Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
UF00098964_02175 ( sobekcm )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
Tharsd

May 4

1950.

——_—

ay

Rarbados

—_—_oooo ee



“STRETCH



West Indies Play
Indians Today

(From Our Ow

APART FROM NET PRACTICE a

team have only one more day’s cricket before the first
match of the tour. Tomorrow they play an Indian

big

n Correspondent)
LONDON, May 3.
t Lords the West Indies

Gymkhana Eleven and at midday on Friday they leave for

Worcester.

Sir Pelham
Is New Head
Of MCC

SUCCEEDS EDINBURGH



SIR PELHAM WARNER

LONDON, ,May 3.

Sir Pelham Warner was today
appointed the new President of
the Marylebone Cricket Club. He
suecéeds the Duke of Edinburgh,
who nominated him.

Sir Pelham, known to everyane
in the cricket world as “Plum”, is
76 and is the game’s most travel-
led personality. He was born in
Trinidad. A former England Cap-
tain, M.C.C. Test Selector, includ-
ing Chairman, Manager of the
M.C.C. touring team. member of
the M.C.C. Commit and M.C.C.
tcuring team, and C.C. Trus-
tee, and uring the war, Secretary
of the M,C.C., Sir Pelham has
eet lis life to the welfare of
cricket. He has played, in Aus-
alla, South Africa, New Zealand,
the ‘West Indies, North America,
Egypt, Colombo, Portugual, South
America, Argentine, Uruguay,
Chile and Peru.—Reuter.



INDIANS COMING

TO WEST INDIES

KINGSTON, Jca., May 2.
It is reported from Londen that
it is practically settled that an
. Indian cricket team will tour the
West Indies in 1952.
Can. Press

World’s Richest

a ‘ 4

Treasure Hunt

ee e
Near Climax

TOBERMORY, Argyll, Scotland,

May 3.
Royal Navy divers, fighting
against time and tide will give to
the world some real clue whether
they have found the fabulously
rich Spanish galleon “Florencia”
suid to be buried deep in the
sands of Tobermory Bay. cine
After more than six weeks
operations the world’s richest
treasure hunt appears near’ its
climax as divers defy blustery
weather and tearing currents to
complete their identification of the

wooden hulk first located a month
ago.



Squally weather has inter-
rupted work several times in the
last two weeks, but, with the
aid of giant compressor pumps
and powerful air nets probing
the bed silt 60 feet below water
the expedition leaders believe
their dream may come true any
dawn now.

The man with the brightest
dream is the Duke of Argyll, 47-
year-old Scottish peer whose
family has long owned salvage
rights in Tobermory Bay.

He hopes to recover more thin
530 million worth of gold plate,
precious jewels and pieces of
freight believed lost with the ship
250 years ago.—Can, Press.



BOLIVIA GETS $16M
LOAN

WASHINGTON, May 3.

The Export-Lmport Bank said
today that it has granted a
$16,000,000 loan to Bolivia to com-
plete a highway between Cochan-
bama and Santa Cruz. The
$16,000,000 will pay two-thiras ot
the cost of completing the road
begua in 1944, the remaining
portion will be paid by the Bolivian
Government.—Reuter.



GOOD RELATIONS

BELGRADE, May 4

Marshal Tito tole former Italian
partisans at a reception here last
night: “no questions which have
isted between Italy and us, or
which still are outstanding could
trouble the good relations between
@ur two countries”. —Reuter.



vw They haye taken the opportun-
ity to run their eye over Roley
Jenkins, whom they will meet at
Worcester and have formed the
impression that he is a bowler to
be treated with respect. Judging
by the form he displayed against
Yorkshire two days ago Jenkins
is a certain inelusion in England’s
ma for the First Test.

@ West Indians were intro-
duced to their largest audience to-
night when they appeared on
Britain's television screen. They
were the guests in the weekly
feature “picture page” and after
being introduced by Miss Joan
Gilbert they were interviewed by
Leslie Mitchell, probably the Bést
known interviewer in British
radio. John Goddard, Captain of
the tourists, was the first to speak
and he introduced to viewers each
member of his team.

As Goddard introduced each
man he outlined his particular
capability and ended by remarking
1 have not seen. many English
players but as my batsmen are
all in top form I think we shall
score a lot of runs and have a good
record on the tour.

In the afternoon they attended
a radio newsreel cinema in Soho
Square, London to view all eamera
shots which have been taken of
them since their arrival in Eng-
land. —Reuter.

St. Kitts Police
Patrol Antigua
Strike Spreading’

Aavoeate Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, May 3.

The Trade Union strike has
spread to Mill Reef where work
on luxurious holiday bungalows
ceased due to the dismissal of an
employee.

An administrative suggestion
that a dock Labour Committee,
consisting of one representative of
the Union, one of the shipping
agents, Bennett and Brysons with
an Independent chairman nomi-
nated by Government should be
set up. This was rejected by the
Union, while Brysons was willing
to try the experiment for three to
six months.

Police reinforcements arrived
from St, Kitts to assist patrols in
the streets. An important an-
nouncement is expected any
moment from the Government.





New Speaker For

Jamaica

KINGSTON, JAMAICA, May 3

The Attorney General advise
that the House must elect a Speak-
er at the meeting tomorrow in
place of O. A. Malcolm, whose
appeal against his conviction of a
breach of the election law is still
pending. It is expected that
C. C. Campbell, member for West-
ern Westmoreland, will be the new
Speaker.—(C.P.)

,



Russians Arrest
British Vessel

LONDON, May 3.
The British Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Fisheries stated to-day
that the British Trawler Etrara
was arested by a Russian naval
vessel on May 1. The owners of
the trawler, The Standard Steam
Fishing Company of Grimsby,
said it had been boarded by a
Russian crew and taken to Mur-
mansk, The trawler left Grimsby
on April 19 with a crew. of 22

bound for the White Sea.
—Reuter

~ °
Soviets Issue ‘Fifth
State’ Loan

LONDON, May 3.

The Soviet Government has de-
cided to issue a 20,000 million
roubles loan, Moscow Radio said
today. It will be known as “fifth
State loan for economic recon-
struction and development. At
the nominal change rate fixed
when the rouble was revalued {ast
March, the loan will total about
1,786 million, repayable in 20
years.



|
|

| ‘Snap’ Votes

1

Strachey Will

LONDON, May 3
British Minister John Stracney
will pay a brief visit to Hong Kong





end of this month, the War Office
announced today



terrorist operations

Accompanying Mr
tary of State at the Colonial Office
who

would be making tw
months’ tour of Malaya, North
Borneo, Sarawak and Hong Kong
—Reuter.



War Any
Time Now
SAYS U.S. ADMIRAL

SINGAPORE, May 3.

Rear Admiral Walter Boone}
Commander of the American
Seventh Fleet told reporters here
today that a new war “might
break out any time” with the
world military and political situ-
ation as it is. On board his flag-
ship, the aircraft carrier Boxer,
he said, he thought the many)
explosive situations prevailing |
might become major conflicts any
day. Asked if the United States |
would use Singapore as a base
jin the event of war, Admiral
Buone said: “If we are so unifér-
tunate as to have another war I
think we all recognise that the |
Unjited States and Britain will Zbe |
allied again and feel sure the basa
of each power would be used by
the other as required. —Reuter.



Six Protest

LONDON, May 3.
A group of Labour Members of
Parliament took the unusual step
tonight of trying to get the House
of Commons to censure the Opposi-
tion for conduct ‘“caleulated to
bring the Parliamentary Govern-
ment Into ridicule and disrepute.”

On a motion of censure wh



test against Conservative er
fin forcing “snap” votes on +
they term minor issues. One of
those unexpected votes in the
evenly balanced House of Com-
mons resulted last month in a
Government defeat and anofher,
on Monday in a tie. A motion of
censure is a method an opposition
uses to force a@ debate and vote on
a vital issue.

Six members have signed
night’s motion of censure, in-
cluding two members of the
Labour Party’s National Executive,
Mr. Tom Driberg and Mr. Joseph
Reeves. Political observers “did
not think the Government would
find time to discuss it.—( Reuter.)

Overseas
Event at Bisley

LONDON, May 8.

An oversexs team event is to be
included for the first time in the
British Naticnal Smallibore Rifie
Meeting at the Bisley Range, Sur-
rey, in July. Competition is epen
to one team of four from each
Colony or Dominion of the British
Commonwealth. Sons and daugh-
ters of parents domiciled in a
dominion or colony, who are resi-
dent in Britain for educational
purposes, are entitled to shoot.
The small bore meeting precedes
the National Rifle Association's
Imperial Meeting, which includes
the blue riband of rifle shooting—
the King’s Prize Competition.—-
Reuter.

to-



}



Streets Look Clean

DESPITE the intermittent griz-
zles which fell yesterday morning
the eight streets between the
Lower Green and the market area
were in a clean condition.

The only one that looked a bit
untidy was Cumberland Street.

In Hinecks Street the din of
coopers’ hammers could be heard
a good way off as they pounded
on the hoops around the barrels.

The other streets, Chapel, St.
George, Drumm, Cowell, Hartes
and Prince Alfred were all quiet.

Sunken Boat Afloat

THE fishing boat Lady Gracias,



It is a lottery loan, the radio| which sank off Ojstin shore re-

added. Both the bonds and prize

money will be exempt from State| ashore yesterday morning.

and local taxation.—Reuter.

Plane Missing:
14 Aboard

QUITO, May 3.

An Aviancia plane overdue yes-
terday on a flight from Quito to
Guayaquil is still not found
spite of a search by commerfial
and military planes. Last contact
was by radio when 20 minutes
from Guayaquil. It has been re-
ported that a burnings plane was
seen falling at Los Rios Province








but no confirmation has been
obtained. On board were 11 pas-
sengers and three crew. Aviancia

hopes the plane might have been
fforced to make an emergency
landing in the jungle —Reuter

inj

cently, was refloated and towed
The
other fishing boat, Lady Eagle,

which was damaged while towing
in the Lady Gracias on Monday
will soon be seaworthy again

INFECTIOUS DISEASES

SEVEN Infectious Diseases
were reported in the istand during
the month of April, 1950

There were five cases of Tuber-
culosis and two cases of Enteric
Fever.

PEPPER DEFEATED
MIAMI, Florida, May 3.
George Smathers, 36-year-ola
Marine officer and a member df
the House of Representatives, de-
feated Senator Pepper in the Dem-
ceratic Party’s primary eleciior (
rere for the Senate.—Reuter.





Visit Far Kast

during a visit to the Far East wiin|
Colonial Secretary Griffiths at the |

The chief purpese of Mr
Strachey’s visit to the Far Fast!
would be to see military units!
taking part in the Malayan anti-

Griffiths |
would be the deputy Under Secre- |



they hope to get debated they pro- |







BUTLER’S ©
ADVISER
GOES SLOW

{From Our Qwn Correspondent |
LONDON, May 3. |

_M. G. Sinanan, lawyer-politi- |
cian from Trinidad and adviser to |
the Butler Union has temporarily |
postponed his plans for interesting |
British MPs in the successful out- |
‘ome of the proposed West Indies |
Federation |
His intention now
the arrival of the West Indian |
delegates due shortly to discuss |
with His Majesty’s Government |
the future of B.W.I sugar con-
tracts. |
With delegates and particularly |
Albert Gomes his fellow Trini-

is to await |





LA,
ne

her appearance ‘Dier
Hitechoun wag refused a permit to enter England with the rest
of the French mannequins, later e Home Office decided to
grant one after all. Her measurements—-Hips 35, bust 36, Height
5 ft. 6 ims—Exzpress '

} ‘
fare sip

LIE WILL NOT TAKE
MESSAGE TO STALIN
FROM TRUMAN

PARIS, May 3.
Trygve Lie, Secretary General of the United Nations, said
today he would go to Moscow on May i0th. Lie who arrived
here from London on Saturday, made the announcement
at a Press Conference.

In Paris he has already seen French President Vincent
Auriol and Foreign Minister Robert Schuman. He is pre









nd he, show mother, |
Peres. t 3 ~the wiv ftag eaealial steps. foe ithe .gelic
penne ie choo ge athening of the West. wa

dadian of a rival political party he
hopes to cooperate in this task of
approaching MPs of all parties
here. '

The Colonial Office are expect-
ng Gomes to arrive from Trinidad
in the near future.

Thore is still no clear indication |
as to when the sugar talks will
commence although May 12 has
been mentioned unofficially as the
probable date |

The correct answer may
provided on May 10 when L. D
Gammans will ask the Colonial
Secretary, James Griffiths, if His
Majesty's Government are pre-
pared to reconsider the decision
to reopen negotiations on a long |
term sugar contract,

Meanwhile, it has been an-
nounced in Barbados that the |
talks will start during the week |
beginning May 15,

be



“Big 3” Will Discuss
Western Strength

WASHINGTON, May 3,

Secretary of State, Dean
Acheson, said today that the “Big
Three” Foreign Ministers meeting
in London this month, would dis.

The

He said that the three Foreign
Ministers would see whether the
policies of their three Govern-
ments could be brought into line
in various matters and what steps
were needed to be taken for the
general strengthening of the West

—(Reuter)



Austria Oppose

Soviet Move

x VIENNA, May 33.
; The Austrian Cabinet today de-
cided to oppose a Soviet move to

“ clause compelling the Govegn-
ment to dissolve Fascist Organjs-
ations Foreign Minister Kar\
Gruber said all attempts to build

States,
help in winning the return to Italy
of the Adriatic tree territory of
Trieste

energetically
made by Senators yesterday that

establisiiinent of pewee and of ser k
ing.” solution to the
framework.

siding over a meeting of heads of the United Nations’ neo-Nazi cells had been trustrated

2 ialised agencies, The Soviet proposal, made ‘in

_ Speman $4 Lie said he expected, to be in| London recently, would place new ,
Moscow for several days and {oe difficulties in the way of the con-|



see Soviet leaders.

“If Premier Stalin is in Moscow
and it can be arranged | hope |
see him.”

Constantin Zanercho, Assistan
Secretary General for the Security
Council affairs, will accompany
him to Moscow.

Mr. Lie said that he has already
interviewed leaders of the othe
three great powers and does np

SPORTS
WINDOW

College and Pickwick-Rovers
meet at Kensington this afternoon
jn a return Pirst Division fixture
When these teams met earlier thic
season Piekwick-Rovers won the
game by @ three-oneg@margin





5 thle. lind en expect immediate results as jc
Since 5 ime ollege has i ¢ aiti * “* 4,
shown some improvement by hold- oe cae of e -avtipuse 8. 2 i me
ing the strong Empire team to a ope that all these exchanges
draw views may lead to some resuk
it will be interesting io see durin: the next two o1 thre
whether Pickwick-Rovers can re- - ne '” he said ra FF
peat thein win or College on this months, © Sald.
gecasion “manage to turn the |} Mr. Lie told correspondents: 1
table

jam not bringing a inessage from
| President
| Stalin.” (He had heard
rumour in New York.)

I have no messages or proposals
from leaders of the Government
“lL am only interested now

a aa nan a senate



Gold Will Not a
Go Up

WASHINGTON, May 3





the world situation.”
Mr. Lie, who has

visitec
| Moscow since 1946, will leave fo

not

Truman to Marshal |

in
making up my own opinion about |

clusion of the Austrian Treaty, he |



aid.—-Reuter.



Aduncate
POINT” ON SUGAR

9

' Sugar Is Vital To
B.W.I, Economy



A Bachelor “Looks

‘a number of different occasio:
y | for other than British Carib!
For Help | interest
No one who has any knowledzé
ROME, May 8. of social conditions in this par
Italian Premier Alcide Defof the Commonwealth can den
| Gasperi today cafled on the United| that economie improvement

Italy should withdraw from the , ; i i
Atlantic Pact and the Western Lose Seniority
Ene-up ashen a a oes NORFOLK, Virginia, May 3
e affirme wt the Ttalian Three key Officers, of the 45,004)
Governibent’s in on of wo Latter jas balWeshin 2 oe
ing wentne ae eae. fort Youth ip Gtree bait fir Chibs

lini’s
Northern Italy, said he will appeal
against the 19 years sentence given

him last night for collaboration > Py m

with the Germans, according to

the Counsel I OLYGAMY
The appeal will be made to SAN FRANCISCO, May 3

Italy's Supreme Military Tribunal,
insert in the Austrian) State treaty, | though the 68 year old oldier, one
of the last of the leading Fascists,
will nave only

Phice:
FIVE CENTS
35.










Year

‘Times’ Urges U.K.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 3.

ECONSIDERATION by the British Government of thei:

offer to B.W.1, sugar producers is suggested in the May
edition of the “Times Review of Industry” published today.
It is pointed out that while a new offer of 25,000 tons to
British Honduras has been welcomed in the West Indies
there is still dissatisfaction at the total British Caribbean
queta,

+ The West Indies are anticipatin
something like a glut in the nex
few years and even with Imper
preference are afraid that Cul
sugar producers may depre
world price below a remunerative
| level for the B.W.L.
On the other hand,
| Times, “it has to be rememb«
| the

Before He Leaps”

LONDON, May 3
Britain's defender of
bachelorhood Judge Sir Ern-

sa

est Charles, in Southern sugar prices have risen muc
England to-day (aged 78) is | more than those of most oth
still a bachelor imported foods and the Briti

Government are reluctant to cor
mit themselves to a bargain whic
night mean paying an unecor
mically high price for West India:
sugar in 1957 without any margi:
for ordinary commercial bary

His definition of a bach-
elor was; “A man who looks
before he leaps and, having
looked, does not leap.”

He received many mar-
riage proposals from women







aged between 2 and 5 ing.

after he had complained | “Yet, even so” concludes The
from the bench that “No | Times, ‘as the sugar growin

one ever wanted to marry dustry is of vital importanc

me although I am in a good
job”, He was then 66,
—Reuter

the economy of the B.W.l,, a
broadly speaking, must continue
be, the British Government oug
to consider whether they eann
stretch a point in this matter
They have done so elsewhere or





DeGasperi Calls

Britain these colonies is in urgent ne¢

and here isa real opportunity”

and France for

Missouri Ofiicers

Speaking in the

rejected

Senate, he
proposals



| peake Bay
Varane k
Vana .

tiny ¢

n January, nave ber
ove Of seniority t



problem wr

Graziani. Will
Appeal
ROME, May 3

Graziani, Musse-
gap” commander in

A

Pe §, th od. by court tag
tial on fheghgence vharys, b
cluded Capt. William D, Brown,©
aged 47, who commanded the bat-
tleship. Capt. Brown had told a”
Naval Court of Inquiry: “I bear >

a the sole responsibility,”’—Reuter, ©
Ex~Marshal

“last



CHINA OUTLAWS

Communist China has enforced
new marriage regulations outlaw-
ing polygamy and the sale of wos

14 months more tofmen, Peking radio announced to«

Serve hefore being freed, day Both practices have been
He has already been in gaot to condoned in China for thousands
more than four years.—-Reuter, of year Reuter,





“I enjoy the:

Half-Hour Protest best of all!”

‘ge
Strike In Rome
ROME, May 3
Buses and trams halted for five
minutes throughout Rome today
as transport workers joined in a
half-hour general strike called by
the Communist- led unions in pro-
test against the shooting two
peasants
The strike was timed to coincid
with the funeral of the two men
shot at Celano, Bast of Rome, on
Sunday, during a clash with police
~-Reuter.

oO



All Points Not
Yet Settled

}
|
|
}
|

The Board of the International : |
Monetary Fund today recommend- | the Hague tomorrow afternoan. | LONDON, May 3
ed the rejection of South Africa's He will stay there on Friday an: } Not all points of difference be

proposal to increase the price of} 0% Saturday will go to Geneva
gold,

Its present price is $35 an ounce,| Health Assembly on Monday

The Board also recommended| May 8. He will also speak or
the rejection of South Africa’s pro-| Tuesday May 9, at the corner-
posal to allow gold producing| Stone laying for the new building
countries to sell half their gold! of the “Palais Des Catens,” needed
output at whatever price could be| to house the Worid
obtained above the pegged rate Organisation.

i He will leave for Moscow or
South Africa’s requests were Wednesday, May 10
made last year at the annual meet- 2
ing of the Fund. They met strong
opposition from the United States
President Truman has said that
the United States -woula never in-
crease its purchase price for gold
as long as he was President.- ‘|

FLIGHT |

—Reuter



Czech Planes
Released

GERMANY, May 3
Three Czechoslovak D63 (Dsa-

CANCEL

where he will speak at the third

Health | Py

Cathalie Church
in the recently
jagreement, according to a
;|veport from Warsaw
London A communique
all
(difficulties encountered by the
»\|mixed commission of three Bishops
and three state representatives in
| reaching agreement.—Reuter,

Roman
, | settled signed
press
reaching
signed

| RAIL STRIKE IN U.S.

CHICAGO, May



2
3.

jed in seven Midwest rail centres
| beginning tomorrow morning, the
|Railway Yardmasters of America



;tween the Polish State and the;
were!

|

Polish Bishops referred to;

|
|

kota) aircraft which made unau- |. od t 1. Phe RYA-is a}
thorised landings at an aizpart | onion of "mnerergiiing’ ;
BRUSSELS, May 3, | near Munich on March 24 with 65 “nei Reuter
Sabena, the Belgian Airline, | people aboard have been released |
cancelled their Brussels-Vienna| tO Czech authorities’ headquarters, aay
flight today when Sowet authori-| uropean Command, the United
ties in the Austrian capital for States army announced here to- 15 DROWNED IN

bade the airline’s planes from! “#¥,, ;
landing. According jo airline| . = ae release of the planes is in
officials the ban is a sdnetion im- ee ee wath the long ie
posed by the Soviet authorities! policy of the United States in
Banaue ia Sat hy seed *, Co-operation with Czech author-

i Sabena aircraft in| ities to effect a prompt return of
augurating the service a week 42°) the abandoned aircraft vhich
did not follow the regular corridor.| make unauthorised landings” the

—Reuter announce stated.—Reuter



1ent

FLOODS

ANKARA, May :





Floods following heavy rai
drowned 15 people, destroyed 36
es and damaged 15( Polat

f h province f M
tya.—Reuter j

vard fore-’ There'll never be a

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PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950

ROXY THEATRE









Ub © Sir Stafford Says Sir Stafford, in a written reply, |
said: If

VERY time a guy takes out _ The tax on a 49 cent packet of {

his gal in Britain Chancellor 20 cigarettes is about 39 cents.





of the Exchequer Sir Staiford : ou a
i 7 a Sa ea ndy The tax on a pint of average v | -siisaiabbialiliie
OY PAWLEY, Foreign News The Top Of The List ee Ehret rake-off strength beer is about ten cents. {|
“Daily ; P.M
graph wh of the “Daily tele rr a Rand Mrs: B. Watson have! Just how much is levied by the. 2°? ‘™ = an ounce of pipe| TO-NIGHT AT 8.15 P.M.
¢ who wrote an article on | : a ‘i ” hh 4 7 ¢ tobaceo is abou: 44 cents, vary- |
‘aribbéah F -ati : ‘ 2 a left for Grenada after spend-|Exchequer for the privilege af 5 : i : é : ne
last week, fe'ueck ot hin Geak ates ' i ing a short holiday at “Cacrabank”.|going to a football game, seeing 6 a eee TRINIDAD'S POPULAR CALYPSONIANS
a 27,000 miles’ trip by air and var | 5 Mr. Watson is Superintendent for} movie, drinking a glass of beer, The .ax on lipsticks aud face
in 26 days. Apart from calling in Transport and Export of the|putting on a dab of powder, or the movies is ten cents. | D ZIEGFIELD - “MIGHTY SPOILER”
at most of the West Indian colonies, Standard Oil Company in Aruba,| making lips ruby red? The tax on ¢ 38 cent ticket for LORD ZIEG

with whom he has worked for 25
years. They are searching for

he visited seven South American

a football game is three cents.
Republics, the United States and

Sir Stafford was asked to work

“TRINIDAD MIDGET”



2 " > oa is LORD PRETENDER anak
Bermuda, but not Barbados. the nicest place to retire, and after Sout \in: the Bouse of Commons. ‘The tax on iipsticks and face
pews visiting the American Islands, the ene = pi if a couple powder is 100 ner cent. of whole-
-Réturning Today Dutch Island; the French Islands spend a few dollars on every day sale valve. Across

luxuries, an amazingly large pro- 1 Tuts pet is made to act like 4

























MESS 2 izase TH WAIN- and the English Islands, Barbados} portion of it would go in taxa- The tax on a $4.65 bottle of iuman being. (3)
‘WRIGHT, Headmistress of tops the list, and they are hoping | tion, canes 5. | 4 A singular noun—when it grows
5 ; : whiskey is $3.4 } up it grows down. (6)
the “Antigua Girls’ High School either to buy or build a house and | 6 [desert Brien in chan. (¢)
Cre from a three weeks’ visit live here. oe ~ stitial th demin ae laa aires . 7 Sort | of marble—ask the «ia
-G.- yesterday and was mct ene it it
by Mis. Risely Tucker at Seawell. Barbados Is Best CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it: fo eeeeereren sre. fan, nese
She is due to return to Antigua R, VEREK MENDES, who has AXYDLBAAX R i You never know if the explosion
this morning. been Acting Operations Offi- is LONGFELLOW 12 Setback (3)
On The i cer, B.W.1A, im Barbados since One letter simply stands for another. In this example A is used | '3 TO her tts undoubvediy some
ir iovead ply § | thing else (5)
HHREE Antiguan Steel Bands the beginning of the year returned for the three L’s, X for the two O’s, etc. Single letters, apose | i4 Cockney chickens. (3)
ve their first experi t 1 to Trinidad yesterday afternoon trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints 116 ana semit, $0. the: ora:
° S unenta y ° . e 5
broadcast on the grounds of the Mag? ye who was only here Each day the code letters are different. ) 16 One rider that Is evidently not so
April 25" eeeeite cares for a short time was very popular A Cryptogram Quotation 1, Gar ae sae, wpe ee ae
on- reception Rae tomas remetnon Mr. Ek. G. RINFRET with everyone at Seawell, and i 20 Change of way that cuuid be
from Trinidad ae eceivec they, along with several members DPDA XGH’'V WIJIGPFHDAED VDDKFAX slim. (4) : (
eral o FY - Barbados and sev- of the fairer sex are very sorry 22 Pugitistie encvutster ' Suuia Be.
nj ‘ ~ $ , . ( 23. Some re >
hour ‘6: a on their halt P.M.G. Of Canada to see him go. : , DVMJINAXDH—SGGH. ‘ 4 Such reusuning seems to be
felt that the . eaaus 4) is TacunG at ine Crane Hotel His next station is Belize, Brit- unsound. (9)
Bee Be planted in freer ae unul Saturday, when he re- i8h Honduras. He leaves Trinidad ‘ .- Cryptoquote: AGAINST TRUTH FALSEHOOD Down
* eracall-odlh 4 _ in front of the tins to Canada by T.C.A., is Mr, 10% Belize on May 28th and expects HATH NO MIGHT—LYDGATE. 1 According wo report nes @ stout
so that their ery tee oivantage E. G. kintret, Post Master General t@ be there for about three weeks. Title Dace atic tolrod tres one
pronounced might be more ©: Canada. He arrived by B.W.LA. 2° will then be returning to Trini- | |}——~ Dial 8404 Fi (5) re
i : ee eS ties eee Cees 3 Asa erical dignatory ,
a ee re ier being a keen yesteraay from Yriniaad. Mr. Derek who has been to almost =p A for Reservations $ Pon 1 trees wins tea
ateur radio enthusiast made ‘fret was an intransit passenger , i fawn bat fate ISTINS Ser: aa a
this broadcast . e pet “ih = 5 E all the West Indian islands thinks “ . ss ® Makes ay hot to work It ie
ast possible with the on the “Lady Nelson’, which that Barbados is the best of the Wed. & Thurs: 5 & 6.30 p.m. ». SE von pet ee tel
3. le other amateurs, called here a few days ago on its punch, Final Instalment of Serial..... squad at work (7)
The ne oni a tt and C. DeSilva. way South, and he was so im- THE CLUTCHING HAND ‘ lo He tet her change he: name. (5),
ME coemceichaet Stee ay, Be Cet iret ne Garages itd For Two Weeks ind The Western Action... ERs Bg org Kebaa ay”
- who also the Crane that he thought it would : Johnny Mack BROWN in— GUN TALK 18 No royal kiiling this, (3)
ave the bands ini . pit ISS R. FOWLER, who arrived . hie Bn > a Te ae
some trainin 2 e 2 1 . 20 Prophet from 6 relldble scurce
gZ. be nice to spend the last couple ; f *
a. Were Griffith and Mrs. cf days of his holiday enjoying it A from British Guiana via GRAND OPENING FRIDAY 5th 5 & 8.30 P.M. yo ds oe eee In a Programme of the Latest CALYPSOES
ertha Higgins also helped them. . : ; Trinidad yesterday will be here THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE would get a repeat (3)
‘as Fete an te Not Cricket This Time! ee and is staying at With Errol FLYNN, Olivia DeHAVILLAND , Solution of yesterdays vuseie. — Nerosss See and Hear The “TRINIDAD MIDGET’—4_feet 1 inch tail
eed tun - ' FOR cricket this time” ceeiate. la plume. te ve, 1B.
the improvement in their vs ee ee eee F Hee Perennee 2) ert ts seabers as. ||
music. Mrs. C. T. Smith hn .. said Mr, Edgar Marsden, Were Here Three Months ; nial Noon: 25, “feats Bown: 1. Becestian: PRICES: Pit 18c; House 36c; Balcony 48c; Boxes 60c.
active--social worker hasm been But for one month's holiday”’. R. AND MRS. GEORGE Ns ae % Nat: 7. Blemenrs. & Bite: 1 Rani;
keenly: interested and she did their 4 arrived yesterday from Trini- MARQUES, who have been IRE TP Meme PPeT NG coee

AQUATIC CLUD CINEMA (Members Only)
TONIGHT at 8.30
Universal presents “DANGER WOMAN”
with BRENDA JOYCE — DON PORTER
PATRICIA MORRISON — KATHERINE HUNTER

Commencing Friday 5th

announcing. dad accompanied by his wife and here for the past three months on
esdenacte Gate” under Capt, they are staying at the Paradise holiday returned to British Guiana
owe yeston Was the first band Beach Club. Mr. Marsden is tne on Tuesday afternoon by B.W.LA.
aoe e m 1946. “Red Army” Trinidad representative on the Mr. Marques is Assistant Secre-
F, orth in 1947 and “Brute West Indian Cricket Board of tary of Messrs. William Fogarty

‘orce” in 1948. Takin sc : 4 ata ee ar p
sideration they all Sarna te Control, and a W.1. Test selector. in Georgetown, Their stay here

SYDNEY.
Australians are receiving trom
an Italian travel firm a leatiet de-
signed to induce them to take a

























Bo a a ee oeeaiall
THE ITALIAN WAY .








































z was spent at Hastings Hotel except -mi i
a ae On old truck wheels and Keen Cricketer over the Carnival which took them EDWARD G. ROBINSON — ANN SOTHERN riatns cine ifloctess ser-
eae discarded railway lines R. DONALD CAMPBELL to Trinidad, Mr. and Mrs. Willie HUMPHREY BOGART in BROTHER ORCHID vice,” it says:
rress ‘aha oad ge gy wll pi who has been ‘holidaying or at Seawell to. see “Our hostess is young and nice-
tuned steel ae lally here staying with triends returnea ¥ looking. No more aged of 30 years
A Ba een an Ree eennsk _ to B.G. on Tuesday by b.W.LA. With Venezuelan 7 old, she has a good erudition, a
consists of seventeen insthtmente, He is a Civil Servant and is in the G : j Gan oe . and eo eee
Six treble pans, tw - Audit Department in B.G. overnmen i ution resisting particularily to the
two tenor pans, one ‘tieie eee Mr. Campbell is on four months’ FTER spending one week at||}p4 Stine efforts in auto-
one bass drum or ‘growler’, one leave, three of which he has the Paradise Beach Club Mr. “During travel on the ‘bus she
tenor ‘growler’, two tango drums, ®/'eaay spent here, He was in and Mrs. John Emmanuel return- behaves like a landlady, offers
‘one set of two Maracas, one set of Parbauos tor the B.G.-Barbados ed to Venezuela yesterday by i 5
two Pa . t of ‘ ; beverages, tea, liqueurs, and
} letos. Cricket Tests and is a member of B.W.I1.A. Mr. Emmanuel is with sweets contained in the bar and
Married In Trinidad tne Demerara Cricket Club in the Venezuela Government Ser- BTO-DAY & TO-MORROW 5 & 8.30 ONLY frigo.
RRIVING yesterday by Reng sed toe za neem euaneiae vice in Caracas. on arrival to hotels, she treats
B.W.1.A. from ini e is taking a keen interest, (like ‘ with kind firmness with the man-
Mr. and Mrs. oe were most of us) in the West Indies New Air Hostess CLARK GABLE and MYRNA LOY ager for the assignment of rooms.
‘were «married on datitdey in cricket team now in England, NE of B,W.1. Airways’ new ait | |}, “She is able to transform her-
. Mrs. Davies is the former 13 Years In Venezuela hostesses is Miss Molly in Ve re Seneery SW PSs oe
iin Stampfii, daughter of R. and Mrs. Thomas Walpole O'Donnell, who left Barbados {|/f, Ee be trdee Jor tha setae
ae and as. A. Stampfii of Trin. returned to Venezuela yester- oe ae an peer: os pate: ” aed don’t admit to spend a night
uv 5 il rece é The re ace . :
(was with T.L.L. in South Trinidad on SE a ies oe faite bition flight recently to La Guaira an d MANHATTEN MELODRAMA without to play cards.”—(L.ES.)
has returned to Barbados to entes (omPamed by Meir two e ’ on Tuesday afternoon she was on

intoâ„¢ He Commercial Margaret and Tommy, who, with the B.G, flight to Barbados.
life of Mrs. Walpole arrived about three “She told me that her family

ST ne
Fee er who went to Trinidad ®"4 @ halt weeks ago. Mr. Wal- were now comfortably settled in

for the wedding return- pole has only been here for two -prinidad, her father however was
‘ed on Sunday, and arriving yester and a half weeksyhe is with Shell not very well,





OPENING SATURDAY DANCE & FLOOR




















day a fw ho Caribbean in Maracailf>. | He is \ f P
_ aes an Englishmafi and has!been living Transferred 5 & 8.30 p.m. and | SHOW
Christine, Manag the Cent: in Venezuela for thirteen years. R. MICHAEL MAN. who oe ; says ELSIE
: +, Who 7s Mrs. Walpole is a Canaaian., arrived from B.G. on Tues- Confinuing — at —
man. ; They spent their holiday at the gay by B.W.LA. has been trans- ; : 4 THE BARBADOS the BORDEN cow \
Petroleum r Paradise Beach Club, ferred to the Barbados Branch of The human story that will AQUATIC CLUB

MRS, JOHN T. WIL- The Lucky One Barclays Bank, He has been. with
arrived from Venezuela N INTERESTING visitor to Bare ays for-eighteen months. His

via Trinidad by A Barbados recently was Mr. ee aa Man was at the
and they hope to be Lewis Miles. He represents, and © P Aas

(Members Only)

SATURDAY, MAY 6th
9 p.m. — 2 a.m.

take you into the lives
of a bunch of wonderful :
guys you'll never forget!


































= for it two weeks staying works for Herbert Whitworth * ’ ; ‘
at the-Maradise Beach Club. Mr. Limited, Cotton Manufacturers of To Niagara Falls MGM's finest picture!
x ally comes from Manchester, who are exporters of RS. CARMEN BELGRAVE FAREWELL
a ur, Engineer al) classes of Cotton, Rayon and and her daughter Peggy left PERFORMANCE
for" Oil +, in Venezuela. wollen piece goods. for Venezuela yesterday morning aS Saas \ 3
= To The U.S.A An Open Scholarship was offer- PY B.W.1.A. Peggy has been going ' Watch for that dreamy-eyed look of contentment \



JEFFREY’S
Troupe of Artistes











when KLIM milk is in his bottle. No need to worry
HN} about upsetting his delicate little rummy. KLIM is
specially processed so that the fat contained in fresh
cows’ milk is broken down into a form which is

. who were recently with textiles, and one prize (or sade nas ae gc gpl bae

ere, left on Sunday by part of it) was a six months’ free jore on a visit
B.W.1.A., intransit for the United trip to B.W.I. Mr. Miles was the Peggy Mrs. Belgrave said
States. They are returning to Mr. lucky one who won it and he has would be leaving Venezuela for

Tnniss’ home in Oxnard, California, visited Jamaica, British Guiana, Canada today, to continue het






Meas, MRS. CLARENCE ed to all England in connection ‘ school at the Ursuline Convent
m

Ry OF 7 starring

VAN JOHNSON

Featuring...
LANDY De MONTBRUN











it ‘“ ” of Trinidad much easier for baby to digest. The extrem ;
Also leaving on Sunday for the Trinidad and Barbados. educati @ The “Bob Hope” o Sane , : ' y gest. je care i
Oe ee ee se cts Seach was a Sa nthe Y JOHN HODIAK anos with which KLIM sade stues you that every cin {|
Alice Perkins and Mr. and Mrs. guest at “Cacrabank”. He his Mr. Belgrave is a Construction , f mipate and safe—depen le for infant feeding!

A. Hughes and infant. now left to return to England. Engineer in Venezuela.



LOTS OF FUN Count on KLIM for the nutrition that makes it |











RICARDO NONTALBAN




















af LAUGHTER preferred by physicians. .. a favorite of mothers and
BY THE WAY By Beachcomber GEORGE MURPHY anh MERIC babies everywhere, |
‘ant aaa eis sy MARSHALL THOMPSOit- JEROME COURTLAND Admission to Ballroom 2/- pure,
aware that ave The Seesaw Ci her fist. (News item.) YLOR + BRU OWLIN 4.5.50.—3n. :
written so much _ nonsense Brat ete be “MATER red in tooth and JAMES WHITMORE « DOUGLAS FOWLEY meee y safe

LEGN AMES « GUY ANDERSON
THOMAS E. BREEN » DENISE DARCEL
RICHARD JAECKEL« JIM ARNESS
SCOTTY BECKETT» BRETT KING
“Drama, humor and vitality
—one of those rare films
that should oe seen by a
universal audience —
women as well as. men!”
—Eileen Creelman,
N.Y. SUN

about the new kinds of food that . ; oa claw,” commented a_by-
when I. quote what other people asked in the House: (I.) stander.

Whether it is conducive to Eng- °
write ni ‘ believes me. lish prestige abroad to allow two One Thing and Another

Persians to play seesaw on a T IS suggested that hotel-

Taking’ the risk once more, | plank laid éme the belly of a keepers and landladies will in
pass on the information that a third in the vestibules of hotels future take pet dogs as paying
diet of whale meat need not be which may be ured by foreign guests, If so, why not cats
monotonous. Something called tourists, (II. In the event of parrots, canaries, apes, tortoises
the Whale Meat Advisory Bureau such performances proving neces- and horses, all of which neec
has been busily inventing delicious sary for the earning of dollars, holidays? I foresee a great com-
es. And here are some of whether an English team could motion at the reception desk when
their discoveries, made from not be substituted, (III.) Whether a thug of a cat lurches in and asks
tinned whale meat (my italics); such performances are legal on for the canary in No. 641; or when
sausage rolls, vol-au-vent, and sundays, having regard to the a family horse wanders into the
“plain and exotic main meal wearing, by the Persian per- room occupied by a_ nervous
recipes like cottage pie, Savoury formers, of clothes which seem to widow, and begins to eat her straw
steak pie, moussaka, and ravioli.” }:ing these performances into the hat. And fancy waiting for two



Sp. a

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER

So

KLIM, STIR AND YOU






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M-G-M Presents

“EDWARD MY SON”

Starring 3



















MAVE SAFE, PURE MILK

Spencer Tracy, Doborah Kerr, ay
fan Hunter



EMPIRE mee









category of stage performances. lady tortoises to precede you into
Well, I will back against all the lift. To-Day Only at 445 & 8.30 p.m,
those delicacies, any day, my own Wild Life Talking of apes, I am very fond United Artists Present
recipe for exotic roast beef made of Mr. Jack Hulbert’s riddle

“THE FABULOUS
DORSEYS ”

from Bay of Be.‘gal octopus — or He said his mother lost her What is it that wears white spats
even egg pudding made from temper, and bit into a writing- and leaps from branch to branch!











processed serge. _desk and broke a light bulb with A bank director. aes, Bera Gen |
net, Jimmy Dorsey, Janet Blair
~ MENS SHIRTS is
9 ROXY
M WHITE Now’s The Best Time .

To-Day at 4.45,-Only

to PAINT ieadiod allay ovis
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“THE TIME OF
YOUR LIFE”’

Starring James Cagney, William
Bendix, Wayne Morris





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PLANTATIONS LTD. —Distributors

~





















THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950

Tattoo Of A

Lady Stopped
Him Boxing

NEW YORK.

Jose Rafael Aviles, 23-year-old
Puerto Rican mechanic, is on an
£1,800 bond as the aftermath of
one of boxing’s alleged cases of
impersonation.

He is charged at Wichita, Kan-
sas, with fraud in having fought
there under the name of the
Central American Middleweight
Champion, Tuzo Portuguez.

__ The county prosecutor said that,
if convicted, Aviles faces a sen-
tence of one to five years’ jail.

In New York, Portuguez said he
did not even know he was fighting
in Kansas until he learned from a
newspaper he had been knocked
out there.

Aviles’ fight was staged by a
Kansas promoter who told a re-
porter: “Aviles definitely didn’t
tell me he was not Portuguez.”

Suspicion was aroused when
fans in the front row observed a
young woman tattooed upon the
chest of the “Portuguez” in the
ring, whereas they could not re-
member that the one they had
a in New York was tattooed at
all.

Tuzo (Kid) Portuguez is a 23-
year-old Costa Rican middle-
weight with a record of only
three defeats in 50 fights since
1946. —L.E.S.

BONE IDLE

CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND.

The mayor of Cambridge, Al-
derman G. J. James, feels that the
“curse” of Britain is “bone idle-
ness”’.

Mayor James deplored that fact
that only 100 of the 90,000 popula-
tion of Cambridge were sufficiently
interested to attend a eivil defence
recruiting meeting.

“The curse of this eountry in the
last 100 Years has beén bone idle-
ness. In evefy war we have been
caught on the wrong foot.”

° .

Did A Daniel

HEREFORD, ENGLAND.

The 66-year-old mayor of Hert-
ford County Councillor Daniel
Dye, mimicked the biblical Daniel
by entering a cage with four lions
and their trainer at a touring cir-
cus in Hertford.

“It was the biggest decision I
have ever made in life,” the mayor
said afterwards, “but I am game to
try everything once.”

Daniel Dye dared the liotts—but
he did not dare tell the mayoress
he intended to do it

°

Lorries Callide

TWO lorries M-2004 owned by
S. E. Cole of Roebuck Street and
driven by Edward Archer of
Wavell Avenue and M-1064 the
property of A. Haynes of Black
Rock and driven by Alfred Gibson
of Whitehall yesterday about 5
p.m. collided and damaged a wall
while travelling along Rockley
Road, Christ Church. The right
front fender of M-2004 was
damaged. No one was injured.

£10 FINE FOR THEFT

NEVILLE BECKLES of Bay-
croft Road, St. Michael, was yes-
terday ordered to pay a fine of
£10 in monthly instalments of
£1 each when he was _ found
guilty of stealing a bicycle be-
longing to Oscar Wiltshire. Mr.
A. J. H. Hanschell adjudicated the
case.













BEAUTY PREPARATIONS.











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First Catch Your
WAAB

WASHINGTON.

IN the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan
it’s not too late to collect that
reward for a captured waab, alive
or dead.

First, of course, yOu must catch
your waag—a chafacter more fan-
tastie than those of “Alice in
Wonderland”. As described by
the more primitive natives who
firmly believe in its existence, it
is a huge, man-shaped creature
covered with red hair, speaking
many languages and totally lack-
ing in joints.

The discoverer of a waab can
expect not only cash reward but
an “out-of - this - world” rating
among more prosaic zoologists.
So far, however, according to re-
cent assurances by the Governor
of the Sudanese camptal at Khar-
toum, no one has chaimed the
prize ($287 in Egyptian pounds)
originally posted many years ago
for’ the fabulous creature.

The legendary waab of the
Sudan recalls another strang¢?
character of African folklore, the
“humanoid ape,” notes the
National Geographic Society.

A Ceremonial Dancer

This big, manlike ape is covered
with dark hair and_ habitually
walks erect, if you believe the
stories of pygmy tribesmen living
in the rain-forest treas it is said
to frequent.

A man-eater, rather than prim-
arily vegetarian (like the real
chimpanzees, gorillas, and orang-
utangs), the humanoid is supposed
to celebrate the capture of prey
by a ceremonial dance. In the
ceremony, the females are said to
form a circle around the furious-
ly dancing males, and ‘beat on
drumlike objects.

till another account tells of
the agogwe, the “little furred
people,” of the big-game country
of East Africa.

Several hunters have seriously
reported that the agogwe resem-
ble men four feet tall; that they
habitually walk upright, and are







In Grandmamma’s day a cough was a cough—and you were given a
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SS POF L SSS Ser FOSS SSS



covered with brown or russet
hair.
One witness suggested that

these animals, more_credible than
the waak or dancing apes, may
be rare monkeys. Backing the
theory was the observation that
neighbouring monkeys paid no
special attention to the curiosities.

According to the National Geo-
graphic Society, zoologists have
long pointed out that remote
regions may contain outlandish
beasts unknown to science or be-
lieved to be extinct, The possibil-
ity that giant sloths may still
exist in the wilds of South
America is not entirely discounted
by authorities.

Speculation

Another subject of speculation
is the curious Nandi Bear, which
is often blamed for the killing of
humans and domesticated animals
in East Africa. Although scien-
tific eyaluation is lacking, native
and white hunters alike claim to
have encountered the beast; and
several descriptions of the bear-
like creature agree on its sham-
bling gait, shaggy hair, little ears
and long snout.

In reports of the “mystery
creatures,” legend and fact are
intermingled. From Siam in re-
cent years have come stories of
on crocodiles, believed by some
iamese to contain the spirit of
a dead king. In the Himalayan
mountains of northeast India, a
90-foot monster was said to be
roving and nibbling for nourish-
ment at the tops of trees.
Australia, home of nature's
oddest creations, has produced
some of the most fabulous yarns.
One concerns the “bunyip,” vari-
ously described as resembling a
seal, a horse, a crocodile, and/or
& bullock. Another tells of ten-
foot rabbits, seen in the dry
inland wastes of the continent,
and possibly linked to the Dipro-
todon, extinct these many thou-
sand years.

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Five

London Express Service

FATHER
JOHN BULL



EASTBOURNE,
Dr. A. T. Wilson, of the
Tavistock Institute of Human

Relations, insisted that without a
doubt the “Englishman's home is
his castle.”

Reporting . researchers into
family behaviour at an Eastbourne
conference of health visitors, Dr.
Wilson put the home uhder a
miscroscope and painted this pic-
ture of life with Fat\er John Bull.

Father is prepared to help wash
dishes provided his assitance is
not taken for granted but sueh
jobs as bed-making are definitely
out.

Father is willing to be responsi-
ble for such jobs as moving house,
decorating and carpentry, but
some jobs are completely taboo-—
sewing On buttons or darning
socks for example—however good
he may be at it.

Certain times of the day are
sacrosanct to the head of the
family, and at these times violent
outbursts of “righteous rage” are
often aroused by “ill-timed, even
if modest, requests for assistance.”

As a Rule

Father as a rule feels that it is
a sort of duty to spend at least

five evenings at home with his
wife, but they have their own
forms of amusement. A weekly
visit to the movies with his wife
has acquired “an almost ritual
quality:”

Father’s relations with his

neighbours hinge 6n the British
desire for privacy,

He is on “dropping iz” terms
with at least three of his ummedi-
ate neighbours, and says good
morning to most of the people
living in the same street.

Father is not, however, on inti-
mate terms with many of them
and Christian names are practical-
ly never used even with

friends
of long standing.
Curtains in the front roy ~“s
(which are seldom used) are

usually always half drawn.



TONIC

~



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¢..ake it off. That’s why more and

Ask at your Druggist today for - - - F E R

THE TONIC

Mixture that builds as it

ADVOCATE

New Pubs
For Old

LONDON,
Two refugees from Central
Europe have collaborated with
three Britons to win first prize in
contest to design what is possibly
the most British of all buildings—
public-house.

PAGE THREE

eee nee






















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DRESS SHOPPE
For STYLE plus

Pollak, 36,
Prus, 33,
where his

They are Ernest
from Prague and Victor
who prefers not to say

relatives live behind the iron mm
—e Dont get nervous
The quintet—#ll ardent beer a

drinkers”—won £500 with an entry
in the Brewers’ Society’s contest
to design *“*The Pub of Tomorrow.”

Most critics liked the winning bo t
Gesign because it incorporates a u
features traditional to the old-





style pub, modernizing only such



amenities as ventilatic: and ay
neeting. . ” ‘Hi, Ladies’ Handbags
INFLUENZA |i ecto:
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from $2.50 to $8.95



“The Times’ architectural corre-
spondent wrote: “Their four bars
ure remarkably successful in re-
interpreting the English public-
house tradition in a modern way,
cleverly using familiar ingredients
such as glass screens, mirrors,
ornamental lettering but with
imagination and not in a spirit of
pastiche.



Ladies’ Dresses

For Cocktails, wedding or
afterncon, A fine assort-
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“They also bring out clear
distinction of character —which
is part of the public-house tra-
dition—between the saloon bar
and the public bar, the one de-
seended from the wine tavern
and the coffee house, with a
richness of decoration infla-
enced by the 19th-century gin
Palace; the other showing «|
simpler, more robust character |
appropriate to its descent from)
the ale-house kitchen.”





Ladies’ Hats

The finest assortment in
stock now. Many of them
are tichly trimmed. With
colourful feathers, beauti-
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j

The Europeans’ three colleagues,
bearded Dick Negus, Phil!
Sharland, 26, end Charles Hasler, |

99



41, all are employed in designing

for the 1951 Festival of Britain. | priced from $5.19 up
The “Manchester Guardian a

called the winning design “pleas- . ;

ine and certainly not revolu-} d ats

tionary”’—but took considerable La tes Houseco

exception to some other entries

Select from this Fihe As
sortment whether cotton,



“One may observe,” the
‘Guardian’ observed, “such styles rayon or nylon. roe are
as the dungeon, boudoir, nautical sure to find your style at

sum-trap and clinical; and one has

ptices ranging - -

a floor covering of such dazzling

and broken brilliance that any- from $4 32to $18.00
body standing on it may feel tipsy .

without having touched a drop.’

“A hint of constetnation,” said
the ‘Daily Telegraph,’ “must colour
our congratulations to the two
young men from Central Europe
who shared in the prize-winning
design for an ideal English pub

“For what has happened to the
English character, whose inward-
ness it has always been our pride

Accessories

Gold buttons—gold belts—
feathers — flowers velvet
ribbons — rayon ribbons
—veilings and many other
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It’s the rich lather of Rinso that makes
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For the thorough, gentle action of Rinso
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to conceal from the foreigners, if ‘ fr doa) . any
strangers can thus grasp the spirit ae too, have an extra sparkle when MODERN
of its immemorial shrine? _ hed in ae oe Rin a rising
jor easier, quicker and better results

“Has this citadel of the mis 4 J \ DRESS SHOPPE
understocd become transparent to NS fo. :
the profane view, seen through Ri, Oo Y all your wash: aetias
the bottom of a tilted glass?”

A-R 232-000-568
cetentinnlnentuiae
—Can, Press. '





every effort is made to ereci
high fences in the back gardens
owing to the fear of being over
looked

Dr. Wilson said the whole em-
phasis is on keeping neighbours
out rather than letting them in
He concluded

“It is indeed true that th
Englishman's home is his castle.”
—I.N.S.





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PAGE FOUR



ADVOGATE

Sasa

Published by Thu Advocate Co. 1ta., 34, Broad Si, Bridgernws



Thursday, May 4, 1950

Trinidad
Changes

‘THE neighbouring Island of Trinidad will
be going to the polls later in the year to
elect their representatives in the Legisla-
ture. These Elections will be the prelude
to far reaching changes in the Trinidadian
Constitution. ,

Trinidad, unlike Barbados does not have
continuity in its constitution nor do they re-
gard the constitution as so sacrosanct as
many in Barbados regard our local consti-
tution, This enables alterations to be made
which do not arouse the same bitter con-
troversy as takes place when changes in
the law and custom of the constitution

re mooted in Barbados.

Under the new constitution, Trinidad
will have a unicameral Legislature and an
Executive Council which, in the words of
the Address from the Legislative Council
to Sir Hubert Rance, “will no longer be
merely advisory but the instrument for
the formation of policy.”

The Legislative Council will consist of
24 members and the elected representa-
tives will be increased from nine to eigh-
teen, thus giving to the Legislature a
more representative character. There will
be fiye nominated members and a speaker
who shall not vacate his office by reason
of dissolution of the Legislative Council.

There will be nine members of the Exec-
utive Council under the Chairmanship of
the Governor and will consist of the Colo-
nial Secretary, the Attorney-General, the
Financial Secretary, five elected and one
nominated member of the Legislative
Council.

The five elected members of the Execu-
‘tive Council will be elected by the Legis-
lative Council from amongst the elected
members of that body. The nominated
member will be appointed by the Govern-
or from among the nominated members of
the Legislative Council,

The administration of departments of
Government will be assigned to members
of the Executive Council but although
there is nothing in the Constitution to pre-
vent the nominated members from having
departments assigned to them it is not
expected that the Governor will do so.
Members of the utiye Council who
have departmenta: edjto them will be

a




will, ¢ontinue to have
s and overrule the Leg-
‘special cases. He can do
so if authorised by the Secretary of State
or if in the Governor’s opinion urgent
necessity requires that the declaration be
made without obtaining the authority of a
Secretary of State. In the latter case he
must certify in writing that urgent neces-
sity requires that the declaration be made
without obtaining such authority.

The new constitution does not go as far

as many in Trinidad had hoped and it is
unlikely that it will remain unaltered for
Jong. ss’ ;
Political opinion in Trinidad is not as
strongly divided along party lines as in
Barbados and Jamaica and it is improbable
therefore that party politics, made more
difficult as it is by the existence of numer-
ous racial groups, will in the near future
dominate the Trinidad political scene.

The success with which West Indians
manage the affairs of their own individual
Colonies will be an indication of the extent
to which they will be able to function in
the wider field of West Indian affairs. If
the British Parliament is made the model
then Trinidad lags behind Barbados in its
progress towards self-government, but the
test of any political experiment must be
based on its local success and the function-
ing of the new Trinidad Constitution will
be closely observed throughout the Carib-

bean.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



“TO BE, or not to be; that is
the question”. Like Hamlet we
ponder but on a different subject
—a projected theatre for Barba-
dos

First, to be. The number of
entertainments recently held in
the Empire Theatre and the sup-
port Which they received clearly
indicates that the public is avid

for live entertainment. That a
good lecture hall, concert hall
and meeting place for publi:

bodies is needed does not requ re
stressing. It would also be avail-
able for touring theatrical com-
panies, when the cost of transport
makes it possible for them to visit
our shores once more.

At present, the rent of the
Empire Theatre is $250.00 per day
on top of the production costs of
any entertainment. This, undoubt-
edly, makes a hole in the profits,
whether these are devoted to
charity or accumulated for build-
ing a new theatre. This is by no
means the whole story. The
dressing rooms, back stage,
equipment and acoustics are far
from ideal, but these are not
insuperable difficulties. The out-
standing disadvantage of the
Empire Theatre is that it is a
cinema: every evening there is ”
performance and a matinee on
Saturday afternoons, The man-
agement cannot, therefore, per-
mit rehearsa's to take place at the
times most convenient to amateur
actors.

The majority of amateur actors
are men and women with occupa-
tions, so that rehearsals in the
Empire Theatre must be held after
the cinema closes to the Public,
or, on Sundays. This is not only
most inconvenient, but inadequate
for the rehearsals required. As a
result, rehearsals have to be held
in private homes or small halls,
which is a severe handicap to
amateur, or for that matter pro-
fessional actors. Voice production
in a private sitting-room differs
greatly from that required in the
Empire Theatre, even were its
acoustic properties ideal. Actors
do not learn the ‘feel of the stage’
in sitting-room rehearsals; en-
trances and exits have to be

imagined. In the end the whole
production suffers, and this is
inevitable in existing circum-
stances.

The Empire Theatre, were it
in the market, is not to be recom-
mended for purchase as a theatre,
adequate as it is for a cinema.
A new theatre must be built, but
a new theatre will cost a large
sum of money. How is that to be
raised? i.

It has been pointed out that the
profits made by Dramatic Socie-
ties should be devoted to the new
theatre fund, and a committee
appointed to collect money from
interested persons. That course
should, be followed. It has also
been pointed out that the project
should be a long-term one, nee
that be so? Government should
be asked to contribute to the new
theatre fund, and the contribution
should be substantial. Immedi-



ately, the question arises “Can
Government afford to contribute
substantially to such a fund?”
The answer is, most probably, in
the negative. But Government
could afford to contribute sub-
stantially to the new theatre fund
if an entertainment tax were
imposed on the existing prices of
cinema seats.

The entertainment tax would
not be a large one, say a penny
on the cheapest seats, and six-
pence or nine pence on the most
expensive seats. The tax on the
price of intermediate seats would
be scaled accordingly. This form
of taxation would not be felt by
the Cinemas or cinema _ goers
after the first week. It would also
enable Government to retain in
this Island a fraction of the
amount spent on cinema enter-
tainment over and above that
expended by cinemas in taxation
and wages.

The machinery for collecting
this tax is very simple. It would
scarcely require one additional
civil servant. Cinemas would be
required to furnish the Treasury
with weekly returns «f the seats
sold, the tax collected thereon and
a cheque. This tax would he ear-
marked for building the new
theatre.

When the new theatre is built
the tax should be retained. From
the fund created by this tax an
annual grant should be made to
the theatre in the same way that
theatres in other countries receive
state aid. The annual grant would
not be large enough to absorb this
fund, what of the alance?
Undoubtedly, the balance should
be used for entertainment and not
for some utilitarian purpose.

At this moment there are two
fountains in Bridgetown which do
not ‘play because of the cost—the
fountain in the Fountain Garden
and that of Queen’s Park, although
the basin of the latter has at long
last been mended. Two electric
pumps could be purchased out of
this fund, which would use the
same amount of water over and
over again. Two arid concrete
wastes would then be converted
into pleasing sights. In a climate
such as this, fountains are a joy
to the eye and mind. More foun-
tains might even be erected.

Out of this fund displays of
fireworks could ven in
Queen's Park or on the Bay Street
Esplanade, to celebrate the King’s
birthday, and at the Holetown
Monument on the anniversary of
the discovery of the Island.

A portion of this fund could
usefully be placed at the disposal
of a committee for the proserva-
tion of such ancient monuments
as we have. These lie mostly in
churchyards, which is scarcely
entertainment. The urgency of
preserving what is left of our past
history should outweigh this fact.
It will be entertainment for pos-

d terity.’ Already the ravages of

time have blotted out many old
tombstones. These form part of
our history of which we should be
proud, Mean or poverty stricken



THE BABY WHO MAY

bents have made little attempt in
the past to check this loss.

Or Not To Be ?
lf through the lethargy of local
dramatic societies, interested rer- ;
sons and Government, there is no|
attempt to create 2 fund for
building a new theatre, what!
then? There is one obvious!
answer: local dramatic societies
and interested persons who are
not sufficiently interested to help;
themselves do not deserve a

theatre.

In the event of local dramatic
societies and interested persons
being sufficiently interested to
raise a fund for a new theatre,
but Government unwilling to
impose an entertainment tax as
suggested, all is not lost. In
Queen’s Park there is the possibil-
ity of creating a charming little
theatre on the first floor of
Queen's House. Already the stage
is there. The floor is said to be
unsafe, and in any case the seat-
ing in the auditorium would have
to be raised on a slight incline.
Adjoining the auditorium is
another room suitable for a bar
or c‘ub room. There are many
theatre clubs in London which

Vestries and indifferent incum- |
|



operate in accommodation far
smaller than that of Queen's
House. Mrs.

could be adopted. The theatre
could be shared by all dramatic
societies and run as a club or
company. Members or sharehold-
ers should be asked to pay an
annual sum of $5.00 or less. This
would finance productions and
enable subscribers to buy two
seats at one of the first two per-
formances, which would be open
to subseribers only, possibly at a
reduced cost of, say, ten per cent.

After the two performances for
members or shareholders, the
public could purchase seats for
further performances. The pro-
ceeds would be devoted to produc-
tion costs, such rents as may be
demanded, the purchase of new
equipment for the theatre, and
the salaries of a cleaner, stage
carpenter and part time box office
clerk or secretary.

Amateur dramatic societies
would thus be able to give more
than three performances. These
need not be all in the same week,
Two or at the most three per-
formances could be given for
three weeks if the demand war-
ranted it. This would surely find
favour with amateur actors, who
after many weeks of hard work
now have so short a time in
which to display their achieve-
ments.

St. Michael’s Vestry, which has
given permission for the erection
of another monstrous steel shed
in Queen’s Park by the Agricul-
tural Society, can scarcely be so
blind to the public amenities of
the Park as to refuse to permit
the use and alteration of the first
floor of Queen’s House to an
undertaking of such cultural value
to the community.

White's suggestion |



CHANGE HISTORY

SOON, now, the child of Seretse
Khama and his white wife Ruth
will be born.

This baby will arouse more con-
troversy than any other in the
history of the British Empire. It
could change the course of his-
tory.

Or it might just disappear into
the nameless mass of the disin-
herited—those offspring of parents
of different worlds.

By an odd coincidence, the
child will probably be born just
about the time the British Gov-
ernment publishes its long-await-
ed report un racial discrimination
legislation in the Colonial Empire.

Equality Demand

Surveys for the report have
been completed and are now being
analysed.

Make no mistake—in his (or
her) small person the Khama
baby will symbolise the passion-
ate demand of the coloured people
for racial equality.

That, now, is how their opinion
has crystallised over the Seretse
affair.

This baby’s arrival, its subse-
quent progress, will be watched
by coloured people all over the
world.

For—while the majority of them
are against inter-racial marriage
—they no longer believe the old
assertion that the offspring of such
marriages inherit the worst char-
acteristics of the two races from
which they spring.

Are they right?

In this month’s West African
Review Dr. S. D. Cudjoe roundly
asserts: “There is nothing biologi-
cally or genetically unsound about



By Don Taylor

inter-marriage, any more thaa
there is with regard to marriage
within one’s own race.”

Fatal Weakness

Yet, if you travel abroad-—in the
East, in Africa—you can see the
products of the mixed marriages.

You can see them in the great
ports of Britain itself. Often
there is undoubted intelligence,
but a fatal weakness of character,
a lack of responsibility, of Welief
in themselves.

Might that not be due to the
very atmosphere of the colour bar
with which they are surrounded?

I remember, travelling in a
remote area of the Gold Coast,
coming to a native village.

The usual crowd of chattering
half-naked youngsters surrounded
me. Suddenly, in that sea of black
faces, I saw the light skin of a
European child.

He, too, was clad in a ragged
cloth, He, t00, was shouting,
“Dash (give) me one penny,
master.” His face was handsome
and alive—he was no more than
ten—and he would have passed
unnoticed in an English street.

Yet he was an African village
boy, living in a remote village
of mud-huts, living the life of
primitive man.

Did he hate the white man, who
bequeathed him a mind — and
then pushed him back down the
centuries?

It filled me with shame.

Is there, anyhow, such a thing
as racial purity?

I believe that, by bologists, a
aN EO



small race in the Andaman
Islands are regarded as the only
racially pure people in the world.

And, when it comes to Africans,
what of America’s 12,000,000
Negroes?

It is said that only some 20 per
cent. of them are of pure African
descent. All the rest have strains
of other blood—mainly white.

I feel strongly that inter-racial
marriage is not a_ particularly
good thing. And most informed
co’toured people would agree with
me.

I believe, too, that the white
man must provide leadership for
a long time yet.

But, as I have emphasised,
Seretse’s baby—and what happens
to it—signifies something more
than that.

Remember, this is the child of
a royal line.

Colonial peoples will see the
child as a sort of test-case of
Britain’s sincerity over colour
prob!pms.

We have declared our belief in
a multi-racial society (which
does not necessarily signify inter-
marriage.) “Now,” say the 460
million coloured people of the
Empire, “let us see if they can
live up to their words.”

Dr. Cudjoe says: “. . . the
Anglo-Saxons and the _ Boers
seem to find an implied humilia-
tion of their manhood’ in the
preference of their womenfolk
for foreign men, or men belonging
to a different racial group.” |

He thinks that the real basis of

‘ the Seretse dispute is that it is a

challenge to the white
superiority in Africa.

man’s

—L.E.S.





} ance movement and after the liberation revealed

A NEW THEATRE? __sDR. JOLOI—CURE

By J. C. Oestreicher
LN.8. Foreign Director

NEW YORK.
ON® of the most controversial figures in modern
Europe camé to public attention recently with
the French government’s decision to oust Com-
munist Dr. Frederic Joiiot-Curie from chairman-
ship of France’s Atomic Energy Commission:

The cabinet of Premier George Bidault thus

acknowledged a mounting tide of criticism over]
presence of a Communist in such a post at a time] |

ef world divisior. and Communst infiltration.

This criticism was spurred by the arrest, cor-
viction and sentence to 14 years in prison of Dr.
Klaus Fuchs, the German-born naturalized Britisn
scientist who betrayed vital secrets to the Soviets.

It flared even higher when Joliot-Curie told a
National Congress of the French Communist party
that NO “progressive scientist” ever would permit
his work to be used against the Soviet Union. ©

This statement was more or less typical of
Joliot-Curie’s usual utterances,

Joliot-Curie. a man of tremendous ability and
vast achievements, is a difficult personality to
define.

As a Frenchman, he would be expected to be
indignant in the extreme over any implication
that he might be disloyal to his fatherland in the
event of war with Soviet Russia. Yet he always
has followed the party line, up to and including
the declaration of Maurice Thorez that French
workers would NOT fight against Soviet troops.

Then there is the matter of Joliot-Curie’s
performance in the second world war.

When western Europe was overrun by the Nazis
in 1940, the great scientist was in the midst of his
atomia researches at the College of France.

He ignored the entreaties of his friends to leave
the country and remained at his post. German
occupation authorities compelled him to admit
German researchers into his laboratory.

But Joliot-Curie played a game of cat and mouse.
and this may be a key to his mental reflexes. He
secretly affiliated himself with the French resist-

that he had joined the Communist party and served
with the so-called National Front, a Communist-
dominated resistance coalition.

Had the Germans learned this, Joliot-Curie
might easily have become a candidate for instant
death.

Because of his scientific achievements, his resist-
ance record, and his unquestioned ability, Joliot-
Curie was named to head the FPench Atomic
Commission when it was founded in 1946.

This was while Communists still were part of
the French government and the east-west rift had
NOT widened to a yawning chasm.

Joliot-Curie has taken the stand from the begin-
ning that atomic research should exclude the field
of war, and for this reason he refused to witness
the Bikini bomb tests.

He claims that under his leadership, the French
Atomic Commission has devoted itself entirely to
research into the use of atomic energy for indus-
trial and other peacetime purposes and has been
among the loudest in criticizing alleged western
preparation for war.

It was inevitable, therefore, that the Commun-
ist press of Paris would look upon his dismissal
as “proof” that France has joined with the United
States and Great Britain in what it terms nefarious
plans to plunge the world into a new war.

The decision of the French government obvious-
ly was NOT made without a great deal of soul-
searching.

President Vincent Auriol himself supported Jol-
jot-Curie as Atomic Committee chairman when
the question of his appointment came up.

His Communist leanings and affiliations were
well known at the time and many rightist ele-
ments warned that the nation would come to regret
its decision.

If anything is indicative of changing times it is
the dismissal of the Nobel prize winner from his

post.

It is somehow reminiscent of dispatches from
iermany a few days ago recalling the fifth anni-
versary of the date when United States and Soviet
forces made their first junction on the Elbe River
at ‘Torgau. For a while, the town was a shrine
of Soviet-American friendship and collaboration.
To-dey it is a monument to Communist anti-
Americanism,





reste i a eee lasses resonances
I |

——$—_—$—$—————

Other People’s Letters

millions of
ome and ee
, thousands of them write

to bag Corporation. Criticism and
the programme .

sackful day and las

ie BBC Povalved one hun-
and thousand letters
the h lisveners and a
fifty thousand from those
So far‘as the cor-
section can judge no

.

ig]

is too old or too young
to to the BBC abou it.
All types of people in every 1D

i
:
i

beg
|
a
1G
Es
aE

Some letters are abusive.
uite incomprehensible and
have nothing at all to do

¢ proadcasting but the large
majority are friendly and some of
‘them are helpful. Whilst praise
is aecepied with pleasure by pro-
gramme producers criticism is also

ed for it is from construc-
tive and intelligent criticism that
producers can jJearn whether the
pr they write and pre-
pare with so much care are pleas-
ig. the listening public or not.

A large part of this vast cor-
respondence consists of queries.
Most of them are simple requests

au

for the names and si,aature tunes
or the titles of records buy others
relating to programmes are more
complicated, Some are unanswer~
able even by the BBC's large svaff
for listeners who apparently re-
gard the BBC as omniscient have
recently writven to ask “ why cats
have ‘so extenSive and long
whiskers?” and could you please
tell me what are the dates of the
second and third Tuesdays in the
month of June for the year 1900?”
It was also not within the scope
of the BBC to accede to vhe re-
quest of the lady who wanted a
Dutch translation of several
isolated words including “Town,
dog, justice; police; sport; my; fox;
chicken; gi day;” sent to her
withouwv delay. The staff of the
PBC’s correspondence section, re-
sourceful as it is, were puzzled
when they tried to think of a way
in which they could adopy the sug-
gestion of a listener who wrote to
say, “Although we hear often in
the News announcements of the
death of renowned persons it
strikes me as strange that the
announcer never mentions the
birth of great men. It is time this
riaglect was remedied.” Whilst
no help can be given vo the writers
of such letters every relevant
query is answered as scon as pos-
sible and ali correspondence . is
acgknowledged

Our Readers Say:

Sugar Workers
The Editor The Advocate,

SIR,—Piease allow me to draw
the attention of those concerned
to certain workers in the sugar
industry. I refer to crop season
employees such as chemists, over-
seers and clerks.

Quite recently an increase of
1242% was granted to all workers
in the sugar industry, but I under-
stand that the above mentioned
are not to be considered at all,

Now Sir, can you enlighten me?
Are these gentlemen engaged in
the sugar industry, or the arrow-
root industry? Why should this
difference be made? It is grossly
unfair to them, who are affected
in the same way by the high cost
of living to be denied what is theirs
by right. They are called upon
to do responsible jobs, jobs which
involve long hours, jobs which
tax their mental capacity, inso-
much that at the end of a day’s
work they feel completely jaded.
Why are they to be left out?

If this increase is made because
of the increased price of sugar,
they should get their share. On
the other hand, if it is made on
account of the high cost of living
they should share accordingly.

PUZZLED.

Modern Boys

The Editor The Advocate,

SIR,—‘‘Small things amuse small
minds,” but I am convinced no
one can deny that to-day the order
is “big things amuse small minds.”

The syllabus of the Modern
pr hag form is truly an example of

his.

Theic are fifteen English books
to be done for the examination
while three of these must be
studied minutely for a_ special
paper, on each of these books,
commentaries or criticisms are ex-
pected to be read.

In respect to History, the Eng-
lish is froni 1485 on, while the
American is from the Making of
the Constitution, 1787 onwards, as
far as can be reached. Previously
a half of the English period was
done. Now I understand that the
Examiners complain that the
questions are limited too much to
a certain period—that is, the half
done—and must be more diffused.
The implications of this are
obvious.

Then there is a special subject,
twenty*five years of a period that
must be closely studied. I also
understand that the books re-
quired are unobtainable. The
paper still has to be sat.

This is the syllabus, not to men-
tion two subsidiary subjects.

; Insult has not been heaped upon
injury by the bringing forward of
the examination date; and I for-
got to say that all this labour is
expected to be done in three
terms! Now does any sane man
think it possibly could be done?

To my mind, the burial of the
student under this mountain of
work stunts his youthful literary
taste, and at a time during which
it should be carefully handled and
encouraged, not blighted for ever.

T have also heard that this year,
a credit in French must be gained
in the School Certificate for a
student to enter sixth form. It is
a last dying and unworthy effort
to improve results for French.
There is only one thing to be said
—a boy who is brilliant at Classic,
Maths or anything for that matter,
passes these subjects easily, but
fails French — he is to be kept
down till he gets a credit. I fore-
see many boys leaving school after
failing French in their School
Certificate, and this is by no means
fair to any of these boys.

“FAIR PLAY”.





Canadian Legion

The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—I am enclosing a letver
from the Dominion Command,
Ottawa, Canada.

I could see anyone, officers or
men from the three services any
time in. vhe forenoon from 9 a.m.
until 12 noon.

A. H. V. WAKEHAM,

Capt. A. V. H. Wakeham,

Astra,
St. Lawrence.

Dear Sir,—This will reply to
your recent levter addressed to the
Canadian Legion which you en-
quire about forming a branch in
Barbados. In order to do this you
would need to have a minimum
of 15 members and the per capita
\@x required by Dominion Com-
mand would be $1.00 per year
for each member plus the cost!
of membership badge at 25c each.

The other matters mentioned. in
your letter have been forwarded to
the Secretary of the Red Chevron |
Club.

Yours sincerely,
T.A



Executive Assistant.

Canadian Legion, \
Dominion Command,
Ottawa. Canada. !

|





@LETTERS whch are signed with a nom-de-plume, but unaccom-
panied by the customary bona fides, will be ignored. Many such
reach the Editor’s desk each week, and readers are again reminded |
of the necessity for the writer’s name to be known te the Editor, |
not for publication, but as an assurance of good faith. :



THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950



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serene}







THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950



Car Collision Case

Before High Cour
$600 Damages Claimed

A COURT OF COMMON PLEAS action in which
Clarence Fitz-Herbert Corbin, Undertaker of

Belmont Road, is clai

a.m. today.

t iming damages from Joseph
Nathaniel Hurdle of Welches Road and his wife,
occupied the attention of the Court for the entire
day yesterday. A special jury had been empanelled

to try the case, hearing of which will resume at 10

Cerbin is claiming $609.71 for damage done to his motor ca1
M-350 ir a collision which occurred between it and the car

M-1244 which Hurdle was driving along Pine Road about

5.30 p.m. on July 9, 1946. M-1244 belongs to Hurdle’s wife.

Wettest In
St. Peter

WAS gloomy in Bridgetown |

T

{ resterday, The sun never shone
really brightly for the entire day.
Occasional showers, punctuated
with drizzles, fell during the morn-
ing. The temperature was 81° Fah-
ag eit a the shade.

rained in every parish excep!
St. Andrew on Tuesday and >
to 6 o’clock yesterday morning. St.
Peter, with 58 parts, recorded the
heaviest rainfall during the night.
St. Lucy, 56 parts: and St. John,
52; were the only other parishes to

got exactly 50 parts.

The returns were: Bridgetown
19 parts, Station Hill District 25
parts, St. George 50 parts, St.
Philip 18 parts, St. Thomas 22
parts, St. Peter 58 parts, St. Joseph
35 parts, St. James 10 parts, St.
Lucy 56 parts, St. John 52 parts.

A

ported lost by Lucille Inniss of
Prospect, St. James.

She stated that the wallet was
removed from the counter at
Messrs. DaCosta & Co. Ltd,
Broad Street, on Tuesday. It is
her property.

HE WHARF, near Messrs.

Robert Thom'’s Warehouse,
was the scene of an accident at
about 12.15 p.m. on Tuesday be-
tween the motor car M-1890,
owned by D. V. Scott of Two
Mile Hill and driven by Fitzgerald
Herbert of the same address, and
a mule-drawn cart owned by Inez
Moore. The right rear fender of
the car was damaged.

C= OUTRAM, a cyclist,
was injured on his right
wrist and right foot when he be-
came involved in an accident along
Constitution Road at about 8.00
a.m. on Tuesday.

Also involved was the motor
lorry G-72, owned by Bulkeley
Factory Ltd., and driven by John
Straughan of Bridge Road St.
Michael. ;

E OVERHANGING gallery

of a house in Reed Street,
owned by Gordon Springer ot
Black Rock, collapsed on Tuesday
night at about 8.45. Luckily no
one was passing when this hap-
pened.

Recently this gallery was struck
by a truck and since then it had
become very shaky. Those in the
house were npt hurt.

A police van rushed to the
scene about 9 o’clock and dis-
persed the crowd that gathered
in the street so that the electric
wires in the house could be dis-
connected.

Robert Wilson who lives in a
house opposite Mr. Springer’s
own said about 8.45 he was sitting
in the doorway of his house when
he heard a crash and saw the
gallery and uprig!:ts fall to the
ground.

IFTY AND THREE quarter
acres of ripe canes were
destroyed within the first two days
of May. Although many appeals
have been made by the Police and
plantation managers, these cane
fires continue.

Cane fires on some occasion
threaten to destroy houses. It is
likely that on some occasions the
fire may catch a paling and spread
to a tenantry.

The targest of the recent fires
broke out at Joes River Planta-
tion at about 1.40 p.m. on Monday
and destroyed nine and one half
acres of fifth crop and four acres of
fourth crop ripe canes.

This fire extended to a field at
Frizers Plantation and destroyed
six acres of second crop and ten
acres of fifth crop ripe canes

The canes are the property of
Joes River Ltd. and were all in-
sured.

OCIETY PLANTATION, St.

John, was the scene of a cane
fire at about 7.30 p.m. on Monday.
Seven and a half acres of second
crop ripe canes were destroyed.
The canes are the property _of
C. N. Reece of the same Plantation
and were insured.



_—






after a Course of



BISMA-REX
STOMACH POWDER

We also offer these:







eae and Banfield for
plaintiff, Corbin, and Mr. D. H. .L.



| sequently deprived of the use of

‘his car.
get over 50 parts but St. George]

MAPPY AGAIN !!

STOMACH PAINS GONE

REXALL





Counsel in the case are Mr, G. H.

Adams, instructea py Messrs

Ward, instructed

by

fendants, Mr. and Mrs. Hurdle.

The Claim

Claim is alleging that the accident

was caused because Hurdle so un-

skilfully drove and managed
M-1244 that it was driven against
M-380 which was being driven by
Corbin's chauffeur, Maughn,
cabbage palm tree growing by the

M-380, and that plaintiff was con-

The defendants on the other

‘hand, filed a Defence to the effect
| that the alleged damage to M-380

was not caused or occasioned by
any act or acts of Hurdle, but was
caused solely by the negligence of
the driver Maughn, in that he fail-

.ed to keep a proper look-out, and

allowed M-380 to. veer too far

WALLET containing money, | 8¢Foss the road when being over-
to the value of $26, was re- | t#ken by M-1244.

As a result of that alleged
negligence, said the Defence, the
right side of the bumper of M-380
caught into the left rear fender
of M-1244, as a result of which
Maughn lost control of M-380 and
collided with the tree.

After Mr. Adams had outline”

the case to the jury evidence was
started.

Car Owner

First witness was Mr. Corbin:
He said: One of my occupations is
that of undertaker and garage
proprietor. I am owner of the
car M-380. I had certain informa-
tion on July 9, 1946, that my car
had been damaged on the Pine
Road. I went to the Pine Road
and saw it facing the direction of
Belmont Road. It was on the left
side against a Cabbage Palm Trae.
I took it to E. O. Layne’s Garage.

The radiato: was against the
Cabbage Palm Tree. It was
properly smashed. Two tyres

were blown. The whole front
part of the car was actually
smashed. Mr. Layne came on the
spot” with his lorry and removed
it. .The car could not move on its
own power,

In due time Mr. Layne sent me
an itemised bill. I cannot re-
member the amount. The bill in
court is the same. It is for $316.71.
In addition to Mr. Layne’s bill I
had a bill for painting the car.
That was from Kenneth A, Jordan
for $75.00. I am only claiming
half of that amount because the

ear was bought in 1937 and I con- |

sidered it would soon need repaint-
ing. It was a Ford V-8.

, Parts Necessary
f got parts for repairing the car
from McEnearney.
They also furnished me with a
bill. The coil, the hub cap and
the rim were absolutely necessary

the
Messrs.

Haynes and Griffith, for the de-

The plaintiff in his Statement of

so
that M-380 was forced on to a

side of the road, thereby damaging

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





When I got there my driver was
not there. I understood that he
had been injured and gone to the
doctor. I do not. remember the
Police asking me to sign any paper
that evening.

Hurdle the male defendant
came to me next morning about
the same business. I did not
tell him that as far as I was
concerned I was not bothering
about the accident. Hurdle and
I were good friends. He has
worked for me, and his wife has
worked for my wife as a nurse,
Two tyres were burst. I have

no idea in what part of the car
the coil is placed. I do not re-
member which rim was smashed.
I am not a mechanic. I should
imagine that the coil had to be re-
placed as a result of the accident.
The car was working well before
the accident.

Mr. Layne made no promise to
have the car repaired in a month’s
time. Mr. Layne explained that
he had to keep the car a long time
because there were certain parts
that he could not get. I do not

a month for a hired car is rather
high.

I did not see the extent of the
damage to the defendant's car.

Mr. Layne did not tell me he
had kept the car a long time be-
cause he had plenty of crop work.

Re-examined : I simply chatted
with the male defendant. I did
not say anything to the point. I
told him I was going to call the
police. He suggested that we
could settle it amicably as we
were friends.

I did see Hurdle next day. He
| tola me that he would take his
step from me; that he would abide
by my decision,

Motor Mechanic

Mr. E. O. Layne said: I have a
garage at Tweedside Road. I have
been a motor mechanic for over
25 years. I was employed by
Mc Enearney for 10 years, I am an
expert on Ford cars,

Sometime in July 1946, at the
request of Mr. Corbin I was asked
to go to Pine Road.

I found a car facing Belmont
Road. It was in the gutter. It
was on the left side of the road.

The car’s axle was bent, the
radiator was smashed, the fender
was damaged and so were the
tyres and wheels, I had to tow it
t6 my garage.

At my garage I saw after the
repairs and tendered Mr, Corbin
a bill. The bill in Court is mine.
All the items on the bill had to
be supplied as a result of the
accident.

As far as the bill from Me
Enearney is concerned, the items
on that bill had to be supplied
in the course of my repairing.
The coil was damaged on ac-
count of the accident. The two
new tyres and tubes were neces-
sary, because those on the car
at the time of the accident were
punched through. :

The painting was done in my



as a result of the collision. So
a arage. It was wholly due to the
or eine ore tubes. That| Chen’. ‘The body had to be
The accident took place on|< _

July 9, 1946. I got back the car
about a year later. I am claiming
only four months’ loss of earnings
heecause I consider that the car
could have been repaired in four
months.

For loss of earnings I estimate
$1.50 a day for four months—
$180.00.

To Mr. Ward: When I went to
the scene of the accident I saw the
male defendant there. The police
were there. They did not take
anv staiements from me. I did
not tell the Police I would not
make a Police case. I did not say
I did not want the Police to inter-
vene, that both of us would stay
our own camages.



What’s on Today use

Court of Common Pleas at
10.30 a.in.

Police Band at Moravian
Manse, Country Road at
4.00 p.m.

Football at Kensington at
5.00 p.m.





LOOK YOUR
BEST



























VASELINE is the registered trade mark of

‘PLUMBER HAD
DIZZY SPELLS

Trouble Began to Leave on
Using 1 Bottle of Dodd’s

“1 am a plumber by trade,” writes Charles
T. James, William St., Kitty Village, East





aware ‘
REXALL PRODUCTS ath or hepa
COD LIVER OIL EMULSION | aeod a ee
an Emulsion in palatable form. 1 Dedd’s Almanac that
Suitable for children and adults. }))| prompt ey ae
COLD AND INFLUENZA MIXTURE || Dodd's Kidney Pills
SERCY, OF NEROFEDSPHIEES - | cana kets
' ORES Ij‘ lied ‘two tore: bottles of Dedd's Kidney
DRUG ST {| pleted two more betles of Dedd's Kidney
KNIGHTS DE PRODUCTS y cy Mande ab Side tondatd ceande—

\ Dodd’s Kidney Pils.” 6G449
©

think that the estimate of $45.00 |



taken off

smashed in, I started working on
the car in 1946. The new parts
were put in in 1947. It look a

long time because we had to take
out the engine. The chassis, was
badly bent.

If I could have got all the parts
and started right away it would
have taken not less than four
months to do the job. When the
job was finished it was in good
condition.

To Mr. Ward: The two front
tyres were burst. I cannot re-
member if both wheels were on
the hub when I reached the scene.
The coil is situated behind the
radiator. We had to pull down the
job when we found that the acci-
dent had burst the timing gear
cover. I would say as a mechanic
that the piston rings had been
broken as a result of the accident
The set of piston rings cost $8.75

For taking down an_ engine,
overhauling it and replacing it
$60.00 was the normal price in
those days. I did not charge the

{full price for the job, because 1
felt that the two parties would
|have made satisfaction, The car
| ae a 1937 model.
Entire Overhauling

I have never examined the car
before the accident, so I could not
give a true estimate of the value.
I had to give the car an entire
overhauling. The battery also
went as a result of the accident.
The coil worked on the distributor,
The housing of the distributor was
smashed. Damage to two spark
plugs could have been caused as
a result of the accident. The horn
is between the radiator and the
engine. The horn_was bent.

The valves are in the cylinder
block, and so are the bushings. I
would not say that the bushings
were actually broken as a result of
the accident, but they may have
been damaged through repairs
that were carried out to the en-
gine.

After taking down the car I had
to reface the valves. I had to send
out the chassis and front axle to
be straightened. You could ‘not
paint one side of the ear and not
the other. I promised Mr. Corbin
that I would get through the job
in a month, but I found it impos-
sible.

In repairing a car, parts may
be broken, I would_pot say that
this was due to negligence where
Mr. Corb/:’s car was concerned.

The Chauffeur

Cuthbert Da Costa Maughn said
I am a chauffeur. In July, 1946, I
was working with Mr. Corbin, On
July 9, 1946, I was driving the
Ford car M 380 along Pine Road
It was about 5,30 p.m. I was go-
ing in the direction of Belmont on
the left side of the road.

I heard_a car horn behind me
and I pulled a little closer on my
side. The other car began to pass
me, and before he cleared he
swerved back in front of me. His
left rear fender hogked my right
front bumper. I lost control of the
steering wheel, and M.380 went
into the cabbage palm tree by the

@ on page 7



Dangerous

Beware this S-bend. It can
cause offence if not kept
scrupulously clean. Sprinkle
in some ‘ Harpic,’ leave as

The fender had been!



LIGHTER LOADS OF FLOUR were discharged on the waterfront, the inner basin yesterday
before being removed to the warehouse F

FLOUR
ARRIVES

OVER sixteen thousand bags o!
flour arrived for Barbados within
the past two days.

On Tuesday evening, the
s.s Mormacsun sailed into Bridge-
town with 14,656 bags of - com-
modity from Vancouver. Early
yesterday the s.s. Sunjewel came
in with 1,900 more bags of flour
from Halifax, Nova Scotia

The flour brought by
Mormacsun was FE Grade
wheat flour.

Stowaway Jailed

AUBREY DAVIS d@ seaman ot
Trinidad was found guilty of
stowing away on the s.s Mormac-
sun by His Worship Mr. A. J. H
Hanschell yesterday and sentenced
to 14 days’ imprisonment with
hard, labour.

AUTO BANK GETS
$11,000

THE Traveuing Office of the
Government Savings Bank which
was in operation this year from
February 20, has already collected
$11,115.59 This was obtaines
from 526 deposits including 84 new
accounts, Last year the bank
collected $10,923.56 from 644 de-
posits,

£3 For Three Tins

A FINE of £2 to ve paid by in-
stalments of £1 per month or i
default two months’ imprisonmént
was imposed on Eric Alleyne of
Bank Hall by His Worship Mr
A. J. H. Hanschell yesterday fo
stealing three tins of butter valuec
at 10/9 and the property ol
Stansfeld, Scott & Co. Ltd.

the
and

Obituary:
Mr. G. Macandrew

NEWS was received a few day:
ago of the sudden death, on 16ti.
April, of Mr, Gerald Macandrew 0:
Headley, Hampshire, England.

Mr. Macandrew in 1932 marriec
Miss Patsy O’Brien, younges,
daughter of the late Sir Charle:
O'Brien, at one time Governor 0.
Barbados, and Lady O’Brien o
Headley.

The Advocate learns that the
Parish of Headley, by his early
death of the age of 55 years, lose
the services of one who has alway:
taken an active part in anythin;
to do with the welfare of the
parish.

The Advocate would like to offer
their sympathy to his widow anc
four daughters and other member:
of the family.




long as possible—thea fush.

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the whole pan even where no brush can reach.

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———.







SS!

Claims £20: Gets

<7 Damages

His Honour Mr J W
“henery yesterday gave
o Percy Walcott of Bel
try, My Lords Hill, for
-ourt of Orig’nal Jurisdiction

Walcott had claimed
ages from Jim Best

udgme
e Teng



and Lot

£7 int

B
ont

he

£20 dam-

tic

Smith, also of the same district
accusing them of having woundec

him with
14, last year
medical treatment.

He said that after Best had «
him on his head with the sick
Smith exclaimed that as th
would have to be impr soned, th

a sickle on Novem!

61

Walcott had to ge

le
e.
e\

could as well get imprisoned foi

doing something.
away the sickle
slashed at him.
Smith said that Best had be
eutting grass when Walcott ca
and made-a row.
Best did not cut Walcott,

Bible Society
Hold Meet

The Meeting of the British ar
Foreign Bible Society was held

from

She then too}
Best anc

er
ne

She said that

ad |
at

the Naval Hall of the Y.M.C.A. on

Tuesday evening. His Lordsh
Bishop Hughes presided,

Crosby read the annual report ar

Rev. J

ip

ad |

he also made an appeal for mem-

bership. Rev. Inniss briefly ou
lined the progress of the Society
works in South America, Japa
Europe and Africa, The functic
ended after the showing of a fil
which
the Bible and the many demanc
for the Holy Book
countries,

Hospital Ups Bread Prices

‘Ss

in different

t-

n,
on |
m

illustrated the printing of

The Barbados General Hospital
Advisory Committee yesterday de

cided to give Messrs.

prices for fresh bread.
This was done

ation

considet
firi

after

of a letter from the

Zephirin ,
Ltd., an increase of the contract |
{
)

TN

drawing attention to the increase

in the cost of flour and asking fe
an increase of their contract price
as a result,

Mr. B. A. Weatherhead,
member on the Committee, we
welcomed by the Chairman Dr
H. G, Cummins.

Mr. Weatherhead thanked
Chairman for his remarks

FRY'S CHOCOLATE
* HAZEL NUPS
in ‘¢ lb. and 1 Ib. Boxes
Priced at . ‘
90c. and $1.62 per Box
Also FRESH SHIPMENT of
HTUMPHREY’S
HOMEOPHATIC
REMEDIES
Humphrey's Specifies
(all Numbers) 50
Humphrey's Veterinary
Remedies 1
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
i Liquid
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
Liquid
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
Ointment
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
Ointment

96
56

87

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LIMITED









)
new ;
is

|

the |}

i)

yt

â„¢

TONI HOME PERM

PAGE FIVE



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nothing to dull your hair’s natural lustre. With
your very first shampoo, Halo brings out shim-
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women have proved only Halo gives hair such natural radiance,

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THE COSMOPOLITAN

Day Phones 2041—4441

—-

-*
Night 81—41

La
~s





&

Invigorating



Our Home Products Department has everything for him or her
Pink & White Woollen Blankets

Woollen Jackets in shades of Pink

& White, Blue & White, Plain

Blue, Plain White
White Organdie
Bonnets trimmed
with Blue
Children’s K hus
Khus Hangers ea.
Sun Bonnets







| —each ......... ;
Wollen Jacket to match
Flanellette Blanket

NA MW VAUXHALL

VELOX OR WYVERN



Booties—each ..,.... 60c., 66c., & .72e.
.. $7.50
2.25 White Crochet Bonnets trimmed
3.00 with Pink or Blue—each 2.00
White Material Bonnets trimmed ‘
$3.00, 3.60 in Pink or Blue—each. . . . 156

10, 1, 12, & 13 BROAD STREET



——



[SSeS

MAKES A_ FINE CHOICE.

New shipment of these Cars recently Arrived.

ROBERT THOM LTD.





COURTESY GARAGE









PAGE SIx BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON











TOAST TO
YOUR
HEALTH !!

|
|
|
wr WINCARNIS te






Seen! HERE WE C
aeaatemeewe aS ETES ~rW4E

“aa agai.
TR RE OF MLOOO4F* ... THROUGH “THE
RMANTIC SOuIrTUDES OF THE DESERT...








ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT.
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.






BLONDIE __











YEH---
> LIVE
: 20) DOLLS






DON'T HAVE
MANY BABY



and
D.V.SCOTT & Co.,Ltd.

have a host of
items to suit all





pockets-here are some










































WE CAN'T GET THE MASKED) COME ON!) |
MAN NOW. HE'S BACK OF P WE'LL GET
“THAT BIG ROCK, OUT OF HERT

iF Wo CAN REACH 4
“\ OCK WEILL
hY ( HAE




yA alee LA ers ae FRYS HAZEL NUT CHOCOLATES, 1 Ib. ooo osscosossosossssee $1.62
er FRYS HAZEL NUT CHOCOLATES, 4 tbo ooo ocsscscssssooossesse 90
BLACK MAGIC CHOCOLATES oococssooossosssrosessersessesn $1.75




SOME. 1
\~m_SHELTER:





FULLERS CHOCOLATES, 2 Ib. o.........cccccssssecsssessssssnsisesssteeennen $2.27




FULLERS CHOCOLATES, } Ib. pack




FRUIT CENTRES, bottles o.oo... ccceecssecssscssssesssseseecenneed





CANNED FRUIT







v G8ial j
he iadalie af éhow










bes , 7 7

AUN NON SMEDLEYS BLACK CURRANTS 00.00/00

DID YOU "NOTICE THE PUG'S Y I'LL SAY HE was! WELL .WHISPER, PROFILE

FACE AS HE TOLD HIS TALE/HAS SENT HIS LaST RED DOMINO.NO MORE

TO THE POLICE? THE ONLY) WARNINGS FOR HIS VICTIMS -—OR YOUR
THING THAT HE MADE FATHER, EH?. oe -

BROOK PEARS oo.e...cecccccccccccsssssssesneesssssenees










DUTCH PEARS \o....sscssscsssssss sevssessssssseensesssesssees

A HAVE BEEN STUCK

rg









~~ Senor * eet PCy: WHEN WE'VE HAD A
K. PY YOUNG MAN, 2

A THERE FOR THE
DON'T KNOW HUW TO
Pa 4 . m) \ HOLIDAY, WE'LL SEE
BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS

Yr nignt d + LA
~ a \ KA Pith = ; nate | SAT} | / THANK You, MR.CANNON. 1
Ree CN 1 ; Wik YOU'VE BEEN SO GOOD TO
== = . Hii a oul WHISPER... AND TO ME.
a apne Lay A LOT OF YOU =I HOPE.)
aii? |*



Ee oth OF.
Order Dept.
Phone

HEINZ TOMATO
Soup
MORTON'S PEA

SOuP
FRAY BENTOS VEGE.
TABLE SOUP



HELLO~SGGS-+T
WIFE'S BROTHER



HOUSE = AN
AFRAID TO GO
TO MY OFFICE”

PEA SOUP

Ee ere
‘

ONION soup
RALEIGH CREAM OF
ASPARAGUS soup

a

BY FRANK STRIKER :
“me Ceara) || CONFECTIONERY

For MEAT Phone 2392

sy ‘

BY ALEX RAYMOND

!| |...S0, SISTER,



VEAL—TRIPE
KIDNEYS—

MINCED BEEF
AUSTRALIAN PRIME

THE PHANTOM > BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES BEEF (Roast & Steak)
: aS SS eucowasy —= «s >~_ ano You sensiour GIIRAN, ) GURAN, YOU SURPRISE ME.) |i

D = \) BELIEVE a CALL THE OTHER MENOF
SMOKE Agose ER yd THIS? | RHOW NOT WHAT TO \4 | SANDAR. | WANT TOHEAR
WHEN/T FO NW £ ; WHAT THEY THINK,
CLEAREDTHE ¥ pe |: -
STATUE WAS | WR
GONE*IN ITS |: 7



|
ff ; : é te 4
S. RB. APRICOTS oo...ccssescsssitinsensese . Js §
OPICAL FRUIT SALAD oe ip US 6 "Se " S
eae [gS tig, Ms "Mag | SI =CANNED
s Yon le,
Gils fT





\ eT Ff : rh ts . i yyy Gyr) ® —— ie TF % z=
ao les i = a \ n=—_————— # | :
j \ iy oa iad | ri \ t f a 3 \ f Hy Py | }

PN . Ll SALA Pemert. wal’ Lwolke mont erennro Bd aened WEIL rrr 2 if § \



THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950

‘CLASSIFIED ADS.





a

DIED

ATHERLEY—MRS. MARY MARTHA
yesterday at her residence, Arthur's
Hill, Tweedside Road. Her funeral
will leave her late residence at 4 30
p.m. to-day for the James Street
Methodist Chureh, and thenee to the
ae Cemetery. Friends are in-
William

Atherley, Stanley





Pilgrim |

(U.S.A) and Darniey Pilgrim (sons), |

Mrs. Germaine Archer, Mrs



Amanda

Moore (daughters), Leroy, William,

Delores, Florette, Fred, Rudy and
Junior (grandchildren)

HACKETT—Yesterday at her residence

Green Hill—ELIZA,

aged $2 years. |

The funeral leaves her late residence |

at 4.30 o'clock this evs
Matthew's Church, Tieden

vited.

Nurse Helena Kennedy (sister), Elsie

Kennedy (niece), Edwin Kennedy

(nephew). 4.5 50—In, |



Friends are in- |

|

}
|

McDONALD—EGLON, at his residence |

Blades Hill, St. Philip. Funeral will



4N MEMORIAM

—=—_—_

FOR RENT













4OUSF*



BUNGALOW, also Flat, facing sea mai
road, Hastings, furnished from May ist
All English baths with heaters

verandahs

showers, telephones, - Tele-
phone 2949. 31.3.50—t.f.n

_—

PLAT: Upstairs flat with 3 bedrooms

running water in each. For further
particulars Dial 3696.

28.4.50—t.f_n.

FLAT—Fully furnished. Linen

Cutlery, All modern conveniences
ninutes from Clubs and City

and
10
Dial 4103
4.5,50—2n
—————

MARKHAM—On the Sea Hastings,

| furnished or unfurnished 3 bedrooms

with all. modern conveniences. Gas in-
Ester for cooking. Apply: Elise Court.

















PUBLIC SALES





leave his late residence at 5 oe. ees ie
pm pina ra

Paints ae Chureh. Friends |" 1 ARGE COOL ROOM—$8.00 per month

Christopher (father), Charlotte ee = Rnapnands 4 my Side,

(mother), Dorothy Greenidge, | _“ ser me a

5 rl ately Sammy Howard, | RESIDENCE—From_ Ist May upstairs

R. Cas Boe lon, Barton, | 53. Swan Street, 2 Bedrooms, Drawing

ee 1 nd Dining rooms, Toilet, Bath.

€3.30-th | eae — airy: Also suitable for

MacKENZIE—HUG . ices mmediate possession. A, y

on fee ee ee anlage a THANI BROS, Dial 3533 Business pad

No 2 Bay Strect. ia funeral aa | 4158 on Sundays 3.5.50—t.f.n
eave his late residence at 4.45 o'clock ?

a WESTMONT — i
is eee Pay ante Westbury | House. From fae ter Phone allt
ind 8 § toll a.m... 4to6 p.m. 3.5.50—5n

Mrs. Laura L, MacKenzie and |
family. 4.5.50—In. |

IN LOVING Memory of my dear
Mother MARY F. CARRINGTON, who
was called above, on May 4th 1940.
Tear are the memories that shall

never fade,

Sweet are the hopes that again

we shall meet
Kneeling together at Jesus feet.
Drusilla Cuffley, Daughter.

FOR SALE















AUTOMOTIVE
: CAR—Morris 10 H.P. in perfect work-
ing order Apply C. E. Tryhane, Baga-
telle Plantation, St. Thomas
4.5.50—4n
CAR—Wolseley 8. In perfect order

Possession May 11th.

Telephone 4014.
Mrs. Graham Yearwood,

4.5,50—2n.



CAR—1949 Morris Minor tourer, low
mileage, condition as new. Apply Raioh
A. Beard, Auction Rooms, Hardwood
Alley, open daily 8 a.m. to 12 noon
Phone 4683 3.5







CAR—Morris 8 h.p. 4 door Sedan in
. 1 Mechanical condition. Newly paint-
ed. Fort Royal Garage.

>

2.5.50—6n.



CAR—1#1 V-8 Ford Saloon, in excel-
lent condition, Courtesy Garage. Phone
4616. 2.5.50—3n



CAR: Pontiac Convertiable Coupe
occasional four Passenger in good order.
Reasonable price for quick Sale. Phone
3348 or 2749. 28.4.50—7n



CAR—One Hillman 1948 Model.
W. R. Tempro 2840 or 8224.
30.4.50—t .f.n

Phone



CARS—1947 Morris Eight. Just com-
pletely overhauled and painted. 1948
Singer Sports, four seater, 1949 Morris

Minor Saloon, 3,300 miles. Like new. 1946
Chi ysler Windsor, Suitable for hired car
service, Fort Royal Garage Lid. Tele-
phone 4504.
—
FORD ENGINE: One V-8 Ford engine
and radiator in good condition, axle,
drive shaft, ring-gear and pinion, and
other parts. Enquire Auto Tyre Com-



pany, Trafalgar Street. Phone 2696.
" 28.4.50—t.f.n
ELECTRICAL

RADIO—One (1) 6 Valve Pye Radic

in good condition. Apply: Mrs Mil-
dred Clarke, St. Matthias Gap, Ch Ch
3 5.5U—2n



RADIO—American G.E. 11 tube, in
good working condition, Phone 2990
between the hours of 4 and 5 p.m.

4.5.50—2n.

——$—$—$<_$$— — —

FURNITURE

FURNITURE—Several
Tables, China Cabinets,
Ete, at Bargain Prices in Ralph A.
Peard’s Auction Rooms, Hardwood
Alley. Open daily 8 a.m. to eee





Bureaus, small
Morris Chairs

—

MISCELLANEOUS

FLOUR BAGS—Opened
white, all marks taken out.
R. Hunte & Co.,
Store, Lower Broad Street.



and washed
Apply K
Ltd. over Bata Shoe
Dial 4611
4.5.50—l4n

TT
FINEST PAINTS—Brandram Henderson
incomparable Forest Green Sun Proot
KEYSTONE White and colours, special
primers, distempers Paints $6.84 gin.
Distemper $3.59 gin, They are Here.
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

25.4.50—13n

IRON RAIL WINDOWS—Seven iron
reli windows complete with shutters.
size 6ft x 4ft. Suitable for garage or
bond, Enquire Gardiner Austin's Build-
ing, opposite Plantations Ltd. Broad
Street or Phone 2696.



28.4.50—t,.f.n.

PAINTS—1I.C.I. Special offer Gloss
Paints. $3.45 per gallon, Come and get
them. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

25.4.50—13n

PUBLIC NOTICES











NOTICE

IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the
intention of the Vestry of the Parish
of St. Andrew to be caused to be in-
troduced into the House 0° Assembly
of this Island a Bill to authorise the
Vestry to borrow a sum not exceeding
£1,000.0.0 for the purpose of completing
the new roof on the Parish Church and
for providing equipment (Pews, etc.)
for the new chapel about to be built at
St. Simons, the loan to carry ee ea
at the rate of 4% per annum and to
repaid by 20 equal annual instalments
out of the rates of the said Parish.

Cc. A. SKINNER,
Vestry Clerk,
St. Andrew.
2.5.50—3n
a
FORM I.

The Land Acquisition Act,
1949

Notice required by fection 3)

Notice ts hereby given that it appears
to the Governor-in-Executive Committee
that the lands described in the Schedule
hereto and situate at Bathsheba in the
parish of St. Joseph in the Island of Bar-
bados are likely to be needed for pur-
poses which in the opinion of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee ae
public purposes, namely for establis playing fields or other places of public

oe THE SCHEDULE con
T certain parcel of Jan -
tainins ae re 3 roods adjoining the site
of the former Railway Statior. as
sheba, bounding on the seashore, on lands
formerly of the Barbados sah ase |
Railway and on the public road, anhewes
to be *). the occupation of Miss Vera
Hinkson of Cane Garden, St Andrew i.
Dated this twenty seventh day of Apri
1950 at the Public Ses ips an teres
stown in the Island 0: a
Se By Command,
Pp. F, CAMPBELL,
Colonial Secretary, fAg.)
3.5.50—3n,

j hip

Pan Thursday May 4th

Car damaged by accident.
R. Archer McKenzie, Auctioneer.
3.5.50—3n.



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the
Insurance Agent I will sell on Friday
May Sth at Messrs Jason Jones Garage
Lower Broad Street at 1.30 p.m. (1) 1947
10 h.p. Morris Car. Damaged in ac-
cident Also at 2 p.m. (1) 1941—27.35
Dodge Truck at Sugar Store op-
posite Highways & Transport Dept:
Fairchild Street, Damaged in accident
Terms Cash

By instructions received I will sel)
in the spot, at
Advent Ave; Bank Hall X Road (1)
Chattel House 24 x 12 with shed 24 x 8

| kitchen attached. Must be sold. Terms

| Chattel





is GOT BETTER — ITS GETTING POPULAR

————$———



Cash,
. VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
30.4.50—3n
REAL ESTATE

“CASVILLE”, Navy Gardens Ch, Ch.
Three bedroom bungalow standing on
8,241 sq. feet land. Can be seen at any
time by appointment. Apply C, A. Peirce.
Phone 3348 or 2749. 28.4.50—Tn,

TAND—1480 sq. ft. of land with

dwellinghouse thereon, situate

at the corner of Wellington Street, an:
ne Street, Bridgetown.

Inspection on application

Tenant, Mrs. Florence Linton.

The property will be set up for sale

' Public Competition at our Office

Tomes Street, Bridgetown, on Thursday
4th May 1950 at 2 p.m.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.
29.4.50—5n.



to th



By public competition at our office,
17 High St., on Thursday 11 May, at
2 p.m. the dwellinghouse of two storeys
comprising public rooms, two bedrooms,
kitchen, bath ete. with shop attached,
standing on 2094 sq. ft. of land in
Tweedside Road and Hunts Road, City,
Apply to Mr. E. H. Kirton, the owner
on the premises Further particulars |
and conditions of sale from COTTLE
CATFORD & CO.

“ALCOTT"—Situate the Stream
Road, Christ Church, on 17,236
Square Feet of land, with right of way
to Worthing Beach.

The house contains gallery, drawing
end dining room, three bedrooms,
pantry, kitchen and usual out-offices.
Garage and servants’ rooms in the yard.

Inspection on application to the tenant

at

Mrs, Watkins every day (except
Sincere): betwens Sie sour: 6, $- ane
p.m. '

The above will be set up for sale at
public competition at our Office in Lucas
Foren on Friday the 5th of May 1950 at

p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,



Solicitors.”
28.4.50—Tn.

“LEIGHTON” — Situate in Passage
Road, St. standing on 6,870
square feet of land.

The house is built of stone and con-
teins gallery, drawing, dining, sitting
end break: rooms, Pantry, kitchen,
W.C. and bath do’ e

Inspection any
tetween 10 a.m. 5 p.m.

The above will be set up for sale to)
Public Competition at our

Lucas Street, Bridgetown on Friday
the 5th May 1950 at 2 p.m.
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors.
23.4.50—12n



BEACH VIEW—Worthing on the Sea
Very cool and good Sea-bathing, 3 bed-
rooms, Toilet and Tea-room upstairs, 3
rooms, Kitchen, Bath and Gallery down-
stairs. Offers received by writing
Address Mr. C. Bourne, Melbourne,
Hastings. 3.5.50—2m,

|









FOR
CHILDREN

Rose, and White .......
CELANESE CELSHUNG in

Gold, Torquoise & Blue .
GEORGETTE in White, Pink,

and Green

LAWN in White, etc., etc.

|





|





AT
THE ADVOCATE STATIONERY

aaa

LOVELY SPUNS

in Orchid, Blue, Old Gold, f

Also SATINS, COTTON PRINTS, FUJIETTES, CAMBRICS,

DROADWAY DRESS SHOP.





BARBADOS AD





PERSONAL



—— waetac are hereby ae @ from page 5
against giving credit to my wife CLA-| side of the road at the corner of
DORA NICHOLLS (nee Devonish) as | Fifth Avenue.

do not hold muyself responsible for her
It would not be true to say that

or anyone else contracting any debt
or debts in my name unless by a written| I swerved to my right while the
order — by me. other car was passing. My car

SYDNEY NICHOLLS,

Station House Hin, | Stopped after hitting the tree.
St. Michael The defendant went a little
3.5.50-—2n way in front, and then reversed



LOST & FOUND



back. I alone was in my car,



his.
When the defendant reversed, I





the other side of the road.

LOST

DOG—Black Labrador
to the name of Count.
contact Dr.

told him he hag cut back too fast
in front of me. He said he did not
realise that he had cut back in so

quickly.
Road Dry

I was going at about 20 to 25
miles an hour. I cannot remem-
ber if the defendant said anything
else. The road was_dry. I did no
see any other vehicies or people
in the road. My mouth got burst
on the steering wheel and I got
a blow in my stomach. I had to
go to hospital the next day. The
defendant took me to Dr. Emtage
the same day, soon after the acci-
ey |

To Mr. Ward: I did not indicate
HELP }to defendant to pass out. I did
oon not speak to him as he passed, 1
MAVALIFIED MECHANIC—For Adding| had been smoking at the time. My
Saat T right hand had been propped on
the door of the car. I do not know

ane ee oe rs 3 a Hewitt, if there was plenty of room for
‘alloring Em um, e he aye S . —
nite Fire, Brigade Station. “Appi; with| fongant cut back Mn

ter and ‘son. 4.5. 50-—4n.
- eres 2 It is not true that I swerved

Dog. Answers
Finder please
Cato at Government Hill.
3.5.70—2n

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—Series O
#¢4$ and Series H. 8052. Finder please
return to F. A. Boxill, Bank Hall Cross
Road 4.5.50—1n

DOG—From Kent on Monday, a large
Bieck and light Browm Dog answering
to Fella. Phone 3698. Reward

a 4.5.50—In

WANTED















—
one : L BEES ANT Sioa Ses in.| over to my right. The fender of
jood references requ . pply Canar- Ye ay i

sie,” Fontabelle. on | defendant's — car was ripped

| through. I did not see anyone com-
|ing up the Fifth Avenue. After
the accident a woman came to me
I do not know where she came
from. I had been driving with
one hand.
REAL ESTATE Defendant did not ask me how
ee I allowed “this thing to happen”.
The undersigned will offer for sale to} 1 did tell the defendant that he
gee scongerran at Sor 8 verere bad cut across too quickly. I can-
ow wo on y the 12th|/not remember if a woman was
vatnes of ‘land at Maxwell, near ‘Top {there at the time. I did not see
Rock, Christ Church, This land whic! | her. Defendant's car did not stop
is os the public road ba SOc mes on the right side of the road be-
168 feet, an aces t galow rec > ;
built by Mr. M. L. Harrison fore it reversed. He stopped on
For further particulars and condition | the left.
I made a statement to the police
next day. I do not remember if I



——

Public Sales-Contd.











of sale apply to
HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD,





Solicitors, ) signed it. :
; James Street.| The Court adjourned for lun-
Bee er as cheon.
(1) Large (2 Storey Stone wall

Building with Shop and Bakery stand-
ing on 1/2 acre land which is run in
a tenantry, Government water & Lights
installed situate at Clapham Land, Flag
Staff Road, overlooking sea and country
District. Next to Highgate’s new tenan-
try For particulars apply on premises
to Mr. J. St. Hill owner



Steno, Note Books and

ROBERTS & CO.

29.4.50—3n
~All THAT certain messuage or store
known as No, 46 Roebuck Street stand-









_ CAR COLLISION CASE

and the defendant alone was in,

was out of my car and sitting |
e
asked me how it happened, and 1 |



SSIES SSS
SELECT THESE NO’

Drawing Books three Sizes

VOCATE

ary \ KR 2OOUL Whe a@cci
dent. I told him how the accident
1Pee happened |

He told me that it was Corbin}

On resumption Joseph Nathaniel

| & Sons, and that he would have to



Hurdle of Welches Road, St. Mi-| toi) his’ Solicitors about it. After |
chael, said: My wife owns the cat) cooing how quickly Corbin had|
M-1244 which I drive for her. On| changed I left him after telling
July 9, 1946, I drove to a funeral.| him he could see to his and I
About 5.30 to 5.45 I was driving} would see to mine e

in Pine Road, returning from a 4‘ few days after Mr. Banfield
funeral ube chiles

called me, and I had a conversa-|
tion with him. I told him that I}
denied liability. |
After the accident I did not ob-|
serve what damage had been done
to Mr. Corbin’s car. ~
To Mr. Adams; I did not hear.
that Corbin was taking steps.!
When I blew my horn M-380 was,
centred in the road. I was a little;
shag geno over 60 feet away then. M-380
I passed out on the right, and ee ae ——
as I did so I heard a blow, felt o| WU 7 aoe “" 7 orfectly st A: tht
tug, and then heard a crash | M-380 was going per me y f re
stopped on the right. I reversed | a ee rae a % x 7
the car across the road, back to | (Ve. = ~ em hae ”
where M-380 was in the gutter Apexi ha * eam —— oo
: 2 crash, e told me that she was
saw the bumper of M-380 resting going towards Collymore Rock,

against the tree. that she heard the crash and turn-
T asked him how he had allowed at taak, ae ,

“this thing to happen’. He told To the Court:
me he had lost control of the cat] about 20 miles an hour and M-380
and collided with my rear fender.| was going at about 18 miles an
He also said that his car had col- | pour.

lided with the tree and that he Ruth Crichlow of Dayrells Road,
had struck his stomach on the], domestic servant, said: I cannot
steering wheel. : remember that date on which this
The driver of M-380 did not thing happened. At about 5.30
tell me that I had cut in too soon! p.m, I was going home. I was to
and collided with him, I saw]|the top of the 5th Avenue when I
that my fender was torn and] heard a crash. I looked back and
pulled away in an outward di-|saw a car on to the cabbage palm
rection from the panel of the] tree.
ear. He asked me to take him The only other car I saw was
to the doctor, and I took him in} Mr. Hurdle’s on the right side of
my car. the road facing Belmont. Hurdle
One woman came just after] reversed and asked the driver of
the crash. She is Ruth Crichlow.| M-380 “how this happened.” Hur-
She came from the 5th Avenue] dle asked him if he had lost con-
and was going towards Collymore|trol, I did not wait to hear the
Rock. She came to the scene of{answer. I went home.
the crash,

By the 5th Avenue I saw M-380
in front of me. I blew my horn
and the driver gave me the signal
te come out. There were no other
vehicles in the road.

As I approached M-380 I saw
\the driver resting his right hand
on the car door and holding a
cigarette in his mouth. As I drew
abreast, the driver looked at me

Mr. Hurdie re-vatled said to Mr.

After taking Maugmn to the doc-} Adams: I saw my Counsel read-

tor, he and I went back to the} ing from his papers when he was
scene. On reaching there I saw|cross-examining Mr. Corbin. I
Mr. Corbin and others. Soon after; heard him read that the driver

that a policeman came. Mr. Cor-
bin and I went to the policeman.
We told the policeman that we did

had lost control and gone across
the road and hit the tree.” I heard
him read that on three occasions.

not want the police in it, and that He never mentioned anything
we would both stand our own] about collision with my fender.
damages. No measurements were] But I know that that is what
taken, Maugbn told me,

I then took his driver near his
home and I then went to my home,
Next morning I went over to Mr,
Corbin about the settlement of a
bill concerning another matter,

This closed the evidence, and
Counsel addressed the jury. Hear-
ing of the case continues to-day. —

pa seer

CARRIBBEAN
WORKERS’ UNION

LECTURE BY

Labour Commissioner
Mr. E. S» BURROWES -





























Parcel Deliv

ery Books,

Dial 3301.





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building has been recently remodelled For Best Value we recommend you to buy oO aa
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Truck
owners —







PAGE SEVEN



SHIPP

FAI RA TICLE oo

BAG42 184) &B AOD







MONTREsL AUSTRALIA NEW
ZEA

The Sch. GARDENIA W will LASD LINE LIMITED
accept Cargo and Passengers for â„¢ AN.Z. LINF:
St. Vincent and Trinidad. Sail- 3.8. is expected to a
ing Thursday 4th inst rive at Trinidad from Australian por's
The Sch EVERDENE will ac- about 20th May.
cept Cargo and Passengers for S.S. “CITY OF DIEPPE” sails Port
Trir.idad Sailing Saturday 6th Firle April 29th, Adelaide May Sth, Mel-
ins: borne, May 18th. Sydney, May 26th, Bris-
The M.V. MONEKA will ac- bane, June 7th, arriving at Trinidad
s about 4th July, Barbados about July 9b.
cept Cargo and Passengers for

Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, Tueke vente: hens: sane Suess SS
Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of a : 5 a en ban ae
Sailing to be given

ladi with

The Sch. UNITED PILGRIM 8
will accept Cargo and Passengers
for St. Lucia, Sailing Friday
Sth inst.

B.W.T.
Assoc.

Schooners Owners
(Ine.) Consignees
Dial 4047

———$_



“THULIN”









DA COSTA & CO. LTD.,
Agents Barbados.

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sai” Arr

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These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
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For further perticulars apply :—
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Agents Trinidad.





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Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Barbados
ss. “ALCOA PILGRIM” April 28th May Ist May lith
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ss. “ALCOA PATRIOT” May 26th May 29th June 9th
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PAGE EIGHT



GEORGE
ARE ON
(ANCE u}

In Carlisle Bay

IN PORT: M.V. Moneka, Sch. D’Ortac












S.S. Lake Canim, Yacht Tern III, Sch.
Frances W. Smitn, Sch. Adalina, Sch
Everdene, Sch. Emanuel Gordon, Sch
Emeline, Sct Noeleen, Sch. Molly
N. Jones, Seh. L Zolleen, Sch, Free
dom Fleary, Sch, Eastern Eel, Sch
Mermaid C., h. Emeralda, Sch, Won-
derful Counsellor, 8.S. Alcoa Puritan,
Sch. Gardenia W. M.V Lady Joy
ARRIVALS

S.8. Sunjewel, 4.304 tons net, Capt
Clark from Haiti

Schooner Mandalay Il, 30 tons n“*
Capt. Gooding, from St. Vincent,

S.S. Donro, 160 tons net, Capt De Jon
for St. Vincent

8.S. Mormacsun, 4,585 tons net, Cay
Whilden, from Trinidad

5 DEPARTURES

S.S. Douro, 160 tons net, Capt De Jon
for St. Lucia Schooner E Tannis
93 tons net, Capt. Tannis, for St, Vin
cent

Schooner Sea Queen D 10 tons ne
Capt. Nelson, for St. Vincent

ARRIVALS--By B.W.1.A.L.

From Trinidad

James Johnaon, Betty Ann Carr,
Charles Baeza, Agnes Baeza, Karl Baeza,
Rodney Baeza, Margaret Massyn,
Joseph Superville, Lucille Superville
Laurence Devin, Catherine Devin, Mich-
ael. Devin, Allen Hodson, Avonda Year-
wood, Elise Yearwood, Marilyn Year-
wood, Oscar Nothnage!l, Wilma Green-

idge, Stewart Noue, Alwyn Gibson, Edgar
Marsden, Pear: Lamphile, Ruth Fowler,







Joyce Byer, Andrew Christine, Arpad
Ronai, Gilard Stoute, Barbara Wilson,
John Wilson, Norma Atherly
Crichlow, Verna Crichlow, Ee

fret, Jask Henry, Robert Lanaison, Nor-
man Craner, Jacques Craner, Lucille
Blades, Richard Davies, Peggy Davies.
Wilfred Horner, Charmian Horner, My-
ron Ideman, Irere Idernan

DEPARTURES—By B.W.1.A.L.

For Trinidad;

Miss Rosemary Arrindell, Mr, Law-
rence French, Mr, Frank Ward, Hon.
Francis Hutson, W.V.L.C. Mr. Lauffer
Eder, Mr. Archibald Reid, Mrs. Elspeth
McCormick, Miss Rosebrock, Mrs. H
Rosebrock, Miss Judith Showalter, Mrs

Gertrude Showalter, Mr. C. Cheesemap
Mr. Albert Mendes, Mr. Malcolm Sond
Mrs. Mary Kernahan, Rev. Harold Mel-
ville, Rev. James Innes, Miss Mary
Dowlen, Miss Karen Dons, Mstr. Mich-
ael Dons, Mr. Carl Dons, Mrs, Joan
Dons, Mr. Morrell} Bourne, Mr. lan Bain

MAIL NOTICES

Mails for St. Vincent, Trinidad
Sch. Gardenia W. will be closed
the General Post Office as under:—

PARCEL & REGISTERED MAIL at
2.30 p.m. on the 4th May 1950.

ORDINARY MAIL at 2.30 p.m,
the 4th May 1950

Mails for Grenada by Sch, Eastern
Eel will be closed at the General Post
Office as under:~

& REGISTERED MAIL
2.30 p.m. on the 4th May 1950,

ORDINARY MAIL at 2.30 p.m, on the

4th May 1950.

by
at

on

at

' .: Woodcock

In Line For

n Line ro
Champion
LONDON.

If British heavyweight boxing
champion, Bruce Woodcock, beats
Lee Savold at the White City
Stadium on June 6, he will defend
his claim to the world heavy-
weight championship in London
next September. . j

In the opposite corner will be
Ezzard. Charles—or whomever the
American’ National Association re-
cognizes as their champion, |

Jack “King” Solomons, Britain’s
ace boxing promoter, is anxious
for Woodcock to prove that he is
the best heavyweight boxer in the
world, x

“We bar no one,” he said, “we
just want to prove we have the
best man in the world,”

In his attempt to line up such a
match Solomons will meet razor-
keen competition from promoters
in New York and Chicago. :

‘oodeock has already received
a tempting offer from Chicago to
meet Dither Joey Maxim or Joe
Louis in the meat city in July—if
he disposes of Savold.

It is almost certain, however,
that Woodcock will turn down the
offer—even of meeting a declining
Joe Louis.

It definitely does appear right
now that London, and not New
York, is the big-money Mecca of

the world’s topliners, and
Bruce plans to stay here to meet
them—LN.S.

s
THIRD _ DIVISION
RESULTS



Police defeated Y.M.C.A, 3-2 yes-
terday in their third division fixture
when they rei at Cariton. Y.M.C.A.,

“J who scored first were quickly overtaken
by their rivals who netted their three
goals in the second half.

At Lodge, the school boys were beaten
the Combermere Old Boys.

atl
Rain en during the games,





OOK)

Harbour ‘Log oe

eyll Do It Every Time __

T WAS IN BERMUDA THE FIRST



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





To Beat A

ustralians

England Must Beat W. 1.
SAYS JACK HOBBS
Two big problems face English cricket this summer. One

is the challenge of the strongest team the West Indies have
ever sent here. The other is to build an eleven to beat Aus-

tralia next winter.

There is a school of cricket thought which argues that we
should discard tradition in the Tests with the West Indies.

“Why play established stars
like Hutton, Compton, Washbrook
and Edrich?” it is said. “We
know their form.”

“Rest them for.the tough Aus-
tralian trip ahead. Use the West
Indies Tests as trial games to
find much-needed new blood.”

In my opinion this would be a
disastrous policy. These West
Indians are a’ magnificent all-
round side, full of ardour and
determination.

Also, if the season is dry and
we get fast wickets, we shall have
all our work cut out to beat them.

The only way to defeat the
Australians is first to beat the
West Indians.

To do this we must bank on
the “old firm”—Hutton, Compton,
Edrich, Evans, ete. These men
will give the team solidity, and
we cannot leave them out.

In any case to select an experi-
mental “trial-horse’ side would
be an insult to our guests.

Remember what happened dur-
ing our last tour of the West
Indies when, for owe reason or
another, we were able to send
only half a team.

The West Indians were indis-
nant at the time, and although
we flew out Hutton at the last
moment it made no_ difference.
We lost--badly.

No, for prestige as well as for
policy reasons, we must field our
best team, To achieve this we
should sprinkle in a few of the
younger cricketers with the tried
men,

It is far too early to say for
er who these newcomers will
e.

What we do know is_ that
BOWLING is going to be our big
headache,

Our absolute minimum bowling
needs are: —

(1) At least one top-class fast
bowler (Larwood should be the
model to aim at).

(2) A first-class googly bowl-
er,

(3) A left-arm bowler who
can seal up one end in the grand
manner like Hedley Verity or
Jack White.

{ hope that Ken Preston of
Essex will supply one of our fast
bowling needs. He has recovered
from his leg injury, but it is too
early to say how he will shape.

The West Indians, of course,
have three good fast bowlers, but
the best in the world still come
from Australia,

I was in South Africa when
the Australians were there during
their recent tour.

From what I saw I am quite
prepared to see Ray Lindwall
return to his old form next
winter,

Against the South Africans he
wasn't quite the player we knew
over here. He had lost some of
his devil. He seemed a little bit
fat.
But he will lose that when he
starts preparing for our arrival!

Then there is G. J. Noblet who
bowled so well in South Africa.
Don't discount Keith Miller either.

They say he doesn’t like fast
bowling—yet he is still the most
oo Australian speed-man
0. .

His “bumper” is certainly more
dangerous than Lindwall’s.

Being taller he does not have
to pitch so short. All-round Keith
has all sorts of tricks.

As well as bumpers he can
make the ball swing, and he even
has a googly. He is one of the
finest slip Selds in the world.

As for this bumping menace,
the only way we can stop it is
to have two fast men on our side
who can bump them, too,

While watching the Australians
in South Africa I found myself
wishing we could capture some of
their keenness.

They hardly ever

relax, not




Vasz was saving omy QO" cues a
FRIEND SENATOR FLUKE“WHEN \ DOESN'T








NAME DROPPER+\ REMEMBER THE TIMES
GIVE HIER TIME,
SHE'LL RATTLE
OFF THE Ponies’ P=.

(‘) F BURKE'S PEERAGE vee



Notre Dame
Defeat
Spartan 1-0

Playing on a sodden ground and
through intermittent drizzles of
rain, Notre Dame netted the only
goal of the day to defeat Spartan
when they met at Second Division
football at Queen’s Park yesterday.

Gill at centre forward for Notre
Dame, who has done most of the
seoring for his team as yet for the
season, sent in the one goal,

Just about three minutes before
the end of the first half the goal
was scored. Both teams during
this halif, seemed equally balanced.
From the sounding of the whistle
for second haJf, Spartan began to
press for the equaliser, The Notre
Dame's defence was not to be
bored and so Spartan seldom got
past the back line. Throughout
the game, both goalies were called
on to make some timely saves,

Hardly any of the players came
off the field at the end of play
without being smeared on the
pants with mud. Fal) after fall
they got as they could not grip
properly on the wet grass.

The ball was often miskicked.
At times when players from both
teams were in good position for
scoring, they sliced sending the
ball wild and in the majority of
cases out of play.

Play began about 15 minutes
late because of rain and was pro-
longed until about 6.15 p.m.

The teams were:

Notre Dame:— Wilkimson, *.
Daniel, F. Daniel, C. Daniel,
Roberts, Browne, Kennedy,
Straughn, Archer, Gill and Best.

Spartan:— Atkins,” Gibbons,
Bowen, Gittens, Reece, Banfield,
Gittens, Trotman, Morris, Jemmott
and Austin,

Mr. O. S. Coppin was referee.



even in the most gruelling heat,
and never in a Test.

Even without Bradman they
will be terribly difficult to beat,

There are many brilliant young-
sters coming up in Australia, Sir
Donald Bradman in a letter to a
friend, confirms this.

Here we mature more slowly.
Brian Close may get plenty of
cricket in the Army—but I doubt
if it is good cricket.

The only way you can produce
the top-notcher is to give him
experience in top-class cricket,

am not being pessimistic-—
simply facing facts. First let us
beat the West Indians.

If we can do that-—and I believe
we can—we shall be more than
half-way on the road to victory
over the Australians.

(World copyright)



The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 5.42 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.12 p.m.
Moon( Last Quarter) May 8
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Water; 4.52 a.m., 6.08

p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .23
ins.

Temperature (Max.) 81.0° F

Temperature (Min.) 71.5° F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E
(3 p.m.) E

Wind Velocity 16 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.962
(3 p.m.) 29,896



By Jimmy Hatlo
“Gf = WONDER DOES SHE

I TOOK HER TO THE
STEAM FITTERS’ BALL»



SS

GAL WHO SOUNDS LIKE
THE APPENDIX OF

THANX To
« MARIE
GINGAC, N.S













|
GAMBLT!, |



{

Russian Claims

Swim Record

|

|

| 4

| LONDON.

|. Russia claims that Leonid Mesh-

kov, a young Russian swimmer,

beat the world 100 metres butter-

fly breaststroke record with a time

of one minute 6.8 seconds,
According to reports from Mos-

cow, Meshkov established this new

record in winning the Soviet

championship.

The official record has been held
by Richard Hough, of America,
at 1 minute 7.3 seconds, since 1939.

—LN:.S.

B.B.C. Radio Programme

THURSDAY, May 4, 1950
The News. 7.10 a.m. News Analy-
is. 7.15 a.m. Sporting Record. 7.30 a.m.
The Cathedral Organs. 7.45 a.m. Generaily
Speaking. 8 aan From the Editorials. 8.10
a.m. Programme Parade, 2.15 a.m. Pavil-
ion Players. 8.30 a.m. Books to Read. 8.45
am. Film Review. 9 a.m. Close Down
"2 Noon The News. 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis. 12.15 p.m. Programme Parade.
12.18 p.m. Listeners’ Choice. 1 p.m. Gerald
Barry Speaking. 1.15 p.m. Radio News-
reel, 1.30 p.m. Take it from here. 2

. > T
Golfers’ Teeth
LONDON.
Golfers have been warned by
Health Service officials to keep

their false teeth in while knocking
that little white pill around.

7 am

.m,
.| The News. 2.10 .

_ A man put the bottom set of his} Britain 218 pone Speen Reve. from

false teeth in his jacket before’ p.m. Ring up the Cyrtain. 3.30 p.m. Twen-

playing golf at the public course at

Croydon, London.

J He ~~ jacket in the club-
ouse, i $

missing—and so were the teeth | SiG on Hea nats dain, St
He reported the theft to the|From the Third Prosramme. 6.50 pan

police and then applied to Croy- Interlude. 7 p.m. The News. 7.10 p.m.

ty Questions. 4 p.m. The News. 4,10 p.m.
The Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. The Adven-
; tures of Richard Hannay. 4.45 p.m. Musie
ef, the Theatre. 5 p.m. Listeners’ Choice.
o49) Dom.

Programme Parade, 6.30 p.m,

: News Analysis. 7.15 p.m, We s B
don Dental Services Committee | $7 p.m. Merchant Nowy Newsletter. é
for a new pair of dentures. p.m, Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m, Gerald

The applicati ‘ Barry Speaking. 8.30 p.m. The Music of
The Scaetelitee depiied that “there | Socviahen 4 20'p a Interk de ‘9.30 i
Storyteller. § m, Interlude, 9.30 p.m
would not appear to be any reason | Ray's a Laugh. 10 p.m, The News. 10.1
why dentures should be removed Bn. From the Editorials. 10.15 p.m. Fes-

t ; ’ val of Britain. 10.45 p.m. id
while playing golf.”’—LN.S. patch. li p.m. The News. wie ae






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Fer a very deserving cause







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To be held at the Buccaneer
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“fay 5th, 1950.
Mr. C. B. Browne’s Orchestra
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ADMISSION 3 ::: 3/-

TO-DAY

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Rey, Lawrence—7.30 p.m,

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Saturday, May 6, at 8.30 p.m.
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Full Text

PAGE 1

THITRSDAT. \l\\ 4 193(1 RARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE Tattoo Of A Lady Stopped Him Boxing NEW YORK Jose Rafael Avile-. W Jan I ijM Purrto Rtcan mechanic, la on an £1.800 bond as tne aftermath of on* of boxing** allege cusea of Impersonation. !' %  Is chara> .1 .,* Wktt i K sas. wuh fraud In having fought there under the name of the Central American Middleweight Champion. Tuxo Por!uguv The county prosecutor said that, if convicted. Avile* faces a sentence of one to five years' jail In New York. Portuguez said he did not even know lie wan lighting In Kansas until he learned from a newspaper he had been knocked out there Avilcs" light was staged by a Kansas promoter who told a reporter: "Avile* definitely didn't tell me he wus not Portuauez." Suspicion was aroused when fans in the front row observed a young woman tattooed upon the chest of the "PortURiier" in Ilia ring, whereas thev could no* remember that the one they had seen in New York was tattooed iit all Tuio (Kid) Portuguez is n 23year-old Cosia Rlcan middleweight with a record of onlv three detent* m M lights sinre 1941 —t-r.s ^|l|Ml||MllMMHIIMII1Mimillllllllllllltllltl!!llllli:iliililll(lllllllllllllHI' !ll t-.! ii:p. > i, %  |]f HMMIIIl^ They re off t>hi,i v . S CII.I.S ,„ul FAMILY = But back soon ... 3 HOLIDAY! \eir Pubs For Old LONDON. Two icfugces from Central Europe have collaborated with irir-*> Britons to win first prlie in tasri to denim what Is possibly the monBrtl I ill buildings— %  public-hoii"' Tho> SJN Ernest Pnll.ik. M. Prague and Y %  Mere his ha ir>n The quintet—U .intent beer Mi inkers" won ||M in the Bran i-Kittest tO asttsign 'The Pub I Mn--t CtittCI liked UM winnilitf gn because n Incoi features traditional to Tbf *hk country m the last 100 years has l>een bone Idleness, in rvofy war we have been caught on the Wrong tool." Did A Daniel HEREFORD, ENGLAND The M-yonr-oW mayoi el Hartnta CoutttcUlar Daniel Dye, mimicked the biblical Daniel by atotertng a cage with four lions and then trninet at a touring incus in Hartford. "It was ihl %  lav. ever made bi lite." the mayor said afterwards, "but I am game to try •jverytnlnsj once." Daniel Dye dared the lions—but he did not dare tell the ITU Jot— he Intended 'o do h First Catch Your WAAB WASHINGTON IN' the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan it's not too late to collect that reward for a captured waab. allre or dead First, of course, you must catch your wasg—a character more ianta-t'r than those of "Alice in Wonderland" As described y (he more primitive natives who firmly believe In Its existence, it is a huge, man-shaped creature .overed with red halt, speaking oarrj lass*rafM Hid an Iq If k> mg in joints. The discoverer of a waab can expect not only cash reward but an "out of this world" rating among more prosaic zoologist* So far. however, according to recent assurances by the Governor of tba Sudanese camptal at Khsrto*:m, no one has claimed tbff prl?e ($287 in Egyptian pounds) originally posted many yean ago for the fabulous creature. The legendary waab of the Sudan recalls another strange 1 character of African folklore, the "hununold ape," notes the National Oeographic Society Lorries Collide A Ceremonial Dancer TWO lorries M-2004 owned by S. E. Cole of Roebuck Str.et an i driven by Edward Archer of Wavell Avenue and M-1064 the property of A. Raynea of Black Rock and driven by Alfred Gibson of Whitehall yesterday about a p.m. collided and damaged a wall while travelling along Rockley Road. Christ Church The right front lender of M-2004 was damaged. No one was injured £10 FINE FOR THE5-T NEVILLE HECKLES of Baycroft Road. St. Michael, was yesterday ordered to pay a fine of £10 in monthly n*t;*lments of ii aadi when ha was found guilty of stealing a bicycle belonging to Oscar Wiltshire. Mr. A. J. H Hnnschell adjudicated the caae. This big. manlike ape is covered with dark hair and habitually walks erect, If yoibelieve the stories of pygmy tribesmen living in the rain-forest areas it in Mid to frequent A man-eater, rather than primarily VtjeatarlaD. (like the real chimpanzee*, gorillas, and orangutangs). the humanoid is supposed to celebrate the capture of prey by a ceremonial dance. In the ceremony, the females are said to form a circle around the furiously dancing males, and beat on drumlike objects. S* ill another account tells of the agogwe. the "littlefurred people," of the big-game countrv of East Africa Several hunters have seriously reported that the agogwe resenible men four feet tall, that they habitually walk upright, and are covered with brown or russet hair One witness suggested that lhee animals, more, credible than the waab or dancing apes, may be rare monkeys. Backing the theory was the observation that neigi.Soiiring monkeys paid no special attention to the curiosities. According to the National Geographic Society, zoologists have long pointed out that remote naj contain outlandish beasts unknown to science or be* hsrVed to be extinct. The possibility that giant sloths may still exist In the wilds of South America Is not entirely discounted by authorities. Speculation Another subject of speculation Is the curious Nandl Bear, which Is often blamed for the killing of humans and domesticated animals in East Africa. Although scientific evaluation is lacking, native and white hunters alike claim to hare encountered the beast; and several descriptions of the bearlike creature agree on its shambling gait, shaggy hair, little ears and long snout. In reports of thr "mystery creatures," legend and fact are intermingled. From Slam In recent years have come sloric of Slant crocodiles, believed by some lamese to contain Ihe spirit of a dead king. In the Himalayan mountains of northeast India, a 90-foot monster was said to be roving and nibbling for nourishment at the tops of trees. Australia, home of nature's oddest creations, has produced some of the most fabulous yarns. One concerns the "bunylp," variously described as resembling a seal, n horse, a crocodile, and/or tl bullock. Another tells of tenfoot rabbits, seen In the dry Inland wastes of the continent, and possibly linked to the Diprotodon. extinct these manv thousand years FATHER JOHN BULL EASTBOURNK Dr. A. T. Wilson, of the T-vlstock Institute Of Human Relation-., insisted that without a doubt the "Englishman's home Is Itll hen into uunny behaviour t an Eatbourne conference of health visitors. Dr. Wilson put the hon.e under J miscroacope and painted this picture of life with FntlVr John Bull. Father is prepared in half) wash bis. aatltnnct u not taken for granted baft MI.-N Jobs as bed-making are definitely nut Father is willing to be responsible (or such jobs as moving tMUOB, decorating and carpentry, but some Jobs are completely ubuo— sewing on buttons or darning socks for example—however goo-l he may be at it Certain times uf the duy are sacrosanct 16 the hOad of HM fumily, and at these times violent >utburst* of %  'rikhloous rage" are often aroused by "ill-timed. evi if modest, requests fur assistance.*' \% a Rule Father ai rule leeis that it la a -art Of duty ti, spend %\ [Mali five evenings at home with his wife, but they have their own forms of umusement. A weekly vi-n to the movies with his wife nai acquired "an almost rllual quality Father's relations with h's neighbours hinge On the British dram for privacy, He is on "dropping i. term frith at leust three .( hi*, immediate neighbours, and says good morning to most of the people living in the same street. Father is not, however, on intimate terms with many uf them and Christian names are praetlcoliy never used even with friends uf long standing. Curtains in the front rot •• (winch are seldom used) ni 4 KM bring out flear diMlnction of chirjeter —which la part of the puhllr-hou*r Irs dltlon—he'uren the x^loon ba and Ihe public h*r the one de -eended from Ihe wine I.I %  n.I the eoffrr hnime. wll riehnrsik o( deeoeatlon Inlln %  need h> Ihe l Q th-eentnry tin palace: thother showing .i simpler, more robii>t ehararter appropriate to lln descent from the ill' lion % % %  kitchen.'' The Fan Byairdad D Si % %  i : %  > %  41. .-ill are tinployed III deaagnlm for Hat 1951 Festival ..f Britain The vi.nw %  %  %  ii.li.vi the winning doatfjn "pieesIIIK nnd etrtainrj not i.ii | but 1 MRnrtWori to ma other antttM "One may ornaarve)," Q %  Ot'ardlan observed, "aucri fltvlea us ihe (! %  %  aim-trap nml clinical; ,-i Boor oov< 'i daullng nnri brolren brilliance Yttut\ itandlni "ii it ma with'.ut lurvtni Lai. hi d %  • drop "A hint ot cotirterriatton,' said tha 'Daily : %  moat eOloui our eonarntulaUona to the i> vim' i man from Central Etimpe wh.. harad in the i>i leitesiK'i for an ideal I Igtlsh ptlb % %  r '. m hat 11 nappenod in i".> %  saBltah eharacter, arhona inward ness it hns ulways bean i Ul pi I t. oonceal from the forelcnera, It strain • >f it' Immarnortal ant Inaf ••ii ,-. this .d el of the i %  i become transparent '" the urofan< vlea the bottom of a tilted —Can Pre**. f'v^i I etfo't iiv ..I. hlKh fences in the hack gani ryi Ing to the (aai of bW looked Dr. Wllaon said tra i phasls U on %  -\ Ing netghbo Otlt rather than letting them it. eoncl ided It i.. Indeed true that Enfjsli iin..."'—1 N.> MM It* till* 1/ for rjn*rf0 I /i /<•-'-' Call in at raw COLLINS Ltd. ^: and select your Fnvourite Line fOe*nUv4| C|%u| BEAUTY PREPARATIONS CLEMENTS INDIAN TONIC exceptional Tonic, containing: — Malt Extract, Nux Vomlca. Damiana elc. Indi rated in weakness. Loss of Energy, Muscular Debility, and all -onditions where a Stimulating Tonic icrgy, I a Stii PRICE .;/BOTTLE We have Just received: — ARRID DEODORANT Obtainable at — Price: 3/A JAE I Messrs Bookers (Mow Drug Stores Ltd. Broad fltreet and A'pba pharnacT. Hastinrs. Broad fltrert f A NEW ANGLE ON COUGHS! In Grandmamma's nay a cou?h wt? a cough—and you were glVel I c ni'h tnirturo for it, but nowadays we know that this is not enough. A cough that hangs on impaira your whole system, and you need something to build up your strength to help ; ike it off. Trial's why m


PAGE 1

PAGE KOI'R BARBADOS ADVOCATE THl'RSItAY VI \, I IS-.ll %  *AO*BaM C _. Mb Broad TMirsda\. May 4. 19.> A NEW THEATRE? DR. JOLIOl-tlRIE Vi strict and Indifferent Incumbents have made little attempt in the past to chcvk this loss. Or Not To Be T If throuuh the lethargy >f load | WH J. 4 Or%lrrirhrr INB Foreign Director I Vi it ic lad Changes THE neighbouring Island of Trinidad will be (joint! to the polls later in the year to elect their lopivsentatives in the Legislature. These Elections will be the prelude to far reaching changes in the Trimdadian Constitution. Trinidad. unlike Barbados docs not haw continuity in its constitution nor do tin gard the constitution as so sacrosanct as many in Barbadca regard our local constitul ion. Tins enables alterations t.. be made which do ni>t arouse the same bitter controversy u lakaa place when changes in tinlaw and custom of the constitution ^irc mooted in Barbados. Under the new constitution, Trinidad will have a unicameral Legislature and an I utive Council which, in the words of the Address from the Legislative Council to Sir Hubert Ranee, "will no longer be merely advisory but the instrument for rmation of policy." The legislative Council will consist of -4 members and the elected representatives will bo increased from nine to eighteen, thus giving to the legislature a more representative character. There will be five nominated members and a speaker who shall not vacate his office by reason of dissolution of the legislative Council. There will be nine members of the Executive Council under the Chairmanship of the Governor and will consist of the Colonial Secretary, the Attorney-General, the Financial Secretary, five elected and one nominated member of the Legislative Council. The five elected members of the Executive Council will be elected by the legislative Council from amongst the elected members of that body. The nominated member will be appointed by the Governor from among the nominated members of the Legislative Council. The administration of departments of Government will be assigned to members of the Executive Council but although there is nothing in the Constitution to prevent the nominated members from having departments assigned to them it is not expected that the Governor will do so. Members of the Executive Council who have department*, assifined^o them will be styled Ministers. The Governor will continue to have power to maketJaws and overrule the Legislature in certain special cases. He can do so if authorised by the Secretary of Stale or if in the Governor's opinion urgent necessity requires that the declaration be made without obtaining the authority of a Secretary of State' In the latter case he must certify in writing that urgent necessity requires that the declaration be made without obtaining such authority. The new constitution does not go as far as many in Trinidad had hoped and it is unlikely that it will remain unaltered for long. Political opinion in Trinidad is not as strongly divided along party lines as in Barbados and Jamaica and it is improbable therefore that party politics, made more difficult as it is by the existence of numerous racial groups, will in the near future dominate the Trinidad political scene. The success with which West Indians manage the affairs of their own individual Colonies will be an indication of the extent to which they will be able to function in the wider field of West Indian affairs. If the British Parliament is made the model then Trinidad lags behind Barbados in its progress towards self-government but the test of any political experiment must lie hiscd on its local success and the function„g of the new Trinidad Constitution will be closely observed throughout the Caribbean. "TO BE. or not to be; that is at.ly. the question arises "Can the question". Like II ....menl -.Tc.rd lo contribute ponder bul on a different su.. I .:. to such a fund '" —a projected theatre for Barb The answer It, most probably, in %  a Hit in at tt va. But Government Finn, to be. The number of could afford la contribute naV cnlerlalnim-iits recently held in Manually to the new theatre fund dramatic societies. interested re. Nru YfmK Ihe r.mpire Theatre apeithr sup,t an entertainment tax were „n, and Government there is no —_ NEW YORK port wh.ch they received clearly imposed on the existing price* of attempt to erejte :. fund for) ON <' lhc most controversial figures in modern w avid cinema seats. I wlrting a new theatre, wh.'t Bm <• cm* to public attention recently with onrJlh.ll IT -"'.'•"""'""'"• , OM „ ,y„.mmenls decision to oust Comgooa lecture nan. tonccri nan not be a large one. say a penny answer loral dramatic amUliH . ^. I""'. „„ |ha cheapest seats, and sixana mtoreatsd r^raoniT whTare """>'•' '" Helen,Jo.iol-Curte from chairmari.eeded does not requ re pence or nine pence on the moat not sufficiently interested to helD, sh 'P ' France's Atomic Energy Commission. II would aUo be avad, xp n „ vo „,, The tax on the then-selves do not ble ror inuring tncairicji con.pr :ce of Intermediate seats would theatre panics, when the coat of transport ^ ^i^ accordingly This form -ikes II possible tor them to wit „ r ui >f local dramatic and interested person luffVcJently interested to rilse a fund for a new theatre, but Government unwilling to impose an entertainment tax as ."UK-tested, all U not lost. In Queen's Park then i* the possibility of creat-ntt j charming hltlr theytre on the lint floor dressing rooms. back •qulpfrH nt and acnust from Ideal, bul therw arc not Insuperable diCBcultles The out:,-mding disadvantage of Theatre is that It cinema* e-ffjf) rvtninit there Is nag fortl .i'. i snd .t n .I'I-.I '%  Saturday afternoons. The manthis tax is very simple. It nS S^JS^LZ. ^SsTSa I^no^anT, llVll the Cinemas or cinema goers h-."t n V after the first week II would also enable Government to retain in this Island a fraction of the cir-.Tfa cnterd above th.it • %  by iiKtiii' In taxation BM men The machin.-i. for -""'l^ y, lfen -, i|o UW Already the stag, ia is there. The floor is said to be the seatId have incline Adjoining the auditorium Is another room suitable for u bar i.r cAlb room There are many theatre clubs in I/mdon which operate In .accommodation far Her than that of Queens White's suggestion ild be adopted. The theatre 'mid be shared by all dramatic ocieties and run as a club or ,. .ompany. Members or sharcholdand women with... uf., <"<'•":' rhe annual grant ouW nou|d t ,. JfcK ,^ ,„ pay un tions. so that rehearsal* in the not be %  "*"" %  ** >*****£$ annual sum of $5.00 or law. This Empire Theatre n.u.t I .. %  held ..fer ";. ( ^"v thi balance th^Td wouM flMn *' P^" c lona *" i 1 ll ,,•meiiia closea to the Public. Undoubtedly, the balance **"'""' enable subscribers to buy two or .n Sundays. This is not only be used for entertainment and not ^^ „, onf (|f lhp (1 „ t tWf> r v ser\'ani sLincm.is w.mio m. _.,j,|.„i„_, „ %  „,, *"* sold, the tax collected thereon and a cheque. This tax wuulH >>e t marked for building tin new theatre When the new theatre is built agemrnt MMOfc, thsatfOW, as> |rf ^ retaine.1. From !"!" r 3* mit rehearsa', to take place^at the b ^ Ux m Hou Mr times most convenient to amateur >nnuaI pan( ^^ ^ mad(f ^ -— the theatre in the same way that maleu, actor, ^"^"^^T^'T^ !"!" actors. The najorily of : nateu at matter pro1 for members or shareholders. On public could purchase seats for _.,d that of Queen's Park, although J actors. *blce product'on the l>asin of lh Utlerhas '•Jjenj hnibm performances. The propHv.te sUt.ng-room differ, ^1,^,^^^^^^ ceeds wou.d KL^IW P-U.ccosts, demanded, the purchase of new ei|iilpment for the theatre, and the salaries of a cleaner, stnac c-irpenter and part time box office cleric or •ecretary. Amateur dramatic societies wonlti thus be able to give more lhan three performances. These differs la*i been mended eouircd In the pumps could be purchased out of this fund, wilich would use the ssuna amount of water over and over again Two arid concrete ... wastes would then be converted t>c Into pleasing sights In a climate the end the whole such a* this, fountains arc .. joy UP this is to the eye and mind. More founexlsting circumtains might even be erected. Out of this fund displays of need not be all In the some week ir*. i t Thmtre were it fireworks could be given in Two or at the most three perT£ J^il imTtrbe riTot" Queen s Park or on the Bay Street formances could be g'ven for n2uTf,J JhS a a theatre. bpUn.de. to celebrate the King's u. weeks if the demand Wad^ Sit a.TwToi" %  cinema bi.thd^v, and at the Holetnwn ra „ te d it. This would surely find A new he.ire must Ibuilt, but Monument on the anniversary of favour wlth amateur actors, who ew theatr • will cost a large the discovery of the lslnnd a n er man .v weeks of hard work ,\ SS? How SuJt to *• A portl-m of this fund could no w have so short a time in mini nf money Hov. U mat to ^jg ^ ^^ ^ ^ 6[9p oi mother monstrous steel shed ppo.ntcd to collect money from ei.lertainrne t The ur,>W )n Quvm 8 Puk bj ,„e AgriculInterested ptnMU That eourte pres,-rving what X !" !" .* !" tural Society, can scarcely be so should, be followed It has also tllatotj fi^^SSSiSi t ll ^SL blind to the public amenities of been poinled out that the project t will b> WJMMmmttjmp' s p k Q ^^ ,„ pvtmit ,ld Ua long-term one. nee, terity. Already *ne /•" !" th(> Uf aiul a | tct ation of the flrst Government should >me have b**^^^"" rt "i' floor of Queen's HOUM to an ^h< itld he undertaking of such cultural value stricken to Ihe comnninity should greatly from that Empire Thcdir. .n wen' acoustic properties ideal Actors ' "or it might )uat disappear into the nameless moss of the disinherited—those offspring of parent! of different worlds. Bu an odd coincidence, the ports child trill probably be bom just there is undoubted intelligence aboul Ihe lime the British Cwbut a fatal weakness of character rrMWftt publishes U* lonp-au-alta lack of responsibility, of Ufllel rd report on ractal dlscrlmliiollon in themselves. leotsiation In 'he Colonial Empire. Might that not be due to tht __, _,, vi v atmosphere of the colour bai !u,v"?' I?ZhzzznL T sa*2r szssrri trrsx&f&st&Fss l^eoTule'leaanUare'niwb.ln. remote are. ^ 1^ ag Coast. t„.n that ^ ( ^ ^ mbttake-in his (or The usual crowd of chattering a royal I the Kbama half-naked youngsters sunoui. man, who prefei —eign men, or men be'ongmp iifferent racial group lie thinks that the real basis of the Seretse dispute is that it is a tliallcnge to the white man'.. siiiieriority in Africa. —L.E.S. thing uolngists. a 4 Premier Georg? Bidault thus %  ,:td a mounting tide of criticism over %  f a Communist in such a post at a lime l world di.iM(. ani Communst infiltration. Mean was spurred by the arrest, corBe* to 14 yean* in priBM i( l> i,.. the tier man-bom naturalized Briliso trayael vital secrets U> the Soviet:;. It flared even higher when Joliot-Curie told a National Congress of the French Communist party that NO "progressive scientist" ever would permit hta %  It. to I* used against the Soviet Union. This sutement was more or less typical of Joliot-Curies usual utterances. Joliot-Cune. ;i man of tremendous ability and vast achievement, is a difficult persor-llty to define. As a Frenchman, he would be expected to be indignant In the extreme over any implication that he might be disloyal to his fatherUnd in the event of war with Soviet Russia. Yet he always has followed the party line, up to and including the declaration of Maurice Thorez that French workers would NOT fight against Soviet troops. Then there is the master of Joliot-Curies performance in the second world war. When western Europe was overrun by the Nans in 1940. the great scientist was in the midst of his atomia researches nt the College of France. He ignored Ihe entreaties of his friends to leave (he country and remained at his post. German occupation authorities compelled him to admit German researchers into his laboratory. But Johot-Curlo pUyed a game of cat and mouse. and thai may be u key to his mental reflexes lie •tanOj aflUlttae. himself with the French resistance movement and after the liberation revealed that he had joined the Communist party and served with the so-called National Front, a Communistdominated resistance coalition. Had the Germans learned thU. Joliot-Curie ight easily have become a candidate for instant death. Because of his scientific achievements, his resistance record, and his unquestioned ability, JollotCuric was named to head the FTench Atomic Commission when it was founded in 1946. This was while Communists still were part of he French government and the east-west rift had NOT widened to a yawning chasm. Joliot-Curie has tnken the stand from the beginning th.t atomic research should exclude the field of war. and for this reason he refused to witness the Bikini bomb tests. He claims that under his leadership, the French Atomic Commission has devoted Itself entirely to research Into the use of atomic energy for industrial and other peacetime purposes and has b*n among the loudest in criticizing alleged western preparation for war. It was inevitable, therefore, that the Communist press of Paris would l^ok upon his dismissal as "proof th.t France has joined with the United States and Great Biilain in what it terms nefarious plans to plunge the world into a new war. The decision of the French government obviously was NOT made without a great deal of soulsearching. President Vincent Auriol himself supported Joliot-Curie as Atomic Committee chairman when the question of his appointment came up. His Communist leanings and affiliations were well known at the time and many rightist elements warned that the nation would come to regret its decision. If anything is indicative of changing times it the dismissal of the Nobel prize winner from h post. It Is somehow reminiscent of dispatches from Germany a few days ago recalling the fifth anniveisary of lhdate when United Stales and Soviet for*s made their first junction on the Elbe River at Torgau. For a while, the town was a shrine of Soviet-American friendship and collaboration. To-diy It is a monument to Communist antiAmericanism. For Your BATHROOM BLUE MOUNTAIN COFFLr. S*^" !" li-lb. Tin '-j-ll. I'kK ROSE'S ORANGE SQUASH '..'.'.' '.'.'." IVr lic.l COSTARD CREAM. KENT lltEAM. MARIE, BOURIION. SWEET ASSORTSPc!,.M,Ji F F CRE *"SHORTCAKE IIIM I ITS l..-lh PR,. CRAWFORD'S CLUB CHEESE STRAWS EVr Tin COCKTAIL Per Tin CHOICE COFFEE BISCUITS SI.39 TRY SOME ,70My. SPECIAL! III.III.IIII.I-. finsli.il I'int-.ipplr Reduced dor-54c lo 36c. STANSFELD. SCOTT a CO. LTD. "INTERNATIONAL" PAINTS COVER THE WORLD! id it IIOOI TOW iMivrs "OANBOLINE" ANTI-CORROMVE PAINT—for galvanized Iron roofs $7.20 per gillon tut (Imperial). "PROPELLER" READY MIXED OIL PAINT—for wooden shingle, asbestos cement, ana aluminium roofs — 14.5 per gallon tin (Imperial). S. /nsfrur'tons jor use:— QalvsnlEed Iron. 1 Fnr new work, allow the surface to went her fur at least a year before painting. Then apply 1 coat of paint. 2. For previously painted work, if the surface Is in good condition, rub down, clean, and applv I coat of paint. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat of "International" Red Lead Graphite Primer, followed by 1 coal of paint. Wooden aalngle. 1. For new work apply I coat of "International" Primer for Wood, followed by 2 coats of paint. 2. For previously painted work, if the surface in in good condition, rub down, dean, and apply 2 coats of paint. 3 For P, revious 'y Painted work, if the surface Is in poor condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, nnd apply 1 coat of %  International" Primer for Wood, followed by 2 coats of paint. Asbestos Cement. 1 For new work, apply 1 coat of "International" Cement and Plaster Primer, followed by 2 coats of paint. 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 2 coats of paint. Aluminium. '' wJ, P W rSSi a ? ply t coat of "Yellow Primocon", followed by 1 coat of paint. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat of paint. 2. bi coneince? finC produc1 of f %  %  % % %  <" %  Paints, Ltd., and DA COSTA & Co., LTD. HARDWARE AND ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT. Other People's Letters Our Readers Say! in Sugar Sorarm Editor 7*>te Adeoralr, Modern Boy Editor Ttic Adeoealr. The BBC hai P>any mlllliw i>< 1.tellers IxMi at home and overM aria Uioosandu ot them write. T^CoeSoraUo... Criticism-.... uralao <* lhe proaramme in i. K the sackful every day and last ,Jar the BBC received one l>unoied and Ofty thousand let. rs £orn tho home '"*" 1 "L? lurther fifty thousand from tnoio everaaaa. So far as the cor.(•oondence section can judge <' t.Vtncr la too old or too younj irT'WTlte to uie BBC about It. All type<•< pew' 1 ln y y lrfnd „7 prSSalonVraa to wrlw tothe Corporation at one tune or another Joll, road and pajaed on to|t1.e appropriate onVlala and d. partner..? Some lettci. arc abualve. am quite lncompr.-heiu.il.le and in aceepVed v/IU. Ml.an.ire oy proK ramme pr.Klucers erltioarn Ra te SS a SSu^^SSn ,ha, as. Voducers can learn whether the U nnounoer for the names and sUrtBture tunesi r tintitles of records but others relating lo programmes* arc mor ( %  implicated. Some arc unanswerjible even by the BBC's InrRe ft^ll l..i listeners who apparently ret (.rd the Bir as oniniseieiit have rocentlv wrir*n to ask why cat* have so extenalve and lopg ubisk.-Ts'*"' and could >ou pk-*iC tell mo what are the dates of iTie second and third Tuesdays in the month of June for the year lwu." It was also not within the scopa of the BBC to accede to the request of the lady who wanted a Dutch translaVioii of several Insult has i.ot been heaped upon injury by the bringing forward of the examination .late, and I forgo! to say that all this labour U SIB,—"Small things amue small expected to be done in three -,„ t n. ..,.„ minds." but 1 am convinced no terms' Now does any sane man -h MT..,. !" t \VL n Jr£I! onc can deny lhftl l d y lhc orrter ,nink W P lbl >wuld ** rtor "" the attention of those concerned s .. (>|g th|ng|l amusc sma ,| mlnda to certain workers in the suar ^^ syllabus of the Modern industry I refer to crop season plxth form „ tnjl ,„ cxamp i 0 o( employees such at> chemist.", over1( .i B seers and clerks work s,ullU h,s >w>hful literary Cap* Canadian Lvgion The Editor, The Advocate SIR,—I am enclosing a letUer from the Dominion Command, Ottawa, Canada. I could sec anyone. ofBccrs or i-en from the three servioee any tune In the forenoon from 9a.m. To my mind, the burial of the un til 12 noon. student under this mountain of A H V WAKEHAi.. work stunts his youthful literary c a pi j*,. V. H. Wakeham. Tneu —c fifteen Eniilish books taste, and at a time during which Astra. Quite recently an increase ol to be dpne for the examination It should be carefully handled and S1 Lawrence. i %  an granted to all worker* while three of these must be encouraged, not blighted forever. Dp ar Sir,—This will reply to in the sugar industry, but 1 under* studied minutely for a special I have also heard that thl' year, \ our recent loiter addressed to the stand that the above mentioned paper, on each of these books, a credit in French must be gained Canadian Lesrton which you enare not to be considered at all. commentaries or criticisms are exin the School Certificate for a quire about forming a branch bi Now Sir. <-an you enlighten me' pected to be read. student to enter sixth form It I* ^^nWV^ave^mmtrri.^ In respect to History, the Eng%  lMt & in t n * unworthy effort <-.• 5 members and the per capn-i from 1485 on. while the *• improve results for French lVx required by Dominion Com-] id would be 11.00 per year' ^„,,^^j .. v w __. %  --** av mtm %  >g, justice, police; sport: my; fox: unfair to them, who licken; goodduy;"' sent to her in the same wav by the high %  ., ithouv delay Tlie staff of Hie 0 f living to be denied what Is theirs Are these gentlemen engaged the sugar industry, or the '.rrowroot industry? Why should thif lish 1485 on, while the lo Improve results for French, is from taut if ah lii %  ,,< There I* only one thing to be said isolated w,..-.!. mduduui Town, dllterene. be made? It I. groart, lfc c „ n ,, 11 u 110 !" 17 ,'',' 0 !" ~^; \ -a boy who b brilliant at Claude, lor each mem~oer-"plus the M far as can be reached Prevtousb Maths or anything for that matter, of membership badge at 25c each a half of the English period was passes these subjects easily, but The other matters menUoned.m •our letter have been forwarded P Maths or anything for that matb English period was passes these subjects easily, but %  i.,"o.,,..spn..d 1 ce seettor, reby right. Thev arc calM 0^00 *• %  %  llll ""-' :: 1 %  ll "' : KL^fS _" J £ "j ""' %  UM s,. „-..,-. of %  R You „ ttneml which they could adopt the sugUx J^ i cnU ^^ ilwo a certain period— that is. the half falling French In their School T A y KINES nd must be more diffused Certificate, and this is by no means Executive Assbnant i£S2 T£T £ much^natTthc ZTo^k ^ K'N^^S^ -rk they fee, ^mpletely Jaded. >— renowned persons it *>>* -" ^ '*> ** Ml <** t as strange that the lf lh|j mcrMkSC ,„ made because "^ *.; "' tl"> increased price of sugar. done— the death of this *rv fair to £rsSwnmasr hey write and prebirth of great man. II Is time Ihia \ ,n ? !" ~,K !" f K !" JSfSK much care in ptoaa, i gtod was remedied," Whilst g|* •*••" 9f J *• \Jg the listening public or not The Implications obvious. Then there is a special suhject twenty-five years of a period that my of these boys. "FAIR PLAV. Canadian Legla Dominion Command, Ottawa. Canada. On must be do >ly studied, help !" be.Vv.r^S the writer, "" other h.Sd. if it 1> made nn understand that the book, such lcttars every relevant account of the high cost of hv r.K quired are unobtainable, a lsr-e nart of this east corciuerjr 1> anewered as !oon a, pnsthev should ,hare accordmsiy paper stall has to be aat. *!l_"i-7 „ „n~ ..i,^ ..„H .11 ...,r,..., Thl, is the .yllabus. not to menPUZZLED. tion two subsidiary subjects. The .-SDonucnco consists of quern's, sible and all correspondence loat of *em are simple raw-Is aekn. • I I I II I:, when are .lined with a nam de-plame. bat aBaeeoinpanied b> thr (a.toniary botu ndea. will be Icnarrd. Maay nuch reach the Editor's drsk e*cli week, and readers are axaln reminded ot thr iwesslty tor Ihe writer's name to be known to the I dil.. not for publication, bul as 4n assurance of lood fsHb. TKII'K. LIVKR, RABBIT. STKW DEBT, STK Tin< Plum Rose Powdered Milk—Ilk Se. .. Hunters Royal Pork S..usages— l .11, „„d III, .. Oxford Sausage—111, Apple Saure—.Tie. .. Primes .. Slice and Pickled Cucumber—18c. .. Fiah Paste—e. MAMMOTH CI.KANSF.R RP.II.I.O SOAP PADS -22e. pkE. And the Finest -I ,v i.STKW VKAL. W l.AMB ENJOY A BIC0 It %  < ill 4M 12c. pk. BAKERY GOODS GontDAiins.



PAGE 1

I I %  11 I N 11 < > Mar 1 l!>-,0. SarbabnB Frier: nvi IE NTS lor .a. •<• STRETCH A POINT" ON SUGAR West Indies Play Indians Today (From Our Own Corrnimadent) LONDON. May .1. ^PART FROM NET PRACTICE .1 Lord. Ihe We-M l„,i„. learn hava onl> g more day's crickn before live firal big malch o |he lour. Tomorrou lit-v play an Indian (.ymknana Eleven and at midday on Friday llaey leave (or •VorcoMer. -Sir Pelham Is New Head OfMQC SUCCEEDS EDINBURGH SIR III II KM WARNER LONDON. Mav 3 Sir Pelham Wimrr was today appointed the new President of Hie Morylcbone Cricket Club. He %  succeeds the Duke of Edinburgh, who nominated him. Sir Pelham. known to evervo/te In the miket world as "Pluni", Is .6 and is the gam"\ most travelled personality. He was born in Trinidad. A former England Caplain. M.C.C. Test Selector. Including Chairman, Manager of thn M.C.C. touring team, member of the M C.C. Committee and M.C.C. Kurlng .team, and MC C. Trustee. and during the war. Secretary of the V.C.C.. Sir Pelham ha*: Stated Ua life to Ihe welfare of. cricket lie has played. In Australia. South Africa. New ZealanHt) ANTIGUA. May 3 The Trade Union strike has Spread to Mill Reef where work luxurious holiday bungalow ceased due to the dismival of al employee. ill administrative uggr*tioi that a dock Labour Committee, consisting: of or* repretcntatixe of the Union, one of the "hipping agents. Btnnett and Rrysons with an Independent ch.urman nominated by Government should be set up. This was rejected by the Union, while Brysens was willing to try the experiment for three to six months. Police reinforcements arrived from St. Kim to %  Meal patrols in he streets. An Important announcement is expected any moment from the Government Strachey Will Visit Far East LOM>.)\ British Minister John will pay a oriel visii to Hi during .i Colonial SecteUiy (.ninths .,( ;:., end of this month, the War OMU announced The chief purpose of Straehey's visit to the Far would oe to ate milttar) al taking part in Itu %  tiona Accomiiaiiying Mr Q would be the depoix Undtl Sect tary oi State at the Colonial Qflks who would he maklB£ a ten months' law ol Mall Borneo. Sarawak and Hi n I —Reuter M War Any Time Now SAYS U.S. ADMIRAL SINGAPORE. M-ix ;i Rattr Admiral Walter Bod i Commander of the Amcnrur Seventh Fleet told reporter*, hero today that a new War "might break out any time" with the world military and political situation a* it is. On board his flagship, the aircraft corner Bexrr he said, he thought the many explosive situations prevailing might become major conflicts any day Asked if the United States would use Slntatpore as a base 4n the event of war. Admiral ftxwie said "If we are so unfortunate as to have another war I think we all recognise thai the "iiitcd States and Britain wiil.Vi allied again and feel sure bag bfsM Of each power would be used by I've other as reaulred. —Heater New Speaker For Jamaica KINGSTON. JAMAICA, May 3 "*> %  %  Attorney General advise that the House must elect a Speakat the meeting tomorrow in place of O A. Malcolm, whose appeal against hi* conviction of n breach of the election law Is still pending. It it expected *hat C. C Campbell, member for Western Westmoreland, will be the new Speaker.—(C.P.) Russians Arrest Rritish Vessel LONDON. May 3 The British Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries stated to-day that the British Trawler E'rora was arcsled b) a Russian naval vessel on May l The owners of the trawler. The Standard 8team Fishing Company of Grimxby. said it had been boarded by a isian crew and taken to Murmansk The trawler left Grimsby April ill with a crew, of 22 bound for the White Sea. Reuter Soviets Issue 'Fifth State' Loan IXWQON. May 3 The Soviet Government has decided to issue a 20.000 million •oubles loan, Moscow Radio said today. It will be known as "fifth state loan for economic reconstruction and development At the nominal change rate ilxed when the rouble was revalued last March, the loan will total about 1.786 million, repayable in 20 years It is a lottery loan, the radio added. Both the bonds and nrif money will be exempt from State and local taxation—lealer Six Protect | 'Stoap' Votes LONDON. May 3 A group of Labour Members ol Parliament took the unusual step tonight of trying to get the Uous? of Commons to censure the Opposition for conduct "calculated to bring the Parliamentary Government Into ridicule and disrepute On a motion of censure wluci* they hope to get debated Ihey protest against Conservative tacu**> in forcing "snap" votes on eli'li they term minor lame*. One of those unexpected vote* in ihe evenly balanced House of Commons resulted last month In %  Government defeat and another, on Monday in a tie. A motion of censure is a method an opposition uses to force J debate and vote on a vital Issue. Six members have signed tonight's motion of censure, ineluding two members n( the Labour Party's National Executive. Mr. Tom Driberg and Mr Joseph Reeves Political observe ill not think the Government woul I find time to discuss tt.—t Renter, i Sugar Is Vital To B.W.I. Economy BUTLER'S ADVISER GOES SLOW LONDON. May 3 al Q Sinanan. lawyei-poht; i ten from Trinidad and advise, to tne Duller Union has icinuorartlv i %  si,„„,,.,( nil plan* for interesting British Mi's in the nirratafiil outome of the proposed West Indies Federation Hts intention nO* b t ,* %  the nrnvnl of the West Indian due shortu to dlacui • .'tih. Mi.M-tty's Government the mtum of B W I Migar contra, iWith delegates and particularly Alh.it (l.Miie. his fellow Tlinid*di..u of ii nval political parly he "l"t. ...operate in this task of approaching MPs of all parties Th.' lolmiul Office are rxpccl"* Gomes to arrive from Trinidad IB Bag near future. Tb ic |i -mi no ,-ie-i loiUcauon aa to whan the lugaw talks will commaqct although May 12 has been otentionad uunffieiaUv as the date I < < t gn >< II may lie' ini.vided on May id when L D. will ask the Sjeretar) Jamaa OrllBthi. if ills %  ' i •overmiieoi ,u | ore. parad to racowUat the daeuMa n aatttUUoni on M long. :. tin sugar con tract MaanwhUe, it h. bai riouneed In Itmbado* that th-talks will ,tart during the week %  "." "ing May 15. •Times* Urges L.K. %  I u.n, t)ii r OWR lorrri|Mindent) LONDON. Mav : UK ONMIHKATIOV \„ the llntish (...yeriiinenl p| :l„ offer In H.W.I. Mflat producers is mggmtoi in Ihe Hit edition of ihe "Times Kevieu of Industry" published led*) ll b pointed out |hsM uliile a ucu ufler of : n-; hm. British Honduras has IHHMI welronied in the Wes( Indies llnre is slill dtssatisfiirtioii at ihe Intat British tanlilicn qii'-ta. r The Waal I \ I | | 0 %  | Ilk • J glut Haeht-lor "Looks Before II** Leapt* 1 LONDON. Ma> 3 Britain's defender of ha, belorhood Judge Sir Ernest Charts*, in toutiMtn %  naland lo-daj (afad mi u -nil %  I'.irhclor M. daflnlUon of ., bteta elor was: "A man who lookl before he leaps and, having ll* received many marriaga prapoaata from women and M '' ,,, "• bad i i ilnad %  beach thai -N,. one ever wanted to marry ma Bill ongh I am m a good job" lie was tin., gfl —Rruter ALLA. dauFhtev of a Maachurlan fnihe. and a • hineac molti'i -she wf*r her e(a*A-s YnirHv Undnaj u t .laia* too. f..iU>*1a* he, appeal ana* al the special I)l, -Tnshio, showi At first All! Ilitchoun wag refused a permit to enter England with the rest of the Frenth mannequins, later U|c Home Office decided to ijr.int one after all. H.i measurcnu iiu Hips 3.'., Uikt Stl. Height s ft. e ins—ExiTi-ajr Overseas Event at Bisley I.ONDON. May I. An oversets team event is to be included for the first time in thn British Nidknal Smallbore lUfl-* Meeting at the Bisley Range. Surrey, in July. Competition Is opei j to one team of four from each Colony or Dominion of the British' Commonwealth. Sons and daughter! Of parents domiciled in nj dominion or colony, who are resident In Britain for educational purposes, are entitled to shoot. The small bore meeting precedes the National Rifle Association's Imperial Meeting, which Include' the blue riband of rifle shooting— the King^ Priw Competition Reuter Streets Look Clean DESPITE the intermittent frizzles which fell yesterday morning the eight streets between Ihe Lower Green and the market area xxere in a clean condition. The only one that looked a bit untidy was Cumberland Street. In Hincks Street the din of coopers' hammers could he heard n good way off as they pounded on the hoops around the barrelH The other streets. Chapel. St George. Drumm. Cowell, Harles and Prince Alfred were all quiet. Plane Missing: 14 Aboard QtriTO. Mny I. An Avlnni-in plr*ne overdue yesterday on a flitht from Quito to %¡ uayaoull is gliU i %  found in sp;te of a search bv commercial md Military plane* Last contact was bv radio when 20 minute* parted thai a burning plane was %  Pmx'ince but no confirmation has been obtained On hoard were 11 passengers and three crew. Avlancia hopes the plane might have heen forced to make an • %  rrcrgencv landang In the jun-l.—Renter Sunken Boat AfUmt THE fishing boat Lady Gracias, which sank off Oistin shore recently, was refloated and tiwad ashore yesterday morning The other fishing boat. Lady Eagle. which was damaged wnile towing in the I-ady Gracias on Monday will oon be serworthv igain INFECTIOUS DISEASES There were five cases of Tuberculosis and two ease' of En.erlr Fever. PEPPER DEFEATED MIAMI. Florida Mav 3 George Smother-. M Marine officer and a member qf the House of Rej %  < feated Senator Pepper in the Democratic Party's primarv iciif„i the Senate —Reuter LIE WILL NOT TAKE MESSAGE TO STALIN FROM TRUMAN PAKIS. Mav ;i Tryuve Lie, Secretary Otrvtraj oi Ihe United Natloni Mtlfl today he would go to Moscow on Muy 10th Lie who ai | gd here from London on Saturday, mode Ihe ami rUnoernerll ut a Press Conference In Paritt he has already seen French Pn-sidi n Vn.iiir Auriul and Foreign Minister Robett Schuman He la pri Mding o\'er a meeting oi heads of Ihe United Nation!' specialised agencies. i Lie said \. t %  lie li. ___^^—^—^—^__Mo: 4 .iv. UM l :e Soviet leaders "If Premier Stalin is In Mowos, and it can be nsrartaWl I hope | see him Constanlin Ziineichu Oi -i ,i i U1 th, So urti) Council affairs, will a< romparr. htm to Moscow Mr. Lie said that he has al interviewed leader* ol tin nth three graal pow ai expect hntnadlaic result* u their xiews and attitude) i hope that all UMOO VX> hangeg views may luad to pot during the next two m thn months." he said. Mr Lie told i HI i".|i.i!dii nl%  I am not brlrigltu a laeaaage liwn Hreoldent Truman to M-rnhat Htalln." i Me had heard thi* rumour in New York.) I batVO %  i I II;, % %  ..' from Utadari ut th*Government "I am onb Interested now rnaking up my own opinion %  bout lbs world aituutlon." Mr. Lie, who hai iiw BOOM of the international J *£V sint *" IM0 v Monetary Fund today recommend' *j* Hague tomorn ed the rejection of South Alma's proposal to increase the Dtia <-' gold It* present price Is $35 an OUnat, The Board also racuinnii'inled the rejection of South Africa's proposal to allow gold producing countries to sell half their gold output at whatever pric i ba obtained above the pegged rate South Africa's requests were made last year at the annual ineeting of the Fund Thev met 'lonx opposition from the United States President Truman has said that 'he United States woulo never info i gold as long aa he was I*rReuter li Big3 M WillDiMUM W ea t e r a StrmgMi WASHINQTON, May 3. The Secretary of State. Dean aid today that the "llig Thraa roredp Mwisten meeting. Ii Lmidou ihu month, gUs needo^ SPH frr Un Ut'en,|iheiiing ril %  thai the three Rwetefl Mini '. i woulu gee whether thf j" 9t then three Qi vernments could bo oi ought Into line In various matters and .vh.it itepi b d to be taken tor lh< general strengthening "1 the W. i -(Reirtc DeGasperi Culls For Efirip HOME, May 3 Pramin Aleltla Jind rranoa foi help HI winning ihe return to Italy t aa A Irlatlc free Mi Speaking; In ihe |ag %  eticalu rejected proposala Senators yesterday that dd xuthdraw from the W* larn Ml.Ilil Italy sin Ml. IIlil.V. ,, tl Pali.,u .ii %  ire ; aujjar Bwduoari n %  dei w.irlii nrtce belo level foi UM 11 M I On the other hand. 11 Tiaw. "ii hai to ba i thav sugar prices have raf more than those of most oth i d foods and tin Government arc relucUn' I -selves to ( bargain anM nUhl mean DBjrll mktall) high pn.-e (a w ,, ii 1M1 Itho % %  an %  %  I har.di 1 Ink \, avi i. so" conclude* The Time* -ithe lltfjBl ki ilui^it i~ ol nUi mi|! um) ol in. B.WJ %  %  %  i point in ttlW lu.iti. i Tbej .i laumbei oi different oi than Mtuish Cat 1 % %  hi Mudmoaa in this i; of the Common weal th can rh ,. i 11 .,1, i thene eoloruei I W urgenl is Missouri Ofiirrrs Los*' Smitirih NOI i ottr., • %  Thuikey office i % %  I i nu > \ Oeaki I lai SPORTS WINDOW Cell*!* and Ficawnn H..%-.. i., Kn .initi"! ilu -". im-i ..i .. .-(urn PlrM Dlvtalon Italun *'"" >••• Icnirii nval r.rlm Ihl %  • %  •.! Flakwua.Beven mi iw %  amp l.y a Ui.-on jB..ri Btnca ihia iimi Coiir|> ivai %  %  ni-iwovtnnriit %  > I oM eag gmplte l-n. t.. %  II -ill M inlen-ii,, ,,, ,,. %  '%  !. %  P-.-liwick.Ila>ver. Un re...I Ihrlr. %>i>. .>, C-,ll... ,., ..,. Austriu 0|i|Ki Soviet Movr VlhNNA. May 33. I h' ,\ 'i Mo (.'abinet today decided to oppose a Soviet move to insert in ihe Aui trial r, clause (UMII>HIIII K :in i nii'in !., HI ,.H. r , %  irg.tpi ations Fureign Minister Kail Oruber -u.i all attempt* to build neo-Nui ceils had bean b ne Snvt.t prossaaai, i aoantl]. would pia< i nei diffl'-ultie N In the v.a, .,! the CM uslon ..( the rauatiian Treat) Is Mid.—Reuler. Craziani Will Appeal om Mu 3 1 I .1 Musiclint's "U ,i ,i.i ii, NoruM ra Italj %  %  d ha will speeel • nighl srlUi the Qermani i %  %  peeal iii i though Ihs (in ,,..i eld I'Mi'i. one ol the I.I i i,i iii. i, idinj i i tvill havi nnl> M rnonuu more (o ... . %  , %  Realer, er \ HI, in. II. ... ,' aged -I? who tornnunided the lleship "apt Brown hud told m of iMulrj I be Krutrr I.i' CHINA OUTLAWS POLYGAMY SAN FKAM ISCO, May 3 inii.ii.i.iii-t Chins has enfoi.-ed now marriage rag ing j*ol> *i.iti '• %  l'"king radio announeed todji* du) Boll i Bve l-H-n l %  Hauler Gold WUI Nol Go Up WASHINGTON, |la) 3 ln Hoard of the Internal join Hulf-Hoiir IVohsl Strikr In Rome HOME. May 3 buses and lium* lulled for ft* minute! throughout Id a* Uajnapsjgi workers kdnad la half-hour general strike called ti the CaaaaaustlaU led tai la pro test ajjaunet the sfaoUng o tv %  The sit ike was timed t< i un Rh the loneral ol tintS>0 snot ai ( alane, K*I 11 Ra Siiii'l.' urta| a clash with pan —Reuter "I enjoy then best of all F'rrvlliing'a ben perirrl hnlai B*| ih igarrllr. hatr bre BsVssstan in luiiirv "Ok, I eVW*. Wf d 'ike iiu M.uuu Ihey are made f u "•ii mill patlHul Ample N y CANCEL FLIGHT rauHKLs Sabena. the Belgia i Airline. • anccllcd their BruMels-Vienna flight today when So\del authorities in the An'i, badri th" ail IhnV landing. According officials ih.' nan i% u aanetion imposed by the Soviet authorities because The Sabena aircraft inaugurating the service a week ago did not follow the regular corridor -Renter ii leave Bii %  itny there on Friday aa on Saturday will go to Genovi. where he will speak .it the tint Health Assembly mi Monda' May 0 He will also speak e'•' Ii' 'i Wai :-uidoi. A H"iiii.,ini'{ dngteuluaa enoountered ,, i. %  %  'greemenl—Reuter. Czech Planes Released GERMANY. May 3 rnree Cgeehoatevak i>n3 (Dakotaj Mrerafl which made unsu thoriscd landings at an airport near Munich on March 24 with •& people aboard have beer, to Czech authoril.es' headquarters. European Command, the United %  need here today Th.rebsaaa "f the planes is in acrordarxe with the long existing policy of the United Stales in co-operation with Czech authorities to effect a prompt return of the abandoned lurcrafl make unauthorised land announce tent staled —Renter RAIL STRIKE IN U.S. i MM UK A ihree-daji Mruteltts ' d in even Mi' i rjertinnlni i Drning, th. of An.i'i snneunaav tix^ Ihe ''VA I %  II <•' Renbnt There'll never be a teller cigarette "Yei.kul it's ih, ii.i. JaeaaV "f "-l"^> ..( ii..nr/. ih. as aVentei |V ; Ikar ii|. iaaaaafsaai llir grealeal aliaeotrri gaj aa>-ml i s "kill|(rll)iMll|eill ladr in ual BBBl Ml /5 DROWNED IN FLOODS ANKARA U j irotei HI d damaged IH %  #ai du MAURIER ^ IHE IXCLUIIVE riLUR IIP CIOABEIIE 'l J HADr IM IHGItNb •3 cenfi for 50



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PACE SI\ HENPY BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tilt RSDAY MAY 4. ItSlI BY CARL ANDERSON VlCKtY MUUbfc. BY WALT DISNtY _--A=^ii=^-)OOK...AJ ..-. u, A'" I : BLONDIE f DON'T HAVE J MASTBASv < %  illlllll'll 1 ^ •^ %  ^^^"^-^xj /-—*, OKAY -T. GOT SOME I (-ETij C*?fcSS O* M* LITTLE ^\T THfM ,. B**OTHERS CLOTHES) V_vA_/ CHIC YOUNG THE LONE RANGER lef r :N REACH \ %  JCK WEIL *" I /*> i K"EOME f v —. ''MtlTER WEAB10UO* OF Wf YEAH-ANP 'r. 'WEN *H0 K^fP f 116 l IWAmti V*Xf .P(?.j^AOR If Hi OTMt. BY FRANK STRIKER H. . iV\.\\ IIM lli.1,11.„i i|„. ftrtl Ho...,,,.. fACi Aft HI TOiD ** TALS( HAS SiNT HIS L^T MO DOMWO.*e MO{ TOTMf •OLICfTHt ONlVl tvOtNlMOS FO H|J VICTIMS-( YOU* THIUft THAT HI MADi ^\ THIM ftCUtVI Hf MAS LVlNft! FATNtK.lM?. BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANU, HE YOU -TACP M -JVAV OjT < %  %  -/'• W.WT VOU AOCOJD [ Tl-C HOOfF WHLl I M*vS MV •. I *QC *V ^5 TCCWV — VOJ'P JU#T AW %  _*_*• WiFB* | Ol MB* *AiV Tip C*FXG 1 A. rvwnvaocp TMA****. FC TV*i Bap NBVHU iM c-A.*cr" CUT OE ME *.* %  £ S >ll\ I O BEEF \l SIHAIJW PRIME BEEF (*oa &Sw.l)



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Till nsDAV MAY |. ijsn BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. DIED F*aa*srNay at he* miOrikrv Anh.il .d.*.* IWi H wrA INN I*. UU reuden** .HH pan lo-dav lor the Jam*, „,,, %  nd .h !" ,„ ,h* W£tbu.O BM M B. J |fi| ar ,„. Si? **g jw< -• %  %  • % %  rv* %  lU.SAi arm Darr.wv Pilgrim <.on.< Mr..tennliw Arch.r. Mr. Amanda Moor* Idltfktrm, Lenny, William. • F.l, h\,dv ant, '•ndcluklren. %  ACKITT jMNto a| he, **..***** TO funeral leave, her late lesldenc* •I 430 o'clock Ih|# *:n mg tot at Bg} %  *-* "=2'% . Nuni; | : wn Eklr Kr-Kl> ...... Kennedy tnephei-i 4SM-.i„ V.lniNMIi lOLOW, it ha* IMhsNIII BUM HUI. 3. PhiUp. FurSfwOl leave hi. laic re.ld-.ee .1 > p m Io-d*v for St Mark. Church Frln.li an Baked lo atwnd Christopher father i. Chartott* irraatnea-i. Dorothy ttreenldge, Dickie H..atd. hiuny Howard. MUIMem CnoMngton. Barton. W Clan lloaard Ma.Ktyit HUGH ANTIIOrV .Tony' Ui rt,ght *. hla INNHN "Ililian". No 2 I1..V Street HI. runr' Friend* ar* asked to altprul kta Ijura L MacKenile end family 4 3 so--In FOR HI VI 1 rviAinw. al Plal. far In*aa *B*< m,d. Hamilr^v fundahed from May %  • AD comfort.. Englltfi bath, with heater. ""N" l a i spha aj**. verandah* Teii%  *M"V* MM. j, j 5p_, „ n *T n 4 v. f 1 FIAT—Fully famished |jn**i and Culler* All modem .^ ( „, I. 1..Inure* Own Club* and Cilv Dial 4181 4 S SO -Irt MAKKHAM-On th* Sea Hhftlngn.rnl*at*s or unrXimlahM 3 bedroom*.h all modern convenience* OM ln%  • % %  :.,; t:„ rooking Applv: Ella* OuM *' Si 4 IB—4 I k I AKCC POOL ROOM -M 00 per month ADPIV Ml.a Shepherd. Sunny Side Iwh Rock 1 s S0-3n I l-StnFNCt: From lat May upstair* H *;-,. Street. 1 Badnmn-i. th ,.,., ml Dining room*. Toilet. Hath .ind airy Altai mltim* lo* *"**• lnwned|*|* peaaesitari Auoli % %  *M Ftltos n... .<• |.„„„. i„, ,,. N >IVI BO Suisdaj. : 1 10 1 1 n 11 HMI.Vtl CAR COLLISION CASE THE FVINJC are hereby *arna aaalT^t (ivtnat craNit to aiv rxill_\ Vk-IIOIJ* nr Demi do no) hoM myMtf rtaaunaVal laa contracUn* oidar •ic^ad %  VnUrl MCarQU I Slatwr. HUUM lilt St MKhaai is -at. LOST A. IOI M ft iMd ai the corner of ll would noi be true lo say thai I e w tr v od lo mj riRhi while Hit%  dkar Mf m pwauki MI t ?lnp,x-d aflcr hiltinu ttM M 11:. .1. I.-u,l.,1,1 wmt a III'I. way In front, and thrn rrv,.--i beefc. I aloaw waa In %  > nV, .nd thr lfr l:i Unl ^lul.,v. ^ kl Hurdle 01 (. St. MiH the car I her On July . 1M6. I drove to a funeral mi LOST TXK-. Black Labrador Dot Amaa.< U. tha name of Count Pindar plaoa• •nla-1 Or CatO at fcvrtmifii 1 Hill a s :o an SWretTTTAKE TirKKTS OMTNi •N and acrlea H WU l.>d^ pi '.turn lo P A tVmll. Ran* it-" • D • % %  Pram Kanl on M *nU Dirck uid tl*ht Brown Dei m \\ A MI n •TT — Worthini 1 fladrwi' r Pmnt June lat pi.onc 4111 i. 11 a m liolpn JIM V HELP QUALIFIED MECHANU? Tor Adding mil T\peaillri> Ila Oaraf* 1 o'clock Slncar Saloun Cai • "MaTed by an acetdanl and on* Pord Truck d a m aafd by ftie 1U P m H. Jaaon Jonaa Sarvtr S-t-.Uon. Bwkwlth Place. MorrU Saloor, Car darrauiad by acctdant Tarnia CaOi I. Arena* McKantla. Auction*** 3 9 So—an T.IU*1n Emporium. Colmdtfr St IN> %  no Fir* Pa-ljada SUlU-n Apply with .tier i,nd In p*i>n 4 8 S0--4n CKSTKAt. SER%'ANT llu-l .1 md r*f***nc*a required Apvlv Foal ,i~v,4 Public Sml*m-Conid. ID H P in perfect workPb C t Ti 1. St. Thomaa 4 S.SO— 4JI CAR WoUaloy %  In parfoct ordaa r*a*a.i May lllh Trlephon* 4014 Ufa. Uraham Yrarwood. 4 S.le—fn UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER W$ :iinictlon received from Ih Inauranoi Aurnt | will **U on Friday May 3lh at M... J.on Jon** C*la||I er Broad Street at I 30 p n. •! %  I04T !• h p Monu Car Damaged in %  *• MM CAR— law MorrU Minor tourar. lo*. rnUoaaa, condition a* new Apply Ra.oti A Board. Auction Rooma, Hardwo^tti Allay, open daily • •in lo 11 noon I'non* teu CAH-Mi.rri. R li p 4 door Sedan In J condition Newly palnt1 Carag*. 3 S S0-n. CAR: Pm.ti.i. Conv*rllabl* Coup* occasional lour I'.i.ariutcr In food ord*r. Raaionabl* price lor quick Sal*. Pbon* 1341 oi rtlV M 4 SO—In CAR Or. Hlllm.>n IIM* Model Phorv W. R. Tainpro 3H0 o. 334 30 4 SO-1 f n p Dod|* Truck at Sugar Store op polla Hlahwayi ft Ttanaport Depl I'aitchild Sti*ct Damaged in accident By m.truction. recalled I will a*|l oi, Thursday May 4th In lb* apol. at Advent Ae. Rank Hall X Road 11Chattel Hoot* Hi 11 with ah*d Mat kitchen attached Hurl be sold. Trn viNciWT Qfurrrni, gsNafJaaaa* 30 4 SO—3n REAL ESTATE %  'CASVlLUf. Navy Gardaru Ch. Ch Thic* bedroom bungalow atandlng on s.lll q f**| land. Can be seen at an* ti" r by auv-.iNti.-n1 Apply C A. P*frc* Pr-me 4 or t7B. M 4 sO-tn CARS IMT Morrl* BbjM J"-t loinplcteli overhauled and jiaintcd l4i Sinaar Sport*, lour f*al*r. 1MB Morrla Minor Saloon. I.3Q0 mil*. Uki'now 1*40 Ch piaar wnvdaor. Sunabl* lor hired car aarvlr* Port Royal Oarage Lul. T*leP>-n* 4S04. POaU MODOl On* V- rord angln* and radlatur in NHal d'lv* >halt. ring-gaar and pinion, and oth*r pan. Inquire Auto Tyr* Coml*any. Trafalgar Str*l Phone 34BJ at 4 50-1.fn ItADIO One (li 0 Valve Pve AadIC 1,1 kood condition. Apply: Mil Mlllied Clark*. St Matthlaa Oap, Ch Ch 3 S.K %  I'i M ondition. Phone IBtO houxa of 4 and t p m 4 3 SO—3.1 FURNITURE^ FTmrlTtrrt-efc-v*ral Bliraai Tables, China Cabinet*. MorrU Chairs Etc. at Barsain Price* In Ralph A Peard'l Auction Rooma, Hardwood Alley Open dally %  a m to 13 rv %  AMI -I4M at), ft of bind win %  % %  dwalllturhouae thereon, ritual.^t the comer of Welllneton Street, an > r Street, Brldgayaawa. Inpecllon on appllca'inn la th Trnant. Mrs PiMWAc* Llnton The property will be act up for *ak Ihiblir Competition al our OfBc S-reet. Bridgetown, on Thuialai May !*M at 1 p m. YEARWOOD a, BOVCE. Solicitor* 33 .aO-Sn REAL ESTATE The undersigned will olre* for aal* H nubile competition at their ofnee Jan* Street, llndaetown. on Friday the I3ln XU> l*so. at 3 p m 1 acre 3 rood* • } f petchea of land at Maawell. near T01 Kock. Chrlat Church This land whlc1 the public road baa %  front*;".* ret, and fares the bungalow recorall' by Mr. M. L. Harrtaon r further panlculara and condition lie apply lo HANFIH 11. Solicitor-. Jama* Street niTriimsoN 27 4 SOan. Wii.'ii tiar defendant n I waa out of my OaV Bfad slltin*: In ttkl olhet aide of the road. H> -K.-,l RM how ii happened, and 1 told him ho had cut buck too fast in front of me He said he did not realise that he had cut back In *< quickly KoMd Dry I was goinj at about 20 to 2- miles an hour I .jnrnt iftnembvr if the drfvndant said uurlbBl else. The toad waa dry. I did no see any other vehicles or pcopl" 11. the road. My mouth got bur*' II the Mecnr.: whet-L and I got n blow in my stomach I had m go to hoapit.il UM IMOaa da3 Th dtfciiit.itii look DM lo Dr Emtagi the same day. s**>i> ;ifler ihe aceltletil Ta> Mr Ward: I did not Indicate) ml in pass out 1 did not speak to him as he passed. 1 had been smoking al the lime. Mv right hand nod been propped on the door of the cat. I do not know if there WJS plenty of room for tht tare cars to pass before defendant cut back in. Il i not true lhat 1 swerved over to my right. The fender of defendant'' car was ripped through. I did not see anyone coming up the Fifth Avenue. After the accident a woman came to me I do mil know where she came from. I had been driving with le hand. Dcfendunt did not ask me Mf* I allowed "Ihl* thing to happen' T did tell the defendant that ho bad cut across loo Quickly. I cannot remember if a woman was there at the lime I did not ee her. Defendant's car did not slop on the right aide of the road before it reversed. He stopped on UM BtJt I made a statement to UM poMOJ next day. 1 do not remember if I xlgned it. The Court lutiourned for lunheon Building with Shop and Bakery atandlng on 11 acre land whh-h la run in a ateaaflrr, OoT*rnmenl water ft Ulhu illed situate al CLapham Lend. Pl-g Stall Road, overlooking tea and country Dinrtct Meal to HsfhSate'* naw t*nantry For particulars apply on prcmlM* lo Mr. J St Hill owner n 4 soJo All THAT certain nveasuag* or • %  %  known • No 40 Roebuck Slree; atand %  ng oa 3TM *q. ft of Und Ti. building ha* been recently rcmodellet and renovated Intpactlon on aivllca Uon lo the iinderalgned The property will be aet up for sen by public rmenpetttton at our ofBc* J..in*. Street. BrtdaWtown. on Friday Tit, May 13M. at 3 p.m. VEARWOOD a BOVCE 39 4 10 Hi By public competition at our oi IT High St an Thursday 11 May. al I p m th* dwell lug hout* of two .toreycomprlalng public room.. Iwo bedroom*. •hen. bath ate with ahop atlached. • landing on 3034 -• ft ..f Und In Tweed *lde Ro*d and Hunt. Road. CWy. Apply to Mr E II Klrton. the owner on th* preml*** Further partie-iUr. and condition* of ule from COTTLE CATPOhO a CO l.i'inini; Srkiol Next lera HAVE you considered Jou'naluan CareerT The llarbado. Advocate la lool %  ng lor a height >oung m-n lo tra aa a Sub-Editor Apply now In wrtiu gi.mg full detail* to Ihe Editor T Advmat* 34 Broad Street JO.4.30 I f I Bl UM Mb. A\, I HIM mv hoin i iver gave me the signal I WsWl no other m the road. As 1 approached M-360 I saw tba OaThrar tilling his right hand on the car door and holding cigarette'in hM %  ..-r It-oked at me %  ., I did BO 1 h''at.i .. bl IW, fell %  I crash 1 stopped Oil Ihe llkhl l n. Do road, back I.. where M-3HU wag In the saw the b um pai "I M-'' ngiinst the tree. i Mm now he hod allowed "this thin* U) tUOaa)an H He to' • me he had lost control ,>r the calami faaWldod with my raor fendei He also said Lhat hat GOT hod 0 lided with the tfee and thai be BOd stunk luv -ttmi.ich on the %  tooi iruj whool The driver of M-380 did not tell me that I had cut in too soon .mil collided with him. I aa.v that my lemUi BnM toro and pulMd .,.v.'in an outward diTroni Ihe panel of the car. He asked me to lake hitn H UM doctor, and I took him in my car one -.Ionian came Just after the crash She is Huth Crichlow. She CUM tron the fttb Avenue and was going towards Collymore Rock. She came to the scene of the crash After taking Maug-m to the doeInp, he and 1 went back to the peotM On le.ichmg there I saw Mr. Corbin and others. Soon after %  came Mr. Corbin and 1 went to the policeman We told the policeman that we did not want the police in it. and thai .• afould (" %  th stand our own damages No m, r-mcnl taken I then took his driver near his home and I ih.ti went to my home Next morning I went over to Mr Corbin about ttM MttaffaiMCrf of • hill eoneerning another mutter. SBUBCT THESE VOII'__ DI.IW II %  Books Sleno Note Books and Pal ROBERTS & CO. For Best Value we recommend you t • btQ SANKEY'S FIREBRICKS A hmitevl tiuantlty now In itOCat, CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. Pier Head. ,J him how the accident %  n,.that it was Coibin A Sons, und that he woui %  tell his Solicitors about it After efci} Oorbtn had changed. 1 left him after telling him he could tee to his and I would see to mine. A few il. called me, and 1 had a con versa-' tiun with him. I told turn that I .Mlily. Aflei 'lie accident I did not Ob; serve what damage had been done' to Mr Corbin's ear. T Mr Adam*: I did not hear that CssTlaln was taking steps When I blew m. ht>m M-380 was p the rood. I was %  htiie over 60 feel BWaj then M-HH0 swerved a little bo the left, leaving, cmite enough i mm for me to past. M-380 was going pti foctlj Thr cabbage palm nee is at the ; the Ml Avenue I da! not MO the woman imtU crash She told me thai she was Komg n. %  i'i> Ittiek. ihat she heaid the crash and turned back Ta the Ceurl : I was going at about 20 miles an hour and M-380 was going at about 18 miles an hour. Ruth CrKhlow Of Dayrells Hoad, a domestic servant, said : 1 I BnBOl letneinW'i lhat doti Ofl WhaCB UUI thing happened. At about 5.30 pm. 1 was goi-ig home I was 10 the top of the 5th Avenue -hen I heard a crash. I looked back and saw a car on to Ihe cabbage palm tree. The only other car I aaw was Mi Hurdles on the right side of the road facing Bclmont Hurdle reversed and asked the driver of M-380 "how this happened Hurdle asked him If he had lost control I did not wait to hear the BJJMWBJ I .veld BMBM Mr iliudie recalled said to Mr Adams: I law my Counsel reading from his papers when he was i iii'S-examining Mr Corbin 1 hcid him read that the driver had lost rontrol and gone across the road and hit the tree I heard him read that on three occasions. He never mentioned anything about collision with my fender 1 tut I know that that i* what Maudlin load "' This closed the eviden.e. and Counsel addressed the Jury. Hearing of the case continue* to-day. (ARRIRBEAN WORKERSUNION LECTURE BY Labour Commissioner Mr E. S BUKROWES • — at — 8 00 pin. — on — Thursday. May 4th. 1H50 — at — Smagugue Building, Synagogue Lane Subject: "TRADE UNIONS AND TI1F.1K PROPIfl Kt'N. TIONS" All Mi nih, iare Invited. SHIPPING L-%%* aVi.w OAfUMLNIA w -HI %  J VHMN M tl The Sch EVERDEHK will *clr ,< CaffJB ."'I BaaaanaaB*. for Trlrldad aalling Saluntay SUl uu. The M V MOWEKA will areept Cargo and Pssaeng*-. for Damlnira. AattuPt*. Mon'*r*t. Nevl* and St Km. Dal* of Sailing lo be given The Sch UNtTBD PIKiBIM S Will accept Cargo and psn—ngn (or St U.ria Sailing Friday KIIMII-I t'.riMI< M' SOAI.ajrp UM i.iif!Tn. WANE LTSTF-i a %  'barexga* u aag*n*si to a l>* at Trtnldad from Australian pai %  /.cul JBth Mara. S 'CJTV OF DDBPFEaalla Port fin* Apol JBih, %  .gaallBa May Btk. M*lborn*. May IMh. Syaksay. Kay 300*. BrUl*vne. June Tth. airtebig at Trinidad %  -:•• 4ih July. rJaasaada* about JJ1> tin Thaaa vaeaata have anew* rpac* for i'.ll*d hard fraaen and gaeaaral cargo C-*g.. arcapsM an through Mil* of adi,*, -l* trw,*hjp*na,t >J Trti.klad fa nvtuah Ouksna, Bwrbado*. WiMwiis a*FW*l BBNNV, For furtkeaparticular* appl> IlKNTJW wTTttV COMPANY. LTD. AgcnN Trtnldad DA O0OTA CD. LTD.. AgoM Steamship Co. foe S "RtPJORD%  TIIL'UN" HIW TOSS UIVKI **BBI Art. Tth April Ihh Aprd BRh April tOi May SB AICOA ROAMXR AICUA RUNNER" "A1XX>A HAH^taiNSW ORLEANS -lavii aal' Art. NO. araea ttnd March 4U. April ALCOA PIU1KIU • %  AU'll PENNANT' > %  "ALCOA PATRIOTApril BBih May lit May 13th May IMh May 33th Mav 3Mh May lllh May BMh June tth SOSTHBOI ND .. "A1.COA POLARIS" %  afMdaM May lllh For Montreal paeki. May JBtli For Montreal Port* Jon13ih Pag SI John. rene* Riv O SI Lawrence Mvar A STEAMER" O St. Uwr*nc* Rlvot A STEAMER These ve**elo have l,n Monueal and st Laafr Port. Apply i DA COSTA O CO., -TI Can adian S*rvl-e. ROBERT THOM LTD.—New Tork and aulf Bervio*. MISCELLA NEOUS ri.nt'H HAtiS llprnt-l and washed white, all marka taken out Apply K It Hu/iU> Si CO Ltd over Bala Slw>> %  Hri LOsSW Bro-d Street Dial 4611 rrNEOT PADXTS— Brandram Hand, KEYSTOME White and colour*. *peclaJ "AirnTT"-ltuate at tba Hoed. Chrtat Churoh. atandlng Souare Feet of land, wllh right of lo Worthing Beset, gallery, dr, >em. Utrea bedr pantry, kitchen and usual out-ofncea Oarage and Bea-vanUr rooma In tha yiid Inepecuon on application to Mr*. Watklna a\ary day i*sc*pt Sundayai between UM hour* of 3 and ibov* will be eat up for aal* at r-ibllcompetition at our Ofnee In Lura* Street on Friday the 3th of May 1390 at The TELEHXJIST Hydraulic Tipping Gear ) Th*y *r* line Ltd H.4.M Bat IRON RAO. WINDOW* lev r. window* complete with %  lie t" a 4ft Suitable for a* bond En.|,ill* Clardlner Auatlni Ing, OpDOflte PlanUtlon* Ltd Street or Phone MM Broad i* \ SO—I.In l-EIGHTON— Slluale lr Road. OI. Michael, atandlrat % %  % %  '• feel of ksnd The houe* I* built of atone and cont in* gallery, drawing, dining. •Itttng %  •id Inkfaet rooma, Pantry, kitchen, W C and bath downstairs badi with running water) upstair. Uon any day I except Sunday! am and 3 p m The above will be aet up fo* Bale to Public i m,petition at our OfBc* In Lira* Street. Irrldgetown on Friday he 5th May ISM at 3 p.m. 31 4B p*r gnllon Come a A. BARNES ft CO Ltd. vt III n trni> NOTICE is itrjtETiv QIVIN uu.. .. Intention of th* Vestry of Ihe far** ol St. Andrew to be caused to be intioduced Into the Houe* o Aa'smbO* „r ti. i, UBBBO %  Bin to author li. • Veatry to borrow a *um not eaceedlng atiaoo 0 0 f->r the purpo-e "* compleung Hie new roof on the Pariah Church and ling equipment ilVwa. '.,r linRaw ihapel about to be bi F>t Simon.. Ihe loan to carry l"**"' 1 at the rate of *^ Pr annu •meld bv M equal annui K: C ---*-• V..TT CMt Prtcillon built, Utd dMlfM* to mlnimlM tlrain on ch.nli, T.l.hoiit Hydraulic Tipping Gmr can b* IHMd to .ImoM uiy typ. of short or lon| wh.olbM* y.hlcl.. SpMdjr lipping li controllor from tho drWor'i c*b And th. body can b* raltod or loworod nd hold at any intrn>*dl*t* potltlon. All Taloholtt o^ulpmon* U (tHusntoad far twolv* months The Land AcquLxititia Ad.' Ifl4 .;. hMtaand .uv.w ., ru,i.irt. l_o* i „„ ,„ Ir^M I PJJ; """THE BCHtDULT. lamina i u.a, ( SUllV. aL BathntUaW^M he .eaUwore. on land. 55? •,;;'::;,:,".',r.i-.'.'.'i'S'v-.M p F ('.' '' Colonial *** r *H r ,-j-' A J IMPORTANT Mill SAMTwo ATTRACTIVE BEACH l-.i II HIM. SUES AT OHM BEACH HT. PETER it.noo IK. 00 MANTIS fiKIMllll roi'ii WINIM to every motorist I.a tuito win n In* la 1 n'fil in %  prooT-4 in il riocatUllg bcitVsswt) \;uious niaUo1 lyn In iln [inst, w liiitovcr li in itho.ee it haa invari.l>lmi nl 'Int.Hiiti.'c .it 'sot iir dm ruble feature. That i -i "M't--, I'u willi llio Now Dunlop Port, |)iiiilu|j bat proiluceil the one tyre that ha* rytV ii \i. It's tltf n.it m al result of leftilerKhip —a li u|cislii|i uliii'li h.is Inin maintoiiied BIDOS the l>uuli>p Kuhlier Coin pan* Ltd. bat ..uu il Htsl IjTs n.iiuufacturcr... ^1 yeai> ago. DUNLOP I ( KSTKI.V HROFt.—Itetribatora In Orchid. Blue. Old Gold, Rose, and White $1 .OH CELANESE CELSHL'NO in While. Grey. Gold, Turquoiae A Blue 0 $1.01 per yd GEORGETTE in Wh'tc. Pink. Gold. Peach and Green 0 tl. 20 per yd. Alto SATINS, COTTON PRINTS. FVJ1ETTES. CAMHHK'^ I-AWN In While, etc., etc. IUIOVIPAVA. Hill SS SHOP. IHE BEST VAllI IN ITS (LASS TO-DAY Seg Ihe I9S0 ,>KI CHARLES MtENEARNEY & CO., LTD. IVS COT BETTER IT'* GETTING POPULAR IT* CROWN GINGER ALE


Tharsd

May 4

1950.

——_—

ay

Rarbados

—_—_oooo ee



“STRETCH



West Indies Play
Indians Today

(From Our Ow

APART FROM NET PRACTICE a

team have only one more day’s cricket before the first
match of the tour. Tomorrow they play an Indian

big

n Correspondent)
LONDON, May 3.
t Lords the West Indies

Gymkhana Eleven and at midday on Friday they leave for

Worcester.

Sir Pelham
Is New Head
Of MCC

SUCCEEDS EDINBURGH



SIR PELHAM WARNER

LONDON, ,May 3.

Sir Pelham Warner was today
appointed the new President of
the Marylebone Cricket Club. He
suecéeds the Duke of Edinburgh,
who nominated him.

Sir Pelham, known to everyane
in the cricket world as “Plum”, is
76 and is the game’s most travel-
led personality. He was born in
Trinidad. A former England Cap-
tain, M.C.C. Test Selector, includ-
ing Chairman, Manager of the
M.C.C. touring team. member of
the M.C.C. Commit and M.C.C.
tcuring team, and C.C. Trus-
tee, and uring the war, Secretary
of the M,C.C., Sir Pelham has
eet lis life to the welfare of
cricket. He has played, in Aus-
alla, South Africa, New Zealand,
the ‘West Indies, North America,
Egypt, Colombo, Portugual, South
America, Argentine, Uruguay,
Chile and Peru.—Reuter.



INDIANS COMING

TO WEST INDIES

KINGSTON, Jca., May 2.
It is reported from Londen that
it is practically settled that an
. Indian cricket team will tour the
West Indies in 1952.
Can. Press

World’s Richest

a ‘ 4

Treasure Hunt

ee e
Near Climax

TOBERMORY, Argyll, Scotland,

May 3.
Royal Navy divers, fighting
against time and tide will give to
the world some real clue whether
they have found the fabulously
rich Spanish galleon “Florencia”
suid to be buried deep in the
sands of Tobermory Bay. cine
After more than six weeks
operations the world’s richest
treasure hunt appears near’ its
climax as divers defy blustery
weather and tearing currents to
complete their identification of the

wooden hulk first located a month
ago.



Squally weather has inter-
rupted work several times in the
last two weeks, but, with the
aid of giant compressor pumps
and powerful air nets probing
the bed silt 60 feet below water
the expedition leaders believe
their dream may come true any
dawn now.

The man with the brightest
dream is the Duke of Argyll, 47-
year-old Scottish peer whose
family has long owned salvage
rights in Tobermory Bay.

He hopes to recover more thin
530 million worth of gold plate,
precious jewels and pieces of
freight believed lost with the ship
250 years ago.—Can, Press.



BOLIVIA GETS $16M
LOAN

WASHINGTON, May 3.

The Export-Lmport Bank said
today that it has granted a
$16,000,000 loan to Bolivia to com-
plete a highway between Cochan-
bama and Santa Cruz. The
$16,000,000 will pay two-thiras ot
the cost of completing the road
begua in 1944, the remaining
portion will be paid by the Bolivian
Government.—Reuter.



GOOD RELATIONS

BELGRADE, May 4

Marshal Tito tole former Italian
partisans at a reception here last
night: “no questions which have
isted between Italy and us, or
which still are outstanding could
trouble the good relations between
@ur two countries”. —Reuter.



vw They haye taken the opportun-
ity to run their eye over Roley
Jenkins, whom they will meet at
Worcester and have formed the
impression that he is a bowler to
be treated with respect. Judging
by the form he displayed against
Yorkshire two days ago Jenkins
is a certain inelusion in England’s
ma for the First Test.

@ West Indians were intro-
duced to their largest audience to-
night when they appeared on
Britain's television screen. They
were the guests in the weekly
feature “picture page” and after
being introduced by Miss Joan
Gilbert they were interviewed by
Leslie Mitchell, probably the Bést
known interviewer in British
radio. John Goddard, Captain of
the tourists, was the first to speak
and he introduced to viewers each
member of his team.

As Goddard introduced each
man he outlined his particular
capability and ended by remarking
1 have not seen. many English
players but as my batsmen are
all in top form I think we shall
score a lot of runs and have a good
record on the tour.

In the afternoon they attended
a radio newsreel cinema in Soho
Square, London to view all eamera
shots which have been taken of
them since their arrival in Eng-
land. —Reuter.

St. Kitts Police
Patrol Antigua
Strike Spreading’

Aavoeate Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, May 3.

The Trade Union strike has
spread to Mill Reef where work
on luxurious holiday bungalows
ceased due to the dismissal of an
employee.

An administrative suggestion
that a dock Labour Committee,
consisting of one representative of
the Union, one of the shipping
agents, Bennett and Brysons with
an Independent chairman nomi-
nated by Government should be
set up. This was rejected by the
Union, while Brysons was willing
to try the experiment for three to
six months.

Police reinforcements arrived
from St, Kitts to assist patrols in
the streets. An important an-
nouncement is expected any
moment from the Government.





New Speaker For

Jamaica

KINGSTON, JAMAICA, May 3

The Attorney General advise
that the House must elect a Speak-
er at the meeting tomorrow in
place of O. A. Malcolm, whose
appeal against his conviction of a
breach of the election law is still
pending. It is expected that
C. C. Campbell, member for West-
ern Westmoreland, will be the new
Speaker.—(C.P.)

,



Russians Arrest
British Vessel

LONDON, May 3.
The British Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Fisheries stated to-day
that the British Trawler Etrara
was arested by a Russian naval
vessel on May 1. The owners of
the trawler, The Standard Steam
Fishing Company of Grimsby,
said it had been boarded by a
Russian crew and taken to Mur-
mansk, The trawler left Grimsby
on April 19 with a crew. of 22

bound for the White Sea.
—Reuter

~ °
Soviets Issue ‘Fifth
State’ Loan

LONDON, May 3.

The Soviet Government has de-
cided to issue a 20,000 million
roubles loan, Moscow Radio said
today. It will be known as “fifth
State loan for economic recon-
struction and development. At
the nominal change rate fixed
when the rouble was revalued {ast
March, the loan will total about
1,786 million, repayable in 20
years.



|
|

| ‘Snap’ Votes

1

Strachey Will

LONDON, May 3
British Minister John Stracney
will pay a brief visit to Hong Kong





end of this month, the War Office
announced today



terrorist operations

Accompanying Mr
tary of State at the Colonial Office
who

would be making tw
months’ tour of Malaya, North
Borneo, Sarawak and Hong Kong
—Reuter.



War Any
Time Now
SAYS U.S. ADMIRAL

SINGAPORE, May 3.

Rear Admiral Walter Boone}
Commander of the American
Seventh Fleet told reporters here
today that a new war “might
break out any time” with the
world military and political situ-
ation as it is. On board his flag-
ship, the aircraft carrier Boxer,
he said, he thought the many)
explosive situations prevailing |
might become major conflicts any
day. Asked if the United States |
would use Singapore as a base
jin the event of war, Admiral
Buone said: “If we are so unifér-
tunate as to have another war I
think we all recognise that the |
Unjited States and Britain will Zbe |
allied again and feel sure the basa
of each power would be used by
the other as required. —Reuter.



Six Protest

LONDON, May 3.
A group of Labour Members of
Parliament took the unusual step
tonight of trying to get the House
of Commons to censure the Opposi-
tion for conduct ‘“caleulated to
bring the Parliamentary Govern-
ment Into ridicule and disrepute.”

On a motion of censure wh



test against Conservative er
fin forcing “snap” votes on +
they term minor issues. One of
those unexpected votes in the
evenly balanced House of Com-
mons resulted last month in a
Government defeat and anofher,
on Monday in a tie. A motion of
censure is a method an opposition
uses to force a@ debate and vote on
a vital issue.

Six members have signed
night’s motion of censure, in-
cluding two members of the
Labour Party’s National Executive,
Mr. Tom Driberg and Mr. Joseph
Reeves. Political observers “did
not think the Government would
find time to discuss it.—( Reuter.)

Overseas
Event at Bisley

LONDON, May 8.

An oversexs team event is to be
included for the first time in the
British Naticnal Smallibore Rifie
Meeting at the Bisley Range, Sur-
rey, in July. Competition is epen
to one team of four from each
Colony or Dominion of the British
Commonwealth. Sons and daugh-
ters of parents domiciled in a
dominion or colony, who are resi-
dent in Britain for educational
purposes, are entitled to shoot.
The small bore meeting precedes
the National Rifle Association's
Imperial Meeting, which includes
the blue riband of rifle shooting—
the King’s Prize Competition.—-
Reuter.

to-



}



Streets Look Clean

DESPITE the intermittent griz-
zles which fell yesterday morning
the eight streets between the
Lower Green and the market area
were in a clean condition.

The only one that looked a bit
untidy was Cumberland Street.

In Hinecks Street the din of
coopers’ hammers could be heard
a good way off as they pounded
on the hoops around the barrels.

The other streets, Chapel, St.
George, Drumm, Cowell, Hartes
and Prince Alfred were all quiet.

Sunken Boat Afloat

THE fishing boat Lady Gracias,



It is a lottery loan, the radio| which sank off Ojstin shore re-

added. Both the bonds and prize

money will be exempt from State| ashore yesterday morning.

and local taxation.—Reuter.

Plane Missing:
14 Aboard

QUITO, May 3.

An Aviancia plane overdue yes-
terday on a flight from Quito to
Guayaquil is still not found
spite of a search by commerfial
and military planes. Last contact
was by radio when 20 minutes
from Guayaquil. It has been re-
ported that a burnings plane was
seen falling at Los Rios Province








but no confirmation has been
obtained. On board were 11 pas-
sengers and three crew. Aviancia

hopes the plane might have been
fforced to make an emergency
landing in the jungle —Reuter

inj

cently, was refloated and towed
The
other fishing boat, Lady Eagle,

which was damaged while towing
in the Lady Gracias on Monday
will soon be seaworthy again

INFECTIOUS DISEASES

SEVEN Infectious Diseases
were reported in the istand during
the month of April, 1950

There were five cases of Tuber-
culosis and two cases of Enteric
Fever.

PEPPER DEFEATED
MIAMI, Florida, May 3.
George Smathers, 36-year-ola
Marine officer and a member df
the House of Representatives, de-
feated Senator Pepper in the Dem-
ceratic Party’s primary eleciior (
rere for the Senate.—Reuter.





Visit Far Kast

during a visit to the Far East wiin|
Colonial Secretary Griffiths at the |

The chief purpese of Mr
Strachey’s visit to the Far Fast!
would be to see military units!
taking part in the Malayan anti-

Griffiths |
would be the deputy Under Secre- |



they hope to get debated they pro- |







BUTLER’S ©
ADVISER
GOES SLOW

{From Our Qwn Correspondent |
LONDON, May 3. |

_M. G. Sinanan, lawyer-politi- |
cian from Trinidad and adviser to |
the Butler Union has temporarily |
postponed his plans for interesting |
British MPs in the successful out- |
‘ome of the proposed West Indies |
Federation |
His intention now
the arrival of the West Indian |
delegates due shortly to discuss |
with His Majesty’s Government |
the future of B.W.I sugar con-
tracts. |
With delegates and particularly |
Albert Gomes his fellow Trini-

is to await |





LA,
ne

her appearance ‘Dier
Hitechoun wag refused a permit to enter England with the rest
of the French mannequins, later e Home Office decided to
grant one after all. Her measurements—-Hips 35, bust 36, Height
5 ft. 6 ims—Exzpress '

} ‘
fare sip

LIE WILL NOT TAKE
MESSAGE TO STALIN
FROM TRUMAN

PARIS, May 3.
Trygve Lie, Secretary General of the United Nations, said
today he would go to Moscow on May i0th. Lie who arrived
here from London on Saturday, made the announcement
at a Press Conference.

In Paris he has already seen French President Vincent
Auriol and Foreign Minister Robert Schuman. He is pre









nd he, show mother, |
Peres. t 3 ~the wiv ftag eaealial steps. foe ithe .gelic
penne ie choo ge athening of the West. wa

dadian of a rival political party he
hopes to cooperate in this task of
approaching MPs of all parties
here. '

The Colonial Office are expect-
ng Gomes to arrive from Trinidad
in the near future.

Thore is still no clear indication |
as to when the sugar talks will
commence although May 12 has
been mentioned unofficially as the
probable date |

The correct answer may
provided on May 10 when L. D
Gammans will ask the Colonial
Secretary, James Griffiths, if His
Majesty's Government are pre-
pared to reconsider the decision
to reopen negotiations on a long |
term sugar contract,

Meanwhile, it has been an-
nounced in Barbados that the |
talks will start during the week |
beginning May 15,

be



“Big 3” Will Discuss
Western Strength

WASHINGTON, May 3,

Secretary of State, Dean
Acheson, said today that the “Big
Three” Foreign Ministers meeting
in London this month, would dis.

The

He said that the three Foreign
Ministers would see whether the
policies of their three Govern-
ments could be brought into line
in various matters and what steps
were needed to be taken for the
general strengthening of the West

—(Reuter)



Austria Oppose

Soviet Move

x VIENNA, May 33.
; The Austrian Cabinet today de-
cided to oppose a Soviet move to

“ clause compelling the Govegn-
ment to dissolve Fascist Organjs-
ations Foreign Minister Kar\
Gruber said all attempts to build

States,
help in winning the return to Italy
of the Adriatic tree territory of
Trieste

energetically
made by Senators yesterday that

establisiiinent of pewee and of ser k
ing.” solution to the
framework.

siding over a meeting of heads of the United Nations’ neo-Nazi cells had been trustrated

2 ialised agencies, The Soviet proposal, made ‘in

_ Speman $4 Lie said he expected, to be in| London recently, would place new ,
Moscow for several days and {oe difficulties in the way of the con-|



see Soviet leaders.

“If Premier Stalin is in Moscow
and it can be arranged | hope |
see him.”

Constantin Zanercho, Assistan
Secretary General for the Security
Council affairs, will accompany
him to Moscow.

Mr. Lie said that he has already
interviewed leaders of the othe
three great powers and does np

SPORTS
WINDOW

College and Pickwick-Rovers
meet at Kensington this afternoon
jn a return Pirst Division fixture
When these teams met earlier thic
season Piekwick-Rovers won the
game by @ three-oneg@margin





5 thle. lind en expect immediate results as jc
Since 5 ime ollege has i ¢ aiti * “* 4,
shown some improvement by hold- oe cae of e -avtipuse 8. 2 i me
ing the strong Empire team to a ope that all these exchanges
draw views may lead to some resuk
it will be interesting io see durin: the next two o1 thre
whether Pickwick-Rovers can re- - ne '” he said ra FF
peat thein win or College on this months, © Sald.
gecasion “manage to turn the |} Mr. Lie told correspondents: 1
table

jam not bringing a inessage from
| President
| Stalin.” (He had heard
rumour in New York.)

I have no messages or proposals
from leaders of the Government
“lL am only interested now

a aa nan a senate



Gold Will Not a
Go Up

WASHINGTON, May 3





the world situation.”
Mr. Lie, who has

visitec
| Moscow since 1946, will leave fo

not

Truman to Marshal |

in
making up my own opinion about |

clusion of the Austrian Treaty, he |



aid.—-Reuter.



Aduncate
POINT” ON SUGAR

9

' Sugar Is Vital To
B.W.I, Economy



A Bachelor “Looks

‘a number of different occasio:
y | for other than British Carib!
For Help | interest
No one who has any knowledzé
ROME, May 8. of social conditions in this par
Italian Premier Alcide Defof the Commonwealth can den
| Gasperi today cafled on the United| that economie improvement

Italy should withdraw from the , ; i i
Atlantic Pact and the Western Lose Seniority
Ene-up ashen a a oes NORFOLK, Virginia, May 3
e affirme wt the Ttalian Three key Officers, of the 45,004)
Governibent’s in on of wo Latter jas balWeshin 2 oe
ing wentne ae eae. fort Youth ip Gtree bait fir Chibs

lini’s
Northern Italy, said he will appeal
against the 19 years sentence given

him last night for collaboration > Py m

with the Germans, according to

the Counsel I OLYGAMY
The appeal will be made to SAN FRANCISCO, May 3

Italy's Supreme Military Tribunal,
insert in the Austrian) State treaty, | though the 68 year old oldier, one
of the last of the leading Fascists,
will nave only

Phice:
FIVE CENTS
35.










Year

‘Times’ Urges U.K.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 3.

ECONSIDERATION by the British Government of thei:

offer to B.W.1, sugar producers is suggested in the May
edition of the “Times Review of Industry” published today.
It is pointed out that while a new offer of 25,000 tons to
British Honduras has been welcomed in the West Indies
there is still dissatisfaction at the total British Caribbean
queta,

+ The West Indies are anticipatin
something like a glut in the nex
few years and even with Imper
preference are afraid that Cul
sugar producers may depre
world price below a remunerative
| level for the B.W.L.
On the other hand,
| Times, “it has to be rememb«
| the

Before He Leaps”

LONDON, May 3
Britain's defender of
bachelorhood Judge Sir Ern-

sa

est Charles, in Southern sugar prices have risen muc
England to-day (aged 78) is | more than those of most oth
still a bachelor imported foods and the Briti

Government are reluctant to cor
mit themselves to a bargain whic
night mean paying an unecor
mically high price for West India:
sugar in 1957 without any margi:
for ordinary commercial bary

His definition of a bach-
elor was; “A man who looks
before he leaps and, having
looked, does not leap.”

He received many mar-
riage proposals from women







aged between 2 and 5 ing.

after he had complained | “Yet, even so” concludes The
from the bench that “No | Times, ‘as the sugar growin

one ever wanted to marry dustry is of vital importanc

me although I am in a good
job”, He was then 66,
—Reuter

the economy of the B.W.l,, a
broadly speaking, must continue
be, the British Government oug
to consider whether they eann
stretch a point in this matter
They have done so elsewhere or





DeGasperi Calls

Britain these colonies is in urgent ne¢

and here isa real opportunity”

and France for

Missouri Ofiicers

Speaking in the

rejected

Senate, he
proposals



| peake Bay
Varane k
Vana .

tiny ¢

n January, nave ber
ove Of seniority t



problem wr

Graziani. Will
Appeal
ROME, May 3

Graziani, Musse-
gap” commander in

A

Pe §, th od. by court tag
tial on fheghgence vharys, b
cluded Capt. William D, Brown,©
aged 47, who commanded the bat-
tleship. Capt. Brown had told a”
Naval Court of Inquiry: “I bear >

a the sole responsibility,”’—Reuter, ©
Ex~Marshal

“last



CHINA OUTLAWS

Communist China has enforced
new marriage regulations outlaw-
ing polygamy and the sale of wos

14 months more tofmen, Peking radio announced to«

Serve hefore being freed, day Both practices have been
He has already been in gaot to condoned in China for thousands
more than four years.—-Reuter, of year Reuter,





“I enjoy the:

Half-Hour Protest best of all!”

‘ge
Strike In Rome
ROME, May 3
Buses and trams halted for five
minutes throughout Rome today
as transport workers joined in a
half-hour general strike called by
the Communist- led unions in pro-
test against the shooting two
peasants
The strike was timed to coincid
with the funeral of the two men
shot at Celano, Bast of Rome, on
Sunday, during a clash with police
~-Reuter.

oO



All Points Not
Yet Settled

}
|
|
}
|

The Board of the International : |
Monetary Fund today recommend- | the Hague tomorrow afternoan. | LONDON, May 3
ed the rejection of South Africa's He will stay there on Friday an: } Not all points of difference be

proposal to increase the price of} 0% Saturday will go to Geneva
gold,

Its present price is $35 an ounce,| Health Assembly on Monday

The Board also recommended| May 8. He will also speak or
the rejection of South Africa’s pro-| Tuesday May 9, at the corner-
posal to allow gold producing| Stone laying for the new building
countries to sell half their gold! of the “Palais Des Catens,” needed
output at whatever price could be| to house the Worid
obtained above the pegged rate Organisation.

i He will leave for Moscow or
South Africa’s requests were Wednesday, May 10
made last year at the annual meet- 2
ing of the Fund. They met strong
opposition from the United States
President Truman has said that
the United States -woula never in-
crease its purchase price for gold
as long as he was President.- ‘|

FLIGHT |

—Reuter



Czech Planes
Released

GERMANY, May 3
Three Czechoslovak D63 (Dsa-

CANCEL

where he will speak at the third

Health | Py

Cathalie Church
in the recently
jagreement, according to a
;|veport from Warsaw
London A communique
all
(difficulties encountered by the
»\|mixed commission of three Bishops
and three state representatives in
| reaching agreement.—Reuter,

Roman
, | settled signed
press
reaching
signed

| RAIL STRIKE IN U.S.

CHICAGO, May



2
3.

jed in seven Midwest rail centres
| beginning tomorrow morning, the
|Railway Yardmasters of America



;tween the Polish State and the;
were!

|

Polish Bishops referred to;

|
|

kota) aircraft which made unau- |. od t 1. Phe RYA-is a}
thorised landings at an aizpart | onion of "mnerergiiing’ ;
BRUSSELS, May 3, | near Munich on March 24 with 65 “nei Reuter
Sabena, the Belgian Airline, | people aboard have been released |
cancelled their Brussels-Vienna| tO Czech authorities’ headquarters, aay
flight today when Sowet authori-| uropean Command, the United
ties in the Austrian capital for States army announced here to- 15 DROWNED IN

bade the airline’s planes from! “#¥,, ;
landing. According jo airline| . = ae release of the planes is in
officials the ban is a sdnetion im- ee ee wath the long ie
posed by the Soviet authorities! policy of the United States in
Banaue ia Sat hy seed *, Co-operation with Czech author-

i Sabena aircraft in| ities to effect a prompt return of
augurating the service a week 42°) the abandoned aircraft vhich
did not follow the regular corridor.| make unauthorised landings” the

—Reuter announce stated.—Reuter



1ent

FLOODS

ANKARA, May :





Floods following heavy rai
drowned 15 people, destroyed 36
es and damaged 15( Polat

f h province f M
tya.—Reuter j

vard fore-’ There'll never be a

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” 8


PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950

ROXY THEATRE









Ub © Sir Stafford Says Sir Stafford, in a written reply, |
said: If

VERY time a guy takes out _ The tax on a 49 cent packet of {

his gal in Britain Chancellor 20 cigarettes is about 39 cents.





of the Exchequer Sir Staiford : ou a
i 7 a Sa ea ndy The tax on a pint of average v | -siisaiabbialiliie
OY PAWLEY, Foreign News The Top Of The List ee Ehret rake-off strength beer is about ten cents. {|
“Daily ; P.M
graph wh of the “Daily tele rr a Rand Mrs: B. Watson have! Just how much is levied by the. 2°? ‘™ = an ounce of pipe| TO-NIGHT AT 8.15 P.M.
¢ who wrote an article on | : a ‘i ” hh 4 7 ¢ tobaceo is abou: 44 cents, vary- |
‘aribbéah F -ati : ‘ 2 a left for Grenada after spend-|Exchequer for the privilege af 5 : i : é : ne
last week, fe'ueck ot hin Geak ates ' i ing a short holiday at “Cacrabank”.|going to a football game, seeing 6 a eee TRINIDAD'S POPULAR CALYPSONIANS
a 27,000 miles’ trip by air and var | 5 Mr. Watson is Superintendent for} movie, drinking a glass of beer, The .ax on lipsticks aud face
in 26 days. Apart from calling in Transport and Export of the|putting on a dab of powder, or the movies is ten cents. | D ZIEGFIELD - “MIGHTY SPOILER”
at most of the West Indian colonies, Standard Oil Company in Aruba,| making lips ruby red? The tax on ¢ 38 cent ticket for LORD ZIEG

with whom he has worked for 25
years. They are searching for

he visited seven South American

a football game is three cents.
Republics, the United States and

Sir Stafford was asked to work

“TRINIDAD MIDGET”



2 " > oa is LORD PRETENDER anak
Bermuda, but not Barbados. the nicest place to retire, and after Sout \in: the Bouse of Commons. ‘The tax on iipsticks and face
pews visiting the American Islands, the ene = pi if a couple powder is 100 ner cent. of whole-
-Réturning Today Dutch Island; the French Islands spend a few dollars on every day sale valve. Across

luxuries, an amazingly large pro- 1 Tuts pet is made to act like 4

























MESS 2 izase TH WAIN- and the English Islands, Barbados} portion of it would go in taxa- The tax on a $4.65 bottle of iuman being. (3)
‘WRIGHT, Headmistress of tops the list, and they are hoping | tion, canes 5. | 4 A singular noun—when it grows
5 ; : whiskey is $3.4 } up it grows down. (6)
the “Antigua Girls’ High School either to buy or build a house and | 6 [desert Brien in chan. (¢)
Cre from a three weeks’ visit live here. oe ~ stitial th demin ae laa aires . 7 Sort | of marble—ask the «ia
-G.- yesterday and was mct ene it it
by Mis. Risely Tucker at Seawell. Barbados Is Best CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it: fo eeeeereren sre. fan, nese
She is due to return to Antigua R, VEREK MENDES, who has AXYDLBAAX R i You never know if the explosion
this morning. been Acting Operations Offi- is LONGFELLOW 12 Setback (3)
On The i cer, B.W.1A, im Barbados since One letter simply stands for another. In this example A is used | '3 TO her tts undoubvediy some
ir iovead ply § | thing else (5)
HHREE Antiguan Steel Bands the beginning of the year returned for the three L’s, X for the two O’s, etc. Single letters, apose | i4 Cockney chickens. (3)
ve their first experi t 1 to Trinidad yesterday afternoon trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints 116 ana semit, $0. the: ora:
° S unenta y ° . e 5
broadcast on the grounds of the Mag? ye who was only here Each day the code letters are different. ) 16 One rider that Is evidently not so
April 25" eeeeite cares for a short time was very popular A Cryptogram Quotation 1, Gar ae sae, wpe ee ae
on- reception Rae tomas remetnon Mr. Ek. G. RINFRET with everyone at Seawell, and i 20 Change of way that cuuid be
from Trinidad ae eceivec they, along with several members DPDA XGH’'V WIJIGPFHDAED VDDKFAX slim. (4) : (
eral o FY - Barbados and sev- of the fairer sex are very sorry 22 Pugitistie encvutster ' Suuia Be.
nj ‘ ~ $ , . ( 23. Some re >
hour ‘6: a on their halt P.M.G. Of Canada to see him go. : , DVMJINAXDH—SGGH. ‘ 4 Such reusuning seems to be
felt that the . eaaus 4) is TacunG at ine Crane Hotel His next station is Belize, Brit- unsound. (9)
Bee Be planted in freer ae unul Saturday, when he re- i8h Honduras. He leaves Trinidad ‘ .- Cryptoquote: AGAINST TRUTH FALSEHOOD Down
* eracall-odlh 4 _ in front of the tins to Canada by T.C.A., is Mr, 10% Belize on May 28th and expects HATH NO MIGHT—LYDGATE. 1 According wo report nes @ stout
so that their ery tee oivantage E. G. kintret, Post Master General t@ be there for about three weeks. Title Dace atic tolrod tres one
pronounced might be more ©: Canada. He arrived by B.W.LA. 2° will then be returning to Trini- | |}——~ Dial 8404 Fi (5) re
i : ee eS ties eee Cees 3 Asa erical dignatory ,
a ee re ier being a keen yesteraay from Yriniaad. Mr. Derek who has been to almost =p A for Reservations $ Pon 1 trees wins tea
ateur radio enthusiast made ‘fret was an intransit passenger , i fawn bat fate ISTINS Ser: aa a
this broadcast . e pet “ih = 5 E all the West Indian islands thinks “ . ss ® Makes ay hot to work It ie
ast possible with the on the “Lady Nelson’, which that Barbados is the best of the Wed. & Thurs: 5 & 6.30 p.m. ». SE von pet ee tel
3. le other amateurs, called here a few days ago on its punch, Final Instalment of Serial..... squad at work (7)
The ne oni a tt and C. DeSilva. way South, and he was so im- THE CLUTCHING HAND ‘ lo He tet her change he: name. (5),
ME coemceichaet Stee ay, Be Cet iret ne Garages itd For Two Weeks ind The Western Action... ERs Bg org Kebaa ay”
- who also the Crane that he thought it would : Johnny Mack BROWN in— GUN TALK 18 No royal kiiling this, (3)
ave the bands ini . pit ISS R. FOWLER, who arrived . hie Bn > a Te ae
some trainin 2 e 2 1 . 20 Prophet from 6 relldble scurce
gZ. be nice to spend the last couple ; f *
a. Were Griffith and Mrs. cf days of his holiday enjoying it A from British Guiana via GRAND OPENING FRIDAY 5th 5 & 8.30 P.M. yo ds oe eee In a Programme of the Latest CALYPSOES
ertha Higgins also helped them. . : ; Trinidad yesterday will be here THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE would get a repeat (3)
‘as Fete an te Not Cricket This Time! ee and is staying at With Errol FLYNN, Olivia DeHAVILLAND , Solution of yesterdays vuseie. — Nerosss See and Hear The “TRINIDAD MIDGET’—4_feet 1 inch tail
eed tun - ' FOR cricket this time” ceeiate. la plume. te ve, 1B.
the improvement in their vs ee ee eee F Hee Perennee 2) ert ts seabers as. ||
music. Mrs. C. T. Smith hn .. said Mr, Edgar Marsden, Were Here Three Months ; nial Noon: 25, “feats Bown: 1. Becestian: PRICES: Pit 18c; House 36c; Balcony 48c; Boxes 60c.
active--social worker hasm been But for one month's holiday”’. R. AND MRS. GEORGE Ns ae % Nat: 7. Blemenrs. & Bite: 1 Rani;
keenly: interested and she did their 4 arrived yesterday from Trini- MARQUES, who have been IRE TP Meme PPeT NG coee

AQUATIC CLUD CINEMA (Members Only)
TONIGHT at 8.30
Universal presents “DANGER WOMAN”
with BRENDA JOYCE — DON PORTER
PATRICIA MORRISON — KATHERINE HUNTER

Commencing Friday 5th

announcing. dad accompanied by his wife and here for the past three months on
esdenacte Gate” under Capt, they are staying at the Paradise holiday returned to British Guiana
owe yeston Was the first band Beach Club. Mr. Marsden is tne on Tuesday afternoon by B.W.LA.
aoe e m 1946. “Red Army” Trinidad representative on the Mr. Marques is Assistant Secre-
F, orth in 1947 and “Brute West Indian Cricket Board of tary of Messrs. William Fogarty

‘orce” in 1948. Takin sc : 4 ata ee ar p
sideration they all Sarna te Control, and a W.1. Test selector. in Georgetown, Their stay here

SYDNEY.
Australians are receiving trom
an Italian travel firm a leatiet de-
signed to induce them to take a

























Bo a a ee oeeaiall
THE ITALIAN WAY .








































z was spent at Hastings Hotel except -mi i
a ae On old truck wheels and Keen Cricketer over the Carnival which took them EDWARD G. ROBINSON — ANN SOTHERN riatns cine ifloctess ser-
eae discarded railway lines R. DONALD CAMPBELL to Trinidad, Mr. and Mrs. Willie HUMPHREY BOGART in BROTHER ORCHID vice,” it says:
rress ‘aha oad ge gy wll pi who has been ‘holidaying or at Seawell to. see “Our hostess is young and nice-
tuned steel ae lally here staying with triends returnea ¥ looking. No more aged of 30 years
A Ba een an Ree eennsk _ to B.G. on Tuesday by b.W.LA. With Venezuelan 7 old, she has a good erudition, a
consists of seventeen insthtmente, He is a Civil Servant and is in the G : j Gan oe . and eo eee
Six treble pans, tw - Audit Department in B.G. overnmen i ution resisting particularily to the
two tenor pans, one ‘tieie eee Mr. Campbell is on four months’ FTER spending one week at||}p4 Stine efforts in auto-
one bass drum or ‘growler’, one leave, three of which he has the Paradise Beach Club Mr. “During travel on the ‘bus she
tenor ‘growler’, two tango drums, ®/'eaay spent here, He was in and Mrs. John Emmanuel return- behaves like a landlady, offers
‘one set of two Maracas, one set of Parbauos tor the B.G.-Barbados ed to Venezuela yesterday by i 5
two Pa . t of ‘ ; beverages, tea, liqueurs, and
} letos. Cricket Tests and is a member of B.W.I1.A. Mr. Emmanuel is with sweets contained in the bar and
Married In Trinidad tne Demerara Cricket Club in the Venezuela Government Ser- BTO-DAY & TO-MORROW 5 & 8.30 ONLY frigo.
RRIVING yesterday by Reng sed toe za neem euaneiae vice in Caracas. on arrival to hotels, she treats
B.W.1.A. from ini e is taking a keen interest, (like ‘ with kind firmness with the man-
Mr. and Mrs. oe were most of us) in the West Indies New Air Hostess CLARK GABLE and MYRNA LOY ager for the assignment of rooms.
‘were «married on datitdey in cricket team now in England, NE of B,W.1. Airways’ new ait | |}, “She is able to transform her-
. Mrs. Davies is the former 13 Years In Venezuela hostesses is Miss Molly in Ve re Seneery SW PSs oe
iin Stampfii, daughter of R. and Mrs. Thomas Walpole O'Donnell, who left Barbados {|/f, Ee be trdee Jor tha setae
ae and as. A. Stampfii of Trin. returned to Venezuela yester- oe ae an peer: os pate: ” aed don’t admit to spend a night
uv 5 il rece é The re ace . :
(was with T.L.L. in South Trinidad on SE a ies oe faite bition flight recently to La Guaira an d MANHATTEN MELODRAMA without to play cards.”—(L.ES.)
has returned to Barbados to entes (omPamed by Meir two e ’ on Tuesday afternoon she was on

intoâ„¢ He Commercial Margaret and Tommy, who, with the B.G, flight to Barbados.
life of Mrs. Walpole arrived about three “She told me that her family

ST ne
Fee er who went to Trinidad ®"4 @ halt weeks ago. Mr. Wal- were now comfortably settled in

for the wedding return- pole has only been here for two -prinidad, her father however was
‘ed on Sunday, and arriving yester and a half weeksyhe is with Shell not very well,





OPENING SATURDAY DANCE & FLOOR




















day a fw ho Caribbean in Maracailf>. | He is \ f P
_ aes an Englishmafi and has!been living Transferred 5 & 8.30 p.m. and | SHOW
Christine, Manag the Cent: in Venezuela for thirteen years. R. MICHAEL MAN. who oe ; says ELSIE
: +, Who 7s Mrs. Walpole is a Canaaian., arrived from B.G. on Tues- Confinuing — at —
man. ; They spent their holiday at the gay by B.W.LA. has been trans- ; : 4 THE BARBADOS the BORDEN cow \
Petroleum r Paradise Beach Club, ferred to the Barbados Branch of The human story that will AQUATIC CLUB

MRS, JOHN T. WIL- The Lucky One Barclays Bank, He has been. with
arrived from Venezuela N INTERESTING visitor to Bare ays for-eighteen months. His

via Trinidad by A Barbados recently was Mr. ee aa Man was at the
and they hope to be Lewis Miles. He represents, and © P Aas

(Members Only)

SATURDAY, MAY 6th
9 p.m. — 2 a.m.

take you into the lives
of a bunch of wonderful :
guys you'll never forget!


































= for it two weeks staying works for Herbert Whitworth * ’ ; ‘
at the-Maradise Beach Club. Mr. Limited, Cotton Manufacturers of To Niagara Falls MGM's finest picture!
x ally comes from Manchester, who are exporters of RS. CARMEN BELGRAVE FAREWELL
a ur, Engineer al) classes of Cotton, Rayon and and her daughter Peggy left PERFORMANCE
for" Oil +, in Venezuela. wollen piece goods. for Venezuela yesterday morning aS Saas \ 3
= To The U.S.A An Open Scholarship was offer- PY B.W.1.A. Peggy has been going ' Watch for that dreamy-eyed look of contentment \



JEFFREY’S
Troupe of Artistes











when KLIM milk is in his bottle. No need to worry
HN} about upsetting his delicate little rummy. KLIM is
specially processed so that the fat contained in fresh
cows’ milk is broken down into a form which is

. who were recently with textiles, and one prize (or sade nas ae gc gpl bae

ere, left on Sunday by part of it) was a six months’ free jore on a visit
B.W.1.A., intransit for the United trip to B.W.I. Mr. Miles was the Peggy Mrs. Belgrave said
States. They are returning to Mr. lucky one who won it and he has would be leaving Venezuela for

Tnniss’ home in Oxnard, California, visited Jamaica, British Guiana, Canada today, to continue het






Meas, MRS. CLARENCE ed to all England in connection ‘ school at the Ursuline Convent
m

Ry OF 7 starring

VAN JOHNSON

Featuring...
LANDY De MONTBRUN











it ‘“ ” of Trinidad much easier for baby to digest. The extrem ;
Also leaving on Sunday for the Trinidad and Barbados. educati @ The “Bob Hope” o Sane , : ' y gest. je care i
Oe ee ee se cts Seach was a Sa nthe Y JOHN HODIAK anos with which KLIM sade stues you that every cin {|
Alice Perkins and Mr. and Mrs. guest at “Cacrabank”. He his Mr. Belgrave is a Construction , f mipate and safe—depen le for infant feeding!

A. Hughes and infant. now left to return to England. Engineer in Venezuela.



LOTS OF FUN Count on KLIM for the nutrition that makes it |











RICARDO NONTALBAN




















af LAUGHTER preferred by physicians. .. a favorite of mothers and
BY THE WAY By Beachcomber GEORGE MURPHY anh MERIC babies everywhere, |
‘ant aaa eis sy MARSHALL THOMPSOit- JEROME COURTLAND Admission to Ballroom 2/- pure,
aware that ave The Seesaw Ci her fist. (News item.) YLOR + BRU OWLIN 4.5.50.—3n. :
written so much _ nonsense Brat ete be “MATER red in tooth and JAMES WHITMORE « DOUGLAS FOWLEY meee y safe

LEGN AMES « GUY ANDERSON
THOMAS E. BREEN » DENISE DARCEL
RICHARD JAECKEL« JIM ARNESS
SCOTTY BECKETT» BRETT KING
“Drama, humor and vitality
—one of those rare films
that should oe seen by a
universal audience —
women as well as. men!”
—Eileen Creelman,
N.Y. SUN

about the new kinds of food that . ; oa claw,” commented a_by-
when I. quote what other people asked in the House: (I.) stander.

Whether it is conducive to Eng- °
write ni ‘ believes me. lish prestige abroad to allow two One Thing and Another

Persians to play seesaw on a T IS suggested that hotel-

Taking’ the risk once more, | plank laid éme the belly of a keepers and landladies will in
pass on the information that a third in the vestibules of hotels future take pet dogs as paying
diet of whale meat need not be which may be ured by foreign guests, If so, why not cats
monotonous. Something called tourists, (II. In the event of parrots, canaries, apes, tortoises
the Whale Meat Advisory Bureau such performances proving neces- and horses, all of which neec
has been busily inventing delicious sary for the earning of dollars, holidays? I foresee a great com-
es. And here are some of whether an English team could motion at the reception desk when
their discoveries, made from not be substituted, (III.) Whether a thug of a cat lurches in and asks
tinned whale meat (my italics); such performances are legal on for the canary in No. 641; or when
sausage rolls, vol-au-vent, and sundays, having regard to the a family horse wanders into the
“plain and exotic main meal wearing, by the Persian per- room occupied by a_ nervous
recipes like cottage pie, Savoury formers, of clothes which seem to widow, and begins to eat her straw
steak pie, moussaka, and ravioli.” }:ing these performances into the hat. And fancy waiting for two



Sp. a

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER

So

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M-G-M Presents

“EDWARD MY SON”

Starring 3



















MAVE SAFE, PURE MILK

Spencer Tracy, Doborah Kerr, ay
fan Hunter



EMPIRE mee









category of stage performances. lady tortoises to precede you into
Well, I will back against all the lift. To-Day Only at 445 & 8.30 p.m,
those delicacies, any day, my own Wild Life Talking of apes, I am very fond United Artists Present
recipe for exotic roast beef made of Mr. Jack Hulbert’s riddle

“THE FABULOUS
DORSEYS ”

from Bay of Be.‘gal octopus — or He said his mother lost her What is it that wears white spats
even egg pudding made from temper, and bit into a writing- and leaps from branch to branch!











processed serge. _desk and broke a light bulb with A bank director. aes, Bera Gen |
net, Jimmy Dorsey, Janet Blair
~ MENS SHIRTS is
9 ROXY
M WHITE Now’s The Best Time .

To-Day at 4.45,-Only

to PAINT ieadiod allay ovis
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eer re a ee ent












“THE TIME OF
YOUR LIFE”’

Starring James Cagney, William
Bendix, Wayne Morris





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OLYMPIC
Inspect these at our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

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Telephone No. 2039, United Artists Present

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~


















THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950

Tattoo Of A

Lady Stopped
Him Boxing

NEW YORK.

Jose Rafael Aviles, 23-year-old
Puerto Rican mechanic, is on an
£1,800 bond as the aftermath of
one of boxing’s alleged cases of
impersonation.

He is charged at Wichita, Kan-
sas, with fraud in having fought
there under the name of the
Central American Middleweight
Champion, Tuzo Portuguez.

__ The county prosecutor said that,
if convicted, Aviles faces a sen-
tence of one to five years’ jail.

In New York, Portuguez said he
did not even know he was fighting
in Kansas until he learned from a
newspaper he had been knocked
out there.

Aviles’ fight was staged by a
Kansas promoter who told a re-
porter: “Aviles definitely didn’t
tell me he was not Portuguez.”

Suspicion was aroused when
fans in the front row observed a
young woman tattooed upon the
chest of the “Portuguez” in the
ring, whereas they could not re-
member that the one they had
a in New York was tattooed at
all.

Tuzo (Kid) Portuguez is a 23-
year-old Costa Rican middle-
weight with a record of only
three defeats in 50 fights since
1946. —L.E.S.

BONE IDLE

CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND.

The mayor of Cambridge, Al-
derman G. J. James, feels that the
“curse” of Britain is “bone idle-
ness”’.

Mayor James deplored that fact
that only 100 of the 90,000 popula-
tion of Cambridge were sufficiently
interested to attend a eivil defence
recruiting meeting.

“The curse of this eountry in the
last 100 Years has beén bone idle-
ness. In evefy war we have been
caught on the wrong foot.”

° .

Did A Daniel

HEREFORD, ENGLAND.

The 66-year-old mayor of Hert-
ford County Councillor Daniel
Dye, mimicked the biblical Daniel
by entering a cage with four lions
and their trainer at a touring cir-
cus in Hertford.

“It was the biggest decision I
have ever made in life,” the mayor
said afterwards, “but I am game to
try everything once.”

Daniel Dye dared the liotts—but
he did not dare tell the mayoress
he intended to do it

°

Lorries Callide

TWO lorries M-2004 owned by
S. E. Cole of Roebuck Street and
driven by Edward Archer of
Wavell Avenue and M-1064 the
property of A. Haynes of Black
Rock and driven by Alfred Gibson
of Whitehall yesterday about 5
p.m. collided and damaged a wall
while travelling along Rockley
Road, Christ Church. The right
front fender of M-2004 was
damaged. No one was injured.

£10 FINE FOR THEFT

NEVILLE BECKLES of Bay-
croft Road, St. Michael, was yes-
terday ordered to pay a fine of
£10 in monthly instalments of
£1 each when he was _ found
guilty of stealing a bicycle be-
longing to Oscar Wiltshire. Mr.
A. J. H. Hanschell adjudicated the
case.













BEAUTY PREPARATIONS.











for you
from every
Angle !!

Call in at

COLLINS Lid. =

A NEW

4
=

They're off today...
GILES and FAMILY
But back soon

BARBADOS
VODA

wee



eg









wes cag SRR a
wt

“i ayee
git RE.

First Catch Your
WAAB

WASHINGTON.

IN the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan
it’s not too late to collect that
reward for a captured waab, alive
or dead.

First, of course, yOu must catch
your waag—a chafacter more fan-
tastie than those of “Alice in
Wonderland”. As described by
the more primitive natives who
firmly believe in its existence, it
is a huge, man-shaped creature
covered with red hair, speaking
many languages and totally lack-
ing in joints.

The discoverer of a waab can
expect not only cash reward but
an “out-of - this - world” rating
among more prosaic zoologists.
So far, however, according to re-
cent assurances by the Governor
of the Sudanese camptal at Khar-
toum, no one has chaimed the
prize ($287 in Egyptian pounds)
originally posted many years ago
for’ the fabulous creature.

The legendary waab of the
Sudan recalls another strang¢?
character of African folklore, the
“humanoid ape,” notes the
National Geographic Society.

A Ceremonial Dancer

This big, manlike ape is covered
with dark hair and_ habitually
walks erect, if you believe the
stories of pygmy tribesmen living
in the rain-forest treas it is said
to frequent.

A man-eater, rather than prim-
arily vegetarian (like the real
chimpanzees, gorillas, and orang-
utangs), the humanoid is supposed
to celebrate the capture of prey
by a ceremonial dance. In the
ceremony, the females are said to
form a circle around the furious-
ly dancing males, and ‘beat on
drumlike objects.

till another account tells of
the agogwe, the “little furred
people,” of the big-game country
of East Africa.

Several hunters have seriously
reported that the agogwe resem-
ble men four feet tall; that they
habitually walk upright, and are







In Grandmamma’s day a cough was a cough—and you were given a
cough mixture for it, but noWadays we know that this is not enough. A

cough that hangs on impairs your whole system, and you need something

to build up

\
more people turn to FERROL COMI!'O |: D as the ideal cure for a persist- |

ent cough, beeause FERROL COMPOUND is not merely another cough

heals.





SS POF L SSS Ser FOSS SSS



covered with brown or russet
hair.
One witness suggested that

these animals, more_credible than
the waak or dancing apes, may
be rare monkeys. Backing the
theory was the observation that
neighbouring monkeys paid no
special attention to the curiosities.

According to the National Geo-
graphic Society, zoologists have
long pointed out that remote
regions may contain outlandish
beasts unknown to science or be-
lieved to be extinct, The possibil-
ity that giant sloths may still
exist in the wilds of South
America is not entirely discounted
by authorities.

Speculation

Another subject of speculation
is the curious Nandi Bear, which
is often blamed for the killing of
humans and domesticated animals
in East Africa. Although scien-
tific eyaluation is lacking, native
and white hunters alike claim to
have encountered the beast; and
several descriptions of the bear-
like creature agree on its sham-
bling gait, shaggy hair, little ears
and long snout.

In reports of the “mystery
creatures,” legend and fact are
intermingled. From Siam in re-
cent years have come stories of
on crocodiles, believed by some
iamese to contain the spirit of
a dead king. In the Himalayan
mountains of northeast India, a
90-foot monster was said to be
roving and nibbling for nourish-
ment at the tops of trees.
Australia, home of nature's
oddest creations, has produced
some of the most fabulous yarns.
One concerns the “bunyip,” vari-
ously described as resembling a
seal, a horse, a crocodile, and/or
& bullock. Another tells of ten-
foot rabbits, seen in the dry
inland wastes of the continent,
and possibly linked to the Dipro-
todon, extinct these many thou-
sand years.

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FATHER
JOHN BULL



EASTBOURNE,
Dr. A. T. Wilson, of the
Tavistock Institute of Human

Relations, insisted that without a
doubt the “Englishman's home is
his castle.”

Reporting . researchers into
family behaviour at an Eastbourne
conference of health visitors, Dr.
Wilson put the home uhder a
miscroscope and painted this pic-
ture of life with Fat\er John Bull.

Father is prepared to help wash
dishes provided his assitance is
not taken for granted but sueh
jobs as bed-making are definitely
out.

Father is willing to be responsi-
ble for such jobs as moving house,
decorating and carpentry, but
some jobs are completely taboo-—
sewing On buttons or darning
socks for example—however good
he may be at it.

Certain times of the day are
sacrosanct to the head of the
family, and at these times violent
outbursts of “righteous rage” are
often aroused by “ill-timed, even
if modest, requests for assistance.”

As a Rule

Father as a rule feels that it is
a sort of duty to spend at least

five evenings at home with his
wife, but they have their own
forms of amusement. A weekly
visit to the movies with his wife
has acquired “an almost ritual
quality:”

Father’s relations with his

neighbours hinge 6n the British
desire for privacy,

He is on “dropping iz” terms
with at least three of his ummedi-
ate neighbours, and says good
morning to most of the people
living in the same street.

Father is not, however, on inti-
mate terms with many of them
and Christian names are practical-
ly never used even with

friends
of long standing.
Curtains in the front roy ~“s
(which are seldom used) are

usually always half drawn.



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ADVOCATE

New Pubs
For Old

LONDON,
Two refugees from Central
Europe have collaborated with
three Britons to win first prize in
contest to design what is possibly
the most British of all buildings—
public-house.

PAGE THREE

eee nee






















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BOVRIL








DRESS SHOPPE
For STYLE plus

Pollak, 36,
Prus, 33,
where his

They are Ernest
from Prague and Victor
who prefers not to say

relatives live behind the iron mm
—e Dont get nervous
The quintet—#ll ardent beer a

drinkers”—won £500 with an entry
in the Brewers’ Society’s contest
to design *“*The Pub of Tomorrow.”

Most critics liked the winning bo t
Gesign because it incorporates a u
features traditional to the old-





style pub, modernizing only such



amenities as ventilatic: and ay
neeting. . ” ‘Hi, Ladies’ Handbags
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“The Times’ architectural corre-
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ure remarkably successful in re-
interpreting the English public-
house tradition in a modern way,
cleverly using familiar ingredients
such as glass screens, mirrors,
ornamental lettering but with
imagination and not in a spirit of
pastiche.



Ladies’ Dresses

For Cocktails, wedding or
afterncon, A fine assort-
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“They also bring out clear
distinction of character —which
is part of the public-house tra-
dition—between the saloon bar
and the public bar, the one de-
seended from the wine tavern
and the coffee house, with a
richness of decoration infla-
enced by the 19th-century gin
Palace; the other showing «|
simpler, more robust character |
appropriate to its descent from)
the ale-house kitchen.”





Ladies’ Hats

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stock now. Many of them
are tichly trimmed. With
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j

The Europeans’ three colleagues,
bearded Dick Negus, Phil!
Sharland, 26, end Charles Hasler, |

99



41, all are employed in designing

for the 1951 Festival of Britain. | priced from $5.19 up
The “Manchester Guardian a

called the winning design “pleas- . ;

ine and certainly not revolu-} d ats

tionary”’—but took considerable La tes Houseco

exception to some other entries

Select from this Fihe As
sortment whether cotton,



“One may observe,” the
‘Guardian’ observed, “such styles rayon or nylon. roe are
as the dungeon, boudoir, nautical sure to find your style at

sum-trap and clinical; and one has

ptices ranging - -

a floor covering of such dazzling

and broken brilliance that any- from $4 32to $18.00
body standing on it may feel tipsy .

without having touched a drop.’

“A hint of constetnation,” said
the ‘Daily Telegraph,’ “must colour
our congratulations to the two
young men from Central Europe
who shared in the prize-winning
design for an ideal English pub

“For what has happened to the
English character, whose inward-
ness it has always been our pride

Accessories

Gold buttons—gold belts—
feathers — flowers velvet
ribbons — rayon ribbons
—veilings and many other
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It’s the rich lather of Rinso that makes
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For the thorough, gentle action of Rinso
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to conceal from the foreigners, if ‘ fr doa) . any
strangers can thus grasp the spirit ae too, have an extra sparkle when MODERN
of its immemorial shrine? _ hed in ae oe Rin a rising
jor easier, quicker and better results

“Has this citadel of the mis 4 J \ DRESS SHOPPE
understocd become transparent to NS fo. :
the profane view, seen through Ri, Oo Y all your wash: aetias
the bottom of a tilted glass?”

A-R 232-000-568
cetentinnlnentuiae
—Can, Press. '





every effort is made to ereci
high fences in the back gardens
owing to the fear of being over
looked

Dr. Wilson said the whole em-
phasis is on keeping neighbours
out rather than letting them in
He concluded

“It is indeed true that th
Englishman's home is his castle.”
—I.N.S.





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PAGE FOUR



ADVOGATE

Sasa

Published by Thu Advocate Co. 1ta., 34, Broad Si, Bridgernws



Thursday, May 4, 1950

Trinidad
Changes

‘THE neighbouring Island of Trinidad will
be going to the polls later in the year to
elect their representatives in the Legisla-
ture. These Elections will be the prelude
to far reaching changes in the Trinidadian
Constitution. ,

Trinidad, unlike Barbados does not have
continuity in its constitution nor do they re-
gard the constitution as so sacrosanct as
many in Barbados regard our local consti-
tution, This enables alterations to be made
which do not arouse the same bitter con-
troversy as takes place when changes in
the law and custom of the constitution

re mooted in Barbados.

Under the new constitution, Trinidad
will have a unicameral Legislature and an
Executive Council which, in the words of
the Address from the Legislative Council
to Sir Hubert Rance, “will no longer be
merely advisory but the instrument for
the formation of policy.”

The Legislative Council will consist of
24 members and the elected representa-
tives will be increased from nine to eigh-
teen, thus giving to the Legislature a
more representative character. There will
be fiye nominated members and a speaker
who shall not vacate his office by reason
of dissolution of the Legislative Council.

There will be nine members of the Exec-
utive Council under the Chairmanship of
the Governor and will consist of the Colo-
nial Secretary, the Attorney-General, the
Financial Secretary, five elected and one
nominated member of the Legislative
Council.

The five elected members of the Execu-
‘tive Council will be elected by the Legis-
lative Council from amongst the elected
members of that body. The nominated
member will be appointed by the Govern-
or from among the nominated members of
the Legislative Council,

The administration of departments of
Government will be assigned to members
of the Executive Council but although
there is nothing in the Constitution to pre-
vent the nominated members from having
departments assigned to them it is not
expected that the Governor will do so.
Members of the utiye Council who
have departmenta: edjto them will be

a




will, ¢ontinue to have
s and overrule the Leg-
‘special cases. He can do
so if authorised by the Secretary of State
or if in the Governor’s opinion urgent
necessity requires that the declaration be
made without obtaining the authority of a
Secretary of State. In the latter case he
must certify in writing that urgent neces-
sity requires that the declaration be made
without obtaining such authority.

The new constitution does not go as far

as many in Trinidad had hoped and it is
unlikely that it will remain unaltered for
Jong. ss’ ;
Political opinion in Trinidad is not as
strongly divided along party lines as in
Barbados and Jamaica and it is improbable
therefore that party politics, made more
difficult as it is by the existence of numer-
ous racial groups, will in the near future
dominate the Trinidad political scene.

The success with which West Indians
manage the affairs of their own individual
Colonies will be an indication of the extent
to which they will be able to function in
the wider field of West Indian affairs. If
the British Parliament is made the model
then Trinidad lags behind Barbados in its
progress towards self-government, but the
test of any political experiment must be
based on its local success and the function-
ing of the new Trinidad Constitution will
be closely observed throughout the Carib-

bean.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



“TO BE, or not to be; that is
the question”. Like Hamlet we
ponder but on a different subject
—a projected theatre for Barba-
dos

First, to be. The number of
entertainments recently held in
the Empire Theatre and the sup-
port Which they received clearly
indicates that the public is avid

for live entertainment. That a
good lecture hall, concert hall
and meeting place for publi:

bodies is needed does not requ re
stressing. It would also be avail-
able for touring theatrical com-
panies, when the cost of transport
makes it possible for them to visit
our shores once more.

At present, the rent of the
Empire Theatre is $250.00 per day
on top of the production costs of
any entertainment. This, undoubt-
edly, makes a hole in the profits,
whether these are devoted to
charity or accumulated for build-
ing a new theatre. This is by no
means the whole story. The
dressing rooms, back stage,
equipment and acoustics are far
from ideal, but these are not
insuperable difficulties. The out-
standing disadvantage of the
Empire Theatre is that it is a
cinema: every evening there is ”
performance and a matinee on
Saturday afternoons, The man-
agement cannot, therefore, per-
mit rehearsa's to take place at the
times most convenient to amateur
actors.

The majority of amateur actors
are men and women with occupa-
tions, so that rehearsals in the
Empire Theatre must be held after
the cinema closes to the Public,
or, on Sundays. This is not only
most inconvenient, but inadequate
for the rehearsals required. As a
result, rehearsals have to be held
in private homes or small halls,
which is a severe handicap to
amateur, or for that matter pro-
fessional actors. Voice production
in a private sitting-room differs
greatly from that required in the
Empire Theatre, even were its
acoustic properties ideal. Actors
do not learn the ‘feel of the stage’
in sitting-room rehearsals; en-
trances and exits have to be

imagined. In the end the whole
production suffers, and this is
inevitable in existing circum-
stances.

The Empire Theatre, were it
in the market, is not to be recom-
mended for purchase as a theatre,
adequate as it is for a cinema.
A new theatre must be built, but
a new theatre will cost a large
sum of money. How is that to be
raised? i.

It has been pointed out that the
profits made by Dramatic Socie-
ties should be devoted to the new
theatre fund, and a committee
appointed to collect money from
interested persons. That course
should, be followed. It has also
been pointed out that the project
should be a long-term one, nee
that be so? Government should
be asked to contribute to the new
theatre fund, and the contribution
should be substantial. Immedi-



ately, the question arises “Can
Government afford to contribute
substantially to such a fund?”
The answer is, most probably, in
the negative. But Government
could afford to contribute sub-
stantially to the new theatre fund
if an entertainment tax were
imposed on the existing prices of
cinema seats.

The entertainment tax would
not be a large one, say a penny
on the cheapest seats, and six-
pence or nine pence on the most
expensive seats. The tax on the
price of intermediate seats would
be scaled accordingly. This form
of taxation would not be felt by
the Cinemas or cinema _ goers
after the first week. It would also
enable Government to retain in
this Island a fraction of the
amount spent on cinema enter-
tainment over and above that
expended by cinemas in taxation
and wages.

The machinery for collecting
this tax is very simple. It would
scarcely require one additional
civil servant. Cinemas would be
required to furnish the Treasury
with weekly returns «f the seats
sold, the tax collected thereon and
a cheque. This tax would he ear-
marked for building the new
theatre.

When the new theatre is built
the tax should be retained. From
the fund created by this tax an
annual grant should be made to
the theatre in the same way that
theatres in other countries receive
state aid. The annual grant would
not be large enough to absorb this
fund, what of the alance?
Undoubtedly, the balance should
be used for entertainment and not
for some utilitarian purpose.

At this moment there are two
fountains in Bridgetown which do
not ‘play because of the cost—the
fountain in the Fountain Garden
and that of Queen’s Park, although
the basin of the latter has at long
last been mended. Two electric
pumps could be purchased out of
this fund, which would use the
same amount of water over and
over again. Two arid concrete
wastes would then be converted
into pleasing sights. In a climate
such as this, fountains are a joy
to the eye and mind. More foun-
tains might even be erected.

Out of this fund displays of
fireworks could ven in
Queen's Park or on the Bay Street
Esplanade, to celebrate the King’s
birthday, and at the Holetown
Monument on the anniversary of
the discovery of the Island.

A portion of this fund could
usefully be placed at the disposal
of a committee for the proserva-
tion of such ancient monuments
as we have. These lie mostly in
churchyards, which is scarcely
entertainment. The urgency of
preserving what is left of our past
history should outweigh this fact.
It will be entertainment for pos-

d terity.’ Already the ravages of

time have blotted out many old
tombstones. These form part of
our history of which we should be
proud, Mean or poverty stricken



THE BABY WHO MAY

bents have made little attempt in
the past to check this loss.

Or Not To Be ?
lf through the lethargy of local
dramatic societies, interested rer- ;
sons and Government, there is no|
attempt to create 2 fund for
building a new theatre, what!
then? There is one obvious!
answer: local dramatic societies
and interested persons who are
not sufficiently interested to help;
themselves do not deserve a

theatre.

In the event of local dramatic
societies and interested persons
being sufficiently interested to
raise a fund for a new theatre,
but Government unwilling to
impose an entertainment tax as
suggested, all is not lost. In
Queen’s Park there is the possibil-
ity of creating a charming little
theatre on the first floor of
Queen's House. Already the stage
is there. The floor is said to be
unsafe, and in any case the seat-
ing in the auditorium would have
to be raised on a slight incline.
Adjoining the auditorium is
another room suitable for a bar
or c‘ub room. There are many
theatre clubs in London which

Vestries and indifferent incum- |
|



operate in accommodation far
smaller than that of Queen's
House. Mrs.

could be adopted. The theatre
could be shared by all dramatic
societies and run as a club or
company. Members or sharehold-
ers should be asked to pay an
annual sum of $5.00 or less. This
would finance productions and
enable subscribers to buy two
seats at one of the first two per-
formances, which would be open
to subseribers only, possibly at a
reduced cost of, say, ten per cent.

After the two performances for
members or shareholders, the
public could purchase seats for
further performances. The pro-
ceeds would be devoted to produc-
tion costs, such rents as may be
demanded, the purchase of new
equipment for the theatre, and
the salaries of a cleaner, stage
carpenter and part time box office
clerk or secretary.

Amateur dramatic societies
would thus be able to give more
than three performances. These
need not be all in the same week,
Two or at the most three per-
formances could be given for
three weeks if the demand war-
ranted it. This would surely find
favour with amateur actors, who
after many weeks of hard work
now have so short a time in
which to display their achieve-
ments.

St. Michael’s Vestry, which has
given permission for the erection
of another monstrous steel shed
in Queen’s Park by the Agricul-
tural Society, can scarcely be so
blind to the public amenities of
the Park as to refuse to permit
the use and alteration of the first
floor of Queen’s House to an
undertaking of such cultural value
to the community.

White's suggestion |



CHANGE HISTORY

SOON, now, the child of Seretse
Khama and his white wife Ruth
will be born.

This baby will arouse more con-
troversy than any other in the
history of the British Empire. It
could change the course of his-
tory.

Or it might just disappear into
the nameless mass of the disin-
herited—those offspring of parents
of different worlds.

By an odd coincidence, the
child will probably be born just
about the time the British Gov-
ernment publishes its long-await-
ed report un racial discrimination
legislation in the Colonial Empire.

Equality Demand

Surveys for the report have
been completed and are now being
analysed.

Make no mistake—in his (or
her) small person the Khama
baby will symbolise the passion-
ate demand of the coloured people
for racial equality.

That, now, is how their opinion
has crystallised over the Seretse
affair.

This baby’s arrival, its subse-
quent progress, will be watched
by coloured people all over the
world.

For—while the majority of them
are against inter-racial marriage
—they no longer believe the old
assertion that the offspring of such
marriages inherit the worst char-
acteristics of the two races from
which they spring.

Are they right?

In this month’s West African
Review Dr. S. D. Cudjoe roundly
asserts: “There is nothing biologi-
cally or genetically unsound about



By Don Taylor

inter-marriage, any more thaa
there is with regard to marriage
within one’s own race.”

Fatal Weakness

Yet, if you travel abroad-—in the
East, in Africa—you can see the
products of the mixed marriages.

You can see them in the great
ports of Britain itself. Often
there is undoubted intelligence,
but a fatal weakness of character,
a lack of responsibility, of Welief
in themselves.

Might that not be due to the
very atmosphere of the colour bar
with which they are surrounded?

I remember, travelling in a
remote area of the Gold Coast,
coming to a native village.

The usual crowd of chattering
half-naked youngsters surrounded
me. Suddenly, in that sea of black
faces, I saw the light skin of a
European child.

He, too, was clad in a ragged
cloth, He, t00, was shouting,
“Dash (give) me one penny,
master.” His face was handsome
and alive—he was no more than
ten—and he would have passed
unnoticed in an English street.

Yet he was an African village
boy, living in a remote village
of mud-huts, living the life of
primitive man.

Did he hate the white man, who
bequeathed him a mind — and
then pushed him back down the
centuries?

It filled me with shame.

Is there, anyhow, such a thing
as racial purity?

I believe that, by bologists, a
aN EO



small race in the Andaman
Islands are regarded as the only
racially pure people in the world.

And, when it comes to Africans,
what of America’s 12,000,000
Negroes?

It is said that only some 20 per
cent. of them are of pure African
descent. All the rest have strains
of other blood—mainly white.

I feel strongly that inter-racial
marriage is not a_ particularly
good thing. And most informed
co’toured people would agree with
me.

I believe, too, that the white
man must provide leadership for
a long time yet.

But, as I have emphasised,
Seretse’s baby—and what happens
to it—signifies something more
than that.

Remember, this is the child of
a royal line.

Colonial peoples will see the
child as a sort of test-case of
Britain’s sincerity over colour
prob!pms.

We have declared our belief in
a multi-racial society (which
does not necessarily signify inter-
marriage.) “Now,” say the 460
million coloured people of the
Empire, “let us see if they can
live up to their words.”

Dr. Cudjoe says: “. . . the
Anglo-Saxons and the _ Boers
seem to find an implied humilia-
tion of their manhood’ in the
preference of their womenfolk
for foreign men, or men belonging
to a different racial group.” |

He thinks that the real basis of

‘ the Seretse dispute is that it is a

challenge to the white
superiority in Africa.

man’s

—L.E.S.





} ance movement and after the liberation revealed

A NEW THEATRE? __sDR. JOLOI—CURE

By J. C. Oestreicher
LN.8. Foreign Director

NEW YORK.
ON® of the most controversial figures in modern
Europe camé to public attention recently with
the French government’s decision to oust Com-
munist Dr. Frederic Joiiot-Curie from chairman-
ship of France’s Atomic Energy Commission:

The cabinet of Premier George Bidault thus

acknowledged a mounting tide of criticism over]
presence of a Communist in such a post at a time] |

ef world divisior. and Communst infiltration.

This criticism was spurred by the arrest, cor-
viction and sentence to 14 years in prison of Dr.
Klaus Fuchs, the German-born naturalized Britisn
scientist who betrayed vital secrets to the Soviets.

It flared even higher when Joliot-Curie told a
National Congress of the French Communist party
that NO “progressive scientist” ever would permit
his work to be used against the Soviet Union. ©

This statement was more or less typical of
Joliot-Curie’s usual utterances,

Joliot-Curie. a man of tremendous ability and
vast achievements, is a difficult personality to
define.

As a Frenchman, he would be expected to be
indignant in the extreme over any implication
that he might be disloyal to his fatherland in the
event of war with Soviet Russia. Yet he always
has followed the party line, up to and including
the declaration of Maurice Thorez that French
workers would NOT fight against Soviet troops.

Then there is the matter of Joliot-Curie’s
performance in the second world war.

When western Europe was overrun by the Nazis
in 1940, the great scientist was in the midst of his
atomia researches at the College of France.

He ignored the entreaties of his friends to leave
the country and remained at his post. German
occupation authorities compelled him to admit
German researchers into his laboratory.

But Joliot-Curie played a game of cat and mouse.
and this may be a key to his mental reflexes. He
secretly affiliated himself with the French resist-

that he had joined the Communist party and served
with the so-called National Front, a Communist-
dominated resistance coalition.

Had the Germans learned this, Joliot-Curie
might easily have become a candidate for instant
death.

Because of his scientific achievements, his resist-
ance record, and his unquestioned ability, Joliot-
Curie was named to head the FPench Atomic
Commission when it was founded in 1946.

This was while Communists still were part of
the French government and the east-west rift had
NOT widened to a yawning chasm.

Joliot-Curie has taken the stand from the begin-
ning that atomic research should exclude the field
of war, and for this reason he refused to witness
the Bikini bomb tests.

He claims that under his leadership, the French
Atomic Commission has devoted itself entirely to
research into the use of atomic energy for indus-
trial and other peacetime purposes and has been
among the loudest in criticizing alleged western
preparation for war.

It was inevitable, therefore, that the Commun-
ist press of Paris would look upon his dismissal
as “proof” that France has joined with the United
States and Great Britain in what it terms nefarious
plans to plunge the world into a new war.

The decision of the French government obvious-
ly was NOT made without a great deal of soul-
searching.

President Vincent Auriol himself supported Jol-
jot-Curie as Atomic Committee chairman when
the question of his appointment came up.

His Communist leanings and affiliations were
well known at the time and many rightist ele-
ments warned that the nation would come to regret
its decision.

If anything is indicative of changing times it is
the dismissal of the Nobel prize winner from his

post.

It is somehow reminiscent of dispatches from
iermany a few days ago recalling the fifth anni-
versary of the date when United States and Soviet
forces made their first junction on the Elbe River
at ‘Torgau. For a while, the town was a shrine
of Soviet-American friendship and collaboration.
To-dey it is a monument to Communist anti-
Americanism,





reste i a eee lasses resonances
I |

——$—_—$—$—————

Other People’s Letters

millions of
ome and ee
, thousands of them write

to bag Corporation. Criticism and
the programme .

sackful day and las

ie BBC Povalved one hun-
and thousand letters
the h lisveners and a
fifty thousand from those
So far‘as the cor-
section can judge no

.

ig]

is too old or too young
to to the BBC abou it.
All types of people in every 1D

i
:
i

beg
|
a
1G
Es
aE

Some letters are abusive.
uite incomprehensible and
have nothing at all to do

¢ proadcasting but the large
majority are friendly and some of
‘them are helpful. Whilst praise
is aecepied with pleasure by pro-
gramme producers criticism is also

ed for it is from construc-
tive and intelligent criticism that
producers can jJearn whether the
pr they write and pre-
pare with so much care are pleas-
ig. the listening public or not.

A large part of this vast cor-
respondence consists of queries.
Most of them are simple requests

au

for the names and si,aature tunes
or the titles of records buy others
relating to programmes are more
complicated, Some are unanswer~
able even by the BBC's large svaff
for listeners who apparently re-
gard the BBC as omniscient have
recently writven to ask “ why cats
have ‘so extenSive and long
whiskers?” and could you please
tell me what are the dates of the
second and third Tuesdays in the
month of June for the year 1900?”
It was also not within the scope
of the BBC to accede to vhe re-
quest of the lady who wanted a
Dutch translation of several
isolated words including “Town,
dog, justice; police; sport; my; fox;
chicken; gi day;” sent to her
withouwv delay. The staff of the
PBC’s correspondence section, re-
sourceful as it is, were puzzled
when they tried to think of a way
in which they could adopy the sug-
gestion of a listener who wrote to
say, “Although we hear often in
the News announcements of the
death of renowned persons it
strikes me as strange that the
announcer never mentions the
birth of great men. It is time this
riaglect was remedied.” Whilst
no help can be given vo the writers
of such letters every relevant
query is answered as scon as pos-
sible and ali correspondence . is
acgknowledged

Our Readers Say:

Sugar Workers
The Editor The Advocate,

SIR,—Piease allow me to draw
the attention of those concerned
to certain workers in the sugar
industry. I refer to crop season
employees such as chemists, over-
seers and clerks.

Quite recently an increase of
1242% was granted to all workers
in the sugar industry, but I under-
stand that the above mentioned
are not to be considered at all,

Now Sir, can you enlighten me?
Are these gentlemen engaged in
the sugar industry, or the arrow-
root industry? Why should this
difference be made? It is grossly
unfair to them, who are affected
in the same way by the high cost
of living to be denied what is theirs
by right. They are called upon
to do responsible jobs, jobs which
involve long hours, jobs which
tax their mental capacity, inso-
much that at the end of a day’s
work they feel completely jaded.
Why are they to be left out?

If this increase is made because
of the increased price of sugar,
they should get their share. On
the other hand, if it is made on
account of the high cost of living
they should share accordingly.

PUZZLED.

Modern Boys

The Editor The Advocate,

SIR,—‘‘Small things amuse small
minds,” but I am convinced no
one can deny that to-day the order
is “big things amuse small minds.”

The syllabus of the Modern
pr hag form is truly an example of

his.

Theic are fifteen English books
to be done for the examination
while three of these must be
studied minutely for a_ special
paper, on each of these books,
commentaries or criticisms are ex-
pected to be read.

In respect to History, the Eng-
lish is froni 1485 on, while the
American is from the Making of
the Constitution, 1787 onwards, as
far as can be reached. Previously
a half of the English period was
done. Now I understand that the
Examiners complain that the
questions are limited too much to
a certain period—that is, the half
done—and must be more diffused.
The implications of this are
obvious.

Then there is a special subject,
twenty*five years of a period that
must be closely studied. I also
understand that the books re-
quired are unobtainable. The
paper still has to be sat.

This is the syllabus, not to men-
tion two subsidiary subjects.

; Insult has not been heaped upon
injury by the bringing forward of
the examination date; and I for-
got to say that all this labour is
expected to be done in three
terms! Now does any sane man
think it possibly could be done?

To my mind, the burial of the
student under this mountain of
work stunts his youthful literary
taste, and at a time during which
it should be carefully handled and
encouraged, not blighted for ever.

T have also heard that this year,
a credit in French must be gained
in the School Certificate for a
student to enter sixth form. It is
a last dying and unworthy effort
to improve results for French.
There is only one thing to be said
—a boy who is brilliant at Classic,
Maths or anything for that matter,
passes these subjects easily, but
fails French — he is to be kept
down till he gets a credit. I fore-
see many boys leaving school after
failing French in their School
Certificate, and this is by no means
fair to any of these boys.

“FAIR PLAY”.





Canadian Legion

The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—I am enclosing a letver
from the Dominion Command,
Ottawa, Canada.

I could see anyone, officers or
men from the three services any
time in. vhe forenoon from 9 a.m.
until 12 noon.

A. H. V. WAKEHAM,

Capt. A. V. H. Wakeham,

Astra,
St. Lawrence.

Dear Sir,—This will reply to
your recent levter addressed to the
Canadian Legion which you en-
quire about forming a branch in
Barbados. In order to do this you
would need to have a minimum
of 15 members and the per capita
\@x required by Dominion Com-
mand would be $1.00 per year
for each member plus the cost!
of membership badge at 25c each.

The other matters mentioned. in
your letter have been forwarded to
the Secretary of the Red Chevron |
Club.

Yours sincerely,
T.A



Executive Assistant.

Canadian Legion, \
Dominion Command,
Ottawa. Canada. !

|





@LETTERS whch are signed with a nom-de-plume, but unaccom-
panied by the customary bona fides, will be ignored. Many such
reach the Editor’s desk each week, and readers are again reminded |
of the necessity for the writer’s name to be known te the Editor, |
not for publication, but as an assurance of good faith. :



THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950



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THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950



Car Collision Case

Before High Cour
$600 Damages Claimed

A COURT OF COMMON PLEAS action in which
Clarence Fitz-Herbert Corbin, Undertaker of

Belmont Road, is clai

a.m. today.

t iming damages from Joseph
Nathaniel Hurdle of Welches Road and his wife,
occupied the attention of the Court for the entire
day yesterday. A special jury had been empanelled

to try the case, hearing of which will resume at 10

Cerbin is claiming $609.71 for damage done to his motor ca1
M-350 ir a collision which occurred between it and the car

M-1244 which Hurdle was driving along Pine Road about

5.30 p.m. on July 9, 1946. M-1244 belongs to Hurdle’s wife.

Wettest In
St. Peter

WAS gloomy in Bridgetown |

T

{ resterday, The sun never shone
really brightly for the entire day.
Occasional showers, punctuated
with drizzles, fell during the morn-
ing. The temperature was 81° Fah-
ag eit a the shade.

rained in every parish excep!
St. Andrew on Tuesday and >
to 6 o’clock yesterday morning. St.
Peter, with 58 parts, recorded the
heaviest rainfall during the night.
St. Lucy, 56 parts: and St. John,
52; were the only other parishes to

got exactly 50 parts.

The returns were: Bridgetown
19 parts, Station Hill District 25
parts, St. George 50 parts, St.
Philip 18 parts, St. Thomas 22
parts, St. Peter 58 parts, St. Joseph
35 parts, St. James 10 parts, St.
Lucy 56 parts, St. John 52 parts.

A

ported lost by Lucille Inniss of
Prospect, St. James.

She stated that the wallet was
removed from the counter at
Messrs. DaCosta & Co. Ltd,
Broad Street, on Tuesday. It is
her property.

HE WHARF, near Messrs.

Robert Thom'’s Warehouse,
was the scene of an accident at
about 12.15 p.m. on Tuesday be-
tween the motor car M-1890,
owned by D. V. Scott of Two
Mile Hill and driven by Fitzgerald
Herbert of the same address, and
a mule-drawn cart owned by Inez
Moore. The right rear fender of
the car was damaged.

C= OUTRAM, a cyclist,
was injured on his right
wrist and right foot when he be-
came involved in an accident along
Constitution Road at about 8.00
a.m. on Tuesday.

Also involved was the motor
lorry G-72, owned by Bulkeley
Factory Ltd., and driven by John
Straughan of Bridge Road St.
Michael. ;

E OVERHANGING gallery

of a house in Reed Street,
owned by Gordon Springer ot
Black Rock, collapsed on Tuesday
night at about 8.45. Luckily no
one was passing when this hap-
pened.

Recently this gallery was struck
by a truck and since then it had
become very shaky. Those in the
house were npt hurt.

A police van rushed to the
scene about 9 o’clock and dis-
persed the crowd that gathered
in the street so that the electric
wires in the house could be dis-
connected.

Robert Wilson who lives in a
house opposite Mr. Springer’s
own said about 8.45 he was sitting
in the doorway of his house when
he heard a crash and saw the
gallery and uprig!:ts fall to the
ground.

IFTY AND THREE quarter
acres of ripe canes were
destroyed within the first two days
of May. Although many appeals
have been made by the Police and
plantation managers, these cane
fires continue.

Cane fires on some occasion
threaten to destroy houses. It is
likely that on some occasions the
fire may catch a paling and spread
to a tenantry.

The targest of the recent fires
broke out at Joes River Planta-
tion at about 1.40 p.m. on Monday
and destroyed nine and one half
acres of fifth crop and four acres of
fourth crop ripe canes.

This fire extended to a field at
Frizers Plantation and destroyed
six acres of second crop and ten
acres of fifth crop ripe canes

The canes are the property of
Joes River Ltd. and were all in-
sured.

OCIETY PLANTATION, St.

John, was the scene of a cane
fire at about 7.30 p.m. on Monday.
Seven and a half acres of second
crop ripe canes were destroyed.
The canes are the property _of
C. N. Reece of the same Plantation
and were insured.



_—






after a Course of



BISMA-REX
STOMACH POWDER

We also offer these:







eae and Banfield for
plaintiff, Corbin, and Mr. D. H. .L.



| sequently deprived of the use of

‘his car.
get over 50 parts but St. George]

MAPPY AGAIN !!

STOMACH PAINS GONE

REXALL





Counsel in the case are Mr, G. H.

Adams, instructea py Messrs

Ward, instructed

by

fendants, Mr. and Mrs. Hurdle.

The Claim

Claim is alleging that the accident

was caused because Hurdle so un-

skilfully drove and managed
M-1244 that it was driven against
M-380 which was being driven by
Corbin's chauffeur, Maughn,
cabbage palm tree growing by the

M-380, and that plaintiff was con-

The defendants on the other

‘hand, filed a Defence to the effect
| that the alleged damage to M-380

was not caused or occasioned by
any act or acts of Hurdle, but was
caused solely by the negligence of
the driver Maughn, in that he fail-

.ed to keep a proper look-out, and

allowed M-380 to. veer too far

WALLET containing money, | 8¢Foss the road when being over-
to the value of $26, was re- | t#ken by M-1244.

As a result of that alleged
negligence, said the Defence, the
right side of the bumper of M-380
caught into the left rear fender
of M-1244, as a result of which
Maughn lost control of M-380 and
collided with the tree.

After Mr. Adams had outline”

the case to the jury evidence was
started.

Car Owner

First witness was Mr. Corbin:
He said: One of my occupations is
that of undertaker and garage
proprietor. I am owner of the
car M-380. I had certain informa-
tion on July 9, 1946, that my car
had been damaged on the Pine
Road. I went to the Pine Road
and saw it facing the direction of
Belmont Road. It was on the left
side against a Cabbage Palm Trae.
I took it to E. O. Layne’s Garage.

The radiato: was against the
Cabbage Palm Tree. It was
properly smashed. Two tyres

were blown. The whole front
part of the car was actually
smashed. Mr. Layne came on the
spot” with his lorry and removed
it. .The car could not move on its
own power,

In due time Mr. Layne sent me
an itemised bill. I cannot re-
member the amount. The bill in
court is the same. It is for $316.71.
In addition to Mr. Layne’s bill I
had a bill for painting the car.
That was from Kenneth A, Jordan
for $75.00. I am only claiming
half of that amount because the

ear was bought in 1937 and I con- |

sidered it would soon need repaint-
ing. It was a Ford V-8.

, Parts Necessary
f got parts for repairing the car
from McEnearney.
They also furnished me with a
bill. The coil, the hub cap and
the rim were absolutely necessary

the
Messrs.

Haynes and Griffith, for the de-

The plaintiff in his Statement of

so
that M-380 was forced on to a

side of the road, thereby damaging

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





When I got there my driver was
not there. I understood that he
had been injured and gone to the
doctor. I do not. remember the
Police asking me to sign any paper
that evening.

Hurdle the male defendant
came to me next morning about
the same business. I did not
tell him that as far as I was
concerned I was not bothering
about the accident. Hurdle and
I were good friends. He has
worked for me, and his wife has
worked for my wife as a nurse,
Two tyres were burst. I have

no idea in what part of the car
the coil is placed. I do not re-
member which rim was smashed.
I am not a mechanic. I should
imagine that the coil had to be re-
placed as a result of the accident.
The car was working well before
the accident.

Mr. Layne made no promise to
have the car repaired in a month’s
time. Mr. Layne explained that
he had to keep the car a long time
because there were certain parts
that he could not get. I do not

a month for a hired car is rather
high.

I did not see the extent of the
damage to the defendant's car.

Mr. Layne did not tell me he
had kept the car a long time be-
cause he had plenty of crop work.

Re-examined : I simply chatted
with the male defendant. I did
not say anything to the point. I
told him I was going to call the
police. He suggested that we
could settle it amicably as we
were friends.

I did see Hurdle next day. He
| tola me that he would take his
step from me; that he would abide
by my decision,

Motor Mechanic

Mr. E. O. Layne said: I have a
garage at Tweedside Road. I have
been a motor mechanic for over
25 years. I was employed by
Mc Enearney for 10 years, I am an
expert on Ford cars,

Sometime in July 1946, at the
request of Mr. Corbin I was asked
to go to Pine Road.

I found a car facing Belmont
Road. It was in the gutter. It
was on the left side of the road.

The car’s axle was bent, the
radiator was smashed, the fender
was damaged and so were the
tyres and wheels, I had to tow it
t6 my garage.

At my garage I saw after the
repairs and tendered Mr, Corbin
a bill. The bill in Court is mine.
All the items on the bill had to
be supplied as a result of the
accident.

As far as the bill from Me
Enearney is concerned, the items
on that bill had to be supplied
in the course of my repairing.
The coil was damaged on ac-
count of the accident. The two
new tyres and tubes were neces-
sary, because those on the car
at the time of the accident were
punched through. :

The painting was done in my



as a result of the collision. So
a arage. It was wholly due to the
or eine ore tubes. That| Chen’. ‘The body had to be
The accident took place on|< _

July 9, 1946. I got back the car
about a year later. I am claiming
only four months’ loss of earnings
heecause I consider that the car
could have been repaired in four
months.

For loss of earnings I estimate
$1.50 a day for four months—
$180.00.

To Mr. Ward: When I went to
the scene of the accident I saw the
male defendant there. The police
were there. They did not take
anv staiements from me. I did
not tell the Police I would not
make a Police case. I did not say
I did not want the Police to inter-
vene, that both of us would stay
our own camages.



What’s on Today use

Court of Common Pleas at
10.30 a.in.

Police Band at Moravian
Manse, Country Road at
4.00 p.m.

Football at Kensington at
5.00 p.m.





LOOK YOUR
BEST



























VASELINE is the registered trade mark of

‘PLUMBER HAD
DIZZY SPELLS

Trouble Began to Leave on
Using 1 Bottle of Dodd’s

“1 am a plumber by trade,” writes Charles
T. James, William St., Kitty Village, East





aware ‘
REXALL PRODUCTS ath or hepa
COD LIVER OIL EMULSION | aeod a ee
an Emulsion in palatable form. 1 Dedd’s Almanac that
Suitable for children and adults. }))| prompt ey ae
COLD AND INFLUENZA MIXTURE || Dodd's Kidney Pills
SERCY, OF NEROFEDSPHIEES - | cana kets
' ORES Ij‘ lied ‘two tore: bottles of Dedd's Kidney
DRUG ST {| pleted two more betles of Dedd's Kidney
KNIGHTS DE PRODUCTS y cy Mande ab Side tondatd ceande—

\ Dodd’s Kidney Pils.” 6G449
©

think that the estimate of $45.00 |



taken off

smashed in, I started working on
the car in 1946. The new parts
were put in in 1947. It look a

long time because we had to take
out the engine. The chassis, was
badly bent.

If I could have got all the parts
and started right away it would
have taken not less than four
months to do the job. When the
job was finished it was in good
condition.

To Mr. Ward: The two front
tyres were burst. I cannot re-
member if both wheels were on
the hub when I reached the scene.
The coil is situated behind the
radiator. We had to pull down the
job when we found that the acci-
dent had burst the timing gear
cover. I would say as a mechanic
that the piston rings had been
broken as a result of the accident
The set of piston rings cost $8.75

For taking down an_ engine,
overhauling it and replacing it
$60.00 was the normal price in
those days. I did not charge the

{full price for the job, because 1
felt that the two parties would
|have made satisfaction, The car
| ae a 1937 model.
Entire Overhauling

I have never examined the car
before the accident, so I could not
give a true estimate of the value.
I had to give the car an entire
overhauling. The battery also
went as a result of the accident.
The coil worked on the distributor,
The housing of the distributor was
smashed. Damage to two spark
plugs could have been caused as
a result of the accident. The horn
is between the radiator and the
engine. The horn_was bent.

The valves are in the cylinder
block, and so are the bushings. I
would not say that the bushings
were actually broken as a result of
the accident, but they may have
been damaged through repairs
that were carried out to the en-
gine.

After taking down the car I had
to reface the valves. I had to send
out the chassis and front axle to
be straightened. You could ‘not
paint one side of the ear and not
the other. I promised Mr. Corbin
that I would get through the job
in a month, but I found it impos-
sible.

In repairing a car, parts may
be broken, I would_pot say that
this was due to negligence where
Mr. Corb/:’s car was concerned.

The Chauffeur

Cuthbert Da Costa Maughn said
I am a chauffeur. In July, 1946, I
was working with Mr. Corbin, On
July 9, 1946, I was driving the
Ford car M 380 along Pine Road
It was about 5,30 p.m. I was go-
ing in the direction of Belmont on
the left side of the road.

I heard_a car horn behind me
and I pulled a little closer on my
side. The other car began to pass
me, and before he cleared he
swerved back in front of me. His
left rear fender hogked my right
front bumper. I lost control of the
steering wheel, and M.380 went
into the cabbage palm tree by the

@ on page 7



Dangerous

Beware this S-bend. It can
cause offence if not kept
scrupulously clean. Sprinkle
in some ‘ Harpic,’ leave as

The fender had been!



LIGHTER LOADS OF FLOUR were discharged on the waterfront, the inner basin yesterday
before being removed to the warehouse F

FLOUR
ARRIVES

OVER sixteen thousand bags o!
flour arrived for Barbados within
the past two days.

On Tuesday evening, the
s.s Mormacsun sailed into Bridge-
town with 14,656 bags of - com-
modity from Vancouver. Early
yesterday the s.s. Sunjewel came
in with 1,900 more bags of flour
from Halifax, Nova Scotia

The flour brought by
Mormacsun was FE Grade
wheat flour.

Stowaway Jailed

AUBREY DAVIS d@ seaman ot
Trinidad was found guilty of
stowing away on the s.s Mormac-
sun by His Worship Mr. A. J. H
Hanschell yesterday and sentenced
to 14 days’ imprisonment with
hard, labour.

AUTO BANK GETS
$11,000

THE Traveuing Office of the
Government Savings Bank which
was in operation this year from
February 20, has already collected
$11,115.59 This was obtaines
from 526 deposits including 84 new
accounts, Last year the bank
collected $10,923.56 from 644 de-
posits,

£3 For Three Tins

A FINE of £2 to ve paid by in-
stalments of £1 per month or i
default two months’ imprisonmént
was imposed on Eric Alleyne of
Bank Hall by His Worship Mr
A. J. H. Hanschell yesterday fo
stealing three tins of butter valuec
at 10/9 and the property ol
Stansfeld, Scott & Co. Ltd.

the
and

Obituary:
Mr. G. Macandrew

NEWS was received a few day:
ago of the sudden death, on 16ti.
April, of Mr, Gerald Macandrew 0:
Headley, Hampshire, England.

Mr. Macandrew in 1932 marriec
Miss Patsy O’Brien, younges,
daughter of the late Sir Charle:
O'Brien, at one time Governor 0.
Barbados, and Lady O’Brien o
Headley.

The Advocate learns that the
Parish of Headley, by his early
death of the age of 55 years, lose
the services of one who has alway:
taken an active part in anythin;
to do with the welfare of the
parish.

The Advocate would like to offer
their sympathy to his widow anc
four daughters and other member:
of the family.




long as possible—thea fush.

‘Harpic’s’ thorough action will clean, disinfect and deodorise
the whole pan even where no brush can reach.

HARPIC

THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER







For MEN :—
For LADIES:—

For GIRLS :—



SHOEMAKERS

FAVOURITES OF THE
LEATHER SOLE SHOES (Black or Brown)
PLATFORM CALIFORNIANS (White or Black)

BALLERINAS (Black or Red) Sizes: 10—2
THE SHOPS WHERE YOUR MONEY GOES FARTHER!

| THE BRITISH FiRaatas SHOR CO., LTD









Fresh for your
Pets !!

PURINA DOG CHOW
PURINA RABBIT CHOW

h Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.
Distributors,

WEEK
Pers $5.05 |

.. $6.70 }})

re ey $1.68 }

TO THE WORLD.



———.







SS!

Claims £20: Gets

<7 Damages

His Honour Mr J W
“henery yesterday gave
o Percy Walcott of Bel
try, My Lords Hill, for
-ourt of Orig’nal Jurisdiction

Walcott had claimed
ages from Jim Best

udgme
e Teng



and Lot

£7 int

B
ont

he

£20 dam-

tic

Smith, also of the same district
accusing them of having woundec

him with
14, last year
medical treatment.

He said that after Best had «
him on his head with the sick
Smith exclaimed that as th
would have to be impr soned, th

a sickle on Novem!

61

Walcott had to ge

le
e.
e\

could as well get imprisoned foi

doing something.
away the sickle
slashed at him.
Smith said that Best had be
eutting grass when Walcott ca
and made-a row.
Best did not cut Walcott,

Bible Society
Hold Meet

The Meeting of the British ar
Foreign Bible Society was held

from

She then too}
Best anc

er
ne

She said that

ad |
at

the Naval Hall of the Y.M.C.A. on

Tuesday evening. His Lordsh
Bishop Hughes presided,

Crosby read the annual report ar

Rev. J

ip

ad |

he also made an appeal for mem-

bership. Rev. Inniss briefly ou
lined the progress of the Society
works in South America, Japa
Europe and Africa, The functic
ended after the showing of a fil
which
the Bible and the many demanc
for the Holy Book
countries,

Hospital Ups Bread Prices

‘Ss

in different

t-

n,
on |
m

illustrated the printing of

The Barbados General Hospital
Advisory Committee yesterday de

cided to give Messrs.

prices for fresh bread.
This was done

ation

considet
firi

after

of a letter from the

Zephirin ,
Ltd., an increase of the contract |
{
)

TN

drawing attention to the increase

in the cost of flour and asking fe
an increase of their contract price
as a result,

Mr. B. A. Weatherhead,
member on the Committee, we
welcomed by the Chairman Dr
H. G, Cummins.

Mr. Weatherhead thanked
Chairman for his remarks

FRY'S CHOCOLATE
* HAZEL NUPS
in ‘¢ lb. and 1 Ib. Boxes
Priced at . ‘
90c. and $1.62 per Box
Also FRESH SHIPMENT of
HTUMPHREY’S
HOMEOPHATIC
REMEDIES
Humphrey's Specifies
(all Numbers) 50
Humphrey's Veterinary
Remedies 1
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
i Liquid
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
Liquid
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
Ointment
Humphrey's Witch Hazel
Ointment

96
56

87

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LIMITED









)
new ;
is

|

the |}

i)

yt

â„¢

TONI HOME PERM

PAGE FIVE



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ee il

















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Halo—contains no soap or sticky oils —
nothing to dull your hair’s natural lustre. With
your very first shampoo, Halo brings out shim-
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For hair that’s lustrous, use Halo,
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women have proved only Halo gives hair such natural radiance,

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THE COSMOPOLITAN

Day Phones 2041—4441

—-

-*
Night 81—41

La
~s





&

Invigorating



Our Home Products Department has everything for him or her
Pink & White Woollen Blankets

Woollen Jackets in shades of Pink

& White, Blue & White, Plain

Blue, Plain White
White Organdie
Bonnets trimmed
with Blue
Children’s K hus
Khus Hangers ea.
Sun Bonnets







| —each ......... ;
Wollen Jacket to match
Flanellette Blanket

NA MW VAUXHALL

VELOX OR WYVERN



Booties—each ..,.... 60c., 66c., & .72e.
.. $7.50
2.25 White Crochet Bonnets trimmed
3.00 with Pink or Blue—each 2.00
White Material Bonnets trimmed ‘
$3.00, 3.60 in Pink or Blue—each. . . . 156

10, 1, 12, & 13 BROAD STREET



——



[SSeS

MAKES A_ FINE CHOICE.

New shipment of these Cars recently Arrived.

ROBERT THOM LTD.





COURTESY GARAGE






PAGE SIx BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON











TOAST TO
YOUR
HEALTH !!

|
|
|
wr WINCARNIS te






Seen! HERE WE C
aeaatemeewe aS ETES ~rW4E

“aa agai.
TR RE OF MLOOO4F* ... THROUGH “THE
RMANTIC SOuIrTUDES OF THE DESERT...








ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT.
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.






BLONDIE __











YEH---
> LIVE
: 20) DOLLS






DON'T HAVE
MANY BABY



and
D.V.SCOTT & Co.,Ltd.

have a host of
items to suit all





pockets-here are some










































WE CAN'T GET THE MASKED) COME ON!) |
MAN NOW. HE'S BACK OF P WE'LL GET
“THAT BIG ROCK, OUT OF HERT

iF Wo CAN REACH 4
“\ OCK WEILL
hY ( HAE




yA alee LA ers ae FRYS HAZEL NUT CHOCOLATES, 1 Ib. ooo osscosossosossssee $1.62
er FRYS HAZEL NUT CHOCOLATES, 4 tbo ooo ocsscscssssooossesse 90
BLACK MAGIC CHOCOLATES oococssooossosssrosessersessesn $1.75




SOME. 1
\~m_SHELTER:





FULLERS CHOCOLATES, 2 Ib. o.........cccccssssecsssessssssnsisesssteeennen $2.27




FULLERS CHOCOLATES, } Ib. pack




FRUIT CENTRES, bottles o.oo... ccceecssecssscssssesssseseecenneed





CANNED FRUIT







v G8ial j
he iadalie af éhow










bes , 7 7

AUN NON SMEDLEYS BLACK CURRANTS 00.00/00

DID YOU "NOTICE THE PUG'S Y I'LL SAY HE was! WELL .WHISPER, PROFILE

FACE AS HE TOLD HIS TALE/HAS SENT HIS LaST RED DOMINO.NO MORE

TO THE POLICE? THE ONLY) WARNINGS FOR HIS VICTIMS -—OR YOUR
THING THAT HE MADE FATHER, EH?. oe -

BROOK PEARS oo.e...cecccccccccccsssssssesneesssssenees










DUTCH PEARS \o....sscssscsssssss sevssessssssseensesssesssees

A HAVE BEEN STUCK

rg









~~ Senor * eet PCy: WHEN WE'VE HAD A
K. PY YOUNG MAN, 2

A THERE FOR THE
DON'T KNOW HUW TO
Pa 4 . m) \ HOLIDAY, WE'LL SEE
BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS

Yr nignt d + LA
~ a \ KA Pith = ; nate | SAT} | / THANK You, MR.CANNON. 1
Ree CN 1 ; Wik YOU'VE BEEN SO GOOD TO
== = . Hii a oul WHISPER... AND TO ME.
a apne Lay A LOT OF YOU =I HOPE.)
aii? |*



Ee oth OF.
Order Dept.
Phone

HEINZ TOMATO
Soup
MORTON'S PEA

SOuP
FRAY BENTOS VEGE.
TABLE SOUP



HELLO~SGGS-+T
WIFE'S BROTHER



HOUSE = AN
AFRAID TO GO
TO MY OFFICE”

PEA SOUP

Ee ere
‘

ONION soup
RALEIGH CREAM OF
ASPARAGUS soup

a

BY FRANK STRIKER :
“me Ceara) || CONFECTIONERY

For MEAT Phone 2392

sy ‘

BY ALEX RAYMOND

!| |...S0, SISTER,



VEAL—TRIPE
KIDNEYS—

MINCED BEEF
AUSTRALIAN PRIME

THE PHANTOM > BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES BEEF (Roast & Steak)
: aS SS eucowasy —= «s >~_ ano You sensiour GIIRAN, ) GURAN, YOU SURPRISE ME.) |i

D = \) BELIEVE a CALL THE OTHER MENOF
SMOKE Agose ER yd THIS? | RHOW NOT WHAT TO \4 | SANDAR. | WANT TOHEAR
WHEN/T FO NW £ ; WHAT THEY THINK,
CLEAREDTHE ¥ pe |: -
STATUE WAS | WR
GONE*IN ITS |: 7



|
ff ; : é te 4
S. RB. APRICOTS oo...ccssescsssitinsensese . Js §
OPICAL FRUIT SALAD oe ip US 6 "Se " S
eae [gS tig, Ms "Mag | SI =CANNED
s Yon le,
Gils fT





\ eT Ff : rh ts . i yyy Gyr) ® —— ie TF % z=
ao les i = a \ n=—_————— # | :
j \ iy oa iad | ri \ t f a 3 \ f Hy Py | }

PN . Ll SALA Pemert. wal’ Lwolke mont erennro Bd aened WEIL rrr 2 if § \
THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950

‘CLASSIFIED ADS.





a

DIED

ATHERLEY—MRS. MARY MARTHA
yesterday at her residence, Arthur's
Hill, Tweedside Road. Her funeral
will leave her late residence at 4 30
p.m. to-day for the James Street
Methodist Chureh, and thenee to the
ae Cemetery. Friends are in-
William

Atherley, Stanley





Pilgrim |

(U.S.A) and Darniey Pilgrim (sons), |

Mrs. Germaine Archer, Mrs



Amanda

Moore (daughters), Leroy, William,

Delores, Florette, Fred, Rudy and
Junior (grandchildren)

HACKETT—Yesterday at her residence

Green Hill—ELIZA,

aged $2 years. |

The funeral leaves her late residence |

at 4.30 o'clock this evs
Matthew's Church, Tieden

vited.

Nurse Helena Kennedy (sister), Elsie

Kennedy (niece), Edwin Kennedy

(nephew). 4.5 50—In, |



Friends are in- |

|

}
|

McDONALD—EGLON, at his residence |

Blades Hill, St. Philip. Funeral will



4N MEMORIAM

—=—_—_

FOR RENT













4OUSF*



BUNGALOW, also Flat, facing sea mai
road, Hastings, furnished from May ist
All English baths with heaters

verandahs

showers, telephones, - Tele-
phone 2949. 31.3.50—t.f.n

_—

PLAT: Upstairs flat with 3 bedrooms

running water in each. For further
particulars Dial 3696.

28.4.50—t.f_n.

FLAT—Fully furnished. Linen

Cutlery, All modern conveniences
ninutes from Clubs and City

and
10
Dial 4103
4.5,50—2n
—————

MARKHAM—On the Sea Hastings,

| furnished or unfurnished 3 bedrooms

with all. modern conveniences. Gas in-
Ester for cooking. Apply: Elise Court.

















PUBLIC SALES





leave his late residence at 5 oe. ees ie
pm pina ra

Paints ae Chureh. Friends |" 1 ARGE COOL ROOM—$8.00 per month

Christopher (father), Charlotte ee = Rnapnands 4 my Side,

(mother), Dorothy Greenidge, | _“ ser me a

5 rl ately Sammy Howard, | RESIDENCE—From_ Ist May upstairs

R. Cas Boe lon, Barton, | 53. Swan Street, 2 Bedrooms, Drawing

ee 1 nd Dining rooms, Toilet, Bath.

€3.30-th | eae — airy: Also suitable for

MacKENZIE—HUG . ices mmediate possession. A, y

on fee ee ee anlage a THANI BROS, Dial 3533 Business pad

No 2 Bay Strect. ia funeral aa | 4158 on Sundays 3.5.50—t.f.n
eave his late residence at 4.45 o'clock ?

a WESTMONT — i
is eee Pay ante Westbury | House. From fae ter Phone allt
ind 8 § toll a.m... 4to6 p.m. 3.5.50—5n

Mrs. Laura L, MacKenzie and |
family. 4.5.50—In. |

IN LOVING Memory of my dear
Mother MARY F. CARRINGTON, who
was called above, on May 4th 1940.
Tear are the memories that shall

never fade,

Sweet are the hopes that again

we shall meet
Kneeling together at Jesus feet.
Drusilla Cuffley, Daughter.

FOR SALE















AUTOMOTIVE
: CAR—Morris 10 H.P. in perfect work-
ing order Apply C. E. Tryhane, Baga-
telle Plantation, St. Thomas
4.5.50—4n
CAR—Wolseley 8. In perfect order

Possession May 11th.

Telephone 4014.
Mrs. Graham Yearwood,

4.5,50—2n.



CAR—1949 Morris Minor tourer, low
mileage, condition as new. Apply Raioh
A. Beard, Auction Rooms, Hardwood
Alley, open daily 8 a.m. to 12 noon
Phone 4683 3.5







CAR—Morris 8 h.p. 4 door Sedan in
. 1 Mechanical condition. Newly paint-
ed. Fort Royal Garage.

>

2.5.50—6n.



CAR—1#1 V-8 Ford Saloon, in excel-
lent condition, Courtesy Garage. Phone
4616. 2.5.50—3n



CAR: Pontiac Convertiable Coupe
occasional four Passenger in good order.
Reasonable price for quick Sale. Phone
3348 or 2749. 28.4.50—7n



CAR—One Hillman 1948 Model.
W. R. Tempro 2840 or 8224.
30.4.50—t .f.n

Phone



CARS—1947 Morris Eight. Just com-
pletely overhauled and painted. 1948
Singer Sports, four seater, 1949 Morris

Minor Saloon, 3,300 miles. Like new. 1946
Chi ysler Windsor, Suitable for hired car
service, Fort Royal Garage Lid. Tele-
phone 4504.
—
FORD ENGINE: One V-8 Ford engine
and radiator in good condition, axle,
drive shaft, ring-gear and pinion, and
other parts. Enquire Auto Tyre Com-



pany, Trafalgar Street. Phone 2696.
" 28.4.50—t.f.n
ELECTRICAL

RADIO—One (1) 6 Valve Pye Radic

in good condition. Apply: Mrs Mil-
dred Clarke, St. Matthias Gap, Ch Ch
3 5.5U—2n



RADIO—American G.E. 11 tube, in
good working condition, Phone 2990
between the hours of 4 and 5 p.m.

4.5.50—2n.

——$—$—$<_$$— — —

FURNITURE

FURNITURE—Several
Tables, China Cabinets,
Ete, at Bargain Prices in Ralph A.
Peard’s Auction Rooms, Hardwood
Alley. Open daily 8 a.m. to eee





Bureaus, small
Morris Chairs

—

MISCELLANEOUS

FLOUR BAGS—Opened
white, all marks taken out.
R. Hunte & Co.,
Store, Lower Broad Street.



and washed
Apply K
Ltd. over Bata Shoe
Dial 4611
4.5.50—l4n

TT
FINEST PAINTS—Brandram Henderson
incomparable Forest Green Sun Proot
KEYSTONE White and colours, special
primers, distempers Paints $6.84 gin.
Distemper $3.59 gin, They are Here.
A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

25.4.50—13n

IRON RAIL WINDOWS—Seven iron
reli windows complete with shutters.
size 6ft x 4ft. Suitable for garage or
bond, Enquire Gardiner Austin's Build-
ing, opposite Plantations Ltd. Broad
Street or Phone 2696.



28.4.50—t,.f.n.

PAINTS—1I.C.I. Special offer Gloss
Paints. $3.45 per gallon, Come and get
them. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

25.4.50—13n

PUBLIC NOTICES











NOTICE

IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the
intention of the Vestry of the Parish
of St. Andrew to be caused to be in-
troduced into the House 0° Assembly
of this Island a Bill to authorise the
Vestry to borrow a sum not exceeding
£1,000.0.0 for the purpose of completing
the new roof on the Parish Church and
for providing equipment (Pews, etc.)
for the new chapel about to be built at
St. Simons, the loan to carry ee ea
at the rate of 4% per annum and to
repaid by 20 equal annual instalments
out of the rates of the said Parish.

Cc. A. SKINNER,
Vestry Clerk,
St. Andrew.
2.5.50—3n
a
FORM I.

The Land Acquisition Act,
1949

Notice required by fection 3)

Notice ts hereby given that it appears
to the Governor-in-Executive Committee
that the lands described in the Schedule
hereto and situate at Bathsheba in the
parish of St. Joseph in the Island of Bar-
bados are likely to be needed for pur-
poses which in the opinion of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee ae
public purposes, namely for establis playing fields or other places of public

oe THE SCHEDULE con
T certain parcel of Jan -
tainins ae re 3 roods adjoining the site
of the former Railway Statior. as
sheba, bounding on the seashore, on lands
formerly of the Barbados sah ase |
Railway and on the public road, anhewes
to be *). the occupation of Miss Vera
Hinkson of Cane Garden, St Andrew i.
Dated this twenty seventh day of Apri
1950 at the Public Ses ips an teres
stown in the Island 0: a
Se By Command,
Pp. F, CAMPBELL,
Colonial Secretary, fAg.)
3.5.50—3n,

j hip

Pan Thursday May 4th

Car damaged by accident.
R. Archer McKenzie, Auctioneer.
3.5.50—3n.



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the
Insurance Agent I will sell on Friday
May Sth at Messrs Jason Jones Garage
Lower Broad Street at 1.30 p.m. (1) 1947
10 h.p. Morris Car. Damaged in ac-
cident Also at 2 p.m. (1) 1941—27.35
Dodge Truck at Sugar Store op-
posite Highways & Transport Dept:
Fairchild Street, Damaged in accident
Terms Cash

By instructions received I will sel)
in the spot, at
Advent Ave; Bank Hall X Road (1)
Chattel House 24 x 12 with shed 24 x 8

| kitchen attached. Must be sold. Terms

| Chattel





is GOT BETTER — ITS GETTING POPULAR

————$———



Cash,
. VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
30.4.50—3n
REAL ESTATE

“CASVILLE”, Navy Gardens Ch, Ch.
Three bedroom bungalow standing on
8,241 sq. feet land. Can be seen at any
time by appointment. Apply C, A. Peirce.
Phone 3348 or 2749. 28.4.50—Tn,

TAND—1480 sq. ft. of land with

dwellinghouse thereon, situate

at the corner of Wellington Street, an:
ne Street, Bridgetown.

Inspection on application

Tenant, Mrs. Florence Linton.

The property will be set up for sale

' Public Competition at our Office

Tomes Street, Bridgetown, on Thursday
4th May 1950 at 2 p.m.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.
29.4.50—5n.



to th



By public competition at our office,
17 High St., on Thursday 11 May, at
2 p.m. the dwellinghouse of two storeys
comprising public rooms, two bedrooms,
kitchen, bath ete. with shop attached,
standing on 2094 sq. ft. of land in
Tweedside Road and Hunts Road, City,
Apply to Mr. E. H. Kirton, the owner
on the premises Further particulars |
and conditions of sale from COTTLE
CATFORD & CO.

“ALCOTT"—Situate the Stream
Road, Christ Church, on 17,236
Square Feet of land, with right of way
to Worthing Beach.

The house contains gallery, drawing
end dining room, three bedrooms,
pantry, kitchen and usual out-offices.
Garage and servants’ rooms in the yard.

Inspection on application to the tenant

at

Mrs, Watkins every day (except
Sincere): betwens Sie sour: 6, $- ane
p.m. '

The above will be set up for sale at
public competition at our Office in Lucas
Foren on Friday the 5th of May 1950 at

p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,



Solicitors.”
28.4.50—Tn.

“LEIGHTON” — Situate in Passage
Road, St. standing on 6,870
square feet of land.

The house is built of stone and con-
teins gallery, drawing, dining, sitting
end break: rooms, Pantry, kitchen,
W.C. and bath do’ e

Inspection any
tetween 10 a.m. 5 p.m.

The above will be set up for sale to)
Public Competition at our

Lucas Street, Bridgetown on Friday
the 5th May 1950 at 2 p.m.
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors.
23.4.50—12n



BEACH VIEW—Worthing on the Sea
Very cool and good Sea-bathing, 3 bed-
rooms, Toilet and Tea-room upstairs, 3
rooms, Kitchen, Bath and Gallery down-
stairs. Offers received by writing
Address Mr. C. Bourne, Melbourne,
Hastings. 3.5.50—2m,

|









FOR
CHILDREN

Rose, and White .......
CELANESE CELSHUNG in

Gold, Torquoise & Blue .
GEORGETTE in White, Pink,

and Green

LAWN in White, etc., etc.

|





|





AT
THE ADVOCATE STATIONERY

aaa

LOVELY SPUNS

in Orchid, Blue, Old Gold, f

Also SATINS, COTTON PRINTS, FUJIETTES, CAMBRICS,

DROADWAY DRESS SHOP.





BARBADOS AD





PERSONAL



—— waetac are hereby ae @ from page 5
against giving credit to my wife CLA-| side of the road at the corner of
DORA NICHOLLS (nee Devonish) as | Fifth Avenue.

do not hold muyself responsible for her
It would not be true to say that

or anyone else contracting any debt
or debts in my name unless by a written| I swerved to my right while the
order — by me. other car was passing. My car

SYDNEY NICHOLLS,

Station House Hin, | Stopped after hitting the tree.
St. Michael The defendant went a little
3.5.50-—2n way in front, and then reversed



LOST & FOUND



back. I alone was in my car,



his.
When the defendant reversed, I





the other side of the road.

LOST

DOG—Black Labrador
to the name of Count.
contact Dr.

told him he hag cut back too fast
in front of me. He said he did not
realise that he had cut back in so

quickly.
Road Dry

I was going at about 20 to 25
miles an hour. I cannot remem-
ber if the defendant said anything
else. The road was_dry. I did no
see any other vehicies or people
in the road. My mouth got burst
on the steering wheel and I got
a blow in my stomach. I had to
go to hospital the next day. The
defendant took me to Dr. Emtage
the same day, soon after the acci-
ey |

To Mr. Ward: I did not indicate
HELP }to defendant to pass out. I did
oon not speak to him as he passed, 1
MAVALIFIED MECHANIC—For Adding| had been smoking at the time. My
Saat T right hand had been propped on
the door of the car. I do not know

ane ee oe rs 3 a Hewitt, if there was plenty of room for
‘alloring Em um, e he aye S . —
nite Fire, Brigade Station. “Appi; with| fongant cut back Mn

ter and ‘son. 4.5. 50-—4n.
- eres 2 It is not true that I swerved

Dog. Answers
Finder please
Cato at Government Hill.
3.5.70—2n

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—Series O
#¢4$ and Series H. 8052. Finder please
return to F. A. Boxill, Bank Hall Cross
Road 4.5.50—1n

DOG—From Kent on Monday, a large
Bieck and light Browm Dog answering
to Fella. Phone 3698. Reward

a 4.5.50—In

WANTED















—
one : L BEES ANT Sioa Ses in.| over to my right. The fender of
jood references requ . pply Canar- Ye ay i

sie,” Fontabelle. on | defendant's — car was ripped

| through. I did not see anyone com-
|ing up the Fifth Avenue. After
the accident a woman came to me
I do not know where she came
from. I had been driving with
one hand.
REAL ESTATE Defendant did not ask me how
ee I allowed “this thing to happen”.
The undersigned will offer for sale to} 1 did tell the defendant that he
gee scongerran at Sor 8 verere bad cut across too quickly. I can-
ow wo on y the 12th|/not remember if a woman was
vatnes of ‘land at Maxwell, near ‘Top {there at the time. I did not see
Rock, Christ Church, This land whic! | her. Defendant's car did not stop
is os the public road ba SOc mes on the right side of the road be-
168 feet, an aces t galow rec > ;
built by Mr. M. L. Harrison fore it reversed. He stopped on
For further particulars and condition | the left.
I made a statement to the police
next day. I do not remember if I



——

Public Sales-Contd.











of sale apply to
HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD,





Solicitors, ) signed it. :
; James Street.| The Court adjourned for lun-
Bee er as cheon.
(1) Large (2 Storey Stone wall

Building with Shop and Bakery stand-
ing on 1/2 acre land which is run in
a tenantry, Government water & Lights
installed situate at Clapham Land, Flag
Staff Road, overlooking sea and country
District. Next to Highgate’s new tenan-
try For particulars apply on premises
to Mr. J. St. Hill owner



Steno, Note Books and

ROBERTS & CO.

29.4.50—3n
~All THAT certain messuage or store
known as No, 46 Roebuck Street stand-









_ CAR COLLISION CASE

and the defendant alone was in,

was out of my car and sitting |
e
asked me how it happened, and 1 |



SSIES SSS
SELECT THESE NO’

Drawing Books three Sizes

VOCATE

ary \ KR 2OOUL Whe a@cci
dent. I told him how the accident
1Pee happened |

He told me that it was Corbin}

On resumption Joseph Nathaniel

| & Sons, and that he would have to



Hurdle of Welches Road, St. Mi-| toi) his’ Solicitors about it. After |
chael, said: My wife owns the cat) cooing how quickly Corbin had|
M-1244 which I drive for her. On| changed I left him after telling
July 9, 1946, I drove to a funeral.| him he could see to his and I
About 5.30 to 5.45 I was driving} would see to mine e

in Pine Road, returning from a 4‘ few days after Mr. Banfield
funeral ube chiles

called me, and I had a conversa-|
tion with him. I told him that I}
denied liability. |
After the accident I did not ob-|
serve what damage had been done
to Mr. Corbin’s car. ~
To Mr. Adams; I did not hear.
that Corbin was taking steps.!
When I blew my horn M-380 was,
centred in the road. I was a little;
shag geno over 60 feet away then. M-380
I passed out on the right, and ee ae ——
as I did so I heard a blow, felt o| WU 7 aoe “" 7 orfectly st A: tht
tug, and then heard a crash | M-380 was going per me y f re
stopped on the right. I reversed | a ee rae a % x 7
the car across the road, back to | (Ve. = ~ em hae ”
where M-380 was in the gutter Apexi ha * eam —— oo
: 2 crash, e told me that she was
saw the bumper of M-380 resting going towards Collymore Rock,

against the tree. that she heard the crash and turn-
T asked him how he had allowed at taak, ae ,

“this thing to happen’. He told To the Court:
me he had lost control of the cat] about 20 miles an hour and M-380
and collided with my rear fender.| was going at about 18 miles an
He also said that his car had col- | pour.

lided with the tree and that he Ruth Crichlow of Dayrells Road,
had struck his stomach on the], domestic servant, said: I cannot
steering wheel. : remember that date on which this
The driver of M-380 did not thing happened. At about 5.30
tell me that I had cut in too soon! p.m, I was going home. I was to
and collided with him, I saw]|the top of the 5th Avenue when I
that my fender was torn and] heard a crash. I looked back and
pulled away in an outward di-|saw a car on to the cabbage palm
rection from the panel of the] tree.
ear. He asked me to take him The only other car I saw was
to the doctor, and I took him in} Mr. Hurdle’s on the right side of
my car. the road facing Belmont. Hurdle
One woman came just after] reversed and asked the driver of
the crash. She is Ruth Crichlow.| M-380 “how this happened.” Hur-
She came from the 5th Avenue] dle asked him if he had lost con-
and was going towards Collymore|trol, I did not wait to hear the
Rock. She came to the scene of{answer. I went home.
the crash,

By the 5th Avenue I saw M-380
in front of me. I blew my horn
and the driver gave me the signal
te come out. There were no other
vehicles in the road.

As I approached M-380 I saw
\the driver resting his right hand
on the car door and holding a
cigarette in his mouth. As I drew
abreast, the driver looked at me

Mr. Hurdie re-vatled said to Mr.

After taking Maugmn to the doc-} Adams: I saw my Counsel read-

tor, he and I went back to the} ing from his papers when he was
scene. On reaching there I saw|cross-examining Mr. Corbin. I
Mr. Corbin and others. Soon after; heard him read that the driver

that a policeman came. Mr. Cor-
bin and I went to the policeman.
We told the policeman that we did

had lost control and gone across
the road and hit the tree.” I heard
him read that on three occasions.

not want the police in it, and that He never mentioned anything
we would both stand our own] about collision with my fender.
damages. No measurements were] But I know that that is what
taken, Maugbn told me,

I then took his driver near his
home and I then went to my home,
Next morning I went over to Mr,
Corbin about the settlement of a
bill concerning another matter,

This closed the evidence, and
Counsel addressed the jury. Hear-
ing of the case continues to-day. —

pa seer

CARRIBBEAN
WORKERS’ UNION

LECTURE BY

Labour Commissioner
Mr. E. S» BURROWES -





























Parcel Deliv

ery Books,

Dial 3301.





Se ae = ces SEE lee
ing on 2788 sq. ft. of land. The x 8.00 p.m.
building has been recently remodelled For Best Value we recommend you to buy oO aa
— Ne abet oP on applica- S i REBRI KS i : _ on deh. 1080
tion to the w . nursday, ay , .
Th rt ill b t for sale °
are ganas “Site SANKEY'S FI C nes
‘ nm jay, syne rue i
ma male A limited quantity now in stock. cial oe Me
YEARWOOD & BOYCE tr 1, Subject: “TRADE UNIONS
te CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. AND THEIR PROPER







Leaving School Next Term? |’ =

HAVE you considered Journalism as a
Career? “The Barbados Advocate is look-
ing for a bright young man to train *
as a Sub-Editor. Apply now in writing
giving full details to the Editor
Advocate 34 Broad Street.
30.4.50 t.f.n

' Whe

The







ORIENTAL

Curios, Ivory, Teak, Sandal, Jewel
lery, Brass Ware, Tapestries,
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ae

strain on chassis,





and the body can

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WHY?

because it is best.

twelve months,




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The President and Members of
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tion will hold their

FIRST DANCE

under the Patronage of Mr. E,.
DR. Mottley M.C.P, at the Hall
of the Princess Alice Playing Field
(formerly Reef Grounds) on Em-
pire Day, 24th May 1950,





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DANCING : 9 p.m.—3 a.m.
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Be among the first to Dance in
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where soft breezes from the At-
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» 4224 —







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All Telehoist equipment is guaranteed for

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We shall be pleased to undertake repairs and overhauls
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FOR SALE
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I was going at] Ss “ByFJORD” .. Ree eKs














a, since the Dunlop
|

Truck
owners —







PAGE SEVEN



SHIPP

FAI RA TICLE oo

BAG42 184) &B AOD







MONTREsL AUSTRALIA NEW
ZEA

The Sch. GARDENIA W will LASD LINE LIMITED
accept Cargo and Passengers for â„¢ AN.Z. LINF:
St. Vincent and Trinidad. Sail- 3.8. is expected to a
ing Thursday 4th inst rive at Trinidad from Australian por's
The Sch EVERDENE will ac- about 20th May.
cept Cargo and Passengers for S.S. “CITY OF DIEPPE” sails Port
Trir.idad Sailing Saturday 6th Firle April 29th, Adelaide May Sth, Mel-
ins: borne, May 18th. Sydney, May 26th, Bris-
The M.V. MONEKA will ac- bane, June 7th, arriving at Trinidad
s about 4th July, Barbados about July 9b.
cept Cargo and Passengers for

Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, Tueke vente: hens: sane Suess SS
Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of a : 5 a en ban ae
Sailing to be given

ladi with

The Sch. UNITED PILGRIM 8
will accept Cargo and Passengers
for St. Lucia, Sailing Friday
Sth inst.

B.W.T.
Assoc.

Schooners Owners
(Ine.) Consignees
Dial 4047

———$_



“THULIN”









DA COSTA & CO. LTD.,
Agents Barbados.

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
sai” Arr

rence River Ports,

These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
A

Apply: DA COSTA & ., 4TD.—Can adian Servire.
ROBERT few ¥

THOM LTD.—New

York and

Gulf Service.

Trinidad
jos, Windward

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For further perticulars apply :—
FURNESS WITHY & COMPANY, LTD.
Agents Trinidad.





N.O. Bides
SS “ALCOA ROAMER™ ............... 23nd March 6th April
“ALCOA RUNNER" Sth April 23rd pan
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SOUTHBOUND
Sails Sails Arrives
Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Barbados
ss. “ALCOA PILGRIM” April 28th May Ist May lith
8.8. “ALCOA PENNANT" May = 12th May 15th May 26th
ss. “ALCOA PATRIOT” May 26th May 29th June 9th
NORTHBOUND
pies
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ss. “ALCOA POLARIS" May tith For aeae & St. Lawrence River
“A STEAMER” May 28th For Montreal & St. Lawrence Rivet
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“A STEAMER" June 12th For St. John, Montreal and St, Laws





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ort, Dunlop has produced the one tyre that has


PAGE EIGHT



GEORGE
ARE ON
(ANCE u}

In Carlisle Bay

IN PORT: M.V. Moneka, Sch. D’Ortac












S.S. Lake Canim, Yacht Tern III, Sch.
Frances W. Smitn, Sch. Adalina, Sch
Everdene, Sch. Emanuel Gordon, Sch
Emeline, Sct Noeleen, Sch. Molly
N. Jones, Seh. L Zolleen, Sch, Free
dom Fleary, Sch, Eastern Eel, Sch
Mermaid C., h. Emeralda, Sch, Won-
derful Counsellor, 8.S. Alcoa Puritan,
Sch. Gardenia W. M.V Lady Joy
ARRIVALS

S.8. Sunjewel, 4.304 tons net, Capt
Clark from Haiti

Schooner Mandalay Il, 30 tons n“*
Capt. Gooding, from St. Vincent,

S.S. Donro, 160 tons net, Capt De Jon
for St. Vincent

8.S. Mormacsun, 4,585 tons net, Cay
Whilden, from Trinidad

5 DEPARTURES

S.S. Douro, 160 tons net, Capt De Jon
for St. Lucia Schooner E Tannis
93 tons net, Capt. Tannis, for St, Vin
cent

Schooner Sea Queen D 10 tons ne
Capt. Nelson, for St. Vincent

ARRIVALS--By B.W.1.A.L.

From Trinidad

James Johnaon, Betty Ann Carr,
Charles Baeza, Agnes Baeza, Karl Baeza,
Rodney Baeza, Margaret Massyn,
Joseph Superville, Lucille Superville
Laurence Devin, Catherine Devin, Mich-
ael. Devin, Allen Hodson, Avonda Year-
wood, Elise Yearwood, Marilyn Year-
wood, Oscar Nothnage!l, Wilma Green-

idge, Stewart Noue, Alwyn Gibson, Edgar
Marsden, Pear: Lamphile, Ruth Fowler,







Joyce Byer, Andrew Christine, Arpad
Ronai, Gilard Stoute, Barbara Wilson,
John Wilson, Norma Atherly
Crichlow, Verna Crichlow, Ee

fret, Jask Henry, Robert Lanaison, Nor-
man Craner, Jacques Craner, Lucille
Blades, Richard Davies, Peggy Davies.
Wilfred Horner, Charmian Horner, My-
ron Ideman, Irere Idernan

DEPARTURES—By B.W.1.A.L.

For Trinidad;

Miss Rosemary Arrindell, Mr, Law-
rence French, Mr, Frank Ward, Hon.
Francis Hutson, W.V.L.C. Mr. Lauffer
Eder, Mr. Archibald Reid, Mrs. Elspeth
McCormick, Miss Rosebrock, Mrs. H
Rosebrock, Miss Judith Showalter, Mrs

Gertrude Showalter, Mr. C. Cheesemap
Mr. Albert Mendes, Mr. Malcolm Sond
Mrs. Mary Kernahan, Rev. Harold Mel-
ville, Rev. James Innes, Miss Mary
Dowlen, Miss Karen Dons, Mstr. Mich-
ael Dons, Mr. Carl Dons, Mrs, Joan
Dons, Mr. Morrell} Bourne, Mr. lan Bain

MAIL NOTICES

Mails for St. Vincent, Trinidad
Sch. Gardenia W. will be closed
the General Post Office as under:—

PARCEL & REGISTERED MAIL at
2.30 p.m. on the 4th May 1950.

ORDINARY MAIL at 2.30 p.m,
the 4th May 1950

Mails for Grenada by Sch, Eastern
Eel will be closed at the General Post
Office as under:~

& REGISTERED MAIL
2.30 p.m. on the 4th May 1950,

ORDINARY MAIL at 2.30 p.m, on the

4th May 1950.

by
at

on

at

' .: Woodcock

In Line For

n Line ro
Champion
LONDON.

If British heavyweight boxing
champion, Bruce Woodcock, beats
Lee Savold at the White City
Stadium on June 6, he will defend
his claim to the world heavy-
weight championship in London
next September. . j

In the opposite corner will be
Ezzard. Charles—or whomever the
American’ National Association re-
cognizes as their champion, |

Jack “King” Solomons, Britain’s
ace boxing promoter, is anxious
for Woodcock to prove that he is
the best heavyweight boxer in the
world, x

“We bar no one,” he said, “we
just want to prove we have the
best man in the world,”

In his attempt to line up such a
match Solomons will meet razor-
keen competition from promoters
in New York and Chicago. :

‘oodeock has already received
a tempting offer from Chicago to
meet Dither Joey Maxim or Joe
Louis in the meat city in July—if
he disposes of Savold.

It is almost certain, however,
that Woodcock will turn down the
offer—even of meeting a declining
Joe Louis.

It definitely does appear right
now that London, and not New
York, is the big-money Mecca of

the world’s topliners, and
Bruce plans to stay here to meet
them—LN.S.

s
THIRD _ DIVISION
RESULTS



Police defeated Y.M.C.A, 3-2 yes-
terday in their third division fixture
when they rei at Cariton. Y.M.C.A.,

“J who scored first were quickly overtaken
by their rivals who netted their three
goals in the second half.

At Lodge, the school boys were beaten
the Combermere Old Boys.

atl
Rain en during the games,





OOK)

Harbour ‘Log oe

eyll Do It Every Time __

T WAS IN BERMUDA THE FIRST



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





To Beat A

ustralians

England Must Beat W. 1.
SAYS JACK HOBBS
Two big problems face English cricket this summer. One

is the challenge of the strongest team the West Indies have
ever sent here. The other is to build an eleven to beat Aus-

tralia next winter.

There is a school of cricket thought which argues that we
should discard tradition in the Tests with the West Indies.

“Why play established stars
like Hutton, Compton, Washbrook
and Edrich?” it is said. “We
know their form.”

“Rest them for.the tough Aus-
tralian trip ahead. Use the West
Indies Tests as trial games to
find much-needed new blood.”

In my opinion this would be a
disastrous policy. These West
Indians are a’ magnificent all-
round side, full of ardour and
determination.

Also, if the season is dry and
we get fast wickets, we shall have
all our work cut out to beat them.

The only way to defeat the
Australians is first to beat the
West Indians.

To do this we must bank on
the “old firm”—Hutton, Compton,
Edrich, Evans, ete. These men
will give the team solidity, and
we cannot leave them out.

In any case to select an experi-
mental “trial-horse’ side would
be an insult to our guests.

Remember what happened dur-
ing our last tour of the West
Indies when, for owe reason or
another, we were able to send
only half a team.

The West Indians were indis-
nant at the time, and although
we flew out Hutton at the last
moment it made no_ difference.
We lost--badly.

No, for prestige as well as for
policy reasons, we must field our
best team, To achieve this we
should sprinkle in a few of the
younger cricketers with the tried
men,

It is far too early to say for
er who these newcomers will
e.

What we do know is_ that
BOWLING is going to be our big
headache,

Our absolute minimum bowling
needs are: —

(1) At least one top-class fast
bowler (Larwood should be the
model to aim at).

(2) A first-class googly bowl-
er,

(3) A left-arm bowler who
can seal up one end in the grand
manner like Hedley Verity or
Jack White.

{ hope that Ken Preston of
Essex will supply one of our fast
bowling needs. He has recovered
from his leg injury, but it is too
early to say how he will shape.

The West Indians, of course,
have three good fast bowlers, but
the best in the world still come
from Australia,

I was in South Africa when
the Australians were there during
their recent tour.

From what I saw I am quite
prepared to see Ray Lindwall
return to his old form next
winter,

Against the South Africans he
wasn't quite the player we knew
over here. He had lost some of
his devil. He seemed a little bit
fat.
But he will lose that when he
starts preparing for our arrival!

Then there is G. J. Noblet who
bowled so well in South Africa.
Don't discount Keith Miller either.

They say he doesn’t like fast
bowling—yet he is still the most
oo Australian speed-man
0. .

His “bumper” is certainly more
dangerous than Lindwall’s.

Being taller he does not have
to pitch so short. All-round Keith
has all sorts of tricks.

As well as bumpers he can
make the ball swing, and he even
has a googly. He is one of the
finest slip Selds in the world.

As for this bumping menace,
the only way we can stop it is
to have two fast men on our side
who can bump them, too,

While watching the Australians
in South Africa I found myself
wishing we could capture some of
their keenness.

They hardly ever

relax, not




Vasz was saving omy QO" cues a
FRIEND SENATOR FLUKE“WHEN \ DOESN'T








NAME DROPPER+\ REMEMBER THE TIMES
GIVE HIER TIME,
SHE'LL RATTLE
OFF THE Ponies’ P=.

(‘) F BURKE'S PEERAGE vee



Notre Dame
Defeat
Spartan 1-0

Playing on a sodden ground and
through intermittent drizzles of
rain, Notre Dame netted the only
goal of the day to defeat Spartan
when they met at Second Division
football at Queen’s Park yesterday.

Gill at centre forward for Notre
Dame, who has done most of the
seoring for his team as yet for the
season, sent in the one goal,

Just about three minutes before
the end of the first half the goal
was scored. Both teams during
this halif, seemed equally balanced.
From the sounding of the whistle
for second haJf, Spartan began to
press for the equaliser, The Notre
Dame's defence was not to be
bored and so Spartan seldom got
past the back line. Throughout
the game, both goalies were called
on to make some timely saves,

Hardly any of the players came
off the field at the end of play
without being smeared on the
pants with mud. Fal) after fall
they got as they could not grip
properly on the wet grass.

The ball was often miskicked.
At times when players from both
teams were in good position for
scoring, they sliced sending the
ball wild and in the majority of
cases out of play.

Play began about 15 minutes
late because of rain and was pro-
longed until about 6.15 p.m.

The teams were:

Notre Dame:— Wilkimson, *.
Daniel, F. Daniel, C. Daniel,
Roberts, Browne, Kennedy,
Straughn, Archer, Gill and Best.

Spartan:— Atkins,” Gibbons,
Bowen, Gittens, Reece, Banfield,
Gittens, Trotman, Morris, Jemmott
and Austin,

Mr. O. S. Coppin was referee.



even in the most gruelling heat,
and never in a Test.

Even without Bradman they
will be terribly difficult to beat,

There are many brilliant young-
sters coming up in Australia, Sir
Donald Bradman in a letter to a
friend, confirms this.

Here we mature more slowly.
Brian Close may get plenty of
cricket in the Army—but I doubt
if it is good cricket.

The only way you can produce
the top-notcher is to give him
experience in top-class cricket,

am not being pessimistic-—
simply facing facts. First let us
beat the West Indians.

If we can do that-—and I believe
we can—we shall be more than
half-way on the road to victory
over the Australians.

(World copyright)



The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 5.42 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.12 p.m.
Moon( Last Quarter) May 8
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Water; 4.52 a.m., 6.08

p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .23
ins.

Temperature (Max.) 81.0° F

Temperature (Min.) 71.5° F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E
(3 p.m.) E

Wind Velocity 16 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.962
(3 p.m.) 29,896



By Jimmy Hatlo
“Gf = WONDER DOES SHE

I TOOK HER TO THE
STEAM FITTERS’ BALL»



SS

GAL WHO SOUNDS LIKE
THE APPENDIX OF

THANX To
« MARIE
GINGAC, N.S













|
GAMBLT!, |



{

Russian Claims

Swim Record

|

|

| 4

| LONDON.

|. Russia claims that Leonid Mesh-

kov, a young Russian swimmer,

beat the world 100 metres butter-

fly breaststroke record with a time

of one minute 6.8 seconds,
According to reports from Mos-

cow, Meshkov established this new

record in winning the Soviet

championship.

The official record has been held
by Richard Hough, of America,
at 1 minute 7.3 seconds, since 1939.

—LN:.S.

B.B.C. Radio Programme

THURSDAY, May 4, 1950
The News. 7.10 a.m. News Analy-
is. 7.15 a.m. Sporting Record. 7.30 a.m.
The Cathedral Organs. 7.45 a.m. Generaily
Speaking. 8 aan From the Editorials. 8.10
a.m. Programme Parade, 2.15 a.m. Pavil-
ion Players. 8.30 a.m. Books to Read. 8.45
am. Film Review. 9 a.m. Close Down
"2 Noon The News. 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis. 12.15 p.m. Programme Parade.
12.18 p.m. Listeners’ Choice. 1 p.m. Gerald
Barry Speaking. 1.15 p.m. Radio News-
reel, 1.30 p.m. Take it from here. 2

. > T
Golfers’ Teeth
LONDON.
Golfers have been warned by
Health Service officials to keep

their false teeth in while knocking
that little white pill around.

7 am

.m,
.| The News. 2.10 .

_ A man put the bottom set of his} Britain 218 pone Speen Reve. from

false teeth in his jacket before’ p.m. Ring up the Cyrtain. 3.30 p.m. Twen-

playing golf at the public course at

Croydon, London.

J He ~~ jacket in the club-
ouse, i $

missing—and so were the teeth | SiG on Hea nats dain, St
He reported the theft to the|From the Third Prosramme. 6.50 pan

police and then applied to Croy- Interlude. 7 p.m. The News. 7.10 p.m.

ty Questions. 4 p.m. The News. 4,10 p.m.
The Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. The Adven-
; tures of Richard Hannay. 4.45 p.m. Musie
ef, the Theatre. 5 p.m. Listeners’ Choice.
o49) Dom.

Programme Parade, 6.30 p.m,

: News Analysis. 7.15 p.m, We s B
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The applicati ‘ Barry Speaking. 8.30 p.m. The Music of
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why dentures should be removed Bn. From the Editorials. 10.15 p.m. Fes-

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PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY M \Y t ItM Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay IN POHT S S IjliC.iiim Yichi Tern III. Beti We* Adaliiia. Sen Etenlanr Sen Km. EmMHit Sen L-d/ NoeHwn. S> Moll, N Jon. Mrti. Ijdy Zil*fi "' I %  • aorri Fit-ai>. Sh. Ka*n> 1*1. Beh HmuM C Sh KmetaKlu. Sell Wonit.Kul rounarllir ft S Ak-oa PimUaiS*h Q.ILI"' -. H M V |J*1> Ju> AHHIVA1S 91 Sur.)**i *mn UMI • i ., CU* from Ham BVattoonar Maidalay II. M tans n'\ C* Goodn* IM.II. *( VUKHI. 8 S Do iro. iw ion. nM, C\.pl He J.H. tor M. Vlncer.1 %  S Homucun. 4AM In.,. mi, <„ WbiMlr-r mm Tin.i.l, >l lfARTUIirS II U. DUfo. in lorn iit-i I for St t.iHHa Srl.iHiiiwr I V I ... B3 Ivni n-' To Beat Australians England Must Beat W, 1. Golfers' Teeth Hcfcoonvr Sen Qufti D I* tonin> Capl fit* Seawell AWV*IS %  > II W I A I mm Trinidad Jimn J.,l,.„.,..,. Rally Ann Carr. Charle* Dae/. Ai. BMU K*H IU**J. Kodi*y Ma-ay n. JCaaaph >V| %  Suprrvltto I . |.. Mi. '. Ml Damn. All.-,-, li.o-.i. Avondi YarWDOd, Eli"Vi %  r*OOal, M.irll>n Ye*.wood. Ou.i NMhiMtrt. • MM. flirwan None. AI-" mlxm. Kdaai fc.araa.riv I', an I %  AlldrrChrMIM. Afp.l Hanoi, an rtMi Wlimn. John Wilon. Notnu Alt* Cnrhlnv.. Varna Lrfci RmVSrd Infret Jk Henry. H.N.I I .... man CW I Ill e>Ov Dane. Ilvnter. My By R W I A I Tindrll. Hi %  MSS. Wlllraal H—na-r. nm Wari.an. Ii DKPAKTI "I-For TrlnMad Franc.. BmM. W V I. C Mi U Hfr. Mr Archibald Raid. h El Mi-Cannirk. WKRou-I.rark. Mr. Kcaarbrork. Mlaa Judith Shn.aa.trr. Gf-nnidi' W.owaller. Kr C Id— Mr Alha-rt Uci.dn Mr M-kiilm J Mia M-r> Kl rn M. H.v Harold villr. Re Ja.ru* lunar. Mlu Dowlen. Mi I: %  : Mr ti. Mr MCri Don ii UMIM, in. ft", lai MAIL NOTICES Vallafur St Yimcr.l. Trinidad. M <,... %  1 W will hr ri"*d HH en i I'AHCI 1 u RFUItirRFn MAIL 2 M u m ."> dRRINAItV %  >.*lh May 1N. laAII. al IK) p m • %  ,4th Muy Mail* tor irtnada bv 1N r.^i f>] will in1 PAHriCa. A RBCIRTTRED MAIL 2 30 p m mi ORniNARV llw 4th M.iv IU0 MAIL .1 H %  ni ... 41 h May ISM SAYS JACK HO BBS Two bin problems face English cricket this summer One is the challeni'.e of the strongest team ihc West Indies have I'M r Hot here. The other is to build an eleven to bent Ausi i.i I i.i next winter. There is a school of cricket thought which argues that we should discard tradition in the Tests with the Wesi Iiutn I •Why piny established *iari —— — % % %  — like H.iUi.n. Complon. Wa!.hbrK>k and EdrichT" It is said. "Wr know IIICIT form ttoaoi for Ilic tuugh Austi.ili.n in]) ahcud Use the Wcit MS as trial fames to Olid n i h-needed new blood." In mj opinion IhU would bo a duMstrous policy. These West India in are a magnificent alliiiui.ii side, full of ardour and .H-iiMii.u..,ti<.n Also, if the season Is dry and w# gl fjsl wickeU. we shall have MI out work cul out to beat Ihein The nnl. way t* defeat the AutlrallaM la fmt I* beat the Weil Indians To do this wc must bank on the "old llrm"—Hulton, Compton. Edrich. Kvans, etc. These men will |m ihe team noltdlty, and C m.not leave them out. |h lujU atfm ^ )|v MmtKrd ^ atSri % c&rigl^g l,nolh,, w"' woroTbl/r^„" {- *• *•* %": !" *jf only half %  Icnm l*e tmt.both (talifs w CT o oillcd ThNI)ON lanm tr-.al l^omd Meshknv. a young R.iulan iieul ihc wurld 100 metres butterfly ln;>aaisiiuk record with a time of one minute 6.8 seconds. r.g lo reports from Mmbkov established (his new i winning lh Soviet t.iiiipioiiship The official record has been held i Richard Hough, of A m I minute 7.3 seconds, since 1898. B.B.I. Kadiu Prs^raiaar Notre Dame Defeat SparUtn /— 0 on a sodden ground ami Uu-otUh Intecmlttent drizzles of rain. Notre Dame netted the onh foel of the day to defeat Sparta'. *. Inn they met at Second Division football al Queen's Park >eslerdaj r.i)] it centre forward for Notre Dame, who has dun*most of the scoring for his team as yel for the season, sent in Ihe one goal. Just about three minutes before ihe end of the first half the goal scored. Both teams during Woodcock In Line For Champion LONDON. If British heavywuiKht boxing champion, Bruce Woodcock, beaULee Savold at the White City Stadium on June 6, he will defend his claim lo the world heavyweight championship in l^ondon next September.. In DM opposite corner will be Rzzard Charles—or whomever tin Ainciican National Association recognixes us their champion. Jock "King" Solomons. Drluun'l ace boxing promoter, in anxious (or Woodcock to prove that he is the l*st heavyweight boxer in the world. "We bar no one." lie saul, "we Just want to prove we hove the best man In the world." In his attempt to line up such a match Solomons will meet razorkeen competition from promoters in New York and Chicago. Woodcock has already received e tempting offer from Chicago to meet either Joey Maxim or Joe Louis in the meat city in July—if he disposes of Savold. It Is almost certain, however, that Woodcock will turn down the offer—even of meeting n declining Joe Louis. It definitely does appear right now that London, and not New York, is the big-n>oney Mecca of all the world's topi Inert, and Bruce plans to stay here to meet them—LN.8. THIRD DIVISION RESULTS Ii k| far too enrly to say for certain ho these neweomTs will bo. Whal we do knnw Is that HOWLING Is going lo be our big headache. Our nbsolule minimum bowling needs are: — (1) At Wat one top-rlaaa fast bowler (Larwood should be tho Daniel. model lo alas at). %  %  !> A flnl-clam lootly newt they sliced sending thn ball wild and In the majority of CMM out of play. I'lay began alxoui 15 minutes late because of rain and was prolonged until about 6 15 p.m. The teams were: *• hen %  thenduring 1 1 am quid 1 Y M < <' A 1 I I. %  tardjy in Uv it lliir I .iiviuon mini, vrben Ibey FaM M Cwllon V MCA I wM scored llr.l wrre Hi.l.'kly m-rtahrr *t their rival* who net led Ihrir ihr.. %  LBIIn the aecond hall At I>JdaoIho aehool bc.y. *er lhat when he start* preparing for our arrival! Then there || (1 .1. Noblet who bowled xo well In South Africa. Duii'l iii-iH.mt Keith Miller cither. They say he doesn't like faal bowling—yel he hi allll Ihe most dangerous Australian speed-man ot alj His "bumper" is certainly more dungcrous than landwall's. Being taller be does, not have to pitch so short. All-round Keith has all sorts of tricks. As well as bumpers he can make the ball swing, and he even has a googly He Is one of the Inest slip 'lelds in the world. At for I'm buiiipinu menace. (he only trau U'e ram s'op ir is (o here two fasr men on our ride iBhO 'Or: (unrip flietn, too. While watching the Australians In South Africa I found myself wishing we could capture sonic of their keenness. Thev hnrdlv ever relax, not Noire Dame:— Wilkinson. ". F. Daniel. C. Daniel, Roberts, Browne, Kennedy. Struughn, Archer. Gill and Best. .S|MKM-— AUtlns. Oihbpns. Ilowen, Oitlens. Reece. Bnnfleld. Cittens, Trotman, Morris, Jemmott and Austin. Mr. O S. Coppin was referee. even In the most gruelling heat, and tierer In a Test. Even without Hradman they will be terribly dimcult it. beat. There are many brilliant youniiMer*. coming up in Australia. Sir Donald Bradman In a letter iv a friend, confirms this. Here we mature more slowlv. Brian Close may get plenty of i-ilckel in Ihe Army—but I doubt if it is good cricket. The only way you con produce Ihe top-notcher Is lo give him experience In lup-ciats cricket. I am not being pessimistic simply facing facts. First let u bent Ihe West Indians. If wc can do that -and I believe we can—we shall be more wan half-wr.y on the road to victorv over the Australians. (World copuriohl) The Weather TODAY Sun Klses: S.4t am. Sun Sets; < %  l |. m Moonf Laal Quarter) May I l.ilhHiu: 7.00 p.m. High Water: *'>• a.m., 6M p.m YESTEKDY Ralnrall i t'edring tor.| .13 Ins. Temperature (Max.) 81.0* I Temperature Mm.) 71.5* r Wind IHreetioD 19 a.m.) E (3 p.m.) E Wind Velocity 16 miles per hour Barometer (8 a.m.) 29.888 (3 p.m.) 38.898 They'll Do It Every Tim e %  —.. ^ AS I was SAVINS io My ~v%MP^ '' is (?'/f? r ~i*ie% A XJWTENIMS TO THB G A_ WHO SOUNDS LIKE THE APPEND* OF BUBBLE'S PEERA6E-*P4**I* TO MARll AA*OLm, CNdAC, N. J. r I-ONDON fiolfeis have been warned b> Health Service officials tn keep their false taelh in while knocking .hat little white pill around. A man put Ihe bottom set of tin lalse teeth in his jacket before playing golf at Ihe public course ut Croydon, London He left the jacket in the clubhouse. When he returned it was missing—and so were the teeth. He reported the Ihen to the police and then applied lo Croy.loii Dental Services Committee .or a new pair of dentures. The application was rejected The committee decided that "then would not appear to be any PMfRKI *hy dentures should be lemovcu .Ii.I. i.la>mg golf."-LN.8. ffltafftHVveZ&om comes out in the flavour! And what goes in T Why, pore sugar, wheat, freah egga and buttor— together with the experience that has made HunUev and Palmer* famous the whole world over. So many thrilli varieties to choose from ssstiously.filled Costard Creams and ivsading Creams ', melunglydeueions Slsoiieaae '... all OTao-freah, sealed in Una and | lb. fruhvalu. HUNTLEYft PALMERS BISCUITS delicious teholt'ome cmd nutritious *IM|| I. .. lllkil • CO. 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PAGE 1

Tiiritsnw MAT i. i9-.li IIARBADOS .ADVIK'ATK Car Collision Case Before High Court PACE FIVE #600 Damages Claimc \ COURT OF COMMON PLEA8 action in which Clarence Fitz Herbert Corbin, Undertaker o( Belmont Road, is claiming damages from Joseph Nathaniel Hurdle of Welches Road and his wife, occupied the attention of the Court for the entire day yesterday. A special iury had been empanelled to try the case, hearing of which will resume at 10 a.m. today. Cwbin is rlaiminit SSII9.71 lor duni' clone U hi. MM cii %  MM in a collision which occurred holwrrn u -.nd the cat M 1-1 I which Hurdle was driving aloni: PinR.-id about 5.30 p.m. on July 9, 19 IS. M-1244 belongs lo Hurdle '. wile. Counsel in the case arc Mr. G. H. Adams, mstru. le,i oy Messrs Hutchinson and Banncld for the plat-ifl, Corbin. and Mr D H L Ward, instructed by Mi Wettest In St. Peter Haynes and Griffith, for the defendants. Mr. and Mrs Bur-ll. r! WAS nloomy „, Rnd^towt. Th Claim ypstcida.v. The MID never sti-me ~ l ,laimitT m hls .Statement of really brightly for the entire day. Cl ** m * "U****! "'at 'he nMW Occasional showers, punctuated was < '' ,uw ,, bocau*r Hurdle so unwilh drizzles, tell during the morn*Wlfully drove and manaaed ing. The temperature was 81 r.ihM~! 2M ,naI ,l *' %  driven against M-380 which was being driven by Corbin'* chauffeur. Maughn. so that M-380 was forced on to a cabbage palm tree growing liy the side of the road, there) .damaging M-380, and that plaintiff was consequently deprived of : A WALLET containing lo the value of $26. ported lost by Lucille Innis* of Prospect. St James. She stated that the wallet win* removed from the counter at Messrs. DaCosta & Co. Ltd.. Broad Street, on Tuesday. It Is her property. T HE WIIAftF. near Messrs Robert Thorn's Warehouse, was the scene of an nccident nt about 12.13 p.m. on Tuesday between the motor car M-1890, owned by D. V. Scott of Twc Mile Hill and driven by Fitzgerald Herbert of the same address, and mule-drawn cart owned by Inez Moore The right rear fender of the car was damaged. E RNEST OH TRAM, a cyclist, was injured on his right wrist and right foot when he became Involved in an accident along Constitution Road at about 8 00 a.m. on Tuesday. Also involved was the motor lorry G-72, owned by Bulkeley Factory Ltd.. and driven by John Straugh.in of Bridge Road St. Michael. 'THIE OVERHANGING gallery X of a house In Reed Street, owned by Gordon Springer ot Black Rock, collapsed on Tuesday night at about 8.45. Luckily no one was passing when this happened. Recently this gallery was struck by a truck and since then It had become very shaky. Those In the house were npt hurt. A police van rushed to th scene about 9 o'clock and disr ied the crowd that gathered the street so that the electric wires In the house could be disconnected. Robert Wilson who lives in a house opposite Mr. Springer's cwn said about 8.45 he was silling In the doorway of, his house when he heard a crash and saw the gallery und uprlg'ts fall to the ground. F IFTY AMI THREE quarter acres of ripe canes were destroyed within the first two days of May. Although many appeals have been made by the Police and plantation managers, these cane fires continue. Cane fires on some occasion threaten to destroy houses. It Is likely that on tome occasions the fire may catch a paling and spread to a tenantry. The largest of the recent fl: broke out at Joes River Plantation at about 1.40 p.m. on Monday and destroyed nine and one half an*!* of fifth crop and four acres of fourth crop ripe canes. This fire extended to a field Frlzers plantation and destroyed six acres of second crop and leiv acres of fifth crop ripe cane' The canes are the property of Joes River Ltd. and were all insured. S OCIETY PLANTATION. St John, was the scene of a cane Are at about "30 p.m. on Monday Seven and a half acres of second crop ripe canes were destroyed The capes are the property cf C N. Reecc of the same Plantation and were insured. LIGHTER LOADS Of Horn eudiechar ed to the wan %  rvaiheit In the shade. It rained in every parish except St. Andrew on Tuesday and up to 6 o'clcKk yesterday mornin. St Peter, with 58 parts, recorded the heaviest rainfall during the night St. Lucy, 36 parts; and St. John. —, 52; were the only other parishes to his ear 35 parts. St. James 10 part*. St iH e dr wr Mfl "* nn n < h • Lucy W parts, St John 52 parts.' „ kce P a proper look-out. and •^ I allowed M-380 to veer too far , across the road when being overJ taken by M-1244. As a result of that alleged negligence, said the Defeiuo. tfaf right side of the bumper of M-380 caught into the left rear fender of M-1244. as a result of which Maughn lost control of M-380 and collided with the (rtr. After Mr. Adams had outline the case to the Jury evidence was started. Car Owner First witness was Mr. Corbin. He said: One of my occupations |i that of undertaker and gaiagv proprietor. I am owner of tne car M-380. I had certain inlniiiu.tlon on July 9, 11*46. that my car had been damaged on the Pine Road. I went to tinPlm Road and saw it facing the direction of Kelmont Road. It was on the left side against a Cabbage Palm Tr\-\ I took it to E. O. Layne's Garage. The radlatoi was against the Cabbage Palm Tree. It was properly smashed. Two tyres were blown. The whole front part of the car was actually .smashed. Mr. Lay no came on the spot "with his lorry and removed it. The car could not move on its own power. In due time Mr Layne sent mo an Itemised bill. I cannot remember the amount. The bill in court is the same. It Is lor S316.71 In addition to Mr. Layne's bill I had a bill for painting the car That was From Kenneth A. Jordan for $75.00 I am only claiming half of that amount because the is bought in 1937 SO i I sidcred it would soon need repainting. II was a Fo'd V-8. Par(* Necessary I got parts for repairing the car from McEncarney They also furnished me with a bill. The coil, the h-ib cap and the rim were absolutely necessary as a result of the collision. So were two tyres and tubes. That bill came to 75 50. The nccident took place on July 9. 1940. I got bark Ihe oar about a year later. I am claiming only four months' loss of earnings heoause I consider that the car could have been repaired in four months For loss of earnings I estimate ill.50 a day for four months— 180.00. To Mr. Ward : When I went to the scene of the accident I saw the male defendant there. The police were there. They did not take anv statements from me. I did not tell the Police I would not make a Police case. I did not say I did not want the Police to intervene, that both of us would stay our own .'amages. When I got thein. dltVVfl SPM iKii ihoie I understood that he njurvd and gone to the doctor. I do not remember the Police asking me to sign any paper that evening. Hurdle the male defendant came to me next morning about the same business. I did not tell MsD that as far as 1 was concerned I was not bothering Muni! the accident. Hurdle and i mrt nod friends. He has worked for me, and his wife has worked for my wife as a nurse. Two tyres were burst. I have no Idea in what part of the ear the toil is placed. I do not remember which rim was smashed I am not a mechanic I should imagine that the coil had lo be ieplaced as a result of the accident. The cai was working well before ItssBt Mr Layne made no promise to have the car repaired in a month's time Mi Layne explained that he had to keep the car a long time because there were certain parts that he could not get. I do not think that the estimate of $45.00 .i month fur a hired ear is rather high. I did not see the extent of the damage to the defendant's car. Mr. Layne did not tell me he had kept tho car a long time because he had plenty ol crop work Re-examined : I simply chatted with the mule defendant. I did not say anything to the point. I told him I was going to call the police. He suggested that we could settle it amicably as we were friends. I did see Hurdle next day. He told me that he would take his step from me; that he would abide by my decision. Motor Mechanic Mr E O Layne said : 1 have a garage at Tweedside Road. I have been a motor mechanic for over 25 years. 1 was employed by Mc Enearney for 10 years. I am an expert on Ford cars. Sometime in July 1948, at the request of Mr. Corbin I was asked to go to Pine Hoad. I found a car facing Belmont Road. It was in the gutter. It was on the left side of the road. The car's axle was bent, the radiator was smashed, the fender was damaged and so wentho tyres and wheels. I had to tow it to my garage. At my garage I saw after the repairs and tendered Mr. Corbin a bill. The bill In Court Is mine. All 0M ilems on the bill had to bs) supplied as a result of the .... idatri As far as the bill from Mc Ki.ei.ri.ev | .uncoined, tho items on that bill had to be supplied in the course of my repairing The coil was damaged on ac count of the accident. The twt new tyres and tubes were necessary, because those on the ca at the time of the accident were punched through. The painting was done in my garage. It was wholly due to the accidoo.. The body had to be 'JOOKYOUR BEST IsssSf. Off, The fender had been smashed in I Marled working on the car in mti The new par^ were put in in 1947 It look a long time because we had to take out the engine The chassis, w.is badlv bent If I could have got all the part.', and started right away n would have taken not 'ess than four months to do the job. When the job was finished it was in good condition To Mr. Ward ; The two front tyres were burst. I cannot remember if both wheels were on the hub A heo 1 reached the scene The coil is situated behind the radiatoi We had to pull down tho job when we found that the accident had burst the timing geai cover. I would say as a mevhanL that the piston rings had been broken as a result of the accident The set of piston rings cost $$.75 For taking down an engine. overhauling it and ieplanig 11 $8000 was the normal price In those days. I did not charge the full price for the Job. because I felt thai the two parties woul.l have made satisfaction The ear was a 1937 model. Entire Overhauling I have never examined the car before the accident, so I could not give a true estimate of tho value I had to give the car an SBttn overhauling. The bsttsxrj ssN went as a result of the accident coil worked on Ihe distributor The housing of the distributor way smashed. Damage to two spark plugs could have heen caused u esult of the accident The horn between the radiator and the engine The horn, .was bent. The valves are in the cylinder block, and so ore the bushings. I ild not say that the bushing? e actually broken as a result of accident, but they may have been damaged through repairs that wore carried out to the engine After taking down the car I had to reface the valves. I had lo send out the chassis and front axle to be stiaightoned You could not paint one side of the car and not the other I promised Mr .'mini. that I would get through the job in a month, but I found it impossible. In repairing a car, parts may be broken. I wouldjiot say that this was due to negligence where Mr Corl/i's car was QBOOSf n ad The Chauffeur Cuthbert Da Costa Maughn said I am a cliaufTeui In July, 1946. I was working with Mr COfftta Ol July 9. 1946, I was driving th. : Font car M 380 along Pine Hoad It was about J.30 p.m. I w.>* goIng in the direction of Belmont the lift side •*' Ihe road I )I.II, < .B ca.horn behind and I pulled a little closer on sloe. The other %  T began to pas* me, and before hi cleared he swerved back In front of DM MI left rear fender hooked my rin.li' front bumper. I !*>"! control of the [steering wheel, ami ?.! 380 went into the cabbage palm tree by tho • oa page 7 FLOUR AJtR/VES OVER sixteen thousand bags o. flour arrived for Barbados within the past two days. On Tuesday evening. t n e S.N Mormaraun sailed into Bridgetown with 14,658 bags of commodity trom Vancouver Early yesterday the U. Suajewel came in with 1.900 more bags of flour "rom Halifax. Nova Scotia The flour brought by the lormarsHn trM f tirade and .!-.. .,: Ho .i Stowaway Jailed AITDRF.V DAVIS rf seaman ot Trinidad was found guilty nt vmn away on the s.s Msxmari.v inWonhlp Mr A. J. H Hanschell yesterday and sentenced 14 days' Imprisonment with hard labour AUTO BANK GETS $11,000 THE Trav*UUI| OAM <.f the Government Savings Bank which was in operation this year from ; %  % % %  : ...i v .'" I... ill. ... i lUet h SI 1.115.59 This was obUine om 526 deposits including 84 new 'counts. Last year the bank llected SI0.923.Vi from 644 do*ils £3 For Threo Tins A FINE of t? m ue paid by instalments ol CI per month oi *i default two months' lmprwglisBWurt of Ong Ml M %  > i B %  ceusdu then of haying n,m with a sickle on N nMf Waleott had to t< medical treatment He said that after Host had cu ntm on his head with the si. l.lSmith exclaimed that as the. would have to tks Impf stated, tIn ill.i twail nil imprisoned foi ioing something %  way the sickle from l slashed at lum Smith said that I %  cutting grass when WttfcoV and made a row She said thai Best did not cut \W. Bible Society Hold Meet I .1 wtwg] Ol me British and Foieign Bible Six let • WM held at Ihe Naval Hall ol tiio V M A o., ruceday evening BM Btshop Hughs* prwstdad Itev J ..i.l Ihe annual report und insjj i i'..misn %  -j ,••• •'. foi nn -' bssrshtti Ran touss britdj out lined Ihe progress of the Society> works in South America. J.ip.a Europe and Africa. The nukCtton ended after the showing of a film which illustrated the printing of the Bible and the many demand', for the Holy Hook m dilToient countries. Hospital Ups Bread Prices s •Soaping" dulls hair — HALO (faifkst/ al Hospit iittec fi terdej die Messrs. Zcphtru The Barbado Advisory t'omii cided to give, Ltd.. an uu lease of tho contia. : i h-tati bread Tinv..is done aftei lUon of a letter fiom the flrn: drawing attention to the increase t of flour and asking foi an increase of thou contrgd i Mr It A. We.itheilu-a.1. MW BMtnbi i on the Coinri ".. wsJcorned bv the Cham H 0 Cummtoi Mr. Weathorhond thankol the Chairman for his remarks COLDS and FLU Clear stuffy nose, soothe sore throat, owe achy chest and raspy rogh wilh the mrdk-uud vapouM and %  rsrmlng poullice •cttsti of ssssWteg'l siconr SILIINC 1HSM>*00 %  v %  ""' ***' -" "l i nih awg np i ThiiimuT rmjUu %  kswa pnwssj aggj hssw %iva hM ^i, „,„„.,! nt^mm, HALO rentll Ihi liitlilMi beaulv of >onr hair TOM BOMB PERM CompUt* Swts and Pel ills. Glva yourself that natural look will. TONl-used by 2$ million American Women. Select yours now trom %  • • THE COSMOPOLITAN Night 81 -41 derendshie -WICKS *" W VAPORUR llliiliinr.v: Mr. G. Mt&raiidrrH NsjWS was received a few day. ago of the sudden death, on Ibti. April, of Mr. Gerald Macandrew Oi i Hampshire. England. Mr Macandrew in 1932 marrlei Miss Patsy O'Brien. yQUIIgW daughter of the late Sir Chaile O'Hn-ii, at one time OoW Barbados, and Lady or.nn. o Headloy. The Advoeale learns that th< Parish of Headloy. by his early death of the age of M years, lose the services of one who has alway: taken an active part in anythin, to do with the welfare of HV parish. The Advocate would like U> tUm :heir sympathy to his widow am four daughters and other member nf tho family. What's on Today t'ourt of Common Flrss at 10.30 sail. Poli.* Band at Moravian Msnse. Country Road at 4.00 p.in. Football al KensiniUm at 5.00 p.m UAPP\ 'ABAUtti STOMACH PAINS GONE after a Course of HEX A Li. BISMA-REX STOMACH POWDER We also offer these : BBXAMJL RROHKTS COD Unm OIL EMI LSION an Emulsion in palatable form. Suitable for children and adults. COLD AND INFLI ESZA MIXT1 II mti OF IIVFOPHIISPHITES .... KNIGHTS' DRUG STORES use baseline HAIR TONIC TA*I I IM .. .!-.-... i PLUMBER HAD DIZZYSPELLS Trouble Began to Leave on Uting I Bottle ot Dodd's "I ui %  sjgagsg bi tisdt," writes ChsrWi T. J. !" ... .ll-m 9U k.ii. Vdb(r, I .,i Cssst, Ibokrtva, R.G. "I iSfIrrl TMrl %  ** .r,.,h.-l, M m. I raarMn't il MS S Ss dl %  I mfM \m th M IhiiifivroitH Corner Beware this S-bend. Il can cause offence if not kept scrupulously clean. Sprinkle in some Harpic,' leave u long as possible—thea flush. 'HarptcV thorough action will clean, disinfect aad deodorise the whole pan even where no brush can reach. HARPIC •SOD THE SPiCIAL LAVA-TORY CLEAMSCI s'sVg V b Va Vsr VsrVa Vsf V S Fresh for your Pets ! PURINA DOG CHOW PLRI.NA KADBIT CHOW FOR RF.XAI. I'KOfll ( T-> I 4>.M It •• \U4 AISM* rlMt K-W M lo I., IMd'. K,*. P,IU. fMor. I hw! 6nulwd •n* bortl. i. VMhU rj-t-d I., KWP bMtki PJIi >nd 1 m m. Ir-.no. t LWssi Rismr PiUt." C I. Urn,, u •> DUf %  SusWr •< M I -... UU os*riJ .—Ir .NEW ARRIVALS '•" l (MM l.l \ I I B\/l I Ml' In ii. und I lb !(.••• %  I*rlr*d B | Mr 4ii.l S|.8t prr ll-.\ A!s., HtKSM SIIIPMIM ,.i III MI'IIRFV S Minn in II \ i n t; i M i i in -i llumplii. | full Numbers) !M> Humphr.^ Vi-t.-i Inai. Rarnod %  Htunphrays Wit'i Han i Uquitl H -\ itch Rase) 1.1,1.11.1 Miini|>ln. .'. Witrh lli."l Olntmi-nl Humphray' Witch H %  • >iiiin 11 A7 MlIfE WEATimtlllAII 11 Ml I Hi it € fresh intf in vifiot'titiitft FAVOl KITF.S For M F. N :— LKATIIS:K SOI.F SHOFS (BsMft For LADIES;— FI.ATM.IIM CALIFOItMANS (White or Blackl For €1 III I. H %  — BALLERINAS (Blark r *>d> W 1—t • I.U THE SHOPS WIIERI YOIB MONEY GOES FARTHER IS.M .H .... .. .III-II %  01 CO., LTD SHOEMAKERS TO THE .YORLD. on, 'UowiZfaSif %  l mi Our llmni' I'roilurls llrparlmcnl has rvrrylhinfi lor him or hrr %  ink & WhHi Wimll.-n l:l..nkrls HIHIIII-H— rarh *lr.. Sr & 1U. —...ih 7.:.ll Wollrn Ji.ck.-I In mnlrh 2.2.'. WhileCr.llcl II.H....-K Irili.l Ihmi'll.'ll.IIUnk.1 Mt wilh Pink or Mill.—varh W....II111 Jnrkrls in shall.-. ..I l"i..k A, While. Mine & While. Plain III...', Plain While RMO, Ml W h i I %  Ornamlir llnnnetN Irimmerl uith Blue Sl.Se Children's K h u a Khus 11.. 11. %  i ea. 72c. Sun 11..i, M. is .. 1.44 White Mulerial llolmels tiillilileil ill Pink or Hlu.—-uch I '•• CAVESH EPH ERD & Co.,Ltd. io. II, ii, & 13 HOAD nun IN A NEW VAUXHALL VELOX


PAGE 1

PACK TWO UAKilAUUS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. MAY I, 1930 Ccudb Caltinq NMI The Top Of The List M R and Mrs B. Watson have left for Grenada after •pending a short holiday at "Cacrabank". Mr Watson is Superintendent for Transport and Export of the Standard Oil Company in Aiubwith whom he has worked for 25 years. They are searching fa the nicest place to retire, and aftei visiting the American Islands, the Dutch Island; the French lilind and the English Islands, Barbados tops the list, and they are hoping either to buy or build a nous HM iMta Barbados It Beit \M\i •JKKEK MENDES, who has R OY PAWLEY. Foreign Edttor of the "Dad graph*'. Who wrote an an etc on Caribbean Federation in that paper last week, is back at his desk after a 27.000 miles' trip by air anf the Antigua Girls' High School relumed from a three weeks' vi-it to li G. yesterday and was met by Mrs. Risely Tucker at Seawell she Is due to return to Antlgu' this morning. /•& I IfM. been Acting Operat: On The Air W BBBBBBI w BWIA la Barbados T ni-ir A ~ W '" **ss>JSP the beginning of the year returned HREE Antipian Steel Bag l T i.. Tnnldad yesterday afternoon aTve tholr llrs" experimental ^H [ b) BWIA broadcast on the giounds of the f > %  f Mr Mendes, who was only r A !" i Jf.i r Clifford Palmer on %  "• ** '^^^ Ull ,. ,i lort umc wa% very popular on reJS Son ^"^ C "" (1 RINFRrT *"t* everyone at Seawell. and ew.Jr^P P h 1 v "' bo '" received me>. along with severs rrom rrinidad. Bu bados and sevof the fairer sex ..... ran Ifltrj W 'o?£J. ? and .* T "'"" '"'" P.M.G. Of Canada "• "I" -* feS trm^K d" Anl, u 't U CUnau al UN wan. Hotel H.s next station ll It.-l./e. It.nI' 1 ,,, 1 ^ he bass instruments J) Xaturdav when he re"h Honduras. Ha leaves Trinidad eould be placed in front of the ^M Vf,Ti T?^ M. for Belize on May 2flth and expects £,H^ h <^ to rcater advanta K e !" ^Canada by T-CA, Is Mr. tnrep ^ P-.oin^^'-'^'" :, I/..:!!.:;'„.' KK "-ill then be returning to T,,.,^* •i'-lmeibeing a keen >'""*""V torn Inmoaa. Mr. Drn k wm> „„ ^ lo -|lnost lun.teur radio enthusiast made Minlret was an inlransU passenger „ Ibc WPS1 ln dian islands thinks ^foapcast possible with the on the 'Lady Nelson which fa ml Barbados Is the l>est .if the of other amateurs, called here a lew day* ago on it* bunch. Lett and C. DeSilva. way South, and he was so im-' P ro *n*ainme was prepared by pressed with the surf bathing at s .\._ c -. Carmichael who also the Crane that he thought II would be nice to spend the last couple of days of his holiday enjoy Sir Stafford Say* Sir Stafford, in a written reply, said: E VERY Una a m* take* out Tne Ux n a cant packet -J of the Exchequer Sir Si.uIoiJ • %  __ _— -_ %  „,_• _. ,,.„.>. in indirect taxation. _„• ..„,,„, # nine jpi how Hta irfb, ik. o i n „ 0 1 ** lbou „ „„„. „?,£: 5tT?T. £3i £2*5.3 - !" •— —* %  movie, drinking a glass of beer, The .ax on llpsticKs a..d ia.e putting on a dab of powder, or tnr movies is ten cents making dps ruby red' The tax on r SI cent ticket for Sir Stafford was asked to work • toolbaU am thre "" It out in the llou"* of Commons. -; r ^ tax on .ipst.cks and fare From his figures, tf a couple ,-owdcr Is 100 per cent of wholespend a few dollars on every day ta \ c value luxuries, an amazingly Ltd portion of tt would go In taxaThe tax on a $4 65 bof.le of Oon whiskey is 13.45 CRYroOQCOTK—Here/a how to work It: AXVDLBAAXR M> LONGFELLOW One letter simply stands for another. In this example A is used for the three L's. X for the two O's. etc. Single letters, ape*. trophies, the length and formation of the words are all bints. Each day the code letters are iliffi-rent. A Cryptogram t*uotatloa JPFHDAED V D D K F A X CROSSWORD I J f \ 1 _r i' JO %  I > I i l> 1 i r ROXY THEATRE TO-SIOHT AT MS F.M. nsmsvuri mi %  •< < iiassnassai LORD ZIF^riELD -M.CMTY Si, %  !,.. LORD PRETENDER TR1N.DAD MfiXHr this a^ifltanc* The f? ve "je bands some tralnins n-fc 5J Grlm "' nd Mrs. t ^ "Jenins also helped ihem Lord Baldwin has jlven the Bands great assistance and incour•a Iha improvement In their musle. Kn. c. T Smith an social worker husaj l>ee:i active Not Cricket Thi Time! OT FOH cnckcl Uila lime", said Mi. Edgar Mgiadao, one month •> holiday "but For Two Weeks M ISS H FOWLER, who arrived from British Guiana via Tfimdad yesterday will be here (or two weeks and to staying al Cacrabank Were Here Three Months l|^|lt ANIJ MRS. GEOHCK MAKgUES. who have beei — ••.".mi wiirdir hjisaa lieen keenly interested and she did their Hl urt,vcd yesterday from Irim_ announclns;. dad accoinpaincu i-.v Ins wife and luiv fl(l th( p-fc( (nifv month, w Heirs Gate" under Capt "^ey are staying at the Paradise holiday returned to British Guiana fcugen* Weston wi the first band b ** ch clul > Mr Marsden Is ine Tuesday afternoon by UWIA r'>rmed In 1946 "Red Army" Trinidad representative on the Mr Maruues it Assistant Secrev ime „ ,orth ln ,847 and "Brute West Indian Cricket Board of tary of Messrs William Fogarty In 1048. Taking into eonControl, and a W.l Test .elector, in Ge.rgctown. Their slay here xideration — they all ntarted by "yingi on old truck wheels and discarded railway lines bits thM. it-. — *"."— %  i.way uneft \l\ii mSL .^f C r"* mar "hle proIVl W ho ha* been tiolidayn tuned sSil ? W f? y n "P**'' 1 1 / here staying with friends relurm ir f""'Sssrsu, *— £• J e,,or ,!". one bass flipper. SIrL^ M dT Um or 'aT 0 *'"'. one tenor growler', two tango drums. a,tCi,u y spent here._ spent at Hastings Hotel except Keen Cricketei over the Carnival which took them uuWAliU CAalPBEU* loTriiudad. Mr. and Mrs. Willie Hughes were at Seawell them off. DO on Tuesday by lie is a Civil servant and is in Uio Audit Department in B.G. Mr. Campbell is on four month-' one set of two Mari two Palletos. one set of *•"'*-* tne B.G.-iiarbaiio* .i With Venezuelan Government FTER spending one Wtssk (rt - .2 1.the Paradise Beach Club Mi. I" and Mrs John Enimanuvl reluiMMarried In Trinidad A R B R J. V ."! G yeeterdoy by tiR-Ket Tsjatl and 1* a memoer o( tne IM-merara Cricket Club !•> Ueorgelown. A keen 111 Kl U %  he is taking a keen Interest. (Ilk** most of us) in the West linnet. no tm-hej leu,,, (luw m rJiglaiul 13 Yeara ln Venezuela and Mrs. Thomas Walpote turned to Venezuela yeier.< pie wasrMr AiulievT"" K"glihi>il .mil lia.'h i living lanager^r the Cenlri I" Venezuela lor thirteen jc.us . wh^BLtlJIvJi'i.ktasR Mc, .Walpole is a t'.iiiaiuaii J ^^Jf "a They .pent their hollda.v al the d eum Engineer ParadijBeaeh C'luh. I, were married on Saturday .. TnjUctad. Mrs Davles Is the tormc Miss PcgtaSlamplli. daughter . %  ?. ,^ S, I ?• wh unI11 r"-illy was with ILL Jn South Trlnldl.d has returned to Barbados lo enle line, re Commerelnl life ot Brldselawn. !" .Sf 7 Who w "" lo Trinidad esiiecMW for tile wedding return•d on Sunday, and arriving yesti i day a fw hours ;,I|, *:„ marrretf couple wast M Christine. Manage Agency Lid nun. IHtrwleum _.......,. DTD MRS. JOHN T. WILThe Lucky One ( arrived from Venezuela A N INTERESTING visitor to via Trinidad b/ * %  liarbudo^ recently was Mr It WsXJCT and they hope to be Lewis Miles. He i'ri"-n!. ami hl ''^'^K ,bout two wv ** ts taying works lor Herbert Whitworth ?,', S; 3 £. adil Beach Clul Ml Limited. Cotton Manufacturers of Wilson, gnio originally tomes from Manchester, who aie expnrters of ll t S.tiT f c ^ OIe n, ., En l "ee, aj| Masses of Cotton. Rayon and psaatahs oil Co.. in Venezuela u/ollen piece goods. Oft To Tho U.S.A An Open Scholarship was offerTk*R~.l.N!> MRS. CLAKENCr; d to all England in connection ^ -'IttU 55 wno were recently with textiles, and one prise (or maeaiasl-eiere. left on Sundav by part of It) was a six months' free B.W.I.A.. intrunait for tho United trip to B.W.I Mr. Miles *., the States. They are returning to Mr. luctej one who won it and he has Inniss' home ln Oxnard. California, visited Jamaica, British Guiana. Also leaving on Sunday for the Trinidad and Barbados. U.S.. via Puerto Rico were Ml* Whilst In Barbados he was a Alice Perkins iind Mr. and Mr*, guest at "Cacrabank". He hits A. Hughes and infant, now left to return to England. New Air Hostess ,NE of U.W.I Airways' D*U ill hostesses is Miss Molly O'Uonnell, who left Barbados recently with her parents lo live in Trinidad. She made bat Slav flight recently to I-a Guana anJ on Tuesday afternoon she the B.G. tllghl to Barbados She told me that bag tamll] wan now comfortably settled ID lor twe Trinidad, her father howevei was mi Qsseti >nol VPry well. Transferred M R. MICHAEL MAN who arrived from B G. on Tuesday by B.W.I.A. has been imn*fcrml to the Barbados Branch ol Barclays Bank. He has been With Barclays for.eighteen months. His lincls Mr Albert Man was St the airport to meet him. To Niagara Falls M RS. CARMEN HELGRAVE and her daughter Peggy left for Venezuela yesterday by B.W.I A. Peggy has been going to school at the Ursuline O for some time now and thrc liinMlhs ago her mother IMIIM here on a visit. Peggy. Mrs Belgrave sai< would be leaving Venezuela ft Canada today, to continue ru education at Lorctta Academy i Ningnra Falls. Mi Belgrave is a Constructio Engineer In Venezuela. BY THE WAY I AM well aware that I have written to much nonsense about the new kinds of food that when I quote what other people write nobody believes me Taking the risk once more, 1 pass on the Information that a diet of whale meat need not be monotonous. Something called the Whale Meat Advisory Bureau has been busily inventing delicious dishes. And here are some of their discoveries, all made from rlnned whale meat (my Italics); sausage rolls, vol-au-vent, and plain and exotic main meal iccipes like cottage pie, savoury :teak pte, moussaka, and ravioli." Well. I will back against all those delicacies, any day. my own recipe'or exotic roost beef made (rom Bay of Be.-a^d octopus — or even egg pudding made from (.rocessed serge. Thv >i r-un i'.onlrowrty T HE Home Secretary is in be asked in the House: (I.) Whether it is conducive lo English prestige abroad to allow two Persians to play seesaw on a plank laid across the belly of a third in the vestibules of hotels which may be u'ed by foreign tourists. (II.) ln the event of such performances proving necessary for the earning of dollars, whether nn English team could not be substituted (111 ) Whether such performances are legal on Sundays, having regard to the wearing, by the Persian performers, of clothes which seem to bring these performances into the category of stage performances. w iw Ufa He said his mother lost her temper, and bit info a ti'rltltiedetk and broke a llghl bulb u-ifh By Beachcomber her fist. (News item.) M ATER red in tooth ai claw," commented a bystander. 0M Thing and Another I T IS suggested that hotelkeepers and landladies future take pet dogs as payim. guests. If so, why not cat parrots, canaries, apes, tortois* and horses, all of which Ml holidays? I foresee a great motion nt the reception desk when a thug of a cat lurches In and a*Kfor Ihe canary In No. 041; or whei a family horse wanders Into th room occupied by a nervou widow, and begins to eat her straw hat. And fancy waiting for tw lady tortoises to precede you into the lift. Talking of apes. I am very toM of Mr. Jack Hulbert's riddle What Is it that wears white spata and leaps from branch to branch'.' A bank director. MEN'S WHITE SHIRTS ARROW It AIM At III .\l •• HB1XOWX SaWfW .SHIHTS SUM BLUE. WHITE. TAN. ii.m ..4 4.69 ' v i KADIAC PIQUE DRESS SHIRT COI.1.A9 ATTACHED S.I. 1!) EVANS AND WHTTFIELDS %  •I.A.VTM lO.VH LTD. -distributors




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