Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
Tuesday.

Buly
1950

Hacbados



. KOREANS TH

Wi. Sugar Talks

May End Today

(From Our Own

A

Correspondeni)
LONDON, July 3.

FTER many weeks of skirmishing, West Indian sugar
talks are drawing to a close. It is understood that the!

Government have already made a compromise proposal to

the West Indian delegation
discussions will be written

negotiating bodies will meet
Our correspondent learnt tha

and that the final chapter in
tomorrow evening when both
in the House of Commons.

at the new British offer, which

is in effect a proposal to shelve the whole question of quotas

for three years until new contracts come into force,

not been received favourabl
leagues.





















has
y by Mr. Gomes and his col-





















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|
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a

REATEN

nelle siete nieentiinietaentienn












Price:

- < © —_
FIVE CEN

i



od

Year



SUWON

4 U.S. Troops Set Up

Korean H. Quarters









TOKYO, July 3

(,ENERAL DOUGLAS MacARTHUR’S Head

quarters announced today that three North
Korean columns were threatening the eastern flank
of Suwon, a walled city 25 miles south of the cap.
tured South Korean capital, Seoul. One column
had reached Yongin, 5 miles east of Suwon. The
thira column was moving south about 30 miles east
of Suwon. The announcement said South Korean
defenders were still holding Ichon road junction,
a town east of Suwon and the line north of Suwon.





















have tabled ' They were moving reinforcements north in an at-
sugge 1g just what compror e P
More Su yr {they are SAN Ae patie anh tempt to check the North Korean threat to the
Sa if His Majesty’s Government cat:-| | city’s eastern approaches.
a a not see their way clear to me t} The C . 2 , Jet Aghters from ground fire
or ritish ing thi new claim not be} i im. eee ee al t lat)” “Allied headquarters also said
so ade Shay ee ieee 1 plea} ata % en te ce Ee — ‘that three Communist columns re-
Hi os e fe oi t ato ial is 5,000 te ns Bec 3 rafed a id orm ad § wo Korea ported to contain tanks and artil-
OUSEWIWES |). |,25:10 Pree fotoes south of Kimpo Airiekd near |ROUGat? Stet Han Hives eas
Owl mmplete soul with ema bor : r
| of Seoul rear Kwangijang yester-
BRADFORD, Yorkshire, July 3. In this event it is expected tho| | nen tae lso strafed Su day

Britain's rationed housewives} West Indian delegates would re-} Air fel 1 a Bean 1 iy ae : North Koreans had “used every
will soon get one pound of sugar] ‘urn home and advise sugar pro uw om athe 4 at ombee |avaitebl ns of transportation
bonus for each person in the}d@ucers not to accept the British es | he fick 2 tn K eat i mae lin order to expedite the thrust”
icmily, Food Minister Maurice} Government’s offer. It is expected daa pi a a +8 htt i a | which was believed to be an at-
Webb announced, This means}|the Grenada conference would be Ret : ates 7 fe aeareanet thie . _jtempt to outflank South Korean
that in one week they will get lls reconvened and an entirely new; . i" a tet cee jot a Ma pe wa | for befure American reinforce-
sounds of sugar on eac ONE: plan of attack thought out. ST ee Men" Tents Merced
1 ge n each ration ral William F. Dean
Look, instead of the usual half- This is tah | The West Indian Sugar Delegates pose for a picture outside the Colonial Office before going in for their first formal discussion : ei rs °
pound ration. definite sad tle, be Ken 8s 9) with Mr, Maurice Webb (Food Minister) and Mr. John Dugdale (Minister of State for Colonies). Far East naval forces, compose Drive Halted

at talks will} f alt m { British and American warships,
2 Pnied th: Tis tas te” exvier Gt yug ve 1es | : '

Webb denied that there is any ll through, howeve r. These 2 ontinued patrols off both east and Farlier in the day American
sugar in the non dollar world}only 4 agements believed j N 7 A v J i" | ‘Me e vest coasts but “without particu-|advance headquarters announced
which he could but would not buy;] ; made by ti We > | “} i Cl $ Off » . ? ma om en tae ; ae eee ;
“There is not an ounce in the| /%dian delegation in case any such C¢ roo IS - wa | na ers HAL AAS Pas AE moet Borean cave 1)
world in dny non dollar area thai} Ch Unsency arise N { M aac ~ o nn : —_ | 33 000 T ereranes - mv ane 3 wn » on "= . poenee pew meena

5 2) ug "eA.e@ > a : | \ im un on rom Japan oO Kor ' ‘ nat een LaLlLet WO 1
oa ee ba z “ a eh fp rcgh The position at the moment i: O VE nhac In? S TRA hi d iS. FORCES | Fede roops ontinued unmolested throughout} Korean tanks which had crossed
sales yo lead be poe p hes that the we st Indian delegates e re ~ he day, the communique said H River this morning had re
sine tate & ‘orm, a said, reler-lare determined not to be put off er In | Oo S Korea red, apparently after a recor

ing to the rumour that there was| with what they consider be half ve ° we \ a t ince mission, the announce
rare sugar’ inthe West Tndies. | promises 3 First American Casualty errancga9 at U.S. Plane Lost (0% mission

le =FOO te ai those “vy are lei ‘ Ee tI iS ily 3 rent & .
send aes i se S a a : ne - They are sticking out cy what RUMOURS GROUNDLESS } Chinese National 1 , n| It added that air operation The battlefront has changed lit-

anc é ot ab to sliver no ay intra “ < i

supplies they contracte 1e- rs ‘nese Meck sek aa BERLI J ‘ (By ROY MACARTNEY) | \Mindster Gerge Yeh st ht{ineluded a raid on Yonpu airfield |te in the past 24 hours, said a

I trac ri ri ad a a 2O— . scuss é e] VIRILGILIN, « y 3 rs . . ~ > + "8 | WN e n , . 5 acl renere

liver.—Can. Press. 25 Neg ay sige ugha a 7 | RENE PINS RE j be : With the American Forces on South Korea Front, that talks were vith | in North Korea by 10 B29 Super- | Communique issued by General
West India Committee this morn- British exper ir er] 1ea \ ; : .

ing, they reached c ie. atin i eOKbrite “Gt resi ve ne th July 3 General Douglas facArthur’s | [crtresse American fighters sup- , MacArthur's headquarters. Barely

g, ey reached complete agree-' i reports refugees from the o- : . ‘ “ ee Allied Head ters : Ire ed by Australian Mustangs ha 12 hours after came reports that

tog ment on their policy Soviet Zone Siew loaded Recket-firing North Korean fighters today hit American | bGat Nat es ee we in Japan| t down one North Korean LA7)tWo Communist columns were bit-

sae oS oundless wee 1 forces shortly after their deployment in South Korea, |°.. ationalist Chit offer of Sot down one North we \ing deeper into the South, con-
ritish Officials Afterwards at his hotel Mr ‘i : j ‘ + cee . p y " SOreA, | 33,000 “seasoned troops” {o ctik plane and one Ya 9, des- o's per : ; . 1

Gaines tala one Ti eaanidial {Russian teaop. cust ) ear| inflicting first casualties on American ground troops. lin Korea nce 2 lorric id an 1 90 | oe Samed 0 ad Sante ee

~ 7 tte ye’ ie : ji the c For YF at eens + < wat, : ies S alia i | 4 Pi of seoul, anc vat North Korean

Are Safe In Japan “This issue began with sugar, but) 4 cyokesman in Berlit i For Noo minutes seven fighters strafed with rockets and | He added that exchange of views | 0" troops Rad outflanked the strat-

it long ceased to relate merely tol today: British military authori- | machine-gun fire forward positions while I lay among G.I,s! between Chinese Nationalist and| egic town of Suwon after rapid
or __ LONDON, July 3, |that commodity. It has brought) tie; “here have received no in-| ithout air or anti-aireraft protection. ha United States Government ‘waar | night operation:

Two British Consular officials = the surface basic issues relating} ¢..ation that there are important|, “¢k-ack and fighter aireraft Jover our area, and diving steeply,| \ Mich followed the offer had beer | MacArthur's headquarters’
who withdrew from Seoul in the] to | relationships _between His}. entrations of Russian troops |!@Y be in action tomorrow, but} they punched rockets: into the| {Oâ„¢MuNIeated to United Nation MANCHURIA spokesman said today that North
fang of the North Korean armies, |Majesty’s Government and the| “OnCc) eat" | today’s experience regalled to}rail-yard where flames mounted |°°Cret#'y-General Trygve Lie Korean troops had attempted minor
anid had been untraced for, neatly ae ee colonies. naka: aun rs bor war correspondents the}swiftly and “the roar of burning oe Coa ey made in two meee | drives but had again fallen back
a week, have now reached Japan _the Government should fail| iopelessness of Greek and Crete] vehicles and buildings could be}*'meires delivered at the Ameri- | There had been North Korean. air
ak paeien Office spokes- to give the West Indies guarantees NEUTRAL EXCEPT ; campaigns of the last war except} heard” . onn State Department on June 29} hme tivity but no cases of shooting

an s o-day. now being sought for sugar pro- TO WARMONGERS that today it was Russian-built American G.I’s—mostly boys 19 |‘ nd 30 * cown planes had been reported,

There waaeeulMho ‘Hews: 6f ‘the ee tion, then the impression that | fighters and not German Stuks}and 20—took their first baptism The State Department last night} he added
British Minister Vivyan Holt and = nailing Se Caan " on PARIS, July 3 wae all the time attacked at will.}of fire well. weloomed TE-but said preparation: |
; ake. Vice«Cons ; a. | are willing to get cheap sugar in ried aitanioe te A sergeant from a Kentucky } ‘to meet the threat to Formosa” Tl J
cuimaa th Seenl the etme the competitive market for hom ( Z rille OR adi Ma ae veteran armoured division in Id 1 ene should have priority 7 Troops Retreat

é Se . s kesm2n | consumers at the expense ‘ suerilla Radio ) om . ahd ony a ‘ dived from my point seekin, ationalis sada . .
said to-day it was now about al wect Indies | Sees the in a broadcast t poo cure rearanl tat ae whom | cover, but I have aie seen is F Nationalist Leader Chiang Kai | Warlier today the spokesman
week anes any message had been : | Soviet Union intended es Satan. me patro a anivan unhealthy area (Note: |} nek “sald? tonight Leese jsaid that South Korean battalions

ceive. “Or | . 1 i : MCE > > irs . . re; as ‘ ithe ry
ae at rhe nsid Pr ee ge oe | err neutral oy a American inteestey Sasialee of the Macartney served in Greek and eae al ae rast Cat hel which had tried to stem the North-

. = considering Koreai ul ne ‘ we , ee, ee ,|Crete campaigns in the last war),|/UPPet carrying out part « ; ern troops’ advance, had “retreated
how best t ake enauiries t ’ Va 7 iQ 5 Korean war when he was - gns in the last war).|. 1uUe. y ' peer 9 ee ays —" -
the fate of Holt aan thas British | VENEZUELANS en inde ap i in his foot during che sivakane, , oe Bab Of Aghters peeied |" mr ot awe ent el t Gis QPTAOD 20. SSE SAETS TEES.
vane Fe 5 Ee s Ss +t Indochinese trar ; ran to attack two bridges nearb ——RKeuter. | \ North Korean Army ecommu-
subjects remaining in Seou} who Y Ye eM ; : Attack o nom ges nearby | } A North Korean ¢ 1 pm
‘ Tie ea. vs mitter announce the ‘ a and their bursts of machine-gun cuinntier-imedumine nique quoted tonight by the New
Bishon ee mgper,, Angi an APOLOGISE U.S.S.R., intends to ren me mantenaterk: eee in| fire seemed like hot breath. Bullets | | China News Agency tn a message
s é 3 , oon i neutral, but mean ea i a schoolhouse with maps showing | missed the bridge. w : : :
gees aoe | WASHINGTON, July 3 t clear that she will nat at || children the progress of the fight-| water below. eV UPPIng up orean Debate received in London said North
The State Department re- : weer ae yuan Prac ing and with South Korean flag . na AN ‘ c Korean units advanced swiftly
fy A : . nonger perpetrate es ~ 1 wan nage An American officer and I spent | thy )
EMERGEN ceived an apology from the ahittaténn much in evidence, I was about to| nearly 20 minutes dodging « aspen) outhward on July 1 from Chwun-
cY ACT LIFTED Venezuelan Government over the nvrens Reuts " ” decide that activity was ccnfined ard ‘huts utes dodging around In House chun and Hongehun, alyout 37
stoning yesterday of United States ne to the distant rumble of the bomb- T . me tiles east of Seoul and “liberated
(From Our Own Correspondent : ’ : ru f bomb The strafed town presented a/|
BELIZE Truly 3 jaa beasy property in Caraca ____' ing at Seoul when fighters began pitiful sight as the skies cl “ari | r Ge. 30 distelony. and $00. veInaee

Governor Sir. Ronald. Garvey} Lincoln White, State Depart- e rumours crop | circling the area Three great: avnned elu 7 ” ommons In the area along the east coast,
hag lifted the Emergenc y Act im-| ment spokesman, said the apology ular intervals of about a ek, In groups of twos and threes] mounted skyward and the ranuie shot WIGHTON the communique said, “Korean
posed on February 13 during the} W@8s made to the Emb by| he added. Officials in the Americ |they began peeling off to dive on of fierce flames could be heard AY saat W IGHTON). The communique admitted the| People’s troops continued their
devaluation crisis, representatives of t Foreign! Sector of Berlin adopted the same|the town I had visited on patrol from the railyard os LONDON, July 3 loss of one B26 twin-engined In-| southward drive after joining up

| Office. negative attitude towards reports.| half an hour before. As we drove out of town ter rified | Prime Minister ¢ lem nt Attlee| vader attack bomber, and light’ with guerilla forces.”
, The lifting of the ban followed The United States Ambassador ae oe mates eer oft er ai 1) aie ee eee refugees fled out of ditches and| Deriice Waresiea tee ~ nro e damage to three F80 Shooting Stat —Reuter,
1eavy press and public criticisin | reported that the Police had rrest-| ey ana ae ZO1 . o7 or five minutes tsome Korean soldiers wore make | i ore; tie
and questions asked in the House]ed a number of “hoodlums’ re-| People’s. Police and Red Army|the town was under rocket and | 44 if, bloody bandages over flesh | orean situation — - .
of Commons. sponsible for stoning —Reuter. | troops wére combining manoeu machine-gun attack with great] oo nds ; 7 The Government has chosen it
jaround the former German capital | C}oUds of blue smoke billowing One refugee still living, lay flat speakers for the House of Con
were “highly exaggerated and|Skywards as a land mark among}. his face, a bloody mess. with |" 1ons-Korean_ debate.on Wedne Pp A I N - S
pane | without foundation.” the green rice fields the top of ‘ale head ahot. off he day wher a handful of dissatisfied
BA I Ss OF PAS r GI ANTS Information reaching Berlin re-| Seven fighters began to run} yoayy calibre bullets. “|Labour members is expected to
cently suggested that certain| se ae At American formation head-|©#!lenge the lr gality of action by
ry : ; Soviet units are being replace y| [ quarters the first jeep to arrive taken on Korea by e United
2 Rs fresh occupation troops for | }POCKET CARTOON with casualties carried a Korean mesons Security Coun il
% ;mer manoeuvres | 1 by OSBERT LANCASTER soldier and the veteran Kenfucky . ne vert ite eee eee amt LEWIS BERGER
counts of united movement sergeant with whom I went pat-[! 8 pea r ! : be f OC in
nave gained added « uy th} rolling nerturbec t wants this debate to . .
refugee Germans from the t} Tough Thing be a demonstration to the world | (Great Britain) Lid.
Dena meer that tnn ies | | His first remark was “You can f 2 eet oF ae a an ee | AUTH iy \ {NIN {HANIA
revived old fears of Sovic en-| tear up your interview”. his next: |to the United Nations, and it ha A AVHHTT LEAT UHHH TRH RHHHT AHHH PAU RUHG ETT
| t in Europe } tea you've got any letters for home| been assured in alvance of ovet | YAAUVALLANIHAAIUA GSU \ iil NW | \
citeme ate th est} \I’ll take them with me, They got} helming support.—Reuter, G l . d
; r | c Bi
by port f troop « nty | }me in my foot” | be jaa ins grea year am For a vanise ’
mm Berlin’s outskirt ] | |} Though in great pain he was i) a
tion in the cits | 14 {cheerful throughout. The sergeant I uerto Ric oO b tos or shin-
| Allied officiale rate ) is | M4 | had been philosophic half an hour, , 7 as es ’
lit nother phase of | r| j | before when I asked him how he Can Draft New f
; i no apprehension | ae} | feit about the Korean war. “I ; 3 i l d situ ee
id 4 tself felt among the people seas beeause I was ordered” he Constitu tion g e rools
; 1 —Reuter | Sai ;
1 4 | OF ii | “The tough thing about these WASHINGTON, July 3
4 \ 4 s sma'l wars is that one mortal President Truman today signed
i Thieves Grab | | hell can kill you just as dead as|« bill giving Puerto Rico the right ~“ 4 _- - .
‘ § | 1} | 100," ‘mouth draw up and adopt its n (
4 i | ’ — (Reuter)! constitution. }
| £10,000 From 5 - The Bill said the new constitu t )
a: 3 7 4 ts ) tron “shall provide a Republican
LS Exeter Cathedra 4h eS | SWEDEN AGREES form of Government and shall in-
4 ae USC? ¥ ace | ‘ i clude bill rights.”
ere LONDON, July ¢ 4 ee LONDON July 3 The Government of Puerto Rico : A
1 sh police were today keep Bg uncle has been much the t Sweau ee. ne has operated since 1917 under an ee ;
i itch o air an eo| | red by the Gowers report jthat Sweden has replied to the} st passed by Congr email Ot : sae
Europe for £10,000 , | yur ladyship He says that | United Nations Aid questionnaire ‘* Sab ill be repealed under the
ner . 2. yk tl committee's recom jon Korea, saying she is in full sate bar : Plaka _ ee 7 trod 1
4 ¢ FE Cc il ; tons are carried out sreernent with action taker. |' constitution Reuter.
De t I , 1} ol a ie eee j there “but does not feel called rs
4 l- } & atic asylum." }upon at present to take any spe- .
; 1 Dutch and French police a | cific measures.” —( Reuter) U.S. Planes Bomb | er fa rn
; thon t thier } ‘ .
} } : the thie puted | hte r r St c Brieht R Oxid
get the ste f Brita’r North Kore: ;
oon possible The x-foot | e g | iu inte P Y Green an
- U. S Mi n A d B mb ( LONDON, July 3 ;
’ € i ve | © ° ari es n O ers A Soviet News Agency Tass
+} . 4 1 T F E t "nessage tonight from Py ng Yang
t rd ( ) d a saxid nine American planes dropped | |
irl vergers ¢ re ere O r as |: large number of bombs on the Obtainable ae. 3 foll ! |
( } fo | village of Sondan, ir Hendu Hard ‘ re |
: ; WASHINGTON, Jt 3 | the invasior of Korea began {region of North K esterday |
20.000 co American medium Lombers and| They are part of the Strategic } and bombed the towns of Vonsan C.S. PITCHER & CO |
¢ ¢ teh f ‘certain ground and air units” of | Command of the United States | and Pyoy zy Yan the capital, Ae Nic save |
€ cuenter |the United States Marine Corps | Air Force In another move, | vhich they machine ne PLANTATIONS LTD |
— . caeatta % , have been ordered to reinforce |twelve jet fighter planes took off | —Reuter. ‘OTTON FACTORY LTD |
ere OF fi . , I ric ilitary strength in the |frorn Burbank, California, to-day | —_——_—___—__ COTTON FACTORY L |
rst cricket de o a fr et 0 vst, It nnounce 1ere | or 3.125 . sliverv ; SOND A â„¢ owiTr
irst cricket Code of Laws was 1 Z TURKS WILL HELP Host, It was announced herejon « 3189 mile delivery flight to) “MEDWAY * FOR THE CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD
ok the 1 ! ‘ ‘ | IST ANBI L, Jul 3 Ma fi tationed at Camp There they will augment Jet | MEDITERRANEAN R. & G. CHALLENOR LTD
I article nd many ci t : a O00 k ‘ fornia re order-|sauadrons already on an_ alert . eh als i
have been assembled for tt ! ! ! o General Douglas;The Marines’ transfer was made|_ , WASHINGTON, July 3. — |
the Naticnal Book League’s premises ir I i me f 1 i He ers in| with the approval of President| The United State innouncec¢ DINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTT Bridgetowr Agent |
wi gee keer th ' on : : { that it ] t}
illy. Also ¢ ited are s of the } « 1 request|Truman and the Joint Chiefs of | to-night that it would ser he
PHOTO Srot * pBt., VCs inne C Staff, a United States Navy | 45,000 ton aircraft carrie a HOTTEST mT HHHHNLTUNUNTHGHUNLUTTALU HITE
G t th w h he scored 1,000 rur tk ) ere il > for- ll be the first | spokesman sai fe assum “y | Way” and f estroyers to join] TH PUVA TARE HTT | |
Sa ee tern es bee & | tee 3 I be the fist! spokesman said. He assumed they | Way" and four destrovers to Joln NIM MAO
eet *, sa: .. , 7 “6% ‘
(1765) seen at the Exhibition. —(Reuter the Far E nc vf 15 to 16 days.—Reuter. ‘the Mediterranean, —~-(Reuter) se : feanlsie —_—$_$—$—$





PAGE TWO



IS EXCELLENCY the Gov-
ernor and Mrs. Savage will
be attending the Cocktail Party
the home of Mr, and Mrs. Albert

V. Nyren this evening.

Mr. Nyren is Officer-in-Charge
of the American Consulate m
Barbados and the party is in hon-
our ef Independence Day.

At “Miramar”’

NTAYING at “Miramar’’, St.

James, for a couple of months’
holiday are Dr. and Mrs. John
Pessel and their daughter Ruthlyn
and Dr. and Mrs. Henry Bcskus
and their daughter Barbara

Both families are from Trem-
ton, New Jersey and they arrived
yesterday morning via Trinidad
by B.W.I.A

At Lord’s

MONG the many West Indians
- seen at Lord’s during the
Second Test Match were, Hon,
Garnet Gordon of St. Lucia, who
has just arrived in England after
attending the Imperial Press Con-
ference in Canada and Mr. Hugh
Springer, Registrar of the West
Indian University, who is now out
of hospital. Hugh broke this knee-
cap while running for a ’bus, but
can now walk with the aid of a
stick. He intends returning to
Jamaica soon where he will have
further physiotherapy treatment,
Mr. P. W. W. Branch of Barbados,
who is studying medicine in Lon-
don. Mr. Gerry Gordon of Trini-
dad, Mr. Berkely Gaskin, the well
known British Guiana medium
pace bowler, who has been in
England since April. And finally,





Mr. Greenhill and his wife,
Madame Bromova, and Com-
mander and Mrs, Daysh of Bar-
bados,

On Honeymoon

R. AND MRS. BERNARD

TEXEIRA arrived yesterday
morning frorn Trinidad by
B.W.I.A.

They were married recently ir
Venezuela and spent two days in
Trinidad, before coming over to
Barbados on their honeymoon.

Originally from British Guiana,
Mr. Texeira has been living in
Venezuela for the past twenty
months where he works with the
Mene Grande Oil Co., in Bar-
ceclona.

They are staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.

Returned Over the
Week-end
ISS CLAUDIA EVELYN and
Miss Helen Taitt, who were
spending their annual leave in
Barbados returned to Trinidad by
B.W.LA., over the week-end. On
the Saturday night before they
left they told Carib they had a
wonderful evening at the Marine
Hotel at the Polo Fiesta, They
were staying at “Cacrabank”.
Was Here Last Year
ISS DOREEN SCHULER who
is with the Royai Bank of
Canada in Georgetown arrived
here yesterday by B.W.1.A. to
spend about three weeks’ holiday
staying at Accra, Rockley.
Doreen was here last August
for a holiday.
At Seawell to meet her were
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Olten.
Back from Carib Talks
R. BERNARD ROLFE of the
Secretariat of Colonial De-
velopment and Welfare and Mrs.
Keith Walcott, stenographer also
of Colonial Development and Wel-

fare returned yesterday by
B.W.LA. from Martinique after
attending the tenth meeting of

the Caribbean Commission.

Off to Buenos Aires
R. LIONEL PARRY left Bar-
bados on Sunday afternoon,
en route for Argentina via Trini-
dad by B.W.1.A. There he will
shortly be entering into a Com-

mercial firm in Buenos Aires,
His father Mr, Ernest Parry
accompanied him as far as Trin‘-
dad and he expects to be bac:

here on Wednesday,

Turfite Returns
R. I, O. C. PERKINS who
was in Trinidad for the first

two days of racing returned yes-
terday morning by B.W.1.A.

. Carib Calling





ERIC GATES
Leaving Today

RIC GATES leaves today fo:
New York via Puerto Rico by
B.W.1.A
Eric will long be remembered
in Barbados as the successful pro-
ducer of the Musical Revue, “Hig!:
Tyme”, and there is one particular
Barbadian, a dumb and deaf boy

who will always remember his
name,
Mrs. Ben Moore, the originator

of “High Tyme’, told Carib that
the total profits from the revuc
which went to aid this youngster
amounted to $1,711.53.

Five Weeks’ Visit To
The U.S.
on Sunday eve-

So
ning by B.W.1.A., ways

Miss Lucy Mestier who has been
on five weeks’ holiday visiting th:
US.

Travelling by B.W.1.A. as far
as Puerto Rico, she went by P.A.A.
to New York, and also visited
Connecticut and Philadelphia

In New York, she saw her
brother Joseph and his family, and
while visiting friends in Connecti-
cut she met Capt. Lamb who used
to be Commanding Officer of the
U.S. Military Personnel at Sea-
well during the war.

In Philadelphia she met Miss
Sheila Inniss, Sheila hopes to
come to Barbados in December for
Christmas.

For Summer Holidays

Arriving yesterday morning by
B.W.I.A. from Trinidad was
Mr. Michael Simpson, son of Mr
and Mrs. Fred Simpson of “Wood-
land”, St. George. A student at
the Imperial College of Tropical
Agriculture he is home for the
Summer holidays.

Short Holiday

R. LOUIS ROSS, who is with
the Confederation Life In-
surance in Venezuela arrived from
Trinidad yesterday morning in-
transit from Venezuela by B.W.LA.
Mrs. Ross accompanied him and
they are staying at Super Mare,
Worthing on a short holiday.
Mr. Ross was originally
British Guiana and Mrs. Ross
hails from Jamaica. They have
been living in Venezuela now fo.
about three years.

Returned Yesterday
RS. OLIVE CORBIN of
“Rosemary”, Rockley, and
Miss May Goddard of “The Gar-
den”, St. James, who were in San
Fernando on a short visit return-
ed from Trinidad yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.1A.

Chiid’s Play!
*%7OUNG MASTER STEPHEN
‘ MANSFIELD arrived from
Trinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1LA. He is the four-year-old
nephew of Mr. Charlie Ray. A
trip from Trinidad to Barbados by
air is just “Child’s Play” to
stephen, as he’s been all aroun?,
the U.S. travelling by himself.
Checking through Port Health,
Immigration and Customs at Sea-
well yesterday was just routine
stuff to this youngster and he
came through with flying colours!

from

Sings Tonight

ISS GRACITA FAULKNEI
will sing at Christ Churci
parish Church tonight at 8.10]
o'clock, West Indian born Amer
can soprano, Miss Faulkner h
been giving a series of song re
citals in Barbados. She will |
leaving the island shortly

Visiting home
LANNING to go to Rome a.
the end of August is Gerry
DesIsles of Trinidad. Gerry is one
ol the large community of Wes.
Indians studying law in London
and he has just passed his Roman
Law. Between now and August
he hopes to get an interestin;
vacation job, perhaps on a farm
When in Rome he plans to stay
at a camp run by Boy Scouts just
outside the City. Gerry has taken
the trouble to find out in advance
what the camp menu will be like.
Half a litre of the best Italian
wine, he assures me, is included
n the daily fares.
Weddings
S* DAVID'S CHURCH was
beautifully decorated on
Saturday evening when Miss Iris
Mullin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
P. A. Mullin of Haggatt Hall, was
married to Mr. C. Riley, son of
Mr. C. Kingsley Riley, Headmas-
ter of St. Martin’s Boys’ School,
and Mrs. Riley. The bride is an
assistant teacher at St. Giles’
Boys’ School, while the bride-
groom is attached to the Highways
ind Transport Department.
Mr. Lucien King performed the

duties of Bestman while the
bridesmaids were Miss Hildned
Riley and Miss Dorothy Black-
man, Rev. O, C, Haynes offici-

ated with Mr. Thomas Bayley at
organ.

After the wedding a reception
was held at the home of the bride
it Haggatt Hall

OUNT TABOR CHURCH was

the scene of a quiet wedding
one day last week, when Miss
Mabel Hinkson, eldest daughter
of Mr. and Mrs, Darey Hinkson
of Foster Hall, St. Joseph, was
married to Mr. Gordon Young of
Wilson Hill, St. John.

The ceremony which was fully
choral was performed by Rev
Pilgrim.

The bride who was given away
by her cousin Mr. Oscar Hinkson,
wore a dress of nylon and lace
Her veil was kept in place with

a tiara of orange blossoms and
she carried a bouquet of Queen
Anne's Lace and Anthurium

Lilies,

There was one bridesmaid, Miss
C. Hinkson, sister of the bride,
who wore a dress of pink nylon

The three flower girls were the
Misses ©. Hinkson, Diana Clarke
and Loretta Young.

Mr, M, Corbin, uncle of the
bridegroom was the bestman.
After the ceremony a_ reception
was held at the home of the
bride’s parents.



Century Scorers

HILE the West Indian team

are winning honours for
themselves in their tour of Eng-
land, three other West Indian
cricketers have been keeping the
flag flying in the Lancashire
League. George Headley proved
that he has not passed the run-
getting age by scoring a century
for the second week running on
June 3, and a 68 on the following
Saturday, giving him an average
of 151.66 But it is not Headley
who has most delighted the spec-
tators. A young man from Brit-
ish Guiana, Bruce Pairaudeau,
who is studying in England, turn-
ed out as an amateur for Burn-
ley on June 3 and scored 105
against Nelson. His form in the
return game with Nelson en June
10 was even mare remerkable,
for he obtained 102 not out of
Burnley's winning score of 143
for five. It will be remembered
that Pairaudeau, who narrowly
missed selection for the W.I. team,
scored 161 for B.G. against Bar-
bados last winter. A third West
Indian, J. K. Holt, who is pro-
fessional at Haslingdon, scorec
121 against Kamsbottom in a
splendid cysplay of hitting. One
hit dislodged tiles from the roof
of the pavilion.



BY THE WAY » sscxconse

HEY say that Roland

Dorgeles must have been

a certain exhibition of sculpture

in London. Dorgeles once _pick-

ed up a bit of stone in a friend’s

studio, and left it in the Gallery
of Antiquities in the Louvre.

It was also Dorgeles who tied
a paint-brush to a donkey's tail
and pushed the tail against a
canvas, The ensuing “picture’
was exhibited at the Indepen-
dants show in Paris under the
title “Et le soleil se couche sur

l’Adriatique”. It was signed
“Joachin Raphael Aiboron,” and
thus the donkey, whose name

was Lolo, and who belonged to
Frede of the Lapin Agile, step-
ped into the forefront of modern
art. But in those days young
men played the fool for fun,

Marginal Note

FT\HE youngster who smashed
his way into a film-star’s

POOOSOOSS9SF

GOSS SS OSG 2S L PPP IPO IL OI EG OOS EAE POI OSI OF





house, to ask for her autograph
little thinks that he may have
been the means of inducing
actresses to learn to write, mere-
ly as a measure of self-defence

Baba Blacksheepe Dines Oui
NOTE a new torm of gossip.
Instead of saying, “She wis
looking very fit; her mother was
a Bulper,” you describe in detail

what she ate. What she said, how
often she smiled, and so on
Presumably the chronicler is

standing by the table, typewriter
in hand,

With her sole she had a
potato, of which she ate two
mouthsful, pushing the rest to the
side of her pftte with her fork.
She wiped her mouth after one
rather large mouthful of sole, fol-
lowing it up with a piece of roll,
which she broke off between the
finger and thumb of her left hand,
and opening her mouth to put it in.
She then swallowed it, and took

PPLE PPS OPO PLL PALLET

SERVE THE WHOLE FAMILY

WITH

J&R

BREAD & CAKE

It's Better by far if it's

J&R

—DSOPOSOO SSS SOG ESE SLES ELSI PPS FEFEELEE LPL ESS

another mouthful of sole. Then she
scratched her left leg... .
Financial Note

RTHODOX economists are

Saying, with a giggle, that at
least half the recent £150,000,000
Electricity Loan will have to be
taken up by Government depart-
ments and then shoved on to the
public. What this means, in
effect (1 repeat in effect), is that
if the public doesn’t want the
thing the banks will be landed
with smaller overdrafts, bigect
advances to industry, and all the
ragamadolio and twnble - cum
trivy and rollymolly of new issues
of capital. And that means thet
industry will be up to the fetlocks
in debentures and steeped to the
gills in assets by no means liquid
The net (1 repeat, net) result is
bound to be an all-round sulk!
ness eva recrimination which will
cause those of us who are outside
the great hurlyburly of finance to
slap our thighs and shake with
honest mirth,

PPE FEF, ee

ENJOY THE FINEST!




.
EADS SSSCPCRS

POSS

:

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THIS style of shoe is called

Ltd. In fine grey suede with
are made on the new chik



Collar Pir
gold



i
i
j

" by Joyce (California)
pin front fastening. They
ot last to give extra toe room.



A barbecue
In Mayfair

By Joan Ershine

What's new in the World of
fashion publicity? Nothing les:

than a roof-top barbecue, com-
plete with sizzung ham and hes-
sian hangings. A famous shoe
decided to hold an “out <
ordinary” party at which they
could show their autumn range ot
casual shoes. Having been invited
to “saddle





our hosses and ride up
at half after six” we made de
with staid London taxis and

found our way to Stanhope Gate
curving respectably off Park Lane

There on a wide balcony, cano-
pied in blue and white, the bar-
becue was held.

For the occasion a special bar-
becue stove had been sent over
from America—purely for decora-
tive purposes, since we never did
see what happened to the three
thick slices of bacon which per
fumed the evening air. Addin

the authenticity of the scene we
saddles, feed-bags, scarlet flower

rcugh mats, wooden benches and
checked table-cloths. We dined in
cempus fashion on fried chicken
and sweet corn, many of us for
the first time. A small hill-billy
band played in one corner, and
champagne was dispensed from
another In a burst of curiosity
we examined one of the saddle
—and found inscribed upon it
British Railways
Halfway through the eve

the shoes were shown, and it wa
gratifying to find thai some were
made on a new teenage last. (De-
finition of a last the replica of
the human foot on which the shoe
is made.) Previously this sensible,
wide-toed, shape had been re-
erved for children and for adult
sandals only. Now, strong walking
shoes in brilliant colours and new
designs have been produced, en-
suring that each of your toes has
a place in which to rest, and is
not crowded up against the others

The shoes, designed by Ameri-
con Mrs. Joyce, were scarlet, bot-
tle green, saddlesoft, redberry,
teal, grey, maple sugar, and ever-
green. Some of the new ideas
were to have the laces tied round
small metal hooks, like an old
fashioned boot, to have a gold col-
lar pin clipping the front of a low-
cut vamp; and to have adjustable

'



, COWS

straps and buckies holding the
front of the shoe
Many wemen ask for a very

low cut flat-heeled pump. Taney
do not realise that these are very
cifficulit to keep on the foot, and
that the vamp has to be cut fair-
ly high in order to make it secure.



this firm showed some variations
on the idea by cutting the front
down in the fashionable “shell”
shape, almogs showing the toes,
and then fastening a narrow ad-
justable strap across below the
strap. Can you imagine a shoe
with a split throat? This simply

means that the shoe is seamed up
the front, and the leather edging
cut away, which ensures that the
fcot is not pinched

Do you realise how closely the
leather situation is bound up witn
the meat position’ If, for exam-
ple, Britain imports tough, etderly
the resulting leather often

great scratches and streaks on
it. And few people are aware that
vufi-glove, a hard-wearing shoe
fabric, is merely the reverse side
of the skin of an older animal. It
is practical, and can be brushed
clean quite easily. The roughened

nas

ede surface makes it ideal for
country shoes

A snoe designer told me with
scme force that most women are
mpletel illogical when choos-
ing shoe They will not be ad-
ised as to fitting, and prefer to
cramp their toes into high-heeled |
unsuitable court shoes, rather
than buy a pair more convenient |
for their work.

To cripple oneself for a cocktail '



party is something we all do occa- !
sionally, and it will not harm!
ycur feet. But to spend all day in
very high heels throws your
weight forward, ultimately caus-
ing backache, bunions and other
foot troubles. Equally senseless is
the woman who buys very flat,
low-cut pumps, because she is

foreed to curl up her toes, in order
to keep them on her feet, and this
eventually causes hammer.toes.

A grim picture to paint indeed,

but feet are the most neglected
and ill-used part of the human
body, and a little commonsense

would not come amiss.

=

—

CHILD’S PLAY is a sandal type shoe, built like a small girl’s

at present is very popular in

shoe with double buckles, and
America. By Joyce of California.



LONDON
_For eight days a man suffered
violent hiccoughs in London’s St

Thomas Hospital and no treat-
ment helped him.
Then he remembered that he

had once read of a cure in a book
by Sir Alan Herbert. He akse:l
for a copy of the book, entitled
“Sip, Swallow,” but the book

wa

difficult to find
In desperation he had his nurs
telephone Sir Alan who oblig ngiy



File This Hiccup Cure

it a copy to the hospital. The
treatment suggested in it was
curried out and the man was com-
pletely cured of his hiccoughs.

Said Sir Alan:

“It consists simply of blocking
the ears .with a finger of each
hand while taking five sips. of
water from a glass on a table. I
have often bet hiccoughs victims
$2 that it would work, and so far

Il have never had to pay up.”
—(1.N.S.)



We can supply your

requirements of ....

@ Wheelbarrows,

@® Shovels, Post Hole Diggers,

@ Peck Axes, Felling Axes,

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD.

@ Sledge Hammers.
; |
{
{
{

a.m

Housewives’

| Guide

Prices in the iree market
for Limes and Cucumbers
when the Advocate checked
yesterday were as follows:

Limes .... 2 fer 3%
Cueumibbers. .6c. per |b

B.B.C. Radio Notes
TUESDAY, July 4 1960
The New 7.10 a.
7.15 a.m. Jane >
kK On these things
Speaking: 8 a.m
8.10 «am
Charlie Kunz
Leader ind his
a.m. Close Down: 12 noon The News
12.10 p.m. News Analysis: 12.15 p.m
Programme Parade: 12.18 p.m. Listen
ere’ Choice: 1 p.m. Science Review
1.15-p.m. Patio Newsreel: 1.30 p.m
Tip Top Tunes: 2 pam. The News
2 pm. Home News fram Biitain
p.m. Sports Review: 2.90 p.m
the Commonwealth: 8 pom
Thind Programme: 4 pom
4.10 pan. The daily Service
paw. My kind of music: 4.4
pm. Repo:t from Wimbledon: 6 pm
British open Golf Championship:
bm. Listeners’ Choice: 6.15
gramme Parade: 5.30 p.m
Teller: 5.50 p.m. Onterlude: 6 p.m
Jane Ewre: 6.15 p.m. The Passport
p.m. The News New:
Analysis: 7.15—7.30 p.m
port on W. I
745 pm. Pienoforte Music
trated discussion with Margevie
& William Pilgrim: 8 p.m
reel: €15 p.m. Science Review:
pm. Report from Wimbiedon
_m. Interlude: 6.55 p.m. From th
Raitorials: 2 p.m
‘Comedy: 9.30 p.m. Books to Read: |
p.m. The News: 10.10 p.m Mue



e: 7.20
4% a.m



€



zencrall
Editorials
ade: 815 a.m
Harry





the
News;
4.15

Th



ro

News

D

From the
Programme "ar-

Band: 9

From

5| fully tested on a British liner may
end the traveller’s fear of sea sick-

5.05) ness.

fe sary
Story
..| ship engineers the tests were car-
Tl ried out on the new 24,000 ton P &
O liner Chusan as she steamed at
23 knots off Southampton.

s

vs Hampshire: 7.30 —
— Ilhus-
Few
Radio News-
8.
8.45

hfon the bottom of the vessel and
these held her steady in the heavy

Binding in the Marsh: 0.45 p.m
Commonwealth Survey: li pom. A
Talk.

NO HOPE

LONDON, Monday.

Letters have deluged @he edi-

tor of the London ®weming New:
since he printed a meader’s sug

gestion that “Land ef Mope and

Glory” should become (Bmritain’
national anthem,

“J. Bull” of London put it i
a nutshell:

s

n

“After more than five years of

Socialist tyranny nobody coul

d

call England a land of hope— and

certainly not one of glory.

“A mare
for to-day would
Another Nickel In.”—IN.S.

CROSSWORD



Across

3. This may reming you vi om
fidest Of the three bears. (4, 6)
Sky tight to the aisle ip the Dairy
Show. (5 3)
‘l, Gained at a Vursity only after
a lot of hard work. (4)
'2. Result of having broken rest. (4)
4 uw that was left of the rent man
)
!5. Are Bachelors of Medicine usuatis
this colour” (5) >
13. and 4 Down. Dominate, (7) &
. AS plants go Most people woulc
ts sth thie feathery. (4)
A could be gained by expert us
of this (3) veer ee
él. Anger. sir! Couia it cnange for
such ornaments? (8)
22, Where they stop rents? Couid
be! (9)
23 Pompous schoolmaster.

own

t. What made the Begum R.A +
(7)

2 Uf you dv then vou must expect
anger (4)

4 A Well Known
She Wie Kissed

4 See 17 Across

2 After night vou get the oira

6 Much sought
stones +7)

8 Pound on the Kent coust. (3)

, mane fonging te make Gray nine
(8)

10 Shes oot supposea cto snp “
brigntiy as her elders (i e

1+ When you might back a horse vb
both Ways ¥ “ay

(9)

Dexullty did untt
eo)

(3)
after for precious

Jo BY encireiing gives you fruit 3)
43 That's the tov (4) ce

Look what Mager vett when ne





lost nis head (4)
Svlution of vesterduy's vuseie. — Across;
Voluntary © Ptiguette: 9 Noviaates.
i Bur’ 13. Eliminate: 14. Blate: 16
Car. 18 Nav. 19 katea 0. Gure: 21
A 22 Petty. 25 Any Wown: J. Ven:
feance; 2 Live 8. Tea: 4. Attracts: 5
haan 6 Vableaus BR ‘est: 10
lomate 1 uw. 12 U
1 Lae Pie neasy 15 Lyre
e
ROYAL = (Worthings)

Last 2 Shows To-Day
4.30 & 8.15

Columbia Big Double
ROBERT STANTON
MARJORIE REYNOLD

in

‘SING WHILE YOU DANCE’

AND
“TERROR TRAIL”
with
Charles STARRETTE
Smiley BURNETTE



EMPIRE

To-Day To Thursday
4.45 & 8.30
Paramount Pictures Present .
OLIVIA DeHAVILLAND
MONTGOMERY CLAFT
in
“TME §PIRESS”
With Ralph Richardson
‘ Miriam Hopkins





ROXY
Last 2 Shows To-Day

4.45 & 8.15
Paramount Pictures Present :

BARBARA STANWYCK
WENDELL COREY in
“THELMA JORDAN”

with
Paul Kelly, Joan Tetzel

OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows To-Day
4.30 & 8.15
Eagle Lion Double
James Craig, Lynn Bari

!



in

“MAN FROM TEXAS”
and

“SWING HOSTESS”

with Martha Tilton
Charles Collin

appropriate anthem
be — “Put












on her side Captain R. E. T. Tun-
bridge touched a switch and the
huge vessel

e
Memories of Musical | “VE? keel.

China seas.”

4 5
2 999999459999 09665606 SOEoOL*
i en

| MONOGRAM’S WESTERN DOUBLE !

ys PPOLOCOLPCLSSPSCPP LESCOL LOPE LLLP ALLS,
































TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1950



Rupert and Miranda—32





ot sandwiches and apples. ** Oh,
how topping,” he cries. ‘* The toy
clown must have left this to keep
me going until he comes again. |
wonder what else he has im that
little plane of his.’ Returning to
the secret pass

The little —_— disappears
into the sky and Rupert realises
with some anxiety that he is now
quite alone and also that he is very
hungry. As he turns towards the
turret he sees a curious package
lying neat him. Cautiously he opens
it and to his delight he finds it full

END SEA

LONDON.
A new anti-roll device success-

age the sits and listens
intently beside the sliding panel.

SICKNESS

liners being rocked in heavy
The Chusam, direct from the shi;
builders yards, is the biggest sh:
to test the special device made {|
Brown Bros. of Edinburgh.

The stablizer consists of
rectangular streamlined fins lyir
horizontally on each side of th
ship and projecting from the hu!
Each fin is mounted on a shat
When operating the fins are tilt:
by a mechanism.

The forward movement of ihe
ship causes the water to exert an
upward force on one fin and ;
downward force on the other com-
bining to minimize any roll caused
by waves.

The fins are retractable, a:
when not required are withdraw:
into recesses within the hull.

With experts claiming that link
rocking has been stopped in roug!
seas, the new stabilizing de
: may now be fitted to Britain’s

Ship builders have long sought lantic liners and many other ves-
a stabilizer that would prevent big sels.—(CINS)

URYPTOQUOTE—Here's how to work it:

AXYDLBAAKR
sLONGFELLOW

One leta#r simply stands for another. In this example A ts used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc Single letters, apos-
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints
Each day ihe code letters are different.

A Cryptogram Quotation
TITHN BVSMF LE LFGMWWLDWN
DT AMLFTR DN TJITHN EVSÂ¥ VEC
GWMYYTHN—IKTEYTHGLTWR.

Cryptoquote: SYWHEN OUR PERILS ARE PAS’,
IR GRATITUDE SLEEP ?--CANNING



Watched by British and foreign

As the Chusan rolled 23 degrees

swung back on an

The switch had released two fins

ocean,

Captain Tunbridge said :

“The fins reduce a roll of 14 de-
grees to four degrees. That will
make a big difference when the
Chusan strikes monsoons in the



= Y.

SHAL'





(Members Only)

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA

TUES,, WED., THURS, 8.30 p.m,
MATINEE WED. 5 p.m.



Monogram presents :

“SUSPENSE”

with (Alluring) Belita—Barry Sullivan



Special MATINDE SATURDAY &th 9.80 p.m,
“BOMBA, THE JUNGLE BOY" With Johnny
A Monocram Picture

oe

%,

%

Last 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m, &

WARNER'S EXCITING MUSICAL—ACTION DOUBLE | X

Dick ‘The MILLS “BR ” Q

POWELL—BROTHERS $
= ALSO —

Dennis MORGAN !4— $

“BAD MEN of MISSOURI”

a _., Wednesday and Thursday—S and 8.80 p.m.
1 BECAME A CRIMINAL” & “VALLEY OF THE GIANTS"

98S





GATETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

Last show ‘TONIGHT —
Sidney TOLER
as Charlie CHAN in

8.30 MONOGRAM presents - - -

‘SHADOWS OVER CHINATOWN’

— ALSO —

Jimmy WAKELY in “OKLAHOMA BLUES”

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY—8.30 p.m.

Johnny Mack Brown

Jimmy WAKELY in
“SILVER 2ANGE"

and “SPRINGTIME #N TEXAS”











GLOBE :

TODAY 5 and 8.30 P.M. LAST SHOWING $

* ROGUES REGIMENT ”’ %

—_—_—__,



FOR 2 DAYS ONLY ¥
Wednesday July 5th ana Thursday July 6th 5 and 8.30 x

“CAPTIVE WILD WOMAN” 3

with Aquanetta (Gorilla Girl) 3

— and — >

“WHE INVISIBLE MAN* 3

(CLAUDE RAINS and GLORIA STUART %
Only for Persons with Stout Hearts

% *

LLLP LLAALALLLEN



Coffee Strainers

Tea Strainers
Egg Beaters
Wire Cake Trays
» Frying Baskets
» Salad Washers
Metal Skewers
Potato Ricers
Flour Sifters
| Cake Pans
| Screw Top Bottles
| | Phoenix Ovenware |
|





AT
PLANTATIONS LTD. |

BROAD STREET









TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE

Manley Finds Forced Canada Studies
Cement For

f Conteesions
Federation

" \Old-Age Payments
























































|
'
i t i |
a 5 yocate Corres: hei crimes ‘ oft i n
eres ae ree a ; er ao hed | e iia OTTAWA and get repaid 75 per c f the
Mr. N. Manle K.C., lea Br t census in 20] anada’s Parliament is working} cost by the federal government
of the People’s ‘ . take é April teen a new deal in old-age] The present basic pension is $40
' ' | monthly and i ome }
at a public meeting in vy int ate que | What may come out of it no] this is supplemented by ar
last week saw xd in sor tior } ,o mal | ¢ ne is prepared to predict. It may nal | vineial x
the proposals of the Fe atio 1 ae ¢ j;or may t mean a better dea! The old-age securit
Report. Some others | disagree Preti pharv 1 n!for Cana s 265,000 persons over] was formed of 28 Comme r
with, but he took the view tl ‘ is en , that} 70 who now draw pensions cost-] ber and 2 member of
the draftsmen of the docume: formation obtained’ ft ing the country about $120,000,000} Senate
probably had to placate some < ic 11 ly tor} (£ 25,000,000) a year It may or
their numbers “who were colour- artistic |may not bring about even broader Its tern of refere
blind to anything than seeing Red been, done to dispel| coverage at a younger age wide, It was instructed to stud
oe Mee at the census is pat oi st 3 dec deat the “oper hs n an 1 Sect of ex-
n the question of Jamaica's to trap 1ousand ) r weeks now a @-membery isting legisiation ¢
attitude towards a Fedération vo eserte ‘ re til} | Jount committee of the Common tries and to look closely int
the British Caribbean, Mr. Man!® ir Le \ nder and the Senate h been sitting} “possible alter measui ‘
said that it was certainly true 1 name | almost every day It he heara } old-age security Canada with
that in Jamaica we were s» in- u 0 have beer | presentations = fi m scores offor without a means test for bene-
tensively concerned with our ow “d that organizations, studied the opera-]ticiaries including plar based ¢ n
local problems that we see t mation t anyone yas oe oc federal and pro-| contributory insurance principles
find it difficult to give attenti gistrar-General’ ! ‘ Ne ed Geese ene an legislation, Among the scores of witnesses
to the matter. It may be, too, h ineludes any ocher Govern- |FuiN oe cist is of other coun}, ard, most gave priority in any
suggested, that the West Indie ent GOpartnent hey ran be le at 6 may be lukewarm to the questi for two year BP COSTS OF AM SONS OF SCHEMES - 1 Yegislation to eliminatiq¢n of
and he had tried a lot in his ow: he sholders 1 Suneavy The committee, within its terms] present means t, a lowering of
mind to find reasons for it hie wil] have to. fill-in |of reference, will ort to Par-] the eligible it nereas-



ing benefits in that order

One who did not follow that
order of priorit N Dr. Char
lotte Whitton, Ottawa social
worker She told the committee
that health and housing should be
tackled first and that Canada
should make a full investigation of
the contributory principle.—Can.
Press.

Mr. Manley said that he believed
that in the West Indies we hat
a sufficiency of powerful factors iv
our common life to give the
cement and binding force to the
object of Federation. The people
of the colonies talked the same
language and in a remarkable
manner they spoke the same kind
of way. Get 100 people from the
various sections of the Caribbean
together, he said, and it would
not take them an hour to feel
at home. In addition they had
common difficulties, common
ambitions and he believed it
would be discovered that they had
a single common hope of solving
those difficulties, which should be
powerful enough, ultimately, to

by 1 ft. form he pri. }liament. Then, if recommen-
nary object being a government | dations are to be made, it will be
attempt to complete the most in- |UP to the government to make
limate picture possible ef Bri-|them at the Dominion-Provincial

THE PRESS OF THE EMPIRE IN OTTAWA: Picture above shows the delegates of the Empire Press Union assembled outside the lain’s social development Conference in the fall
Houses of Parliament in Ottawa, This nation-wide quiz will Any eveshaiiias oe old : age
; ; . 1 ‘ , . rovide ir rmation o acing |security legislation could only be
In the front row in the centre is Col. the Hon, John J. Astor chairman of the Times Publishing Company of London and Presi- tes enaaton Bt hy aheee akee ate dent and Chairman of Council of the Empire Press Union since 1929. i and marriage condition "}vinees which at present pay the
Among the many distinguished representatives from the Com monwealth were the Hon. V. ©. Gale, M.L.C., Mr. ©. E. Hitchins including divorce. There will be|Pensions within their boundaries
(Trinidad), Mr. Garnet — (St. Lucia), Mr. 8. G. Fletcher (Jamaica) and Mr. E. Dupuch (Bahamas) Saree abc oo ) ~ and
nihaeeteianhinlcd composition of households |

People will be asked where

B.G. GOVT. EMPLOYEES Freedom To Criticise| 22" | ®4ksasr,
WILL GET NO WAGES RISE : : : Sale Molnar saliag el SUPPER
Was Note Of Imperial |i 0 S888 oss) OR BETWEEN-MEALS














(Advocate Correspondent)





















mr am atid

i i . ET, q pieted
bring federation into reality. GEORGETOWN. | P ne Ti lk i He will staie whether his home E HEAL FOOD.:+

= ae in sonal . Bal pada any THE Colonial Secretary replying to a Memorandum sub-| ress a Ss is_ structurally separate, how TH
@ move in Jamaica, Barbados anc : . ; aa . T ' t . 8 ains ether
g move in Jamaica, Barbados and] tted by the Federation of Government Employees Unions many fooms tt contains, whether LL0GG

1 assy Fi - ; : 4 t ‘ . y, Nin en ss —. ‘ : ’ ‘ s i > « shares a Or
cal power for the people. It wa calling for an upward revision of the wages and salaries| Having tre ve ‘led across Canada by ‘plane, train, ‘bus and water supply, the kitchen ie KE

+ uN Pate . hi pk ; ’ .
not so 20 years ago, These and structure, has made it clear that the Colony’s general econo-| motor car, the Hon, V. C. Gale, M.1 C., returned to Barba-| the cooking ‘stove, or a water
other factors, Mr. Manley said mic situation and the state of Government’s finances wholly dos by T.C.A, on Saturday after attending the seventh] closet and tixed bath
— hee te tenn 10: the ron] precluded the possibility of any further revision and over-| Imperial Press Conference. ; Married women undler 60 will
‘ or oy , j ates a ee ee be asked to give the date o i
eomcla Ce aes Ge aca whal.| all increase of the wage and salary structure of Government ne ee —e iadik etl the naaebde oe RaGLes
aica an I 3 asé € , 2 7 ec »y re conference are o 7 ; .

would have to graple with the ide: employees. : : He Mj ¥ special interest to the Colonies but! Children |
of federation and make it work omission of certain items from the | eC tcop er the Australian resolution is wor- The complete analysis of the
and itcwould never work, he-sata The Federation has urged that Cost-of-Living Index, stated that thy of partieuler note return, which is to cost $3,500,000
5 ven aes veo e sald.) its claim for an upward revision from the Committee’s Report it - Tt H wee. oY pie res will be spread over several yeays
until there was a powerful senti-| of the wages and salaries struc-)was clear that the Committee rozress f tl ehep on Sollows :-— Exeedors A preliminary report of popu
— = it, because it had great} ture was based on the fact that | dealt with those items which were | oO hast tee and F hain s = lation numbers, sexes, and areas
cifficulties to overcome devaluation of the Pound Sterling | considered omissions. In_ this} 7 ‘ we FemeaOES Of CSMOcTaey will be ready within a few ’

Mr. Manley was of the opinior}had imposed a greater financial | connection, however, it directed} 4, i Lire ath z= pense ven intact if the] Weoks of census day The family's health... the happiness of all...
that Jamaica — in population anc} strain upon Government em- | attention to another paragraph of | ; ‘ec nd ated . a hort its et hit te enitials th to survive. The It is estimated that the central the children's hardiness. . depend to a great
political development the larges'}ployees who had no financial|/the memorandum in which was| ,.¢ = be Padh irae tae aire mc Mag att seb ca a bo crite ise those in authority | oi ce 1 juired to administer the | h ent. Keilo "s
and most advanced of the colonies} relief to meet the increased diffi- |embodied the list supplied the 1966 yi dds moe i pms. ry 7 a ere right of every} Gencus will total only 606. But extent on proper nourishm 39g
—had a great responsibility of} culties and upon the a et Unions by the Commissioner of| airwave matemalize, lof the ee et = the re aoa enumerators who call from) door- | Corn Flakes - those tasty little flakes of corn -
ivi a a aes » salary structure » Public | 1, oa: ares cer er o,| Airways materializ ) > Dress § d be no greaterg S™Ume ro
giving leadership to Federatior he salary structure of the ¢} Labour as a complete list of the Models of such air-bus sfg-| and no less than the rights off 7,400" Will number 30,000 | crisp and easily digested - are the ideal food
and its idea throughout the whole | Service Salaries and Wages Com-|items upon which the cost of| 4, pa ap tteaiae ata ‘ ; e re of rhe government anticipate
West Indies, and he was hopin; |â„¢ission implemented in 1949 | living was based | ton many on railway sane citizens. It is not practicable to} wat this huge probe into Bri for breakfast, supper or between-meals. With
that J neice cate sattres that rior to devaluation, was found- ie A ve been prepared by impose restrictions on the daily] jain'e social life will provide milk or cream and sugar they are more nour-
ge Ae ee vou eave é d upon a cost-of-living index | Inadequate Information —“ : a = | press without those restrictions] Va) able material for planner \ | Bash

adership a ne righ time which was based upon a deterior- | | xpt * eanalden paoway sta— extending to the weekly Press, to ind also for the historian of the ishing than an egg... and cost less! ac

Over 500 Ferns __ [ated standard of living. The organization stated: “At! hope pa “3 i gs a ready —_ periodicals, to pamphlets, ty TRAD a netcAvar: ane . package contains six generous servings. Served

The American Philosophical As a possible solution to the|the time the criticisms of the | (4) oe p landings. They] ligious and industrial journals, to} © penalty for refusinia to com ft h k h he bowl!
Society hag made a five hundrec woposals submitted in its orig-|Index were made, we honestly bch y have good clear approach-| books, to firms, to broadcasting, | | ete a census return is up to $28 rom ths Pactags rig A inte he vew
gollar grant to Mr. C. Bernarc | nal Memorandum, the Federation | believed the list to have been a °° 8%4-80 close a link-up of the} and eventually to any form of ex- —(IN.S,)

Lewis, Director and Curator of thy | now suggests the re-introduction | complete one. Therefore, if any ewo torn bf transpor' has obvious] pression by individuals, The Com- Cor sale éver where

Institute of Jamaica for the com-|of the Excess Profits Tax, which | misconception under which the “@V@ntages for travellers monwealth Press Union therefore j ~

letion of field work on a project{|should remain in operation until | compilers of the memorandum | 1 -addit , places on record its belief that any “m8

p of field work on a proj I wl I In addition,. since both the]; ~ SNe
which he is sponsoring in the such time as the general economic |laboured produced many criti- British railways and B.E.A. are infringement on the freedom of N i" M; ' o4

study of fern flora in Jamaica. situation justified its removal. cisms which were not grounded state-owned, the problem of|*@ Press other than restrictions ° Z. aori on ee eee een

The grant will allow for the . upon facts, this is the result of acquiring sites is simplified necessary to preserve the morals
continued study of local fern Prices inadequate information supplied | Two factors have convincea ig poe of the community and ace row in
Tee a a 7 " J , by the Commissioner yabour | Pp EA Saat: aetna c ‘{the rights of individuals, and
species: which had Jong been the} The Federation is also pressing | gnq not nen aT ee _— facies a re : ae - oe ms as io applying in like manner to all “i us A A CPSC gives (72

. “ee oe £ prepa ton to meet air-bus traffic > ¢ 7

study of the late famed Dr. Willian
Maxon, of the Smithsoniar
Institute. For its size, Jamaicé
probably possesses more species of

part of the compilers to | demai “ » “| citizens, or restrictions necessary

: - a isin kper: the | in wartime or in time of declared Rapidly | . BS ¥ wy, wy, yf GeliciouS
national emergency to protect the t ¥ , .- ae /
“hotne-baked buns

for a decision on its request for}on the

the pegging of prices. indulge in wanton criticisms of i
Since the submission of the (the Index. The Commissioner of | rece:

Memorandum by the Federation |{,apour is in part, if not. wholly : - o



er helicopter service




; ees 0 es memo we Pore Cardiff Wak ena nation, should be restricted by I

ae ep Bs rae country in| seve pe "bite ago bate has peep so, responsible for the situation } Liverpo« TA hire “| every section of the community a New Zeal a rae ne 7

the world, Over 500 are known.|an_ inter-change of correspon | which thereby arose.” "9 entre marking the first st oa] re TeIptale sit ¥
With the death of Dr. Maxon. | dence between the Colonial Secre- , ‘ Seatien Sept. Gutiseaiteatan grverament towards} race is increasing so rapidly that na y eS aA qi Nb

ft was found that very little of his| ‘tary and the organization, Despite these observations the | ; : Pritish Aewpplane} "rhe Commonwealth Press Union| °! iso be Delng drastically $d a ry ae

asl ae oritte : ‘ Federation still maintained tha : rs > 0 16 lywassen » > 3 at . : revised as to its future E

manuscripts had | been writte 7 The Unions had first of all lthere were severdl nat x le otal 1 ll be available in, laigze re Onwane that all members than half a centur )
roe Pr . r »centls : s s = m , 8 2 « TT » ’ : ed

Mr. George R. Proctor, recently! drawn attention to the omission|cjongs from the Index. Amon: | should urge their Governments to] i) was being confidently predict

ociated with the Academy of
Natural Sciences in Philadelphia
and formerly a lecturer in Botany



of several important items from
the Index from which official cal-
culations of the Cost-of-Living

plan ineludes an]|efuse to accept any United Na-

these were provision for clothing convention which compro-

repairs, dyeing and cleaning, boot

that the Maoris were doomed

to loeal authorities tinction within a short time







; ae

at Wedania’ Univeralty,.decided: tol are meade, and shoe repairs. ati¢ any way, or condones the form of ane nae BERS lene Bei Re 3
take up the project left unfinished In reply the Colonial Secre- The organisation submitted tl IN.S pt control now operated by race would survive until
by Dr. Maxon tary pointed out that the Index! by these omissions too great a arent sovernares of authoritarian} eventual inevitable _ absorption
"pr. T. W. J. Taylor, Principal] was ad on = Report of the oneree of “velative importance ir Pp i 1 countries by the European inha'gitants ,
of the University College of the|Cost-of-Living Survey Commit-!/the budget” was given to the re } oy -ANncCeA ‘ a : Now, with its numbers creas= F
West Indies, left ‘Jamaica Wednes-|tee of 1942 and said it appeared maining items included in th ionee! Lice Nee Colonial Laws And Rates me faster than ever, ioe ah Gave
day morning to attend a meeting| that the compilers of the Memo- |list upon which the Cost-of-Liv- S Nith regard te Colonial I ct the Executive Committee of the]™andum had made many of their/ing Index was based, and as_ ‘ ought Laws the following resolu °M| ate entity playing an increasing
Association of Universities of the|°¢ riticisms under a misapprehen- consequence the variations in the moved by Mr, Fletcher of Jamaica] jy important part in New Zealand
British Commonwealth Dr, | Sion as to a number of significant |trend of the cost of lis ing could (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) and seconded py the Hon, Mavel] life
Taylor is a member of the Com- particulars. at the not be accurately reflected in the F KINGSTON. Stricklaia ot Malta was passed by] Some estimates place the num-
mittee’ on which he’ represents He therefore suggested that the |Index. Further, it was empha- An application has been made to| by the Conference. ber of Maoris when the airouhana!

officers of the unions concerned |sised that the omitted items form- {the Jamaic Government for a “This Conference recommends} (\sscovered New Zealand a ligt
should give further careful study |}ed a basic part of the conditions | Pioneer industry licence to enable| that the Council of the E.P.U." as 200,000, The introduction at |
to the committee’s report and, if |of living and indulgences of the [the mar t f concentrated | should n offer its services to the

Colonial University Colleges,
The Committee meets in New











ee re en et pi ge eee
a > 5





s - Jehae ’ huropean weapons among a war
Zealand in early August and after-|they desired, arrangements would | workers of the colony. lavoul essences in the island to| Colonial Office to assist in arriv-| like people and the introduction @ When you bake at home, always use * Here’
wards Dr. Taylor will visit the]be made for a senior officer of : : eplace from hard cur-| ing at a fair and equitable decision| cf European disease atiead Puiu Se mE bye sus : lere's all you dot
four University Colleges which|the Department of Labour to ex- The Federation has also asked } rene, Irce henever a question arises Be te inne i a 8 ee M ast Rising Dry Yeast * 4. Just spridkle
form the University of New|plain to them in detail the com-|that the present basis for the) Sponsors of the project are} alleged irresponsible public ation’ be modern baleing discovery thet gives . into lukewarm water.
Zealand. He is expected to return |pilation of the Index figures eRe be: ge egpspas end wae a]Messrs. Stuart Bros 1) henever it propos sad to in- Py 1858 the Maori population rom ~— ory 1g renults qui aa o . a Let stand 10min»
‘ - 2 . ‘ fey be oraered at a Very | Lid ubsic f uce ¢ mend law ii dropped to 58,006 . ‘ pasily § amazing, new granule ° utes ng
to Jamaica on September 8 As regards the claim for anJearly date, It is further submit- it by of mun eet | pt baw pe my fOvernnes eat a Ya mess y are Lot yeast needs no refrigeration—stays full ‘ sth na ii
es increase in wages and salaries,|ted for Government's considera- | Brot} Company. Lt of Mon was down to 39,000 ‘and few strength for weeks on your pantry shelf ® ce _ is one
‘ the Colonial Secretary emphasiz-|tion that “since the preparation | tre] wtih TY . | In a series of three resolutions] people held out any hope for thé Get Fleischmann’s Fast Rising Dry { vomumacct vente.
re ed that any such rise would lead jof cost-of-living indices is a high- Creation of the industr | Cable and Wireless Communi-| race’s future. . Yeast today ° cai er yeast
| to an immediate curtailment, /ly technical matter requiring the ) mean the additional Saal af j cations the Union is to press for But the ond of tribal warfare, . perl Rr
UUMS ec, postponement, or abandonment of | services of experts, the Secretary, r < local pari ts j = ng yreduction of the Empire Press| the gradual acceptance of Euro
capital works in progress or con-|of State for the Colonies be re-| singer, lime and orange “i Ciné | Rate for transmission of news bee oy
templated with consequential loss | quested to send a panel of expert: Drier a Ota, ons: were



pean medicine, and a revival in teh ith Ut
“ ; caver Sha oe nto and tamarind tween groups of colonies closely| svirit under the influence of § Ws Wi 0 Venn CSIC?
of employment to workers; anc to this Colony to unde rtake a new The company plans to go inte ssociated with each other, either) series of notable leaders, Grought
Teeth insofar as recurrent expenditure} survey and prepare a new index.’ Or ‘ ‘3 nab a nt traphically or politically to|a turning point
> services was Cc -erne ; Mn cr € months a [ : = —_ SSS oe =>
{fn public services was concerned, th +} ¢ uvey existing transmission By 1936 ther 82.000 SS S =

| the attempt to provide additional of output com- vere














































































| t meet increased dst neing at $175,000 going up to I ges for Press material by afl] Maoris and teday the population
revenue to ne icrease sts*, 00 { fi five years’ tin ; +} channels; and to take early steps . 3000. It ir ine
ates Ld Rigi in five year ne, and annels; and to take early eps} exceeds 116,000. It i reasing
me merely add to the cost of The Weather ay entually be able to take to ensure ote poauenon to the} twe 2 d a half time as fast aq }
ee vie wag ® ‘ \ TODAY I f the island's requirements |!Owest possible figure. 1) ‘urepean population ‘
Further rise in wages and sal- Sun Rises: 5.42 a.m | ( rinks concentrate - her The resolutions concluded by .
aries, he said, could now be based 4 ar 3 fa goo VEU athe 4 .c : : About half the Mygori popula
sreased producti a! Sun 6.25 pm | mpc n r are rrency {7 mmending “the Council of the| | 4 ; ‘
mnly on increased production and | Moon (Last Quarter) July 6 | “lap are discontnue Empire Press Union vigorously to| "0" today is of mixed descent (Inc. in British Guiana)
yutput, and he stressed that pro- | Lighting: 7.00 pm . continue its efforts towards reduc-] #2 Maoris inter-marry freely w Ath
pues of the nature ontempigted | High "Waters ay am., 8.00 tions of freight and mail rates Furepean jut with the reviv-
n the Chea e aeee peer ek m ; : Fy - >»; both for Press material and for|¢% pride of vace, half-castes are Phone 4562 33 Electrical Dept.
ium were consequently feredoom- | pm YESTERDAY | ree f igeons copies of newspapers, and towards} increa singly identi "the m
Stop ‘Pyorrhea and ey {| Rainfall (Codrington) .05 | the speeding up of communications | *€! noe with the Beers and a
TON ar are r
Trench Mouth The Colonial Secretary added in ane cr LONDON by am a yell as by surface Ne , i ha init ee penal rae
hat he had no doubt that the Temperature (Max) 86.5 Ff bie sming | routes é ng ativ C0
* . T - 7 € } t alf-castes are oft ' y or Y a] ‘ ‘
in 24 Hours Executive of the Unions would Temperature (Min) 76.0 °F “7 . , - t = il "Maori than hoa of a KOLS TER BRAN DES h b RADIOS
Bleeding gums, sore mouth, or loose teeth | vive this aspect of the matter | Wind Direction (9 a.m.) F os vil fie ¥ en
mean that you are a victim of Pyorrhea or]? ) nid eaPraet ssideratic { a z ‘ } Tr y ‘ he crops bh naving ¢ ierce pride in
Trench Mouth, or some bad disease that} °areful and earnest consideration (3 p.m.) E. by N 7 =o p REFUND helr ancestry and a determitia
will eventually cause you to loee eet and with a due sense of the re- Wind Velocity 17 miles per j wits inres € yuantitic ot Saal kn. aiekanen Hea Ae stl 4 “a
ser time Since the great World War [sponsibility which rested upon | hous. jiapie. pet beans, tares an KINGSTON, Jamaica For better Reception, Quality in tone, and Stability.
these mouth diseases have spread through- | {hem. Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.985 | pulse Banana growers have decided to Witt e vigor of the rac me
out the world so that now scientists say | Replying, the Federation refer- > 29 945 be J t r f forr try to dint thie Clos ment to hand I 1 | showir r signs of
that four out of every five people are suf- . oe r e >p.m.) 29.9405, a , ! LO ge ie Government to han val ’ “THE QUEEN M ARY”
ferers sooner or later. Be warned in time ring to that part of the Memoran- 1 and counterfoils the Min-|over £500,000 excess taken fot iminishing it eem doubtful 4 mat amas
and Step (hee) ¢ isan ee etree Seay ioe ate, igum which dealt with the f Food | ended the ration- | various purposes handed back to hether the Maoris will be ab THE QUEEN ELIZABETH”
of teeth, but also chronic rheumatism (SSS SSS g of their feeding stuffs | hem They want the money for orbed in the European popula ‘ / Rak abba ‘
heart trouble, ee ae —~—INS& the extension of the industry (CP) tion.—Can. Press. )
New Discovery ‘ INS. |" mee ar and: , 1
Saves Teeth PATENT i; and now Britain’s new 34,000 tons i
Amosan, the discovery s = Aererieny, \ ” " ort (
scientist, fights these troubles In a new an wang \ ie )
k It penetrates right to the root |} ARD | 4 ‘es | “CARONL ct
ar ine trouble. stops sures from bleeding \ Ud i( N S Be ST | 1A ))
the very first day, — kly yo Sater aen « |
8s out of your mouth, and soon tighte: "4° me | 7 . . 2}
the teeth. The following Jetter trom Mr. W. || COLLINS’ RECEIVED Are all fitted with the K.B, Product. )
W. B. sh the results that Amosan users .
get. “suffered froin Trench Mouth and u LETRIES 1| ;
Pyorrhea for ten years. My gums were sore . i] uk h ‘
and bleeding and { had lost four teeth, * ( j i Millions today are saying
while several we beste were getting ) STOR A ; | | ’ i}
looser all the time. I tried many nes
then heard of this new discovery Amosan. | | But new treatment does more than “What ” ;
I Amosan my gums |) 1 , 19 ; | | Nhat’s good enough for the finest Ships {
m I - y ‘ ”
: iiree days ana til FOR 1 SMOKERS } ease these terrible agonies. in the World, is good enough for me )
two weeks I found my loose teeth were | | + 5 | Daa
much tighter and that I could eat the hard- ¢ { a
eat of M0 i t Acar Oo! ee | A new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives Ww re alway illi rive a de suet
: c e are always willing to give a demonstration
Guaranteed \ BEST DISPENSING SICK ROOM Mackere prompt relief from the pains due to the symptoms of arthritis and 7 =e 8 & r
tand so certain that : I

rheumatism, but also effects the metabolic processes W hich constitute Let your own ear be the judge.

a very important part of the rheumatic state’s background

| DOLCIN has been thoroughly tested in medical institutions,
|

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h and tighten your)
ur complete satisfaction or!| | SERVICE
n return of empty pa
ce 1 ing your teeth or;
rheumatism;
san from your,
clad guaran-



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a SOLD BY: nl rere tient ea





PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS gb ADVOGAT

Pub"uned by Thu Advocate Co. ita, 4. Sroad Bi, Briagewe

Tuesday, July 4, 1950

INDEPENDENCE DAY

OVER one hundred and fifty years have
passed since the American colonies threw
off their allegiance to the British Crown.
It is interesting to speculate what might
have been the course of history if that
momentous event had never taken place.

When the independence of the thirteen
colonies was recognised, they were a thin-
ly populated area running along the
Atlantic seaboard of North America. To-
day the United States of America is the
most powerful country in the world with a
population of about a hundred and twenty
millions. From a policy of isolationism
bequeathed to them by the Father of
America, George Washington, the Amer-
icans have advanced until what happens in
any quarter of the globe is their concern.

The ideals which fired their revolt and
which are embodied in their Declaration
of Independence have remained with them
in the years that have passed. Political
democracy in the United States has reach-
ed great heights and the people enjoy a
standard of life that is the envy of every
other country in the world.

The American Republic has produced
some great men—men whose thoughts and
actions will be discussed as long as civilisa-
tion lasts. Abraham Lincoln, staking all to
preserve the Union which he loved and to
erase the blot of slavery from the American
land. Woodrow Wilson, preaching a new
doctrine of international co-operation and
responsibility only to see his gospel re-
jected by men who could only learn the
hard way. Franklin D. Roosevelt, rescuing
his country from the despair and frustra-
tion into which it had been plunged by the
great depression and steering it through
the greatest war in its history and dying on
the eve of the victory for which he had
worked so hard.

To-day the United States is the best hope
of those men who seek to preserve political
democracy and freedom of expression. In
the last war the United States played a
major role and in the post-war world
amidst the dangers of Soviet ambition and
intrigue all have turned to the great Re-
public for aid and succour. This aid she
has given bountifully. Dvring the war
Lease-Lend enabled the Allies to achieve
the victory for which they endured so much,
and in the post-war years Marshall Aid
and military supplies to the Atlantic
Treaty nations has been a vital factor in
the rehabilitation of war-torn countries and
the means of enabling those countries to
defend themselves.

In the clash of ideologies which is such
an unhappy feature of the day, the United
States is the champion of those countries
which will not embrace the regimentation
of Communism. The burden which this
places on the American Government and
taxpayer is apparent, but the American
people have risen to the responsibilities
which their power has cast upon them,

In the crisis which the Korean invasion
has occasioned, the Government of the
United States is adopting a firm and states-
manlike policy. In its policy it has the
support of the greater part of the world
and in its endeavours to maintain the peace,
the mass of mankind backs it.

On this their Independence Day the Free
World salute the people of America and
pray that their leaders will continue to
uphold the great ideals and traditions
which their forefathers fought for and that
in the end they will succeed in forming a
world in which common men can live out
their lives without the fear of war.







Our Readers Say:
Lover of People

The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Allow me to support the remarks of D. A.
Thani’s letter which appeared in Friday’s Advocate
relating to Mahatma Gandhi. He certainly was
an Apostle of Peace and he loved all humanity.

Many years ago I had the great privilege of
attending Mr. Gandhi's reception held at “Central
Hall, Westminster, London.” There were about 130
delegates present, representing various organiza-
tions.

Unfortunately I arrived at the reception rather
late and Gandhi had been speaking for a few
minutes, He was relating incidents of cruelty he
had witnessed during his travels throughout the
world. He told us he had seen a British Officer
riding on horse back down one of the busy streets
in an Indian City, and this officer had whipped
a little picanniny out of his way. Personally I
did not feel very proud of being a_Britisher at
that moment especially as the small child died as
a result of the whipping. Mr. Gandhi continued
saying that he also had witnessed in the same
place one of his own countrymen put out the eyes
of another man during a dispute over a woman,
and another incident of seeing ears cut off and
so on. Yet, said Mahatma Gandhi, these people
would not be condemned as it was just the way
of humanity.

When Mr, Gandhi had finished speaking, a friend
of mine came up to me and said “Do you realise
we are in the presence of a Saint?” and then I
understood the feeling I myself was experiencing,
it was the sense of awe. Mr. Gandhi had not rais-
ed his voice all through his speech and yet he
held us all—in an uncanny sort of way—the power
of the Spirit, I am sure it was.

This visit of Gandhi’s to London had a kind of
humour attached to it as well as the serious side,

as frequently traffic, motor cars, buses, taxis, etc., |

were held up in the busy parts of the West End,
because Mahatma Gandhi and his disciples at cer-
tain times knelt down to pray wherever they
happened to be at the times of prayer.

Certainly Mahatma Gandhi’s career will stay on
in the m@mory of all who had the honour of
meeting and shaking hands with him and it is

quite certain too he left his truly spiritual influ-
@fice in the world. He loved the world’s peoples
A.B,





SUGAR MEMORANDUM | Cricket Literature
In Engiand

Many W.I. Hooks On View

LONDON,
President of

PRESENTED BY THE BRITISH
WEST INDIES AND BRITISH
Guiana Sugar Delegation to
His Majesty's Government
on 26th May, 1950.

We are a delegation represent-
ing the Legislatures and Trade
Unions of the sugar exporting
Colonies of the British West In-
dies and British Guiana. As
you know, our purpose here is
to press His Majesty’s Gevern-
ment for reconsidering of their
decision on the sugar question
which is at present at issue be-
tween the United Kingdom and
the area which we represent

As we said at our prelimin-
ary meeting with you last week
we take up these negotiations
where they were left off in
January, when the case for
Caribbean sugar was put by the
British West Indies Sugar Asso-
ciation. At q fully representative
regional sugar conference held on
the 23rd and 24th of February,
it was solemnly resolved:

“That as to the question of
the tonnage of sugar for
which reasonably remunera-
tive prices are to be guaran-
teed by His Majesty's Gov-
ernment, this Conference is
convinced that the limitation
of such tonnage to 640,000
tons, a figure substantially
less than the eurrent exports
of the area, must gravely
prejucice not only the inter-
ests of the British West In-
dies and British Guiana, but
also the relations between
His Majesty's Government
and His Majesty’s loyal sub-
jects in the area, and recom-
mends that the quota to be
guaranteed after 1952 should
at least be such as to cover
current British West Indian
and British Guiana exports
estimated at 725,000 tons.”

The peoples of the British Car-
ibbean Area fully endorse this
resolution, and the Governments
cf the sugar exporting Colonies
of the Area have sent us here
as delegates to support it.

West Indians everywhere are
dismayed at the decision of His
Majesty’s Government, which is
regarded by them as not fully
implementing the Government’s
own declaration in its announce-
ment on 10th August, 1949, when
it was stated:

“His Majesty’s Government
asured the delegation that
they recognise that the pros-
perity of the sugar industry
is vital to the maintenance of
an adequate standard of liv-
ing in sugar producing colon-
ies such as the British West
Indies. It is their intention
to make long-term arrange
ments which will give to the
efficient producer of sugar in
these areas and elsewhere in
the Commonwealth firm as-
surances of markets for
agreed tonnages of sugar, at
reasonably remunerative pri-
ces to be negotiated with the
producers, It is the declared
policy of His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment to maintain and im-
prove the economy of the
Colonial territories and
whereas in the British West
Indies, sugar production is
the main and _ indispensable
basis of a healthy economy,
this will be given special
consideration in fixing the
quantities of sugar to be cov-
ered by these arrangements.”

This is a decision by His Ma-
jesty's Government. It was
issued after consideration of the
current position in the British
West Indies by representatives
of the Ministry of Food, the
Treasury, and the Colonial Office.
It is in unequivocal language,
and the West Indies were en-
titled to understand it to mean ex-
actly what it said—that, recog-
nising the vital position of sugar
in the economy of the West In-
dies, His Majesty's Government
would give special consideration
to those Colonies in making their
sugar arrangements, in order to
maintain and improve that econ-
omy.

The present sugar offer of His
Majesty's Government to our area
is not calculated to maintain, much
less improve, the economy of the
area; and the areg has not re-
ceived special cansideration in
fixing the quantities of sugar in-
volved. It is not calculated to
maintain that economy because a
firm assurance of a market at
reasonbly remunerative prices is
offered on 640,000 tons only and
this is substantially less than cur-
rent production, And where is
the special consideration which
was supposed to be given, when
the proposals involve a guaran-
tee to the Dominions for more
than current production, for the
Colonies less; and an overall re-
striction on Dominion export pro
duction at a level approaching
100% more than current exports,
but on Colonial production only
some 25% more than present pro-
duction? Furthermore, during
these negotiations the guaranteed
quantity proposed for the Domin-
ions was increased (from 400,000
tons to 450,000 tons) while tne
Colonial guaranteed production
throughout remained the same (at
1,100,000 tons). Increase the Col-
onial guaranteed production
in proportion, and you are not
far short of a 1,250,000 ton allot-
ment for the Colonies, which
would give the minimum of 725
000 tons for the British West In-

dies and British Guiana which is
sought.

_ During the Autumn negotia-
tions, the B.W.LS.A. delegation
were repeatedly told by the Min-
istry of Food officials, particularly
Mr. Forster, that the allocation of
600,000 tons for Australia was
based on the present expansion
of the industry in response to the
exhortation by His Majesty's Gov-
ernment to both the Colonies and
Dominions to expand production.
Further, we were assured that
Australia would easily produce
this total for export with existing
equipment and with canes already
planted. That these assurances
were incorrect can be seen from
the extracts from Australia’s sugar
papers which we include as
Appendix 1, We think these ex-
tracts speak for themselves and
clearly show why His Majesty's
Government. should sympatheti-
cally reconsider our case for an
increased guaranteed tonnage into
the British Market.

Various Reasons
We wish to urge on His

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Majesty’s Government various
reasons why this matter should
be put right, why this vital ele-
ment of the amount of the guar-
anteed purchase from the British
West Indies and British Guiana
should be increased by 85,000
tons to 725,000 tons. We do not
propose at this stage to go back
over the sugar history of these
Colonies, but we trust that His
Majesty’s present Ministers have
well in mind the background to
tnese whole negotiations, There can
» no dispute that the United King-
dom had the advantage in the
past of buying Colonial sugar at
prices uneconomic to the West
Indies and British Guiana based
on dumped sugar and that this
caused depression and disaster in
these Colonies. On the other hand,
it controlled sugar prices during
both world wars when they would
have been high. In this connec-
tion, we refer you to the Olivier
Commission Report of 1929 and
the Royal Commission Report of
1939. It must be recalled that the
United Kingdom Government in
the 1930’s at the same time as they
were buying sugar from the
Colonies at dumped prices, pro-
cured the imposition of heavy
duties on cheap Japanese goods
which were being supplied to the
Colonies, and actually of quotas
in the case of textiles, mainly in
order to protect the standard of
living of the British working
man.

We turn now to the tonnage
figures: Beyond the total of
1,100,000 tons of Colonial sugar
which the United Kingdom is
prepared to buy at guaranteed
prices (this is the aggregate figure
containing the British West Indies
amount of 640,000 tons) the United
Kingdom is prepared to allow
150,000 tons of Colonial sugar to
find a market in the United King-
dom if it can with Imperial pref-
erence do so in complete competi-
tion with all other sugars, whether
foreign or not, whether dumped
or not. There would be no guar-
antee as to market or as to price
on this amount of 150,000 tons
and in fact no guarantee that any
of this 150,000 tons would be
ought from the British West
Indies and British Guiana. Had
this 150,000 tons been allocated
pro rata between the Colonies, the
share for the West Indies would
have been 85,000 tons. A matter
of 85,000 tons up or down on the
British West Indian guarantee is
not a large matter for the United
Kingdom, but in the future the
question of whether or not this
portion of our production attracts
a fair price can make all the
difference to the stability of the
sugar industry which was recog-
nised in the official statement of
August 10th, 1949, as the mainstay
of the B.W.I. economy.

His Majesty’s Government have
stated that this unguaranteed
element of 150,000 tons will main-
tain some element of competition
in the United Kingdom market to
act as a yardstick of efficiency
for the industry and thus protect
the interests of United Kingdom
consumers, The United Kingdom
have already allowed for the
purchase of 250,000 tons of sugar
from without the Commonwealth
for internal consumption, to say
nothing of about 500,000 tons o!
sugar which they intend to buy
from foreign sources for refining
and re-export. This should give
an ample yardstick to compare
world prices for sugar with the
prices paid to Commonwealth pro-
ducers, In fact the so-called world
price of sugar is no index 0!
efficiency because the price ot
these sugars can be entirely in-
fluenced by protection in other
markets, resulting in dumping.

We wish to stress the 1ollowing
points; —

(i) Apart trom the inequities to

the Colonies of the ruinous

pre-war years, the United
om consumer has had
the benefit of Colonial sugar
for the past ten years at
prices comparing very
favourably with world
market prices and is con-
tinuing to have this benefit
(the price of British West
Indian sugar for 1950 under
a mutually satisfactory long-
term agreement would be
£30. 10s. per ton as com-—
pared with a world market
parity of some £39, per ton).
It would be unfair for the
United Kingdom to expect to
buy all British West Indian
sugar at cheap prices in years
of scarcity, and only guaran -
tee to purchase a portion of
their present production in
future years of plenty.

(ii) We would submit that the
Colonial farmer is entitled to
the same treatment as the
British farmer i.e, that he
should have a guaranteed
market at fair prices lor
every ton of sugar he pro-
duces which is consumed in
Great Britain.

(iii) The statement by His
Majesty’s Government on
sugar issued on August 10th,
1949, promises to maintain
and improve the standard ot
living in the British West
Indian Colonies. In our
opinion, the proposal of His
Majesty’s Government to
buy only a portion of their
requirements from the Wes‘
Indies, less than our current
production, at guaranteed
prices is contrary to this
statement. It is obvious that
in times of plenty as far as
sugar production is concern-
ed, the average price thus
obtained by the West Indirs
would be less than the
economic price fixed unde:
the guaranteed price
arrangement, thus failing to
maintain, much less ita—
prove, the B.W.I. economy.

(iv) It is noteworthy that the
United States Government
reserves practically the
whole of the American
market for sugar from the
United States domestic and
Colonial sugar producers and
Cuba; grants one hundred
per cent preference to United
States colonies and a. sub-
stantial preference to Cuba
and in addition makes con
siderable subsidy payments
to domestic and Colonial pro
ducers, There is no questi
of foreign sugar, other th
Cuban, receiving any quot
into the United State
market, ‘and the tremend





1 Commi

potential expansion of sugar
consumption in the domestic
market of the United State:
is reserved entirely for those
privileged producers. Yet
Cuba, which will receive sc
large a share of these bene-
fits is apparently to be
granted a substantial quota
into the United Kingdorr
market, in other words Cuba
which is regarded as @
special interest by the Uniter
States Government, is also tc
obtain special consideratior
in the, United Kingdom
market at the expense 91
British Colonies. Inciden-
tally, it is difficult to see how
this policy of importing
dollar sugar in preference tc
sterling squares with Hi
Majesty’s Government's
policy of closing the dollar
gap. Elsewhere in the West
Indies, we note that the
French Government pur-
Li chases all the exportable
surplus of the French terri -
tories, Last year’s price wa‘
in the vicinity of £60 per ton
(v) It is continually being saic
in England that the troubles
facing the West Indies are
caused by their concentra-
tion on a one crop economy

and that they would do wei
to diversify their agricul
ture more generally. The

experience of the last 20!
years in the West Indies has
Cenclusively proved that
while the West Indies are
able to grow other crops tha;
sugar to a 1®nited extent
the extent to which this
policy can be developed is
in itself very limited, Thi
can readily be appreciated
when it is considered that
all the research work at the
Imperial College of Tropical
Agriculture in Trinidad and
all the research work of thé
various Departments of
Agriculture in the West
Indies and British Guiana
have been unable to suggest
any economic alternative to
sugar, This is largely due to
the following five reasons:
(1) The West Indies have
no fuel or large scale water
power and the sugar cane
bagasse supplies the fuel
necessary for operating the
factories. (2) Sugar cane
has a gift of maintaining soil
fertility to a remarkable
degree. This can be particu-
larly demonstrated in the
island of Barbados which
has been growing cane for
the past 300 years with in-
creasing productivity. (3)
Sugar will maintain more
labour per acre than any
other crop except bulb
growing in Holland and in-
tensive tomato cultivation.
(4) The West Indies are
subject to hurricanes, and
sugar cane resists the ravages
of these tropical storms far
better than any other crop
which can be grown in these
regions. (5) The West Indies
are subject to periodical
droughts and the sugar cane
is remarkably drought-
resisting, giving crops even
in years of serious lack of
rainfall.

Not Happy

The peoples of the West Indies
and British’ Guiana do not feel
happy about the conduct of the
sugar negotiations since the August
declaration of His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment, and have the impression
that their interests have been
subordinated to those of the
Dominions, It must not be lost

sight of that it was the West!

Indies which raised the question
o! a long-term agreement. During
the summer discussions, His
Majesty’s Government informed
the West Indian delegates that they
admitted the justice of their de-
mand for security in the future,
but reminded them that there were
other sugar producing areas in the
Empire and that it was necessary
to have discussions with all Empire
producers before any concrete
plans could be made. The British
West Indian delegates accepted
this as being quite reasonable and
therefore agreed to return in the
autumn for these talks. It was
most disappointing, therefore,
when it was found that an agree-
ment had been reached with
Australia on the 7th of December
before consultations with the
Colonies had been concluded, The
West Indian people feel that the
liaste with which this agreement
was concluded with Australia was
largely influenced by the near
approach of the Australian elec-
tions

The more recent conduct of these
negotiations has been equally dis-
pleasing to them, The Grenada
Conference asked that a delegation
from the British West Indies and
Pritish Guiana should be received
by His Majesty’s Government, and
this was agreed to, but before that
delegation could arrive in London,
an announcement of the decision
of His Majesfy’s Government was
made in the House of Commons,

We must now deal with the
political considerations of this
matter. The population of the
British West Indies and British
Guiana is fast increasing and it
ig essential that work should be
found to maintain the standards
of living of this increasing popula-
tion. The West Indian people feel
that the promise to maintain the
economy of the West Indies con-
tained in the statement of August
10th has not been implemented by
the present offer. A failure to
obtain. a guaranteed market, for
the tonnage we now ask can
easily lead in the future to a re-
currence of the evil conditions
which existed in) the years 1937
to 1939, when there was wide-
spread unrest together with dis-
turbances in the area, due to the
low wages then existing and the
inability of the population to find
enough employment. Should world
prices of sugar fall, the present
offer could not maintain the
present level of employment.

Does the U.K. wish the British
Caribbean to go back to 1937 con-
ditions with reduced employment
and unrest, ending in a Royal
ion ana more grants;
rathe 8 pay the m 3
fair prices for efficient production

@ On Page 5



Sir Pelham Warner,
M.C.C., opened an exhibition of cricket liter-
ature and relics at the premises of the
National Book League, London, recently. The
most ancient West Indian cricket book on
view was the “Barbados Cricketers’ Annual
for 1894-95,” edited by J. Wynfred Gibbons.

In his opening speech Sir Pelham said
no game had produced more literature than
cricket, but added that when he wrote his
first book on cricket in 1897, publishers tend-
ed to regard cricketers as semi-idiots and
were sceptical about accepting their manu-
However, nowadays the book shops
were flooded with works on cricket. _

After dwelling on the importance of cricket
in English life, and pointing out that the
game had now spread all over the world, he
concluded by saying: “I myself have made a
duck in every part of the globe—except In-
dia, and I have never been there

CRICKET HISTORY

The earliest specific reference to cricket in
English is to be found in the “Guilford Book
of Court”, dated 1598, which is among the
It is recorded that one John Der-
rick, “being of the age of Fyfty and nyne
yeeres or thereaboutes, did runne and play
there at Creckett and other Plaies” with the
other scholars of the Free School.
of Dickens will remember the
fictitious account of a single wicket contest
between Mr. Jingle and Sir Thomas Blaze.
But setting this aside, the earliest records of
cricket in the West Indies are of Service
matches in the 1840's.
club of the 59th Foot was formed, and played
first match against the
Trinidad Cricket Club. A few years later
Barbados saw contest between the 7th Royal
Fusiliers and the 2nd. Batallion of the Royal
But early cricket in the Carib-
bean was, owing to geographical limitations,
largely of a domestic nature which evaded
documentation.

In the ‘sixties James Lillywhite, one of
the great promoters of cricket, arrived in
Trinidad, and his coaching greatly improved
The first inter-colonial
match was played at Bridgetown between
Barbados and _ British Guiana
twenty years later a West Indies team toured
Canada and the United States. In 1900 Sir
Pelham’s brother, R. S. A. Warner, brought
to England a team which included L. Con-
stantine, senior, and C. A. Olliviere. Their
matches did not rank as first class fixtures,
but the experience gained on the tour, to-
gether with the fillip already given by visits
of two English teams in the late ’nineties laid
the foundation for the high standard to be
achieved in later years by such players as
George Challenor, Martindale and Headley.

FOUR BALLS

Among the exhibits is an 1820 version of
the Laws of Cricket published by the St.
Mary-le-Bone Club. The directions for bowl-
ers are as follows: “The bowler shall deliver
the Ball with one foot behind the bowling
crease, and shall bowl Four Balls before he
. . Which he shall do but
The Ball must














E “POPOV Oe
In 1842 the cricket . ee







newly-formed

the standard there.



changes wickets . .
once in the same innings.
be bowled, not thrown or jerked, and de-
livered underhand with the hand below the

Perhaps the most awe inspiring object at
the exhibition is the ball off which W. G.
Grace scored his hundreth 100 against Som-
erset at the Bristol in 1895—not forgetting the
cork of the bottle from which his health was
drunk on that occasion!

Lord Baldwin Replies

(From Our Lendon Correspondent)

LONDON,
Relying on information in the West Indian
that Lord Baldwin, until
of the Leeward Islands,
brought his Antiguan-born chauffeur, Mr.
Francis, to England with him and had prom-
ised to put him through any profession or
training he wished, your London Correspon-
dent wrote to Lord Baldwin to ask if he
could have an interview with Mr. Francis.
Your correspondent mentioned that this in-

terview would appear in “Antigua Star.”

The following unsigned letter, written on
notepaper headed “From the Earl Baldwin of
; Bewdley, Little Stoke House, North Stoke,
Oxfordshire” has been received:

“Lord Baldwin of Bewdley wishes to state,
on behalf of Mr. Francis, that as your in-
formation about his future is incorrect, he
does not see the purpose of being interviewed
especially for the benefit of the “Antigua
Star,” which paper he holds in the utmost
contempt.”





Luneh

The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—The new Bus stand is not at all encourag-
ing, nothing modern about it.
tor the time and he made a joke of my question.
I hope tourists will not criticise Barbados on this

I asked a conduc-

Here in the sweltering sun, there is not even a
sanitary lunch counter, and those “weeping willow”
trees could be shaped and trimmed.

Divisions should be made for the buses, tele-
WEEPING WILLOW.

Peace

The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—After reading a letter recalling the name
and work of the great Mahatma Gandhi, it is
well that this noble man be remembered at this
time, and that his spirit may prevail as a “Dove
of Peace” to this troubled world.

Let all nations live as brothers for the sake of
Gandhi, remember his plea non-violence, his re-
ward, immortality.

It is still time, as the writer states, it is still not

phone booths, ete.

Let the nations live in peace, let all hate and
PEACEMAKER.

Bright 21

The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—In a speech by one of the Hon. Members
against Adult Suffrage, I read:
does a youngster of 21 have of life which would
make him capable of casting his vote, etc.”, a&d
again the Hon, member speaks of “boys at 21 etc.”
In my opinion a young man of that age could
bright and well versed citizen and be
quite fit to vote on his country’s behalf.
by the boys of fifteen who are wage-earners in
quite a ripe age |
for almost any position, and such a person could |

warfare cease.

“What knowledge |



was capable
a young man in |p
Pa

high office, and
should be more so

Tins Veg:

TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1950



Usually NOW
Tins MORTONS JAM—(1-lb.) 38 34

SALAD & MAYONAISE .. 48 43

Tins ORANGE &

GRAPE FRUIT JUICE ....

SERVE DELICIOUS SOUPS





CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S FRENCH CAPERS—per bot. .35

” ” CURRIE POWDER—per bot... .56
” ” CALVES FEET JELLY—per bot. .44
” ” MUSHROOM SOUP—per tin... .23
” ” WHITE VINEGAR—per bot. .. 45
ARMOUR’S SPAGHETTI & CHEESE—per tin ..... a
” CELERY & OXTAIL SOUP—per tin...... 24
” MOCK TURTLE SOUP—per tin.......... 22
SMEDLEYS GARDEN PEAS—per tin.................. 39
HESRINGS IN TOMATO SAUCE—per tin.............. 33



SUNNIWITE WASHING POWDER
For Clothes, Dishes and Pans etc.
Reduced from 19c., to 12c.



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LOW-DOWN SUITES
HIGH-UP SUITES
CAST-IRON BOXES

W.C. PANS “S” & “P” TRAPS

WHITE LAVATORY SEATS

BASINS—22 ins. x 16 ins. & 25 ins. x 18 ins.
(with or without Pedestals)
SINGLE and DOUBLE DRAIN BOARDS and SINKS

SINGLE ALUMINUM DRAINBOARDS
ALUMINUM SINKS—24 ins. x 16 ins. & 30 ins. x 18 ins.

GALVANISE SINKS
PORCELAIN SINKS

COPPER PIPE — 4 ins., ¥% ins., 34 ins., 1% ins., and

FITTINGS

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SUCCESSORS TO

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Dial 4472 & 4687

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For The Gentlemen

A Small Shipment of:

GENTS RAINCOATS

By CHAS. McINTOSH



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MOSQUITO NETTING 90” & 108” wide

a :: ALSO:;:

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for Single and Double Beds



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DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

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CEREALS

Puffed Wheat, Muffets,

Cream of Wheat, Rolled

Oats, Weet-a-bix



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Prunes, Pineapple, Apricots,
Plums, Fruit Salad in pkgs.



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Anchor Butter, Hams Cut,
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Black Currant Jam





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Vegetable Salad in Mayo-
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Beans, String Beans, Cucum-
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DESSERTS

Jellies 5 flavours
Dessert Powders 3 flavours
Sago





TRY “GOLD BRAID” RUM

with a







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PEO,



—.

_=—_



' TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1950

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SUGAR MEMORANDUM

@ From Page 4
Is it not better politically to spynd
the money in tair prices, rather
than in grants, and thus see a
friendly West Indies moving to
political adulthood? You desire
full employme.t for your people
here, and your exports are to be
bought by the british Caribbean,
the economy of which is com-
plementary to your own,

Not Consistent

The policy. of His Majesty's
Government does not appear to
be consistent. On the one hans
we have its declared policy to get
away from exploitation into &
position of trusteeship, extending
into partnership. We have the
Development and Welfare Acts
and the Federation proposals for
the British West Indies and British
Guiana. We have strong economic
ties between the United Kingdom
and the West Indies and British
Guiana, particularly in currency
control conditions which in effect
require the Colonies to buy from
the United Kingdom at high un-
controlled: prices. On the other
hand here is His Majesty's Gov-
ernment planning that the British
‘West Indies should sell cheap a
portion of their sugar crop, or not
produce it at all—His Majesty's
Government preparing the ground
for a retraction in the British
West Indies Me rege oe the

e’s standard 0 iving is
eed distressingly low and
bears no comparison whatever
with standards in the United
Kingdom.

As a result of Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Schemes,
Colonial budgets are being severe-
ly overtaxed by new additions and
pmenities to the structure of West
Indian society. While these ad-
ditions have been created in the
first instance by grants from His
Majesty’s Government (partly in
an endeavour to overcome the ill-
effects of past artificially low
sugar prices) the permanent estab-
lushments which have accrued as
a result must now be met by a
very substantial increase in the
recurrent revenues of these
Colonies.

Take the Federation proposals:
concurrent with this attack upon
the social welfare problems of cur
area, there has been an expansion
of the political privileges of the
people in the new constitutions
which have been granted to
several of the territories during
the same period. The West Indian
people have come to regard all
these as indicative of a new desire
on the part of His Majesty’s Cov-
ernment to recognise the legitimate
claims of these territories for an
increased margin of self-govern-
ment. In view of this enlighten-
ed policy, is His Majesty's Gov-
ernment going to fail to grant
these colonies an absolute min-
imum of economic security on
which to build a structure of
political stability? What of these
Federation proposals so carefully
and energetically fostered by His
Majesty’; Government? What
chance for these, calling for in-
creased overall Government. ex~
ee ture, in a retracting British

Indian economy?
Self-Supporting

It is admitted that the Federa-
tion must be self-supporting to be
successful. Yet it has been shown
that during the initial years it will
be impossible for the Federal
Government to dispense with
certain subsidies from the United
Kingdom; even on the basis that
the price of British West Indies
exports covers cost of production.
if there is a collapse in the price

of Colonial produce then the
Federation will be still-born.
The Grenada coriference took

the view that the impasse which
had been reached in the sugar
negotiations could not be discon-
nected from the grave political
repercussions which inevitably
must follow from it. Are those of
us who have had faith in the good
intentions of His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment to be gravely and bitterly
disillusioned?

This matter cannot be treated as
a mere business transaction and
the concern of the Ministry ot
Food alone, though even on this
pasis the West Indies should have
better treatment. This is not a
mere matter of His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment bargaining with someone
who has come to sell them food,
We are Colonial territories and
His Majesty's Government 1s
therefore responsible for our wel-

re.
tame broad view which we sub-
mit should be taken as follows.
The United Kingdom requires
2,750,000 tons of sugar for ane
consumption. Of this 500,00
tons of sugar is produced at home

at a high cost (£47 per ton in 1949
as against £29. 5. 0d. for B.W.1
sugar). We admit that there may
be strategic reasons for this, and
therefore shall not press the point
eny further except comment
that it is not reasonable to measure
efficiency by cost when the sugar
the United Kingdom produces is

to





sO expensively produced. T!
sull remains 2,250,000 tons re-

quired to satisfy local consumptior
in England. It is submitted in al!
seriousness that the whole of this
quantity should be reserves
production in the Empire

So far as the West Indies are
concerned, (and we are sure that
other colonial areas hold the same
view), we have the land, the
manpower and the technical
knowledge to produce 1,800,000
tons at reasonable eosts, and it
would undoubtedly be far more
Satisfactory to let this develop-
ment take place, rather than to
allow unemployment to obtain in
the Colonies; and then have all
the difficulties which accrue from
economic distress,

for

For many decades the Colenies
have undoubtedly suffered from a
lack of economic stability, Con-
demned as they are to an agricul-
tural destiny with its difficulties
due to diseases, pests, droughts
and floods, the one element which
they need is financial stability.
It appears to us that this stability
can be obtained by reserving the
British market for Colonial- and
Dominions production.

There can therefcre be no
justifiable reason why there should
be limitation on colonial produc-
tion so as to leave room for the
purchase of foreign sugar especi-
ally when as in the past that
Sugar has been = marketed’ at
dumped prices. This, as we see it,
is the broad picture and the policy
which we submit would give the

highest result in happiness and
contentment in our part of the
colonial empire.

Hardships

During the Past seventy years
the colonies have suffered untold
hardship because of economic in-
stability, and it certainly seems
to us that the time mas come when
the uncertainties and distress of
the past should be dealt with on a

more lasting basis. We are tired of |

having commission after commis-
sion visiting the West Indies and
British Guiana, each reporting on
the economic distress of those colo-
nies and stating in the plainest
possible language that this dis-
tress is the result of the lack of a
staple price for sugar. A further
point which should be stressed
here is that whatever may be the
justification for the purchasing
of U.K. sugar in pre-war years
at the cheapest possible price, the
whole economic basis of dealings
between the U.K. and the Colo-
nies has been completely altered
by the exchange control measures
which are in force in Great
Britain and which are applied

considerations which applied in
the past can no longer be applic-
able. If at the present time, and
it appears likely for many years
to come, the Colonial markets are
largely reserved for U.K. manu-
facturers based on _ production
costs, we are entitled to ask that
there should be reciprocity in this
regard and that the U.K. sugar
market should be reserved for
Colonial production on the same
terms.

offer an
relationship between the
and the Colonies eeser

This seems to us to
ideal
U.K.
which their economies can
complementary to each other.

Coming now to the offer of His
Majesty’s Government, the B.W.1.
Sugar Association has under great
pressure accepted an overall
restriction of export production
to 900,000 tons. Having accepted
this restriction it is our view that
the whole of this quantity should
have a guaranteed market in the
U.K. at reasonably remunerative
prices. In as much however as
the B.W.I. Sugar Association has
made further concessions by offer-
ing to accept a guaranteed market

for only 725,000 tons, we are of |

the opinion that this is the mini-
mum quantity which should be
accepted. The latest 1950 estimate
of B.W.I. sugar exports is some
40,000 tons.

ei We do not come to the Mother
Country and ask for this guar-
antee on 725,000 tons as 4 con-
cession, but as a just settlement of
this question which is so vitally
important to us. AS representa-
tives of our people, it is our duty
to ask for this settlement. As
representatives of your people and
responsible fer the Colonies, we
trust that you will see it your duty
to meet this request.





Obituary
Mrs. Alice Skinner

The death occurred at her resi-
dence Aberdeen, Bank Hal} Cross
Road on Saturday evening at the
age of 86 years, of Mrs. Alice
Henry Skinner widow of the late
Brandford Skinner.

Mrs. Skinner who was of ad-
vanced years had not been active
for somé time but maintained the
friendships which she had made
years ago and continued the in-
terest which she had always
taken in general welfare. She
was a loving mother of the Vic-
torian School of thought and de-
manded, from her children stand-
ards of conduct in keeping with
middle class society. Outside the
family circle she maintained a
wide circle of friends who always
sought her advice and genial com-
pany. She carried her years
lightly and despite the accom-
panying ills was blessed with 4
fund of good humour which al-
‘ways made her an agreeable com-
panion. Her husband predeceased
her about 35 years ago

She leaves to mourn their loss



two daughter Miss Leigh Skin-
ner, Headmistress of St. Matthews
Girls’ School, Mrs, D. A. M



Haynes and Mr. Carlton Skin
of New York formerly Mar
of the Bridgetown Ice C
in this island. To these a





sorrowing members of \
deepest sympathy i b c-
tended.

IMPORTS
YESTERDAY

The S.S. C. G. Thulin arrived
here yesterday to take a load of
2,950 barrels of molasses for

Boston and New York.
Before starting to load, the
vessel discharged packages of

shoes, flashlight batteries, hosiery
and personal effects which it
loaded at Trinidad’

The Thulin will be sailing today
via the British Northern Islands
for Boston and New York.

Over 3,000 loose and 23 bags of
cocoanuts were among the cargo
arriving at Barbados by schooner
over the week-end.

This supply was brought by the
sehooners Adalina and W. L.
Eunicia which arrived from St.
Luéia and Dominica respectively.

These schooners also brought
bags of charcoal, copra and fresh
fruit.



“Constructor”

Refloated

From Our Own Correspc

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 3.



The Canadian National Steam-
ship Canadian Constructor which
ran aground off
Grenada, since
flog today. The





rigorously in the Colonies. Under
these changed circumstances the

|

|

November 24
Is Opening Day

For 4th W.I. Conference

FORT-DE-FRANCE, Martinique,
June, 28

A standard operating procedure
regarding the invitation to obser

»jVvers to technical conferences wa

among the items adopted at the
tenth meeting of the Caribbean
Commission. The Secretary
General of the Commission was
authorised to invite publi
agencies and research institutions
to send observers, or eminent

seientists to attend as individuals,
after consultation with the Chair~-
man and Deputy Chairman of th
Research Council,

Governments, not members of
the Caribbean Commission, may
also be invited to send delegates er
observers, subject to the approva!
of the member governments

Fourth Session

The Commission considered the
question of invitations to obser
vers at the West Indian Confer-
ence (Fourth Session). It was
agreed that international organi-
sations such as the United Nations
the Food and Agriculture
Organisation of the United Nation
and the International Laboue
Office, which had participated 140
the preparation of documentation
for the West Indian Conference,
should be invited to send obser-
vers. In addition, other institu-
tions, such as research organisa-
tions or universities could, at
their request, be also invited.

The Commission took note of
the decisions reached by the
International Telegraph and Tele-
phone Conference held in Pat):
Jast year. It was decided at thut

conference that new telephone
regulations with lower tariffs
should be applied to countries
within the European system us

from July 1, 1950.

Lowest Tariffs

This document was considered
by the Commission as a result ct
a recommendation of the West
Indian Conference (Third Session)
that the lowest standardised tele-
graph and radio telephone tariffs
should be introduced as soon as
possible in the Caribbean area

It was also agreed that the next
meeting of the Commission
would take place in Curacao on
November 24, 1950 and that the
opening session would commence?
prior to the Fourth Session of the
West Indian Conference and the
closing sessions would follow
this Conference.

re inds
igh Wind
. re

Sweep City

Many women walking in Broad
Street yesterday were embarrass-
ed when their hats were blown
off by the high winds... Some did
not take-any chances and walked
with their hands firmly holding
the crown of their hats.

The men: also had difficulty in
keeping their hats on their heads
One-hawker while passing through
Broad Street with a tray packed
with sweets on her head, sufferea
the worst when a big gust of
wind tilted the whole tray over
thus causing everything to scatter
on the side walk.

Swearing under her breath she
however quickly picked up every-
thing and started to rearrange
her tray

Case Adjourned

Ragena Ifill of Vaux Hall, Christ
Church, was yesterday charged
before Mr. C. Walwyn of receiv-
ing a quantity of cloth valued at
17/- the property of Elsie Evans
knowing the same to be stolen
or unlawfully obtained. The
offence was committed on June
15. The case Was adjourned until
July 13.

H.P.C. 25 Gill said on June 19
about 1,30 p.m. in consequence of
@ report received he went to
Chapel Street with Randolph Au-



gustine, On reaching a certain
place Randolf showed him a

woman (Tfll) and told him in her
presence that she was the woman
whom he soid two pieces of dress

material which he had _ stoler
from his mother. Ifill denied it.
He then asked her to come to
the station with him.

During the’ course of his in-
vertigations a statement was
made by Ifill. Other statements
wert iven by witnesses and
| Ifill then charged.

Elsie Evans said she is a dresa

maker and recently she has lost

some cloth. Recently she saw
two pieces which she identified
and valued at 17/6.



CHARGED WITH THEFT

ic] Lee Browne of Brereton

Sami
Village, St. Philip

came before

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
yesterday on the charge of steal-
one gold ring valued at £16.



i3.¢; f the dwelling house of
Niels P ation and the prop-
erty of Dorothy MacKenzie. He
was remanded until July 7 and

the offence was. committed some-
time between June 30 and July 1.



Plane In Trouble

A British four engine aeroplane
with 15 persons aboard while on

was developing engine troubles.
according to a cablegram received
at the local Harbour and Ship-
ping Department.

All ships in the vicinity of 14
00 North 78.00 West have
advised and have been requested

» to listeri on 500 kilocycles for the

aircraft Gagnu.





What's on Today

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.60 a.m
Meeting of House of Assem-
bly at 12 noon.
Meeting of Legislative at 200 |
p.m i
Water Polo Practice Match, |
Aquatic Club at 5.00 p.m
Mobile Cinema, Carmichael’s
} Pasture, St
P-m

George at 7.30

{
ee eel

a flight from Balboa to Kingstowr-

=

eee eeee eee
/ SSR eeeeeeeeeeeeen



C.J. Opens July

Grand Sessions

THE JULY SITTING of the Gourt of Grand Sessions opened
with the usual ceremony at 10 a.m. yesterday, His Honour|'°*5*S Which have never pefore
the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Collymore, presiding. Most ot

s spent with the taking of pleas, Miss M
stant Legal Draughtsman, representing the



the day v

Bourne, As:

Crown.

the Grand Jury completed their
consideration of the Bills of Ind
ment yesterday evening, and were
discharged by the Chief
with the thanks of the colony for
their services, and with his con-
gratulations for the despatch with
which they had done their work.





There are 34 cases on the Calen-
dar, of which two are for murder
and one is for manslaughter.

The Chief Justice in his Charge
to the Grand Jury said :—





F ; a ice her four-month-old
Mr, Foreman and Gentlemen of abie man would know that they | a: died at about 4.00 p.m
the Grand Jury, were likely to result in death
In case there are any of you serious bodily hurt error reno 7,
who ar: serving for the first time P eed , Dr. Manning of the St. ‘Thomas
on the Grand Jury and as a re- Malice oro. DET LAs eA et a eee
minder to others I shall briefly In these cases you may find the mortem examination yesterday and
explain your duties to you. You existence of express cebine that }oc, attributed death to natural
“9 . causes
is to say that the wicked intention | > . 35 . . oe
“~~~ is also evidenced by threats on the ro ee > wake ae
. ae part of the accused. er a a ee
Assize Diary In case No. 3 a chauffeur is}V®* ‘eported by Mrs. Edwara
‘ charged with manslaughter by} @°#min of “Kingsley”, Graeme
TUESDAY 4 negligent driving of a motor Hall Terrace, She stated that it
No, 12 — R v Francis [ vehicle. If the facts and circum-[ Vs removed from her bedroom
Walters, stances reveal a probable case of }ecently.
No. 13 — R v Francis driving with a wanton disregard HOUSE at Industry Hall, St.
Walters. of human life and safety you Philip valued $650 was com-
No. 18 — Rv Willys should return a true bill. pletely destroyed by fire at about
Watson, The remaining cases should]}).00 p.m. on Saturday, It is in-
No. 30 — Rv Allan present no difficulties but should shies, ; and ae a: ied. by
Fieids, any arise I shall be pleased to give | \yij.)y Hutel Paes
WEDNESDAY any assistance you require. Arthur ute hinson : }
No. 22 — RB v_ Eric ‘ it is reported to the Police that
Thompsoa & Two Bound Over the house caught fire after a as
Arnett Bourse. tainp blew up.
Ne. 25 —— R v Mignonne Two prisoners who pleaded FIRE OF UNKNOWN origin
Graham. guilty of wounding and both of broke out at Spring Hal
| ey wae ae by Mr. Plantation, St. Lucy, and destroyea
Me . alco .C. were bounc quanti‘y of first crop youn
= , ie k over in the sum of £25 with a chika h le i acre o ahaha
are to consider such bills of in- + A eee ers Seed

aictment as shall be placed before
you, examine the witnesses for the
prosecution, or such of them as
you may consider necessary, and
decide whether a prima facie case
has been made out against the
accused,

Probable Guilt

A prima facie case is made out
when the prosecution has estab-
lished by evidence the probable
guilt of the accused. You are not
concerned with the defence, and
you are not entitled to examine
the witnesses for the defence. A
true bill cannot be returned against
a prisoner unless a majority of at
least twelve of you so decide.

The Calendar for your consider-







ation consists of thirty four indict-
ments as under :—
Murder 2
Manslaughter 1
Wounding with intent 5
Causing grevious bodily harm with
intent 1
Robbery with violence 1
Burglary 1
Burglary and Lareeny 2
Housebreaking and Larceny ,
Shopbreaking and Larceny 3
Building breaking sad Lirveny 1
Larceny 7
1
Forgery 2
Falsification of accounts 1
Delaying au Postal Packet 1
Murder

In cases Nos. 1 and 2 in which
persons are charged with murder,
the alleged facts and circumstances
naturally differ but the law appli-
cable in both cases is the same.
Murder is the wilful killing of a
reasonable person, in, being and



Suffrage Bill Goes
Back To Council

The Bill to amend the Representation of the Peoples Act
dealing with the abolition of property qualification for mem-
bership to the House of Assembly, the granting of Adult

Suffrage and the reduction

members of the House to form
come up for consideration in the Legislative Council today

Among other matters likely to
be dealt with is a Bill to settle the
rates of income tax for the year
1950, and to make provision for
certain other matters in connec-
tion with the levying of the said
tax and to amend the law relating
to Income Tax, .

A Bill to amend the Customs
Tariff Act, 1921,

This Bill seeks in order to en-
courage the industry of manufac-
turing cloth from cotton yarn etc.,
now being undertaken by the
West Indian Knitting Mills, to
reduce the amount of duty pay-
able on imported cotton yarn ete.,
and to allow the duty free impor-
tations of machinery and appara-
tus to be used in the manufacture
$ such cloth from cotton yarn
ete,

A Bill to vest a certain parcel of
land in the parish of St. John, with
the Chapel of St. Mark, the Par-
sonage House, and other building
and the burial ground, in the Lord
Bishop of Barbados and the Rector



of St. John and their respective
successors in office upon certain
trusts.

A Resolution to make it lawful
for a Vestiy to lease land within
their parish for any period not
exceeding 21 years and that any
such lease shall be binding on the
successive Vestries of the said
parish.

House of Assembly

The House may resume discus-
sion on the second reading of the
Bill to amend the law relating to
Separation and Maintenance

Another matter on which there
may be lengthy discussion, is the
Bill to abolish grand juries and to
amend the law relating to the pre-

been ,

| t

|
‘BuvsT

Bice Your Supply ‘rom .
H.

Justice

| Ota ahahaha a ata a sate

ARRIVED-

A FRESH SHIPMENT OF _.

M purRINA POULTRY CHOWS

JASON JONES & CO.,
Distributors.

|t
E

under the King’s peace with malice] U
atorethought, express or implied
By malice is meant a wicked in-
tention to kill or do some serious
bodily injury which in the con-
templation of a reasonable person
would be likely to result in the loss
of life or limb or to cause
permanent or serious injury.

In the cases before you the evi
dence will show that the acts
which caused the fatal injuries
were of such a nature and done

K

some

with such weapons that a reason-| ! «

surety in a similar amount to keep
the peace and be of good behaviour
for 18 months, They were,
Alphonso Rowe, fisherman of St.
Lucy and Eileen Layne, married
woman of Christ Church. Both
had previous clean records, and

V

Mr. Walcott after explaining the
circumstances in which the
offences had been committed

asked the Court to be lenient.

econ

ay mornu

atural ca

> UGENE CODRINGTON of

and two acr

Polo Begins

Wedne

ZULU SEASON
Weanesaday alte

hionea ela a

played in this exciting game
it will be interesting to see how
He mounts—-most c¢

imported anc

Ken to the saddl

rw Hew experience.

|

MURTY - FOUR

Jerome Cheeseman of Villa
oad, St. Michael, died suddenly
his residence at about 11 p.m,
Sunda A post mortem: ex-



was
ng by Li
death was
uses,

4

Walkes Spring r








three quarters of an acre of trash
s of sour grass
i,



alue is unestimate
RTHUR PIERC
Hill, St.
the General



Josey

Hos




from injuries, and wag detained

Pierce was inv

accident with the motor ear O-10,
whned by L. Cools of Spa Hall, St.
Joseph and driven by

performed



sday

BEGINS

rnoon







on
with a

na many new

4 which
i had
e

have
to be
respond to

- YBAR-OLD

yester-
Hi. L. Massiah
attributed to

eported to the

The

E of Fruitfui
yh, was taken
pital suffering
oived

in un

Leroy Mur-

The Chief ere postponed |ray of the same address, along}
sentence on inston Bradshaw | ~:. ‘orde: ; .
who pleaded guilty of receiving a ' ae oe eee at sont ph
light meter knowing it to have NX’ _ ACCIDENT occurred on |
been stolen or unlawfully obtaine: & Spooners Hill over the week-
Sentence was also postponed in| ©! between one bicycle owned
the case in which Etta Harewood |?Â¥ Newton Phillips of Storey Gap,
pleaded guilty on three counts of |Codrington Hill, and ridden by
a falsification of accounts indict-]St. Clair Neblett of the same
ment. She was represented by|address, and another owned by
Mr. EB, K. Waleott K.C. Bustace Phillips of White Hall and
ridden by Lionel Nurse of the
Goes And Comes same address. Both bicycles were
tamed
Joseph Webster who told the ae

Court he was a seaman who “goes
and comes”, pleaded guilty of re-

HE MOTOR CAR G-44, owned

and driven by

ceiving stolen property in two : ,
different cases. He also pleaded slightly damaged a
guilty of being a habitual criminal, |Yolved in an ac

Sentence was postponed,
he is not a Barbadian.
His Honour also postponed sen-
tence in the case in which David }!
Cheeseman, St. George fisherman, |!
pleaded guilty of housebreaking
and larceny.
Norman Weir

He said

was discharged

he was charged was not a “true
bill’.

The Court will resume its sit-
ting at 10 a.m. to-day.

den by Randolph Holder of

Alleyne’s Land, Passage Road,
. |
was extensively damaged after
colliding with the motor car 'T-72,
vned by Jartiett Edwards of
Vault Road, St. Thomas and driven
Ly Frederick Gill of Airy Cot
The accident occurred or. White
of the present number of 12|Perk Road

a quorum, to 9, may again

Session, there was no hearing of |
sentment of indictrnents when it es in the Court of Appeal}
comes up for its second reading, | yesterday, a normal day on which |

The House may discuss Mr.|cnses are scheduled to be heard.|
Miller’s Address to the Governor |The Court yard and building were!
relating to the right of landlords | packed with people who turned
to eject within seven days or a|up to see the parade which formal. |
month, occupiers of lots on which opened the Session |

chattel houses are erected









c
week-end,

Pasture tonight
after the Grand Jury found that /residents of the Carmichael’s area
the Bill of Indictment under which }o{ St. George.

Rive

J

ottawe Road, St




give a

for



Last night a
1at St

priv




shop was broken a
Friday night, and
goods to the value

removed

BICYCLE, OW

NHARLES GOODING, a waiter)

Houses,
nickel-plated

show at

n Lucy’s Almshouse
ILFRED YEARWOOD of
Bank Hall reported that his

ECAUSE OF THE STIR which
attended the opening of Grand}

, John Meb.

Heath of Newbury, St. George was

fter being in-
‘cident along

George over the

Also involved was a_ bicycle
idden by ‘Teddy Harding of
ra Hill, St. Joseph

HE MOBILE CINEMA will

Carmichael’s
the benefit of

ate show was

nd entered on
a quantity of
of $82.66 was

NED and rid-





Mr. Garner's requesting that the A at ht 7 Bebra. ~ 4 |
sum of £100,000 be appropriated ee ri t . teh valned|
from General Revenue for the $95. He stated that it was re.

e: tablishment of the Barbados moved from the ervant’s room
Development Company; and Mr, between 6.30 p.m. and 10 p.m. on |
Mapp’s relating to the fixing of a Friday
eae wage = employees " ;
sufficient to ensure them a reason-
able standard of living. Tit hip eae
|
|
‘ eae) LONDON, June 3.
7 2 Prime Minister Clement Attlee
The ‘Polick Ss lj likely to call Cabinet Minis~|
6 ; : jters to-morrow for further dis-
T y L U \ cussion of the Korean situation. |
qme Ss iP “informed quarters here said to-
| day.

Two days have passed since the | The Cubinet had latest report?
«xpiration of the time given the ‘before it at a meeting held for}
cwoer of the yaw! “Potie by. day and the subject was di
Government to have it reflouted| cussed at some Jength, meet=|
in the inner basin of the Careen-|ing of the Cabinet defence Com-}

ge, mittee on which service Chiefs-

The “Potick”, however, is yet|of-Staff and Service Ministers |

‘o be removed
the Careenage,

from the bed of
All covered with
moss and other marine growths,
the vessel can be seen with a
portion of its bow its
asts still above the water

It has been understood that the
chooner “Philip H. Davidson”,
hich has recently arrived here
rom British Guiana has been =|

and



aged to give assistance in
ing the vessel

It has not yet been decided wha
will be the next step taken either
by Government in the

matter
|

LTD.

”
se
a
he
ki



4

sit will also be called this week. |

—Reuter |





22 ies,

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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE UZ UESDAY, JULY 4, 1956
rr A —_———







ets hn TE Ft
HENRY —_

FOR MORE AND BETTER

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M SIC

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FROM LOOKING
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TAKING A
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AY

n 2

Vv

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roms th

Because of their economy too,

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| RASSLED ALL OVER > i THE RING. THATS WHY / CALLED / WAS MIXED UP /N++SO/HAD % x
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} PEDAL RUBBERS CHROME-PLATED RIMS 3}

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e | ETEND TO \SURE THEY WILL?) | WE CAN RUN MY TRIBE +« y | SADDLES Peon Jooy ane AND $
, ee _.| |BE THAT STATUE~/ THEY'RE A BUNCH | |COLLECT MILLIONS IN f x RIM TAPES TUBES 28” x 1} %
"THIS WOBU TELL: COMETOLIFE? 4 OF IGNORANT | |GOLDAND JEWELS. IT ALL WOBU DECIDED To nu 8 PATCH STRIPS 26” x 3° RACING COVERS AND %
WE GOT AN OLE t [rae THEY WONT FALL.’ SAVAGES. NOT CAME TO ME WHEN 1 ; LOOT THE JUNGLE 1} ee x READIFIX PATCHES TUBES 26” x 114” %
Lop elle hy A FOR THAT. 5 (EIJICATED* LIKE | |SEENYOU IN THAT ws MAT DIP YOU DO, |_| B LONG AND MIDGET CARRIER COVERS AND
peop ie D \% OUTFITS TUBES 26” x 134” ¥
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HIM IN THAT {i g VALVE RUBBER |
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GUTFIT. AUTO BATTERIES ($ SPECIAL PRICES TO DEALERS %
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8



TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEV

CLASSIFIED ADS. |__rensenat | Workers Reis | France Gets | HARBOUR 106

sini ephane tne Wages Policy ar
ouBIRTHDAY GREE . 3 eo A New Govt. in Carlisle Bay















° Voit @are-your
















































































































































































































































































































































































































TINGS i 4 . a i ec Frode L t nd mysel! |

HER 2 Mr ke Mrs: | FOR RENT | ccaponaivie to pot uot myset’ | AND CRIPPS IS PLEASED

J len of Retr St. George “ apy debt or debts in my name PARIS y ) Ill, Sch, Harriet Whéttake 7 A ~r’

on Wednesd: ist J 1 th g =| : fer signed by me LONDON, July 3 Premier Me Queue 3 Se walcon, Vachs Launder, Sct H(7 8 ats Us

mother and so “ KE TH VAUGHAN | cellor of the Exchequer Sir!) formed a new re ht |: , Sch. Mary M

i ( i ew ( hose S
; - : Cripps today gave his . a se whe s H. Davidson, Seh. WN
' St, Pete : mors so tinge alr has ise Rete Wolfe, Sch. By . ry
‘ Se eae : I lhe ec END 2 we the ree f th cialist tre ch Louise. Set. Raster Bei, Sct: Omori ‘6, rt
Pa ‘ e y stonewall, | “7 nnn enn de Union Leaders The. Govermnént “seeay. receive | Lm Sch Marea Henrietta, Sci
AD la 1 at . t va ic are e ed against > yy ome laxatior ‘ ; 7 z ’ 4 ae, Soh Loandeyd lu. Sc’
W. H. B: wth / Belleville ailable Aus t. RA 1 t ‘ PE ne retaxatior the | its first crucial test in the Nationa he , hb. Betieen, Gea. Wenrs
at 1.30 a.m, today. Fune i | ‘ f Bile I do not ges pegging policy. But, he told! Assenibly tomorro\ D, Wallace ;
the lute h_ Avenue, | ‘ e else | the of Commons “we can-| The new Cabinet former Seer Ae
Belleville, at 4.30 pan, t tt | yet pe ace Be rd anything but a limited | day eight days after George !« fue flee ”
W. MW. BRYAN Giushana. | t | of ot relaxation of the ¥ Ridault’s Government pplec M WP dons net, Coot
eg “et ea C4 GREFFITH, | 7 tandards laid dawh after’ could be defeated tomorro the Naveen
J - nna Patriol e 5 fis & Co." Solicit rel devalua * ; . : N ay 98 toms net
months Last. ight. ; TI € Tu ud k Te tone Geis. r | ere Assembly votes ag Queullle | ca» Fase : tr a eee ee :
will leave “Charleston,” Progressive | 25.6.60—-t.f.n | 4.7.50. —2n. | ae 1 en some technical 1e "ss. ¢. CG. Twlin, 1a7 net
Tand. “Bank Hall, at 420 pis weday | 25.6.50—t.f * ss i | He added: “If we were now tc The oan ae an Pe = ce wualia et ee e
for the Westbury © y b ai against | abandon this policy (of restraint) . oe > . . DEPAF TUR" 3
LEON and DAPHNE LASHLEY (Parents) ' t rance Year- | we should set in motion a wave'ot "©™ eee has had little tc Schooner Maren Hen “et*a, 48 tor
van T ’ ee ee WV oid my-/|influction whic coy A ’ do with rance's foreigr r0lic) et, Selby. for ®. Luci
ee LE ceaieeiis ata rT nsit jinn C ch would do v . . na a eg PUBLIC NG FECES ing 2 Cry debts in my} ereat harm to our ecconon TY 'Toreign Minister Robert Schuma MV. ©. KK Serwice VIL. 96 ton
IN MEMORIAM dae a ee we ie eee tN sie! Slee ; nomiy ane has been kept in hi t indica. | Pt Cem. Walte, for British Guiana
In ever loving memory of our dear} = = = , : , ee ne ss i wie cnaatt the | ting that his pl t 1 SS. end Giedeane, 408 tam
= ‘i ~ = Pay | 7 | workers’ ; Geered a an arene son, Roger | SAINT VINCENT WEEKLY als ‘ HAM! i YRARWOOD Nurope coal lee 2106 tons net, Capt
28th of June, 1947 . coe Now makes possible ide Aion | Sir Stafford’s statement cope neg | Government ba for Trinidad
Dear re > WwW ot 3 . 7 es a, 1a We " ‘ The eting 0 : . : : mye rer mre cn oe
Senet ee me tn eile ah taicaaainind : 0, § SSR Se Sener Sot ine | a ese ee pint ate Setmea} Gu Vath Wel Ghetiabes | ..., 4 ey Sane Ser ee ee ere
When this earthly life is o'er | RATHO MILL TOWER HOTEL his to notify the general pubtie|to be ¢ a ted PRES SRRNES es ly ; _ a ain ¥ » h Was Fepessed | will anower this question in years to come
4 pnt ! t vers to be tre storms of Tr: n > ne . c “- ‘

Where. the: Saved ones praising Jecus | St. Vincent tI mhhs te Tor aay dettt | Tsnit roubled by storms of Trade} when _ the rencn Cl ame. | Stati | For further infermation apply:—

So Sk bepee aden ence sunny “CARIBBE j or debts contr Snyone, Wher. | Union discontent on wage issues.| Delegates went home to get thei Coast Station UNITED INVESTORS CO, LIMITED,

Oh that will be joyful when we meet BEE ever in my name unless by written| _ Already 4,500 London. meat| Governments’ opinions on __ the | -riters

te part no more on-the-sea Bequia Island dae ake i | distributi etal a ee | areata a. 3 CABLE and Wireless (W.I.) Limited Insurance Underwriters,
Jean (mother) Eloise (Grand-mother). | fers all that can be desired. Beaut!- SULLIVAN, | Scottis jon workers and 2,000) *rench proposal for overall inter-| sgvise that they can now communicate Marhill Street, City
4.7.50.—1n_ | ful scenery, sea-bathing, fishing, exce! aid ' | Scottish miners are on strike jr} national authority to control the| with the following ships through their Sc aertem ete a a eenedaliadn
ss Se 7 ot ae Lor RATES $4 t H ; Pay disputes. | pest They meet here again today, | Barbados Coast Station
n Loving Memory of my dear Son, 7 - ay. ‘or further detail } } 1 R Compl ts at Frar ss orman Diet; SS. Archimede
Winston Morrison, wh« , and reservations. ; euter, jf omplaints about Frar neWiss ¢ tia ; , 3. Ga
1g. op has Plan dlrs Dich Ne ERROL G. ROOK ees 4.7.50.—2n. | | Government are expected to come | spene: 8 Bolan ea. taelona

He is gone can never be forgotten Box 47, THE public he . vse’ males | ‘ from the left side of the Assembly.| 5.5. Brasil: 5.5 Esperanza; |

Of my son I love so di Saint Vincent. g credit to anyone i 5 1am . | Socialists who refused to join dis-{S5 "oe Ss | Dutra: SS. |

And TI think of him eve mom nt. 13.6.50—26n. withowt’ = “written oler simed bY sms Ch mote, like tw w Mini 7 a Esso Bethlehem; S.S. Southern Cities; | — $$ mer

When I go to kneel in prayer’ ——$———— : at hoke elf responsible ines¢ | Bke tWo Rew. Niinistex They are} s.s. Loide Veneruela; 8.8. Campante;

Wilhelmina Morrison, moth r . : ss F former Premier Paul Reynaud who|S.S Egidias SS. Del Sud; S.S.. MONTR 1 - ot. se
Ocnr M oat Qn her, ee ior ed on ich orders " ke th tM MM e's Fort Townst 4 ss IONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEA ———— a a

scar Morrison, father and amily 4 ITZGERA - takes the new post o inister o VLAN . or ownshend; § 5.5.) LAND L f LTD., N.Z. LINE’ °
Neiee Patricia Morrison, brether NOTICE mn be ar . D 9 Attack P > . , se t i o ister of San Clara; S.S. Uruguay; 8.8. Estero; | . “ : ™ 4 '
sister Elce and Evelyn Best.4.7 oie Gaipgpenenieneeasensnaenpietsanenirateriai hb ec | State for Associated States and 5S 8u ~wel: SS. Lord Gladstone; | ° 5 “CITY OF DIEPPE" sails r M.V. “Daer i” will jl

spelen: “wees All umpives are requested to attend| THE public are hereby warned against S jthe Far East, and Paul Giacobbi|s.S. Sprut; S.8. Cape Sable; 8.8. | Ad lide May 29th. Melbourne Jun: ona BerWwoon” .wF |
_,i@ loving memory of my dear husband | to-day's (Puesdes) meeting he Chal-} giving credit my wife OEMNTA n tatement Minister of State for Civil Service. | Surwa!t: $8. Alar; S.S8. Lord Chureh; | 77d. Sydney June 4th, Brighane June qi] os oent Cars and Passen-
Frank Daniel who died Juty Sed, 1949 | Jenor stand at 4.50 p.m | RURROWES .” Semthorate st | Communists like them even less. |°°S: E¥*tatt: SS. Auris; 8.8. Dolores; | ‘ih arriving at Trinidad about July 21s! accept argo anc assen
eee sad memories of | Sew Umpires will be cordially wel-| not hold myself responsible for her GENEVA, July 3 | Both men are right wingers. Rey. is Nema e hb Seay eke /AMGE Seelsbeae aa: August {|| gers for St, Lucia, St. Vin
yne year ago, omed. : ee aitpenie Galak tasmbennta? pA ; OVA, y 3. | é r > S Yanvhi . Somerville Uy /Avguet she ty Augu or St ‘ a, St. -

It is not the tears at the moment shed, THE BARBADOS ‘CRICKET | ite die’ Yar ame less by a seelthasi At Z this afternoon's session of | naud is independent and Giacobbi. | Chyystanthy, Ss Rowallan Castle felbounne mid July. WN. Queensland fj}

Apa a ie hati is th oe — F. H erde gned b e , the United Nations Economic and|a member of Queuille’s Radical . . I - eh worn ae cooetee s, cote, Saving Tunas i ent, Grenada, Aruba. Sail-

Anc he grie: 1at is silently borne jOyOs, Signed ERROLD BURROWES, Sociz yy » ‘ Z a es i + . Mud irth | bout 9th Septembe: |

The blow was hard ithe shock severe Honorary Secretary — a Perel a wih cial Council, Chinese delegate | Socialist Group cr, | These weasels have ample spuce for | || Thursd: 5

ae, Diow wane Meme hel shack semere, y mare Village. Tsung Chi Yu, said that the coun- j SEAWELL ied, Hat Gieten wad genes carge,| ©, ie Thursday, 6th July.

so hear, 7 502n.) cil should go on reco s con- Cargo accepted on through bills \}
See Saleicienis tienbidael ats 4.7.50—2r i < ord as con i tht : corinne
y nat lost can te demning the recent statement of ~ + ! ssi 2 N cing with transhipment at Trinidad for t

We’ ps arti . é ta us : oO B k R ( ( ARRIVALS BY B.W.LAL 5 a By

Sper 20 be sameeniianed Oh we NOTICE a = | the Polish delegate that no decis- an ate vOCS ip From Antigu paawas d im wien ae | B Wit ooner owners

¥ 4.7.50—1n ions of the United Nations taken See), UACRANE: SAADNM, | : oem, CITC)
Application for one or more vacant WANTED in the presence of Chinese Nation- In Den mark , eer | FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD., | beep ees

Tn ever loving memory of our Dear | St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions at Har- | alist delegations were valid ‘ . FT Daksa | Agents, Trinidad {|
Aunt and Sister, Ellen Agatha Grant, | Tison College will be received by the | = “Repres fr. From Ciudad Trujill } DA COSTA & CO. LTD ,
who fell asleep on the ath of July, 1945. | Clerk of the Vestry up to 4 o'clock | epresentatives of satellite COPENHAGEN, July 3 Mune. hi | Agents, Barbados. ' 7? lll _===_ SS

The Saints of God, their vigil keep | P.m., on Wednesday July 12, 1950 HELP countries have made this sugge The Danish bank rate was in-| From Grenada

Til gon the Gust thes “an ah st vise donigeiees ia sraites T i neat st a t i tion a number of times, and other by one per cent to four \ M. Gordon, I, Bracho, M. Kay: |

e s sy too shall rise , ishioners in straitened circumstances an sistant to do Jeg: . Adon -s eve om > n 7 9

And soar triumphant to the skies must not be less than (9) nor more than office work en nave always remained f per cent by the Danish Sem La Guiara |

© happy Saints! rejoice and sing: (15) years of age on 30th June, 1950, nfidentially. P.O | Silent,” said Tsung Chi Yu National Bank today Respon i-| RG. Mares, R. G. Mar c. v |

He quickly comes, your Lord to be proved by a Baptismal Certificate 4.7.50. —3n . ble financial circles said the re: ; r . 2, Geo, Wilkinson, | ©

and King. which must accompany the application, | |——————— Indian delegate Sir R. Musalair |P'¢ “nancial circles said the rea : Wilkinson, Carel Wilkin- 0.

Ever to be remembered by Forms of application can be obtained A general SERVANT. Apply said while he agreed with the |*°" for the exceptional increase | ¢ , ; }
ane sarsen (sister) Sydney, at the Vestry Clerk's Office. Store 1 Swan Street 4.7.5 ‘-1Chinese delegate “when he gai y | was Denmark's deteriorated eco-
and Alfred Jordan. Evans, Leotia, Elsie, By Order E. C. REDMAN, | ss | Russia; * Sale| nomic situation as It of} From 1
Fred, Basil and Eric Willoughby Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry LADY—for the Office at Hotel Royal ussia and Eastern European |O™M!lc situation as a resu o rom Trinidad { Onc

4.7.50.—In. | Vestry Clerk's Office, Apply in writing and in person to the] countries should retur > wy. | devaluation Rosenn Kabk, Margaret Boland, Cons | ;
Parochial Buildi Manager 7.50—t.f.n turn to confer ad Boyce, Aline Roberts Jargeret |
Manage 50- s ~ ; ie ah i : ie : . 5

IN loving memory of my dear be- Blagtiown e's soe : ences, his delegation regarded the Lyder, Michael Simpson Aarjdtie | NEW ORLEANS SFR, 108
loved son LIONEL CLARKE who died | « : ix wed Bectetery wanted. Adu be canebae oe Government of China as } tyar Perkins. Muriel Rawlins, | sal arr.
on July 3rd 1949 |
Sad and udden was the call, NOTICE $110.00 per month, Hours 8.30 a.m.|as had already been stated by the CUSTOMS Bockus, 4 @lyn Backus, Baxbara Boc- ALCOA SANGER seth June 14th July

e des one lov vy 3 >m ree weeks 1 lic ‘ S« Satie Re + 7 m u we) % ’ an “OA R : os ;

Deke ct seo; Ho word ent. tall Tenders will be received by the under- |.) ie ere eee wrote ‘day 2'India Security Council meetings Dar Dorothy Parmer, Grace ‘Vieira, AMER ith Aug

Of the lost one we loved so well signed up to 12 noon Monday 17 July, ng shorthand and typing},.,/4€ Council then adjourned un- - fa Roy Vn Ore ee asids Doton YORK S"RVIOR

Days of sorrow still come o'er us 1950 for the construction of a Parochiai ‘ ence inistrative | til tomorrow morning a Senulor, Loulé floss, Nellie, Ross, Cyril Arr.

Secuppisenrs. do often Ses, Medical Officer's residence on lands at tonate Civil —Reuter Stoute, John Bayne, Renald Armstrons | ¥. B'dos

or today has brought before us Edghill, St. Thomas, in accordance with House ridge ak x Corllan Uttam, Beresford Texeira,| 8 (BYFJORD” : 30th June 12th July

a Bharheene OF One Wear. a0 plans and specifications, which may be Goddard t 7 Cars Texeira, George Cil Ho Yow “THULIN™ July dist July

e 0 » remembe ‘ ss . +r, ot A { 9 anal # * ,
pnver tebe remembered by:— | | obtained from the Par. Treasurer. Each 3r n L Mon pobert Ghsllenos
zi _,_ {mot : applicant will be required to deposit } L a ‘Mon | trendiest sin sbi wbstacaaeae ny
(sister) Lillian Clarke (grond mother) / $10.00, which will be refunded om the 7 . : ! 11.30 4 vaeMoN |
and_the Clarke's family 4.7.50—In. | return of the plans and specifications in | MISCELLANEOUS W ill Lift Ruhr ia DEPARTURES — BY BWIA L. FOR] CANADIAN SERVICE
Or good condition i ‘ 4 4 ? TRINEDA 5

. spear i Persons to listen to ‘Jeffreys Bee . , ty ren » OUTHBOUND
FOR SALE The Vestry does not bind ‘it elf tO} Landy de Montbrun and his artistes, t Steel Emba yy ' a vo j fall Sail ‘ Arri
award the contract to the lowest or any | he broadcast over Radio Distributior er rgo i Lionel Parry, Ernest Perry Claudia ; i oRrs ~ eevee

AUTOMOTIVE Tender. from 9.00 — 9.15 p.m. Sth and 12th July eA Evelyn, Helen Yattt, Angus Mitehell Montreal see Barbados

“ Ps ; The successful applicant will be re- ak Bee nae eee BONN ‘ . X Delfina’ Pdghi"l, Aida Edghitl, Antonio June 2é@th une 30th July Uith

CAR—1947 Super De Luxe Ford. | quired to provide two (2) surities, whe 24.6.50—16 » see » July 3 Preity tig Ae. than’ \ Gewiian. July 7th July Toth July 2nd
Perfect condition. Tyres & Buttery] win he willing to hind themselves ford SGnuw GAGIR Ow mer lit ci Partial lifting of the embargo ; Helen Ludeker, Mary Willekes-Musk July 2ist July 24th Aug oth
New. Contact VINCENT GRIFFITH. | 4. g mer 7 “ CINE CAMERA aight millimetre./on Ruhr iron d = — Yo 7 —— 1 Rg DeWei Aug. 4th Auge 7th Aug 17th
Tel. 2667 4.7.50—3n. he due performance of the work Kodak preferred. In good condition. | . and steel preduction 4 ’ n Jone Norman DeWeir,

F. F. PILGRIM, can * vor the Soviet Z as i d Reginald Lawes, Her -
— Par. Treasurer St. Thomas, | #0dsen C/O Allexne Arthur & Co. Lt4 c oviet Zone has been de- idnoaie -

CAR—One 8 cylinder Packard—ideal Ee a eb ate 29.6.50—an |cided on, German trade quarters For St. Lucia NOR THROUND
thing for tent pupposts:. Owner bought said tonight. ~ Malcolin Maxwell, Gladys Clausel, Arrives
she car Apply a or ee PUBLIC SALE ES All orders lated b Herman Poxill, Janet Mhrehpenny , ALCOA POLARIS mernaden r mic iain
ard Ave., St, Michael ing 3085 sea : placec efore London Express Service. 8S LOA OLA Ss” uly 1 or Montrea

4.7.50.--3n + fe ——————— | February 8 when the embar
. £O was r .
aretha ane tianlian anes : f fa * : These vessels have limitedpassenger accommodation,

canvosevirwokke won pane} Professional Notice AUCTION imposed because of excessive Zone] Jamaica Knitting The panama
only 13,000 miles and in excellent con-| 4s. omce w i imports of iron and steel accord- amaic £ COOKER : : s
dition Wo reasonable offer refused My office will be closed for vacation U 7 ing to official ‘state ts 5 Apply: DA COSTA & GO, LTD.—Can adian Serve,

Hon og D. Beclen “Brdos Taxi Cabs, | 0 Monday 20th July & will re-open| UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Statements here— | KINGSTON ROBERT THOM LTD,-New York and vif Service,
3 a aes: | on Monday 2th July. Those persons may now be carried out. in tae that pays
ns | WHOSe glasses have not been delivered| BY instruction received IT will sell on This move is interpreted as a) The Jamaica knitting industry 1s ‘ Me

CAR—One Vauxhall 14 H.P. 193¢]4re asked to call in for them before | Thursday | July 6th oat, 2.30 pam. a'1 inducement to th Sei o as @ | threatened with being throttled off or COPPELL PPE LLLP PT AAT TS
model, condition A 4 Apply to Mrs. } Saturday 8th July. H. Harcourt Carter | Mahieea Village, Green ‘Hill, (2) Mileh oO the oviet Zone tO!by a heavy inflow of Indian knit- Itself ! x KIS .
G, Smith, Lower Pinfold St Opthalmist. 27.6.50—5n | Cows both 7 Months with calf; 4 Horse (eagotate an interzonal tradejted underwear, and high level AF % \ 1 =— ole °

4.7.50-—2n. — | & Cart w arness rms Cash eo ¢ ‘ , 5 7 _ : a} MOVAI NOTICE R
ak £2 oe 1 -50--9p VINCENT GRIFFITH agreement to replace that which|Government negotiations may » ah Peed v ¥% % ‘““GOD’S WAY OF x

CAR Moule Sports Car, X—086, Goos| PARTNERSHIP NOTICE Auctioneer, expired on Friday last j|have to be instituted to save the still % S1$ x
Mechanical Condfion, Licensed Owner ae a> eee eerie aoe | 4,1.00—Sn jlocal industry and the jobs of left “S —- vis vy
leaving Island. . Analy” Jon, | Wise [ovo oe, be SEER RY GIVEN that_we |. sam Another reason for the pai » 300 pe Rie SALVATION %
Jeaving island weit Goust, Phone e461, | te Undersigned Winston Orville Osea llifting is that the Soviet 5 jzome 300 person from th Through this medium ait elignta QTR %

‘ . Mas '%4-1.50,—5n. | Haynes and Winston Irvine Gufith} UNDER THE SILVER g is that the Soviet Zone nv Local producers are now in % ond frends are informed that BY Y M
eee Pattners ot the Firm of Haynes & {has credit with West Germany ommunication with the Secre last & th loon has been removed to x x
. ori 1, Solicitors, of No. 2 Sw ., nine c ; | “ ms 6 . *

CARS | 1049 Morris @ cylinder, 3,000 | Cre ert Gove ‘Yoom" this aes HAMMER |_ The third reason, the American |iriat on the matter with a view shipment |X rye somes st as trom July 3 BIS MADE PLAIN” &
pater ane a 1948 eee a > admitted Hugh O 1 Saint Clair Cum : ; ; ; f ; source said, is that the embar Ht » arriving at a formula which s Sau se fhe son eae inte x ¥ *
10,006 miles sike new 949 Morris ‘. rela ” v inesday ith July ane if no pw ‘ ve eT - is Me ) een provided fo
Oxford, 11,000 miles, 1947 Morris 10 H.P, | berbatch, ee a said Firm | concluded). Thursday 6th, we will sell by |4aS been ineffectiw because of! will give the industry a chance to GET ONE | K tomer h Bleyeles aa 2 % s
Very good condition 1907 Morris SHE. oeden daa. 1h aes oo ‘ vs. J. A. Marshall, her furni- |i!legal steel shipments from West |: Lu'vive , TODAY 1% %1]% Free Book from S Roberis, %
Jery good condition 938 auxha 2 tare orients ea Cover) rist Church Sarmes y 5 Sineiet 3 sa My 7" 1 y develop loci a ~ , « .

1948 Singer Sports WINSTON © htt Germany to the Soviet Zone, Thi The industry developed ‘Yl pROM YOUR GAS SHOWROOM | 5: MANHATTAN X1% 30, Central Avenue, Bengor,

All these cars are reasonably priced WHEBTON 1. °G _ | Dining Table, Up Chairs and Rock-|Source said supervision had been | “uring the war but recently im- BAY STREET ix i Cutting Bslonn % ss N. Ireland

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD., rn rs, Mor i 5). 2} inadequate.”—Reuter port licences for the importation ihe 1% ; 7 ois ; sai
Telephone 4504 A ring Cus- | ‘ f the roods from India have SRR RRS, | ’er K. CLINTON OTs
2.7.50,—3n h Berb ul Orna- | : ; ren : _ 2 +1
; Soe cilia been granted and the Indian 8 Att? A AGO Opt Ot that Me
" 4 _ i Tabi Pedestal > pty AMM AMY Vette. Se * *

CAR—(1) Renault 8 h.p. good tyre: OFFICIAL NOTICE Sideboard & Liquor | | underwear is expected to be sold SAVE TO-DAY = = <7 ea ene NS

Phone REECE 4603 28.6 .50—3n c < iters Di > 2 a heaper
: "| BARBADOS. in n Ten eru ections eee seni | PA
— Serie se te oan ea Oe, In the Assistant Court of Appeal Service I Spo Forks, Cut Pepa eee A ON WELL-BOUGHT SSAGES TO IRELAND

CAR—Vauxhall. Velox 18 h.p. Per (Equitable Jurisdiction) i ‘ sont tion, Pie r . |
fect Condition two tone paint work] cyRiL BRUCE BROOKS—P r ar oR arhehdige sry tes, oy | W ‘re O 1 > ] | ‘ 5 P i
geot Condition | ‘ued ‘for ne’ better | SYRIA BRUCE BROOKS —Piaintift! | y tures, tugs, nleuin, | Victrola’ and | ere rderly \|| THE BARBADOS AQUATIC FURNITURE aa Antilles Products Ltd., Roseou, Dominica, offer passages to
carrying of more luggage. Ring R. S : Se. ee ees eae aed % CLUB ) 4 Jublin per M.V. “DUALA”, next sailing from Roseau about
Nict 3925 Home 8324 Iron Betsteads, Springs and Beds, ‘Pine, | BUENOS AIRES ‘ Lk 20th June. s ' : \s a

icholls Office 3925 Home a In pursuance of an Order in this Court] Cedar and Painted c Mahogany | Foll . } » July 3 rHE MONEY-SAVING WAY au eae and thereafter about every thirty-three days

5 in the above action made on the ragit snd MT. ‘Washstands “ollowing political turmol! and i | J Single fare, £70, usue wht zain aie aa "
: Vv BAGG cn Vashstan é Y and | Wi are, 70, usual reductions for children.
a meee any e tain: whet ; 7 ne : care “i ne armed uprising in Arequipa last} RESTAURANT | pser-robes, & Lin \ Apply direct.
nis ha y ate, right o 1 “ 31u tilliare able, Z 7 ‘ shows oO
ELECTRICAL n any lien or incumbrance { te ';month national electiong in Peru! t to the regular en Fr in Mahogany, or m |
BATTERIES: Ediswan 6 Volt, 13, 15 that certain piece or parce! o ; perfect tard let \ Cedar, Birch or Deal
my: awe ’ ove * 5 cpr moe Se mews OL ce 1 Utensil sterday re .cc te] n-| Restau rrwice 2 she |
17 and 19 Plate. Dial 3878. DaCosta @ | » at King George Road afore $f ‘ n eet ; oe : were completely jtr | ar Miaenbie Chvenitent. Lane! ! , Beds Morris |
Co., Ltd., Electrical Departm | said parish of Saint Michael and] Fow) £ ron ypewritet j quil according to reports reaching 1, Tea, Dinner, atc orders $1.50 up—C aoe $3 |
29.6.50—6n | urement ‘Iwenty one perch¢ one | Bicycle, Garde enches. Garden Hose|_/-Uenos Aires With de facto,! we taken. te Wedding | p—Venittes and Stools—Morris, on wy.
Si aacitteaiah ls oi iEcncras hice tebinces 1 ome Of B Pen b ee 880 less | and other ite - : ay “| President-General Manuel O. Ria! nday, Cocktail and Supper Tub rt at Seen eee a ( OPENING :—
te _ = ive of o perch a half of 1 Te *AsH | rvs ” — —_ arti etc ide the wp and ‘ Easy Chairs ining )} eocoanTre om ‘

ELECTRIC —WATER HEATERS by contained in the Public Road ee noes Term CASH | Otria as the only candidate, result , eae bles, extension & ixed } SCOTCH ‘TAPE
Santon in 3, 5, 12, 15, 30 and 40 gallon TROTMAN co : ion of t \ HAITI " tone
sizes. DaCosta & Co., Ltd Electrical | Pereinats t : mentioned) butt ng and * oh ni eae of the voting were a foregone con | Top and other hy Re A t R LIPPING MACHINES

4 2 ounding on la of one rettor e- ‘ ’ . . s A VTL Rack ‘oe Boxes r v oT : ¢
Department. Dia) 3978 29.6.50—6n | ceased, on lands of Caroline Otley t 4 | 7.50.2n.|Ciusion, Some 90 per cent. of the MPS. GRACT Wt Mi | ok R loe Roxes, ond other t $i KAW BROOMS 3.and 4 STRAP
“ELECTRICAL TOOLS by Black & lands of Mise Martin and on the Public] ————————— population went to the ; with | o | JOHNSON'S STATIONEKY & HARDWARE

" 4 & slack oad all ing George vets | : . * ; . |
Decker, _Drilis, Bench Grinders etc. | after ‘mentioned or however ele, the} UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER |®" estimated 70 per cent. in the ee hd ad inner iee $e 1 1 see, ‘i
Dial 3878. DaCosta & Co., Ltd. Electrical | same may butt and boynd to bring before , |City of Lima voting for Obia ee eA I § WILSON CRESS COR PALS AMAA Deere
Dept. 29.6.50—6n | me an account of their said claims with | , I hé SAL ORS 1 to sell a Ray’ | yehose political platform was open San | sie De | 8 ne en eee OEE LO LSS.
SS —- Ii their witnesses, documents and vouchers, | DUT. ord’s ill, I Way 6th ee # n nN We for Reservatio u vider Set : 7

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES: New |to be examined by me on any Tues | July at 1 o'clock a quantity of house-/1ly anti-Communist and in favour piease dial 4461 ha Trafalgar St, os: Dial 4069 1s MAPS—Imperial and Political Wall Maps of the World
ipment of Toasters, Hot Plates, Irons, | or Friday between the hours of r 1} Hold t hich inciudes; double}cr foreign capital investments in AT Eee ? \ !HERMOMETERS—2 kinds F :

ic. Dial 3878. DaCosta & Co., Ltd and o'clock in the afternoon, | bedstead washstand, chiffon-|epn anuntre : : hy -iaciiiiiiaiie 2 ANERC SEES ,

Electrical Dept Office of the Clerk of the Assists Court | ter, mal ned with cedar | the country.—Reuter. \ eS a ate ie 1% EROID BAROMET ER, etc
29.6.50—6n | of Appeai at the Court House Bridget | & 5 irror, coal stove, | ee ———— a — a % w also
| before the 12th day of July 1950, in order | galvanize ld kumber, and other ere é IRE TRAYS WIRE BASKETS
ELECTRIC WASHER EATERS by | that such clans may be tanked scaord. | it a een | For domestic and light lubrication purposes you need a and many other Office Requisites. -
Santon specially constructed for use us| ing to the nature and pvio eros | D'ARCY A, SCOTT. | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE i? ROBERTS . ‘ eens
Shower Bath Patented Mixing Valve | tespectively; otherwise such persons w 1.7.50—4n j —” ee | (RTS & CO. — Dial 3301
regulates temperature at will. DaC me on aa Red isn: < s ; 1 ear | The application of JANETITA HALI oo 1D i?
' ae ecree, and be deprived of all claim « z e Ae Rp! at JANE H n } i
& Co., Ltd.’ Electrical Dept, Dial 3878. | CPC ainst the said property [UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER | fon0 granted “tc Bubs Stognes ine ree { PAPO LLE PLE LA GIGS
Claimants are also notified that they | aaeeed ag? Bee ee theres rede ‘een | 7S SSE
must attend the said Court on Wed t {CEES CF Sennen YE; grouse ro ‘ r Ge cants Ltd. |
LIVESTOCK day the 12th day of July 1950, at 10] 4.004. non the spots on’ « storey board & galvanized build a product of Germ Lubric al |
,| o'clock a.m. when their said claims will | ¢, re 2 o'clock | ing Upper Roebuck St. St i . han-ot |

MARE—half-bred mare by O-T C 15|/ be ranked vo 2 a Double} fer permission to use said license Obtainable at all branches | > i
hands 3 years old. Suitable for ?larte- Given under my hand this 27th day of | '9°fed ! with gal-| * ¥ 0
tion work or Polo. Dial #5264. E. H. | April, 1950. ; v} TLR vu



Farmer, Andrews Pilant., St. Thomas
4.7.50 in

I. V. GILKES,
Ag. Clerk of the Assistant







12 on F
: stulodane Ito HA eNTALMA a; my | CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Lane. ist a ection on | Police Magistrate, Dist A










































/REAL ESTATE } M
.



Â¥ la vera! eiria ic nats rtWOt he | ; i hi
Ser ees a eee ete os | Se | Latest Styles in white, brown, black,
A. BARNES & CO., LTD | afternoon on Friday the 14th duy of July | ! Bratt | red and muiti-eolour

As the Manufacturers have decided that repairs to one of
our Engines can no tonger be delayed, the Company has in











24.5.50—t.f. | 1950 ; { Chureh w| BLAD
———— | All that certain piece or parcel of Jand Green. D F (



' Oe head As Maga Signed H, CAILLENDTR Pas ee
IPP’ BULL & i. Terrier | 2.5.50---31 t 30.6.50-_4 for Applicant 4 > a SS thy CEE
shines K. D OW Emsri. Harrisons | f bint | i ‘ ppiplication will ¢¢. #% ou Me LOOP PEPE PPE REO % ( RPC }
Plin. St. Luc 4.7.00 UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMME ered ¢ Lice ing Court to be held | 2M % f i i °
Re r UNDER THE DIAM R ‘olice Court, District A m 1% r ’ ’ , ze
7 OFFICIAL SALE | any he ina ot Jul ia | MWiGH FASHION NEED |
MECHANICAL | ciietea hesest | will on the Bee a *
NG MACHINE—Butroug xt SARBADOF t e's F on Friday 7th J A. TALN 1% , ’ ’ ‘a @!
ADDING MACHINE, Burrow retra | ARS Ae Auistant Const of Appeal. | st 2 clan” One "very" comtor Police Mixibirate ‘Di “ar. |B NOT HIGH PRICES! |
Suitable for ships manifests or et | yess (Equitable Jurisdiction) |b eccntly repaired and painted 4.7.0—In. |
large documents, H! JASON JONES Sidce GURTON sen ee oe | has Dra rooms, 2 Bed ED SHIPMENT |
& Co. LTD Phone 4279 CLARENCE 5 NG—Detendant | + ienette, Water toilet j |
4.7.50-—3n N ; J es a» | Bat right ao si JUST RECEIV }
otice is hereby given that by virtue t wha ay. For) |
of an Order of the Assistant Court af me ‘ ee TREY Be Beet | | -
Appeal dated the 27th day of April 195 a 4 20.6.50 } L, A |
MISCEL) ANEOUS 4 there will be set up for sale to t : | i ; | ealLi-os Soa i !
NEEDLES for your ;ecord player . ire | @8t bidder at the Office of the |
#1] kinds including Ruby and Sapphire | tne Assistant Court of Appe |



SOS SOO OF OPE STEELE SO POF OOS









NEW PLATTERS—Dinah Shore, Frank | situate at Kink George Ro nid mie’ 7 ¥ — , wr wen consequence had to t this Generating Set (90 .
sinatra, Bing and all the res” Come |The said) part coast STYLED RIGHT-PRICED BIGHT Supt eek. on enerating ‘Set (900 KW.) out of
end get, but quick island aforesaid containing by acne (A.F.S., F.V.A | co 1) to the reduction of standby Plant now
" "A. BARNES & CO., LTD urement Twenty one perches and one half ‘ : a ct 9Q5 Seteti ale. ds in "tne % xt fe ee on ee
24.8.60—t.f.n.| of a perch be the same m ( | EF ~ 3 ‘ $s 6 3 5 . ring the next 4ew months.
ence | ciisive of one perch and of old W tp Ce ceian Ba Anil | rom odoeDeD o ode
ORGAN-—One Cornish Organ in per-| perch contained - the Put a here- | Barros : t Por Successful | * ‘
: Me ‘ » suitable | inafter mentioned) butting « iding me wn fect condition. Melodia sone suitable | on lands. of ‘one Bretton deceaved,. on | | LADIES MOCCASSINS in white and white & red $645 $1) utmost cconome in the rked, co-operate by exercising the
Owner—W. McClean, Lower Reed St lands of Caroline Oxley, on lands of } AUCTION y tn the uce of Blectricity, particularly during

ero an, | Martin and on the Public Road « the Peak period between 6.30 and 8.30 p.m. until further notice,

King George Road hereinafter r
PANTS—Pin Stripe Pants for men | OF however else the same may

— ne . cs * * i
reed TS nd made to order, $7.05| bound and if not then sold the said 5 ORIENTAL SALES



V.



‘SMITH,







SOLE LPCESESEES SE SSSO LE OOOOE

. = > st erty will be set up for sale on e (SE HABLA ESPANOL f
per pair, Stanway Store, Luc oe an. | ceeding Friday between the same CURIOS, IVORY. TEAK, SANDAL | i OTE
2n- | until the same is sold for a sum not JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP- ‘Phone 4640 } 20th June, 1950.
RETREAD tyres at special cash | ‘20 Sai tie ake ESTRIES, GLOVES, PERFUMES.
- r Ss, ate s 27th day o pril, 19 es
eee. Oe % ee ae ee a ae et I. V. GILKES . , > Plantations Building SHOE KERS T THE ORLD {
$38.96; 34 x 7 at $46.90; 825 x 20 at eA KAS 5 MA O W.
$482.5 each. Enquire Auto Tyre Com- Ag. Clerk of the ; i »% ERE
pany, Trafalgar Street, Phone 2696








21.6,50--t.4.n PEALE PPLE PLCS PPPS IS

SE SS

RE Ae ee

ROWN A CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT BY BRINKING THE NEW CROWN GINGER ALE

, ‘ f } i

































PAGE EIGUT



West Indies Playing
Attractive Cricket

“And Public Paying To Watch

Jack Kidney,

SOUTHAMPTON, July 3.

West Indies team manager, was quite |
mistic today about Clyde Walcott’s injury, sustained on |

wpaturday,
idney said Walcott had tried his favourite pull, missed the
Ball, and the impetus of the body swing caused him to strain

a muscle in the hip. Walcott visited a noted specialist in!

London today, but Kidney sa

cautional measure and he hoped the trouble would not be |

|
|

serious.

.

“Channel |"

Tunnel Will
Some True

: LONDON
‘NeW agitation is underway for
fulfilment of the Anglo-French
dream = which Napoleon first
broached 150 years ago—a tunnel
under the English Channel be-
tween Britain and the Continent.

The latest clamour follows the
appointment of Christopher Shaw- |
cross; K.C., former Socialist]
M.P., as director of the Channel|
Tunnel Company

Forty-four year
was, reticent in
the significance
ment. He merely
.The Channel Tunnel
to.come in time.” ,

Many times in the past far-
sighted supporters of the scheme
on both sides of the Channel have
Umsiccessfully tried to push
through this vast and costly pro-
ject. The channel at its narrow-
est point is 21 miles.

The farthest the scheme ever
got was in 1876 when the British
actually began construction on a
1} mile tunnel at Dover. Work
stopped six years later owing to

o'd Shawcross
speculating on
of his appoint-
commented:
will have

eden

political and strategic considera-
tions.
Since then every few years

plans for a channel tunnel have
been revived, but to date nothing
definite has matured

One of the biggest clamours of
all time was shortly after West-
eth Union came into being. It
Ws contended by eminent mili-
tary experts that such a scheme
would be of infinite value to Wes-
tétn Union both economically and

strategically.

("Estimates of the total cost ol
this huge project range from
$200,000,000, to $500,000,000 A
silot tunnel would first have to
% driven from Dover to Calais
This would take five years to

build and would cost $60,000,000
“According to some pre-war plans
the next step would be the con-
struction of two electric railway
tunnels 17 feet in diameter between

0 and 200 feet below the chan-



1 bed. This would cost about
75,000,000.
Economists claim that several

million people would use the tun-
nel every year and that annual
profits would reach about
Bled’ ths It was originally pro-
losed that Britain and France
Would share equally the cost of
eénstruction and the profits

'’The Channel Company has as~-
sets of $60,000, according to the|
ldtest published accounts. Issued
ctipital of the company is $254,000

“Biggest shareholder was the
Southern Railway. Since nation-
alization, those shares are held by
the British Transport Commission

INS.



‘Soccer Stars |

“May Collect |
£2,000 Each

ENVIABLE JOB

rar RIO De JANEIRO July 3

Brazilian players are to receive
£200 each for every match they
play in the final pool of the
World Cup—a total of £600 each.

They are to get a further £500
each if they win the Trophy.
With other emoluments already
received, each player may get
something like £2,000 from the

hampionships.

In, addition, the city of Rio de
Janeiro is now considering what
awards should be made to the
Brazilian team if they prove vic-
torious. ’

When business houses, firms and
stares are likely to make
handsome presents. Being a
tional football player in Brazil is
an enviable job

t

—Reuter.
| They"! Deo It Every

EN POP TOOK LI'L . {
ICHABOD ON THE TOUR ~~ «

THE SODA WATER

KS,JUNIOR SPURNED
THE FREE, COMPLI-
MENTARY BOTTLE=+:






[ Bur AT THE BALL GAME
WHERE THE STUFF CosTsS A
DIME PER EACH, HE DRINKS



ENOUGH TO FLOAT BIG MO>>>

them|the word
na-| has

UV

id the examination was a pre- |

The West Indies are having a
ancially successful tour, Kid-
ney said. The response of the
public to the attractive cricket
they try to play has been fine
and the expenses for the tour
have almost been covered

A share of another big gate has
been missed today owing to rain,
but if the pitch, which was almost
waterlogged up to late this after-
noon, dries out, Sonny Ramadhin
should have a successful day to-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

— a
Eo





morrow.

Yesterday the tourists
enjoyable day at Ventnor
Wight.—Reuter.

Tossed Into
Tiber At
19 Months

LONDON

Two Americans indicated their

had an
Isle of



desire today for a chance at the
ferme and fortune which lies at
the end of a swim across the

Fuglish Channel

One of them, David Frank, 27,
of 20 East 55th Street, New York,
said he has had the swimming
urge from the tender age of 19
months, when his father tossed
him into the Tiber river in Rome

with g rope around his waist—
to test his swimming prowess

The London Daily Mail said
that Frank and Steve Wozniak, of
i99 Townsend Street, Buffalo,
N.Y., are the only two Americans
who have submitted entries thus
far for the newspaper's free-for-

!! cross-channel race held

late August

lo be

First Man $2,800
The Daily Mail is offering $2,800
for the first man to swim the
channel, $2,800 for the first woman
$700 for every other person who
completes the rugged course dur-
ing the race

Swimmers from around — the
world have applied to the Daily
Mai} for a spot in the race. In
addition, dozens of other persons
have annoanced their intention
to pit their skill and physique
against the 21 miles of rough
cold water in private attempts.

Shirly May France, wwe 17-yvear-
old Somerset, Mass., schoolgirl who
failed in her cross-channel try
lust year after two months of
rigorous training, is due to try
again this year The Mercer
family of Fall River, Mass., father
John and his brood of six mer
men and mermaids, also have
announced they wiil be coming
ove.

Seaman

Frank said that he was born in
Rome and went to the United
States in 1940. He said in his
application to the Daily Mail that
he spent three years in the U. S
submarine service and after the
war was a merchant seaman

He added that he had been, ™€m were at Lord's this week to

‘lecorated for helpine to



HEAD WORKER, the nine-year-old stallion bought by Skipper Joh
at. Bridgetown after idir este fro the SS. Lord Churcl
a number of races in Er et known if he will b

before retiring to the stud

Rockley Golf Club
Plans Gala Day

bye °
Circus, Gymkhana, Carnival
Something resembling a combined circus, gymkhana, car-
nival, and burlesque show is in the planning stage at the
Rockley Golf and Country Club, where a field day will pre-
cede the presentation of prizes cn August 5
Under a sub-committee consisting of Dr, Dean Klevan,
William Atkinson and Don Clairmonte a programme is
being arranged that promises to brighten the occasion for
competitors and spectators alike
— — —e Under consideration are a long-
\ driving contest that will spray the

£ 4 |bushes with golf balls, a pitching
amaicans jand putting test that will fray the











iT



|
n Goddard gets his first look
Head Worker is a winner of
e racing in the West Indies

TUESDAY, JULY 4,

Rain Washed Out
Wimbledon Games

WIMBLEDON, July 3

most of the afternoon prevented a

Rain all morning and




ait

Te



championships today. But the decision to end play

fell may have saved the two top seeded players in the











Men’s Singles—Frank Sedgman, Australia, and Billy Tal-
bert, United States.
After losing the fir@ set to
ert va trailing Budge \ albert. Patty found some brilliant
> , (United States) 6—3, 4—6,| strokes to take the lead as Talbert
2—5 on Cour! Number One, and } jot iltogether ¢ t
Sedgman was behind Art Larsen | creas
United States) on the centre| ~ phous: of te f 1
Court when the tournament referee | i
ordered play to cease for the ro-li i
day |
Both Sedgman and Larser ip- |
pealed, hampered by the murky} had st
light and by the slippery surface, the covere
Sedgman discarding his shoes in|; leading t

the second set atching the







EEA PPE FEA EE PFE IES

“e



Hodgson
Cup Races
In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)



GEORGETOWN,
A large crowd of rowing
lined the East Bank of
Demerara River on Thursday |

afternoon and cheered lustily



Desmond Andrade’s crew won tne
Hodgson Cup a clear three lengths |

ahead from A, Gomes’ crew
The Hodgson Cup, presented by

Sir Frederick Hodgson, K.C.M.G

a former Governor of the Colony

way, back in 1905, is competed tor

every year by crews drawn fror

\

BARGAINS

eget tO Ot LEO HF

petit nae Oe
P56 OFOOOSF PFS AP PITT OE

“THE

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le match being completed in the Wimbledom Lawn |

after,about an hour in poor light, and when further rain|

ix | $ JOAN CAULFIELD

1950





REMEMBER..
DEAR RUTH
NOW IT'S
DEAR WIFE

COMING ATTHE;

EMPIRE

cmon ty,
Paramount presen 4y
WILLIAM HOLDEN Z




q,

4

BILLY DE WOLFE
MONA FREEMAN
y EDWARD ARNOLD y



3



MEIRESs”

EMPIRE ° sow suowie



DearWife!





Both men were miscalculating
the bounce of the damp balls as! Por the rst ti 3 ye | ’
Larsen ran ahead 3 he famous tournament tradi-| | FOR THE How. OF YouRUFE, i
‘ tional fine weather had deserted | SAW Aww
Sedgman recovered to draw | ;; peuter. i Seanad _——
level 4 all, and he again levelled |
hen Larsen had beaten through GRE Au $s e™ &» sMOLIO™ Pare a Ghate
n the fifteenth game to lead 8—‘, |
but another break through by the
American led to his taking the }
et ‘
X66666464646565%-" 4 44 6 fe



staris



|
»
members of the Demerara Rowing x
a | stoutest nerves and_ possibly a} Club, % If you are a lady |
Practise nine-hole competition with each Andrade’s crew rowing the x
: player allowed only one club of | “Seaford” named after Sir x | ; |
: | x
e his choice However, the sub-); Frederick Seaford, C.B.E., was sent %& HAVE YOU ° f you are looking for shoes!
} comur > may scard all these] off to qn even start with Gomes |¢@ ~
1s ey | en may discard a ‘ oO Oo ne Bh @ $ % if h d f
. | possibilities in favour of more|crew in the “Humphrey”, name: s ou want them n |
| icetious, farcical and frustrating’ |after Mr. R. G. Humphrey. i VISITED % Y stro g and comty:
(From Our Own Correspondent events before the final programme . %
LONDON, June 28 is completed. “Seaford” I ¥% Then
Mr. G. E. Waddingtoi., captain | Tronhies : $
of the Jamaica Rifle Team drophies The “Seaford” on the inside, } x b
Bisley, told me today that he anid 'hose who are left standing at|powed the faster stroke while the iss x the answer is
his team are getting down to some| the end of the day’s events will |“Humphrey” held them nicely on | % ,

receive the trophies they have won
through the 1949-50 season, if any,
and these presentations will be}
followed by the usual rounds at
the well-known nineteenth hole

In order that the field day and
presentation of prizes would tak2
place after the final tournament of
the season, the Mixed Foursomes,

| serious practice at the rangé We
like the conditions here’ he sai

|“the light is far more subdue

and so better for shooting than ir
Jamaica.” “What we do not like
are the showers of rain that al-
ways descend on us when we gz

out to practise.”

The Jamaicans have now been] last event on the current schedule,
joined in the long camp room| has been moved fowward one
where they live by the teams from} month and will start on July 15,
Trinidad and British Guiana.| entries closing on Thursday July

These two teams arrived this we
via Marseilles,

13 at which time the draw will be
made. This competition will com-





| plete the events now scheduled |
Wearing a blue blazer with the|/and the fixtures for the 1950-51 |

neat crest of the B. W. I. Riffe] s on will be arranged by the/

Association on it—crossed rifles in] Tournament Committee elected in

gold—Inspector Lloyd, Trinidad September at the General Meet-|

Armourer, told me they had ing. |

lovely trip over, “No trouble at

the Customs—I suppose they saw Challenge Ladder

all our guns, we have brough

about twenty. Actually we have However, the Challenge Ladder

recently presented to the Club by
a group of the members, will keep
the ball rolling steadily over the
increasingly green fairways be-
tween competitive campaigns, The
Ladder has produced more interest
watch the Second Test, and they|#nd excitement than anything at

not had time to unpack them yet,
but when we do we shall get them
tested for accuracy right away.”

Mafy of the West Indian Marks-



: slower stroke. At the *%, mi

mark, the “Seaford” leading by

finishing line.

Following were the teams: —
The “Staford” — D. Andrace
(stroke), M. Jardim (3), T. Rhodes

(2), J. Caldeira (Bow)’ and H.C
3arclay (Cox).

The “Humphrey” A
(Stroke), D. Morrison

Gomes

N. Rhodes (Cox).

»









A REMINDER
NOT the Battle of Dunkirk,
NOT Alf Valentine at Old Trafford
NOT Sonny Ramadhin at Lord's
LUT reminding you of

Mr. HAROLD HARDING'S

DANCE

AT THE CHILDREN’S GOODWILL



save > . ar
drowning sailor during his ries tell me they are thinking of rent-|the Rockley Club since Colin
service. ing a television set so that they| Bayley got a hole in one.
Wozniak said in his ¢ licati can watch some of the rrer The blind draw created a
that he is 34 years la eaes dee Bridge Test. hilarious shuffling of high and
@ number of marathon swimming —L.E.S, oF pa eeD: pay sts Witt the
championships. Among them he evelly ni challenges vrenet Ske)
included a ten-mile world’s swim- ike” ae pee ke iy ee pes
ming championship in Toronto. 1 Ties Ene Gah tiie Teena rece
He said he also has won Ameri. Clerical Cricket was dry on the lettered name-
can long-distance swims plates. The fact that the matches
j —1 NS BRISTOL, England ‘are to be played over 18 holes
neath aN.e The Rev. F. Kennedy did not] medal play brought forth delighted |
” keep his appointment with the] grins to the vast majority of the
” tis 3 F , mber
; 1 Bishop of Bath and Wells, members
Itches Salon tasehate Pl

RIO DE JANEIRO
Members of the soccer football
squad from Yugoslavia, in Brazil
for the world championships, are

As the time of his interview! coasting under excessive handi-
drew near he had scored 41 runs} caps, protect their advantage by
for the Somerset clergy in their! studiedly sticking to match play
cricket match against Bristol] events and fail to turn in volun-

who, no doubt, had in
!mind the few mug hunters who,



| ar Stu ir:

fondly known to the Brazilians clergy oe SN Cee Seow Reka ee oe coe
as the “Itches.” The Bishop of Bristol, Dr. F. A. Bae nib, withdraw from the

The reason for this is obvious] Cockin, was luckily watching the I sadar challenges who does not
—nearly every Yugoslav name] match and when he heard of Rev.| Want to compete. So far there
ends in “ich” or “itch” Kennedy’s problem he telephoned | , ides been none, however

a the Bishop of Bath and Wells and ,

The Brazilian press, which al-]asked that the appointment be tare
ways has a lot of trouble with] cancelled.

“Yugoslavia” anyway,
adopted the abbreviation as a

ae eels ale Their Cook

and



Ken
‘|

imple headline expedient, such|nedy went on to score 54 ru
“Itehes Tre -day” : g » team to win b
Itehe rain to-d Pra ee ee team t n by Gave Them
aa ree “ | Victory
PA1T9e ——sreont ss sae ome By Jimmy Halo |











4 WA
| ER

}









rc >
Race

H -

| |
[ L00K, ITCHYTHE MAN Y 7 |

GO ON TAKE IT! 7—

a




. cA : TA, | 4 —~
WHAT DO YOU DO bt es ;
(* TH IT, KID sss JUST ONE MORE, DAD- front pages as newspapers

MADRID, July 3

footballers who on
knocked England out of
the Worid Cup kicked their way to}
} | victory on acclimatised stomachs
| and with a cook

Spanish
Sunday





NTS TO GIVE YOU A >)
ESH BOTTLE OF Pop.) —

NO!





who knew

os an

vs ol <= DON'T } them, soccer sources thought here
os WANT \{ | tonight
hs NONE! hey listed these two factors as
=, <4, ; contributory causes to the Spanish
4 2) } 1—0 victory at Rio De Janeiro

(1) Spain’s foresight in giving
he selected players two weeks’
rest and light training in a moun-
tain hotel near Madrid
(2) Sending a cook
team to give

cn y
Mag) 3.

to Brazil
them the






the
they
Spanish

i. food used to
victory

Korean

nae were
tonight
aside on
, which
ron Sunday evenings
mornings in Spain,
with comment on the

the war




A x TT MUST BE THE ++ io not appes
st) Monday
fn ht up

chivalrous-
repects to
the maestros

formaciones said
ly “We pay our best
he defeated English,
f football”
I said peevishly

“Spain is;





celebr victory because the}
inve of football ave been!
vehaving impe and in-!
discredibly”
Alcazar said “English football |
P c jis adrift’. }
2 Ra Ze “ —Reuter.

LEAGUE
On SATURDAY, 8th JULY, 1950
ADMISSION 2/-
Music by Mr. Percy Green's Ork

REFRESHMENTS BAR



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CONTESTANTS & THEIR SELECTIONS
JOHN MARSHALL singing .. 7
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FITZ HAREWOOD





’ ~lY ?
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narrow margin, was rowing at 248 x

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King (2), M. Marshall (Bow), an 1



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At the half-mile, the “Seaford’ % *
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length away, continuing to in- x ., $ 23
‘rease their lead all the way. At [%& ? < ‘ .
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Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIT.SDAY. JULY I, l5il BARBADOS tdAOVtafcTE) SUGAR MEMORANDUM r. .1 — t—_--i Tiusdu>. July 4, I9S0 I Mil I'l MM M I HAY OVER one hundred and fifty years have passed since the Anu-iiuii colonies threw off Iheir allegiance t<> ihe British Crown. It is interesting to speculate what might have been the course of history if that momentous event had never taken place. When the independence of the thirteen colonies VM recognised, they were a thinly populated area running along the Atlantic seaboard of North America. Today the United States of America is the most powerful country in the world with a population of ftbOUl I hundred anil twenty millions. From a policy oJ isolationism bequeathed to them by the Father of America. George Washington, the Americans have advanced until what happens in any quarter of the globe is their concern. The ideals which fired tneir revolt and which are embodied in their Declaration of Independence haw remained with them in 1he years that have passed. Political democracy in the United State* has reached great heights and the people enjoy a standard of life that is the envy of every other country in the world. The American Republic has produced some greet man—men whose thoughts and actions will be discussed as long as civilisation lasts. Abraham Lincoln, staking all to preserve the Union which he loved and to erase the blot of slavery from the American land. Woodrow Wilson, preaching a new doctrine of international co-operation and responsibility only to sec his gospel rejected by men who could only learn the hard way. Franklin D. Roosevelt, rescuing his country from the despair and frustration into which it had been plunged by the great depression and steering it through the greatest war in its histon end dying on the eve of the victory for which he had worked so hard. To-day the United States is the best hope of those men who seek to preserve political democracy and freedom of expression. In the last war the United States played a major role and in the post-war world amidst the dangers of Soviet ambition ind intrigue all have turned to the great Republic for aid and succour. This aid she has given bountifully. During the war LeaseIXMKI enabled the Allies to achieve the victory for which they endured so much, and in the poet-wer years Marshall Aid and military supplies to the Atlantic Treaty nations has been a vital factor in the rehabilitation of war-torn countries and the means of enabling those countries to defend themselves. In the clash of ideologies which is such an unhappy feature of the day, the United States is the champion of those countries which will not embrace the regimentation of Communism. The burden which this places on the American Government and taxpayer is apparent, but the American people have risen to the responsibilities winch their power has cast upon them. In the crisis which the Korean invasion has occasioned, the Government of the United States is adopting a firm and statesmanlike policy. In its policy it has the support of the greater part of the world and in its endeavours to maintain the peace, the mass of mankind backs it. On this their Independence Day the Free World salute the people of America and pray that their leaders will continue to uphold the great ideals and traditions which their forefathers fought for and that in the end they will succeed in forming a world in which common men can live out their lives without the fear of war. Our lieu tier* Say: Lover of People I'KtSfNTIII m Till. HI;III*II HIM IMIIIN AMD RKIllHll reasons why this mattei Guiana Sugar Itrlrgalion u be put right, why this vtl Ilia Majesty GivrnmrM ment of the amount of the guaron !6lh May ISM intrtd purchase from the British Wag) Inrtity i i. Qulana *" should be | ftVOOti tlN|j.ili. Tn I* ing the L ftofe aTW I nions of ihe sugar M > British W. die* aad Mush auftkne. A* you know, our purpose hen* is to press Hi* Majesty* Gwvrrnmani foi racorasidenag of then deculon UII the sugar queellwl %  mid) i-..l presenl ,ii HMM between the United Kiwi. % % % %  ..n the area which we ropn tnl As we said at our preliminary meeting with you ; we take up these nc I I where thi \ were 1. January, when the case .. %  Wt da not prop o se as M fcl> ^Maek over UM sugar Matorj of these Colonies, but , %  in,si n,..i Mi Majesty's present Ministers have well in i K %  dom had the advantage In the past of buying Colonial sugar at prtoai uneconomir u> liW. Indies and BriUsti Guiana based pad sugar and that this caused depression and disaster in these Colonies. On the mini heed) have been high In thi: Sugai ntallva British West Indie nation. At B fully regional sugar eonfarm the 23rd and 24lh ot Febru.o) %  li-rUllv r— QJVid "That as la the Motion of the tonnage ,.i sugar loi which i. ....li..1.1. rrniunerjthe in nc. are to be suarar. teed by H.. Majesty's Government, this Conferrnce la convinced that the limkUlUn of t.urh tannage U *• tun*. a figure subitantljlly less than Ihe <-• u In Ihe area, and n %  m menda thai the quota to be •ii.i. HI.. I after I9.V? should at least be such an to n current British \Vrs| lndi and British Guiana exports estimated at 7!15.900 turn. %  Ttio people! of tin Britl I Ibbean Area fully andoi I raaoluUon, and the Oovernraai if the sugar exporting Colon of the Area have sent us he delegates to support it tion. we refer you to tha OUl %  Commission Report ..f l2 ami tinItnyal Commission I i. it must ba rocaUad (hoi UM United Kingdom Government in the 1930N at the same turnas they were buying sugar from the Colonies at dumped prices, procured the Imposition of heavy duties on cheap Japanese goods which were being supplied ti. the Colonies, and actual]] of quotas in Ihe case of textiles, mainly III order ki protect the standard oi living of the British work in c We turn now to the lonnag.figures Beyond the total of 1,100.000 toni of Colonial sugar which the United Rlni prepared to buy at guaranteed prices (.this is the aggregate llgur. containing the British West Indies amount of 640.000 tons) the United '" %  Kingdom iprepared to allow 1 ItOeW tons of Colonial sugar to iind a market m the Unttad Kingdom if it can witii bnpartal prat aranca do to in complete enmpcti. tlon with all other sugars. whetbOl foreign or not, whether dumped or not. There would be no guarantee as to market or as to price on this amount of 150.000 tons West Indiana everywhere are nd ln act no guarantee that ... dismayed at the decision of His oJ truB 150,000 tons would be Majesty s i.ovenirncnl. which is frjogght from the BrlUsh West not fully indlea and British Gulano. Had egarded bv them implementing the Government' own declaration In its announce nieul on t'llh Aiutusl. 19IB. whei %  t was stated: "Ilia Majesty's Government asurod the delegation that they recognise that the prosperity of Ihe sugar industry 11 vital to the maintenance of % % %  jii.-T-standard of living in sugar producing colonies auch as the British West Indies It is their intention to make long-term arrange merits which will give to the efficient producer of sugar in these areas and elsewhere in the Commonwealth firm assurances of markets for agreed tonnages of sugar, at reasonably remunerative prices to be negotiated with the producers. It Is the declared policy of His Majesty's Goveminent :.. maintain and Improve ihecanenu of the Colonial territories and whereas In the British West Indies, sugar produclion Is the main and indispensable bails of a healthy economy, this will be given special consideration In lixing the quantities of sugar to be covBred by these arrangements' The Editor, The SIR,—AUo .Mr DOOM, %  to support the remarks of D. A Tham's letter which appaarad In Fn lav's •tdn ,-aurelating to Mahatina Gandhi. He certainly on Apostle of Peace and he loved all humanity Many years ago I had the great privilege of attending Mr. Gandhi's reception held at "Central Hall, Westminster. London." There were alvout 130 delegates present, representing various urgnnUaHone, Unfortunately I arrived at the reception rather i late and Gandhi had been speaking for a few i minutes. He was relating incidents of cruelty he had witnessed during his travels throughout the [ world. He told us he had seen a British Officer ] riding on bona back down one of the busy atrcets i in an Indian City, and this officer had whipped a little picanniny out of his way Personally I did not feel very proud of being a Britisher at that moment especially as the small child died n a -esult of the whipping. Mr Gandhi continued saying that ha also had witnessed in the same place one of his own countrymen put out the eyes of another man during a dispute over a woman, and another incident of seeing ears cut oft and ao on. Yet. said Mahatma Gandhi, these people Would not lie condemn* it Bj H uas just the way of humanity. When Mr. Gandhi had finished speaking, a friend of mine came up to me and said "Do you realise w* are in the presence of a Saint?" and then I understood the feeling I myself was experiencing, It was Ihe sense nf awe. Mr. Gandhi had not raised his voice all through his speech and yet he held us all—in an uncanny sort of way—the power of the Spirit, I am sure It was This visit of Gandhi's to London had a kind of humour attached to It as well as the serious side, as frequently traffic, motor cars, buses, taxis, etc. ware held up in the busy parts of the West ind bar a use Mahatma Gandhi and his disciples at certain times knelt down to pray wherever they happened to be at the times of prayer Certainly Mahatma Gandhi's career will stay on In the memory of all who had the honour of meeting and shaking hands with him at I quite certain %  > lie lift In. truly spiritual InfillThis is a decision by II. .,.v H Government. It rai hWMd after consider..tu.n ..f tl currant poattloo it, iha Brltlat. #est Indies by representatives r-mciency of the Ministry of Food. the Urea ury, and the colonial OAea II is in unequivocal La and tha West Indies wenan tilled in understand it to mean exactly what it said that, recognising the vital position of ug.u in tin. economy of the West Indies. His Majesty's Government would Klve special consideration to those Colonies in making their sugar arrangements. l n order l.t maintain mid improve that economy. The present sugar offer of His Man-st> %  Government to our area is not calculated to maintain, much less Improve, the economy of ihe Brae; and tha an, has not receivert special consideration ii. lixing the quantities nf sugar inrolved ll is not calculated to maintain that economy hlfaiMa .. firm assurance of a market at reasnnbly remunerative prices Is offered on 640.000 tons onlv ami this is subst..ntlally less than current produclion. And where is Ihe special consideration which was supposed to be given, when the proposals involve a guarantee to the Dominions for more than current production, for the Colonies less; a nd an overall restriction on Dominion export pro duction at a level approaching ino r ; more than current exports but on Colonial production only s ''.i' :'.'<• more than present prodUCtiOBT Furthermore. during (I'D Thethese negotiations the guaranteed quantity proposed for DM D ions was increased (from 400.000 tons to 450.000 tons) while tne Colonial guaranteed production throughout remained the sane (at I.IOO.OOOtons). Increase tha Colonial guaranteed production .n proportion, and you are not far short of a 1.250,000 ton allotment for Ihe Colonies which would give the minimum of 725 ooo tons for the British Wan Indies and British Guiana which is nought During the Autumn negotiations, the B.W.IS.A. delegate, "-re repeatedly told by the Mi-. of Food officials, particular! this 150.000 tons been allocate.! pro rata between the Colonies. th< share for the West Indies would have been 85,000 tons. A mattei of 85.000 tons up or down on the British West Indian guarantee li not a large matter for the United Kingdom, but In the future the question of whether or not this portion of our production attrac's a fair price can make all the difference to the stability of tne sugar industry w.hich was recognised in the official statement ot August 10th, 1949. as the mainstay of the B.W.I, economy His Majesty's Government have stated that this unguaranteed element of 150,000 tons will maintain some element of competition In the United Kingdom market to act as a yardstick of efficiency for the Industry and thus protect the interests of United Kuigdo.n consumers. The United Kingdom have already allowed for UlO purchase of 250.000 tons of suga' from without the ComoianwaaiUi for internal consumption, to sav nothing nf about 500,000 Ions 01 sugar which they intend to buy from foreign sources for rctini<;; and re-export. This should give an ample yardstick to compare world prices for suKar with the prices paid 10 Commonwealth pro, ducers. In fact the so-called world price uf sugar is no index Ol because the price al these sugars can !*• entirely influenced by protection in other markets, resulting In dumping. We wish to stress the lOUOWllt I points: — (il Auart irom tne qutt.es to tha Colonies of the rulaou market of the la raae r vad entirely privileged pro-liners. Yet Cuba, which w.ill icceive at large a share of these benefits Is apparently to be granted a substantial quuu ii.t.. -de rjnlfad K market, in other words Cuba which is regarded as a special interest by the Unit! States Government, is also !< obtain special con in the. Untied Kingdom market ut the cxjiensc >i British Colonies hidden tally. It U difficult to see hothis policy of importing dollar sugar In preference U sterling aajaju ail H Majesty's Government policy of closing the dollai gap. Elsewhere in the Wes' Indies, we note that th French Government puj chases all the tltpOjrtabl surplus of the French tern lories. Last year's price WB< in the vicinity of £80 per ton (v) It is continual!, i< in England that the trouble; facing the West Indies are caused by their concent tion on u one | econ* and U %  Ihe] to ilr.ei-.!. thetl tore more generally. The years in Ihe '-'. conclusively proved !li while the West Indies are able to grow other crops th sugar to a lltnilcd exlctit the extent to which thi I'olii in itself very limited Thi can raadU] when it is considered mat all the roaaan h w k at UM Imneilal Collrgi ol Tropical Agriculture in Pi LnM all the research work of UV various Department! ol Agriculture in the West Indies and British Q dan have been unable to suggest any economic alternative lr sugar. This Is largely due to the following five n (1| The West Indies haw no fuel or birge ".ilc u it. i power and the sugar CUM bagasse supplies thi' fuel necessary for operating the factories. (2) Sugar can" has a gift of maintaining < fertility to a remarkable degree This ran be particularly demonstrated in th' island of Barbados winch has been growing cane i". the past 300 years with In creasing productivity. (3) Sugar will maintain mom labour per acre than another crop except bulb growing In Holland and ii tensive tomato rultivatic (41 The West I miles a subject to hurricanes, ai sugar cone resists the ravages of these tropical storms f.u better than any ottwi DTO( which can be grown in the;regions. (5) The Weal indje ore subject to perlodloal droughts and the sugar ran is remarkably drought resisting. gi\ in years of serious lack . rainfall Not Happy The paoplM of the Wesl Indies and British Guiana do not (eel happy about the conduct of thul sugar riegouattona since Uie August declaration of His Majesty' Government, anil h:\vithe impression that their interests have been uibordlnated to On m M tha Dominions Ii must not be lost sight of that it was the West Indk whj ii rateed Ihe question oj a loae-term agreement During t he aunu % %  '. HI ^. the United Majesty' • ^iimen'. infurmcd Dnedom canaumer has had me Weat Indian ili l e ga taa that they the tieneflt of Colonial sugar admltte' 'he net approach of the Australian ele. Hem. The more recent conduct of the I fotlatli IU has been equally -ii pleasing to them. The Grenada Conference Baked that a delegatioi from the British Wesl Indies and I rlthdl Guiana should be n-c-iveby His M.I Oevernment, and this was agreed to, but before that delegation could arrive in I/mdon. and improve UM 'of UM division Uving in the I i W.-: "' His Maic,|> Gnvernme Indian Colonies. In our mode in the Ho ne of C .pinuin. the pro|>osal of HU buy all British West Ind: sugar at cheap prlcei In ye of scarcity, and onlv guan tee to purchase .i portion o! their present production In future years of ptBDtJ (II) We would submit that UM Colonial farmer is entitle.! to the same treatment British farmer i e. that h.> should have a guaranRee I market at f;ir i" every ton of sunar he produces which ieonanmed In Great Bl statement by Hi.. Majesty's Government on sugar Issued on August lOtli. 1949. promises to Quintal Cricket Literature In England Nnrj U'.l. H.M.ks O.i View LONDON. Sn IMham Warner, President of the M C C Opened an exhibition of cuckit literature and relics at the premises of the National Book League. London, recently. The most ancient West Indian cricket book on view was the "Barbados Cricketers' Annual for 1894-95," edited by J Wynfred Gibbons.! En his opening speech Sir Pelhum said (^ no name had produced more literature than IS cricket, but added that when he wrote his S litst booh on cricket in 1897. publishers tend-1^ i | regard cricketers as semi-idiots and IS were %  veptioil about accepting their manuV %  Crlpti However, nowadays the bodexi with works on cricket. Att.i dwelling on the importance of cricket in Kti^hsh life, and point INK *ut that the Uaine had now spread all over the world, he concluded by saying: "I myself have made a duck in every part of the globe—except India, and I have never been there"' CRICKET HISTORY Tineerilegt specific reference to cricket in bi to be found In ihe "Guilford Book of Court", dated 1598, which is among the exhibits. It is recorded that one John Derrick, "being of the age of Fyity and nyne yttree. or thereaboutes. did runne and play then at Creckett and other Plaies" with the other scholars of the Free School. Readers of Dickens will remember the fictitious account of a single wicket contest be tw e en Mr. Jingle and Sir Thomas Blaze. Iha setting this aside, the earliest records of cricket in the West Indies anof Service matches in the 1840's. In 1842 the cricket club of the 59th Foot was formed, and played Its Bret match against the newly-formed Trinidad Cricket Club. A few years later Barbados saw contest between the 7th Royal Fusiliers and the 2nd. Batallion of the Royal Regiment. But early cricket in the Caribbean was. owing to geographical limitations, largely of a domestic nature which evaded documentation. In the 'sixties James Lillywhite, one of the great promoters of cricket, urrhv.i Trinidad, and his coaching greatly improved the standard there. The first inter-colonial match was played at Bridgetown between Barbados and British Guiana in 1865. and twenty years later a West Indies team toured Canada "and the United States. In 1900 Sir PeUuun's brother. R. S. A. Warner, brought in Knglend a team which included L. Constantine, senior, and C. A. Olliviere. Their matches rlid not rank as first class fixtures. but the experience gained on the tour, together with the fillip already given by visits of two English teams in the late 'nineties laid the foundation for the high standard to be achieved in later years by such players as George Challenor/Martindale and Headlev FOUR BALLS Among the exhibits is an 1820 version of the I^ws of Cricket published by the St. Mary-le-Bone Club. The directions for bowlers ere as follows: "The bowler shall deliver tinBall with one foot behind the bowling creese end shall bowl Four Balls before he I'hungcs wickets .... which he shall do but once in the same innings. The Ball must IK.bowled, not thrown or jerked, and delivered underhand with the hand below the elbow.* 1 Perhaps the most awe inspiring object at the exhibition is the ball off which W. G. Grace scored his hundrcth 100 against Somersei ;it the Bristol in 1895—not forgetting the cork of ihe bottle from which his neetth was drunk on that occasion! Lord Baldwin Replies (From Our Lendon Correspondent) LONDON, Relying on information in the West Indian press that Lord Baldwin, until recently. Governor of the Leeward Islands, had brought his Antiguan-born chauffeur, Mr. Francis, tn England with him and had promised to put him through any profession or training he wished, your London Correspondent wrote to Lord Baldwin to ask if he could have an interview with Mr. Francis. Your correspondent mentioned that this hall rview would appear in "Antigua Star." The following unsigned letter, written on nntepaper headed "From the Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, Little Stoke House, North Stoke, Oxfordshire" has been received: "Lord Baldwin of Bewdley wishes to state, OH behalf of Mr. Francis, that as your information about his future is incorrect, he does not see the purpose of being interviewed especially for the benefit of the "Antigua Star." which paper he holds in the utmost contempt.** o v. SCOTT TO-DAY'S SPECIALS a CO.. LTD. at the COLONNADE Tins MORTONS JAM—( Usiii -lb.) illy NOW 311 34 Tins Veg: SALAD & MAVONAISK Tins l ll< Wl.l 4 GRAPE FKl'IT JUICE J SI HVI IM.I H IOI S SOI I'S CT OM1 BLAOKWELLt PUNCH < A ruts— prr hot. 3i i I KKII niiMHK per bes .K CALVES FELT JELLY—err Dot 44 Ml SI1ROOM SOTP—prr tin .23 WHITE VINEGAR per bel. r. AHMOIRS SPAGHETTI a CHEESE—prr tin ... .M CELERY a OXTAIL M.II-;.,, i,,. 44 MOCK TI'RTI.E SUIT—prr Un . SMEULEYS GARDEN PEAS—per Un HEARINGS IN TOMATO SAI'CE—prr Un :>• %  SL'NNIWITE WASHING POWDICR For Clothes, Di*hes and Pans etc. Reduced from 19c, to 12c. SIWSI I I ll SCOTT A CO.. Mil. W^/^/^///^MV//A< V^/////AW.V////,'/'////JV. BATHROOM SUPPLIES U W-IKHVN sums HIGH-UP SUITES CAST-IRON BOXES WC I'ANS "S" & "P" THAPS WHITS LAVATORY SFATS HASINS— 22 UM, x 16 ins. & 25 Inn. x 18 ins (with or without Pedestals) SINGLE and DOUBLE DRAIN BOARDS and SINKS SINGLE ALUMINUM DRAINBOARDS ALUMINUM SINKS—24 Ins. x 16 Ins & 30 ins. x 18 ins. GALVANISE SINKS PORCELAIN SINKS ns.. Mi ins, n ins., I > ins. ami COPPER PIPE FITTINGS WILKINSON & IIAYNKS CO. LTD. SUCCESSORS TO C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. Dial ittl A 487 :-: BEI KWITII STORES We must now deal with thi poUtkal conslderetJena >i UUJ matter. The population of thi British Wetl 1-idiei and Hn!i-I Guiana is fust increasing and i ntial tha' work >1K>UU1 be augar production Majeety's Govarnoieni buy only a portion of thn requircmenls from the ^ 1 Indies, leas than our nun1' production, at guaranteed prices is contrary to latrj Mr F.imter. that the 'allocation of 600.000 tons for Australia was based in the present expansion of the industry in response to th<" exhortation by His Majesty's Government to both the Colonies and Dominions to expand production Further, we were assured that Australia would easily produce this total for export with aarJeUng equipment and with canes already planted That these assurances were Incorrect can be seen from the extracts from Australia's sugar papers which we include as Appendix I We think these extracts speak for themselves end clearly show why His Majesty' Government should sympathet-cally reconsider our case for ar increased guaranteed tonnage Into the British Market. Various Reason* We wish to urge ed. the aet 1 % %  .' 11 ke ihu obtained by the We would be lea than tru economic price fixed undithe guarantee.! p r 1C arrangement, thus, falling imaintain, much h prove, the B-W.1. economy, (ivl It is noteworthy that tlv United St.t<~. C.ovrrnmcn reserves practice, whole of the .V market for sugar from t: United Stati Colonial sun: The West Indian pcopl" l'' 1 '' that the promlM to maintain the economy of the West Indies talnod in the statement of AURUSI Kith has not been implemented I the present offer. A failure 10 obtain, a guaranteed markey for the tonnage we now ask can easily lead in the future to currence of the evil 1 which existed in the years 1M7 lu 1939. when there wee wi* tpraad unrest together with 1I1 turtiaiices in the area, due to UM low wages then existing and the ruduccrs ami inability of the population to llud Cuba: grants one hundred enough employment Should world pricea of sugar fall, the present Suites colonies and a substantial preference t and in addili.ni 111.iki 1 slderubie subsidv paymenta to domestic and Color ducers n %  of foreign sugar, other than Cuban, receiving ai into the Unlfc %  urkr! offer could not maintain the present I) rnaol . Caribbean to go back to 1937 con ditlons with reduced an and unrct. ending In : rather than to pay 1 %  S> On Page 5 A Small Shipment of: GENTS RAINCOATS By t'HAS. MrlNTOSH AND NOW nm st 11 #1 / s MOSQUITO NETTING W & 108 wide x : ALSO : : READY MADE MOSQUTO NETS for Single anil Double Berli I IIIM ll The Editor, The Adt'ocatr. SIR, The new Bus stand is not at all encourag ing. nothing iui*derii aboul It I asked a conduc tor the time and he made u Joke of my question I hope tourists will not criticise Barbados on thi account Here in tie sweltering, sun, there is not sanitary lunch counter, and those "weeping lid lie shaped and trimmed. Division! should be made for the buses, tel* phoni bootha, tic WEEPING WIIXOW. A-illow INanTa Editor, The Adrocare. SIK.—After reading a letter recalling the name and work of the great Mahatma Gandhi, it well that this noble man be remembered at this time, and that his spirit may prevail os a "Dove of P eace" to this troubled world Let all nations live as brothers for the sake of Gandhi, remember his plea non-violence, his reI ward. Immortality. It is still time, as the writer states, it is still not too late. ) %  • •' % %  • nations live in peace, let all hate and 1 irfara ceaae. PEACEMAKER Bright 21 The Brfffor, The Adrocaf S1H. In a speech by one of the Hon. Members against Adult Suffrage, I read: "What knowledge UAgptag or 21 have of life which would make him capable of casting his vote. etc.". and again the lion member speaks of "boys at 21 etc." In my opinion a >oung man of that age COUld in.1 ear) bright and well versed citizen and be 1 n his country's behalf Judging by the bapi of llfteen who are wage-earners In one seems quite a ripe age for almost nnv position, and such a person cou)d DO4 be terrnod At the age of 21. I as a woman was capable^ of holding any high office, and .i nilh u (iimw MM. 1 n ALK or sum



PAGE 1

TUESDAY. JULY 4. 1W HAKrMIMIS .MtYIM'ATF. I'AC.I. TIIIIH. Man ley Find:. (Jemenl For Federation • Barbadoa A*.*. %  •, r, %  Mr. N. W. Manlay, R of the I at ;• puitin met %  with, but he look th, probably had to placet their number"who were colourblind to anything than seeing Ret in Fd.'i. On the question of Jamnirn'' attitude toward, a F< II Hi. Hi/. %  %  i i %  said th.it it am that In J.nnaka we !en>ivrl\ eOMtlV local problems thai find it ditlicult to th* mal be, too. bt suggested, tnat the V. may be lukewarm t.. the and he had tried a lot h mind to And reasons f g H Ml M Hatty Bald that he lieli..* | that in Hi" weet ImMM we h.. ;. -iifTiiii-ncy of powerful our common lite 1" cement Had Ml object of Federation. The people of the uolnni.talked the same language and in a remarkable manner they spoke the some kin 1 of way. Get 100 people from th.various sections of the Caribbean together, he said, and it WOOM not tabs, or to feel at home In addition they had common difficulties. common ambitions and he believed II would lxdiSCOWad Uull they hud a single common hope of solving those difficulties, which should be powerful enough, ultimately, to bring federation into reality. In reran! %  had boon I bados and Trinidad to mum tal power for the people. It wai not so M riicse and other r. ( i '.(.niley said. seemed to him to lead to the conclusion that sooner or later Jamaica and the It W 1 u %  who* would have to graph? i" •>f federation and make it work and it would never work, he said until than wai H |K>werfui sentimanl In It, because it had greal I'ifflculties to OW I Mr Manley was Of tlM '-)r T W .1 Tavlor. Principa' or the University ''un, West indies, lift Jamaica Wedneeday morning to attend | if the Executive Committee of the Association of Unrveeetttei of it-' Prill* h Commonwealth. Dt Taylor is a member of the Committee on which he ri reeenl Colonial University CoU. The Committee Dsaatl In New Zealand in early August and after* wards Dr. Tavlor will visit the four University CoKe %  form the University of New Zealand He is expected to return to Jamaica on September B Forced Confessions %  taken • %  %  Canada Studies OldAge Pay in en Is Tllr: l*Ri:S*i or Tilt; IMI'lIU IN OTTUV.V Plrlurr ..hove .t,.i ,h, %  t.lrc itr* "I Ihe Implr. I'rew. t iiion ajwemblrd >.iit.dr UM lloun-r. i Parliament in OtUivj. In thr from row in the cenirr In Cl the lion. John .1 Ator rlijlrnun of th. Time-. Puhltahinc nip.n.i of London and ivi drnl And Chairman ot aun. il ot llir t'mpire Pre** Imnn -in. A mom the m.n> dinliiinuKhrd reprrentjti\r% Irom thr C"fi mnnwrilt'i -r, Ihr lion X" I cotue ml of u no %  %  TO who aaoni costing the niuntrv al %  it ssaj %  '•:i broader age For %  it'-member %  %  %  | %  %  the opera'' %  Lirve>< d • •tie rlnanit.mi its te P ids, it will he cost by the federal government : % %  %  this supplemented b> an addi%  %  %  w| ii, I Advocate CtirrespiMidrnt) QUOROBTOWN THE Colonial Secrt?tar>' replying %  %  •sum :.ub mlttcd by the Fedcralmn of G I on RmpIoyvM Unions calling lor an upward revision of the wa: i structure, has made il clear that the L'ulony'.s gtrwi mic situation and Uw slate of Government %  precluded the possibility of any furtiui rwvision Mkd o\ trail increase of ihe wage and salary structure "f Government emplovees. omission of certain Ken* I The Federation has urged that Cost-of-Living Index, Stated tha' %  laim for an upward revision fron the Committees Report i it: of the wages and salaries structure was based on the fact that devaluation of the Pound Sterling had Imposed a greater financial strain ujion Government employees who had no financial Meet the increased diftlod upon the fiict that the salary structure of the Public %  nd Wages Com-nission implemented In 1949 %  Tier lo dt sluatton, em founded upon a cost-of-llvi: which was based upon a deteriorit.d standard of living. As a possible solution to the Noposals submitted In its origil Msmorandum, the Federation BMta the re-lnlroduction of the saiceas I'roiits Tax, which should remain In operation until such time us the general economic uation JII stilled its removal. Prices Tlie Fedci ation is also pressing r a decision on Its request lot the pegging of prices. the submission of the) the Federation go there has been niterliange of corresponn ;iie Colonial Secretary and the organisation. The IJalona had tirst of all %  titioii to the omission, of several important items from %  culatiuui of the Cost-of-Living arc made. In reply the Colonial Secretary pomted out that the Index was based on the Iteport of the Cost-of-Living Survey Committee of 1942 and said it appeared that the compilers of the Memorandum had made many of their criticisms under a misapprehension as to a number of significant particulars. He therefore suggested that the officers of the unions concerned should give further careful study to the committee's report end, i( itits would (.a n senior officer ol irtment ol La)bou explain to them in detail UM 00n> Ol the Ir .i. \ B| was deer that the Committee dealt with thoai itr : considereii omissions. In thai connection, however, attention to enotner paragraph of the memorandum in which was embodied the list stir Vnlons by the Commi~ tabour si .> complete U t ol Ihe ItettUl upon which 'hi living was based. Inadequate luiormillion The orianloattoi tated the time thr criticisms of the index were made, are honestly beUavad the list in h.r. i complete one. Therefon rruaeonceptlon under whMi tha coot pilers of the memurandum laboured ptodw i clsms which *: IIIIOII facts, this Is the result ol inadequate Information supplied h) n.e Commissiouer of Labour AU<\ not Ihe re,-, %  %  dge e Index. The Comn, Labour is in p..it. if not ... which thereby arose ti.ere wen Dm the Index Aj these were provision fm leiim and cleaniiu;. bOOl | Gums Bleed, Teeth Loose! Slop Pyorrhea and Trench Moulh in 24 Hours [ %  n M %  utli PC"* M<1 .r.**1h>. *.ll vl>l<"• ' >* %  •" **<" i-.'h and la'* io •' %  •" !-•. i-fr )uU f time Sir,'* Ik* craat Wotia war j* IH la<*. C fi %  ..-. Mew Dlseewery Saves Teallt ,i. II,. flmn'ty o> a> A"*rici nn bla^lliic ih. vr r and no" nsiicni in*l*atli Tha (olM-mc MIM tmm Mr W. W |l alio" il" raauW* I^^ •mm. t r, I .utT'fl from rrancS SwiiN aa4 I'.i -Fh*A In IT >•*!• M umi wara-a %  nd bloadliif "'l I *J Ia> four IralH. %  hil•.•'!' Mba* ttlt %  *r* salllnc I •< r all Ih* "-<• %  <"•' !" iniaa* and i %  haa'il %  '' • "** dn-^ar ftaSatS* .' .i — I I .V4II %  %  r .mum I Guarantee* Amosan ., T#F Pyerrkta— Trtmth for talarles, iihc Cotolalal Baeretary miphasisled that any meh use would lead lo an Immediate curtailment. • '.cut. or abandonment of I capital works in progress oi conItemplated with consequential loss jif eniplojinaiil to workers; and lUTent expenditure on public services was %  the attempt to provide additional % % %  l Iwonld merely add to the COSt of lllVIIW. Further IIK %  id, could now be based Hilv ..n increased proOucllon and input, and he -tressed that prolosals of thnature contemplsted %  ganlzation'a memornnlum were consequently /'redoom.•d lo /ai I The Ceaani eeretary added hat he had no doubt %  the Unl an ol the matter ;areful and earnest con tad a dae anuw of Ihe relehtcli rested kpOM :hem. Rl I ring to thai part of the Hi 4um which dealt with the The "I tanisatiflii : %  %  ,. %  eat i -relative Imp .-'. % %  was iheal • i %  > r> i .ntniii: items Included In th 1st upon which Ihe Cnat-of-liVng Ii das wai % %  %  consequence Hie %  trend ol 'he ooel of iimg could not l>" aonarataij redacted in the Index Further, II wai emphn: the omltti the Colonies but the Au>'i tl.v o| particular note. it aadt % foil I t t ought and e\pr. "ion is the %  democrac] pteaerved intact if the othe fr ee domi arc to aui nghto criticur th. itbi M %  ilianehle i l|hl avei law -..biding citizen, and the rights ol th.press should le no greater MM than the tightof tB It is not practicable to imp. %  icstrn iimis on the dally Itbotfl Iheee restnclkJis extending to the weekly Pri bo periodicels, to pamphlet ligtons and Industrial journals, to book to Urnis. to broadcasting, and ..ntuallv to any ioiiu ..f OB press.on by Individuals. The Commonwealth Press Union theref i i record its belief that infrii tement on the freedom the Preai other than itstricti. necessary to preserve the moi and health of the community and the rights of individuals, and applying m like manner to nil i i %  %  ..m • HI wartUM or in tune of declared n uonal mt reani lo protect tti nation, should bo restricted l> %  %  tlon of the community a marking the Drat step towards lutboi Itarlan fovw The Commonwealth PrcM Un. .. %  ounandi that n rrtenvbet l" .11 urfe Uien < % %  .-rriienls t I -ecept un Un.ted NaiVhlcfa < mpioleakenB this print ipfa In any way. or condones the form ol otrol now operated by Of authoi %  II inn ntrlc Helicopter Progress LONIXJN. A ill have 1 %  I Airways materialise. i railway station %  pared by It K A rallwa I i .int re.idy-made DgS Thev OSuaDy have good Clear approaches ond so close a link-up of the SI*JI1 has obvious ivellen %  % %  both tlm B K A are pri oiem or ipliticd. Two ;... %  The Cardifl m %  i L I Eritl h AewjpUne %  i ithortUea %  l N I PionMr Licence KIN. been mnclr to tor i i to enable I %  ... %  %  %  w.\: t& Sun Seta: Mono (laisl (luirteri Jnl) • laU>thiK T Mi |i m lllch Hater; IMim.H 00 im VKSTI:RI>\V Halnfall il' N vtind VeleeMj I* mile, a" hou.* lUroinrter iS am) 111 Mi (I pJM | VJ Ml In %  • %  Th pai v plane lo go Into i i tually i>* able to lake ' %  %  %  % %  %  %  %  i wide It wainstructed to study %  ting lagfc olternath %  ge Bceurii with ithout a means test for Iwne... %  legislation to elimii / I ering of %  %  %  ' %  One wh. ordci of i %  R worker Stie told the i that health ami houslDJ tackl.Nl llr.t an I dalions are to he %  'l th* l"ii)ii ion Pi I in ihe fall \ arornauUng •t aaeli % %  %  rnplear anatyab ol Ihe return, whli coi %  \ill I>I11 oral yeej* A pieli u to) poouUlion DUI and areas will IH. ready willnn a few %  II estlt tted that tlie central ...tr n mired to adn Son no 1 i ill (loni'doorI noil %  %  inllclpates that this Imcc probe into Rri Will provide .1 foi planner %  nd also dor the hlatorian of tfio Penalty for refovn ... up to e —tiN.a i Free Pigeons %  %  %  . Colonial Law* And Hub i -.. Colonial I i %  foUowmg re olu moved bj Mi Pletehu of jam and aacondi DJ U %  Hon. Mi %  i t Malta : %  by ihe Conlerence. Thi Con I recot thai tne C incil id the EPU 1 i.I .1 .. t .n ., i r i \ ing at u fan and equltabli ... i as ol iti eea) f*l %  *" %  ;' i i ., • .i. played K with Ih) REFUND KINGSTON ann.. growerh t un nit to %  %  I rlOUa purposes hande'i im The* want the puhrl "ii At the %  i oi it.. numbei i, %  pig i eM o >t %  Dopt i"i V" sea*! luiure. Hut the ut,.I i iribal warfare. he gieduni ooceptance •>< Burs %  irit un.'er thi N nr ot bi ought i turning Hv IBM %  • % %  [i %  About hit? tha Maori populahodaj la ol miaed %  eanl %  B il With the re %  i 'i I '.i.e. with the Maoris and many ol them are marrying i>ark ... . -I : arcs pride in nd .i determine %  %  %  itn.s of 1'Hlhtful i be ab' 'iwii i" the 1 NEW RELIEF FOR ARTHRITIC PAINS But new treatment does more than ease these terrible agonies. A new product. DOI.CIN, h*. \r- .rented wliit h not .mlv gl proeapi ndarf from the parae due to the symptoms ol arthrnai inrumaluui. but also affai hi thie nwtalioln pn' •< v ln
  • ' round I JOLT IN haa Wn thoroughlj leatad hi i iml.ciN ibeing n~-d aoss wfth nopadei is linr preai rihed by doetnm now And m Sanim.dn.irn,.I livintf n a r.-.ilt ..f Inking DOI Do d n by (he experience %  (i.t IHiLCIN today. A boiil. of 10 nd |.ii|.riN already I..M f0 WiagMsr. S0PP£R OR BETWF r tl MEALS gstfOaen cow The familv'i h*l)h... iKi hppln o( .11... lk childr.n'i IwdktMl depend lo a S'' • %  ttnl on piop.i nouri^hmtnl. K i I o 9 9 > Com Flki thoi Uilv liHl* lUlim ol toin ciiip and easily diverted are the ideal food foi bteaWait, supper or between-meeli With millt or cream and lujer ihey er more nourishing Irian an gM . and coil lell! Each package contain! lii tjenerou. leivingi Served Irom Ihe package njhi inlo the bov.1! Rprsale everywhere Mt / ^eW fast ff/fes me '—L "*v rtior& cfefofoOf andrv//s/ e Wh.11 >M baas al l mi, ulwavi use %  Hsiachsaai i I I H agDi U %  aad %  lag %  %  •. ihai g*vs* foil d> U kWM fa Hr • %  %  %  at yt-Mt neeas as KfeSgeretMa -stay* full aueagta. ha eeeaaen v " pw on FtaaxtaaaaM'i Ft Kimnn i) iy YraH yana ala> %  1 • eiekl* %  pa.bat' r-, eg I yaaal •£ Stays fesh u/rthout refrigeration wm. mm LID. (Inc. 111 Hi it 1-.Ii l.wi.ui.t) Kli'ttrirnl Depl. I01STER BKANDES (O.) KADIOS Pol he It er Ri'ieplHUi. t)ual.|v in tour. ;md Stability. j Till, QlraaaaN M \KV" Mil; (>l LIN lll/MIITir' nnri now BriaaVfn'l new "M.IWMI bMH CAIIOM \ Arc all filled wilh Ihe K It IVIHIIII I. MtlUoai lodaj are say my "What's i;M)d enough for the fil m the World, is good en usl iP*We are ,ilv\;i\. willing lo give I drmon*ir.itiuii let \011r own rar M uHe jt'dB'". (all now at • WILLIAM FOGARTY LIMITED.





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    PAGE SIX II MillADOS ADVOCATE 11ESDAV. Jl'LV 4. I5 HENRY BY CARL ANDFR:OM MICKEY MOUSE %  •• : '''-3 . BY WALT DISNEY ON"-! \(l DOr^TSCE NOTUN" iJAPPSN.N'* K. o. CANNON WITH WHISPER IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE if-.LWIDMf -" '-IS COVtO BetOMfc • OuftM.. BUT I £ iV*WT •DHT A LCCfc -T ZuC W--\ LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER s BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS |>a) ; ,.. '"T t*P I (.ST 8U5V CO [ I,\ s o-*ne>aa • RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND C€S, D6W... ~^>s fiWICAM HAv* \ Mf UTTLi COTTJ.3E.-} s*y wa eyv IT / *ru uxx coo A PLA:E ^ o OK j cou-:x" NOflK...BUT NOT Tp W/l Ji.iT CCU.>T. XS.U. <> nc VfiS JU.6 vES BUT MO. .'.i„ P COUL0MT4fT MT*i3> WOPf C* Cl,o tvmCVT MS. *E*VE I EWE; jyg uO 08> BEEN., —r-. ^ \ -— %  >Ou DC '/KM MOW '.'. WESOTANai LI %  :•.. '' %  5 AHAPE IMLAACK IN •".' TKIAE PARNEPIF I VOU PON'T LOOK UKE HIM INI.... HAiSLINIj. OUTFIT ME-PtEtHl.t.TONSUeETl.EVWlllf BE THAT STATUE •h*etVk A IUNCH OOMf TOUPE? \ Of IGNORANT TMEV WON T FAIL 1 SAVASES. NOT FOfclUAT. i—ftlJICATED-LIKE COLLECT MILLIONS IN < "% GOLDANDJEWtlS II All %  CAME 10 ME WHEN I r'.-.i SEEHYOU IK THAT V^ii %  OUTFIT/ j~—^ Y \ ITSOUKOEP LIKE}-'bO YOU AND ANEAYPCKET/T>lE BENISAPE. I MAD NOTHIN'/ *U DEODEDTO TO LOSE • U lOOT THE 0UN6LE .' DIDVOODO HRTI FOR MORE AND BETTER BREAD 'HARVEST QUEEN" FLOUR is back again — HAPPY RELIEP FROM BACKACHE rto ( hbeur teW Takm DMII PMt' YY'HY PUT UP wb neeJka* ** tl.kcomlan Iran batambe, %  BC pains, lumbaro, *;Jf, tk: >ii muKtn and moil or lb* t i .innary disorder* due W a i Udney %  'iion *h yo* K -T hippy reuet Mine tbouiandi of healthy E Mew the day tbey " %  n* Backache Kidney Pita, Thi well known diuretic and %  f -nry antiaeptic helpa ahiggnni kiune^i to carry oui iheir functioa •J i-jding the blood ofnert* uric •ciJ and other Unpuiltiet harmful to health. Graceful people, etery* wht-r-. recommend Doan'a Pilb to (heir •-•"..! aod net(nbourv I'..: DOAN'SiALSO rr 'GOLDEN CRUST "E" GRADE FLOUR Supplied throughout the war by LAKE of the WOODS MILLING Co., Ltd. ; llaily 1'imdrrrri M hnlr Milk ; O Allans Ulnlr Kollrd CMl ^ Krart IT. |. n ,i M I-T ,I,I $ 1 hr, .. Wi(ll Ml.UIIIII ^ MM • u Flavouring [Menem X Molr't. rwtard Powder ^ I I'.LVI& Sanuorn Coflvr S ll-lb Tltu) ^ Ouinn* i ... ki.,1 (SalM4l C l'.-.:illt~ CLARKE'S "BLOOD MIXTURE Cleanse the system from blood Impurities ; many sufferers from rheumatic ache* and pains, lumbago, neuritis, pimples, bolls, sores and minor skin ailments, can derive great benefit from this well-known medicine. fa> LIQUID •• TABLET FORM | INCE& Co., Lid. j i.Al ?;.jt, SOBUCK SI. #-r rirrr . r ** s £iXiUMm • • LINDDi ILOAMIM • • HI i i M ACI vi 11 • Sparkling glass S Polith l.ghlly that* an lor twice the shine in hnlf the time, just uc Wmdolene. Grease, di't iind fly ntauk* ,:>< in a flash and leave your (lass sparkling and spoilesslt clean. Windolene MBfl ^ %  ftat* tpouwyou can trust osperlonce of n •pnrialtaU Thut I %  lis th^> hnv* mhini-i wurldtdt> tame Tor thair a worthlnaaa— tha ability loKe*n ,. dallrerina pewer uttli.ut n falter throach the wot ravjIMaaji RiUMi'f their aionoriiv too. ind Ihalr wv mainienanca ) •rill be wiae to in-UI ime There i-e rnoice for the Mb vua have in mind —Pelrol. Parattln ur Hir*l operated. Your dealar haa detail* of the varJ.t* of r^iuipmefit available, happy to *lvo you advn and inlormatlcn On all ap*taJ piotlema t; ihe HoftU sprriaiiirta behind him PETROLPARAFFIN-DIESEL SOLE DISTRIBUTORS :FOHT HOVAI. GARAGE LTD. PKone 2385 Distributors Phone 4504 m A BRIGHTER LONGER LIFE ''' %  ••'•''••'*•*•*'*'*'.:','.:',•,•,',',', %  ,', %  •AWi-V*V//>W/// A'-.* Keep Your BICYCLE In Fine Trim!! ;* We are offering the following DUNLOP ACCESSORIES BUI DURALIFE AITO UMllltlls Wltfeh I li.Mi.lr .rai.iialu. (OIHIIS. . %ll \l.l. WhitcparkRd. ROBERTTHOM LTD. Dial 4391 Bl IKl BLOCKI Ml I) l LAI'S nur. L£Vi:RS HANI> (iKll'S i I\i iiminis mints KIM TAPES PATCH STRIPS 16~ %  Kr\niITX PATTHES LONQ AND MIDGET OITFTTS VALVE Kl MBLi; \K(.E \Mi BMA1X BOLOHOM ram n MI* a \sii' iti < HROME-PLATEI> RTMS ROADSTER COVERS AND nun %  x ij" If \CING (OVERS AND TIDES -:G" x V t t AltRIER (OVERS AND Tl'BES M" x IU" SPECIAL PRICES TO DEALERS I ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET DIAL 4269



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    PAI.I r.K.m BAKHADOS ADVOCATE II I-1IW Jl I.Y 4, 1951' West Indies Playing Attractive Cricket And Public Paying To Watch SOUTHAMPTON. July :t J% Jack Kidney, Weal Indian 1 tana manager, was quite] optimist uinday about Clyde Walc ('hannel Tonne) Ct nrty-four yeei o*d Shawcrosa waa reticent m ipaculatlna on the jugnifloance of his sppointroan) He i *i *ientcd* The Channel Tunnel will have to come in lime." sighted -upporlei of 1 on both innel have rnrtU<• push ihugh ihi\.ist and cosily project. The channel Bl Its n est point is 21 mil — The farthest the BchSJ i evn got was In 1876 when the British actually begao cofUtrucu(w II rnile tunnel at Dovn Wort Mopped i> -i ii iter owing to political tiOQJ. ante than avaai lew years plans fnr a < humid tunnel havout 01.MW.QOO It was originally pro hosed that Britain Would share equally tht coal of construction and the profit* The Channel i ompany hn %  ctk of oeo.ooo. acenrding to ihr latest published nccount I MMl Coital of the company Is 1254,000. Biggest shareholder was the Southern Railway Si:.. rllMtion, those shares are held by the British Transport Commission INS The West Indies are having m tir ancially successful tour. KidThe response of Itu public to the attractive cricket to play ha> Ijeeii fine Knenans tut the le u I beet A i are <>r .inothn bin M'.< % %  'ed today owing to rain, I ut if the pitch, which was almost w aterloffad up to bate U M out. Sonny llnmadhm should have a n* %  JTOW Yesta Is %  the tourists had an enjoyable day at Ventnor llv ol K eater. Tossed Into Tiber At 19 Months LONDON Two fljnet i •' ,, mc tor s chance •>< ttw %  „• ..mi fortune whit h of i swim aeroaj th* I :ii-i Channel One HI them l*\id trunk. VI of !• I AM 55lh Street. New York. s^U he has had the sKlmmliw ur^e from the tender ag-e of II %  ninths, when infather tossed li'm Into lhTiber river In Rnm with rope around lib. wjisl-fi. lest hk •uinipiini prnuf The IXHKI %  ..t rrenh i l'i Town*. -. s an In ba% II Dally Mall A'i>7.niak. ol nd Street, Buffalo only two Anierlcat" ibmlttod snti %  tht (or the newspaper late Auftusl I.: Rain Washed Out Wimbledon Games K.nn staQlon boo John Goddard lets his first looi l A | winner o 111 be ra< ma u. tiie Wr.t India Ml Ml VMIKkllt .i numb* i % %  before retirlni to %  I Rockley GoK Club Plans Gala Day Circus. Gym kha n a. Gam im I SomtthniL; rsjsjttnbUi g o comb nival, u\ui burloMnw show la In the pi Rockley i;>!f and Country C'l ib, where %  :!l precede Hi" pro enUtioii ol pi in %  n Au| tut 5 Under ;i nib-cornrnittee conaiatusfj ol l>i Dean Klevan,. William Atkinson ond Don CleLfmonte %  programme is being that promlaoo to brighten the occaofon foi competitori ei ollke ——• Under consideration are a lona> vini: contest (hat will spray th" WIMBLEDON. July 3 11 mornuu ami mo Umatch bOUIJ i %  'npU-tPd in the Win %  i lay Bui the de< nd pi<.. < l aboul JII boux In poor hunt, end roll rajay hav,. laved the two top ooed in th< Prank Sedgman, Auatrallo, ond Billy ToilU mied States. i Budget j B .our Nurnlx-r One. and [o ., Sedaman was behind Art Lar^ei. ha* %  %  of tennis I fhen the tournam %  Pt> o " o r UM dbu pp> %  %  pared llppn ted for hours um %  the second -el j •.> —**i !" • : %  hv bounes or ttw I in ahead 3 %  %  %  i leveuad %  %  igh by tie.* laklns the 11 \ .:•. %  ,'.',','.%: .%  '. Ill All III HI NOW IT'S III \\\ WII i: COMING ATTHE EMPIRE '*:;/*. .' : %  !'' I | WI/JIAMIiniM'V 'i J IOWCUIWill) '.: ? BH.1Y union/; I I MOWIK'UWW \ LflWaRDARMOlDl tDear^fe 9 SfMrwasswe^sSHSfflav.' Ii 1 0O0lOS l*H IIIKI Soccer Stars May Colled £2,000 Each ENVIABLE JOB RIO Dc JANEIRO July 3 lira all an players arc to recelvi *200 each for ever? match they plav in the Una) pool of the World t"up—a iota! of £600 each. Ttiev are to K<-1 further £500 acli if they wm the Trophy. WUh other emoluments already received, each Bomathmc like eZ.OOO from UM Cfaampionshipii. In addition, the i Ity "I It"d< Janeiro Is now conaideruifl what awards ihould be made to thi Brazilian leam il the) prove victorious Then uu-sincs* houses, linns and .stores are likely to make Uient h#iMl>m UVC bl UM It Trinidad and British Quians These two le k l.l \1 ,% % %  I Wcarins a blue bla* neat cre~t ..' the B W I Rlfl AflKhdattori on I gold—liispec tot Lluyd. ARnourer, told me ihej loveh trip OVei "No trmihle Bl the Custonu i "i. alt out Klllis. ,. %  (,. about twenty Aetualh WC h.i\ not had time to unpack thi bul "hen we do we shall get them tested for uminiiy rlghl away." ataay ut tiie Wen Indian alarki men were at Lord's tinweek to Hodgson Cup Races In B.G. om On own CstieaaeBstaal] In toll halls. ,i pitching and putUl %  ill fray the stoutest | isslbly a nine-hole compettuon with eacn only one club of < i.im c Hoe evei. the HO* discard all these iiviiiii nf more i i: nslr.itintr %  i. i %  tore Uw uiiai programm* %  %  Trophiea %  %  n iilirin at the ssid of the ds receive tl %  have rOn llu-ough the 1949-50 season, if any. and these presentations will i> followed by th<> usual rounds at PM well-krnnvn nineteenth hole In oilier that the field day and lion ol pi In would tali i l ice after the llnai tournament of the season, the Mixed Foursomes, last avt nt on the current • nodule, ben I to) ward one month and will start on July IS, entries cloning <>n ThurWUQI July 13 at which time the draw will be three lengths at the rear. OBi IROBTOWN, ine 10 A larK'* crowd ni rov lined the East Bank ol U* Demerara River on afternoon and cheen Desmond Anrir:ii.ir l,v crews drawn r %  -i members of the Demerai i Roe in| Club. Andr.ati %  i Ing t.i • named ..IT, I Sn Frederick Seaford. C.BJL, was w:t "IT U. H 8ealordl" The benford' ou the Inside, rowed the faster strnk. "Humphrey' bold thent nice!) on .i slower stroke At UM mark. UM "Seaford" leading by narrow inarain. wi .•trokes to UM minule i.hile then ODpOnentl did about 3o At the hulf-mlle, the Seaford had jumped ahead and v. length nwuy. contlnuliiK tn increase their lead all the A' about 300 yards from UM Bnlah the 'Humphrey' made a game %  ffort but nevertheless was about | V BARGAINS I GALORE Sde. Tin frill com plate the evenfai now schixiuied and the fixtures for the 1950-51 season will be arranged by the I Commit September at the General Meetinn (iinllenue Ladder However, the Chpllenaa ladder recently presented to the Club by .i croup of the members, win koep the boll rolling rtsaollj over the falrwayi between competitive campaigns The produced •> i i He addrd that he biit ix-en """' we,e ** Lord's tin produced more Interest •Ir.aratrsl for heli>ln" excltemenl than ..nvtldng at I si %  nnhas .ni,., d., r i nB bde wsv i** <"• •/ "• thinking of ren1 tm Rockley Club since Colin M-rvicc ,n %  tsjeelslon set * that they tlayles got %  hole in ... %  Votntak -aid in his npplicauon that he is 34 years old and sron B number of maralnon SWhnnung ch am plo n a hl p a Among them he included a ten-mile world's swimming championship in Toronto He said he also has won Arnartcan long-distance swims. —I N.fl Itches" Kl<> Dl JANKIItu Members of the soccei football Miuad from Yugislavia. in Hra/il for the world championships, are iimrily known to the Brazilians H the Itches." The reason [or this I tiearlj i vet • v.u. i .. ruune 00 i in irh" oi it.h" i '.. !.I../ill.in i %  [. -• ,v ),,. %  ..! .hie with the word "Yugoslavia" anyway, hs adopted lbs ibhret let! HUH %  %  I %  %  —INS can wateta HrUlgi' Tn I : I Bl Clerical Cricket BRJ8TOU B The Rev r Kenned) did not lcc|i his appointment Bishop of Batta and Wells As the time of Ins mew near he had scored -ii run* (or the Somerset CsOrgj In their nickel match %  round The Bishop of Bristol, Dt f A C'ockiti, was luckily watching UM match and when he heat problem he tl the Bishop of Belli and Wella snd Baked thai :he sppolnunenl iw calicelled%  Body erenl on to core M runs. — ti mi . I N !)(. Ii Every I iine ItVAQQO ON TetE TOUR & fL Of THIE 502A AATER WfteStJVS'OR SPjRhEp/ THE FREE COMPLl #EK T ARY 80TTLE The blind SI ng of high and km h.in i %  with the result that ehaUenges were running up and down the Ladder i inti before the peurl lettered nameThat the matches at to ba c ayed ovn 18 holes llghl forth delighted i majority r the Who, no douht. had in mind the few mug hunters who %  v Ive handl proti %  t thi .t sdvantage bv *ii king tn match play fall t" turn ba volun res that bettm thati thirl i the board. Of course, thdiaw from the Ladder challenges who dose n Bo far UM i iv i een • one, however Their Cook Gave Them Victory M \nitin Jidj 3 Spenlah rootbellers who i Bngland out of i R i Cup lucked tl* %  %  %  nd with .i cook who knew urces thought hen tonight radon a % %  .-.• .'.uielrothe Seaford" pushed pusse. (Stroke). D. Morrison (3). F. King (2). M Marshall (Bow). N Hhodc(Coxl. THANIS SUPER SALE ALREADY? OlNiatk'Havillaiu] MiiRUjiinieiy(M Wlll.l \M WYLER'S n*ffeirvss MIRIAM BOtHNS mm IMDW 'Saw mtm '^i The Who's Who of BUMPER PROGRAMME VENUE-GLOBE THEATRE TIME-FRIDAY JULY 7th 1950 coNTOSi \N ra g 1 ut n BELBI ntiN-N JOHN MARSHALL slrialng WAliTRR BfllKK 1 1/. HARBWOOD 1 UCILLE CRAir. II M Mflll \v l'RRMAN FORDE -tar Avrai ri*<-i 1 U ist, I hid snmeonr to l.c "M* IVolish Hejri ODUT STARS— THE Mil PON QUARTETTE M \STIK ni M; Baeae M] Balssei N Bexas : I %  •.... %  and >-!^ U' 8 BOid: English football to ..dnff. B —ReMter ,',*,*,*,<,-V-',**,*,C***-'-*. If you are If you wan! them strong and comfy 1 MANSFIELD M $11.23 Bl k Suode and Brown Suede Guiiet Courts wilh low dumpy Black and Brown Glace Kid with nature form toe Brown snd Blue Suede Courts wilh high Louis heel* $11." $12.0. CAVESHEPHERD & Co. Ltd. Brood Street PERFUMES THAT LAST QOI V-IVrliini 1 •naVM I'tmder (faee and Hath) A very nMSsMral sasaeunenl • Imni THi: (OiSMIIPIIIIIAN RED HAND PAINTS for 1 ur laterler iieeorjtinu ut BPM "CALAMITY JANE I \ Ii; 111 Belltlh Movie Tone N> < VRTONS HEINKKIN'S III I 1; 1:1 M \I:K'. ;• i;hii;i s will be opened at 7 p.m. an purposes nd felling* "MATINTO" FLAT OIL PAINT MnUrd In Hhl. (w !" and limn In I (lallon 4nd ', GaMon Tln^ iir Woodwork S" ENAMEL FINISH PAINT siiwked in EfkMs .Hid < ream In I Gallon. i.ulim and ', <^llon Ttni or Ixterior Woodwork TROPICAL WHITE PAINT HARD GLOSS PERMANENT GREEN PAINT -I.,. i.,i In I Gin.. J Gin. and ', Gin Tins Phone 7. 44*6. ; --*-*,*-',•>'*<. '---t.*,-^*-'--, •,-.*,'.',*.*,-,',*.'.-,



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    I'u nilaj. Jill* I. Barbaiws luiuxcate rrirr: FIVE rt.\! B V rur K N. KOREANS THREATEN SUWON W.I. Sugar Talks May End Today (From Our On Corrapoadent LONDON, Jnlj :;. A FTr'.R many weeks ol skirnnso.ne,. WeM lnili.ni sugar Ulks are iir.un. |a a ejnani II IS understood that thr (•ovcrnnieiit have alread\ mailt* a rnmpromiM* proposal to the UVsl Indian delegation and that the lin.il chapter in discussions will be written tomorrow cwimii; lien imlh negotiating bodies will meet in the House -t Commons. Our correapondtnt learnt that the new Bnh.ii offer, which is in effect a proposal to shelve the, bole quest] ioi three yean until new contracti come into tori nut been received favourably b Mi Gome*. leeguea, • Tl i %  If II Ul not see their anrj %  %  %  %  %  %  in tin., event Veai ii %  ould retun I %  i Oovemmeafi offer it d expected ould i" reconvened and an entln ..ttack thought .'iii. More Sugar For British Housewives BRADFORD, Yorkshire, Julj 3. llritain will eooB fi 1 oath person in the 1. rally, Food Minister Maurice Webb announced This meeM 1 >at in one week ttfc pounds of sugar on each ration tea 1 1 %  the . I , HKUZF. July 3 Governor Sir Ronald has lifted tin. Emergent posed on February 13 during the devaluation crisis. The llftlne of the ban folloWM heavy preas end publn and queaUoni asked n the House of Commons Thi> is m 1 to be taken .1 loo thai talks fall through, howl U.S. Troops Sel Lip Korean II. Quarters TOKYO, July J (^ENERAL DOUGLAS M;K ARTHUR'S Head quarters announced today that three North Korean columns were threatening the eastern flajik of Suwon, a walled city 25 miles south of the c1f> rured South Korean capital, Seoul. One column had reached Yongin, ft miles east of Suwon. The thiru column was moving south about 30 miles east of Suwon. The announcement said South Korean defenders were still holding Ihon road junction. .1 town east 01 Suwon and the line north of Suwon. They were moving reinforcements north in an at tempt to check the North Korean threat to the city's eastern approaches. • tighten from around fire Allied headquarters a 110 sard thai three Communist miumns re%  %  need H River ear Kwni l< North Kori .1 ., %  be % %  utflanl \ i '-. ITeai Indian eegai Delegate* poke lor .1 picture outside RO* MACARTN'KV) With the Ameriean PorCea) mi South Koreii I'ront. July I North Korean fighters today hit Ann'i nan force utter then deployment In South Korea %  casualties on Amerftari cround troopg Km 2:niinuii-s seven li hten. strafed with nieiteti .urn rorward posltioni a Kile I lay Huong Q U without .in or anii-mrcraft protectii>i. aircraft be In %  lei 1 %  >," rli oi %  repaued 10 1 %  ; -. %  %  1 stories thai UflOU PeopleV police 1 y Droops "'ere containing in around the formei I %  > uere -highly BXaggi aUon lntonti.it. iggesb Soviet unit Dresh occu| I pier man'" %  %  r-fus-ee <; %  1 the Bast that 1 ; I %  ' : %  rate %  %  I no approbi 1 —*• liter >• 1 ran ivai corrcapi intents the .... ranipsigiu of the last war xnpi %  ll au Biraalaii IwilM lighten, and not Uerman Stuks Who all thi H i .it will. A sergeant from a Kentucky vetoran armoured division in Europe doling the last war whom 1 half an 1 the dm American inrantrj caaualli ol Uu Korean war whan be wai Injured in Ids foot during the itratlng. Attack In headipiaiti 1<-.ubtished in a schoolhouse will children ti.. ing and with South Korean flag* much in %  BbOUl to 1 %  lent rumble uf the bombing at Seoul when Rghta a -ups of twee and thread oeelli oil to diva on i i .1 1 1 tatted on patrol hour before > streaming south dived for rover Fur five minutes A.,, under rocket and pin attack with great t bhie smoke b I lowing as a land mark among %  .. ,I,M %  POCKET CA3TOON i>. OSBI i< 1 1 WCAS1 I Thieves Grab CIO.OOO From Exeter Cathedral LONDON Ing a wai for 1 %  E %  %  (josMhle Ti%  %  %  1 — Banter BATS I %  1 irrned ran ra In Kon er, were now 1 lined In I R 1 ittli an 1 miei the commarMj 01 M %  ml William K Dean ! %  %  v varahipa, %  p in..1. ,.ir botl 1 %  vest coasts bul 'wluSoul ir acuon.* 1 II %  •> Yonj % %  North Korea b) 10 1129 Bupi 1 co m— l g ai %  I , \ Barely BdbyAustrs ""• %  Ihst . sN %  ,. e and *> %  %  1 •bit. n Iruj rka pet South, con* n Ichnn I. miles south ..i ..ni, ..mi ii,..North Korean KoreanDebate III lllMI-C Ol Commone tit\si 1 n/iOHTON) LOffDOM Pi %  ii ml Attler I .* -tiN.rn. I %  I %  1 ... Korean altsj Pha Oovernmenl si*eakers f.n tin House "i Com* r ons-Kni' % %  w, dnei a handful ol I-aboiit 11 %  %  taken 1 n Kon Nations Seeurltv Couni II 1 %  It wanUI 1 .. den .., '..,'., of the nUdarfty of 1 |0 the 1'MII I '.' son %  id I porl — Rrulrr. eam u r daue admitted the 1 N Iwln-engtnad In1 1 attach bornbei %  %  %  . %  Nips had ouuianked the slrategi. town of Buwon aftai rapid a A'tinn\ has (uartei egk %  hat North ltd n ptad mlnoi .• had igabi tallea bai h Then. h.,d ban Borth Korean an M shoot if m • own plane, hid been reported. Troop* Retreat I ll'. Kon %  ,. 1 %  1 .,. > %  had retreated 1 and dulntegi its 1 %  A Noru Korean Ainnrsmnu niiiiir quoted tonight by ihe New '. % % % %  ,, colvi •• fJd*jJ|i Ht \n\\ Mai ....... 'iiia(Min( O'e 1 %  %  1 Ihr Of SWEDEN AGREES IXlNIKiN Julj 3 Obn radio said to nlgpl Ian lan baa n pued to the N tii on Korea, saving he is in full it with action takei ... upon at pn Keutrr Puerio Rico (kin Draft VeU) Constitution WASHDvOTON, July I I'resident Truman today signed %  bill giving Puei' to draw up an I uUon, 1 The Bill said the n< m Uoo "shall provide %  Republican I'.i'ii of Oovaraenent and -hall include bill rights" The Goveiiinn % %  • I' MSla Rl D .'"ri gtoee HUT under aa Act pas-' ilurUpn. Kenler PAINTS by LEWIS BERGER Great Britain) Ltd. U.S. Marines And Bombers Ordered To Far East lul) 3 %  %  for military strength in the %  need here at Camp : ral Douglas V I rill bet BBI to the Far £ast since %  ". I pan ..( the Strategic Command of the United Statev Aif Force. In another move. %  %  from Burtaank, California, to-day oa 1 l.lfl light to Viska dl augment Jet already on an alert as made with the Trun.an and the Joint Chiefs of Staff, a Navy I rpokesmai would go East I. of 13 lo 16 day Healer. U.S. Plains Bomb North Korea LONDON Soviet NewAv 1*001 iiiire Urnlghl %  Arnerica %  % %  %  1 Pflterdi %  %  %  —It -ulrr. MIDWAY" FOR THE MEDITERRANEAN WASHING The Uiul"! Bl tq rdgfal tl M II sr "k [th Fleet in •.',i Mediterranean. — (Hester) For Galvanised, asbestos, or shingled roofs LAST1KQN > ... 1 %  .. 1 %  %  1 1 %  %  %  r .II. I laid! %  %  AUSTIN C S PIT1 HER P1.ANTAIIONS LTD COTT* 4 UTD rNDRY LTD R. ft O ( H kl %  I!



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    TUESDAY. JITY 4. lt&) BARBADOS ADVOC \TE PACE FIVE SUGAR MEMORWDIM a> Frem Fanr I Is it not 11 :ly to *.ind as against £i I the money in lair prices, rail aft than in gran;*, and ihu* w a bf strategic ntNOl foi friendly V/pst Indies moving to therefore shall nol ( res. the point poll in ui MI ifthootff full MaplojuM-ti foi youi iwople ibatittanot here, ai. ; bought bj the the MOORU >.( which nt cot nq %  plemeni.*! ^ i-> your own. Net l oil vi> ten I qutn J The poll. • England. It Is submit-.-.! fa .,:: Government doei.i appear io seriousness Ui-l tie* .i..i. b consistent on the orw h** **?* %  ""*> "Otlkl be WO have its declared policy lo gel prOdUCOOn In lh< •way from exploitation into a So far ai tin w. i position o( Uu-eU-eship. extending %  %  oiici-rnv. i. iDto pai-.nerthip. We have the tn cr colonial areas hold the same Development and Welfare Acts view), we hav.th,Und. the and the Federation raropoaatl (or ^""^Y' the British West Indies and British knowledge to produce 1.800.000 Guiana We hav strong economic ,on al **ooabto costs, and It tie, between the United Kingdom "* undoubtedly be and the West Indies and br.t.sh *•"*/* <"' • to let 1 Guiana, particular!} J £** $** ''" "' fban to control couOuoos which in %  fled :'. ,lnw .. n "'"i ,: '"' • %  require the CotonaM to buy iron the United Kingdom at high lUV controlled prices. Os the ataei ban* 1 h.rc la His Majesty's GovFur many ,|„.. l(los t[ ernmenl planning that llie BrmMi j IjtvP undoul.tr.li. Weal Indies should sell cheap a j a ,k of economic stain; portion of their sugar crop, or nol demned as thej ire to m agrtcul produce it at ..11-His Majesty, tural deatiny with its difficulties Government preparing Ihg gTOODd dug to diseases, peats, drmigh for a retiaction In th* Hritish and Hoods. the on.* Been*M v. i cfa West Indit-s economy. wkMCg the the* nevd is financial stability people's standard of living is It appears to us that this stability already distressingly low and can be obtained by reserving the bear* no comparison whatever British market for Colonialand with standards in the United Dominions production. Kingdom Thcr r, "" ther.-f..r.As a result of Colonial Developjustifiable reason why there should rnent and Welfare Schemes, he limitation on colonial produc Colonial budgets arc being severelion so a* to leave room for the ly overtaxed L> ran ...iditions and P u rrna p r f>reiim sugar espoci Omenities lo the structure ol West General of U %  %  %  the Colonies; and then |,..v the dhTfeulttce which MCTU rrom -coiiomic dijtress %  i s In thei sugar hgg been marketed dumped pi. la the broad picture and tinpol which we submit would give th* highest result .ii hap) %  contentment in our part of the colonial empire. %  told Hardship* Dunn,: |na> pggj -. % %  ,. n | MM have suffered i ti.irdship because ..r it-onom aubiltty, and it certain)] aee— %  UI Diat the tim,. ,iits Novembeif 24 IsO|>eningI)ay For 4th W.I. Conference %  %  BSanB was publi* %  %  C r Indian society. While ditions have been created in lha Ortt Instance by granU Irom His Majesty's Oovenuneut tpartly in an endeavour to overcome the dleffects of past aitiii-o.ik low augar prices) the permat' luhment' which have accrued ta a result roust now be met by 0 Very substantial in. %  %  -.. %  recurrent revenue! ol thes Colonies Take the Federation pi concurrent with this attack upon h( unrrr1a)niu ^'uv^'Wi the social wellaie problem, of .... ,,,, area, there has been an expansion „ w of the political privileges of the hav in a com: . people in the new constitutions „,„„ V isitu, L the W\ |i which have been granted to British Guiana, each reporting on aeveral of the territories during the economic dlatn the Mine pei-iod The West Indian nles and people have come to regard all p> the exchange control measures which arc m i.i Britain und which nre applicl rlEorouslv m the Colonii %  . i %  i %  i : Research Council. iban %  laio IK 1 un 1 of the m Fourth ScaoHNM The Conn t the West Indian I anoa [F rtfe bV %  It wa i...'inn.il organ. '• t o K,jV C.J. Opens July Grand Sessions THKJVLYSTTT1NG I I I with the uajual 11 %  %  % %  %  Jugllec, .* %  :r Allan CoUymorw, pn Ilk) day I I %  %  tman, repn i Crown. I %  pea 1 t' ntlofl bo kill oi dV i lib InJ 0 of %  a iik.-iv 1 limb p. %  unanent or serious injury 1 &V noa wl ^ isefa cauaad the fatal were of such a nature and done with such weapons that a reasona e man would knom that they to res u lt In death or %  • %  illy hurl Pol olo \\ ednesdai iM 1SON I.I ..INN . •. and Jury completed th •, ol [nd even and wen i'\ UM Cl ...... god with his con gratulalMma for the despatch will which they had done then work %  %  %  A .. asfi ne moui. | %  mi KOI st VautaVaMA <'i Villa % %  l| II p.m. There air 34 cases on the Cairni a vhich two are for murder and one is for manslaughter. The Chief Justice in nil Chaff! to the Grand Jury Hid Mr. Foreman .IM Gentlemen of the Grand Jury. In COM then atnrhu '>" uw <>n the Grand Jura snd I othen 1 shall I %  B exphnn 1..111 duthl Assize Diarv T 1 BDA1 No 1^ — R v li.M.h Walters. No 13 — R v Praael i\..iiNo. 18 R v Hill*. W..I .Ml N'l SO R v Allan i %  %  1 -M -1. \\ \,. — R \ 1 riIliomp*u.i 1 \riirtl Hearor. K v Mlgiionnr lafllfcam that the lowert standard praph sad radio UHepnone tartfl should be IntTOi Ible .: %  %  Carlbbi an area %  i nun hart on Id take place in C %  i November 24. 19S0 and that th* opening session would prior to the Fourth Session ot till w.-t Indian CoeuTerence and lha you are not entitled to closing sessions t %  which to bull political itapHity? What of these Federation proposals so carefully and energetically fostered by His JJJJJ Halaaly'i Government? What chance ior these, calling for Increase.i overall Government expenditure, in a retracting British West Indian economy'.' Self-Supporting It is oamltted that the Federation must be self-supporting to be successful. Yet i: has been shown that during the initial years It will be Impossible for the Federal market should bereserved t Government to dispense with Colonial production on the certain subsidies from the United terms. Kingdom; even on the basi s that the price of British West Indies exports covers cost of production. If there is a collapse in the price of Colonial produce then the federation will be still-born. The Grenada conference took the view lha! !hr had been reached In '< negotiations could not be disconim nected from the grave political 1O 900,000 tons. Havi repercussions which Inevitably t hi 8 restriction it is %  considerations which ap 1 longer be applicable If Ot the.present tUnt), an I it appears likefy for mat to come, the Colonial market.. .1. largely reserved for U.K. manufacturers based on productioi costs, we lire entitled to ,.sk that there should be reeipiixitv m th; regard and that the U.K. sugar Tills seems lo US to ideal relationship between th' rj.K, and the Colonies through which th^ir economies can b complementary to each other Coming now to the offer of Hit Majesty's Government, the B W I Sugar AgaClaUj0U has under great pressure accepted an overall restriction of export prod uc tion accepted jew that rnust follow from it. Are those of lhe whole of this quantity should US who have had faith in the good |, ave a guaranteed market in the intention* of His Majesty's GovU.K. at reasonably ramuneraovt ernment <* he gravely and bitterly pr i c es In as much ho disillusioned? the B.W.I. Sugar A t o made further con. 1 This matter cannot be treated a* ,„_ lo aci (ip a guaranteed markebusincss transaction and f(([ onW 725,000 tons, wo are <>i a mere for only ._ DM on bion thai tbii is the mini mum nuontiiy which should * %  : -i. -, %  MOastl „1 It W I 01 at %  \l".i %  1 %  !' 740.000 I ., Wo i i not come Bo U Countrj and ask for I the concern of the Ministry Food alone, though even on this basis the Wot Indies should have better treatment. This la not %  mere matter ot I! ernment bargaining with someone who has come to sell them food We are Colonial territories and anU p „„ 729JMM His afahstty^ Government bf cession, but as a Just eetti< {Si! -SCnr ;< produ^ a. * !" < < ".cot thi S n are to C OnSldei Mich bU au unenl sa shall bo placed a unino the Itnai • lion, or such ol them yjpU DUO • onsidi net i-s-.n v ..1 hether %  (>i imi %  Probable Guill M ilkc In these cases you may Uriel the •M malice, that is to say that the wfckad intention l 1 threats on the %  % % %  ., . .1 fn case No. 3 a chauffeut h i.htei by w (tiaent dnvinu of a motor c ucle. If the pjefa and circumstances reveal a probable case of of woiindini: and lx)th of am were repn nted by Mr I K Waleott Kan over ui thi till kaep the peace and be of good bahaviout for 18 months 'lh. % %  afar*, 11. %  I lie, married ^> man of QaW Church B. tti %  Mr Waleott aflei expls %  im a In w h ic h the had been conunltted '• I 1 1 Court to be ieme.it I T" A prlsna faelr eaao IB made out when lhe peoseCUUOO hae.-lab• hl OiUM %  evldenca the probable aetitence RUlll of UV 1. are in 1 u ( concerned With the defence, and [„. p. 1 tponcd Hi. ould folio High Winds Sweep City % %  i women w.i Stn p ne < ware blown I ilan 1 Orml) hoiduiK %  %  ahM had drfncult) In %  ; %  1 Kl r while iMtssing through Broad Str-'l with a tray uacfOsd her head, suffereci hen a big gust of ed the whole tray ov. ng % %  1 rything to %  or her breath she icked up every• %  • to h.r tru the witnesses for the defence A true bill cannot be returned atain-l M u n ices n majoiity ..f at keesl twelve of you so decide. The Ca len da i tu ntion consists of thirty four indictments as under 1 ManiliiiiiMri | M anm 11 %  Marti itarf.i-ii -ui. Il'imlav Hurelari .ml l.>*>i\ p lea ded guilt] of remoter knowini; it to have %  Sentance was also postponed in the case in which Rttt llarew.~-l lllty on Ihrw 1 itlOO of ateoin | !e was represented by III i: K Waleott Kt' t.oes An.) t om Bh In cai l\tl V...H Murder Nos. I and 2 in which per* m ire charted arlth osuroer, ... u.'r "*? -"rged facts and clreumstanece the Kill ol Indii tment under which naturally differ but the law applihe was h %  cable in both cases is th • hill". Webster who told the waa a aaaunan who "goes aim comas'', pleaded guilty of rcceiv mtc stolen property 111 two different ..... He .,1 ..> pieaderi being 11 habilu,.! 1 Sin. nee was pti:-t|H.nrd. He : LL.1 he is not a Barbadian. His it. II teiiee ID the 0100 111 wfilcfa llavid Cheeseman. St. George usherman, pleaded gmitt ..r bouaehteaklni and larcens Norman W. 1 !,., %  ) after the Grand Jury found that %  E l GENI ODI1NQ1 0 N I %  Di afann peag %  UhU (H v -u.\i:a %  ... I 1 A mu .1 %  %  It .s in Arthur Hub the housi 1 \ i IM m 1 NKNOWN %  %  .... tars of a : at sour grass. Tlu %  A Kill IK Fauci 1 Hill, si Joseph, wa la %  1 n. 1 b lead m Bpa Hall 1 Mui %  A N ,\<(iiu.M currad on HI the weekain. \ cie ov oed %  I Mill, and rM Nehlesl 1 rwned by %  v. u : .inn. 1 Nurse ol lhe 1 address. %  T in \uiiiir CAR <;-4. owned Inven b) John MeD loath or N > I n \ involved 1 I bl<" 1" %  1, %  T m norm > > mi MA l for l lent in 1 In4 h-iim-sf 111,UK t H.OOK INKKCTION Mil \s demand . this new. more eHective I>i OOM tea ta a HI \ i Haka mle.lwn *rf huaeiUl.lr.tn M ith JBffPINB, the new, powerful enen-kiuor, It kill, • %  v. %  II 1 IIM % %  r, t' I JEYPINE 1 prot. < ti.01 i:.. .: Uu ,r... ,„ % %  viiful hilling [n. In, being ilHl t I 1 I %  %  asj at 10 a.m. to-day. Cine A tljou rned inn ol Vaua Hall, Christ charged C MTalwyn of It of cloth t %  1 D !. %  Evan be ikMen a/fully obtained. The %  ninitted on June 1 iiuad until July 13 li I'c 25 Gill said on June ID equence of lol| h Au%  ifj) < I him a him in her man Won with th • %  • sic* 1 "t dress ,ax %  "" We-t Indian letting HJll 1 reduce the amount of duty pay *~ Importerl cotton yarn etc the duty free Unpoi "aw lotions of marhiner Ihat lhe oi 1 I00.OOQ t 1 fi of thI. 1 evetopm nt Compatu a,.j relating I 1 wage 1 : ifflcieiil lo ensure them 1. iOla slaiil.ird of living. VV Obituary Mrs. Alice Skinner The death OCCUITed at her r denc> Aberdeen, Bank Halt C Road on Baturdaj avanlog si Bge of 80 years, of M llenrv Skinner widow of lhe late Brandford Skinner. A Mrs. Skinner who was of advance.! years had not been actlv*for some time on' maintained the friendships which she hod mad.' year> ago and continued the interest winch she h:..i alwayj taken in general well1 was e loving mother of the Victorian School of thought and demanded, f'orn her children standards of conduct in keeping middle class familv circle she mal wide cinl. nought her advice and genial conv pany. She carried lightly lha accompanying ill* was blessed with ; fund of aood humour ways made her an agreeable com C inion. Her husband predeceaseFT about 13 years ago. She leaves to IMPORTS YESTERDAY The S S (' c; Tankal fieri %  %  • %  la isk load of M M6fJ b rrel ol 1 en :.m and New York. Before starting to load, the veaeeJ duvharsaad packasw of and personal effects whirh ii loaded at Trinidad' The T'liilin will be sailing todat via the BriUeh Hi rtl tor Boston and Sew York. Over 3.000 loose and 23 bags of cocoanuts were amonf arriving at Barbados by schooner over th. This supply was brought by the ,Yl 7, ,L the whoonars ^dnli..o and R tsirtelhr Euvina whlch arnveii from St Lucia ami Dominica respectively These schooners alga bags of charcoal, eoprs and fresh fruit CHARGED WITH THEFT H W< ilr. H. A %  .! ted al £16 • .' '-'I %  I M R U luilll July 7 and •• 1 . tus to be used in the manuf'* tin of such cloUi from rotetc. A Bill to vest a certain pan el ..: land in lhe pansh of St John, with the Chapel <,f St. Mirk, the Pui and the burial ground, in the I., rd Bishop of Barbados and U of st join, nnd Iheli n sucecMira in I.MH V up.. 'r • tana to n aha it lawful ••• .. v, -. 1. .,.. ,. their parish f.ii nnj period *.<>• exceeding 21 years and U uch leatte shall be binding M the successive Vestm,,t iln rj 11 IKI l> Tl \K \\ OOD i 1 %  that hla %  1 %  1 ill* MM OWNBO \ , %  %  %  %  %  %  U i 1 \i -.1 .11 oa WILi DISCUSS KOREA ATTLEE AND CABINET LINENS inaprrt AflM in our Linen Depl. II TOWKI.S in Bh, ><".. I., sue • %  ..• %  I.. SHKIIN ..:: v 'KI Mil \ ins SHKKTIM: -. %  uiilr .1 Ql 1,1 1.11. 11 Hi.l l Ir.illl SI.IU K H • %  u.'li |U*| mid S.MIII ;i v.i M will..1 suiaa. ( WDI.IWKK IIIID8PREADS In (inl.l. Bin.' :.. Sinulr llrd Si/.IIIIIIIIIIll.-.l S./. I.i: DAMASK ,1 Wide .. -I : %  Wide 1 M d Peach -11." 1 S2."i.lHI 1 il Y.I. x:i Yd id MH.IIII rh HIHII.I IM. 1 Blue, Green, K.. (LOTUS White Dune k. Cheeha % % % %  He ...I DenfM HARRISON'S c ooos DIAL 2G64 c I Mane In Trouble lloumof Amn'inbly %  r 1 abcsBrd wiui.0 a IliKht fror llalboa to Klngstowr %  %  iiccording to u cablegr;.:.our and ShipI iiig Department ntty of 14 %  %  The House may resumi ne ae< ibig O* the Bill to emend the Sep;,ratioT oance Another matter on whJ may be lengthy dlscua*.' Hill to abolish grand juries and to amend the law relating to the preT7ie'Potick's Tune As Lip PWO •! || rath k %  %  %  Ov .. a The %  rates*" i %  %  %  %  1 ... %  II It has 1 "rhuip 11 DavtaseB 1 %  %  1 %  I WMWrV.VrVi'iW I.OM>ON I. Prin I hkeK 1 1 the Korean % %  •aetliig r I< A meet 1 % %  1 ... %  n win si —Iteuier WHEN CONSTRUCTING OR REPAIRING A BUILDING ALWAYS USK -KVKHITK' A9BESTOS-CEMFNT CORRUGATED SIII'l'TS "Constructor' 1 Krlloalt'ii their loss two daug elah Skinner. Headml tr> %  ol afia. 1) A M Haynes and Mr. Carlv %  rmerly Manager of the I' lee I ht this island. To these --enada, ?ince June 22 was .*.ed today. The deepest sympathy w:: I nas given tended. PORTI ,lv 3 The Canadian Nation ^hlp Canadian Construe* aground off Sandy \\ hat' I Nsri %  >! Ml l.l 1 Today iJtsr AHIUYhlt\ Fill sll SIMI'MKVT OF II. ,i .' I II a,-. „| \„ I'l IIIW POULTRY CHOWS CORSETS and CORSELETS CORSETS With laced backs and hooked sides, und Wrap-around* with hooked sidi s All sizes. CORSELETS rwe" With nnd without inner nnd Imperial Makes. All belts Twiliit %  I LeCtaUtlvr .1 '. !. I. M th 1 pe4e Piweahw Match iajaatte (1 ut> *\ %  •• v <• %  Mobil" t hsaaan 1 rmn h u 1 .1 : ^o a m |(.r| Vour Suppl* JASON JONFs al DUtrihutore. %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10. II, 12 c 13 BROAD STREET.


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    II I SDAY JULY I. ISin I;\I:II\IMIN imiKiii PAOI si \ : s CLASSIFIED ADS. L %  •*-" %  ^BjRTHDAY GREETINGS (DM REVr \\ orki-rs lt<'Li\ \\ ages Polk} AND CRIPPS IS PLEASED France l.iis \ New Govt, IIAIiBOlli IOC. In Carlisle Bay -i < M a* YAM i I (MMl %  | ,a ,A*e monih. will le.n.CHHU t.„. fnsir land. B." Hall. •! (r CiipUr? LION w.ii DAi'ir-r i AsiiLrv rit*i 4 TS* HOUSES IN MEMORIAM MM ..I -,., %  %  Win of -..i.e. %  lull %  %  ... .IPMR! Jr. n •.**•* %  < ••*•* Oh that -ill he ON l„l -hen we meei lo pan -o mora JaaW llaMhrr Rlnlv GrinC.-nv.iW-. • 7 _I D cf i %  Win i nnar be loryotian • B*S1 %  t •* iin^lTTUTi* Morrtann. mm*i<' Oaqsr Moriini.. fjlher ..nd Limilv .sol*, I'Urr^ Moir.-a.. Mother Parrel! >.'Ur F> %  |M. n i : t, in la lovinginantorr"roiik DaaM who owa *un a >*a Baatorday orouatu and Anil the (riff I Tr bi... hurt Ltl* old w. atum t I death waa :f WRIMHH farewell trad I 4.7.SO--tn A tint and I wha tail IP on liar air a| Tar Baku'..Ciod, Lbair mil kacp While ami Till frrati the d...l the. I... .h..ll n. Anl aoai I'lumphanl in th* tki*. O hap, ..nd n\ II* quid.' (un(v vnui Lord .1 K ... %  I I rr-d. Skill MM % %  •.'WUI...Uii BV lot .nj nirnior) uf m}' **nr ba %  on July 3rd IIUV lha call. Of thf dwn onU.ved by all; DIT'I" "t %  !(.. "" word I.T un> i„-i our *• loved wall. Day* of ""to. till ro.i %  Ran iVii. i ..t< < % %  n. lin. BJM ..(..-. Sad nan aa %  Cele-fln % %  i i %  I PI III M II1 1 U M %  %  ..3 L %  %  %  %  I rlavalual should cot In motion a % %  which would n. %  %  hull, la, Under one irMiafemrot RATHO MILL TOWfcH IIUTrt, It Vlncont and SUNNY CARusBKE on-Ute-ata Baqula Lund OAKI all (hat can ba daaired R.ai.. IUI rearm j. aaa-bathmg, n> w.i ruMlnea and ban BATES ft t K II. W 1. pn day For lu: ."id raacrvationa UtHrtL O M Bo* 47. SM Vlncont. NOTICE Ail m—i m ra iui '>-•)> iT, n fc'f maaaMnf • MI atMvd al 4 p ... hw untptoa WIN i.. eon) loaaad THE BAJbBAKOfc mil KET AaatoCIATIOM W H. Huneiary Sanvlar> NOTICE Appitcation for ana or mora nMH HI Mlobaal. VaaUy EnMljitlotit Bl Ilai%  :HMI C'ollaatr will br racat v ad B) ttk Clerk of U> Vaatry up lo 4 o'clock P*i> on MlnaaaA> J .i> It, Itdd Candtdalca inual 1— Ihe w-.> of paiUhionafa in atlaitcnad clrrurnalanaaa and tn.i*t nol ba iru th-n i> not mora Inar iui ram i* ^ soui j,. !" i. lo ba rovad b* a llaptiamal C i rTM aaWl %  •hull mil airtiima.iv tlw applicallon Form, ol npnlicalioii can tr obUunrfl al Hie Vvati) Clark OfBaa. By Otder E C REDMAN. CUrk. Bl Mlchaal'n Vmi Vaatry Clatki OflWa. Parochial Buildnta-.. %  Wdanowr ... •„ | FOII Mil AUTOMOTIVE I. BJBJ i.uxc Part lit. T>ra. & Bailor) VINCENT OKarTITtl CAR— One • ay l alip Parkatd *•. thtna (OF lai imnwart (>T>ar bouahl now ca* Ai.plv bi Blmon. 81 LaooHBai Kina 30a* 4 7 W -1" CAR-OII. .1. WoJalrv II h p dOi> i.i-r* aid ii. ancaltant on. raaaonabip oiT*^ rrtiiai"i B'doa Takl Cain CABOtic V*io.hall 14 II i 4Mlei. rni.ditHHi A 1 Applv t I lo.aoo %  %  OKI-Id. 11.0 Vtiv aood ."-.-uiiti.ii IfNI Morn •.mdiiii l-t* Sli.if. Ail lhaaa ran ara irawnaMy prirad %  (,. ', .. i. >HACir LTD Trlrphone 4504 CAR %  good lyraPhono REECE 4803 US SO3n CAR—Vxhall Vctnk 11 I> l> P ( %  | OBI B more | u gaii Dine R. 6 %  %  •334 1 90 i • n NOIICE Tandrr* win 1* re Manod up la u no ItOD for lha ...n-ln-IUm <• .. %  .... ,, I .-. i -i Thoma.. In aw plan* an.) •: | i, may tar PU TraHurar Each leant will l i |n i-.-.t lo dapoall . which will I.. %  %  %  %  The W.1, %  %  lajkr, aMHWani win q ilred lo pimido two 111 tutllic-. whu -h* fnl .%  %  FT PIUC Far Traaiinr. St Thomoa 4 1 —in n notify Ihr aatir-al p..bl* itol rm whom%  • without a wWl •Ot OuM ii.%. : It bold m>arir irapunalbllor h. I %  %  4 7 SO JlHWIIH HELP in.QMII %  ttmgm %  Tl-.r, : %  %  %  UlSCELLANtOUS Uroadi-iat ovi RAIIHI DaittlbiiUor in ana Jl;. p .. Sih "•: M a SO 14 I. AMfA Kodak prWarra.' BMaan ... A:-.. %  .ii'i.i ,. I td a M -*.' %  .. ...Ms ,|LM "„ V I. %  I '•'• < lin '1 rraVtr %  %  A 4.f.0n It i,n. ilistrlbulion wf>riwrs nun 2.000 nlnan utr %  *. ray di*putc*. —Ol'OtOf Chiiicsr AttMtk I'olr's Millrilhlil Ahooo : ifh %  ha* %  1 NaUiaaul itvol ti %  %  %  %  %  %  t rorr>gn U %  %  %  %  i flan %  %  GavataWrMi I %  naltoiial authonlv in 1 I poul Thpy mo.* I %  if the Aoaa-mbly who rWujsr-d 1 [ %  fiHMii'i I'n-iiiiM Paid iti' %  stnte tor r\a*ai iattd I lha rai 1 Mlninler of siato tor Cn I ('. %  • %  muniata bko ihati GfDfEVA, JuK 3 Itoth urn ,1. i tl ht v r ,. Al this aftcn.' led Nadjoru Lc-onunta. and %  %  SOCtal CoatBCil. ( hifafSC d<* i; <"P Tsuni Chi T .^_^_^_ %  ii thouM go ea rtxoad -is con1 %  n( %  afatnenl ol l...,l 1F..I., a",.., ( %  .(Ilk li.lli \,tw NatkMai laken 1 .ills! fWlngltiBlM aasn fa) d i:.-,.i. %  oountrlaa hava m.dr tnu iiiiaaa lion ; t BUrabfi 1,1 tun. uiirt UUKI datlMatkw %  S'i. b 1 .!•• ha Bgrart „,,.. 1 %  >,Chincac delegate wben Kiuaia and Easlrni Riuoucan countrlea should return to rauifei once.-. hl delecatl iiKhifui uovtrnmenl ol Cl 1 lha MM in power on the %  led t. the % %  Tin Council ttwn .in>.i.i %  1 row niornniK P>HI<-r Up In II 1 Mill. I Will Lift Ruhr Steel l\mli;iri!<. 1 1 aHENHAQawN J %  creased i.> ona pat can! i<> fwii %  %  DM t I 1 k> Onanclal cii 1 %  on for Ihe *x. • %  pi it ion •• i. 11 snrs I'relmiwial Elfikc 11 Monday IBth July n Monday 14th July PARTNERSHIP NOTICE . %  %  %  %  %  %  1 AUCTION UONN. July 2 Partial lifting Q ( thi OH Kuhr iron and steel produ Uon Lba Soviet Zone has bmi decided on. German Iran. said tonight All orders placed in February 8 when the embargo v. is imposed because 01 aknaHve ?xmc imports or iron and Riecl UNDER T HE IVCRY HAMMER. taK l " loU staietneni HD now be carried out % %  "I This move Is interpnM. mA, I irducvmeiii to (he Bovld %  .'k-otlate an intenfonul I [agreement lo replace Ural expired on Friday la*t a St. I AriuthiT 1 IttUnj is that HM S A I I \. Hh Wei' < .• The third reason, tha A eourrc said, hi 1 baa haan liMaffawtha ball %  %  !'. 11. %  trvl it."_RetiliT. In Touch Wilh Barbados Coast Station CABgJ o.d Wirnaa. W 1 U. II 1 .1 ... tfcrauajh l""" url • ..-.llvtarr as Oai s ll-i !" .,-, v. „. • %  1 %  --a a a i. 1 *,-h.nd M a Clara, SB l'i. SB Eaiam • %  la—t Okadalom. s apnu. a s Oaaa Sa.is a • Aura>, MB l>olon. :O Pa*. ... >• a. Hyam 1 . s S % %  SEA WELL in II VIAI %  %  1 1' 1 (;rmada 1. A *f-unt I'I.IH i..k<-n iii. i MI.II iwrsTOft'srn. 1 iMiitn I at. %  rat (O 1 Mill" li^ui .11.. 1 ndM-,ller*. Marl.lll Bl < il SHIPPING NOTICES IIOMTmtAI l'"tBAI.IA NFai /1 v LAMB 1 i\ LTD (at A H %  UNI 1 1 CITY or an fti UH Mil M< MbaSa* ..'.I B>dj>av J. Hii. hmwi. J 1 k arrxitaj i Trialdad arwHIT WU 1 INQT BOaa rar: Aufu U VV I !U> -..i,c. %  %  I i.tl li<" Mi I —-. MurlN Bawlint. •. %  ..>! I.'irm II."i. r.-... Hart. I*-. 1 I'oaaal. ., M-. Iaaa.nl . . %  i 1.. .. 1. %  %  .. IHiani n-.....ni T.n. aasavgaaa .1. MilBhoil %  I..., II Alilollki ...a. M-'> WlU*kr.-Mak .' % %  .'• II*. 1 .III. ...:i %  UNDER THfi SILVER HAMMER OFFICIAL NOTICE BAASA0OS la
    aarn lal.f Mori work or Polo Hi.l a 301 E II ITPIBiao Andrew. Ptani Si Thnmat l'i '.trnnd. MCCHANICAI. Mints %  kafla ii". in Boo Amiable for shipa "UIHIIMH 01 oth. to.-s* doruownu 'I JA-II 4 Co IT1> i 4IT0 1 1 a0 M1SCEU AMEOUS MXDian lor your :aoord player all Blndf InclodUif Ruby and Happiilr* arml-parmanant naadlaa to p.ay aavatal tnouaond racor-UnaS .__ A. BAJona a m LTD Ml IO I M.W n„\TTJ(.i D1..-I1 Baton, >' %  -.... Blnalra. Bins and all the ra-i arid art. BUI quick pun.ian.r of ai Order in Bali % % %  -late. 11*1.1 or .11 K..n t^... k Road a!..!.. BsBM H BtBk th and one r n ihe 1 ..1,,., %  %  da %  %  a 1 %  %  %  %  Kltchra Utan.il.. Peru FJiM'tions \\ ere Qrdedi HUKhOS AM I FoUowini political I 1 arrncd upriaing m An 1 lonth 11a10n.it 1 la -. %  Joimui<-u Kiiillinu KJNGSTON I hi J-11 .IM.I lUUItlDl % %  bBBataei %  %  .. CaOVCI mi M ;., 1 %  .... %  1. %  now in %  the % %  rtvln l i.n.v ini1 %  %  %  %  %  s By] pajO Till 'LIN %  Mv roH talla M.V. tn Jun* Arr. %  laaa in* July Hit July 1 i. .11 mn r IfM 41 U CM .'Hi.itiM %  l PI NNANT 1 %  %  \ 1 %  '.ills'. . Ml ABIS1 U \lll\S Maainal Jon* TOlli July Till Jiilv IM Ana 411. %  aavii asaa Mallfa. J ins XHn • Ai.a 7", ruil>*4 J.ily lllh %  • %  IV Btid ... Ill .. ll 4 AH is %  m BBBN*] IBM asaaai %  nrd by ma on al 1 MANKI rROTMAI I 0 rOl iBatad I %  ... %  IB VOtil 1 %  .. 1 I %  1 %  %  r . . p t forei KM capita Rental UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER 11 %  hold %  %  %  %  ; locrcc. and l. BOPTlTaa I 1 opt %  c.iiinur.i. are alao nollncd lha! th< .... %  %  : %  \p ii %  1 A Clatk of lha hand BUI GILKBrl. UNDER THr DIAMOND HAMMr'R %  %  .. .-. • 1 Lano with a** .. I di.uble lOiira Wllh ahod ..' Mahofany %  tooM M.. LIQUOR LICLNSF N0TICF : > MM • •I S3| , ISM pnu 1. %  11-* ai UM %  %  m H A IAI MA a %  • Till rtAKHAIHIS Mil Mli l l.l'K RESTAURANT IKIIH IOIIII .... IIIIHKIMIM I.AV -IKI I I SAVE TODAY H1HN1TIM Uttlllei Produ. M Lid Roaea In i". M '. D1 U l % %  11 June, mill I Single f-i"'. 1 .0. 1 Applv 1 1 1 mi. .1. asBH pa\srtgaa to %  Biiini from K.iM'au about • rv Ihiriv-thrvi' ilays ...1 foi il-ddrty*. 1 a .8. WlLMtN nan %  „ si : : IIUI Itb'J jKag*-:rr. i'iJ^-.: —1 11 l'i \/vf;._ %  I" II I AI'K IIAiri 1 LD'l'INC MAI II1NJ ll ., 1!A |. Mill-. I.-I Mil.Ml.i i IMKI.H Kill lit I..I. G ER3UT 1 tinlu' I . hotica ) %  naraby atvan I] of an OTdai ol Of Appeal dau-d Ihe 17th da. (hare will br art op for Mil. I ral blQdrr al the Offlca of < Ihe Ai'lant COUrl Ol Appeal at i. art I %  %  Ffldaj thatain day 01 .... 1 1 %  . toilei %  awarI"" m ii REAL ESTATE OllGAN -One Cnmlah Orson Mrtodia torch or cllatipANTs-dn.i m raad v mad* and inada to ( 1 • 7 a0 3r. RETREAD lyra. •BOcl-> "** %  a,::, each Enq-ntr Auto Tyn Company. Trafaifar Biieri. Pnona %  %  I %  %  landa of Carolina On* Mann and Ui md and if not Ban %  -ale OB OK .rtlU U* . !t,an tfOB • Datrd Ihn J7lh da> ..( Ai I V As Clart u:\111\1 HHAiiin %  %  %  y/;w/.'.w-r AUCTION SALES Tlion* 4610 1'UnUllf.n. I.uil.hn. IIIVII l.lSHIO.\ VafaW xi 1111.11 nuaasi JUST RECEIVED SHIPMENT U. S. LADIES CASUALS Style* .1. white, lirnwn. black. Bed ami .iMilli-rulottr SI VI.in HH.III-I'HH 1it 1111.111 irm s:,.!).. 10 sv,.:ir, LADII S ..III' CASSINS in ul.ilr .mil uhilr a rr 11,. 1 ,.. %  ill..I Hi.I repair. In our of un tunri-r !• detUBsL tl.r( ..mpani baa In %  urn. 1 I ;,„ %  IIIIN 1.. ii• ii.. -.1 .'HH. k W.) OWl O* U 11 UM IB I Ini.ilu BSstl i.f Mifidli. rum lion aiail^i^a ... r. M m. dul .i wrrf—ri la -Ii^d loacFat Inlri^lJU.-IIIUM waytlri* mnnlli-.. '*" r I "" %  '"" 1 EH 1 iir-rjie by exrrrUins the NtaTHMi Baaaaan ai laa B* al Meeirlrlty, pariu-niarii darinc lire "BBfe prrnn. brtwr-rn (J. 10 and UM p.fit. until further notice. \ -Mini f.rurrol Mauaaor. CROWN A CRO>VMSC. 4CHIEVEMENT BY HKISklNI. I III Sl>\ RS .IM,I It ill



    PAGE 1

    I'ACF TWO BAKU UIOS ADVOCATE TCr-SDAV, HIV I. UH Qahib gaMmf H N I • % %  .. Cat M l V Nyrea thtl *'V*niiK. \h Keren OnWar-ln-Cliarge of Use Anienoan Cestst.late as Basgaafl i IT .if IndrpciHltfw Day At "Mir*Mr" S TAYING at "Mtramar", si Ian i iptool months' hnhda> .if,Dr. .-.tid Mrs J.*i. Pes-tl and their dauKlitr •tuttilyn and their daughter Barbara Both families are from Tremlon. NeJrrwy and the. arrived ..... i v 1! W I.A Al Lord'. A MONO tha man) Waal Indiana -* scan M i""'' sksrhuj the Second Test Match wenHoD Garnet Gordon of St. Lucia, who has Just arrived In England after a tt e n d in g Ihe Imperial i' %  ferenre in Canada and Mi Hugh Springer. Registrar of thr West 1 i.iviiMti. tvttB is now uui Hugh broka his knae' i"i while running for %  'l.u-. Uit can now walk with the aid of a stick. He intend* returning to Jamaica soon where he *ill hav. further physiotherapy treatment Mr. P. W. W Branch Of I who Is studying medicine in Lou. Ocrdi %  .if;,; di.d. Mi (.. ., i Qa gin. the well known Brftuh Otdana madnaai E bean In mce April And fin .ill. Mr OraanhUl and nd Com. mander and Mm. Days.) ..f Barbados On Honeymoon M R AND MM. BERNARD TEXEIRA arrived veaterdav morning from Trinidad bv B.W.I.A. They were marriad recent 1> In Vaaanaala and spent two day* in Trinidad, before %  •mint, nvei t.i Barbados on their honeymoon Originally from British Guiana. Mr. Texeira habeen Sting m VanaguMa for the past twant) months where ha works with th" MOM QmSe oil Co.. an iiarrelonB. They stre staying at the Ocean Vie* Hotel. Returned Over the Week-end M ISS CLALDIA EVELYN and Miss Helen Taitt, who were %  P On dl n i their annual Barbados returned to Trinidad by B.W I.A.. over the week-end. On the Saturday night before they left ihey laid Cam they had a wonderful evening at it.. Hotel at tha Polo t testa. Thej were staying ui Cacrabank" Waa Here Laat Year M ISS DOKEEN SCHUUCR who la with the Royai Bank o! Canada in Georgetown arrived Ran %  u-rday by B.W.I A. to |iend about three weeks' holiday t-yUig at Accra, Ruck ley Doreen waa here last Augu.it for a holiday. At Seaweil to meet her wenMr. and Mrs. Fred Olkaa. Back froan Carib Talks M R. BERNARD HOLFE of the BeeretaUBt of Colonial "• ratoooM and Wihare and Mrs Kattt Walcott. stenographer also of Colonial DvvaaOMaBDl and Wei fare ntturned yesterday by It W.l A from Martinii(ni aflBI %  MOIldlllg the tenth meetuw. ol the Cajiubaail Coin mission. Off to Buenos Aires M R. LIONEL PARHY left Barbados on Sunday afternoon. en route (or Argentina via Trinidad bv H W.I A The... li. Mil thorflj N enter] Into a ComRI rcial (li n In Buenos Aires. HI father Mr. Ernest Parr.. accompanied him as far i Tin' dad and inexpaats to be bw bora on Wednesday. Turfite Returns M R. I. O. C. PERKINS who was in Trinidad for ihe first two days of racing returne I yes> lardai morning bv BW.I A i HK GATES Leaving Todav E MC GATES i.av. i today f>' %  Mi Eorfc ... Puerto B.W.I.A Brk will long ba nan i i;. aaaasi al UaeMuslaal invw. -Hig!i Tyroe", ami than is ODO paitletlll Barbadian, a dumb and daal 1ibci luMrs. Ben MOOT!. th. I of "Jljgh ffyma", told Carib tha' the local prats from the raw which want ia aid amounted t<> *. T.T 11 M Five Weeks" Visit To The U.S. R ETURNING on Bunda) aw %  ning by B W I A woo l 1. %  '.: %  %  tiiT who has been ... Ava %  .•''' ks 1 hdUda %  vi itlni tl is TraveUing by H W I A as far .-.Puerto Rasa aha worn i>> PA A t bj air w juat "Ch.ld^ Pla] to Stephen, as he's l*en all arouas 1 the U.S I ravelling by hbnaall Checking through Port Health. Immigration and Custom ..: >., well yesterday was just nui'.uie stuff to this youngster and ba rame through with Hying colours! Singt Tonight M ISS ORA( 11 fAI LKNB pariah Churen Ionian* %  c .. v h bora Aaei tan aosfrano. Ml t. | ... %  -.,i l -i. %  | ba %  V iaitir.g* Komi P LANNtMO I • Dd of Augu %  Deslsles of Till .. ga tommuniiy of Wei Indiar, ntudymg law tu Lonuor. . i !_. Beiween now arid August tO get an interest in: ..nation job. parnago an •• Barn Borne be ptaaa t.. .t.. rwi b) %  • %  BV lias takei. nd out in advanc amp irwnu will be like '!.dj a lure of tlie best Italian .via*, he aafcures me, is includec n the daily fares. Weodings S r DAt ID1 HI i:c ll arai lK'*.u'ifolh decorated on %  • %  lag when Miss Iris aaaagMai al Mr and Mrs. P A M.dhn of Itaagatt Hall, was i %  i Kilev, aon vl Mi C. Km.; i. l;il.. lleadmas%  •I ••[ st Martin 1 Bog Id \, ..nd Mrs Bun Tha bra n aasaStaM laodbsi .it St Oihtt' Buys* BeaMol, whlla tha brtde. KKM>I is attaehod to the Highway) xid aVanapori !>' partmoat Mi LH. Len King performed UH I. al Boatman I'luU 1 btac and Man Dorothy Bl-.k-i an, Rev < % C. Ha; i atod with Mr Tnomai BuflM orsjan. After the wedding a reoeptioi I at 'he home ol %  • M.dl M i if. r TABOR (IIUIKH .. tin>.i I-I,Iui ., nuiel .-i-niiii' Uta I went, -hen Miss Mabel Hlnkson, aldoal duughte. of Mr aiMl Mm. Darcv Hankson Hall 81 Joaaph mairied to Mi Cordon Young o( If %  | The eaassnoat wbieh was hilly irharsl wai pstfurmod i>y Rev 1 The bride who was given away by hei cousin Mr Oscar ILnkaon, wore a oraas or nylon and lacs ii. r veil was k.-j,i in p] a tiara of orange blossoms and she e;iriieii .. I.ouqnct of C/n. LI Lac* md Anthuriurn Lilies Than a rtdi maid, Miss C Hlnk on atstai ..i Uu brlcV WOO won,i di.sof pink nylOO The rhn • Bo i' all I were tfv %  1 I I Hmh Mai and Loratta Young. Mr M Corbln, undo of the bridegroom was tha boatman After the cercmon\ .. rr on .'-me I and n 0 against Nelson His form in the return game with Nelson ..n June avan more rcma-kahle. for he ohtmnetl Hi? not out of Burnley's winning score of M:I for live, ii win ba ruBMngbarad M .,* I'.ll.lu.il ..,, V.h.. .!|.„U'. mis-el jalactloo [ol tha w i loam, scored 161 for B.C. against BatImdos las', winter. A third Weal Indian. .1 K Holt, who |i pro%  1 rlasUngdoOi a i 121 agalnBl nonubottom In splendid (isplav of hitting (In. hit dislodged tiles from Iht i..f Ol the p.ivihon. Guidt* Prince in the ,'ree marke'. nas and Cueumbers when the Adi-ocare checked kesterday aBM .' 1M .1. |l Rupert and Mi:aiula—.12 I %  Ltd Ii ;II. made %  %  %  %  r.l [oral %  nUal They %  A Barbecue In May fair BY THE WAY By tth.Ullt (iMIUM r VWt gay Hi.it Roland %  Dorgeles must have betn a certain exhibition .if seulptiuv in London. Dorgelos once picked up n bit of stone In a friend* studio, and left it in the Gallery ol Antiquitie* in the Louvre. It was also Dorgeles who tied a paint-brush to %  donkey's Uul •nd pushed the tail against .. canvas. The ensuing "piCtUM was exhibited at the Irtdcpoirinnit show in Paris under the title "El le soldi se t-ouche mr l'AHE yuunaatei vvh smash. housr, lo ask tor her I little thinks that he may have been the means ,il indiicn %  „ aclres,ses to learn to writ. %  ly as B measure of self-ddcm % %  HuiM ht4tvk*hrv/„> Diaat OtM I NOTE a new i..rm ol t ,aM V Inste.id of %  .,!> mi looking very nt; her mothOl was %  Buipci." vou daacribs In dataH wliat alie ate What she said, ho'* often she smiled, .uul n 01 I'raoumabiy the .hr.uiicler is standing by the table, typawrltai in hund. . With her sole she had a potato, o| leMah sns ! %  • two rruasffurfal, pn.tini.u (he raal lo Ihe Mate o< b"r plBM urtlk bar terl She icipcd her mourn after one raaast iar W ^ aawthful oj %  > %  irhich she bfO* rinycr and ihunih of her left huml. ad %  ; % %  .'. ha* to put It In j ,< hen %  wallowed U, -md loot mouthfal oi sole. Then bar lefi i our thlghl and shake Wtl I irth What's new la the World of l.-.shlon pubhul. Nothing !•tlian a roof-top b.irbt %  1 .etc with Mi/./img bam and hestian haatghigi A %  doc i dad to hold i rdanao psu ly it which im ran i Uavuuj I % %  i •iur boas a i and [ altar all : found out curving respect There an wide balcosty, canoBiad m blue and White I held Fur tin ocoaalot pad I %  % %  artCI nniel, f.,r tive purpa i n see vh.it hapj thick alia nunad uw i.. nuig all A f of the se .;,dt1e>. Irecl-b.iKs. -cm i. < Ugh nut:-. WOOdOn IHIIC! ... I iii. M d bKblOH lothi Wa dlnad in II |..i laahion on u* and sweat aonii manj ol tiniii-t Una A rnall band pla i ba ni aag n a was tatpenaad Iran iii'olhcr In a bunt %  examii i and found "i Halfwaj through Uu %  the iho gratifying lo rind dial KM %  %  OnlUoa oi .. Uu I thi n i thi bumai loot %  • b I i mads i I 1 "louslj thi aide-toed, anoi I been reervod lor children and b •odab onb Now, itrosuj wouung la Ulianl coloura ami now %  iva bean prodtuce. ui mg that anon of you place in which lo rest, and r. •ot crowded up against Ba The shoes, designed by Anuii:..n Mrs Joyce, were scarlet. l>t le green, saddlesult. radbOTT) ti .d. gm maple pa %  Boa %  at u i ere to have the bit SI I I nail rnatal hookSi like an did fashioned boota to have lai pin cUpping tha tront %  I van i rid t< ad auetdaa huitiing the %  ask lor a very • led pump Taey ukai these arc very %  I "^ the foot, and %  %  vamp has la >*• cut fuar1< high In older to make it II variations I the front :. %  'shell" Baa ba t, %  adboii .. b .. %  Impl) -!. ..I Biat tha ehe> I seamed up ..nd the leatiu I adgOag which an UP* that Baa ached. i basal) the ltd up tviln the meal position? IX, for amuni ts tough, elderly Dg K.iiiiei afban ias and luraeaui on ll And let* people are %  iard-waaeang shoe ll i tevoroe side inunal n %  .il. and can i* The roavhaned n afcei II ideal for %  %  ..'.. i laid ma with age) woman art Illogical whan chooa.. ill not be ."i prufei '.. Into blgli iifsloil %  i hoes, rather than bui .. pail more oonvanlant M Lheli To i ippta naaell lor •• eocktail party l ,u do oecawill not harm Bit) %  I'lil nil day in i throws your %  ward, ultimately cauai. he. bunions and other t.it troubles Equally senseless is the woman who buys very flat. '.i w -< ot pumps, because she 1ST i 1.1 i li curl up her toes, m onlti %  ii ir. on bar feet, and this eventually causes hammer toes A grim picture to paint indeed. hut feet are the most neglected mid ill-used part of the human bodji and .i huh i ixninonseme WOUM not come nmi. BBC. Radio Nolci .'^ i.ii. • tasn %  • u. Tluak an w*r llmi. T S a m .... ... I. -i I'h^n-w %  '..!w %  ii t ... caarae "* %  ;< K-rr KMtar .., hi. SWul %  ".wo 11 noon Tl.* Hflwi } p n. Mw. AnalyMa II II i> m I'rmr.irn-.r fal** 11 II a m LMMMiCa pla* I II Ta> a"i T'*J m. i %  Tt u-i. Ban ) %  y. (ui> i aiuaK. Rr|Mbt Iran Wl—tiligrn. ,. i g^0^_rh awa>ai'*'W I %  ppnm Pa-Mr IS M' TW SWT| Ta. < 1 M Inwrlua* S a m lanr SVrr • It > . Ta* P—^..n 1. Nr: m p %  s, %  Analy-a. : ll T W f n CnMi i(H..".|-I.IM t X • m lnl*rlif FMiUouU. Six edii-tIU> lann II Tagt NO HOPE LONDOB. l Letters have (lelusaal tor of the l^mdaa since he punted a gestion that Lang e* Maaar an %¡ lory" should beouvae BrStain natUMial anthem Bull" of Loodon put II i v nutshell: After more than live yeaus ol Socialist tyranny nobody rail England a land oi hope— and ee-rtainly not one ot glory re appropriate anthem for to-day would be — "Put Another Nickel In "—I.N.S i HOS\\v*mn aanaa 1 rnu mar itanno >..^ (il •'.ilnt .-.. aitei it uu n| libra Burs, in I*. Result of listing brusen rt. 14 i I All Him wi> leu or ii.r -.nt man i. Art. BaciiFiunut Meflicioe usua e uu* colour / lot i'. and 4 iXimi Duminaic. <7i d An pianm ao mast pnopa> *en call tlii. laaltam |4l Wliers thev too .cnta CQUI, .'J PuniDou* .rliuuiinaptrr. iv> Baam I Wiiai man. 0M Oaeorp R.A 1 ".JS* *'."" %  "" %  "'"" f,Bn i veil %  aeem seaati iia gnu %  n u.i. ejiasni it- ng, 1 found .., f,, i^eni ruul • *Jl Hn.M L>mU 0 r*Bj %  •U rn r uie MM 4i "*i; v CHILD'S PLAY is .i landal t.'lH hoe. butll like a small girl's shoe with double hurktcs, and pi ver> |n>pulnr In America By Joyce 0| ( aliforme. ENJOY THE FINEST! (4* A SERVE THE WHOLE FAMILY -' "^ WITH ^-'1 | \^mj J & R % BREAD 8c CAKES 91 It's Better by far if its A s >|a^^' J & R -F ^f 5 File This Hiccup Cure LOM> ,< man saffari I violent hioaoughi Fhonaai HaogaHal •tent he]|Htb e Then he i cm. ir.t.c..hatl nine re.ol ' Sn'.* lEl.^r-eJaIIOYAI. Worthingi! Last 2 Shows To-Day 4.30 fc 8 15 Columbia Big Double ROBTRT STANTON MAHJOKIR REYNOLD in '8INO WHIT i; YOU DANCE' AND TERROR TRAIL" with Charles ST.\RRETTE Smilev Bl'RNETTE MR. COWTRACTORWV* van supply your requirements of .... • W I., el l..n row • Sli.nels PeaM Hole Iin B ers. • I'eck Axes. Felling: Axe*. • Sledge llanimer^ BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD EMPIRK To-Da> To Thursday i 15 B 8 30 Paramount Pictures Picscnt OUVIA :>eHAV114-ANI) MONTCt>MERY CUR m Tut BjBBnVMI W.M. :: Miriam Hopkins noxv Last 2 Shows To-Dav 4.45 k 8.1ft Paramount Pictures Present BARBARA STANWYCK WENDELL COREY in THEI.MA JORDA Nwith ~^ mm Paul Kelly. Joan TeHel oi urn To-D..v atil* IIII. kur sky and Ruprn it*.i*t wnn somt snaaity that h n now quits k>nr and also that hi it very hangryAs ha ram* lowardi :h* nsmi hi mtx a c^.-w. ^r Mgg "T htm. Caunoailr ht oari it and ro hn delighi he find* 5 IM 'c %  % %  BSH Watched by British and foreign ship engineers the tests were cai ,ed out on the new 24,000 ton P & O liner Chusan as she steamed at 28 knots off Southampton. A.' the (kms inlie-i L'.( .ic,: c on hei Mde CaptaUa RET Tuaibridge touched a switch and the huge vessel swung back on an even keel The switch had released two tin* on the bottom of the vessel and these held her steady m the heavy ocean. Captain Tunbridge said : -The DOS reduce a roll of 14 degrees to four degrees. That will make a big difference when the Chusan %  trUUM monsoons in the China seas." Ship builders have long sought a stabilizer that would prevent big ketl In boat rect from tin' % % %  < %  %  t.. had ihe special device | Brown Bros, of Edinburgh. The stabliaer consists of •• letlangular streamlined fins i horizontally on each side el Uu %  ihip and projecting from the 1 Each tin la mounted on ;. When operating the llns are t. by a mechanism. The forward movement of lh* ship cajuaas tin* water tv %  v upward force on one fln anu downward force on the of bining to minimize any roll ca by waves. The Una are retractable, when uot required are wbthdi %  into reteaaes within the hull With experts claiming thoi lui %  ••eking has barn stopped in i %  em the new suhilirkug dei A ba fitted to Britain'^ A' Uwata UngCB and many other eh -4INK) CKVi-TOQI'OTlv—Here'-, how lo work It: AXYULBAAXR a LONGFELLOW One letter simply stands for another In this example A Is ur.ed (oi -he three Ls X for the two Oi. etc Single letters, apos tiapiuca. the :.::.!. and formation of the words are all hlalr Each day Jic cod*letterj are differfnt A Crypaoaram Ouotatlan TJTHN BVSUF LE LFGMWWLDW.' VV PT AMLFTR DN TJTHN EV|| V-, <: W M V Y T H S — IKTK VTHCLTWR (ivi'loqin.lr ivI EN OVR PERILS ARE PAS".. '-'HAL' f •il'*.'!!'! 1 I'K f>,X '".'NING \or.vin i II ii < IM:>I \ ,*e m b, ri 0 ni yl HArtt-.tr wan % gat, "BBSm EN SMSPLAZA 'AKNFRR UtClTINC MURICAl. I'll** Ll I BHOTHIBS DrnnlMORC.AN -1 BROADWAY GONDOLIER' "BAD" MEN of MISSOURI" %  Js-----:-s.:-ss.-sssssssvssss,:'SSSA'A'*A'.-'.w.:< GAIETY (The Grdrn) ST. JAMES Laai •*,* TONIOHT MS MON.-.IUM prvwnte raJSSu. SHADOWS OVER CHINATOWN' t WAKBI.V i UONOGRAN a > %  ram DOVHI %  •"-* • %  ttli'via astNOl ...a ''^ais...uw IN GLOBE TODV 5 mm 3 P.M LAST SHimTNt. •• HOI.III S ||i uvusi •• FOR | DtYS ONLY MMaaai Jui.. r.ih ,n i wtmatm JI> U. r. >ni 8.30 :' ••CAenvr: v>/Hja wot*swlU. \.| Ull .ru. (GorllU Oiril -aa I III IStltlHIl S t IS .ci.*ini: IIUVS .nd <;i.niA muat Only for rrrwtu. wltlt Sluut II. .n. 13" t I I ..I. I lu-i lloubl. JnitMM CraiK. Lynn R "MAN FROM TEXAS" end SWING HOSTESS" with Martha Tllton Cbutaa Collin Coffee BtralDers Tea ftrainers Erg Beaters Wire Cake Trays Frying Bauskets Salad Washers Metal Skewers Potato Ricers Flour Sifters Cake Pans Screw Top Bottles Phoenix Ovenwarr AT aPafc.4 XT A TMOIVS L TD. BROAD STREET


    Tuesday.

    Buly
    1950

    Hacbados



    . KOREANS TH

    Wi. Sugar Talks

    May End Today

    (From Our Own

    A

    Correspondeni)
    LONDON, July 3.

    FTER many weeks of skirmishing, West Indian sugar
    talks are drawing to a close. It is understood that the!

    Government have already made a compromise proposal to

    the West Indian delegation
    discussions will be written

    negotiating bodies will meet
    Our correspondent learnt tha

    and that the final chapter in
    tomorrow evening when both
    in the House of Commons.

    at the new British offer, which

    is in effect a proposal to shelve the whole question of quotas

    for three years until new contracts come into force,

    not been received favourabl
    leagues.





















    has
    y by Mr. Gomes and his col-





















    |
    |
    }


















































































    a

    REATEN

    nelle siete nieentiinietaentienn












    Price:

    - < © —_
    FIVE CEN

    i



    od

    Year



    SUWON

    4 U.S. Troops Set Up

    Korean H. Quarters









    TOKYO, July 3

    (,ENERAL DOUGLAS MacARTHUR’S Head

    quarters announced today that three North
    Korean columns were threatening the eastern flank
    of Suwon, a walled city 25 miles south of the cap.
    tured South Korean capital, Seoul. One column
    had reached Yongin, 5 miles east of Suwon. The
    thira column was moving south about 30 miles east
    of Suwon. The announcement said South Korean
    defenders were still holding Ichon road junction,
    a town east of Suwon and the line north of Suwon.





















    have tabled ' They were moving reinforcements north in an at-
    sugge 1g just what compror e P
    More Su yr {they are SAN Ae patie anh tempt to check the North Korean threat to the
    Sa if His Majesty’s Government cat:-| | city’s eastern approaches.
    a a not see their way clear to me t} The C . 2 , Jet Aghters from ground fire
    or ritish ing thi new claim not be} i im. eee ee al t lat)” “Allied headquarters also said
    so ade Shay ee ieee 1 plea} ata % en te ce Ee — ‘that three Communist columns re-
    Hi os e fe oi t ato ial is 5,000 te ns Bec 3 rafed a id orm ad § wo Korea ported to contain tanks and artil-
    OUSEWIWES |). |,25:10 Pree fotoes south of Kimpo Airiekd near |ROUGat? Stet Han Hives eas
    Owl mmplete soul with ema bor : r
    | of Seoul rear Kwangijang yester-
    BRADFORD, Yorkshire, July 3. In this event it is expected tho| | nen tae lso strafed Su day

    Britain's rationed housewives} West Indian delegates would re-} Air fel 1 a Bean 1 iy ae : North Koreans had “used every
    will soon get one pound of sugar] ‘urn home and advise sugar pro uw om athe 4 at ombee |avaitebl ns of transportation
    bonus for each person in the}d@ucers not to accept the British es | he fick 2 tn K eat i mae lin order to expedite the thrust”
    icmily, Food Minister Maurice} Government’s offer. It is expected daa pi a a +8 htt i a | which was believed to be an at-
    Webb announced, This means}|the Grenada conference would be Ret : ates 7 fe aeareanet thie . _jtempt to outflank South Korean
    that in one week they will get lls reconvened and an entirely new; . i" a tet cee jot a Ma pe wa | for befure American reinforce-
    sounds of sugar on eac ONE: plan of attack thought out. ST ee Men" Tents Merced
    1 ge n each ration ral William F. Dean
    Look, instead of the usual half- This is tah | The West Indian Sugar Delegates pose for a picture outside the Colonial Office before going in for their first formal discussion : ei rs °
    pound ration. definite sad tle, be Ken 8s 9) with Mr, Maurice Webb (Food Minister) and Mr. John Dugdale (Minister of State for Colonies). Far East naval forces, compose Drive Halted

    at talks will} f alt m { British and American warships,
    2 Pnied th: Tis tas te” exvier Gt yug ve 1es | : '

    Webb denied that there is any ll through, howeve r. These 2 ontinued patrols off both east and Farlier in the day American
    sugar in the non dollar world}only 4 agements believed j N 7 A v J i" | ‘Me e vest coasts but “without particu-|advance headquarters announced
    which he could but would not buy;] ; made by ti We > | “} i Cl $ Off » . ? ma om en tae ; ae eee ;
    “There is not an ounce in the| /%dian delegation in case any such C¢ roo IS - wa | na ers HAL AAS Pas AE moet Borean cave 1)
    world in dny non dollar area thai} Ch Unsency arise N { M aac ~ o nn : —_ | 33 000 T ereranes - mv ane 3 wn » on "= . poenee pew meena

    5 2) ug "eA.e@ > a : | \ im un on rom Japan oO Kor ' ‘ nat een LaLlLet WO 1
    oa ee ba z “ a eh fp rcgh The position at the moment i: O VE nhac In? S TRA hi d iS. FORCES | Fede roops ontinued unmolested throughout} Korean tanks which had crossed
    sales yo lead be poe p hes that the we st Indian delegates e re ~ he day, the communique said H River this morning had re
    sine tate & ‘orm, a said, reler-lare determined not to be put off er In | Oo S Korea red, apparently after a recor

    ing to the rumour that there was| with what they consider be half ve ° we \ a t ince mission, the announce
    rare sugar’ inthe West Tndies. | promises 3 First American Casualty errancga9 at U.S. Plane Lost (0% mission

    le =FOO te ai those “vy are lei ‘ Ee tI iS ily 3 rent & .
    send aes i se S a a : ne - They are sticking out cy what RUMOURS GROUNDLESS } Chinese National 1 , n| It added that air operation The battlefront has changed lit-

    anc é ot ab to sliver no ay intra “ < i

    supplies they contracte 1e- rs ‘nese Meck sek aa BERLI J ‘ (By ROY MACARTNEY) | \Mindster Gerge Yeh st ht{ineluded a raid on Yonpu airfield |te in the past 24 hours, said a

    I trac ri ri ad a a 2O— . scuss é e] VIRILGILIN, « y 3 rs . . ~ > + "8 | WN e n , . 5 acl renere

    liver.—Can. Press. 25 Neg ay sige ugha a 7 | RENE PINS RE j be : With the American Forces on South Korea Front, that talks were vith | in North Korea by 10 B29 Super- | Communique issued by General
    West India Committee this morn- British exper ir er] 1ea \ ; : .

    ing, they reached c ie. atin i eOKbrite “Gt resi ve ne th July 3 General Douglas facArthur’s | [crtresse American fighters sup- , MacArthur's headquarters. Barely

    g, ey reached complete agree-' i reports refugees from the o- : . ‘ “ ee Allied Head ters : Ire ed by Australian Mustangs ha 12 hours after came reports that

    tog ment on their policy Soviet Zone Siew loaded Recket-firing North Korean fighters today hit American | bGat Nat es ee we in Japan| t down one North Korean LA7)tWo Communist columns were bit-

    sae oS oundless wee 1 forces shortly after their deployment in South Korea, |°.. ationalist Chit offer of Sot down one North we \ing deeper into the South, con-
    ritish Officials Afterwards at his hotel Mr ‘i : j ‘ + cee . p y " SOreA, | 33,000 “seasoned troops” {o ctik plane and one Ya 9, des- o's per : ; . 1

    Gaines tala one Ti eaanidial {Russian teaop. cust ) ear| inflicting first casualties on American ground troops. lin Korea nce 2 lorric id an 1 90 | oe Samed 0 ad Sante ee

    ~ 7 tte ye’ ie : ji the c For YF at eens + < wat, : ies S alia i | 4 Pi of seoul, anc vat North Korean

    Are Safe In Japan “This issue began with sugar, but) 4 cyokesman in Berlit i For Noo minutes seven fighters strafed with rockets and | He added that exchange of views | 0" troops Rad outflanked the strat-

    it long ceased to relate merely tol today: British military authori- | machine-gun fire forward positions while I lay among G.I,s! between Chinese Nationalist and| egic town of Suwon after rapid
    or __ LONDON, July 3, |that commodity. It has brought) tie; “here have received no in-| ithout air or anti-aireraft protection. ha United States Government ‘waar | night operation:

    Two British Consular officials = the surface basic issues relating} ¢..ation that there are important|, “¢k-ack and fighter aireraft Jover our area, and diving steeply,| \ Mich followed the offer had beer | MacArthur's headquarters’
    who withdrew from Seoul in the] to | relationships _between His}. entrations of Russian troops |!@Y be in action tomorrow, but} they punched rockets: into the| {Oâ„¢MuNIeated to United Nation MANCHURIA spokesman said today that North
    fang of the North Korean armies, |Majesty’s Government and the| “OnCc) eat" | today’s experience regalled to}rail-yard where flames mounted |°°Cret#'y-General Trygve Lie Korean troops had attempted minor
    anid had been untraced for, neatly ae ee colonies. naka: aun rs bor war correspondents the}swiftly and “the roar of burning oe Coa ey made in two meee | drives but had again fallen back
    a week, have now reached Japan _the Government should fail| iopelessness of Greek and Crete] vehicles and buildings could be}*'meires delivered at the Ameri- | There had been North Korean. air
    ak paeien Office spokes- to give the West Indies guarantees NEUTRAL EXCEPT ; campaigns of the last war except} heard” . onn State Department on June 29} hme tivity but no cases of shooting

    an s o-day. now being sought for sugar pro- TO WARMONGERS that today it was Russian-built American G.I’s—mostly boys 19 |‘ nd 30 * cown planes had been reported,

    There waaeeulMho ‘Hews: 6f ‘the ee tion, then the impression that | fighters and not German Stuks}and 20—took their first baptism The State Department last night} he added
    British Minister Vivyan Holt and = nailing Se Caan " on PARIS, July 3 wae all the time attacked at will.}of fire well. weloomed TE-but said preparation: |
    ; ake. Vice«Cons ; a. | are willing to get cheap sugar in ried aitanioe te A sergeant from a Kentucky } ‘to meet the threat to Formosa” Tl J
    cuimaa th Seenl the etme the competitive market for hom ( Z rille OR adi Ma ae veteran armoured division in Id 1 ene should have priority 7 Troops Retreat

    é Se . s kesm2n | consumers at the expense ‘ suerilla Radio ) om . ahd ony a ‘ dived from my point seekin, ationalis sada . .
    said to-day it was now about al wect Indies | Sees the in a broadcast t poo cure rearanl tat ae whom | cover, but I have aie seen is F Nationalist Leader Chiang Kai | Warlier today the spokesman
    week anes any message had been : | Soviet Union intended es Satan. me patro a anivan unhealthy area (Note: |} nek “sald? tonight Leese jsaid that South Korean battalions

    ceive. “Or | . 1 i : MCE > > irs . . re; as ‘ ithe ry
    ae at rhe nsid Pr ee ge oe | err neutral oy a American inteestey Sasialee of the Macartney served in Greek and eae al ae rast Cat hel which had tried to stem the North-

    . = considering Koreai ul ne ‘ we , ee, ee ,|Crete campaigns in the last war),|/UPPet carrying out part « ; ern troops’ advance, had “retreated
    how best t ake enauiries t ’ Va 7 iQ 5 Korean war when he was - gns in the last war).|. 1uUe. y ' peer 9 ee ays —" -
    the fate of Holt aan thas British | VENEZUELANS en inde ap i in his foot during che sivakane, , oe Bab Of Aghters peeied |" mr ot awe ent el t Gis QPTAOD 20. SSE SAETS TEES.
    vane Fe 5 Ee s Ss +t Indochinese trar ; ran to attack two bridges nearb ——RKeuter. | \ North Korean Army ecommu-
    subjects remaining in Seou} who Y Ye eM ; : Attack o nom ges nearby | } A North Korean ¢ 1 pm
    ‘ Tie ea. vs mitter announce the ‘ a and their bursts of machine-gun cuinntier-imedumine nique quoted tonight by the New
    Bishon ee mgper,, Angi an APOLOGISE U.S.S.R., intends to ren me mantenaterk: eee in| fire seemed like hot breath. Bullets | | China News Agency tn a message
    s é 3 , oon i neutral, but mean ea i a schoolhouse with maps showing | missed the bridge. w : : :
    gees aoe | WASHINGTON, July 3 t clear that she will nat at || children the progress of the fight-| water below. eV UPPIng up orean Debate received in London said North
    The State Department re- : weer ae yuan Prac ing and with South Korean flag . na AN ‘ c Korean units advanced swiftly
    fy A : . nonger perpetrate es ~ 1 wan nage An American officer and I spent | thy )
    EMERGEN ceived an apology from the ahittaténn much in evidence, I was about to| nearly 20 minutes dodging « aspen) outhward on July 1 from Chwun-
    cY ACT LIFTED Venezuelan Government over the nvrens Reuts " ” decide that activity was ccnfined ard ‘huts utes dodging around In House chun and Hongehun, alyout 37
    stoning yesterday of United States ne to the distant rumble of the bomb- T . me tiles east of Seoul and “liberated
    (From Our Own Correspondent : ’ : ru f bomb The strafed town presented a/|
    BELIZE Truly 3 jaa beasy property in Caraca ____' ing at Seoul when fighters began pitiful sight as the skies cl “ari | r Ge. 30 distelony. and $00. veInaee

    Governor Sir. Ronald. Garvey} Lincoln White, State Depart- e rumours crop | circling the area Three great: avnned elu 7 ” ommons In the area along the east coast,
    hag lifted the Emergenc y Act im-| ment spokesman, said the apology ular intervals of about a ek, In groups of twos and threes] mounted skyward and the ranuie shot WIGHTON the communique said, “Korean
    posed on February 13 during the} W@8s made to the Emb by| he added. Officials in the Americ |they began peeling off to dive on of fierce flames could be heard AY saat W IGHTON). The communique admitted the| People’s troops continued their
    devaluation crisis, representatives of t Foreign! Sector of Berlin adopted the same|the town I had visited on patrol from the railyard os LONDON, July 3 loss of one B26 twin-engined In-| southward drive after joining up

    | Office. negative attitude towards reports.| half an hour before. As we drove out of town ter rified | Prime Minister ¢ lem nt Attlee| vader attack bomber, and light’ with guerilla forces.”
    , The lifting of the ban followed The United States Ambassador ae oe mates eer oft er ai 1) aie ee eee refugees fled out of ditches and| Deriice Waresiea tee ~ nro e damage to three F80 Shooting Stat —Reuter,
    1eavy press and public criticisin | reported that the Police had rrest-| ey ana ae ZO1 . o7 or five minutes tsome Korean soldiers wore make | i ore; tie
    and questions asked in the House]ed a number of “hoodlums’ re-| People’s. Police and Red Army|the town was under rocket and | 44 if, bloody bandages over flesh | orean situation — - .
    of Commons. sponsible for stoning —Reuter. | troops wére combining manoeu machine-gun attack with great] oo nds ; 7 The Government has chosen it
    jaround the former German capital | C}oUds of blue smoke billowing One refugee still living, lay flat speakers for the House of Con
    were “highly exaggerated and|Skywards as a land mark among}. his face, a bloody mess. with |" 1ons-Korean_ debate.on Wedne Pp A I N - S
    pane | without foundation.” the green rice fields the top of ‘ale head ahot. off he day wher a handful of dissatisfied
    BA I Ss OF PAS r GI ANTS Information reaching Berlin re-| Seven fighters began to run} yoayy calibre bullets. “|Labour members is expected to
    cently suggested that certain| se ae At American formation head-|©#!lenge the lr gality of action by
    ry : ; Soviet units are being replace y| [ quarters the first jeep to arrive taken on Korea by e United
    2 Rs fresh occupation troops for | }POCKET CARTOON with casualties carried a Korean mesons Security Coun il
    % ;mer manoeuvres | 1 by OSBERT LANCASTER soldier and the veteran Kenfucky . ne vert ite eee eee amt LEWIS BERGER
    counts of united movement sergeant with whom I went pat-[! 8 pea r ! : be f OC in
    nave gained added « uy th} rolling nerturbec t wants this debate to . .
    refugee Germans from the t} Tough Thing be a demonstration to the world | (Great Britain) Lid.
    Dena meer that tnn ies | | His first remark was “You can f 2 eet oF ae a an ee | AUTH iy \ {NIN {HANIA
    revived old fears of Sovic en-| tear up your interview”. his next: |to the United Nations, and it ha A AVHHTT LEAT UHHH TRH RHHHT AHHH PAU RUHG ETT
    | t in Europe } tea you've got any letters for home| been assured in alvance of ovet | YAAUVALLANIHAAIUA GSU \ iil NW | \
    citeme ate th est} \I’ll take them with me, They got} helming support.—Reuter, G l . d
    ; r | c Bi
    by port f troop « nty | }me in my foot” | be jaa ins grea year am For a vanise ’
    mm Berlin’s outskirt ] | |} Though in great pain he was i) a
    tion in the cits | 14 {cheerful throughout. The sergeant I uerto Ric oO b tos or shin-
    | Allied officiale rate ) is | M4 | had been philosophic half an hour, , 7 as es ’
    lit nother phase of | r| j | before when I asked him how he Can Draft New f
    ; i no apprehension | ae} | feit about the Korean war. “I ; 3 i l d situ ee
    id 4 tself felt among the people seas beeause I was ordered” he Constitu tion g e rools
    ; 1 —Reuter | Sai ;
    1 4 | OF ii | “The tough thing about these WASHINGTON, July 3
    4 \ 4 s sma'l wars is that one mortal President Truman today signed
    i Thieves Grab | | hell can kill you just as dead as|« bill giving Puerto Rico the right ~“ 4 _- - .
    ‘ § | 1} | 100," ‘mouth draw up and adopt its n (
    4 i | ’ — (Reuter)! constitution. }
    | £10,000 From 5 - The Bill said the new constitu t )
    a: 3 7 4 ts ) tron “shall provide a Republican
    LS Exeter Cathedra 4h eS | SWEDEN AGREES form of Government and shall in-
    4 ae USC? ¥ ace | ‘ i clude bill rights.”
    ere LONDON, July ¢ 4 ee LONDON July 3 The Government of Puerto Rico : A
    1 sh police were today keep Bg uncle has been much the t Sweau ee. ne has operated since 1917 under an ee ;
    i itch o air an eo| | red by the Gowers report jthat Sweden has replied to the} st passed by Congr email Ot : sae
    Europe for £10,000 , | yur ladyship He says that | United Nations Aid questionnaire ‘* Sab ill be repealed under the
    ner . 2. yk tl committee's recom jon Korea, saying she is in full sate bar : Plaka _ ee 7 trod 1
    4 ¢ FE Cc il ; tons are carried out sreernent with action taker. |' constitution Reuter.
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    4 l- } & atic asylum." }upon at present to take any spe- .
    ; 1 Dutch and French police a | cific measures.” —( Reuter) U.S. Planes Bomb | er fa rn
    ; thon t thier } ‘ .
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    get the ste f Brita’r North Kore: ;
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    - U. S Mi n A d B mb ( LONDON, July 3 ;
    ’ € i ve | © ° ari es n O ers A Soviet News Agency Tass
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    ( } fo | village of Sondan, ir Hendu Hard ‘ re |
    : ; WASHINGTON, Jt 3 | the invasior of Korea began {region of North K esterday |
    20.000 co American medium Lombers and| They are part of the Strategic } and bombed the towns of Vonsan C.S. PITCHER & CO |
    ¢ ¢ teh f ‘certain ground and air units” of | Command of the United States | and Pyoy zy Yan the capital, Ae Nic save |
    € cuenter |the United States Marine Corps | Air Force In another move, | vhich they machine ne PLANTATIONS LTD |
    — . caeatta % , have been ordered to reinforce |twelve jet fighter planes took off | —Reuter. ‘OTTON FACTORY LTD |
    ere OF fi . , I ric ilitary strength in the |frorn Burbank, California, to-day | —_——_—___—__ COTTON FACTORY L |
    rst cricket de o a fr et 0 vst, It nnounce 1ere | or 3.125 . sliverv ; SOND A â„¢ owiTr
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    I article nd many ci t : a O00 k ‘ fornia re order-|sauadrons already on an_ alert . eh als i
    have been assembled for tt ! ! ! o General Douglas;The Marines’ transfer was made|_ , WASHINGTON, July 3. — |
    the Naticnal Book League’s premises ir I i me f 1 i He ers in| with the approval of President| The United State innouncec¢ DINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTT Bridgetowr Agent |
    wi gee keer th ' on : : { that it ] t}
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    PHOTO Srot * pBt., VCs inne C Staff, a United States Navy | 45,000 ton aircraft carrie a HOTTEST mT HHHHNLTUNUNTHGHUNLUTTALU HITE
    G t th w h he scored 1,000 rur tk ) ere il > for- ll be the first | spokesman sai fe assum “y | Way” and f estroyers to join] TH PUVA TARE HTT | |
    Sa ee tern es bee & | tee 3 I be the fist! spokesman said. He assumed they | Way" and four destrovers to Joln NIM MAO
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    (1765) seen at the Exhibition. —(Reuter the Far E nc vf 15 to 16 days.—Reuter. ‘the Mediterranean, —~-(Reuter) se : feanlsie —_—$_$—$—$


    PAGE TWO



    IS EXCELLENCY the Gov-
    ernor and Mrs. Savage will
    be attending the Cocktail Party
    the home of Mr, and Mrs. Albert

    V. Nyren this evening.

    Mr. Nyren is Officer-in-Charge
    of the American Consulate m
    Barbados and the party is in hon-
    our ef Independence Day.

    At “Miramar”’

    NTAYING at “Miramar’’, St.

    James, for a couple of months’
    holiday are Dr. and Mrs. John
    Pessel and their daughter Ruthlyn
    and Dr. and Mrs. Henry Bcskus
    and their daughter Barbara

    Both families are from Trem-
    ton, New Jersey and they arrived
    yesterday morning via Trinidad
    by B.W.I.A

    At Lord’s

    MONG the many West Indians
    - seen at Lord’s during the
    Second Test Match were, Hon,
    Garnet Gordon of St. Lucia, who
    has just arrived in England after
    attending the Imperial Press Con-
    ference in Canada and Mr. Hugh
    Springer, Registrar of the West
    Indian University, who is now out
    of hospital. Hugh broke this knee-
    cap while running for a ’bus, but
    can now walk with the aid of a
    stick. He intends returning to
    Jamaica soon where he will have
    further physiotherapy treatment,
    Mr. P. W. W. Branch of Barbados,
    who is studying medicine in Lon-
    don. Mr. Gerry Gordon of Trini-
    dad, Mr. Berkely Gaskin, the well
    known British Guiana medium
    pace bowler, who has been in
    England since April. And finally,





    Mr. Greenhill and his wife,
    Madame Bromova, and Com-
    mander and Mrs, Daysh of Bar-
    bados,

    On Honeymoon

    R. AND MRS. BERNARD

    TEXEIRA arrived yesterday
    morning frorn Trinidad by
    B.W.I.A.

    They were married recently ir
    Venezuela and spent two days in
    Trinidad, before coming over to
    Barbados on their honeymoon.

    Originally from British Guiana,
    Mr. Texeira has been living in
    Venezuela for the past twenty
    months where he works with the
    Mene Grande Oil Co., in Bar-
    ceclona.

    They are staying at the Ocean
    View Hotel.

    Returned Over the
    Week-end
    ISS CLAUDIA EVELYN and
    Miss Helen Taitt, who were
    spending their annual leave in
    Barbados returned to Trinidad by
    B.W.LA., over the week-end. On
    the Saturday night before they
    left they told Carib they had a
    wonderful evening at the Marine
    Hotel at the Polo Fiesta, They
    were staying at “Cacrabank”.
    Was Here Last Year
    ISS DOREEN SCHULER who
    is with the Royai Bank of
    Canada in Georgetown arrived
    here yesterday by B.W.1.A. to
    spend about three weeks’ holiday
    staying at Accra, Rockley.
    Doreen was here last August
    for a holiday.
    At Seawell to meet her were
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Olten.
    Back from Carib Talks
    R. BERNARD ROLFE of the
    Secretariat of Colonial De-
    velopment and Welfare and Mrs.
    Keith Walcott, stenographer also
    of Colonial Development and Wel-

    fare returned yesterday by
    B.W.LA. from Martinique after
    attending the tenth meeting of

    the Caribbean Commission.

    Off to Buenos Aires
    R. LIONEL PARRY left Bar-
    bados on Sunday afternoon,
    en route for Argentina via Trini-
    dad by B.W.1.A. There he will
    shortly be entering into a Com-

    mercial firm in Buenos Aires,
    His father Mr, Ernest Parry
    accompanied him as far as Trin‘-
    dad and he expects to be bac:

    here on Wednesday,

    Turfite Returns
    R. I, O. C. PERKINS who
    was in Trinidad for the first

    two days of racing returned yes-
    terday morning by B.W.1.A.

    . Carib Calling





    ERIC GATES
    Leaving Today

    RIC GATES leaves today fo:
    New York via Puerto Rico by
    B.W.1.A
    Eric will long be remembered
    in Barbados as the successful pro-
    ducer of the Musical Revue, “Hig!:
    Tyme”, and there is one particular
    Barbadian, a dumb and deaf boy

    who will always remember his
    name,
    Mrs. Ben Moore, the originator

    of “High Tyme’, told Carib that
    the total profits from the revuc
    which went to aid this youngster
    amounted to $1,711.53.

    Five Weeks’ Visit To
    The U.S.
    on Sunday eve-

    So
    ning by B.W.1.A., ways

    Miss Lucy Mestier who has been
    on five weeks’ holiday visiting th:
    US.

    Travelling by B.W.1.A. as far
    as Puerto Rico, she went by P.A.A.
    to New York, and also visited
    Connecticut and Philadelphia

    In New York, she saw her
    brother Joseph and his family, and
    while visiting friends in Connecti-
    cut she met Capt. Lamb who used
    to be Commanding Officer of the
    U.S. Military Personnel at Sea-
    well during the war.

    In Philadelphia she met Miss
    Sheila Inniss, Sheila hopes to
    come to Barbados in December for
    Christmas.

    For Summer Holidays

    Arriving yesterday morning by
    B.W.I.A. from Trinidad was
    Mr. Michael Simpson, son of Mr
    and Mrs. Fred Simpson of “Wood-
    land”, St. George. A student at
    the Imperial College of Tropical
    Agriculture he is home for the
    Summer holidays.

    Short Holiday

    R. LOUIS ROSS, who is with
    the Confederation Life In-
    surance in Venezuela arrived from
    Trinidad yesterday morning in-
    transit from Venezuela by B.W.LA.
    Mrs. Ross accompanied him and
    they are staying at Super Mare,
    Worthing on a short holiday.
    Mr. Ross was originally
    British Guiana and Mrs. Ross
    hails from Jamaica. They have
    been living in Venezuela now fo.
    about three years.

    Returned Yesterday
    RS. OLIVE CORBIN of
    “Rosemary”, Rockley, and
    Miss May Goddard of “The Gar-
    den”, St. James, who were in San
    Fernando on a short visit return-
    ed from Trinidad yesterday morn-
    ing by B.W.1A.

    Chiid’s Play!
    *%7OUNG MASTER STEPHEN
    ‘ MANSFIELD arrived from
    Trinidad yesterday morning by
    B.W.1LA. He is the four-year-old
    nephew of Mr. Charlie Ray. A
    trip from Trinidad to Barbados by
    air is just “Child’s Play” to
    stephen, as he’s been all aroun?,
    the U.S. travelling by himself.
    Checking through Port Health,
    Immigration and Customs at Sea-
    well yesterday was just routine
    stuff to this youngster and he
    came through with flying colours!

    from

    Sings Tonight

    ISS GRACITA FAULKNEI
    will sing at Christ Churci
    parish Church tonight at 8.10]
    o'clock, West Indian born Amer
    can soprano, Miss Faulkner h
    been giving a series of song re
    citals in Barbados. She will |
    leaving the island shortly

    Visiting home
    LANNING to go to Rome a.
    the end of August is Gerry
    DesIsles of Trinidad. Gerry is one
    ol the large community of Wes.
    Indians studying law in London
    and he has just passed his Roman
    Law. Between now and August
    he hopes to get an interestin;
    vacation job, perhaps on a farm
    When in Rome he plans to stay
    at a camp run by Boy Scouts just
    outside the City. Gerry has taken
    the trouble to find out in advance
    what the camp menu will be like.
    Half a litre of the best Italian
    wine, he assures me, is included
    n the daily fares.
    Weddings
    S* DAVID'S CHURCH was
    beautifully decorated on
    Saturday evening when Miss Iris
    Mullin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
    P. A. Mullin of Haggatt Hall, was
    married to Mr. C. Riley, son of
    Mr. C. Kingsley Riley, Headmas-
    ter of St. Martin’s Boys’ School,
    and Mrs. Riley. The bride is an
    assistant teacher at St. Giles’
    Boys’ School, while the bride-
    groom is attached to the Highways
    ind Transport Department.
    Mr. Lucien King performed the

    duties of Bestman while the
    bridesmaids were Miss Hildned
    Riley and Miss Dorothy Black-
    man, Rev. O, C, Haynes offici-

    ated with Mr. Thomas Bayley at
    organ.

    After the wedding a reception
    was held at the home of the bride
    it Haggatt Hall

    OUNT TABOR CHURCH was

    the scene of a quiet wedding
    one day last week, when Miss
    Mabel Hinkson, eldest daughter
    of Mr. and Mrs, Darey Hinkson
    of Foster Hall, St. Joseph, was
    married to Mr. Gordon Young of
    Wilson Hill, St. John.

    The ceremony which was fully
    choral was performed by Rev
    Pilgrim.

    The bride who was given away
    by her cousin Mr. Oscar Hinkson,
    wore a dress of nylon and lace
    Her veil was kept in place with

    a tiara of orange blossoms and
    she carried a bouquet of Queen
    Anne's Lace and Anthurium

    Lilies,

    There was one bridesmaid, Miss
    C. Hinkson, sister of the bride,
    who wore a dress of pink nylon

    The three flower girls were the
    Misses ©. Hinkson, Diana Clarke
    and Loretta Young.

    Mr, M, Corbin, uncle of the
    bridegroom was the bestman.
    After the ceremony a_ reception
    was held at the home of the
    bride’s parents.



    Century Scorers

    HILE the West Indian team

    are winning honours for
    themselves in their tour of Eng-
    land, three other West Indian
    cricketers have been keeping the
    flag flying in the Lancashire
    League. George Headley proved
    that he has not passed the run-
    getting age by scoring a century
    for the second week running on
    June 3, and a 68 on the following
    Saturday, giving him an average
    of 151.66 But it is not Headley
    who has most delighted the spec-
    tators. A young man from Brit-
    ish Guiana, Bruce Pairaudeau,
    who is studying in England, turn-
    ed out as an amateur for Burn-
    ley on June 3 and scored 105
    against Nelson. His form in the
    return game with Nelson en June
    10 was even mare remerkable,
    for he obtained 102 not out of
    Burnley's winning score of 143
    for five. It will be remembered
    that Pairaudeau, who narrowly
    missed selection for the W.I. team,
    scored 161 for B.G. against Bar-
    bados last winter. A third West
    Indian, J. K. Holt, who is pro-
    fessional at Haslingdon, scorec
    121 against Kamsbottom in a
    splendid cysplay of hitting. One
    hit dislodged tiles from the roof
    of the pavilion.



    BY THE WAY » sscxconse

    HEY say that Roland

    Dorgeles must have been

    a certain exhibition of sculpture

    in London. Dorgeles once _pick-

    ed up a bit of stone in a friend’s

    studio, and left it in the Gallery
    of Antiquities in the Louvre.

    It was also Dorgeles who tied
    a paint-brush to a donkey's tail
    and pushed the tail against a
    canvas, The ensuing “picture’
    was exhibited at the Indepen-
    dants show in Paris under the
    title “Et le soleil se couche sur

    l’Adriatique”. It was signed
    “Joachin Raphael Aiboron,” and
    thus the donkey, whose name

    was Lolo, and who belonged to
    Frede of the Lapin Agile, step-
    ped into the forefront of modern
    art. But in those days young
    men played the fool for fun,

    Marginal Note

    FT\HE youngster who smashed
    his way into a film-star’s

    POOOSOOSS9SF

    GOSS SS OSG 2S L PPP IPO IL OI EG OOS EAE POI OSI OF





    house, to ask for her autograph
    little thinks that he may have
    been the means of inducing
    actresses to learn to write, mere-
    ly as a measure of self-defence

    Baba Blacksheepe Dines Oui
    NOTE a new torm of gossip.
    Instead of saying, “She wis
    looking very fit; her mother was
    a Bulper,” you describe in detail

    what she ate. What she said, how
    often she smiled, and so on
    Presumably the chronicler is

    standing by the table, typewriter
    in hand,

    With her sole she had a
    potato, of which she ate two
    mouthsful, pushing the rest to the
    side of her pftte with her fork.
    She wiped her mouth after one
    rather large mouthful of sole, fol-
    lowing it up with a piece of roll,
    which she broke off between the
    finger and thumb of her left hand,
    and opening her mouth to put it in.
    She then swallowed it, and took

    PPLE PPS OPO PLL PALLET

    SERVE THE WHOLE FAMILY

    WITH

    J&R

    BREAD & CAKE

    It's Better by far if it's

    J&R

    —DSOPOSOO SSS SOG ESE SLES ELSI PPS FEFEELEE LPL ESS

    another mouthful of sole. Then she
    scratched her left leg... .
    Financial Note

    RTHODOX economists are

    Saying, with a giggle, that at
    least half the recent £150,000,000
    Electricity Loan will have to be
    taken up by Government depart-
    ments and then shoved on to the
    public. What this means, in
    effect (1 repeat in effect), is that
    if the public doesn’t want the
    thing the banks will be landed
    with smaller overdrafts, bigect
    advances to industry, and all the
    ragamadolio and twnble - cum
    trivy and rollymolly of new issues
    of capital. And that means thet
    industry will be up to the fetlocks
    in debentures and steeped to the
    gills in assets by no means liquid
    The net (1 repeat, net) result is
    bound to be an all-round sulk!
    ness eva recrimination which will
    cause those of us who are outside
    the great hurlyburly of finance to
    slap our thighs and shake with
    honest mirth,

    PPE FEF, ee

    ENJOY THE FINEST!




    .
    EADS SSSCPCRS

    POSS

    :

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    THIS style of shoe is called

    Ltd. In fine grey suede with
    are made on the new chik



    Collar Pir
    gold



    i
    i
    j

    " by Joyce (California)
    pin front fastening. They
    ot last to give extra toe room.



    A barbecue
    In Mayfair

    By Joan Ershine

    What's new in the World of
    fashion publicity? Nothing les:

    than a roof-top barbecue, com-
    plete with sizzung ham and hes-
    sian hangings. A famous shoe
    decided to hold an “out <
    ordinary” party at which they
    could show their autumn range ot
    casual shoes. Having been invited
    to “saddle





    our hosses and ride up
    at half after six” we made de
    with staid London taxis and

    found our way to Stanhope Gate
    curving respectably off Park Lane

    There on a wide balcony, cano-
    pied in blue and white, the bar-
    becue was held.

    For the occasion a special bar-
    becue stove had been sent over
    from America—purely for decora-
    tive purposes, since we never did
    see what happened to the three
    thick slices of bacon which per
    fumed the evening air. Addin

    the authenticity of the scene we
    saddles, feed-bags, scarlet flower

    rcugh mats, wooden benches and
    checked table-cloths. We dined in
    cempus fashion on fried chicken
    and sweet corn, many of us for
    the first time. A small hill-billy
    band played in one corner, and
    champagne was dispensed from
    another In a burst of curiosity
    we examined one of the saddle
    —and found inscribed upon it
    British Railways
    Halfway through the eve

    the shoes were shown, and it wa
    gratifying to find thai some were
    made on a new teenage last. (De-
    finition of a last the replica of
    the human foot on which the shoe
    is made.) Previously this sensible,
    wide-toed, shape had been re-
    erved for children and for adult
    sandals only. Now, strong walking
    shoes in brilliant colours and new
    designs have been produced, en-
    suring that each of your toes has
    a place in which to rest, and is
    not crowded up against the others

    The shoes, designed by Ameri-
    con Mrs. Joyce, were scarlet, bot-
    tle green, saddlesoft, redberry,
    teal, grey, maple sugar, and ever-
    green. Some of the new ideas
    were to have the laces tied round
    small metal hooks, like an old
    fashioned boot, to have a gold col-
    lar pin clipping the front of a low-
    cut vamp; and to have adjustable

    '



    , COWS

    straps and buckies holding the
    front of the shoe
    Many wemen ask for a very

    low cut flat-heeled pump. Taney
    do not realise that these are very
    cifficulit to keep on the foot, and
    that the vamp has to be cut fair-
    ly high in order to make it secure.



    this firm showed some variations
    on the idea by cutting the front
    down in the fashionable “shell”
    shape, almogs showing the toes,
    and then fastening a narrow ad-
    justable strap across below the
    strap. Can you imagine a shoe
    with a split throat? This simply

    means that the shoe is seamed up
    the front, and the leather edging
    cut away, which ensures that the
    fcot is not pinched

    Do you realise how closely the
    leather situation is bound up witn
    the meat position’ If, for exam-
    ple, Britain imports tough, etderly
    the resulting leather often

    great scratches and streaks on
    it. And few people are aware that
    vufi-glove, a hard-wearing shoe
    fabric, is merely the reverse side
    of the skin of an older animal. It
    is practical, and can be brushed
    clean quite easily. The roughened

    nas

    ede surface makes it ideal for
    country shoes

    A snoe designer told me with
    scme force that most women are
    mpletel illogical when choos-
    ing shoe They will not be ad-
    ised as to fitting, and prefer to
    cramp their toes into high-heeled |
    unsuitable court shoes, rather
    than buy a pair more convenient |
    for their work.

    To cripple oneself for a cocktail '



    party is something we all do occa- !
    sionally, and it will not harm!
    ycur feet. But to spend all day in
    very high heels throws your
    weight forward, ultimately caus-
    ing backache, bunions and other
    foot troubles. Equally senseless is
    the woman who buys very flat,
    low-cut pumps, because she is

    foreed to curl up her toes, in order
    to keep them on her feet, and this
    eventually causes hammer.toes.

    A grim picture to paint indeed,

    but feet are the most neglected
    and ill-used part of the human
    body, and a little commonsense

    would not come amiss.

    =

    —

    CHILD’S PLAY is a sandal type shoe, built like a small girl’s

    at present is very popular in

    shoe with double buckles, and
    America. By Joyce of California.



    LONDON
    _For eight days a man suffered
    violent hiccoughs in London’s St

    Thomas Hospital and no treat-
    ment helped him.
    Then he remembered that he

    had once read of a cure in a book
    by Sir Alan Herbert. He akse:l
    for a copy of the book, entitled
    “Sip, Swallow,” but the book

    wa

    difficult to find
    In desperation he had his nurs
    telephone Sir Alan who oblig ngiy



    File This Hiccup Cure

    it a copy to the hospital. The
    treatment suggested in it was
    curried out and the man was com-
    pletely cured of his hiccoughs.

    Said Sir Alan:

    “It consists simply of blocking
    the ears .with a finger of each
    hand while taking five sips. of
    water from a glass on a table. I
    have often bet hiccoughs victims
    $2 that it would work, and so far

    Il have never had to pay up.”
    —(1.N.S.)



    We can supply your

    requirements of ....

    @ Wheelbarrows,

    @® Shovels, Post Hole Diggers,

    @ Peck Axes, Felling Axes,

    BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
    FACTORY LTD.

    @ Sledge Hammers.
    ; |
    {
    {
    {

    a.m

    Housewives’

    | Guide

    Prices in the iree market
    for Limes and Cucumbers
    when the Advocate checked
    yesterday were as follows:

    Limes .... 2 fer 3%
    Cueumibbers. .6c. per |b

    B.B.C. Radio Notes
    TUESDAY, July 4 1960
    The New 7.10 a.
    7.15 a.m. Jane >
    kK On these things
    Speaking: 8 a.m
    8.10 «am
    Charlie Kunz
    Leader ind his
    a.m. Close Down: 12 noon The News
    12.10 p.m. News Analysis: 12.15 p.m
    Programme Parade: 12.18 p.m. Listen
    ere’ Choice: 1 p.m. Science Review
    1.15-p.m. Patio Newsreel: 1.30 p.m
    Tip Top Tunes: 2 pam. The News
    2 pm. Home News fram Biitain
    p.m. Sports Review: 2.90 p.m
    the Commonwealth: 8 pom
    Thind Programme: 4 pom
    4.10 pan. The daily Service
    paw. My kind of music: 4.4
    pm. Repo:t from Wimbledon: 6 pm
    British open Golf Championship:
    bm. Listeners’ Choice: 6.15
    gramme Parade: 5.30 p.m
    Teller: 5.50 p.m. Onterlude: 6 p.m
    Jane Ewre: 6.15 p.m. The Passport
    p.m. The News New:
    Analysis: 7.15—7.30 p.m
    port on W. I
    745 pm. Pienoforte Music
    trated discussion with Margevie
    & William Pilgrim: 8 p.m
    reel: €15 p.m. Science Review:
    pm. Report from Wimbiedon
    _m. Interlude: 6.55 p.m. From th
    Raitorials: 2 p.m
    ‘Comedy: 9.30 p.m. Books to Read: |
    p.m. The News: 10.10 p.m Mue



    e: 7.20
    4% a.m



    €



    zencrall
    Editorials
    ade: 815 a.m
    Harry





    the
    News;
    4.15

    Th



    ro

    News

    D

    From the
    Programme "ar-

    Band: 9

    From

    5| fully tested on a British liner may
    end the traveller’s fear of sea sick-

    5.05) ness.

    fe sary
    Story
    ..| ship engineers the tests were car-
    Tl ried out on the new 24,000 ton P &
    O liner Chusan as she steamed at
    23 knots off Southampton.

    s

    vs Hampshire: 7.30 —
    — Ilhus-
    Few
    Radio News-
    8.
    8.45

    hfon the bottom of the vessel and
    these held her steady in the heavy

    Binding in the Marsh: 0.45 p.m
    Commonwealth Survey: li pom. A
    Talk.

    NO HOPE

    LONDON, Monday.

    Letters have deluged @he edi-

    tor of the London ®weming New:
    since he printed a meader’s sug

    gestion that “Land ef Mope and

    Glory” should become (Bmritain’
    national anthem,

    “J. Bull” of London put it i
    a nutshell:

    s

    n

    “After more than five years of

    Socialist tyranny nobody coul

    d

    call England a land of hope— and

    certainly not one of glory.

    “A mare
    for to-day would
    Another Nickel In.”—IN.S.

    CROSSWORD



    Across

    3. This may reming you vi om
    fidest Of the three bears. (4, 6)
    Sky tight to the aisle ip the Dairy
    Show. (5 3)
    ‘l, Gained at a Vursity only after
    a lot of hard work. (4)
    '2. Result of having broken rest. (4)
    4 uw that was left of the rent man
    )
    !5. Are Bachelors of Medicine usuatis
    this colour” (5) >
    13. and 4 Down. Dominate, (7) &
    . AS plants go Most people woulc
    ts sth thie feathery. (4)
    A could be gained by expert us
    of this (3) veer ee
    él. Anger. sir! Couia it cnange for
    such ornaments? (8)
    22, Where they stop rents? Couid
    be! (9)
    23 Pompous schoolmaster.

    own

    t. What made the Begum R.A +
    (7)

    2 Uf you dv then vou must expect
    anger (4)

    4 A Well Known
    She Wie Kissed

    4 See 17 Across

    2 After night vou get the oira

    6 Much sought
    stones +7)

    8 Pound on the Kent coust. (3)

    , mane fonging te make Gray nine
    (8)

    10 Shes oot supposea cto snp “
    brigntiy as her elders (i e

    1+ When you might back a horse vb
    both Ways ¥ “ay

    (9)

    Dexullty did untt
    eo)

    (3)
    after for precious

    Jo BY encireiing gives you fruit 3)
    43 That's the tov (4) ce

    Look what Mager vett when ne





    lost nis head (4)
    Svlution of vesterduy's vuseie. — Across;
    Voluntary © Ptiguette: 9 Noviaates.
    i Bur’ 13. Eliminate: 14. Blate: 16
    Car. 18 Nav. 19 katea 0. Gure: 21
    A 22 Petty. 25 Any Wown: J. Ven:
    feance; 2 Live 8. Tea: 4. Attracts: 5
    haan 6 Vableaus BR ‘est: 10
    lomate 1 uw. 12 U
    1 Lae Pie neasy 15 Lyre
    e
    ROYAL = (Worthings)

    Last 2 Shows To-Day
    4.30 & 8.15

    Columbia Big Double
    ROBERT STANTON
    MARJORIE REYNOLD

    in

    ‘SING WHILE YOU DANCE’

    AND
    “TERROR TRAIL”
    with
    Charles STARRETTE
    Smiley BURNETTE



    EMPIRE

    To-Day To Thursday
    4.45 & 8.30
    Paramount Pictures Present .
    OLIVIA DeHAVILLAND
    MONTGOMERY CLAFT
    in
    “TME §PIRESS”
    With Ralph Richardson
    ‘ Miriam Hopkins





    ROXY
    Last 2 Shows To-Day

    4.45 & 8.15
    Paramount Pictures Present :

    BARBARA STANWYCK
    WENDELL COREY in
    “THELMA JORDAN”

    with
    Paul Kelly, Joan Tetzel

    OLYMPIC

    Last 2 Shows To-Day
    4.30 & 8.15
    Eagle Lion Double
    James Craig, Lynn Bari

    !



    in

    “MAN FROM TEXAS”
    and

    “SWING HOSTESS”

    with Martha Tilton
    Charles Collin

    appropriate anthem
    be — “Put












    on her side Captain R. E. T. Tun-
    bridge touched a switch and the
    huge vessel

    e
    Memories of Musical | “VE? keel.

    China seas.”

    4 5
    2 999999459999 09665606 SOEoOL*
    i en

    | MONOGRAM’S WESTERN DOUBLE !

    ys PPOLOCOLPCLSSPSCPP LESCOL LOPE LLLP ALLS,
































    TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1950



    Rupert and Miranda—32





    ot sandwiches and apples. ** Oh,
    how topping,” he cries. ‘* The toy
    clown must have left this to keep
    me going until he comes again. |
    wonder what else he has im that
    little plane of his.’ Returning to
    the secret pass

    The little —_— disappears
    into the sky and Rupert realises
    with some anxiety that he is now
    quite alone and also that he is very
    hungry. As he turns towards the
    turret he sees a curious package
    lying neat him. Cautiously he opens
    it and to his delight he finds it full

    END SEA

    LONDON.
    A new anti-roll device success-

    age the sits and listens
    intently beside the sliding panel.

    SICKNESS

    liners being rocked in heavy
    The Chusam, direct from the shi;
    builders yards, is the biggest sh:
    to test the special device made {|
    Brown Bros. of Edinburgh.

    The stablizer consists of
    rectangular streamlined fins lyir
    horizontally on each side of th
    ship and projecting from the hu!
    Each fin is mounted on a shat
    When operating the fins are tilt:
    by a mechanism.

    The forward movement of ihe
    ship causes the water to exert an
    upward force on one fin and ;
    downward force on the other com-
    bining to minimize any roll caused
    by waves.

    The fins are retractable, a:
    when not required are withdraw:
    into recesses within the hull.

    With experts claiming that link
    rocking has been stopped in roug!
    seas, the new stabilizing de
    : may now be fitted to Britain’s

    Ship builders have long sought lantic liners and many other ves-
    a stabilizer that would prevent big sels.—(CINS)

    URYPTOQUOTE—Here's how to work it:

    AXYDLBAAKR
    sLONGFELLOW

    One leta#r simply stands for another. In this example A ts used
    for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc Single letters, apos-
    trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints
    Each day ihe code letters are different.

    A Cryptogram Quotation
    TITHN BVSMF LE LFGMWWLDWN
    DT AMLFTR DN TJITHN EVSÂ¥ VEC
    GWMYYTHN—IKTEYTHGLTWR.

    Cryptoquote: SYWHEN OUR PERILS ARE PAS’,
    IR GRATITUDE SLEEP ?--CANNING



    Watched by British and foreign

    As the Chusan rolled 23 degrees

    swung back on an

    The switch had released two fins

    ocean,

    Captain Tunbridge said :

    “The fins reduce a roll of 14 de-
    grees to four degrees. That will
    make a big difference when the
    Chusan strikes monsoons in the



    = Y.

    SHAL'





    (Members Only)

    AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA

    TUES,, WED., THURS, 8.30 p.m,
    MATINEE WED. 5 p.m.



    Monogram presents :

    “SUSPENSE”

    with (Alluring) Belita—Barry Sullivan



    Special MATINDE SATURDAY &th 9.80 p.m,
    “BOMBA, THE JUNGLE BOY" With Johnny
    A Monocram Picture

    oe

    %,

    %

    Last 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m, &

    WARNER'S EXCITING MUSICAL—ACTION DOUBLE | X

    Dick ‘The MILLS “BR ” Q

    POWELL—BROTHERS $
    = ALSO —

    Dennis MORGAN !4— $

    “BAD MEN of MISSOURI”

    a _., Wednesday and Thursday—S and 8.80 p.m.
    1 BECAME A CRIMINAL” & “VALLEY OF THE GIANTS"

    98S





    GATETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

    Last show ‘TONIGHT —
    Sidney TOLER
    as Charlie CHAN in

    8.30 MONOGRAM presents - - -

    ‘SHADOWS OVER CHINATOWN’

    — ALSO —

    Jimmy WAKELY in “OKLAHOMA BLUES”

    WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY—8.30 p.m.

    Johnny Mack Brown

    Jimmy WAKELY in
    “SILVER 2ANGE"

    and “SPRINGTIME #N TEXAS”











    GLOBE :

    TODAY 5 and 8.30 P.M. LAST SHOWING $

    * ROGUES REGIMENT ”’ %

    —_—_—__,



    FOR 2 DAYS ONLY ¥
    Wednesday July 5th ana Thursday July 6th 5 and 8.30 x

    “CAPTIVE WILD WOMAN” 3

    with Aquanetta (Gorilla Girl) 3

    — and — >

    “WHE INVISIBLE MAN* 3

    (CLAUDE RAINS and GLORIA STUART %
    Only for Persons with Stout Hearts

    % *

    LLLP LLAALALLLEN



    Coffee Strainers

    Tea Strainers
    Egg Beaters
    Wire Cake Trays
    » Frying Baskets
    » Salad Washers
    Metal Skewers
    Potato Ricers
    Flour Sifters
    | Cake Pans
    | Screw Top Bottles
    | | Phoenix Ovenware |
    |





    AT
    PLANTATIONS LTD. |

    BROAD STREET






    TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE

    Manley Finds Forced Canada Studies
    Cement For

    f Conteesions
    Federation

    " \Old-Age Payments
























































    |
    '
    i t i |
    a 5 yocate Corres: hei crimes ‘ oft i n
    eres ae ree a ; er ao hed | e iia OTTAWA and get repaid 75 per c f the
    Mr. N. Manle K.C., lea Br t census in 20] anada’s Parliament is working} cost by the federal government
    of the People’s ‘ . take é April teen a new deal in old-age] The present basic pension is $40
    ' ' | monthly and i ome }
    at a public meeting in vy int ate que | What may come out of it no] this is supplemented by ar
    last week saw xd in sor tior } ,o mal | ¢ ne is prepared to predict. It may nal | vineial x
    the proposals of the Fe atio 1 ae ¢ j;or may t mean a better dea! The old-age securit
    Report. Some others | disagree Preti pharv 1 n!for Cana s 265,000 persons over] was formed of 28 Comme r
    with, but he took the view tl ‘ is en , that} 70 who now draw pensions cost-] ber and 2 member of
    the draftsmen of the docume: formation obtained’ ft ing the country about $120,000,000} Senate
    probably had to placate some < ic 11 ly tor} (£ 25,000,000) a year It may or
    their numbers “who were colour- artistic |may not bring about even broader Its tern of refere
    blind to anything than seeing Red been, done to dispel| coverage at a younger age wide, It was instructed to stud
    oe Mee at the census is pat oi st 3 dec deat the “oper hs n an 1 Sect of ex-
    n the question of Jamaica's to trap 1ousand ) r weeks now a @-membery isting legisiation ¢
    attitude towards a Fedération vo eserte ‘ re til} | Jount committee of the Common tries and to look closely int
    the British Caribbean, Mr. Man!® ir Le \ nder and the Senate h been sitting} “possible alter measui ‘
    said that it was certainly true 1 name | almost every day It he heara } old-age security Canada with
    that in Jamaica we were s» in- u 0 have beer | presentations = fi m scores offor without a means test for bene-
    tensively concerned with our ow “d that organizations, studied the opera-]ticiaries including plar based ¢ n
    local problems that we see t mation t anyone yas oe oc federal and pro-| contributory insurance principles
    find it difficult to give attenti gistrar-General’ ! ‘ Ne ed Geese ene an legislation, Among the scores of witnesses
    to the matter. It may be, too, h ineludes any ocher Govern- |FuiN oe cist is of other coun}, ard, most gave priority in any
    suggested, that the West Indie ent GOpartnent hey ran be le at 6 may be lukewarm to the questi for two year BP COSTS OF AM SONS OF SCHEMES - 1 Yegislation to eliminatiq¢n of
    and he had tried a lot in his ow: he sholders 1 Suneavy The committee, within its terms] present means t, a lowering of
    mind to find reasons for it hie wil] have to. fill-in |of reference, will ort to Par-] the eligible it nereas-



    ing benefits in that order

    One who did not follow that
    order of priorit N Dr. Char
    lotte Whitton, Ottawa social
    worker She told the committee
    that health and housing should be
    tackled first and that Canada
    should make a full investigation of
    the contributory principle.—Can.
    Press.

    Mr. Manley said that he believed
    that in the West Indies we hat
    a sufficiency of powerful factors iv
    our common life to give the
    cement and binding force to the
    object of Federation. The people
    of the colonies talked the same
    language and in a remarkable
    manner they spoke the same kind
    of way. Get 100 people from the
    various sections of the Caribbean
    together, he said, and it would
    not take them an hour to feel
    at home. In addition they had
    common difficulties, common
    ambitions and he believed it
    would be discovered that they had
    a single common hope of solving
    those difficulties, which should be
    powerful enough, ultimately, to

    by 1 ft. form he pri. }liament. Then, if recommen-
    nary object being a government | dations are to be made, it will be
    attempt to complete the most in- |UP to the government to make
    limate picture possible ef Bri-|them at the Dominion-Provincial

    THE PRESS OF THE EMPIRE IN OTTAWA: Picture above shows the delegates of the Empire Press Union assembled outside the lain’s social development Conference in the fall
    Houses of Parliament in Ottawa, This nation-wide quiz will Any eveshaiiias oe old : age
    ; ; . 1 ‘ , . rovide ir rmation o acing |security legislation could only be
    In the front row in the centre is Col. the Hon, John J. Astor chairman of the Times Publishing Company of London and Presi- tes enaaton Bt hy aheee akee ate dent and Chairman of Council of the Empire Press Union since 1929. i and marriage condition "}vinees which at present pay the
    Among the many distinguished representatives from the Com monwealth were the Hon. V. ©. Gale, M.L.C., Mr. ©. E. Hitchins including divorce. There will be|Pensions within their boundaries
    (Trinidad), Mr. Garnet — (St. Lucia), Mr. 8. G. Fletcher (Jamaica) and Mr. E. Dupuch (Bahamas) Saree abc oo ) ~ and
    nihaeeteianhinlcd composition of households |

    People will be asked where

    B.G. GOVT. EMPLOYEES Freedom To Criticise| 22" | ®4ksasr,
    WILL GET NO WAGES RISE : : : Sale Molnar saliag el SUPPER
    Was Note Of Imperial |i 0 S888 oss) OR BETWEEN-MEALS














    (Advocate Correspondent)





















    mr am atid

    i i . ET, q pieted
    bring federation into reality. GEORGETOWN. | P ne Ti lk i He will staie whether his home E HEAL FOOD.:+

    = ae in sonal . Bal pada any THE Colonial Secretary replying to a Memorandum sub-| ress a Ss is_ structurally separate, how TH
    @ move in Jamaica, Barbados anc : . ; aa . T ' t . 8 ains ether
    g move in Jamaica, Barbados and] tted by the Federation of Government Employees Unions many fooms tt contains, whether LL0GG

    1 assy Fi - ; : 4 t ‘ . y, Nin en ss —. ‘ : ’ ‘ s i > « shares a Or
    cal power for the people. It wa calling for an upward revision of the wages and salaries| Having tre ve ‘led across Canada by ‘plane, train, ‘bus and water supply, the kitchen ie KE

    + uN Pate . hi pk ; ’ .
    not so 20 years ago, These and structure, has made it clear that the Colony’s general econo-| motor car, the Hon, V. C. Gale, M.1 C., returned to Barba-| the cooking ‘stove, or a water
    other factors, Mr. Manley said mic situation and the state of Government’s finances wholly dos by T.C.A, on Saturday after attending the seventh] closet and tixed bath
    — hee te tenn 10: the ron] precluded the possibility of any further revision and over-| Imperial Press Conference. ; Married women undler 60 will
    ‘ or oy , j ates a ee ee be asked to give the date o i
    eomcla Ce aes Ge aca whal.| all increase of the wage and salary structure of Government ne ee —e iadik etl the naaebde oe RaGLes
    aica an I 3 asé € , 2 7 ec »y re conference are o 7 ; .

    would have to graple with the ide: employees. : : He Mj ¥ special interest to the Colonies but! Children |
    of federation and make it work omission of certain items from the | eC tcop er the Australian resolution is wor- The complete analysis of the
    and itcwould never work, he-sata The Federation has urged that Cost-of-Living Index, stated that thy of partieuler note return, which is to cost $3,500,000
    5 ven aes veo e sald.) its claim for an upward revision from the Committee’s Report it - Tt H wee. oY pie res will be spread over several yeays
    until there was a powerful senti-| of the wages and salaries struc-)was clear that the Committee rozress f tl ehep on Sollows :-— Exeedors A preliminary report of popu
    — = it, because it had great} ture was based on the fact that | dealt with those items which were | oO hast tee and F hain s = lation numbers, sexes, and areas
    cifficulties to overcome devaluation of the Pound Sterling | considered omissions. In_ this} 7 ‘ we FemeaOES Of CSMOcTaey will be ready within a few ’

    Mr. Manley was of the opinior}had imposed a greater financial | connection, however, it directed} 4, i Lire ath z= pense ven intact if the] Weoks of census day The family's health... the happiness of all...
    that Jamaica — in population anc} strain upon Government em- | attention to another paragraph of | ; ‘ec nd ated . a hort its et hit te enitials th to survive. The It is estimated that the central the children's hardiness. . depend to a great
    political development the larges'}ployees who had no financial|/the memorandum in which was| ,.¢ = be Padh irae tae aire mc Mag att seb ca a bo crite ise those in authority | oi ce 1 juired to administer the | h ent. Keilo "s
    and most advanced of the colonies} relief to meet the increased diffi- |embodied the list supplied the 1966 yi dds moe i pms. ry 7 a ere right of every} Gencus will total only 606. But extent on proper nourishm 39g
    —had a great responsibility of} culties and upon the a et Unions by the Commissioner of| airwave matemalize, lof the ee et = the re aoa enumerators who call from) door- | Corn Flakes - those tasty little flakes of corn -
    ivi a a aes » salary structure » Public | 1, oa: ares cer er o,| Airways materializ ) > Dress § d be no greaterg S™Ume ro
    giving leadership to Federatior he salary structure of the ¢} Labour as a complete list of the Models of such air-bus sfg-| and no less than the rights off 7,400" Will number 30,000 | crisp and easily digested - are the ideal food
    and its idea throughout the whole | Service Salaries and Wages Com-|items upon which the cost of| 4, pa ap tteaiae ata ‘ ; e re of rhe government anticipate
    West Indies, and he was hopin; |â„¢ission implemented in 1949 | living was based | ton many on railway sane citizens. It is not practicable to} wat this huge probe into Bri for breakfast, supper or between-meals. With
    that J neice cate sattres that rior to devaluation, was found- ie A ve been prepared by impose restrictions on the daily] jain'e social life will provide milk or cream and sugar they are more nour-
    ge Ae ee vou eave é d upon a cost-of-living index | Inadequate Information —“ : a = | press without those restrictions] Va) able material for planner \ | Bash

    adership a ne righ time which was based upon a deterior- | | xpt * eanalden paoway sta— extending to the weekly Press, to ind also for the historian of the ishing than an egg... and cost less! ac

    Over 500 Ferns __ [ated standard of living. The organization stated: “At! hope pa “3 i gs a ready —_ periodicals, to pamphlets, ty TRAD a netcAvar: ane . package contains six generous servings. Served

    The American Philosophical As a possible solution to the|the time the criticisms of the | (4) oe p landings. They] ligious and industrial journals, to} © penalty for refusinia to com ft h k h he bowl!
    Society hag made a five hundrec woposals submitted in its orig-|Index were made, we honestly bch y have good clear approach-| books, to firms, to broadcasting, | | ete a census return is up to $28 rom ths Pactags rig A inte he vew
    gollar grant to Mr. C. Bernarc | nal Memorandum, the Federation | believed the list to have been a °° 8%4-80 close a link-up of the} and eventually to any form of ex- —(IN.S,)

    Lewis, Director and Curator of thy | now suggests the re-introduction | complete one. Therefore, if any ewo torn bf transpor' has obvious] pression by individuals, The Com- Cor sale éver where

    Institute of Jamaica for the com-|of the Excess Profits Tax, which | misconception under which the “@V@ntages for travellers monwealth Press Union therefore j ~

    letion of field work on a project{|should remain in operation until | compilers of the memorandum | 1 -addit , places on record its belief that any “m8

    p of field work on a proj I wl I In addition,. since both the]; ~ SNe
    which he is sponsoring in the such time as the general economic |laboured produced many criti- British railways and B.E.A. are infringement on the freedom of N i" M; ' o4

    study of fern flora in Jamaica. situation justified its removal. cisms which were not grounded state-owned, the problem of|*@ Press other than restrictions ° Z. aori on ee eee een

    The grant will allow for the . upon facts, this is the result of acquiring sites is simplified necessary to preserve the morals
    continued study of local fern Prices inadequate information supplied | Two factors have convincea ig poe of the community and ace row in
    Tee a a 7 " J , by the Commissioner yabour | Pp EA Saat: aetna c ‘{the rights of individuals, and
    species: which had Jong been the} The Federation is also pressing | gnq not nen aT ee _— facies a re : ae - oe ms as io applying in like manner to all “i us A A CPSC gives (72

    . “ee oe £ prepa ton to meet air-bus traffic > ¢ 7

    study of the late famed Dr. Willian
    Maxon, of the Smithsoniar
    Institute. For its size, Jamaicé
    probably possesses more species of

    part of the compilers to | demai “ » “| citizens, or restrictions necessary

    : - a isin kper: the | in wartime or in time of declared Rapidly | . BS ¥ wy, wy, yf GeliciouS
    national emergency to protect the t ¥ , .- ae /
    “hotne-baked buns

    for a decision on its request for}on the

    the pegging of prices. indulge in wanton criticisms of i
    Since the submission of the (the Index. The Commissioner of | rece:

    Memorandum by the Federation |{,apour is in part, if not. wholly : - o



    er helicopter service




    ; ees 0 es memo we Pore Cardiff Wak ena nation, should be restricted by I

    ae ep Bs rae country in| seve pe "bite ago bate has peep so, responsible for the situation } Liverpo« TA hire “| every section of the community a New Zeal a rae ne 7

    the world, Over 500 are known.|an_ inter-change of correspon | which thereby arose.” "9 entre marking the first st oa] re TeIptale sit ¥
    With the death of Dr. Maxon. | dence between the Colonial Secre- , ‘ Seatien Sept. Gutiseaiteatan grverament towards} race is increasing so rapidly that na y eS aA qi Nb

    ft was found that very little of his| ‘tary and the organization, Despite these observations the | ; : Pritish Aewpplane} "rhe Commonwealth Press Union| °! iso be Delng drastically $d a ry ae

    asl ae oritte : ‘ Federation still maintained tha : rs > 0 16 lywassen » > 3 at . : revised as to its future E

    manuscripts had | been writte 7 The Unions had first of all lthere were severdl nat x le otal 1 ll be available in, laigze re Onwane that all members than half a centur )
    roe Pr . r »centls : s s = m , 8 2 « TT » ’ : ed

    Mr. George R. Proctor, recently! drawn attention to the omission|cjongs from the Index. Amon: | should urge their Governments to] i) was being confidently predict

    ociated with the Academy of
    Natural Sciences in Philadelphia
    and formerly a lecturer in Botany



    of several important items from
    the Index from which official cal-
    culations of the Cost-of-Living

    plan ineludes an]|efuse to accept any United Na-

    these were provision for clothing convention which compro-

    repairs, dyeing and cleaning, boot

    that the Maoris were doomed

    to loeal authorities tinction within a short time







    ; ae

    at Wedania’ Univeralty,.decided: tol are meade, and shoe repairs. ati¢ any way, or condones the form of ane nae BERS lene Bei Re 3
    take up the project left unfinished In reply the Colonial Secre- The organisation submitted tl IN.S pt control now operated by race would survive until
    by Dr. Maxon tary pointed out that the Index! by these omissions too great a arent sovernares of authoritarian} eventual inevitable _ absorption
    "pr. T. W. J. Taylor, Principal] was ad on = Report of the oneree of “velative importance ir Pp i 1 countries by the European inha'gitants ,
    of the University College of the|Cost-of-Living Survey Commit-!/the budget” was given to the re } oy -ANncCeA ‘ a : Now, with its numbers creas= F
    West Indies, left ‘Jamaica Wednes-|tee of 1942 and said it appeared maining items included in th ionee! Lice Nee Colonial Laws And Rates me faster than ever, ioe ah Gave
    day morning to attend a meeting| that the compilers of the Memo- |list upon which the Cost-of-Liv- S Nith regard te Colonial I ct the Executive Committee of the]™andum had made many of their/ing Index was based, and as_ ‘ ought Laws the following resolu °M| ate entity playing an increasing
    Association of Universities of the|°¢ riticisms under a misapprehen- consequence the variations in the moved by Mr, Fletcher of Jamaica] jy important part in New Zealand
    British Commonwealth Dr, | Sion as to a number of significant |trend of the cost of lis ing could (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) and seconded py the Hon, Mavel] life
    Taylor is a member of the Com- particulars. at the not be accurately reflected in the F KINGSTON. Stricklaia ot Malta was passed by] Some estimates place the num-
    mittee’ on which he’ represents He therefore suggested that the |Index. Further, it was empha- An application has been made to| by the Conference. ber of Maoris when the airouhana!

    officers of the unions concerned |sised that the omitted items form- {the Jamaic Government for a “This Conference recommends} (\sscovered New Zealand a ligt
    should give further careful study |}ed a basic part of the conditions | Pioneer industry licence to enable| that the Council of the E.P.U." as 200,000, The introduction at |
    to the committee’s report and, if |of living and indulgences of the [the mar t f concentrated | should n offer its services to the

    Colonial University Colleges,
    The Committee meets in New











    ee re en et pi ge eee
    a > 5





    s - Jehae ’ huropean weapons among a war
    Zealand in early August and after-|they desired, arrangements would | workers of the colony. lavoul essences in the island to| Colonial Office to assist in arriv-| like people and the introduction @ When you bake at home, always use * Here’
    wards Dr. Taylor will visit the]be made for a senior officer of : : eplace from hard cur-| ing at a fair and equitable decision| cf European disease atiead Puiu Se mE bye sus : lere's all you dot
    four University Colleges which|the Department of Labour to ex- The Federation has also asked } rene, Irce henever a question arises Be te inne i a 8 ee M ast Rising Dry Yeast * 4. Just spridkle
    form the University of New|plain to them in detail the com-|that the present basis for the) Sponsors of the project are} alleged irresponsible public ation’ be modern baleing discovery thet gives . into lukewarm water.
    Zealand. He is expected to return |pilation of the Index figures eRe be: ge egpspas end wae a]Messrs. Stuart Bros 1) henever it propos sad to in- Py 1858 the Maori population rom ~— ory 1g renults qui aa o . a Let stand 10min»
    ‘ - 2 . ‘ fey be oraered at a Very | Lid ubsic f uce ¢ mend law ii dropped to 58,006 . ‘ pasily § amazing, new granule ° utes ng
    to Jamaica on September 8 As regards the claim for anJearly date, It is further submit- it by of mun eet | pt baw pe my fOvernnes eat a Ya mess y are Lot yeast needs no refrigeration—stays full ‘ sth na ii
    es increase in wages and salaries,|ted for Government's considera- | Brot} Company. Lt of Mon was down to 39,000 ‘and few strength for weeks on your pantry shelf ® ce _ is one
    ‘ the Colonial Secretary emphasiz-|tion that “since the preparation | tre] wtih TY . | In a series of three resolutions] people held out any hope for thé Get Fleischmann’s Fast Rising Dry { vomumacct vente.
    re ed that any such rise would lead jof cost-of-living indices is a high- Creation of the industr | Cable and Wireless Communi-| race’s future. . Yeast today ° cai er yeast
    | to an immediate curtailment, /ly technical matter requiring the ) mean the additional Saal af j cations the Union is to press for But the ond of tribal warfare, . perl Rr
    UUMS ec, postponement, or abandonment of | services of experts, the Secretary, r < local pari ts j = ng yreduction of the Empire Press| the gradual acceptance of Euro
    capital works in progress or con-|of State for the Colonies be re-| singer, lime and orange “i Ciné | Rate for transmission of news bee oy
    templated with consequential loss | quested to send a panel of expert: Drier a Ota, ons: were



    pean medicine, and a revival in teh ith Ut
    “ ; caver Sha oe nto and tamarind tween groups of colonies closely| svirit under the influence of § Ws Wi 0 Venn CSIC?
    of employment to workers; anc to this Colony to unde rtake a new The company plans to go inte ssociated with each other, either) series of notable leaders, Grought
    Teeth insofar as recurrent expenditure} survey and prepare a new index.’ Or ‘ ‘3 nab a nt traphically or politically to|a turning point
    > services was Cc -erne ; Mn cr € months a [ : = —_ SSS oe =>
    {fn public services was concerned, th +} ¢ uvey existing transmission By 1936 ther 82.000 SS S =

    | the attempt to provide additional of output com- vere














































































    | t meet increased dst neing at $175,000 going up to I ges for Press material by afl] Maoris and teday the population
    revenue to ne icrease sts*, 00 { fi five years’ tin ; +} channels; and to take early steps . 3000. It ir ine
    ates Ld Rigi in five year ne, and annels; and to take early eps} exceeds 116,000. It i reasing
    me merely add to the cost of The Weather ay entually be able to take to ensure ote poauenon to the} twe 2 d a half time as fast aq }
    ee vie wag ® ‘ \ TODAY I f the island's requirements |!Owest possible figure. 1) ‘urepean population ‘
    Further rise in wages and sal- Sun Rises: 5.42 a.m | ( rinks concentrate - her The resolutions concluded by .
    aries, he said, could now be based 4 ar 3 fa goo VEU athe 4 .c : : About half the Mygori popula
    sreased producti a! Sun 6.25 pm | mpc n r are rrency {7 mmending “the Council of the| | 4 ; ‘
    mnly on increased production and | Moon (Last Quarter) July 6 | “lap are discontnue Empire Press Union vigorously to| "0" today is of mixed descent (Inc. in British Guiana)
    yutput, and he stressed that pro- | Lighting: 7.00 pm . continue its efforts towards reduc-] #2 Maoris inter-marry freely w Ath
    pues of the nature ontempigted | High "Waters ay am., 8.00 tions of freight and mail rates Furepean jut with the reviv-
    n the Chea e aeee peer ek m ; : Fy - >»; both for Press material and for|¢% pride of vace, half-castes are Phone 4562 33 Electrical Dept.
    ium were consequently feredoom- | pm YESTERDAY | ree f igeons copies of newspapers, and towards} increa singly identi "the m
    Stop ‘Pyorrhea and ey {| Rainfall (Codrington) .05 | the speeding up of communications | *€! noe with the Beers and a
    TON ar are r
    Trench Mouth The Colonial Secretary added in ane cr LONDON by am a yell as by surface Ne , i ha init ee penal rae
    hat he had no doubt that the Temperature (Max) 86.5 Ff bie sming | routes é ng ativ C0
    * . T - 7 € } t alf-castes are oft ' y or Y a] ‘ ‘
    in 24 Hours Executive of the Unions would Temperature (Min) 76.0 °F “7 . , - t = il "Maori than hoa of a KOLS TER BRAN DES h b RADIOS
    Bleeding gums, sore mouth, or loose teeth | vive this aspect of the matter | Wind Direction (9 a.m.) F os vil fie ¥ en
    mean that you are a victim of Pyorrhea or]? ) nid eaPraet ssideratic { a z ‘ } Tr y ‘ he crops bh naving ¢ ierce pride in
    Trench Mouth, or some bad disease that} °areful and earnest consideration (3 p.m.) E. by N 7 =o p REFUND helr ancestry and a determitia
    will eventually cause you to loee eet and with a due sense of the re- Wind Velocity 17 miles per j wits inres € yuantitic ot Saal kn. aiekanen Hea Ae stl 4 “a
    ser time Since the great World War [sponsibility which rested upon | hous. jiapie. pet beans, tares an KINGSTON, Jamaica For better Reception, Quality in tone, and Stability.
    these mouth diseases have spread through- | {hem. Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.985 | pulse Banana growers have decided to Witt e vigor of the rac me
    out the world so that now scientists say | Replying, the Federation refer- > 29 945 be J t r f forr try to dint thie Clos ment to hand I 1 | showir r signs of
    that four out of every five people are suf- . oe r e >p.m.) 29.9405, a , ! LO ge ie Government to han val ’ “THE QUEEN M ARY”
    ferers sooner or later. Be warned in time ring to that part of the Memoran- 1 and counterfoils the Min-|over £500,000 excess taken fot iminishing it eem doubtful 4 mat amas
    and Step (hee) ¢ isan ee etree Seay ioe ate, igum which dealt with the f Food | ended the ration- | various purposes handed back to hether the Maoris will be ab THE QUEEN ELIZABETH”
    of teeth, but also chronic rheumatism (SSS SSS g of their feeding stuffs | hem They want the money for orbed in the European popula ‘ / Rak abba ‘
    heart trouble, ee ae —~—INS& the extension of the industry (CP) tion.—Can. Press. )
    New Discovery ‘ INS. |" mee ar and: , 1
    Saves Teeth PATENT i; and now Britain’s new 34,000 tons i
    Amosan, the discovery s = Aererieny, \ ” " ort (
    scientist, fights these troubles In a new an wang \ ie )
    k It penetrates right to the root |} ARD | 4 ‘es | “CARONL ct
    ar ine trouble. stops sures from bleeding \ Ud i( N S Be ST | 1A ))
    the very first day, — kly yo Sater aen « |
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    the teeth. The following Jetter trom Mr. W. || COLLINS’ RECEIVED Are all fitted with the K.B, Product. )
    W. B. sh the results that Amosan users .
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    while several we beste were getting ) STOR A ; | | ’ i}
    looser all the time. I tried many nes
    then heard of this new discovery Amosan. | | But new treatment does more than “What ” ;
    I Amosan my gums |) 1 , 19 ; | | Nhat’s good enough for the finest Ships {
    m I - y ‘ ”
    : iiree days ana til FOR 1 SMOKERS } ease these terrible agonies. in the World, is good enough for me )
    two weeks I found my loose teeth were | | + 5 | Daa
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    a SOLD BY: nl rere tient ea


    PAGE FOUR

    BARBADOS gb ADVOGAT

    Pub"uned by Thu Advocate Co. ita, 4. Sroad Bi, Briagewe

    Tuesday, July 4, 1950

    INDEPENDENCE DAY

    OVER one hundred and fifty years have
    passed since the American colonies threw
    off their allegiance to the British Crown.
    It is interesting to speculate what might
    have been the course of history if that
    momentous event had never taken place.

    When the independence of the thirteen
    colonies was recognised, they were a thin-
    ly populated area running along the
    Atlantic seaboard of North America. To-
    day the United States of America is the
    most powerful country in the world with a
    population of about a hundred and twenty
    millions. From a policy of isolationism
    bequeathed to them by the Father of
    America, George Washington, the Amer-
    icans have advanced until what happens in
    any quarter of the globe is their concern.

    The ideals which fired their revolt and
    which are embodied in their Declaration
    of Independence have remained with them
    in the years that have passed. Political
    democracy in the United States has reach-
    ed great heights and the people enjoy a
    standard of life that is the envy of every
    other country in the world.

    The American Republic has produced
    some great men—men whose thoughts and
    actions will be discussed as long as civilisa-
    tion lasts. Abraham Lincoln, staking all to
    preserve the Union which he loved and to
    erase the blot of slavery from the American
    land. Woodrow Wilson, preaching a new
    doctrine of international co-operation and
    responsibility only to see his gospel re-
    jected by men who could only learn the
    hard way. Franklin D. Roosevelt, rescuing
    his country from the despair and frustra-
    tion into which it had been plunged by the
    great depression and steering it through
    the greatest war in its history and dying on
    the eve of the victory for which he had
    worked so hard.

    To-day the United States is the best hope
    of those men who seek to preserve political
    democracy and freedom of expression. In
    the last war the United States played a
    major role and in the post-war world
    amidst the dangers of Soviet ambition and
    intrigue all have turned to the great Re-
    public for aid and succour. This aid she
    has given bountifully. Dvring the war
    Lease-Lend enabled the Allies to achieve
    the victory for which they endured so much,
    and in the post-war years Marshall Aid
    and military supplies to the Atlantic
    Treaty nations has been a vital factor in
    the rehabilitation of war-torn countries and
    the means of enabling those countries to
    defend themselves.

    In the clash of ideologies which is such
    an unhappy feature of the day, the United
    States is the champion of those countries
    which will not embrace the regimentation
    of Communism. The burden which this
    places on the American Government and
    taxpayer is apparent, but the American
    people have risen to the responsibilities
    which their power has cast upon them,

    In the crisis which the Korean invasion
    has occasioned, the Government of the
    United States is adopting a firm and states-
    manlike policy. In its policy it has the
    support of the greater part of the world
    and in its endeavours to maintain the peace,
    the mass of mankind backs it.

    On this their Independence Day the Free
    World salute the people of America and
    pray that their leaders will continue to
    uphold the great ideals and traditions
    which their forefathers fought for and that
    in the end they will succeed in forming a
    world in which common men can live out
    their lives without the fear of war.







    Our Readers Say:
    Lover of People

    The Editor, The Advocate,

    SIR,—Allow me to support the remarks of D. A.
    Thani’s letter which appeared in Friday’s Advocate
    relating to Mahatma Gandhi. He certainly was
    an Apostle of Peace and he loved all humanity.

    Many years ago I had the great privilege of
    attending Mr. Gandhi's reception held at “Central
    Hall, Westminster, London.” There were about 130
    delegates present, representing various organiza-
    tions.

    Unfortunately I arrived at the reception rather
    late and Gandhi had been speaking for a few
    minutes, He was relating incidents of cruelty he
    had witnessed during his travels throughout the
    world. He told us he had seen a British Officer
    riding on horse back down one of the busy streets
    in an Indian City, and this officer had whipped
    a little picanniny out of his way. Personally I
    did not feel very proud of being a_Britisher at
    that moment especially as the small child died as
    a result of the whipping. Mr. Gandhi continued
    saying that he also had witnessed in the same
    place one of his own countrymen put out the eyes
    of another man during a dispute over a woman,
    and another incident of seeing ears cut off and
    so on. Yet, said Mahatma Gandhi, these people
    would not be condemned as it was just the way
    of humanity.

    When Mr, Gandhi had finished speaking, a friend
    of mine came up to me and said “Do you realise
    we are in the presence of a Saint?” and then I
    understood the feeling I myself was experiencing,
    it was the sense of awe. Mr. Gandhi had not rais-
    ed his voice all through his speech and yet he
    held us all—in an uncanny sort of way—the power
    of the Spirit, I am sure it was.

    This visit of Gandhi’s to London had a kind of
    humour attached to it as well as the serious side,

    as frequently traffic, motor cars, buses, taxis, etc., |

    were held up in the busy parts of the West End,
    because Mahatma Gandhi and his disciples at cer-
    tain times knelt down to pray wherever they
    happened to be at the times of prayer.

    Certainly Mahatma Gandhi’s career will stay on
    in the m@mory of all who had the honour of
    meeting and shaking hands with him and it is

    quite certain too he left his truly spiritual influ-
    @fice in the world. He loved the world’s peoples
    A.B,





    SUGAR MEMORANDUM | Cricket Literature
    In Engiand

    Many W.I. Hooks On View

    LONDON,
    President of

    PRESENTED BY THE BRITISH
    WEST INDIES AND BRITISH
    Guiana Sugar Delegation to
    His Majesty's Government
    on 26th May, 1950.

    We are a delegation represent-
    ing the Legislatures and Trade
    Unions of the sugar exporting
    Colonies of the British West In-
    dies and British Guiana. As
    you know, our purpose here is
    to press His Majesty’s Gevern-
    ment for reconsidering of their
    decision on the sugar question
    which is at present at issue be-
    tween the United Kingdom and
    the area which we represent

    As we said at our prelimin-
    ary meeting with you last week
    we take up these negotiations
    where they were left off in
    January, when the case for
    Caribbean sugar was put by the
    British West Indies Sugar Asso-
    ciation. At q fully representative
    regional sugar conference held on
    the 23rd and 24th of February,
    it was solemnly resolved:

    “That as to the question of
    the tonnage of sugar for
    which reasonably remunera-
    tive prices are to be guaran-
    teed by His Majesty's Gov-
    ernment, this Conference is
    convinced that the limitation
    of such tonnage to 640,000
    tons, a figure substantially
    less than the eurrent exports
    of the area, must gravely
    prejucice not only the inter-
    ests of the British West In-
    dies and British Guiana, but
    also the relations between
    His Majesty's Government
    and His Majesty’s loyal sub-
    jects in the area, and recom-
    mends that the quota to be
    guaranteed after 1952 should
    at least be such as to cover
    current British West Indian
    and British Guiana exports
    estimated at 725,000 tons.”

    The peoples of the British Car-
    ibbean Area fully endorse this
    resolution, and the Governments
    cf the sugar exporting Colonies
    of the Area have sent us here
    as delegates to support it.

    West Indians everywhere are
    dismayed at the decision of His
    Majesty’s Government, which is
    regarded by them as not fully
    implementing the Government’s
    own declaration in its announce-
    ment on 10th August, 1949, when
    it was stated:

    “His Majesty’s Government
    asured the delegation that
    they recognise that the pros-
    perity of the sugar industry
    is vital to the maintenance of
    an adequate standard of liv-
    ing in sugar producing colon-
    ies such as the British West
    Indies. It is their intention
    to make long-term arrange
    ments which will give to the
    efficient producer of sugar in
    these areas and elsewhere in
    the Commonwealth firm as-
    surances of markets for
    agreed tonnages of sugar, at
    reasonably remunerative pri-
    ces to be negotiated with the
    producers, It is the declared
    policy of His Majesty’s Gov-
    ernment to maintain and im-
    prove the economy of the
    Colonial territories and
    whereas in the British West
    Indies, sugar production is
    the main and _ indispensable
    basis of a healthy economy,
    this will be given special
    consideration in fixing the
    quantities of sugar to be cov-
    ered by these arrangements.”

    This is a decision by His Ma-
    jesty's Government. It was
    issued after consideration of the
    current position in the British
    West Indies by representatives
    of the Ministry of Food, the
    Treasury, and the Colonial Office.
    It is in unequivocal language,
    and the West Indies were en-
    titled to understand it to mean ex-
    actly what it said—that, recog-
    nising the vital position of sugar
    in the economy of the West In-
    dies, His Majesty's Government
    would give special consideration
    to those Colonies in making their
    sugar arrangements, in order to
    maintain and improve that econ-
    omy.

    The present sugar offer of His
    Majesty's Government to our area
    is not calculated to maintain, much
    less improve, the economy of the
    area; and the areg has not re-
    ceived special cansideration in
    fixing the quantities of sugar in-
    volved. It is not calculated to
    maintain that economy because a
    firm assurance of a market at
    reasonbly remunerative prices is
    offered on 640,000 tons only and
    this is substantially less than cur-
    rent production, And where is
    the special consideration which
    was supposed to be given, when
    the proposals involve a guaran-
    tee to the Dominions for more
    than current production, for the
    Colonies less; and an overall re-
    striction on Dominion export pro
    duction at a level approaching
    100% more than current exports,
    but on Colonial production only
    some 25% more than present pro-
    duction? Furthermore, during
    these negotiations the guaranteed
    quantity proposed for the Domin-
    ions was increased (from 400,000
    tons to 450,000 tons) while tne
    Colonial guaranteed production
    throughout remained the same (at
    1,100,000 tons). Increase the Col-
    onial guaranteed production
    in proportion, and you are not
    far short of a 1,250,000 ton allot-
    ment for the Colonies, which
    would give the minimum of 725
    000 tons for the British West In-

    dies and British Guiana which is
    sought.

    _ During the Autumn negotia-
    tions, the B.W.LS.A. delegation
    were repeatedly told by the Min-
    istry of Food officials, particularly
    Mr. Forster, that the allocation of
    600,000 tons for Australia was
    based on the present expansion
    of the industry in response to the
    exhortation by His Majesty's Gov-
    ernment to both the Colonies and
    Dominions to expand production.
    Further, we were assured that
    Australia would easily produce
    this total for export with existing
    equipment and with canes already
    planted. That these assurances
    were incorrect can be seen from
    the extracts from Australia’s sugar
    papers which we include as
    Appendix 1, We think these ex-
    tracts speak for themselves and
    clearly show why His Majesty's
    Government. should sympatheti-
    cally reconsider our case for an
    increased guaranteed tonnage into
    the British Market.

    Various Reasons
    We wish to urge on His

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Majesty’s Government various
    reasons why this matter should
    be put right, why this vital ele-
    ment of the amount of the guar-
    anteed purchase from the British
    West Indies and British Guiana
    should be increased by 85,000
    tons to 725,000 tons. We do not
    propose at this stage to go back
    over the sugar history of these
    Colonies, but we trust that His
    Majesty’s present Ministers have
    well in mind the background to
    tnese whole negotiations, There can
    » no dispute that the United King-
    dom had the advantage in the
    past of buying Colonial sugar at
    prices uneconomic to the West
    Indies and British Guiana based
    on dumped sugar and that this
    caused depression and disaster in
    these Colonies. On the other hand,
    it controlled sugar prices during
    both world wars when they would
    have been high. In this connec-
    tion, we refer you to the Olivier
    Commission Report of 1929 and
    the Royal Commission Report of
    1939. It must be recalled that the
    United Kingdom Government in
    the 1930’s at the same time as they
    were buying sugar from the
    Colonies at dumped prices, pro-
    cured the imposition of heavy
    duties on cheap Japanese goods
    which were being supplied to the
    Colonies, and actually of quotas
    in the case of textiles, mainly in
    order to protect the standard of
    living of the British working
    man.

    We turn now to the tonnage
    figures: Beyond the total of
    1,100,000 tons of Colonial sugar
    which the United Kingdom is
    prepared to buy at guaranteed
    prices (this is the aggregate figure
    containing the British West Indies
    amount of 640,000 tons) the United
    Kingdom is prepared to allow
    150,000 tons of Colonial sugar to
    find a market in the United King-
    dom if it can with Imperial pref-
    erence do so in complete competi-
    tion with all other sugars, whether
    foreign or not, whether dumped
    or not. There would be no guar-
    antee as to market or as to price
    on this amount of 150,000 tons
    and in fact no guarantee that any
    of this 150,000 tons would be
    ought from the British West
    Indies and British Guiana. Had
    this 150,000 tons been allocated
    pro rata between the Colonies, the
    share for the West Indies would
    have been 85,000 tons. A matter
    of 85,000 tons up or down on the
    British West Indian guarantee is
    not a large matter for the United
    Kingdom, but in the future the
    question of whether or not this
    portion of our production attracts
    a fair price can make all the
    difference to the stability of the
    sugar industry which was recog-
    nised in the official statement of
    August 10th, 1949, as the mainstay
    of the B.W.I. economy.

    His Majesty’s Government have
    stated that this unguaranteed
    element of 150,000 tons will main-
    tain some element of competition
    in the United Kingdom market to
    act as a yardstick of efficiency
    for the industry and thus protect
    the interests of United Kingdom
    consumers, The United Kingdom
    have already allowed for the
    purchase of 250,000 tons of sugar
    from without the Commonwealth
    for internal consumption, to say
    nothing of about 500,000 tons o!
    sugar which they intend to buy
    from foreign sources for refining
    and re-export. This should give
    an ample yardstick to compare
    world prices for sugar with the
    prices paid to Commonwealth pro-
    ducers, In fact the so-called world
    price of sugar is no index 0!
    efficiency because the price ot
    these sugars can be entirely in-
    fluenced by protection in other
    markets, resulting in dumping.

    We wish to stress the 1ollowing
    points; —

    (i) Apart trom the inequities to

    the Colonies of the ruinous

    pre-war years, the United
    om consumer has had
    the benefit of Colonial sugar
    for the past ten years at
    prices comparing very
    favourably with world
    market prices and is con-
    tinuing to have this benefit
    (the price of British West
    Indian sugar for 1950 under
    a mutually satisfactory long-
    term agreement would be
    £30. 10s. per ton as com-—
    pared with a world market
    parity of some £39, per ton).
    It would be unfair for the
    United Kingdom to expect to
    buy all British West Indian
    sugar at cheap prices in years
    of scarcity, and only guaran -
    tee to purchase a portion of
    their present production in
    future years of plenty.

    (ii) We would submit that the
    Colonial farmer is entitled to
    the same treatment as the
    British farmer i.e, that he
    should have a guaranteed
    market at fair prices lor
    every ton of sugar he pro-
    duces which is consumed in
    Great Britain.

    (iii) The statement by His
    Majesty’s Government on
    sugar issued on August 10th,
    1949, promises to maintain
    and improve the standard ot
    living in the British West
    Indian Colonies. In our
    opinion, the proposal of His
    Majesty’s Government to
    buy only a portion of their
    requirements from the Wes‘
    Indies, less than our current
    production, at guaranteed
    prices is contrary to this
    statement. It is obvious that
    in times of plenty as far as
    sugar production is concern-
    ed, the average price thus
    obtained by the West Indirs
    would be less than the
    economic price fixed unde:
    the guaranteed price
    arrangement, thus failing to
    maintain, much less ita—
    prove, the B.W.I. economy.

    (iv) It is noteworthy that the
    United States Government
    reserves practically the
    whole of the American
    market for sugar from the
    United States domestic and
    Colonial sugar producers and
    Cuba; grants one hundred
    per cent preference to United
    States colonies and a. sub-
    stantial preference to Cuba
    and in addition makes con
    siderable subsidy payments
    to domestic and Colonial pro
    ducers, There is no questi
    of foreign sugar, other th
    Cuban, receiving any quot
    into the United State
    market, ‘and the tremend





    1 Commi

    potential expansion of sugar
    consumption in the domestic
    market of the United State:
    is reserved entirely for those
    privileged producers. Yet
    Cuba, which will receive sc
    large a share of these bene-
    fits is apparently to be
    granted a substantial quota
    into the United Kingdorr
    market, in other words Cuba
    which is regarded as @
    special interest by the Uniter
    States Government, is also tc
    obtain special consideratior
    in the, United Kingdom
    market at the expense 91
    British Colonies. Inciden-
    tally, it is difficult to see how
    this policy of importing
    dollar sugar in preference tc
    sterling squares with Hi
    Majesty’s Government's
    policy of closing the dollar
    gap. Elsewhere in the West
    Indies, we note that the
    French Government pur-
    Li chases all the exportable
    surplus of the French terri -
    tories, Last year’s price wa‘
    in the vicinity of £60 per ton
    (v) It is continually being saic
    in England that the troubles
    facing the West Indies are
    caused by their concentra-
    tion on a one crop economy

    and that they would do wei
    to diversify their agricul
    ture more generally. The

    experience of the last 20!
    years in the West Indies has
    Cenclusively proved that
    while the West Indies are
    able to grow other crops tha;
    sugar to a 1®nited extent
    the extent to which this
    policy can be developed is
    in itself very limited, Thi
    can readily be appreciated
    when it is considered that
    all the research work at the
    Imperial College of Tropical
    Agriculture in Trinidad and
    all the research work of thé
    various Departments of
    Agriculture in the West
    Indies and British Guiana
    have been unable to suggest
    any economic alternative to
    sugar, This is largely due to
    the following five reasons:
    (1) The West Indies have
    no fuel or large scale water
    power and the sugar cane
    bagasse supplies the fuel
    necessary for operating the
    factories. (2) Sugar cane
    has a gift of maintaining soil
    fertility to a remarkable
    degree. This can be particu-
    larly demonstrated in the
    island of Barbados which
    has been growing cane for
    the past 300 years with in-
    creasing productivity. (3)
    Sugar will maintain more
    labour per acre than any
    other crop except bulb
    growing in Holland and in-
    tensive tomato cultivation.
    (4) The West Indies are
    subject to hurricanes, and
    sugar cane resists the ravages
    of these tropical storms far
    better than any other crop
    which can be grown in these
    regions. (5) The West Indies
    are subject to periodical
    droughts and the sugar cane
    is remarkably drought-
    resisting, giving crops even
    in years of serious lack of
    rainfall.

    Not Happy

    The peoples of the West Indies
    and British’ Guiana do not feel
    happy about the conduct of the
    sugar negotiations since the August
    declaration of His Majesty’s Gov-
    ernment, and have the impression
    that their interests have been
    subordinated to those of the
    Dominions, It must not be lost

    sight of that it was the West!

    Indies which raised the question
    o! a long-term agreement. During
    the summer discussions, His
    Majesty’s Government informed
    the West Indian delegates that they
    admitted the justice of their de-
    mand for security in the future,
    but reminded them that there were
    other sugar producing areas in the
    Empire and that it was necessary
    to have discussions with all Empire
    producers before any concrete
    plans could be made. The British
    West Indian delegates accepted
    this as being quite reasonable and
    therefore agreed to return in the
    autumn for these talks. It was
    most disappointing, therefore,
    when it was found that an agree-
    ment had been reached with
    Australia on the 7th of December
    before consultations with the
    Colonies had been concluded, The
    West Indian people feel that the
    liaste with which this agreement
    was concluded with Australia was
    largely influenced by the near
    approach of the Australian elec-
    tions

    The more recent conduct of these
    negotiations has been equally dis-
    pleasing to them, The Grenada
    Conference asked that a delegation
    from the British West Indies and
    Pritish Guiana should be received
    by His Majesty’s Government, and
    this was agreed to, but before that
    delegation could arrive in London,
    an announcement of the decision
    of His Majesfy’s Government was
    made in the House of Commons,

    We must now deal with the
    political considerations of this
    matter. The population of the
    British West Indies and British
    Guiana is fast increasing and it
    ig essential that work should be
    found to maintain the standards
    of living of this increasing popula-
    tion. The West Indian people feel
    that the promise to maintain the
    economy of the West Indies con-
    tained in the statement of August
    10th has not been implemented by
    the present offer. A failure to
    obtain. a guaranteed market, for
    the tonnage we now ask can
    easily lead in the future to a re-
    currence of the evil conditions
    which existed in) the years 1937
    to 1939, when there was wide-
    spread unrest together with dis-
    turbances in the area, due to the
    low wages then existing and the
    inability of the population to find
    enough employment. Should world
    prices of sugar fall, the present
    offer could not maintain the
    present level of employment.

    Does the U.K. wish the British
    Caribbean to go back to 1937 con-
    ditions with reduced employment
    and unrest, ending in a Royal
    ion ana more grants;
    rathe 8 pay the m 3
    fair prices for efficient production

    @ On Page 5



    Sir Pelham Warner,
    M.C.C., opened an exhibition of cricket liter-
    ature and relics at the premises of the
    National Book League, London, recently. The
    most ancient West Indian cricket book on
    view was the “Barbados Cricketers’ Annual
    for 1894-95,” edited by J. Wynfred Gibbons.

    In his opening speech Sir Pelham said
    no game had produced more literature than
    cricket, but added that when he wrote his
    first book on cricket in 1897, publishers tend-
    ed to regard cricketers as semi-idiots and
    were sceptical about accepting their manu-
    However, nowadays the book shops
    were flooded with works on cricket. _

    After dwelling on the importance of cricket
    in English life, and pointing out that the
    game had now spread all over the world, he
    concluded by saying: “I myself have made a
    duck in every part of the globe—except In-
    dia, and I have never been there

    CRICKET HISTORY

    The earliest specific reference to cricket in
    English is to be found in the “Guilford Book
    of Court”, dated 1598, which is among the
    It is recorded that one John Der-
    rick, “being of the age of Fyfty and nyne
    yeeres or thereaboutes, did runne and play
    there at Creckett and other Plaies” with the
    other scholars of the Free School.
    of Dickens will remember the
    fictitious account of a single wicket contest
    between Mr. Jingle and Sir Thomas Blaze.
    But setting this aside, the earliest records of
    cricket in the West Indies are of Service
    matches in the 1840's.
    club of the 59th Foot was formed, and played
    first match against the
    Trinidad Cricket Club. A few years later
    Barbados saw contest between the 7th Royal
    Fusiliers and the 2nd. Batallion of the Royal
    But early cricket in the Carib-
    bean was, owing to geographical limitations,
    largely of a domestic nature which evaded
    documentation.

    In the ‘sixties James Lillywhite, one of
    the great promoters of cricket, arrived in
    Trinidad, and his coaching greatly improved
    The first inter-colonial
    match was played at Bridgetown between
    Barbados and _ British Guiana
    twenty years later a West Indies team toured
    Canada and the United States. In 1900 Sir
    Pelham’s brother, R. S. A. Warner, brought
    to England a team which included L. Con-
    stantine, senior, and C. A. Olliviere. Their
    matches did not rank as first class fixtures,
    but the experience gained on the tour, to-
    gether with the fillip already given by visits
    of two English teams in the late ’nineties laid
    the foundation for the high standard to be
    achieved in later years by such players as
    George Challenor, Martindale and Headley.

    FOUR BALLS

    Among the exhibits is an 1820 version of
    the Laws of Cricket published by the St.
    Mary-le-Bone Club. The directions for bowl-
    ers are as follows: “The bowler shall deliver
    the Ball with one foot behind the bowling
    crease, and shall bowl Four Balls before he
    . . Which he shall do but
    The Ball must














    E “POPOV Oe
    In 1842 the cricket . ee







    newly-formed

    the standard there.



    changes wickets . .
    once in the same innings.
    be bowled, not thrown or jerked, and de-
    livered underhand with the hand below the

    Perhaps the most awe inspiring object at
    the exhibition is the ball off which W. G.
    Grace scored his hundreth 100 against Som-
    erset at the Bristol in 1895—not forgetting the
    cork of the bottle from which his health was
    drunk on that occasion!

    Lord Baldwin Replies

    (From Our Lendon Correspondent)

    LONDON,
    Relying on information in the West Indian
    that Lord Baldwin, until
    of the Leeward Islands,
    brought his Antiguan-born chauffeur, Mr.
    Francis, to England with him and had prom-
    ised to put him through any profession or
    training he wished, your London Correspon-
    dent wrote to Lord Baldwin to ask if he
    could have an interview with Mr. Francis.
    Your correspondent mentioned that this in-

    terview would appear in “Antigua Star.”

    The following unsigned letter, written on
    notepaper headed “From the Earl Baldwin of
    ; Bewdley, Little Stoke House, North Stoke,
    Oxfordshire” has been received:

    “Lord Baldwin of Bewdley wishes to state,
    on behalf of Mr. Francis, that as your in-
    formation about his future is incorrect, he
    does not see the purpose of being interviewed
    especially for the benefit of the “Antigua
    Star,” which paper he holds in the utmost
    contempt.”





    Luneh

    The Editor, The Advocate,

    SIR,—The new Bus stand is not at all encourag-
    ing, nothing modern about it.
    tor the time and he made a joke of my question.
    I hope tourists will not criticise Barbados on this

    I asked a conduc-

    Here in the sweltering sun, there is not even a
    sanitary lunch counter, and those “weeping willow”
    trees could be shaped and trimmed.

    Divisions should be made for the buses, tele-
    WEEPING WILLOW.

    Peace

    The Editor, The Advocate,

    SIR,—After reading a letter recalling the name
    and work of the great Mahatma Gandhi, it is
    well that this noble man be remembered at this
    time, and that his spirit may prevail as a “Dove
    of Peace” to this troubled world.

    Let all nations live as brothers for the sake of
    Gandhi, remember his plea non-violence, his re-
    ward, immortality.

    It is still time, as the writer states, it is still not

    phone booths, ete.

    Let the nations live in peace, let all hate and
    PEACEMAKER.

    Bright 21

    The Editor, The Advocate,

    SIR,—In a speech by one of the Hon. Members
    against Adult Suffrage, I read:
    does a youngster of 21 have of life which would
    make him capable of casting his vote, etc.”, a&d
    again the Hon, member speaks of “boys at 21 etc.”
    In my opinion a young man of that age could
    bright and well versed citizen and be
    quite fit to vote on his country’s behalf.
    by the boys of fifteen who are wage-earners in
    quite a ripe age |
    for almost any position, and such a person could |

    warfare cease.

    “What knowledge |



    was capable
    a young man in |p
    Pa

    high office, and
    should be more so

    Tins Veg:

    TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1950



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    SMEDLEYS GARDEN PEAS—per tin.................. 39
    HESRINGS IN TOMATO SAUCE—per tin.............. 33



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    —.

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    ' TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1950

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    SUGAR MEMORANDUM

    @ From Page 4
    Is it not better politically to spynd
    the money in tair prices, rather
    than in grants, and thus see a
    friendly West Indies moving to
    political adulthood? You desire
    full employme.t for your people
    here, and your exports are to be
    bought by the british Caribbean,
    the economy of which is com-
    plementary to your own,

    Not Consistent

    The policy. of His Majesty's
    Government does not appear to
    be consistent. On the one hans
    we have its declared policy to get
    away from exploitation into &
    position of trusteeship, extending
    into partnership. We have the
    Development and Welfare Acts
    and the Federation proposals for
    the British West Indies and British
    Guiana. We have strong economic
    ties between the United Kingdom
    and the West Indies and British
    Guiana, particularly in currency
    control conditions which in effect
    require the Colonies to buy from
    the United Kingdom at high un-
    controlled: prices. On the other
    hand here is His Majesty's Gov-
    ernment planning that the British
    ‘West Indies should sell cheap a
    portion of their sugar crop, or not
    produce it at all—His Majesty's
    Government preparing the ground
    for a retraction in the British
    West Indies Me rege oe the

    e’s standard 0 iving is
    eed distressingly low and
    bears no comparison whatever
    with standards in the United
    Kingdom.

    As a result of Colonial Develop-
    ment and Welfare Schemes,
    Colonial budgets are being severe-
    ly overtaxed by new additions and
    pmenities to the structure of West
    Indian society. While these ad-
    ditions have been created in the
    first instance by grants from His
    Majesty’s Government (partly in
    an endeavour to overcome the ill-
    effects of past artificially low
    sugar prices) the permanent estab-
    lushments which have accrued as
    a result must now be met by a
    very substantial increase in the
    recurrent revenues of these
    Colonies.

    Take the Federation proposals:
    concurrent with this attack upon
    the social welfare problems of cur
    area, there has been an expansion
    of the political privileges of the
    people in the new constitutions
    which have been granted to
    several of the territories during
    the same period. The West Indian
    people have come to regard all
    these as indicative of a new desire
    on the part of His Majesty’s Cov-
    ernment to recognise the legitimate
    claims of these territories for an
    increased margin of self-govern-
    ment. In view of this enlighten-
    ed policy, is His Majesty's Gov-
    ernment going to fail to grant
    these colonies an absolute min-
    imum of economic security on
    which to build a structure of
    political stability? What of these
    Federation proposals so carefully
    and energetically fostered by His
    Majesty’; Government? What
    chance for these, calling for in-
    creased overall Government. ex~
    ee ture, in a retracting British

    Indian economy?
    Self-Supporting

    It is admitted that the Federa-
    tion must be self-supporting to be
    successful. Yet it has been shown
    that during the initial years it will
    be impossible for the Federal
    Government to dispense with
    certain subsidies from the United
    Kingdom; even on the basis that
    the price of British West Indies
    exports covers cost of production.
    if there is a collapse in the price

    of Colonial produce then the
    Federation will be still-born.
    The Grenada coriference took

    the view that the impasse which
    had been reached in the sugar
    negotiations could not be discon-
    nected from the grave political
    repercussions which inevitably
    must follow from it. Are those of
    us who have had faith in the good
    intentions of His Majesty’s Gov-
    ernment to be gravely and bitterly
    disillusioned?

    This matter cannot be treated as
    a mere business transaction and
    the concern of the Ministry ot
    Food alone, though even on this
    pasis the West Indies should have
    better treatment. This is not a
    mere matter of His Majesty’s Gov-
    ernment bargaining with someone
    who has come to sell them food,
    We are Colonial territories and
    His Majesty's Government 1s
    therefore responsible for our wel-

    re.
    tame broad view which we sub-
    mit should be taken as follows.
    The United Kingdom requires
    2,750,000 tons of sugar for ane
    consumption. Of this 500,00
    tons of sugar is produced at home

    at a high cost (£47 per ton in 1949
    as against £29. 5. 0d. for B.W.1
    sugar). We admit that there may
    be strategic reasons for this, and
    therefore shall not press the point
    eny further except comment
    that it is not reasonable to measure
    efficiency by cost when the sugar
    the United Kingdom produces is

    to





    sO expensively produced. T!
    sull remains 2,250,000 tons re-

    quired to satisfy local consumptior
    in England. It is submitted in al!
    seriousness that the whole of this
    quantity should be reserves
    production in the Empire

    So far as the West Indies are
    concerned, (and we are sure that
    other colonial areas hold the same
    view), we have the land, the
    manpower and the technical
    knowledge to produce 1,800,000
    tons at reasonable eosts, and it
    would undoubtedly be far more
    Satisfactory to let this develop-
    ment take place, rather than to
    allow unemployment to obtain in
    the Colonies; and then have all
    the difficulties which accrue from
    economic distress,

    for

    For many decades the Colenies
    have undoubtedly suffered from a
    lack of economic stability, Con-
    demned as they are to an agricul-
    tural destiny with its difficulties
    due to diseases, pests, droughts
    and floods, the one element which
    they need is financial stability.
    It appears to us that this stability
    can be obtained by reserving the
    British market for Colonial- and
    Dominions production.

    There can therefcre be no
    justifiable reason why there should
    be limitation on colonial produc-
    tion so as to leave room for the
    purchase of foreign sugar especi-
    ally when as in the past that
    Sugar has been = marketed’ at
    dumped prices. This, as we see it,
    is the broad picture and the policy
    which we submit would give the

    highest result in happiness and
    contentment in our part of the
    colonial empire.

    Hardships

    During the Past seventy years
    the colonies have suffered untold
    hardship because of economic in-
    stability, and it certainly seems
    to us that the time mas come when
    the uncertainties and distress of
    the past should be dealt with on a

    more lasting basis. We are tired of |

    having commission after commis-
    sion visiting the West Indies and
    British Guiana, each reporting on
    the economic distress of those colo-
    nies and stating in the plainest
    possible language that this dis-
    tress is the result of the lack of a
    staple price for sugar. A further
    point which should be stressed
    here is that whatever may be the
    justification for the purchasing
    of U.K. sugar in pre-war years
    at the cheapest possible price, the
    whole economic basis of dealings
    between the U.K. and the Colo-
    nies has been completely altered
    by the exchange control measures
    which are in force in Great
    Britain and which are applied

    considerations which applied in
    the past can no longer be applic-
    able. If at the present time, and
    it appears likely for many years
    to come, the Colonial markets are
    largely reserved for U.K. manu-
    facturers based on _ production
    costs, we are entitled to ask that
    there should be reciprocity in this
    regard and that the U.K. sugar
    market should be reserved for
    Colonial production on the same
    terms.

    offer an
    relationship between the
    and the Colonies eeser

    This seems to us to
    ideal
    U.K.
    which their economies can
    complementary to each other.

    Coming now to the offer of His
    Majesty’s Government, the B.W.1.
    Sugar Association has under great
    pressure accepted an overall
    restriction of export production
    to 900,000 tons. Having accepted
    this restriction it is our view that
    the whole of this quantity should
    have a guaranteed market in the
    U.K. at reasonably remunerative
    prices. In as much however as
    the B.W.I. Sugar Association has
    made further concessions by offer-
    ing to accept a guaranteed market

    for only 725,000 tons, we are of |

    the opinion that this is the mini-
    mum quantity which should be
    accepted. The latest 1950 estimate
    of B.W.I. sugar exports is some
    40,000 tons.

    ei We do not come to the Mother
    Country and ask for this guar-
    antee on 725,000 tons as 4 con-
    cession, but as a just settlement of
    this question which is so vitally
    important to us. AS representa-
    tives of our people, it is our duty
    to ask for this settlement. As
    representatives of your people and
    responsible fer the Colonies, we
    trust that you will see it your duty
    to meet this request.





    Obituary
    Mrs. Alice Skinner

    The death occurred at her resi-
    dence Aberdeen, Bank Hal} Cross
    Road on Saturday evening at the
    age of 86 years, of Mrs. Alice
    Henry Skinner widow of the late
    Brandford Skinner.

    Mrs. Skinner who was of ad-
    vanced years had not been active
    for somé time but maintained the
    friendships which she had made
    years ago and continued the in-
    terest which she had always
    taken in general welfare. She
    was a loving mother of the Vic-
    torian School of thought and de-
    manded, from her children stand-
    ards of conduct in keeping with
    middle class society. Outside the
    family circle she maintained a
    wide circle of friends who always
    sought her advice and genial com-
    pany. She carried her years
    lightly and despite the accom-
    panying ills was blessed with 4
    fund of good humour which al-
    ‘ways made her an agreeable com-
    panion. Her husband predeceased
    her about 35 years ago

    She leaves to mourn their loss



    two daughter Miss Leigh Skin-
    ner, Headmistress of St. Matthews
    Girls’ School, Mrs, D. A. M



    Haynes and Mr. Carlton Skin
    of New York formerly Mar
    of the Bridgetown Ice C
    in this island. To these a





    sorrowing members of \
    deepest sympathy i b c-
    tended.

    IMPORTS
    YESTERDAY

    The S.S. C. G. Thulin arrived
    here yesterday to take a load of
    2,950 barrels of molasses for

    Boston and New York.
    Before starting to load, the
    vessel discharged packages of

    shoes, flashlight batteries, hosiery
    and personal effects which it
    loaded at Trinidad’

    The Thulin will be sailing today
    via the British Northern Islands
    for Boston and New York.

    Over 3,000 loose and 23 bags of
    cocoanuts were among the cargo
    arriving at Barbados by schooner
    over the week-end.

    This supply was brought by the
    sehooners Adalina and W. L.
    Eunicia which arrived from St.
    Luéia and Dominica respectively.

    These schooners also brought
    bags of charcoal, copra and fresh
    fruit.



    “Constructor”

    Refloated

    From Our Own Correspc

    PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 3.



    The Canadian National Steam-
    ship Canadian Constructor which
    ran aground off
    Grenada, since
    flog today. The





    rigorously in the Colonies. Under
    these changed circumstances the

    |

    |

    November 24
    Is Opening Day

    For 4th W.I. Conference

    FORT-DE-FRANCE, Martinique,
    June, 28

    A standard operating procedure
    regarding the invitation to obser

    »jVvers to technical conferences wa

    among the items adopted at the
    tenth meeting of the Caribbean
    Commission. The Secretary
    General of the Commission was
    authorised to invite publi
    agencies and research institutions
    to send observers, or eminent

    seientists to attend as individuals,
    after consultation with the Chair~-
    man and Deputy Chairman of th
    Research Council,

    Governments, not members of
    the Caribbean Commission, may
    also be invited to send delegates er
    observers, subject to the approva!
    of the member governments

    Fourth Session

    The Commission considered the
    question of invitations to obser
    vers at the West Indian Confer-
    ence (Fourth Session). It was
    agreed that international organi-
    sations such as the United Nations
    the Food and Agriculture
    Organisation of the United Nation
    and the International Laboue
    Office, which had participated 140
    the preparation of documentation
    for the West Indian Conference,
    should be invited to send obser-
    vers. In addition, other institu-
    tions, such as research organisa-
    tions or universities could, at
    their request, be also invited.

    The Commission took note of
    the decisions reached by the
    International Telegraph and Tele-
    phone Conference held in Pat):
    Jast year. It was decided at thut

    conference that new telephone
    regulations with lower tariffs
    should be applied to countries
    within the European system us

    from July 1, 1950.

    Lowest Tariffs

    This document was considered
    by the Commission as a result ct
    a recommendation of the West
    Indian Conference (Third Session)
    that the lowest standardised tele-
    graph and radio telephone tariffs
    should be introduced as soon as
    possible in the Caribbean area

    It was also agreed that the next
    meeting of the Commission
    would take place in Curacao on
    November 24, 1950 and that the
    opening session would commence?
    prior to the Fourth Session of the
    West Indian Conference and the
    closing sessions would follow
    this Conference.

    re inds
    igh Wind
    . re

    Sweep City

    Many women walking in Broad
    Street yesterday were embarrass-
    ed when their hats were blown
    off by the high winds... Some did
    not take-any chances and walked
    with their hands firmly holding
    the crown of their hats.

    The men: also had difficulty in
    keeping their hats on their heads
    One-hawker while passing through
    Broad Street with a tray packed
    with sweets on her head, sufferea
    the worst when a big gust of
    wind tilted the whole tray over
    thus causing everything to scatter
    on the side walk.

    Swearing under her breath she
    however quickly picked up every-
    thing and started to rearrange
    her tray

    Case Adjourned

    Ragena Ifill of Vaux Hall, Christ
    Church, was yesterday charged
    before Mr. C. Walwyn of receiv-
    ing a quantity of cloth valued at
    17/- the property of Elsie Evans
    knowing the same to be stolen
    or unlawfully obtained. The
    offence was committed on June
    15. The case Was adjourned until
    July 13.

    H.P.C. 25 Gill said on June 19
    about 1,30 p.m. in consequence of
    @ report received he went to
    Chapel Street with Randolph Au-



    gustine, On reaching a certain
    place Randolf showed him a

    woman (Tfll) and told him in her
    presence that she was the woman
    whom he soid two pieces of dress

    material which he had _ stoler
    from his mother. Ifill denied it.
    He then asked her to come to
    the station with him.

    During the’ course of his in-
    vertigations a statement was
    made by Ifill. Other statements
    wert iven by witnesses and
    | Ifill then charged.

    Elsie Evans said she is a dresa

    maker and recently she has lost

    some cloth. Recently she saw
    two pieces which she identified
    and valued at 17/6.



    CHARGED WITH THEFT

    ic] Lee Browne of Brereton

    Sami
    Village, St. Philip

    came before

    His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
    yesterday on the charge of steal-
    one gold ring valued at £16.



    i3.¢; f the dwelling house of
    Niels P ation and the prop-
    erty of Dorothy MacKenzie. He
    was remanded until July 7 and

    the offence was. committed some-
    time between June 30 and July 1.



    Plane In Trouble

    A British four engine aeroplane
    with 15 persons aboard while on

    was developing engine troubles.
    according to a cablegram received
    at the local Harbour and Ship-
    ping Department.

    All ships in the vicinity of 14
    00 North 78.00 West have
    advised and have been requested

    » to listeri on 500 kilocycles for the

    aircraft Gagnu.





    What's on Today

    Court of Grand Sessions at
    10.60 a.m
    Meeting of House of Assem-
    bly at 12 noon.
    Meeting of Legislative at 200 |
    p.m i
    Water Polo Practice Match, |
    Aquatic Club at 5.00 p.m
    Mobile Cinema, Carmichael’s
    } Pasture, St
    P-m

    George at 7.30

    {
    ee eel

    a flight from Balboa to Kingstowr-

    =

    eee eeee eee
    / SSR eeeeeeeeeeeeen



    C.J. Opens July

    Grand Sessions

    THE JULY SITTING of the Gourt of Grand Sessions opened
    with the usual ceremony at 10 a.m. yesterday, His Honour|'°*5*S Which have never pefore
    the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Collymore, presiding. Most ot

    s spent with the taking of pleas, Miss M
    stant Legal Draughtsman, representing the



    the day v

    Bourne, As:

    Crown.

    the Grand Jury completed their
    consideration of the Bills of Ind
    ment yesterday evening, and were
    discharged by the Chief
    with the thanks of the colony for
    their services, and with his con-
    gratulations for the despatch with
    which they had done their work.





    There are 34 cases on the Calen-
    dar, of which two are for murder
    and one is for manslaughter.

    The Chief Justice in his Charge
    to the Grand Jury said :—





    F ; a ice her four-month-old
    Mr, Foreman and Gentlemen of abie man would know that they | a: died at about 4.00 p.m
    the Grand Jury, were likely to result in death
    In case there are any of you serious bodily hurt error reno 7,
    who ar: serving for the first time P eed , Dr. Manning of the St. ‘Thomas
    on the Grand Jury and as a re- Malice oro. DET LAs eA et a eee
    minder to others I shall briefly In these cases you may find the mortem examination yesterday and
    explain your duties to you. You existence of express cebine that }oc, attributed death to natural
    “9 . causes
    is to say that the wicked intention | > . 35 . . oe
    “~~~ is also evidenced by threats on the ro ee > wake ae
    . ae part of the accused. er a a ee
    Assize Diary In case No. 3 a chauffeur is}V®* ‘eported by Mrs. Edwara
    ‘ charged with manslaughter by} @°#min of “Kingsley”, Graeme
    TUESDAY 4 negligent driving of a motor Hall Terrace, She stated that it
    No, 12 — R v Francis [ vehicle. If the facts and circum-[ Vs removed from her bedroom
    Walters, stances reveal a probable case of }ecently.
    No. 13 — R v Francis driving with a wanton disregard HOUSE at Industry Hall, St.
    Walters. of human life and safety you Philip valued $650 was com-
    No. 18 — Rv Willys should return a true bill. pletely destroyed by fire at about
    Watson, The remaining cases should]}).00 p.m. on Saturday, It is in-
    No. 30 — Rv Allan present no difficulties but should shies, ; and ae a: ied. by
    Fieids, any arise I shall be pleased to give | \yij.)y Hutel Paes
    WEDNESDAY any assistance you require. Arthur ute hinson : }
    No. 22 — RB v_ Eric ‘ it is reported to the Police that
    Thompsoa & Two Bound Over the house caught fire after a as
    Arnett Bourse. tainp blew up.
    Ne. 25 —— R v Mignonne Two prisoners who pleaded FIRE OF UNKNOWN origin
    Graham. guilty of wounding and both of broke out at Spring Hal
    | ey wae ae by Mr. Plantation, St. Lucy, and destroyea
    Me . alco .C. were bounc quanti‘y of first crop youn
    = , ie k over in the sum of £25 with a chika h le i acre o ahaha
    are to consider such bills of in- + A eee ers Seed

    aictment as shall be placed before
    you, examine the witnesses for the
    prosecution, or such of them as
    you may consider necessary, and
    decide whether a prima facie case
    has been made out against the
    accused,

    Probable Guilt

    A prima facie case is made out
    when the prosecution has estab-
    lished by evidence the probable
    guilt of the accused. You are not
    concerned with the defence, and
    you are not entitled to examine
    the witnesses for the defence. A
    true bill cannot be returned against
    a prisoner unless a majority of at
    least twelve of you so decide.

    The Calendar for your consider-







    ation consists of thirty four indict-
    ments as under :—
    Murder 2
    Manslaughter 1
    Wounding with intent 5
    Causing grevious bodily harm with
    intent 1
    Robbery with violence 1
    Burglary 1
    Burglary and Lareeny 2
    Housebreaking and Larceny ,
    Shopbreaking and Larceny 3
    Building breaking sad Lirveny 1
    Larceny 7
    1
    Forgery 2
    Falsification of accounts 1
    Delaying au Postal Packet 1
    Murder

    In cases Nos. 1 and 2 in which
    persons are charged with murder,
    the alleged facts and circumstances
    naturally differ but the law appli-
    cable in both cases is the same.
    Murder is the wilful killing of a
    reasonable person, in, being and



    Suffrage Bill Goes
    Back To Council

    The Bill to amend the Representation of the Peoples Act
    dealing with the abolition of property qualification for mem-
    bership to the House of Assembly, the granting of Adult

    Suffrage and the reduction

    members of the House to form
    come up for consideration in the Legislative Council today

    Among other matters likely to
    be dealt with is a Bill to settle the
    rates of income tax for the year
    1950, and to make provision for
    certain other matters in connec-
    tion with the levying of the said
    tax and to amend the law relating
    to Income Tax, .

    A Bill to amend the Customs
    Tariff Act, 1921,

    This Bill seeks in order to en-
    courage the industry of manufac-
    turing cloth from cotton yarn etc.,
    now being undertaken by the
    West Indian Knitting Mills, to
    reduce the amount of duty pay-
    able on imported cotton yarn ete.,
    and to allow the duty free impor-
    tations of machinery and appara-
    tus to be used in the manufacture
    $ such cloth from cotton yarn
    ete,

    A Bill to vest a certain parcel of
    land in the parish of St. John, with
    the Chapel of St. Mark, the Par-
    sonage House, and other building
    and the burial ground, in the Lord
    Bishop of Barbados and the Rector



    of St. John and their respective
    successors in office upon certain
    trusts.

    A Resolution to make it lawful
    for a Vestiy to lease land within
    their parish for any period not
    exceeding 21 years and that any
    such lease shall be binding on the
    successive Vestries of the said
    parish.

    House of Assembly

    The House may resume discus-
    sion on the second reading of the
    Bill to amend the law relating to
    Separation and Maintenance

    Another matter on which there
    may be lengthy discussion, is the
    Bill to abolish grand juries and to
    amend the law relating to the pre-

    been ,

    | t

    |
    ‘BuvsT

    Bice Your Supply ‘rom .
    H.

    Justice

    | Ota ahahaha a ata a sate

    ARRIVED-

    A FRESH SHIPMENT OF _.

    M purRINA POULTRY CHOWS

    JASON JONES & CO.,
    Distributors.

    |t
    E

    under the King’s peace with malice] U
    atorethought, express or implied
    By malice is meant a wicked in-
    tention to kill or do some serious
    bodily injury which in the con-
    templation of a reasonable person
    would be likely to result in the loss
    of life or limb or to cause
    permanent or serious injury.

    In the cases before you the evi
    dence will show that the acts
    which caused the fatal injuries
    were of such a nature and done

    K

    some

    with such weapons that a reason-| ! «

    surety in a similar amount to keep
    the peace and be of good behaviour
    for 18 months, They were,
    Alphonso Rowe, fisherman of St.
    Lucy and Eileen Layne, married
    woman of Christ Church. Both
    had previous clean records, and

    V

    Mr. Walcott after explaining the
    circumstances in which the
    offences had been committed

    asked the Court to be lenient.

    econ

    ay mornu

    atural ca

    > UGENE CODRINGTON of

    and two acr

    Polo Begins

    Wedne

    ZULU SEASON
    Weanesaday alte

    hionea ela a

    played in this exciting game
    it will be interesting to see how
    He mounts—-most c¢

    imported anc

    Ken to the saddl

    rw Hew experience.

    |

    MURTY - FOUR

    Jerome Cheeseman of Villa
    oad, St. Michael, died suddenly
    his residence at about 11 p.m,
    Sunda A post mortem: ex-



    was
    ng by Li
    death was
    uses,

    4

    Walkes Spring r








    three quarters of an acre of trash
    s of sour grass
    i,



    alue is unestimate
    RTHUR PIERC
    Hill, St.
    the General



    Josey

    Hos




    from injuries, and wag detained

    Pierce was inv

    accident with the motor ear O-10,
    whned by L. Cools of Spa Hall, St.
    Joseph and driven by

    performed



    sday

    BEGINS

    rnoon







    on
    with a

    na many new

    4 which
    i had
    e

    have
    to be
    respond to

    - YBAR-OLD

    yester-
    Hi. L. Massiah
    attributed to

    eported to the

    The

    E of Fruitfui
    yh, was taken
    pital suffering
    oived

    in un

    Leroy Mur-

    The Chief ere postponed |ray of the same address, along}
    sentence on inston Bradshaw | ~:. ‘orde: ; .
    who pleaded guilty of receiving a ' ae oe eee at sont ph
    light meter knowing it to have NX’ _ ACCIDENT occurred on |
    been stolen or unlawfully obtaine: & Spooners Hill over the week-
    Sentence was also postponed in| ©! between one bicycle owned
    the case in which Etta Harewood |?Â¥ Newton Phillips of Storey Gap,
    pleaded guilty on three counts of |Codrington Hill, and ridden by
    a falsification of accounts indict-]St. Clair Neblett of the same
    ment. She was represented by|address, and another owned by
    Mr. EB, K. Waleott K.C. Bustace Phillips of White Hall and
    ridden by Lionel Nurse of the
    Goes And Comes same address. Both bicycles were
    tamed
    Joseph Webster who told the ae

    Court he was a seaman who “goes
    and comes”, pleaded guilty of re-

    HE MOTOR CAR G-44, owned

    and driven by

    ceiving stolen property in two : ,
    different cases. He also pleaded slightly damaged a
    guilty of being a habitual criminal, |Yolved in an ac

    Sentence was postponed,
    he is not a Barbadian.
    His Honour also postponed sen-
    tence in the case in which David }!
    Cheeseman, St. George fisherman, |!
    pleaded guilty of housebreaking
    and larceny.
    Norman Weir

    He said

    was discharged

    he was charged was not a “true
    bill’.

    The Court will resume its sit-
    ting at 10 a.m. to-day.

    den by Randolph Holder of

    Alleyne’s Land, Passage Road,
    . |
    was extensively damaged after
    colliding with the motor car 'T-72,
    vned by Jartiett Edwards of
    Vault Road, St. Thomas and driven
    Ly Frederick Gill of Airy Cot
    The accident occurred or. White
    of the present number of 12|Perk Road

    a quorum, to 9, may again

    Session, there was no hearing of |
    sentment of indictrnents when it es in the Court of Appeal}
    comes up for its second reading, | yesterday, a normal day on which |

    The House may discuss Mr.|cnses are scheduled to be heard.|
    Miller’s Address to the Governor |The Court yard and building were!
    relating to the right of landlords | packed with people who turned
    to eject within seven days or a|up to see the parade which formal. |
    month, occupiers of lots on which opened the Session |

    chattel houses are erected









    c
    week-end,

    Pasture tonight
    after the Grand Jury found that /residents of the Carmichael’s area
    the Bill of Indictment under which }o{ St. George.

    Rive

    J

    ottawe Road, St




    give a

    for



    Last night a
    1at St

    priv




    shop was broken a
    Friday night, and
    goods to the value

    removed

    BICYCLE, OW

    NHARLES GOODING, a waiter)

    Houses,
    nickel-plated

    show at

    n Lucy’s Almshouse
    ILFRED YEARWOOD of
    Bank Hall reported that his

    ECAUSE OF THE STIR which
    attended the opening of Grand}

    , John Meb.

    Heath of Newbury, St. George was

    fter being in-
    ‘cident along

    George over the

    Also involved was a_ bicycle
    idden by ‘Teddy Harding of
    ra Hill, St. Joseph

    HE MOBILE CINEMA will

    Carmichael’s
    the benefit of

    ate show was

    nd entered on
    a quantity of
    of $82.66 was

    NED and rid-





    Mr. Garner's requesting that the A at ht 7 Bebra. ~ 4 |
    sum of £100,000 be appropriated ee ri t . teh valned|
    from General Revenue for the $95. He stated that it was re.

    e: tablishment of the Barbados moved from the ervant’s room
    Development Company; and Mr, between 6.30 p.m. and 10 p.m. on |
    Mapp’s relating to the fixing of a Friday
    eae wage = employees " ;
    sufficient to ensure them a reason-
    able standard of living. Tit hip eae
    |
    |
    ‘ eae) LONDON, June 3.
    7 2 Prime Minister Clement Attlee
    The ‘Polick Ss lj likely to call Cabinet Minis~|
    6 ; : jters to-morrow for further dis-
    T y L U \ cussion of the Korean situation. |
    qme Ss iP “informed quarters here said to-
    | day.

    Two days have passed since the | The Cubinet had latest report?
    «xpiration of the time given the ‘before it at a meeting held for}
    cwoer of the yaw! “Potie by. day and the subject was di
    Government to have it reflouted| cussed at some Jength, meet=|
    in the inner basin of the Careen-|ing of the Cabinet defence Com-}

    ge, mittee on which service Chiefs-

    The “Potick”, however, is yet|of-Staff and Service Ministers |

    ‘o be removed
    the Careenage,

    from the bed of
    All covered with
    moss and other marine growths,
    the vessel can be seen with a
    portion of its bow its
    asts still above the water

    It has been understood that the
    chooner “Philip H. Davidson”,
    hich has recently arrived here
    rom British Guiana has been =|

    and



    aged to give assistance in
    ing the vessel

    It has not yet been decided wha
    will be the next step taken either
    by Government in the

    matter
    |

    LTD.

    ”
    se
    a
    he
    ki



    4

    sit will also be called this week. |

    —Reuter |





    22 ies,

    |

    ‘CAV

    and

    —

    E SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

    10, 1,

    “y 4

    CORSETS and CORSELETS
    CORSETS

    With laced backs and hooked sides,
    Wrap-arounds with hooked sides.

    CORSELETS

    With and _ without

    There's Danger
    im the Cleanest
    Home !

    FLOOR INFECTION
    AREAS demand...
    this new, more effective germ-protection :



    TSLOORS teem with germs ! Doctors say ordinary cleaning
    s not enough — you need a modern germicide, especially

    where there is a baby

    Make infection areas hospital-clean with JEYPINE, the new,

    powerful germ-killer It kills more germs and kills them

    faster. Yet it’s as gentle and safe as soap to delicate tissue,

    Always add JEYPINE to your cleaning water. Enjoy its fresh

    pine fragrance in your bath—it helps to soften water, too !
    Insist on

    JEYPINE

    For FRAGRANCE and HYGIENE



    On Sale at KNIGHT’S DRUG STORES.

    inspect these in our

    Linen Dept.

    TOWELS :
    In Blue, Rose, Gold, Green snd White from $1.34

    to $2.05 each.

    BATH



    BED SHEETS ss :
    63" x 90” @ $5.24; 70” x 90° @ and
    90” x 108” a

    BED SHEETING

    72” wide @ $2.00 a Yd., 80° Wide @ $2.55 a Yd.

    CANDLEWICK BEDSPREADS
    In Gold, Blue and Peach
    Single Bed Size @ $14.00 and $18.00 each
    Double-Bed Size (@ $25.00 each

    TABLE DAMASK
    54” Wide @ $1.21 Yd.
    72” Wide @ $2.85 Yd.

    HUCK TOWELLING
    In Blue, Green, Rose and Maize @ Sle. a Yd,

    TABLE CLOTHS : :
    In White Damask, Checks and Flowered Designs



    HARRISON'S DRY GOODS

    DIAL 2664

    WHEN CONSTRUCTING
    OR REPAIRING A
    BUILDING

    ALWAYS USE

    -EVERITE’
    ASBESTOS-CEMENT

    CORRUGATED

    SHEETS.

    ck



    t



    and
    All sizes.

    inner belts in Twilfit

    Makes. All sizes.

    Imperial

    12 & 13 BROAD STREET.









    |


    PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE UZ UESDAY, JULY 4, 1956
    rr A —_———







    ets hn TE Ft
    HENRY —_

    FOR MORE AND BETTER

    - BREAD
    “HARVEST

    : QUEEN’
    FLOUR







    is back again —
    ALSO

    “GOLDEN CRUST"
    “E" GRADE FLOUR

    Supplied throughout the war by
    LAKE of the WOODS |
    MILLING Co, Ltd.












    K. 0. CANNON . . . . . . WITH WHISPER

    “ {F MURDERERS
    COME BACK TO THE
    SCENE OF THEIR

    CRIMES - SOMEONE

    pa
    YOU SHOULDN'T HAVE
    ' FOLLOWED ME WHISPER
    |} THIS COULD BECOME

    | SOUGH.. BUT | D/D WANT |,
    | 0 GET A LOOK AT ZUCCI'SA
    | PRIVATE
    | OFFICE.





























    For river...
    Cleanse the system from _ blood
    impurities ; many sufferers from
    rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
    neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and
    minor skin ailments, can derive great
    benefit from this well-known medicine.

    In LIQUID or TABLET FORM

    ia LUXURY
    ~ TOILET SOAPS
    Every Morris Marine engine

    BLUE HYACINTH @ embodies the accumulated
    experionce of marine engineering
    specialists. That is one reason
    why they have achieved world-
    wide fame for their sturdy trust
    worthiness—the ability to keep on

    delivering power without a falter
    Sparkling glass through the worst weather

    conditions








    16 THAT ALL YOU'VE |
    GOT TOL

    > SLEEP
    AROUND HERE °?






    “POOR BOY! HE'S
    ALL TIRED QUT




    SUD -NO! Fix UP THE
    Cc ROOM AND BE

    you”! weu!

    M SIC

    QUIET -DON'T ¥
    x SEE M

    UPON My woRO/
    GET UP OUT
    OF THERE 7

    FROM LOOKING
    FOR WORK//






    GET BUSY 4 DO
    1 SOMETHING " ;

    |

    “4





    TAKING A
    LITTLE NAP



    ~~"

    I Pour some
    “Windolene’ona _
    soft rag 4

    AY

    n 2

    Vv

    V
    \
    roms th

    Because of their economy too,

    and their easy maintenance you

    = the CASY, Way will be wise to instal one. There
    = is a choice for the job you have in

    mind— Petrol, Paraffin or Diesel
    operated.

    0

    rey
    nD




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    8
    TUESDAY, JULY 4, 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEV

    CLASSIFIED ADS. |__rensenat | Workers Reis | France Gets | HARBOUR 106

    sini ephane tne Wages Policy ar
    ouBIRTHDAY GREE . 3 eo A New Govt. in Carlisle Bay















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    TINGS i 4 . a i ec Frode L t nd mysel! |

    HER 2 Mr ke Mrs: | FOR RENT | ccaponaivie to pot uot myset’ | AND CRIPPS IS PLEASED

    J len of Retr St. George “ apy debt or debts in my name PARIS y ) Ill, Sch, Harriet Whéttake 7 A ~r’

    on Wednesd: ist J 1 th g =| : fer signed by me LONDON, July 3 Premier Me Queue 3 Se walcon, Vachs Launder, Sct H(7 8 ats Us

    mother and so “ KE TH VAUGHAN | cellor of the Exchequer Sir!) formed a new re ht |: , Sch. Mary M

    i ( i ew ( hose S
    ; - : Cripps today gave his . a se whe s H. Davidson, Seh. WN
    ' St, Pete : mors so tinge alr has ise Rete Wolfe, Sch. By . ry
    ‘ Se eae : I lhe ec END 2 we the ree f th cialist tre ch Louise. Set. Raster Bei, Sct: Omori ‘6, rt
    Pa ‘ e y stonewall, | “7 nnn enn de Union Leaders The. Govermnént “seeay. receive | Lm Sch Marea Henrietta, Sci
    AD la 1 at . t va ic are e ed against > yy ome laxatior ‘ ; 7 z ’ 4 ae, Soh Loandeyd lu. Sc’
    W. H. B: wth / Belleville ailable Aus t. RA 1 t ‘ PE ne retaxatior the | its first crucial test in the Nationa he , hb. Betieen, Gea. Wenrs
    at 1.30 a.m, today. Fune i | ‘ f Bile I do not ges pegging policy. But, he told! Assenibly tomorro\ D, Wallace ;
    the lute h_ Avenue, | ‘ e else | the of Commons “we can-| The new Cabinet former Seer Ae
    Belleville, at 4.30 pan, t tt | yet pe ace Be rd anything but a limited | day eight days after George !« fue flee ”
    W. MW. BRYAN Giushana. | t | of ot relaxation of the ¥ Ridault’s Government pplec M WP dons net, Coot
    eg “et ea C4 GREFFITH, | 7 tandards laid dawh after’ could be defeated tomorro the Naveen
    J - nna Patriol e 5 fis & Co." Solicit rel devalua * ; . : N ay 98 toms net
    months Last. ight. ; TI € Tu ud k Te tone Geis. r | ere Assembly votes ag Queullle | ca» Fase : tr a eee ee :
    will leave “Charleston,” Progressive | 25.6.60—-t.f.n | 4.7.50. —2n. | ae 1 en some technical 1e "ss. ¢. CG. Twlin, 1a7 net
    Tand. “Bank Hall, at 420 pis weday | 25.6.50—t.f * ss i | He added: “If we were now tc The oan ae an Pe = ce wualia et ee e
    for the Westbury © y b ai against | abandon this policy (of restraint) . oe > . . DEPAF TUR" 3
    LEON and DAPHNE LASHLEY (Parents) ' t rance Year- | we should set in motion a wave'ot "©™ eee has had little tc Schooner Maren Hen “et*a, 48 tor
    van T ’ ee ee WV oid my-/|influction whic coy A ’ do with rance's foreigr r0lic) et, Selby. for ®. Luci
    ee LE ceaieeiis ata rT nsit jinn C ch would do v . . na a eg PUBLIC NG FECES ing 2 Cry debts in my} ereat harm to our ecconon TY 'Toreign Minister Robert Schuma MV. ©. KK Serwice VIL. 96 ton
    IN MEMORIAM dae a ee we ie eee tN sie! Slee ; nomiy ane has been kept in hi t indica. | Pt Cem. Walte, for British Guiana
    In ever loving memory of our dear} = = = , : , ee ne ss i wie cnaatt the | ting that his pl t 1 SS. end Giedeane, 408 tam
    = ‘i ~ = Pay | 7 | workers’ ; Geered a an arene son, Roger | SAINT VINCENT WEEKLY als ‘ HAM! i YRARWOOD Nurope coal lee 2106 tons net, Capt
    28th of June, 1947 . coe Now makes possible ide Aion | Sir Stafford’s statement cope neg | Government ba for Trinidad
    Dear re > WwW ot 3 . 7 es a, 1a We " ‘ The eting 0 : . : : mye rer mre cn oe
    Senet ee me tn eile ah taicaaainind : 0, § SSR Se Sener Sot ine | a ese ee pint ate Setmea} Gu Vath Wel Ghetiabes | ..., 4 ey Sane Ser ee ee ere
    When this earthly life is o'er | RATHO MILL TOWER HOTEL his to notify the general pubtie|to be ¢ a ted PRES SRRNES es ly ; _ a ain ¥ » h Was Fepessed | will anower this question in years to come
    4 pnt ! t vers to be tre storms of Tr: n > ne . c “- ‘

    Where. the: Saved ones praising Jecus | St. Vincent tI mhhs te Tor aay dettt | Tsnit roubled by storms of Trade} when _ the rencn Cl ame. | Stati | For further infermation apply:—

    So Sk bepee aden ence sunny “CARIBBE j or debts contr Snyone, Wher. | Union discontent on wage issues.| Delegates went home to get thei Coast Station UNITED INVESTORS CO, LIMITED,

    Oh that will be joyful when we meet BEE ever in my name unless by written| _ Already 4,500 London. meat| Governments’ opinions on __ the | -riters

    te part no more on-the-sea Bequia Island dae ake i | distributi etal a ee | areata a. 3 CABLE and Wireless (W.I.) Limited Insurance Underwriters,
    Jean (mother) Eloise (Grand-mother). | fers all that can be desired. Beaut!- SULLIVAN, | Scottis jon workers and 2,000) *rench proposal for overall inter-| sgvise that they can now communicate Marhill Street, City
    4.7.50.—1n_ | ful scenery, sea-bathing, fishing, exce! aid ' | Scottish miners are on strike jr} national authority to control the| with the following ships through their Sc aertem ete a a eenedaliadn
    ss Se 7 ot ae Lor RATES $4 t H ; Pay disputes. | pest They meet here again today, | Barbados Coast Station
    n Loving Memory of my dear Son, 7 - ay. ‘or further detail } } 1 R Compl ts at Frar ss orman Diet; SS. Archimede
    Winston Morrison, wh« , and reservations. ; euter, jf omplaints about Frar neWiss ¢ tia ; , 3. Ga
    1g. op has Plan dlrs Dich Ne ERROL G. ROOK ees 4.7.50.—2n. | | Government are expected to come | spene: 8 Bolan ea. taelona

    He is gone can never be forgotten Box 47, THE public he . vse’ males | ‘ from the left side of the Assembly.| 5.5. Brasil: 5.5 Esperanza; |

    Of my son I love so di Saint Vincent. g credit to anyone i 5 1am . | Socialists who refused to join dis-{S5 "oe Ss | Dutra: SS. |

    And TI think of him eve mom nt. 13.6.50—26n. withowt’ = “written oler simed bY sms Ch mote, like tw w Mini 7 a Esso Bethlehem; S.S. Southern Cities; | — $$ mer

    When I go to kneel in prayer’ ——$———— : at hoke elf responsible ines¢ | Bke tWo Rew. Niinistex They are} s.s. Loide Veneruela; 8.8. Campante;

    Wilhelmina Morrison, moth r . : ss F former Premier Paul Reynaud who|S.S Egidias SS. Del Sud; S.S.. MONTR 1 - ot. se
    Ocnr M oat Qn her, ee ior ed on ich orders " ke th tM MM e's Fort Townst 4 ss IONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEA ———— a a

    scar Morrison, father and amily 4 ITZGERA - takes the new post o inister o VLAN . or ownshend; § 5.5.) LAND L f LTD., N.Z. LINE’ °
    Neiee Patricia Morrison, brether NOTICE mn be ar . D 9 Attack P > . , se t i o ister of San Clara; S.S. Uruguay; 8.8. Estero; | . “ : ™ 4 '
    sister Elce and Evelyn Best.4.7 oie Gaipgpenenieneeasensnaenpietsanenirateriai hb ec | State for Associated States and 5S 8u ~wel: SS. Lord Gladstone; | ° 5 “CITY OF DIEPPE" sails r M.V. “Daer i” will jl

    spelen: “wees All umpives are requested to attend| THE public are hereby warned against S jthe Far East, and Paul Giacobbi|s.S. Sprut; S.8. Cape Sable; 8.8. | Ad lide May 29th. Melbourne Jun: ona BerWwoon” .wF |
    _,i@ loving memory of my dear husband | to-day's (Puesdes) meeting he Chal-} giving credit my wife OEMNTA n tatement Minister of State for Civil Service. | Surwa!t: $8. Alar; S.S8. Lord Chureh; | 77d. Sydney June 4th, Brighane June qi] os oent Cars and Passen-
    Frank Daniel who died Juty Sed, 1949 | Jenor stand at 4.50 p.m | RURROWES .” Semthorate st | Communists like them even less. |°°S: E¥*tatt: SS. Auris; 8.8. Dolores; | ‘ih arriving at Trinidad about July 21s! accept argo anc assen
    eee sad memories of | Sew Umpires will be cordially wel-| not hold myself responsible for her GENEVA, July 3 | Both men are right wingers. Rey. is Nema e hb Seay eke /AMGE Seelsbeae aa: August {|| gers for St, Lucia, St. Vin
    yne year ago, omed. : ee aitpenie Galak tasmbennta? pA ; OVA, y 3. | é r > S Yanvhi . Somerville Uy /Avguet she ty Augu or St ‘ a, St. -

    It is not the tears at the moment shed, THE BARBADOS ‘CRICKET | ite die’ Yar ame less by a seelthasi At Z this afternoon's session of | naud is independent and Giacobbi. | Chyystanthy, Ss Rowallan Castle felbounne mid July. WN. Queensland fj}

    Apa a ie hati is th oe — F. H erde gned b e , the United Nations Economic and|a member of Queuille’s Radical . . I - eh worn ae cooetee s, cote, Saving Tunas i ent, Grenada, Aruba. Sail-

    Anc he grie: 1at is silently borne jOyOs, Signed ERROLD BURROWES, Sociz yy » ‘ Z a es i + . Mud irth | bout 9th Septembe: |

    The blow was hard ithe shock severe Honorary Secretary — a Perel a wih cial Council, Chinese delegate | Socialist Group cr, | These weasels have ample spuce for | || Thursd: 5

    ae, Diow wane Meme hel shack semere, y mare Village. Tsung Chi Yu, said that the coun- j SEAWELL ied, Hat Gieten wad genes carge,| ©, ie Thursday, 6th July.

    so hear, 7 502n.) cil should go on reco s con- Cargo accepted on through bills \}
    See Saleicienis tienbidael ats 4.7.50—2r i < ord as con i tht : corinne
    y nat lost can te demning the recent statement of ~ + ! ssi 2 N cing with transhipment at Trinidad for t

    We’ ps arti . é ta us : oO B k R ( ( ARRIVALS BY B.W.LAL 5 a By

    Sper 20 be sameeniianed Oh we NOTICE a = | the Polish delegate that no decis- an ate vOCS ip From Antigu paawas d im wien ae | B Wit ooner owners

    ¥ 4.7.50—1n ions of the United Nations taken See), UACRANE: SAADNM, | : oem, CITC)
    Application for one or more vacant WANTED in the presence of Chinese Nation- In Den mark , eer | FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD., | beep ees

    Tn ever loving memory of our Dear | St. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions at Har- | alist delegations were valid ‘ . FT Daksa | Agents, Trinidad {|
    Aunt and Sister, Ellen Agatha Grant, | Tison College will be received by the | = “Repres fr. From Ciudad Trujill } DA COSTA & CO. LTD ,
    who fell asleep on the ath of July, 1945. | Clerk of the Vestry up to 4 o'clock | epresentatives of satellite COPENHAGEN, July 3 Mune. hi | Agents, Barbados. ' 7? lll _===_ SS

    The Saints of God, their vigil keep | P.m., on Wednesday July 12, 1950 HELP countries have made this sugge The Danish bank rate was in-| From Grenada

    Til gon the Gust thes “an ah st vise donigeiees ia sraites T i neat st a t i tion a number of times, and other by one per cent to four \ M. Gordon, I, Bracho, M. Kay: |

    e s sy too shall rise , ishioners in straitened circumstances an sistant to do Jeg: . Adon -s eve om > n 7 9

    And soar triumphant to the skies must not be less than (9) nor more than office work en nave always remained f per cent by the Danish Sem La Guiara |

    © happy Saints! rejoice and sing: (15) years of age on 30th June, 1950, nfidentially. P.O | Silent,” said Tsung Chi Yu National Bank today Respon i-| RG. Mares, R. G. Mar c. v |

    He quickly comes, your Lord to be proved by a Baptismal Certificate 4.7.50. —3n . ble financial circles said the re: ; r . 2, Geo, Wilkinson, | ©

    and King. which must accompany the application, | |——————— Indian delegate Sir R. Musalair |P'¢ “nancial circles said the rea : Wilkinson, Carel Wilkin- 0.

    Ever to be remembered by Forms of application can be obtained A general SERVANT. Apply said while he agreed with the |*°" for the exceptional increase | ¢ , ; }
    ane sarsen (sister) Sydney, at the Vestry Clerk's Office. Store 1 Swan Street 4.7.5 ‘-1Chinese delegate “when he gai y | was Denmark's deteriorated eco-
    and Alfred Jordan. Evans, Leotia, Elsie, By Order E. C. REDMAN, | ss | Russia; * Sale| nomic situation as It of} From 1
    Fred, Basil and Eric Willoughby Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry LADY—for the Office at Hotel Royal ussia and Eastern European |O™M!lc situation as a resu o rom Trinidad { Onc

    4.7.50.—In. | Vestry Clerk's Office, Apply in writing and in person to the] countries should retur > wy. | devaluation Rosenn Kabk, Margaret Boland, Cons | ;
    Parochial Buildi Manager 7.50—t.f.n turn to confer ad Boyce, Aline Roberts Jargeret |
    Manage 50- s ~ ; ie ah i : ie : . 5

    IN loving memory of my dear be- Blagtiown e's soe : ences, his delegation regarded the Lyder, Michael Simpson Aarjdtie | NEW ORLEANS SFR, 108
    loved son LIONEL CLARKE who died | « : ix wed Bectetery wanted. Adu be canebae oe Government of China as } tyar Perkins. Muriel Rawlins, | sal arr.
    on July 3rd 1949 |
    Sad and udden was the call, NOTICE $110.00 per month, Hours 8.30 a.m.|as had already been stated by the CUSTOMS Bockus, 4 @lyn Backus, Baxbara Boc- ALCOA SANGER seth June 14th July

    e des one lov vy 3 >m ree weeks 1 lic ‘ S« Satie Re + 7 m u we) % ’ an “OA R : os ;

    Deke ct seo; Ho word ent. tall Tenders will be received by the under- |.) ie ere eee wrote ‘day 2'India Security Council meetings Dar Dorothy Parmer, Grace ‘Vieira, AMER ith Aug

    Of the lost one we loved so well signed up to 12 noon Monday 17 July, ng shorthand and typing},.,/4€ Council then adjourned un- - fa Roy Vn Ore ee asids Doton YORK S"RVIOR

    Days of sorrow still come o'er us 1950 for the construction of a Parochiai ‘ ence inistrative | til tomorrow morning a Senulor, Loulé floss, Nellie, Ross, Cyril Arr.

    Secuppisenrs. do often Ses, Medical Officer's residence on lands at tonate Civil —Reuter Stoute, John Bayne, Renald Armstrons | ¥. B'dos

    or today has brought before us Edghill, St. Thomas, in accordance with House ridge ak x Corllan Uttam, Beresford Texeira,| 8 (BYFJORD” : 30th June 12th July

    a Bharheene OF One Wear. a0 plans and specifications, which may be Goddard t 7 Cars Texeira, George Cil Ho Yow “THULIN™ July dist July

    e 0 » remembe ‘ ss . +r, ot A { 9 anal # * ,
    pnver tebe remembered by:— | | obtained from the Par. Treasurer. Each 3r n L Mon pobert Ghsllenos
    zi _,_ {mot : applicant will be required to deposit } L a ‘Mon | trendiest sin sbi wbstacaaeae ny
    (sister) Lillian Clarke (grond mother) / $10.00, which will be refunded om the 7 . : ! 11.30 4 vaeMoN |
    and_the Clarke's family 4.7.50—In. | return of the plans and specifications in | MISCELLANEOUS W ill Lift Ruhr ia DEPARTURES — BY BWIA L. FOR] CANADIAN SERVICE
    Or good condition i ‘ 4 4 ? TRINEDA 5

    . spear i Persons to listen to ‘Jeffreys Bee . , ty ren » OUTHBOUND
    FOR SALE The Vestry does not bind ‘it elf tO} Landy de Montbrun and his artistes, t Steel Emba yy ' a vo j fall Sail ‘ Arri
    award the contract to the lowest or any | he broadcast over Radio Distributior er rgo i Lionel Parry, Ernest Perry Claudia ; i oRrs ~ eevee

    AUTOMOTIVE Tender. from 9.00 — 9.15 p.m. Sth and 12th July eA Evelyn, Helen Yattt, Angus Mitehell Montreal see Barbados

    “ Ps ; The successful applicant will be re- ak Bee nae eee BONN ‘ . X Delfina’ Pdghi"l, Aida Edghitl, Antonio June 2é@th une 30th July Uith

    CAR—1947 Super De Luxe Ford. | quired to provide two (2) surities, whe 24.6.50—16 » see » July 3 Preity tig Ae. than’ \ Gewiian. July 7th July Toth July 2nd
    Perfect condition. Tyres & Buttery] win he willing to hind themselves ford SGnuw GAGIR Ow mer lit ci Partial lifting of the embargo ; Helen Ludeker, Mary Willekes-Musk July 2ist July 24th Aug oth
    New. Contact VINCENT GRIFFITH. | 4. g mer 7 “ CINE CAMERA aight millimetre./on Ruhr iron d = — Yo 7 —— 1 Rg DeWei Aug. 4th Auge 7th Aug 17th
    Tel. 2667 4.7.50—3n. he due performance of the work Kodak preferred. In good condition. | . and steel preduction 4 ’ n Jone Norman DeWeir,

    F. F. PILGRIM, can * vor the Soviet Z as i d Reginald Lawes, Her -
    — Par. Treasurer St. Thomas, | #0dsen C/O Allexne Arthur & Co. Lt4 c oviet Zone has been de- idnoaie -

    CAR—One 8 cylinder Packard—ideal Ee a eb ate 29.6.50—an |cided on, German trade quarters For St. Lucia NOR THROUND
    thing for tent pupposts:. Owner bought said tonight. ~ Malcolin Maxwell, Gladys Clausel, Arrives
    she car Apply a or ee PUBLIC SALE ES All orders lated b Herman Poxill, Janet Mhrehpenny , ALCOA POLARIS mernaden r mic iain
    ard Ave., St, Michael ing 3085 sea : placec efore London Express Service. 8S LOA OLA Ss” uly 1 or Montrea

    4.7.50.--3n + fe ——————— | February 8 when the embar
    . £O was r .
    aretha ane tianlian anes : f fa * : These vessels have limitedpassenger accommodation,

    canvosevirwokke won pane} Professional Notice AUCTION imposed because of excessive Zone] Jamaica Knitting The panama
    only 13,000 miles and in excellent con-| 4s. omce w i imports of iron and steel accord- amaic £ COOKER : : s
    dition Wo reasonable offer refused My office will be closed for vacation U 7 ing to official ‘state ts 5 Apply: DA COSTA & GO, LTD.—Can adian Serve,

    Hon og D. Beclen “Brdos Taxi Cabs, | 0 Monday 20th July & will re-open| UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Statements here— | KINGSTON ROBERT THOM LTD,-New York and vif Service,
    3 a aes: | on Monday 2th July. Those persons may now be carried out. in tae that pays
    ns | WHOSe glasses have not been delivered| BY instruction received IT will sell on This move is interpreted as a) The Jamaica knitting industry 1s ‘ Me

    CAR—One Vauxhall 14 H.P. 193¢]4re asked to call in for them before | Thursday | July 6th oat, 2.30 pam. a'1 inducement to th Sei o as @ | threatened with being throttled off or COPPELL PPE LLLP PT AAT TS
    model, condition A 4 Apply to Mrs. } Saturday 8th July. H. Harcourt Carter | Mahieea Village, Green ‘Hill, (2) Mileh oO the oviet Zone tO!by a heavy inflow of Indian knit- Itself ! x KIS .
    G, Smith, Lower Pinfold St Opthalmist. 27.6.50—5n | Cows both 7 Months with calf; 4 Horse (eagotate an interzonal tradejted underwear, and high level AF % \ 1 =— ole °

    4.7.50-—2n. — | & Cart w arness rms Cash eo ¢ ‘ , 5 7 _ : a} MOVAI NOTICE R
    ak £2 oe 1 -50--9p VINCENT GRIFFITH agreement to replace that which|Government negotiations may » ah Peed v ¥% % ‘““GOD’S WAY OF x

    CAR Moule Sports Car, X—086, Goos| PARTNERSHIP NOTICE Auctioneer, expired on Friday last j|have to be instituted to save the still % S1$ x
    Mechanical Condfion, Licensed Owner ae a> eee eerie aoe | 4,1.00—Sn jlocal industry and the jobs of left “S —- vis vy
    leaving Island. . Analy” Jon, | Wise [ovo oe, be SEER RY GIVEN that_we |. sam Another reason for the pai » 300 pe Rie SALVATION %
    Jeaving island weit Goust, Phone e461, | te Undersigned Winston Orville Osea llifting is that the Soviet 5 jzome 300 person from th Through this medium ait elignta QTR %

    ‘ . Mas '%4-1.50,—5n. | Haynes and Winston Irvine Gufith} UNDER THE SILVER g is that the Soviet Zone nv Local producers are now in % ond frends are informed that BY Y M
    eee Pattners ot the Firm of Haynes & {has credit with West Germany ommunication with the Secre last & th loon has been removed to x x
    . ori 1, Solicitors, of No. 2 Sw ., nine c ; | “ ms 6 . *

    CARS | 1049 Morris @ cylinder, 3,000 | Cre ert Gove ‘Yoom" this aes HAMMER |_ The third reason, the American |iriat on the matter with a view shipment |X rye somes st as trom July 3 BIS MADE PLAIN” &
    pater ane a 1948 eee a > admitted Hugh O 1 Saint Clair Cum : ; ; ; f ; source said, is that the embar Ht » arriving at a formula which s Sau se fhe son eae inte x ¥ *
    10,006 miles sike new 949 Morris ‘. rela ” v inesday ith July ane if no pw ‘ ve eT - is Me ) een provided fo
    Oxford, 11,000 miles, 1947 Morris 10 H.P, | berbatch, ee a said Firm | concluded). Thursday 6th, we will sell by |4aS been ineffectiw because of! will give the industry a chance to GET ONE | K tomer h Bleyeles aa 2 % s
    Very good condition 1907 Morris SHE. oeden daa. 1h aes oo ‘ vs. J. A. Marshall, her furni- |i!legal steel shipments from West |: Lu'vive , TODAY 1% %1]% Free Book from S Roberis, %
    Jery good condition 938 auxha 2 tare orients ea Cover) rist Church Sarmes y 5 Sineiet 3 sa My 7" 1 y develop loci a ~ , « .

    1948 Singer Sports WINSTON © htt Germany to the Soviet Zone, Thi The industry developed ‘Yl pROM YOUR GAS SHOWROOM | 5: MANHATTAN X1% 30, Central Avenue, Bengor,

    All these cars are reasonably priced WHEBTON 1. °G _ | Dining Table, Up Chairs and Rock-|Source said supervision had been | “uring the war but recently im- BAY STREET ix i Cutting Bslonn % ss N. Ireland

    FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD., rn rs, Mor i 5). 2} inadequate.”—Reuter port licences for the importation ihe 1% ; 7 ois ; sai
    Telephone 4504 A ring Cus- | ‘ f the roods from India have SRR RRS, | ’er K. CLINTON OTs
    2.7.50,—3n h Berb ul Orna- | : ; ren : _ 2 +1
    ; Soe cilia been granted and the Indian 8 Att? A AGO Opt Ot that Me
    " 4 _ i Tabi Pedestal > pty AMM AMY Vette. Se * *

    CAR—(1) Renault 8 h.p. good tyre: OFFICIAL NOTICE Sideboard & Liquor | | underwear is expected to be sold SAVE TO-DAY = = <7 ea ene NS

    Phone REECE 4603 28.6 .50—3n c < iters Di > 2 a heaper
    : "| BARBADOS. in n Ten eru ections eee seni | PA
    — Serie se te oan ea Oe, In the Assistant Court of Appeal Service I Spo Forks, Cut Pepa eee A ON WELL-BOUGHT SSAGES TO IRELAND

    CAR—Vauxhall. Velox 18 h.p. Per (Equitable Jurisdiction) i ‘ sont tion, Pie r . |
    fect Condition two tone paint work] cyRiL BRUCE BROOKS—P r ar oR arhehdige sry tes, oy | W ‘re O 1 > ] | ‘ 5 P i
    geot Condition | ‘ued ‘for ne’ better | SYRIA BRUCE BROOKS —Piaintift! | y tures, tugs, nleuin, | Victrola’ and | ere rderly \|| THE BARBADOS AQUATIC FURNITURE aa Antilles Products Ltd., Roseou, Dominica, offer passages to
    carrying of more luggage. Ring R. S : Se. ee ees eae aed % CLUB ) 4 Jublin per M.V. “DUALA”, next sailing from Roseau about
    Nict 3925 Home 8324 Iron Betsteads, Springs and Beds, ‘Pine, | BUENOS AIRES ‘ Lk 20th June. s ' : \s a

    icholls Office 3925 Home a In pursuance of an Order in this Court] Cedar and Painted c Mahogany | Foll . } » July 3 rHE MONEY-SAVING WAY au eae and thereafter about every thirty-three days

    5 in the above action made on the ragit snd MT. ‘Washstands “ollowing political turmol! and i | J Single fare, £70, usue wht zain aie aa "
    : Vv BAGG cn Vashstan é Y and | Wi are, 70, usual reductions for children.
    a meee any e tain: whet ; 7 ne : care “i ne armed uprising in Arequipa last} RESTAURANT | pser-robes, & Lin \ Apply direct.
    nis ha y ate, right o 1 “ 31u tilliare able, Z 7 ‘ shows oO
    ELECTRICAL n any lien or incumbrance { te ';month national electiong in Peru! t to the regular en Fr in Mahogany, or m |
    BATTERIES: Ediswan 6 Volt, 13, 15 that certain piece or parce! o ; perfect tard let \ Cedar, Birch or Deal
    my: awe ’ ove * 5 cpr moe Se mews OL ce 1 Utensil sterday re .cc te] n-| Restau rrwice 2 she |
    17 and 19 Plate. Dial 3878. DaCosta @ | » at King George Road afore $f ‘ n eet ; oe : were completely jtr | ar Miaenbie Chvenitent. Lane! ! , Beds Morris |
    Co., Ltd., Electrical Departm | said parish of Saint Michael and] Fow) £ ron ypewritet j quil according to reports reaching 1, Tea, Dinner, atc orders $1.50 up—C aoe $3 |
    29.6.50—6n | urement ‘Iwenty one perch¢ one | Bicycle, Garde enches. Garden Hose|_/-Uenos Aires With de facto,! we taken. te Wedding | p—Venittes and Stools—Morris, on wy.
    Si aacitteaiah ls oi iEcncras hice tebinces 1 ome Of B Pen b ee 880 less | and other ite - : ay “| President-General Manuel O. Ria! nday, Cocktail and Supper Tub rt at Seen eee a ( OPENING :—
    te _ = ive of o perch a half of 1 Te *AsH | rvs ” — —_ arti etc ide the wp and ‘ Easy Chairs ining )} eocoanTre om ‘

    ELECTRIC —WATER HEATERS by contained in the Public Road ee noes Term CASH | Otria as the only candidate, result , eae bles, extension & ixed } SCOTCH ‘TAPE
    Santon in 3, 5, 12, 15, 30 and 40 gallon TROTMAN co : ion of t \ HAITI " tone
    sizes. DaCosta & Co., Ltd Electrical | Pereinats t : mentioned) butt ng and * oh ni eae of the voting were a foregone con | Top and other hy Re A t R LIPPING MACHINES

    4 2 ounding on la of one rettor e- ‘ ’ . . s A VTL Rack ‘oe Boxes r v oT : ¢
    Department. Dia) 3978 29.6.50—6n | ceased, on lands of Caroline Otley t 4 | 7.50.2n.|Ciusion, Some 90 per cent. of the MPS. GRACT Wt Mi | ok R loe Roxes, ond other t $i KAW BROOMS 3.and 4 STRAP
    “ELECTRICAL TOOLS by Black & lands of Mise Martin and on the Public] ————————— population went to the ; with | o | JOHNSON'S STATIONEKY & HARDWARE

    " 4 & slack oad all ing George vets | : . * ; . |
    Decker, _Drilis, Bench Grinders etc. | after ‘mentioned or however ele, the} UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER |®" estimated 70 per cent. in the ee hd ad inner iee $e 1 1 see, ‘i
    Dial 3878. DaCosta & Co., Ltd. Electrical | same may butt and boynd to bring before , |City of Lima voting for Obia ee eA I § WILSON CRESS COR PALS AMAA Deere
    Dept. 29.6.50—6n | me an account of their said claims with | , I hé SAL ORS 1 to sell a Ray’ | yehose political platform was open San | sie De | 8 ne en eee OEE LO LSS.
    SS —- Ii their witnesses, documents and vouchers, | DUT. ord’s ill, I Way 6th ee # n nN We for Reservatio u vider Set : 7

    ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES: New |to be examined by me on any Tues | July at 1 o'clock a quantity of house-/1ly anti-Communist and in favour piease dial 4461 ha Trafalgar St, os: Dial 4069 1s MAPS—Imperial and Political Wall Maps of the World
    ipment of Toasters, Hot Plates, Irons, | or Friday between the hours of r 1} Hold t hich inciudes; double}cr foreign capital investments in AT Eee ? \ !HERMOMETERS—2 kinds F :

    ic. Dial 3878. DaCosta & Co., Ltd and o'clock in the afternoon, | bedstead washstand, chiffon-|epn anuntre : : hy -iaciiiiiiaiie 2 ANERC SEES ,

    Electrical Dept Office of the Clerk of the Assists Court | ter, mal ned with cedar | the country.—Reuter. \ eS a ate ie 1% EROID BAROMET ER, etc
    29.6.50—6n | of Appeai at the Court House Bridget | & 5 irror, coal stove, | ee ———— a — a % w also
    | before the 12th day of July 1950, in order | galvanize ld kumber, and other ere é IRE TRAYS WIRE BASKETS
    ELECTRIC WASHER EATERS by | that such clans may be tanked scaord. | it a een | For domestic and light lubrication purposes you need a and many other Office Requisites. -
    Santon specially constructed for use us| ing to the nature and pvio eros | D'ARCY A, SCOTT. | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE i? ROBERTS . ‘ eens
    Shower Bath Patented Mixing Valve | tespectively; otherwise such persons w 1.7.50—4n j —” ee | (RTS & CO. — Dial 3301
    regulates temperature at will. DaC me on aa Red isn: < s ; 1 ear | The application of JANETITA HALI oo 1D i?
    ' ae ecree, and be deprived of all claim « z e Ae Rp! at JANE H n } i
    & Co., Ltd.’ Electrical Dept, Dial 3878. | CPC ainst the said property [UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER | fon0 granted “tc Bubs Stognes ine ree { PAPO LLE PLE LA GIGS
    Claimants are also notified that they | aaeeed ag? Bee ee theres rede ‘een | 7S SSE
    must attend the said Court on Wed t {CEES CF Sennen YE; grouse ro ‘ r Ge cants Ltd. |
    LIVESTOCK day the 12th day of July 1950, at 10] 4.004. non the spots on’ « storey board & galvanized build a product of Germ Lubric al |
    ,| o'clock a.m. when their said claims will | ¢, re 2 o'clock | ing Upper Roebuck St. St i . han-ot |

    MARE—half-bred mare by O-T C 15|/ be ranked vo 2 a Double} fer permission to use said license Obtainable at all branches | > i
    hands 3 years old. Suitable for ?larte- Given under my hand this 27th day of | '9°fed ! with gal-| * ¥ 0
    tion work or Polo. Dial #5264. E. H. | April, 1950. ; v} TLR vu



    Farmer, Andrews Pilant., St. Thomas
    4.7.50 in

    I. V. GILKES,
    Ag. Clerk of the Assistant







    12 on F
    : stulodane Ito HA eNTALMA a; my | CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

    Lane. ist a ection on | Police Magistrate, Dist A










































    /REAL ESTATE } M
    .



    ¥ la vera! eiria ic nats rtWOt he | ; i hi
    Ser ees a eee ete os | Se | Latest Styles in white, brown, black,
    A. BARNES & CO., LTD | afternoon on Friday the 14th duy of July | ! Bratt | red and muiti-eolour

    As the Manufacturers have decided that repairs to one of
    our Engines can no tonger be delayed, the Company has in











    24.5.50—t.f. | 1950 ; { Chureh w| BLAD
    ———— | All that certain piece or parcel of Jand Green. D F (



    ' Oe head As Maga Signed H, CAILLENDTR Pas ee
    IPP’ BULL & i. Terrier | 2.5.50---31 t 30.6.50-_4 for Applicant 4 > a SS thy CEE
    shines K. D OW Emsri. Harrisons | f bint | i ‘ ppiplication will ¢¢. #% ou Me LOOP PEPE PPE REO % ( RPC }
    Plin. St. Luc 4.7.00 UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMME ered ¢ Lice ing Court to be held | 2M % f i i °
    Re r UNDER THE DIAM R ‘olice Court, District A m 1% r ’ ’ , ze
    7 OFFICIAL SALE | any he ina ot Jul ia | MWiGH FASHION NEED |
    MECHANICAL | ciietea hesest | will on the Bee a *
    NG MACHINE—Butroug xt SARBADOF t e's F on Friday 7th J A. TALN 1% , ’ ’ ‘a @!
    ADDING MACHINE, Burrow retra | ARS Ae Auistant Const of Appeal. | st 2 clan” One "very" comtor Police Mixibirate ‘Di “ar. |B NOT HIGH PRICES! |
    Suitable for ships manifests or et | yess (Equitable Jurisdiction) |b eccntly repaired and painted 4.7.0—In. |
    large documents, H! JASON JONES Sidce GURTON sen ee oe | has Dra rooms, 2 Bed ED SHIPMENT |
    & Co. LTD Phone 4279 CLARENCE 5 NG—Detendant | + ienette, Water toilet j |
    4.7.50-—3n N ; J es a» | Bat right ao si JUST RECEIV }
    otice is hereby given that by virtue t wha ay. For) |
    of an Order of the Assistant Court af me ‘ ee TREY Be Beet | | -
    Appeal dated the 27th day of April 195 a 4 20.6.50 } L, A |
    MISCEL) ANEOUS 4 there will be set up for sale to t : | i ; | ealLi-os Soa i !
    NEEDLES for your ;ecord player . ire | @8t bidder at the Office of the |
    #1] kinds including Ruby and Sapphire | tne Assistant Court of Appe |



    SOS SOO OF OPE STEELE SO POF OOS









    NEW PLATTERS—Dinah Shore, Frank | situate at Kink George Ro nid mie’ 7 ¥ — , wr wen consequence had to t this Generating Set (90 .
    sinatra, Bing and all the res” Come |The said) part coast STYLED RIGHT-PRICED BIGHT Supt eek. on enerating ‘Set (900 KW.) out of
    end get, but quick island aforesaid containing by acne (A.F.S., F.V.A | co 1) to the reduction of standby Plant now
    " "A. BARNES & CO., LTD urement Twenty one perches and one half ‘ : a ct 9Q5 Seteti ale. ds in "tne % xt fe ee on ee
    24.8.60—t.f.n.| of a perch be the same m ( | EF ~ 3 ‘ $s 6 3 5 . ring the next 4ew months.
    ence | ciisive of one perch and of old W tp Ce ceian Ba Anil | rom odoeDeD o ode
    ORGAN-—One Cornish Organ in per-| perch contained - the Put a here- | Barros : t Por Successful | * ‘
    : Me ‘ » suitable | inafter mentioned) butting « iding me wn fect condition. Melodia sone suitable | on lands. of ‘one Bretton deceaved,. on | | LADIES MOCCASSINS in white and white & red $645 $1) utmost cconome in the rked, co-operate by exercising the
    Owner—W. McClean, Lower Reed St lands of Caroline Oxley, on lands of } AUCTION y tn the uce of Blectricity, particularly during

    ero an, | Martin and on the Public Road « the Peak period between 6.30 and 8.30 p.m. until further notice,

    King George Road hereinafter r
    PANTS—Pin Stripe Pants for men | OF however else the same may

    — ne . cs * * i
    reed TS nd made to order, $7.05| bound and if not then sold the said 5 ORIENTAL SALES



    V.



    ‘SMITH,







    SOLE LPCESESEES SE SSSO LE OOOOE

    . = > st erty will be set up for sale on e (SE HABLA ESPANOL f
    per pair, Stanway Store, Luc oe an. | ceeding Friday between the same CURIOS, IVORY. TEAK, SANDAL | i OTE
    2n- | until the same is sold for a sum not JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP- ‘Phone 4640 } 20th June, 1950.
    RETREAD tyres at special cash | ‘20 Sai tie ake ESTRIES, GLOVES, PERFUMES.
    - r Ss, ate s 27th day o pril, 19 es
    eee. Oe % ee ae ee a ae et I. V. GILKES . , > Plantations Building SHOE KERS T THE ORLD {
    $38.96; 34 x 7 at $46.90; 825 x 20 at eA KAS 5 MA O W.
    $482.5 each. Enquire Auto Tyre Com- Ag. Clerk of the ; i »% ERE
    pany, Trafalgar Street, Phone 2696








    21.6,50--t.4.n PEALE PPLE PLCS PPPS IS

    SE SS

    RE Ae ee

    ROWN A CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT BY BRINKING THE NEW CROWN GINGER ALE

    , ‘ f } i






























    PAGE EIGUT



    West Indies Playing
    Attractive Cricket

    “And Public Paying To Watch

    Jack Kidney,

    SOUTHAMPTON, July 3.

    West Indies team manager, was quite |
    mistic today about Clyde Walcott’s injury, sustained on |

    wpaturday,
    idney said Walcott had tried his favourite pull, missed the
    Ball, and the impetus of the body swing caused him to strain

    a muscle in the hip. Walcott visited a noted specialist in!

    London today, but Kidney sa

    cautional measure and he hoped the trouble would not be |

    |
    |

    serious.

    .

    “Channel |"

    Tunnel Will
    Some True

    : LONDON
    ‘NeW agitation is underway for
    fulfilment of the Anglo-French
    dream = which Napoleon first
    broached 150 years ago—a tunnel
    under the English Channel be-
    tween Britain and the Continent.

    The latest clamour follows the
    appointment of Christopher Shaw- |
    cross; K.C., former Socialist]
    M.P., as director of the Channel|
    Tunnel Company

    Forty-four year
    was, reticent in
    the significance
    ment. He merely
    .The Channel Tunnel
    to.come in time.” ,

    Many times in the past far-
    sighted supporters of the scheme
    on both sides of the Channel have
    Umsiccessfully tried to push
    through this vast and costly pro-
    ject. The channel at its narrow-
    est point is 21 miles.

    The farthest the scheme ever
    got was in 1876 when the British
    actually began construction on a
    1} mile tunnel at Dover. Work
    stopped six years later owing to

    o'd Shawcross
    speculating on
    of his appoint-
    commented:
    will have

    eden

    political and strategic considera-
    tions.
    Since then every few years

    plans for a channel tunnel have
    been revived, but to date nothing
    definite has matured

    One of the biggest clamours of
    all time was shortly after West-
    eth Union came into being. It
    Ws contended by eminent mili-
    tary experts that such a scheme
    would be of infinite value to Wes-
    tétn Union both economically and

    strategically.

    ("Estimates of the total cost ol
    this huge project range from
    $200,000,000, to $500,000,000 A
    silot tunnel would first have to
    % driven from Dover to Calais
    This would take five years to

    build and would cost $60,000,000
    “According to some pre-war plans
    the next step would be the con-
    struction of two electric railway
    tunnels 17 feet in diameter between

    0 and 200 feet below the chan-



    1 bed. This would cost about
    75,000,000.
    Economists claim that several

    million people would use the tun-
    nel every year and that annual
    profits would reach about
    Bled’ ths It was originally pro-
    losed that Britain and France
    Would share equally the cost of
    eénstruction and the profits

    '’The Channel Company has as~-
    sets of $60,000, according to the|
    ldtest published accounts. Issued
    ctipital of the company is $254,000

    “Biggest shareholder was the
    Southern Railway. Since nation-
    alization, those shares are held by
    the British Transport Commission

    INS.



    ‘Soccer Stars |

    “May Collect |
    £2,000 Each

    ENVIABLE JOB

    rar RIO De JANEIRO July 3

    Brazilian players are to receive
    £200 each for every match they
    play in the final pool of the
    World Cup—a total of £600 each.

    They are to get a further £500
    each if they win the Trophy.
    With other emoluments already
    received, each player may get
    something like £2,000 from the

    hampionships.

    In, addition, the city of Rio de
    Janeiro is now considering what
    awards should be made to the
    Brazilian team if they prove vic-
    torious. ’

    When business houses, firms and
    stares are likely to make
    handsome presents. Being a
    tional football player in Brazil is
    an enviable job

    t

    —Reuter.
    | They"! Deo It Every

    EN POP TOOK LI'L . {
    ICHABOD ON THE TOUR ~~ «

    THE SODA WATER

    KS,JUNIOR SPURNED
    THE FREE, COMPLI-
    MENTARY BOTTLE=+:






    [ Bur AT THE BALL GAME
    WHERE THE STUFF CosTsS A
    DIME PER EACH, HE DRINKS



    ENOUGH TO FLOAT BIG MO>>>

    them|the word
    na-| has

    UV

    id the examination was a pre- |

    The West Indies are having a
    ancially successful tour, Kid-
    ney said. The response of the
    public to the attractive cricket
    they try to play has been fine
    and the expenses for the tour
    have almost been covered

    A share of another big gate has
    been missed today owing to rain,
    but if the pitch, which was almost
    waterlogged up to late this after-
    noon, dries out, Sonny Ramadhin
    should have a successful day to-

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    — a
    Eo





    morrow.

    Yesterday the tourists
    enjoyable day at Ventnor
    Wight.—Reuter.

    Tossed Into
    Tiber At
    19 Months

    LONDON

    Two Americans indicated their

    had an
    Isle of



    desire today for a chance at the
    ferme and fortune which lies at
    the end of a swim across the

    Fuglish Channel

    One of them, David Frank, 27,
    of 20 East 55th Street, New York,
    said he has had the swimming
    urge from the tender age of 19
    months, when his father tossed
    him into the Tiber river in Rome

    with g rope around his waist—
    to test his swimming prowess

    The London Daily Mail said
    that Frank and Steve Wozniak, of
    i99 Townsend Street, Buffalo,
    N.Y., are the only two Americans
    who have submitted entries thus
    far for the newspaper's free-for-

    !! cross-channel race held

    late August

    lo be

    First Man $2,800
    The Daily Mail is offering $2,800
    for the first man to swim the
    channel, $2,800 for the first woman
    $700 for every other person who
    completes the rugged course dur-
    ing the race

    Swimmers from around — the
    world have applied to the Daily
    Mai} for a spot in the race. In
    addition, dozens of other persons
    have annoanced their intention
    to pit their skill and physique
    against the 21 miles of rough
    cold water in private attempts.

    Shirly May France, wwe 17-yvear-
    old Somerset, Mass., schoolgirl who
    failed in her cross-channel try
    lust year after two months of
    rigorous training, is due to try
    again this year The Mercer
    family of Fall River, Mass., father
    John and his brood of six mer
    men and mermaids, also have
    announced they wiil be coming
    ove.

    Seaman

    Frank said that he was born in
    Rome and went to the United
    States in 1940. He said in his
    application to the Daily Mail that
    he spent three years in the U. S
    submarine service and after the
    war was a merchant seaman

    He added that he had been, ™€m were at Lord's this week to

    ‘lecorated for helpine to



    HEAD WORKER, the nine-year-old stallion bought by Skipper Joh
    at. Bridgetown after idir este fro the SS. Lord Churcl
    a number of races in Er et known if he will b

    before retiring to the stud

    Rockley Golf Club
    Plans Gala Day

    bye °
    Circus, Gymkhana, Carnival
    Something resembling a combined circus, gymkhana, car-
    nival, and burlesque show is in the planning stage at the
    Rockley Golf and Country Club, where a field day will pre-
    cede the presentation of prizes cn August 5
    Under a sub-committee consisting of Dr, Dean Klevan,
    William Atkinson and Don Clairmonte a programme is
    being arranged that promises to brighten the occasion for
    competitors and spectators alike
    — — —e Under consideration are a long-
    \ driving contest that will spray the

    £ 4 |bushes with golf balls, a pitching
    amaicans jand putting test that will fray the











    iT



    |
    n Goddard gets his first look
    Head Worker is a winner of
    e racing in the West Indies

    TUESDAY, JULY 4,

    Rain Washed Out
    Wimbledon Games

    WIMBLEDON, July 3

    most of the afternoon prevented a

    Rain all morning and




    ait

    Te



    championships today. But the decision to end play

    fell may have saved the two top seeded players in the











    Men’s Singles—Frank Sedgman, Australia, and Billy Tal-
    bert, United States.
    After losing the fir@ set to
    ert va trailing Budge \ albert. Patty found some brilliant
    > , (United States) 6—3, 4—6,| strokes to take the lead as Talbert
    2—5 on Cour! Number One, and } jot iltogether ¢ t
    Sedgman was behind Art Larsen | creas
    United States) on the centre| ~ phous: of te f 1
    Court when the tournament referee | i
    ordered play to cease for the ro-li i
    day |
    Both Sedgman and Larser ip- |
    pealed, hampered by the murky} had st
    light and by the slippery surface, the covere
    Sedgman discarding his shoes in|; leading t

    the second set atching the







    EEA PPE FEA EE PFE IES

    “e



    Hodgson
    Cup Races
    In B.G.

    (From Our Own Correspondent)



    GEORGETOWN,
    A large crowd of rowing
    lined the East Bank of
    Demerara River on Thursday |

    afternoon and cheered lustily



    Desmond Andrade’s crew won tne
    Hodgson Cup a clear three lengths |

    ahead from A, Gomes’ crew
    The Hodgson Cup, presented by

    Sir Frederick Hodgson, K.C.M.G

    a former Governor of the Colony

    way, back in 1905, is competed tor

    every year by crews drawn fror

    \

    BARGAINS

    eget tO Ot LEO HF

    petit nae Oe
    P56 OFOOOSF PFS AP PITT OE

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    ij



    le match being completed in the Wimbledom Lawn |

    after,about an hour in poor light, and when further rain|

    ix | $ JOAN CAULFIELD

    1950





    REMEMBER..
    DEAR RUTH
    NOW IT'S
    DEAR WIFE

    COMING ATTHE;

    EMPIRE

    cmon ty,
    Paramount presen 4y
    WILLIAM HOLDEN Z




    q,

    4

    BILLY DE WOLFE
    MONA FREEMAN
    y EDWARD ARNOLD y



    3



    MEIRESs”

    EMPIRE ° sow suowie



    DearWife!





    Both men were miscalculating
    the bounce of the damp balls as! Por the rst ti 3 ye | ’
    Larsen ran ahead 3 he famous tournament tradi-| | FOR THE How. OF YouRUFE, i
    ‘ tional fine weather had deserted | SAW Aww
    Sedgman recovered to draw | ;; peuter. i Seanad _——
    level 4 all, and he again levelled |
    hen Larsen had beaten through GRE Au $s e™ &» sMOLIO™ Pare a Ghate
    n the fifteenth game to lead 8—‘, |
    but another break through by the
    American led to his taking the }
    et ‘
    X66666464646565%-" 4 44 6 fe



    staris



    |
    »
    members of the Demerara Rowing x
    a | stoutest nerves and_ possibly a} Club, % If you are a lady |
    Practise nine-hole competition with each Andrade’s crew rowing the x
    : player allowed only one club of | “Seaford” named after Sir x | ; |
    : | x
    e his choice However, the sub-); Frederick Seaford, C.B.E., was sent %& HAVE YOU ° f you are looking for shoes!
    } comur > may scard all these] off to qn even start with Gomes |¢@ ~
    1s ey | en may discard a ‘ oO Oo ne Bh @ $ % if h d f
    . | possibilities in favour of more|crew in the “Humphrey”, name: s ou want them n |
    | icetious, farcical and frustrating’ |after Mr. R. G. Humphrey. i VISITED % Y stro g and comty:
    (From Our Own Correspondent events before the final programme . %
    LONDON, June 28 is completed. “Seaford” I ¥% Then
    Mr. G. E. Waddingtoi., captain | Tronhies : $
    of the Jamaica Rifle Team drophies The “Seaford” on the inside, } x b
    Bisley, told me today that he anid 'hose who are left standing at|powed the faster stroke while the iss x the answer is
    his team are getting down to some| the end of the day’s events will |“Humphrey” held them nicely on | % ,

    receive the trophies they have won
    through the 1949-50 season, if any,
    and these presentations will be}
    followed by the usual rounds at
    the well-known nineteenth hole

    In order that the field day and
    presentation of prizes would tak2
    place after the final tournament of
    the season, the Mixed Foursomes,

    | serious practice at the rangé We
    like the conditions here’ he sai

    |“the light is far more subdue

    and so better for shooting than ir
    Jamaica.” “What we do not like
    are the showers of rain that al-
    ways descend on us when we gz

    out to practise.”

    The Jamaicans have now been] last event on the current schedule,
    joined in the long camp room| has been moved fowward one
    where they live by the teams from} month and will start on July 15,
    Trinidad and British Guiana.| entries closing on Thursday July

    These two teams arrived this we
    via Marseilles,

    13 at which time the draw will be
    made. This competition will com-





    | plete the events now scheduled |
    Wearing a blue blazer with the|/and the fixtures for the 1950-51 |

    neat crest of the B. W. I. Riffe] s on will be arranged by the/

    Association on it—crossed rifles in] Tournament Committee elected in

    gold—Inspector Lloyd, Trinidad September at the General Meet-|

    Armourer, told me they had ing. |

    lovely trip over, “No trouble at

    the Customs—I suppose they saw Challenge Ladder

    all our guns, we have brough

    about twenty. Actually we have However, the Challenge Ladder

    recently presented to the Club by
    a group of the members, will keep
    the ball rolling steadily over the
    increasingly green fairways be-
    tween competitive campaigns, The
    Ladder has produced more interest
    watch the Second Test, and they|#nd excitement than anything at

    not had time to unpack them yet,
    but when we do we shall get them
    tested for accuracy right away.”

    Mafy of the West Indian Marks-



    : slower stroke. At the *%, mi

    mark, the “Seaford” leading by

    finishing line.

    Following were the teams: —
    The “Staford” — D. Andrace
    (stroke), M. Jardim (3), T. Rhodes

    (2), J. Caldeira (Bow)’ and H.C
    3arclay (Cox).

    The “Humphrey” A
    (Stroke), D. Morrison

    Gomes

    N. Rhodes (Cox).

    »









    A REMINDER
    NOT the Battle of Dunkirk,
    NOT Alf Valentine at Old Trafford
    NOT Sonny Ramadhin at Lord's
    LUT reminding you of

    Mr. HAROLD HARDING'S

    DANCE

    AT THE CHILDREN’S GOODWILL



    save > . ar
    drowning sailor during his ries tell me they are thinking of rent-|the Rockley Club since Colin
    service. ing a television set so that they| Bayley got a hole in one.
    Wozniak said in his ¢ licati can watch some of the rrer The blind draw created a
    that he is 34 years la eaes dee Bridge Test. hilarious shuffling of high and
    @ number of marathon swimming —L.E.S, oF pa eeD: pay sts Witt the
    championships. Among them he evelly ni challenges vrenet Ske)
    included a ten-mile world’s swim- ike” ae pee ke iy ee pes
    ming championship in Toronto. 1 Ties Ene Gah tiie Teena rece
    He said he also has won Ameri. Clerical Cricket was dry on the lettered name-
    can long-distance swims plates. The fact that the matches
    j —1 NS BRISTOL, England ‘are to be played over 18 holes
    neath aN.e The Rev. F. Kennedy did not] medal play brought forth delighted |
    ” keep his appointment with the] grins to the vast majority of the
    ” tis 3 F , mber
    ; 1 Bishop of Bath and Wells, members
    Itches Salon tasehate Pl

    RIO DE JANEIRO
    Members of the soccer football
    squad from Yugoslavia, in Brazil
    for the world championships, are

    As the time of his interview! coasting under excessive handi-
    drew near he had scored 41 runs} caps, protect their advantage by
    for the Somerset clergy in their! studiedly sticking to match play
    cricket match against Bristol] events and fail to turn in volun-

    who, no doubt, had in
    !mind the few mug hunters who,



    | ar Stu ir:

    fondly known to the Brazilians clergy oe SN Cee Seow Reka ee oe coe
    as the “Itches.” The Bishop of Bristol, Dr. F. A. Bae nib, withdraw from the

    The reason for this is obvious] Cockin, was luckily watching the I sadar challenges who does not
    —nearly every Yugoslav name] match and when he heard of Rev.| Want to compete. So far there
    ends in “ich” or “itch” Kennedy’s problem he telephoned | , ides been none, however

    a the Bishop of Bath and Wells and ,

    The Brazilian press, which al-]asked that the appointment be tare
    ways has a lot of trouble with] cancelled.

    “Yugoslavia” anyway,
    adopted the abbreviation as a

    ae eels ale Their Cook

    and



    Ken
    ‘|

    imple headline expedient, such|nedy went on to score 54 ru
    “Itehes Tre -day” : g » team to win b
    Itehe rain to-d Pra ee ee team t n by Gave Them
    aa ree “ | Victory
    PA1T9e ——sreont ss sae ome By Jimmy Halo |











    4 WA
    | ER

    }









    rc >
    Race

    H -

    | |
    [ L00K, ITCHYTHE MAN Y 7 |

    GO ON TAKE IT! 7—

    a




    . cA : TA, | 4 —~
    WHAT DO YOU DO bt es ;
    (* TH IT, KID sss JUST ONE MORE, DAD- front pages as newspapers

    MADRID, July 3

    footballers who on
    knocked England out of
    the Worid Cup kicked their way to}
    } | victory on acclimatised stomachs
    | and with a cook

    Spanish
    Sunday





    NTS TO GIVE YOU A >)
    ESH BOTTLE OF Pop.) —

    NO!





    who knew

    os an

    vs ol <= DON'T } them, soccer sources thought here
    os WANT \{ | tonight
    hs NONE! hey listed these two factors as
    =, <4, ; contributory causes to the Spanish
    4 2) } 1—0 victory at Rio De Janeiro

    (1) Spain’s foresight in giving
    he selected players two weeks’
    rest and light training in a moun-
    tain hotel near Madrid
    (2) Sending a cook
    team to give

    cn y
    Mag) 3.

    to Brazil
    them the






    the
    they
    Spanish

    i. food used to
    victory

    Korean

    nae were
    tonight
    aside on
    , which
    ron Sunday evenings
    mornings in Spain,
    with comment on the

    the war




    A x TT MUST BE THE ++ io not appes
    st) Monday
    fn ht up

    chivalrous-
    repects to
    the maestros

    formaciones said
    ly “We pay our best
    he defeated English,
    f football”
    I said peevishly

    “Spain is;





    celebr victory because the}
    inve of football ave been!
    vehaving impe and in-!
    discredibly”
    Alcazar said “English football |
    P c jis adrift’. }
    2 Ra Ze “ —Reuter.

    LEAGUE
    On SATURDAY, 8th JULY, 1950
    ADMISSION 2/-
    Music by Mr. Percy Green's Ork

    REFRESHMENTS BAR



    and

    L











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    ’ ~lY ?
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    narrow margin, was rowing at 248 x

    strokes to the minute while their ]%&

    (8), FE.
    King (2), M. Marshall (Bow), an 1



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