Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Sunday
Bully 9
1950

_—





Sunday



Price:
SIX CENTS

Year 5:





LE ——— —

U.S. TANKS RUSHED INTO BATTLE

30, 000 London

Drivers Strike
In Support of Market Hands

LONDON, July 8.

HUNDREDS of London lorry drivers today fore-

stalled their leaders’ call to 30,000 van and
lorry drivers to immobilise their vehicles by Mon-
day morning in support of 4,000 strikers in the
capital’s central meat market.
Without waiting for the beginning of the new week,
hundreds who should have been on the road today
refused to take out their vehicles, putting an
immediate check on the flow of foodstuffs to the
metropolis.

Transport groups along the south coast and as far away as
industrial “Middle” and North England have pledged their
support to the “total paralysis” strike of 70,000 road trans-
port drivers.all over the country, if possible.

: ——*" Strikers will maintain the de-

liveries of essential goods to hos-
s * :

pitals and schools



Public transport — buses and
: e . , trams — are not affected by
Believed Dead strike, but 4,000 petrol and_ oil

drivers have been urged to jpin
their strike. If they respond,
| buses and coaches may have tc
Stop because of lack of fuel
Troops Haul Supplies
Most strikers belong to 1,500,000

LONDON, July 8
Paul Muller, the 63-year-old
German scientist, who set out
to cross the Atlantic to South
America in his 5 yards sailing
boat with his 18-year-old





strong Transport and Gene
daughter Aga, is believed Workers Union. Artsul Deakens
dead, according to Press re- | tie Union’s Secretary has con-
ports here. demned the strike as an act by

reckless, irresponsible people”
Upwey who befriended the The fortnight old Central Meat

Mullers when they put in
there last November, have re-
ceived a telegram asking if
Muller died in Liberia on July
3, reports said.

The Mullers Icft Hamburg
last November “in search of
peace and securi\y”.

—Reuter.

Market strike began with a walk-
cut by 1,400 meat transport
drivers and a protest against al-
leged delays in handling thei:
claim for wage increase

They were joined by

'

nearly
2,500 porters warehousemen, cold
storage men ard workers in the
morket.
The strike



held up deliveries
of groceries as well as meat and
for a week now about 2.500 troops
have heer leeping London house-
wives surnlied. :
The road haulage strike is

at forcing tha settlement

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bell of

2 American

Fighters Lost
TOKYO, July 8.

General MacArthur’s headquar-
ters announced today that two
American fighters were lost yes-
terday over Korea. One was be-
lieved to have fallen a victim to
ground tire and it was thought
that the other ran out of fuel.

Both pilots were believed to
have escaped injury. Bad weather
limited the effectiveness of low-
level fighter strikes.

Australian Mustangs however
flew effective ground sorties dur-
ing the day destroying three
trucks and damaging 19. One Mus-
tang is missing. American jets
destroyed 22 trucks and one tank
and damaged 20 trucks. Three
tanks were probably destroyed
and a fourth left burning. Five
fuel trucks were also left burning,
the statement said.

Superfortresses of the 20th air
forge launched moderately suc-
cessful attacks on the east coast
from Kojo, on the 39th parallel
northward to Konan. The heaviest

@ On Page 11

cf ths Smithfield dispute and
cuickee action by the Transport
anid General. Workers Union on
claim for wage

transpert workers.

increpses for
—Reuter



7 ° ‘
Greek Strike Enda
ATHENS, July 8
Greek communications inside
and outside of the country return-
ed to normal tonight when the
local staff of Cable and Wireless
and the staff of Government’s
Telecommunications Service ended
their
work.
Cable and Wireless staff who
struck on Wednesday returned
after a compromise with the man-
agement under which it was
understood they will get a loan of
two months’ salary to be repaid by
instalments over three years set

strikes and returned to

ing next January.
wages claims.
Government staff who had been
striking for two weeks for wage|
increase, received the promise that |
their claims would be “adequately |

They had made

considered” .—Reuter. |

International Law |
Justifies America’s

Action In Korea ©
—SHAWCROSS

ST. HELIN’S, LANCASHIRE, July 8

SIR HARTLEY SHAWCROSS, British Attorney General
said here to-day America’s intervention in Korea before the
Security Council had sanctioned such action was justified
under International Law on which he is expert.

“What is happening in Korea is not domestic or civil war
as indeed Russians have sought to pretend, but armed}
aggression in a foreign state that had itself actually been
established with the support and under the supervision of
the United Nations”, he said.

i
Foreign Currency

Shortages Cantcelled

PARIS, July 8.

“Not only had it always been as
it still remains, a law that the state
which is made a victim of aggres-
sive attack is entitled to defend
itself, but the other states whether
under treaty or not, are entitled
to go to its assistance.

“That inherent right which na-|




j loaded in



Europe's 18 Marshall Plan)},; ‘aot

: |tions have of individual and
countries | prepared on Saturday hcollective interference was not
to do business through their own labrogated by the Charter of the
International Bank of European i : ;

Payments Union to
trade by
currency

unfetter the
cancelling out foreign
shortages.

Countries which are members

of the European Economic Co-
Operation Organization agreed

unanimously on Friday to set up
a Currency Clearing House

Secretary General Robert Mar-
olin called it a “most important
iinancial decision”

Since the foundation of a World
3ank in 1946 experts now will
draw up etailed rules for opera-
lions

They hope they would have a
final convention ready for signa-
ture early in August and that it
provisions will be retroactive
July 1.
coun-

Previously in European





tries, their trade was geared to a
system cf bilateral agreements
with each other. They could buy
mly in ntries of whose cur-
rency thev had steck Now they
will deposit their dings with a
Central Ager receiving in





turn credits od for
any other member <
Union. —CP)

Irchases ir
intry of the





United Nations.

“Southern Korea is not a mem-{
‘ber of the United Nations, but she!
‘is still entitled to receive imme-|
|diate assistance. States whether
members or not can defend her}
jagninst aggression until the Secu-|
rity Council itself should exercise |
its responsibilities. |

“Any other view would turn the
' Charter of the United Nations into |






















SOUTH KOREAN troop:

country would, in due course, be given independence.
Korea) and Americans landed

of Rashin (North



in their look-out

iting hae HLL





i
OST
on the boundary line between North and Sout Korea,
the Cairo Conference in 1943 the Allies decided that after Korea had been freed from Japanese rule the

At

In 1945 the Russians captured the naval base
at Jinsen (South Korea)

A year later the country

was divided at the 38th parallel, just above the capital city, Seoul.—Express

Airports And Truman Decides
On Conscription

Harbours
Militarised

LOS ANGELES, July 8,
Angeles and other

airports and harbours
moving towards

Los
coast
swiftly
tempo,

Airlines and shipping firms re-
ported they are marshalling
planes ships to
American forces in Korea,

One ‘ine is virtually on a war
footing as Government has chart-



war-

and



West |

supply |

ered its Skymaster cargo planes

Sydney Smith, District Sales
Monager Pan American Airlines,
said the line was “offering its |
fullest facilities to the Depart-
ment of Defence,”

Trans-Ocean Airline has re-
galled ali personnel frorg leave

and is trying to e@large its Sky-
master fleet.
American President
Line announced that it had ask-
ed a Maritime Commission for
more ships.
Lines President George Killion

said they would “bring home
strategic materials for stock-
piling” as well as taking war

supplies to the East and Japan.
—Reuter.



American
Aid For
Korea

By LIONEL HUDSON
PUSAN, South Korea, July 8.
American men, guns and armour

for the big battle against North
Korean invaders were today pour-
ing through this port on the south-
ern tip of Korea like a Cup Final
crowd through turnstiles,

For an anti-Communist scene
it was certainly most heartening
in South Korea today.

No dusi was allowed to settle
on the war materials being dis-
charged from a multitude of ships
plying back and forth from Japan
acr the Straits of Korea

Every sort of ship, from small
Japanese coasters to landing craft,



| destroyers and freighters, was be-

ing used in the operation



An American Navy officer said
he did not sleep for a week and
described the scene as “Dunkirk

in reverse”. He added: “This }
only a second rate vart, but we
have turned roynd more ships in
the past week than they usually
handle here in six months.”

His eves closed involuntarily
with, sleep. At night despite the
blackout the work goes on, Ships
are cleared and trains sent north
all round the clock

Ship Unloaded

A tank landing ship was un
23 minutes yesterday
and its cargo was on its way to
the front within a few hours, and
was rushed on to the railway
trucks with rice straw

Hustling Brigadier - General
Crump Garvin who commands
this “hbeach-head” told me he was
pushing men and materials for-
ward as fast as they were shipped
in

——( Reuter)



Red Koreans
Grab U.S. Lands

LONDON, July 8














Shipping || to



|

|

protection for a few or would put) Nort! Korean Government an-
a premium on sudden unheralded | not iced today it would confiscate
attack, tying the hands of law-| “!! !@%ds in South Korea belong-
abiding States until the Security ("°% “' American Imperialist
Council had taken measures which | °°"! rean Government and big
indeed might make it impossible |!“ ners according to a Tass
‘wr the Council to take any action, '" age from Pyongyang, Nortb
et all.” Korean Capital, received in Lon-
“Passing to Russia’s allegation S cee Mensnge aa one Saba
1t the Security ‘Council’s decis-( Ge Comet Dad released a press
ion was illegal since the Soviets ” cee hae tg this land as
jid not vote and because Com- ‘ cp ak. a relat: oe
unist China was not represent- i
ed”, the Attorney General
lared If those > i be vided
correct at all—and o lan
istification for ey 1 vdded
nas beer ione Tr ecree i t
ted States ar other on or lan All South K |
associated with her would; were abolished, the 1 |
be rested firmly upon ordin- ured id citizens ¥ ,
ational Law’ i le < to the Gover ‘ |
—Reuter. ' in North Kore —Reuter



America Aghast

WASHINGTON, July 8.

PRES'DENT TRUMAN'S decision to put conscription

into effect has awakened American people as nothing be-
fore to the implications of the Korean crisis.
President Truman on Saturday dangled with the Draft
Law over the heads of reservists and prospective recruits
in an urgent effort to build up the United States military
manpower for demands of the war in Korea.

at

MONKEYS WANTED

CASABLANCA, July 8.

Drs. Martin and Blane of
the Pasteur Institute said
to-day they are rinning
short of monkeys on which
experiment with their
vaccine against infantile

|
|
paralysis. |

|
| They announced this week
| that satisfying results had
been obtained in experi-
ments, but vaccine is not yet
| ready

They

|
for general use.
emphasised to-day

that their work

prevent

is on vae-

infantile |
|

cine to
(Poliomyelitis)

accidentally discov e rin g
three years ago that rabbits
were receptive to
paralysis virus, he and his
partner had experimented
on 3,000 rabbits.

But their reaction was not
similar to man’s; so experi

ments were begun on mon-
keys

infantile

These were so scarce
that inoculation direct to
the brain had to be tried
In 80 per cent. of the cases
successful immunity appear-
ed to be the result

Monkeys were _ badly
fecaee to allow inoculations
Vv

paralysis
ind not to cure it
Dr. Martin said that since

|
{
|
}
|
|

normal injections.

| Reuter
FRENCH JOURNALIST
VANISHED

DUTCH GUIANA, July 8





The last contact which the
vanished French journalist and |
explorer Raymong Maurais had
with civilisation was when he

passed through Dutch Guiana at

the end of last November it j
learned today

He was then going in the direc-
tion of a territory inhabited

Indians roving through the Guiana
brazil frontier areas and having
Fractically no contact with the
cutside world.—Reuter.

by |

\ The President gave the Armed
Services power to draft men in a
General Order. on rane esign-
ed to lift the economy limits im-
posed on Army, Navy, Marines
and Air-Force. ie

It was wppareat that the De-
fence Department hoped to get by
a Mg ere ed without using

e Dr, authority. _

No offictal would sy how rie
men are wanted, However, the
comparison of limits fixed by law
against the present strength of
the armed forces indicates that
the figure could run as high as
547,482.

Officials of the Armed Forces,
who made public the President’s
order, said that as far as they
know, there has been no decision
yet to call up a National Guard
or Reservists.

~Reuter and Can. Press

India Warned
Against Communists

MADRAS, July 8,

Jayaprakash Narayan, General
| Secretary of the Indian Socialist
|Party, to-night warned the In-
dian people “not to be deceived
|by attempts of the Communist
| Party | in India to stage a come-
back in the guise of a democratic
front”.

Addressing the eighth National
|Convention, the Socialist Party
here, Narayan, charged the Com-
| munist Party with forming a
“new front not for the preserva-
{tion or building up of the democ-
| racy, but to serve which it sub-
| 8 ribed—to drag iadia into Rus-

sian fashion,”
|



“We do not wish to be dragged
jinto that” Narayan added. He
attributed the Indian Commun-
ists’ change of front to “failure
of methods they had been fol-
\!owing so far resulting in a com-
plete isolation from the people,”

—Reuter.

BANDIT KING MADE
$1,000,000 HAUL

_PALERMO, Sicily, July 8.
It is believed that the Sicilian
bandit chief Salvatoré Giuliano,
who was shot dead on Wednesday,

The Castelvetrano area fur-
ther south where Giuliano was
finally hunted down and shot
was strange country to him and

had about three-quarters of a only

3 y some impelling reaso
million dollars “salted away”! could have rede inf move
mainly in American and North there.
African banks, 1

Police and

That reason might have been

unofficial sources; an esca e plan from Sicily, The
said that Guiliano’s five years’ police ais0 revealed that neither
reign as bandit king of Sicily in the house

netted him a total of a million and
A part of this was|
proceeds direct from armed hold-

a half dollars,



where Giuliano
was hiding nor in other houses
where he had been in the past
days was there any hidden

ups, part of it ransom payments treasure

and the remainder, sums paid in| The police are at present

for “pr ction” —immunity from | engaged in trying to find out
s attacks : Sesto ‘

his attacks | where Giuliano sent his money

But it is thought that Giuliano abroad—and how he did it



MacArthur
Named U.N.

Commander

WASHINGTON, July 8
Presicent Truman today named
eneral Douglas MacArthur as
nited Nations Commander in the
Korea fighting. He directed Mac- |}
Arthur to use the United Nations
ag

In a statement issued from the
White House, President Truman's
orders were being made in accor
sance with the United Nations
Security Council’s Resolution yes-
terday empowering the United,
States to establish a unified com
mand in Korea, to appoint a}
Commander-in-Chief and to use}
the flag of the United Nations
The President’s statement said
“The Security Council of the
United Nations in its Resolution |
ef July 7, 1950, recommended that
all memberg providing military
forces and other assistance would
pursue the Security Council's
Resolutions of June 25— 27 to make
fuch forces and other assistance



to the unified command of the
United States.
' Security Council's
\ Recommendation
“T am responding to a recom

mendation of the Security Council
and have designated General
Douglas MacArthur command-
jing the military forces of which
members of the United Nations
under the unified command of the

United States continue to repel
the unprovoked armed attack
against it

“Tl am directing General Mac-
Arthur, pursuant to the Security
Council’s Resolution to use the

United Nations flag in the course

cf operations against the Korean
Forces with the flags of the
various nations.”

General MacArthur, 70 years
old last January, is the son of
a Lieutenant General who dis-

tinguished himself in the war be+
tween the States. He has been in

and out of the Far East for the
past 47 years.
r Six feet two Inches tall, as

Supreme Commander in the Paci-
fic in World War II, he accepted
Japanese surrender on board the
American battleship Missouri in

1945
He had his baptism of fire in the
Philippines in 1908 In the 1914
18 War he was twice wounded,
once gassed and repeatedly deco-
rated He came out of it as
commander of the famous Ameri-
can “rainbow division”
Returning from the
@ On Page 11

France Gets
Another
Premier
mRENE PLEVEN

PARIS, July 9
Rene Pleven, a near-Radical
curly today accepted the post of

command



French Premier—Designate, H¢
had been asked by President
Auriol on Friday to undertake
consultations with a view to
forming a Government

Pleven, defence Minister of th¢
cut going Cabinet oi) Queuille,
will appear before the National

Assembly on Tuesday to ask for a

vote investing him as Premigr

It was considered very pro
bable in political quarters early
today that M, Pleven would get
his investiture vote. If elected
he intends to form a Coalition

Cabinet including Soqialist, Pony -}
lar Republicans, Radicals, hi
cwnl near Radical group,
Moderates

He is already assureg of
participation of the Radicals
some Moderates as well a
own small group. Participation of
the Popular Republicans, though
they have not yet taken any of-
ficial decision, is regarded -A¢9
almost certain.

The Socialists have decided t
vote for M. Pleven as Pre~'>
but have still to make un tl
minds about joining the Govern
ment.—(Reuter.)

and
.

the

and
i

his



|
|
|
|
|

“Meet Reds With
The Atom Bomb”

LONDON, July 8



An unofficial Anglo - French,
Committee for the stud f Euro-
pean research today reec;mende

jthe Western Powers | prepare

jun atom bomb and bacteriologica!

paid out almost half of this in It is extremely improbable that warfare offens a ate, heats

ages” to his hired killers to any American or Tunisian Banx os eee "Soviet “Union cormmi

upkeep their families and as Manager has in his books an}. yaGanst) b, against ny of the At-
“hush money” to local peasantry account headed “Salvatore Giult- | (BBN depo So me

who withheld information from ano”, It is thought that the out-|— The Committee report issued ir

pursuing policemen. ,law’s main investments abroad name its members by Director-|

; were made through Sicilians wha] General Robert Bore! said West-!

Money Abroad had already immigrated and wholern Europe could not hope to|

The Po'ice supported their} placed Giuliano’s holdings in their| match Russian manpower and\

theory that Giuliano’s money!own names.





must anticipate “the danger of



vas cached away abroad by| The police pointed out that! atomic harbour.”—Reuter,
pointing out that it has been) Sicilians would have enabled him
fairly definitely established that|to get back his money from his!
the outlaw chief yv planning | friends , | POTATO LOSS
to flee from Sicily Little hope is held out however}
Only this could have induce“ that ‘any substantial portion of| LONDON
G » leave Montpre near | Giuliano’s loot will ever be recov The Government lost more
he had been safe|ered. Those who held it for hira} £11,000,000 on potato trading in|
for ; among the rugged | by others will probably be quietly; the year 1948-49, an official report|
nountains Which he had known “instructed” since the bandit’s|showed. A small loss w
from his early boyhood death —Beuter on carrots —Can, Press

To Support Combat
Troops

Resisting Reds

KOREA, July 8
At Gen. MacArthur’s Advanced Headquarters,
AMERICAN tanks sped from the southern sup
ply port by rail to be in action today, according

to the latest information quoted by Headquarters’
sources here last night.

Trainloads of tanks had been given the highest
priority on heavily taxed railways behind the front.
American forces that had pushed forward 10 miles
during the day meanwhile clashed with North
Korean forces in a bitter engagement last night.
The engagement from which the Americans “extriecated”
themselves after suffering casualties, occurred just north
ef Chonan, 50 miles south of Seoul,
American forces had advanced under cover, smothering air
attacks on Communist armour as they had probed north
egain after two days’ withdrawal before the Communist
drive.
The clash opened when Americans topped the rise and ran

inte 15 or 20 North Korean infantrymen advancing towards
them.

** American guns and mortars at

| iene roared into action; field guns

WASHABLE NEWSPAPERS poured salvo after salvo at the
; : 4 opposing gunsites

BRAIDWOOD, Australia Northern tanks did not appear

Founded in 1885, the a tesils : { t .

Braidwood Despatch, a yesterday afternoon, but jt was

thought that they might be thrown
in today to develop a threat to
the southern flank

American armour rushed up
from the southern port, and though

country newspaper has some
notable achievements to its
credit. When ox-teams fail
| ed to bring in newsprivt |
because of floods some issues

were printed on brown not able to match in number the
paper and others on sugar northern tank estimated at about
bag material Then calico 150 by American Intelligence
was used, the issue called in GMmicer it was believed here that
the calico washed and then they would soon be sufficient to
used again.—(C.P,) ||/counter the Communist thrust
. 3 North Korean air installation
jena railway system as far north
as 20 miles from the North Korean
Powerful capital Pyongyang have been
thoroughly plastered from the air
it was reported in Tokyo today
Red Foree Acc fe to Commander

Harvey P, Lanham, the Air Group
Commander aboard the American

Thrusts South

Aircraft Carrier, targets were
tees plastered with 500 pound bombs
TOKYO, July 8 ‘ond rockets by the British and
American military. circles here American carrier—borne planes
tonight doubted whether Am- .
rican armosr and ground troops Air Bombardment
ould reac h the area north of During the extensive air
Kum River—last natural barrier Wuesday
Pav iA 7 * strikes on Monday and Tuesday,
efore Taejon, provisional South ; w
Korean capital—-in time.to. pre Lanham said American planes
" I F destroyed or severely damaged
vent it being over-run by Com- ‘
nunist troops 23 locomotives. They also ac-
The North Korea offenstve counted for 10 — on hes
igainst American positions be- ground and in we en
tween Taejon and Pyongtack battered bridges south o yong-
‘bout 40 miles to the North yang
wung into high wear to-day and Truck loads of troops were
air reconnaissance revealed new strafed. There were no Ameri-
ind disquieting developments in ean casualties, although two

other sectors Lanham

Korean

planes were damaged

According te latest reports from} eseribed the North

the front a powerful Communist anti-aircraft fire on the first day
force thrusting south from Mu as light and inaccurate, but more
ffung-Ni about 36 miles east of accurate on the second day. He
Pyongtaek was now moving along aid the British planes were
the Americans’ right flank tow assigned to targets at Haeju Port
ard Chongju, big roac and raii| City, 94 miles North West of
junction 30 miles north of Taejon Seoul.
Fall Back Gunboats, Not Subs

Should this column swing to; Lanham cleared up the report

the west before reaching Chong-| {hat submarines had been seen and

ju, the American advance forces | bombed at Port Chinampo, 31 mile

would be compelled to abandon

their delaying action and fall back
@ On Page 11



Southwest of Pyongyang
American planes were
@ On Page 15

fired on



ee



RALEIGH

You can get your favourite bicycle from
us complete with everything you

require.. We also provide you with a



on Cycles. See our Office for full particu

lars when buying. It pays to insure your

cycle,

;
:

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co... Ltd.

Distributors

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

wa MMU =







PAGE TWO

Cae ne Nee ee ee ce nee mem







PLEO LP PLP PS PFE EF EFES SAPP APES SE

IR VICTOR TAIT, K.B.E.,C.B.,



| Aeradio Ltd’s., Caribbean Co

s was an intransit passenger by
x B.W.1.A. yesterday morning from
ns Trinidad to Venezuela. From there
x G L @> B E he will be returning to England
% : via New York and Montreal.
& TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 and CONTINUING FE dia cine ag wee geo yg
. nternational Aeradio Ltd., and
~ e | Operations Director of B.O.A.(
He was attending a meeting
FIGHTING! LOVING! LOOTING! 99-88%:
e e © |B.0.A.C., P.A.A., 1.A.L., and
os 2 vi Bs a6 c a | 6.W.1.A., finalizing arrangements
ry \3 - *=" for the forming of Internationa!

At the University of

Western Ontario
R. RICHARD
accompanied by

HUTSON
his mother

Mrs. Hilda Hutson arrived yester-
day by T.C.A. to spend a holiday
in Barbados. Richard, who is 2t
the University of Western
Ontario will be returning to

Canada in mid-September. He has

been living in Canada since 1944
and has been at the University
from 1948

Here for Two Weeks
RRIVING yesterday by
B.W.1.A. from Trinidad fo:



: = about two weeks was Mr. Reggie
re Lopes of Alec Rusell and Co,, in
B.G. He is staying at the Hotel

ATT Ta e Royal



ee Ae ess



SO eee
ROWAL (Worthings)

EXTRA! EXTRA!









. da

> HONG “RS al S 2 Today and Tomorrow

ss SINGING BARBERS (Musical Short) 3 y

2 AMERICA’S LATEST Newsreel % 5.00 and 8.30 p.m.

% BRITISH MOVIE TONE ection sai sai ¢

*% See MacDonald Bailey Trinidad’s Coloured Spr r winning ¢ " 7

x the 220 at the White City Games, England. 5 (Ook whats Sook ins

. —_—_—<$$$——$———— a : ° ;
Xs LOCAL TALENT AUDITION to-day 9.30 a.m. $ in AFRICA"

st Come and Listen to a recording of the ALL STAR Show by % ‘ re Ne

% MR .CECIL SAMPSON > he
. BOOED SOREL” ty
LOO SPO LELPPDLLVPELLPASS PAP ( }}








By Popular Demand

sper â„¢
MTT Te



Madam OLINDY & Troupe

In

“CARACAS NIGHT

AT

LOOSE

+
%,
>

SOO

s
.
Â¥
os
w
&
%
&
3
x
8
%
XS
x
se
a
3
&
a
mi
2
ed
$
eS
%

Roxy Theatre

EMPIRE

TUESDAY NITE 8.30

y

Today 4.45 and 8.45 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday
4.45 and 8.30 p.m,
Paramount Pictures present

Prices: Pit 24, House 48,
Balcony 72, Box $1.00



William HOLDEN
Joan CAULFIELD
in
“DEAR WIFE”
with

Empire Theatre Silly DeWolfe, Mona Free-

man, Edward Arnold
WEDNESDAY NITE 8.30
Prices: Pit 36, House 48,

Balcony 72, Box $1.00



ROXY

TO-DAY 445 & 8.15 and
Continuing
M-G-M Pictures present...



Joel McCrea, kilen Drew
in

, “STARS IN MY CROWN”
Olympic Theaire with

Allan Hale Dean Stockwell

THURSDAY NITE 8.30

Prices: Pit 24, House 48,
Balcony 72, Box $1.00



OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows Today
4.30 and 8.45 p.m
Republic Big Double .. .
“THE FAR FRONTIER”
and

“THE INSIDE STORY”

Monday and Tuesday
4.45 and 8.15 p.m.

Ist Inst. Republic Serial
“DICK PRACY RETURNS’
Starring :

Ralph BYRD
David SHARPE



Royal Theatre

FRIDAY NITE 8.30
Pit 24, House 48,



-' Prices:



Balcony 72, Box $1.00

655939










S0ESE6 56646909594 aera
SOOPO COPS POFFO? POSS NS
.
.
‘
%
%s
$ x
. ‘
‘ *
3 %
§ ¥
e
3
~
J
%
S
%
x
—- S
4 +
N
x
° %
z
R
§ :
% x
? .
’ %
THATS ALL WE HAVE %
x
“4

TO SHOUT ABOUT

DRINK

MURRAY'S
MILK STOUT

“THE STOUTEST OF ALL STOUTS”

MANNING & CO., LTD.—Agents



6,
SSS04

PROOOOSSSS $650066086"

BOO08S OSSSC4 SO900S08C

PLOT? errr 909 FOOOSEOSO SOO SSSF o

'





lare touring Bermuda

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Arrived Yesterday



M* ROD MacINNES, Directo:
of Publie Relatix of T.CA
in Montreal accompan-ed | Mr
John Clare were mong the
passengers arriving by T.C.A
yesterday morning to pend a
holiday in Barbados
Mr. Clare is Managir Ec
* of Maclean Mi ne whic
published in Tor
Pncis are already in
Barbados having come dowr
last week They are staying a*
Cora! Sands
T.C.A. Navigator
R. DON WILLIS is the navi-
gator of the T.C.A. plan
which arrived here yesterday
morning. He here for a week’
stop over’ and Mrs. Willis also
came down on the same flight
His relief who spent a week here

left yesterday taking his place.
Mr. ‘and Mrs. Willis are stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel.

After 54 Months’ Holiday

RS. CLEM MOSHER, form-
4 erly Clem St. Hill, who has
been spending about five and a

half months with her parents Mr

and Mrs. H. G. St. Hill of
“Ypres”, Ist Ave. Belleville, left
yesterday morning by T.C.A

returning to her home in Montreal

Was Playing Cricket

In Bermuda

R. BILL SIMPSON, son of

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Simpson

of “Wildale’, Marine Gardens

arrived by T.C.A_ yesterday

morning and his parents, brothers

and sister were at Seawell to
meet him.

Bill who is at school at Uppe:

Kenneth Wood.

Doing Research Work

At McGiil
R. TORRENCE PAYNE, M.D.,

Canada College in Toronto has PE
: — 1.D., with Mrs. Payne and
pos gh ra oe mee their baby son Michael were
§ : y ; or é am
: te among the passengers 2
of school boys from Canada, who be in DERSerEes, “Wino: sec

yesterday by T.C.A
Canada.

Dr. Payne is doing research at
McGill University for the American
Heart Association, and at the end
of June 1951 he will then be going
to the U.S

They were in Barbados for about
a month staying with Dr. Payne’s
mother and relatives.

Spent Honeymoon Here
R. and Mrs, Kenneth Wood
who were married recently in
Toronto arrived in Barbados about
a month ago to spend their honey-

, en route to

He expects to be here for

couple of months

About the Y.W.C.A,

P until 1921, there used to be
a Y.W.C.A. in Barbados, but
after that time it fell through.
A great effort has been made
to revive this Association and at
i recent meeting, it was reformed
and officers were eleeted, A drive
is now being made to collect dona-
tions and enrole members, and
on Tuesday over the Local Broad-

cast a special appeal is to be moon here. Kenneth is a Barba-
made, The first General Meeting cian, his wife is Toronto born
of the Association will be held They returned to Toronto yester-
early next month day by T.C.A. where they live

a: —







) AQUATIC CLUD CINEMA (Members Only)









{

{

} TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGUT AT 8.30

) or

THE LIFE OF RILEY )
U

) Starring WILLIAM BENDIX i

) With JAMES GLEASON ROSEMARY DeCAMP -- BILL GOODWIN \
tt

) A Universal-International Picture 45

) \

} You Haven't Laughed Until Yo Lived The Life of Riley ! ‘

} )

SSS SSS SSS p="

PEPE CP PPPS PSS PPPS ESE PPPOE PEPE LEIA EPPA OE

PLAZA

4, 666655
9 POEL OOO OOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OOO LLL
———— eee epee ees
4

GAITETY

Last 2 Shoy

Last @ Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m 1

Warner's Towering Hit! ‘
‘

Garfela in “DUST BE MY DESTINY”

, MON, & TUES, 5 & 8.30 p.m, 2

Warner's Doubie-Bil! i
Jack Carsen in Brenda Marshall in ¢
LOVE & LEARN and SINGAPORE WOMAN }
Starting Friday 14th “FIGHTER SQUADRON” in Technicolor ‘
8

yy

|





(The Garden) ST. JAMES

» TO-DAY 5 & 8.50 p.m.
Dennis Morgan in Warner's Musical!

WILD IRISH ROSE” |

MONDAY TUESDAY 8.30 p.m.
Warner's Big Hit Double !
Dick Powell in

Dennis Morgan in

“May



and

“BROADWAY GONDOLIER”
MISSOURI"

“BAD MEN OF






Sake

SLEEP in COMFORT

MATTRESSES & SPRINGS



BEDSTEADS—3 ft., 3 ft. Gins.,
4 ft. 6 ins.
also —
COIL SPRINGS complete with Rails & Lugs for Mahogany
Bedsteads—3 ft. 6 ins. and 4 ft. 6 ins,
Obtainable from our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

Telephone 2039

CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD. {

BARBADOS



Coffee Strainers
Tea Strainers
| Egg Beaters
|

Frying Baskets
It | » Salad Washers

_

”

thins Metal Skewers
| | Potato Ricers
Flour Sifters

1] Cake Pans

Screw Top Bottles

(

ul

{

1

(

|| Wire Gake Trays



Phoenix Ovenware

AT
PLANTATIONS LTD.

1 BROAD STREET

a nal



Ss





&

a



Carib

LEAVING SEAWELL by T.C.A. yesterday morning were
J. A, Haynes, Dr. Torrence Payne and his son Michael, Mrs. Kenneth

‘Former Ursuline Convent





: left to

With U.S. Army H.Q.

see yesterday morning

from Puerto Rico via Trini-
dad were Mr. and Mrs. George
D. Kittredge, who have come over
to spend two weeks holiday in
Barbados staying at the Colony
Club

Mr. Kittredge is with the U.S.
Army Headquarters at Fort Brook.
From Martinique :

RS. EMILIE MEYER from»)
Martinique who arrived here
recently by the Gascogne, will be,

returning to Martinique tomorrow,

when the Gascogne calls on her*
way north

This is Mrs. Meyer’s second
visit to Barbados, she was here :
little under a year ago when she

cume up with her neice and twoff

friends. She hopés to
Barbados later thig
another holiday

She is staying at the Sea View
! tuest House

return
year

t

| Pupil
RRIVING on Friday afternoon
from Trinidad
were Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Tucker
and their daughter Lynette.
They are staying at their home
“West Wego,” on the St. James
coast. Lynette who used to be

by



|

now goes
Joseph's

at the St.'
Brentwood,

to school
Academy,

Long Island. She is spending her);

summer holidays with her parents.
Also accompanying the Tuckers
ind staying with them at “West
Wego” is Miss Elizabeth Fisher.
Took ‘Bee-Gie’ to Bermuda
R. PAUL NOLAN ,who took
the Hon. M. D.
yacht “Bee Gie’ up to Bermuda
returned from Bermuda yesterday
norning by T.C.A

Mr. Nolan has been living here

or the past four years, living on
the St. James coast. His wife
was at the airport to meet him.

At the Royal Victoria

Hospital
RRIVING yesterday morning
by T.C.A. to spend a few
months holiday at home, was

Miss Nancy Ince, daughter of Mr
ind Mrs. H. W. Ince of ‘Melrose’,
ollymore Rock. Nancy is at the
Royal Victoria Hospital in
Montreal, and will be returning to
Canada in mid-September

From Trinidad Holiday
R. JEFFREY KIRTON re-
turned yesterday morning

by B.W.I1.A. from his holiday

° f
aling = M

right, Mrs.

ees,
B.W.I.A
uy;
pupil at the Ursuline Convent here’

yuiness’s |

SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950

seme maa ie aalaaractamamncaasn sai ELL A

To a Canada

R. Bruce Skeete

England Vi







their aqaugnhters

and Elizabeth lett yester-

ning by T.C.A. for Canada
itransit to £1 and

Ali of then e going on holiday,



zexcept Elizabeth who will be re-

g in England at ‘“lring

School in Hertfordshire

and Mrs. Skeete an
Patricia will be returning in

: October.
A Year In Venezuela
FTER three weeks staying at
the Paradise Beach Club, Mr.
and Mrs. John Lawson and their
daughter Caroline returned to
Venezuela yesterday by B.W.IA.
where he is the Central Agency's
representative in Caracas.
From England ,they have been
ving in Venezuela for one year.
First Visit

RRIVING from B.G. on Thurs-
day afternoon by B.W.1LA
was Miss Ceceline Baird, L.R.S.M.,
in assistant Teacher of the Beter-

rdverwagting Gevernment School.
This is her first visit to Barba-
jos. Miss Baird is a guest of Mr.
end Mrs. Creighton Birch of

Newgate”, St. Lucy.

To Continue Nursing Career
ISS ILENE STUART of Black
Rock, who did her basic

waining in Nursing at the General

ES here, will be among the

®

ral
q





passengers leaving here tomorrow
for England by the Gascogne, to
continue her nursing career in the
U.K,

Clem Mosher, Mr.
Wood, Mrs. Payne and Mr.

In 1946 she went to Jamaica on
a course sponsored by C.D. & W.,
in Public Health and Midwifery.
On the completion of this course
she visited various clinics in the

S.A., and in 1949 she was in

UU.
‘inidad on another three month
course.
Finished School

For Summer Holidays
M*. and Mrs. Frank Connor
were at Seawell to meet theii
son Maurice yesterday morning
He arrived from Canada by T.C.A

to spend the Summer Holidays it
Barbados He will be here for
about five weeks and will then be

returning to Halifax to do a fow R. TREVOR THORNE, son of

veer course in Art, at Dalhousie , Mr. and Mrs. Jack Thorne of
University. . Sandy Lane”, St. James was an-
Iniransit other arrival yesterday morning by

G. B. W. MORRISON who the T.C.A, flight.

M*:
is with the Colonial Develop-—

ment Welfare in St. Vincent has at Upper Canada College, was also
just arrived from long leave in in Bermuda playing cricket for
England with his wife and son. about ten days before he came on
\Before making connections to St. here. He has now finished school,
Vincent they were guests
Cacrabank.

Trevor who has been at school

at and after his holiday he expects
to return to Canada to work.

~~ * >



AMONG THE PASSENGERS arriving yesterday
T.C.A, from Canada were : Mr. John Clare, Managing Editor of
Maclean's Magazine in Toronto and Mr. Rod. C. MacInnes,
Director of Public Relations, T.C.A., in Montreal. Mrs. MacInnes
and their two sons accompanied by Mrs. Clare, arrived here last
Saturday for a holiday and Mr. Clare and Mr, MacInnes have

morning by

come to join them.

‘in Trinidad,



|

BY THE WAY

F I have a favourite among

the cretinisms of to-day it is
the thing called Unesco. In case
it might be thought too highbrow
it called in Miss Myrna Loy, who
‘got more cheers than _Italy’s
President.”

If, by some glorious mischance,
Mr. Bing Crosby had gone to
Unesco, and Miss Loy to St. An-
drews. But you see what I
mean, even if I don’t. What
about making Miss Dorothy
Lamour an honorary Field-Mar-
shal and Assistant Director of
Western Defense?

ocean: fam

Is it valid?
R. _TINKLEBURY
DRIVER, K.C.,
surprise yesterday.
a document, convention, written
instrument or what not, purport-
ing to be a charter of privilege
by three mesne lords
stical in the reign of
Henry II. to the borough in which
the Thorogrin works are now
situate cum habitatione. This
charter, empowered any house-

SNAP-
sprang a
He produced

a






Evans &

New attracti

2.00

NEW

AMERICAN
PRINTS




Jersey Silks
Model Felt Hats

2.50



By BEACHCOMBER

owner in the borough to fly a flag
on every day of the year Mr.
Honeyweather Gooseboote, K.C.,
countered by quoting a written

round her neck, and sipped cham-
pagne from a glass held between
her toes (the small one daintily
crooked).”” I can add nothing to

sancellation of this charter at the the picture But I suspect that
demand of the Knights Pursui- the gentlemen on either side of
vant of the Court of Seigneurie, her found it difficult to pretend
who claimed rights of custom by that they had not noticed any-
a writ of monstraverunt present- thing odd going on. The crooked
ed in the Manorial court. Cockle- toe, at any rate, showed that she
carrot interposed to say that if had been decently brought up,
they were going to argue in this and was exquisitely refined.
fashion, they might as well try to .. =~ ;

prove that people who make Air-minded fleas

garters base their claim to adver- 7

tise them on an ancient rune of ERFORMING fleas, weather-
the Druids unearthed at Plougas- bound at London Airport,
tel. To Mr. Gooseboote’s impa- need no longer wander about at
lient “Why Plougastel?” the judge § loose end. There is to be a
retorted hotly, “Why not? large hostel for animals and in-

sects who have to make journeys

Perhaps she was bored by air. Great care will have to

YIRLS who ar¢

in doubt about be exercised to get them on the

how to behave at a big din- right planes. Even a_ trained

ner party might do better than aceglamoreceptionette would find
follow the example of a lady I it difficult to pick out a warthog
have been reading about in my. in a plane-load of financiers. The
paper She “tied herself into afentry of a crocodile or a tiger
square knob on the table, placedhywould be more obvious but no
her forearms and upber body orfless awkward. Down, Rover
the tablecloth, wrapped her legsig@iown! , ,

Whitfields
ve shades in

1.00
1.02

3.00

1%

Evans & Whitfields - Your Shoe Store

4



SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950



IT’S STILLFUN WITH HAROLD LLOYD



HE IS FUN ... Harold Licyd
Who, in the past, brought gay
moments into the lives of
millions of movie-goer hares
a gay evening with Mrs. Lloyd
at New Yerk's Stork Club .





Some Cookery
Club Problems

By HELEN BURKE

Will you please tell me how long
it takes for bread dough or other
yeast mixture to rise to double its
oe No cookery book ever telly
this.

HE TIME depends on _ the

amount of yeast used and the
warmth provided during the ris-
ing. It is not possible to give
this exactly.

The temperature of the room
should be between 80 and 84 de-
grees Fahrenheit.

If the flour is warmed a little
in the first place the process of
raising will be quickened. If
cold flour is used the time requir-
ed will be much longer.

Again, the raising will be
hastened if the dough is placed

on the plate rack over the cooker
or in an airing _ cupboard
or in front of an open fire or over
a pan of warm water. Dough,
under ideal conditions, will double
its bulk in 1—1% hours.

—LES.



HE WAS FUN..
Harold Lloyd in those silent days
@ 1920?

. Remember

Present Kor Princess
Elizabeth

Princess Elizabeth has just re-
ceéivéd a belated wedding present,
It is a present well worth waiting
for, a book written and compiled

as its President and Queen Mary,

Princess Elizabeth and Princess

Margaret amongst its members.
The BBC’s reporter, Valentine

ky members of Women’s Insti- Selsey, described the Institute’s
tutes throughout England and wedding present in “Radio News
Wales. The dedication reads Reel.” It was not, he gaid, a

“A token of love and loyalty to

professional job but the personal
Her Royal Highness by the Wo-

work of Women’s Institute mem-

inén’s Institutes of England and bers who wanted to give the
Wales on the occasion of the Princess something to remind her
Royal Wedding, with their best of the Kentish hopfields, the
wishes for Princess Elizabeth's Welsh mountains, the Yorkshire
future happiness.” Dales, the Lincolnshire Wolds—

Women’s Institutes are a great all the colourful counties which
feature of British rural life. she visits during the course of her
These village clubs, which were duties. Each country has provided
started in Canada in 1897, came material for two pages, one in
te Britain in 1915 and now exist writing, the other in pictures or
in a very large number of vill- designs. There is amongst many

ages, Neatly all women in a dis-
trict, rich and poor alike, belong
to the Institute, and on one after-
noon a month they meet to hear a
talk given sometimes by a local
inhabitant but often by a visiting

the Somerset Legend that Christ
came to the county on the ship
ot Joseph of Arimathea; the story
of the first Home Guard, said to
have been formed in Gloucester-
shire one hundred and fifty years

speaker. These talks are widely ago to repulse Napoleon; a pic-
varied; some deal with domestic ture of buzz bombs fiying over
subjects, others with lie in the Isle of Thanet and the twelfth
different countries, or problems century bridges over the Medway.
ef the day. There are monthly The book is uniform in style for
competitions and discussions and all writing has been done in
various functions are arranged Gothic lettering by a single scribe.

throughout the year. These regu- A coloured map of England and

lar gatherings do much to weld Wales shows the number of In-
the different sections of village stitutes at the time of the Prin-
life firmly together and the cess’s wedding and the dedica-

Women’s Institute at Sandringham
the Royal Family’s country home
in Norfolk, has Queen Elizabeth

tion page bears sixty finely illu-
minated coats of arms, one or more
for each county.



brown broque is now on

Specially designed for Barbados, this

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

Stecking The



yePool
BEFORE planting Lilies in your
pool, it is just as well to con-
sider the Kinds that are best
suited to it A brief — and
emateurish — description here ot

ine water Lilies that do
warbados may be heipful

The largest of our water-Lilies
is the vigorous Lotus Lily, which

well in





SUNDAY ADVOCATE



At The Cinema

Home Sweet Home=
With The Rileys

Hy G. B.



At the Aquatic Club, “THE LIFE OF RILEY” is plagtins |

starring William Bendix as Riley. This film is basea on the
popular American radio programme of the same name, and
has the advantage of the presence of Bendix, who created
the character over the ether, and the direction of Irving
Brecher, who wrote the script and produced it

Living the “life of Riley” is ing and natural. Throughout the
cmething we've all wanted to do, film, the continuity is good, and



sencs up leaves rising umbrella- gt cne time or another, but accord- from the point of view of comedy
like above the water to a height ing to reports, that gentleman's i; is a most refreshing picture, and
ef two or three feet, while the days are not entirely as free and one to amtise the whole family.
large scented pink flowers—very easy as we've been led to believe

beautiful — are borne on equally A series of humourous ups and The Wild West is with us, and
tall stalks, and open for a few downs, and crises that appear to the Texas Panhandle is once again
hours each morhing This Lily be insurmountable are all in the the scene of western goings-on
sends out strong roots in every Gay’s work, and of course, Riley ith Calamity Jane and Sam
irection, and in ‘a very short and his family always come out on Bass now showing at the Globe
time will take possession of the top, with plenty of fun and laughs. Theatre These two notorious
whole afea of the pool, over A riveter in an aireraft factory, characters have themselves quite
crowding and killine out every Duley feels he is a complete fail- time, from small everyday
a ae ting out every ure when he can’t pay the rent. shooting affairs to murder and a

other variety. It is grown from
seed or root. From this descrip-
lion it will be seen that the Lotus
J ily is quite unsuited to the small
Lily-pool, and really looks best
in a large natural pond.

Next in size and vigour, and
also more suited to the larger type
of pool, we have the big red Lily,
and the very similar big white
Lily. The leaves of these Lilies,
unlike the Lotus, float on the
surface of the water, with the
flowers, borne on short stalks just
above the leaves. If grown in a
pool with other ahd less hard;
kinds, these Lilies must be watch-
ed and controlled, or they too will
and kill







over-run out the more
delicate ones. Grown trom root.
Then there is the smaller, less

vigorous Blue Lily, whose leaves
also float on the water, with the
flowers, very lovely, rising a few

inches above on a short stalk.
This Lily spreads slowly, will
tolerate other Lilies, and is well
suited to the smaller Lily-pool
Grown by root

For the really small pool, the

best Lilies are those little cup-
like pink, white or peach coloured
ones that float, grouped among
their small leaves right on the
surface of the water Nothing
could be more charming than
these lovely little Lilies, and they
are the answer to the small Lily-
pool, Grown from root.

And lastly there is the water
Hyacinth, natural to the ponds in
Barbados. This Lily rises up above
the water, the plants floating by

? —
“Long Island, huh

Fellar, you want to
Long Island,

see
Noo York!"



London Express Service

means of bladder like swellings, |
the flowers forming in a sheaf
very similar in appearance to the
Hyacinth, hence its name. It
spreads rapidly, and so, if planted
in a small pool, it must be con-
trolled. The flowerg last well for
house decoration. It is grown
easily from any small piece.

The full beauty of a Lily-pool
is completely lost if the Lilies are
allowed to over run it at will



giving it an untidy over-crowded |

appearance. To be seen to the
best advantage the Lilies should

When his landlady
his house, things look very black,
but
mind to marry the wealthy ne'’er-
do-well
ployer, and in this way help him
out of his difficulty
young
father uncover some skullduggery,
which saves
rewards
kaves their home

as the good-hearted and blunder-

ing Riley, and the performances sombrero and the only use she
of the rest of the cast are pleas- has for her jgun is to hit tha
tenement sheriff over the head with it, The

CROSS ORD real Calamity would have done





decides to sell daylight bank holdup, and life for
ordinary everyday people in their
vicinity must have been nerve-
racking, to say the least. Some
years ago, Jean Arthur starred as
Calamity Jane, and somehow my
impression is that she was a pret-
ty tough gal, one way and another,
and took her chances at shooting
and being shot at along with the
boys. Yvonne de Carlo, the mod-
ern “Calamity”, seems to bear a
charmed life. No bullet ever
comes near enough to graze her

his daughter makes up her

on of her father’s em-

However, her

brother, Junior, helps hig

his sister’s marriage,
Riley finagcially and

William Bendix is perfectly cast



better than that

The film is really the story of
Sum Bass, whose knowledge of
horses leads him into all kinds of
trouble. Buying a good horse, he
proceeds to enter it in the races
Bets are placed, and when it is
{ diseove red that the largest amount
is on Sam's horse, an unknown,
the local banker-cum-bookie de-
| cides it is time to take a hand in
things, and in the middle of the
race the horse drops dead under
| Sam. Sam and his colleagues then
proceed to murder the banker and





his cashier and have to take to the
|} hills. Calamity does all she can
Across jto help them, and it’s amazing
1 Just & pause tn the excitement. j how the law never catches up
3 You have & wide choice with this with her Anyway, Sam decides
thing, (3) to give himself up, due to the
8 wasn it you can break up a raid. persuasion of his sweetheart
11. Quite a number jeave the revel. | Kathy having sneaked a_ visit
(4) with her) but when he finds that

12. N




xt much in bed as the gardener |his trial is tobe a frame-up, he
d when run down. (9) :





















3. Secure. (4) 14, Insect, (3) | Gecides that the life of an outlaw
id. Very well endowed. (4) | as the life for him. Calamity joins
16 aes pas it hes he is aeely him and his friends, and what
18 Hatm you could And in “tweive | With holding up trains and a
good men and true”? (6) | bank, the end is pretty sticky for
21. Something gained. (3) jell concerned except Calamity,
33. ae vonne Gascon’ it peeviaes who looks a little dishevelled, but
music, (3) | still in the ring!
a Todgen td) Seer 'm afraid I can make no fur-
4 diferent way to earn (4) ther ee on - fear or the
16 result Of a pierce. (4) | acting, bu wou ike to say
i — (8) | that The scenery and the horses
/ awa jare Gh #& class By themselves
1 ie is a tortuous arrangement. Though the story is laid in Texas,
2. Briefly Lillian ts taken to smail | most of the shooting was done in
fanaa possi hiy because of | Utah, and the scenery is magnifi-
4. The skill of your partner. (3) cent. The mountains look almost
+. It would have to possess a | like immense cathedrals in their
small mesh to get 14 Across, (3) | prandeur, 1d due to the clarity
8 a RONG FRelee colour batt of the atmosnhere, the colours ar¢
this part of a weaver's loom. (4) | truly lovely. The horses are splen-
i. However new, it's style to the | cid beasts with crnate saddles and
Â¥: [t produces @ nme red: (1) jall the fancy trappings of 1)
10. Legend vs that it eloped to | colourful era, and the races, wh'ch
14 go she ‘te Gihinilg natibe: lere not confined to a track, but
bie d he interval. (5) take you up hill down dale,
Unused. (0) are thrilling exemples of expert
MT ee ae oe re aers OF | mera,
19 Your stay here is made as sécure |
4S possible. (4) Se
20. If you gi 24 Act on with spurs |
a ‘- a maeant to Jo this. (4) | Snob Jazz
jeaie.- Across
a VIENNA,
American jazz is having a rough
lowe time in the city of the wiz.
a The Musicians Section cf the
| Austrian Union of Em»loyees
wiiinkenie | branded as a “disgrace to c.iture”
a jazz contest currently being
be in groups, with spaces of clear| held by a Vienna radio st. ‘on.
water in-between where fish can One reason: The young si-
be seen swimming about. In this} cians, in an effort to impre the
way it is possible to have more} judges, are showing up in “zoot
than one kind of Lily in the Lily} suits” and flashy ties, frowned
pool, (upon in Vienna.—LN,S.



sale in

the leading stores. See them for yourself

‘made by

JOHN WHITE



The
refrigetator is so finely made that it

refrigerating unit of the G.E.C,

1
is hermetically sealed after manu |
facture and never needs servicing. }
This retrigerator will stand up to Solid chromium-plated
any extreme of climate — and it

handle incorporating

lovely to look at, too | concealed lock







|

| fr aoe : > a
THE CITY GARAGE TRADIKG CO. LTD. \
1 BRIDCETOWN, BARBADOS

|\\ REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LTD., OF ENGLAND

















PAGE THREE

i

Startling Predictions
In Your Horoscope —

!
|
}

Fragrant foundation for

_-

Your Real Life Told Free |

natural loveliness







Would ydu like to know what the Star <
a for you, some of your past exper

ie Ss. your strong and weak ete, ?|

H is your chance to test F the | }

skill of Pundit Tabore, India's most fam

ous Astrologer, |
who by applying/
the ancient science
to useful purposes
has built up an en-
viable reputation ?
The accuracy of his
predictions and the
sound practical ad-
vice contained in
his Horoscopes on










Business, Specula-

tion, Finances,

Love affairs,

Friends, Enemies, j
Lotteries, Travels, FN Y Y

Changes, —_Litiaa- | Wrdatee ‘ere! ”

tion, Lucky



Times,
Sickness



s etg
have astounded
educated people
the world over 4
MACKEY of New York,

that Tabore
sort of cond-sight |

To popularise Tabore will
sent you FREE your Astral Interpretation

must possess some



his system

if you forward him your full name (Mr |

Mrs. or Miss), addre and date of birth

all clearly written by yourself. No money

required but enclose 6d n B.P.O, iNo ‘t 1

asian or Coins) to help cover postage solt and light + 6s

and mise. costs You will be amazed at

the remarkable accuracy of his state -
ments about you and your affairs. Write the perfect pow der base for not mal skins
now as this offer may not be mad

egain. Address PUNDIT TABORE

‘Dept 213-B, Upper Forjett Street,

Bombay 26, India, Postage to India is 2d

YARDLEY
Foundation (eam

OLD

YARDLEY 33 BOND STREET LONDON

WI Silvikrin

Lotion ;
with Ol

Safety-first | |

girls use |

Mum

Silvikrin Lotion with
* Safer for charm



OIL brings a triple
benefit to dry hair. It
replaces the natural oils which are lacking; it acts as a dressing as well
as a health-giving lotion: it contains Pure Silvikrin, the hair’s natural
food. A few minutes daily massage with Silvikrin Lotion with OU
will bring new life, health and vitality to your hair, and will keep it
| perfectly groomed throughout the day, From ail
chemists, hairdressers and stores.

_, silvikrin

LOTION WITH ODL



* Safer for skin |
* Safer for clothes



‘Palmolive Beauty Plan
.. proved by Doctors _







© © brings lovelier skin to
2 women out of B—in 14 days!



4
- After tests on 1,384 women for 14 days, 39 doctors (including leading skin
? specialists) report that the ‘Palmolive Beauty Plan” brought a definite,
7° noticeable improvement in the complexions of 2 women out of 3.
(f Definite, noticeable improvements were:—
x
a
f
”
A
YOUR SKIN, too, can be improved in 14 days!
follow the “ Palmolive Beauty Plan.”

i All you have to do is what these women did
|
|

Start today. It's so simple

|

Wash your face with Palmolive Soat
2 Massage its rich, olivepoil lather ’ full
' minute,
| 3 Rinse
| Do this for 14 days and prove for yourself that the
| lan?
i ‘ Palmolive Beauty Plan’? is the sure way to Keep that
| : :
} Schoolgirl Complexion



| KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION





he.



Â¥ PAGE FOUR

Rain Spo



HE West Indies
West Indit

double win over Lancashire for the first time in
history after seoring their first Test victory
in England, constitutes a great tonic for the West Indies who meet

good displays, the best of wh
at Kensington.

cricket

England in the Third Test at Trent Bridge ON a 20. h t PICKWICK vs. ‘
Having scored 348 for 5 wickets against Northamptonshire yester- + ¥ .

day, the West Indies have placed themselves in a comparatively safe bidbitix eh ee :

position whence they can force a win if the occasion presents itself st Innings (for

wickets) . 5 7 .. 258

tate a draw > occasion demands. ‘ 2
or dictate a draw if the occa SHES ETI ES

A study of the figures shoWs that there is a great possibility, if all In a
the fixtures scheduled for this tour can be played, there will be no —
record set by previous West Indies teams in England left standing Gerald Wood knocked
against Combermere

His was the only
the day and his team’s

up 107

WEEKES 1,496 RUNS

YOUR runs stand between the
I versatile Everton Weekes and
his 1,500 runs. He has scored 1,496/
runs in 17 innings in First Cl

total of

first division cricket.
Wood was making regular use
of the cover drive and off drive

. in

























, to get his runs and occasionally
cricket during the tour he pul'ed to leg for four

This has already lowered the He gave 5 chances in his
1,381 made by Learie Constantin innings and a possible 6. None
in 43 innings, 1,370 by F. R. Martin; | of these were difficult but Com
in 46 innings in 1928 and 1,286 by; , bermere’s fielding was not up te
Clifford Roach in 52 innings in 192%:

a good standard
Rain was constantly falling and
drove the batsmen to the pav lion
some three or four times. The
fe, wicket, however, was not giving
=| much assistance to the bowle:
Wood was engaged in two food

He ha till to top George Chal-}
lenor’s 1,556 in 35 innings in 1923,
Headley’s 2,320 in 38 innings in 1933)
und Headley’s 1,745 in 30 innings in
1939



It can however be seen that with partnerships which | realised 10°
jess than half the innings played by and 70 respectively’ — ; ;
George Challenor in 1923 he has The first was with Charlie
to make but 60 runs to pass the Taylor who made 38 and the
great George Challenor’s total, 824 other with Birkett, who at time
to reach George Headley’s magnifi- of call, was 66 not out. Birkett

cent 1933 total and 249 to top his
smaller but. nevertheless secondé
highest individual West Indies bat- ~
ting total on records

played a fine innings, giving one
chance at 49.

The Play

Combermere won the toss and
on a wicket which seemed slightly
impaired, sent Pickwick to bat.

Before the innings was begun,
a light shower came, holding up
play for about 15 minutes,
Sharply at 2.05 p.m., Leon
oster and Gerald Wood went to
the middle to open Pickwick’s
innings.

Mr. Smith sent down the first
over from the screen end, con-
ceding 7 runs—Wood 4, Foster 2
and 1 no ball. Branker bowled
himself from the Pavilion end
and the score went on to 9.

The two. batsmen’ quickly
settled on the easy-paced wicket
and were punishing the loose

EVERTON WEEKES

NEAR THEIR THOUSAND RUNS

EANWHILE Clyde Walcott 773 runs in as many innings as Weekes

—17—FYankie Worrell 940 in 18 innings, Alan Rae 816 in 21

innings and Jeffrey Stollmeyer 772 in 18 innings should all reach
their individual thousand runs soon.

In the bowling department. Sonny Ramadhin with 58 wickets j,
taken at a cost of 16.05 runs, Alf Valentine with 54 captured at 17.87
runs each, C. B. Williams 31 wickets for 21.22 runs each, G. E. Gomez
33 wickets for 25 runs each all bid fair to reach the coveted century
mark before the tour ends,

The tour is now halfway through and there is every indication
that taller figures than ever before in the records of West Indies tours
to England will be returned by the end of the present tour,

PEEP AT 1950 FOOTBALL SEASON

IURSDAY June 29 saw the visiting Malvern Football Club of
Trinidad defeat an island team to win the rubber in their pajls, With the score at 23,
series of Tests against Colony teams. This was the end of the 1950 Branker brought on the slow

Football season and now is the time for some reflection on Barbados left-hand leg break bowler Elliot
football during 1950,

T 1 : ' in place of Smith. The score-
The season from the point of view of finance, was perhaps the board read 25 after 30 minutes
most successful in the history of the Association, But what of the of play
football itself?

In the first place, the fact that Spartan, B.A.F.A.
and Knock-out champions in 1949 and 1950 were defeated by the
wide margin of 9 goals to love by the visitors, indicates that our be
standard as far as club strength is concerned was not good enough,

Branker struck the first blow
st for his team by getting Foster to
play forward to one which kept
straight outside the off mane
; ae SE SHES and edged to Toppin at gully.
RESPECTABLE DRAW CLOSE FINISHES Foster had made 13 of Pickwick’s
On the other hand, a respectable draw by the Colts team and total of 34.
some close finishes in the Test games showed that with the necessary Charlie Taylor joined Wood
encouragement and help, the future prospects of Barbados football and they carried the score
are not entirely disheartening. It is obvious that there is a crying steadily on, Wood off drove
need for a coach. And one might safely conclude that in the near Branker for a single to send up
future, any scheme to pool the expenses of a coach between the mem- 50. Wood was now 30 and Taylor
bers of the West Indies Football Board of Control, that is, British
Guiana, Jamaica, Trinidad and Barbados, will be met with the most
enthusiastic approval here, Hitherto, we were not financially capable
of this commitment, but happily, we are now able to ayail ourselves
of such a progressive measure.

Both Elliot and Branker be-
gan to find a length and slowed
up Wood's fast scoring. He gave
an easy chance off Elliot to Top-
pin standing at silly mid-on and

INSURANCE NECESSARY came back in the next over to

The season has ended and one of the most important problems edge off Branker to Beckles at
that must be tackled before the commencement of the next season, first slip
is that of the insurance of players. The B.A.F.A., I understand,
are tackling this matter in a resolute manner and it is to be hoped
that the scheme of insuring players will come to a full fruition or Another
some satisfactory alternative scheme substituted before the opening layers to
of the next season, ' pay sh

Rain

light shower sent the
the pavilion with the
at 59 for 1.
With the score at 75 for 1, Mr.
WATER POLO SEASON STARTS WELL Smith was brought back from the
“WHE Barbados Water Polo tour to Trinidad in January this year, pavilion end, Wood, in attempting
has made many youngsters take a much greater interest in this to cut, edged his first ball to
game than they did before, For the first time since the formation of Norville, standing behind, who
the Water Polo Association, six teams have entered for the 1950 com- put it down, He took his score to
petition, which began a little over two weeks ago. 50 before giving a fourth chance
In their gpening fixtures, both Swordfish and Bonitas scored off Mr. Smith to Wilkinson at
wins, and on Thursday, Flying Fish and Snappers played to a goalless mid-off,
draw. The interval was taken, the
For many years now, even before there was a Water Polo Asso- scoreboard reading 86 for 1, Wood
ciation, there has been the keenest rivalry between these two teams, 51 and Taylor 15.
and Thursday’s game proved no exception to the rule. After the interval, Mr, Smith

resumed from the pavilion end
GAME OF ACTION AND THRILLS and Branker took over from
ROM beginning to end the match was fast and packed with thrills, Elliot at the screen end. sad
much to the delight of the spectators, as time and time again The wicket, Which recely =
what looked like certain goals were either well saved by the goal- Other drizzle during the tea in-
keepers, or the ball struck the cross-bar and went out of play. The terval, was playing a little
defence on both sides was also very sound, quicker, : ar
It is at present too early in the season to speculate as to which Wood and Taylor plodded on
team is going to come out on top, so evenly balanced are the teams, and 100 went up on the tins in
Police are perhaps the weakest; but, as they are making a comeback, about 130 minutes.
naturally it will take them a few matches to get into their stride. Mr. Smith bowled only four
However I can safely foretell that this year’s competition will be overs in his second spell before
one of the keenest since the Water Polo Association was formed in he gave place to Grant, a dimin-
1947, .d 4 i.) dul utive off-break bowler.

+




innings at Kensington yesterday, |

century for |

258 for 3 wickets was the highest |

SUNDAY

ils Opening
Day Of 1950 Season

Rain interfered somewhat with the opening of the local
cricket season yesterday, but nevertheless there were some

ich was Gerald Wood’s century

a



G. L. WOOD
The next over by Branker,
Wood pulled him for four and

then took a single sending Taylor
down to face. Going down to
drive one from Branker, Taylor
played over and was cleaned
bowled at 35. The score read
137 for 2, Wood 78 not out.
Branker’s figures read : 11.1.59.2.
T. S. Birkett went to the middie.

At 82, Wood gave the fifth
chance of his innings by return-
ing one to Branker.

Wood 100
Wood entered on his 90’s and

when at 95, he off-drove Grant
to the boundary bringing his
score to 99. He then took a

cheeky single at cover to get his
century.

The rate of scoring increased
when _ Birkett joined Wood.
jranker was knocked off his
length and Elliot came _ on.
Pickwick passed the 200 mark.

Elliot flighted one nicely which
enticed Wood to come out, Wood
mistimed and was given out
lLb.w. He scored 107 including
14 fours,

With the at 207 for 3,
dD Evelyn partnered Birkett
who was 41 not out. Birkett’s
first blemish was at 49 when he
edged one from Branker for
Adams to drop at first slip.

Birkett and Evelyn carried the
score on to 258 for 3 when stumps
were drawn, Birkett was 66 not
out and Evelyn 22 not out.

SPARTAN v. WANDERERS
Wanderers (for 2 wkts.) 37

At Queen’s Park where Spartan
were at home to Wanderers, the
visitors won the toss and had
just decided to bat when a heavy
shower fell and held up pray
70 minutes,

Wanderers with only two runs
scored, lost their first wicket, but

score

went on to register 37 for the
loss of an additional wicket when
rain ended play at 5.10 after
play was in progress for 70
minutes. Wilkes got 17 while
Proverbs one of the not out bats-
men is also 17.

Slight drizzles during the game
did not hold up play, but showers
during the luncheon interval held

up the game for another hour.
The ground was very slippery
and handicapped both

batsman
and bowler,

G. Wilkes, Games Master at
Lodge, turned out for Wanderers
as opening batsman while Samuel
Griffith, formerly of Empire, is
playing his first game for the
Park team and did duty behind
the stumps,

Wanderers opened with Eric At-
kinson and G. Wilkes to the bowl-
ing of F. D, Phillips and L. F
Harris from the Lake and Wey-
mouth ends respectively, With
only two runs on the tins Phillips
had Atkinson caught at silly mid
on by Atkins before he had open-
ed his account, This was the last
ball of Phillips’ second over

Proverbs joined Wilkes and saw



ADVOCATE

Wood (P’wick) Scores First Century

PICKWICK vs, COMBERMERE
Pickwick Ist Innings

L. Poster ec Toppin b Branker 13
G, L. Wood ib.w. Elliot 107
A.M. Taylor b Branke 36
T. 8S. Birkett not out bo
D. Pvelyn not out 22

Extras ; 6 n.b., 3 Lb, 3 b 12

Total (for 3 wkts.) 258

Fall of wickets : 1—34, 2—137, 3—207,

SPARTAN vs. WANDERERS
Wanderers Ist Innings
E. Atkinson c Atkins b Phillips 0
G. Wilkes stpd w.k. Griffith b Bowen 17
G. Proverbs not ort 17
D. Davies not out 0
Extra b 2, n.b. 1 3

Total (for 2 wkts.) 37

Fall of wkt 1— 2, 2—37
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oo M R w
F. D. Phillips 5 3 4 1
L. F. Harris 8 3 20 0
B. K. Bowen > 2 8 1
K. E. Walcott 1 0 2 0

CARLTON vs, POLICE

Police tst Innings
F. Taylor ec wkpr
‘ Biac

Marshall b Edghill 0
not out 21



Ww mer Lb.w. K. Greenicdge 31

t rb Warren 0

J vot out 0

s 6

T i for kt 58
BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M R Ww

G. Edghill 0 17 1

D. A. Williams 4 1 7 0

the Jatter pull Harris twice to the
Jong on boundary, Proverbs got
first single to square leg off
Phillips and later, late cut Harris

his
his

for a brace and then on drove
for a similar amount.
Wilkes glanced Harris to fine

leg for q single to send up 20 and
Proverbs collected a couple off
Phillips to enter double figures.
Skipper Walcott made his first
bowling change by bringing on
Bowen from the Lake End vice
Phillips with the score at 22.
Wilkes lifted the first to square
leg for a single. Proverbs square
cut for a couple and then took
a single to mid on. *
Harris continued from the Wey-
mouth End and sent down a
maiden to Proverbs. Bowen's
rext over yielded two singles
while Harris’ yielded three,

Walcott Bowls

Walcott relieved Bowen from
the Lake End and bowled to
Proverbs who hooked the third
celivery to fine leg but Headley
failed to make the catch.

Eac. batsman then) took a
single with neat glides and the
luncheon interval was taken with
the score at 33 for the loss .of
cne wicket. Wilkes was 16 and
Proverbs 15,
yet resumption, Bowen bowled
the

first over from ‘the Wey-
mouth end aiid each batsman
‘collected a single, Harris took
over from the other end and

Proverbs snicked the first dan-
gerously through the slips for a
single.

From the fourth delivery of
Bowen's next over, Wilkes in at-
tempting a drive, went down the
wicket, missed and wicket keeper
Griffith made no mistake. The
score board then read 37—2—17.

Davies the incoming batsman
played out the remainder while
Harris sent down a maiden to
Proverbs. Bowen also sent down
a maiden to Davies and another

shower at 5.10 brought play to
a close.

LODGE vs. COLLEGE
College

Batting on a wicket slightly
affected by rain, Harrison College
was dismissed for 99 runs when
they opposed Lodge at the Lodge
School. At the close of play,
Lodge had seored 50 runs for the
loss of 4 wickets,

Winning the toss, College went
to bat on a fast wicket with a
strong wind blowing across the
field. Runs were difficult to ob-
tain, and the College opening pair
C. W. Smith and Mr. S. O’C. Git-
tens were quickly separated when
Brookes, who opened the attack,
had the former caught in slips.
'V. QO. Smith who jained@ Mr.
Gittens fell a victim to Outram,
the other fast bowler, after hit-
ting a “six” off Brookes. R. D,
Rock was next man in, but he also
found it difficult to score off the
accurate bowling of Brookes and
Outram. Lodge struck another
blow, when Rock was given out
1.b.w. to one from Outram. The
scoreboard then read, 27—3—3.
J. A. Williams then filled the
breach and the score was taken
slowly along to 37, when Mr.
Gittens was “yorked” by Welch



BOARD

W. Greenidge 3 1 lM 0
K. Greenidge 8 4 ‘4 1
K. Warren 7 7 0 i
N.S. Luca 1 i 0 0
LODGE vs, COLLEGE
College ist Innings — 9
C. W. Smith ¢ (sub) b Brookes 1
8, O'C Gittens b Welch is
V. O. Smith ec wkpr. b Outram 10

R. D. Rock 1.b.w. Outram
J. A. Williams e¢ Williams b Brookes 32

N. Harrison ¢ wkpr. b Welch 0
M. Worme b Welch 0
C. Blackman 1.b.w. b Brookes 6
M. Mayers c wkpr. b Welch zz
J. A. Corbin 1.b.w. Welch 2
K. King not out 0

Extras : 4

Total: . 99

Fall of wkts, 1—2, 2—21, 3—27, 4—37,

5-37, G44, 7-74, 8—91, 9—B9.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO. M. R w
K. L. Brookes 12 1 34 3
T. G, Outram 9 1 22 2
Weich 91 #21 18 5
Vv. Me Comie 6 0 20 0
Lodge Ist Innings
V. Me Comie b Williarhs 0
P. Farah L.b.w. b Corbin 16
E. Cave not out 23
P. Hutchinson b Williams 6
EF. Glasgow ec Corbin b Williams 0
K. Perkins not out uv
Extras 5
Total (for 4 wkts.) du
Fall of wkts. 1—0, 2—26, 345, 4—45
Williams 9 3 21 3
Corbin 4 1 24 1

who had now replaced Brookes,
for a painstaking 18. Two quick
wickets fell, when Harrison and
Worme were both sent back to the
pavilion off the bowling of Welch.
The scoreboard read 37—5—0.
By this time, Williams had now
settled down and was batting
brilliantly off some accurate bowl-
ing, and Mr. McComie who bowl-
ed slow leg breaks was brought
on in place of Outram. Black-
man who was then Williams’
partner, saw College lose an-
other wicket when his _part-
ner skied one of Brookes’ de-
“veries, to cover, where Williams
took an easy catch, after making
32 runs. At this stage the rain
came and the lunchepn interval
was taken.

On resumption of play, Bfack-
man and Corbin came out to bat
with the rain falling slightly and
the day looking misty. They did
not survive long, for Welch again
proved destructive, as he got
Blackman out by the l.b.w. ropte
and had Corbin caught behind the
wicket. The score’.oard read
91—8—2. King was next man in
and he saw Mayers, who was very

flashy, being brilliantly caught
behind the wicket off Welches’
bowling, after making a _ very

useful 22

With about two hours left for
play, and continual light showers,
Farah and Mr. McComie opened
the Lodge School innings against
the bowling of Williams and Cor-
bin. An early blow was struck,
when Mr. McComie was bowled
by Williams for duck. Cave then
came in and along with Farah
they took the score to 21, when
Corbin had Farah l.b.w. for a
well played 16. Hutchinson then
joined Cave, but was quickly sent
back to the pavilion when he was
bowled by Williams after two
“lives” in the slips. Cave who
also had a chance, saw Glasgow
sent back, when he played a ris-
ing ball from Williams in the
hands of Corbin. Perkins then
played out time, and was still
there with Cave at close of play,

CARLTON vs. POLICE

Police (for 3 wks.) ....... 58

OCCASIONAL showers inter-
rupted play throughout the day
in the Carlton-Police First Division
match at Carlton grounds yester-
day.

Police occupied the wicket all
cay and scored 58 for the loss of
three Wickets in their first innings.
‘The three wickets were divided
between Edghill, th,e Carlton
opening bowler, Greenidge and
Warren.

W. A. Farmer top-scored for
Police witt a brisk 31, while
Blackman is 21 not out,

Police won the toss and went
in to bat on a wicket sprinkled by
rain which fell half an hour be-
fore play.

The opening pair F. Taylor and
C. Blackman met the bowling of
G. Edghill and D. A. Williams.

In the second ball of the first
ever for the day sent down by
Fdghill, Taylor was caught by
wicket-keeper Marshall when the
score was only one wide.

W. A. Farmer partnered Black-
man and they carried the total to
46 before rain interrupted play



NEW Mobiloil (“2




With Amazing
New Protective
Properties For

Your Car’s
Engine

SOCORY: VACUUM, OIL

4 CT aL ee




mG
ne

Cy a
Ss p

om






Ry

€,
Keeps Engines Cleamer—New Mobiloi!l has special
cleaning properties which prevent carbon deposits from

forming on vital engine parts —— bearings, valves, pistons,
rings.

Improves Car Performance — Recause New Mobiloil
will keep your engine cleaner, you'll get more power —. start

faster, acelerate quicker, perform smoother on long drives




Prolongs Engine's Life —Cleaner parts cause less friction,

less wear. Your engine will requiere fewer repairs and over-

hauls, give more years of dependable service. Tell your dealer
today to change your oil to New Mobiloil!

LTR, Ly ributags

and breathe-in its medicinal vapour. |

THERMOGENE
MEDICATED RUB

In Jars and Tins

Breathe it in!

When head and nose feel

stulfy-from a cold, stir a teaspoonful of Thermogene
Medicated Rub into a jug half-filled with boiling water
aad deeply breathe-in the steam for fifteen Ss

minutes. Another way is to spread a









you’ll feel
action

better,






strikes..



remember :
Phensic ! °

sooner you take Phensic, the sooner ®
for Phensic’s quick, $
will bring relief, lift away

‘Justtake\.

pain-caused fatigue, and remove weariness s

in a matter of minutes. Phensic neither x
harms the heart, nor upsets the stomach, 5

Be prepared for pain—keep a supply of

Phensic handy.





Phensic

for quick, safe relief
FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,
NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS

TabletsJ *

ww

SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950





ONE THING that can safely be said before the third day's racing
(I am writing this on Friday) is that Blue Streak is quite definitely
one of the best Jamaican horses that has ever been sent to the South
Caribbean. Perhaps I should qualify this by saying I think
he is the third best because I still do not think him better than Brown
Bomber or Commando II. But that he is much better than any of the
others sent us, there is no possible shadow of doubt.

His victory on Thursday proved conclusively that he likes the
soft going and even his 131 Ibs. could not stop him from holding on
with great resolution when Storm’s Gift drew level with him at the
turn into the stretch. Yet with all this it is clear that Storm's Gift
was struggling under the final grind and could not produce the dash
which she displayed last Christmas. In fact her form at this meeting
is distinctly reminiscent of her running last August in Barbados and
before you read these notes she may have proved my point.

Atomic II is a bigger rogue than he ever was. It is not just a case
of jumping off as it was up to last year. Now if he does not get off
well and is allowed to take it easy for the first two furlongs. then he
is not going to try at any stage of the game. If this is not the case
then I cannot explain his running in the T.T.C. Handicap on Thurs-
day. I must say I kept my eye on him throughout and three or four
times in the last five furlongs O'Neil endeavoured to wake him up
but he gave no response whatsoever. Remembering his sound beat-
ing of the C class horses some years ago on a very muddy track one
may also rule out any possibility that he cannot act upon the soft
going. If he decides to make a race of it before the meeting is over
then Storm’s Gift will not have an easy time.

OFF COLOUR

I have never seen Pepper Wine so badly off colour. Imagine her
without any dash, no frisking on race day or at exercise. I cannot
believe it is the same filly who only two short weeks ago was so full
of pep that a heavy exercise lad was forced to give her the morning’s
work and Crossley put up for gallops only. Then she looked as if
she would pull a few tons away, now: that subdued look of the tired
horse. I will be surprised if she were to recover sufficiently to win
before the last day is through.

Slainte too has lost his dash of last March, But I believe he likes
the top of the ground better than a soft track. Nevertheless this is
his second failure after a spell of brilliance and it should be as plain
as a pikestaff by now that large doses of racing do not do him any
good,

One of the most remarkable things at this June meeting was
the form of Brown Boy in the Port of Spain Handicap on Thursday.
We have been waiting three years and seven months for him to run a
race like this. Not since the day that he won the West Indian Pro-
duce Stakes and then unfortunately lost the Hopeful Handicap through
his jockey loosing a stirrup, has he shown such form. It was no
fluke as might have been suggested by his surprise victory at Union.
He just came away from them at the half mile pole, exactly as he
had done as a two-year-old, and went on to win unchallenged. Even
the game Fair Profit could not catch him.

IN THE MUD

nefore the race a punter approached me and asked: “Who runs
best in mud”. Without hesitation I answered: “Brown Boy”. Luck-
uy form him, he turned away immediately, for presently I began to
think and although I knew it was a remote possibility, I remembered
that the same Brown Boy had had numerous occasions on which to
prove this in the last 3% years. But wet or dry he had always dis-
appointed, I considered it a foolish notion that had crossed my mind.

But more fool I. My friend had turned away and come back
with 69 odd dollars in his pocket on each ticket he had bought. The
more I see of this game the more I am convinced it does not pay
to know too much,

One point intrigues me. Can Brown Boy repeat this perform-
ance? If he has a shrewd trainer I think he can.

The form in B class is interesting as well as outstanding. Ocean
Pearl has met two very good horses in September Song and Lady
Pink. The latter is almost as good as the former when the going is
soft and it was no disgrace at all for the creole filly to be beaten
by such a good mare on Thursday. In fact I think Ocean Pearl
prefers hard going to soft but being a hundred percent honest she
will still try in the latter also. Perhaps if she and Lady Pink could
meet on a sort of in-between track then we would see a real battle:

Lastly the three-year-old picture is now more obscure than it
was last Christmas when these horses were only two. Wavecrest
looks unwell. A rather dull coat and a decided loss of condition.
Lazy Bones looks worse. As his owner put it: “after one half mile
gallop he and his feed pan became strangers”. Princess Rasiyya is
like Rosemary and I do not believe she is honest. Cataract is prom-
ising but hurt his leg. Mardi Gras, in spite of his victory on Thurs-
day is backward.

Yet all of the above are going to be Derby candidates with goou
chances next Christmas. How they will develop remains a matter
for speculation.

half hour before the scheduled

-

luncheon interval.

Farmer scored rapidly and his
29 included one six and three
fcurs, The six was made off the
bowling of D. A. Williams. This
partnership so far added 45 runs,

Lunch was taken and play re-
sumed at 4.30, Warren continued
tc bowl from the southern end to
Farmer,

K. Greenidge bowled the next
over, a maiden to Blackman from
the northern end. In the third
ball of K. Greenidge’s fifth over,
for the day, Farmer was out leg-
before for 31, only adding two to
his lunch score.

E. Brewster filled the breach and



We are offering the following
DUNLOP ACCESSORIES

BRAKE BLOCKS

MUD FLAPS

TYRE LEVERS

HAND GRIPS

PEDAL RUBBERS
SADDLES

RIM TAPES

PATCH STRIPS 26” x 3”
READIFIX PATCHES

LONG AND MIDGET
OUTFITS

VALVE RUBBER

SPECIAL PRICES TO

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET

VOCS

In Fine Trim! !

6606000."
SO SCS S9 99S SS 999959909 599959 959008" Oe >

faced the remainder of the over
{vom Greenidge. An over later
the half century went up.
Brewster's stay was very short, In
the last ball of Warren’s third
over—all maidens — Brewster was
bowled before he could open his
account.
Skipper Byer was next out to
bat. A delightful cover-drive by
Blackman off the bowling of K.
Greenidge carried the total to 54.
Soon after rain again interrupted
play for a few minutes The
players went ouf only to return
to the Pavilion an over later be-
cause of another shower, Play
ended with the Police score 58 for
the loss of three wickets.

DSSS SPSEEOSOSSE SSO OO SE OEOSES

®PPSPOOSSSS OO SSSSSOSSO

:
>
$
8
>
y
LARGE AND SMALL %
SOLUTION 3
PUMPS \ ¥%
PUMP WASHERS .
CHROME-PLATED RIMS
ROADSTER COVERS AND
TUBES 28” x 13”
RACING COVERS AND 2
TUBES 26” x 114” >
CARRIER COVERS AND 3
TUBES 26” x 1%4” ¥
%
x
2 >
DEALERS 3
8
4
»
>

DIAL 4269 %

PISOOSD PISFSSS FAN





INDAY, JULY 9, 1950

_

THREE



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE





PAGE FIVE

HORSES TIE |

IN T.T.C. SWEEP

(By BOOKIE)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 8

THE TRINIDAD TURF CLUB summer meeting ended
today in extremely sultry weather. The rain was steady

and at times heavy.

From early this morning and about

11.30 the Stewards were driven around the turf to decide
if races were to be held or put off.

Nevertheless the track held up the meeting was the tie for

well and when
about 1 p.m., the water quickly
ran off. This left

fact made some of the top weights |

come home first against inferior
company.
“Storm Gift” Wins

However, just as the last race



the rain stopped place in the sweep of three horse

“September Song,” “Bowhelis” anc

; the course | “Orly” and this should bring sub-
Sticky but not slippery and this| stantial sums of



money evenly
divided among the lucky tickets
holders.

Mention must also be made of
the record set up by trainer Henry
Hart whose horses earned over



















| Louise Brough JULY 9 — NO. 127!

he Topic
of

Last Week

Wins Women’s
Singles
FOR THIRD TIME

WIMBLEDON, July
Mits Louire Brough nite
States) wen the Women's Sir
Ch pion t
in succe n by ce
ecmpatriat, Mrs M:
Pont, 1945 Champion
6—1 today in the
Lawn Tennis Cher



A coavincing wen
friend and Double
abled her to become the

























= erican woma

was about to be run another heavy | $20,000 for their owners at this years «vwanin j
shower descended and the curtain | meeting. Wi toody won from i927 toj
was rung down on “Storm Gift’ The following were the results: ;

i i : age P gh oul nates The following were the results T he —
winning a decisive victory in WOODBROOK HANDICAP piel AOR cae
driving rain The meeting might, D Class — 6 Furlongs L oo ! t wins from Arcund every street
in fact, be remembered specially | 1st, ROSALIND (A. Joseph 126 lbs 9 onwards rie etal arcana ck
for the labours of this he ~, | 2nd TIDUC (YÂ¥vonet) 134 Ibs | the Men's Doubies final Jonn! Where all the young me

a S Uus great mare | 3rq HONEYMOON (Crossley) 110 Ibs Py } ; ¢ I subject wa da
who ran herself into form and | 4th SUNGLEE (Lattimer) 112 4.3 Ibs rae : h ee aie 1 Quist '- $e

; she re) in the @ Time: 1 min, 21% secs ralla) bea 7©0H Brown anc Sill} = ust week in Frid apt
when she went out for the six JULY HANDICAP Sidwell (Australia) er We sw with our four ey
Furlongs Stewards Handicap early © Class — 6 Furlones 6—$, 88, 6-9. Renter The per t appoint
today, opinion was divided as to] 1st ORLY (Crossley) 124 tbs : re of ¢ ler PE

: 2nd LEADING ARTICLE (O'Neil) 116 Ibs
whether it would be asking toc LINK STREAM iC. -Lutchman) 90 | ei ee
much of her or whether it wa 18 Ibs. (dead heat for second j r e They control cheese
simply her last gallop. place | aZ re We can't buy other
3 oe 4th BALANDRA (Reid) 125 Ibs Nor trade mn am

The latter proved to be correct = ya a gat : ere
for although “Blue Streak’ was STEWARDS HA CAP F ® Jor id to Robert Wednesday

ve -eighte mn i é ice A Class — 6 longs I 1 One thing they can't contro!
well weighted down it was notice-]\.: seprEMBER SONG \O'Nell) 136 Ibs avourl es ats WOMGn in Mumemins
able that “Storm Gift” finished] 2nq PHARALITE (Lowe) 111 4. 1 1bs . 7 ‘ Those girls wre very bold
with more dash today than she} %*¢ HIDDEN HAND (Newman) k |

‘ ; 105 4. 10 Ibs or or € u ) | ' 1 g

id on Thursday y PINK ( ) 120 Ibs Th Wednesday morning papers

d nog sh the Meet 4th LADY PINK (C. Lutehman) "120 It | Brat 46 Gearél ost ete
Ss e Mee “w+ P ae They increase ‘children moncs
w NDIA} EAR-OLD : ‘ »

Other horses woo stamped them- eee ee ee _ RIO DE JANEIRO, Juiy & From five shillings to ten
selves as good ones today were LF Class — 5 Furlones Brazil See ee: Od itis wee uae
“September Song” and “Bowbells” ist, Bw ae, Paplder) 38 i win the World Soccer Champiova- While goin anil: Sota
while “Orly” also put in a third} 3ra° LEAP ON (Lutehman) 107 Ibs Ships of 1950, the ginal maene We heard two women talking
victory although with light weight, th TOP FLIGHT (O'Neil) 120 Ibs OPENING OF THE WIMBLEDON TENNIS TOURNAMENT: |c{ which begin on the league! In an Alle Bridgetow
“September Song” can easily . be MBHAVAL. HANDICAP Drobny beats Frenchman: Drobny who plays for Egypt shakes principle on Sunday i fing We iletene their planning
put down as the horse of the meet- C Class — 1 Mile, 130 Yards hands with C. Gr dit e after he had won their match in pool begins with mat*hes in And this is what t sit
ing and the best horse in the| Jt, SILVER BULLET (O'Neil) 130 Ibs the opening of the Tournan at Wimbledon on June 26th. Municipal Stadium e becween Girl let us get the childrer
ang and the b Horse in the| eng LEADING ARTICLE (Crossley) . children now will pay
West Indies today at sprinting 120 Ibs brazil and Sweden id in thik

‘Bowbells” ran against poor op-| 2% BROWN JACK (Reid) 121 Ibs Pacaembu Stadium Pauk W I get one for Robert

siti i ad ~wiil ag | ath CORONADO (Lattimer) 110 4. 4 Tbs + between Spain and Uruguay And you get ¢ for Joe
position but shouldered her 136 Time: 1. min,. S68. sec N ‘ -— bP Wi.y tht lh
Ibs: well, showing no signs of COLONY HANDICAP .) / ~} At least 100,000 fan re ex Girt eeaspe going flow
dying at the finish. In fact, she} , wih cree ae Furlonss ee Or < ; = S pected in Rio, while it is thought
came from behind to finish very} ena FIRST FLIGHT 1c. I selineaet: re that the Pacaembu Stadium will Now y + oa etna st Nght

p Y ’ na : as a four pe ds raig
strong, drawing away more in the) |. sintaTURE ir 110 Ibs, e be filled to its capacity; Ana we can get the eildren
style of a stayer than a sprinter.|{f, runioso maar oom 122 Ibs r . We score ce-horse” rate
But “September Song” went to the Time: 1 min. 218 secs am Ons 1 e Flavio Costa, manager of the Joe Tere wri skid Ma Weer
front early and try as she could, P teiaet oS Brazilian team, also told Reuter That'll put us in a hoéle
the very fast “Lady Pink sgt ist STORM GIFT ‘Lattimer) 125 Ibs 4 + : that it tte =P = Se ey fet RP Pan coce leh Nao penne
16 Tbs. less, could not catch him.| 2nd PHARLITE (Lowe) 105 4. 9 Ibs Mi I li M 2 were after 1ey certainly were And aclice self contra

’ , 3rd BLUE STRE Newman) 137 Ibs ry attle
He literally ran them silly att oe y Ye iy 7 ars ia tsses entu not going into battle to win at Let's keep ourselves from trouble
Another noticeable fact about 7 5 mins. § seca . - all costs | Don't get catch in the snare
--—~ —- —_—_——— In Good Battin Dis la The championships hitherto had aoe _— ba Shees lister
' ey the sign “beware
15 ne Zs ip Ly been played in a keen sporting

THE SRD We AY TO ROVER spirit before a sporting crowd | And Robert "twill be bette

pera rere z ae ‘ y and his te yere not going to be If you will settle down

: AS : ; a NORTHAMPTON, July 8. hn naa ae algtersingthint Don't look around for trouble

4 < : h ‘ . ANS s 5 § peac ; ie &
Bee oe 1 given a fine start by the opening partnership of as P At midnight, in Bridgetown

0 by Jeff Stoll

he day,

meyer and Roy Marshall, the West Indies
never succeeded in striking their usual high rate of scoring

Throughout Northamptonshire bowled accurately |to be drawn out much about thc

Costa said he hoped the Brazil
ian team would not let down their oo, Woe ea
‘ . APs ae aed ill come out in the ligh
millions of supporters. He refused And eighty shillings weekly
Will draw yo belt too tight

jother teams, If they reacned tx






Just pure water
and a measure
of k TAA









| yf } says ELSIE the BORDEN cow |
| ‘ I re {
yy ’
i ‘ f
| : : {
| ife \
i Ik is

| 4 bn ur oo

£ VER
|.

|

nantes



KIWIS RICH WAXES
keep feather supple
and in perfect con-
dition od give a

gleaming bine

. ° .
The Qualitey Shoe Potion |
Nine colours available : (iW! BLACK, DARK
TAN, MID TAN, TAN, !ROWN, OX BLOOD
& MAHOCA’Y—with BLUE & TRANSPARENT
especially for Ladies’ Shoes.



reas

Datrtbutors THE GENERAL AGENCY CO. (BAN N\U0S) LTD. P.O. BOX 27, BRIDGFTOWN

and fielded keenly with Freddie Brown, the captain, setting
a splendid example and they succeeded in keeping the
touring team to under a run a mirute. W.I. scored 348 for
5 in the day’s play
As it was, many of the runs, flagging bowlers and the fielders
were scored by daring running The teams were; —
between the wickets and much of Northamptonshire:—B rookes

the interest for « crowd of over | Oldfield Livingston, Barron,
10,000 came from attempts of the Jakeman, Brown, Brice, Nutter,





fleldsmen notably Jackson and Broderick, Garlick, Fiddling

Brown to run out the batsmen West Indies: Stollmeyer,
Jackson secured a notable victim, Marshall, Worrell, Trestraii,
a magnificent throw from the off Christiani Gomez, Goddard,
boundary dismissing Frank Worrel! Williams Johnson, Ramadhin,

as he tried a second run. Marshall
failed by only one run to scort
his second century on successive
Saturday

Pierre

The Play

Stollmeyer and Marshall had to

fa: Wa by far the more | Proceed cautiously against the
vas ) a 1e nore

sear : : 7 winging ball when Nutter and

adventurous in the opening stand Brice were bowling, and only

and hit fourteen fours by stron
driving and cutting, usually
excellently STnaee . ‘ half hour f

Although blessed several tim« Se bes Belay ye ink
with luck, Marshall played a fine cohen ae a eames wae enick
innings. Stollmeyer's innings of Pore Be had. : | a
seventy, provided a strong con- ‘° carry to Livingston at secont
trast for he hit the ball to the Slip and a later snick off the same
boundary only once, with his fir bowler dropped clear,
scoring stroke. He also gained five The batsmen began to score
from an overthrow, but most o!!â„¢ore freely, but keen fielding and
his runs came from carefully| “ght bowling restricted the runs
placed singles Yet he was never} to 38 in the first hour.
badly outpaced by Marshall. Sto Stollmeyer began to score well
meyer provided a model of stylish | with legside strokes off Nutter and
defensive iy. Late in the day |the scoring rate increased, forty-—
Christiani gave a good display, his | {our being added in the last halt
quick footed driving of the slow |)our before lunch, Brown, leg
bowlers being particularly effec- | break bowler, relieved Nutter and
tive. Even so, many of the honours | Marshall square cut one short
of the day remained with the un @ On Page 11

twelve runs were made in the first





SHIRLEY MAY FRANCE: Channel swimmer

London Kxrpress Servica














Over 50.000
people buy them
every week

British-made handwound
Smiths Alarms are the pop-
ular choice because they are
outstanding in their reliabil

ity, style and value. There

‘Finals, they
declared

It was announced
F.LF.A. will award
medals to each member of the
winning team, But there are
huge financial rewards, especially
in the case of the Brazilians, for
whom victory might mean as
much as £20,000

Andreis Ramirez, mariager of
the Spanish team, told Reuter
that his team would already re
ceive a present for beating Eny-
land and reaching the Finals, and
there Was more to come, thi
amount depending on gate money
and how the team fared

He stressed however that hi
players were playing for the hon
our of becoming world champions
and not for the cash they migh
set o1

must be good, he

today that
solid gold












Improve Your

Writing in a

If you are interested in a

you are ‘invited to apply for
issued by the Regent lastitute

This informative
world-famous Postal Course

ment within a few hours. It
expression

“The small fee I had: to pay
investment I have ever made

}
&

English for business, professional and

bookle

tuition is so planned that ye

,” writes @ student.
the subjects covered by the booklet are the following :—

It is your very contrades
To give thetr feeling vent
Increase the hildren money
By one hundred per cent

And as the



ual custom





No matter v you pal
The Vestry will feed children
They do it every day

So boys just think this over
It will be better by far
To stay h after sunset
With a bott fi & R



sponsored by
J&R BAKERIES

makers of

ENRICHED BREAD

and the blenders of

nnteptetin teees

»)

VISIT the beauty spot of the island
EDGE WATER
BATHSHEBA

This newly erected modern hotel is situate
most picturesque part of the island.

TELEPHONE 95276 FOR RESERVA'PIONS
Rooms with or without private bath etc. We
in Fish and Lobster Luncheons. — Wel! Stocked tor

‘ee
HMOrkKs

ama
La (vet

Specialise
pecralinse























something





Yeast-Vite

Because of its valu-
able tonic properties

to feel brighter, look
better, sleep more
easily and enjoy more
(energy. Next time

you want pain relief
_ take Yeast-Vite and
get tonic benefit too!










THERE’S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

Yes!—Yoast-Vite
quickly soothes away
headaches, neuralgia,
nerve and rheumatic
pains —but it does



else too!

helps you







































Be a Master
of English



Speech and

few Hours

quiring a command of good
social purposes,
a copy of “Word Mastery,”

t describes the Institute’s
in Effective English. The
u gain noticeable improve-
is now widely récognised as

providing the best means of enabling ambitious men and
women to develop the power of ready and attractive
and to avoid errors in speech and writing

for the Course is the best
Among



PAINTS
by
LEWIS BERGER
(Great Britain) Lid.

GAALAITIUENAL ETT LAE
For Galvanised,

asbestos, or shin-
gled roofs ----

JASITIA

UN






YES, it’s true..

8 out of 10 American dentists
say—IPANA dental care promotes



glad to own one!

100% BRITISH MADE



AVAILABLE FROM YOUR
LO@GAL SMITHS CLOCKS STOCKISTS



are models to suit all tastes
in delightful shades to match
any bedroom furnishings. Be

What Good English Means to You,

| You are Judged by the Way You Speak and Write.
| Better English—Better Pay,

Can You Write a Good Letter?

Free Test of Your English.

| The Social Value of Good English.

] The Art of Public Speaking,

j Your English and Your Future.
|

















WRITE TO-DAY FOR A FREE COPY OF

“WORD MASTERY”

Decide at once that you will rid
hancieap that poor English imposes. The study requires
but little time, and the moderate fee puts this unique
Course within the reach of everyone. Al) correspondence
is confidentia!

Send to-day for a free copy of “WOkis MASTERY,”
which gives full information abe *t the Effective English
Course, including the special arrangements for overseas
students, Applications should be addressed to The Regent
Institute (Dept. 501), Regent House, Palace Gate, Lon-
don, W. 8. England.

yourself of the



Don’t delay, Your English is all-important to you, ané
you cannot afford to neglect it.

Write for this interesting booklet NOW—while you
think of it. There is no obligation.

T ) « omi i 1 !
eve if Barb
It r ey '
ff. Stocked in B Or
nteed P em ¢
. ri other Colour
Obtainuble at. the followings |
H Stor
| 1ER co



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO, LTD Bridgetowr Sele Affent

|



HMMM





PAGE SIX









John Ruskin: His Influence On The
Fine Arts In The Nineteenth Century





































By Wilfrid



Hlunt

SUNDAY















ADVOCATE



Record Review

_ For Opera
Lovers













Hy MARY

LONDON, June 29.









BURNETT

by the Mongols, who in the























ISLAMIC ART § leah sud











SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950
















t if y 1 ible. for us to appreciate A a— age was — ome meet oe China = 1
ee ane ereee Mee ae oy > veneration in which Ruskin was held in England By Robert Tredinnick Museum. It consists of exhibits the is, phoenix and the dragon, |
during most of the latter hi { the nineteenth century. A representing various periods of ippeared’ on pottery gla : |
few of the older generation do, indeed, remember with ARLOPHONE have issued aq the art of Islam—from Asia, North m« work, even in =aypt, whose |
what bated breath his name was*once spoken; how his most set of eight records particular Ai ens cr a eine valwe ee withstood the Mongol :
> t c oY P re 3S B > a i c c an .
casual utterances carried the weight of an ex cathedra pro- interest to lovers of opera sa tak Wteabern etiam The fourth phase of the art ot |
ROYNCEMENT. Seven of the eight records are Painted in a dull turquoise grey Islam covers the 16 and 17 cen- |
One who knew him personally, overtaken the Primit-ves of ( wh arias sung by famous and with light mosaic floor, this turies The chief powers reign
and who acc panied him on his Florence and Siena. But though Iti 1 artists —- Guianna Peder- new collonaded section makes a ing in the Islamic world, were
last visit to France, has told rtists such as Sir Thomas Law~- int, Ebe Stignani, Cloe Elmo, formal and quiet setting for the the Cttoman Turkish sultans in|
of the suspense and eager ici- rence, Turner and Etty warmly Lina Pagliughi, Onelia Fineschi, carpets and other exhibits in rich Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt, and
pation which preceded the publi- admired Tintoretto, the general Galliano Masini and Cesare and colourful variety the Safavid kings i Rersia. Tol
catior e earn me nUmD public lagged be hind; Tintoretto Siepi, with the Orchestra Sinfon- In 750 A.D., when the Om- this comparatively late period|
Fors ( F re the was still a “painter's painter ica Della Radio Italiana and mayad line of Caliphs gave way belong the earliest Islamic te 2
mighty fallen! For if Ruskin has it was Ruskin who exposed the the Orchestra Sinfonica Dell ‘Kiar to the Abbasid and the capital tiles that have survived i 1
latterly 1 ed some Measure false doctrines of critics such as (Parlophone R. 30001-7). moved East from Damascus to condition, and the Museum cg@l-
pepe. rene no more “ns Ruger. Clawsywer 2, Paneing) « Baghdad, a distinct form of Isla- lection of them is extremely rich
a social ref er or a dictator of and opened the eyes of travellers These recordings are good, bu: mic art began to emerge. This The Safavid velvets, silks and
ne = : in UL ne 1 find the eighth disc of out- developed in four distinct stages, carpets—which for many people
commands our interest and atten- Renaissance in Venice standing quality. On this Gino the first lasted from the 9th till are the most familiar and appeal-
tion when Ruskin the Prophet Today: the ert Rite Eee — Marinuzzi conducts a chorus and about the end of the llth century. ing of all the forms of Islamic
without hon : his library surrounded by boxes JOHN RUSKIN the Orchestra Sinfonica Dell’Eiar It was, perhaps, the curiosity art—together with the painted
1 May, 1843, a “Graduate of of photographs. The world’s art in Go Thoughts On Golden Wings aroused by imported Chinese tilepanels and wooden doors from
[ae ac weeneagaer anpaymoun)s ip at ‘his elhows, fa. few eo ry (Nabucco) and O Signore, Dal porcelain that encouraged the Isfahan, show work of great lux
first volume of a long work he can lay his hand upon bes THE CRUCIFIX ‘etto| Natio (I Lombardi Alla native potters from Baghdad and uriance.
was one day to yen pi quate porenaaene of or ad Prima Crociata) by Verdi, Samarra during this period to Famed Carpet
name famou aE OUsR OSS eas opus of an artist be nose etal . FISH This is as finely balanced a begin the fruitful Islamic tradi- The ‘carpet from the tomb of |
sl tah facta Huakih was hardly known in hacat = ; piece of recording as anyone tions of fine glazed wares which the Safavid family at Ardabil, is OR
eee oes is century ago. it ae anh ae The skull of the crucifix fish has could wish to hear. The first work form one of the principal sections one of the largest and most fam-! I ‘
A Oars rt = ae iy, ease ol ealicn onint- ang been venerated as a charm is a favourite of Housewives’ of this permanent collection at the o.; in the world An ins ription OQ. Py - ‘3
himatenitie, tho Ge . on Needed’ Cenitiae tthe against danger and sea-sickness. Choice, but this new recording is Victoria and Albert Museum an this carpet which hangs in the (: Ek ‘
wan th eee of the teks ne aenent aaeeeee nes a It is often found in the coastal »iuch better than that so far used _ Broadly speaking, the character- Museum in a monster frame| Jw ¢ WHE g
“Purner. Turner had been 4ittle. of his youthful out; surings (°WS of South America hung on by the BBC. istic of this first phase, is the us¢ yeads: | ig
r, surnet hoes Mls pisie: OF. Te Ye ie _ dio the wall in place of a crucifix. On of heavy stylised ornament, | r
al Academician for mi he himself lived to regret, and 1© the bones of the roof of the mouth (Parlophone R. 30008). heraldically posed human and ‘I have-no refuge in the 4ND as
forty years, he wag nc ye amend. Moreover, his confusion (° 113. crucifix or sea catiish can In the summer of 1947 the Phil- animal figures which, however, world other than thy thresh- AIVL A
“discovery” of Ruskin’s In 2 of morals and aesthetics led him |, seen a crucified figure with a /armonia Orchestra’ conducted Jack any sense of movement. hold, my head has no protec- De |
sense that ceftain Traliag coke ‘o many false conclusions. halo. Once this symbol has been by Nikolai Malko gave a terrific There are, too, the very hand- tion other than this porchway. | R (- ? > |
were +0. be rf wee a hin, But Ruskin did not only rescue recognised, other bones are performance of part of the Suite some inscriptions in the angular The work of the slave of this | um C Uhle :
De tee. os Sates Rus- Certain Old Masters from oblivion j ought into the picture. If the No. 1 of Khachaturian’s Gayaneh writing krfown as Cufic. Holy place, Maksud of Sashan_ | 1
Cee eee ee ee a eas usly 22d one of his older contempora- . 111) is turned over, the breast- Ballet music including the now . in the year of 946’. | ;
kin’s service, not 1p grac “i ola vies from misunderstanding; the joie and spear of a Roman sol- famous Saber Dance. This month Elegant Decoration The 18th and 19th centuries saw | oe ib,
eae we oe tc timely support which he gave to die are visible On sheiciin the you can hear some of the Suite The second phase of Islamic art everywhere a general decline} AGENTS: Le (é
ae sy Ne amie ie the Pre-Raphaelites enabled these skull the e ar ‘stones rattle. th e No. 2 played by the New York covers the 12th and 13th centuries. from earlier artistic standards | ify
the splendid, glowing ha en ae young men—for we must never digas rit thich the» ldiers ‘iat Philharmonic Symphony Orches- New vitality had been brought Furopean influence is conspicu I M B MEYERS & (0 LTD 18
of | Turner's . so-called A oa forget how very young they were I te ¥ mt th " ‘ ae ates tra conducted ‘by. Efrem Kurtz into the Islamic world by the ous in the enamelled decoration de Vie oe WER B REe. ware! m4 ° xr
period In 1851 avlsisiny tyr -to weather the storm that broke ae or e@ garments of Our interpeeta ti taaitiateios Ea invading Turks, people from the of the Guilder and heaves aclia ‘
ee A ae tank ag nad over their heads in 1850. Ruskin 7 q t the fist 1789 well recorded. Personally I vould Khirgiz steppes in Central Asia gold dish presented to the British 3 a
the year 1845, tne ong who Was not, as has sometimes been ican ena a Sn in 780 ike to hear the Phitharmonia Who established a series of prin- Ambassador and the East India Se Z
believe that those De ae {> said, instrumental in any way in states: When the bones of the i a re the, Philharmonia, Cipalities all over the Near East. Company by Fath Ali Shah. o! aoe
only like his early pic ESS, ao the foundation of the Brother- ®€4ad are separated, each repre- anc Malko — tac e this secon Decoration af this. period {9 Persia in 1819 . These are two “S s 99 d Il h .
not, in fact, like him at all. They hood in 1848 indeed, he at first Sets some or of the instruments suite if only because they did elegant and subtle, filled with 4 of the valuable | less lovely oaping ulIS alr —
like that which is essen- ©) cameos Y 6 the ;, of the Passion of Our Redeemer, such a fine job with the first gan , “ of the valuable but less lovely ;
do not s entire power is reacted unfavourably to its work, 2 : ie 7 . f keen sense of movement and a objects on show.
ee a oietures Having, at the Royal Academy forming spear, cross, nails, etc (CoD re SERA wealth of sensitive detail. From Calligraphy is one of the chief
re et enacts at the time Exhibition of 1850, to be “literally | At the Museum on special ex- qy.oy magnificent soprano, Kir- the 12th century onwards, there anq most characteristic forms of
oie blic and the press dragged up to the Millais picture hibition from Saturday is the 6. piagstad, sings three of developed the characteristic Jslamic art. This exhibition is of? e
I Pt Satdlanaet tas aire of of ‘The Carpenter’s Shop’, which skull and spine of this eeerae Grieg’s songs in Norwegian— ‘damascened’ metalwork, in which disappointing in the specimens ri /
are ee ‘Vindication of Turner | had passed disdainfully.” But oi the crucifix clearly Freart Wounds, Thanks For Thy designs engraved in a brass base | or rather lack of specimens of /, VN :
was Ruskin’s first service to art; "0 sooner had he espoused its visible. Counsel. and A Dream, but I are enriched with an inlay of) [slamic lettering and book illus-
f it was achieved by some rather cause than he became a powerful | ooo ore than offset. by the wonder way Mme. Flagstad does gold, silver and copper. __ | trations on view . e
injudiciods. mud-slinging at great ally. Letters to The Times, pam~ unfortunate influence of the them to av orchestral accom- _ Another individual art, whicu| Architecture is another of the
painters such as Claude, we must Phlets and lectures were oa latter style on English architec- paniment. The accompaniment of flourished chiefly in ye ge Islamic claims to artistic fame : oS
plead in extenuation the youth- a) ue Poel Seek atte ae ture in the second half of the the Philharmonia conducted by Page Hie a Saree an | It is sad that no exhibition could
fulness of the author and the Whose fortunes a nineteenth century Venetian Warwick Brathwaite gives the #888. Hanging = tamps ~, ; show the magnificent domes ane
: ta Seta warm advocacy of the acknowl- , aia ay A c oi aa a ; , mosques are very rare today.| the formal, classic gardens which
fervour of his beliefs. lias ir sigh ae ares Dic Gothic, superimposed upon the soloist excellent support, but the With the sentic of the col-| :
The first volume of Modern pop a star elec ra tae Gothic Revival, grew and spread songs should be sung with piano vente r. ye ta Sie sits, | still stand, reminding us of one
Painters, its author tells a pe Ske ied tn Cacterenae” es till its ubiquity became nauseat- only (H.M.V. DB. 21020.) er the Sainte and aN art ie | Of the great periods in world art |
ritte: “i sreat haste anda oe. c ing even to its greatest admirer: a4 oR ees | |
ve Naeuiee: B + tie successor, English art; it is, however, a very re oe oa influence’, Giuseppe Vandengo, with the claimed to be the world’s finest.
which appeared in 1846, dif- pleasant backwater, as many are }., Jaments, “on nearly every New Symphony Orchestra con- A large marble hvetn roms
fered ffom it in tone and finding today, and we cannot but cheap villa-builder between this cucted by Alberto Erede. gives a Hama in Syria is, pet ape, the |
in subject matter. Among its be grateful to Ruskin for his help 444 3romley; and there is most satisfactory performance of Most notable piece of Is ami ait gigs
heroes were Fra Angelica, Giotto, in preserving it for us. scarcely a public-house near the tne Prologue to I Pagliacci. He Sculpture in a Western exhibition | eep i wi ,
and Tintéretto. Ruskin’s champi- It is probably in the field of Crystal Palace but sells its gin has a fine sense of the dramatic My Chinese Moti Ss SHADEINE |
onship of the Italian Primitives architecture that Ruskin’s influ- 4nq bitters under pseudo-Vene- sand there is beauty and resonance The third phase, which SOV EES nian: eer }
was of immense importance. In ence has been most baneful. He tian capitals copied from the jn his voice. (Deeca X. 303). the 14th and 15th centuries, shows] jnQ°hurmices, All |
the days before photography, the opened his campaign with the Church of the Madonna of Health _. how contacts between the Near] natural tints. 50 years’
general public was in the matn publication in 1849 of The Seven oy of Miracles. And one of my —L.E.S | and Far East had been facilitatec | reputation. Ask your chemist to ob-
familiar with works of art only Lamps of Architecture, the book principal notions for leaving my tain some for you from his Whwlesaler.
through engravings. With the in which he first revealed the present house is that it is sur- : aa ) THE SHADEINE COMPANY
best will in the tae the oes = the i : ot rounded everywhere by the 49 Churchfield Road, Acton, London,
mgraver could give little more Oxford”. It has been described) accursed Frankenstein ‘monsters Ja ; Sey oF betes! .
ee the general composition of as “the first treatise in English to of, indirectly, my own making.” | : ; Nes soaping your hale with even finest
~ a picture; texture of paint, colour teach us the significance of archi- The Seven Lamps, however, : es liquid or cream shampoos hides its natural
\ (or at any rate finesse of colour- tecture as national autobiogra- was the starting-point for a| RUPTURE lustre with dulling soap film.
ing) and subtlety of draughts- phy”. Of the closing passage of movement which has had a wide- | ean desl oe uth os tae es
manship were alike sacrificed. “the Lamp of Sacrifice”, Frederick spread and an admirable influence | RELIEF af oy sticky A
Ruskin’s enthusiasm aroused in- Harrison wrote: “No man of on Britain’s national life. I refer, nothing to dull your hair’s natural lustre. With
terest in the works of many feeling, who has in him the echoes of course, to the famous passage Chousands of ruptured men and women your very first shampoo, Halo brings out shim-
Italian painters little known in of this funeral sermon, can stand on “restoration”, beginning “Do 1ave found instant relief by wearing a mering highlights. Its fragrant lather rinse
Britain it was due largely to before a great medieval cathedral pot let us talk then of restoration. | Cashier Air Cushion Appliance. tL A Et . e-tener 2 $
his propaganda that the National without being conscious that it The thing is a Lie from beginning eo 7 ight, strong and easily washed, it holds SRY PCY AB kind of water — needs no
Gallery acquired many important has gained for him a new mean- to end ” The Society for the, ml Xl ty ue hernia with such gentle firmness that after-rinse. For hair that’s lustrous, use Halo,
works. Travellers to Italy visited ing, a sublimer pathos”. Yet in protection of Ancient Buildings | rroken tissues have increased chances of
the galleries with new eyes and this book we encounter again (Morris's “Anti-Scrape’”’), adum- | I a pl 1 re For full details and Free Booklet write _ AMERICA’S BIGGEST SELLING SHAMPOO
fresh ideas. The Arundel ore! Ruskin’s refusal to submit to the prated by Ruskin in 1854 and | ) | iD a I S( yn I AS) to | In America, Halo outsells all other shampoos. The reason? American
founded in 1849 for the reproduc- accepted boundaries between yealised by Morris in 1877, and , women have proved only Halo gives hair such natural radiance.
tion in colour of paintings, morals and aesthetics. “Was the Ruskin’s aah St. George’s Guild IMPERIAL LEATHER 6 LINDEN BLOSSOM e BLUE HYACINTH BEASLEY’S LTH, Hept. 190 .
largely Italian, by the best pro- carver happy while he was about were the inspirations which lay 4 Cork Street, London, W.1, England HALO reveals the hidden beauty ol your hair
cesses available at the time, was jt?” he asks respecting ornament; behind the foundation by Octavié jo * :
one of the many results of his jf not, it will lack life. “The Hill of the National Trust — ne wrt ypreelaoncguob sessed ieieiaatiaeniae, é y
tireless enthus'asm; though these condition is absolute”, he adds. (Morris always acknowledgec eee
prints were still very imperfect But it was after the publication of that Ruskin was “the first-comer
(they had to be made from water- The Stones of Venice (1851—53) the inventor” whom he was proud Py Py
colour copies), they introduced that the disastrous effects of cer- to follow). Whenever we are
many works wholly unknown in tain of Ruskin’s architectural tempted to feel that some aspect
Britain. views first began to be felt; for of Ruskin’s influence on art o
The art of Venice, and that of whatever benefits were bestowed architecture has been
Tintoretto in enigeee “ee en by the attention drawn to Vene-
) suffered the full eclipse that hac



4li

You can always depend
on the natural creamy
flavour of
QD A [Ti pine rasittios min

A ec TOMed

Alka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief

Alka-Seltzer gives you the quick
relief you want PLUS the alka-
lizer you need when overeating
causes excess gastric acidity. Drop
one or two tablets in a glass of
water — watch it fizz, then drink it
down. It’s reliable First Aid. Pleas-
ant-tasting. Not a laxative: Alka-
Seltzer makes you feel fine fast.

INS







Tubes of



unfortun
; ate, let us remember with grati
tian Byzantine and Gothic, they tude this enduring legacy

Crankcaso draj































ensures
healthy cows yielding rich milk and of
a consistent flavour throughout the year.
This rich, wholesome milk is packed under
the most hygienic conditions so that all
the natural vitamins and creamy flavour

nm
f lushed with Nes fen
ae ai jetted with 5
- oO c
MOTOR on, S90 EXTRA
Users have marvelled at the consistent MILES LABORATORIES, INC, Lihahihe heh iilihhhieadtiibedtieiie!
creamy flavour of “Oak” brand powdered
milk. “How is it” they ask, “that through- eS Also Dependable Esso Luby, . -
out the year “Oak” milk powder can be Chassis servicg on bUbri¢ation Gnd chmploty
distinguished by the same delightful fla- mission and differen
vour?” The secret is simple. The cows drained and refilled it!
producing the milk from which “Oak” rs \ £580 XP Compound,”
brand milk is prepared are fed all the e ss) | bie
year round on the rich sunny grasslands i; s
of Hunter Valley, Australia. Th:

bl bleh ltl bate Li |

We can now supply you with the following in
Earthenware —

Get EXTRA Protection...

are retained. “Oak” dissolves readily in MIXING BOWLS (in various sizes *
water and is ideal for drinking, Coffee, ( ) EXTRA Economy —with New
Cocoa, Ete. TEA POTS do. a
m’t worry over mounting milk bills.
ak” brand milk powder with its exeel- TEA CUPS

ent price value allows you and your family
to milk freely

Esso EXTRA Motor Oil!

Unequalled “High Viscosity Index”
keeps lubricating value under extreme
heat of steady driving... flows quickly
when engine is cold. You use less oil...
get longer mileage! ‘

agra Ingredient Added! Special de-

TANKARD JUGS (in various sizes)
MEAT PLATTERS do.

PLATES—Deep and Shallow
DISHES
SAUCE BOATS

3 Lb. Tins $2.43

tergent fights power-robbing carbon and
varnish deposits. Enjoy a cleaner,
smoother-running engine... with

wear and tear! Here’s something emtra
* for your money!

Drive in today for an Esso Extra ott shagge

Your
OAK
@

, -dDRIED
FULL'CREAM

And many others too numerous to mention.

es NOW OBTAINABLE AT = cemanecenatreats

Alleyne Arthur & Co., Ltd. Grocery Knights Ltd (City Pharmacy)
and Provision Knights Ltd. (People’s Pharmacy)

Pay Us a Visit before Purchasing Elsewhere.



ILKé







A) Ashby & Medford Ltd Perkins & So., Ltd.
a teat tas Bookers (B’dos) Drug Stores Ltd, Pitcher Connell & Co., Ltd (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
tethers w» | M .E .R .Bourne & Co W. A. Medford & Co
us au. A .A Browne. Harold Proverbs & Co
aot Saniuet aubbe. Sie eee © 3 | e barbados Hardware (0. {
S. E. Cole & Co., Ltd Stansfeld, Scott & Co., Ltd e | 8 .
H. P. Harris Bruce Weatherhead Ltd |

Hinds Drug Store



| Nos 33 &52 SWAN STREET PHOWE 2109, 3534 or 4406

uw J,



WILLIAMS MARKETING 90., LTD.—Sole Asont

{HE ESSO SIGN
|



R. M, JONES & CO,, LTD—Distributors,





SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1956

What Happened To 1 he tee

THREE SMART

MILLIONS OF FILM FANS
ENVIED THEM, UNTIL—






































pia te vedic t
ree Sr Le
Fourte i icdic : ow
l She wa e na cc -
utr 1c cialised 5,000,000 childre:
Jean were laying with Shirley Temple 1
iva 20,000,000 ere wearing 2
Off- >e1 Temple ribbons er ee
€ et
eed Th May Durbin and Frances
: M l va)
) played
le as tar
i i i ) ‘
ount a short called bvery
La veek Miss Garland woun Sunday”, in which she appeared
€a her c ir t of pique with another child singer, Judy
M Durbin 1 idder away i varland once France G im
( nursing her voice and «
wing avoirdupois. 1938
Miss Temple sitting alon< THE year 1938 was vintage for JUDY (new :
her Hollywood play-roon ur- these little Judy Garl Marriage—Divorce—Marriage.
rounded 1,500 dolls and the §0t herself a mink coat, and
ruins of her marriage put on a film conveyor belt that
What happened to these three Was late rves
ttle rich girls for Star Roone}
rn should? he was going owards th
\ce my Awa she was later to
929 win She was tireless, worked
WE start St. George’s Day nd played hard
1929, when the wife of Mr. Temple ‘ M.G.M. were certain that in her
a California bank manager, gave "/¢y bad an answer to Miss Dur-
birth to a daughter yin, Miss Temple, and the de-
Elsewhe re, n California Edni pression
May, seven-year-old daughter of Miss Temple had nothing to fear DEANNA (now 28) :
Mr. and Mrs. Durbin. Lancashire- Yet-. President Roosevelt had re- Marriage—Divorce—MGrTiigeee
born immigrants from Canada, ceived her. She earned £3,400 ir ivorce,
was taking singing lessons. Neigh- tWo weeks just by endorsing a nen oe ‘ rae eee, me
bours said her voice ounded fine ee Eror es Wizard of Cx” she took
she ought t have a screen test Like Miss Durbin her studio 0Ul @ college correspondence
And. hhofind it with her stets . ieclared to be £2,000,000, COUTSE.
on the vaudeville stage, was four- hen her milk-teeth fell out Miss Durbin, _by 1940, was the
year-old Frances Gumm, daughter the studio gave her false ones only star [eae and ‘Increasing
cf Frank and Ethel Gumm, actor Elsewhere in the Hollywood #€! pre-war fame
She too had a future. Everyone giitter-bowl Miss Durbin was en- IMAL
aid cluding France joying 5s. a week “pocket money’
vhile Mr. and Mrs. Durbin banked WHILE Miss Temple was busy
19 t the thousan on her behalf with exercise books, Misse Durkin
MR. and Mrs. Temple were first 2 and Garland were busy with their
off the mark In 1933 they enter- 1939 Brat husbands. . }
ed Shirley in a contest to find © IN 1939 the three girls were _ / the spring of 1941 both an-
hild actor for the film “Stand Up hardly off the set. Miss Garland nounced their ae 5S
nd Sing.’ was acting ging, and dancing ‘ousand people waited outside =
The studio personnel listening fyriou ‘ ern een ie ‘he v a
to her stood up and cheered, Holly- Miss Temple was calculated t« rt "we om 7 - 7S
ood had found a child genius be worth 142 times her weight in producer aughan Pau
ith golden curls (all 62 finger- gold In July Miss Garland went to
rolled by Mrs. Temple), a chubby Miss Durbin, growing into a Nevada and quietly married the
mile, a voice like a junior angel personal young woman, was going band-leader Dave Rose
> up and down the scales with dollar Both marriages lasted two years
1936 bills floating from every note Within a few Months of each other
WITH a three-year start on the Came the war Eleven-year-old each was thinking of filing suit
other two smart girls, Miss Temple Mis. Temple quit the films and for divorce While Japanese
had a box-office appeal higher started as a junior at Westlake prisoners declared they weren't at
than Garbo’s in 1936. More than School. She had made, they said war with Miss Durbin, she was
200 million people paid to see her. about £4,000,000 in films, either for accusing Vaughan of mental
Her estimated earnings had reach- ferself or someone else The cruelty
cd £250,000 money was invested, everything It took Miss Garland a little
Everybody knew she liked eat- was fine longer to make up her mind,
ing broiled steak, playing with her Miss Garland took up educa- Miss Durbin also got off to her





THIS

WEEK'S GUESS STARS







AMF litcontains. 0:07.
FLIT IS AN @ssoc) PRODUCT

SUNDAY



GIRLS

secouud marriage first, this time to
troducer Felix Jackson. 20 years
Per senior Seven months later
Miss Garland announced that she
would marry her director Vincent
Minelli—then 32, and eleven years

her senior.
1945

MEANWHILE what of Miss
femple’ Havirg ceceived the best
Westlake could offer she was being
groomed by Selzwick for adult
roles. .

In 1945 she, too. began to ex-
periment with thoughts of mar-
riage—to a young army P.T. in-
structor, John Agar aged 24. He
had written her fea letters since
she was so high

Gone wag al) the childhood
glamour. The three smart girls
had now to stand up under a less
sentimental scrutiny

Miss Durbin, however, was stil!
carning something like £100,000 a
year, Miss Garland £75,000. Yet
the zenith was perhaps past.

1946
ONE day in January 1946 both
Miss Garland and Miss Durbin
booked a room n the same
maternity hospital, Jessica Louise

Jackson was born in February,
Liza Minelli in March

Miss Durbin’s film career was
practically completed

Miss Garland’s was to enter,its
most temperamental, cruellest
phase

Miss Temple’s success was to be

nothing like the forecast.

The Durbin second marriage
worked no better than the first.
The same might be said for Miss
Gartand’s

And Miss Temple, who had
married in hope of “a really
Fappy permanent marriage like
mummy's and daddy’s”, found
that Mr. Agar had film ambitions,

end did not like to be called “Mr
Shirley Temple.”

She said that he got drunk and
tnat he said she was no fun be-



ADVOCATE



Rupert and Mi randa—JT



Rupert walks on and on, and
gradually .eealises that he has lost

us way. At that moment a sound
eaches him and he stops anxiously.
That's Miranda's voice, and
eleve she's crying!" he thinks.
What can be the matter?" In
waxiety to find where he is he

Children

a ») JOSE was eccentric and

left an odd will Under his
will his eldest son received four
sheep and half the remainder oi
the flock, the second son four
sheep and half of those left, and
So on, the youngest son reeeiving

as many sheep as there were son
How many sons and sheep werc
there? .

ge snr
ULAR
roquinu
Say} aay
DION daar
uelAjtos

Husking Time

VARMER Early and his wife
Sarah and son Jim together
ean husk a certain field of corn
in five days Farmer Early and
Sarah can husk it by themselves
in five days, Then how long it
take Jim to husk it by himself,
Supposing his rate of speed re-
mained unchanged?

#1 snid g snd % UOIssesoid
uy punoy st daays jo
ou} pu ‘“SUlOs Ano, aieM
“HOS ORUNON Fy) OF Tet
MOq ‘daays ApXM ‘suos sn0q










crawls through a tunnel and ¢
face to face with a mouse. *
hear the doll, Miranda. Is there @
way into the room where she

he asks, “All our rogme
secret’ panels,’ says the q

Look, there is One just above
head."’

’s Shorts
Weigh This

HAT’S the

of

Jones, the
products

scales
any

smallest number
different weights Mr
itinerant buyer of farm
requires on his balance
to weigh (in level pounds)
weight from one pound to
forty pounds? The weights may
be placed in EITHER pan of the

ales

For your benefit, in setiling the
or'guments, we're providing the
onswer below, but we suggest you
work it out yourself first

ued eyo
}O S40}U0S 403 QoURTEG & se pUNEd euD
124} Fuisn uey ‘ued suo uy punod auo
no Buyten yay AQ Pepys eq Aww

punod omj, “spuned Uaags- HU OU) “Sue came, A[UD ameuy
rie
Weighty Matter
ITH how tew weights is it
possible to weigh any amount
between 1 and 127 on an old
fashioned balance scale’ Only

whole numbers must be consider




ed What will be the denomina-
cause she didn’t get drunk. of T St UoTUM tions of the weights?
o/t uit 6/f X/T FRY) 08 “MOM
ep ouo iJ yo seaquinu .
\ 1949-50 rd Sart oxey earner 10Maaty By the way, if a chicken weighs
IN 1949 Miss Temple came into two pounds plus three-fourths of
her immense fortune. re its own Weight, how much does it
Miss Garland had a_ serious Child n ’s Letter weigh?
nervous breakdown. SIR . bsned ane ee
na vd ; af . ’ Haw vuayoyo eu, spunod pA PXTS
Miss Durbin, ‘without a film for Those to whom I have replied oie omy-A1a1u9 ieneaye ie ‘anos
two years, had put on 20Ib. in have shown me great apprecia. om) ‘U0 Joy-syYIIOM UWACy | does
weight, and was ees —_ tion and likeness for the people of —\ °
going into opera, where perhaps, Trinidad, so | would like you t EK 8 aS
the weight would not seem out of publish for me in your Pen Friend Mit A
piace, column, my gratitude, and thanks, 1 Add remain, avoid, atmos
rom then on, for them all, i o all who wrote me because it is 1ere 1d ¢ “ter, und get still.
K th f th ll, it to all wh t t t phere and a letter, 2 i
was the down-slide. Twice impossible for me to do sa in 2. Add transgression and a
M.G.M, suspended Miss Garland. dividually prophet, and get genuine
She had temperamental fits aor CRUOneS wennes
Unlike Mic Durbin, who de- Thanking you in advance tor gabe oii
clared she would never slim, Miss your kind consideration. New Members
Garland drove herself into a Y I = oak 1
ri sli ours respectfully,
Boston hospital trying to slim. a NOEL BETHEL Joan Jones, Black Rock; Ose ne
Miss Temple’s marriage went Alleyne, Alkins Road, Simmons
through a sordid divorce court. te - : Land; Grace Worrell, 3rd Ave.,
Nothing of the glittering dream { [ A { I Land.
seemed to materialise. Two men lies on 0 Sse s rn i l
brawled over Miss Temple on a : j Pen Pals
solf coursé, Miss Durbin, in Paris, - + Company, ~ fail-
dreamed of playing in “Pygmalion” ed in business, is able to pay a ae ; « Chee ;
if anyone would ask her ~ pecans se : on we dollar. , yen oe oe poncho
And Miss Garland thought, per- Had it been able to collect a cer- 7, s twee ‘ years
t wpe Sus eantbesiin inst ane tain debt of $600 it could have bag mag ae ees ae
a ed edge of a tumbler might paid 28c. on the dollar. So what Ba ‘Hall “St Mick vel. ;
oa wae of solving the prob- Were the liabilities and assets? ; “Ernet tH “Taylor. “G BS.S., St
lems that had come to Hollywood's oov'es George's, Grenada, Eldon Taylor,
three smart girls. Oe de gare dat taee bose, «G-B.SS., Si» deena Grenada,
—JOHN PREBBLE nr, silanuer ap” ieree ot) uo, and Frederick Jacobs, G.B.S.S., St
—LES. jo Q4HD OK} PINON GODS OU, 149. May George's, Grenada
Bem etek es et ene
FOR A SMOOTH, COOL




es
«i
Ng at

AS

we

a
Le

‘Hazeline Snow * does so much for
your skin, Women the world ever
trust it as they do no other aaeety
cream. So magically cooling at all
seasons, so good for treating little
blemishes, never greasy, ‘ Hazeline
Snow’ should be your daily choice.

school shoes.

to grow.

Cc. &), CLARK LTD.,

‘HAZELINE SNOW’

Clarks ‘Playe-Up' range is

real confidence; and then to
stages of toddlerhood until

They are soft,

the beauly cream
that is a ‘treatment’








*‘HAZELINE SNOW’



protects the skin from dust
and dirt... guards against sun
cools the skin immediately
it is applied .. . so refreshing
softens and perfumes the
skin, prevents that shiny look

cleanses thoroughly, gently
«+ + gives @ perfect ‘matt’
foundation for powder

*‘PLAYE-UP”

specially

designed to start first-walkers off with

take them through all the
they graduate to Clarks

flexible and scientifically

planned to give adequate support with room for toes

~ $ANDALS

MADE BY
(WHOLESALE ON

STREET, SOMER o

LOCAL AGENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS







PAGE SEVEN





So beautifully easy...
so essily beautiful



because Brylfoarr’s rich lath unses thoroughly and effort-
lessly, infu: vita into every type of hair Look in your
mirror and cc oh a Brylf hampoo 1 s t
new loveliness to 5 hair pliable a née
it is, too, So easy-ti-use ron l



needs no preparatic
the large econor

there's mor:

BRY

THE ORI GINA!

joam Nt

LPF OAM

SHAMPOO IN A TUSE

° eee ee











Perfume . . .
the loveliest thing
abou! you.















‘The subtle difference between leekiag ‘' your best " —
and beimg beautiful. As wonderful as that, the
differeace {ime perfume makes. Goya's lovely
perfumecs create this miracke for you ... their litting
fragsamoes lcnd enchamtment to everyday occasions
«++ Wearing them you feel-—and asc—alluring.
"Phat you may discover the glamewr of wearing good
cookaaiies all the time Goya presents his fragramces in tiey handbag
phials at only 18 amd in a Gilt size at £2 B,1.
Apply your perfume on your skin-—always use
cneugh fer you to sense



Made in Highest by amd enjoy it.
? oOotA Lalas saw evar fama LONDON ww

Digsritetere s bs L. M, B. Meyers &@ Co, lid, P.O, Boe 171,



ult Fashion Need Not Mean



“'Tex-made”’

alia

i ox-inade”’ fabrics,



High Prices...

SEW YOUR OWN!

You can save as much as half the price. ‘And you and
your children can always look your best .
ind most exciting styles «0s ‘Tex: ‘nade! /4cottons.

fabrics are made by, one ,of fthe; largest
manufacturers of cotton prints in the “world’ Old Colony*
Glenwood, Victoria, Beverly, and [Suzanna prints—in
fashionable and i versatile ‘ps patterns arg aman f *the’most'
nopular, They ‘are easy to han handle and'sewAThey drape

moothly, stay fresh, weal yell nd yasbcasily.

'. ok for the ‘identification bandsan and they Tex- made’”’

ie 6.2 the piece goods. This is your” guaré amtee that the
you buy are the "genuine ’sun-! fast and? ,tub-fast_

“TEX-MADE” 1S WELL,MADE

.jin \ the latest

i tee

Lridgetoscs
















PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS Sp ADVOCATE

Sal SS ees SS Pca
Pablianes by Thy Adveeste Co. .td., 4. Sroad







Sunday, July 9, 1950



Legislation
LEGISLATIVE
considerably in recent years the
measures which require attention of
the Legislature are of so complex a nature
that it is time that the machinery for the
preparation of Bills and other measures
be examined. Too often are Bills intro-
duced which, while sound in principle,
have not had the time devoted to them
which is necessary if good legislation is to
be enacted.

In Barbados the staff of the Attorney
General’s chambers is responsible for the
preparation of all measures introduced by
the government into the Legislature. The
burden of work which is thus thrown on
this department is extremely onerous.
Legal draughtsmanship is perhaps tlye
most difficult branch of legal work and
while it is true that in Barbados it is possi-
ble to use the precedents from the United
Kingdom or the Dominions or Colonies,
yet the adaptation necessary for local con-
ditions is by no means a simple matter on
all occasions.

The Adult Suffrage Bill now before the
Legislative Council appears to have reper-
cussions greater than anticipated by those
who drafted it. The Bill purports to
abolish the qualifications for voting for
members of the General Assembly and the
qualifications for being a member of that
Assembly. The Bill apparently does not
intend to affect the qualifications in Vestry
elections for Section 3 (1) mentions only
the General Assembly. On the other hand
the Bill repeals Section 3 of the Represen-
tation of the People Act 1901 as amended
by the Act of 1943, and substitutes a new
section in its stead.

The qualifications for voters in Vestry
elections are stated in Section 14 of the
Vestry’s Act 1911 and this provides that
every person entitled to vote under any
or either of the qualifications mentioned in
Section 3 of the Representation of the
People Act 1901 as amended by the Act
of 1943 shall likewise be qualified to vote
in Vestry elections.

It does appear therefore that unless the
Bill is amended by the Council adult
suffrage will apply not only to voters for
the General Assembly but also for the
Vestries.

The Adult Suffrage Bill in its present
form will also extend the number of per-
sons entitled to serve on the Petty Jury.
Section 2 (3) of the Jurors Act 1891 pro-
vides that every person who is qualified to
be registered as a voter in the election of
members to serve in the General Assembly
shall be qualified and liable to serve as a
juror.

work has increased so

and
the

These two repercussions were obviously:

not foreseen by the Government, for. the
Objects and Reasons of the. Bill does not
include them in the objects of the Bill.
Some members of the House of Assembly
foresaw these implications and warned the
Government of them at the time but
nothing was done to amend the Bill aecord-
ingly. It is not clear why the onus of
amendment should be cast on the Council.
The members of the Hause of Assembly
include four barristers and one solicitor
while the Council has only one legally
trained person to guide them in the tortu-
ous and difficult task of introducing the
necessary amendments.

Greater time should be given to the legal
draughtsmen to prepare their Bills. From
the time that a third qualified person was
given to the Attorney General’s Chambers
there has seldom been three working there.
Transfers and leave have generally pre-
vented the presence of all three officers at
the same time.

This is therefore no criticism of the mem-
bers of that Department. It is merely
another aspect of the need to fill and keep
filled all the posts in the Civil Establish-
ment. Ht is only in this way that Govern-
ment Departments will be enabled to keep



Our Readers Say:

.. Sridaeww



abreast of the work which
them in ever

now faces

increasing quantities.

Juries

THE BILL recently passed by the Legis-
lature having as its objects the abolition
of Grand Juries in Barbados will serve to
bring legal practice here into conformity
with that of the United Kingdom. It was
a non-controversial measure. Grand Juries
have served their time and no heat should
be generated in their disappearance from
the legal scene.

The procedure is for a Magistrate,
prima facie case; the case is then reviewed
by the Attorney General who if he sees fit
commits for trial. The Grand Jury then
examines the witnesses for the prosecution
and once again decides whether a prima
case has been made out. Those in
favour of the abolition of the Grand Jury
system contend that when two legally
qualified persons have examined the evi-
dence and come to the conclusion that
there is a prima facie case it is an un-
necessary delay and a waste of public
money for it again to ‘be subjected to the
scrutiny of men who do not try the case
but merely decide whether it should be
sent down for the verdict of the Petty
Jury.

The only argument against that conten-
tion seems to be a love of the ancient forms
and ceremonies which for centuries have
guided the administration of the justice in
this land. The members of the Legislature
feel that it is more convenient to break
with those traditions and it is likely that
their decision will meet with little public
protest.

Certain members of the Legislature and
certain sections of the public are disposed
to go even further. They are prepared to
abolish all juries and to entrust the decision
in cases criminal as well as civil to the
hands of the judge. The decisions of juries
in Barbados have not always met with the
unqualified approval of cecupants of the
Bench but the principle of trial by jury
particularly in criminal cases is an im-
portant safeguard of the freedom of the
individual in an age in which executive
encroachments become greater every day.

In Barbados members of the Bench have
always maintained an admirable and
excellent impartiality, unswayed by the
interests of the executive. This island
would however be giving hostages to for-
tune on the day on which they allowed
trial by jury to be abolished.

In crimes such as sedition and all politi-
cal offences, trial by jury remains the great-
est safeguard of freedom of speech which

exists in a world in which such freedom is
fast dying out.

Let members of the Legislature there-
fore study carefully the possible results
before they assume the grave responsibility
of abolishing all juries.

Water Cocks

LAST WEEK many Barbadians were
horrified to notice that a new water cock
was being added to the several existing
water cocks along Beckles Road.

The growth of Barbados’ vehicular
traffic has today made Beckles Road a major
road of Barbados.

The activties of the Police and the
Highways and Transport Board have been
laudably directed to the improvement of
traffic circulations,

There are consoling r pons in the press
of heavy fines for exceeding speed regula-
tions in built-up areas.

Yet more water cocks are being added
to Beckles Road to encourage large num-
bers of water drawers to congregate in a
main road at periods of the day when it is
more tempting for motorists to throw
caution to the winds and urge on motor
car or ’bus to do its best on what is confi-
dently expected to be a deserted stretch of
road,

Apart from the temptation to the driver
of vehicles and the cyclist, there is far
greater danger of the water drawer acquir-
ing the mentality which leads him or her
to think of Beckles Road as his or her own
private watering ground.

All the good that the Police have been
doing to encourage Road Safety is hereby
being undermined.

Surely the public are entitled to greater
wisdom and a modern appreciation of the
proper locations of Cocks which provide
the essential water without which we can-
not live for long?

facie

usually a lawyer, to decide that there is a |



SUNDAY

“WEST INDIAN LEADERS SHAKE HANDS

Delegation and John Goddard,



Sitting On The Fence

By Nathaniel Gubbins

..“Would elderly, active lady

eare to share well-furnished

small house and WORK with

elderly, active couple?’—

Advt.

I'VE polished the silver.

Have you? Now you can polish
the grates.

Before lunch?

Too busy for lunch. After the
grates you can scrub the hall.

How old are you?

Eighty-nine. And you?

Eighty-eight.

You're quite a youngster, Bustle
about now.

How old is your husband?

Ninety-one.

What’s he doing?

Distempering the kitchen walls.

Won't it be bad for his heart?

No. Do it good, Hurry up with
those grates.

What for?

I want you to help me with the
curtains.

What are you going to do with
the curtains?

Take em down and wash em,

Before lunch?

I've told you.
up those steps.

No lunch. Get

I get dizzy at heights.

Don’t be a quitter. Up you go.

If I could have some tea. And
a biscuit.

No time for tea, Or biscuits.
You're half-way up now.

But I’ve nothing to hold on to

You don’t need anything. Bal-
ance yourself.

I’m feeling faint.

Take a deep breath.

I can’t reach the curtain pole,
Up another step. Lejt foot first,
Oh.

Now the right,
I’m falling.

No you're not,

But I am.

No, you’re not. Oh, yes you
OPE. . Cracked your head?

Yes. If I could have a cup of
4 | ee

No time for tea, I don’t think

we shall suit each other,

Don’t you?

Better pack your bags.

Perhaps after dinner.

No time for dinner. I'll see you
off at Me station.

Thanks.

Vive le Sportsky

Accordingly to the infor-
mation service of free Czecho-
slovakia, the Kuibishev
Soccer team, “Wings of The
Soviets,” have achieved sur-
prising results at football, not
only because of their physical
fitness, but because they have
a political instructor who en-
courages the players to give

British

LONDON.

Events in the Far East have

almost made British politicians a

forget that a general election
could happen here at any time

Party politics and electioneer-
ing have been largely oversha-
dowed by the near - unanimity
which prevails over the United
States’ decision on Korea, Except
for a mild campaign against the
ailing Ernest Bevin, who is called
on to pass his Foreign Secretary's
portfolio into younger and health
ier hands, the usual partisan at-
mosphere is lacking in Westmin-
ster.

It is



generally expected that

ADVOCATE







Hon. Albert Gomes,
West Indies captain, get together

each other political lectures.

“THANK YOU, Comrade Cen-
tre Forward Kickoff for your
interesting lecture on the Co-
Ordination of Mass Effort under
Directional Thinking assisted by
Physical Persuasion in Free Com-
munist Communities,” says the
political Football Commissar.

“I am flattered, Comrade Foot-
ball Commissar.”

“Thanks are also due to Com-
rade Inside Right Headoff for his
masterly denunciation of the
bourgeois Socialist warmongers
of the decadent West. No wonder
Comrades Kickoff and Headoff
score all the goals. Does anybody
wish to denounce anybody?”

“We would like to denounce
Comrade Goalkeeper Pushoff,”
says Kickoff and Headoff together.

“You first, Comrade Kickoff,”
says the Commissar.
“In the course of a private and

confidential talk I discovered that
Goalkeeper Pushoff is completely
ignorant of the number of nuts
and bolts produced in the factor-
ies of Stalinogorsk from January
1, 1948, to January 1, 1949, inclu-
sive

That explains why he lets so
many goals through,” says the
Commissar “What have you to
tell me, Comrade Headoff?”

“Over a friendly glass of vodka
Comrade Goalkeeper Pushoff was
indiscreet enough to express
doubts as to the proved and un-
deniable fact that Soccer was in-
vented by the great Russian
sports-professor Sockyourheadoff.”

“Lam obliged to you, Comrade
Headoff,” says the Commissar.
“As we are about to reveal that
the game of ericket was invented



by another great Russian sports-
professor, Sillimidoffsky, the dan-
xerous-thinking Goalkeeper Push-
off must be eliminated. I will
arrange a private meeting be-
tween him and Chief of Secret

Police Inspector Bumpoff.”

In Japan, no body will invite a
tax collector to his home. Japan-
ese hotel proprietors will not
provide a tax collector with food
oc drink unless it is poisoned.

In a village near Bombay a tax
collector's house was burned
down and his wife thrown in the
river.

In Lake Shafer,
a Mr, Paul Abbott is lying sub-
merged in an oxygen tank
10 ft. by 6 ft. He will stay there
until taxation is reduced.

In tolerant Britain
Cripps, the most
collector of all
barred from the
friends.

If he went to any hotel in the
country for one of his delicious

Indiana, U\S.,



Stafford
unpopular tax
time, is not
home of his

‘Politics’ Dimmed

the Labour Government, still rid-
ing all parliamentary storms with
slender House of Commons ma-
jority, will at least survive until
the summer recess, due in a
month’s time It majog events still
are brewing in the international
field when Parliament re-assem-
bles in October, Labour’s lease of
life might be prolonged indefinite-
ly,

Herbert Morrison, Deputy Prime
Minister and one of Labour’s lead-
img strategists, says this present
precarious Parliament is working
out a lot better than most people
expected

His statement probably reflects

“Clear and Unequivoecal English”

The Editor, the Advocate,

SIR, — The bewildered letter
signed ‘Planter’ in Thursday’s
Advocate states: “the erection of
a second steel shed has brought
from the Arts and Crafts Society
a threat to withdraw from taking
any active part in the Agricultur-
al Exhibition.” The Arts and
Crafts Society has made no threat,
it-has stated in clear and unequiv-
ocal English that as a_ protest

suggested,
additional
out in any

Vestry’s

ety.

alternative to the steel shed was
would provide
accommodation
destroying the
amenities of Queen’s Park.” This
suggestion was the result of the
invitation,
project of the Arts and C

which

way

It is difficult to follow ‘Planter’
in his reasoning—if, indeed, it can

be called such, Why should the

vey my sincere thanks to all those
who supported my Song Recitals
during the past three weeks in
Barbados. I feel that I should
make special mention of His Ex-
cellency the Governor and Mrs.
Sovage, Mr. H. Risley Tucker,
Representative of the British
Council and his entire staff, Mr
Crichlow Matthews, Mr. Gerald
Hudson and members of the Bar-
bados Choral Society, the minis-

with-

it was not a
Crafts Soci-

against the erection of a second Arts and Crafts Society collect ig ~ eee sens Seeehs
steel shed in Queen’s Park by the funds for the erection of a build- Wieas Pee ain nit rist Church,
| ing which the Agricultural Society Messrs. Radio Distribution and

Agricultural Society, it will no
Yonger continue to organise and
arrange the Art and Handicrafts
Section of the Annual Industrial
Exhibition. If ‘Planter’ had read
the Advocate he would have
seen in the Correspondence Col-
umn the letter which the Arts
and Crafts Society sent to the
Agricultural Society.

The ludicrous suggestion is
made by ‘Planter’ that the issue
of a second steel shed should have
been fought in a “Higher and
nobler way . by the Arts and
Crafts Society using their efforts
to xsafse the funds required for
erecting the type of building which
they contemplate.” According to
Mrs. ‘White’s letter to the Advo-

Sst.
‘Planter’

and jealousy.

making
Queen’s Park.

The Editor,

would use for two days of the year
as a breakfasting shed for judges,
and, for the remainder of the year,
Michael’s Vestry
as a soup kitchen for paupers?
accuses the
Crafts Society of lack of loyalty
Towards whom has
this Society lacked loyalty? Sure-
ly it is not jealousy of the steel
shed, for there is no evidence that
this Society wished to compete in
“jerry - building” in
VIGILANT READER.

Thanks

the Advocate,
SIR,—Please grant me the fa-
cate on the 24th June, a proposal cilities of your newspaper to con-

Mr. W. B. Millar
many
like
you,

There are
others to whom I should
,to say a personal “Thank
would use

I hope to return to Barbados to
renew my acquaintance with
many persons who have made my
stay enjoyable.

GRACITA FAULKNER.
1950.

Arts and

July 7,

War

To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—There is the fear that a
third world war has been ignited
at Korea. This fear could only
be the result of faithlessness in
the Security Council of the
United Nations to stop it,

has so
and it
Korean con-
one between
but rather
the Security

The Security Council
far acted rather wisely,
is evident that the
flict is not merely
North and South
Communism _ ys.
Council,

It should be clear to ail] that
the Reds are not on solid ground
and that. their attack on the
South was purely a test of the
United Nations’ Solidity, Shoyld

his test show. any weakness
there will be a World War
and Communism will triumph
On the other hand {if the Securi-
ty Council shows its hands, Com-
munism will retreat i probably
try again around 195 don’t for-
get it is spreading dally

The Reds have made a mis-

take and they should not be al-
lowed to recover, If we fail to
fight now we shall have to in

a few years time and our chances

of a victory will be slimmer
Most people love peace, but
when war is the nearest and

safest way to it,
means—war.

then, by all

I.V.B

July 5, 1950.

Women

To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR, — Will you kindly let
readers know more of the progress
of the badly needed Y.W.C.A.”’
This building should be in the
city, but the spot where Palm
Beach Guest House was, may be

suitable.

Women are being badly housed.
and at the mercies of the un-
scrupulous, There is no protec-
tion, How can progress be

made?

WORKER

Pray for Peace
Editor, The Advocate

This is a special appeal
to all Peacemakers to write, and
pray unceasingly for peace. We
are all weighed and found want-
ing.

After the
of humanity,

To The
SIR,

last great slaughter

all efforts should
have been made to unite all
nations. It has been worthy of
note that India produced a Peace,
maker. Why can’t other nations
do likewise? Hoping the cries of

mothers may be heard far and
wide and reach everywhere for
peace,

A MOTHER

leader of West Indian Sugar |
after the match at Lord’s.



SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950



ooo eee









| ieee SSS —— eS
| BATHROOM SUPPLIES |
{ LOW-DOWN SUITES
)) HIGH-UP SUITES }
t CAST-IRON BOXES
if W.C. PANS “S” & “P” TRAPS
WHITE LAVATORY SEATS
BASINS—22 ins. x 16 ins. & 25 ins. x 18 in
(with or without Pedestals)
SINGLE and DOUBLE DRAIN BOARDS and SINKS
1 SINGLE ALUMINUM DRAINBOARDS
; ALUMINUM SINKS—26 ins. x 16 ins. & 30 ins. x 18 ins.
| GALVANISE SINKS
» PORCELAIN SINKS
COPPER PIPE s in % jns., 34 in 1, ind
FITTINGS
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.
SUCCESSORS TO
i. GaSe PEICHER & CO..LTD. |



Cocktail Party

THESE

SPOIROF B TACICE ENG Tew beaten hh ONTARIO 8 een CALS AS ee Fae 38
root sandwich, or a carrot juice |{{ DANISH COCKTAIL SAUSAGES in Tins ............. 75
cocktail, nobody would poison
him. That is unless your Uncle 54 st
Nat happened to be there. . 5 7 wine
Bo. Tae vhis hole hes Hot been CHERRIES CREMEDE MENTHE FLAVOUR alah an
burned down. Nor has Lady ONIONS in bottles 7
Givnst heen “thrown ints ake MOONEE 555 5 eis 5 oe ee eeiewk § PRA a bakin gua ott
Thames. PLAIN; OLIVES. —-bottlas 0.50 oot oS tee Bt
But if things go on as they are 5 ae
it may not be long before thou- PEEK FREANS CHEESELETS—Tins .... utente een 1.24
sands of us will be lying in under- weir ehedie
water tanks or holes in the CARRS CHEESE CRISPS in 1-lb, ORES So ; 53
eeu, hiding from the terrible CARRS CHEESE CRISPS in tins .. Werwekin ier eni ale
With so many people lying HEINZ SANDWICH SPREAD—bots. .................. .47

doggo, the revenue will gradually
drop and Cripps will have to find
more taxes, even if he has to go
after the children’s pocket-money.

In the end everybody will be
under ground or under water.
There will be nobody to tax and
Cripps will be alone, with the
last bit of bread and lettuce in
his pocket, preaching in an empty
cathedral, all his instincts for
taxation satisfied, and happy at
last.

AMONG
columnists
newspapers
favourite?

Why, the old original Dr. Gub-
bins, ace quack of Fleet-street.
Here are two of his replies to
readers with just enough strength
to hold a pen.

“I wake in the morning
with pains in the back. I go
to bed with pains in the
stomach, All day long 1!
have pains in the chest.
When [ eat anything I come
out tn a rash, When I don't
I feel sick. What can you do
for me?”

If I were a vet J would sug-
gest you ought to be destroyed. As |
it is, I ean only suggest that you
climb Nelson’s Monument and
jump into Trafalgar-square. That
is, if your back doesn’t hurt too
much,

“Every time I think of the
boy I love I have a fit of
sneezing, ajthough I never
have a sold. What shall I do,
doctor?”

Although this is hardly a doc-
tor’s problem, I offer this advice

the many doctor
now writing for the
who is the public’s



for what it’s worth. You can
either stop thinking of the boy
you love or stuff your nostrils

with blotting paper,

If you sneeze, then you will
either kill his love by shooting
wads of blotting paper at him or,
if the paper stands the strain, air
pressure inside your head will
blow your brains out.

Perhaps this might be the best
end to a romance which would
never last beyond an unusual
honeymoon.—tL.E,S.

a growing confidence within the
party that its razor-edge rule can
continue,

But Labour is not relaxing en-
tirely. Its national executive com-

mittee already is busy on the aca-|)

demic spadework which will pro-
duce a platform for the next elec-
tion whenever it comes.

Political correspondents under-
stand that two documents will be
prepared—one a broad statement
cifferentiating socialist principles
from those of its chief rivals
(probably with a special section
designed to make Liberal voters
feel at home); the other a detailed
programme.



Pigeon Holed

To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—Appearing very regularly
in the columns of the Barbados
Advocate are notices of the award
of Colonial Development and Wel
fare Scholarships to West Indians,
particularly to Trinidadians and
Pritish Guianese,

Barbados boasts of being in the
forefront of West Indian educa-
tion, and I am therefore left to!
presume that no one applies for
these scholarships, or that becaus
of our boasting there is no boost- |
ing, and all the applicants
meticulously pigeon-holed.

GOOD ALL.



are

July 6, 1950,

Poor
SIR,—There is an urgent need
to give more help to the poor
Poor people, some too old to walk,
lined up like cattle, pushed and
jammed by stronger ones to get}
a few shillings which can only
keep life going for a few days. |
The poor in Barbados are just}
a body of people weakened by
Starvation. Feed and help them
and there will be no tuberculosis
It is insulting to say that our
people do not know rules of health. |
DEFENDER

¢

}
ORDER SE
SALTED PEANUTS in Tins ...
DANISH COCKTAIL SAUSAGES in Tins
CHERRIES MARASCHINO FLAVOUR — Bottles

AND REMEMBER

COCKTAILS are
always BETTER
blended «vith

3 YEAR OLD
COCKADE
RUM.

FINE



STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO.,

LTD.













A Small shipment

superb
TROUSERS

in attractive materials

of these

and colours now

‘mn stocks

TAILORED BY,
SIMPSONS
Da COSTA & Co., Ltd.

DRY GOODS DEPT.

———







Music and

Dancing on

Parade
Lack Rhythm
and Pleasure

without

GOLD BRAID



GODDARD'S GOLD BRAID RUM MAKES
YOUR PARTY HAPPIER

Settee

4
&





|
i
|
|
|
|
|



SE en AR i mI A

re REA an FA AE nS EIEIO
ee St SSS

SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950

All Saints’ Sehool |

Mistress Retires
After 42 Years’ Service

Teachers from All Saints’ Boys’ and Girls’ School and many
other schools in St. Peter and St. Lucy gathered at All
Saints’ Girls’ School on Friday evening to bid farewell to
Miss Ada Gilkes, the Headmistress of All Saints’ Girls’ who
is retiring after 42 years’ service with the school, of which

she was Head for 13 years.

Mrs. Victoria Brathwaite, who.
has been with the school since
1931, will act as Headmistress.

Mrs. Brathwaite presented Miss
Gilkes with a Morris rocker and
a purse. The rocker was given
by the Staff of the All Saints’ Girls’
while contributions towards the
purse were made by the staff of
All Saints’ Boys’, the school
m.anagers and pupils of All Saints’
Girls.’

Before the presentation Mrs,
Brathwaite congratulated Miss
Cilkes on her long and faithful
service to the school. She also
spoke of the successful unity be-
tween Miss Gilkes and the Staff
curing the period that she was
Headmistress,

She said that Miss Gilkes was
well respected in the district and
wished her long life and happiness
in retirement,

Mr. C. Broome, Inspector of
Schools, also Spoke of the loyalty
and devotion of Miss Gilkes and
suid that whenever he inspected
the school he always found Miss
Gilkes doing her best.

She was next congretulated by
Mr. H. E. Thorne, Headmaster of
All Saints’ Boys’ and Mr. H. Mar-
ville and Mr. G. Corbin of the
Speightstown Boys’.

The gathering next sang “Auld
Lang Syne” and refreshments were
taken. Among those present
were: Mr. K. N. R. Husbands,
M.C.P., Speaker of the House of
Assembly, Rev. F. E. Pestaina,
Miss Watts, Headmistress of St.
Peter's Girls’, Miss A. Parris,
Headmistress of Indian Ground
Girls’, Miss E. Campbell, Head-
mistress of St. Lucy Girls’, Mrs.
E St. John, Mrs. M. Hunte and
many parents and friends.

PRIVATE SHOW at Christ

Church Almshouse, for the
benefit of patients there, is in-
cluded in this week’s programme
cf the Mobile Cinema. This show
will be on Monday.

On Tuesday night the Cinema
will visit St. George where a show
will be given at Cottage Planta-
tion yard for residents of the
Cottage area, A show will be
given at Oldbury Plantation yard
cn Wednesday for the benefit of
residents of the Oldbury area of
St. Philip.

Residents of the Pool Plantation
area of St. John will benefit from
a show given at the Pool Planta-
tion yard on Thursday. The pro-
framme concludes with an engage-
ment at Husbands Plantation yard,
St. Lucy, on Friday for people of
the Husbands Plantation area.

The current programme is “‘Cos-
sack Horsemen” “Trooping the
Colour”, This is Britain—38,”
‘Hill Sheep Farm,” “Motherhood”,
“East African College,” and
“British News”.

HE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

of Combermere School Old
Toys’ Association will hold a meet-
ing on Tuesday next at 4.30 p.m. At
the meeting dates of the Annual
Meeting, Dinner and Dance will be
fixed and Guests of Honour will
Le selected.

There will be a cricket match
between Present and Past Com-
bermerians at the School grounds
on Thursday at 1.00 p.m. The
team representing the Past will be
skippered by Mr. O. S. Coppin.
re THE LAST few Saturdays

there has not been room for all
the children who came to the
British Council's Saturday morning
film shows to see “Bush Christ-
mias.”

It will be shown again for the
last time this morning at 9.30.
Saturday morning film shows for
children, and Monday afternoon
shows for adults are now regular
Eritish Council Features.

CONCERT by the massed

choirs of eight of the eleven
schools in St. George was held
at the St. George’s Boys’ School at
4.00 p.m. on Thursday. The schools
taking part were: St. George's
Boys’ and Girls’ Schools, South
District Girls’, St. Judes Boys’ and
Girls’ and St. Luke's Boys’, Girls’
and Junior Schools

The programme opened with
“John Peel” after which the
chanty “Heave Away, My Johnny”
was sung Next followed the
national song “Mine Own Coun-
tree”. A Piano Solo, “Wavers of
the Sea” was given by Miss A.

Walker.

The two Negro Spirituals
*Heav’n” and “Swing Low, Sweet
Chariot”, wefe the next items on
the programme and then “The
Jittle Bells.”
ine Choits also sang the Folk
Songs “A Shepherd Kept Sheep
and “O No John”, and the national
“England” after which Miss
Walker gave another Piano Solo








Pharmacy Week

Tuberculosis will be the sub-
ject ot a talk by Dr. C. Man-
ning while Dr, K. Simon will
talk on Diabetes during
Pharmacy week which gets un-
derwey this year on July 16.

It will be the second to be
held here by the Paarmaceuti-
cal Society, the first having been
held last year.

Proceedings will begin on the
evening of the 16th with a talk
over Radio Distribution by the
President of the Seciety Mr
Fred Olton.

During the week there will be
a show window competition by
the drug stores displaying vari-
ous phases of pharmacy.

Dr. Manning and Dr. Simon
will give their talk at the
Y.M.C.A. on the Tuesday and
Wednesday respectively of the
week, beginning each night at
8 o'clock and on the Friday there
will be a film show by the Brit-
ish Council at the same build-
ing.



New Road
At Pine

A NEW ROAD has been made
and houses are being built on the
North West portion of the Pin2
Estate. Grass was formerly grown
on this part of the estate to feed
cattle and be used as mulch, The
road runs West from the main
road of the Estate and is about :1
quarter of a mile long. It ends at
the foot of a hill which forms part
of the land.

Already three houses have been
erected on the land and part of
the hill has been dug down.

Houses are also being built on
either side of Lower My Lord's
Hill. A road has been made on the
South side, running from My
Lord’s Hill to Government Hl
through a wide stretch of land on
which canes used to be grown,

40’. For Stealing

“YOU have now been convicted
of larceny and if you steal again
you will have to go to prison. You
have no previous conviction for
stealing and I have taken into
consideration the fact that you
have pleaded guilty and have lost
your job.” His Worship Mr. C, L.
Walwyn told Gordon Lynch a 2}
year-old labourer of Eagle Hall
yesterday when he fined him 40/-
to be paid in seven days or one
month’s imprisonment for steal—
ing two boxes of Phillips bulbs
valued at $2.60 and the property
of Manning & Co., Ltd.

Lynch who was employed at
Manning & Co., was seen putting
the two boxes of bulbs into his
pocket about 7.25 am,, July 8.
After Lynch produced the boxes to
his chief a policeman was called
in and he was arrested.

Sgt. Garner prosecuted on be-
half of the police.



“Waivlings at Eve”. That great
favourite “Drink to me Only with
Thine Eyes” was next rendered.

The programme ended with
“How Great is the Pleasure” and
the modern song “The Music
Makers”. The choirs were under
the leadership of Mr, A. G. Jordan,
Headmaster of St. George’s Boys’,
who wielded the baton gracefully
and effectively, The Folk Songs
were repeated in response to the
encores of the audience.

At the conclusion Mr. L. T. Gay,
District Inspector of Schools and
Chairman of the Music Festival
Committee, thanked the teachers
and pupils for having organised
and carried through the Concert
so sucessfully. Mr. Jordan replied
and thanked Miss Walker for her
contributions to the programme,

In the audience was Mrs.
Baker, a member of the Women's
Institute, London, She took the
opportunity to speak about the
work done by the Institution,

Among those present were Rev.
F. M. Dowlen, Rector of St.
George, Mr. F. Miller, M.C.P. and
Mrs. Miller, Mrs, L. T. Gay and a
large number of teachers,

FWWELVE-YEAR-OLD Phillip of Representatives for agreement

gon changes
Joseph, was injured when he on

Stewart of Vaughan’s Land, St

from a bicycle while riding alonr
Joy Road. St. Joseph yesterday
morning. The cycle was extensive-
ly damaged. ;

Stewart was riding his father’s
cycle and going in the direction of
Joes River.

DISTINCTIVE AND DIFFERENT

Our Buyer goes yearly to the
British Industries Fair.

Be It guarantees Low Prices !

YOUR JEWELLERS :

Y. DE LIMA

‘Phone 4644





oo

& CO., LTD:

20, Broad Street



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE





The picture of perfect friendship--Butcher the bull-mastiff with dachshund Jane,

Landan Ben

vress Serntoe

A New Roadway Social Welfare Aims

Danger

Standposts on the hishw
must now present :° men;
greater than ever before to th
who have to get their su ply
water from them, now that
number of vehicles in the island
have so considerably increased

Probably the

best means
avert possible fatal accident siderable progress has been made Mr,
under the circumstances, would O.B.E., Commissioner of

be to remove these standposts to
nearby avenues, a move whic .
would also serve the purpose of



La



ing is in



To Lift Standards
Progress Noted In B.G.

The object of Social Welfare in British Guiana is to ene

our-

age the establishment of higher social standards, and.con-

M. B. Laing, C.M.G.,
F r Local Government and Social!
Weliare Officer of the colony told the Advoe

ate yesterday.
Mi

Barbados for



PAGE_NINE

10 Seouts |: ae
Invested
















ON MONDAY evening last yet
another ad was mad re
Great dod of Scouts
when ter s were inve
ut the St. Luke’s 96th Barbad
Group Headquarter y the Dis
riet Commissioner Mr. ¢ mf
Springer, assisted by A.D .¢ vi
\. G. Jordan

The Commissioner gave the
youngsters an outline of Scou
ing, in which the neces for
their Christian duty was stress-
ed. He was very thorough in hi




examination, and after every re-

cruit gave entive satisfactory he}

was invested and his badge |

presented }
The ceremony was very ini-*

pressive, and the A.D.C. gave th ‘ J

closing remarks. Scoutmaster Hi! A wise mother lets baby decide about

Hi. ones. replied and om Pq ‘| the milk for bottle feeds. Lots of energy, steady

n y came to a close with 1 F - :

lusty Scout yell _ | gains, contented days, peaceful nights —these tell her what she most
The Troop will parade at St

wants to know — baby is doing splendidly on Ostermilk.

Why can mother pin her faith so
firmly on Ostermilk ? Because, where
breast feeding; is difficult or impossible
it is the perfect substitute for mother’s

Luke's Church today

THE Boy Scouts Association «
Barbados is preud to be able t
add its quota of congratulations ;
to the victorious West Indies team
who have made history at Lords

important additions are made: Iron
to enrich the blood — sugar to modify
the food for tiny digestions — Vitamin
D to help build strong bones and

Lord Somers, who — sucgeeded | Milk. Ostermilk is finest grade cow's teeth. Ostermilk is made by Glaxo
lord Baden-Powell as "Chief | milk, dried under the most hygienic Laboratories Ltd., who, since 1908,
Scout, was, before he died, Pre- | conditheas, ‘The protein, great body- have been pioneers in the develop-
ident of the M.C.C and it, builder, is made easily digestible ment of the best possible foods for

was his dream that an all-Scout by the voller drying process. And __ babies.

eleven’ might some day be seen

Playing cricket on the famou

Tord's field. We record with Steady

pleasure the fact that Frank Wo1 progross (

rell and Clyde Walcott were both | tells is right
Scouts. It would be interestin: | you 8

to find out if any of the other
members of the team were evi
scouts at any time of their lives

For your free copy of illustrated Baby Book-Phone 4675














, , ace Badges calle a ak : caer eS
ould two months’ holiday. He arrived
providing more space in thes . poe Thiir as : Congrats to P. L. Harcourt
areas on mornings and evening iD ducation ganica ae B.W.1-A.. accom- \scwis of the 60th B’dos (Bethels |
for vehicular traffic, “ronhadeagd ey Guten mney, are Troop on gaining his Camp SOOO 4066 96909993999 GSFPIS SUODO PIS THIOM TPIOO,

To mention only g few of th . Pith cal at Simarat i. Warden’s Badge. Good wark! ¥ %
places where the i menace is Is A lso Under ity oe ee roe aes Harry ! you haws made a splen- | s >
present, Martindales Road a busy Government ana Nan devoted ute did job of it. x 8
Street for traffic at most times has Welfare time primarily to Co-operatives. , We are pleased to note the! & $
ig less than two inaposts Co-operatives have advanced to segutm aster Arthur Srattts Ae a a V %
ones Bettie hens ee, WR tO.” CREAN 8 piguch o standard that thie Seve Sal too wece aitane ce de ele . x
a yO; eckles Road, prob- MR 4 i tBASE, Social peen hander er separate é “e > Sick Ls »
ably one of the busiest cebte on Welfare Officer of the Demerara Abt seeih oe ooo aS Separate the last three weeks is coming | 3 >

; faa f _ 1 ! under a Commissioner *" jae saith mae de ~ .
evenings, three and where prob- Bauxite Company in McKenzie for thei; development around nicely. Cheer up! Arthur, | % %
ably there is the possibility of very for the past two years, told the The Social Welfare Branch is *°4 Nl soon be O.K eae? x
great danger is that at the corner Advocate yesterday that his now devoting its attention and * $
almost of Black Rock and Eagle ‘“uties are very varied energies to the development ot ix e x
Hall Road where there is always He. gaia tt tie i Cottage Industries and the en % ae Ort The Humber trademark | x
heavy traffic. Sete ee ey Oe The Ci ement of voluntary social ee . % eve ( %

“Up to the present,” the Com- menegernant of all educational! walfare drentianemat. Te 1s ie / 4 is your guarantee of lasting x
missioner of Police told the “Ad-- the” Rinse Cranky ne » Women's work is being en SEIZES * e quality, fine appearance and %
tanotel? sterday. “thora a 1 é é geth Fa. ae rae ae . ef
nok been Tha'nS! aceemnsran® sath ai acivities connect wiih cousuet under the direction oa * in the enim ‘tena. Teg
casioned by this state of affair orn i WORK dD McRengle os, primary duties are the RAIL WA YS RS World's leading quality
and so the Police have not given =o aes establishment of a Women’s Insti “6 1X bicycle carries this mark of
The Weert eee” Mr. Crease arrived in Barbados bg oa ame lines as those in ASHING'TON! Jig 8 1% wor distinction.
erect the standposts, Oa ‘the 00 Thursday by B.W.LA,, for two Great Britain, Pre ees =. ae rest
Manager told the ae ae Sa weeks holiday He was accom Mr. Laing said that housing is ( AChE SUA mo ay oH re st . ‘ 8
that tha De Rairtnactt hat ve a “ panied by his wife and they are also an important part of the work a, : . 8 ine wiie R ot ‘Talay 3 5 Cav1V7es this
to do with. the determinate a meee + Cacrabens or the dep ent, the object ) Sivi pont n and inetied whi ;*) c ‘
this’ location, they: just carey out) ak being to improve housing condi. 70° way # it for the Govern-|* .
eg on, they just carry ou Since taking up his appoint tions both in the city and rural 4™™y to run it for the Govern BN b f
instructions, " 2 ment with the Bauxite Company, areas in the establishment of 'ent. FS caeaiet MaVR oO
winssnete er Wensar se or he sald that a gn oy ceceen: higher living standards, ie rae te ec hms ef ‘ :

: § : mendations which hav en pu ‘ ey ae .
sites. forward by the * Social Welfar-» Main Duties defence find security ‘ *% perfection

- ~ Committee, have been adopted. rr i, rhe strike: 38 by members ofl

° e Originally from Oxford, Eng ; The main duties of the Local i shunters nion : orren 2t¥ _

h I F = land, Mr, Crease was formerly “OVernment department are Dis~ 2!Tected five big ' Wester ‘tailvsiy |
ar es irs Sin ni me hs : trict Administration, an important Systems. Workers on another four| a a
Bh rincipal of the Prince of Wales 4 — ; nyaters ended their 12-di dt Se s
e “"College, Moratuwa in Ceylon Pt of which is Village Adminis. System \ded their 12-day « / %

Title Bo t In from 1926—1930. After spending ‘ton. Villages are administered strike on Thursday a few hou- a) sae”
u some leave in the UIK., he wen! rouga elected bodies “in ‘the filter: President Truman a SS bi
~ a eee ae gn font ‘, Villages, and Community Centre es ane action to e “es

Au ust Inspector of Schools. He remaineg ‘Villages run by Community > ‘ bg 3 oe " ve " malt %
8 in that post until 19838 when he Councils, representative of — the riz rf today ory eh ps ote ©

was appointed Director of Educa ocal authority and voluntary rc ait ~~ ite at ae ” ao :

BUFFALO, NEW YORK, tion. He retired in 1948 organisations, provide for the Posa / rom 1 strikers whit VTS

July 8 Oe r advancement of social condition they said, dispose of our dispute 2

Ezzard Charles, who is recog- . : ,, and living standards. The union's proposal was no | % The Aristocrat of all Bicycles %
ised by the N.B.A. as World In conjunction with his duti In addition, the Local Govern— ™2de public. . ea ae ~
Heavyweight champion, will haye 28 Director of Education, Mr. ment Department deals with the In the statement issued with x y
his first fight in August, after being Crease said that he was: hiel establishment of Land Settle- te seizure order the Presiden & %
declared fit following an injury, Censor for the colony during the j,ents which are generally speak— ©#!led on every worker to retur >| %&
eg Pito, match-maker of War from 1939—1942 ing, villages in embryo. When ‘° his job, Reuter DN %
the Fairview Athletic Club said ey : they are established, they are sched .
tonight that Charles would defi- This is his second visit to Bar- banded over to the local author sdieiinieceillibiias ° %
nitely go through with his twice- we F a1 first being = efi ities who are then responsible for es +S q %

ostponed fight against Freddie he spent two months. His wife has 4) ,; é istration. C ‘eS > ,
Caicos sé Mineeitbnie: Sonnet already ae here for twelve heir administration: co OANU I Ss % HARRISON'S ‘
vania. r months, while his daughter spent .

The match-maker said he had four and half years at Codrington ° ARRIVE BROAD ST. $
talked with Jake Mintz, Charles’ High School before going to Scot Demonstration ;
manager, and that the fight would qed, a - she ji oe as ir Over 600 bags of copra, 15 bag LOCAL AGENTS x
probably be held on August 15. omestic Science at Atho re 7 1 of pigeon peas, 20 bags of cor: s

Charles was pronounced fully cent, Edinburgh, Falls Flat and 10 Sais of cocoanu DIAL 2364. x
fecovered from a bruised heart here from St, Vineent y
muscle on Wednesday. '

Sugar Scarce
In Austria

The injury forced him to put
off fights with Beshore in February
end March of this year.

—Reuter,

U.S. To Spend













VIENNA
34. 688 The Au r Vational Bank

9 m. nounced today it considered 1

. i “black market” ended in Austr
Next Year Only butter, nd Ameri
can cigarette were left on the

“scarce” list Butter and st
WASHINGTON, July 8. bring prices 50 per cent higher
The Senate Appropriations Com-— than official rates and cigarette:
mittee to-day approved a Budget sell for 30 cents a pack,

Bill providing for an expenditure
of $34,688,000,000 to run the Am- oa
erican Government for the finan-
cial year beginning this month

This was $1,473,000,000 less
than President Truman had
wanted. The Bill now goes to
the Senate for debate, which is
expected to begin on Tuesday,
Then it will go back to the House

B URINA

The

. huge budget lumps all Bac Your Supply from .

zovernment services in a single H, JASON JONES & CO LTD

vill for the first time. It covers i " fctet ; k

most major expenditures, with 4 Distributors.

the notable exception of “fixed

charges” totalling about $8,000,-

000,000 including interest on the ee ee en en oe ee a ee ote
$256,000,000,000 Federal debt,

—Reuter.

For Delightful Refreshment






MALTED MILK

SANDWICHES te

TEAS—HOT DOGS—COOL DRINKS
SERVICE Al

KNIGHT’S SODA FOUNTAINS

Phoenix & City Pharmacies



bl

FRANKFURT, July 7

\ gr

mo

e shirts,

the
of

t of

up of 35 women and chil-
latter
Communist-led

wearing

German Youth today tried to stage

“Hands Off

Korea” demonstra-



nin front of the United States
isulate General here,



Carrying large banners urging
“Fight Atom Bomb” and de-
iding the withdrawal of occu-
patton troops, they shouted “Kore:
t Koreans”, “Go Home Ameri-
"but none of the German
Iking along the street seermec
listen. A lonely policeman
tched as the group dispersed 1!
nutes later. There was no sigr
attention inside the Consul
reneral.-Reuter.

PRET

DPS FPP PF PF PP Oe ere

Pe

QPS IOIISO BUGIS



HORS
HAI!

POM
BACC

COCKTAIL ONIONS
CHICKEN HADDIES

CHOWS

E RADISH



Or nena a a a ee en ete at ate”
ByU0st ARRIVED-

A FRESH SHIPMENT OF

POULTRY

APPPPP OPP PPOT TS

Bots,

BURGER STEAK Tins
LUNCHEON BEEF ”

IN (Sliced)

Pkg

Ik
Bots
Tin

CUSTARD POWDER
FRUIT SALAD
OLIVE OIL

PERKINS & CO., LTD.



Roebuck Street

LCOS

OA ALLO





by the Schooner “Belqueen”

The “Belqueen” berthed in th
outer basin during the afternoon
in readiness for discharging
cargo,

its;

SFP ESS EEE EELS

—












° ICE CREAM
- FREEZERS
" BREAKFAST CARRIERS

* EARTHENWARE

Now on show in our Furniture Dept.

‘CAVE



SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET.







SS
SS

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.
Annual Holiday

Our CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note that
Workshop will be closed as from Monday 3rd July to





our

. . Saturday the 17th July, 1950, inclusive, for the purpose of
eaadea & MALT Bots, granting our Workmen their Annual Holiday.
ESSENCE OF BEEF Tins Arrangements have been made for emergency work to be
Baden ” undertaken during this period and the receipt of repairs and
P ,OMEL

delivery of completed work will be continued as usual.

JAMS & MARMALADE
Tins & Bots.
CURRANT PUDDING Tins
VI-TONE ”
GOLDEN ARROW RUM

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open to
business as usual,



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

Dial 2072 & 4502 White Park Road, St. Michael.







PAGE TEN





Pilgrim Virgin

Comes

Today

By A Correspondent

remarkable hap-

near the village

Portugal. Three

that a lady had

them on a small

i nearb) Only two of them

d heard the lady speak and they

she wished them to go

‘ 1 the 13th of each month
the month of October.

} K Dlace
ratima n



pite ridicule, despite im-
prisonment, even despite a pre-
ded threat of death, the

the truth of
s the months went
er crowd gathered
em keep their tryst. The
that the lady had
there would be a
! miracle on 18th October
ty some 60,000 were
would happen.
og this vast erowd saw the sun
whick had appeared suddenly, fol-
lowing he». tin, tLrsi become
pale, then i s sen to turn like
catheri ce! sending forth
ays of the ‘ai es: colours of the
sbow, and finally it seemed to
jump out of its orbit, come
iowards the people in a zig-zag
ourss, and then return to its nor-
mal position. The whole scene
lasted twelve minutes.
in it how you will; a vast
a mighty pheno-
‘reat mumbers now
cepted ue the children’s
lady who had
(nem, each time, had
he if ‘The Lady of the
ihe Blessed Virgin her-
self--ine that she had asked that
uilt there in her
that the rosary be re-
aay

I , the only one of the
thre ing and now a Car-
neli nun, revealed that the
tlesse : Virgin had also asked for

ecial devotion to her Immaculate

t means to secure the
nversion of Russia and to bring
sinners back to God.

i reds of thousands of pil-
-cgan to visit Fatima every
€ but for long the Church,
always loath to accept visions as
genuine without the most careful
scrutiny, still suspended its judg-
ment, and indeed it was not till
thirteen years later in 1930, after

commission of enquiry had been
1 rk for eight years, that the
bishop accepted the revela-
genuine and gave official
iission for the cult of ‘Our
, Of Fatima’.
ring the years that have fol-
i, Fatima has become more
ind more thronged with pilgrims,
vel ly a second Lourdes, and
on v3 46 08 many as 500,000

tathered there at one time

children

insisted on
Â¥ and





t lit






ere hi een

menon and

honour and


















and heard a special broadcast
addressed to them by the Pope

But no matter how much they
may wish to do so, there are many
Catholics throughout the world
who cannot journey in pilgrimage
to Fatima and it is to satisfy their
devotion that statues of Our Lady
of Fatima have been sent on ‘pil-
grimage’ through the world. The
first left Fatima on May 13 1947
and went into Spain, France, Hol-
land, Luxembourg and Belgium
and later to Africa and India. The
second was sent out on Oct. 13 o!
the same year to the North Ameri-
can Continent, and so great wa
ine welcome given to it that in St.
Louis, Missouri, about 300,00)
pecple attended the special devo-
uons in one week

The third statue, the one that
coming to Barbados to-day was
blessed on May !3 1948 at Fatima,
and later in Rome by the Holy
Father himself, so that it might
tour the Caribbean and Latin
America. It has already travelled
more than 10,000 miles by air. In
Ciudad Trujillo more than 25,000
witnessed the crowning of the
statue by the Archbishop of Santo
Domingo In Port-of-Spain, the
statue was welcomed by thousands
on its first arrival and everywhere
it has gone from church to church
huge crowds have accompanied it

and attended the specially-
arranged devotions.
Now the statue is coming to

Barbados to bid Catholics join in
the great crusade of prayer to beg
God, through the intercession of
the Blessed Virgin, to bring Russia
back from the materialistic; Athe-
ism which holds it in its gritp, to
bring peace to the world, and to
bring sinners back to the Divine
Mercy

Later it will be taken to neigh-
bouring Islands, and to British
Guiana, before proceeding to Latin
America.



Bishop Denies
Political Interest

July 8.
American born Catholic Bishop
Gerald Patrick O’Hara, who ar-



rived here this morning from
Rumania, said all the charges
made against him in Bucharest

were “completely false’.

Bishop O’Hara who has been for
three years Papal Nuncio_ in
Bucharest was accompanying
Monsignor Guido Delmestre and
his Personal Secretary, Monsignor
John Kirk,

The Rumanian Government on

PLP LELOL LPS SP PESOS SOS SESE OS SESEESOCSSCO

Oo

CLEC ALLL LL AEG







(ESTABLISHED 1845) %

THE POLICY THAT CARRIES

: THE SEAL OE §
$ SECURITY AND SERVICE S
8 Boe pastiles‘and Wavtee, cabical the Agetma: :
* DACOSTA & CO, LTD. 3



PLES

STS aS Oe
RF





CREASE-RESISTING
MIAMI SPUN

$ I -00 yd.

; IN 30 BEAUTIFUL SHADES

36 ins wide

Fabric of which we are the sole dis-
tributors carries a guarantee from the man-
ufacturer as being sunfast, tubfast and dyefast
and if you ean prove to us that this material

l will refund you the cost of the
workmanship and

any obligation

The ULTRA MODERN STORE with a reputation for ge

N. E. WILSON & CO. |
|

DIAL: 3676
P



-

L't
! you Ww
material, cost of
pensation for any imeonvenience you may
have suffered—can you desire any better
uarantee? ? We give you patterns without
a

——=—=



Look Your Best in an
Unusually Low Prica

com-

at low prices.



Canada Closes
Vancouver—

Australia Shipping

MONTREAL, Canada
Canadian-Australasian
Line, announcing that
t will discontinue service between
Nort America and Australia
New Zealand ports next Jan. 29
with the passenger and freight
steamship Aorangi, said that costs
were the reason

“The company
substantial financial losses since
its inception in 1931, and future
prospects accompanied by high
operating costs are such as to
make this decision necessary,’
said the announcement,

The Canadian—Australasian line
subsidiary of the Canadian

The
Steamshir



has sustained

is a

Pecific Steamships. Its 17,000-ton
Aorangl sleek motorship, was
n-e part of a large Pacific fleet
that included the Empress liners
that sai‘ed to the Orient before
the Second World War. She was
the oly ship returning to the
Canada~Australian run after the
war

Removal of the Aorangi ne«i
Janvary means the end of ship
passenger service between Van-
couver, and Australia, In Van
couver, it was reported that a
factor in the decision to discon-

tinue the service is the increased
raffic by air.

Prime Minister Sidney Holland
of New Zealand said at Auckland
that the governments of Canada
and Australia had declined to go
along with the New Zealand
government in payment of a sub-
sidy to keep the liner Aorangi in
trans~Pacific service. The line had
asked special financial assistance
from the three governments 1o
keep the ship operating. |

Prime Minister Holland said
that the Canadian and Australian
governments “had not been dis-
posed” to contribute to a subsidy
although the New Zealand gov -
ernment, after examining the facts
was willing to do so. New Zealan 1
was ready to pay a subsidy of
£10,000 annually for two years.

Consequently, Prime Minister
Holland said, it appears inevitable
that the old British shipping line
must be withdrawn from the
route. He said the existing scale
of fares was as high as could
compete with air travel. Major
factors in the situation were the
small amount of cargo that could
be handled while the ship is in
port, and the mounting cost ot
operating ships in general,—(C.P.)





Wednesday said the three were
guilty of espionage and gave them
three days to get out of the coun-
try. :

Bishop O’Hara said: “Our solé
work in Rumania was to see after
the welfare of the Catholic Church
and we had nothing to do with
political matters or with collect-
ing information.”—Reuter.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



THE STAGE

R. C. SHERRIFF, of all British
dramatists, is the best at telling
the story of an ordinary man or
woman in extraordinary circum-
stances. He showed this power in
Miss Mabel. with perhaps the most
charming murderess the stage has

known And now, in Home
Seven, he has written for Sir
Ralph Richardson a part that

shows a fine actor at his most im-
pressive. Superficially, it is not
a part that seems to nd much
acting. Yet, in fact, it is far
harder to perform than much that
needs only a theatrical flourish.
Sherriff, as dramatist, makes much
of his effect by the truth of his
dialogue, his gift for selecting the
right word and the right phrase
without letting the speeches grow
pallid. as an actor,
succeeds because he does not give
for a moment the impression that
he is acting. No player is more at
home in a stage set. When Rich-
ardson enters the little suburban
sitting-room it becomes a real
place. Not many actors have this
transforming quality, and in the
Wyndham's Theatre production it
is invaluable.

Some have criticised this piece,

oddly, on the grounds that it is
both too realistic and too simple.

But Sherriff’s achievement has
been to establish and maintain
theatrical suspense with a re-

markable economy of means and
in a way that few other current
dramatists can match. His cen-
tra! figure is a bank clerk in the
late ‘forties, an amiable man of
regular habits who is used to re-
turning home nightly at the same
time, and who has few interests
beyond his wife, the work of a
local social club, and his chrysan-
themums, One night he does not
arrive from the City at the usual
time. His wife is distracted; but
on the next night, precisely at
seven, he Treappears as _ usual,
clearly with no idea where he
has spent the intervening
twenty-four hours. He has
lost a day. He is a man “with
a dark space in his mind,” Pre-
sently it is seen that during that
space, that twenty-four hours, he
might well ha® committed réb-
bery and murder, There is noth-
ing to prove that he did not. The
web grows tighter about him.
Sherriff increases the pressure un -
til the very last moment when he
suddenly relaxes it and we can
breathe again. It is admirably
done, in its way a small miracle
of construction, though some may
hold that the end is too obviously
contrived, But Sherriff had to
solve his problem, and it is diffi-
cult to say hibw he could have
solved it better. He has not pat-
ronised any of his people. This is
not a dramatist’s lofty glance at
the suburbs. It is, in its charac-



LL LTT
——

IT'S CRICKET,CRICKET,CRICKET!!!

Slashing our stocks of cricket

gear we have cut

prices on all

bats, gloves, pads, balls down

to near cost...

A. BARNES &

ae
SF



a

nuine goods

31 Swan Si.



come running!

co., LTD.

x
»
Lennidcdité(ttiécriérr; }\QQEEEREEEEREP SESS

[OT en ene

\



Bridgetown

iy

ter-drawing, a piece of unforced
truth, and the company—led by
Sir Ralph Richardson, and Marian
Spencer as his wife—have ap-
proached it in the right way.

pC
Mele

Trewin

Frederick Lonsdale. the author
of The Way Things Go, at the
Phoenix Theatre, would be the
last to hold that his play is a slice
of life. Lonsdale has never wor-
ried about truth in the theatre.
While his people can toss out their
epigrams, spark out the bright
“lines” with which he has made
his reputation, that is all that mat-
ters. The piece is contrived on the
same pattern as usual. That is to
say, a Duke and his relations keep
the wit going, and an amusing,
slight love-story is played out
against the glittering background.
It is all superficial and adroit: it
proves that Lonsdale has neither
advanced nor retreated since he
wrote Aren’t We All? and The
Last of Mrs. Cheyney a quarter
of a century ago. Here he has a
variety of efficient actors, notably
Glynis Johns, who has a direct,
husky charm; Michael Gough, who
is blessed with a kind of stinging-
nettle sincerity; and Ronald
Squire, who has been rolling the
Lonsdale epigrams around his
tongue for many years.

The prolific ‘g@mes Bridie is an-
other type of dramatist again. He
does not trouble about construc-
tion as Sherriff does, or about the
gilded phrase in the manner of
Lonsdale, Instead, he _ writes
comedies that are wise, witty, and
often wandering: that begin well
and fade away: strange, formless,
queerly likeable affairs that some-
times remain in the mind and
sometimes do not. Mr. Gillie, at
the Garrick Theatre, is one of his
lesser pieces, It is the study of a
failure, a man who, for all his ill
luck, has more claim to the re-
spect of posterity than many peo-
ple hailed by the world as suc-
cesses. He is a schoolmaster in a
little Scottish village. None of his
pupils has done him justice, but
Gillie does not mind. He has al-
Ways another possible swan—one,
alas, that must inevitably become
a soose. In the play we see how
two of Gillie’s latest hopes, a pit-
boy who is a_ potential literary
genius, and a doctor’s daughter
who should be an eminent violin-
ist, go—after a clandestine mar-
riage—from Scotland to London.
When they return six months lat-
er, we find the boy has made
money by throwing over all that
Gillie had taught him, and has be-
come a dubious young trickster.
The girl, alas, is on the same road.





Gillie has failed again, and he is
shortly also to lose his post and



IN BRITAIN

his house. Never mind. There is
always hope: he has heard of an-
other possible genius somewhere
around the corner. And he can al-
ways console himself with the
thought that he has been, as it
were, an opener of cages: that he
has allowed his birds to try their
wings in freedom before the cat
has pounced on them. We are
aware, from a prologue, that
Gillie has no chance to proceed;
that, indeed, he is run over and
killed a short time after the play
ends. This is unfortunate. i,
after seeing Alastair Sim in the
part—he is an actor who is always

intel alive—we cannot con-
ceive a dead Gillie. Without
him the play would be nothing.

As it is, it is little more than an
elongated anecdote, pleasant,
warm-hearted, but in substance
dangerously thin.

The principal London visitor
from abroad has been Sidney
Kingsley’s Detective Story at the
Princess Theatre. This play of
New York police methods, a melo-
drama with a difference, excited
its first audience and should be
sure of a reasonable life, if only
for its qualities as a document. It
has other qualities as well. It
tells a good story swiftly and
there is little nonsense about it.
By no means a major play, but a
telling one in the theatre, and ex-
tremely well acted by Douglass
Montgomery as a fanatical detec-
tive, Helen Backlin as his wife,
and Charles Farrell as a grating
police chief. ;

Outside London. the most im-
portant event has been a classical
revival, Measure for Measure,
with which the Stratford-upon-
Avon Festival Company opens its
season well in advance of the us-
ual date. It is not a favourite
play, but it comes off exceedingly
well at Stratford, thanks to the
imaginative directness of Peter
Brook’s production—in a full text
—and to the power of John Giel-
gud’s Angelo, a_ presentation,
beautifully-phrased, of a man who
yields to the vice he has punished
so rigorously in others. Stratford
has found also a new young act-
ress, Barbara Jefford. Her Isa-
bella—much younger than the us-
ual players of the part—for once
sustains our sympathy and does
not freeze us, as so many Isabellas
are apt to do, with an excess of
icy virtue. Stratford's second
production of the Festival is a re-
vival of Tyrone Guthrie’s version
of Henry the Eighth, with one or
two important changes in the cast.
Thus Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies has
followed Diana Wynyard as Queen
Katharine, 4s





BRITISH OIL ENGINES cexeort) LTD.

Sole Concessionaires for the export of

- IRRLEES: PETTER:; MEADOWS: McLAREN

PETTER-FIELDING

INDUSTRIAL & MARINE

ENGINES

Popular Power Producers

PETTER FIELDING 16-80 B.H.P.

Also the famous type AV series 11 single and twin cylinder

cold starting 3—10 B.H.P.

4 Speed range 500 — 1,500 r.p.m.
- SEE US FOR COMPETITIVE PRICES.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY Ltd.



SOLE AGENTS


























Barbados








SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950



Play safe !—Brylcreem your hair. Dry hair, Tight Scalp,
shea loose hair on your comb— these are danger
signals that point the need for Brylcreem’s double benefit :
(1) Day-long smartness, (2) Lasting hair health.

Massage with Brylcreem stimulates the scalp,
encourages natural hair growth, prevents common
Its pure emulsified oils put new
life into Dry hair and impart a splendid

gloss. Don’t take any chances--Brylcreem Say

hair troubles.

your hair.

DAY-LONG SMARTNESS
LASTING HAIR HEALTH





That's the DOUBLE BENFFIT of BRYLCkKEEM



mee



Veen







Your dog is a tame wild dog

THAT DOG of yours does what he’s
told—generally | He’s a nice, kind,
gentle, well-behaved dog—most of
the time! But has it ever struck you
that his ancestors weren’t like that
at all? The dogs of long ago, from
whom he has gradually been bred,
were wild animals.

This means that life under a root
has disadvantages and difficulties for
him. In his natural wild state he'd
be hunting, killing and eating other
animals, He’d be eating the herbs to
which his instincts led him. He'd be
Tunning and roaming {or miles
wherever he liked, whenever he
wanted,

Now he lives with you. He gets

good wholesome food, but it’s
domesticated food. He gets
exercise, but oniy when

you've time to give it him.
So he needs two additions

to his food. He needs



vitamins which his domesticated diet
may lack. And—because he seldom
gets quite enough exercise, especially
in bad weather—he needs the
mineral substances which help to
provide a rich pure blood supply.

Bob Martin’s Condition Tablets

one a day) supply both these needs
in precisely balanced proportions.
By helping to renew the red blood
cells and by supplementing his
ordinary diet, they do much to pre-
vent such common disorders as
constant scratching, listlessness, loss
of appetite and constipation. They
help to give him healthy bones and
teeth and a fine lustrous coat. They
help to keep him a healthy, high-
spirited, good-tempered dog.

If you want further infor-
mation about the care of dogs
write to Bob Martin Export
Limited (Advisory Depart-
ment), Southport, England.

MARTIN’S

for doggy good health







IMPORTANT



to every
motorist

For every motorist there comes a time when he is faced

with the problem of deciding between various makes
of tyre. In the past, whatever his choice it has invari-
ably meant the sacrifice of some desirable feature, That
difficulty no longer exists, for with the New Dunlop
Fort, Dunlop has produced the one tyre that has
everything. It’s the natural

result of leadership—a

leadership which has been
maintained since the Dunlop
Rubber Company Ltd.
became the first tyre manu-

facturers, 61 years ago.



DUNLOP

ee Peete ReRtRiNcsetin

ECKSTEIN BROS.

483.56

— Bay Street

|





Baar



SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950

Saudi
Arabia
Protests














CAIRO, July 8

The Egyptia WSPat
Misra stated -day that
Arabi had tested
against her iurried dec not
to support the United tions
Security Council's re to
aid South Korea, €
consulting othe:
ments.

The Saudi Arabian note was
understood to stress that Egypt's
decision to abstain from the Secur-
ity Council, vote ran “counter to

Saudi Arabian policy
All Misra in sharp comment to-
bi

day said: “Siding with the
powers at the expense of Eg
may have serious repercuss
Arab unity but diverg
foreign issue cannot bs
by Egypt’.

If war could not be prevented



YAS OF



ice on

accepted



as seemed unlikely—it could be
used for waging a defensive war
A Dangerous Ilusion
Discarding the proposal of

Western European neutrality as a
“dangerous illusion”, the report
said that the plan must be oper-
ated jointly by Atlantic powers.

The report said it was a matter
of “absolute necessity to suppress
Communist fifth columns in the
nations of Western Europe”. In
time of war these might number
“several million men”,

Lebanon in non-committal reply
to the Security Council decision,
said last night “the Lebanese Gov-
ernment declares its readiness to
withhold aid from any aggressor”.

Though Saudi Arabia made this
statement on the Security Coun-
cil’s resolution, Press reports
reaching here said she and other
Arab countries were likely to ex-
press support.

King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia
) was already reported to have tele-

graphed Washington his full sup-
port for the United States in the
struggle against Communism.

—Reuter.

Police Hunt
Sex Criminals
IN AUSTRIA

VIENNA, July 8.

Special detachments of the
Austrian Criminal Police are try-
ing to seal off three long stretches
of Austrian frontiers to prevent
the escape abroad of men wanted
in connection with the deaths of
three women murdered for sexual
crimes within the last ten days.

First is Guido Zingerle wanted
in connection with the murder of
Miss Feln Munro, an official of the
* British Art Council, who was

' brutally murdered on Patscher-
kofer Mountain above Insburck
on July 1. Zingerle is believed
to be trying to escape to Italy.

The second is A. Singer whose
») identity card was found in a room
_ of the Salazburg Hotel in which
16-year-old Gertrude Weber was
found dead on a bed with deep
knife wounds on her breast and
abdomen. Singer is reported
to be trying to escape over the
mountains into Bavaria.

The third case is that of a man
on a blue bicyele who killed 18-
year-old Elli Kastner and wound-
ed 19-year-old Antonia Panholder
When they defended themselves
against his indecent assault when
he discovered them bathing in a
remote stream in Lower Austria.
This man is believed to be trying
to cross the frontier into Hungary.

—Reuter

i



















TWO AMERICAN
FIGHTERS LOST

@ From Page 1
attack was made on the port and
naval base Wonsan, 15 miles north
of the 39th parailel, where good
results were reported,

The oil refinery at Wonan was
hit. B-26 medium bombers, fifth
airforce, destroyed road and rail-
way bridges on Chumunjim on the
east coast, just south of the 38th
parallel. Possible hits were scored
on the railroad, road and bridge











W.1L. vs Northants

@ From Page 5

delivery for four, but bad ball
were rare.
Marshall gave a very hard

chance to the wicketkeeper at 44,
when Fiddling touched a legside







ick but could not hold it. in tae
e over Marshall hit a lofty
r rive to the boundary and
iin the next over put him

ahe of Stollmeyer
There were indications of a
record crowd, a thick ring of
spectators squatting on the grass.
At lunch the score was 82,




ng 43, Stollmeyer 30,
nd extras 9.
After Lunch

Marshall continued to
more aggressive batsman
lunch when Nutter and
shared the attack, He reac
titty in one and three quarter
leurs although there might have
been a runout before then had

picked up cleanly at mid-
ke The hundred was raised

105 minutes and the patner-
ship seemed well set. Marshall
however did not look so safe
Stollmeyer and once appeared to

the
afte:

aetna
orown

be



as









e a hard chance to the wit

eper on the leg side. Stollmey
er’s defensive back play was par-
ticularly sound and for a time
difficulty was found in getting
the ball away particularly when
the field was set cleverly for the
Spin bowling of Broderick and
Garlick,

Stollmeyer reached fifty in

2 hours, 25 minutes and had then

hit only one four. Marshall had

escaped from stumping when 88

for he went yards out to

Broderick only for Fiddling to

fail to gather the ball. When

99, however, Marshall lost his

wicket, Fiddling this time taking

a catch at the wicket.

The stand had lasted 5 minutes
short of three hours and put on
180. Marshall’s score included
14 fours, Only four runs were
added before Stollmeyer was bowl-
ed for 70, and before tea, taken
with the score at 221 for three,
Worrell was run out,

After Tea

Soon after tea Nutter gained his
reward for some very steady
bowling when he had Trestrail
lb.w. The ball struck Trestrail a
painful blow on the knee and he
limped off the field. This brought
Gomez in to join Christiani and
they looked like taking the total
é three hundred, but Gomez
caught, and it was left to
Christiani and Goddard to carry
or until stumps were drawn with
the score 348 for 5. ,

The bowlers and fielder
obviously feeling the effects of
an arduous day in the field and
the closing stages were marked
by some fine batting from
Christiani and rungs were coming
faster than at any other time
Christiani was still undefeated
with 77 when stumps were drawn
Scores :



were






W.1, ist Innings se
J. Stollmeyer b Garlick 70
R, Marshall c Fiddling b Broderick 99
F. Worrell run out 18
K, Trestrail l.b.w. b. Nutter 20
R. Christiani not out iy
G. Gomez ec Garlick b Brown 27
J. Goddard not out 14
Extras 18
Total (for 5 wkts.) 348
Fall of wkt 1—180, 2—184, 3--217
4—223, 5-276 4
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M Run
Nutter 29 4 wo 1
Brice 15 3 48 9
Brown 22 5 85 1
Broderick 2s 3 “A :
Garlick 27 3
a —Reuter.



POWERFUL RED FORCE
THRUSTS SOUTH

@ From Page 1
rapidly on Taejon to avoid being
cut off. 7

Intelligence reports reaching
Allied headquarters here describe
Korean rivers as swollen by
heavy rains. But military circles
pointed out glumly that this had
not prevented Communists from
getting 50 tanks, heavy artillery,
and battalions to the Ansong
river at Pyongtaek yesterday as a
prelude to the drive which threw
back American forces at Chonan,
key railroad, at dawn to-day,

A further threat and perhaps a
more dangerous one appeared to
be developing on the East coast
across the mountain hump run-
ning down through South Korea

objective in an area west of —an area which has hitherto been Koreans for many g
Pyongtak.—Reuter. quiet.—(Reuter). had paid a nominal tribute each
- Ce a



Lubrication is Important!





and independence.
Japan annexed this country in
1910 and proceeded to exploit its










Korea Through
The Ages

WASHINGTON, D.C., July.
Throughout its modern history the ancient nation of Korea
has been engaged in a tragic struggle for freedom, unity

year
that country’s centuries-old pre-

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

























f Korea,—Express, and Princess Margaret will dro;
one more rung on the ladder ot
succession,

Prince Charles has the “edge”
on the new baby, particularly if
it is a boy. A baby sister, how-
ever, might “steal” the spotlight
now and again from its older
brother just as Princess Margaret
has temporarily snatched it fron
Elizabeth

The same team which attended
the birth of Charles will insure
that the second baby is brought
safely into the world.

salute



to China in recognition of svemsenssesnchininsignetssrnsemaneatse







WAITS | iy nea

»stensibly to insure ne “changeing”
s introduced—because it
‘archaic and antiquated,”

amily, public and Commonwealth
celebrations.

Meanwhile Britain waits
quietly hoping, like Prince Philip

PAGE ELEVEN













FOR A GIRL |
|

LON s }

ROYAL FINGERS are busy knittin {

the doctors, nurses and nursery are ready and a'i Britair Elastoplas

is quietly waiting for the birth of Princess Elizabeth's = '

second child. i “eaten

All Britain is hoping, too, that Elizabeth's seco wil k ed keep you

make a “pigeon pair’ — a girl to share the nursery at Each tin contains a variety

Clarence House with the princess’ first-born, Bonnie Prince sizes

Charlie.

The birth is expected iny Noted gynaecologist Sir W ] t ] st
August, Elizabeth is still out ana/liam Gilliat is again looking alte as Op as
about and there is less drama] Elizabeth, who is in “exceller a na =
than preceded the arriva] of]}health,” and will attend her a (Fist AID DRESSINGS ?
Prince Charles because there is}the birth at Clarence House ! IN aa a Sk al
now a future male heir to th Sister Rowe ; e
Britis!! throne. Sister Helen Maude Rowe, nurs¢

But the British public none-|in charge at the birth of -
theless thoroughly digests eac!|will be called on again s
m “agi of ore ae = com-} Elizabeth will again be permitte: oases oe am -
Ing blessed event, about the|/to administer trylene to hersel a
.. ne precedents to lt jf the later stages of sabor, au BRUSH ower UP.. . YOUR eee SMILE eee

arrangements will follow the now
Prince Charlie established pattern

Bonnie Prince Charles is irrev The new baby will Fe born His or
ccubly second in line of suc (Her Royal Highnes v 1 the title
cession to the throne and ha c! Prince or Princess
stolen some of the thunder from A few days before the t of
the new arrival—if it is a boy |Charles, King George VI amended
Another boy would never b [the 1917 edict of King George V\|
more than the younger son and{which limited the title of prince|
the younger sons never have en- Jor princess to the children of the|
joyed much fame in England sovereign and to the children of | .

But a baby sister—that woul [the sons of the sovereign The| a 7
be like having another Elizabeth ]new decree included the children| .
or Margaret to watch growing |of the marriage of Elizabeth anc
up, going out with boys, find- {Prince Philip of Edinburgh WITH THE CORRECT-
ing a dream Prince and gettin The present King also scrapped vr r
married. the ola pacnintion’ requiring Ae Wisdom's straight line head reaches ———————--—— Or

SN When the new baby is born it }attendance of the Home Secretary awkward corners easily.
will be third in line to the thron t the birth of a royal child

was - : —
Wisdome's angle in the

handle is the secret of

us comfortable control

vrs
* Wisdom's widely-

tufts ‘comb’ bet.

lean where deca

Wisdonz

ADDIS LTD. OF



Ede — Official

Home Secretary Chuter Ede will
ve telephoned and wil) make the
ficial announcement of the baby’s
arrival in a bulletin pinned to the
doors of the Home Office Depart-
ment building in Whitehall

The news will be flashed every-
where, guns will

HERTFORD, MAKERS OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN (780

royal
great

boom in
and then will follow



“THE SHAVE OF YOUR LIFE"

calmly

















resources thoroughly until the eminence over her neighbour. But this powerless government, under | himself, that the baby is a girl °
end of World War II. But for the Japanese took an active part Dr. Syngman Rhee, campaigned And so confident is Princess m three acts
years prior to the annexation, in Korea from the first moment unceasingly for independence. [Â¥Plizabeth that everything will go
Korea had been a pawn in the of entry. The Cairo conference in 1943 Jiormally that she is making pub-
big power politics of Japan, China promised independence “in due fiice engagements for October
and Russia. Japan, after winning its war course,” and in 1948 the Rhee (LN.S.)
Peace-seeking Korea ushered in with the Russians, made Korea a government at Seoul was recog-
its modern era by concluding an protectorate for a time until the nised by the U.N., though the :
“Open Door” treaty with Japan in annexation, when Korean proper- northern half of the country was MACARTHUR IS U.N.
1876. But Nippon promises of .ties were seized or expropriated, under Russian domination, Mn
independence were n forgotte Korean patriots penned their Now, as their country is torn COMMANDER
The Sino-Japanese war of 1894-95 own declaration of independence by war, Koreans may recall with V
left Japan the dominant foreign]|in 1919. This touching and beau- despair these gentle and hopeful @ From Page 1
power in Korea. This hold was|tifully written document was pre- words in their declaration of in- | of the Army's Philippine Depart
consolidated by victory in the]sented to the Japanese with dependence: “A new era awakes ment in 1930 he became Chief of =~ SPREAD A FILM OF
Russu-Japanese War a decade} peaceful intent—but the signers before our eyes, the old world of | Staff COLGATE BRUSHLESS
later, and the Koreans had no| were executed. force is gone, and the new world He returned to the Philippine [. ~~ ' OVER YOUR BEARD,
free government of their own un- A provisional government in of righteousness and truth is fas American Military Adviser and - a
til the elections held in 1948 under | exile was formed. For many years here.”’—(1LN,S.) retired from the army in 1937. In wnt
United Nations auspices. July, 1941 President Roosevelt j
called him out of retirement anc 4
Obscured gave him the command of. the 4
American forces in the Far East fi
Old Korea’s origins are obscur- MacArthur was in command in f
ed time, but her. people claim u Manila Bay as the Japs closed in #
history of more than 42 certuries, but got away to Australia, telling
notes the National Geographic the Philippine people if shall §
Society. Korean legend celebrates return”. He has not been for 18 a
a founder named Tan Gun, of years —Reuter : y »
superhuman origin, whose alleged “9 ~~ SHAVE.IT AND YOUR lt #
tomb is still venerated. More SaaS} BEARD — O6P, , ba i i --
credible are the historic refer- =] r ad Hi 1 4 9
ences toa Chinese noble who i i d
emigrated to Korea in 1122 B C.,| SRA VIEW CUEST \\ é
and founded a dynasty there that 1 $)| $
ecu Start training for it NOW! HOUSE || Seater encoh conore COLGATE ©
ee FIRST CHOOSE 6 HASTINGS, BARBADOS _ (i)! while shaving, for that *
_ Much of what we now know as There is still room at the top for the fully qualified ss cane wadetor es , | soothed after-shave feeling ->
Korea had attained a degree of YOUR CAREER i ‘ed for the job. YOU can be that EXCELLENT CUISINE | "i — ‘
, man who is fitted for the job. YOU can be { without trace of sting or
unity and enjoyed an old culture ACCOUNTANCY EXAMS, man—successfal, prosperous, with your future FULLY STOCKED BAR )), Sung ‘
at the time the Roman Empire AVIATION assured—by studying at home in your spare time, RATES: § . | burn, there’s nothing to ‘
flourished. In the 14th Century lle guided by the personal tuition of The Bennatt * $5.00 per Day & (1 touch Colgate Brushless SHAVE CREAM
the relatively small peninsular BO0K-KEEPING College. Distance makes no difference. upwards \ r
country became known as the tenant (Inclusive) 1
kingdom of “Chosen,” a name CIVIL SERVIOE WE WILL HELP YOU TO Apply -~ A better shave without a brush than ver had with
often given Korea to this day. COMMERCIAL ART Mrs. W. S. HOWELL $ q jan you ever had with one
Ironically, it means “Land of the ene ACHIEVE YOUR AMBITION ec Re —_—_—
Morning Calm.” 6.P.0, ENG, DEPT, Get your feet on the ladder of success TO-DAY. Le | | * e @

Korea, after completing its
treaty of 1876 with the Japanese,
made similar “open door” agree-
ments with a number of other
powers, including the United
States. But none served to pro-
tect Korea-from.aggression and
exploitation, a fact which has
prompted historians to refer to
the Far East trouble spot as a
“forgotten nation.”

Prior to the Sino-Japanese War,
generations









INST, MUN, EN@.
JOURNALISM
LANGUAGES
MATHEMATICS
MATRICULATION
MINING

PLASTICS

QUANTITY SURVEYING
RADIO (Short Wave)
SECRETARYSHIP
SHORTHAND (Pitman's)
TELEVISION
WIRELESS

WORKS MANAGERS

If your requirements

are not listed above,

write us for free
advice

Write to The Bennett College and learn how
thousands of people just like you have reached
the top with the right guidance. A well-paid
job can be yours— tart this pleasant spare-time
study NOW.

188

Direct Mail to DEPT.

‘The Bennett College

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND



THAT

BOY FRIEND,
DOES

YOUR HAIR

G0 10



Is your hair worthy of a second look ? There is absolutely



For prompt and skilled lubrication drive your Fordson
vehicle in to us. We are your Fordson specialists, and do
the job thoroughly at low fixed prices. Let us also tell you
all about the latest Thames Trucks with their big bodies,
roomy all-steel cabs, semi-forward control, etc. You will be
as enthusiastic as we are about them.

FOrdSOn Vans » Thames Trucks
CHARLES MeENEARNEY & €0., LTD.









no reason why it shouldn't be.
the unruly hair with A.K. POMADE, that an inexperi-

It is so simple to subdue even

mos. : :

enced person can achieve the look of a professional hair-do
following the simple directions on the tin.

| eg



Why not foilow the girls who know, and
dress your hair the easy way with



REGENT
GASOLINE



100%
BRITISH

Distributors:—

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.

JAMES A, LYNCH & CO,, LTD



({
(
ut

a





i
i
{
'
‘

Seaaas=

en

PAGE TWELV!

LOCAL FISHING









Every year the fishing hare of the Colony’'s sideration then some idea
indusiry of Barbados in- food and finance, can be formed as to the
creases in value and with This year nearly five present value of the indur
the help of the Fisheries million fish have been offi- try and its potentialities
Departinent of the Govern cially marketed by fisher- Pictures show some of
ment Service it is contri- men. If the unregistered the activities of members
buting an ever growing sales are taken into con- of the fishing fleet.

FISHERMEN return from a trip that began at 6 a.m. and lasted until 2 p.m. On this occasion
they caught not more than half a fish basket full, that is about 200,

e4
AT RIGHT TOP—A crowd at
the Government Fish Market
waiting to buy fish. CENTRE:
The fishing fleet at Tent Bay,
Rathsheba, makes ready to put
to sea.
BOTTOM: A fisherman pulled
a funny face at the camera.



bo cer

MR. DUDLEY W. WILES, Fisheries Officer inspecis the work
being carried out when the new Experimental Boat was in the

process of construction, The boat was launched on October 21 4 FISH PORTER gives a lesson in_ peaceful relaxation as he
lest year and engaged in fishing for the first time on December waits with his barrow outside the Government Fish Market for

12. It has been carrying out valuable research work. a call from a boat that wants its catch talten to market.

=

Ihe Best STOVE to own ONE

ss @

FLORENCE OiL STOVE







CLEAN and ECONOMICAL
You will be



very pleased



















Yes '—just one dose of MACLEAN
BRAND STOMACH POWDER relieved
Indigestion pain and discomfort! This
wonderfully quick and effective relief
from Heartburn, Flatulence, Nausea,
Acidity and Stomach Pains due to In-
digestion is made possible by the fact
that MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH
POWDER is a perfectly balanced
scientific formula.

Make Meal Times

a Pleasure!
Why go on suffering? Tryjust one dose
to-day but make sure you enuine
MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH POW-
DER bearing the signature “ ALEX. C.
MACLEAN” on bottle and carton,

*MACLEAN BRAND —=
STOMACH POWDER

Bole Agents:—

and OVEN



City Garage Trading Co., Ltd.

VICTORIA ST. - 4671



rnin i /7 |

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE





SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950



Next time you go to
your chemist ask for a

ID

ee,

C.F HARRISON &CO (BARBADOS) LTD








With this
NATURAL-TONE POWDER

It is not how face powder looks in the pack,



but on your skin, that matters. Evening in Paris
powder is naturally-toned to give the complexion

that soft golden glow of youtllui skin ...flactering,



alluriag. Super-sifted and in several smart shades,
Evening in Peris 1s the powder of perfection
your vital aid tu a Hawless make-up
g, é 0 72 @
x
Evening in Paris Porfame Lipstick and
—Cold Cream — i anishing Cream— Tale P Oo WwW DB Ee R

ntine — Hair Cream





fy BOU 8 JO18





NF ~
You took better every day!

Miness, influenza, or even a | revitalizing course of Phyllosan
severe cold, lowers vitality _ tablets. Taken regularly, these
rapidly, but the restoration of tablets act as a gereral tonic,
health and vigour may often be — stimulate metabolism, and in-
tediots and projonged crease energy. They are “a
Speed up. recovery by taking a great help, a wonderful tonic.”

4

To speed recovery—take

PHYLLOSAN

and you'll be fit again sooner"













A BRIGHTER
LONGER LIFE

“‘ Life’s wonderful,”’
she says, ““I°ve
banitshea greasy skin.°’



e

Tamoxa is the secuet of ner perfect skin health, the only true foundation
of lasting loveliness.

The world famous dermatologist whe creates the ee es
ee a a’, ees ont Pee
preparations for each type of skin and age.

Mf your skin is too greasy, sen Aluatahaalincaranicced

restore its naturel and freshness.

te Gean your skin night and morning with coul, deop-eleansing
ENNOXA COMPLEXION MILK. It floats away imparitios,
leaves your skin wonderfully smooth and supple.

%& Restore the ‘tone’ of your akin, contract those open,
relaxed pores with daily applications of INNOXA ASTRINGES®
LOTION. (Over 30's use INNOXA OPEN PORE LOTION —
for « vei ¥ greasy skim or blackheads, all ages sheald uso
INNOXA SOLUTION 41).

%& Stimulate your skin with regular treatments ef the famens
INNOXA WHITE MASK; it contains the sunshine vitamin D
and is « complete ‘ facial’ in itself.



BuY ----

DURALIFE

AUTO BATTERIES
‘Ke Wee the day time always use INNOXA MATINE DAY CREASE on
SCKA FOUNRATIN LOrK. They bey pow Gale with Ebeonite Separators
powders beautifully matt all day.

|
URROND hout, prgporation COURTESY GARAGE
| Whitepark Rd. ROBERT THOM LTD. Dial 4391

jor the lovelenest that tats a SYelime ne

On Sale at BOOKER’S DRUG STORES (B’dos) LTD.
Broad Street and Hastings .

i 7 oo
SSS SSS












SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950

HENRY

NOI






BY WALT DISNEY
T TO RADIO OUR LOCATION,

SO DAT...

AX gai oe,
Vip A



AY

Y

C
\ \

WN]

IN

/

a




BLONDIE

»S& WH} Ii\)

BY CHIC YOUNG



‘SY

= |
SSS he
MY LITTLE EVERETT) _|
LOCKED HIMSELF — aye a
IN OUR UPSTAIRS })}~ OH, My
BATHROOM GOODNESS
“ a













—



<
\S\
ZL {

1 ]
i |

|
GOD
Qo 7%.

[amp o



We








p
>
:
fo
|
® rm) ce £. \
aR O'S BERS BF voune.



BY

inthe

SET FIRE TO THE
BUILDING. THAT/LL

I GOT A ROCK INSIDE THIS PAPER.
LIGHT UP AN! I'LL THROW IT WH THE
ROOF OF THE EXPRESS OFFICE!



WITH WHISPER

( THAT SEEMS TO BE THE THEORY,
AND NOW THIS PERSON-WHOEVER

atte _4 IT 1S =1S ON THE WAY HERE.

Whi I'M BEGINNING TO FEEL /

ii gal \\_A LITTLE SCAREY. yw
a

K. @ CANNON ......

SO, M'SIEU CANNON, YOU SAY IT WAS

SOME O7HEA PERSON ZUCCI DID NOT

SEE, AND WHO ARRIVED AFTER

a \\ CARESSE HAO LEFT ~WHO ACTUALLY

—“ >. MURDERED HIM?
Pr:

IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE

YES, WHISPER, | HAD A HUNCH
THIS CHARACTER SHOT ZUCCI.
| SAID THEY'D HAVE TO PAY
ME TO KEEP QUIET. THEY'RE {
COMING HERE TO MEET ME /
WITH THE MONEY, ! HOPE.












— ——
|WHAT A LOVELY KITCHEN!) IT'S A STEAL AT
ANO A PICTURE WINDOW! /SIXTEEN THOUSAND,
DES, I CAN SEE YOU AND I MIGHT EVEN
A | NOW, PUTTERING IN ) BE ABLE TO SHADE
THE FLOWER GARDEN le THAT iF YOU PUT

WHILE I MAKE
DINNER JUST
1

7B, UP ENOUGH CASH 6,
ake Ba _ THOUSAND...
3 | Iss














FOR YOu!





RITA LANA,
GLAMOROUS
HOLLY WOOD
QUEEN~~«

UH «IF THIS BOAT,
DOESN'T STOP
4 ROCKINGe«!4

SUNDAY XDVOCATE



| Wiring ins tallations

PAGE THIRTEEN

INDUSTRIAL
COMMERCIAL
DOMESTIC







Highest Quality Materials & Workmanship

-

Lighting Fixtures Wiring Devices

Wire & Cable

Lamps

Motors Switchgear

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.

Iweedside Road, %t. Michact







SHELL SILHOULITTES HILLMAN MINX MAGNIFICENT



The latest Hillman Minx Saloon. Four cylinder
1184.5 ex Independent front wheel suspension
Synchromatic finger tip gear Opticurve
windscreen U 1 yg control and vision,

Lockheed hydraulic brakee



OBA ha

The makers of HILILMAN CARS

recommend

L

exclusively

SHELL 9!

DOUBLE

SHELL SPIRAX 140 €

EON



A ,

a



i lA





FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCA



'E






























































































































































































































































CLASSIFIED ADS. |__rensonar _jreums vores HARBOUR LOG | SHIPPING NOTICES









SUNDAY, JULY 9%, 1950

ane ent




















































relephone 2508 Sn pein ene arti wand g rT WEEKLY AIR . Mire, Alexa Pavan, Metre, Donel Pare Ot adeaioemiaaniaidtieits
‘ | Tne, Bublig are Mereby warned wee" | aNice now mes “posible ssem{ In Touch With Barbados "George Puyan, Mrs. Marjorie Cu-|RQYAL NETHERLANDS | (7
THANKS 1 ie not hold myself responsible for | holidays Coastal Station rington, Mr. Ernest Carrington, Miss
| FOR RENT | urrvone contracting debt or debts in r Fh ut- ete inns ‘ De (West Indies) Lid. Gracita’ Faulkner, Mr. Walter Chambers, STEAMSHIP CO.

The Xe ‘ ct | hame by a written order sigr RATHO MILL TOWER HOTEL : “that they can now commur oe McFarlane, Mr. Charles The M.V. “T. B. Radar”
the t ende e f ———— = |by me wus wv ‘isi St. Vincent the following ships through thelr p, La Guaira: Sailing from Amsiercam, motierdam aceept Cargo and Pas-
sent wre °*- | HOUSES ae ~ Barbados Coast Station:— , Gittenzs 10.55 p.m é and Antwerp sengers for St. Lucia, St.
pressed syt a es ; “hk. tus S. Wallowa, Fort Townshend, Crys _ Miss Lilian Rojas, Mrs. Isabel Roja’,| yy 5 «WfERSILIA” J 7.8.11th. Vincent, Grenada. Sailing
Gecasic a 2 ae ONE-< Fontabélle. From : 8.7.90 : HE eeee aonctrue: Mrs. Tula Rojas, Mr. Miguel Rojas, Mr. MS. “HECUBA” August 45 8th Sautrddy. 8th July

y § r F | s anadle a » St .
oes M. Haynes 1s s two (2) flats— P and P Seafarer, Ramon Rojas, Miss Isabel Rojas, Miss} «ins trom Amsterdath and Dover
Ac I \ J of three (3) BE —===_ — <—e M Sand. Matena, Pet- Belem Rojas, Mstr. Ian Turner, Mstr. A VESSEL July 2ist
= . sh-basin, dining-| ‘. Hills, Sheaf Mead. Jules- John Turner, Mrs. Mary Turner, Mr $.S. “COTTICA” August 18th
paappenagnenertnets . et TOoR nnilefy ah alii > ceinenn Site Geotat John Turner, Mr, Antonio Puigbo, Mrs :
IN MEMORIAM | ; oe WANTED " Soe ees ite Foret Teresa Puigbo, Miss Caroline Lawson, Sailing to Madeira Plymouth j] B.W.1. SCHOONER OWN-
: 4) ee j 3 4 Garden State, Mormackite, Fort 4).. winifred Lawson, Mr. John Lawson, Antwerp and Amsterdam ; “
(4) bedroom ea | Box Richepanse, Ile De Noirmoutier, Kerne . Th Scholt Mstr Alfredo “WILLEMSTAD” July 25th ERS’ ASSO. (Inc.)
: : ar onl ce | 1.6.30 Ne Creck, M.V. Willemstad, Biyken, Cot- sebotts Mr. Carlos Scholtz, Mrs. Maria “ORANJESTAD” August 22nd Tel. No. 4047
, G la wal | 14.6.50-—26n i Jeanny, E ,cipator, Itinda, Harry ¢ As =F ~ 3 >, a. . 4
‘ 7 | \ , Jeanny, —_—- Sailing to Trinid Paramaribo, ©
‘ servant | HELP | ; Cit sua Clip, ‘Scholtz 6th July
€ 4 | | es : M.V thern Cities, Alcoa Clip- 56, D. t t uly, 1950
oO and 3245 for | oe ‘ Al r San Juan emera Cc.
Gc v © « ee 5245 for | “GENERAL SERVANT for housé work | sel PRESCOD B. O'NEALE Mr. Seafield Allen, Mrs. Nina Lynen,| $,8. “\COTTICA” July, 11th.
‘ an 75 & Cooking. Apply Mrs. Noél Goddard, | be io , _ eed Mr. Sven Johansson, ur. Richard Ryde, . “Hersilia” July 27th.
eT é not 1.7.50 —- Paynes Bay, St. James 8.7.50--2n| tt at fis O will be « ved { a Mr Charies Ray, Mine Elsie Barnes, Mr S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD., Mites

a Wg 7 BLUE HOt A Business stand with | ——<—<—<$<—=— — nies | Saturday Gh J ee npeee a ae - Fverton Prescot, Miss Olga Worrell, Mr renee _ : — ee -

: ‘ Tt | much future and @ commanding position | ,4 Qualified NURSE for St. Joseph's Aug del eae Walter McClean, Mrs. Christine Crom-

We k rec. Lucas Street. It has fixtures to start | #lmshouse at a salary of $60.44 per | —— well, Mrs. Leora Horsford e s e

J. E. Mi M. Gill. | business right away, For particulars, | month. Applications with Certifieate to NOTICE For Jamaica ana L a 1ona eams L 4S

9.7. 0-1 | aooly THANI BROS, Dial 3466 be forwarded to the Parochial Medical Mrs Josefina Barron, Mr. Harry
E 11.6.50,—t.f.n. | Officer, “Ellangowan,” not later than sT - 4 - = ww Barroh, Mr. Peter McClelland, Mrs. Ivy
nemory of my dear husband | ____ = Monday, 17th July, 1950 tendo eee ie, il ARRIVALS—By B.W.1.A.L. Pratt, Rev. Ernest Butler
1OLAS HUNTE departed | “RUILDING--at Cheapside Reef Road | Any Further Particulars cai be ob-| , Tandem. Incivding spec rine ee gub- | > FiQ™m Trinidad: rales, C. Est- For BRITISH GUIANA :~
nm July 9th, 1 | Large Building 50 feet by 20 feet suitable | tained from the P.M.O jeu w the plese fof the Législaturat | ene iso eee ‘ Marples. wil. ..Mr. Godfrey Watts, Mrs. Doreen Moe,| SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails
ve assed | for Club House, Casino or can be con- | A. A, B. Gta tae gilitioner Nuss a + the | Wicks BL McKenzie, hor, A. Tucker, Miss Constance Theobald, Mr, James Montreal Halifax Boston B'dos B'dos
be } | verted into rooms. Water on premises | Clerk, Poor Law Gttardians, | 410 Meo & * reat Mir | lang, Le, TOCRes, B- Tae Nolan Skinner, Hovertson, Mr. Eric Teixeira, Mr. Elliott
nd love be mine | Apply to R. Archer McKenzie, Victotia St. Joseph Aliishorise api Chagnten; D. Fisher, Viven Skt * Bascom, Mrs. Ida Gonsalyes, Mr. George] LADY RODNEY .. + 80 th June $rd July 5th July Mth July 15th July

L f ‘ | St. Dial 2947 8.7.50—2n. | 8.7, 80-—In Appltestio vee Frank Giley, N. Marshall, G. Gardinea. 1 Gonsalves, Mr. Clement Chatterton. CAN. CRUISER 12th July 15th July - 25th July 25th July

Yet we lov ‘ | Steet Sectiaisiietlietittale | ec. a | undersien os , From La Guatra: . ; For GRENADA :— LADY NELSON 22nd July 25th July 27th July 5th Aug. 6th Aus.
_Mrs. Maud H fe O'Donald ARMEN”.-Situate In Westbury New CLERK with previous office experi-| 1950 oO 2 DE Eldora Conger, Carolyn Conger, Judy Mis¢ Celia Mancini, Mrs, Phillipa | CAN. CHALLENGER llth Aug. 14th Aug 24th Aug, 24th Aug.
Clara oad. Apply to Mrs, S. C. Chandler. | ence — Salary $80.00 per month, Appls | ©'*"! Conger, Phyllis Louise Rohn, A. Sav-| stewart, Miss Lautina Samuel, Miss] LADY RODNEY .. 23rd Aug. 26th Aug. 28th Aug. 6thSep 7th Sep.

§.7.50—1n | Near Dercor Road Black Rock to The Secretary, Dowding Estates & |---| orenan, Rosette Savorman, Roderic Sa-| Monica Stewart, Lady Arrundell, LADY NELSON llth Sep. 14th Sep, 16th Sep. 25th Sep. 26th Sep.
} 8.7.50--2n. | Trading Co., Lid. with written appli NOTICE vorgnan, Pre 9 earee et one
a — cation 1.7.50.—8n Artonio Sanehez, Spence Sincla y

FOR ESPERANZA—St. James Coast now . : “ Schmidt ; NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
ilable for rent Fully furnished LADY for the Office at Hotel Royal ! ao i et it c. DEPARTURES—By B.W.1.A.L HARRISON COLLEGE B’dos B’dos Boston Halifax Montreal

wilihibicsetiie fodern convenience; excellent sea bath- | Apply in writing and f téon to the | 8" ws 2 7 - For Trinidad:
ib ene cotineerinte a | Modern, convenic Te athe, Ra Le ‘ truction Parochial | yyy Laurie Robinson, Mt, Fredetitk LADY RODNEY . 27th July 28th July 7th Aug. 9th Aug. 12th Aug.
AUTOMOTIVE } ——__—— : | Mea ¢ resic ¢ lends at ) Maing, Mrs. Adriana Maing, Mr. Gar, ENTRANCE EXAMINATION LADY iN 18th Aug) 20th Aug. 29th Aug. 3ist Aug. 3rd Sep.
FARAWAY, St, Philip Coast, fully fur- 4 | pk 5 . noe ms field Foster, Mr. Joseph ‘Igrylor, M. ‘The Entrance Examination for can- “y ODNEY .. 9th Sep. 21st Sep. 30th Sep. 1st Oct. 5th Oct.
: ' bedrooms, water mill supply,| MISCELLANEOUS f catic may be} Jonn Bayne, Mr. Martin Kellman, Miss | didates whose names have been listed DY NELSON 8th Oct. 10th Oct. 19th Oct. 20th Oct. 24th Oct.

CAR—Vauxhall 14 h.p. Saloon 1948] Lit plant, Double carport, 2 servants’ vt om the i Tre rer Bac _| Sylvia Hutchinson, Mrs. Rose Teixeira, | for consideration for admission to Har- Matis
rodel_1,900 miles, in excellent conai- | Toms. July, September on. Dial. 4476 Wanted to purehase One (1) Liquor! § will be req ees rison College, in September, 1950, will

$ Ria “ fe 5.6 1h c Ss. E. ‘o 10. whic . be re ed on the 3 hud
thh-Courteay Garage. Dis snié 25.6.50-—t.f.n fiemnce RAPPly 8 A fe 2 ade @ specifications in ) ====ai———aeee 7 * Ke Oe URE ie Viake or Aaa N.B.—Subject to change without Rotice. All vessels fitted With cold storage cham-

8.7.50—3n} = \GRANDALE,” St, Matthias Gap, 7.7,50.—t.t.n. | & q VOR LICENSE NOTICE Must attend on Friday 2ist and Mon- and freight rates on application to :—
ae 5 ces Hastings. Unfurnished, two-storey stone- | Lor t bir itself t a 24th July, between the hots of
pEAR-1M7 Super De Luxe | Ford. | wall, 3 bedrooms, etc., garage, servants'|Persuns to listen to ‘Jeffreys Beer contract to the lowest or an3 LIQ 9 10 a.m. and 12.18 p.m GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.
— dition, Tyres & Battery | room, Available August Ist. Ferreira] Landy de Montbrun and his artistes, to | Tende The application of Lillian Tudor, BOYS OF 10 YEARS AND OVER
New sont VINCENT GRIFFITH, 2881 9.7.50—2n.| be broadcast over Radio Distribution | ful applicant wilt be holder of liquor licensd No. 575 of 1950| Will be required on Saturday 22hd si
: . SS from 9.00 9.15 p.m. on 12th July s two (2) surities rrante fenne Nu . sspect of | July from 9.10 a.m to 1,30 p.m |
NEW MORRIS 10 ewt, Station Wagon LARGE YARD and SHED, apply next %.6.50—16 n. | o bind themselves ee eine ae board and hike (Luncheon Break 12.00 to 12.40) and on 1
Cah scat seven or seat ; can fold ‘and oe - bade bi - Sue Rion, . aS : TPCTEPORE: | OF be work shop with shedroof attached at Upper | Monday 24th July from 9.10 a.m. to CIE. GLE., I RANSATLANTIQUE
‘ corner Roebuck Street and Country For Rent or Boarding Two (2) Gen- F. F. PILGRIM, . wie Michae ¥ - {12.30 p.m
venicle be used er FORT ROYAL ‘ 50, — . ¥ 7 ’ Collymore Rock, St. Michael, for per 2
GARAGE LTD. PHONE 4904 } Read 7.7,.50.—t.£.N.} tlemen Large double Bedroom for the Par. Tréasurér, St , Thomas Sinsien 45+ tide ‘wald. ticente. at followin Candidates must use the Roebuck
6.7.50—3n. | MAPLE VILLE", St. John—Furnished j tight Party near to city. Dial — ; Sete se premises viz:—a board and shingle shop oe saseooe and reper to os Otice FRENCH LINE

a \PLE -E", St. J ed, 5.7 oe étache ssidence at Tweedside Rd in the first instance ey will require
Slag therahet alae in & . wan. | Wc. and Bath, gatas, good tea Gathing. attached to residence a tw neils, a rubber and an unused one re tee
CAR—Vauxhall. Velox 18 h.p. Pet | 4 healt) © codler spot. Long terr ; . | ' St. Michael 9 pencils, a ruuper b + Sailing to Trinidad Sailing to Plymouth
fect Condition two tone paint work proferr “apply, ©. B, Rock, Oistin, per ati Deo heel NOTICE Dated thi 7th day of July. 1960; crpcie Magi oe piney, SF eien acne g y

ve etociall toe ¢ Thrte a cuna - . 4 ‘ s NES, ? hie ‘ s rm the P » Magistrate, st d r as . .
eI ee et ace Rise Ree, | cutis: Charen pe €. atieyne, St. Mar-T wise, bought here Mrs. Vaughn, King’s] Applications fot a vacant Frizers A ee Sened VOLMAR TUDOR, | Which to write, 8.S. “GASCOGNE” 3rd July, 1950 10th July, 1950
Wichole ‘orned atan Horie saan 8. | earet 10h BE. Son 11.6.50—4".} Street or Faitehild & Probyn Sts nuity will be reedived by the Clerk of pag ha kt On Monday Sith Juny, they shoad 8.S. “GASCOGNE” 10th August, 1950 16th Aug. 1950
a 7 . . « “aa. tas iene Poe 8.7.50—2n the V up to 011 Wear aa n ~ * \ » con-| bring exercise books containing the s.s. ” > e ¢ f
6.501 fn NEWHAVEN, Crane Const, fully fur- N.B.--This application will be con Y : GASCOGNE 14th Sept., 1950 20th Sept,., 1950
a = | xedrooms, wate Il supply,, ~ - sidered at a Licensing Court to be held | work they have been doing at their “ ” 5 ve
CAR—One Morris (8) Car in good qon- | i salen a aera none aeapls STAMPS Used Barbados | Postage | be 1 nae od ie at Poli¢ o Court, District “A”, on Mon- | prevent schools. S.S. “GASCOGNE 8th Nov., 1950 14th Nov. 1950.
dition, Price reasonable, apply to V. EB. | ¢ vamnificent bathing beach, For| Stamps. Paving 50c. per 100 for mix ‘igh 7 day, the i7th day of July, 1950 at} Individual notices have been posted For further particulars apply to :
Moore, cor. Passage & Baxters Roads. | December, Dial 4476 tures 1c a ; valies, Ser d 5 00 | ey 5 li c'etbelk, .&.3n pe ars apply to :—
6.7,90—6n BiEL4.0. | mans Box. 1436 chewan er oat Ofice, Snr? BR. M ,ONES &, CC) LID A
ebnieeel — Dil ental ied itemise | PANY a "4 | ; aise re Police Magistrate, Dist. “A" . > a
Singer Sports ROADSTER in excel-| SUMMER HOME, Hastings ele Aa SO a op 9.7,50—In ¢ oe » LLD.- Agents.
lent condition mileage just over 4,000 | + ckley on the s WANED 4 a nar lork are ’ ‘Ben i . ons :
my ” . . ANTED TO BUY Vestry Clerk's Office * ernie
COLE & CO Ltd 7.7.50—6n contains: drawing, dining, estry R “a 4 —————
a. sekteantiannaermeas 4 four (4) bedrooms and ali yer cna oe PLAY HOUSE-—Spetify| Parochial Buildings PO COT
or nce ze an e ne cee teate eee se
Offers are invited for 16,500 sq. s "> | b r) d R ] E t t
ELECTRIC VULCANISERS Stenor, 7.50.—2n ep ; : : i RAYMOND JORDAN is the man feet of land on the seaside St 2 Have arpados hea State
fot a yorfect vuleanise Job. Also pateh — — Application for one or more mn ye SUIT and HAT James. First class beach Next to >
id. various sizes. Courtesy Garage Dial R—Pris Ford Prefect ilable PUBLIC SALES St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions at Hat to Clean your SUIT and Hé Galety. Thadine. s Ow gency
4291 8.7.50--3n] August to November. Most reasonable ‘i rison College will be received by th: Bay Street, APPLY — CECIL JEMMOTT X% } J
term: Responsible party Ring 3395 —— | Clerk of the Vestry up to 4 o'clock Oposite Combermere St. Phone 2146 % INDUSTRIAL—COMMERCIAL
REFRIGERATOR Canadian Refri- enings 5.7.50.—6n. AUCTIO p.m., on Wednesday July 12, 1950 % H i RESIDENTIAL
géfator for sale Leonard 2 yrs. old |} Candidates must be the sons of par ——— Z i“ > ® : "
7 cubic ft. in perfect condition *h=hL Eee UCTION j ishioners in straitened circumstances and | “lo LSSSSOSSS SOOO S SO SOF FO FISH, x ear ! omee melgboss rte
Tel, 8493 Ss I | N | must not be less than (9) nor more than | 434,454,¢5656.G5G5GGSSOSOOPOO® x & The i mgs Hotel Ltd.
i ) ye of age on 30th June, 1950,| %& x, $ 2
or Satle-=Contd. UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER | «1 ) e on ; ine, 1950, | ¢ § % ‘ ia
| to be proved by a Baptismal Certificate | S | Invite your inquiries on the
FURNITURE ntti, | IL have been instrueted to sell by | which must accompany the application. | " SALE x Mr. Peasant | following properties all FOR |
FURNITURE ¥ i) tesee Maton public competition at my office Magazine | Portia 2, ivelles : n aS be obtaines | FOR SA ua ¥ % * SALE : s
IRN IRE—one tt arece j- a , % , 4 1 1 ‘ the Vestry C 's Oo e } , . . |
amy Sideboard ay Mahogany Wagon GALVANIZE Pipes 14, and 2 inches 1 ine, on Thursday next 18th July at] at the estry jerk ic | % YOU CAN HAVE YOU























office will be closed for vacation

S Insufance Underwriters

H. H. WILLIAMS. x Marhill Street,
Dial 2676 ~ City.
<

4, >t,
BAECS. ZIPS COOL

Béds | or sprung Mattre Cup-| from $8.50 to $2.50. ROYAL STORE 7 Monday Adu: dulg me wa
tard, Kitchen Furniture ete, ete Ail 8.7.50-—2n

|
|

|

. |

on Monday 24th Ju Those persons}

li hew condition... Cabk “Ditheon'* Bt ——.——.——-—_| UNDER THE SILVER | whose giasses have not been. detiverce |
|

|

|



yper

of Quality reduced 8.7.50 | My
} on





Lawrence Gap. Telephone 8498 MEN'S AND LADIES SHOBS OF asked to enll it for them before

|
|

6.7. 50—3n distinction and quality at reduced | Sature
in prices, ROYAL STORE HAMMER |

Ophtha



d J okie . a ; t in sizes} 2 p.m. the dwelling house called | By Order E. C. REDMAN, “WINDS LODGE” x :
Se. Sarees. 8) eet eat oe also Galvanize flexible. corre Auto| “Mayaro” situate at Worthing, Ch.{ - —¢ lerk, St. Michael's Vestry WINDSOR % CANES INSURED EN-DAH_WIN, Pine Hill.
ite: chee Grn Mate: § 3 Gar. | Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone ae The oe ee - open yee mn) mee Sinks oi ice, | $13 . Bungalow
a 1 ‘ y Mr sale, 9 Meare Corey 26 dah to the front, drawing dining ~arochia uildings, . . ¢ .-. :
sh Gap, Worthing. Dial &% ait 8.7.50-t-£-n- | rooms, 2 bedrooms, Kitchenette, toilet | Bridgetown 28.6.50--8n| $§ Government =. i ee % By applying to E CREA MUSKOKA—Worthing
>. 7.60.—4n STALEY ASTTRTS . * & bath. It has a pine floor throughout, | — } Standing on One Acre wit ¥ Bungalow
te i ees | KHAKI SHIRTS— Guaranteed quali- : * ‘ . su : STORS CO. 8
meme | 4 MEAT SHINTO Oe SoA the: Gk de. Soindione areg vost : : ; ee % UNITED INVESTORS €O., IC REAM Seve Hone aeusee |
J : ing glance , 8.7.60-9n. | be sold. For inspection apply D'Are Professional Notice Six Acres attached, "4 LIMITED ; ain
withes to, seit Sette lie mmdern wn . A. Scdtt, Magazine Lane N % uy q PARLOUR St. James
Sar di Nine Wain, aittan, Ceentc, oeinted | LADISE SHO For all particulars apply. . .
Â¥
5
%,
X

y 8th July. H. Harcourt Cartes



SO9GB OP PPSOOOF FGF F9ES



gle Solid Mahogany Dining 7a On Thursday 13th, by order of Mrs
Table, seats 8 fortably, 10 a push, | - ‘ a ye > wi se or F 2
Me Kenzie, Victoria Street. Dial 2047," MATTRESS 4 ft, 6 ins. Spring Mat- alate owe, wets ell her Furniture

‘fis 9.7.50 in tress, perfect condition, Recently recov at Isdale, ‘ine Road, Belleville;
a ‘lared. Apply C. P. C, Weatherhead, Bay | Which Includes:— Round Tip-Top Table, |



27.6. 50-——5n















5 Bergere and Mortis Chairs, v |
p 9.7.50.—In. "
LIVESTOCK Sweet 17-50-1-) Writing Table, Waggon, Orname | MAPLE MANOR
MUM-—Stop, Just in time for the hot| Dinin« Table \seat 8), Book Cases glass GUEST HOUSE
PUPPIES—Bull & terrier & mastift| weather. Mum. in? two sizes, A safe| doors), Hat Stand, China Cabinet, Upright ” re

a Chairs all in mahogany: Pict
crossei: Apply Adam’s Castle Dial | and refreshing deodrant, used by every) Wore ana ¢ wary etur

nd Ce




| eep to the Blend that Pleases
} THAT IS

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With The Distinctive Flavour)



. Gla Opposite Hastings Rocks
zechoslovakian Table G
ee Services, Plated Wa











BOURNE,

8325. 8.7,.50—2n. | one Obtainable at Knight's Drug i Tel.—2021, Manageress

; 3 ae 9.7.50-2N- | Brass Tray and
POULTRY eres eae | Pits, Dine Cove
NEEDLES for your record player. . trie Toaster,

1! Kinds including Ruby and Sapphtre Deep Sle
PURE BRED RHODE ISLAND — 4 and | oni-permanent needles to play several | {incn Press, Fasy Chait all in mahox
6 months old Owner leaving Colony housatid | Teccneienen brah Ae, “eee ‘
Apply De Verteull Macston, Hastings, A. BARNES & CO., LTD. Electric Light Fitting

Phone



tand, Jardinieres and ¢
Good Telescope, Elec-
Single Mahogany Bedstead,
p Mattress, Dressinw Table

26.6 .49—-t.f.n







1 Mir Dresser,

and gs, Trunks, Valise, ORIEN’ } i irri
77 9.7.50—3n 24.5.50—t.f.n Coal Stove, Kitchen Utensils, Zine Top . | _ This Rum does not irritate the throat
and other Tables, Garden Bench, Garden ‘SE HABLA ESPANOL)

MECHANICAL NEW PLATTERS—Dinah Shore, Frank} Tools, Hose, Birds’ Bath, Rain Guage CURIOS, IVORY, TEAK, SANDAL SIP IT — TO ENJOY IT!

Bing and all the rest. Come] and Measure; 4 large English Pots and ae RY, BRASSWARE, TAP-
oe. i ns but quick. Palms, and other items. Sale 11.30 o'clock Bs 8, GLOVES, PERFUMES,
BICYCLE -— Hercules, “The Leader . arms Cs

Bicycle with three-speed gear, and light A, BARNES & are oa . BRA NKE! ‘ 4 :
Child's Bicycle. Archer Mc Kenzie, Vic pees ANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

toria Street. Dial 2947 9,7,50,—1n



















Blenders . . .

KASHMERE John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd.

Auctioneers
9,7.50.—2



Ta Ol, GOOKER — American perfection
BIKES, Hercules Silver King, on terms, | ‘vaught proof with ie almost
all models, Black, Green, A. Barnes & | new. Attractive Cook,

Co., Ltd 25.6.50—t.f.n 6.7.9.8» | REAL ESTATE
PLASTIC BELTS—For Ladies and By Public
MISCEL) ANEOUS









SE EY ~ 88







‘ . ; competition at our Office,
Children. In assorted Colours only] James Street, on Friday, the 14th Jul
~ Q each. The Modern Dress Shoppe, | i950 at 2 p'm, 5,984 sq. ft. of land
ANTIQUES— of _every description | Hroad Street 9,7,50.—3n (







Glave, China, old Jewels, fine Sélver, :
Warercolours Early books, Maps, Auto- PURE SHARK OIL-—$7.50 Per gal



1.9.49.—t.f.n 8.7.50—8n. | of Sale apply to



HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD


ATTENTION— Just received a new PLASTIC RAIN COATS—In_ white, Solicitors, James, Stre.t. |
chipment of Bre s Chicken Essence, | 4,e¢ pink. blue maize $4.80 each 1.7.50

4 the Tr and Convalescent he Modern Dress Shoppe, Bros Stree emer -
Strengtheni nd nutritious for build 9 HOUSE—-Georgeville on the sea Payne: |
sg the body up. Obtainable at Knight's

ee | Bay, St. James. Spacious open vera







































in case of negligence. In intel-
ligent households an iron rule



wonderful assortment of

DAY PHONES 2041 & 4441

A
; NIGHT PHONE §81-41

which has open verandohs, drawing end
also Mouth Organs ranging | dining rooms, 2 bedroon



er tol
pwards. The Modern D ~



& bath, kitchen, Inspecti ! lay fre



pe, Broad Street 9.7.50

exists for every wounds: ,,Put



rug Stores §.7.50.2n Tic HEAD TIES—A Fine Assort- | dah, bedrooms, Drawing and Diving
Floral Designs 36¢, each. | roor W.Cc. & Bath, Electric light & .
TURF UB ‘ , rn Dress Shoppe, Broad Street. | Govt. water, Kitehen & " 1 ( A )
5 2/- & each. Apply |! ; PPE Oo 7.80.—Sn. | room, Garage for small car a A.E S., F.V. 4
‘le Hall Corner josed yard; Servant toilet. All
2.7.50.—2n PIANO By Story & Clarke, in good ched enclosed with barbed
nm onditior Archer McKenzie, Victoria | Good Sea bathing; land can be re é
RPOYS SHIRT AND PYJAMAS Stre Dial 2947 9.7.50~1n.| Apply G. D. Burke, Chapel x ~ s 2 =
Feady made and made tc sure ' tae a aac 6.7 ) a
ROYAL STORE 8.7.50—2n 74 ., : ‘ ns i natnennnatnaingtet cimwen | ((
» ROOMS— Cool & Comfortable, fur ¢
OMS actin District Exeelipnt ON HASTINGS MAIN ROAD |) @ pga PERFUMES THAT
CANOE 10% feet long, in good con- | | Bathing. Dial 4669 HOUSE with four bedrooms, usual, (\) py Z if a
@ition, Seat one or twe Single and | ™* 9.7.50—1n. | public room: ) LAST
@ouble paddle Phone 2483 BUNGALOW Wall", two bedroo »))
76 eaten g ar tt r 5
9.7.50.—-1n SHIRTS—Made to measure within = nae aes "partect ' Stee \\ T n ] r GOYA—Perfumes, Colognes
€ yurs ? Ta’ P anc s~ - ’ a
Se NOUS Er arene | conveniences, As ing island ; }} ly y Powder (Face and Bath)
bag a. " 8,7,60-€n, | 1 am. instructed to sell them together at; }} A very beautiful assortment
an attractive price, furn or unfur- | 5) |
eer as hand on | anes: Apply to L. & Cottle | to choose from
TAILORS TRIMMINGS Apply to Catford & Co 50 in \\} |
Ward & Speneer Ltd., Marhill St., Ae cee en doped | Ta | :
Bridgetown, Gents’ Outfitters, and Sta- |~ PROPERTY fae Watton at nas , THE COSMOPOLITAN
Often cause dangerous infections tioners ¢ Street next to Yacht Chub, consisting of Made from ,
ee 5845 sq. ft, of land and a stone house

|

apply to D'Arey A Scott, Magazine








}
i
NEW WHEAT |

\

a.m. to 5 p.m For other f ticula

Purol on”, because one knows, YACHT "Dauntless" Intermediate Class | Lane 4 5.7.20, an. | 4
15 ft 5 in x $8 st. 1. in




a ae









?
" au Intel \ (Wreshly Ground) |
that Purol is deliciously softening W. Skeete (Next Roxy Thea-| }OUSES One at Welche ! Just what you were waiting i
; . fo. re) or Wesley Hall Bovs'| one at. Gilke i ( ) 1) ¥ é +

and healing and because all in School 8.7.50.=2n, | with Sant atRGneel "arnt i} Lik Something You Wail Appreciate
fections can be prevented by light, & out alfices, and } 42c. PER LOAF {Ii
spplying this brilliant skin- | | ~~ Sew nae AA : ee ia : ii me
icaaay" 4.7.50-5n. | )) t it at PURITY ())

y CHIROPRACTIC a Cvcmar Ahaviaie waaon i GARBADINE in Emerald Green, Pink, Red, Gold, Lime Green

and White @ $1.30 per yd.



RESTORES HEALTH LANL






. Graeme rtall Terrace Dial 44°76 ”
ihe ok. ded BUADeE PRA nT BO 4 SHANTUNG in Blue, Rose, Cream, Pink & Gold @ $1.16 per yd.
cr ville”, Upper Bay St. (near Espla- _ aAafatatatat. Cot taPctabd.teuaa 1950 STYLES LADIES SHOES in White, Black & Brown Suede
——$—$—$——— | 2881 Daily (except Holidays) HOUSE—VILLA DUNCAN ( b POOPIE CPAP APBD



Prices ranging from $11.36 to $12.37 —Cuban Heels.
Also DRESSES, SUNSUITS, SHORTS & SLACKS Etc., Etc.

nade). Chiropractic service also latest | Paynes Bay. Spacious op ‘

“| method of electrical massage. Phone | 2 bedrooms, Drawing and Dinine rooms
25.6.50-E.Sun.|W-C. Bath Govt. Water and Electric
Kitchen spacious, enclosed yard and

—————— Servants’ Toilet, Stock





TEN FRIENDS









LALLA LL EEE








































BICO ICE CREAM, CROWN

° S9GSSSSSSSSOSS9S SISOS







nstanee to all candidates
| f plication n be obtal Department of Education,
E * : » Vestry* Cler + 8th July, 1950
eer ; 5 , | ) 3 ‘t - 9.7.50—2n
‘ ‘ 1.50—4n. | wth : | A tchine ‘ a (POPS SSSOSOIIGE FFP

‘ S ridgetown 1.7 ¥

"Apply to * ; ISE" 5.7.50-2n | LAND S

ELECTRICAL Apply to "MANSION HOUSE”, | NOTICE BE ADVISED %

2 contoenind "

=> ae



PINE HOUSE—St. Michael
ABBEVILLE GUEST
HOUSE— Worthing
DOVER—Christ Church.
Building Sites and
Acreage
RICES—St. Philip. |
} Acreage |
| BLOCK OF FACTORY
BUILDINGS—In the
City

opened at Hastings
(opposite Harts Gap
serving

PINE, ORANGE, GINGERS,
SODAS, HOT DOGS ete.

Drop in and Refresh Yourself



U. J. PARRAVICINO



Our shipment of

1 ’
RAT TRAPS
has arrived just in time for the
RAT CAMPAIGN
Buy Yours Today.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Central Foundry Ltd.—Proprietors)
Cnr. Broad and Tudor Streets.













| LS -
ith frontages both on James Street
nd Busby’s Alley) together with the
nuildings thereon the property « the
granhe, etc., at Gorringes Antique Shop, | 9; sic, for 3 sills. At Westmoreland | Est. of Mrs. M. EB. G. Wiles, cee'd @
edjoining Royal Yaeht Club. Plantation. St. James For further particulars and conditlons | me

AUCTIONEER





Plantati Building
SOS 4 EEO? CVDLPLO SSS PDDOPPO SOO,
«3a x
a %
BAKERS &
’,
x
g
+
PROVE ITS $
%
x
%.
EXCELLENCE &
%
%
IN THE MAKING OF §
x
%
SALT BREAD ;
%,
x



Always Demand

APLE

NY
x
‘
%
4
pens, bearing |. onderfi i whe
fruit trees with One Rood jand attsehed | § Mrough, HOLETOWN BROADWAY WRESS SHOP.
. 150 yards from Sea Apply as above. |X
ge G. D. Burke hae Eo : ‘
in 3 Days 4 oo memes
s
nate wour fect h, smart and burn 1% THE x :
adly that they nearly drive you crazy? ms } , %
be rida ae Gitar fons bLUE perry partouR § RELIANCE FREEZERS
that has up hout the world, and THREAD CUTTING 1% cdl nei S 1 and 2 GALLON SIZE.
Foot, Singupo Dhoby ttch Se t WELDING % yourself with BICO Ice ¥ — AL o-
getirid of the trouble until you remove the BATTERY CHARGING |% CREAM; ICED MILK LEMON- g MAIZE AND CORN MILLS.
Zerm cnuse, A new discovery, ¢ 1% ADE ROWN tINKS
cern cause. A new discovery, catled Nixoe METAL TURNING % CoCd COLAS & SODAS; HAM $ on AND a }
th gering in $4 Hour and Gite teeth MOTOR REPAIRS 1% curre CAKES & YOUR ¥ ICE SHAVERS. “ * the
the siin sort, smooth and clear in 8 days See — % OLD TIME “HOME MADE & CALL AND SELECT YOURS AT ONCE — ”
ixoderm is so successft ruart * BREAD % es
to end the itch Ma aitarsne rite ‘ 1 1%
o en wn ; Ntctd gna h Lene eee noe Suny, GURDON OLDEN RS Stop and cafry on a package ¥% Established I ated
h Fimpleas Acne, tecile’ aad Bins. 1% of Tee Cream with you x stablishe T HERBERT Ltd neorpor at
worn of face or nody on tioniy beck one BARBADOS GARAGE, 1% sake RG % 1860 ‘ ‘ 1926 ¥
turn of ,mpty carton, Ask chemist for Nixo- x HUTSON CORNER STORE, 9 f s LR is G iT LL : %
Nixoderm germ today. 138, Roebuck S’. : Mal 3812 1% He 3! ) 10 & 11 Roebuck Street. % T. GEDDES GRANT LTD.—Agents x
16 fuaran- . g ) ¢ >
F tee protects : x St } aati 3
or Skin Troubles you. 1/9 | She has Gas for Cooking [% 66 $$$$S$556599566959965 it = } 556559599099 SP POFFO PSSST SEO























CROWN A CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT BY DRINKING THE NEW CR
_ YR i '







eee







————e

Ws GINGER ALE
]















INDAY, JULY 9, 1950

GOVERNMENT



NOTICES



















CHURCH SERVICES


























SUNDAY Al

























VOCATE





















PAGE FIFTEEN

_ BRITISH INSULATED CALLENDER’S

































MORAVIAN St. Hill 7 p.m Hayne
CONSTITUTION SWAMP AND CONSTITUTION RIVER. | _ ROEBUCK STREET—11 o.m. Morning 13th. instant Meeting
4% Service 7 p.m. Evening Service Preacher © WHITEHALI Miss S. Rouse y ay
d persons who have placed r ca a + ice” a ay Rey Ernest New i p9r M Blunt .
on Abie ins the C placed or caused to be placed any matter | “GRACE HILL—li a.m. Mor GILL_ MEMORIAL—11 a.m. Mr. ¥ 4
or t . in or - ne Constitution Swamp and all persons owning | vice Preacher Mr Francis 7 Deane 7 p.m. Mr. D. Scott e
any matter or thing placed or lyin . Maan ohtiast ; Evening Service Preacher Mr. Al HOLETOWN—8.30 am. Rev. R.A
or Constitutic Riv » oe é: § in or on the Constitution Sw amp FULNECK—11 an Morning Ser Culiough 7 p.m. Mr. G. Maeville “
utution iver are required to remove such matter or thing Preacher M Greene p.m. Evening BANK HALL—9 90 ar Mr V.S
, > t} : ten - . 7 c Cullough Wea
by the 15th of July, 1980, and no person may place any matter or | Syisey react, Mr. “Beane ° =o *
ung in or on the Constitution Swamp or Constitution River during | vice Preacher Mr, Downe ll am. Mr. H DIRECT EXPORTS SOME £16.500.000
the period of the 15th of July to the 3lst of October, 1950 onnor HILL—? p.m. Evening Service ’ Rev. F. Lawrence 44 4 ps x * .
, ars . ies ; i Pa r , * eacher Mr. O. Weekes s 4 11 a.m. Rev F. Lawrence
_ person Ri the terms of this notice will be liable to pro- DUNSCOMBE—11 a.m. Morning Ser- ney Communion 3.30 p.m Mbieinten
ceedings under section 18 of the Departmen i rs é vice Preacher Mr. Suire 7 p.m. Eve- Meeting
port Act, 1945 Pp t of Highways and Trans- ning Service Preacher Mr. Smith BETHESDA —9. 30 Rev. P
. THE ST. MAIER LUTHERAN CHURCH fence Holy Communion 7 p.m. M :
5.7.50—2n Iw GREEN, BRIDGETOWN auseve THE FIFTH Annual General Meeting of British Insulated and will further increase now ility by their experience, ability
. Open Air service 7.15 p.m. at the EETHEL—i1 am. Rev. H.C “on i read ° = . > aver ne ser‘
same spot Fairchild Street 7.15 p.m. 7 P-m. Rev. B. Crosby Callender’s Cables Limited will be held on July 13 in London. tt “toe th italy and even and long service
— eof 8 Boal or The following is an extract from the statement by the j2Pa™ have actively entered th«
eo ev "Donohue, C. D Mr. F. Moore +) . 1 > Pe oa" ists
Speaker, for each service and you are , BELMONT —s1 am. Mr. J. Lovel airman, Sir Alexander Roger, K.C.LE., circulated with the . The Outlook
a a eal ‘1 ‘ warmly encouraged to listen to “Bring- p.m. Mr L. Mayers report ¢ Ace , , 1e
Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- | ing Christ to the nations” at 6.90 pm. . Monday, July 10th Missionary Meet wa and Accounts:— For over 60 years now we a1 nome, the past yeat has been
ment) Order, 1950, No. 24 which will be published in the Official | SY"day be Chairman: Mr. F. Ward. Speaker As a result of an expansion in both the volume and value have maintained, in countries ....)),\, for the change from the
Gazette of Monday 10th July, 1950. eo Sea sare... Paeaciete Os i ie of turnover, and the generally favourable trading conditions overseas, large Branch Off Hers’ to the Buyers’ Market, a
$ ist ‘ 9 an Mr sencia x ss , : eee , > encies itl ‘ “s
Ol aie Bridgetown Si. Hil! 9.30 p.m. Missionary Mest. | CXperienced during 1949, Profit on Trading of the parent Com- aids tenia > sagen ; ange which was to some extent
. 6 | . ; E ee 7 Tone: n, 3 r A ease. 4 * Tne 4 . . y s é ech ¢ ¢ - Bc tabi “ :
» Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling] ; Upper Bay Street = Rev. HO Peso crane. Speaker: | pi Investment Income and Special Receipts at £4,828,954 218” ' ge centuated in our industry by the
ne " : undays 11 a.m, and 7 p.m. Wednes- né 7 p.m. Mr M nical staffs. And of equal im { .
prices of “Pilchards-Canned are as follows :— day - Allister ? G Mei show an improveme fF £283,743 cuts imposed by the Government
: qivs 8 p.m. A Service which includes ; jShow an improvement of £283,743 portance, the closest persona! he ‘ :
Testimonies of Christian Science Heal. . PROWIDENCE— 11 apnp Re B 4 -~ ip intained with then on the capital expenditure of our
Wholesale Price Retail Price ing Sunday. July 9, 1960 Crosby Holy Communion 7 p.m. Mr. E |_| advised you last year that your Assets, Investments and Current ee aa ben wit ; them rincipal customer groups, the
ubjec 7 ~ ne 30ar vere ‘ . 46 é also sustome tior se stries vi
Article (not more than) (not more than) | meni | °* MSS" Sermon: SACRA- “VAUXHALL —9 a.m Rev, B. Crost Boi 1 were providing Deprecia~ Assets amount to over £42,500, 2) og ‘t maak taint tel a 7 een eee ene
THE NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH Holy Communion 7 p.m, Mr. GC. vid | tion of Fixed Assets on the basis 000. The additions made to Re to m cae a Sceht “ a y e devaluation of sterling
PILCHARDS. $16.5 ‘ OF GOD waite of their original cost, at least until serves have further strengthened COUNTY OF pr er eg re eer ee ee
? se $16.56 per case or ST. MICHAEL ‘ such ve as price levels were the overall position Capital ana interest in the five Continent Devaluation in itself is no long
Canned carton of 48x1 lb. . a m baptismal Service at Brandon's 3 me abilised. The charge on Revenue Reserves (applicable to which has not been visited in term solution without its corol-
pe each Baptizers Revds. A. R. Browne U T 7 | = £449315. which : As ¥ © 1949 by a Direct 1 senior lary, name » bre 5
tins. 38c. per 1 Ib. tin AR. W. Wenkés, Ih whe cs os ; Ss. an s Rush thi basi is £443,315, yhich B.I.C-C.) now amounting to ap- beta . by a Direct rot senior Ps Me 3 a ~ ons = open of
$0.24 Service at Eckstein Village 7 p.m. Goo. represents an overall rate of proximately £€10,600,000 ember of our Staff Thes« 1e system of controls, of prices,
.24 per case or land Rev. J. B. Winter ear I on the original cost of buildings * re journeys are of the utmost value. Of subsidies and oppressive tax-
carton of 48 x & i _ CHRIST CHURCH nto Battle and plant, and is considered ade- And E t Business ation
lb. tins. 2lc. per % Ib. tin, | ‘ P'™- Cox Road Rev. E. W. Weekes quate to write off existing fixed Home And Expor USINESS Research And Development ‘) es en
; eadeee ae GEORGE ‘ @ From Page 1 assets by the end of their antici B1t:¢ lhe generation and distribution
8th July, 1950. 780 __9 nm. Sweet bottom Rev. A. R. Brome by two small craft, with 40] non .. 1 mein ka Turnover for the B >.C of electricity is vital for building
9.1.50.<~2n, BRIDGETOWN ee ARMY millimetre shells he said. It was joe yg ea ne ee ed Group showed an _ increase of We continue to expend con- up competitive expanding produc-
? . 5 iirec P > § ) Ss se «4 sider: 5 eo ° ena re a
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 p.m. Con thought at first that these were | sar up to niadécnaut baer tatels Over £6,000,000 an! ee os er ent oe aoe i It surely is one of the pro-
n 2 ° - ‘ ats Ss P >is . p p> 3 or ve
PART ONE ORDERS Prohen ae 7 bam Salvation Meeting Submarines, but a closer look by is at present covered by the Capi with 1948. Increased prices ot shat _— . Us oe jects which should be pressed on
‘ i ajor Smith . ‘ . ——" * . —— sia “C » extent ve not only maintain bu! and have ; > capits i re<
Major 0. F ae ED i WAT Lata TOR STREET No sup Seen tas as gunboats. }tal and Revenue Reserves, but ra oo niger’ 9 itu at nanevel ceasclessly improve our techni- quires Without" . one co
} ' ‘ . ’ | 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 ae supmarines had yet been sight- | your Directors again stress p SOE ta Tugnee youre a n the . > tr : ‘ ectricit:
iui jcopesae tie | pany Meeting 7 pm OS RRS ed hE emphasiced sig a) = " farther salamat a but there has also been a real = be the we of our trade abundant supply of electricity
_ | Con 7 . : 8 ; ee . i é , _ ~t
a ‘i store - .
: ‘os _ " | Meted by pMajor Rawlins (R) He said North Korea was dotted | these reserves against contingen- increase in the output volume of 2) Maine and Abroad. It is neither out industry, nor meny
; eae 7 July 50. | 11 om. eRGHTSTOWN with dirt airstrip hic? i | cies B some of our main products clear that the best prospect of others in this country, can hope
‘OMMAND a oliness Meeting 3 Pom - rips which provided s aU _ ’ : . finals iv ones et ie ‘ . ohne “ .
Major A. R. Foster assumed command thé Cadet Corps w.e.f, 20 June 50, vice | PANY Meeting 7 p.m Salvation Meeting airmen with excellent aitcreft dis- ere eee Export trade gen- ( ) produce cheaply and be com-
Major A. S. Warren | Preacher: Sr. Captain Campbelt versal facilitie " : A large part of the Co "s Turning now to Export busi- erally, lies in the fleld of petitive in the markets of the
2 CONDEMNATION BOARD CARLTON persal facilities Bee ee ee pany Ss ess. I am sure all Stockholders products of a highly technical world
The Acting C.O. has appointed the following officers as members of a Condem- | !1 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 p.m, Com. _ 4S they were pastmasters in| income continues to be taken by UWit) | Ml eee know that the nature and as time goes on it *,-~
nation Board for unserviceable equipment : pany Meeting 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting Camouflage, it was necessary to get | Government in the form of taxa will le . the ic C.. de posslble War. rae neta etn: An active home business is to
Major C. E Jeatherhead, President Preacher: Lieuteng “id . a - ; ; SEs | \ . ¢ s 9.979.095. Direct Exports of the 5 poss P Ww y have even to 7 . oe
Lieut, S. E, L. Johnson, Member DIAMOND Cnet cown really low to locate planes|{%0" Which absorbs £2,079,095, Direc , ited to some £16, “export” more and more of out as to so many Industries, a
2/Lt. S.'G, Lashley, Member ne . ORNER on the gr 1. Th ? ‘ . compared with the Net Profit of Group amountec o Ss : pre-requisite t st s Over
‘ oo ‘ » 7 rs : i 4 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 pr ~ . on ground, he Korean troops .0 22 ‘ ; : c , 7 ‘rease ove technique as well qQuisite On rong ver as
The Board will meet at the QM Stores at 1700 hours on Thursday 13 July $0. | pany Meeting 7 p.m. Sslvation steno, were also fast at lear ; £ 2,058,660 left available. Despite 500,000 showing an increase ¢ ! busines 1 the .
The President will render a sixned report of the proceedings to the Orderly | Preacher Lieutenant. Moore” Meeting * - ra ee at learning bow to| the continued warnings of Indus- the substantial figures of th ot ee andthe two: together are
pa | heitha 3 < toed nd cine sper
8. AUDIT BOARD 1 FOUR ROADS Sak tie : a = motor tru¢ ks | try that this country can only previous year To give a com Organization vital to prosperity
The Acting CO. has appointed the following officers to an Audit Board to} pany’ iting 7 Meeting 3 pm. Com. *"¢ ey e cover from strafing, he | maintain its standard of living by plete picture of our contributior Pew ta :
audit the Regimental Funds A/c, Barbados Regiment Preksher Limitation wee Meeting “dded.—Reuter. constantly increasing and improv- towards the export drive accoun In March last your Board ap- us was never more import-
Lieut. P L. Co Beterkin 3 PIE CORNER. ing its productive and earning should also be taken of our In- pointed Mr. W. H. McFadzean ®t than it is to-day. Competition
2/Lt. S. G. Lashley a. 3 Holiness Meeting 3 pm. Com- SEPARATE LIVING capacity a policy demanding direct Exports, but unfortunately (a Deputy-Chairman of the in Overseas markets is becoming
’ Eta a pereae ites is still in” progress and all those who have not : SEVENTH DAY Rov Meeting AREAS IN S. AFRICA the retention of adequate profits these cannot be accurately com- Company) Chief Executive more and more acute and is being
a ’ se ¢ e no SaVEr ITIST e ndue on née » the re > . . , : ;
yet fired their course will get in touch with the R.S.M. as soon as possible , KING STREET—Pastor ©. oe Reid in I dustry the Chancellor has put The figure would, how Director, a post of the greatest experienced from an increasing
5 OAneEEy OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING 17 vo speak on a subject of Sedphidey at CAPETOWN, July 7 not seen fit to plan any relief and ever, be considerable because a importance, which, | am sure, he number of countries But given
Next for duty GOVERNMENT HIL ; The South Africa Government "@S,. indeed, exacted an even substantial proportion of our will fll with distinetion reasonably balanced load factor
Orderly Officer Lieut. T. A. Gittens | Parchment, the new ae tat secrs, today promulgated the Group oP oe toll by increasing the rate sale; at Home is being incorpo a from the home market we are
Senet eerie 233 L/S Blackman, A. L. O tary of the Leeward Islands Men, Areas Act, 1950—designed to sep- Of Profits Tax as from Ist October, ated in plant and machinery The existing and potential prepared to meet this competition
it. dee 4 nds Missior " y . $
Orderly Serjeant 214 Sit htm ak a sve ‘ arate white and coloured people 1948 ultimately sold overseas kas of the Company and to do. our best to maintain
a ” . 4L, vent Avenue ane. a $ fart : . i for man t , orsens
” ey vill rade at Re ental H $ a 7 S. E. White, the newly an ‘e—Pastor into different living areas The results achieved have en Sched errs nd indeed improve on our
A ran sw parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thursday | dent will be the preacher ected Presi- The Act provides “for the estab- | apied us to place £1.500.000 ti Whilst the great bulk of ou: countries demand increasing at
ae me M, lk D. SIERWES-COX. major saup@tETHODIST seRvicrs. | lishment of group areas, for con~| Reserves, of which £1.000,000 has direct exports has been made to tention being given, to ensure “hievements
S.0.L.F. & Adjutant, ' Me Culleuge REET a.m. Rev. R. | trol Or acquisition of immovable | heen allotted to Contingencies Re- those countries in which we have that the factories will be profit
The Barbados Regiment. PAYNES Bay.) Rev. H.C. Payne | property, and occupation of land! serve. In an international business been firmly established for many @bly operated and developed. ~ .
fo ee ie ee MW | and premises”.—Reuter. like B.1.C.C., it is essential to have years, I am glad to say that We must also be more regularly
1 SSS - a substantial sum set aside to very agreeable proportion has posted with the technical devel-
Ror 9 SAN aren | meet cor vencies worued from other countries in Opments in all part of the
ARL, SAND meet ntingencie
GARDEN MOULD a which we previously have doi world which might be of interest
LIME and A WARNING! A ipared with the Balance little or no business I told you to us Mr, D. W. Aldridge, at
RLOCK STONE { Sheet alue of some £4,500,000 last ye our determination te the unamime invitation of hi
{ ss Z for d, buildings, plant and find and develop new markets, Colleague ‘ the Board, has
{) Dial 4503 moet € a it is es sone and this policy is being energeti- ie relinquish his position
a 1e present replacement cos 5 iN cally pb ed It was never an Executive Director so that
4965604ebada nee | the neighbourhood of £15,000,000 jyere essential the t to-day ean, apart from his f
ROO SSS POOOOSOOSSOSSOOSS | : ir me essentia lan it is to-day; : ' om his normal
7 é] 4 Salisiying 1 Sein in ti i everal of our oldest and utiles as Director, devote hi
. ways, but one which may wel ar - 5 rergies , — ‘
‘ HAVE YOU GOT x most valued markets local manu- Crergies by personal visits abroau
| r F
g A % | present its own problems when the facture of some of our preducts ¢ this work, for which Mr, Ald ~ ya eae tena
COLD or COUGH x time comes for replacement is becoming more and more es- ‘'dge has outstanding qualifica of boils, ulcers eru) ms. D.D.D.
% %} , tablished, anc although in most fons payee voy Pea relief by
$ | : Ce ca we have a technical and netrating deep low the skin to
$ IF S ¥ Group Accounts é . : ,
% O TRY » x pi financial interest, {t would be of ,, At the ame time Dr, L.°G eae poisonous germs and brings
. DG ‘ These show s lar t greater benefit to employment azier and Mr Hu J Stone ealing even to the most istent
¢¥ S » B \ hese show a similar picture : ere elected to the Board as E eores, GET A BOTTLE TODAY
¢ t y {\to that of the parent Company, here if the output were supplied oard aS EX Obeainable fi all P
% w | i ) 1 iy cy an any ROR ao. ol Home Fact py ©cutive Directors, Both of these nable from all Chemists,
% f) 1 Th ’ Rainy weather and damp- {{!| the Net Profit of £2,881,797 show ur ne actories men have given long i val ’
$ | ness bring on Rheumatism. {{!| ing an increase of £212,063 over Other markets political conditions coy vige A thal knoe ivakieet! eens ents
x XI {| 1948. This Net Profit is after @d the shortage of foreign cur- jioc. and their appointment [Miso use 0.0.0, Seap F. B. Armetrong
4 x atic ‘ .vne . + er . , tives pre “8 {fe . - lo
R % | But Rhewmesian and Pains ) sro vidas de a sum than Tency are severely restricting pr ewe 2 effect to the ex _for sensitive skins iidvoenl
5 | % % Stead gent can be con- \)| £3,150,567 for taxation whic nd indeed in some cases making : at Re ton of recruiting ‘to © ae
4 > whe ¥ s i "3 may have a paralysing effect on impossible, the purchase of im- ‘he Board, from as far as possi escri 10
\ B Coiua Bronce sore Stes SIM SEHR) hte yersopmen Ned xoods, And. everywhere ule within the Company, men
a ® Hoarseness, Brunchial Astnaa, % | va 4 \\ In the Balance Sheet, Fixed « petition i becoming keener who have proved their suite
@ Whooping Cough, Disease of the ¥
ba Chest aud Lungs, ete., ete. x Keep a bottle handy ( remem
S x | ; 1 0
A Security Policy taken with UNITED INVESTORS CO. LIMITED, | % r % On Sale at...
will answer this question in years to come. 1% C. CARLTON BROWNE 3
For further information apply: % Wholesale & Retail Druggist * k i e : ae ,
os . \ HIZAIS Drug Stores
UNITED INVESTORS CO. LIMITED, S$ 136, Reebuck St. Dial 2813 %}) : \
Insurance Underwriters, 9 % f
Marhill Street, City PLL CCLO LALA SCPC |\ BEFFELLADL DDL ESSE | 9
aia ctiiactttaiel
ee }
)
{

SELECT THESE Emglish Fine





—

Bome China

: (INC. IN BR. GUIANA)
|



FIRST NEW ARRIVALS OF JAPANESE RAYON GOODS

* These Goods are Cheaper than Anything of Similar Quality from Europe or U. K.

NOw!!
lea Sets.

MAPS—imperial and Political Wall Maps of the World. |

THERMOMETERS—2 kinds
ANEROID BAROMETER, etc.

— also —

f There is a quality about Bone China prized throughout the
world. The grace and charm of your Tea Table is enhanced

by the exquisite designs of these Sets.

WIRE TRAYS — WIRE-BASKETS Now on display at :— |
: ial ie : Si r 2) »ANES ‘ON 1S—36” ; $ 54 yard
and many other Office Requisites. LOUIS L. BAY LEY, JAPANESE RAYON VOILES—36” v. de M4 yare
e JEWELLERS Zolton Lane & Victoria S1. PIQUE RAYONS—36” v ‘de Pe
- Sole Representatives for The Rolex Watch Co. i r ' eee
ROBERTS & co. — DIAL 3301 \ Please see our Show Window at the Aquatic Club { ( RAYON FUGI—36" wid 72
i | 5h ” i si. ; « ”













CREPE BACK SATIN—36” wide. a0 is

PURE SILK PONGEFR--36” wide 200

RAYON SHIOZE—30" 60

wide



@ NAIL SCISSORS

@ TWEEZERS

e@ FILES

@ SHAVING BRUSHES
@ RAZORS



FLAT CREPE —36” wide

SPECIAL RUM

The Rum of Royal Blend



PIG SKIN—36” wide.

”

there
: ) KING COL
|








and



MURRAY'S MILK STOUT i li is now over
CALL IN TO-DAY AT The Stoutest of Stouts y\ {"
COLLINS’ SRF STORES ss cee & Oa. Lip |_| period the Cost of Everything has Advanced—Especially Taxation.
Broad an udor Streets. Grocery and Provision Dealers et
RSS SASS | ) IN 1988—INCOME TAX 124% of Profits

TN 1938—TRADE TAX “a 73% do.







OPENING :-

Just what a PAROCHIAL TAX, POLICE, FIRE BRIGADE

& HIGHWAY do.












SCOTCH TAPE Fisherman

HAIR CLIPPING MACHINES
STRAW BROOMS, 3 and 4 STRAP

IN 1950—INCOME TAX do.

374%

Requires eas IN 1950—TRADE TAX do,

12 %



PAROCHIAL TAX, POLICE, FIRE B
& HIGHWAY amounts a

a Biles Ye
Ten Years ago since WE Imported Japanese (rods, and in that |
|

GALVANIZE WIRE NETTING, LACING WIRE, FISH }
HOOKS, SEINE TWINE and MANILLA ROPE.

We can now supply all your requirements for the



RIGADE

24% do.



JOHNSON’S STATIONERY season. re i} The Government now takes 52% of the Profits of every Business
— AND — My

ELL

Lumber & Hardware

in Bridgetown

HARDWARE. N. B. nO Ww

Dial 3206





¢%

PAGE SIXTEEN





Communists
Undermine
Philippines

MANILA
The Communist invasion of
South Korea strengthened a con-
viction among Filipino defense
leaders to-day that Communist
agents have worked 30 years to
undermine the Philippine Islands

and punch a wide hole Ame

ica’s Far Eastern defense line.
These Filipino officials say that

almost since the founding of the
Soviet regime, Commur agent
have been active throughout the
Far East and that their activities
have more often been treacherous
than not





Driven Home



The situation in Korea has
driven home the dangers anc
highlights these conclusions by
defense experts on these islands

} Filipino Communist, organ-
ised and instructed originally by

American Communist party
members, now take orders from
their Chinese Communist masters
at Peiping by radio and other
means.

2. Chinese Communists repre-
sent the Philippines at Commun-
ist meetings in Bangkok, Hong-
kong and Peiping.

3. Chinese Communists, work-
ing in the Philippines, act as in-
termediaries to collect firearms
and ammunition for Communist
rebels, give financial assistance to

Communist guerrillas and con-
tribute \congiderably to Red
propaganda work.
Open Affiliation

Lt. Col. Carmelo Barbero,
spokesman for the defense de-
partment, frankly explained for
International News Service:

“The Philippine Communist
party openly avows affiliation

with other Communist parties in
the world, It pledges strict ad
herence to the Marx-Lenin-
Stalin teachings.”

Moreover, a Communist
“watch-dog” network, stretching
half way across the world, has
been established to help Filipino
Communists among other things
to get instructions from abroad
Consequently, Filipino Commun
ists under the guise of labor
social or cultural missions have
managed to attend conferences
and contact foreign Communists

These trips abroad lead to
secret huddles and whispered in-
structions that have outlined new
labor union agitation technique:
and the latest underground pro
paganda fashions,

Well Guarded Units

Communist propagandists are so
well organised that they travel

in well guarded information
units, have gained warm sym-
pathy from an_ estimated 75

percent of the peasantry in Cen-

tral Luzon,
Filipinio defense officials, the
colonel added, not only recog-

nise the new propaganda danger
but, are taking steps to neutralize
its effect.

Red propaganda for instance, has
sparked the organisation of a
new government information pro-
gramme,

It has led to a new, gigantic
effort to tighten discipline among
loosely led government soldiers
on Luzon.

Bold Programme

It has touched off recognition
of a bold army organization pro-
gramme to train troops in the be-
lief that only good Communists
are dead Communists

But also important is the fact
that defense officials now realize

that Communist rebels must be
fought on their own hunting
ground.

Out-dated Philippine army
strategy, for example, is being

junked while new recruits study
anti-guerrilla tactics or, fighting
guerrillas with guerrilla strategy

Ten special combat battalions
are being groomed in the new
way of battle while 5,000 re-
cruits, called from the army re-
serve are being trained to bol
ster army strength.

By the end of June,
months after the army took over
the anti-Communist rebel cam-
paign, Major General Mariano
Castaneda, army chief of staff
was confident and proud of his
troops 5

Asked whether United States

three



army troops would be welcomed
to assist Filipino troops in the
campaign the general smiled and
asked:

“Would you allow someone els«
to clean up your house if it was
dirty?”

(IN.S.)

[ They'll Do It Every



c
Wicks DEAR OLD DAD IS sick
THE WHOLE FAMILY COOPERATES
TO LET THE OLD Boy SNOOZE
| ALL DAY... AND, OH, HOW

HE CAN SNOOZE >>>

Burt cones BEDTIME (
FOR THE TIRED b-
FAMILY, AND -s*WELL,





a! coHol RuUBI!

Ad



FRANK DOBSON WITH HIS MODEL OF A RELIEF FOR A Post
OFFICE IN BRITISH GUIANA

FRANK DOBSON, the sculptor, has been working for the past fifteen
months on a full scale clay model of a remarkable high relief for a
Post Office in British Guiana. The relief will be shipped to British
Guiana in 1951, crated in sections and re-assembled there. In recon
structed Guiana Granite, it will weigh 15 tons, measure 17 ft. 2 ins,
by 9 ft. 6 ins. Dobson's full scale model consumed 2! tons of clay
The relief portrays two reclining figures. In the Picture is seen the
relief in miniature as it will appear on the face of the post office, as
seen in a model of the building at the sculptor’s studios in the Royal
College of Art, South Kensington, London. Frank Dobson is seen
looking at it.—Express

Canada’s Senate
May Be Reformed

OTTAWA, Canada.
teform of the Canadian senate, often debated in Canada,
may actually come in the life of the present parliament
which in normal circumstances would continue until 1954
The reform measures may come from within the upper
chamber itself.

The federal government appoints senators for life, the upper
chamber in Canada having a fixed number of representative
from each province. Total number of seats was raised from
96 to 102 when Newfoundland entered the Canadian con-
federation in 1949

Britons Go

It is possible that

governments

provincial
may be given a
voice in future senate appoint-
ments, Further, the present system
of life appointments may be dis-
regarded for some retirement

system—possibly retirement at

m : é «
age 79 on a contributory pension egaltta
plan

Oxfordshire, July 8
Overseas oarsmen won five of
the ten trophies on the final day
of the Henley Royal Regatta which
was the worst for British rowing
since the 1939 Henley
On that occasion four titles went

Proposals for senate reform have
been heard often over a long
period, chiefly from political stal-
warts who object to the system of
federal government appointments
as a reward for political support







ers and a sort of life-time pen- abroad and the double sculls were
sion. But concrete proposals for shared by Britain and Italy who
senate reform are expected to Cead-heated, One of the trophies
come from the conference between Which remained in ‘land was
federal and provincial govern- the Diamond Scull:
ments this fall, If the federal- Anthony Rowe, British Olympic
provincial conferences do not Sculler won this to become the
forward recommendations, the first Englishman to do so_ since
federal Government is believed 1933 ‘owe led __ practically
ready to undertake a senate throughout to win easily from R
streamlining procedure on its own 82 Medsag, a Dutch student.
account, with the senate itself ,,. he Grand Challenge Cup for the
perhaps initiating it Eights was won for the third time
by the Harvard crew of America
Possibilities who put in a powerful finish to
beat the Najoord crew of Holland
In any reform plan, these are by one and a quarter lengths
believed possibilities { Reuven





1. A system of provincial gov-} -——__ee—c
ernment appointments to the |
senate
one-third of
one-thi The Weather

for a five year for
members,

present
representation. This
senators from Newfound-
land, 24 from the Maritimes,
Quebec, Ontario and Western
Canada

term,



the

disturbing
geographical
is six

102
the



TO-DAY

Sun Rises;
Sun Sets; 6

5.44 am
p.m.

* A‘ July 15
2. Retention in federal hand Lighting: 7.00 p.m
of the

right of appointing ne High Water: 11.47 a.m., 11.33
remainder of the senate, but aboli- p.m :
tion of life appointments in favour




Moon (New)

of a of retirement YESTERDAY
Rajnfall (Codrington) .10 in.
Total for Month to
day: .19 in.
Temperature (Min). 74.5 °F
Wind Direction (9
(11 a.m, E.
Wing Velocity 10 miles per
Hour.
Barometer (9 a.m )
(11 a.m.) 29.954

System

federal policy that at
> per cent of the Senate
membership be in opposition, At
present the senate has 77 Liberals,
13. Progressive Conservatives and
12 vacancies

3 A yester-

least
a.m.) E

4 A system of
te-elected
is a

having a sen-
leader as well
leader appointed
governnfent

house 29.963

governmen

the Can. Press

lime sae

-=- By Jimmy Hatlo











/

; SHHH! GO OUT AND PLAY. )
UT DON'T MAKE ANY NOISE!

GO OVER TO THE SCHOOLYARD!
PAPA IS SICK, AND WE MUST LET
HIM SLEEP! GRANDMA TOOK
THE BABY FOR THE
AFTERNOON :> ++

5s
GLAP A CIGARETTE!

MAMA!
THE BABY'S





Down In Royal)

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

INDIA’S
VOTERS
LISTED

FOR ELECTIONS
NEXT SPRING



B.B.C. Radio

Programmes

SUNDAY, JULY 9%, In50

The New






















BOMBA Putfney Post Office 45 5 promotes freer
, ’ ; Forum, 1.15 p Rad ewsreel | more refreshing sleep. 3. Help
t >| ; V
Pre} arations are under way for p.m. Sunday Service. 2 rhe! gte ‘toughing,
lla’s first general elections next s. 2.10 p.n New t Quick satisfaction or
inder the republican con- p.m, Mus 2 .
titutic vhich has given the Bend Bo ; : Pre~ | wnewent: Sacer.
17 . judwe. 4 pur 4 ' nt
),000,000 population the right ide, 415 p.m. T Piano for Pleasure. | =———-——-—
te choose their gzoveryment. 430 p.m. Sunday If Hour. 4.55 p.m
India vorld largest registered Epilogue. 5 p.m. F m P.ayer )
ead Seok * 2 nu p.m, Programme Pare 5.30 p.m, Fre
rat includes 46,000,000 the Children’s Hour. 6 p.m. Records. 64
en p.m. Think on these Things. 7 p.m. The
» far the government has spent News. 7.10 p.m. News Analy 7 e 45
r t i$ ‘epara. Pm. Caribbean Voices, 8 p.m Radio
more han § 10,000,000 in prepara- Noewsreel. 8.15 p.m. English Magaz
ion and printing of electoral rolls. 845 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the
The task has been a difficult one Editorials. 9 p.m, Sunday rvice 0
\ > ,ere p.m. London Forum, 10 p.m. Tr
army Be ; enumerators 10.40 pam. Intertude 5
* vast linguistic, religious to dec 10.45 p E
and social diversities of 11 pm. The New
} idian sub-continent BOSTON
The enumerat as ne
a Se eae er a qo: has bec n WRUL 15.29 Mc wiUW
nade nore complicated by the wrRux 17.75 Me 4.30 p.m Friday
constitution which introduced uni- Science Programme. 3.05 p.m. Le by Me. CB
versal adult suffrage Only 15 Christian Science. Deneis f am
pe ant f+ ey ates ancing 9 a.m
per cent of the people are able MONDAY JULY 10, 1950 pm
read ¢ vrite, and with the
idget cut to the bone the money 7 am. The News. 7.10 a.n
or nlistn rs ‘ Analysis. 7.45 am. Jane Eyre. 7.2
Pee eat trseh nt operations yy Magazine. 7.45 a.m, ¢
was found too little for the mag- spea g. 8 a.m. From the Editoria











nitude of the task as -rogramme Parade
’ . s Pageant. 8.30 a.m. Jack N
Commission The News. 12.10 p.m
The electio . nat ve p.m. Programme P: 3 par
Mm COMMISSION “36 an fo iera Choice. 1 p.m. Science Review

“independent statutory authority”
created by an article in the con-
stitution. The commission is not
ubject to any party or political

p.m. Radio Newsre 30 p.m. Tip
Tunes, 2 p.m. The $, 2.10 p.m. H
News From Britain. 2.15 p.m. Sports
view. 2.30 p.m. Meet the Commonwe
3 pum. From the Third Programme









pressure, according to democratic The News. 4.10 p.m, The Daily
conventions. It has wide powers 4.15 p.m. My Kind of Music. 5 pe
fo the delir at ‘ stit),. teners Choice. 5.15 p.m Prograr
. , % 7 mit ation of constitu de. 5.30 p.m. The Story T or. 6
neles, preparation of electoral Jane Eyre. 6.15 p.m. A Ye: ne
rolls, conduct of actual elections 7 p.m. The News. 7.10 p.m. News Ana
and settling election dis Vi » 7.15—7,30 p.m, Cricket Report on
putes. The |.’ Northants’ 730-745 p.m, BBC

commission is answerable only to

; i land Light Orchestra. 8 p.m
the people’s parliament.





reel. 8.15 p.m, Science Review. 8.30
Leftist elements have been Tommy Kinsman. 8 From
agitating for a “prover rez 4. Editorials. 9 p.m, M s of Mu
ae NS for 1 “proper readjust- Comedy, 9.30 p.m, Books to Read
ment of existing constituencies, p.m. British Masterpieces. 10 p.m
many of which are strongholds of News. 10.10 p.m. Interlude, 10.15
the ruling party, the Pe 1,4. Much Binding in the Marsh. 10.45 5
a ng party, he Indian Na- efi ial Questions. 11 p.m. A Talk
onal Congress. A conference of

the opposition groups will be held
in Bombay shortly to submit a
memorandum to the president on
the delimitation procedure,
However, parliament will be
the final authority on the demar-












JOHN GARFIELD Ace

cation of constituencies. At its A FRENCH WOMAN
ession next September parlia- ,
sient will consider the. election fy Ceeelle hea. Shiee—

commission’s recommendations

The constitution gives voting
power to every Indian national
aged 21 who has been resident in
his constituency for at least six
months. Only the defence forces,

the diplomatic and consular corps,
and refugees from Pakistan are
exempt from the residential quali-
fications.—-(Can. Press.)

ll

MISS IRENE WILLENS








Remind. you of her

UAL DANCE







\ to be held
At Queen's Park
On Saturday Night ,15 July, 1960
( ADMISSION
} : sags OPENING FRIDAY
) Music ty Bees Green's at the ;
ee EMPIRE THEATRE
efreshments on sale —_
} Please extend ‘this invitation DO NOT MISS IT:







OCP PPO9SR9NOOO SES

PM POES

0
LOU

5.556665
4 SOSSOOOOOOO SSF er rerr



TRrel ’
ERS 7
x i ae v
RQ KA
3
. starring W
$ |) WILLIAM HOLDEN 5 gel
$f JOAN CAULFIELD ear eC
$1) BILLY DE WOE ee er mio
% | MONA FREEMAN erence
x EDWARD ARNOLD set eee EO, non
< TODAY and CONTINUING
S AY THE EMPIRE

+







Summer

Sastts

DROP IN NOW AT

P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co.. Ltd.

TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING









alth
4 p.m
Service

mber

wi
Mid-

Radio News-

—PROEOPSOO POPS OPPO OP ODP PO,

' - ~ »,
LOS aoe es > VOSS o> POPES SPFS PSS OSS SO PS POPES CS CES









ASTHMA MUCUS

mg attacks of
ruin your slee
day or night



Top
M

Re-

ANNU

ee

«,

Tuesday
Lis

me Music by
p.m

PLLA APS LEI FE APP FF FS FSD

.,

¢
x,

pw
the
ileal
9.45
The
p.m
»>m

Variety

move thick strangling mucus. 2

Loosene¢ First Day



SUBSCRIPTION

ghing, sneezing, chok-
Bronchitis or Asthma
p and energy another
without trying MEN-

DACO. This great medicine is not a
smoke, injection or spray, but works
through the blood, thus reaching the
lungs and bronchial tubes. The first
dose atarts helping nature immedi-
ately 3 ways: 1. Helps loosen und re-

Thus
breathing and sc der,
evi-
ing
back



wheezing, 8



money

gaaranteed, Get MENDACO) tromâ„¢

ANNUAL
DANCE

CLUB

at Queen's Pai

1950

ist September
1 Orchest



ERTON OLUB

AL DANCE

a
QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE

on
night, 1ST AUGUST,
1950
Mr Percy
Orchestra

Green's

2/-
9.7.50—4n

POCSCO OOOO

Entertainment

and Dance

| Musie by





At

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC

CLUB

(Members Only)

On

SATURDAY, AUGUST 5TH,

9.00 P.M,

Full particulars of Show

later

Arnold Meanwell’s





POSES |







FORTRESS

rk

&
Me |
an
ve on si ral!
Music 7%
f \
Dancing 9 Admissio \
" ae 47, |
News LOBOS OS OPOOE A EOO 72 |
17 v |
1 The Committee and members of % |
the eo |
% |
, EV Z|
request the pleasure of your % |
company to their |



CCE LEEES
——————————————————————————————————





SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950







What's Your Sige ister?
LONG?

SHORT?
STOUT?

=
You'll find



We take the “sighs” out of your size.
suits tailored by us fit snugly and comfortably.
Come in and inspect our fine range of suitings.

You'll be delighted with some new patterns.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET























Orchestra
Keep this date open for Ss. k i th t
A GRAND SHOW Sane ane ae
{ Entire Proceeds for Charity.
freee oa pecial Cake
a ;
. THE BARBADOS Order These:—
AQUATIC CLUB
RE TAUR ' Pkgs. ENGLISH ICING eee
S A » ENGLISH CASTOR SUGA
we » TABLE RAISINS 14's & I's
IN addition to the regular CUT MIXED PEEL —per Ib.
Restaurant Service at the ; CURRANTS per Ib.
Club for Members (Break- Tins BLACK CURRANT JAM
fast, Luncheon, Tea, Dinner, » GLUCOSE SPREAD
ete.), orders will be taken » PRUNES
for Wedding, Birthday, » STRAWBERRIES
Cocktail and Supper Parties, » CHOCOMEL
etc., under the supervision Bots. PEANUT BUTTER
of :— » TARRAGONA VINEGAR i
||| MRS. GRACE WILLIAMS, ee ee
% Manageress.
{|| Mrs. Williams will also ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co., Ltd.
* personally attend and super-
x vise Parties if required. HIGH STREET
x For Reservations and = = = eee
x Orders .. . Please Dial 4461. a a
> = FFE SSS,
* WSssss SO SSSOOOT SP OFFS | y . °
S18 y, Can't B *% i Calling all Dairy Owners, Race Horse Owners,
} 4
Eig 7 eee ee © Sees FT and Stock Owners.
‘ r )
Sik) These Values 5 i
vid No more Feed spoiled or soured by stale or dirty water
% ¥ at it remaining in your Buckets if you use our patent
B1% i.
I B

<

oat at

POOF

PSPOOOD

44664
SEE LLL LID

4,4,

% Lovely
& a yd,

Crettones
Domestic

~ a yd

h ”
$% Khaki Dr
$ White

» Woollens

8 Doeskins
S Plastic L

4,
7

444406

<
POCO SS

“-

toe

Wm, tf



Cotton Prints 40c,

$ Ladies Cotton Vests 39¢,

x » Silk

\% Calice Lovely

3 Gents Cotton

%& Tweeds, Serges, Flannels

4
X $2.00 each

%
‘.
\% Bedspreads Lovely Quality
1X $4.50 each
§

iss Lovely Quality
(Double) $1.09 a yd.

Thousands of

+
%& Also
1% lines too
x tion at Ruthless
ss at as
*
<<
».
s*
‘,
1?
&
os
°

Thani Bros.

SUPER —SALE

Swan St

ee ~
SPSOGO COOOL

‘} THANI'S
SUPER

up
Panties 39c._ ,,

67e.
59¢e. & T5e. a yd
36e. a yd.

Quality 49¢

Vest 39e.
Underwear 75c.
Socks 32c.

ills 59c. up
78e.
in Tropicals

up

up

etc. $1.98 up
arge Table Covers

Bedtick

other
numerous to men-
Reductions

e

iry. St. & 6,



SOS

4.4466 644,
LL LLLPLLLLCELCLOPLLVOLELOLOLOCLG SS CPLLL PLL LLLP APPAR APPDLAPDDSPA APPS



|

SOSSSSS OOS SOOO FOOSE GOEL,














Wash your Bucket and hang it upside down on the
Bucket Hook by its rim. The Bucket is securely. held

by its own weight. It drains and dries in no time. It
remains dry and clean until wanted for use and is easily
and quickly released.

The BUCKET HOOK can be
any wall or upright.

ONLY Oe.

See them demonstrated at

C.8. PITCHER & CO., LID.

AND AT
WILKINSON & HAYNES

SHIRTS
CONSULATE

WHITE COLLAR ATTACHED

fixed on the side of

EACH.

CO:: LTD.





———

|

' AUSTIN REED

COLLAR ATTACHED
SOFT FRONT DRESS

TAFATEX

CREAM SPORT |

METROPOLE |

COLOURED COLLAR
ATTACHED.

AT

C. B. RICE & Co. )

fe |

BOLTON LANE
See”
t







Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EDSUD2NYV_S4N4FP INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T16:16:14Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02229
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Sunday
Bully 9
1950

_—





Sunday



Price:
SIX CENTS

Year 5:





LE ——— —

U.S. TANKS RUSHED INTO BATTLE

30, 000 London

Drivers Strike
In Support of Market Hands

LONDON, July 8.

HUNDREDS of London lorry drivers today fore-

stalled their leaders’ call to 30,000 van and
lorry drivers to immobilise their vehicles by Mon-
day morning in support of 4,000 strikers in the
capital’s central meat market.
Without waiting for the beginning of the new week,
hundreds who should have been on the road today
refused to take out their vehicles, putting an
immediate check on the flow of foodstuffs to the
metropolis.

Transport groups along the south coast and as far away as
industrial “Middle” and North England have pledged their
support to the “total paralysis” strike of 70,000 road trans-
port drivers.all over the country, if possible.

: ——*" Strikers will maintain the de-

liveries of essential goods to hos-
s * :

pitals and schools



Public transport — buses and
: e . , trams — are not affected by
Believed Dead strike, but 4,000 petrol and_ oil

drivers have been urged to jpin
their strike. If they respond,
| buses and coaches may have tc
Stop because of lack of fuel
Troops Haul Supplies
Most strikers belong to 1,500,000

LONDON, July 8
Paul Muller, the 63-year-old
German scientist, who set out
to cross the Atlantic to South
America in his 5 yards sailing
boat with his 18-year-old





strong Transport and Gene
daughter Aga, is believed Workers Union. Artsul Deakens
dead, according to Press re- | tie Union’s Secretary has con-
ports here. demned the strike as an act by

reckless, irresponsible people”
Upwey who befriended the The fortnight old Central Meat

Mullers when they put in
there last November, have re-
ceived a telegram asking if
Muller died in Liberia on July
3, reports said.

The Mullers Icft Hamburg
last November “in search of
peace and securi\y”.

—Reuter.

Market strike began with a walk-
cut by 1,400 meat transport
drivers and a protest against al-
leged delays in handling thei:
claim for wage increase

They were joined by

'

nearly
2,500 porters warehousemen, cold
storage men ard workers in the
morket.
The strike



held up deliveries
of groceries as well as meat and
for a week now about 2.500 troops
have heer leeping London house-
wives surnlied. :
The road haulage strike is

at forcing tha settlement

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bell of

2 American

Fighters Lost
TOKYO, July 8.

General MacArthur’s headquar-
ters announced today that two
American fighters were lost yes-
terday over Korea. One was be-
lieved to have fallen a victim to
ground tire and it was thought
that the other ran out of fuel.

Both pilots were believed to
have escaped injury. Bad weather
limited the effectiveness of low-
level fighter strikes.

Australian Mustangs however
flew effective ground sorties dur-
ing the day destroying three
trucks and damaging 19. One Mus-
tang is missing. American jets
destroyed 22 trucks and one tank
and damaged 20 trucks. Three
tanks were probably destroyed
and a fourth left burning. Five
fuel trucks were also left burning,
the statement said.

Superfortresses of the 20th air
forge launched moderately suc-
cessful attacks on the east coast
from Kojo, on the 39th parallel
northward to Konan. The heaviest

@ On Page 11

cf ths Smithfield dispute and
cuickee action by the Transport
anid General. Workers Union on
claim for wage

transpert workers.

increpses for
—Reuter



7 ° ‘
Greek Strike Enda
ATHENS, July 8
Greek communications inside
and outside of the country return-
ed to normal tonight when the
local staff of Cable and Wireless
and the staff of Government’s
Telecommunications Service ended
their
work.
Cable and Wireless staff who
struck on Wednesday returned
after a compromise with the man-
agement under which it was
understood they will get a loan of
two months’ salary to be repaid by
instalments over three years set

strikes and returned to

ing next January.
wages claims.
Government staff who had been
striking for two weeks for wage|
increase, received the promise that |
their claims would be “adequately |

They had made

considered” .—Reuter. |

International Law |
Justifies America’s

Action In Korea ©
—SHAWCROSS

ST. HELIN’S, LANCASHIRE, July 8

SIR HARTLEY SHAWCROSS, British Attorney General
said here to-day America’s intervention in Korea before the
Security Council had sanctioned such action was justified
under International Law on which he is expert.

“What is happening in Korea is not domestic or civil war
as indeed Russians have sought to pretend, but armed}
aggression in a foreign state that had itself actually been
established with the support and under the supervision of
the United Nations”, he said.

i
Foreign Currency

Shortages Cantcelled

PARIS, July 8.

“Not only had it always been as
it still remains, a law that the state
which is made a victim of aggres-
sive attack is entitled to defend
itself, but the other states whether
under treaty or not, are entitled
to go to its assistance.

“That inherent right which na-|




j loaded in



Europe's 18 Marshall Plan)},; ‘aot

: |tions have of individual and
countries | prepared on Saturday hcollective interference was not
to do business through their own labrogated by the Charter of the
International Bank of European i : ;

Payments Union to
trade by
currency

unfetter the
cancelling out foreign
shortages.

Countries which are members

of the European Economic Co-
Operation Organization agreed

unanimously on Friday to set up
a Currency Clearing House

Secretary General Robert Mar-
olin called it a “most important
iinancial decision”

Since the foundation of a World
3ank in 1946 experts now will
draw up etailed rules for opera-
lions

They hope they would have a
final convention ready for signa-
ture early in August and that it
provisions will be retroactive
July 1.
coun-

Previously in European





tries, their trade was geared to a
system cf bilateral agreements
with each other. They could buy
mly in ntries of whose cur-
rency thev had steck Now they
will deposit their dings with a
Central Ager receiving in





turn credits od for
any other member <
Union. —CP)

Irchases ir
intry of the





United Nations.

“Southern Korea is not a mem-{
‘ber of the United Nations, but she!
‘is still entitled to receive imme-|
|diate assistance. States whether
members or not can defend her}
jagninst aggression until the Secu-|
rity Council itself should exercise |
its responsibilities. |

“Any other view would turn the
' Charter of the United Nations into |






















SOUTH KOREAN troop:

country would, in due course, be given independence.
Korea) and Americans landed

of Rashin (North



in their look-out

iting hae HLL





i
OST
on the boundary line between North and Sout Korea,
the Cairo Conference in 1943 the Allies decided that after Korea had been freed from Japanese rule the

At

In 1945 the Russians captured the naval base
at Jinsen (South Korea)

A year later the country

was divided at the 38th parallel, just above the capital city, Seoul.—Express

Airports And Truman Decides
On Conscription

Harbours
Militarised

LOS ANGELES, July 8,
Angeles and other

airports and harbours
moving towards

Los
coast
swiftly
tempo,

Airlines and shipping firms re-
ported they are marshalling
planes ships to
American forces in Korea,

One ‘ine is virtually on a war
footing as Government has chart-



war-

and



West |

supply |

ered its Skymaster cargo planes

Sydney Smith, District Sales
Monager Pan American Airlines,
said the line was “offering its |
fullest facilities to the Depart-
ment of Defence,”

Trans-Ocean Airline has re-
galled ali personnel frorg leave

and is trying to e@large its Sky-
master fleet.
American President
Line announced that it had ask-
ed a Maritime Commission for
more ships.
Lines President George Killion

said they would “bring home
strategic materials for stock-
piling” as well as taking war

supplies to the East and Japan.
—Reuter.



American
Aid For
Korea

By LIONEL HUDSON
PUSAN, South Korea, July 8.
American men, guns and armour

for the big battle against North
Korean invaders were today pour-
ing through this port on the south-
ern tip of Korea like a Cup Final
crowd through turnstiles,

For an anti-Communist scene
it was certainly most heartening
in South Korea today.

No dusi was allowed to settle
on the war materials being dis-
charged from a multitude of ships
plying back and forth from Japan
acr the Straits of Korea

Every sort of ship, from small
Japanese coasters to landing craft,



| destroyers and freighters, was be-

ing used in the operation



An American Navy officer said
he did not sleep for a week and
described the scene as “Dunkirk

in reverse”. He added: “This }
only a second rate vart, but we
have turned roynd more ships in
the past week than they usually
handle here in six months.”

His eves closed involuntarily
with, sleep. At night despite the
blackout the work goes on, Ships
are cleared and trains sent north
all round the clock

Ship Unloaded

A tank landing ship was un
23 minutes yesterday
and its cargo was on its way to
the front within a few hours, and
was rushed on to the railway
trucks with rice straw

Hustling Brigadier - General
Crump Garvin who commands
this “hbeach-head” told me he was
pushing men and materials for-
ward as fast as they were shipped
in

——( Reuter)



Red Koreans
Grab U.S. Lands

LONDON, July 8














Shipping || to



|

|

protection for a few or would put) Nort! Korean Government an-
a premium on sudden unheralded | not iced today it would confiscate
attack, tying the hands of law-| “!! !@%ds in South Korea belong-
abiding States until the Security ("°% “' American Imperialist
Council had taken measures which | °°"! rean Government and big
indeed might make it impossible |!“ ners according to a Tass
‘wr the Council to take any action, '" age from Pyongyang, Nortb
et all.” Korean Capital, received in Lon-
“Passing to Russia’s allegation S cee Mensnge aa one Saba
1t the Security ‘Council’s decis-( Ge Comet Dad released a press
ion was illegal since the Soviets ” cee hae tg this land as
jid not vote and because Com- ‘ cp ak. a relat: oe
unist China was not represent- i
ed”, the Attorney General
lared If those > i be vided
correct at all—and o lan
istification for ey 1 vdded
nas beer ione Tr ecree i t
ted States ar other on or lan All South K |
associated with her would; were abolished, the 1 |
be rested firmly upon ordin- ured id citizens ¥ ,
ational Law’ i le < to the Gover ‘ |
—Reuter. ' in North Kore —Reuter



America Aghast

WASHINGTON, July 8.

PRES'DENT TRUMAN'S decision to put conscription

into effect has awakened American people as nothing be-
fore to the implications of the Korean crisis.
President Truman on Saturday dangled with the Draft
Law over the heads of reservists and prospective recruits
in an urgent effort to build up the United States military
manpower for demands of the war in Korea.

at

MONKEYS WANTED

CASABLANCA, July 8.

Drs. Martin and Blane of
the Pasteur Institute said
to-day they are rinning
short of monkeys on which
experiment with their
vaccine against infantile

|
|
paralysis. |

|
| They announced this week
| that satisfying results had
been obtained in experi-
ments, but vaccine is not yet
| ready

They

|
for general use.
emphasised to-day

that their work

prevent

is on vae-

infantile |
|

cine to
(Poliomyelitis)

accidentally discov e rin g
three years ago that rabbits
were receptive to
paralysis virus, he and his
partner had experimented
on 3,000 rabbits.

But their reaction was not
similar to man’s; so experi

ments were begun on mon-
keys

infantile

These were so scarce
that inoculation direct to
the brain had to be tried
In 80 per cent. of the cases
successful immunity appear-
ed to be the result

Monkeys were _ badly
fecaee to allow inoculations
Vv

paralysis
ind not to cure it
Dr. Martin said that since

|
{
|
}
|
|

normal injections.

| Reuter
FRENCH JOURNALIST
VANISHED

DUTCH GUIANA, July 8





The last contact which the
vanished French journalist and |
explorer Raymong Maurais had
with civilisation was when he

passed through Dutch Guiana at

the end of last November it j
learned today

He was then going in the direc-
tion of a territory inhabited

Indians roving through the Guiana
brazil frontier areas and having
Fractically no contact with the
cutside world.—Reuter.

by |

\ The President gave the Armed
Services power to draft men in a
General Order. on rane esign-
ed to lift the economy limits im-
posed on Army, Navy, Marines
and Air-Force. ie

It was wppareat that the De-
fence Department hoped to get by
a Mg ere ed without using

e Dr, authority. _

No offictal would sy how rie
men are wanted, However, the
comparison of limits fixed by law
against the present strength of
the armed forces indicates that
the figure could run as high as
547,482.

Officials of the Armed Forces,
who made public the President’s
order, said that as far as they
know, there has been no decision
yet to call up a National Guard
or Reservists.

~Reuter and Can. Press

India Warned
Against Communists

MADRAS, July 8,

Jayaprakash Narayan, General
| Secretary of the Indian Socialist
|Party, to-night warned the In-
dian people “not to be deceived
|by attempts of the Communist
| Party | in India to stage a come-
back in the guise of a democratic
front”.

Addressing the eighth National
|Convention, the Socialist Party
here, Narayan, charged the Com-
| munist Party with forming a
“new front not for the preserva-
{tion or building up of the democ-
| racy, but to serve which it sub-
| 8 ribed—to drag iadia into Rus-

sian fashion,”
|



“We do not wish to be dragged
jinto that” Narayan added. He
attributed the Indian Commun-
ists’ change of front to “failure
of methods they had been fol-
\!owing so far resulting in a com-
plete isolation from the people,”

—Reuter.

BANDIT KING MADE
$1,000,000 HAUL

_PALERMO, Sicily, July 8.
It is believed that the Sicilian
bandit chief Salvatoré Giuliano,
who was shot dead on Wednesday,

The Castelvetrano area fur-
ther south where Giuliano was
finally hunted down and shot
was strange country to him and

had about three-quarters of a only

3 y some impelling reaso
million dollars “salted away”! could have rede inf move
mainly in American and North there.
African banks, 1

Police and

That reason might have been

unofficial sources; an esca e plan from Sicily, The
said that Guiliano’s five years’ police ais0 revealed that neither
reign as bandit king of Sicily in the house

netted him a total of a million and
A part of this was|
proceeds direct from armed hold-

a half dollars,



where Giuliano
was hiding nor in other houses
where he had been in the past
days was there any hidden

ups, part of it ransom payments treasure

and the remainder, sums paid in| The police are at present

for “pr ction” —immunity from | engaged in trying to find out
s attacks : Sesto ‘

his attacks | where Giuliano sent his money

But it is thought that Giuliano abroad—and how he did it



MacArthur
Named U.N.

Commander

WASHINGTON, July 8
Presicent Truman today named
eneral Douglas MacArthur as
nited Nations Commander in the
Korea fighting. He directed Mac- |}
Arthur to use the United Nations
ag

In a statement issued from the
White House, President Truman's
orders were being made in accor
sance with the United Nations
Security Council’s Resolution yes-
terday empowering the United,
States to establish a unified com
mand in Korea, to appoint a}
Commander-in-Chief and to use}
the flag of the United Nations
The President’s statement said
“The Security Council of the
United Nations in its Resolution |
ef July 7, 1950, recommended that
all memberg providing military
forces and other assistance would
pursue the Security Council's
Resolutions of June 25— 27 to make
fuch forces and other assistance



to the unified command of the
United States.
' Security Council's
\ Recommendation
“T am responding to a recom

mendation of the Security Council
and have designated General
Douglas MacArthur command-
jing the military forces of which
members of the United Nations
under the unified command of the

United States continue to repel
the unprovoked armed attack
against it

“Tl am directing General Mac-
Arthur, pursuant to the Security
Council’s Resolution to use the

United Nations flag in the course

cf operations against the Korean
Forces with the flags of the
various nations.”

General MacArthur, 70 years
old last January, is the son of
a Lieutenant General who dis-

tinguished himself in the war be+
tween the States. He has been in

and out of the Far East for the
past 47 years.
r Six feet two Inches tall, as

Supreme Commander in the Paci-
fic in World War II, he accepted
Japanese surrender on board the
American battleship Missouri in

1945
He had his baptism of fire in the
Philippines in 1908 In the 1914
18 War he was twice wounded,
once gassed and repeatedly deco-
rated He came out of it as
commander of the famous Ameri-
can “rainbow division”
Returning from the
@ On Page 11

France Gets
Another
Premier
mRENE PLEVEN

PARIS, July 9
Rene Pleven, a near-Radical
curly today accepted the post of

command



French Premier—Designate, H¢
had been asked by President
Auriol on Friday to undertake
consultations with a view to
forming a Government

Pleven, defence Minister of th¢
cut going Cabinet oi) Queuille,
will appear before the National

Assembly on Tuesday to ask for a

vote investing him as Premigr

It was considered very pro
bable in political quarters early
today that M, Pleven would get
his investiture vote. If elected
he intends to form a Coalition

Cabinet including Soqialist, Pony -}
lar Republicans, Radicals, hi
cwnl near Radical group,
Moderates

He is already assureg of
participation of the Radicals
some Moderates as well a
own small group. Participation of
the Popular Republicans, though
they have not yet taken any of-
ficial decision, is regarded -A¢9
almost certain.

The Socialists have decided t
vote for M. Pleven as Pre~'>
but have still to make un tl
minds about joining the Govern
ment.—(Reuter.)

and
.

the

and
i

his



|
|
|
|
|

“Meet Reds With
The Atom Bomb”

LONDON, July 8



An unofficial Anglo - French,
Committee for the stud f Euro-
pean research today reec;mende

jthe Western Powers | prepare

jun atom bomb and bacteriologica!

paid out almost half of this in It is extremely improbable that warfare offens a ate, heats

ages” to his hired killers to any American or Tunisian Banx os eee "Soviet “Union cormmi

upkeep their families and as Manager has in his books an}. yaGanst) b, against ny of the At-
“hush money” to local peasantry account headed “Salvatore Giult- | (BBN depo So me

who withheld information from ano”, It is thought that the out-|— The Committee report issued ir

pursuing policemen. ,law’s main investments abroad name its members by Director-|

; were made through Sicilians wha] General Robert Bore! said West-!

Money Abroad had already immigrated and wholern Europe could not hope to|

The Po'ice supported their} placed Giuliano’s holdings in their| match Russian manpower and\

theory that Giuliano’s money!own names.





must anticipate “the danger of



vas cached away abroad by| The police pointed out that! atomic harbour.”—Reuter,
pointing out that it has been) Sicilians would have enabled him
fairly definitely established that|to get back his money from his!
the outlaw chief yv planning | friends , | POTATO LOSS
to flee from Sicily Little hope is held out however}
Only this could have induce“ that ‘any substantial portion of| LONDON
G » leave Montpre near | Giuliano’s loot will ever be recov The Government lost more
he had been safe|ered. Those who held it for hira} £11,000,000 on potato trading in|
for ; among the rugged | by others will probably be quietly; the year 1948-49, an official report|
nountains Which he had known “instructed” since the bandit’s|showed. A small loss w
from his early boyhood death —Beuter on carrots —Can, Press

To Support Combat
Troops

Resisting Reds

KOREA, July 8
At Gen. MacArthur’s Advanced Headquarters,
AMERICAN tanks sped from the southern sup
ply port by rail to be in action today, according

to the latest information quoted by Headquarters’
sources here last night.

Trainloads of tanks had been given the highest
priority on heavily taxed railways behind the front.
American forces that had pushed forward 10 miles
during the day meanwhile clashed with North
Korean forces in a bitter engagement last night.
The engagement from which the Americans “extriecated”
themselves after suffering casualties, occurred just north
ef Chonan, 50 miles south of Seoul,
American forces had advanced under cover, smothering air
attacks on Communist armour as they had probed north
egain after two days’ withdrawal before the Communist
drive.
The clash opened when Americans topped the rise and ran

inte 15 or 20 North Korean infantrymen advancing towards
them.

** American guns and mortars at

| iene roared into action; field guns

WASHABLE NEWSPAPERS poured salvo after salvo at the
; : 4 opposing gunsites

BRAIDWOOD, Australia Northern tanks did not appear

Founded in 1885, the a tesils : { t .

Braidwood Despatch, a yesterday afternoon, but jt was

thought that they might be thrown
in today to develop a threat to
the southern flank

American armour rushed up
from the southern port, and though

country newspaper has some
notable achievements to its
credit. When ox-teams fail
| ed to bring in newsprivt |
because of floods some issues

were printed on brown not able to match in number the
paper and others on sugar northern tank estimated at about
bag material Then calico 150 by American Intelligence
was used, the issue called in GMmicer it was believed here that
the calico washed and then they would soon be sufficient to
used again.—(C.P,) ||/counter the Communist thrust
. 3 North Korean air installation
jena railway system as far north
as 20 miles from the North Korean
Powerful capital Pyongyang have been
thoroughly plastered from the air
it was reported in Tokyo today
Red Foree Acc fe to Commander

Harvey P, Lanham, the Air Group
Commander aboard the American

Thrusts South

Aircraft Carrier, targets were
tees plastered with 500 pound bombs
TOKYO, July 8 ‘ond rockets by the British and
American military. circles here American carrier—borne planes
tonight doubted whether Am- .
rican armosr and ground troops Air Bombardment
ould reac h the area north of During the extensive air
Kum River—last natural barrier Wuesday
Pav iA 7 * strikes on Monday and Tuesday,
efore Taejon, provisional South ; w
Korean capital—-in time.to. pre Lanham said American planes
" I F destroyed or severely damaged
vent it being over-run by Com- ‘
nunist troops 23 locomotives. They also ac-
The North Korea offenstve counted for 10 — on hes
igainst American positions be- ground and in we en
tween Taejon and Pyongtack battered bridges south o yong-
‘bout 40 miles to the North yang
wung into high wear to-day and Truck loads of troops were
air reconnaissance revealed new strafed. There were no Ameri-
ind disquieting developments in ean casualties, although two

other sectors Lanham

Korean

planes were damaged

According te latest reports from} eseribed the North

the front a powerful Communist anti-aircraft fire on the first day
force thrusting south from Mu as light and inaccurate, but more
ffung-Ni about 36 miles east of accurate on the second day. He
Pyongtaek was now moving along aid the British planes were
the Americans’ right flank tow assigned to targets at Haeju Port
ard Chongju, big roac and raii| City, 94 miles North West of
junction 30 miles north of Taejon Seoul.
Fall Back Gunboats, Not Subs

Should this column swing to; Lanham cleared up the report

the west before reaching Chong-| {hat submarines had been seen and

ju, the American advance forces | bombed at Port Chinampo, 31 mile

would be compelled to abandon

their delaying action and fall back
@ On Page 11



Southwest of Pyongyang
American planes were
@ On Page 15

fired on



ee



RALEIGH

You can get your favourite bicycle from
us complete with everything you

require.. We also provide you with a



on Cycles. See our Office for full particu

lars when buying. It pays to insure your

cycle,

;
:

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co... Ltd.

Distributors

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

wa MMU =




PAGE TWO

Cae ne Nee ee ee ce nee mem







PLEO LP PLP PS PFE EF EFES SAPP APES SE

IR VICTOR TAIT, K.B.E.,C.B.,



| Aeradio Ltd’s., Caribbean Co

s was an intransit passenger by
x B.W.1.A. yesterday morning from
ns Trinidad to Venezuela. From there
x G L @> B E he will be returning to England
% : via New York and Montreal.
& TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 and CONTINUING FE dia cine ag wee geo yg
. nternational Aeradio Ltd., and
~ e | Operations Director of B.O.A.(
He was attending a meeting
FIGHTING! LOVING! LOOTING! 99-88%:
e e © |B.0.A.C., P.A.A., 1.A.L., and
os 2 vi Bs a6 c a | 6.W.1.A., finalizing arrangements
ry \3 - *=" for the forming of Internationa!

At the University of

Western Ontario
R. RICHARD
accompanied by

HUTSON
his mother

Mrs. Hilda Hutson arrived yester-
day by T.C.A. to spend a holiday
in Barbados. Richard, who is 2t
the University of Western
Ontario will be returning to

Canada in mid-September. He has

been living in Canada since 1944
and has been at the University
from 1948

Here for Two Weeks
RRIVING yesterday by
B.W.1.A. from Trinidad fo:



: = about two weeks was Mr. Reggie
re Lopes of Alec Rusell and Co,, in
B.G. He is staying at the Hotel

ATT Ta e Royal



ee Ae ess



SO eee
ROWAL (Worthings)

EXTRA! EXTRA!









. da

> HONG “RS al S 2 Today and Tomorrow

ss SINGING BARBERS (Musical Short) 3 y

2 AMERICA’S LATEST Newsreel % 5.00 and 8.30 p.m.

% BRITISH MOVIE TONE ection sai sai ¢

*% See MacDonald Bailey Trinidad’s Coloured Spr r winning ¢ " 7

x the 220 at the White City Games, England. 5 (Ook whats Sook ins

. —_—_—<$$$——$———— a : ° ;
Xs LOCAL TALENT AUDITION to-day 9.30 a.m. $ in AFRICA"

st Come and Listen to a recording of the ALL STAR Show by % ‘ re Ne

% MR .CECIL SAMPSON > he
. BOOED SOREL” ty
LOO SPO LELPPDLLVPELLPASS PAP ( }}








By Popular Demand

sper â„¢
MTT Te



Madam OLINDY & Troupe

In

“CARACAS NIGHT

AT

LOOSE

+
%,
>

SOO

s
.
Â¥
os
w
&
%
&
3
x
8
%
XS
x
se
a
3
&
a
mi
2
ed
$
eS
%

Roxy Theatre

EMPIRE

TUESDAY NITE 8.30

y

Today 4.45 and 8.45 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday
4.45 and 8.30 p.m,
Paramount Pictures present

Prices: Pit 24, House 48,
Balcony 72, Box $1.00



William HOLDEN
Joan CAULFIELD
in
“DEAR WIFE”
with

Empire Theatre Silly DeWolfe, Mona Free-

man, Edward Arnold
WEDNESDAY NITE 8.30
Prices: Pit 36, House 48,

Balcony 72, Box $1.00



ROXY

TO-DAY 445 & 8.15 and
Continuing
M-G-M Pictures present...



Joel McCrea, kilen Drew
in

, “STARS IN MY CROWN”
Olympic Theaire with

Allan Hale Dean Stockwell

THURSDAY NITE 8.30

Prices: Pit 24, House 48,
Balcony 72, Box $1.00



OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows Today
4.30 and 8.45 p.m
Republic Big Double .. .
“THE FAR FRONTIER”
and

“THE INSIDE STORY”

Monday and Tuesday
4.45 and 8.15 p.m.

Ist Inst. Republic Serial
“DICK PRACY RETURNS’
Starring :

Ralph BYRD
David SHARPE



Royal Theatre

FRIDAY NITE 8.30
Pit 24, House 48,



-' Prices:



Balcony 72, Box $1.00

655939










S0ESE6 56646909594 aera
SOOPO COPS POFFO? POSS NS
.
.
‘
%
%s
$ x
. ‘
‘ *
3 %
§ ¥
e
3
~
J
%
S
%
x
—- S
4 +
N
x
° %
z
R
§ :
% x
? .
’ %
THATS ALL WE HAVE %
x
“4

TO SHOUT ABOUT

DRINK

MURRAY'S
MILK STOUT

“THE STOUTEST OF ALL STOUTS”

MANNING & CO., LTD.—Agents



6,
SSS04

PROOOOSSSS $650066086"

BOO08S OSSSC4 SO900S08C

PLOT? errr 909 FOOOSEOSO SOO SSSF o

'





lare touring Bermuda

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Arrived Yesterday



M* ROD MacINNES, Directo:
of Publie Relatix of T.CA
in Montreal accompan-ed | Mr
John Clare were mong the
passengers arriving by T.C.A
yesterday morning to pend a
holiday in Barbados
Mr. Clare is Managir Ec
* of Maclean Mi ne whic
published in Tor
Pncis are already in
Barbados having come dowr
last week They are staying a*
Cora! Sands
T.C.A. Navigator
R. DON WILLIS is the navi-
gator of the T.C.A. plan
which arrived here yesterday
morning. He here for a week’
stop over’ and Mrs. Willis also
came down on the same flight
His relief who spent a week here

left yesterday taking his place.
Mr. ‘and Mrs. Willis are stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel.

After 54 Months’ Holiday

RS. CLEM MOSHER, form-
4 erly Clem St. Hill, who has
been spending about five and a

half months with her parents Mr

and Mrs. H. G. St. Hill of
“Ypres”, Ist Ave. Belleville, left
yesterday morning by T.C.A

returning to her home in Montreal

Was Playing Cricket

In Bermuda

R. BILL SIMPSON, son of

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Simpson

of “Wildale’, Marine Gardens

arrived by T.C.A_ yesterday

morning and his parents, brothers

and sister were at Seawell to
meet him.

Bill who is at school at Uppe:

Kenneth Wood.

Doing Research Work

At McGiil
R. TORRENCE PAYNE, M.D.,

Canada College in Toronto has PE
: — 1.D., with Mrs. Payne and
pos gh ra oe mee their baby son Michael were
§ : y ; or é am
: te among the passengers 2
of school boys from Canada, who be in DERSerEes, “Wino: sec

yesterday by T.C.A
Canada.

Dr. Payne is doing research at
McGill University for the American
Heart Association, and at the end
of June 1951 he will then be going
to the U.S

They were in Barbados for about
a month staying with Dr. Payne’s
mother and relatives.

Spent Honeymoon Here
R. and Mrs, Kenneth Wood
who were married recently in
Toronto arrived in Barbados about
a month ago to spend their honey-

, en route to

He expects to be here for

couple of months

About the Y.W.C.A,

P until 1921, there used to be
a Y.W.C.A. in Barbados, but
after that time it fell through.
A great effort has been made
to revive this Association and at
i recent meeting, it was reformed
and officers were eleeted, A drive
is now being made to collect dona-
tions and enrole members, and
on Tuesday over the Local Broad-

cast a special appeal is to be moon here. Kenneth is a Barba-
made, The first General Meeting cian, his wife is Toronto born
of the Association will be held They returned to Toronto yester-
early next month day by T.C.A. where they live

a: —







) AQUATIC CLUD CINEMA (Members Only)









{

{

} TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGUT AT 8.30

) or

THE LIFE OF RILEY )
U

) Starring WILLIAM BENDIX i

) With JAMES GLEASON ROSEMARY DeCAMP -- BILL GOODWIN \
tt

) A Universal-International Picture 45

) \

} You Haven't Laughed Until Yo Lived The Life of Riley ! ‘

} )

SSS SSS SSS p="

PEPE CP PPPS PSS PPPS ESE PPPOE PEPE LEIA EPPA OE

PLAZA

4, 666655
9 POEL OOO OOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OOO LLL
———— eee epee ees
4

GAITETY

Last 2 Shoy

Last @ Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m 1

Warner's Towering Hit! ‘
‘

Garfela in “DUST BE MY DESTINY”

, MON, & TUES, 5 & 8.30 p.m, 2

Warner's Doubie-Bil! i
Jack Carsen in Brenda Marshall in ¢
LOVE & LEARN and SINGAPORE WOMAN }
Starting Friday 14th “FIGHTER SQUADRON” in Technicolor ‘
8

yy

|





(The Garden) ST. JAMES

» TO-DAY 5 & 8.50 p.m.
Dennis Morgan in Warner's Musical!

WILD IRISH ROSE” |

MONDAY TUESDAY 8.30 p.m.
Warner's Big Hit Double !
Dick Powell in

Dennis Morgan in

“May



and

“BROADWAY GONDOLIER”
MISSOURI"

“BAD MEN OF






Sake

SLEEP in COMFORT

MATTRESSES & SPRINGS



BEDSTEADS—3 ft., 3 ft. Gins.,
4 ft. 6 ins.
also —
COIL SPRINGS complete with Rails & Lugs for Mahogany
Bedsteads—3 ft. 6 ins. and 4 ft. 6 ins,
Obtainable from our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

Telephone 2039

CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD. {

BARBADOS



Coffee Strainers
Tea Strainers
| Egg Beaters
|

Frying Baskets
It | » Salad Washers

_

”

thins Metal Skewers
| | Potato Ricers
Flour Sifters

1] Cake Pans

Screw Top Bottles

(

ul

{

1

(

|| Wire Gake Trays



Phoenix Ovenware

AT
PLANTATIONS LTD.

1 BROAD STREET

a nal



Ss





&

a



Carib

LEAVING SEAWELL by T.C.A. yesterday morning were
J. A, Haynes, Dr. Torrence Payne and his son Michael, Mrs. Kenneth

‘Former Ursuline Convent





: left to

With U.S. Army H.Q.

see yesterday morning

from Puerto Rico via Trini-
dad were Mr. and Mrs. George
D. Kittredge, who have come over
to spend two weeks holiday in
Barbados staying at the Colony
Club

Mr. Kittredge is with the U.S.
Army Headquarters at Fort Brook.
From Martinique :

RS. EMILIE MEYER from»)
Martinique who arrived here
recently by the Gascogne, will be,

returning to Martinique tomorrow,

when the Gascogne calls on her*
way north

This is Mrs. Meyer’s second
visit to Barbados, she was here :
little under a year ago when she

cume up with her neice and twoff

friends. She hopés to
Barbados later thig
another holiday

She is staying at the Sea View
! tuest House

return
year

t

| Pupil
RRIVING on Friday afternoon
from Trinidad
were Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Tucker
and their daughter Lynette.
They are staying at their home
“West Wego,” on the St. James
coast. Lynette who used to be

by



|

now goes
Joseph's

at the St.'
Brentwood,

to school
Academy,

Long Island. She is spending her);

summer holidays with her parents.
Also accompanying the Tuckers
ind staying with them at “West
Wego” is Miss Elizabeth Fisher.
Took ‘Bee-Gie’ to Bermuda
R. PAUL NOLAN ,who took
the Hon. M. D.
yacht “Bee Gie’ up to Bermuda
returned from Bermuda yesterday
norning by T.C.A

Mr. Nolan has been living here

or the past four years, living on
the St. James coast. His wife
was at the airport to meet him.

At the Royal Victoria

Hospital
RRIVING yesterday morning
by T.C.A. to spend a few
months holiday at home, was

Miss Nancy Ince, daughter of Mr
ind Mrs. H. W. Ince of ‘Melrose’,
ollymore Rock. Nancy is at the
Royal Victoria Hospital in
Montreal, and will be returning to
Canada in mid-September

From Trinidad Holiday
R. JEFFREY KIRTON re-
turned yesterday morning

by B.W.I1.A. from his holiday

° f
aling = M

right, Mrs.

ees,
B.W.I.A
uy;
pupil at the Ursuline Convent here’

yuiness’s |

SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950

seme maa ie aalaaractamamncaasn sai ELL A

To a Canada

R. Bruce Skeete

England Vi







their aqaugnhters

and Elizabeth lett yester-

ning by T.C.A. for Canada
itransit to £1 and

Ali of then e going on holiday,



zexcept Elizabeth who will be re-

g in England at ‘“lring

School in Hertfordshire

and Mrs. Skeete an
Patricia will be returning in

: October.
A Year In Venezuela
FTER three weeks staying at
the Paradise Beach Club, Mr.
and Mrs. John Lawson and their
daughter Caroline returned to
Venezuela yesterday by B.W.IA.
where he is the Central Agency's
representative in Caracas.
From England ,they have been
ving in Venezuela for one year.
First Visit

RRIVING from B.G. on Thurs-
day afternoon by B.W.1LA
was Miss Ceceline Baird, L.R.S.M.,
in assistant Teacher of the Beter-

rdverwagting Gevernment School.
This is her first visit to Barba-
jos. Miss Baird is a guest of Mr.
end Mrs. Creighton Birch of

Newgate”, St. Lucy.

To Continue Nursing Career
ISS ILENE STUART of Black
Rock, who did her basic

waining in Nursing at the General

ES here, will be among the

®

ral
q





passengers leaving here tomorrow
for England by the Gascogne, to
continue her nursing career in the
U.K,

Clem Mosher, Mr.
Wood, Mrs. Payne and Mr.

In 1946 she went to Jamaica on
a course sponsored by C.D. & W.,
in Public Health and Midwifery.
On the completion of this course
she visited various clinics in the

S.A., and in 1949 she was in

UU.
‘inidad on another three month
course.
Finished School

For Summer Holidays
M*. and Mrs. Frank Connor
were at Seawell to meet theii
son Maurice yesterday morning
He arrived from Canada by T.C.A

to spend the Summer Holidays it
Barbados He will be here for
about five weeks and will then be

returning to Halifax to do a fow R. TREVOR THORNE, son of

veer course in Art, at Dalhousie , Mr. and Mrs. Jack Thorne of
University. . Sandy Lane”, St. James was an-
Iniransit other arrival yesterday morning by

G. B. W. MORRISON who the T.C.A, flight.

M*:
is with the Colonial Develop-—

ment Welfare in St. Vincent has at Upper Canada College, was also
just arrived from long leave in in Bermuda playing cricket for
England with his wife and son. about ten days before he came on
\Before making connections to St. here. He has now finished school,
Vincent they were guests
Cacrabank.

Trevor who has been at school

at and after his holiday he expects
to return to Canada to work.

~~ * >



AMONG THE PASSENGERS arriving yesterday
T.C.A, from Canada were : Mr. John Clare, Managing Editor of
Maclean's Magazine in Toronto and Mr. Rod. C. MacInnes,
Director of Public Relations, T.C.A., in Montreal. Mrs. MacInnes
and their two sons accompanied by Mrs. Clare, arrived here last
Saturday for a holiday and Mr. Clare and Mr, MacInnes have

morning by

come to join them.

‘in Trinidad,



|

BY THE WAY

F I have a favourite among

the cretinisms of to-day it is
the thing called Unesco. In case
it might be thought too highbrow
it called in Miss Myrna Loy, who
‘got more cheers than _Italy’s
President.”

If, by some glorious mischance,
Mr. Bing Crosby had gone to
Unesco, and Miss Loy to St. An-
drews. But you see what I
mean, even if I don’t. What
about making Miss Dorothy
Lamour an honorary Field-Mar-
shal and Assistant Director of
Western Defense?

ocean: fam

Is it valid?
R. _TINKLEBURY
DRIVER, K.C.,
surprise yesterday.
a document, convention, written
instrument or what not, purport-
ing to be a charter of privilege
by three mesne lords
stical in the reign of
Henry II. to the borough in which
the Thorogrin works are now
situate cum habitatione. This
charter, empowered any house-

SNAP-
sprang a
He produced

a






Evans &

New attracti

2.00

NEW

AMERICAN
PRINTS




Jersey Silks
Model Felt Hats

2.50



By BEACHCOMBER

owner in the borough to fly a flag
on every day of the year Mr.
Honeyweather Gooseboote, K.C.,
countered by quoting a written

round her neck, and sipped cham-
pagne from a glass held between
her toes (the small one daintily
crooked).”” I can add nothing to

sancellation of this charter at the the picture But I suspect that
demand of the Knights Pursui- the gentlemen on either side of
vant of the Court of Seigneurie, her found it difficult to pretend
who claimed rights of custom by that they had not noticed any-
a writ of monstraverunt present- thing odd going on. The crooked
ed in the Manorial court. Cockle- toe, at any rate, showed that she
carrot interposed to say that if had been decently brought up,
they were going to argue in this and was exquisitely refined.
fashion, they might as well try to .. =~ ;

prove that people who make Air-minded fleas

garters base their claim to adver- 7

tise them on an ancient rune of ERFORMING fleas, weather-
the Druids unearthed at Plougas- bound at London Airport,
tel. To Mr. Gooseboote’s impa- need no longer wander about at
lient “Why Plougastel?” the judge § loose end. There is to be a
retorted hotly, “Why not? large hostel for animals and in-

sects who have to make journeys

Perhaps she was bored by air. Great care will have to

YIRLS who ar¢

in doubt about be exercised to get them on the

how to behave at a big din- right planes. Even a_ trained

ner party might do better than aceglamoreceptionette would find
follow the example of a lady I it difficult to pick out a warthog
have been reading about in my. in a plane-load of financiers. The
paper She “tied herself into afentry of a crocodile or a tiger
square knob on the table, placedhywould be more obvious but no
her forearms and upber body orfless awkward. Down, Rover
the tablecloth, wrapped her legsig@iown! , ,

Whitfields
ve shades in

1.00
1.02

3.00

1%

Evans & Whitfields - Your Shoe Store

4
SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950



IT’S STILLFUN WITH HAROLD LLOYD



HE IS FUN ... Harold Licyd
Who, in the past, brought gay
moments into the lives of
millions of movie-goer hares
a gay evening with Mrs. Lloyd
at New Yerk's Stork Club .





Some Cookery
Club Problems

By HELEN BURKE

Will you please tell me how long
it takes for bread dough or other
yeast mixture to rise to double its
oe No cookery book ever telly
this.

HE TIME depends on _ the

amount of yeast used and the
warmth provided during the ris-
ing. It is not possible to give
this exactly.

The temperature of the room
should be between 80 and 84 de-
grees Fahrenheit.

If the flour is warmed a little
in the first place the process of
raising will be quickened. If
cold flour is used the time requir-
ed will be much longer.

Again, the raising will be
hastened if the dough is placed

on the plate rack over the cooker
or in an airing _ cupboard
or in front of an open fire or over
a pan of warm water. Dough,
under ideal conditions, will double
its bulk in 1—1% hours.

—LES.



HE WAS FUN..
Harold Lloyd in those silent days
@ 1920?

. Remember

Present Kor Princess
Elizabeth

Princess Elizabeth has just re-
ceéivéd a belated wedding present,
It is a present well worth waiting
for, a book written and compiled

as its President and Queen Mary,

Princess Elizabeth and Princess

Margaret amongst its members.
The BBC’s reporter, Valentine

ky members of Women’s Insti- Selsey, described the Institute’s
tutes throughout England and wedding present in “Radio News
Wales. The dedication reads Reel.” It was not, he gaid, a

“A token of love and loyalty to

professional job but the personal
Her Royal Highness by the Wo-

work of Women’s Institute mem-

inén’s Institutes of England and bers who wanted to give the
Wales on the occasion of the Princess something to remind her
Royal Wedding, with their best of the Kentish hopfields, the
wishes for Princess Elizabeth's Welsh mountains, the Yorkshire
future happiness.” Dales, the Lincolnshire Wolds—

Women’s Institutes are a great all the colourful counties which
feature of British rural life. she visits during the course of her
These village clubs, which were duties. Each country has provided
started in Canada in 1897, came material for two pages, one in
te Britain in 1915 and now exist writing, the other in pictures or
in a very large number of vill- designs. There is amongst many

ages, Neatly all women in a dis-
trict, rich and poor alike, belong
to the Institute, and on one after-
noon a month they meet to hear a
talk given sometimes by a local
inhabitant but often by a visiting

the Somerset Legend that Christ
came to the county on the ship
ot Joseph of Arimathea; the story
of the first Home Guard, said to
have been formed in Gloucester-
shire one hundred and fifty years

speaker. These talks are widely ago to repulse Napoleon; a pic-
varied; some deal with domestic ture of buzz bombs fiying over
subjects, others with lie in the Isle of Thanet and the twelfth
different countries, or problems century bridges over the Medway.
ef the day. There are monthly The book is uniform in style for
competitions and discussions and all writing has been done in
various functions are arranged Gothic lettering by a single scribe.

throughout the year. These regu- A coloured map of England and

lar gatherings do much to weld Wales shows the number of In-
the different sections of village stitutes at the time of the Prin-
life firmly together and the cess’s wedding and the dedica-

Women’s Institute at Sandringham
the Royal Family’s country home
in Norfolk, has Queen Elizabeth

tion page bears sixty finely illu-
minated coats of arms, one or more
for each county.



brown broque is now on

Specially designed for Barbados, this

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

Stecking The



yePool
BEFORE planting Lilies in your
pool, it is just as well to con-
sider the Kinds that are best
suited to it A brief — and
emateurish — description here ot

ine water Lilies that do
warbados may be heipful

The largest of our water-Lilies
is the vigorous Lotus Lily, which

well in





SUNDAY ADVOCATE



At The Cinema

Home Sweet Home=
With The Rileys

Hy G. B.



At the Aquatic Club, “THE LIFE OF RILEY” is plagtins |

starring William Bendix as Riley. This film is basea on the
popular American radio programme of the same name, and
has the advantage of the presence of Bendix, who created
the character over the ether, and the direction of Irving
Brecher, who wrote the script and produced it

Living the “life of Riley” is ing and natural. Throughout the
cmething we've all wanted to do, film, the continuity is good, and



sencs up leaves rising umbrella- gt cne time or another, but accord- from the point of view of comedy
like above the water to a height ing to reports, that gentleman's i; is a most refreshing picture, and
ef two or three feet, while the days are not entirely as free and one to amtise the whole family.
large scented pink flowers—very easy as we've been led to believe

beautiful — are borne on equally A series of humourous ups and The Wild West is with us, and
tall stalks, and open for a few downs, and crises that appear to the Texas Panhandle is once again
hours each morhing This Lily be insurmountable are all in the the scene of western goings-on
sends out strong roots in every Gay’s work, and of course, Riley ith Calamity Jane and Sam
irection, and in ‘a very short and his family always come out on Bass now showing at the Globe
time will take possession of the top, with plenty of fun and laughs. Theatre These two notorious
whole afea of the pool, over A riveter in an aireraft factory, characters have themselves quite
crowding and killine out every Duley feels he is a complete fail- time, from small everyday
a ae ting out every ure when he can’t pay the rent. shooting affairs to murder and a

other variety. It is grown from
seed or root. From this descrip-
lion it will be seen that the Lotus
J ily is quite unsuited to the small
Lily-pool, and really looks best
in a large natural pond.

Next in size and vigour, and
also more suited to the larger type
of pool, we have the big red Lily,
and the very similar big white
Lily. The leaves of these Lilies,
unlike the Lotus, float on the
surface of the water, with the
flowers, borne on short stalks just
above the leaves. If grown in a
pool with other ahd less hard;
kinds, these Lilies must be watch-
ed and controlled, or they too will
and kill







over-run out the more
delicate ones. Grown trom root.
Then there is the smaller, less

vigorous Blue Lily, whose leaves
also float on the water, with the
flowers, very lovely, rising a few

inches above on a short stalk.
This Lily spreads slowly, will
tolerate other Lilies, and is well
suited to the smaller Lily-pool
Grown by root

For the really small pool, the

best Lilies are those little cup-
like pink, white or peach coloured
ones that float, grouped among
their small leaves right on the
surface of the water Nothing
could be more charming than
these lovely little Lilies, and they
are the answer to the small Lily-
pool, Grown from root.

And lastly there is the water
Hyacinth, natural to the ponds in
Barbados. This Lily rises up above
the water, the plants floating by

? —
“Long Island, huh

Fellar, you want to
Long Island,

see
Noo York!"



London Express Service

means of bladder like swellings, |
the flowers forming in a sheaf
very similar in appearance to the
Hyacinth, hence its name. It
spreads rapidly, and so, if planted
in a small pool, it must be con-
trolled. The flowerg last well for
house decoration. It is grown
easily from any small piece.

The full beauty of a Lily-pool
is completely lost if the Lilies are
allowed to over run it at will



giving it an untidy over-crowded |

appearance. To be seen to the
best advantage the Lilies should

When his landlady
his house, things look very black,
but
mind to marry the wealthy ne'’er-
do-well
ployer, and in this way help him
out of his difficulty
young
father uncover some skullduggery,
which saves
rewards
kaves their home

as the good-hearted and blunder-

ing Riley, and the performances sombrero and the only use she
of the rest of the cast are pleas- has for her jgun is to hit tha
tenement sheriff over the head with it, The

CROSS ORD real Calamity would have done





decides to sell daylight bank holdup, and life for
ordinary everyday people in their
vicinity must have been nerve-
racking, to say the least. Some
years ago, Jean Arthur starred as
Calamity Jane, and somehow my
impression is that she was a pret-
ty tough gal, one way and another,
and took her chances at shooting
and being shot at along with the
boys. Yvonne de Carlo, the mod-
ern “Calamity”, seems to bear a
charmed life. No bullet ever
comes near enough to graze her

his daughter makes up her

on of her father’s em-

However, her

brother, Junior, helps hig

his sister’s marriage,
Riley finagcially and

William Bendix is perfectly cast



better than that

The film is really the story of
Sum Bass, whose knowledge of
horses leads him into all kinds of
trouble. Buying a good horse, he
proceeds to enter it in the races
Bets are placed, and when it is
{ diseove red that the largest amount
is on Sam's horse, an unknown,
the local banker-cum-bookie de-
| cides it is time to take a hand in
things, and in the middle of the
race the horse drops dead under
| Sam. Sam and his colleagues then
proceed to murder the banker and





his cashier and have to take to the
|} hills. Calamity does all she can
Across jto help them, and it’s amazing
1 Just & pause tn the excitement. j how the law never catches up
3 You have & wide choice with this with her Anyway, Sam decides
thing, (3) to give himself up, due to the
8 wasn it you can break up a raid. persuasion of his sweetheart
11. Quite a number jeave the revel. | Kathy having sneaked a_ visit
(4) with her) but when he finds that

12. N




xt much in bed as the gardener |his trial is tobe a frame-up, he
d when run down. (9) :





















3. Secure. (4) 14, Insect, (3) | Gecides that the life of an outlaw
id. Very well endowed. (4) | as the life for him. Calamity joins
16 aes pas it hes he is aeely him and his friends, and what
18 Hatm you could And in “tweive | With holding up trains and a
good men and true”? (6) | bank, the end is pretty sticky for
21. Something gained. (3) jell concerned except Calamity,
33. ae vonne Gascon’ it peeviaes who looks a little dishevelled, but
music, (3) | still in the ring!
a Todgen td) Seer 'm afraid I can make no fur-
4 diferent way to earn (4) ther ee on - fear or the
16 result Of a pierce. (4) | acting, bu wou ike to say
i — (8) | that The scenery and the horses
/ awa jare Gh #& class By themselves
1 ie is a tortuous arrangement. Though the story is laid in Texas,
2. Briefly Lillian ts taken to smail | most of the shooting was done in
fanaa possi hiy because of | Utah, and the scenery is magnifi-
4. The skill of your partner. (3) cent. The mountains look almost
+. It would have to possess a | like immense cathedrals in their
small mesh to get 14 Across, (3) | prandeur, 1d due to the clarity
8 a RONG FRelee colour batt of the atmosnhere, the colours ar¢
this part of a weaver's loom. (4) | truly lovely. The horses are splen-
i. However new, it's style to the | cid beasts with crnate saddles and
Â¥: [t produces @ nme red: (1) jall the fancy trappings of 1)
10. Legend vs that it eloped to | colourful era, and the races, wh'ch
14 go she ‘te Gihinilg natibe: lere not confined to a track, but
bie d he interval. (5) take you up hill down dale,
Unused. (0) are thrilling exemples of expert
MT ee ae oe re aers OF | mera,
19 Your stay here is made as sécure |
4S possible. (4) Se
20. If you gi 24 Act on with spurs |
a ‘- a maeant to Jo this. (4) | Snob Jazz
jeaie.- Across
a VIENNA,
American jazz is having a rough
lowe time in the city of the wiz.
a The Musicians Section cf the
| Austrian Union of Em»loyees
wiiinkenie | branded as a “disgrace to c.iture”
a jazz contest currently being
be in groups, with spaces of clear| held by a Vienna radio st. ‘on.
water in-between where fish can One reason: The young si-
be seen swimming about. In this} cians, in an effort to impre the
way it is possible to have more} judges, are showing up in “zoot
than one kind of Lily in the Lily} suits” and flashy ties, frowned
pool, (upon in Vienna.—LN,S.



sale in

the leading stores. See them for yourself

‘made by

JOHN WHITE



The
refrigetator is so finely made that it

refrigerating unit of the G.E.C,

1
is hermetically sealed after manu |
facture and never needs servicing. }
This retrigerator will stand up to Solid chromium-plated
any extreme of climate — and it

handle incorporating

lovely to look at, too | concealed lock







|

| fr aoe : > a
THE CITY GARAGE TRADIKG CO. LTD. \
1 BRIDCETOWN, BARBADOS

|\\ REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LTD., OF ENGLAND

















PAGE THREE

i

Startling Predictions
In Your Horoscope —

!
|
}

Fragrant foundation for

_-

Your Real Life Told Free |

natural loveliness







Would ydu like to know what the Star <
a for you, some of your past exper

ie Ss. your strong and weak ete, ?|

H is your chance to test F the | }

skill of Pundit Tabore, India's most fam

ous Astrologer, |
who by applying/
the ancient science
to useful purposes
has built up an en-
viable reputation ?
The accuracy of his
predictions and the
sound practical ad-
vice contained in
his Horoscopes on










Business, Specula-

tion, Finances,

Love affairs,

Friends, Enemies, j
Lotteries, Travels, FN Y Y

Changes, —_Litiaa- | Wrdatee ‘ere! ”

tion, Lucky



Times,
Sickness



s etg
have astounded
educated people
the world over 4
MACKEY of New York,

that Tabore
sort of cond-sight |

To popularise Tabore will
sent you FREE your Astral Interpretation

must possess some



his system

if you forward him your full name (Mr |

Mrs. or Miss), addre and date of birth

all clearly written by yourself. No money

required but enclose 6d n B.P.O, iNo ‘t 1

asian or Coins) to help cover postage solt and light + 6s

and mise. costs You will be amazed at

the remarkable accuracy of his state -
ments about you and your affairs. Write the perfect pow der base for not mal skins
now as this offer may not be mad

egain. Address PUNDIT TABORE

‘Dept 213-B, Upper Forjett Street,

Bombay 26, India, Postage to India is 2d

YARDLEY
Foundation (eam

OLD

YARDLEY 33 BOND STREET LONDON

WI Silvikrin

Lotion ;
with Ol

Safety-first | |

girls use |

Mum

Silvikrin Lotion with
* Safer for charm



OIL brings a triple
benefit to dry hair. It
replaces the natural oils which are lacking; it acts as a dressing as well
as a health-giving lotion: it contains Pure Silvikrin, the hair’s natural
food. A few minutes daily massage with Silvikrin Lotion with OU
will bring new life, health and vitality to your hair, and will keep it
| perfectly groomed throughout the day, From ail
chemists, hairdressers and stores.

_, silvikrin

LOTION WITH ODL



* Safer for skin |
* Safer for clothes



‘Palmolive Beauty Plan
.. proved by Doctors _







© © brings lovelier skin to
2 women out of B—in 14 days!



4
- After tests on 1,384 women for 14 days, 39 doctors (including leading skin
? specialists) report that the ‘Palmolive Beauty Plan” brought a definite,
7° noticeable improvement in the complexions of 2 women out of 3.
(f Definite, noticeable improvements were:—
x
a
f
”
A
YOUR SKIN, too, can be improved in 14 days!
follow the “ Palmolive Beauty Plan.”

i All you have to do is what these women did
|
|

Start today. It's so simple

|

Wash your face with Palmolive Soat
2 Massage its rich, olivepoil lather ’ full
' minute,
| 3 Rinse
| Do this for 14 days and prove for yourself that the
| lan?
i ‘ Palmolive Beauty Plan’? is the sure way to Keep that
| : :
} Schoolgirl Complexion



| KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION


he.



Â¥ PAGE FOUR

Rain Spo



HE West Indies
West Indit

double win over Lancashire for the first time in
history after seoring their first Test victory
in England, constitutes a great tonic for the West Indies who meet

good displays, the best of wh
at Kensington.

cricket

England in the Third Test at Trent Bridge ON a 20. h t PICKWICK vs. ‘
Having scored 348 for 5 wickets against Northamptonshire yester- + ¥ .

day, the West Indies have placed themselves in a comparatively safe bidbitix eh ee :

position whence they can force a win if the occasion presents itself st Innings (for

wickets) . 5 7 .. 258

tate a draw > occasion demands. ‘ 2
or dictate a draw if the occa SHES ETI ES

A study of the figures shoWs that there is a great possibility, if all In a
the fixtures scheduled for this tour can be played, there will be no —
record set by previous West Indies teams in England left standing Gerald Wood knocked
against Combermere

His was the only
the day and his team’s

up 107

WEEKES 1,496 RUNS

YOUR runs stand between the
I versatile Everton Weekes and
his 1,500 runs. He has scored 1,496/
runs in 17 innings in First Cl

total of

first division cricket.
Wood was making regular use
of the cover drive and off drive

. in

























, to get his runs and occasionally
cricket during the tour he pul'ed to leg for four

This has already lowered the He gave 5 chances in his
1,381 made by Learie Constantin innings and a possible 6. None
in 43 innings, 1,370 by F. R. Martin; | of these were difficult but Com
in 46 innings in 1928 and 1,286 by; , bermere’s fielding was not up te
Clifford Roach in 52 innings in 192%:

a good standard
Rain was constantly falling and
drove the batsmen to the pav lion
some three or four times. The
fe, wicket, however, was not giving
=| much assistance to the bowle:
Wood was engaged in two food

He ha till to top George Chal-}
lenor’s 1,556 in 35 innings in 1923,
Headley’s 2,320 in 38 innings in 1933)
und Headley’s 1,745 in 30 innings in
1939



It can however be seen that with partnerships which | realised 10°
jess than half the innings played by and 70 respectively’ — ; ;
George Challenor in 1923 he has The first was with Charlie
to make but 60 runs to pass the Taylor who made 38 and the
great George Challenor’s total, 824 other with Birkett, who at time
to reach George Headley’s magnifi- of call, was 66 not out. Birkett

cent 1933 total and 249 to top his
smaller but. nevertheless secondé
highest individual West Indies bat- ~
ting total on records

played a fine innings, giving one
chance at 49.

The Play

Combermere won the toss and
on a wicket which seemed slightly
impaired, sent Pickwick to bat.

Before the innings was begun,
a light shower came, holding up
play for about 15 minutes,
Sharply at 2.05 p.m., Leon
oster and Gerald Wood went to
the middle to open Pickwick’s
innings.

Mr. Smith sent down the first
over from the screen end, con-
ceding 7 runs—Wood 4, Foster 2
and 1 no ball. Branker bowled
himself from the Pavilion end
and the score went on to 9.

The two. batsmen’ quickly
settled on the easy-paced wicket
and were punishing the loose

EVERTON WEEKES

NEAR THEIR THOUSAND RUNS

EANWHILE Clyde Walcott 773 runs in as many innings as Weekes

—17—FYankie Worrell 940 in 18 innings, Alan Rae 816 in 21

innings and Jeffrey Stollmeyer 772 in 18 innings should all reach
their individual thousand runs soon.

In the bowling department. Sonny Ramadhin with 58 wickets j,
taken at a cost of 16.05 runs, Alf Valentine with 54 captured at 17.87
runs each, C. B. Williams 31 wickets for 21.22 runs each, G. E. Gomez
33 wickets for 25 runs each all bid fair to reach the coveted century
mark before the tour ends,

The tour is now halfway through and there is every indication
that taller figures than ever before in the records of West Indies tours
to England will be returned by the end of the present tour,

PEEP AT 1950 FOOTBALL SEASON

IURSDAY June 29 saw the visiting Malvern Football Club of
Trinidad defeat an island team to win the rubber in their pajls, With the score at 23,
series of Tests against Colony teams. This was the end of the 1950 Branker brought on the slow

Football season and now is the time for some reflection on Barbados left-hand leg break bowler Elliot
football during 1950,

T 1 : ' in place of Smith. The score-
The season from the point of view of finance, was perhaps the board read 25 after 30 minutes
most successful in the history of the Association, But what of the of play
football itself?

In the first place, the fact that Spartan, B.A.F.A.
and Knock-out champions in 1949 and 1950 were defeated by the
wide margin of 9 goals to love by the visitors, indicates that our be
standard as far as club strength is concerned was not good enough,

Branker struck the first blow
st for his team by getting Foster to
play forward to one which kept
straight outside the off mane
; ae SE SHES and edged to Toppin at gully.
RESPECTABLE DRAW CLOSE FINISHES Foster had made 13 of Pickwick’s
On the other hand, a respectable draw by the Colts team and total of 34.
some close finishes in the Test games showed that with the necessary Charlie Taylor joined Wood
encouragement and help, the future prospects of Barbados football and they carried the score
are not entirely disheartening. It is obvious that there is a crying steadily on, Wood off drove
need for a coach. And one might safely conclude that in the near Branker for a single to send up
future, any scheme to pool the expenses of a coach between the mem- 50. Wood was now 30 and Taylor
bers of the West Indies Football Board of Control, that is, British
Guiana, Jamaica, Trinidad and Barbados, will be met with the most
enthusiastic approval here, Hitherto, we were not financially capable
of this commitment, but happily, we are now able to ayail ourselves
of such a progressive measure.

Both Elliot and Branker be-
gan to find a length and slowed
up Wood's fast scoring. He gave
an easy chance off Elliot to Top-
pin standing at silly mid-on and

INSURANCE NECESSARY came back in the next over to

The season has ended and one of the most important problems edge off Branker to Beckles at
that must be tackled before the commencement of the next season, first slip
is that of the insurance of players. The B.A.F.A., I understand,
are tackling this matter in a resolute manner and it is to be hoped
that the scheme of insuring players will come to a full fruition or Another
some satisfactory alternative scheme substituted before the opening layers to
of the next season, ' pay sh

Rain

light shower sent the
the pavilion with the
at 59 for 1.
With the score at 75 for 1, Mr.
WATER POLO SEASON STARTS WELL Smith was brought back from the
“WHE Barbados Water Polo tour to Trinidad in January this year, pavilion end, Wood, in attempting
has made many youngsters take a much greater interest in this to cut, edged his first ball to
game than they did before, For the first time since the formation of Norville, standing behind, who
the Water Polo Association, six teams have entered for the 1950 com- put it down, He took his score to
petition, which began a little over two weeks ago. 50 before giving a fourth chance
In their gpening fixtures, both Swordfish and Bonitas scored off Mr. Smith to Wilkinson at
wins, and on Thursday, Flying Fish and Snappers played to a goalless mid-off,
draw. The interval was taken, the
For many years now, even before there was a Water Polo Asso- scoreboard reading 86 for 1, Wood
ciation, there has been the keenest rivalry between these two teams, 51 and Taylor 15.
and Thursday’s game proved no exception to the rule. After the interval, Mr, Smith

resumed from the pavilion end
GAME OF ACTION AND THRILLS and Branker took over from
ROM beginning to end the match was fast and packed with thrills, Elliot at the screen end. sad
much to the delight of the spectators, as time and time again The wicket, Which recely =
what looked like certain goals were either well saved by the goal- Other drizzle during the tea in-
keepers, or the ball struck the cross-bar and went out of play. The terval, was playing a little
defence on both sides was also very sound, quicker, : ar
It is at present too early in the season to speculate as to which Wood and Taylor plodded on
team is going to come out on top, so evenly balanced are the teams, and 100 went up on the tins in
Police are perhaps the weakest; but, as they are making a comeback, about 130 minutes.
naturally it will take them a few matches to get into their stride. Mr. Smith bowled only four
However I can safely foretell that this year’s competition will be overs in his second spell before
one of the keenest since the Water Polo Association was formed in he gave place to Grant, a dimin-
1947, .d 4 i.) dul utive off-break bowler.

+




innings at Kensington yesterday, |

century for |

258 for 3 wickets was the highest |

SUNDAY

ils Opening
Day Of 1950 Season

Rain interfered somewhat with the opening of the local
cricket season yesterday, but nevertheless there were some

ich was Gerald Wood’s century

a



G. L. WOOD
The next over by Branker,
Wood pulled him for four and

then took a single sending Taylor
down to face. Going down to
drive one from Branker, Taylor
played over and was cleaned
bowled at 35. The score read
137 for 2, Wood 78 not out.
Branker’s figures read : 11.1.59.2.
T. S. Birkett went to the middie.

At 82, Wood gave the fifth
chance of his innings by return-
ing one to Branker.

Wood 100
Wood entered on his 90’s and

when at 95, he off-drove Grant
to the boundary bringing his
score to 99. He then took a

cheeky single at cover to get his
century.

The rate of scoring increased
when _ Birkett joined Wood.
jranker was knocked off his
length and Elliot came _ on.
Pickwick passed the 200 mark.

Elliot flighted one nicely which
enticed Wood to come out, Wood
mistimed and was given out
lLb.w. He scored 107 including
14 fours,

With the at 207 for 3,
dD Evelyn partnered Birkett
who was 41 not out. Birkett’s
first blemish was at 49 when he
edged one from Branker for
Adams to drop at first slip.

Birkett and Evelyn carried the
score on to 258 for 3 when stumps
were drawn, Birkett was 66 not
out and Evelyn 22 not out.

SPARTAN v. WANDERERS
Wanderers (for 2 wkts.) 37

At Queen’s Park where Spartan
were at home to Wanderers, the
visitors won the toss and had
just decided to bat when a heavy
shower fell and held up pray
70 minutes,

Wanderers with only two runs
scored, lost their first wicket, but

score

went on to register 37 for the
loss of an additional wicket when
rain ended play at 5.10 after
play was in progress for 70
minutes. Wilkes got 17 while
Proverbs one of the not out bats-
men is also 17.

Slight drizzles during the game
did not hold up play, but showers
during the luncheon interval held

up the game for another hour.
The ground was very slippery
and handicapped both

batsman
and bowler,

G. Wilkes, Games Master at
Lodge, turned out for Wanderers
as opening batsman while Samuel
Griffith, formerly of Empire, is
playing his first game for the
Park team and did duty behind
the stumps,

Wanderers opened with Eric At-
kinson and G. Wilkes to the bowl-
ing of F. D, Phillips and L. F
Harris from the Lake and Wey-
mouth ends respectively, With
only two runs on the tins Phillips
had Atkinson caught at silly mid
on by Atkins before he had open-
ed his account, This was the last
ball of Phillips’ second over

Proverbs joined Wilkes and saw



ADVOCATE

Wood (P’wick) Scores First Century

PICKWICK vs, COMBERMERE
Pickwick Ist Innings

L. Poster ec Toppin b Branker 13
G, L. Wood ib.w. Elliot 107
A.M. Taylor b Branke 36
T. 8S. Birkett not out bo
D. Pvelyn not out 22

Extras ; 6 n.b., 3 Lb, 3 b 12

Total (for 3 wkts.) 258

Fall of wickets : 1—34, 2—137, 3—207,

SPARTAN vs. WANDERERS
Wanderers Ist Innings
E. Atkinson c Atkins b Phillips 0
G. Wilkes stpd w.k. Griffith b Bowen 17
G. Proverbs not ort 17
D. Davies not out 0
Extra b 2, n.b. 1 3

Total (for 2 wkts.) 37

Fall of wkt 1— 2, 2—37
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oo M R w
F. D. Phillips 5 3 4 1
L. F. Harris 8 3 20 0
B. K. Bowen > 2 8 1
K. E. Walcott 1 0 2 0

CARLTON vs, POLICE

Police tst Innings
F. Taylor ec wkpr
‘ Biac

Marshall b Edghill 0
not out 21



Ww mer Lb.w. K. Greenicdge 31

t rb Warren 0

J vot out 0

s 6

T i for kt 58
BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M R Ww

G. Edghill 0 17 1

D. A. Williams 4 1 7 0

the Jatter pull Harris twice to the
Jong on boundary, Proverbs got
first single to square leg off
Phillips and later, late cut Harris

his
his

for a brace and then on drove
for a similar amount.
Wilkes glanced Harris to fine

leg for q single to send up 20 and
Proverbs collected a couple off
Phillips to enter double figures.
Skipper Walcott made his first
bowling change by bringing on
Bowen from the Lake End vice
Phillips with the score at 22.
Wilkes lifted the first to square
leg for a single. Proverbs square
cut for a couple and then took
a single to mid on. *
Harris continued from the Wey-
mouth End and sent down a
maiden to Proverbs. Bowen's
rext over yielded two singles
while Harris’ yielded three,

Walcott Bowls

Walcott relieved Bowen from
the Lake End and bowled to
Proverbs who hooked the third
celivery to fine leg but Headley
failed to make the catch.

Eac. batsman then) took a
single with neat glides and the
luncheon interval was taken with
the score at 33 for the loss .of
cne wicket. Wilkes was 16 and
Proverbs 15,
yet resumption, Bowen bowled
the

first over from ‘the Wey-
mouth end aiid each batsman
‘collected a single, Harris took
over from the other end and

Proverbs snicked the first dan-
gerously through the slips for a
single.

From the fourth delivery of
Bowen's next over, Wilkes in at-
tempting a drive, went down the
wicket, missed and wicket keeper
Griffith made no mistake. The
score board then read 37—2—17.

Davies the incoming batsman
played out the remainder while
Harris sent down a maiden to
Proverbs. Bowen also sent down
a maiden to Davies and another

shower at 5.10 brought play to
a close.

LODGE vs. COLLEGE
College

Batting on a wicket slightly
affected by rain, Harrison College
was dismissed for 99 runs when
they opposed Lodge at the Lodge
School. At the close of play,
Lodge had seored 50 runs for the
loss of 4 wickets,

Winning the toss, College went
to bat on a fast wicket with a
strong wind blowing across the
field. Runs were difficult to ob-
tain, and the College opening pair
C. W. Smith and Mr. S. O’C. Git-
tens were quickly separated when
Brookes, who opened the attack,
had the former caught in slips.
'V. QO. Smith who jained@ Mr.
Gittens fell a victim to Outram,
the other fast bowler, after hit-
ting a “six” off Brookes. R. D,
Rock was next man in, but he also
found it difficult to score off the
accurate bowling of Brookes and
Outram. Lodge struck another
blow, when Rock was given out
1.b.w. to one from Outram. The
scoreboard then read, 27—3—3.
J. A. Williams then filled the
breach and the score was taken
slowly along to 37, when Mr.
Gittens was “yorked” by Welch



BOARD

W. Greenidge 3 1 lM 0
K. Greenidge 8 4 ‘4 1
K. Warren 7 7 0 i
N.S. Luca 1 i 0 0
LODGE vs, COLLEGE
College ist Innings — 9
C. W. Smith ¢ (sub) b Brookes 1
8, O'C Gittens b Welch is
V. O. Smith ec wkpr. b Outram 10

R. D. Rock 1.b.w. Outram
J. A. Williams e¢ Williams b Brookes 32

N. Harrison ¢ wkpr. b Welch 0
M. Worme b Welch 0
C. Blackman 1.b.w. b Brookes 6
M. Mayers c wkpr. b Welch zz
J. A. Corbin 1.b.w. Welch 2
K. King not out 0

Extras : 4

Total: . 99

Fall of wkts, 1—2, 2—21, 3—27, 4—37,

5-37, G44, 7-74, 8—91, 9—B9.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO. M. R w
K. L. Brookes 12 1 34 3
T. G, Outram 9 1 22 2
Weich 91 #21 18 5
Vv. Me Comie 6 0 20 0
Lodge Ist Innings
V. Me Comie b Williarhs 0
P. Farah L.b.w. b Corbin 16
E. Cave not out 23
P. Hutchinson b Williams 6
EF. Glasgow ec Corbin b Williams 0
K. Perkins not out uv
Extras 5
Total (for 4 wkts.) du
Fall of wkts. 1—0, 2—26, 345, 4—45
Williams 9 3 21 3
Corbin 4 1 24 1

who had now replaced Brookes,
for a painstaking 18. Two quick
wickets fell, when Harrison and
Worme were both sent back to the
pavilion off the bowling of Welch.
The scoreboard read 37—5—0.
By this time, Williams had now
settled down and was batting
brilliantly off some accurate bowl-
ing, and Mr. McComie who bowl-
ed slow leg breaks was brought
on in place of Outram. Black-
man who was then Williams’
partner, saw College lose an-
other wicket when his _part-
ner skied one of Brookes’ de-
“veries, to cover, where Williams
took an easy catch, after making
32 runs. At this stage the rain
came and the lunchepn interval
was taken.

On resumption of play, Bfack-
man and Corbin came out to bat
with the rain falling slightly and
the day looking misty. They did
not survive long, for Welch again
proved destructive, as he got
Blackman out by the l.b.w. ropte
and had Corbin caught behind the
wicket. The score’.oard read
91—8—2. King was next man in
and he saw Mayers, who was very

flashy, being brilliantly caught
behind the wicket off Welches’
bowling, after making a _ very

useful 22

With about two hours left for
play, and continual light showers,
Farah and Mr. McComie opened
the Lodge School innings against
the bowling of Williams and Cor-
bin. An early blow was struck,
when Mr. McComie was bowled
by Williams for duck. Cave then
came in and along with Farah
they took the score to 21, when
Corbin had Farah l.b.w. for a
well played 16. Hutchinson then
joined Cave, but was quickly sent
back to the pavilion when he was
bowled by Williams after two
“lives” in the slips. Cave who
also had a chance, saw Glasgow
sent back, when he played a ris-
ing ball from Williams in the
hands of Corbin. Perkins then
played out time, and was still
there with Cave at close of play,

CARLTON vs. POLICE

Police (for 3 wks.) ....... 58

OCCASIONAL showers inter-
rupted play throughout the day
in the Carlton-Police First Division
match at Carlton grounds yester-
day.

Police occupied the wicket all
cay and scored 58 for the loss of
three Wickets in their first innings.
‘The three wickets were divided
between Edghill, th,e Carlton
opening bowler, Greenidge and
Warren.

W. A. Farmer top-scored for
Police witt a brisk 31, while
Blackman is 21 not out,

Police won the toss and went
in to bat on a wicket sprinkled by
rain which fell half an hour be-
fore play.

The opening pair F. Taylor and
C. Blackman met the bowling of
G. Edghill and D. A. Williams.

In the second ball of the first
ever for the day sent down by
Fdghill, Taylor was caught by
wicket-keeper Marshall when the
score was only one wide.

W. A. Farmer partnered Black-
man and they carried the total to
46 before rain interrupted play



NEW Mobiloil (“2




With Amazing
New Protective
Properties For

Your Car’s
Engine

SOCORY: VACUUM, OIL

4 CT aL ee




mG
ne

Cy a
Ss p

om






Ry

€,
Keeps Engines Cleamer—New Mobiloi!l has special
cleaning properties which prevent carbon deposits from

forming on vital engine parts —— bearings, valves, pistons,
rings.

Improves Car Performance — Recause New Mobiloil
will keep your engine cleaner, you'll get more power —. start

faster, acelerate quicker, perform smoother on long drives




Prolongs Engine's Life —Cleaner parts cause less friction,

less wear. Your engine will requiere fewer repairs and over-

hauls, give more years of dependable service. Tell your dealer
today to change your oil to New Mobiloil!

LTR, Ly ributags

and breathe-in its medicinal vapour. |

THERMOGENE
MEDICATED RUB

In Jars and Tins

Breathe it in!

When head and nose feel

stulfy-from a cold, stir a teaspoonful of Thermogene
Medicated Rub into a jug half-filled with boiling water
aad deeply breathe-in the steam for fifteen Ss

minutes. Another way is to spread a









you’ll feel
action

better,






strikes..



remember :
Phensic ! °

sooner you take Phensic, the sooner ®
for Phensic’s quick, $
will bring relief, lift away

‘Justtake\.

pain-caused fatigue, and remove weariness s

in a matter of minutes. Phensic neither x
harms the heart, nor upsets the stomach, 5

Be prepared for pain—keep a supply of

Phensic handy.





Phensic

for quick, safe relief
FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,
NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS

TabletsJ *

ww

SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950





ONE THING that can safely be said before the third day's racing
(I am writing this on Friday) is that Blue Streak is quite definitely
one of the best Jamaican horses that has ever been sent to the South
Caribbean. Perhaps I should qualify this by saying I think
he is the third best because I still do not think him better than Brown
Bomber or Commando II. But that he is much better than any of the
others sent us, there is no possible shadow of doubt.

His victory on Thursday proved conclusively that he likes the
soft going and even his 131 Ibs. could not stop him from holding on
with great resolution when Storm’s Gift drew level with him at the
turn into the stretch. Yet with all this it is clear that Storm's Gift
was struggling under the final grind and could not produce the dash
which she displayed last Christmas. In fact her form at this meeting
is distinctly reminiscent of her running last August in Barbados and
before you read these notes she may have proved my point.

Atomic II is a bigger rogue than he ever was. It is not just a case
of jumping off as it was up to last year. Now if he does not get off
well and is allowed to take it easy for the first two furlongs. then he
is not going to try at any stage of the game. If this is not the case
then I cannot explain his running in the T.T.C. Handicap on Thurs-
day. I must say I kept my eye on him throughout and three or four
times in the last five furlongs O'Neil endeavoured to wake him up
but he gave no response whatsoever. Remembering his sound beat-
ing of the C class horses some years ago on a very muddy track one
may also rule out any possibility that he cannot act upon the soft
going. If he decides to make a race of it before the meeting is over
then Storm’s Gift will not have an easy time.

OFF COLOUR

I have never seen Pepper Wine so badly off colour. Imagine her
without any dash, no frisking on race day or at exercise. I cannot
believe it is the same filly who only two short weeks ago was so full
of pep that a heavy exercise lad was forced to give her the morning’s
work and Crossley put up for gallops only. Then she looked as if
she would pull a few tons away, now: that subdued look of the tired
horse. I will be surprised if she were to recover sufficiently to win
before the last day is through.

Slainte too has lost his dash of last March, But I believe he likes
the top of the ground better than a soft track. Nevertheless this is
his second failure after a spell of brilliance and it should be as plain
as a pikestaff by now that large doses of racing do not do him any
good,

One of the most remarkable things at this June meeting was
the form of Brown Boy in the Port of Spain Handicap on Thursday.
We have been waiting three years and seven months for him to run a
race like this. Not since the day that he won the West Indian Pro-
duce Stakes and then unfortunately lost the Hopeful Handicap through
his jockey loosing a stirrup, has he shown such form. It was no
fluke as might have been suggested by his surprise victory at Union.
He just came away from them at the half mile pole, exactly as he
had done as a two-year-old, and went on to win unchallenged. Even
the game Fair Profit could not catch him.

IN THE MUD

nefore the race a punter approached me and asked: “Who runs
best in mud”. Without hesitation I answered: “Brown Boy”. Luck-
uy form him, he turned away immediately, for presently I began to
think and although I knew it was a remote possibility, I remembered
that the same Brown Boy had had numerous occasions on which to
prove this in the last 3% years. But wet or dry he had always dis-
appointed, I considered it a foolish notion that had crossed my mind.

But more fool I. My friend had turned away and come back
with 69 odd dollars in his pocket on each ticket he had bought. The
more I see of this game the more I am convinced it does not pay
to know too much,

One point intrigues me. Can Brown Boy repeat this perform-
ance? If he has a shrewd trainer I think he can.

The form in B class is interesting as well as outstanding. Ocean
Pearl has met two very good horses in September Song and Lady
Pink. The latter is almost as good as the former when the going is
soft and it was no disgrace at all for the creole filly to be beaten
by such a good mare on Thursday. In fact I think Ocean Pearl
prefers hard going to soft but being a hundred percent honest she
will still try in the latter also. Perhaps if she and Lady Pink could
meet on a sort of in-between track then we would see a real battle:

Lastly the three-year-old picture is now more obscure than it
was last Christmas when these horses were only two. Wavecrest
looks unwell. A rather dull coat and a decided loss of condition.
Lazy Bones looks worse. As his owner put it: “after one half mile
gallop he and his feed pan became strangers”. Princess Rasiyya is
like Rosemary and I do not believe she is honest. Cataract is prom-
ising but hurt his leg. Mardi Gras, in spite of his victory on Thurs-
day is backward.

Yet all of the above are going to be Derby candidates with goou
chances next Christmas. How they will develop remains a matter
for speculation.

half hour before the scheduled

-

luncheon interval.

Farmer scored rapidly and his
29 included one six and three
fcurs, The six was made off the
bowling of D. A. Williams. This
partnership so far added 45 runs,

Lunch was taken and play re-
sumed at 4.30, Warren continued
tc bowl from the southern end to
Farmer,

K. Greenidge bowled the next
over, a maiden to Blackman from
the northern end. In the third
ball of K. Greenidge’s fifth over,
for the day, Farmer was out leg-
before for 31, only adding two to
his lunch score.

E. Brewster filled the breach and



We are offering the following
DUNLOP ACCESSORIES

BRAKE BLOCKS

MUD FLAPS

TYRE LEVERS

HAND GRIPS

PEDAL RUBBERS
SADDLES

RIM TAPES

PATCH STRIPS 26” x 3”
READIFIX PATCHES

LONG AND MIDGET
OUTFITS

VALVE RUBBER

SPECIAL PRICES TO

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET

VOCS

In Fine Trim! !

6606000."
SO SCS S9 99S SS 999959909 599959 959008" Oe >

faced the remainder of the over
{vom Greenidge. An over later
the half century went up.
Brewster's stay was very short, In
the last ball of Warren’s third
over—all maidens — Brewster was
bowled before he could open his
account.
Skipper Byer was next out to
bat. A delightful cover-drive by
Blackman off the bowling of K.
Greenidge carried the total to 54.
Soon after rain again interrupted
play for a few minutes The
players went ouf only to return
to the Pavilion an over later be-
cause of another shower, Play
ended with the Police score 58 for
the loss of three wickets.

DSSS SPSEEOSOSSE SSO OO SE OEOSES

®PPSPOOSSSS OO SSSSSOSSO

:
>
$
8
>
y
LARGE AND SMALL %
SOLUTION 3
PUMPS \ ¥%
PUMP WASHERS .
CHROME-PLATED RIMS
ROADSTER COVERS AND
TUBES 28” x 13”
RACING COVERS AND 2
TUBES 26” x 114” >
CARRIER COVERS AND 3
TUBES 26” x 1%4” ¥
%
x
2 >
DEALERS 3
8
4
»
>

DIAL 4269 %

PISOOSD PISFSSS FAN


INDAY, JULY 9, 1950

_

THREE



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE





PAGE FIVE

HORSES TIE |

IN T.T.C. SWEEP

(By BOOKIE)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 8

THE TRINIDAD TURF CLUB summer meeting ended
today in extremely sultry weather. The rain was steady

and at times heavy.

From early this morning and about

11.30 the Stewards were driven around the turf to decide
if races were to be held or put off.

Nevertheless the track held up the meeting was the tie for

well and when
about 1 p.m., the water quickly
ran off. This left

fact made some of the top weights |

come home first against inferior
company.
“Storm Gift” Wins

However, just as the last race



the rain stopped place in the sweep of three horse

“September Song,” “Bowhelis” anc

; the course | “Orly” and this should bring sub-
Sticky but not slippery and this| stantial sums of



money evenly
divided among the lucky tickets
holders.

Mention must also be made of
the record set up by trainer Henry
Hart whose horses earned over



















| Louise Brough JULY 9 — NO. 127!

he Topic
of

Last Week

Wins Women’s
Singles
FOR THIRD TIME

WIMBLEDON, July
Mits Louire Brough nite
States) wen the Women's Sir
Ch pion t
in succe n by ce
ecmpatriat, Mrs M:
Pont, 1945 Champion
6—1 today in the
Lawn Tennis Cher



A coavincing wen
friend and Double
abled her to become the

























= erican woma

was about to be run another heavy | $20,000 for their owners at this years «vwanin j
shower descended and the curtain | meeting. Wi toody won from i927 toj
was rung down on “Storm Gift’ The following were the results: ;

i i : age P gh oul nates The following were the results T he —
winning a decisive victory in WOODBROOK HANDICAP piel AOR cae
driving rain The meeting might, D Class — 6 Furlongs L oo ! t wins from Arcund every street
in fact, be remembered specially | 1st, ROSALIND (A. Joseph 126 lbs 9 onwards rie etal arcana ck
for the labours of this he ~, | 2nd TIDUC (YÂ¥vonet) 134 Ibs | the Men's Doubies final Jonn! Where all the young me

a S Uus great mare | 3rq HONEYMOON (Crossley) 110 Ibs Py } ; ¢ I subject wa da
who ran herself into form and | 4th SUNGLEE (Lattimer) 112 4.3 Ibs rae : h ee aie 1 Quist '- $e

; she re) in the @ Time: 1 min, 21% secs ralla) bea 7©0H Brown anc Sill} = ust week in Frid apt
when she went out for the six JULY HANDICAP Sidwell (Australia) er We sw with our four ey
Furlongs Stewards Handicap early © Class — 6 Furlones 6—$, 88, 6-9. Renter The per t appoint
today, opinion was divided as to] 1st ORLY (Crossley) 124 tbs : re of ¢ ler PE

: 2nd LEADING ARTICLE (O'Neil) 116 Ibs
whether it would be asking toc LINK STREAM iC. -Lutchman) 90 | ei ee
much of her or whether it wa 18 Ibs. (dead heat for second j r e They control cheese
simply her last gallop. place | aZ re We can't buy other
3 oe 4th BALANDRA (Reid) 125 Ibs Nor trade mn am

The latter proved to be correct = ya a gat : ere
for although “Blue Streak’ was STEWARDS HA CAP F ® Jor id to Robert Wednesday

ve -eighte mn i é ice A Class — 6 longs I 1 One thing they can't contro!
well weighted down it was notice-]\.: seprEMBER SONG \O'Nell) 136 Ibs avourl es ats WOMGn in Mumemins
able that “Storm Gift” finished] 2nq PHARALITE (Lowe) 111 4. 1 1bs . 7 ‘ Those girls wre very bold
with more dash today than she} %*¢ HIDDEN HAND (Newman) k |

‘ ; 105 4. 10 Ibs or or € u ) | ' 1 g

id on Thursday y PINK ( ) 120 Ibs Th Wednesday morning papers

d nog sh the Meet 4th LADY PINK (C. Lutehman) "120 It | Brat 46 Gearél ost ete
Ss e Mee “w+ P ae They increase ‘children moncs
w NDIA} EAR-OLD : ‘ »

Other horses woo stamped them- eee ee ee _ RIO DE JANEIRO, Juiy & From five shillings to ten
selves as good ones today were LF Class — 5 Furlones Brazil See ee: Od itis wee uae
“September Song” and “Bowbells” ist, Bw ae, Paplder) 38 i win the World Soccer Champiova- While goin anil: Sota
while “Orly” also put in a third} 3ra° LEAP ON (Lutehman) 107 Ibs Ships of 1950, the ginal maene We heard two women talking
victory although with light weight, th TOP FLIGHT (O'Neil) 120 Ibs OPENING OF THE WIMBLEDON TENNIS TOURNAMENT: |c{ which begin on the league! In an Alle Bridgetow
“September Song” can easily . be MBHAVAL. HANDICAP Drobny beats Frenchman: Drobny who plays for Egypt shakes principle on Sunday i fing We iletene their planning
put down as the horse of the meet- C Class — 1 Mile, 130 Yards hands with C. Gr dit e after he had won their match in pool begins with mat*hes in And this is what t sit
ing and the best horse in the| Jt, SILVER BULLET (O'Neil) 130 Ibs the opening of the Tournan at Wimbledon on June 26th. Municipal Stadium e becween Girl let us get the childrer
ang and the b Horse in the| eng LEADING ARTICLE (Crossley) . children now will pay
West Indies today at sprinting 120 Ibs brazil and Sweden id in thik

‘Bowbells” ran against poor op-| 2% BROWN JACK (Reid) 121 Ibs Pacaembu Stadium Pauk W I get one for Robert

siti i ad ~wiil ag | ath CORONADO (Lattimer) 110 4. 4 Tbs + between Spain and Uruguay And you get ¢ for Joe
position but shouldered her 136 Time: 1. min,. S68. sec N ‘ -— bP Wi.y tht lh
Ibs: well, showing no signs of COLONY HANDICAP .) / ~} At least 100,000 fan re ex Girt eeaspe going flow
dying at the finish. In fact, she} , wih cree ae Furlonss ee Or < ; = S pected in Rio, while it is thought
came from behind to finish very} ena FIRST FLIGHT 1c. I selineaet: re that the Pacaembu Stadium will Now y + oa etna st Nght

p Y ’ na : as a four pe ds raig
strong, drawing away more in the) |. sintaTURE ir 110 Ibs, e be filled to its capacity; Ana we can get the eildren
style of a stayer than a sprinter.|{f, runioso maar oom 122 Ibs r . We score ce-horse” rate
But “September Song” went to the Time: 1 min. 218 secs am Ons 1 e Flavio Costa, manager of the Joe Tere wri skid Ma Weer
front early and try as she could, P teiaet oS Brazilian team, also told Reuter That'll put us in a hoéle
the very fast “Lady Pink sgt ist STORM GIFT ‘Lattimer) 125 Ibs 4 + : that it tte =P = Se ey fet RP Pan coce leh Nao penne
16 Tbs. less, could not catch him.| 2nd PHARLITE (Lowe) 105 4. 9 Ibs Mi I li M 2 were after 1ey certainly were And aclice self contra

’ , 3rd BLUE STRE Newman) 137 Ibs ry attle
He literally ran them silly att oe y Ye iy 7 ars ia tsses entu not going into battle to win at Let's keep ourselves from trouble
Another noticeable fact about 7 5 mins. § seca . - all costs | Don't get catch in the snare
--—~ —- —_—_——— In Good Battin Dis la The championships hitherto had aoe _— ba Shees lister
' ey the sign “beware
15 ne Zs ip Ly been played in a keen sporting

THE SRD We AY TO ROVER spirit before a sporting crowd | And Robert "twill be bette

pera rere z ae ‘ y and his te yere not going to be If you will settle down

: AS : ; a NORTHAMPTON, July 8. hn naa ae algtersingthint Don't look around for trouble

4 < : h ‘ . ANS s 5 § peac ; ie &
Bee oe 1 given a fine start by the opening partnership of as P At midnight, in Bridgetown

0 by Jeff Stoll

he day,

meyer and Roy Marshall, the West Indies
never succeeded in striking their usual high rate of scoring

Throughout Northamptonshire bowled accurately |to be drawn out much about thc

Costa said he hoped the Brazil
ian team would not let down their oo, Woe ea
‘ . APs ae aed ill come out in the ligh
millions of supporters. He refused And eighty shillings weekly
Will draw yo belt too tight

jother teams, If they reacned tx






Just pure water
and a measure
of k TAA









| yf } says ELSIE the BORDEN cow |
| ‘ I re {
yy ’
i ‘ f
| : : {
| ife \
i Ik is

| 4 bn ur oo

£ VER
|.

|

nantes



KIWIS RICH WAXES
keep feather supple
and in perfect con-
dition od give a

gleaming bine

. ° .
The Qualitey Shoe Potion |
Nine colours available : (iW! BLACK, DARK
TAN, MID TAN, TAN, !ROWN, OX BLOOD
& MAHOCA’Y—with BLUE & TRANSPARENT
especially for Ladies’ Shoes.



reas

Datrtbutors THE GENERAL AGENCY CO. (BAN N\U0S) LTD. P.O. BOX 27, BRIDGFTOWN

and fielded keenly with Freddie Brown, the captain, setting
a splendid example and they succeeded in keeping the
touring team to under a run a mirute. W.I. scored 348 for
5 in the day’s play
As it was, many of the runs, flagging bowlers and the fielders
were scored by daring running The teams were; —
between the wickets and much of Northamptonshire:—B rookes

the interest for « crowd of over | Oldfield Livingston, Barron,
10,000 came from attempts of the Jakeman, Brown, Brice, Nutter,





fleldsmen notably Jackson and Broderick, Garlick, Fiddling

Brown to run out the batsmen West Indies: Stollmeyer,
Jackson secured a notable victim, Marshall, Worrell, Trestraii,
a magnificent throw from the off Christiani Gomez, Goddard,
boundary dismissing Frank Worrel! Williams Johnson, Ramadhin,

as he tried a second run. Marshall
failed by only one run to scort
his second century on successive
Saturday

Pierre

The Play

Stollmeyer and Marshall had to

fa: Wa by far the more | Proceed cautiously against the
vas ) a 1e nore

sear : : 7 winging ball when Nutter and

adventurous in the opening stand Brice were bowling, and only

and hit fourteen fours by stron
driving and cutting, usually
excellently STnaee . ‘ half hour f

Although blessed several tim« Se bes Belay ye ink
with luck, Marshall played a fine cohen ae a eames wae enick
innings. Stollmeyer's innings of Pore Be had. : | a
seventy, provided a strong con- ‘° carry to Livingston at secont
trast for he hit the ball to the Slip and a later snick off the same
boundary only once, with his fir bowler dropped clear,
scoring stroke. He also gained five The batsmen began to score
from an overthrow, but most o!!â„¢ore freely, but keen fielding and
his runs came from carefully| “ght bowling restricted the runs
placed singles Yet he was never} to 38 in the first hour.
badly outpaced by Marshall. Sto Stollmeyer began to score well
meyer provided a model of stylish | with legside strokes off Nutter and
defensive iy. Late in the day |the scoring rate increased, forty-—
Christiani gave a good display, his | {our being added in the last halt
quick footed driving of the slow |)our before lunch, Brown, leg
bowlers being particularly effec- | break bowler, relieved Nutter and
tive. Even so, many of the honours | Marshall square cut one short
of the day remained with the un @ On Page 11

twelve runs were made in the first





SHIRLEY MAY FRANCE: Channel swimmer

London Kxrpress Servica














Over 50.000
people buy them
every week

British-made handwound
Smiths Alarms are the pop-
ular choice because they are
outstanding in their reliabil

ity, style and value. There

‘Finals, they
declared

It was announced
F.LF.A. will award
medals to each member of the
winning team, But there are
huge financial rewards, especially
in the case of the Brazilians, for
whom victory might mean as
much as £20,000

Andreis Ramirez, mariager of
the Spanish team, told Reuter
that his team would already re
ceive a present for beating Eny-
land and reaching the Finals, and
there Was more to come, thi
amount depending on gate money
and how the team fared

He stressed however that hi
players were playing for the hon
our of becoming world champions
and not for the cash they migh
set o1

must be good, he

today that
solid gold












Improve Your

Writing in a

If you are interested in a

you are ‘invited to apply for
issued by the Regent lastitute

This informative
world-famous Postal Course

ment within a few hours. It
expression

“The small fee I had: to pay
investment I have ever made

}
&

English for business, professional and

bookle

tuition is so planned that ye

,” writes @ student.
the subjects covered by the booklet are the following :—

It is your very contrades
To give thetr feeling vent
Increase the hildren money
By one hundred per cent

And as the



ual custom





No matter v you pal
The Vestry will feed children
They do it every day

So boys just think this over
It will be better by far
To stay h after sunset
With a bott fi & R



sponsored by
J&R BAKERIES

makers of

ENRICHED BREAD

and the blenders of

nnteptetin teees

»)

VISIT the beauty spot of the island
EDGE WATER
BATHSHEBA

This newly erected modern hotel is situate
most picturesque part of the island.

TELEPHONE 95276 FOR RESERVA'PIONS
Rooms with or without private bath etc. We
in Fish and Lobster Luncheons. — Wel! Stocked tor

‘ee
HMOrkKs

ama
La (vet

Specialise
pecralinse























something





Yeast-Vite

Because of its valu-
able tonic properties

to feel brighter, look
better, sleep more
easily and enjoy more
(energy. Next time

you want pain relief
_ take Yeast-Vite and
get tonic benefit too!










THERE’S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

Yes!—Yoast-Vite
quickly soothes away
headaches, neuralgia,
nerve and rheumatic
pains —but it does



else too!

helps you







































Be a Master
of English



Speech and

few Hours

quiring a command of good
social purposes,
a copy of “Word Mastery,”

t describes the Institute’s
in Effective English. The
u gain noticeable improve-
is now widely récognised as

providing the best means of enabling ambitious men and
women to develop the power of ready and attractive
and to avoid errors in speech and writing

for the Course is the best
Among



PAINTS
by
LEWIS BERGER
(Great Britain) Lid.

GAALAITIUENAL ETT LAE
For Galvanised,

asbestos, or shin-
gled roofs ----

JASITIA

UN






YES, it’s true..

8 out of 10 American dentists
say—IPANA dental care promotes



glad to own one!

100% BRITISH MADE



AVAILABLE FROM YOUR
LO@GAL SMITHS CLOCKS STOCKISTS



are models to suit all tastes
in delightful shades to match
any bedroom furnishings. Be

What Good English Means to You,

| You are Judged by the Way You Speak and Write.
| Better English—Better Pay,

Can You Write a Good Letter?

Free Test of Your English.

| The Social Value of Good English.

] The Art of Public Speaking,

j Your English and Your Future.
|

















WRITE TO-DAY FOR A FREE COPY OF

“WORD MASTERY”

Decide at once that you will rid
hancieap that poor English imposes. The study requires
but little time, and the moderate fee puts this unique
Course within the reach of everyone. Al) correspondence
is confidentia!

Send to-day for a free copy of “WOkis MASTERY,”
which gives full information abe *t the Effective English
Course, including the special arrangements for overseas
students, Applications should be addressed to The Regent
Institute (Dept. 501), Regent House, Palace Gate, Lon-
don, W. 8. England.

yourself of the



Don’t delay, Your English is all-important to you, ané
you cannot afford to neglect it.

Write for this interesting booklet NOW—while you
think of it. There is no obligation.

T ) « omi i 1 !
eve if Barb
It r ey '
ff. Stocked in B Or
nteed P em ¢
. ri other Colour
Obtainuble at. the followings |
H Stor
| 1ER co



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO, LTD Bridgetowr Sele Affent

|



HMMM


PAGE SIX









John Ruskin: His Influence On The
Fine Arts In The Nineteenth Century





































By Wilfrid



Hlunt

SUNDAY















ADVOCATE



Record Review

_ For Opera
Lovers













Hy MARY

LONDON, June 29.









BURNETT

by the Mongols, who in the























ISLAMIC ART § leah sud











SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950
















t if y 1 ible. for us to appreciate A a— age was — ome meet oe China = 1
ee ane ereee Mee ae oy > veneration in which Ruskin was held in England By Robert Tredinnick Museum. It consists of exhibits the is, phoenix and the dragon, |
during most of the latter hi { the nineteenth century. A representing various periods of ippeared’ on pottery gla : |
few of the older generation do, indeed, remember with ARLOPHONE have issued aq the art of Islam—from Asia, North m« work, even in =aypt, whose |
what bated breath his name was*once spoken; how his most set of eight records particular Ai ens cr a eine valwe ee withstood the Mongol :
> t c oY P re 3S B > a i c c an .
casual utterances carried the weight of an ex cathedra pro- interest to lovers of opera sa tak Wteabern etiam The fourth phase of the art ot |
ROYNCEMENT. Seven of the eight records are Painted in a dull turquoise grey Islam covers the 16 and 17 cen- |
One who knew him personally, overtaken the Primit-ves of ( wh arias sung by famous and with light mosaic floor, this turies The chief powers reign
and who acc panied him on his Florence and Siena. But though Iti 1 artists —- Guianna Peder- new collonaded section makes a ing in the Islamic world, were
last visit to France, has told rtists such as Sir Thomas Law~- int, Ebe Stignani, Cloe Elmo, formal and quiet setting for the the Cttoman Turkish sultans in|
of the suspense and eager ici- rence, Turner and Etty warmly Lina Pagliughi, Onelia Fineschi, carpets and other exhibits in rich Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt, and
pation which preceded the publi- admired Tintoretto, the general Galliano Masini and Cesare and colourful variety the Safavid kings i Rersia. Tol
catior e earn me nUmD public lagged be hind; Tintoretto Siepi, with the Orchestra Sinfon- In 750 A.D., when the Om- this comparatively late period|
Fors ( F re the was still a “painter's painter ica Della Radio Italiana and mayad line of Caliphs gave way belong the earliest Islamic te 2
mighty fallen! For if Ruskin has it was Ruskin who exposed the the Orchestra Sinfonica Dell ‘Kiar to the Abbasid and the capital tiles that have survived i 1
latterly 1 ed some Measure false doctrines of critics such as (Parlophone R. 30001-7). moved East from Damascus to condition, and the Museum cg@l-
pepe. rene no more “ns Ruger. Clawsywer 2, Paneing) « Baghdad, a distinct form of Isla- lection of them is extremely rich
a social ref er or a dictator of and opened the eyes of travellers These recordings are good, bu: mic art began to emerge. This The Safavid velvets, silks and
ne = : in UL ne 1 find the eighth disc of out- developed in four distinct stages, carpets—which for many people
commands our interest and atten- Renaissance in Venice standing quality. On this Gino the first lasted from the 9th till are the most familiar and appeal-
tion when Ruskin the Prophet Today: the ert Rite Eee — Marinuzzi conducts a chorus and about the end of the llth century. ing of all the forms of Islamic
without hon : his library surrounded by boxes JOHN RUSKIN the Orchestra Sinfonica Dell’Eiar It was, perhaps, the curiosity art—together with the painted
1 May, 1843, a “Graduate of of photographs. The world’s art in Go Thoughts On Golden Wings aroused by imported Chinese tilepanels and wooden doors from
[ae ac weeneagaer anpaymoun)s ip at ‘his elhows, fa. few eo ry (Nabucco) and O Signore, Dal porcelain that encouraged the Isfahan, show work of great lux
first volume of a long work he can lay his hand upon bes THE CRUCIFIX ‘etto| Natio (I Lombardi Alla native potters from Baghdad and uriance.
was one day to yen pi quate porenaaene of or ad Prima Crociata) by Verdi, Samarra during this period to Famed Carpet
name famou aE OUsR OSS eas opus of an artist be nose etal . FISH This is as finely balanced a begin the fruitful Islamic tradi- The ‘carpet from the tomb of |
sl tah facta Huakih was hardly known in hacat = ; piece of recording as anyone tions of fine glazed wares which the Safavid family at Ardabil, is OR
eee oes is century ago. it ae anh ae The skull of the crucifix fish has could wish to hear. The first work form one of the principal sections one of the largest and most fam-! I ‘
A Oars rt = ae iy, ease ol ealicn onint- ang been venerated as a charm is a favourite of Housewives’ of this permanent collection at the o.; in the world An ins ription OQ. Py - ‘3
himatenitie, tho Ge . on Needed’ Cenitiae tthe against danger and sea-sickness. Choice, but this new recording is Victoria and Albert Museum an this carpet which hangs in the (: Ek ‘
wan th eee of the teks ne aenent aaeeeee nes a It is often found in the coastal »iuch better than that so far used _ Broadly speaking, the character- Museum in a monster frame| Jw ¢ WHE g
“Purner. Turner had been 4ittle. of his youthful out; surings (°WS of South America hung on by the BBC. istic of this first phase, is the us¢ yeads: | ig
r, surnet hoes Mls pisie: OF. Te Ye ie _ dio the wall in place of a crucifix. On of heavy stylised ornament, | r
al Academician for mi he himself lived to regret, and 1© the bones of the roof of the mouth (Parlophone R. 30008). heraldically posed human and ‘I have-no refuge in the 4ND as
forty years, he wag nc ye amend. Moreover, his confusion (° 113. crucifix or sea catiish can In the summer of 1947 the Phil- animal figures which, however, world other than thy thresh- AIVL A
“discovery” of Ruskin’s In 2 of morals and aesthetics led him |, seen a crucified figure with a /armonia Orchestra’ conducted Jack any sense of movement. hold, my head has no protec- De |
sense that ceftain Traliag coke ‘o many false conclusions. halo. Once this symbol has been by Nikolai Malko gave a terrific There are, too, the very hand- tion other than this porchway. | R (- ? > |
were +0. be rf wee a hin, But Ruskin did not only rescue recognised, other bones are performance of part of the Suite some inscriptions in the angular The work of the slave of this | um C Uhle :
De tee. os Sates Rus- Certain Old Masters from oblivion j ought into the picture. If the No. 1 of Khachaturian’s Gayaneh writing krfown as Cufic. Holy place, Maksud of Sashan_ | 1
Cee eee ee ee a eas usly 22d one of his older contempora- . 111) is turned over, the breast- Ballet music including the now . in the year of 946’. | ;
kin’s service, not 1p grac “i ola vies from misunderstanding; the joie and spear of a Roman sol- famous Saber Dance. This month Elegant Decoration The 18th and 19th centuries saw | oe ib,
eae we oe tc timely support which he gave to die are visible On sheiciin the you can hear some of the Suite The second phase of Islamic art everywhere a general decline} AGENTS: Le (é
ae sy Ne amie ie the Pre-Raphaelites enabled these skull the e ar ‘stones rattle. th e No. 2 played by the New York covers the 12th and 13th centuries. from earlier artistic standards | ify
the splendid, glowing ha en ae young men—for we must never digas rit thich the» ldiers ‘iat Philharmonic Symphony Orches- New vitality had been brought Furopean influence is conspicu I M B MEYERS & (0 LTD 18
of | Turner's . so-called A oa forget how very young they were I te ¥ mt th " ‘ ae ates tra conducted ‘by. Efrem Kurtz into the Islamic world by the ous in the enamelled decoration de Vie oe WER B REe. ware! m4 ° xr
period In 1851 avlsisiny tyr -to weather the storm that broke ae or e@ garments of Our interpeeta ti taaitiateios Ea invading Turks, people from the of the Guilder and heaves aclia ‘
ee A ae tank ag nad over their heads in 1850. Ruskin 7 q t the fist 1789 well recorded. Personally I vould Khirgiz steppes in Central Asia gold dish presented to the British 3 a
the year 1845, tne ong who Was not, as has sometimes been ican ena a Sn in 780 ike to hear the Phitharmonia Who established a series of prin- Ambassador and the East India Se Z
believe that those De ae {> said, instrumental in any way in states: When the bones of the i a re the, Philharmonia, Cipalities all over the Near East. Company by Fath Ali Shah. o! aoe
only like his early pic ESS, ao the foundation of the Brother- ®€4ad are separated, each repre- anc Malko — tac e this secon Decoration af this. period {9 Persia in 1819 . These are two “S s 99 d Il h .
not, in fact, like him at all. They hood in 1848 indeed, he at first Sets some or of the instruments suite if only because they did elegant and subtle, filled with 4 of the valuable | less lovely oaping ulIS alr —
like that which is essen- ©) cameos Y 6 the ;, of the Passion of Our Redeemer, such a fine job with the first gan , “ of the valuable but less lovely ;
do not s entire power is reacted unfavourably to its work, 2 : ie 7 . f keen sense of movement and a objects on show.
ee a oietures Having, at the Royal Academy forming spear, cross, nails, etc (CoD re SERA wealth of sensitive detail. From Calligraphy is one of the chief
re et enacts at the time Exhibition of 1850, to be “literally | At the Museum on special ex- qy.oy magnificent soprano, Kir- the 12th century onwards, there anq most characteristic forms of
oie blic and the press dragged up to the Millais picture hibition from Saturday is the 6. piagstad, sings three of developed the characteristic Jslamic art. This exhibition is of? e
I Pt Satdlanaet tas aire of of ‘The Carpenter’s Shop’, which skull and spine of this eeerae Grieg’s songs in Norwegian— ‘damascened’ metalwork, in which disappointing in the specimens ri /
are ee ‘Vindication of Turner | had passed disdainfully.” But oi the crucifix clearly Freart Wounds, Thanks For Thy designs engraved in a brass base | or rather lack of specimens of /, VN :
was Ruskin’s first service to art; "0 sooner had he espoused its visible. Counsel. and A Dream, but I are enriched with an inlay of) [slamic lettering and book illus-
f it was achieved by some rather cause than he became a powerful | ooo ore than offset. by the wonder way Mme. Flagstad does gold, silver and copper. __ | trations on view . e
injudiciods. mud-slinging at great ally. Letters to The Times, pam~ unfortunate influence of the them to av orchestral accom- _ Another individual art, whicu| Architecture is another of the
painters such as Claude, we must Phlets and lectures were oa latter style on English architec- paniment. The accompaniment of flourished chiefly in ye ge Islamic claims to artistic fame : oS
plead in extenuation the youth- a) ue Poel Seek atte ae ture in the second half of the the Philharmonia conducted by Page Hie a Saree an | It is sad that no exhibition could
fulness of the author and the Whose fortunes a nineteenth century Venetian Warwick Brathwaite gives the #888. Hanging = tamps ~, ; show the magnificent domes ane
: ta Seta warm advocacy of the acknowl- , aia ay A c oi aa a ; , mosques are very rare today.| the formal, classic gardens which
fervour of his beliefs. lias ir sigh ae ares Dic Gothic, superimposed upon the soloist excellent support, but the With the sentic of the col-| :
The first volume of Modern pop a star elec ra tae Gothic Revival, grew and spread songs should be sung with piano vente r. ye ta Sie sits, | still stand, reminding us of one
Painters, its author tells a pe Ske ied tn Cacterenae” es till its ubiquity became nauseat- only (H.M.V. DB. 21020.) er the Sainte and aN art ie | Of the great periods in world art |
ritte: “i sreat haste anda oe. c ing even to its greatest admirer: a4 oR ees | |
ve Naeuiee: B + tie successor, English art; it is, however, a very re oe oa influence’, Giuseppe Vandengo, with the claimed to be the world’s finest.
which appeared in 1846, dif- pleasant backwater, as many are }., Jaments, “on nearly every New Symphony Orchestra con- A large marble hvetn roms
fered ffom it in tone and finding today, and we cannot but cheap villa-builder between this cucted by Alberto Erede. gives a Hama in Syria is, pet ape, the |
in subject matter. Among its be grateful to Ruskin for his help 444 3romley; and there is most satisfactory performance of Most notable piece of Is ami ait gigs
heroes were Fra Angelica, Giotto, in preserving it for us. scarcely a public-house near the tne Prologue to I Pagliacci. He Sculpture in a Western exhibition | eep i wi ,
and Tintéretto. Ruskin’s champi- It is probably in the field of Crystal Palace but sells its gin has a fine sense of the dramatic My Chinese Moti Ss SHADEINE |
onship of the Italian Primitives architecture that Ruskin’s influ- 4nq bitters under pseudo-Vene- sand there is beauty and resonance The third phase, which SOV EES nian: eer }
was of immense importance. In ence has been most baneful. He tian capitals copied from the jn his voice. (Deeca X. 303). the 14th and 15th centuries, shows] jnQ°hurmices, All |
the days before photography, the opened his campaign with the Church of the Madonna of Health _. how contacts between the Near] natural tints. 50 years’
general public was in the matn publication in 1849 of The Seven oy of Miracles. And one of my —L.E.S | and Far East had been facilitatec | reputation. Ask your chemist to ob-
familiar with works of art only Lamps of Architecture, the book principal notions for leaving my tain some for you from his Whwlesaler.
through engravings. With the in which he first revealed the present house is that it is sur- : aa ) THE SHADEINE COMPANY
best will in the tae the oes = the i : ot rounded everywhere by the 49 Churchfield Road, Acton, London,
mgraver could give little more Oxford”. It has been described) accursed Frankenstein ‘monsters Ja ; Sey oF betes! .
ee the general composition of as “the first treatise in English to of, indirectly, my own making.” | : ; Nes soaping your hale with even finest
~ a picture; texture of paint, colour teach us the significance of archi- The Seven Lamps, however, : es liquid or cream shampoos hides its natural
\ (or at any rate finesse of colour- tecture as national autobiogra- was the starting-point for a| RUPTURE lustre with dulling soap film.
ing) and subtlety of draughts- phy”. Of the closing passage of movement which has had a wide- | ean desl oe uth os tae es
manship were alike sacrificed. “the Lamp of Sacrifice”, Frederick spread and an admirable influence | RELIEF af oy sticky A
Ruskin’s enthusiasm aroused in- Harrison wrote: “No man of on Britain’s national life. I refer, nothing to dull your hair’s natural lustre. With
terest in the works of many feeling, who has in him the echoes of course, to the famous passage Chousands of ruptured men and women your very first shampoo, Halo brings out shim-
Italian painters little known in of this funeral sermon, can stand on “restoration”, beginning “Do 1ave found instant relief by wearing a mering highlights. Its fragrant lather rinse
Britain it was due largely to before a great medieval cathedral pot let us talk then of restoration. | Cashier Air Cushion Appliance. tL A Et . e-tener 2 $
his propaganda that the National without being conscious that it The thing is a Lie from beginning eo 7 ight, strong and easily washed, it holds SRY PCY AB kind of water — needs no
Gallery acquired many important has gained for him a new mean- to end ” The Society for the, ml Xl ty ue hernia with such gentle firmness that after-rinse. For hair that’s lustrous, use Halo,
works. Travellers to Italy visited ing, a sublimer pathos”. Yet in protection of Ancient Buildings | rroken tissues have increased chances of
the galleries with new eyes and this book we encounter again (Morris's “Anti-Scrape’”’), adum- | I a pl 1 re For full details and Free Booklet write _ AMERICA’S BIGGEST SELLING SHAMPOO
fresh ideas. The Arundel ore! Ruskin’s refusal to submit to the prated by Ruskin in 1854 and | ) | iD a I S( yn I AS) to | In America, Halo outsells all other shampoos. The reason? American
founded in 1849 for the reproduc- accepted boundaries between yealised by Morris in 1877, and , women have proved only Halo gives hair such natural radiance.
tion in colour of paintings, morals and aesthetics. “Was the Ruskin’s aah St. George’s Guild IMPERIAL LEATHER 6 LINDEN BLOSSOM e BLUE HYACINTH BEASLEY’S LTH, Hept. 190 .
largely Italian, by the best pro- carver happy while he was about were the inspirations which lay 4 Cork Street, London, W.1, England HALO reveals the hidden beauty ol your hair
cesses available at the time, was jt?” he asks respecting ornament; behind the foundation by Octavié jo * :
one of the many results of his jf not, it will lack life. “The Hill of the National Trust — ne wrt ypreelaoncguob sessed ieieiaatiaeniae, é y
tireless enthus'asm; though these condition is absolute”, he adds. (Morris always acknowledgec eee
prints were still very imperfect But it was after the publication of that Ruskin was “the first-comer
(they had to be made from water- The Stones of Venice (1851—53) the inventor” whom he was proud Py Py
colour copies), they introduced that the disastrous effects of cer- to follow). Whenever we are
many works wholly unknown in tain of Ruskin’s architectural tempted to feel that some aspect
Britain. views first began to be felt; for of Ruskin’s influence on art o
The art of Venice, and that of whatever benefits were bestowed architecture has been
Tintoretto in enigeee “ee en by the attention drawn to Vene-
) suffered the full eclipse that hac



4li

You can always depend
on the natural creamy
flavour of
QD A [Ti pine rasittios min

A ec TOMed

Alka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief

Alka-Seltzer gives you the quick
relief you want PLUS the alka-
lizer you need when overeating
causes excess gastric acidity. Drop
one or two tablets in a glass of
water — watch it fizz, then drink it
down. It’s reliable First Aid. Pleas-
ant-tasting. Not a laxative: Alka-
Seltzer makes you feel fine fast.

INS







Tubes of



unfortun
; ate, let us remember with grati
tian Byzantine and Gothic, they tude this enduring legacy

Crankcaso draj































ensures
healthy cows yielding rich milk and of
a consistent flavour throughout the year.
This rich, wholesome milk is packed under
the most hygienic conditions so that all
the natural vitamins and creamy flavour

nm
f lushed with Nes fen
ae ai jetted with 5
- oO c
MOTOR on, S90 EXTRA
Users have marvelled at the consistent MILES LABORATORIES, INC, Lihahihe heh iilihhhieadtiibedtieiie!
creamy flavour of “Oak” brand powdered
milk. “How is it” they ask, “that through- eS Also Dependable Esso Luby, . -
out the year “Oak” milk powder can be Chassis servicg on bUbri¢ation Gnd chmploty
distinguished by the same delightful fla- mission and differen
vour?” The secret is simple. The cows drained and refilled it!
producing the milk from which “Oak” rs \ £580 XP Compound,”
brand milk is prepared are fed all the e ss) | bie
year round on the rich sunny grasslands i; s
of Hunter Valley, Australia. Th:

bl bleh ltl bate Li |

We can now supply you with the following in
Earthenware —

Get EXTRA Protection...

are retained. “Oak” dissolves readily in MIXING BOWLS (in various sizes *
water and is ideal for drinking, Coffee, ( ) EXTRA Economy —with New
Cocoa, Ete. TEA POTS do. a
m’t worry over mounting milk bills.
ak” brand milk powder with its exeel- TEA CUPS

ent price value allows you and your family
to milk freely

Esso EXTRA Motor Oil!

Unequalled “High Viscosity Index”
keeps lubricating value under extreme
heat of steady driving... flows quickly
when engine is cold. You use less oil...
get longer mileage! ‘

agra Ingredient Added! Special de-

TANKARD JUGS (in various sizes)
MEAT PLATTERS do.

PLATES—Deep and Shallow
DISHES
SAUCE BOATS

3 Lb. Tins $2.43

tergent fights power-robbing carbon and
varnish deposits. Enjoy a cleaner,
smoother-running engine... with

wear and tear! Here’s something emtra
* for your money!

Drive in today for an Esso Extra ott shagge

Your
OAK
@

, -dDRIED
FULL'CREAM

And many others too numerous to mention.

es NOW OBTAINABLE AT = cemanecenatreats

Alleyne Arthur & Co., Ltd. Grocery Knights Ltd (City Pharmacy)
and Provision Knights Ltd. (People’s Pharmacy)

Pay Us a Visit before Purchasing Elsewhere.



ILKé







A) Ashby & Medford Ltd Perkins & So., Ltd.
a teat tas Bookers (B’dos) Drug Stores Ltd, Pitcher Connell & Co., Ltd (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
tethers w» | M .E .R .Bourne & Co W. A. Medford & Co
us au. A .A Browne. Harold Proverbs & Co
aot Saniuet aubbe. Sie eee © 3 | e barbados Hardware (0. {
S. E. Cole & Co., Ltd Stansfeld, Scott & Co., Ltd e | 8 .
H. P. Harris Bruce Weatherhead Ltd |

Hinds Drug Store



| Nos 33 &52 SWAN STREET PHOWE 2109, 3534 or 4406

uw J,



WILLIAMS MARKETING 90., LTD.—Sole Asont

{HE ESSO SIGN
|



R. M, JONES & CO,, LTD—Distributors,


SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1956

What Happened To 1 he tee

THREE SMART

MILLIONS OF FILM FANS
ENVIED THEM, UNTIL—






































pia te vedic t
ree Sr Le
Fourte i icdic : ow
l She wa e na cc -
utr 1c cialised 5,000,000 childre:
Jean were laying with Shirley Temple 1
iva 20,000,000 ere wearing 2
Off- >e1 Temple ribbons er ee
€ et
eed Th May Durbin and Frances
: M l va)
) played
le as tar
i i i ) ‘
ount a short called bvery
La veek Miss Garland woun Sunday”, in which she appeared
€a her c ir t of pique with another child singer, Judy
M Durbin 1 idder away i varland once France G im
( nursing her voice and «
wing avoirdupois. 1938
Miss Temple sitting alon< THE year 1938 was vintage for JUDY (new :
her Hollywood play-roon ur- these little Judy Garl Marriage—Divorce—Marriage.
rounded 1,500 dolls and the §0t herself a mink coat, and
ruins of her marriage put on a film conveyor belt that
What happened to these three Was late rves
ttle rich girls for Star Roone}
rn should? he was going owards th
\ce my Awa she was later to
929 win She was tireless, worked
WE start St. George’s Day nd played hard
1929, when the wife of Mr. Temple ‘ M.G.M. were certain that in her
a California bank manager, gave "/¢y bad an answer to Miss Dur-
birth to a daughter yin, Miss Temple, and the de-
Elsewhe re, n California Edni pression
May, seven-year-old daughter of Miss Temple had nothing to fear DEANNA (now 28) :
Mr. and Mrs. Durbin. Lancashire- Yet-. President Roosevelt had re- Marriage—Divorce—MGrTiigeee
born immigrants from Canada, ceived her. She earned £3,400 ir ivorce,
was taking singing lessons. Neigh- tWo weeks just by endorsing a nen oe ‘ rae eee, me
bours said her voice ounded fine ee Eror es Wizard of Cx” she took
she ought t have a screen test Like Miss Durbin her studio 0Ul @ college correspondence
And. hhofind it with her stets . ieclared to be £2,000,000, COUTSE.
on the vaudeville stage, was four- hen her milk-teeth fell out Miss Durbin, _by 1940, was the
year-old Frances Gumm, daughter the studio gave her false ones only star [eae and ‘Increasing
cf Frank and Ethel Gumm, actor Elsewhere in the Hollywood #€! pre-war fame
She too had a future. Everyone giitter-bowl Miss Durbin was en- IMAL
aid cluding France joying 5s. a week “pocket money’
vhile Mr. and Mrs. Durbin banked WHILE Miss Temple was busy
19 t the thousan on her behalf with exercise books, Misse Durkin
MR. and Mrs. Temple were first 2 and Garland were busy with their
off the mark In 1933 they enter- 1939 Brat husbands. . }
ed Shirley in a contest to find © IN 1939 the three girls were _ / the spring of 1941 both an-
hild actor for the film “Stand Up hardly off the set. Miss Garland nounced their ae 5S
nd Sing.’ was acting ging, and dancing ‘ousand people waited outside =
The studio personnel listening fyriou ‘ ern een ie ‘he v a
to her stood up and cheered, Holly- Miss Temple was calculated t« rt "we om 7 - 7S
ood had found a child genius be worth 142 times her weight in producer aughan Pau
ith golden curls (all 62 finger- gold In July Miss Garland went to
rolled by Mrs. Temple), a chubby Miss Durbin, growing into a Nevada and quietly married the
mile, a voice like a junior angel personal young woman, was going band-leader Dave Rose
> up and down the scales with dollar Both marriages lasted two years
1936 bills floating from every note Within a few Months of each other
WITH a three-year start on the Came the war Eleven-year-old each was thinking of filing suit
other two smart girls, Miss Temple Mis. Temple quit the films and for divorce While Japanese
had a box-office appeal higher started as a junior at Westlake prisoners declared they weren't at
than Garbo’s in 1936. More than School. She had made, they said war with Miss Durbin, she was
200 million people paid to see her. about £4,000,000 in films, either for accusing Vaughan of mental
Her estimated earnings had reach- ferself or someone else The cruelty
cd £250,000 money was invested, everything It took Miss Garland a little
Everybody knew she liked eat- was fine longer to make up her mind,
ing broiled steak, playing with her Miss Garland took up educa- Miss Durbin also got off to her





THIS

WEEK'S GUESS STARS







AMF litcontains. 0:07.
FLIT IS AN @ssoc) PRODUCT

SUNDAY



GIRLS

secouud marriage first, this time to
troducer Felix Jackson. 20 years
Per senior Seven months later
Miss Garland announced that she
would marry her director Vincent
Minelli—then 32, and eleven years

her senior.
1945

MEANWHILE what of Miss
femple’ Havirg ceceived the best
Westlake could offer she was being
groomed by Selzwick for adult
roles. .

In 1945 she, too. began to ex-
periment with thoughts of mar-
riage—to a young army P.T. in-
structor, John Agar aged 24. He
had written her fea letters since
she was so high

Gone wag al) the childhood
glamour. The three smart girls
had now to stand up under a less
sentimental scrutiny

Miss Durbin, however, was stil!
carning something like £100,000 a
year, Miss Garland £75,000. Yet
the zenith was perhaps past.

1946
ONE day in January 1946 both
Miss Garland and Miss Durbin
booked a room n the same
maternity hospital, Jessica Louise

Jackson was born in February,
Liza Minelli in March

Miss Durbin’s film career was
practically completed

Miss Garland’s was to enter,its
most temperamental, cruellest
phase

Miss Temple’s success was to be

nothing like the forecast.

The Durbin second marriage
worked no better than the first.
The same might be said for Miss
Gartand’s

And Miss Temple, who had
married in hope of “a really
Fappy permanent marriage like
mummy's and daddy’s”, found
that Mr. Agar had film ambitions,

end did not like to be called “Mr
Shirley Temple.”

She said that he got drunk and
tnat he said she was no fun be-



ADVOCATE



Rupert and Mi randa—JT



Rupert walks on and on, and
gradually .eealises that he has lost

us way. At that moment a sound
eaches him and he stops anxiously.
That's Miranda's voice, and
eleve she's crying!" he thinks.
What can be the matter?" In
waxiety to find where he is he

Children

a ») JOSE was eccentric and

left an odd will Under his
will his eldest son received four
sheep and half the remainder oi
the flock, the second son four
sheep and half of those left, and
So on, the youngest son reeeiving

as many sheep as there were son
How many sons and sheep werc
there? .

ge snr
ULAR
roquinu
Say} aay
DION daar
uelAjtos

Husking Time

VARMER Early and his wife
Sarah and son Jim together
ean husk a certain field of corn
in five days Farmer Early and
Sarah can husk it by themselves
in five days, Then how long it
take Jim to husk it by himself,
Supposing his rate of speed re-
mained unchanged?

#1 snid g snd % UOIssesoid
uy punoy st daays jo
ou} pu ‘“SUlOs Ano, aieM
“HOS ORUNON Fy) OF Tet
MOq ‘daays ApXM ‘suos sn0q










crawls through a tunnel and ¢
face to face with a mouse. *
hear the doll, Miranda. Is there @
way into the room where she

he asks, “All our rogme
secret’ panels,’ says the q

Look, there is One just above
head."’

’s Shorts
Weigh This

HAT’S the

of

Jones, the
products

scales
any

smallest number
different weights Mr
itinerant buyer of farm
requires on his balance
to weigh (in level pounds)
weight from one pound to
forty pounds? The weights may
be placed in EITHER pan of the

ales

For your benefit, in setiling the
or'guments, we're providing the
onswer below, but we suggest you
work it out yourself first

ued eyo
}O S40}U0S 403 QoURTEG & se pUNEd euD
124} Fuisn uey ‘ued suo uy punod auo
no Buyten yay AQ Pepys eq Aww

punod omj, “spuned Uaags- HU OU) “Sue came, A[UD ameuy
rie
Weighty Matter
ITH how tew weights is it
possible to weigh any amount
between 1 and 127 on an old
fashioned balance scale’ Only

whole numbers must be consider




ed What will be the denomina-
cause she didn’t get drunk. of T St UoTUM tions of the weights?
o/t uit 6/f X/T FRY) 08 “MOM
ep ouo iJ yo seaquinu .
\ 1949-50 rd Sart oxey earner 10Maaty By the way, if a chicken weighs
IN 1949 Miss Temple came into two pounds plus three-fourths of
her immense fortune. re its own Weight, how much does it
Miss Garland had a_ serious Child n ’s Letter weigh?
nervous breakdown. SIR . bsned ane ee
na vd ; af . ’ Haw vuayoyo eu, spunod pA PXTS
Miss Durbin, ‘without a film for Those to whom I have replied oie omy-A1a1u9 ieneaye ie ‘anos
two years, had put on 20Ib. in have shown me great apprecia. om) ‘U0 Joy-syYIIOM UWACy | does
weight, and was ees —_ tion and likeness for the people of —\ °
going into opera, where perhaps, Trinidad, so | would like you t EK 8 aS
the weight would not seem out of publish for me in your Pen Friend Mit A
piace, column, my gratitude, and thanks, 1 Add remain, avoid, atmos
rom then on, for them all, i o all who wrote me because it is 1ere 1d ¢ “ter, und get still.
K th f th ll, it to all wh t t t phere and a letter, 2 i
was the down-slide. Twice impossible for me to do sa in 2. Add transgression and a
M.G.M, suspended Miss Garland. dividually prophet, and get genuine
She had temperamental fits aor CRUOneS wennes
Unlike Mic Durbin, who de- Thanking you in advance tor gabe oii
clared she would never slim, Miss your kind consideration. New Members
Garland drove herself into a Y I = oak 1
ri sli ours respectfully,
Boston hospital trying to slim. a NOEL BETHEL Joan Jones, Black Rock; Ose ne
Miss Temple’s marriage went Alleyne, Alkins Road, Simmons
through a sordid divorce court. te - : Land; Grace Worrell, 3rd Ave.,
Nothing of the glittering dream { [ A { I Land.
seemed to materialise. Two men lies on 0 Sse s rn i l
brawled over Miss Temple on a : j Pen Pals
solf coursé, Miss Durbin, in Paris, - + Company, ~ fail-
dreamed of playing in “Pygmalion” ed in business, is able to pay a ae ; « Chee ;
if anyone would ask her ~ pecans se : on we dollar. , yen oe oe poncho
And Miss Garland thought, per- Had it been able to collect a cer- 7, s twee ‘ years
t wpe Sus eantbesiin inst ane tain debt of $600 it could have bag mag ae ees ae
a ed edge of a tumbler might paid 28c. on the dollar. So what Ba ‘Hall “St Mick vel. ;
oa wae of solving the prob- Were the liabilities and assets? ; “Ernet tH “Taylor. “G BS.S., St
lems that had come to Hollywood's oov'es George's, Grenada, Eldon Taylor,
three smart girls. Oe de gare dat taee bose, «G-B.SS., Si» deena Grenada,
—JOHN PREBBLE nr, silanuer ap” ieree ot) uo, and Frederick Jacobs, G.B.S.S., St
—LES. jo Q4HD OK} PINON GODS OU, 149. May George's, Grenada
Bem etek es et ene
FOR A SMOOTH, COOL




es
«i
Ng at

AS

we

a
Le

‘Hazeline Snow * does so much for
your skin, Women the world ever
trust it as they do no other aaeety
cream. So magically cooling at all
seasons, so good for treating little
blemishes, never greasy, ‘ Hazeline
Snow’ should be your daily choice.

school shoes.

to grow.

Cc. &), CLARK LTD.,

‘HAZELINE SNOW’

Clarks ‘Playe-Up' range is

real confidence; and then to
stages of toddlerhood until

They are soft,

the beauly cream
that is a ‘treatment’








*‘HAZELINE SNOW’



protects the skin from dust
and dirt... guards against sun
cools the skin immediately
it is applied .. . so refreshing
softens and perfumes the
skin, prevents that shiny look

cleanses thoroughly, gently
«+ + gives @ perfect ‘matt’
foundation for powder

*‘PLAYE-UP”

specially

designed to start first-walkers off with

take them through all the
they graduate to Clarks

flexible and scientifically

planned to give adequate support with room for toes

~ $ANDALS

MADE BY
(WHOLESALE ON

STREET, SOMER o

LOCAL AGENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS







PAGE SEVEN





So beautifully easy...
so essily beautiful



because Brylfoarr’s rich lath unses thoroughly and effort-
lessly, infu: vita into every type of hair Look in your
mirror and cc oh a Brylf hampoo 1 s t
new loveliness to 5 hair pliable a née
it is, too, So easy-ti-use ron l



needs no preparatic
the large econor

there's mor:

BRY

THE ORI GINA!

joam Nt

LPF OAM

SHAMPOO IN A TUSE

° eee ee











Perfume . . .
the loveliest thing
abou! you.















‘The subtle difference between leekiag ‘' your best " —
and beimg beautiful. As wonderful as that, the
differeace {ime perfume makes. Goya's lovely
perfumecs create this miracke for you ... their litting
fragsamoes lcnd enchamtment to everyday occasions
«++ Wearing them you feel-—and asc—alluring.
"Phat you may discover the glamewr of wearing good
cookaaiies all the time Goya presents his fragramces in tiey handbag
phials at only 18 amd in a Gilt size at £2 B,1.
Apply your perfume on your skin-—always use
cneugh fer you to sense



Made in Highest by amd enjoy it.
? oOotA Lalas saw evar fama LONDON ww

Digsritetere s bs L. M, B. Meyers &@ Co, lid, P.O, Boe 171,



ult Fashion Need Not Mean



“'Tex-made”’

alia

i ox-inade”’ fabrics,



High Prices...

SEW YOUR OWN!

You can save as much as half the price. ‘And you and
your children can always look your best .
ind most exciting styles «0s ‘Tex: ‘nade! /4cottons.

fabrics are made by, one ,of fthe; largest
manufacturers of cotton prints in the “world’ Old Colony*
Glenwood, Victoria, Beverly, and [Suzanna prints—in
fashionable and i versatile ‘ps patterns arg aman f *the’most'
nopular, They ‘are easy to han handle and'sewAThey drape

moothly, stay fresh, weal yell nd yasbcasily.

'. ok for the ‘identification bandsan and they Tex- made’”’

ie 6.2 the piece goods. This is your” guaré amtee that the
you buy are the "genuine ’sun-! fast and? ,tub-fast_

“TEX-MADE” 1S WELL,MADE

.jin \ the latest

i tee

Lridgetoscs













PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS Sp ADVOCATE

Sal SS ees SS Pca
Pablianes by Thy Adveeste Co. .td., 4. Sroad







Sunday, July 9, 1950



Legislation
LEGISLATIVE
considerably in recent years the
measures which require attention of
the Legislature are of so complex a nature
that it is time that the machinery for the
preparation of Bills and other measures
be examined. Too often are Bills intro-
duced which, while sound in principle,
have not had the time devoted to them
which is necessary if good legislation is to
be enacted.

In Barbados the staff of the Attorney
General’s chambers is responsible for the
preparation of all measures introduced by
the government into the Legislature. The
burden of work which is thus thrown on
this department is extremely onerous.
Legal draughtsmanship is perhaps tlye
most difficult branch of legal work and
while it is true that in Barbados it is possi-
ble to use the precedents from the United
Kingdom or the Dominions or Colonies,
yet the adaptation necessary for local con-
ditions is by no means a simple matter on
all occasions.

The Adult Suffrage Bill now before the
Legislative Council appears to have reper-
cussions greater than anticipated by those
who drafted it. The Bill purports to
abolish the qualifications for voting for
members of the General Assembly and the
qualifications for being a member of that
Assembly. The Bill apparently does not
intend to affect the qualifications in Vestry
elections for Section 3 (1) mentions only
the General Assembly. On the other hand
the Bill repeals Section 3 of the Represen-
tation of the People Act 1901 as amended
by the Act of 1943, and substitutes a new
section in its stead.

The qualifications for voters in Vestry
elections are stated in Section 14 of the
Vestry’s Act 1911 and this provides that
every person entitled to vote under any
or either of the qualifications mentioned in
Section 3 of the Representation of the
People Act 1901 as amended by the Act
of 1943 shall likewise be qualified to vote
in Vestry elections.

It does appear therefore that unless the
Bill is amended by the Council adult
suffrage will apply not only to voters for
the General Assembly but also for the
Vestries.

The Adult Suffrage Bill in its present
form will also extend the number of per-
sons entitled to serve on the Petty Jury.
Section 2 (3) of the Jurors Act 1891 pro-
vides that every person who is qualified to
be registered as a voter in the election of
members to serve in the General Assembly
shall be qualified and liable to serve as a
juror.

work has increased so

and
the

These two repercussions were obviously:

not foreseen by the Government, for. the
Objects and Reasons of the. Bill does not
include them in the objects of the Bill.
Some members of the House of Assembly
foresaw these implications and warned the
Government of them at the time but
nothing was done to amend the Bill aecord-
ingly. It is not clear why the onus of
amendment should be cast on the Council.
The members of the Hause of Assembly
include four barristers and one solicitor
while the Council has only one legally
trained person to guide them in the tortu-
ous and difficult task of introducing the
necessary amendments.

Greater time should be given to the legal
draughtsmen to prepare their Bills. From
the time that a third qualified person was
given to the Attorney General’s Chambers
there has seldom been three working there.
Transfers and leave have generally pre-
vented the presence of all three officers at
the same time.

This is therefore no criticism of the mem-
bers of that Department. It is merely
another aspect of the need to fill and keep
filled all the posts in the Civil Establish-
ment. Ht is only in this way that Govern-
ment Departments will be enabled to keep



Our Readers Say:

.. Sridaeww



abreast of the work which
them in ever

now faces

increasing quantities.

Juries

THE BILL recently passed by the Legis-
lature having as its objects the abolition
of Grand Juries in Barbados will serve to
bring legal practice here into conformity
with that of the United Kingdom. It was
a non-controversial measure. Grand Juries
have served their time and no heat should
be generated in their disappearance from
the legal scene.

The procedure is for a Magistrate,
prima facie case; the case is then reviewed
by the Attorney General who if he sees fit
commits for trial. The Grand Jury then
examines the witnesses for the prosecution
and once again decides whether a prima
case has been made out. Those in
favour of the abolition of the Grand Jury
system contend that when two legally
qualified persons have examined the evi-
dence and come to the conclusion that
there is a prima facie case it is an un-
necessary delay and a waste of public
money for it again to ‘be subjected to the
scrutiny of men who do not try the case
but merely decide whether it should be
sent down for the verdict of the Petty
Jury.

The only argument against that conten-
tion seems to be a love of the ancient forms
and ceremonies which for centuries have
guided the administration of the justice in
this land. The members of the Legislature
feel that it is more convenient to break
with those traditions and it is likely that
their decision will meet with little public
protest.

Certain members of the Legislature and
certain sections of the public are disposed
to go even further. They are prepared to
abolish all juries and to entrust the decision
in cases criminal as well as civil to the
hands of the judge. The decisions of juries
in Barbados have not always met with the
unqualified approval of cecupants of the
Bench but the principle of trial by jury
particularly in criminal cases is an im-
portant safeguard of the freedom of the
individual in an age in which executive
encroachments become greater every day.

In Barbados members of the Bench have
always maintained an admirable and
excellent impartiality, unswayed by the
interests of the executive. This island
would however be giving hostages to for-
tune on the day on which they allowed
trial by jury to be abolished.

In crimes such as sedition and all politi-
cal offences, trial by jury remains the great-
est safeguard of freedom of speech which

exists in a world in which such freedom is
fast dying out.

Let members of the Legislature there-
fore study carefully the possible results
before they assume the grave responsibility
of abolishing all juries.

Water Cocks

LAST WEEK many Barbadians were
horrified to notice that a new water cock
was being added to the several existing
water cocks along Beckles Road.

The growth of Barbados’ vehicular
traffic has today made Beckles Road a major
road of Barbados.

The activties of the Police and the
Highways and Transport Board have been
laudably directed to the improvement of
traffic circulations,

There are consoling r pons in the press
of heavy fines for exceeding speed regula-
tions in built-up areas.

Yet more water cocks are being added
to Beckles Road to encourage large num-
bers of water drawers to congregate in a
main road at periods of the day when it is
more tempting for motorists to throw
caution to the winds and urge on motor
car or ’bus to do its best on what is confi-
dently expected to be a deserted stretch of
road,

Apart from the temptation to the driver
of vehicles and the cyclist, there is far
greater danger of the water drawer acquir-
ing the mentality which leads him or her
to think of Beckles Road as his or her own
private watering ground.

All the good that the Police have been
doing to encourage Road Safety is hereby
being undermined.

Surely the public are entitled to greater
wisdom and a modern appreciation of the
proper locations of Cocks which provide
the essential water without which we can-
not live for long?

facie

usually a lawyer, to decide that there is a |



SUNDAY

“WEST INDIAN LEADERS SHAKE HANDS

Delegation and John Goddard,



Sitting On The Fence

By Nathaniel Gubbins

..“Would elderly, active lady

eare to share well-furnished

small house and WORK with

elderly, active couple?’—

Advt.

I'VE polished the silver.

Have you? Now you can polish
the grates.

Before lunch?

Too busy for lunch. After the
grates you can scrub the hall.

How old are you?

Eighty-nine. And you?

Eighty-eight.

You're quite a youngster, Bustle
about now.

How old is your husband?

Ninety-one.

What’s he doing?

Distempering the kitchen walls.

Won't it be bad for his heart?

No. Do it good, Hurry up with
those grates.

What for?

I want you to help me with the
curtains.

What are you going to do with
the curtains?

Take em down and wash em,

Before lunch?

I've told you.
up those steps.

No lunch. Get

I get dizzy at heights.

Don’t be a quitter. Up you go.

If I could have some tea. And
a biscuit.

No time for tea, Or biscuits.
You're half-way up now.

But I’ve nothing to hold on to

You don’t need anything. Bal-
ance yourself.

I’m feeling faint.

Take a deep breath.

I can’t reach the curtain pole,
Up another step. Lejt foot first,
Oh.

Now the right,
I’m falling.

No you're not,

But I am.

No, you’re not. Oh, yes you
OPE. . Cracked your head?

Yes. If I could have a cup of
4 | ee

No time for tea, I don’t think

we shall suit each other,

Don’t you?

Better pack your bags.

Perhaps after dinner.

No time for dinner. I'll see you
off at Me station.

Thanks.

Vive le Sportsky

Accordingly to the infor-
mation service of free Czecho-
slovakia, the Kuibishev
Soccer team, “Wings of The
Soviets,” have achieved sur-
prising results at football, not
only because of their physical
fitness, but because they have
a political instructor who en-
courages the players to give

British

LONDON.

Events in the Far East have

almost made British politicians a

forget that a general election
could happen here at any time

Party politics and electioneer-
ing have been largely oversha-
dowed by the near - unanimity
which prevails over the United
States’ decision on Korea, Except
for a mild campaign against the
ailing Ernest Bevin, who is called
on to pass his Foreign Secretary's
portfolio into younger and health
ier hands, the usual partisan at-
mosphere is lacking in Westmin-
ster.

It is



generally expected that

ADVOCATE







Hon. Albert Gomes,
West Indies captain, get together

each other political lectures.

“THANK YOU, Comrade Cen-
tre Forward Kickoff for your
interesting lecture on the Co-
Ordination of Mass Effort under
Directional Thinking assisted by
Physical Persuasion in Free Com-
munist Communities,” says the
political Football Commissar.

“I am flattered, Comrade Foot-
ball Commissar.”

“Thanks are also due to Com-
rade Inside Right Headoff for his
masterly denunciation of the
bourgeois Socialist warmongers
of the decadent West. No wonder
Comrades Kickoff and Headoff
score all the goals. Does anybody
wish to denounce anybody?”

“We would like to denounce
Comrade Goalkeeper Pushoff,”
says Kickoff and Headoff together.

“You first, Comrade Kickoff,”
says the Commissar.
“In the course of a private and

confidential talk I discovered that
Goalkeeper Pushoff is completely
ignorant of the number of nuts
and bolts produced in the factor-
ies of Stalinogorsk from January
1, 1948, to January 1, 1949, inclu-
sive

That explains why he lets so
many goals through,” says the
Commissar “What have you to
tell me, Comrade Headoff?”

“Over a friendly glass of vodka
Comrade Goalkeeper Pushoff was
indiscreet enough to express
doubts as to the proved and un-
deniable fact that Soccer was in-
vented by the great Russian
sports-professor Sockyourheadoff.”

“Lam obliged to you, Comrade
Headoff,” says the Commissar.
“As we are about to reveal that
the game of ericket was invented



by another great Russian sports-
professor, Sillimidoffsky, the dan-
xerous-thinking Goalkeeper Push-
off must be eliminated. I will
arrange a private meeting be-
tween him and Chief of Secret

Police Inspector Bumpoff.”

In Japan, no body will invite a
tax collector to his home. Japan-
ese hotel proprietors will not
provide a tax collector with food
oc drink unless it is poisoned.

In a village near Bombay a tax
collector's house was burned
down and his wife thrown in the
river.

In Lake Shafer,
a Mr, Paul Abbott is lying sub-
merged in an oxygen tank
10 ft. by 6 ft. He will stay there
until taxation is reduced.

In tolerant Britain
Cripps, the most
collector of all
barred from the
friends.

If he went to any hotel in the
country for one of his delicious

Indiana, U\S.,



Stafford
unpopular tax
time, is not
home of his

‘Politics’ Dimmed

the Labour Government, still rid-
ing all parliamentary storms with
slender House of Commons ma-
jority, will at least survive until
the summer recess, due in a
month’s time It majog events still
are brewing in the international
field when Parliament re-assem-
bles in October, Labour’s lease of
life might be prolonged indefinite-
ly,

Herbert Morrison, Deputy Prime
Minister and one of Labour’s lead-
img strategists, says this present
precarious Parliament is working
out a lot better than most people
expected

His statement probably reflects

“Clear and Unequivoecal English”

The Editor, the Advocate,

SIR, — The bewildered letter
signed ‘Planter’ in Thursday’s
Advocate states: “the erection of
a second steel shed has brought
from the Arts and Crafts Society
a threat to withdraw from taking
any active part in the Agricultur-
al Exhibition.” The Arts and
Crafts Society has made no threat,
it-has stated in clear and unequiv-
ocal English that as a_ protest

suggested,
additional
out in any

Vestry’s

ety.

alternative to the steel shed was
would provide
accommodation
destroying the
amenities of Queen’s Park.” This
suggestion was the result of the
invitation,
project of the Arts and C

which

way

It is difficult to follow ‘Planter’
in his reasoning—if, indeed, it can

be called such, Why should the

vey my sincere thanks to all those
who supported my Song Recitals
during the past three weeks in
Barbados. I feel that I should
make special mention of His Ex-
cellency the Governor and Mrs.
Sovage, Mr. H. Risley Tucker,
Representative of the British
Council and his entire staff, Mr
Crichlow Matthews, Mr. Gerald
Hudson and members of the Bar-
bados Choral Society, the minis-

with-

it was not a
Crafts Soci-

against the erection of a second Arts and Crafts Society collect ig ~ eee sens Seeehs
steel shed in Queen’s Park by the funds for the erection of a build- Wieas Pee ain nit rist Church,
| ing which the Agricultural Society Messrs. Radio Distribution and

Agricultural Society, it will no
Yonger continue to organise and
arrange the Art and Handicrafts
Section of the Annual Industrial
Exhibition. If ‘Planter’ had read
the Advocate he would have
seen in the Correspondence Col-
umn the letter which the Arts
and Crafts Society sent to the
Agricultural Society.

The ludicrous suggestion is
made by ‘Planter’ that the issue
of a second steel shed should have
been fought in a “Higher and
nobler way . by the Arts and
Crafts Society using their efforts
to xsafse the funds required for
erecting the type of building which
they contemplate.” According to
Mrs. ‘White’s letter to the Advo-

Sst.
‘Planter’

and jealousy.

making
Queen’s Park.

The Editor,

would use for two days of the year
as a breakfasting shed for judges,
and, for the remainder of the year,
Michael’s Vestry
as a soup kitchen for paupers?
accuses the
Crafts Society of lack of loyalty
Towards whom has
this Society lacked loyalty? Sure-
ly it is not jealousy of the steel
shed, for there is no evidence that
this Society wished to compete in
“jerry - building” in
VIGILANT READER.

Thanks

the Advocate,
SIR,—Please grant me the fa-
cate on the 24th June, a proposal cilities of your newspaper to con-

Mr. W. B. Millar
many
like
you,

There are
others to whom I should
,to say a personal “Thank
would use

I hope to return to Barbados to
renew my acquaintance with
many persons who have made my
stay enjoyable.

GRACITA FAULKNER.
1950.

Arts and

July 7,

War

To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—There is the fear that a
third world war has been ignited
at Korea. This fear could only
be the result of faithlessness in
the Security Council of the
United Nations to stop it,

has so
and it
Korean con-
one between
but rather
the Security

The Security Council
far acted rather wisely,
is evident that the
flict is not merely
North and South
Communism _ ys.
Council,

It should be clear to ail] that
the Reds are not on solid ground
and that. their attack on the
South was purely a test of the
United Nations’ Solidity, Shoyld

his test show. any weakness
there will be a World War
and Communism will triumph
On the other hand {if the Securi-
ty Council shows its hands, Com-
munism will retreat i probably
try again around 195 don’t for-
get it is spreading dally

The Reds have made a mis-

take and they should not be al-
lowed to recover, If we fail to
fight now we shall have to in

a few years time and our chances

of a victory will be slimmer
Most people love peace, but
when war is the nearest and

safest way to it,
means—war.

then, by all

I.V.B

July 5, 1950.

Women

To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR, — Will you kindly let
readers know more of the progress
of the badly needed Y.W.C.A.”’
This building should be in the
city, but the spot where Palm
Beach Guest House was, may be

suitable.

Women are being badly housed.
and at the mercies of the un-
scrupulous, There is no protec-
tion, How can progress be

made?

WORKER

Pray for Peace
Editor, The Advocate

This is a special appeal
to all Peacemakers to write, and
pray unceasingly for peace. We
are all weighed and found want-
ing.

After the
of humanity,

To The
SIR,

last great slaughter

all efforts should
have been made to unite all
nations. It has been worthy of
note that India produced a Peace,
maker. Why can’t other nations
do likewise? Hoping the cries of

mothers may be heard far and
wide and reach everywhere for
peace,

A MOTHER

leader of West Indian Sugar |
after the match at Lord’s.



SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950



ooo eee









| ieee SSS —— eS
| BATHROOM SUPPLIES |
{ LOW-DOWN SUITES
)) HIGH-UP SUITES }
t CAST-IRON BOXES
if W.C. PANS “S” & “P” TRAPS
WHITE LAVATORY SEATS
BASINS—22 ins. x 16 ins. & 25 ins. x 18 in
(with or without Pedestals)
SINGLE and DOUBLE DRAIN BOARDS and SINKS
1 SINGLE ALUMINUM DRAINBOARDS
; ALUMINUM SINKS—26 ins. x 16 ins. & 30 ins. x 18 ins.
| GALVANISE SINKS
» PORCELAIN SINKS
COPPER PIPE s in % jns., 34 in 1, ind
FITTINGS
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.
SUCCESSORS TO
i. GaSe PEICHER & CO..LTD. |



Cocktail Party

THESE

SPOIROF B TACICE ENG Tew beaten hh ONTARIO 8 een CALS AS ee Fae 38
root sandwich, or a carrot juice |{{ DANISH COCKTAIL SAUSAGES in Tins ............. 75
cocktail, nobody would poison
him. That is unless your Uncle 54 st
Nat happened to be there. . 5 7 wine
Bo. Tae vhis hole hes Hot been CHERRIES CREMEDE MENTHE FLAVOUR alah an
burned down. Nor has Lady ONIONS in bottles 7
Givnst heen “thrown ints ake MOONEE 555 5 eis 5 oe ee eeiewk § PRA a bakin gua ott
Thames. PLAIN; OLIVES. —-bottlas 0.50 oot oS tee Bt
But if things go on as they are 5 ae
it may not be long before thou- PEEK FREANS CHEESELETS—Tins .... utente een 1.24
sands of us will be lying in under- weir ehedie
water tanks or holes in the CARRS CHEESE CRISPS in 1-lb, ORES So ; 53
eeu, hiding from the terrible CARRS CHEESE CRISPS in tins .. Werwekin ier eni ale
With so many people lying HEINZ SANDWICH SPREAD—bots. .................. .47

doggo, the revenue will gradually
drop and Cripps will have to find
more taxes, even if he has to go
after the children’s pocket-money.

In the end everybody will be
under ground or under water.
There will be nobody to tax and
Cripps will be alone, with the
last bit of bread and lettuce in
his pocket, preaching in an empty
cathedral, all his instincts for
taxation satisfied, and happy at
last.

AMONG
columnists
newspapers
favourite?

Why, the old original Dr. Gub-
bins, ace quack of Fleet-street.
Here are two of his replies to
readers with just enough strength
to hold a pen.

“I wake in the morning
with pains in the back. I go
to bed with pains in the
stomach, All day long 1!
have pains in the chest.
When [ eat anything I come
out tn a rash, When I don't
I feel sick. What can you do
for me?”

If I were a vet J would sug-
gest you ought to be destroyed. As |
it is, I ean only suggest that you
climb Nelson’s Monument and
jump into Trafalgar-square. That
is, if your back doesn’t hurt too
much,

“Every time I think of the
boy I love I have a fit of
sneezing, ajthough I never
have a sold. What shall I do,
doctor?”

Although this is hardly a doc-
tor’s problem, I offer this advice

the many doctor
now writing for the
who is the public’s



for what it’s worth. You can
either stop thinking of the boy
you love or stuff your nostrils

with blotting paper,

If you sneeze, then you will
either kill his love by shooting
wads of blotting paper at him or,
if the paper stands the strain, air
pressure inside your head will
blow your brains out.

Perhaps this might be the best
end to a romance which would
never last beyond an unusual
honeymoon.—tL.E,S.

a growing confidence within the
party that its razor-edge rule can
continue,

But Labour is not relaxing en-
tirely. Its national executive com-

mittee already is busy on the aca-|)

demic spadework which will pro-
duce a platform for the next elec-
tion whenever it comes.

Political correspondents under-
stand that two documents will be
prepared—one a broad statement
cifferentiating socialist principles
from those of its chief rivals
(probably with a special section
designed to make Liberal voters
feel at home); the other a detailed
programme.



Pigeon Holed

To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—Appearing very regularly
in the columns of the Barbados
Advocate are notices of the award
of Colonial Development and Wel
fare Scholarships to West Indians,
particularly to Trinidadians and
Pritish Guianese,

Barbados boasts of being in the
forefront of West Indian educa-
tion, and I am therefore left to!
presume that no one applies for
these scholarships, or that becaus
of our boasting there is no boost- |
ing, and all the applicants
meticulously pigeon-holed.

GOOD ALL.



are

July 6, 1950,

Poor
SIR,—There is an urgent need
to give more help to the poor
Poor people, some too old to walk,
lined up like cattle, pushed and
jammed by stronger ones to get}
a few shillings which can only
keep life going for a few days. |
The poor in Barbados are just}
a body of people weakened by
Starvation. Feed and help them
and there will be no tuberculosis
It is insulting to say that our
people do not know rules of health. |
DEFENDER

¢

}
ORDER SE
SALTED PEANUTS in Tins ...
DANISH COCKTAIL SAUSAGES in Tins
CHERRIES MARASCHINO FLAVOUR — Bottles

AND REMEMBER

COCKTAILS are
always BETTER
blended «vith

3 YEAR OLD
COCKADE
RUM.

FINE



STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO.,

LTD.













A Small shipment

superb
TROUSERS

in attractive materials

of these

and colours now

‘mn stocks

TAILORED BY,
SIMPSONS
Da COSTA & Co., Ltd.

DRY GOODS DEPT.

———







Music and

Dancing on

Parade
Lack Rhythm
and Pleasure

without

GOLD BRAID



GODDARD'S GOLD BRAID RUM MAKES
YOUR PARTY HAPPIER

Settee

4
&





|
i
|
|
|
|
|
SE en AR i mI A

re REA an FA AE nS EIEIO
ee St SSS

SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950

All Saints’ Sehool |

Mistress Retires
After 42 Years’ Service

Teachers from All Saints’ Boys’ and Girls’ School and many
other schools in St. Peter and St. Lucy gathered at All
Saints’ Girls’ School on Friday evening to bid farewell to
Miss Ada Gilkes, the Headmistress of All Saints’ Girls’ who
is retiring after 42 years’ service with the school, of which

she was Head for 13 years.

Mrs. Victoria Brathwaite, who.
has been with the school since
1931, will act as Headmistress.

Mrs. Brathwaite presented Miss
Gilkes with a Morris rocker and
a purse. The rocker was given
by the Staff of the All Saints’ Girls’
while contributions towards the
purse were made by the staff of
All Saints’ Boys’, the school
m.anagers and pupils of All Saints’
Girls.’

Before the presentation Mrs,
Brathwaite congratulated Miss
Cilkes on her long and faithful
service to the school. She also
spoke of the successful unity be-
tween Miss Gilkes and the Staff
curing the period that she was
Headmistress,

She said that Miss Gilkes was
well respected in the district and
wished her long life and happiness
in retirement,

Mr. C. Broome, Inspector of
Schools, also Spoke of the loyalty
and devotion of Miss Gilkes and
suid that whenever he inspected
the school he always found Miss
Gilkes doing her best.

She was next congretulated by
Mr. H. E. Thorne, Headmaster of
All Saints’ Boys’ and Mr. H. Mar-
ville and Mr. G. Corbin of the
Speightstown Boys’.

The gathering next sang “Auld
Lang Syne” and refreshments were
taken. Among those present
were: Mr. K. N. R. Husbands,
M.C.P., Speaker of the House of
Assembly, Rev. F. E. Pestaina,
Miss Watts, Headmistress of St.
Peter's Girls’, Miss A. Parris,
Headmistress of Indian Ground
Girls’, Miss E. Campbell, Head-
mistress of St. Lucy Girls’, Mrs.
E St. John, Mrs. M. Hunte and
many parents and friends.

PRIVATE SHOW at Christ

Church Almshouse, for the
benefit of patients there, is in-
cluded in this week’s programme
cf the Mobile Cinema. This show
will be on Monday.

On Tuesday night the Cinema
will visit St. George where a show
will be given at Cottage Planta-
tion yard for residents of the
Cottage area, A show will be
given at Oldbury Plantation yard
cn Wednesday for the benefit of
residents of the Oldbury area of
St. Philip.

Residents of the Pool Plantation
area of St. John will benefit from
a show given at the Pool Planta-
tion yard on Thursday. The pro-
framme concludes with an engage-
ment at Husbands Plantation yard,
St. Lucy, on Friday for people of
the Husbands Plantation area.

The current programme is “‘Cos-
sack Horsemen” “Trooping the
Colour”, This is Britain—38,”
‘Hill Sheep Farm,” “Motherhood”,
“East African College,” and
“British News”.

HE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

of Combermere School Old
Toys’ Association will hold a meet-
ing on Tuesday next at 4.30 p.m. At
the meeting dates of the Annual
Meeting, Dinner and Dance will be
fixed and Guests of Honour will
Le selected.

There will be a cricket match
between Present and Past Com-
bermerians at the School grounds
on Thursday at 1.00 p.m. The
team representing the Past will be
skippered by Mr. O. S. Coppin.
re THE LAST few Saturdays

there has not been room for all
the children who came to the
British Council's Saturday morning
film shows to see “Bush Christ-
mias.”

It will be shown again for the
last time this morning at 9.30.
Saturday morning film shows for
children, and Monday afternoon
shows for adults are now regular
Eritish Council Features.

CONCERT by the massed

choirs of eight of the eleven
schools in St. George was held
at the St. George’s Boys’ School at
4.00 p.m. on Thursday. The schools
taking part were: St. George's
Boys’ and Girls’ Schools, South
District Girls’, St. Judes Boys’ and
Girls’ and St. Luke's Boys’, Girls’
and Junior Schools

The programme opened with
“John Peel” after which the
chanty “Heave Away, My Johnny”
was sung Next followed the
national song “Mine Own Coun-
tree”. A Piano Solo, “Wavers of
the Sea” was given by Miss A.

Walker.

The two Negro Spirituals
*Heav’n” and “Swing Low, Sweet
Chariot”, wefe the next items on
the programme and then “The
Jittle Bells.”
ine Choits also sang the Folk
Songs “A Shepherd Kept Sheep
and “O No John”, and the national
“England” after which Miss
Walker gave another Piano Solo








Pharmacy Week

Tuberculosis will be the sub-
ject ot a talk by Dr. C. Man-
ning while Dr, K. Simon will
talk on Diabetes during
Pharmacy week which gets un-
derwey this year on July 16.

It will be the second to be
held here by the Paarmaceuti-
cal Society, the first having been
held last year.

Proceedings will begin on the
evening of the 16th with a talk
over Radio Distribution by the
President of the Seciety Mr
Fred Olton.

During the week there will be
a show window competition by
the drug stores displaying vari-
ous phases of pharmacy.

Dr. Manning and Dr. Simon
will give their talk at the
Y.M.C.A. on the Tuesday and
Wednesday respectively of the
week, beginning each night at
8 o'clock and on the Friday there
will be a film show by the Brit-
ish Council at the same build-
ing.



New Road
At Pine

A NEW ROAD has been made
and houses are being built on the
North West portion of the Pin2
Estate. Grass was formerly grown
on this part of the estate to feed
cattle and be used as mulch, The
road runs West from the main
road of the Estate and is about :1
quarter of a mile long. It ends at
the foot of a hill which forms part
of the land.

Already three houses have been
erected on the land and part of
the hill has been dug down.

Houses are also being built on
either side of Lower My Lord's
Hill. A road has been made on the
South side, running from My
Lord’s Hill to Government Hl
through a wide stretch of land on
which canes used to be grown,

40’. For Stealing

“YOU have now been convicted
of larceny and if you steal again
you will have to go to prison. You
have no previous conviction for
stealing and I have taken into
consideration the fact that you
have pleaded guilty and have lost
your job.” His Worship Mr. C, L.
Walwyn told Gordon Lynch a 2}
year-old labourer of Eagle Hall
yesterday when he fined him 40/-
to be paid in seven days or one
month’s imprisonment for steal—
ing two boxes of Phillips bulbs
valued at $2.60 and the property
of Manning & Co., Ltd.

Lynch who was employed at
Manning & Co., was seen putting
the two boxes of bulbs into his
pocket about 7.25 am,, July 8.
After Lynch produced the boxes to
his chief a policeman was called
in and he was arrested.

Sgt. Garner prosecuted on be-
half of the police.



“Waivlings at Eve”. That great
favourite “Drink to me Only with
Thine Eyes” was next rendered.

The programme ended with
“How Great is the Pleasure” and
the modern song “The Music
Makers”. The choirs were under
the leadership of Mr, A. G. Jordan,
Headmaster of St. George’s Boys’,
who wielded the baton gracefully
and effectively, The Folk Songs
were repeated in response to the
encores of the audience.

At the conclusion Mr. L. T. Gay,
District Inspector of Schools and
Chairman of the Music Festival
Committee, thanked the teachers
and pupils for having organised
and carried through the Concert
so sucessfully. Mr. Jordan replied
and thanked Miss Walker for her
contributions to the programme,

In the audience was Mrs.
Baker, a member of the Women's
Institute, London, She took the
opportunity to speak about the
work done by the Institution,

Among those present were Rev.
F. M. Dowlen, Rector of St.
George, Mr. F. Miller, M.C.P. and
Mrs. Miller, Mrs, L. T. Gay and a
large number of teachers,

FWWELVE-YEAR-OLD Phillip of Representatives for agreement

gon changes
Joseph, was injured when he on

Stewart of Vaughan’s Land, St

from a bicycle while riding alonr
Joy Road. St. Joseph yesterday
morning. The cycle was extensive-
ly damaged. ;

Stewart was riding his father’s
cycle and going in the direction of
Joes River.

DISTINCTIVE AND DIFFERENT

Our Buyer goes yearly to the
British Industries Fair.

Be It guarantees Low Prices !

YOUR JEWELLERS :

Y. DE LIMA

‘Phone 4644





oo

& CO., LTD:

20, Broad Street



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE





The picture of perfect friendship--Butcher the bull-mastiff with dachshund Jane,

Landan Ben

vress Serntoe

A New Roadway Social Welfare Aims

Danger

Standposts on the hishw
must now present :° men;
greater than ever before to th
who have to get their su ply
water from them, now that
number of vehicles in the island
have so considerably increased

Probably the

best means
avert possible fatal accident siderable progress has been made Mr,
under the circumstances, would O.B.E., Commissioner of

be to remove these standposts to
nearby avenues, a move whic .
would also serve the purpose of



La



ing is in



To Lift Standards
Progress Noted In B.G.

The object of Social Welfare in British Guiana is to ene

our-

age the establishment of higher social standards, and.con-

M. B. Laing, C.M.G.,
F r Local Government and Social!
Weliare Officer of the colony told the Advoe

ate yesterday.
Mi

Barbados for



PAGE_NINE

10 Seouts |: ae
Invested
















ON MONDAY evening last yet
another ad was mad re
Great dod of Scouts
when ter s were inve
ut the St. Luke’s 96th Barbad
Group Headquarter y the Dis
riet Commissioner Mr. ¢ mf
Springer, assisted by A.D .¢ vi
\. G. Jordan

The Commissioner gave the
youngsters an outline of Scou
ing, in which the neces for
their Christian duty was stress-
ed. He was very thorough in hi




examination, and after every re-

cruit gave entive satisfactory he}

was invested and his badge |

presented }
The ceremony was very ini-*

pressive, and the A.D.C. gave th ‘ J

closing remarks. Scoutmaster Hi! A wise mother lets baby decide about

Hi. ones. replied and om Pq ‘| the milk for bottle feeds. Lots of energy, steady

n y came to a close with 1 F - :

lusty Scout yell _ | gains, contented days, peaceful nights —these tell her what she most
The Troop will parade at St

wants to know — baby is doing splendidly on Ostermilk.

Why can mother pin her faith so
firmly on Ostermilk ? Because, where
breast feeding; is difficult or impossible
it is the perfect substitute for mother’s

Luke's Church today

THE Boy Scouts Association «
Barbados is preud to be able t
add its quota of congratulations ;
to the victorious West Indies team
who have made history at Lords

important additions are made: Iron
to enrich the blood — sugar to modify
the food for tiny digestions — Vitamin
D to help build strong bones and

Lord Somers, who — sucgeeded | Milk. Ostermilk is finest grade cow's teeth. Ostermilk is made by Glaxo
lord Baden-Powell as "Chief | milk, dried under the most hygienic Laboratories Ltd., who, since 1908,
Scout, was, before he died, Pre- | conditheas, ‘The protein, great body- have been pioneers in the develop-
ident of the M.C.C and it, builder, is made easily digestible ment of the best possible foods for

was his dream that an all-Scout by the voller drying process. And __ babies.

eleven’ might some day be seen

Playing cricket on the famou

Tord's field. We record with Steady

pleasure the fact that Frank Wo1 progross (

rell and Clyde Walcott were both | tells is right
Scouts. It would be interestin: | you 8

to find out if any of the other
members of the team were evi
scouts at any time of their lives

For your free copy of illustrated Baby Book-Phone 4675














, , ace Badges calle a ak : caer eS
ould two months’ holiday. He arrived
providing more space in thes . poe Thiir as : Congrats to P. L. Harcourt
areas on mornings and evening iD ducation ganica ae B.W.1-A.. accom- \scwis of the 60th B’dos (Bethels |
for vehicular traffic, “ronhadeagd ey Guten mney, are Troop on gaining his Camp SOOO 4066 96909993999 GSFPIS SUODO PIS THIOM TPIOO,

To mention only g few of th . Pith cal at Simarat i. Warden’s Badge. Good wark! ¥ %
places where the i menace is Is A lso Under ity oe ee roe aes Harry ! you haws made a splen- | s >
present, Martindales Road a busy Government ana Nan devoted ute did job of it. x 8
Street for traffic at most times has Welfare time primarily to Co-operatives. , We are pleased to note the! & $
ig less than two inaposts Co-operatives have advanced to segutm aster Arthur Srattts Ae a a V %
ones Bettie hens ee, WR tO.” CREAN 8 piguch o standard that thie Seve Sal too wece aitane ce de ele . x
a yO; eckles Road, prob- MR 4 i tBASE, Social peen hander er separate é “e > Sick Ls »
ably one of the busiest cebte on Welfare Officer of the Demerara Abt seeih oe ooo aS Separate the last three weeks is coming | 3 >

; faa f _ 1 ! under a Commissioner *" jae saith mae de ~ .
evenings, three and where prob- Bauxite Company in McKenzie for thei; development around nicely. Cheer up! Arthur, | % %
ably there is the possibility of very for the past two years, told the The Social Welfare Branch is *°4 Nl soon be O.K eae? x
great danger is that at the corner Advocate yesterday that his now devoting its attention and * $
almost of Black Rock and Eagle ‘“uties are very varied energies to the development ot ix e x
Hall Road where there is always He. gaia tt tie i Cottage Industries and the en % ae Ort The Humber trademark | x
heavy traffic. Sete ee ey Oe The Ci ement of voluntary social ee . % eve ( %

“Up to the present,” the Com- menegernant of all educational! walfare drentianemat. Te 1s ie / 4 is your guarantee of lasting x
missioner of Police told the “Ad-- the” Rinse Cranky ne » Women's work is being en SEIZES * e quality, fine appearance and %
tanotel? sterday. “thora a 1 é é geth Fa. ae rae ae . ef
nok been Tha'nS! aceemnsran® sath ai acivities connect wiih cousuet under the direction oa * in the enim ‘tena. Teg
casioned by this state of affair orn i WORK dD McRengle os, primary duties are the RAIL WA YS RS World's leading quality
and so the Police have not given =o aes establishment of a Women’s Insti “6 1X bicycle carries this mark of
The Weert eee” Mr. Crease arrived in Barbados bg oa ame lines as those in ASHING'TON! Jig 8 1% wor distinction.
erect the standposts, Oa ‘the 00 Thursday by B.W.LA,, for two Great Britain, Pre ees =. ae rest
Manager told the ae ae Sa weeks holiday He was accom Mr. Laing said that housing is ( AChE SUA mo ay oH re st . ‘ 8
that tha De Rairtnactt hat ve a “ panied by his wife and they are also an important part of the work a, : . 8 ine wiie R ot ‘Talay 3 5 Cav1V7es this
to do with. the determinate a meee + Cacrabens or the dep ent, the object ) Sivi pont n and inetied whi ;*) c ‘
this’ location, they: just carey out) ak being to improve housing condi. 70° way # it for the Govern-|* .
eg on, they just carry ou Since taking up his appoint tions both in the city and rural 4™™y to run it for the Govern BN b f
instructions, " 2 ment with the Bauxite Company, areas in the establishment of 'ent. FS caeaiet MaVR oO
winssnete er Wensar se or he sald that a gn oy ceceen: higher living standards, ie rae te ec hms ef ‘ :

: § : mendations which hav en pu ‘ ey ae .
sites. forward by the * Social Welfar-» Main Duties defence find security ‘ *% perfection

- ~ Committee, have been adopted. rr i, rhe strike: 38 by members ofl

° e Originally from Oxford, Eng ; The main duties of the Local i shunters nion : orren 2t¥ _

h I F = land, Mr, Crease was formerly “OVernment department are Dis~ 2!Tected five big ' Wester ‘tailvsiy |
ar es irs Sin ni me hs : trict Administration, an important Systems. Workers on another four| a a
Bh rincipal of the Prince of Wales 4 — ; nyaters ended their 12-di dt Se s
e “"College, Moratuwa in Ceylon Pt of which is Village Adminis. System \ded their 12-day « / %

Title Bo t In from 1926—1930. After spending ‘ton. Villages are administered strike on Thursday a few hou- a) sae”
u some leave in the UIK., he wen! rouga elected bodies “in ‘the filter: President Truman a SS bi
~ a eee ae gn font ‘, Villages, and Community Centre es ane action to e “es

Au ust Inspector of Schools. He remaineg ‘Villages run by Community > ‘ bg 3 oe " ve " malt %
8 in that post until 19838 when he Councils, representative of — the riz rf today ory eh ps ote ©

was appointed Director of Educa ocal authority and voluntary rc ait ~~ ite at ae ” ao :

BUFFALO, NEW YORK, tion. He retired in 1948 organisations, provide for the Posa / rom 1 strikers whit VTS

July 8 Oe r advancement of social condition they said, dispose of our dispute 2

Ezzard Charles, who is recog- . : ,, and living standards. The union's proposal was no | % The Aristocrat of all Bicycles %
ised by the N.B.A. as World In conjunction with his duti In addition, the Local Govern— ™2de public. . ea ae ~
Heavyweight champion, will haye 28 Director of Education, Mr. ment Department deals with the In the statement issued with x y
his first fight in August, after being Crease said that he was: hiel establishment of Land Settle- te seizure order the Presiden & %
declared fit following an injury, Censor for the colony during the j,ents which are generally speak— ©#!led on every worker to retur >| %&
eg Pito, match-maker of War from 1939—1942 ing, villages in embryo. When ‘° his job, Reuter DN %
the Fairview Athletic Club said ey : they are established, they are sched .
tonight that Charles would defi- This is his second visit to Bar- banded over to the local author sdieiinieceillibiias ° %
nitely go through with his twice- we F a1 first being = efi ities who are then responsible for es +S q %

ostponed fight against Freddie he spent two months. His wife has 4) ,; é istration. C ‘eS > ,
Caicos sé Mineeitbnie: Sonnet already ae here for twelve heir administration: co OANU I Ss % HARRISON'S ‘
vania. r months, while his daughter spent .

The match-maker said he had four and half years at Codrington ° ARRIVE BROAD ST. $
talked with Jake Mintz, Charles’ High School before going to Scot Demonstration ;
manager, and that the fight would qed, a - she ji oe as ir Over 600 bags of copra, 15 bag LOCAL AGENTS x
probably be held on August 15. omestic Science at Atho re 7 1 of pigeon peas, 20 bags of cor: s

Charles was pronounced fully cent, Edinburgh, Falls Flat and 10 Sais of cocoanu DIAL 2364. x
fecovered from a bruised heart here from St, Vineent y
muscle on Wednesday. '

Sugar Scarce
In Austria

The injury forced him to put
off fights with Beshore in February
end March of this year.

—Reuter,

U.S. To Spend













VIENNA
34. 688 The Au r Vational Bank

9 m. nounced today it considered 1

. i “black market” ended in Austr
Next Year Only butter, nd Ameri
can cigarette were left on the

“scarce” list Butter and st
WASHINGTON, July 8. bring prices 50 per cent higher
The Senate Appropriations Com-— than official rates and cigarette:
mittee to-day approved a Budget sell for 30 cents a pack,

Bill providing for an expenditure
of $34,688,000,000 to run the Am- oa
erican Government for the finan-
cial year beginning this month

This was $1,473,000,000 less
than President Truman had
wanted. The Bill now goes to
the Senate for debate, which is
expected to begin on Tuesday,
Then it will go back to the House

B URINA

The

. huge budget lumps all Bac Your Supply from .

zovernment services in a single H, JASON JONES & CO LTD

vill for the first time. It covers i " fctet ; k

most major expenditures, with 4 Distributors.

the notable exception of “fixed

charges” totalling about $8,000,-

000,000 including interest on the ee ee en en oe ee a ee ote
$256,000,000,000 Federal debt,

—Reuter.

For Delightful Refreshment






MALTED MILK

SANDWICHES te

TEAS—HOT DOGS—COOL DRINKS
SERVICE Al

KNIGHT’S SODA FOUNTAINS

Phoenix & City Pharmacies



bl

FRANKFURT, July 7

\ gr

mo

e shirts,

the
of

t of

up of 35 women and chil-
latter
Communist-led

wearing

German Youth today tried to stage

“Hands Off

Korea” demonstra-



nin front of the United States
isulate General here,



Carrying large banners urging
“Fight Atom Bomb” and de-
iding the withdrawal of occu-
patton troops, they shouted “Kore:
t Koreans”, “Go Home Ameri-
"but none of the German
Iking along the street seermec
listen. A lonely policeman
tched as the group dispersed 1!
nutes later. There was no sigr
attention inside the Consul
reneral.-Reuter.

PRET

DPS FPP PF PF PP Oe ere

Pe

QPS IOIISO BUGIS



HORS
HAI!

POM
BACC

COCKTAIL ONIONS
CHICKEN HADDIES

CHOWS

E RADISH



Or nena a a a ee en ete at ate”
ByU0st ARRIVED-

A FRESH SHIPMENT OF

POULTRY

APPPPP OPP PPOT TS

Bots,

BURGER STEAK Tins
LUNCHEON BEEF ”

IN (Sliced)

Pkg

Ik
Bots
Tin

CUSTARD POWDER
FRUIT SALAD
OLIVE OIL

PERKINS & CO., LTD.



Roebuck Street

LCOS

OA ALLO





by the Schooner “Belqueen”

The “Belqueen” berthed in th
outer basin during the afternoon
in readiness for discharging
cargo,

its;

SFP ESS EEE EELS

—












° ICE CREAM
- FREEZERS
" BREAKFAST CARRIERS

* EARTHENWARE

Now on show in our Furniture Dept.

‘CAVE



SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET.







SS
SS

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.
Annual Holiday

Our CUSTOMERS and FRIENDS are asked to note that
Workshop will be closed as from Monday 3rd July to





our

. . Saturday the 17th July, 1950, inclusive, for the purpose of
eaadea & MALT Bots, granting our Workmen their Annual Holiday.
ESSENCE OF BEEF Tins Arrangements have been made for emergency work to be
Baden ” undertaken during this period and the receipt of repairs and
P ,OMEL

delivery of completed work will be continued as usual.

JAMS & MARMALADE
Tins & Bots.
CURRANT PUDDING Tins
VI-TONE ”
GOLDEN ARROW RUM

Our Merchandise Department and Office will be open to
business as usual,



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

Dial 2072 & 4502 White Park Road, St. Michael.




PAGE TEN





Pilgrim Virgin

Comes

Today

By A Correspondent

remarkable hap-

near the village

Portugal. Three

that a lady had

them on a small

i nearb) Only two of them

d heard the lady speak and they

she wished them to go

‘ 1 the 13th of each month
the month of October.

} K Dlace
ratima n



pite ridicule, despite im-
prisonment, even despite a pre-
ded threat of death, the

the truth of
s the months went
er crowd gathered
em keep their tryst. The
that the lady had
there would be a
! miracle on 18th October
ty some 60,000 were
would happen.
og this vast erowd saw the sun
whick had appeared suddenly, fol-
lowing he». tin, tLrsi become
pale, then i s sen to turn like
catheri ce! sending forth
ays of the ‘ai es: colours of the
sbow, and finally it seemed to
jump out of its orbit, come
iowards the people in a zig-zag
ourss, and then return to its nor-
mal position. The whole scene
lasted twelve minutes.
in it how you will; a vast
a mighty pheno-
‘reat mumbers now
cepted ue the children’s
lady who had
(nem, each time, had
he if ‘The Lady of the
ihe Blessed Virgin her-
self--ine that she had asked that
uilt there in her
that the rosary be re-
aay

I , the only one of the
thre ing and now a Car-
neli nun, revealed that the
tlesse : Virgin had also asked for

ecial devotion to her Immaculate

t means to secure the
nversion of Russia and to bring
sinners back to God.

i reds of thousands of pil-
-cgan to visit Fatima every
€ but for long the Church,
always loath to accept visions as
genuine without the most careful
scrutiny, still suspended its judg-
ment, and indeed it was not till
thirteen years later in 1930, after

commission of enquiry had been
1 rk for eight years, that the
bishop accepted the revela-
genuine and gave official
iission for the cult of ‘Our
, Of Fatima’.
ring the years that have fol-
i, Fatima has become more
ind more thronged with pilgrims,
vel ly a second Lourdes, and
on v3 46 08 many as 500,000

tathered there at one time

children

insisted on
Â¥ and





t lit






ere hi een

menon and

honour and


















and heard a special broadcast
addressed to them by the Pope

But no matter how much they
may wish to do so, there are many
Catholics throughout the world
who cannot journey in pilgrimage
to Fatima and it is to satisfy their
devotion that statues of Our Lady
of Fatima have been sent on ‘pil-
grimage’ through the world. The
first left Fatima on May 13 1947
and went into Spain, France, Hol-
land, Luxembourg and Belgium
and later to Africa and India. The
second was sent out on Oct. 13 o!
the same year to the North Ameri-
can Continent, and so great wa
ine welcome given to it that in St.
Louis, Missouri, about 300,00)
pecple attended the special devo-
uons in one week

The third statue, the one that
coming to Barbados to-day was
blessed on May !3 1948 at Fatima,
and later in Rome by the Holy
Father himself, so that it might
tour the Caribbean and Latin
America. It has already travelled
more than 10,000 miles by air. In
Ciudad Trujillo more than 25,000
witnessed the crowning of the
statue by the Archbishop of Santo
Domingo In Port-of-Spain, the
statue was welcomed by thousands
on its first arrival and everywhere
it has gone from church to church
huge crowds have accompanied it

and attended the specially-
arranged devotions.
Now the statue is coming to

Barbados to bid Catholics join in
the great crusade of prayer to beg
God, through the intercession of
the Blessed Virgin, to bring Russia
back from the materialistic; Athe-
ism which holds it in its gritp, to
bring peace to the world, and to
bring sinners back to the Divine
Mercy

Later it will be taken to neigh-
bouring Islands, and to British
Guiana, before proceeding to Latin
America.



Bishop Denies
Political Interest

July 8.
American born Catholic Bishop
Gerald Patrick O’Hara, who ar-



rived here this morning from
Rumania, said all the charges
made against him in Bucharest

were “completely false’.

Bishop O’Hara who has been for
three years Papal Nuncio_ in
Bucharest was accompanying
Monsignor Guido Delmestre and
his Personal Secretary, Monsignor
John Kirk,

The Rumanian Government on

PLP LELOL LPS SP PESOS SOS SESE OS SESEESOCSSCO

Oo

CLEC ALLL LL AEG







(ESTABLISHED 1845) %

THE POLICY THAT CARRIES

: THE SEAL OE §
$ SECURITY AND SERVICE S
8 Boe pastiles‘and Wavtee, cabical the Agetma: :
* DACOSTA & CO, LTD. 3



PLES

STS aS Oe
RF





CREASE-RESISTING
MIAMI SPUN

$ I -00 yd.

; IN 30 BEAUTIFUL SHADES

36 ins wide

Fabric of which we are the sole dis-
tributors carries a guarantee from the man-
ufacturer as being sunfast, tubfast and dyefast
and if you ean prove to us that this material

l will refund you the cost of the
workmanship and

any obligation

The ULTRA MODERN STORE with a reputation for ge

N. E. WILSON & CO. |
|

DIAL: 3676
P



-

L't
! you Ww
material, cost of
pensation for any imeonvenience you may
have suffered—can you desire any better
uarantee? ? We give you patterns without
a

——=—=



Look Your Best in an
Unusually Low Prica

com-

at low prices.



Canada Closes
Vancouver—

Australia Shipping

MONTREAL, Canada
Canadian-Australasian
Line, announcing that
t will discontinue service between
Nort America and Australia
New Zealand ports next Jan. 29
with the passenger and freight
steamship Aorangi, said that costs
were the reason

“The company
substantial financial losses since
its inception in 1931, and future
prospects accompanied by high
operating costs are such as to
make this decision necessary,’
said the announcement,

The Canadian—Australasian line
subsidiary of the Canadian

The
Steamshir



has sustained

is a

Pecific Steamships. Its 17,000-ton
Aorangl sleek motorship, was
n-e part of a large Pacific fleet
that included the Empress liners
that sai‘ed to the Orient before
the Second World War. She was
the oly ship returning to the
Canada~Australian run after the
war

Removal of the Aorangi ne«i
Janvary means the end of ship
passenger service between Van-
couver, and Australia, In Van
couver, it was reported that a
factor in the decision to discon-

tinue the service is the increased
raffic by air.

Prime Minister Sidney Holland
of New Zealand said at Auckland
that the governments of Canada
and Australia had declined to go
along with the New Zealand
government in payment of a sub-
sidy to keep the liner Aorangi in
trans~Pacific service. The line had
asked special financial assistance
from the three governments 1o
keep the ship operating. |

Prime Minister Holland said
that the Canadian and Australian
governments “had not been dis-
posed” to contribute to a subsidy
although the New Zealand gov -
ernment, after examining the facts
was willing to do so. New Zealan 1
was ready to pay a subsidy of
£10,000 annually for two years.

Consequently, Prime Minister
Holland said, it appears inevitable
that the old British shipping line
must be withdrawn from the
route. He said the existing scale
of fares was as high as could
compete with air travel. Major
factors in the situation were the
small amount of cargo that could
be handled while the ship is in
port, and the mounting cost ot
operating ships in general,—(C.P.)





Wednesday said the three were
guilty of espionage and gave them
three days to get out of the coun-
try. :

Bishop O’Hara said: “Our solé
work in Rumania was to see after
the welfare of the Catholic Church
and we had nothing to do with
political matters or with collect-
ing information.”—Reuter.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



THE STAGE

R. C. SHERRIFF, of all British
dramatists, is the best at telling
the story of an ordinary man or
woman in extraordinary circum-
stances. He showed this power in
Miss Mabel. with perhaps the most
charming murderess the stage has

known And now, in Home
Seven, he has written for Sir
Ralph Richardson a part that

shows a fine actor at his most im-
pressive. Superficially, it is not
a part that seems to nd much
acting. Yet, in fact, it is far
harder to perform than much that
needs only a theatrical flourish.
Sherriff, as dramatist, makes much
of his effect by the truth of his
dialogue, his gift for selecting the
right word and the right phrase
without letting the speeches grow
pallid. as an actor,
succeeds because he does not give
for a moment the impression that
he is acting. No player is more at
home in a stage set. When Rich-
ardson enters the little suburban
sitting-room it becomes a real
place. Not many actors have this
transforming quality, and in the
Wyndham's Theatre production it
is invaluable.

Some have criticised this piece,

oddly, on the grounds that it is
both too realistic and too simple.

But Sherriff’s achievement has
been to establish and maintain
theatrical suspense with a re-

markable economy of means and
in a way that few other current
dramatists can match. His cen-
tra! figure is a bank clerk in the
late ‘forties, an amiable man of
regular habits who is used to re-
turning home nightly at the same
time, and who has few interests
beyond his wife, the work of a
local social club, and his chrysan-
themums, One night he does not
arrive from the City at the usual
time. His wife is distracted; but
on the next night, precisely at
seven, he Treappears as _ usual,
clearly with no idea where he
has spent the intervening
twenty-four hours. He has
lost a day. He is a man “with
a dark space in his mind,” Pre-
sently it is seen that during that
space, that twenty-four hours, he
might well ha® committed réb-
bery and murder, There is noth-
ing to prove that he did not. The
web grows tighter about him.
Sherriff increases the pressure un -
til the very last moment when he
suddenly relaxes it and we can
breathe again. It is admirably
done, in its way a small miracle
of construction, though some may
hold that the end is too obviously
contrived, But Sherriff had to
solve his problem, and it is diffi-
cult to say hibw he could have
solved it better. He has not pat-
ronised any of his people. This is
not a dramatist’s lofty glance at
the suburbs. It is, in its charac-



LL LTT
——

IT'S CRICKET,CRICKET,CRICKET!!!

Slashing our stocks of cricket

gear we have cut

prices on all

bats, gloves, pads, balls down

to near cost...

A. BARNES &

ae
SF



a

nuine goods

31 Swan Si.



come running!

co., LTD.

x
»
Lennidcdité(ttiécriérr; }\QQEEEREEEEREP SESS

[OT en ene

\



Bridgetown

iy

ter-drawing, a piece of unforced
truth, and the company—led by
Sir Ralph Richardson, and Marian
Spencer as his wife—have ap-
proached it in the right way.

pC
Mele

Trewin

Frederick Lonsdale. the author
of The Way Things Go, at the
Phoenix Theatre, would be the
last to hold that his play is a slice
of life. Lonsdale has never wor-
ried about truth in the theatre.
While his people can toss out their
epigrams, spark out the bright
“lines” with which he has made
his reputation, that is all that mat-
ters. The piece is contrived on the
same pattern as usual. That is to
say, a Duke and his relations keep
the wit going, and an amusing,
slight love-story is played out
against the glittering background.
It is all superficial and adroit: it
proves that Lonsdale has neither
advanced nor retreated since he
wrote Aren’t We All? and The
Last of Mrs. Cheyney a quarter
of a century ago. Here he has a
variety of efficient actors, notably
Glynis Johns, who has a direct,
husky charm; Michael Gough, who
is blessed with a kind of stinging-
nettle sincerity; and Ronald
Squire, who has been rolling the
Lonsdale epigrams around his
tongue for many years.

The prolific ‘g@mes Bridie is an-
other type of dramatist again. He
does not trouble about construc-
tion as Sherriff does, or about the
gilded phrase in the manner of
Lonsdale, Instead, he _ writes
comedies that are wise, witty, and
often wandering: that begin well
and fade away: strange, formless,
queerly likeable affairs that some-
times remain in the mind and
sometimes do not. Mr. Gillie, at
the Garrick Theatre, is one of his
lesser pieces, It is the study of a
failure, a man who, for all his ill
luck, has more claim to the re-
spect of posterity than many peo-
ple hailed by the world as suc-
cesses. He is a schoolmaster in a
little Scottish village. None of his
pupils has done him justice, but
Gillie does not mind. He has al-
Ways another possible swan—one,
alas, that must inevitably become
a soose. In the play we see how
two of Gillie’s latest hopes, a pit-
boy who is a_ potential literary
genius, and a doctor’s daughter
who should be an eminent violin-
ist, go—after a clandestine mar-
riage—from Scotland to London.
When they return six months lat-
er, we find the boy has made
money by throwing over all that
Gillie had taught him, and has be-
come a dubious young trickster.
The girl, alas, is on the same road.





Gillie has failed again, and he is
shortly also to lose his post and



IN BRITAIN

his house. Never mind. There is
always hope: he has heard of an-
other possible genius somewhere
around the corner. And he can al-
ways console himself with the
thought that he has been, as it
were, an opener of cages: that he
has allowed his birds to try their
wings in freedom before the cat
has pounced on them. We are
aware, from a prologue, that
Gillie has no chance to proceed;
that, indeed, he is run over and
killed a short time after the play
ends. This is unfortunate. i,
after seeing Alastair Sim in the
part—he is an actor who is always

intel alive—we cannot con-
ceive a dead Gillie. Without
him the play would be nothing.

As it is, it is little more than an
elongated anecdote, pleasant,
warm-hearted, but in substance
dangerously thin.

The principal London visitor
from abroad has been Sidney
Kingsley’s Detective Story at the
Princess Theatre. This play of
New York police methods, a melo-
drama with a difference, excited
its first audience and should be
sure of a reasonable life, if only
for its qualities as a document. It
has other qualities as well. It
tells a good story swiftly and
there is little nonsense about it.
By no means a major play, but a
telling one in the theatre, and ex-
tremely well acted by Douglass
Montgomery as a fanatical detec-
tive, Helen Backlin as his wife,
and Charles Farrell as a grating
police chief. ;

Outside London. the most im-
portant event has been a classical
revival, Measure for Measure,
with which the Stratford-upon-
Avon Festival Company opens its
season well in advance of the us-
ual date. It is not a favourite
play, but it comes off exceedingly
well at Stratford, thanks to the
imaginative directness of Peter
Brook’s production—in a full text
—and to the power of John Giel-
gud’s Angelo, a_ presentation,
beautifully-phrased, of a man who
yields to the vice he has punished
so rigorously in others. Stratford
has found also a new young act-
ress, Barbara Jefford. Her Isa-
bella—much younger than the us-
ual players of the part—for once
sustains our sympathy and does
not freeze us, as so many Isabellas
are apt to do, with an excess of
icy virtue. Stratford's second
production of the Festival is a re-
vival of Tyrone Guthrie’s version
of Henry the Eighth, with one or
two important changes in the cast.
Thus Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies has
followed Diana Wynyard as Queen
Katharine, 4s





BRITISH OIL ENGINES cexeort) LTD.

Sole Concessionaires for the export of

- IRRLEES: PETTER:; MEADOWS: McLAREN

PETTER-FIELDING

INDUSTRIAL & MARINE

ENGINES

Popular Power Producers

PETTER FIELDING 16-80 B.H.P.

Also the famous type AV series 11 single and twin cylinder

cold starting 3—10 B.H.P.

4 Speed range 500 — 1,500 r.p.m.
- SEE US FOR COMPETITIVE PRICES.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY Ltd.



SOLE AGENTS


























Barbados








SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950



Play safe !—Brylcreem your hair. Dry hair, Tight Scalp,
shea loose hair on your comb— these are danger
signals that point the need for Brylcreem’s double benefit :
(1) Day-long smartness, (2) Lasting hair health.

Massage with Brylcreem stimulates the scalp,
encourages natural hair growth, prevents common
Its pure emulsified oils put new
life into Dry hair and impart a splendid

gloss. Don’t take any chances--Brylcreem Say

hair troubles.

your hair.

DAY-LONG SMARTNESS
LASTING HAIR HEALTH





That's the DOUBLE BENFFIT of BRYLCkKEEM



mee



Veen







Your dog is a tame wild dog

THAT DOG of yours does what he’s
told—generally | He’s a nice, kind,
gentle, well-behaved dog—most of
the time! But has it ever struck you
that his ancestors weren’t like that
at all? The dogs of long ago, from
whom he has gradually been bred,
were wild animals.

This means that life under a root
has disadvantages and difficulties for
him. In his natural wild state he'd
be hunting, killing and eating other
animals, He’d be eating the herbs to
which his instincts led him. He'd be
Tunning and roaming {or miles
wherever he liked, whenever he
wanted,

Now he lives with you. He gets

good wholesome food, but it’s
domesticated food. He gets
exercise, but oniy when

you've time to give it him.
So he needs two additions

to his food. He needs



vitamins which his domesticated diet
may lack. And—because he seldom
gets quite enough exercise, especially
in bad weather—he needs the
mineral substances which help to
provide a rich pure blood supply.

Bob Martin’s Condition Tablets

one a day) supply both these needs
in precisely balanced proportions.
By helping to renew the red blood
cells and by supplementing his
ordinary diet, they do much to pre-
vent such common disorders as
constant scratching, listlessness, loss
of appetite and constipation. They
help to give him healthy bones and
teeth and a fine lustrous coat. They
help to keep him a healthy, high-
spirited, good-tempered dog.

If you want further infor-
mation about the care of dogs
write to Bob Martin Export
Limited (Advisory Depart-
ment), Southport, England.

MARTIN’S

for doggy good health







IMPORTANT



to every
motorist

For every motorist there comes a time when he is faced

with the problem of deciding between various makes
of tyre. In the past, whatever his choice it has invari-
ably meant the sacrifice of some desirable feature, That
difficulty no longer exists, for with the New Dunlop
Fort, Dunlop has produced the one tyre that has
everything. It’s the natural

result of leadership—a

leadership which has been
maintained since the Dunlop
Rubber Company Ltd.
became the first tyre manu-

facturers, 61 years ago.



DUNLOP

ee Peete ReRtRiNcsetin

ECKSTEIN BROS.

483.56

— Bay Street

|





Baar
SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950

Saudi
Arabia
Protests














CAIRO, July 8

The Egyptia WSPat
Misra stated -day that
Arabi had tested
against her iurried dec not
to support the United tions
Security Council's re to
aid South Korea, €
consulting othe:
ments.

The Saudi Arabian note was
understood to stress that Egypt's
decision to abstain from the Secur-
ity Council, vote ran “counter to

Saudi Arabian policy
All Misra in sharp comment to-
bi

day said: “Siding with the
powers at the expense of Eg
may have serious repercuss
Arab unity but diverg
foreign issue cannot bs
by Egypt’.

If war could not be prevented



YAS OF



ice on

accepted



as seemed unlikely—it could be
used for waging a defensive war
A Dangerous Ilusion
Discarding the proposal of

Western European neutrality as a
“dangerous illusion”, the report
said that the plan must be oper-
ated jointly by Atlantic powers.

The report said it was a matter
of “absolute necessity to suppress
Communist fifth columns in the
nations of Western Europe”. In
time of war these might number
“several million men”,

Lebanon in non-committal reply
to the Security Council decision,
said last night “the Lebanese Gov-
ernment declares its readiness to
withhold aid from any aggressor”.

Though Saudi Arabia made this
statement on the Security Coun-
cil’s resolution, Press reports
reaching here said she and other
Arab countries were likely to ex-
press support.

King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia
) was already reported to have tele-

graphed Washington his full sup-
port for the United States in the
struggle against Communism.

—Reuter.

Police Hunt
Sex Criminals
IN AUSTRIA

VIENNA, July 8.

Special detachments of the
Austrian Criminal Police are try-
ing to seal off three long stretches
of Austrian frontiers to prevent
the escape abroad of men wanted
in connection with the deaths of
three women murdered for sexual
crimes within the last ten days.

First is Guido Zingerle wanted
in connection with the murder of
Miss Feln Munro, an official of the
* British Art Council, who was

' brutally murdered on Patscher-
kofer Mountain above Insburck
on July 1. Zingerle is believed
to be trying to escape to Italy.

The second is A. Singer whose
») identity card was found in a room
_ of the Salazburg Hotel in which
16-year-old Gertrude Weber was
found dead on a bed with deep
knife wounds on her breast and
abdomen. Singer is reported
to be trying to escape over the
mountains into Bavaria.

The third case is that of a man
on a blue bicyele who killed 18-
year-old Elli Kastner and wound-
ed 19-year-old Antonia Panholder
When they defended themselves
against his indecent assault when
he discovered them bathing in a
remote stream in Lower Austria.
This man is believed to be trying
to cross the frontier into Hungary.

—Reuter

i



















TWO AMERICAN
FIGHTERS LOST

@ From Page 1
attack was made on the port and
naval base Wonsan, 15 miles north
of the 39th parailel, where good
results were reported,

The oil refinery at Wonan was
hit. B-26 medium bombers, fifth
airforce, destroyed road and rail-
way bridges on Chumunjim on the
east coast, just south of the 38th
parallel. Possible hits were scored
on the railroad, road and bridge











W.1L. vs Northants

@ From Page 5

delivery for four, but bad ball
were rare.
Marshall gave a very hard

chance to the wicketkeeper at 44,
when Fiddling touched a legside







ick but could not hold it. in tae
e over Marshall hit a lofty
r rive to the boundary and
iin the next over put him

ahe of Stollmeyer
There were indications of a
record crowd, a thick ring of
spectators squatting on the grass.
At lunch the score was 82,




ng 43, Stollmeyer 30,
nd extras 9.
After Lunch

Marshall continued to
more aggressive batsman
lunch when Nutter and
shared the attack, He reac
titty in one and three quarter
leurs although there might have
been a runout before then had

picked up cleanly at mid-
ke The hundred was raised

105 minutes and the patner-
ship seemed well set. Marshall
however did not look so safe
Stollmeyer and once appeared to

the
afte:

aetna
orown

be



as









e a hard chance to the wit

eper on the leg side. Stollmey
er’s defensive back play was par-
ticularly sound and for a time
difficulty was found in getting
the ball away particularly when
the field was set cleverly for the
Spin bowling of Broderick and
Garlick,

Stollmeyer reached fifty in

2 hours, 25 minutes and had then

hit only one four. Marshall had

escaped from stumping when 88

for he went yards out to

Broderick only for Fiddling to

fail to gather the ball. When

99, however, Marshall lost his

wicket, Fiddling this time taking

a catch at the wicket.

The stand had lasted 5 minutes
short of three hours and put on
180. Marshall’s score included
14 fours, Only four runs were
added before Stollmeyer was bowl-
ed for 70, and before tea, taken
with the score at 221 for three,
Worrell was run out,

After Tea

Soon after tea Nutter gained his
reward for some very steady
bowling when he had Trestrail
lb.w. The ball struck Trestrail a
painful blow on the knee and he
limped off the field. This brought
Gomez in to join Christiani and
they looked like taking the total
é three hundred, but Gomez
caught, and it was left to
Christiani and Goddard to carry
or until stumps were drawn with
the score 348 for 5. ,

The bowlers and fielder
obviously feeling the effects of
an arduous day in the field and
the closing stages were marked
by some fine batting from
Christiani and rungs were coming
faster than at any other time
Christiani was still undefeated
with 77 when stumps were drawn
Scores :



were






W.1, ist Innings se
J. Stollmeyer b Garlick 70
R, Marshall c Fiddling b Broderick 99
F. Worrell run out 18
K, Trestrail l.b.w. b. Nutter 20
R. Christiani not out iy
G. Gomez ec Garlick b Brown 27
J. Goddard not out 14
Extras 18
Total (for 5 wkts.) 348
Fall of wkt 1—180, 2—184, 3--217
4—223, 5-276 4
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M Run
Nutter 29 4 wo 1
Brice 15 3 48 9
Brown 22 5 85 1
Broderick 2s 3 “A :
Garlick 27 3
a —Reuter.



POWERFUL RED FORCE
THRUSTS SOUTH

@ From Page 1
rapidly on Taejon to avoid being
cut off. 7

Intelligence reports reaching
Allied headquarters here describe
Korean rivers as swollen by
heavy rains. But military circles
pointed out glumly that this had
not prevented Communists from
getting 50 tanks, heavy artillery,
and battalions to the Ansong
river at Pyongtaek yesterday as a
prelude to the drive which threw
back American forces at Chonan,
key railroad, at dawn to-day,

A further threat and perhaps a
more dangerous one appeared to
be developing on the East coast
across the mountain hump run-
ning down through South Korea

objective in an area west of —an area which has hitherto been Koreans for many g
Pyongtak.—Reuter. quiet.—(Reuter). had paid a nominal tribute each
- Ce a



Lubrication is Important!





and independence.
Japan annexed this country in
1910 and proceeded to exploit its










Korea Through
The Ages

WASHINGTON, D.C., July.
Throughout its modern history the ancient nation of Korea
has been engaged in a tragic struggle for freedom, unity

year
that country’s centuries-old pre-

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

























f Korea,—Express, and Princess Margaret will dro;
one more rung on the ladder ot
succession,

Prince Charles has the “edge”
on the new baby, particularly if
it is a boy. A baby sister, how-
ever, might “steal” the spotlight
now and again from its older
brother just as Princess Margaret
has temporarily snatched it fron
Elizabeth

The same team which attended
the birth of Charles will insure
that the second baby is brought
safely into the world.

salute



to China in recognition of svemsenssesnchininsignetssrnsemaneatse







WAITS | iy nea

»stensibly to insure ne “changeing”
s introduced—because it
‘archaic and antiquated,”

amily, public and Commonwealth
celebrations.

Meanwhile Britain waits
quietly hoping, like Prince Philip

PAGE ELEVEN













FOR A GIRL |
|

LON s }

ROYAL FINGERS are busy knittin {

the doctors, nurses and nursery are ready and a'i Britair Elastoplas

is quietly waiting for the birth of Princess Elizabeth's = '

second child. i “eaten

All Britain is hoping, too, that Elizabeth's seco wil k ed keep you

make a “pigeon pair’ — a girl to share the nursery at Each tin contains a variety

Clarence House with the princess’ first-born, Bonnie Prince sizes

Charlie.

The birth is expected iny Noted gynaecologist Sir W ] t ] st
August, Elizabeth is still out ana/liam Gilliat is again looking alte as Op as
about and there is less drama] Elizabeth, who is in “exceller a na =
than preceded the arriva] of]}health,” and will attend her a (Fist AID DRESSINGS ?
Prince Charles because there is}the birth at Clarence House ! IN aa a Sk al
now a future male heir to th Sister Rowe ; e
Britis!! throne. Sister Helen Maude Rowe, nurs¢

But the British public none-|in charge at the birth of -
theless thoroughly digests eac!|will be called on again s
m “agi of ore ae = com-} Elizabeth will again be permitte: oases oe am -
Ing blessed event, about the|/to administer trylene to hersel a
.. ne precedents to lt jf the later stages of sabor, au BRUSH ower UP.. . YOUR eee SMILE eee

arrangements will follow the now
Prince Charlie established pattern

Bonnie Prince Charles is irrev The new baby will Fe born His or
ccubly second in line of suc (Her Royal Highnes v 1 the title
cession to the throne and ha c! Prince or Princess
stolen some of the thunder from A few days before the t of
the new arrival—if it is a boy |Charles, King George VI amended
Another boy would never b [the 1917 edict of King George V\|
more than the younger son and{which limited the title of prince|
the younger sons never have en- Jor princess to the children of the|
joyed much fame in England sovereign and to the children of | .

But a baby sister—that woul [the sons of the sovereign The| a 7
be like having another Elizabeth ]new decree included the children| .
or Margaret to watch growing |of the marriage of Elizabeth anc
up, going out with boys, find- {Prince Philip of Edinburgh WITH THE CORRECT-
ing a dream Prince and gettin The present King also scrapped vr r
married. the ola pacnintion’ requiring Ae Wisdom's straight line head reaches ———————--—— Or

SN When the new baby is born it }attendance of the Home Secretary awkward corners easily.
will be third in line to the thron t the birth of a royal child

was - : —
Wisdome's angle in the

handle is the secret of

us comfortable control

vrs
* Wisdom's widely-

tufts ‘comb’ bet.

lean where deca

Wisdonz

ADDIS LTD. OF



Ede — Official

Home Secretary Chuter Ede will
ve telephoned and wil) make the
ficial announcement of the baby’s
arrival in a bulletin pinned to the
doors of the Home Office Depart-
ment building in Whitehall

The news will be flashed every-
where, guns will

HERTFORD, MAKERS OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN (780

royal
great

boom in
and then will follow



“THE SHAVE OF YOUR LIFE"

calmly

















resources thoroughly until the eminence over her neighbour. But this powerless government, under | himself, that the baby is a girl °
end of World War II. But for the Japanese took an active part Dr. Syngman Rhee, campaigned And so confident is Princess m three acts
years prior to the annexation, in Korea from the first moment unceasingly for independence. [Â¥Plizabeth that everything will go
Korea had been a pawn in the of entry. The Cairo conference in 1943 Jiormally that she is making pub-
big power politics of Japan, China promised independence “in due fiice engagements for October
and Russia. Japan, after winning its war course,” and in 1948 the Rhee (LN.S.)
Peace-seeking Korea ushered in with the Russians, made Korea a government at Seoul was recog-
its modern era by concluding an protectorate for a time until the nised by the U.N., though the :
“Open Door” treaty with Japan in annexation, when Korean proper- northern half of the country was MACARTHUR IS U.N.
1876. But Nippon promises of .ties were seized or expropriated, under Russian domination, Mn
independence were n forgotte Korean patriots penned their Now, as their country is torn COMMANDER
The Sino-Japanese war of 1894-95 own declaration of independence by war, Koreans may recall with V
left Japan the dominant foreign]|in 1919. This touching and beau- despair these gentle and hopeful @ From Page 1
power in Korea. This hold was|tifully written document was pre- words in their declaration of in- | of the Army's Philippine Depart
consolidated by victory in the]sented to the Japanese with dependence: “A new era awakes ment in 1930 he became Chief of =~ SPREAD A FILM OF
Russu-Japanese War a decade} peaceful intent—but the signers before our eyes, the old world of | Staff COLGATE BRUSHLESS
later, and the Koreans had no| were executed. force is gone, and the new world He returned to the Philippine [. ~~ ' OVER YOUR BEARD,
free government of their own un- A provisional government in of righteousness and truth is fas American Military Adviser and - a
til the elections held in 1948 under | exile was formed. For many years here.”’—(1LN,S.) retired from the army in 1937. In wnt
United Nations auspices. July, 1941 President Roosevelt j
called him out of retirement anc 4
Obscured gave him the command of. the 4
American forces in the Far East fi
Old Korea’s origins are obscur- MacArthur was in command in f
ed time, but her. people claim u Manila Bay as the Japs closed in #
history of more than 42 certuries, but got away to Australia, telling
notes the National Geographic the Philippine people if shall §
Society. Korean legend celebrates return”. He has not been for 18 a
a founder named Tan Gun, of years —Reuter : y »
superhuman origin, whose alleged “9 ~~ SHAVE.IT AND YOUR lt #
tomb is still venerated. More SaaS} BEARD — O6P, , ba i i --
credible are the historic refer- =] r ad Hi 1 4 9
ences toa Chinese noble who i i d
emigrated to Korea in 1122 B C.,| SRA VIEW CUEST \\ é
and founded a dynasty there that 1 $)| $
ecu Start training for it NOW! HOUSE || Seater encoh conore COLGATE ©
ee FIRST CHOOSE 6 HASTINGS, BARBADOS _ (i)! while shaving, for that *
_ Much of what we now know as There is still room at the top for the fully qualified ss cane wadetor es , | soothed after-shave feeling ->
Korea had attained a degree of YOUR CAREER i ‘ed for the job. YOU can be that EXCELLENT CUISINE | "i — ‘
, man who is fitted for the job. YOU can be { without trace of sting or
unity and enjoyed an old culture ACCOUNTANCY EXAMS, man—successfal, prosperous, with your future FULLY STOCKED BAR )), Sung ‘
at the time the Roman Empire AVIATION assured—by studying at home in your spare time, RATES: § . | burn, there’s nothing to ‘
flourished. In the 14th Century lle guided by the personal tuition of The Bennatt * $5.00 per Day & (1 touch Colgate Brushless SHAVE CREAM
the relatively small peninsular BO0K-KEEPING College. Distance makes no difference. upwards \ r
country became known as the tenant (Inclusive) 1
kingdom of “Chosen,” a name CIVIL SERVIOE WE WILL HELP YOU TO Apply -~ A better shave without a brush than ver had with
often given Korea to this day. COMMERCIAL ART Mrs. W. S. HOWELL $ q jan you ever had with one
Ironically, it means “Land of the ene ACHIEVE YOUR AMBITION ec Re —_—_—
Morning Calm.” 6.P.0, ENG, DEPT, Get your feet on the ladder of success TO-DAY. Le | | * e @

Korea, after completing its
treaty of 1876 with the Japanese,
made similar “open door” agree-
ments with a number of other
powers, including the United
States. But none served to pro-
tect Korea-from.aggression and
exploitation, a fact which has
prompted historians to refer to
the Far East trouble spot as a
“forgotten nation.”

Prior to the Sino-Japanese War,
generations









INST, MUN, EN@.
JOURNALISM
LANGUAGES
MATHEMATICS
MATRICULATION
MINING

PLASTICS

QUANTITY SURVEYING
RADIO (Short Wave)
SECRETARYSHIP
SHORTHAND (Pitman's)
TELEVISION
WIRELESS

WORKS MANAGERS

If your requirements

are not listed above,

write us for free
advice

Write to The Bennett College and learn how
thousands of people just like you have reached
the top with the right guidance. A well-paid
job can be yours— tart this pleasant spare-time
study NOW.

188

Direct Mail to DEPT.

‘The Bennett College

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND



THAT

BOY FRIEND,
DOES

YOUR HAIR

G0 10



Is your hair worthy of a second look ? There is absolutely



For prompt and skilled lubrication drive your Fordson
vehicle in to us. We are your Fordson specialists, and do
the job thoroughly at low fixed prices. Let us also tell you
all about the latest Thames Trucks with their big bodies,
roomy all-steel cabs, semi-forward control, etc. You will be
as enthusiastic as we are about them.

FOrdSOn Vans » Thames Trucks
CHARLES MeENEARNEY & €0., LTD.









no reason why it shouldn't be.
the unruly hair with A.K. POMADE, that an inexperi-

It is so simple to subdue even

mos. : :

enced person can achieve the look of a professional hair-do
following the simple directions on the tin.

| eg



Why not foilow the girls who know, and
dress your hair the easy way with



REGENT
GASOLINE



100%
BRITISH

Distributors:—

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.

JAMES A, LYNCH & CO,, LTD
({
(
ut

a





i
i
{
'
‘

Seaaas=

en

PAGE TWELV!

LOCAL FISHING









Every year the fishing hare of the Colony’'s sideration then some idea
indusiry of Barbados in- food and finance, can be formed as to the
creases in value and with This year nearly five present value of the indur
the help of the Fisheries million fish have been offi- try and its potentialities
Departinent of the Govern cially marketed by fisher- Pictures show some of
ment Service it is contri- men. If the unregistered the activities of members
buting an ever growing sales are taken into con- of the fishing fleet.

FISHERMEN return from a trip that began at 6 a.m. and lasted until 2 p.m. On this occasion
they caught not more than half a fish basket full, that is about 200,

e4
AT RIGHT TOP—A crowd at
the Government Fish Market
waiting to buy fish. CENTRE:
The fishing fleet at Tent Bay,
Rathsheba, makes ready to put
to sea.
BOTTOM: A fisherman pulled
a funny face at the camera.



bo cer

MR. DUDLEY W. WILES, Fisheries Officer inspecis the work
being carried out when the new Experimental Boat was in the

process of construction, The boat was launched on October 21 4 FISH PORTER gives a lesson in_ peaceful relaxation as he
lest year and engaged in fishing for the first time on December waits with his barrow outside the Government Fish Market for

12. It has been carrying out valuable research work. a call from a boat that wants its catch talten to market.

=

Ihe Best STOVE to own ONE

ss @

FLORENCE OiL STOVE







CLEAN and ECONOMICAL
You will be



very pleased



















Yes '—just one dose of MACLEAN
BRAND STOMACH POWDER relieved
Indigestion pain and discomfort! This
wonderfully quick and effective relief
from Heartburn, Flatulence, Nausea,
Acidity and Stomach Pains due to In-
digestion is made possible by the fact
that MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH
POWDER is a perfectly balanced
scientific formula.

Make Meal Times

a Pleasure!
Why go on suffering? Tryjust one dose
to-day but make sure you enuine
MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH POW-
DER bearing the signature “ ALEX. C.
MACLEAN” on bottle and carton,

*MACLEAN BRAND —=
STOMACH POWDER

Bole Agents:—

and OVEN



City Garage Trading Co., Ltd.

VICTORIA ST. - 4671



rnin i /7 |

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE





SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950



Next time you go to
your chemist ask for a

ID

ee,

C.F HARRISON &CO (BARBADOS) LTD








With this
NATURAL-TONE POWDER

It is not how face powder looks in the pack,



but on your skin, that matters. Evening in Paris
powder is naturally-toned to give the complexion

that soft golden glow of youtllui skin ...flactering,



alluriag. Super-sifted and in several smart shades,
Evening in Peris 1s the powder of perfection
your vital aid tu a Hawless make-up
g, é 0 72 @
x
Evening in Paris Porfame Lipstick and
—Cold Cream — i anishing Cream— Tale P Oo WwW DB Ee R

ntine — Hair Cream





fy BOU 8 JO18





NF ~
You took better every day!

Miness, influenza, or even a | revitalizing course of Phyllosan
severe cold, lowers vitality _ tablets. Taken regularly, these
rapidly, but the restoration of tablets act as a gereral tonic,
health and vigour may often be — stimulate metabolism, and in-
tediots and projonged crease energy. They are “a
Speed up. recovery by taking a great help, a wonderful tonic.”

4

To speed recovery—take

PHYLLOSAN

and you'll be fit again sooner"













A BRIGHTER
LONGER LIFE

“‘ Life’s wonderful,”’
she says, ““I°ve
banitshea greasy skin.°’



e

Tamoxa is the secuet of ner perfect skin health, the only true foundation
of lasting loveliness.

The world famous dermatologist whe creates the ee es
ee a a’, ees ont Pee
preparations for each type of skin and age.

Mf your skin is too greasy, sen Aluatahaalincaranicced

restore its naturel and freshness.

te Gean your skin night and morning with coul, deop-eleansing
ENNOXA COMPLEXION MILK. It floats away imparitios,
leaves your skin wonderfully smooth and supple.

%& Restore the ‘tone’ of your akin, contract those open,
relaxed pores with daily applications of INNOXA ASTRINGES®
LOTION. (Over 30's use INNOXA OPEN PORE LOTION —
for « vei ¥ greasy skim or blackheads, all ages sheald uso
INNOXA SOLUTION 41).

%& Stimulate your skin with regular treatments ef the famens
INNOXA WHITE MASK; it contains the sunshine vitamin D
and is « complete ‘ facial’ in itself.



BuY ----

DURALIFE

AUTO BATTERIES
‘Ke Wee the day time always use INNOXA MATINE DAY CREASE on
SCKA FOUNRATIN LOrK. They bey pow Gale with Ebeonite Separators
powders beautifully matt all day.

|
URROND hout, prgporation COURTESY GARAGE
| Whitepark Rd. ROBERT THOM LTD. Dial 4391

jor the lovelenest that tats a SYelime ne

On Sale at BOOKER’S DRUG STORES (B’dos) LTD.
Broad Street and Hastings .

i 7 oo
SSS SSS









SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950

HENRY

NOI






BY WALT DISNEY
T TO RADIO OUR LOCATION,

SO DAT...

AX gai oe,
Vip A



AY

Y

C
\ \

WN]

IN

/

a




BLONDIE

»S& WH} Ii\)

BY CHIC YOUNG



‘SY

= |
SSS he
MY LITTLE EVERETT) _|
LOCKED HIMSELF — aye a
IN OUR UPSTAIRS })}~ OH, My
BATHROOM GOODNESS
“ a













—



<
\S\
ZL {

1 ]
i |

|
GOD
Qo 7%.

[amp o



We








p
>
:
fo
|
® rm) ce £. \
aR O'S BERS BF voune.



BY

inthe

SET FIRE TO THE
BUILDING. THAT/LL

I GOT A ROCK INSIDE THIS PAPER.
LIGHT UP AN! I'LL THROW IT WH THE
ROOF OF THE EXPRESS OFFICE!



WITH WHISPER

( THAT SEEMS TO BE THE THEORY,
AND NOW THIS PERSON-WHOEVER

atte _4 IT 1S =1S ON THE WAY HERE.

Whi I'M BEGINNING TO FEEL /

ii gal \\_A LITTLE SCAREY. yw
a

K. @ CANNON ......

SO, M'SIEU CANNON, YOU SAY IT WAS

SOME O7HEA PERSON ZUCCI DID NOT

SEE, AND WHO ARRIVED AFTER

a \\ CARESSE HAO LEFT ~WHO ACTUALLY

—“ >. MURDERED HIM?
Pr:

IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE

YES, WHISPER, | HAD A HUNCH
THIS CHARACTER SHOT ZUCCI.
| SAID THEY'D HAVE TO PAY
ME TO KEEP QUIET. THEY'RE {
COMING HERE TO MEET ME /
WITH THE MONEY, ! HOPE.












— ——
|WHAT A LOVELY KITCHEN!) IT'S A STEAL AT
ANO A PICTURE WINDOW! /SIXTEEN THOUSAND,
DES, I CAN SEE YOU AND I MIGHT EVEN
A | NOW, PUTTERING IN ) BE ABLE TO SHADE
THE FLOWER GARDEN le THAT iF YOU PUT

WHILE I MAKE
DINNER JUST
1

7B, UP ENOUGH CASH 6,
ake Ba _ THOUSAND...
3 | Iss














FOR YOu!





RITA LANA,
GLAMOROUS
HOLLY WOOD
QUEEN~~«

UH «IF THIS BOAT,
DOESN'T STOP
4 ROCKINGe«!4

SUNDAY XDVOCATE



| Wiring ins tallations

PAGE THIRTEEN

INDUSTRIAL
COMMERCIAL
DOMESTIC







Highest Quality Materials & Workmanship

-

Lighting Fixtures Wiring Devices

Wire & Cable

Lamps

Motors Switchgear

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.

Iweedside Road, %t. Michact







SHELL SILHOULITTES HILLMAN MINX MAGNIFICENT



The latest Hillman Minx Saloon. Four cylinder
1184.5 ex Independent front wheel suspension
Synchromatic finger tip gear Opticurve
windscreen U 1 yg control and vision,

Lockheed hydraulic brakee



OBA ha

The makers of HILILMAN CARS

recommend

L

exclusively

SHELL 9!

DOUBLE

SHELL SPIRAX 140 €

EON



A ,

a
i lA





FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCA



'E






























































































































































































































































CLASSIFIED ADS. |__rensonar _jreums vores HARBOUR LOG | SHIPPING NOTICES









SUNDAY, JULY 9%, 1950

ane ent




















































relephone 2508 Sn pein ene arti wand g rT WEEKLY AIR . Mire, Alexa Pavan, Metre, Donel Pare Ot adeaioemiaaniaidtieits
‘ | Tne, Bublig are Mereby warned wee" | aNice now mes “posible ssem{ In Touch With Barbados "George Puyan, Mrs. Marjorie Cu-|RQYAL NETHERLANDS | (7
THANKS 1 ie not hold myself responsible for | holidays Coastal Station rington, Mr. Ernest Carrington, Miss
| FOR RENT | urrvone contracting debt or debts in r Fh ut- ete inns ‘ De (West Indies) Lid. Gracita’ Faulkner, Mr. Walter Chambers, STEAMSHIP CO.

The Xe ‘ ct | hame by a written order sigr RATHO MILL TOWER HOTEL : “that they can now commur oe McFarlane, Mr. Charles The M.V. “T. B. Radar”
the t ende e f ———— = |by me wus wv ‘isi St. Vincent the following ships through thelr p, La Guaira: Sailing from Amsiercam, motierdam aceept Cargo and Pas-
sent wre °*- | HOUSES ae ~ Barbados Coast Station:— , Gittenzs 10.55 p.m é and Antwerp sengers for St. Lucia, St.
pressed syt a es ; “hk. tus S. Wallowa, Fort Townshend, Crys _ Miss Lilian Rojas, Mrs. Isabel Roja’,| yy 5 «WfERSILIA” J 7.8.11th. Vincent, Grenada. Sailing
Gecasic a 2 ae ONE-< Fontabélle. From : 8.7.90 : HE eeee aonctrue: Mrs. Tula Rojas, Mr. Miguel Rojas, Mr. MS. “HECUBA” August 45 8th Sautrddy. 8th July

y § r F | s anadle a » St .
oes M. Haynes 1s s two (2) flats— P and P Seafarer, Ramon Rojas, Miss Isabel Rojas, Miss} «ins trom Amsterdath and Dover
Ac I \ J of three (3) BE —===_ — <—e M Sand. Matena, Pet- Belem Rojas, Mstr. Ian Turner, Mstr. A VESSEL July 2ist
= . sh-basin, dining-| ‘. Hills, Sheaf Mead. Jules- John Turner, Mrs. Mary Turner, Mr $.S. “COTTICA” August 18th
paappenagnenertnets . et TOoR nnilefy ah alii > ceinenn Site Geotat John Turner, Mr, Antonio Puigbo, Mrs :
IN MEMORIAM | ; oe WANTED " Soe ees ite Foret Teresa Puigbo, Miss Caroline Lawson, Sailing to Madeira Plymouth j] B.W.1. SCHOONER OWN-
: 4) ee j 3 4 Garden State, Mormackite, Fort 4).. winifred Lawson, Mr. John Lawson, Antwerp and Amsterdam ; “
(4) bedroom ea | Box Richepanse, Ile De Noirmoutier, Kerne . Th Scholt Mstr Alfredo “WILLEMSTAD” July 25th ERS’ ASSO. (Inc.)
: : ar onl ce | 1.6.30 Ne Creck, M.V. Willemstad, Biyken, Cot- sebotts Mr. Carlos Scholtz, Mrs. Maria “ORANJESTAD” August 22nd Tel. No. 4047
, G la wal | 14.6.50-—26n i Jeanny, E ,cipator, Itinda, Harry ¢ As =F ~ 3 >, a. . 4
‘ 7 | \ , Jeanny, —_—- Sailing to Trinid Paramaribo, ©
‘ servant | HELP | ; Cit sua Clip, ‘Scholtz 6th July
€ 4 | | es : M.V thern Cities, Alcoa Clip- 56, D. t t uly, 1950
oO and 3245 for | oe ‘ Al r San Juan emera Cc.
Gc v © « ee 5245 for | “GENERAL SERVANT for housé work | sel PRESCOD B. O'NEALE Mr. Seafield Allen, Mrs. Nina Lynen,| $,8. “\COTTICA” July, 11th.
‘ an 75 & Cooking. Apply Mrs. Noél Goddard, | be io , _ eed Mr. Sven Johansson, ur. Richard Ryde, . “Hersilia” July 27th.
eT é not 1.7.50 —- Paynes Bay, St. James 8.7.50--2n| tt at fis O will be « ved { a Mr Charies Ray, Mine Elsie Barnes, Mr S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD., Mites

a Wg 7 BLUE HOt A Business stand with | ——<—<—<$<—=— — nies | Saturday Gh J ee npeee a ae - Fverton Prescot, Miss Olga Worrell, Mr renee _ : — ee -

: ‘ Tt | much future and @ commanding position | ,4 Qualified NURSE for St. Joseph's Aug del eae Walter McClean, Mrs. Christine Crom-

We k rec. Lucas Street. It has fixtures to start | #lmshouse at a salary of $60.44 per | —— well, Mrs. Leora Horsford e s e

J. E. Mi M. Gill. | business right away, For particulars, | month. Applications with Certifieate to NOTICE For Jamaica ana L a 1ona eams L 4S

9.7. 0-1 | aooly THANI BROS, Dial 3466 be forwarded to the Parochial Medical Mrs Josefina Barron, Mr. Harry
E 11.6.50,—t.f.n. | Officer, “Ellangowan,” not later than sT - 4 - = ww Barroh, Mr. Peter McClelland, Mrs. Ivy
nemory of my dear husband | ____ = Monday, 17th July, 1950 tendo eee ie, il ARRIVALS—By B.W.1.A.L. Pratt, Rev. Ernest Butler
1OLAS HUNTE departed | “RUILDING--at Cheapside Reef Road | Any Further Particulars cai be ob-| , Tandem. Incivding spec rine ee gub- | > FiQ™m Trinidad: rales, C. Est- For BRITISH GUIANA :~
nm July 9th, 1 | Large Building 50 feet by 20 feet suitable | tained from the P.M.O jeu w the plese fof the Législaturat | ene iso eee ‘ Marples. wil. ..Mr. Godfrey Watts, Mrs. Doreen Moe,| SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails
ve assed | for Club House, Casino or can be con- | A. A, B. Gta tae gilitioner Nuss a + the | Wicks BL McKenzie, hor, A. Tucker, Miss Constance Theobald, Mr, James Montreal Halifax Boston B'dos B'dos
be } | verted into rooms. Water on premises | Clerk, Poor Law Gttardians, | 410 Meo & * reat Mir | lang, Le, TOCRes, B- Tae Nolan Skinner, Hovertson, Mr. Eric Teixeira, Mr. Elliott
nd love be mine | Apply to R. Archer McKenzie, Victotia St. Joseph Aliishorise api Chagnten; D. Fisher, Viven Skt * Bascom, Mrs. Ida Gonsalyes, Mr. George] LADY RODNEY .. + 80 th June $rd July 5th July Mth July 15th July

L f ‘ | St. Dial 2947 8.7.50—2n. | 8.7, 80-—In Appltestio vee Frank Giley, N. Marshall, G. Gardinea. 1 Gonsalves, Mr. Clement Chatterton. CAN. CRUISER 12th July 15th July - 25th July 25th July

Yet we lov ‘ | Steet Sectiaisiietlietittale | ec. a | undersien os , From La Guatra: . ; For GRENADA :— LADY NELSON 22nd July 25th July 27th July 5th Aug. 6th Aus.
_Mrs. Maud H fe O'Donald ARMEN”.-Situate In Westbury New CLERK with previous office experi-| 1950 oO 2 DE Eldora Conger, Carolyn Conger, Judy Mis¢ Celia Mancini, Mrs, Phillipa | CAN. CHALLENGER llth Aug. 14th Aug 24th Aug, 24th Aug.
Clara oad. Apply to Mrs, S. C. Chandler. | ence — Salary $80.00 per month, Appls | ©'*"! Conger, Phyllis Louise Rohn, A. Sav-| stewart, Miss Lautina Samuel, Miss] LADY RODNEY .. 23rd Aug. 26th Aug. 28th Aug. 6thSep 7th Sep.

§.7.50—1n | Near Dercor Road Black Rock to The Secretary, Dowding Estates & |---| orenan, Rosette Savorman, Roderic Sa-| Monica Stewart, Lady Arrundell, LADY NELSON llth Sep. 14th Sep, 16th Sep. 25th Sep. 26th Sep.
} 8.7.50--2n. | Trading Co., Lid. with written appli NOTICE vorgnan, Pre 9 earee et one
a — cation 1.7.50.—8n Artonio Sanehez, Spence Sincla y

FOR ESPERANZA—St. James Coast now . : “ Schmidt ; NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
ilable for rent Fully furnished LADY for the Office at Hotel Royal ! ao i et it c. DEPARTURES—By B.W.1.A.L HARRISON COLLEGE B’dos B’dos Boston Halifax Montreal

wilihibicsetiie fodern convenience; excellent sea bath- | Apply in writing and f téon to the | 8" ws 2 7 - For Trinidad:
ib ene cotineerinte a | Modern, convenic Te athe, Ra Le ‘ truction Parochial | yyy Laurie Robinson, Mt, Fredetitk LADY RODNEY . 27th July 28th July 7th Aug. 9th Aug. 12th Aug.
AUTOMOTIVE } ——__—— : | Mea ¢ resic ¢ lends at ) Maing, Mrs. Adriana Maing, Mr. Gar, ENTRANCE EXAMINATION LADY iN 18th Aug) 20th Aug. 29th Aug. 3ist Aug. 3rd Sep.
FARAWAY, St, Philip Coast, fully fur- 4 | pk 5 . noe ms field Foster, Mr. Joseph ‘Igrylor, M. ‘The Entrance Examination for can- “y ODNEY .. 9th Sep. 21st Sep. 30th Sep. 1st Oct. 5th Oct.
: ' bedrooms, water mill supply,| MISCELLANEOUS f catic may be} Jonn Bayne, Mr. Martin Kellman, Miss | didates whose names have been listed DY NELSON 8th Oct. 10th Oct. 19th Oct. 20th Oct. 24th Oct.

CAR—Vauxhall 14 h.p. Saloon 1948] Lit plant, Double carport, 2 servants’ vt om the i Tre rer Bac _| Sylvia Hutchinson, Mrs. Rose Teixeira, | for consideration for admission to Har- Matis
rodel_1,900 miles, in excellent conai- | Toms. July, September on. Dial. 4476 Wanted to purehase One (1) Liquor! § will be req ees rison College, in September, 1950, will

$ Ria “ fe 5.6 1h c Ss. E. ‘o 10. whic . be re ed on the 3 hud
thh-Courteay Garage. Dis snié 25.6.50-—t.f.n fiemnce RAPPly 8 A fe 2 ade @ specifications in ) ====ai———aeee 7 * Ke Oe URE ie Viake or Aaa N.B.—Subject to change without Rotice. All vessels fitted With cold storage cham-

8.7.50—3n} = \GRANDALE,” St, Matthias Gap, 7.7,50.—t.t.n. | & q VOR LICENSE NOTICE Must attend on Friday 2ist and Mon- and freight rates on application to :—
ae 5 ces Hastings. Unfurnished, two-storey stone- | Lor t bir itself t a 24th July, between the hots of
pEAR-1M7 Super De Luxe | Ford. | wall, 3 bedrooms, etc., garage, servants'|Persuns to listen to ‘Jeffreys Beer contract to the lowest or an3 LIQ 9 10 a.m. and 12.18 p.m GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.
— dition, Tyres & Battery | room, Available August Ist. Ferreira] Landy de Montbrun and his artistes, to | Tende The application of Lillian Tudor, BOYS OF 10 YEARS AND OVER
New sont VINCENT GRIFFITH, 2881 9.7.50—2n.| be broadcast over Radio Distribution | ful applicant wilt be holder of liquor licensd No. 575 of 1950| Will be required on Saturday 22hd si
: . SS from 9.00 9.15 p.m. on 12th July s two (2) surities rrante fenne Nu . sspect of | July from 9.10 a.m to 1,30 p.m |
NEW MORRIS 10 ewt, Station Wagon LARGE YARD and SHED, apply next %.6.50—16 n. | o bind themselves ee eine ae board and hike (Luncheon Break 12.00 to 12.40) and on 1
Cah scat seven or seat ; can fold ‘and oe - bade bi - Sue Rion, . aS : TPCTEPORE: | OF be work shop with shedroof attached at Upper | Monday 24th July from 9.10 a.m. to CIE. GLE., I RANSATLANTIQUE
‘ corner Roebuck Street and Country For Rent or Boarding Two (2) Gen- F. F. PILGRIM, . wie Michae ¥ - {12.30 p.m
venicle be used er FORT ROYAL ‘ 50, — . ¥ 7 ’ Collymore Rock, St. Michael, for per 2
GARAGE LTD. PHONE 4904 } Read 7.7,.50.—t.£.N.} tlemen Large double Bedroom for the Par. Tréasurér, St , Thomas Sinsien 45+ tide ‘wald. ticente. at followin Candidates must use the Roebuck
6.7.50—3n. | MAPLE VILLE", St. John—Furnished j tight Party near to city. Dial — ; Sete se premises viz:—a board and shingle shop oe saseooe and reper to os Otice FRENCH LINE

a \PLE -E", St. J ed, 5.7 oe étache ssidence at Tweedside Rd in the first instance ey will require
Slag therahet alae in & . wan. | Wc. and Bath, gatas, good tea Gathing. attached to residence a tw neils, a rubber and an unused one re tee
CAR—Vauxhall. Velox 18 h.p. Pet | 4 healt) © codler spot. Long terr ; . | ' St. Michael 9 pencils, a ruuper b + Sailing to Trinidad Sailing to Plymouth
fect Condition two tone paint work proferr “apply, ©. B, Rock, Oistin, per ati Deo heel NOTICE Dated thi 7th day of July. 1960; crpcie Magi oe piney, SF eien acne g y

ve etociall toe ¢ Thrte a cuna - . 4 ‘ s NES, ? hie ‘ s rm the P » Magistrate, st d r as . .
eI ee et ace Rise Ree, | cutis: Charen pe €. atieyne, St. Mar-T wise, bought here Mrs. Vaughn, King’s] Applications fot a vacant Frizers A ee Sened VOLMAR TUDOR, | Which to write, 8.S. “GASCOGNE” 3rd July, 1950 10th July, 1950
Wichole ‘orned atan Horie saan 8. | earet 10h BE. Son 11.6.50—4".} Street or Faitehild & Probyn Sts nuity will be reedived by the Clerk of pag ha kt On Monday Sith Juny, they shoad 8.S. “GASCOGNE” 10th August, 1950 16th Aug. 1950
a 7 . . « “aa. tas iene Poe 8.7.50—2n the V up to 011 Wear aa n ~ * \ » con-| bring exercise books containing the s.s. ” > e ¢ f
6.501 fn NEWHAVEN, Crane Const, fully fur- N.B.--This application will be con Y : GASCOGNE 14th Sept., 1950 20th Sept,., 1950
a = | xedrooms, wate Il supply,, ~ - sidered at a Licensing Court to be held | work they have been doing at their “ ” 5 ve
CAR—One Morris (8) Car in good qon- | i salen a aera none aeapls STAMPS Used Barbados | Postage | be 1 nae od ie at Poli¢ o Court, District “A”, on Mon- | prevent schools. S.S. “GASCOGNE 8th Nov., 1950 14th Nov. 1950.
dition, Price reasonable, apply to V. EB. | ¢ vamnificent bathing beach, For| Stamps. Paving 50c. per 100 for mix ‘igh 7 day, the i7th day of July, 1950 at} Individual notices have been posted For further particulars apply to :
Moore, cor. Passage & Baxters Roads. | December, Dial 4476 tures 1c a ; valies, Ser d 5 00 | ey 5 li c'etbelk, .&.3n pe ars apply to :—
6.7,90—6n BiEL4.0. | mans Box. 1436 chewan er oat Ofice, Snr? BR. M ,ONES &, CC) LID A
ebnieeel — Dil ental ied itemise | PANY a "4 | ; aise re Police Magistrate, Dist. “A" . > a
Singer Sports ROADSTER in excel-| SUMMER HOME, Hastings ele Aa SO a op 9.7,50—In ¢ oe » LLD.- Agents.
lent condition mileage just over 4,000 | + ckley on the s WANED 4 a nar lork are ’ ‘Ben i . ons :
my ” . . ANTED TO BUY Vestry Clerk's Office * ernie
COLE & CO Ltd 7.7.50—6n contains: drawing, dining, estry R “a 4 —————
a. sekteantiannaermeas 4 four (4) bedrooms and ali yer cna oe PLAY HOUSE-—Spetify| Parochial Buildings PO COT
or nce ze an e ne cee teate eee se
Offers are invited for 16,500 sq. s "> | b r) d R ] E t t
ELECTRIC VULCANISERS Stenor, 7.50.—2n ep ; : : i RAYMOND JORDAN is the man feet of land on the seaside St 2 Have arpados hea State
fot a yorfect vuleanise Job. Also pateh — — Application for one or more mn ye SUIT and HAT James. First class beach Next to >
id. various sizes. Courtesy Garage Dial R—Pris Ford Prefect ilable PUBLIC SALES St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions at Hat to Clean your SUIT and Hé Galety. Thadine. s Ow gency
4291 8.7.50--3n] August to November. Most reasonable ‘i rison College will be received by th: Bay Street, APPLY — CECIL JEMMOTT X% } J
term: Responsible party Ring 3395 —— | Clerk of the Vestry up to 4 o'clock Oposite Combermere St. Phone 2146 % INDUSTRIAL—COMMERCIAL
REFRIGERATOR Canadian Refri- enings 5.7.50.—6n. AUCTIO p.m., on Wednesday July 12, 1950 % H i RESIDENTIAL
géfator for sale Leonard 2 yrs. old |} Candidates must be the sons of par ——— Z i“ > ® : "
7 cubic ft. in perfect condition *h=hL Eee UCTION j ishioners in straitened circumstances and | “lo LSSSSOSSS SOOO S SO SOF FO FISH, x ear ! omee melgboss rte
Tel, 8493 Ss I | N | must not be less than (9) nor more than | 434,454,¢5656.G5G5GGSSOSOOPOO® x & The i mgs Hotel Ltd.
i ) ye of age on 30th June, 1950,| %& x, $ 2
or Satle-=Contd. UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER | «1 ) e on ; ine, 1950, | ¢ § % ‘ ia
| to be proved by a Baptismal Certificate | S | Invite your inquiries on the
FURNITURE ntti, | IL have been instrueted to sell by | which must accompany the application. | " SALE x Mr. Peasant | following properties all FOR |
FURNITURE ¥ i) tesee Maton public competition at my office Magazine | Portia 2, ivelles : n aS be obtaines | FOR SA ua ¥ % * SALE : s
IRN IRE—one tt arece j- a , % , 4 1 1 ‘ the Vestry C 's Oo e } , . . |
amy Sideboard ay Mahogany Wagon GALVANIZE Pipes 14, and 2 inches 1 ine, on Thursday next 18th July at] at the estry jerk ic | % YOU CAN HAVE YOU























office will be closed for vacation

S Insufance Underwriters

H. H. WILLIAMS. x Marhill Street,
Dial 2676 ~ City.
<

4, >t,
BAECS. ZIPS COOL

Béds | or sprung Mattre Cup-| from $8.50 to $2.50. ROYAL STORE 7 Monday Adu: dulg me wa
tard, Kitchen Furniture ete, ete Ail 8.7.50-—2n

|
|

|

. |

on Monday 24th Ju Those persons}

li hew condition... Cabk “Ditheon'* Bt ——.——.——-—_| UNDER THE SILVER | whose giasses have not been. detiverce |
|

|

|



yper

of Quality reduced 8.7.50 | My
} on





Lawrence Gap. Telephone 8498 MEN'S AND LADIES SHOBS OF asked to enll it for them before

|
|

6.7. 50—3n distinction and quality at reduced | Sature
in prices, ROYAL STORE HAMMER |

Ophtha



d J okie . a ; t in sizes} 2 p.m. the dwelling house called | By Order E. C. REDMAN, “WINDS LODGE” x :
Se. Sarees. 8) eet eat oe also Galvanize flexible. corre Auto| “Mayaro” situate at Worthing, Ch.{ - —¢ lerk, St. Michael's Vestry WINDSOR % CANES INSURED EN-DAH_WIN, Pine Hill.
ite: chee Grn Mate: § 3 Gar. | Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone ae The oe ee - open yee mn) mee Sinks oi ice, | $13 . Bungalow
a 1 ‘ y Mr sale, 9 Meare Corey 26 dah to the front, drawing dining ~arochia uildings, . . ¢ .-. :
sh Gap, Worthing. Dial &% ait 8.7.50-t-£-n- | rooms, 2 bedrooms, Kitchenette, toilet | Bridgetown 28.6.50--8n| $§ Government =. i ee % By applying to E CREA MUSKOKA—Worthing
>. 7.60.—4n STALEY ASTTRTS . * & bath. It has a pine floor throughout, | — } Standing on One Acre wit ¥ Bungalow
te i ees | KHAKI SHIRTS— Guaranteed quali- : * ‘ . su : STORS CO. 8
meme | 4 MEAT SHINTO Oe SoA the: Gk de. Soindione areg vost : : ; ee % UNITED INVESTORS €O., IC REAM Seve Hone aeusee |
J : ing glance , 8.7.60-9n. | be sold. For inspection apply D'Are Professional Notice Six Acres attached, "4 LIMITED ; ain
withes to, seit Sette lie mmdern wn . A. Scdtt, Magazine Lane N % uy q PARLOUR St. James
Sar di Nine Wain, aittan, Ceentc, oeinted | LADISE SHO For all particulars apply. . .
Â¥
5
%,
X

y 8th July. H. Harcourt Cartes



SO9GB OP PPSOOOF FGF F9ES



gle Solid Mahogany Dining 7a On Thursday 13th, by order of Mrs
Table, seats 8 fortably, 10 a push, | - ‘ a ye > wi se or F 2
Me Kenzie, Victoria Street. Dial 2047," MATTRESS 4 ft, 6 ins. Spring Mat- alate owe, wets ell her Furniture

‘fis 9.7.50 in tress, perfect condition, Recently recov at Isdale, ‘ine Road, Belleville;
a ‘lared. Apply C. P. C, Weatherhead, Bay | Which Includes:— Round Tip-Top Table, |



27.6. 50-——5n















5 Bergere and Mortis Chairs, v |
p 9.7.50.—In. "
LIVESTOCK Sweet 17-50-1-) Writing Table, Waggon, Orname | MAPLE MANOR
MUM-—Stop, Just in time for the hot| Dinin« Table \seat 8), Book Cases glass GUEST HOUSE
PUPPIES—Bull & terrier & mastift| weather. Mum. in? two sizes, A safe| doors), Hat Stand, China Cabinet, Upright ” re

a Chairs all in mahogany: Pict
crossei: Apply Adam’s Castle Dial | and refreshing deodrant, used by every) Wore ana ¢ wary etur

nd Ce




| eep to the Blend that Pleases
} THAT IS

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With The Distinctive Flavour)



. Gla Opposite Hastings Rocks
zechoslovakian Table G
ee Services, Plated Wa











BOURNE,

8325. 8.7,.50—2n. | one Obtainable at Knight's Drug i Tel.—2021, Manageress

; 3 ae 9.7.50-2N- | Brass Tray and
POULTRY eres eae | Pits, Dine Cove
NEEDLES for your record player. . trie Toaster,

1! Kinds including Ruby and Sapphtre Deep Sle
PURE BRED RHODE ISLAND — 4 and | oni-permanent needles to play several | {incn Press, Fasy Chait all in mahox
6 months old Owner leaving Colony housatid | Teccneienen brah Ae, “eee ‘
Apply De Verteull Macston, Hastings, A. BARNES & CO., LTD. Electric Light Fitting

Phone



tand, Jardinieres and ¢
Good Telescope, Elec-
Single Mahogany Bedstead,
p Mattress, Dressinw Table

26.6 .49—-t.f.n







1 Mir Dresser,

and gs, Trunks, Valise, ORIEN’ } i irri
77 9.7.50—3n 24.5.50—t.f.n Coal Stove, Kitchen Utensils, Zine Top . | _ This Rum does not irritate the throat
and other Tables, Garden Bench, Garden ‘SE HABLA ESPANOL)

MECHANICAL NEW PLATTERS—Dinah Shore, Frank} Tools, Hose, Birds’ Bath, Rain Guage CURIOS, IVORY, TEAK, SANDAL SIP IT — TO ENJOY IT!

Bing and all the rest. Come] and Measure; 4 large English Pots and ae RY, BRASSWARE, TAP-
oe. i ns but quick. Palms, and other items. Sale 11.30 o'clock Bs 8, GLOVES, PERFUMES,
BICYCLE -— Hercules, “The Leader . arms Cs

Bicycle with three-speed gear, and light A, BARNES & are oa . BRA NKE! ‘ 4 :
Child's Bicycle. Archer Mc Kenzie, Vic pees ANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

toria Street. Dial 2947 9,7,50,—1n



















Blenders . . .

KASHMERE John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd.

Auctioneers
9,7.50.—2



Ta Ol, GOOKER — American perfection
BIKES, Hercules Silver King, on terms, | ‘vaught proof with ie almost
all models, Black, Green, A. Barnes & | new. Attractive Cook,

Co., Ltd 25.6.50—t.f.n 6.7.9.8» | REAL ESTATE
PLASTIC BELTS—For Ladies and By Public
MISCEL) ANEOUS









SE EY ~ 88







‘ . ; competition at our Office,
Children. In assorted Colours only] James Street, on Friday, the 14th Jul
~ Q each. The Modern Dress Shoppe, | i950 at 2 p'm, 5,984 sq. ft. of land
ANTIQUES— of _every description | Hroad Street 9,7,50.—3n (







Glave, China, old Jewels, fine Sélver, :
Warercolours Early books, Maps, Auto- PURE SHARK OIL-—$7.50 Per gal



1.9.49.—t.f.n 8.7.50—8n. | of Sale apply to



HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD


ATTENTION— Just received a new PLASTIC RAIN COATS—In_ white, Solicitors, James, Stre.t. |
chipment of Bre s Chicken Essence, | 4,e¢ pink. blue maize $4.80 each 1.7.50

4 the Tr and Convalescent he Modern Dress Shoppe, Bros Stree emer -
Strengtheni nd nutritious for build 9 HOUSE—-Georgeville on the sea Payne: |
sg the body up. Obtainable at Knight's

ee | Bay, St. James. Spacious open vera







































in case of negligence. In intel-
ligent households an iron rule



wonderful assortment of

DAY PHONES 2041 & 4441

A
; NIGHT PHONE §81-41

which has open verandohs, drawing end
also Mouth Organs ranging | dining rooms, 2 bedroon



er tol
pwards. The Modern D ~



& bath, kitchen, Inspecti ! lay fre



pe, Broad Street 9.7.50

exists for every wounds: ,,Put



rug Stores §.7.50.2n Tic HEAD TIES—A Fine Assort- | dah, bedrooms, Drawing and Diving
Floral Designs 36¢, each. | roor W.Cc. & Bath, Electric light & .
TURF UB ‘ , rn Dress Shoppe, Broad Street. | Govt. water, Kitehen & " 1 ( A )
5 2/- & each. Apply |! ; PPE Oo 7.80.—Sn. | room, Garage for small car a A.E S., F.V. 4
‘le Hall Corner josed yard; Servant toilet. All
2.7.50.—2n PIANO By Story & Clarke, in good ched enclosed with barbed
nm onditior Archer McKenzie, Victoria | Good Sea bathing; land can be re é
RPOYS SHIRT AND PYJAMAS Stre Dial 2947 9.7.50~1n.| Apply G. D. Burke, Chapel x ~ s 2 =
Feady made and made tc sure ' tae a aac 6.7 ) a
ROYAL STORE 8.7.50—2n 74 ., : ‘ ns i natnennnatnaingtet cimwen | ((
» ROOMS— Cool & Comfortable, fur ¢
OMS actin District Exeelipnt ON HASTINGS MAIN ROAD |) @ pga PERFUMES THAT
CANOE 10% feet long, in good con- | | Bathing. Dial 4669 HOUSE with four bedrooms, usual, (\) py Z if a
@ition, Seat one or twe Single and | ™* 9.7.50—1n. | public room: ) LAST
@ouble paddle Phone 2483 BUNGALOW Wall", two bedroo »))
76 eaten g ar tt r 5
9.7.50.—-1n SHIRTS—Made to measure within = nae aes "partect ' Stee \\ T n ] r GOYA—Perfumes, Colognes
€ yurs ? Ta’ P anc s~ - ’ a
Se NOUS Er arene | conveniences, As ing island ; }} ly y Powder (Face and Bath)
bag a. " 8,7,60-€n, | 1 am. instructed to sell them together at; }} A very beautiful assortment
an attractive price, furn or unfur- | 5) |
eer as hand on | anes: Apply to L. & Cottle | to choose from
TAILORS TRIMMINGS Apply to Catford & Co 50 in \\} |
Ward & Speneer Ltd., Marhill St., Ae cee en doped | Ta | :
Bridgetown, Gents’ Outfitters, and Sta- |~ PROPERTY fae Watton at nas , THE COSMOPOLITAN
Often cause dangerous infections tioners ¢ Street next to Yacht Chub, consisting of Made from ,
ee 5845 sq. ft, of land and a stone house

|

apply to D'Arey A Scott, Magazine








}
i
NEW WHEAT |

\

a.m. to 5 p.m For other f ticula

Purol on”, because one knows, YACHT "Dauntless" Intermediate Class | Lane 4 5.7.20, an. | 4
15 ft 5 in x $8 st. 1. in




a ae









?
" au Intel \ (Wreshly Ground) |
that Purol is deliciously softening W. Skeete (Next Roxy Thea-| }OUSES One at Welche ! Just what you were waiting i
; . fo. re) or Wesley Hall Bovs'| one at. Gilke i ( ) 1) ¥ é +

and healing and because all in School 8.7.50.=2n, | with Sant atRGneel "arnt i} Lik Something You Wail Appreciate
fections can be prevented by light, & out alfices, and } 42c. PER LOAF {Ii
spplying this brilliant skin- | | ~~ Sew nae AA : ee ia : ii me
icaaay" 4.7.50-5n. | )) t it at PURITY ())

y CHIROPRACTIC a Cvcmar Ahaviaie waaon i GARBADINE in Emerald Green, Pink, Red, Gold, Lime Green

and White @ $1.30 per yd.



RESTORES HEALTH LANL






. Graeme rtall Terrace Dial 44°76 ”
ihe ok. ded BUADeE PRA nT BO 4 SHANTUNG in Blue, Rose, Cream, Pink & Gold @ $1.16 per yd.
cr ville”, Upper Bay St. (near Espla- _ aAafatatatat. Cot taPctabd.teuaa 1950 STYLES LADIES SHOES in White, Black & Brown Suede
——$—$—$——— | 2881 Daily (except Holidays) HOUSE—VILLA DUNCAN ( b POOPIE CPAP APBD



Prices ranging from $11.36 to $12.37 —Cuban Heels.
Also DRESSES, SUNSUITS, SHORTS & SLACKS Etc., Etc.

nade). Chiropractic service also latest | Paynes Bay. Spacious op ‘

“| method of electrical massage. Phone | 2 bedrooms, Drawing and Dinine rooms
25.6.50-E.Sun.|W-C. Bath Govt. Water and Electric
Kitchen spacious, enclosed yard and

—————— Servants’ Toilet, Stock





TEN FRIENDS









LALLA LL EEE








































BICO ICE CREAM, CROWN

° S9GSSSSSSSSOSS9S SISOS







nstanee to all candidates
| f plication n be obtal Department of Education,
E * : » Vestry* Cler + 8th July, 1950
eer ; 5 , | ) 3 ‘t - 9.7.50—2n
‘ ‘ 1.50—4n. | wth : | A tchine ‘ a (POPS SSSOSOIIGE FFP

‘ S ridgetown 1.7 ¥

"Apply to * ; ISE" 5.7.50-2n | LAND S

ELECTRICAL Apply to "MANSION HOUSE”, | NOTICE BE ADVISED %

2 contoenind "

=> ae



PINE HOUSE—St. Michael
ABBEVILLE GUEST
HOUSE— Worthing
DOVER—Christ Church.
Building Sites and
Acreage
RICES—St. Philip. |
} Acreage |
| BLOCK OF FACTORY
BUILDINGS—In the
City

opened at Hastings
(opposite Harts Gap
serving

PINE, ORANGE, GINGERS,
SODAS, HOT DOGS ete.

Drop in and Refresh Yourself



U. J. PARRAVICINO



Our shipment of

1 ’
RAT TRAPS
has arrived just in time for the
RAT CAMPAIGN
Buy Yours Today.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Central Foundry Ltd.—Proprietors)
Cnr. Broad and Tudor Streets.













| LS -
ith frontages both on James Street
nd Busby’s Alley) together with the
nuildings thereon the property « the
granhe, etc., at Gorringes Antique Shop, | 9; sic, for 3 sills. At Westmoreland | Est. of Mrs. M. EB. G. Wiles, cee'd @
edjoining Royal Yaeht Club. Plantation. St. James For further particulars and conditlons | me

AUCTIONEER





Plantati Building
SOS 4 EEO? CVDLPLO SSS PDDOPPO SOO,
«3a x
a %
BAKERS &
’,
x
g
+
PROVE ITS $
%
x
%.
EXCELLENCE &
%
%
IN THE MAKING OF §
x
%
SALT BREAD ;
%,
x



Always Demand

APLE

NY
x
‘
%
4
pens, bearing |. onderfi i whe
fruit trees with One Rood jand attsehed | § Mrough, HOLETOWN BROADWAY WRESS SHOP.
. 150 yards from Sea Apply as above. |X
ge G. D. Burke hae Eo : ‘
in 3 Days 4 oo memes
s
nate wour fect h, smart and burn 1% THE x :
adly that they nearly drive you crazy? ms } , %
be rida ae Gitar fons bLUE perry partouR § RELIANCE FREEZERS
that has up hout the world, and THREAD CUTTING 1% cdl nei S 1 and 2 GALLON SIZE.
Foot, Singupo Dhoby ttch Se t WELDING % yourself with BICO Ice ¥ — AL o-
getirid of the trouble until you remove the BATTERY CHARGING |% CREAM; ICED MILK LEMON- g MAIZE AND CORN MILLS.
Zerm cnuse, A new discovery, ¢ 1% ADE ROWN tINKS
cern cause. A new discovery, catled Nixoe METAL TURNING % CoCd COLAS & SODAS; HAM $ on AND a }
th gering in $4 Hour and Gite teeth MOTOR REPAIRS 1% curre CAKES & YOUR ¥ ICE SHAVERS. “ * the
the siin sort, smooth and clear in 8 days See — % OLD TIME “HOME MADE & CALL AND SELECT YOURS AT ONCE — ”
ixoderm is so successft ruart * BREAD % es
to end the itch Ma aitarsne rite ‘ 1 1%
o en wn ; Ntctd gna h Lene eee noe Suny, GURDON OLDEN RS Stop and cafry on a package ¥% Established I ated
h Fimpleas Acne, tecile’ aad Bins. 1% of Tee Cream with you x stablishe T HERBERT Ltd neorpor at
worn of face or nody on tioniy beck one BARBADOS GARAGE, 1% sake RG % 1860 ‘ ‘ 1926 ¥
turn of ,mpty carton, Ask chemist for Nixo- x HUTSON CORNER STORE, 9 f s LR is G iT LL : %
Nixoderm germ today. 138, Roebuck S’. : Mal 3812 1% He 3! ) 10 & 11 Roebuck Street. % T. GEDDES GRANT LTD.—Agents x
16 fuaran- . g ) ¢ >
F tee protects : x St } aati 3
or Skin Troubles you. 1/9 | She has Gas for Cooking [% 66 $$$$S$556599566959965 it = } 556559599099 SP POFFO PSSST SEO























CROWN A CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT BY DRINKING THE NEW CR
_ YR i '







eee







————e

Ws GINGER ALE
]












INDAY, JULY 9, 1950

GOVERNMENT



NOTICES



















CHURCH SERVICES


























SUNDAY Al

























VOCATE





















PAGE FIFTEEN

_ BRITISH INSULATED CALLENDER’S

































MORAVIAN St. Hill 7 p.m Hayne
CONSTITUTION SWAMP AND CONSTITUTION RIVER. | _ ROEBUCK STREET—11 o.m. Morning 13th. instant Meeting
4% Service 7 p.m. Evening Service Preacher © WHITEHALI Miss S. Rouse y ay
d persons who have placed r ca a + ice” a ay Rey Ernest New i p9r M Blunt .
on Abie ins the C placed or caused to be placed any matter | “GRACE HILL—li a.m. Mor GILL_ MEMORIAL—11 a.m. Mr. ¥ 4
or t . in or - ne Constitution Swamp and all persons owning | vice Preacher Mr Francis 7 Deane 7 p.m. Mr. D. Scott e
any matter or thing placed or lyin . Maan ohtiast ; Evening Service Preacher Mr. Al HOLETOWN—8.30 am. Rev. R.A
or Constitutic Riv » oe é: § in or on the Constitution Sw amp FULNECK—11 an Morning Ser Culiough 7 p.m. Mr. G. Maeville “
utution iver are required to remove such matter or thing Preacher M Greene p.m. Evening BANK HALL—9 90 ar Mr V.S
, > t} : ten - . 7 c Cullough Wea
by the 15th of July, 1980, and no person may place any matter or | Syisey react, Mr. “Beane ° =o *
ung in or on the Constitution Swamp or Constitution River during | vice Preacher Mr, Downe ll am. Mr. H DIRECT EXPORTS SOME £16.500.000
the period of the 15th of July to the 3lst of October, 1950 onnor HILL—? p.m. Evening Service ’ Rev. F. Lawrence 44 4 ps x * .
, ars . ies ; i Pa r , * eacher Mr. O. Weekes s 4 11 a.m. Rev F. Lawrence
_ person Ri the terms of this notice will be liable to pro- DUNSCOMBE—11 a.m. Morning Ser- ney Communion 3.30 p.m Mbieinten
ceedings under section 18 of the Departmen i rs é vice Preacher Mr. Suire 7 p.m. Eve- Meeting
port Act, 1945 Pp t of Highways and Trans- ning Service Preacher Mr. Smith BETHESDA —9. 30 Rev. P
. THE ST. MAIER LUTHERAN CHURCH fence Holy Communion 7 p.m. M :
5.7.50—2n Iw GREEN, BRIDGETOWN auseve THE FIFTH Annual General Meeting of British Insulated and will further increase now ility by their experience, ability
. Open Air service 7.15 p.m. at the EETHEL—i1 am. Rev. H.C “on i read ° = . > aver ne ser‘
same spot Fairchild Street 7.15 p.m. 7 P-m. Rev. B. Crosby Callender’s Cables Limited will be held on July 13 in London. tt “toe th italy and even and long service
— eof 8 Boal or The following is an extract from the statement by the j2Pa™ have actively entered th«
eo ev "Donohue, C. D Mr. F. Moore +) . 1 > Pe oa" ists
Speaker, for each service and you are , BELMONT —s1 am. Mr. J. Lovel airman, Sir Alexander Roger, K.C.LE., circulated with the . The Outlook
a a eal ‘1 ‘ warmly encouraged to listen to “Bring- p.m. Mr L. Mayers report ¢ Ace , , 1e
Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- | ing Christ to the nations” at 6.90 pm. . Monday, July 10th Missionary Meet wa and Accounts:— For over 60 years now we a1 nome, the past yeat has been
ment) Order, 1950, No. 24 which will be published in the Official | SY"day be Chairman: Mr. F. Ward. Speaker As a result of an expansion in both the volume and value have maintained, in countries ....)),\, for the change from the
Gazette of Monday 10th July, 1950. eo Sea sare... Paeaciete Os i ie of turnover, and the generally favourable trading conditions overseas, large Branch Off Hers’ to the Buyers’ Market, a
$ ist ‘ 9 an Mr sencia x ss , : eee , > encies itl ‘ “s
Ol aie Bridgetown Si. Hil! 9.30 p.m. Missionary Mest. | CXperienced during 1949, Profit on Trading of the parent Com- aids tenia > sagen ; ange which was to some extent
. 6 | . ; E ee 7 Tone: n, 3 r A ease. 4 * Tne 4 . . y s é ech ¢ ¢ - Bc tabi “ :
» Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling] ; Upper Bay Street = Rev. HO Peso crane. Speaker: | pi Investment Income and Special Receipts at £4,828,954 218” ' ge centuated in our industry by the
ne " : undays 11 a.m, and 7 p.m. Wednes- né 7 p.m. Mr M nical staffs. And of equal im { .
prices of “Pilchards-Canned are as follows :— day - Allister ? G Mei show an improveme fF £283,743 cuts imposed by the Government
: qivs 8 p.m. A Service which includes ; jShow an improvement of £283,743 portance, the closest persona! he ‘ :
Testimonies of Christian Science Heal. . PROWIDENCE— 11 apnp Re B 4 -~ ip intained with then on the capital expenditure of our
Wholesale Price Retail Price ing Sunday. July 9, 1960 Crosby Holy Communion 7 p.m. Mr. E |_| advised you last year that your Assets, Investments and Current ee aa ben wit ; them rincipal customer groups, the
ubjec 7 ~ ne 30ar vere ‘ . 46 é also sustome tior se stries vi
Article (not more than) (not more than) | meni | °* MSS" Sermon: SACRA- “VAUXHALL —9 a.m Rev, B. Crost Boi 1 were providing Deprecia~ Assets amount to over £42,500, 2) og ‘t maak taint tel a 7 een eee ene
THE NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH Holy Communion 7 p.m, Mr. GC. vid | tion of Fixed Assets on the basis 000. The additions made to Re to m cae a Sceht “ a y e devaluation of sterling
PILCHARDS. $16.5 ‘ OF GOD waite of their original cost, at least until serves have further strengthened COUNTY OF pr er eg re eer ee ee
? se $16.56 per case or ST. MICHAEL ‘ such ve as price levels were the overall position Capital ana interest in the five Continent Devaluation in itself is no long
Canned carton of 48x1 lb. . a m baptismal Service at Brandon's 3 me abilised. The charge on Revenue Reserves (applicable to which has not been visited in term solution without its corol-
pe each Baptizers Revds. A. R. Browne U T 7 | = £449315. which : As ¥ © 1949 by a Direct 1 senior lary, name » bre 5
tins. 38c. per 1 Ib. tin AR. W. Wenkés, Ih whe cs os ; Ss. an s Rush thi basi is £443,315, yhich B.I.C-C.) now amounting to ap- beta . by a Direct rot senior Ps Me 3 a ~ ons = open of
$0.24 Service at Eckstein Village 7 p.m. Goo. represents an overall rate of proximately £€10,600,000 ember of our Staff Thes« 1e system of controls, of prices,
.24 per case or land Rev. J. B. Winter ear I on the original cost of buildings * re journeys are of the utmost value. Of subsidies and oppressive tax-
carton of 48 x & i _ CHRIST CHURCH nto Battle and plant, and is considered ade- And E t Business ation
lb. tins. 2lc. per % Ib. tin, | ‘ P'™- Cox Road Rev. E. W. Weekes quate to write off existing fixed Home And Expor USINESS Research And Development ‘) es en
; eadeee ae GEORGE ‘ @ From Page 1 assets by the end of their antici B1t:¢ lhe generation and distribution
8th July, 1950. 780 __9 nm. Sweet bottom Rev. A. R. Brome by two small craft, with 40] non .. 1 mein ka Turnover for the B >.C of electricity is vital for building
9.1.50.<~2n, BRIDGETOWN ee ARMY millimetre shells he said. It was joe yg ea ne ee ed Group showed an _ increase of We continue to expend con- up competitive expanding produc-
? . 5 iirec P > § ) Ss se «4 sider: 5 eo ° ena re a
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 p.m. Con thought at first that these were | sar up to niadécnaut baer tatels Over £6,000,000 an! ee os er ent oe aoe i It surely is one of the pro-
n 2 ° - ‘ ats Ss P >is . p p> 3 or ve
PART ONE ORDERS Prohen ae 7 bam Salvation Meeting Submarines, but a closer look by is at present covered by the Capi with 1948. Increased prices ot shat _— . Us oe jects which should be pressed on
‘ i ajor Smith . ‘ . ——" * . —— sia “C » extent ve not only maintain bu! and have ; > capits i re<
Major 0. F ae ED i WAT Lata TOR STREET No sup Seen tas as gunboats. }tal and Revenue Reserves, but ra oo niger’ 9 itu at nanevel ceasclessly improve our techni- quires Without" . one co
} ' ‘ . ’ | 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 ae supmarines had yet been sight- | your Directors again stress p SOE ta Tugnee youre a n the . > tr : ‘ ectricit:
iui jcopesae tie | pany Meeting 7 pm OS RRS ed hE emphasiced sig a) = " farther salamat a but there has also been a real = be the we of our trade abundant supply of electricity
_ | Con 7 . : 8 ; ee . i é , _ ~t
a ‘i store - .
: ‘os _ " | Meted by pMajor Rawlins (R) He said North Korea was dotted | these reserves against contingen- increase in the output volume of 2) Maine and Abroad. It is neither out industry, nor meny
; eae 7 July 50. | 11 om. eRGHTSTOWN with dirt airstrip hic? i | cies B some of our main products clear that the best prospect of others in this country, can hope
‘OMMAND a oliness Meeting 3 Pom - rips which provided s aU _ ’ : . finals iv ones et ie ‘ . ohne “ .
Major A. R. Foster assumed command thé Cadet Corps w.e.f, 20 June 50, vice | PANY Meeting 7 p.m Salvation Meeting airmen with excellent aitcreft dis- ere eee Export trade gen- ( ) produce cheaply and be com-
Major A. S. Warren | Preacher: Sr. Captain Campbelt versal facilitie " : A large part of the Co "s Turning now to Export busi- erally, lies in the fleld of petitive in the markets of the
2 CONDEMNATION BOARD CARLTON persal facilities Bee ee ee pany Ss ess. I am sure all Stockholders products of a highly technical world
The Acting C.O. has appointed the following officers as members of a Condem- | !1 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 p.m, Com. _ 4S they were pastmasters in| income continues to be taken by UWit) | Ml eee know that the nature and as time goes on it *,-~
nation Board for unserviceable equipment : pany Meeting 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting Camouflage, it was necessary to get | Government in the form of taxa will le . the ic C.. de posslble War. rae neta etn: An active home business is to
Major C. E Jeatherhead, President Preacher: Lieuteng “id . a - ; ; SEs | \ . ¢ s 9.979.095. Direct Exports of the 5 poss P Ww y have even to 7 . oe
Lieut, S. E, L. Johnson, Member DIAMOND Cnet cown really low to locate planes|{%0" Which absorbs £2,079,095, Direc , ited to some £16, “export” more and more of out as to so many Industries, a
2/Lt. S.'G, Lashley, Member ne . ORNER on the gr 1. Th ? ‘ . compared with the Net Profit of Group amountec o Ss : pre-requisite t st s Over
‘ oo ‘ » 7 rs : i 4 a.m. Holiness Meeting 3 pr ~ . on ground, he Korean troops .0 22 ‘ ; : c , 7 ‘rease ove technique as well qQuisite On rong ver as
The Board will meet at the QM Stores at 1700 hours on Thursday 13 July $0. | pany Meeting 7 p.m. Sslvation steno, were also fast at lear ; £ 2,058,660 left available. Despite 500,000 showing an increase ¢ ! busines 1 the .
The President will render a sixned report of the proceedings to the Orderly | Preacher Lieutenant. Moore” Meeting * - ra ee at learning bow to| the continued warnings of Indus- the substantial figures of th ot ee andthe two: together are
pa | heitha 3 < toed nd cine sper
8. AUDIT BOARD 1 FOUR ROADS Sak tie : a = motor tru¢ ks | try that this country can only previous year To give a com Organization vital to prosperity
The Acting CO. has appointed the following officers to an Audit Board to} pany’ iting 7 Meeting 3 pm. Com. *"¢ ey e cover from strafing, he | maintain its standard of living by plete picture of our contributior Pew ta :
audit the Regimental Funds A/c, Barbados Regiment Preksher Limitation wee Meeting “dded.—Reuter. constantly increasing and improv- towards the export drive accoun In March last your Board ap- us was never more import-
Lieut. P L. Co Beterkin 3 PIE CORNER. ing its productive and earning should also be taken of our In- pointed Mr. W. H. McFadzean ®t than it is to-day. Competition
2/Lt. S. G. Lashley a. 3 Holiness Meeting 3 pm. Com- SEPARATE LIVING capacity a policy demanding direct Exports, but unfortunately (a Deputy-Chairman of the in Overseas markets is becoming
’ Eta a pereae ites is still in” progress and all those who have not : SEVENTH DAY Rov Meeting AREAS IN S. AFRICA the retention of adequate profits these cannot be accurately com- Company) Chief Executive more and more acute and is being
a ’ se ¢ e no SaVEr ITIST e ndue on née » the re > . . , : ;
yet fired their course will get in touch with the R.S.M. as soon as possible , KING STREET—Pastor ©. oe Reid in I dustry the Chancellor has put The figure would, how Director, a post of the greatest experienced from an increasing
5 OAneEEy OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING 17 vo speak on a subject of Sedphidey at CAPETOWN, July 7 not seen fit to plan any relief and ever, be considerable because a importance, which, | am sure, he number of countries But given
Next for duty GOVERNMENT HIL ; The South Africa Government "@S,. indeed, exacted an even substantial proportion of our will fll with distinetion reasonably balanced load factor
Orderly Officer Lieut. T. A. Gittens | Parchment, the new ae tat secrs, today promulgated the Group oP oe toll by increasing the rate sale; at Home is being incorpo a from the home market we are
Senet eerie 233 L/S Blackman, A. L. O tary of the Leeward Islands Men, Areas Act, 1950—designed to sep- Of Profits Tax as from Ist October, ated in plant and machinery The existing and potential prepared to meet this competition
it. dee 4 nds Missior " y . $
Orderly Serjeant 214 Sit htm ak a sve ‘ arate white and coloured people 1948 ultimately sold overseas kas of the Company and to do. our best to maintain
a ” . 4L, vent Avenue ane. a $ fart : . i for man t , orsens
” ey vill rade at Re ental H $ a 7 S. E. White, the newly an ‘e—Pastor into different living areas The results achieved have en Sched errs nd indeed improve on our
A ran sw parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thursday | dent will be the preacher ected Presi- The Act provides “for the estab- | apied us to place £1.500.000 ti Whilst the great bulk of ou: countries demand increasing at
ae me M, lk D. SIERWES-COX. major saup@tETHODIST seRvicrs. | lishment of group areas, for con~| Reserves, of which £1.000,000 has direct exports has been made to tention being given, to ensure “hievements
S.0.L.F. & Adjutant, ' Me Culleuge REET a.m. Rev. R. | trol Or acquisition of immovable | heen allotted to Contingencies Re- those countries in which we have that the factories will be profit
The Barbados Regiment. PAYNES Bay.) Rev. H.C. Payne | property, and occupation of land! serve. In an international business been firmly established for many @bly operated and developed. ~ .
fo ee ie ee MW | and premises”.—Reuter. like B.1.C.C., it is essential to have years, I am glad to say that We must also be more regularly
1 SSS - a substantial sum set aside to very agreeable proportion has posted with the technical devel-
Ror 9 SAN aren | meet cor vencies worued from other countries in Opments in all part of the
ARL, SAND meet ntingencie
GARDEN MOULD a which we previously have doi world which might be of interest
LIME and A WARNING! A ipared with the Balance little or no business I told you to us Mr, D. W. Aldridge, at
RLOCK STONE { Sheet alue of some £4,500,000 last ye our determination te the unamime invitation of hi
{ ss Z for d, buildings, plant and find and develop new markets, Colleague ‘ the Board, has
{) Dial 4503 moet € a it is es sone and this policy is being energeti- ie relinquish his position
a 1e present replacement cos 5 iN cally pb ed It was never an Executive Director so that
4965604ebada nee | the neighbourhood of £15,000,000 jyere essential the t to-day ean, apart from his f
ROO SSS POOOOSOOSSOSSOOSS | : ir me essentia lan it is to-day; : ' om his normal
7 é] 4 Salisiying 1 Sein in ti i everal of our oldest and utiles as Director, devote hi
. ways, but one which may wel ar - 5 rergies , — ‘
‘ HAVE YOU GOT x most valued markets local manu- Crergies by personal visits abroau
| r F
g A % | present its own problems when the facture of some of our preducts ¢ this work, for which Mr, Ald ~ ya eae tena
COLD or COUGH x time comes for replacement is becoming more and more es- ‘'dge has outstanding qualifica of boils, ulcers eru) ms. D.D.D.
% %} , tablished, anc although in most fons payee voy Pea relief by
$ | : Ce ca we have a technical and netrating deep low the skin to
$ IF S ¥ Group Accounts é . : ,
% O TRY » x pi financial interest, {t would be of ,, At the ame time Dr, L.°G eae poisonous germs and brings
. DG ‘ These show s lar t greater benefit to employment azier and Mr Hu J Stone ealing even to the most istent
¢¥ S » B \ hese show a similar picture : ere elected to the Board as E eores, GET A BOTTLE TODAY
¢ t y {\to that of the parent Company, here if the output were supplied oard aS EX Obeainable fi all P
% w | i ) 1 iy cy an any ROR ao. ol Home Fact py ©cutive Directors, Both of these nable from all Chemists,
% f) 1 Th ’ Rainy weather and damp- {{!| the Net Profit of £2,881,797 show ur ne actories men have given long i val ’
$ | ness bring on Rheumatism. {{!| ing an increase of £212,063 over Other markets political conditions coy vige A thal knoe ivakieet! eens ents
x XI {| 1948. This Net Profit is after @d the shortage of foreign cur- jioc. and their appointment [Miso use 0.0.0, Seap F. B. Armetrong
4 x atic ‘ .vne . + er . , tives pre “8 {fe . - lo
R % | But Rhewmesian and Pains ) sro vidas de a sum than Tency are severely restricting pr ewe 2 effect to the ex _for sensitive skins iidvoenl
5 | % % Stead gent can be con- \)| £3,150,567 for taxation whic nd indeed in some cases making : at Re ton of recruiting ‘to © ae
4 > whe ¥ s i "3 may have a paralysing effect on impossible, the purchase of im- ‘he Board, from as far as possi escri 10
\ B Coiua Bronce sore Stes SIM SEHR) hte yersopmen Ned xoods, And. everywhere ule within the Company, men
a ® Hoarseness, Brunchial Astnaa, % | va 4 \\ In the Balance Sheet, Fixed « petition i becoming keener who have proved their suite
@ Whooping Cough, Disease of the ¥
ba Chest aud Lungs, ete., ete. x Keep a bottle handy ( remem
S x | ; 1 0
A Security Policy taken with UNITED INVESTORS CO. LIMITED, | % r % On Sale at...
will answer this question in years to come. 1% C. CARLTON BROWNE 3
For further information apply: % Wholesale & Retail Druggist * k i e : ae ,
os . \ HIZAIS Drug Stores
UNITED INVESTORS CO. LIMITED, S$ 136, Reebuck St. Dial 2813 %}) : \
Insurance Underwriters, 9 % f
Marhill Street, City PLL CCLO LALA SCPC |\ BEFFELLADL DDL ESSE | 9
aia ctiiactttaiel
ee }
)
{

SELECT THESE Emglish Fine





—

Bome China

: (INC. IN BR. GUIANA)
|



FIRST NEW ARRIVALS OF JAPANESE RAYON GOODS

* These Goods are Cheaper than Anything of Similar Quality from Europe or U. K.

NOw!!
lea Sets.

MAPS—imperial and Political Wall Maps of the World. |

THERMOMETERS—2 kinds
ANEROID BAROMETER, etc.

— also —

f There is a quality about Bone China prized throughout the
world. The grace and charm of your Tea Table is enhanced

by the exquisite designs of these Sets.

WIRE TRAYS — WIRE-BASKETS Now on display at :— |
: ial ie : Si r 2) »ANES ‘ON 1S—36” ; $ 54 yard
and many other Office Requisites. LOUIS L. BAY LEY, JAPANESE RAYON VOILES—36” v. de M4 yare
e JEWELLERS Zolton Lane & Victoria S1. PIQUE RAYONS—36” v ‘de Pe
- Sole Representatives for The Rolex Watch Co. i r ' eee
ROBERTS & co. — DIAL 3301 \ Please see our Show Window at the Aquatic Club { ( RAYON FUGI—36" wid 72
i | 5h ” i si. ; « ”













CREPE BACK SATIN—36” wide. a0 is

PURE SILK PONGEFR--36” wide 200

RAYON SHIOZE—30" 60

wide



@ NAIL SCISSORS

@ TWEEZERS

e@ FILES

@ SHAVING BRUSHES
@ RAZORS



FLAT CREPE —36” wide

SPECIAL RUM

The Rum of Royal Blend



PIG SKIN—36” wide.

”

there
: ) KING COL
|








and



MURRAY'S MILK STOUT i li is now over
CALL IN TO-DAY AT The Stoutest of Stouts y\ {"
COLLINS’ SRF STORES ss cee & Oa. Lip |_| period the Cost of Everything has Advanced—Especially Taxation.
Broad an udor Streets. Grocery and Provision Dealers et
RSS SASS | ) IN 1988—INCOME TAX 124% of Profits

TN 1938—TRADE TAX “a 73% do.







OPENING :-

Just what a PAROCHIAL TAX, POLICE, FIRE BRIGADE

& HIGHWAY do.












SCOTCH TAPE Fisherman

HAIR CLIPPING MACHINES
STRAW BROOMS, 3 and 4 STRAP

IN 1950—INCOME TAX do.

374%

Requires eas IN 1950—TRADE TAX do,

12 %



PAROCHIAL TAX, POLICE, FIRE B
& HIGHWAY amounts a

a Biles Ye
Ten Years ago since WE Imported Japanese (rods, and in that |
|

GALVANIZE WIRE NETTING, LACING WIRE, FISH }
HOOKS, SEINE TWINE and MANILLA ROPE.

We can now supply all your requirements for the



RIGADE

24% do.



JOHNSON’S STATIONERY season. re i} The Government now takes 52% of the Profits of every Business
— AND — My

ELL

Lumber & Hardware

in Bridgetown

HARDWARE. N. B. nO Ww

Dial 3206


¢%

PAGE SIXTEEN





Communists
Undermine
Philippines

MANILA
The Communist invasion of
South Korea strengthened a con-
viction among Filipino defense
leaders to-day that Communist
agents have worked 30 years to
undermine the Philippine Islands

and punch a wide hole Ame

ica’s Far Eastern defense line.
These Filipino officials say that

almost since the founding of the
Soviet regime, Commur agent
have been active throughout the
Far East and that their activities
have more often been treacherous
than not





Driven Home



The situation in Korea has
driven home the dangers anc
highlights these conclusions by
defense experts on these islands

} Filipino Communist, organ-
ised and instructed originally by

American Communist party
members, now take orders from
their Chinese Communist masters
at Peiping by radio and other
means.

2. Chinese Communists repre-
sent the Philippines at Commun-
ist meetings in Bangkok, Hong-
kong and Peiping.

3. Chinese Communists, work-
ing in the Philippines, act as in-
termediaries to collect firearms
and ammunition for Communist
rebels, give financial assistance to

Communist guerrillas and con-
tribute \congiderably to Red
propaganda work.
Open Affiliation

Lt. Col. Carmelo Barbero,
spokesman for the defense de-
partment, frankly explained for
International News Service:

“The Philippine Communist
party openly avows affiliation

with other Communist parties in
the world, It pledges strict ad
herence to the Marx-Lenin-
Stalin teachings.”

Moreover, a Communist
“watch-dog” network, stretching
half way across the world, has
been established to help Filipino
Communists among other things
to get instructions from abroad
Consequently, Filipino Commun
ists under the guise of labor
social or cultural missions have
managed to attend conferences
and contact foreign Communists

These trips abroad lead to
secret huddles and whispered in-
structions that have outlined new
labor union agitation technique:
and the latest underground pro
paganda fashions,

Well Guarded Units

Communist propagandists are so
well organised that they travel

in well guarded information
units, have gained warm sym-
pathy from an_ estimated 75

percent of the peasantry in Cen-

tral Luzon,
Filipinio defense officials, the
colonel added, not only recog-

nise the new propaganda danger
but, are taking steps to neutralize
its effect.

Red propaganda for instance, has
sparked the organisation of a
new government information pro-
gramme,

It has led to a new, gigantic
effort to tighten discipline among
loosely led government soldiers
on Luzon.

Bold Programme

It has touched off recognition
of a bold army organization pro-
gramme to train troops in the be-
lief that only good Communists
are dead Communists

But also important is the fact
that defense officials now realize

that Communist rebels must be
fought on their own hunting
ground.

Out-dated Philippine army
strategy, for example, is being

junked while new recruits study
anti-guerrilla tactics or, fighting
guerrillas with guerrilla strategy

Ten special combat battalions
are being groomed in the new
way of battle while 5,000 re-
cruits, called from the army re-
serve are being trained to bol
ster army strength.

By the end of June,
months after the army took over
the anti-Communist rebel cam-
paign, Major General Mariano
Castaneda, army chief of staff
was confident and proud of his
troops 5

Asked whether United States

three



army troops would be welcomed
to assist Filipino troops in the
campaign the general smiled and
asked:

“Would you allow someone els«
to clean up your house if it was
dirty?”

(IN.S.)

[ They'll Do It Every



c
Wicks DEAR OLD DAD IS sick
THE WHOLE FAMILY COOPERATES
TO LET THE OLD Boy SNOOZE
| ALL DAY... AND, OH, HOW

HE CAN SNOOZE >>>

Burt cones BEDTIME (
FOR THE TIRED b-
FAMILY, AND -s*WELL,





a! coHol RuUBI!

Ad



FRANK DOBSON WITH HIS MODEL OF A RELIEF FOR A Post
OFFICE IN BRITISH GUIANA

FRANK DOBSON, the sculptor, has been working for the past fifteen
months on a full scale clay model of a remarkable high relief for a
Post Office in British Guiana. The relief will be shipped to British
Guiana in 1951, crated in sections and re-assembled there. In recon
structed Guiana Granite, it will weigh 15 tons, measure 17 ft. 2 ins,
by 9 ft. 6 ins. Dobson's full scale model consumed 2! tons of clay
The relief portrays two reclining figures. In the Picture is seen the
relief in miniature as it will appear on the face of the post office, as
seen in a model of the building at the sculptor’s studios in the Royal
College of Art, South Kensington, London. Frank Dobson is seen
looking at it.—Express

Canada’s Senate
May Be Reformed

OTTAWA, Canada.
teform of the Canadian senate, often debated in Canada,
may actually come in the life of the present parliament
which in normal circumstances would continue until 1954
The reform measures may come from within the upper
chamber itself.

The federal government appoints senators for life, the upper
chamber in Canada having a fixed number of representative
from each province. Total number of seats was raised from
96 to 102 when Newfoundland entered the Canadian con-
federation in 1949

Britons Go

It is possible that

governments

provincial
may be given a
voice in future senate appoint-
ments, Further, the present system
of life appointments may be dis-
regarded for some retirement

system—possibly retirement at

m : é «
age 79 on a contributory pension egaltta
plan

Oxfordshire, July 8
Overseas oarsmen won five of
the ten trophies on the final day
of the Henley Royal Regatta which
was the worst for British rowing
since the 1939 Henley
On that occasion four titles went

Proposals for senate reform have
been heard often over a long
period, chiefly from political stal-
warts who object to the system of
federal government appointments
as a reward for political support







ers and a sort of life-time pen- abroad and the double sculls were
sion. But concrete proposals for shared by Britain and Italy who
senate reform are expected to Cead-heated, One of the trophies
come from the conference between Which remained in ‘land was
federal and provincial govern- the Diamond Scull:
ments this fall, If the federal- Anthony Rowe, British Olympic
provincial conferences do not Sculler won this to become the
forward recommendations, the first Englishman to do so_ since
federal Government is believed 1933 ‘owe led __ practically
ready to undertake a senate throughout to win easily from R
streamlining procedure on its own 82 Medsag, a Dutch student.
account, with the senate itself ,,. he Grand Challenge Cup for the
perhaps initiating it Eights was won for the third time
by the Harvard crew of America
Possibilities who put in a powerful finish to
beat the Najoord crew of Holland
In any reform plan, these are by one and a quarter lengths
believed possibilities { Reuven





1. A system of provincial gov-} -——__ee—c
ernment appointments to the |
senate
one-third of
one-thi The Weather

for a five year for
members,

present
representation. This
senators from Newfound-
land, 24 from the Maritimes,
Quebec, Ontario and Western
Canada

term,



the

disturbing
geographical
is six

102
the



TO-DAY

Sun Rises;
Sun Sets; 6

5.44 am
p.m.

* A‘ July 15
2. Retention in federal hand Lighting: 7.00 p.m
of the

right of appointing ne High Water: 11.47 a.m., 11.33
remainder of the senate, but aboli- p.m :
tion of life appointments in favour




Moon (New)

of a of retirement YESTERDAY
Rajnfall (Codrington) .10 in.
Total for Month to
day: .19 in.
Temperature (Min). 74.5 °F
Wind Direction (9
(11 a.m, E.
Wing Velocity 10 miles per
Hour.
Barometer (9 a.m )
(11 a.m.) 29.954

System

federal policy that at
> per cent of the Senate
membership be in opposition, At
present the senate has 77 Liberals,
13. Progressive Conservatives and
12 vacancies

3 A yester-

least
a.m.) E

4 A system of
te-elected
is a

having a sen-
leader as well
leader appointed
governnfent

house 29.963

governmen

the Can. Press

lime sae

-=- By Jimmy Hatlo











/

; SHHH! GO OUT AND PLAY. )
UT DON'T MAKE ANY NOISE!

GO OVER TO THE SCHOOLYARD!
PAPA IS SICK, AND WE MUST LET
HIM SLEEP! GRANDMA TOOK
THE BABY FOR THE
AFTERNOON :> ++

5s
GLAP A CIGARETTE!

MAMA!
THE BABY'S





Down In Royal)

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

INDIA’S
VOTERS
LISTED

FOR ELECTIONS
NEXT SPRING



B.B.C. Radio

Programmes

SUNDAY, JULY 9%, In50

The New






















BOMBA Putfney Post Office 45 5 promotes freer
, ’ ; Forum, 1.15 p Rad ewsreel | more refreshing sleep. 3. Help
t >| ; V
Pre} arations are under way for p.m. Sunday Service. 2 rhe! gte ‘toughing,
lla’s first general elections next s. 2.10 p.n New t Quick satisfaction or
inder the republican con- p.m, Mus 2 .
titutic vhich has given the Bend Bo ; : Pre~ | wnewent: Sacer.
17 . judwe. 4 pur 4 ' nt
),000,000 population the right ide, 415 p.m. T Piano for Pleasure. | =———-——-—
te choose their gzoveryment. 430 p.m. Sunday If Hour. 4.55 p.m
India vorld largest registered Epilogue. 5 p.m. F m P.ayer )
ead Seok * 2 nu p.m, Programme Pare 5.30 p.m, Fre
rat includes 46,000,000 the Children’s Hour. 6 p.m. Records. 64
en p.m. Think on these Things. 7 p.m. The
» far the government has spent News. 7.10 p.m. News Analy 7 e 45
r t i$ ‘epara. Pm. Caribbean Voices, 8 p.m Radio
more han § 10,000,000 in prepara- Noewsreel. 8.15 p.m. English Magaz
ion and printing of electoral rolls. 845 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the
The task has been a difficult one Editorials. 9 p.m, Sunday rvice 0
\ > ,ere p.m. London Forum, 10 p.m. Tr
army Be ; enumerators 10.40 pam. Intertude 5
* vast linguistic, religious to dec 10.45 p E
and social diversities of 11 pm. The New
} idian sub-continent BOSTON
The enumerat as ne
a Se eae er a qo: has bec n WRUL 15.29 Mc wiUW
nade nore complicated by the wrRux 17.75 Me 4.30 p.m Friday
constitution which introduced uni- Science Programme. 3.05 p.m. Le by Me. CB
versal adult suffrage Only 15 Christian Science. Deneis f am
pe ant f+ ey ates ancing 9 a.m
per cent of the people are able MONDAY JULY 10, 1950 pm
read ¢ vrite, and with the
idget cut to the bone the money 7 am. The News. 7.10 a.n
or nlistn rs ‘ Analysis. 7.45 am. Jane Eyre. 7.2
Pee eat trseh nt operations yy Magazine. 7.45 a.m, ¢
was found too little for the mag- spea g. 8 a.m. From the Editoria











nitude of the task as -rogramme Parade
’ . s Pageant. 8.30 a.m. Jack N
Commission The News. 12.10 p.m
The electio . nat ve p.m. Programme P: 3 par
Mm COMMISSION “36 an fo iera Choice. 1 p.m. Science Review

“independent statutory authority”
created by an article in the con-
stitution. The commission is not
ubject to any party or political

p.m. Radio Newsre 30 p.m. Tip
Tunes, 2 p.m. The $, 2.10 p.m. H
News From Britain. 2.15 p.m. Sports
view. 2.30 p.m. Meet the Commonwe
3 pum. From the Third Programme









pressure, according to democratic The News. 4.10 p.m, The Daily
conventions. It has wide powers 4.15 p.m. My Kind of Music. 5 pe
fo the delir at ‘ stit),. teners Choice. 5.15 p.m Prograr
. , % 7 mit ation of constitu de. 5.30 p.m. The Story T or. 6
neles, preparation of electoral Jane Eyre. 6.15 p.m. A Ye: ne
rolls, conduct of actual elections 7 p.m. The News. 7.10 p.m. News Ana
and settling election dis Vi » 7.15—7,30 p.m, Cricket Report on
putes. The |.’ Northants’ 730-745 p.m, BBC

commission is answerable only to

; i land Light Orchestra. 8 p.m
the people’s parliament.





reel. 8.15 p.m, Science Review. 8.30
Leftist elements have been Tommy Kinsman. 8 From
agitating for a “prover rez 4. Editorials. 9 p.m, M s of Mu
ae NS for 1 “proper readjust- Comedy, 9.30 p.m, Books to Read
ment of existing constituencies, p.m. British Masterpieces. 10 p.m
many of which are strongholds of News. 10.10 p.m. Interlude, 10.15
the ruling party, the Pe 1,4. Much Binding in the Marsh. 10.45 5
a ng party, he Indian Na- efi ial Questions. 11 p.m. A Talk
onal Congress. A conference of

the opposition groups will be held
in Bombay shortly to submit a
memorandum to the president on
the delimitation procedure,
However, parliament will be
the final authority on the demar-












JOHN GARFIELD Ace

cation of constituencies. At its A FRENCH WOMAN
ession next September parlia- ,
sient will consider the. election fy Ceeelle hea. Shiee—

commission’s recommendations

The constitution gives voting
power to every Indian national
aged 21 who has been resident in
his constituency for at least six
months. Only the defence forces,

the diplomatic and consular corps,
and refugees from Pakistan are
exempt from the residential quali-
fications.—-(Can. Press.)

ll

MISS IRENE WILLENS








Remind. you of her

UAL DANCE







\ to be held
At Queen's Park
On Saturday Night ,15 July, 1960
( ADMISSION
} : sags OPENING FRIDAY
) Music ty Bees Green's at the ;
ee EMPIRE THEATRE
efreshments on sale —_
} Please extend ‘this invitation DO NOT MISS IT:







OCP PPO9SR9NOOO SES

PM POES

0
LOU

5.556665
4 SOSSOOOOOOO SSF er rerr



TRrel ’
ERS 7
x i ae v
RQ KA
3
. starring W
$ |) WILLIAM HOLDEN 5 gel
$f JOAN CAULFIELD ear eC
$1) BILLY DE WOE ee er mio
% | MONA FREEMAN erence
x EDWARD ARNOLD set eee EO, non
< TODAY and CONTINUING
S AY THE EMPIRE

+







Summer

Sastts

DROP IN NOW AT

P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co.. Ltd.

TOP SCORERS IN TAILORING









alth
4 p.m
Service

mber

wi
Mid-

Radio News-

—PROEOPSOO POPS OPPO OP ODP PO,

' - ~ »,
LOS aoe es > VOSS o> POPES SPFS PSS OSS SO PS POPES CS CES









ASTHMA MUCUS

mg attacks of
ruin your slee
day or night



Top
M

Re-

ANNU

ee

«,

Tuesday
Lis

me Music by
p.m

PLLA APS LEI FE APP FF FS FSD

.,

¢
x,

pw
the
ileal
9.45
The
p.m
»>m

Variety

move thick strangling mucus. 2

Loosene¢ First Day



SUBSCRIPTION

ghing, sneezing, chok-
Bronchitis or Asthma
p and energy another
without trying MEN-

DACO. This great medicine is not a
smoke, injection or spray, but works
through the blood, thus reaching the
lungs and bronchial tubes. The first
dose atarts helping nature immedi-
ately 3 ways: 1. Helps loosen und re-

Thus
breathing and sc der,
evi-
ing
back



wheezing, 8



money

gaaranteed, Get MENDACO) tromâ„¢

ANNUAL
DANCE

CLUB

at Queen's Pai

1950

ist September
1 Orchest



ERTON OLUB

AL DANCE

a
QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE

on
night, 1ST AUGUST,
1950
Mr Percy
Orchestra

Green's

2/-
9.7.50—4n

POCSCO OOOO

Entertainment

and Dance

| Musie by





At

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC

CLUB

(Members Only)

On

SATURDAY, AUGUST 5TH,

9.00 P.M,

Full particulars of Show

later

Arnold Meanwell’s





POSES |







FORTRESS

rk

&
Me |
an
ve on si ral!
Music 7%
f \
Dancing 9 Admissio \
" ae 47, |
News LOBOS OS OPOOE A EOO 72 |
17 v |
1 The Committee and members of % |
the eo |
% |
, EV Z|
request the pleasure of your % |
company to their |



CCE LEEES
——————————————————————————————————





SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1950







What's Your Sige ister?
LONG?

SHORT?
STOUT?

=
You'll find



We take the “sighs” out of your size.
suits tailored by us fit snugly and comfortably.
Come in and inspect our fine range of suitings.

You'll be delighted with some new patterns.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET























Orchestra
Keep this date open for Ss. k i th t
A GRAND SHOW Sane ane ae
{ Entire Proceeds for Charity.
freee oa pecial Cake
a ;
. THE BARBADOS Order These:—
AQUATIC CLUB
RE TAUR ' Pkgs. ENGLISH ICING eee
S A » ENGLISH CASTOR SUGA
we » TABLE RAISINS 14's & I's
IN addition to the regular CUT MIXED PEEL —per Ib.
Restaurant Service at the ; CURRANTS per Ib.
Club for Members (Break- Tins BLACK CURRANT JAM
fast, Luncheon, Tea, Dinner, » GLUCOSE SPREAD
ete.), orders will be taken » PRUNES
for Wedding, Birthday, » STRAWBERRIES
Cocktail and Supper Parties, » CHOCOMEL
etc., under the supervision Bots. PEANUT BUTTER
of :— » TARRAGONA VINEGAR i
||| MRS. GRACE WILLIAMS, ee ee
% Manageress.
{|| Mrs. Williams will also ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co., Ltd.
* personally attend and super-
x vise Parties if required. HIGH STREET
x For Reservations and = = = eee
x Orders .. . Please Dial 4461. a a
> = FFE SSS,
* WSssss SO SSSOOOT SP OFFS | y . °
S18 y, Can't B *% i Calling all Dairy Owners, Race Horse Owners,
} 4
Eig 7 eee ee © Sees FT and Stock Owners.
‘ r )
Sik) These Values 5 i
vid No more Feed spoiled or soured by stale or dirty water
% ¥ at it remaining in your Buckets if you use our patent
B1% i.
I B

<

oat at

POOF

PSPOOOD

44664
SEE LLL LID

4,4,

% Lovely
& a yd,

Crettones
Domestic

~ a yd

h ”
$% Khaki Dr
$ White

» Woollens

8 Doeskins
S Plastic L

4,
7

444406

<
POCO SS

“-

toe

Wm, tf



Cotton Prints 40c,

$ Ladies Cotton Vests 39¢,

x » Silk

\% Calice Lovely

3 Gents Cotton

%& Tweeds, Serges, Flannels

4
X $2.00 each

%
‘.
\% Bedspreads Lovely Quality
1X $4.50 each
§

iss Lovely Quality
(Double) $1.09 a yd.

Thousands of

+
%& Also
1% lines too
x tion at Ruthless
ss at as
*
<<
».
s*
‘,
1?
&
os
°

Thani Bros.

SUPER —SALE

Swan St

ee ~
SPSOGO COOOL

‘} THANI'S
SUPER

up
Panties 39c._ ,,

67e.
59¢e. & T5e. a yd
36e. a yd.

Quality 49¢

Vest 39e.
Underwear 75c.
Socks 32c.

ills 59c. up
78e.
in Tropicals

up

up

etc. $1.98 up
arge Table Covers

Bedtick

other
numerous to men-
Reductions

e

iry. St. & 6,



SOS

4.4466 644,
LL LLLPLLLLCELCLOPLLVOLELOLOLOCLG SS CPLLL PLL LLLP APPAR APPDLAPDDSPA APPS



|

SOSSSSS OOS SOOO FOOSE GOEL,














Wash your Bucket and hang it upside down on the
Bucket Hook by its rim. The Bucket is securely. held

by its own weight. It drains and dries in no time. It
remains dry and clean until wanted for use and is easily
and quickly released.

The BUCKET HOOK can be
any wall or upright.

ONLY Oe.

See them demonstrated at

C.8. PITCHER & CO., LID.

AND AT
WILKINSON & HAYNES

SHIRTS
CONSULATE

WHITE COLLAR ATTACHED

fixed on the side of

EACH.

CO:: LTD.





———

|

' AUSTIN REED

COLLAR ATTACHED
SOFT FRONT DRESS

TAFATEX

CREAM SPORT |

METROPOLE |

COLOURED COLLAR
ATTACHED.

AT

C. B. RICE & Co. )

fe |

BOLTON LANE
See”
t








PAGE 1

S t. 1111.. Juli Surtuau fluuwate Prlrr: U.S. TANKS RUSHED INTO BATTLE 30,000 London Drivers Strike In Support of Market Hands LONDON, July 8. J-JUNDREDS of London lorry drivers today fore stalled their leaders' call to 33,000 van and lorry drivers to immobilise their vehicles by Mon day morning in support of 4,000 strikers in the capital's central meat market. Without waiting for the beginning of the new week, hundreds who should have been on the road today refused to take out their vehicles, putting an immediate check on the flow of foodstuffs to the metropolis. Transport groups ehing the south couM and us far away a* industrial "Middle" and North I ngI.mil have pledged their support in the "total pura lysis" strike of 70.WHJ road transport drivers all over the country, if possible. '• striken win maintain UM dc%  %  %  I ngjgj goods tO h"< ror< hi. lu *" r %  %  • reports here. Mr. and Mm. Harry Bell of I'pwey who befriended thr Mullen when they pul In there l--t Novfmbrr, have received a telegram asking If Muller dlrd In Liberia on July '. reports maid. The Mullrrloft Hamburg teal November in seanb ( peace and seeuxl.y". %  eater To Support Com ba t Troops Resisting Reds Fightt 2 American lets Last Over Korea TOKYO. July 8. General MacArthur's head iuarten MlUlUUIlCVd lodrfV Hi;,' two American fighters were Ion yw% %  ii.i. over Korea. One was believed lo have fallen a victim to around lire and it was thought that the other ran out of fuel. Both pilots were believed to hair! eu*d injury. Bud weather limited the effectiveness of lowlevel fighter strikes. Australian Mustangs however Hew effective ground sorties during the da) destroying three trucks and damaging 19 One Mustang is missing. American jets liestroyed 22 truck* and one lank and damaged 211 trucks Three tanks were probably destroyed and a fourth left burning Five fuel truckwen also left burning, the statement said. Suparfoctreaaai uf the 2oui air (owe launched moderately sui cessful attacks on the east coast from Kojo. on the 3tfth parallel northward to Konan. The heaviest On Pate 11 %  no oy %  trikc. but 4.000 petrol and oil drivers have been urged lo jpln their strike If theo buses and coaches m.i% stop, because of lack of fuel Troops Haul Supplies • long In i.soooun itrong Transport gftd Q< Workers Union Artsi I Deaka the Union' Secretary has condemned th< sink. ri-ckl* IIMI,I, peopl.-The fortrichi old Central Meat %  r:k,. began with a walkcut by 1.400 meat tl ortvers and a protest ogainst alleged delay in h rind) in* their eiaim for wage Increase They weir laifh 1 t, nearly 2.500 portat storage men and workers In the market The strlk" held up of groceries as well as meat tor i week *ow about 2 5oo ir^-i* • imping l^itnlon houseTh. raad hauhunstrike is rmed al ftre'ne 'ho f • %  th S'Mf'hfWd •Mepti'e and ei'learaction bv the Transport r-H General Work.-e* TV. ctaln 'or w*e* Increeaes for transport worker* — Renter hOST SOTJTH KOBFAN" Iroop in (hail lookout on lb lmnnd..:y line botwetn Norta and Bout Koni. At th* Cairo Oonf-r-iK* in I >43 the Allic decided last after Korsa had boon Tieed from Japanese rule the country would, in due nir*e he given independence In llMft the Buasuim. captured the naval base of Ruhm (North Kori and Ammrn landed ..t Jin-m (South Korea) A year later the country divided a' thSH'ti parallel. jut abc nV i|., Seoul, I i CnckStrike Ends ATHENS, July 8 Greek communications inside and outside of the country retu ed to normal tonight when the local staff of Cable and Wireless and the staff of Government TelecommunicationsService ended their strikes and returned lo work. Cable and Wireless staff who struck on Wednesday returned ufter a compromise with the management under which It was understood they will get a loan of two months' salary to be repaid by instalments over three raan starting next January. They had made wages claims. Oovanunanl staff who had been striking for two weeks for wage increase, received the promise that their claims would be "adequately considered". Reuter. Airports Ami Harbours Militarised %  wtftlj tempo. Airlim %  planes Amort %  (hi.1 [O 'in %  SydfM %  aid the %  >s AMlKl.ES. July 8. i n %  Irporti and harlours are moving h %  i uml snipping firms lean tore* n. i; %  i> vlrtuaU] i Govornmont hai chart-1 t< i %  % %  plan I % %  %  s. %  Pan American AlrUnra, line arai 'offering Truman Decides On Conscription America Aghast WASHINCTON. July 8. PRES'DENT TRUMAN'S decision to put conscription Into gffacl ha* awakonad Anwricgn people us nothiii^ iictnit i<< the ImplicgUoni ol thg Koraan crisis President Truman on Saturday dangled with the Drgd| Law over thai heads of rgaacvtgti and proapattlve recrultg enl effni to iMiiIri up the United Statt-s military! %  npower for demands ol the wat ha Kong fhiti M. rders Sec ur it i %  %  ..[ %  :.. to the Department of Defence" UrlfalC has rei/illed all personnel fror| leave and Is trying '" e#large iiSkymaster fleet. American President Shipping I.iru' announced that it had asked a Maritime Commission for more ships. lanes President George Killion *aid they would "bring home strategic materials for stockpiling" as well as taking war 1 supplies to the East and Japan —Renter International Law J ustifies America's Action In Korea —SHAWCROSS ST. HELIN'S, LANCASHIRE, July 8 SIR HARTLEY SHAWCROSS. British Attorney General &aid here to-day America's intervention m Korea before the Security Council had sanctioned such action was justified under International Law on which he is expert. "What is happening in Korea is not domestic or civil war ;is indeed Russians have sought tu pretend, but armed aggression in a foreign state that had itself actually been established with the support and under the supervision of the United Nations", he said. "Not only had it always been as line, .i law that the stale vhich is made a victim of aggresnve attack is entitled to defend tseli. hut the other states whether Ity or not. are entitled :o go to its assistance. "That inherent right which nalons have of individual and rollective interference was not Foreign Currency Shortages Cancelled PARIS, July 8. Europe'* 18 Marshall Plan i ounirics prepared on Saturday to do business through their own Intcitiatiunal Bank of European Payments Union to unfetter the trade hy camelling out foreign curranej shorl Countries which are members of the European Economic Cooperation Organization agreed unanimously on Friday :i Curr." INiuse. SocreUr) General Robert Marolin call* mpotiant ilnancinl di Since tl %  '. %  Bank it IMI ut| %  %  draw up .|>tnii. lid have a '"noI eot i tore early in August u provisions will be ran July I. Crmrtcr of the Va U Kationr •Southern Karra Is not a mrm-| ber at the I'nlted Nation*, but ahe t% %U\\ entitled to receive Immediate abiUnre Slaten whether member* nr not ran defend her aialnst *|greion until Ihe Srrurtty Caeneil il^-lf should exerci* it* rigoaalaBllln. "Any ther vte would turn the (barter at thr I nltert Nation* Into protertiitn tor ., tew or u ould |.m a premium on *uddrn unheralded alltrk. tyini the h;nd* of law abiding Stale* until the %  aagfMl CeauMfl had lakaa awaaavao >inih i ili-il inisht make it impie*ible >r tiie (oui.ii to lai..ii% settee .•t all American Aid For Korea B> LIONEL HUDSON 1'isAN South Korea, July H id armour for the big battle against North Korean Invaders were toduy pourIng through this pott on the south,ni ti V ol Korea like . Cup Final ciowd through tun Fin ;.n it was o'l'iiniv mo tjeartening in South Korea today. No dusi was alli-wed to lOtUa l^ing discharged from -i multttuda plying back and lorth from J;ipa:< tl Straita ol Kon i orl of ship, rrom -man tan 1 ten was iieAn Ameneim N he did 'i" 1 %  !—p I %  nd Dui.kiiK in i. VIM %  • %  He % %  lad -Thi-; %  • only a neeond rate oort, but wo 1 eve turneri roynd more ships In M ban in six months" Mi < i'' .oluntarlly with -hep At night ('%  blackout the work goean cleared and trim-enl north i-ll round the clock ship Unleaded A tank lunding ship was un loaded in 2.1 minute%  nd iti grgn % %  n II the front within %  few i u • was rushed %  to the railway trill ki with i u i-t%  A HuetUng Brlgadlei General I'nimn Oanin who commands thi* "I—ach-head" told %  man and material! for. . : Red Koreans Grab U.S. Lands %  i ion was Illegal since thi BM Com' I ONDON, Julv 8 %  •: %  • %  i -'' lands i loutl R i i belonfAn rrtcai %  I' Korean | %  hiring all this Previously in European counr t-ade waa gt system i • bilati %  raly in -i %  -"-ti i = of a rency Ihe%  I tl %  'ed firmly member COUOtl .tlonal La\ Ualon — <9t n. w-s nn repment'•*• -''^u. Oeneri eH". Ihe Attorney reclared : ''If those l ... has b> holdings State* and nther nationfOT land i'."lig In re> now associated with he %  .' % %  %  —Heeler %  i — krutrr MONKEYS WANTED CASABLANCA, July g. I i Di" Martin and Blanc of the Pasteur Institute said Hie> nr* running shun <,t monkan on which to experiment with their vaccine against Infantile %  raknifl They announced thiweek that %  aUsfylng rosulti had ban obtained in exparlbut vaccine, is nel >-et xciural use. riiiv ompiniiitd to-day thai their wiirk is on vaepnvenl infantile •ii PoliamyalHU) not to cure It lr Martin s.ud that sfcBN .ring aan ego thai rabbits were receptive to infantile be and hli bad i KperUnented .in 3.000 rabhitx. Bui thru reoctt '"pen menu ware in-gun <>n monTheoo were so scarce inoculation dm • %  the hr;iii> bad to !• tried In HO per cent of the cases successful immunity appeared to be the result Monk-' a g i i bervist. neuter and 0l I'icsidi %  '. ir as they II, i If, j %  ..!. Oal Guard India Warned Vgainst ComiiuiniMts MADRAS. July 8. Jayaprakavh Narayan, General S.eretary of the Indlim Socialist Parts', to-night warned the Inidian people "not to be deceived by attempts of the Communist Parh m India to stage a comeI'-ick in the guise of j democratic front". Addressing the eighth National Convention, the Social's! Party !i"re. Narayan. charged the Communist Party with forming a %  *' front not for the prewlng so far rnulting in a comptatg isolation from the people.' Reuter BANDIT KING MADE $1,000,000 HAUL MacArthur Named U.N. Commander WASHIIfQTOM Pi. ei %  11 u Douglai M* n I .' 'ommandei in the Korea ngntlnj Be flirei ted Mat Arthur to use Ihe Unit* Nat from t*n" '. Preetdi ni Pruman' en b'iiii .th the i ited Nanons < OtUM 11*1 Ri oiuuou ><"• %  aaaaowertng the United statet. eatahtish .. un 'Hiiiui in Kona %  t-m-chici and to uae Ihe Bag nf the Vmu-A Nations Tan pn lenfi Thr Sc.iiniy Council of UM !r.ltd Natlona Ul IU Itosolution I f July 7, 1*80, i' all memlters providini; mlUtarj forces and otka* M ine* would pursue the Bacurtlj I nesolution f June I II to maki %  u.h fbrcoi and othet aaaistance to the unified eommand ol Uv United fJtAtee Security CtAindTg Recommend.itiou Igng .i HI Km the Si i v ('mil and have ikailgnati Oaoeral Douglai MacArthui . ie military funi of which mrni.lv 4 (he United Nations ildet the uiilfled con,maud of the Unii.d State contlii r to n-pel %  HI unprovoked % % %  ad ttaei agamsl II un directing c aval MacArtbui. i i Be m n> itincUl Reaotalloti o us. thg Lulled Nanona Bag In* f operation* ggjalnst thg '' With the It ma of thC JMIIous 11. i' General IfacArthi 70 ,esre old last J.iminv the arm of a lieutenant Genn.d who HO* i himself m ilie Mm hetwoen the stateHe hai been In and out of the Far Baal fm the past 47 yen Six feet two Inches -.n .Supreme Commander in the Pacttie in Woiid War it. he act oted i ap aneaa Mrnndei on b American battl-sh,,, MK-ourl n UNO Me had hat boptlani of At Phllloplnea In ffXH in the iflt4 is War he an twkc wounded. once tpaatedly da ratgd He came out of it commander of th.' hunt u v can "ralnnow division" INturning fTom tbi g> On Paga it KOREA, July 8 At Gen. MacArt.mi 'a Advan .1 H^atlquarters, ^MERICAN tanks iped from the southern sup ply port by rail to be in action today, accordiiu, to the latest information quoted by Headquarters' afN last night. Trainloads of tanks had bom gtvan the highest priority on heavily taxed railways behind the front. American forces that had pushed forward 10 miles during the day meanwhile clashed with North Korean forces in a bitter engagement last night. The eni;;ii:etnent from which the \i'ierii .ins 'evtrirnted" llicitiM'Wi's after suffering rasunllies. occurred jns| north • I t hoiiiui. .Ml miles south of Seoul \iiieririin forces hud itd\nured under io\cr. smuthering air iil.uk> on Communist armour as the> had prohed mirth Hit in after tun dins' withdrawal before the Communist drive The flash opened when Americans lopped the rise and run Into '"' nr 20 North Korean iiiliuilr> men nl\ towards Ihem. WASHABLE NEWSPAPERS BRA1DWOOD Vtiatralla Fo ided iHH. 1 *. the Braidteood '> %  %  pati h countn newipapai hai notable achleverni nu to Its endll When oa learns faili d to bring in n. t t flood • ited on i it.ii'i md otlv ri-.. t, i aVlca led in. the cahco washed and then t r i Powerful Red Force Thrusts South TOKYO July in militari cin-uai i wr Am-1 %  tould reech the arr no.ih of -tun mm lae> natural barrier i' 'ii. i rovt loaal South Konan %  %  lo pre> nu ovei um i Konan i gpili Kent ,! bafig II.I %  Thi I Ml I Tai i IK till PALERMO. Sicily, July 8 It lo believed Ujat the BhftUan Danoll thief Sal vat ore Giuliano. ho was shot dead on Wednesday. hud about three-quarters of a million dollars "salted away' miiinly in American and North' I POlHM and unofnclal sources paid that GuiUano's five yean'. reign a* bandit king of Sicily I netted him a total of a million and a half dollars. A part of this was' proceed* direct from armed hold-1 part of n ransom payment*] i OH paid In' %  • %  %  I.• • i I "HI thai r.luliano il almoal halt of this In 1 bind k.u-i famlUea and a.' lo -il iieaiantr? U bald Inforn ino pursuiiiK policemen | Monev Ahrnad The Po'ite cupported Uieir • hat OlulTano*) ggngd by I Itlng "in that It has l-een lahad tha* a planitlnir Si.il The f *Tr*rlTitfano ana further south where OiuUano was finally hunted down and shot was strange country to him and only some Impelling reason could have made him move there That reawm might hayg bggfl an escape plan from Bkliy The police also revealed that neither in the house where Giuliano was hiding nor In other houses where he had been In the pan days was there any hidden treasure. Thlng to ft ml out Whan fiiulinno sent hi* money nbroad—and how he did it It is extremely improbable that anj American or Tunisian Hans Manager has in his books an aoeoMni headed "Salyaton OhdU %  no" It || thought that the outlaw's main Investments ahroaC were made through Sicilians who had alpeady irnmnrrat.d and who p>Iared Giuliano'" holdings In their %  nes. France Gets Anotlwr Preynier -RENE PLEVEN pAitis, luia l ReiM I'leven. a ne-i l( al eaiiy today ai i tptt I Ihi in mil Pramlei DM ignate 11 MR aakt A.iuoi on Priday i i u dertaki coovuliaiions with a .'ortnbig a Govomment I'leven dan i ut going CablnM oil Q • illk %  rill oppaar before tinNatloual A ombi] on T % % % %  '. • %  '.. to Inverting um i Pret .' it was oonaldgrad nrj pn babkl m political quarters oarl> tl i H old gat ii. .i-'titure vote ir elected ha Uttandf v> form %  Coalition Cabinet Inehtdlng |j. Kepublicans. B i wii near Radical group, UK Moilerates He is already u.v-uieof |M p % %  ation of thg it.I'M .. %  : % %  tome Ifodenti tB %  own small group Participation "f Ihe Popular Repuhlleans. thuug>> thev have not vet take) I..I..I di-cision. Is reganli'd • "nlmoat certain Tlie Sodallsts have dot vote for M Pive : at Pn but hove Mill 10 minds about iolnln-: tl i '; VOTt merit 'Renter) u and Pyongteal DgUea to the N %  high P '' lo-di i end revealed nan ind diM|uictiri ( : devel ipmeni ii Aceordlng lo lab ii.fronl powerful ( onunungn force tiiiunting south h gUnf-Ni ..lH-.it J(i miles wl of Pyongtaek waa nov the Amencens' right flank low%  rd fi gj i bi| %  ind rail nineUon 30 mllai no A Tall lla.k Should this column *wlng U> Ihe west baton roa> b n ni th' AMUTII an adt n a mJd ba i omp Had to theii delaying notion and fail b o mi Pact II mca roared % %  loured g|h %  I i-uiini; gjut %  %  Uioughl that tliey might !• thio'i I I evolop a threat to u ruahf tiom thoeoutheni I, and I %  mah i In iturnbai :i %  i orthern lank eatunated tl ISO bj Antertcai Intelligent %  .. Ihcj oni,i aoon be auflkahait lo ountot !ii< ( i irununiat ihnit North Konan all Inota and railway ratei i fur ninth .•• 20 miles from the North K in %  apttal Pyongy ana hat i %  %  todiu Ai i ordm ian d e r D the An Oroup Vmerj ttg weie I Loitered with 500 pound bomi. nd roc k et! by Ihe BriU HI let borne plan* Air llomlmrdiiieiil During Ine aatawh on Monday and Tueada] Lanhum vald Asnorlean plenea ui stroyed or everely damageil 23 loenmothree. They also nelounlexl for 10 il.ini'. on the ground ind '" Ihe air and .' Pyonf I %  i %  %  : Uand Than wen nu Arnari. .in .., jjgii two en darnaged Lanham Morth :iiit day but monla] Hi BJ ;, h |.' at i^ .''in eni i (iunlimits. Not Sub* %  %  Force) bombed at Port Chinampo, 31 rnflea %  %  .. rod on m Oa Page 18 beThe police fn.mte*l out that eould have enabled him to get hack his money front his friends Little hope iv held out however this could have indu. that anv subtantial p-.' 'iino's ion* adtl i be had been safe ere.J Those who held it for hiiu nra among the rugged ^ |, v others will probably be quietly ii'truited** slocr the bandit .-/!>' boybuod ".vU, "Meet Reds With The Atom liomb" LONDON *. M An unofficial Anglo I Committee for UM pei %  • %  ink tadaj %  %  I' . %  irepar-' l.n atom \.: %  hif Ruaaig enaata In .. few hours, I the 9 gat 't the A'liiit.. powei Xh, Comt lee aw name Ui ma Dlrectoi id w. em Buropi i ould match Ru %  Rewter POTATO LOSS %  the yam .. %  lal n-port showed. A -null lu** b-ii oaxToii ii A L i; 11. II Vau ran art your fjvnurllr batfVai irom %  • aeeatlafg nMfe gvaryllggai rag i-mir, We also pravlde >uu with a %  Cwlr. |M uur Mtet hf riill p.irh.ii l.r wli.n hu.lru II int. In In.uriyour i.l. C4VI SHI I'lll Hll I' ( -.. I •< DnlribulOit 10. II, 12 S 13 BROAD SIBil! g HI :MII



PAGE 1

BUKOAT, Jl/LY 1 IT,,. ftl M)\Y ADVOCATE PAGI IIFTIKN <.OVI lt\>||\| \OTIMS CONSTITUTION SWAMP AND CONSTITDTION RIVER All persons who have placed or caused to be placed anv mailer or Thing in or on th Constiluiion Swamp and all persons owning any matter or thing placed or lying in or on the Constitution Swamp r c "' 're required to remove such matter Of thing td no person may piW an) """ i River during i jd t UM I5th of July U the 31t of October. 1950. Any person infringing the terms of this notice will be liable to prounder section 18 of the Department of Highways and Transport Act, 1945 5 7 50—In Attention kl drawn lo the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amendment! Order. 1950. No L'l •rluen wfll (*• published in the Official Gazette of Monday 10th Julv. 1950. 1. Under thi DM el Pilchar. OrdM the maximum wholesale and retail selling s-Canned are as follows — PILCHARDS— Wholesale Price (not mere tkam carton of Rxi II>. tins. ss* J4 per case or carton of 48 x H Retail Price • i .. Bvwimg Brrvira l"i*~n Mr PVLHBCK Ham Mmn| **• Pi.achar Mr Crwu. | ttmter r*rrachT Mr F !> % %  >* MONTllOMKHV ? p rfi I • SHOP H11.I -1 s> BS K.raHaa a*-' Praaehar fc.r o DUNtCOSOir II am Mamia, j ""• FTaatlw* Mr klir 1pm I nWa. tanirr Pirachrr Mi Sn.nn TMF ST MAIER Ll'THEKA\ mm LOWER CKKSLV KH;> Open Air wn II-P U i •an* aoi rin",a atieat t \i p Was-.a-*lay waning DI-WI air art-. !" %  "!" r O'Domoriu*. C HOl.rTUWN -t % %  > t>.l*>ucr. T p m Mr BANK IIAI I m Jo**T ,. aa *> %  | | SPFI.SHT*TOWN 11 n %  BRITISH 1NSLLATED CALLENDER'S CABLES LIMITED. l* II *r, r l.a.. I) Kr. P-.. t Chru %  |f I..!.-, pj E San u Laid I A H raj nunand lh# Cadet Corp. r I July SO SO Juna H, \*r i (.'•inarm. I IIMII \ 1H|\ I... VI.|. The AeUM CO I... .pp-mi^l ih.r<.iMim uAraraa mrm nation Board lor ururivirrablr equipment Mi, ..%  %  I I I 1'..hn*i.ii. Mambrr 1 I . i I i iirftt at thf UM Sti.ir..I I ISO ll iaUM .in Tlllllta) IJ July SO % % %  —,• „iii irndcr a Minwd report ol Ihe iii,K~i.n. t<, Ihf unii rl* CHRISTIAN tcpuecr F.rl Oi.irth of OirlM •nanli-BiidMUai Vpprr May SKr-et Sunday* 11 a m. a Rat T p n>. Wad' la-* %  p m A larvM* which lneH>dc rwkskSfflhM of ChrtMMrt n Hiu-lay Ji.l, W. Ifi Till: MM TASTAMKNT CHI'Hot sr MIC II.Ml •i m Baftramat Service *| Brandon i L "' ^' %  '" 'HII*/ SEE • nSSHttai V:l,..-. : %  ', ",*.. J B Winter CHRIST Crll'Btll I P m Cox Moad Rr\ V. W W|r< ar uEutMii: "*' "' %  < H I THE ALVAT10N ABMV njrtXIETN CKVTVA, II inHoliiin, kMwx 1 p m <- %  ., P....V M-MMV T p m H.||laai llerti.., Prearher Major SMiHh M a m Hollnr*. fcwl.,^ p ,„ Cj(r %  C : P m lUlVR'lu MMK,. t-"d.-r,i kq M.i,,, PJUiwIln. H" %  ilir.ltrvi,,u\ 1U M^-n^^a 1 ,^..^ P^-rher S, C aptn CMRpb.ll CARI TON' Hollnra* M'nrliii^ j p %  I AH I %  %  SlTIIIJ v m i n a Oeaa I FTMFL-11 T I m Rr% • Crft.bv aioMSV. July I*-.. Mitionarr Ktet SOI'TH niimtlCT-i a m Mr A ln Cha. rm, \ ) p| He'* H C Pavt-^ I D „ %  BJlMf mitKCT EXPORTS MIME B16JMNMMM spsakMi I. 1. M. PHO\Kni;NCCmilit 11 JMSS -• %  %  "• %  noiy • %  mmuninn : n m h|> i T p II FIFTH Am I Vftm* of British Insulated itfd will be held on July 13 in London Tht an extract from the statement by the A..-\.i:i.h %  : Rogtl KOI K. circulatod with the Report and Accounts As a mult ; u %  xptjisffion Ul both ilie volume and value .illy favourable trading conditions %  c ed durtiu 1M9, Profit on Trading ol the parent Compuny. InvMtmei.i I'ir..iiie Jind Special Receipts at £4.82R.9M vemonl of i.: Ur*im ruMU HOMR At mi rtuvHii %  %  audil It* Brami MrrtliiK itng i.tlin-iv i,, H n Aii^ 10. A i. Ilalld. Hrn-iri.l %  :' i* E Wrathr'twad %  P I. Prlrrkln I U O. I^ihtoy \\M M. Ml "l ill 1 ill I-.-I Tb nrind ol tlM A Mr Kitl.. H mil in proir and all inoaf w yat n-rd ihrir cmraa will art in lou.h *ilh Ih* K.S M a* •in a. ORDlRlt on lit* AND OROFBLI SERJEANT FOR MEEK N>> I far dalf Ofderly OrHcri Ordvrl> Ufllin .j, ; -, B|ac nrnwlf ttrMani UM E n arvtdird Or^mHtfaant >l Sit Clarkp. A II PARAIIF4 *: Hffj %  r>. ii Hradquarlan And M..-, DlAtSOMTJ CORMU '• m Hohnraj MM|„>I J PMV Martin, 1 >TfctI P-rchrr l^fuumn, fcfao,. %  %  II .1. ?;' %  %  -""•" •—> % %  <> < !" •£ji2 ^5Sr !rT5.^r-i U.S. Tanks Hush I mi. Battle # From Page I Ly iwo siiidll craft, wilh 40 nuUuiielre shells he M.I.I li i, 4J ^ tliouitht at Dm that these werv rubmarines. but a cloaer look b| p"l revealcl th> m as Kunboata No submarine* had jet been isjhtid, he emphasised. He said North Korea was doited wMl dirt alntrlDi whirh provided iiirmen with excellent aln rail i; %  A* TlH-y w.'ie paatmasters in ccunouflaft, it wmtmetmarj losjti %  %  n u.illy Ion ( y locate planes M the ground n> v Kotmn troop* %  I :.isi .it I. HI. in,. hOl I lump >>ti trains and moti nd t.ike cown u : ddad —t:. in. i SEPARATE LIVING AREAS IN S. AFRICA CAPIT0W14, July : The South Africa Government %  I.I% ;.i %  iU: .: %  %  % %  ,, %  ; '.i Areas Act. 19.10 --designed, lo separate white and mlmired |eople into different living areas The Act prnvid for I huhment of group areas, for control or acquisition of immvalile property, and occupation of land and premise*" — Kentrr %  Bi I \ I i 1 • ..n M I li I .. %  on the i buildings .: t, and % %  .i antlei pated useful life. The lare sum %  i roplawtosMii coM brnk t.'ie Capital and Kiv.-tn.,. Roai nmi Gut yoiu Dincton again sires* the %  at turther huil. '" %  ontlnsMnmm* A larsja port ol UM Company') to be taken I" i anl in the form o( lava tion which absorb £ 2.0?S.0t>5. Uw Proflt " ft avatlal i. Damitc the ranunuod wsn^unga ol InuuaIry that this country can oul> man lam its standard ol llVUUj b) Incn aalng and impnn ing its products cap %  policy dei I tho Choi '-Hen haa 11 to plan an) rotiof ami % %  load astactad an avon grva'er toll h\ increasing the rate ... 1949 ... ..hi. In | .... I I .011 11(111 i, M.0O0 has I BoUnajanclaa Retl HI' like B.ICJ 'It., have %  ...I ... %  I %  • nta and Currcni ovar t.o Mta to itc aervaa haa furtnai \nngOtttw* 1 %  tUon, Capital am%  r ir.il.ie t-i It in ntlng lo ip C10.600 000. am! will further men • that Oermany. Italy and avon Japan, have actively entered the lists For over 50 years now we have maintained, in countries overseas, large BI.TH and numerous AfJBDi M highly trained selling ai nlcal suffs And of • 1'ortanee. the closest contact is maintained with tinand atao with our ,i I OBjWDOt think of .'" %  count l y n( pre-senl or potential %  > 'i the IIv %  i %  hi. h haa not boon i IBM b) .. i Kaanboi i oui Btafl Thoai .ne ot ttie utm %  | Home And Kxporl Business p^^^ An( i Vvr oprm?n i of I building pi %  quipmont, M bi aatlmatad %  nt ropl i %  %  hbourhnnd of j i/ylng ' % % % %  which may "' %  '! %  m a lu-ii tha rcpli droiip Aecounls I<> thai cif the pan I ihi Not i-i At %  %  %  %  %  which may have .. ( ... fut uro pi In the Hal.in. ihe B I C C .1 an increase ol with 1948 Increased | I ii.out in BOB ^.lue of turnover i. .i ie.ii iBttgaggM M the output vohatna • main products Purti t. rum n> Bxporl bu i r.ess. 1 am sure all StOeMwIdai will iplcaaad '< anow ihat tie tporta ol tha i C C Oroup orao ltd. 500,000 howlni an Incraaog w il • or th .,, .... i. %  i ntrlbutloi .i rl | Mill I' Era i Bni orta, but unl %  accurately put* i 'I'll. Bnin mm iarab i i" %  mil it i .: uKorpoi ,i, . %  ..I rnw i %  %  i ..ii.., .t.-i. i rat Whllil -i i .!. %  ,. -p. rta I in which we hav" i I %  %  labluhi i nani %. .II i .n %  aiad %  a) thai pi • in.n ha %  in-i nun MM II. We continue t,, up) %  i.U-t.d'l. efT. I! ..i. i. ., i. Ii demiopment it |a imporattvi that we not ool) man I ceaselessly Isnprova out toehnl Hue in Ihe interests of our trade at Homa and Abroad, li it ........ I Kport trade genanlly, he-. in the field of pradoeta >t .i highly hwhnreal nature and as tune ajBag on IblO we may have even to more and more of OUI taehhlqua as araD (Iricmiiiatiim In March laat vonr Board % %  %  '.' W ii MV Pa i i i Daputy-Qnalrman of the I M K . ui t i v -• II llH .. l">st .,| II.,' RMMtesI • Which, I am -ore ho .MI nit v %  oohmtiai tha t'ompam in Tin exist ii lii nanufai dan and UM tonlh i bolni glvon I MI the i n UM lea will bi "i-i ah .i ..II, i ... , abiii': md U n %  The Outlook At hovrfeg. the past year ha* beer; i i thmange from the i Buyer*' Market, J UW exten* .1 .'I :'.' %  the Government i ii.il expenditure of our • i p "iips. the ad Industries, following -terluiB no total i. Mn solution withotit its cerotraklni npen ..f 'i"l-. -t price-. larva tax%  % %  H vital loi building %  i• .iKiipetiUva expanding produr Uon It snnlv is one of the proECtl wMch should be pressed on ': . %  pita] it ivoiiMv Without a cheap and Dpi] of electrmtv netthai our industry, nor man. -tillin this country, can hope produce c haaply -"'d i compatitiva in Ihe m.iikets of th. world %  1,,-tin. i rveraa u i-isinens .ml Ihe |wo togathaj v it.,i to pn This was never more import .nit than il is to-day Competition ,rnarketa li baconuni i. i I is belnK %  t from an Incraoaliuj But given ...I factor from Mn homa market we ar.' "i'.i.i '.. meet tln> competltlo', and to dO our he.| t,, maintain <>n our | regu wimh w. in v al) ha*Ja ''<>' i mid yt* .-. o. ii rtnlnatlon t. atop markets ... ad. Ii ma MVM %  itial than it H .i .ii mn oldoat and %  rnarta I col manual aoma ol oui pnducti .'. ;. .it more M 1 .1 and ahhouajh iii., .i tat hnii ai md Mas-eat, It would lie .1 i toymen I Ipul won aupplierl by our Home Tactoi i. I %  In la pollMci idlllonj "1 fi.H-iun CUI rency are .. ivlv roati II Ung Il Oma caaes mukin. %  ii. pun baoa ..i lm. %  And avarywhate ptU bei rinnt; keener pentad with in* technical i! i ol tha world win. might ba "' mten -t Mi D W AMi UK Ital %  ''"iie.ie ie tha it. %  ti relinquish hi %  net ill %  ii.. .•. *,, II, Oi. R| Ui hum In ., %  Direct ' Mtloa i.v mi ,..... Cat, f"i Which Ml Aid 1 %  on • lima l. I. (i and \ii ii j Buxq %  elected lo tha Boai i "" %  %  '"' %  Both of then re given long and ml thali appointmi iv.-. ptactlenl tflict t.. the < %  %  i m rultlruj d. from as far as poa %  i i: who have proved tn> **££**] SM frti" 0U£* Don't suflet lh long drasra out smny al iii.il.. i.l. i -, and aruptlons. DD.D. Prrwription quickly biinaa raliaf by priwtraiing d*p bflow thr .Win ii> • ill ihe poiaonoua Bcrma and bdrup licalina; e.*n u, l|,e moal pcraiairnl a.^ea. r.IiT A BOTTLE TODAY. Obtainable in..,, all Chemists. D. Prescription WILLIAM FOGARTY, LIMITED (I NC. IN BR. GUIANA) FIRST NEW ARRIVALS OF JAPANESE RAYON GOODS These (iuiHls are (he.i|ier than Aiiylliing ol Similar Quality fnmi Kurope or U. K. lAPANEKE SAVON VIHI.KS— M" v lb PIQUI BATONS—ST i .1. RAYON ruoi—sr wM... CREPK BACK SATINHi "Idc ran sn.K poNon w *u II WON SMIO/.K— .111" • ill.I I.AT CBSm —M" wlrtr PIO SKIN—36" vvidi* '.I yard I in .72 .. I Hi 2.IK, aa .. % .. .72 .. Il is mm ivfif Ten Vears ago sime v. j Imporleil Japanese (IIMNIS. ami in Ili.it periiHl Ihe (osl of Everything has Advanced—Especially Taxation. IN ISM—INCOME TAX I > Isn—TBAM TAX llif, "1 Pmfil1\"L m I' XllllCHIAI. TAX. POLICE. Hlfl IIKII. Mil & HIOIIWAV l\ 111511— INCOMK TAX IN I:I —TRADl: TAX IM ,l III M TAX. POLKS, Fllll: BRICADF & HIOIIWAV ,,i,...i,.i Sa 37|% do 12 ; dn 21% do Ihf 1.<-i %  i ii.ii. in nntr IHMI'X S90 of Ihf I'rnfilH ol I'rvrp/ Uitiiiifwi in Hi iili/timi i, I



PAGE 1

SUNDAY, JULT 9. issn All Saints' School Mistress Retires After 12 Years' Service era from All Saints' Boy-' ami atria* School ami mamother whoeM in Si. Peter ana Si Luc] gathered Girls' Sihool on Friday m il la bid limn II to Ada Gilkes. the Headmistr. rV who :itr 42 years' service with the school, of which she was Head for 13 years Mr,. Victoria Brathwalte. w hc. 1-as been with the ithool .nice '*" %  "Il act as Headn BONDAY xnvoc.VTE PACK NINE Tube! -Mi. I rathwaita praaa ited Mi" 'l> %  Morrh ikr and I pur-e The i, k.-i wm %  %  >. ;„, D) Hi, .-,;.,|[ %  ... -,,. J, U1 | ,.„,, ,, Kh( llutalk on purse were made bv the slafl of I'l *'e school dci. tl, n.anajer. and pup.l, „l All Sainta' It "ill leld here Pharmacy Week "I' Will 1*the Mlbii ba Or C Man Dr K. Simon wtll Diabetes during week which %  I year on July 16. M ilie s-eond to b, by the P.iaimaoeuti10 Scouts Invested %  E 1 joungst. .. %  %  %  ed He eree MI. UMtougti in in :. i, ., %  ,., .,(!.'! i %  vi MiUn MUIIM v I %  Imeeter it I ",, ,. Be guided / Bel m the presentation Mr*. 1 Society, the first h.iving brx'i Brathwalti ngj tulatod Miss held last year C tikes on her long and faithful Proceedings will begin on t rule) the HbooL She also evening of the 18th with a talk tl-oke of the successful unity beover Hadio Distribution by the MM <;11ki-s and ihe'starT ''resident ..( the Society Mr I'urlng the period that she was Pred 01 '" Heodrol During the week t'.ere will tie She said that HJgg (.like* w as a h"' window competition bv well respected in the dlttrlct! and lhe dru stores displaying variv ished her long life and happines. ous phases of pharmacy. in retirement. !>*" Manning and Dr Sunn:; Mr. C. Broom*. Inspector of *"-' ,w !n ,r %  utiff tfftll dnc-ishund Janm. • it) I.I i a %  A New l! mehtuiM nnly (| places where the n I it-1 f.: M.ii! Mrect tor IratlU || mOBl t.ines has no less than 1 : ,,.' th* .1. t.in. ntlon %  the location, they Just Social Welfare Vims To Lift Standards Progress Aoted In />'.(,. %  %  . MUbluhmcml of hlghei tocUl Handi itdenble pro resa \j ; M H Laing C.M.G £ i, ' l '" 1 '' Qovernnwnt and Social i or the colony told the Advocate %  Mr. Laing |g m Barbados (Ot Mai He arrive l H W I A. accom 'us Hif t and they are %  Cacrabaak. • at Bodal Welfare in 1 % %  OU I II Mil of the loci! ( "' 'luneiit and has devoted its Urn. primarily t.. Cooperatives 1 opanal i i .,..idvanced 11 il be %  C %  rnnrianani %  .n HP I O Officer ol tha !> % %  i in McKei i il !Dte" 1 ii-llilvl. 1 Irinl I. that hi. •U1 Mil %  111 parade al Bt %  THI B r Scouts A I'arbados is prvud to b tulaUon to the VK-toriote. \V. %  v ho have made U t.. v M I rd Lord Sornars, who I ord ll.iden-Powell Bl I I led, Pre i lhe M c i i ;evei-. iiLi.-h: lome da) be seen playing, cruket on the tamou lord's Held w,. record edtii %  % %  % %  r .. 9 tell and Clyde Wai.utt ware bol Scouts It would be intcreftln. to And <"*! "f art) of U memben ol lhe team in fi-outs al any time of their live. BaHyes I to V I. Harcoun MM Bethel Troop on galmm: hi Warden's Badge. Good -, %  Harry %  roll have n ade .. iplent it We are plensed to note th 1 i i Vrtht th ..I :''!tti B'dos (St afatthlaa) Qreur > be has % %  i ii on tl > %  let. h*t foi %  %  %  %  around nlcelv Cheer up) Ailluu %  0 K A wise mother lets baby decide about the milk for bottle feeds. Lots of energy, steady Items, contented days, peaceful nights — these tell her whs' she moM wants to know baby is doing splendidly on Otemulk. Why can mother pin her (nth to firmly on Oiierrnilk ? Bcviutc. where hreasl fecdlai; i dilti.uli H bBpOarMt it It Iherxrfscisuhitituiclor nuxhrr's milk. OatcrBiilk is AneM grade co milk, tbled under the most hygie eoadaajaa. 'rheptvtcin.gir-t bodrhiuhlst, U made easily dlgmlbk by dM Tollst drying pMOH lad importint sdditi.mi arc made: Iron inenruhthe No.x1 tugar lo modifv the 1....I tor tiny digeuioni Vnnmin l> t.' help build strong bones and teeth. Oitcrmilk It made by GUsu Laberarortie Ltd.. who. since 1908, htve been pioneets m ihe lesel0p> mem ol the beii powibk toodi tor Steady proyr.ics ta/ii yee OSTERMILK /I right For your Ireo copy o* illustrated Baby Book-Phone 4675 He saul th.it they ll %  i inatiturloni undi r the the Bauxite Cornpenj ith .ill nd nui devotlni its attentii kweloncneni it ti Ce and |he en ol voluntary social i.ions. is babl| en i 11 the direction ol instruct W %  re Hi* %  Woo en i last! Mi Cn are mverj ... • hues ..> those in HW I A 101 tWO : '" !l %  % %  M* 'i il thai I %  U panted b) his wife and they are als.. an import.mt part of the aror* of lhe department, tha object beini! to improve housiiw | It is undertl tbl I I m " l i TH l ne H*"*'^ Company. .,„,,. Issioners of Health .1,,. ... number of rocomhigh. area of St John will benefit from "' larceny and il y i show given at the Pool Plantation yard OB Thursday. The prograRUne concludes with an engageinent at H u a bandM Plantation van). St. Lucy, on Friday for people the Husbands Plantation area The current programme h I rack Horsemen" "Trooping the Colour". This is Britain—: %  Hill Sheep Farm." Motherhood". •East African Colic British New %  -t.'i %  aeii inissionersite H,tll in the tl., /ill have to go to prison. Yoa have no previous conviction loi .stealing and I have taken into consideration the fact that y HI have pleaded guilty and have lo-d your job." His Worship Mr. C. L Walwyn told Gordon Lynch a tl %  old labourer of Eagle Hall yesterday when he fined him 40 i be paid in seven days or one month's imprisonment for stealund Ing two boxei of Phillips bulbvalued at $2.60 and the property •pHK JXr.tl IlVfc COMMITTEE '' Mannina ft Co.. Ltd. I of Combermere School Old .. Lyn ch *b was employed al Toys* Association will hold a meetMann > > Co.. was seen, puttl.u. ing on Tuesday next at 4.30 p.m. At lhe IT feting dates of the Annual Meeting, Dinner and Dance will be fixed and Guests of Honour will I e selected. There will be N dattom which have bean put forward M the Social Welfat Conunittee hive been adopted. I. from Oxford. BnjJ land. Mr. Cn en il .t the Prino in Coylo.i IMC I9M Ait n LNK %  to British Oulane in l:i! N It. He i. in.one in that |K-t until 1838 % %  • %  i recto. i %  I. IP retire I In 1MB city and rural establishment of lards. .Main Unties Th. %  Lyr, Manning ft C< the two boxes of bulbs Into his pocket about 7.25 am. July 8. After Lynch produced the boxes to his chief n policeman was called in and he was arrested. Sgt. Gamer prosecuted on be%  at I n halt of the police. between I*resent and Past Comberincrians at the School grounds —___—_—__ on Thursday at 1.00 pin. The team representing the Past will be "WaiuUngs at Eve". That great fkippered by Mr. O. S. Coppln. favourite "Urink to me Only with r R THE LAST few Saturdays Thine Eyes" was next rendered, there has not been room for all The programme ended with the children who came to the 'How Great is the Pleasure" and British Council's Saturday morning the modern song "The Music film shows to see "Bush ChristMakers" The choirs were under rias." the leadership of Mr. A. G. Jordan. It will be shown again for the Headmaster of St. George's Boys'. last time thi s morning at 9 30 who wielded the baton gracefully .Saturday morning film show*; for and effectively The Folk Songs children, and Monday afternoon were repeated in response to the snows for adults are now regular encores of the audience Lrtttsh Council Features. At the conclusion Mr. 1, T (lav. A CONCERT by the massed District Inspector of Schools and choirs of eight of the eleven t hairman of the Music Ptatlval schools in St. George was held Committee, thanked the teacheral the St. George's Boys' School at a n << pupils for having organised 4.00 pm. on Thursday. The schools fmd carried through the Concert taking part were: St George's . sucessfully Mr Jordan replied Hovs' and Girls* Schools, South and thanked Miss Walker for her District Girls St Judes Boys' and contributions to the programme Girls' and St. Lukes Bovs*. Girls' In the audience was Mrs and Junior Bcboall Baker, a member of the Women's The programme opened with Institute. London. She took the "John Peal after which the opportunity to speak about the Chanty "Heave Awoy. My Johnny" work done by the Institution. enU nine Next followed the Among those present were Rev on| Mine Own CounF. M 2!tt** Ctor J St . ,. W ven Ol Ceorge Mr. F Miller. MCP and %  A Mn Miller. Mrs. L. T. Gay and n Wn |i.,. r large number of teachers. The two Negro Spirituals nnWI.LVE-VEAR-OLn PhllUp Reev'n" and Swing LOW, Sweet Stewart of Vaughan's IAIKI St i Chariot", were the next items on Joseph, was injured when he feUJ the programme anrl then "The from a bicycle while riding olonil Uttle'Hells" Joy Road. St. Joseph >esterda>l The (.'hoir also snng thr Folk r>6rnlng. The cycle was extensiveSongs "A Shepherd Kept Sheeply damaged. % and "O No John'' and the national Stewart was riding his fathers %  Fnnland" after which Miss cycle and going In the direction of WMker gave another Piano Solo Joes River. Charles' First Title Bout In August BUFFALO. NEW YORK. Julj H fczzard Charles, who tailed by the NBA a \\ il. Hanvywelcbl champion, will have l U firrt tltht in All declared fit following el Charlei PttO, match-maker of the rarrvlew Athletic < tonight that Charles would deli" : "'•" "' ""' nilely go through with I,! I In 1042 whc i poslponnl tight ., Bcshore, .f Rarrl ilr* I ra for twel vania, inoi ti f, i The match-maker said he bad II Ml at Codiingti.n talked wilh J.tke^Imt/. Charli Hit manager, and that the light would Ian I. •* probably be held on Auuu '. |fl n %  %  \ oil Cre Charles was pronOUBcad fully eani Edinburgh. raeoyered from a bruised heart in conjunetlon with bl I... to ..i Bdu Creas. Id that 1 i %  v.... from I83S —184'.' '.. i i main dutlei ol U %  U i depaitmeiit jro Disi .ii. Iroaortan ich iVlilate Aiiinim\ ne uduiitiiste.e.i elected IHI.II.-S in the • rnraunlty Centra • Coattmuall • ent.illve ot the and vohiatai i vide for th octal condition %  nd iivn %  in ndditi Loi I Qoverri i ien| Department deals with tin ol ..f Lund Settle %  ti are generellj aaeah Inc vdiaxes in embryo Wh* ibey ere eetobUabed, they era local author re |ion-ihiif.-: administration. u.s. GOVT. SEIZES RAILWAYS WASHINOTON, July H %  Iruraan %  dai Governmem lebrurr i | bound 8.IS8 mile Ruck lslan.1 railway lyatem and direo*ed % %  Aniiv io run it foi the Oowerninent %  lhe to protect the National . SIKI seeurfts Th strike — i,v ineraben lhe Sl %  Ui %  1 u %  W. 'yten id< i theii It-da? %  I u %  %  ." 'i i irerhvj .. I l i -tier Pren.ileol Tnimiiii hat %  ed" draetlo ection 1 i< Ihi %  i .Ui work. it!.' Piesideni orderi ietrui-r> today in the lice of a pro posal from the stnfc. i %  nf out dispute %  • was no n KM pdblle. In the latent! nl u %  i erltl % %  i ailed on everj %  i rfejei lo rel i to his lob. Rente. Only ONE bicycle in Ilii k world carries this murk of perfection The Ibimbcr itjJt niih to pour gumnanus of luting •tuatliif. nos %  ppearance and uiiii.n J lOranh 1 hi world's lee4lMaeelliy rn.yelc OKIIM thi. iui of thaaetei NUt*" IIUMBER //,. .In,l.„r„. „/ a|| Hi.,,),. Demonstration Falls Flat muscle on Wednesday. The Injury forced him to put off fights with Beihore In l> bruery lid March ..f id,. .. .,, —Renter U.S. To Spend $.M,68ni. Next Year WASHINGTON. July 8. Sugar Scarce In Austria %  %  %  %  %  i k marto ... %  on lhe i Buttei -— pei ine j^nate Appropriations cm tin .Vl't ay y l"•""< Bude* Jiiit providing for an expenditure Of I31.688.00.1.000 to run the Am%  •wrament for the llnanl>eglnnirig this month This was $1.4.3.000.000 loss than 1'nsidcnt Trurnan had wanted The Bill uov. the Sena: ,I,K|I ,J. expected to bt Then it will g.. i el Repreai itatlvei ft i i 'on changes The huge budget lumps all toeenuneal services in a single Jill for the first in, %  |: ,,„,., most major expenditures, with the notable excepti<>n of fixed charges" loteillng about $8,000OOO.ooii including interest on the, S2S6.000,000.000 Federal debt —Beeaar, aPURT, Jul> d .in. r ti imlat-toi i Ii 'UI.III Youth t. da tried I I i! %  i i i %  %  monstrated State %  11 i.i here bannei %  %  I ol %  led "Kor i • i %  none •>' the < % %  rn u long tht • %  • %  %  • pollci mai %  1 1 Renter V.SV.".V.V.V.V.VaV M.II si imm i II %  \ I i:i -II SHIi-Mi Ml oi 1 PURINA POULTKi CHOWS %  I'. I Vour Supply from a II I \ II-. JOMa CO LT1> COCOANUTS ARRIVE % % % %  B 0 1 f oopri is ba| ;i. io beai ol con %  nd 10 beai of coooanuU arrive i'l" from si Vincent % % %  %  i hj the Sehoonei "Itriqucm" The "Heiiiaeeuberthed in th outer h..-m during the afternoon In readiness (or .lisehnrglng (t-i! cargo. SPECIALS Mwiir oa IHI OHISIIUL a •MUIIIiTasaiv-sRcais • oi UMIO IISS OJoddinq DISTINCTIVE AND DIFFERENT Our Buyer goes yearly lo tht British Industries Fair. %  V It quaraot.es Low Prices I YOUR IEWELLERS: Y. DE LIMA & CO., LTD: %  Phone 4644 20. Broad Sfreef %  %  %  %  %  %  %  B B ^ ^ <*> or l '' | K' l "i)l Kefrf\hmiiil • -V* | We Offer MAI Til) MILK SANDWICHES TEAS—HOT DOGS—COOL DKINKS 8EBVICB M KNIGHT'S SODA FOUNTAINS Pl.oeiiix & (in pkwmai --•.-,•.'.•,-.'.-.-. ICE CREAM FREEZERS BREAKFAST CARRIERS EARTHENWARE ' %  '"< shtuiin innI nr ,i,i,n iII, ,,i CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET. V/^v^o^^v*v*',^V/vv*v/-^vr-y/^v/v.v'aV>v> THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. M.1SM II,,, I %  Ni Sliead) CW KTAII. ONIONS < Mil KEN MAIIDir.S %  UD POWDKR FHUIT SAI.AD PI Tin CODUVCB J, MALT B..U. KSSF.NCR ny BEEF Tum GELATINE MEL JAMS ft MAXMALADF. Tina A II-,t CURRANT PUDDING Tin. VI TONF. COLDFN ARROW RUM PhRKINS & CO., LTD. i Roafcuei Street — Dial 2072 & 4502 Annual Holiday Our CUSTOMRRfl end KIUKNUS ire naked to note ihot U dU 3nl Julv tu the 17th JnK ItMO i the purpose of granting .ur v.'.', ih.liday. %  i emergency wnrk to be nndiit.i,.. n during I p .irs and %  fork Will he ciintiiuied its usual. OHlce will be open to tl'lMllMS H ususl. 71M tt lit ft loos tOtXitiiY l.Ul. Whit* Paffc Kosd. St. Hlcluel.



PAGE 1

PACE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. JULY 9, ISSO II......I II. ,,,„ For Opera Lovers By Robert Tredinnick 1 John Raskin: His Influence On I lir Fine Arts In i lie iNineleenl li ( enturv I r is difficult, if not Imp to-da; dunny moel ui the latter hall %¡ the nineteenth century A few ul the what bated breath his name waftooce noken; bow his most casual Utterance* earned the weight of an ex cathedra pronouncement. One who knew hi !" pi Pi mil and who accompanied him on hl Florence and Siena But though last viII i • %  warmfj • %  o( public bind; Tintoretto } How in the a m -til; • i RuaUn of i inn s such as popul. • KnffeW (Handbook of Paanttng) a aoriHl refevrrr i tat) penad 1 hiryr* Of travi'llrrv art, it i the splendour of the Ugh I .. V-.lf.'. ill Vl I lion what ; the art alatonan sits In his Ubrai9 surrounded b] i.tphs The world'* art Oxford'' published i in a few second* hand upon adenaki iat reproductions of the whole • %  I in I u arturi arttoei verv Dana .1 young; man of wH Ii-utly known :n Britain a RU nturj ''" ls therefore The skull of the I ..^ Modern Patntera; hardly surunsinj; that much of IQ-. ^^ veneralari ai :v ..-•;. ',%  ;.:.': %  ': ;...",, often found in the coastal i iuch better than thai %  s of South AmorlC* huntt on by th BBC. ISLAMIC ART n.. i\m iiiiiM ii LONDON. June 39by the Mongols, ail A new section was opened century conquered both < I recently In the Victoria and Albert Muslim. It consists af representing various periods of the art of Islam—from Asia. North Africa and Spain—and include, some of the finest examples ever -sen In a Western collection Ptinted In a dull turquoise grey and with light mosaic floor, this l-ARLOPl iajuea Bight records of partlcul rare of opera. •cords are sung by famous „ artists — Olllintu Pedernew collonnded section maki Elmo, formal and quiet setting for tlu.1 %  l 'toman Turkish sulta: I'aghughi. OneUs PmsschL carpets end other exhibits in rich Asia Minor. Syria and Egypt, and %  the lotus, phoenix >.n pottery metalworK i *.. whose rulsn had withstood the Mongol The tewtta phase of the art of vers the 16 and Ibe %  WH powers reign the Islamic world, were yie FAMILY Food Dr/nk fti made by CADBURYS JOHN RISK1N THE CRUCIFIX FISH %  esfla Bah bai %  Ud ben rather, %  I *as not a "diacoveiv" of Buskins In in %  • ,-rrtaln Italian painter B Put the leeent WOrkJ of Turner hail .-^ranged him from his earlier admirers. Rus%  %  kcroos old .IN to win recognition for the splendid, clowing compositions of Turner"! eo-ealM -third period" I' 1851 %  I lik,luUtter pictures, up to the year IMS. the >• rsens who onlv like hH aarty pictures, d< not. In (Bet, 1LKhim at all. They do 'iof liki' that which is essentially his. Ml entire power best represented by pulnted exactly at the %  :... public and the press gather loudest in abuse or him." Tr %  Hen Of Turner %  %  errlm to art. if it was achieved by some rath. has needed revision n the recent reaearch; not -i little of his youthful outpourings he himself lived to regret, and to Moreover, his confessor of morsls snd aesthetics led him 'o many false conclusions But Ituskin did not only rescue certain Old Masters from oblivion .ind one ot his older contemporaries from misunderstanding, the Ipport which he gave to the Prc-RaphacUtes enabled these young men—for we must never fOTfOt how very young tin-. wOte -to weather the storm u. over their heads in 1850 Buskin was not, as has sometimes been said, instrumental in any way Ul wall in place of a cnuillx On . saeai-?). moved East from Damascus U .... Baghdad, a distinct form of Islai i-cordlngs are good. bu. mlc art began to emerge This Jind the eighth disc of outdeveloped in four distinct stages. Handing quality. On thi s OWo the first lasted from the th till conducts a choiur. ana about Ule end of the 11th century. Etar It was. perhaps, the curiosity ii Oe Thouihu on <;*lde.i Ming* aroused by imported Chinese .mil II Signore. Dal porcelain that encouraged the J>U Nails <| Lombard! Alia naUve potters from Baghdad and Croefata) by Verdi. Samarra during this period to This is as tlnely balanced a begin the fruitful Islamic tradlrdlng as anyone tions of fine glazed wares vfueh iiid wish to beer. The fir.i work form one of the principal sections favourite ot Hou I wive of this permanent collection at the but thfa Vtetotta and Albert Museum. : Broadly speaking. UM .haracteri %  •!. of this tlrst phase, is the use of heavy stylised ornament. %  i'jrl,n*hi.e K. 3tee*> heraldlcally posed human and In the summer of 1847 the Philanimal figures which, however, lonductg i lack any sense of movement l.armonia Orchestra There are. too, the very handlome inscriptions in the angular writing krfown as Cuflc nalo. Once this symbol has been >>y Nikolai Molko gave a tcrril i (.'cognised, other bones arc i*rformance of part of the Suit" brought Into the picture. If the ^" 1 or Khachaturian's (iayaneh iKull Is turned over, the breastBallet music iiuludlrin the now 1 late and spear of a Roman solf.mous Saber Dance. This month Elecant Decoration %  i IN i K On shaking the you can hear some of the Suite The second phase of Islamic art skull the ear >'. rattle—the Ko 2 played by the New York covers the 12th and 13Ih centuncs dies with which the soldiers cast Phllhaimonk Symphony OrcheaNew viuilty had been brought the garments of Our lots n Lord. An account of the ll-h m ITM states: "When the bones of the the foundation of the' Brotherhaad e separated, each repreiKxxl in 1848 indeed, he at lirst "?* ome " of the instruments .mlavourably to its work, the Passion of Our Redeemer. having, at the Royal Academy funning !* %  '. cross, nails, etc At the Museum on .special sail the in II Ul clearly "by Efrom Kuril bito the Islamic world by the h intelliEence and invading Turks, people from the II recorded Personally I would ^/^^.SfffS i".^ 1 !" 1 j££* nliture* "Bvii i !hi lime Exhibition of 1850, to be "literally Iragged up to the Millais picture hibitioti from Saturday r The Carpenter's Shop', which k "H an d spine of this I had passed disdainfully." But sh with the eruclllx %  oonai bad he espoused its visible, rause than he became a powerful ill} Latter! to The Times, paincontturisd literpreted ad Peraonally I arousd ftJU ""8" "5PP* 8 m *, Ik.to hear the Phllharmonla who esWbllshod a series of pnnmd Malko tacJda thU second eipalities all over the Near East. uite If only because they did uch a fine job with the flrst ColumbU IX. 1641-t> LuudkcLoai mud-slingtaj at greet a "J **2r, lo "**' ortei irthu \ u -ld "' the Brotherliood Divoratlon of this period elegant and subtle, filled with keen sense of movement and v ealth of sensitive detail Fro That magnillcent soprano. Kirthe 12th century' onwards, ther sten Flagstad. .'ins three of developed the charactcrtsti' %  %  onftt '" Norveglan-Mumuscened' metalwork, in which ,disftppot... Iiearl Uund. Thanks For Thy designs engraved in a brass base ,„ nilhcr (.un.rl. Ml( | A Dream, but I !" enriched with an inlay iv lame, Flagstad does Hold, silver and copper ihe Safavid kfngi " Ihl %  "injp;,i..lnely J -. t belong the earliest Islamic textiles that have tun I i d conii.tlon. and the Museum callactian of them is astroa The Safavid velvets, silks and carpeta—which for roany people are the most familiar and appealin.; of all the forms of Islamic ar* together with Hie %  • and wooden doors from Isfiihan. show work or B Famed Carpel The carjret from the tomb ol the Safavid family at Ardabil. If one of the largest and most fami.i m the woiid An laserlptloi 0<> i" ureservUig It for ShampiIt is prolMibly m the Held of crystal Palac Italian Prin, tun that Ruskm s infiuanrt (,,„,.,„ Imn>r panado-Vehernsc iiT.portsnce In cure has been most baneful. He amn cap i la i s CO pied from Ihe Its Dhotogranty. thl opened ha camrsalgnwiUi the church of the Madonna of Health was in the aWn publication in 1849 of The Sev.-t, „ of Min^i^ A nd one of mj with works Of art onl L0">Pf Of ArcMfectun*. The book principal notions for llSVUH | rngi vim With th.!, which he first revealed the p,,-^„t house is that it is -ur|, : .ill || the world, thfl Identity Of the "Griiiluate of | 0 ui,ded ev.rvwhere bj the tngraver couB] give little nUM oxford" B has been doscrlbed aecuraed Frankenstein than the neneral rompositlon of as "the first treatise In English to „f „,direellv, my own making." a picture, texture of paint, colout teach us the rignlAcanee of irehlru, feossi Losapt, bowover, tourteeture is naUonal aut.ibio K raWJts i(.,. %  sartlng-polnl for a ing> and subtlety of draughtsphy" Of the dosing passage ot i^ovemtni which has had AM, llika isserlflci d -the I^imp of Sacrifice", Frederick p read mid an admirable Influence r thuslatni aroused InHarrison wrote: "No man of „„ Britain's national life 1 refer. • [ri the WOrtn Of many feeling, who has In him the echoes .,f eouno, t|i:iK.i'd;i that the National without lieln? conscious that it The thing Is a Li<* from I c,.A>> i h.,-, gained for him a new meant„ ,. n d Th. Sorlet. worki i' weU visited „ lfc! „ subllmar pathos" Yet in protection "f Andeni Buildings the gaUerlM with new eyes ana mis btMk we oncountei again ruorrls'i "Antl-Screpe"), adum i SoclOty, Ruskin's refusal to submit to the bra ted by Ruskm In UH54 am'I iii 1849 for the reproducn <-,-epte.l l>oundarie iM-tween realised by Morris In 1877. an' tlon in roloui Of paantlnga, morals and aesthetirs "Wathe Ruskln's own St Qeorga*! Qulld, hirgclN Itah.in. by the hest pror ar\'er happy while he was about were the inspirations which la> -, ,,t the time, was it?" he asks rtwpeetlng onunnent: behind lhe foundation by Oetavti Ooa af the many results ot his ,f no t. it will l.i.k life "The mil of the National Trust enthusiasm; though these condition is absolute", he adds (Morris alwnvs nckn%  11 nrj InUStefaet But it was after the publication of ttiat Ruskin was the tirst-ionn. (they had to be made from wateryj,.Stones of Venice the Inventor" whom he was proud colour eoptea), thej ln yN*anc ad that Ihe disastrous efleets of carto follow). Whenever we nn many works wholly unknown ID uun of Ruskln's architectural tempted to feel lhat rome Britain. rtassi flrst began to be felt; for „f Buskin's influence on The art of Venice, and that ar whatever benefits were ttestnwed architecture has been unfortun Tintoretto In parlicular. had never DV ,he alli-ntion drawn to Venea te let us remember with grali Buflered the full eclipse that had ^ Byzantine and Gothic, they tud'e this enduring legacy r %  %  lll.M.V lilt 'Ml?" With the New Symphony Orchestra conUbert Brad* y facto) erforn ince ol ,no ? 1 tht ITologue to t I'igllseel. He of ihe dramatic %  I voice ecca X SIS I. I I Another individual art. whie %  i d chiefly in Syria, was painting in gold and enamel on glsss. Hanging lamps Iron mosques arc very rare today With the exception of the collection of such I that in the Victoria and Albert ll eliunod to be the world's, finest. A large marble basin from Hama in Syria is, perhaps, th, notable piece of Islamii lplure In a Western exhibition My Chinese Motifs The third phase. wfaiCtl the 14th and 15th centUJnV how contacts between the Near and Far East had been facilitate.' ^ I Islamic lettering and book UIus, tratioiis on view Archite i. Islamic claln fami It is sad lhat no exhll .'how the magnificent dom„ iani which still stand, rerolridlng us of one of the great periods In world art Hum & turn |fe AO.STS. I.. M. II. MHYKRSX Id. 111). "Soaping" dulls hair— h" '•P"iu-i" *ll> i<*" ctwmtst IO okii-n lorn* (or rou I'om h,i WholMlr. THf $MAD7'N£ (foMfANV 4* Ch U rc*,fi)d "old *on. London. ENGLAND HI You can always depend on the natural creamy flavour of Uil K *'•* rowitt.* Milt IMPLHUL LLATIU-H \DfDtH BLOSSOM SLUI in M .MM RUPTURE RELIEF ndi of mpturcd m*n ami w ( %  •und ln.l-,,1 rrllrf I.. .-. i Air i .',..„ Allan. ir.l ith a ml inniuuit all •tiuna and ->ily wa>i^u. n liold• wlih •ii.-h arnlto nrn.r.*-. that llinafor ( til dttalU and Ki noohlrl wtll, IIEASLET'S LTD.. Utpl. 190 I Oark Str*^. I.ndon. W 1. Englind Y*."auipiitK"your hair with even lincm liquid of cream nhjinp,H>* hidv. in BatOtsl e widi dullinit ...

hUlei betitj §| v ,ur hair hate marvtllsd at the eonsUtent flsvour of "Oak M brand powdared Ustrs have creamy flavour of "Oak" brand powdared milk. "How ls It" they ask. "that throughout the ytur "Oak" milk powder can be distinguished by tht sams delightful flsvour ?" The secret la simpla. The cows producing the milk from which "Oak" brand milk u prepared are fed all the year round on the rich sunny grasslands of Hunter Valley, Australia This ensures healthy cows yielding rich milk snd of a consistent flavour throughout the year. Thia rich, wholesome milk u peeked under the most hygienic condition! so that ail the natural vitamins snd creamy flavour arc retained "Oak" dissolve! resdlly in water snd is ideal for drinking, Coffee, Cocoa, Etc. Don't worry over mounting milk bills. "Oak" brand milk powder with m exeelIsnt price value allows you snd your fsmily to drink milk freely 3 Lb. Tina $2.43 First Aid •/or tyset Stomach Xlki Seltzer brines pleasant reel Alka-SelUer gives you the quick reliel you want PLUS the nlk.e User you need when overeating causes execs* gastric acidity. Diop one or two tablets in a glass ol water --watch it fin. then dunk it down. It's reliable First Aid Pleasant-tasting. Not a laxative: AlkaBeltier makes you leel fine last. aa w i w >**1f; Alka-Seltzer us isiossrosiis, INC Full Craom Milk Pewdar %  1)1(1 F.I) L'CREAHJ ^ILKi HOW OBTAINABLE AT Ltd. Otwry S Madlofd Ltd ri ,B-dOi, Dfi> ShuiM Ltd. B -Uourut a Co %  eawaa. I.,M Cn\m S Co Lid I | Hu,f him knljhl. Ltd iClly PlMMinae* Kiiiii'ii. Ud. (Pco^o'a I'harn... Perkins & So, Lid M.,i .1 iv%  v SmlUi A. AlwMl Ud %  SaaassU, Scott Co L Drue* Weaiiivihcid LUI U S. WILLIAMS MAISITIMl %  .. 1 lb -..I. Af—v Mrs. HOUSEWIFE We can now supply you with the following in Eitrthonware — MIXING BOWLS (m variou lil) TEA POT8 do. TEA CUPS TANKARD JUOS (in variou ie) MEAT PLATTERS do. PLATES -Deep and Shallow DISHES SAUCE BOATS And many other, too numerous to mention. Pay U3 a Visit before Purchasing Elsewhere to New ESSO EXTRA Motor Oil (THE IIOVSL FOR BAROAISS) The Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd. Nos 33 a 62 SWAN STREET PHOl.E 2109. 3534 or 4406 Jl Get EXTRA Protection... EXTRA Economy—with New ESM EXTRA Motor Oil! i Unequalled "High Vllcoslty Index" keeps lubricshng value under extreme heet of ataady driving... flows quickly when engine is cold. You use less oil... get longer mileage! tergent fights power-robbing carbon and vsrnish deposits. Enjoy a cleaner, smoother-running engine .. with less wear and tear! Hen's something seara for your money! I*r. liweWtoM AdMI SSMUI iM b tt*y Itt M lm Mn **,*, c4K fls\efy yreep§ ^ storti


PAGE 1

M M<\\ i( i y •!. n-„i SUNDAY AI>\0( \TI p\r.F si vi •* What Happened To The THREE SMART GIRLS Rupert and MILLIONS OF FILM FANS ENVIED TIIIJM. I VIII,%  %  producer" %  %  %  11 bin was %  %  %  1 .... %  %  tit of pique. hidden away in AM and ; %  alone in %  b) 1.500 dolls and the in* .-.;•• %  |l,s on i ... manager, gave turn. 1 i i r WH taking sintun lessons Neighbour., Mid hi And. KoofllM .1 with %  mdnokl stage, was fourOumm, daughter l ind Flhel Qumm. actors. %  I thn %  ualwed) • H U v Temple dolls, -'O.ooo.ooo wen la u] %  i -'ni don'l count .. Sunday**, i. appeared with nod • i; imm t. iasa I ihcse little %  "I "11 | • ll |M-ll thill .nh th. %  %  I V: : I ..* Preal aol B r. ived h.i two week* ju>! by % %  a-aco-at maitmge find. WntraduoM PelU Jeckeaa 20 yearher senior Seven months latci I rr *eniin HMJ HBANWHUJ what of Mx* %  %  ad HH b**t West lake could ofli r .be • brwi* gioomo by Srlri.uk tor adul' rosaa. In IMS the. loo began lo exl-erlment with thoughts of mariiafe U a young irn\y PT msf rut tor. John Agai aged 24 He had written her fi o Milan since *-'w *• BO high Gone wi, all ihe naidkllllll lUamour The t-rec *mart girls had now to stand up under a lr sentimental OTotta] Iftai Duroni. h 4T1 v. r was still laeMlll^ like CIOO.000 :. •ear. Miss GarUmi 173.000. Yei •ne renith was pei hap* past. Children's Shorts CounliirMj Sheep Weigh This IMS MI: ai IT lha in.ii k, u i Shirk to rind ;• %  %  IbrtanJni %  la child geniu* .;(all fl2 flngerD chubb\ WH I "i aii fc I UM Wl I M a Ihree-yeai U mart girls. Mias Tvniple i ni B box-oAca appal higher than Qarbo'i In lf*6 More than 200 milli lo gaa her. ideal ntngi had re* I 000 f• I.KI-1 gat* Infl broiled steak, playing with her %  I th fell out %  id! %  %  %  v i HtM Dorbii %  I'.r.tu IN 1030 I iondiii lateo '. %  |. % %  vajgki rowli nit" ,i ( %  ClStHi.ii % %  i %  II %  %  Came Un Mlsa Temple qull WesUokc School. She had %  dher for hameV someone also. The ntoney was rnvf Led, < Ihh '.is tine Oarland took UP educeUt.AN.NA too* Wl t • fO PlO MI Dnvct—M OHOMOsa DMxxct. lion too. WhiU it.imnK in l!.< • f Or*" •• e !oi^ out j I '.II I' ML wa< tua i : ,' %  aaaln g-wai taanfl IRII WMll.K Miaa T. nipl,I gffCIM books. MUM i' busy u n their 1 t^t fiukhandii. In Ihe nounced thalr marriage Ten thousand people waited t itside a MelhodUt church u> ar M Curbin marrl Ha fnuul producai Vaughnn Paul i ,i a*nt rn .i ind quieily run I P, %  I: | Both inarruunpi laatad I > Within a raw monthi ol • %  h outai %  EM dlvoroa wiul.JJI anese %  . i gajnl Ml %  .I it i %  ha wan Viiughan o| B en I a I cmelty It took Miss Garland a little l<.nger to make up tier mind. Durbln also lot oir t<> her tj hi Jamil i IOM both MD %  Land i Ml Looked a room m Bja hoaallal Jaaalea Lotilaa Jackson araj b I %  I I ii Ma i 'i MUM Durbln', film can-er was T raiiic.ii. caanph tad Ml Qarlanai wai lo onui it'. m o %  t tempai aineiitaJ. aravwsl %  M P %  trthlni lOn MR lanM i The Durbill second niairiage vorke.f no belter Uaag The same might be saiu IM MUM Car land's A'ut \li*< Temple, wli.i had i aim I in hupa of "a I rally I appy pernianeiit iiNurlnue likr %  umniv'-. and 1 lald>'" I.mini \ %  %  „ rtid dM not like to tie rille.l 'Mi %  She tiald that he aot drank and %  v:i, no fun bat:iu*e ihe dldiiT net drunk. O LD JOSI v .. tt an add will t %  wil; inv i %  rtcafiad foui the llotk. tin s*'.uiid -oi\ fnui she. p and half tif those left, aiut ao 'ii. Hie youAdaai son waaratn i. % %  mi' ai aaan wai• Ml Mow many s.m, ami sharp War lhareT Husking Time F A: M Kit Early and his wife Sarah and aon Jim UMttbei .i ..... L tain %  of can in Bv< a-.Kaiinei t'-.iiand Sarah ran liu.-k it b) themaelves in Bve days Tbdn how long it take Jim lo husk ii b) himsalf. %  UDpuatng his rale ol -peed rnuiie-.t i.mtiaiiged j i W IIATS iha MM.,11. -i numbai Ol different ... v %  "• % %  lit.' itinerant buytl at I."'n raquiraa on hi MM level pound) i M |. it> PNIIUI> ihe wfuhta DUU be plare.1 n. KlTIIKlt pan rrf Th.. Fur your benellt. in set" ling the %  'gument', we're provlduui the 1 haw, but MO suggent you v.<>rk it ut vourself flrsi %  I .. e,( %  .IMIIIII i 'iui>jn iwiuaM* * "n p I .-1 .I1W--1 Weighty Matter Till* WI-.I K s I.I i ss si \iis •s* IN 1S49 Mis* Temple GOBM H*H I r inuncoae fortune Mail (•ailaiui ha.I %  .imu. nervous breakdown Miss Durbln. without a liun lor t..o years, hud put mi JO lb in >..'tght. and was thinking about I'.ing into I.|-I.I wheir perhaps, t ..• %  i lg h i wauU ni.I IMM .ml %  >! %  From then on, for them all. it WM the down-slide Twice M.G.M. suspended Ml I! n lai >• Si.e had temperamental (Its Unlike Mis Durbln. who dedared *ho would never slim. Mi-s Oarland drove herself intn a Lnston hospital trying to illfn Miss Temple's marriage went through a sordid divorce rourt. Nothing of the glittering dream M-enied to inutcrlitlise Two men I'swled over Miss Temple on a M If louOMC Miaa DurMn, in Perls oreamed el playing In "Pygmalion" 1 .none would : s k hn And Miss Garland thought, per1 inel too seTlously. that thr iiKgrd rdge of %  tumhli i Maghl wny <4 aOrVhtf the prafc%  id naaa n Hollywi ad'i tl rer -r-nrt rirls. —JOHN v< I r I" i I —I F. . (Jtihiren's letter J s >.-, it. • in wham l run • replMd ,. banbown ma (real ippiei tlon and lUtanaai for Lha paopu ul TrlnKlad, n i would like rou b publish i.' %  me In eour Pan rr* i column, my iraUtude, n d u ani to .ai who wrote me be auaa it Ii ..I.. i DM t" W 'lTII aoff le weight* ih ll ... IK.. aaaount Iftween I and 117 en OM in' %  .1 UilHiiev acalar Otily whole tiuoiben must ilunaldai ad. What .viii be the denomtnaUjoej el tinweight*" llv the w i it %  ehli I %  idea trn*> .1 II iiis >>t own weight, hov Enigmas Thanking you In idl out kind i^msiUeiatin', I am. Sir. VOUn respe. (fully. NOKI. ilETHFl. ion ul' Assets *-plI; XVZ Company, which fuilI ad In bu Inn bk to m.> Its creditors 24c on the ifcaUaf Hid it hern able to colle I tain debt ol $100 it could have paid 26c on the dollar So what wars Tinhabllttti %  Wl M IM ilf *">ll K < %  %  I*" "U Win %  i. Ad.i remain, ivoid ilmoi lilier. and a let lei I M 1 2. Add iraaaaraasiuu and and get prnulne %  ."i*i* i Sen III-IMIM V% Joan Join-.. Hlark Baal OaaBO AM'. II*' Alkuiv Hi-a-t Sinimi'"' i. ace Worrell. 3rd Ave, Itj I-and %  •rn l*iil% i Daah,c/i Ron Oarafa. No f. Renal Road, San Fernando. Trinidad, between 14 and It .lean Ellis. |*iogresMve lanui. Bank Mall. 81 Mirhaal H Taylor, 0 IISS. St I.I Bldon Taylor. ii OSS, st Oaoraa'a <.i*ii-aa. t %  ii rick Jai %  -•-. r. uss. ST %  . < leeaeda So beautifully easy.. so e/:sily beautiful because Orrkk les*lv, ">lii -i BHtlOl aad : i. aan kweka ll l, lm>. No >.: %  i"l '"•' %  I %  aaadp ae ptaearata i tan th laavj aed the iari/i r.. '. m I there's mori foam in BRYirOAM THt Ol-flIK* 1H\M 00 IN A TU'S 4 SMOOTH. COOL the boauty cream Ibat is a MreatniPDl' ^-^ %  miii.r a a . [ prwfaela ta .. n, U-m da* r •*ij..i ,n,ii...,..i J i. 11 1 V eaala UM ikn >wlaiilf I .i T'."i ... ,-Ir-^-, y ao/tana ..i prfua* UM I tkni. |ii-^-m. ikal .i,iat loak I clmmitar* iharouf hi j, |>nil • f jl . giw %  parfm MI ..jh Fashion Need Nat Mean High Prices. % %  'liar 5aw> '. %  R il .. tar* im a* nlWr (Want. pg.rall r coohag ai all j. %  • -I i. J ii. -! .114 laUlr %  >,.,,.i,.. ....I awan'HUa* Sim* aS aafcJ b your daily IMM HAZELINE SNOW 1"/^ A BITHROL..H* I'll ICOKK A lit PHOUUCT mfcbd FLIT r1//F//t cortta/tts D;OiT FLIT IS AN @) PROQaCJ •PLAYE-UP* CUrki 'P i/e-Up'range r. pecially deigned to Itart first-walker, ofl with real confidence: and then to I i*e them through all the stage-, of toddlerhood until iNj fraduate to Clarkt school ihoes. They are *oft. flexible and KkM I I %  planned to g..e adequate support with room for toe; to g'OW SANDALS M*OC * C4I.CIAMK iti.'WMOiri%  LOCAL AO0NTS: ALEC RUSSELL A CO. 0AR0ADOS SEW YOUR OWN! You can sine u much as half the price.'And you and .our children can always look your best . .;in the latest md most uriting styles in'^Tex-miide'i\'cottons. "To-made" fabric*^are made"by one # ol7the'largest manu fa. tin ra of cotton prints in the r^^l^^ ^ Mjne.olllhe laren / i-. w.irlil'y)ld.Colo ny? / Suzann ajprints— in ^-^3tfl areamoj them "~^" !" (Menwood, Victoria^,Be\erl y/andjs foshionaUe and vcisi itUe paltem sSS •Kipular. They are easvjo handlea nd'se w.\riicy v dru|>e ay fresh." wear.well aiidtWaabTeasily. noothl), atay ik for tin. iHiiitificatioTTbandsandthe ':Tex-made" .i ihe piece goods. This is your guarantee I hat the suu buy are the genuine_sunJ'aot 1 aiid,tub-la*t, t-uiade" labrics. 1U4UW IS WUL.HAUl



PAGE 1

SUNOAY Jt-XY . lfi SVXDAY ADVOCATE PAf.F TiiiRTrrv HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON ibV *r*9 MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY K. O. '.\V\\ W ITH WHISPER IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE VtS MflHN,l MAO A MUNCH TMIS CHAfUCTCH 5OT WCCI \ SAID TMfVO HAVE TO V ^ Mf TO Kerr ouirr TMIVM C0MI*6 M"f Tp M(CT M* TM( \*CN(V. I MO'C. sis IW&* niiiMOOiu'i % %  %  in i CitolCtUt Gordons StandsSupb&fHASUPPLIES AGAIN AVAJLABUI Wiring Installations INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL DOMESTIC Highest Quality Materials O Workmanship Lamps Lighting Fixtures Wiring Devices Motors Wire & Cable Stvitehgear ELECTRIC SALES c SERVICE LTD. I .....I,..I. II.....I St M..I....I BULLL SII.UUI I. I J L HlitllAM tl I M X MAUHlHUtM %  i %  Bi rWnrfir /. | I %  • HfMMfm, "-I llllVD. The makers of Illl.l.M \\ CARS exclusive!} recommend SHELL OIL %  SHElA SHELL)! L E A U t II S II I I' IN LUBRICATION



PAGE 1

lu.i sixri i \ SUNDAY AOVOCATE M NOAY, JU.Y 9, USO Communists Undermine Philippines MAMI.A The CommufUM un South Kurea -rtrengthc: i Vlclioil %  I agent;, have %  verked ' undermine the ('.'. ami punch a OfieV i i These h I8J Hi''' I founding of the ... %  |1 % %  %  Far East and that then raMO WOn % %  '!i"i bMI IrencherOUS lhan not l>ri\n Home n-a has driven home the dangers' am highllghta Iheee eenclu %  l niHMIW Comn Ul i-t. organ ISMl :iri.i American Communlit party members, i ,w l..ki' 1 %  %  ihr China ai Common! at Pel ping by radii and other <.< ,.ii 2. Chinese Cornmonl I MM UnPhilippines ui < M nirelr %  N HOBgKong and IVIping. 3. Chiin-..' CommuiuM I Ing In the Philippine*, not at Inlermc(ii,.rn^ to eotlCd and ammunition (oc I istancc to Commun-i guerrillas and contribute oontdeiahl. t. Rr-( propai^nda work Open MTlliulton Ll. Col Carnielo Haibeio. spokesman (or the defense department, frankly explained foi international News StrvlM "The Philippine Corrdnualst party openly avows afilllaUon with other Communist parties In the world ll pledges i herenre lo tinllara-LenlnStalin teachings" Moreover. I ( omiiiuiuM "watch-dog" nut work, stretching half way across the world, hai been established t<. help Filtplfli Communists among other Ibwgi 'f gel imiuiitinii consequents Filipino t'ommun Mi undei ti' guise of laiioi ,„ ial % % %  %  !' i.(i managed to .ittend con and contact foreign Cnmmunlrt" These tups abroad lead t" r-eeret huddles and wh Nlruction* that have outlined nev labor union ngilatlon techrdquand the latent underground pro paganda fashion; Well Qwwfjfd Units CommuuMl pro) %  % % %  well organised that they travel in well guarded Information units, have gained warm sympathy from an MUUtl percent of the peasantry in Central Luzon. Flllplnlo defense off* lei ll %  colonel added, nut only rccogntM the new propaganda danger but, are taking step-* to neutrwl Itg effect Hed propaganda for Instance, has sparked the organisation of a new government infORMUon pTOKramme. It has led to a new. glgentk effort to tighten U.scinlr %  loosely led government lotdlei on Luzon. Bold Programme It has touched off m Ogoittei of a bold mm oraaeJatJea programme to train troops in the belief that only good ComniumsU ... ,,.... Oorru But ais<> important Li the fact thut defense officials now realize that Cori munli l rtb> %  must be fought on their own hunting ground Out-dated Philippine ..riny atratogy. for example, is being junked while new recruits study anti-guerrilla tactic: oi. fighting guerrillas with guerrill. r tr atep Ten special combat battattOfU are being groomed in I he ncv why ..f battle while B 000 n .un' ..lied from the serve are tit Ing b .ster ai By the end of June, time months after the an look ovet The antl-ConunuDiat rebel campaign. Minn General Caataneda, army eUaf of %  tail WOB confident and proud of hi troops whether. United States -"'• %  > ti"ops would be welcomad 10 .. Bel Filipino troops in tincampaign the eeneral i %  %  tlnd "Wouici jrou allow aomeone en* to clean up your houee if it WM dlnvIXD/A'S VOTERS LISTED FOR (LECTIONS NEXT SPRING ll.li.C. Radio Programmes I %  ... Ilw N-HOW I ASTHMA MUCUS Loosener" first Day •he right \ %  PRANK DOBBON WITH HIS MODEL OF A RELIEF FOR X POUT orriCE IN BRITIHn OUIANA FRANK DOBBON. the -udploi. kal BaOB working for Uic pant ftftir.!] nioiithon %  fall scale clay modnl of a rr>iiisrkab)<> IUKII relief for a Post Office in British Oulsna The relief will be sluppod to Briti-l. Onlsna In ItfM, crated in sections and re assembled inere. In recon stracted Onlsii. Online u will weigh IB Ion-, mr.-iuc 17 ft. 2 IDS. by 0 ft ins. Dob ion's full scale model consumed -' %  tons of clny. The relief portrays two reclining figures In the Picture Is seen the relief in immature as it will appear on the face of the post office. H seen In a model of the building at the sculptor's studio-, in the Roy.il College of Art. Houtli Kensington. London Prank Dohsnn Is wn looking t it / %  %  Canada's Senate May Be Reformed OTTAWA, Canada Reform ol the Canadian tonato ten debt may actually come in iht Ufa <>t tha presani (mi %  Which in normal circumstances would coiitinur -i 1 :il 1954 Thi* reform IIUMSUKS may coma from within tha upper chambar ItaeLf. The faderal government appoints senator! foi life, 1! 11 <-hiitnl>cr 111 Canada having a fixed munbei • ocfa provinca. Total number ol eaats woa raisi ;H> to ML* when Newfoundland entered the Conadl 1 coi federation in i u 4!t Britons Go Down In Itoyal Kegallu Oxfordshire, July 8 Overseas oarsmen \-1 i the t--n liophles on the final day of the Henlej Royal Ri gatta which wns the worsl foi Mini h rowlnf %  I 11 %  I %  I I ead-heal 1 Diamond Send raj for '/".;; !" %  : %  %  %  %  nng undi •. hlch -ipuliition the rlghl \ %  Mall M.. 4A.000.000 1 pent Hm.lj uan SIO.000.000 in preparaSe-^'"^T S n 1 in imc of electoral rolls n*a P m ipi*>iue* rricuii %  'or the an Z d.|.rr l"'l %  ,.< II put -n,. H*wi %  Tl %  enumeration has been Its d to the „, ire lured mlatioi awet—Mwi JOS pn 1 al adult %  %  nlj •' %  •" %  eSaai 1 We SIVNPAV IBH N m nd with the '•• .... .. '." %  %  tea UtiB ;. ^1^1 %  I -.*'Sli g. IHIini J. Nathan t oininisMiin %  lection nHiyntge ... '.tutM> authorit\'' "m'aSiJI treated by an Bftkle ill the conTunes l p.n. Thr -.. eodimlssion is not part) "i political nnn to democratic It hOI wide powers delimitation i>i rnostltupreparation of electoral nduct .I actual elections 'ion disputes. The rommlaelori is answerable onl] la the SOople'l parliament. Laftlat ilenunts have been propei readjustoSS^aai Ol existing -onstiluemii 1. %  which are strongholds of I the Indian NaCotjsrt A eoataancc of the oppoduon pwipi wHI be held in Bornbu iriortl* to wbrnlt %  'i.iiii to the preeldtal on procedure However, paruarnant will be 1 %  Uthority on the rtem.tr; iicniles At Its September parlia: cniiMder the election ndatlooj The 1 %  :.''.• %  ••ii irivi Indian national aged 21 who has been 1 rtltuen for al least six months Onlj the defence forcea, n itlc mil cormdar <-orps. ..ml refuge< fi-.in Pakistan %  gempl from the r.Ida ntlal qi (tan I'reu.l gy q g^f~ gaSy i MQkt, Injerllnn or apra?. but through o.a biowl. i" %  gs -:: % %  %  .1 do.* autrta halplnc ul at-; T J BUii 1 ll-P' i" %  -k atn.i but work* ... ..a'hins tha ul>*a Tha nrat It i> 1 1 nta may be given a roke in tuu.x %  .< note %  ppolatmenb Purtber, the preaeni iyaii n of life appointment moj ba dhl regarded foi some ret i rement ret rei mi .1 ntrl 1I0 ptan .K fur seiuiti i> 1 • en beard often ovei 1 loni period, chiellv from DOlltlci ivorti who objed to the u.ier.ii sovernrneni %  ppointments 1 fm pollUi al lupporl era and a nri < t nt*%  ion Bui concrete i • ume from the conference between rarol ..'1.1 provincial inetits this fall If the federal' do n<>t Forward recommendations, the > k ral Qoverarnani is believed ready lo undertake .. senate %  in unUrdna procedure %  ' rltS th. %  Initiating u l^sq*#$igemstat LONG? SHORT? SUM 1 We take the %  sighs'' out ol yow lixa. You'll find .suits Ullorad by iu fll n ; comfortably. Come in and Inspect out Bi I -mtinRs. you'll IK* delighted with some new patterns. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET IWihilili,-, ii .on reform plan, u believed possibilities 1 A system of provincial govonni.nl appointments to the renate for 1 ovc peei larm foi one-third of the 103 without disturbing the present geographical repre s e n tation Thb M-i.t;n 1 let* Onl 1 anada -' Reteouon In loderal hand nwlit of wpiMiintiiut tin i' .ni.i. : ,,i the %  but aboil lion of life appointmenU In favour I reltrement %  f ederal 1 j a cent of the Bt Dab PI %  ilion At . Liberals. 13 Progressive Conservath IS \ 11 11 %  \ qfiten I %  ..! %  .. i 1 lei wall rnmenft leader appointed Caa. rrrw Anthoru oKinpii :. ullei a % % %  %  on %  foi %  I9S3 Rowi from H \ ll Hed ... .1 Dut< I indent. The Oral halli 1 up tor the Eights wa i.v the Harvard crew 1 %  I M Un sh lo beat tin. Mali % %  %  ol Holland 1 Heater, t-'nr '*(if/fifss SAf 11 ml I hill S/rfiitrl 0 'lf# OraW Jlfcaae.— Pkgs. ENGLISH ICING St G \K KNGL1SH t'ASTOR St'G*.R .. TABLL KAISINS I \ 1 1 I'T MIXED PEEI, —per lb. (TRRANTB per lb. Tin* BLACK CURRANT JAM I.I ICOSE SPREAD PRUNES ,. STRAH3ERRIES .. CHOCOMEL Hots. PEANUT BUTTER ., TARRAGONA VINEGAR DRY ESCHAIX)T—3ftr. per lb. They'll Do li Every fimc %  THEN DEAR 010 DAO IS SICK. THE WHOLE H, L y COOP=?4TES TO LET THE O J3 BOV S>OOZE Ao. Wy... t.K?, OH.HOW HE CAH SNOOZE •• %  • / SHMH.' SO O.T Ato PLAv... / JT POVT VA4RD! \ P ^^A .5 &CK;AN3 AE ^UST(.ET \ -* SLEEP! <5NOi TOO< v ^E B*BV R?R TWE ^bgiferV~iT \MIII.WI IIOi/)/\ IO\U'\IMI/M> BII.IYI)i:UOIIf. MOW FREEMAN EDWARD ARNOLD DearWe ;: Ion 1anU It,m S #'/€%# I II I Ill's tit ? THANIS SUPER ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co., Ltd. HIGH STREET Calling all Dairy Owners, Race Horse Owners, and Stock Owners. I %  polled or talntng m your Buckets mured by stale Of dlrt| ivulei 1 you use our patent BUCKET HOOKS Wash your Bucket and Bucket Hook by its rim by Its own weight. It d>i remains dry and clean unt ;.nii quleklv released. The BUCKET HOOK any wall <>r upright. mng It upside down on the The Bucket is securely held ins and dries In no Ume. It 1 wanted for use und Is easily MII be fixed on the side of EACH. fbsr COffES BEDTIME ( .ciASS OF WATER/ ') V *f e A6!rv*NOHJ^^ FAMILY, AHO GIVE A LOOK WELL.



PAGE 1

r PARE FOUR SUNDAY ADVOCATE Sl'VDAT. JULY 4, 1S50 Wood (P'tvick) Scores First Century T pjg \\. %  i .si.' • %  > vei Lancaahlra f 'inBra) in...in %  l rust TM vMorj 1„ En: %  u Ihe Wl vl '"die*, who meet h'.e mi July 2ii Having M-itril :UM fen 5 wlcketl against Northamptonshire yesterday, tb in a comparatively safe :. if the occasion presents itself m liemands. A siudv of the flgun"* %  • nwn i 1 %  great poanwiTiy, >f ell tinRxturM Khediued fM ihli low can be played, then urtll b* no 11Vl .,,. ; %  %  m IB Enidand left Standing WKBCEfl MM KI.NS F OUK nnH Stand between it.. vanatUi Byi ri his 1.500 rui runs In IT Innlngi In Pli %  wtrad UM 1.381 mad< in 4i mi..i I u Martia H Inaj in I92H nungi m i!23.i Headle) %  J.J.N in J iniuap in IWJ! and Heedh SO inninga in ion that with . %  '• Hum hall iii. iniunj Ueorgc Challenor in iittJ he hu lo make but On runs to paaa th* great George Challenor's total, 824 lo reach George Medley's iiiaiiiin-j cent ls^J latal and MB i for 4 HlrkeU) in i braaay and aKKn-*Mw iBnlaaa -•> Kenariaigton Oanld Wi —i knocked up 107 aaaln I i ami %  rmara i.lury for the clay and his team's total of 258 for 3 wiekets was the highest in in-M division cricket. W.N-l wu making regular use "ft drivn get lus runs and occasionally lie nut nl to taf fur fi.ui SCORE BOARD % %  .> He gava 9 chancaf In h. .t .i po dole 6. Norn Of th< M ' r ilitli. nil bermere's HeMing mi not up li a good itandard Ram wat cOfurtantlj. railing .. drove the batsmen la some three or four lime* Th wicket, however, was mil glvln mm h .isSLstanrc Id UM W.HKI was engaged In partnerships which realised and 70 respectively' The first was with t'hjili111? T-iUI liar 3 lti %  %  TAMTAM ' AUUM m • AI I.i > Sin i III > RocK I Will.an | IIT %  — b Wvlrti : pr b Outran. 1" I) i>.,... %  It 1. • T-i-l 1 *M. IIOW1.IN*; ASAI VSIS <> M n 9 < L r. Hatif • 3 M IK ktsfi si I K ). \\„. % %  I 0 1 AMI ros fill.II I r.llrLI I —lot. P. Taylor a wkr Maxiiall b r-imn v. K on I"IW1 INI. ANA li..-.. b li^lrM N liairiaun pr. b W-lch U M Wormb W.ich m i ii^r-man lb* b IIUMM • M Marm c wlpi b W-k* M 1 A Corfcu. ID. W-M I K K.na rwi oui • E*US* 4 Ic'.i I ...... Bl Fall of *m. I , I—gL 1-17. —S7, i Jl. •—44. T 74. %  -•!, a-w. %  OWI.INa ANALYSIS O M. R W K IBronk* II I M 3 T. a. Outran. %  I Zf 1 %  I I II > V Mr Cum )• • 0 M • LaSft III In-.af* \ Mr Cimnr b Wllll • i Uilh It. b C'orbin IC I Can not uul & i. .. Tulsl ISSfl 4 WSI. i iii ..i wfeai ia. r i i Taylor other 3K and th. HVI.RTON Mhlmade Uh BlrkHt. was M not u line Innings, g'vinw on* at 49. The Play Tha Brankei Uirkef Wood pulled him fi,r four and M:AH TI1UK T!IUUSAM> RUNS uns in a* man> inmngit U Weekus IB innings, Alan Hao Blti in 21 m niiiiigs and Jclliey Slollmcyer '"2 in 18 innings should all reach n i„, f„ r about IS i ilH-ir inoivuiuai Ihuiisand runs soon. Combermere won the toas ami m a wicket which Ms-nu-d slightly M EANWHILE Clyda WalcoU 773 runs in as man> mm,*. MM Weekes '"gS^" ^nEST 'l\X!$L. U in IB inninas. Alan Hae BIB in 21 „ llght shuwPI cum V ( holding up nutea. .Sharply at 2.05 i m., Leon In Ihe bowling depai %  tim-ni. bunny Ramadhin with 38 wlckeU f\.si,. r and Gerald Wood Went \u taken at a coat ol iti.ua runs. Alt Valentine with M .apturod at 17.87 runs each, C H. Williams 31 wickets for 21.22 runs each, G. E. Gomel 33 wicket* lor 25 runs each all bid fair lo reach the luvelcd century mark before the lour ends. The tour is now halfway through and there is every indication that taller flgwei than ever before in th* records ol West Indies tours to England will be returned by lle end of the present tour. ih.ii t.i down 11 in.played over and howled at 35. The M 137 for 2, Wood 7B nut out. read 11 I 59 2 ihe latter pull M.aris twice to th.who had now replaced Brookes. bounders Pre v oibe KOI lor a painstaking 18. Two quick I to %  qniare leg off wickets fell, when Harrison and ind later, late cut HamWorm* were both sent back to the %  brace and then on drove pavilion oh" the bowling of Welch In mount rh *' *coreboard read 37—5"—0. Wilkes (danced Ha to fine Bv thl8 dme, WUlii ONE THING that can safely Usaid before the third day's racing (I am writing this on Friday) Is that Blue Streak is quite definitely ..in ol the best Jamaican horses that has ever been sent lo the South Caribbean. Perhaps I should qualify this by saying I think he is the third best because I still do not think him bettcT than Brown Bomber or Commando II. Bui that he is much bettor than U9 of the %  tluiM-nt us, there is no possible shadow of doubt. He victory on Thursday proved conclusively that he likes the %  oft K'.iiig and even his 131 lbs. could not stop him from holding on with Kreat resolution when Slorm's Gift drew level with him at the turn into the stretch. Yet with all this it is clear that Storm's Gift was struggling under the final grind and could not produce the dash which she displayed last Christmas. In fact her form at this meeting is di-tiuctly reminiscent of her running last August in Barbados and before you read these notes she may have proved my point. Atomic II il ." bigger rogue than he ever was It i not just a cose of lumping ofl .is II area un to laat yeai N<>W if ha does not get off %  rii and is allowed i" lake II eeaj ta the Ural !>.. hjrlefassj then he ll Ml going to try at any stage Of the gema If Uns Is not the case nmol explain his running In Ihe rrc Handicap on Thursday. I must say I kept my eye on him throughout and three or four times in the lasl five furlongs 0*Noll endeavoured to wake him up hut he gave no response whatsoever Kfm inhering his sound beating of the C class horses some years ago on a very muddy track one may also rule out any possibilit) thai he cannot act upon the soft Koing If he divides lo make a race of il before the meeting is over then Storm's Gift will not have an eaiiy tune OFF C0L00R I have never seen Pepper Wine so badly oft colour. Imagine her without any dash, no frisking on race day or at exercise. I cannot believe II is the same filly who only two short weeks ago was so full T S Al ik a single sending Taylor I. tai I Oofl u down to from Branker, Taylor J( ., fur Jngle to *endup 2*0 and f-*"?* 1 dow i? and was b ? uln work'and Cranley pul up for gallops only. as eleane, ,.. .,,, fl J lo of| brllll.mlyofl M.me accurate bow iw taw awiy'i 1 I ins In imli.r .Ir.ullll' fll?lirM "*' aIUi Mr MlCotllie WllO buW I •„ L J j -, \. SK PBCT l'*Z • %  d 8| " l0 ""•'•'< s brou hl """' """ "* ""Pri"! %  l had jnpw of pep that a heavy exercise Ind was foreed to give her the morning"* Then she looked as If that subdued look of the lured lo recover sufficiently to win Itirkett w.-nt t.. the middle H2. Wood gave the fifth of h Uk b e ri Fnrt 8 v. 0 r^ m,n who was then Williams* Phillip. wZ \he score at 22 "g^*."* College t lose__a_nlh( Slei open Ilckwuk'r' i Rianke: Wood 100 returnWilkes lifted the flmt to square %  * Proverbs squdi .., middle ._ innings. Wood entered on his 90'* and Mr Smith aenl down the Ilrst when al H5, he otf-drove Gran: over fn>m Ihe screen end. conto the boundary bringing his FBBF AT 1950 KOOTBALl. SEASON 1-yiURSUAV : 2D saw ihe visiting Malvcrn Football Club of -ding 7 ruua—Wood 4. Foster 2 and 1 no ball. Branker l H Led himself from the Pavilion end and the score went on to 9. The two batsmen quickly wnan settled on tho easy-paced wicket Brankei and were punishing the loose lengtll He Uicn took a lo get his to &9 %  tiilury. I'M rate of scoring increased Birkett joined r was knocked Elliul H lost hisdash of Lest March. But 1 b aU oee he likes ,.,, ,if the ground lietter "hnn a soft track Nevertheless this Is ner skied one "f Brookes'^dc,,,s %  ee0Dd [ ,l,u ll: ' %  '"'" "' batlUeuce and il should be as plain id fcTr a e2iO*Tir^ih J q i *Z "veries. to cover, where WllUams as a pikest : ,fl by now that large doses of racing do not do him any % %  t o Sid Oil B ,n k "" "V Catrh an !" kln f 001 "!?".[ ri V? ,nl,nu r d from ."'•' We ?cam r e Un Jnd the* luVjSn ^terva" w ot lhe mort m 'kable things at this June meeting was was taken. '•"' form of Brown Boy in the Port of Spain Handicap on Thursday. On resumption of play, B/ackWe have been waiting three years and seven months for him to run a man and Corbln came put to bat race like this Nol since Hie day that he won the West Indian Pro^da^le3tI^! Hi S& did <,u "' SUk and lhen ""fortunately lost the Hopeful Handicap through ilh End And sent do.... maiden to Proverbs. Bowen'* i oxl over yielded two single' While Harris' yielded three. Wiilcutt Bowls Walcolt relieved Bowen from Wood. UM Lake End and bowled to ill his Proverbs who hooked Uie third i-Iivery to One leg but Meodley the day looking misty. They did urvlve long, for Welch again his >ckey loosing a stirrup, has he shown such form. It was no not proved destructive, a* he got fluke as might have been suggested by his surprise victory at Union. Blackmail oul by the l.b.w. route He just came away from them at the half mile pole, exactly as ha %  an d „ n ? d Co i5! in cau h f behind the had done as a two-year-old. and went on to win unchallenged. Even M. Trinidad defeat an island team lo win Ihe rubber in their na n, 6 with the score at 23. Pickwick passed the 200 mark failed to make tfaa catCfa at St w" SCOrP r • ,h tame Fair Profit could not catch him %  erics of Tests against Colony teams This was the end of the 1950 n ra i,ker brought n the slow Elliot (lighted one nicely which En'.. batsman Uienr took a ".T K wafl 1 man ,n >ooiball season anoI now is UM time for some nfUKUon on BarbedOl Urfl-hand leg break Isiwln Elliot er.li..-.l W.-KI to come out Wood ^ng> with neat glides and yie !"!" v ^H^^Tuh^n^'^u^M !" THE MUD football ouring 1850 in place of Smith The scoremirtlmod and wai given out ^* ">v;l *n, taken wTth JJj; ^'"LK' 1 J'^ .jfi.' rore the race a punter approached me and asked: "Who runs most's^eS! ftfi ULSST: SS iSrS !he IT" M %  *" 3 m,nU,M li'four""*" ^ "^^ -S "''Wslfi was' ST.r-1 Sng^aftef^nlakC Tv^ry U-tlo mud': Without hesitation answered: -Brown Boy". Luckfootball itself/ In the Ilrst place, the fact that Sjiartan, B.A FA piay v/iih ih* s,v.r^ H i im for 1 PV0rhi 15. "",',,,1 2Z t y ,orm n,m nc ,urnea 0w y immediately, for presently I began to and Knock-out cl pi 1949 and 195U were dOOMtOd b> UM n.ank.-. -iruck lh< ilrst blow n J.,. 'mirtmr.a Birkett "" wmpUon, Bowen bowled _J !" w fJSLS H L nSS L lh nk ""d although 1 knew it was a remote possibility, I remembered wide margin ot gll to love t the visitors, indicates that our beet fgr hi, teem by gelling Foster lo ghr. wSl m,t ut 11 ik-tv' lh ,lrsl 0W '""" Weyt f !" h ?,.rt M, M ^1 ^"^li lhal ,he san,e UruW1 Boy had had numerous occasions on which to hiaii.i,.i.i u* taw :,.. .ion ifs,... u ti. !• ,.,. nH rnH t ,„. nn t a ~. =..-,.. a h •"* ".."'_. „ „.,i P h i#....t * IHIK.KS nmui h .'nil and each lintmiv.i. far h n ">* Met omie opened .. ,._ _. _. T" • % %  """ -fciu un v.mi w play forward to one which kept f w | )U ml h was .„ 4) whM) he .,.., („ ^" % "' ,'.",...,.''J X ,\ ",L ,h > <•""' Behool innings against ,rovc lhis in lne la 3 i >* %  %  B"! W0| or dry he had always disairaight > outside the off stumps ( a (i •" September Song and I^dy the tocondng batsman ..„„„,.. ln y tm JJjf !" g? w * P tn k. The latter is almost as good as the former when the going is had a chance, saw Glasgow ^'fl and it was no disgrace at all for the crcole lllly lo be beaten btandard as far as club strength is concerned was not good enough RKSFKCTABLK lfHAW — CLOSK FINISHKN On the otliii tiuiiu. a ivspeclable draw by the Colts lea some close Bnunci In tinTest game* showed tn.il with the ii.--sai> Charlie Taylor Joined encoiiiagement ..mi help, the future prospects of Barbados footu.HI and thev carried tin are nut entirely dlihearlenUlg, It is obvious Ihat than la a crying steadily ""• Wood ofl Branker for a slngl I for duck. Cave Ihei more I need for a coach. And one might safely conclude that in the ... future, any %  CtMSnc t<. pool Ihe xpenses of a coach between Ihe members of Ihe West Indie* Football Board of Control, thai is, British Guiana, Jamaica. Trinidad and Barbados, will be met wilh the most enthusiastic approval henHitherto, we were not huancially capable of this coronuanent, but happily, we are now able lo avail ourselves of 'mil .. proswaesive measure. 50. Bh Ucket he had bought. The *N of this game ihe more I am convinced II doe* not pay too much. epeat this perform. the played Harrl %  ut the sent do •iniiiTider whllo maiden also INSURANCE NECESSARY The season lias ended and one uf Ihe mosl important problems thai must be tackled before the commencemem of the next season, ts that .of the toauraaee of j.layers. The ll.A.F.A I understand. ..re t.ukung :hi n.^ttei in ., icsolute maniiei ami r ,, to be hoped that the scheme of insuring players will come lo a full fruition or some saUsfactOry alternative scheme substituted before the opening of the next season. held p)y Proverb*. Bowen also sent down maiden t0 DtrVtai and anothe: .. at 5.10 brnuuhl nl I close WATER POLO SEASON STARTS WELL • --— teen it 59 for i. OCCASIONAL showers Both Elliot and Branker beAtt/m'-i gun to find a length and slowed were at home to Wander up Wood's fast scoring. He Rave visitors won the toss an N I Chanee off Elliot to TopJ||S ,,,., „!,„ .,, ,.,.. ..hen .1 he; pin standing al silly mtd-on and shower [ell came hack In the next over to 70 imnu le edge ofT iiranki* 1 to Heckles ll Wandi-ieis with only two runs in-i !ip scored, lost their Ilrst wickel. but u went on lo regl*tan M ha the "-"" loss ..1 an A Another light shower sent the ralO ended ph.y tl I the p.ivibon with Uie P*W wa* to pTOgrOh 101 • BatUng on a wicket slightly mpted play throughout the dav !" "i7 -"—" ""7 !" T" —1 '""" •"" "* miucr WK "" nuie ,v -for 1. ""'""" Wdkes got 17 Wl I ..,;., n Collcge ,„ ^ Ciir i lol] _,. ollrt ^nt Division "?"S h fl d m f eed P^" became strangers". Princess Rasiyy. is With the •core at 75 for 1. Mr. Proverbs one of the no) ou Da was ^ J*dge at Ihe Lodge d ay 5 ising but hurt his leg. Mardi Gras, in spite of his victory on Thurs****** .^^:\:^'}:::\::TZ^ t .^::: iSmtJtJSiifS^oftJg: ^ occupum me wicket aU *** ** !" L Thurs iolarof 4 wicket, <:a y and " M tor Ihe •> Y * a11 of * hove are going to be Derby candidates wilh goon Winning the toss, College went J/' h T"\^ !" CU "' lhcir llrtl JSffi '' huncW next Chri,,tmas How they will develop remains a mutter lo bat on a fast wicket with a lhp lhrec "'kcLs w ero divided f ur speculaUon. strong wind blowing across ihe between Edghill, t h.e Carlton lield. Runs were difficult lo obpe n ">g bowler. Greenidge sod —— % %  — __^ tain, and the College opening pair *•_" %  half hour at C. W Smith and Mr. S. 0*C. r^ mS hiur fe^ n uiiiS? red i 1 S by SUch U BO"B ^ct 1 think Ocean Pearl —hand"Vc^ VtVtQ hard g0ing ' * n but be,n a undrpd P* honest she ft %  •.• ""'' Ply to Xl out unie"and was SB w '" S,U1 ^ "> the la,t %  %  ''"^aps .( she and L,,dy P,nk could there with Cave at close of play. mect on a ^^ o( in-between track then we would sec a real battle. LODGE vs. COLLEGE r\HlTnv ... unuri Lu8tly thf ,h ree-year-old picture Is now more obscure than it Change s *1I "1U ^ va. rui.ict. w „ last Christmas when these horses were only two Wavecreat Lodge (far 4 wicket.) 50 '££.CJSj._ww%) Si looks unwell. A rather dull coat and a decided loss of condiUor rI Lary Bones looks worse. As his l owner put It: "after one half mile TsHK Barbados Water Polo tour to Trinidad m January this year, pavilion end. Wood, in atiempun K %  -";: \" has made many youngsters take a much greale, interest inthls 1 eut. edged his Ilrsl ball to ,£ h game than thay did before. F" Ar*t time atoce the tornialion of MorvtUe, sianding behind, who ''" ' th. >>. %  v '' M Ihe Water Polo Association, six teams have entered [01 the I960 Q0Dput il down. He look Ins stole lo "P '"' C' 1 ""' '•" " !" '. ,u "'' petition, which began a little over two weeks ago. -.0 In-fore giving a fourth chance ""; Fr""? ,"'" .";., .' '" In their Opening flituTn, both Swordllsh and Bomta. scored oil Mr Smith to Wilkinson at n l handicnpi^d boll win*, and on Thursday, Flying Fish and Snappers played to a goalless mid-off. alld oowlcr ** taw j; The interval was taken, th..(Wilkes tin J^ many years now ewu before there was a Water Polo Assos,„reboard reading 86 for 1, Wood ljltti „ urn ^i (1|ll ,,„ Wamlor.-i lens were quickly separated elation, there has been the_knet ^.•^.batwaen^then two team*. M and Taylor 18 „ 0 J milg JJ^^ „,,„,. S;ilim ,, Brakes, who opeiwd tfaTattaCa, After the interval, Mr. Smith Qrhntn, formerly >'! Empire, Il nll<, 'he former caught In slips resumed from the. pavilion end raying his liiit came foi ihe ^ %  Smith who joined) Mr. ... mil Branker took o\er from rai k team and did duly l-clui : <^'l'"s fell a victim to Oulram. jain and Thursday's game proved DO exception to the rule 9SBR W"A. Farmer to p-scored for SSLS'lJSS ** 9Ch<,, "" Cd Sj? £ "r alnd ^ over ed when Police will a brisk 31, while Parnier score.1 raoidlw .n. ki. ^^'"""ge. An over later I attack, Blackman is 21 not out. ^ 1 ,rl r ?' ^ l, e _.... hal ^"tury went up. 29 Included GAME Ol ACTION AND THRILLS F ROM beginning lo end the match was fast and packed with thrills, much to the delight of the spectutors, as lime and lime again what looked hke icrtain goals were either well save,I l.v the coalkaapera, or UM ball gtruck the cross-bar and went out of play The defence on both suh-s was also very sound. It Is at present loo early In the season to speculate as to which loom II going to coma OUl on lop, so evenly balanced are ihe teams. Police are perhap> the weakest; but. as they are making .. comeback, natuiully d will take them a few matches to get into their stride. However 1 can safely foretell Ihat this years competition will be Elliot at the screen end The wicket, which race other drirzle during the terval, was playing iiuicker. the other fasl bowler, after hiti dthErtcAtu n %  '"* Ofl Brookes. R. D. I piny Wood and Taylor DlOOcWd 00 and 100 went up on tin tn In %  bout 130 minutes Mr. Smith bowled OOl) fl Ul in hi* second spell befi re <: the stumps red anw.in.l. ,,, opened With BrtC AtSS/_, %  **£*• %  fc R DThe opening poi tea Inklnaon.ndG W.:k. to the bowl"oik was xi ma in, but he also ( Hlilck 7 n;il „ cl i Uttta log ii D. PhlUli i :. I """ i ''""cult t score off ihe L H..1 II-. From Ihe Lake ami w> out Police in to bat on a wicket sprinkled by i ,,u.llmhich fell half an hour bcthe^loss and, went tovT^MuZMrm&caSi £ "^ %  ^^ MX .ltd ol D A Wilh This lasl ball o( Wam-ir* ihird sr J b3S?S-i5inS!i S Wilh one of the kwnMl since Uie Walet Polo Association wa, formed In ho gave place to Grant %  ' I .. AM "Uve oft-brrak bowler NEW Mobiloil %  ccurata bowUni oflliookeV „„d tM """ """ A Wl "l am! Farmer. mlri.t "'"S"' 1 'over-drive by nut. l-odBc" -nu'k !" another "' h "'""" """ "' ,' hC 'T' K Oreonid^ bowled th,,,e„ Qr'l n Z "" ""l £"" "' K PhUUn. VV' — II" out 3 * '"'', '"•> %  %  "' *J 0WT. a 2 to Blnckn,a„ t£ w*5 '' >rd h "" "• M IWnfv, b %  > one fiom Outran, The W*IU. Taylor was eauuht by thr „„ rlhl rn end ,„ ,„, ,'J !" foon after ran, again interrupted J* !" (Mntoud then lead, 2T3-3. v/lcket-keeper Marshall when the ua |, of K ""' Pavilion an over later be, owl, „, ,„ 37. when Mr. man and they carried the total to hi u,,,, 'sew ^T, "', 'n Aowcr. Play Uilten, was ".ork|by Welch 1 before rain interrupted play E (rV'^tcr nllert Ihe l,re,^ .. •,'""7 I "Ilh Ihe Police score 58 for n 'l Ihe loss of three wickets. mouth and. only had AtkoiM.u I . |. 1 .ii the tins auitht al s.ll> i dljninball "• PhUllpr Meond over tcr rilled the brea With Amazing New Protective Properties For Your Car's Engine '''""'"*'V~**W W „ W „, W „ MWWIV .. Keep Your BICYCLE in Fine Trim!! Keeps Engines Clecner— 4# Uobllotl has spr. nl Ctnalnfl proprriii- win. h pn.-ni rnihun J<|m*iti lium forming on it*l tnglot pan* —bcilngi. kalvft, p.-tons, ling*. Improve! Cor Pcrfo-mance—IfcBllM M*i Mo) I will keeg Him rebfdM cleaan -uu'll gp| mor.' po.-r — tlarl fa at w acatrrata ejulcker, pcrforn imoothrr ,.n leag drf-mt Proton*. Engine's Ufa -i |*aaa ntucausi IvMfrlcttaa. iea>, wear \oor engine in mjuisc* lau*i repair* Bad arhauls, gin men nan of dependoMa *r*ic< rellyourtl lOdaj lo .taangivuui oil to v i HJ l-IU. i When head and nose feel i t cold, stir a teaspoonful of Thermogene Medicated Ruo into a jug half-filled with boiling water end deeply breathe-In the steam for fifteen ^p5s?*llW minucec. Another way is to spread a letda of the Rub on a handkerchief atad breathe-In Its medicinal vapour remember Phensic We are offering the fallowing DUNLOP ACCESSORIES The sooner you take Phensic, the sooner wu'.l feel Setter, tar Pbemic's quick, safe action will bring relief, Lift awav pain-caused fatigue, and remove weariness in a nutter of minutes. Phensic neither harms the heart, nor upsets the stomach. Be prepared for pain—keep a supply ,.: Phensic handy. THERMOGENE (Phvnuit* BRAKF BLOCKS Mt'D FLAPS TYRE LEVERS HAND t.RIPH PEDAL K1BBERS SADDLES RIM TAI'ES PATCH STRIPS M" x 3" KEADIFIX PATCHES LOIN] AND MIDGET OI'TFiTS VALVE i: i I'.l'l i: LARGE AND SMALL SOLLTION PIMPS s ITMP WASIIFRS CHROME-PLATED RIMS ROADSTER COVERS AND Tl IBM Itx 11" RACING COVERS AND Tl'BES 26" x IV CARRIER COVERS AND Tl'BES 28x 1*4" SPECIAL PRICES TO DEALERS MEDICATED RUB for quick, safe rel 1 FROM HF.IUCHIS. RHEUMATIC PAINS. LUMI1G0. | I NERVE PUNS, NEUULGIk, INFLUENZA, COLDS 4 CHILLS ECKSTEIN BROTHERS $ BAY STREET DIAL 4269 .W.VAV.V.V^/A<.V,VA-.V.V.W.'.V//.WVAV*VvA



PAGE 1

r.u.j inn vi SUXPW \DVOCATF. M \IM\. Jl I V 1. 1950 LOCAL FISHING Every year the fiahinq Induftiy cl Barbados IncrtaM* in value and with the help ol the I'lsherie*. Department ol the Govern ntcnt Service i' is contributing an ever growing bhare ol ihe Colony A food and finance, This year nearly live million huh have been ofii rr.arlceied by ttsherinen. U t! e unregistered sales are taken Inlo con •iderutlon then eome idea can be formed as to the present value of the indur try and Its potentialities. Pictures show some ol the activities ol member* ol the fishing fleet. FISHERMEN return horn a trip that began at 6 ajn. and lasted until ? p.m. On this occasion they caught not more than half a fish basket lull, that it> about 200. AT RIGHT TOP A crowd a' the Government Fish Market waiting to buy lish. CENTRF: The fishing lleot at Tent Bay. Pathsheba. makes ready to put to sea. BOTTOM: A fisherman pulled a tunny lace at the camera. MR. DUDLEY W. WILES, Ftaheriea Officer inspocui the work being carried out when tho new Experimental Boat wan in the process ol construction. The boat wai launched on October 21 lcrl year and engaged in lixhing lor the Hret time on Docomber 12. It has been carrying out valuable resoarch work. A FISH PORTER gives a lesson in peaceful relaxation as he waits with his barrow outside the Government Fish Market lor a call from a boat that wants its catch taVvn to market. The Best STOVE to own is a FLORENCE OIL STOVE CMJSAX •iinl itlt\OMH if Vou will be very pleased with your new I'IMMr SIIHI and OVEN City Garage Trading Co., lid. VICTORIA ST. 4671 ONE! DOSEl get"* Relieves Bran". 0W^I i.iir 's s w sss sess,*• •* Mil, •f **>• Next time you go to your chemist ask for a product I HARRISON I • O.IBARI IDOSI 1 I *&t2''**Zfr With this NATl'K.\L-TONE POWDER II ii utf ban SKI ( -.IT look* in itpark, I>ul uo four >.m, timl mailer-. I.vi-ning in Pah* |->-(<. i. h tfir the %  -.m'V'initi UiU *ofl golden |lo* ol rouiUui >iun .. .HiitMing. alluring Supw-Jf*<1 an-! in Hrlsisl -mm •had*-, tveninu ii> I'.TII%  !(->Vi ,A [xrfnlmn U ai .lUl .11. CveHi+uz> f^ SreEaMH %  * < %  • POWDER A, BOUkjQiSK Ton look better every day! nines*, tnfluonra. or even a severe cold, lowers Tttaliry rapidly, but Uo renioranon of health and vige ;u may ofton bo tedtotu -md ri^'otg-d Speed up recovery by 'along a re-rttaliring coarse ol Phyllosan tablets. Taken regularly, theso tabkta act as a geriral tonic, •nmui-to motabollsm. and lr\ craaae energy. They ire "J i'-Ji htlp. J tmWVT*u/ tome To speed recovery-like PHYUOSAN aad fon'ii be nt again sooaet INDIGESTION Yn gut one dose of MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH POWDER relieve* Indigestion pain and discomfort! This wonderfully quick and effective relief from Heartburn, Flatulence. Nausea, Acidity snd Stomach Pmias due to Indigestion is made passible by ihe fsot that MACLEAN' BRAND STOMACH POWDPR is a perfectly bsaasWsal scientific formuls. Make Meal Times a Pleasure! WhTfoonouffcring? Trviustoaedcae lo-dsr hul mikr *nrc m art ammo* MM I I AN HHASKSl'OMAC.n POWDER hearing (he itnaiure "ALEX C MAi I IAN oa bottle and carton. •MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH POWDER l—ea la tk. •sent ai sa asa f iet aala haalta. Uaa only trm f ae t afad— sfsBaasa)brfhMsB. Taa vosld fajnaaa danBatalofliii -ka oaaUa taa l io au pi^aradaaa has rarelMioniaMl neetra Uauiy OMlmut and providad ayaato l araeafCUaa Far aaca tyea of attio %  i.-l aft. 4/yaai aaaa ii M araao?. aar.'i haw M| why faaaaa aaW raaam fa aaaaral m*rm mad /raianaw. V Oaaa yaaa akai aaja< mm* aasaataj *•>*• aaal, aMa-akaaaaaaj Bsaexa oaavuDoai anu. it IU.K .. i. ( ia*, 1— ... taie wMirrfalh •—ifc u>i Sjpjta laaMaa tba 'MM' af yaar %  •.-. taaiian thaaa aeaa. ralaiaS pocra with aail> aaal^Uaea l i*>i aJiaimaSBl umes. (Ovrt SS'o w* Dwox* arsn roas LSTisn — as f..f i*. %  ."— -.St a aaa aa a a i sj ali "#•• asaall aas pooia aou-non u>. A *HI-..I.U fas* kl ,lfc '•*' liMUNfe al Ik. law— iwou a-uu* HXII u <..!*, ik* —aohlao vSSaaaa aaliii —aplMa (aaial' l> IIMV. |f taa fjl lay Uaao al-a-. u cmoxa sunns aai OBBMB a* MHU fwwn>ATMM lono*. ik.. haea peaa BaaaBB aavaaat aa W a aasgj aaau all aay. A BRIGHTER LONGER LIFE ^ • % %  / tmmmtxa /~~s. / •a** DURALIFE VI TO UAI illlllS • %  •!• llMniilr ShS>OM .•••• A ** *. /^/ —* dsa k w <4M -HTEKV 44ABAGE Whiteparli Rd. ROBERT THOM LTD. Dial 4391 On Sale at BOOKEE'S DRL'O STORES IB'daa) LTD. Urtwd Sl*l and Butlnfi



PAGE 1

PACE TEN Sl'NDAV ADVOCATE SUNDAY JULY !). 1*50 Pilgrim Virgin Comes Today C %ZL%? THE STAGE 7A BRITAIN By A Correspondent • liable hp%  OtgaL Thrre mi I l'lv had I 0 a small %  a o of ihcm i tfa la spas** and the; • %  ,ncn. io go til* I3ih of each month t i th* month of October. i -pit im'' the month* went ... ; thru bry The 'i I | il miracle on 13th October P ii..MI. (Km weir aid happen << \\4 oao ihe saua I i<< -i.jdrnii. folir-. s-r.osne %  H II la lurn like i i.Jiitg forth %  %  : .nr.,[ the 111 II %  hied t*. and %  U as 500.000 1 lhara at one time braadcaat addraaaed to them by the Pi pi But no matter how much tha) nay wish to do So, Ihcie are aiam Catholics lhroigh(.\.* | who cannot JOUI M t<< Fatima and it is to MttgQ inc.. devotion that statuaa of Our Lady of fatima have bean sant on *pllgrtgaaga 1 through the world The first left Fatima on May 13 194: and went into Spain, Fiance. Holland. Luxembourg and Kelgium to Africa and Ii %  a c o n d was sent out on i i • em to the NorU V can Continent, and so great wa l BU pail to it that IU SI I-ouu, Missouri, aboul 300.0M i %  ai plr attended the apt* UssM in Qg) The third statue, tha .. omuiK to baibaiioi la 1 leaned on May !3 IMS at Fatima and later in Koine b> Ihe Holy Father himself, w* thai it mign: • i i Hi*' .... ..i-< Latin It ha* already traveller -.i 10.000 uulcs hv ajr lu Cludad Trujillo mare than 25.00,' Uncased the crowning of th< •tatue bj the Arrhbuhop of Santo In Port-of-Spain. the welcomed by thousand* on ils tn-t *i rival and eveiywhare it ha.s gone from church to church huge crowds have accompanied it and attended the spcctallyarranged devotions. Now the statue ta coming lo Barbados lo bid Catholics join in the great crusade of prayer to bag God. through the intercession of the Blessed Virgin, to bung Russia back from the materialistic, Mheiam which holds it in Its gr.-Mp. to bring peace to the world, and to bring sinner* back; to the Divine Mci.v Later it will be taken to neighbouring Islands, and to British Guiana, before proceeding lo Latin America Mishap Denies Political interest July 8 American born Cut hour Bishop Gerald Pairs* CHars. who uitlvad here this morning* from aid all the charge* lintt him in Bucharest mplalaty false" niftho,i O Hum who has been for inn vaari Papa] Nuncio In Burhartai was accompanying i Ouldo Dabw mi h> Mopilgnor John Knk. The Rumanian Government on Australia Shipping %  ;KAL. Canada The Canadian-Australasia 11 announcing th it / %  ihtnd poits nev aaaastani aad lieiglu Aor.ingl. said that ro*iPI n 'i.. Ual financial losses sine" Iti inception in 1931, and future .icconipanied by high |M*rnting costs are such as to 'nake this deci>um necessary.' -aid the announcement. I -II i .'..idi.m-Australasian line 1 the Canadian Its 17.000-loti A'II.I'IXI itoak raotoraaun eras M I'-ciflc fleet -I .? intlurtfd mi Kmi>rrss lincrthat saiVT lo w.,i she area |p teturning to the Ian run aftti tha RaaaOVal "I < %  Aorangl nex. Waam tinend of "htp %  a r vl ca between VanM i AuMrauti. In Van icportcil thai i lector in the decision to discon tinu* tne •ervitr is th* 1 increased • v air. Minuter Sidney Hollami /• .ilaiul said at Auckland that the governments of Canadi and Australia had declined to go alOM with the New Zealand government in payment of a sub %  tdy to keep the liner Aorangi In :r.ni%  I'.K Ifli %  >:'. lo Ibl RM %  .isked special financial asslstnnc from the three governments '<• keep the ship operating. PHnjM Minister Holland saui that the Canadian and Australia i governments "'had not lieen dis posed" to contribute to a subsidy although the New Zealand gov ernment. the sad was willing to do so. Nev.' Zealan i was ready to pay a subsidy ol f 10.000 annually fol sWO years Consfquenlly. Prune Ministvi Holland 5 aid. it Bppaafl inevitabl-> old British shipping llnmust I* withdrawn from the I ita Ha said the existing seal'ol fare* was as high as could .ompete with an li.ivel Major factors in the situation WCru |M small amount of cargo that could be handled while the ship is in port, and the mouaUng cost oi operating ships In general — inu UlfonnatlOD Renter M J.l. Tt !< C IHERJUrr, of all Bntifch d ram a tt am Is Uw best at telling the story of an ardsnai woman In extraordln.ii^ %  reum^'.iinccs He showed Ihu .VUJ Maael with peih-p the moat charming murderess the stage has known And now tll %  • Seven, he has %  t,t % %  ,., lldph Richardson j shows a fine actor at his nxan ,,npraaarve SuprrMcially. it u not a part that seem, lo demand much acting. Yet. in fact, it u> far harder to perform than much that need* only a theatrical flourish Sherriff. as dramatist, makes much of his elect by the truth of his -ii..lni.r, hit gift for selecting the %  irfht wesrd and the right phrase without letting the kpeeches grow pallid Richardson, as an actor. bacauga he does not give '.< %  • t\ moment the impression that he is acting No player is more at home In a stage set When Kich..rdson enters the little lubui sitting-room It becomes a real i-i.ice Not many actors have this :t..informing quality, aad m the Wvndham's Theatre production it is invaluable Some hav. cirucisrd Un* piece, oddly, on the grounds that it Is both loo realistic and too umpie But Sherriff's acUtvenkt been to establish and malnl theatrical suspense wi'h ., iemarksble economy of means and In a way that few othei current dramatists can match Hi. central figure is a bank lei k in th< late 'forties, an amiable man of regular hnbils who is used to re. turning home nightly at the same time, and who has tewinterests i dotss. in Its way a small miracle %  t construction, though some may hold that the end is ti-i obvtOUgl) contrived But Sherriff had to i>lvc his problem, and it Is difficult to say it.w he CINIIII have Ued it botlei He has aM pat ionised any of hipeople This is not a dramatists lofty glance at lha -uburbs. It i>. in IM characng, piece oi • I truth, and Ihe company-led by Sir Ralph Richardson, and Marian his wife—have approached it in the right way Frederick Lonsdalc the author ol The Way Thinos Go. at the Phoenix Theatre, would be the last to bold that his play is a slice f Ule Lonsdale has never worried about truth ;n the theatre while his people can toss out their epigrams, spark out the bright jbaas" srltti araaeh he has made in* reputation, that is all that matit r* The piece is contrived on the •ame pattern as usual. That is lo say, a Duke and his relations keep the wit going, and an amusing, slight love-story is played out -gainst the glittering background uperflclal and adroit: It piovea that lAntdale hs neither : nor retreated since he -rote Aren't We All* and The Lost of Mr: Cfiepney a quarter if .i n-iiiury BlaV Here he has a variety of efficient actors, notably Glynls Johns, who has a direct. husky charm; Michael Gough, who is blessed with .< kind of -tingmg.ncerity. and Ronald Siuiic. who has been rolling the Lonsdale epigrams around his tongue for many years. The prolific dtBMI Bridie is an%  -'her type of dramatist again. He does not trouble about construction as Sherriff does, or about the %  iideii phrase in the manner of lnsdale. Instead, he writes comedies that are wise, witty, and .> .iiuleriug: that begin well .iway. strange, formless, keabk? affairs that sotne%  i remain in the mind and sometimaa do not. .Mr. Gillie, at lh Ggnrlck Theatre, it one of bis less* pieces. It is the study of a man who, for all his ill luck, has more claim to the respect of posterity than many peotiailad by the world as suci-.-sse Mr is .i sthoiilmusier In a If tie Scottish village. None of hi* I" 1" 1 has done him justice, but Gillie docs not mind. He has alKttner possible swan—one. alas, that must Inevitably become a goose. In the play we see how IWO Ol lollies bttaai hopes, a pitbo) who i., putential literary genius, and a doctor's daughter who should l>e .in eminent violini t. <> altsi .i cUiidestiia? marin Scotland to London. when thej return -i* montha lat1 % %  %  Ing over all that Qlllk had laugh) lurn, and has baMinie a dubioUl yotinfl Irk-kster. The girl. alas, i, on the tumc road GlUle h..s raned again. :oid he U his house Never mind Thenis • i-^ ays hope: he has heard of an• ither possible genius somewherrirnund the corner And he can always console himself with the thought that he has been, as it were, an opener of cages: that he has allowed bis birds to In then wings in freedom before the cat has pounced on them. We are %  wage, from a prologue, that Gillie has no chance lo proceed, that, indeed, he is run over and killed s short time after the pla> ends. This is unfortunate Still, after seeing Alastair Sim in the pert—he n an actor who is alway %  intensely alivewe cannot connive of a dead GilUe Without turn ihe play would be nothing As it is, it is UtOe more than an i ongated anecdote, pleasant. • %  arm-hearted, but in substance 'langerously thin. The principal London visitor lorn abroad has been Sidney Kingsiey's Drlertire -Story at the I'lincesj Theatre. This play of New York police methods, a melodrama with a difference, excited is first audience and should be sure of a reasonable life, if only for its qualities as a document. It flag other qualities as well. It taHl a good story swiftly and there is little nonsense about It. By no means a major play, but a tilling one in the theatre, and e%'temely well acted by Douglass Montgomery as a fanatical detecive. Helen Backlln as his wife, and Charles Farrell as n grating poUea chief Outside London the most imi>ortanl event has been a classical revival. Measure for Measure, *-llh which the Slratford-uponAvon Festival Company opens its season well in advance of the usual date. It is not a favourite play, but It comes off exceedingly well at Stratford, thanks lo Ihe imaginative directness of Peter Brook's production—In a full text —and to the power of John Glelgud's Angelo. a presentation, beautifully-phrased, of a man who vields to the vice he ha.s punished so rigorously in others. Stratford has found also a new young actress. Barbara Jefford. Her Isabella—much younger than the usual players of the part—for once sustain' our sympathy and does nut frec/e us. as so many Isabellas are apt to do. with an excess of icy virtue. Stratford's second production of the Festival Is a vival of Tyrone Gvilhrie's version ol Henri ihe Fiu'iih. with one oi two Important changes In the cast Thus Gwen Ffiangi on-I>avies has followed Diana Wvnvard os Qu Katharine ..-%•--.-.',-.'.-. lESTARLlSHED IMS) THE POLICY THAT CARRIES THE SEAL OE SECURITY AND SERVICE f r i .i wild advice, censull Ihe Asenta : I DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. Csm IT'S CRICKET.CBICKET.CRICKFiT!'! Slashing our stocks of cricket gaar wo have cut prices on all Dato, gloves, pads, balls down to finar coat... oorae running! W'< .•>"* \r" t ll..i 1,.J„. GENKRAL M.l.MV CO.. (Bubwtaa) LU. .*•/. 1 4 ,„r li-%1 in an • tfuiiiMulli/ /,* 1'ritu JU.BJ CREASE-RESISTING MIAMI SPUN 36 in. wide $(|.00 N. IN 30 BEAUTIFUL SHADES '"' i winch wo nrr the sole dta> uaranlee from Ihe man. being sunfasi. luhfa.si and dytful %  til prove lo ui that ihis milnlal ii ,v win refund yog the cost of the i urorknuuishlp and comITU mionvenieniT you may h.-ive lUftend ...ii you desire any better We ..v. you patterns without %  obll N. E. WILSOiX & CO. T).r I'LTRA MODERN STORK with a rcpululion for icanlM gnodi at low prices. '" %  %  :="" -:•:Htau Si lEHLfES PETTER: MEADOWS: McLAREN PETTER FIELDING INDUSTRIAL & MARINE ENGINES Popular Power Producer! PETTER FIELDING 16-80 B.H.P. Also the t'umoua type AV series 11 single aad twin cylinder cold starting 3—10 B.H.P. Speed range 500 — 1.500 r.p.m. SEE Ug FOR COMPETITIVE PRIDES CENTRAL FOUNDRY Lid. SOLE AGENTS Bridget**! Barbados Play safe !—Brvlcrcem your hair. Pry hji;. Tight Scalp, etccsivc loose hair on your comb ihcne are danger signal* lhai point ihe nccJ for BrylercenVs double bewjit : (I) Day-long smartneii, (2) Lasting hair Health. Massage with Bryicreem simulates the scalp, encuunwes natural hair growth, [re cms common hair troubles. Its pure cmul-ihcJ asb pui new f life iato Dry hair and impan a splendid gloss. Don't lake any dnaaOttHrykrcem your hair. DAT-LONG SMARTNESS LASTING HAIR HrALTH That's the DOUBLr aEVFTT of BRYlOtEtM Your dog is a tame wild dog THAI Dor. ol your* doc hai h*'. (old—generally He's a nice, kind, %  enile. wll-behavcd Jog—moti of ihe time Bui ha n ever struck you ihst hn sn.eor< wcrcn'i like that si an ? Tbc dogs of Uwig "go. from • horn he bat gradually been bred, were wild animalThis meanitui HJ|| un dei I roal hsi Itsadvsniagei and dl ftV M s ts fl for him. In his natural *ilJ viaie he'd be hunting, killing and eating oiher animal.. He'd be eaiing IIKherbs to whith his iiitnmtt UsJ hifn HaM Bg running and rooming \\ mile* wherever he liked, whenever he snaanst Now he lives with v'He gct\ good wholesome fond, hut c' iomututaud food. He gn crcie, hui only vhen you've lime to gh So he needs two addition, to his loud. He need. viianum wlucli lu. domesiicuied die: may lack. And—bevauie he -elJom gets quite enough exercise, espciallv in bad weather—he need, the mineral substances which help to provide a rich pure blood supply Bob Martin'* Condition Tablets MM a day) supply both ihesc nee.li in precisely bslsnced propornon. Hv helping to renew the red blnod call and by supplementing his ordinary diet, ihcy do much to pr.-ICM nBB CBnnnon disorders as •Ti.tini •.TBKbing, liille-.ncss, I %  <>f appetite and ..msiipsiioa. They help to give him heslihy bones sod treih and a line lu*truo cost. They help to keep him ;i healthy, highpMMdt K'-id-iempercd dog. If you want further inforlbout the care of dog* write io Bob Martin Export I united Adiivnv DcpsrtBMOI JlWlh|HII. England BOB a,]s*> MARTIN'S for doggy good health IMPORTANT to every motorist For r-very motorit there eomp* n lime nlicn he is fared with the |ir..M.m of deciding betwesa ratton anfeea of tyre. In the past, whatever his olioics it lias invariably meant t he sacrifice of some desirable feature. That difti. i.lty no longer exists, for with the New Dunlop Fort. Dunlop lias produced the one tyre that has everything. It's the natural reault of leadership —a leadership which has been maintained since the Dunlop Rubber Company Ltd. became the first tyre manufacturers, til years ago. DUNLOP ECKSTEIN BROS. Bay Street





PAGE 1

n ifm.s SUNDAY ADVOCATE M SDAV. Jll.Y , 19311 CLASSIFIED ADS. rE,wo !" L PI NI.H Villl> Mill HE vi HOUSES IN Mt.MORlAM tMO %  %  j E M >i so i %  %  i Mh, in: r I %  ... Hill SAI.fc AUTOMOTIVE i rude IJH %  %  ..•lle..t condl.1 Mli I1 *i i\n ltd I %  nI KCH..I 1 -e. < issw, rt Station Wagon, •eat* can (old and I t RHYAI .' • • I • 7 Bt—an %  "( %  %  jar Hama I"-)* •* It VI I %  %  a**the l. %  ea <3i ftrn|. IMF, dlnlrui < %  %  i bua.neaa .land wilh lur* and %  ro"n und.ni ti..iti..ri It haflaliir. >< jhtrlM-iiUK. i On i.Vs'i ROB. Dial lo fret b* HI I ./\ * ''.. %  •I notaj Full* furnlWied til *• bathI 1 SO—4n %  ]. .. .. asiso ii 1-AHCiE YARD -i*l .HIDED, apply MM it >>T<>t>TT.-H DHUO ST* >intliiir Street and Cou H UK -1. ;; %  .; %  Rfeho II h p %  CAM OM Motrla <•> Car H %  mi• ) • Mi -ooir In) pi %  VII i r *i John rwn U Hiaj, Hid Bu. . • nr conk) %  Mlf SI nl, M John IK %  %  %  WANTES HELP (.•MK u. BER> NT I %  Apply Mr. Noel fi.-H 11 .n %  *! J • %  T SO nm.pr. Mnndav. %  ..I M-HJK for !*t %  *ei..r> of WH per *llh CertfArallo Med lo th* parorhliil Medical "ElIangDwan iint 1*0 1 be obIhfj I' VI fl A A %  :it Jovph < IIK with met Salary I i %  %  ievt. H WnCELLANFOIlS KM 1(1 % %  %  in HA dMr, from 00 lulen to 'Jtflin* Beer tbrun and hll .. %  • .... %  It...ho Dlrtrlbullon fl 11 p m on 111' J>'l> M • 1* n rw Rt-i la mm I arc* tilM Parly n fVi*pr Tin si mi it O'NEAL! NOTICE r*fti.-i %  ..nH aeV! %  %  %  %  %  NOIICL aard the contract lo the lew I %  quired I i %  I Pur i" 1 4 : %  NOTICE HARBOUR LOG In Touch With Barbados Coattal Station IMi i %  • fl fl WalMn m %  a, Fort Townaltand, C*KV%  ugan Canadian Omalruc. ) l.aml. H-lana Pat. i %  Will Gaaroan*. • rttar, K<-rn* OM TtftlMf. Q Tiirkar. A T rfcar. 'hiipnun. n r*h< AtMf N MarahMI. a. C^nlinM. I U CHJII \ttw A>*>a P^ an. Mrtr DonaAd Pun. H m ••• %  MrHarj i a >' i nngUn, Mr Brnaat Carrtnaion. Mia OrKIU PHulknar. Mr Wait** Ch*mbrra. %  Vr.ion McfarUna Mf Ctwrkn Wlln-rt tar la (••>• I M p m Mlaa LUian Ro)a. Mra laabal Rojaa. Mr. TuU R..)t... Mr Mlril Itol. Mr P.M on Nnl.i. Ml* Label Ro|aa. Mita Bwi*m Boiaa. Matr. Ian Turr. Matr J. nn Tumar. Mra Umr Tumar. Mr Wl Mr Anlamio Piuab*. Mr. Trr-M Ihiicbo. Mm Carolina l^waon Mi wmifrrd ljK>n Mr John UaMti. Ml* Tb> %  Sof.,itr Mm AlfrWo Scholti. Mr Carlofchoitr. Mra Man* Scholii Fur San Juan Mr RMArld Alton. Mr* Nina Un.v Mr Avon Johanaaon. Kr Ibrhard RvdMr CTiarloa Rav Ml— RU' B.HW. Mr IS-r-rion Proaii. MlOIa Worrell. Mr Wjlter McCtoon. Mr. C*,rliUna CromIror. Ilnnfonl I,.i J„in.lt* Mn Joaaflna Rarror. Mr Ma.r> Rarron. Mr Petar MtCIelland. Mr. Ivv Pratl, P-ev Flint Bullrr For HKITISH UUIANA Mr G-dfre. Wall.. Mr. Driraen Mne MIM Cunalwrc Theobald. Mr. Jam*. Kobartaon. Mr Enr Tei.eira. Mr Iltlott w, Mra. Ida Oonaalvn, Mr Gooi*' .. ., *l" ph. i A av-tie H.V Mi- H M.tan. JOM> Remta.. AUWl B-n.Mt. I 'tVf. •An'ttir Ml Schmidt : DUO* R. R W I A 1%  iidad\t. I...HRi.bl*m. Mr PrM "" Adrilna Mima. Mr iBrMrvhn Mrd| Ml Mar'.. KHImar. *•'• %  : fnti Mr. ROM T->otr#. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE %  %  %  rppac p-riwlng The i.. i, granted ( %  %  %  ."arhe.| maajlai lo ua %  Hd -' (lieim*.. *ti I I" atljihed tori d i II. I s i I" > V I Ihr Pntranra I dlrlatea %  " na • !" Coll***, in 'rim-niiie: laao. lake pi.ii' ..> lollo* BOYH IT*Df3H Murl attend or Uny Mlh Ji.lv. bet* ran Iho hoilra nf •i'." and II 19 p rrt BOYS OF 10 YEARS AND OVER Will be r*qulr*d on Saturday SJti-l July from 10 a n. lo I 30 p m -l.iinrhr*>fi Broa* II 00 lo IJ 0> and on Monday Mth Juh, from 10 ant to 11* p m Candidate* mu tia* Ute Roebuck fl'-eet Ciitranre and repon lo Ih* Ofrlre In the flr-t In'tanre Tlir^' will require penriM. n rubber and ekerrka* book or pier* or el paper lo fnmih a aumlh barklna whirh lo On Monday Mlh Jolv. ll.av Hhi.nl.I bring ear reive bonk, roiilaimna ti.i> work they have been doing ol Ihrir hoola Individual nMicra have been BOatad lo all randldaln iNp.irtmeiit of Education, %  th July, iflae MM In 3rd July, 19in 10th AuguM, 1BA0 Mth Svpt, 1950 8th Nuv.. 1BS0 iri(j lo Plymouth i July. littO llith Aug. 1SS0 ^Oth Sopl,., 1B50 14th Nov. 1950. For lurtlicr pur' to : RM. ONES & CO, LTD.-Agents. SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. RaillBf l.-m .irir.m. ai.uerdaM aad Aalarra M %  %  HXWULIA' J ..y %  Illh. M s %  ii a atn. Salllnc fr.M Amsterdam aad D.'M eomCAAuruat lath MBM la M.a.lra rlyraaalh MS WILLEMHTAl't j ..-h M 8 ORANJBRT %  -. ... lTrinidad. Paraaarlb.. ll.m-i.r.. tl>. 9S COTT1CAJuly 11th. Ms %  Heroha" July rth 1 P MVfWON. SON CO LTD 1 | M V T H Radar" Cargu and PasM Lucia. St. Vinrcr.*. Grenada. Sailing i o-h July. HDONRR OWNERS ASSO. (Inc.) Tel NO 40•. "'h July :m AUK llth Aua f"h Aui Wth AUK ifth Ser am sp Stmt Sep *th Aua llth Au 1IH Aua Jrd Hep. in Oci nn o.-. GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. AgenU. LIE. I.I.I:. S S. 'GASCOCNE' 8.S. 'GASCOGNK' S.S. "OASCCXiN-E" 8.S. -OASCOCiNE" %  IL\.\SATL,\\TI4>I IB FRENCH USE .Sailing to Trinidad ANTIQUE!"— i 1 la-. China, old J*el. An* a-.fcolour. Earl* •ook*. Mapa. Auto*-.(.h< eli. l Oorrfvaea Antique ftnop. —'* %  • in* Hoyal Yaabt Club iaaj.-t.fn •OB riRi %  m KI is Hall Mat. BOTH SII1KT AND I'YJAMAB 1 ROYAL STORK CANOE Hi fret k %  g ased i 1 MH *T.M. In EHgmEa %  s. no each I1FAD TOM > I I., . 1*. ..... > %  II % %  -! "Ireet I id HaMm. Dut-lrl f*rei1i'i>* p .1 u. Oli*'D cauiidangerous mfcciion. in case of ncf-ligrncc In intel lljtcnt households an iron rule exists for every wounds i ..Put Purol on", hecauw one knows, thai Furoliidelitiously softening and healing and because all infections can be prevented by applying this brilliant skinremedy. 1 %  -Ulr Vilthlll %  Hi and tallalli.l M ST. HtF 1 I Mi th^ MI .-; s rniMMma Uaat) la Murhiil It in. and *la uo-n fl I Mi In ront-n— both by AUtyl inaelher uilh n biilldliltfD tlii'mrfi tinnri-i" .f MrM I <; U further %~>. > I, .|.|.l, to HI' It HINflON .-. I'AMIKJ D I %  < Bat JOHN REAL ESTATE AGENT %  AJPA. F.V.A-1 M. BLAIMDN and AUCTI 0NEER 1-alMkM' Foot Itch Healed : \ 3 Day* i. ..ii, real i t it Mnrl I. %  %  ,.. I ..' i.| 1 1 %  Bi ridol %  arSncai %  oarm. -t. u.|,. ii. i.iuc In %  Ihs II In I it ... ''i-rn l for Nino. Nixoderm Tor Skin Troaklci V/^/Z.V'/W/.VAV/.VA'A'.V.V.'.V.'.V.V.'.V/'.'.V/AV/^ (Kins A CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT 1 1 l\ BRINklM. THE NE>\ CROWN CINC.i R AEE —(



PAGE 1

SUNDAY, .ILLY , lue >l NDAV ADVOCATE W.I. \s \orlliunts • From Pur 5 %  i lour, but bad baOj m n re. Marshall gave a very haiJ the wicketkeeper at 44. IMdHBg touched a legslde ould not hold Marshall hit a lofty -traifiht drive to the boundary and ;i pull in %  i p U t him meyer. There were i Saudi Arabia Protests Jul> 8 %  atSS day that Sau.'-i Arabi against h ,vd. a thick ring ol to support tiie Uni" 0| en the grsi v luncta the Kon %  consulting Ota M 0. "aS* a .-. *. Ail l'"nrh The Saudi Arabian note was \: %  |„. -\ w ilunch srhei • v %  %  red the .,••... .. day saw ., m runou (| %  %  ''' %  %  %  '•' Tha hundred was raised Arab unity bu' dtvergi %  ,,., n .,-, .,,.., .. foreiKn taut .-.,: %  ,eemed well el >' %  lid not look so safe aa %  %  %  '' Ud not be | ^ -H.-iu-jfr and once appeared to %  %  %  %  . %  used tor iva II ( : .i daCenttvi A t\ in cr's defensive %  ..-.> pfti— \ Dum ...us Illusion Discarding ihe proposal of ihtilculty was found in Western European neutrality as a the ball away particular!] -dangerous Illusion" tha raporl t'w Seld was an deverlj tor the said that ihe plan must Inoperspin Iwwling or Brodai ,it-ii lolntly bg AUanUc pow The raporl said it was A natter of "absolute necessity to suppress. Communist fifth columns in the nations of Western Europe". In time ol war these might number million men". Lebanon in non-committal reply o the Security Council i aid last night "the Lebanese Government declares its readiness to withhold aid from any aggressor". Though Saudi Arabia made this Bl on the Security Coun1 til's revolution, Press reports I reaching here said she | Arab countries were lifci ex. | press support. King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia %  Stnlbneyer n 2 hours. 25 minutes and had'then hit only one four. Marshall had irom stumping when 88 Tor he went yards out to I rick only for Fiddling lo fail to uathcr the ball. When 99. however. Marshall lost his wicket. Flddllim this time taking a catch at the wirkel The stand had lasted 3 minutes short of three hours and put on ISO. Marshall's score Included 14 fours. Only four runs were .nlded before Stollmeyer was bowled for 70. and before tea. taken th the score at 221 for three. i out. I'\c.i ELEVEN already reported to bV teleWorrell l graphed Washington his full sup, port for the United States In the After Tea struggle against Communism. Soon after tea Nutter gained his —Heater, reward for some very %  toady — howling when he had Trestrail Police Hunt Sex Criminals The ball struck Trestrail i painful blow on the knee and ha limped off tha field. This brought In to join Chrlstlani they looked like takii Th. bank iexpected in '%  i there is lea) the arrival ol Pi IU* < hitUia male | i throne. Hut the Brittt poblk now 'tiethoroughly digests aac morsel of news about I ibout the %  %  Man Charlie Bom it.i HI.' — II. %  -, %  | throne and %  % %  lha thunder (ran the new arrival il It i ... i more tlian the younger son and tha fi toyed niu.il tuna In Hut i haliy ha like bavtni saoshor Elizabeth or MartEaret to watch ajrowini | out with bo_*s. BfM mg a dream Prance and as ttl r. uHuriad When the new ha by | Will be third in line to Ihe thioti and Prlnceai Margaret will droi one more rung on the laddei ol success i on. Prince Charles has the "edge" 00 the new baby, particularly it it is n boy. A baby sister, how ever, might "steal" the spotUfhl now I again from n oldei brother u-t ;il'nnees> Margaret has temporarily snatched n frou Ttie tama lean which attandsxl Throughout its modem instm-v the aifcclentnation"oTkorak Sla^E* 1 { '"/''.''r "'' mat the second baby is brought BRITAIN WAITS FOR A GIRL I.e. ROYAI. KINc.KIIS >n bus) k II Uar doctors, nurses and lun.-n ire re* %  is quietly wtlttn| u>\ the birth oi P %  ti nul child. All Britain is hoping, too. that Elil lb* tl Baka a "piKeon pair" — a girl to share It) Qaraaca House with the princess' Bnt-I i SYNliMAN UHEE, thi Pr Korea Through The Ages WASHINGTON, D.C., July. IN AUSTRIA Sped V. %  -!!.. I Ing to i I of Ausln has been engaged in a tragic struggle tor fr eedom, unity and independence. Japan anniM.l this OOUBl f Ul See*" to China in recognition of and 1910 and proceeded to exploit Its that country's centuries-old pretotal raaoureaa thoroughly until the eminence ovai hat three hundred, but Qomai snd Ol World War II. BV for the was caught, and It was left to years prior to the anncx..tion £ in Korea from th ml and Goddard to carry Korea had beer. .. %  .!, i % %  :.-.> nr until stumps .:h *".lwer politics of Japan, t Ulna, the score 348 for 5 The bowlers and del obviously feelina the BtV %  ;.fel, rid neighbour. But this powerless gin an active part Hr. Syn>;in,in Kh VIENNA. July 8. il detachments of the i Criminal Police are tryal off three long stretches e ^lbmS i T^l SS t-Ve "closing stages .era nurkod JXi£*3*X ^S.o..^^ul^c a thsrf bv son ;;r fr m The SimuJapanaae war of laM.95 I three women murdered for sexual Chrisllani nnd runs were COnuWI left Japan the dominant (brekpl [ crimes within the last ten days. faster than at First is Guldo Zingcrle wanted Christian! was overimicnt. undi i nee, con first moment unceasingly for lodapwdencc The Cairo conference In 1843 promisecndcncc "in due Rheo htanM i in connection with the murder of Miss Fein Munro. an official of the 1 British Art Counril, who was I brutally murdered on PatscherI kofer Mountain above Insburck r on July i anferle L^ ^ to be trying to escape to Italy. The second is A. Sit ; i | i Identity card was found tn %  room I of the Sala/burn Hotel in which I 16-year-old Gertrude Weber was I found dead on a bed with deep 1 knife wounds on her breeal I abdomen. Singer is reported [ to be trying to escape over the mountains into Bavaria. The third case is that of a mnn ... in a blue bicycle who killed 18OartMi I year-old Elli Knstner and wound| ed 19-veiu-old Antonia Panholder .\ hen lhe> defended themselves against his Indaeei I 1 he discovered them bathing In a remote stream in Lower Austria | This man Is believed to be trying to cros the frontier into Hungary. Reuter pi'nd nd Kussia. Japan, alter winning Its war course." and in 1048 the f wms i iss. J is* %  BOWLING ANALYSIS Kutlrf !" hnM '* s %  nrown %  %  nrodi.ru k 1 J OsiUck SI %  ** POWERFUL RED FORCE THRUSTS SOUTH m rum %  * 1 Tacj TWO AMERICAN FIGHTERS LOST From Page 1 Oi.i Kon arc <*scuri^l time, but her people claim u history of more than 42 cemorivs, notes the National Geographic Society. Korean legend celebrates ir named Tan Gun, of superhuman origin, whose alleged tomb Is still venerated Mote credible arc the historic references to a Chinese noble who emigrated to Korea In 1122 B.C., and founded a dynasty there that ruled lha countrj For many cen| |. I. Mm h of what we now know as i. td degret unity and enjoyed an old culture at the time the Roman Empire to avoid being flourished. In the 14th Century the relatively small peninsular %  ports reaching country iw-ame known as the rb here describe kingdom of "Chosen," a name ollen by Hen given Korea to this day. : --'ly, it means "Land of thr ni| IdJJ DUt olf. Intelligence Allied headquai Korean rivers netrVa relBB. But ndlitary circle pointed out glumly that this had Morning Calm. prevented Communists fro-.. Korca ^ cn npWling attack waTnude on the port and <*"" W tanks, heavy artillery. |l ~J o ^ ,^ 6 w||h ^ Japinew naval base Wonsan. 15 miles north and batiaUons to the Ansoiig mude similar "open dooi" agreeof the 39th parallel, where good river at Pyonsjtaek >csterday aa a results were reported. prelude to the drive whict The oil refinery at Wonan was hack American forces at Chonau. hit. B-28 medium bombers, fifth key railroad, at dawn to-day. orforce. destroyi i r ..IIA further threat and partial way bridges on Chumuniim on the more dangerous one appeared to east coast, lust south of the 38th I*developing on the East coast parallel. Possible hits were scored across the mountain h on the railroad, road nnd bridge mug down through South itorl objective in an area west of —an area which has hit!.'r i Pyongtak —Reuter. quiet— iRruter) ments with a number of other r >wers, Including the United lates. But none served to protect Korea from aggression and exploitation, a fact which has prompted historians to refer lo the Far F,ast trouble spot as a n* -forgotten nation." Prior to the Sir.o-Jup..' • i WSJ Koreans for many generations had paid a nominal tribute each Write Direct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice—Free A KEY POSITION.. WAITS ^-^-FORYOU FIRST CHOOSE YOUR CAREER .i %  iT'-,t • i'. :. I'IH runm -.in % %  UllfllM iis.1 i.i ana mimimir UMtllH iMiHi tllllHIM sunn sun unun Start training for it NOW! Thtra H nill roof %  tli top lor lbs fully qualifies ntin *ho ii IhSM lor the |ob YOU can be dw man—lucttiiflll. proiparowt. with your luiurt aiiured—o. uud>in| at horns tn you' ipara ilm. E lided l. I'T personal lullton of Tha Bannait ollag*. Dniania mahas no difftranc* NE WILL HELP YOU TO ACHIEVE YOUR AMBITION Get your HM on ihe Udder ol HIOaSM fO-OAY. Wrue to The Bennett College and learn how thouiandi ol people ,..n like you ha*s reached the top "ith (he !£ % %  guidance. A well-paid job can be your*—"tan triii plciuot iparetima Uudy NOW. Direct Mail to DEPT. 188 The Bennett Colleoe SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND N. tad health." and will %  Sister Kim, Eiizabeiii will aaaln be parrniued to admiM In the |a*ni arrangement, artll I istabliiherl petV Tne nev i il \ vtllli I 1 .1 .: %  %  A re* Charter Km* ).. %  be iSl I edict i Kh which hmiteit the llUa 'i prince %  uvareifn Itae i r.ew disereo tocJuded Hi i i ntldra Prlaca Phil p A I I i burgh The praaaol KJnsj also the old regulation requirinu the •ttendancc of the Home Sorrel i the birth of %  roj %  -tin-ihiv i. insure no "ch Intro auehals sod sntl i Kde — Official Hone s.. ratal. I buti. Bda will M teleplioned nnd wtU make Hi rtitsal snnounoainenl of Uv beJba at rival In a I.ul let in OU I joors of the Home OftlCI Drp.ni monl Imilnin; in Wlnl. The news w iu ba rtoaha %  i rhersii gum artll boon Ihlte and then will follow ure.ii inoiy. publli and I Kennwhlta H; italn wal (.uietly hoplnf, like Pi himself. Ihal th. i % %  I And BO tonienl || I't linesElisabeth thai avarythlni ..ill ec tiorrnally that shs %  . %  %  (TrP IfekBaSBeaa paaM CenVonabte convemeni p-mkeeo ion eo*-i %  Ki tin. Why n.l MIS thislrb. *ha> know, and ,|r. *ui hali Uw '*•' way with %  . } uu REGENT GASOLINE 04 fuq6 04 atui/tZy REGENT A. K. POMADE Look for tha RED WHITE &BLUE PUMP GLOBE 100% BRITISH rtTOEaU A in Mil — A|rnU Distributors:— DA COSTA & CO., LTD. JAMES A. LYNCH & CQ„ LTD



PAGE 1

PACE EIGHT SUNDAY ADVOC Ml SUNDAY. JULY 1. 130 BARBADOS ADVOSCTE Sunday Jul> 9. 19511 LEGISLATE : considerably in recent yt-ars and the measures which require the attention nf the Legislature are of so complex a nature that it is time that the machinrrv (or the preparation of Bills and other measure* be examined T lature having as its objects the abolition I Juries in Barbados will serve to bunt: legal practice here into conformity with that of the United Kingdom. It was a non-controversial measure. Grand Juries have served their time and no heat should be generated in their disappearance from the legal scene. The procedure is for a Magistrate, usually a lawyer, to decide that there is a prim facie cage); the case is then reviewed by the Attorney General who if he sees fit commits for trial. The Grand Jury then examines the witnesses for the DCOi %  and once again decides whether a primn facie case has been made out. Those in favour of the abolition of the Grand Jury contend that when two legally qualified |>ersons have examined the evidence and come to the conclusion that there h I uriiim facie case it is an unnecessary delay and a waste of public money for it again to be subjected to the scrutiny of men who do not try the case but merely decide whether it should be sent down for the verdict of the Petty Jury. Theonly argument against that contention seems to be a love of the ancient forms and ceremonies which for centuries have guided the administration of the justice in this land. The members of the legislature feel that it is more convenient to break with those traditions and it is likely that their decision will meet with little publicprotest. Certain members of the Legislature anil certain sections of the public are disposed to RO even further. They are prepared to abolish all juries and to entrust the decision in cases criminal as well as civil to the hands of the judge. The decisions of juries in Barbados have not always met with the unqualified approval of occupants of the Bench but the principle of trial by jury particularly in criminal cases is an important safeguard of the freedom of the individual in an age in which executive encroachments become greater every day. In Barbados member! of the Bench have always maintained an admirable and excellent impartiality, unswayed by the interests of the executive. This island would however be giving hostages to fortune on the day on which they allowed trial by jury to be abolished. In crimes such as sedition and all political offences, trial by jury remains the greatest safeguard Of freedom of speech which xists in %  world in which such freedom is fast dying out. Let members of the I.ci;islature tlicrefoie study carefully the possible results before they assume the grave responsibility of abolishing all juries. Water i . If-Hrt .if Wr| Imli.n Su<4 %  hleaeelen •* •'• <.wMa.ni. fffaM indie., % %  pfciai, sei tsieUni alter the mu-h i Lord's. Sitting On The Fence II* \ .il h.i ii ill l.iiltliins .."Would elderly. aottW rare to share well-furnished small house and WORK with elderly, active roupli Advt. I'VE polished the silver. Hai'r yon? Now you can polish the grate*. Before lunch Too busy for lunrh. After fit. grates you va scrub Ike hall. How old are you? Etahfy-'rine. And won? ElKhtv-elKht. You're quite a youtiijafer. Hurt!.' about vow. How old is your husband? Ninety-'" I What's he doing? Dtate mp er ln fl the Htcfe Won't it be bad for I No. Do U good, ffurrjs up vtfJl those grati U'i'h the help going to and wash eat. eh, <;•> What for" i weal m i irfains. What ere rot the curtains'' TiJ.<. Before lun h I've told UOM. Wo hi p (hose so'jn p %  JI with pains hi the hark. I go to bed with pains in the '.lomaeh. /til day luni I have pain* In the rbe< II. 0U|M t<> he destroyed. As I j in only suggest that you climb Nelson's Monument and Jump into Trafalgar-square. That is. If your hack doesn't hurt too much. "Everv lime I think of thr boy I IOVP I hav* a fit of sneertnt.. aiUiuiulh I newnr have a *old. uii.it shall I do. doctor?" Although this is hardly a docloi's problem. I offer this advice for what it's worth. You can either stop thinking of the boy < % %  stuff your nostrils With blotting; paper. if you Miceze. then you will either kill ins love by 'shooting of bk "nig paper at him or. if the paper stands the stralu, air pressure inside \our head wtll tilow your brains out. Perhaps this might be the best end to a romance which would never last beyond an unusual noon.— I.ES. Iti-ilis.li I'oliliYs IIMIIIIHII LONDON Events in the Far East have almost mode British poUtl in forgel that .i i;< M I.U i .. could happen here at an Parts politics and cW %  Ing have been largely dowod by the near unanimity which prevails over th' United States' decision on Kt fee B) for a mild campaign aea ailing Em. I Hovm. who la caUod i t.i pass InFori Si portfolio into younier and healthler hands, ihe usual parti moapnere it tacking In Wi ster. It Ls eanei ill] ex| ectad that the Labour Government, stilt ridi ii.uentary storms with a slender House of Commmis maJortty, win at leaal survive until ummei due in a month's tinnIf major, events still in.: in the international Held when parliament ro-assembles in October. Labours !. %  .!., %  of life might be prolonged indelliiltellerbert KoiTleODi Deputy Prime M i n ist er end one of Labour's leadUaj Btrateghrl sayi thk | precarious Parlianumil is erorklne out a lot better than most people expected lbs statement probably refleou a growing confidence within the party that its razor-edge rule can i ontlnue. Hut Labour Is not relaxing enluely. its national executive committee already Is busy on the academic spadework which will produca %  platform for the next eieeUon whenever it comes. I Heal iorrsp*indciiut understand that two documents will be prepared one a broad statement differentiating socialist ; from those of Its chief rivals (probably with a Bpeclal section designed to make Liberal vote^ f<---l at home); the other a detailed programme. Our Hruihrs Saj: The Edilor, the Adi>oeole. SIR. The bewildered letter a tied 'Planter' In Thursdays voeate state"the erection of u second steel shed has brought from the Arts and Crafl B> %  a threat to withdraw from taking any active part in the Agricultural Exhibition." The Arts and Crafts Society has made DO threat. It has slated in clear and unequivocal English that as a protest against the erection of n second Steal shed in Queen's Park by the Agricultural Society, II will no longer continue to organise and arrange the Art and Handicrafts Section of the Annual Industrial Exhibition. If 'Planter' had read the AdrocdV he would have seen in the Correspondence CoU wmn the lelt. i .-huh the Art* and Crafu BOclet) sent to tho Agricultural Socii'v The ludicrous suggestion is made by 'Planter' that the issue of a second steel shed should have been fought in a "Higher and nobler way .. .. by the Arts and Crafts Society using; their eflorta •—'' the funds required for erecting the lype of building which they contemplate." According to Mrs. White's letter to the Adocata on the 24th June, a proposal "Clear and I iitr>'invitation, it was not j project of the Arts and Crafts SoclM i< difActlll to follow 'Planter' ir. his reasoning—if. indeed, it can K tailed such. Why should the, Arts and I'rufts Society collect funds for the erection of a building which the Agricultural Society would use for two days of the year as a breakfastiifex shell for judges, and. for the icmaindci of UM feel St. Michael's Vestry would usa us n soup kitchen for pauper-'' •Planter' accuses the Arts and Crafts Society of lack of loyalty and jealousy. Towards whom hag this Society lacked loyalty? Surely it Is not jealousy of the steel Bhed. for there Is no evidence that tl ; Society w-iTed to compete In making "jerry building" In Omvn's Park VIGILANT HEADER ThankB The Editor, the Advocate. SIR.—Please grant me the facilities of your newspaper to convey my sincere thanks to all those who supported my Song Recital* during the past three weeks in Barbados. I feel thai I should make special mention of Hi* F.xeellencv the Governor and Mrs Scvage. Mr. H Bisley Tucker. Representative of the British Council and his entire staff, Mi Olchlow Matthews. Mr. Gerald Hiid-on and members of the Barbados Choral Society, the minister and officers of James Slrecl. El Mary's and Christ Church. Messrs. Radio Distribution nrul Mr. W B Millar There ere many others to whom I should like to say a personal "Thank >cu." I hop,io return lo Barbados to renew my acquaintance with many persons who have made mv stay enjoyablr. GRACITA FAl'LKNER July 7. I MO. War To The Editor. The Advocate SIR,—There is the fear that a third world war has been Ignited at Korea. This fear could onK be the result of faithlessness In the Security Council of the United Nations to stop it. The Securit) Council has a fai acted rathei wisely, end it is evident that the Km flict is not merely one bet North and South bul rather Communism \s Qu} s Council. It should Inclear ; 1%  ';• i and thai then ., , South was purely | test o( the t'ulted Nations' Solidity Bb. Jl I this te-t show any wvakne tbaee srlil be %  World W i and Communism •rill triumpl On the other hand If the 80CU1 ty Council shows Ite 1 munism will retreat and probabl %  try again around 1954 get It Is spreading daily. !'!.. %  Hi take and they should not be allowed to reeov I tight now we I ., few >.ars time and our chances of a victory will be sU Most people love peace, but when u .: means—war. I V B U iuni it To The Ediror, The Adcocate MH, — Will you kindly let leaders know more of the progress of ihe badlj needed V w c.A %  Tins building should be in the • the spot where Pnlm Btach Quoet House was. may be suitable. Women are l>eing badly housed and Bt Ihe men |M of the unskiupulous Tnere is no protee* How can ucogteee be rfiadel WORKER Pruv fur Peacv I %  Editor, The Advocate siii This ii Ipeclel appeal tn .ill Peacemakers to write, and pray unceasingly for peace. We era all i* embed and found sntnl iiiriAfter the last great slaughter of bUnVaBlty, all efforts should havi been made to unite all It has been worthy of note that India produced a Peace^ n.aker Why can't other natloni do likewise' 1 Hoping ttu motben may be heard f.ir and wide and reach evervwhere for A MOTHER Pigoon Hohd To The Editor. The Advocate SIR.—Appearing very regular], In the columns of the liar bad •<• Advocate are notices of the awac. of Colonial DevelopnMai and Welfare Scholarship t. V.\ particularly to Trinktadl Pritish Guianese. Barbados boasts of being in ttu 1 rorefroni of West Indian educatiou. and I am therefore left to presume that no one applies foi these scholarships, or that bex-aus of our boasting iheie is no boostIng. and nil the applicants an meticulous!) pigeon-holed. GOOD ALL JuJb ii 1960, Poor SIR,—There Is an urgent need to give more help to the poor Poor people, some too old lined up like cattle, pushed end jammed by stronger ones to get %  few ihllUnge which can onl> keep life going for a few day* The poor In Barbados are just a body of people weakened bv starvation. Teed and help them and there will be no tuberculosis ulting to say that our people do not know rule* DEFENDER BATHROOM SI IM'LIES HOB-OP SLITts CAST-IRON BOXES W.C PASS s^ T n WHITE LAVATOBY %  HASINS— K ns. (with or wlthoul Pi %  %  SINGLE and DOUBLE DKAIN BUAHDS and SINKS SINGLE ALUMINUM DHAINBGAI1DS ALUMINUM %  DOCS—M ins. I Ml : ins. GALVANISE SINKS IRQ LAIN SINKS %  II n %  ..nd FITTINGS mUONSON .\. BAYNES CO. LTD. !l I^SS^iib W C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. mil HI: i %  ; m., KUITII ITOBU. Cocktail (pahtu OHIH it WMBBB SALTED PEANUTS in Tins 3a DANISH COCKTAIL SAUSAGES n, Tin.. 75 CIIEKHIES MARASCHINO FLAVOUR — Bollles M .11 IIIEIilllKS CREMEDE MENTIIE FLAVOUR .77 ONIONS in bolllra ? PI.AIN OLIVES -bOttlM .57 PEEK FIIKANSCHEEM-I.ET.s .... |J| CARRS CHEESE CRISPS m ',-lb ,,k; ..;. .53 CARRS CHEESE CRISIS |0 HEINZ SANDWICH SPREAD-bob 47 AND RtMCMlCH 101HI.XH.S ..,; %  mlitmmm HI i n it lih-mli'it 11ith •'/ il Alt OI II rot *. !#•; FMKE HIM. STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO.. LTD. D AK WEAR s A Small shipment %  these superb TROUSERS in attractive materials ,ind colours novi > stock, TAILORED Et SIMPSONS llat'OVI A A Co., Ltd. DRY GOODS DEPI. GODDARD'S OOLD BRAID RUM MAKES YOUR PARTY HAPFIER



PAGE 1

PAGE TWO SUNDAi kDVOCATE >l \|)\V. Jl 1 V 9. 14.-.0 '.-.-s.:::::'.;;: ,;'.:•<'>'.',• ;v.v/.ww,',w,'.w.v/V)' GLOBE TO-OAY 3 & K3 .md CIIMIM l\l. FIGHTING! LOVING! LOOTING! YVONNE De CARLO • HOWARD DUFF _-* DOROTHY HART • WI1URD PARKER EXTRA! EXTRA! MNGING HAKBEKS MUM. ..I Short) AMERICA'S LA 11.si Newaraal BKITISll MOVIE TONE Newsreel *ce MatHonald Bailey Trinidad's Coloured Sprinter the Zill al the Whlll City Gaase*. England. S IH VICTOR T.MT.K.U.E .CB. was an In transit passenger bj )'. W I A ninit fro.m 'roni there tip Kill be ictumng to Englana via New Tor* and Montreal. Chairman *' International Acrartio Ltd and B' I \ He wan attending a meeting 0l reiircwitK' %  B O.A.i P.A A .. i A i. and ii W i A..ataaJlainf arrancaCMni i ..rl C'< At the University of Wcetern Ontario M R RICHARD HUTSON accompanied by hx mother Mr* Hlld H dJtJf bv T<\Ato flprnd Richard who is *t Unlvi i i' of we st ern Ontario will be returning; to Canada in mid-September He h I hring in Canada since IW4, at ihe University from 1948. Hre for Two Weeks A RRIVING re iII I v Ii W l A from Trinidad foi iff Reggie I an Co IIHAI. I U.JM At TMTION lo-dsy 9.10 a.m. Come and I.i-K-n 'o .. recording of the ALL STAR Sh Mil CECIL SAMPSON ZZZZ5ZZZXX~>>>""", Hi/ Pnpulutr MU'inund Maihiiii O I IMIV A Troupe Arrived Yesterday M R MOD of Pi.'.lu R.I. %  M TCA %  John Clare were imonj thearriving b> T.C.A I Mr Clare iH ..! afacb i %  gei already h it., . i,.. a % %  %  Coral Sands T.CA. Navigator M R. DON WtU T.CA, plan..' which an mortang Ha ii heie foi • %  and Mr Win. also raOM down on the same flight HI i lei hn lay taking hi | Mr and Mr* Willir. are stayrig at the Marine Hotel After 5* Montha' Holiday CLEM MOSHnn. form Iv Clam St Hill, who has Man spendingabout five and a half months with her parents Mr nnd Mm. II O, St Hill of IH Aw. BeHevWe, left by T C \ Ccudb Qcdlinq M~„ staying at the Hotel vesie, day morning illuming to her home in Monties l\\ Al. (Worthing*) Today and T* 5 00 and K M u \pp^c w rat^co 9 fc ;V WSMW*CARACAS MIGHT Wa* Playing Cricket In Bermuda M R 1111,1. SIMPSON, son ol Mr and Mrs. Ja. k s. i of "Wlldsle". Marine Garden, .irrived by TCA reetanu morning and his parents, brolhei-i ml sister wennt Sea well meet him RIM who la at school at Upper Canada College in Toronto bai an ii Bermuda for the past three weeka p'aying crieket tor a |Mm of school boys from Canada, who an tout Inj He expects to be here for couple of months. About the Y.W.C.A. U l 1 1921. than used to !%  a V W C A in Barbados, bul after that time it fell through A great effort has been nada Wife this Association and .it cent II A V: '"t'liln and hi* n LEAVING --I fcWBLL by TCA J. A llaynrv l>r Torrenre Pa>n Kenneth Mood. Doing Reiearch Work At McGiil D R. TORRENCE PAYNE, M.D., I'h I) with Mrs. Payne and r d .* their baby aon Michael west Km among the piaaangan who left * %  %  yesterday bj T.CA., en route to g rbad l)i Payne is doing research rit MeOtl University for The American ** Heart Association, nnd at the end f June 1951 he will then be going %  sWWeaTJ BaaTJaVavaVVaaea^BValBWan*-' "•** J .nning M *iHopital 1 corning were left to right. Mr4 Irm Moher. Mr. 1 Michael, Mr* Kenneth Wood. Mr* Payne and Mr. 1^^,,,,^'] %  UK ay mormiifc hy : AU ol them .ne going on I. xn-p: Eluau-ih arho artll be %  •-aining in bigland at "Inng ^rk" Schuul in Uartfdrjhdura Mr. and MO ind I iing i.. Year In Venexuela •.line weeks staying J! Leach Club, Mr, lanMB and their „ %  returned to enezuela yesterday by B.W.I.A. here he c the Central Agency s fa in Caracaa. from England .they have been nan i" Venezuela for one yeai Firat Viait B-G. on Thur by B.W.I.A d. Li: nl Teacher of the Betrrl/tfwagfing Government School. I flrM vi*it to Barba. ^nest ( f Mi ind Mn Creighton Birch of J To Continue Nuraing Career M ISS 1LENE STUART of BlatK Rockt ho did her basic if aining in Nuraing at the Gencr.ii iHoapltal here, will lie among tho leaving here tomorrow nnd by the Gascognc. to her nursing career in the; rirai v aaaa 9 A RHIVINU from BC. ft day afternoon b] lanu Mi s Coo With U.S. Army H.Q A RBTVTNG yesterday morning from Puerto Rico via Trtni %  d Mrs. Georg. iE Martlnlqua who arrived hero I he>' wen-in ll.ul,a,l. for about receilllv bv „ K Ga-eogne. will t a month ataylTUJ with Dr. Payne's r ,. turnin|[ 1O Mtnin ^r* motber and relatives. ,. h#n lh \ ,"" bpent Honeymoon Here way north For Summer Holidaya M R and. M were .it SOOWeU to meet thel, inn Man. HI p % %  -i .morning ho hove come over e arrived Iron, Canada b] 1 l A wa weeks holiday in ' k Pen Meyers aeci m.u ned recently m visil to R B rhadwi. she wan In I in Barbados about I'ttle under a year ago when ... spend their honeyi ana up with her nelee and iwoh) Kenneth Is a Burl.ifriend* She hopei tO retu Toronto :ond j %  l,eV tWOp ber i Barbados later m Bother holiday. V v* She i* st..yliig ux the Sea VU % %  I ||L J ^uest House i Former UrauJine Convent Pupil A RRIVING on End.., aft kOCfl fiom Trinidad by B W.I.A arere Hr and lira Alvln Tuekerl and their daugbtOI l.ynelte. 1 The> BM .staying al tluu homi • m • ffegO," on the St Jarne. 1 coast Lynette who use-l t.--lenla> morning by T.CA. from Canada were : Mr John Clare. Managing Editor of Macleans Magailne in Toronto and Mr Rod V. Marlnnct. Director ol Public Relation*. T( \.. In Montreal Mrs Maelnnra and Ihelr two Mm OaaffO, arrived here last Saturday for a holiday and Mr flare and Mr. Maclnnes have come to loin them. BY THE WAY By 111 \( IH iiMUKU I F i have ., favourite af -.K the cretinisms of lO-CUD H be thing ..died Uneeco In case ll might he thought loo hlghbn it called in Miss Myrna Lov, w ho 'got mon cheera than it.ih'.ileiit If. by some glorious mischance. Mr Uing Crosby had gone to L'nesco. and Miss lx>y to St. Andrews. But you see what I mean, even if I don't. What about making Miss Dorothy Lamour nn honorary Field-Marshal and Assistant Director of Western Defense'' /a if mini v M R TINKLEHUHY SNAPDRIVEH Ki aprang a surprise yesterday He produced doeumont convention, written Instrument or what mit, purporting to be a charter of privilege granted DS ihntgaoaao kvda acclealaatlcal In the reign of Henry II to the borough in which the Thnrogrin work* are now rituate "i" hoMtankma. This eharter. empowered nn> houao %  i %  • ,n 'he borouwli to rt^ .. flaw II .i v i.% i.f the year Mr. V %  > %  %  ,:-.., G.,..s.l.„„le. K.L. countered by quoting a written cancellation of ihi* ohartei at the demand of the Knlghta Pursuivant of the C'nvin of Seigncurle. who claimed rights of custom by a will Of iiKiilllrarcrii. %  ed in the Manorial courl Coeklecarrot interposed to sny that if they were going to argue in this fashion, they might as well try in prove thai people who make ;;. liters i...se thi ll %  tise them on an ancient rune of %  Plougaalel. To Mi i. Dj fj relorted hotlj W'^ %  /•crftii/i. slw iivi. bond G KU-8 wh a in doubt about how to behava at a In* dinner p.ul might do beltei than follow the exan da ladj i have h-i %  out III nij pepei sin ued bereell Into %  quare knob on Uu I her forearms and Up) • the tablecloth, and sipped chamTi a glass held Iwtween %  the imall one daintily crookedi." I can add nothing to thi uleture Rut 1 suspect that %  : %  Itb 4 km found it difficult to pretand had Dot noticed onvIhing odd going on. Tho crooked rate, showed that she had been decently brought up, nnd was exquisitely refined. e*Mr-miiulvtl flam DEFORMING fl Ca5i weatherE bound at London Airport, need no longer wander about at a loose end. There is to be a large hostel for animals and Inhave to make journevs by nir Great care will have to Iw exercised (O get them on the right planes. Even a trained aceglamorcccptioncttc would find It difficult to pick out a warthog in a plane-load of tlnanciers The OdUe or a tiger iw-ould be more obvious, but no awkward Down. Rover, le-—' DRINK MURRAY'S MILK STOUT "THE STOUTEST OF ALL STOUTS" Evans <$• II In (ft, 1,1s New attractive shades in Jersey Silks , Model Felt Hats 2.00 2.50 3 00 NEWAMERICAN PRINTS 73' .*."-','.',*,V„V. MANNING CO.. LTD—Agent-. Evans & Whitfields Your Shoe Store I i



PAGE 1

M M1AV Jl'LV , ISM MNDAV \1)V(K ATH PAOi IIIKII ITS STILLFIN W ITHH AKOLDLLOYI) Gardeillll}* lliliis For Amateurs Al 'I'lli* 4 in< in.i SliM-kiliti %  "' %  * Lil*.|Ml litrUKE planting I..h. (K>ol. it ii jtiii -* Mil lo longer the Rind* ihat a*. %  itted to U A Lid uid ."inatcurish — deacripii. % %  l UHM thai do well in L arbadoa. may be helpful The largest of our water-Uliea iate vigorous Lotus L ... Home Sweet Home— With The Rileys up leaves rising ll> .. H. A! the Aquatic Club. THI LIKE OV ltll.r. H ham Uendix as Rlley. Thi.s lilm is bMM Ml IIM %  rtcan radio prafruami ui the MOM IMB %  f the presence of Bei x i the Bun end tbt direction ol Irving BfVchnr, who wrote the script and produced It the "life of Rlley" is 114 and natural Throughout the %  A jnted to do, 1 im. the continuity I* food, and Startling Predictions In Your Hflrosropr Your Real Life Told Free 1 ml fou nil .it iD!i for ritaal ther. but accordfrom the point M vh • Mat water lo a height 1 ports, that gentleman'! two or three :.I not Oiittrefj n> scented pink II %  > %  HUful — are bon> I US up* '• ••.alks, and open lor .1 hga appear to -..i.h morning. Ttm 11%' %  >•' "UMAII table arc -.11 In the u> out strong roots ,f couree, l!,lt icUon, aru En •. vfrj *y!tt ^rSfflSg?; a most refreshing picture, and •lo amine the whole family nw W.ld Wet is with u*. and • Texas Panhandle I* once again • I e| western gouigs-on ilh Calami!* Jane and Ham come out on Itaaa now showing at the (.lobe Some Cookery Club Problems whole area of the pool, crowding and killing out c\ oihvr v.. 1 %  1 li % %  m that (he Itiig conpMta failure when I..c.tu'l pa> w %  1 ... %  %  t,. Htl P" ION houoe, thing* lok very black, hm in daughter makes up bee These i liaracMtl have them-clvcs quite linie. from small evarjdej shooting affairs to murder mid a 1 ivllght hank holdup, and lift(of 1 nrcrjii" BOOBUS m their %  I us! liaVO DB0U neivruektiig, to say the u %  %  %  years ago. Jean Arthur starred • alanuty Jane, and somehow mj preoeion is thai she was a prct,.,.. rt h mixture to rise to double it* No cookery book ever ttllj amount of yeast used and Ihi warmth provided during the ri ing. It Is not possible to giv< ihis exactly. The temperature of the roon be between groes Fahrenheit If the flour Is warmed a little Hi the tlrst place the process of raising will be quickened if lU.wers. very Invel ild flour is used the time requiiinches above on %  %  : % % % %  Lily-pool, and really looks beat do-waU ton of hn totlM in a large natural pond Dkryor, and hi thai •'> help him Next in size all toll IfBCUlta HVRfOf or, bW also more suited to the lar and took her ehances at ahnuting vimii i! %  '!:' %  1 heinf shot at along with tin rowaxdl Rllog flnaij ct a H j and boji Yvonne de Carlo, the mcl kavoi their borne. A Bendli is perfectlv cast JS the gOOoVtaeorted and blundering Rlley, and :he performance* of the rest of the • .i-t ,it.p!en*HHiS HIKKt. frfrue fell me houlong ftn( j he vcry Mnil |.„ bread dough or oilier Ulv> The leaves of h( ,. unlike the Lotus, float on M.rf.ue of the water, .itli 'lie f'owerr, borne on short ..Iks 1 % %  ;>bove the leaves if p! %  .. iool with other and l-*s hardy kinds, these Lilies mutt ed and controlled, or thi ver-nm and kill oul the more and 84 de"*Ucale ones. Grown Irom root Then there %  the m dier. ion Lilforous Blue Lily. VrnoN leaves Iso float on the wate: with the K a re* %  rt .'..Ik ed will be much longer. This Lily spreads -I wlv. will Again, the raising will be tolerate other Lille;, nd hi well mod if the douch is placed tutted to the smaller Lily-pool on the plate rack over the cooker ( irown by root i r I n a cupboard Pcr (lo „ a lv nia lhl ipen fire or over b „ t Uli ^ are tho p 1)lllp u|( like pink, while or pea h coloured or in front of a pan of warm water. Dough, under ideal conditions will double its bulk In 1—14 hours —L.E S. Present For Princess Elizabeth ones that float, grouiied among tiieir small leaveri ht on the ntrlaeo of the water Nothinn could be more etenrdng than thaae lovely little Ltli... and they are the answer to the small Lilypool. Grown from ro-1. And lastly there b the water Hyacinth, natural to the ponds in l.arbados Thit Lllj rlsee ui '. he water, the ulants floallni; by CROSSWORD r J n 7" 1 —, r 1 t %  1 %  —1 1 %  laiiiral lovelincei %  Hr 1. >.. ON T.Kir. Indial n n ( fam (HH A*tn-loe*t. -l,u b. |l>ina .%  f ,i tsstaaa • built 111. an Mill.'. Rat .i-'ljn iv %  (-.Airac* at KM 1 aaeew I1-1.' ml ad rtr". Tnivfb. %  '-. I iO* %  %  %  %  %  1 %  II .l-.il, >n I 1 Bl'O s Mlainpa ... t %  HlJICll l \Ur m.urk^blc *cuurv pi hla >Ultmenu about you and >n afl a .low aa Ihli nflvr nuij not b inml' 1 s-l.i Addrraa l-UNII|T TArUiRT Davt tlS-B. Urx-rr rt>r)rlt aim). Ikinibay JU. tnala. I'oaUta lo Indu u ta kltlIt) linn. ; %  r. 1 Ilia %  irllMiifiil ft tee EUtabeth has just reat its President and Q u een Man cetved a belated wedding preaei I nnceu Elizabeth and Pnueev%  veil worth wDtting Margaret amongst its memberfur. 1 t,ook written ana compiled The BBCs reporter. Valentine I 1 p.embers <>l Women's InstiSelsey. described the Institute's lutes throughout England and wedding present In "Radio New. Wales The dedication reads Keel." It was not. he s akd, a A token of love and loyalty to t rofessionol fob but the personal Her Royal Highness by ihv Wowork of Women's Institute niem1 ien"s Institutes of England and bcrs who wanted to give the Wales on the occasion ol the Princess something to remind her Koyal Weddinii, with their best of the Kentish hopftelds. the wishes for Princess Dlxebetti'i Welsh mountains, the Yorkshire future happiness" Delta, the Lincolnshire Wolds— W en's Iiutilutek are n great all the colourful counties which feature of Hntish rural life, she visits during the course of her lull, which were unties Each country has provided .0.1 in )97, came material for two pages, one in Brit exl I trrltuag, the other In nMiiroa or in a verj 'i l Mildesigns. Theie is amoi.. .igeNearlr all women In ;. >>. t %  s 1 ereet legend that Christ tiht. rich and poor alike, belong (.imp ;o the county on the hli *,d the Institute, ami on one gfhnN of ,lo<< bean sixtv finely ttlugiving It on untidy over fie Royal VamUy*e country I led aoale of arms, case or more appearance To be seen lo the i". Norfolk, ba an I %  rounty best advantage the Lll.. n ida cnoloo eltn UlU ining, ui a wnii it fou can ftr^aK ur* raid. II. timie > number inir UM revei. Ig N ( t much In t>M its the gardraar said ht?n run down, ifi %  *l 14. IIMMt. Hi 1 endowad. M 11* IJIITOCI iiaa it iht he I* qulcklr parb %  tti.in hit montj. <41 .H fl.inn VCHI emiid nnd in native good men nod Wie %  1S1 Jl. Mometliiug gamed. (3) '.-1 |-^.ihlv. iSl II T<> ...unp Joarpli It protMaa i Hill) where TOU find tlie lodser. < > lo (III LOTIQ Ilia • %  : % %  I H /,iniO fsloitd, %  1 %  L l %  • mad' ai •ecu "Calamity*, seems to bear charmed life No bullet tVC comes near enough to graze he sombrero and the only use sh bar giun Is to hit tb sheriff over the head with it 1 real Calamity would have A better than that The film is really the gtoi | Sam ita->. whoee knowteitgp oi Mi-.ieuus inn. into all kindi >t Buying aood ii..ise he %  .. enter it 11. the nm (' %  • %  Is JI. pl.ived, ana when it i•d that the large-1 ganoUDl ..ii flam's horse, an unknown, II1 local boruter-evuav-Bookle dam 10 take .1 hand ill I tl nigs, and in the intddl.of the 1 inthe notes drops dead underBem, Sam and hi' enlleagues then proceed to murdei the banker and 1 u cashlei and have to take lo the hills. Calamity doas all she can lo help them, aim it's amazing 1 tin' l.i %  with her An)ui s.nn decides li> give himself Up, dmDM persuasion of ue twWtheart K.dh.. h-ving acteaked .. vital v ith her) but when he finds that I • 1 %  %  that the life of an mitlaw t ihe life r%  1 htm Calamity loins and what rs Id ng up traJna and %  I bank, the end la piettv 11 oncerned exedpi 1 who looks a little dl bevelled, but still in the rang • in afraid 1 can nuke DO (m tl < comment* on the .1. > BCUngti but I wnuld Ilk1 In %  ] thnt the scenerv and H %  re In a cla* by Baemnelvei Though the story Is laid In TM Owe) of toe shooting was dune in I'tah. i-n<\ the srem-ry 11 ina.ui cent. The movntelne look al like Immeiee cathedrals in their 1 1 one to the of the atmoso'iere. ihe eOavtin trulv lovely. Th" hoises on with mat* saddles and %  II Ihe fancy trappings of 1 MIOIU ful era. and the ra> %  are not conAnad in take vou up lull .ire thrillinar OH*mo horsemanship. YARD LEY j~cun(liilion (a a 111 1 ... ir ., l>ie>i 1 ftaii %  1 down deli of 1 Snob Jazz be In gri jj es of cleai %  • I 1 where (i-li cai be seen swimming about In Oil Ible lo have mot kind Of I "' the UI pool. American jazz line in the city of the The Musicians Section 1 v. union of En.tlanded as a "disgrace to 1 a Jan ronteet current!] held bj a Vienna radio st One reason The young elana, In an effort to unpre ludgaa, ere thowiojg up in 1 .*ip..n iV u. I.N.S VI NMA in* %  rough f the 'oyeesl I ue" ring on. %  pM^'^kb.. 1 Specially designed for Barbados, rhis brown broque is now on sale in the leading stores. See them for yourself madeby JOHN WHITE e9t.C ELECTRIC 1 >r n M (melr made 1 1 %  ll* *cjlcd if %  fjuturc tml never need* -cr> kflW, This nrlnifcrator will SBaaa 1 1 I %  of ciimate anil n'. I.ivelv 10 l'Hk '. hJO Solid chromium-01 Ited hirtdlt i"(Of poraung ou lia\r tu do P, Plan," Malt l.-lav It I / 11 y %  !' 2 ; gtfBaari 1 F this i..i 11 days and prove i I tl tu Keep thai KKKI' THAT SIIHMll.l.llll. (OMI'I.IAION



PAGE 1

SI \l>\\ II I \ i) |.,;,,i MINIMI ll>VOCATK THREE HORSES TIE IN T.T.C. SWEEP (Bg BUOKlt) !" „, „„. POKT-Or-SPAIN. Julv d THE TRINIDAD TURK CLUB summer meetir. today m extremely sultry weather The rain w> a,, d al Jinn hfl fron • .i!y thi., morning and about II JO the t:ii\vn around the turf t. it races ayajrt to be hold ur put off. K<-vmJlMi ih track held up the meeting wai the t *T" %  i pad pUce m the iweai aboul i v ,n.. th,water quickly Septembci Boo ran off. This ted tit* course Orly" and this should %  %  tUK> but not ? lipper> and this siantlal iimu of rnonc^ event] iac: made, rant of the top weights divided among the luck come home lir KIN > %  .%  JI LI "AM* e I* %  > %  \ iC .. %  kn M B* Ind LEADING ARTICLE 'O'Nrili II'. lb* I INK STREAM i 1 : -,i.n,*n> II lb.dead Mai l< • pi...i INDSLA 1I-, %  |SJ u,. rim. Ill wi -11 H MLFH-.I.I, |* (tow — • litiHn H. ii> ii* it; % %  '! I'MAKALITR |LoW*l III Ill" %  iMr.ru-. i > "Storm c curtain was run* down on *'Slorm tiift' winning %  deceive victory In driving rain The meeting might, m fact, be naaembered ^pvciuliy /or the labours Of this great man who r.ii. herself Into furm and when she am I Furlong* Stewards Handicap early today, opinion %  much M her or wlietlu| ,i an aimply her 1J ( I gallop. The Utter proved to for although "Blue Slre;ik" was well weighted down it wa able thai BJ ilnished with more dash today than she Ul'l OB Th Horse of the \lcc| Other horses w-o stamped themselves as good <>ri.todaj wet* v i ind BowbeUi* %  frty ojao put In i third vletory although with ll 'Septenii.. : long* put down as the horse uf the meeting and the best bone Wist indies today ;.t sprinting. 'Bowbcll*" ran against poor op: her 136 lb well, showing no eg ag .it the tuiisii in en behind an mush very rtrong. drawing away more In the %  tyka of a stayer than a iprtatar But 'September SOUK" went to the front early and tn th.very fast "Lady pink" with ... IT. lbs less, could not catch htm I I-HARI ITE IUW IIliterallv ran the,' AnoCh. %  %  fan about DOVER %  must also be made of the record set up b> trainer Henrv Hart *h"" rMM M $20,000 t %  %  : | at thl meeting. The following .. %  II is .-i r Ions hire Marshall Hisses Century In Good Batting Display NORTHAMPTON. July B Although ; :nl bv the opoiuin: partnership .>l 180 b] Jell SI illn eyei und ll IJ M.nh.11, the Wm I"" i lucm ed in striking their usual high rate ol t Tl"'" 1 irtnamptonahta oouratefy and Relded k i ni> with FVeddle Brown, the captain] letUnj a aniandid ixampl i i. meeeadad in kpopmt the tounnij team lo und,, .. run .. miatite W I icorM :i48 f..i 5 in Ihi chry' play ng DOWlm ami ihe ItclderBrazil Are Favourites For World Cup HK> DE JAM .1. I.I.I.!! •>' i A it ...., fan | ,, ; %  cored running net ween UM arlekau and much >t "' tOratl foi ., crowd of nvri 10.000 CORN from attampU of tho fieldsmen noiabli Jai >. Brown to run out the Jackson MVII re>i a noiabli .i magnlflcani Uarow (rom the oh* boundTarj dismi sing rranh Woi < i a .. in. M failed b> only oOi run 10 i 4 his second century i succeive %  Me v..i hu a i advonturoui In tha opanh %  i %  %  .. Althoui seal lurv vitii imk Mankhall played u One Bl llmeyer innings ol seventy, i .nmg con trait : %  >! I %  %  ill lo tl %  •coring stroln He also gaj i on overthrow, but i his runs eanu tram earefulU ...,..' %  ', %  %  %  i adj) out) 1 l model of stylish I Late in tin-i.i Christi. MI ga\ i a flood display hi quick foot.-d driving ot II bowlers beinj; pnr1lciilarl> efli tive. Evan ot the da\ %  i. i with tha nn The '.iin Nnrthaniptoiuhire:—It t <> %  > k e -. oiiiileii Livingston, llarrou. Ran Bnarn, Bnce, Nutter. k, Oarllek, nddllng Hesl Indira; Chrlatlani %  1 Worrall, Gomer.. John-ton. In % %  !,,. Goddard, Rmnadhin, The l*la> holl vi and Marshall had to I lUBly ngulnst the winging when Nufei and i ra bowling, IM on'* la i Kf i uif % %  an ma le In I I h II i Stollmevei parttcularty was un< nmfortable ..gains' Brtee A >l' -* i efora ba had scored Juat ttatataA to carry lo Livingston at -ec>nd slip and a later snick off the same %  owatr e Alia 75.000 Plat lo Costa manag* i "' Iha BrattUan laatn, .ti i load stantar hat ll Ait* the honom -.:.• aftar Thej eartalnl) wen it going into bottle t.. whs .,\ a'l costs. I %  • !.. %  '. been played in . kaah sporting %  phii baflort SDd lu> team were not %  Hie mean 6 of disturbing • %  • mi tnbopad I i i town then Millions of suppoi ban in rafttse i Lo bg drawn nut much Jbout tin i iiiei taarna. u ihi i roa> nod rutaJi Mn-\ i u: %  good, ha if land It ,iaiinuin fi FA ^iii awai %  olid gold medals %  each ainnlng team Hut there are luge ilnaiicial rewards. II Uw cma ol tha Brauliani '..i %  imiii m-ii ini^i.much as £20.000 An.ii.-i Ramln the Sp-mh team. tulU Heiuei that hi* team would alnaadj re celve a present for ttegtl land and reaching the Finalv and Uam %  rnori • eotne thi .•mount dejH'iiding on gab and hnw the paarn I an He ((raaaed bowi %  i that hi playcri were playing foi tin* hon i or of becominii world and nol for the cash Ban %  Of it —gentrr 3uSt pure w-ifet o.ni a measure of K LlE me 1 *?" ^tc^.'iest -milk you can aive rr>. fcj nyi ELSIE DM SODDEN r .i H itut IM in a hah. '•" • % % %  %  F. i-i %  . grwi'i ni'i, WallS laalTt*. tupplv in ;- ir-ei UL A It-ANSPARENT espi i i-lly for I .dies" Shoes. magggguiKciN'Tto (gArMvotiin o so it.miwmw* \Base i Aim aaghl* tl.iilingia erkl) nh %  aiHW r.f J n sponsored by J & R BAKERIES moken uf ENRICHED BREAD and the bl-nders of J & R RUM VISIT the beauty apot of the ialn.id EIM1.E U VI III HOI N I UATIISHtHA This newly erected modern notel m i most picturesoue part of the Island. TKLKI'IIONt: IBMO POI KBttBI A fVOfha fC-xims with or without private bath eb V,, In Fish and Lobiler Uuncheoos. — Well Sm. I %  lYEASWITEl j *>s>^aBa a aa^*aa B a B s 4a a a THERE'S PAIN RELIEF AND TONIC BENEFIT Yest — Yeast-Vlle quicUy soothes away headachesi nru: i i. nerve and rhcuinatu pains but it J." • sonietluug else l. Heiuu.c of its valuable tonic properties Yeaai-Vile helps you to feel brighter, look better, sleep more easily and enjoy morr I energy. Neat time you want pain relief take Yeast-Vitc and get tunic benefit tool Over 50.00(1 people buy them every week British • made hsmluonn.i Smiths Alarms are ll pofi ular oboice because ||gM In ouUtaading in their rrhahil ity, style aad value. Therr ars models lo suit all Usttas m daugktful shade, to IIialCB aay aadceam furonbini*. B glad to awa oaa I M0% BKITIaU MADE AVAILABLE FISM \01'B baa A i siiiTHi ctant STOCKISTS llt k u >l.islrr of Eiiglili llliproil loin S|.. .-. I. mill H rilinil in in. Hour* If you art InRiraatad n quiring %  on mand of looil Knglish for l>usln-klng. Vour Knsllsh *nd Vour Fulore HltlTK TO-IHV FftR A RB ('Or** OF UUI VI AM lit V Decide at once that you will rid yourself of the han'ieap that poor English Imposes Tha • hut hltle time, and th.moderi.tr !.• puts Ihk uniqmCourse within the read, of everyone All is ronfldentla! Send to-day for u free copy of "WO ( MASTERY which gives full information afet t Iha Mectlva Knglish Course, including tinspecial arrangement, for overrent alanl Antio.ild bt addressed to The Regent It dilute (Oe.pt .101,. Urgent Rouse. Palace Gate. London. W H England. tsoti'l dels>. Your f ngtiah Is sll-lmporkinl to you. ind vou i .mm,i arTurd to neileet It. VtHtr I think of It. IT thU Intrrrillnr booklet NOW There Is no ebllgallon. PAINTS by LEWIS BERGER (Great Britain) Ltd. For Galvanised, asbestos, or shingled roofs LASTliiO i %  %  %  vthat i daV u %  %  i PlaHKI M I CAB (.AKUlNaH ALHDN a\ CO. LTD.