* it tharacenl London Sugar Talks %  rrivad in Bai bad< %  ij at 9.16 a.m. bv \\ ". I Plarco, intransil from Knyland i i SPORTS WINDOW la i.-*. via M ih* lU-h-*.. Am-ln, |*,, I Uy %  Urta il t The llilurpani la ii ssse MIS. Itol MJ. %  %  .... I %  :l • I V. I! .1 %  %  i .. %  ion on rue aaj DIM Itl 'i m New York, howI at New iad did not .HI ive In .. WiUil.l tin plane developed to divert -i thai arrived i Thursdav afternoon at aplatata J o'clock Mi Cuke the night M N dad pn Li€ Asks Tor TVoapsTo Aid Soiiili Korea i \k> sm us Juli 14 Trygve U< S* i ti;.! rstiortan t. pealed to all Umti Nai .•um. Council Reeolt • %  %  Korea he had tenl an urgenl %  ppeal t" i %  lo *uppi> nd forci The aj i" i m in-aftet formal -••(.sultation* with rnernberi of N liad l--en % %  %  i furl i incountry'! pohcj %  %  .... the United fk : Coun%  il (>' %  made dble (I-I %  ppoii i imandei I % %  %  i %  %  M I IOVI um; ui%  had in %  I %  Thl ., tancr hould im hide %  %  % %  % %  Nai Ttu -1. %  hed in tenei %  tern leavlnt dsialled srranajanw uti in future bllateral negotlationi with the unified command von im 'ii,, ,. %  %  Nationalist China %  %  • %  iad li niual aid C h i aeSf Natlonslhas The t'li: Mi lake I %  %  (11% I.IOM I 111 I1MI.M TOKYO, Juiy lo. ^MtklCAN TROOPS dug in .Hong men Kuia River line of "no retreat" yesterday, hurled back a North Korean fiffoii to bnaob the line and waited for what they thought would be a MM attack. The invaders lank.s. lntaiitry ..nd gueril las had splashed across the muddy Kum River yesterday and for a time established several' small pockets" on the south bank of the river which guards the temporary capital, Taejon. i aflng ti in %  Inf ml GONE FROM LORDS i l.fle live lWiaianhTi It. Gorman Coil. Suffer Defeat Labour \f.l r s \\ anl D.S. To Quit Formosa i uffl red IIONN. Julv heavy defeat Pal r LONDON, J %  i %  ment |i Success) In .m interview Wltfa tin* AdVO cate. shoi UJ RM MI i one ipeakinji foi Ihe IIW i %  nd Brlusti Oulsna Bui gallon mid, "it is (.ui opinion lbs) tha Dekfatlon bai Mhievad %  • remai kaw that lhe> iii .<• %  i blunU) told thai Ineri ihelr con ln| Ii Bni as the Brtl had deei-ii West 1 11 Assotia... i up i the last written replj lo 1 'gallon, ui. %  loth June thai they would be wil ther inter wish-d. I ii ii...i Hal Majesty*. >-t did not inh nd I Ihe qu >T ...i. ......... a... .... a . %  .... -. %  lumen: i ., .: tin British Govern-[then slew that thl aTei ra I ed a Social Democrat motion ment to Ulffl the Withdraw) requiring the Government to eonUnll %  fron row I onus oustlnj now il id ind seure tha adinlsslon %  a rise In tha price of bread nee communists to the Seeunrj Social Demi" uncil •ipposl.u c ; lad solidl. The motion asnl down In the for the naotion while m I • uum of Sidney Silverman. and %  i 21 othai members also %  • Politicians considered lo-d enl lo seafMn ll vote the bliiKest setback the Oovfor a settlement by "'i* ds l#st ernment had received Ino ensleeeours lo Uv Mkked why this rhange of hrart at the eleventh oui Th iwei I Ihe Isuustan ami tin u [ U* : M. oiling powet UM I" % %  lomes They know that the West U flnaneially weak and %  lepei oni rrw thai the West Indies have no • I ; I h mves the trong bargaui* ing power i i •-ginning t" realise fforn it. e %  i o '. IIII of reprasentatives ol Ihe Brilish West India v *' gl ll n last ytti and the vlsil ol ihe present IH>I 'ieal delegation, that there t-e -rengtn In *eal %  Worked Together Another memorable acha rr in which ition. rornposed of polilea, bui dominated by .< un* %  r was most %  an page I hope thai the lined lo Korea n porh %  hcthei II Icatlon to the Chli .'i Dill 'i th.it had id i pied TI lltl.,1 I' .u gro il he did not know 1 1.1 though! 'i Nation %  ute old. • South | I %  . %  i . 'pinion Ii %  ii thag He Miii %  it referenei to Nehru reported Pren let Btalla Lie said Information eboul .im. I ii.. %  mill ed bj the Ii Prime Mil I U %  Kruiei against the %  the United States", it said return of the provisionally exiled %  King Leopold to the throne. (MM Ha* I'nsieH Union offlclals -aid according to • .rly reports stoppage was fairly v. idespread. According to later reports, the rtO^pagaarsa general in coal mines throughout the area. Glass works and leather work were also affected Trams and buses were off the streets. Train, telegraph and telepnone lines were normal Public utility undertakings were also working normally Tnis is the second series of "Stop Leopold" warning strike to be staffed in Belgium's Frenchspeaking Wallon provinces this week. To-morrow m rkei large Wallon centres of Liege The note, referring to the Big Four MoHi agreement m April 1D47 for repatriation before the end of IMS. said America. Britain, and Fiance had repatriated their prisoneis he fanthai date It said arbitrary re*;. %  i i did no' r-heve Ru Ha of its ootlga-turr. these person* | their homes building: Terrific Explosions Rake Portsmouth Naval Base PORTSalOl :n July It big as the first. Ag a huge n Britain* bigge-oat I be %  gl room of daaaa imoks toared P • '. tonight by the blue sky, fire i two big explosion in ammun: ll Gospor. on the opp' side of the harbour These caused several casuallie tug fire, and damaged eral alarms Uon Hanspahto I ^'i'-nt six aminui waded fjon barge St-veral Blasts A Hampshire fire officer fsalikv d. brehen t>. LONDON Ion and pasra I.-. II a n u-and u nt far the f.nii idiu. "to, ll ll Illl> Ti %  rrtrkel Oreand it *M stolen ffesn it-isass base I the I "-• ronn" ol Ihr yavltloa The eeta. dated ITS', .iinl hriilni, ihe head ui Oeaffie III. a u-ri tut the laii up iii ImpellaBI eaati bes t \ I'r Reds Musi Withdraw roEndWar Stiys Statt' lU'pt. WASHI %  the %  I lighting ind -.dlidi i,, i i %  %  %  : %  i il. ind tti-i ii i not h|l OH Ph %  ..ie In..%  ... %  \ 'i 'Ii I i i Itl ,lt. T Seamen \\ ant Reds Ousted ..:.. %  Earlier, I %  %  • %  %  v 1 %  %  K %  %  arttkal i .-1 | Ni.rth Korean %  eeseal di> e feaned Ike roe-mi % %  '• • i iihiii i. ..i id.hum .ed pea rated Heath *• ma loree* MSI i Imi. m IN mile. nerth ol laajan in th : I SYDNEY eai I %  %  %  I Executive men' t %  ksn • %  %  ban Iranspori of wai m b K i %  %  it t/ould the Iwri.—Reutri in the I | open %  %  %  K linking Ta. i I %  slian aii%  .. %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  i %  %  .I • lull m the west whlrh pri ... | %  esaull 'or .i lupu buUduD ol re* %  ere .IM. Fnlliiwr.. i b-oopt, along tha R • Metll-i eTesesrn leeeai ii. %  : ins nfanlr) i \ %  ... rapuleed %  i %  llghtl) lo tl < con ii Raetei %  • i | By %  %  >' peat eeklng to DM Ult 1 Cunehon %  •,',. i i I I %  i .si-tn leaseae I %  ile—Renter Czechs Sri Up New Ministry TO PROTECT REGIME PRAGUE, July 14 %  %  t Natlt %  .. ... 'pei i % %  main %  i unewori %  of -eeurlt* mat ien ->ii of • %  iii'h were formerlj • lb try of thi Iriteriol The pOV | I Minisl %  D* ret i %  taking over ihe (SI Seeurii hi in .ind run anj %  %  %  the management and running of Csachoslo %  approved by Pai I Ki-lltrr ^RETTt S The United States .i KKe sted that \ T Russia Should l\ Finnish f u ]| .smong the i ..information on the Ldenl Harmlllev* Up prisoners acknowledge g her custody. 12) Provide information on thelflrit It surted a big lire number, identrl •*.mediately ipri Namur. plan to join the mov./and place of burial of prisoners beryi ment by staging a 24-hour stn-. ind internee* who had died m'riuslng furtl —Beuter CSpUvKy. RantOf, uf th „ f| ]5 minu i„ \ a -„, was si READ WHAT THE LORDS SAID ABOUT FEDERATION m -Sunday'! Advocate" %  1 %  %  Liit tin i 'nor fires alom: %  %  %  . | .cross the rait the explni' • high Tha barges wero attached to a royal arrmen I ReuUr Co n adff MaySfte n d $.~>o Million f&ore On Defence OTTAWA. Jut l i in View ol tha Kon %  d] growth %  I. accorling to n U U !•' % %  %  %  : %  %  % %  I 'mures are II %  are si U i %  —Reuter i TRUMPETER CIGARE TTES ARE ALWAYS FRESH 10 12 CENTS



PAGE 1

SATURDAY, Jll.Y 11 195U ilAKIIAIMiS ADVOCATE PACK FIVI. Puousel'on Co,our Sliohbei) U Affecting In TinI iii i. ^ I'Hli-nliii : Thursday School Life—Cast It Out!" "Abominable H onutn Fined £2 For F om I'R inn -.*s i destroyed by i daj one ..: Dovei Lhurch v completere OH ThurGap, Cartsl doiiLU'-luurt*l boarded and 'fnngled v-ilued 1.000 and furniture to the value of |600 beloiiKing to Beubh NicholU. She anM occupying the louse at th* time of the incident. Tl:. lira BritMta turned out. but on . *as discovered that the flume* the buildhiK The BMOnd i N KCtimd ;it I'rklge (..I. SI %  hlnctod %  trill shed root and kitchen ..'tached, valued 11.440. It i> the j roperty of Inez Pollard. Neighbours tried hard to contiol the blare but. were unsuceaaftil It Is alleged that a spark from a coal pot started the lire Pollard to!.: ironing clothe* She left the coal pot at the entrance of the shedroof and went about 50 feet away. Shortly after her tiranddiiughter called her and told her that the house wag on fire her fire occurred at Wenton, St.' James, at about 2.45 p.m. >ed a hoarded and shlntfled house belonxitu: to Louise Marshall. This tire a) and destroyed n double roofed houaa valued &f > belonging to Edna Clayton. Both houses were occupied by their owners. The Fire Brigade turned out under the command of Superintendent Grant. S O PAR 8.U0 DRIVERS and 197 conductors have renewed their licences A clerk at the Traffic Department told the Advocate yaaUfdir* thai they are still expecting more within the BtKl few weeks B ATHERS AT C.RAVKSEND make full use of the Hath • peelally on Thursdays and Sundays. This Shed was formatly situated at the southern end of the beach but the HeadQuarters of the First Barbados Sen Scouts has taken its place. The Bath Shed Li now at a ^.ntrjl position In easy reach of everyone using the area to bathe. Standing at Gravesend. between a group of casuarina trees, i an old one-roofed house which i ,,MV years ago was used as a bath shed. Before the erection of the new bath shed many bathers made use of this "''• hut now that all have %  arted it. it has a weather beaten appearance. It may only be a short time before It topples over and becomes an eyesore to tne casuarina walk around It. \ UGLSTA GREEN of Waterlord Tenantry reported the loss of 5205 from the same home between the 3rd and 10th of this month. W ORK on the new St. Joseph Post Offlce Is progressing rapidly Recently the building Btnf painted and it understood that it will be opened shortly M R. C. W. Rl'DDER. Police Magistrate of District recently Imposed lines of 10'and oi.e shilling costs, each on two motorists and two women who wan reported by CpL G Cyrus. Sgl Inn Is* prosecuted for the Police Thev were: Gerald Dyal Kensington New Rood. St Michael, who was lined for driv the motor lorry O—133 on South I iatrld Rood, St. George, on May II with canes projecting 20 Inches on the right side. Herman Forde of Brereton. St. Philip, was fined for driving the motor lorry G—272 on South District Road on May II with canes project.nc 20 inches on the left aide. Finally. Evalina King and Eurrie Smart of South District were lined for making a disturbance on South District Road On May 11. M ANY MEMBERS and friends are expected to turn out at the Y.M.C.A.. on Sunday at 4 45 pm. when Mr. Frank Moore will I e the speaker at a Relig Service. M ANY YEARS AGO Barbados had a YWC.A but it .n 1921 after the building in which it was situated was sold Oil that occasion the Y.W.C A vii nt Trafalgar Street and the Iota MM. Edith Trimingham wa* tne Secretary At praMl a group Of local A King ahead form anoint VWC.A ( 1AM ARE <.OlN<. OUf Of J date and theft hi verv Uttl work in that line for the coach tullders. Mr R. L. Harper. Chech builder and blacksmith ol m %  Id, told the Advocate yesthal occasionally he would ; | few cubs to repair, but "they are getting old fwha o n od with Barbadians." The shop it: which he works was situated ir Gicenlleld for 40 years Another blarksmith of Bedford i. %  or* aid S.II i that nowad | ire is very little work for the blacksmith. He wi smith for 25 years and used to d I a lot of repair work to o>rs" and hand cart. He said that the majority repair work at present is done to bread-cart wheels and horse shoeing, there is actually none of thnt" Pleads Governor \t Queen 9 B College Speech Day HIS EXCBLLENCY the O iQueen'i College Speech Day yesterday, called | snobbery of colour by nearly all shades of the community." Th.' Governor's plea was endorsed by the Lord Bishop When he move*! a vote of thanks later In th* wet* The performance of selections from Glib* Sullivan's "Mikado" nraa ctM ol the highlight* >l the pm ffraUnme, and Nell Hall. June Smith, Mm ley Clarke, Gillian Reed, Joan Drayton, Shirley SeaJt Mary Brathwafte end Ann liaison did some acting thai drew n>un from the audience ail our words and actions our fall in then %  mu.h moit 1". The cwftlume* were lavish, and rrflrrted the resplendent barbarity of the Orient i>> aa extent that should have nude a a j phetotcipher present wish he had a technicolor eaaaan 1880. 19/0 — Different? Tba programme opened withi the playing of the National) Also, adapt yot Anthem as [he Oovernaj arnveti; modern devi attended by hi> l'i:\..'.S,vret-r> •'"" ; M'ur child Seated on the platform w\\\ the Governor. were tinLord Ilsho|>. Mr. Qllndon Road Education. Mis Donald Wiles Mr. D. S. Payne and Miss L. N. Trimingham. Acting ilearim stress The Governor and Miss Trimingham wai each pieaanted 1th a bouquet. The school song. "Fiat I.ux" as followed by a sons* sung by the Middle and Junior School 'Count Your BitMr iteed. who waChairman, welcomed the OOVtnKN on what was the latter's tlrst oAeia] visit to the school. H-expressed regret that Mrs Savage was suffering from chill and wos unable %  He wished her a speed ::> j Scope Widened Body C RICKET PAN! alwaj see large scores on the scoreboard but how many of them ever tried to find out art* and when the score tins are Trade? A man was seen under a shed at Greenfield vestcrday painting some of these tins They arc for a new scoreboard at Carlton Cricket Club. O VERTON MAYNARn -f (\.:.< Garden. St Andrew, rented the lots of a pocket watch valued SIO He told the Police that it was removed frorr his mother'" %  tween 7.10 p m and I' Wednesday The Governing pleased to see so many parents i %  Mr. Heed said, and added that he had intended to use the opportunity to tell them how the scope of education was beinx Idenad, so that it would i>e %  piepaiatu'ii for more interesting life In the future. He realised, however, after seeing tin jtir.n bill of fare that Miss Trimingham had prepared, that it was unnecessary for htm to labour that point He then requested her to dellvei •r report. Bin Trimingham delivered her report, which WU often punctuated by the applause ol listeners, especially whan aha dealt With the achievement-, of pupils of the school. The Games Captain I to reported on matters in her sphere Prices and certificates wai presented by the Governor, and than the Governor delivered his address. He said:— Governor's S§eechi Ho said the report on the School year by Mrs. Trimingham reflects the deep devotion to duty of an overworked atafl owing to constant changes of personnel, the usual high standard of academic results and the successful ancillary uctlvities of a school of this kind When an realise that these achievements have bean won In mU* Of a background of inadequate accommodation, we have good reason to congratulate %  Jncarety all those who by individual effort have helped to maintain, and indeed a n h :i n c e. the reputation of Queen'i You would wish me. I know. special mention of the woik of Mrs Trimingham In studying the records. I And that this is not the iirst occasion on %  ..I ... acted as HeadI know from personal expert to the dUBcultla from .in extended period of acting in someone else's shoes and Utfl from n shortage of %  l .IT Hot icst assured. Madam, that Whan Mrs. Corbta returns she Will find the College hj %  %  all the progress in her absence she would have wished if -'" lua l>eeii here herself Perhaps a little im the present plethora of Speech days has reminded me of th story from Canada of a man sit ting at dinner in a hotel Hf noticed another man tlttlni alone who Bi n lauihed! a iva I hb hand and ha kept on rap* U Curloally aol the better ol the I. i to the other table and %  .L I cuse me. you are a stranger here Can I help you'"The man replied. "No. thank you. The truth Is that 1 lead u vary BoHtary life in the backwoods and have formed a habit of telling stories to myself When amusing. I laugh, and when they are sad, I shed tears." "I understand" said the observer, but what is the waving t %  %  Waj open t. them The mnre they learn the less thev win i. bored the more Inihaj wfll taka in what is ai -till morn the* will plaj %  P.nt in the development of the good In Barbados and in the of I I realise that to mention colour In li.u I..1,1.., ma) be i*,. villnx criticism and b> a newramrr perhaps It is dangerous. Rul I do plrad for an end to this snobbery of colour In nearly all thade* of the eoromunily. No good can come of It. Cast It out from your heart* and your homes and i--.ii h >our i hi I dr. ii that . the chlldrrn or (..MI they are no better In Ilia ,.r> than an> other children. I know it is infecting ..I !ii.. In some degree and It must be removed for It K insidious in Its growth and development. As (here ate no pupils listening, may 1 mention in conclusion the %  '' 1' %  '''< -! % %  -I .i hulidav p. celebrate IhU occasion. 1 have not token legal advice in the matter, but from the prospectus of Queen's College included in the Education Act of 1890 it states merely that there shall be one whole holidov given at the middle of each term But there is no provision in the law for any supplementary holidays. However, if vou. Mrs. Trimingham. or. willing to risk spending a period in prison with me, I hope you will give the girls the usual holiday at an opportune time. The Lord Bishop moving the. vote of thanks complimented Mrs. Trimingham on her report and said he hoped thnt all the thinR* she had ask.nl for for the school would be granted in due course. He hoped that when a hall was granted it would be large enough to accommodate both parents and teochers on Speech Days. The Bishop then thanked the Governor for presenting the prizes and for delivering an excellent address. Where the queslion of colour snobbery was concerned he endorsed everything that the Governor had said. Heatlmistre8s Report At th* beginning ol the School \car. Queen's College wai Mill i.ll BP Ity with .(tpj on the total %  %  %  Language We are al. \ery ing ntn September. Mi %  happy to be Woltun back in %  %  %  %  I'h. raining • i .ud the Old i.niv \***.-ului i... decide 1 U> aha* lb apprecijluih I all thjl Mam llupe h*. done l.n Uucei'i College b> preM-utins hf* ii the interest uu ilS.holai ship luiid Mill, ii ha been aa mulalinc lor m*n> >ear IHI li.s now 11 ... I-. I the sum of tluil I hi s sum, 4 uniuur opportumt fur ome further award or e\hi1..In.n ,, Mi U II.,i,. h, |, ,. ad milted to the COB***, onl> on Hie ^Ireiiglh „f a* undertaking that she Mill return to teach in hswaaeaa %  %  i BI B i Queens paattlori luce MM hM thli term been to 'fSi .:T f Mie ihutvh of I ilen.i.i.i We %  plrll. but congf vish her *V*rj lOOaai in her I er MiC! n.s. it A hag been appo Bll th* vaoancj .it Quean'i College %  %  • %  land completing the I/indon Teaeher*i Dtctlomi v.. ahan wi Icomi Of OUI Meanwhile, M us. f.om MeOIII University, has lolned the Stall teacher until the end ol lliitl Has F i om* "i vacation from Mi & College i M %  %  .-rsity also helping m Ml i Sheila Pilgrim ha s been on ,. year'i Itud unlng for a ai BrdJaton Conege, and dui I Miss Pain, la Hop) ha and loyal civic III position on the Stall Ol Qw College Mis. Patricia Hop* secured an entrance Into the versltv college of thi n and I understand thai I icl :s undei %  %  l QoTanunai at* i an fund to aealal prombdng from R..I M tl al it wDI I"mad* her to read for a de*ree there in the •betnc* i • Mi • MsM Sheila Pilgrim nobl has been don* i>v Ml HaCRetl m the ot t, aehlni of Senior Frerteb A year KUCII as tluo. teU the Staff to the maximum anil I -.h.iuiil like to record my iralcful thanks for the faithful, resoor.e ml iiiiiu.l. they have adopted In all enter render. with special mention of >lr*. Adam* for the able and ever-cheerful way she has helped me and Ihr School as VI ing l>epuly llmdmislresa The support of the Staff h,.not only Mi-i.iini-d me personallv. but augur* wrll for lh> ilinnut e of the high standard set by Oueen'a Cellege We have again had a I year in bamlnatlon ra ilU i t of thirty%  trieg passed th* Cambridge School OerUflcate I with varying DlatlneUoa l'h l-inyuaue. HlatOrj i .>f which b %  Programme Five gain.I !..% %  Matriculation of the Unl I. aidon, whu* ti re* otl pleted their F-xemptl.-n. adding Dlfttnetlon, and one bv adding Credit in English language, to their 194R tl %  i .nis out of Bour obtained the Higher Certificate of the Oxford and Cambridge Joint Hoard. tWO of them. An tin ClaTkl Bl 6 Daphne Pilgrim, reaching Exhibilard with DUUi D Misters, and Melnese llndcemaii has passed the Rntraru THK l>l > ISION A Road to %  .. day* M one month's iniprlaonmenl with herd I i uaing iii.t, Ha J 1H was connrmed by u> F the Ai tent I ol Appeal ley. Their H onoun told Watean thai the latigu.... as a bom prison TheIMM.M | | -he hsill not icappear before then. In Sl. I'eli-r: Fishermen /Xel Large Catches MNHMIMI \ WI i:i %  the be* irket "i h dur.ng the wee* %  long the beach %  BBS" to get their home PPh NlllK':gruntl and other Undj Bah mixed toaathei brought the fishermen 16 cent* for each pound Once or twice during th) weak th* houa |d i hanaa the dJah with j.i. kwtuel eaughi In food Flying ttafa thev ago not m ..bnni .. hra weak i.n i barag Anot he i caea broughl tar W using indecent language ... hit and which was dismissed ot %  same Magistrate was also confirmed tq Thafi Ron •d to pav :hc .-• %  ..i .niiH-.d M anil Watson 8 4. TIUIIK IHlMlt Ks MR. J. H. B ( HtstKV and Ml H A Vaughn. Judge* of \ \ %  Court ol .. Hardaa caadLranad th> 4 tu> Wotahip Mi c iWalwyn who pul Irvtn* Bn a h of Hush Hall on a bond for six months for making threats to Gelu %  .. Baal) on April :i %  • % %  in! .A kftanea said that wa la bat ehop al Buafa Hall On April 24 Riewster came m and i ma rod barrings Brawatoi did not hke th* herrlnga offered to him and g dlaput* foT I .icl in which he promIS4VI tu •hool hei .unl leave the island Bn ^ tei a nhn h amoun; el to 5'8. nUU PBatBONI iMIi: TBS* lIKIIAl placed on personal bond? I ranging tram Cl to CO foi bodU) i aaaaull >vhen these eases IT. :!.. R I-NIIMS oi SpeJ .. %  %  i .in thin which tin* lh* sidewalk Outten of lb* principal itraaU iik.Church Street, Quean B tr aat, Roun d-the-Town and -l' ...ice ,.. twice Sevcnt>-nx years ol.i M..< %  %  MReadwa 0 f I dayjlaced on a bond to. .' montl BACK AGAIN U THREE STARS SWEDISH MATCHES were broughl up tot haai mg i Pouca Courta al Dlatrict "A". the Main School m [ xh W(, : ,t 1 !" "" To the Vlih romify"" Aeadernleaucce The iiifl.i. II. .of a home on the lounger generation cannot be ovrresllmiled and there can be no doubt that the nUndard* of truth. Ju-ti.e patience and afTertion which we parent* practice in our lives and in our homes do mil IIM unnoticed by our children. If we fail to respect each other we are hasty In our |ud 'e criticise nur neighbours roll In tn* .i nioi School then H on Jpjf l S y nlv verc 74, in nbe laan to tt, and Ihis Increase iii i ontlnue, MUM* QU* n I kge has becom* a centre d i preSchools ioi tba Adranced t out i. and %  Scholar'.'.'. are verj klad to have a Bouriahlng \ Ith Form, bui H bacomei an Impoi I.on| Ural i ... With Ihle. lh* earn* tune, that te t with girl Scholar* B lo new entrhn from the Ylh Form. Some girls re bound lo suffer, and a teacher rill tend to feel that the Scholarship candidates have the priority % % %  ntion On the whole, this year has been a difficult one whu. Iieen concerned. Mrs. WheI came to help us during Mrs Corbin's absence, but was forced m labruarj < order to accompany her husband to Engi' time she is with ir*d herself %  "I hen th Queei ly ran have had I helpers lib c To all of them we an Old Girls of %  %  vho have rallied round us in our need Rut even OM OMl %  all be philanthr. a little while thev hat away to > n firle ti.-wn WTM re H secure a H i egligiole er Tl constant ehangai I must eauai lamagc to ,'he work ior and Lower Scho--i ai ... f, u %  with Mimaintain a blgli Ipreparati Of the Hen-, hililrei ';:..H. i •• failings. But if we are Just in'cessfully organised Pilgrim has calned an < > %  i ...aided l,y th* I of the WesI Indie*. The Unlversit' offered six acholarahlpi f<>r th whole ot the West li Daphne was the only yirl and th only Barbadian, t> obtain a scholarship. Both Bar! Queen's College are proud of th" honour she has brOUgl t.. U and a dec Mi ind Mi P being the parent Btrl in the hdand i %  In 1040, Elsie Pilgrim ftrsf oirl to gain Ihe I i an i warded a further grant t'..m th Barbados Government i rch work for ban HI IJtt at Girton College, Cambrian) Another of our Queen's College OM Oirl Pamela Fox. is also ot Cambridge doing research work m History, for her Hist%  alter having obtained I.. %  I'. A it McGli i ,., i It) i i ... Pameu i in the Vllh Torn: id Quaan ink! dlvai aeni % %  • %  ayt, ha room-motes at Girton College both *ng • raaa Best Wishes We offer .an b**1 wisliet to then, both, and to all who have gan* forth froa Qu**i I win success >j,e. (ally remembering Denlse Watson, who has Just obtained the Mabel Mersey Aword for the highest mark* In the Final Examinations at the Ro] Hospital. Montreal. To Miu Eleanor Nurse. Old Oirl CoUeg* i rgenc and laithful menilrr of th. Staff, we DtTer OUT warm. %  on her outstanding achievement In obtaining Com pondenco Course, a First Division in the '. %  %  %  is fitting that Miss Nurse has been chosen to represent Queen's College at a moat important three weeks' Bui dad on 'The Teaching of Carl I • *• pare papet and oth*i Mti ..f refuge Uttei tinrtre> The dustbins er* emptied on mly, "hen lh,' of them are full t" overflowing e not too< i I ii when rain failnt** arc encoui I m around Ihcm I N DaVnUOT %  Police Courta, intVonhle Mi B II. NurmImpo ad I Ing the week The Mghaal of then. w*re t" 2(ls tin.'s imposed on W< Bowen ot cave mn st Lues i tad for 1 %  Street, st Peter, ami for n Constable Bidet wi • %  S/( I' nmell A CART IlKIVIA i i | Smith of St Join, was Inked In an accident With a U • cw ridden b) K Baylej of Can* Qarden, st Joeeph veaterday ill 2 311 p m on V id. St John Tiie eel., waa damag) ilcy lujured BT in tall, st .i ire t "hen ah* wai Involved Ii i a., ident with the btCyi h I and ridden bv A-lihy Phllb| St Genii;... aboUl 4 a? p n %  t, i laj or Church Vlea Ro id the sum of £6 when Magir.tr i; M Orlfllth found bai guslb ol Inflktlng bodily harm on Vstklyn Griffith on June IM. Itaptute, who said that IH-I light was bad. was seated in a chair when pi... < i i: i do* K Hid r* i'.is-11 iK lenience i inMagtatrate aahad hat to ra* i i ssj that RO thing ol thai aori ahould happen again A similar bond was pl.n •• i n Vicklyn Q us whan the pleaded fullty ol m fiictmg i-xiiiv barm on Mar) Bap Uat* on June i I'OK A>!SAtXTINU A NH Bl \ i IM. Prince OUI, IB-yeai i !....; Harmon] Hail Road wai plei id on u bond for 3 month* la the nun of i \ 1 whan he %  ppeared b*fon Maj Irate H A Talma. M UilSTKATC f. R. GRIFKITII ve-ieid... dlatajaaad Iha caaa which waa brought by II f..i .• feeding the speed limit with the bus M 10211 along Illark Rock (Ml Apid In Dyal waa repi %  %  by Mr. J. E T. Hraneker W1IFN BArTIRTF PONEI.I.V. i.n leii.i o| Ki'kslcin Village ap* peered before Magistrate c I. Wal* MI on B charge of the mi lawful poaaeaalon of 2S lbs of cm rots v.ln. Ii e.e v..bled at l H i I, the caaa waa iliamlssed. and Dnneik was %  ubsequentl) ]| %  A FINE COOL FABRIC !! WA%%VsVV*%W*W %  FOR THF. COMFORT OF YOUR Bl PETS USE 11 IMIII.X.V III) I'llHIIIII .....I %  %  l>l lll.\.\ IXMCI Kll I I II %  H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD %  Distributors IF1 %  %  %  n anas falan&A& Q&lAhunq PEACH ICE BLUE. MAC. JEWEL BLUE. SEA HAZE. JASMINE. TUSSORE. ORCHID PINK. BLUE THISTLE and WHITE &f The Ideal Material for LINGERIE. BLOUSES, CHILDREN'S FROCKS BOYS' SHIRTS. Etc. HARRISONS Dry Goods Dept. Dial 2664 Gentlemen Prefer. . these famous brands CONSULATE While Shirt wiih lYutenlMd Collar %  ttacbad Sizes 14 to 17' Site 18 METROPOLE Striptd I'vj.m. %  .. iliei :m -4H Par Soil $7.57 JABOER ( IMHI lluir Slip'.! I. U Bx I...i > %  lach |1&M luri. II,,, I.,,, IKISI Kli.,I .. While -i l..|.i|lh lit III III P.T pair SI.21 SI.211 SI.12 TKOTAI. S( AKIKS In V.I I ..ud Fancy de S3.12 JOCKSS SHOUTS, ii Aciivitv Brands In White, Slid 30 I.. 44 fair SI.Z4 & Sl.3'1 U. HANDKERCHIEFS Plain While I White with Coloured Bordi %  act SZr. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11. 12 & 13, BROAD STREET ,-. ^-.•:-. w .-.-.-.v-.v-.-.% w w ^^? ^„ ww/M ^ /aWiWMWMWiV PHOTOS ol all Ihe aclivities of the Statue of Our Lady of Fatima—from Ihe lime of arrival at Seawell— Orders are being taken now— Come in and look them over al THE CITY PHARMACY KNIGHTS' LTD. Same of our New Arrivals. llUik or llr.mn Iralhi-r %  **> .li.ir li*ala*i Hr.inn.in >iip|if.r Pataal Daaeuii >hlM %  ^ tlrr-,* ( ourl I...Ir. Sluw, lll.ick i>t \\ |||| r i r*anaa*el iwri-r* in %  roam rOtt rilllJlRIN Haag een a r y l ea fat ho ..mi itiFOR RAMII I i r. l'ol„| sirjp Slior. In ftok. Blur, Kr.l tin) Whtte -l/.> 3. i, j S I! | 85.13 81.45 85.40 I SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD § -*-.'.'',*.',***..**,',•.,„„*.. •„'.,'„', •,*,*#****-**v*.



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•• PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. JII.Y IS. 195U W.I. Gain Another Decisive Victory Ramudhin \nd \ ulenlint* Bowl Out Leicestershire Wf57 INDIE S (for 2 whs dec) 652 LEICESTERSHIRE — 352 and 81 LEICKSTKH July 14 Taking full ad Ramudhin ami Alfred Valentin bowb icompleti i batsmen h< %  on the first two dayi during which y9 rum %  loss of 6 wickfis, Ix'UosiiTshin'' for 126 runs in A hours and the W I i unexpectedly easy win. much to.*, it'-*,. tor ; ,, i '• rind up %  ubt i MJ well concealed thai the i*4ec %  • % %  i %  %  Charles Palmer, un i n ila n e a, was outwitted twice In the match b> the same type ball, a vtel break which on both CO made : A bright Bun, which I %  %  %  Kteni that even when the new ball wu mod end) inabjp, Valentine oral brought or, with hii lag leealii after onl) two oVi'l Beautifully controlled length and men. and Hamitilhln's second Innings |>rrformance of 8 for 2'. brought his day's total to a for 4$ and in the match he took Ian lor 117. Letceetarahiti added onlj i > %  heir llrst innings thl hnornlni Valentine at one point taking i wickets for no run* with pfOdt%  loui hht-breaki Thr onl) pan to offer real tan 'he county second innings were 1*hlmer. staying 65 minutes (Of 20 ;m I Walsh Their stand ot II WM the be-i The Play %  .-..complete control lor the Hi I In the Innings Ihi S inners moving vlciouslv utT a tch slight i> affected by ram BaUmen made mistake* In Ihell attempt:to 1 l>ni ValantUMi oit whom no run wai m-omi in %  three minutes, took three for 14 lai .rh""l overs and Ramadhin two for Hi Following on, Lelcestefthlrei avoidol further trouble tor oiilv twentv minutes Jones who had. been able to make the ball lift B.C. Wins Anchor Cup AI Bisley LONDON July M %  Cup Compel %  %  %  Surrey to British Ud With HI6 point-* sswh, but British Guiana wan d* i they had the %  . Jamaica %  cored 813 aj • das 788 Tonnn from all few competed In the event, over ana, S00 and WO >nrd. Whl mally held Mi .i Reld (Trinidad ; the WORNI' cup f.: th.< hlgheal Indlrld i WEST INDIES PL I ) DERBYSHIRE TODA ) II be hosts to the tine made • m to-day at Che*replied with 7S thl %  nd they hke man> others txml.. %  realise thai ihi vaUtaai Tre wi had %  %  % %  %  r..mbirui;ion u quite u good one. when the %  llottad on I of tho game >hat takes a lot of stopping, when .unveil ii get* started The Ion This is the final game, before come in If B keen %  he West Indies enter on the third contest fn 0 ft, Dcibv Tl Match, and everyone will led oft with 199, and e putting the finishing touches SflSWeJ thnr test match form. whoe\'ir si rond try gav 'caving B) l>e W • Seventh 1 i will be the seventh ilxiUl '. rbarshlro itnea ihe initial %  war an IBuO. „nd only ones have M V.. si Indies defeated thr cunty side Not even in 1933. 'hen George Head ley. then reignprince of We*t Indian bal. burn defence with a few Private; ttcnctsd end log -lams hs won this game His Bxcallene] presented the II 13 to equaiiw the score Irophli He took the lead from early In At '.>u * tho saoa bo third game Service changed RsM A E Armstrong. President nl IS 10 in his favour Gliri %  ..f thn VM< A. thanked Nil forehand siams weie now going himself game 21 — 18 to put nearer to the (Trinidad —Beater Bsteelleni *j foi attending and said wide of the board but he however that hf wai glad thai the, tennis managed to %  Bloula, who is lighter, app ea red 1 dltton Willoughby ground an 1900 West Indies team to England WSS then playing for Derbyshire. and took a leading part in debating his erstwhile colleagues. The scores were W.I. 233, and 242; Derby 217, and 2S0 for S wicket.-In the County's last innings OHlvlerre's 64 not out did ihe winning trick. Rain The 1923 game was drawn Rain interfered considerably and small scores prevailed First the W.I made ft of which Leary Constanod Berry to n> a glance whkh finished In WalcoU's hands In forward line leg position ATtcr two i Gomez. Valentine ran"' On with the ball still nOS Watson caught also by Walcor. Beautifully controlled length god spin, with Hie < % % %  pcutccllv deceived, brought sii other COUapse, hair IhS dismissed for thirty three MaShall caught Tompkin verji njesrl) on the boundary, and the iklllul JocsaSJU, drawn Into a had iUOke gave Jones an easy catch. Then LesU-r WSJ entirety beaten b) I r. of Ramudhin'5 %  s tS h l Sh il breaks. The two Smiths fell to niceai give Kills from Rsmadhln KI became the flrst legbefore victim Of the match .it..-, i played the next deliver) on to his stumps The f.iihei and daufhti Atwell and Mivs K,... Atwell, % %  %  : good hsndi%  %  : n thi dras 1 It tbS ion ol be %  wniilt. like 10 ICC men .l„i, | taking an interest in %  ami thl the l*-flt he had seen lead. Greeiudge was latei leading %  Stoute nnd Mid by live points He kept %  %  en S"ou!v pla.Mng 21—14 becoming Handicap Champ. H thl VMC.A for BO many \ ears Next set was for "6" Class %  haps Stoute must be older Champ and in this Harold CorbUl mid thai %  %  very tired any pounds better concovered lost chaniied ut 11 Willoughby was never able to equalise the game and Stoute won '.> equalise the tal H ilougbbj settled down in the na and look four points ut of the tir*'. live Stoutr soon lllatd and went Into the lead later iliangad at 9—6 i/i Siri-' %  favour hut the first .'•) p I and Ken McGregor defeated Lome Main 6—1; 6—2; "—5 —Reuler. Thwuuhi lie Was Oood HiBXCellenM then be had slwayi Uxed table tannii because II i that he ni.d hifin-Hi enjoyed Prior to II be a as of the opinion thai 1m was a nood Table lennli player i"n he has to think dilTen i U] He regretOthOt first round matches bring IjfJJft M ",td not U rthei M. and Mrs, 1. J Maf"*"li u "* m ^, "' total 32. in "tht 1 tfj %  I ..: . I Q Qeorgi % %  lUanor, lbs en %  Si Mr .mil ill %  t % %  who haw ,usi returned from B-0 (Mlier (iame. Ulna bus krll and Col and Mrs. Richard: Vidmer. the former pair having a M j'> ggalnal the I: Mi M %  aaclntyre, handicap v V then |.;• Of the other three trophies that %  I • rre nl %  \1< i|-i of od* i a Hii'. School b* .i wsbn ha, ...CMbut surg H.V £ ,% n brrTnW B br C ^ vived with the dogged Palmer King. 12; i GIU. ths-fi&ndl. until lunch Ai : %  %  %  } :/• %  handicap ploiisti bad fallen for •fhty-niry %  inat, OTIi i:h1 [lo h runs to-day and RamudhinV. mm. -II ,i ne -IMM-IU ..,. ..o i to ,, 1 1 ,„,. s second innings ngUTSl WOTS 10' I ; —15-3. ''",,PX %  "<; %  ''%  ->" ,M „ n hall an Mr. and Mrs. Jean Iverson Mi ,-, n.npcr of the tj lunch and West Indies nd Mi N I wUllw and Mi ; hool met Nurse of bv an inning* Snd 2V> I Ml I' D HcDermotl all hr James Street Youth Cluh. drew byes nnd will not KU mm action until thi k Harpei played more eonfihich win be completad on nexi dentiy In the econd and won Saturday WaWh save the bminss a dyint khk !-. tshini eight in in evei from Valentine ami then liluni him for six. r.ihuei having itayed 65 >..,..utes ior twent) was again bowhit b t i ball he did not attempt to touch from Ramadhin. who SMo eoolly took the llnal catch from I near the SlgW scr.-en. l<> Xui seal .n, a great psrfOn on e His eight wickets to-da, ;. cost 43 runs and his total bag | 10 lor 117. following are the scors %¡ L smaati a ws iupa whu Hanhall PCknrr b HairiaSMn Ja* b vnU-itiw UM.-i III,.i—0 K. Smith i £"• ,. i_„ %  I. Smllh C K-o" H'sui. %  Marshall I Waoii*' "H-mioanin gprn* %  Hamfclhlr. B IS I %  r ol 1 to. !. I i for ais. %  '<" % %  %  i i %  K Si %  i gai .'i' i i. Ramadhin III Un,Mlhlll i l(j.-ilh." ANALYSIS in *II bikng horn ,iu the Hunt ind final | vicf chaniied at 1) -6 in Harper's faVOUl B) Ihe tune *. puinl | were played Rsrpai was live i is in thi i Nurse ma %  asd to i ii* down mrno of the lead itir Harper nowevei won %  ..... %  .,. thi ... C h a m pion in the next set Norman QUI oi Rverton met Campbell Qreeoidge i-.i 'i. Handicap crown. Iret nidge with* some hand ilains hut iiieenidge. with his strong defence. returned i tew nidi inhnjughi from ww bSkm the table Qroanldge bad by now gamed %  A'.' . Mm memi t Phillip The lust game started VST) lloa Corbth had the edge and loofe U early lead. 1'hillip.s thi. most of his points by inaccurate smashina Corbin won 21 — 15. He finished the game with a brilliant buck hand Hick. Corbin played defensively in the %  econd game. He allowed I'hill to do most of the smashing he made confident returns. On one or iwo occasions Phillips nored through this defence but Corbin reniaiiie-l calm His cool disposition caused him to increase his lend when he won the second game 21—18 Aftei %  tough battle Corbin won the third gome 21—19 to become r.' Cuua Chsmp and guaranteeing lion to the "A" next The set of the night "A" Class Championship match was played ii yl In Ihfal LOUll Stoute of lama list year's 'A' Cuua champion, met Frank Willoughly of Pelican (it sd Smashes i %  ihe Aral gsma B1 b the attaching with his haul iih.imi sm.ishes hoi Willoughby K and returned the majority ..i tnass Service .h.mivd at 7—3 in Willoughby's favour Willoughby later delmbteil the spectators with his back hand flicks which I I nd the table He kept the load and won 31—15. ImaBBlng With -i hSTd row hand slam which nisi bouni. %  IT the In the next gome Wllloughby'i •mashing was poid and hii Unung ixcellenl Oi Btouta eould oolj wotab the ball go by without l.cing able to make a. attempt to return th. Wllloughb) was leading but Stouts equalised el II each The ill.iw nit two points' were divided Tinresults BoW Championship H I Nurse 21-17. 2 B. 21 IT Handicap %  beat Gill 15—21. 13. lit 21, II 16. 21—14. CONCERT I Under the Distinguished Patronage of His Excellencv the Governor ilr A W L Savage. CM O. and Mrs Savage! by the HAKRUIOS (MORAL SOCIETY IIIMB1KM1K1 II All tin Thursday. 37lh July 1B. al 83S p arrived And so In 193K whei lind knock and i %  ... 104 in thi. II %  Indies had i<*t I wher. thl %  MgrjUIed o to-day the West 1 their smashing Lalcasteislihe nighl an add yet ntiothei trowing I %  umphs in thl Derbyshire Go to it lads: DM. IO-XH.HI | V.M.P.C. I DANCE Arnold Mean reUr rg a/Ill supply ihe Musk t nine and Knjoy Ytiitrsell at the: Y.M.PeC Brckh-s Ruad I ...i SATCRDAV, July IS g ADMISSION 2/. Dancing 9 p m. Ui 1 ,i i 1 -B" CUM Curbin IK^.t Phillip. 21-15 i 2i—ia "ACka Stuult' beat WillouKhltv 13—21 l—II. 21—10. 21—17. 21 — 18 Scorer Mr K Herbert Y. M. P. c.; ANNUAL SPORTS $ MEETING $ Thursday. Julv SOU... IvSC Final date for rloslni Entries V Monday lTUi July N !^>V'**,V**VV*'.V-'-Vfc****'.*>'VV'-* SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! Suc/i pretty fashion can be followed with . EMHttX UNENE Dark Green. L i u h t Green, Hello, Red. Navy, Saxa, Wine. Old Roaa M ins. wide Per yd M e. I'HINTKI) MATTIN Flciral designs in an assortment of nice colours; M ins. wide Yd 0e. DYED UKCiANDIE Pink. Blue, Green. Salmon Mauve, Yellow Saxc. 37 ins. wide Yd. . 85c. DYED ORGANDIE Whu, Yd. ... Hie. CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.. LTD. 10. II. 12 6t 13 Broad Street. •'-"-•'*•*• '*'.*.'.*.*.•*** v*,*,. -,,*,*.***,-. --• .*,*.*,-,*,-, -. ROXY NOW Major Double They'll Do Ir Every Time m i THE CA3-NS you WSS %  LL PA'/ A?1 SPiC, SWN ANP vERy INVITN6 — • ----. •..', %  J) £k^S B-i" WHEN. iT STARTS I TO GET WI?*-WHAT PO you FiNP, IF LUCKy? %  "TVAS* -ro "A ewB^O" A-POR/48LE? SO N=A./>s:3C'.EKi"=iT Rjrj ) .. WTL ,i %  : % %  %  *~&?i-Xis -v r%  i..rVEVE SOT TO 'S-OPHERS.---. eu> ATUE GAS S-ATiOS. SA'P THE ON-V ONc R3R NET/ MILES.



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PAf.l. inn n.\KR.MM>£ ADVOCATE gATI ltl>AY. Jll-V 15. '"•" CcUiib Callinq Among ihpa*.-nfcer* lea* !" for I*,nrto Ri<-. KWIA w.-r left to right Mi Lenlte Knurrs. Vice President of B-hti Bro. 1:1 !>, %  < ,v> Him. CorMr John Alexander, Station Man •get of BOAC. in Mi.imi. Mr Hmri I %  %  nl af Brh-i Bro-. MrJohnston and Mr A V i Manager of BOAC in New York They were all ;ntr>iiMt from thr RWI' Branch %  •cantljr the pict Port of Spain (third from right i J Perry T.vlor. M %  %  %  S HI BDWARD CUNAI %  England I T (' A For Two or Three Months S in JAM;S Chief Ju Uo ..i Uv L Islands, now retired and Uvln| In Antigua, arrived by |] Rodney" > %  •• lb %  I.I.I-. ma AnlliTua Ladj Rae %  < lira. Tin dos for two or three month*, and the* are staying at Stafford )|. DM Arriving by the "Golfilo" T HE "OolAtO which left England on TI. .. od to arrive in Barbados on Saturday, July 22nd Al passenger* on board for Barbados ii II W Chaltenc .. Mi and Mi • < % % %  Mi.. U 0 -. M. A r Orahinv i n VI %  J o Mi %  i.m-. Ml rhlMff Ml J 1 iMi.-. Mr ant C A I-.. %  i. H ami M %  • da R.i. %  D D Hi* u. r. l>r .1 M i 1 d and 1< lira, i w • 11 M 1 % %  %  mi ^ R \aung and MIM Left Ycsterdav M ils 0 P BENNETT and r daughter. Barbara evfa I'.irbados on hfillda* f mad to Tr lad %  oon bj i'. W i ;. Carib thai HI Bennett would be ii i In Barbadea ID i art] • I ;.,,. %  Barbara who is on the San Per... %  %  To Join Huaband M RS Bim HAN8CHELL and two ohlldran asfl laal rdkhl rm s. Vincent by the Lodg Kodnei,. With her huaband and %  I %  ant i n turne Eni ii Hanachdl was mi tool leave Mr H.inschell. who Is with thr Agriculture Department haj ivr.y Tayloi Humad to Bl Vincent Attended Branch Munagcrs' Conference I i %  %  i-.i Puarto Rico by u w i A arara Mi ll John Alcxan%  %  (la Bogei Mi I gale Managei of u 0 A C In i and Comdr John Ah-xiinii r i Station Manager of rl ii > A i n. Miami Thr other I'nsii | %  i RI %  .. tin Bn* an B ff I Aim BI %  nti In Ban Juan TI %  irere all Intranali 1 Trinidad ( %  : %  Confi rem . % %  I' W I A Headquarters in I'mMr %  i ii w.l.A. here, eras al bul MrSeawall to sea them off fnl Hanschell month "ti i lined j li At The Museum A i praaant on oxhibii < Ba N Left By "Rodney" M B anr. Mi Han and i:.. .i two i bUdntn .ii%  to si Vlnceni lasi %  arrived hart on Juno 17th ba uv %  beudai with Mr si Hoi %  pan I Back From U.S. Visit M R WINSTON WMtn baa n turned to i'.. ,r ii to the U.S. He anil i rVedni lay from AntiKua by B w.i A. Intnuvill (p n u.. ; •jar of tha ParadiM Beach club To Puerto Rico For A Week M K JEAN ivi : Bl N ATM ft of Uv M irtni Motel, and morning for Puerto Rlc %  by i W I A. They ax pad t.i be awej for .< weak Here For Two Weeks M l< and Mi iv, ,1 ii. pi Bo i Bpal morning; l.> II W i .o wevkV . n Barbados Thsa srs %  taylnt at tha Ocean View note) They were accompanied by \ounfi itoit BntelUe, Wns VisitinR Her Son M ILS MOLLY ADAMS, who has been slaying wKn Mi ,,i Bp % %  cer'a llanlatiun f.n ihn v n. % %  ntl; rto Rico by B W I A inli.in.il to the U.S.. where her homo li In AUanl i an visiting her son. Mi Jimmy Ailamn, who i Mi ind Mrs Johnson's sonin-law After bight Years A klONO in* lha weak .v.. sen livi Tiinidad res the paal e>ghi years Ulamfay will bi .i iiiihi.-i in tin % %  :.. %  bUlkUng of Codringti i altar H had barn dajtroyi I I in.' in IBM, the BpSifhtatowo Bridge and the Qouen ituig. %  ivotr Among his private work -s the TUbereulos i w.mi. no has bugjtesuu. that ll ond Hotel i ,. %  tvei During hi i stay in Trinidad h uuilt on the sea side of in. coast was arttn the National Minm; hutting oil the beautiful Companj until an acd and the coast Una whk* inwas taslouery Inyurad i>> which must have U.-.-H poaaltilr in %  < motor lorry laid Mm low for a/hen this pietura was losne mouths. i | ,-.' | continue He I %  gueet ol his brotlv i ii until the end of the month. Ki.onion .s lloarh. M UK '....o.i.n.. Muaawn In iianav %  %  neat of which n lent for ibe DO .i ion by Hon. J i) Chandler, M I. Mi and Mrs J W Chandlei, ird and Mi V ot. r Maraon one >f the prints I %  d IN IhlS COllli: %  picture of the coast mad nooi Worthing. PICTURBD her> '"" or one ol the print? of ihe iff, i a/hlcb are al prsaanl on she* al tha Barbados Museum. This prtnl s/as dona In ISU drawn froro N I u .i M cartel n U neai Worthing, Barbad> D \ 1 i XCJ W A J B y BEACHCOMBER A CRITIC who fears that eomlc strips may have a bail effect on the appreciation of arl dently s a i ii ua-mlndcd fellow Parhai the Academy "Half a Haddock and Two Pears on a Plate will be %  shown for one week* to bo lollowcd by The other half of the !! %  : %  • 1-.-..I .a Plate." Then "The Ma>or ( .f might run for a long time—his trousers, bis waistcoat, his tie, his hat. and out the ill The whole thing ought i' hown as one complete picture later on but I don't care. Making Ends M>-,i nr*HF. tain feulaVlta Brevli >• nog which he had i foi eightpenca from n man ith ., h ,. .mini, Ihe 'Kight Belli Two i veoings later while she .iurn ii ., theatre hi w.irjj for It. return A friend ol Foulenough i.>k bach an Inferioi fc4trpennj ring and -iaimed the 1'5 reward That made 12 10s sold the eightpenny ring (or B i 1'iudiuH.f; sim-iv the lad) knevi the ring • i Myaalfi On, yes The) were all %  iry i>f the award and tin returned mi* ft ini %  paragraph In %  %  ; Thr GmMtm fmlmbird Alone mi SnnaM n>mlrvard ,\ ChhtanuM and M >td a iifiie plastic i. Arfached (o his 'uif .'.:'.;:•.: I I %  Mi a, i. ...i /td Ihe eonrlli, .-lni'i, Ratals har and umbrella, Dotrn iu the Moefcaa w And COSI of Morns Palll Then burled Jecl 4ioiialta In in. sradenl'i overalla. / nil' pii'vr D O vim atop .it Uk ., • .i tad) mi ., N. y bus %  aid the conduc toi Bui Incognito, ol /•///•/rV^WWiWAWAI 1 m ri* THIS NEW l.isr By M. C. r.eberh^rl I Mill Mil II li \\OM >\ t ^l < IV ( IHBT Bv Sir Fafafteh llisllnco riBASinil IN I III: t MEIBBl \N it. -. riewartt NMHXMII. B> stun li.-ni.i.il mi: MALICI (ii MONDAl B> Uric BBwgaaa in VOTAOn or ( \it AIN OOOB It* < tiristiiidii-r l.loi.l mi i mill i ii BWIMMEB By Bid. O lledi-es IUI.C. ftadto Programme 1am Thr Nr.i T 10 | .u+ iircn. 7 It %  m rroni IOr TOlrrt Protrainm*. 7 •" • a n> Fro. Ruptrt and Miranda—42 %  illim ColOBI. r-n an W I Hea. IJ lu p m Na Anal l p ... \ >i *•*..!.v. MiddinN. I IS pi... %  I IS p in I • XI p m A A A j i I *i p m liHi>ur Tij : %  I. n, Mtwa, I *S p m New I VI i %  IS nd>. 10 1 i .... 10 10 V >• \* .1 i; i WKI i. snd white striped ad with A) %  i .. % %  '. adatne Tussa ud Doag.1. behind Ihe iMSOt eSSSe *——.*• W isau? '' BOU *CT Ihmui ; "•>-d .o ; om back toe .'.ding pa... I *"•*" '' m 0 ,lk Morn *ili be'o-e ruaiuBg up rou iwi. •<*>. uuwtn Rassn. .prji >-3 Ma was ori. i! mask Ol Mai i.' Ai patron ami friend wh "" 1 been guillotined that morning. She was also forced to make a death mask o' ; M as he lay in his bath utter being tabbed to death bi i Such arork graduallj part of the job to Mane Tusuud who look suck grkd) n her stride. She was born in Bwltwrlan %  i • % %  lived with her mothei %  %  ,i doctor who moiielli'. in wax as a hobby and eventually opened an i-xhibilion of lifeParis This was %  dly nicceeaful, the King. Queen and Court took lessons nn< the little girl, who was an ivii '"leller than her uncle -n popular at Couri that she spent nine years there ; companion and secretary b Ihe KmgV sister. Bul during nviilutlon Marie, known friend of the Royal Family, u.ithrown into prisoiiawtd the exhibition neglected wnTn eras deeply in debt and had t.i arork f"i nine years to r 11 by which time she marHad rrsmools Tuaaaud and had two sons. Eventually. when she was seventy-five, fhc • i .. permanent exhibiI lot retired al the age of i LgrJ who go to Bakei Str* I to Insinx't the %  heritage she hai left cSn ..-n BgUTO Frail old lad) In a poke benrM t, surveying th Idl) assorted "in pony ansoni lands, a monument t.> whal akilf an.| DAILY ( KYITOQl OTE— Here's ho fo work It: AXYDLBAAXR la LONGFELLOW ttei simply stands for another. In this example A ia the three I.'a. X for the two O'a. etc. Single letters, apoithe length and formation of the wonis are all hint* h .lay the OOdS letters are different A Cryptogram Quotation LURO TWOOWN TWJ GURY PQYPDWYPW MQQJ, GQ HRFP OUW DMUG L D G U FOWWH? GEFFWN. ilurday'a Oyptuquote: WE ARE UNFIT FOB ANY TRUST riLL WE CAN AND DO OBEY MACDQNALD. IO-M4.III DINE AND DANCI AT CLUB MORGANl Till WIST INDIES MOST POPULAR NIGHT 11111.1 DELICIOUS STEAK DINNERS Served Unpughout the NiRht Dial 4000 lor Reservations CROSSWORD i 1 • P 1 1 1 1 ', 1 \ %  i 1 .. f | "] j i i i Adventures that %  Ever Zoomed cross the Screen' '** if Kaaei town wiin ^u.nmia <7| II snow loi ti,r al part ol V Aero— |H. ll b: mlite.ied III j; Hon..i, II HlIKlglltao. IBl la Without &einiiing aiiiiuut end inn ill an i..,..> orei two. (Si i' II. in i %  : %  : :> % %  -li. Conluatd scrap ifii 3s. Liea -v lenalr me place* ISI i dfwwo I. Wnele alir. •J. M..,> Ht | -ait. II %. Heel iitiliailv .uic Mileid I'J* 6 llecord u, 5, Natural. 0 All aorta irf gum mi !r 0b, ? ur ** '*' ,J "** IS. tail out. toi i?. Impelled. H. ..:• UaaliSu' lf"A>UM ?a" BI* IT. Holt. i~ Hen l Ma flu* JI nan \i. fclh.U.Md: -4 1V, ( „ ^ |f.M. B" ^ % %  '." %  •' %  .' %  % %  ' %  BANCE iO-XiUUI CASUARINA CLUB ADVOCATE STATIOXKRY STOKE for i/o u r II, alii, \ MJM SI I I.I' in MMIHMtl MATTRF.SSKS A -irRINGS BI:DSTI:AIIS— 3 rt 3 it. Gins., 4 rt. g Ins. — also — OOH. SPRINGS complete with Rails A I.u* for Mahogan* Ied < tead*—3 fL 6 Ins. and 1 ft. 6 ina. Obtainable from OUT HARDWARE DEPARTMENT Telephone t*it BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD IIOVAI. (Worthings) Ta-day ATo-marrow I :i A 8 30 Republic ii'inMi EVELYN ANKERS— RICHARD : %  Till: FATAL WITNESS" John Wayne Veig Ralston •DAKOTA' goMHgU To-day Ml A H .10 anil eontlnuin20th Century fox l'i. ntl John GAREIFl.D lUerMUne PREJ i E "I'NIIEIt HT SKIN' with Luther ADI.ER Ortej UNiXiREN Also the "THE BATTLE FOR KOREA" MIY To-Day l 30 ft fl IS ..' Continuing Columbia Big Action D Ron Rendel Burton in "OMOO OMOO* AND tlHNATOWN AT MIDNIG1IT" wlth OMMPK To-day to Ml I 4 30 & 8.15 I if Double Pegg) Curnrnlni John Dali IUM1LY IS THE FEMALE AND THE CROOKED W \^ n'ith 9 a Tults 1 TECMNlCOtOR P. > '-i „10U ;AWKU*K[NRT cltll .— %  MTOH 1 HUltR NOW 5 & 8 30 p.m. and Continuing Daily AQUATir I.I II CIIS'EMA (Members Orl/| rCajOOBCT TO MONDAY NIGHT AT B SO Erml FLYNN OttlSa I* HAVILLAND in "THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE' Filmed by Warner Broe tium lrd Teiinvi'* ..,a-leipiere wilh a eaat ol i.ooot rieadca h\ I'.oi. KMIIJ.S Hen* sni'HUVsoN Nit A Salute to Ihe Gallant HX> l Rode 'dUu the J*< <>* l>fair." "' t. All; IV (The Gerden) ST. JAMES SATVR1>AY. BVIITMl Bin aun Matinee Sunday U v in JOHN GAHFIBLO in Hi> Ureateat Role In "DUST BE MY DESTINY" I-OVI. AND ISARN A SINbAPUHI. WOMAN rV L II Hi: TO-DAY 3 & K.:lll p.m. mid .oiuiiiiihit ^;v / M G Ms 6IG IIHNIUB| ROMMCEI SPENCER TRACY JAMES STEWART VALENTWA CMTESA Vl MALAYA^ LXTRA| KXTKAI ilritish Movie Tune News and rinvc.il Ainericdii News ;nul Ltt'g A nit ate (Shorts) TO-MOKKOW g\M A.M. L0CAL TALENT Al ill MIX 1 tJRRAYS MILK STOUT SOLE AGENTS — MANNING & CO.. LTD.



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PAGI SU HENRY BARBADOS ADVOCATE BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BPio snow THE e~ JUOSK # B93~LAVS V --LAMP? | r RLONDIF ; :>" oe NI BY WALT DISNEY %  5 '"-----:-. Z-.?. -' s ~e 3P-LTI LAPI "_ U Kir • -f 3EA9E?TOES -;.-.; '?. 3~w .V s e*E~ A OUTOCTUl TIWI ? WILL ? BY CHIC YOUNG AAXOX t KNftY TNI CANTRIDCF*. CAMMC USIC 'lift PiANM.viDOCQ BfCAiisf MAO MiT*cr Mf IMt DO* Of BLANriS tVrtM aVHICK M 10AKD Hf GUN HI LI WITH WHISPER III THE SOUTH OF FRANCE "" ~z >/ %  jUi %  i II.I I* ANOPirf bJ BO SCm M MtlLU V*Ml$*>Att1f (l,N SOI M Sllu CANNON • V0 vOufW TO l*rll NO' OLD POl AflOUN LONE"RANGER" r~" BRINC'.MC UP FATHER --• %  •-' ,i man vm BY FRANK STRIKER BY GEORGE MC.M-ANUS <> &? '. fr* *e3J SHJLL HJ MHtrf > V utm eec V, %  >, vM-. toes ..,>•.< = ..,.., i_-. .,, ln.a.V. ••iie.iMi L NfeA Durnini C>W. „r,d, i.. ••• %  •• H,.d. % %  <••. -• - ^ I. ._ r?. Cyiro. Help. N.tw,. J w n mlwnl %  hifUt xitni.nc. Him IWINMM M %  oath*. I < %  >(!., %  KlMBI I I mr... ^-, !" Jru(< < >*!•• i S i'. MM ill Karti lillini in* r rmi tnf 10U r (M„ llaAOr %  huh •— %  1lai>—-r tr.4 i.finat) >i%  %  % %  -^ .-, ... %  ... t M O— utu'atM '""' ""•"* ** %  ill WnnHlnM aita fc.nsifr,,.!,, Ul# .idnoprolti yon ima in. mawi of iwriir • %  l '" i • %  " *!.( Bn*i Drtaaiun. aid 9 Wt-k h. Ht. f ,.,.l-lNow WH / Aatf nf'ft Kt Hi* | f .r, vl ri| W,4;, ... flloaar r r' U> bW. all., p,,,,-,,,,, „,,, .J,: Htofrh Improved In 2 Dayt %  f'ird •Ineil (cfrWAi D.( ,..,, ,, %  . It:"," ';"*' /:v? %  >*-*•><-,.„:.; C-r.tJ t* r>W Y* S.,h r JB-Nfcw MfMT l. i or is the most difficult, it i. lafejt in the experienced handi of the Port of London Authority— Ibm it has the a.ldcd advantage of reaching Ine largcit con.un,er matltet in the world. •/ it* Seat tin •*... Vou'U afIrff this •• leuilH it* mltir In coratal 41 h.p. enjine. Independent heel niinmalnrl for a unoothcr ride st, V rin t 'in crar Jt.it Bod. and chaw, huilt a. a ., %  unit ItR liahtne,. and jreatet strength l.tigjajc %  mem of 10 cubic feet Special rustproof finish Bunt n tfi.c cndurlne Bn car perTormanot MORRIS Oxfat -II Nil.I UNI I ,„. S | SOLE DISTRIBUTORS.— FOHT HOI AL I.AHA(.I LTD. Phone 238t5 Sole Di.tributor. Phone 4504 So I iooi j, lliCd Op,r M J4rl ftJ .."j, j^ nd %  *""* %  i"*J up evennjiLJii V>if Mr-air. no-' | ,j tl j ,„ i.— li-f..lh.na,,ov<,l, ...Op,"? "f "iihoui || again PROTEQ YOUR EYES ,uA Optrex m EYE LOTION i^N*"*" 1 'M'l nut %  ^y ' '' "ld * hrilthrtWiJ, I / V*" %  MkNl B MR



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SATTIiiUV Jtl.V IV UM "Sugar Isn'l Is II? : we arp repro: appeared ir< an Amoniar. magatnt I, 1050 %  ::. rmathj.. sugar became % %  lit Arm.it %  Wr I wo '-:II poliev hased on tariff protection. Bv the War i] r had -ugar proTV processing %  quod controls thiK comn was suspendeu itii i'. .111 WAS HFVIVED IN ACT OF 1941 WH1I H i ONTINUBS TO CONTROL TO THE LAST IOUND THI AMOUNT OF SUGAR THAT 'AN COME INTOOVR MARKET Right w lerlni the igar eonnunptfon %  • %  % %  %  our know < %  nents. : %  %  ..! 1 %  %  %  M BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAC.i -mm i Delegation Achieved Success m MM page l striking, worked logetner \\ e Must Learu Hygiene At School -CHIEF INSPECTOR Th<< i to lxused or • i-.re-ni.nd . %  %  ineed UJ UM memoranda %  col to St. Michael told tinH J0TOH> (en wore prepared bv a yesterday that the sanitation al uianing committee and gaprovt I everywhere cl#e. word for word by Ihe delegation .rnm afrata to appoint Mi Oon J*n i kesman and at oil the -.eil i ighly cleaned on flaari,. meeting-, with Ministerthe ling lngB Ml : man. mi 10 lake and the aigurnenls THE END OF A HONEYMOON Ity IHvrrt' J. Ihiss LAKE SUCCBSf I] YORK, The majority of U.N. rfrlcgat %  r Hussia slays in UN. Meal Talks Will [Not End Soon BUpfOfl %  vuon* — %  I lOllg lea* u> %  M '-" %  <' mra: .adm* i. nro*HI4+ <"' Price which v not ret bee*. %  ;, l l' \' hl l' '"'*'<> 400.000 torn %  .i %  gflvcuna -, nimihed I %  Although %  %  %  pproved At lb* iwtinott he Congressional canfll""', oWeeatlon spoke and i I en dapo lb d | .Hid elect in N Mute the 82nd Congn* WHICH WILL HE l HAIKU :i WITH EXTKNDINO REVISING PI ACINI; THE SUGAR 19*2 • "ft dilnk Indu-ii I non bottling plant* throughoul the UW bC4tr 'ha meal lln l in unTh.coM . deadlock befog ,h c K ,,,,.. ,.,,,.„ U WM nich thai only a political &thquko •tther ul au"' """ '" iK'as..M„-„i ,„, „m,,u,. oi aggrcakm on H il m „„,' j tuva Drought a solution. '" %  A ihlrun ... •und.th. IUIIHK i i ,,.. , ""•"" %  "mi • %  • J nipptin he stopped when dfartrk. market: In tha area were aafahUahed \ i %  '. % %  !> thing IKW: ;bit day* in fgvout ..I Kusaia and 3.1 npw r >l the momenl. he soid. were Otn ''• hul : w llr „, lu gHfiL &: JiBKewss • '•,!•• 1.K nVrTC srs; s; ;;^,s ,r.. rv -JS-S,; Thta came wlthlh th* eMaanc, "Jmota waiting wm, l)llti an i <• ,,, T sh...io. i iull.. >i.. ii... ..... ... ..-...-n -f aoviel delegate Jacob Malik or -*••— —•-word from ftuMla as a whole As far aRutatg I* conci I ifid vei> iitting mannci ol conducting affairs was due to the Tact thai cvarj member o( the dflegution knew l-forehand the line Mi Comes uu |d take-almost the rtords he would ilona with ?"' ''." ''''. ,un l \"i^ t'' naaotlaConarat -a* ...ll,, promlMd ihipnanl of onlv I0.0M "',"<''••' ,-foot. ,;'.'. %  .. n( the delegation, great harmonv %  niltad nrrefoie. that aJlhOU|fa then was only one spokrs%  ach and every member ol i i jhance ..:. %  he will "i| between Ion DUO :I ,I %  | 1 '" Uirinjc the comln ,. %  .„ wnu Argentin, londlnj n ,• bW iu a of a %  .'. %  i i 'ompuon arc Liable I u a m visit the mission. Tlie delegation ha^c. no ,0 .r. and are doubt, eomphnaly convinecTWh "• coming generation the best il >ua>>rt ol epacUlMhuaUri and .he,, officials thi pl* -'t wna* ">i^ could be imUl the rulure the West Indie* prcatcd on them WM the school %  and while moat atuloua U 1>lM '" mm, Prt %  Krai I % %  • here aialn the DiaUlci NUTSH Thai nrnm^nH, u„. u ., %  m Mns a good JoT In cfieto ^u BSS^M^i \ % %  ition perform,-i K up on the condition of the lc (,'. n "1. i e 3?l2iM-Jf* rranoji, fA'Jw <*"*•" < % %  Secretarj ol the liealtli of the people ntd offering conducting the millurv inter" ,ound hygienic advice. t, nn malnst a Communist The diplomats gUll .... i the imt time Uruauay. nlghl reach SO IH-I 11 "' Aigeulinr eg 1 %  nil ......,.,. nirtbecmore btoauag L'ruguio nwy UUnk the PoUtburo n maintained purchase nf ,-,„-i". roe un arith lornethlni be' ni Britain and tha ratgnlnj Su^" ck^n^pina £ %  ,h \"\"""^>i ( ritkel 1 (cpendabi? n>l*Wi ruble % %  • antieliwtcrt yi l uK< l,Q sn, u ">:'t Di Cummins had led l^ondon Ufoi IMPOfrrANT THAT AN he di J, and was at preVent In Ne, Moi ,i|.,!i PUBLIC OPINION York lor u few dayshe wai not DBVBLOPINa sure when he would be returning OUR NATIONAL SUGAR POL1 Turning to the subject of cricket FROM HERE OUT he said that Ihe Welt Indies were He thourht that tlie nnitatlOn in this colony comt.._. pared most favounblv with ments othan. and waa eertatare coatIdPred bv those most eompetem and lo do so ha r -thirds of the world's sovern*hlnd General Douguu JAPANESE NAME IDEAL NEWSPAPER W£^3f&2gr+ m k — It \s Wet In Korea %  %  %  %  % %  i %  %  %  %  %  SO. ieti. 1 : %  ,. beo ro:.da in 1 1. htot; f.. m. nth ftM KM 't Ilk-. da aatai aa %  Moils, oil's—(...re ..\, r %  a* l*uaan. Hi, %  in S-otli K %  %  bi n c,\. %  % %  Pofi— III n\ I'U Ol lH.ll, || DUUWOSt, In. %  ratfuce %  un I i lire. HeffHl l* S iv ,, %  : %  P.I.IUI i. indk K %  %  rag. %  I n the Boutin ist • ( dv rainfall inches I V 3Mh %  Ihiit a %  %  In Ide" and otfltoi %  • % %  %  i",11 prevent .sugar i.a becoming Page One doMUter l,DC. %  HO r. itOi i I 1 I %  WHAT'S IN OUR SUGAR BAG md wit \r PRICK si Q n |ueat] U.S. Govt. Calls For More Wheat WASHINGTON, July 14 The United Btatei Governmeni today polled for .. larger whet %  %  Departrr.cnt sCI a 10SI pi %  . njd 119,000,000 %  p.inthan 1948-48 ,i U The Agency said rm n i %  Nal i-argjn fof fa %  %  I i %  rttllt tharp %  tad llvaatock *nch a ng thi caiiv rtagea of Wi playing "glorious cricket". and il wfg plcaaurl to kil and witch them and listen to the comments from the stands. •Itixlney" Crnnvs Ami Goes %  en tiie S--> > % %  >' % %  Kodnej dropped anchor tn Boeton, SI Kllta, Antigua. Montaarrat inlca. <>dncy" sailed out about 0 p m for British Guiana, via Si Vincent, Granada and Trini-| dad, laking 0 p %  During its shori atay, tha 'Rodhargad ., cargo ..r feed, pickled meat, herring; %  .almon and eggs from Canad along with frun from U* Nortnern Islands. Mangoaa were In a good supply among the fruit landed by Large heads of cabbages] %  'riong the cargo WORLD SOCCf R CUP FINAL RIO OR JANEIRO. July 14 Mr Oeoige Reader, of BlitalP, has been chosen to officiate In the Uraril-l'rugunv World Soccer Cup Final match here on Sunday. Mr Van Dcr Meei, of Holland, will referee the Sweden-Spain match it Sao Paulo— Reuu-r MgcArUlUI Everything indicates that the U.N. Security Councils prompt invoking o( the hitherto moribund Chapter VII on breaches of pea..r, was the sadd.-.t bib*, of all to the Comlnfojrn lands ajid to C'ornm ism's fellow travellers World—Peace Crusade It is recalled :hal in the socalled peace offensive launched In Stockholm u ndOt Cominform wa.. the gathering of millions and millions of %  gnatures against war In •Wbl I | n County Criekpt Results LONDON Jub 14 At TaunioK. Wa'uick*nir bra, Somri MI hi an iia> ut a. -.id IK ruBI Waioirlt'hlir MS fir .1 HUi-! Ctd IIS. U.i' 14 and (crond countries. Party members and fe|lUHf g \> ; %  ""'' %  < %  nrtancad bj toe ale ol aiock Ba i and of nli"— the i llrsi teguiar circulation % %  I !• At Ediitbki nh. V.H 11. QlV. ;li"ni J" 111 M • WI T ... r i. Ihc tnld war po,rs. Hju Shlzuko YumaKKhl 5J •,!","' J """"""'"> ...lily Ih. On that bl. Ihi. Cominforn, bank *, „. "^ fi'l'M" I UMl ca, „. Paarac.mpajiTOhallKIU.N. SacraI", ...,..,„>„„.,. tary Ocneral Tryvc Lie ai •>. Tl., v.... ' "' "'''' !" who m.rrl.sl Taka" " !" ls '; m ,f"" ,1** !" '"imPlon „„, .. r ,, 0 „ T 'S' X Nl '"-""-" .1. ,-.,i; a „,..,, monpj.in The „,_".! % %  ..*":.' '":" .. Sl ." h '"'< %  '': mnl from : agjinsl the "w H,w.i.i.d nil.. rn.,irt. H4 n. W.idi. • (, i, AI O..I, Sur-rv %  ..,. i^asrjSti Ota •-trhn Mdni)n m PrlfM not nul ,*r>uidii 30J. Krir Beam it, >. &SI I %  ... r aioiK*iU>i 141. Lakrr tat I. at >*rxitdl( 7lu. Alii-n K>. KminrU SI Laki '" lr M. AI Dil ITllIuilmi HawajliailS mm J of V UP to I behalf batter life R, hould l^> gentlenii',1 Ml Puml Flull.O.. ., ; auto J2S2 imu wlln • ww "Ptj rrMJjmf %  J dvertuing of goodi bcof tnt" COITItll'iTI SHOWfftS STOP WORK mp.hir ar n %  %  Qovert %  hn feed • cut rate prices —Rruler. i; was held up for -'" minuteycffardaj b> i : rain ^hlch began I m. i htei which an re kacharg rgoi the watar-| i re covered over with tar the shoarer ship' n the harbour also made use of larnaulin* to cover then hatch Tinsun mi during! Ing and wotk went hackl noiiiial J Itl. n.-.i^ a bout light, m ilfOUlVltlAl, ,1 ill -iT-it.ihirr 40T; wmr. ... HaaM ; i. K.-.H JIJ; Aim vllv M t,>, g tmt* Ii, A 114. Ktan. .„< H | W *t-r, ffhtra* i^alMi drawn *11rw. MS. Robrili Jtti* Bum Dean Arheson all appear before c or peace riien came the Korean •Ion. its iftokeamen unn ... Inoa pralw Lie foi qulei and W K1 '"•' ";" oetarmlnad acOon lit lnl d h neopl. poaatl |i !,.i the s-. uritj Council Sl "' %  '"' T,""'" J"! .• 2f& houra' notice an i... !" %  ol driflng energy asanw-ig housewives and iiiotiV mired 'he speedy and legnllv eo r M %  —ndi, racj invoking of Charger' VH .ite-KMi ,,'V. L' W J ",'"P w member newsplpei to bl | rov.-n,,„.„:. the right io hurl air, big brotoai W m Wc Urf. Ht. .a.., l dUnfU,,r,; .,into,|^ lin ,tl. i„. „ ur drf . I .• Mlddlf. I.ic—I'nklndeat Cut Rpactlon among the sWlft campoii., • • • | I .. I nn "PODIIT ; ; Messrs Bookers IJMIJOB) DftJMores lid. i 'V.! !" w.rV.V.OT OT W .,,.. WA ., w .,.., A BRIGHTER LONGER LIFE nn. DURALIFE \l io nil II:IIII;S wtlk I launiiatrsaralar. tOIIITI-SY (.ADAGE Whitcparlc Rd. ROBERT THOM LTD. Dial 4391