Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
Wednesday
21

June

1950



KRarbados







Price

FIVE CEATS
“a5

F

Year

W.l. BEAT NOTTS BY INNINGS

' Worrell Takes 5 Wickets

Speaker Allows First! SENANAN

Reading Of Gas Bill | sz

No Rule Forbids Two Bills
On Same Subject

R. E. K. WALCOTT, (E
day to introduce a Bill
1911 (1911-9). His Honour
the effect after Mr. Adams
House had asked for a rulin

be introduced since Government had already given o.:c
of a Bill to amend the said Act since April 25, this vr.

es —+!

WILL NOT

STILL URGING W.I.
FARLIAMENT GROUP

E BUTLER

(From Our Own Correspondent:

LONDON, June 20.
’ Mr. M. G. Sinanan, Legal Ad-
) was given permission yester-| viser to the Butler party, has
to amend the Gas Works Aci a aoa ee tne ages ose
+ . . . : Vv withou seeing
the Speaker gave a ruling (| Uriah Butler. He will leave Eng-

at a previous meeting ef thi |jand to-morrow.

g as to whether the bill sheou'ce In New York Mr. Sinanan will
visit United Nations
ters at Lake Success to study the
working of the Assembly.

His Honour gave the following

headquar- |

| Pollen — He told our correspondent to-

° As regards the seeking ot|/@ay that Mr. Krishna Menon,

Providence | the Speaker's ruling by the Mans Indian High Commissioner in

| ourable Senior Member for St een had See for him

. | Joseph relative to allowing mv-|to be sponsored by the Permanent!

Favours Priest |tion to introduce an amendment] Indian Representative at Lake
| of the Gas Works Act 1911 (1911-| Success.

GEORGETOWN 9), on the grounds that the] During the last couple of days

Phirty-s e v e n«y 6 a reold Government had earlier in this} 1m England, Mr. Sinanan has

Hindit Priest R. Sukul of session given notice of a Bill to] continued work on the formation

tepnora, West. Demerara, jamend the said Act, I have after of a West Indies Parliamentary

holds the ticket that won the careful consideration and much] Group, and has had meeting with

first prize in the Demerara
Turf Club’s May Shilling
Sweep. Two horses tied for
first place—“Tuckers Kitty”
and “Pensive’’—each ticket |
holder receiving $4,131. Pan-
dit Sukul said he bought 75
books of tickets in the |
Sweep. He will also receive

the seller’s prize of $80.14.







Judy Garland |
Cuts Throat

HOLLYWOOD, June 20.

Judy Garland 27-year-old film
star, cut her throat in a fit of an-
guish, her studio stated to-day.
The wound was not serious it add-
ed. This report was denied by
her husband, Mr. Vincent Minelh, |
A Hollywood director, ‘‘There is no
truth whatever in the report”
Mr. Minelli said. “The poor girl
is very much upset, but this —
oh no.” The actress was suspend-
ed by Metro Goldwyn Mayer
studios on Saturday for failing to
report for work on the film “Sum-
mer Stock” which she is making
with Fred Astaire — the second
time in just over a year that such
action was taken against her for
staying away from the set. Minelli
said to-day that his wife was rest-
ing and could not be disturbed.
Two Los Angeles afternoon news-
papers published reports concern-
ing Miss Garland to-day. One said
that Minel!i intervened and took
a knife away before she could
hurt herself

—RKeuter.



Floods Destroy

Citrus Nurseries
In B. Honduras

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

BELIZE, June 20
Colonial Secretary Evelyn Hone
late yesterday rushed to Stann-

citrus centre of the
colony, where a flood caused by
heavy rains destroyed the citrus
nurseries of the British Honduras
Citrus Co. and washed away the
approaches to a bridge.

Creek Valley,





Belgium’s New Parliament

Meets: First

First Item—To Bring Back King Leopold

FOR THE first time in three months the Belgian Parlia-
ment met to-day and began what may well be the most

historic parliament session i
For the first time since

under a one-party Government, a Catholic one.

‘LEOPOLD GOES |
TO GENEVA

To Await Fate

ROME, June 20.
King Leopold, of the Belgians
with his wife, Princess de Rethy

left Rome for Florence and
Geneva today by car after a 1/-
day Holy Year pilgrimage. The

King was reported to be returning
to Geneva to await the outcome
ef the debate in the new Belgian
Parliament on the question of his
return to the Throne

—Reuter

Atom Security
Talks In U.S.

WASHINGTON,
The United States, Britain ar
Canada are discussin? ways
tighten security on atomie secre
the Atomic Energy Commissio
disclosed to-day It did not si
when the discussion began

June 20










The meeting is being heid unde:
the auspices of t Combined
Policy (ommittee, the orgenisa-
tion responsible directin
Anglo-4 mevican Canadian police
in the atomic eners jeld. Poli
cies affecting ecl cation
of informatic I dis-
cussed at the meeting.

-—Reuter.

‘in the parliamentary

} customs of this ancient House of

| sion

Dr. Hyacinth Morgan, M.P. and
Mr. Bird, Mr. Bradshaw and Dr
Cummins of the West Indies
sugar delegation, all of whom
have expressed their approval of
the scheme.

Acheson on Asks |
Support Fi or |
Truman Plan

VIRGINIA, June 20.

study, come to the decision of per-
mitting the honourable introducer
of this amendment to proceed wit!
his first reading of the Bill
Because from all my researer
usaces and
procedure of the British House of
Commons and it’s the rules and



Assembly, I see no reason for not
allowing the hon, senior member
for St. James to proceed with 4
first reading.

Indeed to quote from Sir Ers-
kine May’s “Treaties, Law.. Priv-
ileges Proceedings and Usages of
Parliament (Page 387) I read

J “ne » Mr. Dean Acheson, United
No Rule Or Custom States Secretary of State, to-day

“There is no rule or custom
which restrains the introduc-
tion of two or more Bills rela-
ting to the same subject, and
containing similar provisions.”

appealed to the 48 state Govern-
ors to support President Truman’s
Point Four Programme for aiding
under-developed countries. He told
the Governors the Administration

So honourable members will ‘

, > Oo x-
see that the amendment that is might ees ak fae wna
being introduced is quite in order] Perienced state ollicials 3
as far as the prevailing partic- programme, It may cause incon-

venience to part with these men
for a period” he said, “but we
believe that once the citizens of
your state understand how this
work contributes to our own peace
and well-being, they will be will
ing to accept the inconvenience.

Understandjpg and support from
the Governo was particularly
important to the Point Four Plan’s
success,

The Governors are holding their
Annual Conference at White Sul-
phur Springs. Mr. Acheson’s ap-

eal followed a message similar in
theme from President Truman
yesterday. a the President told ~
Governors they must take the leo

in stimulating the interest of
Americans in foreign policy and
the question of preserving world

mentary custom admits

The placing of a notice on the
Order Paper is just a notice and
in my view cannot, and should
not, take precedence over any
Bill that has been offered to this
House whether or not the notice
refers to the amending of one or
all of the provisions of a similar
Bill.

It might indeed prove a very
seridus thing if a notice on the
Order Paper precluded the in-
troduction of legislation simi-
lar to that involved in the
notice. The admission of such
a principle in procedure would
easily allow of the Government
or a private member, or pri-
vate interests through a _ pri-
vate member or members fore-



stalling very necessary ‘ and | peace. —Reuter.
valuable legislation.
I now declare that the intro-

duction of the Bill to amend the
Gas Works Act 1911 (1911-9) is
in order and do now give permis-
for its first reading.

Parliamentary
Group Resigns

CAIRO, June 20.

The Egyptian Saadist Parlia-
mentary group resigned en bloc
to-day in protest against recent
Royal Deerees under which many
former Senators, including Ibra-
him Abdel Hady Pasha, Saadist
Leader, had been deprived of their
seats. Liberal Constitutionalists
are also considering such actions
following the replacement of Lib-
eral Leader Hussein Heykal
Pasha by Wafdst Zaky El Orabi
Pasha as President of the Upper
House.

Heykal Pasha’s term of office
was not due to expire till next
year. His Liberal Constitutional
Party is the largest Party in the
Senate, where the last elections
were in 1946, so that it was not
affected by Januarw~s Wafdst
landslide in the elections to the
Chamber,—Reuter



HUTSON GETS LEAVE

Hon'ble F. C, Hutson has
been granted five months’
leave from his duties as a
member of the Legislative
Council, the Council was told
in a letter from the Acting
Colonial Secretary which the
Clerk read at yesterday's
meeting. The leave takes ef-
fect as from to-day.

In 3 Months





BRUSSELS, June 20,
Indian Forces Clash
On Pakistan Border

PAKISTAN, June 20;
Armed Forces of Pakistan and
administrative character. Afghanistan clashed on the bor-
Real business will begin on] der between the two countries
| June 27 or 28 when both Houses} with casualties on both sides, on
will meet separately to vote on! June 17, according to unconfirmed
the new Government’s declara-jreports reaching here to-day.
tion of policy. Afghan levies and a party of a

First item on the Government's! Pakistan border patrol unit ex-
programme will be to call a joint) changed fire on Pakistan territory
session of Parliament to repeal] near Gwaza, Baluchistan, where,
\the Regency Law barring exiled} according to the reports, the
King Leopold from the throne.| Afghans had set up a guard post.

This will probably take place —Reuter
early in July.

In the Chamber of Deputies, the
pro-Leopold Catholics with 10%
seats hold a majority of four
Socialists hold seats—11 more
than in the last House.

Liberals hold 20—a loss of 9-

n the nation’s history
1914 Parliamegt was meeting

To-day’s meeting was of a pure



ly



Malan Escapes

CAPETOWN, June 20,
Firemen helped South African
and Communist 7—a loss of 5. Prime Minister Dr Daniel Malan

Compared to the old House, the| and his adopted daughter Marietje
Catholics seats total a gain of 8,| to safety from an outside balcony
They ure certain also to. hold a| When fire broke out in the Prime
ajority in the completed Senate, | Minister’s residence here early

; —Reuter | to-day. Mrs. Malan escaped from
the smoke filled house unassisted
The fire, which broke out in one
of the bedrooms, did only slight
damage to furniture before it was
extinguished by the fire brigade.
Dr. Malan attended his normal
|; Government duties to-day.
—Reuter.

RETURN FORESTS

BUDAPEST, June 20
Russia has given back to Hun-
gary, forests owned by Germans
in Hungary up to the end of the
war, which became Soviet pro-
perty under the peace treaty, the
Hungarian news agency reported.

—Reuter.

a



To Represent
Jamaica

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
KINGSTON, June 20.

Major F. J. Quinton, Director}
of Survey in Jamaica, will repre-
sent the colony at the Inter-
American Congress of Survey and}
Mapping which will be held at]
Washington tomorrow and = con-
tinuing until Friday. At this meet-
ing the latest development will be}
tudied. The South and Central

; American Republic and other W.I
islands will also be represented.





ea a al cen c lgnicadlse eaemeeeeensinae

ee





ey |

BRITISH SHIP
EXPLODES OFF
ARABIAN COAST

CAIRO, June 20

| Rescue’ ships sweeping th
| Waters of the Red Sea with their

searchlights have picked up |
|number of survivors from the|
| British ship Indian Enterpriso|
| (7419 tons) with 50 men aboard,|
| which exploded off the Arabian
| Coast. Some survivors were bad-|
ly burned A series of radio}
messages intercepted by the Port|
|Administration of Alexandria
| told a story of drama which took













W.1. dor 5 wkts. dee.) 525
Notts 240 and 224

NOTTINGHAM, June 2y.

‘THE FINAL DAY'S PLAY of the match here

in which the West Indies beat Nottingham-

shire by an innings and 61 runs was distinguished

by two individual performances, one for each side,

Reg Simpson, who will be playing for England

in the second Test match which starts at Lords on

Saturday, batted for the four hours and forty min-

utes which the Notts second innings lasted, and

made 109, including fourteen fours, out of a total
of 224.

For the West



ince. in) Wands ‘ M ; —-w Indies, Frank
| 2» darkness after the In Worrell, with his slow left arm
dian Enterprise exploded be- Hvevins :
tween Kosseir on the Egyptian deliveries, kept one end going foi
Coast and Wejk on the Snudi three hours, twenty minutes
Arabian Coast. The atekriae sae and finished with the excellent
Hoube: for Calcutta figures of gay oo overs, twenty
The .Etitish steamer. take one maidens, fifty-seven runs,
| Chilliwack of Vancouver, Canada ok aCHatS, , aich ewe 5 eblade vi
| had earlier reported that etre . ‘ , ; eg SHENG: BAA ee
} going to the scene ini i a Pere ;
{ail ships im the vicinity ee; A Or iP t the Note bat-
a sharp lookout for survivors Vise ee f & eee 7 was
The latest radio messant ee y a Jor re taf with 35
|the Lake Chilliwack said v next t orer. This wa
vivors alive but some burned ot careers Hath: -centiry of Wie
hands and back and screamin T) la \ ickets fell whil
Pn a the SOS other $ runs were being sdded aA
ship the Lefae eut ful "ee at amas
atenrn and raced to the scene o ae e AG, - wag ee
the explosion ; a secant : .
Sha wedicads evn Fai Simpson batted steadily but sel-
nae dame as have picked uy dom attempted a forcing stroke
thorot m wt Am searching area He often gave the impression
: bi sane or} on P no fur- that he was more intent on bat-
4 ae : eS me north.” TY os roceeding ting practice in view of Saturday’
TENNIS TEMPTRESS” for Wimbledon: ‘Gorgeous Gussy’ ; le ship was carrying test. The touring team were with-
Moran, who has just arrived in London to take part in the Wim- a general cargo including 580 out their captain, John Goddard
bledon championships, tries outathe new outfit specially designed tons of explosives from Britain] ts. ho did not field today because
for her by Pierre Balmain on the roof of her London hotel. The for the Indian Government of a damaged finger received
chiffon dress has 240 pleats and is worn over a pair of pleated The Indian Enterprise's siste FRANK WORRELL when flelding i drive from Fred
bloomers made of dowwble chiffon. “I prefer them. to the lace- ship, Indian Exw®rter — searchec : aie | Stocks, the previous day ;
edged panties, which caused such a stir last year,” said Gussy. the area from midnight to seven Though the injury is ‘sore, it i
r ay x hee tT, one + stint 5. aa . bs ‘ ‘ , ’ -
The name of the model “Tennis Temptress Express eee and reported that |, ot expected that it will keep him
é orough examination of the w Y it of the Ss * , t
ees Saturday's test at
Sch Defends F 9 [Wreckage showed no other survi.| Jel Fighter Ends |*"",;
vors | ;
c u n e en Ss rance Ss : at sg? yr? / On a pitch whieh howed no
ma By late atte rnoon no news had Initial Trials i signs of wear Sim, and Farris
I x©€en received in London from the ithe not out ba found little
Haste n oa = tee oo nee of the Lake Chilliwack LONDON, vu ne 20 to worry them in the bowling thi
: Am ty of the Indien Britait latest j fi the norning and the Nottinghamshire
e e wnterprise. It was learned that] Hawker P-1u081, ha sucet fully | ; ; " 5
: shi ' Ae é " Pen opening pair looked so confident
At Six-Nation Congress the ship carried 73. office and| completed its initial trials a| that ane as a surprise when
crew, and not 50 as previously| spokesman of the Hawker Com- | they were separated Even then
believed pany said here tonight The air :

Pre-Birth Criticisms Blunt

Best Schemes

PARIS, June 20,

M. ROBERT SCHUMAN, French Foreign Minister,
defended the policy of haste on his coal-steel pool plan
when the six-nation comference on the plan opened here
to-day.

“Six weeks have passed since in this very room (the
clock room of the Quai D’Orsay) filled with historie
memories, the French Government made known its plan,’
he said.

——*)

sae “Six weeks is rather a brief
| porine for such a new and vast
topic as the pooling of the coal
and steel production of our six
countries, very brief indeed when
you think of the usual calmness
international negotiations.
.“France has been reproach-
ed for this rush; it was de-



SPORTS
WINDOW



Two basket-ball games will be .

played at the Y.M.C.A. to-night seribed as a fast and brutal
Police vs. Fortress at 7.30 p.m tactic: but it is exactly the
Y.M.C.A vs Y.M.P.C. at

experience which

that the best initiatives are

blunted when, before birth,

they are held up in prelimin-

ary consultations.

“In a world anguished by so
many failures, I believe we have
the right, even the duty, to count

showed

pn

|
|
|
8.30 |

Stalin On
Grammar





on the strength of one idea and
DNDON. J a the profit from the impulse born
LO , June 2 from the hope aroused by it, and
Marshal Stalin, in a 10,000 word by its instinctive support on the
article published in today’s Prav- part of our populations
da, denounced the “onbelievable Here we ure now at work. It
qontusion ih matter ee ramon is up to you gentlemen, to whom
7 six governments have confided
sible circles of Soviet philologists| thi. task to justify this hope
eae a. ta Ath s tas stify ‘ ;
and aia according to Mo “The principles which have
He sharply criticised the con- determined the choice of our

objectives and which consti-

o > 1 of the lat
duct of the disciples of the late tute the basis of our deliber-

Soviet Academican Professor Marr
who, he said, had formed a closed ations must be expressed in
group of their own and had per- ‘subtle and clear terms with
secuted any one who dared to a view to preparing precise
criticise their theories or ult ertakings.
pose them “We are agreed among our-
The article was in the form of selves. on. the. direction in
question and answer and dealt which our labours are to be

with a controversy current ir turned, and on the target we
Russia on the extent to which a wish to attain.

national language should be modi- byt Our Governments have
fied or re-cast to meet a mew Way] search in common,

of life. confrontation of our

Stalin was emphatic that, views and situations, for the best
the super-structure of a language} way of applying the _ principles
automatically became adapted ¢3] we have accepted, by the creation
changing needs and «qgnditions, aj of new institutions
language could not be substantial-}cedent in the world
ly eradicated without s\rious dis-| Schuman said.

ruption to national life. G Tast
reat Task
“Any attempt to destroy the old | ‘It is a great task which we

language and create a new one is) pave been given by our Govern-

bound to introduce anarchy and | mefits. but we undertake it with

the danger of the disintegration of | ovidh ad ii " , aii of
} ps sonsciousness of re-

society | pitts ac
“Certain comrades think that | ‘P@Sibilities. We feel that we are
soon separate grammars belonging | ''0t allowed.to fail nor to give up
to vurious* classes will put in an} Wi!hout’conclusion
“Our conclusions, as you know,

appearance
“Such ere will be submitted to the apprecia~

to op-



individual
while

without
to-day.”

pre-
M






immars do not exist in

nature but this does not deter|tion of the ‘Governments and to

these comrades. They think such| the sovereign decision of our
grammars will appear and that's) Parliaments.” +

that.” M. Schuman continued: “we

—Reuter. | shall have to establish a draft

|treaty which will define the

| broad lines of the attributions ol
a common authority, its function-

Communists Disband -



| ing, the methods of appealing
i | against its decisions and of settin
In South Africa in motion responsibilities. .
CAPETOWN, June 20, We shall have to envisage,
South Africa's Communist; “ithout however inseribing them
Party disbanded to-day as the|in the treaty, the technical de-|
House of Assembly was ygiving| tails which will be inscribed in
its approval to a Bill to outlaw} Cor ventions to be concluded later,
the party and all Communist ac-| once the treaty has been ratified
tivities. The House gave the Will Not Overlook
measure, officially the os A arose Our initiative in no way in-
of Communism Bill, a third reac eine nds to ignore or overlook the
ing without a division and “mpts being made elsewhere
it to the senate —Reuter | @ on page ¢

reports said 15 were los
Another report s¢ » G
ship Santos was also mined ¢
the same time at the same place
ve agreea | but this report was not confirnied
by a free Although flying the Panamanian

an @arthquake in
Dutch Indonesian
(Aneta) reported.

—Reuter

Plane Missing On
Jamaica-Venezuela |;

Trip: 15 Aboard



raft,
on
P-1052, was in the bir
siderable
flying at
nachine,

jlo be capable

it was a bad mistake in going for
a quick single which led to Harris
being run out with the total at
70, He batted one hundred minutes

for 21.

said to be an tmprovement
supersonic aircraft the
for a eon-
during its trials,
various heights. The

with

the

time

showed hi

ary strokes At 98, however,

erably higher Worrell bowled him and_ this

MIAMI, June 20, hour brought together the two England

Mission Chief Paul Fleming players, Simpson and Hardstaff.
was to arrive here today on his At 148 Hardstaff was guilty of
way to Venezuela to initiate an| . Playing for-

air search for a missionary plane, |

missing since June 9, with 15
Americans aboard, Five children
were among the passengers |

The missing plane was operated
by the New Tribe’s Mission,
inter-denominational

an
organisation

which trains missionaries — for
stations in India, Malaya and
South American countries

The twin engined plane had

been silent since it

an air and ground search
—Reuter,



Two Ships Mined
In Yangtse

HONG KONG, June 20
Two foreign ships were mined
and sunk in the Yangtse River
near Shanghai yesterday, accord-

ing to reports reaching Hong
| Kong today. Hong Kong agents
Se the Panamanian motor vessel
Valve were advised that she was

|mined off Foosung when about to

jenter the Whangpoo River for
{ Shanghai. This report said one
St the crew was killed but other

were lost

aid the Grevk

ibout



Flag, the Valve is Chinese owned
and manned by about 40 Chinesr
crew.

—Ke

E. Java Has Worst
‘Quake In 50 Yeurs

Seventeen Dead

DJAKARTA, ‘ine 20
Seventeen people died and man

hundreds were injure oday it

Ea Java, th

Ni Agenc

The Agency

said that at Sourabaya, on the

eastern tip of the island,
shivered for as
in some places
described as the

the eartt
long as a minute
The quake was
worst in 50 years
—Reuter.

12 STILL MISSING

BAHREIN,
people

June
were still miss-
the two French

Twelve
|ing today from
airliners which crashed in the
Persian Gulf near here within 48
hours of each other last week. It
is know that 75 people lost their
lives in the twin disasters. Two
jof the 19 survivors have already |
left for France and the others are
expected to leave shortly

—Reuter.



Eighty
have been killed
since
conference at
day.
rovists

wept-back wing | Winrow quickly
§ powered bi 4 Rolla- eran capabilities and by forcing meth-
Nine jet engine and it is believed | 048, he hit 20 out of 23 in bound-
of speeds tonsid-
than 600 miles an
—~Reuter,
his first bad stroke

R}
'

*

ward to Worrell he presented the
with an easy return catch
batted just over three quarter
of an hour for his 35
not last long and at
son had made 72
After
and
seore 191
but at that
claimed two wickets
a return catch to

bowler
He

82 ‘Terrorists

Killed In Malaya

SINGAPORE
two terrorist

Stocks did
lunch Simp-
out of 156 for 4
Lunch
Harvey

June 20
s in Mi ils aya
18 captured
police told a pr
Kuala Lumpur
period 23 ter-

took the

after lunch
total Williams
First he held

Simpson
to

and
May 1,

Ss
to-



In the same

have surrendered and 107 dismiss Harve



reported by | agents and 89 supporters were ar- | and two balls later Stinchyeombe
radio on June 9 that it was 25/yrested. Johore was now the focal j patted the ball defensively into
miles from Maracaibo, Venezuela, | point of the security forces pres- 'the hands of Gomez at silly poin’
| after ‘having called at Kingston, | sure Jepson hit out at everything but
Jamaica. It was said that the Peuter. @ on page 10
State Department would ask the |
Venezuelan Government to launch | err

When tilly se best well lo

A lifetime of study may be
given to the art














of choosing the appropriat:
from so much which is
just very good. Yet, wh
cigarettes are concernce
the name “ Benson & Hed
Old Bond Street, Lone.

is an unfailing guide —
for all those occasions

when only the best will do.

la tins of 50
$1.06



SUPER VIRGINIA CIGARETTES



BY
N Br VSON «1 SIEDGES ©
OLD BOND STREET, LONDON wed }
in Erol oct 9?” Wee Si a eS

Ai

SSS
ae

a oo oe ae

I



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lps

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PAGE TWO



Carb Calling

EVERAL members of the Bar-

bados Team for Bisley were in
Bridgetown yesterday doing some
last minute shopping and almost
everywhere they went, they were
stopped by well-wishers, some giv-
ing a few_last words of advice
while others shook their hands and
wished them the best of luck.

Final Destination__Tokyo

RS. W. O. MORGAN, formerly

Miss Joan Cheesem: with
her two little daughters Joanne
and Cathy left Barbados yesterday
afternoon by B.W.1.A. en route to
the U.S.A. via Trinidad.

While in the U.S., she will visit
her busband’s people in Stark-
ville, Mississippi, before she goes
over to the West Coast of North
America in August to embark for
her final destination Tokyo, Japan.

Her husband, Major Morgan is
stationed there with the US.
Army. He has been in Japan since
January, and Mrs. Morgan took
the opportunity of visiting her
mother and relatives before going
over to join him. They expect to
be in souee for about three years.
Her husband, she told Carib, likes
it, and she thinks that she will too.

Maj. Morgan used to be sta-
tioned in Antigua where they met
and were married about five years
ago.

She and her daughters have
been here for three months stay-
ing at Rockley.

Leaving Today

R. and Mrs.. William Morley
are due to leave today for
England by the Golfito on four
months’ holiday. Mr. Morley, who
is Chief Engineer of the Barbados
Electric Supply Corpn., Ltd's
Power Station is on long leave.
While in England, they plan to
spend some of the time with their
sun Neville, who,is with the Staf-
ford Technical College, and also
receives his practical training with
the English Electric Co, Then
they will visit Mrs. Morley’s par-
ents as well as several other re-
lations.

On Long Leave ;

R. and Mrs. J. H. McPhail are

also among the passengers
leaving by the Golfito today for
England. Mr. McPhail, who is on
the staff of Barclays Bank here is
on four months’ long leave, most
of which they will spend in Lon-
don, before touring as much of the
country as they can.

May Go To Rome

R. and Mrs. J. P. O’Mahony

will be leaving by the Golfito
which is due to arrive from Trini-
dad this morning. ' They are off
to England on long leave and hope
to return to Barbados in Novem-
ver. i

Dr. O’Mahony came to Barbados
in November, 1948, as C.M.O, and
was recently appointed Director of
Medical Services. They have been
living in the W.I. now for twenty
years and regard this part of the
world as their home.

Dr. O'Mahony hopes to visit his
brother in Ireland for about two
months and he also told Carib that
chey may visit Rome on the Holy
Year pilgrimage, but as yet no
definite plans have been made in
that direction.

Returned to Aruba

M* OLIVER ROCK, who spent
a short holiday with rélatives
in Barbados, returned to Aruba
on Monday afternoon by B.W.1.A.
where he teaches at the Lago In-
dustrial School,

Intransit

R. TOM TOMLINSON, re-

tired Manager of Trinidad
Government Railways aecom-
panted by Mr. Billy Maingot and
his sister Betty, who used to go to
school in Barbados will be arriv-
ing in Barbados today by the Gol-
fito, as intransit passengers for
England.

Miss Tomlinson, Mr. Tomlin-
son’s sister will also be on board.
She is taking the two youngsters
to school in England.



BY THE WAY

Y favourite animal at the
moment, ousting even the
great Tarasque of Beaucaire
which was slain by St. Martha,
whose reliquary and tomb are
still there, in the church that
bears her name — my favourite
animal is the duck which held up
traffic in the Edgware-road, was
taken to a police station, and
there, with considerable aplomb,
laid an egg.

If only the B.B.C. had had the
enterprise to relay that egg, my
cup of joy would be full and flow-
ing over.

The Suet Housing Plan

ARAGRAPH VI. of Sub-sec-
tion V. of Section IX. of
Charlie Suet’s housing plan deals
boldly and unconventionally with
Materials. Suet would seek



POCKET CARTCON |
by OSBERT LANCASTER }







“My dear Maudie, if you
don’t soon stop worrying
about National Foot Health
Week, we’re never going to
get to Ascot!”

Engage

ISS JOAN MeHOLLs daugh-
ter of Dry and Mrs. Louis
Nicholls of “Rosedale” Worthing
has graduated in Fine Art at the
Art School in y, which is
affiliated bs the University of =
berta. er engagement to Mr
Mervyn Williams who is a Com-
mercial Artist at the same art

school was recently announced.
Joan who is now working in
Calgary will be remaining in Can-

ada for the time being.

Will Visit Their Son

R. and Mrs. Neville Howell

leave today for England by the
Golfito. Mr, Howell, who is Man-
ager of Buttals and Brighton Plan-
tations is on three months’ holi-

om.
hile in England they will visit
their son Geoffrey, who is at
school in Lancashire and they will
also be in London for part of the
time.
To Speyside Tobago

I EAVING yesterday afternoon

« by B.W.1L.A. for Trinidad, in-
transit to Tobago were Mr. and
Mrs. C. E. Shepherd of “Colleton
House,” St. Peter. In Tobago they
will be staying at Speyside for a
couple of weeks’ holiday.

Riviera Holiday

R. C. W. W. GREENIDGE oI
Barbados, a former Chief
Justice of British Honduras, who
is now secfetary of the Anti-
Slavery Society in London, is go-
ing to Geneva in July to study
documents on slavery. After that
he is going to slip down to the
French Riviera for a holiday, He
plans to rent a flat in Nice. “It
is the only place in the world
where I want to live”, he says.
“I go there whenever I get a
chance.”

Cricket Throws

T IS fortunate that cricketers
are not generally easy to
recognise once they are off the
field. Otherwise two of the Wesi
Indies team might have been very
embarrassed last week. On the
Sunday which came in the middl+
of the Manchester Test they went
to Blackpool for the day. In the
Sports garden there they were
invited to try their luck at knock -
ing tin cans off a wall with lit-
tle wooden balls. The distance
they had to throw was only ten
yards and there were prizes, if
three or more cans were knocked
over. Sad to relate that after
three throws the cricketers had
knocked over only one can be-
tween them. They subsequently
improved and when they finally

U.N. Press Officer In
New York

ISS MARCIA COOPER, the
Press Officer for the United
Nations in New York is on a tout
of the West Indies on holiday, On
Monday morning she arrived fren
Trinidad by B.W.1A. and return-
ed there yesterday only staying in
Barbados for one day, “Toe shor:
a time,” Miss Cooper told Cari).
Leaving New York on June |
she has visited Aruba, Curacuo
and Trinidad, before coming her<
She leaves Trinidad for home to-
day.

Naturally !

M* HERBERT FISCHBACI{
who arrived from Caraca3
on Monday afternoon by B.W.1.A.
is an Austrian who has lived in
Venezuela for eleven years, and is
now a Venezuelan citizen. This is
his first holiday in four years,
“and naturally,” said Mr. Fisch-
bach, “I chose Barbados.”
Staying at the Ocean View
Hotel, he is here for three weeks.

Trinidadians In Venezuela

R. and Mrs. Louis Sellier and
their five children are
Trinidadians who have been liv-
ing in Venezuela for the past five
years, They arrived here on Mon-
day morning trom Venezuela via
Trinidad by B.W.LA.
They are in’ Barbados for a
month’s holiday staying at Corai
Sands, Worthing.

Until the End of July

R. and Mrs, James Parker who

are from Oklahoma, but
now live in Monogas in Eastern
Venezuela are here until the end
of July, staying at the Ocean View
Hotel,

For Three Weeks

WO Trinidadians who are
with Alstons in - Port-of-
Spain arrived on Monday morning
by B.W.1.A. Mr. Walter Scott who
is in their Head Office and Mr.
Leonard Maingot who is in the
Shipping Department are here
for three weeks’ holiday staying
at Accra, Rockley.

Californians

R. and’ Mrs. Charles Ward
trom California, who a year
and a half ago went to Trinidad
where Mr. Ward is with the Kern
Trinidad Oilfields Ltd., arrived
on Monday morning by B.W.LA.
to spend a week’s holiday at the
Ocean View Hotel.

Good Show ‘“‘Sleepy”’

. MILLS, who is in charge

of student welfare at the
Colonial Office took a team otf
West Indian students up to Cam-
bridge last week-end to play
cricket against Clare College, and
they did very well. It was only a
one-day match and the result was
Clare 244 for 5 wickets, West In-
dies 190 for 1 wicket, S. G.
“Sleepy” Smith of Barbados mado
most of the runs for the Colonial
team and was 134 not out at the
end of the game. “Sleepy” ts
studying law in London and _ is
Vice Captain of the Inns of Court
cricket team.

Test Best

EST story circulating around
Manchester after the First

Test concerns Alfred Valentine,
Jamaica’s young left arm bowler
After he had taken the first
seven English wickets to fall he
turned to one of his colleagues
and said “When does the captain
come in?’ He was informed that
he had got rid of Yardley two
wickets previously and an ex-
pression of real pleasure crept
over his face. He had no idea
of the names of the batsmen he
had got out but was deeply satis-
fied to know that the rival cap-



left the stall they had an armful tain was among those “in the
of prizes, bag.

By BEACHCOMBER
powers to divert the little metal Dr. Rhubarb’s
asps for trousers from the tailors :
to the builders. They would be Mumbojumbologetics
used to make door-knobs, window- PROFESSOR SNARLSTROM
catches, and other such things. claims that Dr, Rhubarb’s
To do this it would only be Mumbojumbologetics are pre-

necessary to get the Metal Control
Board to agree with the Trouser
Accessories Bureau to transfer
the work of the Dual Purpose
Council to the Overall Distribu-
tional Clearing Centre at Nunea-
ton. Then the Regional Licence
Departments could apply early
next year to the inistry of
Bubble-blowing for the necessary
draft schedules, working through
the usual channels—the Board of
Allocations, the Permanent Sites
Committee, the Town and coun-
try Co-ordination Committee, the
Personnel Board, the Output
Board and the Control of Hous-
ing Commissioners.



Stuyvenheuter, and therefore out
of date. Quoting Ticknold, Worms,
Scattermole, Tungsten, Batcombe,
and Pushmeister, the learned
Sparlstrom endeavours to prove
that Rhubarb’s conception of
thought as an objective phe-
nomenon is outmoded and would
lead to the complete abandon-
ment of Skoul’s Three Prelimin-
ary Positives in Thought Analysis
We who care less than the dust
beneath their chariot-wheels for
all this empty rolly-molly and
tumble-cum-trivy, can now get
on with our drinking, which 1s
“a subjective action of the con-
scious will,’” according to Glumm.



the latest “BUTTERICK” Patterns have arrived
Whithields also offers=
CYCLISTS’ SUNDRIES

CYCLE LAMPS
PUMP CONNECTIONS
SOHN BULL PATCHING KITS.
(ORS BULL PATCHING KITS.
CVOLE BAGS—Large Capacity

WHITFIELDS

WE SHOE STORE

. Me
. We



$1.44
. 1éc.

LINOLEUM
6ft wide ¢

OnLy §.52

per yard run



Magnificent offert-

SU

14 in,
$2.42

16 in.
$2.76

ITCASES

20 in.
$3.46

24 in.

$4.15 $4.49)

BARBADOS ADVOCATE










PRINCE CHARLES watches as
Ceremony, London:
from Clarence House as his grandfather, King George VI drives |

down the Mall with an escort of

Guards Parade for the “Trooping the Colour”. The annual cere- |
mony is held in honour of the King’s birthday. |

Peace For Prince Charles

LONDON.
The daily perambulations of
Prince Charles, Princess Eliza
beth’s young son, will be held i
secret during the next few
months.

Fine weather and the seasona,
inerease in the number of tour-
ists have swelled the crowds
waiting each day outside Clarer:«
House and in St. James’ Park to
watch the young prince sport on
the green.

Wife Must
Be Deaf

LONDON.,

A “Reno-in-reverse” is planned
for Whitley Bay, Northumberland
County, seaside resort.

At the next meeting of the
local council it will be proposed
that a get-together be arranged
for lonely men and women who
are too shy to find a mate



A thousand people have written
to Councillor J. D. Kidd, 4
former council chairman, request-

ing him to find them husbands
and wives.
Strangest request for a, wife

was from a man aged sixty-seven
who stipulated that his brie
must be deaf.

Councillor Kidd said:

Most of the people who have
written to me seem to be genu jac
enough, They seem to be ter,i
bly lonely, :

“T think the only way to sort
the whole thing out would be ‘to
vun a conference for them alk,

“In America people go to Reno
for divorcee, so why not in Britain
come to Whitley Bay to find
happiness?""—(I.N.S,)



Not Cattle

NEWCASTLE.
Judge Croom-—Johnson granted
a divorce to a wife in the New-
castle Court and warned that
‘men today are not entitled to
crder women about like cattle.”

The learned judge declayed
that “many quite excellent men
do not know how to treat women
It is a species of learning which
is not taught in schools or even
in the university.” .

“And, it is a type of learning
which is very hard to acquire,
It springs, I think, out of “
knowledge of human nature.” .

—(1I.N.S.)



Held by his nurse, Prince Charles waves |



1
}

|

the King drives to “Trooping”

Household Cavalry to the Horse

Now, so that he can take his
exercise less in publie eye, Prin
cess Elizabeth has arranged for
Prince Charles and his baby car-
riage to be taken to some spot
where he can be wheeled in peace
and do a_ bit of independent
toddling.

Prince Charles, now 18 months
can walk well but because of the
crowds who wait for his appear-
ince it has been impossible to
jive him much practice in the
vark I.N.S.

HONEY |
BLONDE? |

The Hairdressers
Cannot Agree

oe is aisagreement among

women’s hairdressers abou.
the “most fashionable shade’
for hair this year,

! HERE are 20 horses in

eceentrie owner does not wish 7
stable an even number of horses
!in any one of the
| How
} the barns without having an ever |
} number in any barn?

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950



CAN KBE DONE
1 fiela
bordering three barns. The



Rupert



barn

amor

three

can he divide them

uieq path |

at asn jou pue ‘ugeq seqjouR ul UaAap |
uinq euo UF ouyu gnd URO ef asinoo
S41 ‘a2msuy |

‘uonsend HR fe

CROSSWwOKD |



dell,

Miranda is delighted to hear that in the and she was the only
she is going to get what she wants, Christmas present that poor Jen-
and she begins to skip away with nifer had. Santa Claus must have
the tey clown towards the aute- known what he was doing.”

gyro. But Rupert cannot under- ‘' Yes, and he still knows what he
stand it wt all. “Hi,look here,there is doing.’’ replies the clown
must be some mistake,"’ he protests. mysteriously ashe helps Miranda
** This doll was sent to the cottage up on to the plane,

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED









CANETY Cis Cute St. santa |











Last Instaiment of “THE CLUTCHING HAND”

and the Westerr “PANHANDLE’

ACTUSS
lL. How young Diana’s mending was) With Rod CAMERON-- (MONOGRAM)

sent? (8) —— ——— —

7 eaten ove sen homers FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY 8.30 p.m. Matinee SUNDAY 5 p.m.
11 Proper place for the spur surely | vi S MIRACLE MUSICAL
12. Sucn wood is made cross-grainea Glorio GLORIA WARREN in “ALWAYS iN MY HEART”





(3)
13. Mutilate for a change. (8) ;
15. An alternative to the return of}



red, (5)
18. Sufficient to make any ido} bat

a)
iy. When tnfs db nad

ed, somebody
used his teeth. (3)

DNESDAY & THURSDAY



PLAZA .

20. It will always supply the result a i 5 & AM p.m,
(6) } VARNER'S DOUBLE

23 p| n such a way that vo WAR rs I BLI

ri ee Wear tt Dane CLARK in “PMBRAC EABLE YOU"

(8)
24. Many people would call this vim ind
2 j M NURSE'S SECRET”

TOOMES

ar Rober Rhinehar

(6) 4)
26. Verse out of the code book. ‘¥ | With Reg
Down |
)
\
i

PRIDAY TO MONDAY
SHEFFIELD a

be taunted on coming 5 & 8.0 pam,

JUNGLE BOY

ae. (9)

out.

Polley suggested by Coventry?
(

Broken pots are easy to see (4)

thy of pity, (8)
Briefiy’ he is the one to break

the

Johnn BOMBA The

oo





ee

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
MATINEE: TO-DAY at 5 p.m.
TO-NIGHT & TO-MORROW NIGHT at 8.50
ALAN LADD, DONNA REED

in “BEYOND GLORY”

with GEORGE MACREADY, GEORGE COULOURIS
A Paramount Picture
Thundering Down the Road to Glory







_ SSS







act. (4)

Phey Bropans all the way

from Skye? (4)

Found in gold-leaf. (6)

Taken from a green earring. (4)

The eagle loses a letter to break

into song, (4)

14, Strange, getting a bieat from
this. (5

16. Just the same it's the same. (5)
17. Ruff’s. partner. (5)
21. Iterate, (3) ,
22. End of 15 Across in reverse. (3)
Solution of yesterday's purzle,— Across:
1, President: 8 Estuary; 9, Sure; 11
Miss: 15, Cerise? 14, Trip; 15, Spam; 19
Vege! ; 20, One; 21, Novel; 22, Tucked,
25, me, 24, Down; 1, Puncture:
2, Reservolr; 3.
Dame; 6, Erin; 7,
Slated; 15 Stoke:
ig. Geum. «

See 2 ope
>
=
oe

~

Comes an Adventure Beyond Compare !

——







So
—
SS See



5



lent; 4, Strip: 5,
ot. Basence: i. i
16. Pave; 17. Melon: SS —<—

GLOBE THEATRE _

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8.30 P.M,











=F



ROYAL = (Worthings) |

To-day at 5 P.M
Thursday at 5 & 8.30

Eagle Lion Films Presents M.G.M’s Superb Musical Double
ARTURO DeCORDOVA

“TILL THE CLOUDS ROLL BY”

“ADVENTURES OF :
FRANK SINATRA—LENA HORNE

“HOLIDAY IN MEXICO”



Tonight at 8.30
(By Public Demand)

Madam O’Lindy

In
“CARACAS NIGHT”

& Troupe

JANE POWELL & JOSE ITURBI



The Fellowship of Hair Artists

of Great Britain favour honey
blonde.

“More women are turning
blonde than ever before, but

platinum is definitely out,’ saia
Mr. B. N. Furman, founder presi-
dent,

“The rich tones suit the mew
hair styles, and honey blondes
vary from light golden auburn
to a pinkish tone. In fact, there

is a shade to suit every complex-
ion.

“Women prefer these shades
because the hair has only to be
lightly bleached, and there is no
damage done,”

A court hairdresser differs from
Mr, Furman.

“Honey blonde might be quite
attractive with green or grey eyes,
but it would be impossible with
blue eyes and not in the least
interesting with brown eyes,” he
said,

Lilac, copper

‘Lilac shades of hair are lovely
for those who can take it, and
copper-bronze for people wil
darker eyes,

“Platinum died out in 1935 and
has been replaced by chinchilla—
the greyest blonde possible,

“Best effects are obtained by
streaks and tips of chinchilla,”

The London manager of a
Paris hairdresser also differs. He
finds that rinses are more popular
than bleaching these days.

“There is a noticeable revival
of various blonde shades; warm
colours are liked best,” he said.

—L.E.S.



CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work i:
AXYDLBAAXR
is LONGFELLOW
One letter simply stands for another. In this example A is used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos-
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints.
Each day the code letters are different.

A Cryptogram Quotation

YMMIBYLNJ KT
GKC BGI AKSTW
—VSIEJISU.

Cryptoquote:

COMFORT IS
NOT A

YWWIJICVWT Y

wr Us COY2T Ate

WGKLR

THE FLOWER OF THE YO
MEN, OR THE FLOWER OF YOUTH—LIVY. oF

..- at Whitfields ony |

A NECESSITY =
LUNUR;

WE can Supply .....

LAVATORY BASINS—White & Aqua Green
22”x16" and 25x18”

HIGH & LOW LEVEL TOILET SUITES
White & Aqua Green

WHITE TILES—Square and Shaped

CHROMIUM BATH ROOM FITTINGS —

Towel Rails, Shower Roses, Soap Dishes,
Tumbler and Tooth-Brush Holders, Paper Holders,
Glass Shelves with Guard Rails.

CLEANSERS — All kinds.

DIAL

2039

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON





logs s oti » «
The Show of Shows Picase note that Matinee starts at 4.30 p.m. for this
Prices:—Pit 24, House 48, ar Programme

Balcony 72, Box $1.00 waa







oo









EMPIRE

& tomorrow at 4.45 & 6.30 G L Oo BRB K
1

To-day
Continuing

20th C.-Fox Presents .
BETTY GRABLE

Opening Friday 23rd 5 & 8.30

in
“WABASH AVENUE”
With
Victor MATURE — Phil
HARRIS

ROXY

To-Day & Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15















20th C-Fox Double

“I WAS A MALE WAR
BRIDE”





SAMUEL GOLDWYN presents

M7 ows ANDREWS - susw HAYWARD
“MY FOOLISH HEART”

with Robert Keith + Kent Smith « Lois Wheeler + Jessie Royte Landis + Gigi Perteap
reen Play by JULIUS J, EPSTEIN and PHILIP G. EPSTEIN
cated by MARK ROBSON : Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Toe.

Plus
LEON ERROL in CACTUS CUT-UP.





















With
Cary GRANT Ann SHERIDAN
And

“YOURE MY
EVERYTHING”



<6 D

Starring
Dan DAILEY Ann BAXTER



OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows To-Day 4.30 & 8.15
20th C.-Fox Double
Lloyd NOLAN Signe HASSO
in

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

Free copies of the current hit parade tune, “My Foolish Heart

‘HOUSE ON 92nd, STREET’ SAVE YOUR HALF-TICKETS FRIDAY NITE AND WIN
And a re = T
“DARK CORNER” A CARTON OF JEFFREY'’S STOUT.
POSITIVELY NO INCREASE OF PRICES. q

With
Mark STEVEN Lucille BALL

PIT 1l6¢. — HOUSE 30c, — BALCONY 40c, — BOX 54c.





THURSDAY Nite at 8.30
“CARACAS NIGHT”

STEAK! CHOPS! FLYING FISH!

AND LOTS, AND LOTS OF FOOD

TO-NIGHT AT

CASUARINA CLUB

There'll be an admission charge of 2 shillings/because the Orchestra
has to EAT too. To-night we are strictly informal/so you can don your
glad rags and dance to the rag-time band of Bertie Haywood from 8 to 12
midnight. (The Manager—Peter Howell (in rags) will be as usual).

oo

_——_————















Other attractions include a partner for the “Stags” the “Singing Barman”
and “Freddie.”’

Get the Casuarina habit,

Its one you'll not regret,

For its those that eat out this way,
That have well and truly “ete”

P.S.—Next Saturday/we'll be very debonair, ‘ties will be required/the
Manager will he absent/he doesn’t own one.

i ia ae ll OL

ie iid

rity -tite ie ats vitihina

fn. m

mnmonre

tm eK Oo Rit

aod

fal a lle ll ae ie



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21,



B.G. Governor’

To Attend
Fish Feast

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN.

His Excellency the Governor of
British Guiana, Sir Charles Wool-
ley, K.C.M.G., has accepted an in-
Fish
Feast at the Carnegie Trade Centre
The Feast is part of
an all-out campaign by the Fish-
Agriculture
Department to popularise the con-

Vitation to attend a Skin

on June 23.
eries Division of the

Sumption of skinfish and break

down an old and existing prejudice
among Guianese against the eating

of these fish, which the Depart-
ment claim are not only palatable
and wholesome, but also highly
nutritive and easily available.

The campaign will open with a
week-long drive commencing on
June 18. There will be a series
of five-minute broadcasts over
ZFY by fishermen, fishing boat
owners, fish vendors, housewives,
nutritionists and other persons
connected with the fishing indus-
try in the Colony.

The Churches are also co-oper-
ating. Special articles will be
published in the Church magazines
and leaflets on the subject will be
distributed at Church Services.

At the fish feast on June 23, the
Governor, Members of the Legis-
lative Council, Municipal Councils,
heads of public institutions and
managers of hotels and restaurants
will be served variously prepared
morsels of skinfish.

In the afternoon, the public will
be given demonstrations of how to
skin and cook various skinfish. On
other days there will be demon-
strations open to housewives.



Wanted In B.G.
For Robbery

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

Four Frenchmen, MM. Felix
Melani, Bernard Cadoret,
Doumains and Leon Lemel, who
were wanted by the British Guiana
Police on a charge of breaking and
ermering and larceny of Jewellery
valued $24,606,88 and $1,000 in
B.G- Currency from the Premier
Pawnbrokery, Georgetown, during
the Easter week-end last year,
were extradited from Venezuela
on the request of the British Gui-
ana Government and will now
stand trial.

The four men were held by the
Venezuelan Police after having
crossed the frontier illegally. Jew-
ellery identified as part of the
missing booty was found in their
possession. After arrangements
were concluded for their extradi-
tion the men, accompanied by
Venezuelan Immigration Officers,
were flown by special P.A.A. plane
to Georgetown,

GEORGETOWN. |

Louis!

1950

Get Tue Snow
BRANCH OFF YouR

To BORROW
bie

Survey Party
Find “Lost”

WILL STUDY BARNACLES

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN.
Doctor D. C. Geijskes, Ento-
mologist of the Agricultural Ex-
periment Station, has arrived in
British Guiana to do some ento-
mological studies in connection
with sugar, rice and coconuts and
to inspect the Surinam light}ship |
now in dock at Messrs Sprostons |
Limited.

The barnacles spread over the
sides and bottoms of the vessel |
will be classified by Dr. Geijskes
end a number of specimens will
be treated with various types of
paint in an effort to find out the
best method of eradicating them.
From a scientific point of view,
Dr. Geijskes explained, it is in-
teresting to note that the barnacles
do not thrive on the vessels when
they ply in coastal (muddy)
waters, but attack them when
they ply where there is green
water. They do not grow well in
the rainy season but thrive better



LIGHT,
COOL

AND
REFRESHING






CROSS -CUT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

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bay, CONE END, CLO Bor
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oe

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(Sure

wS WIFE WAS

mY

HE HAS A SPARE
. CUP- FINAL TICKET -
OR OO You KNOW ?

Trinidad *

Librarians

‘HIGH TRANSPORT COSTS|














































































| a:
| Helicopter
|

4 Cents Ride?

LONDON.
The Society of British Aircraft



Coffee Committee
Will “Tone Down”
Report












ause Killed











WASHINGTON, June, 20 The ve
Constructors claimed today that A Senate sub-committee to-day | begins ar
new helicopters under construc-! agreed to “revise and tone down’ ¢ Nixoderm & :
tion Brit shoul roduce . Sean eae = > ans
10 in ritain should produce, its report on coffee price increases, } , Nixoderm is a hew discovery ‘
running costs near those of buses|after the State Department had germs and.parasites on the skin that
and trains. joined Latin American diplo- Fe SO ee caees 2
Type 171 fAve-se neral " r . a Ring we ad £
ype lil iive-seat general pur} mats in“ protest agains ‘ t get rid of u t
| pose helicopters are now in pro-| jts reported suggestion are !
duction by the Bristol Aeroplane Nix
Company, which also is construct- The diplomats, 11 ambassadors] } ten that tieedieue wi
ing 10 to 12-seat twin-engined] and three Charge D’Affaires, yes-] ples and clear your skipsert and
helicopters known as Type 173. terddy called Secrétary of 2 none
Because the wperation of these] State Dean Achesén to protest Nixoderm pe

machines is still in the early
experimental stage the 171 prob-
ably will be used mainly for test

that the sub-committee’s proposal
to control coffee prices “seriously
threatens Latin-Améefican

ForgSkin Troubles ace.

econ-

work by organizations interested] omy
in the potentialities of this form Senator Guy Gillette, Chairman =e
of transport of the five-man agriculture sub > ie

It is expected that when the} committee, to-day agreed to re-
technique of maintenance andj} draft the report, after Assistant © « « @
economics of helicopter operation] Secretary of State Edward Miller and agonising
had been completely mastered the

had said that parts of it were “an




















































‘ _ | big twin-engined Type 173 i lve Maz \ 0) mesh a i
4 la ig twin-engined Type 173 wi affront” to the citizens and officials BAG SHE
River C el (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) | or Eng nec already be in» production of the South Amer countries = ; KAG
hann The Society said that the in-J which produce coffee.
GEORGETOWN, Our Own Correspondent creased payload of these bigger Mr. Miller declares it was
} \ ert S sader- of ac wil re slic: » . the * neig
s ; Unless they can be provided with chea nspt Ni \ibert Gomes, leader- Of] machines will make helicopter] doing much of the “good neigi
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent) : areer, nie I s . . ; Ta g the W.I sugar delegation 1s flight an @conomical proposition | bourty relations between tl
t Goldf r ’
J ion British Guiana’s Cuyuni Goldfields Lt i : : f the Trinidad Gl hal , ’ ‘
GEORGETOWN tions shortly. Mr F. Buckle. the Co te 7 -neirmsen Of Mis NAG) for airlines in Britain United States an ther American
A Geological Survey Party hack] . GRCTAMONS SHOrhy. Bir, &. DUCKS, Lie WONePS oe Library and in this capa-} The world’s first scheduled} republics, and that some of its re-
from a 3-month survey in the Manager reported that at present they were Arrying | cl has been a busy man late-| passenger helicopter service was} commendations and conclusi
Putareng Area reported having} on salvage operations, This meant the treatment of old mill }ly ether with Mr. Carlton} recently opened between Cardiff] were “inappropriate”
mapped about 250 square miles} tailings. Cx Librarian, he has bee™)anq@ Liverpool by British Europ- —Reuter
situated between the Mazaruni and +9 | he explained, are J4™% ® arrangements for sta) ean Airways. The helicopters used nen —
Puruni Rivers. ial 1ich has already | Members of the Trinidad al are single engined machines of
p , rom | t@visit England on” a twelve-|jimited payload and low cruising
1 i from ; pay
The chief feature of interest in Copra Brokers which the & c 7 aa ; } Meath cours During their visit] speed. Although the service is
this area, they report, is the oc- : has been ext Du 1949 | they will attend technical schools} expected to run at a substantial a
currence of an old river channel Press For ibout 20,000 i f tailings were} @Md receive training in librarian-| joss jt will provide valuable Obstinate Set from
which runs from the north-west treated and yielded approximately | ship operational data rheum ; a
S 5 ; . P e Stec r
to the eet ae ear lett Removal Of Ban | 4,300 fine ounces of gold, ‘To date rhree members of the — When Type 173 with its in- complaints the experi Ae
is marke y alluvia eposy : } this ir about 8,000 ft of J are expected to be sent on this] creased safety factor of two related in this
parallel to the present course of (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) | tailin cours¢ «They will come s€Pp-| engines is put into ‘operation, relieved by or
the Mazaruni River and about 4 GEORGETOWN | ly and the first one,’ it is} B.A. will extend their service KRUSCHEN
miles distant from it. The channel Mr. Bissessa Boodhoo, membe: The ‘ é pated, will be here in Sep-|¢o the heart of the British cities
capping the hills about 60 feet of the Copra Brokers Board, has} drawing to ve tember and possibly to the Continent in my arms and 8!
sree the present Mazaruni River charged the local Government) said Mr, Buck! and Co-operation Experts opine that the British | pains started in tt
tes hee. deposits and the] with “keeping the coconut indus-|I don’t kn oing t Officials of the English Library] will play a leading role in the| yack, incr
a eee oo . ore with- try in penury” and predicts a] happen. : Association who are giving every| development of the helicopter ) ranily never : } Douehe & hobtis
a . oe di ing the p an fee | gloomy future unless Government “Under existing « tions it} ¢O-operation in this scheme are)Geographically the country is 1 find that I got a little relief. 1
ogee S Ourine rune years, granted increased prices for copra so daa mi to reopen expected to finalise arrangements } ideal for the development of heli- \] bought another and:before {t was
e chiet object of the survey was | and allowed brokers to export the] \YOU" a (ih “xt week sopter services with its need fe: {| finished all my pains had gone
to obtain more information re-| surplus to foreign markets bye antag; Wer'price of gold te TO! nore have been settled ey of transport which can Rainy weather and damp- () and trom that day have not

: : . * te ‘ } ency) . ice 1ese ave > se t ans & y ad is . s i ¥
Sarding the pistripation and ex- Mr. Boodhoo disclosed offers} (CVNS 0! : betore ae Mi Gcimae and Mr. Comma will] operate economically over short ness EAS. Restinatians, Sppesred again. My palna were
} WAR ns. diamond-bearing | from London, Holland and Vene- Therees the cubes moat Conumediit bahin ‘the ‘aenona pert of thatt eee 5 mist. “Seraliviabians “dhe Pale obstinate and, the reliet really
ey CEPy ss zuela where merchants are offer | ties has rise to x tely | job looking for speakers to! The Society pointed out that the in the joints can be con- Rheumatic pains and backache

ixtended ing prices 50% aa = poe twice pre iv levé visit Trinidad in connection with] helicopter does not cruise as fast quered by are usually the result of poisons
er 1 The _ ‘ 000 ¢ ae tenor of remaining o1 low | the Library's 1951 adult educa-]as the conventional airliner but! 4 f ‘Yin sal meg palo which lazy
i i é S Py ons a ; f . y ; . ‘ / L yels anc rent Ww are
During the next Field Season $160.50 (U B Currency) which is, '©, Yield a profit und e con- | tion scheme They are hoping] gains its passenger potential by SAC ROOL ) pores 9 ‘axhe eeu. a

: ie as S 1 } . io ) »ll-k y 2 i “e) val “ P } Awe
(commencing at the end of July) equivalent to $272.85 (B.G. cur-| ditions Mr. Buckle e; I to arrange for two well-known | the speed of” its centre-to-centre 5 complaints there is no finer
the survey in this area will be rency per ton) or 12 cents per| {further _ that of} personalities to visit the island] travel. Keep a bottle handy treatment than Kruschen Salts
extended to the north-west to the ound em Georgetown. But the| Sterling did permit the d give a series of lectures on] ‘The large machines will operate }| which cleanses all the internal
Cuyuni River. It is proposed to c oon. oT aa — low-grad taili between the centre of cities or On Sale at organs, stimulates them to nor-

‘ ; z ontrol Board refuses permission sewers ? smemenstonen, ; ote ; i} mal healthy action and thus
cube bese Ane Heniweer son to export operations would have from docks and airports to city res " , restores freshness and vigour
Inneneru Village to Makura Point port. several month ‘“ F « | centres hnights Drug Stores a ee chaning cal aoe a
on the Cuyuni River, a total dise] Local price ror copra is 7.75 Wee Whither Welfare? British town planners are {\ All Chemists and Stores ae
tance of about 30 miles, and to! cents per pound, but if exported Main Problem already considering the incorpor- \} 5
survey the area east and west of| could fetch 12 cents per pound in cay 4 SREAT YARMOUTH ation of rooftop ‘rotor stations’ in ;
this line. This should provide! Venezuela. Malaya was selling * Main 1 le e ass oe GRE/ d te ooh their designs for new towns
access to possible diamond areas} copra to the U.K. at 14.30 cents Gis ae : ; eat mcORE ih si, n ; > M weit i It is possible that Type 173)
in the Ekereku River (a tributary) per pound net, and even if B.G fon i Se a vie thane. Rt Rev. P.M Odd. will be in production by 1964
of the Cuyuni). Ata later stage} sold at the Ceylon contract price | > apn ere a Bi hop of Norwich, told "an So I~! British European Airways expert
the possibility of extending the of 11.75 cents per pound they eee i ‘ a o fe conference at Great ar- 25-35 seater multi-engined
trail to the Wenamu River (which) would earn more ae PSUEE SES SEDORNE Uk ae a0 that the welfare sols helicopter with a cruising speed
forms the boundary between Brit- A sub-committee of the Central| i 1p r Cu ee ae cou lead Briton nearer he of over 130 mph to be in operation
Nanen = Venezuela) willl Food Production Committee wen! maine. results A ith I Be obt ined pS ante in eight to ten years time.—I.N.S

$ ‘ sti * . | Pé s vi those »bte < j aid
cue eos Ee ae ates tae in adjoining porfions of Venezuela will be real disaster 1
The Geological Survey Depart~-{* E : . Te : ifare state should so pro- e
ill shortly be making a|increased to 9 cents per pound.) Mr. Buckle point id so deve Q 20~ Ch l | Ca se
they vot lente Paracas of | West Indian islands were getting} geology of north-western 8 ind so deve oR that Peat Lic se
. , i inn .65 cents per pound and in Sur-| Guian: the sa as that of; ple e their sense of responsi-
road patel ip et. Berbice and 2.48 conte ice is 10 cents pex NURO®. stern Venezuela (in which | bility toward their neighbout A ain Before
, : pound. The Copra Brokers Board} important auriferot deposits} and if the material progress is £ 5
is in touch with Government on| have been fout He is of| made at the sacrifice of pet onal
the situation. opinion that intelligently directed | responsibility ; C urt ~
| exploration and prospecting of| . The Bishop was referring to oO Ss
»gio 1 sritish Guiana,} voluntary social work which had
S . Gi B G | ei tae ult is ib alin ca a bit t. ty hospitals and services (Barbados ORT. OF SPAIN
: ‘ -ORT-OF-5S
urinam ives eX¥e! other rich goldbearing deposit for the care of the aged and ny 3 ho” nee ’ .
in the dry season. 1 oc ff PI t Bi Seal hich had now been superceded The Me ¢ arto Oe, ee
Doctor Geijskes made severa 10. 00 oliee ants | bigger Scaie the welfare state case 1s again betore ;
ae : ¢ nthe ; i 7 ‘atch i . Vester , Mrs. Merle MeCarthy
expeditions into the interior of ° | Thi he said, had. resulted| Yesterday 1
; ; oe nde to 4 giinche val against the
Surinam on entomological and (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) | He she ee to the fact | fy he reat spirit of democ- Jaunched an appeal agains : ¢
biological missions. Last year, on ae GEORGETOWN. | that oldmining in Vene zuela I y which appeared to think decision made by Just ice a, z
behalf of the “Natural Scientific Ten thousand young coffee! been put i : bes i ion, | that t needs of the community | Gomes, some months ago in a
Study Circle for Surinam and plants have been received by the | he of { ortatic Rete. be met by state ac-| he gave Michael McC arthy, at 1
Curacao,” a body formed in 1945 Department of Agriculture as aj‘. © a. ly nm ’ the custody of his daughter Vio
in Utrecht, Holland, to promote) free gift from the Surinam Agri- | 749!)) '° bo! j mia ait rhe Bishop pointed out that} let. ae ae m. ;
natura] scientific investigation of] cuiture Department to aid rehabil- | Phe ar ate Oa reds of thousands of peo-| Eminent King's Counsel, Han-
the Netherlands territories in the] itation of farms destroyed in early at f : . ~ Ace een helped in sickness] nays, was on his legs all yesterday
Caribbean, Dr. Geijskes took a] aay foods. i ee va eee trouble by friendly] and today, arguing solid law to : se
natural science expedition into!” “After the floods contact was| *U! : ri ) esenithl ic convince the Appeal Judges @ Thanks to Fleischmann's ou bi Ask :
the interior of Surinam. made with the Director of Agri-| 0! | yh tea yt Brit : Those societies taught men to] Mortimer Duke, A. J. Hamilton | Fast Rising Dry Yeast home today { hmann ast
He disclosed also that there is} culture in Surinam, who Bees Gh \ le ' <5 nd by one another and they} and Kenneth Vincent Browne that baking is easier ... results are Rising Dr
Rigege cus shOn taRerntts wey 30 Rar ante the British usen | anc lo , : ee be Scaggs a nae eee (ee ae cae acta yi hive g better. This new granule yeast HERE'S ALL YOU DO;
seum in Surinam and while in} ¥: ? iMate “| We Y I ! it rr to Htions of people Such & Ore ee oe full strength for weeks. Ii Sprinkle into lukew wake
B.G.. he will be consulting with} Government paying transportation Leite sas a : Chitanactveneetiola He arned that the modern] ted that Violet is only 11! vepes ane saa . lines eeagialvdenl ; 1 ath yavigeas shia si
Honourable Vincent Roth, J.P.,} The first shipment of 10,000 DHREtS | OP adare to the Al River d political development] is badly in need of her mother's you bake at h Let stand 10 oe
Curator of the local museum in} arrived on Sunday by KLM plane |; iows through ht do great deal of harm.] care iO weeks’ supply on hand stir, When dissolved,fone package
this connection. He expects that] and have been sent to farmers in Br 1 outh (in Britain is in danger of losing He said that the judge’s order Fleischmann’s Dry Yeast is as equals one compressed yeast cake
i of the Surinam Gov-| the Pomeroon river district, the wuni R The length most precious thing in Eng-| frustrated the hopes of both fresh when you use it as the day @ in any recip.
with the help of t 2 n %
ernment the museum will be} The plants are being shinged of the Brit Guiar rtion of lish life—the great urge to give| parents who wanted to educate the .

: amaribo towards the | without soil, just the roots, which iR ile oluntary service and the desire} child in England. The case is . a
aay de ge ; je |meant that farmers had to be Pp (W-LG to help one’s neighbour.” continuing and Louis Wharton heh W ou “é 11GElE w/On
Doctor Geijskes is accompanied notified to hays thelr farm. Bre K.C. is appearing for Michael M a
by bis wite and deughtes. ——— CAP EY $666060055099004 POOOIOD 2OSOIPPOOOOODIO SION IO TOTTI OF
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PAGE
iGE FOUR

BARBADOS <8 ADVOCATE

Wednesday, June 21, 1950

Safety At Seawell

THERE are two points of entry in Barba-
dos; one is the harbour and the other the
airport. By the provisions of the law and
long established custom the Baggage Ware-
house through which passengers from ships
must pass, is amply protected. It is not
the same with Seawell Airport. And the
pressing need for closer supervision and
greater protection grows daily.

During the month of May there
101 flights in which no fewer than 2,091
passengers arrived in this island. It is clear
that air travel is becoming more popular
and has outgrown all expectations.

But it is not merely the growing traffic
which focuses attention to Seawell. It is
the extreme need for caution and efficient
management if human life is not to be lost
unnecessarily. Prior to the arrival of a
plane there is the need for the closest
supervision of the runway and the entire
airport. The pilot of an incoming plane
can only bring his craft to a safe landing
on the instructions of the officers in the
communication tower. The merest mishap
on the runway when the plane is about to
land might be fraught with the gravest
consequences. Any accident might result
in the smashing of the plane and the loss
of the lives of all aboard.

In Carlisle Bay there is little chance of
the presence of a small craft causing the
loss of an entire steamer. The presence of
a car or some other vehicle on the runway
carried there by some careless person
might bring disaster.

If the above premises are admitted it is
clear that there should be the greatest pre-
caution to prevent this possibility. At pres-
ent there are two officers at Seawell, the
Manager and the Clerk, both of whom are
in the communication tower on the arrival
of a plane. One makes communication with
the plane and the other records in the log
such instructions as are given and the
answers.

Seawell Airport is the property of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee and
neither the Manager nor the Police can
initiate prosecutions without the consent
of the Colonial Secretary.

It is known that at present there are
regulations for preventing visitors from
contacting passengers before they reach
the immigration and the Customs; but the
presence of unauthorised people who are

merely sight-seeing, people who would like
to wander over the entire airport, and even
those who visit the airport legitinrately, to
receive passengers but who persist in wan-
dering all over the airport can be discon-
certing and dangerous.

It should not be possible for bands of
excursionists and sight-seeing parties to
drive into the airport without permission.

The seriousness of the situation is appar-
ent when it is remembered that at the same

time that there are out going passengers
there are also incoming passengers who
must be attended by the immigration or
emigration and the customs.

The reason for much of the trouble is
that it does not appear that the Police, on
duty every hour of the day and night at
Seawell, have the same authority under the
law as they exercise at the Baggage Ware-
house. It should be easy for greater re-
strictions to be put upon wandering people
at the airport where their presence and
their activities can do more harm than in
the harbour. The staff at the airport is at
present numerically unable to cope with
the work as efficiently as might be done. It
is true that air traffic has grown apace but
it should not be impossible to keep abreast
of the necessary regulations for the proper
control of the airport and the protection of
human life. The airport is now being ex-
tended and modernised and it is no use
waiting until the work has been completed

or until some disaster proves the merit of these
arguments to bring the necessary controls to the
one airport in this island. Any such disaster
would be the worst possible advertisement for
Barbados at a time when she is attempting to
encourage visitors.

OUR READERS SAY:











were

fF Atm”



The Linsell Case Puts |!he Bolder Sex—Women

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

British J ustice On Trial

“It is quite obvious that no

Private Linsell — the Black weigh up the unk: 1iown importance
soldier and no sailor can carry Watch sentry who killed a of his charge arfd the unknown
with him a library of International German policeman—will not determination ot his opponent on
Law, or have immediate access hang. But will his conviction the one hand against the highly
to a professor in that subje.t who stand? The 23-year-old soldier complicated legs! learning as to
can tell him whether or not a still waits to learn what sen- the circumstances when killing is
particular command is a lawful tence, if any, he will be given. or is not jutified?
one.”’ The implications of the Linsell This case ‘illustrates in bold

So directed the Judge-Advocate case are a challenge to British relief the superiority of the English
in the “Peleus” trial, in which, justice, that re-

among others, a German sailor
was sentenced to be shot for obey-
ing the orders of his commanding
officer to fire on the survivors of

says—

CHARLES



Common Law rule over
cently developed as a result of
trials for war crimes, which Brit-
ish military courts are apparently

‘ x _ anxious to copy. The conse-
a British merchantman SHELLEY quences of the new rule are indeed
Yet by gradual extensions of the terrifying.
modern. - doctrine that superior Suppose, for example, in a
orders are no defence to a charge 4 gtate of great confusion, future war, a bomber pilot were
of war crimes, the position is It was started by Article 8 of ordered to blitz an enemy city
rapidly arising when a library or the Nuremberg Charter, whicn which he suspected contained n
a professor will be as essential to deprived admirals and generals military objective. Unger the Lin-

a soldier as a rifle or a helmet.”

such as Raeder and Keitel! of the

sell ruling he would need to satisfy

‘ : a@efence of superior orders. himself that the city did in fact

They Must Ubey Gradually it has been extended contain military objectives before

> ierarchy exhaus-

The law of Englan vas laid Gown the hierarchy until it he took off. If, in spite of ex s

Aen gintnly in cn i ms — reached “other ranks.” Now it has tive researches, he was still in

arising out of the South African been applied, in an honourable doubt he would be justified, nay,
war. . but misplaced sense of justice, not compelled, to disobey.

A British captain took a soldier

merely to our ex-enemies but also

Would the Military Courts, who

i i 7 ine « & icious tO Our own men. have put him in this position, thea
oe ae vee eutee We teen Private Linsell fired five shots acquit him of a charge of dis-
hands to fetch a certain bridle. into the back of a German lorry obeying orders
The farm hand delayed. He there- Which had ignored his order, as Revenge—and After
upon ordered the soldier to fire ® Sentry, to stop. In so doing he
at the farm hand. The soldier Killed a German policeman, Lin- Let us, a@mit that this is all
fired and killed. sell said ‘quite frankly that he wrong. fn order to sweep into the

The legality of the captain’s shot to kill. net of war criminals a number of
order was highly doubtful, Never- | Among other defences, he plead- jigh-ranking German officers, the
theless the soldier was acquitted @d the shoot-to-kill” orders of Allied Powers thought fit—in the}
of a charge of murder. “If in any Dis regiment. The deputy Judge event, unnecessarily—to weaken

doubtful case a soldier was enti-
tled to judge for himself, to eon-
sider the circumstances of tie
' case, and to hesitate in obeying
the orders given to him. that would
be subversive of all military dis-
cipline.”
The Court proceeded to endorse
the rule as laid down in the Army’s
Military Manual as it then stood,

by which soldiers must obey ali ‘Sued it should be punished. But started to mutilate our own time-| attendance of more than 900. :

commands unless they are quite re ghee eae. be ne honoured law On the basis of their experience in towns
bviousl al, legal to the sentry who is ex- Let us have the courage to ia a . ee ae
: Hae iggy et PA Law pected to obey it. He may well admit, before it is too late, that|Of moderate size, the firm have not yet
may now say, however much the Soin = = 1 oe — two wrongs do not make a = | plucked up courage to try the experiment in
Military Manual may have been POFtance of the object he is guard- The new rule was sown in a dark : 1 : Niheps oH eed
changed, that is still the law of 128: bed of revenge, and, as always New York, or any major city. It looks as

England and would be so admin-
istered in our criminal courts

He Shot To Kill

But in other tribunals there is



Advocate-~ General is reported as
having ruled that if the “shoot-

the well-tried defence of superior
orders. Their action was anyhow

to-kill order was illégal Linsell misplaced as that defence never
could not shelter behind it. availed a prisoner if the order
A “shoot-to-kill” order may or was obviously ille gal, as in the
may not be legal, according to concentration-camp cases, or in-
particular circumstances, of which qeed in the “Peleus” trial,
a sentry may know nothing. If, Now we are hoist with that
in the circumstances of Linsell’a petard, In order to give the ap-
case, it was illegal, the officer who pearance of “f hares”, we have

For all Linsell knew, there
might have been a store of atomic
material behind him, and the lorry
might have been desperate to get
at it. How could he be expected,
in the agony of the moment, to



with revenge, we are threatened
with its bitter fruit. But cannot
we break this sequence? Must
Private Linsell be sacrificed to
save someone else’s pride ?

—L.ES



The Richest Man In Britain
Is Getting Richer

Sir John Ellerman, Britain’s
richest man, is growing richer.

That is the impression given by
documents filed away in the vaults
of London’s Bush House, where
details of the ownership of British
companies, large and small, are
kept.

If that impression is right, it
marks down this shy, studious,
40-year-old millionaire as present.
day phenomienon,

For most of Britain’s very
wealthy men &re growing poorer.
They are forced by crippling tax-
ation to live on capital if they
want to maintain a_ millionaire’s
customary standard of living

But not, apparently, Sir John,
Although his father had an in-
come reaching £1,000,000 a year,
the son never developed extrava-
gant tastes.

He has
quiet life.
continued
shrewd
ment.

always preferred the
And so his capital has
to grow, aided by
and far-sighted invest-

£100,000 up

Latest returns of ¢ Ellerman
Lines, king-pin of the shipping
side of the Ellerman empire, show
that Sir John’s holding of the
company’s Deferred stock—some
in his own name, some in con-
junction with ‘three others’—has

By Bernard Harris

whom

he had known since boy-
hood.

And just before the war Sir The wedding took place in the
John was the big figure in a utmost secrecy at Chertsey (Sur-
transaction which resulted in him rey) Register Office, And the

becoming the predominant share-
holder in Illustrated Newspapers,
owners of the Sphere, the Tatler,
and other publications.

More recently he bought 153,000
shares in the Daily Mirror and a
smaller number in its sister
journal, the Sunday Pictorial,

City Thinks

What does all this wealth add
up to? That is a secret known
only to Sir John and his closest
associates,

But in the City it is estimated
that the £18,000,000 ‘which Eller-
man inherited from his father in
1933 must at least have Ween
doubled, possibly nearly trebled.

Ellerman inherited more than
a vast fortune from his father,
He inherited also his father’s deep-
seated reserve, his carefulness in
spending, his capacity for intense
concentration on whatever task
was in hand,

Old Sir John, who was born in
Hull, started his business life as
an accountant’s clerk.

Even after he had become a
prosperous local shipowner he
remained such a solitary, retiring

couple drove off to Eastbourne to
live in a six-roomed villa in a
terrace of working-class houses.

Here Sir John and his bride
spent quiet, happy, and econo-
mical days, with the husband go-
ing around in grey flannel trous-
ers, pullover, and jacket.

But as soon as their identity
was discovered they took train to
Scotland,

It was at Eastbourne later that
Ellerman started on his massive
three-volume work called “The
Families and Genera of Living
Rodents.” It took him ten years to
complete and ran to 1,386 pages.

His wife, a gifted painter, help-
ed him with the illustrations for
this book. She also arranged an
exhibition of paintings by “Ellen
de Streuve’ in a Kensington High
Street art shop.

But when a newspaper discov-
ered that Ellen de Streuve was
in fact Lady Ellerman the exhi-
bition was at once closed.

The passion for secrecy was
carried a stage further when the
couple went to live at an unpre-

ise , » past ious se at Sunningdale,

ein ey ere, piel il figure that he was often unrecog- eer tae leg lived as “Mr
The ere » nised by people who worked for init
at brings the Ellerman hold- hitn, Fountain”.

ing to £624,000. There is no stock
market quotation, but
must run into several millions,

For Ellerman Lines own 83
ships, totalling 540,000 tons, and
have another 16 in the course of
building.

The company’s total assets are
close on £30,000,000, and for
several years the dividend on the
Deferred stock has been ten per
cent, free of tax.

In West End

Another side of the far-ranging
Ellerman interests covers property,
most of it in and around London's
West End.

These assets are concentrated
in the Ellerman Property Trust,
and here, too, Sir John’s personal
holding is shown to have in-

|creased substantially since 1947,

Lesser lights in this constella--
tion of wealth include investment
trusts, breweries, and newspapers.

Sir John, through a nominee,
is the largest individual share-
holder in Odhams Press. That
company has recently increased its

| Hivos, and the Ellerman hold-
ing accordingly shows a further
(substantial capital profit.

its value

And it is said that even today
there are Ellerman workers who
cannot describe what their em-
ployer looks like.

His Privacy

The heir to the aor ene
was born on December 1909,
but no picture of him bee pub
lished until after his father’s
death in 1933,

His privacy was strictly guard-
ed. He was taken away from
Malvern College and put in
charge of private tutors to protect
him against any possible annoy-
ance,

There is no record of the son
having much interest in sport, or
yachts, or fast cars, or any of the
other recreations often favoured
by rich men’s sons.

But he developed a keen inter-
est in acting, and sometimes
staged in his own private theatre
pantomimes and plays which he
himself wrote.

6-Reom Villa

Some months after the first Sir
John died, leaving £36,685,000,
Ellerman married Esther de Sola,
a 28-year old, raven haired girl

.

A Secret

Shortly before the war Eller-
man bought a house in Kensing-
ton Palace-gardens—often known
as “Millionaires’ Row’ —but he
kept his address out of the tele-
phone book and made no men-
tion of it in his six-line entry in
Who’s Who.

The first Sir John was for many
years guided over investments by
the late Sir Miles Mattinson, re-
garded as the City’s most gifted
investment trust expert.

And the father saw to it that
the son should be equally well
advised. The success of the Eller-
man investment policy is shown
in the fact that one of the trusts
formed by the father in 1914 is
now paying an annual dividend
of 71 per cent,

But young Sir John’s interests
are not confined to big companies.
He also helps to run a £5,000 con-
cern known as Kensington Build-
ers, Ltd

And that company shows in its

latest accounts a profit of £581 | widows, need help and they know it.” Red Rose, Blue Cross, Myna
5s. 1ld.—small beer for a man | —_LR : s
worth possibly £40,000,000—L.E.S ' L.E.S, COFFEE



Went With Abe Lincoln



They Outbid Men When It Comes To
A Little Flutter

Hy Frederick Cook

New York

WALL Street has been learning about
women. And women have been learning
about Wall Street. There have been some
surprising discoveries on both sides.

Some months ago, realising that women
held by far the greater part of all American
investments, but as customers were largely
neglected, one of New York’s biggest broker-
age firms organised a series of investment
courses for women only.

The idea spread from coast to coast. The
plan was to educate women in stockmarket
terms and simple operations of buying, sell-
ing, going short or long, hedging and com-
modities.

What the teachers soon found was that
they were providing an elementary school
course for people who needed advanced uni-
versity training.

38,000 ‘STUDENTS’

Almost every lecturer engaged to give a
“women only” course has been bowled over
by the knowledge his students revealed, and
even more so by their keenness to acquire





WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950






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are keener for a profit. Men will buy shares
cautiously, for income. Women will shrug
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there.

Professor G. D. Plunkett, who ran a course
for women at New York University on man-
agement of personal funds, reports: “The
self-assured male thinks he is the bold one.
He likes to think of the little woman as timid,
meek, seeking safety above all. He had better
look in at one of my sessions!

“And most women show as good judgment
in investing as the average man does. They ||
are on an equal footing with men when it
comes to investing. They realise the value
of sound factual information, and are looking
for it.”

At the same time, American women are
demonstrating keen interest in the mutual
funds—the fast-expanding multibillion-dollar
investment companies which accept the sav-
ings of the small investor and spread them
around the market in a diversified “portfolio.”

ANY QUESTIONS? YES, PLENTY

Mr. George Shaskan, who gave a series of
12 lectures on this type of investment, says:
“We gave what amounted to a college course
in the economics of investing. And the
women said: ‘Wouldn't we please give them |!
something a little more advanced!’ i

“The questions they asked fascinated me. ||
They are highly technical and intelligent. The
women showed an extraordinary understand-
ing of the role of mutual funds in solving
their investment problems. We are going to
expand the course to meet their needs and to
give it both during the day and in the eve-
ning.”

Dorcas Campbell, who conducted’ a course
at New York’s New School of Social Re-
search, says: “We had to fight to close our
question-and-answer periods or the women
would have stayed on for hours asking the
guest lecturers additional questions.

“They were not wasting their time, either.
These students, single women,

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EAT & DRINK
THE BEST !!

wives and TEAS

Chase & Sanborn
Blue Mountain
Empire

MEATS
Hunter’s Sausages
Hunter’s Steak and Kidney

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—A piece by R. M. MacColl
on Bing Crosby in your Sunday
issue of May 7, 1950, several times
has Bing as using the expression
“T aim to” — apparently in a mis-
guided attempt to make him sound
“American” This is commonly
done in British publications evi-

dently to establish a_ readily
identified “American speech” pat-
tern.

“I aim” probably disappeared

from usual speech in the States
about the time Abraham Lincoln;
nearly always it is a rustic ex-
pression and I suspect quite
foreign to Crasby’s speech habits.
He is usually ahead of the pack in
slang.
PAUL B, KINDLUND
§05 Oakland Avenue,
St. Paul Minnesota, U.S.A.
May 31, 1950.
Football

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—Kindly allow me to sug-

gest an island eleven to play
against. Malvern in the first
Island match,

Smith (goal), Bowen and Gib-
bons (Full Backs), Medford,
Haynes, Reece (Everton), (Half
Backs), Chase, Lucas, Wilkes

Blades, Drayton (Forwards).
F, G. ROACH.
King George Road,
June 20, 1950.

Policewomen
To the Editor, The Advocate—

Smr,—I read with interest the
call for “Women as Police’. The
Honourable Miss Audrey Jeffers,
M.B.E., for many years advocated
dhe need for women as Police, and
the police authorities of this col-
ony are to be commended for tak-
ing such a step.

For many years the women of
this colony have suffered through
the lack of employment, for ex-
ample, many of our girls who have
had a secondary education could
find no avenue in which to be em-
ployed, and now this democratic
move has been taken it is obvious
that the girls who are physically
fit will embrace the opportunity.

This opening will prevent many
girls from falling, and in turn
there will be less cases of dis-
repute.

Sir Robert Peel, the English
aristocrat who fought many
battles in the House of Commons,

as instrumental in establishing a
proper Police Force in Great Brit-
iin Policing in Barbados has

reached a high standard, and it is
an organization which the general
public should look up to, and re-
spect, because it plays an import-
ant part in maintaining law and
order.

Women Police in my consid-
ered opinion should play a great
part in preventing women from
doing criminal acts without prose-
cuting them, On the other hand,
they are more capable of diagnos-
ing women's troubles than men

So far as Jamaica is concerned,
there are Women Police who
serve as Welfare officers, and act
as mediators with moral delin-
quents who are subjected through
poverty and economic depression
and are constrained to do im-
moral acts, in order to gain a live-
lihood.

Women should hail with joy this
great opportunity which is off-
ered by Col. Michelin, who prob-
ably got the idea through his ex-
periences in Jamaica or England,
which already have organizations
of this nature that play a prom-

inent part in checking crime
espeXally among women in these
areas

magazine especially
women outlining their griev-

A literary
for

ances would go a long way in
building a high standard of living
among women, such a publication
would assist in creating a new
feeling among women in building
character and impart a desire to
labour honestly to obtain a liveli-
hood; social clubs, lecture groups,
sport organizations and healthy
surroundings will assist greatly in
conquering the many social ills
which beset our women folk.
CLAUDE RAMSAY.

3righton,

Black Rock.

Chivalry

Editor, The Advocate—

Srr,—I am very glad to read of
Mr. G. H. Adams’ defence of wo-
men in the recent debate of the
House of Assembly.

He is certainly to be commended
in every way; what would become
of the world if the name “woman’



To the

is to be dragged in the mire? Mr
Adams can well be assured of the
support of women in every clime,

for the great respect he
the sex that gives
nen and womer

The name of “woman ist not
be let down just for the opinion of
some vindictive member of the
male tribe

holds for
birth to noble

Mr, Adams deserves credit, and
has now the British housewives

behind him
DEFENDER.
Football

To the Editor, The Advocate—

Str,—Sunday’s practice game
showed quite a few flaws in our
footballers, and I now suggest the
following team to play against the
“Rest”

Harris (goal, Proverbs and
Gibbons (full-backs), Cadogan,
Haynes, Ishmael (half-backs),
Drayton, Wilkes, Lucas (for-
wards), Chase and Harper (out-

side left).

ERIC EVELYN.
Eagle Hall,
June 17, 1950.

Holders Hill

Editor, The Advocate—
S1tr,—On Holde#s Hill, St. James
the surface of the road is con-
tinually being washed away on the
slightest rainfall, and a new sur-
face continually being replaced in
the same primitive fashion, Re-
cently this Parish resorted to oil-
ing the surface of this Hill, since
this practice has been adopted the
surface of this Hill has been
washed away three times, and is

To the

now being replaced. 1 consider
this a waste of public funds,

Could not the government
through the Highways & Tr: ‘ans-

port Department Engineer give
some technical help to the Paro-
chial authorities, thereby saving
this waste of taxpaye

rs’ money? I
hope the Government will look ih-
to this matter urgently for it is no
use giving us beautiful tenantry

roads and not the same P
arochial |
Highw ays. = |

St. James,
June 14, 1950

TAXPAYER,

Approval |



To the Editor, The Advoc ate—
SIR,—Please allow me to ee

press my appreciation of the ex

cellent refereeing of L, F Harris |

in the Colts—Malvern match on |
Monday I understand that except
for one or two First Division |
Games, that this as his first big |
— He did a good job.

hat struck n
infrequent : tie hile’ at

use of the whis



tle, ¢
his fine control of a ey “ai

could ¢ ly he t ht
rought disr¢
pute



June 20, 1950

For Best feria It's GODDARDS

Hunter’s Meat Pastes
Vienna Sausages





Hams — Whole and Cut
BLACK CURRANT JAM s
Mer DOSIB soci v vd ba nah aes « 50c.
BRAMBLE JELLY per bottle ___ 36
FISH PASTE—per tin .,... ee



Carr's Sweet Biscuits
Carr's Chocolate Tea Cakes
Carr's Lunch Biscuits
Marsh Mallows

Ovaltine Rusks
Table Raisins
Fresh Vegetables
Cucumber in Tins
Pom in Packages



J. & R. BREAD
& CAKES
Fresh Daily

CROWN DRINKS

7 Flavours

Fl FINE Wy
BEERS =

| Gar



GOLD BRAID RUM
TOP NOTCH RUM

Guinness Stoutenips



se













WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950



They Pull
Stolen Cycles
To Pieces

CYCLE THIEVES

are em-
ploying strategy to hide
their stolen cycles. Instead of

selling the-cycles as they are
stolen they pull them to pieces
and change some of the parts

A stolen cycle, which was a
Court Exhibit recently, had the
saddle identified by one per-
on, the back wheel another.
he frame, handle and head lamp
xy three others.

COOL BREEZE BLEW over

the City yesterday: and be-
cause of this the heat was not as
intense as on Monday. The
temperature was 85 degrees
Fahrenheit in the Shade at mid-
day.

During Monday and up to six
o'clock yesterday morning the
rainfall throughout the island was
one inch and 93 parts, This vw;
an increase over the rainfall for
the past few days.

Of this, St. Peter with 41
parts recorded the heaviest’ show-
trs while 25 parts fell in it
Thomas. Other returns were
City four parts, Station Hij| Dis—
trict two parts, St. George four
parts, St. Philip _ six parts, St
Joseph 21 parts, *St, James 24
parts, St. John 20 partg, St
Andrew 41 parts and St. Lucy
4 parts.

ORK ON THE NEW PLAZA

Theatre is rapidly progress-
ing. A part of the concrete for
the ground floor has already been
put down, and workmen are busy
on the other section.

The windows are already fitted
#n and the roof with the excep
tion of a small part is now qov-
ered With a “tintex”, The bulk
of the work is being done to the

ow at



floor of the balcony and the
operating room is almost com-
pleted.

The wall which is on the right
side of the building has already
been constructed, and work is
being carried out on the levelling
of this enclosure.

HE LOSS OF A QUANTITY
of articles was reported by
Henry Best of Watkins Alley. He
stated that they were removed
from his residence between Satur-
day and Monday.
oe WALTERS OF BIBBY
LANE, St. Michael reported
the loss of a quantity of clothing
and a watch, total value $60.30,
from his residence between 9.30
a.m. and 3.30 p.m. on Monday.
Or FIVE TRAFFIC OF-
FENCES recorded yester-
day only one motorist was
charged with exceeding the
speed limit while two persons
were charged with not keeping
their vehicles to the left of the
road,

Another motorist was charged
for driving without due care and
attention and one for driving
without the appropriate licence.

N ACCIDENT OCCURRED
on Bank Hall Road at about
12.45 p.m. on Monday between
a bieyele ridden by Edgar Hold-

er and -a_ pedestrian—Hildfa
Cadogan of Alleyne’s Land,
Passage Road.

Cadogan complained of pains

She was taken to the General
Hospital where she was treated
and discharged.
HE REAR WHEEL of moto:
car M—753, owned by Levis
L. Carter of Black Rock and
driven by Lester E. Carter of the
same address, was damaged in an
accident along Prince William
Henry Street at about 4.20 p.m.
on Monday.

Also involved was motor lorry
X—591, owned by Spencers Plan-
caper and driven by Isaac Frank-
yn.

BICYCLE AND A motor car
were involved in an accident
along Trafalgar Square at about
4.00 p.m. on Monday. The car,

X—276, was owned and driven
by James McKenzie of Navy
Gardens, Christ Church, while

the bicycle was ridden by St.Clair
Watson of Airy Cot, St. Thomas.
The cycle was damaged

IONEL MYLES OF LODGE

4 HILL, St. Michael, was
treated at the General Hospital
for injuries after being involved
in an accident along Prospect
Road, St. James at about 7.45
p.m. on Monday.

Motor van M—2506, owned by
Messrs, Alleyne Arthur & Co.
Ltd., High Street, and driven by
Richards L. Marshall of Brittons

Cross Road, was also involved.
Myles was riding his bicycle.
FIRE WhitcH OCCURRED
t at the residence of Clirrie
Maloney of Passage Road, St.
Michael, at about 2.00 o'clock

yesterday morning destroyed a
portion of the roof and a quantity
of clothing.

es, When the Fire Brigade arrived
eh the scene, neighbours had al-
ready helped in extinguishing the
blaze. The value is unestimated,
but the house is not covered by

insurance, Oh

Jamaica Civil
Servants Ask
50% Pay Rise

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
KINGSTON, June 20.

Jamaica’s Civil Servants yester-
day adopted a resolution calling
upon the Government for an im-
mediate 50% increase on_ their
salaries within one morth. Copies
of the resolution were “being for-
warded to the Secretary of State
for the Colonies. Bustamante as
head of the government. and
N. W. Manley, leader of the Oppo-
sition were elected members of
the Association. Employees de-
clared that if steps were not taken
to satisfy this demand, they would
go on a sick strike. A call was
made for wage increases for Civil
Servants and the government is
studying a report by E. C. Mills
on civil service salary re-organi-
sation. Recently the Government
spokesman pointed out that the
present cost of the service is in
the region, 5 million dollars was
too much for the colony’s present
income



5 time and thought to the question

ee

offer be
of the Memorandum by the that the fullest weight has been treated as a mere matter o{ busi-
Minister of Food and the Min- given te the important part which ness and the concern of the Min-
ister of State for Colonial the sugar industry plays, and must istry of Food alone. We agree
Affairs, issued on June 7th in play, in the economy of their ter- Indeed, we should have thought
reply to representations made ritories. We feel, however, that that it was apparent to all that
by the West Indian Sugar Del- the Delegation does less than jus- the offers made by the United
egation to His Maj sty’s Gov- tice to the extent to which other :
ernment on 26th May, 1950. crops besides sugar have been de-
We have studied sympatheti- veloped over a period of years.
cally the Memorandum presented There is substantial production in
to us on the 26th May, 1950 by the the territories of such crops as ’
British West Indies ‘and British rice, cocoa, coffee, cocoanuts, cit- that an agreement that did not
Guiana Sugar Delegation, and are TUS and bananas and there are have proper regard to the com-
most grateful for the care and other possibilities, such as jute in mercial needs of the buyer as
thought devoted to its prepara- British Guiana. There are also well as to the needs of the seller
tion. We have read with concern, important mineral industries would prove to be _ ill-conceived
however, their strictures on the (bauxite in British Guiana, which anq transitory and we trust that
action of the United Kingdom ®ccounts for 25% of the total ex- the Delegation will be prepared to
Government in announcing on the Ports of the Colony, oil and as- support the view that commercial
8rd April, after the Grenada Con- — “ en tee between considerations have a vital part
ference, that while they would be them form over 70% of the total t play in the evolution of per-
willing to receive a delegation, ©XPorts of Trinidad), and other J anent and satisfactory arrange-
their offer to the British Wes; â„¢ineral potentialities (oil in Bar- : Pre Prt ee
c Ss bad nd bauxite in J ica), ments for the supply of sugar by
Indies Sugar Association was final, 22005 @ amaica). ine w i he. United
Members of the United Kingdom Nor does the Delegation make re- ‘he West Indies to the Unite
Government had devoted much fetence to the efforts which are Kingdom.
being made to develop secondary Li 2 d
piel There are already a unite
considerable number of such in- va omen ronsider the
dustries established and there will coagllent Te. a. Hho
be more. While they - . roy
le they ean hardly ment extending over eight years,
neither the United Kingdom

by themselves wholly support the
economy of the territories they
have their part to play. Fresh Government nor the sugar pro-
sources of powers, e.g. water pow- ducing territories of the Common-
er in British Guiana or perhaps oi] wealth can escape the fact that
in Barbados, would increase the the capacity of the United King-
possibilities. In short, while we dom market is itself limited.
realise that the sugar industry The Delegation has quoted a
must be the mainstay of most of figure for the consumpticn of
the territories, we feel that the sugar in the United Kingdom of
oer have not taken account 2,750,000 tons. We have failed to
a rexports or of the meas- trace the source of this estimate,
Ss already taken to diversify the but it is d edly t
economy and the possibilities PUL jt & undoubtedly over opti.
which exist of carryin Bpelicy “E> Ser a erate, we
ving this ‘policy certainty the future level of sugar

further. “
consumption—a matter which de-

Do Not Believe pends not only on supply but on

the levels of prices and of pur-

cannot

beyond what could be defended
on strict usiness principles

during the winter negotiations,
and having studied the resolu-
tions of the Conference, felt that
it was unlikely that the Delegation
would be able to advaiece facts
or arguments not previously con-
sidered. It would in our view,
have been quite wrong in these
circumstances to have allowed the
Delegation to embark upon their
Yong voyage without making it
clear beyond doubt that the Gov-
ernment could hold out no pros-
pect whatever o€ amending. their
previous offer.

Misconceptions

We are glad, that, nevertheless.
the Delegation” decided to pro-
ceed to the United Kingdom,
since it gives us the opportunity

of removing misconceptions The United Kingdom Govern- chasing power. The estimate
which appepr to underlie the ment emphatically do not believe eventually adopted by the United
criticisms to which ther United that, as the Delegation suggest Kingdom Government, after the
Kingdom Government’s offer has their offer is likely to lead to a most careful investigation, as-
been subjected, and especially recurrence of the conditions that sumes that when rationing
the impression that the interests existed before the war. This can be ended the United
of the West Indies were subor- statement ignores the Yact that Kingdom's annual = consump-
dinated to those of Australia. the offer of a guaranteed market tion of sugar will rise to
The fact is that up to the time

Currency Control

The Delegation has stated that
currency control “in effect requires
the Colonies to buy from the
United Kingdom at high uncon-

the Head of the Australian Dele- S'@te® part of the sugar crop for increases in population and
resentatives of the West Indies "0 Comparable contract has ever immediately before the war
ment’s proposal. The Govern. fer the Government have had in war level at present prices of
postponement or of concluding iâ„¢Portance of ensuring stable eco- tions based upon more optimistic
other Delegations. Since its pro- *!4¢r that the terms proposed are extending over .the next eight
native but to conclude an agree- /€8S than justice to the very sub-
being reached for a comprehen- ten years) and is being made We come now to the actual offer
untrue that political considera- The Delegation’s Memorandum /éies Sugar Association. — In
compatible with their declared Guiana exported an average of
case that the proposals made ritories. The Government = ee big plus either the Canadian or the
long- the export of 900,000 tons of sug-
the years 1953-1957 of 649,- ment as pre-requisites of consti- sua gekee: to te empeiineel. each
comgraon that the exportable of the sugar industry in the Car- Canada or in the United Kingdom:
that they are not in accord sidered that it would not be in atthe time. Bearing in mind the
Voast Indies on the 10th August. | oduction of sugar at the expense dies, this offer should provide for
Ga ee ere for good and stable government in with an industry of about 600,000
come comparable with the yn- fotented Weel economic The details of an offer which provides
therefore, that the United King- contract can only be demonstrated which will afford assured markets
British West Indies Sugar As- Kingdom’s offer provide a sound years before the war and 180,000
cover 725,000 tons. in the West Indies. rightly be condemned as ungenet-
the West Indies have not fully ap- Deeialy met Mew is widely
last winter’s negotiations, a dual market are not fully understood
ensure to the best of its ability trolled prices.” We recognise that
the restriction of dollar imports the Delegation feels that this offer

that agreement was reached with oF cnmunerative prices for the 2,550,000 tons. This figure allows
F : z _ represents a fundamental change for a somewhat higher consump-
aetture for’ Australian. the, veg, £0 pre-war conditions; indeed, tion per head than in the years
been offered by the United King- Wheth in fact -
had felt wholly unable to aecept c 8 ether in fact per capita con
the United Kingdom Galeetre dom Government. In making this sumption would rise to the pre-
ment, therefore, was faced with ™®d, not only their own long- sugar may well be a matter of
the alternatives of indefinite ‘"™ Yequirements, but also the doubt, but certainly any assump-
its arrangements with Australia “0Mic conditions for a major forecasts would be quite unreal-
in advance of agreement with Conial interest. And we con- jstic in relation to a contract
posals were acceptable to Aus- ®t inconsistent with that dual years,
tralia it had, in fact, little alter- Objective. This criticism also does
ment on the understanding that S#Mtial assistance which has been The U. K. Offer
it was subject to a settlement (Some £19 millions over the past
. i de by the United Kingdom
sive Commonwealth Agreement, ®Vailable under The Colonial ™® . iti a
We would add that it is wholly Development and Welfare Acts. Government to the British West
tion influenced the United King- further suggests that the United }re three years before the war the
dom Government's offer Kingdom Government’s offer is in- :
We understand it to be the policy of encouraging constitution- 550,000 tons of sugar, all of which
essence of the Defegation’s al progress in the Caribbean ii "to“be ienid at She: worlssprice
not ‘Wey
by the United Kingdom Gov- regard their offer as in amy way United Kingdom preference, The
eae i aoe on inconsistent with ‘their Government's offer provides for
ndies Sugar ssociation for standing policy of fostering social , af 00
the purchase annually during }etterment and economic develop- ret A Ah Bor A ret eater
000 tons of sugar at a reason- tutional progress. While we full
r M ; Y year, and the remaining 260,000
ae ito ter ive Brice, om recognise the major importance tons will find a market either in
8 should be ;
a na e undealinats ibbean area, and are most anxious gt the world price plus such pre-
, to secure its well-being, we con- ferential duties as may be in force
with the promise made to a
the long-term interest of the West increase in home consumption
previous Delegation from the Indian Colonies to encourage the that has occurred in the West In-
1949, and that the ;
to fears a gil road Frings © med of other forms of ‘economic de- an industry of between 1,000,000
velopment. The best foundation and 1,050,000 tons as compared
ditions in the st Indi . }
so far 2 ee as a aan the Caribbean ‘area lies in the tons before the war. Whatever
well- criticisms can be levelled at the
happy state of affairs before balanced local economics,
the war, The Delegation urge, ¢conomic effects of the proposed for expansion of this order, and
dom Government should ac- by events, but we are confident for exports of 350,000 tons more
cede to the request of the that the terms of the United sugar than was exported in the
sociation that the guaranteed foundation for further progress in tons more than the current level
market should be extended to the economic and industrial field Of exports, we do not think it can
‘ ; ous, or as failing to implement the
We believe these views are mis- undertaking given last summer
taken and arise from the fact that
held it can only be because the
preciated that the United King- te, Amy of iad United Kingdom
dom Government had, throughout
responsibility: a responsibility ; ,
which we gladly acknowledge, to Australia
We understand,, however, that
that sugar producers throughout
the Commonwealth are given rea- js onerous, but it is a burden compares unfavourably with the

sonabie opportunity to expand shared by the United “ingdom offers made to Australia. When
their industry under conditions anq py all the other sterling area the Government of the United
of reasondple security, and a

countries. It is necessary in order Kingdom undertook in 1948 to buy

responsibility for ensuring that the to preserve the strength of ster- the whole exportable surplus that

cost to consumers in the United

Kingdom does not become so bur- ling until the sterling dollar trad- could be produced within the
densome as to carry with it a risk ing account can be brought into Commonwealth up to 1952, they
of public reaction against a policy balance. To do this is in the gave all producers an’ incentive to
of contracting for many years economic interests of each one of expand their exports up to 1952
ahead for the supply of si the sterling area countries. without limit. The results of their
from the Commonwealth. While, But this does not mean that efforts are now known within nar-

therefore, the Government was
prepared to enter into guarantees
in respect of the greater part of
the sugar exported from the Col-
onies to the United Kingdom, it
could not agree that United King-
dom consumers should be called
upon wholly to insulate sugar
producers in the Commonwealth
from the movement of world
prices in respect of all sugar sold
to the United Kingdom. Nor, in-
deed, does the Government be-
lieve that to increase the very
large measure of security already
offered would lead to more effi-
cient sugar preduction, or would
ultimately prove to be in the wider
interests of the West Indies them-

the area from which the Colonies row limits and must clearly stang
can draw their imports is nar- as the minima for any subsequent
rowly restricted. In effect the agreements. This year, Australia,
control severely restricts im- will sell to the United Kingdom
ports at present only from 500,000 tons of sugar, and there
North America and the American 7 . tiwar~ . ac ane

ee area, and from Switzer of 600,000 tons by 1952. It is that
; fact that has established her right
to a quota of 600,000 tons ander
the proposed Commonwealth
agreement. Nevertheless, only
300,000 tons out of this 600,000
tons will be bought at the guaran-
teed price. Having regard to the
importance attached by the West
Indies to the quantities subject to
guarantee, we find it difficult to

Manufactured and cther
imports can be crawn from
most of Europe, independent
Commonwealth countries
within the sterling area and
many other countries with,
for practical purposes. little
or no restriction, This import
and foreign exchange control

never had as its ob‘ect the think that, dispassionately consid-

rrr . Sone a S aatkaond pane ered, an offer to buy 640,000 tons
Cc s ot A tion for United Kingdom ex- out of 900,000 tons from the West
ann ccept ports. Its sole purpose is 40 Indies at a reasonably remunera-

The argument that Colonial congerve the resources of tive price, as compared with only

300,000 tons out of 600,000 tons
from Australia, can be regarded as
favouring the latter. We are con
fident, indeed, that comparison
unr sila confirms our view that the eee
eeerrer ; taking given by the United King-

We note that the a dom Government last August ha
claims that the United Kingdom }.0) fully and, indeed, generous!’

implemented.

Not Responsible

We have already explained that
in our view it would neither be
reasonable, nor in the long term
interests of the West Indies, if con-
sumers in the United Kingdon
were to be called upon to insulate
Commonwealth producers against
the movement of world prices to
an extent greater than is provided
in the United Kingdom Govern-
ment’s proposals. It follows that
the amount of sugar that the

farmers are entitled to be helped
by the United Kingdom Govern-
ment in the same way that United
Kingdom Government helps Unit-
ed Kingdom farmers is not one
that we can accept. It is the United
Kingdom taxpayers as such, not
the consumer of sugar, who stb-
sidizes the United Kingdom beet
farmer. Colonies are not part of
the United Kingdom fiscal system.
Any special assistance to Colonial
producers, over and above a price
for sugar negotiated between sell-
er and buyer, would have to be
borne by Colonial Governments.
The United Kingdom Govern-
ment do not for a moment deny
the natural suitability of the West
Indies for the production of sugar
Indeed, they have in the past en-
couraged expansion of sugar pro-
duction and the arrangements they
are proposing allow for consider-
able further expansion. The De-

“hard” currencies. It therefore
follews that United King-
dom exports are in competi-
tion with exports from many



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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

United Kingdom can undertak
to purchase from the West
Indies under guarantee cannot be
increased. We believe, neverthe-
less, that the Delegation take
altogether too pessimistic a view
of the consequences of selling 29%

dies at the workd price plus
rent preferential duties Their
a misconception of the Cuban pos
ition and a mistaken belief that
Cuba, by reason of her access to
the United States market, can
adopt a policy of “dumping” with
out serious consequences for her
sugar economy. The contrary is
true; the consequences of “dump-
ing” would be most serious for
her. It is not, indeed, open to
doubt that Cuba has a heavic:
stake in the maintenance of a
satisfactory level of world prices
for free market sugar than pro
ducers in the British West Indies
would have under the proposed
arrangements.
°
- Mistaken

The Delegation, arguing
that Cuba has the power t
unload her exportable surplus on
the world market at prices which
bear little or no relation to costs
of production, is repeating an
argument persistently but mistak~
enly advanced by the West Indies
Cuba has a guaranteed outlet in
the United States of America for
rather less than half her exporta-
ble production. She has, however.
no guarantee whatsoever = in
respect of pricé. The basis on
which the United States buys
Cuban sugar is the daily price
at which Cuban sugar is sold in
the world market plus the effective
United States preference of 25 to

in

28 points. (At today's rate of
exchange of 2.80 dollars to the
£, this is equivalent to 2/- t
2/3d. per cwt., or rather less

than half the preference which
the Colonies enjoy in the Unitee
Kingdom). When the world price
stood at 4.70 cents f.o.b. in Jan-
uary last, United States refiners
were buying at 4.96 cents f.0,b
Today when the world price has
fallen to 4.15 cents, United States
reffners are able to’ buy at less
than 4.45 cents: if the world price
declines to 3.50 cents then Cuba
sells to the United States at 3.75
cents to 3.80 cents.

In other words, the
at which the Cubans
sell their exportable pro-
\duction, whether to the
United States or in the free
market, is wholly determined
by the world price. It is true
that a reduction of United
States quotas in the interests
of domestic pro@ucers might
have the temporary effect of
adding a point or two to the
Cuban preference. But an ad-
vantage such as this is pure-
ly incidental and temporary.

price
must

It in no way alters the fact
that the price at which Cuba sells
to the United States is based on
the world market price. Tt follows

that for Cuba a_ policy of
“dumping” sugar on world
markets at something less. than

the economic cost of production
would be suicidal, since the con-
sequences would be _ reflected
immediately hot only in the prices
she received for her “dumped”
sugar, but in the prices
received from the United States.
It is for this reason that Cuba is
so convinced an advocate of &
new International Sugar Agree-
ment. We do not deny, of course
that the West Indies has an inter-
est in the world price. Indeed,
we have expressed the view thet
a healthy sugar economy could
not be developed if she were to
be wholly insulated from that
price. What we are concerned to
point out, however, is that to Cuba
the world price of sugar is vital,
despite her preferential position
in the United States market, and
that to assume that she can afford
to “dump” sugar without the most
serious consequences is to assume
something that is demonstrably

untrue.
" °
The Solution
In the view of the United
Kingdom Government the solu~

tion to the problem of the world
price of sugar is to be found in

the negotiation of a new Inter-
national Sugary Agreement. Fail~
ing such an Agreement there

would be little hope of persuading
such countries as Cuba, San
Domingo, Peru or Java to limit
their production, more especially

us the tIast three have no
preferential markets to which to
turn, and depend wholly upon

selling the maximum amount of
sugar in the free market

The result of failure might
well be to start a disastrous
sugar war from the — conse-
quences of which it wou!l4
in practice, be impossible per
manently to insulate Colonial
producers no matter what the
nature of the guarantee. It is,
therefore, vital that the United

Kingdom, in consultation with the
Colontes, should be in a position
to play her part in the negotiation
of an International Sugar Agree-
ment, and that she could not hope
to do unless she could give firm
undertakings that a defined and
defensible share in the United
Kingdom market would be sei
aside for free market sugar, It is
mainly for this reason that the
United Kingdom has reserved an
amount of 225,000 tons for that

purpose.

During the winter negotiations
the United Kingdom Government

promised to consider with the
producers’ representatives each
year whether a further year

could be added to the agreement
They also stated that the quanti
ties of sugar covered by the long-
rerm agreement offered to Com
monwealth producers coyld be
revised upwards if circumstig
ces permitted, but undertook that
there would be no question of
revising them downwards durjng



the period of the eight-year
agreement (1950—57). These
statements stand Moreover,
if producers so wish, they will
be willing to conduct a_ special
examination during the
first year of the 1953—1957
agreement The examination
would be made in the light of
all the circumstances then ob





Sn re ne ee een

U.K. STATES HER VIEWS ABOUT SUGAR |

*'@ The following is the full text legation can be assured, therefore, Government's

Kingdom Government went much of the production of the West >
cur-

alone. We are convinced, however, view appears to be founded upon

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taining, ineluding the levels o1
export performance achieved by
all parties to the agreement and
consumption trends, The revigw
would cover all the quantities of
sugar which the United Kingdom
Government have undertaken
to buy from the
producers.
in the Untied Kingdom pra’
bigher’ than has been estima}
the United Kingdom v

would not, at that stage
examination of the 5s
some addition to the 4q H
ts be purchased under guarantee

An Appeat

We should like to conclude by a
appealing to the Delegation to
consider the United Kingdom
Government's offer dispassionate-
ly in the light of what is practi-
cable in the hard world of inter-
national commerce in which the
United Kingdom and the Wes:
Indies both must live, rather
than in the light of what might
De theoretically desirable in
quite other circumstances, We
would remind the Delegatidn
that the ability of the United
Kingdom to afford to the Colonjes
and Dominions the security ‘of
long term agreement for sugar
and other commodities rests
altimately on her strength as a
nates nation, and that to, over-
tax that strength must ultynately
curry its penalty. est
Indies have not got al] they
asked for — but negotiators sel-
dom do. On the other hand,
they have been offered a meas-
ure of expansion and a -of




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College Masters
Will Teach Science

MEMBERS of the staff of the
Department of Science and Agri-
culture will no longer be responsi-
ble for the teaching of science at
Harrison College, according to the
terms of a bill passed by the Leg-
islative Council at yesterday’s

meeting.

Arrangements have been made
for the teaching of that subject
to be undertaken by masters of
the College, and the bill relieves
the Director of Science and Agri-
culture from his statutory re-
sponsibility for teaching science
by making appropriate amend-
ments to the Department of Sci-
ence and Agriculture Act, 1925.

Members of the Council yester-
day expressed agreement with
the new arrangement.





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© PAGE SIX



Council Approves Pension
For Loan Bank Manager

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL yesterday by a seven
to four majority passed a BiJl to provide for the payment
of a pension to Douglas Arden Mottley Haynes, Manager ot

the Peasants’ Loan Bank.

The division was:

Ayes: Hon’bles Mr. Challenor,
Dr. Massiah, Mr. Gittens, The
Bishop, Dr. St. John, Mr. Hutson
and the Acting Colonial Secretary.

Noes: Hon’bles Mr, Evelyn, Mr.
Mahon, Mrs. Hanschell and Mr.
Pile.

This Bill seeks to grant to Doug-

s Arden Mottley Haynes, Man-
ger of the Peasants’ Loan Bank,
a pension in respect of public ser-

ce.

Douglas Arden Mottley Haynes
was appointed an assistant teacher
in 1914 and after serving with the
B.W.I. Regiment from 1915 to 1919
‘was appointed a Cadet in the Har-
pour Master’s office. In 1921 he
entered the Parochial Service of
the parish of St. Thomas and re-
mained in that service until 1936
when he was appointed manager
of the Peasants’ Loan Bank, which
post he still holds.

In view of Mr. Haynes’ good ser-
vice in the various offices he has
held, it is considered equitable he
should be granted a pension (or
a reduced pension and gratuity)
of two thirds of his present salary
as Manager of the Peasants’ Loan
Bank when he retires from that

st.

The Bill is drafted to give effect
accordingly.
{| The Acting Colonial Secretary
moved the second reading of the
Bill. He said that it was slightly
unusual, Its purpose was to pro-
vide a pension for a man who had
and was working in the service of
the people of Barbados—the Local
Government, the Central Govern-
ment and otherwise, for 36 years.

Unkind

His service at the Peasants’ Loan
Bank was not pensionable and it
would be an extremely unkind act
for a Government employing him
for so long not to give him any
reward or any safety for his fu-
ture. Mr. Haynes was a very effi-
cient officer and runs the Peasants’
Loan Bank extremely well. He
had undertaken now to do even a
more difficult and he thought a
more important task, that was to
run the Labour Welfare Housing
Loan Scheme, a scheme which
needed his rticular knowledge.
He thought it was fitting that the
Government should give Mr.
Haynes this pension.
| Hon’ble Mr. Challenor seconded
the motion for the second read-

e President said that the
Hon’ble Colonial Secretary in his
oO) remarks had said that the

Was an unusual one, He
agreed, and he thought it was his
duty to draw to the attention of
the Council that the Bill was
breaking completely new ground
as pensions to people for
services which had not been ren-
dered to the Government. When
he first read the notice to the Bill
he compared it to the Bill which
‘was a few years ago for
a pension to Mr. Chase, but on
further consideration it did appear
to him that it was not on the same
basis as that Bill.

Thirty Years

| He was saying that for the
reason that when Mr. Chase re-
tired he had served the Govern-
ment from 1908 to 1938, a period
of 30 years. He then left the Gov-
ernment service to be Manager of
the Barbados Settlement Company
in St. Lucia, better known as the
Nieux Fort Emigration Scheme.
That scheme was financed purely
by Government and therefore al-
though he ht not have been a
Government Civil Servant while
serving in that capacity, he was
certainly a quasi Government ser-
vant. Before accepting that post
he had asked Government that his
services be considered as earning
pension, and he was assured that
that would be given due consid-
eration when the time came.

Mr, Chase remained in that post
from 1938 to 1943 and from 1943
to 1947 he was appointed Social
Welfare Officer. His salary was
fixed on a non-pensionable basis,
and when the time came for him
to retire he was undoubtedly en-
titled to his thirty years’ Govern-
ment service. The Bill for his
pension took into consideration his
ten years’ service with the Bar-
bados Settlement Company and as
Social Welfare Officer, and he was
given half the period as would
qualify him for pension.

| Keep Pace With Equity

» As he had already said the Bill
before them to his mind, was not
on all fours with that of Mr,
(Chase’s. He had looked up the
debate in connection with Mr.
Chase’s Bill and had seen that the
then Colonial Secretary had said
that the Bill was to enable the
law to keep pace with equity; that
tthe Government proposed to do
what they expected it to do, that
twas, to be equitable to those who
had given good service.

He agreed. with everything that
had taken place with regard to
Mr, Chase’s Bill but what had per-
turbed him as regards the present
Bill was that the individual con-
cerned, although he had been in

the Government service and was
a very good servant, was in the
service from 1914 to 1921 after

which he accepted employment in
the parochial service working with
the Vestry of St. Thomas.

That to his mind, although being
a public service, was deftnitely
not Government Service, “Mr.
Haynes must have known when
he accepted the post that he wobid
be losing Government pension and
therefore must have weighed the
pros and cons of the matter.

Mr. Haynes remained in that
service from 1921 to 1936 and he
then went to the Peasants’ Loan
Bank from 1936 to 1950. He would
agree that it would be equitable
to give Mr. Haynes pension for his
service at the Peasants’ Loan
Bank for though it could not be
regarded as official Government
service, it was certainly quasi
Government service.

He did not feel, however, that it
was equitable for Government to

ension anyone for giving fifteen
years’ service to another body. He
felt it would be inequitable to all
other Government employees. He

felt a Bill like that was inequit-
able to all Government servants
who remained permanently and
continuously in the Government
Service, and he only wanted to
point out to the CounciJ that it
was breaking new ground. He was
not quite sure where it would lead

Agreed

Hon'ble Mr.
agreement with
remarks,

The Acting Colonial Secretary
said that in his opening remarks
he had said the Bill was unusual
and there was no denying that. It
was not unusual in that it would
allow pension or gratuity, Where
it was unusual was that it said
service in the public interest
would be counted as Government
service. Some of that service
might have been paid for at a
higher rate than the normal Gov-
ernment rate but in any case it
was too difficult to prove then.

Evelyn expressed
the President’s

It had been suggested that half
the service should have been
counted, but this he would assure
them was slowly becoming out-of-
date,

He was worried about the re-
percussions on the Service gen-
erally, but he did think that Mr.
Haynes’ case was an exceptional
one and merited exceptional
treatment. He, however, would
not like to see it usec as a prece-
dent by other persons who had
given service to outside bodies,
semi-government or otherwise.

As far as he remembered there
was recent agreement by one ves-
try to make contribution to an ex
gratia pension which would come
before the legislature soon, That
would lead them to the position
where they were trying to give a
reasonable benefit to a man who
had served his commyinity well.

The motion that the Bill was
read a second time was then put
to the vote and resolved as al-
ready ‘stated. It was afterwards
passed.



*“Vansluytman’
Lost Stern Post

AFTER spending four weeks
undergoing repairs at Trinidad and
one week discharging cargo at
Antigua, the schooner Timothy
A. H. Vansluytman sailed for Bar-
bados, reaching port on Monday
evening.

On this trip the Vansluytman
lost her stern post when about two
miles from the Bocas. This caused
the delay at Trinidad.

Captain Stoll told the Advocate
yesterday that the Vansluytman
left British Guiana on May 8 for
Antigua via Trinidad. Good
weather prevailed, but the stern
post gave away, damaging the
steering gear.

He sailed the vessel into Port-
of-Spain where all the cargo was
unloaded before docking. From
Trinidad the Vansluytman called
at Antigua and then sailed for
Barbados,

The vessel has only brought 18
pieces of greenheart for this port.

IMPORTS
YESTERDAY

ABOUT 700 bags of first quality
rice and 306 bags of broken rice
arrived in the island yesterday
when the 72-ton schooner Emeline
sailed into port.

This schooner has also brought
1,500 pieces of sawn green heart,
700 bags of charcoal, 68 tons of
firewood and 75 cases of patent

medicines.

Also calling at this port was
the motor vessel Lady Joy from
St. Lucia which brought fresh
fruit, plantains, coconuts and

coconut oil.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





In The Couneil Council Encourages

Yesterday

At yesterday's meeting of the Legisla

tive Council the Acting Colonial Secretary
laid the following documents

Statement showing Gross Customs and
Excise Receipts for twelve months ended
3ist March, 1950

The Labour Welfare
Loans) Regulations, 1950.

The Customs (Amendment) Re«ulations,
1950.

Colonial Estimates, 1950-51

Statement showing Gross Customs and
Excise Receipts for one month ended 30th
April, 1950.

The Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop
Assistants) Order, 1950.

Statement of the sunis of money paid
ever to the Colonial Treasurer by the
Commissioner of Police during the quart
er_ended 3ist March, 1950.

The Motot Vehicles and Road Traffic
(Amendment) Regulations, 1950.

Contract between J. N. Harriman and
Company, Limited, and the Executive
Committee of the Island of Barbados, for
the construction of a new runway,
taxiway and parking apron at Seawell
Airport in the Island of Barbados

The following Bills were passed :

Bill to amend the Department of
Seience and Agriculture Act, 1925.

Bill to amend the Executive Committee
Act, 1891

Bill to amend the Public Employees
Pension Act, 1937.

Bill for promoting the cultivation of
trees and for purposes in connection
therewith,

Bill to provide for the payment of a
pension to Douglas Ardon Mottley Haynes
Manager of the Peasant’s Loan Bank in
this Island.

Bill to amend the Widows and Orphans
Pension Act, 1928,

The Council postponed consideration of
the three following measures ;—

Bill to authorise the Governor-in-Exe-
cutive Committee to let certain Govern-
-ment Jands to the Governing Body of
Combermere School.

Bill to amend the Representation of the
People Act, 1901,

Resolution to make it lawful for a
Vestry to lease land within their parish
for any period not exceeding 21 years
and that any such lease shall be binding
on the successive Vestries of the said
parish,

Fund (Housing

The Council adjourned until 2 p.m, next
Tuesday



% :
Schuman Defends
France
@ From Page 1
to renew healthier European econ-

omy,

“My colleague M._ Stikker
(Dutch Foreign Minister) has
recently made an important and
fruitful contribution to this sub-
ject. It is placed on a different
level to our own, but there is no
overlapping nor _ contradiction
between our two objectives.

“A further characteristic of the
French proposal is this:

“Besides its economic signifi-
cance, susceptible of development
which at the gresent moment one
can only guess at, it has, and pre-
serves, a political value which
from the first hour struck public
opinion in the different countries
more than any other considera-
tion

Co-operation

“The essential thing is that we
want to substitute an enlightened
cooperation for the old practices of
dumping and discrimination, But
what is at least ag important is
the certainty of eliminating from
our European community a latent
cause of trouble, mistrust, and
«nguish, and a hope of erecting on
this peacemaking cooperation a
solid European edifice accessible
we oau European nations of good-
wi

“We would keenly have
desired that Great Britain be
present at our discussions

We cannot conceive Europe

without her. “We know that

the British Government de-
sires the success of our labour,
and this re-assures us.

“Certain differences of view
which presented her from par-
ticipating actively, at least at this
stage. appeared in the course of
an exchange of views which was
as frank as it wag friendly.

“We preserve the hope that the
doubts and scruples, which a
reasoning that tended to be doc-
trinal could not overcome, will
end by giving way before more
concrete demonstrations.

Conformity

“The French Government will
certainly be acting in conformity
with the considerations animating
all the participating governments
when it keeps the British Gov-
ernment informed of the develop-
ment of our deliberations and
thus provides it with a possibility,
if not of joining us—which we
persist in desiring—then at least
of communicating to us all useful
observations thus preparing the
way for future co-operation,

As for ourselves, we shall
have commenced a work that
has been assigned to us. First
of all we must adopt a method
of work.

“It will be the work of a
team and not of a conference
with its rigid regulations. Our
main consideration will be to
be effective. The sparkle of
eloquence will not tempt us.
“An information meeting to-

morrow will enable us to settle
our ideas in this respect, These
ideas will take shape during the
personal contacts which we shail
make it our busingss to establish
and maintain.

“Fundamental problems will be
approached at the same time,
One cannot separate one from the
other.” We shali pool our ideas,
confront them, and choose be-
tween them.

“The French Government a

Planting

Of Trees

A BILL to promote the cultivation of trees and for
purposes in connection therewith was passed by the Leg-

islative Council yesterday.

House of Assembly and went before the Council during the pitoons — were

The Council
House with an amendment, but the

last legislative session.

the House could consider it.

It was therefore necessary to introduce it in the police Band led by Cpl. Morris,

Current session.

Hon'ble Mr. Petrie, Acting Co-
lonial Secretary, explained this to
members as he moved the second
reading, seconded by Dr. Mas-
siah. He said he thought it would
be impertinent for him to add
anything to what had been said
when the bill was fully discussed
on the last occasion that it was
before the Council.

Regret

Hon’ble Mr, F. C. Hutson re-
called that on the last occasion
he had expressed regret that there
was no specific mention of fruit
trees in the bill Hon'ble Mr
Chandler had on_ that occasion
said that the growing of fruit in
Bu. weuse \.culd be an uphill task
because of praedial larceny. Ha
thought, however, that the hon’ble
member had answered his own
criticism when he said that prae-
aial lareeny was not so intense
in places where a great quantity
of fruit was n.

He still it the same re-
gret that there was no speci-
fie mention of fruit trees.
There were thousands of trees
in the island that were neither
fruit trees nor ornamental
trees. They were just shrub-
bery that was not even useful
for firewood. He felt that
steps should be taken to elim-
inate as much as possible of
those useless trees, and that
they should be replaced
wherever possible by some
form of fruit trees.

He looked forward to the day
when there would be a cheaper
and more plentiful water supply,
and people who could not now af-
ford to water fruit trees would
then be able to do so.

Approved Trees
..Hon’ble G, B. Evelyn drew at-
tehtion to the fact that by section
10 of the bill the Director of Ag-
riculture had the power to in-
crease the species of trees includ-
ed in the definition of “approved

First Bulk
Shipment Of

Molasses

The 1,235-ton American tanker
V.W. Gokey arrived at Bridgetown
yesterday to take the first load of
fancy molasses in bulk for
Canada.

The fancy molasses is expected
to be supplied to the . tanker
through the cast iron pipes
which were recently laid down
along. Cavans Lane.

Tanker V.K. Gokey was an-
chored off Pelican Island on its
arrival and remained «at — that
anchorage’ throughout the day.

To take its load of bulk molas-
ses, the tanker has to be berthed
in the outer basin of the Careen-
age, near to the Central Foundry
dock.

The skipper, Captain William
Kamp, was awaiting orders from
his local agents as concerning the
loading of the ship.





make known to you its own ideas
in the next few days.
Draft Proposal

“A draft proposal which it will
submit to you will form what the
French Government hopes will be
a useful and fruitful basis of
work.”

“For today I limit myself to
welcoming you in the name of my
Government, and to expressing
the ardent wish that the expecta-
tion of the peoples who place
their hope and confidence in you
may not be disappointed’’.

—Reuter

This bill was passed by the

returned it to the
session ended before

trees.’ People who pianted fruit
trees would get the benefit from
doing so in a very short time,
whereas the planting of the other
trees like casuarina would only
yield long term benefits like in-
creasing rainfall and may be, con-
serving the water supply, etc.

If one was going to get any ben-

efit from fruit trees, the benefit
would come quickly, and there
would not be the need for a sub-

sidy as the bill provided for. He
thought, therefore, that there was
some reason in not referring
specifically to fruit trees.

10 or 12 Years Ago
Hon'ble Mr. Mahon commend-
ed the Government on sending
down the bill. His only regret was

that had not been sent down
10 or 12 years ago. He regarded
it as more than just encourage-

ment of the planting of trees. He
looked at it as one of the first
minor industries that was being
established, from the point of
view of finding employment for
people

People would not only be em-
ployed in the digging of holes,
the planting and tending of trees
and the subsequent felling of
trees and conversion of them into
firewood, It would also lead to
the employment of a number of
inspectors to superintend those
trees, and to see that they were
grown according to the specifica-
tions of the Department of Agri-
culture

Section 4 1 (a) provided for
trees to be spaced in accordance
with the rules of good arboricul-
ture, Mr, Hutson said. He had
asked the Director of Agriculture
what space he had in mind, but
the Director had told him that he
had not yet reached a decision.

Inspecwors

No doubt, if the Director found
it necessary to change the spaces
from time to time, it would neces-
gitate the employment of a good
pumber of inspectors to see that
the directions of the Department
were being carried out,

He hoped finally, that Govern-
ment would make provision so
that the Department would be
able to acquire the number ot
seedlings necessary to give real
effect to ‘the bill.

Hon'ble Mr. Pile said that when
the Bill was first before the Coun-
cil certain faults in it had been
pointed out, and he understood
that those faults had now been
remedied. He was glad that Mr.
Mahon had mentioned what he
did about the seedlings. The De-
partment of Agriculture could not
supply anything like the number
of trees which would be needed
if the object of the bill was to be
accomplished.

Not Suitable

With regard to fruit trees, he
did not think that the pasture land
on which casuarina trees were
grown would be suitable for the
cultivation of fruit trees, Cas-
uarina trees were. the only ones
that he thought would grow on
that type of land.

Hon'ble Mr. Petrie said he
would like to give the Council the
assurance that it was not the in-
tention of the Government to
make the bill a restricted bill.
Two types of trees were mention-
ed, but it could be extended and
he hoped that the Government
would do the extension,

On the question of seedlings,
the bill did not say that seedlings
would be supplied, but there was
some small provision in the Esti-
mates for seedlings, and he had
no doubt that an additional pro-
vision would be readily available.
The question of whether seedlings
should be purchased or whether
they would be given away as part
of the encouragement programme
would no doubt have to be dis-
cussed.

The Bill was then passed.









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JUNE 1950

21,

WEDNESDAY,



Col. Michelin
Inspects
Cadets

UNDER the command of Capt. |
D. R. Perkins 100 ‘Combermere
School Cadets — forming three
inspected by
Colonel Michelin, Commissioner of
Police yesterday afternoon at
Combermere.

The Cadets






preceded by the

marched on to the parade ground.
No. 1 platoon was in charge of Lt.
Gittens, No. 2 Lt. Brewster and
No. 3 Company Sergeant-Major
Murray.

Exactly at 3.30 p.m. Colonel
Michelin, accompanied by Major
Skewes-Cox and Major Warren
marched on to the parade ground
and inspected the different pla-
toons accompanied by the officers.

Stopping occasionally, the
Colonel talked with some of the
boys and inspected their uniforms.
After the inspection the three
platoons marched past before the
saluting base, No. 2 platoon re-
ceiving the greatest applause.

Fine Spectacle

Swinging their hands from front
to rear and stepping briskly the
cadets presented a fine spectacle
as their buttons and badges shone
brightly in the sun.

The march past over, the pla-
toons were broken up into squads.
Three squads were demonstrating
indication and recognition of tar-

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The boys showed a keen inter-
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their officers apparently were sat-
isfied with the display given by
the boys in front of the Colonel.

Caught In

Speed Trap: £7

VICTOR MAYERS of Hinds-
bury Road, was yesterday ordered
to pay a fine of £7 in monthly in-
stalments by Magistrate G. B.
Griffith for exceeding the speed
limit on White Park Road with
the motor bus M 746 on May 16.

Cpl B. Jones, attached to the
Traffic Branch, said that on May
16, he was on duty along White
Park Road, when he saw the
motor bus M 746 approaching at
a fast speed. He immediatély
timed his “stop watch” and after
the bus had passed, he then
checked it with the other consta-
ble who was on duty with him.
As a result, he discovered that the
speed of the bus was 28% m.p.h., |
while the speed limit in this area
is 15 m.p.h.

SPEEDING: £3

A fine of £3 was also imposed
on Ivan Mayers of Green Hill
by Magistrate G. B. Griffith, when
he was found guilty of exceeding
the speed limit with the motor van
M 1047 along Kingston Road on
May 16. The van was travelling
at the rate of 314 m.p.h., while the
limit in this area is 20 m.p.h,

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$40,000 Voted For ©. "*

Could one not see that who
ever made the recommendation

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVE











In The House 4yeEND CUSTOMS Wheat Council STUDENTS PLAN|

Yesterday TARIFF ACT Rejects Japan’s PEACE PETITION On
















o
Gen er had come to the conclusion that When the House of Assembly met yes- . j
l a a nurse imported from Ragland tendes . Mr. Adams al the folipwins _ The tee “t Seseeiy yeotars . . TOKYO, June 2¢ \ hild ’
7 shou entitled to eat better ..o te vee he Gross*Customs day passed a i © amend the eat The All-Japanese Students Fed- | Ss
food Than a local nurse? For th . ‘pts for ohe mopth ended Cones Tariff at Set 1 10n eration plans to ld peace _-*
ont es? — the honourable member to say The t¢ were given ne purpose o e Bill is for i ‘ re petition” asse i Tokyo on |
To Provide Additional Sta that the demand for the $120... °" » place the sum the manufacturing of cloth from . 0 Lane, June 20 _ Thursday and throughout he { cuts, scratches
being broken up was childish, 91 220% * the disposal of the Governor- cotton yarn ete. and in order to a eee —— Coun- country on Saturday the
/ oe : as ¢ sh, Committee to supplement encourage the industry which ©!! to-day admitted Indonesia and or Jiji Swirape said t \ | *
The House of Assembly at their meeting yesterday, passed nes — stupid was only the tes 1950-51, Part J. Current should prove beneficial to the Spain to membership of the In- PT he Ministry of Education ha and abrasions
> Resolution for forty thousand nine hundred and forty Mr. Aantae ¢ Oy ade eee tary Silicate cteae st g rr island, it is proposed to reduce the Sernatinmne Wheat Agreement but announced that any demonst: a |
dollars to make provision for additional posts in the Medical the good of say +) asked what was form the Schedule to this Resolution snownt af my payable cn import- Tejected Japan's application. ting students will be dealt with | use if
ane Wiad _posts in the ical 8 of saying a Sister got $60 Mr. Walcott : Resolution to approve the @d cotton yarn and to allow the The Council concluded its ses- under the police ban on meetings | a
= ee om at the General Hospital. S. maut se an_ordinaty MUMSE Order entitled “The Sugar Industry \Re- duty free importations of machin- sions in London this afternoon. and demonstrations | ft
addendum F cents? he two dic { habilitation, Price Stabilisation and La- , y ea ncthiats Wederatio: 1]
tion states that the Sseeedtns be attracted to the West Indies Seratt of comparison “Tt . ag dev ine ene 1950" made ty re the ia of gg ee ee ee: ee ear sore , D E TT O L :
Estimates 1950-51, No. at least for a short i Geni tee were criticising the 15th deo af dine’ ee eee tk e m r, was represented off a demonstration last Saturda
provision for the ‘eaten S period. sates x sitowtne i ae ae rid q oa ay of June, 3950, (ander the. pro. from cotton yarn etc. for the first time. Spain was timed to coincide with the arrival - rat Rese see .
Silene of serves ane a the Experience Erethin bonie anise eas a. the Sugar Industry ‘Rehabilitation, Price Mr. M. & Cox (L) who took granted an import quota of here of United States Defenc
7 c A é é t : abilisation ¢ Je c : 4 000 5 secre , yuis i »
Medicab and Nursing Staff and for There was still the pogsibility small one on the grounds that they 147. an Bel’ out. ig the neheniietls Act charge of the Bill said that it 100, tons. . ees ye Pore ae get — Safe . . . Non-poisonons
the additional posts at the Hos- of American. or Canadian gradu- were both Government employees. "se! came within the category of , Indonesia was granted 75,000 | Chief of the United States oink Doesn't Pain , . . Doesn't Stain
pital authorised by the Civil Es- ates wishing to come to a place If they could show him any im ns aay rats pr tn oa the a: the Ploneer Industries. Sometime in tons, to be deducted from Hol- Sreaie e ‘ ~ £ 3 : : oo Ae an te of . m e g *s , i ~ as rade t lewspaper adde
tablishment (General) (Amend- jlike Barbados to gain éxperi- partial dealings: but no. they were ‘@* payable to the Fancy ae eamie o July last year, the House passed !@nd’s quota which, in effect has | SP8tiey the Hew paper ae
ment) Order, 1950, ‘No. 5. qntd Sheth & lgraieite anit esa wan ealitiee ek etek ena rol and Marketing Board on faney mo. # Bill called the Pioneer Industry been split between Holland and | —Reuter
Apart from the increased cost to get an insight into tropical ; lasses produced during the erop year Encouragement Bill which allow- Indonesia. '
= salaries and other emoluments, diseases. Unless the Ciovernment Foolish aor ncn the Goverpar-tegrrees ed pioneer industries to import When Spain and Indonesia de-
0 je s e r re oon e advice 0! ne i i i i i S . ,
ment of wassmae Sebems ae. cast off the practice of only ad- Fancy Molasses Control and Marketing ‘2¢hinery and apparatus in addi- posit their ratifications, the world

tion to raw material duty free, but
it was rejected by the Other Place
for reasons better known to them-
selves.

Had that Bill been passed, they
would not have had to come there
with the one before them. Hon-
ourable members would agree that
they should help those new indus-

total export and import quotas in
the agreement will rise from
13,451,000 to 14,551,000 tons

As at the Council's last meet-
ing earlier this year, it was on fhe
question of access to Australian
sterling wheat that Japan's ap-
plication failed.

sos ‘ e425 "y ; Board } co “ | ew 5
vertising in Great Britain, there It was foolish ror a member of ana 6 ot the Barbados pa cdtlations |

ilies, not exceeding $960 in each would always be a difficulty in that side of the House to sp@ak Production and Export Regulations, 1938
direction, from the place of en- 8°tting men. The idea of some about any previous suggestion , (41... \Kipsen. save notice of an
gagement to Barbados on appoint- who held that American medical that a Sister should get different relating to leave of ehosass coli rene
ment and from Barbados to the S'aduates were inferior to the food or more money for the pur- 4 My C. B. Rock, Official Reporter of
place of engagement on the ter- English medical graduates Was ab- chase of food than local nurses, Waki oar lee tone ae hy elt are
mination of agreements. solute nonsense. That was not the when such a suggestion could only Sod a tipi teat

lut \ Mr Foster tabled a question relating
As the accommodation at the Opinion of the leading men of the have come from the side of the ‘9 Sugar factories in the parish of St

penses of officers and their fam-

“IT’S SUCH A
RELIEF TO HAVE
NO TROUBLE

Hospital is limited, the housing of day. table. Tt could not be in. keabhig Andrew evading payment of Trade tries as they helped to relieve 1 oo . eve ores Siem, WITH TEETHING .. ”
rests staff will entail the The Government could not with reason that members on his Mr. Miller Kave notice of an Address to tae ae en which’. Wave 9 comune, -tanecent

vernment of sui exc’ yes wi i r- bi 7 z any such sug- His Excellency the Governor relating t& f © produce P ivi Ashton
furnished quarters for vic lorne oe gseeihen ee rapa cowuite. uld make any such SUB- private nursery schools. ‘items at more reasonable prices With Britain in safegqarding Oy) Boe pecs &

The House passed a Resolution to place

officers or alternatively the
ment to the officers of an al
ance in lieu thereof. Provisio
included for this necessity.

The total estimated expendi-
ture on increased staff, salaries,
ete, from the Ist of June, 1950,
to the 31st of March, 1951, as
shown in the Supplementary Es-
timates, is $105,580, but this is off-
ate oe the breage of $62,000 by

vings on the salarie
posts of House aha toea
Anaesthetist and
which have now
and the provision
Estimates 1950-51 for
grevag oar vices and

ursing Services whi
now be required ch will not
VING the passin
resolution Mr. Adee (L) “oe

House Surgeon
been abolished

posts on the medical and nu
staff of the General
which the Legislature had al-
ready agreéd should be added to
the present establishment,

Passage Expenses

Apart from the increased cost
of salaries and other emoluments,
provision was included for the
payment of reasonable passage
expenses of officers and their
families, not exceeding $960 in
each direction, from the place of
engagement to Barbados on ap-
pointment and from Barbados to
the place of engagement on the
termination of agreements,

As the accommodation at the
Hospital is limited, the housing
of the additional staff would en-
tail the rental by Government
of suitable furnished quarters for
use by the offices or afternatively
the payment to the officers of an
allowance in lieu thereof.

The total estimated expendi-
ture on increased staff, salaries
etc. from June 1, 1950 to March
31, 1951 as Shown in the Supple-
mentary Estimates was $105,580
but that was offset to the extent

be had.

ay- the necessary doctors needed. The
OW- public - ould not be satisfied with right any anomalies, but honour-
nN 4S that. Tney had to seek the doctors, able

They were quite willing to put

members wer@ confusing

Taey should do everything within themselves with salaries.

their power to that end.
No Films

Mr. Crawford (C) said that who-
ever were responsible for the com-
pilation of the figures had in their

Nor was that the only unsat- minds that the cost to a Sister

isfactory matter at the Hospital.

Two

Surgeon and ‘ures to be taken, were told that

they had no films.

Could they imagine in all its
made in the appalling nature such a state of
additional affairs to be obtaining at the hos-
Additional pital. Whose fault was it? If some }

machine or other had been broke

as a_circumsicance that

ordered them.

Even if there was no accom-
modation at the hospital for
Sisters, it did not mean that
they should be granted an
allowance so much greater
than the ordinary nurse was
given. Allowing for water,
rent, a servant and other like
things, it still meant that
from the $120, $60 could be
put aside ag feeding allow-
ance, It struck him that there
was impartiality in their deal-
ings. Why should they place
such a difference between a
Sister and a local nurse?

“If there is one institution the
smooth running of which should
be ensured,” he said, “it is this
institution. I do not make critic-
isms now merely for the sake of
making them, but with the wish
that a smoother going will soon
I will always support a
measure which aims to put the
hospital in “A” order and I hope
Government will soon sweep away

of $62,000 by savings on the sal- all sources for complaint.”

aries of the posts and Anaesthet-
ist and House Surgeon which had
now been aBélished and the pro-
vision made in the Estimates
1950—51 fom additional Medical
Services and additional Nursing
Services which would not now be
required.

Specialist
Government, Mr. Adams con-
cluded, had taken the advice

offered by the House and agreed

that the Anaesthetist should be a
specialist, .
“Mr. Mottley (E)" said that
any Resolution which came
before the Assembly with the
purpose of eradicating the in-
efficiently of the working of

‘the hospital would always

receive his support. Criticisms

had to be pushed forward

‘until the Government suc-

ceeded in putting the hospital

in order. ;

He supposed the Resolution was
another sign that the Govern-
ment was still trying and he and
the others on that side of the
House hoped they would succeed.
but conditions at the hospital
were still very bad and unsatis-
factory. No day passed, but com=-
plaints were made about the
working of that institution, not
merely by the staff but in respect
to the treatment of the patients.

Get Up And Do Better

The criticisms he was then
offering was an attempt to make.
those responsible for the admin-
istration get up and make a bet-
ter job of it. Since the Resolution
had been passed to increase the
staff at the hospital one would
have thought that there would at
least have been an increase in
the medical staff.

$25 For Local Medicos

But what did mey find? Steps
had to be taken to get some of
the local medical men to work,
to go into the hospital and sleep
and be paid $25. That was: not
enough, On the other hand he had
been making enquiries as to the
prospects of getting additional
medical men at the hospital. It
was true that another young
Barbadian was then resident at
the hospital, but it was still a
question of how long he intended
to stay.

But. the point he. wanted

No Appointment

Mr. Lewis (L) said that he
understood that ever since the
proclamation which brought the
Hospital Act into effect, nobody
working at the hospital, except
those doing so by contract, had
been “‘acpually appointed to the
post to which they were connected,
He remembered that when the
Central Road Board was taken
over by Government, those con-
nected received notice from the
Government telling them that they
were appointed on a particular
date,

Mr. Allder (L) said he wanted
to know whether Government
knew where the additional doctors
would be living. He wanted to
find out whether they were going
to regulate a distance between the
hospital and where the doctors
would living. He wondered
whether Government would not
consider it advisable to rent some

flats from the Garrison district for

the doctors instead of allowing
them to seek flats in far districts.
In the first place it would be

cheaper and in the second the
savings would be coming back to

Government.

Mr. Dowding (E) said that it #
had struck him that Government
should utilise the houses they had
at their disposal to supply those

necessary in the Resolution.

There seemea wo him an in- tion they were stressing. The big them come down to fill the posts.

for her food and that to a local

days ago people applying turse was separated by a differ-
at that institution for X-ray pic- ence of almost four times

It was
quite easy to see that, they were
either paying one too high or the

other too low.
Even allowing for an additional
$12 they would still be able to

decrease the amount for a sistet
»y $30 per month. The only

N other alternative would be to fi-
down, that would have been taken . - . .

could

: said easily happen, but films were not
that it covered the cost of those anoteurnenie that could go bad at sure of their figures.
rsing a moment’s notice. Those respon-
Hospital ysible should have’ known that
some would be wanted many
weeks Before and should have

crease the allowance for an or-
dinary nurse. They should post-

pone the matter if they were not

Mr. F. L, Walcott said honour-
able members always seem to
forget what had already been
passed in the House. The $4 a
week arose when the hospital had
to take in nurses from outside.
It was a just ration allowance.
When they left the hospital on
evenings it was felt that they
should be getting the same allow-
ance which they would have got
had they been remaining. He did
not believe the Senior member
for the City had given the ques-
tion sufficient consideration.

Mr. Dowding (E) ~ said that
there was too much hedging about
a simple question. To try to fall
back on past legislation was in
his opinion merely hedging. It
was quite a simple question that
they were asking. Did it take
four times as much to indulge
the stomach of one person than) it
took for, another? ‘Fhey only
wanted the Government to item-
ise the things the $120 was in-

tended for in case they wanted services of a suitable reporter at to-day.

to say that the comparison of $60
as against $18 was unjust.

Mr. Ward (BE) said that he could
not reconcile the figures for the
two nurses and he felt that if the
member in charge of the Resolu-
tion could not give them
necessary information, he should
postpone it instead of running
the risk of losing their vote,

fully request Your Excellency to

the sum of $40,940 at the disposal of the

Governor-in-Executive Committee to sup-
plement the, Estimates 1950—51, Part 1,
Current, as shown in the Supplementary

Estimates 1950—51

Act, 1971.

A Bill to settle the rates of income tax
for the year 1950, and to make provision

for certain other matters in connection
with the levying of the said tax and to
amend the law relating to Income Tax

A Bill to vest a certain parcel of land
situate in the parish of St, John in this

island with the Chapel of St. Mark, the

palsonage house, and other buildings, and

the burial ground in the Lord Bishop of

tee and the Rector of St, John and
reir respectiv: successors

eee ue uceessors in office upon
The

House adjourned until sday
next at 12 noon. Peery



Official Reporter
Granted Leave

THE House of Assembly yester-
day passed an Address, granting
Mr. C, B, Rock, Official Reported
of a gs segehng Council four
months’ leave of absen from
March 1. -

The Address also makes pro-
vision for the services of an
assistant to Mr. Rock for the
month of July,

Mr, J, H. Wilkinson gave notice
of the Address which reads as
follows:—

The House of Assembly respect-
fully refer Your Excellency to
their Address to you of the 31st
January, 1950, and desire to say
that the Debates Committee ap-
pointed by virtue of section three
of the Legislative Debates Act
1894 (1894-7) has granted Mr.
C. B, Rock, ONjcial Reporter of
the Legislative Council, a further
four months’ sick leave from the
Ist March with full pay. The
Committee has re-engaged the

the rate of $80.00 per month.
The Committee nas decided to

engage the services of an assistant

to Mr. Rock for the month of July

date the matter will be further

the considered by the Debates Com-

mittee,
The House of Assembly respect-

Mr Adams reminded members send down the necessary legisla-

that they had already passed the tion to give effect to the proposals
What of the Debates Committee.

Civil Establishment Order.
members were criticising were
things that were already in exis-
tence.

The computation of 60
arose when ‘off duty’ was being
considered, It was decided that
nurses when on ‘off duty’ were
still entitled to what rations they
should have had were they at
the hospital. They were given it
in money arid it came to 60 cents.
As it appeared to members, it did
seem strange to him at first, but
it was more or less a matter of
bulk production, making a smal-
ler overhead cost. Thus when it
was divided it only came to 60
cents.

To his mind if members would
accept what were the plain facts,
they would see that there was no
question of discrimination. It was
nothing novel that the Govern-
ment was doing. It was something

to which the House had implicit- the motion. He also supported the} 43 jours,

ly agreed.

But one of the immediate ob- junior member for St. James and] qroye home. He hit

5
cents

In moving the passing of the
Address Mr. Wilkinson said that

ourable members knew the
porter of the Other Place
taken ill towards the end of last
year,

The Debates Committee had to
extend his leave as he was serious-
ly ill and he (Mr. Wilkinson) was
glad to say that he had improved
considerably and it was hoped thay
he would be able to resume his
duties on the first of July with the
assistance of someone else.

Mr. Rock nhaq rendered faith-
ful service to the Other Place for
past 15 years and the Address was
asking that legislation be sent
down for the payment of money
to his substitute during his illness,
Mr. W. A. Crawford seconded

remarks made by the honourable

scientists

than they
outside.

Mr. Cox said that the Bill did
not apply to any hotel encourage-
A Bill t© amend the Customs Tariff ment as that was a matter of a

differen sort. The present Knit-

ting Mills employed 78 people of

which 76 were Barbadians.
_ He then moved the second read-
ing of the Bill.

‘Mr. T. O. pryan (L) seconded
and said that he had the privilege

of going through the plant and

seeing some of the finished pro-
ducts which he thought compared
very favourably with imported
articles.

In fact he said that the articles

compared so favourably with
imported articles that several
stores in Swan and Broad Streets
had already placed orders wich
the company.

Mr. Bryan referred to the ques-
tion of wages and said that it was
the duty of the Government to see
that the West Indian Knitting
Mills paid decent living wages to
their employees. Fortunately for
them, they had just passed legis-
lation for the setting up of a
Wages Board which would deal
with the matter.

The Bill was eventually passed.

Fuchs Knew
AboutH-Bomb

NEW YORK, June 20.

Dr. Klaus, British atomic scien-
tist gaoled. for espionage, knew all
the secrets of the hydrogen bomb
as well as of atom bombs, Mr.
William Laurence, New York
Times science reported, declared
He made his statement
in a Saturday Evening Post
article under the title “The Truth
About The Hydrogen Bomb.”

Before the first atom bomb,



for the sum of $40.00 after which Laurence wrote, he was at Los

Alamos, New Mexico, and talked
to Dr. Hans A. Bethe, who headed
the theoretical physicists at the
bomb plant. At that time atomic
were already talking
about the hydrogen bomb, calling
it for camouflage the “superbomb”

and “superdooper” Laurence said,

He asked Dr. Bethe if this bomb
was really true. Dr. Bethe replied
“Yes” and added that it could be

t was an urgent matter as hon- made equal to a million tons of
Re- T.N.T. and even more than a
had million.”—Reuter

were able to get them

their access to the limited sup-

ply of sterling wheat, has a suffi-

cient vote to veto an applicafion
—Reuter

Will America

Give Up The
a 9
Saint’s Crown?

VIENNA, sune 20.

Return of the famous Crown of
St. Stephan to Hungary is being
mentioned here as a point in the
“deal” the Americans are said to
have offered the Hungarian Gov-
ernment for the release of Robert
Vogeler, United States business-
man now serving 16 years’ gaol
on an espionage charge.

Usually well informed sources
here say the Hungarians had
made two demands:

1. The re-opening of
garian Consulates in America
closed down as a_ reprisal for
Vogler’s arrest, trial and sentence

2. The return to the present
regime in Hungary of the histori-
cal Crown of St, Stephan now
believed to be in American hands.

Hungarian sources in Vienna
do not believe the Hungarian
Government would demand the







Hun-

return of this relic for the sake
of one man, |

These Hungarians consider it
more probable that the Hun-
garian government would ask

America to relinquish all claims
on the valuable properties of the
Standard Oil ompany whicn |
have been seized without compen-
sation.

Stephan, King of Hungary, was
converted to christanity in 997 and
in 1001 received the crown fm
Pope Sylvester II. After world
War IT it was found in the Ameri-
ean zone of Austria and was re- |
moved for safety to the ane





zone of Germany. It is believed to
be still there,

his arrest,
Josef Mindszenty, Hungarian
Primate, wrote to the American
authorities asking that the Crown |

Before Cardinal

he restored to the Holy See in
Rome. |
“The Holy Crown of Hungary’)

contains six pounds of gold and
jewels. It is revered by the whole
Hungarian people as a symbol of
Hungarian unity and sovereignty.
—Reuter



Police Shoot ThiefIn U.S.A.

STUBENVILLE, Ohio, June 20.

Police shot and killed Joe
Pacific, 32-year-old Pennsylvan-
jan, in a gun battle near here
after he had robbed two youths
and locked them in the luggage
boot of their car.

Police said the youths gave
Pacific a lift at Canonsburg,
Pennsylvania. At gun point he
robbed them of 16 dollars and
locked them into the boot without
food or water. They were there
while Pacific toured
around in the car, Finally he
his wife on

jects of the Government was the said that the least they could do} the head with a wrench and forced

starting of nursing quarters. When
uch was achieved, it would wipe
away the spurce of apparent dis-
crimination,

Mr. Crawford said that all the
senior member for St. Joseph had
done was to emphasise the posi-

consistency in the figures of the discrepancy between the two was
ordinary nurses’ wages and the still shown.

sisters’, and he wanted to know t at it
as was plicit then that the junior mem-

exactly how $120,

Mr. Adams said that it was im-

scheduled for a Sister for ac- ber for St. Philip was making as
commodation and other such the dig the difference between

‘matters,

Did the cost of food for a nurse
and that for a Sister vary?
Was the one of a different con-
stitution and had to eat a less

expensive food than the other?

had been arrived at. the English nurse and the

local
nurse. He wondered if he knew
it tended to put the local nurse
of the same scale, if he would use
the same argument, It was just
a matter of time that Barbadian
nurses would be qualified for some

Mr. F. L. Watcow (L) said that of those posts, and what would

members could not plead that be said then?
they did not have sufficient time

to peruse the Resolution. They
were then only more or less im-
plementing the House’s agree-

ment,
For members to
breaking up the $120

suggest his tion,

Could that member show him
something then which perpetu-
ated an injustice? If he showed
him discrepancies in the dealing,
he would be willing to withdraw
anything or adjourn the Resolu-
The confusion had started

into the when the 60 cents was first looked

various items which it was in- at. They were even then arguing
tended to defray was the height on something which was not real-

of simplicity and
Wére honourable

childishness. ly before them. They had passea
members not the Estimates

They had by irm-

able to do a little simple arithme- plication agreed to the scale,

was to give Mr. Rock the leave
asked for in the Address and pro-
vide him with the necessary assist-

ance to do his work until such {

time as he could resume his duties.



Mr. W. W. Reece (E) said that
the question of giving rent free
quarters to the staff was a big one
and should be carefully considered
by Government,

When it came to the housing of
the Hospital staff, he felt that
nurses and. sisters should be
housed in the institution and that
was going to raise another ques-
tion and that was the extension of
the present hospital.

He said tnat they would have to
pequire some of the surrounding
property in order to extend the
Hospital. He had not heard for
some time in the House if the
present site of the Hospital was
suitable or whether it should be
removed to another site. He felt
that it was well placed, but it was
not big enough.

It was apparent to all that the
hospital staff was inadequate and
the present Government should
pay attention and give consider-
ation to the question of acquiring

her Into the car. He drove to
Mingo junction, Ohio, where he
stopped to buy a dress to replace
the bloodstained one his wife was
wearing.

Mrs. Pacific jumped from the
ear and ran for help.

Poliae chased Pacific through
the streets, while the locked up
youths were released—hungry,
thirsty and cramped.

Firing at the pursuing Police,
Pacific ran to the woods on thie
edge of the town.

He refused to surrender. A gun
battle followed and Pacific was
killed. —Reuter.

es

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the properties surrounding the

No member had asked about the hospital. 4
money at the time. They had im- He knew that in the past, this
plied their agreement that the Government and other Govern-
sum was reasonable. Thus they ments had been faced with the
were now only asking that they difficulty of acquiring lands as
should continue to pay the two they had to go to a jury to have
additional nurses. the land assessed .

Mr. J. E. T- Brancker (C) de- He was however hoping that in
plored the fact that the ration the near future, the Government
allowance for Nurses was only 60 would be able to acquire land at
cents a day. He said that that a reasonable figure and if that
amount was inadequate and should “time did come, they should acquire

threshed out was how long
| that insular prejudice which
) ‘existed in the island would be
continued? Why did they not
get medical men from Ameri-
ca or Canada. There was no
point in just asking the Secre-
tary of State to get somebody s :
for the Barbadbs Hospital. Mr. Mottley (E) said that either
That was not enough. the Sister's pay was too high or
They had seen from past ex- the nurses too small. At any rate
perience that they were given no he did not consider 60 cents a day
attention. He understood that the enough.

tic? It would be“infra dig” for
him to harbour in his mind for
the slightest moment a suggestion
of breaking up figures for hon-
ourable members.

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_ He was not speaking he substantially increased,
Director of Medical Services was about their differences in salaries,

some of the property surrounding

With respect to the additional the hospital in order that they

the island for a long $120 to 60, he was only speaking Sisters who would be paid at the might be able to extend the insti- he DO. FO ND. This new model is expected in 3 months
ae teak Ke wondered whether as to the other allowances, $120 rate of 2300 aan annum, he seid tution large enough, not only to Ti BARBA Ss U. mY L ad. { 950 LTD
he could not be empowered by as against about $18 or in that that there were Barbadians in the look after the sick, but large White Park Road, St. Michael. } CHELSEA GARAGE (1 ) .

Government to explore the possi- i
bilities of securing the services When a servant pay,

vicinity for the ordinary nurse. United Kingdom who were being enough to house the staff who
rent and such trained for such positions and he would be responsible for looking

of any medical men who might things were taken away, some $60 was looking forward to seeing after the patients.

Dial : 4528

Dial : 4528

Agents

Trafalgar Street.



SSS}



PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HENRY BY



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950







CARL ANDERSON

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&. CANN@N . . . 2. . WITH WHISPER IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE

a

WOULD IT BE RIGHT. MA. MITCHELL, / / A PISTOL? WHY SURE R

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e
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a



_ ! — _
NOW-LET'S SEE -) ||] MY/ WHAT an ODD
OID T PUT poe | PLACE TO BE GELLING

iL ie
ait. I,

RIP KIRBY 4 ‘Vac AANA ENP Bh gett eT
OUR | {POOR OLD DES IS UNDOUBTEDLY/ I UNDERSTAND,
YEARS TOGETHER DESMOND] [A LONELY MAN... HE MAY "| RiPsss NOBODY
RIP, i? You HAS NEVER PRIED INTO MY| |HAVE FALLEN FOR.A "| LIKES MEDDLERS,

THINK DESMOND 1S AFFAIRS AND I CAN'T LONELY HEARTS
BEING DUPED BY SOME \ PRY INTO HIS!
DESIGNING WOMAN, LF:

HY DON'T YOU , a

WARN HIM™® rs



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Bridgetown, *



aa eieee tiaras



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950



CLASSIFI

Telephone 2548

DIED !
th 50th Jun N
ed daughter of Car

, Rock! He

k place at “ Westbury |





LEWIS—ROSALIE JANE, of Rock Hall, |
St. Phomas. Her funeral will le her |
ipte residence at 3.45 o’clock thi |
rng for the Rock Hall Brethrer |
where friends are asked to g:
tuence to 1 St. Thomas Cr

Clarence Evereston Lewis (sc
ond Mrs. Hutson, O. Haynes
Miorgan (Grand-daughte;:

THANKS
thank those friends
reaths, or who express
sympathy in any way at the
our dear WINNIFRE'D
(mother), Lepert ‘son

Ismay (friend)





We
gent cards,
their
purture of

Ada
fAunt)

sincerely





IN MEMORIAM |

In Loving Memory of GRANVILLE}
BASCOMBE, who departed this life 2ist|
June, 1949 |
e tha |

|

}

1

|










One year has passed sir
The one I loved c
Love held together
apart
Faith then did soothe my aching heart
Till memor ar life departs




in .my heart

Time takes away the edge of grief
































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ED ADS. | Lord Mayor Replies | HARBOUR L0G

FOR RENT





Denies Gov

Moorlands”, on q

near Appleby, comfortably
ed with every convenience
Three bedrooms

sea view from
for small family
up residence in



bungalow,
Cozst



rage
lounge
from abroad
the Coiony

and G



20.6.50-



n



CRYSTAL SPRINGS—Annexe St. James
Now available for Rent. Fully
rnished, excellent sea bathing. Two
rae bedrooms. All electric kitchen, ete
available On Monthiy basis
91—54 21.6.50.—t.f.n.

+ _— Erdiston Hill, St
Fully Purnished. 3 bedrooms
» period. Available now. Apply
CARRINGTON & SEALY

20.6.50-—3n



months ago:



controversy in Britain.

In a letter to the “Daily Tele-
“MELROSE VILLA"—Collymore Rock | 9™@ph” this week the Lord Mayor

upstairs, 4 Bedrooms, Toilet and Bath.| answers criticisms voiced recently

Downstairs Drawing and Dining Rooms ’ ;
Evkaktaat Moors, Mieaad. Caer yond | by one of the leading columnists





Closed Gallery, Garage for 2} Of that paper. This writer, he
Servant Rooms ete. Modern Con-| Says, had conveyed the impres-
Dial 2230 ‘ ™

‘ssa ae | sion, first, that the Thanksgiving
. | scheme had been devised by the

ONE LARGE HOUSE and Apartment} Government and that the Govern-
on the sea St. Lawrence, fully furn-| ment had
















































































|
Again To Crities _
|

(From Our London Correspondent)

THE LORD MAYOR of London has found it neeessary
to reply for the second time to criticisms in the Press of
the National Thanksgiving Fund_which he launched two}

¢ The Fund, whose object is to build a e2-|
million overseas students’ centre in London as an expression
of gratitude to the Commonwealth and the United States
for help received during the war, continues to arous:

tut memories turns back every leaf ished. Apply: Miss K. Hainte, Bratton,| ° pressed it upon him;
ITA SONES, |. St. Lawrence. Dial 8357. second, that the Fund's progress

ae ROA 3.6.50—2n.} Was unsatisfactory . “Nothing

loving memory of our dear beloved] UPSTAIRS AP. ° ‘ could be further from the facts”
inihir Clune STAIRS APARTMENT Three} <0; ; ; ,
fother Coote, Fatatophee Sobers, who] unfurnished rooms, one very jarge| Said Sir Frederick Rowland, the

Four years have passed since that sad Dial toe OR win, summing weed, } Lond Mayer.

Death | a Criticism

pacha came in and took our dad] = What the “Daily Telegraph”
The blow was sudden, the shock severe, y . . columnist actually said was this:
We little now that death was near PUBLIC SALES ©) ‘The timing of the Fund and the
ut Jesus knows just what was best bu ii 3 ‘i - ¢ oa a

And took dear daddy home to rest eee! aicings upon which it Dadenstl cba

Ever to be remembered by Oliver, posed to spend money “have led
Herman, Hillary, Edgar, _ Christopher |} AUCTION to more criticism than I can recal!
(sons), Ina (daughter), Peter, Palm, in connection with y P

any other

Peggy, June, Brinda, Ederson, (grand- . Dae z..
children) bie aw in| UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER cee Mayor’s Fund. This has
aoc affected subscriptions. Stirred by

In loving memory of my dear wife By instructions received from the} > criticis anal
Clarabella Lalinda Roach who departed} 2"SÂ¥rance Company, I will sell on Fri- er criticisms, the Lord Mayor,
this life on June 2lst 1940. cay, June 23rd at 2.30 p.m. at the hear, made a_ significant dis-

When we lie far off home be ae steno, ) 2967 10 h.p. Prefect} closure at a recent City dinner.

Some Autumn day; ord, (1) 1939 12 h.p. Austin. Both) The Thanksgiving Fund, he said

Drop bodies in the loam, damaged. Terms Cash. ae a ene ; :

Soft earth, dry clay, ; was a Government idea which he

So let us lie. VINCENT GRIFFITH, had been asked to put into action.”

Not as our eyes had never seen the eae | To this, Sir Frederick pointed

5 Bf ;
Sa te’ We ERIE Ube Gaede “dee ie a San ae RUC. 26 WER COMMON cmeW~
God not I By instructions of the Insurance Com-. ledgé that (apart from where 4
Knows the right time to call “come pans Fw alt at the COURTESEY | sudden disaster was concerned)
on to me” ay “| oor Deeg TEPARK, on FRIDAY! no Lord Mayor launched a national
a g y 3rd. a mM. j . or es
Albert ing Whsusband), Mr and| 1 MORRIS 8 SEDAN CAR damaged by | ®PPea] except on the advice and
Mrs. C. N. Weekes, Mr. & Mrs.| fire. TERMS CASH. | :
1, BE, Smith (friends), Mrs. Amy Hoyte R. ARCHER McKENZIE, |
B.G. Auctioneer \ 7 .
Demerara papers please copy. DIAL 2947. 20.6,50—4n | PUBLE NOTICES
21.6.50—1n i
= ae, i =—_—_
. . * ¢
FOR SALE REAL ESTATE \
an —pinigeencieenenenn = elena dane |
At Bridgefield, St. Thomas, one Stone | NOTICE
AUTOMOTIVE wall House and ‘Shop both in good order | PARION OF ST. ANDAEW
— a 5) Sa ie and 1% acres of arable land which is; mENDERS will be received by the
R—One 14/6 Vauxhall Black Sedan| planted with canes. The right place for | undetataned up to Friday 30th 1950

: aaa Apply to | Andrew Chureh Roof Act, 1949, at a

CAR—One Vauxhall 14-6 in, Good D'ARCY A. SCOTT, j vere Gs one not to exceeding 4
working order new tyres. K. D.| Dial 3745. 21.6.50—3n, ) ber annum Oks
Webste:, Harrison's Pitn, St Luey. | ———-——— - ~ Signed C. A: SKINNER,

21.6.50—8n FOR SALE TO BE DEMOLISHED Vestry Clerk.
aA “i AND REMOVED ‘ St. Andrew
One (1) B.S.A. Motor Car,| CHATTEL HOUSE only) called 17-6.50—sn.
Battery & Tyres Sound, Apply; ‘MAYARO" situate at Hockley Beach - ane .
Crumpton Street 20.6.50 Oe The Purchaser will be required to| SAINT VINCENT WBEKLY AIR
demolish the said house and remove| SERVICE Now~ makes possible ideal

CARS—1942 (6) six cylinder. Forde, »same from the site within fifteen plac ‘ - a j
1937 Dodge, 1937 Morris. Apply to| after the date of purchase. The Gas, Inder one managemen
Cosmopolitan Garage, Magazine Lane,| and water pipes, electric wires, fixtures RATHO MILL TOWER HOTEL
Dial 3915 20.6.50—3n. | and fittings will not be sold with the St ee

house, Offers in writing will be re a

MOTOR CYCLE One (1) B.S.A,| ceived by the undersigned up to 12 noon SUNNY CARIBBEE
1/2 H.P. In Good condition, Phone;cn Friday, 23rd June instant. Note on-the-sea Bequia Island a
20,6.50—3n. | the land on which the house siands is offers all that can be desir, Beauti-
a ~ not for sale ful seenery, sea-bathing, fishing, excel-
For inspection apply at “‘Acera’ next ent cuisines and bars. RATES Lae to
ELECTRICAL door for the keys. pp Regh ot a day. For further details

YEARWOOD & BOYCE and reservations.

RADIO & WINDCHARGER In Solicitors eh S, ROOKS,
working order. K. D. Webster, Har-| 13.6 5n. sac rene
rison's Plin. St. Luey a 2 Saint Vincent.

21.6.50—3n ONE 18 by 9 house with shed 2 years | 13.6 50—26n.
old and painted at Ellerton, St. Georse a el |
Price $600.00,
FURNITURE ‘Small property at St, Stephen's Road NOTICE : !
Se, AVID GASKIN.
near Church, consisting of 7,000 square Iva ALONZA D. A ol cathe eco!

FURNITURE—China (Cabinety Buf-| feet of land and house which has galiery, | formerly caretaker of “Retreat, Pas:
fett Wagon. Table, Dressing . Table! drawing and dining room, bedrooms, | sage Road is NO LONGER author! ane
All in 100 per cent Mahogany Apply | kitchen, water and light ‘Conerete yard | to receive or accept any monies pail
Strathmore, Worthing and room for garage. Price £950. for the rent of Retreat", Passage

21.6.50—2n Apply to Road. Any persons who have paid any
iasiniaanippinamabeatneciadete jamal eal D’ARCY A. SCOTT, rent in advance, or who are desirous
L Dial S748. 21.6.50.—3n. | of renting ‘Retreat’, are requested to

IVESTOCK —j sce or communicate with Mr. A. G
—— ANDY CREST"—situate at Cattle-| pie ot Paradise Beach Club, Black

COW—One cow giving 22 pts. daily. | wash, Bathsheba, standing on One Acre | Rock, St. Michael, and to bring any

& k ; . d
Apply Frere Pilarim Plantapion Ten’ Perches of land, receipt which they may now hold
20.6.50—-2n The house contains gallery, dfawing and A. G. Pile, -for Agent and Owner
ae dining rooms, three bedrooms with run-| wp etreat” »
ning water, kitchenette, usual outoffices, 7 20.6.50—6n.
electric light, garage and servant's room. Banas ae
MECHANICAL The above. wil be set ub for sale at | — ——— oe
c a i it our ice in Lucas

BICYCLES—One Gents Raleigh and | Public competition a NOTICE
One Phillips Gents Sports both in | Street on Weiday 28rd Sune, seaLye BARBADOS ELEMENTARY ‘
good condition and complete with 3 ; Solicitor 4 SCHOOL TEACHERS’ ASSOC 1ATION
Speed, Light, and accessories 11.6.50.—11n. ALL teachers are invited to a

Enauire A. Burrowes, Bath Village | 2 eens | Special General Meeting held on Sat-
Ch. Ch. or C. Medford, Courtesy Gar- The undersigned will offer for sale by | urday 24th June at 12 noon at the
S8Y. 20.6.50—2n. | public competition at their office, James | Church House for the purpose of con-

', Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 23rd | sidering Resolutions to be none

of June 1950 at 2 p.m. to the forthcoming Conference o! 1

MISCELLANEOUS The newly built bungalow called “LAS| Caribbeon Union of Teachers held at
a CAMPANAS," at Navy Gardens, Christ] British Guiana during the Summer

ANTIQUES— of every desrrintinn | Ghoreh, with the land thereto containing | holidays |
Glass, China, old Jewe'ls, fine Silver 00 square feet F.“H. BARKER, |
Watercolours Early books, haps, Auio- | dwellinghouse which is built of Hon, Secty
graphs, etc., at Gorringes Antintie Sno. | reinforced concrete to avoid maintenance RESTA |
adjoining Royal Yacht Club | contains patio, 2 verandahs, living

1.9.40.—tfn | Inia satin, 3 DEN faces a WAR te, ee ee |
th basins and toilets and built-

CALCIUM GLUCONATE Squibha {io Wardrobes, linen cupboards, modern| +IQUOR LICENCE NOTICE |
Calcium Gluconate is administered in al shen. Servant’s room with toilet and The application of Rebecea Spencer of
forms of calcium det y Get it at] bath, and double garage 4 Baxters Koad, St, Michael, for permission

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD LTD The grounds are well laid out an I spirits, Malt Liquors &e., at 2nd
21.6.50—3n | planted with fruit trees. n. diails of a §-atorey building known as
ene — . Inspection by appointment on dialing | 7" 39 pudor Street. City
REALS—Puffed Wheat, Muffets, | 3100. we 2 Dated this 20th day of June, 1950
Oatflakes in Tins, Cream of For further particulars ARK! 8 oO To the Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
rfe & Small and Loose Oat G. L. W. CL ’ Signed
flakes, Pe Barley. W. M. FORD, HUGH WILLIAMS,
Dial 2489, Roebuck St for Applicant
20.6.50-—2n N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at_a Licerising Court to eae

DARNLEY’S CONDITION POWDER Police Court, District “A” .on Friday the
—For Horses, Cattle, Mule: Don- | th day of June 1989, as ih oipo® a.m,
keys, Sheep, Pigs, Poultry, and Do- s Police Magistraty, Dist. “A”
mestic Animals. Price 1/6 Per Tin.\ ast is st ee
ndcnbnalby dca: dear apie 21.6.50—8n,| The public are hereby warned against} eq. , t

31-6-50—8n-| giving credit to my wife GLADYE) 5 ni lub hpnesicaeaao dealt
GERTRUDE TROTMAN inee Doris
| NOTICE

NEEDLES for your record player .. .

semi-permanent needles to play severa!
thousand recordings.
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
24.5.50-—t.f.n

all kinds including Ruby and Pacer | y

NEW PLATTERS—Dinah Shore, Frank |
Sinatra, Bing and all the rest. Come)

and get, but quick. |
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

24.5.50—t.f.n. |

jastie _Rain-

Maize $4.80

|

———











RAINCOATS Ladie
coat White, Blue anc
each a Modern Dress Shoppe
15.6.50—3n. e¢.0.d
EEE
RETREAD tyres at cial ash
prices. 650 x 20 at $28 , 22 x 6 at
$38.96, 34 x 7 at /46.90, 825 x 20 at
$482.5 each Enquire Auto Tyre Com-
pany, Trafalgar Street, Phone 2696
21.6.50—~i.f.n, |

)
TYPHOO TEA Delicious, Refreshing,
Economical
—38c. —s-Ib. package. Get yours to-day
from your Grocer or Druggist. KNIGHT
DRUG STORES 21.6.50,—2n





Fresh supplies just sreceived ==—_—_——— OO

ovell) as I do not hold myself respon |
sible for her or anyone else cont net |
any debt or debts in my name urnies: | oa matte, the Estate of

a written order signed by LEWIS OLIVER YARDE
































. r AN | deceased

Signed Oe ee eee NOTICE is hereby given that all per-
me ‘st. John, {sons having any debt or claim against the
20.6.50—-2n te of Lewis Oliver Yarde-—more often

ae m as Lewis Oliver Burke—dece
RTT Or > of Enterprise in the parish of Christ
THE public are “by varned | Church in this Island who died on the
against giving credit to any PersOM|rith day of May 1950, intestate are re-
or persons (whomsoever in my | quested to end in particulars of their
as I do _not hold myself 20) | claims duly attested to the undersigned
anyone contracting any debt o } Mirlam Adina Straker, c/o Messrs. Haynes
my name unless by a written order) & Griffith, Solicitors, No. 2 Swi Street,
sijmed by me. Bridgetown, on or before the 3lst day of
by me August, 1951 r which date I shall pro
Signed NEWTON ecd da the assets of the de-
ceased among parties entitled thereto
having regard only to such claims of
which I shall then have had notice and
—_—— I will not be liable for the assets or any
es pari thereof so distributed to any per-
” se debt or claim I shall not



had ne



is indebted to the
ted to settle
without delay
his 20th day of June, 1950.
MIRIAM ADINA STRAKER,






said
their said









HELP



OVERSEER — An_ experienced ified Administratrix of the Estate

TINNED FRUIT—Grapes, Penches.| qverseer. Apply to the Manager, I Oliver Burke , deceased.
Apricots, Prunes, Fruit Salad and] piigrim Plantation. 2.6,50—-in. | 21.6.50.—4n.
Sliced Pineapple. W. M. FORD, Dial
2489, 35 Roebuck St. 20.6.50—2n A LADY—for Office Previo oar
experience not essential Apply +t f Z

TINNED MEATS—Salmon Large &| jetter and in person. IL. M. B. Meyer :
Small, Vienna Sausages Large and| & Co., Ltd 17.6. 50—T.F.N ™

Small, Steak & Kidney Pudding, Ham- a
hurger Steak & Prepared Mustard 17c WITH AN

Bottle. W. M. FORD, Dial 3489, 35| MISCELLANEOUS
Roebuck St 20.6, 50— ————————— |
ee CHAIN—Gents i5ct gold watch chair

VITAMIN B. EXTRACT—Standardized
by Parke, Davis & Co. is indicated to
supplement the vitamin B content of
milk for infants and to reinforce the
diet of either children or adults. It is
inditated for pregnant o1
Price Get a

particularly
ursing

women V/-

from

WEATHERHEAD LTD
21.6 5

21.6. 50—31



long 5Sft
Appl
8285.
20.6,.50—3r
—_————









CHT. Oliveblossor 15ft
in the best of condition
Hassell, Phone 2959





Wm. D. Richards & Son, Mc Gregor S
18. 6.50—2r
——
ENGLISH LADY-—Require post as!
Shorthand Typist fully q

Exide



Salary $120.00 Per month ®
Mrs Reece, Farmland ,near V RY
Hill, St. Michael No. 22 }

116.50 | -

—————





TRUNK—Very large trav tr
extra strong or large lir wicke
Phone Williams #221



basket lined
\is 6. 50—6n.






Pressure On

Thanksgiving Fund

LONDON,

1

request of the Government. Tha’
procedure, .he said, had been
followed in the present case
And he added: “But I cannot
sufficiently emphasise my entire
and wholehearted agreement with
the fund’s purpose and objects

Unsatisfactory

To the suggestion that the!
fund's progress was unsatisfactory, |
the Lord Mayor said that the
figures that were available and |
had been published — the latest |
figure was just over £600,000 —
related only to amvunts received
by him direct at the Mansion
House. They did not allow for
the fund-raising activities which
were taking place on an increas-



ing scale locally throughout the
country.

The Lord Mayor ended his
letter with these words: “I can-

not sufficiently stress the essential
consideration, which is that the
response to the fund should be
such as to leave no doubt in the
minds of our generous benefac-
tors overseas that their outstand-
ing kindnesses, often shown at
great sacrifice,.is deeply appre-
ciated by of us, and will for
ever be gratefully remembered.”



ed

MAIL NOTICES

MAILS for Grenasa, Trinidad and Brit
ish Guiana by the M.V. Canadian Con-
structor will be closed at the General Post
Office as under

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail ‘at 3
on the 2ist June

pm

Ordinary Mail at 8 a.m. on the 22nd
June.

Mails for St. John, N.B. Quebec and

Montreal by the M.V. Canadian Cruiser
will be closed at the General Post Office
as under

ee aaah ree hie a AS

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at 3
pm, on the 2ist June, .
Ordinary Mail at 8 a.m. on the 22nd
June.







Sellier,
Stephen

James
Cooper,

Laurie
pher Barnard, Mary Charles, Arthur War
ner,

nald Crampton

Roy



In Carlisle Bay



IN PORT Yaet Ve
Harriet Whittaker, Set
Yacht Leander Set
Gordon, Sch. Belqueen
w Seh Dortac, Seb
Smith, Sch. E. M. Tannis
ARRIVALS
M.V Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt
Parsons, from St. Lucia
American tanker V. W. Gokey, 1,235
tone net, Capt. Kamp, from New York
Schooner Emeline, 72 tons net, Capt
Clarke, from British Guiana |
Schooner Timothy A. H. Vansluyt-j
man, 76 tons net, Capt Stoll, from
‘Antigua
DEPARTURES
S.S. Strategist, 3.788 tons net, Cant
Sawle, from St. Kitis

In Touch With Barbadec
Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd., advise
that they can now communicate with the
folowing ships through their Barbados
Coast Station. ,

S.S. Fana, S.S. Boryslaw,
b ¢, SS. Argentan, S
S.S. 8 Rosa, S.S. Boskoop.
Ss



S.S. Sea
Esso Utica,
Tactician,





Fletero, S.S. Canadian
Stella Arcturus,
Nueva Andalucia, 8.8. Golfite, S
\inherst, S.S. Giacomo Matteotti,
De Noir Mountier, S.S. S. Wilfrid
Steel Maker, S Orion, SS.
Ranger, S.S. Brazi
ritone, S.S. Esso Avila, S.S. Esito, 8.5.
S. Tagalan, S.S. Tista, S.S. Naviero, S.S
flise, $.S. Ubaldo, S.S. Rie De
5.8. Guadeloupe, 8.8. Alcoa Puritan, S.S
Laurits Swenson, 8.8. Loide Uruguay,
Dolores, S.S. Feggen, SS. Bonaire,
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From St.
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From Martinique

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DEPARTURES—BY B.W.LALL,
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Roac Telford Hewitt



For Grenada

Ernest Fenty, Jean Fenty, Philip ren}

ThatFatal Fourth Round

Blinded Woodcock’s Lost Chance |

Hy

Peter I



itton
LONDON

Half-blinded by the blood in his eyes aud with the

sweat vouring down his chest Bruce Woodcock,

British

Heavyweight Champion stuck out a wavering left hand.
Above him the are lights blazed down mercilessly.

The 40,000 crowd at the
ever to see a boxing match

The Heavyweight Championship of the World

and Woodcock was fighting
see.

The tip of his touches |

glove

Lee Savold on the chin Wood
cock tensed himself and threw |
over a right-hander that had
‘finish’ written all over it from
the moment it commenced _ its
journey. The blow missed its
appointed target by about
inches. Instead of landing

bone and melted away harmlessly
over his shoulder.

Thus passed Britain's hope of
bringing the title back to this
country for the first time since
Bob Fitzsimmons won the Heavy {
weight Championship crown
1897.

Woodcock’s final effort. hal
been in vain;, Relentlessly Sav ,\
stalked his man. He knew ne
tight was in his pe and another)
vicious left-hook landed = itselt)
on the ineh-long ‘cut «above
Woodcock’ left eye.

Wiore Blood

Another spurt of blood
from the wound and as
came in again both men 2
covered in red. Woodcock was
esperately pawing the air but
Savold was safely out of the way
and it was obvious as_ the bel
rang to signal the end of roupa}
four that the fight was all over

Woodcock was taken back to
his corner and almost imme
diately the towel was thrown
into the ring It was picked up
again but referee Smyth took enc
look at Woodcock’s eye and with-
out hesitation walked over te
Savold’s corner and raised his;
arm to declare him the winner. |

There could be no doubting the|

its |
tive
on

Savold’s chin it grazed his cheek

came? |
Savoled |
were |






American's superiority He
might not have looked World |
¢lass but at least he had looked |
good enough for Woodcock |

In the first couple of rounds}
Savold had decidedly the worst



It seemed as though
great
on

of the deal
Woodcock would have no
difficulty in winning Only
that thought we

far wrong



Woodcock was on top only ecause

Savold was sizing his man up.

He was crouching in the middle |

of the ring both hands weaving a
pattern in the air about wajst
height.
Temptation

Woodcock was being tempted
to go for Savold’s apparen‘ly
unprotected jaw. The American
wanted him to lead with hfs rignt

City

Garage Trading Co.,

Lid



|
reflection is it possible to see how |

YOU
EXTRA LOW COST
OPERATION

DEPENDABLE BATTERIES

White City, the largest crowd
in England waited anxiously
was at stake
an opponent tie could hardly
and then he was all set to let
fly with his famous left—hook,

It says much for Wood&ck
that he refused the obvicus
nivitation and yet still managed
*o score with several hard right
Shey were perhaps a little tov
high to do any real damage |ut
ut least they made Savold’s face
turn a bright pink,

Honiours were definitely wits
Woodcock until the third round
when Savold started closing «in
ind made him miss with seveyal
well-intentioned rights, Even so,
Woodcock had so far established
a clear points lead and there wa
little indication of what was t
come

The fourth and final round was

‘absolutely fateful for Woodcock

punching
The nex

minute he was
away quite happily
tavold had crashed through a
ght-hook which opened up the
ut above Woodcock's lett ee
After that the issue was never in
loubt.

ne

Tiard Luck
Woodcock has had a lot of hard
luck throughout his career.
Whether his performance at the
White City could be ranked in the
same category I would not like

4o say Savold had taken every-
hing he had to give without
eppearing to be worried, and [

think, Woodcock was a little dis.
ressed to find that his right hand
) which he was so obviously
rélying had not had the desired
effect

As a world title fight it wil!
never be ranked with the great
and if, as I hear, Joe Louis i:
ntending to stage a come~back,
both Woodcock and Savold would
Le well advised to enter honour
uble retirement,

SALE
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The sale of “Kenworth”, Pinfold

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PAGE ‘TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE en ce WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950
—— — hicrpininentn ,
\.A.A. Never Passed On: \ Th |

Invitations To Me
WeDonald Bailey

Says

Barbados Advocate Correspondent
LONDON, June 20
Bailey, Trinidad

letter to the Evening

McDonald

Ayer,

in a

Standard today, adds his weight g ne LONDON, June SUMMER Bhs agpeuas

to the growing call for the A. A.A The Old Trafford Test HAIR CORD, 72¢
to end their petty restrictions in the West Indies from one particular point of view It has 36 in. wide per yard

Pa ewe i reaily cannot say shown that in Valentine and Ramadhin they have two AI te

how often the A.A.A. haye pre- young slow bowlers equal to any in the world at the FANCY SHIRTINGS
vented my running at meetings to moment. For both these youngsters to have performed 31 in. wide 72
which T had been invited, because as they did was a remarkable achievement and sould Per yard ¢
Pins ig pellntite ¢ Bs tt sig solve a lot of West Indian worries for many years to come.

“on . — PRINTED DRESS

I do know that I was re-
fused permission to run in
Brussels; and I do know that

Reflections On

First Test Mateh

W.L Can Still Win Series

iy

There is no need for des-
pondency over the result of
this match, The wicket was

Peter Ditton

}
|
|
has proved a great success for |



| Table Tennis

Special

Bargains

CAMBRIC, an as-
sortment of pretty



dos | undoubtedly awkward, very, | " patterns, 36” wide

= ee ee aor | very awkward. Indeed, Arthur Cl h Ne ° t Per Yard ......

— ae a, ta ee | Gilligan, a former. England as CX

o run ; ‘. Be eee | Captain, told me he had never

so - not San as is | seen a worse one in his career.

organisers no’ nm giv d
answer, but the a has We in England have got to the DELUSTED SUEDE CREPE
not even been passed to me.

“homie

All I know about other meet-
ings is what I am told by people
I meet, and I cannot count the
invitations because they are not
passed on to me’.

TWENTY-EIGHT players wiil
start in the championship race on
Saturday

In Pink, Blue, Peach, White
36 in. wide, Per Yard

duces a result in a Test series
better than the old “feather bed”
At the same time it is exceeding-
ly tough luck on a touring team,
used to hard wickets, to come over
here and play a five-day match on
a wicket which obviously will not
; last more than twenty four hours.



stage where any wicket which pre-|



60c

eed



and
the

by the following

Tuesday names of the



McDONALD BAILEY



| |
| Saturday

The boys from Barna Club are
confident that Stoute will retain)
his title. On the other hand







CRICKET

















Results





|







A Lesson

One lesson the West Indies must





Everton's Gill is showing magnifi-
cent form; closely followed by
Worrell and Greenidge Left-
hander Worrell has improved be-







: last
eight will be interesting to read. |

CaveSHEPHERD& Co, Lid, |

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

























of | learn, however, is patience. Bats-| yond expectations, and great
LONDON, June 20 men of the calibre of Weekes, Wal-| things are expected from this
SF ge Surrey
; At Swansea, Glamorgan—St ’ | cott and Worrell, who have proved} youngster. Anyone, who remem-
At 22 teh Sraws ‘ha: Saean WE i . gone be igae the greatest in} bers Greenidge’s clash with Gomes
Sime Glamorgan ; Parkhouse ’ , yA eRe. : e world, will not meet with their | —Trinidad’s champion last year
later Sit i. Davies 77, H. Davies 60 and mer ARCHERY CONTEST 2,000 miles apart. Sheffield versus Hel- | accustomed success unless they can| year, will know what determina- | / meer "2
ed Sas re. | ondly 150 for 1, Parkhouse 75, As sinki: A unique archery contest has just been carried out in ‘restrain their natural desire to tion and tenacity this player
Joule i Davies not out 54 } Sheffield and Helsinki- -2,000 miles apart. The match was organ- score rapidly from th rord fe 4 ' . ee j ry _
“Ww Rise lef r 1 Surrey 362; Fishlock 76, Mc! ised by Mrs. Martha Soederstroem, a Finnish Archery Ace, who Ben ae ae hat elation aime. Willoughby RELIANCE FREEZERS
oO eft m slows! _ 2 ave f Sheff ’ e Arche ‘ ag: ; ali i . ss Natahitat es ayers “
hie } piece of | Jtyre 84, Clark 60. ah? play ed for She field s Abb ydal Archery Club against Helsinki. That 998 runs were scored at Old] Slocombe, Gooding, the Murrays, 1 and 2 GALLON SIZE.
otad At Lords, Yorkshire beat Mrs Martha Soederstroem is here shown taking aim Trafford indicates that run making] and Edey, cannot be discounted ALSO
ow lin Z0ing cas 96 . ; > plave - Sheffield ag: op , 21s) + lan > ae een * vy, Ce s > pars aa a
bea dir Panty mites we , a = ee aeitubiad when she played for Sheffield against her own Helsinki,—Ezpress. ie ae impossible. But, apart! even Shields and Bynoe, may MAIZE AND CUR™ MILL=
utes, He ts for 57|\ py igen 120, Sharp 80; Wardle : ___ |#Fom Evans’ century 7 the first! spring Surprises. -Table Tennis is — AND —
runs and in » his fine fetes 96 aie P aiicily, ittaee a ae to its full of them. A few upsets would ICE SHAVERS.
work the tourists in in 7 At Howe, Sussex Cambridge ] | eae as a bowler ane Beads Sie edie eater ae ae ye { —— A eee omer Ne eee
ing d 6 1 University match drawn ' man ‘although he scored many competition progresses and why
NOTTS—*ad Innings — an ae» PRaes - a oy ; 7 : t, as no-one loves a one horse ]) °
Sussex 312, C 140, and second- e e A . ~! not, as ne :
H ae a a sas BL. Cox 93, John See oe eee swe eL 4lrace. The present competition af- Established ERT Ltd Incorporated
Oakes 151, Warr 5 for 78. F for 33 ils tahanae aay i aecteen fords a splendid opportunity for 1860 . ° 1926
Cambridge University 471 for 5 bomeaacle of patente and skill. He| Such Players who by dint of hard 10 & 11 Roebuck Street.
14 ec., Dewes 212, Sheppard 158. Pe hit three fours which indicated a practice will ‘he eligible for sélet-
0 At Northampton, Northampton- willinghels to' punish the: loose tion peninst Srinians. sod Bere Cai
15 ive Mcea ate , 5 , : ; ané e - =
| | Shire—Essex match drawn. — TO-DAY the West Indies open their thirteenth match| balls and never once, until he was eat Union talker alice Trints —
5 Essex 431 for 9 dec. Vigar 144, . - es . run out, did he look like losing his ment which takes place at ini
o | Horsfall 63, Insole 81. of the tour against Sussex at Hove and it is interesting to wicket. & dad in August.
, 3 Northamptonshire 240; Living-| pause for a moment and look back at their achievements. to ee dia ata E77"
Tota 24 stone 66, Brooks 74, Brown 57, date. ‘ t Had his example been emulated ; apt,
Peter Smith 5 for 77 and secondly| This match against the county an added attraction for those seek-|>Y Some of the West Indian bats- BARBADOS FRIENDLY *
ann Sass, on as a ae 85, Brown | of the Langridges, Maurice Tate, ing cool and refreshment sibly Bae pom, eee could Pe AT THE ‘.
OV iA ySIs out 134. , illige ; : s ave ulled out o e P i
nee a M ti a a Bristol, Gloucestershire beat mee a 7 Gilligan’ and S.C . fire. ‘Admittedly, the fact that FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION
‘0 34D | epbyehive by Bloruiis , “Billy” Griffith of the last M.C.C. | No Game Yardley won the toss meant that ; : ;
eee aq One eee ees tain aan: Fuck g| team to the West Indies, is the| fuidland gained ss meant that) ArT 5 o’clock this evening at the
18 5 82 1). Gloucestershire 1 “hans oo 5) last game before the Second Test The 1939 tour, cut short owing eng anc we _ What advantage | princess Alice Playing Fields
2 81 . i? came, Bpeonely + FOUN) which opens at Lords on Satur-| to the outbreak of World War If ee ee (Ref). Major A. R. Foster will
= a ° ‘; va PY YO. } | c , — . 3 re Jas very $s . a > mu °
4 i 3 (OO oo eae fj | day. had not yet reached this fixture,} —~" A : present to the Rangers football *
orbys » 314, He t : ‘ > s s tricks fr
Reuter i REE ck bie ta ona And this Test game will be in-| when they had to return home. the. Ree eB ng won team the Challenge Cup and the CALLS FOR
Secondly 90: Gotidard 7 for 42 vested with even greater inter-| The ome ny had a monger Indies followed up their initial ‘eds Jeffrey's knock-out Cup.
, *9 pie : —Rew est since the unhappy comments, game, late in the tour one of the| Joo. yy, ad fiv:
“Play Headley Reuter. which followed the Ast |features of which was a lase| vantage when they had five Eng- | _ RUM
r - s Ww | wicket stand between Teddy Hoad there might r have been a vautly
’ a 1 thi of 7 o ae
D oD . Six ins and Herman Griffith. “Griff” got| qigorent «
Cable Sent to U.K. POCKET CARTOON By their victory over Notts yes-| 89. re een ee an s a oung AT ITS BEST
(Barbades Advocate Gortékpendent) QSBERT LANCASTER terday the West Indies scored For to-day’s game, no doubt Overwhelmed
KINGSTON, June 20. be their sixth win out of 12 games} Trestrail, Marshall and Pierre} @ @
Headley enthusiasts to-day played, a feat unequalled by any| whom luck seems to have dodged| It seemed to me, however that —Vi our Rene ed In other words Sighs
drafted cables to the Secretary, of its predecessors. The 1939 side,} up to now, will) have another go| wnen the West Indies had to face Q
President and Manager of the agreed on every hand as the best| at the fickle dame that first innings total of 312, they
Tt. -erioke Board, Captain of ever sent to England up to that Another win would be a fitting| were slightly overwhelmed, In- Without er on ALL 9
fhe W.i. touring team, M.C.C., time did not register its sixth win| apertif for the Test stead of settling down and giving
Headley and his club Bacup for until far into the tour and did not Good Luck against Sussex lads,| themselves plenty of time to get] If you feel old before your time or suffer
th f this f bat t th th 1 tl B. M the runs, they crashed ahead lik trom nerve, brain and physical weakness
he services of this famous bats- get the seventh victory until the —B. runs, > ahead like 7 ‘i a health in
man to be secured by the W.I. twentieth game against Hampshire ;a Ae at a gate. peat from this tn American Medical discovery which re- SPECIAL RI IM
1 the outsta : Tes ' f ; e 5 ’ an
oe . ene ae at Bournemouth on August hat haved eee e sea? cena Tore ort operat Raa It sa simple Rome e
" i ac ay sii attempter anything | treatment in tablet form, discovered by an
This was done after a This seventh win ,was of im- A oe ti < W ns that was not safe to be attempted. | American Doctor, Absolutely harmless and
in Kingston yesterday portance because up to that time rgentine ins But once they had gone, the other | easy to take, but the nex at ee ko ee ecrenceeeeee
evening no visiting West Indies team to} batsmen always looked uncertain ae directly on your glands, nerves, and so




W

ill No



t Ask



England had won more than six

gemes (at least first class games).








Grand Prix

and likely to get out at any time.
On hard, true wickets the West

vital organs, builds new, pure blood, and
works so fast that sou ean see and feel new
to 48 hours.



H BE WISE-ECONOMISE |





=





—_—
















































































RI
: bod: wer and vigour in 24

These six wins had been put BELGIUM, June 19. Indies have already shown an Because of its natural action on giends and 1
up by the 1923 team, and was By winning the 3elgian ability to score and score heavily. rey ae oer iertote Amiasnsty. y

Headlev double the figure of wins of the} Grand Prix Motor Race here|At Trent Bridge, when they go to] “And this amazing new gland and vigour
c ude 1906 team. yesterday Julian Fangio of|play the Third Test they should restorer, called Vi- Tabs, te Ba a teens USE |

| The 1928, and the 1933 teams,}| Argentina in his Alfa Romeo,| pass 500 without much difficulty. pr Araarieee and Is now available at all

NOTTINGHAM, June, 20 ezch scored five wins out of 30] kept in the chase for world] It is only on a turning wicket that | chemists here, Get Vi-Tabs fro, yore B O W R

John Goddard, West Indies jfixtures. irivers championship. danger 1s likely to present itself, Bie inprevemant in 24 hours, Take the
Captain, said here to-day that The 1939 side, set up new fig- ahah ee Re ‘ Fae I Poe ie ¢ the West In- Cull bottle, Wee eae eee tt ate unit
the touring team had no intention ures. anglo coverec ne: oe sAp8 ° les are force to bat again under | the Pos ¢ 1 ner nd vitality, Cc R
of asking George Headley, former With only two defeats, so far,|the course with a total of about such circumstances, Goddard could ind ‘feetvi0. to. 20 “yeare Gounger or ANTI- ORROSIVE PAINT
ore oe is at Se i!” |W ems a oer gout ie Saige ghar 5, a |RSS | cue prove
the side ) their Secon est on Saturday. : , i ar of ante ages : .

He was commenting on a report “My dear Maudie, if jou Usually this game with Sussex miles an hour Luigi Fagioli of} solidity to the middle of the bat- i-Tabs A ay antes D PROTECTOR OF JRON AND STEEL
from Xin ton, Jamaica ae -_. ae aon wocrstng coms much later on the fixture ee are eee oy aetiax Ung, Baitbe Restores Manhood and_ Vitality GOES FARTHEST «> LASTS LONGEST
ericket enthusiasts were to send abou! ationa oot eatth cara, % - am
a eable pressing for the return of Week, we're never going to Brighton is one of England’s | 40 seconds about 109 M.P.H, 6559696 :

. : . Sa ee Ser E ‘ SOROS 99 9098585 $56,966.56 9585688 aa
Headley, w ho is now playing in a do Askaet” summer resorts and this game js eee ee oon in alk * RE re At ie ee One Gallon will cover 1,000 sq. ft.
Lancasiire League ricket, yod- : * - = a s 1 ¥ 7 + *.
dard 5 id ho such cable had been S cer St . rs 9 minutes 45 seconds, 108 M.P.H. i% GRACI I A FAU LKN ER= = Supplied tho
received oC a eetuaeaaae ae i- x om
—Reuter ; The Weather s — distinguished New York — %
'* e eather : stinguished soprano of New Yor ¥ PERMANENT GREE
* * o “4 r N
ie Wives Follow eau B. B.C. Radio Programme | hee ae : / Ra: GREY BAC co
W eC1ss And Morea Sun Rises: 5.40 a.m WEDNESDAY June 21, 1950 $ % / SUPER BLACK (Heat Resisting)
.m. ¥ 4 of sis J
; fe LONDON, June 20. Sun Sets: 6.23 p.m. sm. Tne News, 7.10 a.m, News|@ ’ 1 ai . in Tins of I ial Measure
Defeated ss Seer Set dee te aaa Moon (First Quarter) June 7.15 a.m. Ralph Wilson, 7.45 a.m | ¥ . x { ins of Imperia easure,
Jock odds, agent for e Bogota 23 * ally Speaking, 8.00 1. From the | m1 I ‘
ir r Club, Mi airos . ack- a sis. 8.10 a.m. Programme Parade | ¢ v) Phone 56 ; Y
T A mete Yea 4 fared { ma’ Snir het okeoeiat ip to Lightiag: 7.00 p.m. ingle ear t Grohecte San % At 3) seated si oon
wo Argentine stars, Heralds aut a DIODoeen : High Water: 7.38 a.m., 8.5 a ont” tae sane” in 401 | | W
Weiss, and Enrique Morea, were pa PM peer international pin. : ,Down, 12 noon ithe News, 10-10) COMEER ERE 91) ILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.
Poway Gereates 4b. tne. SeCOng Mira Pavel mela: ’ ‘ YESTERDAY for Dancing, 1 p.m. Mid week Talk, | % ; or " a Bi
round of the Men's Sfngies in tht Mrs. Favell said to-day that she Rainfall (Codringtor 17 1.15 p.m, Radio Newsreel, 1.30 p.m. | & % | Vesseesee ———
handén Crass Courts Gawn Tent iad talked to her husband by the o eton) 1G The Name is Susan p.m. The News| % HALL %
n aS wth Ma “ans- : w a i. , > Home om Brite % 4 I
champions nips at Queen's Club a Sr spell 1 eoer i le Total for month to yester- > mn mrt Rev ave 2 Tea" x T ay %
I Taal “ot a SrA pate a The terms offered by the Mil- day: 9.07 ins 5 athe IN ¥ Vo ee x!
». Lurie of South Africa and hom a ar 4 tre 7 ake he Wews T aily ' XM}
Raion: fell 1/527 a. 9 Sen , lionairos F.C were acceptable ‘Temperature (Max.) 85 5 Fr 4.15 from Grand $ at 8.30 p.m. %|
Tony Trabert of the United S ’|She will be going by sea next Temperature (Min.) 74.5° P. ) pon Kunz at the/% %
The - wit Ne eg Seeiaaa ht month, her passage being paid by Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E. ii ater oer Satna Bren ¥% Accompanist: |
ner eS tease an sarded AS! the Club, (3 pam.) E slot a S aeies, Le ¥ x
t shears: for Timbledo : : 5 a . mm, 5 po Michae CHAD . | »
ee ey 4 oe he a Sie With pet wil be Mes. Biiy Bie. Wind Velocity 18 miles per B00 p.m. The war tn Burma, 7.00 " m x WALTER, P. CHAMBERS > _— ae ee
a ee a vho wilt Je bgins, wife of the Everton forwarc hour Re al eeu ERe REO aed TICKETS: $1.20, 3/- %
Ee Ai ss ain Sate Het week eee for the Bogota Club a| Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.959 indies ie Paras aol naa. Py Oi g $
: | ” ag " 9 cussion between A. E. T. Henry and] & %
Reuter. —Reute (3 p.m.) 29.909 Ant 3 Brown, 8.00 Radio News- | & Baleony 2/- REAM
Router. reel, B15 p.m. Midweek ‘Talk, 8.90 p.m. |e x Cc
——-—— eee nena " a 5, my of Strings, 9.00 p.m. Land and |s$ Bookings open at Advocate x,
; - ree . ; 1 ck, 9.30 p.m. Music in Miniature, | @ af They'll Do It Every Time epi © ig By Jimmy Hatl oe ete Nes Pm OTT gay x! SH
2 ade vey ROG. mot y Jimmy Hatlo | ee ee aakacey ‘ ORT-SLEEVE
YOU GOT THE TEACHER'S J I BET Yyf Tr. TAKE q Roe eer eye >» %
| WHY DIDN'T NAME SPELLED WRONG! . THE TEACHER (MY PEN IN HAND’! —W/ A A

1%,



You write





















AND CAN'T YOU START




GETS WORSE WHERE DOES SHE











THE NOTE,“I NOW WRITING IN THEM ) THINK HE'D TAKE

TAKE MY PEN IN YY EXCUSE LETTERS / IT?IN HiS FOOT?

HAND”? MAKE HER THAN SHE GETS | I'M GOING TO Y —

THINK YOU'RE A FROMTHE THIRD / TIPHYPROGEN v7 KIPS
BIG SHOT +++ OFF TO LOSE wort |

THAT NOTE:
* | PUT UP
arin
|
}

WITHs*+/

(AW, GEE!

CAN'T YOU
JUST SAY I
HAD A COLD
AND STAYED





MAN ONLY \ th
KNOWS HOW | Atl
are

Ir MOM AND POP
TAKE ANY LONGER,
JUNIOR WILL BE OUT
ANOTHER DAY s+*
THANX TO“GRANDPAY &
PITTSBURGH, PA.

|
A. ||
ty
I |







HP Radios (roate
Records

Everywhere !

There are good reasons why people prefer PYE. As, evidence that they



et ot atm



lo prefer PYE look at yet another sales record, this time made in the

neighbouring island «

of St. Lucia.

In that island last year PYE obtained

9 per cent of the total Radio business. (Ninety-eight per cent). There

are now several hundred Modern Day PYE Radios in St. Lucia, and as

fast as New Houses are built New PYES go into them. Yes, they ve tried

others, but prefer PYE.

P.C.S. MAFFEI & CO. LTD—AGENTS.





SPORT SHIRTS

— +

| AUSTIN REED
COLLAR ATTACHED
SOFT FRONT

DRESS SHIRTS

— AT

C. B. RICE & Co.

OF
BOLTON LANE



Full Text

PAGE 1

V vu.r. EIGHT II UiliAIM is AMVIH.A1I lli\. -nil II M 21. l5ii HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON a. rA.woj\ WITH WHISPER IN THE SOUTH Or rflANCE %  WILi BRINGING UP FATHER Specially designed for Barbados, this brown broque is now on sale in the leading stores. See them for yourself made by JOHN WHITE firz When your BACK ACHES... Ba.-ka'-V I. ..uall. %  • **• '" '•"• .-*-".. Th* kuaner. an the UNJ'I ft**.. When ttqplMtii m6m. ntmm % %  "' %  • %  M> -a***, MM %  > • •**. Wluch*. Ut ch. rttmm^mm, •ad reel a* that I"*-) Ml' lli"i MM Ml** T* o*ak* -MM kiaWt. watt fN-A **I>* k *|lilfciH*l****fV — I>*dd KMW. PiBi IWd. k.aW. PJi QUKU. nd row .r bdr-*l U-H •I •****• Midi and nM *o lh.t pur*. lw-*tjhidtiil*.r T—** f ndu*-U. Th*n .*U f**J I—H Ink brltr.*• %  -•It-, and row aie rndi I* TK-M* with tkr rrJ UMW. Oaf* •/w aim ***• o Handypo cket Always ready to relieve the first hint of' a cold %  MVf .,-.,.. ham /•• %  •-"• •ant-iating. .parkline %  i"t bring* you quick ram the oftj affacte of nt and ov*i indulgence %  %  i drink. Keep it handy. Make sure you ask for Sloan's Liniment —apply it to your rheumatism—thenpains and You cannot jet n -thing better for your mutcular pains than Sloan's Liniment. Simply apply it lightly don't rub and relief it quick and certain. FOR IMI HCTu-P Of OR innOH IHI f> SLOANS L iniment 'Headache's gone ... I took GENASPRIN" '(•PNAWRIV if* ufo K.mdofa.piriu mkitb check* Hcjujvhe*. rootb%  ..n. Nerve jnJ Rhcunwi Pjinm. Colds and I lu Aho fMr*t> helm IO break a WW, At jnv imie of *itjtn or pain, 'iicrwtpnn' tec* you through Sohl h% nil Chemist*. hrurqiUM, etc. INDIGESTION Relieved By ONE DOSE Of This Famous Remedy Doo'l let Indigestion make your meals a miaery. Lethal one doae of MACLEAN BRA NilSTOMACH POWDER bnng you relief' This famous remedy relieves pain and discomfort quickly and effectively becauae it it a perfectly balanced tcientinc lormuU. Try MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH POWDER to-day .' Qulokiy ftalleva. FLATULENCE ACIDITY HEARTBURN NAUSEA STOMACH PAIN lOUSNESS _. to Indltaatlon Ba tan yoa obtain aaaaaaa MACLEAN BRAKD STOMACH WHO tbe <%53'JN Vs r ; &<-\he.i in-fn-. indkaie ih> %  tonrl-h i effective and pi i*cr*rlilUinit noutuhnvtni "'liiil.r J.w.ii, ln ,l I,,,),,,,,,. IB he.i tood.. • Ov.li.nr la rich in le. .•>,.., ( organ.. P ho n...a ) ,,l„ B | > | Pn ,, vr rr ,, orlfl||(1 | fmrn( "tlvah '-r* mmrlihrnrm required ... maintain rnrrg* at the htgh< ... po.-,W< Igaafl, I or their rea-on. %  Ovaltine %  ihe ulnl nlghr.ep irrr froatl drug, and art. In an entire,* natural -, %  ..Mining lull urn, i ai.i.i help, timcklv ID being ffayj deep and r*rfre*h.nu deep of relax and %  he hex kind Nf W FOTO •-. i HUM •flOW GOy.Rp.O • MW LIU>11 f RVO* • MO. vrnau MI IU(*HT i/*/ 4 other fat aJiwti bout ihe world'a moat fammw rcn | tVere i* a NfW Parker "51". finer ihan e.et bafcre. And n H the only pen *.nh ihe renMrk able FN-H Afto-tr-irtfi. Ink S>*iem . ttat devhed: ^etivmatnc Ink Syiiem ta a wht •ctenUfk rnwhod of dra-nn, | n nonna.. |a|MaaBni ,ia, and f-i.-mi, ,nk. lo give ihe MN agagfaiWIj pen r^ilonjum* *,. k,o*n See thk nae pen admir* it* illm grace eapeneiwe II* iJk> writing for vminetr, or at a gdi. ^er• ,* ptrfaction made fine• thn pan alone %  i*,g*d fof „,., %  Smrr -u/i/Udd 7nMt'u)tm&d'pen 'raaoaa m H.M,. rMt o. p Witt Lawralar r., liKtrlbatom lor Barbadaa: s I BRTDEN t SONS cB.KB.nci ITB Bill



PAGE 1

ii \\ .11 M >1 H5U IIMtP.ADflS ADVOCATE M'.l CLASSIFIED ADS. L()rd MaVOr Replies HARBOUR LOG Univsity College O. The West .ndies DIED %  %  <> %  %  i caafal il i 4 * IMC a !" H MIR RE VI' %  of our our Mr biWr W arsst Chrlelophar Mxr>, wtxi in have DMM M %  Wr luluknow thai dnih •• Hoi Jnui knowa 1 ., .11 IUU •. C Or uui p ii • IM RkigW), r> unr. Rrtnrla. Edetaon. >mn* ('...:. 'I 1 . r n !" c-h (HtMb 1 N Week.-.. Ml 'i MIU V\I.E AUTOMOTIVb auvnall Biaik Sedan u.irder 01 %  .lu Telc<;'opri ih-s week the LM .. 1 i racanilj by one of 1 < atomiuat* oj th.it iwpor This BH Njys h*i' 'h.it the Tli-nksKivip | %  (*-T. I.AHOK novwm and Afarb ; and thai tinI %  K— V"Iit' fu "Lj r "" 1M>11 hlni Viiain To Critics Dente* (ittvl. Pressure On 1 hu n ksgiving Fit nil 1 % %  1 Our 1-mirlon t t.rrcvpiinrient) Lewi THE LORD MAYOR of London has found It rMMsaary I n the Moond time to criticisms in the Pn lvln| Fund whicii be launched 'wo months ai<>The Fund. w!; million overseas students' centre in London a<; an i XJMN tha. Commonwealth and tinUi NCtiVvd during tinwar. continues to ar< .:%  : \ in Britain. request of Ihi I jure, hr *aid, had In Carlisle Bay 1 %  % %  smun, "Wi r. M ARIIIVAI %  V V Lady Jo. *• tana no* 'n>. O aan tJ MM net Cap! Kamp. from New 8.-hnier r %  Clarke. Iron Buli.i dula n ... >i £aM. from %  1 : Mlai K. frunla, Bratl A! unaon r 1 in.11 VATES UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER By Inrtrucilom raraJved [ftaaranM OoaaMMVi %  uav. June S3rd at 2 p Courtaay Oarace. u> 1MT 10 1 %  1 A ..1 MOIOIIS S SEDAN c Mi MUMS CASH. It ARCIIFP M. KFN7JF. AuMfeH % % %  second. |iiii(rr was unsatlafactorj could be further from the fact*", Bli 1*1 Ick Rowlaitd, UM Critic IMII Datly r< %  IeuTapll*• %  luiiiiiiil actually said was this •The Uaatni <>f Thr Fund and th* liuiiuiu(;> upon which Ii . IB than I can recal in connection with any olln*i I-nrd Mayor's Fund, affected subscription* Stirred by (hese criticisms, the Lord Mayor. I hear. ,mi ds closure a! %  The Thnnks(nviiie Fund, he said ni Idea which he had been aaioid i" put %  ni/. aettan r 1 %  poLatarJ out thai 11 men ImewUniue thai (apati from •rhara n %  .iiiidcn disaster launched a nationsi 1 : I'I III II !%OTM F* REAL ESTATt CAM HI > vlinder rorda. 1B37 Dodie. 137 Morn. Aaplv to Coamopolltan Carat*. btaaaiUie Lane, BUI MIS %  I 1si H A 1".... 11 ;..< 3,. ELECTRICAL NOTICE m s-md ordi iiShl i/ln.. Ii I'Oa "Al.l 1" HI Id MIMI-III n I IIATTO. nous*; • AV\ P H ran md ,Man FURNITURE FlTtNIU Rl J A~.l.mei, %  II • 30-In LIVESTOCK row 1 Hvtna M MECHANICAL UICVCIJ:*—One GenU Ralelfh and On* Phllltpt Genr, *tM*U boUl %  ood condlKon ... 1 i*'il. a-*i nere"oriea Knouire A lliirtwv*. Balh Vlllae CMedfoid. Counnj Oar.,ir M M aa imfrom lha -!' ithin Bllet.i daya li.-i the Oale of ptirvtuaar The Oaa, id water plpei. electric wlrea. KKluree l.iaold wilh llie 11 wntmaT *Kl l>e re ideruaned DPMI e received B* underaicnvd up lo rndalti I* 'c^ ,. loan of CI.OBO n I Roof Act. lt. a) •araa not to eceedln ahptari r A aKO %  foUawed in law present ca>c Bui 1 , : kuntctetiUj and .\h..u lienti.i a>:ri*cniiii witn 1 the ttandS L'fiNali%faclory l*a 'he Mijt'itum thai ... anaaflatactt > the 1-ord Mayor said that the had own published — the late I 1.1-: Dear tTOO.iKM I related only to anMHinU !" %  b> him direct nt the Mansio.i rfaey did not allan fOJ the funii-t. rim %  % %  tiaa a 11> a %  1 place 01 ai locally ihroughoui tha %  The Lord Mayor endad hll Itttai vith these words i can dentl) stress the aesential conHderation. which i* that lh response to the fund should tie such as to leave no doubt In tha I our generous banrtactors overseas that then outatandin U kinUitf*M-*. i'H.11 shown arcat s.icritU1de-pl> app"eaited by ol ua, "d win (" .-,., inaratanili' tem>-t i" 1 M %  w-ist \M iiiriim %  1 1 1 salary scale at. -. ad accommodation is cv. liable at S per cent annual ion is under F S.S L* arrangements ard chll paid Ai 1 IM Secretary. Interl-L'nivt., : Cordon Square, London. WC 1 from wluoi fur'r.i mation can he obtained MAIL NOTICES \IA11S (in C.rcna B. I'tnndmt and tint .,, ' %  • w||l be CVMMI at % %  real Mail -mi Hearn.' Ml Ji %  Oeatrai I In Touch With Barbados Coaat Station BarBaeM %  tioa SS rna II ItorvUaw It. %  s -. ...,l i %  %  v -. WtHrMa. S* Iteel UaKi-i %  s • \ %  I %  I. Plala I %  laa. BS l^.t. Monalre %  Allnntlr : Vovaarr. S.S Anioaiea ~ s nerceland > SHIPPING NOTICED ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. The M V accept Cars 1... lined Ma** 1 %  %  dad aalllnii T I 1 %  TI1..1 1 1 %  H 1 *. MiMist. .VS-.01 1 \i KM) named into Con-isoD 1 %  i'l Kin POWIII R, ha* %  effective liclno; pn>|its special compound appreciating a lair ion ought always to have a no pi Purol Powder ready oo her drcmngtablc •J'limM'H;! SF.AWELL %  1 1 Anlhoio %  Selber. % %  Bs 1 %  %  1 bin %  -' % % %  tutu Uantaa Tim Miill""|.' %  .lii.ai.il M hili. ni 1 inn Ht .-in IM I.I 11.1.1.1.4 l\ I %  Kin. Burad •i-i i" %  %  "" %  I %  I..1 Wae. %  %  IUIIII Ciai< : Qinen.. Ha.' •^ HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FIK'M THE UNITED KINGDOM .: 1 Sao Jaaa 1 um Cecil BAJHT n m 11 %  • %  hoUdays Under one rn.in.Beme"',, KATHO MII.L TOWftl IIOTKI. Si Vincent BUNNY CABIBBBIt un-lhe-ani Bequla Island ..ne.. all lhal con be desired Beaul lul reanary, aaa-h.it 1 1 nt. Aahin*. '*cOM ruannea and ba< RAT1 H ; i-er day. Foe further aet.n ROOKS. 1. 1. : %  ss s s ss ss rACTICIAN" PL \NTi:i(" LORD CHURCH" ATLANTIAN" %  >MCDIAN" London ; 1 Lotvlon 1 .11 1. %  1 i.list Mar 1 %  %  Juna iTih June uith June nth July I J IIOMFWAHD FDR THI UNITED KINGDOM Wssri rer Caaaaa la Ai'Visri; 1 1 ;,.,in HU LORD QLADeTOME Liverpool rKMPI I ARCH • I^ndor. 'or further particulars apply 10 DA COSTA & CO.. LTD—Aicnt.. Juh .lul. (' iiailian National Steauiship^ OM %  allan dinlns roomi, Uire* badm-"' %  %  % %  "i.i elacirlc lUhl. sarase and aervanli rot 11*10. 1 MISCELLANEOUS ANTIUUKK %  %  • %  Olaai. China, old Je L > Watereolowa Barlv booki, rr..(ih. iir at G.Trlndea adiolnlns Royal Yaeht Clu Thunder*isrieit ., petition Street. Brldselown. ofTer lor K ihelr office. Friday th. %  Navy aard 'I>W -quare (.1. %  utinii I./lll .'. contains | %  .v ,,,1,.,l—. %  %  jv.ii.t 1 .i.ilali., im. 3 bed room*. > bath %  and boll tiCFi tupboatd-. rr--de I • K.llaci/ell lad ,11 d dhritna t/y appointi lion K„i tmtl %  %  , 1 t iinKr. %  NOTICE HU %  AiOMXA %  ,, I! I Mil' % %  %  I i' %  %  Road Any pataom who ha* iei>| in advanee. or who a. ara iei|.ir*ted iLtnuniraie wtih M' A %  Mich,h ihe. BSa) t • ThatFatalFourth Round Hlimleil Wootlatck'* Loaf Chance 11. I'm1 inn.... LONDON llult-blindcd by the blood In hll 1 %  anal pourina down bii dual Bnica Woo* HMVyweiabt Champion s'u.k out .. wVMfaK toll hand. Above him Uu arc liRhis blaitd down 1 The 40,000 crowd at lh While Cltj th %  ever t sep" a boxing milth In Bnclal • The Heavrwelght Championahip of the V 01 and a Banting in opponent 1 liardlj -01 innoiMO Sail* Maatreal 1 IM 1 %  :. . I-.DY IIODhTtY LADY NYlflON 1.1 DV ItoDrlBY SMh June iSnrl Jjlv Ilrd An, \tHHUUOI ND Peas LADY NBtaON IADT RoDNBY : Aic NEtalON I-AIIY RODNEY nth Jim. run Jwi* mil Au ana asi FOR SALE at Constant Plantation %  %  (iARDINF.R AUSTIN (F.ar.ae a/itlvnit noUce paid x %  %  B&ai 1.11. BlatMBNT*BY SCSJOOI II M M't—1HIATIOS LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE fee at Ind %  %  Known ai ''"' .„ Kith da. ,rf juna\ IBM %  < ILLIAMB. I.. 1 Applwant TMI IIIII i'""n wilt be ooeiald %  •* *M*. I The lip of his glove ,. s., v Wood cock tensed himself and i.M>i .1 rlgtal handai tiin.vii' arrltten all over H freni Ihe moment It COnun Tha blow mi %  .ipur.lntci Un %  I I %  ''""" ow Ittsleud of lam hin .t grazed his cheekbone and melted away harmlessly over his shoulder Thus passed Britain's ho|-c 0' I ringing the title back to IBU country for the first lima Miff Dob FitMimmuns WOO UM Hi %  1 'vugiii I'luoopiiit^hip econ '17 b en in 1 %  I :nlki hla man ll<* 1 .tfht was in his grasp i.tt-huok Landrtd I on ihe inch-long eui I Woodcock' left eye. mom Blood Another spurt of Wood ,.,„, tha wound ;.i M BavoJB ame Ui again both men were Dverad In re %  •" %  thniwr. OM! Una It WR* pick, i US again hut referee Smyth look lr*.k nt Woodcock' l 1 .Ut heslUllton WaUKWd DVI Ravold's corner and ratted .... ;:v with hll hunt u l< % %  ho i much loi %  1 %  • • u.vitaUon and f Ml" %  • %  1 I 1 bright iFink Honours were dcflnltel) anlh OCh until Uie th 1 1 %  id made httn mini will v 1 11 intenUoni d rtghl Woodcock had M l.o establishl-tl .1 clear |H)inl. b-wi .mo iula in-*" atlon id i hal %  baorutely nucfui foi .. minute lie was punchihi ,1*" iitc happll) "he new 1 had th auati i %  %  1 I,, 1; %  %  afoodk 1 • .,1 %  in-' It'libl Miirr) Luck a/ood %  Ii ck throughout hi' %  %  ll) oould ba ranked in thi I not Ilk 1 1 uy Bavold had takei %  artttk ni .'. and 1 think. Wtmdciivk was n little CUB rased to find that his nahl hand 1 which he was BO %  had Ihe daslrcd ill.-1 An ii world title "tfht >< *'•" M b> th thi hal 1 ,v.m •and with PASSACiES TO IRELAND Antilles Products Ltd.. Roseau, l>"inini.. offer pas*..i Dublin per ht.V IMIALA". nexi salLtad from Roseau >N all.AM'IQI FRENCH UNI MHwfl '• %  Trinidad .SniNriu lu I'li/i/iouih I ..\sroGNE 1 s s r.ASrcxiNE" B GASCOONB" %  I i.AsroiiNK" 1 haMhee part I M nth July, 1B5II Iflth Au|. tu.'.i. mh s.ut,, i5o Hll. Nuv IBM al>| ly Ic :— JONES & CO.. LTD-Agents. 3,d July. l!:.o tmi. Au 14th .,.t, 1050 8th No* IBM r.ila HAVE YOU GOT A ^ COLD or COUGH IF SO TRY lili'Oli \f ,\ CERTAIN COlh'U VIEW CUIST arm to declare him h r %  I hear. Jos l>'U ,ld lie no doui'*.' American's BOpCraOrlt] mmht not have clnss hut !it least he had lookeOj good enouKh for Woodcock Jr. the first couple of 1 >u.id|gvi i.i bad im leai Uy Ua It seemed as tl'-muh j would hava m dUTieulty in winnina to1 aee how lar wrong that Uiought was Woodcock was on top on! Savol/i was sizing his n He was crouching in n 1 the rtfa] both hand." t 1 tmtlarii in the ,.1 heiKht Teinpt-ilMH) Woodcock was taring u-inpted to go for Savoid's unprotected )aw. The Ami wanted him to lead wltl '" tioth Wot/dcork and Bai 1 1 ed IIVMINf:;*. HAKH.\IH)S j I \( I I I INT CI'ISINR riUV BTOCKKb BAR | mis. SS.0J per Day at I upwards (litelaalve) lippll Mrs W S HOWEId. i URIAH <:i-rriN ri tiiMi n vi II-.KV < 11 \t;t.i'.-. 'ii iM TURNING Md'IOK RU-AIR.i MM IOLHP UAltDADOS CAltAr.E, I3f Hoehuck S' : Mai M-.'\ SALE wriiiiniww MTtllS 11 l\TH-A 1 to you GET EXTRA LOW COST OPERATION OCPENOABIF BATTER FOR 61 VIHS: YACHT iliveblo.f>.... beel of %  An oil artlh t %  OUlni ka not .< 1 1 USE MCHM OILS ron iNCHKAsi.ii on 1 M.MKAI MM.MIHV MM. -.rt vIirSUlluii Trafalrar l BRITISH GUIANA AIRWAYS Hllhll SI ll\ II I s ST. VINCENT AND DOM INICA FOR FULL INFORMATION CONTACT AGENTS BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS low., iroad Si lilihaHaa rhon. 4M5 <~ CARLTON BROWNE I aaakH 11^ HEAL ESTATE JOHN M. Ill 411 ON D v m I in.a.. FOR SALE I'I'M I %  PLANTA riONfl Bl n.lUM. %  CRWN A CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT %  MKINKINC. THE NEW CROWN GINGER ALE



PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY. JUNE 21. U5u BARBADOS ADVOCATE f\(.l SEVEN $40,000 Voted For General Hospital To Providv Additional Stuff wn*i J:B Could one no %  jar m* House of Assembly at their mMUlU ^ -t-i.l..\ i| Resolution for iorty thousand nine hjundred an; re that who 'nun. n,|_Ut.n n*fl romr i.. ih, n a bjsJt ,,,,, %  nun* unporlru from l'n*l*ml %  MM he entitled t„ ral wiler rood Tn.n j lot-^l %  sWatf fur i hlr MMbtf lo aa HI. i HM AMI .II,i.-. mall one on the ground* that the> l Canadian guilt.un, I rung lo come lo a place If they could show In The lions, Yesterday dollars to make provision for additional posts in the Medu-al the noo*t oi and fturin staff at the General Hospital. ihe addendum to the resolution states that the Supplementary bf attracted to the Wev. IIHf doth Iron cotton yarn ateami to ordoi lo %  the MduatT) which should pu.ve beneti. iKY< an.l *"J ..( %  %  merit of reasonable passage expenses of officers and their fainUnless the Government cast off Inc. practice of only ad%  rtising in Great Britair.. tbero Foolish KaT -i member ol mS, BOt excwduia ,, iMO < '| l H .?h WQulc1 aIwa y* be a difficulty In thai side of the House lo si*ak J: .. > Ul'ltlllil IIIUIV Tli.i I.I.ii. .. I %  ~n>i K_>ni n ... —la—dlaa getting men. The idea of some about any previous suggestion gagement to Barbados on appointwno neld thM American m ed i cal natl %  Water should get different ment and from Barbados lo the graduates were Inferior to the f<" l ty for the purplace of engagement on the terK*'i*h medical graduates was ib-> %  "-( than local nurse*, minatlon of agreements. aolute notmense. That n not the when Rich %  lugMStlon could OBhj As the accommodation at the "pinion of ihe leading men of the hm lido of tinHospital is limited, the housing of day. table It could not ba In kcpinit ?J£Z the additional staff will entail the The Government could not v.ith r—on thai maj btl Mi uum nw n, rental by Government of suitable excuse themselves *ilh their havaide would make anv such sug"*• '•;*•; rushed quarters for use by the lng provided money to employ gestions Th, it . Thcs ware quit willing to put '•" •"" %  **.•* direction, from the place of officers -, %  ii KWI„t. %  lo pfndno laat to iiw r*. tcil antl Hamniika Hoard IUI linrv r UM> PC-I .. ., rr ,,„, M l HM Qaoarast lil.ii ' Coaunitl IMI Ihv advic* o( O. Pann MUUKM Central and Markn , .,-.>'•>-<* .Kh Rrtulatli n. %  M Harbado. r>n<> MOHMM % %  luduriiim and Kapwrl nrtnlalHrtu, itu Ml wiBunaaa a. n..nc* i m Mi. KxcaUMW* "^ Ootrrn.. rrUttna lo lra. r ..( .! %  .— bri lta pan I i M. i It H..-1, omrial Kpponrr .( da) iMlmitled Indoriesia and ihe Spj,,! to niemberihip of Hw Ii island, it' Is proposed lo reduce the tcro:iti.m.il Wheat Agreement bul amount of duty payable on importrciected Japan's application ed cotton yarn and to allow the The Council conclude.: K duty free importations of machinsions in London this afternoon ery and apparatus to be used in Germany, who reeently t the manufacture of such cleth came a member, was reprewiUv from cotton yarn etc. Hat AM time Span Mr. M, k lex (U 4W kMk f-*Sfif, an ,mpor uo of chari* ol Hat Bill amid thai it lw - lon *' came withm th. ralagWj of Indonesia v. a traamMd 75.iM>i I'lonecr Industrie^ SometiMie m '""' '" l "' deducted from llol July last year, the House passed land's quota which, in effect has .. Bill called the Pioneer Industry l w *Plit between Hollar.,i .n Kncouragement Bill which allowladooaaia. ft pioneei industries to import When Spain and Indonesia de:nachiner> and apparatus in addiposit their ratification lh> tion to raw material duty free, but toUl export and im|iort quotas in it was rejected by the Other Place the agreement will rise from for reasons better known to them13.451.000 to 14.551.000 ton"Y,*** „.. As at the Council's last meetHad that Bill been passed. the> 1I1K aarttai lh.. v,a.. it ..on Ch W ^&£Tl£ n t i2Z'%S ""^ lo *" -Australia AnJ.rdurable members would aicree that ..lu-nti.m failed :hey should help those DM mdus' .."; on Bl,c V:... a nee in lieu thereof. Provision i Included for tl , Hfa i f.11 !S^!!" Vel y lhe ,P>la necessary doctori needed Th the omcers of an alfowwU lr ^ uld nol ^ tl.fle.i Uld IhftM 10 a local l.UrM was agparatad by a differ"\ ence oi rnaa It was pa, LUlle easy to %  thl eilher paying oiw ti-j highoi the %  in* Ciulom Tar.ft ready agreed should be added to the present establishment. Passai/f Kxpenses Apart from the increased cost of salaries and other emoluments, provision tvas include,! f or o,^ payment of reasonable passage expenses of officers and their families, not exceeding $960 in each directfon. from the place of engagement to Barbados on appointment and from Barbados lo the place of engagement on the termination of agreements. As the accommodation at the Hospital Is limited, the housing of the additional staff would entail the rental by Government knowi wanted ri should fsponthnt many Nor was that the only unsatisfactory matter at ihr Hospital. Two days ago people applying at that institution for X-ray piclures to be taken, were told that Anaesthetist and House Surgeon ,hcv hBd no nlms w'hlch have now been abolished Could they imagine in all it* ,hrr .. and the provision made in the appalling nature such a s tte of .,** ;ill,a "!' "MV""n T' gmataa 1950-51 for additional afidM to be obtaining at the h l ",' %  ,hI !', .V & tr rVk es ;md Additional pital. Whoso fault w2 10 It lomi JTSS "Sontn %I I IN MOVING the n.m „, .K a down that wo "'*l have been taken creBSC hc allow;. reluUon ih lEmS^TSx as u '"wM-nce that could dtoary mum Thay .houid pottthai ti !" .~j. .K^ '. Mld w,s,1 y h "PPfn, but lllins were not poia? the matter if they m %  • the Le g l,ltu„. hud al„„ would weeks Before ordered them. Even if there was no aecatnmodatlon at the hoapiLU for Sisten. It did not mean thai they should be granted an allowance so much greater than the ordinary nunc was ajlven. Allowing for water. rent, a servant and other like things, it still meant that from the Sl?0. $60 could Input aside a* feeding allow-tiuc It struck him that there was Impartiality in their dealings. Why should they place such a difference between a Sister and a local nurse:' "If there is one institution th' A am i.. .mi, ih, nstas af inran* Isa • 1SS0. and UmaN* tM n SM .Triam alhrr mailer, m wrm*. limi w.th in. lavyasg ui u>, *,a an .„d i.. MM ii* ia. reiatug Is l aa m n T>V A Hat i u mat csrutta u*i >ii 1...1 Mtual, ,„ ,h, p.,,.,, ni si j 0 ,„, Z aK i-Uml WIUJ UM .., .1 %  si Igark, gtal 1 Mhtt i.uiiamaa. ai.j I,-. -1 J..'.I. ana should help those new indus< tries as they helped to relieve some of ihe unemployment in the colony and were likely to produce MBW -t more reasonable prices than they were able to get them outside Mr. CQX said that the Bill did not apply to any hotel encouragement as that wax a matter of 11 differen. sort. The present Knitting Mills employed 78 people of hkh 76 were Barbadians. He then moved the seco~d reading of the Bill Britain alone ndla and the other countries. %  felon have u common interest vlth Britain In safegtjardlnM heir access to the limited sir ilv of ilerlih* wheat, has a nil ient v„ie t,i veto an applics/ie, —Ft ruler I %  %  %  l"i ftWlMBMS 1 %  mder the i'iii" 1 an on nv %  The Sli.. %  ifnsfd '"I l an Ival ..le ..I I Saeretary 1 Chief ol the Ulliti • I Omar, I —Rrulrr On children's cuts, scratches and abrasions use 'DETTOL' rai aooiih snmittK S'rn-pu/mmn %  I -irs SUCH A RELIEF TO HAVE NO TROUBLE WITH TEETHING . Will America Give Up The Saint's Crown V Mr r. Rbl mi forgel ..'.-ii. Officiul Heporter Gruuted Leave VIENNA, .-uiie 2i< Ketiini of the famous Crown 0 si Sti uluiii lo Hung-i'v Is belli* mantitkned here as a potnl la UH "iteal" the Americans an' said taki Mr. T. O. tsryma (t,i seconded and said that he had the privilege of going through the plant and seeing some of the finished products which he thought compared very favourably with Imported article*. In fact he said that the articles compared so favourably with imported articles that several h a"ve orie'rcd'thV'ifu^^ G stores in Swan and Broad Street! rinnifnl 1m ihe release of Robert had already placed orders w,.h Vngeler. United States bmllttat THE House v f AMembly veater""^ co nD nv . ,. man now serving 16 years' gaol *.'&?%*-< ^ .~^!s^aMfflrtt? !" ~r':; uulates in Ainrrn.i •Iceied flown as n reprisal for Vogler's arrest, trial and MMH.IUI 2. The return to the present reglBM III Hiing-ny Ol the historical Crown of st sieph;ni nov hflieved to he in American hand passed iu the House. The 54 a mo nthv il,vi ..• aaMaaaZT -"'"' u "**' ll ,lil1 nn aw m i week arose when the hospital bad M^IT, kMe o! abMn !" ,roni Mills paid decent living wages to ft1^1.^ I.. % % %  #_^ AHIAI JA ^^ |KII* kit, ibl.iX n. > It. H, 11 b %  .• ill I. nurse-, from outside allowance. When they left the hc*pitnl on f-venings it was felt that they should be Kettlrut the same allowance which they would have tot had they been n*niiilning. He did not believe the Senior member lor thp_Citv bad given the .(lies11m side rat ion The Address also makes Qto vision for the services of an assistant to Mr. Rock for the. month of July. Mr. J. H. H.ikinao.. gave notko of the Ads which reads a> inflows:— The House of Assembly respeilfully refer Your Excellency to Mr. Dowdlitx IE) said that their Address to you of the 31 si i:..-!.-was too much hedgir* about January. 1950, and desire to sa\ I -unple .luestinr. IV t.y to fall 0^. Ihe 0^^ Committee ap. back on past taCUrttafl was 111 pouued by virtue of section thr-e opinion merely hedging. It of tnc ^^ ^.^ A ,, 1894 (18M-7J has granted Mt Rock, OaUcial Reporter I. their employees. Fortunately for garia them, they had just passed legislation for the setting up of a Wages Board which would deal with the matter. The Bill wa s eventually passed I uc I is Knew About H-Boml) Hungarian not balk it 1 it %  in VI.-II y. dgr*-s^ /. I rs IIMH* yasjl baby Aaktos "\ V-^S. .*,_ N^ !-.... lafaai.' rSSSBSfB, -yak SM ^^A \ aalllfclj attBaaa] •! trrtkis* ASHTON & PARSONS INFANTS POWDERS The dai/if dose of does /// Hungarian I •mill demand tin I leln fol the ok) simple quest K was fjuite t:iey were asking. Did il take four times as much to indulgi of suitable furnished quarters for Smooth running of which should Uic slomnch of one person than il hc Illative Council, a fUTthei use by the offices or alternatively bo ensured," he said, "It is this look f or another? They only ' UI months su-k leave from 11 the payment to the officers of an institution. I do not make criticwonted the Government to itemlal March with full pay. Tinallowance in lieu thereof tan now merely for the sake of ise the things the Siao was b> Conunittcv has re-engaged the The total estimated 'expend!making them, but with the wish tended for in case they wanted services of a suitable reporter at ture on increased staff, salaries thal smoother going etc. from June I, 1950 to March be hod. I will always support a against $ 31, 1951 as sKown In the Supplemeasure which alms to put the mciilarv E-t.m..;.was $105,580 hospital In "A" order and I hope but that was offset to the extent Government wIU soon sweep away of $62,000 by savings on the sal"II sources for complaint arie, of the rsUiind AnacsthelN s,--—a 1st and llou -e_S urgeiin which had rr now been alffiTlshed and the pro.Mr. Lews* d.i said that vision made In the Estimates understood that ever since the 1950—51 foa additional Medical proclamation which brought the Services and additional Nursing Hospital Act into effect, nobody gft ifotiE2 t £m&& ;ill soon to say that the comparison of $60 the rate ol $60.00 per month Services which would not 1 required. Specialist Government, Mr. Ac eluded, had taken the working at the hospital, except NEW YORK, June 20 I)r Klaus. British atomn Kttn tint gaoled fur espionage, knew all the secrets of the hydrogen bomb as woll as of atom bombs, Mr William I.aurcnre. New YortTimes science reported, declared to-dayHe mane his statement In a Saturday EeeNinp Pon unlust. ihe Committee nan decided to article under the title "The Truth vt, \ ..^ .v> -,.i HI, a „,o.i 1 %  "**** the services of an assistant Alfiul The Hydrogen Bomb" f^JES SkflSiS V ^ lu Mr Bocll for the month ol July M"'" the IIrat atom liomh. y SSSLtffih I o, th,. .sum o! M0.00 after which Uuieueewm.e. he was at |„, :*en^rlnX'rl;, C : :f Una ^oul "->'>• %  '-"^ will be lur.he. ffSnJSK ^^Jfi^JSSfi tion could not give them the considered by the I>ebate-s Comnecesaary information, he ihottkl "Wtttt ho postpone it instead of running The House of Assembly re*pcct— the risk 01 Insing their vote fully rtquatl Y0111 E\cellemy to Mr Adams MnUnded nii'inbers send down the neceuary legislatliat they had already passed the tion to give effect lo the proposals Wha* uf the Debates Coimnittee. had oban veer,. rlUcii things lh.it wen* already were offered by the House and agreed OVff b covenuneiit, HIOK* thci ihd Anufinmidi dhnitM lut n — those doing so by contract. been ac'aally appointed to the •, post to which they were connected, The computation of 00 cents He remembered that when the arose when 'off duty" was being Central Koad Board was taken considered. I* was decided that that the Anaesthetist should be spe "Mr. MotUry (E) said that any Resolution which runf before the Aaembl> with the purpose of eradicating the Ineftiiirntly of the working of the hospital would sJwa** recrive hkt support. Criticlsmx had to be pushed forward until the Government succeeded in putting the hospital In order. He supposed the Resolution was another sign that the Government wus still trying and he and the others on that side of the House hoped they would succeed. but conditions at the hospital J" J^ !" ^ ace still very bad and unsatutra In moving the passing ot the AddresMr. Wilklnssn said that It was an urgent matter as honourable inembeis knew the ReTNT porter of the Other Place had million when on 'off duty wenlak "' '" towards the end ol last the .-'ill entitled to what ratloie. they y !" ahould have had wart thai M % %  '"' Debates Lummitlee had to the hospital. Thev were given It extend hU leave as he wai. senou*111 money and it cuno to (10 tently ill and he (Mr. Wilkinson) waa As It appeared to members. it did glad to say that he had unproved %  in strange lo him at first, but considerably and it was hoped thai less a matter nf he would be able to resume his Dr. Hans A. Belhe. who headed the theoretical physicists at the bomb plant At that time atomic claatl I watt already talking ,.l>out the hydrogen bomb, falling il for camouflage the "superbomb" mil "supcrdooper" Laurence said He asked Dr. Bet he if this bomb was really true. Dr. Bethe replied Yes" and added that It could be made equal to a million tons of ,nd even more than a Renter leluru of th %  if one man. These Hungarianel dM mote probable that the Hungarian government WOUM Hal Anvriea to relinqin-h all Clalml on the valuable prr H contain* six pound:, of %  Old lewels. ft M revered by the whole Hungarian people aa svinlw.l % %  ( Hungarian uolt> -ml oven-ignU —Rrulrr Keeps Mem bn'ahf... Keeps them r/tjkt con%  ted received notice (rom Government telling them that they were appointed on a particular date. Mr Allder (L) said he wanted to know whether Government knew where the additional doctors would be living. He wanted to HiKl out whether they were going to regulate a distance between tin hospital and where the doctors would living. He wondered accept what were the plain facti whether Government would not the" would see that there was no consider it advisable to rent some qtestion of discrimination. It waflat a from the Garrison district for nothing novel that the Governthe doctors instead ot allowing ment was doing. It was something them to seek fiats in far districts, to which the House had impllcltit would be ly^agTeed Police Shool Thief In U.S. A. bulk production, making a • overhead cost. Thus v. is divided It only came cent' To his mind If members smalhen i* to 60 %  vi.uli duties on the first of July with the assistance of someone else. Mr. Rock hat] rendered faithful service to the Other I'l la past 15 years and the Address *n asking that legislation be ami down for the payment of mOOsn to his sub-tHute during his illness. Mr. W. A. Crawford seconded the motion. He also supported the remarks made by the honourab' were But one of the immediate ob>Junior member for St. James and saviiun would be cominTback to J^ 1 of h ' '-^-'"ment was the said that the least they could do factory. No day passed, bul com!f !" SJs !" "* com,ng DBCk lu Marling of nursing quart • G ^Xwding < B > said that It #* plaints were made about the working of that institution, not merely by the staff but ,„ respect JV",.""" ,o the treatnien, of the patient*. S^*"^^, to supp)y Gel t'p And I>u Better necessary in the Revolution The criticisms he was then oiTcniiK aan attempt to make those responsible for the administration get up and muke a better Job of It. Since the Resolution had been passed to increase the staff at the hospital one would have thought that there would at least have been on increase In the medical staff. S2-' For l-cal Medicta But what did ibey fifl had to be taken to get some of When was lo givi litter) It would wipe asked for Rock the leave the Address and vide him with the necessary 1 ante to do his work until -u time as he could resume his dull SrCHF.NVU.I.K Ohio. June 'l>\ Police shot and killed Joe Pacific, 32-year-old Pi-nnsylvim ian, in a gun battle near here after he had robbed two youths and locked them In the luggage boot of their car Police said the youths gave Pacific a lift at Canonsburg. Pennsylvania. At gun point he robbad them of Hi dollars and locked them into the boot without food or water. They were thefts hours, while Pacific toured around in the car Finally he drove home He hit his wife on the head with a wrench and force-1 Into the ingo tunclic He dr< Mingo jum-lion, Ohio, where sii.pped 10 buy a dress ba rtpl llu' bloodstained one hit. wife was %  vi,ir nig Mrs. Pacific Jumped from the car and ran for help Polite chased Parlflr througl the street*, while the kwkad at youths were released hungiv. thirsty and cramped. Firing at the pursuing Police. Pacific run lo the wood on edge, of Uie town. He refused to surrender A gun battle followed and Parlflr WM killed —Reutrr PROTECT YOUR HOMES "U5iS IStaiimi For members htt .truck him UUI Governmen. -^S l ^S^ VVm '" "'""''"' """ the houses they hud Mr Crawford laid that all the %  tnll 1 inernlwr for St. Joseph ha I ,. done art to Mnphaalft the posiThere seemeo so him sn ini„,n ih.-. wan Itnttliuj. The big them come down to fill the post consistency in the fnurrr. of thr 1M UH tht two was !*>• w. W. Reeee (E) Said that ordlnar) nurses' wage* and the still shown the question of giving rent rree sister*" and he wanted to know Mr. Adams 1 aid that It Was IfAquarters l" ihe staff was a 1 exactly how $120. aa was plicit then that the junior memand should be carefully con fli-dtilril for A Sister for aet rr tnr St I'hihp wai making U by Governmenl rMauassdaUon wd Tiber aich "e dig the difference between When it came to the housug of ^T!£r? i^o r^en arrived It ""' Km ' ,iUr ' l "" 1 ,hp lotal ,he "*P""> uff h '•' ,hal1 w!TEJ+*Z*SFr^m ""• He wondered ,f he knew nurses and ..sters should be 1 m -Tlr J+ r SsT il l^'ded to put the local nurse housed in the institution and that and thai sor a ""•"**"• lf )h e name scale, if he would uso was going to raise another ques!£.! "'a 0 *. 7T. ^L lh e n>c argument It was tust tion and that was the extension of slituUon and had lo eat s leas ( matter „ r l|m „ (J(l Barbadian the present hospital. -xpenslve rood than the other nunH woulrt ^ qualified for some „ a h .,, of those post-, and what would I,e Mld ,nal lhr ?: > ., M(f icqulre some f.f the Could thai • ini tttti nted an L. Walei < (L| the Itxral medical men to ork, morabeTS could „ot plead that to go Into tho hoap tal and sleep thcv aw Jwt ^^ flumcier ,, i in „. and be paid $25. That was not o ^ ^^ Re,lution They enough. On the other hand he had wp £ thcn onW morc or lf-M )m been making enquiries as the ^n^un, tnft House's agreeuld have to rurroundlng nher --how him property in order to extend the huh perpctuHospital He had not heard for If he showed onv? |*"J '", th medical men at the hospital was true that anothe Barbadian was then re tht hospital, but it w question of hi House if tht him dlMPtj I e dealing. pr*n' site of the Hospital was bt WOUld IaiUuUJ to withdraw suitable or whether it should be anything or adiourn the Resolu'V !" """* Io another e. He felt _jggest his tton Tnt eonfusl lartad that it was well placed, but ? . breaking up the $120 into the srhtO tht 60 ctnq was first looked not big enough. various items which it was In>t The. than arguln K was apparent to all that the was the height on lOrnathing whleh was not real.\ w P'tLtff was inadequate and Ident at still a lo nl 11 was .-ii.i a ,_ n j M ,_ j.f rft l he .-.tended 7-W ; d *'~ i NOTICE OCR CUSTOMERS ore a.kiH l„ Nidill.al our SlonCI.OSKS for . vrorK-i \KI.\<. On Thuraday 29th June und until 12 O'clock (MOOtf) on Friday 3lh YOI ARE ASKr.DTO CO-0PKBATB Johm I. Tmfjlor AGAINST THE WEATHER We eiin supply you uilli ihe following;: — BVBB1TE CORBUGATBD sin ITS (in all ,ize*l GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS U.I MINUM t ORRUGATED SHEETS COPPER (.I'TTKHINf. also PAINTS in tinmost famotaj Itramls and inuiiv oilier Innldilig requisite* too numerous lf> mention All at Attractive Prices PAY is A VISIT AND in-: OONVIffCBD. Bat. the point he wanted threshed out was how Ions that Insular prejudice which existed in the island would be continued* Why did they not get medical men from America ae CanadaThere was no point In Just sskinc Ihe Secretary af Ktale to get aomebody tar the Itorbodh* Hospital. That was not eneuh. Thev had seen from past exiplldty and childIshness" I* bate* their"ThVy"had'passVu the prtstnt Government should W^re honourable members not Iht Esl.m.tta They had by 1m^^^^Jfo ^ "" lo do a little simple arithmeplication agreed lo the scale. -' un lo ,h ** It -oukt be-Infra d|" for No mcmber had asked ^^ ^ hospiul.^ He knew that in the past, this %  bit Hiiring the surround i .. ua. ,-.%  No mrmber had asked about I to harbour in his mind fo. mQMy ^ (nc l|mc ^ had h the slightest moment a sugxcsiion pu^ thelr agreement that th*-Government and other Goveniof breaking up figures for hon%um WJ reasonable Thus they ments had bten faced with the ourable memben were now only asking that they difficulty of acquiring lands ahould continue to pay ihe two they had to go to a Jury to ha : i.iiti. ,1 nuraai the land assessed Mr. J. B. T Rrsnrkrr <(') deHe was however hoping that plored the fact that the rstion the near future, the Governnn • for Nurses was only 0 would be able 10 acquire land at cents s day He said that that %  reasonable figure and If tha nerlcnce that they were given no ht did not considtr 60 cents a day amoun was inadequate and should lime did come, they should acquin attention. He understood that the enough. Ht was nol speaking ^ substantially Increased. some of the property surr-j .ndmg Director of Medical Services was about thtir differences in salane-, with respect to the additional the hospital in order that they leaving the island for a long $120 to $0. he was only speakin* sisters who would be paid at the might be able to extend th" inst ra-riod and he wondered whether as to tht othtr allowances, $120 rate of e$00 per annum, ht said tution large enough, not only to he could not be empowered by as against about $18 or in tha • %  %  •• Barbadians in the look after the sick, but large / %  !" atn tr pwnlore the oosslvictnltv for the ordinary nurse TTnlted Klnudom who were being enough to house the staff who SOHS^T aaeurina tte services When a servant pay. rent and such trained for such positions and he would be responsible for looking of any meoS men who might things were taken .way. tome $60 was looking bra Which? Mr. Mettley IE) sai.i IhsA ihe Sister's pay was too high or the nurses too small. At any rate seeing after the patients DMAL — t.tlH FOH EXRAXDED MKTAL Sire* — IB ft x %  f* g III : ft H ft. x 2 Ins. 8 ft. x 4 fr x 1 in. 8UUSVT8 Matfi liic Barbados Hardware Co.. Ltd. (Mil HOI I] I OH 04MOAIHS) No. 33 62 BWAN STREET PH0..E 2100. 3S34 or 4408 "// •• %  /<.r./>• /ili'ii.unnf M. //''/""/ ti"" "'HI* "lie nf Ihe fnllim itiii Molt,i I t l,,,l. •##• III \ MS & 4' x 2' A OOOD -\ l l i l in• %  We Welcome your enquiries for QlA-i ARC I I I i i i-.oiii WELDING PI.ANTH BRITISH OXYGEN WII.IIINC, MTTING EQI'IPMENT Tkm BARBADOS ! Park Read. St. Wcaael. Dial : 4528 Dial : 4528 The STANDARD VANGUAltD 68 h.p. o m rTANDARD ia < wl PK9C-I P ihe BTAKDARD nn.lVEIlY VAN STANDARD LSTATE CAR The Siloon The THIl %  MWI MAVKLOWEI! 38 h p. 4 water Saloon. CHELSEA GARAGE (19501 LTD. Agenti Trafilgar Street


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PACF •US FOUR it WellADOS ADVOCATE HI DM SOAY, Jl'VE 21. U3t) rfARBADOS AOV'OOffE Viivi; Ai Seawell THERE IN two Botntl "I entry in Barbados, one is the harbour and the olher the airport. By th*' pmvisi'i and long established tfUfftom the Btgglge Warehouse through which pUNtagHI frum ships must pass, is amply protected. It is not the same with Stawell Airport. And the pressing need for closer supervision and greater protection grows daily. During the month of May there were 101 Mights In which no fewer than 2,091 passengers arrived in this island. It is clear that air travel is becoming more popular and has outgrown all expectations. But it is not merely the growing traffic which focuses attention to Sea well. It is the extreme need for caution and efficient management if human life is not to be lost unnecessarily. Prior to the arrival of a plane there is the need for the Gk) supervision of the runway and the entire airport. The pilot of an incoming plane can only bring his craft to a safe landing on the instructions of the officers in the communication lower The merest mishap on the runway when the plane is about to' land miiiht be fraught with the gravest consequences. Any accident might result in the smashing of the plane and the loss of the lives of all aboard. In Carlisle Bay there is little chance of the presence of .i small craft causing the Us* of an entiVe steamer. The presence of a car or some other vehicle on the runway juried there by some careless person might bring disaster If the above premises are admitted it is clear that there should be the greatest precaution to prevent this possibility. At present there are two officers at Seawell, the Manager and the Clerk, both of whom are in the communication tower on the arrival of a plane. One makes communication with the plane and the other records in the log such instructions as are given and the answers. Seawell AJrpQI t Ifl tinproperty of the Covernor-ui-Executive Committee a nd neither the Manager not the 1'olice can initiate prosecutions without the consent of the Colonial Secretary. It is known that at present there are regulations for preventing visitors from contacting passengers before they reach the Immigration and the Customs; but the presence of unauthorised people who are merely sight-seeing, people who would like to wander over the entire airport, and even those who visit the airport legitimately, to receive passengers but who persist in wandering all over the airport can be disconcerting and dangerous. It should not be possible for bands of excursionists and sight-seeing parties to drive into the airport without permission. The seriousness of the situation is appar ent when it is remembered that at the lima time that there are out going passengers there are also incoming passengers who must be attended by the immigration or emigration and the customs. The reason for much of the trouble is that it does not appear that the Police, on duty every hour of the day and night at Seawell. have the iame authority under the law as they exercise at the Baggage Warehouse. It should be easy for greater restrictions to be put upon wandering people at the airport where their presence and their activities can do more harm than in the harbour The staff at the airport is at present numerically unable to cope with the work as efficiently as might be done It is true that air traffic has grown apace but it should not be impossible to keep abreast of the necessary regulations for the proper control of the airport and the protection of human life. The airport is now being extended and modernised and it is no use waiting until the work has been completed or until some riisnttrr prove* the mrril of these iirgumeni* to bring ihe nscwatry controlf to UM one airport m this ml.ind. Anv such I1IS;,MIT would be (he worst posslblo %  clrirlliasn.si.l tor Barbados at a lime when nhc is attempting to encourage visitor* The l.iiis II Cast* Puts British Justice On Trial ii tii.i -.Mi.. .1..1 no tailor with him J lihrao of lnl.rn.li.ni .1 l.aw. or have Immediate ,-ree*% lo A prre*Mir in ih.t ..iiht. < who ^n on him whether -t i..,t tiilouUt command I* ft Uur.il So directed the Juf.jfc-Advoc.it. IVIeUs" trial, in winch unions others. .1 German sailor was acntenced to be -he lug the orderof hli eon n , not hlti %  i! ThL' caM' ii th.lr.iU* ll %  to Britten n %  j.. 411 Aims SHELLEY vor that BSfJKQ devvloj* L trials for war ci imc*. erhv military OMirtl ITS .ipparentK %  IMttOUj to a ;y Tin* consequences of the BOW rule are indeed terrifying Suppose, fyr example, in %  tutu of urdcied to blit %  .... ,..., k B tin Nuii'ml-'i i'h.nter. whicn which he MIKU> %  %  deprlvod admiral! .... Hilary ob j ective (Jigs. •,. U *uch an Raedei Kt defence of supen. nattl that i> dtj did in fact Qregtually It ha.-, been extended contain milltarv objtcUVM befOTi down the hier.irchv until it he took off. If. in spite of exhaus1 "other ranks Now it has tlvo rOSOOl vat still in •rtoing*'out"of the" South" African been a PP |led '" an honourable doubt he would t>c justified, na>, but misplaced sense of justice, not compelled, to lnn the order* given lo him. that would be subversive nf all milltarv dl. lirlo.e The CoUTl prooOSdOd lO endorse the rule M laid down ifi tog Army' %  %  %  %  %  .' '1 soldiers must obe; UnlSSt tlu'> .ne liuite obvlounly illegal ret int. maUonal Law may now say. however much the Manual 1n.1v have been changed, thai i-nil the law of England and would be so administered in our criminal courtIIShot To Kill rong [it 1 %  p into ths. net of witt criminal* ;> number of Among other defen.is. he pleadhigh-ranking German olti. ed ih* "shoot-to-kiir' ordjarg of A iii. I P at M • -in thei mem The depot> Judg< ,, w ., ll unnec. ml< Advorate-Generol is reporte. the well-tried %  having ruled (hat if Ihe '-shoot)( ,,j,. rv Tlll anyhow to-kill oraor AM illegal Unsell misplaced u that dafenCS nevi 1 COOld not shelter behind it availed a prisoner if th< A %  vhoot-n^km ordei maj o. wm obvhmi. u in the may not he legal, aecordlna 10 concentraUi or lnparncular circtimttancsg, of wtucti ,.,^.,[ [ n t nr p. i, u" trial a sentry may know nothing. If, Now m in ih. < Mint. %  -!,.in. of l.msell 1 ,,,..,i,| h • ,j Issued it should be punished i DWn tlmCKurh an order caruuM bo *bvtm>i> nwured law Illegal t,. in.s.ntr. HTbO 10X]., | „ (j peeled to AM it He mil. well ; ,,| ln i!. |-f, not be told of the extreme mii wi wrongs not make •• rlffhl pcranea of the otijeel he ieuardTho new n. In a dark *" %  ; ,. „ l>ed of revenue, nnd. as always For al] I.insell knew thei.„. iUl rOvODSjl ... -ir might have h.en %  itor* Of atomic wil h its b.tt. r fruit. But cannot material behind him. and DM ion. we break UlU sequence' Hurl might have IX^II ile-pei ate le gel rtl vat e Unsell b.' sacrlllcad t.i at \X How could he be expected. m, ve ,rneorto eh. pride in Ihe agony of the moment, to I I ~ TLW l.ii IK si >l;m In Britain Is iM'llino lli*her sir .1. an asamnan, Brttab rlcneat ni.in. i. growing rkhar UM Impression given t>' doeurnenti Hhtd away in the vaults of London's Hush House, where details of the ownership <>f British companies, large and small, are kept ir that Irapraenon is right, it in.uk< down this i-h> f studious. tO-yeai 1 1d mill %  dav |iliii.1 p I Pet aost of Britain'i very • 11 are srovi u They are forced by crlpplinn taxation to Use on capital if tiiey wanl to muintiiiii .1 millinmnie'. c ust o ma ry rtandard of Uvlni Hut nut. appaOBfltly, Sir John Although hifiith. 1 ha.I in 111%  the Mm never developed exlnvs %  gant taste lie nr alwayi preforred the <|Uiet life And 10 fill capital nSS centtnueil to POW, %  Iwd 09 nd btr-itgntad Invest ment tioo.mm up Lall I returns of Kllermait Linos, king-pin of the sluppin,: side of the Ellerman empire, show lhat Sir John's holding of the lumpany's Deferred stock—some In hla own nnme, some in conjunction with "three others"—has risen by £100.000 over the pa-! two reni That brings the Ellerman holding to £824.000 There is no stock market quotation, but its valuemust run Into several millions. For Ellerman Lines own 83 ''HI totalling 540.000 tons, and have another 16 in the course of building The company's total asset, an close on £30.000.000. and for -evi-rnl years the dividend on the Deferred stock has been ten per cent, free of tea In West Knd Another side of the far-ranging BUersBan interests covers property, most of it in and around London I West End Those assets arc concentrated HI the Ellerman Property Trust. too, Sir John's personal holding is shown to have Increased substantially since 1947. 1 %  lights in this constellation of Wealth include investiiicr: IrUtta, In. A.-ties. and newspapers Sir John, through a nominee, the largest individual share1 oliler In Odhams Press. That (iaii> ha: ict-ciitly increased its dividend ond the Blerman boldling accordingly shows a further I substantial capital profit. Ia\ llYliiiir.l llui 1 is And just before the war Sir John was the big ligure In a tra n sa c tion which rasuiied In him becoming the predominant sharebohsai in illustrated Newspapers, i.wncrN of the Sphere, UM [ USM %  mil other publications. Mine recently he bought 153.0IHI .shares in the l)ail> Miimi and .1 smaller number In its .1 ui (ournal. the Sund.iv Pictorial City Thinks What does all this wealth .id 1 up to? That is a aiui known mil... to Sir John and his CUSMSt Hut III the City 1! 1estimated QWI the £ 18.000.000 which I man inherited from his EathSf In IH33 must at least have yt^n doubled, possibly nearly trebled. ,: "*''"" ilientcd Dkort than I vast fortune from his father ltd also his falh. e.ded lescrve, his carefulness in .spending, his capacity for intenso (otucntratiin on whatever task 'and Old Sir John, who was born in Hull, stalled ins busJnass life as tlcrk Even after he bad %  .prosperous local shipowner he remained such a solitat > figure that ns WOI often unrecognised by people who worked for him. And it is said that even today there are Ctlerman workerwho cannot describe what their tfl ployer lOOSBl like lib Privacy The heir to the Ellerman millions was bom on December 21, 1909. but no picture of him was published until after his father's death In 1933 His privacy was strictly guarded. He WHS taken |Waj fi ,. Malvern College and put in charge of private tutors to protect him against any possible annoyance. There Is no record of the son having much interest in sport, or yachts, or fast cars, or any of the other recreations often favoured by rich men's sons. Hid he developed a keen interest In acting, and sometimes staged in his own privat, pantomimes and ptayi which he himself wrote ••Boon Villa Some months after the I %  • v John died, leaving t3fl.H8J.000, Ellerman married bthff do Solo 0 23-year old. raven haired girl whom he had known since boyhood. The weddir ,: took place in the utmost secret nt Chertse) (Surrey) Register Ofllco, And the couple drove B to Eastbourne to live In a six-roomed villa in a lorreoa of working-class houses, Han Sir Jol 1 and his bride spent QJU I Dd economical days, wilh the husband going around in gray lliinnel trous%  ra. OUltoeer and jacket. But as SOON us their Identity was dlscoventl they took train to Scotland. ll was at Eastliourne later that Kllern an started on his maatlv thru VOhtoas work called "Tho Families and (ienera of Ijvmg Rodents." It took him ten years complete and ran to 1,386 pag. His wife, a gifted palotar, rielped him with the illustrations for %  'ii 1 %  Sh-' %  exhihition of paintings hi 1 de Slieuve IN a Kensington High Street art shop. Hut when a newspaper discovered lhat Ellen de Slrciivp wan 1: f.n* l.ady Ellerman the exhibition sfM .; onee tlosod. The passion for secrecy was carried a stage further when the couple went to live at an unprehouse at Sunningdale. For thue Blerman iiv-d as "Mr. Fountain". A Secret Shortly before the war Ellernun bought .. house in Kensington Palace-a>rdcn—often known as "Millionoires' How'—but he k<-pi in.s address out of the telephone book and made no mention of it in his six-line entry in e/hos win. The tlrst Sir John was for many years guided over investments by the late Bbt Miles Mattinson. regarded as the City's most gifted investment trust export And the father saw to It that UM son should be equally well advised. The success of the Dial man inv< > stment policy is shown In the (act that one of the urusts formed by the father in 1914 Is annual dividend Of 71 per cent. But >oung Sir John's Interests %  XI not 1 .nflned to big companies. He ilso help.-to run a f.a.000 concern known as Kensington Rudders, Ltd And lhat company show* in its latest accounts .1 profit of £581 fts. tld.—small beer for a man % %  >• % %  ; v t. %  IIS ihe Bolder Sex-Women T/iey Outbid Men When It Comes To A Little Flutter Hy sV'reHlrrirls I • %  % New York WALL Street has been learning about women. And women have been learning ibuut Wall Street. There have been some surprising discoveries on both sides. Some months ago, realising that women held by far the greater part of all American nvestments, but as customers were largely; neglected, one of New York's biggest brokerage firms organised a series of investment courses for women only. The idea spread from coast to coast The plan was to educate women in stockmarket terms and simple operations of buying, selling, going short or long, hedging and commodities. What the teachers soon found was that they were providing an elementary school course for people who needed udvanced university training. 38.e00 'STUDENTS' Almost every lecturer engaged to give a "women only" course has been bawled over by the knowledge his students revealed, and even more so by their keenness to acquire ore. Lecture courses have been given so far in 65 cities by the firm originating the scheme. Thirty-eight thousand women have attended. One advertisement for a forthcoming lecture in a New Jersey town brought e ol more than 900. On the basis of their experience in towns %  I moderate liM, thf firm have nol jrei plucked up courage to try the experiment In New York, or any major city. "It looks as f we would have to take Madison Square Garden at least if we advertised such a lecture course in New York." said a spokesman. The lecturers have made some interesting digcoverlee about the female mind al WOTfc it) the stock market Women, they discovered, are bolder than men. They will take a chance where a man will hesitate. They are keener for a profit. Men will buy iheret cautiously, for income. Women will shrug off caution if the chance of a l.isl proBt there. Professor G. D. Plunkett. who ran u course for women at New York University on management of personal funds, reports: "The self-assured mole thinks he is the bold one He likes to think of the little woman as timid, meek, seekin;; safely above all. He had better look in at one of my Ml "And most women show as good judgment in investing as the average man does. They are on an equal footing with men when it mines lo investing. They realise the value of sound factual information, and are loOgdlU] for it." At the same time. American women are demonstrating keen interest in the mutual funds;—the fast-expanding multibillion-doUar investment companies which accept the savings of the small investor and spread them around the market in a diversified "portfolio." ANY QUESTIONS? YES, PLENTY Mr. George Shaskan, who gave a .series od 12 lectures on this type of investment, say.s. "We gave what amounted to a college course in the economics of investing. And the women said: 'Wouldn't we please give them something a little more advanced!' "The questions they asked fascinated me. They are highly technical and Intelligent The women showed an extraordinary understand11114 f the role of mutual funds in solving their investment problems. We are going to expand the course to meet their needs and to give it both during the day and in the evening." Dorcas Campbell, who conductetT a course at New York's New School of Social Research, says: "We had to ti R ht to close our question and-answer periods or the women would have stayed on for hours asking the guest lecturera additional queedi ru "They were not wasting their time, either. These students, single women. wW< Widows, nee.i help and they know it." —L.E.S. D.V.SCOTT TO-DAY'S SPECIALS ft CO.. LTD. at the COLONNADE Vnully NOW Bate 11111 tins CASH* Ci. SYRUP ' •• Tin. CHUM SALMON (11 M M I'ACKS t AKK MIX 511 .42 I'M l> till i on rut-: WKATMKm I'rulfft Your HOOIH XOU-U We huvc .... SHINGLES SHINGLE PAINT ... GALVANISE ClUTTEKl.NG 18", 24". 30 M ALUMINIUM GUTTERING 24 30", 36" GALVANISE NAILS IKON NAILS PLASTIC (for stopping holes) • WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. Successor* to C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. Dial 41J. 4172 • 4M7 BECK1V1TB STORFS OI'H IIKAIIKHS SAY: -1 Aim" Went With AIM li.i.oli. To fh* Editor. The Athwart*— SIR,—A ptocfl b) R M HacCoU on Bing Crosby in your Suntlay rnue oi ftb* ;. 1930, several tunM has Bing o* mine Uw I "i aim to" — ipparentls' In a misKuidetj attempt to ni.ik-ne*>. Reece (Everlon), 'Half Baakl), Chase. Lu< u Will.Blndes. Oraylon (Forwards). F G. ROACH torn iioad. June 20, 1950. Pnlivftvwnvn T., ih,/ idler. -; %  >..• AUro.lf' Sn I read wilh Inlen I eall for W i Police". Tin Monoural I t] Jeffers, M it K fin manj rani i ad Jha need tot women ai Police, and tinpolice •uthorttlei ol thl col on) ire l d !t,r tak%  %  For niflin yean the wonun >f bave luSered through th" nek "f empkiyrnent, for exny Of our uirls who have baa -i %  econdii. i find "" evei to ' %  ent" ployed, end now this h iot the Idee ihraueh hut ee1 Which ;iii' 'illations %  %  I esneK illj an i %  A lltei i i in* kli ill these %  i %  for wumeri outliiuiiK UM ances would go a long way In buOdlnl a high standard of iMl | .uiiong women, such ;• \ would HaiSl In creattnj a new %  me women In building character and impart ;i labour honest!) to obtain ., livelihood; social clubs, lecture groups, sport organization* ami healiKv surroundings will assist greatly lii i-ontiucrlng Ihe monv social 111* uhuh beset 1 our women folk CLAUDE RAMSAY. Brighton. Rock. n* I OH I P Ch.se A Sjnborn Blue Mounuln Empire MEATS Hunter'. ........ Hunter-, steak .,i,l Kldnrv Hunter'. Me.t P.sle, % .emu Sausage. Ham. — Whole and 1 ut S""!;' UM per bottle KhWUIl.l. JELLY per holtlr USH f(sri_oer lliT 31k tr. < ... s,,eet Mis, mis I ifrt t ho.-ol.te |>a Cake I Mrt l.uneb Blseult. Marsh Mallow* Ovalllne RniUi. Table Ral&lnt. Fre.h VeseUble. Curumber In Tint Pom In Parbaie. CROWN IIIIIXKS 7 Flavour, •i. A ii. I.III-.AU A I AKI.S Fre,h Diily E V/ltSfe ceuj mi AMI HIM B^ERS and • %  .\OT II IIIM II'US %  • % %  ss S -nip* For Best Service It's G0DDARDS



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS AI'VOCAIX l DM RDA1 ii Nl -' %  I9.-.H Council Approves Pension For Loan Bank Manager THE LEGIS1.AT: : yi'sli-rday bj %  T to Jour majority passed a Bil to provide for the payi. of a pension to Douglas Arden M< • erol ^ uw wflu rana the Peas.Wilts' Uian Bank in The Council Council Encourages Col. Michelin Yesterday __ ># O /„. m W S ^-asS Btf. A. Iin Colonia r.th. widrl Planting Of Trees *SS£ %  MM H.*<>Uil. %  If" ^ %  f'ffiK'wMr. Challenor. the OovernmeM sen c, and was Dr. Messiah. Mr Gitles* P K-HKI servant. Bishop. Dr. SI John. Mr But* %  }*}? •nd the Acting Colonial Secretary rt.%  BMM an oat jmalra. IftW-M %  UMtMDI arm-lns Graaa CuMon* Md 1921 after %  %  ' %  RocMpU lot J'lJ l Z r vlco. -vai deflate.1 1 and Road Tiafflr HMH and Nor*. lionhies Mr. Evelyn, Mr. Mahon, Mrs. Hani-hell ..nrt Mr Pile. This BUI seeks lo grant to DOUK.,lu Arden Mottley Haynes. Man"<>' Govcrnmenl .,...e M tiger S the Peasants' Loan Bank. Haynes must have known #ten Cw ,„ -c ^..^ j h M-fTimM1 %  nan-Inn In raarnrri nf iinrillr itT he ucrcpted thc poe' in.-t he woUin Com#any. UnmM. am Uw Kxn-..i a pennon in respect of public ser ^ |os ^ g ^ ov ,. II m „. ll lKfn *oa and q-a-atfdj-a 3thr wJ3 Douglas Arden Motley BajmH tbw Lghg| the WM appointed an assistant teacher proa and com of the.n.after, in 1914 and after serving with the Mr. Haynes remained ID 1 that B.W.I, Regiment from 1915 to I91H service from 1921 to 1936 and he was appointed a Cadet In the liarUian went to the ^*f J^H ix>ur blaster.ofneo. In 1921 he Hank from 1936 to 1930 lie would %  aH i-nton-l the Parochial SeniM Ol |T '!_,: It .. i,..iUt ; l. the pariah of St. Thomas and remained in that service until 1836 when he was appointed manager of the Peasants' Loan Bank, which post he still holds. gwatsds*. aa %  i runway. !'>i*a> and parkin* •(•run al ftrawrl Airport la in* Inland of Rarltadoe T-r (.iLm-tna 111 lit w*ir pawd H-.il lo amend Ihr Hfidiimni Siimr* and Aarwullunr Ad. ItaS Bin to an>*iMi xhr Eici-ittvr cwmmitw before the Council. Act. Iltl. amand.tha Publlt aaSSSJieai Kegrel Peas* 1 Act. is*? In view of Mr. Haynes' good serYlce in the various offices he has to give Mr. Haynes pension for his service .it the Peasants' Loan n. and Bank for though it could not be owrawHh. retarded as oflldal Government ^^VKJarte. Ai*7.^£ !" HaY.. service, it was certainly quasi \Lnai, o( in* Pnaaant • i>..<> Bank m Government service ">u utaiwi He did not feel, however. Ihal it .. Hm to ? ,n J w *J b Widow, and Orphan. %  1 tfsjttal l fin < .ovemment to held, it Is considered equitable he pension unyonc for givlnR fifteen should be granted a pension (or years' service to another body He a reducad pension and gratuity) of two thirds of his present salary as Manager of the Peasants' Loan Hank when he retires from tli.it post The Bill is drafted to give effect accordingly. The Asttnc OvastsstJ Swnten moved tha second reading of the BUI. He said that It was slightly unusual. Its purpose was to provide a pension for a man who had and was working In the tcrvlce of the people of Barbados—the Local Government, the Central Government and otherwise, for 36 years felt it would be Inequitable to aU nther Govcrrui'nl i-rnployees. He felt a Rill like that was inequitable to all Government servants who rein. .1 ully and itlnuously in KM t iimtisnenl Service. i.nd he or !y wanted to t?£?JSUl2l v polnl out to the C-'uncU that It [>ari.h. ,. I,:.. .kilU'in A giouiid. Hewas .Tlw; Council adWn^J .,wi not quite sure where it would lead <"••"** Agree*! lliinblc Mr Kve Wit I: tl remarks. The Acting Colonial Secretary I'nkind saW that in his opening remarks he had said the Bill was unusual His service at the Peasants' Loan and there was no denying that. It Bank was not pensionable and it was noi unusual in that It would would be an extremely unkind act ullow pension or gratuity. Where for a Government employing him It was unusual was that It said for so long not to give him any service In the public interest reward or any safety for his fuwould be counted : %  Government lure. Mr. Haynes was a very emservice Some ol that service C£l to our own hut cient officer and runs the Peasants' might have been paid for at a !" ..WwnJ 7,^ r S2t&i ,, Loan Bonk extremely well. He higher rate than the normal Gov""napping or l contradiction had undertaken now to do even a erntnent rate hut In any case It between our two objectives, more difficult and he thought a wns too difficult to nrove then „ A lurtner characteristic of the more important task, that was to trench proposal is this, run the Labour Welfare Housing It had been suggested that half "Besides its economic sigmltLoan Scheme, a scheme which the service should have been cance, susceptible of development needed his particular ImowledJte counted, but this he would assure whh 4t the frcscnl moment one He thought it was fitting that the them was slowly baeonupg out-ofcan only guess at, it has, and preA BILL to promote lh P cultnation ol trees and for purposes in connection therewith tvu paased bv the LeRI'NDER the command of Liiatlve Council yesteVdd>. This bill was passed by the ^^ ^ku -i House of Assembly and Wsktst batWe the Council duriiig the ^rioons -"ere laapmi n* last legislative session. The Council returned it to tho Colonel Michelin. co m a m— one* of il m with an amendment, but the sessmn ended before i^iice yesterday afternoc* ,. ,, _„i. mM __ \ ,,' combermere. the House could consider it. Thc CadeU preceded I It was therefore necessary to introduce it in the p„ nce Band led by Cpl. slerrtj. Current sessnm. marched on to the parade g) Hun hie Mr Prlrie. Acting Cotrees People who planted fruil No1 platoon was in charge of LA lonial Secretary, explained this to tree* would *et Ihe benefit Irom Glltens No. 2 Lt Brewswr and members as he moved the second doiii* so in %  very short lime. No. 3 Company sergeant-Major leading, seconded by Dr M -i ,. pLmtiiig uf the other Murray. n-a—I He aaW he thoxxht It would beea like raauariua would only JEjucUy at 3.30 p.m. C...ml :. inqxrtinent for him to add yiel.l long term benefits like inMichelin a-eompanieO '"> J l r unvihinK to what had irrn said crea tig rainfall and may be. eonBtewea-Cox and Mum %  %  '*" when the bill was fullv dis.-u< Ihc water supply, etc. marched on to the iwade l !" nd the last occasion that it was If one was going to get any benand *!>*-"* ,' '^JaJSiV efit Iron, fruit tree., the benefit toons accompanied bj the officers m* quickly, and there Stopping occastonaily. ihc ot uthe neVd for a subColonel talked with some of the Sd, a. the .U provided for He boys andI inspected_ their unifonns tfMNight. therefore, that there wi Alter the inspection ihe three reason In not referring platoons marched past before the rally to fruit trees saluting base. No 2 platoon receiving thc greatest applause. II) or 12 Years Age Fine Sawctiicle llon'ble Mr Million commendSwinging their hands from Iront Tha ctwaeii poMpomd c !" -id.ran !" i |) ._ (-1 j be an Uphill task id 1'. Goveniment on sending to rear and stepping briskly the praedJel lercero Ho dowi the bin Hfa only refr et wee eedete presemed a tine *£*&£ ihougbt, Ikowmr, that Use boa HU I : '' been sent down as their button,, and badges shone uW u-r„;,n, 'BeeV'af member had nruwerrd his own 10 12 years ago He regarded brightly inthe sun criticism when he said thai nracIt .1 inure than hart encourageThe march past over, the plaaeattta th, "'. toTcenv was not Intense n.en: ol the planting of trees He toons were broken up into squads. vrtampag?. one of the first -Tnree squads were demonstrating nunu industries that was being indication ami recognition of tareatablishcd, from the point of gels, three aiming nstrurti-ms. tinding employment fo" two fool and arms drill and four section formation. People would not only be .mThe boys showed a keen in>rploy. in Ihe diguing of holes, est in what they were doing and th* planting and tending of trees their officers apparently were satand -he subsequent felling ol Uficd with ihe display given by l conversion of them into the boys In front of the Colonel. nn**ood. It would also lead to Ule employment of a number of Inspecton to superintend those in-. and to see thai they wen gj ..cording to the specificationof the Department of Agri%  Ad. I llorible Mr t IIUUMI ILUWI that on 'Jibe had expressed regret thitt Iherw was no specinc menti<. of fruit tiees in the MIL Hon'ble Mr Chandler had on that occasion ild that the irowlng of fruit In %  11111 r %  utnoriM* tht(1-IMII p ('' %  MibannanSchool Hill lo amend in* Hepi 1'i-H'lr ATI, 1MI. •* — RrxduDon to roakr il lawful SM a Hi pi, I—r land within IhHJ SStrtsh ,rf [r in an. prrind no* f.it-iini SI Ian a, 1blndina %  • lh* aald X ,,M .... Schuman Defends !'rt ,n ble Mr file suid that when the Hill was first before the Council certain faults in it had been IS : ..ph. The 1,235-ton Amencan UUUHK ...tainty of eliminaUng from *.W. Gofcey arrived at BridgartOWTI Intad ML and he understood Uf raironean communily a latent yesterday to take the first load of ' %  '' those JU "* "< ''* !" ..use of trouble, mistrust, an, fancy moias^s ,n bulk for .:,. e. He .as gtod *£* ngulsh. and a hope of erecting on l anada d tX lhc SJ, The De" C peacemaking cooperation a The fancy molasses il SSMCted in ,. nl „, A g r cu i, ure couW nol •la o pcnilon lo Mr. CliMe, but on rcMoiuibte bcncfll lo mm wk further consideration it did appear to him that it was not on the same basis aa that BUI. Thirty Years He was saying that for the reason that when MrChase retired he had served the Government from 1908 to 1038, a period of 30 years. He then left the Government service to be Manager of the Barbados Settlement Company In St. Lucia, better known as the Vieux Fort Emigration Scheme. That scheme was financed purely had served his rcmnuinlty well. The motion lh.it ihe Bill was read a second time was then put to the vote and resolved as already stated. It was afterwards paved olid European edifice accessible to bo suppUcd to the tanker JT/ anything like the numbci 11 all European nations ot goodthrough the cast iron pipes will which were recently laid down along Cuvans lame Tanker VJL Gefcsy was anchored on* Pelican Island on itarrival and remained at thai anchorage throughout the day. To take its load of bulk mclas'Vansiuytman' Lost Stern Post "We weald keenly have desired that Great Britain be present ml our dlaeuasiona We %  .uin.it conceive Kurope without her. "We know thai Ihe British Goveeiunent de\ires the aue c eaa of our labour, and this re-aaaorea ns. litTerenn SPEEDING: £3 fine of £3 was also imposed Ivan Mayers of Green Hill by Magistrate G. II Griffith, when found guilty of exceeding thc speed limit with the motor van M 1047 along Kingston Road on _, May 16 The van was travellini: of trees which would be needed LTTLZLtl *^.i < v.n .1 .U ma eb)ee1 ol the bill was to bo %  l 1 ? e l c v ,P f s l "Jf*s h ''* ,he ,.„„,,,.,,., limit in this area t. 20 m.p.h. yot Suitable 1 MV9ITRRY luld m UN loOs*J ^""h nsadln WHY DIDN'T TH1Y ASK I JI~JU( UM llilDV IN IIKUr-UIID SWUABK for aTter hh -(..•Mi %  -M ; 1:. %  boat THF F.AKI.Y MDBMM; I It wai 1 r iirrgrTioN. olirn hr pul ihDM THK TAIU Iilw iv.litrnmn -aid THAT -< yOUH MAN Ol IKSPBt CHRISTIE DAVID FltOME. REX STOUTK and nFl.rON COPn I read ihr lal Hovaxa 1 Ui*. A MOKMNt; AT 1 IT I -Uf. l>v Biami Milt.lliulin \ RUNC1ALOW BY Till BBACH H DstMfe Ball K A YOl'NO MAN W fl on Salr a Thsjar and many olhrt" wrll With regard to fruit trees, he did not think that the pasture land on which Cdsuarina trees were grown would be suitable for the vhich presented her from pardock. the tanker has to be berthed cultivation of fruit trees. Caain the outer basin of the CareenUitr ma trees were lhc only ones age. near to the Central Foundry t nat ;.,. thought would grow A IT EH spending four weeks by Government and therefore alundergoing repairs at Trinidad and though he might not have been a one week discharging cargo at Government Civil Servant whUe Antigua, thc schooner Timothy reasoning that tended to be doenerving in that rapacity, he was -* %  "• Vanalui/iman suited for Bartnnal could not overcome, will 'rtainly a quasi Government scrDados, reaching port on Monday end by giving way before more ticipaUng acUvely, at least at thi stage appeared in the course of an exchange of views which was as frank as it w., friendly. "We preserve the hope that the and scruples, which .,t type of land, linn Me Mr fetrie vanL Before atccpUng lhal post evening. he hnd asked Government that his On this trip lhc Vanslupfman services be considered as earning tost her stern post when about two % %  enslon, and he was assured that 'idles from the Hocas This caused that would be given due conald"'<-' delay at Trinidad eratlon when the time came. Captain Stoll told the Aduocole yesterday that the Varulupf-naii Mr. Chase remained In that post left British Guiana on May 3 for from 1938 to 1843 and from IMS Antigua via Trinidad Good to 1947 he was appointed Social weather prevailed, but Ihe Stern Welfare Officer. His salary was post gave awav, damaging the fixed on a imr,-j)cnsioaable basis, steering gen. and whan the lime came for him He sailed the vessel into Porticrete demonst rations Conformity The French Government will ertainly be acUng In confornuty illi the conaideraUous aiiimaling The skipper, Captain William Hen'hie Mr. Petrte said he Kamp. was awaiting orders from would like to give the Council the his local agents as concerning the assurance Uiat il was not the inloading of the ship. '''"'IOII of the Government to make the bill a restricted biU. ~~~— Two types of trees were mentionmake known to you its own Jtious ed. but il could be extended and m the next few days he hoped that thc Government i*. %  .fi Pr.nu.mi would do the extension. -A draft proiiosa which U will li(|| ^ sav Ul(jl swtl illR submit to you wiU form what the wou d ^ suppUcd> but there was French Government hopes will be wmp (imnU p rovbilon in the &t i. a useful and fruitful basis of milt| ., for lfcPed |( nS 5 > „ n ,| h c had work." no doubt that an additional proFor today I limit myself to vision would be readily available all the piirticipaUng governments welcoming you in the name of my The question of whether seedlings When it keeps the British Govli'vernment. and to expressing should bo purchase,! or whether niuiciit informed of the developthe? ardent wish that the expectnn,,., would Ugiven away as part man! of our dellberaUons and : MI.provides it with a possibility. if not of joining us—which to retire he was undoubtedly onof-Spain where all the cargo was persist in desiring—then at least of communicating to us aU useful observations thus preparing tha way for future co-operaUou. As for ooraelves, we shall have loi.uneiieed a work thai has been assigned to as. First •f all we moat adopt a method • %  f work. "It v, ill be Ihe work of a team and net of a conference "Hi. Its rigid reguratlona. Oar main eonalderaUon will be to be rfTeeUve. The sparkle of eloquence wiU not tempt us. "An informaUon meeting tomorrow will enable us to settle our ideas in this respect. These ideas will tako shape dumig tho (M-rsonal contacts which we shall -ike It our bustnrs* to establish tiUed to his thirty years' Governunloaded before docking. From ment service The BUI for his Trinidnd thc Varnli.ptman called pension took into consideration his at Antigua and then sailed for ten years' service with the BarBarbados. bados Settlement Company and as The vessel has onlv brought 18 Social Welfare otticer. and he was pieces of greenhcart for llils port given half the period as would qualify him for pension. Ke*?p Pace Wilh r<|tiily • Aa ho had already said the Mill before Ihem to his mind, was not on aU fours with that of Mr. Chase's, lie had looked up the debate in %  onnertion with Mr. of the peoples who place „f the encouragement programme Ihelr hope and confidence in you would no doubl have to be dismay not be disappointed". eussed. —Heater The Hill was then passed. IMPORTS YESTERDAY Chase's BUI and had seen that the arrived ABOUT 700 bags of first quality and 300 bags of broken rice HALL'S DISTEMPER ^^UJflTtfl PA HIT Is e recognised firif grade WATER PAINT then Colonial Secretary had said that the Bill was lo enable the law to keep pace wllh equity; thai the GnviTii'ii. What they expected It to do. thnt was. to be equitable to tho 0 1 who had given good service He agreed wilh everylhinii that Jiad taken place Wife regard to Mr. Chase's Bill but what hud perturbed him as regards tlie present BUI was that the individual confr "it. cerned, although he had been In >'*>" the •land yesterda lien the Tl-tOfl %  i-hooiirr Kmeline lo port This schooner has ,\\> brought iwii „i. en heart. ii.ituml, im ions of and maintain. firewood and 73 cases ot patent "Fundamental problems wiU be approached at the same time. Also calling at this port was One cannot separate one from the thc motor vessel lavdy Joy from other." We shah pool our ideas. ... which brought fresh confront them, and choose beplaiitaius. coconuts and iween them. oil. "The French Government B*mo. oil-bound, •aiy ol spolkM.on nd ot o.iiuoj.nq co>*nng capacity >i Ueally waed o. n i"i* tJot*ii" pu*t %  •>•• S ht^-i ttanda)iJ Hat favih 1| -. %  • J STOCKED BV ALL Trfli LEADING STORES SISSONS BROTHERS A co. LTD, HULL. I narhariM Co-Operallv i T. Herbert Ltd. C I A Barnes Co. Ltd. Cotton Factory PlantaUens Ltd. Harrison A Co (It'dos) Ltd \(f y I ^| cleans everything smoothly and speedily! FAItliOW'S GIANT I*IIII PEAS Thc EXTRA fine flavour of thc pick of ihc crop S.P.C.K. BOOK DEPARTMENT 1st. FLOOR. C. F. HARRISONS & Co.. Ltd. WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD. Inc. B.C. ANNOUNCES OUR — MID-YEAR OFFER — OF VALUES FOR THE FAMILY. SEE OUR CENTRE SHOW WINDOW — CHOCK—FULL OF WORTHWHILE BARGAINS — THAT ARE WORTH TAKING ADVANTAGE OF — TO MENTION A FEW— Flowd George...* Flowered Art Silk Embosted Organi Pater Pan Mu.lin Miami Linen ITS LIKE BUYING SOVEREIGNS— FOR A PENNY — FOGAHTY'S S2.I6 yd. NOW—$1.00 yd. 2.16 .. ., — 1.00 „ 2.36 ., .. — 1.44 „ LSI .. — .84 „ 1.08 ., .. — .90 „ lubrication is Important t For prompt and skilled lubrication drive your 1-ordson vehicle in to us. Wc arc your Fordson spedaiists, and do the job thoroughly" at tow fixed prices. I.e.: ualso tell you all about the latest Thames Trucks with their big bodies, roomy all-steel cabs. scnu-forw*i


PAGE 1

I'AC.K TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE ,n n\i -n II ii Ml II UM Ccmib patting S I I "Mi W : t>c-t of the Barb-dor Taam (or Bhk-v Hri r.t, they were -'eppwtby woll-i'hWB, acme gtnig t*w last 1 v-.da of advice while others shook their a.in He baa been In Japan wiice January, and Mrs. Morgan took the opportunity of visiting her mother and relative* before going over to Join him. They expect to IKin Japan for about three years. Her husband, she told Carib. likes it. and she thinks that she • ill la Ma) Morgan used to be stationed In Antigua where they met itnd were married about rive years i.gO. She and her daughters have three month* itayirifc at Ih-ckley Leaving Today M R. and Mr* William Morley are due to leave today for F.nglanil by the (iolflto on four months' holiday Mr Morley. who is Chief Engineer of the Barbados Klectric Supply Corpu, Ltd* Power Station is on long leave. While in England, they plan to spend some of the time with their i. N. rille, arha with the Stafiorri Technical College, and also receives his practical training with the English Electric Co. Then they will vialt Mrs Morley's parents as well as several other relation*. On Long; Leave M R. and Mr* J H McPhall are also among the passengers leaving bv the Golflto today for England. Mr McPhall, who la on the staff of Barclays Bank here is on four months' long leave, most Of which ihev will spend In Ixindon, before touring as much of the country as they can My Go To Ron* POCKET CARTOON by (ISMM. .' U\l .\> I I %  M f flag* Maakltf, if you don't ion Map worrying abflui Nuiwnoi Paai Health Wrek, aafag nrter go>n* 10 t ta Aieet I" UN. Press Officer In New York M iss MAHC1A COOPKK. Il Press Officer for the I'nltei Nations in New York Is on a tout of the Went Indies on holiday. On Monday morning she arrive.) fro Trinidad by 11 W.I.A and return eri there yesterday only staying .i llarbados for one da) "Too all"%  time." Mlu Cooper told Car: i Leaving New York on J fa a she has visited Aruba. Curac:.and Trinidad, before coming her. She leaven Trinidad for hOSM t day. Naturally D R. ind lin J IV O'Mahonv I be leaving by the Golfiio which Is due to arrive from Trinidad this mornlnu They are off in England on long leave and hope Ifl return to Barbados in Novam'er. Dr. O'Mahonv came lo Barbados in November. 1948. as C-M.O. and was recently appointed Director of Medical Services. They have been living in the W I. now for twenty years and regard this part of the world as their home. Dr. O'Mahony hopes to visit his brother in Ireland for about two months and he also told Carib that uhey may vialt Rome on the Holy Year pilgrimage, but as yet no definite plans have been made In that direction. Returned to Aruba M R OLIVER ROCK, who spent a short holiday with relatives in Barbados, returned to Aruba mi Monday afternoon by B.W.I A. vsnere he leaches at the l.ng In.lu-lil.il S, ll.N.I Intransit M R. TOM TOMLINSON. retired Manager of Trinidad (invernment Railways accompanied bv Mr. ii,h Mslngol and his sister Betty, who used to go to M''l in Barbados will be arriving in Barbados today by the Gotflto. as intransit passengers for England. Miss Tomhnson. Mr. Tomlinson'B sister will also be on board She li laUna the two yoMagtora lo school in England M Engaged ISS JOAN NICHOI.l-S daugh ler of Dr. and Mrs 1-.HU Nicholls of "Ragedale" Worthily has graduated In Vine Art at the Art School in Calaaiy, which %  • affiliated to the Universlly of Alberta. Her engagement lo Mr Mervyn Williams who Is a Commercial Artist at the same ad school was recently announced Joan who ia now working In Calgary will be remuining in Canada for the time being Will Visit Their Son M R. and Mrs. Neville Howell leave today for England by the Ool/lto. Mr. Howell, who is Manager of Buttals and Brighton Plantations is on three months' holiday While |n England they will visit their son Geoffrey, who Is at school in Lancashire and they will also be In Ixindon for part of the time. To Speyaide Tobago 1 SAVING yesterday afternoon by BWI A for Trinidad, intransit to Tobago were Mr. ami Mrs. C E. Shepherd of "Collelon House." St. Peter. In Tobago they will be slaying at Speydde for a couple of weeks' holidas Riviera Holiday M R C. W. W GREENIDGE >i Barbados, a former Chief Justice of British Honduras, who J* now secretary of the AntiSlavery Society In London. Is going to Geneva in July to studv documents on slavery. After that he is going to slip down to the French Riviera for a holiday. He plans to rent n flat in Nice "It is the only place in tne world where 1 want to live", he wiys. "I go there whenever I gel a chance.' 1 Cricket Throws I T IS fortunate that crickctci"are not genei illj recognise once they are off tie field. Otherwise two of the West Indies team might have been very embarrassed last week. On the Sunday which came In the middl I of the Manchester Test they want to Blackpool for the day. In the sports garden there they were invited to try their luck at knocking tin cans off a wall with Uttle wooden balls. The distance the> had to throw was only ten yards and there were prizes, if three or more cans were knocked over. Sad to relate lh.it after three thrown the cricketers hnd knocked over only one can between them They subsequently Improved and when they flnalKleft the stall ihey had an arminl of prises. M R. HERBERT EISCHBACIi who arrived from Caracas on Monday ufternoon by B.W.I.-*". is an Austrian who has lived %  .. Venezuela for eleven years, and* u now a Venezuelan citiacn This U his first holiday in four year:. "and naturally.'' said Mr Flschbach. "I chose Barbados." Staying at the Ocean Vic* Hotel, he is here lor three week-. Trinidadians In Venezuela M R and Mrs. Louis SelUer and their live children art Trlnidudians who have been living In Venezuela for the past ft" 1 years. They arrived here on Monday morning from Venezuela via Trinidad by B.W.I.A They are in Barbados for a month's holiday staying at Coral Sands. Worthing. Until the End of July M R. and Mrs James Parker wh > are from Oklahoma, but now live in Monogas in haaW a are here until the end of July, staying at the Ocvun View Hotel. For Three Weekt T WO Trinidad ian* who are with Alstons in Port-of Spam arrived on Monday morning by aW.LA. Mr. Walter Scott Who Is In their Head Office and Mr. Leonard Maingot who is in the Shipping Department are hero for three weeks' holiday staying at Accra. Rockley. rr r.i.\ in ,%>; T REgfl .,.. JO hoaaej ft bordering three tx I'ccentrte owner does not • %  IBh stable an even number ol Dorses In any one ol the three earns am union; the barns without having an even number in any barn'' Conformant M R. and Mrs. Charles Ward from California, who a year and a half ago went to Trinidad where Mr. Ward is with the K.m Trinidad Oilfields Ltd, arrived on Monday morning by B.W.I.A. to spend a week's holiday ut Pic Ocean View Hotel. Good Show "Sleepy" M R. MILLS who is in charg. of student welfare ut trc Colonial Office took a team West Indian students up to Cambridge last week-end to plaj cricket against Clare College, and they did very well. It was only one-day match and the result w flare 244 lor 5 wickets. West Indies 190 for 1 wicket. S. G. •SleepySmith or iiariwdoa rntda most of the runs for the Colonial team and was 134 not out at thend of the game. "Sleepy" studying law In London and Vice'Captain of the Inns of (tunI cricket team Test Beit B EST story circulating around Manchester after the First Test concerns Alfred Valentine, Jamaica's young left arm bowler After he had taken the first •tven English wickets to fall ha turned to one of his colleagues and said "When does the captain come In*"' He was Informed thai he had got rid of Yardley two wickets previously end an expression of real pleasure crept over hie face. He had no I uf the names of the batsmen had got out but was deeply satistied to know that the rival captain was among (hose "in tne bag. BY THE WAY mummm M Y favourite animal at the moment, ousting even the great Taraequc of Beaucainwhich was slam by St. Martha, whose reliquary and tomb are still there, in the church that bears her name — my favourite animal Is the duck which held up traffic in the Edgware-road. was taken to a police station, and there, with considerable aplomb, laid an egg If only the B B.C had had the enterprise to relay that egg. my cup of joy would be full and Hewing over. The Suet Homing Ftan P ARAGRAPH VI. of Sub-settlon V. of Section IX. of Charlie Suet's housing plan deals boldly and u neon vent tonally With Materials Suet would seek powers to divert the little metal hasps for trousers from the tailors lo the builders. They would be used to make door-knobs, windowcalehea. and other such thing* To do this It would only be necessary to get the Metal Control Board to agree with the Trouser Accessories Bureau to transfer the work of the Dual Purpose Council to the Overall Distributional Clearing Centre at Nunealon. Then the Regional Licence Departments could apply early neat year lo the Ministry of Bubble-blowing for the necessary ilraft schedules, working through the usual channels—the Board of Allocations, the Permanent Sites Committee, the Town and country Co-ordination Committee, the Personnel Board, the Output Board and the Control of Housing Com nuss loners Or. Rhubarb'* Hum bojum botogt'liv* P ROFESSOR SNARLSTRO^ claims that Dr. Rhubarb'* Mumbujumbologvtics are prcStuyvenheuter, and therefore out of date. Quoting Tlcknold. Worms. Scattermote, Tungsten, Batcombe. and Pushmeister, the teamed Snarlstrom endeavours to prove that Rhubarb's conception of thought as an objective phenomenon is outmoded and woul'i lead to the complete abandonment of Sknul's Three Preliminary Positives in Thought Analysir. We who care leas than the dust beneath their chariot-wheels for all this empty rolly-molly and tumble-cum-trtvy, can now gel OB with our drinking, which it "a subjective action of the conscious will,"' according to Glumm • . at Whitfields ONLY the latest "BUTTERICK" Patterns have arrived PRINCE CHARLES watches ... the King dm. lo "Trooping" Ceremony, London Held by his nurse. Prince Charles waves from Clarence House as his grandfather. King Oearge VI drlvs down the Mall with an escort of Household Cavalry to the Boras Guards Parade for the "Troopn g the Colour" The annual ceremony is held In honour of the King's birttm.i. Peaee For Prince Charles LONDON The daily perambulations ol Prince Charles, Princess Kit/. beth's young son. will be held i secret during the next few months Fine weather and the seasona increase in the number of UWt ists have swelled the c r we tf i waiting .-.ii h na> ., House and In St Jamc?-' Park b watch the young prince sport on tne (rreen Now. so that he can take hiexercise less in public eye. Prrt i ess Elizabeth has arranged Hot I i.irles and his baby car nage to be taken to some spot i in be wheeled in peac. ..rid do a bit of Independen* toddling. Prince Charles, now IS months can walk well but because of the %  ho wait for his appearunea it has been impossible t< %  ;ive h'"i much practice In the >& INS. Wife Must Be Deaf HONEY BLONDE? The Hairdressers Cannot Agree "MIEKE I-, ojaagre women's hairdressers aboui c "most fashionable shade' i hair this year. I'.K.llow.slup ol Hair Artists honey LONDON, A "Heno-ln-reverse" is pjaniy, foi Win tie* Bay. Northumberls.n. County, seaside resort rws At the next meeting of '.he £ local council It will be uropoeed that a get-together be arrant-;for lonely men and women w.nn ftfej too shy to find a mate "I Great britam fav A thousand people have written blonde. to Councillor J. D. KJnM. i "Man women are turning orn.cr council chairman .request Monde than ever before, but B H '^J ,md lhfm nu-b,n Piattnum Is definitely out ..,< Str^est request for a Ui "J* N riirm wan from a man aged sixtv %  even !" who stipulated that his br/le Ihc %  "" lollcs < >'" %  *"•* must be deaf hu,T styles, and honey blonde: .. _.., w,.... .. v ry ,rom " hl golden auburn Councillor Kidd said to a pinkish tone. In tad Most of the people who B avi t> d ^.^ tu >ui: written to ma seem to i> t IMtti %  erwugh. to* seem to be ter, i: ^ thades "I think the only way to sor: toe 5 B 1 u,r 11 tn4 \ h T J".^ to ** the whole thing out would bete %  *?""* uk,a ched, and th rll-n a conference for them* all damage dotM "In America people go to lb. .. A court hairdresser dJOH ior divorce, so why not in Britain air. Furman. come to Whitley Bay u ilml "Honey blonde might be quit! happiness*— -e greyest blonde possible. Ihal many quite excellent men Hi are Obtained b 1 do not know how to treat won.q i nps of chinchilla.' It is a species of learning whjfh The London manager of is not taught in schools or ev.-r. Parta naJrdxeaser also differ* ll. 111 Ihe university nda that rinses are more popula "And. It is a typp of Icamuu; ""f" t*""'l"'>i these days, which is very hard to acquire. ''"" *'-leeable revival It springs, 1 think, out of n ot various blonde shades; warm knowledge of human nature colours are liked best. 1 he said. —(I N S > HI CR\TTO g" wh*t and -V brg:ni H 'if . 'on :i gyra. lur Ruprti unnoi under•rsnd ,t n .11. '•H.-lnoki %  IsUBt, h* promt*. Th • -te.il i %  ri'tmj* ptrwr.t thi: poor %  %  noun whi: h* wn doing." m\ he ...II know, what ha do.ng." uplift the down fMenoutly j-he helps M.rjidi Hit HilUHlML) lily Jl-n < ihe pUi I Beri "'. i i u> a -v. !•! II froper abue IK 1 ; • %  -Di' % % %  %  saatf % %  arali %  %  %  ea mo. iMSq Hi* if'tfi. .,„..•-..u .... Si lit !**•• UDOI* tnr resw< -i*u in sucn • *v thai %  GAIETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES mi Mm BuWO MMI K'NOAl •*. %  I h] '.'IftU HI cau brr It < %  M Want Utopia would call mi 'it Vena out oi tn* de acis Dona l. Mai ba Uuntad :i. Brosen poi< *. Worihi ol !, • h Bnetir he I* tfie Uit pact. 14 a. An they br H round in ri< M. TnKen Irom a ai 10. Tne *aale lota a tetter to brcan Into iins. HI 14. dimiufr. gtitina a bleat thU. <5l tha aame. Its tba ssi i J. Hum purtner. (5) St. Iterate. <3| JO. Bod of IS An PLAZA 1 1 Ut m v. %  ajn I %  i .. i 'tnH \< i \ni i tui %  i .:^i sstcaatmm re .M..I i* us am tau am Slaved: IS Btje: 1(fttt.ri. Uc^OQ. irKOl AT (Worthing,; \KTI 11(1 l>et 1IRDOV \ \vi-:NrrKi.s 01 CASANOVA' Tonisnt nl %  30 If l^ihlk: Demand. Madam O'Undv a Troope CARACAS SIGHT' The Show ot Sho*> : >4Ho. II il M) < H II %  :>ii>iiii Tn-tlav ft (oniwro. .1 4 4B A S 1 Conlinuinc 2Uh C.-Fox Presents BETTY GKABLE in -WARASII WINII With Victor MATURE —Hhil HARRIS HOXV To-Dnv A Tuntorrow 4 JO ft s | "I WAS A MAI.E WAR ItKIIIK "YOtl-Ri: MY EVERYTHING OI.Y.MIMf I A'l 1 Snowi Tn-Dav 4 30 A S t -'"th C.-Fox Double '. HOt Ut in %  Mill SE ON 91nd.srKH.l "HARK CORNER' GLOBE THEATRE TO-DAY & To-Moaaoa LSI & KM P M %  UMSTl Superb MIIM.JI [)„ulil,. "TILL THE CLOUDS ROLL BY" FRANK SINATRA LENA HORNE "HOLIDAY IN MEXICO" JANE POWELL & JOSE iTURBI P|MH iicle Ihal HMIDM Mnrls It LM p.m. for tin. — FfogmnuM V i. 41 ii i; Opening Friday 23rd 5 & S.30 SAMUEL C0LDWYN pieseno DA ANDREWS SISASIIAYWARD MY FOOLISH HEART" utm Ml • ua sail • u.. n*M %  l. I !- %  • & %  > nn. %  i II -11 r-tr.N... PHIUf G IrSTUN Wtm— I.IHHII H.BMliHH.ml.1 I'lu. I.IOV l:BKI)l. In < ,\< TIS (IT-IP LOCAL HUM IIV I-AHAIII: Frrr rnplr* .f Ih. turrrnt hit p.radr Inn-. "M. Kooll.li llrarr %  ATI llll R HALF-ril KETS FKI1IAV MTI: AMI WIN A rARTON Or JEPFRF.V'S STOIT I'OSIIIWIA HO IM tl W III PRICKS I'll Iti! — HOISI: 3llr — B..\I.('.INV III. —BOX Mr I V I INI V SIMIIIIIS CTCUf LAMPS lie rVMT CONNECTIONB I* HHIS BILL l-VrCMNC. KITt I4e MH ai LI. r ITI'IIING KITS Or MU aMOS—Lun Ciparlty fl 44 r.cBii i c "•>T'*4L ** p*r .11 . tit EMXS & vsfirmELDs *m. WORE II\OIII>I 6ft wide ONLY 1..J2 per yard run Magnificent offer! SUITCASES 14 In. II In $2.76 20 In. $3.46 24 la. •^1 1", CHOPS! FLYING FISH! AND LOTS AND LOTS OK FOOD i o-xii,u i AT CASUARINA CLUB There'll bv an admission charge of 2 shillings/because the Orchestra has to EAT too. To-nmlit we ansinclly informul'su yuu can dnn your K'ad rags and dance to ihe rag-lime band of Bern, Hajrwood from it to Inldntgnt (The Manager— Peter Howell (in rage) wttl b..^ UCUal) %  ^ include a partner for the "SUgs" the "Singing Barman" and "Freddie." Get the CaeeaWbu habit. \\s one you'll not reyri-t. For its those thai rat out this .iy. That have well and trul\ "i-tr" P.S.—Ni-xl Sitttrday we'll be vrrv debonair, lie Manager will hiib^rnl h,> drx-sp | will be required/I In



PAGE 1

W •ri % %  )-•. ll : %  • .ln.i.21 I !l .'. II JBmrfotims & Quorate ? VT, W.I. BEAT NOTTS BY INNINGS Worrell Takes S Wickets Speaker Allows First Reading Of Gas Bill A Rule Forbids Two Bills On Same Subject V1K. I:. K W.\I.MTT. (|) WHS n wn permission yrsU-r1 da, in introduce a Kill In amend ih, fias Work-. A.. 1'iM ntll-9). His Hunuur Ihe Spcukrr gVt I mlinic I* Hi. i-ih'i ( allcr Mr. Admits .n u previous mc-clin;: i>f th> II %  had asked fi>r a mini as in whether (lie bill %  •liu' liin I rod m ill since (•overnmrnt had itlreudy giver* O.iC %  •I u Bill to .niM'iiil tli ( said Ar| since April 2.". this •' ti.Honour |m the foPowrnj ruling:— As regards (hi' seeking <•! ng i>\ the Hi.fiBffUM Ml %  l"i Si Jooaph reiaUva lo allowing motion l<> uiuudiice an amendment Work* Act 1911 ( 11111y>, on ihe ground* thai the Government had earl HI hi tin.session given notice of %  > BUI to • mind the said Ael. I have after careful consideration and much study, tome lo the decision at pariiilllnii the bonounblo introducer •if thll amendment lo proceed wilt. :: of the Hill Because from all mj In the parliament.ir> usa* ca and procedure of baa British House at Commons and il\ th* rulM and customs of this ancient Mouse of Assembly. I sac no reason (off nol allowing the ban for St. James lo proceed with %  flrat reading. I...I., £ ',.l....,l Indeed U. quote from Sir ErJllU\ LaiIUlUl nine May', Tre Law. Privileges Proceedings and Usages of Parllamanl (Page 38" Providence Favours Priest liKOKOETOWN. Thir' ... r-old Hindu Priest If Sukul of n erara, holdi that %  HI the flrs( ii.. Turf Clubs May Shilling tied for first pU i Kilty' eat h inkci M.lSI Pandit Sukul saio he ln>ught 75 hooks ui itckato in the Ban %  %  I Kg 0t $80.14. Garland Cuts Throat HOUYWOOD. June 20. Judy Garland ... star, cut her throat in a lit of anguish, her .studio stated to-day. The around was not serious it added. This ropon snu denied by her husband. Mr Vincent Mmoili, A Holly wood du< ti nth whatever in tho report" Mr. Minelli said The poor glii Is very much upset, but this — oh no The actress was suspended by Metro Goldwyn Mayer studios on Saturday for failing loi report for WOfffc on the iHm "Sum-I %  ner Stock" which she is making witii Kred Astalre — Ihe second tune in Jwl over a year lhat such action wan taken against her for staying away from the set Minelli said to-day that his wife was retting and could not be disturbed. Two Los Angeles afternoon newspa|>er* published reports concerning Miss Garland to-day. One said %  i i intervened and took a knifi-he could hurt herself. —Keiiler Floods Destroy Citrus Nurseries In 8. Honduras Hartal" M eaai a i C i m a m ai M l BELIZE, Juno SO Coioni.ii Sec %  in %  '.v.ivn Hone late yoaterdaj ruafced lo fturnnCreek Valley, citrus centre of the colony, whore a flood caused i>> heavy raindoa t royed the citrus nurseries of the British Honduras Citrus Co and ivaal i d av/a> ""• approaches to a I id — No Rule Or Cotton Than t* "•• ruh or custom which restrains the Introduction of (wo or ii..HUN r i. din lo the same subject, and .•iiiijinint similar provisions" So honourable numbers anil it lhat is being introduced Is quite in ordei t i rovalUnf par'u • menuu*) custom admits The placing of a notice on the Order Paper Is Just a notice and in my view eannol. and should not. take precedence over any Bill that has been offered to this House whether or not (he notic*.* refers to the umendinK of one i-r all of the provisions of a similar Bill. H mishl indeed prnvr a ver> serious Uilni If a notice on the Order Paper prrcluded the In troductiwn of leghilallon stmi lar lo thai Involved in tin notice The admission or such a principle In procedure noiili ea-sih allow of thr (iovrrnmfn or 4 private member, or prl vale interest* through a prl vale member or members forestalling very necessary and valuable lesauation I now declare that the introduction of the Bill t" amend Uw Oaa work* Act mil tis11 -> I m onler and do now give pern ^ion for its first reading HUTSON GETS LEAVE llon'ble I G llutson has lieen granted live month* leave from hi* duties aa a member of the legislative Council, the Council wa* told In a letter from the Artlng Colonial Secretary which the Clerk read at yesterday's meeting The leave takes effect aa from to-day. SINANAJV WILL NOT SEE BUTLER STILL URGING W.I. PARLIAMENT GROUP iFti.m Our Own C o n M yomOmt LONDON. June M Mr. M. G. Sinanan. Legal Adviser to the Butler port) feai igWkted to return so Trinidad via New York without seeing Uriah Butler. He will leave England to-morrow. In New York Mr Sinanan will visit United Nations headquarters at Lake Success to study the working of the Assembly. Ha told our correspondent today that Mr. Krishna Menon. Indian High Coanmaarinnoi London, had arranged for him lo be sponsored by the Permanent Indian Hcpicsenlallvc al Lake Sin cess During the last couple of days in England, Mr Sinanan ha: continued work on the formation of a Wesl Indies Parliamentary Group, and has had meeting with %  >r Hyacinth Morgan, Ml' and Mr Bird, Mr. Bradshaw and Dr Cummins of Ihe West Indies sugar delegalion, all of whom have expressed their approval of the scheme Ache8on Asks Support For Truman Plan VIRGINIA. June 20 Mr Dean Acheson. United States Secretary ol Slate, lo-doj appealed to Ihe 48 slate Govcrnors to support President Truman's Point Four Programme tor aldin;. under-developed countries. He told the Governors Ihe Administration might borrow some of their experienced state officials lor the programme. 'It may cans.inconvenience lo part wilh these men for a period" he said, "but we believe that once the ell I your slate understand how this work contributes lo our own peace and well-being they will be will ing to accept the inconvenience. UnderslandM|K and support from (he OoffernorT was particularly important to the I'oini Four Plan* %  ucceaa. TheCJovemora are holding then Annual Conference at While Sulphur Springs. Mr. Acheson's appeal followed a message similar >n theme from President Truman yesterday. The President (old the Governors they must take t)M lead In stimulating the mvi. Americans in foreign policy and the question of preserving peace. -Keuler Belgium's New Parliament Meets: First In 3 Months First Hen—To Bring Buck King Leopold BRUSSEUS. June 20. FOR THE first time UI Ihrec months the Belgian Parliament mot to-day and began what may well l* the moat unj don In the nation'i history. For the ft** time M,1(V ,1 4 Parliamc>|i WM meetine. under a onc-partv Government, a Catholic one • To-day's meeting wni of a pure ly administrative character. bualneaa will begin nJune 27 or 28 when both House will meet separately to vole Ihe new Government's declaration of policy. Firat ilem on the Government"! programme will be to call a fotnl session of Parliameni to repeal mey Low Uirring exiled King Leopold from the throne. This will pfObobbji ake place II* early In July. The | n the Chamber of Deputies, (he LEOPOLD GOES TO GENEVA To Await Fate Parliamentary Group Resigns CAIRO, June 20 The Egyptian Saadist Parliamentary group resigned en bloc to-day In protest againsl recent Royal Ddrrecs under which many former Senators. Including Ibraj him Abdel Hady Pasha. Snadist leader, had been deprived of their .seats. Liberal Constitutionalists are also considering such action* following the replacement of liberal Leader Hussein Heykal Pasha by Wofdst Zaky El Orabi Pasha as President of the Upper House. Heykal Pasha* term of office Mas not due to expire till next *ear His Liberal Constitutional Party Is the largest Party In Ihe laanaw. where the last election; were In lu. so that it was not affected by Januarys Wafdst landslide in the elections to the Chamber. Realer ROME. June 20. King Leopold, of th. with his wife. Princess da t^ 1 lb] left Rome for Florence and Qenevo lodaj by cer after dg) Holy Yeai pilgrimage Kiini was reported to be rennnii. |.ro-[.onpold Catholics with 1":: to Geneva to await the outcome Mats hold %  majority nl fou" uf the debate in the new Ball %  *eats—II mnf Parliament on the oueeUon "f Ml than in the last House. i •: to the Throne —Bete.Atom Security Talks la U.S. Liberals hold 20 -a loag ol rnunhri 7 %  losi of I • %  ie old House, the Catholics seats tola! a gain of C. ii also to hold a Itj In the completed Senate —Heater Indian Forci-s Clush On Pakistan Border PAKISTAN. Juno 2 Armed Forces of Pakistan and Afghanistan clashed on der lx-tween the Iwn rountrtt'l with easuallirs on l>th side, on Junr 17, according lo unconr.nncd report?, reaching here t..-dy Afghan levies and a parly of a Pakistan border patrol unit exchanged (he oh Pakistan territory near Gwaza. Baluchistan, where acrording to the reports, the Afghans had set up a guard post Reuler "TENNIS TEMPT!:: Moran, a/h. Iilidoii i h.i i I fin in i in Pierre Hal*iaiu on the r0< ehlfl -to pleats and Is b % %  > %  i i %  edaed pantlea, which eauacd nan %  The name ol the fnodel "Tennis Tei bledon "Ooroeoui GlMgy' part in the Wnn. ! t.u'iit spa lalls deatgned oi don hotel TIIC %  Mm over a p.oi "t pleated I bred i them to the lacestir last year." tald Quaff* reei t rpr< M Schunian Defends France's Haste In Coal-Steel Pool At Six-Nation Congress Pre'Birth Criticisms Itlunt Hvst Schemes PARKS. June 20. M BOBERT SCIIUMAN. rrench toruuin defended the policy of haste on his coal-steel pool plan when Ihe six-nalioii comferonce on the plan opened here to-day. "Six weeks h.tve passed siiier in this very loom (the clock mom %  f the (juai U'Orsuy) lilled with historic memoiiea, the French (Jovernmcnl made known its plan/ he Mid. ** 'Six week* u rather a brief I0d for such a new and vast [topli ,i> ihe pooling a —! %  Ci m apsaiiall i KINGSTON, j Major V. J Qulnton. Director! l.onuica. will reprethe colony al the Inter-1 ihe organlsflAmerican Congress of Survey and I ping which w.ll he held all nington tomorrow and conj ga Ma la11 Escapes CAPKTOWN. June M Firemen helped Soulh African Piime Minister Dr Daniel Mala* and his adopted daughti i to safety from an outside balcony when fire broke out In the Prime Minister's residence here early to-day. Mr* Malan escaped from ihe smoke tilled house unassisted j The fire, which broke out in one I the tedrnorru.. did only slight I damage to furniture before it wai j extinguished by the fire brigade I Dr Malan attended his normal Government dudes to-day Reuler Stalin On Grammar LONDON. June 20 Marshal Stalin, in n 10.000 word urti %  i da, denounced the "unbelievable confusion in matters of philology reigning among ihe moat responsible circles Of Bovtel i and ling". I %  aw cow radio. He sharply n. duct of the disnpW of the lale i r !. % %  i Man who, he said, had formed a closed group of their own and had perHocuted run oi % %  .1><. %  criticise their theoiies or to opiose them The article uvu in the lorn % %  queStton and answer and deali with .i nrrent |r Russia on the extent to which %  national language should be modified or r*-caat lo meet .i Of life. Stalin was emphatu that, while the super -sir uelure of a language automatic.: changing needs and conditions, a buiguage could not IN' substantial* vious dis. HI kg to national life "Any attempt 1o daatn tor this rush: II was de siribed an a fast and brutal taetlc: but It la exactly thr experience which shoued that the be-,1 inllUUvr* are blunted when, before birth. the* are held uu in preliminary aaeamlUtluwa. "In a world anifuished by B0 many failures. I believe we have right, even the duty. Ie count the strength of one Idea and the profit from Die impulse born frorn the hope aroused by it, and uy Its Instinctive support on the lrl of our populations Hi n il work It up to "in tfriilleiiien. to whom sJx governments have confided to justify (his hope "Thr principle* M hleh have determined Ihe .hiiee of our objVetlve* and whi.h curwll tule the bajd* of our deliber allona must be expressed In MM and clear Inms wild a view la prepanne pfftMaM uu ertakinss. "We are arrcpri amo.n oar>elves on the direction in which our labour, are lo be turned, and on Ihe tarfet we %  ixh lo attain. cur Qoveiwnanfa hain by a free %  -. -.f f "iii Individual views and situations, (or the bed way of applying the principles we have accepted, by the erfgrtlon of new institutions without pre homed A ) the Port IdmlnkatraU Alexandria b Id a stars* of di place In %  the India.i Knterpi.-e tween Koaselr on th* I Coosl ami Weik on Ihi Arabian Coast TI ... .It.! The British %  team* Lake 4'Miiiwark ,,( Vancouve had e..i IHM gems tO On %  < a sharp lookout %  The latest iii.1i. UM t.*hr IhilllMai rtvon .il VI %  hands and bach -hip ihe l.rtae | ^leam ami raced (lie i-xplosion s '"radloe ptekod m om> survivor Am •earchhu am I Ih that abrn or !,t,p, north The phlp a i earrylnj •enarel am of esiploaivai tn m Britain ihe 1 'in-lit The Indian rnlcrprl-. hip, IndUn Kxtonrthe area fnI li> (he New TrilM' %  Ml %  ,,i 1 which trains missmnartes Uu i stations m India. Malaya and South American countries The twin ennincd plane had been silent since it na ntdlo mi June 0 that It was 2!S miles from Maracaibo. VaSMatiala, after having called at Kingston". Jamaica It waa said Ihal the Stale IVpartment would ask (hr 1 in Ooeernmerrl to launch an air mid ground search —Reulrr W.I. (for 5 wkt& dec) 325 Notts 240 and 224 I -. I> rtorr'.tvsn.'ud. JMW 90 THE FINAL DAYS PLAY of the match here in whsih the West Indies beat Nottingham: h.re by an nnings and 01 runs w;is distinf-ta. ied by two individual performances, one for each side. Reg Simpson, who will be playing for England in the second Test match which starts at Lords on Saturday, batted for the four hours aud forty min utes which the Notts second innings lasted, and made 109, including fourteen fours, out of a total of 224 Kr .nl %  I .1 get I i.lie end gmiiK foi three hours, IsreM) mhsuyM and Brushed with the excellent ort SM ovara, twenty %  n rua D tribute %  Notts bat.n ogs was %  %  I td %  %  %  %  %  %  %  but sel, .. n. %  He often ga** Has impression that he wa .... ol Baturda) t. || The %  •.mint: b John Qoddard nol baild ti-i.i %  | %  i Though ihe injury li %  oro, it I %  • will keep hjm ,. it of the ,.! %  On i pit* 1 %  not out irolni and opt Dins] p.ui looks i a confldenl lhat it earn I'' I'll 111! I. It was a bad mistake m a quick single which led lo II n being run out with the i %  .,i..ii. .i rninuu tor 21 Wlnnm qub '. i and by forcing meth"iv strokes At •>* VorfsrU Mrwled him and thw the two England %  Hardsi Al MB Mpirrl.lafT WM his flrsi bad i 1 %  ing fora ..i.i to WorroU %  • i resented th %  %  %  %  %  i Ml lor I. \ftei l.unch Simpson rid I lunch. %  %  ilal W II..in %  .1 return cab h to d nl Harve and two balls late* patted the ejv min the hands of Gomel lit si: II g) on pair I" 1KINK WIUtitH.l Jet tighter End* Initiut Trials LOND %  hUwkei i %  %  fulli I i %  panj s.tni here tonlghl rhe air1 on ihe supersonic aircraft the %  Iderabls Ume during. %  Aylhi .ii v\ings. .. in %  ,i\ble •' erabli hi —Kcillel 82 Terroritftfl KiDed In Malawi i igi %  SIN< %  %  e i M.i I 'IIM.I Ms %  d > In the Hue iI 23 ler%  nd 10*3 %  . .... point nl II I II WASHINGTON, June 20 The 0| Canada tighten eei in. cm at mie se r" the A:< n II did not s. when the The meat'ni is being P itfe %  -I'". tion responsible Anglo-in the ate . .,. : unui rndaj A, thJ H the latent development will b-1 war. wliich became Soviet proof Information .-.re nol being dr'studied The South and Central,petty under the peace treaty, the cussed al the meeting. American Republic and other WI I Hungarian news agency reported. islands will also be represented. —Reater. MTUftN FORESTS BUDAPEST. June 20 tussla ha* given back lo Hunv, forest-owned by Germans it inffjars up lo the end of the %  "Certain corrtradea thloh thai irrtmari iwionging to VBrlOUS "Issues will put in an appearance •Such iTiimmars do nol exist in nol deter %  i ornrade "fl oy tM grammars will apfj lh.it -Heater Great Task raai %  %  %  ; •"•"' %  B fi5 B an ffn by our Govern. the dargcr of the disintegration of IUl Communisrs Disband In South Africa CAPROWN ibai %  Hojse uf ii appraval lo Bill ihe party and all I i .:JVe the ippression of Communism Hill. %  '* ing without a dh It 10 Ihe senate—Reuler ments, bul "ii We feel thai we are rail nor to give up iiicl <>nr conclu ions, as you know, will be submitte.1 lo Hie appreciate n of the Qovemments and t the MiV'lelirr. I. %  . kM M OOf Pai llarnanti M Schuman continued 1 'v.e i shall have to establish a draft %  'o'li -s .u da %  the I broad lines of Ihe attfil %  u authority, its functionI Ing, the methods of appealing asjatnat IU decision* and of setting responstratttlaa. We Ihall have to envisage. without however inscribing them io the tiealy, the technical details which will be inscribed In SM to be concluded later, •reaty has been ratified Will Not Overlook live in no way Inignore or overlook the attempts being made elsewhere eapageC THO Ships Mined In YaUigtafe HONG KONG. Inad M Tv/o leretgn slops were mined and sunk m the Vangl %  i %  near Shanghai yeslerdii. %  ng to ropori r> I tung Honr Kong toda> Hone Ron| ifnU of the Panamanian motoi .. %  l/ahse rrara advised thai she was mined off Fomung when about lo sntar the Whanfpoo Hue, f r Shanghai Tillreport Of Ihe crew was killed but other reiorts said IS were loat ....... Ship .S'anfo. uiis .. tin v.'irru. time at the Ml bm this report wa not tlthouct] Hying the Par PMA Da 1/anM I I blnaae owned IM mnnned by aboiil 4'i I crew E. Java Has Wortfl Ouakc In SO Yea Seventeen Deoci DJAKARTA 10 ..... hundrodi ike In Ei DUICh lodOTH US %  AflSTM (Anern) reported. The Agency said that it aourebaya. on tin •astern up i the Hdana\ Uu i irtl mvered KN long a minute in some plan lain was %  rat li 'iO year Keau-r Wto *)///// //*/' deit Iftffldfo \7 STILL MISSING MAHHEIN. J ; %  %  ing today rnan 'intwo French which crashed in the Persian Gulf neai here within 48 hours of asch other hist week II is know ihst "3 paopile lives in the twin of the ia survivor* Rave left rot France and the eneeted to leav<—Reater si PEH Vim.IMA CIGARETTES BEWSOA W tIi;Dfii:s nin hiisu biititi. losuus f f



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WEDNESDAY. JUNE 21. 195(1 II Mill MMK AUMll \ i l B.C. Governor To Attend Fish Feast GEORGETOWN HH Excellency lb* Governor of Bulana, Str charie> WoolMC, has accepted an iu attend a Skin Fish Foul at the Carnegie Trade Centre on June 23 The Feast is part of an all-out carni eries Division of the Agneult Department to popularise the c sumption of skfnAsh and break d> HI old and existing prcjud among Guianese aguinst the eati ol these Bah. which the Departlaim arc not only palatable and wholesome, but auto highly nutritive and easily available. The campaign will open with .1 week-long drive commencing on June If There will be a series •n mute broadcasts over ZFY by fishermen. n>hmg boat owner*. ii*h vendors. In nutritionists and othcV persons COftn)OCt*jd with the ilshing indu-:fry in the ColonyThe Churches arc also co-operating. Special articles will be published in the Church magazines and leaflets on the subject will be % %  1 at Church Services. At the fish feast on June 23. the Governor. Members of the Legislative Council, Municipal Councils, heads of public institutions and managers of hotels and rcuurunu will bo served variously prepared morsels of skinflsh. In the afternoon, the public will be given demonstrations of how to skin and cook various skinflsh. On other days there will be demonstrations open to housewives THEGAMBOL 4t '- JutMoot5tf***C0* *-uO **• OcO GKOKGKTOWN Doctor D. C. Geijskes. Entomologist of the Agricultural Experiment Station, has arrived in British Guiuna to do some entomological studies in connection .', rice and coconuts and I the Surinam llghushir now In dock at Messrs Sprostot 1* Limited. The barnaclej ipraad over the sides and bottoms of the vessel will be ctassliled by Dr Geijskcs end a number of specimens will be treated with various types of paint in an effort to llnd out the best method of eradicating them From a scientific point of view. Dr. Geijikes explained. It la In|ssjnoting to note that the barnacles do not thrive on the vessels when they ply in coastal (muddy) waters, but attack them when they ply where there 1nag] water. They do not grow well Ir the rainy season but thrive better in the dry season. Doctor Geijskes made several expeditions Into the Interior of Surinam on entomological biological iin>Mutis. Last year, on behalf of the "Natural Bcttntifl Study Circle for Surinam and Curacao." a body formed in 1945 In Utrecht. Holland, to promote natural scientilic investigation of the Netherlands territorial in t Caribbean, Dr. Geijskes took natural science expedition into the interior of Surinam Ha 1 closed also thai there 's .1 project on foot to start a iriuseum in Surinam and while B.G., he will be consulting w HonourabU Vincent Roth. J.P.. CUrttor of the local museum in this connection. He expects that with the help of the Surinam Government the museum will be opened In Paramaribo towards the end of the year. Doctor Geijskes is accompanied lie anil diiughUCopra Brokers Press For Removal Of ban iBsrbaSot MtNIH C WK SfSaiiall GEORGETOWN Mr DUaWM Boodho. of the Copra BrokerBoard, has charged the local Government with keeping the coconut industry tn penury" ;.t;il 1 : gloomy future union Government granted Increased price foi copra and allowed brokers to BXJ surplus to foreign markets. Mr. Boodhoo from London. Holland erehant ng prices 50*4 higher than paid locally. The latest offer from Venezuela was for ;.U00 tons at $160 50 (U.S. Currencyl which i •quivalent to f272 85 (BJQ vncy per ton) or 12 11 pound fob. Georgetown But th> Control Board refuses permission tu export Local puce lor OOpra cuts pec pound, but if exported ould fetch 12 cents per pound || copra to the UK at 14 J" eel per pound net, and even if B.G sold at the Ceylun conU of II 75 cents per pound they ould earn more A sub-committee of the Cent Food Production Committee wenl Into the question and Mr. Boodhoo ommended that the prta i< Increased to 0 cents per pouno West Indian islands wei S.gS cenu per pound and in Surinam the price pound. The Copr.i is In touch with Guvet I the situation %  I happen. n %  %  %  ties ha tenor of 11 1 Mi. Buckli %  %  Sterling did low-grade Surinam Gives 1(.<>. 10,000 Cofftvl'lunls HHMIII A**a*al* (.rrt.•. %  '"<' GEORGETOWN Ten thousand young colTce' E .nts have been received by the parlment of AgriCuituri free gift from the Surinam Agriculture Department to aid itation of farmdestroyed in early year floods. After the tloods contact was made with the Director of Agriculture in Surinam, who ofieicl to provide British Guiana with 30.000 plants, the British Guiana Government paying transportation The first shipment of 10.000 plants arrived on Sunday by Kl.M plani and have been MM to formal in the Pomeroon river dtftl The plants are being %  him d without soil, just the ttrnta, winch meant that farmer* had to be notified lo have their fauns pie,ared tiefore arrival of the plant Mam Problem %¡ Irai %  %  %  1 . 1 that the I. British 1 in which deposits %  lltgentl • direi led tploratloi %  1 ... . othat 1 Icli % % %  % %  Trinidad I i11 rai-ia 11 I or l-inirlaiid %  %  i'i krddad cafM %  i atha M lib Mi <'. !. it. I. .!...: %  I 1 for stag ry ,i,.-i i id on'a tw lea luring then visit It. 11 .lining in rJbrerlanra of the stall gnt on this • ii. %  ,' it is %  1 % %  in Bop* % %  ( 0 %  • pi'rulimi : \ 1 berno are !....: mgngiii %  . : %  Ir. I ommi wil %  of ihcir 1 %  visit Tin i> %  Uon with 11 .< %  I : i> .ne hoping to arrarua ireil-known Iha islaml Bigger Beak 1 ... 11 11. 1 %  1 • %  %  1 %  l 0/1 1 %  Bi the %  %  %  Whilhvr Welfare? v tniiom II I Ban P. M llerbecl 1 1 in Oddcrenee at Grt it •faifen '-' ; Brit D %  I %  lioiild so pro1 develop tl 1 ... bilit< toward thou ami ii the material i . %  'I a B %  I'inii. to vol itai 1 which IMI 1 ian mi .igcl ,-n.l uptrcedod 1 %  : ... v state 1 pointed Of |HUI %  %  11 l ind they %  peoplt" %  .,. ....,., to ettopmant .1. .i nf i, 1 Brltali or losing prei %  %  % %  1 HeJicoBtgf 4 Cents Hide? LONDON. Th.Soiiety of HriU.v' %  1* claimed today that ...piers under conatruc)intaiti should produce running outs near those of buses and trains. I live—sci general pur* pvw hath apt W %  pruductmn by Iha BflsaMl Acivplane Company, which ahn Is cossstructing 10 to IL'-wat t-Mi: -enginen beucopters known J> l>po I7J. of "hce Is still in the early experimental slage the 171 probably will lie used makklj for ten work b) organiaatlons mU'rested he potentialities .if • r -i It tM expivle.1 that when the • %  sad % %  had been coraplotoly ma rypa ITS will ,nt thai the tnreas e d payload of than bigger i:,-lHO|lti'|flight an economical proposition for airlines in BJ The orld*a Brat passenger helicooi.-. srvl I VM recanU) opanad ba t waa u Cardiff .•.I I l eafpoel by UrltlM. Kurn>tan aJrwaya Tii-heiu-tipters used are single engines! machines of limited payload and 1" I>eed Although the Ii • t< 1 nn st a substant ;. .itin'i When %  B E A valuabai Coffee Committee Will 'Tone Down" Report WaBHU* %  joinr.i ljitm Arnarteaa mats \n\, protest %  The diplomats, n ami and three Ch 1 .1 I) ARi V .ili-cunimltesto 1 1 ; ">rtr mk-i. %  nt Qatb %  f tin flve-mai 1 agfeed lo % %  tr^di the report, aflat I %  affront" %  Mi M doigg imii'ii ti the D %  B I. publics and '' %  %  %  me .: its re —neuter PTmC i'Ace nvr. / Cause KUIed in yDa> RHEUMAi.JM t •and agonising BACKAUHE m CONE! will provide ,il data lypo 173 with its ir Igfatj factor of tw 1pin 1,1.1 DparaUo -ill extend their service r the untisii 1 n M and possibly to the Continent 1 . opine lhat the Brtnah will puj 1 l—rBng role In 'd developmenl ol the hoiieoptei Geographically the country :* nil .il for Iha ilivrliipTin'iit of hell. rvkaa with Its need ft 1 form of trangport which CUM uper.ite coiiomi. .illy over short ransjai The So. iet> p.tinted out that tha lei iloer. not ervhW ;is fast gj the conventional airliner but gguU It passenger potenUsI by the speed it 1" > entre-tn-centr.* Havel. The large m-hine< will operate i>eiweeii iha aantra of ciaai ar from docks and airport-ii <-ily centre* British town planners are g)r*ead| conatdartpg the incon'or itton of rooftop % %  %  their designs rag Qga lawni It is pi*>ililf th^t Type ITS will i>e in production by ia** tin aj • 1 iparl y< s.^.iti 1 inuiti a n g jn asj helicopter with .. rinsing speed of over 130 mph to be in operation nttoten %  1 Um a 1 KJ Child Case Again Before Courts The He Carthy'i < luld cnatody igsi n before tha coum Uarh MeCarthj huitehad ppes made 6) Justice s. r. Gomes, SOD 0 m WTttCh he gave Mihat | |f< Cartl or hi let Brnlncnl King". n nays, was on his ICK >" and today, arguing mild law to 11 D v 1 n 0 tM A|.| gal Judge-. Duke. A .1 and Kenneth Vincent Br< the tii.il nidiic was wrong in giving Ion Hanmu ltd thai Viol)' 1 %  onh If yi In Di ed "f her mother's ih laid that tha |ud| %  1 tin hop.Ql .. vkob d toedu I I child in Bngjaad Tl Louli wiuitoi K C Ii ippaarlng fa UM bat 1 %  %  \ \\ UtNING! weathei and I : -nit rffl Rhetll Bui Rra i" ' Pair* In tha j 1 can <•<• 00aSAtltOOl on Baal at Mgttg Ira] Stres Obillnalc ;~ r '; complain Ii rll*d by RRUSCHEN in nu ' %  In! k. in reading until I %  1 %  and thai 1 % %  %  lutis Jt! bought an I ft'! Iinl-nr.l Mil n.v |>*lris | 1 T R. Rhmimal iro In t "-• Wood p ill r>Bi whl bowelan>l tir.-t kioi.. .. cuiniilainta ihi In n sosss all 'he internal organ*. tliiiu1l*B thsm ? tu 1 heaitl •, %  • %  %  • .Hour. All chemi"!* and Nuns aaJ' k 1 u %  u. /f??£ at a moment's • Thsnk. iWe* 1 you buy %  Past Bhang i'" %  < 0M Ml (JU DO •Uyt full •iicniiitil"' week. Ii you bs*c l ho.ne keep MVCIS! 1..1 1 weeks' supply on haaa> PlsiM-hmaiin'a Dry Ytasl u % %  |usUii' %  — w i( Stays -fresh wft/iout refrigeration



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WIUMMIW. Jl\f 21. 1SI5I. BAA-UlOS ADVOCSTF PACE FIVF. U.K. STATES HER VIEWS ABOUT SUGAR They Pull Stolen Cycles To Pieces The fdkiwinv r;.n he assured, therefore. *•* %  of Ike Memorandum bj thiilia! the lulle-l weight has been trail Minister o( Food and the Mir pvM :e the knporiMi: part wMcfa nan of State for Cnlomal the sugar Industry plats, and must •*; offer cat %  that ru VCM %  > ploying tank Mole" vcle : eilmi. thecycle* i Mil I I MM the-. Affair-issued on June 7th i". pla>. in the •eonomj of thei napl)' to repre-citations made ritories We feel, however, by the West Indian Sugar %  %  !"^ Deleg.iiinn does less than juscgnlloii ti> His Ma,..-iv'lice to th ,,-,„• ,,, „ n cn other ernrnenl on 26th M.iv. 1950 crop* beside* sugar have been deW. ,,ve MutfWd sympathetic velopeo ovei a period of years tally the Memorandum prevented There is substantial production in to m on the 26th May, 1950 by the the territories of such crops M ... %  rtHai w. • in.,. ., %  i %  rlttf %  *•. reeoi warn w conni tti of Guiana Sugar Delegation, and are grateful for the care Food alone W we should ha v.that It was apparent to the offers made by the Kingdom t.overnmehl w.-i %  hat could be e on strict buautaas pi alone We are con "~ that agreement that d •t be United Kingdom OBJ purchase frs-m MmIndies under guarantee i .igiee Ucraaaad W# beiseve. MVgrttsI ought lees, that the Delcgati. 1 that a i l u sj Ul i Li too prsMmit.',., %  ,„ of the ronsstuemennf Belling 29 i much o* *• la iaajna W on ot iru Waal In ..men" dies at the world ,.!•.. iv.plaa rent preferential dutMM The ,. r view appears to be founded upon roffi. i, and banana, and there are have proper regard to th. other possibilities, jiuch as jute In nieroal needs of the M a m is conception of the Cuba s9B and or a, Cuba aMing iiiuluduni the I .•erformance .< .11 pertain to the ag>. %  PWIMHDptlon trends. The rev War all the ajuafttUsM MkiCB. thr United Kin**' m-nt have undent fruwi the Com produce**. |l conauanplion tar to the tinned Kingdom pi.., higher' than has been estifnaaai IJM IMBBfj Kingdivn *" .ould not. at that %  „ t'MHI run, *t n>— I ml.lakrn Mil* Ital „, milullioll „, ,„ c ol hrr acm> I" ,„,„, .ddluon to the iR RIVAL NYLON SWIM SUTS pre,..,: ,_ Bntish C.II There are also fan i lhe needs U> loien they pull them to "piece* thought devoted ^-> K .iisrl change wrw of the parts tion We turn read with concern Important mineral industries would prove to he A fto san cycle, which u^ a however, their -trietures on thI bntflgMt in British Guiana, which and transitory and we few %  ;onn Exhibit recently, had the action of the United Klngdon ieeounti tor % of the total exthe Delegation will be prep:i -*ddle Identified by one per Government in announcing on the V !" *> *"• Colony, oil and asnsaporl the view that comr 3rd April, after the Gr.-nada ConP" 0 '" Trinidad which between t -o m .deration* ha\-e a vltn: ference. that while they would he h m nrt S^JL !" ? nf 'I* l 0 J*' to plav in the evolution i • *\ the City vf*terda> and be Indies Sugar Association wa* final ? %  rt,, ^ •'" a L hauxlte in Jamaica) Members of the United Kingdom ot ** '"* ^legation make rethe back wheel by another "ie frame, bundle and neud v three other* CfM)l BRV 1 /I RH-K the City yeserda\ %  and be cairae of this the heat was i intense as on Monday The Government had devoted much temperature was no degree, time and thought to th. Fahrenheit In the Shade at mid during the winter negotmtions. wy _. and having studied the re>oluMond.ny and u ( to i* t,ons of the Conference, felt that likeh that Mi. DWli Limited i.'i lock yesterday morning tli.utitall throughout the islaiul w.,i MM inch and 93 parts Thi-. a ;.n increase over the rainfall fo the past few days Of this. St Peter with 4 partx recorded the heaviest show r iv while 25 parts M V Other returns weie City four parts. Station H$\ Di* iiiet two parts, St (; %  Mvta, 5t Philip six pans. St .leneph 21 parts. St Jame ports. St John 20 partM parts anil St parts JagnSt I • would be able lo adva* bv themselves whnllv support the m,m lt,e "<""l' v W-W econom> of the territories thev ''*" * United King w have then part to play Fresh Government nor the sugar prosources of powers, e.g water powduring terrilories of the Ce>' l lri the United States nwrket DBI i Ml adopt a policy of dump v., ,i,_, out serious consequem-es lor her n sugar economy. The ont |a l true; the consequonces ot 'dumpr ing" would be most sen. her It is not. indeed, open t>. doubt that Cuba has a heavie. Y* stake in the inanisenanee a| • satisfactory level ol aro*W 1 for free market sugar than pro ducerg in the Briu-h West tads' would have under B*M ammgemeni* i -in-. perhaps oil ild increase the short, while wi. sugar tndust W tlKK ON THE NEW 1*1.AZA Theatre Ls rapidly i %  ing A part o( the roo. the ground floor has already been put down, and workmen i the other sertlc lieen bt i ned out of this enclo~ure %  *HE bOH Or A tH'ANYII 1 of articles was reported b> i %  Bag4 of \V\.:K.UAlley He ^Iatod thul they were removed Mom hiBkatui day and Mondav. II MIS U \l II KN Mi IIH.K ...ust be the matnstav of most of ment could hold out no proalbt u-mtories. we feel that the Delegation have not tak> of other exporu or of the measRdj taken to riiversifs thi whnh .ippefo lo underlM the ment einphgiu-alKdo not MLUrM The windows are already tiite.1 gg-jg? f £j^i5 h ri .. !hc '-i? l I. < d !__-_ M * ^^WKiot, vuggest i D ami the roof with the excep K n dom h Oovenimen I offer has nelr off r a „ kel tion of n small part 1| now pv l T 1 ""bjfrtni .and especially recurrence of the eondil. eied with a 'tintrx". The bulk ^ ""pression that the interest, axiiltd O0lote ol Die work is being done lo the f tm \ Wwl ndtes w "f %  ••?'• -tatement ..no! ROOT of the balcony and the 2i MI * to ', hosr r Au-tralia. ui e on er ol a i i-INTBting room Is almost comTh '• w 'noi "P > ^ "tne „ remunerat.w price* oleted that agreement was reached with --^,1^,„_,., of ,_ '"•-'• r_,T£3 sss-^ ;n?%jrj& S_f-S_r_= KM M> wholly „n..,l. U> .cccp, "" SSLSJ^i ^ K "." PtlClCi was reoorte-l b„ iril l(lfl| _., orC( WM fuced wUh mind, not only their own long ;,!t.-ni.,i 1 vr ,.f indefinite Tm • iu'rneiiu. but also the doubt, but certainly ant asaumppostponement or of mududlng !" lrnreof *w ing stable ecolions based upon more optimistic ill artiingemeiits with Australia !" c cuaditlons for a major forecasts would be cpilte unrealin advance nf aurrrmrni uilh o-l*nil interest And we conUITONWALTtlSOFBIB.l Shcf^S^^SS^U ^ -*" _2 S !"_! """"" .... Mirhvl r.-porl,-,! „,.,,. .-—^M, „, *„,_'' mcoiiMnl with UI du.l MM v.iu, toon. SSS,^S"i5_55i. m J^: •-fig" >• • -55 3 „ % %  • ZL ^.£ !" JL "'""' "" " unoVr,l.nomrih.t •_". %  .! ;.„uace which h_, b~., 'Xr Fire iS.Sl^ra " "ubject lo a sMtl-nom I" !" "" million, owi Ihr — O r,"" ZSZr-Z: lW.r-od lieiuls not only on supply but on the levels of prices and of purchasing power. The estimate eventually adopted by the United Kingdom Government, aftei the most careful Investigation, aathat when rationing, Inis can be ended the Unite d hat Kingdom I annual eonsiimpantevd market tmn ni l prier* "(nil' tie..1 iittir 01 no relation bo eog-i ..f pioduetlon. is repeating an argument pgHtiahsntl) hut mistak %  Rb %  drvVncefl i the Weal Indies Cuba has a guamnteeti rmtlei la UK United Stae> of America foi rather leu than half her exportable production She hks. however no guarantee whatsoever Ml mpect of prior Thg basis on which the UnltMl States bu>i Cuban sugai is the it.1 Mt which Cuban %ugai i> ppld In the world market plufl -TM N< Uvt United St-tos pief.-nn.. M pnlati lAt today's rate of exchange of 2 10 dollars to UM £. this, is equivalent to 2 b l/M |ei cwt or ratbei les. .1 MM MlatsMoa srhi li the Colonies enjoy in the United Kingdom) When the world price %  lood at 4 70 cents 1.0 L Ifl Jan uary last, United Stales raOnan were buying at 4 W COBtg f.o.b Today when the wnrlu pru-f li•..ll.ii to 4.15 cents. Unite-, St-teleflners ate able to 1 buy at lesv than 4 45 cents, it the world prk be purchased under gn An Xpprat We should like to eonrlud> b9 ..pf^aling to th Delegation to < oniuder the United Kingdom -overnileiit's offer dispassionate Ij in the light of what l practi. ;ible in the hard world of inter national commerce in which the Unltgd Kingdom and the WaIndieboth must live. i-tliei j UWn in the light of what mum.., iheoretically de-irable .ii 1 %  ( uite other iUrumstanceg, W, -mind the Delegatioi UU1 ihe ability of the Uniteo I Kingdom to afford to tinr.nd Duminionk tinsecurity of) lung term agreesnent for sugai 1 and other .-ommodlties reals I ultimately on her strength eg %  'raduig nation, and that to. over 1 Ux that htrength must uttgii.itel' ..irr> its penalty The Wlfti Indies httvtt not got -1; they agfagd for — but negotiators set torn do On the other hanrl. LM3 have been offered a meas !• %  of expansion and a degree ol securttgr that ten or fifteen year. i would have seeme 1.MISS sHor. V IIIIIII %  %  a %  a %  %  %  _ %  mi saaaaaaa a %  sr W JIST IHHIU ItK FRFSII SHU-MI ^T PURINA I'OILTH". CHUwS t.n %oor sappl> Irani I H HV JOSIS I1--1..1..H.11VaWaV Ctjbs .1 I Istlc in relation extending the 7"e U. K. Offer FF.NCKS recorded yesRei-il.'ii" only one motorist .barged with exceeding the toeing made sive Commonwealth Agreement available under The Colonial Wa would add that it is wholly development and Welfare Aits rnaor b, Hi. Government 1 Indies Sugar %  to the actual oil' United Kingd.n 1 the BriUsh Wei AsatK-iatioii rood Another motorist wag charged for drlvinc without due care and attention and one for driving without the appropriate ItronciA N ACCIDENT OCC1 RKKII 011 Bank Hall Road at about 12 45 p m on Mondav between a bicycle ridden by Edgar Holder and a pedestrian—Ilildfi Cadogon of Alle.vne's Land. Pas-age Road. Cadogan complained of paii.s She i\ .is taken to the General Hospital where *hr WU treatc. %  %  1 %  iiarged T ill-: RKAR Wltlfl of motoi car M—753. owned by Levis L. Carter of Black Rock and ilnven t Lester K Carter of lhe same address, was damaged in an accident along Prince tTnian Mom. Sireet at alxiut 4 20 p.m mi Monday. Also Involved was motor lorry X—.'.91. owned by Spciii.r!M;iUthUDD and driven i.v Isaac Franklyn. A MC'VCLC AND A motor cai were involved in an accident .iloiiij Trafalgar Square at about 4 00 p.m. on Mondav The car. X—276. wag OWfttd .ind driven by Jamc; McKenrie of Navy Carriem. Christ Church, while the bicycle was ridden bv St ClanWnfton of Air>Cot, St Thomas The cycle wa* damaged Kingdom Government's offer Is incompatible with their declared We understand it to be the policyof encouraging constitution^ rwnnc of lhe DetegatloaVa al progress in the Caribbean tarcaae (hat the propmuK made ritories. The Government does not by the United Kingdom flovregard then offer a: ernrnenl Indies Sug Ihe purrhaae the years 1953-195? 000 tons of .ne.ir at ably reeauneratlve price exported an average ot 550.000 tons of sugar, all of which "'' had to be sold at the world price plus either the Canadian or *j United Kingdom preference. ** Government's offer decline* to 3.SO cents the to Ust iiiitct Mah to 3 80 cents In ether wsrda. II" price at which Die t'uh.nmust sell their exportable pro daetlon. wbrlher to thr UnttM Hlaloa ee In the free market, ia whellv delernilned In the world price It ia true that a redaction af United State* quotas in the interests of dssne-Uc producer-, mliht have the l-mr—i.r > effect of adding I point or twfj U. thr 1 uli-11 preference But -n _d vantage aueh si> thi. Is punl> IncldenUI Mi Irinporarv It CflBege Musters W ill Teiicli Si'iemt' MEMBERS of thestaff of (V Depurunent of Scieme and A-i. %  ulture will iu, longer 1hie for the teaching ,.r ntonot Harrison College, BOMrdlltl lo "" terms of a bill passed lo tog Iisiutive Coumil „t y—Urday'i meetlug. Arrangements !ia\r bOMI nueie h>r the teaching ot u, lo be undertaken bv masters of the College, and the hill ra]|av the Direcloi of Science ;ind Agu* ulture from histatutory res|ioiiMbilit.v foi tending science i'i inakirifc Mgaaarlab aiMgalmeuts i.> the Department ..1 s,, ence and Agrtcultuir Act. 1925. Members, of the Couinil .rster day expressed upii'inml with the new arrangfiiiiiii condition that surplus should %  inn nun tons. Ihat they are with Ihe promt previODB M--l.-r.-li. Writ Indies on Ihe IMS and that ih Vs^ilL fi ,nPO r irtenl ( w,,h *" %  *?> the export of W.000 tons ol ,ug^^" ^ortrur SSS ^ UC l P( Wnn S2? OT, of which, alter !•. MOO,dunng betterment an d econ omic developlol ls w „, ^ ^ughi ?t a guaran,„, ""'!' '"? _2_2__rtJ?f C n 'o" W^ Price to be negotiated toC* tionol profreas. Wh.le we fully y( |r> „ d |he --mainin. H0.OO.) .-ognise the matot importance 1on wlll f^ marfcet f ther „, be StoshST .„ nf |' hP SUgar ,ndlW,f> ,n ,ne CW Can— or '" the United K.ngd re inadequate "' b n "** nd 11 '" m ' 1 i "' X H lur "" '"" not to -ceord WO,r *_ l! y*-***we con fewntial duties as may he in lore "dered that It would not be In .t the time. Bearing in mind th. M long-term uiterest of the West increase in home consumplioi ldian Colonies to encourage the lr B t has occurred in the West In production of sugar at the expense m( *. this offer should provide for of other forms of econornii.dean industry of between |,000.00* pment The best foundation and 1,050,000 tons as cotnnMrw' rood and stable government in with an industry of about 000,000 C".iribbean area lies In thr ton* before the war Whatever development of wellcriticisms can be levelled at Ih made n from the 10th August. itao lo fears that under the terms of the proposed agreement conditions in lhe West Indies nuv %  0 far deteriorate as to be*inp li come comparable with the ungradual the fad he that the prtn at which Cuba sell: he to the United State fM Ihe world marki-t pttce It follow that lot Cuba polo j dumping" sugar on wot!markets jit somethin, less thai (hieconomic cost of prodUCtlfM would be suicidal. _lnce the con equem-es would bt refte< t.s immediately hot onlv In th.prlcf she received for her "dumped sugar, but in the prices sh received from the United States It Is for this reason tli.it Cuh.i 1 so 4-onv.need an advocate ol 1 now Internuiional Ni._,u Agree ment We do not don., of courst that the West ImlirDH tin inte BOMB OT THrSr: I T K M s AM: FROM CANADA ANI> THF. I'.S.A. AND DLK TO Hit IMM.LAR sm ii; 1 Ml CANNOT ftfl RKri.ACKD. -.i-lSS. '_l-la-i IHiiiui. •St •I', %  rl.i pm I n. hi happv stale .iT.iiibefore boll urge. local economics The details of an offer which povid. the war The Delegation urge, economic effects uf the proposed for expansion of this order, an* therefore. Ihat lhe United Kingcontract can only be demonstrated which wlll afford assured market .1..111 flevernmenl should aehy events, but we are eonildent for exports of 350.000 tons cede to the request of the that the terms of the United sugar than was exported in the British Kesi Indie* Sugar AsKingdom's offer provide a s ound years before the war and IBO.uOO soelation Ihat Ihe guaranteed foundation for further progress in tona more than the current level market should he extended to the economic and industrial field of •XporU. we do not think it L IONEL MYIT.M OF HUH. I HILL, si HtenwL m iver 775.0M tons We lielieve these vicWI are mi>taken and arise from the fact that the West Indies have not fully appreciated that the United Kingdom .government had. throughout last winter's B e^ oUatlona, a dual II sponsibllltv: .1 responiibllitv which 1 the West Indies Currency Control we have expressed the view the". .1 health-, -OK-' not !> %  developed if rhe wenla IH wholly Insulated from that prica What we .1%  001 am* 1 I ,-r ixiiiit out. bwava_L iv thai t.. Cuba ik. lhe world price of sugar is vital. despite her preferential position m the United States market Usd that to assume that she can affi Pi "dump" sugar without the ni serious consequences Is to assu soincttiini: that i> demonstra unlrue The Solution ^ their Motor van M—2506. owned by Messrs, Alleyne Arthur 4 Co Ltd., High Street, and driven b) _. „ H.chards L. M-rshall of Briltoni-T.T -.^2-'' Cnm Rood, was also involved. a?nsome as to carry with tinUnilii lu rightly be cono^emncd us ungetiei oua. or as failing to implement th undertaking Riven last summei Certainly if that view is widel. held It con only be becauw th .nirol "In Mttl rtqu.rr%  %  ••" ""' '"'" '""" lhe Colonlm lo Buy from lhe \ nil i-ll lio _£___? r__L_. !" ( i_nv HknowMM lo UntUd Kuiniiom in high upronAustralia KIIK •-> %  ' %  inaled u lhe Qmenl Houiul "- %  • '" ""' 5 "'i 1 oh L" 1> ,ro M %  """• %  "' "?•"* %  '" *r nlw-l, Mnt •<>* PPnunlly w apul ,„.-„ „,. ,he United '.InMon. ,,-er, made lo Au.lr When ""''"X h S !" HondU ,n c r '" in order Kingdom undertook in 1MB lo bu. "^ , ,„ lespomlbllily lor.-wring thai he ,„ V1 ,„,„„, ,„ ._ h e whole e„^t.t,l, .u.pl... that ,U Utu'i n n|| un „| h e .tcrlmii dollar Wadcould be produced wllhin lhe H.lc ln account can be broucht In Commonwealth up to lS2. thev balance. To do thi. is In the gave all producers an Incentive tr too*. *., n i r....ii. '"•-". n in root n.Hi... suit ,i. lb. bolt "...,.,,. .,,,..,,. %  I*I. e-rh Bain B-as-fWtrtMn raws1 .oi.l l_,.i. CksM t-tai. ... X • Ml-vuiln a.Mi.t, i-,,i, J.-S.l I.„I-I. Only ONE Wrvrls* in (lie world TW Hunbrr iraJanaii. h To-i g-s-aaif* of ls-oii tl-alin. Bat aapesrsiKC soil -oo-lkJ str-f-.il> Tfai VorlJ's IvadlaggusliiT Mcyds JIIT,II afaji mark of -viiaf public %  %  ti.ir against of eontroetiTii; (oi man> A l'llii: Wlllrll OCCliHReil ahPad for the suppl; residence of Clirri. ninrnmg destroyed porUon Of the roof and u quantit> of clothing _When th,. Fue Hngade arrived oh *ho ^-eno. neighbours had already helped in extinguishing the DUBS, The value is unestimated "-nt the house Is not covere d h> i.isuranc*. 'VIB Jamaica Civil Servants Ask 50% Pay Rise %  : > I ..I... M....i' i rre..ui--i %  KINGSTON. June 20 Jamaica's Civil Servants yeslnrday adopted a resolution calling economic intrres'.ol each one of expand therr exports up \<> 1952 the sterling area countries without limit The results oi their from the Commonwealth Whfie. Bot this does not mean that efforts are now known within northerefore thr Government was the area from which the C o H wlll row limits and must clearly stand draw their imports is nai • .he minima lor any suhsequen! in "respect of the greater part of r.><_)> reslrtoWd In effacl ttN agreements. This year A u -t...l... the sugar exported from the Colcontrol severely i .strlCs im will sell to Ihe United Klngdon. onies to the United Kingdom. It MTU _t present only from 500.000 tons of sugar, and ihere rould not agree that United KingNorth America and the American is no reaaonabk. doubt thai slv D>niingo, Peru their production. 11,01 us the last three preferential mink'-' turn, ond depend AIU.II selling the maximum am sugar in the free market p" Hill have n( upi The well be UgH %  luence i esult of to start var Irom of whict dom consumers should be called upon wholly lo insulate sugar producers in the Ounmonwealth from the movement of world prices in respect of all sugar sold to the United Kingdom Nor. indeed, does the Government believe ".hat to increase the verv large measure of security alreads %  Ml %  'ivild lead to more efficient sugar production, or would ultimately prove to be in the wider Intagggti i,f the West Indies themselves. Cannot Acc&pi The .irgumcnt that Colonial farmers are entitled to be helped by the Untied Kingdom Governupon The Government for an imment in the same w> that United "in*", increase on their Kingdom Government helps Unit-ithin one mouth. Cople* ed Kingdom farmers Is not one of the resolution were -being forthat we can accept. It is the United worded to the Secretary of State Kingdom taxpayers as such, not for the Colonies Bustamante as the comnimer of sugar, who subhead of the government and lldUM the United Kingdom beet N W Manic, leader of the Oppofarmer. Colonies are not pan or llOn >'-re elected members of the United Kingdom fl*i :ii • he AsgociaUon. Employees deAny special •sssatanet lo t'oionlal vl.ired that if step* were not taken protfcicers. over and above a price to satisfy this demand, they would for sugar negotiated be'.) BO on a sick strike. A call was er and buytl Would h.ue to be made Jor wage increases for C'.. I owruu O^vernmenta. Servants and the government i. The Crated Klngdon I rnutylng :i repOsi b> E C Millv -I' not fur a moment deny -rvice salary re-organithe natural lultal %  •|. the Government Indies for the production of sugar spokesman poll il the ln deed L J he y have in the pas t enpiesent cost of the service is In couraged expansion of sugar peothe region, 5 million dollars was duct ion and the arrangements the% •. much for the colony* present nre proposing allow fnr considerJiQ9m9 able further expanoor. The Dent area, and from Switzerland Manufactured and i tier lmporta can be tfftim Iran* moat of Kurope. independeat Commonwealth penal I 1 If)a wllhin the %  fitflng area ....i many other rountnr. iih for praetlral purpo-c tape or no risttriction This .in.H-r*. and foreign rxrhanie control has never had aw Ita ob'erf Hsacurlns of a shelter id i:m for I'niled Kingdom • %  > peiia. IU sole purpose is to dinsrrvr the resources ef %  •id!" eurrenelee. It therefore reUews that I'nlted Klagdaen evporta are In rempetl lawith experU from man* •ther saurees. We note that the Delegatin Halms that the United Kingdnrr ill be able !< ..f bOOOOO tons by 1852. Il fact that has established he quota ot 600,000 K xport in.it inbe tiy ih.r producen right nature of anrlti therefore. D-UU OH it ight in .. < ni the nibl. insulate Cnlontnl rii..lt'i Wi nu.irantuIt is. that the Unite; Whnt's on Today Court nl C III ill %  ni. mmon Pleas at MMle fir lesaa al King Georse V %  -rk al 7.30 ,,m Bnaket Ball • 'Ml |> m al Y.MC.A. at the proposed Comniimwe a tin Kinndom. in omsultatl'm with thi ..greemenl Nevertlseless only ( ..lonh-s -hould be in a posillot :i00.000 tons out of this 600.00') to play her part in Uw iWgatlatlOl tons will be bought at the guaran> Ol an International Sngai AflrtC teed price. Having regard to thment. nnd that she could no) hap importance attached tij lbs W. I i do unless she could give firm Indies to the quantities subject lo undertakings that a defined and guarantee, we find it difficult to dtfs-Mlble share in the United think that, dispassionately eonsi'i. lO n gdO tn market would be set ered. an offer to buy 640.000 toraside for free market sugar Ittt out of 900,000 tons Irom thi We-l mainly for this reason that the Indies at a reasonably remunenUnited Kinndom h- IMnrtni tlve price, as compered with on!) amount of 1-5 000 tons for H 300.000 tons out of BOO.WMI ton purpOte. from Australia, can he regmded a& Cavoun-ag the latu-r sTeVte non 'hiring the winter negotiations MZ fnoeed that eurnt-im lh < ^SSS confirms ntn view that the „nderP r^;^. ''_^;^. r (l W | 4 h JZ takinK Riven by the Unite, Kinr^S TnethrTT furNl eould be added to the ar Thev ajao sUled that Ih. %  f igar covered by the liirg :erm agreement offered to Cori lU o riS/en l Ol produceri. %  upwards Ir etrt tea per m itted, but undertook tna' Ihere w



Wednesday
21

June

1950



KRarbados







Price

FIVE CEATS
“a5

F

Year

W.l. BEAT NOTTS BY INNINGS

' Worrell Takes 5 Wickets

Speaker Allows First! SENANAN

Reading Of Gas Bill | sz

No Rule Forbids Two Bills
On Same Subject

R. E. K. WALCOTT, (E
day to introduce a Bill
1911 (1911-9). His Honour
the effect after Mr. Adams
House had asked for a rulin

be introduced since Government had already given o.:c
of a Bill to amend the said Act since April 25, this vr.

es —+!

WILL NOT

STILL URGING W.I.
FARLIAMENT GROUP

E BUTLER

(From Our Own Correspondent:

LONDON, June 20.
’ Mr. M. G. Sinanan, Legal Ad-
) was given permission yester-| viser to the Butler party, has
to amend the Gas Works Aci a aoa ee tne ages ose
+ . . . : Vv withou seeing
the Speaker gave a ruling (| Uriah Butler. He will leave Eng-

at a previous meeting ef thi |jand to-morrow.

g as to whether the bill sheou'ce In New York Mr. Sinanan will
visit United Nations
ters at Lake Success to study the
working of the Assembly.

His Honour gave the following

headquar- |

| Pollen — He told our correspondent to-

° As regards the seeking ot|/@ay that Mr. Krishna Menon,

Providence | the Speaker's ruling by the Mans Indian High Commissioner in

| ourable Senior Member for St een had See for him

. | Joseph relative to allowing mv-|to be sponsored by the Permanent!

Favours Priest |tion to introduce an amendment] Indian Representative at Lake
| of the Gas Works Act 1911 (1911-| Success.

GEORGETOWN 9), on the grounds that the] During the last couple of days

Phirty-s e v e n«y 6 a reold Government had earlier in this} 1m England, Mr. Sinanan has

Hindit Priest R. Sukul of session given notice of a Bill to] continued work on the formation

tepnora, West. Demerara, jamend the said Act, I have after of a West Indies Parliamentary

holds the ticket that won the careful consideration and much] Group, and has had meeting with

first prize in the Demerara
Turf Club’s May Shilling
Sweep. Two horses tied for
first place—“Tuckers Kitty”
and “Pensive’’—each ticket |
holder receiving $4,131. Pan-
dit Sukul said he bought 75
books of tickets in the |
Sweep. He will also receive

the seller’s prize of $80.14.







Judy Garland |
Cuts Throat

HOLLYWOOD, June 20.

Judy Garland 27-year-old film
star, cut her throat in a fit of an-
guish, her studio stated to-day.
The wound was not serious it add-
ed. This report was denied by
her husband, Mr. Vincent Minelh, |
A Hollywood director, ‘‘There is no
truth whatever in the report”
Mr. Minelli said. “The poor girl
is very much upset, but this —
oh no.” The actress was suspend-
ed by Metro Goldwyn Mayer
studios on Saturday for failing to
report for work on the film “Sum-
mer Stock” which she is making
with Fred Astaire — the second
time in just over a year that such
action was taken against her for
staying away from the set. Minelli
said to-day that his wife was rest-
ing and could not be disturbed.
Two Los Angeles afternoon news-
papers published reports concern-
ing Miss Garland to-day. One said
that Minel!i intervened and took
a knife away before she could
hurt herself

—RKeuter.



Floods Destroy

Citrus Nurseries
In B. Honduras

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

BELIZE, June 20
Colonial Secretary Evelyn Hone
late yesterday rushed to Stann-

citrus centre of the
colony, where a flood caused by
heavy rains destroyed the citrus
nurseries of the British Honduras
Citrus Co. and washed away the
approaches to a bridge.

Creek Valley,





Belgium’s New Parliament

Meets: First

First Item—To Bring Back King Leopold

FOR THE first time in three months the Belgian Parlia-
ment met to-day and began what may well be the most

historic parliament session i
For the first time since

under a one-party Government, a Catholic one.

‘LEOPOLD GOES |
TO GENEVA

To Await Fate

ROME, June 20.
King Leopold, of the Belgians
with his wife, Princess de Rethy

left Rome for Florence and
Geneva today by car after a 1/-
day Holy Year pilgrimage. The

King was reported to be returning
to Geneva to await the outcome
ef the debate in the new Belgian
Parliament on the question of his
return to the Throne

—Reuter

Atom Security
Talks In U.S.

WASHINGTON,
The United States, Britain ar
Canada are discussin? ways
tighten security on atomie secre
the Atomic Energy Commissio
disclosed to-day It did not si
when the discussion began

June 20










The meeting is being heid unde:
the auspices of t Combined
Policy (ommittee, the orgenisa-
tion responsible directin
Anglo-4 mevican Canadian police
in the atomic eners jeld. Poli
cies affecting ecl cation
of informatic I dis-
cussed at the meeting.

-—Reuter.

‘in the parliamentary

} customs of this ancient House of

| sion

Dr. Hyacinth Morgan, M.P. and
Mr. Bird, Mr. Bradshaw and Dr
Cummins of the West Indies
sugar delegation, all of whom
have expressed their approval of
the scheme.

Acheson on Asks |
Support Fi or |
Truman Plan

VIRGINIA, June 20.

study, come to the decision of per-
mitting the honourable introducer
of this amendment to proceed wit!
his first reading of the Bill
Because from all my researer
usaces and
procedure of the British House of
Commons and it’s the rules and



Assembly, I see no reason for not
allowing the hon, senior member
for St. James to proceed with 4
first reading.

Indeed to quote from Sir Ers-
kine May’s “Treaties, Law.. Priv-
ileges Proceedings and Usages of
Parliament (Page 387) I read

J “ne » Mr. Dean Acheson, United
No Rule Or Custom States Secretary of State, to-day

“There is no rule or custom
which restrains the introduc-
tion of two or more Bills rela-
ting to the same subject, and
containing similar provisions.”

appealed to the 48 state Govern-
ors to support President Truman’s
Point Four Programme for aiding
under-developed countries. He told
the Governors the Administration

So honourable members will ‘

, > Oo x-
see that the amendment that is might ees ak fae wna
being introduced is quite in order] Perienced state ollicials 3
as far as the prevailing partic- programme, It may cause incon-

venience to part with these men
for a period” he said, “but we
believe that once the citizens of
your state understand how this
work contributes to our own peace
and well-being, they will be will
ing to accept the inconvenience.

Understandjpg and support from
the Governo was particularly
important to the Point Four Plan’s
success,

The Governors are holding their
Annual Conference at White Sul-
phur Springs. Mr. Acheson’s ap-

eal followed a message similar in
theme from President Truman
yesterday. a the President told ~
Governors they must take the leo

in stimulating the interest of
Americans in foreign policy and
the question of preserving world

mentary custom admits

The placing of a notice on the
Order Paper is just a notice and
in my view cannot, and should
not, take precedence over any
Bill that has been offered to this
House whether or not the notice
refers to the amending of one or
all of the provisions of a similar
Bill.

It might indeed prove a very
seridus thing if a notice on the
Order Paper precluded the in-
troduction of legislation simi-
lar to that involved in the
notice. The admission of such
a principle in procedure would
easily allow of the Government
or a private member, or pri-
vate interests through a _ pri-
vate member or members fore-



stalling very necessary ‘ and | peace. —Reuter.
valuable legislation.
I now declare that the intro-

duction of the Bill to amend the
Gas Works Act 1911 (1911-9) is
in order and do now give permis-
for its first reading.

Parliamentary
Group Resigns

CAIRO, June 20.

The Egyptian Saadist Parlia-
mentary group resigned en bloc
to-day in protest against recent
Royal Deerees under which many
former Senators, including Ibra-
him Abdel Hady Pasha, Saadist
Leader, had been deprived of their
seats. Liberal Constitutionalists
are also considering such actions
following the replacement of Lib-
eral Leader Hussein Heykal
Pasha by Wafdst Zaky El Orabi
Pasha as President of the Upper
House.

Heykal Pasha’s term of office
was not due to expire till next
year. His Liberal Constitutional
Party is the largest Party in the
Senate, where the last elections
were in 1946, so that it was not
affected by Januarw~s Wafdst
landslide in the elections to the
Chamber,—Reuter



HUTSON GETS LEAVE

Hon'ble F. C, Hutson has
been granted five months’
leave from his duties as a
member of the Legislative
Council, the Council was told
in a letter from the Acting
Colonial Secretary which the
Clerk read at yesterday's
meeting. The leave takes ef-
fect as from to-day.

In 3 Months





BRUSSELS, June 20,
Indian Forces Clash
On Pakistan Border

PAKISTAN, June 20;
Armed Forces of Pakistan and
administrative character. Afghanistan clashed on the bor-
Real business will begin on] der between the two countries
| June 27 or 28 when both Houses} with casualties on both sides, on
will meet separately to vote on! June 17, according to unconfirmed
the new Government’s declara-jreports reaching here to-day.
tion of policy. Afghan levies and a party of a

First item on the Government's! Pakistan border patrol unit ex-
programme will be to call a joint) changed fire on Pakistan territory
session of Parliament to repeal] near Gwaza, Baluchistan, where,
\the Regency Law barring exiled} according to the reports, the
King Leopold from the throne.| Afghans had set up a guard post.

This will probably take place —Reuter
early in July.

In the Chamber of Deputies, the
pro-Leopold Catholics with 10%
seats hold a majority of four
Socialists hold seats—11 more
than in the last House.

Liberals hold 20—a loss of 9-

n the nation’s history
1914 Parliamegt was meeting

To-day’s meeting was of a pure



ly



Malan Escapes

CAPETOWN, June 20,
Firemen helped South African
and Communist 7—a loss of 5. Prime Minister Dr Daniel Malan

Compared to the old House, the| and his adopted daughter Marietje
Catholics seats total a gain of 8,| to safety from an outside balcony
They ure certain also to. hold a| When fire broke out in the Prime
ajority in the completed Senate, | Minister’s residence here early

; —Reuter | to-day. Mrs. Malan escaped from
the smoke filled house unassisted
The fire, which broke out in one
of the bedrooms, did only slight
damage to furniture before it was
extinguished by the fire brigade.
Dr. Malan attended his normal
|; Government duties to-day.
—Reuter.

RETURN FORESTS

BUDAPEST, June 20
Russia has given back to Hun-
gary, forests owned by Germans
in Hungary up to the end of the
war, which became Soviet pro-
perty under the peace treaty, the
Hungarian news agency reported.

—Reuter.

a



To Represent
Jamaica

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
KINGSTON, June 20.

Major F. J. Quinton, Director}
of Survey in Jamaica, will repre-
sent the colony at the Inter-
American Congress of Survey and}
Mapping which will be held at]
Washington tomorrow and = con-
tinuing until Friday. At this meet-
ing the latest development will be}
tudied. The South and Central

; American Republic and other W.I
islands will also be represented.





ea a al cen c lgnicadlse eaemeeeeensinae

ee





ey |

BRITISH SHIP
EXPLODES OFF
ARABIAN COAST

CAIRO, June 20

| Rescue’ ships sweeping th
| Waters of the Red Sea with their

searchlights have picked up |
|number of survivors from the|
| British ship Indian Enterpriso|
| (7419 tons) with 50 men aboard,|
| which exploded off the Arabian
| Coast. Some survivors were bad-|
ly burned A series of radio}
messages intercepted by the Port|
|Administration of Alexandria
| told a story of drama which took













W.1. dor 5 wkts. dee.) 525
Notts 240 and 224

NOTTINGHAM, June 2y.

‘THE FINAL DAY'S PLAY of the match here

in which the West Indies beat Nottingham-

shire by an innings and 61 runs was distinguished

by two individual performances, one for each side,

Reg Simpson, who will be playing for England

in the second Test match which starts at Lords on

Saturday, batted for the four hours and forty min-

utes which the Notts second innings lasted, and

made 109, including fourteen fours, out of a total
of 224.

For the West



ince. in) Wands ‘ M ; —-w Indies, Frank
| 2» darkness after the In Worrell, with his slow left arm
dian Enterprise exploded be- Hvevins :
tween Kosseir on the Egyptian deliveries, kept one end going foi
Coast and Wejk on the Snudi three hours, twenty minutes
Arabian Coast. The atekriae sae and finished with the excellent
Hoube: for Calcutta figures of gay oo overs, twenty
The .Etitish steamer. take one maidens, fifty-seven runs,
| Chilliwack of Vancouver, Canada ok aCHatS, , aich ewe 5 eblade vi
| had earlier reported that etre . ‘ , ; eg SHENG: BAA ee
} going to the scene ini i a Pere ;
{ail ships im the vicinity ee; A Or iP t the Note bat-
a sharp lookout for survivors Vise ee f & eee 7 was
The latest radio messant ee y a Jor re taf with 35
|the Lake Chilliwack said v next t orer. This wa
vivors alive but some burned ot careers Hath: -centiry of Wie
hands and back and screamin T) la \ ickets fell whil
Pn a the SOS other $ runs were being sdded aA
ship the Lefae eut ful "ee at amas
atenrn and raced to the scene o ae e AG, - wag ee
the explosion ; a secant : .
Sha wedicads evn Fai Simpson batted steadily but sel-
nae dame as have picked uy dom attempted a forcing stroke
thorot m wt Am searching area He often gave the impression
: bi sane or} on P no fur- that he was more intent on bat-
4 ae : eS me north.” TY os roceeding ting practice in view of Saturday’
TENNIS TEMPTRESS” for Wimbledon: ‘Gorgeous Gussy’ ; le ship was carrying test. The touring team were with-
Moran, who has just arrived in London to take part in the Wim- a general cargo including 580 out their captain, John Goddard
bledon championships, tries outathe new outfit specially designed tons of explosives from Britain] ts. ho did not field today because
for her by Pierre Balmain on the roof of her London hotel. The for the Indian Government of a damaged finger received
chiffon dress has 240 pleats and is worn over a pair of pleated The Indian Enterprise's siste FRANK WORRELL when flelding i drive from Fred
bloomers made of dowwble chiffon. “I prefer them. to the lace- ship, Indian Exw®rter — searchec : aie | Stocks, the previous day ;
edged panties, which caused such a stir last year,” said Gussy. the area from midnight to seven Though the injury is ‘sore, it i
r ay x hee tT, one + stint 5. aa . bs ‘ ‘ , ’ -
The name of the model “Tennis Temptress Express eee and reported that |, ot expected that it will keep him
é orough examination of the w Y it of the Ss * , t
ees Saturday's test at
Sch Defends F 9 [Wreckage showed no other survi.| Jel Fighter Ends |*"",;
vors | ;
c u n e en Ss rance Ss : at sg? yr? / On a pitch whieh howed no
ma By late atte rnoon no news had Initial Trials i signs of wear Sim, and Farris
I x©€en received in London from the ithe not out ba found little
Haste n oa = tee oo nee of the Lake Chilliwack LONDON, vu ne 20 to worry them in the bowling thi
: Am ty of the Indien Britait latest j fi the norning and the Nottinghamshire
e e wnterprise. It was learned that] Hawker P-1u081, ha sucet fully | ; ; " 5
: shi ' Ae é " Pen opening pair looked so confident
At Six-Nation Congress the ship carried 73. office and| completed its initial trials a| that ane as a surprise when
crew, and not 50 as previously| spokesman of the Hawker Com- | they were separated Even then
believed pany said here tonight The air :

Pre-Birth Criticisms Blunt

Best Schemes

PARIS, June 20,

M. ROBERT SCHUMAN, French Foreign Minister,
defended the policy of haste on his coal-steel pool plan
when the six-nation comference on the plan opened here
to-day.

“Six weeks have passed since in this very room (the
clock room of the Quai D’Orsay) filled with historie
memories, the French Government made known its plan,’
he said.

——*)

sae “Six weeks is rather a brief
| porine for such a new and vast
topic as the pooling of the coal
and steel production of our six
countries, very brief indeed when
you think of the usual calmness
international negotiations.
.“France has been reproach-
ed for this rush; it was de-



SPORTS
WINDOW



Two basket-ball games will be .

played at the Y.M.C.A. to-night seribed as a fast and brutal
Police vs. Fortress at 7.30 p.m tactic: but it is exactly the
Y.M.C.A vs Y.M.P.C. at

experience which

that the best initiatives are

blunted when, before birth,

they are held up in prelimin-

ary consultations.

“In a world anguished by so
many failures, I believe we have
the right, even the duty, to count

showed

pn

|
|
|
8.30 |

Stalin On
Grammar





on the strength of one idea and
DNDON. J a the profit from the impulse born
LO , June 2 from the hope aroused by it, and
Marshal Stalin, in a 10,000 word by its instinctive support on the
article published in today’s Prav- part of our populations
da, denounced the “onbelievable Here we ure now at work. It
qontusion ih matter ee ramon is up to you gentlemen, to whom
7 six governments have confided
sible circles of Soviet philologists| thi. task to justify this hope
eae a. ta Ath s tas stify ‘ ;
and aia according to Mo “The principles which have
He sharply criticised the con- determined the choice of our

objectives and which consti-

o > 1 of the lat
duct of the disciples of the late tute the basis of our deliber-

Soviet Academican Professor Marr
who, he said, had formed a closed ations must be expressed in
group of their own and had per- ‘subtle and clear terms with
secuted any one who dared to a view to preparing precise
criticise their theories or ult ertakings.
pose them “We are agreed among our-
The article was in the form of selves. on. the. direction in
question and answer and dealt which our labours are to be

with a controversy current ir turned, and on the target we
Russia on the extent to which a wish to attain.

national language should be modi- byt Our Governments have
fied or re-cast to meet a mew Way] search in common,

of life. confrontation of our

Stalin was emphatic that, views and situations, for the best
the super-structure of a language} way of applying the _ principles
automatically became adapted ¢3] we have accepted, by the creation
changing needs and «qgnditions, aj of new institutions
language could not be substantial-}cedent in the world
ly eradicated without s\rious dis-| Schuman said.

ruption to national life. G Tast
reat Task
“Any attempt to destroy the old | ‘It is a great task which we

language and create a new one is) pave been given by our Govern-

bound to introduce anarchy and | mefits. but we undertake it with

the danger of the disintegration of | ovidh ad ii " , aii of
} ps sonsciousness of re-

society | pitts ac
“Certain comrades think that | ‘P@Sibilities. We feel that we are
soon separate grammars belonging | ''0t allowed.to fail nor to give up
to vurious* classes will put in an} Wi!hout’conclusion
“Our conclusions, as you know,

appearance
“Such ere will be submitted to the apprecia~

to op-



individual
while

without
to-day.”

pre-
M






immars do not exist in

nature but this does not deter|tion of the ‘Governments and to

these comrades. They think such| the sovereign decision of our
grammars will appear and that's) Parliaments.” +

that.” M. Schuman continued: “we

—Reuter. | shall have to establish a draft

|treaty which will define the

| broad lines of the attributions ol
a common authority, its function-

Communists Disband -



| ing, the methods of appealing
i | against its decisions and of settin
In South Africa in motion responsibilities. .
CAPETOWN, June 20, We shall have to envisage,
South Africa's Communist; “ithout however inseribing them
Party disbanded to-day as the|in the treaty, the technical de-|
House of Assembly was ygiving| tails which will be inscribed in
its approval to a Bill to outlaw} Cor ventions to be concluded later,
the party and all Communist ac-| once the treaty has been ratified
tivities. The House gave the Will Not Overlook
measure, officially the os A arose Our initiative in no way in-
of Communism Bill, a third reac eine nds to ignore or overlook the
ing without a division and “mpts being made elsewhere
it to the senate —Reuter | @ on page ¢

reports said 15 were los
Another report s¢ » G
ship Santos was also mined ¢
the same time at the same place
ve agreea | but this report was not confirnied
by a free Although flying the Panamanian

an @arthquake in
Dutch Indonesian
(Aneta) reported.

—Reuter

Plane Missing On
Jamaica-Venezuela |;

Trip: 15 Aboard



raft,
on
P-1052, was in the bir
siderable
flying at
nachine,

jlo be capable

it was a bad mistake in going for
a quick single which led to Harris
being run out with the total at
70, He batted one hundred minutes

for 21.

said to be an tmprovement
supersonic aircraft the
for a eon-
during its trials,
various heights. The

with

the

time

showed hi

ary strokes At 98, however,

erably higher Worrell bowled him and_ this

MIAMI, June 20, hour brought together the two England

Mission Chief Paul Fleming players, Simpson and Hardstaff.
was to arrive here today on his At 148 Hardstaff was guilty of
way to Venezuela to initiate an| . Playing for-

air search for a missionary plane, |

missing since June 9, with 15
Americans aboard, Five children
were among the passengers |

The missing plane was operated
by the New Tribe’s Mission,
inter-denominational

an
organisation

which trains missionaries — for
stations in India, Malaya and
South American countries

The twin engined plane had

been silent since it

an air and ground search
—Reuter,



Two Ships Mined
In Yangtse

HONG KONG, June 20
Two foreign ships were mined
and sunk in the Yangtse River
near Shanghai yesterday, accord-

ing to reports reaching Hong
| Kong today. Hong Kong agents
Se the Panamanian motor vessel
Valve were advised that she was

|mined off Foosung when about to

jenter the Whangpoo River for
{ Shanghai. This report said one
St the crew was killed but other

were lost

aid the Grevk

ibout



Flag, the Valve is Chinese owned
and manned by about 40 Chinesr
crew.

—Ke

E. Java Has Worst
‘Quake In 50 Yeurs

Seventeen Dead

DJAKARTA, ‘ine 20
Seventeen people died and man

hundreds were injure oday it

Ea Java, th

Ni Agenc

The Agency

said that at Sourabaya, on the

eastern tip of the island,
shivered for as
in some places
described as the

the eartt
long as a minute
The quake was
worst in 50 years
—Reuter.

12 STILL MISSING

BAHREIN,
people

June
were still miss-
the two French

Twelve
|ing today from
airliners which crashed in the
Persian Gulf near here within 48
hours of each other last week. It
is know that 75 people lost their
lives in the twin disasters. Two
jof the 19 survivors have already |
left for France and the others are
expected to leave shortly

—Reuter.



Eighty
have been killed
since
conference at
day.
rovists

wept-back wing | Winrow quickly
§ powered bi 4 Rolla- eran capabilities and by forcing meth-
Nine jet engine and it is believed | 048, he hit 20 out of 23 in bound-
of speeds tonsid-
than 600 miles an
—~Reuter,
his first bad stroke

R}
'

*

ward to Worrell he presented the
with an easy return catch
batted just over three quarter
of an hour for his 35
not last long and at
son had made 72
After
and
seore 191
but at that
claimed two wickets
a return catch to

bowler
He

82 ‘Terrorists

Killed In Malaya

SINGAPORE
two terrorist

Stocks did
lunch Simp-
out of 156 for 4
Lunch
Harvey

June 20
s in Mi ils aya
18 captured
police told a pr
Kuala Lumpur
period 23 ter-

took the

after lunch
total Williams
First he held

Simpson
to

and
May 1,

Ss
to-



In the same

have surrendered and 107 dismiss Harve



reported by | agents and 89 supporters were ar- | and two balls later Stinchyeombe
radio on June 9 that it was 25/yrested. Johore was now the focal j patted the ball defensively into
miles from Maracaibo, Venezuela, | point of the security forces pres- 'the hands of Gomez at silly poin’
| after ‘having called at Kingston, | sure Jepson hit out at everything but
Jamaica. It was said that the Peuter. @ on page 10
State Department would ask the |
Venezuelan Government to launch | err

When tilly se best well lo

A lifetime of study may be
given to the art














of choosing the appropriat:
from so much which is
just very good. Yet, wh
cigarettes are concernce
the name “ Benson & Hed
Old Bond Street, Lone.

is an unfailing guide —
for all those occasions

when only the best will do.

la tins of 50
$1.06



SUPER VIRGINIA CIGARETTES



BY
N Br VSON «1 SIEDGES ©
OLD BOND STREET, LONDON wed }
in Erol oct 9?” Wee Si a eS

Ai

SSS
ae

a oo oe ae

I



(

lps

<




PAGE TWO



Carb Calling

EVERAL members of the Bar-

bados Team for Bisley were in
Bridgetown yesterday doing some
last minute shopping and almost
everywhere they went, they were
stopped by well-wishers, some giv-
ing a few_last words of advice
while others shook their hands and
wished them the best of luck.

Final Destination__Tokyo

RS. W. O. MORGAN, formerly

Miss Joan Cheesem: with
her two little daughters Joanne
and Cathy left Barbados yesterday
afternoon by B.W.1.A. en route to
the U.S.A. via Trinidad.

While in the U.S., she will visit
her busband’s people in Stark-
ville, Mississippi, before she goes
over to the West Coast of North
America in August to embark for
her final destination Tokyo, Japan.

Her husband, Major Morgan is
stationed there with the US.
Army. He has been in Japan since
January, and Mrs. Morgan took
the opportunity of visiting her
mother and relatives before going
over to join him. They expect to
be in souee for about three years.
Her husband, she told Carib, likes
it, and she thinks that she will too.

Maj. Morgan used to be sta-
tioned in Antigua where they met
and were married about five years
ago.

She and her daughters have
been here for three months stay-
ing at Rockley.

Leaving Today

R. and Mrs.. William Morley
are due to leave today for
England by the Golfito on four
months’ holiday. Mr. Morley, who
is Chief Engineer of the Barbados
Electric Supply Corpn., Ltd's
Power Station is on long leave.
While in England, they plan to
spend some of the time with their
sun Neville, who,is with the Staf-
ford Technical College, and also
receives his practical training with
the English Electric Co, Then
they will visit Mrs. Morley’s par-
ents as well as several other re-
lations.

On Long Leave ;

R. and Mrs. J. H. McPhail are

also among the passengers
leaving by the Golfito today for
England. Mr. McPhail, who is on
the staff of Barclays Bank here is
on four months’ long leave, most
of which they will spend in Lon-
don, before touring as much of the
country as they can.

May Go To Rome

R. and Mrs. J. P. O’Mahony

will be leaving by the Golfito
which is due to arrive from Trini-
dad this morning. ' They are off
to England on long leave and hope
to return to Barbados in Novem-
ver. i

Dr. O’Mahony came to Barbados
in November, 1948, as C.M.O, and
was recently appointed Director of
Medical Services. They have been
living in the W.I. now for twenty
years and regard this part of the
world as their home.

Dr. O'Mahony hopes to visit his
brother in Ireland for about two
months and he also told Carib that
chey may visit Rome on the Holy
Year pilgrimage, but as yet no
definite plans have been made in
that direction.

Returned to Aruba

M* OLIVER ROCK, who spent
a short holiday with rélatives
in Barbados, returned to Aruba
on Monday afternoon by B.W.1.A.
where he teaches at the Lago In-
dustrial School,

Intransit

R. TOM TOMLINSON, re-

tired Manager of Trinidad
Government Railways aecom-
panted by Mr. Billy Maingot and
his sister Betty, who used to go to
school in Barbados will be arriv-
ing in Barbados today by the Gol-
fito, as intransit passengers for
England.

Miss Tomlinson, Mr. Tomlin-
son’s sister will also be on board.
She is taking the two youngsters
to school in England.



BY THE WAY

Y favourite animal at the
moment, ousting even the
great Tarasque of Beaucaire
which was slain by St. Martha,
whose reliquary and tomb are
still there, in the church that
bears her name — my favourite
animal is the duck which held up
traffic in the Edgware-road, was
taken to a police station, and
there, with considerable aplomb,
laid an egg.

If only the B.B.C. had had the
enterprise to relay that egg, my
cup of joy would be full and flow-
ing over.

The Suet Housing Plan

ARAGRAPH VI. of Sub-sec-
tion V. of Section IX. of
Charlie Suet’s housing plan deals
boldly and unconventionally with
Materials. Suet would seek



POCKET CARTCON |
by OSBERT LANCASTER }







“My dear Maudie, if you
don’t soon stop worrying
about National Foot Health
Week, we’re never going to
get to Ascot!”

Engage

ISS JOAN MeHOLLs daugh-
ter of Dry and Mrs. Louis
Nicholls of “Rosedale” Worthing
has graduated in Fine Art at the
Art School in y, which is
affiliated bs the University of =
berta. er engagement to Mr
Mervyn Williams who is a Com-
mercial Artist at the same art

school was recently announced.
Joan who is now working in
Calgary will be remaining in Can-

ada for the time being.

Will Visit Their Son

R. and Mrs. Neville Howell

leave today for England by the
Golfito. Mr, Howell, who is Man-
ager of Buttals and Brighton Plan-
tations is on three months’ holi-

om.
hile in England they will visit
their son Geoffrey, who is at
school in Lancashire and they will
also be in London for part of the
time.
To Speyside Tobago

I EAVING yesterday afternoon

« by B.W.1L.A. for Trinidad, in-
transit to Tobago were Mr. and
Mrs. C. E. Shepherd of “Colleton
House,” St. Peter. In Tobago they
will be staying at Speyside for a
couple of weeks’ holiday.

Riviera Holiday

R. C. W. W. GREENIDGE oI
Barbados, a former Chief
Justice of British Honduras, who
is now secfetary of the Anti-
Slavery Society in London, is go-
ing to Geneva in July to study
documents on slavery. After that
he is going to slip down to the
French Riviera for a holiday, He
plans to rent a flat in Nice. “It
is the only place in the world
where I want to live”, he says.
“I go there whenever I get a
chance.”

Cricket Throws

T IS fortunate that cricketers
are not generally easy to
recognise once they are off the
field. Otherwise two of the Wesi
Indies team might have been very
embarrassed last week. On the
Sunday which came in the middl+
of the Manchester Test they went
to Blackpool for the day. In the
Sports garden there they were
invited to try their luck at knock -
ing tin cans off a wall with lit-
tle wooden balls. The distance
they had to throw was only ten
yards and there were prizes, if
three or more cans were knocked
over. Sad to relate that after
three throws the cricketers had
knocked over only one can be-
tween them. They subsequently
improved and when they finally

U.N. Press Officer In
New York

ISS MARCIA COOPER, the
Press Officer for the United
Nations in New York is on a tout
of the West Indies on holiday, On
Monday morning she arrived fren
Trinidad by B.W.1A. and return-
ed there yesterday only staying in
Barbados for one day, “Toe shor:
a time,” Miss Cooper told Cari).
Leaving New York on June |
she has visited Aruba, Curacuo
and Trinidad, before coming her<
She leaves Trinidad for home to-
day.

Naturally !

M* HERBERT FISCHBACI{
who arrived from Caraca3
on Monday afternoon by B.W.1.A.
is an Austrian who has lived in
Venezuela for eleven years, and is
now a Venezuelan citizen. This is
his first holiday in four years,
“and naturally,” said Mr. Fisch-
bach, “I chose Barbados.”
Staying at the Ocean View
Hotel, he is here for three weeks.

Trinidadians In Venezuela

R. and Mrs. Louis Sellier and
their five children are
Trinidadians who have been liv-
ing in Venezuela for the past five
years, They arrived here on Mon-
day morning trom Venezuela via
Trinidad by B.W.LA.
They are in’ Barbados for a
month’s holiday staying at Corai
Sands, Worthing.

Until the End of July

R. and Mrs, James Parker who

are from Oklahoma, but
now live in Monogas in Eastern
Venezuela are here until the end
of July, staying at the Ocean View
Hotel,

For Three Weeks

WO Trinidadians who are
with Alstons in - Port-of-
Spain arrived on Monday morning
by B.W.1.A. Mr. Walter Scott who
is in their Head Office and Mr.
Leonard Maingot who is in the
Shipping Department are here
for three weeks’ holiday staying
at Accra, Rockley.

Californians

R. and’ Mrs. Charles Ward
trom California, who a year
and a half ago went to Trinidad
where Mr. Ward is with the Kern
Trinidad Oilfields Ltd., arrived
on Monday morning by B.W.LA.
to spend a week’s holiday at the
Ocean View Hotel.

Good Show ‘“‘Sleepy”’

. MILLS, who is in charge

of student welfare at the
Colonial Office took a team otf
West Indian students up to Cam-
bridge last week-end to play
cricket against Clare College, and
they did very well. It was only a
one-day match and the result was
Clare 244 for 5 wickets, West In-
dies 190 for 1 wicket, S. G.
“Sleepy” Smith of Barbados mado
most of the runs for the Colonial
team and was 134 not out at the
end of the game. “Sleepy” ts
studying law in London and _ is
Vice Captain of the Inns of Court
cricket team.

Test Best

EST story circulating around
Manchester after the First

Test concerns Alfred Valentine,
Jamaica’s young left arm bowler
After he had taken the first
seven English wickets to fall he
turned to one of his colleagues
and said “When does the captain
come in?’ He was informed that
he had got rid of Yardley two
wickets previously and an ex-
pression of real pleasure crept
over his face. He had no idea
of the names of the batsmen he
had got out but was deeply satis-
fied to know that the rival cap-



left the stall they had an armful tain was among those “in the
of prizes, bag.

By BEACHCOMBER
powers to divert the little metal Dr. Rhubarb’s
asps for trousers from the tailors :
to the builders. They would be Mumbojumbologetics
used to make door-knobs, window- PROFESSOR SNARLSTROM
catches, and other such things. claims that Dr, Rhubarb’s
To do this it would only be Mumbojumbologetics are pre-

necessary to get the Metal Control
Board to agree with the Trouser
Accessories Bureau to transfer
the work of the Dual Purpose
Council to the Overall Distribu-
tional Clearing Centre at Nunea-
ton. Then the Regional Licence
Departments could apply early
next year to the inistry of
Bubble-blowing for the necessary
draft schedules, working through
the usual channels—the Board of
Allocations, the Permanent Sites
Committee, the Town and coun-
try Co-ordination Committee, the
Personnel Board, the Output
Board and the Control of Hous-
ing Commissioners.



Stuyvenheuter, and therefore out
of date. Quoting Ticknold, Worms,
Scattermole, Tungsten, Batcombe,
and Pushmeister, the learned
Sparlstrom endeavours to prove
that Rhubarb’s conception of
thought as an objective phe-
nomenon is outmoded and would
lead to the complete abandon-
ment of Skoul’s Three Prelimin-
ary Positives in Thought Analysis
We who care less than the dust
beneath their chariot-wheels for
all this empty rolly-molly and
tumble-cum-trivy, can now get
on with our drinking, which 1s
“a subjective action of the con-
scious will,’” according to Glumm.



the latest “BUTTERICK” Patterns have arrived
Whithields also offers=
CYCLISTS’ SUNDRIES

CYCLE LAMPS
PUMP CONNECTIONS
SOHN BULL PATCHING KITS.
(ORS BULL PATCHING KITS.
CVOLE BAGS—Large Capacity

WHITFIELDS

WE SHOE STORE

. Me
. We



$1.44
. 1éc.

LINOLEUM
6ft wide ¢

OnLy §.52

per yard run



Magnificent offert-

SU

14 in,
$2.42

16 in.
$2.76

ITCASES

20 in.
$3.46

24 in.

$4.15 $4.49)

BARBADOS ADVOCATE










PRINCE CHARLES watches as
Ceremony, London:
from Clarence House as his grandfather, King George VI drives |

down the Mall with an escort of

Guards Parade for the “Trooping the Colour”. The annual cere- |
mony is held in honour of the King’s birthday. |

Peace For Prince Charles

LONDON.
The daily perambulations of
Prince Charles, Princess Eliza
beth’s young son, will be held i
secret during the next few
months.

Fine weather and the seasona,
inerease in the number of tour-
ists have swelled the crowds
waiting each day outside Clarer:«
House and in St. James’ Park to
watch the young prince sport on
the green.

Wife Must
Be Deaf

LONDON.,

A “Reno-in-reverse” is planned
for Whitley Bay, Northumberland
County, seaside resort.

At the next meeting of the
local council it will be proposed
that a get-together be arranged
for lonely men and women who
are too shy to find a mate



A thousand people have written
to Councillor J. D. Kidd, 4
former council chairman, request-

ing him to find them husbands
and wives.
Strangest request for a, wife

was from a man aged sixty-seven
who stipulated that his brie
must be deaf.

Councillor Kidd said:

Most of the people who have
written to me seem to be genu jac
enough, They seem to be ter,i
bly lonely, :

“T think the only way to sort
the whole thing out would be ‘to
vun a conference for them alk,

“In America people go to Reno
for divorcee, so why not in Britain
come to Whitley Bay to find
happiness?""—(I.N.S,)



Not Cattle

NEWCASTLE.
Judge Croom-—Johnson granted
a divorce to a wife in the New-
castle Court and warned that
‘men today are not entitled to
crder women about like cattle.”

The learned judge declayed
that “many quite excellent men
do not know how to treat women
It is a species of learning which
is not taught in schools or even
in the university.” .

“And, it is a type of learning
which is very hard to acquire,
It springs, I think, out of “
knowledge of human nature.” .

—(1I.N.S.)



Held by his nurse, Prince Charles waves |



1
}

|

the King drives to “Trooping”

Household Cavalry to the Horse

Now, so that he can take his
exercise less in publie eye, Prin
cess Elizabeth has arranged for
Prince Charles and his baby car-
riage to be taken to some spot
where he can be wheeled in peace
and do a_ bit of independent
toddling.

Prince Charles, now 18 months
can walk well but because of the
crowds who wait for his appear-
ince it has been impossible to
jive him much practice in the
vark I.N.S.

HONEY |
BLONDE? |

The Hairdressers
Cannot Agree

oe is aisagreement among

women’s hairdressers abou.
the “most fashionable shade’
for hair this year,

! HERE are 20 horses in

eceentrie owner does not wish 7
stable an even number of horses
!in any one of the
| How
} the barns without having an ever |
} number in any barn?

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950



CAN KBE DONE
1 fiela
bordering three barns. The



Rupert



barn

amor

three

can he divide them

uieq path |

at asn jou pue ‘ugeq seqjouR ul UaAap |
uinq euo UF ouyu gnd URO ef asinoo
S41 ‘a2msuy |

‘uonsend HR fe

CROSSWwOKD |



dell,

Miranda is delighted to hear that in the and she was the only
she is going to get what she wants, Christmas present that poor Jen-
and she begins to skip away with nifer had. Santa Claus must have
the tey clown towards the aute- known what he was doing.”

gyro. But Rupert cannot under- ‘' Yes, and he still knows what he
stand it wt all. “Hi,look here,there is doing.’’ replies the clown
must be some mistake,"’ he protests. mysteriously ashe helps Miranda
** This doll was sent to the cottage up on to the plane,

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED









CANETY Cis Cute St. santa |











Last Instaiment of “THE CLUTCHING HAND”

and the Westerr “PANHANDLE’

ACTUSS
lL. How young Diana’s mending was) With Rod CAMERON-- (MONOGRAM)

sent? (8) —— ——— —

7 eaten ove sen homers FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY 8.30 p.m. Matinee SUNDAY 5 p.m.
11 Proper place for the spur surely | vi S MIRACLE MUSICAL
12. Sucn wood is made cross-grainea Glorio GLORIA WARREN in “ALWAYS iN MY HEART”





(3)
13. Mutilate for a change. (8) ;
15. An alternative to the return of}



red, (5)
18. Sufficient to make any ido} bat

a)
iy. When tnfs db nad

ed, somebody
used his teeth. (3)

DNESDAY & THURSDAY



PLAZA .

20. It will always supply the result a i 5 & AM p.m,
(6) } VARNER'S DOUBLE

23 p| n such a way that vo WAR rs I BLI

ri ee Wear tt Dane CLARK in “PMBRAC EABLE YOU"

(8)
24. Many people would call this vim ind
2 j M NURSE'S SECRET”

TOOMES

ar Rober Rhinehar

(6) 4)
26. Verse out of the code book. ‘¥ | With Reg
Down |
)
\
i

PRIDAY TO MONDAY
SHEFFIELD a

be taunted on coming 5 & 8.0 pam,

JUNGLE BOY

ae. (9)

out.

Polley suggested by Coventry?
(

Broken pots are easy to see (4)

thy of pity, (8)
Briefiy’ he is the one to break

the

Johnn BOMBA The

oo





ee

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
MATINEE: TO-DAY at 5 p.m.
TO-NIGHT & TO-MORROW NIGHT at 8.50
ALAN LADD, DONNA REED

in “BEYOND GLORY”

with GEORGE MACREADY, GEORGE COULOURIS
A Paramount Picture
Thundering Down the Road to Glory







_ SSS







act. (4)

Phey Bropans all the way

from Skye? (4)

Found in gold-leaf. (6)

Taken from a green earring. (4)

The eagle loses a letter to break

into song, (4)

14, Strange, getting a bieat from
this. (5

16. Just the same it's the same. (5)
17. Ruff’s. partner. (5)
21. Iterate, (3) ,
22. End of 15 Across in reverse. (3)
Solution of yesterday's purzle,— Across:
1, President: 8 Estuary; 9, Sure; 11
Miss: 15, Cerise? 14, Trip; 15, Spam; 19
Vege! ; 20, One; 21, Novel; 22, Tucked,
25, me, 24, Down; 1, Puncture:
2, Reservolr; 3.
Dame; 6, Erin; 7,
Slated; 15 Stoke:
ig. Geum. «

See 2 ope
>
=
oe

~

Comes an Adventure Beyond Compare !

——







So
—
SS See



5



lent; 4, Strip: 5,
ot. Basence: i. i
16. Pave; 17. Melon: SS —<—

GLOBE THEATRE _

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8.30 P.M,











=F



ROYAL = (Worthings) |

To-day at 5 P.M
Thursday at 5 & 8.30

Eagle Lion Films Presents M.G.M’s Superb Musical Double
ARTURO DeCORDOVA

“TILL THE CLOUDS ROLL BY”

“ADVENTURES OF :
FRANK SINATRA—LENA HORNE

“HOLIDAY IN MEXICO”



Tonight at 8.30
(By Public Demand)

Madam O’Lindy

In
“CARACAS NIGHT”

& Troupe

JANE POWELL & JOSE ITURBI



The Fellowship of Hair Artists

of Great Britain favour honey
blonde.

“More women are turning
blonde than ever before, but

platinum is definitely out,’ saia
Mr. B. N. Furman, founder presi-
dent,

“The rich tones suit the mew
hair styles, and honey blondes
vary from light golden auburn
to a pinkish tone. In fact, there

is a shade to suit every complex-
ion.

“Women prefer these shades
because the hair has only to be
lightly bleached, and there is no
damage done,”

A court hairdresser differs from
Mr, Furman.

“Honey blonde might be quite
attractive with green or grey eyes,
but it would be impossible with
blue eyes and not in the least
interesting with brown eyes,” he
said,

Lilac, copper

‘Lilac shades of hair are lovely
for those who can take it, and
copper-bronze for people wil
darker eyes,

“Platinum died out in 1935 and
has been replaced by chinchilla—
the greyest blonde possible,

“Best effects are obtained by
streaks and tips of chinchilla,”

The London manager of a
Paris hairdresser also differs. He
finds that rinses are more popular
than bleaching these days.

“There is a noticeable revival
of various blonde shades; warm
colours are liked best,” he said.

—L.E.S.



CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work i:
AXYDLBAAXR
is LONGFELLOW
One letter simply stands for another. In this example A is used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos-
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints.
Each day the code letters are different.

A Cryptogram Quotation

YMMIBYLNJ KT
GKC BGI AKSTW
—VSIEJISU.

Cryptoquote:

COMFORT IS
NOT A

YWWIJICVWT Y

wr Us COY2T Ate

WGKLR

THE FLOWER OF THE YO
MEN, OR THE FLOWER OF YOUTH—LIVY. oF

..- at Whitfields ony |

A NECESSITY =
LUNUR;

WE can Supply .....

LAVATORY BASINS—White & Aqua Green
22”x16" and 25x18”

HIGH & LOW LEVEL TOILET SUITES
White & Aqua Green

WHITE TILES—Square and Shaped

CHROMIUM BATH ROOM FITTINGS —

Towel Rails, Shower Roses, Soap Dishes,
Tumbler and Tooth-Brush Holders, Paper Holders,
Glass Shelves with Guard Rails.

CLEANSERS — All kinds.

DIAL

2039

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON





logs s oti » «
The Show of Shows Picase note that Matinee starts at 4.30 p.m. for this
Prices:—Pit 24, House 48, ar Programme

Balcony 72, Box $1.00 waa







oo









EMPIRE

& tomorrow at 4.45 & 6.30 G L Oo BRB K
1

To-day
Continuing

20th C.-Fox Presents .
BETTY GRABLE

Opening Friday 23rd 5 & 8.30

in
“WABASH AVENUE”
With
Victor MATURE — Phil
HARRIS

ROXY

To-Day & Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15















20th C-Fox Double

“I WAS A MALE WAR
BRIDE”





SAMUEL GOLDWYN presents

M7 ows ANDREWS - susw HAYWARD
“MY FOOLISH HEART”

with Robert Keith + Kent Smith « Lois Wheeler + Jessie Royte Landis + Gigi Perteap
reen Play by JULIUS J, EPSTEIN and PHILIP G. EPSTEIN
cated by MARK ROBSON : Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Toe.

Plus
LEON ERROL in CACTUS CUT-UP.





















With
Cary GRANT Ann SHERIDAN
And

“YOURE MY
EVERYTHING”



<6 D

Starring
Dan DAILEY Ann BAXTER



OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows To-Day 4.30 & 8.15
20th C.-Fox Double
Lloyd NOLAN Signe HASSO
in

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

Free copies of the current hit parade tune, “My Foolish Heart

‘HOUSE ON 92nd, STREET’ SAVE YOUR HALF-TICKETS FRIDAY NITE AND WIN
And a re = T
“DARK CORNER” A CARTON OF JEFFREY'’S STOUT.
POSITIVELY NO INCREASE OF PRICES. q

With
Mark STEVEN Lucille BALL

PIT 1l6¢. — HOUSE 30c, — BALCONY 40c, — BOX 54c.





THURSDAY Nite at 8.30
“CARACAS NIGHT”

STEAK! CHOPS! FLYING FISH!

AND LOTS, AND LOTS OF FOOD

TO-NIGHT AT

CASUARINA CLUB

There'll be an admission charge of 2 shillings/because the Orchestra
has to EAT too. To-night we are strictly informal/so you can don your
glad rags and dance to the rag-time band of Bertie Haywood from 8 to 12
midnight. (The Manager—Peter Howell (in rags) will be as usual).

oo

_——_————















Other attractions include a partner for the “Stags” the “Singing Barman”
and “Freddie.”’

Get the Casuarina habit,

Its one you'll not regret,

For its those that eat out this way,
That have well and truly “ete”

P.S.—Next Saturday/we'll be very debonair, ‘ties will be required/the
Manager will he absent/he doesn’t own one.

i ia ae ll OL

ie iid

rity -tite ie ats vitihina

fn. m

mnmonre

tm eK Oo Rit

aod

fal a lle ll ae ie
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21,



B.G. Governor’

To Attend
Fish Feast

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN.

His Excellency the Governor of
British Guiana, Sir Charles Wool-
ley, K.C.M.G., has accepted an in-
Fish
Feast at the Carnegie Trade Centre
The Feast is part of
an all-out campaign by the Fish-
Agriculture
Department to popularise the con-

Vitation to attend a Skin

on June 23.
eries Division of the

Sumption of skinfish and break

down an old and existing prejudice
among Guianese against the eating

of these fish, which the Depart-
ment claim are not only palatable
and wholesome, but also highly
nutritive and easily available.

The campaign will open with a
week-long drive commencing on
June 18. There will be a series
of five-minute broadcasts over
ZFY by fishermen, fishing boat
owners, fish vendors, housewives,
nutritionists and other persons
connected with the fishing indus-
try in the Colony.

The Churches are also co-oper-
ating. Special articles will be
published in the Church magazines
and leaflets on the subject will be
distributed at Church Services.

At the fish feast on June 23, the
Governor, Members of the Legis-
lative Council, Municipal Councils,
heads of public institutions and
managers of hotels and restaurants
will be served variously prepared
morsels of skinfish.

In the afternoon, the public will
be given demonstrations of how to
skin and cook various skinfish. On
other days there will be demon-
strations open to housewives.



Wanted In B.G.
For Robbery

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

Four Frenchmen, MM. Felix
Melani, Bernard Cadoret,
Doumains and Leon Lemel, who
were wanted by the British Guiana
Police on a charge of breaking and
ermering and larceny of Jewellery
valued $24,606,88 and $1,000 in
B.G- Currency from the Premier
Pawnbrokery, Georgetown, during
the Easter week-end last year,
were extradited from Venezuela
on the request of the British Gui-
ana Government and will now
stand trial.

The four men were held by the
Venezuelan Police after having
crossed the frontier illegally. Jew-
ellery identified as part of the
missing booty was found in their
possession. After arrangements
were concluded for their extradi-
tion the men, accompanied by
Venezuelan Immigration Officers,
were flown by special P.A.A. plane
to Georgetown,

GEORGETOWN. |

Louis!

1950

Get Tue Snow
BRANCH OFF YouR

To BORROW
bie

Survey Party
Find “Lost”

WILL STUDY BARNACLES

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN.
Doctor D. C. Geijskes, Ento-
mologist of the Agricultural Ex-
periment Station, has arrived in
British Guiana to do some ento-
mological studies in connection
with sugar, rice and coconuts and
to inspect the Surinam light}ship |
now in dock at Messrs Sprostons |
Limited.

The barnacles spread over the
sides and bottoms of the vessel |
will be classified by Dr. Geijskes
end a number of specimens will
be treated with various types of
paint in an effort to find out the
best method of eradicating them.
From a scientific point of view,
Dr. Geijskes explained, it is in-
teresting to note that the barnacles
do not thrive on the vessels when
they ply in coastal (muddy)
waters, but attack them when
they ply where there is green
water. They do not grow well in
the rainy season but thrive better



LIGHT,
COOL

AND
REFRESHING






CROSS -CUT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ee eens —_— eee

me Taxe *

a eT

bay, CONE END, CLO Bor
i}

oe

>

\Qe
(Sure

wS WIFE WAS

mY

HE HAS A SPARE
. CUP- FINAL TICKET -
OR OO You KNOW ?

Trinidad *

Librarians

‘HIGH TRANSPORT COSTS|














































































| a:
| Helicopter
|

4 Cents Ride?

LONDON.
The Society of British Aircraft



Coffee Committee
Will “Tone Down”
Report












ause Killed











WASHINGTON, June, 20 The ve
Constructors claimed today that A Senate sub-committee to-day | begins ar
new helicopters under construc-! agreed to “revise and tone down’ ¢ Nixoderm & :
tion Brit shoul roduce . Sean eae = > ans
10 in ritain should produce, its report on coffee price increases, } , Nixoderm is a hew discovery ‘
running costs near those of buses|after the State Department had germs and.parasites on the skin that
and trains. joined Latin American diplo- Fe SO ee caees 2
Type 171 fAve-se neral " r . a Ring we ad £
ype lil iive-seat general pur} mats in“ protest agains ‘ t get rid of u t
| pose helicopters are now in pro-| jts reported suggestion are !
duction by the Bristol Aeroplane Nix
Company, which also is construct- The diplomats, 11 ambassadors] } ten that tieedieue wi
ing 10 to 12-seat twin-engined] and three Charge D’Affaires, yes-] ples and clear your skipsert and
helicopters known as Type 173. terddy called Secrétary of 2 none
Because the wperation of these] State Dean Achesén to protest Nixoderm pe

machines is still in the early
experimental stage the 171 prob-
ably will be used mainly for test

that the sub-committee’s proposal
to control coffee prices “seriously
threatens Latin-Améefican

ForgSkin Troubles ace.

econ-

work by organizations interested] omy
in the potentialities of this form Senator Guy Gillette, Chairman =e
of transport of the five-man agriculture sub > ie

It is expected that when the} committee, to-day agreed to re-
technique of maintenance andj} draft the report, after Assistant © « « @
economics of helicopter operation] Secretary of State Edward Miller and agonising
had been completely mastered the

had said that parts of it were “an




















































‘ _ | big twin-engined Type 173 i lve Maz \ 0) mesh a i
4 la ig twin-engined Type 173 wi affront” to the citizens and officials BAG SHE
River C el (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) | or Eng nec already be in» production of the South Amer countries = ; KAG
hann The Society said that the in-J which produce coffee.
GEORGETOWN, Our Own Correspondent creased payload of these bigger Mr. Miller declares it was
} \ ert S sader- of ac wil re slic: » . the * neig
s ; Unless they can be provided with chea nspt Ni \ibert Gomes, leader- Of] machines will make helicopter] doing much of the “good neigi
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent) : areer, nie I s . . ; Ta g the W.I sugar delegation 1s flight an @conomical proposition | bourty relations between tl
t Goldf r ’
J ion British Guiana’s Cuyuni Goldfields Lt i : : f the Trinidad Gl hal , ’ ‘
GEORGETOWN tions shortly. Mr F. Buckle. the Co te 7 -neirmsen Of Mis NAG) for airlines in Britain United States an ther American
A Geological Survey Party hack] . GRCTAMONS SHOrhy. Bir, &. DUCKS, Lie WONePS oe Library and in this capa-} The world’s first scheduled} republics, and that some of its re-
from a 3-month survey in the Manager reported that at present they were Arrying | cl has been a busy man late-| passenger helicopter service was} commendations and conclusi
Putareng Area reported having} on salvage operations, This meant the treatment of old mill }ly ether with Mr. Carlton} recently opened between Cardiff] were “inappropriate”
mapped about 250 square miles} tailings. Cx Librarian, he has bee™)anq@ Liverpool by British Europ- —Reuter
situated between the Mazaruni and +9 | he explained, are J4™% ® arrangements for sta) ean Airways. The helicopters used nen —
Puruni Rivers. ial 1ich has already | Members of the Trinidad al are single engined machines of
p , rom | t@visit England on” a twelve-|jimited payload and low cruising
1 i from ; pay
The chief feature of interest in Copra Brokers which the & c 7 aa ; } Meath cours During their visit] speed. Although the service is
this area, they report, is the oc- : has been ext Du 1949 | they will attend technical schools} expected to run at a substantial a
currence of an old river channel Press For ibout 20,000 i f tailings were} @Md receive training in librarian-| joss jt will provide valuable Obstinate Set from
which runs from the north-west treated and yielded approximately | ship operational data rheum ; a
S 5 ; . P e Stec r
to the eet ae ear lett Removal Of Ban | 4,300 fine ounces of gold, ‘To date rhree members of the — When Type 173 with its in- complaints the experi Ae
is marke y alluvia eposy : } this ir about 8,000 ft of J are expected to be sent on this] creased safety factor of two related in this
parallel to the present course of (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) | tailin cours¢ «They will come s€Pp-| engines is put into ‘operation, relieved by or
the Mazaruni River and about 4 GEORGETOWN | ly and the first one,’ it is} B.A. will extend their service KRUSCHEN
miles distant from it. The channel Mr. Bissessa Boodhoo, membe: The ‘ é pated, will be here in Sep-|¢o the heart of the British cities
capping the hills about 60 feet of the Copra Brokers Board, has} drawing to ve tember and possibly to the Continent in my arms and 8!
sree the present Mazaruni River charged the local Government) said Mr, Buck! and Co-operation Experts opine that the British | pains started in tt
tes hee. deposits and the] with “keeping the coconut indus-|I don’t kn oing t Officials of the English Library] will play a leading role in the| yack, incr
a eee oo . ore with- try in penury” and predicts a] happen. : Association who are giving every| development of the helicopter ) ranily never : } Douehe & hobtis
a . oe di ing the p an fee | gloomy future unless Government “Under existing « tions it} ¢O-operation in this scheme are)Geographically the country is 1 find that I got a little relief. 1
ogee S Ourine rune years, granted increased prices for copra so daa mi to reopen expected to finalise arrangements } ideal for the development of heli- \] bought another and:before {t was
e chiet object of the survey was | and allowed brokers to export the] \YOU" a (ih “xt week sopter services with its need fe: {| finished all my pains had gone
to obtain more information re-| surplus to foreign markets bye antag; Wer'price of gold te TO! nore have been settled ey of transport which can Rainy weather and damp- () and trom that day have not

: : . * te ‘ } ency) . ice 1ese ave > se t ans & y ad is . s i ¥
Sarding the pistripation and ex- Mr. Boodhoo disclosed offers} (CVNS 0! : betore ae Mi Gcimae and Mr. Comma will] operate economically over short ness EAS. Restinatians, Sppesred again. My palna were
} WAR ns. diamond-bearing | from London, Holland and Vene- Therees the cubes moat Conumediit bahin ‘the ‘aenona pert of thatt eee 5 mist. “Seraliviabians “dhe Pale obstinate and, the reliet really
ey CEPy ss zuela where merchants are offer | ties has rise to x tely | job looking for speakers to! The Society pointed out that the in the joints can be con- Rheumatic pains and backache

ixtended ing prices 50% aa = poe twice pre iv levé visit Trinidad in connection with] helicopter does not cruise as fast quered by are usually the result of poisons
er 1 The _ ‘ 000 ¢ ae tenor of remaining o1 low | the Library's 1951 adult educa-]as the conventional airliner but! 4 f ‘Yin sal meg palo which lazy
i i é S Py ons a ; f . y ; . ‘ / L yels anc rent Ww are
During the next Field Season $160.50 (U B Currency) which is, '©, Yield a profit und e con- | tion scheme They are hoping] gains its passenger potential by SAC ROOL ) pores 9 ‘axhe eeu. a

: ie as S 1 } . io ) »ll-k y 2 i “e) val “ P } Awe
(commencing at the end of July) equivalent to $272.85 (B.G. cur-| ditions Mr. Buckle e; I to arrange for two well-known | the speed of” its centre-to-centre 5 complaints there is no finer
the survey in this area will be rency per ton) or 12 cents per| {further _ that of} personalities to visit the island] travel. Keep a bottle handy treatment than Kruschen Salts
extended to the north-west to the ound em Georgetown. But the| Sterling did permit the d give a series of lectures on] ‘The large machines will operate }| which cleanses all the internal
Cuyuni River. It is proposed to c oon. oT aa — low-grad taili between the centre of cities or On Sale at organs, stimulates them to nor-

‘ ; z ontrol Board refuses permission sewers ? smemenstonen, ; ote ; i} mal healthy action and thus
cube bese Ane Heniweer son to export operations would have from docks and airports to city res " , restores freshness and vigour
Inneneru Village to Makura Point port. several month ‘“ F « | centres hnights Drug Stores a ee chaning cal aoe a
on the Cuyuni River, a total dise] Local price ror copra is 7.75 Wee Whither Welfare? British town planners are {\ All Chemists and Stores ae
tance of about 30 miles, and to! cents per pound, but if exported Main Problem already considering the incorpor- \} 5
survey the area east and west of| could fetch 12 cents per pound in cay 4 SREAT YARMOUTH ation of rooftop ‘rotor stations’ in ;
this line. This should provide! Venezuela. Malaya was selling * Main 1 le e ass oe GRE/ d te ooh their designs for new towns
access to possible diamond areas} copra to the U.K. at 14.30 cents Gis ae : ; eat mcORE ih si, n ; > M weit i It is possible that Type 173)
in the Ekereku River (a tributary) per pound net, and even if B.G fon i Se a vie thane. Rt Rev. P.M Odd. will be in production by 1964
of the Cuyuni). Ata later stage} sold at the Ceylon contract price | > apn ere a Bi hop of Norwich, told "an So I~! British European Airways expert
the possibility of extending the of 11.75 cents per pound they eee i ‘ a o fe conference at Great ar- 25-35 seater multi-engined
trail to the Wenamu River (which) would earn more ae PSUEE SES SEDORNE Uk ae a0 that the welfare sols helicopter with a cruising speed
forms the boundary between Brit- A sub-committee of the Central| i 1p r Cu ee ae cou lead Briton nearer he of over 130 mph to be in operation
Nanen = Venezuela) willl Food Production Committee wen! maine. results A ith I Be obt ined pS ante in eight to ten years time.—I.N.S

$ ‘ sti * . | Pé s vi those »bte < j aid
cue eos Ee ae ates tae in adjoining porfions of Venezuela will be real disaster 1
The Geological Survey Depart~-{* E : . Te : ifare state should so pro- e
ill shortly be making a|increased to 9 cents per pound.) Mr. Buckle point id so deve Q 20~ Ch l | Ca se
they vot lente Paracas of | West Indian islands were getting} geology of north-western 8 ind so deve oR that Peat Lic se
. , i inn .65 cents per pound and in Sur-| Guian: the sa as that of; ple e their sense of responsi-
road patel ip et. Berbice and 2.48 conte ice is 10 cents pex NURO®. stern Venezuela (in which | bility toward their neighbout A ain Before
, : pound. The Copra Brokers Board} important auriferot deposits} and if the material progress is £ 5
is in touch with Government on| have been fout He is of| made at the sacrifice of pet onal
the situation. opinion that intelligently directed | responsibility ; C urt ~
| exploration and prospecting of| . The Bishop was referring to oO Ss
»gio 1 sritish Guiana,} voluntary social work which had
S . Gi B G | ei tae ult is ib alin ca a bit t. ty hospitals and services (Barbados ORT. OF SPAIN
: ‘ -ORT-OF-5S
urinam ives eX¥e! other rich goldbearing deposit for the care of the aged and ny 3 ho” nee ’ .
in the dry season. 1 oc ff PI t Bi Seal hich had now been superceded The Me ¢ arto Oe, ee
Doctor Geijskes made severa 10. 00 oliee ants | bigger Scaie the welfare state case 1s again betore ;
ae : ¢ nthe ; i 7 ‘atch i . Vester , Mrs. Merle MeCarthy
expeditions into the interior of ° | Thi he said, had. resulted| Yesterday 1
; ; oe nde to 4 giinche val against the
Surinam on entomological and (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) | He she ee to the fact | fy he reat spirit of democ- Jaunched an appeal agains : ¢
biological missions. Last year, on ae GEORGETOWN. | that oldmining in Vene zuela I y which appeared to think decision made by Just ice a, z
behalf of the “Natural Scientific Ten thousand young coffee! been put i : bes i ion, | that t needs of the community | Gomes, some months ago in a
Study Circle for Surinam and plants have been received by the | he of { ortatic Rete. be met by state ac-| he gave Michael McC arthy, at 1
Curacao,” a body formed in 1945 Department of Agriculture as aj‘. © a. ly nm ’ the custody of his daughter Vio
in Utrecht, Holland, to promote) free gift from the Surinam Agri- | 749!)) '° bo! j mia ait rhe Bishop pointed out that} let. ae ae m. ;
natura] scientific investigation of] cuiture Department to aid rehabil- | Phe ar ate Oa reds of thousands of peo-| Eminent King's Counsel, Han-
the Netherlands territories in the] itation of farms destroyed in early at f : . ~ Ace een helped in sickness] nays, was on his legs all yesterday
Caribbean, Dr. Geijskes took a] aay foods. i ee va eee trouble by friendly] and today, arguing solid law to : se
natural science expedition into!” “After the floods contact was| *U! : ri ) esenithl ic convince the Appeal Judges @ Thanks to Fleischmann's ou bi Ask :
the interior of Surinam. made with the Director of Agri-| 0! | yh tea yt Brit : Those societies taught men to] Mortimer Duke, A. J. Hamilton | Fast Rising Dry Yeast home today { hmann ast
He disclosed also that there is} culture in Surinam, who Bees Gh \ le ' <5 nd by one another and they} and Kenneth Vincent Browne that baking is easier ... results are Rising Dr
Rigege cus shOn taRerntts wey 30 Rar ante the British usen | anc lo , : ee be Scaggs a nae eee (ee ae cae acta yi hive g better. This new granule yeast HERE'S ALL YOU DO;
seum in Surinam and while in} ¥: ? iMate “| We Y I ! it rr to Htions of people Such & Ore ee oe full strength for weeks. Ii Sprinkle into lukew wake
B.G.. he will be consulting with} Government paying transportation Leite sas a : Chitanactveneetiola He arned that the modern] ted that Violet is only 11! vepes ane saa . lines eeagialvdenl ; 1 ath yavigeas shia si
Honourable Vincent Roth, J.P.,} The first shipment of 10,000 DHREtS | OP adare to the Al River d political development] is badly in need of her mother's you bake at h Let stand 10 oe
Curator of the local museum in} arrived on Sunday by KLM plane |; iows through ht do great deal of harm.] care iO weeks’ supply on hand stir, When dissolved,fone package
this connection. He expects that] and have been sent to farmers in Br 1 outh (in Britain is in danger of losing He said that the judge’s order Fleischmann’s Dry Yeast is as equals one compressed yeast cake
i of the Surinam Gov-| the Pomeroon river district, the wuni R The length most precious thing in Eng-| frustrated the hopes of both fresh when you use it as the day @ in any recip.
with the help of t 2 n %
ernment the museum will be} The plants are being shinged of the Brit Guiar rtion of lish life—the great urge to give| parents who wanted to educate the .

: amaribo towards the | without soil, just the roots, which iR ile oluntary service and the desire} child in England. The case is . a
aay de ge ; je |meant that farmers had to be Pp (W-LG to help one’s neighbour.” continuing and Louis Wharton heh W ou “é 11GElE w/On
Doctor Geijskes is accompanied notified to hays thelr farm. Bre K.C. is appearing for Michael M a
by bis wite and deughtes. ——— CAP EY $666060055099004 POOOIOD 2OSOIPPOOOOODIO SION IO TOTTI OF
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PAGE
iGE FOUR

BARBADOS <8 ADVOCATE

Wednesday, June 21, 1950

Safety At Seawell

THERE are two points of entry in Barba-
dos; one is the harbour and the other the
airport. By the provisions of the law and
long established custom the Baggage Ware-
house through which passengers from ships
must pass, is amply protected. It is not
the same with Seawell Airport. And the
pressing need for closer supervision and
greater protection grows daily.

During the month of May there
101 flights in which no fewer than 2,091
passengers arrived in this island. It is clear
that air travel is becoming more popular
and has outgrown all expectations.

But it is not merely the growing traffic
which focuses attention to Seawell. It is
the extreme need for caution and efficient
management if human life is not to be lost
unnecessarily. Prior to the arrival of a
plane there is the need for the closest
supervision of the runway and the entire
airport. The pilot of an incoming plane
can only bring his craft to a safe landing
on the instructions of the officers in the
communication tower. The merest mishap
on the runway when the plane is about to
land might be fraught with the gravest
consequences. Any accident might result
in the smashing of the plane and the loss
of the lives of all aboard.

In Carlisle Bay there is little chance of
the presence of a small craft causing the
loss of an entire steamer. The presence of
a car or some other vehicle on the runway
carried there by some careless person
might bring disaster.

If the above premises are admitted it is
clear that there should be the greatest pre-
caution to prevent this possibility. At pres-
ent there are two officers at Seawell, the
Manager and the Clerk, both of whom are
in the communication tower on the arrival
of a plane. One makes communication with
the plane and the other records in the log
such instructions as are given and the
answers.

Seawell Airport is the property of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee and
neither the Manager nor the Police can
initiate prosecutions without the consent
of the Colonial Secretary.

It is known that at present there are
regulations for preventing visitors from
contacting passengers before they reach
the immigration and the Customs; but the
presence of unauthorised people who are

merely sight-seeing, people who would like
to wander over the entire airport, and even
those who visit the airport legitinrately, to
receive passengers but who persist in wan-
dering all over the airport can be discon-
certing and dangerous.

It should not be possible for bands of
excursionists and sight-seeing parties to
drive into the airport without permission.

The seriousness of the situation is appar-
ent when it is remembered that at the same

time that there are out going passengers
there are also incoming passengers who
must be attended by the immigration or
emigration and the customs.

The reason for much of the trouble is
that it does not appear that the Police, on
duty every hour of the day and night at
Seawell, have the same authority under the
law as they exercise at the Baggage Ware-
house. It should be easy for greater re-
strictions to be put upon wandering people
at the airport where their presence and
their activities can do more harm than in
the harbour. The staff at the airport is at
present numerically unable to cope with
the work as efficiently as might be done. It
is true that air traffic has grown apace but
it should not be impossible to keep abreast
of the necessary regulations for the proper
control of the airport and the protection of
human life. The airport is now being ex-
tended and modernised and it is no use
waiting until the work has been completed

or until some disaster proves the merit of these
arguments to bring the necessary controls to the
one airport in this island. Any such disaster
would be the worst possible advertisement for
Barbados at a time when she is attempting to
encourage visitors.

OUR READERS SAY:











were

fF Atm”



The Linsell Case Puts |!he Bolder Sex—Women

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

British J ustice On Trial

“It is quite obvious that no

Private Linsell — the Black weigh up the unk: 1iown importance
soldier and no sailor can carry Watch sentry who killed a of his charge arfd the unknown
with him a library of International German policeman—will not determination ot his opponent on
Law, or have immediate access hang. But will his conviction the one hand against the highly
to a professor in that subje.t who stand? The 23-year-old soldier complicated legs! learning as to
can tell him whether or not a still waits to learn what sen- the circumstances when killing is
particular command is a lawful tence, if any, he will be given. or is not jutified?
one.”’ The implications of the Linsell This case ‘illustrates in bold

So directed the Judge-Advocate case are a challenge to British relief the superiority of the English
in the “Peleus” trial, in which, justice, that re-

among others, a German sailor
was sentenced to be shot for obey-
ing the orders of his commanding
officer to fire on the survivors of

says—

CHARLES



Common Law rule over
cently developed as a result of
trials for war crimes, which Brit-
ish military courts are apparently

‘ x _ anxious to copy. The conse-
a British merchantman SHELLEY quences of the new rule are indeed
Yet by gradual extensions of the terrifying.
modern. - doctrine that superior Suppose, for example, in a
orders are no defence to a charge 4 gtate of great confusion, future war, a bomber pilot were
of war crimes, the position is It was started by Article 8 of ordered to blitz an enemy city
rapidly arising when a library or the Nuremberg Charter, whicn which he suspected contained n
a professor will be as essential to deprived admirals and generals military objective. Unger the Lin-

a soldier as a rifle or a helmet.”

such as Raeder and Keitel! of the

sell ruling he would need to satisfy

‘ : a@efence of superior orders. himself that the city did in fact

They Must Ubey Gradually it has been extended contain military objectives before

> ierarchy exhaus-

The law of Englan vas laid Gown the hierarchy until it he took off. If, in spite of ex s

Aen gintnly in cn i ms — reached “other ranks.” Now it has tive researches, he was still in

arising out of the South African been applied, in an honourable doubt he would be justified, nay,
war. . but misplaced sense of justice, not compelled, to disobey.

A British captain took a soldier

merely to our ex-enemies but also

Would the Military Courts, who

i i 7 ine « & icious tO Our own men. have put him in this position, thea
oe ae vee eutee We teen Private Linsell fired five shots acquit him of a charge of dis-
hands to fetch a certain bridle. into the back of a German lorry obeying orders
The farm hand delayed. He there- Which had ignored his order, as Revenge—and After
upon ordered the soldier to fire ® Sentry, to stop. In so doing he
at the farm hand. The soldier Killed a German policeman, Lin- Let us, a@mit that this is all
fired and killed. sell said ‘quite frankly that he wrong. fn order to sweep into the

The legality of the captain’s shot to kill. net of war criminals a number of
order was highly doubtful, Never- | Among other defences, he plead- jigh-ranking German officers, the
theless the soldier was acquitted @d the shoot-to-kill” orders of Allied Powers thought fit—in the}
of a charge of murder. “If in any Dis regiment. The deputy Judge event, unnecessarily—to weaken

doubtful case a soldier was enti-
tled to judge for himself, to eon-
sider the circumstances of tie
' case, and to hesitate in obeying
the orders given to him. that would
be subversive of all military dis-
cipline.”
The Court proceeded to endorse
the rule as laid down in the Army’s
Military Manual as it then stood,

by which soldiers must obey ali ‘Sued it should be punished. But started to mutilate our own time-| attendance of more than 900. :

commands unless they are quite re ghee eae. be ne honoured law On the basis of their experience in towns
bviousl al, legal to the sentry who is ex- Let us have the courage to ia a . ee ae
: Hae iggy et PA Law pected to obey it. He may well admit, before it is too late, that|Of moderate size, the firm have not yet
may now say, however much the Soin = = 1 oe — two wrongs do not make a = | plucked up courage to try the experiment in
Military Manual may have been POFtance of the object he is guard- The new rule was sown in a dark : 1 : Niheps oH eed
changed, that is still the law of 128: bed of revenge, and, as always New York, or any major city. It looks as

England and would be so admin-
istered in our criminal courts

He Shot To Kill

But in other tribunals there is



Advocate-~ General is reported as
having ruled that if the “shoot-

the well-tried defence of superior
orders. Their action was anyhow

to-kill order was illégal Linsell misplaced as that defence never
could not shelter behind it. availed a prisoner if the order
A “shoot-to-kill” order may or was obviously ille gal, as in the
may not be legal, according to concentration-camp cases, or in-
particular circumstances, of which qeed in the “Peleus” trial,
a sentry may know nothing. If, Now we are hoist with that
in the circumstances of Linsell’a petard, In order to give the ap-
case, it was illegal, the officer who pearance of “f hares”, we have

For all Linsell knew, there
might have been a store of atomic
material behind him, and the lorry
might have been desperate to get
at it. How could he be expected,
in the agony of the moment, to



with revenge, we are threatened
with its bitter fruit. But cannot
we break this sequence? Must
Private Linsell be sacrificed to
save someone else’s pride ?

—L.ES



The Richest Man In Britain
Is Getting Richer

Sir John Ellerman, Britain’s
richest man, is growing richer.

That is the impression given by
documents filed away in the vaults
of London’s Bush House, where
details of the ownership of British
companies, large and small, are
kept.

If that impression is right, it
marks down this shy, studious,
40-year-old millionaire as present.
day phenomienon,

For most of Britain’s very
wealthy men &re growing poorer.
They are forced by crippling tax-
ation to live on capital if they
want to maintain a_ millionaire’s
customary standard of living

But not, apparently, Sir John,
Although his father had an in-
come reaching £1,000,000 a year,
the son never developed extrava-
gant tastes.

He has
quiet life.
continued
shrewd
ment.

always preferred the
And so his capital has
to grow, aided by
and far-sighted invest-

£100,000 up

Latest returns of ¢ Ellerman
Lines, king-pin of the shipping
side of the Ellerman empire, show
that Sir John’s holding of the
company’s Deferred stock—some
in his own name, some in con-
junction with ‘three others’—has

By Bernard Harris

whom

he had known since boy-
hood.

And just before the war Sir The wedding took place in the
John was the big figure in a utmost secrecy at Chertsey (Sur-
transaction which resulted in him rey) Register Office, And the

becoming the predominant share-
holder in Illustrated Newspapers,
owners of the Sphere, the Tatler,
and other publications.

More recently he bought 153,000
shares in the Daily Mirror and a
smaller number in its sister
journal, the Sunday Pictorial,

City Thinks

What does all this wealth add
up to? That is a secret known
only to Sir John and his closest
associates,

But in the City it is estimated
that the £18,000,000 ‘which Eller-
man inherited from his father in
1933 must at least have Ween
doubled, possibly nearly trebled.

Ellerman inherited more than
a vast fortune from his father,
He inherited also his father’s deep-
seated reserve, his carefulness in
spending, his capacity for intense
concentration on whatever task
was in hand,

Old Sir John, who was born in
Hull, started his business life as
an accountant’s clerk.

Even after he had become a
prosperous local shipowner he
remained such a solitary, retiring

couple drove off to Eastbourne to
live in a six-roomed villa in a
terrace of working-class houses.

Here Sir John and his bride
spent quiet, happy, and econo-
mical days, with the husband go-
ing around in grey flannel trous-
ers, pullover, and jacket.

But as soon as their identity
was discovered they took train to
Scotland,

It was at Eastbourne later that
Ellerman started on his massive
three-volume work called “The
Families and Genera of Living
Rodents.” It took him ten years to
complete and ran to 1,386 pages.

His wife, a gifted painter, help-
ed him with the illustrations for
this book. She also arranged an
exhibition of paintings by “Ellen
de Streuve’ in a Kensington High
Street art shop.

But when a newspaper discov-
ered that Ellen de Streuve was
in fact Lady Ellerman the exhi-
bition was at once closed.

The passion for secrecy was
carried a stage further when the
couple went to live at an unpre-

ise , » past ious se at Sunningdale,

ein ey ere, piel il figure that he was often unrecog- eer tae leg lived as “Mr
The ere » nised by people who worked for init
at brings the Ellerman hold- hitn, Fountain”.

ing to £624,000. There is no stock
market quotation, but
must run into several millions,

For Ellerman Lines own 83
ships, totalling 540,000 tons, and
have another 16 in the course of
building.

The company’s total assets are
close on £30,000,000, and for
several years the dividend on the
Deferred stock has been ten per
cent, free of tax.

In West End

Another side of the far-ranging
Ellerman interests covers property,
most of it in and around London's
West End.

These assets are concentrated
in the Ellerman Property Trust,
and here, too, Sir John’s personal
holding is shown to have in-

|creased substantially since 1947,

Lesser lights in this constella--
tion of wealth include investment
trusts, breweries, and newspapers.

Sir John, through a nominee,
is the largest individual share-
holder in Odhams Press. That
company has recently increased its

| Hivos, and the Ellerman hold-
ing accordingly shows a further
(substantial capital profit.

its value

And it is said that even today
there are Ellerman workers who
cannot describe what their em-
ployer looks like.

His Privacy

The heir to the aor ene
was born on December 1909,
but no picture of him bee pub
lished until after his father’s
death in 1933,

His privacy was strictly guard-
ed. He was taken away from
Malvern College and put in
charge of private tutors to protect
him against any possible annoy-
ance,

There is no record of the son
having much interest in sport, or
yachts, or fast cars, or any of the
other recreations often favoured
by rich men’s sons.

But he developed a keen inter-
est in acting, and sometimes
staged in his own private theatre
pantomimes and plays which he
himself wrote.

6-Reom Villa

Some months after the first Sir
John died, leaving £36,685,000,
Ellerman married Esther de Sola,
a 28-year old, raven haired girl

.

A Secret

Shortly before the war Eller-
man bought a house in Kensing-
ton Palace-gardens—often known
as “Millionaires’ Row’ —but he
kept his address out of the tele-
phone book and made no men-
tion of it in his six-line entry in
Who’s Who.

The first Sir John was for many
years guided over investments by
the late Sir Miles Mattinson, re-
garded as the City’s most gifted
investment trust expert.

And the father saw to it that
the son should be equally well
advised. The success of the Eller-
man investment policy is shown
in the fact that one of the trusts
formed by the father in 1914 is
now paying an annual dividend
of 71 per cent,

But young Sir John’s interests
are not confined to big companies.
He also helps to run a £5,000 con-
cern known as Kensington Build-
ers, Ltd

And that company shows in its

latest accounts a profit of £581 | widows, need help and they know it.” Red Rose, Blue Cross, Myna
5s. 1ld.—small beer for a man | —_LR : s
worth possibly £40,000,000—L.E.S ' L.E.S, COFFEE



Went With Abe Lincoln



They Outbid Men When It Comes To
A Little Flutter

Hy Frederick Cook

New York

WALL Street has been learning about
women. And women have been learning
about Wall Street. There have been some
surprising discoveries on both sides.

Some months ago, realising that women
held by far the greater part of all American
investments, but as customers were largely
neglected, one of New York’s biggest broker-
age firms organised a series of investment
courses for women only.

The idea spread from coast to coast. The
plan was to educate women in stockmarket
terms and simple operations of buying, sell-
ing, going short or long, hedging and com-
modities.

What the teachers soon found was that
they were providing an elementary school
course for people who needed advanced uni-
versity training.

38,000 ‘STUDENTS’

Almost every lecturer engaged to give a
“women only” course has been bowled over
by the knowledge his students revealed, and
even more so by their keenness to acquire





WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950






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are keener for a profit. Men will buy shares
cautiously, for income. Women will shrug
off caution if the chance of a fast profit is
there.

Professor G. D. Plunkett, who ran a course
for women at New York University on man-
agement of personal funds, reports: “The
self-assured male thinks he is the bold one.
He likes to think of the little woman as timid,
meek, seeking safety above all. He had better
look in at one of my sessions!

“And most women show as good judgment
in investing as the average man does. They ||
are on an equal footing with men when it
comes to investing. They realise the value
of sound factual information, and are looking
for it.”

At the same time, American women are
demonstrating keen interest in the mutual
funds—the fast-expanding multibillion-dollar
investment companies which accept the sav-
ings of the small investor and spread them
around the market in a diversified “portfolio.”

ANY QUESTIONS? YES, PLENTY

Mr. George Shaskan, who gave a series of
12 lectures on this type of investment, says:
“We gave what amounted to a college course
in the economics of investing. And the
women said: ‘Wouldn't we please give them |!
something a little more advanced!’ i

“The questions they asked fascinated me. ||
They are highly technical and intelligent. The
women showed an extraordinary understand-
ing of the role of mutual funds in solving
their investment problems. We are going to
expand the course to meet their needs and to
give it both during the day and in the eve-
ning.”

Dorcas Campbell, who conducted’ a course
at New York’s New School of Social Re-
search, says: “We had to fight to close our
question-and-answer periods or the women
would have stayed on for hours asking the
guest lecturers additional questions.

“They were not wasting their time, either.
These students, single women,

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EAT & DRINK
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wives and TEAS

Chase & Sanborn
Blue Mountain
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MEATS
Hunter’s Sausages
Hunter’s Steak and Kidney

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—A piece by R. M. MacColl
on Bing Crosby in your Sunday
issue of May 7, 1950, several times
has Bing as using the expression
“T aim to” — apparently in a mis-
guided attempt to make him sound
“American” This is commonly
done in British publications evi-

dently to establish a_ readily
identified “American speech” pat-
tern.

“I aim” probably disappeared

from usual speech in the States
about the time Abraham Lincoln;
nearly always it is a rustic ex-
pression and I suspect quite
foreign to Crasby’s speech habits.
He is usually ahead of the pack in
slang.
PAUL B, KINDLUND
§05 Oakland Avenue,
St. Paul Minnesota, U.S.A.
May 31, 1950.
Football

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—Kindly allow me to sug-

gest an island eleven to play
against. Malvern in the first
Island match,

Smith (goal), Bowen and Gib-
bons (Full Backs), Medford,
Haynes, Reece (Everton), (Half
Backs), Chase, Lucas, Wilkes

Blades, Drayton (Forwards).
F, G. ROACH.
King George Road,
June 20, 1950.

Policewomen
To the Editor, The Advocate—

Smr,—I read with interest the
call for “Women as Police’. The
Honourable Miss Audrey Jeffers,
M.B.E., for many years advocated
dhe need for women as Police, and
the police authorities of this col-
ony are to be commended for tak-
ing such a step.

For many years the women of
this colony have suffered through
the lack of employment, for ex-
ample, many of our girls who have
had a secondary education could
find no avenue in which to be em-
ployed, and now this democratic
move has been taken it is obvious
that the girls who are physically
fit will embrace the opportunity.

This opening will prevent many
girls from falling, and in turn
there will be less cases of dis-
repute.

Sir Robert Peel, the English
aristocrat who fought many
battles in the House of Commons,

as instrumental in establishing a
proper Police Force in Great Brit-
iin Policing in Barbados has

reached a high standard, and it is
an organization which the general
public should look up to, and re-
spect, because it plays an import-
ant part in maintaining law and
order.

Women Police in my consid-
ered opinion should play a great
part in preventing women from
doing criminal acts without prose-
cuting them, On the other hand,
they are more capable of diagnos-
ing women's troubles than men

So far as Jamaica is concerned,
there are Women Police who
serve as Welfare officers, and act
as mediators with moral delin-
quents who are subjected through
poverty and economic depression
and are constrained to do im-
moral acts, in order to gain a live-
lihood.

Women should hail with joy this
great opportunity which is off-
ered by Col. Michelin, who prob-
ably got the idea through his ex-
periences in Jamaica or England,
which already have organizations
of this nature that play a prom-

inent part in checking crime
espeXally among women in these
areas

magazine especially
women outlining their griev-

A literary
for

ances would go a long way in
building a high standard of living
among women, such a publication
would assist in creating a new
feeling among women in building
character and impart a desire to
labour honestly to obtain a liveli-
hood; social clubs, lecture groups,
sport organizations and healthy
surroundings will assist greatly in
conquering the many social ills
which beset our women folk.
CLAUDE RAMSAY.

3righton,

Black Rock.

Chivalry

Editor, The Advocate—

Srr,—I am very glad to read of
Mr. G. H. Adams’ defence of wo-
men in the recent debate of the
House of Assembly.

He is certainly to be commended
in every way; what would become
of the world if the name “woman’



To the

is to be dragged in the mire? Mr
Adams can well be assured of the
support of women in every clime,

for the great respect he
the sex that gives
nen and womer

The name of “woman ist not
be let down just for the opinion of
some vindictive member of the
male tribe

holds for
birth to noble

Mr, Adams deserves credit, and
has now the British housewives

behind him
DEFENDER.
Football

To the Editor, The Advocate—

Str,—Sunday’s practice game
showed quite a few flaws in our
footballers, and I now suggest the
following team to play against the
“Rest”

Harris (goal, Proverbs and
Gibbons (full-backs), Cadogan,
Haynes, Ishmael (half-backs),
Drayton, Wilkes, Lucas (for-
wards), Chase and Harper (out-

side left).

ERIC EVELYN.
Eagle Hall,
June 17, 1950.

Holders Hill

Editor, The Advocate—
S1tr,—On Holde#s Hill, St. James
the surface of the road is con-
tinually being washed away on the
slightest rainfall, and a new sur-
face continually being replaced in
the same primitive fashion, Re-
cently this Parish resorted to oil-
ing the surface of this Hill, since
this practice has been adopted the
surface of this Hill has been
washed away three times, and is

To the

now being replaced. 1 consider
this a waste of public funds,

Could not the government
through the Highways & Tr: ‘ans-

port Department Engineer give
some technical help to the Paro-
chial authorities, thereby saving
this waste of taxpaye

rs’ money? I
hope the Government will look ih-
to this matter urgently for it is no
use giving us beautiful tenantry

roads and not the same P
arochial |
Highw ays. = |

St. James,
June 14, 1950

TAXPAYER,

Approval |



To the Editor, The Advoc ate—
SIR,—Please allow me to ee

press my appreciation of the ex

cellent refereeing of L, F Harris |

in the Colts—Malvern match on |
Monday I understand that except
for one or two First Division |
Games, that this as his first big |
— He did a good job.

hat struck n
infrequent : tie hile’ at

use of the whis



tle, ¢
his fine control of a ey “ai

could ¢ ly he t ht
rought disr¢
pute



June 20, 1950

For Best feria It's GODDARDS

Hunter’s Meat Pastes
Vienna Sausages





Hams — Whole and Cut
BLACK CURRANT JAM s
Mer DOSIB soci v vd ba nah aes « 50c.
BRAMBLE JELLY per bottle ___ 36
FISH PASTE—per tin .,... ee



Carr's Sweet Biscuits
Carr's Chocolate Tea Cakes
Carr's Lunch Biscuits
Marsh Mallows

Ovaltine Rusks
Table Raisins
Fresh Vegetables
Cucumber in Tins
Pom in Packages



J. & R. BREAD
& CAKES
Fresh Daily

CROWN DRINKS

7 Flavours

Fl FINE Wy
BEERS =

| Gar



GOLD BRAID RUM
TOP NOTCH RUM

Guinness Stoutenips



se










WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950



They Pull
Stolen Cycles
To Pieces

CYCLE THIEVES

are em-
ploying strategy to hide
their stolen cycles. Instead of

selling the-cycles as they are
stolen they pull them to pieces
and change some of the parts

A stolen cycle, which was a
Court Exhibit recently, had the
saddle identified by one per-
on, the back wheel another.
he frame, handle and head lamp
xy three others.

COOL BREEZE BLEW over

the City yesterday: and be-
cause of this the heat was not as
intense as on Monday. The
temperature was 85 degrees
Fahrenheit in the Shade at mid-
day.

During Monday and up to six
o'clock yesterday morning the
rainfall throughout the island was
one inch and 93 parts, This vw;
an increase over the rainfall for
the past few days.

Of this, St. Peter with 41
parts recorded the heaviest’ show-
trs while 25 parts fell in it
Thomas. Other returns were
City four parts, Station Hij| Dis—
trict two parts, St. George four
parts, St. Philip _ six parts, St
Joseph 21 parts, *St, James 24
parts, St. John 20 partg, St
Andrew 41 parts and St. Lucy
4 parts.

ORK ON THE NEW PLAZA

Theatre is rapidly progress-
ing. A part of the concrete for
the ground floor has already been
put down, and workmen are busy
on the other section.

The windows are already fitted
#n and the roof with the excep
tion of a small part is now qov-
ered With a “tintex”, The bulk
of the work is being done to the

ow at



floor of the balcony and the
operating room is almost com-
pleted.

The wall which is on the right
side of the building has already
been constructed, and work is
being carried out on the levelling
of this enclosure.

HE LOSS OF A QUANTITY
of articles was reported by
Henry Best of Watkins Alley. He
stated that they were removed
from his residence between Satur-
day and Monday.
oe WALTERS OF BIBBY
LANE, St. Michael reported
the loss of a quantity of clothing
and a watch, total value $60.30,
from his residence between 9.30
a.m. and 3.30 p.m. on Monday.
Or FIVE TRAFFIC OF-
FENCES recorded yester-
day only one motorist was
charged with exceeding the
speed limit while two persons
were charged with not keeping
their vehicles to the left of the
road,

Another motorist was charged
for driving without due care and
attention and one for driving
without the appropriate licence.

N ACCIDENT OCCURRED
on Bank Hall Road at about
12.45 p.m. on Monday between
a bieyele ridden by Edgar Hold-

er and -a_ pedestrian—Hildfa
Cadogan of Alleyne’s Land,
Passage Road.

Cadogan complained of pains

She was taken to the General
Hospital where she was treated
and discharged.
HE REAR WHEEL of moto:
car M—753, owned by Levis
L. Carter of Black Rock and
driven by Lester E. Carter of the
same address, was damaged in an
accident along Prince William
Henry Street at about 4.20 p.m.
on Monday.

Also involved was motor lorry
X—591, owned by Spencers Plan-
caper and driven by Isaac Frank-
yn.

BICYCLE AND A motor car
were involved in an accident
along Trafalgar Square at about
4.00 p.m. on Monday. The car,

X—276, was owned and driven
by James McKenzie of Navy
Gardens, Christ Church, while

the bicycle was ridden by St.Clair
Watson of Airy Cot, St. Thomas.
The cycle was damaged

IONEL MYLES OF LODGE

4 HILL, St. Michael, was
treated at the General Hospital
for injuries after being involved
in an accident along Prospect
Road, St. James at about 7.45
p.m. on Monday.

Motor van M—2506, owned by
Messrs, Alleyne Arthur & Co.
Ltd., High Street, and driven by
Richards L. Marshall of Brittons

Cross Road, was also involved.
Myles was riding his bicycle.
FIRE WhitcH OCCURRED
t at the residence of Clirrie
Maloney of Passage Road, St.
Michael, at about 2.00 o'clock

yesterday morning destroyed a
portion of the roof and a quantity
of clothing.

es, When the Fire Brigade arrived
eh the scene, neighbours had al-
ready helped in extinguishing the
blaze. The value is unestimated,
but the house is not covered by

insurance, Oh

Jamaica Civil
Servants Ask
50% Pay Rise

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
KINGSTON, June 20.

Jamaica’s Civil Servants yester-
day adopted a resolution calling
upon the Government for an im-
mediate 50% increase on_ their
salaries within one morth. Copies
of the resolution were “being for-
warded to the Secretary of State
for the Colonies. Bustamante as
head of the government. and
N. W. Manley, leader of the Oppo-
sition were elected members of
the Association. Employees de-
clared that if steps were not taken
to satisfy this demand, they would
go on a sick strike. A call was
made for wage increases for Civil
Servants and the government is
studying a report by E. C. Mills
on civil service salary re-organi-
sation. Recently the Government
spokesman pointed out that the
present cost of the service is in
the region, 5 million dollars was
too much for the colony’s present
income



5 time and thought to the question

ee

offer be
of the Memorandum by the that the fullest weight has been treated as a mere matter o{ busi-
Minister of Food and the Min- given te the important part which ness and the concern of the Min-
ister of State for Colonial the sugar industry plays, and must istry of Food alone. We agree
Affairs, issued on June 7th in play, in the economy of their ter- Indeed, we should have thought
reply to representations made ritories. We feel, however, that that it was apparent to all that
by the West Indian Sugar Del- the Delegation does less than jus- the offers made by the United
egation to His Maj sty’s Gov- tice to the extent to which other :
ernment on 26th May, 1950. crops besides sugar have been de-
We have studied sympatheti- veloped over a period of years.
cally the Memorandum presented There is substantial production in
to us on the 26th May, 1950 by the the territories of such crops as ’
British West Indies ‘and British rice, cocoa, coffee, cocoanuts, cit- that an agreement that did not
Guiana Sugar Delegation, and are TUS and bananas and there are have proper regard to the com-
most grateful for the care and other possibilities, such as jute in mercial needs of the buyer as
thought devoted to its prepara- British Guiana. There are also well as to the needs of the seller
tion. We have read with concern, important mineral industries would prove to be _ ill-conceived
however, their strictures on the (bauxite in British Guiana, which anq transitory and we trust that
action of the United Kingdom ®ccounts for 25% of the total ex- the Delegation will be prepared to
Government in announcing on the Ports of the Colony, oil and as- support the view that commercial
8rd April, after the Grenada Con- — “ en tee between considerations have a vital part
ference, that while they would be them form over 70% of the total t play in the evolution of per-
willing to receive a delegation, ©XPorts of Trinidad), and other J anent and satisfactory arrange-
their offer to the British Wes; â„¢ineral potentialities (oil in Bar- : Pre Prt ee
c Ss bad nd bauxite in J ica), ments for the supply of sugar by
Indies Sugar Association was final, 22005 @ amaica). ine w i he. United
Members of the United Kingdom Nor does the Delegation make re- ‘he West Indies to the Unite
Government had devoted much fetence to the efforts which are Kingdom.
being made to develop secondary Li 2 d
piel There are already a unite
considerable number of such in- va omen ronsider the
dustries established and there will coagllent Te. a. Hho
be more. While they - . roy
le they ean hardly ment extending over eight years,
neither the United Kingdom

by themselves wholly support the
economy of the territories they
have their part to play. Fresh Government nor the sugar pro-
sources of powers, e.g. water pow- ducing territories of the Common-
er in British Guiana or perhaps oi] wealth can escape the fact that
in Barbados, would increase the the capacity of the United King-
possibilities. In short, while we dom market is itself limited.
realise that the sugar industry The Delegation has quoted a
must be the mainstay of most of figure for the consumpticn of
the territories, we feel that the sugar in the United Kingdom of
oer have not taken account 2,750,000 tons. We have failed to
a rexports or of the meas- trace the source of this estimate,
Ss already taken to diversify the but it is d edly t
economy and the possibilities PUL jt & undoubtedly over opti.
which exist of carryin Bpelicy “E> Ser a erate, we
ving this ‘policy certainty the future level of sugar

further. “
consumption—a matter which de-

Do Not Believe pends not only on supply but on

the levels of prices and of pur-

cannot

beyond what could be defended
on strict usiness principles

during the winter negotiations,
and having studied the resolu-
tions of the Conference, felt that
it was unlikely that the Delegation
would be able to advaiece facts
or arguments not previously con-
sidered. It would in our view,
have been quite wrong in these
circumstances to have allowed the
Delegation to embark upon their
Yong voyage without making it
clear beyond doubt that the Gov-
ernment could hold out no pros-
pect whatever o€ amending. their
previous offer.

Misconceptions

We are glad, that, nevertheless.
the Delegation” decided to pro-
ceed to the United Kingdom,
since it gives us the opportunity

of removing misconceptions The United Kingdom Govern- chasing power. The estimate
which appepr to underlie the ment emphatically do not believe eventually adopted by the United
criticisms to which ther United that, as the Delegation suggest Kingdom Government, after the
Kingdom Government’s offer has their offer is likely to lead to a most careful investigation, as-
been subjected, and especially recurrence of the conditions that sumes that when rationing
the impression that the interests existed before the war. This can be ended the United
of the West Indies were subor- statement ignores the Yact that Kingdom's annual = consump-
dinated to those of Australia. the offer of a guaranteed market tion of sugar will rise to
The fact is that up to the time

Currency Control

The Delegation has stated that
currency control “in effect requires
the Colonies to buy from the
United Kingdom at high uncon-

the Head of the Australian Dele- S'@te® part of the sugar crop for increases in population and
resentatives of the West Indies "0 Comparable contract has ever immediately before the war
ment’s proposal. The Govern. fer the Government have had in war level at present prices of
postponement or of concluding iâ„¢Portance of ensuring stable eco- tions based upon more optimistic
other Delegations. Since its pro- *!4¢r that the terms proposed are extending over .the next eight
native but to conclude an agree- /€8S than justice to the very sub-
being reached for a comprehen- ten years) and is being made We come now to the actual offer
untrue that political considera- The Delegation’s Memorandum /éies Sugar Association. — In
compatible with their declared Guiana exported an average of
case that the proposals made ritories. The Government = ee big plus either the Canadian or the
long- the export of 900,000 tons of sug-
the years 1953-1957 of 649,- ment as pre-requisites of consti- sua gekee: to te empeiineel. each
comgraon that the exportable of the sugar industry in the Car- Canada or in the United Kingdom:
that they are not in accord sidered that it would not be in atthe time. Bearing in mind the
Voast Indies on the 10th August. | oduction of sugar at the expense dies, this offer should provide for
Ga ee ere for good and stable government in with an industry of about 600,000
come comparable with the yn- fotented Weel economic The details of an offer which provides
therefore, that the United King- contract can only be demonstrated which will afford assured markets
British West Indies Sugar As- Kingdom’s offer provide a sound years before the war and 180,000
cover 725,000 tons. in the West Indies. rightly be condemned as ungenet-
the West Indies have not fully ap- Deeialy met Mew is widely
last winter’s negotiations, a dual market are not fully understood
ensure to the best of its ability trolled prices.” We recognise that
the restriction of dollar imports the Delegation feels that this offer

that agreement was reached with oF cnmunerative prices for the 2,550,000 tons. This figure allows
F : z _ represents a fundamental change for a somewhat higher consump-
aetture for’ Australian. the, veg, £0 pre-war conditions; indeed, tion per head than in the years
been offered by the United King- Wheth in fact -
had felt wholly unable to aecept c 8 ether in fact per capita con
the United Kingdom Galeetre dom Government. In making this sumption would rise to the pre-
ment, therefore, was faced with ™®d, not only their own long- sugar may well be a matter of
the alternatives of indefinite ‘"™ Yequirements, but also the doubt, but certainly any assump-
its arrangements with Australia “0Mic conditions for a major forecasts would be quite unreal-
in advance of agreement with Conial interest. And we con- jstic in relation to a contract
posals were acceptable to Aus- ®t inconsistent with that dual years,
tralia it had, in fact, little alter- Objective. This criticism also does
ment on the understanding that S#Mtial assistance which has been The U. K. Offer
it was subject to a settlement (Some £19 millions over the past
. i de by the United Kingdom
sive Commonwealth Agreement, ®Vailable under The Colonial ™® . iti a
We would add that it is wholly Development and Welfare Acts. Government to the British West
tion influenced the United King- further suggests that the United }re three years before the war the
dom Government's offer Kingdom Government’s offer is in- :
We understand it to be the policy of encouraging constitution- 550,000 tons of sugar, all of which
essence of the Defegation’s al progress in the Caribbean ii "to“be ienid at She: worlssprice
not ‘Wey
by the United Kingdom Gov- regard their offer as in amy way United Kingdom preference, The
eae i aoe on inconsistent with ‘their Government's offer provides for
ndies Sugar ssociation for standing policy of fostering social , af 00
the purchase annually during }etterment and economic develop- ret A Ah Bor A ret eater
000 tons of sugar at a reason- tutional progress. While we full
r M ; Y year, and the remaining 260,000
ae ito ter ive Brice, om recognise the major importance tons will find a market either in
8 should be ;
a na e undealinats ibbean area, and are most anxious gt the world price plus such pre-
, to secure its well-being, we con- ferential duties as may be in force
with the promise made to a
the long-term interest of the West increase in home consumption
previous Delegation from the Indian Colonies to encourage the that has occurred in the West In-
1949, and that the ;
to fears a gil road Frings © med of other forms of ‘economic de- an industry of between 1,000,000
velopment. The best foundation and 1,050,000 tons as compared
ditions in the st Indi . }
so far 2 ee as a aan the Caribbean ‘area lies in the tons before the war. Whatever
well- criticisms can be levelled at the
happy state of affairs before balanced local economics,
the war, The Delegation urge, ¢conomic effects of the proposed for expansion of this order, and
dom Government should ac- by events, but we are confident for exports of 350,000 tons more
cede to the request of the that the terms of the United sugar than was exported in the
sociation that the guaranteed foundation for further progress in tons more than the current level
market should be extended to the economic and industrial field Of exports, we do not think it can
‘ ; ous, or as failing to implement the
We believe these views are mis- undertaking given last summer
taken and arise from the fact that
held it can only be because the
preciated that the United King- te, Amy of iad United Kingdom
dom Government had, throughout
responsibility: a responsibility ; ,
which we gladly acknowledge, to Australia
We understand,, however, that
that sugar producers throughout
the Commonwealth are given rea- js onerous, but it is a burden compares unfavourably with the

sonabie opportunity to expand shared by the United “ingdom offers made to Australia. When
their industry under conditions anq py all the other sterling area the Government of the United
of reasondple security, and a

countries. It is necessary in order Kingdom undertook in 1948 to buy

responsibility for ensuring that the to preserve the strength of ster- the whole exportable surplus that

cost to consumers in the United

Kingdom does not become so bur- ling until the sterling dollar trad- could be produced within the
densome as to carry with it a risk ing account can be brought into Commonwealth up to 1952, they
of public reaction against a policy balance. To do this is in the gave all producers an’ incentive to
of contracting for many years economic interests of each one of expand their exports up to 1952
ahead for the supply of si the sterling area countries. without limit. The results of their
from the Commonwealth. While, But this does not mean that efforts are now known within nar-

therefore, the Government was
prepared to enter into guarantees
in respect of the greater part of
the sugar exported from the Col-
onies to the United Kingdom, it
could not agree that United King-
dom consumers should be called
upon wholly to insulate sugar
producers in the Commonwealth
from the movement of world
prices in respect of all sugar sold
to the United Kingdom. Nor, in-
deed, does the Government be-
lieve that to increase the very
large measure of security already
offered would lead to more effi-
cient sugar preduction, or would
ultimately prove to be in the wider
interests of the West Indies them-

the area from which the Colonies row limits and must clearly stang
can draw their imports is nar- as the minima for any subsequent
rowly restricted. In effect the agreements. This year, Australia,
control severely restricts im- will sell to the United Kingdom
ports at present only from 500,000 tons of sugar, and there
North America and the American 7 . tiwar~ . ac ane

ee area, and from Switzer of 600,000 tons by 1952. It is that
; fact that has established her right
to a quota of 600,000 tons ander
the proposed Commonwealth
agreement. Nevertheless, only
300,000 tons out of this 600,000
tons will be bought at the guaran-
teed price. Having regard to the
importance attached by the West
Indies to the quantities subject to
guarantee, we find it difficult to

Manufactured and cther
imports can be crawn from
most of Europe, independent
Commonwealth countries
within the sterling area and
many other countries with,
for practical purposes. little
or no restriction, This import
and foreign exchange control

never had as its ob‘ect the think that, dispassionately consid-

rrr . Sone a S aatkaond pane ered, an offer to buy 640,000 tons
Cc s ot A tion for United Kingdom ex- out of 900,000 tons from the West
ann ccept ports. Its sole purpose is 40 Indies at a reasonably remunera-

The argument that Colonial congerve the resources of tive price, as compared with only

300,000 tons out of 600,000 tons
from Australia, can be regarded as
favouring the latter. We are con
fident, indeed, that comparison
unr sila confirms our view that the eee
eeerrer ; taking given by the United King-

We note that the a dom Government last August ha
claims that the United Kingdom }.0) fully and, indeed, generous!’

implemented.

Not Responsible

We have already explained that
in our view it would neither be
reasonable, nor in the long term
interests of the West Indies, if con-
sumers in the United Kingdon
were to be called upon to insulate
Commonwealth producers against
the movement of world prices to
an extent greater than is provided
in the United Kingdom Govern-
ment’s proposals. It follows that
the amount of sugar that the

farmers are entitled to be helped
by the United Kingdom Govern-
ment in the same way that United
Kingdom Government helps Unit-
ed Kingdom farmers is not one
that we can accept. It is the United
Kingdom taxpayers as such, not
the consumer of sugar, who stb-
sidizes the United Kingdom beet
farmer. Colonies are not part of
the United Kingdom fiscal system.
Any special assistance to Colonial
producers, over and above a price
for sugar negotiated between sell-
er and buyer, would have to be
borne by Colonial Governments.
The United Kingdom Govern-
ment do not for a moment deny
the natural suitability of the West
Indies for the production of sugar
Indeed, they have in the past en-
couraged expansion of sugar pro-
duction and the arrangements they
are proposing allow for consider-
able further expansion. The De-

“hard” currencies. It therefore
follews that United King-
dom exports are in competi-
tion with exports from many



What's on Today -

Court of Common Pleas at
10.30 a.m.

Mobile Cinema at King

George V Park at 7.30 p.m.

Basket Ball at Y.M.C.A. at
8.20 p.m.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

United Kingdom can undertak
to purchase from the West
Indies under guarantee cannot be
increased. We believe, neverthe-
less, that the Delegation take
altogether too pessimistic a view
of the consequences of selling 29%

dies at the workd price plus
rent preferential duties Their
a misconception of the Cuban pos
ition and a mistaken belief that
Cuba, by reason of her access to
the United States market, can
adopt a policy of “dumping” with
out serious consequences for her
sugar economy. The contrary is
true; the consequences of “dump-
ing” would be most serious for
her. It is not, indeed, open to
doubt that Cuba has a heavic:
stake in the maintenance of a
satisfactory level of world prices
for free market sugar than pro
ducers in the British West Indies
would have under the proposed
arrangements.
°
- Mistaken

The Delegation, arguing
that Cuba has the power t
unload her exportable surplus on
the world market at prices which
bear little or no relation to costs
of production, is repeating an
argument persistently but mistak~
enly advanced by the West Indies
Cuba has a guaranteed outlet in
the United States of America for
rather less than half her exporta-
ble production. She has, however.
no guarantee whatsoever = in
respect of pricé. The basis on
which the United States buys
Cuban sugar is the daily price
at which Cuban sugar is sold in
the world market plus the effective
United States preference of 25 to

in

28 points. (At today's rate of
exchange of 2.80 dollars to the
£, this is equivalent to 2/- t
2/3d. per cwt., or rather less

than half the preference which
the Colonies enjoy in the Unitee
Kingdom). When the world price
stood at 4.70 cents f.o.b. in Jan-
uary last, United States refiners
were buying at 4.96 cents f.0,b
Today when the world price has
fallen to 4.15 cents, United States
reffners are able to’ buy at less
than 4.45 cents: if the world price
declines to 3.50 cents then Cuba
sells to the United States at 3.75
cents to 3.80 cents.

In other words, the
at which the Cubans
sell their exportable pro-
\duction, whether to the
United States or in the free
market, is wholly determined
by the world price. It is true
that a reduction of United
States quotas in the interests
of domestic pro@ucers might
have the temporary effect of
adding a point or two to the
Cuban preference. But an ad-
vantage such as this is pure-
ly incidental and temporary.

price
must

It in no way alters the fact
that the price at which Cuba sells
to the United States is based on
the world market price. Tt follows

that for Cuba a_ policy of
“dumping” sugar on world
markets at something less. than

the economic cost of production
would be suicidal, since the con-
sequences would be _ reflected
immediately hot only in the prices
she received for her “dumped”
sugar, but in the prices
received from the United States.
It is for this reason that Cuba is
so convinced an advocate of &
new International Sugar Agree-
ment. We do not deny, of course
that the West Indies has an inter-
est in the world price. Indeed,
we have expressed the view thet
a healthy sugar economy could
not be developed if she were to
be wholly insulated from that
price. What we are concerned to
point out, however, is that to Cuba
the world price of sugar is vital,
despite her preferential position
in the United States market, and
that to assume that she can afford
to “dump” sugar without the most
serious consequences is to assume
something that is demonstrably

untrue.
" °
The Solution
In the view of the United
Kingdom Government the solu~

tion to the problem of the world
price of sugar is to be found in

the negotiation of a new Inter-
national Sugary Agreement. Fail~
ing such an Agreement there

would be little hope of persuading
such countries as Cuba, San
Domingo, Peru or Java to limit
their production, more especially

us the tIast three have no
preferential markets to which to
turn, and depend wholly upon

selling the maximum amount of
sugar in the free market

The result of failure might
well be to start a disastrous
sugar war from the — conse-
quences of which it wou!l4
in practice, be impossible per
manently to insulate Colonial
producers no matter what the
nature of the guarantee. It is,
therefore, vital that the United

Kingdom, in consultation with the
Colontes, should be in a position
to play her part in the negotiation
of an International Sugar Agree-
ment, and that she could not hope
to do unless she could give firm
undertakings that a defined and
defensible share in the United
Kingdom market would be sei
aside for free market sugar, It is
mainly for this reason that the
United Kingdom has reserved an
amount of 225,000 tons for that

purpose.

During the winter negotiations
the United Kingdom Government

promised to consider with the
producers’ representatives each
year whether a further year

could be added to the agreement
They also stated that the quanti
ties of sugar covered by the long-
rerm agreement offered to Com
monwealth producers coyld be
revised upwards if circumstig
ces permitted, but undertook that
there would be no question of
revising them downwards durjng



the period of the eight-year
agreement (1950—57). These
statements stand Moreover,
if producers so wish, they will
be willing to conduct a_ special
examination during the
first year of the 1953—1957
agreement The examination
would be made in the light of
all the circumstances then ob





Sn re ne ee een

U.K. STATES HER VIEWS ABOUT SUGAR |

*'@ The following is the full text legation can be assured, therefore, Government's

Kingdom Government went much of the production of the West >
cur-

alone. We are convinced, however, view appears to be founded upon

U som on rma

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taining, ineluding the levels o1
export performance achieved by
all parties to the agreement and
consumption trends, The revigw
would cover all the quantities of
sugar which the United Kingdom
Government have undertaken
to buy from the
producers.
in the Untied Kingdom pra’
bigher’ than has been estima}
the United Kingdom v

would not, at that stage
examination of the 5s
some addition to the 4q H
ts be purchased under guarantee

An Appeat

We should like to conclude by a
appealing to the Delegation to
consider the United Kingdom
Government's offer dispassionate-
ly in the light of what is practi-
cable in the hard world of inter-
national commerce in which the
United Kingdom and the Wes:
Indies both must live, rather
than in the light of what might
De theoretically desirable in
quite other circumstances, We
would remind the Delegatidn
that the ability of the United
Kingdom to afford to the Colonjes
and Dominions the security ‘of
long term agreement for sugar
and other commodities rests
altimately on her strength as a
nates nation, and that to, over-
tax that strength must ultynately
curry its penalty. est
Indies have not got al] they
asked for — but negotiators sel-
dom do. On the other hand,
they have been offered a meas-
ure of expansion and a -of




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College Masters
Will Teach Science

MEMBERS of the staff of the
Department of Science and Agri-
culture will no longer be responsi-
ble for the teaching of science at
Harrison College, according to the
terms of a bill passed by the Leg-
islative Council at yesterday’s

meeting.

Arrangements have been made
for the teaching of that subject
to be undertaken by masters of
the College, and the bill relieves
the Director of Science and Agri-
culture from his statutory re-
sponsibility for teaching science
by making appropriate amend-
ments to the Department of Sci-
ence and Agriculture Act, 1925.

Members of the Council yester-
day expressed agreement with
the new arrangement.





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© PAGE SIX



Council Approves Pension
For Loan Bank Manager

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL yesterday by a seven
to four majority passed a BiJl to provide for the payment
of a pension to Douglas Arden Mottley Haynes, Manager ot

the Peasants’ Loan Bank.

The division was:

Ayes: Hon’bles Mr. Challenor,
Dr. Massiah, Mr. Gittens, The
Bishop, Dr. St. John, Mr. Hutson
and the Acting Colonial Secretary.

Noes: Hon’bles Mr, Evelyn, Mr.
Mahon, Mrs. Hanschell and Mr.
Pile.

This Bill seeks to grant to Doug-

s Arden Mottley Haynes, Man-
ger of the Peasants’ Loan Bank,
a pension in respect of public ser-

ce.

Douglas Arden Mottley Haynes
was appointed an assistant teacher
in 1914 and after serving with the
B.W.I. Regiment from 1915 to 1919
‘was appointed a Cadet in the Har-
pour Master’s office. In 1921 he
entered the Parochial Service of
the parish of St. Thomas and re-
mained in that service until 1936
when he was appointed manager
of the Peasants’ Loan Bank, which
post he still holds.

In view of Mr. Haynes’ good ser-
vice in the various offices he has
held, it is considered equitable he
should be granted a pension (or
a reduced pension and gratuity)
of two thirds of his present salary
as Manager of the Peasants’ Loan
Bank when he retires from that

st.

The Bill is drafted to give effect
accordingly.
{| The Acting Colonial Secretary
moved the second reading of the
Bill. He said that it was slightly
unusual, Its purpose was to pro-
vide a pension for a man who had
and was working in the service of
the people of Barbados—the Local
Government, the Central Govern-
ment and otherwise, for 36 years.

Unkind

His service at the Peasants’ Loan
Bank was not pensionable and it
would be an extremely unkind act
for a Government employing him
for so long not to give him any
reward or any safety for his fu-
ture. Mr. Haynes was a very effi-
cient officer and runs the Peasants’
Loan Bank extremely well. He
had undertaken now to do even a
more difficult and he thought a
more important task, that was to
run the Labour Welfare Housing
Loan Scheme, a scheme which
needed his rticular knowledge.
He thought it was fitting that the
Government should give Mr.
Haynes this pension.
| Hon’ble Mr. Challenor seconded
the motion for the second read-

e President said that the
Hon’ble Colonial Secretary in his
oO) remarks had said that the

Was an unusual one, He
agreed, and he thought it was his
duty to draw to the attention of
the Council that the Bill was
breaking completely new ground
as pensions to people for
services which had not been ren-
dered to the Government. When
he first read the notice to the Bill
he compared it to the Bill which
‘was a few years ago for
a pension to Mr. Chase, but on
further consideration it did appear
to him that it was not on the same
basis as that Bill.

Thirty Years

| He was saying that for the
reason that when Mr. Chase re-
tired he had served the Govern-
ment from 1908 to 1938, a period
of 30 years. He then left the Gov-
ernment service to be Manager of
the Barbados Settlement Company
in St. Lucia, better known as the
Nieux Fort Emigration Scheme.
That scheme was financed purely
by Government and therefore al-
though he ht not have been a
Government Civil Servant while
serving in that capacity, he was
certainly a quasi Government ser-
vant. Before accepting that post
he had asked Government that his
services be considered as earning
pension, and he was assured that
that would be given due consid-
eration when the time came.

Mr, Chase remained in that post
from 1938 to 1943 and from 1943
to 1947 he was appointed Social
Welfare Officer. His salary was
fixed on a non-pensionable basis,
and when the time came for him
to retire he was undoubtedly en-
titled to his thirty years’ Govern-
ment service. The Bill for his
pension took into consideration his
ten years’ service with the Bar-
bados Settlement Company and as
Social Welfare Officer, and he was
given half the period as would
qualify him for pension.

| Keep Pace With Equity

» As he had already said the Bill
before them to his mind, was not
on all fours with that of Mr,
(Chase’s. He had looked up the
debate in connection with Mr.
Chase’s Bill and had seen that the
then Colonial Secretary had said
that the Bill was to enable the
law to keep pace with equity; that
tthe Government proposed to do
what they expected it to do, that
twas, to be equitable to those who
had given good service.

He agreed. with everything that
had taken place with regard to
Mr, Chase’s Bill but what had per-
turbed him as regards the present
Bill was that the individual con-
cerned, although he had been in

the Government service and was
a very good servant, was in the
service from 1914 to 1921 after

which he accepted employment in
the parochial service working with
the Vestry of St. Thomas.

That to his mind, although being
a public service, was deftnitely
not Government Service, “Mr.
Haynes must have known when
he accepted the post that he wobid
be losing Government pension and
therefore must have weighed the
pros and cons of the matter.

Mr. Haynes remained in that
service from 1921 to 1936 and he
then went to the Peasants’ Loan
Bank from 1936 to 1950. He would
agree that it would be equitable
to give Mr. Haynes pension for his
service at the Peasants’ Loan
Bank for though it could not be
regarded as official Government
service, it was certainly quasi
Government service.

He did not feel, however, that it
was equitable for Government to

ension anyone for giving fifteen
years’ service to another body. He
felt it would be inequitable to all
other Government employees. He

felt a Bill like that was inequit-
able to all Government servants
who remained permanently and
continuously in the Government
Service, and he only wanted to
point out to the CounciJ that it
was breaking new ground. He was
not quite sure where it would lead

Agreed

Hon'ble Mr.
agreement with
remarks,

The Acting Colonial Secretary
said that in his opening remarks
he had said the Bill was unusual
and there was no denying that. It
was not unusual in that it would
allow pension or gratuity, Where
it was unusual was that it said
service in the public interest
would be counted as Government
service. Some of that service
might have been paid for at a
higher rate than the normal Gov-
ernment rate but in any case it
was too difficult to prove then.

Evelyn expressed
the President’s

It had been suggested that half
the service should have been
counted, but this he would assure
them was slowly becoming out-of-
date,

He was worried about the re-
percussions on the Service gen-
erally, but he did think that Mr.
Haynes’ case was an exceptional
one and merited exceptional
treatment. He, however, would
not like to see it usec as a prece-
dent by other persons who had
given service to outside bodies,
semi-government or otherwise.

As far as he remembered there
was recent agreement by one ves-
try to make contribution to an ex
gratia pension which would come
before the legislature soon, That
would lead them to the position
where they were trying to give a
reasonable benefit to a man who
had served his commyinity well.

The motion that the Bill was
read a second time was then put
to the vote and resolved as al-
ready ‘stated. It was afterwards
passed.



*“Vansluytman’
Lost Stern Post

AFTER spending four weeks
undergoing repairs at Trinidad and
one week discharging cargo at
Antigua, the schooner Timothy
A. H. Vansluytman sailed for Bar-
bados, reaching port on Monday
evening.

On this trip the Vansluytman
lost her stern post when about two
miles from the Bocas. This caused
the delay at Trinidad.

Captain Stoll told the Advocate
yesterday that the Vansluytman
left British Guiana on May 8 for
Antigua via Trinidad. Good
weather prevailed, but the stern
post gave away, damaging the
steering gear.

He sailed the vessel into Port-
of-Spain where all the cargo was
unloaded before docking. From
Trinidad the Vansluytman called
at Antigua and then sailed for
Barbados,

The vessel has only brought 18
pieces of greenheart for this port.

IMPORTS
YESTERDAY

ABOUT 700 bags of first quality
rice and 306 bags of broken rice
arrived in the island yesterday
when the 72-ton schooner Emeline
sailed into port.

This schooner has also brought
1,500 pieces of sawn green heart,
700 bags of charcoal, 68 tons of
firewood and 75 cases of patent

medicines.

Also calling at this port was
the motor vessel Lady Joy from
St. Lucia which brought fresh
fruit, plantains, coconuts and

coconut oil.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





In The Couneil Council Encourages

Yesterday

At yesterday's meeting of the Legisla

tive Council the Acting Colonial Secretary
laid the following documents

Statement showing Gross Customs and
Excise Receipts for twelve months ended
3ist March, 1950

The Labour Welfare
Loans) Regulations, 1950.

The Customs (Amendment) Re«ulations,
1950.

Colonial Estimates, 1950-51

Statement showing Gross Customs and
Excise Receipts for one month ended 30th
April, 1950.

The Wages Board (Bridgetown Shop
Assistants) Order, 1950.

Statement of the sunis of money paid
ever to the Colonial Treasurer by the
Commissioner of Police during the quart
er_ended 3ist March, 1950.

The Motot Vehicles and Road Traffic
(Amendment) Regulations, 1950.

Contract between J. N. Harriman and
Company, Limited, and the Executive
Committee of the Island of Barbados, for
the construction of a new runway,
taxiway and parking apron at Seawell
Airport in the Island of Barbados

The following Bills were passed :

Bill to amend the Department of
Seience and Agriculture Act, 1925.

Bill to amend the Executive Committee
Act, 1891

Bill to amend the Public Employees
Pension Act, 1937.

Bill for promoting the cultivation of
trees and for purposes in connection
therewith,

Bill to provide for the payment of a
pension to Douglas Ardon Mottley Haynes
Manager of the Peasant’s Loan Bank in
this Island.

Bill to amend the Widows and Orphans
Pension Act, 1928,

The Council postponed consideration of
the three following measures ;—

Bill to authorise the Governor-in-Exe-
cutive Committee to let certain Govern-
-ment Jands to the Governing Body of
Combermere School.

Bill to amend the Representation of the
People Act, 1901,

Resolution to make it lawful for a
Vestry to lease land within their parish
for any period not exceeding 21 years
and that any such lease shall be binding
on the successive Vestries of the said
parish,

Fund (Housing

The Council adjourned until 2 p.m, next
Tuesday



% :
Schuman Defends
France
@ From Page 1
to renew healthier European econ-

omy,

“My colleague M._ Stikker
(Dutch Foreign Minister) has
recently made an important and
fruitful contribution to this sub-
ject. It is placed on a different
level to our own, but there is no
overlapping nor _ contradiction
between our two objectives.

“A further characteristic of the
French proposal is this:

“Besides its economic signifi-
cance, susceptible of development
which at the gresent moment one
can only guess at, it has, and pre-
serves, a political value which
from the first hour struck public
opinion in the different countries
more than any other considera-
tion

Co-operation

“The essential thing is that we
want to substitute an enlightened
cooperation for the old practices of
dumping and discrimination, But
what is at least ag important is
the certainty of eliminating from
our European community a latent
cause of trouble, mistrust, and
«nguish, and a hope of erecting on
this peacemaking cooperation a
solid European edifice accessible
we oau European nations of good-
wi

“We would keenly have
desired that Great Britain be
present at our discussions

We cannot conceive Europe

without her. “We know that

the British Government de-
sires the success of our labour,
and this re-assures us.

“Certain differences of view
which presented her from par-
ticipating actively, at least at this
stage. appeared in the course of
an exchange of views which was
as frank as it wag friendly.

“We preserve the hope that the
doubts and scruples, which a
reasoning that tended to be doc-
trinal could not overcome, will
end by giving way before more
concrete demonstrations.

Conformity

“The French Government will
certainly be acting in conformity
with the considerations animating
all the participating governments
when it keeps the British Gov-
ernment informed of the develop-
ment of our deliberations and
thus provides it with a possibility,
if not of joining us—which we
persist in desiring—then at least
of communicating to us all useful
observations thus preparing the
way for future co-operation,

As for ourselves, we shall
have commenced a work that
has been assigned to us. First
of all we must adopt a method
of work.

“It will be the work of a
team and not of a conference
with its rigid regulations. Our
main consideration will be to
be effective. The sparkle of
eloquence will not tempt us.
“An information meeting to-

morrow will enable us to settle
our ideas in this respect, These
ideas will take shape during the
personal contacts which we shail
make it our busingss to establish
and maintain.

“Fundamental problems will be
approached at the same time,
One cannot separate one from the
other.” We shali pool our ideas,
confront them, and choose be-
tween them.

“The French Government a

Planting

Of Trees

A BILL to promote the cultivation of trees and for
purposes in connection therewith was passed by the Leg-

islative Council yesterday.

House of Assembly and went before the Council during the pitoons — were

The Council
House with an amendment, but the

last legislative session.

the House could consider it.

It was therefore necessary to introduce it in the police Band led by Cpl. Morris,

Current session.

Hon'ble Mr. Petrie, Acting Co-
lonial Secretary, explained this to
members as he moved the second
reading, seconded by Dr. Mas-
siah. He said he thought it would
be impertinent for him to add
anything to what had been said
when the bill was fully discussed
on the last occasion that it was
before the Council.

Regret

Hon’ble Mr, F. C. Hutson re-
called that on the last occasion
he had expressed regret that there
was no specific mention of fruit
trees in the bill Hon'ble Mr
Chandler had on_ that occasion
said that the growing of fruit in
Bu. weuse \.culd be an uphill task
because of praedial larceny. Ha
thought, however, that the hon’ble
member had answered his own
criticism when he said that prae-
aial lareeny was not so intense
in places where a great quantity
of fruit was n.

He still it the same re-
gret that there was no speci-
fie mention of fruit trees.
There were thousands of trees
in the island that were neither
fruit trees nor ornamental
trees. They were just shrub-
bery that was not even useful
for firewood. He felt that
steps should be taken to elim-
inate as much as possible of
those useless trees, and that
they should be replaced
wherever possible by some
form of fruit trees.

He looked forward to the day
when there would be a cheaper
and more plentiful water supply,
and people who could not now af-
ford to water fruit trees would
then be able to do so.

Approved Trees
..Hon’ble G, B. Evelyn drew at-
tehtion to the fact that by section
10 of the bill the Director of Ag-
riculture had the power to in-
crease the species of trees includ-
ed in the definition of “approved

First Bulk
Shipment Of

Molasses

The 1,235-ton American tanker
V.W. Gokey arrived at Bridgetown
yesterday to take the first load of
fancy molasses in bulk for
Canada.

The fancy molasses is expected
to be supplied to the . tanker
through the cast iron pipes
which were recently laid down
along. Cavans Lane.

Tanker V.K. Gokey was an-
chored off Pelican Island on its
arrival and remained «at — that
anchorage’ throughout the day.

To take its load of bulk molas-
ses, the tanker has to be berthed
in the outer basin of the Careen-
age, near to the Central Foundry
dock.

The skipper, Captain William
Kamp, was awaiting orders from
his local agents as concerning the
loading of the ship.





make known to you its own ideas
in the next few days.
Draft Proposal

“A draft proposal which it will
submit to you will form what the
French Government hopes will be
a useful and fruitful basis of
work.”

“For today I limit myself to
welcoming you in the name of my
Government, and to expressing
the ardent wish that the expecta-
tion of the peoples who place
their hope and confidence in you
may not be disappointed’’.

—Reuter

This bill was passed by the

returned it to the
session ended before

trees.’ People who pianted fruit
trees would get the benefit from
doing so in a very short time,
whereas the planting of the other
trees like casuarina would only
yield long term benefits like in-
creasing rainfall and may be, con-
serving the water supply, etc.

If one was going to get any ben-

efit from fruit trees, the benefit
would come quickly, and there
would not be the need for a sub-

sidy as the bill provided for. He
thought, therefore, that there was
some reason in not referring
specifically to fruit trees.

10 or 12 Years Ago
Hon'ble Mr. Mahon commend-
ed the Government on sending
down the bill. His only regret was

that had not been sent down
10 or 12 years ago. He regarded
it as more than just encourage-

ment of the planting of trees. He
looked at it as one of the first
minor industries that was being
established, from the point of
view of finding employment for
people

People would not only be em-
ployed in the digging of holes,
the planting and tending of trees
and the subsequent felling of
trees and conversion of them into
firewood, It would also lead to
the employment of a number of
inspectors to superintend those
trees, and to see that they were
grown according to the specifica-
tions of the Department of Agri-
culture

Section 4 1 (a) provided for
trees to be spaced in accordance
with the rules of good arboricul-
ture, Mr, Hutson said. He had
asked the Director of Agriculture
what space he had in mind, but
the Director had told him that he
had not yet reached a decision.

Inspecwors

No doubt, if the Director found
it necessary to change the spaces
from time to time, it would neces-
gitate the employment of a good
pumber of inspectors to see that
the directions of the Department
were being carried out,

He hoped finally, that Govern-
ment would make provision so
that the Department would be
able to acquire the number ot
seedlings necessary to give real
effect to ‘the bill.

Hon'ble Mr. Pile said that when
the Bill was first before the Coun-
cil certain faults in it had been
pointed out, and he understood
that those faults had now been
remedied. He was glad that Mr.
Mahon had mentioned what he
did about the seedlings. The De-
partment of Agriculture could not
supply anything like the number
of trees which would be needed
if the object of the bill was to be
accomplished.

Not Suitable

With regard to fruit trees, he
did not think that the pasture land
on which casuarina trees were
grown would be suitable for the
cultivation of fruit trees, Cas-
uarina trees were. the only ones
that he thought would grow on
that type of land.

Hon'ble Mr. Petrie said he
would like to give the Council the
assurance that it was not the in-
tention of the Government to
make the bill a restricted bill.
Two types of trees were mention-
ed, but it could be extended and
he hoped that the Government
would do the extension,

On the question of seedlings,
the bill did not say that seedlings
would be supplied, but there was
some small provision in the Esti-
mates for seedlings, and he had
no doubt that an additional pro-
vision would be readily available.
The question of whether seedlings
should be purchased or whether
they would be given away as part
of the encouragement programme
would no doubt have to be dis-
cussed.

The Bill was then passed.









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JUNE 1950

21,

WEDNESDAY,



Col. Michelin
Inspects
Cadets

UNDER the command of Capt. |
D. R. Perkins 100 ‘Combermere
School Cadets — forming three
inspected by
Colonel Michelin, Commissioner of
Police yesterday afternoon at
Combermere.

The Cadets






preceded by the

marched on to the parade ground.
No. 1 platoon was in charge of Lt.
Gittens, No. 2 Lt. Brewster and
No. 3 Company Sergeant-Major
Murray.

Exactly at 3.30 p.m. Colonel
Michelin, accompanied by Major
Skewes-Cox and Major Warren
marched on to the parade ground
and inspected the different pla-
toons accompanied by the officers.

Stopping occasionally, the
Colonel talked with some of the
boys and inspected their uniforms.
After the inspection the three
platoons marched past before the
saluting base, No. 2 platoon re-
ceiving the greatest applause.

Fine Spectacle

Swinging their hands from front
to rear and stepping briskly the
cadets presented a fine spectacle
as their buttons and badges shone
brightly in the sun.

The march past over, the pla-
toons were broken up into squads.
Three squads were demonstrating
indication and recognition of tar-

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The boys showed a keen inter-
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their officers apparently were sat-
isfied with the display given by
the boys in front of the Colonel.

Caught In

Speed Trap: £7

VICTOR MAYERS of Hinds-
bury Road, was yesterday ordered
to pay a fine of £7 in monthly in-
stalments by Magistrate G. B.
Griffith for exceeding the speed
limit on White Park Road with
the motor bus M 746 on May 16.

Cpl B. Jones, attached to the
Traffic Branch, said that on May
16, he was on duty along White
Park Road, when he saw the
motor bus M 746 approaching at
a fast speed. He immediatély
timed his “stop watch” and after
the bus had passed, he then
checked it with the other consta-
ble who was on duty with him.
As a result, he discovered that the
speed of the bus was 28% m.p.h., |
while the speed limit in this area
is 15 m.p.h.

SPEEDING: £3

A fine of £3 was also imposed
on Ivan Mayers of Green Hill
by Magistrate G. B. Griffith, when
he was found guilty of exceeding
the speed limit with the motor van
M 1047 along Kingston Road on
May 16. The van was travelling
at the rate of 314 m.p.h., while the
limit in this area is 20 m.p.h,

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950

$40,000 Voted For ©. "*

Could one not see that who
ever made the recommendation

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVE











In The House 4yeEND CUSTOMS Wheat Council STUDENTS PLAN|

Yesterday TARIFF ACT Rejects Japan’s PEACE PETITION On
















o
Gen er had come to the conclusion that When the House of Assembly met yes- . j
l a a nurse imported from Ragland tendes . Mr. Adams al the folipwins _ The tee “t Seseeiy yeotars . . TOKYO, June 2¢ \ hild ’
7 shou entitled to eat better ..o te vee he Gross*Customs day passed a i © amend the eat The All-Japanese Students Fed- | Ss
food Than a local nurse? For th . ‘pts for ohe mopth ended Cones Tariff at Set 1 10n eration plans to ld peace _-*
ont es? — the honourable member to say The t¢ were given ne purpose o e Bill is for i ‘ re petition” asse i Tokyo on |
To Provide Additional Sta that the demand for the $120... °" » place the sum the manufacturing of cloth from . 0 Lane, June 20 _ Thursday and throughout he { cuts, scratches
being broken up was childish, 91 220% * the disposal of the Governor- cotton yarn ete. and in order to a eee —— Coun- country on Saturday the
/ oe : as ¢ sh, Committee to supplement encourage the industry which ©!! to-day admitted Indonesia and or Jiji Swirape said t \ | *
The House of Assembly at their meeting yesterday, passed nes — stupid was only the tes 1950-51, Part J. Current should prove beneficial to the Spain to membership of the In- PT he Ministry of Education ha and abrasions
> Resolution for forty thousand nine hundred and forty Mr. Aantae ¢ Oy ade eee tary Silicate cteae st g rr island, it is proposed to reduce the Sernatinmne Wheat Agreement but announced that any demonst: a |
dollars to make provision for additional posts in the Medical the good of say +) asked what was form the Schedule to this Resolution snownt af my payable cn import- Tejected Japan's application. ting students will be dealt with | use if
ane Wiad _posts in the ical 8 of saying a Sister got $60 Mr. Walcott : Resolution to approve the @d cotton yarn and to allow the The Council concluded its ses- under the police ban on meetings | a
= ee om at the General Hospital. S. maut se an_ordinaty MUMSE Order entitled “The Sugar Industry \Re- duty free importations of machin- sions in London this afternoon. and demonstrations | ft
addendum F cents? he two dic { habilitation, Price Stabilisation and La- , y ea ncthiats Wederatio: 1]
tion states that the Sseeedtns be attracted to the West Indies Seratt of comparison “Tt . ag dev ine ene 1950" made ty re the ia of gg ee ee ee: ee ear sore , D E TT O L :
Estimates 1950-51, No. at least for a short i Geni tee were criticising the 15th deo af dine’ ee eee tk e m r, was represented off a demonstration last Saturda
provision for the ‘eaten S period. sates x sitowtne i ae ae rid q oa ay of June, 3950, (ander the. pro. from cotton yarn etc. for the first time. Spain was timed to coincide with the arrival - rat Rese see .
Silene of serves ane a the Experience Erethin bonie anise eas a. the Sugar Industry ‘Rehabilitation, Price Mr. M. & Cox (L) who took granted an import quota of here of United States Defenc
7 c A é é t : abilisation ¢ Je c : 4 000 5 secre , yuis i »
Medicab and Nursing Staff and for There was still the pogsibility small one on the grounds that they 147. an Bel’ out. ig the neheniietls Act charge of the Bill said that it 100, tons. . ees ye Pore ae get — Safe . . . Non-poisonons
the additional posts at the Hos- of American. or Canadian gradu- were both Government employees. "se! came within the category of , Indonesia was granted 75,000 | Chief of the United States oink Doesn't Pain , . . Doesn't Stain
pital authorised by the Civil Es- ates wishing to come to a place If they could show him any im ns aay rats pr tn oa the a: the Ploneer Industries. Sometime in tons, to be deducted from Hol- Sreaie e ‘ ~ £ 3 : : oo Ae an te of . m e g *s , i ~ as rade t lewspaper adde
tablishment (General) (Amend- jlike Barbados to gain éxperi- partial dealings: but no. they were ‘@* payable to the Fancy ae eamie o July last year, the House passed !@nd’s quota which, in effect has | SP8tiey the Hew paper ae
ment) Order, 1950, ‘No. 5. qntd Sheth & lgraieite anit esa wan ealitiee ek etek ena rol and Marketing Board on faney mo. # Bill called the Pioneer Industry been split between Holland and | —Reuter
Apart from the increased cost to get an insight into tropical ; lasses produced during the erop year Encouragement Bill which allow- Indonesia. '
= salaries and other emoluments, diseases. Unless the Ciovernment Foolish aor ncn the Goverpar-tegrrees ed pioneer industries to import When Spain and Indonesia de-
0 je s e r re oon e advice 0! ne i i i i i S . ,
ment of wassmae Sebems ae. cast off the practice of only ad- Fancy Molasses Control and Marketing ‘2¢hinery and apparatus in addi- posit their ratifications, the world

tion to raw material duty free, but
it was rejected by the Other Place
for reasons better known to them-
selves.

Had that Bill been passed, they
would not have had to come there
with the one before them. Hon-
ourable members would agree that
they should help those new indus-

total export and import quotas in
the agreement will rise from
13,451,000 to 14,551,000 tons

As at the Council's last meet-
ing earlier this year, it was on fhe
question of access to Australian
sterling wheat that Japan's ap-
plication failed.

sos ‘ e425 "y ; Board } co “ | ew 5
vertising in Great Britain, there It was foolish ror a member of ana 6 ot the Barbados pa cdtlations |

ilies, not exceeding $960 in each would always be a difficulty in that side of the House to sp@ak Production and Export Regulations, 1938
direction, from the place of en- 8°tting men. The idea of some about any previous suggestion , (41... \Kipsen. save notice of an
gagement to Barbados on appoint- who held that American medical that a Sister should get different relating to leave of ehosass coli rene
ment and from Barbados to the S'aduates were inferior to the food or more money for the pur- 4 My C. B. Rock, Official Reporter of
place of engagement on the ter- English medical graduates Was ab- chase of food than local nurses, Waki oar lee tone ae hy elt are
mination of agreements. solute nonsense. That was not the when such a suggestion could only Sod a tipi teat

lut \ Mr Foster tabled a question relating
As the accommodation at the Opinion of the leading men of the have come from the side of the ‘9 Sugar factories in the parish of St

penses of officers and their fam-

“IT’S SUCH A
RELIEF TO HAVE
NO TROUBLE

Hospital is limited, the housing of day. table. Tt could not be in. keabhig Andrew evading payment of Trade tries as they helped to relieve 1 oo . eve ores Siem, WITH TEETHING .. ”
rests staff will entail the The Government could not with reason that members on his Mr. Miller Kave notice of an Address to tae ae en which’. Wave 9 comune, -tanecent

vernment of sui exc’ yes wi i r- bi 7 z any such sug- His Excellency the Governor relating t& f © produce P ivi Ashton
furnished quarters for vic lorne oe gseeihen ee rapa cowuite. uld make any such SUB- private nursery schools. ‘items at more reasonable prices With Britain in safegqarding Oy) Boe pecs &

The House passed a Resolution to place

officers or alternatively the
ment to the officers of an al
ance in lieu thereof. Provisio
included for this necessity.

The total estimated expendi-
ture on increased staff, salaries,
ete, from the Ist of June, 1950,
to the 31st of March, 1951, as
shown in the Supplementary Es-
timates, is $105,580, but this is off-
ate oe the breage of $62,000 by

vings on the salarie
posts of House aha toea
Anaesthetist and
which have now
and the provision
Estimates 1950-51 for
grevag oar vices and

ursing Services whi
now be required ch will not
VING the passin
resolution Mr. Adee (L) “oe

House Surgeon
been abolished

posts on the medical and nu
staff of the General
which the Legislature had al-
ready agreéd should be added to
the present establishment,

Passage Expenses

Apart from the increased cost
of salaries and other emoluments,
provision was included for the
payment of reasonable passage
expenses of officers and their
families, not exceeding $960 in
each direction, from the place of
engagement to Barbados on ap-
pointment and from Barbados to
the place of engagement on the
termination of agreements,

As the accommodation at the
Hospital is limited, the housing
of the additional staff would en-
tail the rental by Government
of suitable furnished quarters for
use by the offices or afternatively
the payment to the officers of an
allowance in lieu thereof.

The total estimated expendi-
ture on increased staff, salaries
etc. from June 1, 1950 to March
31, 1951 as Shown in the Supple-
mentary Estimates was $105,580
but that was offset to the extent

be had.

ay- the necessary doctors needed. The
OW- public - ould not be satisfied with right any anomalies, but honour-
nN 4S that. Tney had to seek the doctors, able

They were quite willing to put

members wer@ confusing

Taey should do everything within themselves with salaries.

their power to that end.
No Films

Mr. Crawford (C) said that who-
ever were responsible for the com-
pilation of the figures had in their

Nor was that the only unsat- minds that the cost to a Sister

isfactory matter at the Hospital.

Two

Surgeon and ‘ures to be taken, were told that

they had no films.

Could they imagine in all its
made in the appalling nature such a state of
additional affairs to be obtaining at the hos-
Additional pital. Whose fault was it? If some }

machine or other had been broke

as a_circumsicance that

ordered them.

Even if there was no accom-
modation at the hospital for
Sisters, it did not mean that
they should be granted an
allowance so much greater
than the ordinary nurse was
given. Allowing for water,
rent, a servant and other like
things, it still meant that
from the $120, $60 could be
put aside ag feeding allow-
ance, It struck him that there
was impartiality in their deal-
ings. Why should they place
such a difference between a
Sister and a local nurse?

“If there is one institution the
smooth running of which should
be ensured,” he said, “it is this
institution. I do not make critic-
isms now merely for the sake of
making them, but with the wish
that a smoother going will soon
I will always support a
measure which aims to put the
hospital in “A” order and I hope
Government will soon sweep away

of $62,000 by savings on the sal- all sources for complaint.”

aries of the posts and Anaesthet-
ist and House Surgeon which had
now been aBélished and the pro-
vision made in the Estimates
1950—51 fom additional Medical
Services and additional Nursing
Services which would not now be
required.

Specialist
Government, Mr. Adams con-
cluded, had taken the advice

offered by the House and agreed

that the Anaesthetist should be a
specialist, .
“Mr. Mottley (E)" said that
any Resolution which came
before the Assembly with the
purpose of eradicating the in-
efficiently of the working of

‘the hospital would always

receive his support. Criticisms

had to be pushed forward

‘until the Government suc-

ceeded in putting the hospital

in order. ;

He supposed the Resolution was
another sign that the Govern-
ment was still trying and he and
the others on that side of the
House hoped they would succeed.
but conditions at the hospital
were still very bad and unsatis-
factory. No day passed, but com=-
plaints were made about the
working of that institution, not
merely by the staff but in respect
to the treatment of the patients.

Get Up And Do Better

The criticisms he was then
offering was an attempt to make.
those responsible for the admin-
istration get up and make a bet-
ter job of it. Since the Resolution
had been passed to increase the
staff at the hospital one would
have thought that there would at
least have been an increase in
the medical staff.

$25 For Local Medicos

But what did mey find? Steps
had to be taken to get some of
the local medical men to work,
to go into the hospital and sleep
and be paid $25. That was: not
enough, On the other hand he had
been making enquiries as to the
prospects of getting additional
medical men at the hospital. It
was true that another young
Barbadian was then resident at
the hospital, but it was still a
question of how long he intended
to stay.

But. the point he. wanted

No Appointment

Mr. Lewis (L) said that he
understood that ever since the
proclamation which brought the
Hospital Act into effect, nobody
working at the hospital, except
those doing so by contract, had
been “‘acpually appointed to the
post to which they were connected,
He remembered that when the
Central Road Board was taken
over by Government, those con-
nected received notice from the
Government telling them that they
were appointed on a particular
date,

Mr. Allder (L) said he wanted
to know whether Government
knew where the additional doctors
would be living. He wanted to
find out whether they were going
to regulate a distance between the
hospital and where the doctors
would living. He wondered
whether Government would not
consider it advisable to rent some

flats from the Garrison district for

the doctors instead of allowing
them to seek flats in far districts.
In the first place it would be

cheaper and in the second the
savings would be coming back to

Government.

Mr. Dowding (E) said that it #
had struck him that Government
should utilise the houses they had
at their disposal to supply those

necessary in the Resolution.

There seemea wo him an in- tion they were stressing. The big them come down to fill the posts.

for her food and that to a local

days ago people applying turse was separated by a differ-
at that institution for X-ray pic- ence of almost four times

It was
quite easy to see that, they were
either paying one too high or the

other too low.
Even allowing for an additional
$12 they would still be able to

decrease the amount for a sistet
»y $30 per month. The only

N other alternative would be to fi-
down, that would have been taken . - . .

could

: said easily happen, but films were not
that it covered the cost of those anoteurnenie that could go bad at sure of their figures.
rsing a moment’s notice. Those respon-
Hospital ysible should have’ known that
some would be wanted many
weeks Before and should have

crease the allowance for an or-
dinary nurse. They should post-

pone the matter if they were not

Mr. F. L, Walcott said honour-
able members always seem to
forget what had already been
passed in the House. The $4 a
week arose when the hospital had
to take in nurses from outside.
It was a just ration allowance.
When they left the hospital on
evenings it was felt that they
should be getting the same allow-
ance which they would have got
had they been remaining. He did
not believe the Senior member
for the City had given the ques-
tion sufficient consideration.

Mr. Dowding (E) ~ said that
there was too much hedging about
a simple question. To try to fall
back on past legislation was in
his opinion merely hedging. It
was quite a simple question that
they were asking. Did it take
four times as much to indulge
the stomach of one person than) it
took for, another? ‘Fhey only
wanted the Government to item-
ise the things the $120 was in-

tended for in case they wanted services of a suitable reporter at to-day.

to say that the comparison of $60
as against $18 was unjust.

Mr. Ward (BE) said that he could
not reconcile the figures for the
two nurses and he felt that if the
member in charge of the Resolu-
tion could not give them
necessary information, he should
postpone it instead of running
the risk of losing their vote,

fully request Your Excellency to

the sum of $40,940 at the disposal of the

Governor-in-Executive Committee to sup-
plement the, Estimates 1950—51, Part 1,
Current, as shown in the Supplementary

Estimates 1950—51

Act, 1971.

A Bill to settle the rates of income tax
for the year 1950, and to make provision

for certain other matters in connection
with the levying of the said tax and to
amend the law relating to Income Tax

A Bill to vest a certain parcel of land
situate in the parish of St, John in this

island with the Chapel of St. Mark, the

palsonage house, and other buildings, and

the burial ground in the Lord Bishop of

tee and the Rector of St, John and
reir respectiv: successors

eee ue uceessors in office upon
The

House adjourned until sday
next at 12 noon. Peery



Official Reporter
Granted Leave

THE House of Assembly yester-
day passed an Address, granting
Mr. C, B, Rock, Official Reported
of a gs segehng Council four
months’ leave of absen from
March 1. -

The Address also makes pro-
vision for the services of an
assistant to Mr. Rock for the
month of July,

Mr, J, H. Wilkinson gave notice
of the Address which reads as
follows:—

The House of Assembly respect-
fully refer Your Excellency to
their Address to you of the 31st
January, 1950, and desire to say
that the Debates Committee ap-
pointed by virtue of section three
of the Legislative Debates Act
1894 (1894-7) has granted Mr.
C. B, Rock, ONjcial Reporter of
the Legislative Council, a further
four months’ sick leave from the
Ist March with full pay. The
Committee has re-engaged the

the rate of $80.00 per month.
The Committee nas decided to

engage the services of an assistant

to Mr. Rock for the month of July

date the matter will be further

the considered by the Debates Com-

mittee,
The House of Assembly respect-

Mr Adams reminded members send down the necessary legisla-

that they had already passed the tion to give effect to the proposals
What of the Debates Committee.

Civil Establishment Order.
members were criticising were
things that were already in exis-
tence.

The computation of 60
arose when ‘off duty’ was being
considered, It was decided that
nurses when on ‘off duty’ were
still entitled to what rations they
should have had were they at
the hospital. They were given it
in money arid it came to 60 cents.
As it appeared to members, it did
seem strange to him at first, but
it was more or less a matter of
bulk production, making a smal-
ler overhead cost. Thus when it
was divided it only came to 60
cents.

To his mind if members would
accept what were the plain facts,
they would see that there was no
question of discrimination. It was
nothing novel that the Govern-
ment was doing. It was something

to which the House had implicit- the motion. He also supported the} 43 jours,

ly agreed.

But one of the immediate ob- junior member for St. James and] qroye home. He hit

5
cents

In moving the passing of the
Address Mr. Wilkinson said that

ourable members knew the
porter of the Other Place
taken ill towards the end of last
year,

The Debates Committee had to
extend his leave as he was serious-
ly ill and he (Mr. Wilkinson) was
glad to say that he had improved
considerably and it was hoped thay
he would be able to resume his
duties on the first of July with the
assistance of someone else.

Mr. Rock nhaq rendered faith-
ful service to the Other Place for
past 15 years and the Address was
asking that legislation be sent
down for the payment of money
to his substitute during his illness,
Mr. W. A. Crawford seconded

remarks made by the honourable

scientists

than they
outside.

Mr. Cox said that the Bill did
not apply to any hotel encourage-
A Bill t© amend the Customs Tariff ment as that was a matter of a

differen sort. The present Knit-

ting Mills employed 78 people of

which 76 were Barbadians.
_ He then moved the second read-
ing of the Bill.

‘Mr. T. O. pryan (L) seconded
and said that he had the privilege

of going through the plant and

seeing some of the finished pro-
ducts which he thought compared
very favourably with imported
articles.

In fact he said that the articles

compared so favourably with
imported articles that several
stores in Swan and Broad Streets
had already placed orders wich
the company.

Mr. Bryan referred to the ques-
tion of wages and said that it was
the duty of the Government to see
that the West Indian Knitting
Mills paid decent living wages to
their employees. Fortunately for
them, they had just passed legis-
lation for the setting up of a
Wages Board which would deal
with the matter.

The Bill was eventually passed.

Fuchs Knew
AboutH-Bomb

NEW YORK, June 20.

Dr. Klaus, British atomic scien-
tist gaoled. for espionage, knew all
the secrets of the hydrogen bomb
as well as of atom bombs, Mr.
William Laurence, New York
Times science reported, declared
He made his statement
in a Saturday Evening Post
article under the title “The Truth
About The Hydrogen Bomb.”

Before the first atom bomb,



for the sum of $40.00 after which Laurence wrote, he was at Los

Alamos, New Mexico, and talked
to Dr. Hans A. Bethe, who headed
the theoretical physicists at the
bomb plant. At that time atomic
were already talking
about the hydrogen bomb, calling
it for camouflage the “superbomb”

and “superdooper” Laurence said,

He asked Dr. Bethe if this bomb
was really true. Dr. Bethe replied
“Yes” and added that it could be

t was an urgent matter as hon- made equal to a million tons of
Re- T.N.T. and even more than a
had million.”—Reuter

were able to get them

their access to the limited sup-

ply of sterling wheat, has a suffi-

cient vote to veto an applicafion
—Reuter

Will America

Give Up The
a 9
Saint’s Crown?

VIENNA, sune 20.

Return of the famous Crown of
St. Stephan to Hungary is being
mentioned here as a point in the
“deal” the Americans are said to
have offered the Hungarian Gov-
ernment for the release of Robert
Vogeler, United States business-
man now serving 16 years’ gaol
on an espionage charge.

Usually well informed sources
here say the Hungarians had
made two demands:

1. The re-opening of
garian Consulates in America
closed down as a_ reprisal for
Vogler’s arrest, trial and sentence

2. The return to the present
regime in Hungary of the histori-
cal Crown of St, Stephan now
believed to be in American hands.

Hungarian sources in Vienna
do not believe the Hungarian
Government would demand the







Hun-

return of this relic for the sake
of one man, |

These Hungarians consider it
more probable that the Hun-
garian government would ask

America to relinquish all claims
on the valuable properties of the
Standard Oil ompany whicn |
have been seized without compen-
sation.

Stephan, King of Hungary, was
converted to christanity in 997 and
in 1001 received the crown fm
Pope Sylvester II. After world
War IT it was found in the Ameri-
ean zone of Austria and was re- |
moved for safety to the ane





zone of Germany. It is believed to
be still there,

his arrest,
Josef Mindszenty, Hungarian
Primate, wrote to the American
authorities asking that the Crown |

Before Cardinal

he restored to the Holy See in
Rome. |
“The Holy Crown of Hungary’)

contains six pounds of gold and
jewels. It is revered by the whole
Hungarian people as a symbol of
Hungarian unity and sovereignty.
—Reuter



Police Shoot ThiefIn U.S.A.

STUBENVILLE, Ohio, June 20.

Police shot and killed Joe
Pacific, 32-year-old Pennsylvan-
jan, in a gun battle near here
after he had robbed two youths
and locked them in the luggage
boot of their car.

Police said the youths gave
Pacific a lift at Canonsburg,
Pennsylvania. At gun point he
robbed them of 16 dollars and
locked them into the boot without
food or water. They were there
while Pacific toured
around in the car, Finally he
his wife on

jects of the Government was the said that the least they could do} the head with a wrench and forced

starting of nursing quarters. When
uch was achieved, it would wipe
away the spurce of apparent dis-
crimination,

Mr. Crawford said that all the
senior member for St. Joseph had
done was to emphasise the posi-

consistency in the figures of the discrepancy between the two was
ordinary nurses’ wages and the still shown.

sisters’, and he wanted to know t at it
as was plicit then that the junior mem-

exactly how $120,

Mr. Adams said that it was im-

scheduled for a Sister for ac- ber for St. Philip was making as
commodation and other such the dig the difference between

‘matters,

Did the cost of food for a nurse
and that for a Sister vary?
Was the one of a different con-
stitution and had to eat a less

expensive food than the other?

had been arrived at. the English nurse and the

local
nurse. He wondered if he knew
it tended to put the local nurse
of the same scale, if he would use
the same argument, It was just
a matter of time that Barbadian
nurses would be qualified for some

Mr. F. L. Watcow (L) said that of those posts, and what would

members could not plead that be said then?
they did not have sufficient time

to peruse the Resolution. They
were then only more or less im-
plementing the House’s agree-

ment,
For members to
breaking up the $120

suggest his tion,

Could that member show him
something then which perpetu-
ated an injustice? If he showed
him discrepancies in the dealing,
he would be willing to withdraw
anything or adjourn the Resolu-
The confusion had started

into the when the 60 cents was first looked

various items which it was in- at. They were even then arguing
tended to defray was the height on something which was not real-

of simplicity and
Wére honourable

childishness. ly before them. They had passea
members not the Estimates

They had by irm-

able to do a little simple arithme- plication agreed to the scale,

was to give Mr. Rock the leave
asked for in the Address and pro-
vide him with the necessary assist-

ance to do his work until such {

time as he could resume his duties.



Mr. W. W. Reece (E) said that
the question of giving rent free
quarters to the staff was a big one
and should be carefully considered
by Government,

When it came to the housing of
the Hospital staff, he felt that
nurses and. sisters should be
housed in the institution and that
was going to raise another ques-
tion and that was the extension of
the present hospital.

He said tnat they would have to
pequire some of the surrounding
property in order to extend the
Hospital. He had not heard for
some time in the House if the
present site of the Hospital was
suitable or whether it should be
removed to another site. He felt
that it was well placed, but it was
not big enough.

It was apparent to all that the
hospital staff was inadequate and
the present Government should
pay attention and give consider-
ation to the question of acquiring

her Into the car. He drove to
Mingo junction, Ohio, where he
stopped to buy a dress to replace
the bloodstained one his wife was
wearing.

Mrs. Pacific jumped from the
ear and ran for help.

Poliae chased Pacific through
the streets, while the locked up
youths were released—hungry,
thirsty and cramped.

Firing at the pursuing Police,
Pacific ran to the woods on thie
edge of the town.

He refused to surrender. A gun
battle followed and Pacific was
killed. —Reuter.

es

TIC

OUR CUSTOMERS are asked to......

Note that our Store CLOSES for...

STOCK-TAKING

On Thursday 29th June and until — — —
12 O'clock (NOON) on Friday 30th
YOU ARE ASKED TO CO-OPERATE

John D. Taylor & Sons Lid.

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the properties surrounding the

No member had asked about the hospital. 4
money at the time. They had im- He knew that in the past, this
plied their agreement that the Government and other Govern-
sum was reasonable. Thus they ments had been faced with the
were now only asking that they difficulty of acquiring lands as
should continue to pay the two they had to go to a jury to have
additional nurses. the land assessed .

Mr. J. E. T- Brancker (C) de- He was however hoping that in
plored the fact that the ration the near future, the Government
allowance for Nurses was only 60 would be able to acquire land at
cents a day. He said that that a reasonable figure and if that
amount was inadequate and should “time did come, they should acquire

threshed out was how long
| that insular prejudice which
) ‘existed in the island would be
continued? Why did they not
get medical men from Ameri-
ca or Canada. There was no
point in just asking the Secre-
tary of State to get somebody s :
for the Barbadbs Hospital. Mr. Mottley (E) said that either
That was not enough. the Sister's pay was too high or
They had seen from past ex- the nurses too small. At any rate
perience that they were given no he did not consider 60 cents a day
attention. He understood that the enough.

tic? It would be“infra dig” for
him to harbour in his mind for
the slightest moment a suggestion
of breaking up figures for hon-
ourable members.

Which? '

The STANDARD VANGUARD
68 h.p, 6 seater Saloon,

The STANDARD PICK-UP
The STANDARD DELIVERY VAN
The STANDARD ESTATE CAR
The TRIUMPH HEN( IWN 2 Litre Saloon
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eater Saloon.



_ He was not speaking he substantially increased,
Director of Medical Services was about their differences in salaries,

some of the property surrounding

With respect to the additional the hospital in order that they

the island for a long $120 to 60, he was only speaking Sisters who would be paid at the might be able to extend the insti- he DO. FO ND. This new model is expected in 3 months
ae teak Ke wondered whether as to the other allowances, $120 rate of 2300 aan annum, he seid tution large enough, not only to Ti BARBA Ss U. mY L ad. { 950 LTD
he could not be empowered by as against about $18 or in that that there were Barbadians in the look after the sick, but large White Park Road, St. Michael. } CHELSEA GARAGE (1 ) .

Government to explore the possi- i
bilities of securing the services When a servant pay,

vicinity for the ordinary nurse. United Kingdom who were being enough to house the staff who
rent and such trained for such positions and he would be responsible for looking

of any medical men who might things were taken away, some $60 was looking forward to seeing after the patients.

Dial : 4528

Dial : 4528

Agents

Trafalgar Street.



SSS}
PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HENRY BY



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950







CARL ANDERSON

ag




"tard pe di








BY WALT DISNEY
L_| [WHEN D TREASURE 1S FOUND... 1+
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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950



CLASSIFI

Telephone 2548

DIED !
th 50th Jun N
ed daughter of Car

, Rock! He

k place at “ Westbury |





LEWIS—ROSALIE JANE, of Rock Hall, |
St. Phomas. Her funeral will le her |
ipte residence at 3.45 o’clock thi |
rng for the Rock Hall Brethrer |
where friends are asked to g:
tuence to 1 St. Thomas Cr

Clarence Evereston Lewis (sc
ond Mrs. Hutson, O. Haynes
Miorgan (Grand-daughte;:

THANKS
thank those friends
reaths, or who express
sympathy in any way at the
our dear WINNIFRE'D
(mother), Lepert ‘son

Ismay (friend)





We
gent cards,
their
purture of

Ada
fAunt)

sincerely





IN MEMORIAM |

In Loving Memory of GRANVILLE}
BASCOMBE, who departed this life 2ist|
June, 1949 |
e tha |

|

}

1

|










One year has passed sir
The one I loved c
Love held together
apart
Faith then did soothe my aching heart
Till memor ar life departs




in .my heart

Time takes away the edge of grief
































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ED ADS. | Lord Mayor Replies | HARBOUR L0G

FOR RENT





Denies Gov

Moorlands”, on q

near Appleby, comfortably
ed with every convenience
Three bedrooms

sea view from
for small family
up residence in



bungalow,
Cozst



rage
lounge
from abroad
the Coiony

and G



20.6.50-



n



CRYSTAL SPRINGS—Annexe St. James
Now available for Rent. Fully
rnished, excellent sea bathing. Two
rae bedrooms. All electric kitchen, ete
available On Monthiy basis
91—54 21.6.50.—t.f.n.

+ _— Erdiston Hill, St
Fully Purnished. 3 bedrooms
» period. Available now. Apply
CARRINGTON & SEALY

20.6.50-—3n



months ago:



controversy in Britain.

In a letter to the “Daily Tele-
“MELROSE VILLA"—Collymore Rock | 9™@ph” this week the Lord Mayor

upstairs, 4 Bedrooms, Toilet and Bath.| answers criticisms voiced recently

Downstairs Drawing and Dining Rooms ’ ;
Evkaktaat Moors, Mieaad. Caer yond | by one of the leading columnists





Closed Gallery, Garage for 2} Of that paper. This writer, he
Servant Rooms ete. Modern Con-| Says, had conveyed the impres-
Dial 2230 ‘ ™

‘ssa ae | sion, first, that the Thanksgiving
. | scheme had been devised by the

ONE LARGE HOUSE and Apartment} Government and that the Govern-
on the sea St. Lawrence, fully furn-| ment had
















































































|
Again To Crities _
|

(From Our London Correspondent)

THE LORD MAYOR of London has found it neeessary
to reply for the second time to criticisms in the Press of
the National Thanksgiving Fund_which he launched two}

¢ The Fund, whose object is to build a e2-|
million overseas students’ centre in London as an expression
of gratitude to the Commonwealth and the United States
for help received during the war, continues to arous:

tut memories turns back every leaf ished. Apply: Miss K. Hainte, Bratton,| ° pressed it upon him;
ITA SONES, |. St. Lawrence. Dial 8357. second, that the Fund's progress

ae ROA 3.6.50—2n.} Was unsatisfactory . “Nothing

loving memory of our dear beloved] UPSTAIRS AP. ° ‘ could be further from the facts”
inihir Clune STAIRS APARTMENT Three} <0; ; ; ,
fother Coote, Fatatophee Sobers, who] unfurnished rooms, one very jarge| Said Sir Frederick Rowland, the

Four years have passed since that sad Dial toe OR win, summing weed, } Lond Mayer.

Death | a Criticism

pacha came in and took our dad] = What the “Daily Telegraph”
The blow was sudden, the shock severe, y . . columnist actually said was this:
We little now that death was near PUBLIC SALES ©) ‘The timing of the Fund and the
ut Jesus knows just what was best bu ii 3 ‘i - ¢ oa a

And took dear daddy home to rest eee! aicings upon which it Dadenstl cba

Ever to be remembered by Oliver, posed to spend money “have led
Herman, Hillary, Edgar, _ Christopher |} AUCTION to more criticism than I can recal!
(sons), Ina (daughter), Peter, Palm, in connection with y P

any other

Peggy, June, Brinda, Ederson, (grand- . Dae z..
children) bie aw in| UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER cee Mayor’s Fund. This has
aoc affected subscriptions. Stirred by

In loving memory of my dear wife By instructions received from the} > criticis anal
Clarabella Lalinda Roach who departed} 2"SÂ¥rance Company, I will sell on Fri- er criticisms, the Lord Mayor,
this life on June 2lst 1940. cay, June 23rd at 2.30 p.m. at the hear, made a_ significant dis-

When we lie far off home be ae steno, ) 2967 10 h.p. Prefect} closure at a recent City dinner.

Some Autumn day; ord, (1) 1939 12 h.p. Austin. Both) The Thanksgiving Fund, he said

Drop bodies in the loam, damaged. Terms Cash. ae a ene ; :

Soft earth, dry clay, ; was a Government idea which he

So let us lie. VINCENT GRIFFITH, had been asked to put into action.”

Not as our eyes had never seen the eae | To this, Sir Frederick pointed

5 Bf ;
Sa te’ We ERIE Ube Gaede “dee ie a San ae RUC. 26 WER COMMON cmeW~
God not I By instructions of the Insurance Com-. ledgé that (apart from where 4
Knows the right time to call “come pans Fw alt at the COURTESEY | sudden disaster was concerned)
on to me” ay “| oor Deeg TEPARK, on FRIDAY! no Lord Mayor launched a national
a g y 3rd. a mM. j . or es
Albert ing Whsusband), Mr and| 1 MORRIS 8 SEDAN CAR damaged by | ®PPea] except on the advice and
Mrs. C. N. Weekes, Mr. & Mrs.| fire. TERMS CASH. | :
1, BE, Smith (friends), Mrs. Amy Hoyte R. ARCHER McKENZIE, |
B.G. Auctioneer \ 7 .
Demerara papers please copy. DIAL 2947. 20.6,50—4n | PUBLE NOTICES
21.6.50—1n i
= ae, i =—_—_
. . * ¢
FOR SALE REAL ESTATE \
an —pinigeencieenenenn = elena dane |
At Bridgefield, St. Thomas, one Stone | NOTICE
AUTOMOTIVE wall House and ‘Shop both in good order | PARION OF ST. ANDAEW
— a 5) Sa ie and 1% acres of arable land which is; mENDERS will be received by the
R—One 14/6 Vauxhall Black Sedan| planted with canes. The right place for | undetataned up to Friday 30th 1950

: aaa Apply to | Andrew Chureh Roof Act, 1949, at a

CAR—One Vauxhall 14-6 in, Good D'ARCY A. SCOTT, j vere Gs one not to exceeding 4
working order new tyres. K. D.| Dial 3745. 21.6.50—3n, ) ber annum Oks
Webste:, Harrison's Pitn, St Luey. | ———-——— - ~ Signed C. A: SKINNER,

21.6.50—8n FOR SALE TO BE DEMOLISHED Vestry Clerk.
aA “i AND REMOVED ‘ St. Andrew
One (1) B.S.A. Motor Car,| CHATTEL HOUSE only) called 17-6.50—sn.
Battery & Tyres Sound, Apply; ‘MAYARO" situate at Hockley Beach - ane .
Crumpton Street 20.6.50 Oe The Purchaser will be required to| SAINT VINCENT WBEKLY AIR
demolish the said house and remove| SERVICE Now~ makes possible ideal

CARS—1942 (6) six cylinder. Forde, »same from the site within fifteen plac ‘ - a j
1937 Dodge, 1937 Morris. Apply to| after the date of purchase. The Gas, Inder one managemen
Cosmopolitan Garage, Magazine Lane,| and water pipes, electric wires, fixtures RATHO MILL TOWER HOTEL
Dial 3915 20.6.50—3n. | and fittings will not be sold with the St ee

house, Offers in writing will be re a

MOTOR CYCLE One (1) B.S.A,| ceived by the undersigned up to 12 noon SUNNY CARIBBEE
1/2 H.P. In Good condition, Phone;cn Friday, 23rd June instant. Note on-the-sea Bequia Island a
20,6.50—3n. | the land on which the house siands is offers all that can be desir, Beauti-
a ~ not for sale ful seenery, sea-bathing, fishing, excel-
For inspection apply at “‘Acera’ next ent cuisines and bars. RATES Lae to
ELECTRICAL door for the keys. pp Regh ot a day. For further details

YEARWOOD & BOYCE and reservations.

RADIO & WINDCHARGER In Solicitors eh S, ROOKS,
working order. K. D. Webster, Har-| 13.6 5n. sac rene
rison's Plin. St. Luey a 2 Saint Vincent.

21.6.50—3n ONE 18 by 9 house with shed 2 years | 13.6 50—26n.
old and painted at Ellerton, St. Georse a el |
Price $600.00,
FURNITURE ‘Small property at St, Stephen's Road NOTICE : !
Se, AVID GASKIN.
near Church, consisting of 7,000 square Iva ALONZA D. A ol cathe eco!

FURNITURE—China (Cabinety Buf-| feet of land and house which has galiery, | formerly caretaker of “Retreat, Pas:
fett Wagon. Table, Dressing . Table! drawing and dining room, bedrooms, | sage Road is NO LONGER author! ane
All in 100 per cent Mahogany Apply | kitchen, water and light ‘Conerete yard | to receive or accept any monies pail
Strathmore, Worthing and room for garage. Price £950. for the rent of Retreat", Passage

21.6.50—2n Apply to Road. Any persons who have paid any
iasiniaanippinamabeatneciadete jamal eal D’ARCY A. SCOTT, rent in advance, or who are desirous
L Dial S748. 21.6.50.—3n. | of renting ‘Retreat’, are requested to

IVESTOCK —j sce or communicate with Mr. A. G
—— ANDY CREST"—situate at Cattle-| pie ot Paradise Beach Club, Black

COW—One cow giving 22 pts. daily. | wash, Bathsheba, standing on One Acre | Rock, St. Michael, and to bring any

& k ; . d
Apply Frere Pilarim Plantapion Ten’ Perches of land, receipt which they may now hold
20.6.50—-2n The house contains gallery, dfawing and A. G. Pile, -for Agent and Owner
ae dining rooms, three bedrooms with run-| wp etreat” »
ning water, kitchenette, usual outoffices, 7 20.6.50—6n.
electric light, garage and servant's room. Banas ae
MECHANICAL The above. wil be set ub for sale at | — ——— oe
c a i it our ice in Lucas

BICYCLES—One Gents Raleigh and | Public competition a NOTICE
One Phillips Gents Sports both in | Street on Weiday 28rd Sune, seaLye BARBADOS ELEMENTARY ‘
good condition and complete with 3 ; Solicitor 4 SCHOOL TEACHERS’ ASSOC 1ATION
Speed, Light, and accessories 11.6.50.—11n. ALL teachers are invited to a

Enauire A. Burrowes, Bath Village | 2 eens | Special General Meeting held on Sat-
Ch. Ch. or C. Medford, Courtesy Gar- The undersigned will offer for sale by | urday 24th June at 12 noon at the
S8Y. 20.6.50—2n. | public competition at their office, James | Church House for the purpose of con-

', Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 23rd | sidering Resolutions to be none

of June 1950 at 2 p.m. to the forthcoming Conference o! 1

MISCELLANEOUS The newly built bungalow called “LAS| Caribbeon Union of Teachers held at
a CAMPANAS," at Navy Gardens, Christ] British Guiana during the Summer

ANTIQUES— of every desrrintinn | Ghoreh, with the land thereto containing | holidays |
Glass, China, old Jewe'ls, fine Silver 00 square feet F.“H. BARKER, |
Watercolours Early books, haps, Auio- | dwellinghouse which is built of Hon, Secty
graphs, etc., at Gorringes Antintie Sno. | reinforced concrete to avoid maintenance RESTA |
adjoining Royal Yacht Club | contains patio, 2 verandahs, living

1.9.40.—tfn | Inia satin, 3 DEN faces a WAR te, ee ee |
th basins and toilets and built-

CALCIUM GLUCONATE Squibha {io Wardrobes, linen cupboards, modern| +IQUOR LICENCE NOTICE |
Calcium Gluconate is administered in al shen. Servant’s room with toilet and The application of Rebecea Spencer of
forms of calcium det y Get it at] bath, and double garage 4 Baxters Koad, St, Michael, for permission

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD LTD The grounds are well laid out an I spirits, Malt Liquors &e., at 2nd
21.6.50—3n | planted with fruit trees. n. diails of a §-atorey building known as
ene — . Inspection by appointment on dialing | 7" 39 pudor Street. City
REALS—Puffed Wheat, Muffets, | 3100. we 2 Dated this 20th day of June, 1950
Oatflakes in Tins, Cream of For further particulars ARK! 8 oO To the Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
rfe & Small and Loose Oat G. L. W. CL ’ Signed
flakes, Pe Barley. W. M. FORD, HUGH WILLIAMS,
Dial 2489, Roebuck St for Applicant
20.6.50-—2n N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at_a Licerising Court to eae

DARNLEY’S CONDITION POWDER Police Court, District “A” .on Friday the
—For Horses, Cattle, Mule: Don- | th day of June 1989, as ih oipo® a.m,
keys, Sheep, Pigs, Poultry, and Do- s Police Magistraty, Dist. “A”
mestic Animals. Price 1/6 Per Tin.\ ast is st ee
ndcnbnalby dca: dear apie 21.6.50—8n,| The public are hereby warned against} eq. , t

31-6-50—8n-| giving credit to my wife GLADYE) 5 ni lub hpnesicaeaao dealt
GERTRUDE TROTMAN inee Doris
| NOTICE

NEEDLES for your record player .. .

semi-permanent needles to play severa!
thousand recordings.
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
24.5.50-—t.f.n

all kinds including Ruby and Pacer | y

NEW PLATTERS—Dinah Shore, Frank |
Sinatra, Bing and all the rest. Come)

and get, but quick. |
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

24.5.50—t.f.n. |

jastie _Rain-

Maize $4.80

|

———











RAINCOATS Ladie
coat White, Blue anc
each a Modern Dress Shoppe
15.6.50—3n. e¢.0.d
EEE
RETREAD tyres at cial ash
prices. 650 x 20 at $28 , 22 x 6 at
$38.96, 34 x 7 at /46.90, 825 x 20 at
$482.5 each Enquire Auto Tyre Com-
pany, Trafalgar Street, Phone 2696
21.6.50—~i.f.n, |

)
TYPHOO TEA Delicious, Refreshing,
Economical
—38c. —s-Ib. package. Get yours to-day
from your Grocer or Druggist. KNIGHT
DRUG STORES 21.6.50,—2n





Fresh supplies just sreceived ==—_—_——— OO

ovell) as I do not hold myself respon |
sible for her or anyone else cont net |
any debt or debts in my name urnies: | oa matte, the Estate of

a written order signed by LEWIS OLIVER YARDE
































. r AN | deceased

Signed Oe ee eee NOTICE is hereby given that all per-
me ‘st. John, {sons having any debt or claim against the
20.6.50—-2n te of Lewis Oliver Yarde-—more often

ae m as Lewis Oliver Burke—dece
RTT Or > of Enterprise in the parish of Christ
THE public are “by varned | Church in this Island who died on the
against giving credit to any PersOM|rith day of May 1950, intestate are re-
or persons (whomsoever in my | quested to end in particulars of their
as I do _not hold myself 20) | claims duly attested to the undersigned
anyone contracting any debt o } Mirlam Adina Straker, c/o Messrs. Haynes
my name unless by a written order) & Griffith, Solicitors, No. 2 Swi Street,
sijmed by me. Bridgetown, on or before the 3lst day of
by me August, 1951 r which date I shall pro
Signed NEWTON ecd da the assets of the de-
ceased among parties entitled thereto
having regard only to such claims of
which I shall then have had notice and
—_—— I will not be liable for the assets or any
es pari thereof so distributed to any per-
” se debt or claim I shall not



had ne



is indebted to the
ted to settle
without delay
his 20th day of June, 1950.
MIRIAM ADINA STRAKER,






said
their said









HELP



OVERSEER — An_ experienced ified Administratrix of the Estate

TINNED FRUIT—Grapes, Penches.| qverseer. Apply to the Manager, I Oliver Burke , deceased.
Apricots, Prunes, Fruit Salad and] piigrim Plantation. 2.6,50—-in. | 21.6.50.—4n.
Sliced Pineapple. W. M. FORD, Dial
2489, 35 Roebuck St. 20.6.50—2n A LADY—for Office Previo oar
experience not essential Apply +t f Z

TINNED MEATS—Salmon Large &| jetter and in person. IL. M. B. Meyer :
Small, Vienna Sausages Large and| & Co., Ltd 17.6. 50—T.F.N ™

Small, Steak & Kidney Pudding, Ham- a
hurger Steak & Prepared Mustard 17c WITH AN

Bottle. W. M. FORD, Dial 3489, 35| MISCELLANEOUS
Roebuck St 20.6, 50— ————————— |
ee CHAIN—Gents i5ct gold watch chair

VITAMIN B. EXTRACT—Standardized
by Parke, Davis & Co. is indicated to
supplement the vitamin B content of
milk for infants and to reinforce the
diet of either children or adults. It is
inditated for pregnant o1
Price Get a

particularly
ursing

women V/-

from

WEATHERHEAD LTD
21.6 5

21.6. 50—31



long 5Sft
Appl
8285.
20.6,.50—3r
—_————









CHT. Oliveblossor 15ft
in the best of condition
Hassell, Phone 2959





Wm. D. Richards & Son, Mc Gregor S
18. 6.50—2r
——
ENGLISH LADY-—Require post as!
Shorthand Typist fully q

Exide



Salary $120.00 Per month ®
Mrs Reece, Farmland ,near V RY
Hill, St. Michael No. 22 }

116.50 | -

—————





TRUNK—Very large trav tr
extra strong or large lir wicke
Phone Williams #221



basket lined
\is 6. 50—6n.






Pressure On

Thanksgiving Fund

LONDON,

1

request of the Government. Tha’
procedure, .he said, had been
followed in the present case
And he added: “But I cannot
sufficiently emphasise my entire
and wholehearted agreement with
the fund’s purpose and objects

Unsatisfactory

To the suggestion that the!
fund's progress was unsatisfactory, |
the Lord Mayor said that the
figures that were available and |
had been published — the latest |
figure was just over £600,000 —
related only to amvunts received
by him direct at the Mansion
House. They did not allow for
the fund-raising activities which
were taking place on an increas-



ing scale locally throughout the
country.

The Lord Mayor ended his
letter with these words: “I can-

not sufficiently stress the essential
consideration, which is that the
response to the fund should be
such as to leave no doubt in the
minds of our generous benefac-
tors overseas that their outstand-
ing kindnesses, often shown at
great sacrifice,.is deeply appre-
ciated by of us, and will for
ever be gratefully remembered.”



ed

MAIL NOTICES

MAILS for Grenasa, Trinidad and Brit
ish Guiana by the M.V. Canadian Con-
structor will be closed at the General Post
Office as under

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail ‘at 3
on the 2ist June

pm

Ordinary Mail at 8 a.m. on the 22nd
June.

Mails for St. John, N.B. Quebec and

Montreal by the M.V. Canadian Cruiser
will be closed at the General Post Office
as under

ee aaah ree hie a AS

Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at 3
pm, on the 2ist June, .
Ordinary Mail at 8 a.m. on the 22nd
June.







Sellier,
Stephen

James
Cooper,

Laurie
pher Barnard, Mary Charles, Arthur War
ner,

nald Crampton

Roy



In Carlisle Bay



IN PORT Yaet Ve
Harriet Whittaker, Set
Yacht Leander Set
Gordon, Sch. Belqueen
w Seh Dortac, Seb
Smith, Sch. E. M. Tannis
ARRIVALS
M.V Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt
Parsons, from St. Lucia
American tanker V. W. Gokey, 1,235
tone net, Capt. Kamp, from New York
Schooner Emeline, 72 tons net, Capt
Clarke, from British Guiana |
Schooner Timothy A. H. Vansluyt-j
man, 76 tons net, Capt Stoll, from
‘Antigua
DEPARTURES
S.S. Strategist, 3.788 tons net, Cant
Sawle, from St. Kitis

In Touch With Barbadec
Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd., advise
that they can now communicate with the
folowing ships through their Barbados
Coast Station. ,

S.S. Fana, S.S. Boryslaw,
b ¢, SS. Argentan, S
S.S. 8 Rosa, S.S. Boskoop.
Ss



S.S. Sea
Esso Utica,
Tactician,





Fletero, S.S. Canadian
Stella Arcturus,
Nueva Andalucia, 8.8. Golfite, S
\inherst, S.S. Giacomo Matteotti,
De Noir Mountier, S.S. S. Wilfrid
Steel Maker, S Orion, SS.
Ranger, S.S. Brazi
ritone, S.S. Esso Avila, S.S. Esito, 8.5.
S. Tagalan, S.S. Tista, S.S. Naviero, S.S
flise, $.S. Ubaldo, S.S. Rie De
5.8. Guadeloupe, 8.8. Alcoa Puritan, S.S
Laurits Swenson, 8.8. Loide Uruguay,
Dolores, S.S. Feggen, SS. Bonaire,
Sundale, 8.8. Fylgia, SS. Rakaia, S.S.
Southern Counties, S.S. Islandside, S.S
Chantilly, S.S. Granpond, S.S. Atlantic
Voyager, S.S. Anzoategui, S.S, Esso Hart-
ford, S.S. Gergeland. SS. Florida, S.S
S.S. Alexandra, S.S. Jean

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS—BY B.W.LA.L.
From Trinidad

Leonard Maih Walter Scott, Step
hanie Sellier ictor Sellier, Anthony
anette Sellier, Peter Sellier
Sellier, Louts Sellier, Allene
Helen Hutchinson, Alec
Parker Ruth Parker,
Veesie Hargrave, Milo

Phillip Price
From St.
Barnard,
Barnard,

Constructor, §
4% SS



SS. Champe
















Ward,
Margia

Cross

Lucia
Marguerite
Craig Barnard

Denis Barnard

Christo.

Gertrude Warner,
Adam Clayton-Smith
Ruth Barnes

From Martinique

Suzan
Donald

Georne
Barnes,

Bruno Rietmann |

From St,
John Wigley
DEPARTURES—BY B.W.LALL,
For Trinidad
Walter Bates, Joseph Barber, Ercille
King, Euradina King, Oliver Rock, Walter

Kitts

Edwards, Delford Roach, Fred Cole
For Antigua |
Robert ‘Swan, Arepibald Harris, Regi

Lucey Crampton, Theodore

Gittens, Barton Watson
For San Juan
Charles Hurley, Theodore Dhanga, Cecil
Roac Telford Hewitt



For Grenada

Ernest Fenty, Jean Fenty, Philip ren}

ThatFatal Fourth Round

Blinded Woodcock’s Lost Chance |

Hy

Peter I



itton
LONDON

Half-blinded by the blood in his eyes aud with the

sweat vouring down his chest Bruce Woodcock,

British

Heavyweight Champion stuck out a wavering left hand.
Above him the are lights blazed down mercilessly.

The 40,000 crowd at the
ever to see a boxing match

The Heavyweight Championship of the World

and Woodcock was fighting
see.

The tip of his touches |

glove

Lee Savold on the chin Wood
cock tensed himself and threw |
over a right-hander that had
‘finish’ written all over it from
the moment it commenced _ its
journey. The blow missed its
appointed target by about
inches. Instead of landing

bone and melted away harmlessly
over his shoulder.

Thus passed Britain's hope of
bringing the title back to this
country for the first time since
Bob Fitzsimmons won the Heavy {
weight Championship crown
1897.

Woodcock’s final effort. hal
been in vain;, Relentlessly Sav ,\
stalked his man. He knew ne
tight was in his pe and another)
vicious left-hook landed = itselt)
on the ineh-long ‘cut «above
Woodcock’ left eye.

Wiore Blood

Another spurt of blood
from the wound and as
came in again both men 2
covered in red. Woodcock was
esperately pawing the air but
Savold was safely out of the way
and it was obvious as_ the bel
rang to signal the end of roupa}
four that the fight was all over

Woodcock was taken back to
his corner and almost imme
diately the towel was thrown
into the ring It was picked up
again but referee Smyth took enc
look at Woodcock’s eye and with-
out hesitation walked over te
Savold’s corner and raised his;
arm to declare him the winner. |

There could be no doubting the|

its |
tive
on

Savold’s chin it grazed his cheek

came? |
Savoled |
were |






American's superiority He
might not have looked World |
¢lass but at least he had looked |
good enough for Woodcock |

In the first couple of rounds}
Savold had decidedly the worst



It seemed as though
great
on

of the deal
Woodcock would have no
difficulty in winning Only
that thought we

far wrong



Woodcock was on top only ecause

Savold was sizing his man up.

He was crouching in the middle |

of the ring both hands weaving a
pattern in the air about wajst
height.
Temptation

Woodcock was being tempted
to go for Savold’s apparen‘ly
unprotected jaw. The American
wanted him to lead with hfs rignt

City

Garage Trading Co.,

Lid



|
reflection is it possible to see how |

YOU
EXTRA LOW COST
OPERATION

DEPENDABLE BATTERIES

White City, the largest crowd
in England waited anxiously
was at stake
an opponent tie could hardly
and then he was all set to let
fly with his famous left—hook,

It says much for Wood&ck
that he refused the obvicus
nivitation and yet still managed
*o score with several hard right
Shey were perhaps a little tov
high to do any real damage |ut
ut least they made Savold’s face
turn a bright pink,

Honiours were definitely wits
Woodcock until the third round
when Savold started closing «in
ind made him miss with seveyal
well-intentioned rights, Even so,
Woodcock had so far established
a clear points lead and there wa
little indication of what was t
come

The fourth and final round was

‘absolutely fateful for Woodcock

punching
The nex

minute he was
away quite happily
tavold had crashed through a
ght-hook which opened up the
ut above Woodcock's lett ee
After that the issue was never in
loubt.

ne

Tiard Luck
Woodcock has had a lot of hard
luck throughout his career.
Whether his performance at the
White City could be ranked in the
same category I would not like

4o say Savold had taken every-
hing he had to give without
eppearing to be worried, and [

think, Woodcock was a little dis.
ressed to find that his right hand
) which he was so obviously
rélying had not had the desired
effect

As a world title fight it wil!
never be ranked with the great
and if, as I hear, Joe Louis i:
ntending to stage a come~back,
both Woodcock and Savold would
Le well advised to enter honour
uble retirement,

SALE
WITHDRAWN

The sale of “Kenworth”, Pinfold

Street, has been withdrawn, In-

tending purchasers are kindly

asked to take note

22.6.50.--2n



GET



7m
~
Te ~

FOR G1 YEARS!

CROWN A CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT BY BRINKING THE NEW CROWN GINGER ALE

| or ASSISTANT LECTURER in Chemistry. The duties of é lisfi i ry
; Will include undergraduate teaching tn inorganic ehemi pustules, I spots, a rug
alary seale for an Assistant Lecturer is £450 £25 } skin, p rspitation etc, ther
> | for a Lecturer £600 £25 £800. A small cost of living allowat ilis time to tr the delightful
is also paid. The status of the appointment ahd point of entry in ti PUROL POWI ER, having such
salary scale are determined by experience and qualification Ur s by

Mormactern, S.S. Spurt, S.S. Rufina, |
| S.S. Mormacpenn, S.S. Alcoa Polaris, S.S
Ss



La Plata, |

Littlepage,



oo |\Canadian National Steamship:

dale PPPOE POPES
SOUTIBOU x >
UT ND Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sali i ’ y .
Montreal Halifax Boston B'don B dos % “Oo SALE $

CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 9 June 12 June 22 June 16th July % SG x
une 3rd July 5th Juty i4th July — 6th Av . EN-DA IN x

LADY NELSON 2ind July 25th July 27th July Sth Aug. 7th Sen, x ° H-WIN ¥
LADY RODNBY . 2rd Aug. 26th Aug. 20th Aug, Yh Aug. ww mae .

| NEW BUNGALOW i .
| NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails arrives Arrives arrives ; ne %
B'dos B'dos Boston Halifax Montreal x 3 bedroomy, te ! bath 8

LADY NELSON 27th June 29th June 8th Tuly 10th July 13th Jul fare ene evant quare
LADY RODNEY with July 20th July ith Aug. 8th Aug, 12th Aus Sa rane Maen 4 rage, %
LADY NELSON 18th Aug. 20th Aug, 20th Aug. Sist Aug. “rd Sep anding in about 6,000 aq. fr. %&
LADY RODNEY + 19th Sep. ist Sep. 30th Sep, Ist Oct, Sth Oct e moet mail, his %&
bain i + %

BZ fom wanpapos apaiicwars &

N.B.—Subsect to change without notice, All vessels fitted with cold storage chai [ge [STE AGENCY. Pe) 3 ®
bers, Passenger Fares ami freight retes on appieation to :— Ss 21.6 >

i

Ps bOGGS6OuSocececeseejeceeed

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents. 9999S OGTGS ODS OO ec




















>AGE NINE



}
}

[University College Of The West Indices | (W@WRA=i or oe
eA ee

St wey
ee bn lh th.

im ornament of
when your face i



APPLICATIONS are invited for the appointment of LECTURER |
f ;





effective healing proportic
its special compound. Ladies,
appreciating a fair complexion,
ought always to have a tin of
Purol Powder ready on her
dressingtable,

| furnished accommodation is evvilable at 5 per cent. salary. Su;

; annuation is under F.S.S.U. arrangements and child allowanc«

j paid Applications should be sent before July 22nd, 1950, to the
Secretary, Intet+University Council for Higher Education in the Co!
onies, 1 Gordon Square, London, W.C.1. from whom further infor-
mation can be obtained.





SHIPPING NOTICES

|ROYAL NETHERLANDS







—=_—
Curios, Ivory, Teak, Sanda!
Jewellery, Brass Ware

Tapestries, Carpets, f

KASH MERE












SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM,

\ ROTTERDAM AND ANTWERP

| SS. “HERSILIA", July 7.8.11th and Aruba, Dare of

| SS “HECUBA”", August 4.5. 8th

SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM
AND DOVER

avibtnned
notified

The M.V. “T.B
ateept Cargo and
St. Vincent, Grenada,
dad sailing Thursday

RADAR”
Passengcr fo

“COTTICA”, June 2rd "
id Trini

s
S. “BONAIRE”, July 2ist
LING TO MADEIRA, PLYMOUTH



STEAMSHIP co. The M.V. “DABRWOOGD"
accept Cargo and Passenger
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Gr


























ANTWERP AND) AMSTERDAM FOR YOUR INSURANCE
a 8 “athe June 27th seen NEEDS CONSULT
S. “WILLEMSTAD", duly 25th BW. SCHOONER OWNERS ANDREW D. SHEPPARI
ap ene, “SRS hc; ASSOCIATION | = re SHEE FAnD
me ee ele a ta a SA } Confederation © Associa
| M.S. “HELENA" June, 29th, ee tie
| S P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD, ; soa
Agents \ '



}
|



Nutural Gas

HARRISON LINE

The Supply of





IMPORTANT NOTICE



i] . is being continued pend-
V OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM: ing negotiations
Vesset From Leaves Due The Barbados Gas Co
Barbados ”
\S.S “TACTICIAN” ee London Sist May 22nd June
S.S. “PLANTER”... Liveryoo! 17th June 39¢h June
‘LORD CHURCH London 17th June Ena June
{AT LANTIAN” London 30th June mate une
COMEDIAN” Liverpoo! 8th July 23rd July



HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM: FOR SALE







‘ea Vessel For Closes in Barbados at i
. “ADVISER” ; London. 26th June . Xt
SS. “LORD GLADSTONE” Liverpool Barly July Constant Plantation |}
S.S. “TEMPLE ARCH.” London Early July Principle Purlin I

: " J Ts and urlin Fs
For further particulars apply to tory’ "Roots vered .w

corrugater i a

DA COSTA & CO., LTD—Agents. oa eae pat

Apply .
_ D. M. SI 3ON &
21.6. 80-6



999999969654045 6:6,66646.64°















HAVE YOU GOTA >
COLD or COUGH &
IF SO TRY :
BROWNE'S ;
CERTAIN COUGH °

eee RE

* PASSAGES TO IRELAND

Antilles Products Ltd., Roseau, Dominica, offer passages to
Dublin per M.V. “DUALA”, next sailing from Roseau about
20th June, and thereafter about every thirty-three days.

Single fare, £70, usual reductions for children.

Apply direct.













14446 ott
PLLSLLELPP AAA AAP PPPS ASAP.





= ¥,
> ——— - > ; CU} ’
SaaS yo
’ ’ “4 ‘
CIE. GLE., TRANSATLANTIQUE Maron aimedy. for Coughs, %
FRENCH UNE He “gene So Dinense of the

hd. Lungs, ete., ete KS

Sailing to Trinidad Sailing to Plymouth |\|% - x

rela ! %° C. CARLTON BROWNE %
S.S. “GASCOGNE” 3rd July, 1950 9th July, 1950 S wWhote care :
S.S. “GASCOGNE” 10th August, 1950 16th Aug. 1950 9 ig ee & Retail Druccist 3
S.8. “GASCOGNE” 14th Sept, 1950 20th Sept,., 1950 % “oy Racbuck St. Dial zei3 ¥
S.\8. “GASCOGNE” 8th Nov, 1950 14th Nov. 1950. Sesesesesesene ‘

4454,
POP AN ort ot ot

REAL ESTATE
JOH’
v4.
HBG ADDS

Aft FYA
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

SM. sONES & CO, LTD.- Agents.

|
!
Yor further particulars apply to :—~. |










SEA VIEW GUEST
HOUSE

HASTINGS, BARBADOS
EXCELLENT CUISINE

FULLY STOCKED BAR

For .--
THREAD CUTTING
WELDING
BATTERY CHARGING
METAL TURNING
MOTOR REPAIRS

oe



RATES: $5.00 per Day & }
upwards GURDGN BOLDEN FOR SALE
(Inclusive) BARBADOS GARAGE, cLoceomona |
ae \ 130, Roebuck $*, ; Dial 3651 02 ita tu
; Mrs. W. S. HOWELL i







An Oil without Oiliness is not
a Lubricant

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PAGE ‘TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE en ce WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1950
—— — hicrpininentn ,
\.A.A. Never Passed On: \ Th |

Invitations To Me
WeDonald Bailey

Says

Barbados Advocate Correspondent
LONDON, June 20
Bailey, Trinidad

letter to the Evening

McDonald

Ayer,

in a

Standard today, adds his weight g ne LONDON, June SUMMER Bhs agpeuas

to the growing call for the A. A.A The Old Trafford Test HAIR CORD, 72¢
to end their petty restrictions in the West Indies from one particular point of view It has 36 in. wide per yard

Pa ewe i reaily cannot say shown that in Valentine and Ramadhin they have two AI te

how often the A.A.A. haye pre- young slow bowlers equal to any in the world at the FANCY SHIRTINGS
vented my running at meetings to moment. For both these youngsters to have performed 31 in. wide 72
which T had been invited, because as they did was a remarkable achievement and sould Per yard ¢
Pins ig pellntite ¢ Bs tt sig solve a lot of West Indian worries for many years to come.

“on . — PRINTED DRESS

I do know that I was re-
fused permission to run in
Brussels; and I do know that

Reflections On

First Test Mateh

W.L Can Still Win Series

iy

There is no need for des-
pondency over the result of
this match, The wicket was

Peter Ditton

}
|
|
has proved a great success for |



| Table Tennis

Special

Bargains

CAMBRIC, an as-
sortment of pretty



dos | undoubtedly awkward, very, | " patterns, 36” wide

= ee ee aor | very awkward. Indeed, Arthur Cl h Ne ° t Per Yard ......

— ae a, ta ee | Gilligan, a former. England as CX

o run ; ‘. Be eee | Captain, told me he had never

so - not San as is | seen a worse one in his career.

organisers no’ nm giv d
answer, but the a has We in England have got to the DELUSTED SUEDE CREPE
not even been passed to me.

“homie

All I know about other meet-
ings is what I am told by people
I meet, and I cannot count the
invitations because they are not
passed on to me’.

TWENTY-EIGHT players wiil
start in the championship race on
Saturday

In Pink, Blue, Peach, White
36 in. wide, Per Yard

duces a result in a Test series
better than the old “feather bed”
At the same time it is exceeding-
ly tough luck on a touring team,
used to hard wickets, to come over
here and play a five-day match on
a wicket which obviously will not
; last more than twenty four hours.



stage where any wicket which pre-|



60c

eed



and
the

by the following

Tuesday names of the



McDONALD BAILEY



| |
| Saturday

The boys from Barna Club are
confident that Stoute will retain)
his title. On the other hand







CRICKET

















Results





|







A Lesson

One lesson the West Indies must





Everton's Gill is showing magnifi-
cent form; closely followed by
Worrell and Greenidge Left-
hander Worrell has improved be-







: last
eight will be interesting to read. |

CaveSHEPHERD& Co, Lid, |

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

























of | learn, however, is patience. Bats-| yond expectations, and great
LONDON, June 20 men of the calibre of Weekes, Wal-| things are expected from this
SF ge Surrey
; At Swansea, Glamorgan—St ’ | cott and Worrell, who have proved} youngster. Anyone, who remem-
At 22 teh Sraws ‘ha: Saean WE i . gone be igae the greatest in} bers Greenidge’s clash with Gomes
Sime Glamorgan ; Parkhouse ’ , yA eRe. : e world, will not meet with their | —Trinidad’s champion last year
later Sit i. Davies 77, H. Davies 60 and mer ARCHERY CONTEST 2,000 miles apart. Sheffield versus Hel- | accustomed success unless they can| year, will know what determina- | / meer "2
ed Sas re. | ondly 150 for 1, Parkhouse 75, As sinki: A unique archery contest has just been carried out in ‘restrain their natural desire to tion and tenacity this player
Joule i Davies not out 54 } Sheffield and Helsinki- -2,000 miles apart. The match was organ- score rapidly from th rord fe 4 ' . ee j ry _
“Ww Rise lef r 1 Surrey 362; Fishlock 76, Mc! ised by Mrs. Martha Soederstroem, a Finnish Archery Ace, who Ben ae ae hat elation aime. Willoughby RELIANCE FREEZERS
oO eft m slows! _ 2 ave f Sheff ’ e Arche ‘ ag: ; ali i . ss Natahitat es ayers “
hie } piece of | Jtyre 84, Clark 60. ah? play ed for She field s Abb ydal Archery Club against Helsinki. That 998 runs were scored at Old] Slocombe, Gooding, the Murrays, 1 and 2 GALLON SIZE.
otad At Lords, Yorkshire beat Mrs Martha Soederstroem is here shown taking aim Trafford indicates that run making] and Edey, cannot be discounted ALSO
ow lin Z0ing cas 96 . ; > plave - Sheffield ag: op , 21s) + lan > ae een * vy, Ce s > pars aa a
bea dir Panty mites we , a = ee aeitubiad when she played for Sheffield against her own Helsinki,—Ezpress. ie ae impossible. But, apart! even Shields and Bynoe, may MAIZE AND CUR™ MILL=
utes, He ts for 57|\ py igen 120, Sharp 80; Wardle : ___ |#Fom Evans’ century 7 the first! spring Surprises. -Table Tennis is — AND —
runs and in » his fine fetes 96 aie P aiicily, ittaee a ae to its full of them. A few upsets would ICE SHAVERS.
work the tourists in in 7 At Howe, Sussex Cambridge ] | eae as a bowler ane Beads Sie edie eater ae ae ye { —— A eee omer Ne eee
ing d 6 1 University match drawn ' man ‘although he scored many competition progresses and why
NOTTS—*ad Innings — an ae» PRaes - a oy ; 7 : t, as no-one loves a one horse ]) °
Sussex 312, C 140, and second- e e A . ~! not, as ne :
H ae a a sas BL. Cox 93, John See oe eee swe eL 4lrace. The present competition af- Established ERT Ltd Incorporated
Oakes 151, Warr 5 for 78. F for 33 ils tahanae aay i aecteen fords a splendid opportunity for 1860 . ° 1926
Cambridge University 471 for 5 bomeaacle of patente and skill. He| Such Players who by dint of hard 10 & 11 Roebuck Street.
14 ec., Dewes 212, Sheppard 158. Pe hit three fours which indicated a practice will ‘he eligible for sélet-
0 At Northampton, Northampton- willinghels to' punish the: loose tion peninst Srinians. sod Bere Cai
15 ive Mcea ate , 5 , : ; ané e - =
| | Shire—Essex match drawn. — TO-DAY the West Indies open their thirteenth match| balls and never once, until he was eat Union talker alice Trints —
5 Essex 431 for 9 dec. Vigar 144, . - es . run out, did he look like losing his ment which takes place at ini
o | Horsfall 63, Insole 81. of the tour against Sussex at Hove and it is interesting to wicket. & dad in August.
, 3 Northamptonshire 240; Living-| pause for a moment and look back at their achievements. to ee dia ata E77"
Tota 24 stone 66, Brooks 74, Brown 57, date. ‘ t Had his example been emulated ; apt,
Peter Smith 5 for 77 and secondly| This match against the county an added attraction for those seek-|>Y Some of the West Indian bats- BARBADOS FRIENDLY *
ann Sass, on as a ae 85, Brown | of the Langridges, Maurice Tate, ing cool and refreshment sibly Bae pom, eee could Pe AT THE ‘.
OV iA ySIs out 134. , illige ; : s ave ulled out o e P i
nee a M ti a a Bristol, Gloucestershire beat mee a 7 Gilligan’ and S.C . fire. ‘Admittedly, the fact that FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION
‘0 34D | epbyehive by Bloruiis , “Billy” Griffith of the last M.C.C. | No Game Yardley won the toss meant that ; : ;
eee aq One eee ees tain aan: Fuck g| team to the West Indies, is the| fuidland gained ss meant that) ArT 5 o’clock this evening at the
18 5 82 1). Gloucestershire 1 “hans oo 5) last game before the Second Test The 1939 tour, cut short owing eng anc we _ What advantage | princess Alice Playing Fields
2 81 . i? came, Bpeonely + FOUN) which opens at Lords on Satur-| to the outbreak of World War If ee ee (Ref). Major A. R. Foster will
= a ° ‘; va PY YO. } | c , — . 3 re Jas very $s . a > mu °
4 i 3 (OO oo eae fj | day. had not yet reached this fixture,} —~" A : present to the Rangers football *
orbys » 314, He t : ‘ > s s tricks fr
Reuter i REE ck bie ta ona And this Test game will be in-| when they had to return home. the. Ree eB ng won team the Challenge Cup and the CALLS FOR
Secondly 90: Gotidard 7 for 42 vested with even greater inter-| The ome ny had a monger Indies followed up their initial ‘eds Jeffrey's knock-out Cup.
, *9 pie : —Rew est since the unhappy comments, game, late in the tour one of the| Joo. yy, ad fiv:
“Play Headley Reuter. which followed the Ast |features of which was a lase| vantage when they had five Eng- | _ RUM
r - s Ww | wicket stand between Teddy Hoad there might r have been a vautly
’ a 1 thi of 7 o ae
D oD . Six ins and Herman Griffith. “Griff” got| qigorent «
Cable Sent to U.K. POCKET CARTOON By their victory over Notts yes-| 89. re een ee an s a oung AT ITS BEST
(Barbades Advocate Gortékpendent) QSBERT LANCASTER terday the West Indies scored For to-day’s game, no doubt Overwhelmed
KINGSTON, June 20. be their sixth win out of 12 games} Trestrail, Marshall and Pierre} @ @
Headley enthusiasts to-day played, a feat unequalled by any| whom luck seems to have dodged| It seemed to me, however that —Vi our Rene ed In other words Sighs
drafted cables to the Secretary, of its predecessors. The 1939 side,} up to now, will) have another go| wnen the West Indies had to face Q
President and Manager of the agreed on every hand as the best| at the fickle dame that first innings total of 312, they
Tt. -erioke Board, Captain of ever sent to England up to that Another win would be a fitting| were slightly overwhelmed, In- Without er on ALL 9
fhe W.i. touring team, M.C.C., time did not register its sixth win| apertif for the Test stead of settling down and giving
Headley and his club Bacup for until far into the tour and did not Good Luck against Sussex lads,| themselves plenty of time to get] If you feel old before your time or suffer
th f this f bat t th th 1 tl B. M the runs, they crashed ahead lik trom nerve, brain and physical weakness
he services of this famous bats- get the seventh victory until the —B. runs, > ahead like 7 ‘i a health in
man to be secured by the W.I. twentieth game against Hampshire ;a Ae at a gate. peat from this tn American Medical discovery which re- SPECIAL RI IM
1 the outsta : Tes ' f ; e 5 ’ an
oe . ene ae at Bournemouth on August hat haved eee e sea? cena Tore ort operat Raa It sa simple Rome e
" i ac ay sii attempter anything | treatment in tablet form, discovered by an
This was done after a This seventh win ,was of im- A oe ti < W ns that was not safe to be attempted. | American Doctor, Absolutely harmless and
in Kingston yesterday portance because up to that time rgentine ins But once they had gone, the other | easy to take, but the nex at ee ko ee ecrenceeeeee
evening no visiting West Indies team to} batsmen always looked uncertain ae directly on your glands, nerves, and so




W

ill No



t Ask



England had won more than six

gemes (at least first class games).








Grand Prix

and likely to get out at any time.
On hard, true wickets the West

vital organs, builds new, pure blood, and
works so fast that sou ean see and feel new
to 48 hours.



H BE WISE-ECONOMISE |





=





—_—
















































































RI
: bod: wer and vigour in 24

These six wins had been put BELGIUM, June 19. Indies have already shown an Because of its natural action on giends and 1
up by the 1923 team, and was By winning the 3elgian ability to score and score heavily. rey ae oer iertote Amiasnsty. y

Headlev double the figure of wins of the} Grand Prix Motor Race here|At Trent Bridge, when they go to] “And this amazing new gland and vigour
c ude 1906 team. yesterday Julian Fangio of|play the Third Test they should restorer, called Vi- Tabs, te Ba a teens USE |

| The 1928, and the 1933 teams,}| Argentina in his Alfa Romeo,| pass 500 without much difficulty. pr Araarieee and Is now available at all

NOTTINGHAM, June, 20 ezch scored five wins out of 30] kept in the chase for world] It is only on a turning wicket that | chemists here, Get Vi-Tabs fro, yore B O W R

John Goddard, West Indies jfixtures. irivers championship. danger 1s likely to present itself, Bie inprevemant in 24 hours, Take the
Captain, said here to-day that The 1939 side, set up new fig- ahah ee Re ‘ Fae I Poe ie ¢ the West In- Cull bottle, Wee eae eee tt ate unit
the touring team had no intention ures. anglo coverec ne: oe sAp8 ° les are force to bat again under | the Pos ¢ 1 ner nd vitality, Cc R
of asking George Headley, former With only two defeats, so far,|the course with a total of about such circumstances, Goddard could ind ‘feetvi0. to. 20 “yeare Gounger or ANTI- ORROSIVE PAINT
ore oe is at Se i!” |W ems a oer gout ie Saige ghar 5, a |RSS | cue prove
the side ) their Secon est on Saturday. : , i ar of ante ages : .

He was commenting on a report “My dear Maudie, if jou Usually this game with Sussex miles an hour Luigi Fagioli of} solidity to the middle of the bat- i-Tabs A ay antes D PROTECTOR OF JRON AND STEEL
from Xin ton, Jamaica ae -_. ae aon wocrstng coms much later on the fixture ee are eee oy aetiax Ung, Baitbe Restores Manhood and_ Vitality GOES FARTHEST «> LASTS LONGEST
ericket enthusiasts were to send abou! ationa oot eatth cara, % - am
a eable pressing for the return of Week, we're never going to Brighton is one of England’s | 40 seconds about 109 M.P.H, 6559696 :

. : . Sa ee Ser E ‘ SOROS 99 9098585 $56,966.56 9585688 aa
Headley, w ho is now playing in a do Askaet” summer resorts and this game js eee ee oon in alk * RE re At ie ee One Gallon will cover 1,000 sq. ft.
Lancasiire League ricket, yod- : * - = a s 1 ¥ 7 + *.
dard 5 id ho such cable had been S cer St . rs 9 minutes 45 seconds, 108 M.P.H. i% GRACI I A FAU LKN ER= = Supplied tho
received oC a eetuaeaaae ae i- x om
—Reuter ; The Weather s — distinguished New York — %
'* e eather : stinguished soprano of New Yor ¥ PERMANENT GREE
* * o “4 r N
ie Wives Follow eau B. B.C. Radio Programme | hee ae : / Ra: GREY BAC co
W eC1ss And Morea Sun Rises: 5.40 a.m WEDNESDAY June 21, 1950 $ % / SUPER BLACK (Heat Resisting)
.m. ¥ 4 of sis J
; fe LONDON, June 20. Sun Sets: 6.23 p.m. sm. Tne News, 7.10 a.m, News|@ ’ 1 ai . in Tins of I ial Measure
Defeated ss Seer Set dee te aaa Moon (First Quarter) June 7.15 a.m. Ralph Wilson, 7.45 a.m | ¥ . x { ins of Imperia easure,
Jock odds, agent for e Bogota 23 * ally Speaking, 8.00 1. From the | m1 I ‘
ir r Club, Mi airos . ack- a sis. 8.10 a.m. Programme Parade | ¢ v) Phone 56 ; Y
T A mete Yea 4 fared { ma’ Snir het okeoeiat ip to Lightiag: 7.00 p.m. ingle ear t Grohecte San % At 3) seated si oon
wo Argentine stars, Heralds aut a DIODoeen : High Water: 7.38 a.m., 8.5 a ont” tae sane” in 401 | | W
Weiss, and Enrique Morea, were pa PM peer international pin. : ,Down, 12 noon ithe News, 10-10) COMEER ERE 91) ILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.
Poway Gereates 4b. tne. SeCOng Mira Pavel mela: ’ ‘ YESTERDAY for Dancing, 1 p.m. Mid week Talk, | % ; or " a Bi
round of the Men's Sfngies in tht Mrs. Favell said to-day that she Rainfall (Codringtor 17 1.15 p.m, Radio Newsreel, 1.30 p.m. | & % | Vesseesee ———
handén Crass Courts Gawn Tent iad talked to her husband by the o eton) 1G The Name is Susan p.m. The News| % HALL %
n aS wth Ma “ans- : w a i. , > Home om Brite % 4 I
champions nips at Queen's Club a Sr spell 1 eoer i le Total for month to yester- > mn mrt Rev ave 2 Tea" x T ay %
I Taal “ot a SrA pate a The terms offered by the Mil- day: 9.07 ins 5 athe IN ¥ Vo ee x!
». Lurie of South Africa and hom a ar 4 tre 7 ake he Wews T aily ' XM}
Raion: fell 1/527 a. 9 Sen , lionairos F.C were acceptable ‘Temperature (Max.) 85 5 Fr 4.15 from Grand $ at 8.30 p.m. %|
Tony Trabert of the United S ’|She will be going by sea next Temperature (Min.) 74.5° P. ) pon Kunz at the/% %
The - wit Ne eg Seeiaaa ht month, her passage being paid by Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E. ii ater oer Satna Bren ¥% Accompanist: |
ner eS tease an sarded AS! the Club, (3 pam.) E slot a S aeies, Le ¥ x
t shears: for Timbledo : : 5 a . mm, 5 po Michae CHAD . | »
ee ey 4 oe he a Sie With pet wil be Mes. Biiy Bie. Wind Velocity 18 miles per B00 p.m. The war tn Burma, 7.00 " m x WALTER, P. CHAMBERS > _— ae ee
a ee a vho wilt Je bgins, wife of the Everton forwarc hour Re al eeu ERe REO aed TICKETS: $1.20, 3/- %
Ee Ai ss ain Sate Het week eee for the Bogota Club a| Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.959 indies ie Paras aol naa. Py Oi g $
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Reuter. —Reute (3 p.m.) 29.909 Ant 3 Brown, 8.00 Radio News- | & Baleony 2/- REAM
Router. reel, B15 p.m. Midweek ‘Talk, 8.90 p.m. |e x Cc
——-—— eee nena " a 5, my of Strings, 9.00 p.m. Land and |s$ Bookings open at Advocate x,
; - ree . ; 1 ck, 9.30 p.m. Music in Miniature, | @ af They'll Do It Every Time epi © ig By Jimmy Hatl oe ete Nes Pm OTT gay x! SH
2 ade vey ROG. mot y Jimmy Hatlo | ee ee aakacey ‘ ORT-SLEEVE
YOU GOT THE TEACHER'S J I BET Yyf Tr. TAKE q Roe eer eye >» %
| WHY DIDN'T NAME SPELLED WRONG! . THE TEACHER (MY PEN IN HAND’! —W/ A A

1%,



You write





















AND CAN'T YOU START




GETS WORSE WHERE DOES SHE











THE NOTE,“I NOW WRITING IN THEM ) THINK HE'D TAKE

TAKE MY PEN IN YY EXCUSE LETTERS / IT?IN HiS FOOT?

HAND”? MAKE HER THAN SHE GETS | I'M GOING TO Y —

THINK YOU'RE A FROMTHE THIRD / TIPHYPROGEN v7 KIPS
BIG SHOT +++ OFF TO LOSE wort |

THAT NOTE:
* | PUT UP
arin
|
}

WITHs*+/

(AW, GEE!

CAN'T YOU
JUST SAY I
HAD A COLD
AND STAYED





MAN ONLY \ th
KNOWS HOW | Atl
are

Ir MOM AND POP
TAKE ANY LONGER,
JUNIOR WILL BE OUT
ANOTHER DAY s+*
THANX TO“GRANDPAY &
PITTSBURGH, PA.

|
A. ||
ty
I |







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Records

Everywhere !

There are good reasons why people prefer PYE. As, evidence that they



et ot atm



lo prefer PYE look at yet another sales record, this time made in the

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In that island last year PYE obtained

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are now several hundred Modern Day PYE Radios in St. Lucia, and as

fast as New Houses are built New PYES go into them. Yes, they ve tried

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P.C.S. MAFFEI & CO. LTD—AGENTS.





SPORT SHIRTS

— +

| AUSTIN REED
COLLAR ATTACHED
SOFT FRONT

DRESS SHIRTS

— AT

C. B. RICE & Co.

OF
BOLTON LANE




PAGE 1

il s BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY Jl'NEJt. 1M V..V.A. Never Passed On invitations To Me Suys McDonald llailey %  I i. . hs-e the ure*nl*em not been gle * saMMtr. I'"' Ibe Invitovltoi has ,,... OVOH been paaaed to me. \i: I know about other mcetigs U what I am told by people 1 meet, and I cannot counl UW I>ecau5c th' pa*aed on to me", not County Cricket Results LONDON. June i!" i, Gunnorgan—Surrey work 11 • ll %  %  i M % %  >i i.i"I'luy llendley" Cable Sent to U.K. ..i.-.i. OstMSiMMlMtfl KINOB iit-ilay %  W I l •• %  % %  i M (' I' thil l.itnnu-t oataUw W.I. . %  I in* i IUC reed "Play %  Will Not Ask llratHey ...-. 20 W*1 Ilullf!. %  %  ti I %  lit. %  11--> IWTMI West Indian Teat batsman, to jo.-i %  1 ft* % %  • poi I I..! .. cabl • pn %  return oi %  %  kfcet, <;;,ni 448; l'arkr. K. Davlea 77. II Davies 60 and sec oodb ISO for I. I'arkhouse 75. H r oul M Ml, Fishli-'k 76. Mc Intyre 84, Clark 60. A1 Lords, Yorkshire beat It runs x 286 for 9 declared. i 120, Sharp 80; Wardle I At Howe, SusMN Cimiondgo match drawn : %  Co* 140. and second350. C Oakai 51. CO* 93. John I lakes 151. Warr 5 for 78. Cambt dge i"l f' 5 %  i I > %  < 21* Sheppard 158. A! Northampton. Northampton: i as match drawn. HI for 9 dec. Vigar 144. HortfaO 63. Insole HI Northamptonshire MO. Living%  tOM 66. Brooks "4. Brown 57. Pettr Smith •' ,Ml '<'• and *** < ,(U >' 281 foi 7: Livingstone 85. Brown nOl ul 134. A1 Bristol. Gloucestershire beat Dar b y sh lra by 81 runs. Gloucestershire 104: Jachaon 6 for S7 and secondly 381: Young QravOBV 95 Dorbythlra SI4, Berne. 79. Smith 11, RhodM 52. Cook 6 for 82, and secondly w Ootldard 7 for 42. —Renter. Reflections On The First Test Match IT./. Gem Still Win Series II* IMrr l>. ...... LONDON, June The Old Trafford Teat has proved a gn lot I MI %  >( view %  that in Valentine and RamadTiin they IW yo-jnj; slow bowlers equal In any in the world at tlie moment Fur both these youngster* to have peilunned as they did was a remarkable achievement end llrfJUld fOlve u lot of West Indian worries foi %  0 COBM. There la pondrnrv o Ihh match, unduublrdli o nerd For deser thr result ol The ihrt •* awkward. very awkward. Indeed. Arthur (.iJii .ii former F.niland i aiii.in told me he had never seen a worse one In his career. We singe oueea better Al the England have got to the rrc any wicuct which pron-sult in a Tad *er,rs is an the old "leather bed" exceedinttMtCHERY CONTEST i 0 mita iparl BhcflMd versus Helvinki. A unlqw archers rootaal hai i i I bam % %  .irried out in Sheffield % %  i < IT.KI :• % %  • %  IImatch waa organi %  Itnftlah Archery Ace. who Bh< il" Airhcry Club against Hel Mr^ Marth.i Boedei taking aim when she ulay.il rafl BbaflwJd against her own Helsinki —Pxprest W.I. PLA Y SUSSEX TOD A Y TO-DAY the Wet Indies open their thirteenth matchl^l's an ol the tour anainst Sussex at Hove and it is interesting t". [.""i^S 1 pause for a moment and look back ;it their achievement! to BBBBBBBBBI an added attraction lor those s-cklB| cool ind refreshment ivtd — IJciiler This match jgaiiul tb> of th i,jiiigriiig s. Uaurici Tati. Cornford, Gillin^rv an "Billy Griffith of the Li team to the West Indtai List game baton the Bo> nil Tl which opona .ii i day. And ihis Test gama will bs Investod with oven m"iT Inter* eat since the unhappy which followed Ihe first. Six Win* By Ihnr victory "V r N.V terduy the Wi--t IndaM their sixth win mil of 12 games played, u feat unequalled by any of Its predecessors The 1939 side. agreed on every hand as the best rvcr sent to England up to thnt time did not regtttai Its sixth win until far Into the lour and did not get the seventh victor) until 11" twentieth game against Hempthun at Bournemouth on AufuM I Thbi seventh win e*N "' "" portanee because up to thai lime no vliithiR West Indir-. Ir-um tngland had wmi more thjn .;rme. tough luck on a louring team, used to hunt wnkets. to come over here and play a live-day malch on a wickel which obviously will not laat more than twenty four hours. A 1.CSMHI .tie* miLsl leurn however, .s patience. Batamenuf tliecahb.euf W C0H and Worrell, who have proved themselves among the greatest in the world, will not meet With then accustomed success unless they can restrain iheu natural desire to score rapidly from the word go. That 998 runs were stored at Old Trafford indicates that run making was not impossible. But. apart from Evans' century in the first innin,. no one wan able to score quickly Trevor Bailey, played DOW .i .i l-iwler more than a batsman, although he scored many I double centuries while he was a school-boy. stayed over two hours [ for 33 His innings was a perfect example of patience and skill. He hit three fours which indicated a willingness to punish the loose balls and never once, until he did he look like losing his K-ket Had his example been emulated by some of the West Indian balsI think this match could possibly have been pulled out of the Ore. Admittedly, the (act that Yerdli won the toss meant that England gained what advantage their was to be had from the pikh, but it was very small. The ball was performing all its tin k> hom the Aral hour and had the West Indies followed up their initial advantage when they had five English wickets down for only 88 runs there might have lieen a vastly different -lory lo tell. Overwhelmed Argentine I. I." ml Wins Tl\ ard. Brighton is OH trimmer resorts BELOIUM, June II \ winning tne Belgian i ... Race am Ju i n Fangto ol I in his All., H karri in the chase lor worh (rivet onan It seemed to me, how.\. id.,: when Ihe West Indies had lo face %  hat llrst innings total of 312. they were slightly overwhelmed. Instead of settling down and giving themselves plenty of lime to get they crashed ahead like a bull al a gale. Exempt from this criticism were the two openers who never attempted anything that was not safe to be attempted Hut once they had gone, Ihe other betsmOB always looked uncertain and likely to get out at any time On hard. Irue wickets the West Indies have already shown ability to score and score heavily. Al Trent Budge, when they go to play the Third Test they should pass 500 without much difficulty It is only on a turning wicket thai danger is likely to present itself, ami I Hunk that, if the West Indies are forced to bat again under bout such circumstances. Goddard could nutes | do a lot worse than put in Jeff at No. 4 or 5 to add Ihe middle of the batTable' Tennis Clash Next Saturday TWENTY-EIGHT pUytTS Wtil start in the championship fece < B Saturday and by U %  Tuesday the names of Ihe last eight will be inleresUng to read. The boya from BarnClub arc that Sioute will retain his title. On the other hand ( %  ill is .-Jiowiug iiiagnificcnt form, closely followed by Worrell aim Qreehldgt LeftVorret] !...improved beyond ixp'i l.ition>. and great Ihings are t ipa ct od from this youngster. Anyone, who remem%  ;!.:< % %  > .lash with Gomes -Trinidad's champion last year, year, will know what determina:IOTI and tenacity this player %  an show on great occasions Seasoned players like WUloughby. Stocombe. (kmding. the Murrays, and Edey. cannot be discounted, even Bhlrffh and Bynoe. may %  prlng Burprtaai Tabls Tennis i^ full of them. A few upsets would Interest a th competiUon progresses and wit. BOt, U IMI OM loves a one horse race The present competition affords a splendid opportunity for such players who by dint of hard practice will be eligible for selection against Trinidad and British Guiana In the Trinidad Tournament which takes place at Trlnii dad in August. BARBADOS FRIINDLY FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION AT & o'clock this evening at the inn Alice Flaying Fields (Her, Major A B. F< football learn the Challenge Cup Hid Uw jeaTrej knock-out Cup. Glands Made Young -Vigour Renewed Without Operation Special f&/ Bargains sIMMIK HKlt/t HAIR OOftD a. in wtde per yard rAHCI SHIRTINGS 31 In wl Per >ard 72c 72c PRINTr'H OKI CAaaaWC, an a-or1mr>tt of nrttl patterns. I Per Yard ide 84c mil iTBD BCIDI t 'Rr ri In Pink. Blue. Peach, White 3 in wide Per Vard 60c CAVESHEPHERD&Co.,Ltd. W, 11, 12 & 13 MOAjP S1RHI If |ou t>l old brfor* rmir lime or auK*l Cram Mm tr.tr> srid phyrtcal VlHEm ym will And ixrw tiopplni-*. nna healih H .lo.r.y^lhlul usour srl HUIUJ-Q"l<--i than sbnd op-rtionII la Mmple >"m. (r*atmniit In IMUVI form. dlMOVMd by B Am-rlfBH I"lor. Absolutely tarsii !" and rt.Vl..I.k..M'.lhn-r •rful Invlsoural %  da illrHi on your vital orn. hullda a, ind ml pow*BOWH w nclanp-. I; lUnda, nrv*, and •. pur* olo'>d. and mi i \ xi i ilit :i:/i %  ;> 1 and 2 GALLON SIZE — ALSO — MAIZE AMI K:. MII.L— AMB — ICE SHAVERS CALL AND SELECT YO RS AT ONCE ~ h d T. HERBERT Ltd. 'r;; 2 r 10 & 11 Roebuck Slreet. HOLIDAYING AT THE SEASIDE CALLS FOR RDM AT ITS fST. In other words... ALLEYNE ARTHURS SPECIAL RUM. ol Is game %  • \\ riss Ami Moren Defeated Two Are? to-day 0 i> Lurli Afi i %  %  %  next we". —Kruter. a • 11 orto %  T< m Club i, to Soccer Stars' Wives Follow LONDON. June 20 Mrs Bobhj K.IVI-H in-day visited' lOOh Di-hls. Bfenl rur tlie Bogobi Club, aUllionnroa F.C., In BinckIKHII about her proposed trip to "ii > %  •! M.I. .till i II. i* i. .; rtd it iiin..it.i MiFavetl -.nil tu-day tlml slu> iad talked to bet husband by unit! -AH.-mtii' telephone and he :.m h rai ran bapm in Deeota The term otr.-t.-H bj ihe Miif.C avere ,u-rcptbie Sinwill InBOlni by lea next month, her [Mfrng*g i-eini; paid hv the riub. With net iii u, tin Bill] Higllna, wire >f Ihe Bverten forward ad foi Ihe Bogota Club %  %  i.-.ii BBD Kruter The Weather covered the 33 laps ol the course with a total of 307 miles in 2 noun 47 n .-. erage about 110 Stollmcy Lutil F.igioli ofisolidlty i Italy also in an Alia Romeo washing, IT minutes I 'i i...mis about 109 M.P.H.I JJ ,. . ind Louis Rosier, Franco in a If % % %  Ml I JUMi in l>\> Sun I;I-. 5.40 4.M Sun Si'U: t,.!;* ,,n, MtNin (Vlng) Qjaaj 23 Jun^ Uskttngi :. HO |, m. IIHill Hater: 7 JK a.m., K5 %  gum vtsrt.Kiiw Rainfall *, i. ., .17 laa, Total for ninnth in pl.rday; 907 In. Temperature IMJ\ I .>.'. I remperalure iMIn.) 74.5* K. Wind iiii.-ii (9 4.m.i t. 13 p.m.) E. Wind fall tat] IH mile, get hour lUromru-r i9 a.m.* IHO.Vi .3 pm.. ujet Heuler .-, %  :.nd fi-l n — btdy powar and vigour In It t S Bcura. H". ..!•• o Ha naluiml rll"n on landa and n*na. your brain pow-r. mmary and %  rangai aliea Irasravi sraaatjonv ,_ And ifeiawaaSt n-w umi Udyjaear t ...lr.r. JE3 VI.Tab., inWaWMsA U nu !>••" Ieild and pruvrd fef riou.(idB %  TaaaattH aid B now avafiaW. M all ctitmiMi hrra O-t VI-TaSt from your hmla( today. Pol It I" < %  • '•• **• |K >.\M |rpprtm*nt In 14 houm. Tafca • uu botllo. whlrh laala >l*M flaya. undr •ho pr>alUvf Buarantsa ih.t II MR BaUN ..... full of "laour. saenv and l'n". ind tral 10 to IS r*a>* >ntiti|ir or mai tack on ralurn o( amply praaa. A .p-tldl. doubl— tlr.nalh b-Ule o f* VImmm arB Taka coaia llilia. Vi-Tabs aUSiCrT %  •stares Manhaaa l aaui VHaJlnr Talbol third in 2 hours minute-. 15 seconds. 108 M P H II. K. C. Radio Iro^raiu im nU, 7 Ii am Halph Wilson. 14ta.n .i %  ('.nil III. %  TI |'i.m'iiiiu> I'aiaor . ,. niu ..I Erudand Liahi OtchM-tia. 4.IIA1ITA — dislmpuitfu-d will give a SUM. RECITAL II i Thr Nn I? I ,lhcyll Do Ii Livery Time WHY C*PNT yu WRITE THE NOTE FOP HIM LAST NI6HT? InA LATE POR WORK MOW!! By ]iinrn y # Hatlo | *I NOW TAKE 'P/' AAV PEN IN HANP WHERE CVBS SMc THE NOTE,"I NOW J WRIT.N6 IN THEM 1 TW'.N< ME'P TAKE C? EXCUSE LETTERS y IT?1N H* FOOT? THAN SHE GeTS \ I'M GON&TO V? 1 T1PHVPR06E\ S *' C LOSE I SJ' I'.nadr. I> in f.%-v.n*\\\ ap—a iin Mlrhart Krrtn 9 -, Ton p.m .II p %  .-- A".I>M. 7 in p m. Cru-bel -.<•. BJ 1 Dut iitiiii inn in HAM. im Thurvdav June H, 19M Aeeompani5t: WALTFR V CHAMBERS TKKirS: 1110. 3/Hjl.sony %lHowkinui open Jl UfeeVt mm 11 1 s %  #: 1 A 'OXOMISE VSE BOWRANITE ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT THE PROVED PROTECTOR OF IRON AND STEEI. GOES FARTHEST .. LASTS I.ONOEST OIIO Gallon will carat I .M0 sq. (I. Supplied in PERMANENT GREEN RED. GREY. BLACK and / SUPER BLACK (Heal Rtriatbigi in Tins of Imperial Moaaum Thimc MM c Anenls WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. ,',V,','///,V.V/.'//.V.V.V.W.'.'.'/.'.'.'.'.V.--'.'.'. (Radio A Qhsunts. pod rensons why people pn-f.-i rvi-'.. A nee that th.-y .. I-YE l.M.k at yet anulher sales record, Ihis tmnmade In n f island of bt Lucia. In lhal island last yaai I'Yl: obtaUMd M pn raal "( the total Radio bualneat, (Nin.-iy-.-ii:hi per ..-nil. Than Ha] hundrod Modem Day PYE Radios in St >,.•>. Hoaaai are kirfll New I'YK.S no into tin-Ill V, I ii pretor I'YK. P. C. S. MAFFEI & COLTD-AGENTS. RECENT ARRIVALS CREAM SHORT-SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS AUSTIN REED COLLAR ATTACHED SOFT FRONT DRESS SHIRTS AT C. B. RICE & Co. OF BOLTON LANE