Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
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SOUTHCOM rushes aid to Jamaica


by William H. Ormsbee
QUARRY HEIGHTS (US-
SOUTHCOM PAO) - U.S.
Southern Command began disaster
relief operations to Jamaica from
Panama Wednesday with the
shipment of about 40 tons of disaster
relief supplies throughout the day
following the devastation to that
Caribbean island caused by
Hurricane Gilbert Monday.
The first of four flights of supplies
departed Howard Air Force Base at
9:45 Wednesday morning by a U.S.
Air Force C-130 aircraft loaded with
27,467 pounds of rolls of plastic
sheeting and 10 chain saws. Also
onboard were Alejandro James from
the San Jose, Costa Rica-based
regional office of the Office of
Foreign Disaster Assistance under
the Department of State's Agency for
International Development and
Doctor Claude de Ville with the Pan


American Health Organization.
* A second C-130 aircraft with
16,320 pounds of cargo departed
Howard Air Force Base at 11:34 a.m.
with 18 300-gallon-capacity rubber
water tanks, also headed for
Kingston Airport in Jamaica. A third
C-130 with 17,600 pounds of cargo
departed Howard at 1:37 p.m.,
followed by a fourth C-130 which
departed at 3:32 p.m. with 17,500
pounds of supplies.
One or two C-130 flights were
expected to depart Howard
yesterday with one projected to leave
about noon, with more tents and
water containers.
Total shipments from the
Panama-based stockpiles are
expected to include 360 rolls of
plastic sheeting (to be used for
temporary shelter), 10 chain saws, 18
300-gallon rubber water tanks, 200
civilian-type tents, about 4,000 five-


gallon water jugs, and 9,600 cotton
blankets.


The assistance is being provided in
Continued on Page 24


y -


WARM WELCOME -Jamaican Prime MinisterEdwardSeaga greets U.S.
Air Force C-130 crew members whoflew the initially tons of relief supplies
into hurricane-ravaged Jamaica. (photo by SSgt. Matthew Gildow)


the Tropic Times


Vol. I, No. 33 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Sept.16, 1988


LikeHiroshima,


KINGSTON, Jamaica (UPI) -"It
looks like Hiroshima," said
Jamaican Prime Minister Edward
Seaga in describing Hurricane
Gilbert's ravaging of his island
nation.
The death toll has climbed to
nineteen, an estimated 750,000
people have been left homeless and
the damage amounts to "billions of
dollars," according to Seaga.


A dusk-to-dawn curfe
imposed in the nation
Kingston, because of lool
troops patrolling the stre
looters caught in the act.
A report from an
disaster relief team from
States said Gilbert de
heavily damaged the hon
800,000 Jamaicans - aboi
of the nation's population


AIRCRAFT DESTROYED - Smal planes in various stages of d
following Hurricane Gilbert. (photo by SSgt. Matthew Gilbert)

Gilbert heading toward


CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas (UPI)
- Hurricane Gilbert howled across
the Gulf of Mexico yesterday with
120-mph winds toward an
anticipated weekend assault on
Texas, and coastal communities
boarded up and fled en masse as the
"monster" storm approached.
Helicopters ferried 10,000 workers
from offshore oil rigs, schools closed
all along the Texas coast and
authorities urged the evacuation of
600,000 residents in advance of the
storm that claimed at least 20 lives
and caused billion-dollar damage in
a four-day rampage through the
Caribbean.
"If we get a direct hit, we're
looking at -a catastrophe," said
Richard Hawkins, director of
emergency management in Houston.
"I think the death toll is going to be
very, very high."
Blood banks issued pleas for
donors, and officials told residents
bent on riding out the storm to be
fingerprinted by police. "We want to
be able to identify their bodies later,"
said Judge John Damon in Surfside
50 miles south of Houston.


At 3 a.m. EDT, G
centered near latitude
longitude 90.8 west or
southeast of Brownsville,
moving west-northwest
The National Hurricane
Miami predicted the store
would turn more north
make landfall Friday nij
Saturday on the south 1
between Brownsville al
Christi if it takes that coi
A hurricane watch flem

Soldier,


'Jamaicanpremier says
:w has been Four transport planes flew from resort of Montego Bay reported
n's capital, the U.S. Howard Air Force Base in widespread damage, islandwide
ting. Armed Panama to Kingston with tents, power outages, some looting, and
ets shot two chain saws, plastic sheeting, 74,000 streets choked with debris.
gallons of water and cotton blankets. "I went through the 1951
11-member "It's the worst disaster in modern hurricane, Charlie ... and this is much
the United Jamaican history," said Earl Carl, worse than Hurricane Charlie," said
-stroyed or the deputy chief of the Jamaican Kingston operator Gordon Stewart.
ies of about Embassy in Washington, D.C. "All the trees are flattened and I
ut one-third Amateur radio operators in would say 70 percent of the smaller
n. Kingston and the northwestern houses are damaged."
Stewart reported "a lot" of looting,
and said police shot two men,
government officials initially
reported five unconfirmed deaths,
but other sources put the toll as high
- as 30 dead, he said.
I, In Montego Bay, Jamaica,
BI> Gilbert's 115-mph winds hurled
S*sunfish sailboats and their masts
S. "into the cars like spears" and streets
.-- in the city were "impassable" from
fallen trees and other debris, said
destruction litter the Montego Bay airport in Jamaica amateur operator Dave Porter.
Windows in the Wyndham Hotel
Scoas li shattered from the storm and floors
d T exas coasthIlie shookk for hours," said Porter of
Hope, N.J., who brought radio
equipment along on the trip. "It
'ilbert was entire 400-mile Texas coast from looks like a bomb went off in my
21.6 north, Brownsville to Port Arthur and room."
515 miles along the coast of northeast Mexico The building was jammed Tuesday
Texas, and north from Tampico. Forecasters with more than 300 residents and
at 15 mph. warned residents in that zone to "be guests seeking shelters, he said,
e Center in ready for quick action" today as adding, "everybody is safe, we have
m gradually Gilbert's path became more certain, no deaths or injuries."
thwest and Gilbert thundered into the gulf Widespread flooding and wind
ght or early Wednesday night after pounding the damage were reported in Jamaica,
Texas coast posh beach resorts of Mexico's where Gilbert peeled the roof off a
nd Corpus Yucatan Peninsula for nine hours, hospital, wrecked airport facilities
urse. The hurricane crashed ashore with and airplanes and knocked out
w along the Continued on Page 24 communications.

alone in cab, robbed downtown


by Bob Blocher
FT. CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)
- Everyone has been told to travel in
groups when downtown. It just
makes sense. A sergeant in U.S.
Army South recently took that
precaution - but he didn't take it far
enough.
Earlier this month, he was in a
downtown bar with his friends, who
decided to go someplace else. He was
getting tired, so he decided to go
home


He got a taxi and told the driver he
wanted to go to Ft. Clayton. A few
blocks down the street, the cab
stopped to pick up a Panamanian
national. "I've been in cabs before
where other people got in, or I got in
with someone else," he said. He
didn't think anything of it at the time.
The cab driver turned down a few
side streets. When the Panamanian
got out of the taxi, he yelled
something in Spanish to other
Panamanians who were waiting


there. They pulled the soldier from
the cab and mugged him. The cab
driver took off.
"At the height of it, there were
women and children pulling at me
-trying to get whatever I had. They
took my shoes, my socks, my cash,
my wallet and credit cards. I was left
with my pants and my underwear."
He then fled on foot and made his
way to Albrook Air Force Station,
where he contacted the Security
Continued on Page 24


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2 Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988


question of the week


What have you done


















"I'm taking two correspondence
courses, and I've also taken
advantage of College Level
Examination Program. I've read the
books, taken a test at the MOS
library, and received credits that
translate into promotion points."
Pvt. 2 Charles J. Camp
Company B, 154th Signal Battalion


lately to accumulate promotion points?


\


"I just took my SQT and improved
my score by eight percent. I've taken
three correspondence courses; 91C, a
medic's course; 84B, a photographer's
course and the precommission
course. I have completed two and
one-half years of college."
Spec. Carmine Nicely
Southern Command Network


ft;'I'.


"I've taken 71L administration
specialist correspondence courses
and college."
Spec. Annjanette Atkins
USARSO DESPER


"I'm taking correspondence courses
76P20, material control specialist."

Spec. Johnny E. Canada, HHC,
193rd Support Battalion


our readers say

1750 Faust Street
Englewood, FL.
34224

Editor,
Tropic Times.

I have a request. The people I know or knew in Panama are dwindling
down to a precious few, but I am continuing to persevere with trying to
establish a museum encompassing the Panama Canal or the Panama
Railroad or the Republic of Panama (insofar as it concerns the first two) or
all three.
My first efforts in this mission were as a committee member appointed
by the Panama Canal Society in Florida. This resulted in a ballot
published in the society's publication which reached about 4,500 members.
Of these, nine bothered to respond - most months later. After this debacle,
I withdrew from the committee member's position, determined to press
ahead on my own.
I still carry on, but I and a few friends have decided that the only way to
go is affiliating ourselves in some way with an already established museum
and preferably one here in the United States. And we have come to the
conclusion that if it is going to become a reality, our generation will have to
do it.
Our kids are too busy living, working, worrying about the kids'
education, food, clothing and all that sort of thing. They simply do not
have the time nor the money to devote to such a cause. The generation
behind them will be too late.
I have written to a lot of people. Some respond, some do not. In general,
I am seeking information about the thousands of pictures, in both official
and private collections, depicting everything from the French canal
through the first and second world wars through the Korean and Vietnam
conflicts.
In addition, I would also welcome some information about Peter
Golding, formerly in the British Embassy, and William Taylor, who, the
last I heard, was living out on the old road between Arraijan and Chorrera.

Sincerely,
A. M. (Kibby) Bouche
The Tropic Times welcomes letters from its readers, within the following
guidelines:
All letters must conclude with the name of the writer, his or her
signature, and a telephone number where that person may be reached
during normal duty hours. The use of a nom de plume is not permitted.
The editor of the Tropic Times reserves the right to edit or abridge letters
for the sake of brevity, grammar, etc.
Letters complaining about a specific person or agency of the U.S.
Department of Defense or its component departments will be referred to
that person or agency.


U.S. banking system experiences

major changes in check processing


COROZAL - The Expedited
Funds Availability Act passed by
Congress in 1987 will create major
changes in the U.S. banking system
when it goes into effect on Sept. 1.
The act regulates the length of time
banks and other institutions can hold
check deposits before the funds are
available for withdrawal. To meet the
new hold schedules, the Federal
Reserve Board has directed
procedural changes be made in the
way banks process checks drawn on
other financial institutions. The
regulations are aimed at
standardizing check endorsements
and expediting the return of unpaid
checks.
Under the regulations, banks will
be required to disclose their hold
policies to their clients. American
Express Bank Ltd., which in the
Pacific theater operates military
banking facilities in Panama, Korea
and the Philippines says that no
changes are required to its existing
policy. However, as required of
other U.S. banks, AEBL intends to
publish its policy.
Banks and other financial
institutions will now be instructing
their customers to limit their
endorsements on the reverse of the
check to within 11/2 inches of the
trailing edge. The trailing edge is the
lift side, when looking at the front of
the check. The remaining area on the
reverse of the check is reserved for
bank endorsements.
"Individual customers are unlikely
to be inconvenienced by the new
endorsement requirements when
cashing checks at the bank" states
Robert S. Thoms AEBL's District
Manager in Panama. "Our tellers
have been instructed to commence


explaining the new endorsement
requirements, as necessary, to
individual customers."
The new regulations will present a
problem for on-base organizations
who have traditionally used the
reverse of customer checks to notate
additional customer identification.
AEBL has already written to all of
their organizational clients advising
them of the new requirements.

AMEXpays Oct. 1

COROZAL (MBF) -- From
information being received, it is
evident that a certain amount of
confusion exists as to whether the
first payday in the new fiscal year will
be on Saturday, Oct. 1, or Monday,
Oct. 3, 1988.
Robert Thors, District Manager
of the American Express Military
Banks in Panama said that the
Corozal Bank will be open as usual
on Saturday, Oct. 1 from 9 a.m. 2
p.m. and all paychecks will be
honored whether dated October 1 or
3,1988.
Likewise, account holders with
direct deposit of their pay will be able
to draw funds at the bank, or use
their checks for purchases, etc, from
Oct. 1. This decision has been taken
in line with the bank's policy to
cooperate with and assist their
customers in every way possible.
Although the bank will remain
closed on Monday, Oct. 3,
accountholders with ATM cards can
of course use the 24 hour "Express
Tellers" located at Howard AFB and
Fort Davis where they can draw up
to $300 per day and make deposits as
required. For more information
contact Robert S. Thorns 227-4565.


Commander-in-Chief.............. Gen. Fred F. Woerner Assistant NCOIC ................ SFC Richard A. Czizik This authorized unofficial command information publication
Director, Public Affairs.......... Col. Ronald T. Sconyers Editorial Staff.................. SSgt. Laurie Scott-Keller is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas. The Tropic Times is
Executive Editor/NCOIC .......... SMSgt. Harold J. Lee Spec. Monique Chere published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information
Managing Editor ........................... Colin Hale PFC Todd Jacobucci Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of
Composing Room .................... Rosemary Chong the director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
T i* s Carolyn Coffey Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official view
S1 Sheila L. Hall of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the U.S.
th e C 1 Tm Southern Command. The address is: APO Miami, 34002,
Albrook Post Office. Telephone 285-6612.









Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988 3


Reservist develops oral history project


by SSgt. Joe Patton
Theater Support Element
USSOUTHCOM PA

QUARRY HEIGHTS - When
the U.S. Southern Command needed
someone to develop an oral history
project, it tapped a multi-talented
attorney and U.S. Army Reserve
from Cayey, Puerto Rico.
The telephone call from Col. Ed.
E. Wade, the Joint Reserve Forces
Office chief, caught Lt. Col. Miguel
A. Ortiz by surprise.
"If anyone had suggested before
that I would ever be taking
'depositions' for a military history
project, I would have replied 'not
likely,'" Ortiz said.


"But after learning what
of staff (Rear Adm. R.C. Us
in mind, I was hooked."
Ortiz was asked to de
project to preserve imp
surrounding military exerc
events in SOUTHCOM's tl
operations within the past y
could be of later historical
and value.
A diversified military and
background made Ortiz
candidate for the task. Ortiz,
practiced criminal law for I
has served as an infantry
finance officer, and a Regul
advisor to the National Guar
21 years of active and reserve
He took a degree in


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~4"�r4nr ut'5 fl I P... -


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Lt. CoL MiguelA. Ortiz (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Michael Vest)


the chief administration at the University of
tick) had Puerto Rico where he qualified for
the Olympics in the metric mile in
-velop a 1966 and was a Distinguished
ressions Military Graduate in ROTC in 1967.
ises and Ortiz, who completed Ranger
heater of training at Ft. Benning, Ga. with the
year that West Point graduation class, earned
interest a juris doctor degree from the
University of Puerto Rico in 1973,
Civilian partly through night classes he
an ideal started while on active duty.
who has "People are sometimes surprised
15 years, at the range of talent in the reserve
officer, forces inventory, but we seem blessed
ar Army with an abundance of it," Wade said.
d during "In this case, we were able to obtain
e service. the services of one whose military
business and civilian experience made him an
ideal choice to handle a project of
this scope."
Ortiz, no stranger to special tasks,
concedes the oral history project is by
far the most unusual and challenging
' yet.
The project has since been
" ~ expanded to identifying historically
"' significant documents for military
-' archives.
S"We found that a lot of valuable
Information was being lost through
reassignment of key players or
shredding of working documents
that needed to be preserved for
posterity," Ortiz said.
"Experience has already shown
that projects like this can put a
veritable treasure-trove of
information at the fingertips of
military analysts and researchers."
Core questions developed for
interviews touch on a multitude of
topics to include benefits of civic
action engineering, and medical'


exercises, strengths and weaknesses
in organizational structure and
personnel, recommendations for
better utilization of equipment and
manpower assets, and assessments of
external events that impact on
SOUTHCOM operations and
interests.
Among other things, the
interviews also seek opinions about
the extent and effect of the drug
problem on U.S. interests in the
region and thoughts about what role,
if any, the U.S. Armed Forces could
or should play in dealing with it.
But he also believes in the sage
warning that those who do not heed
the lessons of past history are
doomed to repeat its mistakes, one of
the reasons he agreed to take on the
project.
An agency which embraces that
philosophy, the Center for Army
Lessons Learned, has been put on the
distribution list for copies of the oral
interview transcripts.
"-It would be premature and
speculative to say that we expect any
startling revelations from a report to
come out of oral interviews and other
information we are assembling," he
said.
"But if it does nothing more than
to show better ways of doing business
or identify new and better ways of
utilizing our military assets, then the
several months that went into the
project will have been invested
wisely."
In the vernacular of Ortiz the
finance officer, a historical
perspective can mean the difference
in paying a price two, three or even
fifteen times.


'Traffic cop 'directs incoming reserve components


by Sgt. Michael Vest
Theater Support Element
SOUTHCOM PA

FT. CLAYTON - SFC Angel
Brito likens his job at the Joint
Reserve Forces Office, U.S.
Southern Command, to that of a
traffic cop in some respects.
Brito, a U.S. Army Reservist from
Santurce, Puerto Rico, serving a
third Active Guard and Reserve
(AGR) tour, was indeed a police
officer in civilian life - a detective.
As operations sergeant for reserve
component training, Brito helps to
identify realistic training
opportunities for U.S. Army Reserve
and National Guard units from the
United States deploying to
SOUTHCOM's theater of
operations for annual training -
anything from medical readiness
training exercises to civil engineering
projects.
He's also responsible for the
administrative tracking of a number
of individual reservists and
guardsmen on extended active duty
in SOUTHCOM and coordinates the
transportation for reserve
components, one reason for the
traffic cop analogy.
"When a reserve component
soldier comes into Panama, I'm often
the first person he meets. I frequently
meet the plane and take him through
in-processing, anything involved in
making his entry into the system
easier," Brito said.
"And, of course, I'm always ready
to give advice and help to straighten
out administrative problems
reservists and guardsmen may have."
Brito said that they usually find a


more realistic level of training in
SOUTHCOM due to the interaction
with active component personnel
and the hands-on approach to



\ .1


SFC AngelBrito (U.S. Army photo
by Sgt. Michael Vest)


training - next best thing to full-
time active duty, Brito added.
He notes that reserve component
personnel deployed to SOUTHCOM
for training also become more
knowledgable about their neighbors
in Central and South America and
leave with a better understanding
about the importance of being here.
"Both peoples benefit from
reservists and guardsmen training
here in SOUTHCOM. It's an
opportunity to learn from each other
and that makes ambassadors of
goodwill," said Maj. James Feely,
reserve component training division
chief.
"For example, humanitarian
assistance programs in our medical
readiness training exercises
contribute to the health and well-
being of the local people while
providing our people hands-on
training and a sense of genuine
accomplishment."
Because of the expanded role


being played by citizen-soldiers in the
military today, training exercises in
Central and South America are
invaluable, he emphasized. Feely
characterizes the training reservists
and guardsmen are getting here as
"real Army," exciting and satisfying.
Brito has witnessed changes in the
mission and appearance of the office
more or less paralleling the increased
emphasis on reserve forces in the
total army framework.
Three years ago, it occupied a
single room in a breezeway. One
room has given way to several nicely
done offices, courtesy of a group of
Individual Ready Reservists from
Puerto Rico who did the renovation.
It's a focal point of pride with Brito
who said that it was a thoroughly
professional job and one of many
examples of what reserve component
soldiers can do when their military
skills are matched up with the right
training opportunity.
He likes being a traffic cop.


ISC-South civilians receive service awards


COROZAL (USAISC) - Six
civilian employees of U.S. Army
Information Systems Command-
South received awards from Col.
Robert Van Steenburg III for their
superior service to the Army over the
past year.
In a ceremony held Aug. 23 at the
ISC South Headquarters, Raymond
L. Bennett received a 30-year Federal
Service certificate and gold lapel pin.
Bennett has been newly assigned to
the command in the Projects Branch.
He is responsible for monitoring
communications upgrade projects


for the Southern Command.
Luis Cantu received a 20-year
certificate and silver lapel pin for his
service to the Army. He also works in
the projects branch of USAISC-
South.
Ten-year certificate and bronze
lapelpins were earned by Humberto
Bethancourt and Raymundo
Richards. Bethancourt is assigned as
a maintenance worker. Richards is a
computer operator.
Mrs. Brenda McArthur received a
Sustained Superior Performance
Award for her work in ISC-South's


budget office. Mrs. Donna Morgan's
work as a computer assistant also
won her a Sustained Superior
Performance Award.


~j3C









Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988



Boats now authorized


by Bob Blocher
FT. CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)-
- You may now ship boats, boat
trailers, and boat motors during your
permanent change of station
according to Arthur W. Myke, chief,
movement branch, of the Transpor-
tationn Department here.
This new entitlement is offered only
to active-duty military, according to
Myke.
Effective Aug. 1, a change in the
Joint Federal Travel Regulations on
permanent duty travel now allows the
shipment of boats at government
expense. The boats weight counts
against your household goods limit
but beware, there are some additional
costs and responsibilities involved.
According to Myke, "There's going
to be an excess cost when you ship a
boat -- things like crating, packaging,
handling and so on. All additional
charges are payable by the
servicemembers." Myke stressed, "If
you should ship a boat, there will be an
additional cost payable by you."
Also. said Myke, depending on the
host country, there may be customs


restrictions, import, operations fees
and licenses, and parking fees. All the
arrangements for importing,
maintaining, and operating the boat
are your responsibility.
The U.S. Customs Division does
not yet have a set of guidelines to the
importation/operation restrictions of
the countries in the region. "This is a
new issue. There will be some hang-
ups," said Myke. "For now, we're
handling things on a case-by-case
basis." The U.S. Customs Division is
currently working with the countries
of the region to compile a list of
restrictions.
According to Myke, you should
contact U.S. Customs and the
Transportation Division before
purchasing a boat that you may want
to ship. Get the authority before you
buy.
For more information on
import/operations restrictions,
contact the U.S. Customs Division at
282-4204/3101. For more information
concerning the shipment of a
boat/trailer/motor, contact the
Transportation Division at 287-
6465/6759.


Gorgas announces vacancies

ANCON (MEDDAC) -- Gorgas
Army Community Hospital has
permanent, temporary and
intermittent vacancies for Practical
Nurse, NM-620-05. Applicants must
have a current LPN License to'
practice in the United States or '
Puerto Rico. "
The Civilian Personnel Office also /
is accepting applications from .'-- '
Registered Nurses in all speciality' ~ A
areas. Candidates must posses a e
current U.S. license as a professional
nurse in a State, District of
Columbia, the Commonwealth of '
Puerto Rico or a Territory of the
United States. 1
Interested persons may contact
Ms. Small or Ms. Montgomery at i
285-4160 or visit the Civilian :
Personnel Office, Building 560, , " '
Room 306, Corozal, Panama.


The Industrial Division's new portable structures shelter equipment and
personnel from the effects of weather. (Courtesy of Panama Canal
Commission)

PCC erects new structures


BALBOA HEIGHTS (PCC PAO)
- Prefabricated, portable structures
were recently erected at the Panama
Canal Commission Industrial
Division in Mount Hope to increase
quality, productivity and safety by
reducing the effects of weather.
Leased with an option to buy from
Sprung Instant Structures of
Calgary, Canada, the structures
consist of parallel aluminum frames
supporting a coated, reinforced
polyester fabric. Two miter gates can
easily be overhauled on the
synchrolift work table under these
translucent, waterproof and fire-
retardant structures, which also serve


to contain dust and grit during
abrasive blasting.
Under the direction of a Sprung
Instant Structures field engineer,
seven Industrial Division employees
put up the giant domes over a two-
week period using only simple tools.
The structures can be taken down
and re-erected in sections or all
together over other .work areas,
including the Industrial Division
drydock.
"They're among the best
improvements to the Industrial
Division since the synchrolift itself,"
says William Rankin, chief of the
Production and Planning Branch.


DEH cancels service request cards


FT. DAVIS (USARSO PAO) --
Atlantic DEH is cancelling the use of
the Service Request Cards which are
normally placed in quarters windows
when housing occupants require
maintenance or repair.
As of Aug. 8, occupants may call
the Service Order Desk at 289-


3279/3273.
The caller will be provided with a
service order number, which the
caller can use for follow-up if
maintenance is not completed within
21 days.
For more information call 289-
3116.


The Provost Marshal's Corner


Late one Friday night, three
young men slipped into the jungle
looking for a private place far
from the maddening crowd.
Satisfied that they were alone, the
three opened up their picnic
basket and settled down to some
serious partying. Instead of fried
chicken, they had in their hamper
two small bags of marijuana, a
bottle of Jim Beam and three cans
of Coke.
Before they could really get
started though, the ax fell in the
form of the Military Police, who
arrived and busted them. This is
probably the first time that ants
would have been more welcome at
a picnic than more guests.
A charge of assault with a
deadly snake was not filed against
two Panamanian men over at Ft.
Kobbe when it was determined
that the 12-foot snake they
repeatedly shoved in the face of an
MP was non-poisonous. The MP
had observed the pair acting
suspiciously near building 801 and
approached them.
One of the men dropped the bag
and pulled the loaded snake and
pointed it at the patrolman. After


being ordered to put the snake
away several times, the trespasser
did, but then forcefully resisted a
search for more concealed snakes.
The MP then arrested the two
men and a boa, took them to
building 131 and booked them on
charges of trespassing, resisting
apprehension,and assault before
being turned over to the PDF.
Presumably the evidence was not
retained.
Early one morning, a resident
of Cocoli awoke to find that
during the night his house had
been visited by suppliers for the
Midnight Auto Supply and Fence
Co. After unscrewing the security
light under the house, they not
only broke into his new Firebird
and storage area, but jacked up a
friend's car and stole three tires
and wheels.
The thieves did replace the
wheels with full cans of paint, but
the color was wrong and the
sergeant couldn't use it. The
public is advised to keep an eye on
a neighbor's security lights. When
they aren't on, report it to the
MPs.
A walking patrol in the 1100
area of Ft. Clayton attempted to


identify several suspicious
individuals one evening after
midnight. One of the group had a
dog without a leash which
foolishly began to threaten the
patrol dog. On orders from the
MP, the owner of the pugnacious
dog tried to to hold him back, but
without success.
The dog broke loose and
attacked the guard dog and the
MP tried to break them up. The
civilian dog got confused and bit
the MP and was then bitten by the
guard dog. The civilian dog was
taken to the vet clinic where he
was treated and released to his
owner.
His owner was taken to the
station where he was charged with
failure to obey a written
regulation, and failure to control a
pet. The MP was taken to Gorgas
Army Community Hospital
where he was treated and released.
The guard dog was released to his
kennel.
A midday fire at Ft. Clayton
caused an estimated $21,000
damage to a residence. The maid
lit candles as part of a personal
religious observance and left them
unattended. The candles ignited


some clothes and the flames
spread to the quarters. Quick
reaction by the fire department
limited the fire, but the damage
was still extensive. Six thousand
dollars of damage was done to the
family's personal property.
In spite of the number of
shoplifters arrested there's always
one more who thinks he can beat
the odds. This week's thief was
observed hiding two Zippo
lighters in his socks. Then he tried
to nonchalantly stroll out of the
Corozal main store. He didn't
even make it to the parking lot
before the long arm of the law fell
on his shoulders and tagged him
out of the game.
Finally today, another hit and
run with a happy ending.
Saturday morning at 1 a.m.
someone struck a car owned by a
civilian employee of MEDDAC
while it was parked next to
building 154 at Ft. Clayton. The
driver then took off leaving the
owner of the damaged car to
discover her loss. Two days later,
the MPSs found the culprit and
charged her with a hit and run and
then released her to her own
custody.


- -s I -- ---








Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988


MEDDA C exercise evaluates disaster response


-. -.
DISASTER - ShellyB. Prince, a registered nurse at GorgasA rmy Hospital,
performs first aid on mock casualty Spec. Terry A. Marks, Battery D, 324th
Field Artillery. (U.S. Army photo by Bob Blocher)


by F.L. Marquez

On Sept. 1 at 9:30 a.m., an earth
tremor registering 3.0 on the
Richter scale caused the
infrastructure of the main sections
of Gorgas Army Hospital to
shudder. Lights temporarily
blinked for several seconds. All
other systems within the hospital
remained operational.
At 9:35 and 9:37, two tremors
measuring 4.0 caused additional
damage.
At 9:45 a.m., an earthquake
that registered 6.5 on the Richter
scale hit Panama City and caused
the hospital's main building to
shudder severely. As a result there
was extensive damage to the
building and many were injured
-Memorandum for instruction of
Internal Disaster Exercise.

GORGAS ARMY HOSPITAL,
Ancon - This was the scenario for
U.S. Army Medical Department
Activity Mass Casualty Exercise.
"Our objective was to see if,
indeed, we could get patients through
the hospital, triaged adequately,
taken care of and transported out,"
said Col. Prentice Thompson Jr.,
Commander, USA MEDDAC.
Every six months, it is
MEDDAC's objective to evaluate
their response to such disasters. With
mock damage to the building and 25
mock casualties to be evacuated,


organizations including MEDEVAC,
Logistics Division, the Panama
Canal Commission Fire Department,
the Nursing Department and 214th
Medical Detachment, responded
Immediate casualties were moved
first. Down as many as seven flights
of stairs, litter-bearers simulated
carrying.the wounded to the hospital
lobby. There the injured were triaged
and prepared for movement by
nurses and immediately loaded onto
ambulances. The ambulances than
raced through the streets to the
Quarry Heights landing pad.
There, two real casualties were
brought in by a helicopter that
originally was to transport the mock
wounded to Building 519, Ft.
Clayton. The real casualties were
incorporated into the exercise and
were immediately transported by
ambulance to Gorgas. Shortly
thereafter, the exercise was ended.
"On balance, the exercise went
well," said Thompson. "Overall, I
think we met our objectives."
"An exercise like this is always a
learning experience, but we feel we
did our job and we did it well," said
Lt.Col.Robert L.Kornegay,chief of
plans, operations, training and
security at Gorgas Army Hospital.
"The health care professionals here
really do a good job of taking care of
patients. The one thing we learned
today, above all, is that the better you
communicate the more effective you
can be."


Ceremony honors helper of WW II airmen


MACDILL AFB, (AFNS) --
DuringWorld War II, a small group
of Belgians retaliated against
German oppression by aiding allied
airmen downed behind enemy lines.
The Order of Daedalians Suncoast
Flight 25 honored one of those
patriots, 83-year-old Anne
Brusselmans, during a recent
ceremony at MacDill.
From 1941 to 1944, Mrs.
Brusselmans provided food,
clothing, shelter and assistance to
more than 200 allied airmen while
living with her husband and two
children in Brussels, Belgium.
In addition, using the services of
like-minded patriots, she arranged
forged passports and other
documents to give safe passage to the
downed airmen.
Mrs. Brusselmans' story began in
1940 with the Nazi occupation of
Belgium. A Protestant clergyman
knew she had an English mother and
was familiar with the English
language.
The clergyman asked Mrs.
Brusselmans if she would translate


the British Broadcasting News
bulletins into French to be
distributed among patriots opposing
the Nazis. Belgian stations were
already controlled by the occupying


forces, and it was forbidden to listen
to allied programming. If caught,
listeners faced six months in prison.
Having agreed to help translate the
broadcasts, Mrs. Brusselmans was
w...


A WARD WINNER - SFC Jamie Robles, Company B, 3/7th Special
Forces Group, wonfirstplace in the "Creative Effects" category during the
recent USARSO Photo Contest with this entry.


A tlantic Space 'A' reinstated


by Doyle C. Carr

FT. DAVIS (USARSO PAO) -- Sign
up for Space A travel has been
reinstated for 180 days in the Atlantic
Community.
Beginning Sept. 6, Atlantic
residents can go to the Adjutant
General Office, Building 232, second
floor, Ft. Davis and sign up for Space
A travel, instead of going to the
Pacific side of the Isthmus.
Hours of operation for Space A
travel are Monday through Friday
from 8 a.m. until 4;30 p.m. All
Department of Defense (DOD)
members, military personnel and
their family members are eligible.
Active duty personnel must be in a


leave status when signing up for
Space A and have their leave forms
with them.
Other documentation to have
when signing up for Space A are
military and bilingual identification,
passports, resident alien card (if not a
U.S. citizen) passports and visa
packets.
Children need not be present when
signing up for Space A, but sponsors
must bring their documentation and
IDs. Both parents, however, need to
sign up in person.
An instructional letter on Space A
travel will be forthcoming from the
Atlantic AG Office.
For more information on Space A
travel call 289-3181.


then recruited to provide civilian
clothes and food coupons to aid
British soldiers stranded behind
enemy lines when Belgium
surrendered. At that time, there were
no "escape lines" functioning in
Belgium.
By mid-1941, the Royal Air Force
had started raids over enemy
occupied territories. Knowing Mrs.
Brusselmans willingness to be
involved, church members asked her
to harbor downed airmen until an
escape line could be started. In 1942,
the United States joined the British in
the air raids, and American flyers
became part of the growing group
which also included Irish, Canadian,
New Zealand, Australian and Polish
pilots.
The pilots were guided around the
streets of Brussels and were provided


clothing and identification papers.
Most importantly, they were
screened to avoid double agents from
infiltrating the escape system that
took flyers from Brussels, via Paris,
through the Pyrenees Mountains to
Madrid and Gibraltar.
By undertaking the dangerous
underground tasks, Mrs. Brussel-
mans and her family placed
themselves under the constant threat
of discovery by Gestapo agents and
local spies. Discovery would have
surely meant execution.
By April, 1944, the allies were
preparing for their Normandy
invasion by bombing railway
junctions that aided Nazi movement.
The raids also crippled prime escape
routes. An underground leader
decided therisksweregetting toogreat
and the men would have to stay
where they were or move into forest
camps.
Mrs. Brusselmans had 54 airmen
under her "control" in several houses
where she kept them hidden until tne
country's liberation, Sept. 3, 1944.
On that day, Mrs. Brusselmans
proudly brought the 54 flyers, mostly
Americans, to the British intelligence
unit at the Metropole Hotel in
Brussels.
Mrs. Brusselmans has also been
awarded several other decorations
for her heroic actions. These include
the Knight of the Order of Leopold
II, Croix de Guerre and Medal of
Voluntary Combatant .from
Belgium; Medal of Resistance from
Polan; Order of the British Empire;
and the Medal of Freedom from the
United States.
A diary Mrs. Brusselmans kept
during the war years was translated
in 1954 and published by Benn
Publishing of London under the title
"Rendez-vous 127," the Brusselmans
street number at that time. (Courtesy
of the Thunderbolt newspaper).









6 Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988


Regulation
by Spec. William P. Bradner
FT. BRAGG, N.C. - Special
Forces Group commanders will soon
have the authority to test and award
their soldiers with the Expert
Infantryman's Badge (EIB) thanks to
a recent change to Army Regulation
672-1, Authorization and Wear of
Military Awards.
This change comes almost one
year after DA Circular 350-87-XX,
The Expert Infantryman Badge Test,
was drafted and approved by the
U.S. Army Infantry School, granting
unit commanders the same
authority.


change gives new Ell


The EIB is an individual award for
excellence given to soldiers in
combat military occupational
specialties. The soldiers participate
in a gruelling and comprehensive
"hands-on" test. It covers a broad
spectrum of critical infantry skills.
In the past, Special Forces soldiers
have had to train and test with other
infantry units in order to win the
EIB. The change to AR 672-1 makes
this unnecessary.
"The Special Forces soldiers in 1st
Special Operations Command
(Abn.) have been testing for the EIB
to Special Forces soldiers for quite


some time," according to Maj.
Roderick M. Pinkney, chief of
DCSOPS Training Branch for 1st
SOCOM.
Pinkney explained that the 1st
SOCOM soldiers on Ft. Bragg were
attached to the 82nd Airborne
Division for two weeks for training
and testing, since 1st SOCOM
"didn't have the manpower,
equipment, or testing facilities."
In a letter to the commanders of all
Special Forces Groups, the Deputy
Commanding General of 1st
SOCOM, Brig. Gen. Sidney-
Shachnow, acknowledged that this


571st MPs assume Amador duties I


by Capt. Nancy Bates


FT. CLAYTON - The 571st
Military Police Company (STRAF)
from Ft. Ord, Calif., has transitioned
from performing combat support
type missions in Honduras to law
enforcement duty at Ft. Amador.
The 571st is under operational
control of the 759th Military Police
Battalion from Ft. Carson, Colo.
The 759th falls under the 89th
Military Police Brigade from Ft.
Hood.
The 571st is certainly accustomed
to a rapid changing environment. In
March, the 571st returned from
Honduras, where they spent 3 1/2
months performing combat support
type missions such as air-base
ground defense convoy escort, and
area security as part of Joint Task
Force Bravo. Within weeks of
returning to Ft. Ord, the 571st was


back in Central America, this time as
part of the Joint Task Force Panama
Security Augmentation mission.

Ft. Amador is an unusual area to
secure. As a joint area of
Panamanian/U.S. Control, the
soldiers of the 571st often work in
joint patrols with the Panamanian
Defense Forces, manning the main
gate and entrance to the Naval
housing area.

Ft. Amador is also the
headquarters for the U.S. Naval
Forces Southern Command and the
residence for several senior ranking
officers, to include the U.S. Army
South commander.

Duty for the soldiers is somewhat
repetitious, but the 571st
accomplishes their law enforcement
with dedication and pride, knowing
the sunny skies of California will
eventually greet them.


Telephone system gives voter
WASHINGTON (AFNS) - campaign to increase awareness
Military people and their families about national and state elections.
now have access to voter information In a survey conducted after the
on candidates for president, vice 1984 general election, 20.8 percent of
president, U.S. Senate and state military respondents said they did
governor through a worldwide not vote because they were not
telephone system. familiar with candidates and issues,
The voting information center, or they had no candidate preference.
organized by the Defense The system was developed in an
Department, Noncommissioned effort to serve this need.
Officers Association, Anheuser- The telephone system is available
Busch Corp., and the Democratic free throughout the worldwide
and Republican National Autovon network. The touch-tone
Committees, will provide recorded number is 285-4333, rotary number is
messages from candidates. 221-6100.
The telephone system is part of a People may also call from private


Cpl Kevin J. Kelly conducts a radio
check. (U.S. Army photo by Capt.
Nancy E. Bates)


information
phones, paying long distance charges
if necessary, by dialing rotary (703)
325-6100, and touch tone (202)
504-4323.
For more information on
candidates and issues not covered on
the recorded messages, callers can
leave their names, addresses and
telephone numbers. Requests will be
answered by mail.
If Autovon telephone service is not
available, requests for information
may be made by writing to: Defense
Department Voting Information
Center, 225 N. Washington St.,
Alexandria, Va. 22314.


? authority
has been happening, and encouraged
those units "which have coordinated
with other units to trying and test for
EIB to maintain those relationships."
"Most Special Forces soldiers
have been testing for teh EIB since
it's conception," according to one
source in the John F. Kennedy
Special Warfare Center and School,
"and many of them have worn the
badge even without authorization of
AR 672-1."
"The Operational Groups have
usually made agreements with
neighboring or local infant units,"
according to MSgt. Michael R.
O'Neil, Unit Training NCO for the
Special Warfare Center and School,
"and have provided their soldiers
with the means to test for the EIB
since 1983."
With the recent changes, all
Special Forces soldiers are eligible to
test for AND wear the EIB without
breaking or bending any regulations,
with the exception of Special Forces
Medics. Medics will test for the
Expert Medical Badge.
Authorization to test and award
the EIB is also granted to
commanders of forward deployed
Special Forces Battalions.

Quito's churches
Continuedfrom Page 7
everyone with a role in church
restoration.
Ecuador is the second poorest
country in South America, and the
quake damaged its oil pipeline,
eating into a key revenue source.
Jaramillo said in an interview'that
his group needed at least $6 million
to restore the Quito churches. The
government granted only $40,000.
The Organization of American
States (OAS) had approved $30,000
for restoration and the United
Nations was expected to approve
$130,000 but these sums were
nowhere near those required to
repair the damaged buildings, he
added.
The Roman Catholic church in
Ecuador, also strapped for money,
has few resources for church repairs,
said Padre Angel Aguirre, who runs
San Agustin, a 17th century church
that was badly damaged.
"We (the church) have nothing,"
he said.
What repairs that are being
undertaken are financed by the
patrimony institute, the clergy and a
'local beer firm.


Ask the DEH


Housing is trying to equalize the waiting lists


Q. I have been waiting since
April to get my family to Panama
but since I don't have on post
quarters yet, they are still waiting.
When I checked with Housing,
they said I might have to wait until
next spring before my family
could join me.
A friend of mine got here last
month and got quarters
immediately.We are both the same
rank but he has two kids and I
only have one. Can you do
something to make the time we are
away from our families more
equal. Signed: A frustrated
sergeant, Mech Loop, Clayton.
A. As a matter of fact, we are
doing something. To balance out
the waiting lists is no small chore


and the command recently blessed
a plan to do just that.
The longest waiting lists are the
field grade three-bedroom,
company grade two-bedroom and
junior enlisted two-bedroom lists.
The shortest lists are the company
grade three-bedroom, junior
enlisted three and junior enlisted
three-bedroom lists.
We have, therefore, reallocated
housing from those categories
with the shortest waiting time to
those categories with the longest
waiting times. This will help
balance out the waiting time.
Additionally, Housing Division
is attempting to alleviate the
junior enlisted two-bedroom list
by allowing those with two


children, one child and one on-
the-way to move to larger three
bedroom quarters. Last weeks'
column provided details, so check
it for more information.
In an attempt to maintain as
much rank integrity in
neighborhoods as possible,
selectedfamilies are being moved
at government expense from one
neighborhood to another. Only
those families volunteering to
participate will be moved.
Families will not be moved
against their wishes.
Some families at Amador are
being moved to Clayton as more
field grade three-bedroom
requirements move to Amador. A
similar program will follow which
affects the 600 area of Corozal.


Rest assured that Housing
Division is trying minimize the
inconveniences of all concerned.
Finally, there is yet another
program. Because there are
currently excess family quarters in
the Atlantic community, they are
being made available on a
temporary basis to those on the
waiting lists who have the longest
times to wait for their families to
join them.
This is being handled on a first
come, first served basis until the
quarters in the Atlantic
community are filled.
Questions about any of the
aforementioned programs should
be directed to Mr. Cotto-Perez or
MSgt. Pierre at 287-3956/4564.


I ~rer~s~esa~l~ks







Tropic Times
Sept. 16, i 988 7


hemisphere



General strike ruins Peronista image


BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA In private, Menem's aides have
(UPI) - It took just a few hours of long expressed concern about the
violence during a general strike to "fear factor" in the election, a feeling
pour down the drain years of effort in a large part of the electorate that a
by Argentina's Peronist Party to Menem administration would result
refurbish its image as a mainstream, in social and political chaos.
respectable political institution. In the original labor rally and
The big loser in Friday's violence, strike Friday, the labor confederation
which led to a new general strike demanded higher wages and a
Monday called by Peronist- moratorium on foreign debt
controlled unions, is likely to be the payments, moves that would be
party's candidate for president in bound to further complicate talks
next May's election, Carlos Menem.
Until now he seemed to have an Stroessner not ill
insurmountable lead, but his
campaign had not been touched by ASUNCION, Paraguay (UPI)
violence. - A government spokesman has
The revival of the impression that said that President Alfredo
the party of the late strongman Juan Stroessner is in good health and
Peron employs strongarm methods will resume making ceremonial
to attain its ends sent a chill through appearances this week.
the Argentine electorate.
The first evidence was the failure Stroessner, 76, dropped out of
of Monday's general strike called to sight on Aug. 31 and has not been
protest the violent clashes last Friday seen in public since.
between police and rioters after Diplomats and other reliable
demonstrators at a labor rally began sources said the president,
to systematically break shop Paraguay's undisputed ruler since
windows and loot stores. 1954, underwent prostate gland
Tired of 13 general strikes called surgery and was under post-
by the Peronist unions over five operative care.
years, Argentines Monday voted The sources said there were
with their feet. Most people went to some post-operative complications
work. that have since been overcome.
For the first time, a handful of "The president is in perfect
Peronist political and labor leaders health and doesn't have any
openly broke with the unions and problems,"presidentialspokesman
opposed the stike aimed at the police.


Pre-Inca grave in Peru


between Argentina and the
International Monetary Fund that
are already stalled over the country's
foreign debt arrears of more than $1
billion.
Menem, the charismatic governor
of La Rioja Province, was apparently
warned that violent incidents could
take place and stayed away. But his
association with the old guard
Peronist union leaders is likely to
hurt his chances against the


candidate of President Raul
Alfonsin's Radical Civic Union
Party, Cordoba Province Governor
Eduardo Angeloz. Alfonsin is
prohibited from running for a second
term.
Menem, in his primary election
campaign against rival Peronist
Antonio Cafiero, skillfully cultivated
the labor bosses, known in Argentina
as "La Patota Sindical," literally
meaning the "Union Gangsters."
The union chieftains are Peronist
demagogues who travel with a large
retinue of bodyguards and get
elected to union positions on a
single slate of candidates helped by
musclemen.
Their frequent use of intimidation
and past record of violence dog
Peronist politicians, who for years
have been trying to present an image
of moderation to the public.
Analysts agree that a major factor
in the Alfonsin 1983 election victory
was a single televised incident; the
Peronist candidate for the
governorship of Buenos Aires
Province, Herminio Iglesias,
publicly burned a flag of Alfonsin's
party at a mass rally of one million
people.
That stirred memories of the
violence with which the Peronists
have been associated since Peron
persecuted his political opponents
after he rode to power on a populist
surge in 1946.


richest in hemisphere


WASHINGTON (UPI) - A at the University of California, Los ordered that spot excavated, tomb. Thirty items went on display in
Peruvian tomb that evaded looters Angeles, said. That order led to a dramatic Washington today, and the bulk of
for 1,500 years has yielded the richest Donnan was part of the team, discovery - a masoleum containing the collection is now being examined,
archeological find in the western funded by the National Geographic the body of a richly-clad Moche lord, restored and catalogued in Peru.
hemisphere - a trove of gold and Society under the direction of the as well as those of two other men, two Donnan said the Moche tomb's
jewels that rivals the treasures of Peruvian government, that women and a dog believed to have treasure surpasses that of two
ancient Greece, it was announced excavated the lavish burial mound been part of the royal entourage, previous contenders for the richest
Tuesday. near Sipan on the north coast of The Moche preceded the Inca archeological site in the Americas:
A 20foot-wide, solid gold Peru. culture by hundreds of years, the jade-laden tomb of Pacal at
headdress, a warrior's golden Archeologists were alerted to the dominating the northern coast of Palenque, Mexico, and a gold-rich
backflap weighing almost 2 pounds tomb's existence after an adjoining Peru from about A.D. 100-800 and excavation at Monte Alban, Mexico.
and a string of gold bells showing a grave was looted and a large quantity producing superb jewelry from The Moche treasure is even
god lopping off human heads are just of finely-wrought gold jewelry locally mined gold and from shells impressive by worldwide standards,
a fraction of the riches found in the flooded the black market for stolen, and stone imported from as far north Donnan said, noting that it
grave of a warrior-priest of the ancient treasures. as Ecuador and as far south as Chile. "compares very favorably" with the
Moche culture. In April 1987, Walter Alva, "This jewelry is just unsurpassed in magnificent gold jewelry unearthed
"The real richness is in director of the Bruning Archaeologi- the exquisite craftmanship and from tombs near the ancient city of
information it contains. But in cal Museum in Lambayeque, Peru, technical virtuosity of the artisans Mycenae in Greece.
material terms, just in terms of gold sent a team of archeologists to the who created it," said Donnan, noting But the anthropologist conceded
objects and jewelry, this tomb looted tomb to salvage what artifacts that some of the mosaic inlay, bead- that event he splendor of the
contains the greatest quantity as well the robbers had left behind and to and goldwork is so minute it would Peruvian site pales in comparison to
as the quality of gold jewelry taht clean up the site. almost take a magnifying glass to the copious rides found in the tomb
we've ever seen come from an A few months into the efforts, the fashion the design. of the famed Egyptian king
archeologically excavated tomb int archeologist noticed a depression Archeologists would 'not give a Tutankhamen. "I don't think
he Americas," said Christopher that appeared to have been filled in dollar estimate for the cache of gold anything can compare with that,"
Donnan, an anthropology professor with earth in ancient times and and jewels found at the Peruvian Donnan said.

Quito's magnificent churches in danger of collapse


QUITO (REUTERS) - Magnifi-
cent colonial churches in the
Ecuadoran capital damaged in a
severe earthquake last year are
neglected, decaying and in danger of
collapse.
Architects, restoration experts and
churches.have had scant restoration
work performed since emergency
patch-up operations right after the
March 1987 earthquake, which hit
hardest a remote area around 60
miles northeast of Quito and killed
more thari 1,000 people.
Built by Spanish settlers and
adorned with gold, paintings and
murals by Spanish and Indian artists
depicting early Christian miracles,
the churches are now wrapped with


scaffolding. Wide fissures threaten
walls and arches.
Church officials and restoration
experts fear the churches could
collapse altogether in another
tremor.
Janet Silva, an architect working
on church restoration, said many
churches were already weakened by
centuries of wind, rain and previous
earthquakes.
Jose Maria Jaramillo, director of
the state-run National Institute of
Cultural Patrimony, said most of the
40 to 50 buildings damaged in Quito
were churches. The northeastern city
of Ibarra, including Basilica de la
Dolorosa, also suffered quake
damage.


Worst hit in Quito were the
Convent of Santo Domingo and the
Church of San Agustin run by
Aguirre, and Convent de la Merced,
a famous old church not far from
Quito's Plaza Independencia.
The Convent de la Merced houses
one of the largest church bells on the
continent, a gold, silver, zinc and
bronze instrument measuring about
16 feet across and seven feet high.
Sharing the bell-tower is one of the
oldest clocks, made in London and
installed in the 19th century.
Father Octavio Proano, the padre
at la Merced and the author of
several books on Quito church
architecture, said no one has rung the
bell since the quake damaged the


tower and showered stones on the
bell.
The clock, which carries the
inscription Handle and Moore,
Clerkenwell, 1817, was wrecked by
falling walls during the quake.
For over 40 years, one Ecuadoran
man, named Seferino Congo, had
maintained the clock, scaling the 57-
meter tower twice a day. When he
died in 1965, no one willing to make
the scary ascent was found, and the
clock stopped.
"Of course we could restore the
clock," said Proano. "But that would
cost a lot of money that we don't
have."
His plaint is repeated by nearly
Continued on Page 6


spokesman says
Juan Jose Benitez Rickmann told
United Press International.
Repeating the official version of
Stroessner's disappearance,
Benitez Rickmann said the
president was given a medical
checkup because of a trip to
Taiwan planned for October and
"his state of health is satisfactory."
He denied there had been an
operation and said Stroessner will
resume making public appearances
this week.
Stroessner, Latin America's last
old-fashioned, anti-Communist
caudillo and one of the world's
longest-reigning heads of state,
came to power in 1954 after a
military coup as the eighth
president in seven years in the
landlocked South American
country of 4 million people.


r4
i



r









8 Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988

commentary



Reserve forces get help with job conflicts


HOWARD AFB (USAFSO
PAO) - Who does one of 243,298
Air National Guardsmen and Air
Force Reservists turn to when having
a problem getting time off from a
civilian job to train?
The first attempt to resolve the
problem should be made at the
employer-employee level, according
to Col. Charles R. Price, staff
director of the National Committee
for Employer Support of the Guard
and Reserve.
"Often, a calm, objective face-to-
face discussion can reveal solutions
through give-and-take interaction,"
Price explained. If that process fails,
he said, the reservists should contact
the unit commander.
"Commanders have a vested
interest in the problem and may be
able to explain the situation or
suggest compromises that will satisfy
everyone's needs," he said.
In addition to the national staff,
there are 55 states and territorial
committees for employer support
that stand ready to assist.
Price said that most state
committee members are local
business leaders who understand
both sides of the problem and can
help mediate, usually through face-
to-face discussion.

Heroes dare


to be leaders
by Patrick A. Toner,
Chaplain (Capt.), USAF

HOWARD AFB (USAFSO
PAO) - "I sing of the arms and the
men..." begins Virgil's Aeneid. His
was not the first nor the last attempt
to honor our heroes.
I have often wondered why we wait
until someone dies before we honor
him. We need to give our children
living heroes. They don't have to be
bigger than life, just filled with life.
In the musical "Goodbye Mr.
Chips," the hero sings a song that
says what I hope to say: "In the
morning of my life I looked to the
sunrise, in the morning of my life
when my world was new, and these
three questions I must answer; was I
brave and strong and true, did I fill
the world with love my whole life
through?"
These four qualities define what it
takes to be a hero. Heroes are brave
because they accept challenges and
dare to be leaders.
Heroes are true because they are
men and women of character and
principle. And above all else, they
must strive to fill the world with love.
This life of service sets them apart
from others and earns them
recongition as heroes.
The heroes we need are men and
women of character who fill the
world with love. I have a long list of
candidates; many I know personally
and many more I know by
reputation. Heroes come from the
ranks of commanders, NCOs,
mechanics, cooks, plumbers,
parents, neighbors, and friends.
Take time this week to honor a
real-life hero by letting them know
they have made a difference in your
life. Heroes come in all sizes, shapes
and ages.
A little encouragement on our part
can go a long way toward filling our
world with heroes. When you meet a
hero, sing his or her praises.


State committees may be
contacted through commanders,
state adjutants general or by calling
the national committee's toll-free
number: 1-800-336-4590. From
Guam, reservists should call collect
202-653-0841.
Price said if local efforts fail, a
phone call or letter to the national
committee will bring help from a
qualified ombudsman.


"The ombudsman service is
informal, and the objective is to
smooth out misunderstandings,
disagreements and difficulties to the
satisfaction of all," Price
emphasized.
Although the national and state
committees and the ombudsman
have no authority to enforce
statutory provisions of Title 38 of the
U.S. Code, they may refer people to


RETREAT CEREMONY - A joint service retreat ceremony to mark
PO W/MIA Recognition Day will be held at HowardAFB today at 5p.m.
Participating in the ceremony will be units from the U.S. Air Force
Southern A ir Division, U.S. A rmy South and U.S. NavalForces Southern
Command/U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal. (photo by MSgt. Herb
Cintron, Det. 5, 1361th A VS)


NCO works to register voters
by Sgt. Joseph A. Figueroa squadron members, but the entire
6933rd Electornic Security country.
Squadron At last count, Cook had registered
HOWARD AFB, (USAFSO/PA)-- more than 1,400 people.
Commitment is one thing most "Historically, military participa-
people don't carry out to the fullest, tion has been very poor. I want to
They say they will commit to dieting, change that," he explained. "There
exercising, studying more for are more than 15,000 voters in this
promotion exams, and yes, even country, and we can use our clout to
voting for the people who they feel bring about changes we feel are
will lead the United States. Often, needed."
when it comes to the commitment of With so many people in Panama
voting, people back away. not registered, Cook decided the best
There is a man who is carrying out way to get his point of voting across
the true word, "commitment." He is was to go on the offensive. He
TSgt. Anthony Cook of the 6933rd attacked the apathy by actively and
Electronic Security Squadron. aggressively seeking out voters and
Cook has committed himself to encouraging them to register.
registering every U.S. voter in the Cook sets up a voter registration
Republic of Panama. booth from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
"I feel that military members Saturdays. to give citizens the right
should have a say in what direction to vote. For the remainder of this
the U.S. is going," he said. As an month he will be in front of the
extra duty, he is the voting officer for Howard Post Office.
the 6933rd ESS, but he is serious "All you need to bring is a valid
about his commitment. Thus. he has identification card: I will help you
extended the arena from not only his \with the rest," he concluded.


the Department of Labor or the
Office of Personnel Management.
The colonel offered some advice to
help promote positive employer
support:
-Let employers know as far in
advance as possible of training dates.
-At least once a year thank the
employer and supervisor for their
cooperation.
-If possible, use tasks learned
during military training on the
civilian job.
-Iron out problems personally.
Price said employer support is a
two-way street. Employers should
support civilian-military employees,
but Guardsmen and Reservists must
cooperate as much as possible with
employers.

Volunteers help

in contributing

to manyprograms
by Capt. Johnnie D. Ainsley
28th Air Division Public Affairs
Tinker AFB, Okla.
HOWARD AFB (USAFSO/PA)
They carry no 'rank on their
shoulders, but their commitment to
serve our country is just as strong.
They contribute to the nation's
freedom by staying behind when
their uniformed spouses go to war.
Their commitment transcends
personal gain and selfish interest.
By practicing patriotism, loyalty
and fidelity on the home front, their
aspirations parallel the three most
powerful words in the English
language - duty, honor and country.
They are selfless managers and
capable planners, and are skilled in
the art of instilling love and devotion
in our children.
They help sustain us in good times
and bad, nourishing and ensuring
our future. They are the cornerstones
of our war-fighting capability,
contributing immeasurably to the
Air Force mission: "They," if you
haven't guessed already, are Air
Force spouses.
Air Force spouses volunteer for
such organizations as family support
centers, family services, American
Red Cross, the chapel and various
youth programs. They answer
phones, lend clerical assistance, serve
on committees, help with workshops
and coach sporting events.
They provide child care to military
families, help newly-assigned
families get settled and lend a
sympathetic shoulder in times of
grief. They span all age groups and
education levels, and they all have
one thing in common - they want to
help.
Recognizing some of the hardships
that spouses face, President Reagan
recently said, "Spouses serve as
volunteers in their communities and
as goodwill ambassadors abroad.
Not a few are called upon to make
personal sacrifices, defer careers,
forego familiar surroundings and
endure long periods of separation for
the defense of freedom. Truly, they
are our unsung heroes."


173 ji








Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988


leisure


Zodiac Rec sponsors


trip to Portobelo


by Karen Boyd
Volunteer Writer


HOWARD AFB (USAFSO
PAO) - For those people who love
history and going to the beach, the
Zodiac Recreation Center has a tour
of Portobelo, Panama, that will
fulfill those needs.
While on the tour, people can
rediscover the port Columbus
proclaimed as Puerto Bello, meaning
"Beautiful Harbor." The name was
later changed to its present spelling
of Portobelo.
The first stop on the tour is the
harbor in Portobelo. The town is
small and very quiet. It is hard to
believe it was once a very important
commercial and defense spot for the
Spanish.
Early in its history, Portobelo was
an important link in trade between
Peru and Spain. Once a year, a
convoy of ships loaded with goods
and treasures would sail from
Portobelo to Spain.
During this time of the year, the


town held a festival known as "The
Fair." The streets were lined with
gold and silver awaiting transport to
Spain.
In the boom years of Portobelo,
"The Fair" lasted 40 days. However,
as the years passed, the festivities
were cut back to two weeks and now
is is not held at all. Because of the
festivities, the town became a target
for thieves and pirates.
In 1740, it lost its leading role in
trade because of the increasing
number of ships rounding Cape
Horn.
The last stop on the tour is
Langosta Beach. Here, snorkling,
swimming, shelling or getting a tan
can be relaxing. Bohios can be rented
for a small fee complete with
electrical outlets.
The only thing people need to
bring is a packed lunch and a small
amount of money to enjoy this
relaxing day with the Zodiac
Recreation Center's tour of
Portobelo.
For information about this tour
and other tours call 284-6109/6161.


'New Jazz' in concert
"New Jazz," appearing in concert Oct. 7 at 8 p.m. at the Balboa Theater,
promises to entertain its audience with the sounds of Eduardo Irving on
soprano sax; Ernesto Crouch, drums; Alvaro Maturel, bass and Ricardo
Velazquez on electric and accoustic piano. "New Jazz" has appeared locally
in Las Malvinas Cafe," "Paradise Pub" and now in concert at the Balboa
Theater. Tickets are on sale at the YMCA in Balboa, Las Malvinas Cafe,
Paradise Pub and the Argosy Book Store. (Photo courtesy New Jazz)



Atlantic, Pacific plan


Hispanic Week activities


Fish fry
HOWARD AFB, Panama (1978th CG/PA) -- MSgt. Bobby Boyd, left, hands
a plate of fried fish, fries,coleslaw and bread to MSgt. John Forister during the
1978th Communications Group'sfish fry outing late last month. The afternoon
off was a thanksfrom the unit's CG Commander, Lt. Col. CarlA. MclntirellI,
for a month's fine work, and to gain funds with the outing for upcoming unit
activities. (U.S. Air Force photo by SSgt. Debra L. Penton)


Special luncheons have been
scheduled through the week at the Ft.
Clayton NCO Club. On Sept. 16 a
mariachi band will play. There will be
a Hispanic produce display, customer
specials onHispanic products and food
tasting throughout the week at
selected times at the Corozal
Commissary.
There will be a Hispanic display in
the Corozal Exchange. There will also
be aHispanic cultural display at the Ft.
Clayton library.
Other events include "Dances of
Panama" and Colombian dancers at
the Ocean Breeze Community Center
at Ft. Sherman Sept. 17 from 7 p.m.
where souvenir displays and food
tasting will follow.
At the Cocoli Community Center a
Hispanic Food Tasting will occur
Sept. 14 at noon and a food tasting and
party Sept. 16 at 6 p.m.


A salute to Panamanian culture
with dances, food, crafts, and displays
will take place at the Valent
Community Recreation Center from
noon to 4 p.m. There will also be a
display in the lobby of the Valent
Center.
At the Sherman Arts and Crafts
Center from Sept. 11 to 17, there will
be a display of craftsmanship from
Ecuador, Peru and Panama and
posters from Hispanic countries.
A Hispanic Week Womens
Volleyball Tournament will occur
Sept. 12-17 at Reeder Gym.
A special program featuring music,
food, folklore will be held at the Loft
Theater at Ft. Espinar presented by
the Atlantic Youth Activities (a small
entry fee) Sept. 23 at 7 p.m.
Ft. Davis Community Club will
hold a night of Latin music Sept. 16 at
8 p.m.


WIFESTYLES looking for a few good people'


We frequently hear the expression
"plan ahead." Army Community
Service is in the midst of doing just
that by planning and recruiting for
WIFESTYLES.
As a resource fair for women,
WIFESTYLES is a part of the
annual celebration of the Month of
the Military Family. On Nov. 4,
Valent Recreation Center will be the
scene of a day of classes,
information, displays, special events,


entertainment, door prizes, free
samples and a luncheon; all to help
women know more about the
programs, services and activities
available to make life in USARSO a
rich experience.
Experts, support, hard work are
needed from many areas to make
WIFESTYLES an exciting resource
fair that will attract women and
make tham aware of the abundance
of opportunities available to them.


Does your organization have special
services or programs for women? Do
you have information, talent, or
experience that you would like to
share with women? Would you like
to know more about how to be
involved in activities here in
Panama? Contact the Army
Community Serivces office and find
out how you can be part of
LIFESTYLES.
Women usually know how to
make the most of a good possibility


and a few good women can turn a
challenge into a great opportunity.
ACS has the challenge, and needs a
few good women to help set up
displays, teach classes, help with
advertising, sell tickets, make
telephone calls, collect door prizes,
entertain, move tables and chairs.
You can be part of this great event
even if you have only one hour to
spare. For more information call
Hanna Stockwell at ACS, 285-
6517/5556.


----I










1 Tropic Times


G - General Audiences All ages admitted.
PG - Parental guidance suggested. Some material may not
be suitable for children.
PG-13 - Parents are strongly cautioned. Some material may
be inappropriate for children under 13.
R - Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or
adult guardian.


Panama Area Exchange


Movie Schedule


Box office opens 20 minutes prior to each performance.
Programs are subject to change without notice.
RT: Running time in minutes.
SIT: Titulos en Espanol - Subtitles in Spanish.


Howard Clayton

284-3583 287-3279


Dai


Davis Quarry Hts Amador

289-5173 282-3635 282-4287


Sherman

289-6251


BIG
Tote iank,
Adults-S2.50 Children-S125
Rated (PG) RTI104
THE RUNNING MAN
Arnold Schwarrenegger
Adultt-S2.00 Children-SI 00
Rated (R) RT i1(1


MATINEE-2:


THE. tLEAD VUL
Clint Eastwood
Adults-$2.50 Chlddren-$S25
Rated (R) RT92


THE PRESIDIO
Scan Connery
Adults-S2 50 Children-SI 25
Rautd (R) RT 97


EVENING(
THE DEAD POOL
Clint Elasti ood
Aduelt-2.50 Chdldrcn-S1.25
Rated (R) RT-92
THE PRESIDIO
Soan Conncry
Adult-S52.50 Children-SI25
Rated (R) RT:97


THE UNHOLY


Ben Cro,
Adults-S2 00 Chldren- 00
Rated(R) RT:104

DuNDMEEH
Adults-S2 50 Chidren-S1 25
Rn, atIPGC RT:II I


BEETLEJUICE
Alee Baldwun
Adultn-S2 00 Children-SI.00
Rated (PG) RT92
CROCODILE DUNDEE II
Paul Hogan
Aduls-S2 50 Children-S 1 25
Rated(PG) RTIll
BLOODSPORT
Don.,ld Gihh
,\dclls-S2 00 5 llldrcn 5 00
,Rtd )Rl 1I 92


I I


G-7:00 & 9:00 EVENING-7:00 9:00
S SCHOOL DAZE
Rated (R) ' _" -r
^"Adu S 0I i ' i ,':,,
ILLEGALLY YOURS
Rob n oI I RI "
Adulls-2 00 Children-SI00 IN BABYSITTING
Rated(l'G) RK.102 Adulh-$2.50 Chldren- SI 25
Raed E PG-131 RI.99
00 EVENING_ IMATINEE-2:00 EVENING-7:00


I n HI" I
Alee BaDdei
Ad�.I.,4(2 1.
- S o ,Aduit,.$50
h ]dren-S 125
,~Chdie SI dlill
ateld (PG)
RT 92


RENIT A LCP
Bunrt Reynolds
Adult-S2 00 Chldren-S 00
Rated (R) RT'96
THE DEAD POOL
Clint Eastwood
Adults-S2.50 Children-Sl 25
Rated(R) RT:92


Adults-S2.00 Children-SI.25
Rated (R) RT(97
RED HEAT
AAnold Schwartenegger
AdulR-S2.50) Chldren-SI 25
Raed (R) RT:103


I- I


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EVENING - 7:30
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GREATOUTDOORS




EVENING-7:00 & 9:00


ARTHUR2,
ONTHE ROCKS
Dudley Moore
Adulhs-S2.50
Chddren-SI 25
RT ,1[2

POLTERGEIST III
N-ncy Alien
Adullt-S2 50 Clldren-SI 25
Racd (PG-13) R r97


G-7:00& 9:00 EVENING-7:30
CROCODILEDUNDEE II EBRO oN^R
NPaul Hn THE ROKS
1 - Adullis-2 50 ChldrenSI t5 .2
( . l."Ratdl PUi RT:I;I! U .r Adullr-S2 51
Ch dren-SI 25'
SBLOODSPORT 11
Aduols-s2,o0 Children-1 00 0
Rated (R) R:R 14


EVENING-7:00 & 9:00 EVENING-7:30
CROCODILE DUNDEE II
Adull-S2 50 Children-SI 25
Tuesday .. l .. COLORS
Aduls-$ S2 00Chlldrn-Sl00 *( C L R
Tuesd y Rated(Ri 113 R ADVENTURES
BULL DURHAM IN BABYSITTING Scan Penn
Ke-.n Costner Elizabeth Shue Adults-S2.00 Children-SI 00
rAdu 5250Chldrn'1-.525 Adulrs-2 50 Children-SI.25 Raed (R) RT 120
Ratd (R) RT:92Rated (PG -13) RT.99
EVENING-7:00 & 9:00 EVENING-7:30
WORLD GONE WILD ACTION JACKSON
tdullts m I ll d-S. 00 Ch W-S 1 00
W e n sSf : RRd(ReRI RT9RI
W ednes. ia.c-iS * O: *
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day., K, _0 THE GREAT OUTDOORS
Chd dren-$l 25 *duit -52.50 Chlkhen- S25 25 5
Rate(['(;d RR)

EVENING-7:00 & 9:00


rhursda :
'dult,5250 Chld r n-$1 25`2
BULL DURHAM i 1. T OORS
l d- 5 A l -2 50 hd n 25 dui-S2 50 (hdlldrn-SI 25
.l R)_ ..,t R PY- tlG) R I Id (R ) R I:R


It lI T TT IlSWITCHING CHANNELS



LeonIlaun Kennledy0 .d
Adul .200 Ch. dRen-Sl
Rated(R) RT91 1 117


EVENING-7:30 EVENING - 7:30

ybestfriendisa DTP- MN 4
EMPIRE

Cheryl Pollock
Adul1s-12. 1

CRidre(n-lS U
RI ld (RI
Rated (PG) RT: 7

2T.9'


I EVENING-7:30


FUNNY FARM
A hot shot sportswriter finds the
tranquil beauty of living in the
country can be hilariously unsettling
when he decides to chuck big city life
and move to a quiet New England
village. (Language)
THE PRESIDIO
Presidio is a thrilling contemporary
drama about a post commander and
a cop who reluctantly team up for a
San Francisco crime investigation set
against the city's military compound.
PENITENTIARY III
After a pro-boxer pummels an
opponent to death in the ring, he is
sent to prison and becomes the much
sought after prize in a dogfight
between the sadistic warden and a
powerful inmate.
THE DEAD POOL
Action abounds when, for the first
time in detective Harry Callahan's
career, he becomes the hunted and a
target lor a psychopathic
executioner.
WORLD GONE WILD
The year is 2087 and a pacifist leader
of a small settlement is forced to hire
mercenaries to protect the water
supply Irom a vicious cult fanatic.


WILLOW
In this whimsical sword and sorcery
fantasy a good natured dwarf takes
on the mission of escorting a young
child to a haven of safety after a
wicked queen orders her death.
BIG
A young boy visits a carnival and
makes a wish to be "BIG" to the
fortune telling machine. Next thing
he knows, he's an adult and climbing
the corporate ladder of a toy
company. (Language, sex)

CROCODILE DUNDEE II
When Dundee's ladyfriend is
threatened by a vicious Colombian
drug czar, our Aussie hero whisks her
away down under to fight them on
his turf. (Violence, language)
LICENSE TO DRIVE
After failing to get his "License to
Drive." a teenager sneaks his
grandfather's 1972 Cadillac out for
an evening of fun and games with
hilarious consequences. (Violence
and language)
JUDGEMENT IN BERLIN
Judgement in Berlin is a taut
compelling drama concerning two
East Berliners who hijack an airliner
in a desperate attempt for freedom.


MY BEST FRIEND
IS A VAMPIRE
A shy teenager has a steamy
encounter with a sultry vampire
which brings him into her red-cell
craving ranks and he is forced to do
some hilarious major adjusting to an
alternate lifestyle. (Violence, sex)
RED HEAT
Moscow's toughest cop winds up in
Chicago teamed up with a wise
cracking, rule breaking, American
detective on the trail of a Russian
drug dealer against whom they both
have a personal vendetta.
ADVENTURES IN
BABYSITTING
A young woman's last minute
babysitting chores quickly and zanily
go awry when an S.O.S. phone call
from distressed would be runaway
desperately summons her to a
downtown bus depot on a whirlwind
rescue mission. (Violence, language)

PHANTASM II
A trio of young people combine
forces to hunt down and stop a
ghoulish mortician who has been
converting corpses into murderous
zombie dwarfs that serve his.
minions.


COMING ATTRACTIONS
HOWARD AFB
Fri LICENSE TO DRIVE (PG-13)
Fri THE MILAGRO BEANFIELD WAR (R)
Sat WALT DISNEY'S BAMBI (G)
Sat CADDYSHACK II (PG)
Sun CADDYSHACK (PG)
Sun WALT DISNEY'S BAMBI (G)
Sun PENITENTIARY III (R)
FT.CLAYTON
Fri BIG (PG)
Fri THE GREAT OUTDOORS (PG)
Sat BIG (PG)
Sat GOOD MORNING VIETNAM (R)
Sat THE DEAD POOL (R)
Sun THE DEAD POOL (R)
Sun POLTERGEIST III (PG-13)
FT. AMADOR
Fri RED HEAT (R)
Sat PLATOON (R)
Sun ARTHUR 2, ON THE ROCKS (PG)
FT. DAVIS
Fri SCHOOL DAZE (R)
Fri RENT A COP (R)
Sat BEETILEJI ICE (PG)
Sat BIG BUSINESS (P(;)
Sun CROCOI)ILE D NDEE II (PG)
Sun THE PRESIDIO (R)
FT. SHEHMAN
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Sat CAT'S Yt (P(;-131
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just forkids


Ft. Clayton Youth
Center
Youths are invited to stop by the Ft.
Clayton Youth Center for tourneys.
Preteens may join the Foosball
competition Sept. 18 at 1 p.m. The
teen tourney follows at 3:30 p.m. A
Ping Pong tourney for teens is slated
for Sept. 24 at 4 p.m.
There will be a Spaghetti Eating
contest Sept. 29. Call 287-6451..

Ft. Amador Youth
Center
The center invites teens tojoin in for
late movies and snacks Sept. 16. A
small fee will be charged. For
information call 282-4448. A teen rap
session will be held Sept. 18 at 2 p.m.

Atlantic center
The Atlantic Youth Activities
reminds you of its Hispanic Heritage
Show Sept. 23. The program will be
offered at the Loft Theater at 7 p.m.

Youth bowling

The Young American Bowling
Alliance (YABA) offers youth an
opportunity to participate in league
bowling. To make this program a


success, team coaches, instructors and
scorekeepers are needed to assist the
younger bowlers. No experience is
necessary. Instructors will train you.
Interested? Call 284-4190 or 286-4260.

Girl Scouts
Effective Oct. 1, the USA Girl
Scouts-Panama Service Center,
building 806, Albrook AFS, will be
open for retail business Tuesday from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesday from
noon to 4 p.m. and Thursday from 9
am. to 1 p.m. For more information on
Girl Scouting call 286-3670.


Nature bazaar

The Panama Audubon Society will
hold a nature baazar and handicrafts
fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 24, at
the Gamboa Community Center.
Among the available items will be a
full-color wall calendars of tropical
birds and 16-month engagement
calendars for September 1988 through
December 1989. Vendors who would
like to reserve tables should call 52-
6614 or 56-6384.


Lead can affect children's mental development


BOSTON (UPI) - Eposure to low
levels of lead, possibly even at doses
below those deemed safe under some
government standards, may
adversely affect a child's mental
development, a new study indicates.
Researchers at the University of
Adelaide in Australia reported last
week that a study, of 537 children
found those exposed to higher than
normal, but still relatively low levels
of lead scored significantly lower on
intelligence tests.
The findings add to a growing
body of data indicating that lead
exposure, in addition to being toxic
at high levels, can cause brain
damage to children even at relatively
low levels.
"We think the evidence is
increasing (that low lead levels can


impair mental development), and
this (study) may contribute to it,"
said Dr. Alan Leviton, an associate
professor of neurology at Harvard
Medical School.
The Australian researchers took
blood samples from children born
from 1979 to 1982 to women living in
the town of Port Pirie, a southern
Australian community located
downwind from a large lead-smelting
factory.
The researchers took blood
samples from the children again
periodically until they were 4 years
old, when they were given a standard
test to gauge their cognitive
development.
children who had an average of
about 30 micrograms of lead per
deciliter of blood scored an average


of 7.2 points lower on a test that
measures general cognitive abitliy
than those who had blood lead levels
of about 10 micrograms per deciliter,
which is considered about normal,
the researchers reported.
"We conclude that postnatal blood
lead concentration is inversely
related to cognitive development in
children," the Australian researchers
wrote in reporting their findings in
the New England Journal of
Medicine.
"This ... study indicates that a
raised blood-lead concentration in
early childhood has an independent
deleterious effect on mental
development as evaluated at the age
of 4 years," they said.
The study also indicates that
"there may be no clear threshold
below which an adverse effect on


mental development does not occur,"
the researchers said.
.The federal Centers for' Disease
Control in Atlanta recommends that
levels of lead exposure below 25
micrograms per deciliter of blood are
safe for young children.
Previous studies that reached
similar conclusions have been
questioned because of concern other
factors, such as low socio-economic
status, may be the true cause of
children scoring lower on intelligence
tests.
The Australian researchers said
they attempted to compensate for
that by taking into account a variety
of factors. But they said the results
must be interpreted cautiously
because it is difficult to take all
factors into consideration.


leisur


meetings

Astronomy club
The Panama Canal Astronomy
Club will discuss the autumnal
equinox at their meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Sept. 20 at the Panama Canal Training
Center.

NCOA meeting
A Non Commissioned Officers
Association Isthmian Chapter general
membership meeting will be held at 6
p.m. Sept. 27. at the Howard NCO
CLub. E-4s through E-9s and spouses
are welcome. Committee appointments
will be made. There will be door prizes.
Call 282-3994 for information.

Pen women meet
The Panama Canal Chapter,
National League of American Pen
Women, will meet at 8:30 a.m. Sept. 17
at the Quarry Heights Officers' Club.
The meeting will feature the traveling
slide art show of the 1988 Pen Women
exhibit in Washington, D.C.
representing the winning entries from
Pen Women branches through the 50


states. All members, guests, and the
interested public are invited. A buffet-
style breakfast will be available. For
inforamtion call Anita Seifert at 64-
3534.

Support group
The Alzheimer's Support Group
will meet Sept. 21 at building 115,
Corozal. The session will start at 6:30
p.m.


IBM meeting
The Cosmic computer! Cosmic
what? Want to find out more about the
Cosmic computer? Attend the
Panama Canal IBM-PC users Group
meeting Sept. 21 at 7 p.m. in Panama
Canal Training Center. A special
dBase meeting wil begin at 6 p.m.
Everyone is welcome.


1/508th Wives
All wives of 1 / 508th are welcome to
join this month's First Sergeant's
meeting at the Zodiac Club Sept. 20 at
10 a.m. This month we're having a
"White Elephant Bingo." Don't forget
to bring a white elephant. For more


information call Marie Van Heusen at
284-3799.

Phi Delta Kappa
meeting
Phi Delta Kappa will hold their first
general meeting of this school year
Sept. 21 at Ft. Amador Officers Club
at 6 p.m. with dinner at 6:45 p.m. The
guest speaker will be announced that
evening. For dinner reservations
contact Karen Hiller at 252-2702 or
Barbara Seni at 287-6215 by Sept. 19.


tours


Field trips
The Ft. Clayton Arts and Crafts
Center has photo field trips on the
second and fourth Sunday of each
month. Group meets at building 180,
Ft. Clayton at 10 a.m. Get information
on camera settings for better color
saturation, looking for high contrast,
and improve your composition. Call
287-5957 to reserve a space.

River trip
Now is the time to reserve your


space for the Indian village river trip
being held by the CRD Outdoor
Recreation Branch Oct. 1.
Ride a cayuco, hike, take pictures of
this beautiful nature area, get baskets
and wood carvings. Registration is
underway and will continue until Sept.
28 at building 154, Ft. Clayton. For
information call 287-3363.

Valent tours

The Valent Tours and Travel Office
offers two special tours: On Sept. 17
enjoy a beach trip on the Pacific coast.
A dinner tour follows on Sept. 23. The
destination is Pizzeria Italia where you
will have a chance to try international
cuisine. Advance reservations are
required. Call 287-6500.


Sundial tours

Several activities are planned by
Sundial Center at Ft. Davis. Tour
colorful El Valle on Sept. 18, for a
change of pace. Make your shopping
list now, because on Sept. 24, the
center will sponsor a tour to the Pacific
PX. Call 289-3889.


Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988


11









2 Tropic Times
1 Sept. 16, 1988

places to go


notices


Leadership award
The American University is
accepting nominations for the Rogers
W. Jones award for executive
leadership. The university presents
this award each year to two career
executives of the federal government.
Selection is based on demonstrated
superior leadership that resulted in
outstanding organizational
achievements and a strong
commitment to the effective
continuity of government by
successfully bringing about the
development of managers and
executives.
Nominations must be submitted to
the Civilian Personnel Office not later
than Oct. 13. Contact the Incentive
Awards administrator at 285-5611 for
further details.
Photo contest

The Ft. Davis Arts and Crafts
Center is featuring the Army Photo
Contest Exhibit throughout Sept. 24.
The community is invited to view these
fine works. The center is located in
Bldg. 251, Ft. Davis and is closed on
Tuesday and Wednesday.


Clayton ceramics

The Ft. Clayton Ceramics Center is
now open additional hours. Enjoy
your favorite hobby at Bldg. 155, Ft.
Clayton. The ceramics center is now
open on Tuesday and Wednesday
from 1-9 p.m.

Air Force OWC Bazaar

Howard/Albrook Officers Wives'
Club needs vendors for the Christmas
Bazaar, Oct. 1, at the Albrook
Officers' Club from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
For more information, call Linda
Wilson at 286-4890.


Welfare applications

The Quarry Heights Officers Wives'
Club is now accepting Welfare
applications. Application forms may
be obtained by writing, QHOWC, c/o
Welfare Chairman, PSC 1848, APO
34003.
Auditions
The Pacific Theater Arts Center will
have auditions for "Catch Me if You
Can," a murder mystery. The cast
requires five men and two women.
Auditions will be held Sept. 20 and 21
at building 2060, Curundu, at 7:30
p.m. For information call 286-3152.

New officers
Newly elected officers of the
Panama Canal Chapter of the
National League of American Pen
Women (NLAPW) were sworn in at a
breakfast meeting held earlier this
summer at the Quarry Heights
Officers' Club. The new officers:
President Anita Seifert, First Vice
President Janet Len-Rios, Second
Vice President Marsha Kat, Secretary
Charlotte Kerksiek and Treasurer
Kathy Engle, have put together a slate
of programs for the coming year
covering a variety of activities of
interest ot Pen Women.
Of special note is the season's first
Juried Art Show set for Oct. 18. Entry
requirements and other details of this
show will be announced soon.
Anic ish 'g to learn r-. :


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i


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A


about the Pen Women and their local
activities may call Anita Seifert at 64-
3534.
Teachers needed

The Cocoli Community Center is
seeking instructors for Spanish,
cooking, sewing or crocheting, and
Piano lessons. Persons interested may
contact Chris Merner at 287-3010.

Learn to bowl

The Howard and Albrook Bowling
Centers are offering the opportunity to
get out of the house and have some
fun. Learn how to bowl in the Tuesday
morning Coffee Break League. This is
open to all DOD personnel and their
family members. Register no later
than Sept. 27, at either bowling center.
For more information, call 284-4190
or 286-4260.
Aerobics teacher

ACS is seeking a volunteer aerobics
instructor. Call 285-4500 and ask for
Mrs. Flynn.


CRD Sports hours

The CRD Sports Office has
changed its operational hours. Pleae
note that the office now opens at 7:30
a.m., and provides services until 4:30
p.m. The CRD Sports Office is located
in Bldg. 154, Ft. Clayton. Information
.is available by calling 287-4050.

School meals

Applications for free or reduced
price school meals may be picked up at
Army Community Service in Bldg. 115
Corozal or Bldg. 8348 in the Margarita
complex. Balboa High School,
Cristobal High School and Curundu
Jr. High School will also have
applications available. For additional
information call 285-4864.

Spouse Orientation
A reminder to everyone! The
Spouse Orientation is offered every
Wednesday. Don't miss this tour of
Pacific installations. Meet at the
Clayton Chapel at 9 p.m. for this
informative trip. Call 285-4630 for
reservations.
Air Force Ball

The U.S. Air Force will celebrate its
41st anniversary at the Ft. Amador
Officers' Club Sept. 17.
There will be dancing, music, food,
and a lot of history and tradition.
Social starts at 7 .m. and the program
at 7:45 p.m.
All services are invited to attend.
For more information, call your unit
first sergeant or 284-4952. Dress for
the ball is mess dress or its equivalent.

Family child care
Now that school has started your
child care needs may have changed.
Remember that USARSO Child
Development Service has several
options available.to you. Family child
care is one of them. Family child care
is a program whereby you can take
your child to the home of a trained and
certified child care provider for care.
There are family child care homes on
most installations, making FCC a
convenient choice in child care.
Additionally, many family child care
providers are willing to care for
children during the early morning
hours or in the late afternoon r


evening - a service to single parent
soldiers or dual military couples with
duty obligations to fulfill.
For information on FCC homes in
the Atlantic and Pacific communities
contact Mrs. Purmalis at
287-3301/6810.

Info line

If you want to know where to go,
what to do in Panama; if you are
interested in sports, music or theatre
events; call the Community
Information Line. The service is
available Monday through Friday
from 7 a.m.-6 p.m., and on Saturdays
from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Call 287-INFO
(4636) for answers!

Theater auditions
The Theater Guild of Ancon will
hold auditions for "The Nerd" Sept. 26
and 27 at 7, p.m. at the Theater Guild.
This delightful comedy by Larry
Shue will be directed by Mitch
Swanson. There are parts for two
women, four men and for an 8 or 9-
year-old bov.

OCWC-P luncheon
The U.S. Army Officers and
Civilian Wives Club of the Pacific will
hold their monthly luncheon Sept. 21
at 11 a.m. at the Amador Officers'
Club. For information contact
Barbara Tierney at 282-3895 or Trudy
Higginbotham at 287-2971 or Doll
Alexander at 287-4293.

Protestant chapel
Join the Ft. Clayton Protestant.
Chapel for an evening of music and
fun and fellowship. "Sunday night
live" will be at 6 p.m. Sept. 25. with
refreshments afterward.

Rodeo
The Central American Rodeo
Cowboys Association will hold a
rodeo Oct. 1 at La Herrdura Arena,
Chorrera with start time set at 1 p.m.
Admission is as follows: 12 years and
under - free; 12-16 years - $1; and 16
years and over - $2. Those interested in
riding should contact the club in
advance if possible. For more
information call Scott Sharp at 287-
6234.

Jewish services
The Kol Nidre Service will be held
Sept. 20 at 6:45 p.m. and the Yom
Kippur Service will be held Sept. 21.
Both services will be held at Ft.
Amador Chapel. Registration for
Sunday school is now in progress. Call
Peggy McGinnis at 282-4833. Sunday
school will begin Oct. 2.

EMT course
Gorgas Army Community Hospital
will offer the Basic Emergency
Medical Technician course starting
Oct. 11 through Nov. 22. Civilians
wishing to apply will submit
completed Standard Form 171 to
Gorgas Army Community Hospital,
Department of Primary Care and
Community Medicine no later than
Sept. 30. Applications must have a
current telephone number and
address.
Requirements to be considered are
as follows: high school diploma or
equivalent; a valid motor vehicle
license from the Republic of Panama;
ability to speak, read, and write in
English (knowledge of Spanish is
desirable for non-native personnel);
pre-entry test (basic EMT knowledge)
given Oct. 4.
Contact SSgQ. Etienn-, NCOIC.


DPCCM or Ms. Viruet, secretary
DPCCM, at 282-5238 for infor-
mation.

AF fun run

Come and celebrate the U.S. Air
Force 41st Anniversary by
participating in the 5k Fun Run Sept.
17 at 7 a.m.
The first 100 runners to register will
receive a commemorative T-shirt. The
$5 fee can be paid at the Howard
Sports and Fitness Center. It will be $6
the day of the race. Volunteers are
needed to help make this event
possible. For more information on
helping with the race, or the race itself,
call A IC Tina Musselman at 284-3451.


Having a baby?

Community Health Nursing is
presenting: Having a Baby? It's A
Wonderful Time! This fair will be held
Sept. 24 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the
Valent Recreation Center, Ft.
Clayton. There will be guest speakers,
films, exhibits, a fashion show and
door prizes. For more information call
287-6202/282-5418.

Golf tourney
The Ft. Amador Golf Course
announces its Two Person Best Ball
tournament for Oct. 8. Call 282-4511
for information.

Atari users
The Panama Canal Atari Computer
Users' Group will host a Software Fair
in September instead of having a
regular monthly meeting. The
Software Fair will be held Sept. 17 at
the Balboa YMCA, auditorium from 9
a.m.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Such software applications such as
SYNCALC, B/GRAPH, MUSIC
programs, graphics, and PERT will be
on display. The purpose of the
Software Fair is to demonstrate the
capacity of the Atari computer and
what it can do. Everyone is invited to
attend.


Fishing tourney
A challenging competitive event
gets underway at the Gamboa area
tomorrow: the Bass Fishing
Tournament. Participants will be be
able to compete for cash prizes to be
awarded to first-fifth places and the
heaviest 10-bass stringer.
The annual event is being sponsored
by the CRD Outdoor Recreation
Branch. A briefing will be offered at
5:30 a.m. at the Gamboa public boat
ramp.

Theater night
The American Society will sponsor
an evening at the theater, beginning at 8
p.m. Sept. 29, at the Ancon Theater
Guild. After enjoying the local
production of Neil Simon's "Biloxi
Blues" participants will join cast
members for a party onstage. Tickets
can be purchased from any society
board member or by calling 69-3385 or
24-3400.

Art instructors

Instructors for tole painting,
weaving, and varied arts and crafts are
needed at the Ft. Clayton Arts &
Crafts Center. Persons interested
should contact Mrs. Walsh, Center
Director, at bldg. 180. Ft. Clayton, or
call 287-595-.













things to do


T.O.P.S. (Take off pounds sensibly)
is a support group for those wishing to
take off pounds sensibly or keep off
pounds sensibly. Men, women, teens
and preteens may attend meetings.
Upcoming topics include "Dressing
for your Figure," "Relaxation
Techniques," "Body Language,"
"Nutritious snacks," and much much
more. For more information call 286-
4934 or 286-3438.

Position open
The University of Oklahoma has
one part-time office position open.
Qualifications include bachelors
degree, good communication skills
and office skills. Applications
available at Albrook AFS, building
808, room 300, from 1-4:30 p.m. All
applications must be received by Sept.
23.

Vendors needed
The U.S. Army Officers and
Civilian Wives Club of the Pacific is
accepting table reservations for the
upcoming Christmas bazaar to be held
Oct. 29 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Ft.
Amador Officers Club. Vendors need
to call 287-4888 by Oct. 13 to reserve
tables.

Army Community
Service
Army Community Service has four
volunteer positions for family
members interested in gaining
experience as receptionist by working
four hours daily or three times a week.
Experience is not required. On the job
training will be provided. ACS is
located in building 115, Corozal,
Make your appointment by calling
Mrs. Spratling at 285-4630/4500.

FCC qualification

The USARSO Family Child Care
Program would like to remind the
community that persons using
government quarters to care for
unrelated children must be certified.
Certification as a Family Child Care
(FCC) provider is awarded after
successful completion of classwork,
paperwork, background checks, and
home inspections. Call 287-
3301/6810.

AUSA awards dinner
Soldiers, civilians, spouses and
anyone who has an interest in the
Army are invited to attend the
Isthmian Chapter, AUSA Awards
Dinner. The event will be held from 6-
9:30 p.m., Sept. 22 at the Ft. Clayton
NCO Club. Dress is informal
guayaberaa) and entertainment will be
provided. For tickets, contact Capt.
Smith at 285-5809/5215.

Pentecostal services

United Pentecostal Church services
are held at Balboa Union Church
every Sunday from 1-4 p.m. and on
Thursday nights at 7 p.m. Dalton
Ferguson is pastor. For info call 284-
4734 or 287-4725.

Air Force baby goodies

Attention: expectant Air Force
parents. If you are E-5 or below and
this is your first child, sign up for a free
basket of goodies at Family Services.
Call 284-3968.


The Howard and Albrook Bowling
Centers are looking for a few
volunteers to work with us to make
our Bowling Centers the best. Bowling
is a lifetime sport and we need ideas
from people ages 6 to 80. Get in on the
fun and work with us by joining the
volunteer advisory team. For more
information call 284-4818 or 286-4260.
Bring in proof that you are a volunteer
and bowl one game free Labor Day.


New bowling hours

Albrook and Howard Bowling
Centers have new hours. They are as
follows:
ALBROOK -- Mon-Thurs-ll a.m. to
10 p.m.; Fri-8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sat-9
a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sun 1 p.m. to 9 p.m.
HOWARD - Daily-7:30 a.m. to 11
p.m.; Sat- 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sun Noon
to 10 p.m.
For more information call 284-4190
or 286-4260.


Ice breaker

The Quarry Officers Wives CLub
welcomes new folks (wives and
husbands) to Panama, greets old
friends, and celebrates the first social
event of the 1988-89 year Sept. 24,
from 6-8 p.m.,at the Ft. Amador
Officers Club, Canal Room.
Cost is $2 per person, and dress is
casual. A pay as you go bar and hours
d'oeuvres will be featured.
For reservations call Linda
Barrager at 282-3784.

Taste of Panama
A Taste of Panama is the weekend
highlight at Valent Community
Recreation Center. Sept. 17.
Featured will be colorful dances of
Panama and typical dresses; view a
special slide show, sample products,
and obtain crafts and items of this
country. Local vendors will have
molas, pottery, baskets, Guaymi
design pilows, ceramics, Tembleques,
watercolor cards, Huaca jewelry,
cookbooks with recipes of Panama,
Christmas cards with local designs,
crochet doilies, bracelets and more.
In addition, you will be able to buy
typical food. Stop by from noon until
4 p.m.
Haunted house
Help is being sought for the annual
Haunted House held at Valent
Recreation Center in October.
Volunteers are needed for
construction of props, painting and to
portray characters. Call 287-6500 for
information.


Play opening
"Oklahoma," Rodgers and
Hammersteins's classical musical
comedy , opened last week at the
Pacific Theater Arts Center in
Curundu. The production will
continue this weekend and concludes
Sept. 25.
Performances are being presented at
building 2060, Curundu at 8 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, and Sundays at
2 p.m. Reserve tickets today. Call 286-
3152.


Bowling Center

Want to know what's happening on
the bowling scene? Dial 284-4818 to


find out. If you have an idea,
comment, or complaint about
Howard or Albrook Bowling Centers,
you can let us know on a recorded
message.


classes


C&W lessons
Country and Western dance lessons
are given every Saturday night at 7
p.m. at the Corral, Ft. Clayton NCO
Club.


Finance class
Ft. Kobbe ACS will have a
Checkbook Management class Sept.
27. The session will begin at 9 a.m. at
building 801, Ft. Kobbe. Call 284-
5759.

Future pilots?
A beginners ground school for
pilots will be available for U.S. Naval
Station Panama Canal MWR office.
starting Oct. 18. This is a seven week
course which covers all subject
material essential for private pilots
and prepares students for the FAA
Private Pilot Written test. Classes will
be held each Tuedsay and Thursday
evening from 7 to 9 p.m. There are no
prerequisites for age limit.
Instructor of this course is a FAA
certificate flight and ground school
instructor with over 20 years active
teaching experience. Classes will be
limited. For registration or more
information contact Maria at the
Navy MWR office at 284-5307.

Boating course

The Howard/Rodman Boating
Course will be held Sept. 24 from 8
a.m. to noon at the Rodman Marina.
Cetification from this course will
permit authorized personnel to
operate Howard MWR's 17-foot
Boston Whaler fishing rigs. A
registration fee will be charged. For
more information, call 284-5307.


Dive classes

The Ft. Clayton Scuba Center'is
pleased to announce that a new scuba
instructor is now offering dive classes.
Persons interested in learning Scuba
Diving are invited to stop by bldg. 178,
Ft. Clayton, to register. Class include
theory sessions, pool sessions, and
dives. Call 287-5858 for information.

Boating lessons

If you want to learn how to operate
a motorboat, check with the Ft.
Clayton Boat Shop on space
availability for the class slated to begin
tonight. The two-session course will
include theory and a hands-on session.
Call 287-6451.Ft. Clayton.


tours


Navy MWR tours
The Navy MWR has scheduled
many tours. They are: Oct. 29-Nov.
5, Bonaire, Dutch Antilles for scuba
diving; Nov. 11-14, Costa Rica for golf
and/or white water rafting; Nov. 23-
27, Venezuela/Caracas and Angel
Falls shopping and Adventure; Dec.
24-Jan. 1, Peru/Machu Picchu and
the Inca ancient empire.
The 1989 tours are: Jan. 14-20,
Costa Rica bird watching, Feb. 10-14,
Dominican Republic Valentine
special; Mar. 18-26, Easter Guatemala
special; May 27-June 2, Cancun
Mexico/Scuba diving and archae-
ology of Mayan culture; June 17-July
4, Big game photo safari/ Kenya,
Africa, via Amsterdam Holland.
All of these tours are fully escorted
and take advantage of special
holidays, weekends and low group
rates. Details will be provided 30 days
or more before each trip at the MWR
Office, building 65, U.S. Naval Station
Panama Canal, Rodman. Special
presentation of trips and tours will be
available for groups upon request. For
more information contact Marie at
MWR tour office at 284-5307.


TOPS


Bowling centers


Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988


13


I









4 Tropic Times
14Sept. 16, 1988


I club calendar


Specials/Openings
Davis Community Club - Fri., Social
hour from 4:30 to 6 p.m., club closes
at 3 a.m.; Wed., Sr. NCO/Officers'
lounge is open from 5-10 p.m.; Thur.
Lounge is open from 4:30 p.m. to
midnight.
Davis Mountain Top Pub -Available
for kiddie parties. Call 289-3506.
Espinar Community Club -
Available for special functions and
parties only. Call 289-5160.
Ft. Amador O'Club - Available for
special events on Wed., Fri. & Sat.
Bamboo Inn - Mon.& Wed., social
hour, 5-6 p.m.
Ft. Clayton NCO Club - Hispanic
music, salsa, merenque, Mon.-Fri.
during Hispanic Heritage Week.
Ft. Sherman Cadre Lounge - Sat.,
Open from 5 to 10 p.m. Enjoy the
new variety disco program.
Ft. Sherman Community Club -
Mon., Tues., Wed., club closed,
available for special functions.
Howard NCO Club - Fri., Casual
Cove, variety disco, 9 p.m.-l a.m.;
Ballroom, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., variety,
disco; Sun.-Mon., Ballroom, variety,
disco, 8-12 p.m.; Casual Cove, Sun.,
salsa, disco, 7-12 p.m.; Mon., variety
disco, 7-12 p.m.; Wed.-Thurs.,
Casual Cove, Country & Western,
9-12 p.m.; Tues., Wed., Ballroom,
variety disco, 7-12 p.m., Thurs., 7
a.m.-1 a.m.
Naval Station Anchorage Club -Fri.,
4-6 p.m., social hour; Sat., singles
night, 8-12 p.m.; Tues., 4-6 p.m.,
social hour.
Naval Station O'Club - Fri., social
hour from 5-7 p.m.; Wed., social
hour from 5-7 p.m.
Naval Station CPO Club - Fri.,
Social hour, 4-6 p.m.; Wed., social
hour, 4-6 p.m.
STRAC Club - Open Mon.-Fri.,
from 4:30-10 p.m.; Fri., social hour
with snacks, DJ, 4:30-6 p.m.


Dining


Albrook O'Club - Fri. & Sat., 6-9
p.m., Prime Rib & Seafood;
Tue.,burgers in the bar from 6 p.m.-
1:30 a.m.; Wed., 6-8:30 p.m.,
Mexican night.
Thur., 6-8:30 p.m., 2-1 Steak.


Amador O'Club - Thu. from 6-9
p.m., Mongolian BBQ; Mon.,
closed, fumigation.
Bayview Room - Fri. & Sat., open
from 6-10 p.m.
Clayton NCO Club - Casa Maria,
Mexican food specials Mon.-Thurs.
5-9 p.m., Fri. & Sat., 5-10 p.m.
Davis Community Club - Fri. & Sat.,
Dining from 5:30 to 10 p.m. & Caoba
Cafe for elegant dining w/live music
from 7-11 p.m.; Sat. Dining from
5:30-10 p.m.; Wed., Buffet specials
from 5-10 p.m.
Davis Mountain Top Pub - Thur.
thru Sun., Pizza & chicken delivery
from 5 to 9:30 p.m.
Howard O'Club - Fri., 6-9 p.m.
Prime Rib & Seafood; Sat., 5-9 p.m.
Prime Rib w/shrimp;Tues.- Thurs.
new club menu served in the bar
lounge and dining room from 6-8:30
p.m.; Closed Sun. & Mon.
Howard NCO Club - (Hrs. 5:30-9
p.m.) Fri., Surf & Turf; Sat., 2-1
steak & A La Carte dining; Mon.
closed for entomology; Tues.,
Mexican night; Wed., A La Carte
dining; Thur., A La Carte special.
Sherman Community Club - Tue.-
Sun., Pizza garden is open from 4-10
p.m., & La Vista dining room is open
Fri. & Sat. from 5:30-9:30 p.m.;
Closed Mon., Labor Day; Thurs, A
La Carte dining from 5:30-9:30 p.m.
Water Front Inn - Fri., Open from
3:30 p.m.-l:30 a.m.; Mon. thru Sat.,
open for fast food from 5:30-10 p.m.
Naval Station Anchorage Club -
(Hrs. 5-9 p.m.) Fri., Prime Rib; Sat.,
Prime Rib;. Sun. Grill sandwich bar,
4-10:30 p.m.; Mon., Family night,
pizza; Tue., special beef kabob;
Wed., Mongolian stir fried; Thurs.,
Southern fried chicken.
Naval Station O'Club - (Hrs. 5-9
p.m.) Fri., A La Carte-dining; Sat.,
Prime Rib; Sun., A La Carte dining;
Mon., Seafood special; Tues.,
Family night, Mexican; Wed.,
Mongolian Stir Fried; Thurs., Beef &
Burgundy.
Naval Station CPO Club - (Hrs. 5-9
p.m.) Fri., Chicken or beef kabob;
Sat., International Italian Cuisine;
Thurs., Fried chicken in a basket.
Red Door - Closed for renovation
Sept. 5-30.
Quarry Heights - Tue.-Sat., 6-10
p.m., dinner specials plus A La Carte
dining.


Entertainment

Albrook O'Club - Fri.& Sat., Disco
from 9:30 p.m.-l:30 a.m.
Bamboo Inn - Fri., Rock & Roll
band Saigon starting at 7 p.m.
Howard O'Club - Wed., bar bingo
starts 6 p.m.
Clayton NCO Club - Fri. & Sat.,
C&W in the Corral from 7 p.m.-1
a.m., and a live band in the Corner
Post Lounge from 11 p.m.-3 a.m.;
Mon., closed, Labor Day; Tue.,
C&W at the Corral from 7-11 p.m.;
Wed., Music in the Corner Post
Lounge from 7-midnight and Ladies
Night Disco from 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Davis Community Club - Fri. live
band music celebrating Hispanic
Heritage Week, starts 7 p.m.
Naval Station Anchorage Club -Fri.,
8-12, live band; Sat., D.J. 8-12
p.m.;Tues., 7:30 p.m., movie night.
Naval Station O'Club - Fri.- Thurs.,
Live entertainment.
Naval Station CPO Club - Fri., 5
p.m.-l a.m., DJ; Movie night, 2-6
p.m.
STRAC Club - Thurs., Men's Night,
Freestyle dancers, 5-7 p.m.


Lunch

Albrook O' Club - Tues.-Fri. from 11
a.m.-1 p.m.
Amador O'Club - Tues.- Fri. from
11:30 a.m.-l p.m. lunch specials;
closed Mon. for fumigation.
Bamboo Inn - Lunch specials 11
a.m.-2 p.m., Fri., Corvina or Chef
Salad; Sat., T-bone steak; Mon.,
Pork chops or Hamburger steak;
Tues., Beef Stew or Chicken fried
rice; Wed., all you can eat Tacos;
Thurs., Meat loaf or chow mein.
Clayton Guest House - Mon.,- Fri.,
Lunch specials from 11 a.m.- 2 p.m.
Clayton NCO Club - Mon.- Fri.
lunch specials from 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Davis Community Club -Tue.-
Thurs. Hispanic Heritage specials
from 11:30 a.m.-1 a.m.
Howard O'Club - Mon.-Fri. from
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Howard NCO Club - Mon.-Fri. from
11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Naval Station O'Club - Mon.-Sat.
from 11 a.m.-l:30 p.m.
Naval Station Anchorage Club -
Mon.-Fri. from 11 a.m.-l:30 p.m.
Quarry Heights - Mon.-Fri. lunch


I anI le F..nn, 11 -30 a-,1 n lT-


on as uI m 11:.J v a.-um.- J.m. .

Breakfast

Naval Station Anchorage Club -
Mon.-Fri. from 7-9:30 a.m.
Howard NCO Club - Mon.-Fri., sit
down breakfast, 6-9 a.m.
Quarry Heights O'Club - Mon.-Fri.,
until 8:30 a.m.; Sat., 7:30-9:30 a.m.;
closed Sun.


Sunday Brunch

Albrook O'Club -10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Amador O'Club - 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Clayton NCO Club -10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Davis Community Club- 10 a.m. to I
p.m.
Howard NCO Club -10 a.m. to 1
p.m.
Naval Station O'Club- 10:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m.
Sherman Community Club -La Vista
Room, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Games

Clayton NCO Club - Sun. & Tue.
starting at 6 p.m.
Davis Community Club - Sun.
starting at 3 p.m.; Wed., starting at 7
p.m.
Howard NCO Club - Sun., Bingo, 2
p.m.; Wed., Bingo, 6 p.m.
Naval Station Anchorage Club -
Thur. Bingo starting at 7 p.m.
Naval Station CPO Club - Sat.,
Dart's day 7-11 p.m.;Tue. Bingo
starts 5 p ..

Ask~~g


August Quality of Life Meeting sets issues


FT. CLAYTON (USARSO OPA)
- Questions dealing with selling
automobiles, banking hours and
proper maintenance of lawns were
the main issues at the August Quality
of Life Meeting.
Used car lots have been proposed
to help people sell their cars at a local
spot in Curundu. The cars must be in
proper working order to be placed in
the parking lot.
It was also noted that many cars
are being placed in the parking lot by
Burger King. Cars may be parked
there, but may not be abandoned, the
board decided.
The board was asked if the
banking hours could be adjusted to
the needs of the community. The
American Express Bank is currently
passing out a survey to find out
which days are best for them to be
open.
This is the annual survey for good
hours and days of the week when the
bank is utilized the most. Patrons of
the bank are encouraged to fill out a
survey form which will help decide
the final banking hours.


The bank has also set up a service
desk to help with questions and
passing out forms for new accounts.
Keeping yards cut and in an
orderly fashion is the responsibility
of each occupant, the board has
decided. Problems were voiced of
people not caring for their lawns even
after being asked by their neighbors.
Mayors were encouraged to help
improve the areas of coordination


and to keep people on their toes. The
problem could also be referred to the
Garrison commander.
In connection with that, the Yard
of the Month award is currently
getting proper approval before
becoming a part of community life.
Each month a yard will be selected as
the best yard and the owners will
receive prizes for their efforts. Prizes


will include free dinners, movie
passes and a $25, gift certificate from
AAFES.
The next Quality of Life Council
Meeting will be Sept. 15 at 9 a.m. on
the third floor of the Ft. Clayton
NCO Club. All issues to be addressed
by the council must be in no later
than the last Thursday of the month
preceding the next meeting.


HowardAFB to begin CFC campaign soon


HOWARD AFB (USAFSO
PAO) - The Combined Federal
Campaign will start in the near future
here, with a recommended goal of
$73,337.
Other Tactical Air Command
bases started their campaigns Sept. 1
and will continue through
November.
Each base will set their own goals,
according to SSgt. Kevin A. Brooks,
Headquarters TAC. It is
recommended that goals be set at 90
percent of average actual


contributions pledged over the past
three years.
"The objective is to get a goal that
is attainable and which can be
exceeded in an enthusiastic and
purposeful campaign," said Brooks.
"It will require some aggressiveness
on the part of project officers, but is
important that giving be kept
positive.
"CFC donations are strictly
voluntary, and designations are at
the discretion of each individual,"
Brooks continued. "There are so


many worthwhile organizations
eligible for contributions through
CFC that it is sometimes difficult to
choose."
Last year, TAC military and
civilian contributions totaled
$2,722,553 - 117 percent of the
command goal.

REGISTER









Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988 15

science watch


Sights on computers that think


Japan sets

TOKYO -- The Japanese
government is throwing its weight
behind the development of
computers made in the image of the
human mind.
The Ministry of International
Trade and Industry (MITI) wants to
conduct a $165,000 feasibility study
into "brainy" neural computers that
could lead to a 10-year, multi-billion
dollar project starting in the early
1990s.
"Our goal is to develop a
completely new neural model better
than those currently existing," said
Taizo Nishikawa, deputy director of
MITI's electronics policy division.
Neural computers would be
modeled after the human brain
which through its dense network of
inter-connected nerve cells can
process awesome quantities of data
and perform many tasks
simultaneously.
Though still the stuff of science
fiction, neural computers portend a
radical departure from conventional
computers, which operate on a
system of ones and and zeroes.
Conventional computers are fast,
but stupid -- they can do only one
thing at a time and do only what they
are told.
Neural computers -- in theory at
least -- could learn, judge and infer at
a basic level, letting them interpret
novel situations. But they won't be
ready until the next century.
"This is one of the key
technologies. It transcends anything
we've got now," said Peter Wolff, a
high technology analyst for


Yet Japan has still to duplicate
success in areas where research -- as
with neural computing -- would be at
a basic, rather than applied, level
experts said. Nor is japan's industry
united in how to pursue the research.
But with at least 15 Japanese firms
doing their own research into neural
computing, and the United States
and Europe planning or beginning
national research projects of their
own, MITI is keen to get going.
Its study will investigate various
theories on neural computing as well
as the potential of realizing them in
devices which use light rather than
electricity, or cell-like materials
rather than silicon or gallium
arsenide.

.-" 1


Prudential-Bache Securities.
"Neural research is an emerging
technology. The Japanese can jump
in, get a foothold and develop it. The
project would act as a catalyst for
industry," he said.
The MITI feasibility study, which
would start in April, is almost certain
to gain government approval but
long-term plans are unformulated,
Nishikawa said. Newspapers said
MITI was considering a plan so
spend between $300 to $375 million
over a decade.
Japan has long targeted crucial
industries technologies. And it has
been wildly successful: witness the
steel, car, consumer. electronics and
microchip industries.




,Mir
j'^^


Scientists probe space for origin of life


MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) -
- Scientists discussed Friday how
Martian soils, Jupiter's huge
atmospheric storms and evidence of
lakes on Venus relate to the search
for life's origins and the future of
U.S. space missions.
"We've just gotten a glimpse of
what there is," said Lynn Griffiths,
head of the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration
exobiology flight program. "The
clues to life's origins ... are going to
be found elsewhere in the solar
system."
The scientists spoke at a news
conference after participation in a
symposium or exobiology in the
solar system sponsored by the NASA
Ames Research Center.
Professor John Oro of the


University of Houston said
discoveries in thefield of exobiology
-- such as finding oceans on the
Jovian satellite Europa and
discovering that Mars once had more
atmosphere -- have practical and
important consequences.'
For example, he said, by studying
Earth's nearest planetary neighbor,
Mars, during the Viking program,
scientists learned about an
evolutionary history that can give us
lessons about what might happen on
Earth.
Examination of Martian soils
shows lakes and deep rivers once
covered the planet.
Evidence of lakes on Venus
collected during the pioneer-Venus
probe suggests the early inner solar
system contained planets with an


abundant water supply, a necessary
condition for life.
Discovery of large storms on
Jupiter during the Voyager project
indicate a natural laboratory for
chemical evolution, scientists
believe.
Dr. Harold Klein said these
discoveries and others provide "very
important clues" to tracing the
origins of Earth, the solar system and
life itself.
Dr. Geoffrey Briggs, director of
solar system exploration at the
NASA, said the country now spends
about $400 million a year on its
planetary exploration program and
will need about $600 million
annually within two or three years to
maintain a vigorous program and to
complete scheduled projects.


Glenn Carle, chief of solar system
exploration at the NASA-Ames,
noted the nation's space program has
weathered a series of setbacks but
added" now it appears like the
queen's about to give us new ships."
New programs on the launching
pad for next year include sending
exploratory probes to Venus,
Neptune and its satellite, Titan.
Dr. Harold Klein, who worked on
the Viking project to Mars, said
biology was just one of 14
components of Viking and he would
be pleased if that ratio is maintained
on future programs.
The U.S. space program, in
trouble since the explosion of the
shuttle Challenger, has gained
support from both major
presidential candidates this year.


Doctors document case of steroid addiction
NEW YORK -- A young Studies suggest as many as one combat chronic infection and severe calf muscles, dilated pupils, an
bodybuilder who regularly used million U.S. athletes may be using trauma. enlarged liver, testicles about one-
massive doses of anabolic steroids anabolic steroids, derivatives of the The unidentified athlete injected half normal size and acne and needle
apparently became addicted to the male hormone testosterone, to build himself every other day with marks over the upper arm and
drugs and suffered withdrawal muscles and improve performance. Dianobol and Primobolan and took buttocks.
symptoms similar to those induced ,,t, ........... ... ,,_ , r- . ..... ,. A-A^_ A,..... . A_,.I :i. The letter said the athlete had


by heroin, doctors said in one of the
first documented cases of steroid
addiction.
The 23-year-old athlete had been
using the steroids every day for three
years, Dr. Forest Tennant said in a
letter to the editor in the Sept. 1
edition of the New England Journal
of Medicine.
The athlete said his weight had
risen from about 176 pounds to 224
pounds and he felt uncontrallably
violent, paranoid, an suicidal while
using the steroids.


t I very commonIIIIIIIIn sports, LIr.
Robert Voy, director of sports
medicine and science on the U.S.
Olympic Committee, told Reuters.
Voy and David Black of the
Vanderbilt Child and Adolescent
Psychiatric Hospital in Nashville,
Tenn. also signed the letter to the
Journal.
The steroids, banned along with
other performance-enhancing drugs
in many athletic competitions, are
legitimately used to help patients
gain weight after surgery or to


tWO others, /rAavadl aiiu AnadrolU , 111
pill form each day.
The doses were 10 to 12 times
higher than normal, a technique
called "stacking," the letter said.
Tennant said the athlete, whom he
treated in west Covina, Calif., could
not stop using the drugs without
suffering withdrawal symptoms,
including depression and disabling
fatigue.
He said the body builder had
marked enlargement of the trapezius.
deltoid, pectoral biceps, thigh and


Symptoms similar to those observed
in cases of narcotics addiction.
Over a six-day withdrawal period,
he suffered nausea, chills, headache,
dizziness and increased perspiration,
pulse rate and blood pressure, the
letter said. It said most of the
symptoms faded after five days.
A day later the patient called to say
he could not stand his depression,
fatigue, and craving for steroids and
he planned to resume using the
drugs, the letter said.


The study will also look onto
approaches to neural computing in
the West, where activity is heating
up.
The U.S. Defense Advanced
Research Projects Agency
(DARPA) is advocating an eight-
year, $390 million Neural Network
Program, experts said.
DARPA believes neural networks,
the precursor of neural computers,
offer the best approach to artificial
intelligence (AI) -- the duplication,
through computers, of human
thought processes.
Neural networks could make
possible more sophisticated
detection and surveillance of military
targets and lead to high-speed
analysis of several streams of data
simultaneously. Such analysis,
known as data fusion, is crucial to the
U.S. Strategic Defense Initiative
(SDI) known as "Star Wars."
The European Commission (EC)
has shelled out $1.65 million for
research projects known as the
BRAIN initiative (Basic Research in
Adaptive Intelligence and
Neurocomputing).
Six projects will involve almost
100 researchers in 28 laboratories,
and additional projects are being
considered, an EC spokeswoman
here said.
In Japan, not all scientists like the
idea of a national project run by MITI
which would support industrial
rather than academic research. Some
say MITI would siphon funds away
from academics who are best at basic
research.










1 Tropic Times
1 USept. 16, 1988


tv guide


Friday


6:00 a.m. CNN Headline News
6:30 NBC At Sunrise
7:00 NBC Today Show
9:00 It Figures
9:27 Just Kidding
9:52 Serendipity Singers Show
10:20 CNN Newsbreak
10:30 Classic Concentration
I1:00 Super Password
11 30 Taxi
Noon CNN Headline News
12-30 p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:40 CNN Sports Tonight
1:10 Oprah Winfrey...Teacher-Student Affairs
(Mature Theme)
2:00 Another World
2:57 NBC News Digest
2:59 Bridget Loves Bernie
3:26 Mr. Roger's Neighborhood
3:55 CNN Newsbreak
4:03 It Figures
4:25 Guiding Light
5:13 General Hospital
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 NBC Sports Olympic Opening
Ceremonies
11:00 CNN Headline News
11:30 Late Night With David Letterman
12:30 a.m. Nightline
1:00 All Night Movie..."Brubaker"(131 min., Mature
Theme)
3:12 All Night Movie..."The King Of The Olympics"
(93 min., Mature Theme)
4:47 All Night Movie..."The King Of The Olympics"
(Pt. 2, 94 min.)
6:23 Videolink



Saturday

7:00 a.m. CNN Daybreak
7:29 Just For Kids!
7:30 Care Bears Family
7:56 Huckleberry Hound & Friends
8:27 Bravestarr
8:52 Heathcliff
9:17 Popeye And Son
9:43 Nickelodeon Movie..."Emil & The Detectives
(96 min.)
(94 min.)
11:30 CNN Headline News
noon NBC Baseball & Pre-Game Show (3 hrs.)
3:00 NBC Olympics (3 hrs.)
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 NBC Olympics (4.5 hrs.)
11:00 Cnn Headline News
11:30 NBC Olympics (2 hrs.)
1:30 a.m. All Night Movie..."Rebecca" (147 min.)
4:00 All Night Movie..."Play Misty For Me" (104
min.) (Mature Theme)
5:45 Grand Ole Opry Live Backstage
6:10 Grand Ole Opry Live
6:40 Videolink



Sunday



7:00 a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics
11:00 CNN Headline News
11:30 NFL Live
noon NFL Pro Football (3 hrs.)
3:00 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics
11:00 CNN Headline News
11:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics



Monday


6:00 a.m.
8:59
9:23
10:20


NBC Summer Olympics/Today Show
It Figures
Sesame Street
CNN Headline Newsbreak


10:30
11:00
11:30
Noon
12:30 p.m.
12:40
1:10

2:00
3;00
3:59
3:58
4:44
5:30
6:00
6:30
11:00
11:30


Classic Concentration
Super Password
Rhoda
CNN Headline News
SCN Midday Report
George Michael's Sports Machine
Oprah Winfrey...Child Preachers
(Mature Theme)
Another World
NBC f988 Summer Olympics
The Guiding Light
It Figures
General Hospital
SCN Evening Report
NBC Nightly News
NBC 1988 Summer Olympics
CNN Headline News
NBC 1988 Summer Olympics


Tuesday

6:00 a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics/Today
Show
9:00 Ensign O'Toole
9:27 The Partridge Family
9:53 Last Of The Wild
10:20 CNN Headline Newsbreak
10:30 Classic Concentration
11:00 Super Password
11:30 Get Smart
Noon CNN Headline News
12:30 p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:40 CNN Sports Tonight
1:08 Donahue...Soap Opera Stars (Mature
Theme)
2:00 .Another World
3:00 NBC 1988 Summers Olympics
3:59 Guiding Light
4:44 General Hospital
5:30 SCN Evening Report
6:00 NBC Nightly News
6:30 nbc 1988 Summer Olympics
11:00 CNN Headline News
11:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics



Wednesday

6:00 a.m. NBC Summer Olympics/Today Show
8:59 It Figures
9:23 Sesame Street
10:21 CNN Headline Newsbreak
10:30 Classic Concentration
11:00oo Super Password
11:30 Fight Back! With David Horowitz
Noon CNN Headline News
12:30 p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:40 CNN Sports Tonight
1:10 Oprah Winfrey...Babysitting Abuses
(Mature Theme)
2:00 Another World
3:00 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics
3:59 Guiding Light
4:43 General Hospital
5:30 SCN Evening Report
6:00 NBC Nightly News
6:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics
11:00oo CNN Headline News
11:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics



Thursday


6:00 a.m.
9:00
9:30
9:53
10:20
10:30
11:00
11:30
Noon
12:30 p.m.
12:40
1:08
2:00
3:00
3:59
4:44
5:30
6:00
6:30
11:00
11:30


NBC Summer Olympics/Today Show
Huckleberry Finn & Friends
Kidsongs
Dennis The Menace
CNN Headline Newsbreak
Classic Concentration
Super Password
Frugal Gourmet
CNN Headline News
SCN Midday Report
CNN Sports Tonight
Donahue...One Night Stands (Mature Topic
Another World
NBC 1988 Summer Olympics
Guiding Light
General Hospital
SCN Evening Report
NBC Nightly News
NBC 1988 Summer Olumpics
CNN Headline News
NBC 1988 Summer Olympics


Sports On SCN-TV
Friday

7:00 p.m. Summer Olypics Opening Ceremonies (4 Hrs)
Bryant Gumbel hosts

Saturday

12:00 p.m. NBC baseball & Pre- Game Show (3 Hrs)
Montreal Expos at N.Y. Mets or San Francisco
Giants at Houston Astros (Choice by NBC)

- NOTE: Olypic events will be listed on SCN's Daily TV
Guide.

3:00 p.m..NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (3 Hrs)
6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4 Hrs)
11:30 p:m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs)

Sunday

7:00 a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4 Hrs)
11:30 a.m. The NFL Live (30 Min) A Look at NFL action
12:00 p.m. NFL Pro Football (3 Hrs)
Decision on game aired made by NBC.
3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (3 Hrs)
6:30 p.m. NBC 1988' Summer Olympics (4.5 Hrs)
11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs)

Monday .

6:00 a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (3 Hrs)
3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer OLympics (I Hr)
6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4.5 Hrs)
11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs)

Tuesday

6:00 a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics/Today Show (3
Hrs)
3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (1 Hrs)
6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4.5 Hrs)
11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs)

Wednesday

6:00 a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics/Today Show (3
Hrs)
3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (3 Hrs)
6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4.5 Hrs)
11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs)

Thursday

6:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics/Today Show (3
Hrs)
3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (3 Hrs)
6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4.5 Hrs)
11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs)


Movies On SCN-TV

Brubaker - Robert Redford stars as a warden who sets
about reforming a prison but finds some deadly secrets are
hidden there as well.
King Of The Olympics - The Life and Loves of Avery
Brundage - This mini-series was aired recently, but many
have asked that we show it just one more time. avery
Brundage was the leader and a member of the International
Olympic Committee for over 40 years. In all the globe-
trotting he did in those years he acquired a wife, a lover and
children. This is the story of the man who made the
Olympics his life. Played at the start of the 1988 Summer
Olympic Games.
Emil and the Detectives - Emil (Bryan Russell) is going to
Berlin to visit his grandmother (Elsa Wagner) and give her
some money, but on the bus he's robbed by a pickpocket.
Arriving in Berlin he hires two detectives to help him find
the thief.
Rebecca - A young, unsophisticated girl (Joan Fontaine)
marries a country gentleman (Laurence Olivier) who is
dominated by the memory of his first wife in this Alfred
Hitchcock film.
Play Misty For Me - Clint Eastwood and Jessica Walter
star in this story about a woman who seeks to dominate a
disc jockey and make him her own, but what deadly secret
does she hide?

Special On SCN-TV

The 1988 Summer Olympic Games - Start with the
Opening Ceremony Friday Evening and continue
throughout the next two weeks. Tune in SCN daily for TV
Guide listings of Olympic Events.









Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988 1 7

women's world



Women are majority among new vet students


SACRAMENTO, Calif. (UPI) -
- A steep decline during this decade
in male applicants to U.S. veterinary
schools has made women the
majority sex among incoming
veterinarian students, a school
official said.
Since 1980, the number of
applications to the 27 veterinary
schools in the United States has
dropped 42 percent. The decrease in
male applicants from 4,061 to 1,689
has accounted for 77 percent of that
drop, says Robert Hansen, associate
dean of student services for the
University' of California, Davis,
School of Veterinary Medicine.
While men made up 57 percent of
the incoming classes of veterinarians
in 1980, they represented only 43
percent of the 1987 freshmen,


Hansen said.
The incoming veterinary class at
UCD is composed of 91 women and
31 men, Hansen said.
Hansen says he is not certain what
has caused the decrease in the
number of male applicants, but
theorized that money may be a
leading factor.
"One (reason) that may make
some sense is the economic outcome
of going into veterinary medicine as a
career," Hansen said. "Salaries and
earnings for veterinary medicine are
not nearly what they would be for
human medicine."
The average first-year salary for a
graduating veterinarian in the United
States is between $20,000 and
$22,000, according to theCalifornia
Association of Veterinary Medicine.


Miss America former 'blimpo'


ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) -
Newly crowned Miss America
Gretchen Elizabeth Carlson, a
Minnesota car dealer's daughter
whose brothers once called her
"blimpo," is a sushi-loving Swedish-
American who hopes to be a
corporate attorney.
The confident new Miss America
1989 says chance didn't figure into
her win.
"This wasn't luck," she said just
hours after her crowning in this
seaside resort's Convention Center
early Sunday, adding that she didn't
bring any good-luck charms to the
62nd Miss America Pageant.
The 22-year-old woman from the
Minneapolis suburb of Anoka said
her own skills brought her the crown.
After winning a preliminary talent
competition earlier in the week, Miss
Minnesota said parts of her
performance were "exquisite."
Miss Carlson performed a spirited
violin solo titled "Gypsy Airs." She
has studied violin for 17 years,
winning national and state violin
competitions.
"I'm definitely an overachiever,"
she said.
This year, pageant officials took
special pains to emphasize that the
judges were looking for an
"articulate, educated, dynamic role
model" and not just a beauty queen.
Miss Carlson is several credits
away from graduating from Stanford
University with a degree in
organizational behavior. She says
she wants to attend Harvard Law
School "and become a successful
corporate executive."
But for the next year, Miss Carlson


will tour the country promoting the
Miss America scholarship program.
She also will push the products of the
pageant's corporate sponsors,
including underwear, orange juice,
pantyhose and hair coloring.
Last year's Miss America, Kaye
Lani Rae Rafko, also used her reign
to promote nursing.
Miss Carlson said she wants to
focus on "education for the children
of tomorrow. "Specifically,she wants
to see children receive more
education on values, "teaching
children to be less narcissistic."
"Today children tend to be more in
love with themselves instead of being
in love with other people," said Miss
Carlson.
The new queen traveled later
Sunday to New York City with Miss
Rafko, who will stay on for several
days to orient the new titleholder.
Miss Carlson planned to pick out a
personal wardrobe for the year and
prepare for television appearances.
When asked what kind of Miss
America she would make, Miss
Carlson laughed and replied, "A
short one."
The 5-foot-3 Miss Carlson didn't
have to bend when Miss Rafko
placed the crown on her head. At 108
pounds, she is 20 pounds lighter than
the hefty 120 she weighed when she
was 16.
"When I used to be fat, my
brothers used to call me "blimpo,"
she said, adding that she "went on
this major diet and lost all this
weight."
Today the green-eyed blonde of
Swedish descent likes to dine on
sushi.


Pope says liberation in religion


TURIN, Italy (Reuter) -- Pope
John Paul II said on Sunday the
religious life could be a way of
liberation for women and that
progress and personal fulfillment
were not to be found through sexual
freedom or disregard for moral
precepts.
In an address to some 2,300 nuns
gathered in Turin's 19th century
church of Mary Help of Christians,
the pope restated the traditional
values of chastity and obedience.
The pontiff, who is expected to
issue a special document later this
month on the role of women in
today's church, told the nuns: "In the
course of history, there have been
many contradictory ideas that


present progress and personal
fulfillment in terms of sexual liberty,
the elimination of moral laws and
emancipation from the religious way
of life.
"Crises of personal and
institutional identity are a sorrowful
sign of these contradictions and a cry
for help."
Last Friday the pope praised U.S.
bishops for seeking to end sexual
discrimination in the Catholic
church.
The pope told the bishops the
church wanted to serve the cause of
women in the modern world and to
help clarify their rights and duties,
while 'defending "feminine dignity
and vocation."


Hansen said the average for all
veterinarians is $41,000.
"I don't know if I'd say women are
more satisfied with a lower salary. I
think that's untrue, Hansen said.
"I think women enter health
professions for reasons other than
monetary. I know that's just one
man's opinion, but I talk to a lot of
applicants."
Vicki Robertson, a Los Angeles
veterinarian and a past president of
the Association for Women
Veterinarians, does believe that
"women will work for less money."
But she also said that anyone who
goes into veterinary medicine, male


or female, does not do it primarily for
money.
"In the areas of small-animal
practices in urban settings, probably
we have too many vets," he said. But
new veterinarians still are needed for
large-animal, rural practices, he said.
Hansen, who interviews all
qualified applicants to UCD's
veterinary school, said he doubts
men will receive any special
consideration when applying
because of their new minority status.
"We've got a lot of affirmative
action to catch up with before we
start thinking about affirmative
action for men,"he said.


WOMEN AT WORK


Changing Trends
In Education
by Tamara Jones

ADAPTING FOR THE NEXT
BUSINESS CYCLE: The educa-
tional trend seems to be moving
away from the once coveted MBA
(Master of Business Administration)
degree to degrees in the Arts and the
Sciences. Although business will
continue to dominate much of the
American job market over the next
several years, experts predict the
economy will cause business to shift
from largely service-oriented to
export-driven. This means employ-
ers will be looking for people who
can adapt to the more diverse
requirements that will be part of this
change.
Apparently, some employers find
that people with a background in
liberal arts tend to be be more
adaptable to change. (Of course, this
is a generalization; some MBAs may
be more flexible in outlook than
those with Arts degress.) As one
employer told me: "I can retrain
anyone working for me. That's no
problem. The problem is whether or
not they're willing to be retrained.
Some of my business school gradu-
ates get scared just thinking of
having to change specialties."
The new export economy will still
need people with advanced business
degrees. However, the focus should
be widened to include courses in
international marketing and foreign
languages. Since Americans tend to
show a shameful lack of geography
and world history, these areas


should also be strengthened.
Education majors will be needed
to teach the children of corporate
personnel sent abroad to handle the
increased international trade.
Nurses and medical technicians
will also be recruited for overseas
work. Courses in foreign languages,
therefore, should be included for
those pursuing Bachelor or Masters'
degrees in Science. Chinese, Japan-
ese, Russian and Spanish lead the
list. German is important. French is
vital since it's still used in many
parts of Africa and Southeast Asia.
The expanded international trade
picture is also a positive trend for
those who are not looking for
management or executive positions.
Administrative personnel will be in
demand, as will computer program-
mers and librarians. Technicians will
be needed to maintain the enhanced
technology that will be used to
handle the increased information
flow.
CHILD SUPPORT FOR WORK-
ING WOMEN: Many working
women are not able to collect
mandated child support payments
from husbands or ex mates who
ignore court orders. In many cases,
the women can't afford to take time
away from their jobs to press for
collection in court, nor can they pay
lawyers to act for them. In this
election year, it might be a good idea
to alert our candidates that some-
thing needs to be done. (Any
thoughts? Send them to me c/o King
Features Weekly Service, 235 East
45 Street, New York, N.Y. 10017.)
(C) 1988 by King Features. Synd.


_ d- IL � -~e~L~s I







8 Tropic Times
10 Sept. 16 1988

sports


Motivation and teamwork can


. make people cross a country


SEVENTH ANNUAL TRANSISTHMIAN RELAY RACE


LEG COURSE LAYOUT



1 (Start) In front of Red Barn located next to
Margarita Clubhouse.


2 Approximately 50 yards in front of
the Heres Mattress factory.


3 Near large billboard which says
"Milano International."


4 Yellow post marker 1869 east of
Gatun Lookout.


5 Bridge at Bodega Elida northwest of
PLANT ESSO.


6 "Y" in highway with large sign
stating "PU RO VIGOR" which is the
halfway point to Coco Solo.


7 Bridge with numbers 30K and 632
(Chilibre) at "EL REMANSO" Bar
and Restaurant (turn right at "Y"
and take Madden Road through rain
forest).


8 General Torrijos Memorial in the
rainforest (waterfall in background).


9 Baseball field in Paraiso at the
intersection of Paraiso Road and
Gaillard Highway (cross railroad
tracks at Pedro Miguel Locks).


10 Bus stop across the highway from
Crossroads Church (turn right at
McKinely Avenue, pass Army Cold
Storage Warehouse, building 300,
then right at Balboa YMCA through
main gate of Ft. Amador, left at
circle to Officers Club via officers'
housing area along golf course.)


FINISH: Fort Amador Officers
Club


DISTANCE.



5.4



5.1



4.8



5.0



5.0



4.8




5.4






5.7



4.8





4,6









TOTAL

50.6 miles


All relay points will be marked with
orange paint.


by Spec. Monique Chere
Tropic Times staff writer
The Marine Corps Barracks at
U.S. Naval Station Panama started
the event to commemorate their
service's birthday. It began at
Colon's city limits, went over the
Bridge of the Americas, and ended at
Rodman Officers Club.
But its popularity and growing
number of participants led the Army
to take over direction.
In 1987, 86 teams ran from the
Atlantic to the Pacific. This year.
runners in the USARSO-sponsored
Trans-lsthmian Relay tie their laces
Dec. 17.
There are four categories for
entrants: Open, Military (active duty
personnel only), Over 40, and
Women. Each category is open to
both sexes, except for the Women
category.
Participants run a course of 50.6
miles beginning in front of Red Barn
located next to Margarita Clubhouse
on the Atlantic side and ending at the
Ft. Amador Officers Club on the
Pacific side. Each leg is from 4.6 to
5.7 miles.
"Legs two and three require
'mountain goats' because they are
steep uphill grades," said Mike
Uhorchak, frequent relay
participant, and DOA employee at
DCSRM, PA & E.
"Leg five, although the easiest, is
"where runners tend to 'crash and
burn,' " said Uhorchak, because it's
the easiest part. People go all out and
get overheated."
There are no way stations set up
for the race and it's up to the support
groups (a maximum of two vehicles
per team) to take care of team


members with liquids and shouts of
encouragement.
Vehicles may not travel alongside
the runners.
"Vehicles should mo\e in leaps
and bounds," said Robert O. Appin.
command sports director at
Commu nit, Recreation Division,
Sports Branch. Ft. Clayton. "All
vehicles should travel at least one-
eighth of a mile before the runners."
MEDDAC ambulances are
stationed throughout the route and
trail the last runner, according to
Appin. Most of the cases they handle
during a race will be heat-related, he
said.
Spectators are able to view the
runners only at the start and finish of
the race, due to the limitations of the
Trans-lsthmian Highway. "This is a
race for the runners and their support
groups," Appin said.
Food and beverages will be
available at the finish on a pay-as-
you-go basis said Appin.
Trophies wii be awarded to first,
second and third place winners in
each category at a ceremony at the
Amador Officers Club at 1:30 p.m.
the day of the race. Certificates will
be given to all team members.
The Panamanian Defense Forces
relay team record of 4:21:46, in 1986
remains unbeaten.
In 1987 the top teams in each
category were: Open - Adidas'Balboa
- 4:21:41: Military - 3,7 Special
Forces Group - 5:09:10: Over 40 -
Nike Masters - 5:31: 41; and Womer
- Road Runners - 6:06:54.
Training for a relay-marathoi:
requires team spirit. December 17 is
three months away, and now is the
time to begin getting a team
together.
The Marines started something


that has seemingly become a
permanent fixture in Panama. A bit
unstructured, the Trans-lsthmian
S" ,' Relay has become an annual event
/.> ",u that is enjoyed by thousands. It's not
S" often one can say he or she has run in
Sa race across a country and from
coast to coast.
SBut, the Trans-lsthmian remains a
/ , race of participation and teamwork,
n / -ot necessarily competition. And
' that's what required to cross a
highway through the jungle.

Registration forms are
' available now at the CRD office,
I ' building 154,, Ft. Clayton. Entry
fee is $75 per team which includes
a T-shirt.. ' >r all team runners.
Team representatives must attend
S all briefings. The first meeting is
. scheduled for Nov. 9 at the Valent
/Recreation Club, Ft. Clayton.
Interested individuals may also
S ,attend. For more information call
S'./the CRD office at 287-5618 or
- " 287-4050.



~I*;~cgarjZ~~~,~K















Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988 17



Red Machine wins annual Jamboree


Balboa High School's Red
Machine football team scored 26
points, was unscored upon, won
three quarters and tied one to win the
annual Jamboree for the second year
in a row. The Red, coached by Rick
Dahlstrom, Mike Erhart and John
Magee, looked very strong in the
round-robin competition against the
other DODDS varsity teams and
appears to be the leading contender
in the fight for the league
championship.
In the first quarter of play the Red
faced the PCC Green Devils. A 32-
yard pass from Red QB Dennis
Cowles to Carlos Welch set up a 30-
yard field goal by Torrey Gragg that
split the uprights with 12 seconds
remaining to get the Red a 3-0
victory.
'The second period matched up the


Bulldogs


Green De


Last Friday evening Coach Vince
Martinez' Balboa Bulldogs hosted
Louie Husted's Green Devil Football
team at the Balboa Stadium in the
season opener for both teams. The
Bulldogs came away at the end of the
evening with a hard earned 7-0
victory over the Devils. In the tough
defensive battle neither team was
able to do much on the ground. The
Bulldogs rushed for 63 yards and the
Devils for a net 29. The Bulldog
defensive attackers were able to sack
the Devil quarterbacks five times for
a total loss of 43 yards, virtually
wiping out what would have been a
respectable rushing total. The Devils
got to the Bulldog QB three times for
19 lost yards and a fumble recovery.
A tough rush up front also helped the
Devils defensive backs to intercept 3
Balboa passes. Johnny Haines
grabbed two and Robert Kimbrough
one.
Both teams had opportunities to
score early in the game but failed.
Green defensive end Russel
Strombers forced a Balboa fumble
recovered by Jason Sweeney close to
the Bulldog goal line, but a series of
penalties put the Devils out of range.



Defensive


home team CHS Tigers against the
Curundu Cougars. Coach Fred
Bales' Cougars won the quarter 6-0
when Randy Jones threw to Ed
McDonald for a 40-yard touchdown
midway through the period. Tiger
Ricky Walker blocked the extra
point attempt. The Tigers' drive
toward the Cougar goal line at the
end of the period was stopped inside
the 20 by a fumble.
The third quarter saw the Red
defeating the Bulldogs 7-0. Jack
Sorenson stole a Bulldog handoff
and dashed 60 yards for the Red
score. Torrey Gragg converted.
Sorenson also stung the Bulldogs
with an interception which included
a 14 yard return.
In the fourth contest the Cougars
and Devils played to a zero-zero tie.
Roberto Sealey snatched a Green


shutout


vils, 7-0


Robert Thrift picked up a Devil
fumble and ran.42 yards to the very
edge of the goal line before being
caught by Jason Sweeney. The green
line held and time ran out in the first
half to prevent a score.
The difference for the Bulldogs
came in the air. QB Ralph Furlong
passed 14 times for seven.
completions and 124 yards in the air,
including a TD toss of 30 yards to
Ken Jenkins. Furlong also kicked
the extra point.
The Devils were unable to match
the Balboans in the air although
Johnny Haines did complete four of
nine passes for fifty yards. The
leading rusher for the evening was
fullback Ricky Larkin, who gained
33 yards in just four slashing runs
from the devil backfield.
Captains for the Devils were
Russell Stromberg, Jason Sweeney,
Chris Findlay and David Wall.
Bulldog captains were Ernie
Holland, Ralph Furlong and Ed
Winkler. Friday night the Bulldogs
will face the Cougars at Balboa and
the Devils will travel to Tiger country
to take on Cristobal. Game time
7 p.m.


battles


Devil pass at the end ofthe quarter to
prevent the Devils from scoring.
The fifth contest was another tie
between the Tigers and Bulldogs.
Tiger lineman Adonicio Hartley
recovered a fumbled punt but
Lawrence Groom returned the favor
by intercepting a Tiger pass. The
Bulldogs threatened at the end of the
quarter after Robert Thrift hit Ken
Jenkins for a 40-yard pass
completion. Thrift then drove the
ball to the Tigers' 5 only to be held
scoreless due to an offensive pass
interference penalty.
The 6th, 7th and 8th quarters all
ended in ties. In the ninth contest the
Red Machine offense really
unloaded against the Tigers, securing
the Jamboree Championship. The
Red scored on a 7-yard pass to Alex
Velez from Cowles and on a 31-yard


run with Mike Joseph. Rey Francis
ran over both conversions for bonus
points. The Red finished the night
with a 16-0 win over CHS and
walked away with their second
consecutive Jamboree Champion-
ship.
The final contest was for runner-
up between the Cougars and the
Bulldogs prevailed based on veteran
quarterback Ralph Furlong's 22-
yard run which set up a QB'sneak and
a Bulldog victory.
The lovely queens for the
Jamboree were Jackie Brogie-Red,
Amy Vowell-Cougars, Lisa
Deslondes-Bulldogs, Eddy Lynn
Corrigan-Devils and Marcie Dodge-
Tigers.
Games will be played each Friday
evening through early November.


mark opening of 1988


Youth football season


Last Saturday evening was the
opening of the 1988 Youth tackle
football season. In the light weight
division the Fort Clayton Cowboys
earned a 20-0 win over the Fort
Kobbe Raiders. In Balboa Stadium
the Balboa Rams defeated last years
lightweight champs, the Kiwanis
Kolts, by a score of 14-0. The Ram
scores came on a two-yard run by
Eric Diaz and a sixty-yard run after
an interception by Alfredo Richards
at the end of the game. Diaz also had
a successful conversion and was the
leading rusher with 18 carries for 88
yards.
In the heavy weight division the
Rams did it again with an identical
14-0 score over the Kolts. The first
TD came on a QB keep by James


Beattie. The Rams second
touchdown came on a pitch to
Ricardo Salazar. Chris Hovan split
the uprights for the two-point
conversion.
Outstanding defensive players
included Ryan Underwood with two
fumble recoveries, Edwin Herrera
and Fred Cordero who also
recovered fumbles and Eugene
Monaghan who stole a Kolt handoff.
Kolt defensive player Eduardo
Pardo, intercepted a Ram pass and
number 00, Juan Hincapie, played an
outstanding defensive game.
On Saturday Sept. 17 the Atlantic
Figers' lightweight team will visit the
Kolts at 3 p.m. at Balboa Stadium.
The Rams will travel to Fort
Clayton's Jarman field with the light


weights' game scheduled for 5 p.m.
and the heavy weights for 7 p.m.

While the Bulldogs and Devils
were flexing their defensive muscles
the Red Machine went over to
Cristobal's stadium to practice
offence. The Reds emassed 141 yards
on the ground and 45 in the air, while
scoring four touchdowns. Dennis
Cowles threw two touchdowns to
Warren Stephens. Cowles was 5 for
11 in the air. Cowles also scored on
the ground with a 46-yard TD sprint.
He finished the night with 53 yards
rushing. Running back Mike Joseph
rushed for a respectable 46 yards in 8
carries. He also recovered a CHS
fumble.
The Red defense didn't do so had


either. CHS was held to negative
yardage on the ground and the Red
ripped off two Tiger passes, one by
David Daniel and the other by
Torrey Grass who ran 27 yards for
another TD. Grass also kicked an
extra point. Todd Underwood and
Jack Sorenson contributed to the
Red's defensive success. Sorenson
played his last game on the Isthmus
and has left for Chicago. He will be
sorely missed by the Machine.
The Tiger gained some respect in
the air. QB Greg Gerringer
completed two out of five attempts
for 29 yards. Shawn McCracken was
two for six and 23 yards. The longest
pass of the evening was a 26-yard toss
from Gerringer to Matt Rigby.
The Red has a bye this weekend.


i












2 Tropic Times
2U Sept. 16, 1988



NFL REPORT


Week 2


Bills 9 Dolphins 6


ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. (AP) --
Scott Norwood kicked two of his
three field goals in the fourth quarter
as the Buffalo Bills overcame four
turnovers to edge the Miami
Dolphins 9-6 Sunday.
Norwood gave Buffalo its second
win of the year with the last of the
game's five field goals -- a 28-yarder -
- with 3:12 left in the game after an
ineligible man downfield penalty
nullified a 7-yard Jim Kelly to Chris
Burkett touchdown pass.
The Dolphins, who fell to 0-2, had
a chance to tie late in the game when
they drove from their own 28 to the
Buffalo 35. But on fourth down, Dan
Marino's pass to Jim Jensen fell
incomplete with 37 seconds left.
Buffalo rookie running back
Thurman Thomas gained 74 yards
on 21 carries and added three catches
for 57 yards. Bills wide receiver
Andre Reed caught eight passes for
122 yards.
Two of the Bills' turnovers led
directly to Dolphin scores, with Fuad
Reveiz snapping a 3-3 tie late in the
third quarter with a 27-yard kick.
The Bills were driving from their
own 7 when Miami linebacker John
Offerdahl knocked the. ball from
Buffalo receiver Trumaine Johnson
following a short pass play.
Dolphins linebacker Hugh Green
recovered the fumble at the Buffalo
32 and returned it five yards. The
Dolphins moved another 17 yards
before stalling and giving way to
Reveiz.


Buffalo responded on their next
possession, with Thomas getting the
bulk of the yardage in a 64-yard drive
that ended with Norwood's 35-yard
field goal tying the score at 6-6 early
in the fourth quarter.
A 50-yard field goal attempt by
Reveiz later in the quarter would
have given Miami a9-6 lead but it fell
short by several feet.
Kelly had 15 completions in 24
attempts for 231 yards, while Marino
finished with 22 completions in 34
attempts for 221 yards.


Bears 17 Colts 13



INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -- Matt
Suhey's 2-yard touchdown run put
Chicago ahead, and a fumble
recovery by Steve McMichael and
pass interception by Vestee Jackson
halted late Indianapolis drives in the
Bears' 17-13 NFL victory over the
Colts on Sunday.
The Colts took a 13-10 lead on a
12-yard run by Eric Dickerson early
in the final period, then drove to the
Chicago 37 before Dickerson
fumbled with under six minutes
remaining.
The Bears took over and worked
the clock to 1:38 before a punt gave
the Colts their last chance.
But the first pass from quarterback
Jack Trudeau was intercepted by
Jackson and the Bears retained
possession the rest of the game.
Jackson also intercepted Trudeau's
first pass in the first quarter, starting
Chicago's first touchdown drive.
Chicago is 2-0, Indianapolis 0-2.


The touchdown by Suhey capped a
77-yard, 12-play drive that started
early in the fourth quarter after the
touchdown by Dickerson.
Dickerson's score came one play
after his apparent touchdown pass
reception was nullified by an
interference penalty against
teammate Matt Bouza.
Both Chicago scoring drives in the
first half, resulting in a 35-yard
touchdown pass from Jim
McMahon to Dennis Gentry and a
40-yard field goal by Kevin Butler,
also were kept alive by Indianapolis
penalties.
The Chicago defense, meanwhile,
held Indianapolis to two field goals
by Dean Biasucci and limited
Trudeau to only one completion in
10 attempts until he hit Clarence
Verdin for 48 yards late in the third
period. Three plays later, Dickerson
scored for the 13-10 lead, the only
lead by Indianapolis in the game.


Skins 30 Steelers 29


WASHINGTON (AP) -- Chip
Lohmiller kicked a 19-yard field goal
with 12 seconds left Sunday to give
the Washington Redskins a 30-29
comeback victory over the
Pittsburgh Steelers.
Bubby Brister threw two long
touchdown passes and ran for
another score to help Pittsburgh take
a 29-20 lead with 9:29 remaining.
But a 7-yard pass from Redskin
quarterback Doug Williams to
Kelvin Bryant cut the margin to 29-
27 with 4:48 left, and Washington
moved from its own 44 to the


Pittsburgh 1-yard line in the final
three minutes to put Lohmiller in
position for his game-winning kick.
Art Monk had two receptions
totalling 23 yards on te' final drive,
which also featured a 2-yard run by
rookie Jamie Morris on a third-and-
one play from the Pittsburgh 35.
The victory enabled the defending
Super Bowl champions to improve
their record to 1-1.



NFL

STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pet. FF PA


Bufff alo
New England
NY Jets
Indianapolis
Mi ami
C
Cincinnati
Houston
Cleveland
Pittsburgh

Seattle
Denver
LA Raiders
Kansas City
San Diego
NATIONAL

NY Giants
Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas
Phoeni ;
C
Chicago
Detroit
Minnesota
Tampa Bay
Green Bay

LA Rams
San Francisco
New Orleans
Atlanta


2 0 0 1. 00l
1 1 0 .500
1 1 . 5
1 2 0 .

centrall
2 0 0 1. 000

1 1 0 500
1 1 ) .500
West
2 0 0 .000
1 1 0 .500:
1 . 1 0 . 500
0 2 0 .000

CONFERENCE
East
1 1 0 .500
1 1 I 5
1 1 0 .500
1 1 0 :.500
0 2 0 .000
centrall

C ) .5)1
1 1 0 .50:)
1 1 0 .500
1 1 0) . 500
0 2 0 .000
West
2 0 0 1.000
1 1 0 .500
S 2 C .1 :
1 1 ( .000)


The Baseball Statistical Report


National League American League


Standings


East Division
W L Pct.
New York 87 57 .604
Pittsburgh 77 67 .535
Montreal 73 72 .503
St. Louis 70 76 .479
Chicago 69 76 .476
Philadelphia 59 86 .407
West Division
W L Pect.
Los Angeles 84 60 .58e
Houston 78 67 .538
Cincinnati 75 69 .521
San Francisco 75 71 .514
San Diego 72 72 .500
Atlanta 49 95 .340



NL Hitting


Average
Palmeiro, Chi
Gwynn, SD
Ferry, Atl
Gibson, LA
Dawson, Chi
Galarraga, Mtl
Butler, SF
Oquendo, StL
Grace, Chi
Van Slyke, Pitt
Home Runs

Strawberry, NY
Davis, Hou
Clark, SF
Galarraga, Mtl
Davis, Cin
Gibson, LA
Johnson, NY
4 players tied 23

Runs Batted In

Clark, SF
Davis, Hou
Van Slyke, Pitt
Davis, Cin
Strawberry, NY
McReynolds, NY
Bonilla, Pitt
Galarraga, Mtl
Brooks, Mtl
Marshall, LA


Standings


6 1/2
9
I
12
-_'.5


Boston
New York
Detroi t
Mi lwaulee
Toronto
Cleveland
Baltimore

Oalland
Minnesota
Sansas City
Cali4ornia
Tex as
Chicago
Seattle


East Division
W L Pet.
82 63 .566
77 67 .535
77 69 .527
78 70 .527
74 72 .507
70 75 .483
51 93 .354
WestDivision
W L Fct.
92 54 .630
8) 65 .552
77 68 .531
73 73 .500
64 80 .444
62 82 .431
60 86 .411


B4
4 1/2
5 1/2
5 1/2

30 1/2


11 1/2
14 1/2
19
27
29
7.2


AL Hitting


.307
.307

.301

.300

. 2937
.290

.289


33
28
26
26
25
25
24


Average
Boggs, Bos
Fuckett, Minn
Greenwell, Bos
Winfield, NY
Molitor, Mil
Brett, KC
Trammell, Det
Hrbek, Minn
Yount, Mil
Franco, Clev
Home Runs
Canseco, Oak
McGriff, Tor
McGwire, Oak
Carter, Clev
Gaetti, Minn
Clark, NY
Hrbek, Minn
Murray,. Bait
Winfield, NY
players tied 24

Runs Batted In
Canseco, Oak
Greenwell, Bos
Winfield, NY
Puckett, Minn
Brett, KC
Evans, Bos
Carter, Cle"
McGwire. Oa
Bell, Tor
Tartabul., KC


.359
.344
.339
337
.320
.317
.316
.312
.308
.307


39

28
27
27
25
25
25
25



115
110
104
102
99
97
94
90
89
87


AL Pitchi
Strikeouts
Clemens, Bos
Langston, Sea
Viola, Minn
Higuera, Mil
Moore, Sea
Stewart, Oak
Swindell, Cl ev
Hough, Tex.
GuZman, Tex
Gubicza, f::C


Earned Run
Higuera, Mil
Viola, Minn
Anderson, Minn
Gubicza, KC
Clemens, Bos
Robinson, Det
Swindell, Clev
Stewart, Oak
Leibrandt, KC
Candiotti, Clev
Wins
Viola, Minn
Stewart, Oak
Hurst, Bos
Gubicza, KC
Clemens, Bos
Swindell, Clev
Davis, Oak
Welch, Oak
Tanana, Det
Saberhagen, KC
Games
Thigpen, Chi
Williams, Tex
Crim, Mil
Guante, Tex
Farr, KC
Jackson, Sea
Henneman, Det
Smith, Bos
Ward, Tor
Reardon, Minn
Saves
Eckersley, Oak
Reardon, Minn
Jones, Clev
Plesac, Mil
Thigpen, Chi
Smith, Bos
Henke, Tor
Righetti, NY
Farr, KC
Henneman, Det


ng

269
211
177
173
166
165
162
158
154
153
Average
2.27
2.34
2.69
2. 83
2.86
2.98
3.24

3.31


21-6
18-12
17-5
17-7
16- 1 C)
16-13
15-5
15-7
14-9
14-14

63
63
60.
6 C)
59
59
58
58
58
57

40
38
33
30
3C0
26
23
21
20
19


NL Pitching
Strikeouts
Ryan, Hou
DeLeon, StL
Cone, NY
Scott, Hou
Fernandez, NY
Hershiser, LA
Leary, LA
Gooden, NY
Rijo, Cin


Earned Run
Cone, NY
Tudor, LA
Perez, Mtl
De.Martinez, Mtl
Rijo, Cin
Robinson, SF
Hershiser, LA
Jackson, Cin
Scott, Hou
Leary, LA
Wins


Jackson, Cin
Hershiser, LA
Reuschel, SF
Gooden, NY
Maddux, Chi
Leary, LA
Cone, NY
Browning, Cin
De.Martinez, Mtl
4 pitchers tied
Games
Murphy, Cin
Agosto, Hou
Robinson, Pitt
Tekulve, Phil
Worrell, StL
Franco, Cin
Garrelts, SF
Harris, Phil
Gott, Pitt
Lefferts, SF


Average
2.21
2.27
2.38
2.42
2.43
2.50
2.52
2. 64
2.66
2.68

21-7
21-8
18-8
17-7
17-7
17-9
16-3
15-5
15-12
14


Saves
Franco, Cin
Gott, Pitt
Worrell, StL
Davis, SD
Bedrosian, Phil
Smith, Hou
Myers, NY
J.Howell, LA
McDowell, NY
2 pitchers tied 14


224
186
176
176
171
168
166
157
153


I mlwmmm�


1








Tropic Times
Sept. 16, 1988


21


B. Company Express takes tournament


By F. L. Marquez

The players showed up in their make
shift uniforms supplied by the gym.
In the predawn darkness, they began
to warm up by stretching stiff arms
and legs. Soon the squeaky sounds
of sneakers' rubber against the court
floor could be heard as lumbering
bodies came to life. Then arms and
legs became more animated as the
unpredictable bouncing rubber ball
gave players their test of agility.
Control was found as the ball
pounded onto the floor, and shots
thundered off the backboard and
rim. Players leapt high into the air
struggling for possession of the
-round rubber toy.
Sweat began to beed on foreheads
and adrenaline flowed as nervous
eyes spied the clock winding down
before the opening tip off.
It was a case of basketball fever as
the 154th Signal Bn. soldiers played
in their newly organized, double-
elimination tournament at Reeder
Gymnasium this past August and
first part of September.


It is an ongoing array of sports
competition to keep up the unit's
moral, according to Lt. Gary S.
McNamee, who is the battalions
sports and recreation officer in
charge.
McNamee had already organized
an individuals' racquetball
tournament in July which was
successful and is now planning for a
softball tournament in September.

In the basketball tournament, six
teams in all vied for the top spot and
the unit's bragging rights for this
season in basketball. The self
organized teams and team appointed
coaches battled it out on the hard
wood every Tuesday and Thursday
morning at 6.
"It was kind of strange to have it in
the mornings like we did," said
McNamee, but Reeder's busy
schedule didn't give them any other
choice.
"The guys would come out early in
the morning and start the game off
slow, but once they got going..."
The first game was played early
morning, August 2nd. It featured A


Company Thunderbolts coached by
Terry Johnson in a match up against
the HHC Company Bootmen
coached by Gary Farris. The
Thunderbolts edged by the Bootmen,
43-40.
The second game showcased B
Company Express vs. the 426th
Signal Bn. on temporary duty from
Ft. Bragg, N.C. The Express,
coached by Anthony Carter,
defeated the 426th coached by Ray
Owensby, 45-39.
In the third game, A Company
Newbreed coached by James Artis
routed the "Officers" coached by
Gary McNamee by a score of 58-25.
In game four, Newbreed squeaked
by The A Company Thunderbolts in
a heartbreaker by a score of 48-47.
Newbreed tossed in the last bucket
with only seconds remaining.
In game five, A Company
Newbreed fought by the B Company
Express to a 41-38 victory.
In game six, HHC Company
Bootmen handed the 426th Signal
Bn. their second loss, 49-45 while the
426th failed to win any games.
In game seven, A Company


Thunderbolts gave a 72-37 lashing to
the officers, eliminating them from
the tournament.
In game eight, it was a grim day for
A Company Newbreed as they were
defeated by A Company Thunder-
bolts, 56-47.
In game nine, A Company
Thunderbolts bounced back to
defeat HHC Company Bootmen,
thus eliminating them, 45-33 and
headed into the tournament
semifinal game to face A Company
Newbreed.
In game ten, it was an A Company
showdown as the Thunderbolts
trailed over Newbreed by a score of
53-45 and advanced into the final.

The championship game was finally
played after the Labor Day weekend.
The Thunderbolts (4-1) failed to rise
up to the challenge of undefeated B
Company Express as they lost, 45-37.
The 154th Signal Bn. is now
looking forward to a softball
tournament which will take place
sometime this month, according to
McNamee who hopes it will bejust as
successful.


SOUTHCOM upset


by 6933rd ESS, 47-3 7


by Sgt. Buz Robinson


I
.-


. iI









Walter J. Davis of A Company drives to the hoop against A Company
Thunderbolt defenders Byron L. White andLuis Diaz in the semi-finalgame
of the August/Sept. tournament. (photo by F.L. Marquez)


Isla Grande Tour
The Trailblazer Travel Club is
sponsoring an Isla Grande Tour
Sept. 23-25.
The tour provides all meals, hotel
accommodations, transportation to
and from the Island, and a complete
boat tour around the Island.
To make a reservation: Call now at
252-2615 or 252-2951.

Pool party
The 24th Transportation
Squadron Unit Advisory Council is
sponsoring its annual pool party and
Swimsuit Contest from 6 p.m.-
midnight, Sept. 16, at the Howard
pool.

Boating course
The Howard-Rodman Boating
Course will be held Sept. 24 from 8


a.m.-noon at the Rodman Marina.
Certification from this course will
permit authorized personnel to
operate Howard MWR's 17-foot
Boston Whaler fishing rigs. A
registration free will be charged. For
information call 284-5307.

Turkey Bowl
The CRD Sports Branch is
looking for Flag Football coaches
for the Army team to participate in
the upcoming Turkey Bowl sports
competitions. Send your resume to
Building 154, Ft. Clayton by Oct. 12.
For information call 287-4050.

Women's hoop
A civilian Women's Basketball
program and the unit level Women's
Basketball program will soon begin.
Pacific registration will continue


SOUTHCOM vs. 6933rd ESS
HOWARD AFB, (USAFSO
PAO) - SOUTHCOM, one of the
top teams in the league, was out-
played by 6933rd ESS in an upset,
47-37. ESS hit 16 of 22 freethrows
from the line as SOUTHCOM was
continually in foul trouble. Eddie
Perez and Dave Curry led ESS with
14 and 11 points, respectively. Troy
Covington has team-high honors for
SOUTHCOM with 13 points.

24th Supply 1 vs. TRANS
Transportation, who has been
struggling all season, pulled through
with a shocking victory, by driving
Supply 1, 63-54. Norm Gulick,
TRANS, and Derrick Smith, Supply
1, were game-high scorers with 18
points each.

4400 AIRPS vs. 24th CAMS 2
Air Postal Squadron led from start
to finish and ended up annihiltating
24th CAMS 2 by 60 points, 86-26.
Avery Canady and Roy Clinkscales,


until Sept. 29 at Building 154, Ft.
Clayton. An organizational meeting
will be held that day at 6 p.m. in the
CRD Sports conference room.


Triathlon


The Howard/Albrook Youth
Centers are sponsoring their Annual
Youth Fitness Triathlon on Sept. 17.
The event is open to boys and girls
ages 6-18 who have a bilingual card.
The event will start at the Albrook
Swimming Pool at 7a.m.
Registration for the triathlon will be
from Sept. 1-14 at the Howard or
Albrook Youth Centers. A small fee
will be charged. For more
information contact either center at
284-4700 or 286-3195.


two AIRPS' players who have been
the key to the team's success this
season, continued to demonstrate
their abilities by dropping in 22 and
19 points, respectively.

Comm Group 1 vs. 24th Supply 2
Comm Group breezed to an easy
victory with a 79-58 win over Supply
2. Trenton Neal and Wesley Collins,
Comm Group., had a good night
from the field and fired in 26 and 20
points. Both players have
consistently shot in the double
figures and deserve a note of
recognition.


HQSQ vs. 61st CAMS/MAC
Thanks to their balance-scoring
attack, Headquarters Squadron
hung on to the lead for a 66-57
trouncing of 61st CAMS/MAC.
HQSQ received support from Vince
Duncan who has 16 points, Greg
Taylor who had 12, and Bobby Lucas
with 10 points. Lenner Broadway,
CAMS/ MAC, was game-high scorer
with 23 points.


Rugby Club
The SOUTHCOM Rugby Club
will host a rugby tournament on
Sept. 24 at Albrook Soccer Field.
Team rosters may include up to 10
players and each team must provide a
referee. All games will start at 10 a.m.
For information call Steve
McNair at 285-4401 or 286-4933.


SCN Radio Sports


Sept. 16 -- Los Angeles Dodgers at
Cincinnati Reds, 6:30 p.m.

Sept. 16 -- Opening ceremonies for
summer Olympics, 9 p.m.

Sept. 19 - Indianapolis Colts at
Cleveland Browns, 7:06 p.m.












22 Tropic Times
Z 2Sept. 16, 1988


c a i*sr..... ,, wo .' .....- ~" c "I had to eat my broccoli last night. Mom took the TV as
"How do I hke it, Edith?" a hostage."


CPO position vacancies

Who can submit applications for permanent positions:
Current civilian employees of U.S. Army South and Army-serviced
activities, U.S. government agencies in the Panama Canal Area, qualified
reinstatement eligibles (those persons who previously have workedfor the
U.S. Government on a permanent basis), U.S. Government employees in
the Panama area in a leave without pay status. Candidates with
applications in th CPO applicant supply file will be considered for
appropriate vacancies.
Who can submit application for temporary vacancies:
For clerical positions, only those applicants who have taken the
appropriate examination and have notice of rating. For positions, usually
above the NM-05 level, non-clerical applicants need not have taken an
examination.
For sensitive positions requiring security clearance, applications will be
accepted from U.S. citizens.
How to apply:
Applicants must submit application to the Civilian Personnel Office,
Building 560, Room 306, Corozal, by the close of business on the closing
date of the announcement. Employees located on theA tlantic community,
submitting applications to the civilian personnel representative at Ft.
Davis, have until Wednesday after the closing date of the announcement.
The following must be submitted by all interested applicants:
(1). Standard Form 171, Personal Qualifications Statement. (2). Standard
Form 50, Notification of Personnel Action showing your current status.
(3). USARSO Form 106, Application for Consideration or in lieu of the
USARSO Form 106 you may submit: (A). A current or your latest
performance appraisal, and (B). your supplement qualifications
addressing the knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA s) described under job
related criteria in this announcement.
The information provided in the SF-171 is used for qualifications
determination only. The information you provide on the job related
criteria determines if you are highly qualified and ultimately referred for
consideration to the selecting official
Remember: in job related criteria tell what, when, where, how how long
and with what results you acquired the knowledge, skill or ability.
Method of Evaluation:
Ranking of eligible candidates to determine the best qualified will be
accomplished by comparing each candidate's knowledge, skills, and
abilities with the job related criteria listed below. Supervisory appraisals,
experience past performance, training and awards will be considered in the
rating and ranking process. Note: Only information provided in SF 171,
USARSO 106 or appraisal and job related criteria will be used.
Other considerations:
Positions are subject to priority referrals and reemployment priority
lists. Consideration of candidates for repromotion will precede efforts to
fill the position by competitive procedures. All qualified applicants will
receive consideration without regard to race, religion, color, national
origin, marital status non disqualifying handicap, age, sex, political
affiliations or other non-merit factors. Additional information on
vacancies is available at the Civilian Personnel Office at 285-4104/4128.
NOTE: APPLICATIONS FOR VB1513-88, MAINTENANCE WORKER LEADER, ML-4749-08, ARE
BEING ACCEPTED UNTIL COB 09-27-88.
NOTE: IVB550-88, ADMINISTRATIVE CLERK (TYP), NM-303-04, IS AMENDED TO
READ: (SENSITIVE)
NOTE: APPLICATIONS FOR VB#513-88, MAINTENANCE WORKER LEADER, ML-4749-08, ARE
BEING ACCEPTED UNTIL COB 09-27-88.
PERMANENT POSITIONS VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT EXP REQ TIME-IN-GRADE
AND LOCATION OPEN CLOSE DATE GEN SPEC 1 YR AT:


09-16-88 09-27-88
LOSS & DAMAGE CLAIMS EXMR IT), NM-992-7 558-88
US ARMY GARRISON, SJA, FT CLAYTON
JOB RELATED CRITERIA: NONE
SUPPLY CLERK, NM-2005-04 559-88
DON, SUPPLY DIV., CUSTOMER SPT BR, CZL
JOB RELATED CRITERIA: NONE
SUPPLY CLERK," HM-2005-04 560-88
DO, SUPPLY DIV., PROPERTY CTRL BR, CZL
JOB RELATED CRITERIA: NONE
CONSTRUCTION & MAINT FMN, MS-4701-09 561-88
DEH, B&G DIV., FT DAVIS
JOB RELATED CRITERIA:
I. Ability to supervise.
2. Knowledge of standards and procedures for carpel


NM-5


I YR AS JOURNEYMAN IN
OF THE OCCUPATIONS
SUPERVISED

nTry, masonry, and paint


trades.
3. Ability to communicate in writing In English language.
4. Ability to plan/organize work, setting priorities to meet schedules.
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST, NM-334-12 562-88 1 3 N/A
USAISC-SOUTH/DCS IM, FT CLAYTON
JOB RELATED CRITERIA:
I. Knowledge of data base administration.
2. Skill In Identifying and defining user Information requirements and
translating them Into Integrated data architectures and data base
structures.
3. Knowledge of data dictionaries, relational data bases, and data base
management systems.
4. Ability to communicate orally and In writing technical Information to
staff managers and action officers.
TELEPHONE MECHANIC LEADER, ML-2502-10 563-88 N/A 1 N/A
USAISC-SOUTH, OPER DIV, COROZAL (SENSITIVE)
JOB REIATFD CRITFRIA: NONF


h wan: to leave my oay l mu s vs "When Mother Hubbard found the cupboard bare, why
my hospital bill.didn't she apply for food stamps?"


Wbasif RTi ~e E adsF


Bark Alarm. 201b Beagle/Dachsund wi601b bark, trained
watchdog, free to good home. Call 282-3188.
White Pony Calico. 5400. Call 252-5026.
Reg. Doberman puppies, red or black, dewormed. shots.
5100.. down payment to reserve. Call 262-1914.
2yr old female dog, mixed, great children, house trained,
free to good home. Call 284-3470.
Puppy. 6wks old, female, free to a good home. Call 287-4335.
Free 6mos old female, mixed breed puppy, good w/children,
house-brkn. Call 284-4926.
Pomeranian puppy, male, champagne color, 2mos,
dewormed, ccp reg. Call 226-5395.
Toy Poodle puppy, 5'wks. black male, ccp reg.. parents less
than 51bs ea. 5350. Call 261-0693.
3 female Doberman puppies, 6wks old, black/tan. $125. Call
286-6194.



Sansui amplifier, model 1000-a, needs repair. $85. Call 282-
4225.
8 track am-fm auto stereo. $35.,VCR Montgomery Ward
VHS. $210. Call 286-3676.


13" Toshiba color TV, like new. $140. Call 286-3928.
Zenith 25" console TV, good cond. $395., cement lamposts,
20ft, from old Pan. Canal Co. $395 ea. Call 228-0305.
Fisher VHS VCR. $175., 25" Quasar colorTV console. $650.
Call 261-2015.
Marantz stereo receiver, 65w per chan., exc. cond. $210. Call
287-3883.
Kenwood cass. player. $50. Call 286-4280.
Sony betamax w/remote control. $250. Call 286-6127.
Sanui 7" 4chnnl reel to reel, QD-5500 tape recorder. $400.
Call 287-5120.
Teac stereo, incl. cass. deck, tuner/ampl. $250. Call 286-
3188.
JVC stereo receiver w/R, Kenwood CD player w/r, 10 band
stereo equlzr, Irg camera bag. Call 287-3779.
Commodore C-64, color monitor.- disk/cass 'drv, jystck,
wrgmes, educational, word processing, sftwre. $450. Call 287-
3793.
Magnavoc stereo, good cond. $350., Atari 1200XL computer
w/acces. $750., good deal. Call 286-6388.
Apple IIE, 128K memory, dual disk dry, Epson FX-80
printer, 16K bffr card, sys. svr, jystck, prgrms. Cal287-5332.


L the Tropic Times

Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis to U.S. military
members, civilian DOD enployv's and employees of other U.S. government agencies.
Ads will be accepted only for NON-COMMERCIAL services or goods offered by the
advertiser or an immediate family member. Offerings of real estate of personal ads will not
be accepted. Suspected abuse of the ad service will result in non-publication of the ad(s) in
question. The Tropic Times reserves the right to edit any advertisement. Questions
regarding non-publication of submitted ads may be directed to the F.'itor at 285-6612.
Submissions must be typed or legibly printed and limited to 15 words. Only two
submissions per family per week will be accepted. Each submission must indicate only one
category for publication. Ads for services will be accepted once per quarter as will ads for
the Wanted category. Patio Sale ads must indicate date and location. Submitted ads will
be published only once and must be resubmitted for further publication. Ads not run
because of late receipt or lack of space need not be resubmitted; they will be run the
following week unless a specific date is involved.
The deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Friday for the following Friday's edition. If
Friday or Monday is a holiday, the deadline is 9 a.m. Thursday. Ads may be mailed to the
Tropic Times, APO 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office.
Advertisers should allow seven to 14 days for processing.
AUTOMOBILES AUDIO VISUAL ANIMALS BOATS & CAMPERS
A PATIO SALES HOUSEHOLD MISCELLANEOUS ANIMALS
MOTORCYCLES LOST FOUND AVAILABLE WANTED

D




F
O PRICE HOME PHONE
Circle only one of the above categories. Only two categories per person each
R week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type or print
neatly. Information listed below is not included in the ad.
M SPONSORS NAME RANK
ORG. SSN/IP No.
DUTY PHONE _ Social Security numbers are required to insure proper
identification of persons submitting ads, and will not be released to unauthorized
third parties.




















Bearcat scanner 50XL. $140., Yacsu FT-203R, 2 meter VHF
with chrgr. $200., Teac X20R reel to reel. $500. Call 252-
5829.

Color TV, Sony Trinitron, 17", w/ rem.,exc. cond. $350. Call
252-7821.

Apple 2C, monitor, stand, 2 drns,jystck. lots of sftwre, 8mos
old. $850. Call 287-5072.

Bell 8 Howell slide projector, Okimate 10 printer. Yamaha
am-fm receiver stereo. $50 ea. Call 260-1740.

For IBM-pc and compatibles. $90. Call 286-6374.

Pioneer digital timer, Sansui rev. amp. Acoustic dynamics 2
way speakers, 8mm prosector w/sound. Neg. Call 284-5076.

Sony stereo. $200., Crown betamax. $175. Call 245-1563.

13" Hitachi color TV. $200. Call 282-3392.

Panasonic SR partner PC, IBM comp, 640K memory, dual
dsk dry, built-in printer, clock. $1900. Call 286-6395.

Pioneer receiver, 50w. $150., Sansui receiver, I 10w. $185.,
exc. cond. 284-3675.

Fisher complete stereo system, like new. BO. Call 284-6494.

Brand new AIWA X-33, Hi-Fi component sys, 20w spkrs
5475. Call 286-6198.

13" Sony color TV w/noise ftr. $130., Sanyo alarm clock
radio. $13., fm antenna, electr. dirctbl. $25. Call 262-2729.

Zenith 19" color TV space Cmd. rem cntrl. $225. Call 262-
0185 aft 5pm.

Zenith betamax, TV, stand. $850.. Atari computer printer, 2
dsk drvs, tbl. $750. Call 228-4796.

LP record albums. $5 ea., cass tapes. $5 ea. Call 252-7821 aft
4:30pm.




1982 Chevrolet Chevette, a/t, runs good, needs minor body
work and parts, must sell. $800. Call 287-3327.

1981 Volkswagon Truck, camper top, 5spd, exc. cond. $3900.
Call 287-6777.

1980 Buick Skylark, V-6 eng., radio, ps, pwr brakes, auto,
good cond. $1500. Call 260-2904.

1978 Ford Fairmount, rebuilt eng., 2dr, nw radio, alt, bttry,
pw exe. mech. cond. $1600. Call 287-3778.

1981 Oldsmobile Cutlass CrusierSW, a/cDiesel. $2700. Call
287-4272.

1986 CJ-7 Jeep, a/c, ps, 6cyl, hard top, am-fm cass. Call 286-
3792.

1979 Pontiac Firebird 350 eng., radio cass, good cond. $2000.
Call 224-9007.

1977 Caprice, ac, am-fm cass, new btry, uphlstry, carpet,
exc. cond. $2000. Call 284-5229.

1978 Plymouth Fury Salon, 4dr, V-8, ps, pb, nwtires. $1350.
Call 260-7973.

1973 Ford Torino. B/O. Call 287-3181.

1985 Mercedes 2.3, 16valve, US specs, loaded, sunroof, wine
color, tax paid. $18,500. Call 226-5822.

1981 Datsun Long-bed Pick-up, good cond. $2500. Call 228-
3105.

1979 Pontiac Trans Am, ac, ps, pb, p/w, nw paint, trans,
great shape. $4000/neg. Call 286-6327 bef 4:30pm.

1981 Ford F100 Pickup, 3spd, 6cyl. $2600/OBO. Call 269-
0005 aft 6.

1984 Mazda RX-7, black, ac, pb, pw, radio cass., 5spd, runs
good. $5750/neg. Call 226-0356.

1986 Isuzu Trooper, US specs, 4wd, ac, ps, pb, am-fm cass,
37,000mls, exc. cond. $8900. Call 286-3370.

1980 Chvrolet Citation. $1500/firm. Call 287-3178.

1982 Chevy Corvette, loaded, Iw mlge, serious inq. only. Call
286-3792 aft 6pm.

1984 Toyota Pickup, exc. cond., dty paid. $3650/ neg. Call
224-8106.

1984 Renault Encore, 44,000 auto, ac, am-fm cass. $2900.
Call 284-4323.

1981 Toyota Cressida Diesel, xtras. $3600.. 1982 Fleetwood.
$6700. Call 286-6333.

1984 Chevrolet Cavalier, 4dr, 4cyl, loaded, nw tires, am-fm
cass/clock. $5300. Call 286-4124.

1987 Toyota 1.6SR, Iw mlge, loaded. $7000. Call 264-4725.

1977 Subaru SW, 4dr, 4wd, over haul, nw paintjob, dty paid.
S1500. Call 224-1555.

1982 Buick Skylark, ac, ps, pb, as is. $1250/OBO. Call 282-
4893.

1985 Plymouth Colt DL, 4dr, auto, ac, under 29,000mls, one
owner . $4250. Call 260-4204.

1982 Mazda RX-7, ac, am-fm cass, exc. cond. many xtras.
$5000. Call 282-4530.

1981 Pontiac Phoenix. dty paid, a/c, xtras. $1900. Call 262-
0882.

1985 Mercedes 280S, ac, auto, am-fm cass., ps, pb, dty free,
no US specs, 10,000mls. $23,000. Call 232-5258.

1984 Chevy Chevette, auto, ac, am-fm, cass., ps, pb, good
cond. $2500. Call 282-4381.

1986 Toyota Corolla, 6 R. $4500. Call 252-2886.

1977 Chevy Blazer, auto, 6cyl, no 4x4, dty paid, needs minor
body work, runs good. $2500. Call 284-4493.

1986 Oldsmobile Cutlass Cierra, ac, 4dr, autom am-fm cass.,
loaded, exc. cond. $9500. Call 284-6693.

1979 Ford Bronco, 4wd, ac, pb, ps, am-fm. nw tires, xtras.
$4500/firm. Call 287-5977.

1974 Chevy Nova, 6cyl, nw carb, needs some work.
$1200;OBO. Call 287-5233.

1986 Mustang, 4spd, 4cyl. $4000 289-6118 M-F 8:30-3pm.

1982 Oldsmobile, 4dr, exc. cond , nw paint/ tr, am-fm cass,
ac. economical diesel. $3500. Call 282-3326.

1980 Grand Prix. needs eng. B;O. Call 284-6871

1984 Toyota Carina. auto, radio, ac. $4500/OBO. Call 241-
f723.


1982 Lada Sedan 1200. $900. Call 233-2462.

1983 Nissan Pulsar, 5spd, 4dr, hatchback, dty paid, exc.
cond. $3300. Call 261-7647.

1971 Chevrolet Monte Carlo 350-2 Bareel, ps, pb, runs exc.
$1595, Call 287-5496.

1987 BMW. 4dr. 5spd, a/c, r/c, 190000KMS, European
specs, fully loaded, cxc. cond. S13.000. Call 252-6458.

1981 Cutlass Supreme Oldsmobile Broughm, 4dr, all xtras,
Iw mis. $4000/OBO. Call 260-4490.

1979 VW Bug, rebuilt eng.. good cond.. avail. 19 Oct. Call
284-3294.

1974 Dodge Dart, 6cyl, auto, runs great. $900/OBO Call
228-1339.

1968 BMW 2002, 2dr coupe. B/O. Call 243-5372.

1973 Dodge Dart, auto, ps, pb, runs well, nw bury. $1200.
Call 262-1809.

1985 Pontiac Fiero sale or trade (Ior Cutlass, Grand Prix,
Regal, etc). $6000. Call 284-4979.

1987 Chevy Camaro, a/c, pb. ps, tinted wndws. dark brown,
sharp car. $8800. Call 286-4280.

1980 Toyota Corolla, hatch back, good gas mlge. good cond.,
dry paid, US spec. $1800. Call 287-3210.

1988 Honda Accord, under warranty, radio/cass., ps, pb,
auto wndws, auto trans, exc. cond. Call 287-2582.

1976 Dodge Van, 12 pssngr. exc. cond. $1950/OBO. Call
286-4333.

1974 Nissan Patrol, 2dr, 6cyl gas, 4x4, winch, dty free,
remvable hardtop. $2500. Call 252-2870.

1982 Buick Regal. J-6, fully loaded. $4000/OBO. Call 286-
3924.

1985 Nissan Sunny, xtra clean, 4dr. $4400. Call 252-2628.





Maid , exc. w/children, days/evens. Call 252-6825.

Eng-spkng, nicely finished house to share in El Dorado, all
amenities. Call 260-4490 aft 5.

English-spkng, live in maid, prefer somebody yound, no
Spanish, good w/children, M-S. Call 287-5280.

Spanish spkng maid, live-in, dependable, experienced.
honest. Call 252-6046.

Eng-spkng maid, 3-5 dys,available for 3dys immed. Call 221-
0496.

Spanish spkng maid, live-in, good w/children, has refs. Call
284-4197.

Eng/Spanish spkng live in maid, honest, reliable, M-F, cxc.
w/kids. Call 224-8757.

Exc. day or live-in maid, very good w/ children, housekeeping,
Spanish spkng. Call 287-5586.

Pcsing, "leaving the best maid in Panama, Eng spkng, live in,
Children's nanny, exc. Call 282-3235.

Spanish spkng maid, M-F. Call 268-2202.

Honest, reliable, good Eng-spkng, maid, exc. w/children, M-
F, live-out. Call 226-1063.

Spanish-spkng, some English, honest, dependable,
hardworking maid, M-F, exc. w/kids. Call 286-4696.

Gardner/handyman, gen. household duties. Call 226-4275.





15W' V hull, 85hp Mercury, many xtras, trailer. $2500. Call
286-6343.

27' Sailboat, 1979 Hunter. $21,400. Call 252-6825.

14' Boston Whaler, 40hp outboard trailer and equip., inside
steering. $3000/firm. Call 256-6818.

19' Carson w/out eng., w/trailer, xtras. BO. Call 284-4499.

181,' Glastron tri-hull w/ll5hp Mercury outboard, rebuilt
eng., fuel tanks, skiis, xtras. $4500/OBO. Call 284-5775.

29' Cal sloop, exc. maintenance, 5 sails, full cruising gear,
diesel, many xtras. Call 223-0703.

16' Runabout w/tanks, 35hp, good cond. $2500/OBO. Call
252-5119.

2 Irg new boat fenders. $50 pair.,2 new plastic props for Mere.
V-6. $30. ca. Call 252-5829.

8' rubber, inflatible life raft. $100/OBO. Call 287-3780.

Hobie cat 16' sailboat, orange sails/trmp, new rigging, exc.
cond. $2500. Call 227-2582.

17' Agunsport center Bimini top trim tabs, 1986 1.5 liter
OMC outboard, ready to fish. $8500. Call 252-6902.

17' Tri-hull w/1986 60hp Johnson motor, dty paid, trailer,
good cond. $4500. Call 252-2824.




17cf Kenmore refrig. 25in. color Zenith console TV. $300.,
Power lawn mower. $50. Call 228-3282.

China cabinet, very good cond., coffee tble, oval w/curved
legs. Neg. Call 252-2911.

Chest of Drawers, night table, desk/chair, maple. $275. Call
287-6297.

Kenmore dryer, new, white Irg capacity, exc. cond. $300. Call
286-3821.

Kenmore heavy dty washer/dryer, used less than I yr. $800.
Call 260-4480.

3pc Ivgrm set w/6 pillows, good cond. $250. Call 269-3543.

25" Curtis Mathis TV. $650., lrg colonial Ivngrm set incl" sofa,
loveseat, chair, etc. $2500. Call 284-4781 aft 5pm.

K-st bdspread. beige, new. $50., sewing machine console.
$30., Track light. $30. Call 232-5258.

Kenmore dishwasher, runs good. 5125. Call 252-2824.

Waterbed. 6 drawer pedestal, bookcase, headboard 5300..
mtchng dresser. $100.. 26" console TV Call 284-6380

12000btu a c,c Whirlpool. 275., microwave cart cabinet
$50. Call 252-5829.


Rugs avacado 9x12. $100., 15x 18. $150., sofa. $600.,
dishwasher. $75. Call 252-6061.

Flourescent lights. $8-$25., gourmet clay roasting pot. $15., 2
wool hall rugs. $100. Call 252-6061.

I King sz bed. $175. Call 286-3188.

Birds of paradise room divider. $600., sofa bed.$150. carved
box. $200., bar. $600. Call 228-4796.

Lrg uprght freezer, GE. $440. Call 236-0713 aft 4pm.

Rugs. $20, Rattan tbl. $100., bassinett. $40., wicker tbl. $30.,
10spd bikes , more. Call 287-5770.

Chinese bdrm set-7pc. Rattan Ivngrm set-6pc, wsher/dryer,
dble door refrig. Call 286-3327.

Lvngrm sofa, loveseat, 2 chairs. $800., patio set- 4 chairs,
table, umbrella. $350., bar w/stools. $180. Call 252-5406.

Wall to wall Ivng rm, stairs, hallway carpet-tropical housing,
biege w/padding. $300. Call 284-5775.

Glass top rattan dinning set w/4 chairs, like new. $500. Call
286-6484.

wooden bookcase, 3 sections totaling over 8' long, I section
has built-in desk, $200. Call 252-5415.

I 12x15 rug w/pad. $135., 2 9x12 rugs w/pad. $125., 25"
console color TV. $350.. water beds. $300. Call 284-3120.

3pc Ivng rm set. $600., Lowery Organ. $600. Call 252-5026.

Diningrm set, Early American, table, 6 chairs, china cabinet,
very beautiful, exc. cond. Call 287-4422.

Sofa, chair, tables, dresser, bike. Call 252-5327.

Broyhill sofa sleeper/loveseat, solid pine/herculd,
sctchgurded fabric, solid pine coffee tble. Call 287-3822.

Braided rugs, Irg rust. $80., 2 sm. blue. $25/$10, charcoal
grill. $30/OBO. Call 286-3832.

Whirlpool Portable dishwasher. $150. Call 287-5072.

Refrigerator 1Ocf. $200., 5cf.-$125., B/w TV/radio/tape.
$100., never used chip dips, $4-$8. Call 263-9510.

6pc Rattan Ivngrm set w/xtra cushions. $1550 new. $850.
Call 226-0719.

Living rm, dining rm, bedroom furniture. Everything goes!
Call 284-3573.

White twin sz canopy bed, dresser/hutch, all beddng inclu.
$500. Call 287-3324.

Carved Teak wall unit w/marble in laid shivs, Honduran
wooden statue, wall emblem. Call 284-3731.

Greek white carpet, good cond. $200., vac cleaner, Ight
weight. $20., sm bird. $45. Call 284-6125.

Dining rm tble w/4 chairs, bar, desk, microwave cart. BO.
Call 284-3328.

GE wshr/dryr, Heavydty, Irgcapacity, exc. cond., sold as set.
$600. Call 284-5234.

12x15 brown carpet. $100., drapes/rods Farfan housing,
beige w/brown floral motif. $200. Call 284-5087.

21,000btu, Whirlpool a/c. $275., TV/VCR Veneer stand.
$60. Call 269-0012.

Baby crib, white. $85., high chair. $25., misc. toys, prices
vary. Call 260-7647.

6 drawer Captain's bed, good cond. w/mttrss. $199. Call 287-
5641.

3 flip chairs, wall unit, wicker tble, bakers rack, 3 6x9 carpets,
misc items. Call 287-3534.

Girl bdrm set, perfect cond. $400., boy's bed perfect cond.
$100. Call 252-6057.

Dresser w/mirror. $200., chest. $150., nightstand. $75.,
wicker book stand. $100., rug. $25. Call 287-4631.

Taundle bed/2 mattrsses. $250., walnut/pole book shivs.
$250., Early American child's desk. $100. Call 287-3323.

Pcsing, everything must go, furniture, swings, appl., curtains,
rugs, a/c, more. Call 282-3235.

3yr old exc. cond., complete bdrm set, mahogany k-szbed, 2
Ight bedsde tbls w/drawwrs. $600. Call 252-2894.

Wood china cabinet, wood serving tble. BO.,beige
curtains/rods for kitchen/Ivngrm. BO. Call 287-3294.

Zenith TV console, Sharp microwave, beige recliner, sm tbl,
baby bed w/mttrsses. Call 286-4358.

Bedrm set. $375., Ivngrm set. $250., Toshiba betamax.
$250/OBO. Call 226-0356.

Couch, 2 chairs, table, 4pc set, 3yrs old. $450. Call 284-3294.

Kenmore dryer. $100., Magnavox console am-fm stereo,
turntable. $150. Call 284-4492.

GE 20cf side-side refrig/freezer. $650., 3 a/cs. $150 ea. Call
228-3105.




New diving gear, 50cf alum tank w/back pack, J valve,
rubber boot. $100. Call 260-9345.

Bicycle ladies 10spd, 40pc dinnerware. $25. Call 287-4631.

Artificial Christmas tree, 6'. $25., 6' refrigerator. $110. Call
287-3294.

Fredrichs 16,000 btu, recently serviced. $180/OBO., must
sell. Call 287-6287.

19" Adult folding NEALECO Italian bike, folds in half to fit
in truck, boat or plane, yellow. $50. Call 252-6570.

Girl's pink guaymi dress, hand made. $25., vanity fair
sleepwear, new. Call 252-5985.

4 bowling balls, 2-161b angles. $45 ea, 2-151b Ebonites. $25 ca.
Call 287-3780.

Surf board, bag. $225. Call 2604374 aft 5pm.

Glass for 1987, 1988 Sentra RH, front door. $65. Call 252-
5759.

Whirlpool at c, 8000btu, used less than 3mos. $295. Call 289-
4004.

4 8,000btu feders a cs, used only 8mos. $175 ea. Call 260-
4204.

Baby high chair $30.. 36pc glass set. S35.. headboard fordble
bed. 535 Call 286-3134

6.000 btu a c. carpets9x12and 2x15. drapes Call 2864986.


Tropic Times

Sept. 16, 1988 23




Oak baby crib, stroller, high chair, car seat, very good cond.
$250. Call 226-0719.

CharBroil gas grill, new cond. $50. Call 252-2676.
Mercruiser eng. 120hp and trans for trade on sale. B/O. Call
284-4499.

57-48in. Dual Fluoresent ceiling lamps. $10 ea, commercial
fans w/heavy base, telescpc neck. $195. ea. Call 228-0305.

Pick up camper shell $250., glass wickertbl w/r chairs. $150.,
microwave stand. $25., train set. $30. Call 287-5396.

18,000btu a/c, 2yrs old. $225., baby carriage-lrg. $40. Call
284-3470.

Bundy trumpet. $150/OBO, 20 gal, aquarium w/ access. and 4
gold fish. $50., playpen. $20. walker. $10. Call 287-5233.

English riding saddle, US made, used I yr. $250. Call 243-
5305.

Top quality riding boots, adult sz 7 [, like new. $75. Call 284-
5772. -

Schwmn 5spd women's bike, spare wheels, toddler girl's bike.
BiO. Call 252-5606.

80001b warn winch w/mount for Jeep vehical, lyrs old used
twic. $500/OBO. Call 252-6902.

Gas Range. $100., Hoover semi-auto washer. $70, 2
motorcycle helmets. $80., I Nolan. $45. All neg. Call 287-
6380.

15 pair of girl's shoes size 5, winter coat grey/blue sz 8. $40.
Call 286-4562.

Jet Windsurfer. $350/OBO, 2pc sectional Ivngrm w/sleeper,
mauve. $750., 25" TV outside antenna. $495. Call 260-8098.

Little Tikes Turtlesandbox. $15., IrgTown/Country Wagon.
$25., like new. Call 286-3928.

Jacket styled Tusa BCD, blue/red, exc. cond. $150. Call 286-
4273.

Wedding dress, pearl and lace emb., US made, sz 9. $175.
Call 287-6297.

Lrg rectnglr brass/glass table w/6 chairs. $700., girls white
canopy bedroom set complete. $1000. Call 2844781.

Baby swing, bassinett, changing tbl, playpen, walker, ceiling
fan, swimfins, snorkel, masks, guitar w/case. Call 287-4349.

Ladies dress shoes, sz 86im, just like new. $15 ea. Call 287-
4974.

A/c, GE 18,000 btu, 220v. $200. Call 282-3093.

Yorx stereo, card table w/4 chairs, rugs, toys, plants, all must
go. Call 264-9070.

Deep frier, med. sz, brand new. $40. Call 220-2201.

Copy machine; vac. cleaner, drafting tbl, lamps, dskchair, TV
and tble, k-sz mattresses, wshr. B/O. Call 243-5372.

Utility trailer, Tandem Axel, all steel construction, bed
14x66, 5' sides, drop tail gate. $3800. Call 252-5449.

Stereo cabinet w/glass doors. $85., car seat/baby stroller.
$25. ea. Call 284-3675.

Cosco baby car seat, newborn to 301bs, used I month. Cosco
high chair, 3mos old. $60/both, will sell sep. Call 282-5741.

Sofas, end tble, big bar-b-q grill w/gas tank, curtains,dishes,
mahgny plant hider, exc. cond. Call 282-6933.

Aluminum camper for truck. 5'x6', $95, truck tires. $5 ea.,
lovely potted plants. Call 252-2889.

Baby car seals. $7.50 ea, 2 for $10, 2 strollers. $25 ca, Singer
sewing machine. $100. Call 287-3822.

No Frost refrig. freezer, GE 17.7cf, new heavy dty Maytag
wsher, microwave. Call 262-0519.




1985 Honda 100cc sports bike, street, good cond. $475. Call
282-3188.

Honda CT90 parts and wheels. BO. Call 252-5606.




Qtrs Ft Amador, Saturday, for directions. Call 282-3188.

Qtrs 1580 Balboa, Saturday 8-1. a/cs, furniture, shoes,
children's clothes, misc.

Qtrs 308A Ft Kobbe, Saturday 8-noon.

Atrs 89 Howard, Saturday 7-noon, furniture, freezer,
household goods, etc.

104B Howard, Saturday 7:30-noon.

Qtrs 13B Theller Cir. Howard, Saturday 7-1 lam, funiture,
clothing, toys, misc.

Qtrs 94A Albrook, Saturday 8-noon, toys, clothes,
household items, misc.
Qtrs 132 Balboa Hgts, Saturday 8-noon, elect, stove,
furniture, books, games, curtains, misc.

Qtrs 67 Albrook, Saturday 8am-lpm, clothes, furniture,
more.

Qtrs 289B Albrook, Saturday 8-noon, curtains, clothes,
misc., shoes.

Qtrs 7 Abrook, Saturday, household furniture, clothing, toys,
misc. Call 286-3674.

Qtrs 105B Albrook, toys, clothes, misc. Call 286-3586.




English speaking live-in maid, young not bilingual, good
w/kids. Call 287-5280.

Jeep Cherokee. 1986 or newer. Call 264-5995.

Couple interested in Marlin fishngat Pinas Bay, Dec. 26-Jan.
2. $1100 per couple. Call 286-6520.

Anyone on Taboga Launch w/ good photograph of sailboat
w, yellow ,black spinnaker. Call 252-7650.

Pontiac body 70-77. reasonable priced, will tow, X-lrg dog
carrier, will pick up. Call 289-3243.

AKC reg., American Cocker Spaniel puppy, newborn, buff.
female, good home a\ail. Call 284-5997.

Set of pool balls, a pc ofclear plexiglass 'wide x 4' long Call
252-2889.









4 Tropic Times
4 Sept. 16, 1988


USSOUTHCOM aids storm-ravaged Jamaica


Continuedfrom Page 1
response to an appeal for
international relief aid made by
Jamaican Prime Minister Edward
Seaga, who called the situation the
worst disaster in Jamaica's modern
history.
Following approval by the
Department of State and the
Department of Defense and tasking
by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the


emergency relief supplies were
withdrawn from the Disaster Relief
Stockpiles maintained at the U.S.
Naval Station Panama Canal at
Rodman near Panama City by U.S.
Southern Command's Army
component, U.S. Army South, for
AID's Office of Foreign Disaster
Assistance.
Army members of the 41st Area
Support Group of USARSO's
Directorate of Management
:ns ~ B h. , " "


prepared and loaded the supplies
onto pallets and moved them to
Howard where airmen of the 79th
Aerial Port Squadron loaded them
onto the aircraft. The operation was
coordinated by the U.S. Southern
Command's J4 Directorate.
The C-130 aircraft and crews
participating in the disaster relief
operations are on rotational duty at
Howard Air Force Base from the
Military Airlift Command's 324th
Tactical Airlift Wing in Little Rock,
Arkansas, and the Air National
Guard's 118th Tactical Airlift Wing
in Nashville, Tennessee.


The emergency supplies were
withdrawn from the Panama-based
stockpiles since the stockpiles of
plastic sheeting in the United States
had been depleted by disaster relief
shipments destined to Bangladesh.
In support of the Bangladesh flood
relief operation, emergency materials
from the AID stockpiles in Panama
were transported Sunday from
Howard Air Force Base to
Bangladesh via Hawaii by U.S. Air
Force C-141 aircraft carrying 5760
wool blankets, 150 civilian tents, six
boats with outboard motors, and a
boat trailer.


C-130 crew sees devastation


! wool


-iFy

-I


r* P ,f Ij ci. -
RELIEFSUPPLIES - Jamaican workers unloadrelief supplies from a U.S.
Air Force C-130 Hercules in Kingston, Jamaica. (photo by SSgt. Matthew
Gildow)

Gilbert heading toward Texas


Continued from Page 1
200-mph wind gusts and 15-foot
waves. Homes were wrecked and
streets turned into rivers.

Caymans escape

deaths, injury

LITTLE CAYMAN, Grand
Cayman Islands (UPI) - Although
it hurled maximum sustained winds
of 130 mph., Hurricane Gilbert
spared the Cayman Islands'
inhabitants deaths or major injury.
Government reports from the
Caymans said the storm caused
heavy damage to buildings, blocked
roads, wiped out the 102 square mile
island's banana crop and slightly
injured two persons.
A broadcast from the police
station on Little Cayman and
monitored in the Virgin Islands,
reported that "all citizens are
accounted for" on that island.
"It's too early for detailed damage
reports," the report said, adding that
both Grand Cayman and Cayman-
Brac had reported no casualties from
Gilbert.
Cayman-Brac had heavy damage
on its southern side, the report said,
noting that "people are starting to
move around and traffic is starting
up.
"It appears a lot better than most
of us expected," the report said.


Army troops and Red Cross
workers went to the disaster zone
with food and drinking water, but
communications to the peninsula
were cut and no word had been
received on whether the storm caused
casualties there, the Defense
Ministry said in Mexico City.
"We are only making contact with
authorities in the region via the radio
and at times, this is impossible,"
Defense Ministry spokesman
Salvador Macias Cabrera said.
"What we do know is that the
situation is grave."
Once the strongest Atlantic
hurricare on record, Gilbert
weakened over Mexico and its winds
had dropped from 175 mph to 120
mph by the time it lunged into the
gulf. Hurricane center director Bob
Sheets said Gilbert likely would
intensify in the warm gulf with winds
rising up to 155 mph, a storm still
capable of causing extreme damage.
"We still have a potentially much
more powerful storm," he said. "It is
a very large storm. It has everything
going for it, so it's not going to go
away."
Born Saturday night in the
southeastern Caribbean Sea, Gilbert
cut an 1,800-mile swath of
devastation on its relentless march to
the Gulf of Mexico. At least 30
people were killed -19 in Jamaica, six
in the Dominican Republic and five
in Venezuela.


Soldier, alone in cab, robbed


Continuedfrom Page 1
Police. His greatest concern now is
that other people become aware of
the potential danger of riding alone
in taxis.
Although this appears to be an
isolated, unusual event, there are
some basic safety tips servicemembers
can follow to reduce the risk of this
happening to them.
- Avoid travelling alone.


- Don't allow the cabbie to pick
up additional fares.
- Keep the doors locked. They
had to open this sergeant's door to
drag him out.
- Note the number of the taxi
before you get in.
- Report any suspicious activity
to the proper authorities.
Just a few simple precautions can
significantly reduce the chances of
becoming a victim.


by Sgt. Kirk Boyd
HOWARD AFB (USAFSO
PAO) - The first C-130 Hercules
departed Howard Air Force Base at
9:45 a.m. Wednesday loaded with
27,600 pounds of plastic tarps and
chain saws. The pilot, co-pilot,
navigator and flight engineer are
assigned to the 50th Tactical Airlift
Squadron, based at Little Rock Air
Force Base, Ark. The crew chief and
the loadmaster are assigned to the
2nd Mobile Aerial Port Squadron,
also based in Arkansas.
The aircraft landed in Kingston,
Jamaica at 12:10 p.m. Meeting the
plane was James Shields, disaster
specialist from the State Department
in charge of relief operations, and
Michael Sotirhas, U.S. Ambassador
to Jamaica.
As engines shut down, several
people waited anxiously to off-load
the supplies. Four of the six pallets
were off-loaded. Two were left
aboard to be taken to Montego Bay,
where no relief efforts had reached
since Hurricane Gilbert hit the island
Monday.
"The storm made its way onto the
island at 9 a.m., Sept. 12," said
Sotirhas. "180 mph winds pounded
the island for 24 hours. The wind
didn't die down until about 9 a.m.,
Sept. 13. .
"The initial assessment of damage
is major. There is no power, water or
communications in any part of the
country," he explained.
The plane departed Kingston at 1
p.m. for Montego Gay. On board
was the Jamaican Prime Minister,
Edward Seaga. According to Seaga,
his government is requesting beds,
blankets, tents, water and canned
foods from the U.S. government for
immediate relief. For long-term
relief, they will probably request help
is rebuilding the island, he said.
The trip to Montego Bay was
longer than normal, so that the prime


minister could view the damage to his
country.
As they passed over it was evident
that most of the crops, poultry
business and tourist spots were
destroyed.
The strongest recorded hurricane
of this country had left its mark on
this island nation.
Field after field of sugar cane,
banana trees and coconut trees were
completely flattened by the storm's
winds. About 95 percent of the
chicken farms were destroyed and
the beaches, which attract thousands
of tourists each year, were wiped out,
according to Shields.
As the plane got over the city of
Montego Bay, you could easily see
that about 80 percent of the houses
were damaged and about 20 percent
of those were destroyed.
The C-130 touched down in
Montego Bay at about 3:30 p.m. with
the two remaining pallets of plastic
tarps. Both pallets were off-loaded
within minutes.
While there, a Lion Air Caribbean
airliner landed to take some of the
hungry, tired and thirsty tourists who
had been stranded at the airport, out
of the country. It was the first
commercial jetliner since the storm
had hit the island.
"We have been here since the.
morning of Sept. 12," said one weary
tourist from Portland, Ore. "We
were stuck here with no food, water
or power. We will be very glad to get
home."
The C-130 departed Montego Bay
at 4 p.m. and headed back to
Kingston. All the years of training
that this C-130 crew, headed by
CKapt. Mike Schaar, had gone
through to prepare for a mission like
this had paid off.
This crew, from Little Rock, Ark.,
had made a lot of lives a little easier
on the island of Jamaica with relief
provided by the United States.


Scale rates hurricanes 1 to 5


by United Press International
Forescasters at the National
Hurricane Center in Miami
upgraded Hurricane Gilbert to a
"category 5" storm Wednesday as
maximum sustained winds
reached 175 mph.
Forecasters use the Saffir-
Simpson Scale to rate the strength
and damage potential of
hurricanes. A Category 1
hurricane is the weakest, and
Category 5 is the strongest.
The categories:
Category 1 - capable of doing
minimal damage; winds of 74 to
95 mph; storm surge of 4 to 5 feet.
Category 2 - moderate
damage; winds of 96 of 11 to 130
mph; storm surge of 6 to 8 feet.


Category 3 - extensive
damage, winds of 111 to 130 mph;
storm surge of 9 to 12 feet.
Category 4 - extreme damage;
winds of 131 to 155 mph; storm
surge of 13 to 18 feet.
Category 5 - catastrophic
damage; winds of 156 and up;
storm surge of 18 feet and up.
There have been only two
Category 5 hurricane in this
century. An unnamed 1935
hurricane struck the Florida Keys,
killing 408 people, and Hurricane
Camille hit Louisiana and
Mississippi in 1969, killing 256
people and causing almost $1.5
billion in damage.
There have been more than a
dozen Category 4 hurricanes.


-- 9




Full Text

PAGE 1

SOUTHCOM rushes aid to Jamaica by William H. Ormsbee American Health Organization. gallon water jugs, and 9600 cotton The assistance is being provided in QUARRY HEIGHTS (US* A second C-130 aircraft with blankets. Continued on Page 24 SOUTHCOM PAO) -U.S. 16,320 pounds of cargo departed Southern Command began disaster Howard Air Force Base at 11:34 a.m. relief operations to Jamaica from with 18 300-gallon-capacity rubber Panama Wednesday with the water tanks, also headed for shipment of about 40 tons of disaster Kingston Airport in Jamaica. A third relief supplies throughout the day C-130 with 17,600 pounds of cargo following the devastation to that departed Howard at 1:37 p.m., Caribbean island caused by followed by a fourth C-130 which ,. Hurricane Gilbert Monday. departed at 3:32 p.m. with 17,500 The first of four flights of supplies pounds of supplies. departed Howard Air Force Base at One or two C-130 flights were 9:45 Wednesday morning by a U.S. expected to depart Howard Air Force C-130 aircraft loaded with yesterday with one projected to leave 27,467 pounds of rolls of plastic about noon, with more tents and sheeting and 10 chain saws. Also water containers. onboardwereAlejandroJamesfrom Total shipments from the the San Jose, Costa Rica-based Panama-based stockpiles are regional office of the Office of expected to include 360 rolls of Foreign Disaster Assistance under plastic sheeting (to be used for the Department of State's Agency for temporary shelter), 10 chain saws, 18 WARM WELCOME -Jamaican PrimeMinisterEdwardSeaga greets U.S. International Development and 300-gallon rubber water tanks, 200 Air Force C-130 crew members who flew the initial10 tons of relief supplies Doctor Claude de Ville with the Pan civilian-type tents, about 4,000 fiveinto hurricane-ravaged Jamaica. (photo by SSgt. Matthew Gildow) the Tropic Tim es Vol. I, No. 33 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Sept.16, 1988 'LikeHiroshima, 'Jamaicanpremier says KINGSTON, Jamaica (UPI) -"It A dusk-to-dawn curfew has been Four transport planes flew from resort of Montego Bay reported looks like Hiroshima," said imposed in the nation's capital, the U.S. Howard Air Force Base in widespread damage, islandwide Jamaican Prime Minister Edward Kingston, because oflooting. Armed Panama to Kingston with tents, power outages, some looting, and Seaga in describing Hurricane troops patrolling the streets shot two chain saws, plastic sheeting, 74,000 streets choked with debris. Gilbert's ravaging of his island looters caught in the act. gallons of water and cotton blankets. "I went through the 1951 nation. -A report from an 11-member "It's the worst disaster in modern hurricane, Charlie .and this is much The death toll has climbed to disaster relief team from the United Jamaican history," said Earl Carl, worse than Hurricane Charlie," said nineteen, an estimated 750,000 States said Gilbert destroyed or the deputy chief of the Jamaican Kingston operator Gordon Stewart. people have been left homeless and heavily damaged the homes of about Embassy in Washington, D.C. "All the trees are flattened and I the damage amounts to "billions of 800,000 Jamaicans -about one-third Amateur radio operators in would say 70 percent of the smaller dollars," according to Seaga. of the nation's population. Kingston and the northwestern houses are damaged." Stewart reported "a lot"of looting, and said police shot two men, government officials initially reported five unconfirmed deaths, but other sources put the toll as high as 30 dead, he said. In Montego Bay, Jamaica, Gilbert's 115-mph winds hurled sunfish sailboats and their masts "into the cars like spears" and streets in the city were "impassable" from fallen trees and other debris, said AIRCRAFTDESTROYED -Smallplanes in various stages of destruction litter theMontegoBay airport inJamaica amateur operator Dave Porter. following Hurricane Gilbert. (photo by SSgt. Matthew Gilbert) Windows in the Wyndham Hotel shattered from the storm and floors Gilbert heading toward Texas coastline ";hok frhous," sd Portr do Hope, N.J., who brought radio equipment along on the trip. "It CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas(UPI) At 3 a.m. EDT, Gilbert was entire 400-mile Texas coast from looks like a bomb went off in my -Hurricane Gilbert howled across centered near latitude 21.6 north, Brownsville to Port Arthur and room." the Gulf of Mexico yesterday with longitude 90.8 west or 515 miles along the coast of northeast Mexico The building wasjammed Tuesday 1 20m p h wind s t ow a r d an southeast of Brownsville, Texas, and north from Tampico. Forecasters with more than 300 residents and anticipated weekend assault on moving west-northwest at 15 mph. warned residents in that zone to "be guests seeking shelters, he said, Texas, and coastal communities The National Hurricane Center in ready for quick action" today as adding, "everybody is safe, we have boarded up and fled en masse as the Miami predicted the storm gradually Gilbert's path became more certain, no deaths or injuries." "monster" storm approached. would turn more northwest and Gilbert thundered into the gulf Widespread flooding and wind Helicopters ferried 10,000 workers make landfall Friday night or early Wednesday night after pounding the damage were reported in Jamaica, from offshore oil rigs, schools closed Saturday on the south Texas coast posh beach resorts of Mexico's where Gilbert peeled the roof off a all along the Texas coast and between Brownsville and Corpus Yucatan Peninsula for nine hours. hospital, wrecked airport facilities authorities urged the evacuation of Christi if it takes that course. The hurricane crashed ashore with and airplanes and knocked out 600,000 residents in advance of the A hurricane watch flew along the Continued on Page 24 communications. storm that claimed at least 20 lives and caused billion-dollar damage inSoda ne cb rb ed ow t n afou-d ugh th Soldier, alone in cab, robbeddowntown Caribbean. "If we get a direct hit, we're by Bob Blocher He got a taxi and told the driver he there. They pulled the soldier from looking at a catastrophe," said FT. CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) wanted to go to Ft. Clayton. A few the cab and mugged him. The cab Richard Hawkins, director of -Everyone has been told to travel in blocks down the street, the cab driver took off. emergency management in Houston. groups when downtown. It just stopped to pick up a Panamanian "At the height of it, there were "I think the death toll is going to be makes sense. A sergeant in U.S. national. "I've been in cabs before women and children pulling at me very, very high." Army South recently took that where other people got in, or I got in -trying to get whatever I had. They Blood banks issued pleas for precaution -but he didn't take it far with someone else," he said. He took my shoes, my socks, my cash, donors, and officials told residents enough. didn't think anything of it at the time. my wallet and credit cards. I was left bent on riding out the storm to be Earlier this month, he was in a The cab driver turned down a few with my pants and my underwear." fingerprinted by police. "We want to downtown bar with his friends, who side streets. When the Panamanian He then fled on foot and made his be able to identify their bodies later," decided to go someplace else. He was got out of the taxi, he yelled way to Albrook Air Force Station, said Judge John Damon in Surfside getting tired, so he decided to go something in Spanish to other where he contacted the Security 50 miles south of Houston. home Panamanians who were waiting Continued on Page 24

PAGE 2

Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 question of the week What have you done lately to accumulate promotion points? "I'm taking two correspondence "I just took my SQT and improved "I've taken 71L administration "I'm taking correspondence courses courses, and I've also taken my score by eight percent. I've taken specialist correspondence courses 76P20, material control specialist." advantage of College Level threecorrespondencecourses;91C,a and college." Examination Program. I've read the medic's course; 84B, a photographer's Spec. Annjanette Atkins Spec. Johnny E. Canada, HHC, books, taken a test at the MOS course and the precommission USARSO DESPER 193rd Support Battalion library, and received credits that course. I have completed two and translate into promotion points." one-half years of college." Pvt. 2 Charles J. Camp Spec. Carmine Nicely Company B, 154th Signal Battalion Southern Command Network our readers say U.S. banking system experiences 1750 Faust Street major changes in check processing Englewood, FL. 34224 COROZAL -The Expedited explaining the new endorsement Funds Availability Art passed by requirements, as necessary, to Editor, Congress in 1987 will create major individual customers." Tropic Times. changes in the U.S. banking system The new regulations will present a when it goes into effect on Sept. 1. problem for on-base organizations I have a request. The people I know or knew in Panama are dwindling The act regulates the length of time who have traditionally used the down to a precious few, but I am continuing to persevere with trying to banks and other institutions can hold reverse of customer checks to notate establish a museum encompassing the Panama Canal or the Panama check deposits before the funds are additional customer identification. Railroad or the Republic of Panama (insofar as it concerns the first two) or available for withdrawal.To meet the AEBL has already written to all of all three. new hold schedules, the Federal their organizational clients advising My first efforts in this mission were as a committee member appointed Reserve Board has directed them of the new requirements. by the Panama Canal Society in Florida. This resulted in a ballot procedural changes be made in the published in the society's publication which reached about 4,500 members. way banks process checks drawn on A M EXpays Oct. 1 Of these, nine bothered to respond -most months later. After this debacle, other financial institutions. he I withdrew from the committee member's position, determined to press regulations are aimed at COROZAL (MBF) -From ahead on my own. standardizing check endorsements information being received, it is I still carry on, but I and a few friends have decided that the only way to and expediting the return of unpaid evident that a certain amount of go is affiliating ourselves in some way with an already established museum checks. confusion exists as to whether the and preferably one here in the United States. And we have come to the Under the regulations, banks will first payday in the new fiscal year will conclusion that if it is going to become a reality, our generation wil have to be required to disclose their hold be on Saturday, Oct. 1, or Monday, do it. policies to their clients. American Oct. 3 1988 Our kids are too busy living, working, worrying about the kids' Express Bank Ltd., which in the Robert Thoms, District Manager education, food, clothing and all that sort of thing. They simply do not Pacific theater operates military of the American Express Military have the time nor the money to devote to such a cause. The generation banking facilities in Panama, Korea Banks in Panama said that the behind them will be too late. and the Philippines says that no Corozal Bank will be open as usual Ihavewrittentoalotofpeople.Somerespond,somedonot.Ingeneral, changes are required to its existing on Saturday, Oct. I from 9 a.m. 2 I am seeking information about the thousands of pictures, in both official policy. However, as required of p.m. and all paychecks will be and private collections, depicting everything from the French canal other U.S. banks, AEBL intends to honored whether dated October I or through the first and second world wars through the Korean and Vietnam publish its policy. 3,1988. conflicts. Banks and other financial Likewise, account holders with In addition, I would also welcome some information about Peter institutions will now be instructing directdeposit oftheir pay will be able Golding, formerly in the British Embassy, and William Taylor, who, the their customers to limit their to draw funds at the bank, or use last I heard, was living out on the old road between Arraijan and Chorrera. endorsements on the reverse of the their checks for purchases, etc, from check to within 1 inches of the Oct. 1. This decision has been taken Sincerely, trailing edge, The trailing edge is the in line with the bank's policy to A. M. (Kibby) Bouche lift side, when looking at the front of cooperate with and assist their The Tropic Times welcomes letters from its readers, within the following the check. The remaining area on the customers in every way possible. guidelines: reverse of the check is reserved for Although the bank will remain All letters must conclude with the name of the writer, his or her bank endorsements. closed on Monday, Oct. 3, signature, and a telephone number where that person may be reached "Individual customers are unlikely accountholders with ATM cards can during normal duty hours. The use of a nom de plume is not permitted. to be inconvenienced by the new of course use the 24 hour "Express The editor of the Tropic Timesreservesthe right to edit or abridge letters endorsement requirements when Tellers" located at Howard AFB and for the sake of brevity, grammar, etc. cashing checks at the bank" states Fort Davis where they can draw up Letters complaining about a specific person or agency of the U.S. Robert S. Thoms AEBL's District to $300 per day and make deposits as Department of Defense or its component departments will be referred to Manager in Panama. "Our tellers required. For more information that person or agency. have been instructed to commence contact Robert S. Thoms 227-4565. Commander-in-Chief. Gen. Fred F. Woerner Assistant NCOIC .SFC Richard A. Czizik This authorized unofficial command information publication Director, Public Affairs. Col. Ronald T. Sconyers Editorial Staff.SSgt. Lauric Scott-Keller is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas. The Tropic Times is Executive Editor/NCOIC. SMSgt. Harold J. iee Spec. Monique Chere published in conjunction swith ihe Armed Forces Information Managing Editor .Colin Ha e PFC Todd Jacohucci Program of the apartmentt of Defense, under the supervision of 4 :-Composing R oom .........R oscmary Chong the d director of Pubhlic A ffairs U.S. Southern Com1mand. Copn Cof ey Contets of the Aatopic Im r o uthe Uimand. Sheila L. Hall fth, U.S. Governmenthe Department of Dfenseorthe US. A rmSoh Command. The addr.s is: APO Miami 34002, A brook post Oie. Telephone 285-6612.

PAGE 3

Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 3 Reservist develops oral history project by SSgt. Joe Patton "But after learning what the chief administration at the University of exercises, strengths and weaknesses Theater Support Element of staff(Rear Adm. R.C. Ustick)had Puerto Rico where he qualified for in organizational structure and USSOUTHCOM PA in mind, I was hooked." the Olympics in the metric mile in personnel, recommendations for Ortiz was asled to develop a 1966 and was a Distinguished better utilization of equipment and QUARRY HEIGHTS -When project to preserve impressions Military Graduate in ROTC in 1967. manpower assets, and assessments of the U.S. Southern Command needed surrounding military exercises and Ortiz, who completed Ranger external events that impact on someone to develop an oral history events in SOUTHCOM's theater of training at Ft. Benning, Ga. with the SOUTHCOM operatipns and project, it tapped a multi-talented operations within the past year that West Point graduation class, earned interests. attorney and U.S. Army Reserve could be of later historical interest a juris doctor degree from the Among other things, the from Cayey, Puerto Rico. and value. University of Puerto Rico in 1973, interviews also seek opinions about The telephone call from Col. Ed. A diversified military and civilian partly through night classes he the extent and effect of the drug E. Wade, the Joint Reserve Forces background made Ortiz an ideal started while on active duty. problem on U.S. interests in the Office chief, caught Lt. Col. Miguel candidate for the task. Ortiz, who has "People are sometimes surprised region and thoughts about what role, A. Ortiz by surprise. practiced criminal law for 15 years, at the range of talent in the reserve if any, the U.S. Armed Forces could "If anyone had suggested before has served as an infantry officer, forces inventory, but we seem blessed or should play in dealing with it. that I would ever be taking finance officer, and a Regular Army with an abundance of it," Wade said. But he also believes in the sage 'depositions' for a military history advisor to the National Guard during "In this case, we were able to obtain warning that those who do not heed project, I would have replied 'not 21 years of active and reserve service. the services of one whose military the lessons of past history are likely,"' Ortiz said. He took a degree in business and civilian experience made him an doomed to repeat its mistakes, one of ideal choice to handle a project of the reasons he agreed to take on the this scope." project. Ortiz, no stranger to special tasks, An agency which embraces that concedes the oral history project is by philosophy, the Center for Army far the most unusual and challenging Lessons Learned, has been put on the yet. distribution list for copies of the oral The project has since been interview transcripts. expanded to identifying historically "It would be premature and significant documents for military speculative to say that we expect any archives, startling revelations from a report to "We found that a lot of valuable come out of oral interviews and other information was being lost through information we are assembling," he reassignment of key players or said. shredding of working documents "But if it does nothing more than that needed to be preserved for to show better ways of doing business posterity," Ortiz said. or identify new and better ways of "Experience has already shown utilizing our military assets, then the that projects like this can put a several months that went into the veritable treasure-trove of project will have been invested information at the fingertips of wisely." military analysts and researchers." In the vernacular of Ortiz the Core questions developed for finance officer, a historical interviews touch on a multitude of perspective can mean the difference topics to include benefits of civic in paying a price two, three or even Lt. CoL MiguelA. Ortiz (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Michael Vest) action, engineering, and medical fifteen times. 'Traffic cop'directs incoming reserve components by Sgt. Michael Vest more realistic level of training in training -next best thing to fullbeing played by citizen-soldiers in the Theater Support Element SOUTHCOM due to the interaction time active duty, Brito added. military today, training exercises in SOUTHCOM PA with active component personnel He notes that reserve component Central and South America are and the hands-on approach to personnel deployed to SOUTHCOM invaluable, he emphasized. Feely for training also become more characterizes the training reservists FT. CLAYTON -SFC Angel knowledgable about their neighbors and guardsmen are getting here as Reserve Forces Office, U.S. in Central and South America and "real Army," exciting and satisfying. Reserve Force Officee U.S.s n h Southern Command, to that of a leave with a better understanding Brito has witnessed changes i the traffic cop in some respects. about the importance of being here. mission and appearance of the office Brito, a U.S. Army Reservist from "Both peoples benefit from more or less paralleling the increased Santurce, Puerto Rico, serving a reservists and guardsmen training emphasis on reserve forces in the third Active Guard and Reserve here in SOUTHCOM. It's an total army framework. (AGR) tour, was indeed a police opportunity to learn from each other Three years ago, it occupied a officer in civilian life -a detective. and that makes ambassadors of single room in a breezeway. One As operations sergeant for reserve. goodwill," said Maj. James Feely, room has given way to several nicely component training, Brito helps to reserve component training division done offices, courtesy of a group of chief. Individual Ready Reservists from identify realistic training "For example, humanitarian Puerto Rico who did the renovation. and National Guard units from the assistance programs in our medical It's a focal point of pride with Brito United States deploying to readiness training exercises who said that it was a thoroughly SOUTHCOM's theater of contribute to the health and wellprofessional job and one of many operations for annual training being of the local people while examples of what reserve component anything from medical readiness providing our people hands-on soldiers can do when their military training exercises to civil engineering training and a sense of genuine skills are matched up with the right projects. SFCAngelBrito (U.S. Armyphoto accomplishment." training opportunity. He's also responsible for the by Sgt. Michael Vest) Because of the expanded role He likes being a traffic cop. administrative tracking of a number of individual reservists and -* r e e r e guardsmen on extended active duty 'South civians receive service awards in SOUTHCOM and coordinates the tran port at i on for reserve COROZAL (USAISC) -Six for the Southern Command. budget office. Mrs. Donna Morgan's components, one reason for the civilian employees of U.S. Army Luis Cantu received a 20-year work as a computer assistant also traffic cop analogy. Information Systems Commandcertificate and silver lapel pin for his won her a Sustained Superior "When a reserve component South received awards from Col. service to the Army. He also works in Performance Award. soldier comes into Panama, I'm often Robert Van Steenburg III for their the projects branch of USAISCthe first person he meets. I frequently superior service to the Army over the South. meet the plane and take him through past year. Ten-year certificate and bronze in-processing, anything involved in In a ceremony held Aug. 23 at the lapel pins were earned by Humberto making his entry into the system ISC South Headquarters, Raymond Bethancourt and Raymundo easier," Brito said. L. Bennett received a 30-year Federal Richards. Bethancourt is assigned as "And, of course, I'm always ready Service certificate and gold lapel pin, a maintenance worker. Richards is a to give advice and help to straighten Bennett has been newly assigned to computer operator. out administrative problems the command in the Projects Branch. Mrs. Brenda McArthur received a reservists and guardsmen may have." He is responsible for monitoring Sustained Superior Performance Brito said that they usually find a communications upgrade projects Award for her work in ISC-South's

PAGE 4

4 Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 Boats now authorized by Bob Blocher restrictions. import operations fees and licenses, and parking fees. All the FT. CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)arrangements for importing, ou may now ship boats. boat maintaining, and operating the boat trailers, and boat motors during your are your responsibility. per man ent change of sta tio The U.S. Customs Division does according to Arthur W. Myke, chief, not yet have a set of guidelines to the movement branch, of the Transporimportation/operation restrictions of tationn Department here, the countries in the region. "This is a his new entitlement is offered only new issue. There will be some hangto active-duty military, according to L ups," said Myke. "For now, we're Myke. -handling things on a case-by-case Effective Aug. I, a change in the basis." The U.S. Customs Division ts Joint Federal Travel Regulations on currently working with the COuntri permanent duty travel now allows the of the region to compile a list of shipment of boats at government restrictions. expense. The boats weight counts According to Myke, you should against your household goods limit contact U.S. Customs and the but beware, there are some additional Transportation Division before costs and responsibilitie involved, purchasing a boat that you may want According to Myke, "There's going to ship. Get the authority before you to be an excess cost when you ship a buy. boat -things like crating, packaging, For more informat ion on handling and so on. All additional imot -prtin retitos charges are payable by the import/' operations restrictions, The Industrial Division's new portable structures shelter equipment and servicemembers." Myke stressed, "If contact the U.S. Customs Division at personnel from the effects of weather. (Courtesy of Panama Canal sericeembrs. Mye sresed,"If 282-4204/3101. For more information Comsin you should ship a boat, there will be an concerning the shipment of a commission) additional cost payable by you." boat/trailer/ motoi, contact the Also, said Myke, depending on the Transportation Division at 287C C er c sn w t u t re host country, there may be customs 6465/6759. BALBOA HEIGHTS (PCC PAO) to contain dust and grit during -Prefabricated, portable structures abrasive blasting. were recently erected at the Panama Under the direction of a Sprung G orgas announces vacancies Canal Corn mission Industrial Instant Structures field engineer, Division in Mount Hope to increase seven Industrial Division employees ANCON (MEDDAC) -Gorgas quality, productivity and safety by put up the giant domes over a twoArmy Community Hospital has reducing the effects of weather. week period using only simple tools. permanent, temporary and Leased with an option to buy from The structures can be taken down intermittent vacancies for Practical Sprung Instant Structures of and re-erected in sections or all Nurse, NM-620-05. Applicants must Calgary, Canada, the structures together over other work areas, have a current LPN License to consist of parallel aluminum frames including the Industrial Division practice in the United States or supporting a coated, reinforced drydock. Puerto Rico. polyesterfabric. Two mitergates can "They're among the best The Civilian Personnel Office also easily be overhauled on the improvements to the Industrial is accepting applications from synchrolift work table under these Division since the synchrolift itself," Registered Nurses in all speciality translucent, waterproof and firesays William Rankin, chief of the 7 areas. Candidates must posses a retardant structures, which also serve Production and Planning Branch. current U.S. license as a professional -, nurse in a State, District of D EH cancels service request cards Columbia, the Commonwealth of FT. DAVIS (USARSO PAO) -3279/3273. Puerto Rico or a Territory of the Atlantic DE H is cancelling the use of The caller will be provided with a UInted States. ct the Service Request Cards which are service order number, which the MInterestedopersonsmay oentact normally placed in quarters windows caller can use for follow-up if 285-4160 or visit the Civilian when housing occupants require maintenance is not completed within 285410 o vsitth Cvilan / -o ~ -T7,.maintenance or rpi.21 days. Personnel Office, Building 560, matnnerepair. Room 306, Corozal, Panama. As of Aug. 8, occupants may call For more information call 289the Service Order Desk at 2893116. The Provost Marshal's Corner Late one Friday night, three being ordered to put the snake identify several suspicious some clothes and the flames young men slipped into the jungle away several times, the trespasser individuals one evening after spread to the quarters. Quick looking for a private place far did, but then forcefully resisted a midnight. One of the group had a reaction by the fire department from the maddening crowd. search for more concealed snakes. dog without a leash which limited the fire, but the damage Satisfied that they were alone, the The M P then arrested the two foolishly began to threaten the was still extensive. Six thousand three opened up their picnic men and a boa, took them to patrol dog. On orders from the dollars of damage was done to the basket and settled down to some building 131 and booked them on MP, the owner of the pugnacious family's personal property. serious partying. Instead of fried charges of trespassing, resisting dog tried to to hold him back, but In spite of the number of chicken, they had in their hamper apprehension,and asault before without success. shoplifters arrested there's always two small bags of marijuana, a being turned over to the PDF. The dog broke loose and one more who thinks he can beat bottle of Jim Beam and three cans Presumably the evidence was not attacked the guard dog and the the odds. This week's thief was of Coke. retained. MP tried to break them up. The observed hiding two Zippo Before they could really get Early one morning, a resident civilian dog got confused and bit lighters in his socks. Then he tried started though, the ax fell in the of Cocoli awoke to find that the M P and was then bitten by the to nonchalantly stroll out of the form of the Military Police, who during the night his house had guard dog. The civilian dog was Corozal main store. He didn't arrived and busted them. This is been visited by suppliers for the taken to the vet clinic where he even make it to the parking lot probably the first time that ants Midnight Auto Supply and Fence was treated and released to his before the long arm of the law fell would have been more welcome at Co. After unscrewing the security owner. on his shoulders and tagged him a picnic than more guests. light under the house, they not His owner was taken to the out of the game. only broke into his new Firebird station where he was charged with Finally today, another hit and A charge of assault with a and storage area, but jacked up a failure to obey a written run with a happy ending. deadly snake was not filed against friend's car and stole three tires regulation, and failure to control a Saturday morning at 1 a.m. two Panamanian men over at Ft. and wheels. pet. The M P was taken to Gorgas someone struck a car owned by a Kobbe when it was determined The thieves did replace the Army Community Hospital civilian employee of MEDDAC that the 12-foot snake they wheels with full cans of paint, but where he was treated and released. while it was parked next to repeatedly shoved in the face of an the color was wrong and the The guard dog was released to his building 154 at Ft. Clayton. The M h was non-poisonous. Tie M P sergeant couldn't use it. The kennel, driver then took off leaving the had observed the pair acting public is advised to keep an eye on A midday fire at Ft. Clayton owner of the damaged car to SuspiCiOuIsy near buildings 801 and a neighbor's security lights. When caused an estimated $21,000 discover her loss. Two days later, approached them. they aren't on, report it to the damage to a residence. The maid the MPSs found the culprit and One of the men dropped t he bag M Ps. lit candles as part of a personal charged her with a hit and run and and pulled the loaded snake and A walking patrol in the 1100 religious observance and left them then released her to her own pointed it at the patrolman. After area of Ft. Clayton attmtpted to unattended. The candles ignited custody.

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Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 5 MEDDA C exercise evaluates disaster response by F.L. Marquez organizations including MEDEVAC, Logistics Division, the Panama On Sept. I at 9:30 a.m., an earth Canal Commission Fire Department, or registering 3.0 on the the Nursing Department and 214th Richter scale 3 oused the Medical Detachment, responded infrastructure of the main sections Immediate casualties were moved of Gorgas Army Hospital to first. Down as many as seven flights shudder. Lights temporarily of stairs, litter-bearers simulated blinked for several seconds. All carrying the wounded to the hospital other systems within the hospital lobby. There the injured were triaged remained operational. and prepared for movement by At 9:35 and 9:37, two tremors nurses and immediately loaded onto measuring 4.0 caused additional ambulances. The ambulances than damage. raced through the streets to the At 9:45 a.m., an earthquake Quarry Heights landing pad. that registered 6.5 on the Richter There, two real casualties were scale hit Panama City and caused brought in by a helicopter that the hospital's main building to originally was to transport the mock shudder severely. As a result there wounded to Building 519, Ft. was extensive damage to the Clayton. The real casualties were building and many were injured incorporated into the exercise and -Memorandum for instruction of were immediately transported by Internal Disaster Exercise. ambulance to Gorgas. Shortly thereafter, the exercise was ended. GORGAS ARMY HOSPITAL, Ancon -This was the scenario for "On balance, the exercise went U.S. Army Medical Department well," said Thompson. "Overall, I Activity Mass Casualty Exercise. think we met our objectives. "An exercise like this is always a "Our objective was to see if, learning experience, but we feel we indeed, we could get patients through did our job and we did it well," said the hospital, triaged adequately, Lt.Col.Robert L.Kornegay,chief of taken care of and transported out, plans, operations, training and said Col. Prentice Thompson Jr., security at Gorgas Army Hospital. Commander, USA MEDDAC. "The health care professionals here Every six months, it is reallydoagoodjoboftakingcareof MEDDACs objective to evaluate patients. The one thing we learned DISASTER -ShellyB. Prince, a registerednurse at GorgasA rmy Hospital, their response to such disasters. With today, above all, is that the better you performs first aid on mock casualty Spec. Terry A. Marks, Battery D, 324th mock damage to the building and 25 communicate the more effective you Field A rtillery. (U.S. Army photo by Bob Blocher) mock casualties to be evacuated, can be." Ceremony honors helper of WW II airmen MACDILL AFB, (AFNS) -the British Broadcasting News forces, and it was forbidden to listen clothing and identification papers. DuringWorld War II, a small group bulletins into French to be to allied programming. If caught, Most importantly, they were of Belgians retaliated against distributed among patriots opposing listeners faced six months in prison. screened to avoid double agents from German oppression by aiding allied the Nazis. Belgian stations were Having agreed to help translate the infiltrating the escape system that airmen downed behind enemy lines. already controlled by the occupying broadcasts, Mrs. Brusselmans was took flyers from Brussels, via Paris, The Order of Daedalians Suncoast through the Pyrenees Mountains to Flight 25 honored one of those Madrid and Gibraltar. patriots, 83-year-old Anne By undertaking the dangerous Brusselmans, during a recent underground tasks, Mrs. Brusselceremony at MacDill. mans and her family placed From 1941 to 1944, Mrs. themselves under the constant threat Brusselmans provided food, of discovery by Gestapo agents and clothing, shelter and assistance to local spies. Discovery would have more than 200 allied airmen while surely meant execution. living with her husband and two B il, 1944, the allies were children in Brussels, Belgium. By Aril, 194 the allies aw dy In addition, using the services of preparing for their Normandy like-minded patriots, she arranged .invasion by bombing railway forged passports and other junctions that aided Nazi movement. documents to give safe passage to the The raids also crippled prime escape downed airmen. routes. An underground leader dMwned armn decided the risks were getting toogreat Mrs. Brusselmans' story began in adtemnwudhv osa 1940 with the Nazi occupation of and the men would have to stay Belgium. A Protestant clergyman where they were or move into forest knew she had an English mother and camps. Brusselmans had 54 airmen lan uaet A WARD WINNER -SFC Jamie Robles, Company B, 3/7th Special under her "control" in several houses The clergyman asked Mrs. Forces Group, wonfirstplace in the "CreativeEffects "category during the where she kept them hidden until tne Brusselmans if she would translate recent USARSO Photo Contest with this entry. country's liberation, Sept. 3, 1944. then recruited to provide civilian On that day, Mrs. Brusselmans Cl.Uclothes and food coupons to aid proudly brought the 54 flyers, mostly A antic Sp ace 'A 'reinstated British soldiers stranded behind Americans, to the British intelligence by Doyle C. Carr leave status when signing up for enemy lines when Belgium unit at the Metropole Hotel in Space A and have their leave forms surrendered. At that time, there were Brussels. FT. DAVIS(USARSOPAO)--Sign with them, no "escape lines" functioning in Mrs. Brusselmans has also been up for Space A travel has been Other documentation to have Belgium. awarded several other decorations reinstated for 180 days in the Atlantic when signing up for Space A are By mid-1941, the Royal Air Force for her heroic actions. These include Community. military and bilingual identification, had started raids over enemy the Knight of the Order of Leopold Beginning Sept. 6, Atlantic passports, resident alien card (if not a occupied territories. Knowing Mrs. II, Croix de Guerre and Medal of residents can go to the Adjutant U.S. citizen) passports and visa Brusselmans willingness to be Voluntary Combatant from General Office, Building 232, second packets. involved, church members asked her Belgium; Medal of Resistance from floor, Ft. Davis and sign up for Space Children need not be present when to harbor downed airmen until an Polan; Order of the British Empire; A travel, instead of going to the signing up for Space A, but sponsors escape line could be started. In 1942, and the Medal of Freedom from the Pacific side of the Isthmus. must bring their documentation and the United Statesjoined the British in United States. Hours of operation for Space A IDs. Both parents, however, need to the air raids, and American flyers A diary Mrs. Brusselmans kept travel are Monday through Friday sign up in person. became part of the growing group during the war years was translated from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. All An instructional letter on Space A which also included Irish, Canadian, in 1954 and published by Benn Department of Defense (DOD) travel will be forthcoming from the New Zealand, Australian and Polish Publishing of London under the title members, military personnel and Atlantic AG Office. pilots. "Rendez-vous 127," the Brusselmans their family members are eligible. For more information on Space A The pilots were guided around the street number at that time. (Courtesy Active duty personnel must be in a travel call 289-3181. streets of Brussels and were provided of the Thunderbolt newspaper).

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6 Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 Regulation change gives new EIB authority by Spec. William P. Bradner The EIB is an individual award for some time," according to Maj. has been happening, and encouraged FT. BRAGG, N.C. -Special excellence given to soldiers in Roderick M. Pinkney, chief of those units "which have coordinated Forces Group commanders will soon combat military occupational DCSOPS Training Branch for 1st with other units to traing and test for have the authority to test and award specialties. The soldiers participate SOCOM. EIB to maintain those relationships." their soldiers with the Expert in a gruelling and comprehensive Pinkney explained that the 1st "Most Special Forces soldiers Infantryman's Badge (EIB) thanks to "hands-on" test. It covers a broad SOCOM soldiers on Ft. Bragg were have been testing for teh EIB since a recent change to Army Regulation spectrum of critical infantry skills. attached to the 82nd Airborne it's conception," according to one 672-1, Authorization and Wear of In the past, Special Forces soldiers Division for two weeks for training source in the John F. Kennedy Military Awards. have had to train and test with other and testing, since 1st SOCOM Special Warfare Center and School, This change comes almost one infantry units in order to win the "didn't have the manpower, "and many of them have worn the year after DA Circular 350-87-XX, EIB. The change to AR 672-1 makes equipment, or testing facilities." badge even without authorization of The Expert Infantryman Badge Test, this unnecessary. In a letter to the commanders of all AR 672-1." was drafted and approved by the "The Special Forces soldiers in 1st Special Forces Groups, the Deputy "The Operational Groups have U.S.ArmyInfantrySchool,granting Special Operations Command Commanding General of Ist usually made agreements with unit commanders the same (Abn.) have been testing for the EIB SOCOM, Brig. Gen. Sidney, neighboring or local infanty units," authority. to Special Forces soldiers for quite Shachnow, acknowledged that this according to MSgt. Michael R. O'Neil, Unit Training NCO for the Special Warfare Center and School, 1st M s assume A ador d es "and have provided their soldiers with the means to test for the EIB by Capt. Nancy Bates back in Central America, this time as since 1983." part of the Joint Task Force Panama With the recent changes, all Security Augmentation mission. Special Forces soldiers are eligible to FT. CLAYTON -The 571st test for AND wear the EIB without Military Police Company (STRAF) Ft Amador is an unusual area to breaking or bending any regulations, from Ft. Ord, Calif., has transitioned secure. As a joint are a of with the exception of Special Forces from performing combat support Panamanian/U.S. Control, the Medics. Medics will test for the type missions in Honduras to law soldiers of the 571st often work in Expert Medical Badge. enforcement duty at Ft. Amador. joint patrols with the Panamanan Authorization to test and award The 571st is under operational Defense Forces, manning the main the EIB is also granted to control of the 759th Military Police gate and entrance to the Naval commanders of forward deployed Battalion from Ft. Carson, Colo. housing area. Special Forces Battalions. The 759th falls under the 89th Military Police Brigade from Ft. Ft. Amador is also the uito churches Hood. headquarters for the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and the Continuedfrom Page 7 The 571st is certainly accustomed residence for several senior ranking everyone with a role in church to a rapid changing environment. In officers, to include the U.S. Army restoration. March, the 571st returned from South commander. Ecuador is the second poorest Honduras, where they spent 3 1/2 country in South America, and the months performing combat support Duty for the soldiers is somewhat quake damaged its oil pipeline, type missions such as air-base repetitious, but the 571st eating into a key revenue source. ground defense convoy escort, and accomplishes their law enforcement Jaramillo said in an interviewthat area security as part of Joint Task with dedication and pride, knowing CpL. Kevin J. Kelly conducts a radio his group needed at least $6 million Force Bravo. Within weeks of the sunny skies of California will check. (U.S. Army photo by Capt. to restore the Quito churches. The returning to Ft. Ord, the 571st was eventually greet them. Nancy E. Bates) government granted only $40,000. The Organization of American ~ States (OAS) had approved $30,000 Telephone system gives voter information e Ued Nations was expected to approve WASHINGTON (AFNS) -campaign to increase awareness phones,payinglongdistancecharges $130,000 but these sums were Military people and their families about national and state elections. if necessary, by dialing rotary (703) nowhere near those required to now have access to voter information In a survey conducted after the 325-6100, and touch tone (202) repair the damaged buildings, he on candidates for president, vice 1984 general election, 20.8 percent of 504-4323. added. president, U.S. Senate and state military respondents said they did For more information on The Roman Catholic church in governor through a worldwide not vote because they were not candidates and issues not covered on Ecuador, also strapped for money, telephone system. familiar with candidates and issues, the recorded messages, callers can has few resources for church repairs The voting information center, or they had no candidate preference. leave their names, addresses and said Padre Angel Aguirre, who runs organized by the Defense The system was developed in an telephone numbers. Requests will be San Agustin, a 17th century church Department, Noncommissioned effort to serve this need. answered by mail. that was badly damaged. Officers Association, AnheuserThe telephone system is available If Autovontelephone serviceisnot "We (the church) have nothing," Busch Corp., and the Democratic free throughout the worldwide available, requests for information he said. and Re pu b ii can N at i o n a1 Autovon network. The touch-tone may be made by writing to: Defense What repairs that are being Committees, will provide recorded number is 285-4333, rotary number is Department Voting Information undertaken are financed by the messages from candidates. 221-6100. Center, 225 N. Washington St., patrimony institute, the clergy and a The telephone system is part of a People may also call from private Alexandria, Va. 22314. local beer firm. Ask the DEH Housing is trying to equalize the waiting lists Q. I have been waiting since and the command recently blessed children, one child and one onRest assured that Housing April to get my family to Panama a plan to do juts t that. the-way to move to larger three Division is trying minimize the but since I don't have on post The longest waiting lists are the bedroom quarters. Last weeks' inconveniences of all concerned. quarters yet, they are still waiting. field grade three-bedroom, column provided details, so check Finally, there is yet another When I checked with Housing, company grade two-bedroom and it for more information, a program. Because there are they said I might have to wait until junior enlisted two-bedroom lists. In an attempt to maintain as currently excess family quarters in next spring before my family The shortest lists are the company much r a n k i n t e g r it y in the Atlantic community, they are could join me. grade three-bedroom, junior neighborhoods as possible, being made available on a A friend of mine got here last enlisted three and junior enlisted selectedfamilies are being moved temporary basis to those on the three-bedroom lists. at government expense from one waiting lists who have the longest month and got quarters neighborhood to another.: Only tings lowist wo h iaiist mmedatelyWe are both the same We have, therefore, reallocated thofamilies volunteering to times to wait for their families to rank but he has two kids and I housing from those categories participate will be moved, join them. only have one. Can you do with the shortest wiaiting time to Families will not be moved This is being handled on a first something to make the time we are those categories with the longest against their wishes. come, first served basis until the away from our families more waiting times. This will help Some families at Amador are quarters in the Atlantic equal. Signed: A frustrated balance out the waiting time. being moved to Clayton as more community are filled. sergeant, Mech Loop, Clayton. Additionally, Housing Division field grade three-bedroom Questions about any of the A. As a matter of fact, we are is attempting to alleviate the requirements move to Amador. A aforementioned programs should doing something. To balance out junior enlisted two-bedroom list similar program will follow which be directed to Mr. Cotto-Perez or the waiting lists is no small chore by allowing those with two affects the 600 area of Corozal. MSgt. Pierre at 287-3956/4564.

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Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 7 hemisphere General strike ruins Peronista image BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA In private, Menem's aides have between Argentina and the candidate of President Raul (UPI) -It took just a few hours of long expressed concern about the International Monetary Fund that Alfonsin's Radical Civic Union violence during a general strike to "fear factor" in the election, a feeling are already stalled over the country's Party, Cordoba Province Governor pour down the drain years of effort in a large part of the electorate that a foreign debt arrears of more than $1 Eduardo Angeloz. Alfonsin is by Argentina's Peronist Party to Menem administration would result billion. prohibited from running for a second refurbish its image as a mainstream, in social and political chaos. Menem, the charismatic governor term. respectable political institution. In the original labor rally and of La Rioja Province, was apparently Menem, in his primary election The big loser in Friday's violence, strike Friday, the labor confederation warned that violent incidents could campaign against rival Peronist which led to a new general strike demanded higher wages and a take place and stayed away. But his Antonio Cafiero, skillfully cultivated Monday called by Peronistmoratorium on foreign debt association with the old guard thelaborbosses,knowninArgentina controlled unions, is likely to be the payments, moves that would be Peronist union leaders is likely to as "La Patota Sindical," literally party's candidate for president in bound to further complicate talks hurt his chances against the meaning the "Union Gangsters." next May's election, Carlos Menem. The union chieftains are Peronist Until now he seemed to have an "'r's'e not ill demagogues who travel with a large insurmountable lead, but his p, stsays retinue of bodyguards and get campaign had not been touched by ASUNCION, Paraguay (UPI) Juan Jose Benitez Rickmann told elected to union positions on a violence. -A government spokesman has United Press International. single slate of candidates helped by The revival of the impression that said that President Alfredo Repeatingthe official version of musclemen. the party of the late strongman Juan Stroessner is in good health and Stroessner's disappearance, Their frequent use of intimidation Peron employs strongarm methods will resume making ceremonial Benitez Rickmann said the past record of violence dog to attain its ends sent a chill through wernis polticans whoin formoia yearsRcka ad h the Argentine electorate. appearances this week. president was given a medical have been trying to present an image The first evidence was the failure Stroessner, 76, dropped out of checkup because of a trip to of moderation to the public. of Monday's general strike called to sight on Aug. 31 and has not been Taiwan planned for October and Anats ae tht pujlict protest the violent clashes last Friday seen in public since. "his state ofhealth is satisfactory." Analysts agree that a major factor between police and rioters after Diplomats and other reliable He denied there had been an in the Alfonsin 1983 election victory demonstrators at a labor rally began sources said the president, operation and said Stroessner will was a single televised incident; the to systematically break shop Paraguay's undisputed ruler since resume making public appearances Peronist candidate for the windows and loot stores. 1954, underwent prostate gland Ithis week. governorship of Buenos Aires irdos13 a nd er strikes ca9l4 derStroessner, Latin America'slast Province, Herminio Iglesias, Tired of 13 general strikes called surgery and was under postold-fashioned, anti-Communist publicly burned a flag of Alfonsin's by the Peronist unions over five operative care. caudillo and one of the world's party at a mass rally of one million years, Argentines Monday voted The sources said there were longest-reigning heads of state, people. with their feet. Most people went to some post-operative complications came to power in 1954 after a That stirred memories of the work. that have since been overcome, military coup as the eighth violence with which the Peronists For the first time, a handful of "The president is in perfect president in seven years in the have been associated since Peron Peronist political and labor leaders health and doesn't have any landlocked South American persecuted his political opponents oelbrkwihthe unions and aftokd ot meia ereurde tos powerca opapopulist openly broke with the n ice d problems,"presidential spokesman country of 4 million people. after he rode to power on a populist opposed the strike aimed at the police.surge 1946. Pre-Inca grave in Peru richest in hemisphere WASHINGTON (UPI) -A at the University of California, Los ordered that spot excavated. tomb. Thirty items went on display in Peruvian tomb that evaded looters Angeles, said. That order led to a dramatic Washington today, and the bulk of for 1,500 years has yielded the richest Donnan was part of the team, discovery -a masoleum containing the collection is now being examined, archeological find in the western funded by the National Geographic the body of a richly-clad Moche lord, restored and catalogued in Peru. hemisphere -a trove of gold and Society under the direction of the as well as those of two other men, two Donnan said the Moche tomb's jewels that rivals the treasures of P e r u vi an g o v e r n me n t, t h at women; and a dog believed to have treasure surpasses that of two ancient Greece, it was announced excavated the lavish burial mound been part of the royal entourage. previous contenders for the richest Tuesday. near Sipan on the north coast of The Moche preceded the Inca archeological site in the Americas: A 20foot-wide, solid gold Peru. culture by hundreds of years, the jade-laden tomb of Pacal at headdress, a warrior's golden Archeologists were alerted to the dominating the northern coast of Palenque, Mexico, and a gold-rich backflap weighing almost 2 pounds tomb's existence after an adjoining Peru from about A.D. 100-800 and excavation at Monte Alban, Mexico. and a string of gold bells showing a grave was looted and a large quantity producing superb jewelry from The Moche treasure is even god lopping off human heads are just of finely-wrought gold jewelry locally mined gold and from shells impressive by worldwide standards, a fraction of the riches found in the flooded the black market for stolen, and stone imported from as far north Donnan said, noting that it grave of a warrior-priest of the ancient treasures. as Ecuador and as far south as Chile. "compares very favorably" with the Moche culture. In April 1987, Walter Alva, "This jewelry is just unsurpassed in magnificent gold jewelry unearthed "The real richness is in director of the Bruning Archaeologithe exquisite craftmanship and from tombs near the ancient city of information -it contains. But in cal Museum in Lambayeque, Peru, technical virtuosity of the artisans Mycenae in Greece. material terms, just in terms of gold sent a team of archeologists to the who created it,"said Donnan, noting But the anthropologist conceded objects and jewelry, this tomb looted tomb to salvage what artifacts that some of the mosaic inlay, beadthat event he splendor of the contains the greatest quantity as well the robbers had left behind and to and goldwork is so minute it would Peruvian site Iales in comparison to as the quality of gold jewerlry taht clean up the site. almost take a magnifying glass to the copious ri ies found in the tomb we've ever seen come from an A few months into the efforts, the fashion the design. of the famed Egyptian king archeologically excavated tomb int archeologist noticed a depression Archeologists would 'not give a Tutankhamen. "I don't think he Americas," said Christopher that appeared to have been filled in dollar estimate for the cache of gold anything can compare with that," Donnan, an anthropology professor with earth in ancient times and and jewels found at the Peruvian Donnan said. Quito's magnificent churches in danger of collapse QUITO (REUTERS) -Magnifiscaffolding. Wide fissures threaten Worst hit in Quito were the tower and showered stones on the cent colonial churches in the walls and arches. Convent of Santo Domingo and the bell. Ecuadoran capital damaged in a Church officials and restoration Church of San Agustin run by The clock, which carries the severe earthquake last year are experts fear the churches could Aguirre, and Convent de la Merced, inscription Handle and Moore, neglected, decaying and in danger of collapse altogether in another a famous old church not far from Clerkenwell, 1817, was wrecked by collapse. tremor. Quito's Plaza Independencia. falling walls during the quake. Architects, restoration experts and Janet Silva, an architect working The Convent de la Merced houses For over 40 years, one Ecuadoran churches .have had scant restoration on church restoration, said many one of the largest church bells on the man, named Seferino Congo, had work performed since emergency churches were already weakened by continent, a gold, silver, zinc and mantained the clock, scaling the 57patch-up operations right after the centuries of wind, rain and previous bronze instrument measuring about meter tower twice a day. When he March 1987 earthquake, which hit earthquakes. 16 feet across and seven feet high. died in 1965, no one willing to make hardest a remote area around 60 Jose Maria Jaramillo, director of Sharing the bell-tower is one of the the scary ascent was found, and the miles northeast of Quito and killed the state-run National Institute of oldest clocks, made in London and clock stopped. more than 1,000 people. Cultural Patrimony, said most of the installed in the 19th century. "Of course we could restore the Built by Spanish settlers and 40 to 50 buildings damaged in Quito Father Octavio Proano, the padre clock,"said Proano. "But that would adorned with gold, paintings and were churches. The northeastern city at la Merced and the author of cost a lot of money that we don't murals by Spanish and Indian artists of Ibarra, including Basilica de la several books on Quito church have." depicting early Christian miracles, Dolorosa, also suffered quake architecture, said no one has rung the His plaint is repeated by nearly the churches are now wrapped with damage. bell since the quake damaged the Continued on Page 6

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8 Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 commentary Reserve forces get help with job conflicts HOWARD AFB (USAFSO State committees may be "The ombudsman service is the Department of Labor or the PAO) -Who does one of 243,298 contacted through commanders, informal, and the objective is to Office of Personnel Management. Air National Guardsmen and Air state adjutants general or by calling smooth out misunderstandings, The colonel offered some advice to Force Reservists turn to when having the national committee's toll-free disagreements and difficulties to the help promote positive employer a problem getting time off from a number: 1-800-336-4590. From satisfaction of all," Price support: civilian job to train? Guam, reservists should call collect emphasized. -Let employers know as far in The first attempt to resolve the 202-653-0841. Although the national and state advance as possible of training dates. problem should be made at the Price said if local efforts fail, a committees and the ombudsman -At least once a year thank the employer-employee level, according phone call or letter to the national have no authority to enforce employer and supervisor for their to Col. Charles R. Price, staff committee will bring help from a statutory provisions of Title 38 of the cooperation. director of the National Committee qualified ombudsman. U.S. Code, they may refer people to -If possible, use tasks learned for Employer Support of the Guard during military training on the and Reserve. civilian job. "Often, a calm, objective face-to-Iron out problems personally. face discussion can reveal solutions Price said employer support is a through give-and-take interaction," two-way street. Employers should Price explained. If that process fails, support civilian-military employees, he said, the reservists should contact but Guardsmen and Reservists must the unit commander. cooperate as much as possible with "Commanders have a vested employers. interest in the problem and may be able to explain the situation or Volunteers help suggest compromises that will satisfy everyone's needs," he said. in contributing In addition to the national staff, there are 55 states and territorial to manyprograms committees for employer support that stand ready to assist. by Capt. Johnnie D, Ainsley Price said that most state 28th Air Division Public Affairs Pric sad tht mst sateTinker AFB, Okla. committee members are local business leaders who understand HOWARD AFB (USAFSO/PA) both sides of the problem and can -They carry no 'rank on their help mediate, usually through faceshoulders, but their commitment to to-face discussion. serve our country is just as strong. They contribute to the nation's freedom by staying behind when H heroes dare their uniformed spouses go to' war. Their commitment transcends to be leaders personal gain and selfish interest. By practicing patriotism, loyalty by Patrick A. Toner, and fidelity on the home front, their Chaplain (Capt.), USAF aspirations parallel the three most powerful words in the English HOWARD AFB (USAFSO language -duty, honor and country. PAO) -"I sing of the arms and the They are selfless managers and men." begins Virgil's Aeneid. His capable planners, and are skilled in was not the first nor the last attempt th.e art of instilling love and devotion to honor our heroes. in our children. I have often wondered why we wait They help sustain us in good times until someone dies before we honor and bad, nourishing and ensuring him. We need to give our children our future. They are the cornerstones living heroes. They don't have to be of our war-fighting capability, bigger than life, just filled with life. contributing immeasurably to the In the musical "Goodbye Mr. Air Force mission: "They," if you Chips," the hero sings a song that haven't guessed already, are Air says what I hope to say: "In the Force spouses. morning of my life I looked to the RETREAT CEREMONY -A joint service retreat ceremony to mark Air Force spouses volunteer for sunrise, in the morning of my life POW/MIA RecognitionDay willbe heldatHowardAFB today at5p.m. sur oraiztouses volynsuppor when my world was new, and these Participating in the ceremony will be units from the U.S. Air Force such organizations as family support three questions I must answer; was I SouthernA irDivision, U.S. Army South and U.S.NavalForcesSouthern centers, family services, American brave and strong and true, did I fill Command/U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal. (photo by MSgt. Herb youth programs. They answer the world with love my whole life Cintron, Det. 5, 1361th A VS) phones, lend clerical assistance, serve through?" on committees, help with workshops takes te uro Ha rotes derie whavei N CO works to reg ster voters and coach sporting events. takes to be a hero. Heroes are brave NThey provide child care to military because they accept challenges and by Sgt. Joseph A. Figueroa squadron members, but the entire families, help newly-assigned dare to be leaders. 6933rd Electornic Security country. families get settled and lend a Heroes are true because they are Squadron At last count, Cook had registered sympathetic shoulder in times of men and women of character and HOWARD AFB, (USAFSO/ PA) -more than 1,400 people. grief. They span all age groups and principle. And above all else, they Commitment is one thing most "Historically, military participaeducation levels, and they all have must strive to fill the world with love. people don't carry out to the fullest. tion has been very poor. I want to one thing in common -they want to This life of service sets them apart They say they will commit to dieting, change that," he explained. "There help. from others and earns them exercising, studying more for are more than 15,000 voters in this Recognizing some of the hardships recongition as heroes. promotion exams, and yes, even country, and we can use our clout to that spouses face, President Reagan The heroes we need are men and voting for the people who they feel bring about changes we feel are recently said, "Spouses serve as women of character who fill the will lead the United States. Often, needed." volunteers in their communities and world with love. I have a long list of when it comes to the commitment of With so many people in Panama as goodwill ambassadors abroad. candidates; many I know personally voting, people back away. not registered, Cook decided the best Not a few are called upon to make and many more I know by There is a man who is carrying out way to get his point of voting across personal sacrifices, defer careers, reputation. Heroes come from the the true word, "commitment." He is was to go on the offensive. He forego familiar surroundings and ranks of commanders, NCOs, TSgt. Anthony Cook of the 6933rd attacked the apathy by actively and endure long periods ofseparation for mechanics, cooks, plumbers, Electronic Security Squadron. aggressively seeking out voters and the defense of freedom. Truly, they parents, neighbors, and friends. Cook has committed himself to encouraging them to register. are our unsung heroes." Take time this week to honor a registering every U.S. voter in the Cook sets up a voter registration real-life hero by letting them know Republic of Panama. booth from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., they have made a difference in your "I feel that military members Saturdays, to give citizens the right life. Heroes come in all sizes, shapes should have a say in what direction to vote. For the remainder of this and ages. the U.S. is goiig," he said. As an month he will be in front of the A little encouragement on our part extra duty, he is the voting officer for H osward Post Office. can go a long way toward filling our the 6933rd ESS, hut he is serious "All you need to bring is a valid world with heroes. When you meet a about his commitment. Ithus, he has identification card: I will help you hero, sing his or hei praises. extended the arena trom tot onlsy fis wih th rust."' he concluded.

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Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 leisure Zodiac Rec sponsors trip to Portobelo by Karen Boyd town held a festival known as "The Volunteer Writer Fair." The streets were lined with gold and silver awaiting transport to Spain. HOWARD AFB (USAFSO In the boom years of Portobelo, PAO) -For those people who love "The Fair" lasted 40 days. However, history and going to the beach, the as the years passed, the festivities Zodiac Recreation Center has a tour were cut back to two weeks and now of Portobelo, Panama, that will is is not held at all. Because of the fulfill those needs. festivities, the town became a target While on the tour, people can for thieves and pirates. rediscover the port Columbus In 1740, it lost its leading role in proclaimed as Puerto Bello, meaning trade because of the increasing "Beautiful Harbor." The name was number of ships rounding Cape later changed to its present spelling Horn. of Portobelo. The last stop on the tour is The first stop on the tour is the Langosta Beach. Here, snorkling, harbor in Portobelo. The town is swimming, shelling or getting a tan small and very quiet. It is hard to can be relaxing. Bohios can be rented believe it was once a very important for a small fee complete with commercial and defense spot for the electrical outlets. Spanish. The only thing people need to Early in its history, Portobelo was bring is a packed lunch and a small an important link in trade between amount of money to enjoy this Peru and Spain. Once a year, a relaxing day with the Zodiac convoy of ships loaded with goods Recreation Center's tour of and treasures would sail from Portobelo. Portobelo to Spain. For information about this tour During this time of the year, the and other tours call 284-6109/6161. 'New Jazz' in concert "New Jazz," appearing in concert Oct. 7 at 8 p.m. at the Balboa Theater promises to entertain its audience with the sounds of Eduardo Irving on soprano sax; Ernesto Crouch, drums; A ivaro Maturel, bass and Ricardo Velazquez on electric and accoustic piano. "New Jazz" has appeared locally in Las Malvinas Cafe," "Paradise Pub" and now in concert at the Balboa Theater. Tickets are on sale at the YMCA in Balboa, Las Malvinas Cafe, Paradise Pub and the Argosy Book Store. (Photo courtesy New Jazz) Atlantic, Pacific plan Hispanic Week activities Special luncheons have been A salute to Panamanian culture scheduled through the week at the Ft. with dances, food, crafts, and displays Clayton NCO Club. On Sept. 16 a will take place at the Valent mariachi band will play. There will be Community Recreation Center from a Hispanic produce display, customer noon to 4 p.m. There will also be a specials onHispanic products and food display in the lobby of the Valent tasting throughout the week at Center. selected times at the Corozal At the Sherman Arts and Crafts Commissary. Center from Sept. 11 to 17, there will There will be a Hispanic display in be a display of craftsmanship from the Corozal Exchange. There will also Ecuador, Peru and Panama and be aHispanic cultural display at the Ft. posters from Hispanic countries. Clayton library. A Hispanic Week Womens Other events include "Dances of Volleyball Tournament will occur Panama" and Colombian dancers at Sept. 12-17 at Reeder Gym. the Ocean Breeze Community Center A special program featuring music, Fish fry at Ft. Sherman Sept. 17 from 7 p.m. food, folklore will be held at the Loft HOWARD AFB, Pansamah9781h CG/PA) MSgt. Bobby Boyd, left, hands where souvenir displays and food Theater at Ft. Espinar presented by plate offriedfish, friescoleslaw and bread oMSgt. John Forister during the tasting will follow. the Atlantic Youth Activities (a small 19p8th ommuricatifish, escoeslad red outMglt. Jasmonth. Theafternoon At the Cocoli Community Center a entry fee) Sept. 23 at 7 p.m. 1978thCommunicationsGroup'sfishfry outing late last.onth.Th efero Hispanic Food Tasting will occur Ft. Davis Community Club will off was a thanks from the unit's CG Commander, L t. Col. CarlA. MclntireIll, Se. 4tnonadafdtstgadhodaihtfLaimsiSe. 6a for a month's fine work, and to gain funds with the outing for upcoming unit Sept. 14 at noon and food tastingand hold a night of Latin music Sept. 16 at activities. (U.S. Air Force photo by SSgt. Debra L. Penton) party Sept. 16 at 6 p.m. 8 P.M. WIFESTYLES looking for a few good people' We frequently hear the expression entertainment, door prizes, free Does your organization have special and a few good women, can turn a "plan ahead." Army Community samples and a luncheon; all to help services or programs for women? Do challenge into a great opportunity. Service is in the midst of doing just women know more about the you have information, talent, or ACS has the challenge, and needs a that by planning and recruiting for programs, services and activities experience that you would like to few good women to help set up thaT availyble ptannin ande liti in a share with women? Would you like displays, teach clases, help with W s a resource fake fioe women, USARSh experie .to know more about how to be advertising, sell tickets, make As a resource fair for women, rich experience, involved in activities here in telephone calls, collect door prizes, WIFESTYLES is a part of the Experts, support, hard work are Paa ?Cntc teAry netimoeabsadchr. neeed romman aras o mke Panama? Contact the Army entertain, move tables and chairs. annual celebration of the Month of WIFESTYLES an exciting resource Community Serivees office and find You can be part of this great event the Military Family. On Nov. 4, out how you can be part of even if you have only one hour to Valent Recreation Center will be the fair that will attract women and WIFESTYLES. spare. For more information call scene of a day of classes, make tham aware of the abundance Women usually know how to Hanna Stockwell at ACS, 285information, displays, special events, of opportunities available to them. make the most of a good possibility 6517/5556.

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Tropic Times 1U Sept. 16, 1988 G -G nr I Audi ne.s All ages admitted VG -Parentl gid.r.es.ggResed. So-m ria y no; A e ofie opns 20 Brnie e hpe rmnc. be Inilobi, in, children. .Panam a A r a Exchange P ognomo ann ec0 tio Ihno2h oie PG-13 -Penlare trn gly c utioneed.Somem ericiAlmY RT: Ronning tine in min es be n r r e r h d nSiT: Tilalos en Espanol -Sbtities in Spnish. adult ________n Movie Schedule Hd -Restr led. Under 17 requlres nccompanying parennior le C Howard Clayton Davis Quarry Hts Amador Sherman 284-3583 287-3279 289-5173 282-3635 282-4287 289-6251 EVENING 7:00 & 9:00 EVENING-7:00& 9:00 EVENING-7:30 EVENING-7:30 dATNAdu00 VEIN-630 MATIEEdr00eEENN 7 0 EVNN-3 EVEIN 730n Adu b-e.stfildin-ndisa edRDE-F-C4 -ardday TEUNNGMAN ILLEGALLY YOCRS ADETR Adul--2.0 ChiTdren51.00Adult-52.0 Chldren-, .0 II Il N BABVS T'TING Aut-20 hlrnS ) MATINEE-2:00 EVENING -6:30 MAT INEE-2: EVENING-7:00 EVENING-7:30 EVENING -7:30 TniB11 best frierl isDE-N Adua-2.5 Auls-5 5 Adlt-500 hidre-525P IR E %Ni r1n-1.21 RED HEAT Sun ayR:12R 0. 4 RT:902'RtdR RT:2,12.22s52 Saturday EVENING-830 &10:30 EVENING-9:00 TTH CEAD PHE UNHOLY TN E e RENT ~ i A QUGETIOUTDOORSC0.duts2.00hde2 5.9 atdR R : 22'Ra THE LEAD OL IUN DEP Ad,-S2. 0 Ch in-.2 'dS2.50 dr 2, MATINEE-2:00 EVENING-6:30 & 3:30 EVENING-7:00 & 9:00 EVENING-7:30 VENING -7:30 THEDEADP L BEE I ITTEN K dAdl-2. CirEn-l2 EN uNG s00 .00 EVENINGn-30 A0cy" RatedTHE -T9 ae(G T92 C' d-0 5 Su d CROCODILE DUNDEE it 21e Pa THE PRESIDIO B ODSPO) l'PLERGEIST III 111E EVENING-7:00&: EVENING-7:30 EVENING 7:30 THE IELL AD DREAMS Monday All.', RaTed()i19 unm A InthisXX lri~~i~a SX (li and501 ChI l ISe AVAMPIR THE PRESDO BLI-D1 PLIT contyca e iarosyn untngr 00t D ona(7d esring a oung encont(PGo asti \am ar ri HEr MLGOBEN WRd (R) whenhe ecies o Acuk big cit Chlde hil to5 \dlaX520 COh 1sildralen-51.rc h ig hm no i Ald-c ls5 Sl C Wi LTdr SNE-S AMB (G mov t a Ruitew Englan xxreodquenordherdeah i ainRI nkRan hcislolctd S(lG) ADITYHACII(G EVENING-7:00 & 9:00OO EDNEE1 EVE7NING-7:30 AdV IW0L R COAU.NG ChSOrO-N 0 Rate DR A -II ADI N R ES TRT NH 4 EPT AT HnWARD andUHMNBITTIG s au o u tCD C village. (Language)C Asyoun boy viits ahu carnivlt-.0 andiler nat resoI oer.sx) SnWATDSNYSB-B G Adrlan hd e kno2 w hes a 1adlran d 25 R hi g rr(u wt a se rB2t RatagainstTt9e cityds military:comCound. EVENING7:00E& I9:00 EVENING-7:30 bsa rorectSWTEDEACTION JACKSON O Wednes. Rre e d R1 ai: C m so g t sir pie r THE GR AT OU nDOOR t 4hlde -5 2 Ad .-5.h.-. EVENING-7:00 & 9:00 EVEN.NG-7:30 T NING -7:30 p tENSE TO DRIVE gE) al RO I rhursday BLL DURHAM O FUNNY FARM WILLOW MY BEST FRIEND COMING ATTRACTIONS frotha distressed would bed runasca% FT. iA i A hot shot sportswriter finds the After faii to rd his "Licery IS A VAMPIRE OWA AF Atranui bu of eivior the f fantasy a good natgrd dwarl takes A sh d teenager has a steayrd Fri LICENSE TO DRIVE PG-13) con the misio of sCoting a yung encounter With a sultry eamvpirr Fri TaHE g aILAGRO EANFELD WAR (R) career e ecoes tcleck b t child to a haven of safety after a which bring s him into her red-cell Sat WALT DISNEY'SBAMB (G) ar e to qie p Ea i icked queen orders her death cain anks and ie is focd to do Sat CADDYSHACK Il (PG) vilage.x(Lut guage)rBIG soadln hile A rio f oung adjUStieople ol Sun CADDYSHACK LPG) A young boy visits a carnival aNd alternate lifestyle. (Violence, sex) Sun WALT DISNEY'SBAI(ii H G) .THE PRESIDIO makes a wish to be "BIG" t ge REDii EAT Sn PENITENTIARYbIII (R) Presidio is a thrilling contempt r lor fortune telling acneN ing Moscocs toughest cop w inds lP It F .CLATON drama about a post commander and re knows, he's an adult and climbing Chicago teamed r p %ith a wise Fri BIG (PC.) a cop who reluctantly team up fort a tie corporate ladder of a to. cmackin tng, American Fri THE GREAT OT DOORS (PG) San Francisco crime investigation set com p a ny .( La ng ua g s ex-) det ective onl tile trail of a Russia n Sat BIG (PG;) against the city's military compound. dr ug dealer against \Ahomn they buith Sat GOOD MORNING % IETNAM (R) PENITENTIARY III CROCODILE DUNDEE IIh11 esna edta a TEDA otR After H pro-boxer pumnmeis an When Dundee's ladyfriend is hcaDpenlNTUE I Nia Sat THEl DEAD POOL (R) opponent to death in the ring, lie is threatened by it vicious Colombian A VN U E INSun TEREAS POOL (R-) sen t piso ad ecmesth mch drug czar, our Aussie hero whisks herBABYSITTING Si OTRES H((-3 Sengt te rn andy beowme unde tc Fih hr n Ayugwmnsls T. AMIADOR sogtatrprize Iin a dogfight wadwnndrtfihtemn Ayon wma' s minute Iri RED HEAT fill between fne sadistic warden arid a his turf. (Violence, language) babysitting clinrcs quickly and zanily, N.1 PL A T ON (R) Powerful mate. LICENSE TO DRIVE go awry when an S.O.S. phone cail So,, AR T [itR 2, .* ONIltE ROCKS (116 THE DEAD POOL After failing to get his "Licenise to frmdiresdwudbrnwaFTDvI Action abounds whenl, lor the first Drive," a teenager Sneaks his desperately sumnmons her to a FriSCHOOL DAZL(Rt time lin detective H arry Callahan's grandfather's 1972 Cadillac out for downtown bus depot on a whirlwind Fri RENT A C OP (R) career, lie becomes the Ihunted arid ai an evening of fun and games with rescue mission. (Violence, language) S.1 BEELEICIEn(FG t ar g et ; o r a p s y ch opa t hic hilariou., consequences. (Violence PH A N TASM II SatIn( B BS IN ESS (P(, exicutloner. and language) A trio of yroung people combine su(RO DLDtNIf10% WORLD GONE WILD JUDGEMENT IN BERLIN forces to h-unt down and stop a uiIltPRSD0() Thle vear is 2087 Ind a pacifist leader JUdgemieni Iin Berlin is a lain ghoulish mortician Alto has been II lRIA ofa small setternent is forced to ]tire compelling drama concerning tw;o convertulg corpses into miurderou, Iri (OI(I TRIP (R1 mnerccenarics to protect the wAiter East Becrlinrs whio hijack an airliner /ombhie dArfts that serve hitcA~ a stUppky lrom a %jCIotu, Cult fanatic. Iin a desperate attempt fo:ireedom. 1n11011. .11 THu I()\ AD Till HmW

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Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 just for kids Ft. Clayton Youth success, team coaches, instructors and Center scorekeepers are needed to assist the Youths are invited to stop by the Ft. younger bowlers. No experience is Clayton Youth Center for tourneys. necessary. Instructors will train you. Preteens may join the Foosball Interested? Call 284-4190 or 286-4260. competition Sept. 18 at 1 p.m. The teen tourney follows at 3:30 p.m. A Girl Scouts Ping Pong tourney for teens is slated Effective Oct. 1, the USA Girl for Sept. 24 at 4 p.m. Scouts-Panama Service Center, There will be a Spaghetti Eating building 806, Albrook AFS, will be contest Sept. 29. Call 287-6451. open for retail business Tuesday from Ft. Amador Youth toI p.m., Wednesday from Tnoon to 4 p.m. and hursday from 9 r : C enter am. to I p.m. For more information on The center invites teens tojoin in for Girl Scouting call 286-3670. late movies and snacks Sept. 16. A small fee will be charged. For information call 282-4448. A teen rap session will be held Sept. 18 at 2 p.m. Nature bazaar Atlantic center The Panama Audubon Society will The Atlantic Youth Activities hold a nature baazar and handicrafts reminds you of its Hispanic Heritage fair from 9a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 24, at Show Sept. 23. The program will be the Gamboa Community Center. offered at the Loft Theater at 7 p.m. Among the available items will be a Youth howling full-color wall calendars of tropical birds and 16-month engagement The Young American Bowling calendars for September 1988 through Alliance (YABA) offers youth an December 1989. Vendors who would opportunity to participate in league like to reserve tables should call 52bowling. To make this program a 6614 or 56-6384. Lead can affect children's mental development BOSTON (UPI) -Eposure to low impair mental development), and of 7.2 points lower on a test that mental development does not occur," levels of lead, possibly even at doses this (study) may contribute to it," measures general cognitive abitliy the researchers said. below those deemed safe under some said Dr. Alan Leviton, an associate than those who had blood lead levels The federal Centers forDisease government standards, may professor of neurology at Harvard of about 10microgramsperdeciliter, Control in Atlanta recommends that adversely affect a child's mental Medical School. which is considered about normal, levels of lead exposure below 25 development, a new study indicates. the researchers reported. micrograms per deciliter of blood are Researchers at the University of blood samples from children born "We conclude that postnatal blood safe for young children. Adelaide in Australia reported last from 1979 to 1982 to women living in lead concentration ieverely Previous studies that reached week that a studyof 537 children the town of Port Pirie, a southern children," the Australian researchers sious stusies ha eed found those exposed to higher than Australian community located wrote in reporting their findings in questioned because of concern other normal, but still relatively low levels downwind from large lead-smelting the New England Journal of factors, such as low socio-economic of lead scored significantly lower on factory. Medicine status, may be the true cause of intelligence tests. The researchers took blood "This .study indicates that a children scoring lower on intelligence The findings add to a growing samples from the children again raised blood-lead concentration in tests. body of data indicating that lead periodically until they were 4 years early childhood has an independent The Australian researchers said exposure, in addition to being toxic old, when they were given a standard deleterious effect on mental they attempted to compensate for at high levels, can cause brain test to gauge their cognitive development as evaluated at the age that by taking into account a variety damage to children even at relatively development. of 4 years," they said, of factors. But they said the results low levels, children who had an average of The study also indicates that must be interpreted cautiously "We think the evidence is about 30 micrograms of lead per "there may be no clear threshold because it is difficult to take all increasing (that low lead levels can deciliter of blood scored an average below which an adverse effect on factors into consideration. leisure states. All members, guests, and the information call Marie Van Heusen at space [or the Indian villge river trip interested public are invited. A buffet284-3799. being held by the CRD Outdoor meetings style breakfast will be available. For Recreation Branch Oct. 1. inforamtion call Anita Seifert at 64P h i D e1t a K a p p a Ride a cayuco, hike, take pictures of Astronomy club 3534. meeting this beautiful nature area, get baskets The Panama Canal Astronomy Phi Delta Kappa will hold their first and wood carvings. Registration is Club will discuss the autumnal Support group general meeting of this school year underway and will continue until Sept. equinox at their meeting at 7:30 p.m. The Alzhcimer's Support Group Sept. 21 at Ft. Amador Officers Club 28 at building 154, Ft. Clayton. For Sept. 20 at the Panama CanalTraining will meet Sept. 21 at building 115. at 6 p.m. with dinner at 6:45 p.m. The information call 287-3363. Center. Corozal. [he session will start at 6:30 guest speaker will be announced that p.m. evening. For dinner reservations Valent tours NCOA meeting contact Karen Hiller at 252-2702 or A Non Commissioned Officers Barbarahe Valent Tours and Travel Office Association Isthmian Chapter general IBM meeting offers two special tours: On Sept. 17 membership meeting will be held at 6 The Cosmic computer! Cosmic tours enjoy a beach trip on the Pacific coast. p.m. Sept. 27. at the Howard NCO what? Want to find out more about the A dinner tour follows on Sept. 23.The CLub. E-4s through E-9s and spouses Cosmic computer? Attend the destination is Pizzeria Italia where you are welcome. Committee appointments Panama Canal IBM-PC users Group will have a chance to try international will be made. There will be door prizes. meeting Sept. 21 at 7 p.m. in Panama Field trips cuisine. Advance reservations are Call 282-3994 for information. Canal Training Center. A special The Ft. Clayton Arts and Crafts required. Call 287-6500. dBase meeting wil begin at 6 p.m. Center has photo field trips on the Pen women meet Everyone is welcome, second and fourth Sunday of each The Panama Canal Chapter, month. Group meets at building 180, Sundial tours National League of American Pen Ft. Clayton at 10 a.m. Get information Women, will meet at 8:30 a.m. Sept.17 1/508th Wives on camera settings for better color Several activities are planned by at the Quarry Heights Officers' Club. All wives of 1/ 508th are welcome to saturation, looking for high contrast, Sundial Center at Ft. Davis. Tour The meeting will feature the traveling join this month's First Sergeant's and improve your composition. Call colorful El Valle on Sept. 18, for a slide art show of the 1988 Pen Women meeting at the Zodiac Club Sept. 20 at 287-5957 to reserve a space. change of pace. Make your shopping exhibit in Washington, D.C. 10 a.m. This month we're having a list now, because on Sept. 24, the representing the winning entries from "White Elephant Bingo." Don't forget River trip center will sponsor a tourto the Pacific Pen Women branches through the 50 to bring a white elephant. For more Now is the time to reserve your PX. Call 289-3889.

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Tropic Times 12 Sept. 16, 1988 places to go about the Pen Women and their local evening -a service to single parent DPCCM or Ms. Viruet, secretary notices activities may call Anita Seifert at 64soldiers or dual military couples with DPCCM, at 282-5238 for infor3534. duty obligations to fulfill. mation. Teachers needed For information on FCC homes in Leadership award the Atlantic and Pacific communities AF fun run .contact Mrs. Purmalis at The American University is The Cocoli Community Center is 287-3301/6810. Come and celebrate the U.S. Air accepting nominations for the Rogers seeking instructors for Spanish, W. Jones award for executive cooking, sewing or crocheting, and Force 41st Anniversary by leadership. The university presents Piano lessons. Persons interested may Info line participating in the 5k Fun Run Sept. this award each year to two career contact Chris Merner at 287-3010. 17 at 7 a.m. executives of the federal government. If you want to know where to go, The first 100 runners to register will Selection is based on demonstrated what to do in Panama; if you are receive a commemorative T-shirt. The superior leadership that resulted in Learn to owl interested in sports, music or theatre $5 fee can be paid at the Howard outstanding organizational events; call the Community Sports and FitnessCenter.Itwillbe$6 achievements and a strong The Howard and Albrook Bowling Information Line. The service is the day of the race. Volunteers are commitment to the effective Centers are offering the opportunity to available Monday through Friday needed to help make this event continuity of government by get out of the house and have some from 7 a.m.-6 p.m., and on Saturdays possible. For more information on successfully bringing about the fun. Learn how to bowl in the Tuesday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Call 287-INFO helping with the race, or the race itself, development of managers and morning Coffee Break League. This is (4636) for answers! call AlC Tina Musselman at 284-3451. executives. open to all DOD personnel and their Nominations must be sumitted to family members. Register no later Theater auditions the Civilian Personnel Office not later than Sept. 27, at either bowling center. of Ancon will baby? than Oct. 13. Contact the Incentive For more information, call 284-4190 The Theater Guild Havd" aep. 2 Awards administrator at 285-5611 for or 286-4260. hold auditi 'ons for "The Nerd" Sept. 26ComntHelhNrigs Afrsadinisrator ade28t-ails.for -and 27 at 7, p.m. at the Theater Guild. Community Health Nursing is further details. Aerobics teacher This delightful comnedy by Larry presenting: Having a Baby? It's A Shue will be directed by Mitch Wonderful Time! This fair will be held ACS is seeking a volunteer aerobics Swanson. There are parts for two Sept. 24 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the The Ft. Davis Arts and Crafts instructor. Call 285-4500 and ask for women, four men and for an 8 or 9Valent Recreation Center, Ft. Mrs.Flyn. ear-ld ov.Clayton. There will be guest speakers, Center is featuring the Army Photo Mrs. Flynn. year-old boy, films, exhibits, a fashion show and Contest Exhibit throughout Sept. 24. OCWC-P luncheon door prizes. For more information call The community is invited to view these 0 CWC-P lucho doo przs For more io o 287-6202/282-5418. fine works. The center is located in CRD Sports hours The U.S. Army Officers and Bldg. 251, Ft. Davis and is closed on Civilian Wives Club of the Pacific will Tuesday and Wednesday. The CRD Sports Office has hold their monthly luncheon Sept. 21 Golf tourney changed its operational hours. Pleae at 11 a.m. at the Amador Officers' The Ft. Amador Golf Course note that the office now opens at 7:30 Club. For information contact announces its Two Person Best Ball Clayton ceramics a.m., and provides services until 4:30 Barbara Tierney at 282-3895 or Trudy tournament for Oct. 8. Call 282-4511 p.m. The CRD Sports Office is located Higginbotham at 287-2971 or Doll for information. The Ft. Clayton Ceramics Center is in Bldg. 154, Ft. Clayton. Information Alexander at 287-4293. now open additional hours. Enjoy is available by calling 287-4050. Atari users your favorite hobby at Bldg. 155, Ft. Protestant chapel The Panama Canal Atari Computer Clayton. The ceramics center is now School meals Join the Ft. Clayton Protestant Users'Group will host a Software Fair open on Tuesday and Wednesday Chapel for an evening of music and in September instead of having a from 1-9 p.m. Applications for free or reduced fun and fellowship. "Sunday night regular monthly meeting. The price school meals maybe picked up at live" will be at 6 p.m. Sept. 25. with Software Fair will be held Sept. 17 at Air Force OWC Bazaar Army Community Servicein Bldg. 115 refreshments afterward. the Balboa YMCA, auditorium from 9 Corozal or Bldg. 8348 in the Margarita a.m.m. to 4:30 p.m. Howard/Albrook Officers Wives' complex. Balboa High School, Rodeo Such software applications such as Club needs vendors for the Christmas Cristobal High School and Curundu The Central American Rodeo SYNCALC, B/GRAPH, MUSIC Bazaar, Oct. 1, at the Albrook Jr. High School will also have Cowboys Association will hold a programs, graphics, and PERT will be Officers' Club from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. applications available. For additional rodeo Oct. I at La Herrdura Arena, on display. The purpose of the For more information, call Linda information call 285-4864. Chorrera with start time set at I p.m. Software Fair is to demonstrate the Wilson at 286-4890. Admission is as follows: 12 years and capacity of the Atari computer and Spouse Orientation under -free; 12-16 years -$1; and 16 what it can do. Everyone is invited to A reminder to everyone! The years and over -$2. Those interested in attend. Welfare applications Spouse Orientation is offered every riding should contact the club in Wednesday. Don't miss this tour of advance if possible. For more T Pacific installations. Meet at the information call Scott Sharp at 287Fishing tourney Tu ar Hsn eightOfice Wivfe Clayton Chapel at 9 p.m. for this 6234. A challenging competitive event Club is now accepting Welfare informative trip. Call 285-4630 for gt newya h abaae applications. Application forms may reservations,. Jew-s gets underway at the Gamboa area be obtained by writing, QHOWC, c/o reevtos Jewish services tomorrow: the Bass Fishing Welfare Chairman, PSC 1848, APO Air Force Ball The Kol Nidre Service will be held Tournement. Participants will be be 34003. Sept. 20 at 6:45 p.m. and the Yom able to compete for cash prizes to be Kippur Service will be held Sept. 21. awarded to first-fifth places and the Auditions The U.S. Air Forcnniversaryeaae .Aits Both services will be held at Ft. heaviest 10-bass stringer. The Pacific Theater Arts Center will 41st anniversary at the Ft. Amador Amador Chapel. Registration for The annual event is being sponsored have auditions for "Catch Me if You Officers' Club Sept. 17. Sna coli o npors.Cl yteCDOtorRceto Can" amurer ystry.Thecas There will be dancing, music, fo, Sunday school is now in progress. Call by the CRD Outdoor Recreation Can," a murder mystery. The cast Teewlbednngmsifood' Peg cinsa 8-4833. Sunday Branch. A briefing will be offered at requires five men and two women. and a lot of history and tradition. Peggy McGinnis at 282-43.Sna rnh reigwl eofrda a ats at amd t school will begin Oct. 2. 5:30 a.m. at the Gamboa public boat Auditions will be held Sept. 20 and 21 Social starts at 7 .m. and the program ramp. at building 2060, Curundu, at 7:30 at 7:45 p.m. p.m. For information call 286-3152. All services are invited to attend. EMT course For more information, call your unit Gorgas Army Community Hospital Theater night New officers first sergeant or 284-4952. Dress for will offer the Basic Emergency The American Society will sponsor Newly elected officers of the the ball is mess dress or its equivalent. Medical Technician course starting an evening at the theater, begining at 8 Panama Canal Chapter of the Oct. I through Nov. 22. Civilians p.m. Sept. 29, at the Ancon Theater National League of American Pen Family child care wishing to apply will submit Guild. After enjoying the local Women (NLAPW) were sworn in at a completed Standard Form 171 to production of Neil Simon's "Biloxi breakfast meeting held earlier this Now that school has started your Gorgas Army Community Hospital, Blues" participants will join cast summer at the Quarry Heights child care needs may have changed. Department of Primary Care and members for a party onstage. Tickets Officers' Club. The new officers: Remember that USARSO Child Community Medicine no later than can be purchased from any society President Anita Seifert, First Vice Development Service has several Sept. 30. Applications must have a board member or by calling 69-3385 or President Janet Len-Rios, Second options available to you. Family child current telephone number and 24-3400. Vice President Marsha Kat, Secretary care is one of them. Family child care address. Charlott& Kerksiek and Treasurer is a program whereby you can take Requirements to be considered are Art instructors Kathy Engle, have put together a slate your child to the home of a trained and as follows: high school diploma or of programs for the coming year certified child care provider for care. equivalent; a valid motor vehicle covering a variety of activities of There are family child care homes on license from the Republic of Panama; Instructors for tole painting, interest ot Pen Women. most installations, making FCC a ability to speak, read, and write in weaving. and varied arts and crafts are Of special note is the season's first convenient choice in child care. English (knowledge of Spanish is needed at the Ft. Clayton Arts & Juried Art Show set for Oct. 18. Entry Additionally, many family child care desirable for non-native personnel): Crafts Center. Persons interested requirements and other details of this providers are willing to care for pre-entry test (basic EMT knowledge) should contact Mrs. Walsh, Center show will be announced soon. children during the early morning given Oct. 4. Director, at bldg. 180. Ft. (layton, or h" ours or ;thc i:c iitcrnoo:T C-intac ISS:. EtiennX(-()1(. cl 2-9f

PAGE 13

Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 13 things to do TOPS Bowling centers T.O .P.S. (Take off pounds sensibly) The Howard and Albrook Bowling is a support group for those wishing to Centers are looking for a few take off pounds sensibly or keep off volunteers to work with us to make pounds sensibly. Men, women, teens our Bowling Centers the best. Bowling and preteens may attend meetings. is a lifetime sport and we need ideas Upcoming topics include "Dressing from people ages 6 to 80. Get in on the for your Figure," "Relaxation fun and work with us by joining the Techniques," "Body Language," volunteer advisory team. For more "Nutritious snacks," and much much information call 284-4818 or 286-4260. more. For more information call 286Bring in proof that you are a volunteer 4934 or 286-3438. and bowl one game free Labor Day. Position open The University of Oklahoma has New bowling hours one part-time office position open. Qualifications include bachelors Albrook and Howard Bowling degree, good communication skills AbokadHwr oln degreefgcedskimluniatplicskions Centers have new hours. They are as and office skills. Applications follows: available at Albrook AFS, building ALBROOK -Mon-Thurs-lI a.m. to 808, room 300, from 1-4:30 p.m. All 10 p.m.; Fri-8:30a.m. to 10p.m.; Sat-9 applications must be received by Sept. a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sun 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. 23. HOWARD -Daily-7:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sat9 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sun Noon Vendors needed to 10 p.m. For more information call 284-4190 The U.S. Army Officers and or 286-4260. Civilian Wives Club of the Pacific is accepting table reservations for the upcoming Christmas bazaar to be held Oct. 29 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Ft. Ice breaker Amador Officers Club. Vendors need to call 287-4888 by Oct. 13 to reserve The Quarry Officers Wives CLub tables. welcomes new folks (wives and husbands) to Panama, greets old Ar my C o m m u n it y friends, and celebrates the first social Service event of the 1988-89 year Sept. 24, from 6-8 p.m.,at the Ft. Amador find out. If you have an idea, Dive classes Army Community Service has four Officers Club, Canal Room. comment, or complaint about volunteer positions for family Cost is $2 per person, and dress is Howard or Albrook Bowling Centers, The Ft. Clayton Scuba Center'is members interested in gaining casual. A pay as you go bar and hors you can let us know on a recorded pleased to announce that a new scuba experience as receptionist by working d'oeuvres will be featured. message. instructor is now offering dive classes. four hours daily or three times a week. For reservations call Linda Persons interested in learning Scuba Experience is not required. On the job Barrager at 282-3784. Diving are invited to stop by bldg. 178, training will be provided. ACS is classes Ft. Clayton, to register. Class include locatedyour ap ing 115, C F aste of Panama theory sessions, pool sessions, and Mrs. Spratling at 285-4630/4500. A Taste of Panama is the weekend dives. Call 287-5858 for information. highlight at Valent Community C&W lessons Recreation Center. Sept. 17. Country and Western dance lessons Boating lessons FCC qualification Featured will be colorful dances of are given every Saturday night at 7 Panama and typical dresses; view a p.m. at the Corral, Ft. Clayton NCO If you want to learn how to operate The USARSO Family Child Care special slide show, sample products, Club. a motorboat, check with the Ft. Program would like to remind the and obtain crafts and items of this Clayton Boat Shop on space community that persons using country. Local vendors will have availability for the class slated to begin government quarters to care for molas, pottery, baskets, Guaymi Finance class tonight. The two-session course will unrelated children must be certified. design pilows, ceramics, Tembleques, Ft. Kobbe ACS will have a include theory and a hands-on session. Certification as a Family Child Care watercolor cards, Huaca jewelry, Checkbook Management class Sept. Call 287-6451.Ft. Clayton. (FCC) provider is awarded after cookbooks with recipes of Panama, 27. The session will begin at 9 a.m. at successful completion of classwork, Christmas cards with local designs, building 801, Ft. Kobbe. Call 284paperwork, background checks, and crochet doilies, bracelets and more. 5759. tours ho0me inspections. Ca 287In addition, you will be able to buy 3301/6810. typical food. Stop by from noon until FuturepiotS? 4 p.m. A beginners ground school for Navy MWR tours AUSA awards dinner Haunted house pilots will be available for U.S. Naval The Navy MWR has scheduled Soldiers, civilians, spouses and Help is being sought for the annual Station Panama Canal MWR office. many tours. They are: Oct. 29-Nov. anyone who has an interest in the Haunted House held at Valent starting Oct. 18. This is a seven week 5, Bonaire, Dutch Antilles for scuba Army are invited to attend the Recreation Center in October. course which covers all subject Isthmian Chapter, AUSA Awards Volunteers are needed for material essential for private pilots diving; Nov. 11-14, Costa Rica forgolf Dinner. The event will be held from 6construction of props, painting and to and prepares students for the FAA 27, Venezuela/ Caracas and Angel 9:30 p.m., Sept. 22 at the Ft. Clayton portray characters. Call 287-6500 for Private Pilot Written test. Classes will Falls shopping and Adventure; Dec. NCO Club. Dress is informal information. be held each Tuedsay and Thursday 24-lan. I, Peru/Machu Picchu and (guayabera) and entertainment will be evening from 7 to 9 p.m. There are no the Inca ancient empire. provided. For tickets, contact Capt. prerequisites for age limit. teIc nin mie Smith at 285-5809/ 5215. Play opening Instructor of this course is a FAA The 1989 tours are: Jan. 14-20, "Oklaaho8-589/5.a ," dg certificate flight and ground school Costa Rica bird watching, Feb. 10-14, Oklahoma," Rodgers and Dominican Republic Valentine Pentecostal services Hammersteins's classical musical instructor with over 20 years active specan Republic Vase te comedy opened last week at the teaching experience. Classes will be special; Mar. 18-26, Easter Guatemala limited. For registration or more special; May 27-June 2, Cancun United Pentecostal Church services Pacific Theater Arts Center in information contact Maria at the Mexico/Scuba diving and archaeare held at Balboa Union Church Curundu. The production will Navy MWR office at 284-5307. ology of Mayan culture; June 17-July every Sunday from 1-4 p.m. and on continue this weekend and concludes 4, Big game photo safari/Kenya, Thursday nights at 7 p.m. Dalton Sept. 25. Boatin course Africa, via Amsterdam Holland. Ferguson is pastor. For info call 284Performances are being presented at All of these tours are fully escorted 4734 or 287-4725. building 2060, Curundu at 8 p.m. and take advantage of special Friday and Saturday, and Sundays at The Howard/ Rodman Boating holidays, weekends and low group Air Force baby goodies 2 p.m. Reserve tickets today. Call 286Course will be held Sept. 24 from 8 rates. Details will be provided 30 days 3152. a.m. to noon at the Rodman Marina. or more before each trip at the MWR Cetification from this course will Office, building65, U.S. NavalStation Attention: expectant Air Force permit authorized personnel to Panama Canal, Rodman. Special parents. If you are F-5 or below and Bowling Center operate Howard MWR's 17-foot presentation of trips and tours will be this is your first child, sign up for a free Boston Whaler fishing rigs. A available for groups upon request. For basket of goodies at Family Services. Want to know what's happening on registration fee will be charged. For more information contact Marie at Call 284-3968 the bowling scene? Dial 284-4818 to more information, call 284-5307. MoWR tour office at 284-53M'.

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PP. 1 4 Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 club calendar Amador O'Club -Thu. from 6-9 specials from 11:30 a.m.-l p.m. p.m., Mongolian BBQ; Mon., Entertainment Specials/Openings I closed, fumigation. I Breakfast Bayvie Room -Fri. & Sat., open Davis Community Club -Fri., Social from 6-10 p.m. Albrook O'Club -Fri.& Sat., Disco hour from 4:30 to 6 p.m., club closes Clayton NCO Club -Casa Maria, from 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Naval Station Anchorage Club at 3 a.m.; Wed., Sr. NCO/Officers' Mexican food specials Mon.-Thurs. Bamboo Inn -Fri., Rock & Roll Mon.-Fri. from 7-9:30 a.m. lounge is open from 5-10 p.m.; Thur. 5-9 p.m., Fri. & Sat., 5-10 p.m. band Saigon starting at 7 p.m. Howard NCO Club -Mon.-Fri., sit Lounge is open from 4:30 p.m. to Davis Community Club -Fri. & Sat., Howard O'Club -Wed., bar bingo down breakfast, 6-9 a.m. midnight. Dining from 5:30 to 10 p.m. & Caoba starts 6 p.m. Quarry Heights O'Club -Mon.-Fri., Davis Mountain Top Pub -Available Cafe for elegant dining w/ live music Clayton NCO Club -Fri. & Sat., until 8:30 a.m.; Sat., 7:30-9:30 a.m.; for kiddie parties. Call 289-3506. from 7-11 p.m.; Sat. Dining from C&W in the Corral from 7 p.m.-1 closed Sun. Espinar Community Club -5:30-10 p m.; Wed. Buffet specials a.m., and a live band in the Corner Available for special functions and from 5-10 p Post Lounge from 11 p.m.-3 am. parties only. Call 289-5160. Mon., closed, Labor Day; Tue., Ft. Amador O'Club -Available for Davis Mountain Top Pub -Thur. C&W at the Corral from 7-11 p.m.; _SundayBrunch special events on Wed., Fri. & Sat. thru Sun., Pizza & chicken delivery Wed., Music in the Corner Post sp o Ivn s Mon.& Wed., sial from 5 to 9:30 p.m. Lounge from 7-midnight and Ladies Albrook O'Club -10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Bamboo Inn .., soci Howard O'Club -Fri., 6-9 p.m. Night Disco from 9 p.m.-l a. Amador O'Club -10 a.m. to 1 p.m. hour, 5-6 p.m. Prime Rib & Seafood; Sat., 5-9 p.m. Davis Community Club -Fri.l Clayton NCO Club-iv a.m. to 1 p.m. -Ft. Clayton NCO Club -Hispanic Prime Rib w/shrimp;Tues.Thurs. .Davis Community Club10a.m. to 1 music, salsa, merenque, Mon.-Fri. new club menu served in the bar band music celebrating Hispamc p.m. during Hispanic Heritage Week. lounge and dining room from 6-8:30 Heritage Week, starts 7 p.m. Howard NCO Club -10 a.m. to I Ft. Sherman Cadre Lounge -Sat., Closed S & M Naval Station Anchorage Club -Fri., p.m. Open from 5 to 10 p.m. Enjoy the p.m.; un. on. 8-12, live band; Sat., D.J. 8-12 Naval Station O'Club -10:30 a.m. to new variety disco program. Howard NCO Club -(Hrs. 5:30-9 p.m.;Tues., 7:30 p.m., movie night. 1:30 p.m. Ft. Sherman Community Club -p.m.) Fri., Surf & Turf; Sat., 2-1 Naval Station O'Club -Fri.Thurs., Sherman Community Club -La Vista Mon., Tues., Wed., club closed, steak & A La Carte dining; Mon. Live entertainment. Room, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. available for special functions. closed for entomology; Tues., Naval Station CPO Club -Fri., 5 Howard NCO Club -Fri., Casual Mexican night; Wed., A La Carte p.m.-1 a.m., DJ; Movie night, 2-6 G Cove, variety disco, 9 p.m.-l a.m.; dining; Thur., A La Carte special. p.m. Ballroom, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., variety, Sherman Community Club -Tue.STRAC Club -Thurs., Men's Night, disco; Sun.-Mon., Ballroom, variety, Sun., Pizza garden is open from 4-10 Freestyle dancers, 5-7 p.m. Clayton NCO Club -Sun. & Tue. disco, 8-12 p.m.; Casual Cove, Sun., p.m., & La Vista dining room is open starting at 6 p.m. salsa, disco, 7-12 p.m.; Mon., variety Fri. & Sat. from 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Davis Community Club -Sun. disco, 7-12 p.m.; Wed.-Thurs., Closed Mon., Labor Day; Thurs, A Lunch starting at 3 p.m.; Wed., starting at 7 Casual Cove, Country & Western, La Carte dining from 5:30-9:30 p.m. p.m. 9-12 p.m.; Tues., Wed., Ballroom, Water Front Inn -Fri., Open from Albrook O'Club -Tues.-Fri. from 11 p.mN; Wed., Bingo, 6 p.m. variety disco, 7-12 p.m., Thurs., 7 3:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Mon. thru Sat., a.m.-1 p.m. Naval Station Anchorage Club a.m.-l a.m. open for fast food from 5:30-10 p.m. Amador O'Club -Tues.Fri. from Thur. Bingo starting at 7 p.m. Naval Station Anchorage Club-Fri., Naval Station Anchorage Club -11:30 a.m.-l p.m. lunch specials; Naval Station CPO Club -Sat., 4-6 p.m., social hour; Sat., singles (Hrs. 5-9 p.m.) Fri., Prime Rib; Sat., closed Mon. for fumigation. Dart's day 7-11 p.m.;Tue. Bingo night, 8-12 p.m.; Tues., 4-6 p.m., Prime Rib;. Sun. Grill sandwich bar, Bamboo Inn -Lunch specials 11 starts 5 p. social hour. 4-10:30 p.m.; Mon., Family night, a.m.-2 p.m., Fri., Corvina or Chef Naval Station O'Club -Fri., social pizza; Tue., special beef kabob; Salad; Sat., T-bone steak; Mon., hour from 5-7 p.m.; Wed., social Wed., Mongolian stir fried; Thurs., Pork chops or Hamburger steak; hour from 5-7 p.m. Southern fried chicken. Tues., Beef Stew or Chicken fried Naval Station CPO Club -Fri., Naval Station O'Club -(Hrs. 5-9 Thurs. Meat loaf or chow mein. Social hour, 4-6 p.m.; Wed., social p.m.) Fri., A La Carte-dining; Sat., Clayton Guest House -Mon.,Fri., hour, 4-6 p.m. Prime Rib; Sun., A La Carte dining; Lunch specials from 11 a.m.2 p.m. STRAC Club -Open Mon.-Fri., Mon., Seafood special; Tues., Clayton NCO Club -Mon.Fri. from 4:30-10 p.m.; Fri., social hour Family night, Mexican; Wed., lunch specials from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. with snacks, DJ, 4:30-6 p.m. Mongolian Stir Fried; Thurs., Beef & Davis Community Club -Tue.Burgundy. Thurs. Hispanic Heritage specials .Naval Station CPO Club -(Hrs. 5-9 from 11:30 a.m.-1 a.m. ningp.m.) Fri., Chicken or beef kabob; Howard O'Club -Mon.-Fri. from Sat., International Italian Cuisine; 3 O Cb -Mon.-Fri. from Albrook O'Club -Fri. & Sat., 6-9 Thurs., Fried chicken in a basket. 11 a.m.-l p.m. p.m., Prime Rib & Seafood; Red Door -Closed for renovation Naval Station O'Club -Mon.-Sat. Tue.,burgers in the bar from 6 p.m.Sept. 5-30. from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. 1:30 a.m.; Wed., 6-8:30 p.m., Quarry Heights -Tue.-Sat., 6-10 Naval Station Anchorage Club Mexican night. p.m., dinner specials plus A La Carte Mon.-Fri. from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Thur., 6-8:30 p.m., 2-1 Steak. dining. Quarry Heights -Mon.-Fri. lunch August Quality of Life Meeting sets issues FT. CLAYTON (USARSO OPA) The bank has also set up a service and to keep people on their toes. The will include free dinners, movie Questions dealing with selling desk to help with questions and problem could also be referred to the passes and a $25, gift certificate from automobiles, banking hours and passing out forms for new accounts. Garrison commander. AAFES. proper maintenance of lawns were Keeping yards cut and in an In connection with that, the Yard The next Quality of Life Council the main issues at the August Quality orderly fashion is the responsibility of the Month award is currently Meeting will be Sept. 15 at 9 a.m. on of Life Meeting. of each occupant, the board has getting proper approval before the third floor of the Ft. Clayton Used car lots have been proposed decided. Problems were voiced of to help people sell their cars at a local people not caring for their lawns even becoming a part of community life. NCO Club. All issues to be addressed spot in Curundu. The cars must be in after being asked by their neighbors. Each month a yard will be selected as by the council must be in no later proper working order to be placed in Mayors were encouraged to help the best yard and the owners will than the last Thursday of the month the parking lot. improve the areas of coordination receive prizes for their efforts. Prizes preceding the next meeting, It was also noted that many cars are being placed in the parking lot by therbutmaynotbeadne HowardAFBto begin CFC campaign soon Burger King. Cars may be parked o a d p%/ there, but may not be abandoned, the board decided. HOWARD AFB (USAFSO contributions pledged over the past many worthwhile organizations The board was asked if the PAO) -The Combined Federal three years. eligible for contributions through banking hours could be adjusted to Campaign will start in the near future "The objective is to get a goal that CFC that it is sometimes difficult to the needs of the community. The here, with a recommended goal of is attainable and which can be choose." American Express Bank is currently $73,337. exceeded in an enthusiastic and Last year, TAC military and passing out a survey to find out Other Tactical Air Command purposeful campaign," said Brooks. civilian contributions totaled which days are best for them to be bases started their campaigns Sept. 1 "It will require some aggressiveness $2,722,553 -117 percent of the open. and will continue through on the part of project officers, but is command goal. This is the annual survey for good November. important that giving be kept hours and days of the week when the Each base will set their own goals, positive. REGISTER bank is utilized the most. Patrons of according to SSgt. Kevin A. Brooks, "CFC donations are strictly the bank are encouraged to fill out a Headquarters TAC. It is voluntary, and designations are at survey form which will help decide recommended that goals be set at 90 the discretion of each individual," e mJ1 FE the final banking hours. percent of average actual Brooks continued. "There are so

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Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 15 science watch Japan sets sights on computers that think TOKYO -The Japanese Prudential-Bache Securities. Yet Japan has still to duplicate The study will also look onto government is throwing its weight "Neural research is an emerging success in areas where research -as approaches to neural computing in behind the development of technology. The Japanese can jump with neural computing -would be at the West, where activity is heating computers made in the image of the in, get a foothold and develop it. The a basic, rather than applied, level up. human mind. project would act as a catalyst for experts said. Nor is japan's industry The U.S. Defense Advanced The Ministry of International industry," he said. united in how to pursue the research. Trade and Industry (MITI) wants to The MITI feasibility study, which But with at least 15 Japanese firms Research Projects Agency conduct a $165,000 feasibility study would start in April, is almost certain doing their own research into neural (DARPA) is advocatig an eightinto "brainy" neural computers that to gain government approval but computing, and the United States year, $390 million Neural Network could lead to a 10-year, multi-billion long-term plans are unformulated, and Europe planning or beginning Program, experts said. dollar project starting in the early Nishikawa said. Newspapers said national research projects of their DARPA believes neural networks, 1990s. MITI was considering a plan so own, MITI is keen to get going. the precursor of neural computers, spend between $300 to $375 million Its study will investigate various offer the best approach to artificial "Our goal is to develop a over a decade. theories on neural computing as well intelligence (Al) -the duplication, completely new neural model better Japan has long targeted crucial as the potential of realizing them in through computers, of human than those currently existing," said industries technologies. And it has devices which use light rather than thought processes. Taizo Nishikawa, deputy director of been wildly successful: witness the electricity, or cell-like materials Neural networks could make MITI's electronics policy division. steel, car, consumer electronics and rather than silicon or gallium possible more sophisticated Neural computers would be microchip industries. arsenide. detection and surveillance of military modeled after the human brain targets and lead to high-speed which through its dense network of analysis of several streams of data inter-connected nerve cells can simultaneously. Such analysis, process awesome quantities of data smlaeul.Sc nlss pr s reform ans fataknown as data fusion, is crucial to the an d perform many tasks U.S. Strategic Defense Initiative simultaneously. (SDI) known as "Star Wars." Though still the stuff of science The European Commission (EC) fiction, neural computers portend a has shelled out $1.65 million for radical departure from conventional research projects known as the computers, which operate on a BRAIN initiaive (Basic Research in system of ones and and zeroes. Adaptive Intelligence and Conventional computers are fast, Neurocomputing). but stupid -they can do only one Six projects will involve almost thing at a time and do only what they 100 researchers in 28 laboratories, are told. and additional projects are being Neural computers -in theory at considered, an EC spokeswoman least -could learn, judge and infer at here said. a basic level, letting them interpret In Japan, not all scientists like the novel situations. But they won't be idea of a national project run by MITI ready until the next century. which would support industrial "This is one of the key n rather than academic research. Some technologies. It transcends anything say MITI would siphon funds away we've got now," said Peter Wolff, a from academics who are best at basic high technology analyst for research. Scientists probe space for origin of life MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP)University of Houston said abundant water supply, a necessary Glenn Carle, chief of solar system -Scientists discussed Friday how discoveries in the field of exobiology condition for life. exploration at the NASA-Ames, Martian soils, Jupiter's huge -such as finding oceans on the Discovery of large storms on notedthenation'sspaceprogramhas atmospheric storms and evidence of Jovian satellite Europa and Jupiter during the Voyager project weathered a series of setbacks but lakes on Venus relate to the search discovering that Mars once had more indicate a natural laboratory for added" now it appears like the for life's origins and the future of atmosphere -have practical and chemical evolution, scientists queen's about to give us new ships." U.S. space missions. important consequences. believe. New programs on the launching "We've just gotten a glimpse of For example, he said, by studying Dr. Harold Klein said these pad for next year include sending what there is," said Lynn Griffiths, Earth's nearest planetary neighbor, discoveries and others provide "very exploratory probes to Venus, head of the National Aeronautics Mars, during the Viking program, important clues" to tracing the Neptune and its satellite, Titan. and Space Administration scientists learned about an origins ofEarth,thesolarsystemand Dr. Harold Klein, who worked on exobiology flight program. "The evolutionary history that can give us life itself, the Viking project to Mars, said clues to life's origins .are going to lessons about what might happen on Dr. Geoffrey Briggs, director of biology was just one of 14 be found elsewhere in the solar Earth. solar system exploration at the components of Viking and he would system." Examination of Martian soils NASA, said the country now spends be pleased if that ratio is maintained The scientists spoke at a news shows lakes and deep rivers once about $400 million a year on its on future programs. conference after participation in a covered the planet. planetary exploration program and The U.S. space program, in symposium or exobiology in the Evidence of lakes on Venus will need about $600 million trouble since the explosion of the solar system sponsored by the NASA collected during the pioneer-Venus annually within two or three years to shuttle Challenger, has gained Ames Research Center. probe suggests the early inner solar maintain a vigorous program and to support from both maj o r Professor John Oro of the system contained planets with an complete scheduled projects. presidential candidates this year. Doctors document case of steroid addiction NEW YORK -A young Studies suggest as many as one combat chronic infection and severe calf muscles, dilated pupils, an bodybuilder who regularly used million U.S. athletes may be using trauma. enlarged liver, testicles about onemassive doses of anabolic steroids anabolic steroids, derivatives of the The unidentified athlete injected half normal size and acne and needle apparently became addicted to the male hormone testosterone, to build himself every other day with marks over the upper arm and drugs and suffered withdrawal muscles and improve performance. Dianobol and Primobolan and took buttocks. symptoms similar to those induced "It is very common in sports," Dr. two others, Anavar and Anadrol, in The letter said the athlete had by heroin, doctors said in e o f the Robert Voy, director of sports pill form each day. symptoms similar to those observed irst documented cases of steroid medicine and science on the U.S. The doses were 10 to 12 times in cases of narcotics addiction. addiction. Olympic Committee, told Reuters. higher than normal, a technique Over a six-day withdrawal period, The 23-year-old athlete had been Voy and David Black of the called "stacking," the letter said. he suffered nausea, chills, headache, using the steroids every day for three Vanderbilt Child and Adolescent Tennant said the athlete, whom he dizziness and increased perspiration, years. Dr. Forest Tennant said in a natsi h letter to the editor in the Sept. I Psychiatric Hospital in Nashville, treated in west Covina, Calif., could pulse rate and blood pressure, the edition of the New England Journal Tenn. -also signed the letter to the not stop using the drugs without letter said. It said most of the of Medicine. Journal. suffering withdrawal symptoms, symptoms faded after five days. The athlete said his weight had The steroids, banned along with including depression and disabling A day later the patient called to say risen from about 176 pounds to 224 other performance-enhancing drugs fatigue. he could not stand his depression, pounds and he felt uncontrallably in many athletic competitions, are He said the body builder had fatigue, and craving for steroids and violent, paranoid, an suicidal while legitimately used to help patients marked enlargement ofthe trapezius, he planned to resume using the using the steroids. gain weight after surgery or to deltoid, pectoral biceps, thigh and drugs, the letter said.

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Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 tv guide 10:10 Classic Concentration 1:00 Super Password Sports On SCN-TV Friday 11:10 Rhoda Friday Non CNN Headline News (2:30 p. SCN Midday Report 7:00 p.in. Summer Olypics Opening Ceremonies (4 Hrs) 6:10 aim. CNN Headline News 12:40 George Michae's Sports Machine Bryant Gumbel hosts 6:3 NBC At Sunrise 1:10 Oprah Winfrey.Child Prachers 7:01 NBC Today Show (Mature Theme) Saturday 9:) It Figures 2:00 Another World 9:27 Just Kidding 300 N BC f988 Summer Olympics 12:00 p.m. NBC baseball & PreGame Show (3 Hrs) 9:52 Serendipity Singers S-ow 3:59 The Guiding Light Montreal Expos at N.Y. Mets or San Francisco 1: 20 r CNN Newsbresk 3:58 It Figures Giants at Houston Astros (Choice by NBC) 1:30 Classic Concentration 4:44 General Hospital I :10 Casper Passwocr 5:3(0 SCN Evening Report -NOTE: Olypic events will be listed on SCN's Daily TV 1 0 Tape 6:00 NBC Nightly News Guide. N s CNN Headline News 6 :30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics 2311 psi. SCN Midday Report 11:00 CNN Headline News 3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (3 Hrs) 1240 CNN Sportsd Tnigrt 11:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics 6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4 Hs) Oprah Wnfreyn her-Stdunt Alfairs 11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summser Olympics (2 Hrs) (Mature Theme) 2:00 Another World Sunday 2:57 NBC News Digest Tuesday 2:59 Bridget Loves Bernie 7:00 ann. NBC (988 Summer Olympics (4 Hen) 1:26 Mr. Roger's Neighborhood 6:00 a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics/Today 11 :30 a.m. The NFL Live (30 Min) A Look at NFL action 3:55 CNN Newsbreak Show 12:00 p.m. NFL Pro Football (3 irs) 4:03 It Figures 9:00 Ensign O Foole Decision on game aired made by NBC. 4:25 Guiding Light9:27 The Partridge Family 3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (3 Hrs) 5:5 General Hospital 9:53 Last Of The Wild 6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4.5 Hrs) 6:00 SCN Evening Report 10210 CNN Headline Newsbreak 11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs) 6:30 NBC Nightly News 1030 Classic Concentration 7:00 NBC Sports Olympic Opening 11:00 Super Password Monday Ceremonies 1:30 Get Smart 11:00 CNN Headline News Nnnn CNN Headline News 6:00 a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (3 Hrs) ((:30 Late Night With David Letterman 12:30 p.m. SCN Midday Report 3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer OLympics (I Hr) 12:30 am. Nightline (2:40 CNN Sports Tonight 6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4.5 Hrs) 1:00 All Night Movie."Brubaker"(131 min. Mature 1:08 Donahue.soap Opera Stars (Mature 11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs) The00)Theme) Theme) 2:00 ,Another World Tuesday 3:12 All Night Movie.The King Of The Olympics" BC 1988 Sumers Olympicses (93 min., Mature Theme) 30 B 98SmesOypc 4:47 All Night Movie."The King Of The Olympics" 3:59 Guiding Light 6:00 a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics/Today Show (3 (Pt. 2, 94 min.) 4:44 General Hospital Hrs) 6:23 Videolink 5:30 SCN Evening Report 3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (I Hrs) 6:00 NBC Nightly News 6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4.5 Hrs) 6:30 nbc 1988 Summer Olympics 11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs) I :00 CNN Headline News Saturday 1:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics Wednesday 7:00 am. CNN Daybreak 6:00 a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics/Today Show (3 7:29 Just For Kids! s Hrs) 7:30 Care Bears Family F w 3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (3 Hrs) 7:56 Huckleberry Hound & Friends 6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4.5 Hrs) 8:27 Bravestarr 6.00 am. NBC Summer Olympics/Today Show 11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs) 8:52 Heathcliff 8:59 It Figures 9:17 Popeye And Son 9:23 Sesame Street Thursday 9:43 Nickelodeon Movie."Emil & The Detectives 10:21 CNN Headline Newsbreak (96 min.) 10:30 Classic Concentration 6:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics/Today Show (3 (94 min.) 1:00 Super Password H rs) 11:30 CNN Headline News 11:30 Fight Back! With David Horowitz 3:00 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (3 Hrs) noun NBC Baseball & Pre-Game Show (3 hrs.) Noon CNN Headline News 6:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (4.5 Hrs) 3:00 NBC Olympics (3 hrs.) 12:30 p.m. SCN Midday Report 11:30 p.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olympics (2 Hrs) 6:00 CNN Headline News 12:40 CNN Sports Tonight 6:30 NBC Olympics (4.5 hrs.) 1:10 Oprah Winfrey.Babysitting Abuses O1:00 Con Headline News (Mature Theme) Movies On SCN-TV 11:30 NBC Olympics (2 hrs.) 2:00 Another World 1:30 am. All Night Movie."Rebecca" (147 min.) 3:00 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics Brubaker -Robert Redford stars as a warden who sets 4:00 All Night Movie."Play Misty For Me" (184 3:59 Guiding Light about reforming a prison but finds some deadly secrets are min.) (Mature Theme) 4:43 General Hospital hidden there as well. 5:45 Grand Ole Opry Live Backstage 5:30 SCN Evening Report King Of The Olympics -The Life and Loves of Avery 6:10 Grand Ole Opry Live 6:00 NBC Nightly News Brundage -This mini-series was aired recently, but many 6:40 Videolink 6:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics have asked that we show it just one more time. avery 11:00 CNN Headline News Brundage was the leader and a member of the International 11:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics Olympic Committee for over 40 years. In all the globetrotting he did in those years he acquired a wife, a lover and Sunday children. This is the story of the man who made the ThursdaOlympics his life. Played at the start of the 1988 Summer Thursday Olympic Games. 6:00 a.m. NBC Summer Olympics/Today Show Emil and the Detectives -Emil (Bryan Russell) is going to 7:08a.m. NBC 1988 Summer Olymptcs 9:00 Huckleberry Finn & Friends Berlin to visit his grandmother (Elsa Wagner) and give her 11:00 CNN Headline News 9:30 Kidsongs some money, but on the bus he's robbed by a pickpocket. 11:30 NFL Live 9Nw Dennis The Menace Arriving in Berlin he hires two detectives to help him find NFL Pro Football 3 hrs. 10:20 CNN Headline Newsbreak the thief. oon NRebecca -A young, unsophisticated girl (Joan Fontaine) 3:00 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics 10:30 Classic Concentration marries a country gentleman (Laurence Olivier) who is 6:00 CNN Headline News 11:00 Super Password do 6:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics 11:30 Frugal Gourmet dominated by the memory of his first wife in this Alfred 11:00 CNN Headline News Noon CNN Headline News Hitchcock film. 11:30 NC H d88 New Nlympics 12 .CNN Heay ewt Play Misty For Me -Clint Eastwood and Jessica Walter 11:30 -NBC 1988 Summer Olympics 12:30 p.m. SCN Midday Report star in this story about a woman who seeks to dominate a 1:08 Donahue .one Night Stands (Mature Topic disc jockey and make him her own, but what deadly secret 2:00 Another World does she hide? M monday 3:00 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics 3:59 Guiding Light Special On SCN-TV 4:44 General Hospital 5:30 SCN Evening Report The 1988 Summer Olympic Games -Start with the 6:00 a.m. NBC Summer Olympics/Today Show 6:00 NBC Nightly News Opening Ceremony Friday Evening and continue 8:59 It Figures 6:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olumpics throughout the next two weeks. Tune in SCN daily for TV 9:23 Sesame Street 1:00 CNN Headline News Guide listings of Olympic Events. 10:20 CNN Headline Newsbreak 11:30 NBC 1988 Summer Olympics

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Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 1 I women's world Women are majority among new vet students SACRAMENTO, Calif. (UPI) Hansen said. -A steep decline during this decade The incoming veterinary class at in male applicants to U.S. veterinary UCD is composed of 91 women and schools has made women the 31 men, Hansen said. majority sex among incoming Hansen says he is not certain what veterinarian students, a school has caused the decrease in the official said. number of male applicants, but Since 1980, the number of theorized that money may be a applications to the 27 veterinary leading factor. schools in the United States has "One (reason) that may make dropped 42 percent. The decrease in some sense is the economic outcome male applicants from 4,061 to 1,689 of going into veterinary medicine as a has accounted for 77 percent of that career," Hansen said. "Salaries and drop, says Robert Hansen, associate earnings for veterinary medicine are dean of student services for the not nearly what they would be for University' of California, Davis, human medicine." School of Veterinary Medicine. The average first-year salary for a While men made up 57 percent of graduating veterinarian in the United the incoming classes of veterinarians States is between $20,000 and \ in 1980, they represented only 43 $22,000, according to theCalifornia percent of the 1987 freshmen, Association of Veterinary Medicine. Miss America former 'blimpo' ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) -will tour the country promoting the Newly crowned Miss America Miss America scholarship program. Hansen said the average for all or female, does not do it primarily for Gretchen Elizabeth Carlson, a She also will push the products of the veterinarians is $41,000. money. Minnesota car dealer's daughter pageant's corporate sponsors, "I don't know if I'd say women are "In the areas of small-animal whose brothers once called her including underwear, orange juice, more satisfied with a lower salary. I practices in urban settings, probably "blimpo," is a sushi-loving Swedishpantyhose and hair coloring. think that's untrue, Hansen said. we have too many vets," he said. But American who hopes to be a Last year's Miss America, Kaye "I think women enter health new veterinarians still are needed for corporate attorney. Lani Rae Rafko, also used her reign professions for reasons other than large-animal, rural practices, he said. The confident new Miss America to promote nursing. monetary. I know that's just one Hansen, who interviews all 1989 says chance didn't figure into Miss Carlson said she wants to man's opinion, but I talk to a lot of qualified applicants to' UCD's her win. focus on "education for the children applicants." veterinary school, said he doubts "This wasn't luck," she said just of tomorrow."Specifically,she wants Vicki Robertson, a Los Angeles men will receive any special hours after her crowning in this to see children receive more veterinarian and a past president of consideration when applying seaside resort's Convention Center education on values, "teaching the Association for Women because of their new minority status. early Sunday, adding that she didn't children to be less narcissistic." Veterinarians, does believe that "We've got a lot of affirmative bring any good-luck charms to the "Today children tend to be more in "women will work for less money." action to catch up with before we 62nd Miss America Pageant. love with themselves instead of being But she also said that anyone who start thinking about affirmative The 22-year-old woman from the in love with other people," said Miss goes into veterinary medicine, male action for men,"he said. Minneapolis suburb of Anoka said Carlson. her own skills brought her the crown. The new queen traveled later After winning a preliminary talent Sunday to New York City with Miss W OM E AT W ORK competition earlier in the week, Miss Rafko, who will stay on for several Minnesota said parts of her days to orient the new titleholder. performance were "exquisite." Miss Carlson planned to pick out a Changing Trends should also be strengthened. Miss Carlson performed a spirited personal wardrobe for the year and Education majors will be needed violin solo titled "Gypsy Airs." She prepare for television appearances. In Education to teach the children of corporate has studied violin for 17 years, When asked what kind of Miss by Tamara Jones personnel sent abroad to handle the winning national and state violin America she would make, Miss increased international trade. competitions. Carlson laughed and replied, "A ADAPTING FOR THE NEXT Nurses and medical technicians "I'm definitely an overachiever," short one." BUSINESS CYCLE: The educawill also be recruited for overseas she said. The 5-foot-3 Miss Carlson didn't tional trend seems to be moving work. Courses in foreign languages, This year, pageant officials took have to bend when Miss Rafko away from the once coveted MBA therefore, should be included for special pains to emphasize that the placed the crown on her head. At 108 (Master of Business Administration) those pursuing Bachelor or Masters' judges were lo king for an pounds, she is 20 pounds lighter than degree to degrees in the Arts and the degrees in Science. Chinese, Japan"au e, eded o namifor the poundhe 20 he s w ighter hn Sciences. Although business will ese, Russian and Spanish lead the "articulate, educated, dynamic role the hefty 120 she weighed when she continue to dominate much of the list. German is important. French is model" and not just a beauty queen. was 16. American job market over the next vital since it's still used in many Miss Carlson is several credits "When I used to be fat, my several years, experts predict the parts of Africa and Southeast Asia. away from graduating from Stanford brothers used to call me "blimpo," economy will cause business to shift The expanded international trade University with a degree in she said, adding that she "went on from largely service-oriented to picture is also a positive trend for organizational behavior. She says this major diet and lost all this export-driven. This means employthose who are not looking for she wants to attend Harvard Law weight." ers will be looking for people who management or executive positions. School "and become a successful Today the green-eyed blonde of can adapt to the more diverse Administrative prsonnel will be in corporate executive." Swedish descent likes to dine on requirements that will be part of this demand, as will computer programBut for the next year, Miss Carlson sushi. change. mers and librarians. Technicians will Apparently, some employers find be needed to maintain the enhanced 0 thiat people with is background in technology tlsat will he used to Pone says liberation in religion 2i tb odn adbu Pope says libe ati n in reli io liberal art-, tendl to he he moore handle the increased information adaptable to change. (Of course, this flow. TURIN, Italy (Reuter) -Pope present progress and personal is a generalization; some MBAs may CHILD SUPPORT FOR WORKJohn Paul II said on Sunday the fulfillment in terms of sexual liberty, be more flexible in outlook than ING WOMEN: Many working religious life could be a way of the elimination of moral laws and those with Arts degress.) As one women are not able to collect liberation for women and that emancipation from the religious way employer told me: "I can retrain mandated child support payments progress and personal fulfillment of life. anyone working for me. That's no from husbands or ex mates who were not to be found through sexual "Crises of personal and problem. The problem is whether or ignore court orders. In many cases, freedom or disregard for moral institutional identity are a sorrowful not they're willing to he retrained. the women can't afford to take time precepts. sign of these contradictions and a cry Some of my business school graduaway from their jobs to press for In an address to some 2,300 nuns for help." ates get scarCd just thinking of collection in court, nor can they pay gathered in Turin's 19th century Last Friday the pope praised U.S. having to change specialties." lawyers to act for them. In this church of Mary Help of Christians, bishops for seeking to end sexual The new export economy will still election year, it might be a good idea the pope restated the traditional discrimination in the Catholic need people with advanced business to alert our candidates that somevalues of chastity and obedience, church. degrees. However, the focus should thing needs to he done. (Any Thluesto The pope told he bisrchsthe be widened to include courses in thoughts? Send them to me c/o King The pontiff, who is expected bishops international marketing and foreign Features Weekly Service, 235 East issue a special document later this church wanted to serve the cause of languages. Since Americans tend to 45 Strect, New York, N.Y. 10017.) month on the role of women in women in the modern world and to show a shameful lack of geograplhy C) 11M b5 King F idmrs syne today's church, told the nuns: "In the help clarify their rights and duties, and world history, these aria course of history, there have been while defending -feminine dignity many contradictory ideas that and 'ocation."

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Tropic Times 8Sept. 16 1988 sports Motivation and teamwork can make people cross a country by Spec. Monique (here m rbers wsith liquids and shouts (11 Iropic Tinies staff writer courage menit. ThC Marine Gorps Rarracks at Vehicle, miay not tra\el alongLside UI.S. Naval Stationl Planlama starjted the runners.I the Cecent to colmmemioratc their "Vehijces should nmcr inl leap, sris hirthda\. It bean Lt md hounds," said RobrIt ().Appin. Colon's city timit, wenlt om er the C 0 mm11an1d Sp r01-t I d ireCtorI a t 13ridge of the Anmcricas, and coded it C omnlli'it' Recrleation I )ivision, Rodmaln Officcrs Club. Bpor 1 ranch, Ft. Clayton. "All But its popularity and growIng chaics should tral i at least onenumher of participants lcd the Army cighib of a mile before the rnIncrs'. to take over direction. M E DDAC ambulances are in 1987, 86 teams ran Irom thr stationed throoghoot the route and Atlantic to the Pacific. IThis %ear. trail the last runner, according to runners in the SARSO-sponsoied Appin. Nost of the cases these haiidlc Irans-Isthmian Relay tic their iaces during a race will be hcat-relatcd, he Dec. 17. said. There are four categories for Spectators are able to View the entrants: Opcn, Military (active duty ru nners only at thc start and finish If personnel only), Over 40, and the race, due to the limitations of the Women. Each category is open to Trans-lsthmian Highway. "This is a -both sexes, except for the Women race for the runners and their support SEVENTH ANNUAL TRANSISTHMIAN RELAY RACE category. groups," Appin said. Participants run a course of 50.6 Food and beverages will be miles beginning in front of Red Barn available at the finish on a pay-asL.EG COURSE LAYOUT DISTANCS located next to Margarita Clubhouse you-go basis said Appin. on the Atlantic side and ending at the Trophies wo be awarded to first, Ft. Amador Officers Club on the second and third place winners in Pacific side. Each leg is from 4.6 to each category at a ceremony at the 5.7 miles. Amador Officers Club at 1:30 p.m. M (Start) In front of Red Barn located next to 5.4 "Legs two and three require the day of the race. Certificates will 'mountain goats' because they are be given to all team members. steep uphill grades," said Mike The Panamanian Defense Forces 2 Appoximately 50 yards in front of 5.1 U ho r ch a k, freq ue nt relay relay team record of 4:21:46, in 1986 participant, and DOA employee itt remains tUnbeaten. the Heres Mattress factory. -DCSRM, PA & E. In 1987 tile top teams in each "Leg five, although t he easiest, is category sTere: Open -Adidas'Balboa 3 Near large billboard which saxs 4.8 wherc rutnIners tend to 'crash and -4:21:41: Military -3 7 Special "Milano International." uir 1 s aid Uhorchak, because it's Forces Giroup -5:09:10: Over 40 ti rasiest pait. People go all out and N ike Masters -5:31: 41: aind Womet get oscirated. -Road Runners -6:06:54. 4 Yeelowr r no was' stations set 1P Training for a relay-marathor atulln Lokourt. for th rr and it's up to the support requires team spirit. December 17 is groups (a maxiulmr 01 two Vehicles three months away, and now is tile per tearn) to take care of teaill tuile to begin getting a team together. 5 Bridge at Bodega Elida northwest of 5.0 Fhe Marines started something PLANTA ESSO. that has seemiingly become a permanent fixture in Panamna. A bit unsttrUctured, tile IralIs-Isthilliall 6'Y" in highway with large sign 4.8 Rlay has become an annual IVet staitinlg"PURO VIGOR" which is the that is enjoyed by thousands. It's not halfway point to Coco Solo. often one cai say ile or she has run il a race across a coUlltr and from coast to coast. 7 Bridge with nlumblers 30K itld 632 5.4 But, the Trans-Istlmian remains a (Chilie) Lit "El. RFMANSO" Bar ..aCe of pLrticipation and teamwork, and Restaurant (turn rig ilt MN "Ya not ncessarilv competition. And and take Maddet Road tillr Igh rain that's what required to cross a an ak ade oa hruhranhiha trugyh jungle. forest). lilgisay through tie Registration forms are 8 Genleral Torrijos Memorial il tile 5.7 available now at the CRD office, rainlrest (waterfall itl background). building 154,, Ft. Clayton. Entry fee is S75 per team which includes a T-shirt. r all team runners. 9 Baseball field in Paraio at the 4.8 Team representatives must attend intersection of Paraiso Road and all briefings. The first meeting is Gaillard H ighway (cross railroad scheduled for Nov. 9 at the Valent tracks Lit Pedro Miguel Locks). Recreation Club, Ft. Clayton. Interested individuals may also attend. For more information call 10 Bs stop across the highway from 4.6 'the CRD office at 287-5618 or Crossroads Churich (turn right at 287-4050. McKinely Avenue, pass Army Cold Storage Wareihouse, building 300. then right Lit Balboa YMCA through main gate of Ft. Amadoir, left Lit circle to Officers C1uh via officers' housing arca along golf course.) TOTAL FINISH: Fort Amador Officers Club 50.6 miles All relay points sill be marked itih ortan11ge p[ain1t.

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Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 Red Machine wins annual Jamboree Balboa High School's Red home team (HS Iigers against the Devil pass at theend of thequarter to run with Mike Joseph. Rey Francis Machine football team scored 26 Coro udo Cougars. Coach Fred present the Devils from scoring. ran oer both conversions for bonus points, was unscored upon. won Bales' CO 'gars Won the quarter 6-0 1 The fifth contest was another tie points. 'The Red finished the night three quarters and tied onto win the sw'hein Randy Jones threw to Ed between the Tigers and Bulldogs. with a 16-0 win over CHS and annual Jamboree for the second sear McDonald for a 40-sard touchdown Tiger litnian Adonicio H artley walked away with their second in a row. The Red, coached by Rick midway through the period. Tiger recovered a fumbled punt but consecutive Jamboree ChampionDahlstrom, Mike Erhart and John Ricky Walker blocked the extra Lawrence Groom returned the favor ship. Magee, looked very strong in the point attempt. The Tigers' drive by intercepting a T-iger pass. The The fital contest was for runnerround-robin competition against the toward the Cougar goal line at the Bulldogs threatened at the end of the Tp bwn te C as anrother DODDS varsity teams and end of the period was stopped inside quarter after Robert Thrift hit Ken up between the Cougars atnd the appears to be the leading contender the 20 by a fumble. Jenkins for a 40-yard pass Bulldogs prevailed based oil veteran in the fight for the league The third quarter saw the Red completion. Thrift then drove the quarterback Ralph Furlotg's 22championship. defeating the Bulldogs 7-0. Jack ball to the Tigers' 5 only to be held yard run whichset upaQBsnakand In the first quarter of play the Red Sorenson stole a Bulldog handoff scoreless due to an offensive pass faced the PCC Green Devils. A 32and dashed 60 yards for the Red interference penalty. The lovely queens for the yard pass from Red QB Dennis score. Torrey Gragg converted. The 6th, 7th and 8th quarters all Jamboree were Jackie Brogie-Red, Cowles to Carlos Welch set up a 30Sorenson also stung the Bulldogs ended in ties. In the ninth contest the Amy Vowell-Cougars, Lisa yard field goal by Torrey Gragg that with an interception which included Red Machine offense really Deslondes-Bulldogs, Eddy Lynn split the uprights with 12 seconds a 14 yard return. unloaded against the Tigers, securing Corrigan-Devils and Marcie Dodgeremaining to get the Red a 3-0 In the fourth contest the Cougars the Jamboree Championship. The Tigers. victory. and Devils played to a zero-zero tie. Red scored on a 7-yard pass to Alex Games will be played each Friday The second period matched up the Roberto Sealey snatched a Green Velez from Cowles and on a 31-yard evening through early November. Bulldogs shutout Green Devilsl 7-0 Last Friday evening Coach Vince Robert Thrift picked up a Devil Martinez' Balboa Bulldogs hosted fumble and ran 42 yards to the ve Louie Husted's Green Devil Football edge of the goal line before being team at the Balboa Stadium in the caught by Jason Sweeney. Thegreen season opener for both teams. The line held and time ran out in the first Bulldogs came away at the end of the half to prevetit a score. evening with a hard earned 7-0 The difference for the Bulldogs victory over the Devils. In the tough came in the air. QB Ralph Furlong defensive battle neither team was passed 14 titles for se en able to do much on the ground. The completions and 124 yards in the air, Bulldogs rushed for 63 yards and the including a TD toss of 30 yards to Devils for a net 29. The Bulldog Ken Jenkins. Furlong also kicked defensive attackers were able to sack the extra point. the Devil quarterbacks five times for The Devils Were unable to match a total loss of 43 yards, virtually the Balboans in the air although wiping out what would have been a Johnny Haines did complete four of respectable rushing total. The Devils nine passes for fifty yards. The got to the Bulldog QB three time, for leading rusher for the evening was 19 lost yards and a fumble recovery. fullback Ricky Larkin, who gained A tough rush up front also helped the 33 yards in just four slashing runs Devils defensive backs to intercept 3 from the devil backfield. Balboa passes. Johnny Haines Captains for the Devils were grabbed two and Robert Kimbrough Russell Stromberg, Jason Sweeney, one. Chris Findlay and David Wall. Both teams had opportunities to Bulldog captains were Ernie score early in the game but failed. Holland, Ralph Furlong and Ed Green defensive end Russel Winkler. Friday night the Bulldogs Strombers forced a Balboa fumble will face the Cougars at Balboa and recovered by Jason Sweeney close to the Devils will travel to T iger country the Bulldog goal line, but a series of to take on Ciistobal. Game time penalties put the Devils out of range. 7 pin. Defensive battles WHOWARD AFB, (USA FSO/PA) -The Air Force Volleyball team m ar opening of 1988 defeated the A rmy in the best of five games in the Labor Day Tournament at Fort Clayton's Reeder Gymnasium, Sept. 4. It was the second time the A ir Force team had beaten the Army team. The other win came in the Fourth of July tournament. A bove, Ernesto Diaz blocks a spike attempted by a squid. Eddie Rolon (1) ispositioned to assist. (U.S. A ir Force photo by Sgt. Kirk Boyd) Last Saturday evening was the Beattie. The Rants second weights' game scheduled for 5 p.m. either. CHS was held to negative opening of the 1988 Youth tackle touchdown came on a pitch to and the heavy weights for 7 p.m. yardage on the ground and the Red football season. In the light weight Ricardo Salazar. Chris Hovan split ripped off two Tiger passes, one by division the Fort Clayton Cowboys the uprights for the two-point While the Bulldogs and Devils David Daniel and the other by earned a 20-0 win over the Fort conversion, were flexing their defensive muscles Torrey Grass who ran 27 yards for Kobbe Raiders. In Balboa Stadium Outstanding defensive players the Red Machine went over to another TD. Grass also kicked an the Balboa Rams defeated last years included Ryan Underwood with two Cristobal's stadium to practice extra point. Todd Underwood and lightweight champs, the Kiwanis fumble recoveries, Edwin Herrera offence. The Reds enmassed 141 yards Jack Sorenson contributed to the Kolts, by a score of 14-0. The Ram and Fred Cordero who also on the ground and 45 in the air, while Red's defensive success. Sorenson scores came on a two-yard run by recovered fumbles and Eugene scoring four touchdowns. Dennis played his last game on the Isthmus Eric Diaz and a sixty-yard run after Monaghan who stole a Kolt handoff. Cowles thress two touchdowns to and has left for Chicago. He will be an interception by Alfredo Richards Koft defensive player Eduardo Warren Stephens. Cowles was 5 for sorely missed by the Machine. at the end of the game. Diaz also had Pardo, intercepted a Ram pass and I I in the air. Coswles also scored on The Tiger gained some respect in a successful conversion and was the numberOO Juan Hincapie, played an the ground with a 46-yard TD sprint. the air. QB Greg Gerringer leading rusher with 18 carries for 88 outstanding defensive game. He finished the night with 53 yards completed two out of five attempts yards. Oi Saturday Sept. 17 the Atlantic rushing. Running back Mike JOseph for 29 yards. Shawn McCrackcn was In the heavy weight division the Tigers' lightWeight teatmt Will visit the rushed for a respectable 4i yards iii 8 two or six atid 23 yards. The longest Rams did it again with an ident ical Kolts at 3 p.m. at Balboa Stadium. ca rries. He also recovered it CHS pass of thevcning wa2-yard toss 14-0 score over the Kolts. The first The Ras sill travel to I it tum ble. front (erritinger to Mtot Rigb\. ID caine on a QB keep lby Jhamoes Claton's Jairian field sith th liehlit I he Red defense didn't do so had [he Red has a bye this WCekend.

PAGE 20

20 Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 NFL REPORT Week 2 Buffalo responded on their next The touchdown by Suhey capped a Pittsburgh 1-yard line in the final Bills 9 Dolphins 6 possession, with Thomas getting the 77-yard, 12-play drive that started three minutes to put Lohmiller in bulk ofthe yardage in a64-yard drive early in the fourth quarter after the position for his game-winning kick. that ended with Norwood's 35-yard touchdown by Dickerson. Art Monk had two receptions ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. (AP) -field goal tying the score at 6-6 early Dickerson's score came one play totalling 23 yards on te final drive, Scott Norwood kicked two of his in the fourth quarter. after his apparent touchdown pass which also featured a 2-yard run by three field goals in the fourth quarter A 50-yard field goal attempt by reception was nullified by an rookie Jamie Morris on a third-andas the Buffalo Bills overcame four Reveiz later in the quarter would interference penalty against one play from the Pittsburgh 35. turnovers to edge the Miami have given Miami a9-6 lead but it fell teammate Matt Bouza. The victory enabled the defending Dolphins 9-6 Sunday. short by several feet. Both Chicago scoring drives in the Super Bowl champions to improve Norwood gave Buffalo its second Kelly had 15 completions in 24 first half, resulting in a 35-yard their record to 1-1. win of the year with the last of the attempts for 231 yards, while Marino to uc h d ow n pass from J i m game's five field goals --a28-yarderfinished with 22 completions in 34 McMahon to Dennis Gentry and a -with 3:12 left in the game after an attempts for 221 yards. 40-yard field goal by Kevin Butler, NFL ineligible man downfield penalty also were kept alive by Indianapolis ND N nullified a 7-yard Jim Kelly to Chris penalties. STANDINGS Burkett touchdown pass. Bears 17 Colts 13 The Chicago defense, meanwhile, AMERICAN CONFERENCE The Dolphins, who fell to 0-2, had held Indianapolis to two field goals East a chance to tie late in the game when by Dean Biasucci and limited N L T t F PA tedrv IDAAOI(A)-Matt byD16iscc n oSl they drove from their own 28 to the INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Trudeau to only one completion in New England 1 1 -49 Buffalo 35. But on fourth down, Dan Suhey's 2-yard touchdown run put 10 attempts until he hit Clarence NY Jets 1 1 (1 .5( 26 -1 Marino's pass to Jim Jensen fell Chicago ahead, and a fumble Verdin for 48 yards late in the third Indianapolis u 2 0 incomplete with 37 seconds left. recovery by Steve McMichael and period. Three plays later, Dickerson Central Buffalo rookie running back pass interception by Vestee Jackson scored for the 13-10 lead, the only Ci'innti 2 o( 1"c"' 49 3 Thurman Thomas gained 74 yards halted late Indianapolis drives in the lead by Indianapolis in the game on 21 carries and added three catches Bears' 17-13 NFL victory over the bittsbrgh 1 1 511 9 1 for 57 yards. Bills wide receiver Colts on Sunday. Skins 30WSteelersI29estattte 27,1' 4 Andre Reed caught eight passes for The Colts took a 13-10 lead on a Se1ns 30 Steelers 29 1 .8 2 24 12 y rd ,Denve1 l .1 0 4 4 122 yards. 12-yard run by Eric Dickerson earIN LA Raiders I 1 ( ."00 5' 51 Two of the Bills' turnovers led in the final period, then drove to the WASHINGTON (AP) -Chip Iansa, City -.1 -7 directly to Dolphin scores, with Fuad Chicago 37 before Dickerson Lohmiller kicked a 19-yard field goal San )ONAL N E C Reveiz snapping a 3-3 tie late in the fumbled with under six minutes with 12 seconds left Sunday to give East third quarter with a 27-yard kick. remaining. the Washington Redskins a 30-29 NY Gat, I 1 5-1 41 4f The Bills were driving from their The Bears took over and worked comeback victory over the deiphi I 1 1'ashinqton I I 1(11 1. t6 own 7 when Miami linebacker John the clock to 1:38 before a punt gave Pittsburgh Steelers. Dal las I 1 a.5,1 e -8 Offerdahl knocked the. ball from the Colts their last chance. Bubby Brister threw two long Phoeni 1 2 .8 U Buffalo receiver Trumaine Johnson But the first pass from quarterback touchdown passes and ran for h Central following a short pass play. Jack Trudeau was intercepted by another score to help Pittsburgh take Detroit 1 .5v8 41 -4 Dolphins linebacker Hugh Green Jackson and the Bears retained a 29-20 lead with 9:29 remaining. minnesota 1 1 (1 -46 19 recovered the fumble at the Buffalo possession the rest of the game. But a 7-yard pass from Redskin Tampa Say 1 1 1 32an etrnditfieyadarheGeen Bay d: 2 :l0 7 32 and returned it five yards. The Jackson also intercepted Trudeau's quarterback Doug Williams to West Dolphins moved another 17 yards first pass in the first quarter, starting Kelvin Bryant cut the margin to 29LA Rams 2 ', 1 "r, 51 17 San Francisco 2 1: 1 170 -4 5n before stalling and giving way to Chicago's first touchdown drive. 27 with 4:48 left, and Washington New Orleans 1 1 6 Reveiz. Chicago is 2-0, Indianapolis 0-2. moved from its own 44 to the Atlanta o 2 0.1 18 6(l The Baseball Statistical Report National League American League AL Pitching NL Pitching Strikeouts Strikeouts Standings Standings Clemens, Dos 269 Ryan, HOU 224 Langston, Sea 211 DeLeon, StL 186 EEast Divisien Viola, Minn 177 Cone, NY 176 Es DiVi n Hi r, Mil 172 Scott, Hou 17 A L t.8a L ',c., inr, i 7 NY87 t7 604 Semt.n 92 62 .566 -Moore, Sea 166 Fernandez, NY 171 Fittsburgh 77 67 .525 I.' New Yert 77 67 .5-.5 4 1/2 Stewart Oak 165 Hershiser, LA 168 M-ntreal 72 72 .5'37 14 1/2 Swindell, C1ev 162 Leary, LA 166 St. Le1is 75' 76 .479 18 TerentI 74 70 8 1/2 Hough, Te 158 Gooden, NY 157 C1icag 69 76 .476 18 1/2 Cleveland 7 7 ouman, Tex 154 Rii, Gin 157 Philadelphiae D9 86 47 28 1/2 altimore I 1/2 Gobicza, SC 15 Weststivvisien W L tFt. 889 t .en Le L Fc. Gdes 8 W L' .t8. GE Earned Run Average Earned Run Average HD t /07 67 .-Bt 1/2 atland -54 .-Iguera, Mil I. Cone, NY 2.21 Cincinnati 75 '69 .t1 9 Viola, Minn 8 8udr, L _.:7 IFa,,ea Lil 77 681 1 14 E.: 17a N6on Tudor, LO Ian Francisce 72 71 .514 1" Caiarrn 7 7 t, 19 Anderson, Mi 68 Ferez, ntn 2.28 Otlt Teas 64 81 7ubicza, KC 7.b D.artine2, -t. 2.42 Chica o 62 82 .4 1 -1 Clemens Sos 2.,G 2.4. 6 16 .411 .2ebinson, Dt .9 Robinson, SF 2.5 Swindell, Clev 24 Hershiser, LO NL Hitting AL Hitting Stewart, Oak J 7, a son, G1 2.b4 Leibrandt, K(C .1 Scott, HO 2.66 Candiotti, Clev .Leary, LA 2.68 Average Average Wins Wins Falmeiro, Chi .o7 Hnggs, Sos .359 Viola, Minn 21t MJackson, Cin 21-7 Gwynn, SD .7 Fckett, lion 44 Stewart, Oak 18-12 Hershiser, LA 21-8 Perry, Atl .renel1 ea9 Hurst, Sos 17 Reuschel SF 18Gibson, LO Winfield, NY Sbicza, KCS 17-7 wooden, NY 17-7 Dawson, Chi -.olitor, Mil .2Q Clemens, Bos 1610 Madd-X, Chi 17-7 Salarraga, Mtl br ett, KC .317 Swindell, Clev 161 Leary, LA 17-9 Butter, SF -29 Trammell, Det 16 Dvi., oak 15-5 Cone, NY 16-27 OqLendo, GtL 29Hrbek, Minn Welch, Oak 15-7 Srownino, Cin 15-5 Grace, Ghi 91 Yount, Mil Tanana, Det 14-9 De.Martinez, Mtl 1-l2 Van Slyke, Pitt .289 Franco, C1ev .37 Saberhagen, 1KC 14-14 4 pitchers tied 14 Home Runs Home Runs Games Games Canseco, Gal 39 Thigpen, Chi 6. Murphy, Cin 69 Strawberry, NY McSrfrif+ Tor 7 Williams, Tex 6: Ogosto, Ho, 68 Davis, Hou 28 McGwire, alk 28 Cris, Mit 6n Robinson, Fitt 66 Clark, SF 26 Garter, Cev 27 Guante, Tex 60 Tekulve, Phil 64 Galarraga, Mtl 26 Gaetti, Minn 27 Farr, KC 59 Worrell, StL 64 Davis, Cin G5 Clark, NY 25 Jackson, Sea 59 Franco, Cin 62. Gibson, LA 25 Hrbek, Minn 25 Henneman, Det 58 Garrelts, SF 61 Johnson, NY 24 Murray,. Balt 2Smith, Bos 58 Harris, Phil 61 4 players tied 23 Winfield, NY 5 Ward, Tor 58 -Gott, Fitt 6C, 2 players tied 24 Reardon, Minn 57 Lefferts, SF 60 Runs Batted In Runs Batted In Saves Saves Clark, SF 99 Canseco, Gak 115 Eckersley, Oak 40 Franco, Cin Davis, HOU 94 Greenwell, Sos 110 Reardon, Minn 3,8 Gott, Pitt 29 Van Slyke, Pitt 89 Winfield, NY 104 Jones, Clev .Worrell, StL 29 Davis, Cin 88 Fuckett, Minn 1U2 Plesac, Mil .0 Davis, SD 27 Strawberry, NY 88 Brett, KC 99 Thigpen, Chi 3. Bedrosian, Phil 2 McReynolds, NY Evans, Bos 97 Smith, Bos 26 Smith, HOu 25 Bonilla, Pitt 8 Carter .Cle" 94 Henke, Tor 27 Myers, NY 22 Galarraga, Mtl 82 McGwire. Ga 90 Righetti, NY 21 J.Howell, LA 19 Brooks, Mtl 80 Bell, Tor 89 Farr, KC 20 McDowell, NY 16 Marshall, LA 77 TartabulA, K(C 87 Henneman, Det 19 2 pitchers tied 14

PAGE 21

Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 B. Company Express takes tournament By F. L. Marquez It is an ongoing array of sports Company Thunderbolts coached by Thunderbolts gave a 72-37 lashing to competition to keep up the unit's Terry Johnson in a match up against the officers, eliminating them from The players showed up in their make moral, according to Lt. Gary S. the H HC Company Bootmen the tournament. shift uniforms supplied by the gym. McNamee, who is the battalions coached by Gary Farris. The In game eight, it was a grim day for In the predawn darkness, they began sports and reacreation officer in Thunderbolts edged by the Bootmen, A Company Newbreed as they were to warm up by stretching stiff arms charge. 43-40. defeated by A Company Thunderand legs. Soon the squeaky sounds McNamee had already organized The second game showcased B bolts, 56-47. of sneakers' rubber against the court an individuals' ra c quetbali Company Express vs. the 426th In game nine, A Company floor could be heard as lumbering tournament in July which was Signal Bn. on temporary duty from Thunderbolts bounced back to bodies came to life. Then arms and successful and is now planning for a Ft. Bragg, N.C. The Express, defeat HHC Company Bootmen, legs became more animated as the softball tournament in September. coached by Anthony Carter, thus eliminating them, 45-33 and unpredictable bouncing rubber ball defeated the 426th coached by Ray headed into the tournament gave players their test of agility. In the basketball tournament, six Owensby, 45-39. semifinal game to face A Company Control was found as the ball teams in all vied for the top spot and In the third game, A Company Newbreed. pounded onto the floor, and shots the unit's bragging rights for this Newbreed coached by James Artis In game ten, it was an A Company thundered off the backboard and season in basketball. The self routed the "Officers" coached by showdown as the Thunderbolts rim. Players leapt high into the air organized teams and team appointed Gary McNamee by a score of 58-25. trailed over Newbreed by a score of struggling for possession of the coaches battled it out on the hard In game four, Newbreed squeaked 53-45 and advanced into the final. round rubber toy. wood every Tuesday and Thursday by The A Company Thunderbolts in morning at 6. a heartbreaker by a score of 48-47. The champioship game was finally Sweat began to beed on foreheads "It was kind of strange to have it in Newbreed tossed in the last bucket played after the Labor Day weekend. and adrenaline flowed as nervous the mornings like we did," said with only seconds remaining. The Thunderbolts (4-1) failed to rise eyes spied the clock winding down McNamee, but Reeder's busy In game five, A Company up to the challenge of undefeated B before the opening tip off, schedule didn't give them any other Newbreed fought by the B Company Company Express as they lost, 45-37. It was a case of basketball fever as choice. Express to a 41-38 victory. The 154th Signal Bn. is now the 154th Signal Bn. soldiers played "The guys would come out early in In game six, HHC Company looking forward to a softball in their newly organized, doublethe morning and start the game off Bootmen handed the 426th Signal tournament which will take place elimination tournament at Reeder slow, but once they got going." Bn. their second loss, 49-45 while the sometime this month, according to Gymnasium this past August and The first game was played early 426th failed to win any games. McNamee who hopes it will be just as first part of September. morning, August 2nd. It featured A In game seven, A Company successful. SOUTHCOM upset by 6933rd ESS, 47-3 7 by Sgt. Buz Robinson two AIRPS' players who have been the key to the team's success this SOUTHCOM vs. 6933rd ESS season, continued to demonstrate HOWARD AFB, (USAFSO their abilities by dropping in 22 and PAO) -SOUTHCOM, one of the 19 points, respectively. top teams in the league, was outplayed by 6933rd ESS in an upset, Comm Group 1 vs. 24th Supply 2 47-37. ESS hit 16 of 22 freethrows Comm Group breezed to an easy from the line as SOUTHCOM was victory with a 79-58 win over Supply continually in foul trouble. Eddie 2. Trenton Neal and Wesley Collins, Perez and Dave Curry led ESS with Comm Group., had a good night 14 and I points, respectively. Troy from the field and fired in 26 and 20 Covington has team-high honors for points. Both players have SOUTHCOM with 13 points. consistently shot in the double figures and deserve a note of 24th Supply 1 vs. TRANS recognition. Transportation, who has been struggling all season, pulled through with a shocking victory, by driving HQSQ vs. 61st CAMS/MAC Supply 1, 63-54. Norm Gulick, Thanks to their balance-scoring TRANS, and Derrick Smith, Supply attack, Headquarters Squadron 1, were game-high scorers with 18 hung on to the lead for a 66-57 points each, trouncing of 61st CAMS/MAC. HQSQ received support from Vince 4400 AIRPS vs. 24th CAMS 2 Duncan who has 16 points, Greg Air Postal Squadron led from start Taylor who had 12, and Bobby Lucas Walter J. Davis of A Company drives to the hoop against A Company to finish and ended up annihiltating with 10 points. Lenner Broadway, Thunderbolt defenders ByronL. White andLuisDiaz in the semi-finalgame 24th CAMS 2 by 60 points, 86-26. CAMS/ MAC, was game-high scorer of the August/Sept. tournament. (photo by F.L. Marquez) Avery Canady and Roy Clinkscales, with 23 points. Isla Grande Tour a.m.-noon at the Rodman Marina. until Sept. 29 at Building 154, Ft. Rugby Club Certification from this course will Clayton. An organizational meeting The Trailblazer Travel Club is permit authorized personnel to will be held that day at 6 p.m. in the The SOUTHCOM Rugby Club sponsoring an Isla Grande Tour operate Howard MWR's 17-foot CRD Sports conference room. will host a rugby tournament on Sept. 23-25. Boston Whaler fishing rigs. A Sept. 24 at Albrook Soccer Field. The tour provides all meals, hotel registration free will be charged. For Team rosters may include up to 10 accommodations, transportation to information call 284-5307. and from the Island, and a complete Triathlon players and each team must provide a boat tour around the Island. referee. All games will start at 10 a.m. To make a reservation: Call now at Turkey Bowl The Howard/Albrook Youth For information call Steve 252-2615 or 252-2951. The CRD Sports Branch is Centers are sponsoring their Annual McNair at 285-4401 or 286-4933. Pool party looking for Flag Football coaches for the Army team to participate in Youth Fitness Triathlon on Sept. 17. The 24th Transportation the upcoming Turkey Bowl sports Teevent is open to boys and girls Squadron Unit Advisory Council is competitions. Send your resume to ages 6-18 who have a biligual card. sponsoring its annual pool party and Building 154, Ft. Clayton by Oct. 12. The event will start at the Albrook Swimsuit Contest from 6 p.m.For information call 287-4050. Swimming Pool at 7a.m. Sept. 16 -Los Angeles Dodgers at midnight, Sept. 16, at the Howard Cincinnati Reds, 6:30 p.m. po.Women's hoop Registration for the triathlon will be from Sept. 1-14 at the Howard or Sept. 16 -Opening ceremonies for Boating course A civilian Women's Basketball Albrook Youth Centers. A small fee s u mmer 01 y ni pics, 9 p. m. program and the unit level Women's will be charged. For more The Howard-Rodman Boating Basketball program will soon begin. information contact either center at Sept. 19 -India napolih Colts at Course will be held Sept. 24 from 8 Pacific registration will continue 2X4-4700 or 28')-3195. Cic land Iross 7:06 p.m.

PAGE 22

22 Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 4Er had o ea my rocoli ast igh .m ok the Tv "I wan to leve my body 10 medical i seneogwt "When Mother Hubbard found the cupboard baire, why n1K < .tm. -ilstog t r y optlbl "HUw du I like, II, Edih?" a hostage." didn't she apply for food stamps?" CPO position vacancies Be71y B 14p Who can submit applications for permanent positions: S MTEMR, SMAV, 1 TINK E ALETY0L 11URE REAL MALE I'M VERY PAY 11 R Current civilian employees of U.S. Army South and Army-serviced CHAU T L I BER ATE FER activities, U.S. government agencies in the Panama CanalArea, qualified reinstatement eligibles (those persons who previously have workedfor the U.S. Government on a permanent basis), U.S. Government employees in the Panama area in a leave without pay status. Candidates with applications in th CPO applicant supply file will be considered for appropriate vacancies. Who can submit application for temporary vacancies: For clerical positions, only those applicants who have taken the appropriate examination and have notice of rating. For positions, usually above the NM-05 level, non-clerical applicants need not have taken an rai ad [ examination. For sensitive positions requiring security clearance, applications will be accepted from U.S. citizens. How to apply: Applicants must submit application to the Civilian Personnel Office, Bark Alaro. 20) beagle Dachsaod w 6b bath ta -ed 13" Toshiba cloo TV. like n.o. S140. Call 286-3928. Building 560, Room 306, Corozal, by the close of business on the closing te-hdhg. 2i5to goad hVto. Call 22 23188.d .s3., eme ms date of the announcement. Employees located on theA tlantic community, SViac Pooy Calico. s400. Call 252-5026. 25 Fom old Pa Cana C,. $395g. tCall 228pt305. submitting applications to the civilian personnel representative at Ft. Rg. Dohran poppies. red r black. .or., d.shots FisherVHSVCR. $175.,25"QoascolorTV oonsol. $650. Davis, have until Wednesday after the closing date of the announcement. S100 do,, pay Call 262-1914. Call 261-2015. The following must be submitted by all interested applicants: 2", oldtadog. o .othildtohouseied. Macantesto teoeive, 65w poe he.o d.5 210. Call (1). Standard Form 171, Personal Qualifications Statement. (2). Standard 2Kd.803. Call1287-4335. Koso at lyc 5.Cl 8-20 Form 50, Notification of PersonnelAction showing your current status. Kopood m,,.play,,. 50Ca'' 286f42M0w (3). USA RSO Form 106, Application for Consideration or in lieu of the a-hcko.dfema md bCaldlp2ppy4-4,9d2/6.hddn, SOy betawa tooeote cotr. $250. Call 286-6127. USARSO Form 106 you may submit: (A). A current or your latest PCottatian poppy. wal, chmpagtte aaloc, 2wos, Sansi 7" 4hott reel to reel, QD-5500 ape roootder. $400. performance appraisal, and (B). your supplement qualifications dewoowd, ep g.Call 226-5395. Cut[28,-5120. addressing the knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) described under job To Poodle ppp. k black ale. cp g. parents lssp. 250. Call 26related criteria in this announcement. ttan Slot ca$350 Ca' 261-0693. 3e8C The information provided in the SF-171 is used for qualifications 3 feale Dobe.pppiestewksod, blocktoo. $125. Call sVere -e / R, ea. C3 p87-37 1b. determination only. The information you provide on the job related 286-6 94. Cowwodoce C-6t l, woniton. ditkut I c jytok. criteria determines if you are highly qualified and ultimately referredfor ___eed___ _,_ _cers50. Ca_2_7consideration to the selecting official. -3793. Remember: in job related criteria tell what, when, where, how how long SnsUi amtplifier, model 1000-a, needs ropait. $85. Call 282Mago stereo good ond. $350., Atai 1200X Leompter and with what results you acquired the knowledge, skill or ability. 4225. w/accs $750. good deal Call 28&-63I. Method of Evaluation: 8 trck ow-lm auto sereo. $35.,VCR Montgomery Wrd Apple HIE, 128K wewory, dual disk dr. Epson FX-80 VHS. $210. Call 286-3676. pniotenr,16K bIfereard.sys.snenjytok.prgrws. Cal 287-5332. Ranking of eligible candidates to determine the best qualified will be accomplished by comparing each candidate's knowledges, skills, and abilities with the job related criteria listed below. Supervisory appraisals, experience past performance, training and awards will be considered in the USAerSenc 106 oapriaanjoreaecrtrawlbeud e Tropic Tlim es rating and ranking process. Note: Only information provided in SF 171, USA RSO 106 or appraisal and job related criteria will be used. Other considerations: Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis to U.S. military Positions are subject to priority referrals and reemployment priority members, civilian DOD enploy-s and employees of other U.S. government agencies. lists. Consideration of candidatesfor repromotion willprecede efforts to Ads will be accepted only for NON-COMM ERCIAL services or goods offered by the fill the position by competetive procedures. A l qualified applicants will advertiser or an immediate family member. Offerings of real estate of personal ads will not receive consideration without regard to race, religion, color, national be accepted. Suspected abuse of the ad service will result in non-publication of the ad(s) in origin, marital status non disqualifying handicap, age, sex, political question. The Tropic Times reserves the right to edit any advertisement. Questions affiliations or other non-merit factors. Additional information on regarding non-publication of submitted ads may be directed to the F'itor at 285-6612. v available at the Civilian Personnel Office at 285-4104/4128. Submissions must be typed or legibly printed and limited to 15 words. Only two vacancies is sI O the C3-B6, PA ORKER A 28-404 1 Submissions per family per week will be accepted. Each submission must indicate only one E: IPL CCEPSER 071 ,A CO NECR AR-00R categoryforpublication. Ads forservices will be accepted once perquarteraswill adsfor NOT E : 0R55-8, ADM IN IRATI E CLETYP ), NH-303-04, IS AMENDED TO the Wanted category. Patio Sale ads must indicate date and location. Submitted ads will READ: (SENSIT VE) be puslished only once and must be resubmitted for further publication. Ads not run BOTE: APPLICATIONS FOR V#OO3-OO, MAINTENANCE WORKER LEADER, 0L-4749-O, ARE because of late receipt or lack of spaCe need not be resubmitted; they will be run the PERMINEAC EPOSITILCS 927ACYC ANUNCEME T EOP 8E T IME-IN-GAE following week unless a specific date is involved. AND LOCAT ION OPEN CLOSE DATE GEN SPEC 1 YR AT: The deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Friday for the following Fridays edition. If 09-16-8 09-27-88 Friday or Monday is a holiday, the deadline is 9 a.m. Thursday. Ads may be mailed to the LOS 0A GARRI S N E -992-7 550-00 F C LA-T Tropic Times, APO 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. J00 RELATED CRITERIA: NONE Advertisers should allow seven to 14 days for processing. SIPPLY CJLERK tII0I-01 519 -B I N, PLYK t2 SOONER SPT R. CZL 9 AUTOMOBILES AUDIOVISUAL ANIMALS BOATS&CAMPERS JOB RELATED CRITER0 A 505N A PATIO SALES HOUSEHOLD MISCELLANEOUS ANIMALS 8 U P PORTY CTRL BR, CZL -MOTORCYCLES LOST FOUND AVAILABLE WANTED JOB RELATED CRITERIA: NONE CONSTRUCT ION A MA INT FMNN MS-4701-09 561-68 1 YR As OcRNEYMAN 11 0E8, $00 DIV., FT DAI1 op THE OCCUPATIONs J00 nELATED CRITERIA: SUPERVISED .Ability to supOrVis-. 2. Knoladg. of standPds Nnd rocadsres top orpennty, N.sonry, and plInt 3. 8.1111y to Po .n T -n1r u11ng tn EnglIsh Fngage. 4. Ab11 Ity So plat/uoann ork,. settIng prlortIl Nt o meet schedu10s. PRICE HOME PHONE COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYsT, N-334-12 562-80 I 3 N/A US0 ISC-so0T7/DCS IM. FT CLAYTON Circle only one of the above categories. Only two categories per person eanh JOB RELATED CRITER -A: week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type or print 0. Klld I ldnt Nod edntrntn 0r IntormatIon equ-reents end neatly. Information listed beow is not includedin the ad. tr ntIng IhN. to lnregrat dan, ,roh Itectres ,nd dsn. se1SPONSORS NAME RANK 3. snroladutrot den, diRctoceries, reltonal detn bsos, ,nd den, baet ORC. SSN/IP No. 77ang "en O yt s DUTY PHONE Social Security numbers are required to insure proper 0. A1111 no eot cate Ity end I, .rtt n enlc l tntormaton .tt identification Ofpersons submitting ads, and will not be released to unauthorized staft Nenersi and acNon of OS tters. TELEPHONE MECHANIC LEADE, -2502-lO 563-88 0/A 1 8/A third parties. SAISC-SOUTH, OPENI A .COROZAL (SENSlT 1E

PAGE 23

Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 Bear.scam-er 5OXL. $140., Yuusu FT-203R, 2 mete, VHF l982 Lad. Sedan 1200. $900. Call 233-2462. Rugs .do 9xl2. $l00,, l5x l8. $150., suua. 5600. Oak baby ib, li, hgh chair, car seat, very good nd wih uhug,. 0200., TeuX20R rel to roee 0500. Call 252-dishwasher. $75. Call 252-6061. 0250. Cull 226-0719. 5829. 193 Nissan Puls,. 5spd, 4d,, haChback. du, puid, exc. 59 ud. 53300. Caii 261-7647, Flu res.en lights. 08-025. gourmet ulay ruusuing put. 15.,2 ChurBroil gas grill, uuw cund. $50. Cull 252-2676. ColurTV, SoyTrinui7, 7,uwm.x. uund. $350. Call -wool hall rugs. $100. Call 252-6061. 252-7821. 1971 Chevrullt Monte Cado 350-2 Har.l, .p, b. rns eM 4 9 -595. Call 207-5496. I King ut bed. 5l75. Call 286-3188. 284-4499. Applu 2C, uouiuu uud. 2 t,,,,jyuuk. l, glfi u m, Ouu upld 0 Cul 267-507, 2 197 BMW, ,dy. 5,pd, a ser 9,OOOKM, Birds of padis-uuou dvider. $600., s-fa bed. S150. carved 57-48iu. Dul Fluuesnt uuilng lump. S$0 t a, mmerIal eld u850. Caull, 4drd. s, uad. S13,0ll00l Cll 252-6450 bux 020., bar. S600. Cull 220-4796. fs wi heay buue, "ulusupc ueuk. $195. C. Call 228-0305. Bell 0 Howull slidu prljeetor, Oka, 10 prir Yamaha Lrg prght fr.r, GE, $440. Call 236-U713 uft 4pm. Pick up ,mpe .et u25u., Its wik,, tbw chais $150, a rf ll r eim l u s er -u .050 -a. Call 260-1740. 19 h] Cullasu Supureme Oldsmobilu Broughum, 4,, all xards Lucp gwaue stFn4. $25 ,aid se. .30 Call 287-5396. -u -u. 04000 0110. Call 260-4490. Rugs S20, Ruuuu l b]. $1M., buusi.u. 0$40., wikur I l S30., Fo I BM-pc and compatibles. 090. Cull 260-6374. 9 V ,spd bikcs more Cut[ 287-5770 18,00bt, 2yrs .1d S225 baby .rrIe-lrg. $40 Call 1979 VW lug.,b ebuil ug., gd cuud.,uuvail. 19 Out. g all l2p uu uuu I 0-70 84Olb u347 u ld 2S.bbycuig-ug 4.Cl Piuer digtal timer, S uuui re,. amp, Austiu dynumics 2 g/4-3294, hills.ber, -7pe, Raa, Uungr se-6p, w4her, drye,4 wauuupuukuuu. Xuuu pruuucuur uw sunud. Nug. Cull 264-5076. C.~u du u-p .BundlurupeO.Sgu5u, B, 20galaquaium u aces.und, 974 DO d g D mi .be yl. au t ruu t gr -0u. $900 O B O .C all d bl, d l -r fig .C ull 286-3327. Bundy -uu upu .150 O B O ,2 0 g u. uquuuiuou uu CC .uud 4 Suu,. 0200. C, buuu. 0175. Cull 245-1563. '22-1339.ea, 2 SHOO l.e4gld fish. $50., pluypuu. 020. walkk,. $10. Call 207-5233. Sonys__re_._2__.,_Crowne____ax._$_7__Ca___245-_63____-_339Lvuguuu uulu, I uveseut, 2 chairs. 0800., puuiu uuu4 uhuirs, 13" Hulchi olur V. 0200. Cull 282-3392. 1968 BM0W 2002, 2,1, cupu. BO 0. CAll 243-5372. able, umubuullu. 0350., buu uwI uulu. 0180. Call 252-5406. Euglish ridug addlu, US uad, used I yu. 0250. Call 2435305. Paunuu u SIP puruneu luC., IBM uump, 641K umy,u, dual 1973 Ddg, Da1, u, p, ph, uuu ll, a, billy. $1200. Wull 1u uwull luug r C, stu, hallway uuupuu-uuupicul usiug, duk dru, b .Il-in puiuuIru Ciuk. S1900. Cull 286-6395. Call 262-1809. biege w puddiug. 0300. Call 284-5775. Tup quuliy u/diugbuuuuudulu su7%, likuuuuw.875. Cull2845772. Pin ueiur, 0wu. $151. Suusui u.v.u, I10w. S185. 1985 Ponuia F1-uo sale urdu (i/u Cu-luuu, Guund prI, Gluu tup auau dinuiug suw14 chuuir, like gw. 5500. Call ud. 284-3675. Regal, e,,). 06000. Cull 264-4979. 286-6484. SuhwuiCa supdw muu's biku. sprewhelsuddlu rgirl' sbk. Flhe, -uupluuu sueueu sysuem, like 1. O. Call 284-6494, 1987 Cheuy Camr, u /u, pa pu. uinued wudws, d-, k brow uwuud e buukuus, 3 seiOunsl totaling uer 0 lung, I siu 0o ulharp cuu. ,001. Call 286-4280. h buull-in duuk 0200. Cull 252-5415. 900016 w.r. .ih w, munt P,, Jeup vehial. lyuu uld ued nd uw AIA X-33, HI-Ci upu s, 2upkric. $500 OBO Call 252-902 S0475. Cull 286-6198. 1980 Tuyuta Curulla, hauch buuk, guud gas ulge, guud ed., I 12x15 uug u pud. 135. 2 9,12 uugu u'pad. 5125. 25 ul uu dy puid, U/S up. $800. Cull 2E7-3210. csulu uuluu TV. $350., uwaer beds. 0300. Call 284-3120. Ga, Rug. $l00., Hugv,, suui-auo w.sher. 070, 2 3 y sc r T,, v ni l. Si3o. s y hnurm cuu ycl ulmets. 060., I Nuluu. 045. All neg. CAll 287radio. 013., Jul antnua, elect. diutbl. $25. Call 262-2729. a966 HOudu Aucurd, uudur uuuuuuuy, uudi uuuus., pu, ib. 3pu luug rm seu. 0600. Luwery Organ. 0600. Call 252-5026. 6380. Zenith 19' uuluu TV spuuu Cmd. reu unal. 0225. Call 262-udws, uu urau, uxi. ud. Call 287-2582. Dining-u set, Early Amuriuuu, table. 6 chirs, uhiuu uabinuu 15 pai of girl's shes su 5, uinerucguu guuy blu 8. 040. 0185 art 5P. 1976 Dodge Va. 12 puuugu, ux-. oud. 31950 080. Cull very beautiful, uc. cnd. Call 287-4422. Cull 286-4562. Zenith be6-m3 TV, 33d. .85., Ala piler printer, 2 286-43 sO, chair, Oblus, drssuu, bike,. Call 252-5327. Je, Wiudurur. $3507BO, 2 .p iuuul luugum w/sleupuu, dsk drvs, ubl. $750. Call 228-4796. 1974 N'iuuuu Purul, 2dr, 6lyl ga,. 4x4, viuch, dy free, Buuyhill sufa sleeper/ldu eau, solid pine b. uld, iun. S750.,25"TV upside aennuu.$495. Cull260-8098. LP re.rdabumus.u$5u.uucsup-s.55,, Callu252-782l aft able hauduup. $2500. Cull 252-2870. uthguded fabig, solid pine goue ble. Cull 282-5822. Little Tikes Turlesaudbu. $15., lgTuw/Country Wuguu. 4,30p. [982 Buick Regal, J-6, fully loaded. 04000,OBO. Call 286Buuidud rugs, lug rus. $80., 2 siu. blue. $25, $10, ,harcul 025., lik u-u. Call 286-3928. 3924. grill. S30/OBO. Call 286-3832. 1985 Niusun Suuuuuy, ua lu, 44t. $440. Cull 252-2628. Jacket styled Tusa BCD, blu, gred,cu.und. $150. Cull 286__________95 _Nsa _Su __,_xra ___a__4dr_$4 __._a__252-628 Whirlpuul Portable dishwasher. $150. Call 287-5072. 4273. 1982 Cbeu.u.let Ce.te, u/t, runs gold, needs minor body Retrigeruou CI. $200., SuP. $121., /uw TV/rudia/uapu. Weddig dress, pearl and lace emb., US mad, su 9. $175. work and pur, musu uoll. 0800. Call 287-3327. S100., never used chip dipu, S4-8. Call 263-9510. Call 287-6297. 1981 VulkswuugoTruukuamuperuuup,5spd, uuuu good, $3900. u6p Rat,, Inugum ueu ux s u shguuions. $I55O new. $850. Lug rectgir hass/glass table w/6 chairs. $700., gill, whit, Cull 287-6777. Md Mad c. w/Childroen, duyu/ev. Call 252-6825. Call 226-0719. cnopy bedroom sel complete. $I000. Call 284-4781. 1980 Buigk Skylauk, V-6 eng., radio, pu, puu brakes, aulo, Eog-upkog, nicely Putished house uo share in El Dorado, all Living ur, dining rm, bedroom furniture,. Everything gos! Baby swing, basusiuuuu, Changing t1. plape, walk, eiliog good .u 500. Call 260-2904. saP 5. Call 284-3573. fa,, saimfins, sorkel, maks, guitaru w/cae. Cull 207-4349. 9Engliuh-spkog, Iiue in maid, prefer smubody yound, no Whie wi sz uauupp bud, dressur/bulnh, all bddg ing!,. Ladius dess sh os, a A., just like new. $15 ua, Call 287197 Ford F iod, reb"i Call, 2d, w radio, Hit, lry' Spanish, good w/children, M-S. Call 287-528. $500. Call 287-3324. 4974 1981 Olds oil u Culas uCusir0.Wu/ isul.l02700. Call Spanish spkng maid, ige-in, dependable, uxperionced, Carvod Teak wall unit w/mauble in laid shlus, Honduran A/C, GE 18,000 b du, 220v. $200. Call 282-3093. 287-472l honest. Call 252-6046. wood,,nuagoe, wall umblum. Call 284-3731. 2 8 7 -4 2 7 2 ....d en__ _ _ _. .I[_e m b l e m._C all__ _ _ _Y o r x s er e o c a r d a b l w /4 c ha i rs, ru g s, to y p la n ts a ll m au t Eog-spkogmaid,3-5dys,availoblefor3dysimmed. CalS221Greek white caurpe, good cond. $200., vac Cluaoer, Igh go. Call 264-9070. 1986 CJ-7 Jeop, a/ c, ps, 6eyl, hard top, amd-fmn Cass. Call 286046 eg, 2. id 4.Cl 8-15 3792.0498. weight. $20., sm bird. $45. Call 284-6125. 3 7 9 2 -S p a i sh__ _ _m ai,__ _ _g oo__ _ _ _a se f s .C al D e e p r ie m e d .s .b r a n d um .$ 4 0 .C a ll 2 2 0 -2 2 0 1 1979panish spkg maid. lie-io, goud w/uhildren, has rPs. Call oDiig rm tble m/4 chairs, bar, odsk, micowave Carl. BO. C 97 9 887. 284-4197. Call 284-3328. Copy machine, va. clean,,, draftg tbl, lamps, dskchair, TV C.11 224-9007. _________________________.__and lble, k-sa matuuuses, shr. B/0. Call 243-5372. g/77 Cuprice, ae, um-Pm gau, n Sl uh pC Eoo/paoish spkng live in maid, honest, reliable, M-F, exc. GEwshr/dryrHeavypduyluguapacilyuexc.ond.,oadas se. ux77 Codpr$20 all 84-522, w w/kids. Call 224-8757. $608. Call 284-5234. Utility trailer, Tandem Ax,!. all ste! construction, bud ex__cond. $2000. Call 284-5229. 14x66, 5' sidu, drop ti galu. S300. Call 252-5449. En. dayorlive-in maid,erygood w/children,h.ousekepng, 12xI5 bruww caupet. $100., drapsuds FArfaan housing, 1978 Plymouth Fury Saon,$4d, V-8, ps, pb, ,wtires.$1350. Spanish spkng. Call 287-5586. beige w/bown 1oalmtif. 5200. Call 284-5087. Stereo cabinet w/glas doorm. $85., car seat/baby stroller. Call 260-7973. $25. mu. Call 284-3675. Pcsiog, leavingg hous maid in Panama, Eogspkng, livio, 21,00bu, Whirlpool a/c. $275., TV/VCR Veeer s -and. 1973 Ford Tornno. B/O. Call 287-3181. Child re'u 0any, ug. Cull 282-3235. $60. Call 269-0012. Coag baby Car seat, newborn .301bsb, ued I mth. Coso 1985 Mercedes 2.3, 16valve, US specs, loaded, sunrooP wine .high ghaiu, 3mos old. $60/both, will sell sap. Call 282-5741. p Cpaosh spkog maid, M-F. Call 268-2202. Baby Crib, whie. $85., high Chair. $25., miug. uoyn, prices clor, bax paid. S18,501). Call 226-5822. vac, ry. Call 260-7647. Sofas, end tble, big bar-b-q grill w/gas lack, Carolin, dishes. Hons, rliab, good Eng-upkog, maid, xg.w/hildre, Muuydrx. Call 280-7007. find ier, g ead, gu 21981 Dalsn Loog-bud Piuk-op, good good. $2500. Call 228mahgy pla!bd, n.gn.Cl 8-83 31 iF, lig,-oul. Call 2261063. 6 draw Captain' bed, good Cood. w/mlss. $199.Call 287105.plub-ophog, -0, Englinh, haou, depeodable. 5641. Alomiam oampue for truck, 5'x6', 095, truck tires. $5 oa., 1929 PoopiagsTusnk Amsam, pa, ph,,p/insn, pependabuaa, lovely pouuud plans. Call 252-2889. 1979 Pontiac Trans Am, 4 / ps, C l b, p/, n2 pal,m. hrdworkig maid, M-F, eg. w/kid. Call 286-4696. 3 Rip Chais, wall unit, wickertble, bkr o 3a,6x9 apets, great shape. 54000/neg. Call 286-6327 be 4:30pm.s sC 3 Baby car sa. $7.50 ca, 2 for $10, 2 urolln. $25 ,a, Singer Gardoer/haodymun, go. household duties. Call 226-4275. -i ms Call 287-3534. 1981 Ford P100 Pickup, 3spd, 6gyl. $2600/0130. Call 269sewing machine, 100. Call 287-382 0005 at 6. Girl bdrm set, perfect cond. 0400., boy's bed perfect Cond. ___ __ ___ __ __6._ $100. Cal 252-6057. No Froul refrig. freezer, GE 17.7cf, nw heavy dty Maytag 1984 Mazda RX-7, black, ag. pb, pm, radio cauu., fspd, runs he,, micuowa. Call 262-0519. good. $5750/og. Call 226-0356. iresser w/mirro. S200., chesu. $150., nightuland. 075., S9' V hull, 85hp Mercury, many extras, traier. 02500. Call wicker book sand. $100., pug. 025. Call 287-4631. 1986 Isuou Tropgu, US spec, 4.d, ag, pn, ph, am-fm cas, 286-6343. Toandle, bud/2 matrss. $250., walnout/pole book shlvs. 37,000mIs, exig good. $8900. Call 286-3370. 27' Sailboat, 1979 Huome,. $21,400. Call 252-6825. $250., Early American ghild's desk. 0100. Call 287-3323. 1985 Honda 100cc sport, bike, street, good uond. $475. Call 1980 Ch.olet Citalion. $1500/film. Call 287-3178. 14' Boston Whaler, 40hp outboard trailer and equip., inside Pcsing, everything must go, furniture, swings, appl.,curailns, 282-3188. 1982 Chevy Cou-ello, loaded. 1w 1. gesouigo. only. Call steerng. 03000/firm. Call 256-6018. rugs, a/u, more. Call 282-3235. Honda CT90 parns and whuln. BO. Call 252-5606. 286-3792 afu 6pm. 19' Car n w/mu e g., w/uaile,, x Blas. 0O. Call 284-4499. 3y old .ond., Complete bdrm set, mahogany k-subed, 2 1984 Toyota Pickup, uC. cood., duy paid. $3650/ neg. Call Ight bdsde Ib, s w/drawwrs. S600. Call 252-2894. 224-8106. 1819' Glaoto, ri-hull w/l15hp Mercury outboard, rebuild eng., fuel tanks, nkils, xt,,s. 4500/0BO. Call 284-5775. Wood china cabinet, wood serving ble. BO.,hbig3 1984 Renault Engore, 44,000 0010, ad, am-fm ga. $2900. cuuurins/rods for kiChun/lungrm. 00. Call 287-3294. Qurs Pt Amador, Saturday, for dirctiuo. Call 202-3188. Call 284-4323. 29' Cal loop, n. maintanog,, 5 uails, full cruluog gear, diesel, many xtran. Call 223-0703. Zenith TV console. Sharp microwave, beige uclioer, nm tbl, Qtrs 1580 Balboa, Saturday 8-1, a/g, furniture, soes, 1981 Toyota Cressida Dies.l, uras. $53600., 1982 Fluetwood. baby bd w/mttrses. Call 286-435g. Children' clothes, misg. $6700. Call 286-6333. 16' Runabout w/lanks, 35hp, good gond. 02500/00. Call 252-5119. Becdr set. 0375., lvngum se,. 0250., Touhib belama. Qtrs 308A Fe Kobbe, Sauruday 8-ooo. 1984 Chevrolet Cavalier, 4, 4,y], loaded, Ow tires, am-fm -21010 Call 122 351 Alrs 89 Hoard, Saturday 7em leon, otur-2e, C 2ezer, ga/gclock. 55300. Call 286-4124. 2lu nwr halPedew .50pou., nm lalindeparos.eg.$5_____p___ir.,2_______ew____p____sAuni9compdrSaopay7of,,PrniM,,eP,,,, V-b. 030. ea. Call 252-5829. Couch, 2 chairs, table, 4p set, 3yrs old. $450. Call 284-3294. houshold good, 1eg. 1987 Toyala I.6S R, 1w mlge, loaded. 07000. Call 264-4725. 4BH d audy7:0' rubber, inaliblu life rafP. $100/OO. Call 287-3780. K ,nmoue duye. 1100., Magoavo Conuolo am-fm seeO, 100 owad, 00101 730-ooo. 1977 Subaro SW, 4d,, 4wd, agor haul, -mpainljob,dly paid. -uenuable. $150. Call 2844492. Qrs 13B Theller Cir. Howard, Saturday 7lam, funitr, 91500. Call 224-1555. Hobie at 16' saib-a, orange sailn/temp. new rigging, exe. Comd. $2500. Call 227-2582. GE 20cf slide-side refrig/Preeue. $650., 3 a/c. $150 Ca. Call clouhing, 10ys, wing. 1982 Buick Skylark, aC, ps, ph, as is. $1250/OBO. Call 282228-3105. Qurs 94A Albrouk, Saturday 8-noon, loys, clothes, 4893. 17' Aguosport enter Bimini top Ima tabs, 1986 1.5 liter OMC outboard, ready to Ii. $8500. Cali 252-6902. Io.n.bold iemn, /985 Plymouth Colt DL, 4dr, auto, ac, under 29,000ols, -Qtrs 132 Babo H Saturday 8-glug, elect. se, .wer. 04250. Call 260-4204. 17' Ti-holl w/ 1986 60hp Johnon umouor day paid, ,railer, furniture, books, games, curtains, -gsn. good cond 4500. Call 252-2824N ga, 5 alum k w/bak po ale, 1982 Mazda RX-7, ag, am-fm gusc ge. cood, many rau. rubber oto. $00. Call 260-9345. Quu 67 Albrook, Jaaurday 8am-lpm, Clothes, fPrniure, $5000. Call 282-4530. m100oCall_260-9345_Qre.7 Albr_____SaturdaySam_ _.-C, 1981 Polaig Ph. du.city paid, a/c, aln. $1900) Call 262Bicycle ldie, 10spd, 40p, dinnerware. 025. Cal 287-4631. Q us 2890 Albrook, Saturday 8-noon, Curtains, Clothes, _82.: 7e Keno e reorig. 25I. Colb, Zgnilh -guolg TV. $300., Alificeal Christmas lre, 6'. $25., 6' refrigerator. S 10. Call misg., bos. 1985 Meredes 280S, ag, aoto, aw-fPr cauu., pa pb, duy fre, Fume, lawn mgoe. $50. Call 228-3282. 287-3294. Qeus 7 Abrok, Salueday, household Puni10re, oloubiog,uoys, do US pecs, 10,O00mls. $23,000. Call 232-5258. China cabinet, very good uged., Coffee tbl, Iol w/curved Freduichs 16,000 t, recently suviced. $180/000., mus o miag. Call 286-3674. 1984 Cheuy Chveltle, alo,, acam-Pm, as., pg. ph, good legu. Neg. Call 252-291 -ol. Cull 87-287. Qts 105B Albrk, toys, glothgs miug. Call 286-3586. "nd. $2500. Call 22-4381. Chgst ofPDawer, night labI,, dgsk/ chair, maplg. $275. Call 19" Adult folding NEALECO Italian biko, oldsin halfto fit 1986 Toyota Corgl a, 6 R. 04500. Call 252-2806. 287-6297. n lu h boal a pl ne, y ello w $50. Call 252-6570. 1977Chey B~cact6,y, 44, ty aid neds ail.Girl's pink guaymii dr-s, hand made. $25., vanity fair 1 977 Chguy Blauer, aulo, 6cyl, no 4x4,.duy paid, ogodu wino, Kenmore dryer, new, whilo lrgcupacily, exc. cond. $500. Cull 0,' pn goyiegbnduag02.fulyPu body work, runs good. 02500. Call 284-4493. 286-3821. sleepw-ar, e. Call 252-5985. English speakng live-in maid, yuung not bilingual, guud 1986 Oldsmobile Cutlaus Cigrr. og, 4dr, ougn am-fl gang. Kenmoe hgovy duy washuer duyur, used luss uhan I y,. 0800. 4 boliug balls, 2-16h auglu. 45 ca, 2-151b Ebonie. 025 a. a kids. Call 287-5280. loaded, ggg, gond. 09500. Call 284-6693. Call 2604480. Call 287-370. Jeep Cherokee, 1986 r ogwgr. Call 264-5995. 1979 Furd Broncu, 4, ug, pb, ps, am-Pm, -m tis, xlrs. 3pc ngum seu w,6 pillw,. guud cond. 250. Call 269-3543. SCu buard bog. 0225. Cull 260-4374 aa pu. Luuphe uueresd in Marlin lishogal Pias Boy, e,, .26-Jun. 400firm. Call 287-5977. 25 Cus Mohis TV. $650., uguuluuiul l.grumu. s. icl: ,,,, Glus fPr 1987, 1988 Sena RH, firo du,. 565. Cull 2522. 811110 puuuuoplu. Call 206-6520. 1974 Ch-y Ngva, 6cyl. n arb,. ndu u, omi wlrk. .gg.su., chair, etc. 82500. Call 284-478 aft 5pm. 5759. Anyon -n Tahga I aunh o guud phtluguaph f uuilbul 91200 050. Call 287-5233. Kbdspread, beige, w .m s. Whiripl a c, 000blu, -ed lhan 3moS295. Call w w black pin-kcr Call 252-7650) 1986 Mung, 4upd, 4cyl. 04000. 299-6118 MO 9:30-3pm. 530. 'Trak light. S30. Call 232-5256. 4004. P1n1budy 71-77. ruauunhle pri, aedill uo. X-/ug dug 1912 Oldsmuhil, 4dr, x-. und., guw paiuu tr, am-Im cal K m,,, diuhwash, ru g.4 SI Cul -25. 5 24, 4 Cd -1, 269-7244. uuenomi3al diun0l. 03510. CAlI 22-132,. W r64 d l 66 h1 r4 4704. AKC reg.S.umricanP'ckgr spaulul puppy, newahr,, bIul., 198g Grand Prixned uug. 0 u. .ul. 05 n /B4-87 mQ1hng d-,Sud ?6on'/u I g, u.tl u ll 24.-59 bud. S35. Call 2' 3/ 34 Su. poo /h41.' a /u '"' pluxiglal lui -d, x 4' 1 l/ 1984 1 Tyulta(aria. ulu.r ;udig,. u. ,4 100 OBOL lll 24112110btu u. Whirlpol. 6275. microwave earuuabineu. 723. S5 .Call 252-5929./I 60 .b u .b -, pu.u9 1/2utnd a[. dr.pu. Cu/I 26-498 l. 252 2,05.

PAGE 24

24 Tropic Times Sept. 16, 1988 USSOUTHCOM aids storm-ravaged Jamaica Continuedfrom Page emergency relief supplies were prepared and loaded the supplies The emergency supplies were withdrawn from the Disaster Relief onto pallets and moved them to withdrawn from the Panama-based response to an appeal for Stockpiles maintained at the U.S. Howard where airmen of the 79th stockpiles since the stockpiles of international relief aid made by Naval Station Panama Canal at Aerial Port Squadron loaded them plastic sheeting in the United States Jamaican Prime Minister Edward Rodman near Panama City by U.S. onto the aircraft. The operation was had been depleted by disaster relief Seaga, who called the situation the Southern Command's Army coordinated by the U.S. Southern shipments destined to Bangladesh. worst disaster in Jamaica's modern component, U.S. Army South, for Command's J4 Directorate. In support of the Bangladesh flood history. AID's Office of Foreign Disaster The C-130 aircraft and crews relief operation, emergency materials Following approval by the Assistance. participating in the disaster relief from the AID stockpiles in Panama Department of State and the Army members of the 41st Area operations are on rotational duty at were transported Sunday from Department of Defense and tasking Support Group of USARSO's Howard Air Force Base from the Howard Air Force Base to by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Directorate of Management Military Airlift Command's 324th Bangladesh via Hawaii by U.S. Air Tactical Airlift Wing in Little Rock, Force C-141 aircraft carrying 5760 Arkansas, and the Air National wool blankets, 150 civilian tents, six Guard's 118th Tactical Airlift Wing boats with outboard motors, and a in Nashville, Tennessee. boat trailer. C-130 crew sees devastation by Sgt. Kirk Boyd minister could view the damage to his HOWARD AFB (USAFSO country. PAO) -The first C-130 Hercules As they passed over it was evident departed Howard Air Force Base at that most of the crops, poultry 9:45 a.m. Wednesday loaded with business and tourist spots were 27,600 pounds of plastic tarps and destroyed. chain saws. The pilot, co-pilot, The strongest recorded hurricane navigator and flight engineer are of this country had left its mark on assigned to the 50th Tactical Airlift this island nation. Squadron, based at Little Rock Air Field after field of sugar cane, Force Base, Ark. The crew chief and banana trees and coconut trees were the loadmaster are assigned to the completely flattened by the storm's 2nd Mobile Aerial Port Squadron, winds. About 95 percent of the also based in Arkansas. chicken farms were destroyed and RELIEFSUPPLIES -Jamaican workers unloadrelief suppliesrom a US. The aircraft landed in Kingston, the beaches, which attract thousands Air Force C 30 Hercules in Kingston, Jamaica. (photo by SSgt. Matthew Jamaica at 12:10 p.m. Meeting the of tourists each year, were wiped out, irorc Cplane was James Shields, disaster according to Shields. Gildow) specialist from the State Department As the plane got over the city of in charge of relief operations, and Montego Bay, you could easily see G ilbert heading tow ard Texas Michael Sotirhas, U.S. Ambassador that about 80 percent of the houses to Jamaica. were damaged and about 20 percent Continuedfrom Page 1 Army troops and Red Cross As engines shut down, several of those were destroyed. 200-mph wind gusts and 15-foot workers went to the disaster zone people waited anxiously to off-load The C-130 touched down in waves. Homes were wrecked and with food and drinking water, but the supplies. Four of the six pallets Montego Bay at about 3:30 p.m. with streets turned into rivers. communications to the peninsula were off-loaded. Two were left the two remaining pallets of plastic were cut and no word had been aboard to be taken to Montego Bay, tarps. Both pallets were off-loaded Caym ans escape received on whether the storm caused where no relief efforts had reached within minutes. casualties there, the Defense since Hurricane Gilbert hit the island While there, a Lion Air Caribbean Ministry said in Mexico City. Monday. airliner landed to take some of the deaths,injury "We are only making contact with "The storm made its way onto the hungry, tired and thirsty tourists who authorities in the region via the radio island at 9 a.m., Sept. 12," said had been stranded at the airport, out LITTLE CAYMAN, Grand and at times, this is impossible," Sotirhas. "180 mph winds pounded of the country. It was the first Cayman Islands (UPI) -Although Defense Ministry spokesman the island for 24 hours. The wind commercial jetliner since the storm it hurled maximum sustained winds Salvador Macias Cabrera said. didn't die down until about 9 a.m., had hit the island. of 130 mph., Hurricane Gilbert "What we do know is that the Sept. 13. "We have been here since the, spared the Cayman Islands' situation is grave." "The initial assessment of damage morning of Sept. 12,"said one weary inhabitants deaths or fom the Once the strongest Atlantic is major. There is no power, water or tourist from Portland, Ore. "We Caymans said the storm caused hurricare on record, Gilbert communications in any part of the were stuck here with no food, water heavy damage to buildings, blocked weakened over Mexico and its winds country," he explained. or power. We will be very glad to get roads, wiped out the 102 square mile had dropped from 175 mph to 120 The plane departed Kingston at 1 home." island's banana crop and slightly mph by the time it lunged into the p.m. for Montego Gay. On board The C-130 departed Montego Bay injured two persons. gulf. Hurricane center director Bob was the Jamaican Prime Minister, at 4 p.m. and headed back to broadcast from the police Sheets said Gilbert likely would Edward Seaga. According to Seaga, Kingston. All the years of training station on Little Cayman and intensify in the warm gulf with winds his government is requesting beds, that this C-130 crew, headed by monitored in the Virgin Islands, rising up to 155 mph, a storm still blankets, tents, water and canned CKapt. Mike Schaar, had gone reotedi the igizns a recapable of cauing extreme damag. foods from the U.S. government for through to prepare for a mission like reported that all citizens are immediate relief. For long-term this had paid off. accounted for" on that island. "We still have a potentially much relief, they will probably request help This crew, from Little Rock, Ark., "It's too early for detailed damage more powerful storm," he said. "It is is rebuilding the island, he said. had made a lot of lives a little easier reports," the report said, adding that a very large storm. It has everything The trip to Montego Bay was on the island of Jamaica with relief both Grand Cayman and Caymangoing for it, so it's not going to go longer than normal, so that the prime provided by the United States. Brac had reported no casualties from away." Gilbert. Born Saturday night in the Cayman-Brac had heavy damage southeastern Caribbean Sea, Gilbert Scale rates hurricanes 1 to 5 on its southern side, the report said, cut an 1,800-mile swath of noting that "people are starting to devastation on its relentless march to by United Press International Category 3 -extensive move around and traffic is starting the Gulf of Mexico. At least 30 Forescasters at the National damage, winds of I IIto 130 mph; up. people were killed -19 in Jamaica, six Hurricane Center in Miami storm surge of 9 to 12 feet. "It appears a lot better than most in the Dominican Republic and five upgraded Hurricane Gilbert to a Category 4 -extreme damage; of us expected," the report said. in Venezuela. "category 5" storm Wednesday as winds of 131 to 155 mph; storm maximum sustained winds surge of 13 to 18 feet. reachd 175mph.Category 5 -catastrophic Soldier, alone in cab, robbed ;or use the Saffirdamage; winds of 156 and up; Simpson Scale to rate the strength storm surge of 18 feet and up. Continuedfrom PageI -Don't allow the cabbie to pick and damage potential of There have been only two Police. His greatest concern now is up additional fares. hurricanes. A Category 1 Category 5 hurricane in this that other people become aware of -Keep the doors locked. They hurricane is the weakest, and century. An unnamed 1935 the potential danger of riding alone had to open this sergeant's door to Category 5 is the strongest. hurricane struck the Florida Keys, in taxis. drag him out. The categories: killing 408 people, and Hurricane Although this appears to be an Note the number of the taxi Category 1 -capable of doing Camille hit Louisiana and before you get in. minimal damage; winds of 74 to Mississippi in 1969, killing 256 isolated, unusual event, there are -Report any suspicious activity 95 mph; storm surge of 4 to 5 feet. people and causing almost $1.5 some basic safety tips servicemembers to the proper authorities. Category 2 -moderate billon i damage. can follow to reduce the risk of this Just a few simple precautions can damage; winds of 96 of 11 to 130 There have been more than a happening to them. significantly reduce the chances of mph; storm surge of 6 to 8 feet. dozen Category 4 hurricanes. -Avoid travelling alone. becoming a victim.


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