Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
UF00098964_02176 ( sobekcm )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Friday

“= Rarbados

—.—————————. . = Wee

CANADA URGED TO

Ramadhin Takes |

2 Whis. for 9 Runs

OSTERLEY, Middlesex. May 4.
HE WEST INDIES ericket touring team got in some
useful practice when they drew the one-day game
with an Indian Gymkhana eleven which included two Indian
Test players Mankad and Polly Umrigar, and the former
West Indies Test player, Leary Constantine. at Osterley, | j
Middlesex, today.

cag pied ce ntact rele iatieiatiinarnanip alps

Sir Pelham Congratulated

SIR PELHAM WARNER,
who accompanied the M.C.C.
to the West Indies in 1948,
has been elected President
of the M.C.C. for this year.

On receipt of this news
the Barbados Cricket Asso-
ciation sent him the follow




































ACCEPT STERLING
, Could Help Colonial

Development

HOME PRODUCER FIRST;
EMPIRE PRODUCER SECOND

|
| : sina (Barbados Advocate Correspondent
| UK Workers

LONDON, May 4.
ANADIAN participation in the development o
Are Angry
With Attlee

the colonies should be fostered in the United
LONDON, May 4.







The West Indies who won the
toss scored 177 for 7 declared and
in reply the Indian Gymkhana XI
made 78 for 8. 9

The Gymkhana batsmen found
runs hard to get against the ae-
curate W.I. attack in which Sonny
Ramadhin was outstanding. He
had the batsmen guessing with his
spinners which he turned both
ways. Varying his pace and mak-
ing the ball do some peculiar



Kingdom, says Mr. Julian Amery,.M.P., son of :
former Colonial Secretary, in a letter to ‘“Thé

Times’’ today.
His letter which follows the recent parliamentary debat



S. RAMADHIN—
Took 5 for 9

K. TRESTRAIL—
Top scored—49

Vv. MANKAD-—
4 for 49

including three fours in 103
minutes, while his colleague
Alan Rae hit one six and four
fours in his 47 made in 85 min-
utes. The pair together added
103 for the second wicket and
put the West indies in a good
position, but at 163, three wick-
ets fell without any addition to

At a meeting in London
today leaders of over 600,000 civil
servants—ranging from executives
to office cleaners—said they were
“thoroughly dissatisfied with a
letter Mr. Attlee sent them earlier
this week replying to their protest
that there was discrimination in
applying the “freeze” to the Civil

; i Britain's Government workers| on Anglo-Canadian trade recalls the reference by Michac

fee cistetineis atat® inst e a: oe esr for omy | | are so angry with Prime Minister! Foot to the fact that unless Britain is to balance her trad
wishes on your Presi- The highest score of me, das 6é ‘PIRA TES 29 T aes" welies "that thee’ devlaen with Canada at an undesirably low level canna must b
fence, Buvbatios ‘Crickat came from the yeune West 0 i oday to seek intareiew wi rsuaded to accept sterling as part payment for some o
Association. dies Ken Trestrail who made 49 U S. Should ry tostay to seek an interview with| persuaded to pt g n

her export goods.



BELIEVED
OFF T’DAD

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

’ Such sterling, Mr. Foot sugge

FOUR DEPUTIES | 32!) c7nesion 2080"

U.S. Want current transactions and, above al
ADJOURN

To Win Cold War
U.K. Promise

SAYS TRUMAN

for Canadian investment in, th4
sterling area and the Colonies,

Mr. Amery points out that, whil
| it may be in the best interests ¢













pum. to-day
the docks

Sanads articipate th
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 4. WASHINGTON May 4 “ Canada to participate in
WASHINGTON, May 4. Th Vene ans, a father resi ‘sien eel > : os hia Service, LONDON, May 4 Development of the Colonis
Fifty-one members of the House | This was chiefly due te Mankad | two ro ray age Be President Truman said today that the United States should Mr. Attlee had denied this and| The Four-Power Deputies dis-| Empire it would, nevertheless, |
of Representatives today asked| who flighting his slow spinners|Trinidad on a shopping mission, use every means at its command te win the cold war, said civil servants were free to} cussing the Austrian Treaty today] a bold step for a young county
Secretary of State Dean Acheson | qjeverly caused the batswen the}are missing. They are believed The President made this statement at his weekly Press| t#ke their pay claims to arbitra~ | adjourned their meeting called by} which still offers great scope fq
to obtain Britain’s promise that all| most trouble. He took the wickets|to be victims of “Pirates” said to| Conference in defending the cost of the Marshall Plan. oe —(Reuter.) the Soviet delegate George Zaru-| domestic investment :
shipments to the Middle East will|o¢ Walcott and Christiani with}be roaming the sea off Pajos, a ~~ <--> Mp. Trumen eeid the Marshall bin without reporting any pro-| — It was therefore, up to the U.
ee halted until Israel and the Arab | consecutive balls, and very nearly |tiny island off the coast of We: bien wae anh ae the atiet teeta ° Srom._ thet will meet again on] Government to create conditic
ates agree 7 ri - ; ‘ i 7 inks ¢ Hs ; Me May 22,—Reuter. ic Canadians would
The “United States’ end: oat: one pe to bang ver ie Sek reer one ae ; of winning the cold war and he orrison 7 oe ee er en eaates te
n ; a. nezuelans é x <1 out that it was much : es,
should join in an effort to bring —_ ati P ted to be’carr a car f SPORTS ta aie ! Colonies |
umps after beating Gomez reported to be“carrying a cargo o a wi f eet ‘ : on
about such a treaty, the request Ls hg finished with four “wickets |merchandise worth. $3,000, pur- frente Seeeeiia caie 8 Oo Communist Boycott First of those conditions sho’
to Bekenan edder. for 49 runs and later scored a|chased in Port-of-Spain | when WINDOW tne high rae aan ant F 1 I H il . d be reasonable profit from inve
e presentatives are 30 Demo- | },,; 21 including one six and|they left in a small boat. Some Peete aah : ils ment without in any way jeop|
crats and 21 Republicans. ee ice in 33 Oe Dae cloth, similar to the material the The Basketball mateh between ~ Foreign Office pr ORT Site, the LONDON, May 4 au n onan dising the interests of the 1
—(Reuter) } *” ; men bought has since been dis- Harrison College Old Boys anda || /'esident said that his Defence) Mr, Herbert Morrison, Leader ROTTERDAM, May 4 population.
On Page 8 covered by the Police, in the pos- Pickwick, which was fixed to Budget for the next year would ]of the House of Commons, today} adin ” Americ as“ " |
@ On Page : by the Falice, in the pag take place at the Y¥.M.C.A be smaller than for this year refused a suggestion by six of his| The unloading of American Secondly, as “quid pro 4 |
session of a City man. tomorrow night, Will now be H id that th ae ho res \ sugges Boa 7 ims from the American freighter for Canadian acceptance of s'
. This brings to seven the number played at Y.M.P.C. at 7.90 © said that there was no reason | supporters that Parliament should! Ppire State began at about 6) ling payments, British subje
Hayworth—Khan of men missing and _ believed ‘onight er fo be alarmed and the defence} be asked to censure the Opposition | \\"/\! i ennai ‘ ;

Brazilian Mission

The surroundings of
were empty of people
a few policemen saun-

in the United Kingdom she
he permitted to
proved Canadian companies.

programme would he adequate to
the defence of the United States
The President also made a spirited

drowned and their bodies weight-
The Police
for the past 36 hours have been

for forcing unexpected
minor issues.

voles on
One of these votes
resulted in a Government defeat



; J invest in
ed with pieces of iron.

and only

Divorce? Arrives In France



7 ; >fenc » . S oe ; tered around. Police launches Thirdly Canadians should be X ,
dragging the area of the piraes U.N.O BACKS sotence of the United Nations. _ | last month and another in a tie patrolled the ship from the sea.]in no doubt that such develd
ROME, May 4. LE HAVRE, May 4. working with nets. r heedoaaee vith Sy S-. a oalea ia ser ee 7 It was, evident that the Com-{ ment was the real aim of
: ; rte i. § s sition would e such - ia ry . sensei a i ‘ 4 ‘ ‘ z
The leading Rome newspaper| The new French liner “Claude TRY( SVE LIE made by. ex-President Herbert ik but Mr Sioa eae munist boycott plan had proved a | British Government. “It is no
Il Messaggero reported tonight | Bernar” (8,020 tons), of the Com- Hoover very damp squib.—Reuter

that Rita Hayworth and her hus-
band Prince Ali Khan are on their
way to Cannes—where they were

pagnie Maritime des Chargeurs,
arrived here this morning, com-
pleting its maiden voyage to South

Engulfs 125 Hames

married last year--to arrange a
See, Gpeting Fas informed
circles in. ,” the newspi

said that the fabulous aoughes
decision to divorce was due to
“profound incompatibility of
character which appeared in the
months immediately after their
marriage and especially since the
birth in December, 1949 of theix
daughter Yashmin”.

American ts. #0

On board was a Brazilian Eco-
nomic ion, headed by M. Bezi-
lacqua, former Director of Com-
mercial Agreements at the Brazil-
ian Foreign Ministry.

Their object is to conclude a
Franco-Brazilian financial agree-
ment, notably on settling the debt
in France owed by Brazil to
France on account of past loans.
It is the first Brazilian Economic
Mission to come to France since
the war.~—Reuter.

ITALY APPEALS
GRAZIANI SENTENCE

ROME, May 4.

The Italian State to-day appeal-
ed against the 19 year sentence
for collaboration with the Ger-
mans pronounced by a Military
Tribunal on Tuesday on ex-Mar-
shal Rodolfo Graziani. The Public
Prosecutor seeking more severe
punishment appealed against the
finding of the Military Tribunal.
—(Reuter)

—(Reuter)





Senora Franco On
Holy Year Visit

ROME, May 5.

Senora Franco, wife of the
Spanish Head of State, arrived by
yacht to-day in the tiny Tegan
port of Gaeta ona Holy Year
visit to Rome. She was accom-
panied by her newly-married
daughter Carmen and son-in-law.

The party will be received in
audience next week by the Pope
at the Vatican Palace.—Reuter.

Occupation Forces Ready
For Any Eventuality
Says MaeArthur

TOKYO, May 4.
General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Allied Commander,
angounced today: that the occupation Forces wer? main-
taining their bases in a state of “almost complete readiness

Foe)
for any eventuality”. He made his statement in a
letter to Lieut..General Kuzma
Dervyanko, Russian member of
the Allied Council for Japan, re-
plying to the Soviet delegate pro-
test note against the reconstruction
of. Japanese Naval and 1

In the letter, publish day,
General Mac Arthur called Gen-
eral Dervyanko’s note a “yeliicle
of propaganda or provocative im-



Canadian Red River

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA,
May 4.
The Canadian Red River
engulfed early to-day more

than 125 homes in Winnipeg pertinence”. ; ey
suburbs and _ threatened The Supreme Commander said
three hospitals. General rvyanko’s “anxiety

The flood crest was last over Japan was “quite ground-
reported about 31 miles from less.”

Japan was completely disarmed
and no Japanese forces existed.
“As for bases for the forces of

Winnipeg.

Emergency food es
had to be sent an Winnie

py lorris and occupation, both American and
Ba Mast ate Britich, they can and will, so long
Nearly all the 1,100 popu- as the occupation lasts; be main-
lation of Morris have been tained in a condition of such ade~-
evacuated.—Reuter. quacy and preparedness as will

ensure the fullest security, oper-
ational efficiency and most. com-
plete readiness for any eventual-
ity”. —(Reuter.)

VIDELA BACK
IN _ CHILE



New W.I. Air
Reute Planned

es. THE HAGUE. SANTIAGO, Chile, May 4.
A new Spanish-Dutch-sir-treaty| President, Gonzalez _—_-Videla

enabling. Dutch Airlines| afrived at Santiago tonight in a

(K.L.M.) h Madrid on its} U.S, Constellation after three

Amsterdam-West Indies route has] weeks’ visit to the U.S. The

been announced. President arrived with his wife
A Minis of Transport and} Rosa Marckmann De Gonzalez

Public Wor communique says
that Spain and Holland have
reached agreement on an air
treaty providing for exploitation
of a Dutch-operated air service
from Amsterdam via Nice
(France), Madrid, Lisbon, Cape
Verde Island, eventually Dakar,
Paramaribo to Curacao.

Pending the new treaty, the
Spanish Government twice granted
Holland a three months prolonga-
tion of a permit to touch Spanish
nirports. —B.U.P.

—Reuter.)
BEVIN OUT OF
HOSPITAL

LONDON, May 4

The British Foreign Secretary
Mr. Ernest Bevin, left hospital by
car this afternoon looking pale but
cheerful.

He will spend the next few days
convalescing before his meeting
here next week with the United
States Secretayy of State Dean
Achesen —(Revter )

Sugarmen Leave
Trinidad May 9
(Barbados Advocate, Corvespondeuts

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 4.
A. Edun, President of B.G.
Manpower Citizens Association
and Hon, W. J. Raatgever, B.G

. PARIS, May 4.

The United Nations Administra-
tive Co-ordination Committee,
which met here on cnlitenanis
yesterday under the® rmanship
of the United Nations Secretary
General Trygve Lie, today issued
a unanimous statement backing
Lie’s attempt to bring East and

delegate to Sugar Talks in Lon-, West together,

don, arrived in Trinidad today.

Edun said that there is a feeling
of uncertainty in B.G. of the
future of the Sugar Industry
there, if the talks fail.

Raatgever said that it is vitally
necessary to get an agreement
They leave here together with the
Trinidad delegate, Hon A
Gomes, and Hon. Harold Robin-
son, B.W.LS.A. delegate, who is
going. as adviser, May 9



U.S, Citizen Not
Allowed To Land
In Trinidad

Barbados Advocate Correspondent
RT-OF-SPAIN, May 4.

Trinidad Government refused to
grant permission to Damon Wills,
a U.S. citizen who married a
Trinidad girl, to land.

Wills is on a suspended sentence
of ten years by the Court of Vir-
ginia, U.S.A., after being found
guilty of rape. The decision means
that Wills will have to serve the

sentence. His father-in-law, liv-
ing here, had petitioned the
Governor seeking permission to

allow Wills to land.



Agreement Reached
In Antigua Dispute

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA, May 4. -,
"The capital was quiet “this
morning but for red flag bearers
loitering in the vicinity of
Bryson’s. There was a meeting
this afternoon, at which an agree-
ment was signed between Bennett
Brysons and the Union in the
presence of Federal Labour Officer
Edwards.

A Dock Labour Committee is to
be established comprising a repre-
sentative of Brysons, the shipping
agents, a representative of the
Union, and an independent Chair-
man nominated by the Adminis-
trator, its functions being to select
stevedore labour from a register
atready agreed upon for working
each steamer for a‘trial period of
eight months.



S. Africa Troops
Will Stay In Union

CAPETOWN, May 5.
Prime Minister Daniel Malan
} told the South African Senate to-
day that in the event of another
war the Union Army may at first
jinstanece be required at home, but
should the position in the Union
prove to be safe-—and he under-
stood it would be gafe—the Goy-
jernment would consider what
jcould be done He said it was
|sound principle that, rather than
send South African troops over-
seas the position should be made
secure not only in the Union but





also in countries in Africa to the
north. South Africa was concern-
ed as to what happened in those
countries. —Reuter



The statement said: “A lasting
| peace can be achieved and main-
{teined only by world organisa-
tion.

essential for the future of both the
United Nations and the specialised
institutions that a settlement of the
present political deadlock within
the United Nations should come
about as soon as possible,

“The peace-loving peoples de-
mand of their Governments a new



effort on the part of the nations |

of the World with a view to the
establishment of a_ constructive
and lasting peace.”—Reuter,



Stop Scientist
From Leaving US

NEW YORK, May 4.

A Chicago atomic scientist who
had publicly expressed faith in
Dr. Klaus Fuchs, the British phy-
sicist who was convicted of pass-
ing secrets to Russia, was today
prevented from leaving for France.
The State Department, which im-
pounded the scientist’s passport,
said it had done so because his
proposed trip would be “not in the
national interest’’.—Reuter



Fuchs Post Filled

LONDON, May 4.

Britain today filled the research
post held by the German born
atom spy Klaus Fechs whois
serving a jail term for betraying
secrets to Russia.

Dr. Maurice H. L. Pryce, 37-
year-old Professor of Physics at
Oxford University, has agreed to
be responsible for the technical
supervision of the Theoretical
Physics Division at Britain’s Har-
well Atomic Energy Establishmeny

the job Fuchs was doing when
he was arrested,

A Ministry of Supply announce-
ment today said that Dr. Pryce
would be in charge of the division

for the time being”.—Reuter.







last week that the non-
Communist nations should organ-
ise themselves to the exclusion of
Communist nations,

Ste Id continue to
suppért the United Nations as long
as he was\President of the United
States. He said that the United
Nations was an organisation for
discussion amongst the ations
seeking a peaceful settlement of
their disputes and it was working
well on many subjetts
Questioned about a private con-

Y si ; ‘ | versation which he had with Mr.
“We specially believe that it is

Hoover immediately after Mr.
Hoover delivered his speech in
New York, President Truman said
today that he had discussed with
Mr. Hvover the part of his speech |
in which he referred to the neces-
sity of mobilising the moral forces
in the world against the immoral}
forces. .
President Truman said to-day
that that was just what he had
been trying to do for the last}

five years.
—Reuter.



13 Killed In_ |
Bomb Blast

CATANIA, May 4

Police, troops and voluntary
helpers were tonight digging for
the bodies of 13 workers who
were buried or blown to pieces
when 100 tons of bombs of the last
war exploded here today Two
explosions, following closely on
each other, tore a vast hole deep
in the field where the bombs were
being defused, beside the muni-
tions dump. The explosions cut
all telephone communications in|
the city, of Catania for several}
hours, increasing the panic |
—Reuter.





5 CHILDREN ARRESTED

ATHENS, May 4
Athens police today arrested five
schoo] chiJdren who tried to per-
sudde a classmate to join them
in a strike against. payment of
extra fees, Other pupils paraded
outside the Ministry of Education

shouting, “We have no money!”
Pupils at most Athens and pro-
vincial secondary schools left

classes when they were asked t
pay an extra ordinary fee to en-
able the Government to pay bon-
uses to teachers. —Reuter.

Sydney’s Labour Part

Endorses Government

ili

| To Outlaw Communists

SYDNEY, May 4.
The Australian Federal Parlia~

mentary Labour Party today de-»

cided to endorse the principles of
the Government’s bill to outlaw
the Communist Party as 50 mines
in New South Wales coalfields de-
fied a stop-work order of their
Communist controlled union

This morning 50 of the State's
115 mines voted against holding
stoppages as a protest against the
bill

At 65 mines, where work stop-
ped for the day, the majorities in
favour of stoppages wcre only by
a few votes in most cases

Australia’s biggest coal producer,
| Burwood North, which in the past
}has been recognised as a Commu-

nist-controlled mine, voted against
any stoppage.

In Canberra Mr. Joseph Chifley,
Labour Chief and Leader of the
Parliamentary Opposition, an-
hneunded that the Federal Parlia-
mentary Labour Party would ap-
prove the Government's bil! but
would seek alterations to the
clauses which authorise the Gov-
ernment to “declare” other organi-
sations and persons, who are
members of such organisations, or
advocate or support their views

a semblance of appeal was given |
both to such “declared” organisa-;
tions and to “declared’ persons. |

In the Labour Party's opinion
this appeal would be largely illu-
sory, he said —Reuter

4 Truman said that the

make time for it.—Reuter,



Labour Wins
By-Election

BRIGHOUSRE, Yorkshire, May 5

Britain's Labour Government
to-day inereased its effective vote
majority in the House of Commons
to nine by a vietory at Brighouse
in the Parliamentary Bye-Election
there,

Mr. L. J. Edwards, the Labour
candidate, polled 24,004 votes
against National Liberal (Conser-
vative) Major W. E. Wooley
23,567, The victory increases the
majority in the Commons to
seven, but because two Irish
Nationalist members who returned
at the General Election have not
taken their Oath the effective
majority will be nine. —(Reuter.)



Parachute Traps

" Pilot: Dies In Crash

COPENHAGEN, May 4

Thousands lining Copenhagen’s
streets saw a Danish jet plane
pilot, trapped by his parachute
as he tried to bail out, crash te
his death today during an air
show celebrating the Fifth Anni-
versary of Denmark's liberation

The pilot, Captain-Lieutenant
Carlo Flish Soerensen, struggled
vainly to free himself when his

parachute got caught in his nose-
diving plane. (Reuter)



KING CAROL
IN BRITAIN

LONDON, May 4

Ex-King Carol of Rumania and
his wife, the former Madame}
Lupescu, arrived in Britain tonight |
9 attend the International Stamp
exhibition in London. They will |
ve the guests at the Stamp Day |
linner given by dealers and other |
xperts at the Savoy Hotel in|
London on May 6 ~—-(Reuter) |





U.K. to Ask Russia
About Ship’s Arrest |

LONDON, May 4 |

Britain is to ask Russia why
Soviet naval patrols have arrested
the British fishing trawler “Etru-
ria”, a Foreign Office spokesmar
said today. If circumstances
rant it, the trawler’s immediat
release will be requested.

The trawler, 3,737 tons, was)
apparently arrested in the White}
Sea on Monday and is believed to
have been taken to the Russian |
naval port of Murmansk. It had |
2 crew of 21,.—Reuter. |

war-



|

SWEDEN WILL PROTEST |
STOCKHOLM, May 4
Sweden’s Embassy in Moscow i

to protest to the Soviet Russian
Government about the seizure of
two Swedish vessels in interna-
tional waters. The trawlers were

| stopped by Russian warships about
Chifley said that under the bill} 30

ea miles from the Polish coast

last February and taken to the
port of Neukueren. There they
were held’ for 18 allowed to communicate with tt



Swedish authorities
—~ (Reuter)

Finland’s Rail
Strike Spreads

HELSINKI, May 4.



‘Finland's railway strike spread
this morning as drivers and fire-
men



on the emergency trains
began to cé work,
These trains, carrying workers

to their factories and offices, milk
to the towns and reparation goods
to Russia, were running normally
yesterday

The
strikers’ reply to a call up order
issued to them
new
ernment

new stoppage was the
yesterday by the
Right Wing Agrarian Gov-

—~ (Reuter)

DETROIT STRIKE ENDS

DETROIT, May 4

The strike of 89,000 Chrysler
workers, the second largest and
most costly in the automobile

industry, was settled here today,
a few minutes before it was due

enter the hundredth

‘Wa
\saas

â„¢N

dary
Reuter,





Se.

a

pf
..and

herefore, paying lip service to t 1
»rinciple of discrimination, redug
ing preferences or passing piod
resolutions at Geneva, Havanaii
Annecy or Torquay, a

“Trstead” we hc cima po nA ae
to the principle of the Ottawa?
Axgreements—home producer ‘ir
Empire producer second, the re
also ran,’ says Mr, Amery

He concludés by stressing the
point that Canadian acceptance of
sterling payments would go a long
way to correct the present ul
balance in world trade

“In a short time, howeve
accession of Canada’s producti
power to the sterling area wou!
almost certainly reduce — tha
(dollar) gap still farther to ti
point where free convertibility «
currencies might once again be:
sight





EXTEND CONSCRIPTION

WASHINGTON, May 4

The Armed Services Committee
of the House of Representatived
voted today to extend conscrip-

tion for anoth@r two years, The) 4

present Service Act is due to exe,
pire on

June 4.--Reuter.

~

| advocat@







FP

GE TWO





~



Legdon Express Service.

aes BROMOVA and her
* Committee are giving a party
this. afternoon at 4.30 o'clock, at
the St. Michael’s Girls’ School,
dales Road, in honour of
Mollie Radcliffe, the new dancing
tor for the Anna Bromova
School of Dancing, who arrived
here recently from England.
here will also be a dernonstra-
tion by the pupils.

‘Arriving in August

TR, GEORGE SEEL, K.C.M.G.

the new Comptroller for De- ;

velopment and Welfare, who spent
the... week-end at Government
House as a guest of His Exceliency
the Governor and Mrs. Savage, has
now eo to Cacrabank.

. orge hopes that Lady
Seel-will join him in August.

Music from “High Tyme’’

APTAIN RAISON tells me
that the fortnightly Police
Band concerts at the Hastings
Rocks resume to-night. The con-
oaa will begin at 8 p.m. instead of

Special feature of to-night’s pro-
gramme will be the music from
‘High Tyme,’ the musical revue re-
cently staged at the Empire
Theatre.

Also on the programme is: Con-
cert Overture, The Hebrides, Fin-
gal’s Cave by Mendelssohn. Like
the Scotch Symphony, this pic-
turesque composition owes its
origin to a Highland tour under-
taken in 1829,.avhen Mendelssohn
was only twenty years of age. The
rugged coastline and grand scenery
So appealed to him that he wrote
the opening movement and prin-
cipal theme on the spot.

Honeymoon at Bathsheba

PENDING their honeymoon at
“Bathsheba are Mr. and Mrs.
pongiss Wilkie who were married
On Saturday afternoon at St. Au-
ees Church. Mr. Wilkie is
son of Mr. and Mrs. Noel Wil-
kie of “Cottage,” St. George and
» Wilkie is the former Miss
y Mc Conney, dayghter of
Mr,.and Mrs. S. W. Mc Conney of
“Newbury”, St. George.

“At Sea Since 1911

APT. TRYGVE EIDE, Skipper

of the S.S. “Seabreeze” of the
Brae Steamship Line has been in
los since April 26th at the

‘al Hospital. He is now fit

and well again and off to join his
. at St. Johns N.B. He left

ay by B.W.1.A, for Puerto

7 and New York. He will then

‘o. by train from New York to St.

pt. Eide has been at sea since
1911,
First Visit
ISS MARIA ESCOBAR, Miss
‘Olga and Miss a Gomes
who .arrived here on Wednesday
afternoon by B.W.LA, from Vene-
zuela, are vel Barbados for
the first time. ey are staying
at the Hotel Royal, and hope to be
here for two weeks.

“To Live in Miami

R. AND MRS. JACK KAP-

LAN and their young son

for the U.S. yesterday by
B.W.LA. via Puérto Rico. They
are.going to live in Miami.



aay

ave
nim

I THER that air-hostesses, or.
you prefer to call them, aero-
lonettes, are trained at

a -schools.”
: are taught “Tact, deport-
how to serve food while
g at speed, how to deal
with: wild animals and survive in
jles.”” And my paper adds:
think their training will
‘to make them good wives.”
t in the air means that
you detect a gases the
plane you say quietly, “We are
PO pamsing over Cheltenham.”

he

ent follows, as, you come

down. the aisle between

ts with a cup of coffee and

a biscuit in one hand, a hunk of

“meat for the jaguar in the
and, balanced on your head,
of pills for the green

ah Saree in jungles depends
on whether the forced







- aRROW

‘> RADIAC
= REGAL

2.91

BLUE, WHITE, TAN.

BY THE WAY



Antigua Passengers

On ‘“‘Gascogne”’

-S. “GASCOGNE” called at

Antigua on April 28th and
picked up a number of passengers
bound for the U.K. Rev. and Mrs.
W. Palmer, the Misses C. & J.
Palmer and Master W. Palmer:
came here from St. Kitts to join
the ship also Rev. A. R. Thompson
and Mrs. Thompson from Nevis.
















their two young daughters Janic:
and Katherine who were both
born in Antigua. The Shaefler:
now have their permanent home
at Weatherals estate in Antigua,
where Mr. Shaefler has developed
one of the island's largest cotto:
cultivated areas.

Mr. and Mrs, Emanuel Farara|
sailed on the “Gascogne”. i
their intention to join the pilgrim-|
age to Rome.

Mrs, Barbara Macdonald wife?
of Mr, Roy Macdonald of the An-“
tigua Sugar Factory Ltd. also sail-
ed for England with their daugh-
ter Sandra. Mr. Macdonald will
be leaving the factory at the end
of the crop to join his wife in
England. It is Mr. Macdonald’s
intention to take a three year
course in mining engineering.

“Cricketers from the W.I.”’

HE OFFICIAL Brochure of
the West Indies cricket tour of

England was published last week
by Playfair blications. It is
called, appropriately enough,

“Cricketers from the West Indies”
and has a foreword by Sir Pelham
Warner. There is also a message
from Mr. R. K. Nunes (President
of the W.LC.B.C.). Included in
the brochure are pen pictures of
all the players together with re-
cords of every ‘Test Match in
which the West Indies have parti-
cipated.

Transatlantic Race

FY: possibly six, British yachts
will be taking part in the
2,780-mile transatlantic race from
Bermuda to Plymouth this sum-
mer. This great event, organised
yy the Royal Ocean Sailing Club,
has been revived this year after a
break caused by the war. Before
the long-distance race the British
yachts will race from Rhode
Island to Bermuda under Cruising
Club of America rules. Three of
them—*Mokoia”, “Samuel Pepys”
and “Cohoe”, with their crews left
the Port of London last week for
Bermuda in the Royal Mail cargo
ship “Araby”.

Snowing Two Weeks Ago

RS. IDA MANTLE and her

daughter Paula, who arrived
in Barbados on March 18th live
about four miles from Worcester
in England. She had a letter from
home saying that it was still snow-
ing there up to about two weeks
ago, and she was wondering how
it was going to affect the cricket.

Yesterday afternoon, she and
her daughter left by B.W.ILA., for
Trinidad, and they will be there
until Sunday, staying with Mr. and
Mrs. Taurel, friends they met on
the boat coming over,

They will then be returning
here to join the “Golfito” which
leaves Barbados on May 11th for
England.

see

Her sun-broiled arms were strati-
fied

When time stood idle,

Stars, like golden bones strewn
for the wild dogs

Of Paradise, hovered over a pal-
sied world.

I saw the political consciousness

Come creeping home like a sick
dog

From a rubbish-heap.

And then
T knew.
Only a torn edge of life flapping
Like a dirty paper-bag in a
runnel,

(Woonoze Gubstan in “Poems of
Now.”’)

Difficulties of a duet

During the duet he seemed to
faller once or twice,
(Music critic.)

RROBABLY. When Rustiguzzi
sang with Broccoli he always
refused to come close to_ her,
because, he said, she deafened

MENS wate

‘ 646

3.94
4.69

EVANS avo



~~ Carib Calling

So Tired

VER in England for a holiday

is Miss Kay Bury, hostess at
the Butlin’s dollar-earning camp
at Nassau, Bahamas. She has de-
cided she needs a rest from sun-
bathi dancing and entertaining
millionaires. Her duties at the
Nassau Camp read strangely to
Londoners at present undergoing
a cold spell, including snow: rise
early, greet the guests, arrange
fishing trips, swim and lie in the
= with them, and then dance till
ate.

Grenada Tennis Champ

R. RONALD COOLS-LAR-

TIGUE, son of Mr. Justice

A. R. Cools-Lartigue Puisne Judge

of St. Vincent and Mrs. Cools-Lar-

tigue is in Barbados for about four
or five days.

His father, he told Carib is Act-

sing Puisne Judge in Grenada and

‘he is with Gerald S. W. Smith and
Co., Commission Agents in Grena-
da. He arrived on Wednesday by
-W.LA. from St. Kitts and will
be returning to Grenada over the
eek-end.

He is very keen on tennis and
ja few days ago playing in a tennis
urnament he gecame Grenada’'s
ennis Champ. He is staying at
the Hotel Royal.

Married Yesterday

ISS LIL MELVILLE, daugh-

ter of the late Canon and
Mrs. H. A. Melville of Trinidad
and sister of Rev. H. A. Melville,
Vicar of St. Ambrose, was married
esterday afternoon to Mr. Ian
Jackson, Director of Messrs. Gor-
don Grant & Co., Ltd.

The ceremony took place at St.
Margaret's Church, Port-of-Spain
where the bride’s father was Rec-
tor for many years. It was con-
ducted by Rev. H. A. Melville who
left on Wednesday evening by
B.W.LA. for the occasion. He was
assisted by the Bishop of Trinidad
and Canon J. D, Ramkeesoon,
Rector of St. Margaret’s.

A reception was held at Queen’s
Park Hotel for 250 guests and later
in the evening, the couple left by
the “Lady Nelson” for St. Vincent
to spend their honeymoon,

Well Worth While

VISIT to the Barbados

Museum, just at present is
well worth while, There are two
art exhibitions at present going on,
and they will be of particular in-
terest to anyone who collects
water colour or oil paintings.

The style of the two artists
varies considerably and each one
in their own way is very impress-
ive,

In one room there is the work
of the famous Dutch artist William
Van Yperen, who is at present in
Barbados. His work is full of de-
teil, colourful and they range
from Dutch scenes to local har-
bour and careenage scenes.

There are also scenes of Dutch
Guiana, British Guiana and Trini-
dad, where the artist has visited.

In the other room the work of
Geoffrey Holder, the young Trini-
dad artist is exhibited, a review
of his work was given recently by
Mr. John Harrison, Arts Officer of
the British Council.

First Lady
ISS LOUISE ROWLEY, dele-
gate from Grenada to the
recent Civil Service Federation
Talks held here two weeks ago was
a passenger by B.W.LA., for
Grenada on Monday. Miss Row-
ley is the first lady delegate to
represent any of the Colonies at
these talks. During her stay here
she was a guest at ‘Leaton-on-
Sea’, The Stream. She was ac-
companied by her sister Miss Doris
Rowley.

For U.S. Holiday
R. JOHN HOYOS left yester-
day by B.W.1.A. for Puerto
Rico en route to New York where
he is going on a couple of months’
holiday.



By Beachcomber

nim. I remember, too, an occa-
sion at Salzburg when Tapioca,
greeting Dotti with the exuberant
ery, “’Tis thou, my love!” blew
his helmet sideways and made the
audience rock with laughter. He
got his own back in Act II. During
a short interlude in the bawling,
after she had roared “Hush. I pray
thee! I hear a noise within the
castle walls.” “So do I, by St.
Fiacre,” shouted Dotti, before
resuming his role.
Have you Racined

your boots?

T is reported that when Mimsie

Slopcorner was approached by
the British Council, with a view
to a series of lectures on Racine
in Swedish Lapland, she said, “I
think Racine is wonderful stuff.
I use it every day, and so does
Mummy. But I really don’t know
as I ought to advertise it like this
in Swedish Lapland. Just say I
hope all the people there will use
it like I do.”

SHIRTS

See EE UEEEEEEEnn!



RADIAC PIQUE DRESS SHIRT

COLLAR ATTACHED $5.49

WHIETEIELDS



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





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conducting Max Fretor Hollywood Art Sthool of Make-Up Classes, acquired
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being presented free-of-charge at Cave, Shepherd & Co., Ltd. offer invaluable
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MAX FACTOR PRODUCTS also obtainable
from:

Knights Ltd.,
Collins Ltd., Booker’s Drug Store
C.F. Harrison & Co., Ltd.
Wm. Fogarty Ltd. The

Cosmopolitan Pharmacy.

All Branches, © Bruce Weatherhead Ltd.
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H. P. & Co,

Modern Dress Shoppe,

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|



BARN DANCE

and WEANA ROAST

In slacks, shorts, or just bathsuits

CASUARINA CLUB

(Next Cable Office)
St. Lawrence,

If the weather man is kind—
Weana by moonlight. If he
is unkind—by electric light

Our Dance floor has been en-
larged—and now there is
always music

P.S.— For Sunday morning:

@ sea bath, a game of billiards

or snooker—and our Black

Pudding and Souse is the real
jeCoy.





ROYAL Worthings

Starting To-day 5 & 8.30

M-G-M Proudly Presents.
Lassie in

“COURAGE OF LASSIE”
With
Elizebeth TAYLOR
Frank MORGAN, Tom DRAKE

The picture your

heart will
always remember :

To-day 2.30 & 8.30
tinuing....

and Con-
M-G-M’s Gay Technicolor
Musical, .....

“TAKE ME OUT TO THE
BALL GAME”

Starring
Frank SINATRA

Esther WILLIAMS, Gene KELLY
Betty GARRET

ROXY

To-day To Tues.
Columbia’s



4.30 & 8.15
Sensational Double

“ROSE OF SANTA ROSA”

with The Hoosier Hot-Shots,
Patricia WHITE

and “PORT SAID"

: With
Gloria HENRY, William BISHOP
Steven GERAY



OLYMPIC

To-day to Sun. 4.30 & 8.15
M-G-M Double......

Lana TURNER,
Vincent PRICE in

Gene KELLY

“THREE MUSKETEERS” and
“NEPTUNE’S DAUGHTER’
Starring Esther WILLIAMS

Red SKELTON, Ricardo
MONTALBAN



————_—_—
———SS!





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)

5

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950



AQUATIC CLUB CIN EMA (Members Only)
MATINEES: TODAY & TOMORROW at 5 p.m.
TONIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT at 8.30
EDWARD G. ROBINSON — ANN SOTHERN
HUMPHREY BOGART

in “BROTHER ORCHID :
with DONALD CRISP — RALPH BELLAMY
ALLAN JENKINS
A Warner Bros. Picture









SS









BRIDGETOWN PLAYERS

Under the Distinguished Patronage of His Excellency
the Governor and Mrs. Savage

: Present :

REBECCA

(Directed by TOM McGEE)
: AT:

THE EMPIRE THEATRE

ON THURSDAY, MAY 11TH, AT 8.30 P.M. and
ON FRIDAY AT 5 P.M. and 8.30 P.M.

PRICES: Orchestra and Boxes $1.50; Circle $1.00
House 84c., and Balcony 48c.

BOX OFFICE opens FRIDAY 5TH at 8.30 a.m.

THE MAGNIFICENT STORY OF THE HEROIC “600”
by ALFRED
LORD TENNYSON’S WORLD-FAMOUS POEM!











“Cannon To Right Of Them, Cannon To Left Of Them,
Cannon In Front Of Then Volleyed And Thundered”
A Salute To The Gallant “600" Who Rode “Into The
Jaws Of Death” That A Comrade Might Live For Love!

ERROL FLYNN
OLIVIA de HAVILLAND

The Unforgetiabic Stars of “Captain Blood” im






Prem Tenapen’) Meron Mavierpioce wih
PATRIC KNOWLES |
HENRY STEPHENSON
NIGEL BRUCE+ Donald Crisp
David Niven «Robert Barrat
Directed by Michaci Curtic

Now!

PLAZA

5 and 8.30 p.m. and continuing





GLOBE”

LAST SHOWING TODAY at 5 and 8.30 p.m.

(LARK GABLE and MYRNA LOY

IN

| MANHATTEN MELODRAMA x








GRAND OPENING
TO-DAY

and Continuing

VAN JOHNSON » JOHN HODIAK
RIGARDO MONTALBAN » GEORGE MURPHY

MARSHALL THOMPSON + JEROME COURTLAND - DON TAYLOR + BRUCE COWLING

JAMES WHITMORE - DOUGLAS FOWLEY + LEON AMES + GUY ANDERSON

THOMAS E. BREEN + DENISE DARCEL + RICHARD JAECKE: + JIM ARNESS
SCOTTY SECKETi + BRETT KING

Story and Screenplay by ROBERT PIROSH, Associate Producet a
Directed hy WILLIAM A. WELLMAN » Produced by DORE SCHARY_<
A METRO-GOLOWYN-MAYER PICTURE “



This ts Denisd,
@ “very friendly”
French girli 4













LL a” a neemreamsaaae |”
SATURDAY AT 830 PM.
é JEFFREY’S BEER presents a FAREWELL. VARIETY CONCERT with
Landy De Montbrun and other leading artistes:
Retain your half-ticket for this Show and win a complimentary to the
, GLOBE for six months and a carton of JEFFREY’S BEER.
' OSS I IIIs
e







FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950



Finances
Of the Carib

Commission

LONDON,
Sir Herbert Williams (Cons
tive) asked the Secretary of Sta
for the Colonies in the House o
Commons (on April 26,)
payments have been made by



Majesty’s Government in the
United Kingdom and by oth«
Governments to the Caribbean

Commission and to the Caribbean
Research Council; and in what
currencies these payments were
made.

Mr. James Griffiths answered
“As the reply contains numerous
figures I will with permission cir-
culate it in the Official Report.

Following is the reply:

“His Majesty's Government have
made |the following contributions
to the Budget of the Caribbean

Commission since it was formed

in 1946:—

Financial Year £
1946—47 15,226
1947—48 28,693
1948—49 21,681
1949—50 af ~. $6,543
1950—51 (Estimated

contribution 36,000

The expenses of the Caribbean
Research Council are paid from
the Commission’s budget and no
separate contributions are made
in respect of it, His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment’s agreed proportionate
share of the Commission’s budget
is 34.3 per cent; the United States
contributes 38.4 per cent; France
16 per cent; Netherlands 11.3 per
cent. His Majesty’s Government’s
contribution is paid in Trinidad
currency.” —B.U.P.

Economics
Of Caribbean

LONDON,

Mr, James Griffiths, Secretary of
State for the Colonies told the
House of Commons (on April 26,)
that a new edition of the Economic
Survey of the Colonial Empire
was in preparation but it would
be some time before it was ready
for publication.

He had been asked by Mr
Sorensen to arrange for a periodi-
cal economic and financial sur.
vey of the West African,
Caribbean, and other Colonial



areas and also to arrange for the
official registration and record ot
European, United States and

Indian capital invested in colonial
enterprises.

Mr. Griffiths said he wouid
“consider” the capital registration
request —B.U.P.

Tarzan Comes

Back

SOUTHAMPTON

A’ young Tarzan walked the
streets of Southampton, knife in
hand, but not for long.

Jack Brown, a bakery delivery-
man, was making his rounds
shortly after dawn when he came
across the “jungle boy,” about four
feet tall and wearing only ag piece
of spotted imitation “leopard skin”
draped over one shoulder and be-
tween the legs.

The Tarzan explained to Brown
that his home was in Africa,
“where there are no schools, where
we live in trees,” He added that
“wicked soldiers” had brought him
to Southampton.

Tarzan consented to accompany
Brown to a nearby police station.
A frenzied call came to the police,
asking for help in locating Patrick
Drew, aged seven, suffering from
an “overdose of romanticism.”

ARGENTINA BUYS GOLD
BUENOS AIRES, May 3.
The Argentine Minister of
Finance, Dr. Alfredo Gomez, an-
nounced that Argentina has pur-
chased 60 tons of gold of which
44.322 kilos. were purchased from
the United States and the remain-
der from Switzerland.—Reuter.









ea

ONE GIRL from St. Thomas, in the W
is among this group of
ing training in England.

a







colo

Free Grants Cuban And

To W. Indies

LONDON,

Mr. James Griffiths, Secreta-y
of State for Colonial Affairs, gave
details of free grants promised or
given by the British Government

to the Caribbean area from
January 1945 to the end of the
financial year 1950-51 in the

course of a general review of such
grants to the Colonies.

He said the total of all such
grants was £183,219,525 of which
£ 2,534,944 had been given in the
form of food subsidies but direct
grants for that purpose had now
ended.

Claims to repayment of loans
to Colonies that had been waived
included £100,418 to British
Honduras (Hurricane Loan);
Subsidies other than food included
£117,669 compensation to Britisn
Guiana Sugar growers and £190,450
subsidies for sugar replanting in
Trinidad. Food subsidies (four out
of five of them went to the
Caribbean) were: — Jamaica
£418,415; Turks and Caicos Islands
£179,865; British Guiana £366,667;
and Antigua £19,997,

—B.UP.



Puerto Rico
Wants To
Boost Sugar

NEW YORK
As part of what is termed
“Operation Bootstrap", Puerto

Rico is trying to get United States
political and financial support for
extending her sugar industry.

Dr. Fernos-Isern, Puerto Rican
Resident Commissioner in Wash-
ington, has stated that if his
country’s current quota of 910,000
tens of sugar a year being pro-
duced in Puerto Rico could be in-
creased by 200,000 tons the island’s
economy would benefit by twenty
million dollars a year. Anothei
twenty million dollars would re-

sult if the island could refine
sugar locally instead of sending
it raw. He has also asked for

more cruise ships from the States,
complaining that only one vessel
now calls there.

Meanwhile Mr. Oscar Ewing,
U.S. Federal Security Admini-
strator has left for Puerto Rico to
lay the groundwork for social
security schemes which the U.S.
Senate is expected to pass by the
end of the session. These will
give Puerto Rico old age and de-
pendents’ assistancé, and help for
dependent children and the blind,

but not unemployment _ benefit
which is not expected to pass
Congress.

—B.UP.

Jamaican
Rums Down

NEW YORK

A survey by the National
Association of Alcoholic Beverage
Importers, in the United States,
shows that during last year while
Cuban and Jamaican rum imports
crashed still further, Puerto Rico
more than doubled her shipments

Mr. Harry Lourie, executive
vice president of the Association,
Says “Imported rum, coming main-
ly from Cuba and Jamaica, showed
a decline in consumption in 1949.
The market appears decidedly
unimportant and limited to a few
well-advertised brands. The ship-
ments of Puerto Rican rum to the
United States more than doubled
in 1949. The co-operative efforts
of the Puerto Rico Inuustrial De-
velopment Company and the
members of the import trade in
advertising and promoting Puerto

Rican rum have had a_ worth
while effect.
“For 1950 plans already have

been considered which will utilise
the experience of 1949. Adver-
tisements in the institutional
campaign now carry the brand
names of Puerto Rican rums
which are nationally advertised
and promoted. The campaign has
demonstrated the necessity of the
project being continued for a
period of time sufficient to enablt
the rebuilding of consumer
fidence in Puerto Riean rum
Demand Is Up

“The principal deduction which
may be drawn for 1949 is that
consumers did increase their de-
mands and that shipments reflect
an actual increase in consumption
Surplus stocks which caused so
many of the difficulties for Puerto
Rican rum have been largely dis-
sipated and the distributing branch
of the industry, wholesalers and
retailers, are now in a_ fairly
liquid inventory position.” .

It is pointed out that Americon
attempts to rebuild the domestic
market for foreign wines and
spirits showed results for prac-
tically all liquors—except foreign
rums—i.e. Cuban and Jamaican

—B.U.P.

con-



Bookers Man
i In NY |——

NEW YORK,

Mr. Derick Richmond, 28-year-
old overseer, of Booker Bros.
McConnell and Co., Georgetown,
British Guiana, whose home

address is in London, was taken}

ill on arrival at La Guardia Air-|
a)

port, New York, and is now in a
city hospital. His family have been
informed. é

Mr. Richmond spent a day rest-
ing at the airport on arrival but
did not improve and two doctors
recommended he be taken to
hospital

. —B.U.P.



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|

)private seeretary at Antigua.
“His Excellency never gets dis-
{gusted with anybody and would
not run away if he did,” he said.
—B.U.P.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Mason Gets 12.
Months Jail |

1
Decisions of His Worshi; Mr, |
A. J. H. Hanschell were varied |
yesterday by Their Honours of the
Assistant Court of Appeal © Mr.
“G. L. Taylor and Mr, J. W. 5
Chenery. Mr. Hanschell had
sentenced Gladstone Skeete, a
33-year-old mason of Clapham to
two six-month terms of imprisen-
ment to run concurrently, when he
had found him guilty of having
Stolen a plastic belt valued 59c.,
ind also $4 in cash

The belt was the property of
W. A. Griffith, while the money
belonged to Whitfield Rest. The
offences were committed on April
29. Both the Police and Skeete
appealed against Mr. Hanschell”
Cecisions.

Ther Honours ordered that the
sentences ryn consecutively
Skeete was also convicted by Mr
Henschell, having been foun
fuilty of resisting Island Constabl
Preston Ifill. Their Honours sen-
tenced him to seven days’ im-
prisonment; the latter term is to
run concurrently with the two
previous.

£25 Damages

Judgment was entered for
‘Francis Browne of Cuttings Road,
Haggat Hall, for £25 by His Honour
Mr. J. W. 8. Chenery in the Court
of Original Jurisdiction yesterday

Browne had claimed £50 dam-
ages from Clarence ‘Trotman
accusing him of having removec
her house which was on her
daughter's land on Bush Hall. The
house was carried to Worthing
View, Christ Church. The remova
was done on May 1, 1948. Brown
afterwards demanded the hous
from Trotman and he refused t
give it to her,

IMPORTS
YESTERDAY



Packages of tea, ovaltine, corn
flakes, biscuits, oats and cartons
of milk stout were among the
eargo arriving here from London
yesterday by S.S. Rivercrest.

The Rivercrest also discharged
here Prefect and Vauxhall motor
cars, toys, paint and cement,
From Barbados this vessel will be
sailing south.

One thousand five hundred bags
of rice from British Guiana arrived
in the island yesterday by the
schooner Marjon Belle Wolfe. This
schooner also brought supplies of
firewood, charcoal, wallaba posts,

paling staves and sawn green-
heart.

Also arriving was
vessel Caribbee from Dominica
with cabbages, eschalot, fresh
fruit, mauby bark and reading
books.



BALDWIN WOULDN'T
RUN AWAY

ANTIGUA,
Reports that Earl Baldwin has
decided to resign as Governor of
the Leeward Islands because he is
“disgusted” with local politics

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PAGE FOUR



sawed

“eblishec Dy Tb. Adwocate Co. 1t0., 14 Broad Si, Bridgetrw:
LS

Friday, May 5, 1950

Thanks
Trans-Canada

IF BARBADOS could earn two hundred
thousand dollars in five months it would
mean that each individual Barbadian would
have benefited by one dollar more than he
or she had before.



That is, assuming that the present popu-
lation of Barbados is as much as two hun-
dred thousand and not more than the official
one hundred and ninety-two thousand.

If the earning continued over the next
five months, then each individual would
have (on the same computation of two hun-
dred thousand Barbadians) a dollar more.

It would be possible to carry on this kind
of sum indefinitely, but there is a reason
for the apparent lapse from orthodox
economics. It is so easy to speak in terms
of statistics and forget that the men and
women—the ordinary men and women who
comprise our society—are not skilled econ-
omists.

an attempting to assess what Trans-Can-
ada Airlines has done for Barbados solely
in terms of tourists from the date of the
inaugural flight here on December third,
until April the twenty-ninth when the last
plane arrived here, the illustration uséd
above has been purposely employed to im-
press on the minds of those who normally
decry the advantages of tourists what are
some of those advantages.

Firstly, it must be explained that 473
passengers arrived from Canada on Trans-
Canada planes from December third up to
last Saturday, the twenty-ninth of April.

No accurate ngures exist for checking
what one individual Canadian tourist
spends in Barbados, but a conservative
estimate has been made of an average of
slightly more than two hundred West
Indian dollars per week. Since the aver-
age Canadian tourist spends the best part
of three weeks in Barbados an average
estimated expenditure of six hundred and
twenty West Indian dollars during three
weeks is not considered excessive for each
individual tourist. If six hundred and
twenty dollars are multiplied by 473—the
total number of Canadian tourists who
have spent an average of three weeks here
per person—a figure far in excess of two
hundred thousand dollars is obtained.
The actual figure is $293,260 (West Indian).

The average reader will lose no time in
pointing out that the dollars earned by
tourists are not in fact distributed on a
per capita basis. This is self-evident since
a considerable number of the population
are still infants in arms or have not yet
reached the age where they can work for
themselves.

In an island as little charted as is Bar-
bados in the intricacies of deciding total
‘wage-earning family groups, as distinct
‘from individual wage earners, the appli-
‘cation of these thousands of dollars to indi-

- ‘viduals cannot be decided by any existing
“agency. But it is patent to the ordinary
- ’ man and woman that by flying 473 Cana-
- ‘dians into Barbados in the five months

‘ended on May third, Trans-Canada Air-

‘ines have contributed $293,260 dollars at

“Yeast, to those who find direct employment

“in hotels, motor cars, newspaper wire
© ' groceries, dry goods stores, entertainmen|
- ‘houses, (to satan the list) and have added

“to the total revenue of Barbados in the form

“of Canadian dollars, considerable sums of

, _ money which might not otherwise have
“been there.

Barbades has much for which to be
grateful to ‘Trans-Canada Airlines, and
-when the runway at Seawell is completed
and a double service begins operation they

will have much more for which to return

thanks.

“
a?

HUR READERS SAY:

“Two Oil

-

AN airliner flies off across the
sea. In the cabin men and women
lie back in armehairs, eating,
reading or sleeping. In the cock-
pit the radio operator checks his
position, reports all well.

Then—disaster.

What happens? Ingenious minds
and slide-rule experts think up
every kind of answer. Only the
men who say “Sabotage” are
labelled as crackpots.

ON THE NIGHT of January 30,
1948, Star Tiger, a four-engine
Tudor, bound from the Azores to
Bermuda with 25 passengers and a
crew of seven, radioed its posi-
tion: “380 miles N.E. of Bermuda,
and all well.”

After that—silence. No more
was heard of Star Tiger.

_One fine day, a year later, a
sister ship of the same fine
climbed out into a clear blue sky
over the Sargasso Sea between
Bermuda and Jamaica, carrying
20 people, Last heard of, she was
at 18,000 feet, one hour out from
Bermuda.

Then, from her, too, silence.

ON JUNE 23, 1949, a Constella-
tion of the Royal Dutch Airlines,
bound from Athens to Rome,
crossed the Italian seaport of Bari,
when an explosion blasted the

plane.

The pilot turned back, to sea
and the great machine fell,
eavorting, into the Adriatic, a
total loss with all aboard her.

‘DAYS AGO, the Viking Vigilant,
of British European Airways, flew
peacefully across the Channel
towards France, There was a
flash and a violent explosion in the
back of the cabin. Only superb
airmanship saved her from plung-
ing into the waters and adding to
the long list of airliners which
have mysteriously disappeared.
But Viligant landed safely at
Northolt. Explosive experts later
gave their verdict: “A bomb”.

Sabotage Was
Ignored

PEOPLE SCOFFED at Air Vice
Marshal Don Bennett, then Chief

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

IS IF EASY TO PUT A
BOMB IN AN AIRLINER?

By Group Captain Hugh Dundas, D. S. 0., D. F.C.

Executive of British South Amer-
ican Airways, for suggesting that
the Tudors might have been sabo-
taged,

Every conceivable theory was
put forward, from structural fail-
ure to waterspouts; a specimen
Tudor was pulled apart nut by
nut and tested for weakness; an
investigating committee was set
up under Lord Brabazon; the
whole fleet was withdrawn from
passenger service with British air
corporations.

But, in its long report, the com-
mittee failed to pin-point the
root of the mysteries. Sabotage
was brushed aside. “‘There was
no evidence. . . though the pos-
sibility of an infernal machine
could not, of course, be entirely
eliminated.”

I wonder what the report of a
committee would have been had
Vigilant disappeared into the
Channel.

OUR MINDS were tuned to the
possibility of sabotage by the case
of Albert Guay, sentenced to death
for murdering his wife with a
time-bomb placed in a plane’s
baggage hold.

The case of the Viking was
different. It is as certain as a
thing can be that the explosive
was planted in the toilet compart-
ment of the plane some time be-
fore flight.

How could such a thing be
done? Who could get at the plane
to do it? The answer is that it
could be done with the greatest
ease,

This is what happens. A Viking
lands from abroad. Passengers
get out and freight is unloaded
at the terminal on the south side
of the airport. The plane is then
towed to the hangers on the north
side, inspected and prepared for
the next flight. After that it is
parked, unattended.

NOW, HOW COULD the sabo-
teur get aboard? I would make



up an old pair of B.E.A. overalls,
and walk boldly through the gates
used by hundreds of workmen
every day.

If possiblé I would choose a
moment when a bus or lorry drove
in. After that it would be plain
sailing. There would be littl
difficulty about getting into one
of the waiting planes.

If you were seen you would be
taken for one of the many
mechanies about their business.
And _ saboteurs, remember, are
armed with quick answers as well
as with bombs.

IF THIS could happen so easily
at one of London’s two main air-
ports—and my own observations
are confirmed by people who work
there—how much more easily
could it happen elsewhere. I have
seen every kind of rag-tag and
bob-tail hanging around on air-
ports abroad.

Last year I went to Rome to
pick up a Tempest fighter and fly
it to Karachi. The machine was
nearly stofn from under my nose
by an impostor hired to take it to
Israel. Only the vigilance of a
British mechanic working on the
plane thwarted his plan.

If you can come so close to
making off with a brand new 2,000
horse-power wasplane, it should
not be difficult to hide a small
bomb in the lavatory of an air-
liner.

IT IS to be hoped that the Vik-
ing outrage will have alarmed the
authorities as much as it has
alarmed the travelling public.

Waterspouts? Structural failure?
Lightning or turbulence?

Perhaps we should have put a
simple question to the Home Sec-
retaries and Ministers of Civil
Aviation: “Are you properly pro-
tecting our-airliners from sabo-
tage?”

—L.E.S.




14 MILLION WORDS OF
WISDOM

By George Malcolm Thomson

CHAMBERS’ ENCYCLOPAEDIA
(New Edition); XV Volumes.
George Newnes, Ltd. £42 10s.
HANDSOME does as handsome

is. The new Chambers’ looks an

alert and companionable array

with its new blue uniform on 15

volumes (one consisting of maps

and index) in place of the former
redcoat ten.

With about the same number
of pages and words io the page,
each volume weighs %4-lb. lighter
than its predecessor. There are
therefore a few million more
words in, the edition, without a
proportionate increase in total
weight.

But the buyer of, encyciupeedias
looks deeper than appearances.
He wants the collection to which
he is assigning a good 2 ft .of his
precious shelves to be

(1) As aceurate as human falli-
bility will allow;

(2) As impartial as human pas-
sion will permit;

(3) As up to date as may be;

(4) As short as possible—at 14-
million words, the new Cham-
bers’ probably satisfies this con-
dition;

(5) As full as possible;

(6) Interesting, yet not so ab-
sorbing that the reader is led on
from Hydrostaties to Hygiene and
after spending the late afternoon
in an excited ‘study of third cen-
tury hymns in Antioch, wonder
what on earth was his original
motive in opening the volume.
Let it be said at once that the
new Chambers’ does not alto-
gether escape this danger;

(7) Illustrations should be as
few as is necessary. They should
provide some information other-
wise incommunicable.

Although the new Chambers’
is not, in this respect, as bad an
offender as others, it has too
many photographs that are too
small and too trivial. But it
would be wrong not to add that
it also contains some magnificent
illustrations in half-tone and
colour.

So much for the general prin-
ciples on which encyclopedias
are to be judged. The broad ver-
dict is that Chambers’ is the best
compilation of its kind now be-
fore the public. An _ excellent
£42 10s, worth,

If anybody recalls in complaint
that the original Chambers’ of
a century ago was put out in
520 weekly parts at 1%d. a copy,
making £3 5s, for the lot, he must
be told that the advance of
knowledge in 100 years is worth

at least £39. Or is it?
There is, however, another
question, The ola Chambers’

had a genial, quixotic, north-of-
the-Tweed flavour with occasional
flashes of eccentricity. It usually
gave you a little more than you
had expected — and how useful
that little proved to be?

MarxeAnd Duce

The old hands will look anx-
iously to see if this kindly quality
has been preserved, now that
Chambers’, like the Britannica
has crossed the Border, although
not yet the Atlantic.

There is, be it acknowledged,
some loss of this Edinburgh tang;
in compensation, more comeliness,
convenience (the old Chambers’
scorned an index), efficiency.

With what whoops of surprise
one used to fall upon, e.g., the
information that in the French
Commune of 1871, 6,500 Com-
munards were slaughtered and
38,578 taken prisoner, One looks
in vain for that colourful detail
in the new version.

This is not to say that Com-
munism is neglected. Far from it!

Karl Marx, described in the
1926 Chambers’ as the ‘founder
of international Socialism,” has
now become the “founder of
modern Communist doctrine” and
is allowed, 2% columns. Lenin
(half a column in the old edition)
has two columns; Trotsky is pro-
moted from a quarter column to
three-quarters; Stalin from eight
lines to two columns. This seems
less than just, in view of the
fact that Mussolini gets three
columns, Hitler three and a half-
Winston Churchill (not men-
tioned in 1926, unlike Charles
and Lord Randolph) five and_a
half columns, and _ Roosevelt
seven.

Meet Chaplin

But how hard it is to be just!
On Karsavina the index is silent
but Lydia Lopokova appears /as



the wife of Lord Keynes
and a half columns).

(two
Chaplin is

there—but where Garbo, Valen-
tino, or Dietrich (Marlene, as
opposed to Epics)?

Charieston, samba, conga ap-
pear — but not a peep out of
bebop. Sir Frank Whittle (jet
engine) is named in the index,

but ‘net Sir Robert Watson Watt
where is Isherwood? . The author
of The Cocktail Party (T, S.

Eliot), but mot the author of
Venus Observed (Christopher
Fry).

To make up for this, however,
here are C. B. (English cricketer),
Elizabeth (English reformer),
Joseph (English manufacturer),
Joshua (American surveyor) and
Roger (British painter, critic), to
say nothing of smaller fry.

The stage comes well out of
things. Here are Olivier and
Gielgud (hard on the heels of
Gide), Barrault and Welles. But
what of the artists who design
settings for those heroes? Where
is Christian Bérard, John Piper,
Roger Furse? These small omis-
sions should be read against the
background of a remarkable com-
pleteness.

Latest News

As for up-to-dateness, the work
has got down as far as Existen-
tialism (allowed the same space
as Exorcism), to the news that
Eire is a republic outside the
Commonwealth and India one in-
side it. has heard of Mao
Tze-tung and even of his victory
over Chiang last year.

In short, it is remarkably down
to the minute.

It has kept, in its smart new
gilise, the sober level-headed
quality of its Edinburgh ancestor,
if its objectivity seems to have
the slightest bias in favour of
Britain, that may be the natural
answer to the spread-eagleism of
a competitor. It is conservative
on sculpture (Eric Gill’s Ariel is
the only recent British work
shown) and not enterprising on
architecture. But what a blessing
not to have that usual picture of
Stockholm ,Town Hall!

»

:









—— $$$,

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950



Is The Dock Strike
A Dress Rehearsal?

Because /f So It's Time Other People

Did Some Dress Rehearsing Too
THE LONDON Dock Strike started on Wed-

nesday, April 19 and lasted 11 days.

This

analysis of the situation was written while the
strike was still in progress.

By TREVOR EVANS

LONDON, April 25.

THAT was an odd phrase Mr. Isaacs made to

Parliament about the London dock strike.
said: “The only question at issue is an entirely |\

trade union matter, with which the public are not '

eoncerned.”

Misleading, Mr. Isaacs. The public are concern- |)

ed about the effect of a dock strike of this size

They are

interested in knowing how the strike

started, how it can be stopped, how these annual

outbursts can

be eliminated, and whether the

authorities — whoever they are — are doing thei:
best to stop the present strike. .

The ‘public would be alarmed if certain fears
about the present strike are justified.

Mr. Arthur Deakin believes it is a Communist

dress rehearsal for a bigger upheaval.

The real

trouble will come, he thinks, if our relations with

Russia deteriorate further,

if arms have to be

loaded or unloaded.

Mr. Deakin

is not alone in his belief. It is

shared by members of the Cabinet and by such a
considerable-trade union authority as Lord Citrine.
THE THREE MEN

If true, the

Communists have every reason to

feel fairly satisfied with their present exercise.
After all, this strike started only last Wednesday.
Troops had to be brought in yesterday. And it has all
been done on whipping up indignation over three
“martyrs”, expelled from their union, not only
for the part they played in leading last year’s strike,

but for refusing to promise future good. behaviour.”
The strike could end to-day if the three men,
Ted Dickens, Harry Constable, and Bert Saunders,

gave an undertaking that they would do what is
expected from all other good trade unionists—obey
union rules, honour union agreements.

Union chiefs regard Ted Dickens as the key
man. He is a Communist Party executive member,
He is chairman of one of its transport committees.

How did all this begin? It appears that some

dockers asked

the union’s “protection” from

trouble-makers. Dickens, Constable and Saunders
were named, They were brought before a “discip-

linary board,”
members

which consisted of rank-and-file

eoncerned only with union rules, not

with conditions at the dock.

EXPELLED

Dickens was asked: “Will you give an under-
taking that you will observe union rules and act
constitutionally?

He replied: “It depends on the circumstances of

the time,”

He was expelled,

He appealed, Again he was

asked a similar question and gave a similar reply.
So his eppeal was rejected.

Weeks before fis appeal was heard, the Port
Workers’ Defence Committee threatened trouble



if the “sentences” on Dickens and his mates were
not quashed, Obviously they were preparing. In-
deed, they were ready.

Dickens and

that their appeals had been turned down. The
strike started next morning.

The strike

leaders whipped up resentment

against the union, its machinery, its committee,

and Mr. Deakin.

All these would have been all

right if the verdict had gone the other way.
Do the strike committee want to “break” the
union? No, Not yet, anyway. They suggested a bal-

lot of dock-w

orkers on whether the sentences

shall stand or not. This, mark you, to be conducted
by the union they have been attacking!

FIRST VICTORY

Maybe this is a dress rehearsal after all. If so,
it demands counter-preparations, Mr. Deakin is

right to demand the end of the strike.

He is right

to withhold recognition from unofficial leadership.
He may have been right to have stood aloof from
strikers’ delegations to his office for two days,
although the strike leaders were quick to miscon-
strue this as indifference to the dockers.
Constitutionally correct though Mr. Deakin has
been, the temporary victory has gone to the strike

leaders.

Mr. Deakin and his officers have got to find a
way of pinning a slur on a docker’s manhood if

he strikes on the flimsiest excuse,

To-day the

docker feels that slur if he remains at work.

FEAR OF JEERS

That is the key to to-day’s situation. Ten thous—
and of the men on strike to-day would rather be

at work.
Take this as

a typical scene, It happened yes~|

terday morning.

Strike-leader

Vic Marney was haranguing

crowd outside the dock gates. Little groups from
the edges moved away to report for work. “Scabs.”
“Blacklegs,” yelled the crowd around Marney.

Singiy or in

turned away from the dock gates towards their

homes. They

triumphant strikers.
That is the atmosphere which must be reversed,

—Lafigon Express Service.

Companies Are Now Drilling Here”

: in the

The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—It seems that when we are
struggling in the dark here to get
peep into the future of oil, the
Times has got there first.
This is what I read under the
ra “Closer Caribbean Union”
issue of April 24:— “Even
has hopes of striking oil
two companies are now drill-

”







have it on good information
the last Oil well to be drilled
“Barbados was drilled by the
Union in 1940. I have

" heard that there was a lot of talk

ing on about oil but anyone who
oes a to a dentist will
you t is a lot of difference
talk and his drill?
this blackout on oil?
READER.

a St. George

The Editor, The Advocate
_SIR,—Kindly grant me space in
your valuable columns to make
mention of a cause that sadly lacks
assistance. “The cause of the
travelling public of St. George.”
Something can be done, something
should be done, something must
be done. )
On May 1, 1950 I had an appoint-
ment with a Doctor for a certain

hour. When the bus got to the

int at which I generally board
Re I .was refused : east a os

engers were already in eac

seat. Quite . A friend took
me to town; but I was late for my
appointment by fifteen minutes.

On May 2, I had occasion to be
in town, This time six passengers
were packed into the seat in which
I sat.

f

Again on May 4, I used the bus.
The conditions were worse, Seven
passengers were squeezed into the
seat whether I liked it or not.

Now Sir, what I would like to
know is this. Should the number
in each seat as regulated by law
be five, six or seven? I am sure the
Manager of Route 8 and 8A (if
there is one) can answer this
question, and before it is too late
do something to remedy the situa-
tion that is becoming increasingly
annoying.

Vox.

Note Roley

The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—yYesterday’s edition of
your paper states that “the West
Indies team have taken the oppor-
tunity to run their eye over Roley
Jenkins, whom they will meet at
Worcester”.

_

They will do well to take note
of him. I saw him bowl in South
Africa and I consider him the
most dangerous bowler they will
meet.

What a man he is for breaking
up astand!! He tosses up innocu-
ous looking stuff, “with plenty of
air”, but when the ball hits the
turf it becomes alive. There is so
much spin and break in the ball
that a very usual entry in the score
book is “stumped—bowled Jen-
kins”. Yes watch out for Jenkins,
he will be among the wickets.

E. C. JACKMAN.

Disendowment

The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—I believe reading a few
years ago His Lordship the Bishop
said that he having read in the
newspaper .that a Bill wes read
a first time in our House of Assem-
bly for the disendowment of the
Church of England caused him to
accept the Bishopric, otherwise he
would not. I am writing under
correction. Sometime ago, his
Lordship called together all the
ministers of his church to discuss
the question of the disendowment
of the church and I believe that
the great majority of the ministers

were in favour of the disendow-
ment of the Anglican Church.
Why then are our representatives
in the House of Assembly so reluc-
tant in bringing it about consti-
tuted as it is.

I hold that the ministers are
civil servants, and that the Bishop
can’t discipline them as he would
if they were not state paid.

Why should the members of the
Methodist, Moravian, Brethren,
Salvation Army and other denom-
inations (who do not even cross
the doors of the State paid
churches except at a wedding or
funeral) be compelled to pay for
something they don’t want. Again
I repeat, if His Lordship and the
great majority of the ministers
would like to see the Church dis-
endowed, why should our repre-
sentatives in the House of Assem-
bly feel so hard to bring it about?

R. EASTMOND.
Vestryman Explains
The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—From the several com-
plaints which I have encountered,
more especially during the past
two weeks, I can come to no better
and reasonable conclusfon that out

administration—parochial “tspeci-
ally—should be better known to
all sections of the community,
thus creating “closer union”.

The old system of hiding from
our children even theoretical
knowledge of certain fundamental
things was often the cause of ruin
and chaos. Why have our taxes

‘increased from $3.72 to $4.90 on

land is the query. There can be
many answers given to this query;
but (1) this tax has been levied
not only to cover our overdue
balances but to budget for this
year’s expenditure. The rise in
price per acre on land is above
most of the other rural parishes
and there it i)that even the most
modest perso.’ may dispute. It is
alleged by some of the past Vestry,
who are yet in executive positions
that the closing of Bromefield's
factory and the inactivities of the
Mt. Gay plantation have added to
this. I know however, that Own-
ership tax on which I’ve queried
as a member of the Vestry is in
my mind one of the sources from
hw this rise has become inevi-
ab‘te.

If we compare ourselves with
others we must accept the truth
that parishes even in these days

could not face the jeers of the

pairs those who wanted to work
—L.E.S.

H

‘i

|
|

which face the devaluation of the)
pound, and their other commit-)|
ments and yet keep their taxes;
normal, must be thought as|
praiseworthy.

On the other hand whether it
be St. Lucy or any other parish,
whose only policy is to get money i
aceording to Shakespearfe’s ver-
sion no matter how you get it, will
never comply with the feelings of
taxpayers. Yet I would envisage
for the good of readers of this
paper etc, that we as loyal citizens
should look forward to the speed-/
ing up of production with all in-)
crease at our demand to meet our
taxes as well as the supposed rise}
in the cost of living from which)
even the peasant proprietor is not |
shielded. But much depends upon|
the Executive body of any organi-
sation whether fortune or mis-|
fortune be our attendant. Our)
Educational Authorities emphasise |
comprehension from our children. |
Likewise taxpayers of St. Lucy,
deem it necessary to receive com-
prehension as regards their paro-|
chial affairs from the Vestry.

KENNETH C, O'NEALE. |

Checker Hall,
St, Lucy.









(

j

his mates heard on Tuesday night |



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Wooden Shingle.

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| GOpDAnDs. _









FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950

Trade Unionism Is
Something New

Commissioner

Tells Workers

TRADE UNIONS are today looking after not only the
working improvements of the people, but they are trying

to improve the lives of the

people outside their working

hours as well as the lives of the families of these people,
the Labour Commissioner said to his audience at the head-
quarters of the Caribbean Workers’ Union last night.



Heavy
Rainfall
Yesterday

VERY COOL day was ex-
perienced in the City yester-

day. During the morning light
showers fell but by midday the
skies had cleared up, and the sun
reached its usual brightness. The
temperature, however, was only
82° Fahrenheit in the shade.

Heavy showers fell on Wednes-
day night, and early Thursday
morning. Seven inches and 30
parts of rain fell over the island.
Of this St. Peter and St. Andrew
recorded one inch, 39 parts each,
while St. Lucy and St. John each
had 89 parts. It was one of the
heaviest rainfalls for the year.

The returns were: City 25 parts,
Station Hill District 57 parts, St.
George 60 parts, St. Philip 38 parts,
St. Thomas 56 parts, St. Peter 1.39
parts, St. James 48 parts, St. Lucy
89 parts, St. Andrew 1.39 parts and
St. John 89 parts.

“JQ RITISH .NEWS”, “Piccadilly
Roundabout”, “Gardens of
England,” “Macbeth” and the Film
strip “Achimota”’ will be filmed at
Waketielq at 4.45 p.m, today.

A film show for chilaren will
be held tomorrow at 9.30 a.m.
when the following tlms will be
shown:—

“British News”, “Piccadilly
Roundabout,” “Looking Through
Glass,” “Western Waterway,” and
the film strip ‘“Achimota.” Ad-
mission is free.

ATHLEEN LAURIENS of
Sugar Hill, St. Joseph, re-
ported the loss of a gold bracelet
valued $54, and a gold pin valued
$12, from her residence. ’

N ACCIDENT occurred on
Arthur Hill Road at about
3.20 p.m. on Wednesday hetween
the motor bus M-1965, owned by
the Diamond Bus Co., and driven
by Goulbourne Harper of St.
Bernards, St. Joseph, and a bicycle
owned by St.Clair Grainger of
Chase Gap, Hall’s Road, and rid-
den by Wilbert Trotman of Upper
Roebuck Street. The lamp and
front fork of the bicycle were
damaged.

HE MOTOR CAR M-1581,

owned by Samuel Beckles of
Bank Hall, and driven by Winston
Seale of Baxters Road, was
damaged in’an atcident on Bridge *
Street at about 12.50 p.m. on
Wednesday.

Also involved was the motor
lorry T-155, owned by Apple-
whaites Factory Ltd., and driven
by Alburn Gaskin of Venture, St.
John.

ESIDENTS OF Marshall’s Gap

New Orleans, were privileged

to see (what was termed) a
Flying Saucer at 7.25 last night.

Kenneth Harris, one of the

first to see the Saucer, told the
“Advocate” last night that he
saw a bright light which at first
appeared to be a star. The
light changed to red and then
blue before taking a zig-zig
course in a North-easterly
direction.

He is convinced that what he
saw was not a star because he
never saw “anything like it be-
fore.”

FIRE BROKE out at Henley
A Plantation on Tuesday morn-
ing about 4 o’clock. Eight acres of
third crop ripe cane, the property
of J. T. Boyer, were burnt. With
the assistance of neighbours the
fire was put out at about 6.30.

roe THE patronage of Mr.
E. Holder, St. James’ Vestry-
man, a programme of music was
given at the Fox Club, St. James
on Sunday. It was in aid of the
Barbados Pioneer Group.

The Choir was made up of
members of the Pioneer Group,
lead by Mr. C. Leslie, and the play
“New Barbados”, was staged by
the Group.

gern LOSS of a mattress, pillow
and a mirror, total value $34,
was reported by Mr. A. W. Roberts
of Erdiston College’ He stated

He was giving a talk on the sub-
ject “Trade Unions and Their
Proper Functions.”

He said: “The first object of a
trade union is to organise the
workers, It is absolutely no good
for a trade union to try to do any-
thing unless it has first organised
its members. A trade union has
to have substantial membership
to give it strength; without such
strength it cannot act.”

That was one of the rules, and
another was that the election of
officers to the committees should
be absolutely free. That was one
of the cardinal provisions in the
Rules. This was usually done by
secret ballot so that the organisa-
tion would be resting on a demo-
cratic foundation,

“It has been asserted by peo-
ple who have been members of
the Communist Party that the
ballots in such cases have been
falsified. ‘You want to be sure
of your free elections for pur-
poses like that so that you elect
the people you want to run your
union.’

Policy

“The Annual General Confer-
ence of any union usually deter-
mine the general policy that is
followed by the union. The
Union elects the Committee cf
Management. This is called by
different names but the members
have to look after the affairs of
the union between the general
conferences,”

“When we think over the cen-
turies”, he said, “trade unionism
in the world is something com-
paratively new.”’

He said that at the time of the
Great Plague in Europe, living
conditions were bad generally,
with the exception of course,
of those people who lived
in castles and _ places _ like
that. At that time a lot of
people died and those who re-
mained could stand up because of
the shortage of workers, and say
they were not working unless they
got better wages. In England a
law was passed to prevent that.

In those days there were no
trade unions and the law he had
referred to was in force until the
time of Queen Elizabeth's reign.
Something then began gradually
to, happen in England. Factories
began to come into being and peo-
ple left the rural areas to work in
the towns, for before that, people
were more or less scattered in the
country and worked in their homes
with their families.

The industrial revolution began
but in due course the towns be-
came filled. with people as more
and more entered them to get
employment.

Conditions Worse

More and more competed for the
jobs that were offered until con-
ditions became worse and worse.
In those days the people were
mostly illiterate but they tried to
combine together in order to en-
deavour to better their conditions,
As they did so laws were passed to
make such combinations illegal.
These anti-combination laws pre-
vented people from combining so
as to ask for better conditions of
work,

People began to think of free-
dom to organise and as a result
about twenty-five years later,
there was brought about the re-
peal of the Combination Laws.
That was in 1824.

Although the laws
pealed there were still ways in
which if workmen tried to com-
bine to improve their conditions
they could be prosecuted, Charges
of conspiracy and other charges
were brought against them so that
they really did not have the com-
plete freedom to organise,

“Things went on like that until
1871 and it was in that year that
the law which is really the first
great charter of. trade unions, was
passed in England.

Prohibition

“T am not going to go into the
details of that law, but I think I
will refer to one particular aspect
of it. That is, removing the pro-
hibition on trade unionists doing
acts in restraint of trade.

That was a great step because
previously it had been held that a



STAMPS

MORE than eleven thousand
dollars of the new stamp, issue!
were sold in two days. Mr. H. N
Armstrong, Colonial Postmaster
told the “Advocate’’ yesterday
that $11,846 was received for the
new pictorial stamps on Monday
and Tuesday.

Monday's sales brought $9,174.00
as against $2,672.00 on Tuesday
At St. Lawrence, the Postmistress
also had a very busy day on Mon-
day as she sold $1,100 in stamps

fhe new stamps wh'ch are of

12 denominations with values
expressed in decimal, currency.
range from 1 cent to $2.40 and
the only connecting link between
the new issue and the old one
will be found in the $2.40 stamp
which neudes a reproduction of
the Seal of the colony.
_ The set of stamps which has
just been withdrawn, is substan-
tially the same as the one issued
in 1925, except that the words
Postage & Revenue have been
removed.

Mr. J. C. Kellman, Secretary
of the Barbados Philatelic Soci-
ety, told the “Advocate” that he
was favourably impressed with
the new issue of stamps as it was
a change from the long list of
definitive stamps showing the
seal of the colony.



He said that Barbados was one
of the last of the British colonies

te issue a pictorial set. He how-
ever thought that the paper used
for printing the stamps was of a
poor quality.

The stamps are in two perfora-
tions. Those in the vertical
format having finer perforations
than those in the horizontal. The
vertical ones are perforated 13%”,
while the horizontal ones are per-
forated 11 by 11%”.

The design of the six cent
stamp was taken from a photo-
graph which he had submitted
to the Committee of the Barba-
dos Philatelic Society, and which
was adopted as the design for-
warded by the Society for con-
sideration by the Selection Com-
mittee. The original of this
photograph was the property of
the Barbados Publicity Com-
mittee.

Mr. Kellman said that the
printers of the new set are
Messrs. Bradbury, Wilkinson and
Co., Ltd. whereas Messrs De La
Rue had been printing the stamps
of Barbados for a good number of
years.

‘Keep Your
Hands Off’

SAYS MAGISTRATE

“THIS is a terrible thing to do
and I have no sympathy with you.
You must keep your hands off
what does not belong to you,” Mr,
A. J. H. Hanschell told Neville
Beckles of Baycroft Road, St.
Michael, yesterday when he im-
posed a fine of £19—to be’ paid
by instalments of £1 per month
-—or three months’ imprisonment,
for stealing a bicycle owned by
Oscar Wiltshire of Cole’s Road,
Carrington Village.

£2 FOR SPEEDING

Lochert Harris of Checker Hall,
St. Lucy was fined £2 in 28 days
or one month’s imprisonment by
His Worship Mr. A. J. H. Hans-
chell yesterday for speeding on
Bank Hall while driving the motor
lorry S—144 on April 8.

SOLD BANANAS TOO

DEAR: £2

Viola Howell, a hawker of Bank
Hall Road, was found guilty ot
selling bananas at a greater price
than permitted. The offence was
committed on December 20. -

Mr. E. A. McLeod, Magistrate
of District “A”, ordered her to
pay a fine of £2 by instalments or,
in default, one month’s imprison-
rent,

FINED £4 FOR

CARELESS DRIVING

A fine of £4 to be paid by
instalments, or in default one







trade unionist could organise and month’s imprisonment, was im-

he could ask for better wages and
ccnditions, but the. moment he did
something that was in restraint

posed on Clayton Joseph of Rouen
Village by His Worship Mr.
A. J. H, Hanschell yesterday.

of trade, the act was illegal. The Joseph appealed, ’

whole idea from the time of this
new Act was that everything must
‘be free” :

He was found guilty of driv og
the motor bus M-2138 on Roebusk
Street: a highway without due care

that the articles were removed The Commissioner then referred @nd attention for other persons

from the dormitory at the College
during last month.

This is the second loss
College has suffered recently.

Lower Cariton, St. James,
reported that his house was broken
and entered, and a wallet with
contents to the value of $24 ta

asii few weeks. The seas were
Fvourable; and fishermen return-
ed to Bathsheba Bay with large
catches.

Now that the
are fairly slow,
used to take the

a motor car. is
fish elsewhere

as low as three cen!
beach. y
7T.HE GAMBIAN Welfare Choi

under the leadership of Mr
Sherville Gill of Edgecliff, St.

©

of
that

to the further development
trade unionism. He _ said

the trade unionists eventually began
to take an Interest in politics. An
trade
ARDINAL CHANDLER of unions the power to put into a
crea
the ers are on the move to form their
for political purposes. Such own association and om Saturday
ken, funds had to be approved of by next at 2 p.m., they will hold
It was a separate

ISH VENDORS in St. Joseph fund and a member had to sign Park.
F were very busy during the a paper to say if he did not want

Act was passed giving
Rules
political

money

that they could
funds and spend

the members.

to contribute to it.

The Commissioner ending his lecture

using the same road.

JOINERS TO FORM
ASSOCIATION

Local Cabinet makers and join-
their first meeting at Queen’s
Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C., and

(Mr. E. D, Mottley, M.C.P., have
been invited to the meeting to

said: “The Webbs said that a trade outline the purpose of the associa-

union was a continuous associa
wage
lives’; but trade unions are going
little further nowadays, they
efter not only

side their working

the lives of the families of



John gave a performance at the

Horse Hill Casino on Sunday eve-
ning. ae
Next Sunday the Choir will give

a ‘ormance at Sealey Hall, St.
Jol

and destroyed five and

Another Flying
Saucer?

It is expecied that a con-
test will take ae pe ap fe
vhe St. John Choirs, and wi eo ‘ ‘
staged at the St. John Mixed by a resident of St

ol.
ABOUT 9.00 p.m. on Mon-

Christ Church,

quarter acres of second crop ripe jn the air.

canes which were insured.

Estates Ltd.

They
were the property of Carringtor suddenly

It however,

had

disappeared,
as it
leaving no trail.

4 earners for the purpose of im-
sales in Sv. Josq@ph proving the conditions of their working

Another flying saucer was seen
Lawrence,
on Wednesday
Scho morning about 4.35. While stand-
A’ ing at his open window he sud-

day a cane fire broke out at Geniy heard a buzzing sound like
Mangrove Plantation, St. Philip, that of a bee, and saw a bright
three disc of a silvery colour spinning

as
appeared,

tion.

a
sve‘iookine TWENTY-FIVE RETURN
the working improve-
to be sold. The price of fish WaS jents of the people, but they are trying
each om ‘he to improve the lives of the people out-
hours as well as
these

FROM MIAMI
The chartered ’plane of Natiqn-

wide Air Transport Service which
arrived here oni Wednesday after-
hoon, with 25 labourers returning
from work in Miami, left Barba-
dos yesterday morning for Miami}

via Puerto Rico,





What’s on Today

Court of Ordinary at 11.00
a.m

Football at Queen’s Park as
5 p.m.

Police Band Concert, Hast-
ings Rocks at 8.00 p.m.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Schooner Sauk
120 Miles From B.G.

CAPTAIN William Parsons,
a 40-year-old St. Vincentian, now
Skipper of the Lady Joy went to
sea at 19. He started his career as
a sailor of the schooner Uncatina
and has now risen to be master of
the Motor Vessel Lady Joy.

Captain Parsons has also sailed

on schooners Ferna, Nora
Baker, Lady Violet, Juliana,
Esteranita, Marion Belle Wolfe

and Mannie M. Mosher. Dur-
ing his 21 years of sea life, he
hes touched all of the Windward
and Leeward Islands.

“I have had a very exciting sea

life,” he told the Advocate. In
spite of ace'dents, hurricanes,
still

heavy seas and drifts he
loves the sea.

Once the Lady Violet, sank with
him and e'ght others about 120
miles off British Guiana but the
entire crew of nine reached the
shores of British Guiana safely.

On that trp the Lady Violet was
taking cargo from Georgetown to
Trinidad. The vessel suddenly
sprung a leak. The crew got oif
into the small boat and began to
tow the schooner. They encoun-
tered seven days of calm in the
Bocas. Luckily they had managed
to transfer sufficient food and
water into the smal boat.

On the way back to British
Guiana, the boat sprang a leak
again and sunk. The crew again
got off into the small boat: and
were drifting for two days before
they reached British Guiana.
They were never without food and
water.

The Ferna once turned , over
with him about four miles Yrom
British Guiana. This time he
spent seven hours in the sea, and
reached British Guiana safely.
The Ferna was salvaged and he
sailed on it again,

During the war he was working
on the Juliana, the Esteranita
and the Marion Belle Wolfe. He
finished tthe war on the Wolfe
and went over to be mate of the
Minnie M. Mosher. In 1949, he
passed his captain's examination
and became master of the Lady
Joy.

Salvaged Barge
Under Repair

THE barge Resolute Which was
sunk in the inner basin of the
Careenage during the flood waters
of September last year, and was
since salvaged, is now undergoing
extensive repairs on dock at Hard-
wood Alley.

The Resolute has been bought
over by Mr. J. O. Olivier, who
was formerly a shipping agent of
Trinidad. Towards the end of
next week, it will be towed down
to Trinidad by the motor vessel
Blue Star and from there it will
be towed over to Venezuela.





‘Caracas’ Brings

Seawell Equipment

MORE equipment for Seawell
arrived by motor vessel Caracas

yesterday.
The Caracas could not begin to
discharge this equipment the

same day because the schooners
Frances W. Smith and Freedom
Fleary occupied the berth opposite
the Government crane, which is
the only machinery on the wharf
used for unloading heavy cargo
such as trucks and bulldozers.

‘Lady Nelson’
Calls On Sunday

THE S.S. Lady Nelson will call
at Barbados on Sunday, Messrs,
Gardiner Austin Co., Ltd., inform-
ed the Advocate yesterday. It
will arrive from British Guiana
via Trinidad, Grenada and St,
Vincent,

The Nelson is scheduled to leave
port the same night for Bermuda,
Boston, Halifax and Montreal via
the British . Northern Islands.
Passengers have already booked
their passages.

‘ATHEL RUBY’ TAKES
MORE MOLASSES

THE Athel Ruby returned here
yesterday for its usual cargo of
approximately 126,000 gallons of
= pan molasses for Trini-

Shortly after 10 a.m., it was
made fast at its berth in the inner
basin, and was being prepared
for taking the molasses. It is ex-



pected to leave Bridgetown to-day ‘

for Trinidad.









Jury Decides In
Defendant's Favour

Surprising Verdict, Says Chief Justice

NINE out of the 12 members of the Common Pleas Jury

which tried the action in which Clarence Fitz-Herbert Cor- |

bin sought to recover damages from Joseph N. Hurdle for
damage to a car as a result of a collision, yesterday founc

a verdict in favour of Hurdle.

Judgment was entered

for Hurdle with costs, by His Honour the Chief Judge, Sir

Allan Collymore.

“I must confess that it is a most surprising verdict”, the

Chief Judge commented. “However, that is your verdict.”

In the accident which occurred
on Pine Road on July 9, 1946,
Corbin’s car which was then
driven by his chauffeur, Cuthbert
Maughn, was forced against a
palm tree growing by the side of
the road, and was so damaged
that it could not be moved under
its own power.

Corbin in paragraph 3 of his
Statement of Claim alleged that
it was due to negligent driving on
the part of Hurdle, who was over-
taking Corbin’s car, and who, so
Corbin alleged, had collided with
his car in the act of passing him

out.
Other Side

On the other hand, Hurdle in
his Defence claimed that the
accident had been caused by negli-
gent driving on the part of
Maughn, whom, he alleged, had
veered suddenly to the right and
collided with Hurdle’s car, thereby
causing the mishap.

The majority of the Jury said
yesterday that they were not sat-
isfled that Corbin had proved para-
graph 3 of his Statement of Claim.

Corbin claimed damages to the
tune of $609.71 made up of the
cost of repairing the car, the cost
of repainting it, and the loss of
earnings for four months, He was
represented by Mr. G. H. Adams
who was instructed by Messrs.
Hutchinson & Banfield.

Mrs. Hurdle, and Mr. Hurdle
were cited as defendants. Mrs.
Hurdle is owner of the car M-1244
which was being driven by her
husband on the evening in ques-
tion. Mr. Hurdle was admitted to
be her agent in driving the var.
The Defendants were represented
by Mr. D. H. L. Ward, instructed
by Messrs. Haynes & Griffith.

From Funeral

Both cars were returning from
a funeral when the accident oc-
curred.

Hearing of the action was begun
on Wednesday, The Chief Judge
summed up to the Jury vesterday
and the latter retired at 11.35. Six
hours later they returned to Court
with a majority verdict in favour
of the defendant.

It was certified that the case
was a proper one to have been
tried by a special jury.

Summing Up

The Chief vudge summing up,
told the jury that the case was es-
sentially one for them. As counsel
on both sides had said, there was
not much law in it. There were
two defendants, Mr. Hurdle, whom
they had seen and heard, and his
wife, who was the owner of the
car, which along with the plain-
tiff’s had been involved in the
accident,

The car had been on its lawful
mission, returning from a funeral,
as indeed, had been the other car.
If therefore, there was liability—*
that was, if they found for the
plaintiff, both defendants would be
responsible, the female defendant
being the owner of the car, and
the male defendant, as admitted
in the Defence, being her egent in
driving it,

Negligence
The Chief Judge, explaining
“negligence”, told the Jury that
legal negligence was somewhat |
different from negligence in the
common or lay sense, Illus-
trating the point, he said tha‘
if one of them negligently
forgot to tie his shoe lace, and
the shoe lace tripped him up
it might be sald in a lay sens«
that that person had _ ber
negligent, But “negligence” in
law was a relative term, because

it meant that there had been a

breach of some duty, some fail-

ure to take care.

Therefore, for their purpose,
“negligence” there Was a failure
to take such care as the circum-
stances of the case demanded.
There could be no general defini-
tion, because the circumstances of
each particular case varied.

Common Sense
“You will bear in mind”, the
Chief Judge said, “that it is for the

eee a a na ee enn 2 eae

Fresh for your
Pets !!

PURINA DOG CHOW
PURINA RABBIT CHOW

h. Jason Jones & Co, Lid.

Distributors.

Refurnish your Rooms

with these beautiful



Furnishing Fabrics

Art Silk-Cotton Furnishing Fabrics

In green, rose, gold. 48” wide Per yd.

| Cotton Sheeting

72" wide. Per yd. $1.74



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.

10, 11, 12, & 13 BROAD, STREET







$9.40

Also

White Cotton Damask

Napkins



plaintiff to establish his case to
your satisfaction. But in this kind
of case, unlike a criminal case, you
are entitled not only to have re-

gard to the facts proved in evi-/|

dence, but, exercising your com-
mon sense, to have regard in ihe
light of that evidence to the pro-

babilities of the case, and to come}

to a conclusion as to what you
reasonably believed to have hap-

pened.

The Chief Judge next dealt with
the question of damages. If they
found that the defendant was
liable, he said, it would mean that
he so negligently drove his car on
the occasion that he damaged or
eaused the damage to the other
car.

To use the example that Mr
Adams had used, if for instance
someone had an old wall or paling
and someone else violently collidex
with it and knocked it down, or
knocked down a portion of it, even
if in a general sense the paling
was so old that it would have tc
be renewed in any case, the person
suing was still entitled to have a
new paling put back up, While
that was so, it was the duty of the
person suing to minimise his dam-
ages as Mr. Ward had said, so as
not to put additional burdens on
the person from whom he eventu-
ally recovered the sum.

Damages

“Bearing those two general
principles in mind”, said the Chiet
Judge, “if you come to consider
the question of damages, you will
so approach that question.”

Dealing with the particulars of
special damage which appeared ir
the Statement of Claim, the Chie!
Judge mentioned the cost set out
for repair of the car at $316.71
cost of painting the car, $37.50
cost of tyres, a hub, a coil ete. He
also reminded them that for loss
of earnings of the car, the plaintiff
had estimated $1.50 a day for four
months, a total of $180.00.

On one hand, he said, while Mr.
Adams for the plaintiff had said
that the plaintiff had been too gen-
erous, in that he had omitted t
charge for a battery, and that he
had only charged for half of the
painting of the car, and had only
charged for four months’ loss of
earnings although the car was
under repair for nearly a year,
Mr. Ward for the defendant, on
the other hand, said that far from
being too generous, there were
many items on the bill put in evi-
dence by the witness Layne which
should not have appeared in it
because they were not necessitated
as a result of the accident.

Objection

In other words, it had been put
to them for the Defence that there
was that 1937 Model Ford
damaged in 1946, repaired by Mr
Layne, and all those items anc
bills placed before them, In goin:
@ On Page 7

LUXURY,
= : aetalty
isi, Pour Satya
on the hottest da: Koape
the skin as as he
—and nee 7
Soap and
the luxury |











(uticura
. TALCUM

te an

NEW ARRIVALS

FRY'S CHOCOLATE
HAZEL NUTS
in '4 Ib. and 1 Ib, Boxes
Priced at...
90c. and $1.62 per Box
Also FRESH SHIPMENT of
HUMPHREY'S
HOMEOPHATIC
REMEDIES
Humphrey's Specifi
(all Numbers)
Humphrey’s Veterinary
Remedies 1.20
Humphrey’s Witch Hazel
Liquid
Humphrey’s Witch Hazel
Liquid
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
Ointment
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
Ointment

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LIMITED











96

56



87





18”x18" Ea Abe
















































SIKIN
TROUBLE

NOT A BLEMISH TO BE SEEN!

The close resemblance —
between the natural ou
in Germolene and the
natural oil of healthy
human skin is of very
great importance.

PENETRATING 1
explains why Germolene
«.s3 down through itching,

=

irritated, inflamed _ skin,
soothes tortured nerve
ndings.

ANTISEPTIC ‘rhanks to
this easy penetration
Germolene purifies hidden
| recesses—sweat pores, tiny
| hair follicles, sebaceous
| glands.

|
SOOTHING The soothing, cooling,

| comforting touch of Germolene has
| brought gratitude to thousands and

its healing powers have never been
surpassed, Use Germolene yourself !

{

}
|

ASEPTIC OINTMENT

GO 47)7



CHECK THIS LIST NOW!
BOYS :
BOYS’ % HOSE—Grey only @ $ 72 p
BOYS’ SHIRTS is
In stripes and plain colours @ 87c., $2.01, $2.42
and $2.92 eac
BOYS’ ETON CAPS ... @ 24e. and 36e. ead
PLASTIC BELT @ 36c.
BLACK and TAN LACE SHOES
(INO Bere oak Rect ipa yd ace
BLACK LACE SHOES (Size 2—5)
TAN LACE SHOES (Size 2—5) .
KHAKI DRILL
GIRLS 3
DYED LINENS—In Navy, Royal, Brown, Beige, Pin
Green, Gold, Peach and White @ 82c., 94¢,, al
97c. a Yd.
DYED TOBRALCO—in White Royal and Navy.
CHILDREN’S LACE SHOES
In Black ‘and Tan (Sizes 11-—1) @ $4.30 a pair
GIRLS’ LACE SHOES—(Sizes 2—5) @ $5.14 a pair
PANAMA HATS @ $1.62, $1.79 and $1.82 eae
BERETS in Green, Beige, Brown Saxe, Red,
Royal and Navy at $1.01 each,
also STATIONERY
Rulers, Quink, Pencils, Sharpeners, Holders, Golden
Platignum, Esterbrook and Waterman’s Fountain Pens.

HARRISCN'S



ye BARE BOMBED Wee ee

”
”

$6.20 p
-ssees.. from 87e. to $1.12

”

j ”





BROAD ST



TS ——=

















PAGE SIX



BY CARL
i] ;



ANDERSON









————

NO-NO! NOT THAT KIND L)7






HEY, HASSAN..CAN ~
WOU GET US SOME
DATES?




ree AM.
LPRUNGEY!










ACHMED'S Arl
COME IN AND REST YOU
J CARANAN -










NOW WATCH THIS «++
FLIPPO--AND THE

QUARTER iS NOW
A SILVER COLLAR!

A Ou
INTERESTED DEAR®



BY FRANK STRIKES

ND OF AN
SILVER. AT LEAST HE
US =r pet INFORMATION

|



TURE WITH WHISPER BEGINS TODAY
a YOUR BREAKFAST \J rE

ee a lth |
(| ay 4

i 7



rie) Cte) ek,
EOC Le An
ese.) rm






So





et





| aT rEreter SS SEN]

BRINGING UP F


























WAT DID T YES - DUGAN - - eer
oe ee éHES GIVIN! A YES- MRS. DUGAN- YOu HEARD ME!
VIE CHASED YEAH- I'LL TELL YER WIFE UST
SS Sub rotone ncn”
alse: F 'D Hi
QllsE P HOW ee
WANT TO REMAIN

HEALTHY’

BY ALEX RAYMOND

WHAT , \
NOW, i. }
MUGGER? |

MY! SHE'S REAL MAD, AIN'T
Py SHE, SISTERE



MOORE




NTO





a PO YOU BELIEVEHE IS roa
=\—-——| |GREATER THAN THE PHANTOM? 3.4 Ri yi

MEN OF BANPAR, DO You estore os HEREC TY

FEAR AND BELIEVEINTHIS| [> =a | kK

APE IDOL?



BARBADOS ADVOCATE







Lady Dudley, one

of England's loveliest titled women, is a
use Pond’s Creams regularly and it’s amazing the Piference

"It's so much softer, smoother, clearer.

Brunette Mrs. Lawrence Earle, who lives in U.S.A.,
and Lady Dudley, well-known London hostess, have
one thing in conmon-—they use the same beauty care!

This beauty care is Pond’s, and it is the favourite
of society’s loveliest women in America, England,
and France.

Why not give your complexion the benefit of the
same care? Follow this easy routine: regularly every
night, cleanse the skin thoroughly with Pond’s Cold
Cream, swirline it gently over face and throat with
your fingers. “Rinse” with more Cold Cream for
extra cleansing, extra softening.

In the morning, before you make-up, smooth a
\ «#
| l ODAY eee

| Mor Keasm to bly
QUAKER OATS







QUAKER OATS GIVES YoU
MORE FOR YOUR MONEY:

| MORE wineRALs..................for strong bones and teeth



MORE PROTEINS.................. for solid flesh and muscles
MORE CARBOHYDRATES.............. for energy ond stomina
VITAMINS (B, and B2)......... turn food into “body-fvel”

|
|
| «++More Flavor and Enjoyment, teo!

You're ready for anything with the exuberant health thatQuaker
Oats helps yoy to enjoy! Children thrive on this delicious and
healthful food—so rich in the key elements needed for strength
and energy—for taller growth and solid muscles and bone.
Grown-ups who eat Quaker Oats regularly know ithelps them to
greater endurance and vitality, too. For ALL the family,
there’s no BIGGER NOURISHMENT VALUE than Quaker
Oats. Buy it today!

LINOLEUM CARPETS
Sizes: 9ft. by 71% ft. and 101% ft. by 9ft.
Also
LINOLEUM IN ROLLS 6ft. wide

All very reasonable in Price.



go = LS HERBERT Ltd, 9 ze
10 & 11 Roebuck Street.

i | Se SSS
%



Mrs. Lawrence W.

! 4 without my Pond’s Creams,” she says.“ Pond’s Cold Cream is
Pond’s Creams have made to my skin,” says Lady Dudley. so pleasant to use, and it leaves my face looking ever so much
safer and fresher.

Blonde or Brunette

| THEY PROTECT. THEIR LOVELINESS WITH THF SAME BEAUTY CARE

little Pond’s Vanishing Cream into your skin. This
delightful, non-greasy cream makes an ideal powder
base because it holds powder matt for hours, It
protects your skin, too.

Start at once with Pond’s two creams to make your
skin clearer, softer, smoother. In a very short while




FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950

Gums Bleed?

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your
mouth well and save your teeth or
money back on return of empty pack
age Get Amosan from your chemis

today. The guar-

Amosan antee protects
you.

For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth



BOYS SHOES

f Earle, leading figure in Philadelphia
honey blonde with grey eyes and a wonderful, fair skin. "I society, is noted for her lovely complexion. "I wouldn't be

IN BLACK and BROWN
(All Sizes)

You can’t beat these
for Comfort.
From $4.13 Up.
Visit - - -

THANI Bros.

Pr. Wm, Henry Street
and 6, 42 & 53 Swan Streets
DIAL 3466,

you'll be thrilled with its new
radiance. At all beauty counters.

wy
Pond’s








A‘dazzling
smile

A Pepsodent

!
|
|
|
|
smile?

Such
brilliant

Irium ! — That’s what Pepsodent contains to make
your teeth so much whiter, so much brighter, Irium,
the most effective brand of tooth cleansing agent
known to dental science, is exclusive to Pepsodent, It
removes harmful film and unattractive stains — gives

| your teeth an extra whiteness you can see. Ht

:

|





THE TOOTHPASTE COnrTAINING IRIUM
PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ENGLAND





all day long

Ms f
This wonderful sensation is wonderfully easy to get. Just

shower yqurself all over with Cashmere Bouquet Talcum



Powder, aiser every bath, every bathe. Then — all day
long your fascinating freshness will be the envy of your
fecncs: your skin will have a marvellous silken texture :
i t vill linger about you a subtly seductive fragrance.

Por Cashmere Bouquet is the Taleum Powder with the
1zrance that men love.

== Cashmere Bouquet

ay | TALCUM POWDER

ai

COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET CO



LOVELY SPUNS

in Orchid, Blue, Old Gold,
| . Rose, and White ... .+eeee. @ $1.08 per yd.
CELANESE CELSHUNG in White, Grey,
Gold, Torquoise & Blue ......... .... @ $1.01 per yd.
GEORGETTE in White, Pink, Gold, Feach





and Green . SMe Brera tates as @ $1.20 per yd.
} Also SATINS, COTTON PRINTS, FUJIETTES, CAMBRICS,
} LAWN in White, etc., etc

i BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.

a e 1)
7 ONSSSGOy) | Bae |







FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950

oe eee ae ae Se ee bans! ieee



CLASSIFIED ADS.



—_——

IN MEMORIAM



IN loving memory of my dear Sister
ESTELLE BROWNE who fell asleep on
May Sth, 1949

“Not dead to us who loved her

Not lost but gone before

She lives with us in memory,

And will for ever more.”’

REST IN PEACE

George Clarke (son), Archibald Clarke
(brother) Louise Eastmond (sister)
Claud Eastmond (brother-in-law).

5.5.50—In





FOR SALE







AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Morris 10 H.P. in perfect work-
ing order Apply C. E. Tryhane, Baga-
telle Plantation, St.» Thomas.

4.5.50—4n.





CAR—Wolseley 8. In perfect order
Possession May 1ilth. Telephone 4014.
Mrs. Graham Yearwood, 4.5,50—2n,





Phone 4683

CAR—Morris 8 h.p. 4 door Sedan in
A. 1 Mechanical condition. Newly paint-
ed. Fort Royal Garage.

2.5.50—én.

CAR: Pontiac Convertiable Coupe
occasional four Passenger in good order.
Reasonable price for quick Sale, Phone
3348, or 2749 28 .4.50—Tn

CAR-—One Hillman 1948 Model, Phone
W. R. Tempro 2840 or 8224

30.4.50-—t.f.n.



|

FORD ENGINE: One V-8 Ford engine
and radiator in good condition, axle,
drive shaft, ring-gear and pinion, and
other parts Enquire Auto Tyre Com-
pany, Trafalgar Street Phone 2696.
28.4.50—t.f.n.





ELECTRICAL



RADIO—American G.E, 11 tube, in;
good working condition. Phone 2990 |

between the hours of 4 and 5 p.m.
4.5.50—2n



MECHANICAL

LADIES BICYCLE—Good condition.
$30.00. Apply: Good, Juhilee, Gibbs
Beach, St. Peter. 5.5.50—2n.



MISCELLANEOUS

FLOUR BAGS Opp and washed
white, all marks taken out. Apply K,.
RR. Hunte & Co., Ltd. over Bata Shoe
Store, Lower Broad Street. Dial 4611.

4.5.50—l4n





FINEST PAINTS—Brandram Henderson
incomparable Forest Green Sun Proot
KEYSTONE White and colours, special
rimers, distempers Paints $6.84 gin.
istemper $3.50 gin. They are Here.
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

25.4.50—13n





GROCERY ITEMS-—Suncrest Evapo-
rated Milk. Cut-rite Wax Paper, 1-Ib.
Tins Klim, Eschalot, Secure yours early
from John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd. Dial
4335, Roebuck Street, 5.5.50—2n,
clrnneininnt ates eens ao

GARDEN HOSE—Half inch genuine
rubber Hose. Double Braided for extra

Lid. Dial 4222

PAINTS—I.C.I. Special offer Gloss
Paints. $3.45 per gallon. Come and get
them A. BARNES & Co., Ltd

values, postally used, Other B.W.1.
Stamps also wanted, Apply Box A.
C/o Advocate Co. 5. 3

)

WATER PUMP—One (1) second-hand
“Lister” Water Pump. 50 gallons per
hour. Drawn by % h.p. 110 volt, single
phase Motor, Apply: The Barbados
Foundry, Ltd., White Park Road, St.
Michael. 5.5.50—2n.







PUBLIC NOTICES





FORM L

The Land Acquisition Act,
1949

(Notice required by Section 3)
Notice is hereby given that it appears
to the Governor-in-Executive Committee
that the lands described in the Schedule
hereto aad situate at Bathsheba in the
parish of St. Joseph in the Island of Bar-
bados are likely to be needed for pur-
poses which in the opinion of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee are
public purposes, namely for establishing
playing fields or other places of public

rt.
eee THE SCHEDULE
ALL THAT certain parcel of land con-
taining 1 acre 3 roods adjoining the site
of the former Railway Station at Bath-
sheba, bounding on the seashore, on lands
formerly of the Barbados Government
Railway and on the public road, alleged
to be in the occupation of Miss Vera M,
Hinkson of Cane Garden, St. Andrew.
Dated this twenty seventh day of April
1950 at the Public Buildings in the City
of Bridgetown in the Island of Barbados.
By Command,
Pp. F, CAMPBELL,
Colonial Secretary, (Ag.)
3.5.50—3n.





LE

NOTICE

person or persons who may be
aatpeuabien the purchase of a parcel of
Jand at Skene’s Hill, St. George, be-
longing to Mrs. Ivy Edith Ashby, Mrs.
Erskine Ione Gittens and others are
hereby warned that there is an Agree-
ment to sell 4 Acres of this land to us
the undersigned and are advised to see
our Soler. Meets: nh &
Sealy who will give fu nfoerm®
oe 5. . GULSTONE,
L. A BYNOE.
5.5.50—2n.







=—————————————————
WANTED

———————





HELP

UALIFIED MECHANIC~ For Adding
Mochines and Typewriters Department.
Rradshaw & Co. 4.5.50—8n.

eee AAA AAAS
Bi y itt
A GIRD—For our Office. J W. Hewitt,
‘Tailoring Emporium, Coleridge St., oppo-

site Fire’ Brigade Station, Apply with

jettey and in person. 4.5. 50—4n

(Gen-
GUESTS—Two Paying Guests
tle men preferred) to share Large Com-




fortable Bedroom with running water.

Situated on Worthing Coast



8272.

OL

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE

The application of Ethelbert Ainsell

a St. B'town. St. Mich-
France of Tudor 5t « ao

Liquors, &c., at Bottom floor of No 38

ael for permission to sell Spirits,

‘Tudor St. St. Michael
Dated this 4th day of May, 1950
To H. A. Talma aes xi
lice Magistrate, Dist “A’
x Signed AINSELL FRANCE
Applicant

B.—This application will be con-].
= icensing Court to be held
District “A”, on Mon-
11

sidered ata f
at Police Co . 0
day the 15th day of May, 1950

o'clock, a.m




at

H. A, TALMA
Police Magistrate Dist ”













, kh, Archer McKenzie, Auctioneer.
















Good oe
Pathi N _ Hart, Sea” Field, Dia
hing. N.. W om














A
5.5.50—In





FOR RENT





f

HOUSES



AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY—A very
soeod Business Stand with or without
fixtures. Suitable for Dry Goods, Sta-
Yonery, Leather or any other similar
type of Business called “Blue H of
in Lutas Street. Apply Immediately.
Thani Bros. Dial 3466, after hours 4158,

5.5.50—t.f.n.

_

BUNGALOW, also Flat, facing sea mai;
coud, Hastings, furnished from May ist
Al) comforts, English baths with heaters
showers, telephones, verandahs. Tele
phone 2949. 31.3.50—t.{.n

BUNGALOW — Attractive and airy
bungalow, “Moorlands”, situated on St.
James Coast, near Appleby. Comfortably
turnished with every convenience. Three
bedrooms and Garage. Beautiful Sea
view from lounge. Suitable for smali
fanily from abroad taking up residence
in the Colony. Apply on premises. De-
livery immediate after 13th May. Diai
3589 5.5.50-—fn.











FLAT: Upstairs flat with 3 bedrooms
running water in each For further
particulars Dial 3696.

28.4.50—t f.n.

FLAT—Fully furnished. Linen and
Cutlery. All modern conveniences. 10
r.inutes from Clubs and City. Dial 4103.

4.5.50—2n

FOR RESIDENCE or OFFICE—Upstairs
premises at the Corner of Middle and
Swan Street. Very cool with all con-
veniences. 2 bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining rooms, kitchen space, Bath and
Toilet etc. Immediate possession. Thani
Bros. Dial 466 or 4158. 5.5.50—t.f.n.

MARKHAM-—-On the Sea Hastings,
3







28.4.50—t.f.n.

WESTMONT — Worthing. 3 Bedroom-
House. From June Ist. Phone 4117
8 to ll a.m., 4 to 6 p.m. 3.5,50—5n

SILVER COT — Beautiful unfurnished
House at Worthing View Gap. 3 bed-
rooms, living room, dining, kitchen, toilet
bath and servants’ quarters. Apply on
premises. 5.5.50—2n.











PUBLIC SALES



UCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

By instruction from DaCosta & Co.,
Ltd: we will sell on TUESDAY the 9th
at their Store Room, Bolton Lane
‘obliquely opposite Louis Bayley) 11

Show Cases. Sale 12.30 o'clock. Terms
Cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers
5.5.50—2n.



By instructions of the Insurance Com-
pany, I will offer for sale on FRIDAY
5th at the time set out below—Courtesy
Garage 2 o'clock Singer Saloon Car
demaged by an accident and one Ford
Truck damaged by fire.

2.45 p.m. H. Jason Jones Servce
Station, Beckwith Place, Morris Saloon
Car damaged by accident. Terms Cash.








3.5.50—3n.
















UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER

By instructions received from Mr. 8S.
Drapot I will sell his house which is
almost new and recently painted on
the spot at Merricks, St, Philip on land

of Miss Millicent Crichlow on Thurs-
day next llth May at 2 o'clock. It is

two roofs, with shed and kitchen a
tached. Same must be sold. Terms
Cash, D’ARCY A. SCOTT, Auctioneer.



REAL ESTATE

FURNITURE—Several Bureaus, small
Tables, China Cabinets, Morris Chairs
Ete. at Bargain Prices in Ralph A.



4.5.50—3n.



“CASVILLE”, Navy Gardens Ch. Ch.
Three bedroom bungalow standing on
8,241 sq. feet land. Can be seen at any
time by appointment. Apply C, A, Peirce.
Phone 3348 or 2749. 28.4.50—7n,



By public competition at our office.




2 p.m. the dwellinghouse of two storey:
comprising public rooms, two bedroom:
kitchen, bath ete. with shop attached,
standing on 2094 sq. ft. of land in
Tweedside Road and Hunts Road, City,
Apply to Mr. E. H. Kirton, the owner
on the premises. Further particulars
and conditions of sale from COTTLE
CATFORD & CO,

“ALCOTT”’—Situate at the Stream
Road, Christ Church, standing on 17,236
Square Feet of land, with right of way
to Worthing Beach.

The house contains gallery, drawing
end dining rocm, three bedrooms,
pantry, kitchen and usual out-offices.
Garage and servants’ rooms in the yard.
Inspection on application to the tenant
ts. Watkins every day (except
Pome between the hours of 3 and

p.m.

The above will be set up for sale at
public competition at our Office in Lucas
gus: on Friday the 5th of May 1950 at

p.m.

















CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors.
28.4.50—Tn

“LEIGHTON” — Situate in Passage
Road, St. Michael, standing on 6,87)
square feet of land.

The house is built of stone and con-
teins gallery, drawing, dining, sitting
end breakfast rooms, Pantry, kitchen,
W.C. and bath downstairs. 4 bed-
rooms (2 with running water) upstairs

Inspection any i (except Sundays)
between 10 a.m. 5 p.m.

The sbove will be set up for sale to
Public Competition at our Office
Lneas Street, Bridgetown on Friday
the Sth May 1950 at 2 p.m.
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors.
23 ,4.50-—12n.

























ne

All THAT certain messeage or store
known as No, 46 Roebuck Street stand-
ing on 2788 sq. ft. of land. The
building has been recently remodelied

and renovated. Inspection on applica
tion to the undersigned.

The property will be set up tor sale
by public competition at our office,
James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday,

12th May 1950, at 2 p.m.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE
Solicitors.

2 Roods 10 perches: two



9278 for further particulars.

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

of Baxters Rd.,

posite Chapman St., St. Michael.
Dated this 4th day of May 1950.
To:—H. A. TALMA Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
Sgd. CONNELL WHITE, Agent,
for Applicant.

a.m.
H. A. TALMA, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist.
5.5.50—In







17 High St., on Thursday 11 May, at

























































29.4 50—12n
——————
“REST HAVEN’'—Rockley New Road










Ss.
Servants’ rooms, garage. Apply Mr
Marshall opposite for inspection. Dial
5.5.50—-2n.




The application of HENRY YOUNG

St. Michael for per-
missiou to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.,
at a 2-storey board and shingle shop
with residence attached at Bexters, op-




N.H.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, Mistrict “A’, on Monday
the Sth day of May 1950 at 11 o'clock,

|
‘|












@ From Page 5

through the bills, if they came io
do so, they would recollect Mr.
Ward's criticism of the inclusion
of certain items, which he sub-
mitted could not have needed
replacement as a result of the
accident.

It was a matter for them to
deeide, the Chief Judge told the
Jury, He believed that most of
them had a working knowledge of
cars, and were better qualified
than he to express an opinion as
to whether all those items should
justifiably have been included on
the bills as a result of that
accident. They would remember
too the point made by Mr. Ward
that the cost of repainting parts of
the car that the accident’s damage
had not caused to need repairing
should not be charged to the de-
fendant, and Mr. Adams’ repiy
that no one would drive about
in a piebald car. They would also
remember Mr, Layne’s evidence
on that point.

Rather. High

Where the estimate of $1.50 al

day earnings of the car was con-
cerned, the Chief Judge told the
jury that that had not been
seriously challenged by other evi-
dence, although it had been criti-
cised, and although it was sugges-
ted to be rather high. That again
was a matter for them to consider,
bearing in mind all that he had
told them.

In connection with that point,
there was the length of time—four
months—that the plaintiff had put
in for. That had also been strongly
criticised by Mr. Ward. Mr. Layne





LOST & FOUND
LOST _

SWEATER—One Beige Sweater be-
tween Land's End and the New Bus
Stand. Finder will be rewarded. Con-
tact “Sweater’’ C/o Advocate Advertis-
ing Dept.
—_—_——







PERSONAL

THE PUBLIC are hereby warned
against giving credit to my wife Mrs.
LEILA PARRIS (nee Grimes) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or







anyone else contracting any debt or,
debts in my name unless by a written)

order signed by me.
Sed. CONRAD PARRIS,





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Sylvan Vaughan of
Bawden, St. Andrew purchaser of Liquor
License No, 605 of 1950 granted in respect
of a boarded and galvanized house with
shop attached, situated at Bawden St
Andrew to remove said License to a
boarded and galvanized shop situate at
Walkers St. Andrew and use it at such
last described premises.

Dated this 2nd day of May, 1950.

To the Police Magistrate, Dist. “F."”
Cc. L, D. H. WALWYN,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consider-
ed at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “F,” on Friday the
12th day of May 1950 at 11 o’clock, a.m,

Signed SYLVAN VAUGHAN,
Ag. Police Magistrate District “F’’.
§.5.50—In

Leaving School Next Term?



HAVE you considered Journalism as a
Career? ‘The Barbados Advocate is look-
ing for a bright young man to train
as a Sub-Editor. Apply now in writing
giving full details to the Editor The

Advocate 34 Broad Street.
30.4.50 t.f.n.







GOVERNMENT NOTICE

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Jury Decides In
Defendant’s Favour

had originally given Mr. Corbin an
estimate of one month for repairs
For various reasons, as they knew,
the job had taken nearly a year,
but Cerbin, the plaintiff had.put
in a claim for four months. In
considering the question of
damages, if they .did consider
them, they would have to decide
whether four months was a
reasonable time, and if $1.50 a day
was a reasonable amount.

Which of the Parties?

Leaving the question of damages,
the Chief Judge said that the only
issue in the case was which of the
parties caused the accident. There
was not, as in some cases, any
question of contributory negli-
gence. The plaintiff was saying
that it was the male defendant
who so drove his car that he ran
into plaintiff's car causing the
driver to lose control so that the
ear was forced into the palm tree.

On the other hand, the defen-
dant’s case was that while he was
overtaking the plaintiff’s car the
driver of the latter suddenly
veered across the road and struck
the defendant's car, thus causing
the mishap.

The Chief Judge then reviewed

the evidence of the occurrence, re-
minding the jury of the submis-
sions and points made by both
counsel. He mentioned the sugges-
tion about the request that there
should be no police intervention in
the matter, and referred to the
= of Defence Counsel on
that.

Police
But police intervention, he said,
would be nothing to do with the


















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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
St. George’s Girls’ School—St. George.
Applications are invited for the Headship of St. George’s Girls’

School from teachers with at least 10 years’ teaching experience.

The minimum professional qualification required is the Certificate A

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May, 1950.

27,4.50—2n








Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
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Gazette of Thursday, 4th May, 1950.

2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling price of

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IN PORT: M.V: Moneka, Sch. DOrtac
Yacht Tern MI, Sch, Frances W. Smith.
Sch Adalina, Sch Everdene, Seb.
Emanuel Gordon, Sch. Emeline, Sch
Lady Noeleen, Sch. Molly N Jones.
Sch. Lady Zolieen, Sch. Freedom Fleary,
Sch. Eastern Eel, Sch. Mermaid C., Sch

Emeralda, Sch. Wonderful Counsellor,

8.S. Aicoa Puritan, Sch. Gardenia W..
M.V. Lady Joy, Sch. Mandalay It

ARRIVALS
Schooner Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tons
net, Capt. Every, from British Guiana
M.V. Caracas, 235 tons net, Capt
Vincent, from Trinidad

|
$.S. Rivercrest, 4,907 tons net, Capt



5 from Dominica

M.V Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt
Gumbs, from Dominica
wPARTURES

S.$. Sunjewel, 4,304 tons net, Capt
Clarke; for Trinidad

$.S. cmterpreter, 4,026 tons net’ Capt.



Coates, for La Guaira.

Advocate vs. National at the Bay
Referee Mr. O. Graham

Westerners vs. Harkliffe at St. Leon-|
ard’s

Referee Mr. E. Reece
St. Mary's vs. Wavell Sports Club at
Shell

In Touch With Barbados’ Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.I.) Ltd advise
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through their Bar-
bados Coast Station:-

S.S. Misr, Poseidon, President Meny,
World Trotter, Calliroy, Alsudan, M.T
Nueva Andalueia, M.T. Vikingen, Mateo,
Atlantic Ranger, Mormaclark, Lundys
Lane, Quemado Lake, South Mountaint
Gulf Pride, Sunjewel, Loide Columbia
Sabaneta, Yamanota, Askepot, Cochrane

ARRIVALS—By B.W.1.A.L

From St. Lucia:

Sheila Arthur, Guthbert Arthur, John
O'Keeffe, Thomas Huli, Margurite Barn-
ard, Laurie Barnard, Camille Dyer
Leonard Dyer, Trevor Dyer :

From Trinidad:

e-e——————————

matter they were considering
a ee , -
Police intervention would be moce
in the nature of a prosecution fo:
dangerous driving or something of
that kind, although a conviction
for dangerous driving would prob-
ably be a sure foundation for a
civil action for damages.

However, the police were told not to
intervene, because, as might well be ex
pected, the parties were friendly then,
and were indeed still friendly up to the
time, and after the action was started

We hope", said the Chief Jude.
the parties will remain as friendly as
they were, wWhatover the outcome of this
litigation may be,”

In conclusion he briefly repeated what
he said about the evidence, about the
points made by counsel and about the
nature of the negligence appropriate to
that case, He reminded them that there
was no claim for general damages as in
other cases. If they rame to the question
of damage therefore, they would only

Ave to consider the matter of special
lamages—that was damages to the car,
its resultant repairs and the loss of earn-
‘nes for the four months for which claim
had been made.



The Jury then retired for the already
mentioned period and returned to Court

with the already mentioned verdict.



REAL ESTATE
JOHN M. BLADON

(A.F.S., F.V.A.)
Formerly

DIXON & BLADON

Fer Sale:

“LEETON-ON-SEA"—Near Ols-
tins. An attractive sea-side bun
galow built pight on to a sandy
beach with excellent bathing
facilities, There is a wide front
verandah extending the entire
frontage, 4 bedrooms 3 with wash
besins, large L shaped lounge with
cocktail bar, kiléhen, garage and
servants’ quarters, Enquiries in
vited.

“WINDY RIDGE", St. James
This very attractively § situated
medern stone bungalow has 3


































large bedrooms all with basins,
verandah, 2 lounges, dining room,
bath, 2 toilets, There are 2 acres
one under cane and the rematnder
is very well laid out with lawns,

fruit trees, flowering shrubs ete
The view can never be spoiled and
prevailing breezes are unobstruct-
ed. 5 miles from town centre
“LITTLE BATALLYS,” St. Peter

_ Charming small country house
Standing in approximately 1 acre
This property was re-designed by
its architect owner and contains 3

reception, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and
toilets, kitchen, laundry, detached
servants’ quarters and «arage
Very attractive arched verandah
on two sides and fernery Right
of way to sea

BLUE VISTA, Rockley (near
Golf Club) One of the better type
modern homes in a select locality,
well planned and constructed by a
firrn of repute, Large Jounge, din-
ing room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms
twith basing and fitted wardrobes),
tiled bathroom, double garage,
servants’ quarters, terraced rock
garden, lawns, flowering shrubs
and plants. Owing to unforseen
circumstances this desirable pro-
perty is offered well below cost
for early sale.

Phone 4640
Plantations Building









GERM DETERGENT

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Of Interest To Ladies...

JERSEY ART. SILK PETTICOATS—Pink and White

do. do. do. HALF SLIPS
—White, Peach, Blue and Black

do. do. do. PANTIES & BRIEFS
do. do. do. VESTS — Opera Top

do. do. do. NIG
—Pihk, Biue, White and Green

— ALSO —

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pee SEE OUR SHOW CASE.



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rulvy, Skagern, Pygma
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lion, Cavina,

Wave, Hersilia, Borgny, Atlantic Ship-

per, Virgilio, Esso, Little Rock, Sacon-
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1, Hemmerfest, Estero, Altragaz,
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From La Guaira

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DEPARTURES By B.W.1.A.L

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For Antigua

Miss Winifred Wainwright






























ORIEN

Curios, Ivery, Teak, Sandal, Jewel
lery, Brass Ware, Tapestries,
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KASHMERE



= i : yd Cy

AUCTION SALE

FURNITURE & HOUSEHGLD
EFFECTS

-RICES”

NEAR THE CRANE





TURSDAY 9TH., AT It A.M












We are instructed by Mrs. C. M
Winter to sell by auction the fol-
lowing valuable furniture and
effects:

Antique Mahogany Cellarette,
Mahogany Tip-top Tables, Mahog-
any dining table, oval Walnut
table, Mahogany serving table,
Mahogany. china cabinet, Deal
tables (all sizes), Dairy utensils,
2 Cream Sep ors, Mahogany
dinner wagon, Cedar Presses,
Painted Betlroom furniture, Spring
filled and Fibre Mattresse ‘Towel
Racks, Mirrors, Cabinet Gramo-~-
phone, Hanging Scales, Document
Cabinet, Cushions, Tennis Net,
Royal Typewriter) Spruce Reclin-
ing Chair, Linoleum, large model
Toy Mill, Mahogany and Ebony
Occasional Tables, Slate topped
Table, Aluminium topped Table,
Marble topped Tables, 11 Mahog~
ny Dining Chairs, Mahogany side
Board, Mahogany double ended
Sofa, Upholstered Settee, Mahog-
nay and Bentwood Rockers, Cedu
Wardrobes, Mahogany Bedroor
Furniture, Mahogany, and Iron
double and single Bedsteads,
all kinds of miscellancous
Bedroon® Furniture, Medicine Cab-



























































inet, Shaving Cabinet, Magozine
Rack, Indian Hammock, Folding
Cota, Westminster Chiming Clock
Microscope, Folding Chairs, Rugs
und many other Interesting items

Viewing morning of and day to

Sale
CASH ON FALL OF HAMMER
AUCTIONEERS

John M. Bladon

(A.F.8., F.V-A.)
Formerly DIXON & BLADON
Phone 4640, Plantations Building











OILS

"D
aTbD.

Trafalgar St.
































—Pink and White





—Pink and White





T DRESSES


















|
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Raphael Laffain, Josepn Jordan, Fell |













SHIP

PAGE SEVEN









St

The
cept
Trinidad
inst

The M.V
cept

The

for

5th inst





Cana

SOUTHBOUND

CAN. CHALLENGER 25th Apr.
LADY RODNEY .. 12th
CAN. CRUISER

LADY

NELSON
LADY RODNEY
LADY NELSON
LADY RODNEY

NORTHBOUND

LADY
LADY
LADY
LADY
LADY
LADY

The Sch. GARDENIA W wiil
accept Cergo and Passengers for
and Trinidad. Sail-
ing Thursday 4th inst

EVERDENE will

Sailing Saturday

MONEKA will
Cargo and Passengers
Dominica,
Nevis
Sailing to be given

UNITED PILGRIM S
will accept Cargo and Passengers



(Iine.) Consignees



ithout notice.

N.B.—Subiect to jm wi

PING NOTICES











SS. GOLFITO

On inquiring at the office of
Messrs Wilkinson & Haynes Co.,
Ltd. yesterday we were informed
that this vessel is expected to
arrive here on Thursday, the llth
May, and will be leaving the same
day for Southampton. The pas-
senger ac is fully
taken up with the exception of
one two berth cabin which was
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Anyone wishing to avail them-
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apply today. —advt.



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y May 2th May 27th May
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25th July 27th Sth ‘Aug. Aug.
26th Aug. 20th Aug. th Aug. Sep.



All vessels fitted with cold storage cha:

and freight rates on application to :—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.





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“GASCOGNE” gs to inidad Sailings to Pi
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28th 1950 July 5th 1950
2nd 1950 August 9th .1950

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~ PAGE EIGHT

Rovers Beat
College 5-0

IN FIRST DIVISION

} Piekwick-Rovers, in spiic
many missed opportunities, deait

@ 5S—0 defeat to Harrison

in their First Divisic.

a0 i fixture at Kensington
yesterday evening.

Pickwick-Revers who ught

in for the first time Denis Atkinson

and Denis Worme, scored three
Ot their goals during ‘he first
halt, }

Denis Atkinson at outside left
opened the scoring after play was
in progress for about 12 minutes,
w Wilkes at centre forward
scored the remainder.

Pickwick-Rovers defended the
geal from the pavilion end and
were first on the offensive. Wilkes
theiy centre forward, sent in a
hard grounder which Smith saved
but did not gather. Wilkes who
Was still on the run eventually
kicked over in attempting to score.

The College boys in a good
movement then) carried the bal)
well down the field and Reid on
the left wing after receiving from
Smith, sent & a good effort which
struck the upright. They later

oe another raid on the Pick-
k-Rovers’ goal but without
result.

Open Goal

The College soon found them-
selves one down when Smith their’
goalie came out to clear and fum-
bled, to give Denis Atkinson an
opportunity to score into an open

Fighting for the equalizer the
College front line made another
good movement, but Worme kick-
ed away from Smith as he was
about to take a shot.

Pickwick-Rovers took over. and
kept the ball in their opponents’
area for some time; but their for-
wards did every thing except
shoot.

Pickwick-Rovers kept on press—
ing, and were rewarded when full
sback Ford missed and Wilkes, who
g£0t possession, beat Smith with
a well placed shot.

No sooner was the ball centred
than) it was back in the College
area, and Pickwick-Rovers regis-
tered their third when Wilkes
again scored into an open goal
after receiving from Atkinson,

The interval was taken imme-
Giately afterwards with the score
3—0 in favour of Pickwick-Rovers

Second Half

On resumption, the College were
the first to attack, and Smith on
the left wing sent in a good effort
which full back Proverbs cleared
The College made another raid
and this time Williams sent in
a hard grounder which Hill saved:

Pickwick-Rovers, who were now

* trying to increase their lead,
swept down the field and Wells
centred accurately from the right
wing, but Atkinson headed out.

Later Wells again got possession
and sent in a hard one which
Smith deflected over the par, but
nothing resulted from the corngr.

The College boys on the other
hand were still trying to open their
score, and Smith after receiving
a good pass from one of his halves,
sent in a hard one which Hill
gathered and cleared. .

Pickwick-Rovers made a num-
ber of ruids on the College goal,
and kept their defence very busy
at this stage. On one occasion
Smith saved what looked a
certainty when Wells cut in from
the wing, and sent in a hard
grounder.

Good Show

The College boys, although three
down, were still putting up a good
show. They concentrated chiefly
on their left winger Smith who
sent in many a good effort but
without-result,

Pickwick-Rovers’ front men led
by Wilkes, were still looking for
goals and during one of their raids,
Atkinson struck the cross bar, but
the ball rebounded into play.

It was not long after this that
Wilkes sent in the fourth for his
team with a well placed shot frorm
outside the area,

Pickwick-Rovers again got
ession, and Croney hit the up-
right with a powerful shot, but
from the rebound he _ kicked
straight to Smith who had no
difficulty in saving.

From another raid by Pickwick-
Rovers, Wilkes beat Sniith with a
well placed grounder to make the
score , and the game ended
shortly afterwards.

The reteree was Mr. Paul
Wilkins while the linesmen, were
t:. ‘G. E. Amory and Mr. L, F.

arris. :

The teams were as follow:—
Pickwick - Rovers: Hill, R.
Atkinson, Proverbs, Worme,
‘ster; Hunte, Wells, Davies,
ilkes, Croney, D. Atkinson,
Harrison College: C. W. Smith,
orrison, Ford, Morris, St. John,
gimmonds Medford, Williams,
dor, V. O. Smith, Reid.
———o“€

heyll Do It Every

\

——








i ox

os
ene ik



SURE ENOUGH,

THIS DOWN”

Aba baven

The
Peschiera

a Lat claps
“Ferrari” car of

-during the Mille Mig

et

@ From Page 1

The match was played in dull
cold weather. After the match the
West Indies cricketers were enter-
tained at a _ reception by the
Gymktiana Club in the pavilion,

Late
The driver of the coach bring-
ing the West Indies cricket team



Marzotto



“ee iaeig dykes WE Bild
» (brother of the winner)
lia 1,000 miles road race

and lik ew

W.1—Indian Cricket

for the Cricket Club Conference
Eleven against ihe West Indies
last week. He made 39 not out
in 107 minutesswith five fours.
Scores:

W.1, ist Innings
Stolimeyer |.b.w. Bb. Mankad

A. Rae c Amery b Umrigar 47
K. Trestrail ¢ Amery b Mankad 49
F. Worrell ¢ O, Singh b Constante 36
Cc. Waleott ¢ & b. Mankatl 16

Christiant stpd; Amery b Manikad »

here for the match lost his way,|G. Gomez not out

and the party was late in arriving C Beene LLb.w. b Constantine 6

When they reached the ground, Getrag bat Lbs 13

however, they found that a start

could not be made because of the Total (for 7 whkts. dpe.) 7

soft state of the pitch following] ran of wkts. 1—0, 2—102, 3—105, 4—163,

early rain. Play was held up for 163, 6—163, 7—169.

an hour from the scheduled start- BOWLING QAbyas

ing time while the pitch was dry-| constantine % ¥ Le ‘

ing out Mankad 94 4 49 4
7 Cooper 6 Oo 24 0
The Teams 0, Singh 6 Be 0

Umrigar 7 0 27 1

West Indies: J. Stollmeyer
(Capt.); RK. Christiani, G. Gomez
L. Pierre, A. Rac, 5S. Ramadhin,
i. Trestrail, A. Valentine C. Wal-
cott, C, Williams, F. Werrell.

Indian Gymkhana:
R. Cooper, V. Mankad, P. timriger,

Cc. Masiers,



Gymkhana Ist Innings’
Singh b Pierre
Amery |.b.w. b Gomez
. Cooper not ott
. Mankad ¢ Valentine b Williams
fe eae stpd, Walcott b Rama-

BB-0

. Masters ¢& b Ramadhin
Constantine b Ramadhin

6
0
I... Constantine, V. Ali, ©. Singh,, E Tipthorp ¢ & b Ramadhin 2
* *) i , ap TM. AWD Rar
R. Khan, S. Singh, W. Amery, T.} R, fan sor aeet t
ripthorp Extras: b4 4
Jeff Stollmeyer, captaining the to
West Indies, won the toss and| Tt! (for @ wkts) ae
decided to Latona soft pitch.The, Fail of wis. 1--1, 2—7, 3-38, 4—63,
hii ' ith ane (5-55, 6—55, 7-61, 8-61
tourists gol off to a bad start for BOWLING ANALYSIS
Stollmeyer was leg before to Maa- oO. M R w.
kad before a run had been scored. Fieme 8 3 16 1
Ken Trestrail joined Alan Rae Willems A 7 Po ‘
and the pair recovered in good} Ramadhin 12 7 9 5
style, Rac specially, showing —Reuter.

excellent form, using the drive
forcibly. He made one vicious pull
off Mankad which sent the ball oa
to the top of some trees, and the
game was held up a few minutes
while the piayers searched for it
in another field. Rae and ‘Trestratl
added 50° in 42 minutes,

Good Stand

Rae and Trestrail then took part
in a century stand for the second
wicket and reached 102 in #0
minutes before they were parted.
With the score at 163 the tourists
lost three wickets without addition
to the score. This was chiefly due
to Mankud who is considered by
Jack Kidney manager of the West
Indies as among the world’s best
left arm slow bowlers, With his
slow spinners on a drying pitch he
took the wickets of Walcott and
Christiani with successive balis
and very néarly completed a hat
trick with the next delivery which
beat Gomez but went over the
wicket. Mankad brought off a
magnificent running catch off dis
own bowling to dismiss Walcott
and then hed Christiani stumped
Worrell, who batted 45 minutes
and hit five fours in his 36 mis-
timed a big hit off Constantine's
first ball of the next over and.was
smartly caught at midoff,

Mankad came out with 4 for 49
having earlier claimed the wickets
of Stollmeyer and Trestrail. The
iatter having batted 103 minutes
for 49 which included three fours,
Another Indian test player, Umri-!
gar, claimed Rae after he had hit
47 ineluding one six and fovr
fours in 85 minutes.

|

Gymkana Batting

THE West Indies declared just
before tea. The Indian Gym-
khana had about 2 hours in which
to get the required runs, if they
were to win, and tea was taken
before they began their bid,

The Gymkhana team always
found runs hard to get against the
accurate. West Indies bowling
dominated by Ramadhin. Spin-
ning the ball both ways he always;
had batsmen in trouble. Mankad
played a bright innings of 21
whjch included a six and three}
fours in 33 minutes, but the best
Gymkhana, batsman was the Vice-
Captain, R. Cooper who played



“Time
Sr
Y

~




GRASS ON THAT
CUEBALL:-- (_ BUSY STREET:
WELL, WHAT

‘YA KNOW:::




TO WRITE



seat + re Oe By Jimmy Hatlo |
Tae GOOD OL’ CUEBALL. Y AND EGGHBAD IS SO |
HE NEVER GIVES UP } ANXIOUS TO BELIEVE
TRYING TO GROW ¢

THE ONLY
WAY THEY'LL
GET HAIR ON

Tranquility
Coming May 10

(Barbados Advyucate Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 4.

The Tranquility Tennis Club is
making big plans to send a pow-
erful contingent to meet Savan-
nah Club, The team is due to ar-
rive in Barbados May 10. Two of
the colony's best mens’ doubles
combination Nothnagel and Cuth-

bert Thavenot will oppose’ the
current champions Jin Ho and
Hunter Archer in a_ floodlight

match to-morrow night, (Friday)
proceeds going to aid in sending
ing the team across. Tranquility
selected Harold Nothnagel to lead
the side, with Arneaud De Ver-
teuil vice-Captain.

—(Reuter,)

Gondoliers Win

VENICE, May 4.

The three day strike of Venice's
Gondoliers ended today with com-
plete victory for the graceful old
Gondolas over the motorboats.
Motor vessels have been banned
by the City Council from the inner
waterways of Venice and from the
Grand Canal. Gondoliers untied
their mooring ropes and once
again offered their boats for hire.

The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 5.42 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.12 p.m|
Moon (Last Quarter) May 8
Lighting: 7.00 p m
High Water: 5.45 a.m., 7.09
p.m



YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington)
ins.

Total for month to yester-
day: .60 ins.

Temperature (Max,) 85.0° F

Temperature (Min.) 71.5° F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
(3 p.m, E, by N,

Wind Velocity 15 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,962
(3 p.m.) 29.889.

37

.















HIM,HE REALLY THINKS
HE SEES PEACH FUZZ
ON CUEY'S DOME:+:

I TOLD ’EM
TO RUB A LITTLE
LIMBURGER ON:AN’
I KNOW “THEY

Y








LuisteninG To THE
SKINDOME BOYS
KIDDING THEMSELVES:

THANX “TO
AVARTIN Q, DIETZ,
VASHINGTON , 0.C.



seen
r C through Italy.
mechanic were safe—in spite of the car having broken in two.—Ewxpress.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

)

ne A ‘
Toad trace through ftaly.
after it had crashed near
Both driver and



Gordon Richards
Wins 4,000 Races
ALL-TIME RECORD

SANDOWN, Surrey, May 4.

The British champion jockey,
Gordon Richards, who is 46 to-
morrow, rode his four thousandth
winner today, an all-time record.

The Biggest money, spinner jn
British horse-racing history, Rich-
ards in 30 years on the turf has
earned an estimated £1,800,000 in
prize money for racehorse owners
and collected at least £200,000 in
prizes for himself, but Richards
has never yet won Britain’s great-
est race—the Derby.—Reuter.

?



.
B.B.C. Radio Programme
FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950

7 a.m, The News, 7.10 a.m. News Analy-
sis. 7.15 a.m. Think on these things. 7.30
am, From the third Programme, 7.50
am. Interlude. 8 a.m. From the Editori-
ais. 8.10 a.m, Programme Parade, 8.15 a.m.
London Light Orchestra. 9 a.m. Close
Down. 12 Noon The pm,
hews Analysis. 12.15 p.m, New ,
1 p.m. The Debate Continues. 1.15°p.m.
Radio Newsreel. 1.30 p.m. Symphony of
Strings. 2 p.m. The News. 2.10 p.m. Home
News from Britain. 2.15 p.m. Sports Re-
tTew, 2.30 p.m. Musie in Miniature. 3 p.m.
The end of the Road. 330 p.m, BBC
Northern Orchestra, 4 p.m. The News
4.10 p.m. The Daily Service. 4.15 p.m
Nights at the Opera. 5 p.m, Listeners
Choice. 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade, 5.30
p.m. From the @hird Programme, 5.50
p.m, Interlude. 6 p.m. New Records. 6.43
p.m, Dance Music. 7 p.m. The News, 7.10
p.m. News Analysis. 7.15 p.m, West In-
dian Diary, 7.45 p.m. The Piano for
Pleasure. 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel. 8 15
p.m. The Debate Continues. 8.30 p.m. The
Country House. 9 p.m. British Concert
Hall. 10 p.m. The News. 10.10 p.m, From
the Editorials 10.15 p.m. Sandy Mac-
Pherson at the Theatre Organ, 10.30 p.m,
lusic Magazine. 10.45 p.m. Worid Affairs
p.m. The News,

==

News, 12.10

— —. ——.





|

\



WOOLLENS :—
DOESKINS :—

Can Be Seen At

Se aoe

| sufferin

WHICH CAN BE MADE
SUITS FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN

C. B. RICE & Co.

OF
BOLTON LANE

Roy Marshall 'Frontenae Trophy | =

Rejoins Team

LONDON, May 4.

Roy Marshall, the young Wesi
Indies all-rounder, who has been
from meusic wa
ing hospital in Eastbourne today
to rejoin the team.

Marshall was taken to hospital)
with measles in Eastbourne last
Wednesday, after he had played
in the two days’ practice match
against Colone} L. C. Stevens Xl
The West Indies party leave
London tomorrow, and the tearn t
meet Worcestershire will be
selected on the train.

Mr. Kidney said that the select-
ors had been watching the players’

lwuv-

form intently, and that a final de- %

ision on the team woul’ be made
Curing a discussion on the journey

Although the county ground at! ¢ pe held in the School



Shoot on Saturday

THE qualifying shoot for the
Frontenac Trophy which is 10
rounds at 300 and 500 yards, is

seheduled to take place at the
Government Rifle Range on
Saturday, May 6.

The 16 highest scorers will be
cligible to compete in the final
stage which will be shot for on |
Saturday, 13th May. The condi-

tions of this stage are 15 rounds |

at 500 and 600 yards.
These conditions are among

and are comparable with the
King’s final stage. [t is expected
ihat there will be some keen com-
petition.



3OBA MEET TONIGHT

ALL Old Combermerians are
reminded of the monthly ane

Jen ,, to-
Vorcester, where the iatch will pight, Friday, May 5, at 8 o’clock.

be played, was below six feet of
water six weeks ago, today it is
considered to be in splendid con-
dition. The ground had been
flooded by the overflowing of the
River Severn.

Soccer XI

In a letter to Colonel L. C.
Stevens, Chairman of the East-
bourne Football and Cricket

Teams, Mr. J. Kidney, manager of
the West Indies touring side, has
intimated the possibility of the

West Indies turning out a Becese| }

XI at the end of their cricket pro-
gramme.

He wrote: ‘When we have won
the rubber we hope to come down
to Eastbourne again, and beat
your team at soccer.”

During their 10 days’ stay at
Eastbourne, the West Indies watch-
ed the Eastbourne Football Club
play a Corinthian League match.

—Reuter.



Exercise Tracks
Being Built
AT GARRISON

TWO exercising tracks which
are being built on the Garrison
will be completed in about two
weeks, Mr. Lewis, Secretary of
the Barbados Turf Club told the
Advocate yesterday. One track
will be ised duripg the dry
weather, the other ring wet
weather.

After the August flood last year,
Mr. Perkins’ “Fly On" got one of
its feet broken when it sank into
the soft track. Horses also had
to exercise on the beach. This
firm wet-weather exercising track
is being hurried on to offset any
such recurrences.

S

Finest Quality British

WORSTEDS :—
TWEEDS :—
SERGES :—
LINENS. -

DRILLS :—
INTO TAILORED

ppearance

is a Suit Tailored
by us.

Only the Finest
Quality Suitings
stocked . . only
the Best Workmanship
guaranteed

e

LET US FIT YOU
TODAY

P. C. S. MAFFEI
& C0, LTD.

“Pop Scorers in
Tailoring”

‘

Through the courtesy of
British Council Re

‘he following films will be shown:

|



1. British News. ;
2. Letter from Britain.
3. House of Windsor.
4. Mercy Flight.

There will be the usual games
after the Film Show.

sa cant aia ceamala nena ie
| TO-DAY.

FUN! MUSIC!
LAUGHTER!



— BY —
JEFFREYS
RADIO
STARS

Who like JEFFREY’S
BEER will thrill you to
the very~ heart.

THE BOYS’ FOUNDA-
TION SCHOOL
2.30 p.m.

(For School Children
Only)
HARBOUR BAR AND
RESTAURANT
at 5 p.m.



the |
most difficult in the West Indies | |

‘esentative +







(Take advantage of these big savings by
planning your overseas trip now. Not only
are TCA rates specially low—but
accommodation in European centres during
these same seasons is less crowded—and

hotel rates, too, are lower.

You save time when you fly TCA to Europe
in restful comfort aboard giant 4-engined
“North Star’ Skyliners—have more time
there to visit, sightsee or do business,



Ask for full information

from your T C A, Agents

' GARDINER AUSTIN « co

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INTERNATIONAL y
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FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950



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(Savings based on regular one-way
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1. Travel both ways during “Low
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Full Text

PAGE 1

FRIDAY, MAY 5, IS50 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGF • %  \ i -. CLASSIFIED ADS. Jury Decides In IN MLMORIAH IN -'i-P • tin ELI : BROWNE whw toll i May lOl. 1MB il U id who Im Ml her NM lost but gut.e Irrfoie Xkf t'-es with u> in memory. %  REST iN ••CACt George tui >tu I. BBS 1-H. c:. a| gas ion SALE CAR—Morris 10 II P n perfect oorkma order Applv f F Tryhane, tUUlrU PlanbiUoai, St. Thumw a.s.ao. 4a CnK-Volwl*) *. In perfect ordci %  HMMuMn May UUl. Istrphonr 4014 kii* (iiahara VnrwuM e.S.aS—an CAR—1MB Morris Minor tourer, low nUMp. condition M new. Apply Ba .> A. Board. Auction Rooms. iiardu-. Alloy, open dally %  a m to 13 noon %  9MM .".I S.JO— CAKMum. I Up. 4 or Sedan In A I Mechanical vondrU<*a. Newly pelniCAB Pi H. ..-.ji ,..' .' i ... as IM itlBBIs Coup" %  i, lur quick Sale Phon* 3 4 50-Jn rOBD ENOlNr.. One V-l Ford on %  nd radiator In food 001 I drtvo ntt. ring-soar and P"" lon __ other oaris Enquire Auto Tyro Compeny. Trafalgar Street JJ'Titt T? i ELECTRICAL 11ADIO-American OS. II %  .%  I working condition Pr. Glldf the hours or 4 and i FOR nr.vr HOUSt*AVAO^ill 1MMEDIATTLV-A very c—a amw i tho Ch.e( Jad k -< JuryHe believed that most of them hud a working knowledge ol can, and were batter Qualified than he to express an i-pmn-n to whether all those Items should '—-' (Justifiably have been included an BL-NOAXOW A-tct.*o ond air, "*• bills as a result of thai bu-sulow. 'Moorlands situated on St. accident. They would remember Ann Coast, no.*Applobr CamroruM, too the point made by Mr Word ... W I I I VIlM. I i k_ tbat the COM .fl. p;iiin.iin | .i: 1af the car that the accidents damage had not caused to need repairing should nut be charged to the d>fcndat.l. and Mr. Adam thai no one would drive abow In a piebald car. Thfj would also remember Mr. Layne's widen 1 .* on that point. NOAIOW. also FUt. farlnar nn> %  lT..nri (a fumi.hea fi~n \l .> tS, English both* with heat-. telephones, verandah' Trl> MOO Apply on prcmlas* Doinntuiv aftor IJth M*y Dloi S S.BO-dr. Upttili. Hat with 1 bwlroom* .(r in r rh ror rutthor SB 4 SB—I 1 n r\.\r ruiiv All mndrm ennvonto fii.i Club* | I City nidi 4103 i %  a SBBBUBTMCB %  "iiu. fi-i 0 n—mim ut Ihc Corner il Middlr and %  waoj StroH Very !" .il wltn all con. ranloncoo I bodrooma, Drowtrul and runins rorma. kitchen ipacr. Rath and TOJU-I Mc Unntadlato pun m mn Ttimil MAitKHAM On Iha Bto H4Jtln|>. Iiirnlahod o unfunuahod S bedroom* o-Mh all modem canvemanceo Ooa In.i.illed lor cooklrtg Appl. : EllM Court. IfaiUnc* M 4 V— t I n WFJTTMONT — Worthlnc S Bedroomllmiae From Juno lat Phonr 4111 a to II a m .4 lolp.m 9 ) W-Bn SIIATR COT — Beautiful unfiimldiod HOUM at Worthlruj Vlrw Cop 1 bed-.....* living room, dinlns. kitchen, toilet bath and wrvanl.' quarter* Apt4y on !-. |BiBH S 9 SO-an. MECHANICAL MISCELLA NEOUS r-LOl'R. IIAt.S Mncnrd BB %  ratal attif I U" riNTST PAINTS Brandrain Hendoroon KKYTrYOMB Whlta and t-'Iour. ipertal pclmor., dulrmpera Patnta SO *4 fin. DiilMnper S3 M ln. Thry are ricre A BAKNEH A Co 1TFMH Si ncreat 1 Milk. w Papar. Kk-i 1-. ".'K.l Iron J..rm D I.-l.. at %  <* Ltd .. %  Hbuck lUoot, Jlt 11" EvapoI-lb aarlT I'lHIir SALES Kather lliuh Where the eslnnulc of 1.50 t day corntnirs of the enr was concerned, the Chief Judge told Mai lury ihiii that hnd not been seriously challenRed by dence. alihouKh it hud been criui ised. and althouRh it was suKge>ted to be rather high. Thut UK-HI was a mutter for them to consider. bearing in mind all that he bad told them. In connection with that point, there wan the length of time—fo ir months—that the plaintiff had put in for That had also been stronglv criticised by Mr. Ward Mi LfiyM h.id otiginuth itivcn Mr. C Bonth for repairs us reasons, as thay knew. the job had taken nearly a year. but Caibin. the plaintiff had put R claim for four months In c.tnsidering the questioned* damages, if tluy did conWdj.thecn. they would liave Is deci ( whether four months was reasonable time, and If SI 50 a day as a reasonable amount. Which o( the Parties? Leaving the question of damages. Ihss Chief Judgja Bud that the only issue in the case was which of the parties caused the accident There as In some cases, any question of contributory negligence. The plaintiff was sayinS that it was tho male defendant who so drove his car that he ran into plaintiffs cur cau-mg the drtvag to lose .mitroi so that the car was forced into the palm tree. On the other hard, the defendant's rase was that while he w is overtaking the plaintiff's car tha rival f the latter sudden i> veered across the road mul struck the defendant's car. thus rausin.l the mishap. The Chief Judge then rwiowe the evidence of the occurrence, rv:; mum ihe jury of the submissions and points made by both counsel He DMmuetMd the suggestion ab**ut the request that there should be no police intervention in the matter, and referred to thv comments M Defence Counsel on that Polite Rut police Intervention, he said. %  %  ild be nothing to do with the SHIPPING NOTICES U* PORT M VIConeha. Ski, r> V*ht Ton III. fch rr asstoa W i * Adallna. S.-h RvorOene. rii...mw! Uordex Skfl. KO S OMl. L*0 NnM-l. M I Biaa %  Clark* for TilnUad Skit Baatam Eel ch SS.rm.-l C Entenlda. Sett Wonderful CWunaaOWr. a • AiCOO Puritan. Sch Gardenia W COOle*. for I i %  HV Lady Jy. Sk-h Mandalay II ^^ Nrfi-fW Mr O Oraham AROIVAIS Woalarnec. VS lUrklDIo at SN l^on*fahooner Marion Belle Wolfe. ~4 Una a.d'i rot, Captgvory, from Brm.ii Ouaaaa Referee Mr r Deere K V Caraca.. S3S MM ,..< Capl %  ..Club at Vincent. Irom Ttlnldad " In Touch With Brbdo.' Cotl Stion Cab'* and WitHe> Sana. RJOO, Oetmlv. Sitaser'i, Pyum. %  II Mhih MounteM %  intorteai, aelrro Aitrngai. (iulf Pride. Skmle*.-: Sabaneta. Vair rruidad Sallins Saturday Sth The M V MOICKKA will acept Carao and Paa-er-aeri lor Inica. A^tur... Monlaarrat. • and St Km* DBM of us to be give* % %  t. • %  rMTEU PTLOBIal H accept Cergand r>llll #111 -. Lima SWrnns PTkday Canadian National Steamships o^u^lllL AKHIVAUt n> II W I A 1 Fiwm at LIM h. SSteila Arthur > %  "•>" %  %  1 % %  M HI Bfirgl.il sra 1...HT1. Ban ,-,„. H 1 ast % %  1 DMi 1 %  %  ,.1 DM r Pi. !" Ttlnklad i %  La. G Pelee. Mantilla Beeooar. %  Prom SI Kitu Ml. Anne M 1 .ui. Ml ..nald O' • a...* Mr Joan %  ItirhartU. Capt 1 Po< Ai.' -' %  t %  1 %  %  II Ul. rvns li'lr UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER By Innruclion from DoCoata |> Co.. Ltd: wo wiu aou on TUESDAY the Sth at iheir Star* Room. Ballon Lonr lobnquolr opposite Louli Bojley) II *how Caae* Sal* 13 30 oeloek. Term* Caah. BRANKER. TROTMAN s OO. AHrlloneers tta-a. <;AR1>CM IIOBB-llaU Inch SonuW* rubber II.— Double Braided foe extra By initructlona of the Inau |i. I will orTOr for sale on raiUAl Mb at Ui time set out betow-Courteev (ianuro 1 o'clock airujor Saloon Car dainaaed by an accUeiit and one FOrd Truck damaaed by Ore. 2 4S p m H. Jason Jonea Serve* sasSaaa, BeckwUh Place. Morris Koi'TBltnrsfD Sail* H.atreal 'AN CIIAI l.KNUER SSth Apr l^DV BtmMTV .. Ilth May I'AK OtviKXJt 1BU) May 1-A.DY MElatON SIM Mae l-AIIV H'>fSEA' SOth June !J*HV NTIAON Mr.1 July IAPY KOOMBV 13rd Au| • in. Bella 11.01.. Baa t oo atAh Apr ISth May 1T May 3Snd May aasa aura* ana JWM srd Juite at* JUDO 14th June lath June trrt July Sth July I4UI Julv ISth Julv SSth July 3TU Italy h AuS ** Alaf SSth Aug SaffJt Aaaj. Sth AUS TO) Srp sstB stay rrih Ma, NOB II NO Arrives •all. 1 .AIIY NassaffJON 1-MJV HOPN1.Y w>i>v ssa*iN i^nv HontJTJv l-^HY N'M.<>N laU>Y RoDhTKY StRX—aurdoct to R'dea > May Sth May h Juno Ifth Jiane Juno aS-.i. June M.I.I. Arrives Uslktas HanUaaJ ITIh May lOtn Hay Sfevd Mkn ISth Juno Hat Jtano solh Junooi July ISth July Utb July Tth Aog. BUk Aug. tath Am ana Aug. lust Am Rst aop %  % %  .1. Bop 1st Oct. tth On (.ARDINER AUSTIN & CO.* LTD. Agent. 111-. .l\l-:.. IIIA.XSAII \\ IH.M 1 FRENCH UN£ "M1SR" ^.iilinyt (o Trinidad .Saiimm fo Piumoufh "GASCOGNE" May 11th 1S50 "GASC'CKSNE" May 24th 1950 May 31st 1950 "GASCOGNE'' June 28th 1950 July Sth 1850 August 2nd 1950 August 9th 1950 S S "MISR" third class passages are available at 1240.00. Arrangements can be made for your return passages from England. For further particulars apply to: — PAINTS I C I special oftei pulnta S3.45 per gallon Corn* %  hem iT BAHNliS k Co Ltd STAMPS—Now Bnrbadr-i St, tatties, BOotally used Other Stamp* -lao wanlod. Apply, s so :i WA1KK I'VMP One 111 socond-hand %  laitorWa4* Pump. 80 Callona per h..,uIrrawn by '. h.p. 110 volt, alnirle ,.';* Motor Apply: The Itarbe*" Foundry. Ltd While Parlt Road, sn Michael I So—So IMHI.H AOTI4KS I hiLand Acquisition Ad. 1949 red by %  SSM \ thai I land ol Bari-i,l. a lot Pitpinion ol the mmlttee I Nail. -. •.,.. i %  hereto and BH0-*B at Hath.hoh. r at Joeph in t badoa aro likely to be paw. wba Oovernor-ln-Eecutlve —.... public pu.po.. raSSWblor e.tabluBlns pUyins %  id. or other plaeoo Ol isuofc* Wn THE *CH.m'L enn ALL THAT certain paical 0* UjWlaimrts 1 acre 3 n"l' ad;oininB ••"• of the for.-. Bail—y "" *&£ -heba. bi>undinB on tltc *ahoro.^ Ra toss .s; r ,£rx&* s .p'-to be In the occ-jpallon of Ml* %  ^.r, !" Cane (lordan. St. Androw. "'&SS !" .V~.„V ...;-. .,• %  " !••* at the V MM Biiiklinaa m the City II. i'..inmand. p P CAMPBELL. Coioroal Sro^^rv.^A. n UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER By UuSiuiuona received from Drapol I will %  ell hi. house t alu..ut new anil rnrntly painted the anal at U.iriih> SI. Philip on Una law an Thuraday neat Ilth May al 3 o'clock. II la two roofa. with shod and kitchen attached Santf Caah. D'ARCY RCAL ESTATE FURNITURE—Sever Tables. China Cabinets, Morris Chalra gH. at Barsain I'rtcoa In Ralph A PeBTd's A notion Rouma. Hard wood Ai.i-j Open dally B 4.B.S0—Sn ASVil I 1. Net I Uatdn IT. (T. Thr it bu LtM %  a fret Can be Apply C i'i.. ..nn ..:?t -"' l T.. NOTICE sra*ir. p, .'iS" '^ss v Se-i, t s! Mrs. Ivy Ednh Aahbr. Mr* j N r.UlarTONE. WAMIIr HELP" M| IUQOS Bftg Typewriters l>r*UBr4nseni %  Drafassa sRats OlfEBTS T-.a 1-j.lnar Ou. %  ited-unm wrlh -'Situated on Worth' rsalMng. wen Comang wawr Good Sea 5 i gt i raj i'1 LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE r.-> i The -,,. — I SBSSSBB, ' tSSm %  %  rsmed tai of No \< u.... gat T. H raUSTM I i Appl %  Mstrxi %  •A 1 *, on SSon. lith day of May. HMO Poi.re Masl.lral*. II A TALMA All THAT known as No % %  SOil STBt hu i Id in I haThursday II May. a the dwoUliujhouse of two iloroyi comprising public rootns. two bedrooma kitchen, bath etc with shop attached Handing on 30M so fl of land II reedni4e Road and Hunts Hoad. City fcppty to Mr. K. II KUton. Iho own in the pfemlsos Further parilcalan md conditions of solo from COTTIX L'ATFOhU ACO %  'AlaTOTT-Sltuato al tho Ru-I. Chrtrl Church, standing quire Feet of land, with rtf0tl i Worthing Beech 'I %  house oontalna lallary. drawing pantry, kitchen and Oarage and servasits Iitspectlon on appl Tha above will bo att up for sal. public competition at our Office In l.i rt on Friday the lUt of May ISM at CARIUNOTOM 8XAJ.Y, Solicitors SS4 SO-tn % %  t.FJOHTOK" — Situate U Road, St. Michael, staavdinsj ire foot of land. is house Is built of stone > gillary, drawing, dining sitting breakraat rooms, Pantry, kitchen. W.C and bath do**rastatrs. 4 I.e.! ooms 11 with running water I upstairs Impact ion any day (except Sundaj %  .t.-f" 11 m and B p.m. The hova v.U) he set up for asle n IM.!* Competition at our Offko U LskSafl Btroei. Bridgetown on rrMSs: ihe Sth May %  **• at 1 r> %  i ArUtlNOTON at aolkcltore. a • so—im Hoet>..K Stra-t Wand ft of land Th. i recently remod. Inspection on ai'plK Uaa to the landol e properly -M.I be sot us Iiiiblic coronet It Ion al rt Street, BHdaWtown. ITlh May ISM. at "REST HAVErT'-Rockloy| Hindi 10 perches: loo Servant!' rooms, garage Apply Mr Marshall opposite for Inspection Dial :n for farther particulars. I ) B-sn LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of HENRY TOUNQ ni nailers Rd St Michael for pernwesioi. lo sHI Bpltits. Matt LIOUOI*. Src ,.| a l-*toro? board snd shingle BBsSB with residassro aSlached spmar !P St Michael II.tea this 4th day of May ISB0 TO II A TAlJdA Ea-a Police Mrfl-trate. Dlst. -A~ Sgd CORNELL WHTTE, Agent. for Apelsront. N H -TI.U aopllcaUOn srtll bo cm | lacenatng Court to bo held at IWkt Court. TXetrlrt ihe Mh day uf May ItBO IT'S .T BETTER IT'S GETTING POPUEAR ITS CROWS GINGER AEE



PAGE 1

PACE FOl'R BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. M \Y 5. 1910 BARBADOS iSlADV^OOCTE f. i -.-—t.—., •* area* ... Friday. May 5. 19311 Thanks Tr.iiis-I anada IF BARBADOS could earn two hundred thousand dollars in five months it would mean that each individual Barbadian would have benefited by one duilar more than he or she had before. That is. assuming that the present population of Barbados is as much as two hundred thousand and not more than the official one hundred and ninety-two thousand. If ihe earning continued over the next five months, then each individual would have (on the same computation of two hundred thousand Barbadians) a dollar more. It would be |>ossible to carry on this kind of sum indefinitely, but there is a reason for the apparent lapse from orthodox economics. It is so easy to speak in terms of statistics and forget that the men and women—the ordinary men and women who comprise our society—are not skilled economists. iii attempting to assess what Trans-Canada Airlines has done for Barbados solely in terms of tourists from the date of the inaugural flight here on December third, until April the twenty-ninth when the last plane arrived here, the illustration used above has been purposely employed to impress on the minds of those who normally decry the advantages of tourists what are some of those advantages. Firstly, it must be explained that 473 passengers arrived from Canada on TransCanada planes from December third up to last Saturday, the twenty-ninth of April. No accuruie ngures exist for checking what one individual Canadian tourist spends in Barbados, but a conservative estimate has been made of an average of slightly more than two hundred West Indian dollars |ier week. Since the average Canadian tourist spends 'he best part of three weeks in Barbados an average estimated expenditure of six hundred and twenty West Indian dollars during three weeks is not considered excessive for each individual tourist. If six hundred and twenty dollars are multiplied by 473—the total number of Canadian tourists who have spent an average of three weeks here per person—a figure far in excess of two hundred thousand dollars is obtained. The actual figure ia $293,260 (West Indian). The average reader will lose no time in pointing out that the dollars earned by tourists are not in fact distributed on a per capita basis. This is self-evident since a considerable number of the population are still infants in arms or have not yet reached the age where they can work for themselves. In an island as little charted as is Barbados in the Intricacies of deciding total wage-earning family groups, as distinct from individual wage earners, the application of these thousands of dollars to individuals cannot be decided by any existing agency. But it is patent to the ordinary man and woman that by flying 473 Canadians into Barbados in the five months ended on May third. Trans-Canada Airlines have contributed $293,260 dollars at least, to those who find direct employment in hotels, motor cars, newspaper offices, oroccr.es. dry <e little every kind of answer. Only the investigating committee was set difficulty about getting Into one men who say "Sabotage" arc up under Lord Brabaxon; the of the waiting planes, labelled as crackpots. whole fleet was withdrawn from „ ,. ON THE NIGHT of January M, passenger service with British air >" •*•* %  *" you would be 1948. Star Tiger, a four-engine orporations. [iltc for *"• * the many Tudor, bound from the Azores to mechanics about their business Bermuda with 25 passengers and a But, in its long report, the comAn< * %  b I£• ur ^, r* m m her, Bl crew of seven, radioed its posimiltee failed to pin-point the armed with quick answers as well tion "SBS mile. N.E. at Bermuda, root of the mysteries Sabotage %  wlUl bomb*.. .iul .11 v. %  n %  Wa4 brushed aside "There w>< .„ „„.„ Ate that—silence No more no evidence though the poslF THIS could happen so easily was heard of Star Tiger sibility of an infernal machine t one of London'a two msin airOne fine day. a year later, a could not. of course, be entirely ports—and > own ot-servaUons sister ship of the same fine eliminated." are conflrmed hy people who climbed out into a clear blue sky I wonder what the report of a uWr< '—how *uCh IT over the Sargasso Sea between committee would have b-^ii had tou,d happen elsewhere. I have Bermuda and Jamaica, carrying Vigilant disappeared into the *" >' vcr y kind of rag-tag and 20 people. I-ast heard of. she was Channel bob-tail hanging around on ail at 1B.0O0 feet, one hour out from P oru abroad. Bermuda. OUR MINDS were tuned to the ^ „ Then, from her. too. silence. possibility of sabotage by the case 1 1 ?* !" 1 %  %  •* w nl „ J. Komo ON JUNE 23. 1949, a Constella3 Albert C.uay. sentenced to dei.tr P** "P Jf^S t^^J^U tion of the Royal Dutch Airlines, for murdering his wife with i bound from Athens to Rome, time-bomb placed in a plane' crossed the Italian seaport of Ban. baggage hoW. when on explosion blasted the The case of the Viking %  Plane different It is as certain as i The pi'ot turned back, to sea ihing can be that the explosiv. and the great machine fell, was planted in the toilet cotnpartcavorting. into the Adriatic, a rnant of tinplane some time bctotal loss with all aboaid her f, ir ,. flight DAYS AGO. the Viking Vigilant. ^ of British European Airways, flew How could such a thing be !" ** Olfflcull to hide a small peacefully acroaa the Channel done? Who could get at the plena bomb ln th lavatory of an airtowards France. There was a to do It? The answer is that it liner. flash and a violent explosion in the could be done with the greatest back of the cabin. Only superb ease airmanship saved her from plung* into the waters and adding to it to Karachi. "The machine nearly sssJan from under my nose by an impostor hired to take it to Israel. Only the vigilance of BriUsh mechanic working on the plane thwarted his plan. If vou can come so close 10 (taking off with a brand new 2.000 hor-M'-power waaplane, il should Is The Dork Strike A Dress Rehearsal? Because // So It's Time Other People Did Some Dress Rehearsing Too Tlir LONDON Deck Strike started on Wednesday April 14 4 nd luted 11 days Thss anah-ta of the sitiulloa was written while the slrikr *., ,U|| in progress. Bv TRFVOR EVANS LONDON, April 25 i an odd phrase Mr. Isaacs made to about the London dock strike. He only question at issue 1 an entirely matter, with which the public are not the long list of airliners which have mysteriously disappeared. But Viligant landed safely at Northolt Explosive experts later gave their verdict : "A bomb". SiilMil.it*.' W.is I Ignored PEOPLE SCOFFED at Air Vice IT IS to be hoped that the Viking outrage will have alarmed the This Is what happens. A Viking authorities as much as It has lands from abroad. Passengers alarmed the travelling public. get out and freight is unloaded waterspouts %  Structural failure 1 at the terminal on the south side Lightning or turbulence? of the airport. The plane is then •_,, t towed to the hanger* on the north Perhaps we should have put a side. Inspected and prepared for simple question to the Home Seethe next flight After that il U retartes and Ministers of Civil parked. na .tended Aviation: "Are you properly protecting our airliners from saboNOW. HOW COULD the sabotage?" Marshal Don Bennett, then Chief teur get aboard? I would make —L E S. - HE MAKES IT .... BIT SHE'S M1SSI.X4. W 14 MILLION WORDS OF WISDOM IIS tartars*** >llilrlm TIlOIIISOH CHAMBERS' ENCYCLOPAEDIA If anybody recalls In complaint the wife of I-ord Ke>nes (two (New Edition): XV Volumes, thai the original Chambers' of nnd a half columns!. Chaplin U George Newnes. Ltd. tit lta. a century ago was put out! In there—but where C.arbo, ValenHANDSOME does as handsome 520 weekly parts at 1 Mjil .a copy, tino, or Dletrieh (Maiiene. as Is. The new Chambers* looks an making £3 5s. for the lot. he must opposed to Epic*) alert and companionable array be told that Ihe advance of ,._,„-„_ .„,,„ -,„, Bn with its new blue uniform on 15 knowledge in 100 years is worth ^I 1 ""** 0 "* S^mSKsKl volimcs (one consisting of maps ut least £38. Or Is it? f*" — '>ut not and index) in place of the former There is, however, another < redcoat ten quest With about the same number had L of pages and words m the page. the-Tweed flavour with ii aft* Ml each volume weighs M-tb. lighter flashes of eccentricity. It usually than Its predecessor. There are gave you a little more than you therefore a few million more had expected — and how useful Sir Frank Whittle Met The old 'Changers' n ? 1 !" i '• namc(l ll lhe "ldex, genial, quixotic, north-ofda in. the edition, without a proportionate increase In total weight. that little proved to be? >|jtr\\ml liner The old hands will look but not Sir Robert Watson Watt where is Isherwood"* The author of The Cocktail Party (1) Illustrations should be as allowed. 2'. columns. Lenin Tie-tun* and even of his victory few as li necessary. They should (ha if n column In the old edition) over ChiarifUst year provide some information othernas lwo co lumns; Trotsky is pro'" fthon ' remarkably down wise iniomiiuinlcable. moted from a quarter column to to the minute. Although the new Chambers 1 lhrw qur)r er s; Stalin from eight has kept. In Its smart new is not. in this respect, as bad an „ w 0 two columns. This seems SO"*; "> ^ber level-headed offender as others, it has too EJ lhnn Justt ln vlcw of the QUS 'ty of IU Edinburgh ancestor. many photographs that are too fact y,,,, Mussolini gets three it obje small and too trivial. But it ro | umnft imier three and a half'P' would be wrong not to add that wtnston Churchill (not menit also contains some magnillcent IJQ,,^ r 1926, unlike Charles illustrations in half-tone and J|Ilr) (_ (l|l) Randolph) live and n colour. half columns, and Roose\elt So much for the general prinM v ,. n ciple* on which encyclopa-dias are to lxjudged The broad verVlrt'l t llUUllll diet Is that Chambers' Is the best ~^ lompllation of its kind now beBut how hard it fore the public An excellent On Kersavir J142 10s. worth. to be lust' i the index Is silent but Lv.il., Lopokovu appears -OA (lightest bias in favour Britain, th.it may be the natural answer i" the spread-eagleism of a competitor. It Is conservative mi sculpture (Eric C.ill's Ariel is lhe onl) recent British work shown) and not enterprising on architecture. But what a blessing not to have that usual picture of Stockholm Town Hall! rx> i Esveu Sfrvtt-i THAT Parliamen laid: Th trade um< moerned Misleading. Mr. Isaacs. The public are concerned about the effect of a dock strike of tlm size They are interested in knowing how the strike suited, how it can be stopped, how these annual outburst* co'. bo eliminated, and whether lh< authorities whoever they are — are doing theii beat to stop the present strike. The public Mould be alarmed if certain fears about the present strike are justified. Mr Arthur Deakin beNeves it is a Communist dress rehearsal for a bigger upheaval The real trouble will come, he thinks, if out relations with Russia deteriorate further, if arms have to be loaded or unloaded. Mr. Deakin is not alone In his belief. It is shared by members of the Cabinet and by such a considerable trade union authority as Lord Citrine. I III I 111(1.L MEN If true, the Communists have every reason to feel fairly satisfled wiUi their present exercise. After all. this strike started only last Wednesday. Troops had to bo brought in yesterday. And it has all been done on whipping up indignation over three "martyrs", expelled from their union, not only for the part they played in leading last year's strike, but for refusing to promise future food behaviour." Th. stnke could end to-day If the three men. T>->1 l)i.kens. Harry Constable, and Bert Saunders. gave an undertaking that they would do what ls expected from all other good trade unionists—obey union rules, honour union agreements. Union chiefs regard Ted Dickens as the key man He U a Communist Party executive member. He Is chairman of one of its transport committees How did all this begin? It appears that some dockers a.-.ked the union's "protection" from trouble-makers. Dickens, Constable and Saunders were named. They were brought before a "disciplinary loan!." which consisted of rank-and-flle members Concerned only with union rules, not with londliion.v at the dock. KXPKLLED Dr.ken, was asked: "Will you give an undertaking that you will observe union rules and act tonsil l utionajly? He replied! "It depends on the circuntttsnces of the time." He was expelled. He appealed. Again he was asked a similar question and gave a similar reply. So his pppeal was rejected. Weeks bsitttt] nto appoal was heard, the Port Workers* Defence Committee threatened trouble if the "sentences" on Dickens and his mates not quashed. Obviously they were preparing. Indskad, tbev MN ready. Dickens and his males heard on Tuesday night that their appeals had been turned down. The strike started next morning. The strike leaders whipped up resentment against the union, it* machinery, its committee, nnd Mr. Deakin. All these would have been all right if the verdict had gone the other way. Do the strike committee want to "break" the union? No. Not yet. anyway. They suggested a ballot of dock-workers on whether the sentences shall stand or not This, mark you. to be conducted by the union they have been attacking" FIRST VICTORY Maybe this is a dress rehearsal after all. If so. it from the dock gates towards their homes. They could not face the jeers of the triumphant strikers. i That is the atmosphere which must be reversed. —L.E.S D v. SCDTT TO-DAY'S SPECIALS & CO.. LTD. at the COLONNADE ; u.i'i\ Now 1.KTONA APRICOT JAM f oil, lhe London Times has got then first. This is what I read under lhe heading "CIOM-I l .inl.lH-.tii Union In the usnie of April 24:"Even Barbados has hopes of striking 0*1 and Mro companies are noie dHIIitip there." I have it on good information .that the last Oil well to be drilled in Barbados was drilled by the British Union In 1940 I have heard that th< re was a lot of talk C jing on about oil but anyone who 0 s ever bfrn to a dentist will .|1 • ou ther* u. a lot of dinVrencr. between his talk and his drill? Anvhow why this blackout on nil? READEK St. G^orgm The Kditor. The Advocate SIR,—Kindly r.runt me f-pat-p in your valuable columns to make mention of a can i that sadly lucks assistance "The cause of the rUing public of si George.'* Something can i" di omething; should be tkK* nmcthlng must be dooe, On May 1, 1950 I had an appointment wit* a Doctor for a certain JAY Two Oil Companies Are Now Drilling Here %  a. i-.., ,.• * ihe Thev will do well to tuke note were in favour of the disei.lowadministration—parochial ""ofpeci'= JTSleK ^crSv 1 ^". J& I'saw^.l-.Vsoulh ment of the Anglican Ch.rch ally.hould be MkMjl hour. When the bus got to th ( point at which 1 generally board it, I was refused a seat as five passengers were already In each seal. Quite good. A friend took me to town; but I was late [04 m] appointment by fifteen mlnut.s On May 2. 1 had occasion to IKin town. This time six passengers were packed into the seat IB which I r*t Again on May J. I used the bus. The conditions were worse. Seven passengers were squeezed into the sen* whether I liked It or not. Now Sir. what I would like to know ls this. Should the number in each scut as regulated by law be five, six or seren? I am Bure Uw Manager of Route 8 and 8A (if there is one* can answer this nuggflon, end before it Is too late do something lo remedy the mutton that ls becoming Increasingly annoying. ^ Notv Rohy The Editor. The Adiwate SIR.—Yesterday's edition of your paper states that "the Weal Indies team (wive l.iki n the opportunity to run their eye over Roley whom they will meet at Worcester". They will do well lo take not Of him I saw him bowl in South Africa and I consider him tin moat dangerous bowler they will meet. What a man he is for breaking up i stand ! He tosses up innocuous looking stuff, "w.th plenty of :nr'\ but when the ball hits the turf it becomes alive There is so much spin and break in the ball th.it a vi-rv usual rnlr> in the score book Is "stumped—bowled Jenkins" Yes watch out for Jenkins, he will be among the wickets. E. C JACKMAN th.-, ailmrmvnI Th.Editor. The Adfoca'c SIR.—I batWea reading a few years ago His lordship the Ilishop %  aid that he having read In the newspaper that a Dill wai read a first time in our House of Assembly for the disondowment of the Church of England caused him to %  oeept tinBsMOftflc, otherwise he would not. I am writing under eorreetton Sometime ago. his Lordship railed together all the i hurch to discuss Hot) of the dlsendowment of the church and I believe that the great majority of the ministers favour of the diseiiilowmenl of the Anglican Church Why then arc our represent.ittvi in the House of Assembly so reluctant In bringing ll about oinstilute.i H U i I hold that the ministers are civil servants, and that thi I'.Im can't discipline them as he \'ould if they were not state paid. Why should the members if the Methodist. Moravian. Hi'hren. Salvation Army and niher dt-nontin.itions (who do not even cross the doors of the State paid churches except at a weddl-ig or funeral) be compelled to pav for something they don't want. Again I repeat, if His Lordship and the great majority of the minsters would like to see the Chure' disendowed, why should our i^presentntives in the House of A-.sembh ftvl so hard to bring it about? R. EASTMONQ. Yfttryman Kvplain* The Editor. The A.Irocat. SIR.—From the sever.il compiatnti which I have encountered, more especially during the past two s wki I can oine to i and reasonable conclusion that our administration—parochial ""espeei.Uy-should be better known 11 11 sections of the community, thus creating "closer union". The old system of hiding from our children even theoretical knowledge of certain fundamental things was often the cause of ruin and chaos. Why have our taxe* increased from $3.72 to $4M ou land Is the query. There can be many answers given Ut this query; but (I) this tax has been levied not only to cover our overdue balances but to budget for this year's expenditure. The rise In price per acre on ,land ls above most of the other rural parishes and then* it ',that even the most modest pcrso.v may dispute It U alleged by some of the past Vestry, who arc yet in executive positions that lhe closing of Bromefield's f.ietoi> .ind the Inactivities of the %  ML Gay plantation have added to this. I know however, thai Ownership tax on which I've queried as a member of the Vestrv is in my mind one of the sources from which this rise has become %  .ntab'e If we compare ourselves with others we must accept the truth that parishes even in these days which face the devaluation of the pound, and their other commitments and yet keep their taxes normal, must be thought as praiseworthy. On the other hand whether :t be St Lucy or any other parish.) whose only policy is to get money according to Shakespeare's version no matter how you get it. will never comply with the feelings ol taxpayers. Yet I would envisage: for the good of readers of thi: l %  per etc. that we as loyal citizen should look forward to the speei. i ing up of production with all increase at our demand to meet oui taxes as well as the supposed rite in the cost of living from which even the peasant proprietor ls not shielded But much depends upon the Executive body of any organlBsitton whether fortune or misfortune be our attendant. Our Educational Authorities emphasise comprehension from our children. Likewise taxpayers of St. Lucy deem it necessary to receive comprehenslon as regards their parochial affairs from the Vestry. KENNETH C. CNEALE Checker Hall. St. Lucy. TRII'K. I.IVKK. RABBIT, STKW BKKF. STO Tinr I'luni Rose I'ouderrd Milk—1 ID 96r. Hunters Royal Pork Sausages—Vain and lib Oxford Saus IM .._[ ||, ApftSt S.ni.-e—37c. Prunes ., Slice and Pickled Cucumber—I He. ,. Fish Paste—4k. MAMMOTH CI.KANSm BRII.I.O SOAP PAI>S -22c. pks. And the Finest J & R. STKW VRAL, VV LAMB ENJOY A BICO 111 III V( 12c. pk. BAKERY GOODS GO on Anns.


Friday

“= Rarbados

—.—————————. . = Wee

CANADA URGED TO

Ramadhin Takes |

2 Whis. for 9 Runs

OSTERLEY, Middlesex. May 4.
HE WEST INDIES ericket touring team got in some
useful practice when they drew the one-day game
with an Indian Gymkhana eleven which included two Indian
Test players Mankad and Polly Umrigar, and the former
West Indies Test player, Leary Constantine. at Osterley, | j
Middlesex, today.

cag pied ce ntact rele iatieiatiinarnanip alps

Sir Pelham Congratulated

SIR PELHAM WARNER,
who accompanied the M.C.C.
to the West Indies in 1948,
has been elected President
of the M.C.C. for this year.

On receipt of this news
the Barbados Cricket Asso-
ciation sent him the follow




































ACCEPT STERLING
, Could Help Colonial

Development

HOME PRODUCER FIRST;
EMPIRE PRODUCER SECOND

|
| : sina (Barbados Advocate Correspondent
| UK Workers

LONDON, May 4.
ANADIAN participation in the development o
Are Angry
With Attlee

the colonies should be fostered in the United
LONDON, May 4.







The West Indies who won the
toss scored 177 for 7 declared and
in reply the Indian Gymkhana XI
made 78 for 8. 9

The Gymkhana batsmen found
runs hard to get against the ae-
curate W.I. attack in which Sonny
Ramadhin was outstanding. He
had the batsmen guessing with his
spinners which he turned both
ways. Varying his pace and mak-
ing the ball do some peculiar



Kingdom, says Mr. Julian Amery,.M.P., son of :
former Colonial Secretary, in a letter to ‘“Thé

Times’’ today.
His letter which follows the recent parliamentary debat



S. RAMADHIN—
Took 5 for 9

K. TRESTRAIL—
Top scored—49

Vv. MANKAD-—
4 for 49

including three fours in 103
minutes, while his colleague
Alan Rae hit one six and four
fours in his 47 made in 85 min-
utes. The pair together added
103 for the second wicket and
put the West indies in a good
position, but at 163, three wick-
ets fell without any addition to

At a meeting in London
today leaders of over 600,000 civil
servants—ranging from executives
to office cleaners—said they were
“thoroughly dissatisfied with a
letter Mr. Attlee sent them earlier
this week replying to their protest
that there was discrimination in
applying the “freeze” to the Civil

; i Britain's Government workers| on Anglo-Canadian trade recalls the reference by Michac

fee cistetineis atat® inst e a: oe esr for omy | | are so angry with Prime Minister! Foot to the fact that unless Britain is to balance her trad
wishes on your Presi- The highest score of me, das 6é ‘PIRA TES 29 T aes" welies "that thee’ devlaen with Canada at an undesirably low level canna must b
fence, Buvbatios ‘Crickat came from the yeune West 0 i oday to seek intareiew wi rsuaded to accept sterling as part payment for some o
Association. dies Ken Trestrail who made 49 U S. Should ry tostay to seek an interview with| persuaded to pt g n

her export goods.



BELIEVED
OFF T’DAD

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

’ Such sterling, Mr. Foot sugge

FOUR DEPUTIES | 32!) c7nesion 2080"

U.S. Want current transactions and, above al
ADJOURN

To Win Cold War
U.K. Promise

SAYS TRUMAN

for Canadian investment in, th4
sterling area and the Colonies,

Mr. Amery points out that, whil
| it may be in the best interests ¢













pum. to-day
the docks

Sanads articipate th
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 4. WASHINGTON May 4 “ Canada to participate in
WASHINGTON, May 4. Th Vene ans, a father resi ‘sien eel > : os hia Service, LONDON, May 4 Development of the Colonis
Fifty-one members of the House | This was chiefly due te Mankad | two ro ray age Be President Truman said today that the United States should Mr. Attlee had denied this and| The Four-Power Deputies dis-| Empire it would, nevertheless, |
of Representatives today asked| who flighting his slow spinners|Trinidad on a shopping mission, use every means at its command te win the cold war, said civil servants were free to} cussing the Austrian Treaty today] a bold step for a young county
Secretary of State Dean Acheson | qjeverly caused the batswen the}are missing. They are believed The President made this statement at his weekly Press| t#ke their pay claims to arbitra~ | adjourned their meeting called by} which still offers great scope fq
to obtain Britain’s promise that all| most trouble. He took the wickets|to be victims of “Pirates” said to| Conference in defending the cost of the Marshall Plan. oe —(Reuter.) the Soviet delegate George Zaru-| domestic investment :
shipments to the Middle East will|o¢ Walcott and Christiani with}be roaming the sea off Pajos, a ~~ <--> Mp. Trumen eeid the Marshall bin without reporting any pro-| — It was therefore, up to the U.
ee halted until Israel and the Arab | consecutive balls, and very nearly |tiny island off the coast of We: bien wae anh ae the atiet teeta ° Srom._ thet will meet again on] Government to create conditic
ates agree 7 ri - ; ‘ i 7 inks ¢ Hs ; Me May 22,—Reuter. ic Canadians would
The “United States’ end: oat: one pe to bang ver ie Sek reer one ae ; of winning the cold war and he orrison 7 oe ee er en eaates te
n ; a. nezuelans é x <1 out that it was much : es,
should join in an effort to bring —_ ati P ted to be’carr a car f SPORTS ta aie ! Colonies |
umps after beating Gomez reported to be“carrying a cargo o a wi f eet ‘ : on
about such a treaty, the request Ls hg finished with four “wickets |merchandise worth. $3,000, pur- frente Seeeeiia caie 8 Oo Communist Boycott First of those conditions sho’
to Bekenan edder. for 49 runs and later scored a|chased in Port-of-Spain | when WINDOW tne high rae aan ant F 1 I H il . d be reasonable profit from inve
e presentatives are 30 Demo- | },,; 21 including one six and|they left in a small boat. Some Peete aah : ils ment without in any way jeop|
crats and 21 Republicans. ee ice in 33 Oe Dae cloth, similar to the material the The Basketball mateh between ~ Foreign Office pr ORT Site, the LONDON, May 4 au n onan dising the interests of the 1
—(Reuter) } *” ; men bought has since been dis- Harrison College Old Boys anda || /'esident said that his Defence) Mr, Herbert Morrison, Leader ROTTERDAM, May 4 population.
On Page 8 covered by the Police, in the pos- Pickwick, which was fixed to Budget for the next year would ]of the House of Commons, today} adin ” Americ as“ " |
@ On Page : by the Falice, in the pag take place at the Y¥.M.C.A be smaller than for this year refused a suggestion by six of his| The unloading of American Secondly, as “quid pro 4 |
session of a City man. tomorrow night, Will now be H id that th ae ho res \ sugges Boa 7 ims from the American freighter for Canadian acceptance of s'
. This brings to seven the number played at Y.M.P.C. at 7.90 © said that there was no reason | supporters that Parliament should! Ppire State began at about 6) ling payments, British subje
Hayworth—Khan of men missing and _ believed ‘onight er fo be alarmed and the defence} be asked to censure the Opposition | \\"/\! i ennai ‘ ;

Brazilian Mission

The surroundings of
were empty of people
a few policemen saun-

in the United Kingdom she
he permitted to
proved Canadian companies.

programme would he adequate to
the defence of the United States
The President also made a spirited

drowned and their bodies weight-
The Police
for the past 36 hours have been

for forcing unexpected
minor issues.

voles on
One of these votes
resulted in a Government defeat



; J invest in
ed with pieces of iron.

and only

Divorce? Arrives In France



7 ; >fenc » . S oe ; tered around. Police launches Thirdly Canadians should be X ,
dragging the area of the piraes U.N.O BACKS sotence of the United Nations. _ | last month and another in a tie patrolled the ship from the sea.]in no doubt that such develd
ROME, May 4. LE HAVRE, May 4. working with nets. r heedoaaee vith Sy S-. a oalea ia ser ee 7 It was, evident that the Com-{ ment was the real aim of
: ; rte i. § s sition would e such - ia ry . sensei a i ‘ 4 ‘ ‘ z
The leading Rome newspaper| The new French liner “Claude TRY( SVE LIE made by. ex-President Herbert ik but Mr Sioa eae munist boycott plan had proved a | British Government. “It is no
Il Messaggero reported tonight | Bernar” (8,020 tons), of the Com- Hoover very damp squib.—Reuter

that Rita Hayworth and her hus-
band Prince Ali Khan are on their
way to Cannes—where they were

pagnie Maritime des Chargeurs,
arrived here this morning, com-
pleting its maiden voyage to South

Engulfs 125 Hames

married last year--to arrange a
See, Gpeting Fas informed
circles in. ,” the newspi

said that the fabulous aoughes
decision to divorce was due to
“profound incompatibility of
character which appeared in the
months immediately after their
marriage and especially since the
birth in December, 1949 of theix
daughter Yashmin”.

American ts. #0

On board was a Brazilian Eco-
nomic ion, headed by M. Bezi-
lacqua, former Director of Com-
mercial Agreements at the Brazil-
ian Foreign Ministry.

Their object is to conclude a
Franco-Brazilian financial agree-
ment, notably on settling the debt
in France owed by Brazil to
France on account of past loans.
It is the first Brazilian Economic
Mission to come to France since
the war.~—Reuter.

ITALY APPEALS
GRAZIANI SENTENCE

ROME, May 4.

The Italian State to-day appeal-
ed against the 19 year sentence
for collaboration with the Ger-
mans pronounced by a Military
Tribunal on Tuesday on ex-Mar-
shal Rodolfo Graziani. The Public
Prosecutor seeking more severe
punishment appealed against the
finding of the Military Tribunal.
—(Reuter)

—(Reuter)





Senora Franco On
Holy Year Visit

ROME, May 5.

Senora Franco, wife of the
Spanish Head of State, arrived by
yacht to-day in the tiny Tegan
port of Gaeta ona Holy Year
visit to Rome. She was accom-
panied by her newly-married
daughter Carmen and son-in-law.

The party will be received in
audience next week by the Pope
at the Vatican Palace.—Reuter.

Occupation Forces Ready
For Any Eventuality
Says MaeArthur

TOKYO, May 4.
General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Allied Commander,
angounced today: that the occupation Forces wer? main-
taining their bases in a state of “almost complete readiness

Foe)
for any eventuality”. He made his statement in a
letter to Lieut..General Kuzma
Dervyanko, Russian member of
the Allied Council for Japan, re-
plying to the Soviet delegate pro-
test note against the reconstruction
of. Japanese Naval and 1

In the letter, publish day,
General Mac Arthur called Gen-
eral Dervyanko’s note a “yeliicle
of propaganda or provocative im-



Canadian Red River

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA,
May 4.
The Canadian Red River
engulfed early to-day more

than 125 homes in Winnipeg pertinence”. ; ey
suburbs and _ threatened The Supreme Commander said
three hospitals. General rvyanko’s “anxiety

The flood crest was last over Japan was “quite ground-
reported about 31 miles from less.”

Japan was completely disarmed
and no Japanese forces existed.
“As for bases for the forces of

Winnipeg.

Emergency food es
had to be sent an Winnie

py lorris and occupation, both American and
Ba Mast ate Britich, they can and will, so long
Nearly all the 1,100 popu- as the occupation lasts; be main-
lation of Morris have been tained in a condition of such ade~-
evacuated.—Reuter. quacy and preparedness as will

ensure the fullest security, oper-
ational efficiency and most. com-
plete readiness for any eventual-
ity”. —(Reuter.)

VIDELA BACK
IN _ CHILE



New W.I. Air
Reute Planned

es. THE HAGUE. SANTIAGO, Chile, May 4.
A new Spanish-Dutch-sir-treaty| President, Gonzalez _—_-Videla

enabling. Dutch Airlines| afrived at Santiago tonight in a

(K.L.M.) h Madrid on its} U.S, Constellation after three

Amsterdam-West Indies route has] weeks’ visit to the U.S. The

been announced. President arrived with his wife
A Minis of Transport and} Rosa Marckmann De Gonzalez

Public Wor communique says
that Spain and Holland have
reached agreement on an air
treaty providing for exploitation
of a Dutch-operated air service
from Amsterdam via Nice
(France), Madrid, Lisbon, Cape
Verde Island, eventually Dakar,
Paramaribo to Curacao.

Pending the new treaty, the
Spanish Government twice granted
Holland a three months prolonga-
tion of a permit to touch Spanish
nirports. —B.U.P.

—Reuter.)
BEVIN OUT OF
HOSPITAL

LONDON, May 4

The British Foreign Secretary
Mr. Ernest Bevin, left hospital by
car this afternoon looking pale but
cheerful.

He will spend the next few days
convalescing before his meeting
here next week with the United
States Secretayy of State Dean
Achesen —(Revter )

Sugarmen Leave
Trinidad May 9
(Barbados Advocate, Corvespondeuts

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 4.
A. Edun, President of B.G.
Manpower Citizens Association
and Hon, W. J. Raatgever, B.G

. PARIS, May 4.

The United Nations Administra-
tive Co-ordination Committee,
which met here on cnlitenanis
yesterday under the® rmanship
of the United Nations Secretary
General Trygve Lie, today issued
a unanimous statement backing
Lie’s attempt to bring East and

delegate to Sugar Talks in Lon-, West together,

don, arrived in Trinidad today.

Edun said that there is a feeling
of uncertainty in B.G. of the
future of the Sugar Industry
there, if the talks fail.

Raatgever said that it is vitally
necessary to get an agreement
They leave here together with the
Trinidad delegate, Hon A
Gomes, and Hon. Harold Robin-
son, B.W.LS.A. delegate, who is
going. as adviser, May 9



U.S, Citizen Not
Allowed To Land
In Trinidad

Barbados Advocate Correspondent
RT-OF-SPAIN, May 4.

Trinidad Government refused to
grant permission to Damon Wills,
a U.S. citizen who married a
Trinidad girl, to land.

Wills is on a suspended sentence
of ten years by the Court of Vir-
ginia, U.S.A., after being found
guilty of rape. The decision means
that Wills will have to serve the

sentence. His father-in-law, liv-
ing here, had petitioned the
Governor seeking permission to

allow Wills to land.



Agreement Reached
In Antigua Dispute

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA, May 4. -,
"The capital was quiet “this
morning but for red flag bearers
loitering in the vicinity of
Bryson’s. There was a meeting
this afternoon, at which an agree-
ment was signed between Bennett
Brysons and the Union in the
presence of Federal Labour Officer
Edwards.

A Dock Labour Committee is to
be established comprising a repre-
sentative of Brysons, the shipping
agents, a representative of the
Union, and an independent Chair-
man nominated by the Adminis-
trator, its functions being to select
stevedore labour from a register
atready agreed upon for working
each steamer for a‘trial period of
eight months.



S. Africa Troops
Will Stay In Union

CAPETOWN, May 5.
Prime Minister Daniel Malan
} told the South African Senate to-
day that in the event of another
war the Union Army may at first
jinstanece be required at home, but
should the position in the Union
prove to be safe-—and he under-
stood it would be gafe—the Goy-
jernment would consider what
jcould be done He said it was
|sound principle that, rather than
send South African troops over-
seas the position should be made
secure not only in the Union but





also in countries in Africa to the
north. South Africa was concern-
ed as to what happened in those
countries. —Reuter



The statement said: “A lasting
| peace can be achieved and main-
{teined only by world organisa-
tion.

essential for the future of both the
United Nations and the specialised
institutions that a settlement of the
present political deadlock within
the United Nations should come
about as soon as possible,

“The peace-loving peoples de-
mand of their Governments a new



effort on the part of the nations |

of the World with a view to the
establishment of a_ constructive
and lasting peace.”—Reuter,



Stop Scientist
From Leaving US

NEW YORK, May 4.

A Chicago atomic scientist who
had publicly expressed faith in
Dr. Klaus Fuchs, the British phy-
sicist who was convicted of pass-
ing secrets to Russia, was today
prevented from leaving for France.
The State Department, which im-
pounded the scientist’s passport,
said it had done so because his
proposed trip would be “not in the
national interest’’.—Reuter



Fuchs Post Filled

LONDON, May 4.

Britain today filled the research
post held by the German born
atom spy Klaus Fechs whois
serving a jail term for betraying
secrets to Russia.

Dr. Maurice H. L. Pryce, 37-
year-old Professor of Physics at
Oxford University, has agreed to
be responsible for the technical
supervision of the Theoretical
Physics Division at Britain’s Har-
well Atomic Energy Establishmeny

the job Fuchs was doing when
he was arrested,

A Ministry of Supply announce-
ment today said that Dr. Pryce
would be in charge of the division

for the time being”.—Reuter.







last week that the non-
Communist nations should organ-
ise themselves to the exclusion of
Communist nations,

Ste Id continue to
suppért the United Nations as long
as he was\President of the United
States. He said that the United
Nations was an organisation for
discussion amongst the ations
seeking a peaceful settlement of
their disputes and it was working
well on many subjetts
Questioned about a private con-

Y si ; ‘ | versation which he had with Mr.
“We specially believe that it is

Hoover immediately after Mr.
Hoover delivered his speech in
New York, President Truman said
today that he had discussed with
Mr. Hvover the part of his speech |
in which he referred to the neces-
sity of mobilising the moral forces
in the world against the immoral}
forces. .
President Truman said to-day
that that was just what he had
been trying to do for the last}

five years.
—Reuter.



13 Killed In_ |
Bomb Blast

CATANIA, May 4

Police, troops and voluntary
helpers were tonight digging for
the bodies of 13 workers who
were buried or blown to pieces
when 100 tons of bombs of the last
war exploded here today Two
explosions, following closely on
each other, tore a vast hole deep
in the field where the bombs were
being defused, beside the muni-
tions dump. The explosions cut
all telephone communications in|
the city, of Catania for several}
hours, increasing the panic |
—Reuter.





5 CHILDREN ARRESTED

ATHENS, May 4
Athens police today arrested five
schoo] chiJdren who tried to per-
sudde a classmate to join them
in a strike against. payment of
extra fees, Other pupils paraded
outside the Ministry of Education

shouting, “We have no money!”
Pupils at most Athens and pro-
vincial secondary schools left

classes when they were asked t
pay an extra ordinary fee to en-
able the Government to pay bon-
uses to teachers. —Reuter.

Sydney’s Labour Part

Endorses Government

ili

| To Outlaw Communists

SYDNEY, May 4.
The Australian Federal Parlia~

mentary Labour Party today de-»

cided to endorse the principles of
the Government’s bill to outlaw
the Communist Party as 50 mines
in New South Wales coalfields de-
fied a stop-work order of their
Communist controlled union

This morning 50 of the State's
115 mines voted against holding
stoppages as a protest against the
bill

At 65 mines, where work stop-
ped for the day, the majorities in
favour of stoppages wcre only by
a few votes in most cases

Australia’s biggest coal producer,
| Burwood North, which in the past
}has been recognised as a Commu-

nist-controlled mine, voted against
any stoppage.

In Canberra Mr. Joseph Chifley,
Labour Chief and Leader of the
Parliamentary Opposition, an-
hneunded that the Federal Parlia-
mentary Labour Party would ap-
prove the Government's bil! but
would seek alterations to the
clauses which authorise the Gov-
ernment to “declare” other organi-
sations and persons, who are
members of such organisations, or
advocate or support their views

a semblance of appeal was given |
both to such “declared” organisa-;
tions and to “declared’ persons. |

In the Labour Party's opinion
this appeal would be largely illu-
sory, he said —Reuter

4 Truman said that the

make time for it.—Reuter,



Labour Wins
By-Election

BRIGHOUSRE, Yorkshire, May 5

Britain's Labour Government
to-day inereased its effective vote
majority in the House of Commons
to nine by a vietory at Brighouse
in the Parliamentary Bye-Election
there,

Mr. L. J. Edwards, the Labour
candidate, polled 24,004 votes
against National Liberal (Conser-
vative) Major W. E. Wooley
23,567, The victory increases the
majority in the Commons to
seven, but because two Irish
Nationalist members who returned
at the General Election have not
taken their Oath the effective
majority will be nine. —(Reuter.)



Parachute Traps

" Pilot: Dies In Crash

COPENHAGEN, May 4

Thousands lining Copenhagen’s
streets saw a Danish jet plane
pilot, trapped by his parachute
as he tried to bail out, crash te
his death today during an air
show celebrating the Fifth Anni-
versary of Denmark's liberation

The pilot, Captain-Lieutenant
Carlo Flish Soerensen, struggled
vainly to free himself when his

parachute got caught in his nose-
diving plane. (Reuter)



KING CAROL
IN BRITAIN

LONDON, May 4

Ex-King Carol of Rumania and
his wife, the former Madame}
Lupescu, arrived in Britain tonight |
9 attend the International Stamp
exhibition in London. They will |
ve the guests at the Stamp Day |
linner given by dealers and other |
xperts at the Savoy Hotel in|
London on May 6 ~—-(Reuter) |





U.K. to Ask Russia
About Ship’s Arrest |

LONDON, May 4 |

Britain is to ask Russia why
Soviet naval patrols have arrested
the British fishing trawler “Etru-
ria”, a Foreign Office spokesmar
said today. If circumstances
rant it, the trawler’s immediat
release will be requested.

The trawler, 3,737 tons, was)
apparently arrested in the White}
Sea on Monday and is believed to
have been taken to the Russian |
naval port of Murmansk. It had |
2 crew of 21,.—Reuter. |

war-



|

SWEDEN WILL PROTEST |
STOCKHOLM, May 4
Sweden’s Embassy in Moscow i

to protest to the Soviet Russian
Government about the seizure of
two Swedish vessels in interna-
tional waters. The trawlers were

| stopped by Russian warships about
Chifley said that under the bill} 30

ea miles from the Polish coast

last February and taken to the
port of Neukueren. There they
were held’ for 18 allowed to communicate with tt



Swedish authorities
—~ (Reuter)

Finland’s Rail
Strike Spreads

HELSINKI, May 4.



‘Finland's railway strike spread
this morning as drivers and fire-
men



on the emergency trains
began to cé work,
These trains, carrying workers

to their factories and offices, milk
to the towns and reparation goods
to Russia, were running normally
yesterday

The
strikers’ reply to a call up order
issued to them
new
ernment

new stoppage was the
yesterday by the
Right Wing Agrarian Gov-

—~ (Reuter)

DETROIT STRIKE ENDS

DETROIT, May 4

The strike of 89,000 Chrysler
workers, the second largest and
most costly in the automobile

industry, was settled here today,
a few minutes before it was due

enter the hundredth

‘Wa
\saas

â„¢N

dary
Reuter,





Se.

a

pf
..and

herefore, paying lip service to t 1
»rinciple of discrimination, redug
ing preferences or passing piod
resolutions at Geneva, Havanaii
Annecy or Torquay, a

“Trstead” we hc cima po nA ae
to the principle of the Ottawa?
Axgreements—home producer ‘ir
Empire producer second, the re
also ran,’ says Mr, Amery

He concludés by stressing the
point that Canadian acceptance of
sterling payments would go a long
way to correct the present ul
balance in world trade

“In a short time, howeve
accession of Canada’s producti
power to the sterling area wou!
almost certainly reduce — tha
(dollar) gap still farther to ti
point where free convertibility «
currencies might once again be:
sight





EXTEND CONSCRIPTION

WASHINGTON, May 4

The Armed Services Committee
of the House of Representatived
voted today to extend conscrip-

tion for anoth@r two years, The) 4

present Service Act is due to exe,
pire on

June 4.--Reuter.

~

| advocat@




FP

GE TWO





~



Legdon Express Service.

aes BROMOVA and her
* Committee are giving a party
this. afternoon at 4.30 o'clock, at
the St. Michael’s Girls’ School,
dales Road, in honour of
Mollie Radcliffe, the new dancing
tor for the Anna Bromova
School of Dancing, who arrived
here recently from England.
here will also be a dernonstra-
tion by the pupils.

‘Arriving in August

TR, GEORGE SEEL, K.C.M.G.

the new Comptroller for De- ;

velopment and Welfare, who spent
the... week-end at Government
House as a guest of His Exceliency
the Governor and Mrs. Savage, has
now eo to Cacrabank.

. orge hopes that Lady
Seel-will join him in August.

Music from “High Tyme’’

APTAIN RAISON tells me
that the fortnightly Police
Band concerts at the Hastings
Rocks resume to-night. The con-
oaa will begin at 8 p.m. instead of

Special feature of to-night’s pro-
gramme will be the music from
‘High Tyme,’ the musical revue re-
cently staged at the Empire
Theatre.

Also on the programme is: Con-
cert Overture, The Hebrides, Fin-
gal’s Cave by Mendelssohn. Like
the Scotch Symphony, this pic-
turesque composition owes its
origin to a Highland tour under-
taken in 1829,.avhen Mendelssohn
was only twenty years of age. The
rugged coastline and grand scenery
So appealed to him that he wrote
the opening movement and prin-
cipal theme on the spot.

Honeymoon at Bathsheba

PENDING their honeymoon at
“Bathsheba are Mr. and Mrs.
pongiss Wilkie who were married
On Saturday afternoon at St. Au-
ees Church. Mr. Wilkie is
son of Mr. and Mrs. Noel Wil-
kie of “Cottage,” St. George and
» Wilkie is the former Miss
y Mc Conney, dayghter of
Mr,.and Mrs. S. W. Mc Conney of
“Newbury”, St. George.

“At Sea Since 1911

APT. TRYGVE EIDE, Skipper

of the S.S. “Seabreeze” of the
Brae Steamship Line has been in
los since April 26th at the

‘al Hospital. He is now fit

and well again and off to join his
. at St. Johns N.B. He left

ay by B.W.1.A, for Puerto

7 and New York. He will then

‘o. by train from New York to St.

pt. Eide has been at sea since
1911,
First Visit
ISS MARIA ESCOBAR, Miss
‘Olga and Miss a Gomes
who .arrived here on Wednesday
afternoon by B.W.LA, from Vene-
zuela, are vel Barbados for
the first time. ey are staying
at the Hotel Royal, and hope to be
here for two weeks.

“To Live in Miami

R. AND MRS. JACK KAP-

LAN and their young son

for the U.S. yesterday by
B.W.LA. via Puérto Rico. They
are.going to live in Miami.



aay

ave
nim

I THER that air-hostesses, or.
you prefer to call them, aero-
lonettes, are trained at

a -schools.”
: are taught “Tact, deport-
how to serve food while
g at speed, how to deal
with: wild animals and survive in
jles.”” And my paper adds:
think their training will
‘to make them good wives.”
t in the air means that
you detect a gases the
plane you say quietly, “We are
PO pamsing over Cheltenham.”

he

ent follows, as, you come

down. the aisle between

ts with a cup of coffee and

a biscuit in one hand, a hunk of

“meat for the jaguar in the
and, balanced on your head,
of pills for the green

ah Saree in jungles depends
on whether the forced







- aRROW

‘> RADIAC
= REGAL

2.91

BLUE, WHITE, TAN.

BY THE WAY



Antigua Passengers

On ‘“‘Gascogne”’

-S. “GASCOGNE” called at

Antigua on April 28th and
picked up a number of passengers
bound for the U.K. Rev. and Mrs.
W. Palmer, the Misses C. & J.
Palmer and Master W. Palmer:
came here from St. Kitts to join
the ship also Rev. A. R. Thompson
and Mrs. Thompson from Nevis.
















their two young daughters Janic:
and Katherine who were both
born in Antigua. The Shaefler:
now have their permanent home
at Weatherals estate in Antigua,
where Mr. Shaefler has developed
one of the island's largest cotto:
cultivated areas.

Mr. and Mrs, Emanuel Farara|
sailed on the “Gascogne”. i
their intention to join the pilgrim-|
age to Rome.

Mrs, Barbara Macdonald wife?
of Mr, Roy Macdonald of the An-“
tigua Sugar Factory Ltd. also sail-
ed for England with their daugh-
ter Sandra. Mr. Macdonald will
be leaving the factory at the end
of the crop to join his wife in
England. It is Mr. Macdonald’s
intention to take a three year
course in mining engineering.

“Cricketers from the W.I.”’

HE OFFICIAL Brochure of
the West Indies cricket tour of

England was published last week
by Playfair blications. It is
called, appropriately enough,

“Cricketers from the West Indies”
and has a foreword by Sir Pelham
Warner. There is also a message
from Mr. R. K. Nunes (President
of the W.LC.B.C.). Included in
the brochure are pen pictures of
all the players together with re-
cords of every ‘Test Match in
which the West Indies have parti-
cipated.

Transatlantic Race

FY: possibly six, British yachts
will be taking part in the
2,780-mile transatlantic race from
Bermuda to Plymouth this sum-
mer. This great event, organised
yy the Royal Ocean Sailing Club,
has been revived this year after a
break caused by the war. Before
the long-distance race the British
yachts will race from Rhode
Island to Bermuda under Cruising
Club of America rules. Three of
them—*Mokoia”, “Samuel Pepys”
and “Cohoe”, with their crews left
the Port of London last week for
Bermuda in the Royal Mail cargo
ship “Araby”.

Snowing Two Weeks Ago

RS. IDA MANTLE and her

daughter Paula, who arrived
in Barbados on March 18th live
about four miles from Worcester
in England. She had a letter from
home saying that it was still snow-
ing there up to about two weeks
ago, and she was wondering how
it was going to affect the cricket.

Yesterday afternoon, she and
her daughter left by B.W.ILA., for
Trinidad, and they will be there
until Sunday, staying with Mr. and
Mrs. Taurel, friends they met on
the boat coming over,

They will then be returning
here to join the “Golfito” which
leaves Barbados on May 11th for
England.

see

Her sun-broiled arms were strati-
fied

When time stood idle,

Stars, like golden bones strewn
for the wild dogs

Of Paradise, hovered over a pal-
sied world.

I saw the political consciousness

Come creeping home like a sick
dog

From a rubbish-heap.

And then
T knew.
Only a torn edge of life flapping
Like a dirty paper-bag in a
runnel,

(Woonoze Gubstan in “Poems of
Now.”’)

Difficulties of a duet

During the duet he seemed to
faller once or twice,
(Music critic.)

RROBABLY. When Rustiguzzi
sang with Broccoli he always
refused to come close to_ her,
because, he said, she deafened

MENS wate

‘ 646

3.94
4.69

EVANS avo



~~ Carib Calling

So Tired

VER in England for a holiday

is Miss Kay Bury, hostess at
the Butlin’s dollar-earning camp
at Nassau, Bahamas. She has de-
cided she needs a rest from sun-
bathi dancing and entertaining
millionaires. Her duties at the
Nassau Camp read strangely to
Londoners at present undergoing
a cold spell, including snow: rise
early, greet the guests, arrange
fishing trips, swim and lie in the
= with them, and then dance till
ate.

Grenada Tennis Champ

R. RONALD COOLS-LAR-

TIGUE, son of Mr. Justice

A. R. Cools-Lartigue Puisne Judge

of St. Vincent and Mrs. Cools-Lar-

tigue is in Barbados for about four
or five days.

His father, he told Carib is Act-

sing Puisne Judge in Grenada and

‘he is with Gerald S. W. Smith and
Co., Commission Agents in Grena-
da. He arrived on Wednesday by
-W.LA. from St. Kitts and will
be returning to Grenada over the
eek-end.

He is very keen on tennis and
ja few days ago playing in a tennis
urnament he gecame Grenada’'s
ennis Champ. He is staying at
the Hotel Royal.

Married Yesterday

ISS LIL MELVILLE, daugh-

ter of the late Canon and
Mrs. H. A. Melville of Trinidad
and sister of Rev. H. A. Melville,
Vicar of St. Ambrose, was married
esterday afternoon to Mr. Ian
Jackson, Director of Messrs. Gor-
don Grant & Co., Ltd.

The ceremony took place at St.
Margaret's Church, Port-of-Spain
where the bride’s father was Rec-
tor for many years. It was con-
ducted by Rev. H. A. Melville who
left on Wednesday evening by
B.W.LA. for the occasion. He was
assisted by the Bishop of Trinidad
and Canon J. D, Ramkeesoon,
Rector of St. Margaret’s.

A reception was held at Queen’s
Park Hotel for 250 guests and later
in the evening, the couple left by
the “Lady Nelson” for St. Vincent
to spend their honeymoon,

Well Worth While

VISIT to the Barbados

Museum, just at present is
well worth while, There are two
art exhibitions at present going on,
and they will be of particular in-
terest to anyone who collects
water colour or oil paintings.

The style of the two artists
varies considerably and each one
in their own way is very impress-
ive,

In one room there is the work
of the famous Dutch artist William
Van Yperen, who is at present in
Barbados. His work is full of de-
teil, colourful and they range
from Dutch scenes to local har-
bour and careenage scenes.

There are also scenes of Dutch
Guiana, British Guiana and Trini-
dad, where the artist has visited.

In the other room the work of
Geoffrey Holder, the young Trini-
dad artist is exhibited, a review
of his work was given recently by
Mr. John Harrison, Arts Officer of
the British Council.

First Lady
ISS LOUISE ROWLEY, dele-
gate from Grenada to the
recent Civil Service Federation
Talks held here two weeks ago was
a passenger by B.W.LA., for
Grenada on Monday. Miss Row-
ley is the first lady delegate to
represent any of the Colonies at
these talks. During her stay here
she was a guest at ‘Leaton-on-
Sea’, The Stream. She was ac-
companied by her sister Miss Doris
Rowley.

For U.S. Holiday
R. JOHN HOYOS left yester-
day by B.W.1.A. for Puerto
Rico en route to New York where
he is going on a couple of months’
holiday.



By Beachcomber

nim. I remember, too, an occa-
sion at Salzburg when Tapioca,
greeting Dotti with the exuberant
ery, “’Tis thou, my love!” blew
his helmet sideways and made the
audience rock with laughter. He
got his own back in Act II. During
a short interlude in the bawling,
after she had roared “Hush. I pray
thee! I hear a noise within the
castle walls.” “So do I, by St.
Fiacre,” shouted Dotti, before
resuming his role.
Have you Racined

your boots?

T is reported that when Mimsie

Slopcorner was approached by
the British Council, with a view
to a series of lectures on Racine
in Swedish Lapland, she said, “I
think Racine is wonderful stuff.
I use it every day, and so does
Mummy. But I really don’t know
as I ought to advertise it like this
in Swedish Lapland. Just say I
hope all the people there will use
it like I do.”

SHIRTS

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|



BARN DANCE

and WEANA ROAST

In slacks, shorts, or just bathsuits

CASUARINA CLUB

(Next Cable Office)
St. Lawrence,

If the weather man is kind—
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Our Dance floor has been en-
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always music

P.S.— For Sunday morning:

@ sea bath, a game of billiards

or snooker—and our Black

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jeCoy.





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Starting To-day 5 & 8.30

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Elizebeth TAYLOR
Frank MORGAN, Tom DRAKE

The picture your

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tinuing....

and Con-
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“TAKE ME OUT TO THE
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Starring
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Betty GARRET

ROXY

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“THREE MUSKETEERS” and
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FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950



AQUATIC CLUB CIN EMA (Members Only)
MATINEES: TODAY & TOMORROW at 5 p.m.
TONIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT at 8.30
EDWARD G. ROBINSON — ANN SOTHERN
HUMPHREY BOGART

in “BROTHER ORCHID :
with DONALD CRISP — RALPH BELLAMY
ALLAN JENKINS
A Warner Bros. Picture









SS









BRIDGETOWN PLAYERS

Under the Distinguished Patronage of His Excellency
the Governor and Mrs. Savage

: Present :

REBECCA

(Directed by TOM McGEE)
: AT:

THE EMPIRE THEATRE

ON THURSDAY, MAY 11TH, AT 8.30 P.M. and
ON FRIDAY AT 5 P.M. and 8.30 P.M.

PRICES: Orchestra and Boxes $1.50; Circle $1.00
House 84c., and Balcony 48c.

BOX OFFICE opens FRIDAY 5TH at 8.30 a.m.

THE MAGNIFICENT STORY OF THE HEROIC “600”
by ALFRED
LORD TENNYSON’S WORLD-FAMOUS POEM!











“Cannon To Right Of Them, Cannon To Left Of Them,
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A Salute To The Gallant “600" Who Rode “Into The
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ERROL FLYNN
OLIVIA de HAVILLAND

The Unforgetiabic Stars of “Captain Blood” im






Prem Tenapen’) Meron Mavierpioce wih
PATRIC KNOWLES |
HENRY STEPHENSON
NIGEL BRUCE+ Donald Crisp
David Niven «Robert Barrat
Directed by Michaci Curtic

Now!

PLAZA

5 and 8.30 p.m. and continuing





GLOBE”

LAST SHOWING TODAY at 5 and 8.30 p.m.

(LARK GABLE and MYRNA LOY

IN

| MANHATTEN MELODRAMA x








GRAND OPENING
TO-DAY

and Continuing

VAN JOHNSON » JOHN HODIAK
RIGARDO MONTALBAN » GEORGE MURPHY

MARSHALL THOMPSON + JEROME COURTLAND - DON TAYLOR + BRUCE COWLING

JAMES WHITMORE - DOUGLAS FOWLEY + LEON AMES + GUY ANDERSON

THOMAS E. BREEN + DENISE DARCEL + RICHARD JAECKE: + JIM ARNESS
SCOTTY SECKETi + BRETT KING

Story and Screenplay by ROBERT PIROSH, Associate Producet a
Directed hy WILLIAM A. WELLMAN » Produced by DORE SCHARY_<
A METRO-GOLOWYN-MAYER PICTURE “



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Retain your half-ticket for this Show and win a complimentary to the
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FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950



Finances
Of the Carib

Commission

LONDON,
Sir Herbert Williams (Cons
tive) asked the Secretary of Sta
for the Colonies in the House o
Commons (on April 26,)
payments have been made by



Majesty’s Government in the
United Kingdom and by oth«
Governments to the Caribbean

Commission and to the Caribbean
Research Council; and in what
currencies these payments were
made.

Mr. James Griffiths answered
“As the reply contains numerous
figures I will with permission cir-
culate it in the Official Report.

Following is the reply:

“His Majesty's Government have
made |the following contributions
to the Budget of the Caribbean

Commission since it was formed

in 1946:—

Financial Year £
1946—47 15,226
1947—48 28,693
1948—49 21,681
1949—50 af ~. $6,543
1950—51 (Estimated

contribution 36,000

The expenses of the Caribbean
Research Council are paid from
the Commission’s budget and no
separate contributions are made
in respect of it, His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment’s agreed proportionate
share of the Commission’s budget
is 34.3 per cent; the United States
contributes 38.4 per cent; France
16 per cent; Netherlands 11.3 per
cent. His Majesty’s Government’s
contribution is paid in Trinidad
currency.” —B.U.P.

Economics
Of Caribbean

LONDON,

Mr, James Griffiths, Secretary of
State for the Colonies told the
House of Commons (on April 26,)
that a new edition of the Economic
Survey of the Colonial Empire
was in preparation but it would
be some time before it was ready
for publication.

He had been asked by Mr
Sorensen to arrange for a periodi-
cal economic and financial sur.
vey of the West African,
Caribbean, and other Colonial



areas and also to arrange for the
official registration and record ot
European, United States and

Indian capital invested in colonial
enterprises.

Mr. Griffiths said he wouid
“consider” the capital registration
request —B.U.P.

Tarzan Comes

Back

SOUTHAMPTON

A’ young Tarzan walked the
streets of Southampton, knife in
hand, but not for long.

Jack Brown, a bakery delivery-
man, was making his rounds
shortly after dawn when he came
across the “jungle boy,” about four
feet tall and wearing only ag piece
of spotted imitation “leopard skin”
draped over one shoulder and be-
tween the legs.

The Tarzan explained to Brown
that his home was in Africa,
“where there are no schools, where
we live in trees,” He added that
“wicked soldiers” had brought him
to Southampton.

Tarzan consented to accompany
Brown to a nearby police station.
A frenzied call came to the police,
asking for help in locating Patrick
Drew, aged seven, suffering from
an “overdose of romanticism.”

ARGENTINA BUYS GOLD
BUENOS AIRES, May 3.
The Argentine Minister of
Finance, Dr. Alfredo Gomez, an-
nounced that Argentina has pur-
chased 60 tons of gold of which
44.322 kilos. were purchased from
the United States and the remain-
der from Switzerland.—Reuter.









ea

ONE GIRL from St. Thomas, in the W
is among this group of
ing training in England.

a







colo

Free Grants Cuban And

To W. Indies

LONDON,

Mr. James Griffiths, Secreta-y
of State for Colonial Affairs, gave
details of free grants promised or
given by the British Government

to the Caribbean area from
January 1945 to the end of the
financial year 1950-51 in the

course of a general review of such
grants to the Colonies.

He said the total of all such
grants was £183,219,525 of which
£ 2,534,944 had been given in the
form of food subsidies but direct
grants for that purpose had now
ended.

Claims to repayment of loans
to Colonies that had been waived
included £100,418 to British
Honduras (Hurricane Loan);
Subsidies other than food included
£117,669 compensation to Britisn
Guiana Sugar growers and £190,450
subsidies for sugar replanting in
Trinidad. Food subsidies (four out
of five of them went to the
Caribbean) were: — Jamaica
£418,415; Turks and Caicos Islands
£179,865; British Guiana £366,667;
and Antigua £19,997,

—B.UP.



Puerto Rico
Wants To
Boost Sugar

NEW YORK
As part of what is termed
“Operation Bootstrap", Puerto

Rico is trying to get United States
political and financial support for
extending her sugar industry.

Dr. Fernos-Isern, Puerto Rican
Resident Commissioner in Wash-
ington, has stated that if his
country’s current quota of 910,000
tens of sugar a year being pro-
duced in Puerto Rico could be in-
creased by 200,000 tons the island’s
economy would benefit by twenty
million dollars a year. Anothei
twenty million dollars would re-

sult if the island could refine
sugar locally instead of sending
it raw. He has also asked for

more cruise ships from the States,
complaining that only one vessel
now calls there.

Meanwhile Mr. Oscar Ewing,
U.S. Federal Security Admini-
strator has left for Puerto Rico to
lay the groundwork for social
security schemes which the U.S.
Senate is expected to pass by the
end of the session. These will
give Puerto Rico old age and de-
pendents’ assistancé, and help for
dependent children and the blind,

but not unemployment _ benefit
which is not expected to pass
Congress.

—B.UP.

Jamaican
Rums Down

NEW YORK

A survey by the National
Association of Alcoholic Beverage
Importers, in the United States,
shows that during last year while
Cuban and Jamaican rum imports
crashed still further, Puerto Rico
more than doubled her shipments

Mr. Harry Lourie, executive
vice president of the Association,
Says “Imported rum, coming main-
ly from Cuba and Jamaica, showed
a decline in consumption in 1949.
The market appears decidedly
unimportant and limited to a few
well-advertised brands. The ship-
ments of Puerto Rican rum to the
United States more than doubled
in 1949. The co-operative efforts
of the Puerto Rico Inuustrial De-
velopment Company and the
members of the import trade in
advertising and promoting Puerto

Rican rum have had a_ worth
while effect.
“For 1950 plans already have

been considered which will utilise
the experience of 1949. Adver-
tisements in the institutional
campaign now carry the brand
names of Puerto Rican rums
which are nationally advertised
and promoted. The campaign has
demonstrated the necessity of the
project being continued for a
period of time sufficient to enablt
the rebuilding of consumer
fidence in Puerto Riean rum
Demand Is Up

“The principal deduction which
may be drawn for 1949 is that
consumers did increase their de-
mands and that shipments reflect
an actual increase in consumption
Surplus stocks which caused so
many of the difficulties for Puerto
Rican rum have been largely dis-
sipated and the distributing branch
of the industry, wholesalers and
retailers, are now in a_ fairly
liquid inventory position.” .

It is pointed out that Americon
attempts to rebuild the domestic
market for foreign wines and
spirits showed results for prac-
tically all liquors—except foreign
rums—i.e. Cuban and Jamaican

—B.U.P.

con-



Bookers Man
i In NY |——

NEW YORK,

Mr. Derick Richmond, 28-year-
old overseer, of Booker Bros.
McConnell and Co., Georgetown,
British Guiana, whose home

address is in London, was taken}

ill on arrival at La Guardia Air-|
a)

port, New York, and is now in a
city hospital. His family have been
informed. é

Mr. Richmond spent a day rest-
ing at the airport on arrival but
did not improve and two doctors
recommended he be taken to
hospital

. —B.U.P.



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|

)private seeretary at Antigua.
“His Excellency never gets dis-
{gusted with anybody and would
not run away if he did,” he said.
—B.U.P.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Mason Gets 12.
Months Jail |

1
Decisions of His Worshi; Mr, |
A. J. H. Hanschell were varied |
yesterday by Their Honours of the
Assistant Court of Appeal © Mr.
“G. L. Taylor and Mr, J. W. 5
Chenery. Mr. Hanschell had
sentenced Gladstone Skeete, a
33-year-old mason of Clapham to
two six-month terms of imprisen-
ment to run concurrently, when he
had found him guilty of having
Stolen a plastic belt valued 59c.,
ind also $4 in cash

The belt was the property of
W. A. Griffith, while the money
belonged to Whitfield Rest. The
offences were committed on April
29. Both the Police and Skeete
appealed against Mr. Hanschell”
Cecisions.

Ther Honours ordered that the
sentences ryn consecutively
Skeete was also convicted by Mr
Henschell, having been foun
fuilty of resisting Island Constabl
Preston Ifill. Their Honours sen-
tenced him to seven days’ im-
prisonment; the latter term is to
run concurrently with the two
previous.

£25 Damages

Judgment was entered for
‘Francis Browne of Cuttings Road,
Haggat Hall, for £25 by His Honour
Mr. J. W. 8. Chenery in the Court
of Original Jurisdiction yesterday

Browne had claimed £50 dam-
ages from Clarence ‘Trotman
accusing him of having removec
her house which was on her
daughter's land on Bush Hall. The
house was carried to Worthing
View, Christ Church. The remova
was done on May 1, 1948. Brown
afterwards demanded the hous
from Trotman and he refused t
give it to her,

IMPORTS
YESTERDAY



Packages of tea, ovaltine, corn
flakes, biscuits, oats and cartons
of milk stout were among the
eargo arriving here from London
yesterday by S.S. Rivercrest.

The Rivercrest also discharged
here Prefect and Vauxhall motor
cars, toys, paint and cement,
From Barbados this vessel will be
sailing south.

One thousand five hundred bags
of rice from British Guiana arrived
in the island yesterday by the
schooner Marjon Belle Wolfe. This
schooner also brought supplies of
firewood, charcoal, wallaba posts,

paling staves and sawn green-
heart.

Also arriving was
vessel Caribbee from Dominica
with cabbages, eschalot, fresh
fruit, mauby bark and reading
books.



BALDWIN WOULDN'T
RUN AWAY

ANTIGUA,
Reports that Earl Baldwin has
decided to resign as Governor of
the Leeward Islands because he is
“disgusted” with local politics

here, have been denied by his


























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PAGE FOUR



sawed

“eblishec Dy Tb. Adwocate Co. 1t0., 14 Broad Si, Bridgetrw:
LS

Friday, May 5, 1950

Thanks
Trans-Canada

IF BARBADOS could earn two hundred
thousand dollars in five months it would
mean that each individual Barbadian would
have benefited by one dollar more than he
or she had before.



That is, assuming that the present popu-
lation of Barbados is as much as two hun-
dred thousand and not more than the official
one hundred and ninety-two thousand.

If the earning continued over the next
five months, then each individual would
have (on the same computation of two hun-
dred thousand Barbadians) a dollar more.

It would be possible to carry on this kind
of sum indefinitely, but there is a reason
for the apparent lapse from orthodox
economics. It is so easy to speak in terms
of statistics and forget that the men and
women—the ordinary men and women who
comprise our society—are not skilled econ-
omists.

an attempting to assess what Trans-Can-
ada Airlines has done for Barbados solely
in terms of tourists from the date of the
inaugural flight here on December third,
until April the twenty-ninth when the last
plane arrived here, the illustration uséd
above has been purposely employed to im-
press on the minds of those who normally
decry the advantages of tourists what are
some of those advantages.

Firstly, it must be explained that 473
passengers arrived from Canada on Trans-
Canada planes from December third up to
last Saturday, the twenty-ninth of April.

No accurate ngures exist for checking
what one individual Canadian tourist
spends in Barbados, but a conservative
estimate has been made of an average of
slightly more than two hundred West
Indian dollars per week. Since the aver-
age Canadian tourist spends the best part
of three weeks in Barbados an average
estimated expenditure of six hundred and
twenty West Indian dollars during three
weeks is not considered excessive for each
individual tourist. If six hundred and
twenty dollars are multiplied by 473—the
total number of Canadian tourists who
have spent an average of three weeks here
per person—a figure far in excess of two
hundred thousand dollars is obtained.
The actual figure is $293,260 (West Indian).

The average reader will lose no time in
pointing out that the dollars earned by
tourists are not in fact distributed on a
per capita basis. This is self-evident since
a considerable number of the population
are still infants in arms or have not yet
reached the age where they can work for
themselves.

In an island as little charted as is Bar-
bados in the intricacies of deciding total
‘wage-earning family groups, as distinct
‘from individual wage earners, the appli-
‘cation of these thousands of dollars to indi-

- ‘viduals cannot be decided by any existing
“agency. But it is patent to the ordinary
- ’ man and woman that by flying 473 Cana-
- ‘dians into Barbados in the five months

‘ended on May third, Trans-Canada Air-

‘ines have contributed $293,260 dollars at

“Yeast, to those who find direct employment

“in hotels, motor cars, newspaper wire
© ' groceries, dry goods stores, entertainmen|
- ‘houses, (to satan the list) and have added

“to the total revenue of Barbados in the form

“of Canadian dollars, considerable sums of

, _ money which might not otherwise have
“been there.

Barbades has much for which to be
grateful to ‘Trans-Canada Airlines, and
-when the runway at Seawell is completed
and a double service begins operation they

will have much more for which to return

thanks.

“
a?

HUR READERS SAY:

“Two Oil

-

AN airliner flies off across the
sea. In the cabin men and women
lie back in armehairs, eating,
reading or sleeping. In the cock-
pit the radio operator checks his
position, reports all well.

Then—disaster.

What happens? Ingenious minds
and slide-rule experts think up
every kind of answer. Only the
men who say “Sabotage” are
labelled as crackpots.

ON THE NIGHT of January 30,
1948, Star Tiger, a four-engine
Tudor, bound from the Azores to
Bermuda with 25 passengers and a
crew of seven, radioed its posi-
tion: “380 miles N.E. of Bermuda,
and all well.”

After that—silence. No more
was heard of Star Tiger.

_One fine day, a year later, a
sister ship of the same fine
climbed out into a clear blue sky
over the Sargasso Sea between
Bermuda and Jamaica, carrying
20 people, Last heard of, she was
at 18,000 feet, one hour out from
Bermuda.

Then, from her, too, silence.

ON JUNE 23, 1949, a Constella-
tion of the Royal Dutch Airlines,
bound from Athens to Rome,
crossed the Italian seaport of Bari,
when an explosion blasted the

plane.

The pilot turned back, to sea
and the great machine fell,
eavorting, into the Adriatic, a
total loss with all aboard her.

‘DAYS AGO, the Viking Vigilant,
of British European Airways, flew
peacefully across the Channel
towards France, There was a
flash and a violent explosion in the
back of the cabin. Only superb
airmanship saved her from plung-
ing into the waters and adding to
the long list of airliners which
have mysteriously disappeared.
But Viligant landed safely at
Northolt. Explosive experts later
gave their verdict: “A bomb”.

Sabotage Was
Ignored

PEOPLE SCOFFED at Air Vice
Marshal Don Bennett, then Chief

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

IS IF EASY TO PUT A
BOMB IN AN AIRLINER?

By Group Captain Hugh Dundas, D. S. 0., D. F.C.

Executive of British South Amer-
ican Airways, for suggesting that
the Tudors might have been sabo-
taged,

Every conceivable theory was
put forward, from structural fail-
ure to waterspouts; a specimen
Tudor was pulled apart nut by
nut and tested for weakness; an
investigating committee was set
up under Lord Brabazon; the
whole fleet was withdrawn from
passenger service with British air
corporations.

But, in its long report, the com-
mittee failed to pin-point the
root of the mysteries. Sabotage
was brushed aside. “‘There was
no evidence. . . though the pos-
sibility of an infernal machine
could not, of course, be entirely
eliminated.”

I wonder what the report of a
committee would have been had
Vigilant disappeared into the
Channel.

OUR MINDS were tuned to the
possibility of sabotage by the case
of Albert Guay, sentenced to death
for murdering his wife with a
time-bomb placed in a plane’s
baggage hold.

The case of the Viking was
different. It is as certain as a
thing can be that the explosive
was planted in the toilet compart-
ment of the plane some time be-
fore flight.

How could such a thing be
done? Who could get at the plane
to do it? The answer is that it
could be done with the greatest
ease,

This is what happens. A Viking
lands from abroad. Passengers
get out and freight is unloaded
at the terminal on the south side
of the airport. The plane is then
towed to the hangers on the north
side, inspected and prepared for
the next flight. After that it is
parked, unattended.

NOW, HOW COULD the sabo-
teur get aboard? I would make



up an old pair of B.E.A. overalls,
and walk boldly through the gates
used by hundreds of workmen
every day.

If possiblé I would choose a
moment when a bus or lorry drove
in. After that it would be plain
sailing. There would be littl
difficulty about getting into one
of the waiting planes.

If you were seen you would be
taken for one of the many
mechanies about their business.
And _ saboteurs, remember, are
armed with quick answers as well
as with bombs.

IF THIS could happen so easily
at one of London’s two main air-
ports—and my own observations
are confirmed by people who work
there—how much more easily
could it happen elsewhere. I have
seen every kind of rag-tag and
bob-tail hanging around on air-
ports abroad.

Last year I went to Rome to
pick up a Tempest fighter and fly
it to Karachi. The machine was
nearly stofn from under my nose
by an impostor hired to take it to
Israel. Only the vigilance of a
British mechanic working on the
plane thwarted his plan.

If you can come so close to
making off with a brand new 2,000
horse-power wasplane, it should
not be difficult to hide a small
bomb in the lavatory of an air-
liner.

IT IS to be hoped that the Vik-
ing outrage will have alarmed the
authorities as much as it has
alarmed the travelling public.

Waterspouts? Structural failure?
Lightning or turbulence?

Perhaps we should have put a
simple question to the Home Sec-
retaries and Ministers of Civil
Aviation: “Are you properly pro-
tecting our-airliners from sabo-
tage?”

—L.E.S.




14 MILLION WORDS OF
WISDOM

By George Malcolm Thomson

CHAMBERS’ ENCYCLOPAEDIA
(New Edition); XV Volumes.
George Newnes, Ltd. £42 10s.
HANDSOME does as handsome

is. The new Chambers’ looks an

alert and companionable array

with its new blue uniform on 15

volumes (one consisting of maps

and index) in place of the former
redcoat ten.

With about the same number
of pages and words io the page,
each volume weighs %4-lb. lighter
than its predecessor. There are
therefore a few million more
words in, the edition, without a
proportionate increase in total
weight.

But the buyer of, encyciupeedias
looks deeper than appearances.
He wants the collection to which
he is assigning a good 2 ft .of his
precious shelves to be

(1) As aceurate as human falli-
bility will allow;

(2) As impartial as human pas-
sion will permit;

(3) As up to date as may be;

(4) As short as possible—at 14-
million words, the new Cham-
bers’ probably satisfies this con-
dition;

(5) As full as possible;

(6) Interesting, yet not so ab-
sorbing that the reader is led on
from Hydrostaties to Hygiene and
after spending the late afternoon
in an excited ‘study of third cen-
tury hymns in Antioch, wonder
what on earth was his original
motive in opening the volume.
Let it be said at once that the
new Chambers’ does not alto-
gether escape this danger;

(7) Illustrations should be as
few as is necessary. They should
provide some information other-
wise incommunicable.

Although the new Chambers’
is not, in this respect, as bad an
offender as others, it has too
many photographs that are too
small and too trivial. But it
would be wrong not to add that
it also contains some magnificent
illustrations in half-tone and
colour.

So much for the general prin-
ciples on which encyclopedias
are to be judged. The broad ver-
dict is that Chambers’ is the best
compilation of its kind now be-
fore the public. An _ excellent
£42 10s, worth,

If anybody recalls in complaint
that the original Chambers’ of
a century ago was put out in
520 weekly parts at 1%d. a copy,
making £3 5s, for the lot, he must
be told that the advance of
knowledge in 100 years is worth

at least £39. Or is it?
There is, however, another
question, The ola Chambers’

had a genial, quixotic, north-of-
the-Tweed flavour with occasional
flashes of eccentricity. It usually
gave you a little more than you
had expected — and how useful
that little proved to be?

MarxeAnd Duce

The old hands will look anx-
iously to see if this kindly quality
has been preserved, now that
Chambers’, like the Britannica
has crossed the Border, although
not yet the Atlantic.

There is, be it acknowledged,
some loss of this Edinburgh tang;
in compensation, more comeliness,
convenience (the old Chambers’
scorned an index), efficiency.

With what whoops of surprise
one used to fall upon, e.g., the
information that in the French
Commune of 1871, 6,500 Com-
munards were slaughtered and
38,578 taken prisoner, One looks
in vain for that colourful detail
in the new version.

This is not to say that Com-
munism is neglected. Far from it!

Karl Marx, described in the
1926 Chambers’ as the ‘founder
of international Socialism,” has
now become the “founder of
modern Communist doctrine” and
is allowed, 2% columns. Lenin
(half a column in the old edition)
has two columns; Trotsky is pro-
moted from a quarter column to
three-quarters; Stalin from eight
lines to two columns. This seems
less than just, in view of the
fact that Mussolini gets three
columns, Hitler three and a half-
Winston Churchill (not men-
tioned in 1926, unlike Charles
and Lord Randolph) five and_a
half columns, and _ Roosevelt
seven.

Meet Chaplin

But how hard it is to be just!
On Karsavina the index is silent
but Lydia Lopokova appears /as



the wife of Lord Keynes
and a half columns).

(two
Chaplin is

there—but where Garbo, Valen-
tino, or Dietrich (Marlene, as
opposed to Epics)?

Charieston, samba, conga ap-
pear — but not a peep out of
bebop. Sir Frank Whittle (jet
engine) is named in the index,

but ‘net Sir Robert Watson Watt
where is Isherwood? . The author
of The Cocktail Party (T, S.

Eliot), but mot the author of
Venus Observed (Christopher
Fry).

To make up for this, however,
here are C. B. (English cricketer),
Elizabeth (English reformer),
Joseph (English manufacturer),
Joshua (American surveyor) and
Roger (British painter, critic), to
say nothing of smaller fry.

The stage comes well out of
things. Here are Olivier and
Gielgud (hard on the heels of
Gide), Barrault and Welles. But
what of the artists who design
settings for those heroes? Where
is Christian Bérard, John Piper,
Roger Furse? These small omis-
sions should be read against the
background of a remarkable com-
pleteness.

Latest News

As for up-to-dateness, the work
has got down as far as Existen-
tialism (allowed the same space
as Exorcism), to the news that
Eire is a republic outside the
Commonwealth and India one in-
side it. has heard of Mao
Tze-tung and even of his victory
over Chiang last year.

In short, it is remarkably down
to the minute.

It has kept, in its smart new
gilise, the sober level-headed
quality of its Edinburgh ancestor,
if its objectivity seems to have
the slightest bias in favour of
Britain, that may be the natural
answer to the spread-eagleism of
a competitor. It is conservative
on sculpture (Eric Gill’s Ariel is
the only recent British work
shown) and not enterprising on
architecture. But what a blessing
not to have that usual picture of
Stockholm ,Town Hall!

»

:









—— $$$,

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950



Is The Dock Strike
A Dress Rehearsal?

Because /f So It's Time Other People

Did Some Dress Rehearsing Too
THE LONDON Dock Strike started on Wed-

nesday, April 19 and lasted 11 days.

This

analysis of the situation was written while the
strike was still in progress.

By TREVOR EVANS

LONDON, April 25.

THAT was an odd phrase Mr. Isaacs made to

Parliament about the London dock strike.
said: “The only question at issue is an entirely |\

trade union matter, with which the public are not '

eoncerned.”

Misleading, Mr. Isaacs. The public are concern- |)

ed about the effect of a dock strike of this size

They are

interested in knowing how the strike

started, how it can be stopped, how these annual

outbursts can

be eliminated, and whether the

authorities — whoever they are — are doing thei:
best to stop the present strike. .

The ‘public would be alarmed if certain fears
about the present strike are justified.

Mr. Arthur Deakin believes it is a Communist

dress rehearsal for a bigger upheaval.

The real

trouble will come, he thinks, if our relations with

Russia deteriorate further,

if arms have to be

loaded or unloaded.

Mr. Deakin

is not alone in his belief. It is

shared by members of the Cabinet and by such a
considerable-trade union authority as Lord Citrine.
THE THREE MEN

If true, the

Communists have every reason to

feel fairly satisfied with their present exercise.
After all, this strike started only last Wednesday.
Troops had to be brought in yesterday. And it has all
been done on whipping up indignation over three
“martyrs”, expelled from their union, not only
for the part they played in leading last year’s strike,

but for refusing to promise future good. behaviour.”
The strike could end to-day if the three men,
Ted Dickens, Harry Constable, and Bert Saunders,

gave an undertaking that they would do what is
expected from all other good trade unionists—obey
union rules, honour union agreements.

Union chiefs regard Ted Dickens as the key
man. He is a Communist Party executive member,
He is chairman of one of its transport committees.

How did all this begin? It appears that some

dockers asked

the union’s “protection” from

trouble-makers. Dickens, Constable and Saunders
were named, They were brought before a “discip-

linary board,”
members

which consisted of rank-and-file

eoncerned only with union rules, not

with conditions at the dock.

EXPELLED

Dickens was asked: “Will you give an under-
taking that you will observe union rules and act
constitutionally?

He replied: “It depends on the circumstances of

the time,”

He was expelled,

He appealed, Again he was

asked a similar question and gave a similar reply.
So his eppeal was rejected.

Weeks before fis appeal was heard, the Port
Workers’ Defence Committee threatened trouble



if the “sentences” on Dickens and his mates were
not quashed, Obviously they were preparing. In-
deed, they were ready.

Dickens and

that their appeals had been turned down. The
strike started next morning.

The strike

leaders whipped up resentment

against the union, its machinery, its committee,

and Mr. Deakin.

All these would have been all

right if the verdict had gone the other way.
Do the strike committee want to “break” the
union? No, Not yet, anyway. They suggested a bal-

lot of dock-w

orkers on whether the sentences

shall stand or not. This, mark you, to be conducted
by the union they have been attacking!

FIRST VICTORY

Maybe this is a dress rehearsal after all. If so,
it demands counter-preparations, Mr. Deakin is

right to demand the end of the strike.

He is right

to withhold recognition from unofficial leadership.
He may have been right to have stood aloof from
strikers’ delegations to his office for two days,
although the strike leaders were quick to miscon-
strue this as indifference to the dockers.
Constitutionally correct though Mr. Deakin has
been, the temporary victory has gone to the strike

leaders.

Mr. Deakin and his officers have got to find a
way of pinning a slur on a docker’s manhood if

he strikes on the flimsiest excuse,

To-day the

docker feels that slur if he remains at work.

FEAR OF JEERS

That is the key to to-day’s situation. Ten thous—
and of the men on strike to-day would rather be

at work.
Take this as

a typical scene, It happened yes~|

terday morning.

Strike-leader

Vic Marney was haranguing

crowd outside the dock gates. Little groups from
the edges moved away to report for work. “Scabs.”
“Blacklegs,” yelled the crowd around Marney.

Singiy or in

turned away from the dock gates towards their

homes. They

triumphant strikers.
That is the atmosphere which must be reversed,

—Lafigon Express Service.

Companies Are Now Drilling Here”

: in the

The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—It seems that when we are
struggling in the dark here to get
peep into the future of oil, the
Times has got there first.
This is what I read under the
ra “Closer Caribbean Union”
issue of April 24:— “Even
has hopes of striking oil
two companies are now drill-

”







have it on good information
the last Oil well to be drilled
“Barbados was drilled by the
Union in 1940. I have

" heard that there was a lot of talk

ing on about oil but anyone who
oes a to a dentist will
you t is a lot of difference
talk and his drill?
this blackout on oil?
READER.

a St. George

The Editor, The Advocate
_SIR,—Kindly grant me space in
your valuable columns to make
mention of a cause that sadly lacks
assistance. “The cause of the
travelling public of St. George.”
Something can be done, something
should be done, something must
be done. )
On May 1, 1950 I had an appoint-
ment with a Doctor for a certain

hour. When the bus got to the

int at which I generally board
Re I .was refused : east a os

engers were already in eac

seat. Quite . A friend took
me to town; but I was late for my
appointment by fifteen minutes.

On May 2, I had occasion to be
in town, This time six passengers
were packed into the seat in which
I sat.

f

Again on May 4, I used the bus.
The conditions were worse, Seven
passengers were squeezed into the
seat whether I liked it or not.

Now Sir, what I would like to
know is this. Should the number
in each seat as regulated by law
be five, six or seven? I am sure the
Manager of Route 8 and 8A (if
there is one) can answer this
question, and before it is too late
do something to remedy the situa-
tion that is becoming increasingly
annoying.

Vox.

Note Roley

The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—yYesterday’s edition of
your paper states that “the West
Indies team have taken the oppor-
tunity to run their eye over Roley
Jenkins, whom they will meet at
Worcester”.

_

They will do well to take note
of him. I saw him bowl in South
Africa and I consider him the
most dangerous bowler they will
meet.

What a man he is for breaking
up astand!! He tosses up innocu-
ous looking stuff, “with plenty of
air”, but when the ball hits the
turf it becomes alive. There is so
much spin and break in the ball
that a very usual entry in the score
book is “stumped—bowled Jen-
kins”. Yes watch out for Jenkins,
he will be among the wickets.

E. C. JACKMAN.

Disendowment

The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—I believe reading a few
years ago His Lordship the Bishop
said that he having read in the
newspaper .that a Bill wes read
a first time in our House of Assem-
bly for the disendowment of the
Church of England caused him to
accept the Bishopric, otherwise he
would not. I am writing under
correction. Sometime ago, his
Lordship called together all the
ministers of his church to discuss
the question of the disendowment
of the church and I believe that
the great majority of the ministers

were in favour of the disendow-
ment of the Anglican Church.
Why then are our representatives
in the House of Assembly so reluc-
tant in bringing it about consti-
tuted as it is.

I hold that the ministers are
civil servants, and that the Bishop
can’t discipline them as he would
if they were not state paid.

Why should the members of the
Methodist, Moravian, Brethren,
Salvation Army and other denom-
inations (who do not even cross
the doors of the State paid
churches except at a wedding or
funeral) be compelled to pay for
something they don’t want. Again
I repeat, if His Lordship and the
great majority of the ministers
would like to see the Church dis-
endowed, why should our repre-
sentatives in the House of Assem-
bly feel so hard to bring it about?

R. EASTMOND.
Vestryman Explains
The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—From the several com-
plaints which I have encountered,
more especially during the past
two weeks, I can come to no better
and reasonable conclusfon that out

administration—parochial “tspeci-
ally—should be better known to
all sections of the community,
thus creating “closer union”.

The old system of hiding from
our children even theoretical
knowledge of certain fundamental
things was often the cause of ruin
and chaos. Why have our taxes

‘increased from $3.72 to $4.90 on

land is the query. There can be
many answers given to this query;
but (1) this tax has been levied
not only to cover our overdue
balances but to budget for this
year’s expenditure. The rise in
price per acre on land is above
most of the other rural parishes
and there it i)that even the most
modest perso.’ may dispute. It is
alleged by some of the past Vestry,
who are yet in executive positions
that the closing of Bromefield's
factory and the inactivities of the
Mt. Gay plantation have added to
this. I know however, that Own-
ership tax on which I’ve queried
as a member of the Vestry is in
my mind one of the sources from
hw this rise has become inevi-
ab‘te.

If we compare ourselves with
others we must accept the truth
that parishes even in these days

could not face the jeers of the

pairs those who wanted to work
—L.E.S.

H

‘i

|
|

which face the devaluation of the)
pound, and their other commit-)|
ments and yet keep their taxes;
normal, must be thought as|
praiseworthy.

On the other hand whether it
be St. Lucy or any other parish,
whose only policy is to get money i
aceording to Shakespearfe’s ver-
sion no matter how you get it, will
never comply with the feelings of
taxpayers. Yet I would envisage
for the good of readers of this
paper etc, that we as loyal citizens
should look forward to the speed-/
ing up of production with all in-)
crease at our demand to meet our
taxes as well as the supposed rise}
in the cost of living from which)
even the peasant proprietor is not |
shielded. But much depends upon|
the Executive body of any organi-
sation whether fortune or mis-|
fortune be our attendant. Our)
Educational Authorities emphasise |
comprehension from our children. |
Likewise taxpayers of St. Lucy,
deem it necessary to receive com-
prehension as regards their paro-|
chial affairs from the Vestry.

KENNETH C, O'NEALE. |

Checker Hall,
St, Lucy.









(

j

his mates heard on Tuesday night |



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C. S. PITCHER & CO., LTD.

Dial 4472 & 4687 ote BECKWITH STORES







ENJOY THE





BLUE MOUNTAIN COFFEE



eee W%-lb. Pkg. 145
” ” »” 1-lb, ” .84
» ” e- i
CHOICE COFFEE .....”.., eb. Pig 0
2 ee tc 1-Ib. , 115
ROSE’S ORANGE SQUASH |. f
CUSTARD CREAM, KENT CREAM}? -
MARIE, BOURBON, SWEET ASSORT-
ED, e UF F CREAM, SHORTCAKE
Boh Oc ATET Ete aeea eh -Ib. Pkg.
CRAWFORD'S CLUB CHEESE SiitAWs Ber Tin a ‘$e
- i, » COCKTAIL :
PIRCUIP RE 5s a eee Per Tin $1.39
SPECIAL!
TRY hamas Crushed
Pineapple

SOME
TODAY

Reduced from 54c. to 6c.

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.



=





Se

“INTERNATIONAL” PAINTS COVER
THE WORK)!

RED ROOFING PAINTS

“DNANBOLINE” ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT—for galvanized
iron roofs. — $7.20 per gallon tin (Imperial), \

“PROPELLER” READY MIXED OIL PAINT—for wooden
shingle, asbestos cement, and aluminium roofs — $4.95
per gallon tin (Imperial).

Instructions for use:—

ee

Galvanized Iron.

1. For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least a
year before painting. Then apply 1 coat of paint.

2. For previously painted work, if the surface is in good
condition, rub down, clean, and apply 1 coat of paint.

3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor
condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat
of “International” Red Lead Graphite Primer, followed by
1 coat of paint.

Wooden Shingle.

. For new work, apply 1 coat of “International” Prim
Wood, followed by 2 coats of paint. ea

2. For previously painted work, if the surface is in good
condition, rub down, clean, and apply 2 coats of paint.

3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor
condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat

of “International” Primer for Wood, followed by 2 coats
of paint.
Asbestos Cement.

1, ‘For new work, apply 1 coat of “International” Cement and
Plaster Primer, followed by 2 coats of paint.

2. For previously painted work, rub down th 1,
it od 2 coats of paint. ence

For new work, apply 1 coat of “Yell i pt -
lowed by 1 coat of paint. t eeeee

2. For previously painted work, rub down th
and apply 1 coat of paint. f Wadivucsa esos

Try these fine product. i
ha! aeslotneed, products of International Paints, Ltd., and

DA COSTA & Co, LTD.

HARDWARE AND ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT.







——










TRIPE, LIVER, RABBIT, STEW VEAL,
STEW BEEF, STEW LAMB

Tins Plum Rose Powdered
Milk—11b 96c.

» Hunters Royal Pork
Sausages—l41b and 1tb

» Oxford Sausage—1Ib

» Apple Sauce—37c.



ENJOY A

BICO

iCE CREAM

» Prunes
» Slice and Pickled Cu-
cumber—4&c.

» Fish Paste—6c.

MAMMOTH CLEANSER
BRILLO SOAP PADS
—22c. pkg.
And the Finest J & R.



| GOpDAnDs. _






FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950

Trade Unionism Is
Something New

Commissioner

Tells Workers

TRADE UNIONS are today looking after not only the
working improvements of the people, but they are trying

to improve the lives of the

people outside their working

hours as well as the lives of the families of these people,
the Labour Commissioner said to his audience at the head-
quarters of the Caribbean Workers’ Union last night.



Heavy
Rainfall
Yesterday

VERY COOL day was ex-
perienced in the City yester-

day. During the morning light
showers fell but by midday the
skies had cleared up, and the sun
reached its usual brightness. The
temperature, however, was only
82° Fahrenheit in the shade.

Heavy showers fell on Wednes-
day night, and early Thursday
morning. Seven inches and 30
parts of rain fell over the island.
Of this St. Peter and St. Andrew
recorded one inch, 39 parts each,
while St. Lucy and St. John each
had 89 parts. It was one of the
heaviest rainfalls for the year.

The returns were: City 25 parts,
Station Hill District 57 parts, St.
George 60 parts, St. Philip 38 parts,
St. Thomas 56 parts, St. Peter 1.39
parts, St. James 48 parts, St. Lucy
89 parts, St. Andrew 1.39 parts and
St. John 89 parts.

“JQ RITISH .NEWS”, “Piccadilly
Roundabout”, “Gardens of
England,” “Macbeth” and the Film
strip “Achimota”’ will be filmed at
Waketielq at 4.45 p.m, today.

A film show for chilaren will
be held tomorrow at 9.30 a.m.
when the following tlms will be
shown:—

“British News”, “Piccadilly
Roundabout,” “Looking Through
Glass,” “Western Waterway,” and
the film strip ‘“Achimota.” Ad-
mission is free.

ATHLEEN LAURIENS of
Sugar Hill, St. Joseph, re-
ported the loss of a gold bracelet
valued $54, and a gold pin valued
$12, from her residence. ’

N ACCIDENT occurred on
Arthur Hill Road at about
3.20 p.m. on Wednesday hetween
the motor bus M-1965, owned by
the Diamond Bus Co., and driven
by Goulbourne Harper of St.
Bernards, St. Joseph, and a bicycle
owned by St.Clair Grainger of
Chase Gap, Hall’s Road, and rid-
den by Wilbert Trotman of Upper
Roebuck Street. The lamp and
front fork of the bicycle were
damaged.

HE MOTOR CAR M-1581,

owned by Samuel Beckles of
Bank Hall, and driven by Winston
Seale of Baxters Road, was
damaged in’an atcident on Bridge *
Street at about 12.50 p.m. on
Wednesday.

Also involved was the motor
lorry T-155, owned by Apple-
whaites Factory Ltd., and driven
by Alburn Gaskin of Venture, St.
John.

ESIDENTS OF Marshall’s Gap

New Orleans, were privileged

to see (what was termed) a
Flying Saucer at 7.25 last night.

Kenneth Harris, one of the

first to see the Saucer, told the
“Advocate” last night that he
saw a bright light which at first
appeared to be a star. The
light changed to red and then
blue before taking a zig-zig
course in a North-easterly
direction.

He is convinced that what he
saw was not a star because he
never saw “anything like it be-
fore.”

FIRE BROKE out at Henley
A Plantation on Tuesday morn-
ing about 4 o’clock. Eight acres of
third crop ripe cane, the property
of J. T. Boyer, were burnt. With
the assistance of neighbours the
fire was put out at about 6.30.

roe THE patronage of Mr.
E. Holder, St. James’ Vestry-
man, a programme of music was
given at the Fox Club, St. James
on Sunday. It was in aid of the
Barbados Pioneer Group.

The Choir was made up of
members of the Pioneer Group,
lead by Mr. C. Leslie, and the play
“New Barbados”, was staged by
the Group.

gern LOSS of a mattress, pillow
and a mirror, total value $34,
was reported by Mr. A. W. Roberts
of Erdiston College’ He stated

He was giving a talk on the sub-
ject “Trade Unions and Their
Proper Functions.”

He said: “The first object of a
trade union is to organise the
workers, It is absolutely no good
for a trade union to try to do any-
thing unless it has first organised
its members. A trade union has
to have substantial membership
to give it strength; without such
strength it cannot act.”

That was one of the rules, and
another was that the election of
officers to the committees should
be absolutely free. That was one
of the cardinal provisions in the
Rules. This was usually done by
secret ballot so that the organisa-
tion would be resting on a demo-
cratic foundation,

“It has been asserted by peo-
ple who have been members of
the Communist Party that the
ballots in such cases have been
falsified. ‘You want to be sure
of your free elections for pur-
poses like that so that you elect
the people you want to run your
union.’

Policy

“The Annual General Confer-
ence of any union usually deter-
mine the general policy that is
followed by the union. The
Union elects the Committee cf
Management. This is called by
different names but the members
have to look after the affairs of
the union between the general
conferences,”

“When we think over the cen-
turies”, he said, “trade unionism
in the world is something com-
paratively new.”’

He said that at the time of the
Great Plague in Europe, living
conditions were bad generally,
with the exception of course,
of those people who lived
in castles and _ places _ like
that. At that time a lot of
people died and those who re-
mained could stand up because of
the shortage of workers, and say
they were not working unless they
got better wages. In England a
law was passed to prevent that.

In those days there were no
trade unions and the law he had
referred to was in force until the
time of Queen Elizabeth's reign.
Something then began gradually
to, happen in England. Factories
began to come into being and peo-
ple left the rural areas to work in
the towns, for before that, people
were more or less scattered in the
country and worked in their homes
with their families.

The industrial revolution began
but in due course the towns be-
came filled. with people as more
and more entered them to get
employment.

Conditions Worse

More and more competed for the
jobs that were offered until con-
ditions became worse and worse.
In those days the people were
mostly illiterate but they tried to
combine together in order to en-
deavour to better their conditions,
As they did so laws were passed to
make such combinations illegal.
These anti-combination laws pre-
vented people from combining so
as to ask for better conditions of
work,

People began to think of free-
dom to organise and as a result
about twenty-five years later,
there was brought about the re-
peal of the Combination Laws.
That was in 1824.

Although the laws
pealed there were still ways in
which if workmen tried to com-
bine to improve their conditions
they could be prosecuted, Charges
of conspiracy and other charges
were brought against them so that
they really did not have the com-
plete freedom to organise,

“Things went on like that until
1871 and it was in that year that
the law which is really the first
great charter of. trade unions, was
passed in England.

Prohibition

“T am not going to go into the
details of that law, but I think I
will refer to one particular aspect
of it. That is, removing the pro-
hibition on trade unionists doing
acts in restraint of trade.

That was a great step because
previously it had been held that a



STAMPS

MORE than eleven thousand
dollars of the new stamp, issue!
were sold in two days. Mr. H. N
Armstrong, Colonial Postmaster
told the “Advocate’’ yesterday
that $11,846 was received for the
new pictorial stamps on Monday
and Tuesday.

Monday's sales brought $9,174.00
as against $2,672.00 on Tuesday
At St. Lawrence, the Postmistress
also had a very busy day on Mon-
day as she sold $1,100 in stamps

fhe new stamps wh'ch are of

12 denominations with values
expressed in decimal, currency.
range from 1 cent to $2.40 and
the only connecting link between
the new issue and the old one
will be found in the $2.40 stamp
which neudes a reproduction of
the Seal of the colony.
_ The set of stamps which has
just been withdrawn, is substan-
tially the same as the one issued
in 1925, except that the words
Postage & Revenue have been
removed.

Mr. J. C. Kellman, Secretary
of the Barbados Philatelic Soci-
ety, told the “Advocate” that he
was favourably impressed with
the new issue of stamps as it was
a change from the long list of
definitive stamps showing the
seal of the colony.



He said that Barbados was one
of the last of the British colonies

te issue a pictorial set. He how-
ever thought that the paper used
for printing the stamps was of a
poor quality.

The stamps are in two perfora-
tions. Those in the vertical
format having finer perforations
than those in the horizontal. The
vertical ones are perforated 13%”,
while the horizontal ones are per-
forated 11 by 11%”.

The design of the six cent
stamp was taken from a photo-
graph which he had submitted
to the Committee of the Barba-
dos Philatelic Society, and which
was adopted as the design for-
warded by the Society for con-
sideration by the Selection Com-
mittee. The original of this
photograph was the property of
the Barbados Publicity Com-
mittee.

Mr. Kellman said that the
printers of the new set are
Messrs. Bradbury, Wilkinson and
Co., Ltd. whereas Messrs De La
Rue had been printing the stamps
of Barbados for a good number of
years.

‘Keep Your
Hands Off’

SAYS MAGISTRATE

“THIS is a terrible thing to do
and I have no sympathy with you.
You must keep your hands off
what does not belong to you,” Mr,
A. J. H. Hanschell told Neville
Beckles of Baycroft Road, St.
Michael, yesterday when he im-
posed a fine of £19—to be’ paid
by instalments of £1 per month
-—or three months’ imprisonment,
for stealing a bicycle owned by
Oscar Wiltshire of Cole’s Road,
Carrington Village.

£2 FOR SPEEDING

Lochert Harris of Checker Hall,
St. Lucy was fined £2 in 28 days
or one month’s imprisonment by
His Worship Mr. A. J. H. Hans-
chell yesterday for speeding on
Bank Hall while driving the motor
lorry S—144 on April 8.

SOLD BANANAS TOO

DEAR: £2

Viola Howell, a hawker of Bank
Hall Road, was found guilty ot
selling bananas at a greater price
than permitted. The offence was
committed on December 20. -

Mr. E. A. McLeod, Magistrate
of District “A”, ordered her to
pay a fine of £2 by instalments or,
in default, one month’s imprison-
rent,

FINED £4 FOR

CARELESS DRIVING

A fine of £4 to be paid by
instalments, or in default one







trade unionist could organise and month’s imprisonment, was im-

he could ask for better wages and
ccnditions, but the. moment he did
something that was in restraint

posed on Clayton Joseph of Rouen
Village by His Worship Mr.
A. J. H, Hanschell yesterday.

of trade, the act was illegal. The Joseph appealed, ’

whole idea from the time of this
new Act was that everything must
‘be free” :

He was found guilty of driv og
the motor bus M-2138 on Roebusk
Street: a highway without due care

that the articles were removed The Commissioner then referred @nd attention for other persons

from the dormitory at the College
during last month.

This is the second loss
College has suffered recently.

Lower Cariton, St. James,
reported that his house was broken
and entered, and a wallet with
contents to the value of $24 ta

asii few weeks. The seas were
Fvourable; and fishermen return-
ed to Bathsheba Bay with large
catches.

Now that the
are fairly slow,
used to take the

a motor car. is
fish elsewhere

as low as three cen!
beach. y
7T.HE GAMBIAN Welfare Choi

under the leadership of Mr
Sherville Gill of Edgecliff, St.

©

of
that

to the further development
trade unionism. He _ said

the trade unionists eventually began
to take an Interest in politics. An
trade
ARDINAL CHANDLER of unions the power to put into a
crea
the ers are on the move to form their
for political purposes. Such own association and om Saturday
ken, funds had to be approved of by next at 2 p.m., they will hold
It was a separate

ISH VENDORS in St. Joseph fund and a member had to sign Park.
F were very busy during the a paper to say if he did not want

Act was passed giving
Rules
political

money

that they could
funds and spend

the members.

to contribute to it.

The Commissioner ending his lecture

using the same road.

JOINERS TO FORM
ASSOCIATION

Local Cabinet makers and join-
their first meeting at Queen’s
Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C., and

(Mr. E. D, Mottley, M.C.P., have
been invited to the meeting to

said: “The Webbs said that a trade outline the purpose of the associa-

union was a continuous associa
wage
lives’; but trade unions are going
little further nowadays, they
efter not only

side their working

the lives of the families of



John gave a performance at the

Horse Hill Casino on Sunday eve-
ning. ae
Next Sunday the Choir will give

a ‘ormance at Sealey Hall, St.
Jol

and destroyed five and

Another Flying
Saucer?

It is expecied that a con-
test will take ae pe ap fe
vhe St. John Choirs, and wi eo ‘ ‘
staged at the St. John Mixed by a resident of St

ol.
ABOUT 9.00 p.m. on Mon-

Christ Church,

quarter acres of second crop ripe jn the air.

canes which were insured.

Estates Ltd.

They
were the property of Carringtor suddenly

It however,

had

disappeared,
as it
leaving no trail.

4 earners for the purpose of im-
sales in Sv. Josq@ph proving the conditions of their working

Another flying saucer was seen
Lawrence,
on Wednesday
Scho morning about 4.35. While stand-
A’ ing at his open window he sud-

day a cane fire broke out at Geniy heard a buzzing sound like
Mangrove Plantation, St. Philip, that of a bee, and saw a bright
three disc of a silvery colour spinning

as
appeared,

tion.

a
sve‘iookine TWENTY-FIVE RETURN
the working improve-
to be sold. The price of fish WaS jents of the people, but they are trying
each om ‘he to improve the lives of the people out-
hours as well as
these

FROM MIAMI
The chartered ’plane of Natiqn-

wide Air Transport Service which
arrived here oni Wednesday after-
hoon, with 25 labourers returning
from work in Miami, left Barba-
dos yesterday morning for Miami}

via Puerto Rico,





What’s on Today

Court of Ordinary at 11.00
a.m

Football at Queen’s Park as
5 p.m.

Police Band Concert, Hast-
ings Rocks at 8.00 p.m.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Schooner Sauk
120 Miles From B.G.

CAPTAIN William Parsons,
a 40-year-old St. Vincentian, now
Skipper of the Lady Joy went to
sea at 19. He started his career as
a sailor of the schooner Uncatina
and has now risen to be master of
the Motor Vessel Lady Joy.

Captain Parsons has also sailed

on schooners Ferna, Nora
Baker, Lady Violet, Juliana,
Esteranita, Marion Belle Wolfe

and Mannie M. Mosher. Dur-
ing his 21 years of sea life, he
hes touched all of the Windward
and Leeward Islands.

“I have had a very exciting sea

life,” he told the Advocate. In
spite of ace'dents, hurricanes,
still

heavy seas and drifts he
loves the sea.

Once the Lady Violet, sank with
him and e'ght others about 120
miles off British Guiana but the
entire crew of nine reached the
shores of British Guiana safely.

On that trp the Lady Violet was
taking cargo from Georgetown to
Trinidad. The vessel suddenly
sprung a leak. The crew got oif
into the small boat and began to
tow the schooner. They encoun-
tered seven days of calm in the
Bocas. Luckily they had managed
to transfer sufficient food and
water into the smal boat.

On the way back to British
Guiana, the boat sprang a leak
again and sunk. The crew again
got off into the small boat: and
were drifting for two days before
they reached British Guiana.
They were never without food and
water.

The Ferna once turned , over
with him about four miles Yrom
British Guiana. This time he
spent seven hours in the sea, and
reached British Guiana safely.
The Ferna was salvaged and he
sailed on it again,

During the war he was working
on the Juliana, the Esteranita
and the Marion Belle Wolfe. He
finished tthe war on the Wolfe
and went over to be mate of the
Minnie M. Mosher. In 1949, he
passed his captain's examination
and became master of the Lady
Joy.

Salvaged Barge
Under Repair

THE barge Resolute Which was
sunk in the inner basin of the
Careenage during the flood waters
of September last year, and was
since salvaged, is now undergoing
extensive repairs on dock at Hard-
wood Alley.

The Resolute has been bought
over by Mr. J. O. Olivier, who
was formerly a shipping agent of
Trinidad. Towards the end of
next week, it will be towed down
to Trinidad by the motor vessel
Blue Star and from there it will
be towed over to Venezuela.





‘Caracas’ Brings

Seawell Equipment

MORE equipment for Seawell
arrived by motor vessel Caracas

yesterday.
The Caracas could not begin to
discharge this equipment the

same day because the schooners
Frances W. Smith and Freedom
Fleary occupied the berth opposite
the Government crane, which is
the only machinery on the wharf
used for unloading heavy cargo
such as trucks and bulldozers.

‘Lady Nelson’
Calls On Sunday

THE S.S. Lady Nelson will call
at Barbados on Sunday, Messrs,
Gardiner Austin Co., Ltd., inform-
ed the Advocate yesterday. It
will arrive from British Guiana
via Trinidad, Grenada and St,
Vincent,

The Nelson is scheduled to leave
port the same night for Bermuda,
Boston, Halifax and Montreal via
the British . Northern Islands.
Passengers have already booked
their passages.

‘ATHEL RUBY’ TAKES
MORE MOLASSES

THE Athel Ruby returned here
yesterday for its usual cargo of
approximately 126,000 gallons of
= pan molasses for Trini-

Shortly after 10 a.m., it was
made fast at its berth in the inner
basin, and was being prepared
for taking the molasses. It is ex-



pected to leave Bridgetown to-day ‘

for Trinidad.









Jury Decides In
Defendant's Favour

Surprising Verdict, Says Chief Justice

NINE out of the 12 members of the Common Pleas Jury

which tried the action in which Clarence Fitz-Herbert Cor- |

bin sought to recover damages from Joseph N. Hurdle for
damage to a car as a result of a collision, yesterday founc

a verdict in favour of Hurdle.

Judgment was entered

for Hurdle with costs, by His Honour the Chief Judge, Sir

Allan Collymore.

“I must confess that it is a most surprising verdict”, the

Chief Judge commented. “However, that is your verdict.”

In the accident which occurred
on Pine Road on July 9, 1946,
Corbin’s car which was then
driven by his chauffeur, Cuthbert
Maughn, was forced against a
palm tree growing by the side of
the road, and was so damaged
that it could not be moved under
its own power.

Corbin in paragraph 3 of his
Statement of Claim alleged that
it was due to negligent driving on
the part of Hurdle, who was over-
taking Corbin’s car, and who, so
Corbin alleged, had collided with
his car in the act of passing him

out.
Other Side

On the other hand, Hurdle in
his Defence claimed that the
accident had been caused by negli-
gent driving on the part of
Maughn, whom, he alleged, had
veered suddenly to the right and
collided with Hurdle’s car, thereby
causing the mishap.

The majority of the Jury said
yesterday that they were not sat-
isfled that Corbin had proved para-
graph 3 of his Statement of Claim.

Corbin claimed damages to the
tune of $609.71 made up of the
cost of repairing the car, the cost
of repainting it, and the loss of
earnings for four months, He was
represented by Mr. G. H. Adams
who was instructed by Messrs.
Hutchinson & Banfield.

Mrs. Hurdle, and Mr. Hurdle
were cited as defendants. Mrs.
Hurdle is owner of the car M-1244
which was being driven by her
husband on the evening in ques-
tion. Mr. Hurdle was admitted to
be her agent in driving the var.
The Defendants were represented
by Mr. D. H. L. Ward, instructed
by Messrs. Haynes & Griffith.

From Funeral

Both cars were returning from
a funeral when the accident oc-
curred.

Hearing of the action was begun
on Wednesday, The Chief Judge
summed up to the Jury vesterday
and the latter retired at 11.35. Six
hours later they returned to Court
with a majority verdict in favour
of the defendant.

It was certified that the case
was a proper one to have been
tried by a special jury.

Summing Up

The Chief vudge summing up,
told the jury that the case was es-
sentially one for them. As counsel
on both sides had said, there was
not much law in it. There were
two defendants, Mr. Hurdle, whom
they had seen and heard, and his
wife, who was the owner of the
car, which along with the plain-
tiff’s had been involved in the
accident,

The car had been on its lawful
mission, returning from a funeral,
as indeed, had been the other car.
If therefore, there was liability—*
that was, if they found for the
plaintiff, both defendants would be
responsible, the female defendant
being the owner of the car, and
the male defendant, as admitted
in the Defence, being her egent in
driving it,

Negligence
The Chief Judge, explaining
“negligence”, told the Jury that
legal negligence was somewhat |
different from negligence in the
common or lay sense, Illus-
trating the point, he said tha‘
if one of them negligently
forgot to tie his shoe lace, and
the shoe lace tripped him up
it might be sald in a lay sens«
that that person had _ ber
negligent, But “negligence” in
law was a relative term, because

it meant that there had been a

breach of some duty, some fail-

ure to take care.

Therefore, for their purpose,
“negligence” there Was a failure
to take such care as the circum-
stances of the case demanded.
There could be no general defini-
tion, because the circumstances of
each particular case varied.

Common Sense
“You will bear in mind”, the
Chief Judge said, “that it is for the

eee a a na ee enn 2 eae

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White Cotton Damask

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plaintiff to establish his case to
your satisfaction. But in this kind
of case, unlike a criminal case, you
are entitled not only to have re-

gard to the facts proved in evi-/|

dence, but, exercising your com-
mon sense, to have regard in ihe
light of that evidence to the pro-

babilities of the case, and to come}

to a conclusion as to what you
reasonably believed to have hap-

pened.

The Chief Judge next dealt with
the question of damages. If they
found that the defendant was
liable, he said, it would mean that
he so negligently drove his car on
the occasion that he damaged or
eaused the damage to the other
car.

To use the example that Mr
Adams had used, if for instance
someone had an old wall or paling
and someone else violently collidex
with it and knocked it down, or
knocked down a portion of it, even
if in a general sense the paling
was so old that it would have tc
be renewed in any case, the person
suing was still entitled to have a
new paling put back up, While
that was so, it was the duty of the
person suing to minimise his dam-
ages as Mr. Ward had said, so as
not to put additional burdens on
the person from whom he eventu-
ally recovered the sum.

Damages

“Bearing those two general
principles in mind”, said the Chiet
Judge, “if you come to consider
the question of damages, you will
so approach that question.”

Dealing with the particulars of
special damage which appeared ir
the Statement of Claim, the Chie!
Judge mentioned the cost set out
for repair of the car at $316.71
cost of painting the car, $37.50
cost of tyres, a hub, a coil ete. He
also reminded them that for loss
of earnings of the car, the plaintiff
had estimated $1.50 a day for four
months, a total of $180.00.

On one hand, he said, while Mr.
Adams for the plaintiff had said
that the plaintiff had been too gen-
erous, in that he had omitted t
charge for a battery, and that he
had only charged for half of the
painting of the car, and had only
charged for four months’ loss of
earnings although the car was
under repair for nearly a year,
Mr. Ward for the defendant, on
the other hand, said that far from
being too generous, there were
many items on the bill put in evi-
dence by the witness Layne which
should not have appeared in it
because they were not necessitated
as a result of the accident.

Objection

In other words, it had been put
to them for the Defence that there
was that 1937 Model Ford
damaged in 1946, repaired by Mr
Layne, and all those items anc
bills placed before them, In goin:
@ On Page 7

LUXURY,
= : aetalty
isi, Pour Satya
on the hottest da: Koape
the skin as as he
—and nee 7
Soap and
the luxury |











(uticura
. TALCUM

te an

NEW ARRIVALS

FRY'S CHOCOLATE
HAZEL NUTS
in '4 Ib. and 1 Ib, Boxes
Priced at...
90c. and $1.62 per Box
Also FRESH SHIPMENT of
HUMPHREY'S
HOMEOPHATIC
REMEDIES
Humphrey's Specifi
(all Numbers)
Humphrey’s Veterinary
Remedies 1.20
Humphrey’s Witch Hazel
Liquid
Humphrey’s Witch Hazel
Liquid
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
Ointment
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
Ointment

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LIMITED











96

56



87





18”x18" Ea Abe
















































SIKIN
TROUBLE

NOT A BLEMISH TO BE SEEN!

The close resemblance —
between the natural ou
in Germolene and the
natural oil of healthy
human skin is of very
great importance.

PENETRATING 1
explains why Germolene
«.s3 down through itching,

=

irritated, inflamed _ skin,
soothes tortured nerve
ndings.

ANTISEPTIC ‘rhanks to
this easy penetration
Germolene purifies hidden
| recesses—sweat pores, tiny
| hair follicles, sebaceous
| glands.

|
SOOTHING The soothing, cooling,

| comforting touch of Germolene has
| brought gratitude to thousands and

its healing powers have never been
surpassed, Use Germolene yourself !

{

}
|

ASEPTIC OINTMENT

GO 47)7



CHECK THIS LIST NOW!
BOYS :
BOYS’ % HOSE—Grey only @ $ 72 p
BOYS’ SHIRTS is
In stripes and plain colours @ 87c., $2.01, $2.42
and $2.92 eac
BOYS’ ETON CAPS ... @ 24e. and 36e. ead
PLASTIC BELT @ 36c.
BLACK and TAN LACE SHOES
(INO Bere oak Rect ipa yd ace
BLACK LACE SHOES (Size 2—5)
TAN LACE SHOES (Size 2—5) .
KHAKI DRILL
GIRLS 3
DYED LINENS—In Navy, Royal, Brown, Beige, Pin
Green, Gold, Peach and White @ 82c., 94¢,, al
97c. a Yd.
DYED TOBRALCO—in White Royal and Navy.
CHILDREN’S LACE SHOES
In Black ‘and Tan (Sizes 11-—1) @ $4.30 a pair
GIRLS’ LACE SHOES—(Sizes 2—5) @ $5.14 a pair
PANAMA HATS @ $1.62, $1.79 and $1.82 eae
BERETS in Green, Beige, Brown Saxe, Red,
Royal and Navy at $1.01 each,
also STATIONERY
Rulers, Quink, Pencils, Sharpeners, Holders, Golden
Platignum, Esterbrook and Waterman’s Fountain Pens.

HARRISCN'S



ye BARE BOMBED Wee ee

”
”

$6.20 p
-ssees.. from 87e. to $1.12

”

j ”





BROAD ST



TS ——=














PAGE SIX



BY CARL
i] ;



ANDERSON









————

NO-NO! NOT THAT KIND L)7






HEY, HASSAN..CAN ~
WOU GET US SOME
DATES?




ree AM.
LPRUNGEY!










ACHMED'S Arl
COME IN AND REST YOU
J CARANAN -










NOW WATCH THIS «++
FLIPPO--AND THE

QUARTER iS NOW
A SILVER COLLAR!

A Ou
INTERESTED DEAR®



BY FRANK STRIKES

ND OF AN
SILVER. AT LEAST HE
US =r pet INFORMATION

|



TURE WITH WHISPER BEGINS TODAY
a YOUR BREAKFAST \J rE

ee a lth |
(| ay 4

i 7



rie) Cte) ek,
EOC Le An
ese.) rm






So





et





| aT rEreter SS SEN]

BRINGING UP F


























WAT DID T YES - DUGAN - - eer
oe ee éHES GIVIN! A YES- MRS. DUGAN- YOu HEARD ME!
VIE CHASED YEAH- I'LL TELL YER WIFE UST
SS Sub rotone ncn”
alse: F 'D Hi
QllsE P HOW ee
WANT TO REMAIN

HEALTHY’

BY ALEX RAYMOND

WHAT , \
NOW, i. }
MUGGER? |

MY! SHE'S REAL MAD, AIN'T
Py SHE, SISTERE



MOORE




NTO





a PO YOU BELIEVEHE IS roa
=\—-——| |GREATER THAN THE PHANTOM? 3.4 Ri yi

MEN OF BANPAR, DO You estore os HEREC TY

FEAR AND BELIEVEINTHIS| [> =a | kK

APE IDOL?



BARBADOS ADVOCATE







Lady Dudley, one

of England's loveliest titled women, is a
use Pond’s Creams regularly and it’s amazing the Piference

"It's so much softer, smoother, clearer.

Brunette Mrs. Lawrence Earle, who lives in U.S.A.,
and Lady Dudley, well-known London hostess, have
one thing in conmon-—they use the same beauty care!

This beauty care is Pond’s, and it is the favourite
of society’s loveliest women in America, England,
and France.

Why not give your complexion the benefit of the
same care? Follow this easy routine: regularly every
night, cleanse the skin thoroughly with Pond’s Cold
Cream, swirline it gently over face and throat with
your fingers. “Rinse” with more Cold Cream for
extra cleansing, extra softening.

In the morning, before you make-up, smooth a
\ «#
| l ODAY eee

| Mor Keasm to bly
QUAKER OATS







QUAKER OATS GIVES YoU
MORE FOR YOUR MONEY:

| MORE wineRALs..................for strong bones and teeth



MORE PROTEINS.................. for solid flesh and muscles
MORE CARBOHYDRATES.............. for energy ond stomina
VITAMINS (B, and B2)......... turn food into “body-fvel”

|
|
| «++More Flavor and Enjoyment, teo!

You're ready for anything with the exuberant health thatQuaker
Oats helps yoy to enjoy! Children thrive on this delicious and
healthful food—so rich in the key elements needed for strength
and energy—for taller growth and solid muscles and bone.
Grown-ups who eat Quaker Oats regularly know ithelps them to
greater endurance and vitality, too. For ALL the family,
there’s no BIGGER NOURISHMENT VALUE than Quaker
Oats. Buy it today!

LINOLEUM CARPETS
Sizes: 9ft. by 71% ft. and 101% ft. by 9ft.
Also
LINOLEUM IN ROLLS 6ft. wide

All very reasonable in Price.



go = LS HERBERT Ltd, 9 ze
10 & 11 Roebuck Street.

i | Se SSS
%



Mrs. Lawrence W.

! 4 without my Pond’s Creams,” she says.“ Pond’s Cold Cream is
Pond’s Creams have made to my skin,” says Lady Dudley. so pleasant to use, and it leaves my face looking ever so much
safer and fresher.

Blonde or Brunette

| THEY PROTECT. THEIR LOVELINESS WITH THF SAME BEAUTY CARE

little Pond’s Vanishing Cream into your skin. This
delightful, non-greasy cream makes an ideal powder
base because it holds powder matt for hours, It
protects your skin, too.

Start at once with Pond’s two creams to make your
skin clearer, softer, smoother. In a very short while




FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950

Gums Bleed?

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your
mouth well and save your teeth or
money back on return of empty pack
age Get Amosan from your chemis

today. The guar-

Amosan antee protects
you.

For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth



BOYS SHOES

f Earle, leading figure in Philadelphia
honey blonde with grey eyes and a wonderful, fair skin. "I society, is noted for her lovely complexion. "I wouldn't be

IN BLACK and BROWN
(All Sizes)

You can’t beat these
for Comfort.
From $4.13 Up.
Visit - - -

THANI Bros.

Pr. Wm, Henry Street
and 6, 42 & 53 Swan Streets
DIAL 3466,

you'll be thrilled with its new
radiance. At all beauty counters.

wy
Pond’s








A‘dazzling
smile

A Pepsodent

!
|
|
|
|
smile?

Such
brilliant

Irium ! — That’s what Pepsodent contains to make
your teeth so much whiter, so much brighter, Irium,
the most effective brand of tooth cleansing agent
known to dental science, is exclusive to Pepsodent, It
removes harmful film and unattractive stains — gives

| your teeth an extra whiteness you can see. Ht

:

|





THE TOOTHPASTE COnrTAINING IRIUM
PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ENGLAND





all day long

Ms f
This wonderful sensation is wonderfully easy to get. Just

shower yqurself all over with Cashmere Bouquet Talcum



Powder, aiser every bath, every bathe. Then — all day
long your fascinating freshness will be the envy of your
fecncs: your skin will have a marvellous silken texture :
i t vill linger about you a subtly seductive fragrance.

Por Cashmere Bouquet is the Taleum Powder with the
1zrance that men love.

== Cashmere Bouquet

ay | TALCUM POWDER

ai

COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET CO



LOVELY SPUNS

in Orchid, Blue, Old Gold,
| . Rose, and White ... .+eeee. @ $1.08 per yd.
CELANESE CELSHUNG in White, Grey,
Gold, Torquoise & Blue ......... .... @ $1.01 per yd.
GEORGETTE in White, Pink, Gold, Feach





and Green . SMe Brera tates as @ $1.20 per yd.
} Also SATINS, COTTON PRINTS, FUJIETTES, CAMBRICS,
} LAWN in White, etc., etc

i BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.

a e 1)
7 ONSSSGOy) | Bae |




FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950

oe eee ae ae Se ee bans! ieee



CLASSIFIED ADS.



—_——

IN MEMORIAM



IN loving memory of my dear Sister
ESTELLE BROWNE who fell asleep on
May Sth, 1949

“Not dead to us who loved her

Not lost but gone before

She lives with us in memory,

And will for ever more.”’

REST IN PEACE

George Clarke (son), Archibald Clarke
(brother) Louise Eastmond (sister)
Claud Eastmond (brother-in-law).

5.5.50—In





FOR SALE







AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Morris 10 H.P. in perfect work-
ing order Apply C. E. Tryhane, Baga-
telle Plantation, St.» Thomas.

4.5.50—4n.





CAR—Wolseley 8. In perfect order
Possession May 1ilth. Telephone 4014.
Mrs. Graham Yearwood, 4.5,50—2n,





Phone 4683

CAR—Morris 8 h.p. 4 door Sedan in
A. 1 Mechanical condition. Newly paint-
ed. Fort Royal Garage.

2.5.50—én.

CAR: Pontiac Convertiable Coupe
occasional four Passenger in good order.
Reasonable price for quick Sale, Phone
3348, or 2749 28 .4.50—Tn

CAR-—One Hillman 1948 Model, Phone
W. R. Tempro 2840 or 8224

30.4.50-—t.f.n.



|

FORD ENGINE: One V-8 Ford engine
and radiator in good condition, axle,
drive shaft, ring-gear and pinion, and
other parts Enquire Auto Tyre Com-
pany, Trafalgar Street Phone 2696.
28.4.50—t.f.n.





ELECTRICAL



RADIO—American G.E, 11 tube, in;
good working condition. Phone 2990 |

between the hours of 4 and 5 p.m.
4.5.50—2n



MECHANICAL

LADIES BICYCLE—Good condition.
$30.00. Apply: Good, Juhilee, Gibbs
Beach, St. Peter. 5.5.50—2n.



MISCELLANEOUS

FLOUR BAGS Opp and washed
white, all marks taken out. Apply K,.
RR. Hunte & Co., Ltd. over Bata Shoe
Store, Lower Broad Street. Dial 4611.

4.5.50—l4n





FINEST PAINTS—Brandram Henderson
incomparable Forest Green Sun Proot
KEYSTONE White and colours, special
rimers, distempers Paints $6.84 gin.
istemper $3.50 gin. They are Here.
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

25.4.50—13n





GROCERY ITEMS-—Suncrest Evapo-
rated Milk. Cut-rite Wax Paper, 1-Ib.
Tins Klim, Eschalot, Secure yours early
from John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd. Dial
4335, Roebuck Street, 5.5.50—2n,
clrnneininnt ates eens ao

GARDEN HOSE—Half inch genuine
rubber Hose. Double Braided for extra

Lid. Dial 4222

PAINTS—I.C.I. Special offer Gloss
Paints. $3.45 per gallon. Come and get
them A. BARNES & Co., Ltd

values, postally used, Other B.W.1.
Stamps also wanted, Apply Box A.
C/o Advocate Co. 5. 3

)

WATER PUMP—One (1) second-hand
“Lister” Water Pump. 50 gallons per
hour. Drawn by % h.p. 110 volt, single
phase Motor, Apply: The Barbados
Foundry, Ltd., White Park Road, St.
Michael. 5.5.50—2n.







PUBLIC NOTICES





FORM L

The Land Acquisition Act,
1949

(Notice required by Section 3)
Notice is hereby given that it appears
to the Governor-in-Executive Committee
that the lands described in the Schedule
hereto aad situate at Bathsheba in the
parish of St. Joseph in the Island of Bar-
bados are likely to be needed for pur-
poses which in the opinion of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee are
public purposes, namely for establishing
playing fields or other places of public

rt.
eee THE SCHEDULE
ALL THAT certain parcel of land con-
taining 1 acre 3 roods adjoining the site
of the former Railway Station at Bath-
sheba, bounding on the seashore, on lands
formerly of the Barbados Government
Railway and on the public road, alleged
to be in the occupation of Miss Vera M,
Hinkson of Cane Garden, St. Andrew.
Dated this twenty seventh day of April
1950 at the Public Buildings in the City
of Bridgetown in the Island of Barbados.
By Command,
Pp. F, CAMPBELL,
Colonial Secretary, (Ag.)
3.5.50—3n.





LE

NOTICE

person or persons who may be
aatpeuabien the purchase of a parcel of
Jand at Skene’s Hill, St. George, be-
longing to Mrs. Ivy Edith Ashby, Mrs.
Erskine Ione Gittens and others are
hereby warned that there is an Agree-
ment to sell 4 Acres of this land to us
the undersigned and are advised to see
our Soler. Meets: nh &
Sealy who will give fu nfoerm®
oe 5. . GULSTONE,
L. A BYNOE.
5.5.50—2n.







=—————————————————
WANTED

———————





HELP

UALIFIED MECHANIC~ For Adding
Mochines and Typewriters Department.
Rradshaw & Co. 4.5.50—8n.

eee AAA AAAS
Bi y itt
A GIRD—For our Office. J W. Hewitt,
‘Tailoring Emporium, Coleridge St., oppo-

site Fire’ Brigade Station, Apply with

jettey and in person. 4.5. 50—4n

(Gen-
GUESTS—Two Paying Guests
tle men preferred) to share Large Com-




fortable Bedroom with running water.

Situated on Worthing Coast



8272.

OL

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE

The application of Ethelbert Ainsell

a St. B'town. St. Mich-
France of Tudor 5t « ao

Liquors, &c., at Bottom floor of No 38

ael for permission to sell Spirits,

‘Tudor St. St. Michael
Dated this 4th day of May, 1950
To H. A. Talma aes xi
lice Magistrate, Dist “A’
x Signed AINSELL FRANCE
Applicant

B.—This application will be con-].
= icensing Court to be held
District “A”, on Mon-
11

sidered ata f
at Police Co . 0
day the 15th day of May, 1950

o'clock, a.m




at

H. A, TALMA
Police Magistrate Dist ”













, kh, Archer McKenzie, Auctioneer.
















Good oe
Pathi N _ Hart, Sea” Field, Dia
hing. N.. W om














A
5.5.50—In





FOR RENT





f

HOUSES



AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY—A very
soeod Business Stand with or without
fixtures. Suitable for Dry Goods, Sta-
Yonery, Leather or any other similar
type of Business called “Blue H of
in Lutas Street. Apply Immediately.
Thani Bros. Dial 3466, after hours 4158,

5.5.50—t.f.n.

_

BUNGALOW, also Flat, facing sea mai;
coud, Hastings, furnished from May ist
Al) comforts, English baths with heaters
showers, telephones, verandahs. Tele
phone 2949. 31.3.50—t.{.n

BUNGALOW — Attractive and airy
bungalow, “Moorlands”, situated on St.
James Coast, near Appleby. Comfortably
turnished with every convenience. Three
bedrooms and Garage. Beautiful Sea
view from lounge. Suitable for smali
fanily from abroad taking up residence
in the Colony. Apply on premises. De-
livery immediate after 13th May. Diai
3589 5.5.50-—fn.











FLAT: Upstairs flat with 3 bedrooms
running water in each For further
particulars Dial 3696.

28.4.50—t f.n.

FLAT—Fully furnished. Linen and
Cutlery. All modern conveniences. 10
r.inutes from Clubs and City. Dial 4103.

4.5.50—2n

FOR RESIDENCE or OFFICE—Upstairs
premises at the Corner of Middle and
Swan Street. Very cool with all con-
veniences. 2 bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining rooms, kitchen space, Bath and
Toilet etc. Immediate possession. Thani
Bros. Dial 466 or 4158. 5.5.50—t.f.n.

MARKHAM-—-On the Sea Hastings,
3







28.4.50—t.f.n.

WESTMONT — Worthing. 3 Bedroom-
House. From June Ist. Phone 4117
8 to ll a.m., 4 to 6 p.m. 3.5,50—5n

SILVER COT — Beautiful unfurnished
House at Worthing View Gap. 3 bed-
rooms, living room, dining, kitchen, toilet
bath and servants’ quarters. Apply on
premises. 5.5.50—2n.











PUBLIC SALES



UCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

By instruction from DaCosta & Co.,
Ltd: we will sell on TUESDAY the 9th
at their Store Room, Bolton Lane
‘obliquely opposite Louis Bayley) 11

Show Cases. Sale 12.30 o'clock. Terms
Cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers
5.5.50—2n.



By instructions of the Insurance Com-
pany, I will offer for sale on FRIDAY
5th at the time set out below—Courtesy
Garage 2 o'clock Singer Saloon Car
demaged by an accident and one Ford
Truck damaged by fire.

2.45 p.m. H. Jason Jones Servce
Station, Beckwith Place, Morris Saloon
Car damaged by accident. Terms Cash.








3.5.50—3n.
















UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER

By instructions received from Mr. 8S.
Drapot I will sell his house which is
almost new and recently painted on
the spot at Merricks, St, Philip on land

of Miss Millicent Crichlow on Thurs-
day next llth May at 2 o'clock. It is

two roofs, with shed and kitchen a
tached. Same must be sold. Terms
Cash, D’ARCY A. SCOTT, Auctioneer.



REAL ESTATE

FURNITURE—Several Bureaus, small
Tables, China Cabinets, Morris Chairs
Ete. at Bargain Prices in Ralph A.



4.5.50—3n.



“CASVILLE”, Navy Gardens Ch. Ch.
Three bedroom bungalow standing on
8,241 sq. feet land. Can be seen at any
time by appointment. Apply C, A, Peirce.
Phone 3348 or 2749. 28.4.50—7n,



By public competition at our office.




2 p.m. the dwellinghouse of two storey:
comprising public rooms, two bedroom:
kitchen, bath ete. with shop attached,
standing on 2094 sq. ft. of land in
Tweedside Road and Hunts Road, City,
Apply to Mr. E. H. Kirton, the owner
on the premises. Further particulars
and conditions of sale from COTTLE
CATFORD & CO,

“ALCOTT”’—Situate at the Stream
Road, Christ Church, standing on 17,236
Square Feet of land, with right of way
to Worthing Beach.

The house contains gallery, drawing
end dining rocm, three bedrooms,
pantry, kitchen and usual out-offices.
Garage and servants’ rooms in the yard.
Inspection on application to the tenant
ts. Watkins every day (except
Pome between the hours of 3 and

p.m.

The above will be set up for sale at
public competition at our Office in Lucas
gus: on Friday the 5th of May 1950 at

p.m.

















CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors.
28.4.50—Tn

“LEIGHTON” — Situate in Passage
Road, St. Michael, standing on 6,87)
square feet of land.

The house is built of stone and con-
teins gallery, drawing, dining, sitting
end breakfast rooms, Pantry, kitchen,
W.C. and bath downstairs. 4 bed-
rooms (2 with running water) upstairs

Inspection any i (except Sundays)
between 10 a.m. 5 p.m.

The sbove will be set up for sale to
Public Competition at our Office
Lneas Street, Bridgetown on Friday
the Sth May 1950 at 2 p.m.
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors.
23 ,4.50-—12n.

























ne

All THAT certain messeage or store
known as No, 46 Roebuck Street stand-
ing on 2788 sq. ft. of land. The
building has been recently remodelied

and renovated. Inspection on applica
tion to the undersigned.

The property will be set up tor sale
by public competition at our office,
James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday,

12th May 1950, at 2 p.m.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE
Solicitors.

2 Roods 10 perches: two



9278 for further particulars.

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

of Baxters Rd.,

posite Chapman St., St. Michael.
Dated this 4th day of May 1950.
To:—H. A. TALMA Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
Sgd. CONNELL WHITE, Agent,
for Applicant.

a.m.
H. A. TALMA, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist.
5.5.50—In







17 High St., on Thursday 11 May, at

























































29.4 50—12n
——————
“REST HAVEN’'—Rockley New Road










Ss.
Servants’ rooms, garage. Apply Mr
Marshall opposite for inspection. Dial
5.5.50—-2n.




The application of HENRY YOUNG

St. Michael for per-
missiou to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.,
at a 2-storey board and shingle shop
with residence attached at Bexters, op-




N.H.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, Mistrict “A’, on Monday
the Sth day of May 1950 at 11 o'clock,

|
‘|












@ From Page 5

through the bills, if they came io
do so, they would recollect Mr.
Ward's criticism of the inclusion
of certain items, which he sub-
mitted could not have needed
replacement as a result of the
accident.

It was a matter for them to
deeide, the Chief Judge told the
Jury, He believed that most of
them had a working knowledge of
cars, and were better qualified
than he to express an opinion as
to whether all those items should
justifiably have been included on
the bills as a result of that
accident. They would remember
too the point made by Mr. Ward
that the cost of repainting parts of
the car that the accident’s damage
had not caused to need repairing
should not be charged to the de-
fendant, and Mr. Adams’ repiy
that no one would drive about
in a piebald car. They would also
remember Mr, Layne’s evidence
on that point.

Rather. High

Where the estimate of $1.50 al

day earnings of the car was con-
cerned, the Chief Judge told the
jury that that had not been
seriously challenged by other evi-
dence, although it had been criti-
cised, and although it was sugges-
ted to be rather high. That again
was a matter for them to consider,
bearing in mind all that he had
told them.

In connection with that point,
there was the length of time—four
months—that the plaintiff had put
in for. That had also been strongly
criticised by Mr. Ward. Mr. Layne





LOST & FOUND
LOST _

SWEATER—One Beige Sweater be-
tween Land's End and the New Bus
Stand. Finder will be rewarded. Con-
tact “Sweater’’ C/o Advocate Advertis-
ing Dept.
—_—_——







PERSONAL

THE PUBLIC are hereby warned
against giving credit to my wife Mrs.
LEILA PARRIS (nee Grimes) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or







anyone else contracting any debt or,
debts in my name unless by a written)

order signed by me.
Sed. CONRAD PARRIS,





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Sylvan Vaughan of
Bawden, St. Andrew purchaser of Liquor
License No, 605 of 1950 granted in respect
of a boarded and galvanized house with
shop attached, situated at Bawden St
Andrew to remove said License to a
boarded and galvanized shop situate at
Walkers St. Andrew and use it at such
last described premises.

Dated this 2nd day of May, 1950.

To the Police Magistrate, Dist. “F."”
Cc. L, D. H. WALWYN,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consider-
ed at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “F,” on Friday the
12th day of May 1950 at 11 o’clock, a.m,

Signed SYLVAN VAUGHAN,
Ag. Police Magistrate District “F’’.
§.5.50—In

Leaving School Next Term?



HAVE you considered Journalism as a
Career? ‘The Barbados Advocate is look-
ing for a bright young man to train
as a Sub-Editor. Apply now in writing
giving full details to the Editor The

Advocate 34 Broad Street.
30.4.50 t.f.n.







GOVERNMENT NOTICE

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Jury Decides In
Defendant’s Favour

had originally given Mr. Corbin an
estimate of one month for repairs
For various reasons, as they knew,
the job had taken nearly a year,
but Cerbin, the plaintiff had.put
in a claim for four months. In
considering the question of
damages, if they .did consider
them, they would have to decide
whether four months was a
reasonable time, and if $1.50 a day
was a reasonable amount.

Which of the Parties?

Leaving the question of damages,
the Chief Judge said that the only
issue in the case was which of the
parties caused the accident. There
was not, as in some cases, any
question of contributory negli-
gence. The plaintiff was saying
that it was the male defendant
who so drove his car that he ran
into plaintiff's car causing the
driver to lose control so that the
ear was forced into the palm tree.

On the other hand, the defen-
dant’s case was that while he was
overtaking the plaintiff’s car the
driver of the latter suddenly
veered across the road and struck
the defendant's car, thus causing
the mishap.

The Chief Judge then reviewed

the evidence of the occurrence, re-
minding the jury of the submis-
sions and points made by both
counsel. He mentioned the sugges-
tion about the request that there
should be no police intervention in
the matter, and referred to the
= of Defence Counsel on
that.

Police
But police intervention, he said,
would be nothing to do with the


















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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
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IN PORT: M.V: Moneka, Sch. DOrtac
Yacht Tern MI, Sch, Frances W. Smith.
Sch Adalina, Sch Everdene, Seb.
Emanuel Gordon, Sch. Emeline, Sch
Lady Noeleen, Sch. Molly N Jones.
Sch. Lady Zolieen, Sch. Freedom Fleary,
Sch. Eastern Eel, Sch. Mermaid C., Sch

Emeralda, Sch. Wonderful Counsellor,

8.S. Aicoa Puritan, Sch. Gardenia W..
M.V. Lady Joy, Sch. Mandalay It

ARRIVALS
Schooner Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tons
net, Capt. Every, from British Guiana
M.V. Caracas, 235 tons net, Capt
Vincent, from Trinidad

|
$.S. Rivercrest, 4,907 tons net, Capt



5 from Dominica

M.V Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt
Gumbs, from Dominica
wPARTURES

S.$. Sunjewel, 4,304 tons net, Capt
Clarke; for Trinidad

$.S. cmterpreter, 4,026 tons net’ Capt.



Coates, for La Guaira.

Advocate vs. National at the Bay
Referee Mr. O. Graham

Westerners vs. Harkliffe at St. Leon-|
ard’s

Referee Mr. E. Reece
St. Mary's vs. Wavell Sports Club at
Shell

In Touch With Barbados’ Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.I.) Ltd advise
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through their Bar-
bados Coast Station:-

S.S. Misr, Poseidon, President Meny,
World Trotter, Calliroy, Alsudan, M.T
Nueva Andalueia, M.T. Vikingen, Mateo,
Atlantic Ranger, Mormaclark, Lundys
Lane, Quemado Lake, South Mountaint
Gulf Pride, Sunjewel, Loide Columbia
Sabaneta, Yamanota, Askepot, Cochrane

ARRIVALS—By B.W.1.A.L

From St. Lucia:

Sheila Arthur, Guthbert Arthur, John
O'Keeffe, Thomas Huli, Margurite Barn-
ard, Laurie Barnard, Camille Dyer
Leonard Dyer, Trevor Dyer :

From Trinidad:

e-e——————————

matter they were considering
a ee , -
Police intervention would be moce
in the nature of a prosecution fo:
dangerous driving or something of
that kind, although a conviction
for dangerous driving would prob-
ably be a sure foundation for a
civil action for damages.

However, the police were told not to
intervene, because, as might well be ex
pected, the parties were friendly then,
and were indeed still friendly up to the
time, and after the action was started

We hope", said the Chief Jude.
the parties will remain as friendly as
they were, wWhatover the outcome of this
litigation may be,”

In conclusion he briefly repeated what
he said about the evidence, about the
points made by counsel and about the
nature of the negligence appropriate to
that case, He reminded them that there
was no claim for general damages as in
other cases. If they rame to the question
of damage therefore, they would only

Ave to consider the matter of special
lamages—that was damages to the car,
its resultant repairs and the loss of earn-
‘nes for the four months for which claim
had been made.



The Jury then retired for the already
mentioned period and returned to Court

with the already mentioned verdict.



REAL ESTATE
JOHN M. BLADON

(A.F.S., F.V.A.)
Formerly

DIXON & BLADON

Fer Sale:

“LEETON-ON-SEA"—Near Ols-
tins. An attractive sea-side bun
galow built pight on to a sandy
beach with excellent bathing
facilities, There is a wide front
verandah extending the entire
frontage, 4 bedrooms 3 with wash
besins, large L shaped lounge with
cocktail bar, kiléhen, garage and
servants’ quarters, Enquiries in
vited.

“WINDY RIDGE", St. James
This very attractively § situated
medern stone bungalow has 3


































large bedrooms all with basins,
verandah, 2 lounges, dining room,
bath, 2 toilets, There are 2 acres
one under cane and the rematnder
is very well laid out with lawns,

fruit trees, flowering shrubs ete
The view can never be spoiled and
prevailing breezes are unobstruct-
ed. 5 miles from town centre
“LITTLE BATALLYS,” St. Peter

_ Charming small country house
Standing in approximately 1 acre
This property was re-designed by
its architect owner and contains 3

reception, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and
toilets, kitchen, laundry, detached
servants’ quarters and «arage
Very attractive arched verandah
on two sides and fernery Right
of way to sea

BLUE VISTA, Rockley (near
Golf Club) One of the better type
modern homes in a select locality,
well planned and constructed by a
firrn of repute, Large Jounge, din-
ing room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms
twith basing and fitted wardrobes),
tiled bathroom, double garage,
servants’ quarters, terraced rock
garden, lawns, flowering shrubs
and plants. Owing to unforseen
circumstances this desirable pro-
perty is offered well below cost
for early sale.

Phone 4640
Plantations Building









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FURNITURE & HOUSEHGLD
EFFECTS

-RICES”

NEAR THE CRANE





TURSDAY 9TH., AT It A.M












We are instructed by Mrs. C. M
Winter to sell by auction the fol-
lowing valuable furniture and
effects:

Antique Mahogany Cellarette,
Mahogany Tip-top Tables, Mahog-
any dining table, oval Walnut
table, Mahogany serving table,
Mahogany. china cabinet, Deal
tables (all sizes), Dairy utensils,
2 Cream Sep ors, Mahogany
dinner wagon, Cedar Presses,
Painted Betlroom furniture, Spring
filled and Fibre Mattresse ‘Towel
Racks, Mirrors, Cabinet Gramo-~-
phone, Hanging Scales, Document
Cabinet, Cushions, Tennis Net,
Royal Typewriter) Spruce Reclin-
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Toy Mill, Mahogany and Ebony
Occasional Tables, Slate topped
Table, Aluminium topped Table,
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nay and Bentwood Rockers, Cedu
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double and single Bedsteads,
all kinds of miscellancous
Bedroon® Furniture, Medicine Cab-



























































inet, Shaving Cabinet, Magozine
Rack, Indian Hammock, Folding
Cota, Westminster Chiming Clock
Microscope, Folding Chairs, Rugs
und many other Interesting items

Viewing morning of and day to

Sale
CASH ON FALL OF HAMMER
AUCTIONEERS

John M. Bladon

(A.F.8., F.V-A.)
Formerly DIXON & BLADON
Phone 4640, Plantations Building











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SHIP

PAGE SEVEN









St

The
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for

5th inst





Cana

SOUTHBOUND

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LADY RODNEY .. 12th
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will accept Cargo and Passengers



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N.B.—Subiect to jm wi

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SS. GOLFITO

On inquiring at the office of
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day for Southampton. The pas-
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~ PAGE EIGHT

Rovers Beat
College 5-0

IN FIRST DIVISION

} Piekwick-Rovers, in spiic
many missed opportunities, deait

@ 5S—0 defeat to Harrison

in their First Divisic.

a0 i fixture at Kensington
yesterday evening.

Pickwick-Revers who ught

in for the first time Denis Atkinson

and Denis Worme, scored three
Ot their goals during ‘he first
halt, }

Denis Atkinson at outside left
opened the scoring after play was
in progress for about 12 minutes,
w Wilkes at centre forward
scored the remainder.

Pickwick-Rovers defended the
geal from the pavilion end and
were first on the offensive. Wilkes
theiy centre forward, sent in a
hard grounder which Smith saved
but did not gather. Wilkes who
Was still on the run eventually
kicked over in attempting to score.

The College boys in a good
movement then) carried the bal)
well down the field and Reid on
the left wing after receiving from
Smith, sent & a good effort which
struck the upright. They later

oe another raid on the Pick-
k-Rovers’ goal but without
result.

Open Goal

The College soon found them-
selves one down when Smith their’
goalie came out to clear and fum-
bled, to give Denis Atkinson an
opportunity to score into an open

Fighting for the equalizer the
College front line made another
good movement, but Worme kick-
ed away from Smith as he was
about to take a shot.

Pickwick-Rovers took over. and
kept the ball in their opponents’
area for some time; but their for-
wards did every thing except
shoot.

Pickwick-Rovers kept on press—
ing, and were rewarded when full
sback Ford missed and Wilkes, who
g£0t possession, beat Smith with
a well placed shot.

No sooner was the ball centred
than) it was back in the College
area, and Pickwick-Rovers regis-
tered their third when Wilkes
again scored into an open goal
after receiving from Atkinson,

The interval was taken imme-
Giately afterwards with the score
3—0 in favour of Pickwick-Rovers

Second Half

On resumption, the College were
the first to attack, and Smith on
the left wing sent in a good effort
which full back Proverbs cleared
The College made another raid
and this time Williams sent in
a hard grounder which Hill saved:

Pickwick-Rovers, who were now

* trying to increase their lead,
swept down the field and Wells
centred accurately from the right
wing, but Atkinson headed out.

Later Wells again got possession
and sent in a hard one which
Smith deflected over the par, but
nothing resulted from the corngr.

The College boys on the other
hand were still trying to open their
score, and Smith after receiving
a good pass from one of his halves,
sent in a hard one which Hill
gathered and cleared. .

Pickwick-Rovers made a num-
ber of ruids on the College goal,
and kept their defence very busy
at this stage. On one occasion
Smith saved what looked a
certainty when Wells cut in from
the wing, and sent in a hard
grounder.

Good Show

The College boys, although three
down, were still putting up a good
show. They concentrated chiefly
on their left winger Smith who
sent in many a good effort but
without-result,

Pickwick-Rovers’ front men led
by Wilkes, were still looking for
goals and during one of their raids,
Atkinson struck the cross bar, but
the ball rebounded into play.

It was not long after this that
Wilkes sent in the fourth for his
team with a well placed shot frorm
outside the area,

Pickwick-Rovers again got
ession, and Croney hit the up-
right with a powerful shot, but
from the rebound he _ kicked
straight to Smith who had no
difficulty in saving.

From another raid by Pickwick-
Rovers, Wilkes beat Sniith with a
well placed grounder to make the
score , and the game ended
shortly afterwards.

The reteree was Mr. Paul
Wilkins while the linesmen, were
t:. ‘G. E. Amory and Mr. L, F.

arris. :

The teams were as follow:—
Pickwick - Rovers: Hill, R.
Atkinson, Proverbs, Worme,
‘ster; Hunte, Wells, Davies,
ilkes, Croney, D. Atkinson,
Harrison College: C. W. Smith,
orrison, Ford, Morris, St. John,
gimmonds Medford, Williams,
dor, V. O. Smith, Reid.
———o“€

heyll Do It Every

\

——








i ox

os
ene ik



SURE ENOUGH,

THIS DOWN”

Aba baven

The
Peschiera

a Lat claps
“Ferrari” car of

-during the Mille Mig

et

@ From Page 1

The match was played in dull
cold weather. After the match the
West Indies cricketers were enter-
tained at a _ reception by the
Gymktiana Club in the pavilion,

Late
The driver of the coach bring-
ing the West Indies cricket team



Marzotto



“ee iaeig dykes WE Bild
» (brother of the winner)
lia 1,000 miles road race

and lik ew

W.1—Indian Cricket

for the Cricket Club Conference
Eleven against ihe West Indies
last week. He made 39 not out
in 107 minutesswith five fours.
Scores:

W.1, ist Innings
Stolimeyer |.b.w. Bb. Mankad

A. Rae c Amery b Umrigar 47
K. Trestrail ¢ Amery b Mankad 49
F. Worrell ¢ O, Singh b Constante 36
Cc. Waleott ¢ & b. Mankatl 16

Christiant stpd; Amery b Manikad »

here for the match lost his way,|G. Gomez not out

and the party was late in arriving C Beene LLb.w. b Constantine 6

When they reached the ground, Getrag bat Lbs 13

however, they found that a start

could not be made because of the Total (for 7 whkts. dpe.) 7

soft state of the pitch following] ran of wkts. 1—0, 2—102, 3—105, 4—163,

early rain. Play was held up for 163, 6—163, 7—169.

an hour from the scheduled start- BOWLING QAbyas

ing time while the pitch was dry-| constantine % ¥ Le ‘

ing out Mankad 94 4 49 4
7 Cooper 6 Oo 24 0
The Teams 0, Singh 6 Be 0

Umrigar 7 0 27 1

West Indies: J. Stollmeyer
(Capt.); RK. Christiani, G. Gomez
L. Pierre, A. Rac, 5S. Ramadhin,
i. Trestrail, A. Valentine C. Wal-
cott, C, Williams, F. Werrell.

Indian Gymkhana:
R. Cooper, V. Mankad, P. timriger,

Cc. Masiers,



Gymkhana Ist Innings’
Singh b Pierre
Amery |.b.w. b Gomez
. Cooper not ott
. Mankad ¢ Valentine b Williams
fe eae stpd, Walcott b Rama-

BB-0

. Masters ¢& b Ramadhin
Constantine b Ramadhin

6
0
I... Constantine, V. Ali, ©. Singh,, E Tipthorp ¢ & b Ramadhin 2
* *) i , ap TM. AWD Rar
R. Khan, S. Singh, W. Amery, T.} R, fan sor aeet t
ripthorp Extras: b4 4
Jeff Stollmeyer, captaining the to
West Indies, won the toss and| Tt! (for @ wkts) ae
decided to Latona soft pitch.The, Fail of wis. 1--1, 2—7, 3-38, 4—63,
hii ' ith ane (5-55, 6—55, 7-61, 8-61
tourists gol off to a bad start for BOWLING ANALYSIS
Stollmeyer was leg before to Maa- oO. M R w.
kad before a run had been scored. Fieme 8 3 16 1
Ken Trestrail joined Alan Rae Willems A 7 Po ‘
and the pair recovered in good} Ramadhin 12 7 9 5
style, Rac specially, showing —Reuter.

excellent form, using the drive
forcibly. He made one vicious pull
off Mankad which sent the ball oa
to the top of some trees, and the
game was held up a few minutes
while the piayers searched for it
in another field. Rae and ‘Trestratl
added 50° in 42 minutes,

Good Stand

Rae and Trestrail then took part
in a century stand for the second
wicket and reached 102 in #0
minutes before they were parted.
With the score at 163 the tourists
lost three wickets without addition
to the score. This was chiefly due
to Mankud who is considered by
Jack Kidney manager of the West
Indies as among the world’s best
left arm slow bowlers, With his
slow spinners on a drying pitch he
took the wickets of Walcott and
Christiani with successive balis
and very néarly completed a hat
trick with the next delivery which
beat Gomez but went over the
wicket. Mankad brought off a
magnificent running catch off dis
own bowling to dismiss Walcott
and then hed Christiani stumped
Worrell, who batted 45 minutes
and hit five fours in his 36 mis-
timed a big hit off Constantine's
first ball of the next over and.was
smartly caught at midoff,

Mankad came out with 4 for 49
having earlier claimed the wickets
of Stollmeyer and Trestrail. The
iatter having batted 103 minutes
for 49 which included three fours,
Another Indian test player, Umri-!
gar, claimed Rae after he had hit
47 ineluding one six and fovr
fours in 85 minutes.

|

Gymkana Batting

THE West Indies declared just
before tea. The Indian Gym-
khana had about 2 hours in which
to get the required runs, if they
were to win, and tea was taken
before they began their bid,

The Gymkhana team always
found runs hard to get against the
accurate. West Indies bowling
dominated by Ramadhin. Spin-
ning the ball both ways he always;
had batsmen in trouble. Mankad
played a bright innings of 21
whjch included a six and three}
fours in 33 minutes, but the best
Gymkhana, batsman was the Vice-
Captain, R. Cooper who played



“Time
Sr
Y

~




GRASS ON THAT
CUEBALL:-- (_ BUSY STREET:
WELL, WHAT

‘YA KNOW:::




TO WRITE



seat + re Oe By Jimmy Hatlo |
Tae GOOD OL’ CUEBALL. Y AND EGGHBAD IS SO |
HE NEVER GIVES UP } ANXIOUS TO BELIEVE
TRYING TO GROW ¢

THE ONLY
WAY THEY'LL
GET HAIR ON

Tranquility
Coming May 10

(Barbados Advyucate Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 4.

The Tranquility Tennis Club is
making big plans to send a pow-
erful contingent to meet Savan-
nah Club, The team is due to ar-
rive in Barbados May 10. Two of
the colony's best mens’ doubles
combination Nothnagel and Cuth-

bert Thavenot will oppose’ the
current champions Jin Ho and
Hunter Archer in a_ floodlight

match to-morrow night, (Friday)
proceeds going to aid in sending
ing the team across. Tranquility
selected Harold Nothnagel to lead
the side, with Arneaud De Ver-
teuil vice-Captain.

—(Reuter,)

Gondoliers Win

VENICE, May 4.

The three day strike of Venice's
Gondoliers ended today with com-
plete victory for the graceful old
Gondolas over the motorboats.
Motor vessels have been banned
by the City Council from the inner
waterways of Venice and from the
Grand Canal. Gondoliers untied
their mooring ropes and once
again offered their boats for hire.

The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 5.42 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.12 p.m|
Moon (Last Quarter) May 8
Lighting: 7.00 p m
High Water: 5.45 a.m., 7.09
p.m



YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington)
ins.

Total for month to yester-
day: .60 ins.

Temperature (Max,) 85.0° F

Temperature (Min.) 71.5° F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
(3 p.m, E, by N,

Wind Velocity 15 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,962
(3 p.m.) 29.889.

37

.















HIM,HE REALLY THINKS
HE SEES PEACH FUZZ
ON CUEY'S DOME:+:

I TOLD ’EM
TO RUB A LITTLE
LIMBURGER ON:AN’
I KNOW “THEY

Y








LuisteninG To THE
SKINDOME BOYS
KIDDING THEMSELVES:

THANX “TO
AVARTIN Q, DIETZ,
VASHINGTON , 0.C.



seen
r C through Italy.
mechanic were safe—in spite of the car having broken in two.—Ewxpress.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

)

ne A ‘
Toad trace through ftaly.
after it had crashed near
Both driver and



Gordon Richards
Wins 4,000 Races
ALL-TIME RECORD

SANDOWN, Surrey, May 4.

The British champion jockey,
Gordon Richards, who is 46 to-
morrow, rode his four thousandth
winner today, an all-time record.

The Biggest money, spinner jn
British horse-racing history, Rich-
ards in 30 years on the turf has
earned an estimated £1,800,000 in
prize money for racehorse owners
and collected at least £200,000 in
prizes for himself, but Richards
has never yet won Britain’s great-
est race—the Derby.—Reuter.

?



.
B.B.C. Radio Programme
FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950

7 a.m, The News, 7.10 a.m. News Analy-
sis. 7.15 a.m. Think on these things. 7.30
am, From the third Programme, 7.50
am. Interlude. 8 a.m. From the Editori-
ais. 8.10 a.m, Programme Parade, 8.15 a.m.
London Light Orchestra. 9 a.m. Close
Down. 12 Noon The pm,
hews Analysis. 12.15 p.m, New ,
1 p.m. The Debate Continues. 1.15°p.m.
Radio Newsreel. 1.30 p.m. Symphony of
Strings. 2 p.m. The News. 2.10 p.m. Home
News from Britain. 2.15 p.m. Sports Re-
tTew, 2.30 p.m. Musie in Miniature. 3 p.m.
The end of the Road. 330 p.m, BBC
Northern Orchestra, 4 p.m. The News
4.10 p.m. The Daily Service. 4.15 p.m
Nights at the Opera. 5 p.m, Listeners
Choice. 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade, 5.30
p.m. From the @hird Programme, 5.50
p.m, Interlude. 6 p.m. New Records. 6.43
p.m, Dance Music. 7 p.m. The News, 7.10
p.m. News Analysis. 7.15 p.m, West In-
dian Diary, 7.45 p.m. The Piano for
Pleasure. 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel. 8 15
p.m. The Debate Continues. 8.30 p.m. The
Country House. 9 p.m. British Concert
Hall. 10 p.m. The News. 10.10 p.m, From
the Editorials 10.15 p.m. Sandy Mac-
Pherson at the Theatre Organ, 10.30 p.m,
lusic Magazine. 10.45 p.m. Worid Affairs
p.m. The News,

==

News, 12.10

— —. ——.





|

\



WOOLLENS :—
DOESKINS :—

Can Be Seen At

Se aoe

| sufferin

WHICH CAN BE MADE
SUITS FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN

C. B. RICE & Co.

OF
BOLTON LANE

Roy Marshall 'Frontenae Trophy | =

Rejoins Team

LONDON, May 4.

Roy Marshall, the young Wesi
Indies all-rounder, who has been
from meusic wa
ing hospital in Eastbourne today
to rejoin the team.

Marshall was taken to hospital)
with measles in Eastbourne last
Wednesday, after he had played
in the two days’ practice match
against Colone} L. C. Stevens Xl
The West Indies party leave
London tomorrow, and the tearn t
meet Worcestershire will be
selected on the train.

Mr. Kidney said that the select-
ors had been watching the players’

lwuv-

form intently, and that a final de- %

ision on the team woul’ be made
Curing a discussion on the journey

Although the county ground at! ¢ pe held in the School



Shoot on Saturday

THE qualifying shoot for the
Frontenac Trophy which is 10
rounds at 300 and 500 yards, is

seheduled to take place at the
Government Rifle Range on
Saturday, May 6.

The 16 highest scorers will be
cligible to compete in the final
stage which will be shot for on |
Saturday, 13th May. The condi-

tions of this stage are 15 rounds |

at 500 and 600 yards.
These conditions are among

and are comparable with the
King’s final stage. [t is expected
ihat there will be some keen com-
petition.



3OBA MEET TONIGHT

ALL Old Combermerians are
reminded of the monthly ane

Jen ,, to-
Vorcester, where the iatch will pight, Friday, May 5, at 8 o’clock.

be played, was below six feet of
water six weeks ago, today it is
considered to be in splendid con-
dition. The ground had been
flooded by the overflowing of the
River Severn.

Soccer XI

In a letter to Colonel L. C.
Stevens, Chairman of the East-
bourne Football and Cricket

Teams, Mr. J. Kidney, manager of
the West Indies touring side, has
intimated the possibility of the

West Indies turning out a Becese| }

XI at the end of their cricket pro-
gramme.

He wrote: ‘When we have won
the rubber we hope to come down
to Eastbourne again, and beat
your team at soccer.”

During their 10 days’ stay at
Eastbourne, the West Indies watch-
ed the Eastbourne Football Club
play a Corinthian League match.

—Reuter.



Exercise Tracks
Being Built
AT GARRISON

TWO exercising tracks which
are being built on the Garrison
will be completed in about two
weeks, Mr. Lewis, Secretary of
the Barbados Turf Club told the
Advocate yesterday. One track
will be ised duripg the dry
weather, the other ring wet
weather.

After the August flood last year,
Mr. Perkins’ “Fly On" got one of
its feet broken when it sank into
the soft track. Horses also had
to exercise on the beach. This
firm wet-weather exercising track
is being hurried on to offset any
such recurrences.

S

Finest Quality British

WORSTEDS :—
TWEEDS :—
SERGES :—
LINENS. -

DRILLS :—
INTO TAILORED

ppearance

is a Suit Tailored
by us.

Only the Finest
Quality Suitings
stocked . . only
the Best Workmanship
guaranteed

e

LET US FIT YOU
TODAY

P. C. S. MAFFEI
& C0, LTD.

“Pop Scorers in
Tailoring”

‘

Through the courtesy of
British Council Re

‘he following films will be shown:

|



1. British News. ;
2. Letter from Britain.
3. House of Windsor.
4. Mercy Flight.

There will be the usual games
after the Film Show.

sa cant aia ceamala nena ie
| TO-DAY.

FUN! MUSIC!
LAUGHTER!



— BY —
JEFFREYS
RADIO
STARS

Who like JEFFREY’S
BEER will thrill you to
the very~ heart.

THE BOYS’ FOUNDA-
TION SCHOOL
2.30 p.m.

(For School Children
Only)
HARBOUR BAR AND
RESTAURANT
at 5 p.m.



the |
most difficult in the West Indies | |

‘esentative +







(Take advantage of these big savings by
planning your overseas trip now. Not only
are TCA rates specially low—but
accommodation in European centres during
these same seasons is less crowded—and

hotel rates, too, are lower.

You save time when you fly TCA to Europe
in restful comfort aboard giant 4-engined
“North Star’ Skyliners—have more time
there to visit, sightsee or do business,



Ask for full information

from your T C A, Agents

' GARDINER AUSTIN « co

TRANS - CANA
INTERNATIONAL y
TRANSCONTINENTAL








1c

{
{
‘)
{
)



{

)



. -LrD



FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1950



Does your Roof need
Painting ?

Then BOWRANI?,

‘



BOWRANITE
ANTI-CORROSIVE =PAINi

Goes Farthest Lasts Longest
One Gallon will cover 700---1,000 sq. {ect
Stocked in RED, GREY, BLACK and SUPER BLACK
(Ileat Resisting) in drums and tins of Imperial Measure

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., [1D.

PHONE 4456





sents.

feather-

' PANTIES—(sizes S.W., W., W.X.

and O.S.) Prices from .... 67e. to $1.41

PYJAMAS—in Pink only—size W. ........ ... $3.42
SLIPS—sizes W., W.X., and OS. ...... $1.63 & $1.79
VESTS in Pink’only—size W. ...............-.. 96e.







CAVE SHEPHERD & (o,, Lm

10, 11, 12 & 1? BROAD STREET



—————_—_—_—

You save more money when you fly TCA
during the “Low Fare”’ seasons, All tickets
under the new plan are good for a 12-month
period, effective immediately.

Especially attractive for Holy Year Travel
to Rome. Stop-overs, if desired, at other
Centinental points at no additional fare.
Daily flights to London, Glasgow or
Shannon with convenient onward
connections to Continental Europe.

YOUR CHOICE
OF THREE TRAVEL PLANS

(Savings based on regular one-way
fares each way; Montreal-)undon.)

1. Travel both ways during “Low
Fare’’ Season SAVE {'247.00

2. Travel one way “Low Fare” and
one-way Regular Fare
SAVE $160.80
3. Regular Round-Trip Fare
SAVE $74.70

Plan your overseas travel early.











SAVE on
Air Travel








PAGE 1

PACE SIX MPrJOy BARBADOS ADVOCATE 1-KIDAV MAV 5. 19M \GJ La o \> -II%  | %  p -^^ ^D> 2, — BV TAPI ANDERSON Ml MICKEY MOUb L BY WALT Dlb,. 1 P Gums Bleed! ... i, HA L C f g fl ll**rt Ttoiilil* ii' %  li-l> Bum Mra-dlna tl flrl day. .•") wn moult. • f.4 qijcklv llghlrlll tlw IMIli Iroa HaO monoy MM on Muni wT •mpn M'h for fro'r*"—Trotae*. M*vfk l-h D>aV<. Ml a) I ..'.>./ ItralMH f.'/-./ I* — ,,i M... USMBH V. Ian. ft IM| fcj ( %  I'h.ladriptiu, A**"! W.-irf' irtih ft > %  .'> •*** t.<,.f-/h.l.Jiu •.-. "/ JMICII. If MMi_/W i u -uld*l i* '" f*"W'i O-owtj t'**t*il'unJ Wi am aOMf ik* 4,t r mur utiAwi m, l'„nJ i i %  | IJOtamit tkai ft^l • IwamirW •*>.•>.> J&IM. MI ,I /W.*\ 7-W.>>. ^^.uw-i fo _c. aW .( (MI -, "W u /,*,*,n* • I /l i M much tofirr. tmooibn. drwtr. iu/| iW /r—k*>." Blonde or Brunette TlfKV PA0TEC1 IHI.IR LOVBLUOtn WITH till SAME BEAUTY GARB sun 11 HruntMr Mr.. Uwrrn.r Kail--, who li>r in I S.A.. nd U-ly I hull-*, wett* re London hoaiaaa, bvra ••nMhiiiK in ••>!.> n ih. > iielh. %  .IIIII %  kmh-jir! Thilft\ rani* IWI'.. and n iill%  avoorltc • >f aorirty** Iturlir-.t HOIIWII in \nii-nn. r.nnl.md. udFn Why mil give your cuniplcxion thr Unrhl of ihc I %  .iiii. tin.*.v miiiHH*: ntaftnli > %  *>, %  night. Hew iha 1U1 ibonta|Uy ith PoirfaCoM (Jrt-ain, -irli:"il aanfit) over lire and ihroat with Vuur rinifi-. "Kin-*** kith mm Cold Cream for Mini %  (( % %  n.jnif, rxira Mifteninic. ID ili' mooting. bafuie yuu make-up, %  irioolli a lllllr |>..n,| ddbjdufolj iiMii-^i.-.-. i raw baa bi i n* Il boUi pot I ratal M fOBJ -Lin. loo. %  m into V..HI -kin ThU %  r. ideal puMdctr d. r limit rot hour*. Il ihl id'itwot r-am(..niakr y.mr iiooftw, lii J rer) MOTI while v !%  tlmlUd -.Hi iu oaw lailianre. Al all brauly cuuntns. TODAY... QUAKER OATS greater Nourishment Value tt0tf&*tosr w

-fwl . Mor. Fla.or and In|oymnt. T„( You're ready for inything ieli iht ttubvranl health thaiQuakcr Oai. helpi yog to enjoy! Children ihriw on this delicioui and healthful food— BO rich in (he key element! needed for slrenedt and energy —for uller growth and solid musclea und hone. Grown-uptwhoealQuaker Oat. regularly know ithelpsthem to greater endurance and vitality, loo. For ALL the bally, there's no BIGGER NOURISHMENT VALUE than Quaket Oats. But it todav! I.I.MII.HM Vlll'l IS BktMl Ml. by 7'/ 2 11. and lOVj fl. bv 911. Alia I.l.\OI I I ,| Iff KOI IS 6ft. wide All very rcamoaablc in Price. i.ii!iii:n;ih,i. 10 & 11 Roebuck Sirwt. EM tlWIBjaal 1026 Pond's IN BLACK and BROUN (All Sires) You can't tn-.il these for Comfort. From M.13 Up. Visit . THANI BROS. Pr. tVm, Henry Street and 6, 42 ft M swan strrrli DIAL I4M A dazzling smile A Pepsodent smile! V Such brilliant white leelh.7*? 1-iuin I — Thai't what Pcpwdcm containi 10 mike your lecth so nun-li whiter, oo much brighter. Irium, the nwwt eflective brand of tooth cleansing agent known to dentul science, is exclusive to Pepiodcnt. It removes harmful film and unattractive itaint — gives your teeth an extra .v.jtencvt you can itv ( Ap^M Look — / iJUX all day long '!' %  DdvAtl MMCJ %  i.-l.Tfiilly Iff t"Ket. Jil*l %  B % %  . it. .„, .. | I 1 I %  % %  TIIIMI — oil day •ill IK111. iOjl v ,: : %  m •' rnun. Ilttui -.ilken U-xturo : HI >>.u %  uiiiU -. % %  %  %  iivt> fm :...!.. %  i ; (i-t %  MM IWaan r,>v.acr nii •,..n RJ man l>vo. • *': islinscrc Rouqnel TALCUM POWOER LOVELY .SI*VMS i Orchid. Blue. Old Gold. %  Rose, and White CMLAMSM CBLAHUH Gold. Torqiiois* & Blue $1.01 per vd. GEORGETTE in White. Pink, Gold. Poach anu Gram .......... %  si.20 per yd. OTTON PRINTS, riTJIETTES, CAMBRICS, v.< on



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. MAY 5. ISSO BARBADOS ADVOCATE rAGK Trade Unionism Is Something New Commissioner Tells Workers STAMPS MOM IhM eleven thousand dollar* of the new stamp, luur %  witp sold in two days Mi H N i:. Colonial Postmaster to! I :he "Advocate" /Sflaldaj that $11,848 i %  n i fused Schooner Sunk L20 Miles FromB.G, CAPTAIN William Fn Id st viBMBtlan. Skipper of the f.ad^ Joy wit is received for the *ea at 19 lie started his car.. tamps on Monday sailor of the sch< | -~\d has now risen to be i TRADE UNIONS are today looking after not only the Monday's salai brought S9.i74.oo ">* Motor Vessel Lady Joy. wurk.ng impj^nt. of itapeopte. but they are tryng £ ST^JSS IfcSSSi -.'^^SUSeS"" K..' to improve the lives of the people outside their working also ha -,,, n Bal,-.. Ladv I'lolrr. ;>IIM. hours as Well as the lives Ot the families of these people, da) H Ital MM SI.IOO in stamp" Ettrranila. Marion Bellr Wflfe the Labour Commissioner said to his audience at the head' h V luw *•"•• wh ch rc "' f ?? ^"Vi"' 2 MMl r u. "!' quarters of the Caribbean Workers' Union last night. H^SSTS 'a !" maT' !" !" hi Muehid'X-1taW&.rt range from I cent to $2 40 and • llrt '-eeward Islands. tht only connecting link N-twcen ' nav nad %  vcrv exciting issue and the old one "**> he lolrt ,h Advoenle will be found m the 12 40 stamp workers. It is absolutely no good Heavy Rainfall Yesterday I trade union to try to do anything unless it has first organised its members. A trade union has to have substantial membership to give It strength' without such A VERY COOL day was exstreo.th it cannot act perienced in the City yeslerThat was one of the rules, and day. During the morning light another was that the election of showers fell but by midday the officers to the committees should skies had cleared up, and the sun of %  btolutely free. That was one reached its usual brightness. The 3* * cardinal provisions temperature, however, was only He was giving a talk on the subject 'Trade Unions and Their Proper Functions." He said: "The first object of a he Seal of the colony The set of stamps which has In spite of ace dents, hurricanes. heavy seas and drifts he -till loves the sea. Once the Lady Violet, sank Fahrenheit in the shade tn the Rules. This was usually done by secret ballot so that the organisam\ -.__ ,lo l would be resting Heavy showers feU on_Wcdnescrallc foundalion i a demo day night, and early Thursday morning. Seven inches and 30 liarts of rain fell over the island. O, .hi, St. Per and St. Andrew SS^ST^S recorded one inch. 39 parts each, while St. Lucy and St. John each had 80 parts. It was one ot the heaviest rainfalls for the ye;ir. The returns wereCity 25 part-. Station Hill District 57 parts. St. George 60 parts, St Philip 38 part*. St. Thomas 56 parts. St. Peter 1.39 an withdrawn i* subsianhlm %  "*• K nt others about 12<' tiallv the same as the one issued Imlr •>"* British Guiana but tlv MI n..'. t., On that tr p the Lady V'u.let wa Mr. J. C. Kell.nan. Set-retarv u,km * %  f,a "" Georgetown b of the Barbados Philatelic SociTrinidad. The ve**el suddcnl' ety. told the "Advocate'' that he *Prung a leak The crew got o. was favourably impressed w.th lnl ,hp "nail boat and began V the new issue of stamps , it was low tne "ch"oner They ennum a change from the long list of **** seven days of calm in tin definitive stamps showing the ^ oc s Luckily they had manage, seal of the col-xi> "It has been asserted by people who have been members of tho Communist Party that the a have been falsified. 'You want to be suro of your free elections for purposes like that so that you elect the people you want to run your UMOU Policy "The Annual General Conferparts, St. James 48 parts. St. Lucy ence of an/ unlon U8mi |... data 89 parts. St. Andrew 139 parts and mine the general policy that is St. John 89 parts. followed by the union. Th England," "Macbeth' and Uie Film have "to look'Mter'the* affairs Koundaboul' "Gardens Union elects the Committee .1 p ver thought that the paper Management. This Is called by ,or printing tl different names but the members Por quality. Jury Decides In Defendant's Favour Surprising Verdict, Says Chief Justice NINE out o( the 12 member* of the Common Pleas Jury which tried the action In which Clarence Fits-Herbert Corbin sought to recover damages from Joseph N. Hurdle tot damage to a car a< ;i result <>f a collision, yesterday fount .i \erdict in favour of Hurdle. Judgment nu %  for Hurdle with costs, by His Honour the Chief Judge St] Allan C.illymore. "I must confess that it is a most surprising verdict", tin Chief Judge commented. "However, that is your v.'idut ill In the accident which occurred pl*>ntiff to establish his case to on Pine Road on Jul* 9 194*. your satisfaction. But in this kind tli Corbin'*, ear which *u then ' case, unlike a criminal case. you driven by his chauffeur. Culhberl ar entitled not only to have leMdufhn, was forced acsinat a Kard to the facts proved in e\ i palm tree growing by the aisle ol Jcn <"*. bu '< exercising your eomIhf road, and wa* so damaged mon %  *"**. ' have regai.1 in tn that It could not be moved under ''*"! "t tbat evidence to the pioiu (NB newer. bablllties ot the case, and to come Corbin In paragraph 3 of his lo conclusion as to what you Statement of Claim alleged that reasonably believed to have hapIt W*A due to negligent driving on the part of Hurdle, who u overtaking Corbin's car. -tnd who. so Corbin alleged, had collided 1 his car In out. Other Side Onjhe other hand. Hurdle that SKIN TROUBLE NOT A BLEMISH TO BE SEEN! pencd." The Chief Judge next dealt with the question of damages If the> found that the defendant Wuf he'ael V i Wmc h'lm [SJ* ,l '^'" t WOUW MOigsatl) draVt his car on ihe occasion that he ( %  am nUIWd the drimage lo the othei Bocai to transfer sufficient fo;l water into the imi 1 boat On the vaa luick tc Bntbli J Guiana, the boat sprang a leak again and sunk. The crew again Mw Defence claimed got off into the small boat and accidtmi had been cau.w.t hv nii .."" !" Z 2 !" *S""^y; "'."_^"' drifting for two davs before S; drlinj , Vho . i Adam h d J u d ; if lo %  ** %  reache.1 Br.t.sh Guiana KuMhS whom h*. ^TleJed h.?i ^m^n. hi ,,i ^ oki ^U ^ were never wtthout food and vl^n^ JTlm^i ^ XtTSSSSttSSZ ...Hided with Hurdles ctf. thereby klux K H l down I pofttOB of .(. m causing the mishap ,, ,„ a ^ncra) £„„. llie |whllB The majority of the Jury said was so old that it would lm £ '? 1 ^ rd _* y 1?*! Wy were not a,_ be renewed in anv case, the person -tied that (.orbin had provedpara8U | nf was still entitled to have • new paling put back up. Whil The close resemblance between the natural oil hi (Jermolcne and the natural oil of healthy I uman skin is of vcrv p-cat importance. r'l NETRATING 1. explains why Gcrmolcne d .vn through itching, innamcd tkin. • >i rha tortured nerve aduxgi. AMTISIPTIC nrt>, iv penetration i .iiinolcnc purifies hidden recesses—sweat pores, tiny I nr folhclcs, sebaceous asda. SuOTHINQ The *oothuut, cooling, itxnforting touch of %  th htm about four miles front British Guiana. This time be spent seven hours in the sea. and reached British Guiana safely The Ferna was salvaged and he the example that Mr •led < HV.am strip "Achlmota' will be nimea at waaeuela at 4.49 p.m. today. A Him show for cniiuren will be held tomorrow at tf.30 the union between the gene conferences." "When we think over the centuries", he said, "trade unlonli The stamps are in two perfuraj tions. Those in the verUcal format having finer perforations when the following nlms will be in the world is something comahown:— para lively new." "British News". "Piccadilly He said that at the time of the Roundabout." "Looking Through Great Plague in Europe, living Glass." "Western Waterway," and conditions were bad generally. the film strip "Aehimota." Adwith Uie exception of course, mission is free. of those people who lived in caatles and places like K ATHLEEN LAURIENSof that. At that timI lot <>f Sugar Hill, St. Joseph, repeople died ami those who reported the loss of a gold bracelet mained could stand up because of valued $54, and a gold pin valued the shortage of workers, and $12. Irom her residence. A N ACCIDENT occurred Arthur Hill Road at about 3.20 p.m. on Wednesday between they were not working unless the> got better wages. In England u law was passed to prevent thai. In those days there trade unions and the la' than lhoi vertical ones are perforated 13 W while the horizontal ones are perforated II by life". The design of the six cent -.Limp was taken from a photograph which he had submitted lo the Committee of the Barbados Philatelic Society, and which was adopted aa the dealgu forwarded by the Society Tor consideration by the .Selection Committee The original of this photograph WSA the properly ol the Harbado* Publicity Committee Mr Kellman said that the printers of the new set are During the on the Juliana, the Esteranl'ii and the Marion Belle Wolfe. He finished the war on the WolUand went over to be mate of the Minnie M Moiher. In 1B49, he. graph 3 of his Statement of Clan Corbin claimed damages to the that was so. it was the dutj of Uv % %  fcln* lunc * *,neri h tiiiue inunna nsni an isnv e noa he motor bus M-1965. owned by cr the Diamond Bus Co^and dnwn „ mc of Quwn EU „ be h by Gou I bourne Harper of St. Bernirds. St. Joseph, and a bicycli owned by St.Clalr Grainger of Somehbing then began gradually to happen in England. Factories began to come into being and peoChase Gap. Hall's Road, and ridp j e le(1 lhe Iural areat to work ln den by Wllbert Trot man of Upper he lownS( for be forc lha t, people Roebuck Street. The lamp and we „ more or )e8S scattered in the front fork of the bicycle were country and worked in their homes damaged. with their families. u i.m The industrial revolution began H. course the towns be..... with people as more Bank Hall, and driven by Winston ^ more entered them to get Seole of Baxters Road, was employment, damaged In an accident on Bridge Street at about 12.50 p.m. on Conditions Worse Wednesday. Also involved was the moti lorry T-153. owned by Appleditions became worse and whaltes Factorv Ltd and driven In those days the people to"Alburn oSin of Venture. St. mostly illiterate but they tried to posVd John. the horizontal.JThe pa^ed his capU'n's exainlnati< and became master of the LnH Joy. Salvaged Barge Under Repair THE barge Resolute which %  sunk in the Inner basin of the Careenage during the flood watei of September last year, and wa since salvaged, is now undergoin, extensive repairs on dock at Hardwood Alley. The Resolute has been bough' Messrs. Bradbury. Wilkinson and over by Mr J. O. Olivier, Who he had Co., Ltd whereas Messrs I> La w " formerly a shipping agent oi Rue had been printing the stamps Trinidad Towards the end ol of Barbados for n good number of ne "**• ll w,u ** lowed dowr to Trinidad by the motor %  — earnings for four months. H represented by Mr. G. H. Adams who was instructed by Messrs. Hutchimon A Bonfleld. Mrs. Hurdle, and Mr. Hurdle were cited a defendants. Mrs. Hurdle is owner of the car M-1744 which was besng driven by her husband on the evening in question Mr Hurdle her agent in d Mr Ward had said, so ai put additional burdens an the person from whom he event ally recovered the sum Damage* "Bearing those two general principles in mind", said the ChMI Judge, "if you come to eonsldei the question of damages. IN will so approach that question Dealing with the particulars of idrnltted to special damage which appeared II t the car. u,e Statement of Claim, the Chlei BfsM Star and from there it srlll be towed over to Venezuela. '-pHE MOTOR CAR ss-m, b A owned by Samuel Beckles of 'Keep Your CarnW Bring8 FMnds Off 9 SeaweD Equipment SAVS MAGISTRATE The Defendant WtTO representexl j„dge mentioned the cost set by Mr D. H L. Ward, instructe.1 f ot repair of the ear at WI0.7I by Messrs Haynes & Griflith. 0>t „f painting the car. $37 50 — — %  | cost of tyres, a hub, a coil tic Hi rrom runeral .,]„, nffirunded them thul loi lost Both can* were returning from „f %  arnlruni > %  < the ear, Iha plamtifl . funeral when the accident OChad ..timnted $1 M) a day f-.i roui ettWgtl. months, a total of tlHOO". Hearing of the action was Iwgun f> n one hand, he said, while Mr. on Wednesday. The Chief Judge Adams for the plaintiff had Bl summed up lo the Jurv yesterday that the plaintiff had U-vn ion genand the latter retired at II 35. Six erous. in that he had omitted Ii hours later they returned to Court charge for a ballerv and tn.ii h. with a majority verdict In favour had only charged fot ball of Hi. of the defendant. painting of Ihe car. and had onl> It was certified that the case charged for four months' loss of proper one to have been earnings although the car wa* under repair for nearly u year. Mr. Ward for the defendant, on tried by a special Jury Summing Up MORFequipment for Scawell arrived by motor vessel Caracas "THIS is a terrible thing to do '"rhe^Caraea. etudrt nnt I,,.,,. U You 'must 6 kee'p'Tur^'h^s'off^%^^^^^ More and more competed for the what does not belong lo you," Mr. p rflnr ,.,' us vV.uu ^ IVMHL 1 ,! job. U. w.ro oSS u„,U conA J II. H33 .old NcvUle ^"^XZ^^Z Michael, ycslcrday when he lm,„„ onlv machlnor on ,„,. wh .„ *7~ "".? WO tor unloading heavy cars. combine together in order lo enby instalments or 11 per month .....v, .. i rlu .k. „„ A tmnj. deavour to better their conditions. %  -or three months' imprisonment, R ESIDENTS OF Marshall's Gap As they did so laws were passed to for stealing a bicycle owned by New Orleans were urivilcaed make such combinations illegal. Oscar Wiltshire of Cole's Road, to see (what was termed! a These anti-combination laws preCarrlngto n Village. pi„lni"e„cor ,1 7 21 last nlilM vented people from combining so %  ^ssraa! '. n s *. r <* * , 2 FOR SPEEDING People began to think of freeresult l/>chcrt Harris of Checker Hall, later. St. Lucy was fined t2 i t rucks and bul ldo; 'Lady Nelson' Calls On Sunday ftrat to see the Hsucer. told the %  Ad !" Sr irViSh Uhr.. ""."'ro"o !" 'nuU '.nd bright light which st first about | Wen ty-flve year; was brought about the reLaws. His Worship Mr. A. J. IT Hansvia Trinidad. Grenada -hell yesterday for speeding on Vincent H %  *• '" lirr? MMM ApriTS^ 0 m0, r Sel ' H SChedU,ed to leaVB appeared to be a star. The light changed to red and then p^i 0 ( t he CombinaUon blue before Uklng a slg-slg That was in 1824. aourse In a North-easterly Although the laws were remonth's imprisonment by THE S.S. Lady Nelson will at Barbados on Sunday. Met %  ia JM Gardiner Austin Co.. Ltd., inform!" u.; d he Advoroie yesterday. It ill arrive from British Guiana nd St. He is convinced that what he which If workmen tried to saw was not a star because he bine to Improve their conditions never fore." "anything like It bethey could be prosecuted. Charges -* -onsplracy and other charge." brought against them so that A FIRE BROKE out at Henley they really did not have the cornPlantation on Tuesday mornplete freedom to organise, ing about 4 o'clocs. Eight acres of "Things went on like that third crop ripe cane, the property 1871 and it was in that year tha' of J, T. Boyer. were burnt With the law which Is really the first the assistance of neighbours tho great charter of trade union,, was fire was put out at about 6.30. P*"<1 '" England. U NDER THE patronage of Mr. Prohibition E Holder. St. James' Vestry"I am not going to go into the Kay* It wa, in aid of the g^tbj. J^n^mfMhe p.oBarbados Pioneer Group. JS in restraint of trade. The Choir was made up of rtM wM a because members of the Pioneer Group, previous ] v „ had hpen heM that port the same night for Bermuda, Boston, Halifax and Montreal via the British Northern IsliodSPiissongcrs have already booked their passages. SOLD BANANAS TOO DEAR: £2 Viola Howell, a hawker of Bank %  all Road, was found guilty ot til selling bananas at a greater price lhan permitted. The offence was committed on December 20. THE Athel Ruby returned here Mr. E. A. McLeod. Magistrate yesterday for Its usual cargo of or District "A", ordered her to approximately 128,000 gallon*, of pay a fine of £2 by instalments or. vacuum pan molasses for Trinl%  n default, one month's Imprisondad. ATHEL RUBY' TAKES MORE MOLASSES FINED £4 FOR lead by Mr. C. Leslie, and the play rade un ()lllsl t olll(i lllt ,. inl "New Barbados', was staged by hc ^JH „,* f or hotter wages and tho Group. conditions, but the moment he did -. —. .,„„ something that was In restraint rpHE LOSS of a mattress pillow of iado hp M| WftS n pRal Thc i and a mirror, total value $34, wn ole yea from thc lime of thi* vas reported by Mr. A W. Roberts )ww Act was that everything must of Krdiston College. He stated be free." that thc articles were removed fhe Commissioner then referred from the dormitory ot the College to the further development during last month. >rade unionism. He This is the second loss tho trade College has suffered recently. Thr Comnuaaiorar •ndlns hla tho' ists eventually began to lake an Interest in politic ,v Act WM passed giving trade C ARDINAL ('HANDLEI of unions the power to put Into their Lower t'ariton, St. James. Rules that they could create" reported that his house was broken political funds and spend the Ti^sZfcJS B nd a wallet with roney for political purposes. Such and entefed. and a wanet u ^^ ^ ap p rovPd of bv contenu to the value ol $2t laken. ^ m< mbers u W8( ;| „.„,„... F ISH VENDORS in St. Joseph fund and n member had to sign were very busy during the a paper to say if he did not want pasV few weeks. The seas were tocontribute to it favourable, and fishermen returned to BaAhsheba Bay with large catches ••• —mm* for th* m-w ol Now lhat the sales in S>Jos^n ,•-'> %  "* mimiiu !" * "•" %  rre fairly slow, a motor car is "* used to take the ush elsewhere ;*„" to be sold Tho price of nsh was ,..„ its low as three cents each on Vho m i beech T*HE GAMBIAN Welfare Choi under the leadership of Mr Shervllle Gill of Edgecllff, St John gave a performance at the Horse Hill Casino on Sunday evening. Next Sunday the Choir will give a performance, at Sealev Hall. St John It Is cxpec*d that a contest will take place between all \he St John Choirs, and will rxstaged at the St. John School A T ADOCT 9 00 pm. c day a cane fire broke out at dcn y neard a buzxing f0urid u ke Mangrove Plantation. St Philip, ihat of a bee. and saw a bright and destroyed five and three aiiC 0 f a s ,i V ery colour quarter acres of second crop ripe ln m e air. canes which were insured. They n disappeared, however, as were the property of Carringtor suddenly as it had appeared. Estates Ltd. leaving no trail. CARELESS DRIVING A fine of £4 to be paid by i inutaJments, or ln default one I month's Imprisonment, was lmp<*cd on Clayton Joseph of Rouen Village by Hfcs Worship Mr A. J. H. HanscheU yesterday Joseph appealed. He was found guilty ot dn\ „ %  the motor bus M-2138 on Roebt-..'k Street' a highway without due cart nd attention lor other persons IAMI* the same road Tha ( lnei „iiitge summing up, lold the jury that thc case was esM-ntially one tor them. As counsel on both sides had said, there was not much law in It. There were two defendants, Mr. Hurdle, whom they had seen and heard, and hi* wife, who was Ihe owner of the ca.-. which along with the plumtiff's had been ident. The ear had been on its lawful mission, reluming from a funeral. as indeed, hud been the other cui If therefore, then was liability that was, if they found for the plaintiff, both defendants would he responsible, the female defendant beans, ihe owner of the car, and the male defendant, as admitleo in the Defence, being her aigenl in driving it. Negligence The Chief Judge, explaining in-.h.-in i told the Jury that legal negligence was somewhat different from negllgrnrtin tin common or lay sense. Illustrating the point, he said tha them negllgenll> forgot to tie his shoe laee. .n the sin., laee tripped him up II might be said In a lay semi thst that person had he" negligent. But "negligence" In law was a rtlalivr term, because It meant that lhare had been a breach of sentr duty, some failure to take rare Therefore, for their purpose, "negligence" there was a fail lo take si stanei >, of the case demunded There could be no general delbn rcuinstanceo thc other hand, said that far from being t"" generous, there ware many items on the bill put in evidence by Ihe witness UytM wbtcfa should not have appeared In it i.-i.mi tin-, weicnot Meeasttateo us n resu" ot thc accident. 4 >n lee I ion in other ingot. H had I %  • an p %  to them for the Defence thai ihoi. involved hi the was that 1B37 Model damaged In 1940. repaired By V l-oyne. and all those Items OH bills placed bufofl UnWI In goln # •'• 1'iuse %  a $ .72 paid CHr.t'K THIS LIST NOW HOYS BOYS' '. IIOSI—(irev onlv BOYS' SHIRTS In stripes ..ml pL.in colours n 87c. $2.U1. $2.42 and S2.92 eael HOYS' rTON (APS .. 24r. and 36c. eaci IM.ASTIC HKLTS „ We. Kl \t Is mid TAN LACE SHOKS (Sin %—&) $4.14 L BLACK LACE SHOES <8fa 2—5) $C00 i TAN LACE SHOES (Size 2—5) $ 6.20 KII\KII)KIM. from 87c. to $1.12 1.IHLS lVi:l> I.IN'KNS— lii Navy. Royal, Brown. Beifie, PIg{ One*, Gold, INnrli iind White n S2c. Mc, 97c. n Yd. DYED TOHRAlf O—... While Roval and Navy. CIIIMHUAs LACE SHOES In Black iind Tun (Sbcfl II — I) Cti $4.30 a pair GIRLS' LACE SHOES—(Site* 2—I) oni -..rfcin, hnnr. ** *'ll .. of the fairtillev ol ih Another Flying Saucer? Another flying u,.wt b resident of St Lawrence. Mixed chrlgt church, on Wednesday _ morning about 4 35 While tandn tog at his open window he sudLnral Cabinet makers and Joiners are on the move to form their own association and on Saturday nKl at 2 p.m.. they will hold their first meeting at Queen? Park. Ho,: V. f*. Gale. M L C, and ,M>. E. D. Mottley. M.C.P.,ha< i*-ture icn Invited to the meeting .. *""*J outline the purpose of the associaTWENTY-FIVE RETURN FROM MIAMI The chartered 'plane of Nationwide Air Transport Ser\'ice which jtrrived henon Wednesday afterroaii, with 25 labourers returning fiom work in Miami, left Barivi''os yesterday morninsr for Miami yta Puerto Rico W hat's on Today Conrt ol Ordinary al Il.M a.m Football at Queen's pjrk al : pm. Poliee Band Toneert. Hastins Roeks at "Hi pm



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FRIDAY. MAY S. USD ll.VBBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE TUBES Finances Of the Catrib Commission LQN] Sit Herb*>n Williams for the Colonies H stM H (on April payments turn been mats* by Hi* %  %  t) i. \. UMMri bkiDg Ion %  %  Governments lo the Caribbean CanULtasssM and lo ihe Caribbean Research Council; and u. wh %  currenciei these payments wc-e made Mr. James Griffiths answeici "As the reply omUinBtMMTttU •flrrures | will with perrmukKi ci; euUle it in the OfTlcial Report Following ll trie R "Mil Maici, Oov< rnment hnv made the fulh-w lo the Budget ol the Caribbrni Commission UnM it in 1M6: — FhkBDcUl Year im—47 1M7—48 1MB—48 1MB—50 iao—i a: conlnbutio: The expenses of. ihe Carlbbeu:. Research Council ate paid ben the Comml separate cosrMI in resp-tt or it. Hi* Majesty's Government's agreed proportionate share of the Com mission's rwnllHl is 34.3 per cent; the United Slates contributes 38.4 per cent; France 18 per cent; Netherlands 11.3 per cent His Majesty's QevtjgiUDi contribution Is paid in Trinidad currency." —B-t'T. ONE GIRI. from St Then; • IUK tK.iiitiB in Enctsnd ivas formt J 28.693 21.681 I M I Free Grants To W. Indies Economics Of Caribbean LONDON. Mr. James Gi.intl*. £ i State for the CotoOMt told the House of Commons ton April 38.) that a new edition of the Economic Survey of the Colon., was in preparation but it would be some time before it was read. for publication. He had been asked by Mr S itussl n tn imnn for a periodical economic and nnaacUl Ml the West African, railWr—ii. .it. %  i.i,. i ipltal invests* %  nMrjTtjsjis Mr Gnmths said he wou,.l %  n qut —in iLONDON. Mr. James Griffiths. Socreta > of Stale f r given by the Brllisri Government to the Caribbean area from January 1945 to tne end of the vear 1950-51 in the course of a general review of such Krauts to the ColHe said the total of nil such grants was Ilfl3.2l9.525 of whi-h i: 2.534.944 had been Riven In inform of lood anhtsJtti but direct grants for that purpose had now ended. Claims to repayment ol loans to Colonies that had been waived included £100,418 to Mriiivi Honduras (Hun Subsidies other than bod included C 117.089 compensation Guiana sugaj yeayaen and fl90.45fl >uh-iihe* lot ~ug.ii rwuianting in Trinidad Food subsidies (four out of five of them went to the Caribbean > were Jamaica 1418,415; Turk* and Caicos Islands i! 78.865; British Guiana (366,667 .md Antigua £19,997. —B.rjr Tarzan Comes Back SOUTHAMPTON A voting Taiv.ni walked tins if s. iif ptou. katfa .ii hand, but not hn l u ny. Jack Brown, a bakan delivery niati. was making his rounds shortly alter dawn when he came across the "Jungle boy," about four feet tnll and ereexini only ., placM Of spotted Imitation "leopard skin" draped ova* one shoulder and between the lana The Tartan explained to Brown home was In Africa, "where there are no schools, where we live In tnea." He added thai "wicked soldiers" had brought him to Southampton. Tarzan consented to accompany Brown to a nearby poll. A fren/ied call came to the police, nuking for help In locating Patrick Drew, aged seven, suffering from on %  overdose of romanticism." ARGENTINA BUYS GOLD BUENOS AIRES. May 3 The Argentine M Finance. Dr. Alfredo Conn/, announced that Argentina has purchased 60 tons of gold of which 44.322 kilos, were purchased from the United States and the remainder from Switzerland.— Reuter Puerto Rico Wants To Boost Sugar NEW YORK As pan of what is termed Upcia'.ion buuMiap". P u e r I u Rico is trying to get United States political and financial support for extending her sugar industry. Dr. Fernos-Isern, Puerto Rktfl Ib-nunit CuininUkiuiiei ington, has stated that if his country's current quota of 910,000 tons of sugar a year ball ducea In Puerto Rico eoul.i be increased by 200,000 tons the inland'., aaenne ay would benefit by twenty million dollars : %  Mir. Anolhei twenty million dollars would result if the Uajn I eon sugar locally instead 04 It raw. He has also asked for more cruise ships from the States. complaining that only one vessel now calls there. Meanwhile Mr. Oscar Fwlng, l*S Penan) Security Administrator has left for Puerto Rico to lay the groundwork for social security schemes which the VS. Senate is expected to pass by intend of the session. These Will eivc Puerto Rico old r:;e and de!>endents' assist an rf. and I atjj) for dependent children and th" blind, but not unemployment benefit which Is not expected to pass Congress. —MM*. Cuban Ami Jamaican Hums Down NrN vi gut A suivty by Uiv National SstBOOaUOa of A. AIM h. ..:.. I Impel ten., in thi %  ar artuia Cuban and Jam. crashed still lutthei. I'ucilo RiCO IB doubled her shipments Ml Marty Laurie, vice president vt tin A says Imported rum, coming mainly fru;:i Cuba and Jamaica, showed a decline in consumption in 1V49. The market appears decidedly unimportant a-id 1 muted to a few tiscd brand.'I m i .p PUarte rUoan rum to tim United States more than doubled in 1949 The co-operative efforts of the Puerto Rico Industrial Development Company and the member* of ihe impoit Inoa i" i, 1 i'uertu Rican rum have hail I worth while effect, "For 1950 plans already have been considered whicli will utilise the expeiicnce. of 1949 Adver%  i in the Institutional campaign now carry the brand names of Puerto Rican rums which are nationally advertised and promoted. The campaign has demonstrated the IU'IV.I ..f t;.. project being continued for B i-crlo! nf time luffli lha rabulldirujj oJ fldence In Puerto Riean rum rvemanif Is I'p |hl pftaeipal -it ineliuii which may tie drawn | IMI %  collsumet^ did ; rid that shlpmanl an actual increase in consumption Surplus stocks which caused so many of the rMfllfllitll Rican rum have been Istl SlpateH and the distribution h-rnch of the industry, wholesalers and retailers, are nnw in a fairly Hn'iiH Inventory position" I! %  pointed nut thai American attempt' to rebuild 'he dome*tl Mutwo CM Damugea Judgmeal vaa wlsrrjd tM Browns] at Cuttings Roau. Haggat Hall, for £25 by His UODOUJ Mr. J. W M Oin, Jurisdiction >esu-rda.v Browne had claimed £50 damI Ian nit Trotman ... IIIMIIU him ol luivii ,. her house hi..i was on ha. Clatisyasi bwd on itush Hall Trw house was .arnul to Worthily View. Chrit Church The rSRWva wa-. done on May 1. 194H Mi^n afterwardu demanded the turns. from Trot man and he refused t> give it to her. esayi essafaas^s^ri ^^##*s^*^* s VJr jajaj f#J'^j IMPORTS YESTERDAY Packages of tea, ovaltine, corn flakes, biscuits, oats and cartons Of milk stout were among th*.cargo arriving here from London yesterday by S.S. Kiecreresl The rooercfatl also discharged ban Prafacl nnd Vauxhall motor cars, toys, pa:nt and cement. From Barbados this vessel will be railing south. One thousand live hundred bags I'.iilish Guiana arnved In the Island yesterday bj Ihe Belli '.Volfe. This schooner also brought supplies of i hatcoal, wallaba posts, puling staves ami sawn greeni..'.ni Also arriving was the motor %  riobta from Dominica ibbajaaa, eschalot, fresh fruit, mauby bark and reading books. id Ja — n.\w. Bookers Man III In NY NEW YORK. Mr Derick Richinmn' old overseer, .f ror* Bros McConnell and Co., G-, Bn'.ish Guiana. whose home In LorHlon, was taken 111 on arrival ot La Cuaidia Anport. New York, and is now in :• city hospital. His lamily have been informed Mr Richmond spent u day resting at the airport on arrival bul did not lmpro* and two doclo.-s ii-<..ii.ininded he DP taken 10 h< P,,Ul -B.U.P. BALDWIN WOULDN'T RUN AWAY ANTIGUA. Reports that Bar) Baldwin has dad lad 10 tesign as Governor ol the Lastwi eeouse he is • %  dlBusUM(• %  wHh IH--I poliUi* here, have been denied by his MMlary nt Antigua. ( -His rbraaisancy navai gets di rbody ami trauld mil run away il he did," Id —B.H.P. Jhinldnq a • DIAL 4283 You can then be assured of First Class Quality WK ,VO OilER:ENGLISH ELECTRIC REFRIGERATORS in Cream and While — with or wilhuul Lock Hermetically Scaled Unit • 5 Year Guarantee. > All Sleel Cabinet. • llconomical tu operate. YOUR INSPECTION INVITF.D THE CORNER STORE I %  d)ll>*> rrwl"j I'l piafai | I. ... I %  I -'.%  '.. % %  "MORSES "iSSf PILLS I COMSTOCKS WORM flLLnS nitul. I,r Urofcli.r. ol Dr. M<* I'llI I immuu l*. *.. %  %  I I I I i. am •' %  %  % %  • %  I i i v///.'/.y,v.;V/y/.-. *//.'.' JLS1 RECEIVED ii ^ Pkts. Uafer Cera Flakes. { Tins I'ea.bes I'.iJrliii.i-nr -.1 ,M,,r,l Perk BanMies I' .l.-llu.f %  : ilXtoi J Suiuir* I' .I' llinriK %  ( umbridir Sstn-ites Pineapple Jsm ll lb.) .. MarmslKdc JJBI rj lb I Msrmslkde Jam 'ilb.) ll..: 'i. i, Palmer's BiwuiU—4 ie of Avurled (I lb, TISM Catterd Cresm Hhort Tshe (1 I QiVt? us this day our Jjuilij (Bread" BUT TO ENSURE A BETTER LOAF you should insist on DAILY INCE & Co.. Ltd £ DIAL ??36 ROOur.BREAD FLOUR After Many Years DAILY BREAD FLOUR is back again. As usual it is milled from the best available wheat with an unfailing uniform quality ensuring profits to shopkeepers and bakers BUY THE BEST TO BAKE THE BEST BUY DAILY RREAD FLOUR PRODUCT OF THE ST. LAWRENCE FLOUR MILLS, CO., LTD. MONTREAL — CANADA H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD—AGENTS



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%  %* GE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MAY S, 1*50 Cahib Caiiinq So Tired O VER in England for a holiday a Miss Kay Bury, hostess al the Hjtlins dollar-earning camp al Nti-iau, Bahamai. She has decided ihe need* a rest from sunIM thing, dancing tiiid entcilJining ir.ilhonalrea. Her duties at the Niissas. Camp read strangely to Londoners at present undergoing .1 cold spell, including snow: rise early, greet the guests, arrange r.ihing trips, swim and lie in the sun with them, and then dance till late. M A-DAME BKOMOVA and her Committee arc giving a party this afternoon at 4 30 o'clock, at the St Michaels Oirls" School. Martindales Road, in honour of MoUie Radclure. the new aancing Instructor for the Anna Bi Antigua Passengers On "Gascogne" S "CASCOGNE" railed Antigua on Api il 28lh and of Si eked up a .lumber of passengers tigue Grenada Tennis Champ M bound for the U.K. Rev and Mi* School of Dancing, who arrived W. Palmer, the Misses C. Sc J RONALD COOLS-LARTIGUfc, son of Mr. Justice R. Cools-l^rtlgue Puisne Judge nd airs. Cools-LarItjihados for about four here recently fr There will also be a'demonsti i England. r five days. His father, he told Carlb is Acttion by the pupils. Arriving in August Palmer and Master W. Palmer ,' %  •>.. Puisne Judge in Grenada came here from St Kitts to Joinihe is with Gerald S. W Smith Ihe ship also Rev. A. R. Thompson Co Commission Agents and Mrs. Thompson from Nevis, da. He arrived on Wednesday by nd Mrs. Martin Shaeflcr M W 1 A from St. Kitts and who came to live in the Leeward be returning to Grenada S 1 lands at the beginning of World week-end. fSTf! f ,,' i £: %  V/ar 2 were also passengers makHe is rry keen on tennis e of the island's largest cottco .iliivatvd areas. a.M ^.hi^f^^ !" ^ F M'W*"H A Melville of Tiuiidad -i Mi Iluv M.u'lon.ild Spe< i..l feature of to-night %  pro, et s atu i ra nth their daughMacdonald will The Marga rmony took place at St. Church. Purt-of-Spain Recmany years. grin !" wifl bi thc,nu,ie from K ,S?S thTf^"^. !" /^ Sd w". the bed.', lather Hill, Tyme.' the musical revue reJf h "'",* ,„ %  """ ry h "' '^S-M '-, for many yew.. II ft ...aged : ft. Kmptro 2,,',,^"?, >,, 'Sr" atajonatd" iVt b >^^ 22K,1S intention to lake a three yea iurse In mining engineering. Theatre. Also on the programme Is; Concert Overture. The Hebrides, ttngal's Cave by Mendelssohn. Like the Scotch Symphony, this picturesque composition owes origin to a Highland tour under"Cricketerg from the W.I." left on Wednesday evening by R.W.I.A. for the occasion. He was assisted by the Bishop of Trinidad and Canon J. D. Ramkeesoon, Rector of St. Margaret's. A reception was held at Queen'* T HE OFFICIAL Brochure of p ar k Hotel for 250 guests and later the West Indies cricket tour of in the evening, the couple left by taken in 1829, 4*.hen Mendelssohn England was published last week the "Lady Nelson" for St. Vincent was only twenty years of age. The by Playfair Publications. It Is to spend their honeymoon. rugged coastline and grand scenery called, appropriately enough, so appealed to him that he wrote "Cricketers from the West Indies' the opening movement and prlnand has a foreword by Sir Pelham cipal theme on the spot. Warner. There is also a message from Mr. R. K. Nunes (President Honeymoon at Bathiheba of the W.i.C.B.C). included in the brochure are pen pictures of S PENDING their honeymoon at all the players together with Bathsheba are Mr. and Mrs. cord* D f every Test Match in Douglas Wllkle who were married which the West indies have partion Saturday afternoon at St. Anclpated. gustine's Church Mr. Wilkle Is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Noel Wllkle of "Cottage." St George and Mrs. Wllkle Is the former Miss Dorothy Mc Conney, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. V.. Mc Conney of ...780-mi.e transatlantic race from v.* !" "Newbury". St. George. B^rmud. ** *"£ ^J.^^His'work ft. ElTS de" At Sea SLBCe 1911 V the Royal Ocean Sailing Club. | ''• £53?* """ *£„,'Zf has been revived this year after a £" m ""tch scenes to local hnrG APT. TRYGVE EIDE. Skipper break caused by the war. "Before *£J£ d .^tH* of the S.S. "Seabreeze" of the the long-distance race the British Alcoa Steamship Line has been In yachts will race from Barbados since April 26th at the island to Bermuda untrain from Ne Capt. Eide has been at %  11V First Visit There are also scenes of Dutch from" Rhode Cu"* !" British Gutana and TriniEw Cruising ,Ud whcr ,n UIiM n vl ed ,ma In the other room the work of Geoffrey Holder, the young Trinidad artist is exhibited, a review of his work was given recently bv Mr. John Harrison, Arts Officer of the British Council. i sinci Snowing Two Weeks Ago M M SS MARIA ESCOBAR, Miss Olga and Miss Elm Gomes who .arrived here IDA MANTLE and her daughter Paula, who arrived In Barbados on March 18th live about four miles from Worcester in England. She had a letter from First Lady M ISS LOUISE ROWLEY, delegate from Grenada to the recent Civil Service Federation Talks held here two weeks ago was passenger by B.W.1.A Wednesday home saying that it was still snowafternoon by B.W.IA. from Venalng there up to about two weeks r. eure T n xuela, are visiting Barbados for Ha0( -nd „*,,. waf wondering how M M tnl the first time. They art staying n „,. an>no ( „ .AWI ih f F t*ir*i > at the Hotel Royal, and hope to be here for two weeks. Grenada on Monday. Miss Rowley Is the first lady delegate to iy of the Colonies at During her stay here if was going to affect the cricket, f !" W ?, B f U, o^i** "^". '!" Yesterday afternoon, she and S a T hc ? ,r ^ , V her daughter left by B.W.I.A.. for companie*! by her sister Miss Dons Trinidad, and they will be there Kowie 'until Sunday, staying with Mr. and 17# 11 ft u.|;j. u Mr.. Taiirrt. irUrndf they met on For U Holiday the boat comin over \f H JOHN lloY S '•" yilr~.. They will then be returnln "I day by B.W.I.A. lor Puerto lafl for the U.S. yesterday by here to join the "GoMto" whteh 'eo en route 10 New York where B.W.IA. via Pu#rto Rleo. They leavea Barbado. on May 11th lor he la going on a couple of monlhs' arc aoing to live In Miami. England. holiday. To Live) in Miami M B. AND MRS. JACK KAPLAN and their young BY THE WAY By Beachcomber I GATHER that air-hostesses, or gjfyou prefer to call them, aeroreceptlonettes. are trained at "crtarm-achools." "They are taught "Tact, deportmeeit, how to serve food while travelling at speed, how to deal with wild animals and survive In iunsjlcf.." And my paper adds: %  -ThirV think their training will help to make them good wives."' fait In the air means that when you detect a jaguar in the plane you say quietly, "We are now passing over Cheltenham." Deportment follows, as you come swaying down the aisle between the seats with a cup of roffee and a biscuit in one hand, a hunk of raw *neat for the Jaguar in the other, and, balanced on your head, a bottle of pills for the green roan,. Survival In jungles depend* largely on whether tinforced landing Includes the jaguar. /or your anthology Smokeless her sordine-colon red Her sun-broiled armt ur fiHce. (Muskcritic.) P ROBABLY When Rustigurzi sang with Broccoli he always refused to come close to her. because, he said, she deafened nlm. I remember, too, an % %  slon at Saliburg when Tapioca, greeting Dottl with the cxuberi cry. Tls thou, my lovel" bl his helmet sideways and made the audience rock with laughter, got his own back In Act II. During a short Interlude In the bawling after she had roared "Hush. I pra; thee' I hear a noise within Ih caslle walls." "So do I, by St Flam-." shouted Dottl, befoi resuming his role. Ilarv you RacineH your boot*? I T Is reported that when Minisie Slopcorner was approached hy the British Council, with a view lo a series of lectures on Racine in Swedish Lapland, she .udd. "I think Racine Is wonderful stuff. I use It every day, and so doc* Mummy. But I really don't know as I ought to advertise It like this In Swedish Lapland. Just say I hope all the people there will use it like I do." MEN'S WHITE SHIRTS AllltOW HAIil Y4 lllt.AI. -MUENOWX" BOYS' SHIMS 2.91 BLUE. WHITE. TAN 6.46 4. RADIAC PIQUE DRESS SHIRT COLLAR ATTACHED 93.19 EVANS AND WHSTFIELDS Youandd<><:" :h nl .ndfeminiQCttttftiontoyour beauty. Learn the newest ArtofMake-Upwpfc edb Max factor Ho/')'"""' Several Dlflj CUet**** 01 *! %  instfuctton You II receive •OUIOVO tadWAeal color bunwoy mAcup Chan featuringi J MLLYWOOtrsmwumK* a„riw-B/R-'-"' lw 1 ihadtt fc '"" if ***' "'" "" VounVeaiHa*"-""*"'" SCHOOL OF MAKE-UP... AT CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. TO-DAY at 9. iO a.m. and 2 p.m. MAX FACTOR PRODUCTS alto obtainable from: Knights Ltd.. All Branches, Bruce Weatherhead Ltd CollinaLtd.. Booker's Drug Store Da Costa & Co. Ltd C. F. Harrison & Co.. Ltd. H. P. Harris tV Co. Wm. Fogarty Ltd.. The Modern Dress Shoppe. Cosmopolitan Pharmacy. Now's The Best Time to PAINT YOUR HOUSE A wMe ranee "' Read? Mixed Paints sod material %  upplied bv the foresaost manufaeturrrs tp select from. i: l Ml MIU i; when ya* uve Ihe Surface vou Bse s s s Iiwpecl these at our II MtDWARE DEPARTMENT Trlephi ufl No. 2039 GLOBE LAST SHOWING TODAY al 5 and 8:10 p.m. CLARK l.Allll and MYRNA LOT IN MANHATTEN MELODRAMA 4 BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD. GRAND OPENING TO-DAY and Continuing Daily AT THE GLOBE QM& OAJJ aCfiCofj WmdeALdb 3T r -G-M's Finest Picture! BATTtEGROU VAN JOHNSON • JOHN H0DI/4K RICAROO MQNTALBAN GEORGE MURPHY NtlSHAU IMMfSM %  IEI0ME COuinMD • DON 111101 • (iUCE COm IKE IIM1S WHITMORE %  DOUCIIS lOftUT %  LEBH MiS • GUY HhOifSON THOMAS i. BlliH • DENISE DISCI I • RICHARI IIIClll %  IIM ABNESS SCOUT 3ECK:T1 BRE1T KING Sio'i t'd StiMrpUi a* aOWat aiaoSH Aiiwiti p.odKfi DitKlea 0, WILLIAM . WEUMaN Produced by DOM SCHA8* A tl0 GOlDWfO HAYfR PICTuat SATl'RDAV AT 8.30 P.M. JKFFRKY'S BKKK |.r.v.-nt 5 a FAKKWELI. VARIETY CONCERT with Landy !> %  Mnnthrtin and nthrr lradinK artistes. R*tain your half-tirket for this Show and win a complimentary to the' Cl.Olli: tor six munths and a carton ol JEFFREYS BEER.


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*t I I i %  I I May .1 I9J0. Barhafoas Quorate CANADA URGED TO ACCEPT STERLING Could Help Colonial Development Ramadh in Takes 5 Wkts. for 9 Runs ONTrKLI V qpllf: WRST INDIES crickei loui Sir Pelham Congratulated MMilcarx, Mai 1. %  >u' i-i INN ant in so.lie ii-iiul practice, when they drew the urniia> cimt with an Indian Gymkhana eleven which included two Indian 'IVst player* Mankad and Polly I'mrigar. and the former Weal Indies Te*i player. Leary ConMairtii>e. at Osicrley, Middlesex, today. The Wet innic^ who [toss scored 1"T lor 7 declared and in iep!> 'he Indian Oymkhnna XI made 78 lor 8. The Gymkhana taken i hard to get again*! the SIR 1'fcI.HAM WARNER who accompanied ihe M C.C to the We Indies in IMS. has been elected President of the M.C C. for this year. On receipt of this new* the Barbados Cricket Association sent him the following cable: — 'Congratulation* and best wishes on your Presidency Barbados Cricket Association. U.S. Want U.K. Promise WASHINGTON. May 4. Fifty-one members of the House of Representatives today asked Secretary of State Dean Acheson to obtain Britain's promise that all .shipments to the Middle East will ("• hatted until Israel and the Arab States agree on a peace treaty. The United States and Britain should join in an effort to bring about such a treaty, the request to Acheson added The presentatives are 30 Demo, crats and 31 Republicans. —Heuter l / curate WJ attack in which Sonny Ramadhin was outstanding. He had the batsmen *ue*sing with his spinners which he turned both ways. Varying his pace and making the ball do some peculiar things, he took 5 wicket* for only 8 runs In II overs. The highest score ol the gay came from the young Went Indies Ken Treslrall who made including three fears In 101 minutes while his colleague Alan lac hit one six sod four fours In hla 47 made in %  i minute* The pair together added 103 for the second wicket and put the West Indie* In a good pooitlon. but at 181. three wicketa fell without any addition ithe score. This was chiefly due tc Mankad who flighting his alow spinners cleverly caused the batsn>cn the most trouble. Hetook the wickets of Waleott and Christian! with consecutive balls, and very nearlycompleted his hat trick when his next ball passed just over the stumps after beating Gomez He finished with four wickets I for 48 run* and latescored a I bright 21 including one six and three fours in 33 minuteHOME PRODUCER FIRST; EMPIRE PRODUCER SECOND Hay worth—khan Divorce? ROME. May 4. The lending Home newspaper II Me(tagficro reported tonight that Rita Hay worth and her husband Prince Ali Khan are on their way to Cannes—where they were married last year—to arrange a divorce, Quoling "well Iniorqwd circles in Milan." loo ncwsp;Spain whan they left in a small boat Some cloth, similar to ihe material The men bought hah abase been illscovered by the Police. In the poesesslon of a Cily man. This brings to seven the number ol men misting ,ind Itclievetl drowned and then bodies weighted with pieces of iron The Police lor the past 36 hours have bean iirigging the area of the p|ra%M -AorkuiK with net.* V. MANKAD K. TRKHTR \u Too icorcri 4H Sugarmen Leave Trinidad May 9 IvucoU Unr*M4,ni4* U.S. Should Try To Win Cold War SAYS TRUMAN WASHINGTON, May 4. President Truman said today thai the United Stairs should use cviT\ means at Us comit .11 d to win (hiCOM wai PlS .idi'm made this aiatement at hia v> Conference In defending the eoal ol the Marshall Plan. %  ~ Mr. Truman said the Marshall iiroi SOU one of the chief means •4 winnini the cold wir and he .in.id out that il was niiieli i.eapti than a abQattflg ami Pressed by correspondents gbotll 'lie high BOM ol 1e.11 SB II %  r hM.eutn mike programme, tin 1'itMiueiit .said Hi.it In-. l>cfeiicc Budget for th.next yaw emik be smaller than fm tin-, mu Mo said that there was no reason < .LIIIIW .tnd Ihe defence plogranUBs; would ue adequate to Ira tofanee ol the tinted siato n 1'i'Milent iilbo made a spirited Oafancg of the United Nations. He •aid that lie was not in agreamoni with UH suggestion mad.. b\ 1 i. %  Hni.fi! Hoi uaM vrOBSt that the nonCumiiunisl natioi.dtnuld oriani.e Uu-n.itelvsM !.auom SPORTS WINDOW AIM 1. Y.M f A. U.1N.O. BACKS TRYGVE LIE PORT-OF-SI'AIN. Ma\ 4 A Edun, Pnaldani aXO Manpower Citizens Association and Hon. w J, RaatsAvtr. H G doMfota to SH ; II Talks In Lostdon. ariUM'd In Trinidad tOtU] Edun -..HI thai of uncortainty in B.C. of the future of the Sugar Industry nan If the taUu rafl Haitgever said thai it is vitall> i.ecessary to get an aj They leave here together with the i Trund.id delegate. Hon A Gomes, and Hon Han I son, n.Wl.SA dalegab lo 1 ;roing as adviser. Mav ti Occupation Forces Ready For Any Eventuality Soys MacArthur TOKYfX May 4. Gencryl Douglas MacArthur. Supreme Allied Commander, announced today that the occupation Force* warf mainUinlng 1 heir bases in a state ol "almost complete readiness. lor any eventuality" He made bu .tateincm letter lo Liaut. General KUJ Dervyanko. ItusMsn menibei the Allied Council lor Japan. plying to Ihe Soviet delegate pTOtest note againsi ih* reconstruction of Japaitese N-val and An !*-• In the letter, published today. General Mac Arthur called Genera] Dervyanko's note a vshicls of propaganda or provocative impertinence". Ths hupicma Commander saw General IJervyanko's -.,nx\rv." over Japan was qude groimdCanadian lt River Engulf a 125 Hornet; WINNIPSG. MANITOBA. Iday 4. The Canadian Rod River engulfed early to-day more than 125 homes in Winnipeg suburbs and threatened three hospitals. The flood crest was last reported about SI miles from Winnipeg. Emergency food supplie* had 10 be sent from Winnipeg to nearby Morris and Sa.nt Jean Baptiste Nearly all the 1.100 population of Morris have been evacuated—Reater. U.S. Citizen Not Allowed To Land In Trinidad Karbas* Advecatr ( orrrspoiigenl PORT-OF-SI'AIN. May 4. Trinidad Government refus-d to tiranl permission to Dumon Wills, a US citizen who man led a Trinidad girl. 10 land. Wills is on a suspended sentence of ten years b> the Court of Virginia, U.S.A, aftai betni tsjund utility of rape. The decision means that Wills will have to serve the jentencc His father-in-law. living here, had petitioned the %  %  overnni seeking permission to allow Wills lo land. PARIS. May 4 The United Nations AdminiMr ttve Co-ordination Committal which me* here on Tue>d-j ang yesterday under the essainnsnxhlp ol the United Nations ierretar) General Trygve 1-ic today issmd 'i unnnimouo statement backing He's .ittempi to ttnng East and Wast together. The BHtaCMnt said: "A la-ling iic.Mii .111 I"' oliiiM-it .nut in.. 111ti ineii oniv by woriecially believe that it H eaaentia! for the future of both the United Nations and the specialised institutions that a settlement of the present political deadlock within the United Nations should come aa soon aa possible "The peace-loving people Mr Morrison Sqys I\o 1A)N1KJN, May 4 Herbert Morrison l*ede< f the Mouse of Commons, todav refused a suggestion by -ix of his -upporlet %  that Parliament should be asked to censure the OjjVpoalWOn unexpacfad votes on ()n< of thesi vote-, resulted in a Government detent Livt niootli .III.I anolhei in 1 Ha Mi Winston Churchill said the Opposition would enjoy such debate but Mi Morrison refnwil to .II.MII.HI..-. \1l\os.1te Correapondenl LOKDfsH, Mas 4. ( f ANADIAN participation in the development 0 the colonies should be fostered in the Unite Kingdom, says Mr Julian Amery, M P., son of former Colonial Secretary, in a letter to "Th Times" today. Hi. letter which Inlluws the recent purliamenl.ir\ deli.: on \imln-C anadian Iradr rMulls Ihe reference h> MBBfaai TIMII lo the (iii 1 (hat tinle-is llrituin to hnlunre her Iffad utlh ( auadii at an uude>iriill> low level (iinail.i m.'-i pervii:nleil tu accept vtcrlinic as part pavment for some 1 li,i i'' 1 n-'ii-FOUR DEPUTIES ADJOURN LONDON. Ma] 4 The Kour-Power Deputle-ti tuning the Auatrian Treats utda] adjourned their nieelin:: .-..lied \^ lalegi ti Qe> rga Earu %  bin without repotting BB) DffO> BTesa TJiev will Ma) II Rruler make tu 1 fn il Reuler "loatostit Iiuman e*nd tn.i ihe I'IK< StStSSI 'WOldd eolilitiili> li lUppdrt Hie Iniied Nations as long a* he was President of Ihe I'mled Slates He ssid thai the United Nations wim an organisation for discussion .imoiiK-t the i.ition* eeking a peaceful settlement of then 1 nule-. ami it was working wall "ii many subjects iju."'ioned .dKUit a private conversation which :i.had wiUi Mr Hoover Immediately sfU'tMr H.HIVI'I dMlvend hi. apeaoh ta New York. I'i.--ident Truman said todav that he hs m Uw %  ewa 1 beeauaa >•"< IrU h NaUonaUat members who M-nimi-l d Ihe f: |,avc in.! taken thefi Oath the effeetlvu %  id ba ".IL iBeuler > Cimiiniiiii-.l UOM oil Kails In Holliiiul The rtOTTERDAM May 4 iiilnading of American 1 the American fieighter pan Stela i>agan at %  bout 0 I'll. MiiKmndings or [ag dot k were antpi) >>f iicopie and ont) 1 few |>lnemen sauntered aionnd Follel I,mm he patrolled ilia ship from im % % %  ., It WBN evident llli.t the Coinn.um.i ba) "it plan iiad proved .1 very damn stpdh Heulrr Finland** Hail Strike Spreads 1 ii. li..l'.Kl May 4. iiiilwa> -,li u.ipii .HI drivers mid Itren>. gsjaaraj en i trams c-tahllshmenl of n constructive j been trying to do for the last! md lasting peace "--Renter llVi,-eji New W.I. Air Route Planned — THE HAGUE. A new Saantsh-Dutch air treaty enabling Royal Dutch Airlines IK I. \l j tojouch Madrid on Ita Amsterdam-Wast Indies route has been announced A Ministry of Transport ;.nd Public Works communique says that Spain and Holland have reached agreement on an air treaty providing tut exploitation of 1 Dutch -opera ted air service from Amsterdam via Nice (Prance), Madrid, Lisbon. Cape Verde Island, eventually Dakar. Paramaribo to Curacao. Pending Ihe new treaty, the Spanish Government twice granted Holland a three month" prolong*, tion of a permit to touch Spanish -aVt'P. kmJapan wai completely disarmed and no Japanese forces exalted "At for bases toi the foroai of occupation, both American and British, they can and will. >o 1< as the occupation lasts, he ma tained m a condition of such adequacy and preparedness a enure the fullest security, operations) efficiency sod most complete readiness for any eventual Jty — (Reater) V1DELA BACK IN CHILE SANTIAGO. Chile. May 4. President Gonxale/ Videl arrived at Santiago tonight in a US. Conftenation alter lhr<*weeks' visit to the US The ai'ilead with tn wife Rosa Marckmam. D —(RrHtrr 1 BEVIN OUT OF HOSPITAL LONDON. :.!%  > 4 The British Foreign Secretary Mr. Ernest Bevin. left hospital by car this afternoon looking pale but cheerful Stop Scientist from Leaving US NEW YORK. May 4. A Chicago atomic seienti-t win had public!' expressed faith i" Dr Klau* Fuch*. the British phi hicist who was convicted of passing secrets to Russia. wa> loda Srevente-l from leaving for France he Slate Department, which impounded the scientist's passport said il h.i.i done .0 because hi' proposed trip would be "not in the %  tereel Reuter Verrrmcnl lica-lic) III Antigua Dispute "AMUGUATsaay'l The capital win quiet Uw* itirnu.g bul for red flag tie.ini loitering in the vicinity of BryaonV There was a meet this afternoon, at which an agreement was bigried between Bennett Brysons and the Union in the presence of Federal Labour Officer Uwardi A Dock I*l>.' 1 Con '1 be astablLshcd comprtunn .• n-piesentative of Brysons. the shipping agents, a representative of the Union, and an independent Chairman nominated hy the Administrator, its functions being to select stevedore labour from a register aVeady agreed upon for working each steamer for a Irial period of eight month' Fuths Post Filled Britain I %  ...-I, atom spy LONDON. May 4. oday filled the resean by the German boi Kiau. rV-li. who 13 Kilted In Bomb Blast CATANIA. Mav 4 Police troops and viiuntarv helper., weie tonight •UKKH-M f" the bodie of IS workers who .were burieii or Mown h pteea 1 when 100 tons of bombs of the lam ,war exploded here today Two [explosion*, following clonely on leach Other, tore ii vast hole deep 1 in Ihe field whan the lambs were i being tMligaal baglda Ina muni* [tlons dump The expl"* \\ ba l epnona 1 lualcauona m ihe citv of Catania fi hour* increasing ihe panic H-lilr. I'liracliulr Traps Pilfil: hies In CIUKII COPCNHAOEN, May 4 Thousands lining Copi treet 1 a Danlah |et plane pilot. Impped by his Mraeauti as he trie-i to ball real 1 today during an a>r ihou celebrating the Fifth Ann : Denmark'a uiwratkon The pilot. Captaln-Lieiitenaiit Can. Ki. I Boerensen struggle.! valnlv to free himself when hla parachute got caught In his nose... 1 .m > IIIK works to Iheir f,11 (in ies aad oltlcea. milk to ihe towns ami reparation good*. lo Russia *serunnUig 1 1 yeatacdai The new stoppage was the strikers' reply to a call up OM) iepl 10 Hi. Kight Wing s4erda] i>* t .., DETROIT STRIKE ENDS nuitm 1. Igaj i 1., 1 Mi.ii %  ivoricet Ihe leeond i.irgest u< most en ii'. in tha BUtcenobuV llhin trj J sellieil hen lml.i\ ii lew minuiaa h %  lb 'he l.uiidi.'.llh day Rcule Such laarUni ' Foot *..*• ad a to ba currenl lianaarllnni .nut above J %  iwrilng .'Hi. and the < %  Mr Aniei. potnta %  •>!' lhat, win n rnaj ha li Ihe be* li 1 an.id.i i.. parttctpata la U %  HI "i iha 1'..1.'in Fin|iiie it WOUld, no*, f a bold Mep loi .1 > winch si ill offers great investment It was therefore, u|i I (loverninent to cceata in which Canadian! would < 'nlnl 11 First < %  ( IhoM cotidiiin'is s|w| ment without In anj %  a 11 the population geeondlt 4-.laid BM fur 1 %  ul.i ii i.l 'It IS tin %  .( dMcrlminatl hnaj pref* ram ag it Oenevti Hava \ • % %  l'"i'i"a> . 1 iv* |rji'in g^TeiM! of the on.iv > produce) HBpin pioductf aatond '•• M" Ann 1 • 11. orn luda 1 b .mint thai Canedlai < iterUng paymenla would i> 1 toi wo) t,. aorreet tinpi Mlance in world iralM "In .\ BnOri "ni< 1 1 mada's produoU lower to the sterling area wou> .dmost iM'rtainly reduei |J 'dollar) gap still farther to ti KIIIII where free coirVl '' m ba i dial ___ hXTEND CONSCRIPTION WASH IN Tl.e Armed Bm of 1 hi ii' %  ol Repri %  l otad I.KI.I %  lo 1 ctei con rripl ,1 .11The present Servlpe A*i k* dua pire on Jl 4 Renter dlVil'K pi 1 Renter 1 ing a tail term lot betraying %  KNU to Russia Dr Maurice H 1. Hryce. 87yaar-old rriifaaaVn ol i" Oxfoid I'liiversity. has %  greed lo be itapOfnUbai for the technical %  upsrvuui'i of Iha fssaofsjtii i| rniysics Division .a Britain's Haiell Aton 11 Energy EstaUuhmeo) the job Fuchs was doing when was arrested. A Ministry of Supply -onominient today said that Dr Pryci would be in charge of the ditdBaan the tini being"—r S. Africa Troops Will Slay In I nion CAPRTOWN. Prime M Milan told the South African 5 day that in ihe event of another war the Union Armv mav at Brst instance be required at home, but should the position in the Union prov.!., be safeand he underrtooci it would bssaf— the Ooyvould consider >• hot could be done. He gob %  sound prill "her than send South African troops ovetthe ;. %  %  .daHe will spend the next few day*i .^ciire not nnlv in the U convale-scing before hi* meeting .-,1., H in Afri here next week with the United north South Africa wa •tater Secrftai> I Sta'e D.-an od as to what happened asaaaaoa — iBeeter) aaaaalriai 5 CHILDREN ARRESTED ATlir^s Ml %  I Atheim police imliiv am Mi icnpOl • r.il-ij 1--, .%li 0 tried to persuaaai .1 aaaafnate u> in ;. sinkv aaauui pi ixtra fee. Other ajupii paraded outside the Mini-tf1 1 I shouting. We Mve Pupils at most Athens and provincial •* 1 ondai. • 1 1lefi clttues whatl ttie> ware asked 1' pay •' %  extra %  rdlnary leg '<• •liable the Oveemniciit 1 -. | l-saa lo teacherResHa* Sydney'8 Labour Party Endorses Government BUI To Outlaw Communists SYDNEY. May 4 nist-controlbvi mini t da The Australian federal Parhaany stoppage Labour Parly today deIn Canberra Mi Joeepl •ided to enOorse the principles ol I,aboui Chief and Leader ol itv* tha Ooeen im an t 'i bill to outlaw parliamentary Oppoaltioi the Communist Paity as SO miues uuui,rVd thai Ihe Federal I'aiilam New South Wales co&iiieiMs d%  aaaartarj Latmur Part> wou fled a ^top-work ordci ol tn< It prove the Oovsri.im n' hill but Cornsapnlal controlled union woulo ••• • : the bill ped for ine day. the rrujoniirx m a •favour of stoppagew, re onh bj bdal %  few votm In most cases tions and to "declared' persons Australia'bigge-M coal producer, jj, ihe Labour Party's opinion Burwood North, which in ihe past this appeal would he largely liluhas been recognised a< s Commueory I Reuter Kl!S(i CAROL 1I\ BRITAIN LONDON, MU 4 fU-Ktng Carol ol Itumama and Ms wile, ihe [ormei laadanie "i %  "! ,i. iii italn lonisjhi 4 Arrrsl LONDON. Maj llnt-ii u t<, nsk RU Soviet naval palrola hiv ihe British fishing trawler Kliuii-". a Foreign O, %  aid todav If cfn an rant it J. %  trawler 1 irnmediat •elease will 1* requested. The trawler, 1.737 |i %  pnarenU) arrested m Iha Won Sea on Monday and la believed to 1 ave Iwen I.ken i naval port nt Murmansk It had a crew of 11 —Reuler SWEDEN WILL PROTEST STOf KHOI.M. Mav 4 Mo to protasi w KK 1 t about ihe aa %  lion a I wai an Tns trawlers were •toj.pe.1 b) Rii'sian warsaUi 30 sea mile fron %  .., por' of Naukucren There the. for II ,


PAGE 1

PACE IIP.IIT Rovers Heat College 5-0 IN FIRST DIVISION HUiBAOOS \HVOTATF. FRIDAY. MAY 5. 150 PWavi cut | %  it t., Ha Colleen football 11 tfeeil i\ i ul Kensington ysstcr %  ri in for the %  Dlrtl IMI in -rniK .In in-*! hill. Denis Alkinff • priMvl ii 1( MOTI in progress [or uboui 12 minute*, white Wilki's at centre (otward (.cored tho remainder. PtCtcv i-tendcd the the pavilion end and W \ . Ire i hard aroui dj Ui; dii not gall i va mill kirketi ovw In attempting lo score. Ttw* t'liiii „i movement trier carried tinbell well down the Held and Reld on th left wing after receiving frtm Smith, sent In a sect effort which Mruck the upright They leler made another raid BA MEET TONICHT W.I.—Indian Cricket Tbp Weit Indies party leajwa ,, g ut comparable with the London tomorrow, ami the loam t King's final itaae. ft is expected meet Worcestershire will be il at there will he ww keen comselccted on the train petition. Mr. Kidney said met the leleet on had form In team wont I on on the journey county ground at whe-e the n Itch wil 1 • played, was below v Fool ol water six woes* ago. to.l„v it i* considered to be in splenoul From Page 1 MO was played in dull %  :I.OI. After the match the -• I %  !• enteri %  reception I Club in the pavilion Late The dnver of the coach bring„ in| st era bet team he was ncrc fl ,n n "'" 11 '"' ana the pji l) wat lati in tYhen UM i n ached ihe lie found Ihl %  %  uld %  >. %  : %  %  %  ..( u> raft state of the pitch following eatb i HI Plaj waj held up for an hour front the %  heduled mn hlle the pitch was drying out The Teams Ursi Ndtan J. Btollmeyei rCapl.). I: (bristianl, c, (ioiiH. \ F,. i -i ;: K Treslrail. A Vulcii'-,c C Walcott, C Williams, i Worrell. Indian <;mkh..n;i: C ?.I;I.LIIS. • \' blanked, P. i"t tnline, V. All, < Sin h Kl B ilngh, W. Amen-. T. Tn lor the Cricket Club Conference Eleven against >ho West Indie* lasl weefe He made 3M not >*!. .. i ij v. b xi_.k..i n rt !( %  c Ani) b Umrtaai Slnhl IC It I'KnnNMil 41*0 Amr> l> UaMrt 0 Second Half lert Slollmeyei. c;.|Hainmk; llyal Wi %  %  Ii %  won the t'. u I On reeumpUon.tho College wei. o> lOfl inicUThe the fln-t to attack, and Smith 01 lourlsli %  oil to .1 bad start for the left whig sent 111 a good effort StoUmeyet was leg before ti Ma.iwhich full beck l*roverbs cleared had before %  run had t>een score!. Th College made another raid Ke 1 Treat 111 fitn-it Alan Rae nrnl this time Williams sent in 1 d tinpah rOT-Ove r ed in good a hard grounder which Hill saved (ally, showing Pickwick-It•ivors, who were now ,,iloiu (orra, using the drive trying to increase their lead. ,, ir lhh He made on.vicious null T..i*l il..r 1 atSt rau "i wkbi 1 n, t tot, 3 Ha. -. i'-!. s ii. i-ia. BOWUHO ANALYSIS O M H • HMtaabna i 1 B Hunkmd It • l Caojei COM singh S I It 1 msw 1 t ,rr "...n.h.M. IM 1. .. . Huifh li p ^'ll|^ I U 1. Hi>n*rt li < ,-n-r nM oiii V MaukM c VWni up b UMi.m... 1 I'.mlB-i IIIMI Wslr.ni b Ran,a Qhiii 1 HsmMinin I canMantins i> Rsmsdhin IT Tipiliorp r ft b Ramailhiil V All b tUiiMdnm II Khan nol oul rlia^ 11 • T..UI I %  M I %  fjaesl down the field and Wells centred accurately from the right wing, but Atkinson headed out Later Wells again got posw;*ion and % %  ••tit in :i ban] one which Smith ilellected over the bar. but nothing remitted from tineornor Tlie c tJlego boy* on the other h;jid were rUU trying to open then won-, and Smith after receiving n good imss from ora? of hi) halva sent tn a hard otW which Hill tad>eii" 1. and the 1 %  lev minutes hlle the nlayera seprched for it li j T I,IL-' iniioite (ioml Si .ml oh part Rae %  nd rrastrall t 1 ".1 .1 centui > stand rdt B/tekel and rement 1 102 in vo minute', before thej arera | it U Pickwi.-h-Kovcrs made a numWith the icon Si IjW Ul tourl ta ber .it raids o., the College goal. %  '- "" "'•^"'' '' l t mid kept their defence very busy '• %  ^"' lh "'' ch *^. dU at this stage. On one occasion 1M Smith saved what looked %  %  '" certainty when Wells cut in from ' ''' ; ,l ''' 1 the ar£ff. and sent in a hard I'" "" "" u "^ Wrs w ">') eroundiT slow •! "*' %  "> ,nK l ,,trh *' ou u "' look Walcoti an 1 1.nod Show > ChrW ad eer) n The College boys, although three ,, k n, the n xi delivers Whit* down, were still putting up a good ,.,. : ,t (.,,,,. %  bul wenl over toe show. They ronecntrnted chiefly ,,, 1.,.Mnnkail brought of! .1 on their lelt arbifltr Smith who ,,,., : Ing catch off till sent in nwn> .1 good effort but own bowllri b dlsml 1 Walcoti without-iesult. : ,ud than h Pickwick-Hovers' front men led u/ornli. who batted l> mlnutea by Wilkes. were still looking for an d hit nve lours In nil M 101-goals nnd durina one of their raidt, -. 1|;| ,,ff Canstontlnc'n Atkinson struck the cross bar. but nrat ball of the nexl ovet and the ball rebounded Into play. It was not long after this that Wilkes sent in the fouilh for hit team with a well placed shot from outside the area. J .-. 1 "I ..tI 1. 1 I, l-M, 1 U HI. %  •! %  OWMXn ANALYSIS Tranquility Coming May 10 i Wi, .1, 1 i-B-^il'Hl) Pickwick-Rovers again got possession, and Cronev hit the upright wilh a powerful shot, but from the rebound he kicked straight to Smith who had no difficulty in saving. From another raid by PnkwickRovers. Wilkes heat Snllth with a well placed grounder to make the tlv cauuht at midofT Mankad came out with 4 for 49 I avlng earlier claimed the wicket of Btollni -•' %  %  %  Treatrall. Th> Ul r hi Vlng hatted 1(13 inmiiles for 49 which included n 1 ajiofhai Indian tot player, Umd. .1 Rae aftai 1 ; 17 Including one six .out fimr toun in BS mhi ta (iymkunii It.niiii ; POItT-OF SI'AiN Mnv The TranquUlly Tennis flu makiiiK %  -. i nd a powtrfUl contingent to meet Savannah Club. The team Is doe to ariive n Hail.aiii. M.,-. |D Tw n the colonyS best inens" double combination Nothnagil and Culllbert Thnvenot will opMH UM nun' chiunploni Jm Ho and KunMl Archer in a llootllight match to-morrow night, (rVidu proceeds going to aid in sand&g Rig the team net us*. Tranquility selected llarnld Nntlm. .. 1 t<> lead the ibSe, with Arneaud Do V^r* leuil vu-e-Caplain. — (KeuMr.) 1 spomloliiTWin VBNK'E. ttu I The three day strike M Venice's 0i ndoUeri < nded todny with con* plele victor) for the graceful olo QondolH over the motorlxmls Motoi vessels have leen banned by the City Council from the Inner ..ici u. ayi of Venice and from tht Grand Canal. Oondollers untied Iheir mooring ropes and once again offered their boats for hire (o ft 11 m H i v I KM 11 Wins 4,000 Raffs ALL-TIME ftfCORD SANDOWN. Surrey. May 4 The British champion jockey Condon Rleharda, who is 46 toriorrow, rode his four thousandth v inner today, an all-time record The Biggest money 'pinner in r.ritlsh horse-racing history. RlchdIn 30 years on the turf has irned an estimated £ 1.800,000 i rise money for racehorse ownt and collected at least tiOU.OOO r rlres for himself, but RlcfcanU ever ret won nrilaln's greate,t race—Ihc Derby.—Brats* B.B.I. lafii Prafraaar I %  N*1 I N. !'.....1 .n Ihi %  in InicfhullB %  1 v%  10 a m. I'K.a.ai lundoii Liahi (tier Pawn 'i N, ~ M T| f ri Annlj.n 1 put T>. f n.-iNit, 1 The end Nn. 11 Id |. ni S.m. N. M-rwS— '11 (Hi 1.. Th* S.--I ID p . :i IlnUin US ii m tpoiiKi> :>.,. H11W in VlmialuT X ul Ihe K*d I J p m Hill' I* p ui ThtUaih Servir* Nlhf. al lh Op-r. .1 p .n ChoM* t II P m Prncrammr Pal p m rrm ilw "hlrd Prof ran p m tnlilu4 • p m. New BrcP m Danc Mmir. i p i" Ti-r N Wra* Aitatnta J tl pm nan Diar* T.A p in Tin P I'lra-m* a p in Ra Mar nr*an IBM pm p IN WiKHI Altair. Soccer XI i a letter lo Colonel I. C I irins, Chairman of the Bail-' bourne Football and cricket Teams. Mr .1 Kidney, m .he West Indie* touring side, has Intimated Ihe possibility of the •Act Indies turning out a Soccer I XI at the end of their cricket prograsjujnp. He wrote When we have won the rubber we hope to come down to Eastbourne again, and beat your team at soccer." During their 10 days' stti al Eastbourne, the West Indies watehed tho Eastbourne Football Club nlav n Corinthian lA-aue match —Benter. ALL Old Combermerianj are LCmlnded %  >! the monthly reunion i he held In the School Hall, tonitht, rrlday, May 5. at 8 o'clock. Thiough the courtesy of the liutith Council Representatwe Ihe following films will be shown: British News. J. Letter from Britain. 3 House of Windsor. 4. Mercy Flight. There will be the usual games after the Film Show. ii*> Farthest I One tiallon will cevei ~w Stocke.l in litD. GRFY* BLACK i llatal cI lint) in drum | | tli 1.000 so .. : nd Sl'PFi: I WILKINSON & HAYNLS CO., PHONE 115(1 — I s Exercise Tracks Being Built AT GARRISON TWO exercising trscks which are being built on the Garrison will bo completed in about two asalka, Mr LeWia, Secretary of • he Barbo I5.f F 1..... i..-. ..i..,,.. (Mln.l 715* I" Wind Hi......... % %  ...... F_ (1 pm.' E by N Wind Wl.x.i. li mile, i.n hour. Ilaron.rlrr (9 ...ml .M2 Il p.ml J Theyll Do Ic Every Time — — %  •—• Hatlo Finest Quality British WOOLLENS :DOESKINS :WORSTEDS :TWEEDS :SERGES :LINENS. DRILLS :WHICH CAN BE MADE INTO TAILORED SUITS FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN Can Be Seen At C. B. RICE & Co. OF ROLTON LANE 'oarr l } a**pori tm iUml -. i/lppearaiM,is a Suil Tailored by us. Only lfe| r,i„..| Wii..1.1. Suilings slnrkcd . only ihr H.-si Workmanshla i:ii.ii.iul....l TO-III Y FIX i aajsKi 1.11• %  unn-.n: JHIIIMYS HADMO STARS Who like JKFFKKY'S I1I1K' will thrill you lo Ihp very heart. THE BOV8' FOUNDATION si II. MM Ua p.m. (For School Children Only I HARBOUR BAR ANI> HKKTAUBAVr al 5 p.m. "A ,ight as featherPANTIKS—liie> 8.W.. W-. W.X. und 0S>) l*rir*es from PYJAMAS—in Pink only—siie Vt SLIPS—.lie-. W.. W.X., nnd OS. VfSfSCJa I'inkTinly—iie W. He. io $i.4i J3.42 ,1141 & SI.7S ".Ik. CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., LTD 10. II. 12 & IJ BROAD STREET SAVE on Air Travel to Europe LISTENING TO THE SWMJOME BOYS KlOPlNS TrlEMSELVEST1.ANX -TO .MARTIN (J.06TZ, FASIN6TON,0.C. S^U ET U FIT TODAY P. f. S. MAFFEI & CO.. LTD. "Top Scorers in Tail or in c" -J i... ealtaaW %  MHlasfa*7 Htrt'l V" BS CANADA TO I0ROFI. MStSA*. m 'fer Vi ; I V ... IO ,OPB TOCANADA^ —i—_— T >as a*t %  T_i..l.sar ^ 1 1 %  "'4'" UOW AIS Tsrlts advcinloas of tbsee bin savinga by planntna your ovasMI trip now. Not onlv are TCA r.u. specially low—but arcomnodalion in Kuroptnin entities during these saroi' ss-nsons is letta (TOK*^ 1. Trawl one way "lo Fare" and •% %  %  ,v v. HVgulsr Far* aavi ii so ao S. Heeulsr Round Trip Fare \k vi t'4 n Nlia-.AI.ONA. • -tAhi.I l AN't TtSNlCCNTINIMTAl