Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
UF00098964_02184 ( sobekcm )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
PAGE TEN



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



—

By Professor J. 8.8. Haldane

HE-most striking advances in

medicine in the last ten years
are the discoveries of penicillin
and streptomycin.

I doubt if they are the most im-
portant in the long run, because
we may hope some day by hygienic
measures to make the germs which
they ki{as unimportant as those
of cholemg or leprosy are today in
Britain, =

Before-Birth Attack

@ THE WORK which I am
going to describe relates to a
group of diseases which attack us
before birth or very soon after,
and whose nature and cause were
unknown ten years ago,

The key to their understanding
was an experiment which began
when Landsteiner, an Austrian-
Jewish refugee in New York, in-
jected a monkey’s blood into a
rabbit, just as the key to the
understanding of bacterial disease
was Pasteur’s investigation as to
why substances with different
crystalline forms are fermented at
different rates,

Here is the problem. About
one pregnancy in 200 ends in
the baby’s death, before or
after. birth, from jaundice,
dropsy, or anwmia.

We now know that these are all
symtoms of the same disease,
which accounts for about one-
tenth of all still-births and more
than a twentieth of all deaths in
the first week of life.

The disease is confined to a few
families. If one baby has died
of it, in many cases all the others
will do so unless the correct treat-
ment is given,

False Clues
@ THE STORY .of how the
cause was found out is far more
exciting and far more intricate @ONCE THE cause” was
than most detective stories. known the treatment was obvious
I will try to present the evidence, ‘The baby dies because its red
not as it came out, but as a prose- blood corpuscles are damaged. You
cutor might present the evidence can cure the anaemia by injecting
for a crime. ~ * blood from a man or woman who ;
Supposing you have lost a lot does. not possess the Rh antigen, problems of the Churches if they
of skin; and I give you a piece and whose blood will therefore not ad not to provide separate build-
of mine~to graft on to the raw be attacked by the antibodies from 18S and man-power for so many
area, it will live for a while and the mother. denominations, ree a lot ase
then tte;*though by the time it But even when this was ag ge get ts iy rhgg not
does so you will have grown «a done many of the babies died. oO c 2 iL. so. many: times over.
new skin to replace it. They had enough new blood
But if you want a second skin celis. But so many of the old
graft youwhad better get it from oes were being scrapped that
someone,@lse. If you try some of the liver was overwhelmed
my skinedt will die in a few days. ee Se babies: 28 Anyway, preparations should be
. : of jaundice. $ ws dyesiey inter athongeee
Inherited So nowadays in severe casos Made for a blood transfusion if it
@ YOU HAVE become immune the baby's own blood is taken out, i§ needed. ise soca
to my skin. Your blood contains isyally through the navel-string, _ Why do people differ in regars
substanees which kill cells from gt the same time as new blood is t© Rh?

A healthy, happy baby i

s the pride of a

what the substances responsible
or her immunity are called) in
ner blood soak into the blood ul
ihe later babies and destroy their
blood corpuscles,

Why They Died ___ SAYS

HURCH reunion—what a dif-
erence it would make to the



A test oh a Grop of your
blood will teil you if there is
any danger. If there is, try
to have your baby in hospital.

frome
ena

my boaye~ pumped into it. Calculation suggests that in tap
Almost everybody else's thousand years or so ae aoe

2 ay > i t 8 ave

body. contains substances Discovery people without Rh_ shoulc €

which. you can learn to treat . ' j
a6 foteien intrelaen: @ IT WAS ONLY in 1941 that

es... ar Levine, Burnham, Katzin, and

Theee £ aubetnng 2 called Vogel, in New York, proved the

antigens, and they are inherited. * Aye AA bat eartelint
One of the rules of their in- Cause of the disease with certainty,

died out by natural selection. And
in China and India almost every-
body has it,

I believe
arose from

that the Europeans
a mixture of a race

i while Wiener showed how to deal |. ‘ithout i
pete, ay, Se one “win cases of iedue fo lber sans IMM MAA rae en
bod air a g it. *. Moureau
Signe willl was nor Pieent Moureau, in Belgium, seems 9 (A A, that the Bacques, a
in one or other of his or her have made a aeeevery cat Ss people speaking a very ancient
parents. crag gg Mh oP ay only heard Of joanguage, lack Rh about as often
‘ ae — i British doctors took up the D perkapd the absence of Rh
® NOW COMES the appli- discovery at once, and whereas, a ad a: R
cation to saving babies lives, befére 1943, 72 per cent, of the comes down to us from ancient

Some mothers treat their babies japies treated in the Oxford in-
as they. would treat grafts of grmary died, the nymber had
somebody else’s skin, Almost all peen cut down to 23 per cent, in
these mothers are found to lack the years from 1943 to 1947. I
a certain antigen in their blood hone it is as low as 10 per cent,
corpuscles, by now.

is antigen is sometimes called “what does this mean to you if
Rh, ‘after the Rhesus monkey in yoy are an expectant mother?
whose blood it was first found, It “ some people will say that a
is sometimes called D. Only about chance of one in 200 is not worth
one-man and one woman in six worrying about. Well, an air raid

peoples like the modern Basques
who lived in Europe in the old
Stone Age, and. were mixed with
invaders from the east who had
Rh. in their veins.

It is lucky that Hitler did not
know about Rh, or he might have
massacred the Basques as he did
the Jews.

New Chapter

@ 1 HAVE toid* only the

lacks it among the European that ‘killed one Londoner in 200, begining of the story, There 1s
peoples. even after evacuation, would reason to think that quite a lot

Now when such a woman Mar~- jaye killed over 20,000 people, and Of bad conditions in children, in-
ries. a man who possesses it, we worried about raids which cluding some kinds of mental

either half the children or all of killed 200
them possess it.
Only about once in a thousand
times does the first baby immu- Danger Test :
nise the mother and die in con- @ UNLESS YOU are a woman We-aren't sure yet. Bur wand-
Sequence, but the number goes Without Rh married to a man steintr’s monkey and — ‘abbit
up to abéut one in 20 if she has with it, you have little to worry opened a new chapter in medical
as many_as four children. about. If you are you have «a history, and will save the lives of
The poor mother has been chance of about one in 40 of killing millions of babies.
immunised by her earlier babies, Your second child, and one in 20 of (World Copyright)
and “thé “anti-bodies (which is killing your fourth child. L.E.S

defect, and possibly some of the
illnesses of pregnancy, are caused
in the same kind of way.





A Discovery [hat Helps Mothers



ny fam” ~

Churches Are Closer :

DR. FISHER

Wy Harold Norwood

As Dr. GEOFFREY FISHER,
the Archbishop of Canterbury,
looks round, he reports he is “pro-
foundly encouraged” at the way
the Churches are getting together.

Union between his Church and
the other Protestant Churches is
much nearer than 20 years ago.
Later this year a report is coming
out which should make the pace
of reunion faster still.

There is one exception — the
Church of Rome, which cannot
trim its creed or doctrines, to ac-
commodate any other Church.
There, says the Archbishop, “we
are as far apart as 20, 50, or even
300 years ago.”

But not quite. THE POPE now
permits Catholics to attend Pro-
testant meetings of a non-religious
nature without the permission of
their bishops.

They can also join w.th Protes~
tants in prayer. But when they
say the Lord’s Pray they must
say the Catholic version. This
begins “Our Father who art (in-
stead of the Protestant ‘which art’)
in heaven....” And il ends at
“Deliver us from evil,” while the
Protestant version goes on, “For
thine is the Kingdom... .” ;

He Draws 5.000

OMETIMES there are murmur-
ings from inside the Churches
against the pulling power of their
own “star” preachers. It is said

that on a Sunday they attract
people and their money away
from their own* chapels in the

suburbs,

No complaint on that score
against Mr, Tom Rees, the evange-
list. He draws the biggest congre-
gation in London. He fills the
Albert Hall with 5,000 people.
And he does it on Saturday nights.

His people, mostly youns, com>
not only from ll parts of London,
but in parties of over 100 from
Birmingham, Lincolnshire, Bucks,
Hampshire, Northants, and all the
Home Counties. He reads out ths
list. All told, nearly 200 separat>
parties, and the crush of motor-
coaches waiting to take them hom>
afterwards is like a big football
match,



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SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950
—
What does Tom Rees offer his : . {£99599 FSSGOS S59 OSO SHO TOVSF LEASES PPS
crowds in place of Saturday sports Like Drinks, Not =
and recreations? Hymns, choruses, + ‘
public professions on “How I be- Easy To Handle
came a Christian” by selected

young people, and, above all, the
personality of Tom Rees, poured
forth in song, quip, and sermon
He is not a parson, but his brother

is, and there are many parsons’
collars on his platform. ;
Tom Rees, in his early forties,

has the energy and the vital stuff
more often found at the head of
vast industrial enterprises in the
Midlands and the North. He pve-
fers the vastness of the Albert
Hall, ‘
He sets his thousands. singing.
‘ Then, with a frown and a wave
of his hand he stops them dead.
“Not like Ahat—like this.” They
go on again. They enjoy being
jollied and he has put more mean-
ing in their singing.

He puts on a choir. It is heard
reverently. Tom rises, “Did you
enjoy that singing? Well, why
don’t you clap?” They clap.

A collection is taken on wooden
trays and the pattering silver coins
sound like a hailstorm.

And then silence. A command
from Tom Rees that nobody is to
cough or fidget or even to look
around. He is going to preach his
sermon. In the course of it he
quotes many passages from Serip-
ture. Into them go the fire, the
human energy that might have
built a fleet of cargo liners or filled
them with tractors.

Exhausted after the effort? He
is still fresh as a daisy.

Those who feel converted stay
behind for further instruction.
One night’s harvest, and it is big-
ger than most big congregations.

Mr.Stokes’ Problem

RITAIN’S ancient cathedrals
are her biggest standing at-
raction for foreign visitors. Yet
or every threepenny bit left \in
the cathedral box, 3s. is spent at
the café just outside, 5s. on coach
and train tickets, and £1 on hotel
bills,

That is one of the reasons why
Dr. E. G. SELWYN, the Dean of
Winchester, is now demanding
that the State should help with the
cost of maintaining cathedrals.

Who pays at present? It is the
sole responsibility of the Church
of England and her bill for urgent
repairs to cathedrals, churches,
and other properties now stands
at £3,000,000.

At St. Paul’s, London, the
Chureh is responsible for the
second highest dome in Europe,
and is trying to raise £100,000
for repairs. At Salisbury, the
tallest spire in England is threat-
ening to tumble down. Hundreds
of other great churches need
drastic restoration or complete re-
building.

Should the Church go on paying
for the nation’s show places?
Churchmen are divided.

There is just a chance that the
Minister of Works, Roman Catho-
lic RICHARD STOKES, can find
the way out of the problem of how
to provide State funds and still
keep the cathedrals as places of
worship,

Henhouse Church

EFORE the war
building a good average 400-
seater church was put at £9,000-
£10,000, parish hall £4,000, and |
viearage £2,500.

To-day, the same equipment
would cost £40,000, and church
building is down the queue be-
hind homes, schools, and Govern-

the cost of

ment offices. But temporary
ehurches are allowed,
At Clayton, Newcastle-under-

Lyme, the Anglicans have boysst
a farm, The cowshed will be their
church and the farmhouse the
vicarage.

At Canley estate, Coventry, the
Methodists have, for ten years,
been using a henhouse as a church.
In. North London they seat 80
worshippers in a shop. At Rossen-
dale, Lanes., they hold their ser-
vices in a room at a felt manufac-
turing mill.

At Dalton, near Darlington, they
have gone along with the squatters
at a former R.A.F, camp and
squatted in the name of the
Church in one of the huts.

You can’t keep a good cause |

—London Express Service.



@ From Page 5
time since pre-war, said; “The
food is monotonous — but so it |
seemed to me when I wes at Cam- |
bridge in 1937.”
A new

Recommended
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hygienic foil which you can
use for making covers for larder
dishes, wrapping _ sandwiches,
cooking different vegetables sep-~
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wrap each kind in a parcel and
drop it in), making a steam-proot
cover on a baking dish, lining

Hello Everybody!

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>
cake tin, or wrapping fish to keep | $
in the smell. I s 2s. a roll, | x
s don } x
* LONDONERS 1 love:— j g
SHE stood at Marble Arch |Â¥ %
yesterday, toothless, wild-haired, | % z
flat-bosomed, dressed in a straight | ¢ %
mud-brown coat, And she was | & R
saying: “Come on, come on, for & x
a thundering good dose of salva- RS 3
tion,” 3 ¥
+ SHE was immensely rich and 1% x
very old. A mink coat wrapped | % %
her thin, bent figure, and golden | \ x
curls straggled over the collar. s %
She walked into the costly salon | \ xg
and sat down. No one had to|/%& ¥
ask her what she wanted. Every | ¢ y
week, year after year, she comes | \ mS
in and buys herself a new. hat. %
—London Express Service. < %
a aetihenestipenelinalpagtigiinnasistamtteptieneaane? x
> %
i< ¥
ITCHING ;: $
: | s %
*
INFLAMED ;: S
e | & %
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by X
%,
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1% ¥
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3 :
|e <
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se 4 gt
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Relentless itching—caused by germs under * $
the skin, speedily develops into irritating yf $
pimples and open sores unless checked. w mo
Thousands of skin sufferers have proved %
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i ion. fe f x
cree tergaee |e Please give YOUR Baby
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MALARIA SORES or RINGWORM— | %& the same start
just @ few applications of wonderful 1%
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Leaving School Next Term? 8 My Favourite—Soon will be Yours!
HAVE you considered Journalism as a | x
Career? The Barbados Advocate is look- % 2:
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String Rall sealig Se une "eahor The | % %
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SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PAGE THIRTEEN








z YOU SEE...] [
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SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950

FIVE more students returned from Canada yesterda:
ae hones by T.C.A. They are, left to right, Mr. Ke

ey McKenzie, Mr.



of
7°

for the Sum-
eith Gooding,

John Goddard, Jr., Mr. Harold

Farmer and Mr. ffrey Watson.

For Summer Holidays After 43 Years

ETURNING from Canada AT™™ an absence of 43 years
yesterday to spend the from the island, Mr. L.

Summer holidays here were Mr.
Harold Farmer who is doing his
second year B.Sc., Mr. Geof Wat-
son, second year Commerce, Mr.
Kefth Gooding third year BSc.,
and Mr. Geof McKenzie second
year, Commerce. These boys are
at McGill. Mr. John Goddard Jr.,
the other student is doing his first
year Commerce at Queen’s Uni-
versity.

Their parents, relatives and
friends were at the airport to meet
them.

Trinidadians Entertained

HERE was a Cocktail Dance
Tast night at the Royal Bar-
bados Yacht Club given in honour
of the visiting Tranquility Tennis
Team, by the members of the
Barbados team.

Today there Is be a luncheon
peasy for them at the Crane

ouse Club. This is also given
by the Barbados Team.



Across
Looks as though Fianagan
pevenue a d exD midleara, (63 _
nd expenditure, (C)
Gockneys

have a word of greet-

ae (3)

rye Will measure the diameter
all fibres, (Y)

Amid? She may have been. (4)
The university term beginning in
january takes it for mirth, (8)

lon to take against sun
and Snger. (6)
The return of pins to cut. (4)
in manner of speaking

me
oN

-
>

+ G)
Wembley gets more than one
in-year. (5)
a can almost smeli this coin.
‘8.@ nasal sound, (6)
Start ofall teething troubie (3)
Down
Anybody willing may make them.

)
Ancient city feature for the little
@rab. (6)
ops of dish you'll find ('m in.

here you Will always find Olga.
(4) 6. Turn the hay, 3)
. Tapertieion to let air into a vile

. The ery ou hear when Thomas
1

e tiles, (5
ested, (5) ye:
ersify. (5)

into the gap. (5)

wet, (%) 19, Indite, (3)
Was always above the Sultans of

Turkey. (3)
a1. This word vs sheltered. (3)

Solution of yesterday's
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3,8. Cauterise; ;
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‘on; Rover; 22. 3
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Ace; 14



Bentham of New York City paid
a five-week visit here and re-
turned on Sunday last by the
“Lady Nelson.” He was staying
with his sister Mrs. G. Maughan
of Belmont Road,

He said that the islana nad made
vast improvements since he had
left and certainly looked strange
to him. He had however enjoyed
his holiday and thanked all those
who had contributed in making it
a pleasant one.

Off To School In U.S.
Pa on Wednesday on his
way to the U.S.A. was
young Ferdinand Goodridge of
Spring Farm, St. Thomas. He will
join his brother Franklin who is
at school there.

Amateur Actor
AYING his first holiday visit to
Barbados is Mr. E. G. Fras-
er, Civil Servant attached to the
Income Tax Office of British Gui-
ana. He arrived here recently
by the “Lady Nelson” to spend
part of his six months’ holiday and
fis staying at “Leaton on Sea,” The
Stream.

A member of the Georgetown
Dramatic Club, Mr. Fraser said
that they had done plays over a
feries of years in B.G., and had
just finished “While the Sun
Shines” which was staged in Bar-
bados last year.

Here Until Wednesday
RRIVING yesterday morning
from Trinidad by B.W.1LA..
was Mr. Clyde Archer, Legal
Draughtsman to the Government
of Trinidad. Hé will be in Barba-
dos until Wednesday. Mr. Archer
was a former Judge of the Bridge-
town Petty Debt Court.



Guess Star



LAST WEEK’S GUEST STAR
is Marilyn Monroe.

‘Nelson from his column

keeps a look-out over
all London.’’

sag

a look-out for
‘Black & White’

enue



GARDENING
HINTS FOR
AMATEURS

Crazy Pavement

Crazy paving for garden paths is
not quite such a craze as it was
some years ago, yet this type of
path is still popular with many
people.

Crazy pavement paths can be
most. attractive, especially in the
less forma) and smaller garden.

Like the Cement Path it is quite
possible for any energetic garden.
er to construct a crazy path him-
self at home at a quarter the cost
that would be entailed if expen-
sive outside labour was employed.

As a rule the snag about making
crazy pavement paths is the diffi-
culty of obtaining suitable stone.
This difficulty, however, can be
overcome by making the stone
yourself right on the spot, using
the same concrete mixture as tha;
given for cement paths, i.e.,

4 parts shingle (small stones or
grits)

2. parts sand

1 part cement.

There are two methods of mak-
ing these stones. One way is to
form the stones actually on the
site of the prepared path by put.
ting lumps of the concrete mix-
ture on the svot. and shaping up

the stones with a trowel.

_ The second way, not quite so
simple, is to make a wooden
mould, say one and a half feet by
six feet (a packing case cut down
answ well), nail some wooden
pieces across at different angles,
and put in your concrete mixture
to a depth of 1% to 2 inches. When
it is quite hard (about 4 days)
take the pieces earefully out of
the mould, and repeat the process
until, you have enough slabs to
make your crazy path.

uming now that you have
your stones all ready we will now

describe in detail how to make thd
path.

How To Make A Crazy Path

Having chosen the site for your
path, proceed to peg it out by
careful measurements to the shape
and size you want it. Next, dig
cut the site to a depth of twelve
inches, leaving the sides straight
and clean, cut to form the walls
of the path,

Fill in the cavity with stones
and marl to %4 of the depth, ram-
ming and rolling it to a body.

When this is done, put in a




“1 see you’ve been forcing
your divisions agcin
Plumton Minor.”



layer of soil (leaving just enough
room for the depth of the stones),
and roll and ram this very firm
and level (some people use sand
here). Now comes the fascinating
part of arranging the crazy jig-
saw of your path.

Assemble your concrete slabs
conveniently near, and have a
little eement handy. Put dow»
your first slab and under each end
of it make a small hole in the
pathway. Fill these holes with a
blob of cement and put the slab
back down on top, pressing and
settling it until you have it proper-
ly in place and you feel the cement
grip.

Continue in this way, arranging
your path as you fancy, but giving
each slab two little cement “seats”
as described.

‘When all the slabs have been
laid, the cracks between can be
filled in with a cement gruel (3
parts sand and one part cement
mixed thick), or the spaces can be
filled with soil. If soil is used,
small rock plants such as “Little
Yellow Daisy” or “Sweet Allysum”
can be planted in between the
Stones, here and there, giving the
path a very charming appearance.

“‘And all London keeps

”



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

At the Cinema

“East Side,

“East Side, West Side”, the
film version of Marcia Davenport’s
best-selling novel of the same
name, is now showing at the Globe
Theatre. Though well-acted, the
characters seem a little flat in
comparison with the well rounded
and clearly defined personalities
of the book, and the eontrasting
atmospheres of New York’s east
and west sides are missing, having
probably been lost on the cutting
room floor.

It is the story of Jessie. Bourne,
born and raised on the east side,
who marries Brandon Bourne,
wealthy New York Socialite.
Bourne’s infidelities are forgiven
by his wife, who is desperately
in love with him, but when he
resumes his attachment to cheap,
but fascinating Isabel Lorison,
Jessie realizes their marriage is
finished, On the point of leaving
Brandon, he tells her that Isabel
has been murdered and he will be
questioned. When the murder is
solved by Mark Dwyer, returned
soldier and ex-policeman, and
Brandon is exonerated, Jessie
tells him that her love for him is
dead, and she is leaving him.

On the whole, it is a trite, story,
but it is lifted out of the ordinary
run of “eternal triangles” by the
acting and _ direction. Jessie
Bourne as played by Barbara
Stanwyck, is warmly sympathetic
and sincere throughout, and her
reactions to her husband's infidel-
ities are well defined and in
keeping with her character. It
is probably one of the best roles
Miss Stanwyck has played, and
with her usual ability, she loses
no opportunities to make it out-
standing. James Mason as the
philandering husband, was as
convincing as possible in a role
that did not seem to suit him too
well, His scenes with Isabel
Lorison has obviously been cut to
shreds, though a resounding slap
he gives her face is left in. Ava
Gardner, as Isabel, cheap, preda-
tory and always fascinating to
Brandon, turned in an excellent
performance, and her scene with
Jessie, when Jessie realizes final-
ly what her husband really is, is
acutely cruel. The role of Mark
Dwyer, who falls in love with
Jessie, is engagingly natural and
well-played by Van Heflin,

“East side, West side” will be
enjoyed by most people, and
particularly those who have not
read the book. It is dramatic
throughout and interest is sus-
tained to the end.



West Side’’
G.B.

“My Friend Irma”

MY FRIEND IRMA,” a pic-
turization of one of radic’s most
peyular comecy programs, is now
plating at the Aquatic Club
Cinema, Marie Wilson plays
the original role of Irma, which
she created on the air, and when
she takes things into her rather in-
capable hands—chaos is apt to
result, and frequently does. How-
ever, everything turns out happily,
in the end.

Supporting Miss Wilson are
John Lund as the boy friend, Don
Diana Lynn as her friend Jane,

radio’s comic team of Dean Martin
DeFore as a _ nillionaire and
and Jerry Lewis. If, you. like

plenty of laughs and hilarious fun,
youll probably want to see “My
Friend Irma.”

“Intruder In The Dust”

Once again, a film that serves
to prod social conscience has come
to Barbados. “Intruder In The
Dust”, showing at the Roxy
Theatre deals with the racial ten-
sions between the white and
coloured peoples in the South-
ern States. The story tells
the plight of a negro land-
owner who is falsely arrested for
murdering a white man. While
the mob gathers outside the jail,
prior to lynching the prisoner,
a young white boy, whom the
negro had once saved from
drowning, persuades his uncle, a

lawyer, to defend the man,
Through the boy’s efforts, it is
proved that the negro did not

commit the murder. The strength
and dignity of Juano Hernandez
as the proud negro dominate the
film and Claude Jarman is con-
vineing and sincere as the ado-
lescent boy. Overtones of meaning
help to deepen the impact of
dialogue and action; silence and
normal sound effects largely re-
place the musical background,
with dramatic effect.

“Father Was A Fullback”

A comedy. of family life,
“FATHER WAS A_ FULL-
BACK” starring Maureen O'Hara,
Freq Mac Murray is now playing
at the Empire Theatre. To quote
a short American review—
“Sparkling humour and refresh-
ing modern dialogue enhance this
diverting comedy, which for all
its laughable exaggerations,
directs healthy satire at the indul-
gent American parent and the
spirited teen-ager. Deft direction
maintains a fast pace and foot-
ball scenes furnish excitement
Fine fun for the whole family.



Rupert and the Dragon Pills—38



When Rupert and the dragon
are safely inside the rocket attach-
ment the Mandarin stands well

back, The steps are removed by
the chiet assistant, who then tetches
a torch tied to a long pole. Lighting
the torch, he thrumyg ir at che fuse,
which at ance catenes fire, There

Children’s Letter

Dear Children,

We celebrating Mother's

are

Day today. Those of you who are
fortunate to have your mothers
with you must certainly feel very

happy, and I hope you do your
best to make her happy too, and
really feel this is her day.

It is not a gift on Mother’s Day
that matters so much as it is not
always possible to give something,
but there are so many little
things that you could do, and I
am sure they would be apprecia-
ted by her.

I must wish you all a very
happy day.

Yours very truly,
CHILDREN’S EDITOR.







is a momentary hissing and
spluttering and with a foar_the
great rocket moves, slowly at first,
then suddenly at a tremendous
speed it shoots off the steel guiding
rod and straight up to the sky,
leaving a long trail of smoke and
fiery sparks behind it.

Pen Pals

19 Louise
Vreed-
British

Oscar
Street,
British

Harry Bayne, Age
Bayne 18 Frank Bayne 20.
en-Hoop, West Bank,
Guiana,, South America,
Limerick, 92. Cronoque
Georgetown, Queenstown,
Guiana South America, Claude
Hazzard 14 years Boys’ Hostel
Tauteen, St. George's Grenada,
Stamp collecting, dancing, Cin-
ema!

Tongue-T wisters

Repeat each of these aloud



three times without tripping
your tongue—if you can.

Sheilah, shrieking, slid side-
ways on Shelley Shelton’s slip-
pery slide Saturday.

G.B.I

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PAGE THREE



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BARBARA GOALEN



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WH





as effective’. .

SUNDAY ADVOC



illustrates

‘Like Drinks, Not Easy to Handle”

By ANNE EDWARDS

THE fashion for white comes

, men is like the effect of drink 01

most men. After one they want

back with a bang, White collars} another and after two they don’t
and cuffs of pique or muslin are care how many they have... .

on most of the new Spring dresses.”
White hats, white pique gloves,
white roses or carnations, white®
chiffon handkerchiefs, white shirts,!
and separate sets of white collars *
and cuffs to add to frocks that
haven’t got them...they fill the
shop windows.

It’s a fashion that’s easy to copy®

—but hard to handle. The effect

Barbara Goalen shows you how
that ‘touch of whifje should be
used and too often isn’t.

Remembering that the more
white you use the less effective
you look. Barbara limits herself
to one dazzling collar on an all-
black outfit, or a pair of short
white gloves with a navy dress
and accessories, or a hat and a
buttonhole on an outfit that is

of white accessories on most wo-% otherwise black to its fingertips.



To Eat

* COCKTAIL PARTY
seen around: —

DELIGHTFUL ... big yellow
grapefruit, spiked all over with
orange sticks which were tipped
with olives, pearl onions
radishes,

DELICIOUS .. . tinned frank-
furters, baked instead of boiled,
and served very hot. (Put them

ideas

A DIET TO CUT DOWN YOUR WEIGHT

Slimming

Are you contemplating joining
the rapidly increasing numbers
of weight reducers?
pecially men—who would like to
“take a bit off’ shy from the
experiment because the slimming
meals so widely publicised are
much more attractive to women
than men.

Here, for their benefit are the
very successful reducing diet
tules of St. Bartholomew’s Hos-
pital. The hospital claims that
every .month it adds another 80
over-weight people to the roll of
those whose eating habits it is
regulating,

Breakfast

Tea or coffee (ground), as much
as liked; milk, 4 tablespoonfuls
(no sugar or sweetened con-
densed milk).

One egg, boiled or poached.

Bread, 2 ozs. brown or white,
two thin slices, with butter or
marmalade, or jam, very thinly
spread,

Midday
Lean meat, rabbit, stewed liver,
chicken or fish - (not fried),

medium portion, 2 ozs.
Gravy without fat or thickening.
(No barley, rice Yorkshire pud-



ding, suet dumplings or pie
crust.

Vegetakles, boiled, as much as
liked (but no potatoes, dried
beans peas or lentils).

Raw fruit, as much as liked.
ae
we
[aa

$
Tp,

jer Yardley cherish
er vardle)

Pamper your s

melting softness of the Yardley Cleansing Creams,

the richness of Nigh

Stimblate it gently with one of the Toning Lotions,

and, during the day, si



)

Many—es- -

(Bananas and grapes in small
quantities only.)
Tea
As much tea as you like, with
milk, 4 tablespoonsful (no sugar
or sweetened condensed milk).
Bread, two thin slices; butter or
jam very thinly spread.
Salad, as much as liked.
Vinegar, if desired, but no oil or
mayonnaise,

Evening

Tea or coffee (ground), with 2
tablespoonsful milk (no sugar
or cocoa).

Bread, one thin slice.

Cheese, sardines (no oil), salmon,
herring or kipper, small portion
1% ozs.).

Or 2 eggs, boiled or poached; or
white fish or smoked haddock,
medium portion.

Raw fruit or salad.

Butter not to exceed } oz. in the
day.

The amounts of food allowed in
the above list may not be exceed-
ed, but they may be arranged to
taste.

Allowed Without Restriction

Fruit, raw (bananas and grapes
in small quantities only).

Green vegetables (except green

peas).

Salads (except beetroot).

Tea, coffee (ground).

Clear soups and meat extracts
and Marmite.

Soda water, lemon water (no



yout

kin with the

nt Cream.

he and cleanse

Without Drugs

sugar). Water,
Vinegar (moderate amounts).
Saccharine.

Not Allowed

Fat and fat meats, such as ham,
bacon, pork,

Oil and salad dressings.

Fried fish, chip potatoes and other
fried foods.

Cream.

Nute.

Sugar, sweets, and chocolates.

Fruits tinned in syrup and dried
or fruits,

8 condensed milk.
Puddings of all kinds, including
suet and Yorkshire puddings.
“Biscuits, pastry, cakes and ice-

cream.

Thickening in stews and soups
and barley, rice, tapioca
macaroni and Lockshen.

Potatoes, dried beans, peas, and
lentils.

Cocoa and sweetened bottled
coffee,
Beer, stout, sweet wines and
spirits.

Mineral waters (except soda
water), ginger ale, ginger beer
and cider.

Bottled fruit juices and barley
water.

* % oz. unsweetened biscuit may
be substituted for 1 oz. bread.
The chief dietician at the

hospital adds this warning: “If

you want to reducé, see .your
doctor. It is the only safe way.

“He should test your heart, take




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STREET LONDOW

and *



in a tin with dripping seasoned
with salt, pepper, and a little
ginger). Chicory stalks filled wito
demi-sel cream cheese. “Daiquiris”
made with three parts white rum
(35s. 4d. a bottle) and two parts
lemon squash, served very cold.

DE-LOVELY .. . Table decor-
ated with those nursery candle-
sticks (the one-candle-in-sauce!
kind). One czimson candle in
the centre, and a dozen flower
heads heaped in the cup (it holds

enough water to keep them
fresh)

Easy Lesson
* The art of public speaking

_... IT have been asked to say
a few words about .. . but I can-
not let the occasion pass without
... the spirit of loyal co-operation
in which ... and a special word
of thanks to...

I am confident I am expressing



your blood pressure and examine
you for anaemia and chest con-
ditions.

“There should be no need for
drugs. We normally try to avoid
using them, Dexedrine merely
makes you lose appetite. We
encourage patients to cut their
food by will power.”

A Shock For The System

If a person has heart trouble,
bulky food would not be recom-
mended by the hospital. Gastric
sufferers would not be prescribed
food likely to irritate.

Patients are expected to lose
2% lbs. each week. If they are
losing more, then the diet is in-
creased. To lose a stone a month
is normally reckoned too big a
shock for the system.

Special exercise is not recom-
mendeq because it strengthens
the appetite. People are told ‘
drink water or soda water
allay hunger.

At Bart’s they saw that women
who concentrate on slimming
without medical supervision some-
times become neurotic

And they add: “For every
patient who must reduce, the
hospital still has three who must
be fattened up.”

to

—L.E.S. G



;

GEC.

HOUSEHOL
A





Bolling water in a few minutes

polished aluminium, it has a q



p ELECTRIC
PPLIANCES

help you and this is whataG.E.C. Electric |
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ATE



my firm ; |

theory that ‘half as much means twice
. Says ANNE EDWARDS



1. Short white cotton gloves
with a sleeveless dress, and—1920
touch—a long white cigarette
holder.

2. White hat and buttonhele of
two white carnations—worn the
new way—nowhere near your
buttonhole and very close to your
chin.

3. Brilliantly white collar on an
all-black outfit., The collar looks
whiter this way and the outfit
blacker. The collar is shaped like
two separate petals.

the wishes of you afl when...

who has asked me to say . . . she

has unfortunately been prevented }
from coming, but has, however,

sent a telegram: “Best wishes for

your venture.”

But we have been fortunate in
securing who has kindly
consented to. Finally I would
like to thank the committee .. .
the untiring efforts of . . . last,

but not least, the gallant work
put in by It only remains
for me to say without whose
help this would have been im-
possible.
To Read

* LETTERS | doubt often get

written: —

‘I am a_ hospital nurse, and |
every patient at some _ time

remarks on the whiteness of my

teeth, and asks what toothpaste
I use.” (From an advertisement.)
Is That So....
* QUOTES: Maurice Chevalier
(about a meeting between
Guitry and King Alfonso):
“Sacha assumed such a_ kingly
manner and the king was so
natural that for the moment I

had them confused,”

Doris Langley Moore (about
getting clothes for her museum
of costume): “The hardest type
to find of any era — are chil-
dren’s and maids’ dresses. They're
never discarded till they’re worn
out.” |
Sylvia Shelley (about the poses |
in fashion photographs): “When
1, started modelling 12 years ago
we had to lean far back, smile
into the camera, and look vital.
Now the smart thing is to lean
forward, drop your eyes, and look

deadpan.”
Thanks |
é@ VD LIKE TO thank the}
woman who, after being
beaten up, said: ‘Flogging? No

I don’t believe in it.”
I'd like to thank the man who,
returning to England for the first
@ On Page 10 |

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PAGE SEVEN



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FOR COLGATES, ACTIVE,
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\ HIDDEN CREVICES BETWEEN THE
TEETH, CLEANS ENAMEL

NTLY, SAFELY— TOO!









Clean
Your Breath While

You Clean Your Teeth -

AND/HELP sToP
TOOTHIDECAY:!








PAGE EIGHT



Published by Tho Advocate Co. 114., 34, Broad St, Bridge =

Sunday, 1950

May 14,

Summer Season.

TOMORROW Mr. Fred Goddard, M.C_P.,
and the Manager of the Marine Hotel
are flying to Venezuela on a goodwill mis-
sion, They will remain there until Satur-
day. The object of the visit is to encourage
Venezuelans to spend their summer holi-
days in Barbados. In order to encourage
them the Marine is offering special summer
rates. The visitors from Barbados will
interview travel agencies, hotels, clubs
and companies in Venequela which are
interested in potential tourists. They are
out to sell Barbados as a good buy to the |
Venezuelans, who have summer holidays \
and who cannot afford to go too far from
home. Barbados is only a few flying hours
from ‘Caracas and already this year there
have been many visitors to Barbados from
Venezuela. At Easter there was a special
charter flight for the week-end.

But the visit of the visitors from Barba-
dos is primarily designed to get Vene-
zuelans here during the summer season
when tourists from the North have re-
turned home.

The hotels of Barbados were packed to
capacity this winter with visitors from the
North most of whom remained at hotels
for periods of at least one month. The in-
flux of Canadians made the accommodation
available at hotels here inadequate to cope
with a large number of would-be visitors.
And it is to be hoped that the Government
of Barbados is already making plans to take
advantage of the offer of Canadian capi-
tal which will be made available for build-
ing a new hotel, if necessary: tax free
legislation is passed in the House and
certain other requirements met.

Barbados had a good winter season of .
tourists and the indications are that next })
year will be better. i

But what of the summer?

The established hotels of Barbados
keep open throughout the year but most
are forced to cut down the numbers of their
employees at the end of every winter
season. It is to avoid this seasonal fluctu-
ation in the hotel industry that the two

visitors from Barbados are leaving for â„¢

Venezuela tomorrow. It is too early yet in
the summer season to know just how many
Canadians will avail themselves of the ex-
eceptionally favourable rates offered by
Trans-Canada Airlines during the summer
but there is no reason to believe that Bar-
bados* hotels cannot cope with Canadians
and Veneguelans who are eager to see
Barbados in the months when many Bar-
badians are themselves on holiday.

There are many difficulties to be over-
come in encouraging tourists to come to
Barbados from Venezuela.
| But one of the most urgent difficulties
to be faced is the lack of permission for
regular Venezuelan airliners to ne ‘

If Barbados had had to rely only on
British West Indian Airways for transport
of visitors to and from Canada, Barbados
would have lost a substantial amount of
dollars last winter. #

It ig not possible to get large numbers of
Venezuelans here unless Venezuelan Air-
lines ean be granted equivalent landing
facilities to those that are at present ex-
tended to Trans-Canada Airlines. 4

Permission has been given and can still
be given in the future to charter planes to
come here from Venezuela but unless the
tourist agencies in Venezuela can assure
tourists to Barbados of a regular service by
the normal airlines of the country, it is
very doubtful whether the volume of
traffic necessary to provide Barbadian
hotels with a permanent summer industry
can be built up. ;

British West Indian Airways can carry
a small number of Venezuelan visitors now
but tourists on a large scale will want to
fly to Barbados in their own planes.

It will be interesting t6 know just how
many Dutch visitors from Curacao and
Aruba do not come to Barbados for a short
summer holiday because of the lack of
landing rights at Seawell for K.L.M. Tour-
ism is the major industry of Barbados
after sugar. It is something of the present.
It is within our grasp. No selfish interests,
no lack of enterprise must allow it eae

"Yene visit of the two Barbadian visitors
so soon after the goodwill mission of the
Barbados Polo team will be a welcome
reminder to Venezuelans in search of soft
beaches and blue waters that Barbados is
only a few hours as the plane flies, But the
planes must be allowed to fly.
West Indian
Industrialisation
PROFESSOR W. ARTHUR LEWIS has

recently published under the auspices of
the Caribbean Commission his report on
the Industrialisation of the British West
Indies.. This Report will be studied by
governments, legislatures and chambers
of commerce, and it is fitting that com-
ment be made on a matter of great impor-
tance to the future development of the
West Indies.

| Professor Lewis is the Stanley Jevons
Professor of Economics in the University
of Manchester, England, and his opinions
are worthy of great respect and careful
consideration. The layman, however, who
peruses Professor Lewis’ article carefully
may be forced to the conclusion that the
Professor has overlooked certain vital mat-
ters in writing his article on behalf of West
Indian industrialisation.

The means of financing the industriali-
sation of the West Indies, is the biggest
problem to be faced. Professor Lewis
admits in his article that ‘the islands can-
not be industrialised to anything like the
extent that is necessary without a consid-

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

erable inflow of foreign capital and capi-
talists,” and proposes that the foreign
capitalists be wooed to invest in the West
Indies. Throughout his article Professor
Lewis has always in mind the industri-
alisation programme of Puerto Rico but
that example is not as fitting as Professor
Lewis suggests. Firstly, he admits that
Puerto Rican Industrial Development was
made possible by Government grants to
the Government Development Bank and
that the Government was able to make
these grants from “surplus which accrued
during the war, mainly from taxes on
greatly expanded sales of rum to the U.S.”
Secondly, the U.S. Federal Government
returned to the Puerto Rican Government
the money raised in taxes on Puerto Rican
rum imported into the States during the
war.

Such a refund would be equivalent io
the British Government giving to the Bar-
bados Government the duties which the
Customs and Excise in England had lev-
ied on Barbadian rum entering the U. K.
during the war, In view of the heavy
duty on rum the considerable amount of
money involved becomes apparent. But
since such a refund appears most unlikely
it is misleading for Professor Lewis to
rely as much as he does on the example of
the Puerto Rican Industrial Development

For Industrialisation to play a useful
role in the West Indian economy the in-
dustries must be able to pay their way and
make a profit. Again Professor Lewis offers
no reason for the flourishing condition of
the Cement Industry of Puerto Rico, but
it is known that an extensive housing
programme is being financed by the Fed-
eral Government hence the demand for
large quantities of cement. Actually it is
now known that cement is the only Puerto

» Rican industry that is being run at a profit
for the above reason.

It is agreed by Professor Lewis that for
West Indian Industry to be a paying con-
cern, considerable exports would have to
be made to foreign countries. He contin-
ues “Latin-America seems, on the face of

x it, the most obvious direction in which to

look.....If the West Indies could cap-
ture just a small fraction of the Latin-
American import trade in manufactures,
their problem would be solved complete-
ly.” While recognising the difficulties of
breaking into such a market, Professor
Lewis does not discuss the instability of
the Governments of so many Latin-Amer-
ican States and the drastic results of a
repudiation of debts on a change of Gov-
ernment on an infant West Indian Industry.

In requiring exports too, the West Indies
would face the hazards now being experi-
enced by Britain in being dependent on
fluctuating markets in a world in which
all countries are joining in the race for
industrialisation.

Professor Lewis, in discussing the future
of Agriculture appears to consider only
the future of sugar. This is not a fair
assumption, strenuous efforts are being
made in all the islands to produce an ever
increasing amount of local foodstuffs at a
remunerative price and to diversify the
crops in production. This should have the
effect of increasing employment, and of
offsetting- any mechanisation of the sugar
industry which may take place.

If the money required to finance indus-
trialisation were utilised in emigration
schemes to British Guiana and British
Honduras, the employment problem would
be more effectively solved by means less
pregnant with danger.

Professor Lewis is a distinguished son of
the West Indies and these criticisms are
offered in no carping spirit but to remind
those responsible for policy in such mat-
ters that the opinions of the most distin-

guished, when too long separated from the

subjects of their enquiry, must be rigor-
ously. examined before their suggestions
can be acted upon with assurance.



The Day of Reckoning

NOW that the House of Assembly is once more
in Session, it is to be hoped that high on its
programme is a grant for the entertainment of

H.R.H. Princess Alice and the Earl of Athlone
There is no question that this entertainment was
other than lavish and excellent. Two months
have elapsed since thg Royal Visitors left these
shores, and bills have to be paid whether incur-
red by Government House or a lowly cottage.

The Governor has had a costly beginning to
hig term of office. Apart from additional expen-
diture caused by his transfer such as new uni-
forms, a car and other incidental expenses, with-
in a few days of his arrival he was called upon
to entertain his fellow Governors attending the
West Indian Governors’ Conference. This has
been followed by the entertainment of other con-
ferences meeting here, naval units of British,
American and Dutch Navies, distinguished visi-
tors, and a visit to Jamaica to attend the installa-
tion of H.R.H. Princess Alice as Chancellor of
University College, West Indies. In addition
there has been the customary entertainment of
local guests.

The Governor’s annual entertainment, allow-
ance is far from large, indeed it is scarcely ade-
quate to cover the cost of norinal routine
entertainment. Of this allowance for the past
financial year the Agting Governor, Mr. Stewart
Perowne, O.B.E.,, who had spent 7 months at
Government House, was entitled to 7/12, leaving
the Governor with 5/12 to cover an extremely
heavy expenditure. 2

H.R.H. Princess Alice and the Earl of Athlone
were handsomely entertained as befits such an
occasion. Barbados can be proud that the enter-
tainment of the Royal Guests left nothing to be
desired Apart from luncheons and dinner par-
ties at Government House, 600 guests were enter-
tained at a Garden Party, 500 at an Evening
Reception, as well as 700 school children. Enter-
tainment on such a scale is costly,

Trinidad made a grant to its Governor in
advance of the arrival of the Royal Guests. It is
not often that we are able to welcome such guests
to our shores, and the Island is grateful to His
Excellency that the traditional hospitality of
Barbados was so well maintained. It is to be
hoped that the grant already mooted will be both

adequate and speedy. It would be ungrateful
and undignified if this matter is further delayed

ee fT te ER TL ee ee ae

rp Sas bneemeptateapeeesienssteenninasinnstenines

tive Committee will be of especial



—_—-

THE PRINCIPAL OF THE

EVENING

THOSE who provide the most
lasting benefits to a country are
not always the politicians and
those in the public eye. Some
working in scholarship and, in
fields not subject to the blaze of
publicity give to the country in
which -they work benefits which
may not be recognised or appre-

ciated until long after

themselves have quit the -
Such a one is Dr. Bruce Ham-

ilton. Historian, novelist, -

wright, and amateur actor B:
Hamilton during his sojourn in
this island has enriched the
historical knowledge of Barbadian
institutions and by his work on
behalf of the Evening Institute
has set on foot a movement whose
future cannot at present be dis-
cerned but which will undoubtedly
be a factor of major importance tn
the education of the island in the
future.

Graduating with a Degree in
History from London University
in 1926, Dr. Hamilton came out to
Barbados in 1927 as History Master
at Harr'son College. He remained
at Harrison Col'ege until 1927
when he returned to England, But
the attractions of Barbados lured
him back in 1936, and in 1938 he
took up his old post at Harrison
College.

When, in 1947, History was made ;

a possible subject for Harrison
College boys to take for the Higher
Certificate, Dr. Hamilton was

made Senior Master of Group II 4

candidates.

Dr, Hamilton has written several
novels, among them being “Pro”,
“Midd'’e Class Murder’, and “Tet
Him Have Judgment” (American
title “Hanging Judge”’.) To Bar-
badians, however, his history of
“Cricket in Barbados” and _ his
work on the history of the Execu-

interest.

In 1947 Dr. Hamilton was
awarded his Doctorate in History
by the University of London on
his thesis on Barbados and the
Confederation Question. That has
unfortunately not yet been pub-
lished but in 1944 he delivered a
lecture to the Barbados Museum
and Historical Society on an im-
portant aspect of this subject. The
wealth of study and research which
Dr. Hamilton undertook is evident
in the lecture which he delivered.

How far Dr. Hamilton was in-
strumental in forming the jidea
embodied in what has come to be
known as “The Bushe Experiment”
will probably never be known.
Politicians are not in the habit
of revealing the sources of their
inspiraiion. In the course of his
lecture to the Museum Society Dr.
Hamilton said:— “It will have
been noticed that the most sub-
stantial difference between the law
and that formerly providing for an
Executive Committee in Jamaica

DR. HAMILTON,
Ondersley.”

Our Readers Say:

centre,







Dr. Bruce Hamilton

was that in Barbados no provisio+
was made for the payment of
members of the Committee. Per-
haps that has contributed in a

INSTITUTE

trust. It is true of course that
unpaid unofficial members are as
a rule unable to give anything like
their whole attention to the busi-
ness of the Committee, and this
has inevitably had one possibly.
undesirable effect, that the real
body of the work is done by an

inner Committee of salaried
official members.
Two forebodings, very com-

monly felt at the time of the origi-
nal Act, have not been realised.
No practical difficulty has ever
been experienced in securing seats
for a sufficient number of officials,
«und, so far, no attempt has been
made to use the machinery of the
Executive Committee to enforce a
kind of party government. Yet
such an attempt could be made,
and it remains to be seen whether
recent developments, along the
line of splitting the House into two
opposed groups, may not in fact
lead to the refusal of a parlia-
mentary majority to co-operate
with an Executive Committee in
which such a majority is not
reflected.”

When the pressure of work was
not as great as it is today Dr.
Hamilton used to take part in the
plays put on by the Bridgetown



—In the late Christopher Bean

higher degree than any other cir-
cumstance to the practical success
of the measure. The absence of a
material interest makes it easy for
unofficial members to resign if
they find themselves in disagree-
ment with government policy, and
this renders it possible for them
to perform the functions entrusted
to them without incurring mis-

as Leonard Brisby in “Exit James

Players. The theatre going public
may remember him in “The
Sacred Flame”, “Family Album”,
“The Ringer”, and others. The
Bridgetown Players has done much
to help charities in Barbados and
those who devoted their time and
energies to help are deserving of
public gratitude.

Dr. Hamilton has made Barba-
dos his home and perhaps no
greater compliment can be paid
him than to say he is thought of
as a Barbadian by those who have
had the privilege of working with
him. Today he has begun the
work which may well gain him
lasting remembrance in this island
although his books. will do so in
other countries. The Evening In-
stitute is the most important
educational development which
has taken place in this island for
many a long year. Through their
endeavours the blot of illiteracy
may be abolished when the Insti-
tute is able to devote their ener-
gies in that direction.

At Harrison College Dr. Hamil-
ton’s work has also been of lasting
benefit to the school. For years
he did his utmost to ensure that
boys could take History for the
Higher Certificate and eventually
re met with success in
1947.

A man of modest and retiring
disposition, completely devoid of
racial prejudices, Dr. Hamilton has
exerted a beneficial influence on
many generations of schoolboys,
and when historians come to assess
those who have made a lasting
contribution to the life of this
island it is undoubted that Bruce
Hamilton will receive their care-
ful consideration.

Oil And The Public

at the recent Grenada Sugar Con-into this “Is the U.K. Government

Dear Sir,

According to the latest infor-
mation given by Government on
the Gas situation, they have
granted or are willing to grant
the Company a license to gn-
tinue the gas supply for three
months, while the British Union
Oil Company and the Attorney
of Turner Hall are only willing
to continue for seven days, these
two statements are quite clear,
but surely there must be ee
in the granting of a license That
requires some explanation from
Government or else, British
Union Oil Company and the At-
torney of Turner Hall would
have agreed to the three months
extension, there appears to be
some secrecy or clumsy handling
of the entire affair.

One can hardly imagine our
learned Attorney General, or our
well known Crown Solicitor ad-
vising His Excellency to an-
nounce the coming into opera-
tion of the Oil Act, which act
cancels all leases as well as takes
over the control of peoples land
and places the granting of li-
censes and the fixing of the con-
ditions of said license, without
having first made provision for a
continuous supply of Gas by
Government to Government, pri-
vate individuals and Companies’
who use the gas all the time.

There has been and apparently
still is a great deal of clumsy
handling of the entire affair aid
the blame for the disruption of
the service to the general public
must rest on the shoulders of
Government. The public once
more feel that they have been
let down either through ignor-
ance or complete disconcern by
those whose duty it is to see to
the welfare of the community’s
interest.

GAS USER.
Sugar
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—As one of the delegates

who represented British Guiana

ference, I wish to say how much
my heart and mind go out with
the Delegates to London, prayer-
fully hoping that the maximuin
of success would attend their
mission.

I am sorry that Mr. Bustamante
could not make the trip as I re-
gard him as a statesman of a very
high order in spite of what else
might be said of him. But I am
happy in the fact that Mr. G. H.
Adams goes on the delegation.
Barbados seems to’ hold the key
to the delegation’s success in their
Mr. Adams. For apart from Mr
Adam’s political status in Barba-
dos he has it in his power to cal!
forth world denunciation of the
United Kingdom by publicly re-
tracting the build-up he gave the
U.K. (at the United Nations meet-
ing) as to justice, fairplay, ete.,
should the U.K. betray its trust
and obligation now to the colonies
in the West Indies. Mr. Adams
promised to do this at Grenada.
We the people concerned will stand
by and do so if Mr. Adams doesn’t
in the event of failure of the
negotiations.

With my knowledge of the facts
I fail to see how the U.K. Gov-
ernment can turn down the re-
quest to raise the guaranteed
amount from 640,000 tons to
725,000 tons, ie., to_the amount
presently produced for two reasons
at least:—

(1) By their proposed agree-
ment the U.K. Government is
calling for efficient production.
This simply means mechanisation,
which in turn means unemploy-
ment to the extent thdt the ma-
chine will be turning off human
labour. One therefore normally
expects that the U.K. Government
would or should guarantee far
more than the present total pro-
duction figure so as to absorb the
people being displaced by the
machine. Having regard also to
the fact that the demand is selfish-
ly intended by the U.K. Govern-
ment to keep down her purchase
price, the question resolves itself

foing to commit a flagrant breach
of her responsibility to her col-
onies by deliberately creating un-
employment in the colonies.’”’ Let
us watch and see.

(2) U.K. Government has given
to Australia a guarantee of an
amount which is above her
present production figures and
Australia from extracts of state-
ments made to hand is worried to
know if she can produce the guar-
anteed amount immediately. The
question here is why this generous
treatment to Australia who need
not sink or swim with the U.K
Government such as on devalua-
tion etc., while the West Indies
not only has to sink or swim but
buy the U.K. high priced goods.

Is the U.K. Government going
to do justice and fairplay to the
West Indies now or commit a

breach of trust. Let us watch and
see.

I am or tne opinion that if Aus-
tralia can ask to have her agree-
ment re-opened if the U.K. gives
more terms to the West Indies
then it is also open to the U.K.
in a re-opening of the Australia
agreement to say that she reduces
her guaranteed amount to them
upon giving the West Indies a
higher guaranteed amount. She
has the moral argument at any
rate for doing so.

After all, the U.K. Government
is not being asked .to move up
the overall quota of 900,000
tons but merely to increase the
guaranteed amount within this
figure, by 85,000 tons.

The international prestige of the
U.K. Government is in issue over
these negotiations. Her trustee-
ship to her colonies is also being
challenged. How she is going to
come out of these negotiations is
what we must all watch and see.
We know what we will do “If.”

DANIEL P. DEBIDIN,
Elected Member
Legislature of British Guiana.
Powell Spring Hotel,
Bathsheba,
May 12, 1950

SUNDAY, MAY 14, 19506













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—_—

W.I. SCORE 468-4. |

(a a

BY. RECORD BATTING |

| Weekes 192, Walcott 128
Trounce Surrey Bowling

| Boy Painted
Without Hands

VATICAN CITY, May 13.
A 16-year-old Italian war
mutilated boy today present-
ed Pope Pius XII with a pic-



B.U.0.C. Deadline
Is May 20th

“{ N VIEW of the Press Communique published in yester-

day’s “Advocate” on the question of the supply of
Natural Gas, I feel that I should issue a statement of the
position of The British Union Oil Co., Limited in this matter.
wt ——** Negotiations have been in-pro-

— pote a erp igemesmnesciireninicinicial prt ntnaemeniieanint areata epipecneenntsiemne

$$
, :

Two Records Broken
LONDON, May 13.





only set the first centuries of the totimfor the

i "gress with the King’s Soli
U; S. Order Czec Arg | 210% the lines of the stdaleusdtear
To Reduce

Consulates
~Retaliation
WASHINGTON, May 13.
‘The United States to-day call-

ed on Czechoslovakia to reduce
her official staff in the United

States by two-thirds and close
a Cleveland and Pittsburg
‘ons! i

The Department of State issued
a statement to-day summarising
a note to the Czechoslovak Gov-

ernment e¢ontaining these de-
.mands:—
The Czech Ambassador Dr.

Viadmir Outrata was called in
this morning to receive the note,
and the American Ambassador in
Prague also delivered the note to
the Czech Foreign Office there.

The United States action was
understood té be in retaliation to
the demand of the Czechoslovak
Government for ihe drastic reduc-
tion of United States, official per-
sonnel at’ the American Embassy,
and the Consulate General in
Czechoslovakia, on the grounds
that they were being used for
hostile purposes.

The State Department state-
ment to-day described the Czech-
oslovak demand as “part of
efforts of the

the} for an
Czech and other|ments should be made to continue

issued by the Government on we
10th instant, namely, “That a NEW
Lease of the Natural Gas Weu
should be granted by Government
to The British Union Oil Co: Lim-
ited on tne same terms as the olu
Lease, and that The B.U.0.C, Ltd.,

should continue to -pay royalties ;

to the Lessor at the same rate as!
in the past.”

In view of these negotiations, :
the Attorney of “Turner’s Hall’
plantation has extended _ his
notice to quit for a further seven
days, and this extension was com-
municated to the King’s Solicitor
on the 11th instant.

In the negotiations with the
King’s Solicitor, no question of
accounts or monetary compensa-
tion has arisen, and The B.U.O.C.,
Limited regard as inexplicable
the statement in the Govern-
ment’s communique of the 13th
instant relating to examination of
the documents and records of the
Natural Gas Well.

Interim Period

Negotiations with the King’s
Solicitor have been on the basis
that the lease to be granted to The
B.U.0.C, Limited should be for
the unexpired period (about 20
years) of the old Lease. |

The Government’s communique |
of the 13th instant states “That,
interim period arranse-





western European Governments ta] the supply of Natural Gas to the
segregate people in those coun-| public on the same terms as under
tries from contact with the outside |the old Lease”

world.”
—Reuter.



Lies—Says
Truman

GREAT FALLS, Montana,

bv May 13.|Lease of the Turher’s Hall area is

t Mruman told @ granc|reasonable, and they have ac-

7 ; hat cordingly informed Government
munists of ao were telling} that they will be unable to oper-
tpreosterous Ties” about the} ate the Natural Gas Well after
Mr. Truman dedlered. "thet the 20th instant unless by that

Russian leaders were saying on
the one hand that the United
States was weak, and on the other

The Government has suggested |
an interim period of three months,
which ir completely unrelated to
the whole tenor of the negotia-
tions conducted with the King’s
Solicitor.

The B.U.O.C. Limited consider
that the time which has been given
to Government to complete nego-
tiations in respect of the new

date the negotiations with The
B.U.O.C. Limited and the Attor-
ney of Turner’s Hall Plantation

Minaegubae areata gay cuiiiaaaih tis not

MRS. BANCROFT of Savannah

t Police |
earch Sea

E



ture of a country church
Which he had painted with-
out hands.

The Pope received the
painting in Saint Peter's
sasilicea where he received
3uU child war cripples among
30,000 pilgrims, Germany,
France, Beigium, Spain and
Brazil were represented by

: strong pilgrimages at the
audience,
—Reuter,



Winnip
Still In
Danger

WINNIPEG, May 13.

Although the rise of the flood
ed Red River appeared to have
Steadied, flood reliet officials
warned Wipiipeg residents that
the city was still in danger, and
utged that the evacuation of
women, children, and old peo-
ple should continue,

More than 40,000 of the city
850,000 population wore estir
ated to have left the city by last
night.

Ss

scala ates ee



anadian Railways removed
more than 25,000 from the food
area in special trains, and roads
leading from the city were pack-
ed with private cars. Airplanes
and Buses carried thousands
more.

The Red River resched a re-
cord level of nearly 30 feet yes

day. #lood Control Authori-
ties warned that the dykes migh*

| EVERTON WEEKES and Clyde Walcott, not
1
|

MUNRO SMASHING ONE FROM WORME—Gun-Munro of Tranquillity. /to)
net. and smashes a lob from Worme of Savannah, to win.the first set of Wen’s

(bottom) missés one well placed on the right corner by Mi
teuil of Tranquillity..Mrs. Bancroft went on to win the Ladies’ Singles,

‘Big Three’ Reach





runs right up to the
Singles.

sch

%
38 De Ver-



|
|

give way at any time,

of Greater Winnipeg

unofficial estimate said
more than 60,000 people had
heen driven from.their homes in
the river cities. The normal life
remained

seriously disrupted,

Water lay inches deep on many

streets near the downtown busi-

were

ness district.

Tramear and _ bus __ services
cancelled in som? places
Theatres and other places of

amusement are closed. The Pres-

West Indies today at the Oval, but set up a new
record partnership for a team from the Caribbean
Islands in this country.
After Allan Rae had made 96, Weekes and Walcott
added 247 in two and three-quarters hours for the
fourth wicket to beat the previous best, 230 for the
third wicket by George Headley and J. E. D. Sealy
against Nottinghamshire at Trent Bridge in 1939.

Weekes defied the Surrey attack for five hours and re-
mained unbeaten with 192 to his credit. He has so far hit
21 boundaries. ;
Altogether the West Indies scored 468 for 4 wickets, and
issued a warning as to what the England bowlers can ex-
pect when the five-day Tests come along. ;

No touring team in England
sitlee the war has given a more
satisfying exhibition. This was
was the first appearance of the
West Indies in London _ this
season, and for the first time they
found conditions similar to their
own sunlit islands.

The Oval crowd of nearly
20,000 soon discovered that these
mda do not play cricket the
grim way—to them it is a
pastime and any loose ball has
to be punished.

At first the Surrey attack was
particularly good, the first hour
yielding only 32 runs, but the
pace was stepped up to 90 an
hour or more by the afternoon

Walcott was at the wicket for
' two and three-quarter hours for
his 128, and hit 15 fours.

Weekes’ total was the highest
ever by a West Indies player
against Surrey

The teams were:

WEST INDIES:—A. Rae;'R.
Marshall, F. Worrell, E. Weekes,
Cc, Waleott, R. Christiani, G.
Gomez, J, Goddard, C, Williams,
H, Johnson, A. Valentine. ‘.

SURREY:~—. L. \Fishlock, Eric
Bedser, J. Parker, B. Constan-
ble, * Whittaker,

Se on pdablas



EVERTON WEEKES

Z e
U. S. Strike
es °
Situation
e .
Critical
NEW YORK, May 13.
_ At least 200,000 workers
idle in the United States to-day,
because of the strike of 18,000

railway firemen on four lines, |
it was estimated here,











The strike, called last Wednes-

day by the Brotherhood of Locu-





e ; ’
- ;’ lent of Winnipeg’s Retail Mer j Man ace iF
“that we are strong and want to have been satisfactorily conclud I D | ide é peg’ : motive Firemen and Enginemeu |;
wege war”. r ed. or rugs oO tc 7 eemen } on 8 Association TepUTiae {to support a demand tor a
Te a “preposterous lies”.| he added. He said that the Un statemen a e eces: é jae . vill pu housands more on
States was seeking only peace,| authority has been granted to The £30,000 WORTH FOUND F | short time next Monday if con-
and did not wish war with any|5.U.0.C. Limited to enable them ALEXANDRIA, May 13. LONDON, May 13. tinued.

of its world neighbours.
—Reuter

Czechs Rush For
Last British Books

PRAGUE, May 13.
Hundreds of Czechs of all ages
jammed the offices of the British
Information Service, on one of
Prague’s main thoroughfares, to
get English books, periodicals,
magazines, and other reading mat-
ter which Were distributed freely
a few hours before the offices were
due to close at mid-day today on
the orders given yesterday by the

Czechoslovak Foreign Ministry.

—Reuter.





U.K. GOVT. GETS READY
TO LEAVE LONDON

The British Government has invited local authorities
to give it detailed information to help it carry out “possi- |

ble evaciiation in the case



to operate the Well for the interim
period, the fact is that, before
advising The B.U.O.C. Limited
to accept the supposed Licenge,
the legal advisers of The B.U.O.C.
Limited requested Government on
the 10th instant to furnish partic-
ulars of the Regulations, terms,
and conditions, under which that
License was intended to be
granted, This has not yet been
done, and, accordingly, The
B.U.O.C., Limited do not consiaér
that fhey have at present the au-
thority necessary under the Act
to operate the Gas Well, as al-
leged by Government.
E. G. MACINTYRE.
Manager and Attorney,
The B.U.O.C. Ltd,

LONDON, May 13.

of an emergency.”

The Government hopes to have details ready for offi-
cial consultation and implementation by the end of June.



Thank You

EVERYONE in Mount
Vernon, a New York sub-
urb, is being most careful to
say “Please” and “Thank
you.” That is because the
mayor, William Hussey, the
soul of courtesy himself,
“wants Mount Vernon to set
the world an example.

He has asked all citizens,
even the police, to be more
polite. “What can I do for
you?” he asked affably when
I telephoned him to find out
the reason for this cam-

gn.

His reply: “Lack of cour-
tesy is now world-wide.
Many world problems are

caused by inconsiderate
people. Maybe Mount Ver-
non can start’ something.

And ¢hank you for calling.”



CzechPoliceTorture
Slav To Death

LONDON, May 13.

One of the leaders of the Yugo-

slav colony in Czechoslovakia, M.

A Health Ministry spokesman
told Reuter to-day “There is no
special significance in this request.
It is merely a question of normal
preliminary steps as a result of
Parliament having decided to put
Civil Defente on a permanent
footing by special acts a couple of
years ago.”

The Communist Daily Worker
had made the move its main story
to-day under the headline “Evacu-
ation Planned Once Again”.

Commenting on this, the spokes-
man said “There really is nothing
new or sensational im this. It
originates from circulars issued on
April 18 providing detailed guid-
ance on the planning of the Civil
Defence Services.

They were sent to all local
authorities in England and Wales,

—Reuter.

Awarded
U.C.W.I.

| Scholarships

| The following have been award-
jed Open Scholarships to the Uni-
| versity College of the West Indies,



Dimrievich, has died in a Prague| as a result-of examinations taken

prison “as a result of atrocious
Gestapo-like tortures by
Czechoslovak police,”
radio reported this morning.

His death has provoked a “wave!
of indignation and anger” through- |

out Yugoslavia, the radio added.
—Reuter

the |
Belgrade | Collins, C. King.

\in February this year

British GUIANA:

| Jamatca: O Hue, R. Morris.
Badseapos: Daphne Pilgrim.

Barsapos Exuipirions: E. DeC,
|Inniss, (Medicine); E. S. King,
i (Arts)

A few words muttered by a
semi-conscious Egyptian fisher-
man, found suffering from sun-
stroke on the sands near Alexan-
dria by a coastal patrol, have
started Egyptian police on a wide-
spread coastal search for smug-
gled drugs.

Next day, at dawn, an anti-drug
squad found the “catch” which the
fisherman had been waiting to
pick up from the sea—over 176
pounds of hashish. That started
the police off.

For thrée days now, searching
between Alexandria and Port Said
for more dumps of the deadly
drug, they have made a rich haul
—over £30,000 worth of hashish
and opium.

Off Port Said. 32 sacks were
found weighted down by two an-
chors in deep water, and at Dam-
ieta at the Nile’s mouth, another
sunken 330 pounds in rubber
sacks.

Police continuing their search
believe yet bigger consignments
are still under. water. —Reuter,

$12,000,000
Peru-W. German
Trade Pact

FRANKFURT, May 13.

Senor Vicente Cerro, head of the
Peruvian trade delegation to West
Germany, left for Rome today,
after initialling a $12,000,000 Peru-
West ‘German. trade . agreement
yesterday under the new agree-
ment expected to import pri-
marily steel products, chemicals,
' pharmaceutical products, and con-
sumer..goods.







West Germany will
mainly cotton and wool,
sugar,

import
ores,
ides and some food items.

French Ex-Premier

; PARIS, May 13. |
Paul Reynaud, 1 ennvets |

nts agreement was

concluded, the West Germany
Economics Ministry announced.
—Reuter,





former French Prime Minister, |
married his 36-year-old private |
secretary, Mile Christiane es |
| last December, a source close to
| Reynaud disclosed today.

“The marriage was not secret,”
they said, “but Reynaud consid- |
ered it a purely private affair. He

is c>posed on principle to political | publicist, Father Gabel, editor of
figures receiving the publicity ac-!{he Catholic daily newspaper La

| Croix has aroused some comment
a | here

corded to film stars,
“Madame Paul Reynaud was

_—_—_—

The Foreign Maree of Frarice, Britain and the United
States after a three-day study of the cold war, hemisphere
by hemisphere announced. tonight that they had agreed
upon the lines of their policy in all parts of the world,

The statesmen—Robert Schu-
man. of France, Ernest Bevin of
Britain. and Dean Acheson of
America-issued two communi-
ques one a general statement of
their conclusions and the other
emphasising the need for facili-
tating’'the migration of European
peoples, particularly from Ger-
many and Italy.

The statement held up an all



Furniture
Dances About

AT HAUNTED FARM

LA ROCHELLE, May 13.
Police are investigatng mys-
terious events reported to have
been happening for several weeks
at a “haunted” farm, near La
Poiriniere-en-Rochetrejoux, West~



















——————

SPORTS
WINDOW

SAVANNAH-TRANQUILLITY
TOURNAMENT
MONDAY’S GAMES

Miss at beautee aa Miss important declaration on Ger-| ern France ;

>. de Verteuil vs, Mrs, J. ‘Connell many, the problem nation, which According to the Briant family,

and Miss L Lenagan, is believed to have taken up|Wwho own the farm, furniture,
Men's Doubles most of their time during the[{ grocery and shoes have been

F, Gun Munro and H. Nothnagel

vs. J. L. St. Hill and D. J, Lawless, three days they met here. dancing about





A. De Verteuil and P, Waddell They announced that this pro- Money has refused to stav in
eal C. G. Manning and E, P nouncement was being communi-|locked drawers, and seattered
Mixed Doubles cated immediately to the West]i’self about. Worse, M. Briant’s
Miss M. Trestrail and T. Schjol- German Federal Government. fa'se teeth have been jump ng
ot. ve Mrs A. L. Perkins and It would be published to the] out of their glass, and his shaving
ere world.on Monday. brush has obstinately reeoiled
—— Highlights of the Foreign Min-| from his face, eventually flying
isters’ two communiques were: out of his hand to land on top of
(1) The purpose of the talks had | a cupboard

Unknown been to reduce the risk of war few days avo, the dogs
and establish the conditions of | barked all night long. At dawn,
' a lasting peace they were unleashed and their

Vessel Sto Ss (2) The Ministers planned closer | collars had vanished
Pp co-ordination of their joint re- Clocks have stonned = every

sources of the three power&| morning at 8.20, the Br ants said.

Tanker without endangering their The Briants are Huguenots.

, social and material standards.; but in desperation they called

(3) They intended to support the | the local Catholic priest who gave

THE HAGUE, May 13. new independent. nations of}them a statue of the Blessed

The British tanker “Nayadis’’} South-east Asia and would] Virgin and a holy medal—all
sailing for the Anglo-Saxon Qi!| take every opportunity of ex-| without avail.

Company. arrived somewhat late! posing “Communist imperial- Hundreds of peonle have vis-

at Willemstad, Curacao, on Friday | ism” in the serious situation|ited the farm, but up to now

afternoon after being detained by; developing there. “sp'rit” activities have only been

an unknown ‘ship flying the, The Ministers considered| witnessed by the owners and

that the South-east Asia re-
gion as a whole is economi-

Venezuelan flag, Netherlands News
Agency reports from Willemstad

their relations

|
| The strange thing is that when





tonight, cally underdeveloped. All the|gendarmes came to suard the
ernments in the region| house nothing happened
The unkno~n vessel ate should get together on devel- —Reuter
several shots, commanding the opment .plans designed to
tanker to stop, which it did. The} raise the standard of living. * 2 ss
incident occurred outside the! (4) Experts had been appointed Union Calls Strike

three-mile zone off the Venezuelan

Avis Islands. :
It is believed the Venezuelan

ship was making an investigation

to study problems of surplus
population in Western Europe.
They had been charged with
producing additional plans for



Against P.A.A.



{ i y NEW YORK, May 13
actio' s , y or 5 ' , .
ae action against arms nae ane from A nationwide strike against Pan
—(Reuter) 4 @ oo page 15 American Airways by service
personnel was called at midnight
by the Transport Workers’
Union,
The Union said that 800

‘ATOM BOMB—CRIME
AGAINST HUMANITY”’

PARIS, May 13.

stewards, stewardesses and purs-

ers were involved but a Company

ae said the number was only
0

E ght pickets took up their

But Father Gabrel, asked by | posts outside the entrance to La

A prominent French Catholic | Reuters, today made it clear that
the article was written on his per-
sonal responsibility only, and
without prior consultation with his
hierarchy in the Church.

by condemning the use of

| resistance hero who)suffered de-|the atom bomb, and by describing

W. Chan, C. | portation to Germany for her ac-| its use at Hiroshima as “a crime

He also said: “I do not regom-

| tivities with the Maquis |against humanity” despite the | mend Catholics to sign their so-
Reyniaud’s, first,marriage to the | good intentions that may have ani-|called Stockholm peace appeal
daughter of Henri Robert. well- | mated those who decided to use it. | because this is manifestly a Com-

|



known French lawyer, was dis-
solved after the Liberation
—Reuter

Humanite
Gabrel

The official Communist paper | munist exploitation of the people’s
ha quoted Father | desire for peace.”

h approval

—Reuter

Guardia Air Field at midnight

A Union spokesman said _ that
Idlewi'd airport, and other Pan
American ports would also be
picketed .

A Union spokesman in Miami
said the strike was to remain in|

effect until a new contract is|
signed
He said about 2,000 employees}
were involved in the Miami!
area
—Reuter













The chairman of the Railway-
men’s Union said last night that
the strike was “just as dead-
locked now as at the start”.

In Pennsylvania, 20,000 coal
miners were idle, and the num-
ber will inerease to 25,000 by
Monday.

Nearly a fourth Wester:
Pennsylvania’s coal production!
is shut off because of a lack of

of

coal trucks. Some 4,000 coallâ„¢ 3
miners were affected in Indiana.|
-—Reuler, CLYDE WALCOTT



RALEIGH

Fitted with

STURMEY
ARCHER

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Distributors
10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street







oe ey



PAGE FOUR



EST INDIAN cricket circles are particularly happy to-day over

the performance of the West Indies cricket team in England
who scored 468 runs for the loss of four wickets in the first day of
play against Surrey at the Oval.

Following closely upon their two-day win over Yorkshire by three
wickets and their impressive draw with Worcestershire in the open-
ing fixture of the tour, this performance against Surrey augurs well
for the future success of the team during the tour.

IMPRESSIVE OPENING

HE West Indies are certainly not out of the wood yet, nor are

they “blooded” in the aecepted sense of the word as far as the
tour is concerned but come what may, they have opened their tour
in keeping with the high rating which competent judges of the game
have placed upon them by Imperial cricket standards.

It is true that the Yorkshire game appeared a close thing but it
must be conceded that the Yorkshiremen were at home and so had
experience in their favour in the scales of balance.

We must at once admit that with Ramadhin and Pierre padded
up in the pavilion there was not much hope of our negotiating any
reasonable total‘if the Rae-Jones partnership had been broken.

On the other hand it must be remembered that the Australians
in their victorious tour of England in 1948 came nearer to defeat in
their game with Yorkshire on May 5 and 6 than in any other match
of the tour.

“AUSSIES” NEARLY LOST

OSE who followed the game will remember that a missed catch

at a critical period cost Yorkshire a great chance of atoning for
their disappointment against the 1938 team at Sheffield and so being
the first county to beat the Australians since 1912 when Hampshire
triumphed.

DISPLEASURE

E IN the West Indies have listened with considerable displea-
sure to the comment of one Ernest Eytle of British Guiana over
the B.B.C. on Saturday, May 6.

Mr. Eytle in his broadcast found so many flaws in the constitu-
tion of the West Indian team, that it was small wonder that they
held Worcestershire to an honourable draw, to say nothing of defeat-
ing Yorkshire in two days.

Yesterday's showing against the Surrey team is another indis-
putable indication of the potential strength of the West Indies team,
While we all appreciate and are greatful for constructive criticism,
yet we in the West Indies can scarcely be expectéd to swallow the
indigestible pill of defeatism,

U.K. CRITICS PRAISE

Ar the West Indies’ performance in the opening days of play
é against Worcestershire Alex Bannister ¢f, the “Daily Mail” opined
that after having seen Weekes and Worrell, the non-sale of last day
test tickets was interesting.

Bannister was convinced that the English cricket crowds were in
for the biggest treat they have had since the war. The “Daily Graphic”
was equally enthusiastic.

Charles Bray of the “Daily Herald”, who covered the M.C.C. tour
to the West Indies, in 1948, with whom I associated during his stay
hére and for whom I hold the greatest respect with regard to his
knowledge of the game, wrote in the “Daily Herald”, “Mark my words,
the West Indies cricketers are going to be one of the most attractive
sides ever to visit this country. And I am not forgetting the all-con-
quering Australians of 1948,”

MORE KUDOS

RAWFORD WHITE of the “News Chronicle”, who also accompan-
ied the 1948 M.C.C. team to the West Indies, was “intrigued

by the class of the West Indies

batsmen”.
THE SPINNER In the face of these reports, one
frien c&nnot reconcile Eytle’s strange
observations on the West Indies

—

team which he gave over the B.B.C.
on Saturday. May 6, Eytle found
fault with Ramadhin’s bowling,
with Walcott’s wicket-keeping, with
the West Indies fielding among other
\ things.

To judge from his remarks, the
a West Indies should have lost their
match against Yorkshire, joint
county champions last year, perhaps

in one day, but this was not so.

SONNY we ee oe have proven
rt. Eytle to be a_ selkf}appointed
RAMADHIN “Know-all” who only knows as

much about the West Indies team
as I know about the “flying

West Indian RAMADHIN has “"°°'S

already shown his adaptability to MEN WHO KNOW
wickets. He splns the n Responsible circles in the West
— ways and has his googly as Indies have always deprecated

- any attempt by West Indians resi-
London Eeprese Servies, dent in England to set themselves
up as “men from away”. We who have followed personally the'1948
M.C.C, tour to the West Indies, which by the way Mr. Eytle has not,
will at once prefer to err with competent judges of the game like
Charles Bray and Crawford White than shine with Mr. Eytle, a self-
styled expert on West Indies cricket. It may or may not have been
in the interest of West Indies cricket that. Mr. Eytle cannot claim the
honour of having represented either British Guiana in intercolonial
cricket or the West Indies in international cricket; but the fact re-
mains, he has not.

Constructive criticism must at all times be appreciated, but we
in the West Indies will never tolerate any opinions that can only be
construed as figments of the imagination when they are compared
with responsible opinions of people, who although they belong to an-

aoe eae have openly expressed opinions that differ almost diametri-
cally.

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

14, 1950

SUNDAY, MAY



Spartan Trounce College 7—0

Spartan easily drubbed College 7—0 when they met ina

first division football fixture

at Kensington Oval yesterday

afternoon. Four of the goals were netted in the first half.
The seven goals were scored by Johnson who kicked in
three, Trotman 2 and Walcott 1. The other goal College
netted on themselves the result of a melee in their goal

area,

OOTBALL
FIXTURES

FIRST DIVISION
Monday, May 15
Cariton vs Empire. Referee: K
Laughlin; Linesmen: O. 8S. Cop-
pin and L. F. Harris.

Thursday, May 18

Spartan vs Pickwick-Rovers
Referee: D. W. Sayers; Linesmen
S. Gittens and B. Hoyos.
Saturday, May 20

Everton vs College. Referee:
0. S. Coppin; Linesmen: G. E
Amory and D. W. Sayers.

SECOND DIVISION

Tuesday, May 16

Everton vs Y.M.P.C. Referee :
L. F. Harris.

Wednesday, May 17
Empire vs Notre Dame. Referee:
B. Hoyos
Friday, May 19
College s Y.M.P.C. Referee :
N, edford.
INTER-SCHOOL
Tuesday, May 16
Lodge vs Foundation at Lodge
Referee : A. Wilkes.
Wednesday, May 17
College vs Combermere at Col-
lege. Referee: L. Thomas,
Friday, May 19
Lode vs Combermere at Lodge.
Referee: G, Amory.
THIRD DIVISION
Tuesday, May 16
Cable and Wireless vs Y.M.C.A,
at Boarded Hall. Referee: C, Smith
Empire vs Combermere Old
Boys at Bank Hall, Referee: A

Ishmael,
Combermere vs Y.M.P.C. at

Combermere. Referee; N. Holder.



Yardley
Leads M.C.C.



NORMAN YARDLEY

LONDON, May 12.

Norman Yardley, the Yorkshire
captain, is to lead M.C.C. against
the West Indies in the match be-
ginning at Lord’s here on May 20.

In view of the need to find an
England captain, both for the
Test series this summer, and for
the England tour to Australia in
the winter, the choice of Yardley
is regarded here as a special point-
er to the feelings of the leading
E gland officials.

There are a number of other
selections in the M.C.C. side which
reveal the young cricketers whose
abilities have attracted most at-
tention at Lora’s.

R. Berry, Lancashire's 5ft 4ins.
left-arm slow bowler; Eric Bedser,
Surrey off-break bowler = and
opening bat, who is a twin brother
to Test bowler Alex Bedser; and
Don Brennan, Yorkshire wicket-
keeper, have all found favour.

Middlesex, without a County
match at the time, provide four
players — Denis Compton, Bill
Edrich, Jack Robertson and forty-
five-year-old slow leg-break
bowler, Jim Sims.

The team is: N. W. D. Yardley
(Captain) and D.,V. Brennan
(Yorkshire), W. J. Edrich, D.
Compton, J. Robertson, and J.
Sims (Middlesex), R. T. Simpson
(Nottinghamshire), T. E. Bailey
(Essex), J. G. Dewes (Cambridge
University), R. Berry (Lanca-
shire), and E. Bedser (Surrey),

a —Reuter




:

Men everywhere

—._¢ Spartan showed their intention

of scoring early and the first goal
came from a corner, kicked bs
Boyce on the left wing and John-
son made no mistake in kicking
it into the nets. The second was
netted very soon after when Wal-
cott receiving a pass from John-
son ran down unmarked and
scored in the right hand corner of
the goal.

At this stage the College de-
fence was beginning to weaken
and Johnson took full advantage
of this and scored the third goal
after a pass from Boyce.

Occasionally. there was some
play in the Spartan goal area but
custodian Harris had very little
to do. The greater part of the play
was seen in the College goal area
and after a melee in ffont of the
College area, Johnson scored a
fourth about three minutes before

Referee Wilkins blew for half
time.
After half time Spartan

changed up their formation, Har-
ris was seen at right wing and
Chase in the goal. Very soon after
the. kick off Trotman taking a
pass from Walcott ran through to
score the fifth giving Smith no
chance to save.

The schoolboys were always
seen bundling and very soon they
scored on themselves as full-
back Gibbons trying to clear
kicked into his own goal. About
five minutes before the end
Trotman again scored making the
total seven.

The teams:—

Spartan: Harris, Gibbons, Bow-
en, Gittens, Cadogan, Haynes,
Chase, Johnson, Walcott, Trot-
man and Boyce.

College. Smith, Gibbons, Mor-
rison, Morris, St. John, Simmons,
Reid, V. O. Smith, C. E. Tudor,
Williams and F. L. Tudor,

The Referee was Mr. P. Wil-
kin.

Linesmen: Messrs. Amory and
Graham.

Best Display
Since Aussies’
Visit
(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, May 13,

A 17,500 crowd at the Oval today
went home convinced that they
had seen the best exhibition of
forceful batting since the Austra-
lians were here two years ago.

Even members of the West
Indies team were amazed at: the
frequency with which -theyball
was despatched to the boundary.

Learie Constantine told me
afterwards that he considered it
one of the best exhibitions he
had ever seen from the West
Indies side.

Particularly satisfying from John
Goddard’s point of view is that
his men have shown themselves
capable of fighting back after
suffering early losses.

Inability to do this has been a
great failing to previous sides
which have toured here.

The big question now is whether
Goddard will declare first thing
Monday morning. The first hour
is the time when bowlers get
most help from the wicket, but
Goddard has not made up his mind
yet.

He wants to see what the
weather is like. If it continues
warm and sunny, he may go on
batting for another hour or so,
giving his team orders to force the
pace; but if it rains during the
weekend, he will probably hand
straight over to his bowlers,



Premiere’s Tennis
Club Tourney

MONDAY’S FIXTURES.

Men's Doubles.

L. Campbell and L. Blackett vs.
W. DeC. Forde and C. B. Forde.
Ladies’ Singles.

Miss G. M,. Grimes vs. Miss C.
Alleyne.

Men's, Singles. ‘
J, Robinson vs. B. Wharton.
F. Edwards vs, Dr. G. M.

Cummins '

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‘“MOYRA BLAIR’’ WINS
A SECOND TIME

Commodore Wilkinson’s “Moyra Blair”, skippered by his
son Tom, scored her second victory for the season when
she defeated all other ‘B’ Class boats at the Ninth Regatta
of the R.B.Y.C., which took place in Carlisle Bay yesterday

‘Tranquillity
Leads
Savannah

SAVANNAH won two of the
four games yesterday afternoon
at the Garrison to make their
score three as against five by the
visiting Tranquillity team from
Trinidad.

Mrs. R. S, Bancroft of Savan-
nah beat Miss C. De Verteuil in
the Ladies’ Singles 7—5; 9—7;
while Miss D. Wood and J. D.
Trimmingham also of Savannah
beat Miss M. Trestrail and T.
Schjo'seth 7—5, 6—3, in one of the
Mixed Doubles games.

In the other Mixed Doubles
game, Miss M. Trestrail and H.
Nothnagel of Tranquillity beat
Mrs, A. L. Perkins and C. R.
Packer 6—1; 6—2; while F. Gun
Munro of Tranquillity carried off
the Men’s Singles from DP. E
Worme 6—1; 7—5.

Undoubtedly the best match of
the afternoon was the Ladies’
Singles on Court No, 3 in which
Mrs. Bancroft defeated Miss De-
Verteuil. It was tennis of the
highest standard with both ladies
serving and driving exceptionally
well,

In the first set, the games were
very even and at 5—5 Mrs. Ban-
croft broke through to win Miss
De’ Verteuil’s service and made
the game 6—5 in her favour. She
then clinched the set by winning
her own service at 7—5.

In the second set, the games
went much the same way, each
player winning her service until]
Mrs. Bancroft led 8—7, and then
won her service to win the set
9—T.

Both ladies were getting good
length and there were many ex-
changes of rallies for indeed, the
first game went to 19 points before
Mrs. Bancroft eventually won it.

There was however, not very
much to choose between the two
players. Mrs. Bancroft was, per-
haps, the more aggressive while
Miss De Verteuil was at all times
steady with both back and fore
arm. As was already stated, the
tennis was of a very high standard
and was very much appreciated
by the crowd.

On Court No. 2 in the Men’s
Singles, F, Gun Munro won the
first set very easily from D. E.
Worme 6—1. In the second set,
Worme had Gun-Munre 4—2, but
the latter soon equalised and then
took the next game to lead 5—4,
Worme won the following game to
make the score 5—5 and then
Munro took the last two games.

Neither of the players was
really playing on form and tennis
was not up to standard.

In the Mixed Doubles J. D.
‘TYrimmingham played very sound
tennis and was ably partnered by
Miss D. Wood to win the match
v-—5; 6—3 from T. Schjolseth and
Miss M. Trestrail, the Tranquillity
pair,

In the first set, Tranquillity
started off and had Savannah 3—1.
The latter then equalised only to
see Tranquillity go ahead again
with the score at 5—3.

Miss Wood then came into the
picture witn some forcing back-
hand and forearm shots. To
climax this good display, she won
her service and then had the
score at 5—5. From this, Sayan-
nah never looked back, but went
ahead to win the game 7—5, 6—3.

In the other Mixed Doubles, H.
Nothnagel and Miss A. Reid
(Tranquillity) had a very easy
victory over Mrs. A. L, Perkins
and C. R. Packer and won 6—1;
6—2.

The tournamfnt continues on
Monday.



Trade Enquiries to; T,.

This race was a very keen one.
Dr. J. W. P. Harkness’ “Circe”,
which started first, looked a sure
winner as it kept its lead through-
out the first lap and up to the time
it reached, the Needham’s Point
buoy. On reaching this buoy
“Moyra Blair’, which was only a
few yards behind, crept into the
lead and before “Circe” could
completely clear the buoy “Fan-
tasy”, owned and skippered by
Teddy Hoad, came into second
place. They finished in that order.

The boats sailed north-about in
a very light breeze which was
especially not suitable for the
centre-boarders. Only the “Reso-
lute” in the ‘B’ Class and “Dawn”
in the Intermediate, did not start

“Mohawk”, owned by Dr. David
Payne and skippered by Bob Cum-
berbatch scored her second victory
this season in the Intermediate
Class. The other victory was
scored in the Seventh Regatta and
the boat afterwards overturned
but on this occasion it got back
safely to its mooring.

Coming second in the Inter-
mediate was Sydney Nurse’s
“Clytie’ which he himself skip~
pered. So far “Clytie has gbeen
second on a previous occasion but
has not yet scored a victory for
the season. -

Third position went to Johnnie
Hoad’s “Coronetta” which was
captained by his son Jackie. ;

“Astra”, owned and skippered
by Milton Tucker, carried off .
Class honours for the second time.
Second in this Class was “Range”,
owned and skippered by Stanley
Cheeseman while “Wizard”, owned
and skippered by Jim Jones was
third, This is the third occasion
on which “Wizard” came third
but up to the present it has not
been able to gain a second posi-
tion. }

“Sinbad”, owned and skippered
by Lionel Baggott, won an easy
race in the “D” Class to score its
first victory for the season. Second
was “Olive Blossom,” owned and
skippered by Winston Hassell and
third “Peter Pan”, owned and
skippered by Eric Raison.

The results were as follows:

. B’ Class:—1. Moyra Blair. 2
Fantasy. 3. Circe.

‘C’ Class:—1. Astra. 2. Ranger.
3. Wizard.

Intermediate Class:—1. Mohawk.
2. Clytie. 3. Coronetta.

‘D’ Class:—1. Sinbad.
Blossom. 3. Peter Pan.

The Tenth Regatta of the
R.B.Y.C. will be sailed on Satur-
day, May 27.

Roberts Wins
Frontenac Cup

MR. T. A. L. ROBERTS won
the Frontenac Trophy and ‘the
N.R.A. Silver Medal when he
broke the Frontenac Trophy
Shoot record at the Government
Rifle Range yesterday. Mr. Rob-
erts scored 144 points out of a
possible 150.

In 1948 when the Frontenac
Trophy Shoot first started, Capt.
Cc. R. E. Warner, the then winner,
scored 136 points. Last year Lt.-
Col. J. Connell added two points
and now Mr. Roberts has beaten
Lt.-Col. J. Connell’s 138.

Fifteen rounds were fired from
each of the two distances, 500 and
600 yards. Shooting conditions
were good, the wind steady and
the light consistent.

Following are the eight best
scores: —

2. Olive



500 600

Yards Yards Total
Mr, T, A. L. Roberts 72 72 144
Lt.-Col, J. Connell va 71 142
Major J. E, Griffith 69 71 140
Mr. M. R. De Verteuil 68 69 137
Lt. C. E. Neblett 68 69 137
Capt. J. R. Jordan .. 70 67 137
Lt. T. A. Gittens 68 67 135
Mr. M, D. Thomas 70 65 135



Barbados Friendly
Football Association

THE third trial match of the
above association will be played
to-day at Empire Grounds, Bank
Hall.

Gillette

. .. the sharpest edge in the world!

Geddes Grant

Limite. }



IT IS a remarkable thing that in the last thirty years classifica-
tion of racehorses in Barbados and Trinidad should have remained
so consistent. AJ) the more so because it passed through a very try~
ing period during the last war. By consistency I mean that a certain
standard has been maintained whereby it has been possible to judge
the merits not only of contemporary thoroughbreds but also those of
different periods, For instance, looking at a classification list of to-
day I find that in comparison with one of 1930 there is little difference
in the general standard of the runners in class Peed

Naturally there must be some difference of opinion when one
compares horses of different periods and of course I do not mean to
say that Beacon Bright, Blue Streak and Gun Site (three of today’s
giants) are of exactly the same vintage as Tom Pearson, Bambolina,
and Senator, three who raced around 1930. But when I say that I
think Beacon Bright, Blue Streak and Gun Site are genuine A class
horses it means something because the standard of the class has re-
mained constant. This to my mind {# a decided feather in the cap of
the authorities who control racing in Barbados and Trinidad.

The great thing about the “A” class of to-day is the quantity in
this division and its sub class “A2” as well as the fact that half the
number is made up of native bred horses. Having established the fact
that there has been no lowering of the general standard in the top
class, this immediately tells us that we are breeding better horses to-
day than we were in 1930. At that time class “A” was made up of two
or three imported horses only. It also tells us that racing in general
in the B.W.I. is on the up-grade. ‘ :

According to the most recent classifications issued by the Barba-
dos Turf Club and the Trinidad Turf Club, one of which is published
on the opposite page, there are now 16 animals in class “A” and “A2”.
16 of these are native bred and 4 of these sixteen are Derby winners
either in Jamaica, Trinidad or Barbados. Added to this we find 24
horses classified in division “B” and “B2”, of which 5 are creoles.
Three of these five are classic winners in the same three colonies as
mentioned above. ;

Comparing these figures with the corresponding classes in 1930 1
cannot say off hand what the totals were then, but I can tell you that
they were much smaller and, in addition, not one was a native bred
horse. In fact there were no creoles above class “D” in those days.

The above, in my view, are the most significant points about the
classifications recently issued by the respective Turf Clubs of Trinidad
and Barbados.

Another point of interest in the recent classification by the B.T.C
is the number of two-year-olds there are on the list. I have counted
15 so far. This, I believe, is the greatest number ever to be placed on
the list as early as May.

Taken alphabetically, here are a few pointers on their potential-
ties which I have been able to gather so far:—

First on the list is Best Wishes. This is a filly by Burning Bow
out of Felicitas, and therefore an own sister_to the very fast Bow Bells
whom we have already been able to, judge® Bred and owned by Mr.
Cyril Bernard in St. Vincent, I have not seen her yet, but I am told
by eyewitnesses that she stands 15 hands, 3 inches and is about 1%
inches taller than Bow Bells. She is described as much better looking
all round than her famous sister. We are left to wonder if she will
be so much better on the track. We shall have to wait, however, be-
cause she is not scheduled to arrive here for racing until next October.
If she does turn out to be better than Bow Bells, well... . I leave it
to everybody to make their own comments, There is still some
diversity of opinion on this point.

Clementina I have seen and I like her. She is a filly by Roidan
out of Fiena, a mare bred in Jamaica by Beccaquimec, sire of Jeeves.
Clementina was bred in St. Lucia by Mr. Purchase who might be
described as a pioneer of breeding in that island. He has sold her to
Mr. I. O, C. Perkins and she will no doubt race here in August. She
is by no means tall but I like her conformation and she is well set up
on her legs.

Consternation is another from Mr. Purchase in St. Lucia. She is
by Millersdale out of Mary, another Jamaican mare by Scatter, sire
of Brown Bomber, I have not seen her nor do I know when she will
race. However, I shall be very interested in her because she is the one
and only thoroughbred by Millersdale whom I have ever heard about.
This bfg son of Bold Archer never had a proper chance as a sire in
my opinion and it is ironic that now he is dead we should be seeing
his first thoroughbred foal racing.

Cross Roads is a rather leggy son of Dunush (also dead) and
April Showers, the mare who gave us the great Atomic II, perhaps
O.T.C’s best son. Cross Roads has been in training now since carly
in the year and already I have noticed an improvement in him. For
one thing he is not as leggy as he was a few months ago for,
another he has almost lost his baby looks. I believe he will be among
the forward ones, if not in development, at least in training.

Dunese, the pronunciation of whose name I am not sure, is by
Dunusk out of Celanese, a mare who became famous for the number
of come-backs she made to racing after repeated retirements. Ske was
in fact more successful on the track after she produced a foal. I have
not seen Dunese either. Being a supporter of the progeny of Deni-
stone, sire of Celanese, I shall also be very interested in the career of
Dunese,

Hi-Lo’s name is about the only thing I like about the poor laddie.
He is by Dunusk out of China Clipper and the nomenclature therefore
seems to be apt, but he is as straight as bee-line from his fetlock
joint to his coronets. This is a very bad sign in a racehorse although
some of the famous have been known to run well with it. Perhaps
Hi-Lo may, who knows?

Miracle, by Battle Front out of Marshlight, is another I have not
seen. He has been bought from Mr, Proverbs by Miss Hawkins, I am
told. His dam has already done very well with Will O’the Wisp IT
ane oe from the same sire. Miracle therefore has a reputation to
uphold.

River Mist, small but comely daughter of the famous Sunrise,
is by Restigouche. I like everything about her except her size.
Rather more refined than the average Sunrise progeny, she is a beauti-
ful chestnut. She too has a reputation to uphold. J

Exactly the opposite in size but equally good looking is Soprano.
A big upstanding filly by Sunplant out of Night Singer, her dam
appears to have fitted her up well with the powerful quarters of
Tetratema on the frame of Sunstar. This provides her with a fifty-
fifty chance at being a stayer or sprinter and being excellent at either.
It shall be interesting to see on which side she does come down.

Sunbeam is Mr. George de Nobriga’s Sunshaft-Miramichi filly. I
have not seen her yet. Her dam Miramichi I believe is out of Minehaha
but I am-not sure who by.

Vanguard is a very robust son of O.T.C. and the big mare Hurri-
cane who was not much of a success at racing. He is such a powerful
colt (or gelding), I am not sure which, that seeing him at a distance
on the track for the first time I thought the Turf Club had imported
another stallion. On coming closer I perceived that he was only a two-
year-old, but what a baby. Obviously he shall need time.

Waterbell is Hon. J. D. Chandler’s other two-year-old by Resti-
gouche out of Belleplain. She is the small powerful type. Her dam
having produced Front Bell, and War Path, we might also expect
sorfething from her,

The fifteenth is actually out of alphabetical order but this is be-
cause she is in “G2”. She is the hal#-bred filly Joan’s Star. I wonder
where she hails from?

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PAGE FOUR



EST INDIAN cricket circles are particularly happy to-day over

the performance of the West Indies cricket team in England
who scored 468 runs for the loss of four wickets in the first day of
play against Surrey at the Oval.

Following closely upon their two-day win over Yorkshire by three
wickets and their impressive draw with Worcestershire in the open-
ing fixture of the tour, this performance against Surrey augurs well
for the future success of the team during the tour.

IMPRESSIVE OPENING

‘HE West Indies are certainly not out of the wood yet, nor are

they “blooded” in the aecepted sense of the word as far as the
tour is concerned but come what may, they have opened their tour
in keeping with the high rating which competent judges of the game
have placed upon them by Imperial cricket standards.

It is true that the Yorkshire game appeared a close thing but it
must be conceded that the Yorkshiremen were at home and so had
experience in their favour in the scales of balance.

We must at once admit that with Ramadhin and Pierre padded
up in the pavilion there was not much hope of our negotiating any
reasonable total’if the Rae-Jones partnership had been broken.

On the other hand it must be remembered that the Australians
in their victorious.tour of England in 1948 came nearer to defeat in
their game with Yorkshire on May 5 and 6 than in any other match
of the tour.

“AUSSIES” NEARLY LOST

OSE who followed the game will remember that a missed catch

at a critical period cost Yorkshire a great chance of atoning for

their disappointment against the 1938 team at Sheffield and so being

the first county to beat the Australians since 1912 when Hampshire
triumphed. .

DISPLEASURE

E IN the West Indies have listened with considerable displea-

sure to the comment of one Ernest Eytle of British Guiana over
the B.B.C. on Saturday, May 6.

Mr. Eytle in his broadcast found so many flaws in the constitu-
tion of the West Indian team, that it was small wonder that they
held Worcestershire to an honourable draw, to say nothing of defeat-
ing Yorkshire in two days.

Yesterday's showing against the Surrey team is another indis-
putable indication of the potential strength of the West Indies team.
While we all appreciate and are greatful for constructive criticism,
yet we in the West Indies can scarcely be expectéd to swallow the
indigestible pill of defeatism,

: U.K. CRITICS PRAISE

aT the West Indies’ performance in the opening days of play
é against Worcestershire Alex Bannister «f, the “Daily Mail” opined
that after having seen Weekes and Worrell, the non-sale of last day
test tickets was interesting.

Bannister was convinced that the English cricket crowds were in
for the biggest treat they have had since the war. The “Daily Graphic”
was equally enthusiastic.

Charles Bray of the “Daily Herald”, who covered the M.C.C. tour
to the West Indies, in 1948, with whom I associated during his stay
hére and for whom I hold the greatest respect with regard to his
knowledge of the game, wrote in the “Daily Herald”, “Mark my words,
the West Indies cricketers are going to be one of the most attractive
sides ever to visit this country. And I am not forgetting the all-con-
quering Australians of 1948,”

MORE KUDOS |

RAWFORD WHITE of the “News Chronicle”, who also accompan-
ied the 1948 M.C.C. team to the West Indies, was “intrigued

‘ by the _ Class of the West Indies
THE SPINNER inthe’

In the face of these reports, one
e@not reconcile Eytle’s strange
observations on the West Indie

— team which he gave over the B.B.C.
on Saturday. May 6. Eytle found
fault with Ramadhin’s bowling,
with Walcott’s wicket-keeping, with
the West Indies fielding among other
things.

To judge from his remarks, the
West Indies should have lost their
match against Yorkshire, joint
county champions last year, perhaps
in one day, but this was not so.

SONNY we eset —. cae es
. Eytle to be a_ sekf}appointed
RAMADHIN “Know-all” who only knows as

much about the West Indies team
as I know about the “flying
saucers”,
MEN WHO KNOW

Responsible circles in the West
pos goal ar a deprecated
5 any attempt by West Indians resi-
Londen Buproes Servies. dent in England to set themselves
up as “men from away”. We who have followed personally the 1948
M.C.C. tour to the West Indies, which by the way Mr. Eytle has not,
will at once prefer to err with competent judges of the game like
Charles Bray and Crawford White than shine with Mr. Eytle, a self-
styled expert on West Indies cricket. It may or may not have been
in the interest of West Indies cricket that. Mr. Eytle cannot claim the
honour of having represented either British Guiana in intercolonial
cricket or the West Indies in international cricket; but the fact re-
mains, he has not.

West Indian RAMADHIN has
already shown his bility to
English wickets, He the batt
both ways and has his googly as

Constructive criticism must at all times be appreciated, but we
in the West Indies will never tolerate any opinions that can only be
construed as figments of the imagination when they are compared
with responsible opinions of people, who although they belong to an-

ad race, have openly expressed opinions that differ almost diametri-
cally,

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SUNDAY 1DVOCATE

SUNDAY, MAY

14, 1950



Spartan Trounce College 7—O

Spartan easily drubbed College 7—0 when they met in a

first division football fixture

at Kensington Oval yesterday

afternoon. Four of the goals were netted in the first hall.
The seven goals were scored by Johnson who kicked in
three, Trotman 2 and Walcott 1. The other goal College
netted on themselves the result of a melee in their goal

FOOTBALL
FIXTURES

FIRST DIVISION
Monday, May 15
Carlton vs Empire. Referee: K
Laughlin; Linesmen: O, S. Cop-
pin and L. F. Harris.
Thursday, May 18
Spartan vs Pickwick-Rovers.
Referee: D. W. Sayers; Linesmen:
S. Gittens and B. Hoyos.
Saturday,
Everton vs
Oo. S$. Coppin;
Amory and D. W
SECOND
Tuesday, May 16
Everton vs Y.M.P.C. Referee :
L. F. Harris.
Wednesday, May 17
Empire vs Notre Dame. Referee:
B. Hoyos.
ar May are
ollege ys -M.P.C. Referee :
N. Meator

‘d,
INTER-SCHOO:
Tuesday, May 16 -

Lodge vs Foundation at Lodge
Referee; A. Wilkes,
Wednesday, May 17

College vs Combermere at Col-
lege. Referee: L. Thomas.
Friday, May 19

Lodge vs Combermere .
Referee; G. Amory. viene

THIRD DIVISION

Tuesday, May 16

Cable and Wireless vs ¥.M.C.A.
at Boarded Hall. Referee: C, Smith

Referee:
: GE

. Sayers.
DIVISION

Empire vs Combermere Old
Boys at Bank Hall. Referee: A
Ishmael,

Combermere vs at

Y.M.P.C.
Combermere. Referee: N. Holder.



Yardley
Leads M.C.C.



NORMAN YARDLEY

LONDON, May 12.

Norman Yardley, the Yorkshire
captain, is to lead M.C.C. against
the West Indies in the match be-
ginning at Lord’s here on May 20.

In view of the need to find an
England captain, both for the
Test series this suramer, and for
the England tour to Australia in
the winter, the choice of Yardley
is regarded here as a special point-
er to the feelings of the leading
Egland officials.

There are a number of other
selections in the M.C.C. side which
reveal the young cricketers whose
abilities have attracted most at-
tention at Lord's.

R. Berry, Lancashire's 5ft 4ins.
left-arm slow bowler; Eric Bedser,
Surrey off-break bowler and
opening bat, who is a twin brother
to Test bowler Alex Bedser; and
Don Brennan, Yorkshire wicket-
keeper, have all found favour.

Middlesex, without a County
match at the time, provide four
players — Denis Compton, Bill
Edrich, Jack Robertson and forty-
five-year-old slow leg-break
bowler, Jim Sims.

The team is: N. W. D. Yardley

(Captain) and D.,V. Brennan
(Yorkshire), W. J. Edrich, D.
Compton, J. Robertson, and J.

Sims (Middlesex), R. T. Simpson
(Nottinghamshire), T. E. Bailey
(Essex), J. G. Dewes (Cambridge
University), R. Berry (Lanca-
shire), and E. Bedser (Surrey),
—Reuter

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of scoring early and the first goal
came from a corner, kicked
Boyce on the left wing and John-
son made no mistake in kicking
it into the nets. The second was
netted very soon after when Wal-
cott receiving a pass from John-
son ran down unmarked and
scored in the right hand corner of
the goal,

At this stage the College de-
fence was beginning to weaken
and Johnson took full advantage
of this and scored the third goal
after a pass from Boyce.

Occasionally. there was some
play in the Spartan goal area but
custodian Harris had very little
to do. The greater part of the play
was seen in the College goal area
and after a melee in ffont of the
College area, Johnson scored a
fourth about three minutes before
Referee Wilkins blew for half
time.

After half time Spartan
changed up their formation, Har-
ris was seen at right wing and
Chase in the goal. Very soon after
the. kick off Trotman taking a
pass from Walcott ran through to
score the fifth giving Smith no
chance to save.

The schoolboys were always
seen bundling and very soon they
scored on themselves as full-
back Gibbons trying to clear
kicked into his own goal. About
five minutes before the end
Trotman again scored making the
total seven.

The teams:—

Spartan: Harris, Gibbons, Bow-
en, Gittens, Cadogan, Haynes,
Chase, Johnson, Walcott, Trot-
man and Boyce.

College. Smith, Gibbons, Mor-
rison, Morris, St. John, Simmons,
Reid, V. O. Smith, C. E. Tudor,
Williams and F. L. Tudor,

The Referee was Mr. P. Wil-
kin.

Linesmen: Messrs. Amory ,and
Graham.

Best Display
Sinice Aussies’
Visit
(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, May 13,

A 17,500 crowd at the Oval today
went home convinced that they
had seen the best exhibition of
forceful batting since the Austra-
lians were here: two years ago.

Even members of the West
Indies team were amazed at: the
frequency with which -theyball
was despatched to the boundary.

Learie Constantine told me
afterwards that he considered it
one of the best exhibitions he
had ever seen from the West
Indies side.

Particularly satisfying from John
Goddard's point of view is that
his men have shown themselves
capable of fighting back after
suffering early losses.

Inability to do this has been a
great failing to previous sides
which have toured here.

The big question now is whether
Goddard will declare first thing
Monday morning. The first hour
is the time when bowlers get
most help from the wicket, but
Goddard has not made up his mind
yet.

He wants to see what the
weather is like. If it continues
warm and sunny, he may go on
batting for another hour or so,
giving his team orders to force the
pace; but if it rains during the
weekend, he will probably hand
straight over to his bowlers.





Premiere’s Tennis

Club Tourney

MONDAY’S FIXTURES.

Men’s Doubles.

L. Campbell and L. Blackett vs,
W. DeC. Forde and C. B. Forde.
Ladies’ Singles.

Miss G. M, Grimes vs. Miss C.
Alleyne.

Men’s, Singles. ‘
J. Robinson vs. B.- Wharton.
F. Edwards vs, Dr. G, M.

Cummins



‘“MOYRA BLAIR’ WINS
A SECOND TIME

Commodore Wilkinson’s “Moyra Blair”, skippered by his
son Tom, scored her second victory for the season when
she defeated all other ‘B’ Class boats at the Ninth Regatta
of the R.B.Y.C,, which took place in Carlisle Bay yesterday

evening.



‘Tranquillity
Leads
Savannah

SAVANNAH won two of the
four games yesterday afternoon
at the Garrison to make their
score three as against five by the
visiting Tranquillity team from
Trinidad.

Mrs. R. S. Bancroft of Savan-
nah beat Miss C. De Verteuil in
the Ladies’ Singles 7—5; 9—7;
while Miss D. Wood and J. D.
Trimmingham also of Savannah
beat Miss M. Trestrail and T.
Schjo'seth 7—5, 6—3, in one of the
Mixed Doubles games.

In the other Mixed Doubles
game, Miss M. Trestrail and H.
Nothnagel of Tranquillity beat
Mrs. A. L. Perkins and C. R.
Packer 6—1; 6—2; while F. Gun
Munro of Tranquillity carried o
the Men’s Singles from PD. E,
Worme 6—1; 7—5.

Undoubtedly the best match of
the afternoon was the Ladies’
Singles on Court No. 3 in which
Mrs. Bancroft defeated Miss De-
Verteuil. It was tennis of the
highest standard with both ladies
serving and driving exceptionally
well,

In the first set, the games were
very even and at 5—5 Mrs. Ban-
croft broke through to win Miss
De Verteuil’s service and made
the game 6—5 in her favour. She
then clinched the set by winning
her own service at 7—5.

In the second set, the games
went much the same way, each
player winning her service until
Mrs. Bancroft led 8—7, and then
won her service to win the set
9—7.

Both ladies were getting good
length and there were many ex-
changes of rallies for indeed, the
first game went to 19 points before
Mrs. Bancroft eventually won it.

There was however, not very
much to choose between the two
players. Mrs. Bancroft was, per-
haps, the more aggressive while
Miss De Verteuil was at all times
steady with both back and fore
urm. As was already stated, the
tennis was of a very high standard
and was very much appreciated
by the crowd.

On Court No. 2 in the Men’s
Singles, F. Gun Munro won the
first set very easily from D. E.
Worme 6—1. In the second set,
Worme had Gun-Munro 4—2, but
the latter soon equalised and then
took the next game to lead 5—4,
Worme won the following game to
make the score 5—5 and then
Munro took the last two games.

Neither of the players was
really playing on form and tennis
was not up to standard.

In the Mixed Doubles J. D.
‘Yrimmingham played very sound
tennis and was ably partnered by
Miss D. Wood to win the match
v-—5; 6—3 from T. Schjolseth and
Miss M. Trestrail, the Tranquillity
pair.

In the first set, Tranquillity
started off and had Savannah 3—1.
The latter then equalised only to
see Tranquillity go ahead again
with the score at 5—3.

Miss Wood then came into the
picture witn some forcing back-
hand and forearm shots. To
climax this good display, she won
her service and then had the
score at 5—5. From this, Sayan-
nah never looked back, but went
ahead to win the game 7—5, 6—3.

In the other Mixed Doubles, H.
Nothnagel and Miss A. Reid
(Tranguillity) had a very easy
victory over Mrs. A. L. Perkins
and C. R. Packer and won 6—1;
6—2.

The tournamfnt continues on
Monday.



1 sandals are now

he f ) lie ‘ }
¢ high quality of tt




Trade Enquiries to; T.

This race was a very keen one.
Dr. J. W. P. Harkness’ “Circe”,
which started first, looked a sure
winner as it kept its lead through-
out the first lap and up to the time
it reached the Needham’s Point
buoy. On reaching this buoy
“Moyra Blair’, which was only a
few yards behind, crept into the
lead and before “Circe” could
completely clear the buoy “Fan-
tasy”, owned and skippered by
Teddy Hoad, came into second
place. They finished in that order.

The boats sailed north-about in
a very light breeze which was
especially not suitable for the
centre-boarders. Only the ‘‘Reso-
lute” in the ‘B’ Class and “Dawn”
in the Intermediate, did not start.

“Mohawk”, owned by Dr. David
Payne and skippered by Bob Cum-
berbatch scored her second victory
this season in the Intermediate
Class. The other victory was
scored in the Seventh Regatta and
the boat afterwards overturned
but on this occasion it got back
safely to its mooring.

Coming second in the Inter-
mediate was Sydney Nurse’s
“Clytie” which he himself skip-
pered, So far “Clytie has mn
second on a previous occasion but
has not yet scored a victory for
the season. \

Third position went to Johnnie
Hoad’s “Coronetta” which was
captained by his son Jackie.

“Astra”, owned and skippered
by Milton Tucker, carried off ‘C
Class honours for the second time.
Second in this Class was “Range”,
owned and, skippered by Stanley
Cheeseman while “Wizard”, owned
and skippered by Jim Jones was
third, This is the third occasion
on which “Wizard” came third
but up to the present it has not
been able to gain a second posi-
tion.

“Sinbad”, owned and skippered
by Lionel Baggott, won an easy
race in the “D” Class to score its
first victory for the season. Second
was “Olive Blossom,” owned and
skippered by Winston Hassell and
third “Peter Pan”, owned and
s“ippered by Eric Raison.

Vhe results were as follows:

. *B’ Class:—1. Moyra Blair.
Fantasy. 3. Circe.

‘C’ Class:—1. Astra. 2. Ranger.
3. Wizard.

Intermediate Class:—1. Mohawk.
2. Clytie. 3. Coronetta.

9

—D’ Class:—1. Sinbad. 2. Olive
Blossom. 3. Peter Pan.
The Tenth Regatta of the

R.B.Y.C. will be sailed on Satur-
day, May 27.

Roberts Wins
Frontenac Cup

MR. T. A. L. ROBERTS won
the Frontenac Trophy and ‘the
N.R.A. Silver Medal when he
broke the Frontenac Trophy
Shoot record at the Government
Rifle Range yesterday. Mr. Rob-
erts scored 144 points out of a
possible 150.

In 1948 when the Frontenac
Trophy Shoot first started, Capt.
C. R. E. Warner, the then winner,
scored 136 points. Last year Lt.-
Col. J. Connell added two points
and now Mr. Roberts has beaten
Lt.-Col. J. Connell’s 138.

Fifteen rounds were fired from
each of the two distances, 500 and
600 yards. Shooting conditions
were good, the wind steady and
the light consistent.

Following are the eight best
scores: —

500 600
Yards Yards Total

72 72 «(144
i
69
68

A. L, Roberts
J, Connell ..
Major J. E. Griffith .
Mr. M. R. De Verteuil
Lt. C, E, Neblett
Capt. J. R. Jordan

Lt. T. A. Gittens /

M. D. Thomas

Mr. T.
Lt.-Col.

70
68

Mr 70



Barbados Friendly
Football Association

THE third trial match of the
above association will be played
to-day at Empire Grounds, Bank
Hall.





Gillette

.. + the sharpest edge in the world!

Geddes Grant Limite. }



IT IS a remarkable thing that in the last thirty years classifica-
tion of racehorses in Barbados and Trinidad should have remained
so consistent. AJ) the more so because it passed through a very try-
ing period during the last war. By consistency I mean that a certain
standard has been maintained whereby it has been possible to judge
the merits not only of contemporary thoroughbreds but also those of
different periods. For instance, looking at a classification. list of to-
day I find that in comparison with one of 1930 there is little difference
in the general standard of the runners in class ‘AY.

Naturally there must be some difference of opinion when one
compares horses of different periods and of course I do not mean to
say that Beacon Bright, Blue Streak and Gun Site (three of today’s
giants) are of exactly the same vintage as Tom Pearson, Bambolina,
and Senator, three who raced around 1930. But when I say that 1
think Beacon Bright, Blue Streak and Gun Site are genuine A class
horses it means something because the standard of the class has re-
mained constant. This to my mind 1s a decided feather in the cap of
the authorities who control racing in Barbados and Trinidad.

The great thing about the “A” class of to-day is the quantity in
this division and its sub class “A2” as well as the fact that half the
number is made up of native bred horses. Having established the fact
that there has been no lowering of the general standard in the top
class, this immediately tells us that we are breeding better horses to-
day than we were in 1930. At that time class “A” was made up of two
or three imported horses only. It also tells us that racing in general
in the B.W.I. is on the up-grade. :

According to the most recent classifications issued by the Barba-
dos Turf Club and the Trinidad Turf Club, one of which is published
on the opposite page, there are now, 16 animals in class “A” and “A2”.
16 of these are native bred and 4 of these sixteen are Derby winners
either in Jamaica, Trinidad or Barbados. Added to this we find 24
horses classified in division “B” and “B2”, of which 5 are creoles.
Three of these five are classic winners in the same three colonies as
mentioned above.

Comparing these figures with the corresponding classes in 1930 1
cannot say off hand what the totals were then, but I can tell you that
they were much smaller and, in addition, not one was a native bred
horse. In fact there were no creoles above class “D” in those days.

The above, in my view, are the most significant points about the
classifications recently issued by the respective Turf Clubs of Trinidad
and Barbados.

Another point of interest in the recent classification by the B.T.C
is the number of two-year-olds there are on the list. I have counted
15 so far. This, I believe, is the greatest number ever to be placed on
the list as early as May.

Taken alphabetically, here are a few pointers on their potential-
ties which I have been able to gather so far:—

First on the list is Best Wishes. This is a filly by Burning Bow
out of Felicitas, and therefore an own sister to the very fast Bow Bells
whom we have already been able to, judge® Bred and owned by Mr,
Cyril Bernard in St. Vincent, I have not seen her yet, but I am told
by eyewitnesses that she stands 15 hands, 3 inches and is about 1%
inches taller than Bow Bells. She is described as much better looking
all round than her famous sister. We are left to wonder if she will
be so much better on the track. We shall have to wait, however, be-
cause she is not scheduled to arrive here for racing until next October.
If she does turn out to be better than Bow Bells, well. . . . I leave it
to everybody to make their own comments. There is still some
diversity of opinion on this point.

Clementina I have seen and I like her. She is a filly by Roidan
out of Fiena, a mare bred in Jamaica by Beccaquimec, sire of Jeeves.
Clementina was bred in St. Lucia by Mr. Purchase who might be
described as a pioneer of breeding in that island. He has sold her to
Mr. I. O. C. Perkins and she will no doubt race here in August. She
is by no means tall but I like her conformation and she is well set up
on her legs.

Consternation is another from Mr. Purchase in St. Lucia. She is
by Millersdale out of Mary, another Jamaican mare by Scatter, sire
of Brown Bomber, I have not seen her nor do I know when she will
race. However, I shall be very interested in her because she is the one
and only thoroughbred by Millersdale whom I have ever heard about.
This big son of Bold Archer never had a proper chance as a sire in
my opinion and it is ironic that now he is dead we should be seeing
his first thoroughbred foal racing.

Cross Roads is a rather leggy son of Dunush (also dead) and
April Showers, the mare who gave us the great Atomic II, perha
O.T.C’s best son. Cross Roads has been in training now since early
in the year and already I have noticed an improvement in him. For
one thing he is not as leggy as he was a few months ago for,
another he has almost lost his baby looks. I believe he will be among
the forward ones, if not in development, at least in training.

Dunese, the pronunciation of whose name I am not sure, is by
Dunusk out of Celanese, a mare who became famous for the number
of come-backs she made to racing after repeated retirements. Ske was
in fact more successful on the track after she produced a foal. I have
not seen Dunese either. Being a supporter of the progeny of Deni-
ae sire of Celanese, I shall also be very interested in the career of

unese,

Hi-Lo’s name is about the only thing I like about the poor laddie.
He is by Dunusk out of China Clipper and the nomenclature therefore
seems to be apt, but he is as straight as bee-line from his fetlock
joint to his coronets. This is a very bad sign in a racehorse although
some of the famous have been known to run well with it. Perhaps
Hi-Lo may, who knows?

Miracle, by Battle Front out of Marshlight, is another I have not
seen. He has been bought from Mr. Proverbs by Miss Hawkins, I am
told. His dam has already done very well with Will O’the Wisp IT
— ooee from the same sire. Miracle therefore has a reputation to
uphold,

River Mist, small but comely daughter of the famous Sunrise,
is by Restigouche. I like everything about her except her size.
Rather more refined than the average Sunrise progeny, she is a beauti-
ful chestnut, She too has a reputation to uphold. ‘

Exactly the opposite in size but equally good looking is Soprano.
A big upstanding filly by Sunplant out of Night Singer, her dam
appears to have fitted her up well with the powerful quarters of
Tetratema on the frame of Sunstar. This provides her with a fifty-
fifty chance at being a stayer or sprinter and being excellent at either.
It shall be interesting to see on which side she does come down.

Sunbeam is Mr. George de Nobriga’s Sunshaft-Miramichi filly. I
have not seen her yef, Her dam Miramichi I believe is out of Minehaha
but I am~not sure who by,

Vanguard is a very robust son of O.T.C. and the big rhare Hurri-
cane who was not much of a success at racing. He is such a powerful
colt (or gelding), I am not sure which, that seeing him at a distance
on the track for the first time I thought the Turf Club had imported
another stallion. On coming closer I perceived that he was only a two-
year-old, but what a baby. Obviously he shall need time.

Waterbell is Hon. J, D. Chandler's other two-year-old by Resti-
gouche out of Belleplain, She is the small powerful type. Her dam
having produced Front Bell, and War Path, we might also expect
sorfething from her.

The fifteenth is actually out of alphabetical order but this is be-

cause she is in “G2”. She is the half-bred filly Joan’s Star. I wonder
where she hails from?















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from Heartburn, Flatulence, Nausea,
Acidity and Stomach Pains due to In-
digestion is made possible the fact
aoe es BRAND MACH
is &@ perfectly balanced
scientific formula.
Make Meal Times
a Pleasure !
Why go on suffering? Tryjust one dose
to-day but make sure you get genuine
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DER ing the signature “ ALEX. C.
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i





PAGE TWELVE

B.G. Plans Large-Scale
Banana Industry

Expert Arrives For Experiments

Jamaica to commence

(From Our Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, May-8.
Mr. E. S. SHARPE has arrived in British Guiana from
the Banana Development ®cheme
under the auspices of the Department of Agriculture here.
This Scheme has arisen oui of re

in the Evans Commission Report

1



commendations contained

The dey banan*

B.G. Press * ,

2 . mined whether or ne t bet amas’ tor
Association eepert i an be grow Ss cuted sfully
in British. Guiana,t and’ seconei

(From Our Own Corresp







GEORGETOWN no calls b, ships. This takes tinw

Mr. W. I. Gomes was elected #d depends on'the’ success oF t
resident of the Bria o first or experimental ph Only
Guiana Press Association at the this fitst phase is now being con

Sixth Annual Meeting held +" ue
Association’s Reference Rooms,
Robb Street, Georgetown, on Sun-
day, May 7, 1950.

elected are Mr. P, I
President; Mr. woyd
Secretary; Miss ( E,
Treasurer; } P Kempado),
Asst. Secretary-Treasurer; Unofl
cial Members: Mr. Justice E. RB
L. Ward, Mr. C. D. Kirton, M1
O. E. Armstrong and Mr, Cha:
Wright.

The Asociation held its Fourth
Annual Dinner at the New City
Restaurant and Hotel the previous

Rohe







Tneob: | |, the
Association, ane
Pres... McConnell & Co., Ltd. Bac!
has agree) to bear a third of the
expenditure up to a given mawxi-
mum.



stry must be in two pha
mceRperimental = f¢
’ sf

ring which it 1 det

© developritnt phase du

Eleets Officers oo (ons Bee

warrant ‘regul:.!

built up “to



sidered,

Woaile Government ts partici-
pating id the Scheme Jit is not
eee » Counc essentially a Government Scheme.

ran. Sienbers Of Was vues It is: a joint enterprise between
t the Government of British Guiana.
Jamaica Banana Frotucers’
Messrs Booke~

Producers Anxious

The Jamaica Banana Producer
Assoefation are anxious to obtain

8 fies of bananas from area
eveiin 2 re : suppli ane
the Quat FHone a wes Mi Me outside the hurficane area. More-

tice F. M. Boland, LL.B. Other Ve: they are, or will be in
guests of the ‘Aséociation were Mr, Position to supply the specially

W. A. Crawford (Barbados), Mr
H. Engert (London), Hon. EB. F

McDavid, C.M.Gi.C.B.E}y Hon across” the
doubtful whether, even. if it

showr” that )
grown’ here satisfactorily, and in-
dustry could be started by Brit-

BG Plans First ish Guiana alone and without

Capt. G. H. Smellie, Mr. H. G
Seaford, O.B.E.











ij
ke

Z06 ln WI

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN,

The British Guiana Government
is considering proposals put for-'
ward by Hon. Vincent Roth, J.P.
M.L.C., for the establishment ot
a Zoological Park, along the lines

of the London Zoo. If Roth’: r
proposals’ are accepted Britishyy There is of

Guiana will be the first Carib-
bean colony with
Gardens, where ‘visitors will be
able to see the most comprehen-
sive collection of tropical fauna
in these ‘parts.

It is proposed to establish th«
Zoological Gardens in the north-
western section of the Botanic.
Gardens.

Based on the number of per-
sons who visit the Natural His-
tory Section of the Museum, it iy
estimated that by levying «
nominal charge of one penny per
person as is done in the case of
the Government-owned Kew
Gardens, after making allowances|
for a reduction in the number of
visitors, revenue derived from
this source would
approximately $314 per month











ssistence of
shipping and marketing organisia-
tion such as this.

Messrs. Booker Bros. joined the B. Cc.
Scheme because they have great
interests in British Guiana and
they believe a policy of broaden-
economy
id be followed, and are pre-
pared to support schemes with
that end in view.

ing

British

Ministry of
United Kingdom market

This variety
ind purposes, immune from Pana-
but is unfortunately
usceptible to Leaf Spot Disease,
but unlike Panama Disease) this ¢) Ruimveld site which will al

be levelled off, Rain is holding \

"na disease,

ean be controlled,
amount tolywhen there are easily available preliminary. work.
supplies of water as there are in

designed and refrigerated shi
necessary for

carrying banan
Atlantic arid ~it

bananas could

some

its agricultural

ount of experimental work

Zoologicale:P& done before it can be deter-
mined whether or not it is possible
to establish a banana industry
Earlier trial
nave failed mainly because of the
isease problem, but a new variety
ealled “Lacatan” is. now being oO
grown and shipped in Jamaica
and has been accepted by the
Food and in the

Guiana.

Diocese Control
is to all

or a little less than $4,000 per&iBritish Guiana.

year. It is
amount

hoped that this
would be sufficient tor

the vicinity 0f $12,000 and the cost
of maintenance would be in the
region of $4,000 per annum

Cabral President
Of B.G. Bar

GEORGETOWN.
Mr, Ly M; F. ~ Cabral,

ment -of

bodies,

The indications from banana
defray the cost of maintainingjgrown in British Guiana already
the Zoo by way of wagés and food#for the local market, usually with
for the specimens on exhibits. pthe minimum of cultivation, are

Capital “cost of the establish-"icuffiele
ment is estimated to be within’ "periments
While the general,» administris
tion will be under the Depari-approval and
Agriculture, ‘the actual
control of policy will be Under-a
committee consisting of a repré= the Province to take ‘part
sentative from each of the three year in a
If after an experimental
period, which is likely to be trom
one to two years, the results Hp-. Pentecost—May 18 to 28
Barbados Advocate Correspondent pear’ to warrant expansion toa ' ‘
commercial scale, additional aréus
M.A, Wilk be planted and opportunities
B.C.L., was elected President of given for private farmers, smali
the B:G. Bar Association at the and large, to grow bananas for





Annual Meeting held on Friday, shipment,

Victoria Law
office-bearers

May 6, at. the
Courts. Other

The exact



the
established

course a great

intents

particulariy

to warrant further ex-

type of organisation

tana

SHE GOES TO ROME ON HORSEBACK?

Riding h
the German Countess Helen Von

has just arrived in Rome after trav«

ESS FROM BAVARIA,

Convent, Bavaria

ant she Jater became a catholic ¢

a

ger
he



The Countess

# guest in her Berlin Mansion,



City: «Photo shows +

monies,

Clearan

Countess
Giselle” on her arrival in Rome

ce

(Advocate Correspondeni)
GEORGETOWN

Georgetown’s city slum

ance is moving near
The Central Housing

Bank of the Demerar

rer

likely to be dispossessed in

Albuoystown slum cle

at Ruimveld. About
from Atkinson Field

arance,

Officials of the Town-Plannin:
ffice are busy conducting sui-
veys before laying out the arca
15 houses
and other
salvage material will: be remove
to the site to provide shelter fi

approximately 500° pérsons

Preparing Ruimvelc

canting centre will include
ing of a road from Albuoystoy:
1 the Cit

(southermost Ward it

jas a



Primate’s

Call

To Prayer

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)



EORG

His Grace ‘the Arehbishop «
the West dndies “with the wana

brother Bishops has
the-Clergy and Lai



Provinci
Prayer and Dedicatio
vena ..from

“BIG FHREE” FINISIi

STOWN

support” of

called

ul Act
nin a

Aseension Day

VITAL TALKS

LONDON,. May 13

The t’oreign Ministers of
tain, France and the United St

were today finishing vital cold \
iclude with

elected for the 1950—51 period Which would operate or control talks, which will cor

are Hon, A, T.

Peters (Vice- the local industry will have to be
President), “Mr. P) A, Cutfimings decicted: tater by the British Gui-

(Secretary), Mr. Jenarine Singh ana Government.

(Treasurer), Mr: Guya Persaud
(Asst. Secretary). These officers
along with the

The number

constitute the Governing Body of obtained is yet unknown, but

the Association: Hons, Theo Lee Sufficient can be obtained some wiil
be distributed to local farmers to
try-out for themselves.

and John Carter, Messrs J. Veerasawmy and S. I, Cyrus.

ST





Why so depressed?

If you feel so low - spirited,

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fex like you have quickly

The effect of taking Phyllosan
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disappearance of the feeling

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following will “Lacatan” variety which can be

the publication ofa

momen ¢

statement on the future of (

many.

After discussing Ger
Austria exclusively yesterday, the
Ministers had prepared an imoor
tant and comprehensive policy «°-
on Germany’s future
which would “be made public
the end of their meeting, a Fre

claration

spokesman said.—Reuter.












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hes

Sage: AG CT ey

THE PILGRIM COUNT-
famous white horse ‘Belle Giselle”

idohenau, of Ketschendorf, Bavaria,

ling about 937 miles from the Ettal

s fifty, and although born a Protest-

it one time the present Pope was

vhon he was Apostolic Nuncio in the
Helen von Hohenau riding “Belle

take part in the Holy Year Ceres

Begins Slum Hoffman Is |

Disappointed
NEW YORK, May 18,

Paul. Hoffman, Marshall Pian
Administrator admitted today ‘that



he was. disappointed at: the pro-
gress so far made towards the in-
tegration of the European economy

“In all fairness it.deserves to b
ijtated that the progress which has
yee, nvade in the past few months

toward the better organisation of
the European economy would in
normal times be worthy of high
praise,’ he added.

“It is only because the need is
o great, and time so pressing,
that | am disappointed with the
progress made thus far.”

He told the-United States Con-
ference of Me + “E do not want
to confuse disappointment with
diseburagement. T am-not discour-
iged, beeause I believe that the
job can be done andl is beginning
o be done



Mr. Hoffman’ said the Marshall
Plan countries would need to ac-
complish within the next - 25
months, what would normally take

5

) years,

9



“T am convinced that before the
Marshall Plan is completed in 2
years our friends in Western Eu-
rope with our help will take those
major ste towards. the creation
fa single market in Europe which
they aecepted as the prime objec-
tive and which has the full sup-
port of the United States Govern-
ment,” he said



Mr. Hoffman said he believed
Communism was a passing storm
and that 80 per cent or perhaps
90 per cent of the peoples of Po-
land and Czechoslovakia detested
the system under which they were
forced to live

Given any reasonable chance of
success they would fight to break
away from it.

‘Ten years ago there were 3 dic-
tatorships in the world led by Hit-
ler, Mussolini and Stalin,” he said.
The three were viciously attack-
ing and encroaching upon the free
world, Two are gone, I expect
to live to see the third—the most
evil of all dictatorships—go.”

—Reuter.







SUNDAY,



B.G. Has Enough
Meat For Export

Air Transport Necessary

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN,

Mr. H. G. Seaford,.O.B.E, Chairman of the Nupunun

Development Company .Ltd..
British Guiana, declared yesterday that, ia the

of the Company’s Board of

largest cattle ranchers. i
»pinior
Directors, there are sufficient

cattle in British Guiana to supply local requirements, and

to start an export trade to

Trinidad, but this will entai!

flying down all beef from the Rupununi cattle country.

ee

Welcome Big
3 Co-operation

WASHINGTON, May 13

Representative John Kee, Dem-
ocrat Chairman of the House of
Representatives Foreign Affai
Committee, to-night hailed. the
announcement of the close accor J
at the Foreign Ministers’ London
meeting as an important -ste
towards the economic and even-
tually tke political federation
Europ<

It would be a very nderful
thing, but I doubt at this stag
wheth ithe European = countrie
could come to full agreement on
all the matters necéssary t
achieve. complete federation

That is a long range goal, Mr
Kee said.



He said that the Ser-te
House Conference now meeting to
reach agreement on the Foreign
Aid Appropriation Bill had agreed
yesterday, following a _ request
from the Secretary of Siate, Mr.
Dean Acheson, not to make For-
eign aid conditions on “political
federation”.

Mr. Kee ‘said that the words
were dropped from the compro-
mise bill so as not to put up any
barrier to the success of the Lon-
don talks.

He added that there was never-
theless a strong sentiment in Con-
gress for more rapid progress
towards that goal

Kee endorsed the idea of en-
uraging the new states of South
Rast Asia in their steps towar
independence.



Although he knew of no new
recent developments, Mr. Kee said
he regarded the appointment of
General Carlos Romulo as Phil-
ippines Foreign Minister as a
significant step towards the reali-
sation of a closer accord between
the West countries

He said the grouping of demo-
cratic countries in Asia in a pact
similar to the North Atlantic
Treaty “was “essential to the
security ..of. those, countries. a
well asweof the, United States.

, ~ —Reuter



Foreign Ministers
Diseuss Africa

LONDON, May 13.

The Foreign Ministers of France,
the United States and Britain de-
cided here today to make fresh
efforts to overcome divergencies
inside the United Nations on Colo-
nial questions, it was learned on
good authority.

The three, Mr. Ernest Bevin,
Britain; Mr. Dean Acheson, United
States; and M. Robert Schuman,
France, briefly discussed colonial
matters today, with special refer-
ence to Africa

The main question of co-ordin-
ation between the three powers
was believed to have centred on
divergencies inside the United
Nations on colonial questions.

—Reuter.





VAN ZEELAND ARRIVES

’ LONDON, May 12
The Belgian Prime Minister,
Paul Van Zeeland, arrived here
by air tonight from Brussels to
take part in next week’s North
Atlantic Council meetings.
—Reuter.

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peta ee tale ie tele Came geltl lis)



In sharp criticism of the hand-
ling of the meat situation, Mr.
Seaford declared at the general
meeting of the Company’s share-
ho'der that the Directors hav?
continued thelr struggle to point
vul the absurdity of the present
position, whereby t pays th
Company to drive. its best catth
over the trail and sustain losses
in numbers, weight and, conditio-.
rather than sell_at Lethem, in th
Rupununi, District +

“As a fesult,” added Mr. Sea
ford, “only: those,eattie are flow:
down which are considered either
Yoo old cr too weak

More Than Enough

“We are of opinion that thers
re sufficient cattle in the colony
to supply local requirements and
an export trade to Trini-
dad, but this would enta‘l the
flying down of all beef from th:
Rupununi. Government is pre
pared, however, to allow a price
of 50 cents per pound to be paid
for Australian beef while con-
‘rolling the price of British
Guiana beef at 32 cents. Local
representations to Government
have failed, and the Directors of
the Company are now cons'dering
what further steps should |
taken

The Directors’ Report showed
1 profit of $1 5.89 against a
profit of $20,788.43 for 1948. f

Cattle on hand at the Rupununi
Savannah at December 31, 1949,
are estimated to have been 30,000
head, and 770 head in the Ber-
bice Savannahs



to start





Labour Officers
Will Discuss

Work Overseas

KINGSTON, May 9

A model agreement for the con-
tract employment overseas of West
Indian workers-will be one of the
prineipal. items of -bustness to be
discussed at the conference of
British Caribbean Labour. officers
to be held in Barbados starting
May 15.

It is possible that this agreement
will be based on the Internationa!
Labour Office convention which
relates to written contracts for mi-
grant. workers.

Jamaica will be represented at
the conference by the Labour Ad-
viser, Mr: G..H. Scott,

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SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950





They Left Britain To Be
Redskins’ Brides

Hy James Cooper

TORONTO

“Bang, bang, bang . . . and
seven more redskins bit the dust.”

THAT famous line in tales of
the Wild West was quoted by my
English master as the most excit-
ing introduction to any story.

And that “Last of the Mohi-
cans” attitude is what Jasper Hill
(Chief Big White Owl) and the
130,000 or so Indians in Canada
are fighting to-day as Canada
prepares to debate a Bill making
Indians full citizens.

Eighty years after the last skir-
mish between red man and white,
the Mohawks, the Swampy Crees,
the Blackfeet, and all the other
tribes hope they will cease 50 be
treated as children and wards of
the Government.

They hope they will be
given a vote and have the
ban on their drinking liquor
eased; they hope to get better
education and have a right
to spend their own tribal

moneys. *

For war bride Mrs. Betty News
from Coleman-street, Brighton,
who married an Indian and is
living in the Sahanatien Reserve,
Ontario, it means she may be able
to have the occasional gin-and-
lime she liked when, as Betty
Schooley, she was one of the best
dancers at the Regent Ballroom,
Brighton. '

Risks of jail

@ UNTIL NOW, like all Brit-
ish girls married to Indians, she
has been regarded as an Indian
squaw living along with the 50
other red-skinned, raven-haired
Mohawk women in the reserve,

There are risks of being jailed
for a long sentence if caught
drinking beer; she is liable to be
questioned even if an empty
bottle is found nearby.

Their is neither water nor
electricity in the wooden

home.

For her husband Geoffrey the
new law may mean he is able to
go down the trail to the Bala
Tavern for a glass of beer.

For their _ golden-haired
Papoose, Rosemary, rising three,
it should mean better schooling.

For the whole family it may
mean that they won't be regarded
as minors under the law, unable
to sign documents, and will be
able to go te the banks and raise
a mortgage for housts.

But it might also mean losing
the privileges of Indians on re-
serves of not paying rates and
taxes.

Better homes

@ FOR PEACE-TIME bride
Margaret Dolman, from Lower
Court-road, Epsom, Surrey, who
recently married a Swampy Cree
Indian, Sinclair Cheechoo, at the
old Hudson’s Bay post of Moose-
factory, James Bay, there should
be twice as much money to spend
on the Indian children who trudge
to the mission school where she
teaches by the light of paraffin
lamps.

Tudions will also seek better
homes than tents with no floor
other than a layer of spruce
boughs, often just a wooden box
as furniture.

Hungry strike

@ ONLY MENTION of the
warpath I have heard has been
by “rebel” Jules Sioui, 43-year-
old Huron who, far from scalp-
ing, has resorted to a hunger
strike in his shop at Loretteville,
Quebec, until “Canada is given
back to the Indians,”

No one seems to take very

house she has made her i The Dark Lady, The



Wedding day picture of Margaret Dolman,
from Epeom, and ber Indian bridegroom

Sinctsir

But there are still contrasts
and misgivings. In prosperous
Ontario, where the 30,000 Indians
mingle unnoticed the cities,
half of them still live on fishing
and hunting.

Rum-runners

@ IN_ BRITISH COLUMBIA
Frank Calder is the first full
Indian member of any Cana-
dian provincial legislature, and
the Indian chief's daughter,
Gloria Cranmer, is studying to
become the first Indian woman
doctor.

But there is still the problem
of the rum-runners who take fire-
water to the coastal tribes.

_ Some Indian tribes ,have an
pee mortality rate of 500 per

Cheechoo.

Braves hunt
@ CONSUMPTION HAS a
rate forty times higher for In-
cians than whites. In the Rock-
ies are nomadic tribes who face
starvation rather than take any-
thing trom the white man.

In the north the braves
still hunt while the squaws
do the work.

That is why the Big White Owl
welcomes emancipation with safe-
guards. “We want to see that
emancipation won't lead to our
losing our land through being
dispossessed for not paying taxes,”
he say He wants Indian M.Ps
with six chiefs in the pow-wows
of the white men.

—-London Express Service.



THE

A FORMER colleague of mine
on a provincial newspaper
obtained a better post several
years ago, married a pretty,
dark-haired girl, and, alas, was
killed in an accident.

He had shown me a portrait
of his wife, but I never met her.

In the samc office was, among
many other girl clerks, one with
fair hair, who, as girl clerks will
do, married several years ago
and left the office.

Both women (I say with
apologies to them) had passed
completely out of my mind.

I have been living in retirement
in the country for ten years.

Wed Another

On the morning of Monday,
May 1, I woke from a dream
which, though it seemed idle
enough, left me with a strange
sense of something very impor-
tant having happened.

The dream was that I was
engaged to be married to this
dark girl (whom I had never met
in real life).

But on the way to the church,
I, as so often in dreams, found
that I had left my wedding gar-
ments in the office and hurried
back to get them.

The dark girl declared that she
could not wait, but must there
and then marry some other man
—and so she did.

“Windowed Girl

Meanwhile, I got back to the
office, and, hot and bothered, was
searching for my clothes. To my
astonishment, I there found the
fair-haired girl, who had left us



Fair Lady And—

DREAM

To my startled inqu'ry, she
replied that her husband had
died, and that she had got back
her old job in this, my old office

“She’s All Right”

When I left the meeting and
got into the street, I met a former
colleague who told me the news
of the office.

Haunted by my dream, I asked
him if he knew what had hap-
pened to the dark lady, widow
of the colfeague who had been
killed.

“Oh, she’s all right,” he answered
brightly. “I have just come from
her wedding this morning!”

—L.E.S.

Scout Notes

S. W. District Hold

Competition
On Wednesday 24th May, Empire
Day, the South Western District
will hold a Scouting Competition
at the Combermere and Harrison
College grounds and Scouters of
the District met on Friday last to

discuss the programme
Ten Troops have entered, and
each will be represented by a
Patrol of eight scouts at each of
8 stations which will be taken in



cyclic order, covering the work

of the Tenderfoot and Second
Class Badge Tests.

Empire Youth Sunday

The Empire Youth Sunday
service will be held at Govern-
ment House Ground on Sunday





SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SITTING ON

iy Nathaniel Gubbins

MERICAN visitors are still
compiaining about English
reserve, though one girl admits
that, after a couple of drinks,
Englishmen are no more reserved
than anybody else.

That is to say, about as viva-
cious as a couple of English
explorers having a drink at a
London club after many years’
absence.

One has been to the North Pole;
the other to Central Africa.

“Been far?”

“Pole.”

“North or South?”
“North.”

“Shoot any bears ”
“Couple.”

“Cold there?”

“Bit Parky.” -
“Tee?”

“Bags of ice.”
“Snow ?”

“Bags of snow.”
“Oh.”

“You been far?”
“Central Africa.”
“Shoot any lions?”

“Couple.”

“Hot there?”

“Bit stuffy.”

“Natives ?”

“Bags of Natives.”

“Women?”

“Bags of———look here, I say.”
“Sorry, old man. Bad show.”
“Not a bit, old man.”
“Interestin evenin ?”

“Rather, Good-night, old man.”
“Good-night, old man.”

La Belle Dame
Sans Output

“In the Soviet Union there is no
mystical or obscure treatment of
love, such as decadent cosmopoli-
tan poets use. We sing of how a
young man falls in love with a
girl because of her big industrial
output... ."—Soviet poet Stephan
Petroviv.

(After John Keats.)






POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERIT LANCASTER

‘Would one be wrong in

thinking that frudt spent her SE § 2
Sunday aitermoon of i OSEY PARKERISM and the

advocating peace ?”

O what can ail thee, factory hand,
Alone and palely loitering?
The never-ending belt is still
And no wheels sing.

O what can ail thee, factory hand,
So haggard and so woebegone?
The quota’s met, the shelves are
full,
And the foreman’s gone,

I met a lady in the shop,
Not beautiful—a peasant’s child.
lfer hair was cropped, her cheeks
were smudged,
And her eyes were wild.

I made a garland for her head
Of nuts and bolts and shavings,
too,
And presently her small, voice
said:



THE FENCE!

And sideways she would lean and
sing
A factory song.



She found me roots of relish

sweet,
And sandwiches her mother

made,
And through her trembling lips

said “I

Can't make the grade.”

She took me to her elfin grot,
And told me as she wept ful:
sore,
“Six boilers some girls made last
year,
But I made four.”

And there she whispered me
asleep,
And there I dreamed— Woebetide,
A girl who can’t make boilers six
Can't be a bride.

And there I saw pale commissars
Who cried “No use to make a
fuss,”
Who cried “La Belle Dame Sans
Output
Must come with us.”

And this is why I sojourn here,
Alone and palely loitering;
ice | never-ending belts are
stil
And no wheels sing.

Cold War

“On April 25, when several
degrees of frost were regis-
tered in Britain, the tempera-
ture in Moscow was over 70
degrees.”—From the news.

OR the information of Sir

Waldron Smithers this is only

the first indication of a gigantic
Russian plot to transfer their
weather over here,

When they talk about a cold
war they mean a cold war.

Russian scientists have not only
discovered how to by-pass the
east wind round Moscow and
Leningrad so that it hits us with
greater velocity; they have also
harnessed millions of whales to
drag icebergs towards the British
Isles, leaving their northern ports
ice free,

lf Sir Waldron doesn’t believe
me, what about the 100 refugee
Whales who committed suicide on
a Scottish coast rather than live
a life of slavery?

And what about the polar bear,

suffering from sunstroke, who]}

piloted his own aircraft through
the Iron Curtain and crash landed
at London Airport?

It's no use semi-official circles
saying he’s in love with Brumas’s
mother. Will M.I.5 deny that he
has given valuable information?

If they don’t want to look silly,
they'd better not.

World Snoopery

eager search for useless in-

formation have become world {
}

diseases of the mind.

in Czechoslovakia people who
eollect the wrong stamps are
denounced by snoopers to the
secret police ... Indian students
are taking a census of maneless
lions ... after years of research
snoopers in Japan have reported

that 27 per cent. of Japanese ])

husbands still yell “Oi, Oi” to call
their wives .. . chaps in England

with nothing else to do have dis-})

covered that we strike 270,000,000
matches every day. .

The ‘Tavistock Institute of })

Human Relations has found out

that most men say “Good morn- {

ing” to most people living in the
same street; that the curtains in
the front rooms of the under-
privileged are left half drawn with
the patterns facing outwards .. .
thank heaven a census official in



ou

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been known to remind Cana- riage to her, when my good angel at 3.30 p.m, and will march from Gay long, Priiee er tearen Sebi ety erat Age Saeelneee :
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grants here but me.”

He pleads that Indians are
starving not so much for food as
for a spirit of understanding, and
are not “the cruel, fierce savages”

That same morning, four hours
later, I drove 40 miles to my old
office, to attend a meeting of
directors.

The first person I met, as I was

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: ; ke 4
of the history books. opening the outer door, was the to attend their Athletic Sports HICH SIDE x
“Whatever may have been our fair-haired woman to whom in Which will be held at pereson 3
practices, they can’t compare with my dream I had been about to College Grounds on Empire I ay, %
the practices of civilised nations,” propose marriage. ‘ 24th May, beginning at J o'clock. :
he says. s
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PAGE SIX





SUNDAY ADVOCATE

THE REPERTORY THEATRE

IN BRITAIN

Hy J. Clifford King


























A REPERTORY theatre is one ance of ch experiments for lor
in which there is a nanet i tiences iking le
company of professional act L iccesst L unite
putting on a season of plays which desire ywrights
are changed at three-weekly, even local one : write the
fortnightly or even weekly inter- work for the Londor age tr
vals. In Britain such theatres hich the Di return wo
are very largely provincial insti- naturally
tutfons. In 1911 t iverpool Repertor

The earliest repertory theatre Theatre, the Pi 10Use, v open
in Britain was esta hed at ed and—the ori Manchest
Manchester in the early years of venture having failed is tod
this century under the direction of the oldest repertory theatre in the
Miss Horniman who interested country, entirely self-supporting,
herself from the first in develop- a part of the city’s cultural lit
ing a régional theatre by foster- and, with the Birmingham
ing the work of local playwright Repertory Theatre the second
Since those early days other oldest the f nursery f
repertory theatres, in various actors we h ive_in Britain. Ti
parts of the country, have pursu years immediaiely before the wat
the samé aim with varying results, saw the establishment of fiourish-
the most recent and highly the: s of this kind in many
cessful example of this bein ef cur e towns and their pro
emergence. of a school of play- « uctions, particularly “the experi-
wrights “fround two Glasgow mental work at the Cambridge
theatres Two considerations, Arts Theatre, often aroused ex-
however, have tended in the past cited interest far outside local
to mitigaté against the continu- circle

FREQUENT CHANGES of plays entails much work besides

rehearsing. Here the Midland Theatre Company
scenery for a new production.

is painting



-
“

ee

Norman and Florence Daysh

Towards the end of the war, and
since, what has been called an up-
roarious -interest in the theaire
was manifested by all sections ot
the population and led to an im-
mense and extraordinarily sudden
growth of the repertory movement
ir the provinces. TBjs storm of
popularity has now perhaps blown
itself out; but, although the in-
evitable disasters were to be found
in its wake; These were surprising-
ly few in number, The gains re-
sulting from the re-awakening of
interest in the theatre were con-
siderable.

In much of the
velopment the Arts
had a part to play. The Bristol
Theatre Royal, built in 1766, a
perfect specimen of English
Georgian theatre architecture, was
bought for the citizens of Bristol
and its ownership vested in a
Board of Trustees which leased
the building to the Arts Council
Restoration of the fabric was
completed and subsequently, after
the theatre had been used for a
time by touring companies, an Olc
Vie Company took over in 1946,
presenting plays with the financial
assistance of the Council. After
two years, however, this assistance
was no longer required. Today
the Bristol Old Vic pays its way
as Bristol’s other repertory theatre,
The Little, has been doing for
many years.

post-war de
Council has

Perhaps more significant than
the temporary financial aid it gives
to new ventures, has been the Arts
Council’s direct management of
such companies as the Salisbury
Arts Theatre which also. tours tha
neighbouring district continually,
playing one to three nights in
small, theatreless towns which, but
for the Council's enterprise, would
never have seen a live show,



IN BRITAIN, Repertory Theatres are lagrely
Midland Theatre Company during rehearsal.



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provincial institutions,

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The scene here shows the





in “Rebecca”
Life for the West of England

Theatre Company has been even
more strenuous. Based in Es
it has played “one night stands”
in a large number of the small
West Country towns and villages.
Perforce, the company’s produc-
lions, although excellent in their
way, are of the “fit-up” variety;
but, in their repertory, they have
been able to include plays by
Shakespeare as well as other clas-
sics. This was an admirably cour-
ageous venture, started by mem-
bers of the company with their
own savings but now, happily, re-
ceiving the Arts Council’s financial
help.



The extension ot public support
in the form of grants and guaran-
lees against loss has been an im-
portant feature of this post-war
development of the provincial
theatre. The Local Government
Act, 1948, empowers local authort-
ties to levy up to a sixpenny rate
for the provision of live entertain-
ment and there are signs that local
authorities are increasingly under-
taking responsibility for, amongst
other things, the setting up of
Civic repertory theatres. Maccles-
field, a small town in Cheshire, to
take a single pioneering example
of what is being done in this direc-
tion, has recently opened such a
Civic Theatre in conjunction with
the Adelphi Theatre Guild, a com-
pany which can already claim to
nave mounted a very creditable
list of productions. Similar under-
takings have been started in Don-
caster, Manchester, Nottingham
and elsewhere,

A consistent attempt is made by
many of the non-commercial, re-
pertory companies to build up and
keep in touch with their audiences.
Audience Clubs are started ‘at
which lectures are given which
encourage people to take an intel-
ligent interest in the plays they
see, there are play readings and
club rooms, often attached to the
theatres, usefully fulfilling a social
neea,

Even with the purely commer-
cial twice nightly repertory com-
ponies which, since the war, have
established themselves in the
smaller industrial towns and in

‘aside resorts, and which are
criticised from practically every
point of view, sampling their per-
formances does suggest that they
ere doing much better work than
is generally realised. Two things
are significant about these com-
panies: the enormous increase in
their numbers and the immeas
urably better choice of plays
‘which reflects the improvement in
public taste





The repertory theatres are Uh-
questionably Britain's largest em-
ployers of actors and actresses,
From Drama Schools every year
the new, young players emerge to
take their chances in the most
hazardous of the professions. Most
hope to see their names in lights

utside a West End theatre; but
fow succeed until their work on
the stage has been seen by a West
End manager

The twice cy »nce nightly re-
pertory companies are able to ab-
sorb some of the surplus labour;
but, from the actors’ point of view,

little more can be said for them }

than that. The better repertory
theatres, however, do serve as
really valuable training ground. A

,young actor in such a theatre will

be tested in a vast variety of parts,
large and small; he will have t¢



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Agents for Barbados GENERAL AGENCY CO., (Barbados) Ltd.

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act rts he could never have «é _
imagined himself playing. In this $28 For Kiss

in time, he should be able to

way â„¢
discover his natural bent, learn beet’ Snaaeaes . LONDON.
about his limitations and, with the t co udley Cecil Nott of

often selfless help of the theatre’s Wallington, Surrey exactly $28 to

i 0 m acti “kiss and embrace” his girl friend |
director, develop his own acting aan i |
personality. A repertory theatre On his return from abroad. é
like the Bristol Old Vic has its The trouble was Nott did hi

smooching while driving a car.

acting school and most of the
own acting school a The sieneie dase: deltees

larger. theatres take pupils, many
of tvhom will already have had
dramatic training.

. When an actor has graduated to

explained “it was a cold night
and one thing led to another.”

ene of these larger theatres, a -~I,N.S.
future in the West End, if he de-

sires it, is practically assured. It 36 Vs I

is no exaggeration to say that of

the highest paid West End actors WOLVERHAMPTON.

at present appearing, by far the Long odds caused a 14-year-old
largest proportion has come from Wolverhampton boy to skip|
tre provincial repertory theatres— cchool. |
mcst, indeed, from Liverpool or He told Wolverhampton Juvenile

Pirmingham.
tending school because the othe:
boys in the class stopped him
from playing games and “were
always on to me.”

WORLD’S ONE HOPE
LAKE SUCCESS, May 12.

Mrs. Roosevelt expressed hope The chairman, Dr. Margaret
that Mr. Trygve Lie’s visit to Mackay, asked him if he could
Moscow might bring about at least box.

some new suggestions for bridging
the East-West gap.—Reuter.

“Not 36 of them,” was the boy’s
reply.—LN.S.

Lo.
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did not deny the allegations but |

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SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950
ee























Nistributore: L. M. B. Meyere & Ce,, Ltd,, P.O, Bex 171, Bridgetows























PAGE SIXTEEN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950
































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Democracy
Stressed

AT LIBERTY CONGRESS

HAVANA, May 1%.

The Inter-American Confer-
ence tor Democracy and Freedom
opened here last night at the
National Capitol wiin Senator

Miguel Suarez, Fernandez, Presi-
dent of the Cuban Congress, wel-
coming approximately 200 dele-
gates from American Republics
and Puerto Rico.

The conterence is seeking first:
To find means to strengthen
democracy in the Americas. Sec-
ond; To obtain co-operation of the
continent for world peace. And
Third: To establish a permanent
organisation to galvanise de-
mocratic peoples to a degree
wherein they are ready to defend
democracy, even at the cost of life,
against all dangers.

Frances Grant, Chairman of
the Latin-American section of the
International League for the
Rights of Man, said “the Declara-
tion of Human Rights should be-
come not a document in the ar-
chives of nations, but a reality,
and a staff of life for every man
and woman in this hemisphere.

“Millions of fellow Americans
are unable to speak in their own
defence because civil and politi-
cal liberties are suppressed in an
alarming number of American
countries.

It is to heartén these inarticu-
late Americans that we meet here
to form a hemispheric front for
democracy and liberty.”

The session was closed 1.30 a.m,
by Lazo Havan, University Pro-
fessor who said that the ideals of
the conference were already
rooted in millions of hearts there-
fore he was confident that the
meeting would progress in the
defence of democracy, —Reuter

US Has Baby
Atom Bomb

WASHINGTON, May 13.

The United States has preduced
“baby” atomic bombs — small
enough to be carried by jet planes,
officials said to-night.

The officials said that the small
size of the bombs did not mean
that they were less powerful ‘than
full-sized bombs,

The officials gave no indication
how powerful that “baby A-
bomb" could be, but the report
prompted speculation that it might
be more powerful than the early
model atomic bombs dropped on
Japan or tested at Bikini.

It was reported that the secret
of the new bombs lay in a non-
explosive casing or envelope—
called a “tamper” which enabled
a reduction in the “critical size”
of the bomb.

The critical size of an atomic
bomb is defined as the amount of
fissionable material, such as Uran.
ium 235 or Plutonium, which must
be assembled in order to. produce
an explosion,

—Reuter.

. They'll Do It Every Time




WILBUR, OL’ BOY
YOU'RE TOPs!
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COMES IN AND THE DOPE RIGHT HE PICKS “EM P
PAYS THIRTY TO OUT OF THE OATBIN BY CALCULUS
4 ONE! I WIN TODAY, KID+** YOU

.Â¥ 300 BUCKS!

= Wow!)



_J_-). MUST HAVE MADE
A BUNDLE, YOUR-

Plentiful
Yesterday

FRUIT sellers yesterday made a
good trade in the city area. Water
coconuts were very plentiful, es-
pecially in the Probyn Street area,
and quick sales were being made
because of the great heat.

Oranges, limes, and mangoes
could be seen in every stall, and
there was the constant call of these
sellers to the numerous buyers.
The supply of mangoes which are
imported are becoming ve ry
abundant, and are being sold at a
low price.

In and around Busbey’s Alley,
fruit such as pineapples, bananas,
papaws, sweet sops, and mammy-
apples, were being quickly pur-
chased. Several children were
seen purchasing cashews and
sapodillas, which come from the
country districts.

Vegetables, especially carrots
and cabbages were plentiful and
housewives were seen gathering a
supply of these. Tomatoes are
quickly getting out of season while
plantains are a bit scarce.



Frantic Search
For Lord Mildway

Britain's Jockey Peer

PLYMOUTH. May 12.
Police aided by boats were to-
night ‘searching for Britain's
premier jockey over hurdles, Lord
Mildmay, who disappeared today
after taking his daily swim at the
mouth of the Yealm River near

here,
“Milord”, as he was known to
thousands of British turf fans,

went out early this morning from
his country home at Holbeton for
nis usual bath from -a- private
beach at the river mouth.

Four hours later his clothes were
found on the beach and a wide-
spread search was immediately
started for the 41-year-old peer.

It is known that at certain stages
of the tide, the beach from which
he bathed is dangerous,

Directly they heard he had dis-
appeared, the police called in help
and a fast motor fishing-vessel
was ordered out to sweep the
waters at the river mouth.

A Sea Otter ‘plane and RAF
launches were also called on, and
the Plymouth lifeboat went out
while motor-boats from nearby
seaside towns also began to scour
the sea approaches. —Reuter,



. Polish Diplomats
Flee Finland

; HELSINKI, May 13.

Two diplomatics in the Polish
Legation here have flown to
Sweden with their families after
refusing to return to Warsaw.

They are Dr, J. Zeprowski, Cul-
tural Attache, and Mr. F. Mysz-
kowski, Vice-Consul.

Both are believed to be on their
way to Argentina. —Reuter.

Registered U6 Pema Ofies











“jf, FROM THE CHIEF-MOURNER
LOOK ON WILBUR,I DEDUCE

THAT HE DIDN'T PLAY HIS
OWN SELECTION» ++















rll HANDICAPPER SELDOM
:| POSITIONS -~s-



BUENOS AIRES, May 13.
British conductor Sir Malcolm
Sargeant, told a Press Conference
in Buenos Aires this morning that
he is collecting Uruguayan, Bra~
zilian and Chilean music during |
his present tour of those four
countries in the hope to be able
to give a concert of South Ameri-
can music when he returns wo
Britain.—Reuter.



—_—

Action Against 7
U.S. Oil Companies

WASHINGTON, May 13.

The United States Justice De-
partment to-day announced — a
major anti-trust court action
against seven large oil companies.

The Standard Company and the
Shell Company were named
among the defendants.

Attorney-General Howard



Me















on

SATURDAY, MAY 27th,
9 p.m.





Music by
ARNOLD MEANWELL’S
ORCHESTRA

Particulars of Floor Show
later.

Admission to Ballroom 2/-

PROCEEDS FOR CHARITY
14.5.50.—1n,



——

AT THE DRILL

In Aid of the Barbados

Rifle Association’s
BISLEY FUND

On TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1950 §)' |
at 9 p.m.

)
)
HALL



4
Grath said he had filed a civil he ‘Police Band conducte4
action in the Los Angeles Federal e ae Cant. Balaon. wisi pro-
District Court, charging the com- vide the Music
panies with anti-Trust Law viola- cer aeey
tions “in the production, transport- There will be a well stocked )
ation, refining and marketing of BAR & REFRESHMENTS }\\|\
crude oil and refined petroleum on sale, _ }
products in the Pacific States Loy ae
Area”. —Reuter.)}) ADMISSION:
; (By Ticket only) 3/-
Dress Formal
ee
AIDS LLLP

As British Spy

BERLIN, May 13.
East German police have ar-
rested Kurt Mueller, Deputy
Chief of West German Commun-
ist party, East German Minisury
for State Security announced to-
day.

he was an agent of a foreign
power and guilty of other criminal
offences,” the announcement said.
No details were given of where
Mueller was arrested. The West
German Communist party yester-
day announced the expulsion of

Mueller Arrested |
“Mueller was arrested :
|

Mueller from the party for al-
leged spying for a foreign power,
later named by Communist Par-
liamentary leader Heinz Reiner
as Britain.

Reports yesterday said that
Mueller thhad disajspeqred from

his home in Hanover.—Reuter



The Weather
TODAY

Sun Rises: 5.39 a.m.
Sun Sets; 6.13 p.m.
Moon (New) May 16
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

i

High Water: 1.47 a.n., 2.26
p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil.
Total for month to Yoster-

day: .92 ins.
Temperature (Min.) 7.35° F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E
(11 a.m.) E,
Wind Velocity 8 miles per
hour.
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.938

(11 a.m.) 29.925.
Gittens 11.45





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ilbustrate alks )
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~ ate bags en Pee of the HONS 99909999 FOOORS, pono Paani Teredo Anti-crease Resist-
n exact r
female body, it shows every organ, x SAVANNAH CLUB ot ing Hair Cords in leading
blood vessel, bone and nerve ana] 4% 4 a A §
s ce j 1st —_—- HERE IS A NEW PRODUCT FOR EXTERNAL AND
oe een pongo pd : INTERNAL SURFACES. ‘ | shades of Jade Green, Sal- .
mga i canee wml OOCKTALL DANCE | agen ge
An official of the council, who] mon, Beige, Navy, Rose,
een te ae ied. ee % Cc E M E N T ] Copen, Red, Wine, Srown,
vensored.” declared: : . sf the
“If anyone comes along om . in honour of th White. 36 ins.
dirty mind it is not our fault. TRANQUILLITY TENNIS
. is nothing dirty about the iu ager aN eee 1.00
Sama ‘body. % TEAM LIQUID STONE PAINT Per yd $
see earch work by German] | )RROCKES PRINTS in small designs suitable
Scientists. % on This Paint may be applied to new or old ager Asbestos fc Ch.'cren’s Dresses and Sun Suits, 36 ins. $ .99
; : > 8 ly two such fig-] ¢ ’ Cement, Plaster, Stone, Fibre and Wood; in fact, it goes on and : ; ap
sia ax eolavinee’ ona Dr Robert] § WEDNESDAY 17th May stays on almost any surface. It will not chip, flake or peel and {K, In large designs (2 only) suitable for Ladies’ House
Sutherland, medical adviser and & 7I—10 p.m. provides a washable, extremely durable and weather-resisting Coats; 96 ING. sc oo carck Le AS $1.90
- tary u the council went} ¢ finish which, when dry, is also fireproof
| Specially to Cologne to negotiate x for x |
its loan. % > Supplied in Stonewhite, Caen Stone and Mid Blue Green,
“The figure is made of trans-| \ Members and their » R at $4.88 per gin : roe
arent plastic material and was) % friends x CAVE HEPHERD & C0 1D
built i geic an anonymous Ger-} > Special Thinners . at $1.80 per gin. | *9 xt
man woman acting as model. With} °34449%96G6696S664409008% |}
turers will be able te 2 4 7
Gemnoratrate to visitors to the Fair| = , 10, 11, 12 & 1? BROAD STREET
exactly how infected foods are Phone 4456
harmful tothe system. one nov) GRAND WHITSUNTIDE
sorrect foods benefit the ee : , 0 LTD
FOR the first time in their history, the roads in the Ivy Village, eer FLOOR SHOW & DANCE W ILKINSON & HAYNES ( es {L * |
just off Government Hill, are getting their names put up. Here é SS FS ——EEeE—E, is one of the first signs. ade es sree er ag = fo cae
Conductor io eek aes es aN
1 ° . : AQUATIC CLUB i he rans eel aoe
ee
American Fruit S. American Music ee ae

Finest Quality British

WOOLLENS :—

DOESKINS :—
WORSTEDS :—
TWEEDS :—
SERGES :—
LINENS: -
DRILLS :—

INTO TAILORED

Seen At

Cc. B. RICE & Co.
OF
BCLTON LAINE



Who

The search

PRIZES:
FIRST PRIZE—The Cow and Gate Silver Challenge Bowl to keep for one (1) year,
a Silver Cup, and $25.00 in cash, presented by Cow & Gate, L
SECOND PRIZE—S10.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate, Ltd.

THIRD PRIZE—S5.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate and (9)
Souvenir Gifts



RULES:
All babies must be under 2 years of age on October Sist, 1950,

A posteard size photograph of baby must be sent in together with 24 lids from
tins of Cow & Gate Milk Food.

Parents agree to abide by the selections of the Special Joimmittee and the
final judges,

2

The twelve (12) leading babies will be selected by a Board of Judges for final jude-
ing. The names of the selected twelve will appear in the “Sunday Advocate” of

Ne reraer Sth and the final judging will take place on Saturday, 18th November,
ono,



ENTRY FORM

SSLIE & CO., LTD., Representative COW & GATE LTD.,

P.O, Box 216, Collins’ Building, Bridgetown.

J
I hereby enter my baby for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest, 1950, and enclose
postcard size picture.
I certify that 4 yak is a Cow & Gate Baby, and I
nelose lids taken from lcs bielatal aa Waele aar0 8 RALGT Wy Gags neem ee 6 tins of
COW & GATE Milk Pood. I agree to abide by the decision of the Special Commit-
tee and Judges

Baby's Name

Born on

Weight

at Birth Present Weight. .

Parents

Address

Signature of Parent of Guardian

Date



is Barbados’

Bonniest Baby

of 19.350?

for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby of 1950 is

on, and mothers are invited to enter their babies for
Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest of 1950. Barbados’
Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babies and
this competition is open to all babies fed on Cow &
Gate Milk Food, the Food of Royal Babies and tne
Best Milk for Babies when, Natural Feeding fails.



THE COW & GATE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL

If you are not yet using Cow & Gate for your Baby, don’t
delay. Get a tin from your nearest dealer and put baby on
COW & GATE Milk Food, the Best Milk for babies when
Natural FeeGing Fails. Cow & Gate Milk Prod is free from
all disease germs, including tubercle, dipthefia and typhotd.
Cow & Gate Food is safe because Cow & Gate roller process
ensures that all disease germs are utterly destroyed whilst
the essential vitamins and valuable mineral salts which baby
needs to grow straight bones and develop strong teeth remain
intact,

THEY WILL BE WHAT YOU WANT THEM TO BE ON

Cow & GATE

THE BEST MILK FOR BABIES WHEN

MILK
FOOD

NATURAL FEEDING FAILS







PAGE TWO











CARIBBEAN
WORKERS’
UNION



_ “MAGNIFICENT
COLD DANISH
BUFFET SUPPER

SERVED
SUNDAY NIGHT

11 o'clock

day Night, May 15th
t 7.30 p.m.



arpenters—Tuesday
May
7 7,30 p.m.

Ze



16th, .at









>

3. Seamen—Wednesday
May
7.30 p.m.

Night,

17th at



E. KINSELL FRANCE,

From 7 to General Secretary.



















ROYAL Worthings

LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY 5 & 8.30

(By Special Request)

M-G-M presents —

THE BARRETTS OF WIMPOLE
STEEET”

Starring :
ma Shearer, Frederick March,
Charles Laughton, Maureen
O'Sullivan

The Picture that created a
Sensation

oo
MON. & TUES. 5 & 8.30
ROMANCE OF ROSY RIDGE

with Van JOHNSON,
Thomas pessredodstonmas

EMPIRE

To-day 445 & 8.30 and continuing



20th Century-Fox presents



ween = - =



“FATHER WAS A FULLBACK”

Starring :
Fred MacMurray, Maureen O'Hara,

|

the war,

six months

MEETINGS b nim Greeanill, 0
Port {Wérkeh—titon. Bheeab” and a happy holidag*in

SUNDAY ADVOCATE.

EAWELL yesterday at about
8 am., was. crowded with
several pupils from Madame Bro-
mova's Dancing School, pareats
; Of the pupils, Molly Raccliife, he
new dancing instructress and. her

husband, and several members of
the Development and ~ Welfare
Organisation. *-

They were gathered together

to wish Madame
ausband Mr.
D. and W's



sromova and }
Mark Greenhill
Secretariat

er
of
Bon

England.

The Greenhills first arrives
Barbados just before the end of
and Madame Eromova
started her dancing school about
after that. Two years
jater they went to England on
eight months leave and t!
returned to Barbados.

This time they are going to
England for six. months and it is
not yet known if they wil! be re-
turning. Meanwhile the school is
of Molly

hen again

in the capable hands
Radcliffe.

There were. tears in Madame’s
eyes as she kissed each girl good-
bye. Goodbyes over, they started
for the plane, and as they passed
the group of girls, parents’ and
friends, Capt. Raison called, for
three cheers for Madame Bromova
and Mr. Greenhill, which were
heartily given.

The Greenhills left for Antigua
and will be going to Miami via
Puerto Rico and then by train to
Washington. There, Mr. Greenhill
will attend the meeting of the
Working Committee of the Carib-
bean Commission, and they leave
shortly after that for England by
the “Parthia.”

England,

mova’s husband.

Summer In England
ON. P. F. CAMPBELL, who
first arrived in Barbados on
18th June, 1948, left here yester-
day by T.C.A., accompanied by
his wife. ‘
Mr. Campbell, who has been
Acting Colonial Secretary since
Mr. Perowne’s departure is on his
way to Tanganyika where he will
take up his new appointment as

Left By T.C.A.

R. CHARLES PEIRCE and his

mother Mrs, Ida Peirce lett
by T.C.A. yesterday morning. Mr.
Peirce is on his way to England.
Mrs. Peirce will be staying in
Canada,

Landy’s Brother

TONI HOME PERM

Complete Sets and Refills.
Give yourself that natural look with

Rudy Vallee, Betty Lynn

R. LANDY De MONTBRUN
was at Seawell yesterday
morning to meet his brother Jose,
who was an intransit passenger
by T.C.A. for Trinidad, returning








TO-DAY to Tuesday 4.45 & 8.15



aoa by 25 million American M-G-M present : ey trip to Holland and
omen, rans 5 : ngland,
“INTRUDER IN THE DUST” While in England, Jose told

Select yours now from - - -

THE COSMOPOLITAN

Carib he saw the*Worcester mate.
Mr. J. de Montbrun is a keen turf-
ite of Trinidad.

Landy also left for Trinidad,

. Starring :
David Brian, Claude Jarman, 3r.,
Juano Hernandez, Porter Hall.

“ey <



Assistant Chief Secretary of that

Colony. j
Before going to Tanganyika
however, they plan to spend the

Summer in England.

Bought “‘Canefield House”’
R. CHAS. MERRILL of Souta-
ampton, Long Island U.S.A.,
head of the oldest Stock Broking
firm in New York City, has pur-
chased “Canefield House,” St.
Thomas and also its furniture,











Day Phones 2041—444 Night 81—41 Yesterday afternoon after a Mr, Merrill spent a few weeks
Fa OLYMPIC successful week of hectic jin Barbados early this year as the
We ep at 2p ayoneneaeses| LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY entertainment making everyone in guest of Mr. and Mrs. Coe at
4.30 & B46 Barbados laugh. “Old Trees” St. James.
Colombia Double—



“GUNFIGHTERS”

In case

you need
HARNESS

We can supply

with
Randolph Seott, Barbara Britton
and

“WALK A CROOKED MILE”

——$$——<—<—_——

MON. & TUES. 6.45 & 8.15
ist Inst, Columbia Serial

THE TRON CLAW

with Charles QUIGLEY,
Forest TUCKER







HARNESS LEATHER
BELLY LEATHER

BRIDLE LEATHER
BASIL .
ROLLER BUCKLES

and BIRKMYRE CANVAS 3 feet wide

BIRKMYRE HOOD CLOTH
6 feet wide

The Greatest
CALYPSO SHOW
ever heard
in Barbados

at:

CLUB
MORGAN

\\ i WEDNESDAY NIGHT
MAY 17TH
\







PLANTATIONS LTD.

CS















ee



ICE CREAM

TO YOUR HEART'S
DELIGHT



ANY QUANTITY

HOME MADE QUALITY

WE OFFER THE

ICE CREAM FREEZERS

4 pt. 8 pt. 16 pt.
IGE PICKS

FLASKS 1 pt. FLASKS 4 pt.

mouth

THE CORNER STORE

with wide





GLOBE
TONITE $.30 and Continuing Daily § and 8.30 pm
JAMES BARBARA VA VAN
MASON = STANWYCK GARDNER HEFLIN

EAST SIDE. WEST SIDE

+






AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT at 8.30 and continuing
“MY FRIEND IRMA”

Starring JOHN LUND — DINAN LYNN. — DON DeFORDE
with MARIE WILSON as Irma and introducing DEAN MARTIN
and JERRY LEWIS

A Paramount Picture

=|

itt |

1

Vee







PL AZA | Last 2Shows ToDay 5 & 830p.m.

PARAMOUNT'S CINECOLOR WESTERN ROMANCE!

“EL PASO’ John Payne—Gail Russel—others

MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 & 8.30 P.M.
PARAMOUNT’S GREATEST DOUBLE-BILL

{ THE PALE FACE Min Technicolor‘ Spéed to Spare’

Bob HOPE -~—- Jane RUSSELL — Richard ARLEN







GAIETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

un 14 — Mon. 15 — 8.30 p.m.
‘WARNER BROS” classic — —

“THE SEA HAWK”

Starring Errol FLYNN — Brenda MARSHALL — others.
ROARING WITH ADVENTURE! SIZZLING WITH ACTION!

Coming: Warner's Double: “It all Came True” & “Hidden Hand.”



Remember to eee
“ae i

JULY Ist

(Saturday night)

n oe

&g:



Open for the Grand Polo Ball

and entertainment at the

MARINE HOTEL

cA ir
| Useful Household Items.

FIBRE MATS



Si MEMOMCIMONNA 6's OLE aie bine vauie eo be eed $1.87
BROOMS AND BRUSHES
PUTING ATOM ry. ieiatk vs s owhalelvele cade .20
FUNNELS
With Gauze Wire Strainers .......... .59
INSECTICIDE SPRAYERS
Strong, Efficient Type ................ 121
BONING KNIVES ,............5....00005 76
| GALVANISED BUCKETS
watwous Meee Tome sh... ecko wes 89



Dial 2039

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON

FACTORY LTD.




SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950



Bs
5



MANY of the pupils of Madame Bromova’s Dancing School and their parents were at Seawell
yesterday to say goodb¥e to Madame Bromova who left for Antigua enroute to the U.S.A. and

Madame Bromova is seen here signing an autograph album, as several of her pupils look an.
Also in the picture are Mrs. Vernon Knight, Capt. Raison and Mr. Mark Greenhill, Madame Bro-



HON, and MRS. P. F. CAMPBELL who left Barbados yesterday
by T.C.A. are pictured on their way out to the aircraft.

Encourage Care
HE annual Cow & Gate Baby
Contest has once again been
announced. No doubt mothers are
busy collecting their tin covers

and also building up their young @

ones for the event, Since this
contest was started two years ago
it has grown in popularity and
has done much to encourdge the
proper care of babies throughout
the i§land. We should imagine
that this year’s will draw a more
ere ec itry still.

New Manager
HE new manager of the Wind-
sor Hotel arrived
morning by T.C.A. from Montreal,
He is Mr. Rene Martin. He was
accompanied by his wile
children, Billy and Bonnie.

Mr. Martin has been to the
Caribbean before, having lived in
Bermuda and Nassau.

Mrs.’ Elizabeth Archer, the
present Manageress, will be leav-
ing shortly for the United States.

'

yesterday |

and two ;

Touring The Islands

R. R, OSBOURNE, a British

Guianese ‘resident in the
U.S.A. as a real eState operator,
arrived in Barbados about a
month ago for a holiday. He was
accompanied by his American
born wife from Brooklyn and they
are staying at “Leaton-on-Sea”’,
The Stream.

Mr. Osbourne who has been re-
siding in the U.S.A. for the pas¢
30 years, said that he had just =
his second yisit to his home
the first being about 23 years

His wife and he are meking 2
tour of the islands in the Carib-
bean and will be leaving shortly
for St. Kitts their next stop. They
expect to return to the US.A.
sometime in August.

To. Study. Monotyping
R. DUNCAN BURKE and
Mr. “Happy” Brown, two

employee of the Advocate Com-
pany , left yesterday eve-
ning by B.W.I.A. for Trinidad
where they will take a six months’
course in Monotyping at thé
"Port-of-Spain Gazette.”

A senior linotypist, Mr. Burke
first joined the staff in March 1929
and during his 21 years’ service
was connected with the linotyps
department, while Mr. Brown, a

attached. to the job

; compnaiiog
printing department, was a ‘mem-

ber of the staff for the last 10

Cleveland W:
R. CLAUDE TAL-
BOT, who writes for the
Cleveland News isin ~ Barbados
for a few days to write a few
articles about the “NCA a ar-
rived yesterday ,by ut ‘a
touring the islands fi ihe
bean which the TCA. anes
stop at, and his ‘Travel Stories’
are to encourage the people of
Cleveland to come to Barbados
and the other W.1., for their
holidays. He is staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

From North Borneo
HO should arrive yesterday
by T.C.A., for a few months
holiday in Barbados but Mr. and
Mrs. Edward Plunkett. Mr. Plun-
kett who is now Deputy Commis-
sioner of Police in Nerth Borneo
used to be a Supt. in the Police
Force here for many years. He
was also Commissioner of Police
in St. Lucia, which he left in
December 1947 for Borneo.

He knows Dr, Douglas Weather-
head, a Barbadian who is now
Director of Medical Services in
Borneo. Dr. Weatherhead, he said
begged him to say hello to all of
his friends here.

Their trip over to Barbados was
via Singapore, India, Egypt, Rome,
Lisbon and Bermuda. In Bermuda,
they met Mr. and Mrs. Max
Parker also of Barbados, and had
dinner with them on Friday night.

Mrs. Plunkett is the former
Miss Lucille Mourraille, a sister
of Mrs. C. B. Sisnett and Mrs.
Betty Press.

; years.



MR. and MRS. EDWARD PLUNKETT





BY THE WAY By Beachcomber

From sun and wind his face
was red,

His mother and his aunt were
dead.

His father was a sturdy wight

Who worked from morning until
night.

(Wordsworth. )
HY on earth should I be
the only writer to keep
silent amid the present Words-
worth uproar?

The above fragment, found
behind a stove-pipe in a cottage
near Kendal, is said by experts
to belong to the Allan Bank
period, just previous to the two
years at Bootle Rectory and the
reconciliation with Coleridge,
(See “Lines Composed While the
Author was Engaged Upon a
Tract Occasioned by a Celebrated

Event in Connection with Henry

Fellowes.”’)

Polish Up Your Listening
AM told that the B.B.C. has
devised an entertainment

which will teach people how to

listen, I hope there will be
enough employees to keep a sharp
eye on households suspected of
inattention or of any other form
of culpable laxity in listening.
Later on, perhaps, a special -corps.
of radio police could be formed,
to report anybody who listens in
the wrong way, or is slack about
regular listening, As for those
who never listen at all, they
should be medically examined and
then segregated. We cannot afford
anti-social irflusnces of this sort.

Wera at Snigglefield
‘ime formidable Elfrida

Thawcker next approached
a middle-aged draper, who sang
“Ship mates o’ Mine” at village
concerts, “Opera?” he said in an
amazed voice. “Goo’ lor! You
mean here? In’ the village.” “Why
not?” asked the Thwacker. “War-
gener?” asked the draper. “Not
at first,” said Elfrida. “Can’t sing
foreign songs,” said: the draper.
“We shall sing English words,”
replied Elfrida. Foreign choons?”

THE AMERICAN...

<“BESTFOR
Brassieres & Girdles

bis AT ple

EVANS ano -WHITFIELDS

BROAD STREET



“Naturally,” barked _ -Elfrida,
“Dressin’ up?” asked the coones.
“Of course.” The draper be;

see himself in a helmet, wi re
spear in his hand. “Who writes
the operas?” he inquired, “They
were all written long ago,” said
Mrs, Thwacker. “You must mans
heard of Puccini and ae

at the ground.

operas?” he asked. “We do. The
singers, of course.” “Singing and
acting at the same time? Same
people?” ctr oe “Goo’ lor!”
said the draper, “Pusheeny, What
next?”

Nothing To Do With Me

Beating time with his arms, he
held the bow betwéen.his toes and
played a violin laid against his
other leg.

(News Item.)
DON’T see what was to stop
him, as the fool said when
he saw an octopus playing the
bagpipes.



‘



SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950









CHAMPIONS CANTER HOME

ear

ee

Triple Tie In
Errol Flynn
Cup Race

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, May 9.
Three Rio Grande raftsme:
pulled to a triple tie in the second
renewal of the Errol Flynn Ghal-
longs Dp raft race down the
scenic tourist water playground in
Portland on Sunday, smashing the
1948. record of 93..minutes. with
splendid 85 minute run down. the
Rio Grande on a six miles journey
from Berrydale to Burlington.
The vaft race was specially spon -
sored by Movie Actor Errol Flynn
owner of Navy Island, an islet of
Port Antonio, on Jamaiea’s north-
coast, who with his fiancee, Prin-
cess Ghiea, are now holidaying: in
Jamaica, Prizes were distributec|
by the actor, while Princess Ghic:
was a passenger on’one of the win-
ning bamboo craft

Rafting on tne Rio Grande, one
of Jamaica’s largest rivers, which
runs through a beautiful valley
and gorge, has always been an at -
traction to tourists in Jamaica, and
became even more popular. when
the movie actor came to Jamaica
some years ago, bought Navy
Island and other property and or-
ganised races for a cup he.donated
and money prizes donated by the
Richfield Hotel,







CHAMPION SPRINTER Aber-
nant puts his heart into the job
as he carries champion Gordon
Kichards to his 4,000th victory at
Sandown.

Barbados Friendly
Football Association

THIS WEEK’S FIXTURES :



















esday 16th—St. Mary's OldsBoys vy
liffé at St. Leonard's, Referee; Mr.
‘ce, Maple vs, St. Maithews Old
B at Shell Referee Mr. E, Clarke
rose vs, National at the Bay, Referee
M Archer
\ esday T7th—Rangers vs, Westetr
e Shel Referee: Mr, O, Graham
L » vs. Advpcate ateSt. Leonards
£ - Ee fony) Hinds. Colts
v Club at the Bay. Ref
€ d Ver
~ Phursday MBth--Reeds United vs. st
Mary's Old Boys at St. Leonards, Ref-
eree: Mr, C. Jemmoit, St. Matthews -Old
Boys vs. Colts at Shell. Referee; Mr. E
Reece
Friday 19th--Penrode vs. Berwick at St
Leonard's 2 : Mr E. Clarke
Nat r at the Bay, Referee
Mr. B. ¢

Saturday



Maple \

Referee; Mr. J

Old Boys vs. St. Mary
Bay Referee Mr. B



Baseball Results

NEW YORK, May 13

Results of Major League Base-
ball games played yesterday were
American League:—Cleveland In-
dians 5,,Chicago White Sox. 1;
New York Wankees 3, Philadel-
phia Athletics 2; Washington Sen-
ators.1, Boston Red Sox 3.
National League:—St, Louis Car-

dinals 1, Cineinnatti Reds 3; Pitts -

burgh Pirates 3, Chicago Cubs 6

The Amateur Athletic Association
Of Barbados

Presents its Big Intercolonial Cycle
Meeting

WHIT-MONDAY. MAY
THURSDAY, JUNE

ON

and Athletic

Sports

29 &
1

AT KENSINGTON OVAL

Under the distinguished patr > of
HIS EXCELLENCY, THE GOVERNOR. MRA W_L, SAVAGE

Mrs. Weiss”
Meets Defeat

—AFTER ROUND OF
VICTORIES

LONDON, May 13.

Mrs. Maria Weiss of Argentine,

was beaten in the final of the wo-

men’s singles at the Hurlingham
Tennis Tournament
to-day, Mrs. Dorothy Head of the
United States, taking the honours

Open Lawn

by 3—6, 6—3, 7—5.

This was Mrs. Head's first Bu-
the
strength of her forceful game was
tested to the utmost by the firm
play of the Argentine player who
showed good control, and main-

driving

ropean Tournament = and

tained
length,

an immaculate

It was not until the second set
the powerful shots. of -the
American began to tell, and she

that

won that set comfortably
At one time in the third set, it

looked as though the American's

game had been beaten by. Mrs.
Weiss display, but eventually Mrs,
Head proved her sufriority with
a series of good winning strokes
—Reuter.

MAXIM K.O'S PETERSEN
MEMPHIS, Tennessee, May 13
Joey Maxim, the world

heavyweight champion,

out Bill Petersen of

Oregon, (heavyweight) in

sixth round of a ten-round

title bout here last night.

Maxim weighed 13 st., 5 Jbs.:



non-

Petersen 14 st., 13 lbs.—Reuterf#°Ur.

3ST0699950%".
WE ARE OFFERING.~.., »-

HILL'S BADMINTON



PISSVSS



SMOKING MIXTURE

AT REDUCED PRICE

light
knocker
Portland
the

“ SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Some Young Players

To Wateh This Summer
By Peter Ditteiw

The MCC, that austere body

has. in the past week, endeared itself to followers of the
game by its praiseworthy action in giving an opportunity

to youth,

Alfas Snatch
Grand Prix
Honours

FANGIO LOSES BY
IL LUCK

SILVERSTONE, May 1%
Sheer i luck robbed Juan Man-
uct Fangio, the erack Argentii«
driver of finishing first or at least
dag a high place in the Grand
Prix of Europe which was ru
ver about 210. miles, op the Si!
Stone circuit here ta-day
Right on the tail of the-ewetua
winner. Guseuppe Farina, wit
cnly, 24 miles to go. his Alfa
Romeo ear broke an oil pipe, and
he eaulied into the - pif with the
body covered.jn oil, and the engine
bclehing, smoke. be paises
Fang'@, who was in-the position
to jump to the fropt in the. ast
few Japs, gvas greatlysupse! at
having to netive,.and. the Took of
disappointment +on Ris face’ said
tuch more than words could hav»



one. =
Fangie..bad given the crowd
timated to “be _15,000 many

thrilg with Jb‘s skilful and daring
driving. On the corners, he often
left.the spectators amazed by the

y he.slid his ear round with
a ceo'ness that is rarely seen in
such big races,

Alfas Lead

The AMaeRomeo team by virtue
of the best: practice times, made
up the first row at the starting
line today, and .right from the
flag they swept into. the lead and
never dropped back then, barring
accidents.

The four Alfas raced alone ia
a group, fighting out the lead
between themselves, for Farina to
finish first, Luigi Fagioli second,
and Reg Parnell third.

Times were 2 hrs. 13 mins, 23
secs,

The three Alfa-Romeo_ cars
which finished were the only
machines to cover the complete
70 laps. anit

In fourth and fifth positions
came two French four and a half
litre Talbots which ran the course
without refuelling but completed
only 68 laps.

The Alfas had to refuel once,
but--they--did-this—at-sueh- speed
(Fangio completed his in 25
seconds) that the time lost did
not matter.

No Real Race



The biggést crowd ever to

attend a motor race in
saw a fine spectacle but no real
road race. The four Italhan cars—
the most modern designs entered
—literally led a procession from
the start to finish.

Before the race started, the
drivers were introduced to Their
Majesties. the. King and Queen
and Princess Margaret. It was the
first time that a reigning monarch
of England had attended a motor
race.

His Majesty on being introduced
to Fangio, asked “Do you speak
English?” and Fangio shook his
head with a smile. Signor Alessio
Meneral, manager of the Alfa
Romeos acted as interpreter.

“The King said he knew our
team had all made the fastest laps
and therefore we start in the first
four positions,” he said, after-
wards.

1 The fast lap in the race itself
;was made by Farina with 1 min,
50.6 sees. for the three miles, an
average speed of 94.02 miles per





THE

MICHELIN
Zk
TYRE

Britain?"



LONDON.
which governs English cricket,

This may be England's big
season in internalionas cocker.
Lhe YOngs prsyetS Wh Gagavod
during tne war ana were Carb

.raignt into the first team. when

County erickel was resumed ia
'94i have now ,ad the necessary
ume to mature, It remains to be
wnetner they justly tuem-

seives ama follow in ,... «
Or AGE fe cGby S25,
wooley, Leylsma, c.uicies, owes
and thelr like.

ic has, been particularly en-
(ouragiag to see, the lead com-

from the M,C.C. In their two
iatcnes against Yorkshire and
surrey. they gave a chance to
uch up.aad eoming young play-
is as Fred Titmus, of Miaclesex,
vob Clarke of Northamptonshire,
» werry. of Lancashire, and
Shackleton oj, Hampshire.

It is all, well and for in-
uividual ceynties to ver and
«coach young players, but the
young cricketer — unless he be
a ther Compton or Bra..man—
vanot get the necessary “big
match” atm ere from oc-
casional appearances in county
ercket. Not until he is hoyour-
ed by selection for « representa-
tive match—such as these MCC
s2mes—can his ability to rise to
















the occasion really be de-

term’ ned.

laeve have veen many cases 1n
We past, ana tnere wit propably

be as many in the future, where
young players have been grame
uw trial by a county. In the nets
chey have bowled unplayable balls
and produced strikes straight from
the text book. But out in the
field of play they have become a
bag of nerves and completely uo
able to justify themselves. For
such players little can be ,done
But correspondingly there are
others who can always produce
that Jittle extra when the occasion
demands, and it is for players of
this calibre that the MCC are now
searching,

Much has already been written
about. the taecties the England
Selectors sheuld adopt this, sum-
mer. when they come to. choose the
team. to play in the five-day Tests
against the West Indies. One
school of. thought argues that the
“ames should serye simply as trials
for the forthcoming MCC visit to
Australia. Others feel that the
West Indies should only be cp-
posed by the best eleven England
can find. in the field,

Sufficient to say that when

the time for the first, Test dawns
the Selectors will. probably find
that even their best eleven will
have all their work cut out to
prevent the West Indies record-
ing their first ever victory in
this enuntry.
Nevertheless the Englatd teem
does not pick itself automatically.
Players like Compton, Hutton,
Washbrook, Bedser, Bailey and
Evans ure more or less assured of
their places but that still leaves
five vacancies to be filled. It
would be no, slur on_ our West
Indian visitors if these places were
filed by young players, not. cx-
perimentally but on performan:e,
For the .sad truth of the matter
is that England, to date, has not
got eleven players of recognised
Test standard,

If, for instance, Bob Clarke o:
Northants should have a_ good
start to the season he should be
rewarded with an England cap.
Goodness knows, we have ware
long enough for a genuine fast
left arm powler, But it would be
folly to play Clarke simply on the
strength of what he might do
The same applies to any of the
other youngsters whom the MCC
have so opportunely encouraged

a







PAGE FIVE







MAY P — NO. 119 | OFFICIAL CLASSIFICATION
The Topic

MID-SUMMER MEETING 1950

of





ws A. 1 D. 1 F.2 (contd)
Last Week Beacon Bright Coronado Perseverance
3lue Strea) iren
, Blue Streak Firemi Pharos II
~. Don Arturo
~— Drake’s Drum D 2 Phoney Lad
Elizabethan Riptide
Gun Site Riv
snk 4 iver Midst
Pepper Wine Ratlle Star a fids
Seawell ' ae sent Sinbad
Storm’s Gift Lancy, Teas Sir Bernard
Sweeper
Soprano
°
A. %, F. 1. Stralght’ Alri
Sunbeam
Atomic II : .
Slainte Ali Baba Sunfire
The Gambler Kendal Po The Eagle
Oatcake i
Wellington ornada
BI Uusher
Boys samething happened Frida j . Vangue
A youns gitl.cried “oh hell ! Lady Pink gE. 2. : iguatd
Come Joe ering Rovert with you September Son Waterbell
Mr, Mottley in the cell Battalion
We ran across the swing bridge BR. 2 Comet G1
Spointing the hundred yards, ° Dulecibella —-
fren Lou Joined an the marathon ‘:
Till we all reached the Main Guard - suntone .
: Corfu Watercres Betsam
Joe turned and said, what happer Jatania alle
Boiher Motts tells us right now : tsi ; Minyette
Bo. Mottiey said, “Keep quiet NEUSOH re. 1 Monsoon
Li me solve this ‘hawkers’ row Landmark ; ite pl
. . Sy Silk n
One Ume we had a market Perlect Set > Bells in it
With a temperature like hell Rebate Bow, Bells Tango
So all the hawkers walked out > . 4 Bowmanston oo °
And in Broad Street they now dweil Silver Bullet e . T'yhpoon

War Lord Count Cain



Now the police. on the right side Joint Commani Vietory
Ask therm all to walk along, 7 4 Vixen
So the hawkers then told Mottley c. 1, Lazy Bone
Cause they can’t be wrong.and strong Postscript
Well we three were much delighted s
Just to get the right-of-way" Beaullls F,) 2. G, 2.
Cause if Mottley was a prisoner Fabulous
It would be an awful day Fanny Adams
. " . “14 ei Apollo bh Diamo
Now we ask why Mr. Mottley Flieuxce i AP iota autre
Lust escort them for this walk Leaging Article Ap Tower Brahmin’s Choice
All the other. politicians ‘4 Racton Best Wishes Chindl
Gone to join the Sugar Talk sertariouk Bonnie Lass undit
Talk to-day of Mr, Mottley Swiss Roll Brown Girl Diana
Join the others careless chat ' £ . 3 seve ‘ing A
But be sure when you're intraubl Southern Cro Bull eye Flying Ann
He's the one to “bell the cat.’ Sin Queen clone Joan’s Star
® * ‘ Tiberit Ade Clementina :
Now poor Joe didn't know no better Miberian Lady Colleton h Lucky Shot
Went alone to see the play Winter Belle : . iat
he Kmpire Theatre Consternation Maytirne
was’ “Rebecca” by the way o% Cross Bow Mopsy
One of those loud “talkie” women wae Cross Roads Otcedol
Who adore. in neo Dunese
Shouted out “Joe got becca ili epic
Lou must know this; she's his wife Ability Epicure
: ‘ . . Dainty Bess Facetiou
doe decide and sUmmoned courage Fai Sontest Flame Flower
Took Lou to, Rebecca's, house ide F . ' " . : +
But a nice vase dropped and broke up ad Oxglove
Made Lou frightened as a mouse Kitchen Front Goblin
e > * ; a Pa
Then the neighbours round the mansion Link Stream Hi-Lo Classifiers!
Listened in to all this mess Marine Light Joan of Are hy o
“Till poor Robert cried out ‘shut up" Musk Lady Rommel
Keep this business from the press r ¥
rt eee . Pactora Mary Ann I’. N. Peirce
Poot bow. standitig ub: bow lideged River Sprite Miracle
istened to Joe's words un f . .
All because he failed to. admit St. Moritz Mocassin L, E.R. Gill
"Twas Rebecea on his mind Sailors Fun Mountbatten
5 hd“ Tiles teiiivete, lsh eo vaaiaanas Starry Night Miss Friendship G. D. Bynoe
Steeped Low's life in pickled sauce William TI Page Boy

All Because poot Louw was frightened
To assume her place as boss,
. . .

-
Subject to change in the event of any horse taking part in any
Meeting prior to the Barbados Mid-Summer Meeting, 1950.

eee

But to-day there’s no “Rebecca”
To olfend Low amy more
Yes | the yacht left her forever
On the happy tolden shore

° .



Boat in pieces, Cabin unlocked
Divers found the broken spar
So im honour of “Rebecca”
Joe unc Lou drink J @& R,

sponsored by

J & R BAKERIES
makers of

ENRICHED BREAD

and the blenders of

_J&R RUM




Alka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief

Alka-Seltzer gives you the quick
relief you wart PLUS the alka-
lizer you need when overeating
causes excess gastric acidity, Drop
one or two tablets in a glass of
water — watch it fizz, then drink it
down. It’s reliable First Aid. Pleas-
ant-tasting. Not a laxative: Alka-





| GeNGiNe )
| WEST INDIAN
|
|

Tubes of
12 & 30 tablets.










HANDCRAFT S

See The Seltzer makes you feel fine fast.
Handcrafts
Company |



Bridge & Trafalgar Streets |





POPP PFFS SS FSP SIFFS PSSSS SSO SS

C.M.G
Come and ¢ t G 1 ee CATON UE § f, d
es and see Compton Gonsalves, Lindsay Gordon, Laddi holesale & Ret ruggist )
Lewis, Wilfred Tull, Hamilton Bridgernan, C. Piitice pa Trini 136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813 or Rete an
dad’s Lady Flyer, Pearl Gooding in action against Ken Farnum, . ‘ com mercial ve hicles

Lisle Carmichael, Harclyde Stuart, C Keiz i

» Ha s 5 sizer, Nazi, A,
W. Bennett, E. Denny, Austin Clarke and the eeted
Sprinter Grace Cumberbatch.

36 Thrilling Events 36
PROGRAMME

FIRST DAY ’

BOO BOI AO OM nee

Hunte,
Barbados Lady













*
LOYAL BROTHERS OF
THE STARS
present

1950 CARNIVAL













1 1 Mile—Novices SECOND DAY
¢ 1 woe Roadster fis Suse
3 3 ieee 1 ¢ Jump
4% Mile Muetoen ie 2 ‘a Mile Cycle—Div. A & FAR You may well ask why we permit our scientists to do anything
5. 100 yards Flat— i + 290 ~=yerds Flat—La s ; » > have {
: {00 vards Fist—Gpen ‘ 20 yards Piat~Ladies so foolhardy. But the plain answer is that we have to do ito
00 yards Flat—Bi B » 4» Mile Cycle termediate ieti ; ° ‘ a tel + t
. W0 wards Flat~—Girls under 16 (Sk CaeoA SGeresene ate e ee - satisfy ourselves that even after proionged storage, REGENT
A tle 4 _ ° ¢ . . .
10 3 Mile Gvele—aA a te cee cee ome ove - Gale, M.L.C., Messrs. will not form gum to stick valves and clog fuel sys:ems.
11. 440 yards Fiat—O; 100 var a yirls over 16 . : eae
Rar ts INTERVAL. 100 yards Flat—Local Men F. BS en oe The tests wnich consist of boiling samples under 100 Ib. per
2 igh Jump 10 file Cyele rrmediate = je . A ss acts ssh auth he hin Vie
13. 5 Mile—Intermediate so! Saar eee M.C.P. sq. inch oxygen pressure in “bombs” , are quite safe. We have
14. Z Mile Cycle—A By), elle Creek af ; ie eae
15. 2 Mile Cycle—B 12 5 Mile Cycle—B at never lost 4 scientisi~—or for that matter—a customer because
16 150 yards Flat~Girls over 16 3 990 yards Fis . ’ ‘ ; j bs at
" 220 varde Flat Boys over 16 Ay aap Nectar na 7 QUEEN’S PARK ofa sticky valve. This test is one of many Witich guarantee the
ile Flat—Open roe ae A + Tt ne
19 440 vards Relay 14 440 yards Relay—Roys’ School on quality and performance of REGENT petrol |
20 9 Mile Cyele—Open is 15 Mile Cycle—Open Thursday, 8th June j
Weight-lifting and Hand-balancing Gates open. at 12 noon ‘
Police Band in attendance n 2nd day. Costume Competition, Fire- a ena
; f an Cg works Display, Dancing Free, f = PE % RO ‘yegsuy:
Entries close at 4.00 p.m. on Tuesday. May 16, Special Display by Barbados i" “| " p ; ESPN)
Bre ; e Ag y od 7 ‘ Q i walt,
Plan of seats open at Civic Society, Swan Street and High ne re exgmgat snd baa uterling Quality told
Street: 10.00 a.m. an Monday, May 15 . ALE STAR Singing
‘ " n
i 2: 3.3 - i ee
Heats on Tuesday May 23 at 3.30 p.r Competitoin RE a nm 0
Grounds open for practice on Tuesday Mav 16 at 4.00 p.m ADMISSION 1/-
PERSONS who ere desirous of istri mir
Prices: Kensington Stand 3/-; George Cha Stand 2/6 obtaining STALLS and BOOTHS Distributors:
Seeley alae Inge” Distributors:— Dear’s Garage Ltd. DA COSTA & CO., LTD.
Uncovered Stand 2/-: Ground viduals are a to register their R ; k S t B d i ,
ss cae ame to Mr. CHARLES C i wri.
ee Jo Dee 127 Roebuck Street. Bridgeto JAMES A. LYNCH & CO, LTD |
Se











a

PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS.

Telephone 2508





BIRTH
GREAVES—To Mr. and Mrs Fred A
Greaves of Fairmount, St Lucy, the
birth of a son and heir. Mrs. Greaves
is the former Miss Mildred Ward

Mother and babe are doing well.
. Pek 14.5.50—In

ooo
DIED

GOLLOP—Yesterday at
; St. David's Road, WALTER SAMUEL

his residence,



PERSONAL








The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife OLYNTHIS
CODRINGTON (nee Austin) as I do not!
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me.»

Signed CAMERON CODRINGTON, |

King William Street
13.5.50—an |













AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY—A very a => ——
ee ee oes oe cake
type of Business







LOST

P







SUNDAY ADVOCATE



UBLIC

SALES



























25 Countries

aan ake Part In
By“instructions received from the Truss |

tees. of the Hutchinson Trust, I will sell} e e

on the ‘spot, t property known ag/ P.

“White Hail”, consisting of one acre and | al ts air
pate roods of land “be the same r e or

€ and ali wall buii¢ standing |

thereon situate above Mangrove Planta- | PARIS, May. 13.
tion, in the parish of Saint Philip, on ¢ 7 inister
CE ee eee hee nt Men ios, | Jean Louvel,. Fregch Mini
between the hours of twelve and four}of- Industry and Trade, today
o'clock in the afternoon

Terms Cash

E. L. MOORE,

formally 9pened the Paris Fair “La

Foire de’ Paris’

at the Port De

Versaillés on the southern edge of

the capital.

and friends who attended the funeral















di Govt. Auctioneer,
The funeral will leave the residence SWEEPSTAKE TICKET BOOK—Series District “C",
of Mr, Clyde Gollop of Sargeant's Vil-| FURNISHED—White Cottage St. James} £ 2330—39. ‘Finder please. tetizn sama ie 10.5.50,—~7n,
lage, Christ Church, at 4.15 o'clock} Apply Mre. E. M, Greenidge, White] £, Field c/o E. S. A. Field, 41 Roebuck |°* tied

this afternoon for St. David's Church.| House, St. James 14.5.50—1n | Street. oe

1.5.00-—2n.| UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER

Friends are invited

















FLAT—downstairs, unfurnished, with

one largd;. cbet ‘ Yves ene four bentwood chairs;

one oak ice bucket




















Some

SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950 —~





GOVERNMENT NOTICES






ORIENTAL

Curios, Ivory, Teak, Sandal, Jewel-
lery, Brass Ware, Tapestries,

THE NEW PLAN FOR CASTRIES, ST. LUCIA

Lucia”, are on sale at the Advocate Stationery at a cost of $2.00 per

copy. 14.5.50,—In.



Applications from Sanitary Inspectors and Registered Nurses
(Hospital Trained) for Course of Training at the Public
Health Training Centre in Jamaica.

APPLICATIONS are invited from Sanitary Inspectors and Regis-

Barbados Real Estate
Agency

tered Nurses (Hospital Trained) who are willing to be considered

10,500 exhibitors (1,509] for advanced courses which are expected to last about Eleven and Ten

more than last year) have booked | months respectively at the Public Health Training Centre in Jamaica.

Space,

Twenty-five countries are

represented in the 85 sections. Tén

countries — Austria,
Czechoslovekia, Italy,

land, Turkey,

Pakistan,

Belgium,
isda The | and a full curriculum vitae should be included in the application,
Switzer- | The scholarships for these courses if approved, provide: —
and Yugoslavia —

have national stands. The fair will
last until May 29. Five million

francs

Ada (wife); Clyde & Keith (sons); “FARAWAY”, St. Philip coast. Fully SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Y
Audrey, Ada, Frances, — gee furnished; 3 bedrooms, es rooms,| Finder please return same to ae By instructions received I will sell on
Ca ee ghey to Terme) carport, ebelng Wants Ser Bat cect” | Aker, Roebuck Giteet (nese Céeoe-| Vine gt Latirence Gop, nes the Chur
yne é 's). , St. 1 ence Gap, near the C .
ne Deach, Tin. Wee ees | coms the entire lot of furniture which consists | Netherlands,
—— 16. §.50-—2n of ;—one mahog. dining table; one mahog.
~ —=| drawing room table; one mahog. kidney j
THANKS FLAT—One Ground Floor Flat with table; twa .t ; al .
$ painted deck chairs; one Cool
one bedroom Dial 3006s so ttn.) PUBLIC NOTICES | 522 2:5, 20%. 278 mance, Liquor, chest;
We the undersigned desire through ' “= . ie one folding sereen; one cordea drawing
this medium to thank all those relatives -— =} room table; table, six painted rush chairs,

wofth of

exhibited.
















goods are

2 = NOTICE j with ware container; one Ice Cream — s
and also by thelr expressions of sym-| trance, || Unfurnished apartment _up- | Beemer oes quart ‘without tub, toh —
lititen, out Seni dis taka sehen Bi stairs with one large, cool bedroom. MRS. LEVITT begs io notify her| mahos. beds sprinsy and mattresses; two
iaigihant sntenaeh ‘ihe death ‘of Miss Dial 4506. 14.5.50—1n | customers that the Mayfair Beauty Salon| P4inted chest of drawers; one ware bed» I T. h With B b d
ELIZA HACKETT, late of Green Hill.) FLAT—Four rooms particularly well = Pees ay donnie May 3518 | 1oPD Glothes horse Sak many other tee wae ? rh _—
Nurse Helena Kennedy (sister), Elsie| furnished in Hastings available very soon.|{he fewly decorated flat ai Sune Sth al or interest Coastal Station
Kennedy iniecey Edwin Kehnedy| Entire contents, including linen and cut- Fae mG he Agua | Teruis Cash
‘nephew) 14.5.50-——1n | lery, are being offered for sales, ish RO. a re tn oe D'ARCY A. SCOTT, Cable and Wiretess (West Indies) re
7 5.50.—3n. i Auctioneer.! advise that they can now communicate
on en te ee a7 ; = : og bad ham ae fas | 33-6,50.—4n | acth the following ships through their
anks e@ many ends an 9 c ; ; Coast Station >—
sympathisers who sent flowers, letters FURNISHED APARTMENT—At Coral nit at witientio. Peion | Barbados Coagt Station §.8. Colobre, S.S.
and cards of sympathy of the death of [Sands, W. , with Silver and) PIPASANT Plontatone Ss. miner) UNDER THE SILVER | Sivestre, 5 S___ Fortrichepanse, Ss
LEWIS BURKE, late Sgt. of Fire |} Cutlery. G Sea-bathing. Dial 8134.) gna st : wae, St. ee Castor, SS. Frederic A. Eilers, S.S.
Brigade Station Alma Lashley. 11,5,50—4n. | Sue 8 ‘Nooo ase ‘ ; Saeverd. 8.8. America, S.S. Itabera, 8.3.
Miriam Straker (mother), Whitfield —————_____——__ | rrrve Plan 1, ie Corde a HAMMER Kim, SS. Pocone, S.S. Rangitane, 8.8.
Burke (cousin), Odessa Burke /cousin) FLAT: VU ius flat with 3 bedrooms a aen th rx} ae = Te oe end Abiqua, 8.S. Florida, S.S. Alcoa eeeet
14.9.0—In. F rune ag, wa eo For furtner| og the above Act against tho sald Plan-| | On Tuesday 16th by order of Mrs. P. ¥ MY Pee ES ees. ee aa
ee os 5008-4 s0-4.0.8, | lone Inhrenpect of tne Agricultural year | Cormprell we wil gel] ney house appgint:| qrsineis, $8. Hllegbeth (A. Flanigan,
Mae tere ing oseal, many Sie MARKHAM—On the Sea Hastings, No money has been borrowed under : which include : peal NA ne: ss. Siecneeen? ss.
y 8 Agric ; he | Bxtensic > Table, ht, 2 oe i oo
letters, cards, or in any oher way ex- | (urnished or unfurnished 3 bedrooms eel tee ne Aids A eh al > . chair as oe a aanede ied Imperial Quebec, 8.5. Golfito, S.S. Oberon
Pressed ‘their sympathy to us ip cats veitis all sneer conveniences. Cae ine | rove vem ne cane may be) in respect | table, Tea Trolley; Morris Suite compriss|/3-3° Misr Ee ere Eade
recent reavement occasioned throug! cooking. Apply: ice Court, : - ing Settee for 3, Four Arm Chairs, and] ~ ris a ‘wenk
the death of our beloved mother | Hastings. aati, | CR Se ee ey ct ee ane Spring Cushions, Book Cases (glass! Alcoa Corsalr, S.S. Habana, 8.8. ia,
DELCINA GILKES who died on 5th May, | ie RRIS, | Doors), Coffee and Ornament Tables; Flat) S‘S- Hawk. 8-8 Ree SL ae,
1950, MODERN STONE BUNGALOW, Seclu- : Ow | Top Desk with glass top, all in mahogany; | S:S. Apache Canyon, 'S.S.\ Spat, ve:
The Gilkes Family. 14.5.50.—In. | ded part of Pine . 2 bedrooms. 2 12.5 50 Ginss and China, Tea Services, Pictures, | TCaraibe, $,S., Alcoa Polaris, 8.8. Mar-

——_———_———_

IN MEMORIAM

In memory of our loving and devoted
mother ALEATHA BISHOP, who fel!
asleep on l4th May 1949

Not dead to us who loved her

Not lost but gone before

She lives with us in memory and will

* forevermore.

Bishop's family.
14,5,50—In.

IN loving memory of MRS. MAY
ROWE who departed from us 15th May,
1939.

Faithful and honest in all her ways
Loving and true to the end of her



days

So never forgotten Mother Dear shall
you be

As long as life last we will remem-
ber thee

Remembered by her loving husband

Lawrence Rowe, Daughters Mrs. Olga
Weekes, Viotta (niece) Caspair, Gwen
14,5.50-—1n

Kirton, who fell asleep on May 14th 1941.
Thou art gone to the grave
But 'twere wrong to deplore thee
For God was thy ransom, thy guardian

nd guide
He gave thee—He took thee—and
He will restore >
Mabel Reid (Mother), Little Mary
(daughter), Leta and Dora _ (sisters)
Ben (nephew). 14.5.50—In

In loving memory of my dear wife
GERTRUDE SMITH who fell asleep on
April 19, 1949.

A year has past

Lies the one T love so dearly

Praise God we never lived a bad life}

How good it is to say
Oft 1 wondered
Never in this world I think
ion gates shall open wide
At last we two shall meet once more,
Alphonza Smith (husband), America.
Mrs. Lilian Thorne (sister), Clyde and
Carlos (nephews).
(American Papers please . copy)
15.5.50—In.

In loving memory of our dear daughter
PHYLLIS JEAN ROACHFORD, who fell
ashkeep on May 14th 148.

Safe in the arms of Jesus,

Safe on this gentle breast,

There by His love o’ershadowed,

Sweetly your soul shall rest,

Ever to be remembered by:

Stanley Roachford (father), Deva Roach-
ford (mothér), Denton, Leigh, Hugh,
Vere (brothers), Sybil, Marie (sisters)

14.5.50~<1n



In loving memory of our dear beloved
mother and srand-mother KETURAH
APPLEWHAITE who fell asleep on I4th
May 1947.

In a grave and quietly sleeping

Where the green grass gently waves

Lies the one we love so dearly

One we love, but could not save

To you who have a mother cherish

with care

You never know her

see her vacant chair.

Ever to be remembered by:

Edward Applewhaite (husband), Doris

value till you

Aubrey, Arthur and Gaskin
(children) and his 12 grand children

14.5,.50—In.
In ever loving and never fading

dear mother and grand

to rest on the 14th of May 1948.

Two sad years have passed to-day,

When the dear one we loved was

called away,

We love her well, God loved her best,
+ And took dear granny home to rest
‘ May she rest in peace,

By the mercy of God.

Ever to be remembered by:
Gwendolyn, Katie and Aletha Smart
children), Jessie, Neville, Gerald and
Cleveland (grandchildren).

14.5.50—In





FOR SALE |

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Morris 10 H.P, in_perfect
ips ore: hag gee Tryhane,
telle jantation, 4 omas.

: 13.5,50,—Sn.

—

CAR—One 10 h.p. Hillman. In good
working order. Only $300.00. For par-
ticulars dial 4021. 13,5,50—2n.
———$————$—$——

CAR—One Morris 12 Saloon. Excel-
Jent condition, Done only 8,500 miles.
13.5, 50—3n.

CAR—One Vauxhall 14-6, good work-
ing order, H. P, Harris & Co., Lower
Broad Street. Phone 4045.

12.5.50.—3n,

VAN—Pick-up in good working order,
Apply; Belgrave’s Garage, Hindsbury
Road. 10.5.50—3n,







work -
Baga-









MOTOR CYCLE—1% h.p. B.S.A, In
Only

3,100 miles.
apply H. A. Cuke jnr, Phone or
4231. 9.5,50—fn.

ELECTRICAL

ELECTRICAL WIRE and fit I
triple 7/044 twin, 7/029 triple,
twin, 3/029 triple, 3/029 twin C.T.S.
7/064, 7/052, 7/044, 7/029, and 3/029 V.L.R,
iso switches, receptacles and other items,
mnquire Auto Tyre Company, Trafalgar
Street, Phone 2696.







ELECTRIC STOVES -- complete with
oven in white and Green REDMAN &
TAYLOR'S Garage and Showroom

: 14.5.50—3n

———

WESTINGHOUSE REFRIGERATOR—
6 cu. ft. (In good working ordér.
Owen T. Allder, Roebuck Street. Dial
3299. 13.5.50—3n.



FURNITURE

CHAIRS — Correct Office Posturé
Chairs, With three point adjustment to

give perfect posture and
comfort, equipped with okt eh
GEDDES GRANT LTD. $.5.50—én





CRO












if 1 could replaced] dition.





10.5,50,—t.i.n.

ge Solar heatin ‘

servants rooms. Gi
% acre grounds.



Labour saving. Apply eee '
he & Nicolls & Co., Solicitors, 1-2, eee Ce AOD,

Koebuck St. Telephone 3925.
9.5.50—t.f.n

—
“NEW HAVEN", Crane Coast fully fur-
nished, 3 bedrooms, 3 servants’ rooms,
double garage, lighting plant, water
mill, Superb bathing beach. Dial 4476

November, December
19.3.50-—t.f.n

~RUS-IN-URBE—Crumpton Street from
Ist June 1950, Dial 4524.

To the creditors holding specialty liens
against

Thomas.

Take Notice that I, the owner of the
above named plantation, am about to
obtain a loan of £2,000 under the pro-
visions of the above Act, against the
Sugar, Molasses and other crops of the
said plantation to be reaped in 1951.

No money has yet been borrowed
against the said crops



14.5.0—1n F. F, PILGRIM,














SUMMERHOME—Situate at Hastings
om the sea-side near Rockley. The
house contains drawing, dining, break-



13.5,50.—3n,

THE SUGAR INDUSTRIAL AGRICUL-
URAL BANK ACT, 19145

To the itors holding specialty liens

HANNAYS & LOWER GREYS

ntations, Christ Church.

Take Notice that we, the Owners of
the above Plantations are about to obtain
a loan of £10,000 under the provisions of
the above Act against the said Planta-
tions, in respect of the Agricultural year
1950 to 1951.

No money has been borrowed under th
Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the above










dining rooms, kitchenette,
garage, unfurnished (can be furnished by
arrangement). Dial 8495. 14.5.50.—1

WANTED __









Act ted als to such year, i
Dat ; ay, .

HELP r F URSQUARE Estates LTD
wher,

E, S, ROBINSON,
Managing Director.

_ qualifications
Manning & Co., Ltd. mission Dept.

and by. letter 13,8.50.—3n,
12.5,50—3n,

Hie SUGAR INDUSTRIAL AGRICUL.
TURAL BANK ACT, 1048

To the creditors holding specialty liens
against GROVE Plantation, St, Philip
Take Notice that we, the owners of the
above Plantation are about to obtain o
loan of £8,000 under the ptovisions o!
the above Act against the said Plantation
in réspect of the Agricultural year 195¢

to 1951,
No money has been borrowed under the

TAILORS — Want immediately,
Journeymen Tailors, 3rd floor No. 7
Swan Street. 14,5.50—1n,

MISCELLANEOUS

GOLF CLUBS—One used set







Golf
Clubs and bag or odd clubs in 00d con-

Auricultural Aids Act, 1906, or the above
Phone 8152. 7.5,50—5n, Act in Teapect of auch ost: sito,
A POCKET GUIDE to the West Indies | Dated this f ESTATES, |
by Alermon Aspinwall. Martin Griffith, SVUHOMerTs etna oe
Four Winds. 10,5,50—2n B. S. Robinson,
CUSTOMERS, for PURE FRESH COWS | 14 559 —~3n, Se

.. Supply from Tuberculin Tested
STINGS

























Outario and Canada aforesaid the quali-
food pepcrenentt, of chil] fed executrix of the Will
fh Oe , Pgrteet | deceased, in care of Messrs.

4A ‘| & Sealy of Lucas Street, Bridgetown,

r Solicitors, on or before the 15th day of
July 1950, after which date 1 shall pro-
ceded to distribute the assets of the
deceased among the parties entitled
thereto having regard only to

of the
Carrington

such

rs, RRC RLANTATION, ° Assoc. (Inc.) Consignees ‘ sides and fernery. Right
gems, Lee May 1950. THE 8 KR INDUSTRIAL AGRICUL 10.5.50—9n, “ELLESMERE” PLANTATION, ARAM, y DEMERATA Ere. Dial 4047 fF ada, ery ight of way
ROUTE. Write L. N. RAL BANK ACT, 143 a ST, GEORGE ss Yo May 1
Hutchinson “CLARENDON” BLACK | vo the creditors holding specialty lien: HOUSE—The board and _— shingled We are instructed by the Trustee of MS. “ * 18th “WEMBLEY”, N. Gardens.
° p J. Seale aan ar a ;
ROCK. 11, 5.50-—2n, Feinet FOURSQUARE GROUP 0 Emelda Cot”, Martindales Road. For me ue ine errs i. i S.S..“HECUBA” Jufe Ist. A very pleasant modérn. -houre
lantations, St. Philip il perticulars dial 2668. 13.5.50—3n. o offe r sale a Plan- tes . o f x —_ ons ry or 5
F Contd. Take Notice that we, the Owners of th | ——_—_____—__- | tation consisting af aiput, 128 aerés of S. P. MUSSON SON @ CO., LTD, Agents Pb ried is popular nae jcee my.
or e@=Contd, above Plantations, are about to obtain i: | “STAUNTON” and land thereto con-, Which about 88, are arable. There dsaf 00) Soss0 so verandah, kitchen and.2 bed-
loan of £11,000 under the provisions © | taining approximately 15,678 square feet, | Managet’s house and usual outbuildings. Touhy Gn. tn, Ae Hee and
reaus, small} the above Act against the said Plantations th Avenue, Belleville There is good quality stone which could F =
extra room on ground floor now
‘Tables, China Cabinets, Morris Chairs,| in respect of the Agricultural year 195 The dweiling house which is a sub-]} ve worked. > wh 7 - : ; used as a flat, The gafden is
etc., at bargain prices in Ralph A. | to 1951. lantially erected stonewall building in| ” Pull particulars and permission to view ana a eams |B} walled ait rouna with stone, At
Beard’s Auction Rooms, Hardwood No. money has been borrowed unde exfect condition comprises. ;- ‘ can be obtained from Mr. Charles Arm- . the price asked this residi nce is’
Alley. Open daily 8 a.m. to 12 noon. | the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or thi Downstairs, Spacious cool verandahs} strong of Pool, St, John, Conditions of = worth inspécting je!
4.5.50—3n, | above fi tl seenes of ance oars mn two sides, large drawing and dining} cole can be obtained from the undersign- 4 , ‘
men ————__—__—___—— Dated this 10th day of May, 195 coms, buttery, larder room, pantry,} ed who will offer the property at auction BLUE VISTA.

FURNITURE — Beautifully designed FOURSQUARE BATS TEs. LTD tehen and servants’ room. | of at thein, Offices st 2.30 fm. of Friday Sails Sails Arrives Golf Club) One ae ane vahter.
wae eee sa coe ay o E. 8. Robinson oe 8 uaa 9th June, 1950, hates a day Halifax Boston B’dos type modern homes in a_ select
mahogany fu e . . - sabe bi Ade 1 . r ¢ CA G locality, well planned and con-
ae emmih & Co. Furniture Manufactur- Managing Directo: There is a small lawn to the east of Pie: ae, 15 May 15 May . :

, re 13.5.50,—3n. he ho well as spacious back yard : os No 1th May 26th May 27th May structed by a firm of e.
£m, connate ECoeara ne 06; Roomuns | vith lime anc fruit trees planted June 2nd June Large lounge, dining room ‘eiteh-
< THE oe oe BIOL L Yard. Large garage and washroom RUPTURE ard June 6th June l4th June 15th June sat Cees Bee? basins and
TU ‘ OT, 14a Electric light, water and gas are in- 12 June 22 22 wardrobes) bathroom,
To the creditors holding speciilty lem | jailed throughout Inspection by ap-| ; % a yune 5 guns double garage, servants’ quar
; : Sth July 4th July 15th July quarters,
anaes against FOURSQUARE F*CTORY, Si niment with Mrs, Waite, the owner, RELIEF Ps July ain July 5th Aug. 6th Aug. terraced rock garden, ldwns,

GOATS uuimibe i Phiip Telephone 2553 A 26th . Aug r flowerin, shrubs and __ plants.
Goats oe Ewe act Roop en Take Notice that we, the Owners of th« By public auction on Friday the -19th ie Aug Oth Aug. th Sep. Owing 5 wntrsedh acinar
S. Mayhew, Fitts Village, St. James. eta bet A ae Pen A istthe of a ea oe samt St Sie otioe er the | ‘Thousands of ruptured men and women NORTHBOUND Satls Arrives = Arrives Arrives ces this desirable property . is

1m8. the above Act against the said Factory iquluya. and conditions of may ban hove. toute re relies a wearing a -. to pitas Montreal a at well below Gant 20. atkly
in respect of the Agricultural year 1950} obtained . ‘ ' easley Air Cushion Appilance. June 10th June 19th June 2ist June 2th June ¥
MECHANICAL to lear, 8 hme ih ; Fitted with a = Se bh wl LADY "son 27th June 29th June 8th July 10th July 13th July WINDY RIDGE, st. J *
No money has Leen borrowed under the K. S. NICHOLLS & CO., ae Se a Ter antia drvicnea shat RODNEY 27th July 29th July 7th Aug. 9th Aug. 12th Aug. This very attractively. ames.
3 s BICYCLES Cycles | Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the above 151 & 152 Roebuck Street, \ne hernie w such gentle anee ; LADY NELSON 18th Aug. 20th Aug. 29th Aug. 3ist Aug. 3rd Sep. tedden a ively situated
sh ie & Motor Cycles| ‘Act in respect of such year. Phone 3925. 10.8.80.——Gch BI PEOR SR GREE cere Cray Se | Seer MOOR - 19th Sep. 2ist Sep. 30th Sep. 1st Oct. 5th Oct 1 ore Gt aie tee
shes a gag ese before purenani | “Dated Ge ey Sa SE MAK Nc | —camcama Oe mee a Roma | Fo" ill detail and ree Booklet write verdes oS" lounges ating
¢ re. ye gar- FOURSQUARE FACTORY LTD'| TRELAWNY, on Hastings main Road, = . ‘ ” tetlete. ae ning
agé and Showroom. 14,5,50—2n Owners ‘eddy vecom#budted with: four bedain.™ NB. to change without notice. All vessels fitted with cold storage chain room, 2 tollets. There are 2
E. §. Robinson, oms running water in edch, usual Fares and freight rates on application to :— Pernaindersis vote aie Gok oe
yg nandtvne Diver | SG onl ta pales ind] DRASLEY'S LID, Dept. 198| Gago AUSTIN @ CO. LTD._A wih is trees. fowertng
" . : .50,—3n. rn conveniences . _ hi : .
G. L. Taylor. Dial 3120. —— | Xhnex, new wall building, two bed-| 4 Cork Street, London, W.1, Ensland, tid i gents. Be oentted ar ee winy, can: never
10.5.50—3n. nN i ing ¥ lining > Meant ; ee . spoiled and prevailing breezes
NOTICE rooms with running water, dining and ‘ ad are unobst!
itting rooms and, jodern con- 5 - — SS = —— = nie Tucted. 5 miles town
aA ae ee Sewing Machine, as Re. Estate of veniences Will accept able offer, ee eu '
new. Owner leaving island. Apply (01 WASORIE WINSOME MAUDE CHAM-| syply on premises Telephone 3001 ISN'T IT NICE TO VISITORS TO OUR ISLAND NEA DENDRA—Pine Hill Estate.
ittens, Harr ERS, 14.5% 50—1n i j Recently | built coral .
College Gap. Roebuck Street. ‘ B eaneubin i WAY HAVE BAGGAGE WORRY? bungalow ‘in select reddecel
ee NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN eg an i aA You can pave your Baggage with us for despatch by our crew all Gesigned and _con-
: persons having any debt or claim agains\) '{t regular service. You can be assured of its safety. ° : a oo
MISCELLANEOUS the Estate of Majorie Winsome Maude} ) MAPLE MANOR R . . ‘ontmctors. 3 (built-
: 2 F in wardrobes! ;
_Chambers late of Ontario, Canada, who| | emember ! ) lounge/dining

ANTIQUES— of every description | died in this Island on the 16th day of) } GUEST HOUSE AND TO SAVE? WE GIVE PERSONALIZED SERVICE pL sina led witcher, tiled bathroom
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine er,| November 1949, are hereby required t § Opposite Hastings Rocks | servelite’ ou garage, laundry,
Watercolours books, Maps, Auto-/ send rticulars of their claims duly 1. BOURNE it

pa > Morris and Tub Suites or separate
, etc., at Antique Snop, | atiested, to the undersigned Herber Yel.—3021. Manageress. Pieces, Redio, Cocktail or Fancy
qi, Ro; Yi Club
sdjoining Royal Yacht Club. Campbell Sealy the attorney in this 26.6.49—t.f.n, Tables, Tea Trolleys, Liquor Cases,
1,9,49.—t.f.n.
0.49.—t.2.n.) island for Mrs. Constance Vokes of} (/ i $5 up—Barbice and other restful
claims of which I shal} then have had
oy eee at 26.75 (per beg: | notice, and that 1 will not be liable for
Phone 13 §.50—2n Be a or any part thereof so dis-
_ tributed, to any person whose debt or



claim we shall then have had notice
, And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their in

DOOR MATS—ibre Door Mats. Plain
and Inlaid in several sizes. Price $1.73



up. G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO
LIMITED 4222 . $0—an debtedness without delay,

i Daa i 34.8 : MR aR day of May 1950.

_ “RELJANCE" CAMPBELL SEALY

1en Cama FREEZERS in %, 1 and attorney for Constance Vokes
2 gallon sizes. Also Ide Picks, Ice]. Qualified Executrix of the wili of
Shredders and Ice C: rvers-——Order Majorie Winsome Maude Chambers,
yours TO-DAY. G, Ww. Hinson & | deceased.
Co. Ltd. Dial 4222. 14,5. 50—m 14.5, 50-—-4n

ee nee
PROFESSIONAL NOTICE

DR, FERREIRA of “Chiroville’ Upper
Bay St. (near Esplanade) by Chiropractic
meth corrects diseases of eyes, cars.
nose, throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys ano
lower organs. Dial 2881

:





FLOUR BAGS—
white, all marks ti
R. Hunte & Co., Ltd.
Store, Lower Broad

————$— —$—$—$ $$$
“LASSIB’—Brand Rolled Oats in 20 oz.

tins at 44c, per tin from all Grocers,
’ 13,5.50—2n.





AT YOUR SERVICE

it & cl by of its taking

les to the cup. supply at your IN CLEANING; DYEING,

Grocer. 13.5. LAUNDERING AND HAT

——-——_———- DRESSING
STOVE—-One Two Burner Bi RAYMOND JORDAN,

stove and six spare wicks lever been Bey Street, C e s'

are see P< tee. te Ipp. Combermere St



———
TINS—A quantity of empty tins ior
hatching plants or household purposes.

Dial 3063 ,Purity Bakeries Ltd.
13.5.50.—7n.

For MARL, SAND,
GARDEN MOULD,

———
PIPE—One Iron Pipe 19 feet long with
6 inch diameter. Dial 3063, Purity Baker-



ies Ltd, 13.5.50.—7n. and LIME ;
.WHEELS—2_ Complete Motor Car Dial 4503
wheels, new tyres, 475 x 18. Belgrave's t

{ Garage, Hindsbury Rd. 14.5,50.—In, SS



ree







WELCHES PLANTATION, Si. |

Dated this 13th day of May, 1950. |

Owner, |
























slectrie Table Lamps, Electric Clock, 2
} Carpets 9x12; Rugs, Mahogany Single Herdsman, $.S. Sirena, S.S. Raban, at
| Bedsteads, Vono Springs, Hair Mattresses; Arlington, S.S. Myken, S.S. L, C, Coubre,
i ve nice Vanity Table with Triplet} 5-5 Libreville, S.S. S. Amado, S.S. Louis
| Mirre and Stool; Large and Small] Howe, $.S. Overo, S.S. Maria De Larrin-
mahogany Presses; Medicine Cupboard | 3%. S.S. Great City, S.S. Sheafmead, 8.38.
and Shoe Rack ‘combined,old mahog, | Esso Avila, M.S. Amerigo Vespucci, S.S.
Linen Press; G.E. Refrigerator, in work- Mormacyork, S.S. Atlantic Producer, s.s.
ing order, Ware Presses, Kitchen Cabinet | Bataan, S.8. Cottica, S.S. Tachira, s.s.
Larder; ail painted Cream and Green,| Canadian Challengers, $.S. Sevane, S.s.
Coal Stove, Kitchen Utensils, Canvas | Devon, $.S. Campero, S.S. Delphic, 8.S.
Cots; Verandah Chairs; Lady's Raleigh | Latirus, 8S. Atlantian, §.$. Regent Pan-
Bicycle, Roller, Garden Tools a lot of] ther, S.S, Pont Audemer, S.S. Stella Pol-
'Good Books, and many other items,| aris, S.S. Megna, S.S, Sun Avis, S.S.
This furniture is modern, and is in ex-]} Snipaas.
cellent condition. —
Sale 11.30 o'clock _- Terms Cash s 1
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. Public aalles—Contd.
Auctioneers ——
12.5.50,—2n.
REAL ESTATE
————————
ONE STONEWALL HOUSE, standing
REAL ESTATE on 1 acre and 23 perches of land, ee
AT WILDEY PLANTATION the 20in at Bridvefiela,. Bt xno” aaa ae
x30in. Milling Plant complete with en-} rooms, two bedrooms, breakfast room,
gine 13ins 30ins. and all steel gear-| kitchen, water toilet and bath, sae
ing stonewall shop and garage, encio!
Three Cameron Pumps, Evaporator,| yard. Apply on premises. ‘
two Aspinal Pans, 8ins x 12ins. Colon- 14.5.50.—In.
ial Hor; Engine, two Filter Presses aid | —~——— >,
Montegus, 3 Clarifiers, Tins—Oin. dia TAKE YOUR CHANCES ve
7 Sing ; AWAKE BUYERS! Good Buys W:
x 12in Oin Multitubular Boiler, all Re-Sale Values, Inspect and Decide for
steam and water piping and fittings. Yourselves. I Say--An Excellent 3 Bed-
Apply to the Manager. 14.5.50—6n.|.,o9m Stonewall Residence io del oor
Ne aerator a ; mactive =
“CHURCHILL"—situate at Maxwells oe ae Hh cate ai Bungalow in
Coast, Christ Chureh, standing on 9,266| A-1 Condition at Monteith Gardens, For
square feet of land, with 12 foot right of | Medium Pockets, A esieisie S ae ee
way to the sea, 30 yards distant. (Fair Size) Stonewall Bungalow iy
The house ‘contains drawind-dining | Street. A Suitable 3 Bedroom Bungalow

room





SaaS























, three bedrooms and _ kitchen,





Solicito


























THE POPULAR

Radiation
Cookery Book
received
At your Gasworks, Bay St.
36th Edition
Price Only 4/6



=<









jata, $.S, Kettle Creek, S.S, Bowrio, 8.

Ss.







all] type















Chairs or Settees, Rush Furniture,
Mahogany nd other Bedsteads,
Beds, Extra size Cradles for Baby's
comfort, Go-Carts or Prams, $7 up,
Desk with flat or hinged tops in
Deal or Mahogany, $8 up,—Office,
Chairs,
Larders, Waggons, Kitchen Cabi-
nets
All at Money Saving Prices.

Gallery or Garden





L. S. WILSON



at White Park. A Suitable 2 Bed-

I % . house, Contains 3 recéption, 5
with ‘built-in cupboards and wardrobes, | roorn Concrete Bungalow at Station Hill, . The M.V. “Moneka" will accept s
verandah, small hall_and the usual offices. | and Two 2 Bedroom Cottages (seaside) at ]SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM, ROT- Cargo and Passengers for St. Vin- ea Vane iemene
Gorage and one servant's room with bath | Black Rock, A Seaside 3 Bedroom Stone- TERDAM & ANTWERP cent, Dominica, Antigua, Mont- figure for Guide aie.
in the yard, wall Bungalow at Fontabelle. Mortgages Ms. “ ” May 12/18/16th serrat, St. Kitts-Nevis, loading :
Inspection om application to the under-| Arranged, Please Don’t Miss Me Wise} wig, + * “June 9/10/13th Wednesday, sailing Thursday 18th “LITTLE BATALLYS”
signed, from Whom further particulars | and Keen Purchasers for Anything in SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM May. \ Peter small ¢ &
and conditions of sale may be obtained, | Real Estate! My List is Like a Special DOVER Apias standing ies Se
The above property will be set up for] Menu but Not Lengthy with nite S.S. “BONAIRE” May 26th The M.V, “T. B, Radar’ will ac- 1 atre, This p.rope . i
vie at public auction at aur office, 151 & | Elephants” coupled with Fancy Prices. S'S. “COTTICA” J Y sea cept Cargo and Passengers for St. designed by its aronitedt ‘ >
152 Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, on Fri-| Dial 3111 or 2713 — D. F. de Abreufi . fe MADEIRA, PLYMOUTH Lueia, St. Vincent, Trinidad, sail- and contains 3 reception, |
lay the 19th May, 1950, at 20 p.m. Tele-| A, Trained | Auctionten Gita Borges ANTWERP AND AMSTERDAM | ing 17th May, 1950. rooms, baths and” toliets, °
shone Broker Jaluer ‘a . . cher
: Broke «br Garter Bros., Tudor St..] M.S. “WILLEMSTAD” May 23rd. Lae RR a a gins RS
RS. NICHOLLS & CO,, __| Near Mason Hall St. 14.5.50—1n | M.S. “ORANJESTAD"” June 27th Be sue AL wae aoe



:



|



For Balanced QOiliness
We recommend

GERM MOTOR OILS
CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Service Station

CRANE HOUSE CLUB
WILL BE

SUNDAY

UNTIL 3



$33 Trafalgar St.

CLOSED
ON.

MAY I4TH
PL!







2. Applicants should apply in writing before the 31st of May,
to the Director of Medical Services, Government Building, The Wharf,

(a) Free air passage to and from Jamaica.
(b) Subsistence allowance at $3.60 a day.
(c) Travelling expenses in Jamaica at the rate of $14.40 pe
month. a's
(d) Contingencies at the rate of $4.80 a month.
3. The scholarships will only be granted on the following con-
ditions:

(a) That the Commissioners of Health agree to pay to the
officer, his or her salary while absent on study leave,
where the applicant is employed by the Commissioners.

(b) That the officer selected agrees to enter a bond to con-
tinue in the service of the Commissioners or of some
other body or Board in the Island whose function is to
administer to Public Health.

14,5.50—3n.

A limited number of copies of “The New Plan for Castries,



















INDUSTRIAL—COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL
Office: Hastings Hotel Ltd.
Telephone 2336

FOR SALE
DOVER, Christ. Church—six. lots
on sea 3 x 10,000 & 3 x 12,000 sq.

ft. also 7% acres. 5 acres. 4%
acres. 3 acres.

BANYAN BEACH — Brighton.
Cement block house, built 1949,
verandah, reception room, shower
bath, kitchen fiitted with Frig,
excellent beach and sea bathing,
water, electricity~ telephone.

BLACKMAN-—St. Joseph, Stone
house built about 1828, draw:
room, dihing room, breakfa:
room, 6 bedrooms, 2 kitchens,
bath room, all outbuildings, beau-
tiful surroundings, standing .in
about 5 acres land, electricity,
water, telephone.

PINE HOUSE — St. Michae?.
Stone house, ‘large ve!
drawing room, dining room, 4 bea-
rooms, bath, toilet, large garage
servants’ quarters, water, elec-
tricity. telephone.

COVE SPRING HOUSE — St.









James. Stone and wood house,
overlooking sea, own private
bathing cove, 4 bedrooms, livii
room, dining room, verandahs,
bath rooms, outbuildings, water,
electricity

ROSLYN — 8th Avenue, Belle-






















PART ONE ORDERS
, B

y
Lieut.-Col. J. CONNELL, O.B.E., E.D.

ville Wooden house, drawing-
dining room, closed verandah,
Commanding, bath, toilet, water, eléctricity,

immediate occupancy.

LITTLE BATALLYS—St. Peter.
Stone house, 2 verandahs, 3 Te-
ception rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 Bath
rooms, kitchen, servants’
water mains and well, electricity,
about 1 acre land.

The Barbados Regiment.
Issue No. 19 May 12, 1950

7 eS ee ee Ce

Thursday, 18 May, ’50; The battalion will parade at 1700 hours

‘ . ; RLVILLE, upper Spooner’:
on the battalion parade ground for a réhearsal for the King’s Birth- a Two storey Rouse, part slope
day Parade. TiS carandan, Kicnea, bo

Owing to the Police Sports on Thursday, 25 May, ’50, there will
be no Regimental Parade.
2. VOLUNTARY CLASSES
Officers: There will be a voluntary class for Officers on Monday,
15 May, ’50.
N.C.Os: There will be NO voluntary class for N.C.O.s on Tuesday,
16 May, ’50. . .
ORDERLY OFFICER & ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK
ENDING 22 MAY, ’50.
Orderly Officer—Lt. S. E. L. Johnson
Orderly Serjeant—214 L/S Clarke, A. H.
Next for Duty
Orderly Officer—Lt. T, A. Gittens
Orderly Serjeant—212 L/S Haynes, G. L.
M. L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
S.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.

SHIPPING NOTICES

——

electricity.

e have and but
the ‘shes "at Gidbes Bay. at.
James, Rices, St, Philip, and in
e City,











REAL ESTATE
JOHN MM:

BLADON

Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE





“FRIENDLY HALL”, Maycock’s,
Bay, St. Lycy. Old est&te home

in good state of préservation with
12 acres of lami and. old

house, mill, stables and cannd

—





ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.












B.W.4, Schooners Owners’ attractive arched vefandah on 2

















































back in

MOVERS — PACKERS — & FREIGHT FORWARDERS |

approximately 1/3
Alexander House,

ground with wide frontage. Coral

stone walls with roof,

James Street, flush panelled doors, ail sult i
Bridgetown. Phone 3024. cupboards. There is 9

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room

gallery, 3 bedrooms, Liphet a

servants’ rooms, room for 2

Provision for solar heater. 5



Property ma:
furnished Y DE Porchiased

ful
reasonable figure. * ¥












DRESS MAKING
Art Embroidery, Beading

Lace and Cut Work
Button Holes Eté,

Also Lessons on Embroidery
Can be arranged

NEW ARRIVALS

ENAMEL WARE

Mugs, Ewers, Plates, Basins,
Ete



250
i Magnificent views,






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» tub bath
' a
By Mrs. Adell Yearwood | 20 x 2x 1% — 26x 1% Kitchen, a
De! 27x 1%4 —26x1% ters, tiled patio faci ’
‘leasa, Laid our gardens. Stand ;
TYRES — TUBES. 80,000 sq. ft. oh

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Christ Church,

quarters etc.
RESIDENCE,—II_ Graeme ui
Road Attractively ‘aakgnee
modern two storey home well set
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YY, 2 bathrooms with
and
TOON eRe
tins. An attra ouaaige
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beach with excellent ba’
facilities. There is a wide
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frontage: 4 bedrooms (3 with
wash basins), laree L shaped

lounge with cocktail bar, ki

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Enquiries invited. te quarters.

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£3,500 or near offer. 5

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Auctioneer & Surveyor
PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640

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Blenders ....

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RINKING THE NEW CROWN





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SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950







CHAMPIONS CANTER HOME

Triple Tie In’
Errol Flynn
Cup Race

From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, May 9
Three Rio Grande raftsme:

pulled to a triple tie in the second
renewal of the Errol Flynn Ghil-
lenge Cup raft race down the
sceni¢e tourist water playground in
Portland on Sunday, smashing thi
1948 record of 938.minutes. with:
splendid 85 minute run down. the
Rio Grande on a six miles journey
from Berrydale to Burlington

The waft race was specially spon -
sored by Movie Actor Errol Flynn
owner of Navy Island, an islet oft
Port Antonio, on Jamaica's north-
coast, who with his fiancee,-Prin-
cess Ghiea, are now holidaying: in
Jamaica, Prizes were distributec|
by the actor, while Princess Ghic
Was a passenger on*onr of the win
ning bamboo craft

Rafting on tne xio Grande, one
of Jamaica’s largest rivers, which
runs through a beautiful valley
and gorge, has always been an at-
traction to tourists in Jamaica, and
became even more popular when
the movie actor came to Jamaiea,
some years ago, bought Navy
Island and other property and or-
ganised races for a cup he.donated
and money prizes donated by the
Richfield Hotel. 5





(SaaS eee



The Amateur Athletic Association |
Of Barbados |

Presents its Big Intercolonial Cycle
Meeting

WHIT-MONDAY.
THURSDAY,

ON

CHAMPION SPRINTER Aber-
nant puts his heart into the job
as he earries champion Gordon
Richards to his 4,000th victory at
Sandown





Barbados Friendly
Football Association

THIS WEEK'S FIXTURES
y i16th—St OldsBoys v

Harcliffe at St.









Leonid Referee Mr
C. Reece Mar 5 Matthews Old
Boys at She 1. Referee 1 E, Clarke
Ta se V Vatic a Bay. Referec
€ it Shel Referee A
Renre Advocate at
Referee Moro FE, Pony
Wavell Sports Club at the Bay Ref
eree iy. J Archer
Thursday BthReed United v St
Nary Old | i Ss Leonards, Ref-
eree: Mr. C ts atthews Old
Boys vs. Coits at |, Referee; Mr. E
Reece
Friday 19th—Penrodt Berwick at S
Leonard Referec \ I Clarke
Nat Maple a e Ba Referee
Mr, 3.9 disor
Saturday 20th—Colts vs. Advocate at S
Leona teferes Ir. O. Grahar
Maple Wavell Sports’ Club at Shell
Referee My J Archer St Matthey
Old Bo St, Mar Old Boy t the
Ba teferec ir. BG

andiso



Baseball Results

NEW YORK, May 13
Results of Major League Base-
ball games played yesterday wer«
American League:—Cleveland In
dians 5,,Chicago White Sox 1;
New York Yankees 3, Philadei-
phia Athletics 2; Washington Sen
ators, Boston Red Sox 3
National League:—St. Louis Car-
dinals 1, Cincinnatti Red

burgh Pirates 3, Chicago Cubs 6







Athletic

Sports

MAY
I

&



3



a 4

AT KENSINGTON OVAL

Under the distinguished patronage of

Lewis



W. Bennett, E. Denny, Austin





Come and see Compton Gonsalves, Linds
Wilfred Tull, Hamilton Bridgeman, C
dad's Lady Flyer, Pear! Gooding in actic
Lisle Carmichael, Harclyde Stuart, C

)
HIS EXCELLENCY, THE GOVERNOR, MR. A, W. L. SAVAGE
C.M.G :

iy Gordon, Laddie
Prince and Trini-
»”n against Ken Farnum,
Keizer, Nazi, A. Hunte,












’ Clarke and the Barbados Lady
Sprinter Grace Cumberbatch. Rae
36 Thrilling Events 36
FIRST DAY : ; ;
1 1 Mile—Novices SECOND DAY
moe mt Roadster LAs Jump
3, 1 Mile—Intermediate 2 Mile Cye )
4 % Mile Grelern + ¥ Mile Cyele—Div. A i
5. 100 yards Flat—Ladies = yords Flat—Ladies )}
6 100 yards Flat~Open 4 220 yards Flat—Ladies »)
7. 100 yards Flat—Boys under 16 lile Cygle—Intermediate ni
8 80 yards Flat—Girls under 16 le Cycle—A Ny
9 3 Mile Cycle—B 7 . ‘ 18 at
10 3 Mile Cycle—A y age Tatas. Pinbetoee Gver 16. }})
11. 440 yards Flat—Open oa, cares Riat-sairig aver 36." 5
INTERVAL 0 yards Flai—Local Men \
12 High Jump e ¢ Intermediate
13. 5 Mile—Intermediate file ¢ leh,
14. 2 Mile Cycle—A : ee
15. 2 Mile Cycle—B 2 Mile Cycle--B
14 «150 yards Flat—Girls over 16 1 t—Open
17. 220 yards Flat—Boys over 16 aie
18. 1 Mile Flat—Open ERVAI
19 440 vards Relay 14 440 yard -lay—Bors’ School
20 9 Mile Cycle—Open > 1 le Cycle—Open
Weight-lifting and Hand-balancing
Police Band in attendance on 2nd day.
Entries close at 4.00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 16
Plan of seats open at Civi iety, Swan Street and High
Street: 10.00 a.m. an Monday 1 )
Heats on Tuesd May 23 at 3.30 \
: T 1A i
Grounds open for practice or € ( 00 pr
\} Prices Kensington Star /-:G Cha Stand. 2/6 |
l
t ; ; ih
)) Uncovered Sta G Y )
nt nt
( tt
?

Mrs. Weiss
Meets Defeat

—AFTER ROUND OF
VICTORIES

LONDON, May 13

Mrs. Maria Weiss of Argentine





SUNDAY ADV

fOCATE

Some Young Playe
To Wateh This Summer

Ry Peter Ditton

The MCC, that austere body

has. in the past week, endeared itself to followers 9f the
game by its praiseworthy action in giving an opportunity

to youth.

Alfas Snatch
Grand Prix
Honours

FANGIO LOSES BY
ILL LUCK

SILVERSTONE, May 13

Sheer ill luck robbed Juan Man-
uel Fangio, the crack Argentin«
river of finishing first or at least
saga high place in the Grand
’rix of Europe which was ru
\ about 210. miles, on the Si!

Stone circuit here. tazday



Right on the tail of the-ewedtua
nner Guseuppe Farina, wi
cnly., 24 miles to go. his Alfa
Romeo car broke an oil pipe, and
he spujied into the -pit with the

body coveredjn oil, and the engia
bolehing, smoke. .

Fang 9, whe was in-the position
to jump to the front in the. ast
fow.. Japs, gvas greathyeupse! at
Poving to-netipe,,anc the Took of
disappointment +on his face said
iuch more than Words eould have
one,

Fangie.had given the crowd

timated to “be 15,000 many
ters with b's skilful and daring
driving. On the corners. he often
left.the spectators amazed by the
he .slid his ear round with
a ceowess that is rarely seen in
such big races.

Alfas Lead

The AlfaeRomeo team by virtue
of the best practice times, made
up the first row at the starting
line today, and .right from the
flag they swept into the lead and
never dropped back then, barring
accidents,

The four Alfas raced alone io
a group, fighting out the lead
between themselves, for Farina to
finish first, Luigi Fagioli second,
and Reg Parnell third.

vay

Times were 2 hrs. 13 mins, 23
secs,

The three Alfa-Romeo = cars
which finished were the only
machines to cover the complete
70 laps.

In fourth and fifth positions
came two French four and a half
litre Talbots which ran the course
without refuelling but completed
only 68 laps.

The Alfas had to refuel once,
but--they- did-—this—at. sueh- speed

was beaten in the final of the wo- (Fangio completed his in 25
men’s singles at the Hurlingham seconds) that the time lost did
Open Lawn Tennis Tournament not matter.
to-day, Mrs. Dorothy Head of the
United Stat taking the honours No Real Race
by 3—6, 6 » 7—5 }

This was Mrs. Head's first Eu- The biggest crowd | ever to
ropean Tournament and the attend a motor race in Britain

strength of her forceful game was
tested to the utmost by the firm
play of the Argentine player who
Showed good control, and main-

tained
length

It was not
that the

an immaculate drivin

powerful shots of
won that set comfortably
At one time in the third set, i
looked
Same had been beaten by. Mrs
Weiss display, but eventually Mrs

Head proved her su#riority wit!

a series of good winning strokes
—Reuter,



MAXIM_K.O'S PETERSEN

MEMPHIS, Tennessee, May 13

until the second sect

the
American began to tell, and she

as though the American’

road race. The four, Italian cars—
the most modern designs entered
—literally led a procession from
the start to finish.

Before the race started, the
drivers were introduced to Their
Majesties. the. King and Queen
and Princess Margaret. It was the
first time that a reigning monarch
t of England had attended a motor
race,

His Majesty on being introduced

#

; to Fangio, asked “Do you speak

) English?” and Fangio shook his
head with a smile. Signor Alessio

Meneral, manager of the Alfa
Romeos acted as interpreter.
“The King said he knew our

team had all made the fastest laps

Joey Maxim, the world light and therefore we start in the first
heavyweight champion, knocked af positions,” he said, after-
out Bill Petersen of Portland Wards. - .
Oregon, (heavyweight) in the 4 The fast lap in the race itself

2i sixth round of a ten-round non- 3
3; Pitts- title bout here last night.

Maxim weighed 13 st., 5 Jbs.
Petersen 14 st 13° Ibs

|
|

WE ARE. OFFERING~.

HILL'S BADMINTON




SMOKING MIXTURE

AT REDUCED PRICE

C. CARLTON BROWNE
Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813

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|





THE STARS
present

1950 CARNIVAL
& PAIR

under the Distinguished
Patronage of Hon. V. C
Gale, M.L.C., Messrs.
F. C. Goddard, M.C.P.,
and E. D..Mottley,
M.C.P

at
QUEEN’S PARK

Thursday, o 8th June

Gates open at 12 noon
Costume Competition, Fire-
works Display, Dancing Free,
Special Display by Barbados
Youth Movement and
Pioneer Group.

ALL STAR... Singing
Competitoin
1.

ADMISSION

PERSONS who ‘
and BOOTHS

g STALLS



s Costumes Bands and indi-

d are asked to register their

« Mr CHARLES €
MORRIS, Sobers Jane



—Reuter

ALSOP ALLELES SOS

LOYAL BROTHERS OF |

was made by Farina with 1 min.
50.6 sees, for the three miles, an
average speed of 94.02 miles per
hour.

————



saw a fine spectacle but no real



rs

LONDON,
which governs English cricket,

This may be England's big
season in internauonar | cricket.
ine yout paw oe Who aaaaVed
auring tie war anu were Curb

.raignt into the first team when

County ecrackel wag resumed ha
194i have now iad the necessary
ime to mature. It remains to be
wnhelmer they jusuly twuenm-
seives ana tollow in
Gr GaP pb, es
w OoheY, Ju@ylana, & +i we
nd their like,
it hus... been particularly en-
yxuragiag lo see, the lead com-
oy from the MC.C. In their two
wwitues against Yorkshire and





rrey. they gave a chance to
ich up amd coming young play-
as Fred Titmus, of, Miaclesex,
b Clarke of Northamptonshire,
cerry of , Lancashire, and
Shackleton. of, Hampshire

It is all, well and good for in-
.ividual ceynties te discover and
coach young players, but the
young cricketer — unless he be
au ther Compton or Bra. man—
vanot get the necessary “big
mitch” atmosphere from oc-
casional appearances in county
ercket. Not until he is honour-
ed by selection for « representa-
ive match—such as these MCC
eemes—can his ability to rise to

the occasion really be = de-

term’ned

Vue ave vecn many cases 1n
Ne pasi, ana there wit probably
be us many in the tulure, where

young players have been granmie
« trial by a county In the nets
hey have bowled unplayable balls
and produced strikes straight from
the text book. But out in the
field of play they have become
bag of nerves and completely uo
able to justify themselves F
such players little can be .done
But correspondingly there are
others who can always produce
that little extra when the oecasion
demands, and it is for players of
this calibre that the MCC are now
searching.

Much has already been written
about. the. tacties the England
Selectors sheuld adopt this’ sum-
mer. when they come to. choose the
team to play in the five-day Tests
against the West Indies. One
school of thought argues that the
ames should serye simply as trials

for the forthcoming MCC visIt to
Australia Others feel that the
West Indies should only be cp-
posed by the best eleven England
can find in. the field

Sufficient to say that when

the time for the first Test daw os
the Selectors will probably find
that even their best eleven will
have all their work cut out to
prevent the West Indies recor4-

ing their first ever victory in
this country,
Nevertheless the Englahd teem

does not pick itself automatically
Players like Compton, Hutton,
Washbrook, Bedser, Bailey and
Evans are more or less assured of

their places but that still leaves
five vacancies to be filled. It
would be no slur on our West

Indian visitors if these places were
filled by young players, not cx-
perimentally but on performan:¢

For the sad truth of the matter
is that England, to date, has not
got eleven players of recognised
Test standard,

If, for instance, Bob Clarke o
Northants should have a_ good
start to the season he should be
rewarded with an England cap.
Goodness knows, we have waric
long enough for a genuine fast

left arm bowler, But it would be

folly to play Clarke simply on the
6trength of what he might do
The same applies to any of the

other youngsters whom the MCC

J

THE

MICHELIN

forc

commerc






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MAY 14













PAGE FIVE





— OFPICIAL CLASSTFICATION

MID-SUMMER MEETING 1950



NO. 119
The Topic
of













A. 1 Dd. 1 F.2 (contd)
Last V V eek Beacon Bright na Perseverance
Blue Stre Firermi
ig PS ’ Pharos II
is: Don Artary
~~’ Drake’s Drur p. 2 Phoney Lad
Elizabethan Riptide
jun Site a %
i =F wiles Rattle Star River Midst
Seawell hxaminer Sinbad
Storm’s Gift Lady Bel Sir Bernard
Sweeper
Soprano
A. ? ia ‘
A. Rr. 1 Straight’ Ain
. a Sunbeam
Atomic ‘a
Slainte Ali Baba Sunfire
The Gamble Kendal & The Fagle
Oatcake
_ 4 Pornada
Wellit n
B. 1 Uusher
Boys something happened Frid Vanguard
A young itl cried “ob hell | Lady Pink es angi
Come Joe-bring Robert with yo. September Son Waterbell
Mr. Mottley in the cell ttn)
> ° Battalion
We rao aeposs the swing bride BR 2 Comet G.1
Spomting the hundred yares, = Dulcibella 4
fren Lou Joimed an the marathon . °
Till we all reached the Main Guard : untone s
Corfu Wuterere Betsam
Je and said, what happe: Jataniz ate
sits tells us right now t t : Mingett
y said, ‘Keep quiet nfusion Rt Monsoon
& e solve this ‘hawkers’ row Landmark .
Periect Set Silk Plant
One time we had a market
With a temperature like hell Rebate sow Bells Tango
So all the hawkers walked oul > 2 Bowmanston :~ .
And in Broad Street they now dwell Silver Bullet a l'yhpoon
War Lord Count Cain Victor
Now the police on the right side Joint Command Chory
Ask them all to walk along azy ’ Vixen
So the hawkers then told Mottley oC. fk, L. : BONE
Cause they can't be wrong and strong Postseript
Well we three were much delighted a i i :
Just to get the “right-of-way Beaull : P,) 2, G. 2,
Cause if Mottley was a prisoner Fabulous
It would be an awful day Fanny Adams
* nd ale ak ea Apollo blue Diamond
Now we ask why Mr. Mottley Flieuxce ' ° =

ust escort them for this wall Leading Artic April Flower Brahmin’s Choice









All the other politicians an Best Wishes ‘ ;
Gone to join the Sugar Talk Racton bn Toad Chindit
; ; Sertorious Bonnie as +.
Talk to-day of Mr. Mottley Swiss Roll Brown Girl Uiana
Join the others less chat ~ . Bullseye Piyir }
But be sure when you're in trouble Southern Cro hay relying Ant
He's the one to “bell the cat Sun Queen can tus Joan's Star
. Ther ie 3 Clementina .
Now poor Joe didn't know no. betler Tiberian Lacy Colleton Lucky Shot
Went alone to see the play Winter Belle F : Mayt
impire Theatre Consternation Slaytime
was’ "Rebecca" by the way o% Cross Bow Mopsy
One of those loud “talkie women mee Cross Roads Otecedol
Who adore in making strife Dunese
Shouted out “Joe got Rebecca on Rena Ook,
Lou must know this; she's his wife Ability Epicure
. . Dainty Be Facetiou

Joe decide and sfimmoned courage

Fair, Contest Flame Flowet



Took Lou to Rebecca's house *
But a nice vase dropped and broke up Kidstead Foxglove .
Made Lou frightened as a mouse Kitchen Front Goblin
Then the neighbours round the mansion Link Stream Hi-Lo Classifiers
Listened in to all this mess Marine Light Joan of Are : .
‘Till poor Robert cried out “shut up’ Musk Lady Rommel
Keep this business from the press . a P 4
. ‘ . Pactora Mary Ann IN. Peirce

Poor Lou standing up bewildeted River Sprite Miracle
Listened to Joe's words ainkind . Tye LIT > Pp ‘
All because he failed to. admit St. Moritz Mocassin L. BR. Gill
Twas Rebecca on his mind Sailors Fun Mountbatten

i’ Hen, Bakvere. tos Lousskeroas Starry Night Miss Friendshi; G. D. Bynor

sped Low's life in pickled sauce William TI Page Boy

All because poot Louw was ftightened



To assume her place as boss - ‘

aa “pp int 8 Subject to change in the event of any horse taking part in any
ete ee ere ae ete fe Meeting prior to the Barbados Mid-Summer Meeting, 1950
Yes he yacht Jeft ber forever







On the happy golden shore
Boat

in pieces, Cabin unlocked

Divers found the broken spar
So in honour of
Joe

a
ane Lou drink J & R,

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makers of
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The tests +

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SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950

Soup Kitchen, Rat
Poison, Steel Sheds

In’ Queen’s Park

(By A Special Correspondent)

SOME interesting facts emerged at the Meeting of
the Association of Cultural Societies held recently to pro-
test against the erection of a second steel shed in Queen's
Park. The Meeting was well attended by representatives

c¥ cultural bodies.

ill
Killed In Fall
From Lorry
AROLD BRATHWAITE, a
labourer of Sargeants
Street, St. John, died almost in-
stantly after falling from a lorry
along College Road, St. John, at
about 5.30 p.m. on Friday.

This accident occurred when
lorry J 9, owned by Bath Planta-
tion and driven by Thomas Ward
of Sealey Hall, was going towards
Palmers. It was loaded with
canes and Brathwaite was sitting
on the canes.

It is understood that the right
upright broke, causing Brathwaite

to fall along with some of the
canes.

POLICE CONSTABLE was

on duty at the north en-
trance to Victoria Bridge yester-
day and he made sure that
pedestrians used the footpath.

He stopped vehicles to allow
those who were on the left to
cross over the road to the foot-
path on the right. ”
ORDAN’S LANE was the scene

of an accident at about
12.55 p.m. on Friday, between
motor *’bus M1448, owned by the
General ‘Bus Company = and
driven by” Ackland Gazette of
White Hall, St. Michael, and a
push cart owned by Mrs. Mustor,
of Dottins Alley and manned by
Bryan Holder of the Union Hotel.
The right wheel of the eart was
damaged.

EMBERS OF THE Church

View Social Club kept up

their ‘first anniversary at the

0 St. Philip, on Thursday night
ast.

The President of the Club, Miss
Ivy Gay, welcomed the gathering
and told them that the purpose of
the Club was to encourage social
activities among its members,

Tne Secretary, Miss Joyce
Lloyd, gave an account of the
work of the Club for the past
year. She said that the Club had
no age limit. They had started
with thirteen members and this

had now increased to thirty-
eight.
Their meetings were held

weekly for about a session of
thirteen weeks and then they took
a short vacation.

“So far we have had three
terms. During the first term we
spent our afternoons’ knitting.
Having had a few expert knitters
in the Club who readily, eagerly,
and unselfishly gave of their
knowledge to others, we have
consequently all done some fine
work and now have qvite a few
qualified’ knitters,” she said.

After expressing appreciation
of the work that had been done
by Mrs. Woodland, one of the
founders who had now left the
island, Miss Lleyd referred to
other activities of the Club and
their expectations of development.

She ended by asking anyone
who desired to offer suggestions
for imprgvement,

“7 T WAS THE JEWISH Trus-

tees that sold the Jewish
Cemetery at Synagogue Lane and
now the Jews are clamouring
to regain it,” an official told the
Advocate yesterday.

He pointed out that the story
is a very complicated one. Mr.
H. P. Graham Yearwood bought
the Jewish Synagogue from Jew-
ish Trustees. Some of the con-
tents of the Jewish Church are
now in various private houses
while the clock afi a pew were
presented to the Barbados
Museum,

oe ae time it has changed
hands fain and it is understood
that the present owners have
promised to give it back to the
Jews providjig certain matters
are dealt with as soon as possible.

He ended, “Tt is the fault of the
Jews themselves that they lost
their Cemetery, and it is hoped
that if they ever regain possession
they would pay better attention

to something they should
treasure.”
DAY IS ODDFELLOWS

DAY throughout the world.
The Grand United Order of Odd-
fellows will be celebrating at
their Lodge Room, Bay Street, at
3.30 o’clock this evening and it is
expected that there will be a good
turn out of members.

HIS EVENING at 4.45 a Re-

ligious Service will be held

at the Y.M.C.A. to open their

weekly programme. The Speaker
will be the Rev. Fairweather.



With the exception of one rep-
resentative, who is also a member
of St. Michael's Vestry, the Mect-
iug Was uuanimous in its indigna-
tion that the Barbados Agricul-
tural Society had been permitted
to erect another steel shed in
Queen’s Park, which would further
impair its beauty. Representa-
tions had been made both to the
Vestry and the Agricultural Society
without avail. Both bodies are
determined to ride roughshod
over publie op.uci.. ,

It was with aporoval and de-
light that the Meeting learned
that the Agricultural Society's ap-
plication for a grant of £1,000
from Public Funds towards the
cost of the second steel shed had
been refused.

The Agricultural Society, in its
Annual Report, dignifies the new
steel shed with the name “Break-
fast Shed.” As it has previously
been pointed out, this is to shelter
the judges of the Annual Exhibi-
tion during breakfast on two days
of the year, and remain an eye-
sore for 363 days. The Vestry
now proposes to use this new shed
for feeding 200 paupers—there is
no information as to where the
paupers will be fed while the
judges are breakfasting there. The
question was asked why the o'!d
steel shed could not be used for
this purpose, and the answer
given was, that it was already
being used for experiments and
the manufacture of rat poison!

Steel Shed

The new steel shed is now in
the process of erection. It is be-
ing put up: below the Queen's
Park Kitchens, and will obstruct
the view from Queen’s Park of
the delightful facade of the
Georgian house occupied by the
Department of Agriculture. Bar-
bados is not rich in good archi-
tecture, and to obscure one of its
fine buildings thus is entirely un-
necessary.

Queen’s Park, one of the main
lungs of Bridgetown, is now
desecrated by steel sheds, a soup
kitchen for paupers and rat poison.

Is-such a state of affairs to be
allowed to continue? . Barbadians
are inordinately proud of Barba~-
dos, it is most regrettable that civic
pride has been so lacking in the
past that such a state of affairs
has been allowed to occur, Civic
pride, however, can be strong
enough to force the removal ot
these offences in Queen's Park,
whatever may be the legal rights
of the Vestry and the Agricultural
Society. At the next election, the
electors of St. Michael’s Vestry can
show their disapproval in no un-
certain terms.

Paupers must be fed, and rat
Poison prepared, but why in
Queen’s Park? The Agricultural
Society has, in the past, done
excellent work, is that enough to
warrant the destruction of the
amenities of the only park in the
island?

It is obvious that successive
Vestries have cared little for
Queen’s Park, and failed to fulfil





Venezuelan Tourists

AAAS
HNN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Spend $200 Each

APPROXIMATELY 800

tourists from Venezuela have

already visited the island this year as against a similar num-
ber which came up to the middle of September.last year, Mr
Vernon Knight, Honorary Vice-Consul for Venezuela and
an Executive of Messrs. DaCosta and Co., Litd., told the

“Advocate” yesterday.

He said that it was gratifying: »

to see the tremendous increase in
the number of tourists coming
out here from Venezuela, Each
year, the is and became more and
more popular for foreign resi-
dents in Venezuela — including
British, American, Dutch, Swiss,
Cuban, Danish, and others.

All the retail shops unanimously
declared .that the visitors were
good spenders espé@cially the
Venezuelans themselves, and
although he: could not say how
much money they actually spent,
yet he thought that $200.00 per
person would be a very conserva-
tive estimate.

Influx

For several years he had been
working on the development of
tourist traffic from Venezuela
prior to his appointment as Vice-
Consul, and the results were now
pleasing to all sections of the
community, as not only the hotels
had benefited from this influx
of tourists, but domestic servants,
taxi drivers and grocery depart-
ment stores.

He said that Messrs. DaCosta
& Co., Ltd. are the agents of
the Venezuela Airline Aerovia.
Venezolanas (Avensa) which
made two special flights to Bar-
bados during the Easter season
and negotiations were now in
progress with the British authori-
ties for this airline to run a
regular service to Barbados.

The company is one of the
leading aviation ones in Vene-
zuela, and with their connections,
they should be able to increase
considerably the volume of pas-
senger traffic generated from
Venezuela, particularly during
the off season from April to
November.

—Permission—

He hoped that permission would
shortly be granted for the com-
pany to operate the service to
Barbados as it would be of
mutual benefit to all concerned,

Mr. Knight said that it was
felt that the leading hotels or

this part of their task. The con- other new interests would have

stitution of Queen’s Park Com-
mittee changes annually. If there
is to be any continuity of policy
with regard to the amenities of
the Park, the Vestry should co-
opt members of the Association of
Cultural Societies on the Queen's
Park Committee. These co-opted
members would have more know-
ledge and interest in matters
affecting the Park than the average
vestryman. If the power to co-
opt does not exist, the relevam
Act should be amended to give
this power,

Royal Visitor

In 1879, a Royal Visitor to Bar-
bados wrote: ‘We also called on
General Gamble, C.B., command-
ing the forces at Queen's House,
where we went round the well
arranged garden, in which are all
sorts of curious shrubs and plants
and in a great tank in a shaay
dell three old turtles of great
antiquity”. Seventy one years have
elapsed since then. Could the
Royal shade re-visit Queen's Park
in 1950, the shock can be imagined.

Queen's Park should be one of
the beauty spots of Bridgetown.
Not only should its walks of trees,
shrubs and flowers give joy to the
residents of the area, but to the
entire community. It should be
one of the places of interest for
tourists to visit, where tropical
plants could be seen, clearly
labelled. Instead the Park is an
eyesore and a disgrace.







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to increase their accommodation
or new hotels would have to be
built, as at Easter time, with the
big influx of tourists from Vene-
zuela, the hotels were already
booked up.

He pointed out that-Holy Week
was the most popular vacation
period for Venezuelans and more
would have come: over, but were
unable to do so owing to the lack
of suitable accommodation.

Employment

This development with Vene-
zuela had also helped in a very
limited way, the labour situation
of the island as from time to
time, domestic servants were
gradually finding employment in
Venezuela, thereby relieving the
unemployment question and
ultimately, those individuals
would of necessity send back
money which would be in valua-
ble hard currency for the support
of their relatives.

He said that it was the unani-
mous opinion of all visitors here
that Barbados was one of the
most wonderful places in the
world for spending a vacation as
the island was blessed in having
all the various amenities to offer
to visitors in the form of wonder-
ful beaches for seabathing, yacht-
ing, polo, horse racing, golf,
tennis etc.

The road system he said also
induced visitors to see the beauty
spots of the island and he hoped
that every encouragement would





When you send us a Prescription, we compound it with that
accuracy and care characteristic of us.
Pharmacies you are always assured of that extra service which
make your shopping a pleasure.

FOR BETTER SERVICE IT’S

KNIGHTS DRUG

Police Dogs

Cane Fires
THE ever-improving local Police
Force may at some time in the
near future, if the Government
approves, be equipped with the
valuable addition of Police dogs,
Col. Michelin, Commissioner v!
Police, told the “Advocate” yes-
terday.

He said that he regards these
dogs as the answer to cane fires,
for not only would they be able
to sniff the origin of cane fires
when in the area, but would track
down the culprit as well.

It was in Trinidad, he said, that
he discussed the project with the
Commissioner of Police there, wit.,
the idea of getting, if Governfnent
would approve, a dog trainer from

Canada for both Farces, the cost
to be shared equally by them.

—Find Out Costs—

Tne Trinidad Commissioner
favoured the suggestion and he
(Col. Michelin) was now com-
municating with the Royal Cana-
dian Mounted Police to find out
the cost. When this was obtained,
the project would be put up to
both governments.

“Apart from their use in the
matter of cane fires,” said Cdl.
Michelin, ‘ dogs are extremely
useful in tracking down persons
wanted by the Ponce und are. in
hiding.”

Col. Michelin said that it was
also hoped that in the not too
distant future, that the Force
would be equipped with the new
V.H.F. wireless set. The present
one was very much out of date
and had outlived its usefulness.

—Three Launches—

The Force had three launches
in operation at the moment, and
it was very necessary that these
should be in wireless communica-
tion with the shore at all times.
At present once they left the shore
they were out of contact. With
the installation of the new wire-
less set this state of affairs would
be altered.

“A new set is a necessity as
speed in communication is vital
to any modern Police Force” sai
Col. Michelin,

Speaking about the taking away
of the rifle from the sentry at the
entrance to the Central Police
Station, he said that the carrying

be given by Government, com-
mercial interests as well as all
concerned in furthering the
development which was taking
place with regard to tourism from
Venezuela.

tate e's ss se ss

NOW FRESH

eee eT ETT YT
Tree treeeocaeeMAMNL ty yy
TATE ANY ‘MEENA YN



ee

mi Reades.

sends a postcard
iviera

2 Stowaways
Return On ‘*Misr’”’

THE two stowaways Marcus
Joseph and Eiter Cummins, after
getting a free trip from Barba-
dos to France aboard the 7,367-
ton chartered French liner
“Mist”, were brought back to
Barbados on Thursday evening
on the return of the “Misr’’.

Marcus and Eiter got aboard
the “Misr” on the night of April
5 and passed themselves off as
third class passengers until the
ship arrived at Plymouth, Eng-
land, on April 18.

They demanded landing per-
mits but the French authorities
imprisoned them on the ship and
took them to Le Havre, France,
where they were landed and

imprisoned.

Marcus and Eiter were brought
back to the “Misr” and again im-
prisoned on the ship. They com-
plained of being hungry, saying
that they had got no food in the
prison at Le Havre.

The “Misr” sailed from Lisbon
and the two men were
turned over to the chief officer
of the ship to work on deck, On
reaching the ports Funchal,
Pointe-a-Pitre, Hort de France
and Port-of-Spain, the ship's
captain ordered them to be kept
behind bars. e

Next pov of their free voyage
was La Guaira, Venezuela, where
the authorities insisted that they
be landed and imprisoned, Again,
they complained of getting no
food in prison.

Eiter and Marcus were two
free men again when they were
landed at Barbados on Thursday

Drove Without
Lights: Fined 15/-

A FINE of 15/- to be paid ia
14 days or 14 days’ imprisonment
was imposed on Reynold Robin-
son of Lodge Road, Christ Church
by His Worship Mr. A. J. H, Han-
schell yesterday for not having

his lights on while driving the
motor lorry S — 217 on Broad
Street on March 31 about 7.10
p.m,

of this rifle was a tradition ex-
tending well over 100 years. When
he first came to the island he con-
sidered it just a relic of the past
and not in keeping with present
day progress. Because it was
traditional, however, he gave it a
great deal of thought before ar-
riving at the conclusion that a more

ful purpose would be served

giving the sentry a stick in-
stead, .

—Law And Order—

The Police, said Col. Michelin,
wanted the public to realise that
not only was it their duty to see
law and order maintained, but
they wanted to give any assistance
possible, The sentry was a persoa
who could be approached and
asked about contacting anyone 1).
the station from whom informa-
tion might be obtained. It was not
desired that he should be regarded
by timid-minded persons as to»
formidable a being to be approach -
ed,



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Roses For
Mothers’ Day

TODAY children and grown-
ups too will be urged to remem-
ber one of God’s best gifts — a
mother. Some of the island's
churches will be celebrating what
is called “Mothers’ Day”. Churehs|
goers whose mothers are still
alive will wear a red rose. Those
whose mothers are dead will
wear a white one,

The Salvation Army celebrated
the festival last week. Last year
there was a special Cradle Roll
service at Bethel’s Methodist
Chureh

The Anglican Church have a
similar festival called Mothering
Sunday which is held in the
middle of the Lenten Season.

;

O'MAHONY IS D.MS.

Under the provisions of the De-
partment of Medical Services Act,
1947 (1947-14), which came ini:
operation on May, 5, 1950, His Ex-
cellency the Governor has been
pleased to appoint Dr. J, P
O'Mahony, Chief Medical Officer.
to be Director of Medical Services,
Barbados, and Dr, F. N. Grannum,
Sanitation Officer, to be Senior
Medical Officer of Health.





25 YEARS AGO
(Barbados Advocate, May 14,
1925)

Since the screening of “The
Ghost in the Garret” Empire
patrons have been anxiously
looking forward to “Three Live
Ghosts” pronounced to be un-
doubtedly the greatest of all
Comedy-dramas

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‘PAGE NINE





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SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOC: _ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN







9S9OSS89SSSS 5599 99 SSSSB SOO FF SASS HOFF I SOFI SH









B.B.C. News:

BBC RADIO













~ . = SS
Church Services i The Presidept and Members of [|| & :
Be aoe KEEP THE Date OPEN fi, | oe aes Tolar nes RELIANCE FREEZERS
METHODIST tion will’ hold their A ° ‘<¢ >
est Indies Cricket Tour. PROGRAMMES Hi |) FIRST DANCE sees Salle eee
BETHEL For the | s ‘ ALSO —
it am. Mr, P. Bruce; 7 Rev, B. | >, : Is :
i i anne ane ) 1} under the Patronage ot Mr. FE { D rE > r : ‘
Daily BBC Broadcasts direct beam on 19.85 metres, 15.07 a eae mmand: } }}\ GRAND FAIR 1 D. Moitiey M.C:P. at the Hall || 3 MAIZE ee MILLS.
For those not interested in megacycles. Comments on re- SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950 DALKEITH ys 1G: eee Gren on eee P % ICE SHAVERS
cricket — if there are any such ception or on the quality of the ,7 am. (The News 710 am. News| !l am. Mr. H. EF. Gilkes; Tp». Mr A} ij) At HASTINGS ROCKS ’ |]] pire Day, 24th May 1950. $ Att Se sis
individuals in the West Indies reporting will be welcome. grass 7 ]5 aim. Mights at the Opera. he Mayers. BELMONT X On SATURDAY, | Muse bY Mr. SYDNEY NILES’ . SOEs ARS Bees cere At ONCE
— these weekly notes on BBC Address these to The BBC, P.O. Programme, Parade. §.15 a.m. Accordeon pits m, Rev. H. C. Payne; 7 Mr. € » June 10th, 1950 )} Orchestra. | °
programmes will prove very Box 408, Kingston, Jamaica, B.W.1, Interlude. 630 am. From the Children's | Brathwaite ; P \ | DANCING ¢ 9 p.n.—3 a.m. Established ‘ 1 p Incorporated
> . ’ » BWA. Hour. 9 Clase De 124 Th SOUTH DISTRICT - : Sale
boring for the next few months. ‘Caribbean Voices’ News. 1210" Pie News Analysis, 12 15] 9 am. Mr. W. W. Alleyne: 7 p.m. M it FUL PAI Tl *ULARS os cag the Art to Dance in ; 1860 I. HERBERT hid 1926
While the BBC tries to cater to * . p.m, Ray’s A Laugh. 12.45 p.m. London | G. Jones {) FULL A g CULS | Be mnene tiful surroundings oe =
The schedule of ‘Caribbean Forum. 1.15 p.m. Radio NeWsreel. 1.30 PROVIDENCE ii} LATER i) DT, CF ag neh ba =. t. 10 & 11 Roébuck Street.
all tastes they have gone to con- yojces’ i ‘ : ‘ aé where soft breezes from the A
Voices’ for May contains very little p.m. Sunday Service. 2 p.m. The News. 11 a.m. Rev, B. Crosby. Holy Commun} )}) . | lantie fan the cheek. 4.5.50—fin
siderable trouble—-and expense— poetry, only three individuals con- 210 Pm. Home News trom Britain. 2.15 | ion. 7 p.m, Mr. ‘T. Callender 4 At. eee : a ir ’
to provide full‘coverage of the tributing to 5 ewe eee, SOP Ble Varter VAUXBALL =
West Indies cricket Sivan” del tributing to the programmes this mabor. 3: 3 Dm). ane Country Trouse. 9 a.m. Rev. B. Crosby. Holy Comm A
ma + 5 e ws. 4. m., ters on. 7 p.m. }. Bascombe

will therefore appear to be con- a. ae oan ue ies p.m. Voice of the violin, 4.30 i — ment eden eee |
centrating on the sport loving Ro a ras ay — Spey: Bal ove, saudi Epilogue’ | in am. Rev. F. Lavevence; 7 pm, Rev A Y
public during the teur and in this ee dace a eee Cane Programme Parade. 5.30 p.m. BBC Sym- wianata Ce eee a our
column we recognise this fact by ‘or uu y Phony Orchestra. 6.35 p.m. From the 9.30 a.m. Mr. W. St. Hill: 7 pom. Mr. V
constant reference to the cricket of Trinidad. Children's Hour. 645 p.m. Michael | St. John

SERVICE

Krein Saxophone Quartet; 7 p.m, The



bean Voices.’ From Monday to
Friday the accounts will cover the
last two days of the match against
Surrey and the three days of the
match against Cambridge Uni-
versity. On Saturday, the open-
ing day of the match against the
M.C.C. i.e. 20th inst. in addition to
the report at 7.15 p.m. there will
be ball-by-ball commentaries from
8.00 to 8.30 a.m., from 10.45 to
11.15 am. and again from 1.00
p.m. to 1.30 p.m. Special beams
will be put on for these com-
mentaries on 16,95 metres, 17,70
megacycles and for the first broad-
cast*there will be an additional

WHITE u ero
; . N 7 10 News A E * 20 a bs all f eo ; >
ie ath Man ee meek begn- = Two. British Writers =. 8 p.m’ Cartobeem “Volnse Poems ae | 3029. Ghat MeCulioush: 7 pa - JUST WELLIAMES 9 «.
ning iy repo! by eye On Wednesd t, 17th inst. 12 Carew of British Guiana, and Short GILL MEMORIAL im the
witnesses will be given at 7.15 at er ae ie = Story by mest Carr of Trinidad. 8] 11 am. Mr. F. Moore; ? p.m. Rev. H, | MAGIC PAINTING
si 8 p.m. Books t Payne | y gy ,

eo ie ke ean grammes on two writers. The Read 8 Seen mm. Britian Masterpieces es HOLETOWN | DRUG LINE BOOKS
time daily—except for the Sunday ‘rst is Sir Walter Scott who is the art, 228 Be Bunaey | Serving: Bie. ane er R Also :

hich will subject of a talk by Lord David The News. 10.10 p.m. From | the BANK HALL ‘i es tie 4 , bias as
programme which w continue : a 4 Bdliorials. 10.15 p.m. Journey into Mel- Sah gad Sida> Ateeeies 9 ns Ss To-morrow May 15th I will be carrying on business
fo be devoted entirely to ‘Carib- Cecil in the series on “The English ody. 11 p.m. The News. De ee FD, Mr CHILDREN ~ CUTOUT BOOKS

PAINTING & TRAC-
' ING BOOKS

Novel’. The second is H. G. Wells,
a new judgment on whom forms a
feature programme at 6.00 p.m.
This critical assessment has been
written by Kingsley Martin, Editor
of ‘The New Statesman and Nation’
assisted by J. F. Horrabin who,
like Kingsley Martin, was a per-
sonal friend of Wells.
British Landscape Painfing
On Sunday, 14th inst. the series
‘British Masterpieces’ will deal
with British Landscape Painting
with, of course, particular mention
of Constable. The talk is by the
art critic Eric Newton and can be
heard at 8.30 p.m. on Sunday.



W.I. Score 468-4 By

Record

Batting

from page 1

e
J. Laker,‘ Alec Bedser, W. Sur-
ridge, G. Kirby, J. Mc. Mahon.
The Start

Goddard won the toss and de-
cided to take first knock in ideal
batting conditions. The tourists
suffered an eXly setback, losing
Roy Marshall with only 9 on the
boards. Allan Rae and Frankie
Worrell brought the score to 56
before Worrell was dismissed,
and at lunch Rae was still at the
wicket, partnered by Everton
Weekes. Marshall mistimed both
the opening bowlers, Alec Bedser
and Surridge, before he was
splendidly caught close to the
ground by first slip off Bedser.

Three quarters of an hour
elapsed before the first boundary
came, from a cover drive by Rae
off Surridge. The first hour pro-
duced 35 runs. Then Worrell fell
to Laker, right arm off spinner
who toured the West Indies with
the M.C.C. two years ago.
Trying to drive, he was well
caught in the slips. He was at
the wicket for 65 minutes for his
ae wet ne had faced most of

ling. Weekes played

Goigntrony and stayed with Rae
until lunch, Rae, employing the
eut freely at the expense of
Australian left arm googly bowler,
McMahon, completed 51 out of
88 in 1 hour, 45 minutes with a
sparkling on drive off the Aus-
tralian. At lunch he was 52 not
out and the total 90 for 2 wickets.
Weekes was 16.

After Lunch

After lunch, and in glorious
sunny weather, Surrey who had
a long time in the field yesterday
against Derbyshire, had to strug-
gle to keep the runs down.

Rae went on to bat well to
make 96 in three hours five min-
utes, Including 15 fours. He tried
to complete his century by

the tea interval. Weekes com-
pleted a forceful century and the
tea interval found the score at
282—Weekes 104, and Walcott 51.

After Tea

In the final period of the day’s
play, Weekes and Walcott com-
pletely mastered the Surrey
bowling and piled up runs well
ahead of the clock. Walcott com-
pleted a fine century, and reached
128 before he was out l.b.w. to
Alec Bedser.

The partnership had added 247
and Walcott had hit 15 bounda-
ries and had batted for 2% hours.

Weekes who was then partnered
by Christiani, batted for 5 hours
and in his 192 hit 21 boundaries.

Christiani was three not out,
and the total 468 when stumps
were drawn.

The scores: —

Scores .

w. a Innings



A. Rae ec & b Laker .............06- 96
R. Marshall c Marion b A. Bedser .. 4
F. Worrell c Surridge b Laker.... 17
E, Weekes not Out oo. peeee ieee 192
Cc. Waleott lbw. b A. Bedser -» 128
R. Christiani not out . of 3
POMOEOE is is Vetus Rasen diane 28
Total (for 4 wkts.) 468

Fall of wickets: 1—9; 2—26; 3—188;
4—435, Reuter,



“Big Three” Reach
Policy Agreement

@ from page 1

(5) The three Governments vr2re

Boston

WRUL 15.29 Mc., WRUW 11.75 Mc
WRUX 17.75 Me

4.30 p.m, Christian Science Programme,
3.05 p.m, Lecture on Christian Science

MONDAY, MAY 15, 1950

7 am. The News. 7.10 am. News An-
alysis. 715 pm. Listéners’ Choice. 7.45
a.m. Places of Interest. 8 a.m. From the
Editorials. 8.10 a m. Pre®ramme Parade.
8.15 a.m. British Orchestral Music; 8 30
a.m. Sid Phillips and his Band; 9 a.m
Close Down. 12 (noon) The News. 12.10
Pm, News Analysis 15 pm. Pro-
gtamme Pardde. 12 18 pm Music from
Grand Hotel. 1 pm. Science Review
1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel. 1 30 pm
Tip Top Tunes. 2 pm The News. 2.10
p.m. Home News from Britain. 2.15
p.m. Sports Review; 2.30 p.m, Meet the
Commonwealth; 3 p.m. From the Third
Programme; 4 p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m
The Daily Service. 415 pm Journey
into Melody. 5 p.m. Listeners’ Choice
5 15 p.m. Programme Parade. 5 30 p.m.
Places of Interest. 5.45 p.m. Dance
Music. 6 pm_ Ring Up the Curtain
7 p.m. The News. 710 pm. News
Analysis. 715-730 pm. Eye Witness
Account of W.I. vs. Surrey. 7,30-7.45
p.m, Light Music. 8 p m. Radio News-
reel. 815 pm. Science Review. 8 30
Pm. Tip Top Tunes 9 pm. The
Animal World 930 pm_ British Or-
chestral Music; 9.45 p.m. The Cathedra!
Organs, 10 p.m. The News. 10.10 pm
From the Editorials. 10.15 p.m. Much
Binding in the Marsh. 10.45 p.m. Com-
monwealth Survey. 11 p.m. The News

Holidays For
Employees

After Round Of Victories

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON.

Seven classes of occupations
are to be recommended to Gov-
ernment by a Committee recently
appointed to recommend the
occupations to which the provis-
ions of the Holidays with Pay Law,
1947, should be extended.

The law was passed in 1947 but
never put into operation, Recent-
ly the Government appointed a
Committee, under the chairman-
ship of the Labour Adviser, to de-
note the types of occupation in the
island for which the Governor-in-
Executive Council should make
regulations for statutory annual
holidays. The types of occupations
to be recommended are: (1): all
manufacturing establishments, (2)
building construction, (3) trans-
portation, (4) dockworkers, (5)
establishments in which persons
are employed mainly in clerical
work, (6) establishments for the
treatment and care of the sick, and
(7) theatres and places of amuse-
ment,

The inclusion of domestic ser-
vants in the categories of workers
who are entitled to annual holi-
days was weighed, but no decision
was reached because it was diffi-
cult for the Committee to see how
legislation could properly be im-
plemented. A _ special report on
this subject will be forwarded to
the Governor.



SPEIGHTSTOWN
11 a.m. Mr. G. Marville; 7 p Rev
F. Lawrence

SALVATION ARMY

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL

11 am. Holiness Meeting: 32 p.m. Com
Pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Mecting.
Preather : Major Smith.

WELLINGTON STREET

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting: 3 p.m. Com-
Pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
Preacher : S/Major Gibbs

SPEIGHTSTOWN

ll a.m Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
Preacher: S/Captain os ‘ampbell

CARLT

11 a.m. Holiness Mocting: 3 p.m, Com-
pany Meeting: 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
Preacher: Lieutenant Reid.

DIAMOND CORNER

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 2 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
Preacher : Lieutenant Moore.

SEA VIEW

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m, Com-
pany Meeting: 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
Preacher : Lieutenant Gibbons

FOUR ROADS

11 a.m Holipess Meeting; 3 p.m, Com-
pany Meeting: 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
Preacher Lieutenant Hinds.

ST. MATER LUTHERAN CHURCH
Lower Greens, Bridgetown

Open Air Service at 7 p.m. Rev. W. F

O’Donohue, Speaker; Subject What i

Error". Wednesday Evening at 7 pm
Open Air Service at the same Ar
to listen to Dr. Benkingson, D D Sermon
6 p.m. Sunday.
MORAVIAN

ROEBUCK STREET 11 a.m. and 7
p.m. Rev. Ernest New.

*GRACE HILL—1l1 a.m. Mr. Swire. 7
pm Mr O. Weekes.

FULNECK—11 am. Mr. Alleyne. 7
p.m. Mr. Smith.

MONTGOMERY~—7 p.m..Mr, Greene.

SHOP HILL—7 p.m. Mr. Downes

DUNSCOMBE-—-11 a.m, Mr. F. Deane
7 p.m. Mr, Francis.

CHURCH OF GOD

St. Michael
11 a.m. Bank Hali Rev. M. B, Pretti-
john; 7 p.m. Eckstein Village; Elder R,
H, Walkes



Christ Church

11 a.m. Poarded Hall: Rev. E. W
Weekes; 7 p.m, Cox Road Rev. E. W
Weekes

St.
ll am Sherbourne : MEles R. H. Walkes

1l a.m, & 7 p.m, “Crab Yai : Rev. A, R
Brome.

|



Se

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} SEA VIEW GUEST |)
HOUE

HASTINGS, BARBADOS



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FULLY STOCKED BAR
RATES: $5.00 per Day &
upwards

(Inclusive) i
Apply-~ |
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EXCELLENT CUISINE |

}

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Ww. MEWMT



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straight driving Jim Laker, but
instead Laker held the ball at
the second attempt.

“CLIFTON,” BRIAR, MAYFAIR AND EVERDRY
— also —

TOBACCOS.
FOUR SQUARE, CAPSTAN, LOG CABIN, CLASSIC,

GOLD BLOCK.

COLLINS' DRUG STORES

and. social conditions there.

Weekes, after a slow beginning
reached 50 in 78 minutes.

Clyde Walcott joined Weekes

and this pair proceeded to take

operation between Britain, Hill and 40-year-old Ursula Fenty
France and other African pow-. Of Bridge Gap, were both found

LOLOL

SPOOL LOPES PODS SOOO TOE COE ~












“ nae a oa and the United States. By ey te eaterday ie the eae Clubs, Associations, Church- ’ :
eavy toll o e Surrey bowling. onsultations between the y . Ss especial! issions 444 £6660
Rae had left with the score at Ms three powers should be more and assaulting Island Constable Cultural Boeetion 5 oie SSS ~ LSPA OOOO OOOO oe dicidictntshacidichitcititidid
frequent. The Ministers agreed Herbert Mayers while in the exe-
to meet again soon— ibiy cution of his duty.
in New York before fhe next Hamblin was fined 25/- for the
meeting of the General Assem- obstruction and Fenty 15/- for the
bly of the United Nafiens. assault. The offences were com-
: —Reuter. mitted on May 12.







Cultural Societies ete.
Leaders of the above or-

Yn
nv
i
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i
There has been a grow- H
ing demand from overseas
for more information re-
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188, and the second century was.
soon hoisted. Weekes scored all
around the wicket, and Walcott
punched his way past 50 before

Churchill’s
Colt Wins
£500 Stakes

KEMPTON PARK, Middlesex,
May 13.

Mr. Winston Churchill saw his
French-bred four-year-old colt,
“Colonist II”, win the £500 Victor

'ild Stakes over one and a half
miles here this afternoon.

Tremendous applause broke out
as soon as it was seen that the colt
had the race won a lofig way from
the post, and the cheering con-
tinued right until “Colonist I”
had been led into the winning
enclos\re.

“Colonist II’, ridden by T.
Gibbs, started 5—4 and beat the
odds on favourite Jai Mahal by
three lengths.—Reu!

4

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Seas tment od oe = =
Sa

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stocked with

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at $8.85 per 100 Cash







garding the history, mem-
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lication in the next issue of
the BARBADOS ANNUAL
REVIEW which is now be-
ing compiled) are kindly
asked to send the necessary
information written briefly
on one side of the copy,
and posted before June 15th
1950, to the STOMARA
PUBLICITY Co., c/o A.
LLOYD MAYERS, “Sto-

mara”, Clapham, St. Mi-
chael, Barbados, B.W.I.

SHOOTING SEASON WILL START

=
=










EMPIRE WEEK EXHIBITION
1950
at Combermere School May 24-27

LOWER PRICES!
LOUIS L. BAYLEY,

Jewellers.
Bolton Lane & Victoria St.

Sole Representative Rolex Watch Co.

IT IS IN YOUR INTEREST
TO MAKE ADVANTAGE



STYLISH LADIES’ and
CHILDRENS’ SHOES

With Low Wedges in White Nubuck and Black Suede.
ALL SIZES IN STOCK.
FASHION CREATIONS IN READYMADE DRESSES,

OF THIS FREE PUB-

basic@Tly agreed as to the im- . Einod

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opment o e peoplés 0: ,

Africa and improved economic : For Assault

There should be close| co- _ALONZA HAMBLIN of Station
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TENNIS SHORTS, BEACH WEAR, ETC.

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under the distinguished pat-
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WILLIAM FOGARTY LED, |
:

: (Inc. in Br. Guiana)
MODERN HIGH SCHOOL Dry Goods Dept
DETAILED results of the 1949 Cambridge School Certificate have now arrived and are

%,
%
% make it look
s,
3
quoted below. ' x
%
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x

nee eo more attractive with





Saturday, 3rd June,



lL

The Girl Guide|!
|

|

|







The School entered 14 candidates for the whole examination 13 of whom passed (5 1950 Have Just Opened “l uw
with exemption from London Matriculation).
Besides this, 8 ona agariineg certificates 7 of which were with distinction or credit eu ae hike he follow! ;
were obtained. % ea ' We can now supply you with the following sizes in
; Of the 5 candidates passing with exemption 1 was superannuated from Form II Har- % THE DRILL HALL ( A FINE ASSORTMENT OF attractive Designs at reasonable prices.
» rison College in 1948. % from 3 — 10 p.m. i § SQUARES :
N.B. This is the ONLY school to offerexaminees in oral French, a most necessary x he Statio abe patina ets tH 3 yds. x 2 yds. 3 yds. x 2% yds
accomplishment in the learning of a foreign language. % peed 0 er) ae i " 3 yds. x 3 yds. 3 yds. x 314 yds.
: ee ae : oe : 3 yds. x 4 a
Subject | No. of Entries (Distinction and; Ordinary | Failures x There will be a Guide Dis { —_ ALSO —
? Credit Passes Passes | % play at 4.30 p.m. and a In White Calf, Black Calf 27 ins. WIDE
Re Nei On ie Me tae eae | rate % Variety Concert by the i , 36 ins. WIDE In continuous LENGTHS
Pogtieh Language .. “a 14 6 7 | 1 x Police Band at 8 p.m { Red—Black and Brown Suede 72 ins. WIDE
i is 9 8 1 0 % A Baleith Blevcia wil. be vi ; . Try us before purchasing elsewhere.
: Written’ French ci us 14 12 2 0 s pated wae ae y In a wide variety of Styles
i eeocmiiede ) Ye | ee a :
s gious Know ge ‘ x Admissi seg 233 1/- ‘5 — Also — Th B b d H d ( Lt
® English Literature .. os 3 | : 4 1 : i. on . ‘ mer ee e ar a OS ar ware 0., :
% Spoken French s i 2 fidren under 14 ::: 6d !
Ses ee ee ERE aR AcE ET i L. A. LYNCH, om Seouts & Guides CHILDRENS WHITE ! (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
: : Principal % ingeliorm 64 | ee Il! os 33 & 52 SWAN STREET PHONE 2109, 3534 or 4406
Sonmmnneeses SOSSSO SSS OOS LOOSE C3VPP QE @ QE REX __ EO@E y ===
‘ i





Full Text

PAGE 1

! SUNDAY. MAY II. H50 IMM N*WM SIAIHY IDVCM Ml PACK FlrTKr.N West Indies Cricket lour BBC RADIO PROGRAMMES Daily BBC Broadcasts direct beam on 1B85 metres. For those not interested in megacycles. Comments u cricket — if there are any such eeption or on the quality i individuals in the Wet Indu-reporting will be wile — these weekly note* on BBC Address these to The BBC. P.O. httmmniT'pmiit* lit am A !" .^ programmes wit] prove very Box 4C*. Kingston. Jamaica. BW I. ^'^^.^cLZ'JZ22 n*i£2?i!i2 beting for the next lew month-. Caribbean Voice** •* %  *.• P . N. A-ii^Ti. is While the BBC^ tries to cat^r -. -Th, schwtulc of -Caribbean t^*\\f 9 \?*^" M UZ*riZ all tastes they have gene to eonVoices'for May contains very little P^ni., Ctfei i p-'Tx.. atderable trouble—and expense— ... .„* j.... rf „.i. — i to provKlf full'coverage ol the Indie, cricket matches ana En0n O l 7"o M Of theat'wffl be heard J >£, '?*' N V Sunday. 14th May. — E M. will therefore appear to be centra ting public during the tour'and in this column we recoynise this fact by constant reference to the cricket broadcasts. For the week beginning 14th May reports by eyewitnesses will be given at 7.15 .. p.m. each day in the West Indies u, re w,n ** two BBC half-hour which begins at that r m m *. " lwo w tributor on Sunday is Ernest C of Trinidad. Two British Writers On Wednesday nexi,_17th Inst. proThe time daily-except for the Sunday "< ls %  Walter Scott who is the programme which will continue -ubjeei of a talk by Lord David ££, 0 !" to be devoted entirely to CaribCecil n the series on "The English jg"gj bean Voices/ From Monday to Nov,er The seeond is H. G^ Wells. •£ Friday the accounts will cover the %  new Judgment on whom forms a WRUX i last two days of the match against 'ure programme at 1.00 pm Surrey and the three days of th This critical assessment has been match against Cambridge Uniwritten by gingsley Martin Edito verslty. On Saturday, the openof The New Statesman and Nation log day of toe match against the nwutod by J F. Iforrabin who. M.C.C. i.e. 20th Inst. In addition to >'ke Klngsley Martin, was a perthe report at 7.15 p.m. there wfll """I fri nd < w lls _ be ball-by-ball commentaries from British Landscape Painfint: 8.00 to 8.S0 a.m.. from 10.45 to On Sunday. 14th inst the 11.IS a.m. and again from 100 'British Masterpieces' will deal T ip TVTU* "i o'm p.m. to 1.30 p.m. Special beams with British Landscape Painting pm Hl ridge. G. Klrby, J. Mc. Mahon The Start Coddard won the toss and decided to take first knock In Ideal batting conditions. The tourists suffered an eAfJy setback, losing Roy Marshall with only 9 on the boards Allan Rae and Frankie play. Weekes and Walcott Worrell brought the score to 56 pletely mastered the before Worrell was dismissed, bowling and piled up runs well .From Our Own Coemporulmt) and at lunch Rae was still at the ahead of the clock. Walcott comKINGSTON wicket, partnered by Everton pletd a tine century, and reached Seven classes of occupat: After Tea i the final period of the day's Holidays For Employees After Round Of Victories Weekes. Marshall mistimed both 128 before he the opening bowlers, Alec Bedser Alec Bedser. and Surridge, before he was The partnership had added 247 appointed splendidly caught close to the ground by first slip off Bedser. Three quarters of an hour elapsed before the first boundary ind Walcott had hit 15 boundaies and had batted for 2*i hours. Weekes who was then partnered by Christianl. batted for 5 hours out l.b.w. to ar e to be recommended to Government by a Committee the recommend came, from a cover drive by Rae and in his 192 hit 21 boundaries, off Surridge. The first hour produced 35 runs Then Worrell fell to Laker, right arm off spinner a "d ihe total 468 when stumps who toured the West Indies with WGre d Scores. 9. Woi — ii E Weehe. r C Walcott l the M.C.C. two years ago. Trying to drive, he was well caught In the stipe. He was at the wicket for 85 minutes for his 17, but Rae had faced most of the bowling. Weekes played delightfully and stayed with Rae until lunch. Rae. employing the cut freely at the expense of m Australian left arm googly bowler, i McMahon. completed SI out of 88 In 1 hour. 45 minutes with a sparkling on drive off the Ausran trallan. At lunch he was 52 not -*& out and the total 90 for 2 wickets. Weekes was 16. After Lunch After lunch, and in glorious sunny weather Surrey who had T' %  • a long time in the Held yesterday I'olK'V ACTCeiTieiU against Derbyshire, had to strugJ ^B upalions to which the provls ions of the Holidays with l\iv IJIW 1947, should be extended. The law was passed in 1947 but never out into operation RecantChristian! wa three not out. }Li^„,^' e 1 ^' n i l ,f p, ^ intcd .J .u_ .„.-. • „.i— ....„. Committee, under the chairmanship of the Labour Adviser, to derote the types of occupation in the, island for which the Govemor-inExecutive Council should maki regulations for statutory ann holidays. The types of occup,.ti. to be recommended are. (1) The scores: — "Big Three" Reach gle to keep the runs down. the ball at Rae went on make 96 In three ho utes. Including 15 fo to complete his straight driving Jin Instead Laker held the second attempt. Weekes, after a slow beginning reached 50 In 78 minutes Clyde Walcott joined Weekes and this pair proceeded to tak? heavy toll of the Surrey bowling. Rae had left with the score at ltS. and the second centur> wai. soon hoisted. Weekes scored all around the wicket, and Walcott punched his way past 50 before bat well to iirs five mlnjrs. He tried (5) The thrc century by Laker, but from page 1 manufacturing esti bllnhnienl; building construction, (3) tram portation, (4) dockworker*. (5 establishments in which panotH are employed mainly In clerical work. (6) establishments for the treatment and care of the sick. (7) theatres and places of nm event. The inclusion of domestic s. vants in the categories of •rork •no ara entitled to annual holidays was weighed, but no dec! ched because it was difficult for the Committee to see how legislation could properly he plemented. A special report this) subiect will be forwarded to the Governor Two Fined For A88atill AI-ON7.A HAMBUN of Slat; Hill and 40-year-old Ursulii Penty of Bridge Gap. were both found guilty by His Worship Mr. A. J. II Hansehell yesterday of obstructing and .i..s. inning Island Constabl i the %  rnmenls vjre baslcgTIy agreed as to the Importance of the politic*' development of the peoples of Africa and improved economic and social conditions there There ahould be close' cooperation between Britain. France and other African powers and the United States. (6) Consultations between the three powers should be mote frequent. The Ministers agreed Herbert Mayers while to meet again soon—possibly f^on of his duty. In New York before the next Hamblin was fined 25/for the meeting of the General Asscmobstruction and Fenty IS'for the bly of the United Naffcrns. assault. The offence* were com—Renter. milt ed on May 12. EMPIRE WEEK EXHIBITION 1950 a* Combermere School May 24-27 Churchill's Colt Wins £500 Stakes KEMpTON PARK. Middlesex. May 13 Mr. Winston Churchill saw his French-bred four-year-old colt, •Colonist II", win the £500 Victor Wild Stakes over one and a half miles here this afternoon. Tremendous applause broke out as soon as it was seen that the colt had the race won a loAg way from the post, and the cheering continued right until "Colonist IT 1 had been led into tho winning enclosure. "Colonist II". ridden by T. Gibbs. started 5—4 and beat the odds on favourite Jal Mahal by three lengths.—Reatcr. MODERN HIGH SCHOOL DETAILED results of the rM9 Cambridge School Certificate have quoted below. The School entered 14 candidates for the whole examination 13 ol with exemption from London Matriculation). Besides this, 8 supplementary certificates 7 of were obtained. Of the 5 candidates passing with exemption 1 was superannuated f rison College In 1948. N.B. This Is the ONLY school to offer examinees in oral French, accomplishment In the learning of a foreign language STYLISH LADIES' and CHILDRENS SHOES With Low Wcdm In While Nuburh and Murk Huedr ALL KIZES IN STOCK. FASHION CREATIONS IN READVMAIIE Mill --> BLOUSES. SKIRTS. SLACKS. HOl'SE COATS TENNIS SHORTS, BEACH WEAR. ETC UllESS t-aai row 11 m HoUnro Mtrum I I>ny Mf*tina: 1 pin Balm Preacher : Lteutenaiil H-I DLAMOm* i OHM it . HollSMl Meel.n I pint Mrrlim T pnv K*ltat. Prrarhri Ueutenai SgA VII* • m Hfilir.ru Merlin. 1 |> m TomMeelinc. 1 p.m. : %  mi aOAD* • %  m ComHeelins'1 pii. aaSa sr. MAIEB LiraraAK can m H !• %  • OIHIII. iiiimn.-i. Open Air Mrrvu-r *i I i i; 'Danohue. Speaker. Subleti What I. Error" W*nwd*y Kvenina a' 7 pm Open Air Seivlre ..' ti .... Ii k,,.. hofiu-iK -.TMter .HAU: HILL n I > WrekP* I 'I NECK II am m M. s,. ,n, MOHTCOUXRV T p SHOP mi i DKNSCUMBE II a m. M %  D S„ :. 7 fff THAT l*i III I i I FTTTiXV SiiT s*:*: i\s HUM \v'e can Supply . TROPICALS. WORSTEDS FLANNELS Etc. FOR EXPERT TAILORING BACKED BY PUNCrUALITY PHONE 2117 .JL II'. HEWITT K Op|-ji'.Fir,Bnoade—Coleridur Street I Ml SI IHOI I TOE \i i,-Fi iirosi -in n UN TWO KTKr.NCTllSI i:i I.I l \K IN Till: M-I.I.OW i \I:KIS Mil II ilOK ( llll.OKr N> IN Till: Hit t. CARTON 1 MI'sri.KOLr. is ., n< n stuiriiiig ir-n i in m Vapoui Client 1 It il which correctlv applied will l.rnii 1NSIAN V HKI.IBF to t %  'i Ml' i in I COLDS—SOUtUOaVT and all kinds ef Ml SClTLAK ACHES and 1'AINS MI'STI-ftOI.t: i.li. ve eongestlofl awlftlv and efieetively... YOU .vhi.uKi never be uitheul a ).n of Ml SIHtULl m Hi,house. It s MlSTMtOLr: for both ...lull* and children. RETAIL I'KKJ: 2 t A JAR. t.hUinaMe at . Messrs Booker's (BDOSI |)ru^Stores Ltd. Broart Street and Alpha Pharmacy. lUxllugv And at ALL 1IR1 (• sTORtS. -.-.-,e...*..^e.-^^ > e i e J e^^^,e.e^,e^^.ex^.*-*.-.-r*-e^'^.'ir>r,.' Sub)l English Language LaUn Written French Mathematics .. Religious Knowledge English Literature ., Spoken French No. of Entries 14 t 14 14 UisUnction and Credit Passes I a it ii 10 • L. A. LYNCH. Principal. hich were with distinction or credit





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PACK FOI'II SUNDAY ADVOCATE HINDAT, MAY II. 193" Spartan Trounce College 7—0 Sparun easily drubbed Collet 7-0 when they met in a Hist division football fixture at Kensington Oval yesurdy afternoon. Four of the noals were netted In the first hah. W EST INDIAN cricket dffdM CM p.nli.-.il.irly happ> to-day over the performance of the West Indies cricket team in England who scored 468 runs for the lots <>f four wickets in the first day of play against Sum Following closely upon their lwo-day win over Yorkshire by three wickets and their impressive draw with Worcestershire in the opening fixture of the tour, this performance against Surrey augurs well for the future success of the team during the tour. IMPRE88IVE OPENING T IE West Indies are certainly not out of the wood yet, nor are Ihey "blooded." in the accepted sense of the word as far as the tour is concerned but come what may, they have opened their tour in keeping with the high rating which competent judges of the game have placed upon them by Imperial cricket standards. It la true that the Yorkshire game appeared a close thing but it must be conceded that the Yorkshiremen were at home and so had experience in their favour In the scales of balance. We must at once admit that with Ramadhin and Pierre padded up in the pavilion there was not much hope of our negotiating any reasonable total'if the Rae-Jones partnership had been broken. On the other hand it must be remembered that the Australians In their victorious tour of England in 1948 came nearer to defeat in their game with Yorkshire on May 5 and 6 than in any other match of the tour. AUSSIES NEARLY LOST r IOSE who followed the game will remember that a missed catch •t a critical period cost Yorkshire a great chance of atoning for their disappointment against the 1938 team at Sheffield and so being the first county to beat the Australians since 1812 when Hampshire triumphed. DISPLEASURE The seven goats were scored by Johnson who kicked ... three, Trotman 2 and Walcott I. The other goal College netted on themselves the result of a melee in their goal area. • Spartan showed their intention of scoring early and the first goal F%J\JiDALdLi c m Ttom a corner, kicked M Boyce on the left wing and Johnrrv/rrrnrc on m d nt> mistake in kicking FiJL i UKiLb it into the nets. The second was netted very soon alter when Walcott receiving a pass from Johnson ran down unmarked and acored in the right hand corner of the goal. At this stage the College defence was beginning to weaken id Johnson took full advantage M.Rdat. Mar IS i n an pin and L P Harrt. • Pli-kwlc* I N.\rM. 1.. 1 B H..vr *• Collcae it.i.T. Anon "0 D. W Sav.r. SECOND DIVISION l*..*.. Mar | Kvarton v. V M PC K.f. %  il. .. *. YSIPC ".(-.,. %  N Madfont IMTta.aCHOOI. TMSSW, Ma* %  • Lodar vi r n imiM. v. Comawrmnr al Col. i.i< Hrln** 1, Thoma. SrMaf. Mar St l.-U. vi CombHaMrt al Lod. r r*r a. Anwr num. DIVIflON i ... % %  MBT !• Caltlr and Wlrrl v. YMCA B.^...ll Hall Hrfra>: C. Smith I I ...1r Empi paj Hl*rc* : OH 'MOYRA BLAIR" WINS A SECOND TIME Commodore Wilkinsons "Moyra Blair", skippered by his son Tom. scored her second victory for the season when she defeated all othej 'B' Class boats at the Ninth Regatta of ihe R.B.Y.C., which took place in Carlisle Bay yesterday evening. This race was a very keen one Ur J. W. P. Harkness' "Circe", which started first, looked a sure "he'nierltsTot otuy'of ^nbempor'ary thoroughbreds but also those of winner as It kept Its lead throughdifferent periods. For instance, looking al a classification list of toout the first lap and up to the lime d nnd lnat in comparison with one of 1930 there is little difference it reached, the Neednam's Point in trM general standard of the runners in class "A '. buoy. On reaching this bupy Naturally there must be some difference of opinion when one Muyra Blair", which was only a compares horses of different periods and of course 1 do not meani few yards behind, crept into the say that Beacon Bright. Blue Streak and bun Site (three ot todays lead and before • %  Circe" could giants) are of exactly the same vintage as Tom Pearson Bambolin^ ^neJeSv clear the buoy Fanand Senator, three who raced around 1930 But when I say that 1 .. MM w* !" n Bright. Blue Streak and Gun Site are genuine A class • —imething because tbe standard of the class has reThis to my mlqd M a decided feather in the cap of the authorities who control racing iu Barbados and Trinidad. Tranquillity Leads Savannah IT IS a remarkable thingthat in the last thirty years classification of racehorses in Barbados and Trinidad should have remaine.. so consistent. All the more so because it passed through a very try^M ing period during Ihe last war. By consistency I mean that a certain c standard has been maintained whereby it has been possible to judge of this and scored the third goal after a pass from Boyce. SAVANNAH won two of the Occasionally, there was some four games yesterday afternoon play in the Spartan goal area but ul *• Garrison Io make their V ~ Tnev rt n uhed in that ordei custodian Harris had very little •* three as against five oy the *> ^ ^J „ m norUl sb out ll4 to do. The greater part of the play visiUng Tranquillity team from „ hl brwie which was was seen in the College goal ana Tr> "'* d a especially not suitable for the and after a melee In front of the Mrs R s Bancroft of Savan<,„_boarders. Only the "ResoCollege area. Johnson scored a Jn J** 1 ">* C. De Verteull in |u|e .. lf) tne n claM .^^ fourth about three minutes helotlh -* !" "?' M .*—*• ?—£ i n the Intermediate, did not start. Referee Wilkins blew for ball wh M D Wood and J. D -Mohawk", owned by Dr. David lime. Trimmlngham also of Savannah d ,klppered by Bob Cumbeat Miss M. Trestrail and T. ^^^tSJSl^secsmd victory listened with considerable displeaErneM Eytle of British Cluii.n.i ov.i ii.kri crowds were in The "Daily Graphic" W E IN the West Indies havi sure to the comment of urn the H B.C. on Saturday, May G Mr. Eytle in his broadcast found so many (laws in Ihe cunstit.iUon of the West Indian team, thai it was small wonder thut they held Worcestershire to an honourable draw, to say nothing of defeating Yorkshire in two days. Yesterday's showing against the Surrey team is another indisputable indlcaUon of the potential strength of the West Indies team. While we all appreciate and nre greatful for constiucUve criUcism, yet we In the West Indies can scarcely be expected to swallow the indigestible pill of defeatism. U.K. CRITICS PRAISE A FTER the West Indies' performance in Ihe opening days of play *V against Worcestershire Alex Bunmslcr I I the "Dally Mull" opined that after having seen Wcekr* and Worrell, Ihe non-sale of lags, day test tickets was interesting. Bannister was convinced thnt the English 4 for the biggest treal they have had since the um was equally enthusiastic. Charles Bray of the "Dally Herald", whn covered the M.C.C. lour lo the West Indies, in 1948, with whom I assoeiuled during his stay here and for whom I hold the greatest respect with regard to his knowledge of the game, wrote in the "Daily Herald". "Mark my words, the West Indies cricketers are going to !• one of the most attractive tides ever to visit this country. And 1 urn not forgetting ihe ull-conqueruig Australians ot 1941." MORE KUDOS C RAWFORD WHITE of the "News Chronicle", who also accompanied the 1948 M.C.C team to the West Indies, was "Intrigued by the class of the West Indies batsmen". In the face of these reports, one effnnot reconcile Eytle's strange observations on the West Indict team which he gave over the BBC. on Saturday. May 6. Eytle found fiiuh with Kamadhin's bowling, with Walcott's wicket-keeping, with the West Indies fielding among other things. To Judge from his remarks, the West Indies should have lost their match against Yorkshire. Joint county champions last year, perhaps in one. day, but this was not so. ..., Subsequent evenU have proven VlMirvtiM %  %  P-Vl p to be a self ^appointed much about the West Indies team as I know about the "flying saucers". MEN WHO KNOW Responsible circles in the West Indies have always deprecated any attempt by West Indians resident In England to set themselves up as "men from away". We who have followed personally the'1948 M.C.C. tour to the West Indies, which by the way Mr. Eytle has not, will at once prefer to err with comiictenl judges of the game tike Charles Bray and Crawford White than shine with Mr Eytle. a selfstyled expert on West Indies cricket. It may or may not have been in the Interest of West Indies cricket that Mr. Eytle cannot claim .he honour of having represented either British Guiana in intcrrn1oni.il cricket or the West Indies in international cricket: but the (SCl rs mains, he has not. Constructive criticism must at till times be appreciated, but we in the West Indies will never tolerate any opinions that ran only be construed as figments of the imagination when thev are compared with responsible opinions of people, who ullhough they belong to another race, have openly expressed opinions Hint differ almost diametrically. Yardley Leads M.C.C After half time Spart,i/i changed up their formation. Harris was seen at right wing ai.d Chase in die goal Very soon after the. kick off Trotman taking a pass from Walcott ran through to score the fifth giving Smith no chance to save. T he schoolboys were always seen bundling and very soon Uiey scored on themselves as fullback Gibbons trying to clear kicked into his own goal. About five minutes before the end Trotman again scored making the total seven. The teams:— Spartan: Harri*. Gibbons, Bowen. Glttens, Ciidogan. Haync-. Chase, Johnson. Walcott. Trotman and Boyce. College. Smith. Gibbons, Morrison. Morris. St. John, Simmons. H.KI V O. Smith. C. E. Tudor, Williams and F. U Tudor. The Referee was Mr. P. WilSehjo'seth 7—5, 6—3. Mixed Doubles games v of the The great thing about the "A" class of to-day Is the quantity In this division and its sub class "A2" as well as the fact that half the number is made up of native bred horses. Having established the fact that there has been no lowering of the general standard in the top Dawn" c i aMi this immediately tells us that we are breeding better horses today than we were In 1930. At that lime class "A" was made up of two or three imported horses only. It also tells us that racing In general '" the B.W.I, is on the up-grade. According to the most recent classtficaUons issued by the BarbaIs season in the Intermediate dos Turf Club and the Trinidad Turf Club, one of which Is published other victory was on the opposite page, there are now 18 animals In class "A" and "A;*' berbatch scored her second victory m, pi... Tn other victory was on tne opposite page, mere arc now 10 ifuuidi& m I-.BK. n uuu •-•* r-L in ihf. cevon'h Reealla and 16 of these are native bred and 4 of these sixteen are Derby winner ixed Doubles • r red A n 1 "2,5*1 ",, Jvertu.ncd either in Jamaica. Trinidad or Barbados. Added to this we find 24 t^t back horses classified in division "B" and "B2", of which 3 In the other name. Mi:.;. M. Trestrail and H. Nothnagel of Tranquillity beat Mrs. A. L. Perkins and C. R. Packer 8—1; t—2; while F Gun Munro of Tranquillity carried vit m !" „ the Men's Singles from P E Worme g—1: 7—5. but on this occasli safely to Its moorisg. Coming; second in the was Sydney Nurse: Clytie" which he himself skip, he ireolei Undoubtedly the best match ot pcred. So far Clytie hasSpecn .econd on a previous occasion but has not yet scored a victory for Three of these five are classic winners In the same three colonies as inter mentioned above. Comparing these figures with the corresponding classes in 1930 I cannot say off hand what the totals were then, but I can tell you that much smaller and, In addition, not one was a native bred e. In fact there were no creoles above class "D" In those days. The above, in my view, are the most significant points about the classifications recently issued by the respective Turf Clubs of Trinidad and Barbados. Another point of interest in the recent classification by the B.T.C is the number of two-year-olds there are on the list. 1 have counted 15 so far. This, I believe. Is the greatest number ever to be placed on honour, tor Ihe second llmo p.^ o| h| ||Jt (I B(<| mihet Th|s ,. „ miy by Bulnln a,,. In Ihe nrsl ,et, Ihe tfumes were Second In Ou Clawwas nan^w Qi|l of Fl .| k l!a > -nd therefore an own sister to the very fast B..w Bells very even and at J—5 Mrs Burtowned and '"'PP 0 !" *i.. , whom we have already been able lo judue? Bred and owned by Mr rrofl broke throueh to win Miss Cheeseman while -wizard ownen c H BtrnHr(1 m Sl Vincent. 1 have not seen her yet. but I am told 1* Verlcull's M 'Sic oru made a d 'Upper*.! by Jim Jones ... oy e ,., w |,„e^, thai she stand. 15 hands. S Inches and I. about 14 third. This Is the third occasion lnc „„ t a ||„ than Bow Bells She I. dcKrtbed as much belter lool ihe afternoon was the Ladie.' the WML Single on Court No. 3 In which Third podtlon went lo"" Mrs. Bancroft defeated Miss DeHoad'. "Coronetta which was Verteull. It wa. tennL. of Ihe captained by hti on Jackie, highest standard with both ladies "Aatra'. owned and ''P rv,„, and driving exceptionally by Milton Tucker, carried off well CL Linesmen Graham. Messrs. Amory and the vamp fl_-. in lier l B v !" Vr ^he third. Tnis IS tne uuro u, I mi •-• inches taller than Bow Bells She is described as much better looking then clinched theIM by winning " whlch •' wl rd cam ? """.' nil round than her famous sister. W* are left to wonder If she will her own .service at 1 —5. Best Display Since Aussies' Visit but up to the present it has not be so muc h better on the track. We shall have to wait, however, bebeen able to gain a second posicause she is not scheduled to arrive here for racing until next October IH 'ha ^ , t •!-„ t ion she does turn out to be better than Bow Bells, well ... I leave ft J muclTX'^e way*-" ^Slnbid". owned and skippered ,o everybody to make their own comments. There is still some ,.ay.r wmnlng her LSS £S by Un*. Baggott .won an easy •^m/LBSIXA'SgSx H* her. She is a filly bv Roidan Mrs. Bancroft led 87. and then race Ini the D cia^ io %  F J mare bred j in b Bcccaqulmcc. sire of Jeeves. won he. service to win the set first iclory EJ^T gJg Clementina was bred In St. Lucia by Mr. Purchase who might be -• w^^LSIa Uraell and '"escribed as a pioneer of breeding in that island. He has sold her to Both ladles were getting good skippered by Winston Hassell -^ I ,. third "Peter Pan", owned and inotn Our Own Corrt-tlwi-tofil. LONDON, May 13. A 17.500 crowd at the Oval today I'-ngth and there were ,.„ changes of rallies for indeed, the K lSp er b > f-"..!^. first game went to Id points befor Mrs Bancroft eventually won I The results were as follows 'B' Class:—1. Moyra Blair I Fantasy. 3. Circe. %  C' Class:—1. Astra. 2 Ranger 3 Wlrard. Intermediate Class:—1 Mohawk 2. Clytie. 3. Coronetta D* Class:—1. Slnbad 2. OHvi' Indu i SaturTHE SPINNER was however, not very ... home convinced that they m !" h *> ^oose between the two had seen the best exhibition of j *•* %  ; sttg. Bancroft was, perforceful batting since the Austra%  '•P*. "*e more aggressive while liana were here two years ago. M,N '*' Verteull was at all times KviS3 members of the Weit .steady with both back and fore Blossom. 3. Peter Pan i team were amaiad at'thu arm. As was already stated, the The Tenth Regatti requency with which Ihe ball tennis was of a very high standard RB.YC. will he sailed r-ns despatched to the boundary, and was very much appreciated day. May 27. Learle Constantlne told me by the crowd. ^^— — ftcrward* that he considered It On Court No. 2 in the Men's LONDON, May 12. one of Ihe best exhibitions he Singles, F. Gun Munro won the Norman Yardley, the Yorkshire had ever seen from the Wet first set very easily from D. E. captain, is to lead M.C.C. against Indies side. Worme 6—1. In the second set, T"l a af\n the West Indie!, in the match beParticularly satisfying: from John Worme had Gun-Munro 4—2. but f rOHtCttC V-lll|J ginning at Lord's here on May 20. Goddard s point of view is thnt (he latter soon equalised and then %  • In view of the need to find an hl m *n h Vft shown themselves took the next game to lead S—t. MR T A L ROBERTS M England captain, both for It* < "gM r <* [JW*& back fler Worme wn the fohowing game to thr rron'tenae Trophy and the NOKMAN YARIILEY Roberts Wins Test series this summer, and for %  **J5| r, > r luW *f the Engl.iud lout to Australia In ,nabl !' 1 .? * do lhl the winter, the choice of Yardley f !" "^ is regarded here as a special pointer to the reelings of the leaning England officials. There are a number of other selections in ihe M.C.C. side which SONNY •-sV Weal Indian %  AMAIMIN baa already saowa his adaptability i.i I n.lUh .i.k.K II. amlat Ihr ball %  mil. wati and has his JDOIIV a* well. LoaSira IlD'ru .< iw falling to previous hich have toured here. The big question now Is whether Goddard will declare first thing Monday morning. The first hnu is the tin,.when llloht help (rolll the •rvivnvi, "i'. H-ILI xr,,U'' h y r':," • %  .?" s .,r: h T: <* t~< %  % %  -i B MI... make ihe score 5—5 and then Munro took the last two games abilities have attracted most attention at Lord' yet. Neither of the players was really playing on form and tennis was not up to *.;iiulard In the Mixed Doubles J. D. bowlers get Trlmmingham played very sound T rophy"shoot"first 'sMrtedrCa'pt. wicket, hut tennis_and was ably partnered by c. R. E. Warner, the then winner, Wood to win the match scored 136 points. Last year Lt.N.R.A Silver Medal when ha broke the Frontenae Trophy Shoot record at the Government Rifle Range yesterday. Mr. Roberts scored 144 points out of a possible ISO. In 1948 when the Frontei • points beaten 7—6; 6—3 from T Srhjolseth and Col. J. Connell added tw what the Ml>s M. Trestrail. the Tranquillltv and now Mr. Roberts hai H. Berry, Lancashire* 5ft 41ns. weather is like. If it conlimi-'s pa | r LI.-Col. J Conncll's 138. left-arm slow bowler. Eric Bedser. "'""" lscry Wc-or. • Improves Car Performance. • Reduces Gas and Oil Consumption. a. N* %  > %  ;.i„ New Mobiloil help heep yovf engine free of depoiil* rhoi CO u.e wear, wa.le fuel and oil. Don'i ndt trovble. Chanoe o New Mobiloil. •Odoy. WORL D'S J^ARGESTSELLIN G MOTOR OIL GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD.—Distributors. Miss Wood then came Into tha pUtiirc wltn some forcing backhand and forearm shots. To Ml T climax this good display, she won Li -Col her service and then had tho %  " score at 5—5. From this. Savannah never looked back, but went ahead to win the game 7—5. —3. In the other Mixed Double*. H Nothnagel and Miss A. Held (Tranquillity) had a very easy victory over Mrs. A. L Perkins and C. R Packer and won fl—I: 6—2. The tournamlnt continues Monday. Following are scores* — the eight best 1 Connell J E. Grimm R 11 Vrttaiiil E Nrhlr" H. JoKdan OHIani Mr. I O. C. Perkins and she will no doubt race here In August Sin is by no means tall but I like her conformation and she Is well set up on her legj. Consternation is another from Mr. Purchase in St. Lucia. She Is by Millersdale oul of Mary, another Jamaican mare by Scatter, sire of Brown Bomber. I have not seen her nor do I know when she will race. However. I shall be very interested in her because she Is the one and only thoroughbred by Millersdale whom I have ever heard about. This big son of Bold Archer never had a proper chance as a sire In my opinion and It Is Ironic that now he is dead wo should be seeing his first thoroughbred foal racing. Cross Roads Is a rather leggy son of Duuush (also dead) and April Shower*, ihe mare who gave us the great Atomic II. perhaps O.T.C's best son. Cross Roads has been In training now since early in the year and already I have noUced an Improvement in him. For one thing he Is not as leggy as he was a few months ago for. another he has almost lost his baby looks. I believe he will be among the forward ones. If not In development, at least in training. Duncse, the pronunciation of whose name I am not sure, is bv Dunusk out of Celanese. a mare who became famous for the Dumber of come-backs she made to racing after repeated retirements. She was in fact more successful on the track after she produced a foal. I have not seen Dunese either. Being a supporter of the progeny of Denistone, sire of Celanese. I shall also be very interested In the career of Duncse. Hi-I-o's name Is about the only thing I like about the poor laddie. He is by Dunusk out of China Clipper and the nomenclature therefore seems to be apt, but he Is ns straight as bee-line front fill tetlock Joint to his coronets. This is a very bad sign in %  raMhorM %  Itbg4l2li some of the famous have been known to run well with it. Perhaps Hi-I-n may, who knows? Miracle, by Battle Front out of Marshlight, is another I hove not seen. He has been bought from Mr. Proverbs bv Miss Hnwkln*. I nrr told. His dam has already done very well with Will Oth* Wisp If and Comet from the same sire. Miracle therefore has a reputation '.n uphold. River Mist, small but comely daughter of the famous Sunrise. is by Restlgouchc I like everything about her except her size. Rather more refined than the average Sunns. | n.geny. she is a beautiful chestnut. She too has a reputation to uphold. Exactly the opposite in si?.e but equally good looking is Soprano A big upstanding filly by Sunplant out of Night Singer, her dam appears to have fitted her up well with the powerful quarters of Tetratema on the frame of Sunstar. This provides her with a flftvHfty chance at being a stayer or sprinter and being excellent at either It shall be interesting to see on which side she does come down. Sunbeam Is Mr. George de Nobriga's Sunshaft-Miramlchl filly. I have not seen her yet Her dam Miramichi I believe is out of Minehaha but I am not sure who by. Vanguard Is a very robust son of O.TC. and the big mare Hurricane who was not much of a success at racing He Is sutrh a powerful colt (or gelding). I am not sure which, that seeing him at a distance on the track for the first time I thought the Turf Club had imported another stallion On coming closer I perceived that he was only n twoyear-old. but what a baby. Obviously he shall need time. Waterbell Is Hon J. D. Chandler's other two-year-old by Rcstieouchc out of Ilelleplain. She is the small powerful type. Her dam having produced Front Bell, and War Path, we might also expect Barbados Friendly Football Association THE third trial match of the .sorfething from he. above association will be ployed The fifteenth is actually out of alphabetical order but this is beon to-day at Empire Grounds. Bank cause she is in "G2". She is the half-bred filly Joan's Star. I wonder Hall. where she hails from? Men everywhere have discovered the comfort of Chupplee Sandals, and their cool and sleek smartness CLARKS of Somerset, England, started making


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SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1910 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE ELKVF.N They Left Britain To Be m*mm*-— Redskins 9 Brides SITTING ON THE FENCE TORONTO "Bang, bans, bane . (•) sere* more rcdikinj bil the dust." THAT famous iin* in tales of the Wild West wu quoted by m> English master as the mod exciting introduction to any itory. And that "Last of the Mohicans" attitude is what Jasper Hill (Chief Big White Owl) and the 130,000 or so Indians in Canada are fighting to-dai as Canada prepare* to debate a Bill making Indians full citizens. Eighty years after the last skirmish between red man and white, the Mohawks, the Jwampy Crees, the Blackfeet, and all the other tribes hope they will cease ip be treated as children and wards of the Government. They hope Ibey will be given a vote and bave the baa on Ihelr drinking liquor eased: they hope to iet belter education and have a rliht to spend their own tribal •Bones*. For war bride Mrs. Betty News from Coleman-street, Brighton. who married an Indian and is living in the Sahanatien Reset Wedding Jay picture ol Mai freaa Epsosn. asid k*. InJ, Sinclair Ch*h Bui there are still contrasts and misgivings. In prosperous Ontario, where the 30,000 Indl brid* groom ; €rS* sags era Schooley. she was one of the best a1 1 """<" %  dancers at the Regent Ballroom, Kum-runnvr* Brighton. • IN BRITISH COLUMBIA Frank Caldcr is the first full if is A-* of /ail Indian member of any Canadian provincial legislature, and # UNTIL NOW, like all Britthe Indian chief's daughter. Ish girlr married to Indians, she Gloria Cranmer, is studying to the flrst Indl Bran %  • hunt • I ''.SUMPTION HAS a la forty times higher for InIhan whites In the Hockmadlc tribes who face starvation nathas than take anything irum the white man. In lhnorth the br.vrs .Cll hunt while the squaws da the work. That is whv Ihi Bin White Owl .•elcomes emancipation with safewoman guards "We want to see that emancipation won't lead to our other red-skinned, raven-haired Hut there Is still the problem 'using our land through being Mohawk women In the reserve. of the rum-runners who take firedispossessed Mr n >t paying taxes," There are risks of being jailed water to the coastal tribes. he says. He wants Indian \: Pi for a long sentence If caught f m ,f Indian tribes have an with six chiefs in the puw-wows drinking beer; she is liable to be infantile mortality rate of .'.on per of the white men. questioned even if an empty 1.000. London Bxprvag Sen-ice. bottle is found nearby. has been regarded as an Indian becoirn! squaw livm„ along with the 50 doctor. Their la neither water nor rlpclri.il. In the wooden hovse she I sde her A %  off rev theij is able toB For her husband Geoffrey new law may mean he I go down the trail to the Bala Tavern for a glass of beer. For their golden-haired papoose. Roserrary, rising three, it should mean better schooling. For the whole family It may mean that they wont be regarded as minors under the law, unable •o sign documents, and will be able to go to the banks and raise a mortgage for houses. But it might also mean losing the privileges of Indians on reaerves of not paying rates and taxes. Better hornet • FOR PEACE-TIME bride Margaret Dolman, from Lower Court-road. Epsom, Surrey, who recently married a Swampy Cree Indian. Sinclair Cheechoo, at the old Hudson's Bay post of Moose%  actory. James Bay, there should be twice as much money to spend on the Indian children who trudge to the mission school where she teaches by the light of paraffin lamps. Indians will also seek better homes than tents with no floor other than o layer of spruce boughs, often just a wooden box as furniture. Hungry ttrike 9 ONLY MENTION of the warpath I have heard has been by "rebel" Jules Sioul, 43-yearold Huron who, far from scalping, has resorted to a hunger strike in his shop at LoretteviUc. Quebec, until "Canada is given back to the Indians." No one seems to take very seriously this lltUe man Instead, they listen to full blooded Mohawk Milton Martin, who waa a brigadier in the Canadian Army, and has been known to remind Canadian*: "You are all ImmlrraJrts here but me." He pleads that Indians are starving not so much for food as for a spirit of understanding, and ore not "the cruel, fierce savages" of the history books. "Whatever may have been our practices, they can't compare with the practices of civilised nations," he says The Dark Lady, The Fair Lady AndTHE DREAM A i CAM i union are still fining about EnsJIsJi reserve, though one girl admit < that, nfter a couple of drink.-. Englishmen are no more reserved than anybody else. That is to say. about as vivacious as a couple of English explorers having a drink at a LetsdOB i-lub after many years' Lit ftll'l' One has been to the North Pole: i to Central Africa. far?" %  IVIe "North or South"" "North." 'Shoot any bears "Couple "Cold there?" I lit Parky." "Ice?" "Bags of ice." "Snow "Bags of snow." Oh." "YOU been far"" Central Africa." "Shoot any lions?" "Couple" • Hut there?" "Bit stuffy "Natives ?" "Hags of Natives." "Women?" "Bags of look here. I say" did man. Bad show." "Not a bit. old man." "Interestin evenm t"Rather. Good-night, old man." "Good-night, old man." I.a II. 11. Ili.i.n Sans Output "In the Soviet Union there I* no mystical or obscure treatment of ') as decadent cosmopolitan poets use. We Mng of how a young man fall, in love with n girl because of her big industrial output Soviet purl Stephan Pelrevlv. (Affrr John Keats i I • ays she would lean and ng %  Si found me roots of relish sweet, And sandwiches her mother m;. i Ink) Mei btlf m croppnd, her ehttka inudged, And hi r nyi % % % %  n wild. 1 made a gail.md for her head Of nuts and bolts and shavings, And presently her said: "I love thee line I sel her on my motor-bike. i than I saw pale commissars Who cried "No use to BSSSBS ;. fuss." Who cried "La Belle Dame Sans Output Must come with us." \nd this If why I sojourn here. Alone rind palely loitering; Though never-ending hrlt* aic still And no wheels sing. rolil War -On April 25. when several degrees of frost were registered in Britain, the temperature m Moscow was over 70 degrees.*"—From rfte news. "t*OIt the information of Sir Wjklion Smithers this U only the I'.rst Indication of a gigantic Russian plot to transfer their VranthaV over hero. When they talk about a cold war they mean a cold war Hussian scientists have not only discovers*] how to by-pass the Mat wind round Moscow and Leningrad so that It hits us with groater velocity; they have also %  d millions of whales to .i* loshatgi towards the British I*le*. leaving their northern ports i-e free. If S.i WakJron doesn't believe u ". what about the 10U refugee Wfales who committed suicide on a Scottish coast rather than live a life of slavery? snd what about the polar boar, suffering from sunstroke, who piloted his own aircraft through the 11.>n Curtain and crash landed at London Airport*' It's no use semi-official circles saying he's in love with Brumas's BOthW. Will M 1.5 deny that ho has given valuable informaton? If they don't want to look silly, they c bettor not World SiiM|irr* rtM OSKY PARKERISM and the tflX^I eager search for useless Information have become world di • Msa of the mind la Ciechoaiavakin people who ...ilf.! ihe wioiia stamps are aasBOUagad h> snoopers to the Secret police . Indian students are taking a census of maneloss lions . after years of research xtpers in Japan have reported cent, of Japanese husbands still yell "Oi. Ol" to call their Wives . chaps In England with nothing else to do have dlscovorod that ws strike 270.0O0,0OO matches every doy The Tavistock Institute of Human Relations has found out that most men htty "Good morn I .. In most people living m Ui %  i.Tiie street, that the curtains In IhO front rooms of the underprivileged are left half drawn with ice tho patterns facing outwards tli.t'ik heaven a census official In W.'Khlngtnn, US, has I wen bitten bj MI tnrsgod husband win thought Hie tjovciiimeul Inquisitor And through the woods drove all woi making a pass at his wife, day long. —London Express Service. %S3^ Whenever van-men switch over to Fordsons, their satisfied comments follow very much UK -ame -\ittern. Thev all praise the Fordson becau".--: ie lit capacity it big it I'* rumtinx cotlt are low it lit mainh-numt is OBOBJ nUCai ir lit handling it easy df lu loading it simple and — if II aheayt reliable FoidsoivVans 5 cwt inii 10 cwi ^ (IIAIllES MtENEARNHV k , LIB. Dunlop. the first to introduce a tread with teeth, has extended this wonderful load holding principle in the design of the new Dunlop Foit. More teeth — more Nte — giving a grip co defy skidding on the most'ultppery of surface*. Thhh juil rne of the many safely feaiures which maka,uH_ew Ion the one tyre that has everything. DUNLOP FORT DUNLOP HJHf* COMPANY ITD KIKMINCMAM. TNGLAN — zrrr. ECKSTEIN BROS. — By St. /^FRESHER BREATH not for minutes In scientific tests, more than 80'/c of cases of simple bad breath were overcome—not for minutes hut for hours — with a single brushing of LISTERINE TOOTH PASTECOMPARE THIS WITH ANY OTHER DENTIFRICE! You're nk"s IO he near >ih >>iur hrrsih sweet and your imile i|>*rh.lirij( when yuu use New LIMTRINK TOOIH PASTE. It pulishrs lecih whurr .. Ircshcns hresih hcurr. I'sa deliihtful, 'efrt-biwg Nt I.ISTfcRINF TOOTH PASTS' %  XCiUSi VI lUlfrSPOAM ACTION AND BSmtHINO MINTT ftavouii New LISTERINE TOOTH PASTE cleans your i**th |o sparkling -..lur*! besuly. hs livlu*i*c 1 ,.!(-. i. ..mi iiii.ni JII J tesdul niLiiiv %  baihe iur whole mooih in loagsr[ rRKSHNESS. v£g£ ,l_'.l--* %  ftr a fresher breath CREAM OBTAINABLE SMOOTH PALATABLE RICH IN QUALITY Now available at . Your Soda Fountain, Restaurant, Club, Hotel or Dealer Insist on . ICO ITS UtAL ICE CRCAM I HE BARBADOS ICE CO.. LTD.-BAY ST. WHICH SIDE OF THE FACE IS YOURS Hbes your facr rr-veal nerve strain and fatigue, or are you cheerful and full .f lif'••• M'TKOIMIOS (furnu-ily THIOPHOS) is HI ideal (nic for you if you suffer from nervous disorders. HlMuntilMtoil by Ieadin B physicians, I: restores your natural good humour, you apuclite and yufcir vigour. Remember: YOU KAT WKI.I., BUsV WELL. FEEL WKLL. when you lake NUTROPHOS (KOKMKKI.Y THIOPHOS) MTKOPHOS i> iihlainablr al all Ipadina Drug Mm, } /mtmMmiw SIOKKS It UVNUK LTD-.t !" i.. l


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PAGK FOI-K SUNDAY iDVOCATE SUNDAY, MAY 14, l'JSfl W! play againM Sut %  SRORTr. ate I'.n tl< ularly happy to-day over *t Indies cricket team in England l of four wkkcU in the flrsl day of Spartan Trounce College 7—0 .it ||M O,.I Following closely upon their two-day win over Yorkshire by three wickets and their impresslva draw with Worcestershire in the opening fixture of the tour, this performance against Surrey augurs well for the future success of the team during the tour. IMPRESSIVE OPENING 'TWE West Indies are certainly not out of the wood yel. nor are X they "blooded" in the accepted sense of the word as far as the tour is concerned bul come what may. they have opened their tour in keeping with the high rating which competent judges of the game have placed upon them by Imperial cricket standards. It It true that the Yorkshire game appeared a close thing bul it must be conceded that the Yorkshlremen were at home and su had experience in their favour in the scales of balance. We must at once admit that with Ramadhln and Pierre padded up In the pavilion there was not much hope of our negotiating any reasonable total'if the Rao-Jones partnership had been broken. On the other hand it must be remembered that the Australians in their victorious tour of England in 1948 came nearer to defeat In their game with Yorkshire on May 5 and 6 than in any other match of the tour. AUSSIES NEARLY LOST T IOSE who followed the game will remember that a missed catch it a critical period coat Yorkshire a great chance of atoning for their disappointment against the 1938 team at Sheffield and so being the first county to beat the Australians since 1912 when Hampshire triumphed. DISPLEASURE Spartan easily drubbed College 7-0 when they met in a first division football fixture at Kensington Oval yesterday afternoon. Four of the *oals were netted in the firs* hahf. The seven goala were scored by Johnson who kicked in three. Trotman 2 and Walcott I. The other goal College netted on themselves the result of a melee In their goal area. - Spartan thowed their intention of scoring early and the nrst goal came from a corner, kicked W) Boyce on the left wing and Johnson made no mistake in kicking it into the nets. The second was netted very soon after when Walcott receiving a pass from Johnson ran down unmarked and scored In the right hand comtr of the goal. At this stage the College defence was beginning to weaken and Johnson took full advantage of this and scored the third goal after a pass from Boyce. Occasionally, tbere was some FOOTBALL FIXTURES liaT DIVIHION %  %  ... Mar II Cailloi. v. Empir* Hrl'trr K I^ucitlm. l.inaunvn O B Coppin tndL r Harria. < .r.-l., MB* II Spartan v. rVkwtcft-Rovtr. •<•'" %  D. W Sayan. iJnwwi. S Oman* and B Hoyoa. "alar*ar. Slav fl> %  vatton va Collas* Rafaraa O S Cppir.. Unaaman O E Amor* and D. W. Sayan SICOMD DIV1SIOM Taaalav. Mar IS Evarlon v. Y.MFC Rafarr* I. F HarrU Mar n I Notra Darrvr K*f*ra* rrlSat. Mar J" OasttM *a V.M PC r-. r N .*< % %  !< ,-i ^-a.-S V* "* %  .'sir •; *$;z£" % %  •-*• Wtdaxdav. Ma. I? r.iilasa v. Cornbannair al Cnlssunsv ^ l.-1. va CnmU'fmatr al Lodla Hrfrr*t Q. AHMTT. IIIIHI. DIVISION Tafadar. May U CaW. and Wlrtlaaa va Y SIC A ai rV.ai.lrd Hall RafafM: C. Sinllh 'MOYRA BLAIR" WINS A SECOND TIME Commodore Wilkinson's "Moyra Blair", skippered by his son Tom, sored her second victory for the season when she defeated all othej: 'B* Class boats at the Ninth Regatta of the R.B.Y.C., which took place in Carlisle Bay yesterday evening. This race was a very kevn one Dr. J. W. P. Harkness' "Circe", %  Bank Kail. Kcfala : A aaaMi ComWrnMrr* va V MFC. a ..II hri ,rtr Rafarn N Holdar Tranquillity Leads Savannah SAVANNAH games yesterday two of 'our gamea yesterday afle__.__ play in the Spartan goal area but aI the Garrison to make their custodian Hams had very little **ore three as against five by the to do. The greater port of the play visiting Tranquillity team from was seen in the College goal area Trinidad, and after a melee in ffont of the MrsI Bancroft of SavanIT IS a remarkable thing that in the last thirty years classification of racehorses in Barbados and Trinidad should have remained so consistent. Al) the more so because it passed through a very trying period during ihe last war. By consistency I mean that a certain standard has been maintained whereby it has been possible to judge ..hich started first, looked a sure ^ merlU „,* oray Q f contemporary thoroughbreds but also those of winner as It kept it* lead throughcufjerem periods. For instance, looking at a classification list of toout the first lap and up to the time dfly i nno ^i ,„ comparison with one of 1930 there Is little difference it reached the Neednam's Point m lrte general standard of the runners in class "A", buoy. On reaching this bupy Naturally there must be som" difference of opinion when one Moyra Blair*\ which was only a compares horses of different periods and of course I do not mean to few yards behind crept into the say that Beacon Bright, Blue Streak and Uun bite (three of ioda> s ead and before • %  Circe" could giants) are of exactly the same vintage as Tom Pearson Bambolina r^mnletelv ST the buoy 'Tanand Senator, three who raced around IBM But when I say that I the 5 mp lrte *fl "J .ktuMred bv think Beacon Bright, Blue Streak and Gun Site are genuine A class oon Kl "Sir? !il "%riarl Chase in the goal. Very soon after the. kick off Trotman taking Teddy Hoad, appoln,ted "Know-all" who only knows as much about the West Indies team C** 3 %  1 know about the "fiytng rat Indian BtAMADHIN kuu Yardley Leads M.CC. the other pass fVorn WaVoU ran through" to **%'**" M -£" tr, "L ar d H icore the fifth giving Smith no S^ hn * d f of ^ T J?L nau 1 lv chance to save. The schoolboys were always seen bundling and very soon they %  cored on themselves as fullback Gibbons trying to clcjr kicked into his own goal. About five minutes before the end Trolman again scored making the total seven. The teams-— Spartan: Harris. Gibbons. Bowen. Glttena. Cndogan, Haync^, Chase. Johnson. Walcott. Trot%  nd Boyce. ..wording to the most recent classifications issued by the Barbaof the ^ jpajon „, ih e intermediate dos Turf Club and the Trinidad Turf Club, one of which Is published rlass The other victory was on the opposite page, there arc now 16 animals in class "A" and "A2" JJ^L m tfc* % % %  —ilk Reaatta and 18 of these arc native bred and 4 of these sixteen are Derby winner. ed Doubles •~ r *J ,n ^J,.^ 1 K overturned *"her in Jamaica. Trinidad or Barbados. Added to this we find 24 i H *" ^M^^SS! I ^ot back horses classified in division "B" and "B2'\ of which S ore Creoles b ^ l but on this occasion it got oacK ^ e C|BM[C wlnncrs m lhff Mme lnree colonies a < : R. ***\y 1U moonng. mentioned above r.un Coming second in the Intercomparing these figures with the corresponding classes in 1930 I mediate was Sydney Nurses cunnol say 0 ff hand what the totals were then, but I can tell you that "Clytie" which he himself skip[hov wpre mucn smaller and. In addition, not one was a native bred pered. So far "Clytie has*>een hoIse | n f flc t there were no Creoles above class "D" in those days, second on a previous occasion but -r ne above, in my view, are the most significant points about the Undoubtedly the best match of nM no ?*' • cor#d a v 'ctory for classifications recently issued by the respective Turf Clubs of Trinidad Slnl^ W m C Co U rtNo ^in'iXrh ^TWrTp^iUon went to Johnnie Anothe^nt of interest in the recent classification by the B.T.C Sraf^^f? ILliSai it iw Hoad's ^CaroDettt" which was i f the number of two-year-olds there are on the list. I have counted %&SrH ISTSLSZ *; "^.ned W son J-kie. l£ SOtST Thlf. Relievo, is the greatest number ever to b. p.aced on highest standard with both ladies "* %  •'. OWBSd ""J^fWrS Taken nlphabellcally, here are a few pointers on their potenUalaerving and driving exceptionally bv M ton Tucker, carried on Class honours for the second lime In the first set. the games were Second In this Class was "Rangc|' ned and skippered by Stank* Held. V. O. Smith. C. E. Tudor. l?> W.lllums and F. L. Tudor. L The Referee was Mr. P. Wiland skippered by third. This Is the third occasion Linesmen Graham. Mo Amory and Best Display Since Aussies' Visit ties which I have been able lo gather so far'— First oi. the list is Best Wishes This is a filly by Burning Bow out of Fflititas, and therefore an own sister to the very fast Bow Bells whom we have already been able to. judge* Bred and owned by Mr Cyril Bernard in St. Vincent, I have not seen her yet, but I am told by eyewitnesses that she stands 13 hands, 3 Inches and Is about 14 inches taller than Bow Bells. She is described as much better looking on which "Wizard" came third aU round than her famous sister. We are left to wonder if she will but up to the present it has not i^ ^ much better on the track. We shall have to wail, however, bebeen able to gain a second posicause she is not scheduled to arrive here for racing until next October. thn ssbs*BBidl ei th^ unmr-a taBfl sne ^"ea turn out to be better than Bow Bells, well. ... I leave it MM much Sam ma* "• % *•• %  ". !" > "" **V"<* 2 everybody lo make Ihdr own commtnU. There i> A1U me jagRS up bv Uonel B^oll won „, ., -. !" g ^*nj ihU^n,^ ^ ^ ^ g swwrtJt: is£&s-i?a zSE Sbm m&rsssss-is are - %  w !" 2iiLSSn Smma and described ps n pioneer of breedlm In Ih.l i.l.nd. He ha. sold l.,-r lo llolh ladles were nelllnu cood *''•"* f „?*'. ,'V",,.„, : d Mr c P"Kln and ihe will no doubl rote here In Augual She Collece. Smith. Gibbons. MotiX ^hn. Simmons, -ry ^and^, ^Mjv Ban^ n ^-rd^d Do Verteuil's service and mode " •WPP*red by Jim Jone, the game 6—5 in her favour She then clinched the set by winning her own service at 7—5. In ngth and there were many exHU"* "Petei Pan", vned and %  changes of rallies for Indeed, the first game went to 19 points before Mr* Bancroft eventually won It. There was however, not very much to choose between the two ers. Mrs. Bancroft was, pcrwhtle ... here two years ago. Miss De Verteuil was at oil times Even members of the Weit steady with both back and fore Indies team were amaicd a*. u> arm. As was already stated, the LONDON. May 13. A 17.500 crowd at the Oval tod-, went home convinced that they had seen the best exhibition of forceful batting since the Austr.i''!. the more aggrei NORMAN V AHIH.IV THE SPINNER LONDON. May 12 Norman Yardley, the Yorkshire had ever captain, is to lead M.C.C. against the West Indies in the match beginning at lord's here on May 20. In view of the need to find an England captain, both for the Test scries this summer, and for the England tour to Australia In frequency with which the ball tennis was of a very high sti was despatched to the boundary, and was very much npprr Learle Constantlne told me by the crowd, afterwards that he considered tt On Court No. 2 in the Men's of the best exhibitions he Singles. F. Gun Munro won the seen from the Wet first set very easily from D. E. Indies side. Worme 6—1. In the second set. Particularly satlslylng from John Worme had Gun-Munro 4—2. but Goddard's point of view is that the lattcsoon equalised and then his men have shown themselves took the next game to lead 3—4. capable of fighting back after Worme w.n the foil, suffering early loi .. ..pered by Eric Raison. ".he results were as follows: 'B' Class:—!. Moyra Blair 2 Fantasy. 3. Circe. 'C' Class:—1. Astra. 2 Ranger 3 Wlxard. Intermediate Clas< —1. Mohawk. 2. Clytie. 3. Coronetta %  D' Class— 1. Sinbad 2 Ollv,. Blossom. 3. Peter Pon. The Tenth Regatta of the dard R.B.Y.C. will be sailed on Saturlated day. May 27. Roberts Wins Frontenac Cup Inability to


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%  MAT l! 193H SUNDAY \DVO< \T! r\r.r irvrv I WHITE BARBARA GOALEN illustrates my firm theory that 'half as much means twice as effective* . says ANNE EDWARDS "Like Drinks. Not Easy to Handle" By ANNE EDWARDS t men is like the aftact of dunk p THE fashion for while eomerf m.: men Vlei B) %  IrMw with salt, pepper, and a little + COCKTAIL PARTY ideas Singeri Clncor.vstalkHt.lled With W IMP armm.l deml-sel cream cheese "Daiquiris DCttr.HTFJu' hi* voilo* niade with three oat" white rum or.5Sr",tIeki > which were tipped >~?.,SP*' •*"* • " with olives, pearl omom have been fortunate In urns mmom ***** *m m ** idishi DELlCiOUS tinned frankfurters, baked Instead of boiled, and served very hot (Put them DE-LOVELY . Table decor ated with those nursery candle >ticks < the one-candle-lit-MUt-ei kind). One crimson candle in the centre, and a dozen flown heads heaped In the cup (II holui TO YOUR MAKE-UP CUTEX Magic-weir CUTEX. so easy to apply—givei beauty to your fingertips. This incredibly longwearing polish resist! (hipping and peeling. Stays perfcxt longer — CUTEX* clear, nonfading shades never se m their brilliant lustre 7/e FAM/LYFoodDr/nk S&i/ruzde 6t/ CADBURYS A DIET TO CUT DOWN YOUR WEIGHT Stintming Without tPrinis enough fre A-ater to keep them Are you contemplating joining th? rapidly increasing number* of weight reducers? Many—especially men—who would like to take a bit off" shy from the experiment because the slimming meals so widely publicised are much more attractive to women than men. Here, for their benefit are the very successful reducing diet rules of St. Bartholomew's Hospital. The Tiospital claims that every roootn" it adds another 80 >v< > vefeht |>eopl to the roll of those, whose entlnr habits it Is rcgiilaranar. Breakfast Tea oi codec i ground), as much as liked; milk, 4 tablespoonfuls (no sugar or sweetened condensed milk). One egg. boiled or pouchedBread. 2 ozs. brown or white. two thin slices, with butter or marmalade, or jam, very thinly spread. Midday Lean meat, rabbit, stewed liver, chicken or fish (not fried), medium portion. 2 ozs. Oravy without fat or thickening (No barley, rice Yorksmre pudding, suet dumplings or pie crust. Vegetables, boiled, us much as liked (but no potatoes, dried beans peas or lentils > Raw fruit, as much as liked. (Bananas and grape* in small quantities only.) Tea As much tea as you like, with milk, 4 tablNpoonsful (no sugar or sweetened condensed milk) Bread, two thin slices: butter or jam very thinly spread. Salad, as much as liked. Vinegar, if desired, but no oil or mayonnaise. tvenins sogax). Water. Vinegar (moderate amounts) Kacchariae. Not Allowed Fat and fat meats, such aa ham. bacon, pork, and sausages. Oil and salad dressings. Fetal Hah, chip potatoes and other fried tends Cream. Nat* Sugar, sweats, and ohooolatea. Easy Lesson J_ The art of public siieakisu *V . ] have been usked to sa.v ,i few wut in by It only remain-. I H oie to MIS Without Whose h.lp this would have been im%  To Kead + LETTERS I doubt often gel W written '1 am a hospital nurse, and i CM'IV juitien* at some tune HI the whiteness of IB] teeth, and asks what toothpaste 1 use." I From an advertisement Is That So + M OTES: Maurice Chevalle M labou* meeting between and King Alfonso) i assumed such a klngl} i and the king was so ,1 that for the moment I tan confused." Ih.rU |j>nzlr> Moore (about your blood pressure and examine gatttng clothes foe her museum you for anaemia and chaari conof coatuRMt): "The hardest type ilitions to find — of any cuj — ara chll%  There should be no need for dren-;md maids* dresses They're drugs. We | using them, makes you tm.illy try lo Dexedrtne n appetit. void liscnrded till they're worn Tea or coffee (ground), with 2 Fnaihi tinned In syrup and dried f """ b y wt l l P*"*" Ijitleapoonsful milk (no sugar or cocoa). Bread, one thin slice. Cheese, sardines (no oil), salmon. herring or kipper, small portion m oat.). Or 2 eggs, boiled or poached; or Thickening white Hah or smoked haddock, medium portion. Raw fruit or salad. Butter not to exceed } oz. in the day. The arnounlB of food allowed In the aboi'e list may not be exceeded, bu( they may be arranged to tarn. Allowed Without Restriction fruit, raw tbanaaua and grapes Bottled In small quantllle* only), (ireen vegetable* (except green peas). Salads (except beetroot). Tea. coffee eeau.M.> It strengthen' the appetite. IWiple lire told ^ drink water or soda water to nii.iv hunger. At Hart's they saw that women who concentrate on slirmnimi without medical sunervi-: limes become And they add; For ever i^.iiciit who must reduce. Ih 1 hospital still has three who mir be fattened up" —1-F..R. out." Sylvia Hhelley (about tha majg in fashion pholonraphs* "When '2 years ago had to lean far lack. smile ini" the camera, and look vital. Now the smart thing Is to lean forward, drop your eyes, and look deadpan Thanks I'D I.IKi: TO thank the woman who. after being beatz1 up. Bald "Kluggmg' 1 No | I don't believe in it." ill like to thank the man who. T. turning to Kngland for the Brat S) On Pafg It FOOTBALLERS BK SIKi: TO KV.r.V A BOTTLE OF SACROOL handy -It's the grestest Painkiller In Barbados On Sale at all "rug Stores KN1C1HTS LlMIT.:i Olstrlhutors So htmutifully easy* • so easily beautiful ht'CtlttSe '" %  "'"Mr,„(lrwm-.m (n i.llrvlt.^m Ic.... fsaf i !" „ r""* h ** d lM *' B a r**" ar gto-ing wiih bsaaty. |UM squerse Bivltoam l,„ ro rhc i^hc and watch how ii whipi up Into a %  MWII i lather. •** l kw r bait glowi with bealul; Icel hov inaiMtpahl.-a „ Wh; a wnoderful difference Brylfoam make* to halt WT sasy_o ofc.ut.ag. N,. preparaiHO. no apwiaJ nnaet— m h*s so hrauniufl> ey to %  MSBSJ T 1U I^,,^ | 0 lubfl ,_1.,-J, „j gC l'X> thorny toe ^^ there's more foam in BRYLFOAM THE OaiOINAL (HAM SHAMPOO IN A IUM When a mail's married his troubles/begin! tat %  s-nj** 1 Pamper v •JBlo%oUnc* maltinf softnsM of lh Tar Jley Ctosaiaiaa; Cre.,.,"i^^^^HBW UM nchoou of -Nigh* (.rean.. Stiniijlair %  |SW %  .,.,! and, during ihaUhfoftral IM'.IUU prcparnllon* l\ YARDLEY |Craasnl %  N*g).i Oream rejag tnsjisj >.\[h<-up ha— I Rouge • Pod^r %  1 aasantna Maneara VAIDLIT OLD lOVD STBKET



PAGE 1

•IMilV. M\\ II. I'Jill %  noon M>VO( \TE PAGF FIVE IH.VHI>IO\S i w mi IIUMI: ? : Some Young Players To Watch This Summer l*y Pelrr llin...LONDON MCC, ih:it austere body v lad i the past week, endea ed luelf to !l .am.. b>' its prilscw Tlhv avtioti in f\\-\nn an opportunity lo youth. Alias Snatch Grand Prix Honours FANGIO LOSES ILL LUCK BY SILVEHSTONF M I I I .11 luck robbed Juan Man1 K ilgio. Ihf it.i ol finishing first i • i. ; .1 lugh |u vi, 0 it 2i0 miles m ikw ckcull ii.i. Ufe n the but of i %  ... v Ipl :,. so his \lf„ 1 i broke nil oil MpC and l uj'''' llO the i>il -i" '" i.. il\ roverSsLiii .- itlU ftllh i skilful B] fin the roiwra he often loft the rtatort am** %  *< lie |1U hi I %  US1 .-' %  %  i nil Mi rice*. \lls l>.ir ii Triple Tie In Errol Flynn Cup Race CHAMPION M'lSlVlUt \h.tBMl put" Inhr-rt into Ihr Job A\ br ear-i.. < tiampiou Gordon • ah nximii %  icton M SalldnU |< Barbados Friendlj I'oolbull Association Tin-, aranc-a i anvm KINGSTON. M.i> g Three Hiu Ciatiue pulled to %  triple tie in tbi wcon renewal of the Errol Flynn CbxItengo Cup raft race down the %  trnlo tourist water playground in J'uitland on Sunday, smashing '!>• '>'•>*$ racoiu „t MS minute with i -pl.udid B3 miiiule run down the Rio Grande on a six miles journci from Berrydalc u. Burlington The t-mtl race was specially RXtn sored by Movie Actor Errol Flyn I owner of Navy Island, an inlet olT Port Antonio, on Jamaica's north'ho with Im lMtu-, Princess Ghtca. lire no Jamaica. Prizes were distribute.-! i h) the actor, while Priii.. was a passenger on'onning bnmbon crall Raping on tne HIU Gr.uin. .„..Of Jamaica's largest rivers, which runs through a beau'irul vallcv UM nrgw, has .li'A.ivbeen an ttu action to tourists in Jainan I, ind • MI more popular phen the movie actor came to Jumaiok. some years ago, bought Nuvv l-l.ind .mil i.iher property and organised raws for a cup he donate,i ..nd money |>rl7es donated bv the Hiehttetd Hotel. Peteraai 'i • 13 lb K.-UUM may — kei aunog UH ... -i .HI.' .—. i.ignt into the flrsl lean] when .,.-... %  thi i ..ie ta*> luaui n BO] .. . i then like. • %  %  | i ... ung > '•"% i'i-> 1 I :. lai kc %  : N I'll, ,. Sli*i M I i'P J Ii U all wrll ...>.t Rood lor In .ivMeal --iinllr u diseover and • <.jih ...iii. t iiii>' but tht %  Lajhi orwaetar — UIU>M> be b* J i Ihrr i miiioii I.I Homaai— :i..; get Hitnecessar) "big initph" -inn siihriifrom ci I'lanal >\'v %  •' %  "' %  ta eountT ii itat Not unlll he iliunour P4 b> -ri. HM for rtpceaa l aU"t m*l>b—ueh j lhe*e MCC urn"—cms id* jlnhli le rise to II r or.aslnn reill* he dr'•'m'nrd oi. pei ana Inert wui I.I .. yn ing pi*] %  I |r*m %  bj louniy in tha aej i have bov led unplayable baiu %  i light ii %  i ii bookUut uut in IM .MI., -i:. „. %  team b> rbrtue Icttj of plaj th.-> nuve become a ,, nil ... en, made aa a i leh u up th* flrsl row at the -lertinf. able : justify (heanaelvm r line today, and) right ft.nn the audi ptayera Utue t'ng they swept Into the load ind i t < ver dropped back then. l..irnnt ,.•,„%  • aj] .i!.., thai Uttlt extra when. The four Alfas raced alone in Fernanda, and i! is fOl players ol .i group, lighting out the lead tr|it caUbrC that the Mcr retween themaelvea, for Farina to s* B tihinR. Muili hidn„d> i.i %  ..ooui the taeu lh Eutla -a Selectors aliould adopt tb mei when then mine to chooaj* the ie..!i to play in the i.v. daj Tl m iinat the Wwi tndtai 0 %  Mi: 1 of thought arguet. Hut the M khOuM sci ve simply two Trench four and a hall ; 'he forthcoming JfCC visjl lo Talbots which ran the eourwA " lMl N l 'h* 1 Wit Ii .i %  ,;be %  %  • i oar. ind iq the Held M.Mi.-M-l.l tN-' Hl.t MAY 14 — NO. 119 The Topic of Last Week 'iniih first. Luigt Fagioli second, and Reg Parnell third Times were 2 hr* 13 mln*. 23 The three Alfa-Romeo cars which finished were the only machines to rover ihe complete ro lapa In fourth and fifth posit Without refuelling but enmpletei nil __ The Alfas had to refuel but thv dui this •• auak 1 -I I l-T •n .11 iha iw>ta*r wainr.1 .. %  % %  %  %  • %  '"' Htm ihr MbN iir nghi ...i. t, UM i->.i' ihr.. n>kl .Until.v I, .1 lo Ml lh Iu % %  .. %  %  .. .... > m M *.k B*l Mi UMUn ... All l>— llMr palllieiBM %  >• Tiii ..|xti JM dalii I Kno KB 1' I in •*> ih plat r...|ilt. nir*tir mo w s i uw aw • .. ..i igjaa iitud uihw awBM n "..fcii^ *irU •tv ilnl Ml lam M nVIM. I In-..(. OFFICIAL CLASSIFICATION MID-SUMMER MEETING 1950 A. 1 I.-. M In Ire %  %  •S.MVW-II Clft % %  r.2 UMU) Reaanata HOUM iliripprd nrt bmkr n i... 'i ightanM • The btggejU nowd aver attend .1 o "t"i raej Ih Brltn saw < line spevlaile but no r... road race The luhon cam— *"*' *?* P ,rk j, 5" the most modern designs entered J,; Jjr !" the time ror the first Test IUW na tli%  I. %  i..iHIII probablt i %  th.l even their beot rlren dl %  ava .ii their work rui u U t la %  II 111 the Wet 1 %  !.1 %  %  irim I im their flmt ever rleten la Itala aaistrr Sovei l he I ess the EnglaB ntleally like Coinplor I — literal^ led a procewion from Washbrook. Bedser Itid.-s the start to finish. Before the race started drivers were introduced to Thei Maicstics the King and Queei and Princes* Margaret It was th first lime that a reigning monarcl of England hod attended nice His Majesty on being Introduced! ti ij, Ht EiigUnd. to d to PaUtfio. aked "Do yoi speak
    ' Clarke simply on the da by Farina with 1 mln. atrangtb of what he might do %  iO.li aara. lor the three mile*, an The same applies |o ..<,. t trM |ayeCgg* s|iec*1 of * 02 miles per other youngsterwhom the Ml l hour. Iiavtso opportune The Amateur Athlelir Associalioii .1... 1.11 -. 1.. all 1 ... I i" Inn o.mlma up bail4au>ii %  I %  .l~. %  ,*• miklna ... 1 Krl--,.. un hi. rnlnO .,...1 MiI 1 < %  >,—par %  1 oVl III. in p*>Hd OlioI r |n-.t l,.u wni|ti(*i>rH 1 i.r. pakM aa bo... Ihr... B-. %  H.I—! t > |.i •> im.rw %  > -na. .1 ..I H.i-.. I 4 M sponsored by J & R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and Ih ''.lenderof J & R RUM pink %  %  1 Infusion : .. I I : Ri Sllvei Bi Wai 1 ..i.i < l I 1 %  Phony v Pueuxco Rai i. 1 Sartorlou* Souihet 1 %  .1 1 ( %  Iberian 1 Winter Belli < • AbllllN i -.. le Ktdiitad Kit.hen fl lank S > Marlni 1 Musk Pacb 1.1 n.v.i 8, si Morlu sail r Sterri Night H 1.1 snisi WEST ism is iiwnrniK 1 s see The llnlllllll. .. 11 and r rafts l umpany Hrfilge A Trafalgar Slreela ."ranee %  1'liaros II D 2 Piimtay Lad Riptide Hiver Midst Sinbad Sweeper Sir 0m Soprano r. 1. Straight Aim Sunbeam \ %  K 1 del t 1 %tcake 1 V.i.,. Wat., 1. 1 %  %  %  %  %  %  U '. 1 1 .-OOll Silk Plant %  Count 1 Tyhj 1 mman 11\ (ven l' ( . SI.... „„,„ 0 Spnnler Grace rumh. n Thrilli.,,, — PROGRAMME IIBST DAY Novice I MilR...l>; Milp Inlrf"ir-1ilr v ,. I "1 ria' l*rt t^ rial—Op*i i rial -Bov. 1 rui


    PAGE TEN



    SUNDAY ADVOCATE



    —

    By Professor J. 8.8. Haldane

    HE-most striking advances in

    medicine in the last ten years
    are the discoveries of penicillin
    and streptomycin.

    I doubt if they are the most im-
    portant in the long run, because
    we may hope some day by hygienic
    measures to make the germs which
    they ki{as unimportant as those
    of cholemg or leprosy are today in
    Britain, =

    Before-Birth Attack

    @ THE WORK which I am
    going to describe relates to a
    group of diseases which attack us
    before birth or very soon after,
    and whose nature and cause were
    unknown ten years ago,

    The key to their understanding
    was an experiment which began
    when Landsteiner, an Austrian-
    Jewish refugee in New York, in-
    jected a monkey’s blood into a
    rabbit, just as the key to the
    understanding of bacterial disease
    was Pasteur’s investigation as to
    why substances with different
    crystalline forms are fermented at
    different rates,

    Here is the problem. About
    one pregnancy in 200 ends in
    the baby’s death, before or
    after. birth, from jaundice,
    dropsy, or anwmia.

    We now know that these are all
    symtoms of the same disease,
    which accounts for about one-
    tenth of all still-births and more
    than a twentieth of all deaths in
    the first week of life.

    The disease is confined to a few
    families. If one baby has died
    of it, in many cases all the others
    will do so unless the correct treat-
    ment is given,

    False Clues
    @ THE STORY .of how the
    cause was found out is far more
    exciting and far more intricate @ONCE THE cause” was
    than most detective stories. known the treatment was obvious
    I will try to present the evidence, ‘The baby dies because its red
    not as it came out, but as a prose- blood corpuscles are damaged. You
    cutor might present the evidence can cure the anaemia by injecting
    for a crime. ~ * blood from a man or woman who ;
    Supposing you have lost a lot does. not possess the Rh antigen, problems of the Churches if they
    of skin; and I give you a piece and whose blood will therefore not ad not to provide separate build-
    of mine~to graft on to the raw be attacked by the antibodies from 18S and man-power for so many
    area, it will live for a while and the mother. denominations, ree a lot ase
    then tte;*though by the time it But even when this was ag ge get ts iy rhgg not
    does so you will have grown «a done many of the babies died. oO c 2 iL. so. many: times over.
    new skin to replace it. They had enough new blood
    But if you want a second skin celis. But so many of the old
    graft youwhad better get it from oes were being scrapped that
    someone,@lse. If you try some of the liver was overwhelmed
    my skinedt will die in a few days. ee Se babies: 28 Anyway, preparations should be
    . : of jaundice. $ ws dyesiey inter athongeee
    Inherited So nowadays in severe casos Made for a blood transfusion if it
    @ YOU HAVE become immune the baby's own blood is taken out, i§ needed. ise soca
    to my skin. Your blood contains isyally through the navel-string, _ Why do people differ in regars
    substanees which kill cells from gt the same time as new blood is t© Rh?

    A healthy, happy baby i

    s the pride of a

    what the substances responsible
    or her immunity are called) in
    ner blood soak into the blood ul
    ihe later babies and destroy their
    blood corpuscles,

    Why They Died ___ SAYS

    HURCH reunion—what a dif-
    erence it would make to the



    A test oh a Grop of your
    blood will teil you if there is
    any danger. If there is, try
    to have your baby in hospital.

    frome
    ena

    my boaye~ pumped into it. Calculation suggests that in tap
    Almost everybody else's thousand years or so ae aoe

    2 ay > i t 8 ave

    body. contains substances Discovery people without Rh_ shoulc €

    which. you can learn to treat . ' j
    a6 foteien intrelaen: @ IT WAS ONLY in 1941 that

    es... ar Levine, Burnham, Katzin, and

    Theee £ aubetnng 2 called Vogel, in New York, proved the

    antigens, and they are inherited. * Aye AA bat eartelint
    One of the rules of their in- Cause of the disease with certainty,

    died out by natural selection. And
    in China and India almost every-
    body has it,

    I believe
    arose from

    that the Europeans
    a mixture of a race

    i while Wiener showed how to deal |. ‘ithout i
    pete, ay, Se one “win cases of iedue fo lber sans IMM MAA rae en
    bod air a g it. *. Moureau
    Signe willl was nor Pieent Moureau, in Belgium, seems 9 (A A, that the Bacques, a
    in one or other of his or her have made a aeeevery cat Ss people speaking a very ancient
    parents. crag gg Mh oP ay only heard Of joanguage, lack Rh about as often
    ‘ ae — i British doctors took up the D perkapd the absence of Rh
    ® NOW COMES the appli- discovery at once, and whereas, a ad a: R
    cation to saving babies lives, befére 1943, 72 per cent, of the comes down to us from ancient

    Some mothers treat their babies japies treated in the Oxford in-
    as they. would treat grafts of grmary died, the nymber had
    somebody else’s skin, Almost all peen cut down to 23 per cent, in
    these mothers are found to lack the years from 1943 to 1947. I
    a certain antigen in their blood hone it is as low as 10 per cent,
    corpuscles, by now.

    is antigen is sometimes called “what does this mean to you if
    Rh, ‘after the Rhesus monkey in yoy are an expectant mother?
    whose blood it was first found, It “ some people will say that a
    is sometimes called D. Only about chance of one in 200 is not worth
    one-man and one woman in six worrying about. Well, an air raid

    peoples like the modern Basques
    who lived in Europe in the old
    Stone Age, and. were mixed with
    invaders from the east who had
    Rh. in their veins.

    It is lucky that Hitler did not
    know about Rh, or he might have
    massacred the Basques as he did
    the Jews.

    New Chapter

    @ 1 HAVE toid* only the

    lacks it among the European that ‘killed one Londoner in 200, begining of the story, There 1s
    peoples. even after evacuation, would reason to think that quite a lot

    Now when such a woman Mar~- jaye killed over 20,000 people, and Of bad conditions in children, in-
    ries. a man who possesses it, we worried about raids which cluding some kinds of mental

    either half the children or all of killed 200
    them possess it.
    Only about once in a thousand
    times does the first baby immu- Danger Test :
    nise the mother and die in con- @ UNLESS YOU are a woman We-aren't sure yet. Bur wand-
    Sequence, but the number goes Without Rh married to a man steintr’s monkey and — ‘abbit
    up to abéut one in 20 if she has with it, you have little to worry opened a new chapter in medical
    as many_as four children. about. If you are you have «a history, and will save the lives of
    The poor mother has been chance of about one in 40 of killing millions of babies.
    immunised by her earlier babies, Your second child, and one in 20 of (World Copyright)
    and “thé “anti-bodies (which is killing your fourth child. L.E.S

    defect, and possibly some of the
    illnesses of pregnancy, are caused
    in the same kind of way.





    A Discovery [hat Helps Mothers



    ny fam” ~

    Churches Are Closer :

    DR. FISHER

    Wy Harold Norwood

    As Dr. GEOFFREY FISHER,
    the Archbishop of Canterbury,
    looks round, he reports he is “pro-
    foundly encouraged” at the way
    the Churches are getting together.

    Union between his Church and
    the other Protestant Churches is
    much nearer than 20 years ago.
    Later this year a report is coming
    out which should make the pace
    of reunion faster still.

    There is one exception — the
    Church of Rome, which cannot
    trim its creed or doctrines, to ac-
    commodate any other Church.
    There, says the Archbishop, “we
    are as far apart as 20, 50, or even
    300 years ago.”

    But not quite. THE POPE now
    permits Catholics to attend Pro-
    testant meetings of a non-religious
    nature without the permission of
    their bishops.

    They can also join w.th Protes~
    tants in prayer. But when they
    say the Lord’s Pray they must
    say the Catholic version. This
    begins “Our Father who art (in-
    stead of the Protestant ‘which art’)
    in heaven....” And il ends at
    “Deliver us from evil,” while the
    Protestant version goes on, “For
    thine is the Kingdom... .” ;

    He Draws 5.000

    OMETIMES there are murmur-
    ings from inside the Churches
    against the pulling power of their
    own “star” preachers. It is said

    that on a Sunday they attract
    people and their money away
    from their own* chapels in the

    suburbs,

    No complaint on that score
    against Mr, Tom Rees, the evange-
    list. He draws the biggest congre-
    gation in London. He fills the
    Albert Hall with 5,000 people.
    And he does it on Saturday nights.

    His people, mostly youns, com>
    not only from ll parts of London,
    but in parties of over 100 from
    Birmingham, Lincolnshire, Bucks,
    Hampshire, Northants, and all the
    Home Counties. He reads out ths
    list. All told, nearly 200 separat>
    parties, and the crush of motor-
    coaches waiting to take them hom>
    afterwards is like a big football
    match,



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    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950
    —
    What does Tom Rees offer his : . {£99599 FSSGOS S59 OSO SHO TOVSF LEASES PPS
    crowds in place of Saturday sports Like Drinks, Not =
    and recreations? Hymns, choruses, + ‘
    public professions on “How I be- Easy To Handle
    came a Christian” by selected

    young people, and, above all, the
    personality of Tom Rees, poured
    forth in song, quip, and sermon
    He is not a parson, but his brother

    is, and there are many parsons’
    collars on his platform. ;
    Tom Rees, in his early forties,

    has the energy and the vital stuff
    more often found at the head of
    vast industrial enterprises in the
    Midlands and the North. He pve-
    fers the vastness of the Albert
    Hall, ‘
    He sets his thousands. singing.
    ‘ Then, with a frown and a wave
    of his hand he stops them dead.
    “Not like Ahat—like this.” They
    go on again. They enjoy being
    jollied and he has put more mean-
    ing in their singing.

    He puts on a choir. It is heard
    reverently. Tom rises, “Did you
    enjoy that singing? Well, why
    don’t you clap?” They clap.

    A collection is taken on wooden
    trays and the pattering silver coins
    sound like a hailstorm.

    And then silence. A command
    from Tom Rees that nobody is to
    cough or fidget or even to look
    around. He is going to preach his
    sermon. In the course of it he
    quotes many passages from Serip-
    ture. Into them go the fire, the
    human energy that might have
    built a fleet of cargo liners or filled
    them with tractors.

    Exhausted after the effort? He
    is still fresh as a daisy.

    Those who feel converted stay
    behind for further instruction.
    One night’s harvest, and it is big-
    ger than most big congregations.

    Mr.Stokes’ Problem

    RITAIN’S ancient cathedrals
    are her biggest standing at-
    raction for foreign visitors. Yet
    or every threepenny bit left \in
    the cathedral box, 3s. is spent at
    the café just outside, 5s. on coach
    and train tickets, and £1 on hotel
    bills,

    That is one of the reasons why
    Dr. E. G. SELWYN, the Dean of
    Winchester, is now demanding
    that the State should help with the
    cost of maintaining cathedrals.

    Who pays at present? It is the
    sole responsibility of the Church
    of England and her bill for urgent
    repairs to cathedrals, churches,
    and other properties now stands
    at £3,000,000.

    At St. Paul’s, London, the
    Chureh is responsible for the
    second highest dome in Europe,
    and is trying to raise £100,000
    for repairs. At Salisbury, the
    tallest spire in England is threat-
    ening to tumble down. Hundreds
    of other great churches need
    drastic restoration or complete re-
    building.

    Should the Church go on paying
    for the nation’s show places?
    Churchmen are divided.

    There is just a chance that the
    Minister of Works, Roman Catho-
    lic RICHARD STOKES, can find
    the way out of the problem of how
    to provide State funds and still
    keep the cathedrals as places of
    worship,

    Henhouse Church

    EFORE the war
    building a good average 400-
    seater church was put at £9,000-
    £10,000, parish hall £4,000, and |
    viearage £2,500.

    To-day, the same equipment
    would cost £40,000, and church
    building is down the queue be-
    hind homes, schools, and Govern-

    the cost of

    ment offices. But temporary
    ehurches are allowed,
    At Clayton, Newcastle-under-

    Lyme, the Anglicans have boysst
    a farm, The cowshed will be their
    church and the farmhouse the
    vicarage.

    At Canley estate, Coventry, the
    Methodists have, for ten years,
    been using a henhouse as a church.
    In. North London they seat 80
    worshippers in a shop. At Rossen-
    dale, Lanes., they hold their ser-
    vices in a room at a felt manufac-
    turing mill.

    At Dalton, near Darlington, they
    have gone along with the squatters
    at a former R.A.F, camp and
    squatted in the name of the
    Church in one of the huts.

    You can’t keep a good cause |

    —London Express Service.



    @ From Page 5
    time since pre-war, said; “The
    food is monotonous — but so it |
    seemed to me when I wes at Cam- |
    bridge in 1937.”
    A new

    Recommended
    “ Buy of the week:

    hygienic foil which you can
    use for making covers for larder
    dishes, wrapping _ sandwiches,
    cooking different vegetables sep-~
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    wrap each kind in a parcel and
    drop it in), making a steam-proot
    cover on a baking dish, lining

    Hello Everybody!

    AF
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    >
    cake tin, or wrapping fish to keep | $
    in the smell. I s 2s. a roll, | x
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    * LONDONERS 1 love:— j g
    SHE stood at Marble Arch |Â¥ %
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    + SHE was immensely rich and 1% x
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    her thin, bent figure, and golden | \ x
    curls straggled over the collar. s %
    She walked into the costly salon | \ xg
    and sat down. No one had to|/%& ¥
    ask her what she wanted. Every | ¢ y
    week, year after year, she comes | \ mS
    in and buys herself a new. hat. %
    —London Express Service. < %
    a aetihenestipenelinalpagtigiinnasistamtteptieneaane? x
    > %
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    ITCHING ;: $
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    vs I have been raised on...
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    Leaving School Next Term? 8 My Favourite—Soon will be Yours!
    HAVE you considered Journalism as a | x
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    String Rall sealig Se une "eahor The | % %
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    OLDEN :
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    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950

    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    PAGE THIRTEEN








    z YOU SEE...] [
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    BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
    MORE IMPORTANT, 1
    AM THE SPOKESMAN

    DO NOT be alarmed when you find that Shell
    X-100 Motor Oil changes colour soon after it has
    been in use, for the fact that it becomes darker in the
    sump than it was in the container is a reassuring
    sign. It is visible proof that additives in the
    new oil are preventing the deposition of sludge
    and lacquer which would otherwise form
    deposits on working parts and cause piston rings
    to stick.

    You should be pleased to note the darkening




    REFILL WITH

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    results, DRAIN, FLUSH, AND
    SHELL

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    your engine is ‘‘coming clean’’ . . . impurities that
    would be harmful in the mass are dispersed as
    minute, harmless particles throughout the body of
    the oil. The freedom of piston rings and valve
    stems, and the cleanliness of oilways, mean Jess
    wear and no restriction of engine power.

    New life has been given to your engine when
    you haye drained, flushed, and refilled with
    SHELL X-100 Motor Oil,

    SHELL X-100 will mix with any mineral oil which is
    already in the sump, but to get the best and quickest.

    X-100

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    ——————— ne



    a


    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950

    FIVE more students returned from Canada yesterda:
    ae hones by T.C.A. They are, left to right, Mr. Ke

    ey McKenzie, Mr.



    of
    7°

    for the Sum-
    eith Gooding,

    John Goddard, Jr., Mr. Harold

    Farmer and Mr. ffrey Watson.

    For Summer Holidays After 43 Years

    ETURNING from Canada AT™™ an absence of 43 years
    yesterday to spend the from the island, Mr. L.

    Summer holidays here were Mr.
    Harold Farmer who is doing his
    second year B.Sc., Mr. Geof Wat-
    son, second year Commerce, Mr.
    Kefth Gooding third year BSc.,
    and Mr. Geof McKenzie second
    year, Commerce. These boys are
    at McGill. Mr. John Goddard Jr.,
    the other student is doing his first
    year Commerce at Queen’s Uni-
    versity.

    Their parents, relatives and
    friends were at the airport to meet
    them.

    Trinidadians Entertained

    HERE was a Cocktail Dance
    Tast night at the Royal Bar-
    bados Yacht Club given in honour
    of the visiting Tranquility Tennis
    Team, by the members of the
    Barbados team.

    Today there Is be a luncheon
    peasy for them at the Crane

    ouse Club. This is also given
    by the Barbados Team.



    Across
    Looks as though Fianagan
    pevenue a d exD midleara, (63 _
    nd expenditure, (C)
    Gockneys

    have a word of greet-

    ae (3)

    rye Will measure the diameter
    all fibres, (Y)

    Amid? She may have been. (4)
    The university term beginning in
    january takes it for mirth, (8)

    lon to take against sun
    and Snger. (6)
    The return of pins to cut. (4)
    in manner of speaking

    me
    oN

    -
    >

    + G)
    Wembley gets more than one
    in-year. (5)
    a can almost smeli this coin.
    ‘8.@ nasal sound, (6)
    Start ofall teething troubie (3)
    Down
    Anybody willing may make them.

    )
    Ancient city feature for the little
    @rab. (6)
    ops of dish you'll find ('m in.

    here you Will always find Olga.
    (4) 6. Turn the hay, 3)
    . Tapertieion to let air into a vile

    . The ery ou hear when Thomas
    1

    e tiles, (5
    ested, (5) ye:
    ersify. (5)

    into the gap. (5)

    wet, (%) 19, Indite, (3)
    Was always above the Sultans of

    Turkey. (3)
    a1. This word vs sheltered. (3)

    Solution of yesterday's
    eto: 8 Ce ter! I
    3,8. Cauterise; ;
    Nil; 16, Malted: 17, Rear:
    ‘on; Rover; 22. 3
    ‘mt ae Vu Antes e RY
    ye, 5, See Cross;
    Toga: it.’ Ou: 15. .
    Den.

    $8.85 83 ;

    $Serss2-e er




    Ace; 14



    Bentham of New York City paid
    a five-week visit here and re-
    turned on Sunday last by the
    “Lady Nelson.” He was staying
    with his sister Mrs. G. Maughan
    of Belmont Road,

    He said that the islana nad made
    vast improvements since he had
    left and certainly looked strange
    to him. He had however enjoyed
    his holiday and thanked all those
    who had contributed in making it
    a pleasant one.

    Off To School In U.S.
    Pa on Wednesday on his
    way to the U.S.A. was
    young Ferdinand Goodridge of
    Spring Farm, St. Thomas. He will
    join his brother Franklin who is
    at school there.

    Amateur Actor
    AYING his first holiday visit to
    Barbados is Mr. E. G. Fras-
    er, Civil Servant attached to the
    Income Tax Office of British Gui-
    ana. He arrived here recently
    by the “Lady Nelson” to spend
    part of his six months’ holiday and
    fis staying at “Leaton on Sea,” The
    Stream.

    A member of the Georgetown
    Dramatic Club, Mr. Fraser said
    that they had done plays over a
    feries of years in B.G., and had
    just finished “While the Sun
    Shines” which was staged in Bar-
    bados last year.

    Here Until Wednesday
    RRIVING yesterday morning
    from Trinidad by B.W.1LA..
    was Mr. Clyde Archer, Legal
    Draughtsman to the Government
    of Trinidad. Hé will be in Barba-
    dos until Wednesday. Mr. Archer
    was a former Judge of the Bridge-
    town Petty Debt Court.



    Guess Star



    LAST WEEK’S GUEST STAR
    is Marilyn Monroe.

    ‘Nelson from his column

    keeps a look-out over
    all London.’’

    sag

    a look-out for
    ‘Black & White’

    enue



    GARDENING
    HINTS FOR
    AMATEURS

    Crazy Pavement

    Crazy paving for garden paths is
    not quite such a craze as it was
    some years ago, yet this type of
    path is still popular with many
    people.

    Crazy pavement paths can be
    most. attractive, especially in the
    less forma) and smaller garden.

    Like the Cement Path it is quite
    possible for any energetic garden.
    er to construct a crazy path him-
    self at home at a quarter the cost
    that would be entailed if expen-
    sive outside labour was employed.

    As a rule the snag about making
    crazy pavement paths is the diffi-
    culty of obtaining suitable stone.
    This difficulty, however, can be
    overcome by making the stone
    yourself right on the spot, using
    the same concrete mixture as tha;
    given for cement paths, i.e.,

    4 parts shingle (small stones or
    grits)

    2. parts sand

    1 part cement.

    There are two methods of mak-
    ing these stones. One way is to
    form the stones actually on the
    site of the prepared path by put.
    ting lumps of the concrete mix-
    ture on the svot. and shaping up

    the stones with a trowel.

    _ The second way, not quite so
    simple, is to make a wooden
    mould, say one and a half feet by
    six feet (a packing case cut down
    answ well), nail some wooden
    pieces across at different angles,
    and put in your concrete mixture
    to a depth of 1% to 2 inches. When
    it is quite hard (about 4 days)
    take the pieces earefully out of
    the mould, and repeat the process
    until, you have enough slabs to
    make your crazy path.

    uming now that you have
    your stones all ready we will now

    describe in detail how to make thd
    path.

    How To Make A Crazy Path

    Having chosen the site for your
    path, proceed to peg it out by
    careful measurements to the shape
    and size you want it. Next, dig
    cut the site to a depth of twelve
    inches, leaving the sides straight
    and clean, cut to form the walls
    of the path,

    Fill in the cavity with stones
    and marl to %4 of the depth, ram-
    ming and rolling it to a body.

    When this is done, put in a




    “1 see you’ve been forcing
    your divisions agcin
    Plumton Minor.”



    layer of soil (leaving just enough
    room for the depth of the stones),
    and roll and ram this very firm
    and level (some people use sand
    here). Now comes the fascinating
    part of arranging the crazy jig-
    saw of your path.

    Assemble your concrete slabs
    conveniently near, and have a
    little eement handy. Put dow»
    your first slab and under each end
    of it make a small hole in the
    pathway. Fill these holes with a
    blob of cement and put the slab
    back down on top, pressing and
    settling it until you have it proper-
    ly in place and you feel the cement
    grip.

    Continue in this way, arranging
    your path as you fancy, but giving
    each slab two little cement “seats”
    as described.

    ‘When all the slabs have been
    laid, the cracks between can be
    filled in with a cement gruel (3
    parts sand and one part cement
    mixed thick), or the spaces can be
    filled with soil. If soil is used,
    small rock plants such as “Little
    Yellow Daisy” or “Sweet Allysum”
    can be planted in between the
    Stones, here and there, giving the
    path a very charming appearance.

    “‘And all London keeps

    ”



    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    At the Cinema

    “East Side,

    “East Side, West Side”, the
    film version of Marcia Davenport’s
    best-selling novel of the same
    name, is now showing at the Globe
    Theatre. Though well-acted, the
    characters seem a little flat in
    comparison with the well rounded
    and clearly defined personalities
    of the book, and the eontrasting
    atmospheres of New York’s east
    and west sides are missing, having
    probably been lost on the cutting
    room floor.

    It is the story of Jessie. Bourne,
    born and raised on the east side,
    who marries Brandon Bourne,
    wealthy New York Socialite.
    Bourne’s infidelities are forgiven
    by his wife, who is desperately
    in love with him, but when he
    resumes his attachment to cheap,
    but fascinating Isabel Lorison,
    Jessie realizes their marriage is
    finished, On the point of leaving
    Brandon, he tells her that Isabel
    has been murdered and he will be
    questioned. When the murder is
    solved by Mark Dwyer, returned
    soldier and ex-policeman, and
    Brandon is exonerated, Jessie
    tells him that her love for him is
    dead, and she is leaving him.

    On the whole, it is a trite, story,
    but it is lifted out of the ordinary
    run of “eternal triangles” by the
    acting and _ direction. Jessie
    Bourne as played by Barbara
    Stanwyck, is warmly sympathetic
    and sincere throughout, and her
    reactions to her husband's infidel-
    ities are well defined and in
    keeping with her character. It
    is probably one of the best roles
    Miss Stanwyck has played, and
    with her usual ability, she loses
    no opportunities to make it out-
    standing. James Mason as the
    philandering husband, was as
    convincing as possible in a role
    that did not seem to suit him too
    well, His scenes with Isabel
    Lorison has obviously been cut to
    shreds, though a resounding slap
    he gives her face is left in. Ava
    Gardner, as Isabel, cheap, preda-
    tory and always fascinating to
    Brandon, turned in an excellent
    performance, and her scene with
    Jessie, when Jessie realizes final-
    ly what her husband really is, is
    acutely cruel. The role of Mark
    Dwyer, who falls in love with
    Jessie, is engagingly natural and
    well-played by Van Heflin,

    “East side, West side” will be
    enjoyed by most people, and
    particularly those who have not
    read the book. It is dramatic
    throughout and interest is sus-
    tained to the end.



    West Side’’
    G.B.

    “My Friend Irma”

    MY FRIEND IRMA,” a pic-
    turization of one of radic’s most
    peyular comecy programs, is now
    plating at the Aquatic Club
    Cinema, Marie Wilson plays
    the original role of Irma, which
    she created on the air, and when
    she takes things into her rather in-
    capable hands—chaos is apt to
    result, and frequently does. How-
    ever, everything turns out happily,
    in the end.

    Supporting Miss Wilson are
    John Lund as the boy friend, Don
    Diana Lynn as her friend Jane,

    radio’s comic team of Dean Martin
    DeFore as a _ nillionaire and
    and Jerry Lewis. If, you. like

    plenty of laughs and hilarious fun,
    youll probably want to see “My
    Friend Irma.”

    “Intruder In The Dust”

    Once again, a film that serves
    to prod social conscience has come
    to Barbados. “Intruder In The
    Dust”, showing at the Roxy
    Theatre deals with the racial ten-
    sions between the white and
    coloured peoples in the South-
    ern States. The story tells
    the plight of a negro land-
    owner who is falsely arrested for
    murdering a white man. While
    the mob gathers outside the jail,
    prior to lynching the prisoner,
    a young white boy, whom the
    negro had once saved from
    drowning, persuades his uncle, a

    lawyer, to defend the man,
    Through the boy’s efforts, it is
    proved that the negro did not

    commit the murder. The strength
    and dignity of Juano Hernandez
    as the proud negro dominate the
    film and Claude Jarman is con-
    vineing and sincere as the ado-
    lescent boy. Overtones of meaning
    help to deepen the impact of
    dialogue and action; silence and
    normal sound effects largely re-
    place the musical background,
    with dramatic effect.

    “Father Was A Fullback”

    A comedy. of family life,
    “FATHER WAS A_ FULL-
    BACK” starring Maureen O'Hara,
    Freq Mac Murray is now playing
    at the Empire Theatre. To quote
    a short American review—
    “Sparkling humour and refresh-
    ing modern dialogue enhance this
    diverting comedy, which for all
    its laughable exaggerations,
    directs healthy satire at the indul-
    gent American parent and the
    spirited teen-ager. Deft direction
    maintains a fast pace and foot-
    ball scenes furnish excitement
    Fine fun for the whole family.



    Rupert and the Dragon Pills—38



    When Rupert and the dragon
    are safely inside the rocket attach-
    ment the Mandarin stands well

    back, The steps are removed by
    the chiet assistant, who then tetches
    a torch tied to a long pole. Lighting
    the torch, he thrumyg ir at che fuse,
    which at ance catenes fire, There

    Children’s Letter

    Dear Children,

    We celebrating Mother's

    are

    Day today. Those of you who are
    fortunate to have your mothers
    with you must certainly feel very

    happy, and I hope you do your
    best to make her happy too, and
    really feel this is her day.

    It is not a gift on Mother’s Day
    that matters so much as it is not
    always possible to give something,
    but there are so many little
    things that you could do, and I
    am sure they would be apprecia-
    ted by her.

    I must wish you all a very
    happy day.

    Yours very truly,
    CHILDREN’S EDITOR.







    is a momentary hissing and
    spluttering and with a foar_the
    great rocket moves, slowly at first,
    then suddenly at a tremendous
    speed it shoots off the steel guiding
    rod and straight up to the sky,
    leaving a long trail of smoke and
    fiery sparks behind it.

    Pen Pals

    19 Louise
    Vreed-
    British

    Oscar
    Street,
    British

    Harry Bayne, Age
    Bayne 18 Frank Bayne 20.
    en-Hoop, West Bank,
    Guiana,, South America,
    Limerick, 92. Cronoque
    Georgetown, Queenstown,
    Guiana South America, Claude
    Hazzard 14 years Boys’ Hostel
    Tauteen, St. George's Grenada,
    Stamp collecting, dancing, Cin-
    ema!

    Tongue-T wisters

    Repeat each of these aloud



    three times without tripping
    your tongue—if you can.

    Sheilah, shrieking, slid side-
    ways on Shelley Shelton’s slip-
    pery slide Saturday.

    G.B.I

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    PAGE THREE



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    Pomerat aa MPM Mn Maa" aM" ee eae aaa MeMaMe”

    BARBARA GOALEN



    wags pe

    WH





    as effective’. .

    SUNDAY ADVOC



    illustrates

    ‘Like Drinks, Not Easy to Handle”

    By ANNE EDWARDS

    THE fashion for white comes

    , men is like the effect of drink 01

    most men. After one they want

    back with a bang, White collars} another and after two they don’t
    and cuffs of pique or muslin are care how many they have... .

    on most of the new Spring dresses.”
    White hats, white pique gloves,
    white roses or carnations, white®
    chiffon handkerchiefs, white shirts,!
    and separate sets of white collars *
    and cuffs to add to frocks that
    haven’t got them...they fill the
    shop windows.

    It’s a fashion that’s easy to copy®

    —but hard to handle. The effect

    Barbara Goalen shows you how
    that ‘touch of whifje should be
    used and too often isn’t.

    Remembering that the more
    white you use the less effective
    you look. Barbara limits herself
    to one dazzling collar on an all-
    black outfit, or a pair of short
    white gloves with a navy dress
    and accessories, or a hat and a
    buttonhole on an outfit that is

    of white accessories on most wo-% otherwise black to its fingertips.



    To Eat

    * COCKTAIL PARTY
    seen around: —

    DELIGHTFUL ... big yellow
    grapefruit, spiked all over with
    orange sticks which were tipped
    with olives, pearl onions
    radishes,

    DELICIOUS .. . tinned frank-
    furters, baked instead of boiled,
    and served very hot. (Put them

    ideas

    A DIET TO CUT DOWN YOUR WEIGHT

    Slimming

    Are you contemplating joining
    the rapidly increasing numbers
    of weight reducers?
    pecially men—who would like to
    “take a bit off’ shy from the
    experiment because the slimming
    meals so widely publicised are
    much more attractive to women
    than men.

    Here, for their benefit are the
    very successful reducing diet
    tules of St. Bartholomew’s Hos-
    pital. The hospital claims that
    every .month it adds another 80
    over-weight people to the roll of
    those whose eating habits it is
    regulating,

    Breakfast

    Tea or coffee (ground), as much
    as liked; milk, 4 tablespoonfuls
    (no sugar or sweetened con-
    densed milk).

    One egg, boiled or poached.

    Bread, 2 ozs. brown or white,
    two thin slices, with butter or
    marmalade, or jam, very thinly
    spread,

    Midday
    Lean meat, rabbit, stewed liver,
    chicken or fish - (not fried),

    medium portion, 2 ozs.
    Gravy without fat or thickening.
    (No barley, rice Yorkshire pud-



    ding, suet dumplings or pie
    crust.

    Vegetakles, boiled, as much as
    liked (but no potatoes, dried
    beans peas or lentils).

    Raw fruit, as much as liked.
    ae
    we
    [aa

    $
    Tp,

    jer Yardley cherish
    er vardle)

    Pamper your s

    melting softness of the Yardley Cleansing Creams,

    the richness of Nigh

    Stimblate it gently with one of the Toning Lotions,

    and, during the day, si



    )

    Many—es- -

    (Bananas and grapes in small
    quantities only.)
    Tea
    As much tea as you like, with
    milk, 4 tablespoonsful (no sugar
    or sweetened condensed milk).
    Bread, two thin slices; butter or
    jam very thinly spread.
    Salad, as much as liked.
    Vinegar, if desired, but no oil or
    mayonnaise,

    Evening

    Tea or coffee (ground), with 2
    tablespoonsful milk (no sugar
    or cocoa).

    Bread, one thin slice.

    Cheese, sardines (no oil), salmon,
    herring or kipper, small portion
    1% ozs.).

    Or 2 eggs, boiled or poached; or
    white fish or smoked haddock,
    medium portion.

    Raw fruit or salad.

    Butter not to exceed } oz. in the
    day.

    The amounts of food allowed in
    the above list may not be exceed-
    ed, but they may be arranged to
    taste.

    Allowed Without Restriction

    Fruit, raw (bananas and grapes
    in small quantities only).

    Green vegetables (except green

    peas).

    Salads (except beetroot).

    Tea, coffee (ground).

    Clear soups and meat extracts
    and Marmite.

    Soda water, lemon water (no



    yout

    kin with the

    nt Cream.

    he and cleanse

    Without Drugs

    sugar). Water,
    Vinegar (moderate amounts).
    Saccharine.

    Not Allowed

    Fat and fat meats, such as ham,
    bacon, pork,

    Oil and salad dressings.

    Fried fish, chip potatoes and other
    fried foods.

    Cream.

    Nute.

    Sugar, sweets, and chocolates.

    Fruits tinned in syrup and dried
    or fruits,

    8 condensed milk.
    Puddings of all kinds, including
    suet and Yorkshire puddings.
    “Biscuits, pastry, cakes and ice-

    cream.

    Thickening in stews and soups
    and barley, rice, tapioca
    macaroni and Lockshen.

    Potatoes, dried beans, peas, and
    lentils.

    Cocoa and sweetened bottled
    coffee,
    Beer, stout, sweet wines and
    spirits.

    Mineral waters (except soda
    water), ginger ale, ginger beer
    and cider.

    Bottled fruit juices and barley
    water.

    * % oz. unsweetened biscuit may
    be substituted for 1 oz. bread.
    The chief dietician at the

    hospital adds this warning: “If

    you want to reducé, see .your
    doctor. It is the only safe way.

    “He should test your heart, take




    t with refreshing Complesion Milk,

    beauty preparations by YARDLEY

    Nigh
    Powd

    Cleansing Creams - { Cream + Tan




    / Rouge - r

    YARDLEY 33

    n » Eye Shadow

    OLD BOND

    ng Lotions + ‘Make-up Base

    + Mascara

    STREET LONDOW

    and *



    in a tin with dripping seasoned
    with salt, pepper, and a little
    ginger). Chicory stalks filled wito
    demi-sel cream cheese. “Daiquiris”
    made with three parts white rum
    (35s. 4d. a bottle) and two parts
    lemon squash, served very cold.

    DE-LOVELY .. . Table decor-
    ated with those nursery candle-
    sticks (the one-candle-in-sauce!
    kind). One czimson candle in
    the centre, and a dozen flower
    heads heaped in the cup (it holds

    enough water to keep them
    fresh)

    Easy Lesson
    * The art of public speaking

    _... IT have been asked to say
    a few words about .. . but I can-
    not let the occasion pass without
    ... the spirit of loyal co-operation
    in which ... and a special word
    of thanks to...

    I am confident I am expressing



    your blood pressure and examine
    you for anaemia and chest con-
    ditions.

    “There should be no need for
    drugs. We normally try to avoid
    using them, Dexedrine merely
    makes you lose appetite. We
    encourage patients to cut their
    food by will power.”

    A Shock For The System

    If a person has heart trouble,
    bulky food would not be recom-
    mended by the hospital. Gastric
    sufferers would not be prescribed
    food likely to irritate.

    Patients are expected to lose
    2% lbs. each week. If they are
    losing more, then the diet is in-
    creased. To lose a stone a month
    is normally reckoned too big a
    shock for the system.

    Special exercise is not recom-
    mendeq because it strengthens
    the appetite. People are told ‘
    drink water or soda water
    allay hunger.

    At Bart’s they saw that women
    who concentrate on slimming
    without medical supervision some-
    times become neurotic

    And they add: “For every
    patient who must reduce, the
    hospital still has three who must
    be fattened up.”

    to

    —L.E.S. G



    ;

    GEC.

    HOUSEHOL
    A





    Bolling water in a few minutes

    polished aluminium, it has a q



    p ELECTRIC
    PPLIANCES

    help you and this is whataG.E.C. Electric |
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    ATE



    my firm ; |

    theory that ‘half as much means twice
    . Says ANNE EDWARDS



    1. Short white cotton gloves
    with a sleeveless dress, and—1920
    touch—a long white cigarette
    holder.

    2. White hat and buttonhele of
    two white carnations—worn the
    new way—nowhere near your
    buttonhole and very close to your
    chin.

    3. Brilliantly white collar on an
    all-black outfit., The collar looks
    whiter this way and the outfit
    blacker. The collar is shaped like
    two separate petals.

    the wishes of you afl when...

    who has asked me to say . . . she

    has unfortunately been prevented }
    from coming, but has, however,

    sent a telegram: “Best wishes for

    your venture.”

    But we have been fortunate in
    securing who has kindly
    consented to. Finally I would
    like to thank the committee .. .
    the untiring efforts of . . . last,

    but not least, the gallant work
    put in by It only remains
    for me to say without whose
    help this would have been im-
    possible.
    To Read

    * LETTERS | doubt often get

    written: —

    ‘I am a_ hospital nurse, and |
    every patient at some _ time

    remarks on the whiteness of my

    teeth, and asks what toothpaste
    I use.” (From an advertisement.)
    Is That So....
    * QUOTES: Maurice Chevalier
    (about a meeting between
    Guitry and King Alfonso):
    “Sacha assumed such a_ kingly
    manner and the king was so
    natural that for the moment I

    had them confused,”

    Doris Langley Moore (about
    getting clothes for her museum
    of costume): “The hardest type
    to find of any era — are chil-
    dren’s and maids’ dresses. They're
    never discarded till they’re worn
    out.” |
    Sylvia Shelley (about the poses |
    in fashion photographs): “When
    1, started modelling 12 years ago
    we had to lean far back, smile
    into the camera, and look vital.
    Now the smart thing is to lean
    forward, drop your eyes, and look

    deadpan.”
    Thanks |
    é@ VD LIKE TO thank the}
    woman who, after being
    beaten up, said: ‘Flogging? No

    I don’t believe in it.”
    I'd like to thank the man who,
    returning to England for the first
    @ On Page 10 |

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    PAGE SEVEN



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    PAGE EIGHT



    Published by Tho Advocate Co. 114., 34, Broad St, Bridge =

    Sunday, 1950

    May 14,

    Summer Season.

    TOMORROW Mr. Fred Goddard, M.C_P.,
    and the Manager of the Marine Hotel
    are flying to Venezuela on a goodwill mis-
    sion, They will remain there until Satur-
    day. The object of the visit is to encourage
    Venezuelans to spend their summer holi-
    days in Barbados. In order to encourage
    them the Marine is offering special summer
    rates. The visitors from Barbados will
    interview travel agencies, hotels, clubs
    and companies in Venequela which are
    interested in potential tourists. They are
    out to sell Barbados as a good buy to the |
    Venezuelans, who have summer holidays \
    and who cannot afford to go too far from
    home. Barbados is only a few flying hours
    from ‘Caracas and already this year there
    have been many visitors to Barbados from
    Venezuela. At Easter there was a special
    charter flight for the week-end.

    But the visit of the visitors from Barba-
    dos is primarily designed to get Vene-
    zuelans here during the summer season
    when tourists from the North have re-
    turned home.

    The hotels of Barbados were packed to
    capacity this winter with visitors from the
    North most of whom remained at hotels
    for periods of at least one month. The in-
    flux of Canadians made the accommodation
    available at hotels here inadequate to cope
    with a large number of would-be visitors.
    And it is to be hoped that the Government
    of Barbados is already making plans to take
    advantage of the offer of Canadian capi-
    tal which will be made available for build-
    ing a new hotel, if necessary: tax free
    legislation is passed in the House and
    certain other requirements met.

    Barbados had a good winter season of .
    tourists and the indications are that next })
    year will be better. i

    But what of the summer?

    The established hotels of Barbados
    keep open throughout the year but most
    are forced to cut down the numbers of their
    employees at the end of every winter
    season. It is to avoid this seasonal fluctu-
    ation in the hotel industry that the two

    visitors from Barbados are leaving for â„¢

    Venezuela tomorrow. It is too early yet in
    the summer season to know just how many
    Canadians will avail themselves of the ex-
    eceptionally favourable rates offered by
    Trans-Canada Airlines during the summer
    but there is no reason to believe that Bar-
    bados* hotels cannot cope with Canadians
    and Veneguelans who are eager to see
    Barbados in the months when many Bar-
    badians are themselves on holiday.

    There are many difficulties to be over-
    come in encouraging tourists to come to
    Barbados from Venezuela.
    | But one of the most urgent difficulties
    to be faced is the lack of permission for
    regular Venezuelan airliners to ne ‘

    If Barbados had had to rely only on
    British West Indian Airways for transport
    of visitors to and from Canada, Barbados
    would have lost a substantial amount of
    dollars last winter. #

    It ig not possible to get large numbers of
    Venezuelans here unless Venezuelan Air-
    lines ean be granted equivalent landing
    facilities to those that are at present ex-
    tended to Trans-Canada Airlines. 4

    Permission has been given and can still
    be given in the future to charter planes to
    come here from Venezuela but unless the
    tourist agencies in Venezuela can assure
    tourists to Barbados of a regular service by
    the normal airlines of the country, it is
    very doubtful whether the volume of
    traffic necessary to provide Barbadian
    hotels with a permanent summer industry
    can be built up. ;

    British West Indian Airways can carry
    a small number of Venezuelan visitors now
    but tourists on a large scale will want to
    fly to Barbados in their own planes.

    It will be interesting t6 know just how
    many Dutch visitors from Curacao and
    Aruba do not come to Barbados for a short
    summer holiday because of the lack of
    landing rights at Seawell for K.L.M. Tour-
    ism is the major industry of Barbados
    after sugar. It is something of the present.
    It is within our grasp. No selfish interests,
    no lack of enterprise must allow it eae

    "Yene visit of the two Barbadian visitors
    so soon after the goodwill mission of the
    Barbados Polo team will be a welcome
    reminder to Venezuelans in search of soft
    beaches and blue waters that Barbados is
    only a few hours as the plane flies, But the
    planes must be allowed to fly.
    West Indian
    Industrialisation
    PROFESSOR W. ARTHUR LEWIS has

    recently published under the auspices of
    the Caribbean Commission his report on
    the Industrialisation of the British West
    Indies.. This Report will be studied by
    governments, legislatures and chambers
    of commerce, and it is fitting that com-
    ment be made on a matter of great impor-
    tance to the future development of the
    West Indies.

    | Professor Lewis is the Stanley Jevons
    Professor of Economics in the University
    of Manchester, England, and his opinions
    are worthy of great respect and careful
    consideration. The layman, however, who
    peruses Professor Lewis’ article carefully
    may be forced to the conclusion that the
    Professor has overlooked certain vital mat-
    ters in writing his article on behalf of West
    Indian industrialisation.

    The means of financing the industriali-
    sation of the West Indies, is the biggest
    problem to be faced. Professor Lewis
    admits in his article that ‘the islands can-
    not be industrialised to anything like the
    extent that is necessary without a consid-

    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    erable inflow of foreign capital and capi-
    talists,” and proposes that the foreign
    capitalists be wooed to invest in the West
    Indies. Throughout his article Professor
    Lewis has always in mind the industri-
    alisation programme of Puerto Rico but
    that example is not as fitting as Professor
    Lewis suggests. Firstly, he admits that
    Puerto Rican Industrial Development was
    made possible by Government grants to
    the Government Development Bank and
    that the Government was able to make
    these grants from “surplus which accrued
    during the war, mainly from taxes on
    greatly expanded sales of rum to the U.S.”
    Secondly, the U.S. Federal Government
    returned to the Puerto Rican Government
    the money raised in taxes on Puerto Rican
    rum imported into the States during the
    war.

    Such a refund would be equivalent io
    the British Government giving to the Bar-
    bados Government the duties which the
    Customs and Excise in England had lev-
    ied on Barbadian rum entering the U. K.
    during the war, In view of the heavy
    duty on rum the considerable amount of
    money involved becomes apparent. But
    since such a refund appears most unlikely
    it is misleading for Professor Lewis to
    rely as much as he does on the example of
    the Puerto Rican Industrial Development

    For Industrialisation to play a useful
    role in the West Indian economy the in-
    dustries must be able to pay their way and
    make a profit. Again Professor Lewis offers
    no reason for the flourishing condition of
    the Cement Industry of Puerto Rico, but
    it is known that an extensive housing
    programme is being financed by the Fed-
    eral Government hence the demand for
    large quantities of cement. Actually it is
    now known that cement is the only Puerto

    » Rican industry that is being run at a profit
    for the above reason.

    It is agreed by Professor Lewis that for
    West Indian Industry to be a paying con-
    cern, considerable exports would have to
    be made to foreign countries. He contin-
    ues “Latin-America seems, on the face of

    x it, the most obvious direction in which to

    look.....If the West Indies could cap-
    ture just a small fraction of the Latin-
    American import trade in manufactures,
    their problem would be solved complete-
    ly.” While recognising the difficulties of
    breaking into such a market, Professor
    Lewis does not discuss the instability of
    the Governments of so many Latin-Amer-
    ican States and the drastic results of a
    repudiation of debts on a change of Gov-
    ernment on an infant West Indian Industry.

    In requiring exports too, the West Indies
    would face the hazards now being experi-
    enced by Britain in being dependent on
    fluctuating markets in a world in which
    all countries are joining in the race for
    industrialisation.

    Professor Lewis, in discussing the future
    of Agriculture appears to consider only
    the future of sugar. This is not a fair
    assumption, strenuous efforts are being
    made in all the islands to produce an ever
    increasing amount of local foodstuffs at a
    remunerative price and to diversify the
    crops in production. This should have the
    effect of increasing employment, and of
    offsetting- any mechanisation of the sugar
    industry which may take place.

    If the money required to finance indus-
    trialisation were utilised in emigration
    schemes to British Guiana and British
    Honduras, the employment problem would
    be more effectively solved by means less
    pregnant with danger.

    Professor Lewis is a distinguished son of
    the West Indies and these criticisms are
    offered in no carping spirit but to remind
    those responsible for policy in such mat-
    ters that the opinions of the most distin-

    guished, when too long separated from the

    subjects of their enquiry, must be rigor-
    ously. examined before their suggestions
    can be acted upon with assurance.



    The Day of Reckoning

    NOW that the House of Assembly is once more
    in Session, it is to be hoped that high on its
    programme is a grant for the entertainment of

    H.R.H. Princess Alice and the Earl of Athlone
    There is no question that this entertainment was
    other than lavish and excellent. Two months
    have elapsed since thg Royal Visitors left these
    shores, and bills have to be paid whether incur-
    red by Government House or a lowly cottage.

    The Governor has had a costly beginning to
    hig term of office. Apart from additional expen-
    diture caused by his transfer such as new uni-
    forms, a car and other incidental expenses, with-
    in a few days of his arrival he was called upon
    to entertain his fellow Governors attending the
    West Indian Governors’ Conference. This has
    been followed by the entertainment of other con-
    ferences meeting here, naval units of British,
    American and Dutch Navies, distinguished visi-
    tors, and a visit to Jamaica to attend the installa-
    tion of H.R.H. Princess Alice as Chancellor of
    University College, West Indies. In addition
    there has been the customary entertainment of
    local guests.

    The Governor’s annual entertainment, allow-
    ance is far from large, indeed it is scarcely ade-
    quate to cover the cost of norinal routine
    entertainment. Of this allowance for the past
    financial year the Agting Governor, Mr. Stewart
    Perowne, O.B.E.,, who had spent 7 months at
    Government House, was entitled to 7/12, leaving
    the Governor with 5/12 to cover an extremely
    heavy expenditure. 2

    H.R.H. Princess Alice and the Earl of Athlone
    were handsomely entertained as befits such an
    occasion. Barbados can be proud that the enter-
    tainment of the Royal Guests left nothing to be
    desired Apart from luncheons and dinner par-
    ties at Government House, 600 guests were enter-
    tained at a Garden Party, 500 at an Evening
    Reception, as well as 700 school children. Enter-
    tainment on such a scale is costly,

    Trinidad made a grant to its Governor in
    advance of the arrival of the Royal Guests. It is
    not often that we are able to welcome such guests
    to our shores, and the Island is grateful to His
    Excellency that the traditional hospitality of
    Barbados was so well maintained. It is to be
    hoped that the grant already mooted will be both

    adequate and speedy. It would be ungrateful
    and undignified if this matter is further delayed

    ee fT te ER TL ee ee ae

    rp Sas bneemeptateapeeesienssteenninasinnstenines

    tive Committee will be of especial



    —_—-

    THE PRINCIPAL OF THE

    EVENING

    THOSE who provide the most
    lasting benefits to a country are
    not always the politicians and
    those in the public eye. Some
    working in scholarship and, in
    fields not subject to the blaze of
    publicity give to the country in
    which -they work benefits which
    may not be recognised or appre-

    ciated until long after

    themselves have quit the -
    Such a one is Dr. Bruce Ham-

    ilton. Historian, novelist, -

    wright, and amateur actor B:
    Hamilton during his sojourn in
    this island has enriched the
    historical knowledge of Barbadian
    institutions and by his work on
    behalf of the Evening Institute
    has set on foot a movement whose
    future cannot at present be dis-
    cerned but which will undoubtedly
    be a factor of major importance tn
    the education of the island in the
    future.

    Graduating with a Degree in
    History from London University
    in 1926, Dr. Hamilton came out to
    Barbados in 1927 as History Master
    at Harr'son College. He remained
    at Harrison Col'ege until 1927
    when he returned to England, But
    the attractions of Barbados lured
    him back in 1936, and in 1938 he
    took up his old post at Harrison
    College.

    When, in 1947, History was made ;

    a possible subject for Harrison
    College boys to take for the Higher
    Certificate, Dr. Hamilton was

    made Senior Master of Group II 4

    candidates.

    Dr, Hamilton has written several
    novels, among them being “Pro”,
    “Midd'’e Class Murder’, and “Tet
    Him Have Judgment” (American
    title “Hanging Judge”’.) To Bar-
    badians, however, his history of
    “Cricket in Barbados” and _ his
    work on the history of the Execu-

    interest.

    In 1947 Dr. Hamilton was
    awarded his Doctorate in History
    by the University of London on
    his thesis on Barbados and the
    Confederation Question. That has
    unfortunately not yet been pub-
    lished but in 1944 he delivered a
    lecture to the Barbados Museum
    and Historical Society on an im-
    portant aspect of this subject. The
    wealth of study and research which
    Dr. Hamilton undertook is evident
    in the lecture which he delivered.

    How far Dr. Hamilton was in-
    strumental in forming the jidea
    embodied in what has come to be
    known as “The Bushe Experiment”
    will probably never be known.
    Politicians are not in the habit
    of revealing the sources of their
    inspiraiion. In the course of his
    lecture to the Museum Society Dr.
    Hamilton said:— “It will have
    been noticed that the most sub-
    stantial difference between the law
    and that formerly providing for an
    Executive Committee in Jamaica

    DR. HAMILTON,
    Ondersley.”

    Our Readers Say:

    centre,







    Dr. Bruce Hamilton

    was that in Barbados no provisio+
    was made for the payment of
    members of the Committee. Per-
    haps that has contributed in a

    INSTITUTE

    trust. It is true of course that
    unpaid unofficial members are as
    a rule unable to give anything like
    their whole attention to the busi-
    ness of the Committee, and this
    has inevitably had one possibly.
    undesirable effect, that the real
    body of the work is done by an

    inner Committee of salaried
    official members.
    Two forebodings, very com-

    monly felt at the time of the origi-
    nal Act, have not been realised.
    No practical difficulty has ever
    been experienced in securing seats
    for a sufficient number of officials,
    «und, so far, no attempt has been
    made to use the machinery of the
    Executive Committee to enforce a
    kind of party government. Yet
    such an attempt could be made,
    and it remains to be seen whether
    recent developments, along the
    line of splitting the House into two
    opposed groups, may not in fact
    lead to the refusal of a parlia-
    mentary majority to co-operate
    with an Executive Committee in
    which such a majority is not
    reflected.”

    When the pressure of work was
    not as great as it is today Dr.
    Hamilton used to take part in the
    plays put on by the Bridgetown



    —In the late Christopher Bean

    higher degree than any other cir-
    cumstance to the practical success
    of the measure. The absence of a
    material interest makes it easy for
    unofficial members to resign if
    they find themselves in disagree-
    ment with government policy, and
    this renders it possible for them
    to perform the functions entrusted
    to them without incurring mis-

    as Leonard Brisby in “Exit James

    Players. The theatre going public
    may remember him in “The
    Sacred Flame”, “Family Album”,
    “The Ringer”, and others. The
    Bridgetown Players has done much
    to help charities in Barbados and
    those who devoted their time and
    energies to help are deserving of
    public gratitude.

    Dr. Hamilton has made Barba-
    dos his home and perhaps no
    greater compliment can be paid
    him than to say he is thought of
    as a Barbadian by those who have
    had the privilege of working with
    him. Today he has begun the
    work which may well gain him
    lasting remembrance in this island
    although his books. will do so in
    other countries. The Evening In-
    stitute is the most important
    educational development which
    has taken place in this island for
    many a long year. Through their
    endeavours the blot of illiteracy
    may be abolished when the Insti-
    tute is able to devote their ener-
    gies in that direction.

    At Harrison College Dr. Hamil-
    ton’s work has also been of lasting
    benefit to the school. For years
    he did his utmost to ensure that
    boys could take History for the
    Higher Certificate and eventually
    re met with success in
    1947.

    A man of modest and retiring
    disposition, completely devoid of
    racial prejudices, Dr. Hamilton has
    exerted a beneficial influence on
    many generations of schoolboys,
    and when historians come to assess
    those who have made a lasting
    contribution to the life of this
    island it is undoubted that Bruce
    Hamilton will receive their care-
    ful consideration.

    Oil And The Public

    at the recent Grenada Sugar Con-into this “Is the U.K. Government

    Dear Sir,

    According to the latest infor-
    mation given by Government on
    the Gas situation, they have
    granted or are willing to grant
    the Company a license to gn-
    tinue the gas supply for three
    months, while the British Union
    Oil Company and the Attorney
    of Turner Hall are only willing
    to continue for seven days, these
    two statements are quite clear,
    but surely there must be ee
    in the granting of a license That
    requires some explanation from
    Government or else, British
    Union Oil Company and the At-
    torney of Turner Hall would
    have agreed to the three months
    extension, there appears to be
    some secrecy or clumsy handling
    of the entire affair.

    One can hardly imagine our
    learned Attorney General, or our
    well known Crown Solicitor ad-
    vising His Excellency to an-
    nounce the coming into opera-
    tion of the Oil Act, which act
    cancels all leases as well as takes
    over the control of peoples land
    and places the granting of li-
    censes and the fixing of the con-
    ditions of said license, without
    having first made provision for a
    continuous supply of Gas by
    Government to Government, pri-
    vate individuals and Companies’
    who use the gas all the time.

    There has been and apparently
    still is a great deal of clumsy
    handling of the entire affair aid
    the blame for the disruption of
    the service to the general public
    must rest on the shoulders of
    Government. The public once
    more feel that they have been
    let down either through ignor-
    ance or complete disconcern by
    those whose duty it is to see to
    the welfare of the community’s
    interest.

    GAS USER.
    Sugar
    To the Editor, The Advocate—

    SIR,—As one of the delegates

    who represented British Guiana

    ference, I wish to say how much
    my heart and mind go out with
    the Delegates to London, prayer-
    fully hoping that the maximuin
    of success would attend their
    mission.

    I am sorry that Mr. Bustamante
    could not make the trip as I re-
    gard him as a statesman of a very
    high order in spite of what else
    might be said of him. But I am
    happy in the fact that Mr. G. H.
    Adams goes on the delegation.
    Barbados seems to’ hold the key
    to the delegation’s success in their
    Mr. Adams. For apart from Mr
    Adam’s political status in Barba-
    dos he has it in his power to cal!
    forth world denunciation of the
    United Kingdom by publicly re-
    tracting the build-up he gave the
    U.K. (at the United Nations meet-
    ing) as to justice, fairplay, ete.,
    should the U.K. betray its trust
    and obligation now to the colonies
    in the West Indies. Mr. Adams
    promised to do this at Grenada.
    We the people concerned will stand
    by and do so if Mr. Adams doesn’t
    in the event of failure of the
    negotiations.

    With my knowledge of the facts
    I fail to see how the U.K. Gov-
    ernment can turn down the re-
    quest to raise the guaranteed
    amount from 640,000 tons to
    725,000 tons, ie., to_the amount
    presently produced for two reasons
    at least:—

    (1) By their proposed agree-
    ment the U.K. Government is
    calling for efficient production.
    This simply means mechanisation,
    which in turn means unemploy-
    ment to the extent thdt the ma-
    chine will be turning off human
    labour. One therefore normally
    expects that the U.K. Government
    would or should guarantee far
    more than the present total pro-
    duction figure so as to absorb the
    people being displaced by the
    machine. Having regard also to
    the fact that the demand is selfish-
    ly intended by the U.K. Govern-
    ment to keep down her purchase
    price, the question resolves itself

    foing to commit a flagrant breach
    of her responsibility to her col-
    onies by deliberately creating un-
    employment in the colonies.’”’ Let
    us watch and see.

    (2) U.K. Government has given
    to Australia a guarantee of an
    amount which is above her
    present production figures and
    Australia from extracts of state-
    ments made to hand is worried to
    know if she can produce the guar-
    anteed amount immediately. The
    question here is why this generous
    treatment to Australia who need
    not sink or swim with the U.K
    Government such as on devalua-
    tion etc., while the West Indies
    not only has to sink or swim but
    buy the U.K. high priced goods.

    Is the U.K. Government going
    to do justice and fairplay to the
    West Indies now or commit a

    breach of trust. Let us watch and
    see.

    I am or tne opinion that if Aus-
    tralia can ask to have her agree-
    ment re-opened if the U.K. gives
    more terms to the West Indies
    then it is also open to the U.K.
    in a re-opening of the Australia
    agreement to say that she reduces
    her guaranteed amount to them
    upon giving the West Indies a
    higher guaranteed amount. She
    has the moral argument at any
    rate for doing so.

    After all, the U.K. Government
    is not being asked .to move up
    the overall quota of 900,000
    tons but merely to increase the
    guaranteed amount within this
    figure, by 85,000 tons.

    The international prestige of the
    U.K. Government is in issue over
    these negotiations. Her trustee-
    ship to her colonies is also being
    challenged. How she is going to
    come out of these negotiations is
    what we must all watch and see.
    We know what we will do “If.”

    DANIEL P. DEBIDIN,
    Elected Member
    Legislature of British Guiana.
    Powell Spring Hotel,
    Bathsheba,
    May 12, 1950

    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 19506













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    —_—

    W.I. SCORE 468-4. |

    (a a

    BY. RECORD BATTING |

    | Weekes 192, Walcott 128
    Trounce Surrey Bowling

    | Boy Painted
    Without Hands

    VATICAN CITY, May 13.
    A 16-year-old Italian war
    mutilated boy today present-
    ed Pope Pius XII with a pic-



    B.U.0.C. Deadline
    Is May 20th

    “{ N VIEW of the Press Communique published in yester-

    day’s “Advocate” on the question of the supply of
    Natural Gas, I feel that I should issue a statement of the
    position of The British Union Oil Co., Limited in this matter.
    wt ——** Negotiations have been in-pro-

    — pote a erp igemesmnesciireninicinicial prt ntnaemeniieanint areata epipecneenntsiemne

    $$
    , :

    Two Records Broken
    LONDON, May 13.





    only set the first centuries of the totimfor the

    i "gress with the King’s Soli
    U; S. Order Czec Arg | 210% the lines of the stdaleusdtear
    To Reduce

    Consulates
    ~Retaliation
    WASHINGTON, May 13.
    ‘The United States to-day call-

    ed on Czechoslovakia to reduce
    her official staff in the United

    States by two-thirds and close
    a Cleveland and Pittsburg
    ‘ons! i

    The Department of State issued
    a statement to-day summarising
    a note to the Czechoslovak Gov-

    ernment e¢ontaining these de-
    .mands:—
    The Czech Ambassador Dr.

    Viadmir Outrata was called in
    this morning to receive the note,
    and the American Ambassador in
    Prague also delivered the note to
    the Czech Foreign Office there.

    The United States action was
    understood té be in retaliation to
    the demand of the Czechoslovak
    Government for ihe drastic reduc-
    tion of United States, official per-
    sonnel at’ the American Embassy,
    and the Consulate General in
    Czechoslovakia, on the grounds
    that they were being used for
    hostile purposes.

    The State Department state-
    ment to-day described the Czech-
    oslovak demand as “part of
    efforts of the

    the} for an
    Czech and other|ments should be made to continue

    issued by the Government on we
    10th instant, namely, “That a NEW
    Lease of the Natural Gas Weu
    should be granted by Government
    to The British Union Oil Co: Lim-
    ited on tne same terms as the olu
    Lease, and that The B.U.0.C, Ltd.,

    should continue to -pay royalties ;

    to the Lessor at the same rate as!
    in the past.”

    In view of these negotiations, :
    the Attorney of “Turner’s Hall’
    plantation has extended _ his
    notice to quit for a further seven
    days, and this extension was com-
    municated to the King’s Solicitor
    on the 11th instant.

    In the negotiations with the
    King’s Solicitor, no question of
    accounts or monetary compensa-
    tion has arisen, and The B.U.O.C.,
    Limited regard as inexplicable
    the statement in the Govern-
    ment’s communique of the 13th
    instant relating to examination of
    the documents and records of the
    Natural Gas Well.

    Interim Period

    Negotiations with the King’s
    Solicitor have been on the basis
    that the lease to be granted to The
    B.U.0.C, Limited should be for
    the unexpired period (about 20
    years) of the old Lease. |

    The Government’s communique |
    of the 13th instant states “That,
    interim period arranse-





    western European Governments ta] the supply of Natural Gas to the
    segregate people in those coun-| public on the same terms as under
    tries from contact with the outside |the old Lease”

    world.”
    —Reuter.



    Lies—Says
    Truman

    GREAT FALLS, Montana,

    bv May 13.|Lease of the Turher’s Hall area is

    t Mruman told @ granc|reasonable, and they have ac-

    7 ; hat cordingly informed Government
    munists of ao were telling} that they will be unable to oper-
    tpreosterous Ties” about the} ate the Natural Gas Well after
    Mr. Truman dedlered. "thet the 20th instant unless by that

    Russian leaders were saying on
    the one hand that the United
    States was weak, and on the other

    The Government has suggested |
    an interim period of three months,
    which ir completely unrelated to
    the whole tenor of the negotia-
    tions conducted with the King’s
    Solicitor.

    The B.U.O.C. Limited consider
    that the time which has been given
    to Government to complete nego-
    tiations in respect of the new

    date the negotiations with The
    B.U.O.C. Limited and the Attor-
    ney of Turner’s Hall Plantation

    Minaegubae areata gay cuiiiaaaih tis not

    MRS. BANCROFT of Savannah

    t Police |
    earch Sea

    E



    ture of a country church
    Which he had painted with-
    out hands.

    The Pope received the
    painting in Saint Peter's
    sasilicea where he received
    3uU child war cripples among
    30,000 pilgrims, Germany,
    France, Beigium, Spain and
    Brazil were represented by

    : strong pilgrimages at the
    audience,
    —Reuter,



    Winnip
    Still In
    Danger

    WINNIPEG, May 13.

    Although the rise of the flood
    ed Red River appeared to have
    Steadied, flood reliet officials
    warned Wipiipeg residents that
    the city was still in danger, and
    utged that the evacuation of
    women, children, and old peo-
    ple should continue,

    More than 40,000 of the city
    850,000 population wore estir
    ated to have left the city by last
    night.

    Ss

    scala ates ee



    anadian Railways removed
    more than 25,000 from the food
    area in special trains, and roads
    leading from the city were pack-
    ed with private cars. Airplanes
    and Buses carried thousands
    more.

    The Red River resched a re-
    cord level of nearly 30 feet yes

    day. #lood Control Authori-
    ties warned that the dykes migh*

    | EVERTON WEEKES and Clyde Walcott, not
    1
    |

    MUNRO SMASHING ONE FROM WORME—Gun-Munro of Tranquillity. /to)
    net. and smashes a lob from Worme of Savannah, to win.the first set of Wen’s

    (bottom) missés one well placed on the right corner by Mi
    teuil of Tranquillity..Mrs. Bancroft went on to win the Ladies’ Singles,

    ‘Big Three’ Reach





    runs right up to the
    Singles.

    sch

    %
    38 De Ver-



    |
    |

    give way at any time,

    of Greater Winnipeg

    unofficial estimate said
    more than 60,000 people had
    heen driven from.their homes in
    the river cities. The normal life
    remained

    seriously disrupted,

    Water lay inches deep on many

    streets near the downtown busi-

    were

    ness district.

    Tramear and _ bus __ services
    cancelled in som? places
    Theatres and other places of

    amusement are closed. The Pres-

    West Indies today at the Oval, but set up a new
    record partnership for a team from the Caribbean
    Islands in this country.
    After Allan Rae had made 96, Weekes and Walcott
    added 247 in two and three-quarters hours for the
    fourth wicket to beat the previous best, 230 for the
    third wicket by George Headley and J. E. D. Sealy
    against Nottinghamshire at Trent Bridge in 1939.

    Weekes defied the Surrey attack for five hours and re-
    mained unbeaten with 192 to his credit. He has so far hit
    21 boundaries. ;
    Altogether the West Indies scored 468 for 4 wickets, and
    issued a warning as to what the England bowlers can ex-
    pect when the five-day Tests come along. ;

    No touring team in England
    sitlee the war has given a more
    satisfying exhibition. This was
    was the first appearance of the
    West Indies in London _ this
    season, and for the first time they
    found conditions similar to their
    own sunlit islands.

    The Oval crowd of nearly
    20,000 soon discovered that these
    mda do not play cricket the
    grim way—to them it is a
    pastime and any loose ball has
    to be punished.

    At first the Surrey attack was
    particularly good, the first hour
    yielding only 32 runs, but the
    pace was stepped up to 90 an
    hour or more by the afternoon

    Walcott was at the wicket for
    ' two and three-quarter hours for
    his 128, and hit 15 fours.

    Weekes’ total was the highest
    ever by a West Indies player
    against Surrey

    The teams were:

    WEST INDIES:—A. Rae;'R.
    Marshall, F. Worrell, E. Weekes,
    Cc, Waleott, R. Christiani, G.
    Gomez, J, Goddard, C, Williams,
    H, Johnson, A. Valentine. ‘.

    SURREY:~—. L. \Fishlock, Eric
    Bedser, J. Parker, B. Constan-
    ble, * Whittaker,

    Se on pdablas



    EVERTON WEEKES

    Z e
    U. S. Strike
    es °
    Situation
    e .
    Critical
    NEW YORK, May 13.
    _ At least 200,000 workers
    idle in the United States to-day,
    because of the strike of 18,000

    railway firemen on four lines, |
    it was estimated here,











    The strike, called last Wednes-

    day by the Brotherhood of Locu-





    e ; ’
    - ;’ lent of Winnipeg’s Retail Mer j Man ace iF
    “that we are strong and want to have been satisfactorily conclud I D | ide é peg’ : motive Firemen and Enginemeu |;
    wege war”. r ed. or rugs oO tc 7 eemen } on 8 Association TepUTiae {to support a demand tor a
    Te a “preposterous lies”.| he added. He said that the Un statemen a e eces: é jae . vill pu housands more on
    States was seeking only peace,| authority has been granted to The £30,000 WORTH FOUND F | short time next Monday if con-
    and did not wish war with any|5.U.0.C. Limited to enable them ALEXANDRIA, May 13. LONDON, May 13. tinued.

    of its world neighbours.
    —Reuter

    Czechs Rush For
    Last British Books

    PRAGUE, May 13.
    Hundreds of Czechs of all ages
    jammed the offices of the British
    Information Service, on one of
    Prague’s main thoroughfares, to
    get English books, periodicals,
    magazines, and other reading mat-
    ter which Were distributed freely
    a few hours before the offices were
    due to close at mid-day today on
    the orders given yesterday by the

    Czechoslovak Foreign Ministry.

    —Reuter.





    U.K. GOVT. GETS READY
    TO LEAVE LONDON

    The British Government has invited local authorities
    to give it detailed information to help it carry out “possi- |

    ble evaciiation in the case



    to operate the Well for the interim
    period, the fact is that, before
    advising The B.U.O.C. Limited
    to accept the supposed Licenge,
    the legal advisers of The B.U.O.C.
    Limited requested Government on
    the 10th instant to furnish partic-
    ulars of the Regulations, terms,
    and conditions, under which that
    License was intended to be
    granted, This has not yet been
    done, and, accordingly, The
    B.U.O.C., Limited do not consiaér
    that fhey have at present the au-
    thority necessary under the Act
    to operate the Gas Well, as al-
    leged by Government.
    E. G. MACINTYRE.
    Manager and Attorney,
    The B.U.O.C. Ltd,

    LONDON, May 13.

    of an emergency.”

    The Government hopes to have details ready for offi-
    cial consultation and implementation by the end of June.



    Thank You

    EVERYONE in Mount
    Vernon, a New York sub-
    urb, is being most careful to
    say “Please” and “Thank
    you.” That is because the
    mayor, William Hussey, the
    soul of courtesy himself,
    “wants Mount Vernon to set
    the world an example.

    He has asked all citizens,
    even the police, to be more
    polite. “What can I do for
    you?” he asked affably when
    I telephoned him to find out
    the reason for this cam-

    gn.

    His reply: “Lack of cour-
    tesy is now world-wide.
    Many world problems are

    caused by inconsiderate
    people. Maybe Mount Ver-
    non can start’ something.

    And ¢hank you for calling.”



    CzechPoliceTorture
    Slav To Death

    LONDON, May 13.

    One of the leaders of the Yugo-

    slav colony in Czechoslovakia, M.

    A Health Ministry spokesman
    told Reuter to-day “There is no
    special significance in this request.
    It is merely a question of normal
    preliminary steps as a result of
    Parliament having decided to put
    Civil Defente on a permanent
    footing by special acts a couple of
    years ago.”

    The Communist Daily Worker
    had made the move its main story
    to-day under the headline “Evacu-
    ation Planned Once Again”.

    Commenting on this, the spokes-
    man said “There really is nothing
    new or sensational im this. It
    originates from circulars issued on
    April 18 providing detailed guid-
    ance on the planning of the Civil
    Defence Services.

    They were sent to all local
    authorities in England and Wales,

    —Reuter.

    Awarded
    U.C.W.I.

    | Scholarships

    | The following have been award-
    jed Open Scholarships to the Uni-
    | versity College of the West Indies,



    Dimrievich, has died in a Prague| as a result-of examinations taken

    prison “as a result of atrocious
    Gestapo-like tortures by
    Czechoslovak police,”
    radio reported this morning.

    His death has provoked a “wave!
    of indignation and anger” through- |

    out Yugoslavia, the radio added.
    —Reuter

    the |
    Belgrade | Collins, C. King.

    \in February this year

    British GUIANA:

    | Jamatca: O Hue, R. Morris.
    Badseapos: Daphne Pilgrim.

    Barsapos Exuipirions: E. DeC,
    |Inniss, (Medicine); E. S. King,
    i (Arts)

    A few words muttered by a
    semi-conscious Egyptian fisher-
    man, found suffering from sun-
    stroke on the sands near Alexan-
    dria by a coastal patrol, have
    started Egyptian police on a wide-
    spread coastal search for smug-
    gled drugs.

    Next day, at dawn, an anti-drug
    squad found the “catch” which the
    fisherman had been waiting to
    pick up from the sea—over 176
    pounds of hashish. That started
    the police off.

    For thrée days now, searching
    between Alexandria and Port Said
    for more dumps of the deadly
    drug, they have made a rich haul
    —over £30,000 worth of hashish
    and opium.

    Off Port Said. 32 sacks were
    found weighted down by two an-
    chors in deep water, and at Dam-
    ieta at the Nile’s mouth, another
    sunken 330 pounds in rubber
    sacks.

    Police continuing their search
    believe yet bigger consignments
    are still under. water. —Reuter,

    $12,000,000
    Peru-W. German
    Trade Pact

    FRANKFURT, May 13.

    Senor Vicente Cerro, head of the
    Peruvian trade delegation to West
    Germany, left for Rome today,
    after initialling a $12,000,000 Peru-
    West ‘German. trade . agreement
    yesterday under the new agree-
    ment expected to import pri-
    marily steel products, chemicals,
    ' pharmaceutical products, and con-
    sumer..goods.







    West Germany will
    mainly cotton and wool,
    sugar,

    import
    ores,
    ides and some food items.

    French Ex-Premier

    ; PARIS, May 13. |
    Paul Reynaud, 1 ennvets |

    nts agreement was

    concluded, the West Germany
    Economics Ministry announced.
    —Reuter,





    former French Prime Minister, |
    married his 36-year-old private |
    secretary, Mile Christiane es |
    | last December, a source close to
    | Reynaud disclosed today.

    “The marriage was not secret,”
    they said, “but Reynaud consid- |
    ered it a purely private affair. He

    is c>posed on principle to political | publicist, Father Gabel, editor of
    figures receiving the publicity ac-!{he Catholic daily newspaper La

    | Croix has aroused some comment
    a | here

    corded to film stars,
    “Madame Paul Reynaud was

    _—_—_—

    The Foreign Maree of Frarice, Britain and the United
    States after a three-day study of the cold war, hemisphere
    by hemisphere announced. tonight that they had agreed
    upon the lines of their policy in all parts of the world,

    The statesmen—Robert Schu-
    man. of France, Ernest Bevin of
    Britain. and Dean Acheson of
    America-issued two communi-
    ques one a general statement of
    their conclusions and the other
    emphasising the need for facili-
    tating’'the migration of European
    peoples, particularly from Ger-
    many and Italy.

    The statement held up an all



    Furniture
    Dances About

    AT HAUNTED FARM

    LA ROCHELLE, May 13.
    Police are investigatng mys-
    terious events reported to have
    been happening for several weeks
    at a “haunted” farm, near La
    Poiriniere-en-Rochetrejoux, West~



















    ——————

    SPORTS
    WINDOW

    SAVANNAH-TRANQUILLITY
    TOURNAMENT
    MONDAY’S GAMES

    Miss at beautee aa Miss important declaration on Ger-| ern France ;

    >. de Verteuil vs, Mrs, J. ‘Connell many, the problem nation, which According to the Briant family,

    and Miss L Lenagan, is believed to have taken up|Wwho own the farm, furniture,
    Men's Doubles most of their time during the[{ grocery and shoes have been

    F, Gun Munro and H. Nothnagel

    vs. J. L. St. Hill and D. J, Lawless, three days they met here. dancing about





    A. De Verteuil and P, Waddell They announced that this pro- Money has refused to stav in
    eal C. G. Manning and E, P nouncement was being communi-|locked drawers, and seattered
    Mixed Doubles cated immediately to the West]i’self about. Worse, M. Briant’s
    Miss M. Trestrail and T. Schjol- German Federal Government. fa'se teeth have been jump ng
    ot. ve Mrs A. L. Perkins and It would be published to the] out of their glass, and his shaving
    ere world.on Monday. brush has obstinately reeoiled
    —— Highlights of the Foreign Min-| from his face, eventually flying
    isters’ two communiques were: out of his hand to land on top of
    (1) The purpose of the talks had | a cupboard

    Unknown been to reduce the risk of war few days avo, the dogs
    and establish the conditions of | barked all night long. At dawn,
    ' a lasting peace they were unleashed and their

    Vessel Sto Ss (2) The Ministers planned closer | collars had vanished
    Pp co-ordination of their joint re- Clocks have stonned = every

    sources of the three power&| morning at 8.20, the Br ants said.

    Tanker without endangering their The Briants are Huguenots.

    , social and material standards.; but in desperation they called

    (3) They intended to support the | the local Catholic priest who gave

    THE HAGUE, May 13. new independent. nations of}them a statue of the Blessed

    The British tanker “Nayadis’’} South-east Asia and would] Virgin and a holy medal—all
    sailing for the Anglo-Saxon Qi!| take every opportunity of ex-| without avail.

    Company. arrived somewhat late! posing “Communist imperial- Hundreds of peonle have vis-

    at Willemstad, Curacao, on Friday | ism” in the serious situation|ited the farm, but up to now

    afternoon after being detained by; developing there. “sp'rit” activities have only been

    an unknown ‘ship flying the, The Ministers considered| witnessed by the owners and

    that the South-east Asia re-
    gion as a whole is economi-

    Venezuelan flag, Netherlands News
    Agency reports from Willemstad

    their relations

    |
    | The strange thing is that when





    tonight, cally underdeveloped. All the|gendarmes came to suard the
    ernments in the region| house nothing happened
    The unkno~n vessel ate should get together on devel- —Reuter
    several shots, commanding the opment .plans designed to
    tanker to stop, which it did. The} raise the standard of living. * 2 ss
    incident occurred outside the! (4) Experts had been appointed Union Calls Strike

    three-mile zone off the Venezuelan

    Avis Islands. :
    It is believed the Venezuelan

    ship was making an investigation

    to study problems of surplus
    population in Western Europe.
    They had been charged with
    producing additional plans for



    Against P.A.A.



    { i y NEW YORK, May 13
    actio' s , y or 5 ' , .
    ae action against arms nae ane from A nationwide strike against Pan
    —(Reuter) 4 @ oo page 15 American Airways by service
    personnel was called at midnight
    by the Transport Workers’
    Union,
    The Union said that 800

    ‘ATOM BOMB—CRIME
    AGAINST HUMANITY”’

    PARIS, May 13.

    stewards, stewardesses and purs-

    ers were involved but a Company

    ae said the number was only
    0

    E ght pickets took up their

    But Father Gabrel, asked by | posts outside the entrance to La

    A prominent French Catholic | Reuters, today made it clear that
    the article was written on his per-
    sonal responsibility only, and
    without prior consultation with his
    hierarchy in the Church.

    by condemning the use of

    | resistance hero who)suffered de-|the atom bomb, and by describing

    W. Chan, C. | portation to Germany for her ac-| its use at Hiroshima as “a crime

    He also said: “I do not regom-

    | tivities with the Maquis |against humanity” despite the | mend Catholics to sign their so-
    Reyniaud’s, first,marriage to the | good intentions that may have ani-|called Stockholm peace appeal
    daughter of Henri Robert. well- | mated those who decided to use it. | because this is manifestly a Com-

    |



    known French lawyer, was dis-
    solved after the Liberation
    —Reuter

    Humanite
    Gabrel

    The official Communist paper | munist exploitation of the people’s
    ha quoted Father | desire for peace.”

    h approval

    —Reuter

    Guardia Air Field at midnight

    A Union spokesman said _ that
    Idlewi'd airport, and other Pan
    American ports would also be
    picketed .

    A Union spokesman in Miami
    said the strike was to remain in|

    effect until a new contract is|
    signed
    He said about 2,000 employees}
    were involved in the Miami!
    area
    —Reuter













    The chairman of the Railway-
    men’s Union said last night that
    the strike was “just as dead-
    locked now as at the start”.

    In Pennsylvania, 20,000 coal
    miners were idle, and the num-
    ber will inerease to 25,000 by
    Monday.

    Nearly a fourth Wester:
    Pennsylvania’s coal production!
    is shut off because of a lack of

    of

    coal trucks. Some 4,000 coallâ„¢ 3
    miners were affected in Indiana.|
    -—Reuler, CLYDE WALCOTT



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    PAGE FOUR



    EST INDIAN cricket circles are particularly happy to-day over

    the performance of the West Indies cricket team in England
    who scored 468 runs for the loss of four wickets in the first day of
    play against Surrey at the Oval.

    Following closely upon their two-day win over Yorkshire by three
    wickets and their impressive draw with Worcestershire in the open-
    ing fixture of the tour, this performance against Surrey augurs well
    for the future success of the team during the tour.

    IMPRESSIVE OPENING

    HE West Indies are certainly not out of the wood yet, nor are

    they “blooded” in the aecepted sense of the word as far as the
    tour is concerned but come what may, they have opened their tour
    in keeping with the high rating which competent judges of the game
    have placed upon them by Imperial cricket standards.

    It is true that the Yorkshire game appeared a close thing but it
    must be conceded that the Yorkshiremen were at home and so had
    experience in their favour in the scales of balance.

    We must at once admit that with Ramadhin and Pierre padded
    up in the pavilion there was not much hope of our negotiating any
    reasonable total‘if the Rae-Jones partnership had been broken.

    On the other hand it must be remembered that the Australians
    in their victorious tour of England in 1948 came nearer to defeat in
    their game with Yorkshire on May 5 and 6 than in any other match
    of the tour.

    “AUSSIES” NEARLY LOST

    OSE who followed the game will remember that a missed catch

    at a critical period cost Yorkshire a great chance of atoning for
    their disappointment against the 1938 team at Sheffield and so being
    the first county to beat the Australians since 1912 when Hampshire
    triumphed.

    DISPLEASURE

    E IN the West Indies have listened with considerable displea-
    sure to the comment of one Ernest Eytle of British Guiana over
    the B.B.C. on Saturday, May 6.

    Mr. Eytle in his broadcast found so many flaws in the constitu-
    tion of the West Indian team, that it was small wonder that they
    held Worcestershire to an honourable draw, to say nothing of defeat-
    ing Yorkshire in two days.

    Yesterday's showing against the Surrey team is another indis-
    putable indication of the potential strength of the West Indies team,
    While we all appreciate and are greatful for constructive criticism,
    yet we in the West Indies can scarcely be expectéd to swallow the
    indigestible pill of defeatism,

    U.K. CRITICS PRAISE

    Ar the West Indies’ performance in the opening days of play
    é against Worcestershire Alex Bannister ¢f, the “Daily Mail” opined
    that after having seen Weekes and Worrell, the non-sale of last day
    test tickets was interesting.

    Bannister was convinced that the English cricket crowds were in
    for the biggest treat they have had since the war. The “Daily Graphic”
    was equally enthusiastic.

    Charles Bray of the “Daily Herald”, who covered the M.C.C. tour
    to the West Indies, in 1948, with whom I associated during his stay
    hére and for whom I hold the greatest respect with regard to his
    knowledge of the game, wrote in the “Daily Herald”, “Mark my words,
    the West Indies cricketers are going to be one of the most attractive
    sides ever to visit this country. And I am not forgetting the all-con-
    quering Australians of 1948,”

    MORE KUDOS

    RAWFORD WHITE of the “News Chronicle”, who also accompan-
    ied the 1948 M.C.C. team to the West Indies, was “intrigued

    by the class of the West Indies

    batsmen”.
    THE SPINNER In the face of these reports, one
    frien c&nnot reconcile Eytle’s strange
    observations on the West Indies

    —

    team which he gave over the B.B.C.
    on Saturday. May 6, Eytle found
    fault with Ramadhin’s bowling,
    with Walcott’s wicket-keeping, with
    the West Indies fielding among other
    \ things.

    To judge from his remarks, the
    a West Indies should have lost their
    match against Yorkshire, joint
    county champions last year, perhaps

    in one day, but this was not so.

    SONNY we ee oe have proven
    rt. Eytle to be a_ selkf}appointed
    RAMADHIN “Know-all” who only knows as

    much about the West Indies team
    as I know about the “flying

    West Indian RAMADHIN has “"°°'S

    already shown his adaptability to MEN WHO KNOW
    wickets. He splns the n Responsible circles in the West
    — ways and has his googly as Indies have always deprecated

    - any attempt by West Indians resi-
    London Eeprese Servies, dent in England to set themselves
    up as “men from away”. We who have followed personally the'1948
    M.C.C, tour to the West Indies, which by the way Mr. Eytle has not,
    will at once prefer to err with competent judges of the game like
    Charles Bray and Crawford White than shine with Mr. Eytle, a self-
    styled expert on West Indies cricket. It may or may not have been
    in the interest of West Indies cricket that. Mr. Eytle cannot claim the
    honour of having represented either British Guiana in intercolonial
    cricket or the West Indies in international cricket; but the fact re-
    mains, he has not.

    Constructive criticism must at all times be appreciated, but we
    in the West Indies will never tolerate any opinions that can only be
    construed as figments of the imagination when they are compared
    with responsible opinions of people, who although they belong to an-

    aoe eae have openly expressed opinions that differ almost diametri-
    cally.

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    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    14, 1950

    SUNDAY, MAY



    Spartan Trounce College 7—0

    Spartan easily drubbed College 7—0 when they met ina

    first division football fixture

    at Kensington Oval yesterday

    afternoon. Four of the goals were netted in the first half.
    The seven goals were scored by Johnson who kicked in
    three, Trotman 2 and Walcott 1. The other goal College
    netted on themselves the result of a melee in their goal

    area,

    OOTBALL
    FIXTURES

    FIRST DIVISION
    Monday, May 15
    Cariton vs Empire. Referee: K
    Laughlin; Linesmen: O. 8S. Cop-
    pin and L. F. Harris.

    Thursday, May 18

    Spartan vs Pickwick-Rovers
    Referee: D. W. Sayers; Linesmen
    S. Gittens and B. Hoyos.
    Saturday, May 20

    Everton vs College. Referee:
    0. S. Coppin; Linesmen: G. E
    Amory and D. W. Sayers.

    SECOND DIVISION

    Tuesday, May 16

    Everton vs Y.M.P.C. Referee :
    L. F. Harris.

    Wednesday, May 17
    Empire vs Notre Dame. Referee:
    B. Hoyos
    Friday, May 19
    College s Y.M.P.C. Referee :
    N, edford.
    INTER-SCHOOL
    Tuesday, May 16
    Lodge vs Foundation at Lodge
    Referee : A. Wilkes.
    Wednesday, May 17
    College vs Combermere at Col-
    lege. Referee: L. Thomas,
    Friday, May 19
    Lode vs Combermere at Lodge.
    Referee: G, Amory.
    THIRD DIVISION
    Tuesday, May 16
    Cable and Wireless vs Y.M.C.A,
    at Boarded Hall. Referee: C, Smith
    Empire vs Combermere Old
    Boys at Bank Hall, Referee: A

    Ishmael,
    Combermere vs Y.M.P.C. at

    Combermere. Referee; N. Holder.



    Yardley
    Leads M.C.C.



    NORMAN YARDLEY

    LONDON, May 12.

    Norman Yardley, the Yorkshire
    captain, is to lead M.C.C. against
    the West Indies in the match be-
    ginning at Lord’s here on May 20.

    In view of the need to find an
    England captain, both for the
    Test series this summer, and for
    the England tour to Australia in
    the winter, the choice of Yardley
    is regarded here as a special point-
    er to the feelings of the leading
    E gland officials.

    There are a number of other
    selections in the M.C.C. side which
    reveal the young cricketers whose
    abilities have attracted most at-
    tention at Lora’s.

    R. Berry, Lancashire's 5ft 4ins.
    left-arm slow bowler; Eric Bedser,
    Surrey off-break bowler = and
    opening bat, who is a twin brother
    to Test bowler Alex Bedser; and
    Don Brennan, Yorkshire wicket-
    keeper, have all found favour.

    Middlesex, without a County
    match at the time, provide four
    players — Denis Compton, Bill
    Edrich, Jack Robertson and forty-
    five-year-old slow leg-break
    bowler, Jim Sims.

    The team is: N. W. D. Yardley
    (Captain) and D.,V. Brennan
    (Yorkshire), W. J. Edrich, D.
    Compton, J. Robertson, and J.
    Sims (Middlesex), R. T. Simpson
    (Nottinghamshire), T. E. Bailey
    (Essex), J. G. Dewes (Cambridge
    University), R. Berry (Lanca-
    shire), and E. Bedser (Surrey),

    a —Reuter




    :

    Men everywhere

    —._¢ Spartan showed their intention

    of scoring early and the first goal
    came from a corner, kicked bs
    Boyce on the left wing and John-
    son made no mistake in kicking
    it into the nets. The second was
    netted very soon after when Wal-
    cott receiving a pass from John-
    son ran down unmarked and
    scored in the right hand corner of
    the goal.

    At this stage the College de-
    fence was beginning to weaken
    and Johnson took full advantage
    of this and scored the third goal
    after a pass from Boyce.

    Occasionally. there was some
    play in the Spartan goal area but
    custodian Harris had very little
    to do. The greater part of the play
    was seen in the College goal area
    and after a melee in ffont of the
    College area, Johnson scored a
    fourth about three minutes before

    Referee Wilkins blew for half
    time.
    After half time Spartan

    changed up their formation, Har-
    ris was seen at right wing and
    Chase in the goal. Very soon after
    the. kick off Trotman taking a
    pass from Walcott ran through to
    score the fifth giving Smith no
    chance to save.

    The schoolboys were always
    seen bundling and very soon they
    scored on themselves as full-
    back Gibbons trying to clear
    kicked into his own goal. About
    five minutes before the end
    Trotman again scored making the
    total seven.

    The teams:—

    Spartan: Harris, Gibbons, Bow-
    en, Gittens, Cadogan, Haynes,
    Chase, Johnson, Walcott, Trot-
    man and Boyce.

    College. Smith, Gibbons, Mor-
    rison, Morris, St. John, Simmons,
    Reid, V. O. Smith, C. E. Tudor,
    Williams and F. L. Tudor,

    The Referee was Mr. P. Wil-
    kin.

    Linesmen: Messrs. Amory and
    Graham.

    Best Display
    Since Aussies’
    Visit
    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    LONDON, May 13,

    A 17,500 crowd at the Oval today
    went home convinced that they
    had seen the best exhibition of
    forceful batting since the Austra-
    lians were here two years ago.

    Even members of the West
    Indies team were amazed at: the
    frequency with which -theyball
    was despatched to the boundary.

    Learie Constantine told me
    afterwards that he considered it
    one of the best exhibitions he
    had ever seen from the West
    Indies side.

    Particularly satisfying from John
    Goddard’s point of view is that
    his men have shown themselves
    capable of fighting back after
    suffering early losses.

    Inability to do this has been a
    great failing to previous sides
    which have toured here.

    The big question now is whether
    Goddard will declare first thing
    Monday morning. The first hour
    is the time when bowlers get
    most help from the wicket, but
    Goddard has not made up his mind
    yet.

    He wants to see what the
    weather is like. If it continues
    warm and sunny, he may go on
    batting for another hour or so,
    giving his team orders to force the
    pace; but if it rains during the
    weekend, he will probably hand
    straight over to his bowlers,



    Premiere’s Tennis
    Club Tourney

    MONDAY’S FIXTURES.

    Men's Doubles.

    L. Campbell and L. Blackett vs.
    W. DeC. Forde and C. B. Forde.
    Ladies’ Singles.

    Miss G. M,. Grimes vs. Miss C.
    Alleyne.

    Men's, Singles. ‘
    J, Robinson vs. B. Wharton.
    F. Edwards vs, Dr. G. M.

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    ‘“MOYRA BLAIR’’ WINS
    A SECOND TIME

    Commodore Wilkinson’s “Moyra Blair”, skippered by his
    son Tom, scored her second victory for the season when
    she defeated all other ‘B’ Class boats at the Ninth Regatta
    of the R.B.Y.C., which took place in Carlisle Bay yesterday

    ‘Tranquillity
    Leads
    Savannah

    SAVANNAH won two of the
    four games yesterday afternoon
    at the Garrison to make their
    score three as against five by the
    visiting Tranquillity team from
    Trinidad.

    Mrs. R. S, Bancroft of Savan-
    nah beat Miss C. De Verteuil in
    the Ladies’ Singles 7—5; 9—7;
    while Miss D. Wood and J. D.
    Trimmingham also of Savannah
    beat Miss M. Trestrail and T.
    Schjo'seth 7—5, 6—3, in one of the
    Mixed Doubles games.

    In the other Mixed Doubles
    game, Miss M. Trestrail and H.
    Nothnagel of Tranquillity beat
    Mrs, A. L. Perkins and C. R.
    Packer 6—1; 6—2; while F. Gun
    Munro of Tranquillity carried off
    the Men’s Singles from DP. E
    Worme 6—1; 7—5.

    Undoubtedly the best match of
    the afternoon was the Ladies’
    Singles on Court No, 3 in which
    Mrs. Bancroft defeated Miss De-
    Verteuil. It was tennis of the
    highest standard with both ladies
    serving and driving exceptionally
    well,

    In the first set, the games were
    very even and at 5—5 Mrs. Ban-
    croft broke through to win Miss
    De’ Verteuil’s service and made
    the game 6—5 in her favour. She
    then clinched the set by winning
    her own service at 7—5.

    In the second set, the games
    went much the same way, each
    player winning her service until]
    Mrs. Bancroft led 8—7, and then
    won her service to win the set
    9—T.

    Both ladies were getting good
    length and there were many ex-
    changes of rallies for indeed, the
    first game went to 19 points before
    Mrs. Bancroft eventually won it.

    There was however, not very
    much to choose between the two
    players. Mrs. Bancroft was, per-
    haps, the more aggressive while
    Miss De Verteuil was at all times
    steady with both back and fore
    arm. As was already stated, the
    tennis was of a very high standard
    and was very much appreciated
    by the crowd.

    On Court No. 2 in the Men’s
    Singles, F, Gun Munro won the
    first set very easily from D. E.
    Worme 6—1. In the second set,
    Worme had Gun-Munre 4—2, but
    the latter soon equalised and then
    took the next game to lead 5—4,
    Worme won the following game to
    make the score 5—5 and then
    Munro took the last two games.

    Neither of the players was
    really playing on form and tennis
    was not up to standard.

    In the Mixed Doubles J. D.
    ‘TYrimmingham played very sound
    tennis and was ably partnered by
    Miss D. Wood to win the match
    v-—5; 6—3 from T. Schjolseth and
    Miss M. Trestrail, the Tranquillity
    pair,

    In the first set, Tranquillity
    started off and had Savannah 3—1.
    The latter then equalised only to
    see Tranquillity go ahead again
    with the score at 5—3.

    Miss Wood then came into the
    picture witn some forcing back-
    hand and forearm shots. To
    climax this good display, she won
    her service and then had the
    score at 5—5. From this, Sayan-
    nah never looked back, but went
    ahead to win the game 7—5, 6—3.

    In the other Mixed Doubles, H.
    Nothnagel and Miss A. Reid
    (Tranquillity) had a very easy
    victory over Mrs. A. L, Perkins
    and C. R. Packer and won 6—1;
    6—2.

    The tournamfnt continues on
    Monday.



    Trade Enquiries to; T,.

    This race was a very keen one.
    Dr. J. W. P. Harkness’ “Circe”,
    which started first, looked a sure
    winner as it kept its lead through-
    out the first lap and up to the time
    it reached, the Needham’s Point
    buoy. On reaching this buoy
    “Moyra Blair’, which was only a
    few yards behind, crept into the
    lead and before “Circe” could
    completely clear the buoy “Fan-
    tasy”, owned and skippered by
    Teddy Hoad, came into second
    place. They finished in that order.

    The boats sailed north-about in
    a very light breeze which was
    especially not suitable for the
    centre-boarders. Only the “Reso-
    lute” in the ‘B’ Class and “Dawn”
    in the Intermediate, did not start

    “Mohawk”, owned by Dr. David
    Payne and skippered by Bob Cum-
    berbatch scored her second victory
    this season in the Intermediate
    Class. The other victory was
    scored in the Seventh Regatta and
    the boat afterwards overturned
    but on this occasion it got back
    safely to its mooring.

    Coming second in the Inter-
    mediate was Sydney Nurse’s
    “Clytie’ which he himself skip~
    pered. So far “Clytie has gbeen
    second on a previous occasion but
    has not yet scored a victory for
    the season. -

    Third position went to Johnnie
    Hoad’s “Coronetta” which was
    captained by his son Jackie. ;

    “Astra”, owned and skippered
    by Milton Tucker, carried off .
    Class honours for the second time.
    Second in this Class was “Range”,
    owned and skippered by Stanley
    Cheeseman while “Wizard”, owned
    and skippered by Jim Jones was
    third, This is the third occasion
    on which “Wizard” came third
    but up to the present it has not
    been able to gain a second posi-
    tion. }

    “Sinbad”, owned and skippered
    by Lionel Baggott, won an easy
    race in the “D” Class to score its
    first victory for the season. Second
    was “Olive Blossom,” owned and
    skippered by Winston Hassell and
    third “Peter Pan”, owned and
    skippered by Eric Raison.

    The results were as follows:

    . B’ Class:—1. Moyra Blair. 2
    Fantasy. 3. Circe.

    ‘C’ Class:—1. Astra. 2. Ranger.
    3. Wizard.

    Intermediate Class:—1. Mohawk.
    2. Clytie. 3. Coronetta.

    ‘D’ Class:—1. Sinbad.
    Blossom. 3. Peter Pan.

    The Tenth Regatta of the
    R.B.Y.C. will be sailed on Satur-
    day, May 27.

    Roberts Wins
    Frontenac Cup

    MR. T. A. L. ROBERTS won
    the Frontenac Trophy and ‘the
    N.R.A. Silver Medal when he
    broke the Frontenac Trophy
    Shoot record at the Government
    Rifle Range yesterday. Mr. Rob-
    erts scored 144 points out of a
    possible 150.

    In 1948 when the Frontenac
    Trophy Shoot first started, Capt.
    Cc. R. E. Warner, the then winner,
    scored 136 points. Last year Lt.-
    Col. J. Connell added two points
    and now Mr. Roberts has beaten
    Lt.-Col. J. Connell’s 138.

    Fifteen rounds were fired from
    each of the two distances, 500 and
    600 yards. Shooting conditions
    were good, the wind steady and
    the light consistent.

    Following are the eight best
    scores: —

    2. Olive



    500 600

    Yards Yards Total
    Mr, T, A. L. Roberts 72 72 144
    Lt.-Col, J. Connell va 71 142
    Major J. E, Griffith 69 71 140
    Mr. M. R. De Verteuil 68 69 137
    Lt. C. E. Neblett 68 69 137
    Capt. J. R. Jordan .. 70 67 137
    Lt. T. A. Gittens 68 67 135
    Mr. M, D. Thomas 70 65 135



    Barbados Friendly
    Football Association

    THE third trial match of the
    above association will be played
    to-day at Empire Grounds, Bank
    Hall.

    Gillette

    . .. the sharpest edge in the world!

    Geddes Grant

    Limite. }



    IT IS a remarkable thing that in the last thirty years classifica-
    tion of racehorses in Barbados and Trinidad should have remained
    so consistent. AJ) the more so because it passed through a very try~
    ing period during the last war. By consistency I mean that a certain
    standard has been maintained whereby it has been possible to judge
    the merits not only of contemporary thoroughbreds but also those of
    different periods, For instance, looking at a classification list of to-
    day I find that in comparison with one of 1930 there is little difference
    in the general standard of the runners in class Peed

    Naturally there must be some difference of opinion when one
    compares horses of different periods and of course I do not mean to
    say that Beacon Bright, Blue Streak and Gun Site (three of today’s
    giants) are of exactly the same vintage as Tom Pearson, Bambolina,
    and Senator, three who raced around 1930. But when I say that I
    think Beacon Bright, Blue Streak and Gun Site are genuine A class
    horses it means something because the standard of the class has re-
    mained constant. This to my mind {# a decided feather in the cap of
    the authorities who control racing in Barbados and Trinidad.

    The great thing about the “A” class of to-day is the quantity in
    this division and its sub class “A2” as well as the fact that half the
    number is made up of native bred horses. Having established the fact
    that there has been no lowering of the general standard in the top
    class, this immediately tells us that we are breeding better horses to-
    day than we were in 1930. At that time class “A” was made up of two
    or three imported horses only. It also tells us that racing in general
    in the B.W.I. is on the up-grade. ‘ :

    According to the most recent classifications issued by the Barba-
    dos Turf Club and the Trinidad Turf Club, one of which is published
    on the opposite page, there are now 16 animals in class “A” and “A2”.
    16 of these are native bred and 4 of these sixteen are Derby winners
    either in Jamaica, Trinidad or Barbados. Added to this we find 24
    horses classified in division “B” and “B2”, of which 5 are creoles.
    Three of these five are classic winners in the same three colonies as
    mentioned above. ;

    Comparing these figures with the corresponding classes in 1930 1
    cannot say off hand what the totals were then, but I can tell you that
    they were much smaller and, in addition, not one was a native bred
    horse. In fact there were no creoles above class “D” in those days.

    The above, in my view, are the most significant points about the
    classifications recently issued by the respective Turf Clubs of Trinidad
    and Barbados.

    Another point of interest in the recent classification by the B.T.C
    is the number of two-year-olds there are on the list. I have counted
    15 so far. This, I believe, is the greatest number ever to be placed on
    the list as early as May.

    Taken alphabetically, here are a few pointers on their potential-
    ties which I have been able to gather so far:—

    First on the list is Best Wishes. This is a filly by Burning Bow
    out of Felicitas, and therefore an own sister_to the very fast Bow Bells
    whom we have already been able to, judge® Bred and owned by Mr.
    Cyril Bernard in St. Vincent, I have not seen her yet, but I am told
    by eyewitnesses that she stands 15 hands, 3 inches and is about 1%
    inches taller than Bow Bells. She is described as much better looking
    all round than her famous sister. We are left to wonder if she will
    be so much better on the track. We shall have to wait, however, be-
    cause she is not scheduled to arrive here for racing until next October.
    If she does turn out to be better than Bow Bells, well... . I leave it
    to everybody to make their own comments, There is still some
    diversity of opinion on this point.

    Clementina I have seen and I like her. She is a filly by Roidan
    out of Fiena, a mare bred in Jamaica by Beccaquimec, sire of Jeeves.
    Clementina was bred in St. Lucia by Mr. Purchase who might be
    described as a pioneer of breeding in that island. He has sold her to
    Mr. I. O, C. Perkins and she will no doubt race here in August. She
    is by no means tall but I like her conformation and she is well set up
    on her legs.

    Consternation is another from Mr. Purchase in St. Lucia. She is
    by Millersdale out of Mary, another Jamaican mare by Scatter, sire
    of Brown Bomber, I have not seen her nor do I know when she will
    race. However, I shall be very interested in her because she is the one
    and only thoroughbred by Millersdale whom I have ever heard about.
    This bfg son of Bold Archer never had a proper chance as a sire in
    my opinion and it is ironic that now he is dead we should be seeing
    his first thoroughbred foal racing.

    Cross Roads is a rather leggy son of Dunush (also dead) and
    April Showers, the mare who gave us the great Atomic II, perhaps
    O.T.C’s best son. Cross Roads has been in training now since carly
    in the year and already I have noticed an improvement in him. For
    one thing he is not as leggy as he was a few months ago for,
    another he has almost lost his baby looks. I believe he will be among
    the forward ones, if not in development, at least in training.

    Dunese, the pronunciation of whose name I am not sure, is by
    Dunusk out of Celanese, a mare who became famous for the number
    of come-backs she made to racing after repeated retirements. Ske was
    in fact more successful on the track after she produced a foal. I have
    not seen Dunese either. Being a supporter of the progeny of Deni-
    stone, sire of Celanese, I shall also be very interested in the career of
    Dunese,

    Hi-Lo’s name is about the only thing I like about the poor laddie.
    He is by Dunusk out of China Clipper and the nomenclature therefore
    seems to be apt, but he is as straight as bee-line from his fetlock
    joint to his coronets. This is a very bad sign in a racehorse although
    some of the famous have been known to run well with it. Perhaps
    Hi-Lo may, who knows?

    Miracle, by Battle Front out of Marshlight, is another I have not
    seen. He has been bought from Mr, Proverbs by Miss Hawkins, I am
    told. His dam has already done very well with Will O’the Wisp IT
    ane oe from the same sire. Miracle therefore has a reputation to
    uphold.

    River Mist, small but comely daughter of the famous Sunrise,
    is by Restigouche. I like everything about her except her size.
    Rather more refined than the average Sunrise progeny, she is a beauti-
    ful chestnut. She too has a reputation to uphold. J

    Exactly the opposite in size but equally good looking is Soprano.
    A big upstanding filly by Sunplant out of Night Singer, her dam
    appears to have fitted her up well with the powerful quarters of
    Tetratema on the frame of Sunstar. This provides her with a fifty-
    fifty chance at being a stayer or sprinter and being excellent at either.
    It shall be interesting to see on which side she does come down.

    Sunbeam is Mr. George de Nobriga’s Sunshaft-Miramichi filly. I
    have not seen her yet. Her dam Miramichi I believe is out of Minehaha
    but I am-not sure who by.

    Vanguard is a very robust son of O.T.C. and the big mare Hurri-
    cane who was not much of a success at racing. He is such a powerful
    colt (or gelding), I am not sure which, that seeing him at a distance
    on the track for the first time I thought the Turf Club had imported
    another stallion. On coming closer I perceived that he was only a two-
    year-old, but what a baby. Obviously he shall need time.

    Waterbell is Hon. J. D. Chandler’s other two-year-old by Resti-
    gouche out of Belleplain. She is the small powerful type. Her dam
    having produced Front Bell, and War Path, we might also expect
    sorfething from her,

    The fifteenth is actually out of alphabetical order but this is be-
    cause she is in “G2”. She is the hal#-bred filly Joan’s Star. I wonder
    where she hails from?

    ONES
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    PAGE FOUR



    EST INDIAN cricket circles are particularly happy to-day over

    the performance of the West Indies cricket team in England
    who scored 468 runs for the loss of four wickets in the first day of
    play against Surrey at the Oval.

    Following closely upon their two-day win over Yorkshire by three
    wickets and their impressive draw with Worcestershire in the open-
    ing fixture of the tour, this performance against Surrey augurs well
    for the future success of the team during the tour.

    IMPRESSIVE OPENING

    ‘HE West Indies are certainly not out of the wood yet, nor are

    they “blooded” in the aecepted sense of the word as far as the
    tour is concerned but come what may, they have opened their tour
    in keeping with the high rating which competent judges of the game
    have placed upon them by Imperial cricket standards.

    It is true that the Yorkshire game appeared a close thing but it
    must be conceded that the Yorkshiremen were at home and so had
    experience in their favour in the scales of balance.

    We must at once admit that with Ramadhin and Pierre padded
    up in the pavilion there was not much hope of our negotiating any
    reasonable total’if the Rae-Jones partnership had been broken.

    On the other hand it must be remembered that the Australians
    in their victorious.tour of England in 1948 came nearer to defeat in
    their game with Yorkshire on May 5 and 6 than in any other match
    of the tour.

    “AUSSIES” NEARLY LOST

    OSE who followed the game will remember that a missed catch

    at a critical period cost Yorkshire a great chance of atoning for

    their disappointment against the 1938 team at Sheffield and so being

    the first county to beat the Australians since 1912 when Hampshire
    triumphed. .

    DISPLEASURE

    E IN the West Indies have listened with considerable displea-

    sure to the comment of one Ernest Eytle of British Guiana over
    the B.B.C. on Saturday, May 6.

    Mr. Eytle in his broadcast found so many flaws in the constitu-
    tion of the West Indian team, that it was small wonder that they
    held Worcestershire to an honourable draw, to say nothing of defeat-
    ing Yorkshire in two days.

    Yesterday's showing against the Surrey team is another indis-
    putable indication of the potential strength of the West Indies team.
    While we all appreciate and are greatful for constructive criticism,
    yet we in the West Indies can scarcely be expectéd to swallow the
    indigestible pill of defeatism,

    : U.K. CRITICS PRAISE

    aT the West Indies’ performance in the opening days of play
    é against Worcestershire Alex Bannister «f, the “Daily Mail” opined
    that after having seen Weekes and Worrell, the non-sale of last day
    test tickets was interesting.

    Bannister was convinced that the English cricket crowds were in
    for the biggest treat they have had since the war. The “Daily Graphic”
    was equally enthusiastic.

    Charles Bray of the “Daily Herald”, who covered the M.C.C. tour
    to the West Indies, in 1948, with whom I associated during his stay
    hére and for whom I hold the greatest respect with regard to his
    knowledge of the game, wrote in the “Daily Herald”, “Mark my words,
    the West Indies cricketers are going to be one of the most attractive
    sides ever to visit this country. And I am not forgetting the all-con-
    quering Australians of 1948,”

    MORE KUDOS |

    RAWFORD WHITE of the “News Chronicle”, who also accompan-
    ied the 1948 M.C.C. team to the West Indies, was “intrigued

    ‘ by the _ Class of the West Indies
    THE SPINNER inthe’

    In the face of these reports, one
    e@not reconcile Eytle’s strange
    observations on the West Indie

    — team which he gave over the B.B.C.
    on Saturday. May 6. Eytle found
    fault with Ramadhin’s bowling,
    with Walcott’s wicket-keeping, with
    the West Indies fielding among other
    things.

    To judge from his remarks, the
    West Indies should have lost their
    match against Yorkshire, joint
    county champions last year, perhaps
    in one day, but this was not so.

    SONNY we eset —. cae es
    . Eytle to be a_ sekf}appointed
    RAMADHIN “Know-all” who only knows as

    much about the West Indies team
    as I know about the “flying
    saucers”,
    MEN WHO KNOW

    Responsible circles in the West
    pos goal ar a deprecated
    5 any attempt by West Indians resi-
    Londen Buproes Servies. dent in England to set themselves
    up as “men from away”. We who have followed personally the 1948
    M.C.C. tour to the West Indies, which by the way Mr. Eytle has not,
    will at once prefer to err with competent judges of the game like
    Charles Bray and Crawford White than shine with Mr. Eytle, a self-
    styled expert on West Indies cricket. It may or may not have been
    in the interest of West Indies cricket that. Mr. Eytle cannot claim the
    honour of having represented either British Guiana in intercolonial
    cricket or the West Indies in international cricket; but the fact re-
    mains, he has not.

    West Indian RAMADHIN has
    already shown his bility to
    English wickets, He the batt
    both ways and has his googly as

    Constructive criticism must at all times be appreciated, but we
    in the West Indies will never tolerate any opinions that can only be
    construed as figments of the imagination when they are compared
    with responsible opinions of people, who although they belong to an-

    ad race, have openly expressed opinions that differ almost diametri-
    cally,

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    SUNDAY 1DVOCATE

    SUNDAY, MAY

    14, 1950



    Spartan Trounce College 7—O

    Spartan easily drubbed College 7—0 when they met in a

    first division football fixture

    at Kensington Oval yesterday

    afternoon. Four of the goals were netted in the first hall.
    The seven goals were scored by Johnson who kicked in
    three, Trotman 2 and Walcott 1. The other goal College
    netted on themselves the result of a melee in their goal

    FOOTBALL
    FIXTURES

    FIRST DIVISION
    Monday, May 15
    Carlton vs Empire. Referee: K
    Laughlin; Linesmen: O, S. Cop-
    pin and L. F. Harris.
    Thursday, May 18
    Spartan vs Pickwick-Rovers.
    Referee: D. W. Sayers; Linesmen:
    S. Gittens and B. Hoyos.
    Saturday,
    Everton vs
    Oo. S$. Coppin;
    Amory and D. W
    SECOND
    Tuesday, May 16
    Everton vs Y.M.P.C. Referee :
    L. F. Harris.
    Wednesday, May 17
    Empire vs Notre Dame. Referee:
    B. Hoyos.
    ar May are
    ollege ys -M.P.C. Referee :
    N. Meator

    ‘d,
    INTER-SCHOO:
    Tuesday, May 16 -

    Lodge vs Foundation at Lodge
    Referee; A. Wilkes,
    Wednesday, May 17

    College vs Combermere at Col-
    lege. Referee: L. Thomas.
    Friday, May 19

    Lodge vs Combermere .
    Referee; G. Amory. viene

    THIRD DIVISION

    Tuesday, May 16

    Cable and Wireless vs ¥.M.C.A.
    at Boarded Hall. Referee: C, Smith

    Referee:
    : GE

    . Sayers.
    DIVISION

    Empire vs Combermere Old
    Boys at Bank Hall. Referee: A
    Ishmael,

    Combermere vs at

    Y.M.P.C.
    Combermere. Referee: N. Holder.



    Yardley
    Leads M.C.C.



    NORMAN YARDLEY

    LONDON, May 12.

    Norman Yardley, the Yorkshire
    captain, is to lead M.C.C. against
    the West Indies in the match be-
    ginning at Lord’s here on May 20.

    In view of the need to find an
    England captain, both for the
    Test series this suramer, and for
    the England tour to Australia in
    the winter, the choice of Yardley
    is regarded here as a special point-
    er to the feelings of the leading
    Egland officials.

    There are a number of other
    selections in the M.C.C. side which
    reveal the young cricketers whose
    abilities have attracted most at-
    tention at Lord's.

    R. Berry, Lancashire's 5ft 4ins.
    left-arm slow bowler; Eric Bedser,
    Surrey off-break bowler and
    opening bat, who is a twin brother
    to Test bowler Alex Bedser; and
    Don Brennan, Yorkshire wicket-
    keeper, have all found favour.

    Middlesex, without a County
    match at the time, provide four
    players — Denis Compton, Bill
    Edrich, Jack Robertson and forty-
    five-year-old slow leg-break
    bowler, Jim Sims.

    The team is: N. W. D. Yardley

    (Captain) and D.,V. Brennan
    (Yorkshire), W. J. Edrich, D.
    Compton, J. Robertson, and J.

    Sims (Middlesex), R. T. Simpson
    (Nottinghamshire), T. E. Bailey
    (Essex), J. G. Dewes (Cambridge
    University), R. Berry (Lanca-
    shire), and E. Bedser (Surrey),
    —Reuter

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    —_—« Spartan showed their intention

    of scoring early and the first goal
    came from a corner, kicked
    Boyce on the left wing and John-
    son made no mistake in kicking
    it into the nets. The second was
    netted very soon after when Wal-
    cott receiving a pass from John-
    son ran down unmarked and
    scored in the right hand corner of
    the goal,

    At this stage the College de-
    fence was beginning to weaken
    and Johnson took full advantage
    of this and scored the third goal
    after a pass from Boyce.

    Occasionally. there was some
    play in the Spartan goal area but
    custodian Harris had very little
    to do. The greater part of the play
    was seen in the College goal area
    and after a melee in ffont of the
    College area, Johnson scored a
    fourth about three minutes before
    Referee Wilkins blew for half
    time.

    After half time Spartan
    changed up their formation, Har-
    ris was seen at right wing and
    Chase in the goal. Very soon after
    the. kick off Trotman taking a
    pass from Walcott ran through to
    score the fifth giving Smith no
    chance to save.

    The schoolboys were always
    seen bundling and very soon they
    scored on themselves as full-
    back Gibbons trying to clear
    kicked into his own goal. About
    five minutes before the end
    Trotman again scored making the
    total seven.

    The teams:—

    Spartan: Harris, Gibbons, Bow-
    en, Gittens, Cadogan, Haynes,
    Chase, Johnson, Walcott, Trot-
    man and Boyce.

    College. Smith, Gibbons, Mor-
    rison, Morris, St. John, Simmons,
    Reid, V. O. Smith, C. E. Tudor,
    Williams and F. L. Tudor,

    The Referee was Mr. P. Wil-
    kin.

    Linesmen: Messrs. Amory ,and
    Graham.

    Best Display
    Sinice Aussies’
    Visit
    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    LONDON, May 13,

    A 17,500 crowd at the Oval today
    went home convinced that they
    had seen the best exhibition of
    forceful batting since the Austra-
    lians were here: two years ago.

    Even members of the West
    Indies team were amazed at: the
    frequency with which -theyball
    was despatched to the boundary.

    Learie Constantine told me
    afterwards that he considered it
    one of the best exhibitions he
    had ever seen from the West
    Indies side.

    Particularly satisfying from John
    Goddard's point of view is that
    his men have shown themselves
    capable of fighting back after
    suffering early losses.

    Inability to do this has been a
    great failing to previous sides
    which have toured here.

    The big question now is whether
    Goddard will declare first thing
    Monday morning. The first hour
    is the time when bowlers get
    most help from the wicket, but
    Goddard has not made up his mind
    yet.

    He wants to see what the
    weather is like. If it continues
    warm and sunny, he may go on
    batting for another hour or so,
    giving his team orders to force the
    pace; but if it rains during the
    weekend, he will probably hand
    straight over to his bowlers.





    Premiere’s Tennis

    Club Tourney

    MONDAY’S FIXTURES.

    Men’s Doubles.

    L. Campbell and L. Blackett vs,
    W. DeC. Forde and C. B. Forde.
    Ladies’ Singles.

    Miss G. M, Grimes vs. Miss C.
    Alleyne.

    Men’s, Singles. ‘
    J. Robinson vs. B.- Wharton.
    F. Edwards vs, Dr. G, M.

    Cummins



    ‘“MOYRA BLAIR’ WINS
    A SECOND TIME

    Commodore Wilkinson’s “Moyra Blair”, skippered by his
    son Tom, scored her second victory for the season when
    she defeated all other ‘B’ Class boats at the Ninth Regatta
    of the R.B.Y.C,, which took place in Carlisle Bay yesterday

    evening.



    ‘Tranquillity
    Leads
    Savannah

    SAVANNAH won two of the
    four games yesterday afternoon
    at the Garrison to make their
    score three as against five by the
    visiting Tranquillity team from
    Trinidad.

    Mrs. R. S. Bancroft of Savan-
    nah beat Miss C. De Verteuil in
    the Ladies’ Singles 7—5; 9—7;
    while Miss D. Wood and J. D.
    Trimmingham also of Savannah
    beat Miss M. Trestrail and T.
    Schjo'seth 7—5, 6—3, in one of the
    Mixed Doubles games.

    In the other Mixed Doubles
    game, Miss M. Trestrail and H.
    Nothnagel of Tranquillity beat
    Mrs. A. L. Perkins and C. R.
    Packer 6—1; 6—2; while F. Gun
    Munro of Tranquillity carried o
    the Men’s Singles from PD. E,
    Worme 6—1; 7—5.

    Undoubtedly the best match of
    the afternoon was the Ladies’
    Singles on Court No. 3 in which
    Mrs. Bancroft defeated Miss De-
    Verteuil. It was tennis of the
    highest standard with both ladies
    serving and driving exceptionally
    well,

    In the first set, the games were
    very even and at 5—5 Mrs. Ban-
    croft broke through to win Miss
    De Verteuil’s service and made
    the game 6—5 in her favour. She
    then clinched the set by winning
    her own service at 7—5.

    In the second set, the games
    went much the same way, each
    player winning her service until
    Mrs. Bancroft led 8—7, and then
    won her service to win the set
    9—7.

    Both ladies were getting good
    length and there were many ex-
    changes of rallies for indeed, the
    first game went to 19 points before
    Mrs. Bancroft eventually won it.

    There was however, not very
    much to choose between the two
    players. Mrs. Bancroft was, per-
    haps, the more aggressive while
    Miss De Verteuil was at all times
    steady with both back and fore
    urm. As was already stated, the
    tennis was of a very high standard
    and was very much appreciated
    by the crowd.

    On Court No. 2 in the Men’s
    Singles, F. Gun Munro won the
    first set very easily from D. E.
    Worme 6—1. In the second set,
    Worme had Gun-Munro 4—2, but
    the latter soon equalised and then
    took the next game to lead 5—4,
    Worme won the following game to
    make the score 5—5 and then
    Munro took the last two games.

    Neither of the players was
    really playing on form and tennis
    was not up to standard.

    In the Mixed Doubles J. D.
    ‘Yrimmingham played very sound
    tennis and was ably partnered by
    Miss D. Wood to win the match
    v-—5; 6—3 from T. Schjolseth and
    Miss M. Trestrail, the Tranquillity
    pair.

    In the first set, Tranquillity
    started off and had Savannah 3—1.
    The latter then equalised only to
    see Tranquillity go ahead again
    with the score at 5—3.

    Miss Wood then came into the
    picture witn some forcing back-
    hand and forearm shots. To
    climax this good display, she won
    her service and then had the
    score at 5—5. From this, Sayan-
    nah never looked back, but went
    ahead to win the game 7—5, 6—3.

    In the other Mixed Doubles, H.
    Nothnagel and Miss A. Reid
    (Tranguillity) had a very easy
    victory over Mrs. A. L. Perkins
    and C. R. Packer and won 6—1;
    6—2.

    The tournamfnt continues on
    Monday.



    1 sandals are now

    he f ) lie ‘ }
    ¢ high quality of tt




    Trade Enquiries to; T.

    This race was a very keen one.
    Dr. J. W. P. Harkness’ “Circe”,
    which started first, looked a sure
    winner as it kept its lead through-
    out the first lap and up to the time
    it reached the Needham’s Point
    buoy. On reaching this buoy
    “Moyra Blair’, which was only a
    few yards behind, crept into the
    lead and before “Circe” could
    completely clear the buoy “Fan-
    tasy”, owned and skippered by
    Teddy Hoad, came into second
    place. They finished in that order.

    The boats sailed north-about in
    a very light breeze which was
    especially not suitable for the
    centre-boarders. Only the ‘‘Reso-
    lute” in the ‘B’ Class and “Dawn”
    in the Intermediate, did not start.

    “Mohawk”, owned by Dr. David
    Payne and skippered by Bob Cum-
    berbatch scored her second victory
    this season in the Intermediate
    Class. The other victory was
    scored in the Seventh Regatta and
    the boat afterwards overturned
    but on this occasion it got back
    safely to its mooring.

    Coming second in the Inter-
    mediate was Sydney Nurse’s
    “Clytie” which he himself skip-
    pered, So far “Clytie has mn
    second on a previous occasion but
    has not yet scored a victory for
    the season. \

    Third position went to Johnnie
    Hoad’s “Coronetta” which was
    captained by his son Jackie.

    “Astra”, owned and skippered
    by Milton Tucker, carried off ‘C
    Class honours for the second time.
    Second in this Class was “Range”,
    owned and, skippered by Stanley
    Cheeseman while “Wizard”, owned
    and skippered by Jim Jones was
    third, This is the third occasion
    on which “Wizard” came third
    but up to the present it has not
    been able to gain a second posi-
    tion.

    “Sinbad”, owned and skippered
    by Lionel Baggott, won an easy
    race in the “D” Class to score its
    first victory for the season. Second
    was “Olive Blossom,” owned and
    skippered by Winston Hassell and
    third “Peter Pan”, owned and
    s“ippered by Eric Raison.

    Vhe results were as follows:

    . *B’ Class:—1. Moyra Blair.
    Fantasy. 3. Circe.

    ‘C’ Class:—1. Astra. 2. Ranger.
    3. Wizard.

    Intermediate Class:—1. Mohawk.
    2. Clytie. 3. Coronetta.

    9

    —D’ Class:—1. Sinbad. 2. Olive
    Blossom. 3. Peter Pan.
    The Tenth Regatta of the

    R.B.Y.C. will be sailed on Satur-
    day, May 27.

    Roberts Wins
    Frontenac Cup

    MR. T. A. L. ROBERTS won
    the Frontenac Trophy and ‘the
    N.R.A. Silver Medal when he
    broke the Frontenac Trophy
    Shoot record at the Government
    Rifle Range yesterday. Mr. Rob-
    erts scored 144 points out of a
    possible 150.

    In 1948 when the Frontenac
    Trophy Shoot first started, Capt.
    C. R. E. Warner, the then winner,
    scored 136 points. Last year Lt.-
    Col. J. Connell added two points
    and now Mr. Roberts has beaten
    Lt.-Col. J. Connell’s 138.

    Fifteen rounds were fired from
    each of the two distances, 500 and
    600 yards. Shooting conditions
    were good, the wind steady and
    the light consistent.

    Following are the eight best
    scores: —

    500 600
    Yards Yards Total

    72 72 «(144
    i
    69
    68

    A. L, Roberts
    J, Connell ..
    Major J. E. Griffith .
    Mr. M. R. De Verteuil
    Lt. C, E, Neblett
    Capt. J. R. Jordan

    Lt. T. A. Gittens /

    M. D. Thomas

    Mr. T.
    Lt.-Col.

    70
    68

    Mr 70



    Barbados Friendly
    Football Association

    THE third trial match of the
    above association will be played
    to-day at Empire Grounds, Bank
    Hall.





    Gillette

    .. + the sharpest edge in the world!

    Geddes Grant Limite. }



    IT IS a remarkable thing that in the last thirty years classifica-
    tion of racehorses in Barbados and Trinidad should have remained
    so consistent. AJ) the more so because it passed through a very try-
    ing period during the last war. By consistency I mean that a certain
    standard has been maintained whereby it has been possible to judge
    the merits not only of contemporary thoroughbreds but also those of
    different periods. For instance, looking at a classification. list of to-
    day I find that in comparison with one of 1930 there is little difference
    in the general standard of the runners in class ‘AY.

    Naturally there must be some difference of opinion when one
    compares horses of different periods and of course I do not mean to
    say that Beacon Bright, Blue Streak and Gun Site (three of today’s
    giants) are of exactly the same vintage as Tom Pearson, Bambolina,
    and Senator, three who raced around 1930. But when I say that 1
    think Beacon Bright, Blue Streak and Gun Site are genuine A class
    horses it means something because the standard of the class has re-
    mained constant. This to my mind 1s a decided feather in the cap of
    the authorities who control racing in Barbados and Trinidad.

    The great thing about the “A” class of to-day is the quantity in
    this division and its sub class “A2” as well as the fact that half the
    number is made up of native bred horses. Having established the fact
    that there has been no lowering of the general standard in the top
    class, this immediately tells us that we are breeding better horses to-
    day than we were in 1930. At that time class “A” was made up of two
    or three imported horses only. It also tells us that racing in general
    in the B.W.I. is on the up-grade. :

    According to the most recent classifications issued by the Barba-
    dos Turf Club and the Trinidad Turf Club, one of which is published
    on the opposite page, there are now, 16 animals in class “A” and “A2”.
    16 of these are native bred and 4 of these sixteen are Derby winners
    either in Jamaica, Trinidad or Barbados. Added to this we find 24
    horses classified in division “B” and “B2”, of which 5 are creoles.
    Three of these five are classic winners in the same three colonies as
    mentioned above.

    Comparing these figures with the corresponding classes in 1930 1
    cannot say off hand what the totals were then, but I can tell you that
    they were much smaller and, in addition, not one was a native bred
    horse. In fact there were no creoles above class “D” in those days.

    The above, in my view, are the most significant points about the
    classifications recently issued by the respective Turf Clubs of Trinidad
    and Barbados.

    Another point of interest in the recent classification by the B.T.C
    is the number of two-year-olds there are on the list. I have counted
    15 so far. This, I believe, is the greatest number ever to be placed on
    the list as early as May.

    Taken alphabetically, here are a few pointers on their potential-
    ties which I have been able to gather so far:—

    First on the list is Best Wishes. This is a filly by Burning Bow
    out of Felicitas, and therefore an own sister to the very fast Bow Bells
    whom we have already been able to, judge® Bred and owned by Mr,
    Cyril Bernard in St. Vincent, I have not seen her yet, but I am told
    by eyewitnesses that she stands 15 hands, 3 inches and is about 1%
    inches taller than Bow Bells. She is described as much better looking
    all round than her famous sister. We are left to wonder if she will
    be so much better on the track. We shall have to wait, however, be-
    cause she is not scheduled to arrive here for racing until next October.
    If she does turn out to be better than Bow Bells, well. . . . I leave it
    to everybody to make their own comments. There is still some
    diversity of opinion on this point.

    Clementina I have seen and I like her. She is a filly by Roidan
    out of Fiena, a mare bred in Jamaica by Beccaquimec, sire of Jeeves.
    Clementina was bred in St. Lucia by Mr. Purchase who might be
    described as a pioneer of breeding in that island. He has sold her to
    Mr. I. O. C. Perkins and she will no doubt race here in August. She
    is by no means tall but I like her conformation and she is well set up
    on her legs.

    Consternation is another from Mr. Purchase in St. Lucia. She is
    by Millersdale out of Mary, another Jamaican mare by Scatter, sire
    of Brown Bomber, I have not seen her nor do I know when she will
    race. However, I shall be very interested in her because she is the one
    and only thoroughbred by Millersdale whom I have ever heard about.
    This big son of Bold Archer never had a proper chance as a sire in
    my opinion and it is ironic that now he is dead we should be seeing
    his first thoroughbred foal racing.

    Cross Roads is a rather leggy son of Dunush (also dead) and
    April Showers, the mare who gave us the great Atomic II, perha
    O.T.C’s best son. Cross Roads has been in training now since early
    in the year and already I have noticed an improvement in him. For
    one thing he is not as leggy as he was a few months ago for,
    another he has almost lost his baby looks. I believe he will be among
    the forward ones, if not in development, at least in training.

    Dunese, the pronunciation of whose name I am not sure, is by
    Dunusk out of Celanese, a mare who became famous for the number
    of come-backs she made to racing after repeated retirements. Ske was
    in fact more successful on the track after she produced a foal. I have
    not seen Dunese either. Being a supporter of the progeny of Deni-
    ae sire of Celanese, I shall also be very interested in the career of

    unese,

    Hi-Lo’s name is about the only thing I like about the poor laddie.
    He is by Dunusk out of China Clipper and the nomenclature therefore
    seems to be apt, but he is as straight as bee-line from his fetlock
    joint to his coronets. This is a very bad sign in a racehorse although
    some of the famous have been known to run well with it. Perhaps
    Hi-Lo may, who knows?

    Miracle, by Battle Front out of Marshlight, is another I have not
    seen. He has been bought from Mr. Proverbs by Miss Hawkins, I am
    told. His dam has already done very well with Will O’the Wisp IT
    — ooee from the same sire. Miracle therefore has a reputation to
    uphold,

    River Mist, small but comely daughter of the famous Sunrise,
    is by Restigouche. I like everything about her except her size.
    Rather more refined than the average Sunrise progeny, she is a beauti-
    ful chestnut, She too has a reputation to uphold. ‘

    Exactly the opposite in size but equally good looking is Soprano.
    A big upstanding filly by Sunplant out of Night Singer, her dam
    appears to have fitted her up well with the powerful quarters of
    Tetratema on the frame of Sunstar. This provides her with a fifty-
    fifty chance at being a stayer or sprinter and being excellent at either.
    It shall be interesting to see on which side she does come down.

    Sunbeam is Mr. George de Nobriga’s Sunshaft-Miramichi filly. I
    have not seen her yef, Her dam Miramichi I believe is out of Minehaha
    but I am~not sure who by,

    Vanguard is a very robust son of O.T.C. and the big rhare Hurri-
    cane who was not much of a success at racing. He is such a powerful
    colt (or gelding), I am not sure which, that seeing him at a distance
    on the track for the first time I thought the Turf Club had imported
    another stallion. On coming closer I perceived that he was only a two-
    year-old, but what a baby. Obviously he shall need time.

    Waterbell is Hon. J, D. Chandler's other two-year-old by Resti-
    gouche out of Belleplain, She is the small powerful type. Her dam
    having produced Front Bell, and War Path, we might also expect
    sorfething from her.

    The fifteenth is actually out of alphabetical order but this is be-

    cause she is in “G2”. She is the half-bred filly Joan’s Star. I wonder
    where she hails from?















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    i


    PAGE TWELVE

    B.G. Plans Large-Scale
    Banana Industry

    Expert Arrives For Experiments

    Jamaica to commence

    (From Our Correspondent)
    GEORGETOWN, May-8.
    Mr. E. S. SHARPE has arrived in British Guiana from
    the Banana Development ®cheme
    under the auspices of the Department of Agriculture here.
    This Scheme has arisen oui of re

    in the Evans Commission Report

    1



    commendations contained

    The dey banan*

    B.G. Press * ,

    2 . mined whether or ne t bet amas’ tor
    Association eepert i an be grow Ss cuted sfully
    in British. Guiana,t and’ seconei

    (From Our Own Corresp







    GEORGETOWN no calls b, ships. This takes tinw

    Mr. W. I. Gomes was elected #d depends on'the’ success oF t
    resident of the Bria o first or experimental ph Only
    Guiana Press Association at the this fitst phase is now being con

    Sixth Annual Meeting held +" ue
    Association’s Reference Rooms,
    Robb Street, Georgetown, on Sun-
    day, May 7, 1950.

    elected are Mr. P, I
    President; Mr. woyd
    Secretary; Miss ( E,
    Treasurer; } P Kempado),
    Asst. Secretary-Treasurer; Unofl
    cial Members: Mr. Justice E. RB
    L. Ward, Mr. C. D. Kirton, M1
    O. E. Armstrong and Mr, Cha:
    Wright.

    The Asociation held its Fourth
    Annual Dinner at the New City
    Restaurant and Hotel the previous

    Rohe







    Tneob: | |, the
    Association, ane
    Pres... McConnell & Co., Ltd. Bac!
    has agree) to bear a third of the
    expenditure up to a given mawxi-
    mum.



    stry must be in two pha
    mceRperimental = f¢
    ’ sf

    ring which it 1 det

    © developritnt phase du

    Eleets Officers oo (ons Bee

    warrant ‘regul:.!

    built up “to



    sidered,

    Woaile Government ts partici-
    pating id the Scheme Jit is not
    eee » Counc essentially a Government Scheme.

    ran. Sienbers Of Was vues It is: a joint enterprise between
    t the Government of British Guiana.
    Jamaica Banana Frotucers’
    Messrs Booke~

    Producers Anxious

    The Jamaica Banana Producer
    Assoefation are anxious to obtain

    8 fies of bananas from area
    eveiin 2 re : suppli ane
    the Quat FHone a wes Mi Me outside the hurficane area. More-

    tice F. M. Boland, LL.B. Other Ve: they are, or will be in
    guests of the ‘Aséociation were Mr, Position to supply the specially

    W. A. Crawford (Barbados), Mr
    H. Engert (London), Hon. EB. F

    McDavid, C.M.Gi.C.B.E}y Hon across” the
    doubtful whether, even. if it

    showr” that )
    grown’ here satisfactorily, and in-
    dustry could be started by Brit-

    BG Plans First ish Guiana alone and without

    Capt. G. H. Smellie, Mr. H. G
    Seaford, O.B.E.











    ij
    ke

    Z06 ln WI

    (Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
    GEORGETOWN,

    The British Guiana Government
    is considering proposals put for-'
    ward by Hon. Vincent Roth, J.P.
    M.L.C., for the establishment ot
    a Zoological Park, along the lines

    of the London Zoo. If Roth’: r
    proposals’ are accepted Britishyy There is of

    Guiana will be the first Carib-
    bean colony with
    Gardens, where ‘visitors will be
    able to see the most comprehen-
    sive collection of tropical fauna
    in these ‘parts.

    It is proposed to establish th«
    Zoological Gardens in the north-
    western section of the Botanic.
    Gardens.

    Based on the number of per-
    sons who visit the Natural His-
    tory Section of the Museum, it iy
    estimated that by levying «
    nominal charge of one penny per
    person as is done in the case of
    the Government-owned Kew
    Gardens, after making allowances|
    for a reduction in the number of
    visitors, revenue derived from
    this source would
    approximately $314 per month











    ssistence of
    shipping and marketing organisia-
    tion such as this.

    Messrs. Booker Bros. joined the B. Cc.
    Scheme because they have great
    interests in British Guiana and
    they believe a policy of broaden-
    economy
    id be followed, and are pre-
    pared to support schemes with
    that end in view.

    ing

    British

    Ministry of
    United Kingdom market

    This variety
    ind purposes, immune from Pana-
    but is unfortunately
    usceptible to Leaf Spot Disease,
    but unlike Panama Disease) this ¢) Ruimveld site which will al

    be levelled off, Rain is holding \

    "na disease,

    ean be controlled,
    amount tolywhen there are easily available preliminary. work.
    supplies of water as there are in

    designed and refrigerated shi
    necessary for

    carrying banan
    Atlantic arid ~it

    bananas could

    some

    its agricultural

    ount of experimental work

    Zoologicale:P& done before it can be deter-
    mined whether or not it is possible
    to establish a banana industry
    Earlier trial
    nave failed mainly because of the
    isease problem, but a new variety
    ealled “Lacatan” is. now being oO
    grown and shipped in Jamaica
    and has been accepted by the
    Food and in the

    Guiana.

    Diocese Control
    is to all

    or a little less than $4,000 per&iBritish Guiana.

    year. It is
    amount

    hoped that this
    would be sufficient tor

    the vicinity 0f $12,000 and the cost
    of maintenance would be in the
    region of $4,000 per annum

    Cabral President
    Of B.G. Bar

    GEORGETOWN.
    Mr, Ly M; F. ~ Cabral,

    ment -of

    bodies,

    The indications from banana
    defray the cost of maintainingjgrown in British Guiana already
    the Zoo by way of wagés and food#for the local market, usually with
    for the specimens on exhibits. pthe minimum of cultivation, are

    Capital “cost of the establish-"icuffiele
    ment is estimated to be within’ "periments
    While the general,» administris
    tion will be under the Depari-approval and
    Agriculture, ‘the actual
    control of policy will be Under-a
    committee consisting of a repré= the Province to take ‘part
    sentative from each of the three year in a
    If after an experimental
    period, which is likely to be trom
    one to two years, the results Hp-. Pentecost—May 18 to 28
    Barbados Advocate Correspondent pear’ to warrant expansion toa ' ‘
    commercial scale, additional aréus
    M.A, Wilk be planted and opportunities
    B.C.L., was elected President of given for private farmers, smali
    the B:G. Bar Association at the and large, to grow bananas for





    Annual Meeting held on Friday, shipment,

    Victoria Law
    office-bearers

    May 6, at. the
    Courts. Other

    The exact



    the
    established

    course a great

    intents

    particulariy

    to warrant further ex-

    type of organisation

    tana

    SHE GOES TO ROME ON HORSEBACK?

    Riding h
    the German Countess Helen Von

    has just arrived in Rome after trav«

    ESS FROM BAVARIA,

    Convent, Bavaria

    ant she Jater became a catholic ¢

    a

    ger
    he



    The Countess

    # guest in her Berlin Mansion,



    City: «Photo shows +

    monies,

    Clearan

    Countess
    Giselle” on her arrival in Rome

    ce

    (Advocate Correspondeni)
    GEORGETOWN

    Georgetown’s city slum

    ance is moving near
    The Central Housing

    Bank of the Demerar

    rer

    likely to be dispossessed in

    Albuoystown slum cle

    at Ruimveld. About
    from Atkinson Field

    arance,

    Officials of the Town-Plannin:
    ffice are busy conducting sui-
    veys before laying out the arca
    15 houses
    and other
    salvage material will: be remove
    to the site to provide shelter fi

    approximately 500° pérsons

    Preparing Ruimvelc

    canting centre will include
    ing of a road from Albuoystoy:
    1 the Cit

    (southermost Ward it

    jas a



    Primate’s

    Call

    To Prayer

    (Barbados Advocate Correspondent)



    EORG

    His Grace ‘the Arehbishop «
    the West dndies “with the wana

    brother Bishops has
    the-Clergy and Lai



    Provinci
    Prayer and Dedicatio
    vena ..from

    “BIG FHREE” FINISIi

    STOWN

    support” of

    called

    ul Act
    nin a

    Aseension Day

    VITAL TALKS

    LONDON,. May 13

    The t’oreign Ministers of
    tain, France and the United St

    were today finishing vital cold \
    iclude with

    elected for the 1950—51 period Which would operate or control talks, which will cor

    are Hon, A, T.

    Peters (Vice- the local industry will have to be
    President), “Mr. P) A, Cutfimings decicted: tater by the British Gui-

    (Secretary), Mr. Jenarine Singh ana Government.

    (Treasurer), Mr: Guya Persaud
    (Asst. Secretary). These officers
    along with the

    The number

    constitute the Governing Body of obtained is yet unknown, but

    the Association: Hons, Theo Lee Sufficient can be obtained some wiil
    be distributed to local farmers to
    try-out for themselves.

    and John Carter, Messrs J. Veerasawmy and S. I, Cyrus.

    ST





    Why so depressed?

    If you feel so low - spirited,

    isn’t it simply because you

    are run-down? Thousands who
    fex like you have quickly

    The effect of taking Phyllosan
    tablets is a steadily growing
    sense of general well-being,
    disappearance of the feeling

    of suckers of the

    following will “Lacatan” variety which can be

    the publication ofa

    momen ¢

    statement on the future of (

    many.

    After discussing Ger
    Austria exclusively yesterday, the
    Ministers had prepared an imoor
    tant and comprehensive policy «°-
    on Germany’s future
    which would “be made public
    the end of their meeting, a Fre

    claration

    spokesman said.—Reuter.












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    Sage: AG CT ey

    THE PILGRIM COUNT-
    famous white horse ‘Belle Giselle”

    idohenau, of Ketschendorf, Bavaria,

    ling about 937 miles from the Ettal

    s fifty, and although born a Protest-

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    Begins Slum Hoffman Is |

    Disappointed
    NEW YORK, May 18,

    Paul. Hoffman, Marshall Pian
    Administrator admitted today ‘that



    he was. disappointed at: the pro-
    gress so far made towards the in-
    tegration of the European economy

    “In all fairness it.deserves to b
    ijtated that the progress which has
    yee, nvade in the past few months

    toward the better organisation of
    the European economy would in
    normal times be worthy of high
    praise,’ he added.

    “It is only because the need is
    o great, and time so pressing,
    that | am disappointed with the
    progress made thus far.”

    He told the-United States Con-
    ference of Me + “E do not want
    to confuse disappointment with
    diseburagement. T am-not discour-
    iged, beeause I believe that the
    job can be done andl is beginning
    o be done



    Mr. Hoffman’ said the Marshall
    Plan countries would need to ac-
    complish within the next - 25
    months, what would normally take

    5

    ) years,

    9



    “T am convinced that before the
    Marshall Plan is completed in 2
    years our friends in Western Eu-
    rope with our help will take those
    major ste towards. the creation
    fa single market in Europe which
    they aecepted as the prime objec-
    tive and which has the full sup-
    port of the United States Govern-
    ment,” he said



    Mr. Hoffman said he believed
    Communism was a passing storm
    and that 80 per cent or perhaps
    90 per cent of the peoples of Po-
    land and Czechoslovakia detested
    the system under which they were
    forced to live

    Given any reasonable chance of
    success they would fight to break
    away from it.

    ‘Ten years ago there were 3 dic-
    tatorships in the world led by Hit-
    ler, Mussolini and Stalin,” he said.
    The three were viciously attack-
    ing and encroaching upon the free
    world, Two are gone, I expect
    to live to see the third—the most
    evil of all dictatorships—go.”

    —Reuter.







    SUNDAY,



    B.G. Has Enough
    Meat For Export

    Air Transport Necessary

    (Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

    GEORGETOWN,

    Mr. H. G. Seaford,.O.B.E, Chairman of the Nupunun

    Development Company .Ltd..
    British Guiana, declared yesterday that, ia the

    of the Company’s Board of

    largest cattle ranchers. i
    »pinior
    Directors, there are sufficient

    cattle in British Guiana to supply local requirements, and

    to start an export trade to

    Trinidad, but this will entai!

    flying down all beef from the Rupununi cattle country.

    ee

    Welcome Big
    3 Co-operation

    WASHINGTON, May 13

    Representative John Kee, Dem-
    ocrat Chairman of the House of
    Representatives Foreign Affai
    Committee, to-night hailed. the
    announcement of the close accor J
    at the Foreign Ministers’ London
    meeting as an important -ste
    towards the economic and even-
    tually tke political federation
    Europ<

    It would be a very nderful
    thing, but I doubt at this stag
    wheth ithe European = countrie
    could come to full agreement on
    all the matters necéssary t
    achieve. complete federation

    That is a long range goal, Mr
    Kee said.



    He said that the Ser-te
    House Conference now meeting to
    reach agreement on the Foreign
    Aid Appropriation Bill had agreed
    yesterday, following a _ request
    from the Secretary of Siate, Mr.
    Dean Acheson, not to make For-
    eign aid conditions on “political
    federation”.

    Mr. Kee ‘said that the words
    were dropped from the compro-
    mise bill so as not to put up any
    barrier to the success of the Lon-
    don talks.

    He added that there was never-
    theless a strong sentiment in Con-
    gress for more rapid progress
    towards that goal

    Kee endorsed the idea of en-
    uraging the new states of South
    Rast Asia in their steps towar
    independence.



    Although he knew of no new
    recent developments, Mr. Kee said
    he regarded the appointment of
    General Carlos Romulo as Phil-
    ippines Foreign Minister as a
    significant step towards the reali-
    sation of a closer accord between
    the West countries

    He said the grouping of demo-
    cratic countries in Asia in a pact
    similar to the North Atlantic
    Treaty “was “essential to the
    security ..of. those, countries. a
    well asweof the, United States.

    , ~ —Reuter



    Foreign Ministers
    Diseuss Africa

    LONDON, May 13.

    The Foreign Ministers of France,
    the United States and Britain de-
    cided here today to make fresh
    efforts to overcome divergencies
    inside the United Nations on Colo-
    nial questions, it was learned on
    good authority.

    The three, Mr. Ernest Bevin,
    Britain; Mr. Dean Acheson, United
    States; and M. Robert Schuman,
    France, briefly discussed colonial
    matters today, with special refer-
    ence to Africa

    The main question of co-ordin-
    ation between the three powers
    was believed to have centred on
    divergencies inside the United
    Nations on colonial questions.

    —Reuter.





    VAN ZEELAND ARRIVES

    ’ LONDON, May 12
    The Belgian Prime Minister,
    Paul Van Zeeland, arrived here
    by air tonight from Brussels to
    take part in next week’s North
    Atlantic Council meetings.
    —Reuter.

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    In sharp criticism of the hand-
    ling of the meat situation, Mr.
    Seaford declared at the general
    meeting of the Company’s share-
    ho'der that the Directors hav?
    continued thelr struggle to point
    vul the absurdity of the present
    position, whereby t pays th
    Company to drive. its best catth
    over the trail and sustain losses
    in numbers, weight and, conditio-.
    rather than sell_at Lethem, in th
    Rupununi, District +

    “As a fesult,” added Mr. Sea
    ford, “only: those,eattie are flow:
    down which are considered either
    Yoo old cr too weak

    More Than Enough

    “We are of opinion that thers
    re sufficient cattle in the colony
    to supply local requirements and
    an export trade to Trini-
    dad, but this would enta‘l the
    flying down of all beef from th:
    Rupununi. Government is pre
    pared, however, to allow a price
    of 50 cents per pound to be paid
    for Australian beef while con-
    ‘rolling the price of British
    Guiana beef at 32 cents. Local
    representations to Government
    have failed, and the Directors of
    the Company are now cons'dering
    what further steps should |
    taken

    The Directors’ Report showed
    1 profit of $1 5.89 against a
    profit of $20,788.43 for 1948. f

    Cattle on hand at the Rupununi
    Savannah at December 31, 1949,
    are estimated to have been 30,000
    head, and 770 head in the Ber-
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    to start





    Labour Officers
    Will Discuss

    Work Overseas

    KINGSTON, May 9

    A model agreement for the con-
    tract employment overseas of West
    Indian workers-will be one of the
    prineipal. items of -bustness to be
    discussed at the conference of
    British Caribbean Labour. officers
    to be held in Barbados starting
    May 15.

    It is possible that this agreement
    will be based on the Internationa!
    Labour Office convention which
    relates to written contracts for mi-
    grant. workers.

    Jamaica will be represented at
    the conference by the Labour Ad-
    viser, Mr: G..H. Scott,

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    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950





    They Left Britain To Be
    Redskins’ Brides

    Hy James Cooper

    TORONTO

    “Bang, bang, bang . . . and
    seven more redskins bit the dust.”

    THAT famous line in tales of
    the Wild West was quoted by my
    English master as the most excit-
    ing introduction to any story.

    And that “Last of the Mohi-
    cans” attitude is what Jasper Hill
    (Chief Big White Owl) and the
    130,000 or so Indians in Canada
    are fighting to-day as Canada
    prepares to debate a Bill making
    Indians full citizens.

    Eighty years after the last skir-
    mish between red man and white,
    the Mohawks, the Swampy Crees,
    the Blackfeet, and all the other
    tribes hope they will cease 50 be
    treated as children and wards of
    the Government.

    They hope they will be
    given a vote and have the
    ban on their drinking liquor
    eased; they hope to get better
    education and have a right
    to spend their own tribal

    moneys. *

    For war bride Mrs. Betty News
    from Coleman-street, Brighton,
    who married an Indian and is
    living in the Sahanatien Reserve,
    Ontario, it means she may be able
    to have the occasional gin-and-
    lime she liked when, as Betty
    Schooley, she was one of the best
    dancers at the Regent Ballroom,
    Brighton. '

    Risks of jail

    @ UNTIL NOW, like all Brit-
    ish girls married to Indians, she
    has been regarded as an Indian
    squaw living along with the 50
    other red-skinned, raven-haired
    Mohawk women in the reserve,

    There are risks of being jailed
    for a long sentence if caught
    drinking beer; she is liable to be
    questioned even if an empty
    bottle is found nearby.

    Their is neither water nor
    electricity in the wooden

    home.

    For her husband Geoffrey the
    new law may mean he is able to
    go down the trail to the Bala
    Tavern for a glass of beer.

    For their _ golden-haired
    Papoose, Rosemary, rising three,
    it should mean better schooling.

    For the whole family it may
    mean that they won't be regarded
    as minors under the law, unable
    to sign documents, and will be
    able to go te the banks and raise
    a mortgage for housts.

    But it might also mean losing
    the privileges of Indians on re-
    serves of not paying rates and
    taxes.

    Better homes

    @ FOR PEACE-TIME bride
    Margaret Dolman, from Lower
    Court-road, Epsom, Surrey, who
    recently married a Swampy Cree
    Indian, Sinclair Cheechoo, at the
    old Hudson’s Bay post of Moose-
    factory, James Bay, there should
    be twice as much money to spend
    on the Indian children who trudge
    to the mission school where she
    teaches by the light of paraffin
    lamps.

    Tudions will also seek better
    homes than tents with no floor
    other than a layer of spruce
    boughs, often just a wooden box
    as furniture.

    Hungry strike

    @ ONLY MENTION of the
    warpath I have heard has been
    by “rebel” Jules Sioui, 43-year-
    old Huron who, far from scalp-
    ing, has resorted to a hunger
    strike in his shop at Loretteville,
    Quebec, until “Canada is given
    back to the Indians,”

    No one seems to take very

    house she has made her i The Dark Lady, The



    Wedding day picture of Margaret Dolman,
    from Epeom, and ber Indian bridegroom

    Sinctsir

    But there are still contrasts
    and misgivings. In prosperous
    Ontario, where the 30,000 Indians
    mingle unnoticed the cities,
    half of them still live on fishing
    and hunting.

    Rum-runners

    @ IN_ BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Frank Calder is the first full
    Indian member of any Cana-
    dian provincial legislature, and
    the Indian chief's daughter,
    Gloria Cranmer, is studying to
    become the first Indian woman
    doctor.

    But there is still the problem
    of the rum-runners who take fire-
    water to the coastal tribes.

    _ Some Indian tribes ,have an
    pee mortality rate of 500 per

    Cheechoo.

    Braves hunt
    @ CONSUMPTION HAS a
    rate forty times higher for In-
    cians than whites. In the Rock-
    ies are nomadic tribes who face
    starvation rather than take any-
    thing trom the white man.

    In the north the braves
    still hunt while the squaws
    do the work.

    That is why the Big White Owl
    welcomes emancipation with safe-
    guards. “We want to see that
    emancipation won't lead to our
    losing our land through being
    dispossessed for not paying taxes,”
    he say He wants Indian M.Ps
    with six chiefs in the pow-wows
    of the white men.

    —-London Express Service.



    THE

    A FORMER colleague of mine
    on a provincial newspaper
    obtained a better post several
    years ago, married a pretty,
    dark-haired girl, and, alas, was
    killed in an accident.

    He had shown me a portrait
    of his wife, but I never met her.

    In the samc office was, among
    many other girl clerks, one with
    fair hair, who, as girl clerks will
    do, married several years ago
    and left the office.

    Both women (I say with
    apologies to them) had passed
    completely out of my mind.

    I have been living in retirement
    in the country for ten years.

    Wed Another

    On the morning of Monday,
    May 1, I woke from a dream
    which, though it seemed idle
    enough, left me with a strange
    sense of something very impor-
    tant having happened.

    The dream was that I was
    engaged to be married to this
    dark girl (whom I had never met
    in real life).

    But on the way to the church,
    I, as so often in dreams, found
    that I had left my wedding gar-
    ments in the office and hurried
    back to get them.

    The dark girl declared that she
    could not wait, but must there
    and then marry some other man
    —and so she did.

    “Windowed Girl

    Meanwhile, I got back to the
    office, and, hot and bothered, was
    searching for my clothes. To my
    astonishment, I there found the
    fair-haired girl, who had left us



    Fair Lady And—

    DREAM

    To my startled inqu'ry, she
    replied that her husband had
    died, and that she had got back
    her old job in this, my old office

    “She’s All Right”

    When I left the meeting and
    got into the street, I met a former
    colleague who told me the news
    of the office.

    Haunted by my dream, I asked
    him if he knew what had hap-
    pened to the dark lady, widow
    of the colfeague who had been
    killed.

    “Oh, she’s all right,” he answered
    brightly. “I have just come from
    her wedding this morning!”

    —L.E.S.

    Scout Notes

    S. W. District Hold

    Competition
    On Wednesday 24th May, Empire
    Day, the South Western District
    will hold a Scouting Competition
    at the Combermere and Harrison
    College grounds and Scouters of
    the District met on Friday last to

    discuss the programme
    Ten Troops have entered, and
    each will be represented by a
    Patrol of eight scouts at each of
    8 stations which will be taken in



    cyclic order, covering the work

    of the Tenderfoot and Second
    Class Badge Tests.

    Empire Youth Sunday

    The Empire Youth Sunday
    service will be held at Govern-
    ment House Ground on Sunday





    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    SITTING ON

    iy Nathaniel Gubbins

    MERICAN visitors are still
    compiaining about English
    reserve, though one girl admits
    that, after a couple of drinks,
    Englishmen are no more reserved
    than anybody else.

    That is to say, about as viva-
    cious as a couple of English
    explorers having a drink at a
    London club after many years’
    absence.

    One has been to the North Pole;
    the other to Central Africa.

    “Been far?”

    “Pole.”

    “North or South?”
    “North.”

    “Shoot any bears ”
    “Couple.”

    “Cold there?”

    “Bit Parky.” -
    “Tee?”

    “Bags of ice.”
    “Snow ?”

    “Bags of snow.”
    “Oh.”

    “You been far?”
    “Central Africa.”
    “Shoot any lions?”

    “Couple.”

    “Hot there?”

    “Bit stuffy.”

    “Natives ?”

    “Bags of Natives.”

    “Women?”

    “Bags of———look here, I say.”
    “Sorry, old man. Bad show.”
    “Not a bit, old man.”
    “Interestin evenin ?”

    “Rather, Good-night, old man.”
    “Good-night, old man.”

    La Belle Dame
    Sans Output

    “In the Soviet Union there is no
    mystical or obscure treatment of
    love, such as decadent cosmopoli-
    tan poets use. We sing of how a
    young man falls in love with a
    girl because of her big industrial
    output... ."—Soviet poet Stephan
    Petroviv.

    (After John Keats.)






    POCKET CARTOON
    by OSBERIT LANCASTER

    ‘Would one be wrong in

    thinking that frudt spent her SE § 2
    Sunday aitermoon of i OSEY PARKERISM and the

    advocating peace ?”

    O what can ail thee, factory hand,
    Alone and palely loitering?
    The never-ending belt is still
    And no wheels sing.

    O what can ail thee, factory hand,
    So haggard and so woebegone?
    The quota’s met, the shelves are
    full,
    And the foreman’s gone,

    I met a lady in the shop,
    Not beautiful—a peasant’s child.
    lfer hair was cropped, her cheeks
    were smudged,
    And her eyes were wild.

    I made a garland for her head
    Of nuts and bolts and shavings,
    too,
    And presently her small, voice
    said:



    THE FENCE!

    And sideways she would lean and
    sing
    A factory song.



    She found me roots of relish

    sweet,
    And sandwiches her mother

    made,
    And through her trembling lips

    said “I

    Can't make the grade.”

    She took me to her elfin grot,
    And told me as she wept ful:
    sore,
    “Six boilers some girls made last
    year,
    But I made four.”

    And there she whispered me
    asleep,
    And there I dreamed— Woebetide,
    A girl who can’t make boilers six
    Can't be a bride.

    And there I saw pale commissars
    Who cried “No use to make a
    fuss,”
    Who cried “La Belle Dame Sans
    Output
    Must come with us.”

    And this is why I sojourn here,
    Alone and palely loitering;
    ice | never-ending belts are
    stil
    And no wheels sing.

    Cold War

    “On April 25, when several
    degrees of frost were regis-
    tered in Britain, the tempera-
    ture in Moscow was over 70
    degrees.”—From the news.

    OR the information of Sir

    Waldron Smithers this is only

    the first indication of a gigantic
    Russian plot to transfer their
    weather over here,

    When they talk about a cold
    war they mean a cold war.

    Russian scientists have not only
    discovered how to by-pass the
    east wind round Moscow and
    Leningrad so that it hits us with
    greater velocity; they have also
    harnessed millions of whales to
    drag icebergs towards the British
    Isles, leaving their northern ports
    ice free,

    lf Sir Waldron doesn’t believe
    me, what about the 100 refugee
    Whales who committed suicide on
    a Scottish coast rather than live
    a life of slavery?

    And what about the polar bear,

    suffering from sunstroke, who]}

    piloted his own aircraft through
    the Iron Curtain and crash landed
    at London Airport?

    It's no use semi-official circles
    saying he’s in love with Brumas’s
    mother. Will M.I.5 deny that he
    has given valuable information?

    If they don’t want to look silly,
    they'd better not.

    World Snoopery

    eager search for useless in-

    formation have become world {
    }

    diseases of the mind.

    in Czechoslovakia people who
    eollect the wrong stamps are
    denounced by snoopers to the
    secret police ... Indian students
    are taking a census of maneless
    lions ... after years of research
    snoopers in Japan have reported

    that 27 per cent. of Japanese ])

    husbands still yell “Oi, Oi” to call
    their wives .. . chaps in England

    with nothing else to do have dis-})

    covered that we strike 270,000,000
    matches every day. .

    The ‘Tavistock Institute of })

    Human Relations has found out

    that most men say “Good morn- {

    ing” to most people living in the
    same street; that the curtains in
    the front rooms of the under-
    privileged are left half drawn with
    the patterns facing outwards .. .
    thank heaven a census official in



    ou

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    PAGE ELEVEN



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    PAGE SIX





    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    THE REPERTORY THEATRE

    IN BRITAIN

    Hy J. Clifford King


























    A REPERTORY theatre is one ance of ch experiments for lor
    in which there is a nanet i tiences iking le
    company of professional act L iccesst L unite
    putting on a season of plays which desire ywrights
    are changed at three-weekly, even local one : write the
    fortnightly or even weekly inter- work for the Londor age tr
    vals. In Britain such theatres hich the Di return wo
    are very largely provincial insti- naturally
    tutfons. In 1911 t iverpool Repertor

    The earliest repertory theatre Theatre, the Pi 10Use, v open
    in Britain was esta hed at ed and—the ori Manchest
    Manchester in the early years of venture having failed is tod
    this century under the direction of the oldest repertory theatre in the
    Miss Horniman who interested country, entirely self-supporting,
    herself from the first in develop- a part of the city’s cultural lit
    ing a régional theatre by foster- and, with the Birmingham
    ing the work of local playwright Repertory Theatre the second
    Since those early days other oldest the f nursery f
    repertory theatres, in various actors we h ive_in Britain. Ti
    parts of the country, have pursu years immediaiely before the wat
    the samé aim with varying results, saw the establishment of fiourish-
    the most recent and highly the: s of this kind in many
    cessful example of this bein ef cur e towns and their pro
    emergence. of a school of play- « uctions, particularly “the experi-
    wrights “fround two Glasgow mental work at the Cambridge
    theatres Two considerations, Arts Theatre, often aroused ex-
    however, have tended in the past cited interest far outside local
    to mitigaté against the continu- circle

    FREQUENT CHANGES of plays entails much work besides

    rehearsing. Here the Midland Theatre Company
    scenery for a new production.

    is painting



    -
    “

    ee

    Norman and Florence Daysh

    Towards the end of the war, and
    since, what has been called an up-
    roarious -interest in the theaire
    was manifested by all sections ot
    the population and led to an im-
    mense and extraordinarily sudden
    growth of the repertory movement
    ir the provinces. TBjs storm of
    popularity has now perhaps blown
    itself out; but, although the in-
    evitable disasters were to be found
    in its wake; These were surprising-
    ly few in number, The gains re-
    sulting from the re-awakening of
    interest in the theatre were con-
    siderable.

    In much of the
    velopment the Arts
    had a part to play. The Bristol
    Theatre Royal, built in 1766, a
    perfect specimen of English
    Georgian theatre architecture, was
    bought for the citizens of Bristol
    and its ownership vested in a
    Board of Trustees which leased
    the building to the Arts Council
    Restoration of the fabric was
    completed and subsequently, after
    the theatre had been used for a
    time by touring companies, an Olc
    Vie Company took over in 1946,
    presenting plays with the financial
    assistance of the Council. After
    two years, however, this assistance
    was no longer required. Today
    the Bristol Old Vic pays its way
    as Bristol’s other repertory theatre,
    The Little, has been doing for
    many years.

    post-war de
    Council has

    Perhaps more significant than
    the temporary financial aid it gives
    to new ventures, has been the Arts
    Council’s direct management of
    such companies as the Salisbury
    Arts Theatre which also. tours tha
    neighbouring district continually,
    playing one to three nights in
    small, theatreless towns which, but
    for the Council's enterprise, would
    never have seen a live show,



    IN BRITAIN, Repertory Theatres are lagrely
    Midland Theatre Company during rehearsal.



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    provincial institutions,

    |

    The scene here shows the





    in “Rebecca”
    Life for the West of England

    Theatre Company has been even
    more strenuous. Based in Es
    it has played “one night stands”
    in a large number of the small
    West Country towns and villages.
    Perforce, the company’s produc-
    lions, although excellent in their
    way, are of the “fit-up” variety;
    but, in their repertory, they have
    been able to include plays by
    Shakespeare as well as other clas-
    sics. This was an admirably cour-
    ageous venture, started by mem-
    bers of the company with their
    own savings but now, happily, re-
    ceiving the Arts Council’s financial
    help.



    The extension ot public support
    in the form of grants and guaran-
    lees against loss has been an im-
    portant feature of this post-war
    development of the provincial
    theatre. The Local Government
    Act, 1948, empowers local authort-
    ties to levy up to a sixpenny rate
    for the provision of live entertain-
    ment and there are signs that local
    authorities are increasingly under-
    taking responsibility for, amongst
    other things, the setting up of
    Civic repertory theatres. Maccles-
    field, a small town in Cheshire, to
    take a single pioneering example
    of what is being done in this direc-
    tion, has recently opened such a
    Civic Theatre in conjunction with
    the Adelphi Theatre Guild, a com-
    pany which can already claim to
    nave mounted a very creditable
    list of productions. Similar under-
    takings have been started in Don-
    caster, Manchester, Nottingham
    and elsewhere,

    A consistent attempt is made by
    many of the non-commercial, re-
    pertory companies to build up and
    keep in touch with their audiences.
    Audience Clubs are started ‘at
    which lectures are given which
    encourage people to take an intel-
    ligent interest in the plays they
    see, there are play readings and
    club rooms, often attached to the
    theatres, usefully fulfilling a social
    neea,

    Even with the purely commer-
    cial twice nightly repertory com-
    ponies which, since the war, have
    established themselves in the
    smaller industrial towns and in

    ‘aside resorts, and which are
    criticised from practically every
    point of view, sampling their per-
    formances does suggest that they
    ere doing much better work than
    is generally realised. Two things
    are significant about these com-
    panies: the enormous increase in
    their numbers and the immeas
    urably better choice of plays
    ‘which reflects the improvement in
    public taste





    The repertory theatres are Uh-
    questionably Britain's largest em-
    ployers of actors and actresses,
    From Drama Schools every year
    the new, young players emerge to
    take their chances in the most
    hazardous of the professions. Most
    hope to see their names in lights

    utside a West End theatre; but
    fow succeed until their work on
    the stage has been seen by a West
    End manager

    The twice cy »nce nightly re-
    pertory companies are able to ab-
    sorb some of the surplus labour;
    but, from the actors’ point of view,

    little more can be said for them }

    than that. The better repertory
    theatres, however, do serve as
    really valuable training ground. A

    ,young actor in such a theatre will

    be tested in a vast variety of parts,
    large and small; he will have t¢



    ¥ PROPS P OOO SES SS SSOFP OOF PO PLEPESPOP SPS PPFPOOSRS.

    . ss
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    + ‘
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    OLE LLL AEP SS PO



    Agents for Barbados GENERAL AGENCY CO., (Barbados) Ltd.

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    act rts he could never have «é _
    imagined himself playing. In this $28 For Kiss

    in time, he should be able to

    way â„¢
    discover his natural bent, learn beet’ Snaaeaes . LONDON.
    about his limitations and, with the t co udley Cecil Nott of

    often selfless help of the theatre’s Wallington, Surrey exactly $28 to

    i 0 m acti “kiss and embrace” his girl friend |
    director, develop his own acting aan i |
    personality. A repertory theatre On his return from abroad. é
    like the Bristol Old Vic has its The trouble was Nott did hi

    smooching while driving a car.

    acting school and most of the
    own acting school a The sieneie dase: deltees

    larger. theatres take pupils, many
    of tvhom will already have had
    dramatic training.

    . When an actor has graduated to

    explained “it was a cold night
    and one thing led to another.”

    ene of these larger theatres, a -~I,N.S.
    future in the West End, if he de-

    sires it, is practically assured. It 36 Vs I

    is no exaggeration to say that of

    the highest paid West End actors WOLVERHAMPTON.

    at present appearing, by far the Long odds caused a 14-year-old
    largest proportion has come from Wolverhampton boy to skip|
    tre provincial repertory theatres— cchool. |
    mcst, indeed, from Liverpool or He told Wolverhampton Juvenile

    Pirmingham.
    tending school because the othe:
    boys in the class stopped him
    from playing games and “were
    always on to me.”

    WORLD’S ONE HOPE
    LAKE SUCCESS, May 12.

    Mrs. Roosevelt expressed hope The chairman, Dr. Margaret
    that Mr. Trygve Lie’s visit to Mackay, asked him if he could
    Moscow might bring about at least box.

    some new suggestions for bridging
    the East-West gap.—Reuter.

    “Not 36 of them,” was the boy’s
    reply.—LN.S.

    Lo.
    a.
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    did not deny the allegations but |

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    PAGE SIXTEEN

    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950
































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    Democracy
    Stressed

    AT LIBERTY CONGRESS

    HAVANA, May 1%.

    The Inter-American Confer-
    ence tor Democracy and Freedom
    opened here last night at the
    National Capitol wiin Senator

    Miguel Suarez, Fernandez, Presi-
    dent of the Cuban Congress, wel-
    coming approximately 200 dele-
    gates from American Republics
    and Puerto Rico.

    The conterence is seeking first:
    To find means to strengthen
    democracy in the Americas. Sec-
    ond; To obtain co-operation of the
    continent for world peace. And
    Third: To establish a permanent
    organisation to galvanise de-
    mocratic peoples to a degree
    wherein they are ready to defend
    democracy, even at the cost of life,
    against all dangers.

    Frances Grant, Chairman of
    the Latin-American section of the
    International League for the
    Rights of Man, said “the Declara-
    tion of Human Rights should be-
    come not a document in the ar-
    chives of nations, but a reality,
    and a staff of life for every man
    and woman in this hemisphere.

    “Millions of fellow Americans
    are unable to speak in their own
    defence because civil and politi-
    cal liberties are suppressed in an
    alarming number of American
    countries.

    It is to heartén these inarticu-
    late Americans that we meet here
    to form a hemispheric front for
    democracy and liberty.”

    The session was closed 1.30 a.m,
    by Lazo Havan, University Pro-
    fessor who said that the ideals of
    the conference were already
    rooted in millions of hearts there-
    fore he was confident that the
    meeting would progress in the
    defence of democracy, —Reuter

    US Has Baby
    Atom Bomb

    WASHINGTON, May 13.

    The United States has preduced
    “baby” atomic bombs — small
    enough to be carried by jet planes,
    officials said to-night.

    The officials said that the small
    size of the bombs did not mean
    that they were less powerful ‘than
    full-sized bombs,

    The officials gave no indication
    how powerful that “baby A-
    bomb" could be, but the report
    prompted speculation that it might
    be more powerful than the early
    model atomic bombs dropped on
    Japan or tested at Bikini.

    It was reported that the secret
    of the new bombs lay in a non-
    explosive casing or envelope—
    called a “tamper” which enabled
    a reduction in the “critical size”
    of the bomb.

    The critical size of an atomic
    bomb is defined as the amount of
    fissionable material, such as Uran.
    ium 235 or Plutonium, which must
    be assembled in order to. produce
    an explosion,

    —Reuter.

    . They'll Do It Every Time




    WILBUR, OL’ BOY
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    = Wow!)



    _J_-). MUST HAVE MADE
    A BUNDLE, YOUR-

    Plentiful
    Yesterday

    FRUIT sellers yesterday made a
    good trade in the city area. Water
    coconuts were very plentiful, es-
    pecially in the Probyn Street area,
    and quick sales were being made
    because of the great heat.

    Oranges, limes, and mangoes
    could be seen in every stall, and
    there was the constant call of these
    sellers to the numerous buyers.
    The supply of mangoes which are
    imported are becoming ve ry
    abundant, and are being sold at a
    low price.

    In and around Busbey’s Alley,
    fruit such as pineapples, bananas,
    papaws, sweet sops, and mammy-
    apples, were being quickly pur-
    chased. Several children were
    seen purchasing cashews and
    sapodillas, which come from the
    country districts.

    Vegetables, especially carrots
    and cabbages were plentiful and
    housewives were seen gathering a
    supply of these. Tomatoes are
    quickly getting out of season while
    plantains are a bit scarce.



    Frantic Search
    For Lord Mildway

    Britain's Jockey Peer

    PLYMOUTH. May 12.
    Police aided by boats were to-
    night ‘searching for Britain's
    premier jockey over hurdles, Lord
    Mildmay, who disappeared today
    after taking his daily swim at the
    mouth of the Yealm River near

    here,
    “Milord”, as he was known to
    thousands of British turf fans,

    went out early this morning from
    his country home at Holbeton for
    nis usual bath from -a- private
    beach at the river mouth.

    Four hours later his clothes were
    found on the beach and a wide-
    spread search was immediately
    started for the 41-year-old peer.

    It is known that at certain stages
    of the tide, the beach from which
    he bathed is dangerous,

    Directly they heard he had dis-
    appeared, the police called in help
    and a fast motor fishing-vessel
    was ordered out to sweep the
    waters at the river mouth.

    A Sea Otter ‘plane and RAF
    launches were also called on, and
    the Plymouth lifeboat went out
    while motor-boats from nearby
    seaside towns also began to scour
    the sea approaches. —Reuter,



    . Polish Diplomats
    Flee Finland

    ; HELSINKI, May 13.

    Two diplomatics in the Polish
    Legation here have flown to
    Sweden with their families after
    refusing to return to Warsaw.

    They are Dr, J. Zeprowski, Cul-
    tural Attache, and Mr. F. Mysz-
    kowski, Vice-Consul.

    Both are believed to be on their
    way to Argentina. —Reuter.

    Registered U6 Pema Ofies











    “jf, FROM THE CHIEF-MOURNER
    LOOK ON WILBUR,I DEDUCE

    THAT HE DIDN'T PLAY HIS
    OWN SELECTION» ++















    rll HANDICAPPER SELDOM
    :| POSITIONS -~s-



    BUENOS AIRES, May 13.
    British conductor Sir Malcolm
    Sargeant, told a Press Conference
    in Buenos Aires this morning that
    he is collecting Uruguayan, Bra~
    zilian and Chilean music during |
    his present tour of those four
    countries in the hope to be able
    to give a concert of South Ameri-
    can music when he returns wo
    Britain.—Reuter.



    —_—

    Action Against 7
    U.S. Oil Companies

    WASHINGTON, May 13.

    The United States Justice De-
    partment to-day announced — a
    major anti-trust court action
    against seven large oil companies.

    The Standard Company and the
    Shell Company were named
    among the defendants.

    Attorney-General Howard



    Me















    on

    SATURDAY, MAY 27th,
    9 p.m.





    Music by
    ARNOLD MEANWELL’S
    ORCHESTRA

    Particulars of Floor Show
    later.

    Admission to Ballroom 2/-

    PROCEEDS FOR CHARITY
    14.5.50.—1n,



    ——

    AT THE DRILL

    In Aid of the Barbados

    Rifle Association’s
    BISLEY FUND

    On TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1950 §)' |
    at 9 p.m.

    )
    )
    HALL



    4
    Grath said he had filed a civil he ‘Police Band conducte4
    action in the Los Angeles Federal e ae Cant. Balaon. wisi pro-
    District Court, charging the com- vide the Music
    panies with anti-Trust Law viola- cer aeey
    tions “in the production, transport- There will be a well stocked )
    ation, refining and marketing of BAR & REFRESHMENTS }\\|\
    crude oil and refined petroleum on sale, _ }
    products in the Pacific States Loy ae
    Area”. —Reuter.)}) ADMISSION:
    ; (By Ticket only) 3/-
    Dress Formal
    ee
    AIDS LLLP

    As British Spy

    BERLIN, May 13.
    East German police have ar-
    rested Kurt Mueller, Deputy
    Chief of West German Commun-
    ist party, East German Minisury
    for State Security announced to-
    day.

    he was an agent of a foreign
    power and guilty of other criminal
    offences,” the announcement said.
    No details were given of where
    Mueller was arrested. The West
    German Communist party yester-
    day announced the expulsion of

    Mueller Arrested |
    “Mueller was arrested :
    |

    Mueller from the party for al-
    leged spying for a foreign power,
    later named by Communist Par-
    liamentary leader Heinz Reiner
    as Britain.

    Reports yesterday said that
    Mueller thhad disajspeqred from

    his home in Hanover.—Reuter



    The Weather
    TODAY

    Sun Rises: 5.39 a.m.
    Sun Sets; 6.13 p.m.
    Moon (New) May 16
    Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

    i

    High Water: 1.47 a.n., 2.26
    p.m.

    YESTERDAY
    Rainfall (Codrington) nil.
    Total for month to Yoster-

    day: .92 ins.
    Temperature (Min.) 7.35° F
    Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E
    (11 a.m.) E,
    Wind Velocity 8 miles per
    hour.
    Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.938

    (11 a.m.) 29.925.
    Gittens 11.45





    By Jimmy Hatlo:
    Y wisur is A GREAT
    YM SLY RIGHT Now, BUTS|

    WATT “TILL HE TRIES |;

    TO BORROW LUNCH















    UTNUKE A sone -
    WRITER, THE OFFICE |.

    PLAYS HIS OWN COM-









    BOXING !!

    — at the —
    YANKEE STADIUM Brittons Hill,
    »! ok

    TUESDAY NIGHT JUNE 6TH
    At 8.30 p.m,
    GRAND INTERCOLONIAL MID-
    DLE WEIGHT CONTEST
    j
    K'â„¢D RALPH
    The Market Mat'cr

    vs
    FIGHTING BAILEY

    Terror of the Roped Square
    Trinidad

    10 ROUNDS 10

    of

    THE MAULER
    vs

    SUGAR RAY ROBINSON
    8 ROUNDS 8

    SENSATIONAL PRELIMINARY
    6 ROUNDS 6

    — ADMISSION —
    RINGSIDE $2.00; OUTER RING-
    SIDE $1.50; BALCONY $1.50;

    CAGE $1.00; BLEACHERS 48

    Cc. B. LAYNE and
    KEITH CHANDLER

    Promoters

    SHOP FOR:-
    SPUNS
    GEORGETTES
    CREPE

    DE CHINE
    TAFETTAS
    JERSEYS
    SHANTUNGS

    LINENS
    ETC. ETC. ETC.

    THANT'S

    Pr. Wm. Henry & Swan
    Streets



    Wour Passport







    to that |
    7. Perfect
    = | ppearance

    is a Suit Tailored |
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    Only the Finest
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    LET US FIT YOU
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    P. C. §. MAFFEI
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    “Top Scorers in |
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    WHICH CAN BE MADE
    SUITS FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN

    Can Be

    Te-MORKOW. Stent HAIR CORDS
    Gk ee ad gneinnntes aS ae 2/- Tuis newly erected modern hotcl is situated ws we
    the British Food Fair at Olympia. Music by a anes Meanwelt's . most picturesque part of the island. and
    ‘ "i Guest Stars at Intermiss
    x a : 9 " ne . on » ; -_ ~ *, som , ro
    ae. oF emia deetigs Sep- 12 Themen, Qrenehe. gy TELEPUONE 95276 FOR KESERVATIONS {
    . It will te used’ by the Central Posen a se ton aa Rooms with or without private bath ete. We speciaioe PRINTS oi ee
    ituaiest ™ tes by nae she ALL ARE INVITED. in Fish and Lobster Luncheons. — Well Stocked Bar
    ilbustrate alks )
    Mativigns on the proper selection
    ~ ate bags en Pee of the HONS 99909999 FOOORS, pono Paani Teredo Anti-crease Resist-
    n exact r
    female body, it shows every organ, x SAVANNAH CLUB ot ing Hair Cords in leading
    blood vessel, bone and nerve ana] 4% 4 a A §
    s ce j 1st —_—- HERE IS A NEW PRODUCT FOR EXTERNAL AND
    oe een pongo pd : INTERNAL SURFACES. ‘ | shades of Jade Green, Sal- .
    mga i canee wml OOCKTALL DANCE | agen ge
    An official of the council, who] mon, Beige, Navy, Rose,
    een te ae ied. ee % Cc E M E N T ] Copen, Red, Wine, Srown,
    vensored.” declared: : . sf the
    “If anyone comes along om . in honour of th White. 36 ins.
    dirty mind it is not our fault. TRANQUILLITY TENNIS
    . is nothing dirty about the iu ager aN eee 1.00
    Sama ‘body. % TEAM LIQUID STONE PAINT Per yd $
    see earch work by German] | )RROCKES PRINTS in small designs suitable
    Scientists. % on This Paint may be applied to new or old ager Asbestos fc Ch.'cren’s Dresses and Sun Suits, 36 ins. $ .99
    ; : > 8 ly two such fig-] ¢ ’ Cement, Plaster, Stone, Fibre and Wood; in fact, it goes on and : ; ap
    sia ax eolavinee’ ona Dr Robert] § WEDNESDAY 17th May stays on almost any surface. It will not chip, flake or peel and {K, In large designs (2 only) suitable for Ladies’ House
    Sutherland, medical adviser and & 7I—10 p.m. provides a washable, extremely durable and weather-resisting Coats; 96 ING. sc oo carck Le AS $1.90
    - tary u the council went} ¢ finish which, when dry, is also fireproof
    | Specially to Cologne to negotiate x for x |
    its loan. % > Supplied in Stonewhite, Caen Stone and Mid Blue Green,
    “The figure is made of trans-| \ Members and their » R at $4.88 per gin : roe
    arent plastic material and was) % friends x CAVE HEPHERD & C0 1D
    built i geic an anonymous Ger-} > Special Thinners . at $1.80 per gin. | *9 xt
    man woman acting as model. With} °34449%96G6696S664409008% |}
    turers will be able te 2 4 7
    Gemnoratrate to visitors to the Fair| = , 10, 11, 12 & 1? BROAD STREET
    exactly how infected foods are Phone 4456
    harmful tothe system. one nov) GRAND WHITSUNTIDE
    sorrect foods benefit the ee : , 0 LTD
    FOR the first time in their history, the roads in the Ivy Village, eer FLOOR SHOW & DANCE W ILKINSON & HAYNES ( es {L * |
    just off Government Hill, are getting their names put up. Here é SS FS ——EEeE—E, is one of the first signs. ade es sree er ag = fo cae
    Conductor io eek aes es aN
    1 ° . : AQUATIC CLUB i he rans eel aoe
    ee
    American Fruit S. American Music ee ae

    Finest Quality British

    WOOLLENS :—

    DOESKINS :—
    WORSTEDS :—
    TWEEDS :—
    SERGES :—
    LINENS: -
    DRILLS :—

    INTO TAILORED

    Seen At

    Cc. B. RICE & Co.
    OF
    BCLTON LAINE



    Who

    The search

    PRIZES:
    FIRST PRIZE—The Cow and Gate Silver Challenge Bowl to keep for one (1) year,
    a Silver Cup, and $25.00 in cash, presented by Cow & Gate, L
    SECOND PRIZE—S10.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate, Ltd.

    THIRD PRIZE—S5.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate and (9)
    Souvenir Gifts



    RULES:
    All babies must be under 2 years of age on October Sist, 1950,

    A posteard size photograph of baby must be sent in together with 24 lids from
    tins of Cow & Gate Milk Food.

    Parents agree to abide by the selections of the Special Joimmittee and the
    final judges,

    2

    The twelve (12) leading babies will be selected by a Board of Judges for final jude-
    ing. The names of the selected twelve will appear in the “Sunday Advocate” of

    Ne reraer Sth and the final judging will take place on Saturday, 18th November,
    ono,



    ENTRY FORM

    SSLIE & CO., LTD., Representative COW & GATE LTD.,

    P.O, Box 216, Collins’ Building, Bridgetown.

    J
    I hereby enter my baby for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest, 1950, and enclose
    postcard size picture.
    I certify that 4 yak is a Cow & Gate Baby, and I
    nelose lids taken from lcs bielatal aa Waele aar0 8 RALGT Wy Gags neem ee 6 tins of
    COW & GATE Milk Pood. I agree to abide by the decision of the Special Commit-
    tee and Judges

    Baby's Name

    Born on

    Weight

    at Birth Present Weight. .

    Parents

    Address

    Signature of Parent of Guardian

    Date



    is Barbados’

    Bonniest Baby

    of 19.350?

    for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby of 1950 is

    on, and mothers are invited to enter their babies for
    Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest of 1950. Barbados’
    Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babies and
    this competition is open to all babies fed on Cow &
    Gate Milk Food, the Food of Royal Babies and tne
    Best Milk for Babies when, Natural Feeding fails.



    THE COW & GATE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL

    If you are not yet using Cow & Gate for your Baby, don’t
    delay. Get a tin from your nearest dealer and put baby on
    COW & GATE Milk Food, the Best Milk for babies when
    Natural FeeGing Fails. Cow & Gate Milk Prod is free from
    all disease germs, including tubercle, dipthefia and typhotd.
    Cow & Gate Food is safe because Cow & Gate roller process
    ensures that all disease germs are utterly destroyed whilst
    the essential vitamins and valuable mineral salts which baby
    needs to grow straight bones and develop strong teeth remain
    intact,

    THEY WILL BE WHAT YOU WANT THEM TO BE ON

    Cow & GATE

    THE BEST MILK FOR BABIES WHEN

    MILK
    FOOD

    NATURAL FEEDING FAILS




    PAGE TWO











    CARIBBEAN
    WORKERS’
    UNION



    _ “MAGNIFICENT
    COLD DANISH
    BUFFET SUPPER

    SERVED
    SUNDAY NIGHT

    11 o'clock

    day Night, May 15th
    t 7.30 p.m.



    arpenters—Tuesday
    May
    7 7,30 p.m.

    Ze



    16th, .at









    >

    3. Seamen—Wednesday
    May
    7.30 p.m.

    Night,

    17th at



    E. KINSELL FRANCE,

    From 7 to General Secretary.



















    ROYAL Worthings

    LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY 5 & 8.30

    (By Special Request)

    M-G-M presents —

    THE BARRETTS OF WIMPOLE
    STEEET”

    Starring :
    ma Shearer, Frederick March,
    Charles Laughton, Maureen
    O'Sullivan

    The Picture that created a
    Sensation

    oo
    MON. & TUES. 5 & 8.30
    ROMANCE OF ROSY RIDGE

    with Van JOHNSON,
    Thomas pessredodstonmas

    EMPIRE

    To-day 445 & 8.30 and continuing



    20th Century-Fox presents



    ween = - =



    “FATHER WAS A FULLBACK”

    Starring :
    Fred MacMurray, Maureen O'Hara,

    |

    the war,

    six months

    MEETINGS b nim Greeanill, 0
    Port {Wérkeh—titon. Bheeab” and a happy holidag*in

    SUNDAY ADVOCATE.

    EAWELL yesterday at about
    8 am., was. crowded with
    several pupils from Madame Bro-
    mova's Dancing School, pareats
    ; Of the pupils, Molly Raccliife, he
    new dancing instructress and. her

    husband, and several members of
    the Development and ~ Welfare
    Organisation. *-

    They were gathered together

    to wish Madame
    ausband Mr.
    D. and W's



    sromova and }
    Mark Greenhill
    Secretariat

    er
    of
    Bon

    England.

    The Greenhills first arrives
    Barbados just before the end of
    and Madame Eromova
    started her dancing school about
    after that. Two years
    jater they went to England on
    eight months leave and t!
    returned to Barbados.

    This time they are going to
    England for six. months and it is
    not yet known if they wil! be re-
    turning. Meanwhile the school is
    of Molly

    hen again

    in the capable hands
    Radcliffe.

    There were. tears in Madame’s
    eyes as she kissed each girl good-
    bye. Goodbyes over, they started
    for the plane, and as they passed
    the group of girls, parents’ and
    friends, Capt. Raison called, for
    three cheers for Madame Bromova
    and Mr. Greenhill, which were
    heartily given.

    The Greenhills left for Antigua
    and will be going to Miami via
    Puerto Rico and then by train to
    Washington. There, Mr. Greenhill
    will attend the meeting of the
    Working Committee of the Carib-
    bean Commission, and they leave
    shortly after that for England by
    the “Parthia.”

    England,

    mova’s husband.

    Summer In England
    ON. P. F. CAMPBELL, who
    first arrived in Barbados on
    18th June, 1948, left here yester-
    day by T.C.A., accompanied by
    his wife. ‘
    Mr. Campbell, who has been
    Acting Colonial Secretary since
    Mr. Perowne’s departure is on his
    way to Tanganyika where he will
    take up his new appointment as

    Left By T.C.A.

    R. CHARLES PEIRCE and his

    mother Mrs, Ida Peirce lett
    by T.C.A. yesterday morning. Mr.
    Peirce is on his way to England.
    Mrs. Peirce will be staying in
    Canada,

    Landy’s Brother

    TONI HOME PERM

    Complete Sets and Refills.
    Give yourself that natural look with

    Rudy Vallee, Betty Lynn

    R. LANDY De MONTBRUN
    was at Seawell yesterday
    morning to meet his brother Jose,
    who was an intransit passenger
    by T.C.A. for Trinidad, returning








    TO-DAY to Tuesday 4.45 & 8.15



    aoa by 25 million American M-G-M present : ey trip to Holland and
    omen, rans 5 : ngland,
    “INTRUDER IN THE DUST” While in England, Jose told

    Select yours now from - - -

    THE COSMOPOLITAN

    Carib he saw the*Worcester mate.
    Mr. J. de Montbrun is a keen turf-
    ite of Trinidad.

    Landy also left for Trinidad,

    . Starring :
    David Brian, Claude Jarman, 3r.,
    Juano Hernandez, Porter Hall.

    “ey <



    Assistant Chief Secretary of that

    Colony. j
    Before going to Tanganyika
    however, they plan to spend the

    Summer in England.

    Bought “‘Canefield House”’
    R. CHAS. MERRILL of Souta-
    ampton, Long Island U.S.A.,
    head of the oldest Stock Broking
    firm in New York City, has pur-
    chased “Canefield House,” St.
    Thomas and also its furniture,











    Day Phones 2041—444 Night 81—41 Yesterday afternoon after a Mr, Merrill spent a few weeks
    Fa OLYMPIC successful week of hectic jin Barbados early this year as the
    We ep at 2p ayoneneaeses| LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY entertainment making everyone in guest of Mr. and Mrs. Coe at
    4.30 & B46 Barbados laugh. “Old Trees” St. James.
    Colombia Double—



    “GUNFIGHTERS”

    In case

    you need
    HARNESS

    We can supply

    with
    Randolph Seott, Barbara Britton
    and

    “WALK A CROOKED MILE”

    ——$$——<—<—_——

    MON. & TUES. 6.45 & 8.15
    ist Inst, Columbia Serial

    THE TRON CLAW

    with Charles QUIGLEY,
    Forest TUCKER







    HARNESS LEATHER
    BELLY LEATHER

    BRIDLE LEATHER
    BASIL .
    ROLLER BUCKLES

    and BIRKMYRE CANVAS 3 feet wide

    BIRKMYRE HOOD CLOTH
    6 feet wide

    The Greatest
    CALYPSO SHOW
    ever heard
    in Barbados

    at:

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    \\ i WEDNESDAY NIGHT
    MAY 17TH
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    CS















    ee



    ICE CREAM

    TO YOUR HEART'S
    DELIGHT



    ANY QUANTITY

    HOME MADE QUALITY

    WE OFFER THE

    ICE CREAM FREEZERS

    4 pt. 8 pt. 16 pt.
    IGE PICKS

    FLASKS 1 pt. FLASKS 4 pt.

    mouth

    THE CORNER STORE

    with wide





    GLOBE
    TONITE $.30 and Continuing Daily § and 8.30 pm
    JAMES BARBARA VA VAN
    MASON = STANWYCK GARDNER HEFLIN

    EAST SIDE. WEST SIDE

    +






    AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

    TONIGHT at 8.30 and continuing
    “MY FRIEND IRMA”

    Starring JOHN LUND — DINAN LYNN. — DON DeFORDE
    with MARIE WILSON as Irma and introducing DEAN MARTIN
    and JERRY LEWIS

    A Paramount Picture

    =|

    itt |

    1

    Vee







    PL AZA | Last 2Shows ToDay 5 & 830p.m.

    PARAMOUNT'S CINECOLOR WESTERN ROMANCE!

    “EL PASO’ John Payne—Gail Russel—others

    MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 & 8.30 P.M.
    PARAMOUNT’S GREATEST DOUBLE-BILL

    { THE PALE FACE Min Technicolor‘ Spéed to Spare’

    Bob HOPE -~—- Jane RUSSELL — Richard ARLEN







    GAIETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES

    un 14 — Mon. 15 — 8.30 p.m.
    ‘WARNER BROS” classic — —

    “THE SEA HAWK”

    Starring Errol FLYNN — Brenda MARSHALL — others.
    ROARING WITH ADVENTURE! SIZZLING WITH ACTION!

    Coming: Warner's Double: “It all Came True” & “Hidden Hand.”



    Remember to eee
    “ae i

    JULY Ist

    (Saturday night)

    n oe

    &g:



    Open for the Grand Polo Ball

    and entertainment at the

    MARINE HOTEL

    cA ir
    | Useful Household Items.

    FIBRE MATS



    Si MEMOMCIMONNA 6's OLE aie bine vauie eo be eed $1.87
    BROOMS AND BRUSHES
    PUTING ATOM ry. ieiatk vs s owhalelvele cade .20
    FUNNELS
    With Gauze Wire Strainers .......... .59
    INSECTICIDE SPRAYERS
    Strong, Efficient Type ................ 121
    BONING KNIVES ,............5....00005 76
    | GALVANISED BUCKETS
    watwous Meee Tome sh... ecko wes 89



    Dial 2039

    BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON

    FACTORY LTD.




    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950



    Bs
    5



    MANY of the pupils of Madame Bromova’s Dancing School and their parents were at Seawell
    yesterday to say goodb¥e to Madame Bromova who left for Antigua enroute to the U.S.A. and

    Madame Bromova is seen here signing an autograph album, as several of her pupils look an.
    Also in the picture are Mrs. Vernon Knight, Capt. Raison and Mr. Mark Greenhill, Madame Bro-



    HON, and MRS. P. F. CAMPBELL who left Barbados yesterday
    by T.C.A. are pictured on their way out to the aircraft.

    Encourage Care
    HE annual Cow & Gate Baby
    Contest has once again been
    announced. No doubt mothers are
    busy collecting their tin covers

    and also building up their young @

    ones for the event, Since this
    contest was started two years ago
    it has grown in popularity and
    has done much to encourdge the
    proper care of babies throughout
    the i§land. We should imagine
    that this year’s will draw a more
    ere ec itry still.

    New Manager
    HE new manager of the Wind-
    sor Hotel arrived
    morning by T.C.A. from Montreal,
    He is Mr. Rene Martin. He was
    accompanied by his wile
    children, Billy and Bonnie.

    Mr. Martin has been to the
    Caribbean before, having lived in
    Bermuda and Nassau.

    Mrs.’ Elizabeth Archer, the
    present Manageress, will be leav-
    ing shortly for the United States.

    '

    yesterday |

    and two ;

    Touring The Islands

    R. R, OSBOURNE, a British

    Guianese ‘resident in the
    U.S.A. as a real eState operator,
    arrived in Barbados about a
    month ago for a holiday. He was
    accompanied by his American
    born wife from Brooklyn and they
    are staying at “Leaton-on-Sea”’,
    The Stream.

    Mr. Osbourne who has been re-
    siding in the U.S.A. for the pas¢
    30 years, said that he had just =
    his second yisit to his home
    the first being about 23 years

    His wife and he are meking 2
    tour of the islands in the Carib-
    bean and will be leaving shortly
    for St. Kitts their next stop. They
    expect to return to the US.A.
    sometime in August.

    To. Study. Monotyping
    R. DUNCAN BURKE and
    Mr. “Happy” Brown, two

    employee of the Advocate Com-
    pany , left yesterday eve-
    ning by B.W.I.A. for Trinidad
    where they will take a six months’
    course in Monotyping at thé
    "Port-of-Spain Gazette.”

    A senior linotypist, Mr. Burke
    first joined the staff in March 1929
    and during his 21 years’ service
    was connected with the linotyps
    department, while Mr. Brown, a

    attached. to the job

    ; compnaiiog
    printing department, was a ‘mem-

    ber of the staff for the last 10

    Cleveland W:
    R. CLAUDE TAL-
    BOT, who writes for the
    Cleveland News isin ~ Barbados
    for a few days to write a few
    articles about the “NCA a ar-
    rived yesterday ,by ut ‘a
    touring the islands fi ihe
    bean which the TCA. anes
    stop at, and his ‘Travel Stories’
    are to encourage the people of
    Cleveland to come to Barbados
    and the other W.1., for their
    holidays. He is staying at the
    Ocean View Hotel.

    From North Borneo
    HO should arrive yesterday
    by T.C.A., for a few months
    holiday in Barbados but Mr. and
    Mrs. Edward Plunkett. Mr. Plun-
    kett who is now Deputy Commis-
    sioner of Police in Nerth Borneo
    used to be a Supt. in the Police
    Force here for many years. He
    was also Commissioner of Police
    in St. Lucia, which he left in
    December 1947 for Borneo.

    He knows Dr, Douglas Weather-
    head, a Barbadian who is now
    Director of Medical Services in
    Borneo. Dr. Weatherhead, he said
    begged him to say hello to all of
    his friends here.

    Their trip over to Barbados was
    via Singapore, India, Egypt, Rome,
    Lisbon and Bermuda. In Bermuda,
    they met Mr. and Mrs. Max
    Parker also of Barbados, and had
    dinner with them on Friday night.

    Mrs. Plunkett is the former
    Miss Lucille Mourraille, a sister
    of Mrs. C. B. Sisnett and Mrs.
    Betty Press.

    ; years.



    MR. and MRS. EDWARD PLUNKETT





    BY THE WAY By Beachcomber

    From sun and wind his face
    was red,

    His mother and his aunt were
    dead.

    His father was a sturdy wight

    Who worked from morning until
    night.

    (Wordsworth. )
    HY on earth should I be
    the only writer to keep
    silent amid the present Words-
    worth uproar?

    The above fragment, found
    behind a stove-pipe in a cottage
    near Kendal, is said by experts
    to belong to the Allan Bank
    period, just previous to the two
    years at Bootle Rectory and the
    reconciliation with Coleridge,
    (See “Lines Composed While the
    Author was Engaged Upon a
    Tract Occasioned by a Celebrated

    Event in Connection with Henry

    Fellowes.”’)

    Polish Up Your Listening
    AM told that the B.B.C. has
    devised an entertainment

    which will teach people how to

    listen, I hope there will be
    enough employees to keep a sharp
    eye on households suspected of
    inattention or of any other form
    of culpable laxity in listening.
    Later on, perhaps, a special -corps.
    of radio police could be formed,
    to report anybody who listens in
    the wrong way, or is slack about
    regular listening, As for those
    who never listen at all, they
    should be medically examined and
    then segregated. We cannot afford
    anti-social irflusnces of this sort.

    Wera at Snigglefield
    ‘ime formidable Elfrida

    Thawcker next approached
    a middle-aged draper, who sang
    “Ship mates o’ Mine” at village
    concerts, “Opera?” he said in an
    amazed voice. “Goo’ lor! You
    mean here? In’ the village.” “Why
    not?” asked the Thwacker. “War-
    gener?” asked the draper. “Not
    at first,” said Elfrida. “Can’t sing
    foreign songs,” said: the draper.
    “We shall sing English words,”
    replied Elfrida. Foreign choons?”

    THE AMERICAN...

    <“BESTFOR
    Brassieres & Girdles

    bis AT ple

    EVANS ano -WHITFIELDS

    BROAD STREET



    “Naturally,” barked _ -Elfrida,
    “Dressin’ up?” asked the coones.
    “Of course.” The draper be;

    see himself in a helmet, wi re
    spear in his hand. “Who writes
    the operas?” he inquired, “They
    were all written long ago,” said
    Mrs, Thwacker. “You must mans
    heard of Puccini and ae

    at the ground.

    operas?” he asked. “We do. The
    singers, of course.” “Singing and
    acting at the same time? Same
    people?” ctr oe “Goo’ lor!”
    said the draper, “Pusheeny, What
    next?”

    Nothing To Do With Me

    Beating time with his arms, he
    held the bow betwéen.his toes and
    played a violin laid against his
    other leg.

    (News Item.)
    DON’T see what was to stop
    him, as the fool said when
    he saw an octopus playing the
    bagpipes.



    ‘
    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950









    CHAMPIONS CANTER HOME

    ear

    ee

    Triple Tie In
    Errol Flynn
    Cup Race

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    KINGSTON, May 9.
    Three Rio Grande raftsme:
    pulled to a triple tie in the second
    renewal of the Errol Flynn Ghal-
    longs Dp raft race down the
    scenic tourist water playground in
    Portland on Sunday, smashing the
    1948. record of 93..minutes. with
    splendid 85 minute run down. the
    Rio Grande on a six miles journey
    from Berrydale to Burlington.
    The vaft race was specially spon -
    sored by Movie Actor Errol Flynn
    owner of Navy Island, an islet of
    Port Antonio, on Jamaiea’s north-
    coast, who with his fiancee, Prin-
    cess Ghiea, are now holidaying: in
    Jamaica, Prizes were distributec|
    by the actor, while Princess Ghic:
    was a passenger on’one of the win-
    ning bamboo craft

    Rafting on tne Rio Grande, one
    of Jamaica’s largest rivers, which
    runs through a beautiful valley
    and gorge, has always been an at -
    traction to tourists in Jamaica, and
    became even more popular. when
    the movie actor came to Jamaica
    some years ago, bought Navy
    Island and other property and or-
    ganised races for a cup he.donated
    and money prizes donated by the
    Richfield Hotel,







    CHAMPION SPRINTER Aber-
    nant puts his heart into the job
    as he carries champion Gordon
    Kichards to his 4,000th victory at
    Sandown.

    Barbados Friendly
    Football Association

    THIS WEEK’S FIXTURES :



















    esday 16th—St. Mary's OldsBoys vy
    liffé at St. Leonard's, Referee; Mr.
    ‘ce, Maple vs, St. Maithews Old
    B at Shell Referee Mr. E, Clarke
    rose vs, National at the Bay, Referee
    M Archer
    \ esday T7th—Rangers vs, Westetr
    e Shel Referee: Mr, O, Graham
    L » vs. Advpcate ateSt. Leonards
    £ - Ee fony) Hinds. Colts
    v Club at the Bay. Ref
    € d Ver
    ~ Phursday MBth--Reeds United vs. st
    Mary's Old Boys at St. Leonards, Ref-
    eree: Mr, C. Jemmoit, St. Matthews -Old
    Boys vs. Colts at Shell. Referee; Mr. E
    Reece
    Friday 19th--Penrode vs. Berwick at St
    Leonard's 2 : Mr E. Clarke
    Nat r at the Bay, Referee
    Mr. B. ¢

    Saturday



    Maple \

    Referee; Mr. J

    Old Boys vs. St. Mary
    Bay Referee Mr. B



    Baseball Results

    NEW YORK, May 13

    Results of Major League Base-
    ball games played yesterday were
    American League:—Cleveland In-
    dians 5,,Chicago White Sox. 1;
    New York Wankees 3, Philadel-
    phia Athletics 2; Washington Sen-
    ators.1, Boston Red Sox 3.
    National League:—St, Louis Car-

    dinals 1, Cineinnatti Reds 3; Pitts -

    burgh Pirates 3, Chicago Cubs 6

    The Amateur Athletic Association
    Of Barbados

    Presents its Big Intercolonial Cycle
    Meeting

    WHIT-MONDAY. MAY
    THURSDAY, JUNE

    ON

    and Athletic

    Sports

    29 &
    1

    AT KENSINGTON OVAL

    Under the distinguished patr > of
    HIS EXCELLENCY, THE GOVERNOR. MRA W_L, SAVAGE

    Mrs. Weiss”
    Meets Defeat

    —AFTER ROUND OF
    VICTORIES

    LONDON, May 13.

    Mrs. Maria Weiss of Argentine,

    was beaten in the final of the wo-

    men’s singles at the Hurlingham
    Tennis Tournament
    to-day, Mrs. Dorothy Head of the
    United States, taking the honours

    Open Lawn

    by 3—6, 6—3, 7—5.

    This was Mrs. Head's first Bu-
    the
    strength of her forceful game was
    tested to the utmost by the firm
    play of the Argentine player who
    showed good control, and main-

    driving

    ropean Tournament = and

    tained
    length,

    an immaculate

    It was not until the second set
    the powerful shots. of -the
    American began to tell, and she

    that

    won that set comfortably
    At one time in the third set, it

    looked as though the American's

    game had been beaten by. Mrs.
    Weiss display, but eventually Mrs,
    Head proved her sufriority with
    a series of good winning strokes
    —Reuter.

    MAXIM K.O'S PETERSEN
    MEMPHIS, Tennessee, May 13
    Joey Maxim, the world

    heavyweight champion,

    out Bill Petersen of

    Oregon, (heavyweight) in

    sixth round of a ten-round

    title bout here last night.

    Maxim weighed 13 st., 5 Jbs.:



    non-

    Petersen 14 st., 13 lbs.—Reuterf#°Ur.

    3ST0699950%".
    WE ARE OFFERING.~.., »-

    HILL'S BADMINTON



    PISSVSS



    SMOKING MIXTURE

    AT REDUCED PRICE

    light
    knocker
    Portland
    the

    “ SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    Some Young Players

    To Wateh This Summer
    By Peter Ditteiw

    The MCC, that austere body

    has. in the past week, endeared itself to followers of the
    game by its praiseworthy action in giving an opportunity

    to youth,

    Alfas Snatch
    Grand Prix
    Honours

    FANGIO LOSES BY
    IL LUCK

    SILVERSTONE, May 1%
    Sheer i luck robbed Juan Man-
    uct Fangio, the erack Argentii«
    driver of finishing first or at least
    dag a high place in the Grand
    Prix of Europe which was ru
    ver about 210. miles, op the Si!
    Stone circuit here ta-day
    Right on the tail of the-ewetua
    winner. Guseuppe Farina, wit
    cnly, 24 miles to go. his Alfa
    Romeo ear broke an oil pipe, and
    he eaulied into the - pif with the
    body covered.jn oil, and the engine
    bclehing, smoke. be paises
    Fang'@, who was in-the position
    to jump to the fropt in the. ast
    few Japs, gvas greatlysupse! at
    having to netive,.and. the Took of
    disappointment +on Ris face’ said
    tuch more than words could hav»



    one. =
    Fangie..bad given the crowd
    timated to “be _15,000 many

    thrilg with Jb‘s skilful and daring
    driving. On the corners, he often
    left.the spectators amazed by the

    y he.slid his ear round with
    a ceo'ness that is rarely seen in
    such big races,

    Alfas Lead

    The AMaeRomeo team by virtue
    of the best: practice times, made
    up the first row at the starting
    line today, and .right from the
    flag they swept into. the lead and
    never dropped back then, barring
    accidents.

    The four Alfas raced alone ia
    a group, fighting out the lead
    between themselves, for Farina to
    finish first, Luigi Fagioli second,
    and Reg Parnell third.

    Times were 2 hrs. 13 mins, 23
    secs,

    The three Alfa-Romeo_ cars
    which finished were the only
    machines to cover the complete
    70 laps. anit

    In fourth and fifth positions
    came two French four and a half
    litre Talbots which ran the course
    without refuelling but completed
    only 68 laps.

    The Alfas had to refuel once,
    but--they--did-this—at-sueh- speed
    (Fangio completed his in 25
    seconds) that the time lost did
    not matter.

    No Real Race



    The biggést crowd ever to

    attend a motor race in
    saw a fine spectacle but no real
    road race. The four Italhan cars—
    the most modern designs entered
    —literally led a procession from
    the start to finish.

    Before the race started, the
    drivers were introduced to Their
    Majesties. the. King and Queen
    and Princess Margaret. It was the
    first time that a reigning monarch
    of England had attended a motor
    race.

    His Majesty on being introduced
    to Fangio, asked “Do you speak
    English?” and Fangio shook his
    head with a smile. Signor Alessio
    Meneral, manager of the Alfa
    Romeos acted as interpreter.

    “The King said he knew our
    team had all made the fastest laps
    and therefore we start in the first
    four positions,” he said, after-
    wards.

    1 The fast lap in the race itself
    ;was made by Farina with 1 min,
    50.6 sees. for the three miles, an
    average speed of 94.02 miles per





    THE

    MICHELIN
    Zk
    TYRE

    Britain?"



    LONDON.
    which governs English cricket,

    This may be England's big
    season in internalionas cocker.
    Lhe YOngs prsyetS Wh Gagavod
    during tne war ana were Carb

    .raignt into the first team. when

    County erickel was resumed ia
    '94i have now ,ad the necessary
    ume to mature, It remains to be
    wnetner they justly tuem-

    seives ama follow in ,... «
    Or AGE fe cGby S25,
    wooley, Leylsma, c.uicies, owes
    and thelr like.

    ic has, been particularly en-
    (ouragiag to see, the lead com-

    from the M,C.C. In their two
    iatcnes against Yorkshire and
    surrey. they gave a chance to
    uch up.aad eoming young play-
    is as Fred Titmus, of Miaclesex,
    vob Clarke of Northamptonshire,
    » werry. of Lancashire, and
    Shackleton oj, Hampshire.

    It is all, well and for in-
    uividual ceynties to ver and
    «coach young players, but the
    young cricketer — unless he be
    a ther Compton or Bra..man—
    vanot get the necessary “big
    match” atm ere from oc-
    casional appearances in county
    ercket. Not until he is hoyour-
    ed by selection for « representa-
    tive match—such as these MCC
    s2mes—can his ability to rise to
















    the occasion really be de-

    term’ ned.

    laeve have veen many cases 1n
    We past, ana tnere wit propably

    be as many in the future, where
    young players have been grame
    uw trial by a county. In the nets
    chey have bowled unplayable balls
    and produced strikes straight from
    the text book. But out in the
    field of play they have become a
    bag of nerves and completely uo
    able to justify themselves. For
    such players little can be ,done
    But correspondingly there are
    others who can always produce
    that Jittle extra when the occasion
    demands, and it is for players of
    this calibre that the MCC are now
    searching,

    Much has already been written
    about. the taecties the England
    Selectors sheuld adopt this, sum-
    mer. when they come to. choose the
    team. to play in the five-day Tests
    against the West Indies. One
    school of. thought argues that the
    “ames should serye simply as trials
    for the forthcoming MCC visit to
    Australia. Others feel that the
    West Indies should only be cp-
    posed by the best eleven England
    can find. in the field,

    Sufficient to say that when

    the time for the first, Test dawns
    the Selectors will. probably find
    that even their best eleven will
    have all their work cut out to
    prevent the West Indies record-
    ing their first ever victory in
    this enuntry.
    Nevertheless the Englatd teem
    does not pick itself automatically.
    Players like Compton, Hutton,
    Washbrook, Bedser, Bailey and
    Evans ure more or less assured of
    their places but that still leaves
    five vacancies to be filled. It
    would be no, slur on_ our West
    Indian visitors if these places were
    filed by young players, not. cx-
    perimentally but on performan:e,
    For the .sad truth of the matter
    is that England, to date, has not
    got eleven players of recognised
    Test standard,

    If, for instance, Bob Clarke o:
    Northants should have a_ good
    start to the season he should be
    rewarded with an England cap.
    Goodness knows, we have ware
    long enough for a genuine fast
    left arm powler, But it would be
    folly to play Clarke simply on the
    strength of what he might do
    The same applies to any of the
    other youngsters whom the MCC
    have so opportunely encouraged

    a







    PAGE FIVE







    MAY P — NO. 119 | OFFICIAL CLASSIFICATION
    The Topic

    MID-SUMMER MEETING 1950

    of





    ws A. 1 D. 1 F.2 (contd)
    Last Week Beacon Bright Coronado Perseverance
    3lue Strea) iren
    , Blue Streak Firemi Pharos II
    ~. Don Arturo
    ~— Drake’s Drum D 2 Phoney Lad
    Elizabethan Riptide
    Gun Site Riv
    snk 4 iver Midst
    Pepper Wine Ratlle Star a fids
    Seawell ' ae sent Sinbad
    Storm’s Gift Lancy, Teas Sir Bernard
    Sweeper
    Soprano
    °
    A. %, F. 1. Stralght’ Alri
    Sunbeam
    Atomic II : .
    Slainte Ali Baba Sunfire
    The Gambler Kendal Po The Eagle
    Oatcake i
    Wellington ornada
    BI Uusher
    Boys samething happened Frida j . Vangue
    A youns gitl.cried “oh hell ! Lady Pink gE. 2. : iguatd
    Come Joe ering Rovert with you September Son Waterbell
    Mr, Mottley in the cell Battalion
    We ran across the swing bridge BR. 2 Comet G1
    Spointing the hundred yards, ° Dulecibella —-
    fren Lou Joined an the marathon ‘:
    Till we all reached the Main Guard - suntone .
    : Corfu Watercres Betsam
    Joe turned and said, what happer Jatania alle
    Boiher Motts tells us right now : tsi ; Minyette
    Bo. Mottiey said, “Keep quiet NEUSOH re. 1 Monsoon
    Li me solve this ‘hawkers’ row Landmark ; ite pl
    . . Sy Silk n
    One Ume we had a market Perlect Set > Bells in it
    With a temperature like hell Rebate Bow, Bells Tango
    So all the hawkers walked out > . 4 Bowmanston oo °
    And in Broad Street they now dweil Silver Bullet e . T'yhpoon

    War Lord Count Cain



    Now the police. on the right side Joint Commani Vietory
    Ask therm all to walk along, 7 4 Vixen
    So the hawkers then told Mottley c. 1, Lazy Bone
    Cause they can’t be wrong.and strong Postscript
    Well we three were much delighted s
    Just to get the right-of-way" Beaullls F,) 2. G, 2.
    Cause if Mottley was a prisoner Fabulous
    It would be an awful day Fanny Adams
    . " . “14 ei Apollo bh Diamo
    Now we ask why Mr. Mottley Flieuxce i AP iota autre
    Lust escort them for this walk Leaging Article Ap Tower Brahmin’s Choice
    All the other. politicians ‘4 Racton Best Wishes Chindl
    Gone to join the Sugar Talk sertariouk Bonnie Lass undit
    Talk to-day of Mr, Mottley Swiss Roll Brown Girl Diana
    Join the others careless chat ' £ . 3 seve ‘ing A
    But be sure when you're intraubl Southern Cro Bull eye Flying Ann
    He's the one to “bell the cat.’ Sin Queen clone Joan’s Star
    ® * ‘ Tiberit Ade Clementina :
    Now poor Joe didn't know no better Miberian Lady Colleton h Lucky Shot
    Went alone to see the play Winter Belle : . iat
    he Kmpire Theatre Consternation Maytirne
    was’ “Rebecca” by the way o% Cross Bow Mopsy
    One of those loud “talkie” women wae Cross Roads Otcedol
    Who adore. in neo Dunese
    Shouted out “Joe got becca ili epic
    Lou must know this; she's his wife Ability Epicure
    : ‘ . . Dainty Bess Facetiou
    doe decide and sUmmoned courage Fai Sontest Flame Flower
    Took Lou to, Rebecca's, house ide F . ' " . : +
    But a nice vase dropped and broke up ad Oxglove
    Made Lou frightened as a mouse Kitchen Front Goblin
    e > * ; a Pa
    Then the neighbours round the mansion Link Stream Hi-Lo Classifiers!
    Listened in to all this mess Marine Light Joan of Are hy o
    “Till poor Robert cried out ‘shut up" Musk Lady Rommel
    Keep this business from the press r ¥
    rt eee . Pactora Mary Ann I’. N. Peirce
    Poot bow. standitig ub: bow lideged River Sprite Miracle
    istened to Joe's words un f . .
    All because he failed to. admit St. Moritz Mocassin L, E.R. Gill
    "Twas Rebecea on his mind Sailors Fun Mountbatten
    5 hd“ Tiles teiiivete, lsh eo vaaiaanas Starry Night Miss Friendship G. D. Bynoe
    Steeped Low's life in pickled sauce William TI Page Boy

    All Because poot Louw was frightened
    To assume her place as boss,
    . . .

    -
    Subject to change in the event of any horse taking part in any
    Meeting prior to the Barbados Mid-Summer Meeting, 1950.

    eee

    But to-day there’s no “Rebecca”
    To olfend Low amy more
    Yes | the yacht left her forever
    On the happy tolden shore

    ° .



    Boat in pieces, Cabin unlocked
    Divers found the broken spar
    So im honour of “Rebecca”
    Joe unc Lou drink J @& R,

    sponsored by

    J & R BAKERIES
    makers of

    ENRICHED BREAD

    and the blenders of

    _J&R RUM




    Alka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief

    Alka-Seltzer gives you the quick
    relief you wart PLUS the alka-
    lizer you need when overeating
    causes excess gastric acidity, Drop
    one or two tablets in a glass of
    water — watch it fizz, then drink it
    down. It’s reliable First Aid. Pleas-
    ant-tasting. Not a laxative: Alka-





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    12 & 30 tablets.










    HANDCRAFT S

    See The Seltzer makes you feel fine fast.
    Handcrafts
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    POPP PFFS SS FSP SIFFS PSSSS SSO SS

    C.M.G
    Come and ¢ t G 1 ee CATON UE § f, d
    es and see Compton Gonsalves, Lindsay Gordon, Laddi holesale & Ret ruggist )
    Lewis, Wilfred Tull, Hamilton Bridgernan, C. Piitice pa Trini 136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813 or Rete an
    dad’s Lady Flyer, Pearl Gooding in action against Ken Farnum, . ‘ com mercial ve hicles

    Lisle Carmichael, Harclyde Stuart, C Keiz i

    » Ha s 5 sizer, Nazi, A,
    W. Bennett, E. Denny, Austin Clarke and the eeted
    Sprinter Grace Cumberbatch.

    36 Thrilling Events 36
    PROGRAMME

    FIRST DAY ’

    BOO BOI AO OM nee

    Hunte,
    Barbados Lady













    *
    LOYAL BROTHERS OF
    THE STARS
    present

    1950 CARNIVAL













    1 1 Mile—Novices SECOND DAY
    ¢ 1 woe Roadster fis Suse
    3 3 ieee 1 ¢ Jump
    4% Mile Muetoen ie 2 ‘a Mile Cycle—Div. A & FAR You may well ask why we permit our scientists to do anything
    5. 100 yards Flat— i + 290 ~=yerds Flat—La s ; » > have {
    : {00 vards Fist—Gpen ‘ 20 yards Piat~Ladies so foolhardy. But the plain answer is that we have to do ito
    00 yards Flat—Bi B » 4» Mile Cycle termediate ieti ; ° ‘ a tel + t
    . W0 wards Flat~—Girls under 16 (Sk CaeoA SGeresene ate e ee - satisfy ourselves that even after proionged storage, REGENT
    A tle 4 _ ° ¢ . . .
    10 3 Mile Gvele—aA a te cee cee ome ove - Gale, M.L.C., Messrs. will not form gum to stick valves and clog fuel sys:ems.
    11. 440 yards Fiat—O; 100 var a yirls over 16 . : eae
    Rar ts INTERVAL. 100 yards Flat—Local Men F. BS en oe The tests wnich consist of boiling samples under 100 Ib. per
    2 igh Jump 10 file Cyele rrmediate = je . A ss acts ssh auth he hin Vie
    13. 5 Mile—Intermediate so! Saar eee M.C.P. sq. inch oxygen pressure in “bombs” , are quite safe. We have
    14. Z Mile Cycle—A By), elle Creek af ; ie eae
    15. 2 Mile Cycle—B 12 5 Mile Cycle—B at never lost 4 scientisi~—or for that matter—a customer because
    16 150 yards Flat~Girls over 16 3 990 yards Fis . ’ ‘ ; j bs at
    " 220 varde Flat Boys over 16 Ay aap Nectar na 7 QUEEN’S PARK ofa sticky valve. This test is one of many Witich guarantee the
    ile Flat—Open roe ae A + Tt ne
    19 440 vards Relay 14 440 yards Relay—Roys’ School on quality and performance of REGENT petrol |
    20 9 Mile Cyele—Open is 15 Mile Cycle—Open Thursday, 8th June j
    Weight-lifting and Hand-balancing Gates open. at 12 noon ‘
    Police Band in attendance n 2nd day. Costume Competition, Fire- a ena
    ; f an Cg works Display, Dancing Free, f = PE % RO ‘yegsuy:
    Entries close at 4.00 p.m. on Tuesday. May 16, Special Display by Barbados i" “| " p ; ESPN)
    Bre ; e Ag y od 7 ‘ Q i walt,
    Plan of seats open at Civic Society, Swan Street and High ne re exgmgat snd baa uterling Quality told
    Street: 10.00 a.m. an Monday, May 15 . ALE STAR Singing
    ‘ " n
    i 2: 3.3 - i ee
    Heats on Tuesday May 23 at 3.30 p.r Competitoin RE a nm 0
    Grounds open for practice on Tuesday Mav 16 at 4.00 p.m ADMISSION 1/-
    PERSONS who ere desirous of istri mir
    Prices: Kensington Stand 3/-; George Cha Stand 2/6 obtaining STALLS and BOOTHS Distributors:
    Seeley alae Inge” Distributors:— Dear’s Garage Ltd. DA COSTA & CO., LTD.
    Uncovered Stand 2/-: Ground viduals are a to register their R ; k S t B d i ,
    ss cae ame to Mr. CHARLES C i wri.
    ee Jo Dee 127 Roebuck Street. Bridgeto JAMES A. LYNCH & CO, LTD |
    Se








    a

    PAGE FOURTEEN

    CLASSIFIED ADS.

    Telephone 2508





    BIRTH
    GREAVES—To Mr. and Mrs Fred A
    Greaves of Fairmount, St Lucy, the
    birth of a son and heir. Mrs. Greaves
    is the former Miss Mildred Ward

    Mother and babe are doing well.
    . Pek 14.5.50—In

    ooo
    DIED

    GOLLOP—Yesterday at
    ; St. David's Road, WALTER SAMUEL

    his residence,



    PERSONAL








    The public are hereby warned against
    giving credit to my wife OLYNTHIS
    CODRINGTON (nee Austin) as I do not!
    hold myself responsible for her or any-
    one else contracting any debt or debts
    in my name unless by a written order
    signed by me.»

    Signed CAMERON CODRINGTON, |

    King William Street
    13.5.50—an |













    AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY—A very a => ——
    ee ee oes oe cake
    type of Business







    LOST

    P







    SUNDAY ADVOCATE



    UBLIC

    SALES



























    25 Countries

    aan ake Part In
    By“instructions received from the Truss |

    tees. of the Hutchinson Trust, I will sell} e e

    on the ‘spot, t property known ag/ P.

    “White Hail”, consisting of one acre and | al ts air
    pate roods of land “be the same r e or

    € and ali wall buii¢ standing |

    thereon situate above Mangrove Planta- | PARIS, May. 13.
    tion, in the parish of Saint Philip, on ¢ 7 inister
    CE ee eee hee nt Men ios, | Jean Louvel,. Fregch Mini
    between the hours of twelve and four}of- Industry and Trade, today
    o'clock in the afternoon

    Terms Cash

    E. L. MOORE,

    formally 9pened the Paris Fair “La

    Foire de’ Paris’

    at the Port De

    Versaillés on the southern edge of

    the capital.

    and friends who attended the funeral















    di Govt. Auctioneer,
    The funeral will leave the residence SWEEPSTAKE TICKET BOOK—Series District “C",
    of Mr, Clyde Gollop of Sargeant's Vil-| FURNISHED—White Cottage St. James} £ 2330—39. ‘Finder please. tetizn sama ie 10.5.50,—~7n,
    lage, Christ Church, at 4.15 o'clock} Apply Mre. E. M, Greenidge, White] £, Field c/o E. S. A. Field, 41 Roebuck |°* tied

    this afternoon for St. David's Church.| House, St. James 14.5.50—1n | Street. oe

    1.5.00-—2n.| UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER

    Friends are invited

















    FLAT—downstairs, unfurnished, with

    one largd;. cbet ‘ Yves ene four bentwood chairs;

    one oak ice bucket




















    Some

    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950 —~





    GOVERNMENT NOTICES






    ORIENTAL

    Curios, Ivory, Teak, Sandal, Jewel-
    lery, Brass Ware, Tapestries,

    THE NEW PLAN FOR CASTRIES, ST. LUCIA

    Lucia”, are on sale at the Advocate Stationery at a cost of $2.00 per

    copy. 14.5.50,—In.



    Applications from Sanitary Inspectors and Registered Nurses
    (Hospital Trained) for Course of Training at the Public
    Health Training Centre in Jamaica.

    APPLICATIONS are invited from Sanitary Inspectors and Regis-

    Barbados Real Estate
    Agency

    tered Nurses (Hospital Trained) who are willing to be considered

    10,500 exhibitors (1,509] for advanced courses which are expected to last about Eleven and Ten

    more than last year) have booked | months respectively at the Public Health Training Centre in Jamaica.

    Space,

    Twenty-five countries are

    represented in the 85 sections. Tén

    countries — Austria,
    Czechoslovekia, Italy,

    land, Turkey,

    Pakistan,

    Belgium,
    isda The | and a full curriculum vitae should be included in the application,
    Switzer- | The scholarships for these courses if approved, provide: —
    and Yugoslavia —

    have national stands. The fair will
    last until May 29. Five million

    francs

    Ada (wife); Clyde & Keith (sons); “FARAWAY”, St. Philip coast. Fully SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Y
    Audrey, Ada, Frances, — gee furnished; 3 bedrooms, es rooms,| Finder please return same to ae By instructions received I will sell on
    Ca ee ghey to Terme) carport, ebelng Wants Ser Bat cect” | Aker, Roebuck Giteet (nese Céeoe-| Vine gt Latirence Gop, nes the Chur
    yne é 's). , St. 1 ence Gap, near the C .
    ne Deach, Tin. Wee ees | coms the entire lot of furniture which consists | Netherlands,
    —— 16. §.50-—2n of ;—one mahog. dining table; one mahog.
    ~ —=| drawing room table; one mahog. kidney j
    THANKS FLAT—One Ground Floor Flat with table; twa .t ; al .
    $ painted deck chairs; one Cool
    one bedroom Dial 3006s so ttn.) PUBLIC NOTICES | 522 2:5, 20%. 278 mance, Liquor, chest;
    We the undersigned desire through ' “= . ie one folding sereen; one cordea drawing
    this medium to thank all those relatives -— =} room table; table, six painted rush chairs,

    wofth of

    exhibited.
















    goods are

    2 = NOTICE j with ware container; one Ice Cream — s
    and also by thelr expressions of sym-| trance, || Unfurnished apartment _up- | Beemer oes quart ‘without tub, toh —
    lititen, out Seni dis taka sehen Bi stairs with one large, cool bedroom. MRS. LEVITT begs io notify her| mahos. beds sprinsy and mattresses; two
    iaigihant sntenaeh ‘ihe death ‘of Miss Dial 4506. 14.5.50—1n | customers that the Mayfair Beauty Salon| P4inted chest of drawers; one ware bed» I T. h With B b d
    ELIZA HACKETT, late of Green Hill.) FLAT—Four rooms particularly well = Pees ay donnie May 3518 | 1oPD Glothes horse Sak many other tee wae ? rh _—
    Nurse Helena Kennedy (sister), Elsie| furnished in Hastings available very soon.|{he fewly decorated flat ai Sune Sth al or interest Coastal Station
    Kennedy iniecey Edwin Kehnedy| Entire contents, including linen and cut- Fae mG he Agua | Teruis Cash
    ‘nephew) 14.5.50-——1n | lery, are being offered for sales, ish RO. a re tn oe D'ARCY A. SCOTT, Cable and Wiretess (West Indies) re
    7 5.50.—3n. i Auctioneer.! advise that they can now communicate
    on en te ee a7 ; = : og bad ham ae fas | 33-6,50.—4n | acth the following ships through their
    anks e@ many ends an 9 c ; ; Coast Station >—
    sympathisers who sent flowers, letters FURNISHED APARTMENT—At Coral nit at witientio. Peion | Barbados Coagt Station §.8. Colobre, S.S.
    and cards of sympathy of the death of [Sands, W. , with Silver and) PIPASANT Plontatone Ss. miner) UNDER THE SILVER | Sivestre, 5 S___ Fortrichepanse, Ss
    LEWIS BURKE, late Sgt. of Fire |} Cutlery. G Sea-bathing. Dial 8134.) gna st : wae, St. ee Castor, SS. Frederic A. Eilers, S.S.
    Brigade Station Alma Lashley. 11,5,50—4n. | Sue 8 ‘Nooo ase ‘ ; Saeverd. 8.8. America, S.S. Itabera, 8.3.
    Miriam Straker (mother), Whitfield —————_____——__ | rrrve Plan 1, ie Corde a HAMMER Kim, SS. Pocone, S.S. Rangitane, 8.8.
    Burke (cousin), Odessa Burke /cousin) FLAT: VU ius flat with 3 bedrooms a aen th rx} ae = Te oe end Abiqua, 8.S. Florida, S.S. Alcoa eeeet
    14.9.0—In. F rune ag, wa eo For furtner| og the above Act against tho sald Plan-| | On Tuesday 16th by order of Mrs. P. ¥ MY Pee ES ees. ee aa
    ee os 5008-4 s0-4.0.8, | lone Inhrenpect of tne Agricultural year | Cormprell we wil gel] ney house appgint:| qrsineis, $8. Hllegbeth (A. Flanigan,
    Mae tere ing oseal, many Sie MARKHAM—On the Sea Hastings, No money has been borrowed under : which include : peal NA ne: ss. Siecneeen? ss.
    y 8 Agric ; he | Bxtensic > Table, ht, 2 oe i oo
    letters, cards, or in any oher way ex- | (urnished or unfurnished 3 bedrooms eel tee ne Aids A eh al > . chair as oe a aanede ied Imperial Quebec, 8.5. Golfito, S.S. Oberon
    Pressed ‘their sympathy to us ip cats veitis all sneer conveniences. Cae ine | rove vem ne cane may be) in respect | table, Tea Trolley; Morris Suite compriss|/3-3° Misr Ee ere Eade
    recent reavement occasioned throug! cooking. Apply: ice Court, : - ing Settee for 3, Four Arm Chairs, and] ~ ris a ‘wenk
    the death of our beloved mother | Hastings. aati, | CR Se ee ey ct ee ane Spring Cushions, Book Cases (glass! Alcoa Corsalr, S.S. Habana, 8.8. ia,
    DELCINA GILKES who died on 5th May, | ie RRIS, | Doors), Coffee and Ornament Tables; Flat) S‘S- Hawk. 8-8 Ree SL ae,
    1950, MODERN STONE BUNGALOW, Seclu- : Ow | Top Desk with glass top, all in mahogany; | S:S. Apache Canyon, 'S.S.\ Spat, ve:
    The Gilkes Family. 14.5.50.—In. | ded part of Pine . 2 bedrooms. 2 12.5 50 Ginss and China, Tea Services, Pictures, | TCaraibe, $,S., Alcoa Polaris, 8.8. Mar-

    ——_———_———_

    IN MEMORIAM

    In memory of our loving and devoted
    mother ALEATHA BISHOP, who fel!
    asleep on l4th May 1949

    Not dead to us who loved her

    Not lost but gone before

    She lives with us in memory and will

    * forevermore.

    Bishop's family.
    14,5,50—In.

    IN loving memory of MRS. MAY
    ROWE who departed from us 15th May,
    1939.

    Faithful and honest in all her ways
    Loving and true to the end of her



    days

    So never forgotten Mother Dear shall
    you be

    As long as life last we will remem-
    ber thee

    Remembered by her loving husband

    Lawrence Rowe, Daughters Mrs. Olga
    Weekes, Viotta (niece) Caspair, Gwen
    14,5.50-—1n

    Kirton, who fell asleep on May 14th 1941.
    Thou art gone to the grave
    But 'twere wrong to deplore thee
    For God was thy ransom, thy guardian

    nd guide
    He gave thee—He took thee—and
    He will restore >
    Mabel Reid (Mother), Little Mary
    (daughter), Leta and Dora _ (sisters)
    Ben (nephew). 14.5.50—In

    In loving memory of my dear wife
    GERTRUDE SMITH who fell asleep on
    April 19, 1949.

    A year has past

    Lies the one T love so dearly

    Praise God we never lived a bad life}

    How good it is to say
    Oft 1 wondered
    Never in this world I think
    ion gates shall open wide
    At last we two shall meet once more,
    Alphonza Smith (husband), America.
    Mrs. Lilian Thorne (sister), Clyde and
    Carlos (nephews).
    (American Papers please . copy)
    15.5.50—In.

    In loving memory of our dear daughter
    PHYLLIS JEAN ROACHFORD, who fell
    ashkeep on May 14th 148.

    Safe in the arms of Jesus,

    Safe on this gentle breast,

    There by His love o’ershadowed,

    Sweetly your soul shall rest,

    Ever to be remembered by:

    Stanley Roachford (father), Deva Roach-
    ford (mothér), Denton, Leigh, Hugh,
    Vere (brothers), Sybil, Marie (sisters)

    14.5.50~<1n



    In loving memory of our dear beloved
    mother and srand-mother KETURAH
    APPLEWHAITE who fell asleep on I4th
    May 1947.

    In a grave and quietly sleeping

    Where the green grass gently waves

    Lies the one we love so dearly

    One we love, but could not save

    To you who have a mother cherish

    with care

    You never know her

    see her vacant chair.

    Ever to be remembered by:

    Edward Applewhaite (husband), Doris

    value till you

    Aubrey, Arthur and Gaskin
    (children) and his 12 grand children

    14.5,.50—In.
    In ever loving and never fading

    dear mother and grand

    to rest on the 14th of May 1948.

    Two sad years have passed to-day,

    When the dear one we loved was

    called away,

    We love her well, God loved her best,
    + And took dear granny home to rest
    ‘ May she rest in peace,

    By the mercy of God.

    Ever to be remembered by:
    Gwendolyn, Katie and Aletha Smart
    children), Jessie, Neville, Gerald and
    Cleveland (grandchildren).

    14.5.50—In





    FOR SALE |

    AUTOMOTIVE

    CAR—Morris 10 H.P, in_perfect
    ips ore: hag gee Tryhane,
    telle jantation, 4 omas.

    : 13.5,50,—Sn.

    —

    CAR—One 10 h.p. Hillman. In good
    working order. Only $300.00. For par-
    ticulars dial 4021. 13,5,50—2n.
    ———$————$—$——

    CAR—One Morris 12 Saloon. Excel-
    Jent condition, Done only 8,500 miles.
    13.5, 50—3n.

    CAR—One Vauxhall 14-6, good work-
    ing order, H. P, Harris & Co., Lower
    Broad Street. Phone 4045.

    12.5.50.—3n,

    VAN—Pick-up in good working order,
    Apply; Belgrave’s Garage, Hindsbury
    Road. 10.5.50—3n,







    work -
    Baga-









    MOTOR CYCLE—1% h.p. B.S.A, In
    Only

    3,100 miles.
    apply H. A. Cuke jnr, Phone or
    4231. 9.5,50—fn.

    ELECTRICAL

    ELECTRICAL WIRE and fit I
    triple 7/044 twin, 7/029 triple,
    twin, 3/029 triple, 3/029 twin C.T.S.
    7/064, 7/052, 7/044, 7/029, and 3/029 V.L.R,
    iso switches, receptacles and other items,
    mnquire Auto Tyre Company, Trafalgar
    Street, Phone 2696.







    ELECTRIC STOVES -- complete with
    oven in white and Green REDMAN &
    TAYLOR'S Garage and Showroom

    : 14.5.50—3n

    ———

    WESTINGHOUSE REFRIGERATOR—
    6 cu. ft. (In good working ordér.
    Owen T. Allder, Roebuck Street. Dial
    3299. 13.5.50—3n.



    FURNITURE

    CHAIRS — Correct Office Posturé
    Chairs, With three point adjustment to

    give perfect posture and
    comfort, equipped with okt eh
    GEDDES GRANT LTD. $.5.50—én





    CRO












    if 1 could replaced] dition.





    10.5,50,—t.i.n.

    ge Solar heatin ‘

    servants rooms. Gi
    % acre grounds.



    Labour saving. Apply eee '
    he & Nicolls & Co., Solicitors, 1-2, eee Ce AOD,

    Koebuck St. Telephone 3925.
    9.5.50—t.f.n

    —
    “NEW HAVEN", Crane Coast fully fur-
    nished, 3 bedrooms, 3 servants’ rooms,
    double garage, lighting plant, water
    mill, Superb bathing beach. Dial 4476

    November, December
    19.3.50-—t.f.n

    ~RUS-IN-URBE—Crumpton Street from
    Ist June 1950, Dial 4524.

    To the creditors holding specialty liens
    against

    Thomas.

    Take Notice that I, the owner of the
    above named plantation, am about to
    obtain a loan of £2,000 under the pro-
    visions of the above Act, against the
    Sugar, Molasses and other crops of the
    said plantation to be reaped in 1951.

    No money has yet been borrowed
    against the said crops



    14.5.0—1n F. F, PILGRIM,














    SUMMERHOME—Situate at Hastings
    om the sea-side near Rockley. The
    house contains drawing, dining, break-



    13.5,50.—3n,

    THE SUGAR INDUSTRIAL AGRICUL-
    URAL BANK ACT, 19145

    To the itors holding specialty liens

    HANNAYS & LOWER GREYS

    ntations, Christ Church.

    Take Notice that we, the Owners of
    the above Plantations are about to obtain
    a loan of £10,000 under the provisions of
    the above Act against the said Planta-
    tions, in respect of the Agricultural year
    1950 to 1951.

    No money has been borrowed under th
    Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the above










    dining rooms, kitchenette,
    garage, unfurnished (can be furnished by
    arrangement). Dial 8495. 14.5.50.—1

    WANTED __









    Act ted als to such year, i
    Dat ; ay, .

    HELP r F URSQUARE Estates LTD
    wher,

    E, S, ROBINSON,
    Managing Director.

    _ qualifications
    Manning & Co., Ltd. mission Dept.

    and by. letter 13,8.50.—3n,
    12.5,50—3n,

    Hie SUGAR INDUSTRIAL AGRICUL.
    TURAL BANK ACT, 1048

    To the creditors holding specialty liens
    against GROVE Plantation, St, Philip
    Take Notice that we, the owners of the
    above Plantation are about to obtain o
    loan of £8,000 under the ptovisions o!
    the above Act against the said Plantation
    in réspect of the Agricultural year 195¢

    to 1951,
    No money has been borrowed under the

    TAILORS — Want immediately,
    Journeymen Tailors, 3rd floor No. 7
    Swan Street. 14,5.50—1n,

    MISCELLANEOUS

    GOLF CLUBS—One used set







    Golf
    Clubs and bag or odd clubs in 00d con-

    Auricultural Aids Act, 1906, or the above
    Phone 8152. 7.5,50—5n, Act in Teapect of auch ost: sito,
    A POCKET GUIDE to the West Indies | Dated this f ESTATES, |
    by Alermon Aspinwall. Martin Griffith, SVUHOMerTs etna oe
    Four Winds. 10,5,50—2n B. S. Robinson,
    CUSTOMERS, for PURE FRESH COWS | 14 559 —~3n, Se

    .. Supply from Tuberculin Tested
    STINGS

























    Outario and Canada aforesaid the quali-
    food pepcrenentt, of chil] fed executrix of the Will
    fh Oe , Pgrteet | deceased, in care of Messrs.

    4A ‘| & Sealy of Lucas Street, Bridgetown,

    r Solicitors, on or before the 15th day of
    July 1950, after which date 1 shall pro-
    ceded to distribute the assets of the
    deceased among the parties entitled
    thereto having regard only to

    of the
    Carrington

    such

    rs, RRC RLANTATION, ° Assoc. (Inc.) Consignees ‘ sides and fernery. Right
    gems, Lee May 1950. THE 8 KR INDUSTRIAL AGRICUL 10.5.50—9n, “ELLESMERE” PLANTATION, ARAM, y DEMERATA Ere. Dial 4047 fF ada, ery ight of way
    ROUTE. Write L. N. RAL BANK ACT, 143 a ST, GEORGE ss Yo May 1
    Hutchinson “CLARENDON” BLACK | vo the creditors holding specialty lien: HOUSE—The board and _— shingled We are instructed by the Trustee of MS. “ * 18th “WEMBLEY”, N. Gardens.
    ° p J. Seale aan ar a ;
    ROCK. 11, 5.50-—2n, Feinet FOURSQUARE GROUP 0 Emelda Cot”, Martindales Road. For me ue ine errs i. i S.S..“HECUBA” Jufe Ist. A very pleasant modérn. -houre
    lantations, St. Philip il perticulars dial 2668. 13.5.50—3n. o offe r sale a Plan- tes . o f x —_ ons ry or 5
    F Contd. Take Notice that we, the Owners of th | ——_—_____—__- | tation consisting af aiput, 128 aerés of S. P. MUSSON SON @ CO., LTD, Agents Pb ried is popular nae jcee my.
    or e@=Contd, above Plantations, are about to obtain i: | “STAUNTON” and land thereto con-, Which about 88, are arable. There dsaf 00) Soss0 so verandah, kitchen and.2 bed-
    loan of £11,000 under the provisions © | taining approximately 15,678 square feet, | Managet’s house and usual outbuildings. Touhy Gn. tn, Ae Hee and
    reaus, small} the above Act against the said Plantations th Avenue, Belleville There is good quality stone which could F =
    extra room on ground floor now
    ‘Tables, China Cabinets, Morris Chairs,| in respect of the Agricultural year 195 The dweiling house which is a sub-]} ve worked. > wh 7 - : ; used as a flat, The gafden is
    etc., at bargain prices in Ralph A. | to 1951. lantially erected stonewall building in| ” Pull particulars and permission to view ana a eams |B} walled ait rouna with stone, At
    Beard’s Auction Rooms, Hardwood No. money has been borrowed unde exfect condition comprises. ;- ‘ can be obtained from Mr. Charles Arm- . the price asked this residi nce is’
    Alley. Open daily 8 a.m. to 12 noon. | the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or thi Downstairs, Spacious cool verandahs} strong of Pool, St, John, Conditions of = worth inspécting je!
    4.5.50—3n, | above fi tl seenes of ance oars mn two sides, large drawing and dining} cole can be obtained from the undersign- 4 , ‘
    men ————__—__—___—— Dated this 10th day of May, 195 coms, buttery, larder room, pantry,} ed who will offer the property at auction BLUE VISTA.

    FURNITURE — Beautifully designed FOURSQUARE BATS TEs. LTD tehen and servants’ room. | of at thein, Offices st 2.30 fm. of Friday Sails Sails Arrives Golf Club) One ae ane vahter.
    wae eee sa coe ay o E. 8. Robinson oe 8 uaa 9th June, 1950, hates a day Halifax Boston B’dos type modern homes in a_ select
    mahogany fu e . . - sabe bi Ade 1 . r ¢ CA G locality, well planned and con-
    ae emmih & Co. Furniture Manufactur- Managing Directo: There is a small lawn to the east of Pie: ae, 15 May 15 May . :

    , re 13.5.50,—3n. he ho well as spacious back yard : os No 1th May 26th May 27th May structed by a firm of e.
    £m, connate ECoeara ne 06; Roomuns | vith lime anc fruit trees planted June 2nd June Large lounge, dining room ‘eiteh-
    < THE oe oe BIOL L Yard. Large garage and washroom RUPTURE ard June 6th June l4th June 15th June sat Cees Bee? basins and
    TU ‘ OT, 14a Electric light, water and gas are in- 12 June 22 22 wardrobes) bathroom,
    To the creditors holding speciilty lem | jailed throughout Inspection by ap-| ; % a yune 5 guns double garage, servants’ quar
    ; : Sth July 4th July 15th July quarters,
    anaes against FOURSQUARE F*CTORY, Si niment with Mrs, Waite, the owner, RELIEF Ps July ain July 5th Aug. 6th Aug. terraced rock garden, ldwns,

    GOATS uuimibe i Phiip Telephone 2553 A 26th . Aug r flowerin, shrubs and __ plants.
    Goats oe Ewe act Roop en Take Notice that we, the Owners of th« By public auction on Friday the -19th ie Aug Oth Aug. th Sep. Owing 5 wntrsedh acinar
    S. Mayhew, Fitts Village, St. James. eta bet A ae Pen A istthe of a ea oe samt St Sie otioe er the | ‘Thousands of ruptured men and women NORTHBOUND Satls Arrives = Arrives Arrives ces this desirable property . is

    1m8. the above Act against the said Factory iquluya. and conditions of may ban hove. toute re relies a wearing a -. to pitas Montreal a at well below Gant 20. atkly
    in respect of the Agricultural year 1950} obtained . ‘ ' easley Air Cushion Appilance. June 10th June 19th June 2ist June 2th June ¥
    MECHANICAL to lear, 8 hme ih ; Fitted with a = Se bh wl LADY "son 27th June 29th June 8th July 10th July 13th July WINDY RIDGE, st. J *
    No money has Leen borrowed under the K. S. NICHOLLS & CO., ae Se a Ter antia drvicnea shat RODNEY 27th July 29th July 7th Aug. 9th Aug. 12th Aug. This very attractively. ames.
    3 s BICYCLES Cycles | Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the above 151 & 152 Roebuck Street, \ne hernie w such gentle anee ; LADY NELSON 18th Aug. 20th Aug. 29th Aug. 3ist Aug. 3rd Sep. tedden a ively situated
    sh ie & Motor Cycles| ‘Act in respect of such year. Phone 3925. 10.8.80.——Gch BI PEOR SR GREE cere Cray Se | Seer MOOR - 19th Sep. 2ist Sep. 30th Sep. 1st Oct. 5th Oct 1 ore Gt aie tee
    shes a gag ese before purenani | “Dated Ge ey Sa SE MAK Nc | —camcama Oe mee a Roma | Fo" ill detail and ree Booklet write verdes oS" lounges ating
    ¢ re. ye gar- FOURSQUARE FACTORY LTD'| TRELAWNY, on Hastings main Road, = . ‘ ” tetlete. ae ning
    agé and Showroom. 14,5,50—2n Owners ‘eddy vecom#budted with: four bedain.™ NB. to change without notice. All vessels fitted with cold storage chain room, 2 tollets. There are 2
    E. §. Robinson, oms running water in edch, usual Fares and freight rates on application to :— Pernaindersis vote aie Gok oe
    yg nandtvne Diver | SG onl ta pales ind] DRASLEY'S LID, Dept. 198| Gago AUSTIN @ CO. LTD._A wih is trees. fowertng
    " . : .50,—3n. rn conveniences . _ hi : .
    G. L. Taylor. Dial 3120. —— | Xhnex, new wall building, two bed-| 4 Cork Street, London, W.1, Ensland, tid i gents. Be oentted ar ee winy, can: never
    10.5.50—3n. nN i ing ¥ lining > Meant ; ee . spoiled and prevailing breezes
    NOTICE rooms with running water, dining and ‘ ad are unobst!
    itting rooms and, jodern con- 5 - — SS = —— = nie Tucted. 5 miles town
    aA ae ee Sewing Machine, as Re. Estate of veniences Will accept able offer, ee eu '
    new. Owner leaving island. Apply (01 WASORIE WINSOME MAUDE CHAM-| syply on premises Telephone 3001 ISN'T IT NICE TO VISITORS TO OUR ISLAND NEA DENDRA—Pine Hill Estate.
    ittens, Harr ERS, 14.5% 50—1n i j Recently | built coral .
    College Gap. Roebuck Street. ‘ B eaneubin i WAY HAVE BAGGAGE WORRY? bungalow ‘in select reddecel
    ee NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN eg an i aA You can pave your Baggage with us for despatch by our crew all Gesigned and _con-
    : persons having any debt or claim agains\) '{t regular service. You can be assured of its safety. ° : a oo
    MISCELLANEOUS the Estate of Majorie Winsome Maude} ) MAPLE MANOR R . . ‘ontmctors. 3 (built-
    : 2 F in wardrobes! ;
    _Chambers late of Ontario, Canada, who| | emember ! ) lounge/dining

    ANTIQUES— of every description | died in this Island on the 16th day of) } GUEST HOUSE AND TO SAVE? WE GIVE PERSONALIZED SERVICE pL sina led witcher, tiled bathroom
    Glass, China, old Jewels, fine er,| November 1949, are hereby required t § Opposite Hastings Rocks | servelite’ ou garage, laundry,
    Watercolours books, Maps, Auto-/ send rticulars of their claims duly 1. BOURNE it

    pa > Morris and Tub Suites or separate
    , etc., at Antique Snop, | atiested, to the undersigned Herber Yel.—3021. Manageress. Pieces, Redio, Cocktail or Fancy
    qi, Ro; Yi Club
    sdjoining Royal Yacht Club. Campbell Sealy the attorney in this 26.6.49—t.f.n, Tables, Tea Trolleys, Liquor Cases,
    1,9,49.—t.f.n.
    0.49.—t.2.n.) island for Mrs. Constance Vokes of} (/ i $5 up—Barbice and other restful
    claims of which I shal} then have had
    oy eee at 26.75 (per beg: | notice, and that 1 will not be liable for
    Phone 13 §.50—2n Be a or any part thereof so dis-
    _ tributed, to any person whose debt or



    claim we shall then have had notice
    , And all persons indebted to the said
    estate are requested to settle their in

    DOOR MATS—ibre Door Mats. Plain
    and Inlaid in several sizes. Price $1.73



    up. G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO
    LIMITED 4222 . $0—an debtedness without delay,

    i Daa i 34.8 : MR aR day of May 1950.

    _ “RELJANCE" CAMPBELL SEALY

    1en Cama FREEZERS in %, 1 and attorney for Constance Vokes
    2 gallon sizes. Also Ide Picks, Ice]. Qualified Executrix of the wili of
    Shredders and Ice C: rvers-——Order Majorie Winsome Maude Chambers,
    yours TO-DAY. G, Ww. Hinson & | deceased.
    Co. Ltd. Dial 4222. 14,5. 50—m 14.5, 50-—-4n

    ee nee
    PROFESSIONAL NOTICE

    DR, FERREIRA of “Chiroville’ Upper
    Bay St. (near Esplanade) by Chiropractic
    meth corrects diseases of eyes, cars.
    nose, throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys ano
    lower organs. Dial 2881

    :





    FLOUR BAGS—
    white, all marks ti
    R. Hunte & Co., Ltd.
    Store, Lower Broad

    ————$— —$—$—$ $$$
    “LASSIB’—Brand Rolled Oats in 20 oz.

    tins at 44c, per tin from all Grocers,
    ’ 13,5.50—2n.





    AT YOUR SERVICE

    it & cl by of its taking

    les to the cup. supply at your IN CLEANING; DYEING,

    Grocer. 13.5. LAUNDERING AND HAT

    ——-——_———- DRESSING
    STOVE—-One Two Burner Bi RAYMOND JORDAN,

    stove and six spare wicks lever been Bey Street, C e s'

    are see P< tee. te Ipp. Combermere St



    ———
    TINS—A quantity of empty tins ior
    hatching plants or household purposes.

    Dial 3063 ,Purity Bakeries Ltd.
    13.5.50.—7n.

    For MARL, SAND,
    GARDEN MOULD,

    ———
    PIPE—One Iron Pipe 19 feet long with
    6 inch diameter. Dial 3063, Purity Baker-



    ies Ltd, 13.5.50.—7n. and LIME ;
    .WHEELS—2_ Complete Motor Car Dial 4503
    wheels, new tyres, 475 x 18. Belgrave's t

    { Garage, Hindsbury Rd. 14.5,50.—In, SS



    ree







    WELCHES PLANTATION, Si. |

    Dated this 13th day of May, 1950. |

    Owner, |
























    slectrie Table Lamps, Electric Clock, 2
    } Carpets 9x12; Rugs, Mahogany Single Herdsman, $.S. Sirena, S.S. Raban, at
    | Bedsteads, Vono Springs, Hair Mattresses; Arlington, S.S. Myken, S.S. L, C, Coubre,
    i ve nice Vanity Table with Triplet} 5-5 Libreville, S.S. S. Amado, S.S. Louis
    | Mirre and Stool; Large and Small] Howe, $.S. Overo, S.S. Maria De Larrin-
    mahogany Presses; Medicine Cupboard | 3%. S.S. Great City, S.S. Sheafmead, 8.38.
    and Shoe Rack ‘combined,old mahog, | Esso Avila, M.S. Amerigo Vespucci, S.S.
    Linen Press; G.E. Refrigerator, in work- Mormacyork, S.S. Atlantic Producer, s.s.
    ing order, Ware Presses, Kitchen Cabinet | Bataan, S.8. Cottica, S.S. Tachira, s.s.
    Larder; ail painted Cream and Green,| Canadian Challengers, $.S. Sevane, S.s.
    Coal Stove, Kitchen Utensils, Canvas | Devon, $.S. Campero, S.S. Delphic, 8.S.
    Cots; Verandah Chairs; Lady's Raleigh | Latirus, 8S. Atlantian, §.$. Regent Pan-
    Bicycle, Roller, Garden Tools a lot of] ther, S.S, Pont Audemer, S.S. Stella Pol-
    'Good Books, and many other items,| aris, S.S. Megna, S.S, Sun Avis, S.S.
    This furniture is modern, and is in ex-]} Snipaas.
    cellent condition. —
    Sale 11.30 o'clock _- Terms Cash s 1
    BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. Public aalles—Contd.
    Auctioneers ——
    12.5.50,—2n.
    REAL ESTATE
    ————————
    ONE STONEWALL HOUSE, standing
    REAL ESTATE on 1 acre and 23 perches of land, ee
    AT WILDEY PLANTATION the 20in at Bridvefiela,. Bt xno” aaa ae
    x30in. Milling Plant complete with en-} rooms, two bedrooms, breakfast room,
    gine 13ins 30ins. and all steel gear-| kitchen, water toilet and bath, sae
    ing stonewall shop and garage, encio!
    Three Cameron Pumps, Evaporator,| yard. Apply on premises. ‘
    two Aspinal Pans, 8ins x 12ins. Colon- 14.5.50.—In.
    ial Hor; Engine, two Filter Presses aid | —~——— >,
    Montegus, 3 Clarifiers, Tins—Oin. dia TAKE YOUR CHANCES ve
    7 Sing ; AWAKE BUYERS! Good Buys W:
    x 12in Oin Multitubular Boiler, all Re-Sale Values, Inspect and Decide for
    steam and water piping and fittings. Yourselves. I Say--An Excellent 3 Bed-
    Apply to the Manager. 14.5.50—6n.|.,o9m Stonewall Residence io del oor
    Ne aerator a ; mactive =
    “CHURCHILL"—situate at Maxwells oe ae Hh cate ai Bungalow in
    Coast, Christ Chureh, standing on 9,266| A-1 Condition at Monteith Gardens, For
    square feet of land, with 12 foot right of | Medium Pockets, A esieisie S ae ee
    way to the sea, 30 yards distant. (Fair Size) Stonewall Bungalow iy
    The house ‘contains drawind-dining | Street. A Suitable 3 Bedroom Bungalow

    room





    SaaS























    , three bedrooms and _ kitchen,





    Solicito


























    THE POPULAR

    Radiation
    Cookery Book
    received
    At your Gasworks, Bay St.
    36th Edition
    Price Only 4/6



    =<









    jata, $.S, Kettle Creek, S.S, Bowrio, 8.

    Ss.







    all] type















    Chairs or Settees, Rush Furniture,
    Mahogany nd other Bedsteads,
    Beds, Extra size Cradles for Baby's
    comfort, Go-Carts or Prams, $7 up,
    Desk with flat or hinged tops in
    Deal or Mahogany, $8 up,—Office,
    Chairs,
    Larders, Waggons, Kitchen Cabi-
    nets
    All at Money Saving Prices.

    Gallery or Garden





    L. S. WILSON



    at White Park. A Suitable 2 Bed-

    I % . house, Contains 3 recéption, 5
    with ‘built-in cupboards and wardrobes, | roorn Concrete Bungalow at Station Hill, . The M.V. “Moneka" will accept s
    verandah, small hall_and the usual offices. | and Two 2 Bedroom Cottages (seaside) at ]SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM, ROT- Cargo and Passengers for St. Vin- ea Vane iemene
    Gorage and one servant's room with bath | Black Rock, A Seaside 3 Bedroom Stone- TERDAM & ANTWERP cent, Dominica, Antigua, Mont- figure for Guide aie.
    in the yard, wall Bungalow at Fontabelle. Mortgages Ms. “ ” May 12/18/16th serrat, St. Kitts-Nevis, loading :
    Inspection om application to the under-| Arranged, Please Don’t Miss Me Wise} wig, + * “June 9/10/13th Wednesday, sailing Thursday 18th “LITTLE BATALLYS”
    signed, from Whom further particulars | and Keen Purchasers for Anything in SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM May. \ Peter small ¢ &
    and conditions of sale may be obtained, | Real Estate! My List is Like a Special DOVER Apias standing ies Se
    The above property will be set up for] Menu but Not Lengthy with nite S.S. “BONAIRE” May 26th The M.V, “T. B, Radar’ will ac- 1 atre, This p.rope . i
    vie at public auction at aur office, 151 & | Elephants” coupled with Fancy Prices. S'S. “COTTICA” J Y sea cept Cargo and Passengers for St. designed by its aronitedt ‘ >
    152 Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, on Fri-| Dial 3111 or 2713 — D. F. de Abreufi . fe MADEIRA, PLYMOUTH Lueia, St. Vincent, Trinidad, sail- and contains 3 reception, |
    lay the 19th May, 1950, at 20 p.m. Tele-| A, Trained | Auctionten Gita Borges ANTWERP AND AMSTERDAM | ing 17th May, 1950. rooms, baths and” toliets, °
    shone Broker Jaluer ‘a . . cher
    : Broke «br Garter Bros., Tudor St..] M.S. “WILLEMSTAD” May 23rd. Lae RR a a gins RS
    RS. NICHOLLS & CO,, __| Near Mason Hall St. 14.5.50—1n | M.S. “ORANJESTAD"” June 27th Be sue AL wae aoe



    :



    |



    For Balanced QOiliness
    We recommend

    GERM MOTOR OILS
    CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

    Service Station

    CRANE HOUSE CLUB
    WILL BE

    SUNDAY

    UNTIL 3



    $33 Trafalgar St.

    CLOSED
    ON.

    MAY I4TH
    PL!







    2. Applicants should apply in writing before the 31st of May,
    to the Director of Medical Services, Government Building, The Wharf,

    (a) Free air passage to and from Jamaica.
    (b) Subsistence allowance at $3.60 a day.
    (c) Travelling expenses in Jamaica at the rate of $14.40 pe
    month. a's
    (d) Contingencies at the rate of $4.80 a month.
    3. The scholarships will only be granted on the following con-
    ditions:

    (a) That the Commissioners of Health agree to pay to the
    officer, his or her salary while absent on study leave,
    where the applicant is employed by the Commissioners.

    (b) That the officer selected agrees to enter a bond to con-
    tinue in the service of the Commissioners or of some
    other body or Board in the Island whose function is to
    administer to Public Health.

    14,5.50—3n.

    A limited number of copies of “The New Plan for Castries,



















    INDUSTRIAL—COMMERCIAL
    RESIDENTIAL
    Office: Hastings Hotel Ltd.
    Telephone 2336

    FOR SALE
    DOVER, Christ. Church—six. lots
    on sea 3 x 10,000 & 3 x 12,000 sq.

    ft. also 7% acres. 5 acres. 4%
    acres. 3 acres.

    BANYAN BEACH — Brighton.
    Cement block house, built 1949,
    verandah, reception room, shower
    bath, kitchen fiitted with Frig,
    excellent beach and sea bathing,
    water, electricity~ telephone.

    BLACKMAN-—St. Joseph, Stone
    house built about 1828, draw:
    room, dihing room, breakfa:
    room, 6 bedrooms, 2 kitchens,
    bath room, all outbuildings, beau-
    tiful surroundings, standing .in
    about 5 acres land, electricity,
    water, telephone.

    PINE HOUSE — St. Michae?.
    Stone house, ‘large ve!
    drawing room, dining room, 4 bea-
    rooms, bath, toilet, large garage
    servants’ quarters, water, elec-
    tricity. telephone.

    COVE SPRING HOUSE — St.









    James. Stone and wood house,
    overlooking sea, own private
    bathing cove, 4 bedrooms, livii
    room, dining room, verandahs,
    bath rooms, outbuildings, water,
    electricity

    ROSLYN — 8th Avenue, Belle-






















    PART ONE ORDERS
    , B

    y
    Lieut.-Col. J. CONNELL, O.B.E., E.D.

    ville Wooden house, drawing-
    dining room, closed verandah,
    Commanding, bath, toilet, water, eléctricity,

    immediate occupancy.

    LITTLE BATALLYS—St. Peter.
    Stone house, 2 verandahs, 3 Te-
    ception rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 Bath
    rooms, kitchen, servants’
    water mains and well, electricity,
    about 1 acre land.

    The Barbados Regiment.
    Issue No. 19 May 12, 1950

    7 eS ee ee Ce

    Thursday, 18 May, ’50; The battalion will parade at 1700 hours

    ‘ . ; RLVILLE, upper Spooner’:
    on the battalion parade ground for a réhearsal for the King’s Birth- a Two storey Rouse, part slope
    day Parade. TiS carandan, Kicnea, bo

    Owing to the Police Sports on Thursday, 25 May, ’50, there will
    be no Regimental Parade.
    2. VOLUNTARY CLASSES
    Officers: There will be a voluntary class for Officers on Monday,
    15 May, ’50.
    N.C.Os: There will be NO voluntary class for N.C.O.s on Tuesday,
    16 May, ’50. . .
    ORDERLY OFFICER & ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK
    ENDING 22 MAY, ’50.
    Orderly Officer—Lt. S. E. L. Johnson
    Orderly Serjeant—214 L/S Clarke, A. H.
    Next for Duty
    Orderly Officer—Lt. T, A. Gittens
    Orderly Serjeant—212 L/S Haynes, G. L.
    M. L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
    S.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
    The Barbados Regiment.

    SHIPPING NOTICES

    ——

    electricity.

    e have and but
    the ‘shes "at Gidbes Bay. at.
    James, Rices, St, Philip, and in
    e City,











    REAL ESTATE
    JOHN MM:

    BLADON

    Formerly Dixon & Bladon

    FOR SALE





    “FRIENDLY HALL”, Maycock’s,
    Bay, St. Lycy. Old est&te home

    in good state of préservation with
    12 acres of lami and. old

    house, mill, stables and cannd

    —





    ROYAL NETHERLANDS
    STEAMSHIP CO.












    B.W.4, Schooners Owners’ attractive arched vefandah on 2

















































    back in

    MOVERS — PACKERS — & FREIGHT FORWARDERS |

    approximately 1/3
    Alexander House,

    ground with wide frontage. Coral

    stone walls with roof,

    James Street, flush panelled doors, ail sult i
    Bridgetown. Phone 3024. cupboards. There is 9

    lounge and dining nd
    room

    gallery, 3 bedrooms, Liphet a

    servants’ rooms, room for 2

    Provision for solar heater. 5



    Property ma:
    furnished Y DE Porchiased

    ful
    reasonable figure. * ¥












    DRESS MAKING
    Art Embroidery, Beading

    Lace and Cut Work
    Button Holes Eté,

    Also Lessons on Embroidery
    Can be arranged

    NEW ARRIVALS

    ENAMEL WARE

    Mugs, Ewers, Plates, Basins,
    Ete



    250
    i Magnificent views,






    — ALSO —

    » tub bath
    ' a
    By Mrs. Adell Yearwood | 20 x 2x 1% — 26x 1% Kitchen, a
    De! 27x 1%4 —26x1% ters, tiled patio faci ’
    ‘leasa, Laid our gardens. Stand ;
    TYRES — TUBES. 80,000 sq. ft. oh

    Rockley Main Road,
    Christ Church,

    quarters etc.
    RESIDENCE,—II_ Graeme ui
    Road Attractively ‘aakgnee
    modern two storey home well set
    z
    YY, 2 bathrooms with
    and
    TOON eRe
    tins. An attra ouaaige
    galow built right onto a
    beach with excellent ba’
    facilities. There is a wide
    yerandah extending the entir
    frontage: 4 bedrooms (3 with
    wash basins), laree L shaped

    lounge with cocktail bar, ki

    farare and servants’
    Enquiries invited. te quarters.

    “RETREAT?

    NEWSAM & CO.






    Six Men's Ba:
    St. Peter Charming ald world
    country heme very solidly con-
    structed of stone standing in 12

    TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

    (With The Distinctive Flavour)

    o
    Is A LEADER AMONG THE BEST
    Get a Supply and Prove it for Yourself







    acres of ground with
    beach There are 3 resp
    rooms. 4 bedrooms, kitchen,

    double garave arid out-bi
    Available with vacant poate
    £3,500 or near offer. 5

    REAL ESTATE AGENT
    Auctioneer & Surveyor
    PLANTATIONS BUILDING
    Phone 4640

    SIP IT — TO ENJOY IT.

    Blenders ....

    John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd.



    Nw A CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT BY D

    eq





    RINKING THE NEW CROWN





    GINGER ALE

    pee er








    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950







    CHAMPIONS CANTER HOME

    Triple Tie In’
    Errol Flynn
    Cup Race

    From Our Own Correspondent)
    KINGSTON, May 9
    Three Rio Grande raftsme:

    pulled to a triple tie in the second
    renewal of the Errol Flynn Ghil-
    lenge Cup raft race down the
    sceni¢e tourist water playground in
    Portland on Sunday, smashing thi
    1948 record of 938.minutes. with:
    splendid 85 minute run down. the
    Rio Grande on a six miles journey
    from Berrydale to Burlington

    The waft race was specially spon -
    sored by Movie Actor Errol Flynn
    owner of Navy Island, an islet oft
    Port Antonio, on Jamaica's north-
    coast, who with his fiancee,-Prin-
    cess Ghiea, are now holidaying: in
    Jamaica, Prizes were distributec|
    by the actor, while Princess Ghic
    Was a passenger on*onr of the win
    ning bamboo craft

    Rafting on tne xio Grande, one
    of Jamaica’s largest rivers, which
    runs through a beautiful valley
    and gorge, has always been an at-
    traction to tourists in Jamaica, and
    became even more popular when
    the movie actor came to Jamaiea,
    some years ago, bought Navy
    Island and other property and or-
    ganised races for a cup he.donated
    and money prizes donated by the
    Richfield Hotel. 5





    (SaaS eee



    The Amateur Athletic Association |
    Of Barbados |

    Presents its Big Intercolonial Cycle
    Meeting

    WHIT-MONDAY.
    THURSDAY,

    ON

    CHAMPION SPRINTER Aber-
    nant puts his heart into the job
    as he earries champion Gordon
    Richards to his 4,000th victory at
    Sandown





    Barbados Friendly
    Football Association

    THIS WEEK'S FIXTURES
    y i16th—St OldsBoys v

    Harcliffe at St.









    Leonid Referee Mr
    C. Reece Mar 5 Matthews Old
    Boys at She 1. Referee 1 E, Clarke
    Ta se V Vatic a Bay. Referec
    € it Shel Referee A
    Renre Advocate at
    Referee Moro FE, Pony
    Wavell Sports Club at the Bay Ref
    eree iy. J Archer
    Thursday BthReed United v St
    Nary Old | i Ss Leonards, Ref-
    eree: Mr. C ts atthews Old
    Boys vs. Coits at |, Referee; Mr. E
    Reece
    Friday 19th—Penrodt Berwick at S
    Leonard Referec \ I Clarke
    Nat Maple a e Ba Referee
    Mr, 3.9 disor
    Saturday 20th—Colts vs. Advocate at S
    Leona teferes Ir. O. Grahar
    Maple Wavell Sports’ Club at Shell
    Referee My J Archer St Matthey
    Old Bo St, Mar Old Boy t the
    Ba teferec ir. BG

    andiso



    Baseball Results

    NEW YORK, May 13
    Results of Major League Base-
    ball games played yesterday wer«
    American League:—Cleveland In
    dians 5,,Chicago White Sox 1;
    New York Yankees 3, Philadei-
    phia Athletics 2; Washington Sen
    ators, Boston Red Sox 3
    National League:—St. Louis Car-
    dinals 1, Cincinnatti Red

    burgh Pirates 3, Chicago Cubs 6







    Athletic

    Sports

    MAY
    I

    &



    3



    a 4

    AT KENSINGTON OVAL

    Under the distinguished patronage of

    Lewis



    W. Bennett, E. Denny, Austin





    Come and see Compton Gonsalves, Linds
    Wilfred Tull, Hamilton Bridgeman, C
    dad's Lady Flyer, Pear! Gooding in actic
    Lisle Carmichael, Harclyde Stuart, C

    )
    HIS EXCELLENCY, THE GOVERNOR, MR. A, W. L. SAVAGE
    C.M.G :

    iy Gordon, Laddie
    Prince and Trini-
    »”n against Ken Farnum,
    Keizer, Nazi, A. Hunte,












    ’ Clarke and the Barbados Lady
    Sprinter Grace Cumberbatch. Rae
    36 Thrilling Events 36
    FIRST DAY : ; ;
    1 1 Mile—Novices SECOND DAY
    moe mt Roadster LAs Jump
    3, 1 Mile—Intermediate 2 Mile Cye )
    4 % Mile Grelern + ¥ Mile Cyele—Div. A i
    5. 100 yards Flat—Ladies = yords Flat—Ladies )}
    6 100 yards Flat~Open 4 220 yards Flat—Ladies »)
    7. 100 yards Flat—Boys under 16 lile Cygle—Intermediate ni
    8 80 yards Flat—Girls under 16 le Cycle—A Ny
    9 3 Mile Cycle—B 7 . ‘ 18 at
    10 3 Mile Cycle—A y age Tatas. Pinbetoee Gver 16. }})
    11. 440 yards Flat—Open oa, cares Riat-sairig aver 36." 5
    INTERVAL 0 yards Flai—Local Men \
    12 High Jump e ¢ Intermediate
    13. 5 Mile—Intermediate file ¢ leh,
    14. 2 Mile Cycle—A : ee
    15. 2 Mile Cycle—B 2 Mile Cycle--B
    14 «150 yards Flat—Girls over 16 1 t—Open
    17. 220 yards Flat—Boys over 16 aie
    18. 1 Mile Flat—Open ERVAI
    19 440 vards Relay 14 440 yard -lay—Bors’ School
    20 9 Mile Cycle—Open > 1 le Cycle—Open
    Weight-lifting and Hand-balancing
    Police Band in attendance on 2nd day.
    Entries close at 4.00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 16
    Plan of seats open at Civi iety, Swan Street and High
    Street: 10.00 a.m. an Monday 1 )
    Heats on Tuesd May 23 at 3.30 \
    : T 1A i
    Grounds open for practice or € ( 00 pr
    \} Prices Kensington Star /-:G Cha Stand. 2/6 |
    l
    t ; ; ih
    )) Uncovered Sta G Y )
    nt nt
    ( tt
    ?

    Mrs. Weiss
    Meets Defeat

    —AFTER ROUND OF
    VICTORIES

    LONDON, May 13

    Mrs. Maria Weiss of Argentine





    SUNDAY ADV

    fOCATE

    Some Young Playe
    To Wateh This Summer

    Ry Peter Ditton

    The MCC, that austere body

    has. in the past week, endeared itself to followers 9f the
    game by its praiseworthy action in giving an opportunity

    to youth.

    Alfas Snatch
    Grand Prix
    Honours

    FANGIO LOSES BY
    ILL LUCK

    SILVERSTONE, May 13

    Sheer ill luck robbed Juan Man-
    uel Fangio, the crack Argentin«
    river of finishing first or at least
    saga high place in the Grand
    ’rix of Europe which was ru
    \ about 210. miles, on the Si!

    Stone circuit here. tazday



    Right on the tail of the-ewedtua
    nner Guseuppe Farina, wi
    cnly., 24 miles to go. his Alfa
    Romeo car broke an oil pipe, and
    he spujied into the -pit with the

    body coveredjn oil, and the engia
    bolehing, smoke. .

    Fang 9, whe was in-the position
    to jump to the front in the. ast
    fow.. Japs, gvas greathyeupse! at
    Poving to-netipe,,anc the Took of
    disappointment +on his face said
    iuch more than Words eould have
    one,

    Fangie.had given the crowd

    timated to “be 15,000 many
    ters with b's skilful and daring
    driving. On the corners. he often
    left.the spectators amazed by the
    he .slid his ear round with
    a ceowess that is rarely seen in
    such big races.

    Alfas Lead

    The AlfaeRomeo team by virtue
    of the best practice times, made
    up the first row at the starting
    line today, and .right from the
    flag they swept into the lead and
    never dropped back then, barring
    accidents,

    The four Alfas raced alone io
    a group, fighting out the lead
    between themselves, for Farina to
    finish first, Luigi Fagioli second,
    and Reg Parnell third.

    vay

    Times were 2 hrs. 13 mins, 23
    secs,

    The three Alfa-Romeo = cars
    which finished were the only
    machines to cover the complete
    70 laps.

    In fourth and fifth positions
    came two French four and a half
    litre Talbots which ran the course
    without refuelling but completed
    only 68 laps.

    The Alfas had to refuel once,
    but--they- did-—this—at. sueh- speed

    was beaten in the final of the wo- (Fangio completed his in 25
    men’s singles at the Hurlingham seconds) that the time lost did
    Open Lawn Tennis Tournament not matter.
    to-day, Mrs. Dorothy Head of the
    United Stat taking the honours No Real Race
    by 3—6, 6 » 7—5 }

    This was Mrs. Head's first Eu- The biggest crowd | ever to
    ropean Tournament and the attend a motor race in Britain

    strength of her forceful game was
    tested to the utmost by the firm
    play of the Argentine player who
    Showed good control, and main-

    tained
    length

    It was not
    that the

    an immaculate drivin

    powerful shots of
    won that set comfortably
    At one time in the third set, i
    looked
    Same had been beaten by. Mrs
    Weiss display, but eventually Mrs

    Head proved her su#riority wit!

    a series of good winning strokes
    —Reuter,



    MAXIM_K.O'S PETERSEN

    MEMPHIS, Tennessee, May 13

    until the second sect

    the
    American began to tell, and she

    as though the American’

    road race. The four, Italian cars—
    the most modern designs entered
    —literally led a procession from
    the start to finish.

    Before the race started, the
    drivers were introduced to Their
    Majesties. the. King and Queen
    and Princess Margaret. It was the
    first time that a reigning monarch
    t of England had attended a motor
    race,

    His Majesty on being introduced

    #

    ; to Fangio, asked “Do you speak

    ) English?” and Fangio shook his
    head with a smile. Signor Alessio

    Meneral, manager of the Alfa
    Romeos acted as interpreter.
    “The King said he knew our

    team had all made the fastest laps

    Joey Maxim, the world light and therefore we start in the first
    heavyweight champion, knocked af positions,” he said, after-
    out Bill Petersen of Portland Wards. - .
    Oregon, (heavyweight) in the 4 The fast lap in the race itself

    2i sixth round of a ten-round non- 3
    3; Pitts- title bout here last night.

    Maxim weighed 13 st., 5 Jbs.
    Petersen 14 st 13° Ibs

    |
    |

    WE ARE. OFFERING~.

    HILL'S BADMINTON




    SMOKING MIXTURE

    AT REDUCED PRICE

    C. CARLTON BROWNE
    Wholesale & Retail Druggist
    136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813

    LRSPSPPSOSS FSGS PSPSPS FSO IF APSF SSE

    a
    .

    EEO AOA POD DO Ow





    |





    THE STARS
    present

    1950 CARNIVAL
    & PAIR

    under the Distinguished
    Patronage of Hon. V. C
    Gale, M.L.C., Messrs.
    F. C. Goddard, M.C.P.,
    and E. D..Mottley,
    M.C.P

    at
    QUEEN’S PARK

    Thursday, o 8th June

    Gates open at 12 noon
    Costume Competition, Fire-
    works Display, Dancing Free,
    Special Display by Barbados
    Youth Movement and
    Pioneer Group.

    ALL STAR... Singing
    Competitoin
    1.

    ADMISSION

    PERSONS who ‘
    and BOOTHS

    g STALLS



    s Costumes Bands and indi-

    d are asked to register their

    « Mr CHARLES €
    MORRIS, Sobers Jane



    —Reuter

    ALSOP ALLELES SOS

    LOYAL BROTHERS OF |

    was made by Farina with 1 min.
    50.6 sees, for the three miles, an
    average speed of 94.02 miles per
    hour.

    ————



    saw a fine spectacle but no real



    rs

    LONDON,
    which governs English cricket,

    This may be England's big
    season in internauonar | cricket.
    ine yout paw oe Who aaaaVed
    auring tie war anu were Curb

    .raignt into the first team when

    County ecrackel wag resumed ha
    194i have now iad the necessary
    ime to mature. It remains to be
    wnhelmer they jusuly twuenm-
    seives ana tollow in
    Gr GaP pb, es
    w OoheY, Ju@ylana, & +i we
    nd their like,
    it hus... been particularly en-
    yxuragiag lo see, the lead com-
    oy from the MC.C. In their two
    wwitues against Yorkshire and





    rrey. they gave a chance to
    ich up amd coming young play-
    as Fred Titmus, of, Miaclesex,
    b Clarke of Northamptonshire,
    cerry of , Lancashire, and
    Shackleton. of, Hampshire

    It is all, well and good for in-
    .ividual ceynties te discover and
    coach young players, but the
    young cricketer — unless he be
    au ther Compton or Bra. man—
    vanot get the necessary “big
    mitch” atmosphere from oc-
    casional appearances in county
    ercket. Not until he is honour-
    ed by selection for « representa-
    ive match—such as these MCC
    eemes—can his ability to rise to

    the occasion really be = de-

    term’ned

    Vue ave vecn many cases 1n
    Ne pasi, ana there wit probably
    be us many in the tulure, where

    young players have been granmie
    « trial by a county In the nets
    hey have bowled unplayable balls
    and produced strikes straight from
    the text book. But out in the
    field of play they have become
    bag of nerves and completely uo
    able to justify themselves F
    such players little can be .done
    But correspondingly there are
    others who can always produce
    that little extra when the oecasion
    demands, and it is for players of
    this calibre that the MCC are now
    searching.

    Much has already been written
    about. the. tacties the England
    Selectors sheuld adopt this’ sum-
    mer. when they come to. choose the
    team to play in the five-day Tests
    against the West Indies. One
    school of thought argues that the
    ames should serye simply as trials

    for the forthcoming MCC visIt to
    Australia Others feel that the
    West Indies should only be cp-
    posed by the best eleven England
    can find in. the field

    Sufficient to say that when

    the time for the first Test daw os
    the Selectors will probably find
    that even their best eleven will
    have all their work cut out to
    prevent the West Indies recor4-

    ing their first ever victory in
    this country,
    Nevertheless the Englahd teem

    does not pick itself automatically
    Players like Compton, Hutton,
    Washbrook, Bedser, Bailey and
    Evans are more or less assured of

    their places but that still leaves
    five vacancies to be filled. It
    would be no slur on our West

    Indian visitors if these places were
    filled by young players, not cx-
    perimentally but on performan:¢

    For the sad truth of the matter
    is that England, to date, has not
    got eleven players of recognised
    Test standard,

    If, for instance, Bob Clarke o
    Northants should have a_ good
    start to the season he should be
    rewarded with an England cap.
    Goodness knows, we have waric
    long enough for a genuine fast

    left arm bowler, But it would be

    folly to play Clarke simply on the
    6trength of what he might do
    The same applies to any of the

    other youngsters whom the MCC

    J

    THE

    MICHELIN

    forc

    commerc






    Distributors :— D



    127 Roebuck Street, Bridgetown

    Zi
    TYRE

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    MAY 14













    PAGE FIVE





    — OFPICIAL CLASSTFICATION

    MID-SUMMER MEETING 1950



    NO. 119
    The Topic
    of













    A. 1 Dd. 1 F.2 (contd)
    Last V V eek Beacon Bright na Perseverance
    Blue Stre Firermi
    ig PS ’ Pharos II
    is: Don Artary
    ~~’ Drake’s Drur p. 2 Phoney Lad
    Elizabethan Riptide
    jun Site a %
    i =F wiles Rattle Star River Midst
    Seawell hxaminer Sinbad
    Storm’s Gift Lady Bel Sir Bernard
    Sweeper
    Soprano
    A. ? ia ‘
    A. Rr. 1 Straight’ Ain
    . a Sunbeam
    Atomic ‘a
    Slainte Ali Baba Sunfire
    The Gamble Kendal & The Fagle
    Oatcake
    _ 4 Pornada
    Wellit n
    B. 1 Uusher
    Boys something happened Frid Vanguard
    A young itl cried “ob hell | Lady Pink es angi
    Come Joe-bring Robert with yo. September Son Waterbell
    Mr. Mottley in the cell ttn)
    > ° Battalion
    We rao aeposs the swing bride BR 2 Comet G.1
    Spomting the hundred yares, = Dulcibella 4
    fren Lou Joimed an the marathon . °
    Till we all reached the Main Guard : untone s
    Corfu Wuterere Betsam
    Je and said, what happe: Jataniz ate
    sits tells us right now t t : Mingett
    y said, ‘Keep quiet nfusion Rt Monsoon
    & e solve this ‘hawkers’ row Landmark .
    Periect Set Silk Plant
    One time we had a market
    With a temperature like hell Rebate sow Bells Tango
    So all the hawkers walked oul > 2 Bowmanston :~ .
    And in Broad Street they now dwell Silver Bullet a l'yhpoon
    War Lord Count Cain Victor
    Now the police on the right side Joint Command Chory
    Ask them all to walk along azy ’ Vixen
    So the hawkers then told Mottley oC. fk, L. : BONE
    Cause they can't be wrong and strong Postseript
    Well we three were much delighted a i i :
    Just to get the “right-of-way Beaull : P,) 2, G. 2,
    Cause if Mottley was a prisoner Fabulous
    It would be an awful day Fanny Adams
    * nd ale ak ea Apollo blue Diamond
    Now we ask why Mr. Mottley Flieuxce ' ° =

    ust escort them for this wall Leading Artic April Flower Brahmin’s Choice









    All the other politicians an Best Wishes ‘ ;
    Gone to join the Sugar Talk Racton bn Toad Chindit
    ; ; Sertorious Bonnie as +.
    Talk to-day of Mr. Mottley Swiss Roll Brown Girl Uiana
    Join the others less chat ~ . Bullseye Piyir }
    But be sure when you're in trouble Southern Cro hay relying Ant
    He's the one to “bell the cat Sun Queen can tus Joan's Star
    . Ther ie 3 Clementina .
    Now poor Joe didn't know no. betler Tiberian Lacy Colleton Lucky Shot
    Went alone to see the play Winter Belle F : Mayt
    impire Theatre Consternation Slaytime
    was’ "Rebecca" by the way o% Cross Bow Mopsy
    One of those loud “talkie women mee Cross Roads Otecedol
    Who adore in making strife Dunese
    Shouted out “Joe got Rebecca on Rena Ook,
    Lou must know this; she's his wife Ability Epicure
    . . Dainty Be Facetiou

    Joe decide and sfimmoned courage

    Fair, Contest Flame Flowet



    Took Lou to Rebecca's house *
    But a nice vase dropped and broke up Kidstead Foxglove .
    Made Lou frightened as a mouse Kitchen Front Goblin
    Then the neighbours round the mansion Link Stream Hi-Lo Classifiers
    Listened in to all this mess Marine Light Joan of Are : .
    ‘Till poor Robert cried out “shut up’ Musk Lady Rommel
    Keep this business from the press . a P 4
    . ‘ . Pactora Mary Ann IN. Peirce

    Poor Lou standing up bewildeted River Sprite Miracle
    Listened to Joe's words ainkind . Tye LIT > Pp ‘
    All because he failed to. admit St. Moritz Mocassin L. BR. Gill
    Twas Rebecca on his mind Sailors Fun Mountbatten

    i’ Hen, Bakvere. tos Lousskeroas Starry Night Miss Friendshi; G. D. Bynor

    sped Low's life in pickled sauce William TI Page Boy

    All because poot Louw was ftightened



    To assume her place as boss - ‘

    aa “pp int 8 Subject to change in the event of any horse taking part in any
    ete ee ere ae ete fe Meeting prior to the Barbados Mid-Summer Meeting, 1950
    Yes he yacht Jeft ber forever







    On the happy golden shore
    Boat

    in pieces, Cabin unlocked

    Divers found the broken spar
    So in honour of
    Joe

    a
    ane Lou drink J & R,

    sponsored by
    J & R BAKERIES
    makers of
    ENRICHED BREAD
    and the blenders of
    J & R RUM —





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    HANDCRAETS down. It’s reliable First Aid, Pleas-
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    Dominica | — SB

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    You may well ask why we permit our scientists to do anything
    is that we have to do it to

    REGENT

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    so foolhardy. But the plain answer

    satisfy ourselves that even after proionged storage
    and clog fuel sy:

    ‘es under 100 Ib
    e safe. We have

    will not form gum to stick valve
    The tests +

    sq. inch Oxyzen pressure

    nich consist of boiling sam per

    in “‘bombs’ , are qu

    never lost a scientisi—or for that matter—a customer because

    ofa sticky valve. This test is one of many Witich guarantee the

    quality and performance of REGENT petrol

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    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950

    Soup Kitchen, Rat
    Poison, Steel Sheds

    In’ Queen’s Park

    (By A Special Correspondent)

    SOME interesting facts emerged at the Meeting of
    the Association of Cultural Societies held recently to pro-
    test against the erection of a second steel shed in Queen's
    Park. The Meeting was well attended by representatives

    c¥ cultural bodies.

    ill
    Killed In Fall
    From Lorry
    AROLD BRATHWAITE, a
    labourer of Sargeants
    Street, St. John, died almost in-
    stantly after falling from a lorry
    along College Road, St. John, at
    about 5.30 p.m. on Friday.

    This accident occurred when
    lorry J 9, owned by Bath Planta-
    tion and driven by Thomas Ward
    of Sealey Hall, was going towards
    Palmers. It was loaded with
    canes and Brathwaite was sitting
    on the canes.

    It is understood that the right
    upright broke, causing Brathwaite

    to fall along with some of the
    canes.

    POLICE CONSTABLE was

    on duty at the north en-
    trance to Victoria Bridge yester-
    day and he made sure that
    pedestrians used the footpath.

    He stopped vehicles to allow
    those who were on the left to
    cross over the road to the foot-
    path on the right. ”
    ORDAN’S LANE was the scene

    of an accident at about
    12.55 p.m. on Friday, between
    motor *’bus M1448, owned by the
    General ‘Bus Company = and
    driven by” Ackland Gazette of
    White Hall, St. Michael, and a
    push cart owned by Mrs. Mustor,
    of Dottins Alley and manned by
    Bryan Holder of the Union Hotel.
    The right wheel of the eart was
    damaged.

    EMBERS OF THE Church

    View Social Club kept up

    their ‘first anniversary at the

    0 St. Philip, on Thursday night
    ast.

    The President of the Club, Miss
    Ivy Gay, welcomed the gathering
    and told them that the purpose of
    the Club was to encourage social
    activities among its members,

    Tne Secretary, Miss Joyce
    Lloyd, gave an account of the
    work of the Club for the past
    year. She said that the Club had
    no age limit. They had started
    with thirteen members and this

    had now increased to thirty-
    eight.
    Their meetings were held

    weekly for about a session of
    thirteen weeks and then they took
    a short vacation.

    “So far we have had three
    terms. During the first term we
    spent our afternoons’ knitting.
    Having had a few expert knitters
    in the Club who readily, eagerly,
    and unselfishly gave of their
    knowledge to others, we have
    consequently all done some fine
    work and now have qvite a few
    qualified’ knitters,” she said.

    After expressing appreciation
    of the work that had been done
    by Mrs. Woodland, one of the
    founders who had now left the
    island, Miss Lleyd referred to
    other activities of the Club and
    their expectations of development.

    She ended by asking anyone
    who desired to offer suggestions
    for imprgvement,

    “7 T WAS THE JEWISH Trus-

    tees that sold the Jewish
    Cemetery at Synagogue Lane and
    now the Jews are clamouring
    to regain it,” an official told the
    Advocate yesterday.

    He pointed out that the story
    is a very complicated one. Mr.
    H. P. Graham Yearwood bought
    the Jewish Synagogue from Jew-
    ish Trustees. Some of the con-
    tents of the Jewish Church are
    now in various private houses
    while the clock afi a pew were
    presented to the Barbados
    Museum,

    oe ae time it has changed
    hands fain and it is understood
    that the present owners have
    promised to give it back to the
    Jews providjig certain matters
    are dealt with as soon as possible.

    He ended, “Tt is the fault of the
    Jews themselves that they lost
    their Cemetery, and it is hoped
    that if they ever regain possession
    they would pay better attention

    to something they should
    treasure.”
    DAY IS ODDFELLOWS

    DAY throughout the world.
    The Grand United Order of Odd-
    fellows will be celebrating at
    their Lodge Room, Bay Street, at
    3.30 o’clock this evening and it is
    expected that there will be a good
    turn out of members.

    HIS EVENING at 4.45 a Re-

    ligious Service will be held

    at the Y.M.C.A. to open their

    weekly programme. The Speaker
    will be the Rev. Fairweather.



    With the exception of one rep-
    resentative, who is also a member
    of St. Michael's Vestry, the Mect-
    iug Was uuanimous in its indigna-
    tion that the Barbados Agricul-
    tural Society had been permitted
    to erect another steel shed in
    Queen’s Park, which would further
    impair its beauty. Representa-
    tions had been made both to the
    Vestry and the Agricultural Society
    without avail. Both bodies are
    determined to ride roughshod
    over publie op.uci.. ,

    It was with aporoval and de-
    light that the Meeting learned
    that the Agricultural Society's ap-
    plication for a grant of £1,000
    from Public Funds towards the
    cost of the second steel shed had
    been refused.

    The Agricultural Society, in its
    Annual Report, dignifies the new
    steel shed with the name “Break-
    fast Shed.” As it has previously
    been pointed out, this is to shelter
    the judges of the Annual Exhibi-
    tion during breakfast on two days
    of the year, and remain an eye-
    sore for 363 days. The Vestry
    now proposes to use this new shed
    for feeding 200 paupers—there is
    no information as to where the
    paupers will be fed while the
    judges are breakfasting there. The
    question was asked why the o'!d
    steel shed could not be used for
    this purpose, and the answer
    given was, that it was already
    being used for experiments and
    the manufacture of rat poison!

    Steel Shed

    The new steel shed is now in
    the process of erection. It is be-
    ing put up: below the Queen's
    Park Kitchens, and will obstruct
    the view from Queen’s Park of
    the delightful facade of the
    Georgian house occupied by the
    Department of Agriculture. Bar-
    bados is not rich in good archi-
    tecture, and to obscure one of its
    fine buildings thus is entirely un-
    necessary.

    Queen’s Park, one of the main
    lungs of Bridgetown, is now
    desecrated by steel sheds, a soup
    kitchen for paupers and rat poison.

    Is-such a state of affairs to be
    allowed to continue? . Barbadians
    are inordinately proud of Barba~-
    dos, it is most regrettable that civic
    pride has been so lacking in the
    past that such a state of affairs
    has been allowed to occur, Civic
    pride, however, can be strong
    enough to force the removal ot
    these offences in Queen's Park,
    whatever may be the legal rights
    of the Vestry and the Agricultural
    Society. At the next election, the
    electors of St. Michael’s Vestry can
    show their disapproval in no un-
    certain terms.

    Paupers must be fed, and rat
    Poison prepared, but why in
    Queen’s Park? The Agricultural
    Society has, in the past, done
    excellent work, is that enough to
    warrant the destruction of the
    amenities of the only park in the
    island?

    It is obvious that successive
    Vestries have cared little for
    Queen’s Park, and failed to fulfil





    Venezuelan Tourists

    AAAS
    HNN

    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    Spend $200 Each

    APPROXIMATELY 800

    tourists from Venezuela have

    already visited the island this year as against a similar num-
    ber which came up to the middle of September.last year, Mr
    Vernon Knight, Honorary Vice-Consul for Venezuela and
    an Executive of Messrs. DaCosta and Co., Litd., told the

    “Advocate” yesterday.

    He said that it was gratifying: »

    to see the tremendous increase in
    the number of tourists coming
    out here from Venezuela, Each
    year, the is and became more and
    more popular for foreign resi-
    dents in Venezuela — including
    British, American, Dutch, Swiss,
    Cuban, Danish, and others.

    All the retail shops unanimously
    declared .that the visitors were
    good spenders espé@cially the
    Venezuelans themselves, and
    although he: could not say how
    much money they actually spent,
    yet he thought that $200.00 per
    person would be a very conserva-
    tive estimate.

    Influx

    For several years he had been
    working on the development of
    tourist traffic from Venezuela
    prior to his appointment as Vice-
    Consul, and the results were now
    pleasing to all sections of the
    community, as not only the hotels
    had benefited from this influx
    of tourists, but domestic servants,
    taxi drivers and grocery depart-
    ment stores.

    He said that Messrs. DaCosta
    & Co., Ltd. are the agents of
    the Venezuela Airline Aerovia.
    Venezolanas (Avensa) which
    made two special flights to Bar-
    bados during the Easter season
    and negotiations were now in
    progress with the British authori-
    ties for this airline to run a
    regular service to Barbados.

    The company is one of the
    leading aviation ones in Vene-
    zuela, and with their connections,
    they should be able to increase
    considerably the volume of pas-
    senger traffic generated from
    Venezuela, particularly during
    the off season from April to
    November.

    —Permission—

    He hoped that permission would
    shortly be granted for the com-
    pany to operate the service to
    Barbados as it would be of
    mutual benefit to all concerned,

    Mr. Knight said that it was
    felt that the leading hotels or

    this part of their task. The con- other new interests would have

    stitution of Queen’s Park Com-
    mittee changes annually. If there
    is to be any continuity of policy
    with regard to the amenities of
    the Park, the Vestry should co-
    opt members of the Association of
    Cultural Societies on the Queen's
    Park Committee. These co-opted
    members would have more know-
    ledge and interest in matters
    affecting the Park than the average
    vestryman. If the power to co-
    opt does not exist, the relevam
    Act should be amended to give
    this power,

    Royal Visitor

    In 1879, a Royal Visitor to Bar-
    bados wrote: ‘We also called on
    General Gamble, C.B., command-
    ing the forces at Queen's House,
    where we went round the well
    arranged garden, in which are all
    sorts of curious shrubs and plants
    and in a great tank in a shaay
    dell three old turtles of great
    antiquity”. Seventy one years have
    elapsed since then. Could the
    Royal shade re-visit Queen's Park
    in 1950, the shock can be imagined.

    Queen's Park should be one of
    the beauty spots of Bridgetown.
    Not only should its walks of trees,
    shrubs and flowers give joy to the
    residents of the area, but to the
    entire community. It should be
    one of the places of interest for
    tourists to visit, where tropical
    plants could be seen, clearly
    labelled. Instead the Park is an
    eyesore and a disgrace.







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    to increase their accommodation
    or new hotels would have to be
    built, as at Easter time, with the
    big influx of tourists from Vene-
    zuela, the hotels were already
    booked up.

    He pointed out that-Holy Week
    was the most popular vacation
    period for Venezuelans and more
    would have come: over, but were
    unable to do so owing to the lack
    of suitable accommodation.

    Employment

    This development with Vene-
    zuela had also helped in a very
    limited way, the labour situation
    of the island as from time to
    time, domestic servants were
    gradually finding employment in
    Venezuela, thereby relieving the
    unemployment question and
    ultimately, those individuals
    would of necessity send back
    money which would be in valua-
    ble hard currency for the support
    of their relatives.

    He said that it was the unani-
    mous opinion of all visitors here
    that Barbados was one of the
    most wonderful places in the
    world for spending a vacation as
    the island was blessed in having
    all the various amenities to offer
    to visitors in the form of wonder-
    ful beaches for seabathing, yacht-
    ing, polo, horse racing, golf,
    tennis etc.

    The road system he said also
    induced visitors to see the beauty
    spots of the island and he hoped
    that every encouragement would





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    accuracy and care characteristic of us.
    Pharmacies you are always assured of that extra service which
    make your shopping a pleasure.

    FOR BETTER SERVICE IT’S

    KNIGHTS DRUG

    Police Dogs

    Cane Fires
    THE ever-improving local Police
    Force may at some time in the
    near future, if the Government
    approves, be equipped with the
    valuable addition of Police dogs,
    Col. Michelin, Commissioner v!
    Police, told the “Advocate” yes-
    terday.

    He said that he regards these
    dogs as the answer to cane fires,
    for not only would they be able
    to sniff the origin of cane fires
    when in the area, but would track
    down the culprit as well.

    It was in Trinidad, he said, that
    he discussed the project with the
    Commissioner of Police there, wit.,
    the idea of getting, if Governfnent
    would approve, a dog trainer from

    Canada for both Farces, the cost
    to be shared equally by them.

    —Find Out Costs—

    Tne Trinidad Commissioner
    favoured the suggestion and he
    (Col. Michelin) was now com-
    municating with the Royal Cana-
    dian Mounted Police to find out
    the cost. When this was obtained,
    the project would be put up to
    both governments.

    “Apart from their use in the
    matter of cane fires,” said Cdl.
    Michelin, ‘ dogs are extremely
    useful in tracking down persons
    wanted by the Ponce und are. in
    hiding.”

    Col. Michelin said that it was
    also hoped that in the not too
    distant future, that the Force
    would be equipped with the new
    V.H.F. wireless set. The present
    one was very much out of date
    and had outlived its usefulness.

    —Three Launches—

    The Force had three launches
    in operation at the moment, and
    it was very necessary that these
    should be in wireless communica-
    tion with the shore at all times.
    At present once they left the shore
    they were out of contact. With
    the installation of the new wire-
    less set this state of affairs would
    be altered.

    “A new set is a necessity as
    speed in communication is vital
    to any modern Police Force” sai
    Col. Michelin,

    Speaking about the taking away
    of the rifle from the sentry at the
    entrance to the Central Police
    Station, he said that the carrying

    be given by Government, com-
    mercial interests as well as all
    concerned in furthering the
    development which was taking
    place with regard to tourism from
    Venezuela.

    tate e's ss se ss

    NOW FRESH

    eee eT ETT YT
    Tree treeeocaeeMAMNL ty yy
    TATE ANY ‘MEENA YN



    ee

    mi Reades.

    sends a postcard
    iviera

    2 Stowaways
    Return On ‘*Misr’”’

    THE two stowaways Marcus
    Joseph and Eiter Cummins, after
    getting a free trip from Barba-
    dos to France aboard the 7,367-
    ton chartered French liner
    “Mist”, were brought back to
    Barbados on Thursday evening
    on the return of the “Misr’’.

    Marcus and Eiter got aboard
    the “Misr” on the night of April
    5 and passed themselves off as
    third class passengers until the
    ship arrived at Plymouth, Eng-
    land, on April 18.

    They demanded landing per-
    mits but the French authorities
    imprisoned them on the ship and
    took them to Le Havre, France,
    where they were landed and

    imprisoned.

    Marcus and Eiter were brought
    back to the “Misr” and again im-
    prisoned on the ship. They com-
    plained of being hungry, saying
    that they had got no food in the
    prison at Le Havre.

    The “Misr” sailed from Lisbon
    and the two men were
    turned over to the chief officer
    of the ship to work on deck, On
    reaching the ports Funchal,
    Pointe-a-Pitre, Hort de France
    and Port-of-Spain, the ship's
    captain ordered them to be kept
    behind bars. e

    Next pov of their free voyage
    was La Guaira, Venezuela, where
    the authorities insisted that they
    be landed and imprisoned, Again,
    they complained of getting no
    food in prison.

    Eiter and Marcus were two
    free men again when they were
    landed at Barbados on Thursday

    Drove Without
    Lights: Fined 15/-

    A FINE of 15/- to be paid ia
    14 days or 14 days’ imprisonment
    was imposed on Reynold Robin-
    son of Lodge Road, Christ Church
    by His Worship Mr. A. J. H, Han-
    schell yesterday for not having

    his lights on while driving the
    motor lorry S — 217 on Broad
    Street on March 31 about 7.10
    p.m,

    of this rifle was a tradition ex-
    tending well over 100 years. When
    he first came to the island he con-
    sidered it just a relic of the past
    and not in keeping with present
    day progress. Because it was
    traditional, however, he gave it a
    great deal of thought before ar-
    riving at the conclusion that a more

    ful purpose would be served

    giving the sentry a stick in-
    stead, .

    —Law And Order—

    The Police, said Col. Michelin,
    wanted the public to realise that
    not only was it their duty to see
    law and order maintained, but
    they wanted to give any assistance
    possible, The sentry was a persoa
    who could be approached and
    asked about contacting anyone 1).
    the station from whom informa-
    tion might be obtained. It was not
    desired that he should be regarded
    by timid-minded persons as to»
    formidable a being to be approach -
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    ‘PAGE NINE





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    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOC: _ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN







    9S9OSS89SSSS 5599 99 SSSSB SOO FF SASS HOFF I SOFI SH









    B.B.C. News:

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    ~ . = SS
    Church Services i The Presidept and Members of [|| & :
    Be aoe KEEP THE Date OPEN fi, | oe aes Tolar nes RELIANCE FREEZERS
    METHODIST tion will’ hold their A ° ‘<¢ >
    est Indies Cricket Tour. PROGRAMMES Hi |) FIRST DANCE sees Salle eee
    BETHEL For the | s ‘ ALSO —
    it am. Mr, P. Bruce; 7 Rev, B. | >, : Is :
    i i anne ane ) 1} under the Patronage ot Mr. FE { D rE > r : ‘
    Daily BBC Broadcasts direct beam on 19.85 metres, 15.07 a eae mmand: } }}\ GRAND FAIR 1 D. Moitiey M.C:P. at the Hall || 3 MAIZE ee MILLS.
    For those not interested in megacycles. Comments on re- SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1950 DALKEITH ys 1G: eee Gren on eee P % ICE SHAVERS
    cricket — if there are any such ception or on the quality of the ,7 am. (The News 710 am. News| !l am. Mr. H. EF. Gilkes; Tp». Mr A} ij) At HASTINGS ROCKS ’ |]] pire Day, 24th May 1950. $ Att Se sis
    individuals in the West Indies reporting will be welcome. grass 7 ]5 aim. Mights at the Opera. he Mayers. BELMONT X On SATURDAY, | Muse bY Mr. SYDNEY NILES’ . SOEs ARS Bees cere At ONCE
    — these weekly notes on BBC Address these to The BBC, P.O. Programme, Parade. §.15 a.m. Accordeon pits m, Rev. H. C. Payne; 7 Mr. € » June 10th, 1950 )} Orchestra. | °
    programmes will prove very Box 408, Kingston, Jamaica, B.W.1, Interlude. 630 am. From the Children's | Brathwaite ; P \ | DANCING ¢ 9 p.n.—3 a.m. Established ‘ 1 p Incorporated
    > . ’ » BWA. Hour. 9 Clase De 124 Th SOUTH DISTRICT - : Sale
    boring for the next few months. ‘Caribbean Voices’ News. 1210" Pie News Analysis, 12 15] 9 am. Mr. W. W. Alleyne: 7 p.m. M it FUL PAI Tl *ULARS os cag the Art to Dance in ; 1860 I. HERBERT hid 1926
    While the BBC tries to cater to * . p.m, Ray’s A Laugh. 12.45 p.m. London | G. Jones {) FULL A g CULS | Be mnene tiful surroundings oe =
    The schedule of ‘Caribbean Forum. 1.15 p.m. Radio NeWsreel. 1.30 PROVIDENCE ii} LATER i) DT, CF ag neh ba =. t. 10 & 11 Roébuck Street.
    all tastes they have gone to con- yojces’ i ‘ : ‘ aé where soft breezes from the A
    Voices’ for May contains very little p.m. Sunday Service. 2 p.m. The News. 11 a.m. Rev, B. Crosby. Holy Commun} )}) . | lantie fan the cheek. 4.5.50—fin
    siderable trouble—-and expense— poetry, only three individuals con- 210 Pm. Home News trom Britain. 2.15 | ion. 7 p.m, Mr. ‘T. Callender 4 At. eee : a ir ’
    to provide full‘coverage of the tributing to 5 ewe eee, SOP Ble Varter VAUXBALL =
    West Indies cricket Sivan” del tributing to the programmes this mabor. 3: 3 Dm). ane Country Trouse. 9 a.m. Rev. B. Crosby. Holy Comm A
    ma + 5 e ws. 4. m., ters on. 7 p.m. }. Bascombe

    will therefore appear to be con- a. ae oan ue ies p.m. Voice of the violin, 4.30 i — ment eden eee |
    centrating on the sport loving Ro a ras ay — Spey: Bal ove, saudi Epilogue’ | in am. Rev. F. Lavevence; 7 pm, Rev A Y
    public during the teur and in this ee dace a eee Cane Programme Parade. 5.30 p.m. BBC Sym- wianata Ce eee a our
    column we recognise this fact by ‘or uu y Phony Orchestra. 6.35 p.m. From the 9.30 a.m. Mr. W. St. Hill: 7 pom. Mr. V
    constant reference to the cricket of Trinidad. Children's Hour. 645 p.m. Michael | St. John

    SERVICE

    Krein Saxophone Quartet; 7 p.m, The



    bean Voices.’ From Monday to
    Friday the accounts will cover the
    last two days of the match against
    Surrey and the three days of the
    match against Cambridge Uni-
    versity. On Saturday, the open-
    ing day of the match against the
    M.C.C. i.e. 20th inst. in addition to
    the report at 7.15 p.m. there will
    be ball-by-ball commentaries from
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    p.m. to 1.30 p.m. Special beams
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    cast*there will be an additional

    WHITE u ero
    ; . N 7 10 News A E * 20 a bs all f eo ; >
    ie ath Man ee meek begn- = Two. British Writers =. 8 p.m’ Cartobeem “Volnse Poems ae | 3029. Ghat MeCulioush: 7 pa - JUST WELLIAMES 9 «.
    ning iy repo! by eye On Wednesd t, 17th inst. 12 Carew of British Guiana, and Short GILL MEMORIAL im the
    witnesses will be given at 7.15 at er ae ie = Story by mest Carr of Trinidad. 8] 11 am. Mr. F. Moore; ? p.m. Rev. H, | MAGIC PAINTING
    si 8 p.m. Books t Payne | y gy ,

    eo ie ke ean grammes on two writers. The Read 8 Seen mm. Britian Masterpieces es HOLETOWN | DRUG LINE BOOKS
    time daily—except for the Sunday ‘rst is Sir Walter Scott who is the art, 228 Be Bunaey | Serving: Bie. ane er R Also :

    hich will subject of a talk by Lord David The News. 10.10 p.m. From | the BANK HALL ‘i es tie 4 , bias as
    programme which w continue : a 4 Bdliorials. 10.15 p.m. Journey into Mel- Sah gad Sida> Ateeeies 9 ns Ss To-morrow May 15th I will be carrying on business
    fo be devoted entirely to ‘Carib- Cecil in the series on “The English ody. 11 p.m. The News. De ee FD, Mr CHILDREN ~ CUTOUT BOOKS

    PAINTING & TRAC-
    ' ING BOOKS

    Novel’. The second is H. G. Wells,
    a new judgment on whom forms a
    feature programme at 6.00 p.m.
    This critical assessment has been
    written by Kingsley Martin, Editor
    of ‘The New Statesman and Nation’
    assisted by J. F. Horrabin who,
    like Kingsley Martin, was a per-
    sonal friend of Wells.
    British Landscape Painfing
    On Sunday, 14th inst. the series
    ‘British Masterpieces’ will deal
    with British Landscape Painting
    with, of course, particular mention
    of Constable. The talk is by the
    art critic Eric Newton and can be
    heard at 8.30 p.m. on Sunday.



    W.I. Score 468-4 By

    Record

    Batting

    from page 1

    e
    J. Laker,‘ Alec Bedser, W. Sur-
    ridge, G. Kirby, J. Mc. Mahon.
    The Start

    Goddard won the toss and de-
    cided to take first knock in ideal
    batting conditions. The tourists
    suffered an eXly setback, losing
    Roy Marshall with only 9 on the
    boards. Allan Rae and Frankie
    Worrell brought the score to 56
    before Worrell was dismissed,
    and at lunch Rae was still at the
    wicket, partnered by Everton
    Weekes. Marshall mistimed both
    the opening bowlers, Alec Bedser
    and Surridge, before he was
    splendidly caught close to the
    ground by first slip off Bedser.

    Three quarters of an hour
    elapsed before the first boundary
    came, from a cover drive by Rae
    off Surridge. The first hour pro-
    duced 35 runs. Then Worrell fell
    to Laker, right arm off spinner
    who toured the West Indies with
    the M.C.C. two years ago.
    Trying to drive, he was well
    caught in the slips. He was at
    the wicket for 65 minutes for his
    ae wet ne had faced most of

    ling. Weekes played

    Goigntrony and stayed with Rae
    until lunch, Rae, employing the
    eut freely at the expense of
    Australian left arm googly bowler,
    McMahon, completed 51 out of
    88 in 1 hour, 45 minutes with a
    sparkling on drive off the Aus-
    tralian. At lunch he was 52 not
    out and the total 90 for 2 wickets.
    Weekes was 16.

    After Lunch

    After lunch, and in glorious
    sunny weather, Surrey who had
    a long time in the field yesterday
    against Derbyshire, had to strug-
    gle to keep the runs down.

    Rae went on to bat well to
    make 96 in three hours five min-
    utes, Including 15 fours. He tried
    to complete his century by

    the tea interval. Weekes com-
    pleted a forceful century and the
    tea interval found the score at
    282—Weekes 104, and Walcott 51.

    After Tea

    In the final period of the day’s
    play, Weekes and Walcott com-
    pletely mastered the Surrey
    bowling and piled up runs well
    ahead of the clock. Walcott com-
    pleted a fine century, and reached
    128 before he was out l.b.w. to
    Alec Bedser.

    The partnership had added 247
    and Walcott had hit 15 bounda-
    ries and had batted for 2% hours.

    Weekes who was then partnered
    by Christiani, batted for 5 hours
    and in his 192 hit 21 boundaries.

    Christiani was three not out,
    and the total 468 when stumps
    were drawn.

    The scores: —

    Scores .

    w. a Innings



    A. Rae ec & b Laker .............06- 96
    R. Marshall c Marion b A. Bedser .. 4
    F. Worrell c Surridge b Laker.... 17
    E, Weekes not Out oo. peeee ieee 192
    Cc. Waleott lbw. b A. Bedser -» 128
    R. Christiani not out . of 3
    POMOEOE is is Vetus Rasen diane 28
    Total (for 4 wkts.) 468

    Fall of wickets: 1—9; 2—26; 3—188;
    4—435, Reuter,



    “Big Three” Reach
    Policy Agreement

    @ from page 1

    (5) The three Governments vr2re

    Boston

    WRUL 15.29 Mc., WRUW 11.75 Mc
    WRUX 17.75 Me

    4.30 p.m, Christian Science Programme,
    3.05 p.m, Lecture on Christian Science

    MONDAY, MAY 15, 1950

    7 am. The News. 7.10 am. News An-
    alysis. 715 pm. Listéners’ Choice. 7.45
    a.m. Places of Interest. 8 a.m. From the
    Editorials. 8.10 a m. Pre®ramme Parade.
    8.15 a.m. British Orchestral Music; 8 30
    a.m. Sid Phillips and his Band; 9 a.m
    Close Down. 12 (noon) The News. 12.10
    Pm, News Analysis 15 pm. Pro-
    gtamme Pardde. 12 18 pm Music from
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    1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel. 1 30 pm
    Tip Top Tunes. 2 pm The News. 2.10
    p.m. Home News from Britain. 2.15
    p.m. Sports Review; 2.30 p.m, Meet the
    Commonwealth; 3 p.m. From the Third
    Programme; 4 p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m
    The Daily Service. 415 pm Journey
    into Melody. 5 p.m. Listeners’ Choice
    5 15 p.m. Programme Parade. 5 30 p.m.
    Places of Interest. 5.45 p.m. Dance
    Music. 6 pm_ Ring Up the Curtain
    7 p.m. The News. 710 pm. News
    Analysis. 715-730 pm. Eye Witness
    Account of W.I. vs. Surrey. 7,30-7.45
    p.m, Light Music. 8 p m. Radio News-
    reel. 815 pm. Science Review. 8 30
    Pm. Tip Top Tunes 9 pm. The
    Animal World 930 pm_ British Or-
    chestral Music; 9.45 p.m. The Cathedra!
    Organs, 10 p.m. The News. 10.10 pm
    From the Editorials. 10.15 p.m. Much
    Binding in the Marsh. 10.45 p.m. Com-
    monwealth Survey. 11 p.m. The News

    Holidays For
    Employees

    After Round Of Victories

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    KINGSTON.

    Seven classes of occupations
    are to be recommended to Gov-
    ernment by a Committee recently
    appointed to recommend the
    occupations to which the provis-
    ions of the Holidays with Pay Law,
    1947, should be extended.

    The law was passed in 1947 but
    never put into operation, Recent-
    ly the Government appointed a
    Committee, under the chairman-
    ship of the Labour Adviser, to de-
    note the types of occupation in the
    island for which the Governor-in-
    Executive Council should make
    regulations for statutory annual
    holidays. The types of occupations
    to be recommended are: (1): all
    manufacturing establishments, (2)
    building construction, (3) trans-
    portation, (4) dockworkers, (5)
    establishments in which persons
    are employed mainly in clerical
    work, (6) establishments for the
    treatment and care of the sick, and
    (7) theatres and places of amuse-
    ment,

    The inclusion of domestic ser-
    vants in the categories of workers
    who are entitled to annual holi-
    days was weighed, but no decision
    was reached because it was diffi-
    cult for the Committee to see how
    legislation could properly be im-
    plemented. A _ special report on
    this subject will be forwarded to
    the Governor.



    SPEIGHTSTOWN
    11 a.m. Mr. G. Marville; 7 p Rev
    F. Lawrence

    SALVATION ARMY

    BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL

    11 am. Holiness Meeting: 32 p.m. Com
    Pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Mecting.
    Preather : Major Smith.

    WELLINGTON STREET

    11 a.m. Holiness Meeting: 3 p.m. Com-
    Pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
    Preacher : S/Major Gibbs

    SPEIGHTSTOWN

    ll a.m Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Com-
    pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
    Preacher: S/Captain os ‘ampbell

    CARLT

    11 a.m. Holiness Mocting: 3 p.m, Com-
    pany Meeting: 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
    Preacher: Lieutenant Reid.

    DIAMOND CORNER

    11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 2 p.m. Com-
    pany Meeting; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
    Preacher : Lieutenant Moore.

    SEA VIEW

    11 a.m. Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m, Com-
    pany Meeting: 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
    Preacher : Lieutenant Gibbons

    FOUR ROADS

    11 a.m Holipess Meeting; 3 p.m, Com-
    pany Meeting: 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
    Preacher Lieutenant Hinds.

    ST. MATER LUTHERAN CHURCH
    Lower Greens, Bridgetown

    Open Air Service at 7 p.m. Rev. W. F

    O’Donohue, Speaker; Subject What i

    Error". Wednesday Evening at 7 pm
    Open Air Service at the same Ar
    to listen to Dr. Benkingson, D D Sermon
    6 p.m. Sunday.
    MORAVIAN

    ROEBUCK STREET 11 a.m. and 7
    p.m. Rev. Ernest New.

    *GRACE HILL—1l1 a.m. Mr. Swire. 7
    pm Mr O. Weekes.

    FULNECK—11 am. Mr. Alleyne. 7
    p.m. Mr. Smith.

    MONTGOMERY~—7 p.m..Mr, Greene.

    SHOP HILL—7 p.m. Mr. Downes

    DUNSCOMBE-—-11 a.m, Mr. F. Deane
    7 p.m. Mr, Francis.

    CHURCH OF GOD

    St. Michael
    11 a.m. Bank Hali Rev. M. B, Pretti-
    john; 7 p.m. Eckstein Village; Elder R,
    H, Walkes



    Christ Church

    11 a.m. Poarded Hall: Rev. E. W
    Weekes; 7 p.m, Cox Road Rev. E. W
    Weekes

    St.
    ll am Sherbourne : MEles R. H. Walkes

    1l a.m, & 7 p.m, “Crab Yai : Rev. A, R
    Brome.

    |



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    straight driving Jim Laker, but
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    the second attempt.

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    and. social conditions there.

    Weekes, after a slow beginning
    reached 50 in 78 minutes.

    Clyde Walcott joined Weekes

    and this pair proceeded to take

    operation between Britain, Hill and 40-year-old Ursula Fenty
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    “ nae a oa and the United States. By ey te eaterday ie the eae Clubs, Associations, Church- ’ :
    eavy toll o e Surrey bowling. onsultations between the y . Ss especial! issions 444 £6660
    Rae had left with the score at Ms three powers should be more and assaulting Island Constable Cultural Boeetion 5 oie SSS ~ LSPA OOOO OOOO oe dicidictntshacidichitcititidid
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    : —Reuter. mitted on May 12.







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    188, and the second century was.
    soon hoisted. Weekes scored all
    around the wicket, and Walcott
    punched his way past 50 before

    Churchill’s
    Colt Wins
    £500 Stakes

    KEMPTON PARK, Middlesex,
    May 13.

    Mr. Winston Churchill saw his
    French-bred four-year-old colt,
    “Colonist II”, win the £500 Victor

    'ild Stakes over one and a half
    miles here this afternoon.

    Tremendous applause broke out
    as soon as it was seen that the colt
    had the race won a lofig way from
    the post, and the cheering con-
    tinued right until “Colonist I”
    had been led into the winning
    enclos\re.

    “Colonist II’, ridden by T.
    Gibbs, started 5—4 and beat the
    odds on favourite Jai Mahal by
    three lengths.—Reu!

    4

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    garding the history, mem-
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    lication in the next issue of
    the BARBADOS ANNUAL
    REVIEW which is now be-
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    asked to send the necessary
    information written briefly
    on one side of the copy,
    and posted before June 15th
    1950, to the STOMARA
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    LLOYD MAYERS, “Sto-

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    SHOOTING SEASON WILL START

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    EMPIRE WEEK EXHIBITION
    1950
    at Combermere School May 24-27

    LOWER PRICES!
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    IT IS IN YOUR INTEREST
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