Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Town Hall Meeting
The next U.S. Army South Town Hall
Meeting will be held May 13 at Fort
Clayton's Valent Recreation Center. Mem-
bers of the community are invited to at-
tend. These Town Hall Meetings are an
excellent forum to learn about upcoming
events. For more information call 288-
9303.


T ronic


Times


Vol. XII No. 18 Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama Friday, May 7, 1999
Serving the Joint Community


JIATF-South


'mission complete'


story by Tech. Sgt. Miconna J.
Boaldin
NCOIC, 24th Wing Public Affairs Office
HOWARD AFB - A ceremony that
officially marked the closure of Joint In-
teragency Task Force-South was held
Wednesday at Howard Air Force Base.
To highlight the event, JlATF-South
was awarded the Joint Meritorious Unit
Award for the organization's outstand-
ing contributions to the counterdrug op-
erations in Panama and South America
from June 11, 1997, through May 1.
The unscheduled announcement of
the award bestowed an even greater
sense of pride, and accomplishment, to
the deactivation for those who served
with JIATF-South.
Members of the ceremony official
party were U.S. Ambassador Simon
Ferro, presiding official; Col. Barry J.
Chisholm, JIATF-South director; and Se-
nior Master Sgt. Bertrand C. Blain, senior
enlisted manager.
Blain was the opening speaker for the
ceremony by saying the day was a show-
case of the men and women of JIATF-
South. "These men and women are the
true lynch-pens to the JIATF-South op-
erations." He talked of manpower short-
ages and difficult missions. "We
muddled through it and we have emerged
victorious," he said. "We are part of the
USARSO and team Howard family.
"JIATF-South consists of all four
branches of the service," he said. "We
worked together and became all we
wanted to be."
Chisholm then made his farewells to
the unit; it's people and those they have
worked with over the years. "JIATF-
South has had a short but significant his-
tory," he said. "The joint, international,


interagency team at JIATF-South proved
their exceptional worth over the past two
years and left a trail of accomplishments.
"To my friends at JIATF-South whom
I will terribly miss," he said, "We have
been part of a very worthwhile effort.
The fact that you could accomplish what
you did in a relatively short period of
time speaks extremely well for your ability
to take advantage of your diversity and
apply so many differing talents and back-
ground to achieve success.
JIATF-South supported international
partners that led to substantial disruption
of the illegal narco-industry in the re-
gion. "I'm proud to have had a leadership
role in this international, communal ef-
fort," noted Chisholm. "As a direct result
of JIATF-South support, participating
nation Drug Law Enforcement and Secu-
rity Forces have seized 145 metric tons
of cocaine, hundreds of narcotraffickers
have been arrested, and 38 drug planes
have been destroyed, forced down, or
seized on the ground."
"Many of the Guard and Reservists
have spent up to or over a year of tempo-
rary duty here," he said. "That dedica-
tion has been an absolute necessity for
mission accomplishment.
"My congratulations and thanks are
to all of you." he said. "We take pride
that our team at JIATF-South can say, as
we close our unit - mission complete."
Ferro was that last to speak. He be-
gan with recognizing the hard work the
men and women of JIATF-South have
completed over the years. "You have
served the U.S. with distinction in a way
that has also helped our neighbors in
Latin America and in the Caribbean. Your
hard work has been crucial to this suc-
cess story.


Staff Sgt. Norma Martinez-Galvan (USAF)
Col. Barry Chisholm, Joint Interagency Task Force-South outgoing direc-
tor, speaks with U.S. Ambassador Simon Ferro after the ceremony inac-
tivating the unit. To the left is Carmen Ferro, wife of the ambassador.


- ~ ~
.'. M
'~ .~


Staff Sgt. Norma Martinez-Galvan (USAF)
Senior Master Sgt. Bertrand Blain, the unit's last senior enlisted man-
ager (left) and Col. Barry Chisholm, JIATF-S's outgoing director, loop
the Joint Meritorious Unit Award on their organization's flag as part of
departure ceremonies Wednesday at Howard Air Force Base.


"With the important contributions
made by JIATF-South, we have been
able to establish great working relation-
ships with the Panamanian public forces,
as well as with authorities from other
countries in the region, in the fight
against drugs," he said. "1999 is a crucial
year for forging a new relationship be-
tween Panama and the United States.
JIATF-South is furling their flag, but the
mission goes on.
"As the President's representative to
Panama, it is my honor to thank you for
your valuable service to our country," he
said. "I know those of you who will be
moving to my home state of Florida to
work with JIATF at Key West will be
welcomed in the spirit of southern hospi-
tality."
The closure is part of the U.S. South-
ern Command's implementation of the
Panama Canal Treaties of 1977. The unit
was the command's operational head-
quarters for counterdrug operations in
Panama and South America.


The mission JIATF-South performed
from Howard is now transferred to
JIATF-East in Key West, Florida. This
unit will be the headquarters element of a
new U.S. Southern Command
counterdrug architecture with Forward
Operating Locations for counterdrug air-
craft in the Netherlands Antilles and Ec-
uador.
Narrator for the ceremony was Capt.
Roberto V. Richards.
Throughout the ceremony there was
a flight of JIATF-South members led by
Lt. Col. Bryan P. Newman with Spc. Jus-
tin Mullens as flag bearer.
The color guard represented the unit
jointness with members from four ser-
vices.
They were Air Force Staff Sgt. Kelly
Winston, 24th Security Forces Squad-
ron; Navy Seaman Heather Stevens,
JIATF-South; Marine Cpl. Paul M. Reno,
E Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines;
and Army Sgt. Scott M. Detner, JIATF-
South.


"Heroes Welcome"
Throughout the month of May, SCN will
air the "Heroes Welcome" videotape di-
rectly after its Friday evening broadcasts.
The videotape segment, which showcases
the achievements and legacy of U.S. Army
South, can be recorded via a video cassette
recorder for strictly personal, not business,
reasons.


BHS Graduation
The BHS Graduation will be held 7:30
a.m. May 15 on the front lawn of the high
school. Each family of a senior will be
given eight tickets for their guests. All reg-
istered alumni and guests must pick up
their reserved tickets between 8 a.m.-4
p.m. by May 14 in the main office of BHS.
For information, see Page B11.












Tropic Times
May 7, 1999


People


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II


I,


Curundu gardener
Fred Costin, guidance counselor and volunteer gardener
at Curundu Elementary School, was recently honored
with a plaque due to the many hours he spent creating a
beautiful tropical garden on the school grounds. His ef-
forts have brought much pride to students, parents and
faculty.


Volunteer of


the Week


FORT CLAYTON (Installation
Volunteer Coordinator's Office) -
Dissenia Ortega has been chosen
as the U.S. Army South Volunteer of
the Week for her outstanding sup-
port to the community.
Ortega has volunteered with the
Tropic Times for the past year.
She states what she likes most
about volunteering is having the op-
portunity to learn various computer
skills, courses that are made avail-
able to her and the opportunity to
improve her English skills.
Her most rewarding experience is
seeing the outcome of her work in the
Tropic Times.
In her spare time, Ortega enjoys


Sgt. Tywanna Gordon (Tropic 77Times)
Dissenia Ortega is the U.S. Army
South Volunteer of the Week.
giving her dog and two parakeets a
lot of attention.
Ortega is a native of Panama.


Sgt. Tywanna Gordon (Tropic Times)
Who's the Headhunter of the Month?
Sgt. David E. Shaffer is the Headhunter of the Month for Headquarters
and Headquarters Company, Theater Support Brigade. He is congratu-
lated by 1st Sgt. Paul Kelly, first sergeant of HHC, TSB. Shaffer com-
peted against three others for the Headhunter title Monday at the com-
pany headquarters. Congratulations Shaffer.


This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forc-
es Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Contents of the Tropic
Times do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.


Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004.
Building 405, Field Printing Plant, Corozal One West
Phone: 285-6612/4666 or FAX 285-6613.
E-Mail: pbouchard@usarso-lanl.army.mil
USARSO LAN address: pbouchard@sopa@usarso
Tropic Times on the World Wide Web at: www.tropictimes.com
E-Mail: daniel-amores@usa.net

Commander in Chief........................................................... Gen. Charles E. Wilhelm
Director, U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs .............. Col. Vicente C. Ogilvie
U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office .................................. (305) 437-1200
Editor ............... .........................................................Sgt. Paul Bouchard
Assistant Editor .......... ...................... ............................Sgt. Tywanna Gordon
W riter/Editor ............................................................ .........................D aniel A m ores
Writer/Editor ............................................Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett
W riter/Editor .................................................................................... . Griselda Sterling


W riter/Editor ......................................... ...... .........................Carm ela Lowe Gobem
Office Automation Clerk ......... ...............................................Tina Summerton
Volunteer .............................................................................. .............Dissenia Ortega
U.S. Army South Commanding General ..............Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr.
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office .........................................................288-3143
Public Affairs Officer ....................................................Lt. Col. Byron D. Conover
Deputy Public Affairs Officer ................................................Capt. Larry D. Winchel
Command Information....................... ....... ............................Gaby Capriles
NCOIC ......................................................Sgt. 1st Class Christopher C. Calkins
Editor .................................................................... ............... Spc. D eborah L. Long
24th Wing Commander .........................................................Col. Gregory L. Trebon
24th Wing Public Affairs Office ...................................... ................ 284-5459
Chief of Public Affairs ...........................................1st Lt. Joseph Della Vedova
NCOIC .............................................................Tech. Sgt. Miconna J. Boaldin
Editor ............................................................................. StaffSgt. John B. Dendy IV
Director, Joint Interagency Task Force South ..................Col. Barry J. Chisholm
Joint Interagency Task Force South Public Affairs Office .....................284-7502


Congratulations, Sir!
Lt. Col. Daniel McCallum, the U.S. Army South-Staff Judge Advocate, was pro-
moted to colonel May 3 during a ceremony in the Simon Bolivar Conference Room
in Building 95. Friends and family surrounded him as his wife Diane and Maj. Gen.
Philip R. Kensinger Jr., USARSO commanding general, pinned on his rank.


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News Tropic Times
News May 7,19993


Air Force Quarterly Awards Ceremony


story by Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV
24th Wing Public Affairs
Team Howard held its second quarter quarter)
awards ceremony April 23 at the Howard Theater.
The second quarter award categories, selected
names and duty titles are: Airman of the Quarter-Se-
nior Airman Larry Knoll, 24th Security Forces Squad-
ron; NCO of the Quarter-Staff Sgt. Tim Dimon, 24th
Security Forces Squadron; Senior NCO of the Quar-
ter-Master Sgt. Robert Spencer, 24th Medical Group;
Company Grade Officer of the Quarter--st Lt. Justin
Anderson, 24th Weather Squadron; Civilian Manual
Grade Employee of the Quarter-Kenneth Wampler,
24th Civil Engineer Squadron; Civilian Non-Manual Em-
ployee of the Quarter-Maria Eleta, 24th Comptroller
Squadron; and Civilian Manager of the Quarter-Rob-
ert Harris, 24th Transportation Squadron.
Key player! Unit's Best! Model senior NCO! Re-
ceived laudatory praise! True professional! Customer
focused! Extremely versatile! These were some of the
words used to describe job performance, self-improve-
ment and other accomplishments of this quarter's final-
ists.
Knoll's performance on Howard's intrusion detec-
tion system contributed to a 30-percent decrease in
thefts on Howard. Dimon not only got slots in the
Army Air Assault School for his fellow airmen, but the
personnel selection procedures he put together helped
ensure 100 percent of those airmen graduated.
Spencer's role as a Task Force-Redeployment member
included responsibility for transferring medical airmen
and equipment to gaining units as part of the 18-bed
medical and surgical unit closure at Howard. Anderson
became a player in weather closure actions at Howard
by routing tactical weather and communication equip-
ment to counterparts at 10 gaining bases.
Wampler is now a nationally-registered emergency
medical technician, and he prevented buildings in
Panama's capitol from possibly burning when he was
among Air Force people helping out during a ware-
house fire there. Eleta maintains a 3.7 grade point aver-


Staff Sgt. Mike Boquette (U.S. Air Force)
Col. Gregory L. Trebon, 24th Wing Commander (far left) and 24th Wing Command Chief Master
Sgt. Curtis Brownhill (far right), flank Howard's 1999 second quarter quarterly awards finalists
(from left of Trebon): 1st Lt. Justin Anderson, Master Sgt. Robert Spencer, Staff Sgt. Tim Dimon,
Senior Airman Larry Knoll, Robert Harris, Maria Eleta, and Kenneth Wampler.


age at Florida State University, and she recouped a
whopping $150,000 for taxpayers through aggressive
research on outstanding travel vouchers. Harris re-engi-
neered local aircrew vehicle dispatch processes to en-
sure no transportation-related aircraft departure delays
from Howard.
The award program results were acknowledged by
Col. Gregory L. Trebon, 24th Wing commander, in an
April 23 memo: "It is with great pleasure that I con-
gratulate our Team Howard award winners for the


Jan.-March period. Though we publicly recognized
both our nominees and our winners at our Team
Howard Quarterly Awards ceremony last week, I'd ap-
preciate your further acknowledgment of their strong
performance throughout your respective units.
I am very proud to have all of these outstanding
people working on our team. Without their valuable
contributions, day-in and day-out, we could not get our
job done. Many thanks, and again, my congratula-
tions."


Household goods shipment update


story by Jim Winfrey
USARSO Director of Logistics
FORT CLAYTON - Now that we
have entered the month of May, the peak
of the drawdown, I would like to take the
time to thank all of you for your patience
during this turbulent evolution. A PCS is a
stressful time that requires lots of plan-
ning, and I would like to share some infor-
mation, as well as tips, with you.
During the month of April, the Trans-
portation Office booked 652 household
goods shipments. Our projections did not
show this amount for April; and as a re-
sult, our surge capacity was used one
month earlier than expected.
Additionally, as of April 29, there were
over 680 shipments booked for the month
of May, and the first week of June is also
closed out. Therefore, in order to provide a
better service to all our future customers,
we will not be accepting changes to pack
out dates for the month of May.
The Transportation Office is doing ev-
erything possible to assist you in the ship-
ment of your household goods, but you
must be aware of some important issues. If
you have been in possession of PCS orders
for more than three months and are just
now coming to the Transportation Office,
you will not get an appointment for the


month of May. You will get the earliest
packing date available, which is currently
June 7, or maybe even June 14 now.
Do not wait to make your appointment
with the Transportation Office. There are
only three agents that are packing household
goods out. Even though these agents have in-
creased their capacity to accommodate our
exodus from Panama, and the Transportation
Office has provided material to assist them in
continuing to move personnel, there is a limi-
tation to the number of shipments they can
do every day.
Since, Jan. 1, there have been approxi-
mately 2835 families requiring household
goods shipment. As of April 30, 1564
shipments have been picked up. With an
estimated 680 shipments already sched-
uled for May, there is a remainder of almost
600 shipments. The shipping agents will be
operating at surge capacity during May,
with little feasibility to handle emergency
situations. Your patience in this process is
greatly appreciated. Overbooking the
agents will not only increase your frustra-
tion, but will cause inconveniences to other
members as well. Emergencies will be
handled on a case by case basis.
I thank you again for your patience and
understanding and wish you good luck in
your next assignment.


Space available travel becomes


more limited at Howard AFB


story by Master Sgt. Dennis
Broughton
640th Air Mobility Support Squadron
The 640th Air Mobility Support
Squadron leaves Howard Air Force
Base on June 1. In keeping with our
unit closure plans, the Air Mobility
Command Passenger Terminal will
close its doors on Monday, but
this does not mean there will not be
space available travel opportuni-
ties.
Space available travel will still
be a possibility, but much more lim-
ited than in the past. Things will
certainly not be the same but we
will work hard to provide the same
level of quality customer service
you have grown to expect from Air
Mobility Command's Passenger
Service operation.
On Monday we will move from
building 228 to building 231, the air
freight terminal on Howard AFB. To
enter this facility, you must approach
the entrance between buildings 227
and 231.
Here you'll find a telephone with
instructions on what number to call to
contact our passenger service repre-
sentatives. It's necessary to restrict
entry into this facility due to force
protection concerns.
They will escort you to the space
available sign up area where you will
be briefed on travel procedures and_
allowed to sign-up for space available
travel. Although our location
changes our hours remain the same -
5 a.m. to 6 p.m.


Due to our ongoing drawdown,
space available sign up must now be
done in person and we will no longer
be able to accept space available sign
up via E-mail or fax.
All flight information will be avail-
able on a recorded message by call-
ing 284-3353. As in the past you will
still be responsible for showing up for
the space available roll call and you
will need to have all the proper travel
documentation.
AMC will not transport person-
nel to or from Tocumen Interna-
tional Airport. It will be the
passenger's responsibility to meet
an AMC contractor at Tocumen
IAP. Information on when and
where to meet the contractor will be
provided to those members se-
lected for a flight.
We will still be able to take all cat-
egories of space available passen-
gers, and we can still ship pets out
space available.
One new option available to unac-
companied personnel assigned in
Panama is dependent travel. If you
are assigned to a unit in Panama,
your commander can now sign a let-
ter stating that the sponsor is on an
unaccompanied tour assigned to their
unit.
The family member then can travel
category five into and out of Panama
without the sponsor, or they may
travel with the sponsor in category
three, ordinary leave.
For more information, call Cus-
tomer Service Personnel at 284-3551.


DOIM Mail and Distribution Center Needs
Your Help
FORT CLAYTON (DOIM) - Customers are reminder of the following:
1. Only unit mail clerks are authorized to post and pick up official mail from
the MDC. Personal mail is not authorized with one exception - relocating
personnel are allowed to mail out change-of-address cards, available from the
post office, by presenting a copy of their official travel orders.
2. Do not mail office equipment, furniture, supplies, noncurrent working
files, computers and other IT equipment.
3. Due to a manpower shortage and space limitation, unit mail clerks, in or-
der to be attended, must make an appointment when mailing more than 5 par-
cels. Unit mail clerks without appointment will be required to return at an ap-
pointed time on another date.










4 Tropic Times
May 7, 1999


4wNews


MWR offers plenty at Roosevelt Roads NS


story and photo by Bob Appin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
U.S. NAVAL STATION ROOSEVELT
ROADS, Puerto Rico (USARSO PAO) -
The Special Operations Command -
South members have many Morale,
Welfare and Recreation activities to en-
joy here such as beaches, a marina and
exercise facilities.
Many of the MWR activities are lo-
cated on this naval base. One of the
more popular areas is the "All Hands"
beach. This beach is about a 10-
minute drive from the furthest distance
on post.
There is no fee to use the beach and
if you forget to bring your beverages
and food, don't worry because there is
an MWR beach hut (kiosk) that sells
these items on the beach front.
"We are open on weekends and holi-
days from noon to 4 p.m.," said William


Montafiez Torres, MWR attendant of
the "All Hands" beach hut.
For those who may be too busy to
drive down to the beach, there is the
Bundy Fitness Center.
"We have a weight room, Nautilus
machines, a racquetball court and bas-
ketball court," said Luis M. Rodriguez,
recreation aid at the Bundy Fitness
Center.
In addition, the fitness center has
saunas as well as a swimming pool that
is currently being repaired, Rodriguez
added.
"The marina offers many different
services which include rental of boats,
kayaks and swimming gear," said
Sedith I. Ayala, cashier/clerk of the
Pelican's Roost MWR Marina shop.
There are services such as slip fees
for living-aboard or not, trailer space as
well as launch ramp fees, added Ayala.


Bathers frolic in the waves at a beach in Puerto Rico.
There are several other MWR activi- that the SOCSOUTH members will be
ties such as bowling lanes and the golf able to use to re-create themselves.
course that includes a driving range


Successful security sweeps key to national security


This story is courtesy of the
U.S. Army South Security Man-
ager Office.
FORT CLAYTON - The
following procedures will pro-
vide security managers or ac-
countable officers the founda-
tion for a very successful
counterintelligence security
sweep.
Strict adherence is impera-
tive in order to safeguard the
national security of the United
States.
Coordinate a security sweep
fifteen days before vacating an
office space, building or any


other structure housing a unit
and/or organization.
The area to be inspected
should be prepared in the fol-
lowing manner:
*The area will be neat and
orderly.
*Remove all trash prior to
any sweep.
*Remove all personal items
from the offices prior to inspec-
tion.
*Remove all objects from
desks and workstations and
remove drawers. Place drawers
upside down on top of the
desk/workstation or on the


floor.
*Clean trashcans inside
and out. Remove all plastic
bags from the trashcans and
place the trashcans upside
down on the floor.
*Remove all objects from
walls.
*If the ceiling is made up
of ceiling tiles, remove at least
three tiles from the ceiling in
order to facilitate inspection. If
a building has an attic, clean it
and have it unlocked and ac-
cessible.
+Empty file cabinets and
pull out drawers.


*Empty security contain-
ers and pull out drawers. Reset
combinations to the standard
50-25-50.
*Unlock all inspectable ar-
eas. If any room requires a ci-
pher lock code, this must be
unlocked as well.
*Move all furniture ap-
proximately eight inches away
from walls and doors.
This will help you as you
clean your respective areas and
facilitate the security inspec-
tion.
After a room is swept, do not
allow personnel or equipment


to re-enter the area.
The security manager or
accountable officer will en-
sure the removal, transporta-
tion and/or destruction of
classified and unclassified in-
formation and the proper dis-
position of automated infor-
mation systems and/or media
is conducted in accordance
with established guidelines.
For more information or to
schedule and appointment
please contact Evelyn White or
Lucy Ortiz, U. S. Army South
Security Manager at 288-3512/
13.


Puerto Rico Congregations ready for incoming troops,

looks at military impact in church history, development


This article is courtesy of the Episcopal Cathedral
of St. John the Baptist in San Juan Puerto Rico.
SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO- The English-speak-
ing churches and congregations in the greater San Juan
metropolitan area are preparing to welcome military mem-
bers from Panama to their new home in Puerto Rico,
"The Island of Enchantment."
The leaders of many of these churches are in contact
with the local military chaplains-some of whom are
themselves new to the island-to offer their assistance
as the arriving personnel look to find.a church home for
themselves and their families.
On an interesting if not ironic note, one of these San
Juan English-speaking churches, the Episcopal Cathe-
dral of St. John the Baptist, likely owes its very exist-
ence to the arrival of U.S. military troops to Puerto
Rico-those who arrived in 1898 during the United
States' war with Spain.
At the time of the Spanish-American War, there were
only two Anglican (Church of England) churches in
Puerto Rico: one in Ponce on the southern coast, and
one on the small island of Vieques to the east.
These churches had been founded under the aus-
pices of the Anglican Bishop of the island of Antigua
to serve a Dutch, English and immigrant West In-
dian population.
On July 25, 1898, more than 16,000 U.S. troops,
under the command of General Nelson A. Miles,
landed at Guanica, Puerto Rico on the southern coast
of the island. The forces took that town, moved
immediately to Ponce a few miles away and soon
proceeded north toward San Juan.
Before engaging the main Spanish force there,
however, hostilities between the United States and
Spain ended on August 12 with the signing of a
peace protocol.
The formal document of peace between the two
nations, the Treaty of Paris, was signed on Decem-
ber 10,1898.
The United States Army became the governing
force in Puerto Rico and the capital of San Juan saw
the presence of several thousand troops for the next
year and a half.


As the only English-speaking, non-Roman Catholic
denomination on the island at that time, the Anglican
church swiftly moved to begin services in San Juan to
meet the needs of the Protestant church-going military
personnel.
The newly formed Anglican mission congregation
of St. John the Baptist had its first service on March 12,
1899 in a hall on the plaza of what is now known as Old
San Juan.
Approximately half of the parishioners were mem-
bers of the U.S. military occupation force.
The year 1901 not only saw the transferal of the An-
glican churches in Puerto Rico to the jurisdiction of the
Episcopal Church of the United States, but also the with-
drawal of a large contingent of the U.S. military from
San Juan. St. John's average attendance at services
plummeted.
However, the church continued to grow and on
Christmas Eve, 1901, St. John's became a full-fledged
parish church with its own Rector. A year later, the
cornerstone for St.
40John's first


building was laid in Old San Juan.
St. John's remained at the Old San Juan plaza loca-
tion until 1930, when it moved to its current location in
what has been called "New" San Juan, to reflect the
growth and population shift in the greater metropolitan
area.
In 1938, the parish of St. John became the Cathedral
for the Episcopal Diocese of Puerto Rico.
The Episcopal Cathedral of St. John the Baptist con-
tinues to meet the needs of San Juan's English-speak-
ing Episcopalians and Anglicans.
The makeup of St. John's English-speaking con-
gregation is multiracial, multinational and
multicultural and as such, is similar to that of the first
St. John's congregation of 1901 Old San Juan: U.S.
Continentals, West Indians, British, and Puerto
Ricans, several of whom are active-duty or retired
members of the U.S. military.
The Episcopal Cathedral of St. John is located at
1401 Ponce de Leon Avenue and the Rector is Fr. David
Silva Howell. Regular Sunday services of the English-
speaking congregation are held at 8:00 a.m. and 11:00
a.m. (St. John's is also home to a separate Spanish-
speaking congregation that holds it Sunday service at
9:15 a.m.). The church telephone number is (787) 722-
3254 and its website is www.hows.net/00907ECOSJ.
Other English-speaking churches and services in the
Greater San Juan area include:
Abundant Life Fellowship by the Sea - 727-2101
Calvary Baptist Church (S.B.C.) - 782-8632
Calvary Chapel of Puerto Rico - 744-1651
Freedom Chapel Assembly of God - 721-4187
Grace Lutheran Church - 722-5372
Isla Verde Baptist Church - 761-4206
Our Lady of Perpetual Sorrow Roman Catholic
Church -721-1015
Palmas Community Church - 850-5902
Park Gardens Church of Christ - 748-3025
Revival and Restoration Fellowship - 722-2688
Second Union Church - 720-4423
Stella Maris Roman Catholic Church - 723-2240
Union Church of San Juan - 726-0280
Wesleyan Community Church - 720-2595











* News


Tropic Times
May 7, 1999


TEAMS to shut down operations


by Lt. Col. Don Potter
TEAMS Commander
FORT KOBBE - The Theater Equipment And Main-
tenance Site located at Fort Kobbe Panama shut down
its operation April 30.
TEAMS came into being as a result of a concept
Col. Clyde Vaughn had while serving on the staff of
U.S. Army South and as a Task Force Commander in
Panama during the 1980's.
The idea was to have a set of engineer equipment
and base camp supplies, staged in Panama, which could
be utilized by company size Oversea Deployments for
Training rather than continuing to pay the expensive
sea and air lift that would be required to transport this
type equipment from the states. This idea became a
reality in 1993 when USARSO and National Guard
Bureau agreed to a plan.
The initial equipment and supplies TEAMS would
be provided by USARSO. This was done using equip-
ment that was excess to USARSO units. The manning
and support of the equipment would be provided by
NGB through the use of Active Guard Reserve, Active
Duty for Special Work and rotational maintenance
units on their annual training.
The first year saw the establishment of the organiza-
tion and collection of about 20 pieces of equipment
and some basic supplies needed for a base camp. As
the concept and idea took root, TEAMS expanded to a
20 acre compound with buildings, a maintenance fa-
cility and headquarters building.
The amount of equipment and supplies continued to
grow as USARSO drew down in size. During this time
an agreement was made with the 167th Corps Support
Command of Alabama Army National Guard to supply
regular rotations of maintenance units to TEAMS


while other states would be recruited at the bi-annual
Oversea Contingency Conferences which are spon-
sored by USARSO. By this time, TEAMS had also es-
tablished a Supply Support Agency with Standard Army
Retail Supply System-1 and a Property Book section
using Standard Property Book System-Redesign. The
maintenance activity used Unit Level Logistics Sys-
tems and Standard Army Maintenance System in its
operation.
By 1995, TEAMS had grown to having over 450
major end items, and enough base camp supplies to
support two 500 man base camps and a 100 man base
camp simultaneously. There were 44 rotations of 40
service members each coming to TEAMS in overlap-
ping weeks.
The rotations were locally billeted, fed and trans-
ported at USARSO expense. In fact, USARSO and
NGB split the transportation cost from home station to
Panama and return, which made going to TEAMS not
only a good recruitment tool, real time sensitive MOS
training, but also a financial benefit to the state and
unit, as well as to USARSO.
The original mission of TEAMS was primary sup-
port to the ARNG ODT's and back-up support for the
Joint Chiefs of Staff exercises that took place within
the theater. In 1996, this mission changed when ODT's
were dropped and TEAMS became the primary sup-
port for all JCS excersies.
That meant coordinating, preparing, loading and
shipping all equipment and supplies for the two major
.New Horizon JCS excersies (one for the USAR and
one for ARNG) and all other exercises for FY97 and
FY98. Once the ODTs and JCS exercises were com-
pleted for FY96, TEAMS had only 100 days of main-
tenance time in which to reconstitute and bring this


equipment up to fully mission capable level for re-
lease to the next JCS task force. We coordinated,
loaded and moved this equipment to the Port of
Balboa, where TEAMS, with the support of MTMC,
preformed the Port Support Activity. TEAMS also
built, requisitioned and loaded the necessary Pre-
scribed Load List for each exercise.
While the exercises were on going down range,
TEAMS supported each exercise and anyone else in
theater, for its CLIX repair parts. Additionally,
TEAMS sent maintenance back-up support personnel
to the ARNG exercises when requested
TEAMS has supported exercises which have re-
sulted in the following completed projects: The build-
ing of over 300 schools, over 50 clinics, nearly 400
KM of roads built, 50 wells dropped, over 200 water
pups installed, 50 bridges erected, and many other
projects completed within the theater.
TEAMS has had the support of over 6000 rotational
guardsmen during its existence in accomplishing its
many and varied mission, In fact, no USARSO exercise
or add on missions are completed in theater without
some form of TEAMS involvement.
As of April of this year, about 30 pieces of rolling
stock and 19 milvans of equipment and supplies were
sent to USARSO's new headquarters in Puerto Rico
where a USAR operated "TEAMS" will be established,
under different mission guidance and name.
As TEAMS closed operations, I would like to thank
the thousands of rotational Guard men and women, the
numerous ADSW supporters, the coordination and su-
pervision provided by the AGR staff, the limiless sup-
port from USARSO DCSLOG, MTMC and DOL. Most
importantly, I thank 1SG Mark Adkins, who has served
as "TOP" for over 3 3/4 years.


Cold War Recognition Certificates approved


HOWARD AFB (Public Affairs Of-
fice) - In accordance with section
1084 of the Fiscal Year 1998 National
Defense Authorization Act, the Secre-
tary of Defense approved awarding Cold
War Recognition Certificates to all
members of the armed forces and quali-
fied federal government civilian person-
nel.
The time frame covered under the act
is Sept. 2, 1945, to Dec. 26, 1991.
The certificate is for those who
faithfully and honorably served the
United States anytime during the Cold
War era including active-duty, National
Guard and Reservists, and civilians.
Those who are currently active duty
military or civilian employees of the
U.S. government are also eligible.
To receive the certificate, applicants
must certify or prove that their service
was "faithful and honorable" and that
they served for any period during that
time.
Any official government or military
document with recipient's name, social
security number/military service num-
ber/foreign service number and date of
service is acceptable.
Military service numbers were issued
to members of the armed forces before
social security numbers were used to
identify personnel.
The changeover to social security
numbers occurred in the late 1960s, so
many retirees who are eligible for the
certificate might have only a military
service number on their supporting
documentation.
The foreign service number is used
to maintain records for foreign nation-
als who work for the U.S. government
and who do not have social security
numbers.
Make note that the number supplied
on your initial request, be it SSN, MSN,
or FSN, must match the number sup-
plied on your supporting documentation.
Examples of acceptable documenta-
tion include a Leave and Earnings State-


ment for military or a SF51 for civil-
ians. Applicants are asked to send a copy
of your documentation not the original
document since the documents cannot
be returned.
The certificate may be awarded post-
humously to those whose relatives apply
on their behalf.
There is no charge for a Cold War
Recognition Certificate. The program is
scheduled to run for 10 years, so there
is plenty of time to send in your request
and supporting documentation. You have
up to one year after requesting a certifi-
cate to supply the supporting documen-
tation.
Orderly rooms may apply for the en-
tire squadron or unit. They must supply
the names and identification numbers
for each of the recipients.
The certificates will be mailed in one
package to the address provided. Mili-
tary groups should be advised that Army
MILPER Message 99-125 contains de-
tailed procedures for applying as a unit.
While the message applies specifi-
cally to Army personnel, the other ser-
vices have agreed to follow the same
procedures.
The easiest way to request a certifi-
cate is by using the U.S. or international
request forms which can be found on the
coldwar.army.mil web page.
The site is secure, but if you are un-
comfortable sending your social secu-
rity number over the web, you may send
in a letter to request a certificate.
Also note that any request must con-
tain the words "I certify that my service
was honorable and faithful" or it will be
rejected.
You can either mail the package to
Cold War Recognition, 4035 Ridge Top
Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22030, fax it to
1-800-723-9262 or 1-703-275-6749,
or e-mail it to coldwar@fairfax-
emh 1.Army.mil.
The coldwar.army.mil webpage is
linked to the official Army Home Page
and can be accessed from that web page.


The U.S. Army is the executive agent
for this effort for the entire federal gov-
ernment. Ceremonies are not required
to present these certificates and the
Army's goal is to respond to each appli-


cant within seven weeks. Note that no
medal has been authorized or issued for
Cold War Recognition and contractors
and volunteers are not eligible.


On Mother's Day

by Carmela Lowe Gobern-
Tropic Times Staff
Sunday, May 9, is Mother's Day. This
celebration, which originated in the
United States in 1907, was the idea of
Anna M. Jarvis, a teacher from Grafton,
W. Va., who never married nor had
children, but was concerned because
she felt many mothers were neglected
and unappreciated.
Jarvis was extremely attached to
her mother, Anna Maria Reese Jarvis,
and took care of her for many years.
Her mother, who was the founder of
the Mother's Day Work Clubs, died on
May 9, 1905, at the age of 73.
Two years later, on the anniversary of her/
mother's death, May 12, 1907, Jarvis initiated a
campaign to gain support for the observance of a
day devoted to mothers.
As a result of her efforts, in 1908, a service was
held at Andrews Methodist Church in Grafton to tribute
mothers. Carnations, her mother's favorite flowers, were
furnished at the service by Jarvis and given to those in at-
tendance to symbolize the purity, fidelity, prayers and en-
during love of mothers.
Today, carnations continue to symbolize motherhood. The tradition includes
the wearing of white carnations on Mother's Day as a symbol that one's mother
has died, and.red carnations as a symbol of a living mother.
In 1914 a resolution was passed by the U.S. Congress designating the second
Sunday in May as Mother's Day, a day of public expression of love and rever-
ence for mothers.
Today, Mother's Day is celebrated worldwide with various activities: It is
observed in schools; there are mother-daughter banquets; programs are spon-
sored by churches and clubs; mothers are guests of honor at programs, lun-
cheons and dinners; and flowers, gifts, and greetings cards are sent not only to
one's mother, but also to grandmothers, aunts, mothers-in-law, foster mothers,
stepmothers and godmothers.
















Sports


Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama
Serving the Joint Community


Air Force
The Howard Fitness *
Sports Center is spon-
soring a Basketball
Tournament May
21 - 23. Sign-
up is under-
way. Tourna-
ment is open
to the first eight
teams to sign up.
Maximum 12 per, -
son roster. Coaches
meeting 3 p.m.May 19.
The HFSC invites you to shape
up for the millennium' by partici-
paring inthe 14th Annual May Fit-
ness Month. Win T-Shirts, a $150
sports apparel gift certificate,
phone cards, wrist pouches, sports
towels, neck pouches and even a
trip for four to see the Brickyard
400 Car Race in Indianapolis,
with airfare, hotel and rental car
included. There is also a Armed
Forces Day 5K Run/1.5 mile
walk scheduled. For more infor-
mation, call the HFSC.
The Howard Bowling Cen-
ter is looking for
bowlers in the
upcoming "Fun
M ixe d
Leagues." There
is also reduced
price bowling on Mon-
day and Tuesday. All
games on these days
are $1 with free
shoes. Bowl three
games and get one free. For more
information, call 284-4190.
Free aerobics classes are held
at 5:45 a.m. and 9 a.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays. Also at
4:45 p.m. Monday - Fridays. For
more information, call the HFSC.
For more information on Air
Force sports, call the Howard Fit-
ness Sports Center at 284-3451.

Army
The hours of the Clayton
Bowling Center are as follows: 9
a.m. - 8 p.m. Monday - Thurs-
days, 9 a.m. - 10 p.m. Friday,
noon - 9 p.m. Saturday and 1 - 7
p.m. Sunday.
Is your child having a birthday
and you're wondering what to do?
Why not have a Kiddie birthday
party at the Bowling Center. A spe-
cial package is available. For more
information, call 288-5460.
Aerobic classes are available at
the Fort Kobbe Elementary School
Gym. The cost is $1 per person.
Classes are 5:45 - 6:45 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays, and 9 - 10 a.m.
on Saturday. For more informa-
tion, call 284-3399.
Step aerobics instruction is
available at Reeder Fitness Center.
For more information, call 288-
5201.
For more information on
Army sports call DCA Sports at
288-5610/3866 or the Reeder
Gym at 288-4713/7861.


Panama beats Howard 91-70


Howard Youth Activities director coaches Olympic hopefuls


by Tech. Sgt. Miconna J. Boaldin
NCOIC, 24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - The Panamanian
International Basketball team beat
Howard Air Force Base 91-70 in a late
April scrimmage designed to prepare
both teams for future challenges.
The Panamanian team is now off to
Cuba with their sights set on the Pan Am
Games, the Americas Cup in Puerto
Rico, and eventually the Olympics.
The team is made up of college play-
ers that have returned to Panama from
colleges in various states throughout the
U.S.
Their coach is none other than
Vicente Duncan, director of Youth Ac-
tivities at Howard. Duncan played on
the team himself for eight years after
lettering in the sport for four years in
college.
The Howard squad is made up in part
of Vincent Henderson of the 24th Ser-
vices Squadron, along with Staff Sgt.
Robert Briggs, 24th Security Forces
Squadron; and Tech. Sgt. Bernon Mills
and Senior Airman Tharin Payne, both of
the 24th Supply Squadron.
The group also makes up the Howard
squad competing for Air Combat
Command's 3-on-3 Basketball Tourna-
ment at Offut AFB, Neb. If they are one
of the top-two teams there, they will go
on to a regional tournament.
Henderson was very pleased with his
team's score of 70 and keeping the
Panamanians under 100. "These guys
are Olympic contenders," he said. "Not
to mention we are just a group of guys
who like to play ball. Most of our play-
ers are older and they hadn't even had a
practice together as a team before the
scrimmage with the Panamanian team."
Duncan, meanwhile, is optimistic
about his team's future. "I never made it
to the Olympics as a player but maybe I
can make it as a coach," Duncan said. "I
am very confident in our team. They are


~�/
A ,I .,.
.7 -,~

A ..,~~1 �



yAr


Staff Sgt. Norma Martinez-Galvan (U.S. Air Force)

Jason Wallace jumps for the hoop while Staff Sgt. Robert Briggs takes
the charge. Marine 1st Sgt. Sidney Thomas, #13; Tech. Sgt. Kevin McGee
and Derick Simmons, far right, wait for a possible rebound. Wallace and
Simmons are members of the Panamanian International Basketball team
coached by Howard's own Vicente Duncan, director of Youth Activities.
Briggs, 24th Security Forces Squadron; Thomas, Company E, 2nd Bat-
talion, 2nd Marines; and McGee, 24th Medical Group; all volunteered to
play for the Howard team against the Panamanians.


very young and very athletic.
"I am optimistic about our chances
to reach the Olympics,", he said. "We
have a good nucleus of players with an


average age of 28 and all of them having
college experience. We have a very
good chance of making it to the Olym-
pics and even winning."


Page 6


May 7, 1999


Upcoming runs
A 9K run organized by the Isthmus Road Runners is scheduled for 7 a.m. Sunday, starting at Parque Omar in Via Porras.
The Panama Armed Forces Running Association is sponsoring 2, 3 and 5-mile runs 7 a.m. May 15 starting at the Fort
Clayton Pedestrian Gate. The Gold Coast Triathlon is set for 7 a.m. May 22 in Portobelo. This event is organized by John
Collins - founder of the Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon. For more information on runs, call Allen Jones at 288-3310.


~~,~Y- CIY*ISC*IIY

k:~-~c~rs--~











Sports


Tropic Times7
May 7, 1999


National League
East
W L Pct. GB
Atlanta 19 8 .704 -
New York 17 11 .607 2 1/2
Philadelphia 14 13 .519 5
Montreal 8 18 .308 10 1/2
Florida 6 22 .214 13 1/2

Central
w L Pct GB
Houston 17 TO .630 -
St. Louis 15 11 .577 1 1/2
Chicago 13 12 .520 3
Pittsburgh 13 13 .500 3 1/2
Milwaukee 13 14 .481 4
Cincinnati 11 15 .423 5 1/2

West
W L Pct. GB
San Francisco 17 12 .586 -
Los Angeles 16 12 .57 1 1/2
Arizona 15 14 .517 2
Colorado 11 13 .458 3 1/2
San Diego 10 17 .370 6

American League
East
W L Pct. GB
New York 17 9 .654 -
Tampa Bay 15 14 .517 31/2
Toronto 15 14 .517 3 1/2
Boston 12 14 .462 5
Baltimore 9 17 .346 8

Central
W L Pct. GB
Cleveland 18 8 .692 -
Chicago 13 12 .520 4 1/2
Detroit 13 15 .464 6
Kansas City 11 14 .440 61/2
Minnesota 11 16 .407 71/2

West
W L Pct. GB
Texas 15 12 .556 -
Oakland 14 15 .483 2
Seattle 13 14 .481 2
Anaheim 13 15 .464 2 1/2





Eastern Conference

W L Pct GB
z-Miami 33 16 .673 -
x-Orlando 32 17 .653 1
x-Philadelphia 27 22 .551 6
x-New York 26 23 .531 7
Boston 19 30 .388 14
Washington 18 31 .367 15
New Jersej 15 34 .306 18

Central Division
y-lndiana 33 17 .660 -
x-Atlanta 30 19 .612 2 1/2
x-Detroit 29 20 .592 3 1/2
x-Milwaukee 28 21 .571 4 1/2
Charlotte 25 24 .510 7 1/2
Cleveland 22 27 .449 101/2
Toronto 22 27 .449 10 1/2
Chicago 13 36 .265 19 1/2

Western Conference
Midwest Division
w L Pct GB
x-Utah 37 13 .740 -
x-San Antonio 36 13 .735 1/2
x-Houston 30 19 .612 6 1/2
x-Minnesota 25 24 .510 111/2
Dallas 19 31 .380 18
Denver 14 35 .286 22 1/2
Vancouver 8 41 .163 28 1/2
Pacific Division
y-Portland 35 't4 .714 -
x-L.A. Lakers 30 19 .612 5
x-Sacramento 26 23 .531 9
x-Phoenix 26 23 .531 9
Seattle 24 25 .490 11
Golden State 21 28 .429 14
L.A. Clippers 9 40 .184 26

x-clinched playoff berth
y-clinched division title
z-clinched conference title


Road to the NBA Championships


by Chris Sheridan
AP Basketball Writer
The road to the NBA championship
will go through San Antonio as long as
the Spurs can continue winning. As for
Allen Iverson, the next time he walks on
the court, he'll be known as the league's
leading scorer.
The Spurs clinched the No. 1 seed in
the West and homecourt advantage
throughout the playoffs with an 88-81
victory at Golden State. They'll begin
their postseason Sunday against Minne-
sota.
It'll be a different postseason this
year, with five playoff teams from last
season, Seattle, Charlotte, Cleveland,
New Jersey and - of course - the de-
fending champion Chicago Bulls, sitting
this one out.
The last night of the regular season
was a wild one Wednesday night, with
each of the 16 playoff teams having to
wait until the games ended to learn their
futures.
When the last game ended at 1:09
a.m. EST, the postseason picture for this
lockout-abbreviated, hectic season fi-
nally became clear.
In the first round, it will be Miami-
New York, Indiana-Milwaukee, Orlando-
Philadelphia and Atlanta-Detroit in the
Eastern Conference.
In the West, it will be San Antonio-
Minnesota, Portland-Phoenix, Utah-Sac-
ramento and L.A. Lakers-Houston.
"Now the fun starts," said Miami
Heat coach Pat Riley, whose team will
renew its rivalry with the Knicks. "You
can never say that something crazy isn't
going to happen."
In the statistical races, Iverson won
the scoring title over Shaquille O'Neal,
Chris Webber won the rebounding title,
Jason Kidd led in assists, Kendall Gill
led in steals and Alonzo Mourning led in
blocked shots.
On the scoreboard, it was Philadel-
phia 105, Detroit 100 in overtime; the
Los Angeles Lakers 119, Portland 91;
New York 101, Miami 88; Orlando 103,
Chicago 83; Houston 95, Denver 88;
Atlanta 100, Washington 92; Sacra-
mento 99, Vancouver 95; Phoenix 100,
Minnesota 96; New Jersey 115, Mil-
waukee 107; Toronto 96, Cleveland 87;
Charlotte 133, Boston 129 in double
overtime and Seattle 107, the Los Ange-
les Clippers 105.
Spurs 88, Warriors 81
Golden State pulled within two
points on a 3-pointer by John Starks
with 4:36 left. They got no closer, how-
ever, as San Antonio went 8-of-10 from
the foul line in the closing minutes.
Tim Duncan had 12 of his 28 points
in the fourth quarter and David
Robinson, who played his best ball of
the season down the stretch, had 23
points and a season-high 20 rebounds.
The Spurs went 31-5 after starting the
season 6-8 and finished the season with
five straight wins.
"This is step one in what we want to
accomplish. You build on it. You feel
good about yourselves," Robinson said.
"I still feel Utah is the team we have to
get over (in the playoffs), because
they're so experienced and so good."
76ers 105, Pistons 100, OT
At Philadelphia, Iverson won the
scoring title over O'Neal with 33 points.
Iverson hit a clutch jumper with 8 sec-
onds left in regulation, then dribbled out
the final seconds of overtime - laugh-
ing and high-stepping around former
teammate Jerry Stackhouse.
"We got what we wanted," said


San Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan closely guards Golden State
Warriors forward Antwan Jamison at the Oakland Arena on Wednesday
night.


Iverson, who grabbed a microphone and
thanked the fans as he walked off the
court. "It was just like a gift for those
people. They supported us all year long,
and now we're able to give them some-
thing back."
Lakers 119, Trail Blazers 91
O'Neal went into the game knowing
he needed 40 points to surpass Iverson,
but scored only 18 and sat out the fourth
quarter.
O'Neal scored six points in the first
six minutes, butonly seven more in the
rest of the first half. He sat out the
fourth period after watching Glen Rice
go 6-for-6 on 3-pointers in the third
quarter. Rice finished with 40, just what
O'Neal needed at the Forum.
"Winning this game was more impor-
tant to me than winning the title,"
O'Neal said. "I got the ball to my team-
mates. It would have been very selfish
for me to try and get 40 tonight."
Knicks 101, Heat 88
At New York, the game became
meaningless early in the fourth quarter
when the teams learned that Philadel-
phia won - ending any possibility of
the Knicks moving up from the eighth
seed.
New York coach Jeff Van Gundy or-
dered the out-of-town scoreboard kept
dark so that his players wouldn't spend
the game distracted by updates from the
Detroit-Philadelphia game.
This pvill be the third straight year the
teams have met in the playoffs.
Magic 103, Bulls 83
At Chicago, the Magic earned
homecourt advantage at least through
the first two rounds.
The Bulls finished the 50-game
schedule averaging 81.9 points, shatter-
ing the record for lowest scoring aver-
age in NBA history. The previous record
was 87.4 points in 72 games by the Mil-
waukee Hawks in 1954-55, the season
the shot clock was adopted.
Rockets 95, Nuggets 88
At Denver, Michael Dickerson, com-


ing off a career-high 31 points, hit five
3-pointers and scored 27 points as
Houston spoiled Denver's final game at
McNichols Arena.
Hawks 100, Wizards 92
At Atlanta, Grant Long scored a sea-
son-high 22 points and the Hawks se-
cured the No. 4 seed. They have never
gotten past the second round of the
playoffs since moving to Atlanta in
1968.
Kings 99, Grizzlies 95
At Sacramento, Vlade Divac scored
nine of his season-high 29 points in the
final three minutes and also grabbed a
season-high 17 rebounds.
The Kings advanced to the playoffs
for the third time in their 14 Northern
California seasons.
Suns 100, Timberwolves 96
At Phoenix, Tom Gugliotta scored
four points, chased down a crucial of-
fensive rebound and stole the ball - all
in the final 42 seconds.
Nets 115, Bucks 107
Stephon Marbury had a career-high
41 points and 11 assists as New Jersey
finished its season with a win at home.
The loss dropped Milwaukee (28-22) to
the seventh seed in the East, meaning the
Bucks' first-round opponent will be In-
diana - a team that has beaten them
seven straight times.
Raptors 96, Cavaliers 87
At Toronto, Rookie of the Year fa-
vorite Vince Carter left in the third
quarter after straining his right shoulder
while going for a layup. He lay grimac-
ing in pain on the court for a few min-
utes before being helped off.
Hornets 133, Celtics 129, 20T
At Boston, rookies Brad Miller and
Ricky Davis each scored season-highs
of 32 points for Charlotte.
SuperSonics 107, Clippers 105
The Clippers lost their final game at
the L.A. Sports Arena. A lively crowd of
15,372, about double the Clippers' usual
draw, attended at the NBA's oldest
arena.


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8Tropic Times
May 7, 1999


Feature


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* *..


Crossing the Bridge

COROZAL - Most people cross the Bridge of the Americas in their
cars. Some even cross on foot. A bunch of athletic types ran the length of
the bridge (and a few more miles to boot) during the last Bridge of the
Americas run in December.
But very few fly over it. The exception would be 1st Battalion, 228th
Aviation Regiment, who have flown over the bridge, and just about every-
where else in Panama, many, many times.
But, like so many other U.S. Army South units in Panama, the old days
are coming to an end. A proud chapter in history is closing and it's no dif-
ferent for the UH-60 Blackhawk and CH-40 Chinook Helicopters of 1/
228th.
April 29 was most likely the last time these two helicopters will be seen
over the Bridge of the Americas, or in the skies of Panama. As part of
USARSO's move, the assets of 1/228th are headed to Soto Cano Air Base
in Honduras in the coming months.
Seeing the helicopters hovering over the bridge, over the canal, and pass-
ing ships making the transit signalled, once more, the end of an era.
And much like the helicopters left ripples in the water from their power-
ful churning propellers, so do the men and women who flew them countless
times in countless missions leave a lasting legacy.


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SNews


Tropic Times 9
May 7,1999


Trebon: 'Operationally, we're done'


Airmen move twoflying

missions from Panama

story by Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV
24th Wing Public Affairs Office
HOWARD AFB - Ten airplanes and roughly 170
airmen representing two Air Force flying missions
moved from Howard Air Force Base for good May 1
as part of the U.S. pullout from Panama.
The 10 final take-offs were by six C-130 and four F-16
aircraft assigned to the 24th Wing. The planes are flying
their intratheater airlift and counterdrug support routes
from airfields in San Juan, Puerto Rico and Curacao's in-
ternational airport, respectively.
From contingency to disaster relief duty, U.S. airmen
have flown missions from Panama to nearly all countries
in the Western Hemisphere south of Mexico under the
C-130 program codenamed Coronet Oak. The Puerto
Rico-based C-130 unit was in Panama 37 years-the
first 15 were fulfilled by active duty airmen and the clos-
ing 22 by a mix of Air National Guard and Air Force Re-
serve airmen.
"We're bringing an era to a close," Lt. Col. Peter
Kehoe, the outgoing 24th Expeditionary Airlift Squad-
ron commander, told a Southern Command Network
reporter. "We'll do the same job from Puerto Rico."
Kehoe's C-130 crews began flying New Horizons
airlift missions for SOUTHCOM from Puerto Rico on
May 2. Ground support personnel include members
from the Puerto Rico Air National Guard and
deployees from Davis-Monthan AFB, Ariz. The C-130
staff includes roughly 120 temporary duty airmen.
The first payload of redeploying C-130 gear was
flown into San Juan April 29 by a "rainbow crew with
rainbow equipment" of airmen from various elements of
the total force, said Col. Ron Mehan, mission com-
mander, 166th Airlift Wing (Deployed), Delaware
ANG.
That aircrew included a pilot from the 24th Opera-
tions Group; a pilot and a navigator from the 166th; a
pilot from the Texas ANG; a flight engineer from the
Oklahoma ANG; and a loadmaster from the New York
ANG. Extra crewmembers frequently travel on Coro-
net Oak aircraft as observers to enhance safety of
flight. The airplane was from Nashville, Tenn.
In the mid-1990's a yearly deployment of 30-plus
ANG and AFRES fighter units to Panama began to sup-
port a counterdrug tasking known as Coronet Night-
hawk.
The Panama deployment order for Nighthawk ended
as a four-ship formation of F-16s from North Dakota
succeeded five F-15 Eagles from Oregon on April 9,
before flying missions from Panama and zooming to
the Dutch West Indies on May 1, with a staff of 50 air-
men following them.
"The 24th Wing was outstanding integrating the Air
National Guard into their total force," Chief Master
Sgt. Dave Smale, the last 24th Expeditionary Fighter
Squadron superintendent, summarized on behalf of his
fellow airmen.
"Operationally, we're done. This is it," said Col.
Gregory L. Trebon, 24th Wing commander, as he
watched aircraft formerly under his leadership being


I?,'


Staff Sgt John B. Dendy IV (U.S. Air Force)
An F-16 soars on counterdrug patrol while deployed with the Cornet Nighthawk mission during
the late 1990's.


slurped into the clouds overhead. "A couple of months
ago you couldn't find a place to park an airplane here.
Since then we've transferred counterdrug radar,
AWACS, tanker, medical alert, U.S. Customs, Coast
Guard, Army and
Navy aircraft from
this airfield."
The departed jets
and airlifters were
not the only Air '' :
Force infrastructure


in Panama, so more
labor awaits airmen
at Howard before
the deployment or-
der ends, Trebon
said.
"We've been re-
deploying material
in 23 sea-land vans
a month, and we're
ramping to 50 vans
per month very
soon," Trebon said
of the tractor-
trailer-sized ship-
ping containers the
base is packing.
"We're taking
care of our people
and the base while
ensuring that our
property is turned in


and transferred for re-use."
To that end, said Maj. Fred Girbert, outgoing 310th
Airlift Squadron commander, the hangar that once
housed the C-130 airmen will be pickled immediately.


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Senior Airman Jeremy Moore (U.S. Air Force)


Col. Dave Scott, 24th Operations Group commander, pilots the first
payload of C-130 gear to deploy from Panama to Puerto Rico April ,
29. (Right photo) Airmen in Puerto Rico April 29 remove the first pal-
ette of Coronet Oak cargo to arrive on the island as part of the U.S.
pullout from Panama.


Senior Airman Jeremy Moore (U.S. Air Force)


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'*Briefly


10 Tropic Times
1 May 7, 1999


Spot bid sale
The General Service Administration, Fleet Manage-
ment Center is hosting another vehicle inspection and
spot bid sale of U.S. government trucks, sport utility ve-
hicles and sedans. Vehicle inspections are from 9 a.m. - 3
p.m. today and the vehicle sale begins 9 a.m. Saturday
near the TMP and Cold Storage Facility on Corozal. For
more information, call John B. Stobie at 285-4634.

Mother's Day Brunch
The Tropic Breeze will have a Mother's Day Brunch
Sunday from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Adult cost is $7.95,
children 5-12 is $3.95 and under 5 is free.

JAG closure
The Trial Defense Service Panama Field Office will
not be seeing clients this week due to a court-martial. All
appointments will be tentatively scheduled for May 14
starting at 9 a.m. For more information, call 288-3636/
3638.
Hasta Luego T-shirt sale
The American Red Cross is having an Hasta Luego T-
shirt sale. All prices have been drastically reduced. To
purchase your T-shirt stop by the Red Cross Office 8
a.m. - 4 p.m. starting Monday in Room 344, Building
519.

Final AUSA luncheon
The final Association of U.S. Army Isthmian Chapter
luncheon is 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Fort Clayton Com-
munity Club. During the luncheon the NCO of the 3rd
Quarter, the Soldier of the 3rd Quarter and the AUSA
scholarship winners will be recognized. Maj. Gen. Philip
R. Kensinger Jr. will be the guest speaker.

USARSO Town Hall Meeting
The USARSO Town Hall Meeting is 9 - 11 a.m.
Thursday at the Valent Recreation Center. The agenda
will feature an events update, drawdown information and
shuttle bus to Tocumen. In addition Dr. Joel Goodman,
psychologist and director of the Human Project, will of-
fer a special presentation at 8 a.m. prior to the meeting.

Hasta Luego Panama
If you've got a PCS move coming up you should plan
to attend an Hasta Luego reception. The Commanding
General or his designated representative attends each
event and presents each departing soldier with a
USARSO coin. The next Hasta Luego for soldiers de-
parting USARSO in July, August and September is May
20 at the Fort Clayton Community Club. For more in-
formation, call 288-9268/9235.
Housing Office hours extended
The Fort Clayton Housing Office will be open 7 a.m.
- 5:30 p.m. Monday - Friday and 8 a.m. - noon Satur-
days. Scheduled pre-final and final housing inspections
and assignments to set-aside housing will be conducted
until 2 p.m. on Saturdays. This schedule will stay in ef-
fect until further notice.
Seven digit dialing
Personnel in Panama will now have to dial all seven
digits of a phone number when calling on or between
military installations. This will not affect dialing 119 or
110 for emergencies, dialing "8" for access to DSN
from an official line, or dialing 169 when making mo-
rale calls. For more information, contact the 24th Com-
munications Squadron Telephone Liaison Office at 284-
9211.
New Housing Office procedures
The 24th Civil Engineer Squadron's Housing Office
will operate in Building 2, at the south end of the CES
main building behind the Howard Commissary. All walk-
in customers will be handled at the existing industrial cus-
tomer service area in Building 2. In addition, Monday,
the Housing Office operating hours will be 7:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. Monday to Fridays for walk-in customers, and
I to 4:30 p.m. by appointment only. To make an ap-
pointment, call 284-3301.
Right Start Briefing
The new Right Start Briefing is at the Mountain View
Chapel on the first and third Thursdays with the follow-
ing forecast dates: May 20, and June 3 and 17. For more
information, call Staff Sgt. Diana Miller at 284-3508.
Services reduced at DOIM
The services offered by the 56th Signal Battalion
DOIM Information Center will be reduced. Services
available within the customer area of IC will be as fol-
lows; USARSO LAN access, Internet connectivity, of-
fice automation software, black and white laser printing
and DCPS connectivity.
Optometry Clinic closes May 31
The Fort Clayton Optometry Clinic will provide ser-
vices until May 31. The Howard Optometry Clinic will
provide routine eye care until July 31. Flight Medicine
referrals and emergency eyecare services only will be
available during August. New military eyewear can be
ordered until May 31


Due to commercial airline schedule changes, the Tocumen shuttle will only pickup passengers at
Building 708 on Howard Air Force Base. In addition, times of departure have changed. Passengers
should call Vehicle Dispatch at 284-5058/59 to RSVP to ensure vehicle capacity. Schedules are
available at the post office, Billeting Office and the Howard Enlisted Club.

Outboundflights Depart Howard Arrive Tocumen Depart Tocumen
Arrive Building 708

4 a.m. 4:10 a.m. 5 a.m. 5:10 a.m.
5:05 a.m. 5:15 a.m. 6 a.m. 6:10 a.m.
6:30 a.m. 6:40 a.m. 8 a.m. 8:10 a.m.
10:30 a.m. 10:40 a.m. noon 1:15 p.m.

Inbound flights Arrive Tocumen Depart Tocumen Arrive Building 708
Depart Howard

5 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 8 p.m. 9:15 p.m.
7:45 p.m. 9 p.m. 10:15 p.m. 11:30 p.m.
6:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m.


Travel tips

Pet tips - Pets may now be shipped space-available to CONUS. There is, however, a fee. For more infor-
mation, call the Howard AFB Passenger Terminal at 284-5702.


Annuceet


DCA Clearing
Clearing? Please note that all DCA clearing is now being
processed 7:30 - 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 - 4:30 p.m. in Room
449, Building 519 at the Financial-Management Division. For
more information, call Delia Johnson at 288-6169.

Physical Therapy reduces services
The 24th Medical Group Physical Therapy Clinic has re-
duced its services by 50 percent and will close July 1. In
preparation for this reduction in services, clinic personnel are
working closely with all providers in an effort to ensure the
transition is as painless as possible for all customers.

Drug testing change
Drug testing/urine sampling is now being conducted in
the 24th Medical Group hospital, Building 192, in Room
232 on the second floor. For more information, call Michelle
Tello at 284-5314.

New lightning warning procedures
Howard AFB has adopted new lightning warning notifi-
cation procedures to alert the base community of the obser-
vance of lightning within five nautical miles of the base.
When this occurs, Command Post will sound the base siren.
In response to this warning, the base populace is encour-
aged to take precautions as outlined in the April 1 article,
"Howard Braces for Rainy Season, Lightning Storms."
Lightning Warnings will remain in effect for at least 15 min-
utes after the last strike. To find out if the warning has been
lifted, call the Safe Line at 284-SAFE.

Forms required to leave country
All members and their families who depart from Tocumen
International Airport are required to have SOUTHCOM
Form 4, Certificate of Exemption from the Passenger Service
Fee. In addition, if there are any changes to the original port
call date, SOUTHCOM Form 5, Travel Authorization, is re-
quired. After receiving orders, everyone should report to
their orderly room with a copy of orders in hand to be issued
the forms needed. Call unit orderly rooms for more informa-
tion.

SFC Selection Board
A Department of the Army Selection Board will convene
June 2 to consider soldiers for promotion to sergeant first
class. All staff sergeants with a DOR of 970630 and earlier,
and a BASD between 800630 and 930531 must physically
update and review their personnel qualification records. Ar-
eas of special concern are DA Forms 2A and 2-1 PQR,
NCO evaluation reports, official photographs and offi-
cial military personnel files. The deadline to update
PQRs is April 30. For information on PQRs call 288-
6406; for information on photographs call 288-7403; for
information on NCOERs call 288-6652.

Optometry Services Drawdown
Due to the drawdown of medical facilities and the re-
duced scope of care, Optometry Services will no longer
be able to offer comprehensive eyecare to those patients
not eligible for Tricare Prime. Optometry Services will
continue to offer routine optometry services such as vi-
sion analysis and eye health assessment to non-eligible
Tricare Prime patients on a space available basis until


closure of the Optometry Clinic. For more information,
call the Optometry Clinic at 284-6149.

Classified burn
Due to a large demand by 24th Wing units to destroy
classified material, the Howard Fire Department will
conduct live fire burns in a dumpster next to Building
1010. The burns will be conducted from 9-11 a.m. on
the first and third Monday of each month. Material
brought for destruction should be limited to classified
and sensitive material. For additional information, con-
tact Tech. Sgt. Phillip Nixon or Tech. Sgt. Anthony
Wells at 284-5305.

Veterinary Clinic
The Panama District Veterinary Command will have a Vet-
erinary Clinic at Howard Air Force Base, Building 202, begin-
ning May 17. Daily operation hours will be Monday through
Friday from 8 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Rations inspections
The Ration Inspection Program is designed to ensure
wholesomeness of operational rations and to keep units mis-
sion ready. Air Force units storing rations, such as Meals
Ready-to-Eat or survival rations, should notify the Public
Health Flight to ensure inspections are completed as required
by regulations. For more information, call Senior Airman Jef-
frey Rigdon at 284-4371/4539. If you are moving to Puerto
Rico and your child will require a school physical prior to the
start of the next school year, call the appointment desk at
284-3832/3834/3837.

Wing promotion/induction ceremony
The Team Howard Monthly Enlisted Promotion and In-
duction Ceremony for May is 3 p.m. May 27 in the Howard
NCO Club. The ceremony recognizes enlisted promotes in a
three-phase ceremony. Everyone is invited to attend and re-
freshments will be served following the ceremony. For more
information call 284-5363.

24th Services Squadron inactivation
The 24th Services Squadron inactivation will be at 3 p.m.,
May 26 in the Tropic Breeze Ballroom. Everyone is invited
to attend.

Humanitarian Service Medal
The Humanitarian Service Medal will be awarded for those
personnel assigned to the Ecuador El Nifio Disaster Relief Ef-
fort. The award has been approved for those service mem-
bers who provided humanitarian assistance and were assigned
to the operation from May 9 - 24, 1998. For more informa-
tion, call ILt. Gillespie or Mrs. Wilson-Carrasco at 288-
6655/4155.

Exceptional Family Member Program
AR 608-75, chapter 2, para 2-1, b, 1, the following per-
sonnel must be screened prior to PCS: Family members
PCSing from OCONUS to OCONUS. Family members
PCSing from U.S. to overseas. Family members already en-
rolled in EFMP. NOTE: Family members PCSing to CO-
NUS do not need to be screened. For more information, call
288-6365 Monday, Wednesday, Friday and 288-6695 Tues-
day and Thursday. A list of no shows will be given to LTC
Wilhelm and CSM Humphries. Questions and concerns can
be addressed to SFC Agueda at 288-6268.











I Feature


Tropic Times
May 7, 1999


Americans from the Canal Zone recall



an idyllic life that's just a memory


(This article recently appeared in the Los Angeles
Times).
BALBOA, Panama-Their culture began disappear-
ing 20 years ago, and by the end of this year it will be
completely gone. No one even considered trying to
save it.
Theirs was a tiny civilization of fewer than 100,000
people that existed on a narrow strip of land for a few
generations, not quite spanning the 20th century. In
fact, it was in many ways the ultimate expression of
what has been called the American Century: a bit of
Americana tucked into the tropics that, perhaps appro-
priately, will be erased with barely a trace on Dec. 31
when Panama takes over the canal from the United
States. All that will remain will be the annual reunion
party, a few Web sites and the rich memories of the
people who call themselves Zonians, the inhabitants of
the old Panama Canal Zone.
Extending five miles along each side of the water-
way, the zone was the absolute company town, a U.S.
territory that housed the people who ran and protected
the canal. For Panamanians, it became a slash that di-
vided their country, a visible reminder of U.S. domina-


tion. The zone was officially
eliminated in 1979, two years The Canal
after then-presidents Jimmy
Carter and Omar Torrijos America's e
signed a treaty promising that socialism, an
Washington would turn over
control of the canal to Panama Successful e)
gradually over two decades.
That's when the diaspora was nOt utop
began: Retired electrician close. You w(
Robert Christenson moved to
Texas, and Scott Foster, a yOu knew the
fourth-generation Zonian, to thing to eat E
Chula Vista. Dave Furlong
joined the military and ended
up in Guam. Some Zonians tried to re-create their com-
munity in Orlando, Fla., site of the annual reunion that
draws 100 or more expatriates.
A few, like childhood friends Peggy Acker and Kay
Hamilton, stayed in Panama to teach on the military
bases that are all that is left of the zone. In May, when
the last class graduates from Balboa High School, the
teachers will be transferred to bases far from Panama.
"Even though we may no longer be here, the spirit is
being kept alive," Acker said. "Even just the word
'Zonian.' All of us growing up down here were such a
close-knit, extended family. That is the spirit."
Zonians themselves struggle to capture that spirit in
words. "What is strange to me is everyone who
doesn't have that," Christenson said. He acknowl-
edged, with a catch in his voice, that he misses the zone
"every waking minute."
Over the decades, Zonians developed their own cul-
ture, a mixture of Panama and Americana. George C.
Zidbeck, grandson of a machinist who arrived in
Panama in 1907 to help build the canal, recalls a child-'
hood of saying the Pledge of Allegiance in the morning
and playing "tree tag" in the jungle in the afternoon.
The banyan trees in his neighborhood grew so thick
that children could jump from branch to branch, not
touching the ground for hours.
Roads literally melted in the Panama heat, and kids
picked tar off the street to chew. In addition to cats and
dogs, favored pets included sloths, parrots and mon-
keys. At twilight, children followed the trucks that
drove through the neatly manicured streets of identical
duplexes and quadruplexes, spraying DDT to keep
down mosquitoes that spread malaria. Now that the
risks of the insecticide are known, Zonians jokingly
blame any memory lapses on those nightly chases.
Life here moved to a calypso beat, and even Zonians
who barely speak Spanish take pride in their salsa danc-
ing moves. Patricia Egger, whose grandparents moved
to Panama when her parents were children, discovered
subtle divisions when she went away to college in
1963. Everybody in Panama had pierced ears," common
in Latin culture, she said in a telephone interview from
her Virginia home.
But at the University of Arkansas, "I was told that
nice girls didn't pierce their ears." She had to wear clip
earrings to be accepted. Going barefoot and feeling safe
are common threads in Zonian memory. Theirs was a
well-ordered society, like some Greek city-state where
troublemakers were banished.
"We were raised [thinking], 'Don't get into trouble,


because your dad could lose his job and we would get
shipped out,' " Egger said.
Luke Lambert, now in his 60s, knows that was no idle
threat. When he was 16, he argued with a Canal Zone
police officer. "He hit me with a stick, and I hit him
back," he recalled. "They deported me from the Canal
Zone," allowing his father to keep his job only on the
condition that Lambert leave home. Assimilating into
Panama proper was no easy task for the third-generation
Zonian, who attended Canal Zone schools and spoke
little Spanish. Even after he got accepted back into the
Canal Zone family, Lambert made sure that his own
eight sons learned Spanish.
Zonians are reluctant to discuss some aspects of
their society. Particularly delicate is "the enormous dis-
crepancy between black and white society along the
same jungle corridor," as it was termed by David
McCullough, author of "Path Between the Seas: The
Creation of the Panama Canal."
What McCullough calls a "rigid caste society" began
with the canal's construction. Unskilled West Indian la-
borers-recruited mainly from Barbados, Martinique
and Guadeloupe-were paid in Panamanian silver


balboas. Skilled Americans
were paid in gold-backed U.S.
dollars.
The "gold" and "silver"
standards persisted through-
out the zone's existence,
largely because they were
nominally based on citizen-
ship, not race. Americans
lived in gold towns, with their
own schools and play-
grounds, and were eligible for
better-paying jobs. Heavy la-
bor was for the West Indian
workers' descendants, who


lived in silver towns.
The soldiers and sailors who protected the canal,
passing through on two- or three-year tours of duty,
fell somewhere in between. Young women from Canal
Zone families did not usually date military men.
"It was an extremely segregated place," Egger said.
When Zidbeck was 12, back in 1943, one of his neigh-
bors here in Balboa invited children from the silver com-
munity of La Boca, about a mile away, to play softball.
Just as the game was starting, a playground director
appeared and told the children they could not play.
"We were so disappointed that we didn't think of an
alternative," he said. "We knew there was a color line,
and we didn't tempt it."
Lambert, who still lives in
the quadruplex where he
raised his family in the old In fact,* it (thc
silver town of Paraiso, said was in many
he feels no bitterness.
His great-grandfather mate express
came to Panama from b n
Martinique to work on a b n ll
failed French canal-building Century: a bit
effort at the end of the 19th
century. When the company tucked ito th
went bankrupt, workers were perhaps appr
stranded. They were relieved
to sign on with the Ameri- be erased with
cans, who arrived in 1904. on Dec. 31
Lambert's father and
grandfather also worked for takes over the
the canal, and once his dis- United States.
agreement with the canal po- _
lice blew over, Lambert got a
job in the maintenance division. After 30 years of ser-
vice, he retired in 1987 as a $5-an-hour liaison for the
security division, good wages for Panama.
"You were sure you would get a fair break, even
though they had a double system," he said. "I don't
have any resentment against the U.S. government be-
cause it made sure I had a job. That's why we were so
loyal to the U.S. government."
For a place so regimented on issues such as race,
the Canal Zone also had its progressive side. "The Ca-
nal Zone was America's experiment in socialism, and it
was a very successful experiment," Zidbeck said. "It
was not utopia, but it was close. You weren't rich, but
you knew there was something to eat every day."
"We were the children of tradespeople who were
making very good salaries," he said. Housing, grocer-


ies, schools and recreation-including swimming pools
and tennis courts-were all subsidized by proceeds
from canal fees. "We weren't raised from a capitalist
viewpoint, so none of us ever had any push or drive,"
Egger said. "I grew up in a town that when the pipes
broke, you called maintenance."
In fact, in the Zonian version of the old "how-many-
does-it-take-to-change-a-light-bulb?" joke, the answer
is: "Two, one to pour the drinks and another to call the
Canal Zone electrician."
This lifestyle of orderly concrete houses, shaded
lawns and wide streets contrasted increasingly with the
chaotic, deforested growth of cities outside the zone.
Panamanian resentment was manifested in riots, begin-
ning in the 1960s, that finally resulted in the 1977 treaty
to turn over control of the canal to Panama.
Panamanians were to be hired and trained to take
over canal operations. In 1979, the zone became part of
Panama, except for the bases that until 1997 housed the
U.S. military's Southern Command. The last base will
close when the canal is turned over to Panama.
Zonians like Egger, who had moved away but
wanted to return, found they could not get hired. While
those with seniority could stay on, there were no new
jobs for Americans, just two-year contracts.
What hurt Lambert most was seeing what happened
to his alma mater, Paraiso High School. The school was
supposed to continue operating as part of the Panama-
nian school system, he said. "We had a welding shop
and a plumbing shop, probably $48,000 worth of eqiip-
ment," he recalled. "By December, there was nothing
there."
Panamanian employees took the lights from the
ballpark, pried loose the air conditioners and replaced
the cedar doors with- plywood, he said. The school is
now a government building, and students are bused to
another location.
The last of the Zonians are now collecting memen-
tos for a future museum in Florida. The Balboa High
School plaque, a reproduction of the Canal Zone seal
that numerous freshmen polished at the behest of se-
niors, was removed from the school in February along
with several other class gifts.
Many landmarks will exist only in memories. The
Balboa Yacht Club, the setting for many a first drink and
first date in the zone, burned to the ground in February,
provoking the suspicions of many Zonians.
And those memories are starting to fade. On Canal
Zone Web sites with names like "lostparadise," amid
recipes for the rice dishes that West Indian maids once
prepared and inquiries about old classmates, someone
will post a request for directions to, say, the riding
stables that no longer exist. Remarkably, someone else
will respond with precise instructions-and often a quip
about inhaling too much
DDT.
Canal Zone) "My hometown is on the
Nays the ulti- Internet," Egger said ruefully.
Because the land has been
In of what has returned gradually, its sale
he American being administered by a spe-
cial agency of the Panama-
of Americana nian government, Zonians
a tropics that, who still live in Panama have
become accustomed to the
privately , will loss of their hometown. But it
barly a tra is still hard.
barely a trace "I drive through and expect
ihen Panama to see Americans there,"
Acker said of the old zone, in
canal from the a soft voice cultivated
through decades of comfort-
ing third-graders. "When
they're not, it's a shock."
Acker moved to the Zone in 1940, at age 2. She left to
complete her elementary teaching degree in Michigan
and came home to the Zone to teach in 1960.
Over the years, she adopted three children, two of
them Panamanian. Hamilton also adopted two children,
and the longtime friends helped each other raise their
families. When the Zone reverted to Panamanian con-
trol, Acker and Hamilton continued teaching but lost
the more spacious housing that seniority had earned
them. Now, the pair are waiting to hear where they will
be assigned for the next school year. "We're hoping
that when we transfer, we'll be together," Acker said.
"When you are going away from the only home you
have ever known, you want support."
"It's going to be very difficult to leave," she said.
"But I am looking forward to the next chapter."


Zone was
experiment in
d'it was a very
experiment ... It
pia, but it was
aren't rich, but
are was some-
every day.


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12 Tropic Times
2 May 7, 1999


News


Howard AFB celebrates



National Police Week


story by Master Sgt. Daniel Hogan
24th Security Forces Squadron
HOWARD AFB - In recognition of National Police
Week, May 9-15, the Howard Security Forces have
planned several activities for the base to participate in.
Monday is Abandoned Vehicle Amnesty Day. Secu-
rity Forces investigators will dedicate an individual who
will be available throughout the day to help you process
your old vehicles to DRMO that you know you won't
ship to your next location. By turning your vehicle in
now, you will avoid a possible fine of $400
- $500 if the Security Forces finds it aban-
doned after you depart.
As a reminder, even if you separate, 'A
the Air Force may recoup money through
the Internal Revenue Service if war-
ranted. /
Tuesday is Gotcha Day.
It is a day all SF members
will post "Gotcha" tags on
all insecure property. Hope-
fully this will open your eyes to H E
some of the items that unauthorized
personnel usually target for thefts.
Shoes on porches, unsecured bi- CO
cycles, and unattended offices,
for example.
There will also be a memorial
service at noon Tuesday to recognize Security
Force members who have lost their lives in the line of
duty.
On Thursday, McGruff will visit the Howard and
Kobbe schools along with some on duty police.
McGruff and his helpers will be available to answer
questions and visit with the students about their duties
and what types of things a student should look out for.
Later that day, SF will conduct retreat at the base
flagpole and everyone is welcome to attend.
May 14th will top off the week's activities starting
with a marathon relay lasting 24 hours. A SF member
will be running around the parade field in 30-minute in-
crements until relieved by another SF member. The relay
begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 8 a.m., May 15. Pledge do-
nations may be made by calling 284-3415.


At 2 p.m., Security Forces will start a field day where
they will have their weapons on display, as well as a
horse and dog demonstration that begins at 5 p.m. A
softball tournament will start at 6 p.m. and will be the fi-
nal event of the week ending on Sunday.
The Police Week champions will be crowned on
Sunday after the championship game. Come on out and
show your support for the Cops! For more information
call 284-3415.
History of National Police Week
Every day, thousands of police offic-
ers put their lives on the line.
National Police Week, which runs
from May 9-15, is an opportunity to rec-
ognize police officers for the important
work they perform, and to remember
those who made the ultimate
sacrifice for their commu-
nities.
National Police Week has its
foundations in a Joint Resolu-
tion enacted Oct. 1, 1962 in the
Congress of the United States.
This resolution authorized the
president of the United States,
then John F. Kennedy, to pro-
claim May 15th of each year
as Peace Officers Memorial Day.
The designation of May 15th, to honor those
law enforcement officers, federal, state and municipal,
who have been killed or disabled in the line-of D-duty,
recognizes police officers around the world for their pa-
triotic service, dedicated efforts and devotion to duty,
regardless of the perils or hazards to themselves.
The 103rd Congress, as part of the Violent Crime
Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, amended
Public Law 87-726, signed by President John F.
Kennedy in 1962. President Bill Clinton signed Public
Law 103-322 which directs that the flag of the United
States on all government buildings be displayed at half-
staff on May 15, National Peace Officers' Memorial
Day.


rI















photos by Sgt. 1st Clas Christopher C. Calkins (USARSO PAO)

The Final March
After more than five decades of activity, the
Balboa High School Junior Reserve Officer
Training Course cased its colors during an im-
pressive ceremony held April 30 at the BHS sta-
dium. Prior to the casing, class officers (above)
marched into formation to receive the colors.
Later, cadets Gina Leonard - Zinno (left) and
Maritzel LaPlaca were individually honored.
Guest speaker for the event was BHS Principal
Tom Price, who also participated in review of
the troops. Music was provided by the 79th Army
Band.


Just in case you

were wondering

FORT CLAYTON (Law Enforcement Activity)
- Just in case you wanted to know where are
the MPs, we have an answer for you.
Look carefully! The Military Police vehicles
have a new appearance! Recently, many of the
traditional MP cars provided by General Service
Administration have been replaced by locally
leased smaller versions.
The new MP cars are Mitsubishi Lancers and
come in a variety of colors. Although the new
vehicles have
no light bars
and no sirens,
they are
equipped with
a smaller blue
flashing light
on the dash-
board and are
marked with
"Military Po-
lice" on the
sides. If you
should need
MP assis-
tance, look for the new vehicles and rest as-
sured your MPs are continuing to look out for
your safety.
If you are asked "may I see your authoriza-
tion, please," then this may be the situation.
Does that computer in your car belong to
you? If not, don't risk the embarrassment of be-
ing detained at the MP gate while a telephone
call is made to your supervisor to verify your au-
thorization to transport the equipment.
Soldiers and civilians are reminded to never
transport Government-owned office equipment
in a POV or GOV without written authorization
from a supervisor in the respective chain of com-
mand.
The MPs have increased their random in-
spections, and all drivers of vehicles containing
office equipment will be required to provide
proper documentation for transport.











N News


Tropic Times 13
May 7,1999 1


Command post redeploying


By Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV
24th Wing Public Affairs Office
HOWARD AFB - The com-
mand post operators at Howard
are preparing to meet deadlines
for the pullout from Panama.
Controllers assigned to the
Howard Air Mobility Command
Control Center close that opera-
tion May 31. The 24th Wing
Command Post staff will relo-
cate this summer from Building
703 to another facility on base,
but their phone numbers and
level of support will remain the
same through Oct. 31.
The wing and AMC posts
provide command and control
for their respective local leaders
while the respective controllers
shed excess gear, and transfer
responsibilities to gaining units.
"We've already turned in a lot
of equipment associated with the
JTF-Panama communications net-


work," said Tech. Sgt. Tony
Breeze, acting NCOIC of the
Howard Command Post. "Our
communications) equipment
goes to the 24th Communications
Squadron. Some of our office
equipment has gone to DRMO
or the supply system. A lot of the
material that the AMC Command
Center owns has been tagged for
other AMC bases.
"You'd be amazed at what
this place looks like now.., like a
ghost town with tumbling tum-
bleweeds," Breeze said. "We're
operating the files out of
boxes... Until recently we were
co-located with the (now rede-
ployed) Flight Monitoring Facil-
ity and we're still co-located
with the Howard AMC Control
Center. The AMCC will draw
down and will go away the end
of May. We'll co-locate with
the (24th Security Forces


Squadron) Howard Control
Center the first week of June, af-
ter the runway closes."
Breeze said the wing's con-
trollers would run overall com-
mand and control for base func-
tions when they move, and the
exit will allow the base to pickle
Building 703 on time.
"Our last day of operation is
scheduled to be Sept. 15 and at
that point the folks at Davis-
Monthan (AFB, Ariz.) will be
taking over. We will still be ac-
tive supporting normal base
functions. Notifying people for
exercises is part of the command
and control structure and the
move will have no effect on that.
The HANDS demonstration
and weather advisories, the
284-SAFE number and weather
notifications will continue for as
long as the weather shop oper-
ates at Howard," Breeze said.


by Senior Airman Jeremy Moore (U.S. Air Force)
Tech. Sgt. Edna Johnson-Smith, NCOIC of training,
24th Wing command post, coordinates the redeploy-
ment-related removal of her outfit's tape recorder.
After June 1, hers will be the only command and con-
trol agency left at Howard.


AF hosts final community college graduation


by Gail Fuller
24th Mission Support Squadron
The last Community College of the
Air Force Graduation at Howard Air
Force Base was held at the Howard NCO
Club on April 29.
Col. Dave Scott, 24th Operations
Group commander, gave the commence-
ment address, and Maj. Connie Davis,
24th Mission Support Squadron com-
mander, conferred the diplomas with as-
sistance from Lisa Poland of the Howard
Education Center.
Closing remarks were given by Col.
Gregory L. Trebon, 24th Wing com-
mander, and Bud Goode, Education Ser-
vices chief was the Master of Ceremonies.
"This graduation is an historic
event," said Goode. "We have 38 gradu-
ates, even though we are in a drawdown
status. This is due to the outstanding
professional staff. We could not have ac-
complished this without them."
The graduates were:
AFOSI Det. 214
Special Agent Robert Meekins-Criminal
Justice Electronic Systems Technology
Special Agent Richard Ramsdale-
Avionic Systems Technology Criminal
Justice
24th Aerospace Medicine Squadron
Staff Sgt. Kimberly Bentley-Environ-
mental Medicine Technology
24th Civil Engineering Squadron
Tech. Sgt. Gerald Adams-Fire Science
Staff Sgt. Lorenzo Williams-Fire Science
24th Communications Squadron
Senior Airman Jamie Guerra-Information
Systems Technology


Ii


Senior Airman Douglas Hunter-
Electronic Systems Technology
Senior Airman Derek Nivens-Electronic
Systems Technology
Tech. Sgt. Deborah Pollen-Information
Systems Technology
Tech. Sgt. Michael Taylor-Avionic
Systems Technology
Tech. Sgt. Jacqueline Young-Electronic
Systems Technology
Logistics Group
Staff Sgt. Antonio Bates-Aerospace
Ground Equip Technology
24th Maintenance Squadron
Senior Airman Roy Joyner Ill-Munitions
Systems Technology
24th Medical Support Squadron
Senior Airman Leta Young-Logistics


by Senior Airman Jeremy Moore (U.S. Air Force)
24th Medical Operations Squadron
Senior Airman Damell Newkirk-
Pharmacy Technology
24th Mission Support Squadron
Staff Sgt. Roderick Campbell-Personnel
Administration
Tech. Sgt. Gertrude Elbourne-Personnel
Administration
24th Operations Support Squadron
Staff Sgt. David Johnson-Airport
Resource Management
24th Security Forces Squadron
Staff Sgt. Neil Keifer-Avionic Systems
Technology Education and Training
Management
Tech. Sgt. Kevin McCaw-Criminal
Justice
24th Services Squadron


StaffSgt. Ramon Jimenez-Fitness
Recreation and Services Management
24th Supply Squadron
Senior Master Sgt. Dana Scott-
Information Systems Technology
Logistics
Master Sgt. Malissa Thompkins-.
Logistics
24th Transportation Squadron
StaffSgt. Licci Barham-Logistics
Staff Sgt. Tammy Ulmer-Transportation
24th Weather Squadron
Staff Sgt. Johnnie Church-Weather
Technology
Tech. Sgt. Thomas Zipprich-Weather
Technology
24th Wing (Det. 1)
Staff Sgt. Michael Bardsley-Airway
Science
Tech. Sgt. Kevin Bennett-Avionic
Systems Technology
Master Sgt. Jose Pizano-Criminal Justice
Tech. Sgt. Mark Romero-Information
Management
Staff Sgt. Reid Woodard-Airway
Science
310 Airlift Squadron
TSgt Anthony Hunter-Information
Management
Senior Airman Jennifer Johnson-
Personnel Administration
Tech. Sgt. Alfred Jones-Electronic
Systems Technology
640 Air Mobility Squadron
Master Sgt. Jimmy Jalil-Avionic
Systems Technology
Master Sgt. Martin Taylor-Transporta-
tion
Tech. Sgt. Terri Taylor-Logistics


Howard Spouse Club awards eight scholarships


HOWARD AFB - Members of the Howard
Officer and Enlisted Spouses' Clubs hosted their
final scholarship tea April 30 in the 24th Wing
Conference Room to honor seven graduating high
school seniors and one university student con-
tinuing his education.
The funds for these scholarships come from a
variety of sources, however the main funding came
through the profits of the Howard Thrift Shop, said
Janet Lowe, a spokesperson for the two clubs.
The recipients, scholarship values and the
schools they plan to attend are: first prize selectee
Jaclyn Barnash ($2,500, University of Southern
California); second prize selectee Sharmon Lebby
($1,500, University of South Carolina); third prize
selectee Annette O'Neil ($1,000, University of
Southern California).


The honorable mention selectees and the
school they plan to attend were Carlos Bravo ($600,
Princeton University); Eduardo Diaz Salgado ($600,
Universidad de Puerto Rico); Neil Reaves ($600,
Tarleton State University); and Antonio Somoza
($600, University of Richmond).
The spouses' clubs have also made contribu-
tions to Howard's Women's History Month annual
award winners, Girl Scouts, Arraijan Orphanage,
Air Force Ball, softball tournaments, Rodeo '98,
Fire Prevention Month, childcare for town hall
meetings and other organizations on- and off-base.
The continuing education award selectee was
Col. Gus Mays III, ($600, Virginia Commonwealth
University). Selectees from left are: Mays, Bravo,
Reaves, Lebby, Salgado, Somoza, Bamash, and, for
Annette O'Neil, not pictured, Col. T.J. O'Neil.


-tk


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Tropic Times
May 7, 1999


INews


USARSO Weather Team



Keeping an eye on the skies


story and photo by
Staff Sgt. Cathy Richards
USARSO WETM
HOWARD AFB - Everyone has
seen weather reports on CNN, local
television news and our very own
SCN.
Weather reports seen on televi-
sion are very general compared to
those used in the military.
The military has several rules and
regulations governing the weather
data generated for military use.
A forecast developed by a U.S. Air
Force weather forecaster must give
very specific data such as what time
a thunderstorm will begin or end, or
what type and what amount of cloud
coverage there will be at a given time.
It is a little know fact that the Air
Force weather team is responsible,
not only for providing Air Force units
with weather support, but also for
supporting all U.S. Army units with
weather support.
In fact, there is a small office lo-
cated in Build-
ing 95 on Fort
Clayton called This unique A
the Staff
Weather Of- to Army opera
fice that pro-
vides weather specialized b
support for JTF-Panama
USARSO.
This office Commander;
is the
USARSO support is also
Weather Team USARSO an
(WETM) and
it consists of plans and ex
three weather
person ne 1. agency operate
The Deputy
Chief of Staff
for Intelligence (DCSINT) is respon-
sible for taking care of the needs and
well-being of the weather team.

USARSO Weather Team Mission
The Staff Weather Officer (SWO)
provides direct staff support to both
USARSO and JTF-Panama.
This unique Air Force support to
Army operations includes specialized


I,.


briefings to the JTF-Panama and
USARSO Commander and staff. Staff
support is also provided for all
USARSO and JTF-Panama plans and
exercises/contingency operations.
The SWO is the liaison between the
Multinational Observer Mission Ec-
uador/Peru (MOMEP) and the Air
Force weather community.
The USARSO SWO provides mo-
bility training for eight 24th Weather
Squadron personnel.
This training provides mission
ready weather personnel the
availabliltiy to deploy on a moments
notice throughout Latin America. The
24th Weather Squadron at Howard
AFB provides the personnel for
USARSO support.

Who have they supported?
The USARSO SWO coordinated
with all Army National Guard nation-
building exercises throughout Latin
America, including New Horizons 99
El Salvador, Jamaica, Haiti and Gua-
temala. The
SWO en-
r Force support s ured
weather
itions includes support is-
sues were
iefings to the included in
and USARSO all aspects
of planning
nd staff. Staff and execu-
tion.
provided for all Other typi-
I JTF-Panama cal staff
work in-
;rcises/contin- c u d e s
weather
ns. support is-
sues asso-
ciated with
Allied Forces 98 in Guatemala and
Blue Advance 98.

Providing for exercises
For these exercises, the weather
team provided realistic scenarios of
weather to bring some tropical reality
to operations.
Weather support also includes lo-
gistical requirements for deploying










-, "





�'j t 8~;'o b-


weather personnel as well. The SWO
worked the logistical challenges of
deploying weather personnel and re-
sources from CONUS bases to mul-
tiple exercise locations sometimes in
austere environments.
The weather team deployed to San
Isidro AB, Dominican Republic in
support of the 1/228th and Delta Com-
pany 160th Special Operations Aerial
Regiment. The team provided
weather forecasts for hurricane relief
efforts.
In 1998, weather personnel de-
ployed seven times in support of
counter drug efforts. These TDY's in-
volved redeploying and maintaining
automated weather observation
equipment
at Ground The USARSO
Based Ra-
dar sites nated with all A
through-
out Co- Guard nation-b
lombia in cises through
support of
Joint Inter America, include
Agency
Task Force rizons 99 El 1
South mis- maica, Haiti an
sions.
One team The SWO ensi
member in- issues
stalled one supportissues
of these in all aspects of
rede-
ployed execution.
systems at
Soto Cano
Air Base,


Honduras. These systems allow
casters access to critical data
when making forecasts for the
sparse locations.
The SWO also served as thi
between the Military Observer
Ecuador/Peru (MOMEP), the 24
12th Air Force and Air Comb
mand. In this capacity, the S
sisted in troubleshooting the
weather radar and resolving wed
lated problems that occurred.
In February 98, the 24th V
Squadron provided the Brazi
erations center a high freque


Watching the skie is important to the USARSO mission. Senior Airman Jame uuno, a weather observer
to keep folks informed of life in the skies.


ow fore-
needed


dio allowing them communication ca-
pabilities to their aircraft while in the
Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).
In August 98, weather personnel
installed a compact weather satellite
system for deployed MOMEP weather
personnel to use in daily mission
briefings.

Hurricanes
With the Caribbean as an Area of
Operations, the weather team pro-
vided six-hour updates on nine hurri-
canes to USARSO personnel.
The updates were focused on and
highlighted the dangers of hurricanes
striking Puerto Rico or the U.S. Vir-
gin Islands.
The weather
'WO coordi- team also pro-
vided a de-
rmy National tailed damage
report of
hiding exer- Puerto Rico
tout Latin after Hurri-
cane Georges
ing New Ho- struck to the
USARSO
alvador, Ja- Chief of Staff
1 Guatemala. and essential
personnel.
red weather T h e
'ere includedA R SO
planning.and clearly de-
fined respon-
sibilities asso-
ciated with
any develop-
ing storms
that might impact these areas.


se data- Move to Puerto Rico
The weather team is fully inte-
e liaison grated in the USARSO move to Puerto
Mission Rico. They participated in all planning
th Wing, meetings and identified weather
at Com- unique requirements.
WO as- Weather team support was pro-
tactical vided for JTF-South Battle Training
ather-re- Command Seminar.
This was a training exercise cover-
Weather ing the JTF-South AOR in which
lian op- weather was a critical element for suc-
ency ra- cessful planning and execution.
The SWO provided daily briefings
outlining mission impact on opera-
tions and drew accolades from com-
mand staff for relevance to the op-
erations.
Weather support was also pro-
vided for the Tactical Exercise with-
out Troops (TEWT). This exercise
Covered the JTF-Panama AOR and fo-
cused on the threat to military per-
sonnel, equipment and installations.
The weather team provided an ini-
tial briefing on the mission impacts
for ground, air, sea and communica-
tions. Although the Air Force
weather support to the Army may not
be well known, the Staff Weather Of-
fice stays busy.
Though the people currently sup-
porting USARSO will not relocate to
Puerto Rico, there will be Air Force
weather bodies going to Fort
Buchanan as well as some Guard
weather augmentees to provide
' weather support to USARSO.
The office will consist of two ac-
tive duty U.S. Air Force weather per-
sonnel and one National guardsman
or Reservist.
Just remember they may be small
in numbers, but they will be capable
, helps of providing any weather information
you may need.


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News Tropic Times15
News May 7, 1999 15


Drawdown considerations


Mental health related services in Panama to open


by Col. Terrence Jay O'Neil
USAF, MC Commander
HOWARD AFB - Drawdown and
closure are upon us. Most of our JTF-
Panama team is departing for new ad-
ventures worldwide.
It is important to recognize that in
this very stressful time, the personnel
who provide our psychological sup-
port services must leave Panama in
time to get to their next duty stations,
as well.
Although a psychologist will be
on-station at Fort Clayton until Sept.
1, 1999 to provide emergency evalua-
tions, all persons requiring ongoing
treatment will be referred to a Panama
City provider after our psychiatrist
departs on June 30.
The psychologist at Howard will
depart June 18. Because it is not good
medicine to start up what should be a
long-term therapeutic relationship


with someone and then leave within a
few days, only emergency psychologi-
cal services will be provided on-station
after June 1. Non-urgent referrals will be
sent to TRICARE providers in Panama
City.
Patients requiring detoxification will
be admitted to a civilian facility in
Panama City, detoxified, and air-evacu-
ated to CONUS for inpatient treatment.
Once the patient is medically
cleared, if commercial air travel is the
fastest and safest mode of travel, the
member's unit will provide a non-medi-
cal escort.
After Sept. 1, a flight surgeon with
additional training in mental health pro-
cedures will be available to perform
Commander-Directed Mental Health
Evaluations through closure.
Routine prescription refills of some
mental health-related medications for
patients already under treatment by the


24th Medical Group may be handled
through the Acute Care Clinic. Patients
being seen by TRICARE-approved
providers downtown who currently re-
fill their medications at a 24MDG Phar-
macy may continue to do so through
Sept. 1.
However, once we are a Troop
Clinic, only active duty personnel can
have their prescriptions filled at Medi-
cal Group facilities. Any family mem-
bers remaining in Panama after that
date will have to use civilian pharma-
cies for refills.
Family Advocacy Program direct
services will be limited to brief inter-
ventions and assuring victim safety
only, and will be managed by an avail-
able military health provider only until
expeditious return stateside can be ar-
ranged.
Family Advocacy Program services
at Fort Clayton cease in mid-April and


will terminate July 16 at Howard AFB.
Family Advocacy Prevention Programs
terminate June 30. Substance Abuse
counseling services for family members
terminate July 16.
Educational and Development Inter-
vention Services (EDIS: used to be
called EIS/MRS) will end at Fort
Clayton June 30.
Exceptional Family Member Program
services after the end of May will be
limited strictly to reassignment of Q-
Code families and EFMP re-assign-
ments.
We apologize for the inconvenience
which termination of services may
cause some individuals.All families
needing the above services are urged
to re-locate stateside or to their
OCONUS follow-on locations early, to
avoid discomfort or inconvenience re-
sulting from necessary phased close-
down of 24MDG operations in Panama.


West Bank vet clinic to


begin operations May 17


by Monica D. Daes
TSB Marketing Specialist
HOWARD AFB - Starting on May 17, Howard
AFB and Fort Kobbe residents will no longer have to
travel to the Corozal Veterinary Treatment Facility
(VTF) for their pet's appointment.
In another effort to assist pet owners during the
drawdown, the Panama District Veterinary Command,
U.S. Army South and the 24th Wing have coordi-
nated the establishment of the West Bank Veterinary
Clinic at the Old Howard Thrift Shop, Building 202,
Howard AFB.
Among the many services available at the upcom-
ing clinic, pet owners will be able to obtain health
certificates and complete pet outprocessing, includ-
ing a final medical exam for screwworms and ticks.
Other services offered include vaccinations, heart-
worm tests, heartworm preventatives, as well as tick
and flea control medications and information on
PCSing with pets.
According to Lt. Col. Larry Carpenter, commander
of the Veterinary Command, the clinic will result in
great savings in time for pet owners.


"The day of the appointment, your pets' record
will be transferred from the Corozal Clinic to the West
Bank Clinic. At the end of the day the records will be
transferred back to the Corozal VTF for
outprocessing and transmittal of the export certifi-
cate. Records and export certificates will be given to
the owner upon completion of the final exam for
screwworms and ticks, which should be done within
48 hours of departure.
"There is no need for west bank pet owners to
travel to the Corozal VTF," he said. This second ap-
pointment for screwworms and ticks will also be
scheduled at the West Bank Clinic, if the owner so
desires.
The West Bank clinic will be open 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Monday through Friday .
It will cease operations on Aug. 13 , when most
pets will have been shipped out of Panama. The
Corozal VTF will continue operations until its sched-
uled closure on Aug. 31, in accordance with the TIP
drawdown.
To schedule an appointment at the West Bank
clinic, please contact 285-5866 or 285-5867.


Times are changing
by Richard K. Robinson
Ambulance Service
FORT CLAYTON - Yes, the times are changing,
and so is the Ambulance Serv ice at the Fort Clayton
Clinic. Due to the treaty mandated drawdown, the
last TDY ambulance crew w ill be departing Panama
in early May. The 24th Medical Group has con-
tracted with a civilian ambulance company to con-
tinue to provide high quality emergency response
services to the East Bank, \w which began Saturday.
According to Capt. Christopher Alexander, Fort
Clayton Clinic administrator, "All ambulances will be
equipped with state-of-the art medical equipment
and will be staffed by bilingual, U.S. certified Na-
tional Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians."
This is the same registry that certifies all Department
of Defense emergency medical technicians. Twenty
four-hour ambulance service \will be located on Fort
Clayton through July 3 1. After that date the ambu-
lances will respond from off post
The steps to request an ambulance remain the
same. Simpl) call 281-HELP or 284-HELP and the re-
sponse plan will be put into action. "This transition
will be seamless," Alexander said, "The community
can expect to see the same level of emergence re-
sponse services as it had before."


.. ....... :-"- " ' Best of the Best
S' . Most of the 430 people who
ow, .' .. : .-. .- , make up the 24th Medical
.-.. . . . -W * Group - 250 military members,
S - "E - ' " ' , approximately 180 Department
r. r ' of Defense civilians, civilian
..; contractors, TRICARE partner
t , F -' . . , physicians and civilian
Sy. overhires -gathered fora
,-", post-inspection celebration
S' April 30 at Howard. The mem-
' bers enierged from a combined
. . inspection by the Joint Com-
mission for the Accreditation of
Healthcare Organizations and
the Health Services Inspection
S ", . "Agency with a rating of 97,
better than 95 percent of all
'- .ambulatory care institutions
o A that have gone through the
A.. inspection. In addition, JCAHO
S.. inspectors found three "best
practices" being employed by
. . . 24th MDG personnel which
S- they'll take back and encour-
S-.. . age healthcare organizations
S - across the United States to
p o'-n. -a Jm M e , adopt.
photo by Senior Airman Jeremy Moore (USAF)









16 Tropic Times
1 May 7, 1999


IFNews


99-/4'-


6/i


Crash claims first U.S. deaths in Balkans


WASHINGTON (American Forces Press Service)-
Two soldiers killed Tuesday in the crash of their Apache
helicopter in Albania are the first U.S. troops to die in the
NATO air offensive against Yugoslavia.
President Clinton, in Spangdahlem, Germany,
Wednesday to visit airmen and soldiers involved in Op-
eration Allied Force, said the jobs service members do
are inherently dangerous.
"Just yesterday we lost two brave Americans in a
helicopter training accident in Albania, and today we
grieve with their families and pray for them," he said.
Officials will not comment further on the crash until
the Army completes its investigation of the accident.To
date, the United States has lost an F-117 and an F-16
over Yugoslavia. Combat search and rescue specialists
rescued both pilots. Last week, a Marine AV-8B Harrier
crashed during carrier qualifications and another Apache
crashed during a training exercise in Albania; no one
was injured in these incidents.
Clinton told the airmen, soldiers and their families that
Yugoslav action in Kosovo is an affront to everything
the United States and the other 18 countries of NATO
stand for.
"Two months ago there were 1.8 million ethnic Alba-
nians living [in Kosovo]," he said. "Now more than 1.5
million have been forced from their homes. Their villages
burned, their men often separated from their families and
killed - some of them bundled and set on fire."
This violence, he said, is the result of a deliberate,
calculated 10-year campaign by Yugoslav President
Slobodan Milosevic to exploit the religious and ethnic
differences in the former Yugoslavia to preserve and
enhance his dictatorial powers. Clinton pointed to earlier
conflicts in Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia as proof of
Milosevic's intent.He said Milosevic's so-called ethnic
cleansing has included concentration camps, murder and
rape. It has also entailed the destruction of priceless re-
ligious, cultural and historical sites and of the books and
records of other ethnic groups. "It is evil," Clinton said.
Clinton said the ultimate goal of the air campaign


against Yugoslavia is to create "the kind of world where
an innocent people are not singled out for repression,
for expulsion, for destruction just because of their reli-
gious and ethnic heritage."
NATO stands for the freedom and unity of Europe,
he said, yet the Yugoslav persecution of the ethnic Al-
banians in Kosovo is "occurring in the heart of Europe,
on NATO's doorstep. We must repudiate it. We must
reverse it, and we intend to do that."
Clinton stressed NATO has no quarrel with the Serb
people.
" Our quarrel is with ethnic cleansing and systematic
killing and uprooting and bigotry," he said.
He reiterated NATO's goals: Milosevic must agree
to withdraw all army, police and paramilitary units in
Kosovo. NATO must be the core of any security force
in the province, and the ethnic Albanians who lived there
must be allowed to return.
"We will continue to pursue this campaign in which
we are now engaged," he said. "We will intensify it in an
unrelenting way until these objectives are met."
He said he understands the stresses on U.S. pilots
flying missions in support of Allied Force. He also sym-
pathized with families. "I know this is hard," he said. "I
know too many of these pilots are flying long hours with
too little rest. I know the stress and anxiety must be
unbearable."
But, Clinton said, service members who wonder if it is
worth it should look around when they meet other ser-
vice members. The U.S. military is the best in the world
and it includes all ethnic, religious and racial segments
of the United States, he said.
"Together we make a stronger military," he said.
"Thank God you live in a society that honors the differ-
ences [among people]. Think how terrible it would be to
live in a society that didn't.
"A few years ago you helped end the cruel war in
Bosnia, and I'm sorry you have to do it all over again,
but I'm proud of the job you're doing today in Kosovo,"
Clinton said.


Rodman transfers to the




Government of Panama























JA


One last time
(Top photo) GMC (SW) Gelenn McFarlin, security officer, Rodman
Naval Station (right) and MA2 (PJ) Bill Gallagher, assistant security
officer, Rodman Naval Station, fold the U.S. flag one last time April
30 in front of the former headquarters building on Rodman. Rod-
man Naval Station officially transferred to the Government of
Panama May 1.

(Right photo) Sailors at Rodman Naval Station lower the U.S. flag e
for the final time.

photos by Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett .. ..


Orientation for

Non-DoD schools
FORT CLAYTON - Command sponsored mili-
tary personnel and civilian employees with school-
age dependents remaining in Panama past August
1999 are urged to attend one of the non-DoD schools
orientations to be held May 17, 1999 at 1 p.m. at the
Howard Elementary School Auditorium and at 5 p.m.
at the Valent Recreation Center on Fort Clayton.
The orientation will be conducted by Dr. Charles
Renno, DoDDS Panama/Cuba Non-DoD School li-
aison and Miriam Borras, DoDDS Panama/Cuba
Non-DoD specialist who have been administering
the non-DoD school program for Mexico, the Carib-
bean, Central and South America.
At the orientation, parents will be provided with
an Application for Enrollment in a Non-DoD School
for each of their school-age children, and an ex-
planation of the covered and non-covered educa-
tional expenses. Those schools in Panama which
have an English or bilingual program are being in-
vited to send representatives to the meetings to
explain their programs, requirements, and answer
questions from parents. Private schools in Panama
have selective enrollment policies, which means they
do not take all applicants. Some also have waiting
lists. It is, therefore, imperative to complete enroll-
ment early to be sure that children will be able to
attend school this fall.
For those parents who can not find an accept-
able school locally, the non-DoD school program
can support home schooling for grades K-8 through
the Calvert Home School Program and for grades 9-
12 through the University of Nebraska Indepen-
dent Study High School. Military members who
brought their dependents to Panama at their own
expense and civilians without a travel agreement do
not qualify for educational benefits under the non-
DoD school program.



























Tropictivities

Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama Page BI
Serving the Joint Community


Z4e 4eau4 o naturee


story and photos by
Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett
Tropic Times Staff
Hard day at work, huh? Maybe a
little bit of stress at home too? Or
maybe that's not it at all.
Maybe you're just tired of the
same old routine of going out to the
club, or going to the movies or just
Sitting in front of the television
wasting who-knows-how-many hours
of your life.
Well, I have a suggestion. Go
nature watching. Step out of the
routine and enter a world where
things operate on a much simpler
level.
.. .. ... It's real easy, too. No crowds, no
, long lines for tickets, no commercials,
4.. just the world around you and the
. creatures that live in it.
You don't have to go far, either.
There are many animals right outside
your door just waiting to be discov-
ered, observed and appreciated.
I remember when I was a kid
growing up in western North Carolina
and I used to sit on the porch at home
and watch spiders meticulously
weaving their webs or lizards basking
in the midday sun. Squirrels ran
around looking for nuts while robins
carried worms back to the nest where
the young waited for their lunch to
arrive.
And it's no different here in
Panama. In fact, there is a diversity of


animal life here not found hardly
anywhere else in the world.
Do a little research and read about
different types of birds or insects
there are, then grab a pair of binocu-
lars and try to find them.
Visit El Valle, or Chiriqui or the
Barro Colorado Island Nature Pre-
serve. If you don't feel comfortable
traveling that far then you could visit
the Smithsonian Tropical Research
Institute out on the causeway past
what used to be Fort Amador. Or get
close to a crocodile during a crocodile
photo safari.
Many of these trips are just a
phone call away through the Air
Force and Army Outdoor Recreation
Centers.
You could even turn nature
watching into a hobby. Take pictures
to document your experience or start
an insect collection.
But more than anything, just relax
and observe. Without trying to sound
corny, become nature.
Just remember, nature watching is
nature watching, not touching.
Some animals are dangerous, and
it's a good idea to keep your distance.
So, when you grab for that insect that
you just have to have for your
collection, make sure you know what
you're touching.
So what are you waiting for? Open
your eyes and take advantage of a
precious natural resource.


Hasta Luego T- shirt
The American Red Cross is having
an Hasta Luego T- shirt sale. All prices
have been drastically reduced. To pur-
chase your T- shirt, stop by the Red Cross
Office 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. starting Monday in
Room 344, Building 519 on Fort Clayton.
For more information, contact the Red
Cross at 288-5509.


School physical
The Howard Air Force Base and Fort
Clayton Pediatric Clinics are in-
creasing the number of school
physical appointments avail-
able. Physical appointments
will be offered 1 - 3:30 p.m.
daily. For more information,
contact your local clinics.


FSU Commencement
The Florida State University Panama
Canal Branch cordially invites
you to its 1998 - 99 Commence-
ment Ceremony 10 a.m. Satur-
day at the Panama Canal Col-
lege Auditorium, La Boca,
Balboa. For more information,
call 285-6386/6388.


May 7, 1999


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Tropic Times
B 2 May 7, 1999


Notices


I6 Tips0 0 adours


Air Force
*Outdoor Recreation: 284-6107
Tours depart from Howard Theater.
Visit Gatun Lake 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday, $20. Take a trip to the At-
lantic Side and enjoy the scenery and
visit Gatun Locks, Fort San Lorenzo
and the Fort Sherman Zoo. Stop for
lunch at the Tarpon Club Restaurant.
Horseback riding at Cermeiio
8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday, $24. Experience
an exciting ride at Cermefio Ranch in
the valley of Capira. The spirited
horses will delight you as you explore
the beautiful surrounding area, fa-
mous for its rolling hills and breathtak-
ing vista. Cost includes transporta-
tion, horses, gear and guide. Bring
your own lunch and a change of cloth-
ing if you desire.
Portobelo and Langosta Beach
tour 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday, $14/per-
son. The historic site of Portobelo is
located on the Atlantic coast in a
large and beautiful bay which once
had the capacity for as many as 100
Spanish galleons. After Portobelo, we
will stop at Langosta Beach where you
can snorkel, go shelling or sun bathe.
Be sure to bring coolers with drinks,
beachwear and snorkeling gear.
Crocodile photo safari 8 - 11 p.m.
Thursday, $40. Trained guides will


capture the crocodiles, giving everyone
the chance to take pictures. Don't forget
insect repellent, your camera, flashlight
and rain gear.
Panama Museums tour 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
May 14, $10. Visit the Natural Science,
Reina Torres and the New Canal Muse-
ums in Casco Viejo. Discover the culture,
art, history, flora and fauna of this won-
derful country. Bring some extra money
to pay for the small entrance fees and for
lunch.
Old Panama and Miraflores Locks
tour 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. may 15, $10.
Peacock Bass fishing 5 a.m. - 2 p.m.
May 15, $25. Be prepared to catch a boat
load of fish while peacock bass fishing
near Arenosa Village on Gatun Lake.
Bring your own fishing gear, lunch and
refreshments. Transportation, boat with
guide, bait, ice and coolers for fish and
fish cleaning are provided.
Drake's Island snorkeling trip 7 a.m.
- 5 p.m. May 16, $22. Isla Drake, the his-
torical burial site of Sir Francis Drake,
located on the Atlantic side near
Portobelo, offers a unique opportunity to
the novice snorkeler to explore a reef,
see exotic fish and enjoy the beautiful
Atlantic Ocean.

Army
*Outdoor Recreation Center: 288-
7355/6453


Reservations for outings are under
way at Building 178, Fort Clayton.
Snorkel/dive at Portobelo Saturday.
Portobelo offers much more and its
about an hour and 20 minutes from the
city unless you stop off for a swim at the
black sand Maria Chiquita beach which
has changing facilities, or the white sand
Playa Langosta beach.
El Valle day trip Sunday and May 16.
Join us once a week, the otherwise quiet
and relaxed El Valle becomes a pictur-
esque country shopping center celebrat-
ing its most popular tradition, the Sun-
day Market.
Horseback riding in El Valle May
15. Fee includes transportation, guide
and horse.
Ocean Kayaking May 22.
El Valle Canopy May 29. This adven-
ture features a canopy tour of El Macho.
You will traverse from tree to tree and
platform to platform using pulleys.
The Mamoni overnight trip is avail-
able. Includes a two-hour drive into
Chepo and a three-hour horseback ride.
Enjoy typical food, rustic sleeping ac-
commodations and activities. Not meant
for the mild at heart. For more informa-
tion, call the center.
*Valent Recreation Center: 288-
6500
Make early reservations for tours:
Visit historic Panama City founded


in 1506 and destroyed and sacked by
pirate Henry Morgan. Tour the Casco
Viejo founded in 1676, reminiscent of
its Spanish and French heritage. Stop
at San Jose Church to see their
Golden Altar, the National Theater,
Las Bovedas enjoy live music Fridays
and Saturdays and the French restau-
rant 7 p.m. Monday - Fridays and the
new Canal Museum.
Isla Grande 6:30 a.m. Saturday. Stop
at Portobelo to see the Black Christ.
El Valle 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Enjoy
shopping in the native market which is
only open on Sundays. You'll be able
to purchase handicrafts such as soap-
stone carvings, bateas, and pottery. El
Valle's lush vegetation, colorful flow-
ers and waterfalls make it one of the
most popular tourist attractions in
Panama. Enjoy lunch at Hotel
Campestre.
Shopping tour 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Thurs-
day. Visit Central Avenue, El Dorado
and Los Pueblos shopping malls, the
most popular shopping area in-town.
Carlson Wagonlit offers the lowest
military air fares, hotel, car rental dis-
counts and more. Service also in-
cludes: Special weekday rates at
Gorgona beachfront cabins; Chiva
Parrandera on Thursdays, Fridays
and Saturdays and partial Canal Tran-
sits. Call 288-7077 for details.


Rec ente new


Air Force
*Howard Community Center:
284-6161
The center is located on the
Ground Floor of Building 707. New
hours: 7:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. Monday -
Fridays, noon - 6 p.m. Saturday,
closed Sundays and holidays and
noon - 6 p.m. down days.
Jewelry show and sale 11 a.m. - 5
p.m. today. You don't have to go off
base to shop for fine jewelry.
Souvenir vendors bazaar 11 a.m. -
5 p.m. Saturday.
*Howard Skills Development
Center: 284-6361
The Balloon Shop is located in
the Skills Development Center, Build-
ing 711. Check our daily specials and
make someone smile. The Skills De-
velopment Center now has the Bal-
loon Shop and Pack-N-Wrap with
gifts, balloons and wrappings for
shipping for all occasions.
*Outdoor Adventures: 284-6107
Rent Howard bohios and pools for
private parties or squadron func-
tions. If you wish to serve alcohol,
you must submit a letter of request


to the 24th Support Group deputy
commander at least four working
days before the event.
*Howard AFB Sports and Recre-
ation Rental Center: 284-6107/
3539
Check out the wide variety of
equipment for rent, camping, fishing
and boating, home entertainment,
home improvement, outdoor, picnic
and party, sports and cooking equip-
ment for a minimal fee daily, weekend
and weekly rental. PCSing? If so, get
$5 off weekly and monthly rentals on
TVs, VCRs and TV/VCR combos.
Must be accompanied by orders.
Rent a mountain bike for a month or
week and receive a free water bottle.

Army
*Valent Recreation Center:
288-6500
Private tours for 10 - 15 people
can be arranged. Advance reserva-
tions and payment required for any
tours listed or other local tours. The
center also provides music rooms,
movies on weekends, slot machine,
pool tables, ping pong tables and
rental service.


Art -n cat


Air Force
SHoward Skills Development
Center: 284-6361
New hours of operation 10 a.m. - 4
p.m. Tuesday - Saturdays.
The center accepts commercial
credit cards.
Registration and payment are re-
quired before attending classes.
Classes will be cancelled 24 hours
prior if minimum participation is not
met.
Artificial flower arranging 10 a.m.
- noon Saturday - May 15, $10 plus
supplies. One lesson.
Stained glass workshop 10 a.m. - 1


p.m. May 15, $12.50 plus supplies. Three
lessons.
Clay flowers I - 3 p.m. May 18, $25.
Includes three lessons. Students need to
purchase the supplies.

Army
*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Cen-
ter: 288-5957/7360
Drawing and acrylic painting 2 - 4
p.m. Sunday and 7 - 9 p.m. Wednes-
days. Watercolor and oil painting tech-
niques 7 - 9 p.m. Thursday. Painting sup-
plies are not included in the fee. Regis-
ter in advance. Call for details.
Crafts classes available:
Pottery class 1 p.m. Wednesday.


Woodworking qualification class
9:30 a.m. - noon Saturdays.
Framing instruction 6:30 - 9 p.m.
Thursday. Call for details.
Guitar construction 7- 9 p.m. Thursday.
*Fort Clayton Ceramics Shop: 288-
4360 Ceramics shop close May 31.
Ceramic instruction available: Learn
the fine art of ceramics. Classes are of-
fered at all levels.
Beginner's ceramic painting 6 - 8
p.m. Thursday. Fee is $20.
Ceramic qualification 10 a.m. - 12:30
p.m. Saturday.
Ceramic orientation for pouring 2 - 3
p.m. Wednesday.


Pastel chalk technique 4 - 5 p.m.
Wednesday, $10 plus supplies.
Eye painting 7 p.m. Wednesday, $5.
Dry brush technique 2 - 3 p.m.
Thursday.
Airbrush classes, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Friday, $5.
Advance registration required for
the following courses:
Clay Flower making I a.m. - 1 p.m.
Sunday, $15. Four sessions. Join us
at the center and don't miss the won-
derful class.
Learn to apply Fiesta Color 2 - 4
p.m. Sunday. Cost $20. Four sessions.
Stone stroke class, Sundays, $10.


Child and Youth


14 - 15 MAY
buiildng 155, Ft. Clayton


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AMlamw for4trAld 2 -5 ". oft* xd
'an enLek� Tlmes* sch as: Cr-y
$Nnn,,r Fvos. R Ii, /,jile nand t[Mve
1'upp Fun; Wasi and Wandwful, Anc.
Wto,4 Ajo Oildm� 5-12 rs, Havelly
6enres indu. Tlunnd sbro h Twoh ,
clvmpic Sprit find a oyowg and others.
Doij oyaaA plaok4~ UdkJK' t Id ript,
swirnmMna, ads and crail, ganv-,
<4,Aruft Ow hilsj, ond mu"I more.


INFO.: 288-6816/6810/7506


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Notices ropic TimesB3
Notice May 7,1999 "3


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piww ded 'lo
children
0 - 6years 0o
each Ilight


Sp~ecil vet


Philharmonic Der
* Atlapa Convention Center
The National Association of Concerts is hosting
the exceptional presentation of Philharmonie Der
Nationen directed by Justus Frantz 8 p.m. Wednes-
day at the Atlapa Convention Center. Tickets are
available at the association or at the center the night
of the event. Come join us and enjoy this cultural
event. For more information, call 214-7236.


Town Hall Meeting
* Fort Clayton
The U. S. Army South is hosting a Town Hall
Meeting 9 a.m Thursday at the Fort Clayton Va-
lent Recreation Center. Family and members of
the entire community are welcome to participate
and get updated information and learn about up-
coming events. For more information, call 288-
9303.


Recycling Marathon
� Fort Clayton
The Directorate of Community Activities is host-
ing a Recycling Marathon May 14. Collect bond pa-
per, color paper and cardboard, non ferrous and fer-
rous metals, glass and aluminum cans. The delivery
place is at the Recycling Collection Center locates
in Building 163, Fort Clayton. For more information,
call 288-4838.


Sops ad* lase


Air Force
*Howard Community Center:
284-6161
Beginner, intermediate and ad-
vanced English and Spanish classes.
Call the center for more information.
*Howard Pool: 284-3569
Hours of operation: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Tuesday - Sunday and holidays.
Closed Monday.
Water Aerobics 8:30 - 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays, $2/class,
call for more information.
*Howard Auto Skills Center:
284-3370
Hours: 11 a.m. - 7 p.m Tuesdays -
Thursdays, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday, 9
a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sunday and closed Mondays and
holidays.
Vehicle resale lot: Planning to sell
your car? Contact Auto Skills at
Howard.
Services: Towing 11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Tuesday - Thursdays, 11 a.m. - 6
p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday
(as long as a qualified driver is on
duty). If a tow extends beyond 5:30
p.m., there is an additional hourly
charge. Air conditioning repair, brak-
es, oil changes, tune-ups, front-end
alignment and welding available.
Vehicle inspection services 11
a.m. - 7 p.m. Tuesday - Thursdays, 11
a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday
self help and closed Mondays. Cost
is $10.25. Have your vehicle inspect-
ed at the center in Building 722. Ve-
hicles cannot be left for inspections.
Call the center for details.


*Howard Wood Skills Center: 284-
4510
For wood shop needs, please contact
the Fort Clayton Wood Shop.


Army
*Fort Clayton Boat & Scuba Shop:
288-7355/6453
Fishing enthusiasts are invited to par-
ticipate in a Bass Fishing Tournament
through May. There's a $50 cash prize
per month and a $200 cash prize for the
Grand Finale. Register now at Building
178, Fort Clayton.
Motorboat operator course offered 8
a.m. - noon monthly. Fee is $10 for Jon
boat certification, $20 for Boston Whaler/
ocean certification. Advance reserva-
tions required.
Gatun Lake fishing charters avail-
able, $30/person, minimum of three
people, includes Jon boat w/30hp. In-
cludes boat, guide, cooler, fishing tackle,
bait and safety equipment.
Open-water dive classes begin Mon-
days. Minimum of six people required.
Includes pool sessions, theory sessions
and open-water dives. Register in ad-
vance.
The Scuba Shop has equipment for
rent, advanced instruction and services
to include repairing spear guns, regula-
tors and gauges.
*Auto Craft Center:
The center is located in Buildings
178-A, B, C and Building 135, Fort
Clayton.
The shop features work-area bays,
electric lifts, instructions and classes.
Electric engine analysis 4 - 9 p.m.
Monday.


Air-conditioning
maintenance 2 p.m.
Monday, Thurs-
days and Fridays.
Noon - 5 p.m. Satur-
days, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m
Sunday.
Wheel alignment
3 - 9 p.m. Monday,
Thursday and Fri-
days.
Brake repair
class 1 - 9:30 p.m.
Friday.
*Fort Sherman
Auto Shop Building
153:
Hours of opera- I
tion: noon - 4 p.m.
Sunday, closed
Monday and Tues-
days, 4 - 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Thurs-
days and Fridays
and 10 a.m. - 6 p.m
Saturday and holi-
days.
The shop has four
bays with one en-
gine lift, tire-chang-
ing equipment, en-
gine hoist, a com-
pressor to remove shocks and various
other equipment.
SValent Recreation Center: 288-
6500
New hours of operation: 9 a.m. -9
p.m. Monday - Fridays, noon - 9 p.m.
Saturday, Sundays and holidays. Regis-
ter for ongoing classes.
Spanish headstart class, eight week
course, meets twice a week. Intermediate


Spanish classes available.
Fee includes manual. For more infor-
mation, call the center.
Piano classes Mondays - Thurs-
days, half-hour sessions.
Basic English classes 10 a.m. -
12:10 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Intermediate English Mondays and
Wednesday. For more information,
call the center at 288-6500.


Revival

May 55-9, 1999


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El Nispero Zoo
Visit El Nisoero Zoo in El Valle and say hello to Mr. crocodile. Contact your Outdoor
Recreation Center and set up your trip or tour now. Call 284-6107 or 288-7355.


I


F









B4 Tropic Times
B May 7, 1999


Potpourri


The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is
accepting applications on a continuous basis for
the following announcements. All interested
applicants need to re-submit an updated SF-171
every six months. Registers established from these
announcements will be used to fill temporary
positions.

VB# 51-OC General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill
most clerical positions). *

VB# 52-OC Sales Store Checker, NM-3
(Intermittent wk sch). *

* Until further notice, the written test for all
temporary appointments to clerical positions at
grades NM-2, 3, and 4 is waived.

VB# 55-OC Secretary (Typing/Office Automation),
NM-5, specialized experience required.

56th Signal Battalion Open Continuous Announ--
cements

OPEN: 10-17-97 CLOSE: Will remain open
until further notice

NOTE: The announcements listed below will
be used to fill recurring (temporary/permanent)
vacancies within various divisions of the 56th
Signal Battalion. Interested candidates should
ensure that their application package is complete
in order to receive proper consideration (i.e.
SF171, OF-612, Resume, DD-214 if claiming
veteran's preference, SF-50, current performance
appraisal).

NON-MANUAL POSITIONS:

VB# 21SIG Telecommunication Specialist, NM-
391-11
VB# 26SIG Telecommunication Specialist, NM-
391-09
VB# 30SIG Telecommunication Specialist, NM-
391-7/9

Directorate of Community Activities, Sports &
Leisure - Open Continuous Announcements

OPEN: 04-30-99 CLOSE: Until further notice

VB# 235A-99-SC Recreation Specialist, NM-188-
05/07

RECRUITMENT INFORMATION:

HOW TO APPLY: Submit an SF-171, OF-612 or
Resume to the Job Information Center, JIC,
Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, by 4:14 PM on
the closing date of the announcement. YOUR
application must include: (1) Member 4 copy of
the DD-214, if claiming veterans preference, (2)
copy of college transcripts or PBCE Form 540, if
claiming education, (3) copy of CASP notice of
rating, if applicable, (4) copy of latest SF-50 if you
are a current or previous federal employee. (If you
are a temporary federal employee and have not
received an official performance rating, please
submit a memo/letter from your current supervisor
regarding your performance).

IMPORTANT NOTE: All U.S. citizens and third
country nationals applying for positions
announced by this agency must attach copy of
one the following documents: U.S. citizen/third
country national bilingual ID card, issued to
civilian/military command sponsored family
members; cedula; VI-2 card; VI-3 card, provisional
permit of permanency card, permit in process.

VB# VACANCY, TITLE AND LOCATION
OPEN: 05-07-99 CLOSE: 05-18-99

259-99-SS CONTRACT SPECIALIST, NM-1102-
09. 9th ASC, 56th Signal Battalion, Resource
Management Div., Contract Management Branch,
Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to
NM-07. NOTE: Must be bilingual (Spanish/
English). Temporary NTE: 07/18/99.


Cl ubew


Clayton
*The Loop: 288-7035.
Enjoy the sports games on the TVs available in
CJ's Sports Bar and Grill. Delicious appetizers
available. Lunch is 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Monday
- Friday, dinner 5 - 9 p.m. Monday - Fridays and
4:30 - 9 p.m. Saturday and Sundays.
Prizmz opens until 11 p.m. Wednesday and
Thursday, 1 a.m. Friday, Saturdays and Sun-
days.
Select your favorite tunes tonight at 5 p.m.
Over 100 CDs to choose from the 1950s to the
1990s.
*Clavton Community Club: 288-4716.
The Forum features Chef Rangel's special buf-
fets. Country buffet 5 - 9 p.m. Wednesday fea-
tures from ham hocks and fried chicken to black-
eyed peas. Seafood Fridays. For those who prefer
beef, the Forum is offering steak choices a la carte.
Each evening is a treat on its own.
Sunday brunch 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. The best
deal in town, best value and best entertainment. En-
joy the hot and cold entrees, salads, breakfast items,
pastries and desserts. Great food and background
music.
The club features a special buffet 4:30 - 8 p.m.
Sunday in the ballroom. Members pay $5.95, special
rate for children 5 to I -years-old and under 5 free.
Non-member fee available.
The Corral is open 7 p.m. - 2 a.m. Wednes-
days, Fridays and Saturdays. Join in for great
country sounds.
Tecno Latin Sounds 9 p.m. Wednesday, Fri-
days and Saturdays at The Underground.
*Casa Maria: 288-5767
Authentic Mexican cuisine served 5 - 9 p.m.
Tuesday - Saturdays. Delivery service available
on Fort Clayton.
*La Mola Caf6: 288-4202
Breakfast 6:30 - 9:30 a.m. Monday - Fridays, 7
- 11 a.m. Saturday - Sundays; lunch 11 a.m. - 1:30
p.m. Monday - Fridays, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday
- Sunday; dinner 5 - 8 p.m. daily.
*Cafe 519: 288-6007
Breakfast 6 - 11 a.m. Monday - Fridays.
Lunch 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. with hot specials, a salad
bar and sandwiches. Enjoy a special buffet
Thursday.

Howard
*Howard Club-Building 113: 284-4680.
The Officers Lounge has relocated to a co-lo-
cated Top 3 Enlisted and Officer's lounge at
Building 707.
*Tropic Breeze Club-Building 710: 284-
4189
Cashiers hours: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Saturday -
Wednesdays, 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Thursday, 9 a.m. -
noon Fridays.
Mother's Day Brunch 10 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Sunday. Costs are $7.95 adults, $3.95 children ages
5 - 12 and under 5-years-old eat free.
Closed for lunch 1:15 - 2 p.m. daily.
"A la Carte" Sunday breakfast 9 a.m. - noon.
Eggs-to-order, pancakes, bacon, sausage,


omelets, fresh breads, croissants and more.
A la Carte breakfast 6 - 9 a.m. Monday -
Fridays.
International lunch buffet 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
$4.95. Friday: Southern buffet. Monday: All
American. Tuesday: Italian. Wednesday:
Mexican. Thursday: Oriental.
All ranks a la carte dining. 5:30 - 9 p.m.
Wednesday - Saturdays. A great menu with-
appetizers, salads, soups and entrees to please
everyone.
Breezeway open 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Monday -
Wednesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Tuesday and Fridays, 1la.m. - 11:30 p.m.
Saturday and Sundays, noon - 11 p.m. Sunday.
Steak out 2:30 - 8 p.m. Sunday.
*Tropic Breeze Club Ballroom
Open for special functions only. R & B 8 p.m. -
midnight Fridays.
+Tropic Breeze Club Casual Cove: 284-4189.
Open 11 a.m. - midnight Mondays,
Wednesday and Thursdays, and 11 a.m. - 1:30
a.m. Friday.
Members only Social hour 5:30 p.m. Friday.
Pool tournaments 6:30 p.m. Friday.
Alternative Rock and Tecno 4 - 8 p.m.
Variety music 8 p.m. - midnight Saturdays
Karaoke plus Late Night Disco 11a.m. -
midnight Monday and more Karaoke until 2 a.m.
Tuesday.
Free juke box 11 a.m. - 2 a.m. Tuesday.
Service members appreciation day and draft
beer special all day Wednesday.
Pool tournament 7 p.m. Wednesday
Social hour with snack 6 - 8 p.m. Wednesday
Country and Western night 8 - 11 p.m.
Thursday.
Members night and club card drawing 8:30 p.m.
Thursday. Social hour reduced prices 4:30 - 7:30
p.m.
All nighters 9 p.m. May 15 Los Almirantes
and May 30 Castalia y los Salchichas. Open to
enlisted members and their guest.
*Top 3 Enlisted Lounge: 284-4189
Open 4 - 9 p.m. Monday - Thursdays and 4 -
11 p.m. Friday.
Super social hour 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. Sunday.
Blue note 7 p.m. Sunday. All ranks welcome.
Boss and buddy night social hour snacks 5:30
p.m. Monday.
*Mulligan's on the Green at Horoko: 283-
3295
Breakfast menu 6 - 10 a.m. Saturday, Sundays
and holidays. Open for lunch and dinner.
Weekly lunch and dinner 10 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Monday - Thursdays, 10 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. Friday,
6 - 9:30 p.m. Saturday and 6 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Sunday and holidays.
Mongolian barbecue 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. Monday,
$8.95 for the first 8-ounce and $4.95 for the
vegetarian version.
*Cafe Seven-O-Seven-Building 707: 284-5848
Open 6 a.m. - 7 p.m. Monday - Fridays. Noon - 5
p.m. Saturday and Sundays. Try our deli
sandwiches and pastries.


The Tropic
Breeze Club is
hosting a
Mother's Day
Brunch 10 a.m. -
1:30 p.m.
Sunday. Costs
are $7.95 for
adults and $3.95
" for children
ages 5 - 12. For
more informa-
tion, call 284-
4189.

I """""""l " 2 I


A


____j











Movies


Tropic Times
May 7, 1999B


Location Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Howard AFB 6:30 pm: Simply 4:30 pm: Forces of 4:30 pm: My 7 pm: October Sky 7 pm: The Matrix* 7 pm: 10 Things I 7 pm: Shakespeare
284-3583 Irresistible Nature" Favorite Martian" Hate About You In Love
8:30 pm: The 6:30 pm: October 6:30 pm: Simply
Matrix* Sky Irresistible
8:30 pm: 10 Things I 8:30 pm: The Matrix*
Hate About You

Fort Clayton 6:30 pm: October 4:30 pm: My 4:30 pm: Forces of 7 pm: The Matrix* 7 pm: Shakespeare 7 pm: The Matrix* 7 pm: Rushmore
288-7279 Sky Favorite Martian* Nature" In Love
8:30 pm: 200 6:30 pm: Simply 6:30 pm: October
Cigarettes Irresistible Sky
8:30 pm: The 8:40 pm: 10 Things
Matrix* I Hate About You




All movies are subject to change depending on R Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent
arrival in country or adult guardian.
Tickets are available in five price categories: $3.50, $3, $1.75, PG-13 Parental guidance suggested for children under 13.
$1.50 and $1. *First run movies $3.50 **Special Price PG Parental guidance suggested.
AAFES Home Page: www.panama.phoenix.net/-aafespan.default.html G Suitable for general audience.


Now showing F


Forces of Nature
Sandra Bullock, Ben Affleck
Ben has two days to get from New York to Savannah for his
wedding. How hard can that be in this age of planes, trains and
automobiles? Various circumstances hinder his trip to Savannah.
Ben has to wonder if somebody up there is trying to tell him some-
thing. R, 1 hr, 49 min.

The Matrix
Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne
Keanu Reeves stars in a cyberpunk thriller where human life is
discovered to be a virtual dream. Reeves is a computer hacker
who uncovers an elaborate campaign of deceit. Computer over-
lords have created an extensive earthly facade with plans to domi-
nate the "real " world. Rebels Laurence Fishburne and Carrie-
Anne Moss team with Reeves to combat the Matrix. R, 2 hr, 10
min.

My Favorite Martian
Jeff Daniels, Christopher Lloyd
Based on the television series, "My Favorite Martian," ambi-
tious television reporter Tim O'Hara stumbles upon a Martian
whose spaceship has accidentally crash landed on earth. PG, 1
hr, 28 min.

Simply Irresistible
Sarah Michelle Gellar, Sean Patrick Flannery
Sean Patrick Flannery stars as a department store clerk who
falls prey to restaurateur Sara Michelle Gellar. While he tries to
resist the young chefs charms, Gellar struggles to keep her
mother's business afloat. Her fortunes change when she discov-
ers a magical crab that gives her the power to cook up anything -
even love. PG-13, 1 hr, 15 min.


October Sky
Jake Gyllenhaall, Laura Dern
Jake Gyllenhaal stars as former NASA science engineer Homer
Hickam. Growing up in a small town, Hickam is destined to fol-
low in the footsteps of his coal mining father until the soviet satel-
lite Sputnik flies over his town and inspires him and his friends to
build and launch their own homemade rockets. R, 1 hr, 48 min.

Shakespeare In Love
Gwyneth Paltrow, Ralph Fiennes
Fiennes stars as a young William Shakespeare with writers
block in this elizabethan comedy. Gwyneth Paltrow won the 1999
Oscar for Best Actress while Judi Dench won Best Supporting
Actress for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth. The movie won Best
Picture. R, 1 hr, 49 min.

Rushmore
Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray
Jason Schwartzman stars as a student who loves attending the
Rushmore Academy. He's the editor of the newspaper and year-
book; and involved in every club from the dodgeball society to
the debate team. He's also one of the worst students. Amidst the
threat of expulsion, Schwartzman falls for first grade teacher
Olivia Williams, as does his tycoon mentor Bill Murray.
R, 1 hr, 49 min.

10 Things I Hate About You
Larisa Oleynik, Julia Stiles
A high school version of "Taming of the Shrew." A rule in the
Stratford household forbids Oleynik from dating until her ill-tem-
pered sibling does so first. In desperation, wannabe boyfriend
Joseph Gordon-Levitt tries to find one who can tame and woo
the older sister's heart. PG, 1 hr, 43 min.


'S 0
* . 0
* .


















Showing Tuesday at the Fort Clayton Theater.
* 0








S" Show ingTuesday atthe FOrto ClaytonTheater.


Howard AFB


6:30 pm: October Sky
(PG) Jake Gyllenhaal,
Laura Dern


8:30 pm: The Matrix
(R) Keanu Reeves,
Laurence Fishburne


Fort Clayton


6:30 pm: Simply Irre-
sistible (PG-13) Sarah
Michelle Gellar, Sean
Patrick Flannery


8:30 pm: Life(R)
Eddie Murphy, Martin
Lawrence


li I














SCN TV


Key: + Program time change due to live programming event; * Mature theme; " Series starts; *"Series ends; *"' Program moved to new day and/or time


o
v- 6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
Ca 8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Barney & Friends
10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
� 11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
C Show
= Great Moms
C 12:00 Headline News
.= 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Sylvester & Tweety
Mysteries
3:30 Kratt's Creatures
4:00 Sesame Street
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:35 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 CNN Headline News
2:00 PGA Golf:
Compaq Classic
(2nd Round)
4:00 Basketball:
Harlem Globetrotter's
vs College All-Stars


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Barney & Friends
10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
Great Moms
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Sylvester & Tweety
Mysteries
3:30 Kratt's Creatures
4:00 Xena: Warrior Princess
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 Ghost (TV-PG)
3:30 Shipwrecked (TV-G)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 ESPNews


6:00 CBS 48-Hours
O 7:00 ABC Crime & Justice
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Morning Business
Lf Report
"" 9:00 ABC Good Morning
fl) America
- 11:00 NHL Playoffs: (T)
Teams To Be Announced
2:00 MSNBC Time and Again
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
5:00 Showbiz Today
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 PGA Golf: (T)
Compaq Classic
(2nd Round)
4:00 Basketball: (T)
Harlem Globetrotter's
vs College All-Stars


7:00 Homicide: Life on the
( Streets
ca 8:00 Housesitter (TV-PG)
10:00 Doug
(0 10:30 Rugrats
'- 11:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
a) 1:00 Cats And Dogs
3:00 Homicide: Life on the
Streets
4:00 Housesitter (TV-PG)
O See Primetime table
12:00 Rasputin (TV-PG)
2:00 The View
3:00 Better Homes & Gardens
3:30 Home Matters
4:00 Grace Under Fire
4:30 Ellen
5:00 34th Annual Academy
of Country Music
Awards


6:00 Headline News
6:30 Classic Cartoon
7:00 Sesame Street Specials
7:30 Classic Cartoon
Marathon
9:00 Aaalh! Real Monsters
9:30 Are You Afraid of the
Dark?
10:00 Navy/Marine Corps
News
10:30 Air Force TV News
11:00 Nova
12:00 Dateline NBC
1:00 34th Annual Academy
of Country Music
Awards
4:00 Soul Train
5:00 NASCAR Craftsman
Trucks:
Memphis 200
See Primetime table
12:00 Baywatch
1:00 Madame Sousatzka (TV-
PG)
3:00 Teamster Boss: Jackie
Presser
(TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 Hour of Power


6:00 Headline News
6:30 Classic Cartoon
7:00 Sesame Street Specials
7:30 Muppet Babies
8:00 Disney's Pepper Ann
8:30 Disney's Recess
9:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
9:30 Are You Afraid of the
Dark?
10:00 Navy/Marine Corps
News
10:30 Air Force TV News
11:00 NBA Playoffs
Tripleheader:
(First Round)
See Primetime table
12:00 Baywatch
1:00 Madame Sousatzka (TV-
PG)
3:00 Teamster Boss: Jackie
Presser
(TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 Hour of Power


6:00 Dateline NBC Fri
7:00 ABC 20/20 Fri
8:00 Saturday Morning
9:00 Showbiz
9:30 Style with Elsa Klensch
10:00 Saturday
10:30 Page One withNick
Charles
11:00 Saturday
11:30 Headline News
12:00 Major League Baseball:
Angels at Red Sox
3:00 PGA Golf:
Compaq Classic: New Orleans
Entergy
5:00 NASCAR Craftsman
Trucks
Memphis 200
See Primetime table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 Washington Week In
Review
1:30 Wall Street Journal
Report
2:00 NHL Playoffs: (T)
Teams To Be Announced
5:00 Sportscenter


8:00 Rasputin (TV-PG)
10:00 The View
11:00 Better Homes & Gardens
11:30 Home Matters
12:00 Grace Under Fire
12:30 Ellen
1:00 34th Annual Academy
of Country Music
Awards
4:00 Rasputin (TV-PG)
See Primetime table
2:00 Worship for Kids
2:30 On Main Street
3:00 700 Club
3:30 Real Videos
4:00 7th Heaven
5:00 Road to Avonlea


6:00 The Coral Ridge Hour
6:30 Outreach of Love
7:00 The Field Afar
7:30 Day of Discovery
8:00 Sunday Today
9:00 Air Force TV News
9:30 Adventures Book Of
Virtues
10:00 Promised Land
11:00 MLS Soccer:
NY/NJ Metrostars
at D.C. United
1:00 AMA Supercross
3:00 The Field Afar
3:30 The Joy Luck Club (TV-
PG)
See Primetime table
12:30 America's Black Forum
1:00 Friday Night
2:00 Videolink
3:00 House Party 1 (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise


6:00 The Coral Ridge Hour
6:30 Outreach of Love
7:00 The Field Afar
7:30 Day of Discovery
8:00 Sunday Today
9:00 Air Force TV News
9:30 Adventures Book Of
Virtues**
10:00 Promised Land
11:00 NBA Playoffs
Tripleheader:
(First Round)
See Primetime table
12:30 America's Black Forum
1 :00 Friday Night
2:00 Videolink
3:00 House Party I (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise


6:00 Motor Week
6:30 This Week In Motor
Sports
7:00 Sunday Morning
8:00 CBS Sunday Morning
9:30 CBS Face the Nation
10:00 International
10:30 Style withElsa Klensch
11:00 MLS Soccer:
NY/NJ Metrostars
at D.C. United
1:00 AMA Supercross
3:00 Major League Baseball:
Braves at Padres
See Primetime table
12:00 George Michael Sports
Machine
12:30 Headline News
1:00 ABC This Week
2:00 ABC PGA Golf: (T)
Compac Classic: Energy
(Final Round)
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 Natl. Geographic
Specials
7:00 The Field Afar
7:30 The Joy Luck Club (TV-
PG)
10:00 Worship for Kids
10:30 On Main Street
11:00 700 Club
11:30 Real Videos
12:00 7th Heaven
1:00 Road to Avonlea
2:00 Nail. Geographic
Specials
3:00 The Field Afar
3:30 The Joy Luck Club (TV-
PG)
See Primetime table
12:00 The Harder They Fall
(TV-PG)
2:00 Doug
2:30 Rugrals
3:00 Simpsons
3:30 Home Improvement
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
5:00 CBS: We Were There


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Mister Rogers'
Neighbrhd
10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital

3:00 Bonkers
3:30 Mister Rogers'
Neighbrhd
4:00 California Dreams
4:30 All That
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 The Untouchables (TV-
PG)
3:00 48 Hours (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Mister Rogers'
Neighbrhd
10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Bonkers
3:30 Superman
4:00 California Dreams
4:30 All That
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 The Untouchables (TV-
PG)
3:00 48 Hours (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise


6:00 Dateline NBC Sun
7:00 Navy/Marine Corps
News
7:30 Air Force TV News
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Morning Business
Report
9:00 ABC Good Morning
America
11:00 NHL Playoffs: (T)
Teams To Be Announced
2:00 ABC 20/20 Sun
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
5:00 Showbiz Today
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 NBA Playoffs: (T)
Teams To Be Announced
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 New Detectives
7:00 ER
8:00 The Harder They Fall
(TV-PG)
10:00 Doug
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Simpsons
1 1:30 Home Improvement
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
1:00 CBS: We Were There
2:00 New Detectives
3:00 ER
4:00 The Harder They Fall
(TV-PG)
See Primetime table
12.00 Laura Lansing Slept
Here (TV-PG)
2:00 Doug
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Simpsons
3:30 Home Improvement
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
(TV-PG)
5:00 Amazing Machines


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Blues Clues
10:30 Co-Ed Training
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Blues Clues
3:30 Newton's Apple
4:00 Nick News
4:30 Scholastic Sports
America
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 Magnum Force (TV-PG)
3:30 Cagney & Lacey: View
Through Glass Ceil
(TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Blues Clues
10:30 Co-Ed Training
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Disney's Mighty
Ducks
3:30 Newton's Apple
4:00 Nick News
4:30 Scholastic Sports
America
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 Magnum Force (TV-PG)
3:30 Cagney & Lacey: View
Through Glass Ceil
(TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise


6:00 Dateline NBC Mon
7:00 Early Edition
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Morning Business
Report
9:00 ABC Good Morning
America
11:00 NBA Playoffs: (T)
Teams To Be Announced
1.30 ESPNews
2:00 MSNBC Time and
Again
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
5:00 Showbiz Today
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00' NBA Playoffs: (T)
Teams To Be Announced
4:30 ESPNews
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 Ancient Mysteries
7:00 Gun
8:00 Laura Lansing Slept
Here (TV-PG)
10:00 Doug
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Simpsons
I 1:30 Home Improvement
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
1:00 Amazing Machines
2:00 Ancient Mysteries
3:00 Gun
4:00 Laura Lansing Slept
Here (TV-PG)
See Primetime table
12:00 Twins (TV-PG)
2:00 Doug
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Simpsons
3:30 Home Improvement
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
5.00 The Aviators


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Barney & Friends
10:30 Bodyshaping
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Sesame Street
4:00 Saved By Bell:New
Class
4:30 LegendsOf/Hidden
Temple
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 In The Line Of Fire (TV-
PG)
3:00 Full Eclipse (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Barney & Friends
10:30 Bodyshaping
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Goof Troop
3:30 -Gargoyles
4:00 Saved By Bell:New
Class
4:30 LegendsOf/Hidden
Temple
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 In The Line Of Fire
(TV-PG)
3:00 Full Eclipse (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise


6:00 Dateline NBC Tuesday
7:00 Early Edition
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Morning Business
Report
9:00 ABC Good Morning
America
11:00 NHL Playoffs: (T)
Teams To Be Announced
2:00 MSNBC Time and
Again
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
5:00 Showbiz Today
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 NBA Playoffs: (T)
Teams To Be Announced
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 Vietnam:The 10,000
Day War
7:00 Melrose Place
8:00 Twins (TV-PG)
10:00 Doug
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Simpsons
I1:30 Home Improvement
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
1:00 The Aviators
2:00 Vietnam:The 10,000
Day War
3:00 Melrose Place
4:00 Twins (TV-PG)
See Primetime table
12:00 Everybody's Baby:
The Rescue of Jessica
2:00 Doug
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Simpsons
3:30 Home Improvement
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
5:00 Understanding


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Blues Clues
10:30 CoEd Training
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Animanaics
3:30 Sesame Street
4:30 Blues Clues
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 The French
Connection (TV-PG)
3:00 Robocop 3 (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Blues Clues
10:30 CoEd Training
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Animanaics
3:30 Waynehead
4:00 Hercules: The
Legendary Journeys
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 The French
Connection (TV-PG)
3:00 Robocop 3 (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise


6:00 Dateline NBC Wed
7:00 ABC 20/20 Wed
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Morning Business
Report
9:00 ABC Good Morning
America
11:00 Major League
Baseball: (T)
Teams To Be
Announced
2:00 MSNBC
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
5:00 Showbiz Today
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Primetime table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 NHL Playoffs: (T)
Teams To Be Announced
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 A&E Biography:
Pancho Villa
7:00 XFiles
8:00 Everybody's Baby:
The Rescue of Jessica
10:00 Doug
10:30 Rugrats
I 1:00 Simpsons
11:30 Home Improvement
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
9
1:00 Understanding
2:00 A&E Biography:
Pancho Villa
3:00 XFiles
4:00 Everybody's Baby:
The Rescue of Jessica
See Primetime table
12:00 Tin Soldier
2:00 Doug
2.30 Rugrals
3:00 Simpsons
3:30 Home Improvement
4 00 Star Trek: Deep Space
9
5.00 American Experience:
Heroes


B6


Tropic Times
May 7, 1998












SCN TV


Tropic Times B 7
May 7,1999 I


Key: + Program time change due to live programming event; * Mature theme; " Series starts; *"Series ends; **** Program moved to new day and/or time, (AIP) Already in progress

PRIMETIME 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30
SCN News :35 :35 Late
8 & 10 Showbiz A Wld Sister. Star Trek. Deep Space 9 X Files Headline ews35Showw/y
N&10 dlinN1P)Today Tngewsh Sister" News Tonight Sho w w/ Jay David
News (JIP) Letterman
SCN News :35 Late
I :B05y Showbiz Boy M eets "Sister. Star Trek: Deep Space X Files Headline SCN ews :35 w/ Jayw
Fri. 3 Headline Today Wtrld Sister" 9 * News Tn h S hw w/ Jay David
News (JIP) Leno Letterman
May 7 ---------- I -t------te-------------ma-------n------
ABC World CBS Headline Nightly
15 & 64 Nightly NHL Playoffs: Teams to be Announced Eyveing PBS Newshour Headline Business
News News News Report

16 & 65 The View Ht)Intes & M er U
16 & 65 The View Homes & M alers Gndeccr Fire Ellen 34th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards
Gardens
Coat: NASCAR
8 & 10 Craftlsman Trucks: Beverly Hills 90210) Melrose Place 20/20 Friday Headline Saturday Night Live
M em phis 200 News

at 14 & 63 Tripleheader First Round Beverly Hills 90210 Melrose Place 20/20 Friday Headline Saturday Night Live
Conl: NASCAR Hdlie Navy/Mari-
ay 8 15 & 64 Craftsman Trucks: Headws neCitps NFL Europe: Berlin Thunder at Amsterdam Admirals Headline McLaughli-
Mcimphis 200 News ews News n Group
16 & 65 irship tor On Main Real ti700 Club 7h Heaven Rad t A a aial Geographic The Field The Joluy
16 & 65 7001Club7hHeavoAntnleaLuck Club
Kids Street Videts Specials A far (TV-PG)

Bugs Austin City
Bunny Rugral's Limits
8 & 10 Doug Rugrats Moither's M her's Star Trek: Deep Space 9Headlne Nova D ks/Ch-
Special Special arlie
Ribison
SBugs Austin City
Bu Rugrat's Limits
Sun. 14 & 63 Tre leyde First Round Dntr's Dy he SCN M others Day Special: Mo other (TV-PG) Headline Nova Dilh-
M ay 9 Special Special arlie
9 pRobison

15 & 64 Healine' Vr F e Major League Baseball: Rangers at Blue Jays Sp'rht rhisn NBA k Perspectives
NNI Basketball
H o mI e
16 & 65 Doug Rugrats Simpsons lmprt vemi- Star Trek: Deep Space 9 CBS: We Were There New Detectives ER
ent
SCN News :35 Late
8 & Sh10 w Hdline Toid 6y 0 M minutes Dateline NBC Star Trek: Deep Space 9 Headlws Tn igh hw w/:35 Jay Sh with
News (JIP) Leno Letlerman
SCN News Evryd:35 Late
:05 Showbiz 60 MSinutesrtS po rtHeadline SCN News :35 Show w/
Mon. 14 & 63 Headline Ttday tMinulesves TheNPracticeN hL ow / Jay David
M ay News (JIP) nd Letterman
10 ABC World CBS Headl Nightly
15 & 64 News NHL Playoffs: Teamns io be Announced Eyeing PBS Newshour aine Business
Tonight News News Report

16 & 65 Doug Rugrals Simpsons Improvem- Star Trek: Deep Space 9 Amazing Machines Ancient Mysteries Gun
cat
SCN News SCN Special: More True Headline SCN News :35 ShLawtew
8 & 10 Headline Tdawiz Stories Touched By An Star Trek: Deep Space 9 The Aviators News Ton eight S how w/Jay David
News (JIP) Lent Letterman
SCN News SCN Special: MorSCN NewSCN News : 35 :35 Late
05 Hdlin Showbiz Stories Touched By An Men In Black (TV-PG) News Tonight Show w/ Jay David
News (JIP) LeLetterman
May 11 ---
MNHeadline Nightly
15 & 64 NBA Playoffs: Teams to bhe Announced NBA Playoffts: Teanms to be Announced HNews Business
INe s Report

16 & 65 Doug Rugrals Simpsons I vprovem- Star Trek: Deep Space 9 The Aviattrs "VietWant: The 10,000 - Melrose Place

SCN News CBS SCN News : 35 :35 Late
05 CBS Headline SCN News . Show w/
8 & 10 Headline NHL Playoffs: Teamnts to be Announced Eyeing News Tonight Show w/ Jay David
News (JIP) News Lent Letterm an
SCN News hHHeadline H SCN News : 35 :35 hLaw w/
Wed. 14 & 63 HdN:05 Todyhiz Moesha Ii prvent- Dawson's Creek Bufly The Vampire Slayer News Tonight Show w/ Jay David
3 Headline TidayDLeti
M ay News (JIP) Letterman
12 ABC World CBS Headline Nightly
15 & 64 News NHL Playoffs: Teams it) he Announced Evening PBS Newshour News Business
Tonight News Report
Hno A & E Biography:XFie
16 & 65 D ,oug Rugrats Simpsons Itiprovem- Star Trek: Deep Space 9 Understanding Pancho Vi'llaphy X-Files
ent

8 & 1 0 ad ine0 T dayhw hiz Friends W rkt ng Frasier ad A boul ER NH e ws ; gNi ehn Show 35w / Jay avdu
News (JIP) Letlerman
SCN News SCN News :35 :35 Late
05 ShowbiFs MdHeadline SCniNews w/Jay Show w/

Thur. 4 & 3 ine Shbi Friends Working Frasier ad About ER News Ton ght Show w/ Jay David
8e & 10 Hcadline Today YINe Lenoi

News (JIP) Letierman

M ay News (JIP) ___________
13 ABC World CBS
15 & 64 News ' Evening NBA Playolls: Teams to be Anntunced NBA Playtlfs: Teams to he Announced
Tonight News

16 & 65 Doug Rugrats Simpsos prveit- Star Trek: Deep Space 9 Amer ican Experience: B biography: Colin Powell H homicide: Lile on Streets







SCN Prime Time Movies & Specials SCN Weekend Sports

MOTHER. After two failed marriages, a science fiction writer decides coming to
terms with his mom will improve his chances for a successful relationship, so he NBA Basketball Playoffs: .
A1a.m. Sjiuidais Pla'olITrapleheader ' Cdble14
moves in with his mom. (Comedy, 1996, TV-PG) 8 p.m. Sunday. 1am. d 'pleheader . Cable 14
1la.m. SundaN Playoffrlipleheader , . Cable 14
MEN IN BLACK. Agent K is a member of an organization that has been keeping . ,
track of extra-terrestrial aliens on earth for over 40 years. When K finds himself in Major League Baseball: . .'
need of a new partner, a brash NYPD detective, James Edwards fills the position, Noon SaturdaN . , Angels at Red Sox Cable 15
becoming Agent J. Armed with space-age technology and their razor-sharp wits, J 3 p.m. Su.dn " " Bravesat Padres ' Cble 15
and K investigate a newcomer who is bad news for earth. (Action, Comedy, TV-PG p.m Su . .. .* R at P . Cable l5
7p.m. Sunday " Ranger, at .Blue .I a j Cable 15
1997) 8 p.m. Tuesday. ' "..

SCN's VCR Alert - Recommended for videotaping Auto Racing:
5p.m. Saturday. , Craftsman Truck Senes Memphis"00) Cable 15
GHOST. Sam and Molly are a happy couple and deeply in love. Walking back to.
their new apartment after a night out at the theater they encounter a thief in a dark NHL Hockes Plavoffs: . -
alley, and Sam is murdered. He finds himself trapped as a ghost and realizes that his 6:30p.m tonight Conference Semis-Game I. Team TBA Cable 15
death was no accident. He must warn Molly about the danger that she is in. But as n - . '
a ghost he can not be seen or heard by the living, and so he tries to communicate . ..
with Molly through Oda Mae Brown, a psychic who didn't even realize that her NFLp.m urday Berlin Thunder vs Amsterdam Admirals Cable 15ope
powers were real. (Romance, Drama, 1990, TV-PG) 1:03 a.m. Saturday. 8p.m. Saturday Berlin Thunder vs Amsterdam Admirals Cable 15












8 Q Tropic Times
SMay 7,1999


I* Classified Ads


Cocker Spaniel, 1 pup, 2 adult
w/kennels, 284-6124
Cocker-poo, wht & tan, fem,
spayed, grt w/kids, free, 223-
0441
Husky German shepherd, mix,
14 mos, free, 284-6050
Pekinese, 1 yr, shots $150/
obo, 261-0971
Pit Bull, puppies w/shots &
papers, 1 mos, 230-0663 after
6 pm
Yellow cockatiel w/cage $50,
272-2028



All occasion cakes, prof cake
decorator, 2 days notice, 284-
6608 Mary
Awesome cakes, giant cinna-
mon rolls, banana bread, 284-
3798 Erica
Baby-sitter, anytime, wkdays,
knight & wkends, 288-7394
Sandra
Baby-sitter, available, house-
keeper $150, 266-4348 call
5:30 pm Felicia
Baby-sitter, dependable, re-
sponsible, housework, wkdays
& wkends, available w/ref, 290-
0595 Carmon
Doughnuts, jelly filled & regu-
lar, 284-3798 Erica
Maid, biling, reliable, f/p time,
exc w/children & pets, 284-
3198
Maid, Eng spking, grt w/kids,
honest, dependable, 284-
4970
Maid, Eng spking, hard work-
ing, grt cook, exc w/kids & pets,
honest, reliable, 284-3538
Maid, Eng spking, house-
keeper, live-in/out, Mon-Wed-
Fri, honest, dependable, gd w/
kids, 266-5164
Maid, housekeeper & child
care, live-in/out w/ref, 284-
4791
Maid, live-in/out, Mon-Fri, de-
pendable, gd w/kids, ref, 228-
2836 Nedy
Nanny, live-in, Eng spring,
honest, reliable, gd w/kids, 288-
6728
Never shave again Body sug-
aring the natural method of
hair removal, 284-3729
Pick up to move misc items all
posts, 261-6694
Power window dr lock repair,
222-4972
Translation authorized, Span/
Eng or viceversa, 251-0158
Upholstery curtains & interior
decoration, 261-6694
Usborne books, Educational,
Award Winning, 288-7319



14' FG boat, 14 HP O/B w/
trailer $1500, 612-2069
16' canoe w/paddles $150,
284-4530
16' Tri-hull, center console,
60 HP Mariner $5000/obo,
272-5642
17' tracker bass boat, deep V,
75 HP O/B Mercury, exd cond
$6500, 285-4381
18' fiberglass panga "Argos",
rocket trailer, 40 HP Evinrude,
loaded, new, dty pd $7500,
236-6987


181/2' Tri-hull, open bow, 115
HP, trailer, many extras $4500,
288-5809
21' FG boat, 351 eng w/trailer
$4000, 612-2069
21' Wellcraft, 200 HP Mariner,
kicker, many extras, exc cond,
dty pd $19,000/obo, 272-5642
24' fbra, I/O Volvo, sleeps 4,
built in frzr & more $8900/obo,
272-2227
8 HP motor $800, 284-6127
9' inflatable boat w/wooden
floor, 5 HP Nissan O/B motor,
like new $1600, 225-1375
97 16' Orlando Clipper, 70 HP
Evinrude, power trim, tilt lake
$4500, 272-1170
Knee board, wave board $50,
272-6829
Lg canoe w/trailer, 272-1096
Military type utility trailer w/
mounted spare, new tires, paint
& bearings $600, 272-2656
Sailboat trailer, boats to 30',
grt shipping cradle $1250,
232-5996
Trailer for sm boat or jet skis,
all galvanized, new wheels,
exc cond $450, 272-2121
Water skis $40, 272-6829




31 Ford Model A, extra parts,
runs $5000/obo, 272-2227 Iv
msg
65 Ford Mustang, 3 spd, am/
fm cass radio, exc cond $4200/
obo, 284-6297
79 Chevy Caprice, 350 V-8,
AT, new suspension, dual ex-
haust, dty pd $750/obo, 288-
7131
80 Chevy Malibu Coupe, V-6,
2 dr, runs gd, dty pd $1200,
232-7130
81 Cadillac, AC, 4 dr, brn,
leather, dsl, exc cond $500,
226-0856
81 Dodge Ram Van, V-6, new
tires, dty pd $1400, 232-7016
83 Datsun 280 ZX, 5 spd, AC,
t-top, am/fm CD player $2500/
obo, 284-6297
83 Oldsmobile Cutlass Su-
preme, gd cond $1300/neg,
284-3693
84 Buick Century, 4 dr $1500/
obo, 284-5578 Iv msg
84 Datsun Maxima, needs batt,
all/pwr, gd cond $1500/neg,
288-7114
84 Toyota Corona, AC, needs
body work, runs gd $1500, 270-
1018
85 Mercedes Benz 280 SE,
LM, gd cond $7000, 272-5792
85 Nissan Sentra, motor re-
built, gd cond $2200, 288-
4373
85 Pontiac, 4 dr, FL, AC, runs
exc $1800, 285-4093
85 Porsche 944, 5 spd, red,
exc cond, dty pd $6900, 288-
6574
85 Subaru 1800, 5 spd, 2 dr,
AC, RC, gd cond, dty pd $1800,
262-5843
85 Toyota Camry, 4 dr, AT,
AC, am/fm radio, new tires &
batt, runs grt $2900/obo, 223-
3265
85 VW Golf, 5 spd, 2 dr, AC,
Pioneer stereo $2000, 288-
7292
86 Chysler 5th Avenue $4700/
obo, 236-4756
86 Mazda 323 LX, AC, 5 spd,
sunroof $2200/obo, 284-6297


86 Toyota Cressida, AT, AC,
alarm, sunroof, dty pd $4500/
obo, 614-0159
87 Honda, dty pd $2550, 264-
8050
87 Nissan Lancer, AT, AC,
loaded, dty pd $3800, 272-
2621
87 Toyota Corona, AC, AT, 4
dr, dty pd $3000/obo, 277-
7585
87 Toyota, AC, right hand
drive, exc cond $1700/obo,
.224-7284
88 Chysler sta/wag, 4 dr, 4 cyl,
AT, AC, rebuilt $1600, 615-
2613
88 Ford Escort, 5 spd, exc cond
$1500, 285-4093
88 Mitsubishi Lancer, PW, AC,
am/fm, dty pd $3500/obo, 232-
7028
88 Toyota Corolla FX, 2 dr,
AT, AC, looks & runs gd, dty pd
$3500, 259-9809
88 Volvo 240 DL Wagon, 5
spd, AC, new tires, gd cond
$4200, 272-2618
89 Ford Escort, wht, 5 spd, gd
cond $1500, 260-1642
89 Ford Tempo, 4 dr $2000/
obo, 284-5578 Iv msg
89 Ford Tempo, .many extras,
exc car $2300/obo, 272-
287290 Jeep Cherokee Chief,
loaded, gd cond $7000, 272-
2121
89 Ford Tempo, standard shift,
4 dr, AC, am/fm cass $1500/
obo, 227-8005
90 Chevy Corsica, V-6, AT,
AC, am/fm cass $2500, 288-
7177
90 Hyundai Excell, AT, LM,
dty pd $3200, 259-9809
90 Volvo GL, 4 dr, PW, AC, AT,
red w/hitch, exc con $5500,
284-9236
91 Geo Storm GSI, AC, LM, 5
spd, stereo, new tires, gd cond,
260-4094
91 Mustang 5.0, AT, LM $4000,
263-3789
92 Ford Tempo GL, PS, PB,
AC, 5 spd, am/fm cass $3500/
neg, 232-7130_
92 Mitsubishi Galant, dty pd
$5500, 272-2078
92 Nissan Altima, AT, AC, dty
pd $6800/obo, 614-0159
92 Nissan Altima, LM $7000/
obo, 236-6295 after 5 pm
92 Pontiac Sunbird SE Coupe,
V-6, AC, am/fm cass, 284-4596
92 Toyota Corona, AT, AC,
stereo, dty pd $4900, 260-8252
93 Mazda 626, 4 dr, blue, LM,
loaded, dty pd $7000/obo,
272-1226
.93 Mercury Topaz $3000/obo,
226-6474 after 7 pm
93 Mitsubishi Diamante,
loaded, exc cond, 264-9440
94 C280 Mercedes Benz, 4 dr
Sedan, exc cond $25,000, 272-
2080
94 Chevy Lumina, V-6, AT,
AC, gray, dty pd $6000, 260-
5675
94 Ford Escort wag, AC, exc
cond $6500/obo, 288-5196
94 Toyota Corolla S/W, AT,
AC, LM, air bags $8750, 260-
2693
94 Toyota Cressida, dty pd
$5500, 276-6336
95 BMW 318i, LM, alarm
$18,900, 288-6826


- Duty-free merchandise,
FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder, in
accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern Com-
mand regulations, duty-free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes per-
missible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. Before
such a sale, it Is strongly recommended that the seller contact the
Contraband Control Section for advice at 288-5814.
Access to installations is allowed for ID card holders & pass holders
only. All guests must be signed on by ID card holders.
El acceso a las instalaciones militares solamente le estd permitido
a las personas con tarjetas de identidad personal del Gobierno de los
EEUU y el personal con pases de acceso a las instalaciones. Todos los
invitados deben ser firmados a la entrada de las instalaciones por una
persona con tarjeta de identidad personal de los EEUU.


95 Volvo 940, 4 dr, AT, LM,
sunroof, silver leather int,
loaded $16,000, 210-1522
96 Ford Taurus, dty pd $9500,
276-6336
96 Honda Accord, 4 dr, AT,
AC, am/fm cass, exc cond
$13,800, 284-5039
96 Honda Civic LX, LM, CD
changer, loaded $11,500, 284-
6619
97 Mazda 323F, dty pd $8500,
233-0074
97 Nissan Sentra, Kenwood
stereo, CD changer, exc cond,
dty pd $8000/obo, 260-6179
98 Mitsubishi Lancer, 5 spd,
spoiler, tint, exc cond, dty pd
$9800, 236-5511



AMOK6 II, 300 MHz, 40X 32
Ram, 56K, 3.2 GB, 3D sound,
AGP 8 MB, 14" mon $750,
231-1915
AST 486DX2, 66 MHz, 36 MB,
3 GIG, CD-ROM, modem, spkrs,
keyboard, mouse, Win 95, Of-
fice 97 Pro, IE 4.01 & Epson
Stylus 300 ink jet printer w/7
cartridges $550/all, 250-0069
AST P5, 150 MHz, 8X, 33.6K,
16 Ram, 1 GIG HD, sound/
video, 14" mon $475, 231-
1915
Computer games, IBM, CD-
ROM, Warcraft II, Fallout &
more $10/ea, 288-5953
Computer programs Win 95,
works, quicken 98, money 97,
educational & more, 284-6975
Computrade 486/33 computer
$200, 284-6895
Epson LQ 1070, wide, car-
riage printer $185, 269-6728
IBM computer & printer $200,
272-2947
Macintosh 14" RGB mon $40,
Style writer II printer $40, 265-
5691
Packard Bell, 100 MHz, 80 MB
Ram, 8.4 GIG HD, 4X CD-
ROM, modem, 17" mon, spkrs
$550, 264-9440
Pentium, 266 MHz, 100 MHz
Bus, computer, Mid ATX case
Sony, 15" Multi scan mon,
Canon BJC-620 printer w/mul-
timedia access $1100, 288-'
6574
Scantron & software $1100,
265-6394
Scantron computerized test
grading system w/card reader,
computer, printer & software
$1800, 265-6394



21" Crown TV w/remote $160,
224-9663
25" Zenith console TV, 272-
6393
27" Sony TV, RCA, VCR, 284-
5720
31" Sanyo TV w/remote $450,
260-1642
Amp, turntable, tape deck &
more, 233-0074
Audio technical VHF, wireless,
headworn, mic system, new
$295/neg, 268-4732
Bose spkrs 601 $250, 272-5642
CD player, 5 pack $125, 272-
5678
DJ equip set, dbl CD player,
1200w amp, 6 channel, board,
light, microphone, 8 plug, p/
source & light tubes $1500/
obo, 284-6297
Electric portable typewriter
$80, 262-1251
Fax machine $75, 272-5642
Fender Rhodes elec piano
model 73 $350/obo, 272-5083
Mini stereo, 223-2153 after 6
pm
Multi-meter fluke 27, exc cond
$80, 272-2227
Panasonic elec typewriter $50,
284-6252
RCA 21" color TV $550, 288-
7194
Samsung stereo, 230-2384
Sega games $5, 288-7036
Sega Genesis w/10 games
$100, 284-6895
Sega Genesis w/extras $40,
games $10/ea, Super nes
games $15/ea, 272-2618


Sega Genesis, Sony color TV,
232-5997
Smith Corona electric type-
writer, like new, 232-6026
Smith Corona portable type-
writer $25, 288-5474
Sony 8mm Handy Cam, CCD-
F 500 w/hard side case $350/
obo, 288-5924
Tektronix spectrum analyzer
#492 $3000, 272-2227 Iv msg
Tektronix, oscilloscope w/digi-
tal storage, model 486 $1000/
obo, 272-2227 Iv msg
VCR Panasonic, 4 head $45,
285-4093
Yamaha Pacifica quitar elec,
crate 12w amp $250, 217-
1931
Zenith color console TV $250,
288-7234



1.2' GE micro, turntbl $80,
260-1642
10,000, 13,000, 18,000 AC's,
272-2028
14" Upright frzr $200/obo, 272-
5593
15' Admiral refrig $390/obo,
272-6845
16.5' frzr, bkcase, headboard,
f/sz mirrored headboard,.night
stands, 315-0653
18,000 & 12,000 AC, Desk $60,
Hot Point dryer $125, 232-
7016
18,000 & 6000 AC, refrig, Lafter
LR set, BR set, rattan sofa pa-
tio set, 236-8872
18,000 AC $75, 10,000 AC
$50, 2 dehumidifiers, exc cond
$75-40, 272-2979
18,000 Westinghouse AC
$290, 6000 Whirlpool AC
$125, 272-6210
18,000 Whirlpool AC $175,
Bali blinds $20, 272-5792
18' GE refrig $275/obo, 272-
2915
18' upright frzr $175, wrought
iron patio tbl w/4 chairs $350,
272-2947
18' Whirlpool frzr $350, 15' GE
refrig $285, 272-6210
2 beige 9 x 15 carpets $40/ea,
284-5131
2 LR, teak DR & more, 264-
9440
2 night stands, brass lamp,
dresser, gd cond, 284-4620
2 sets f/sz matt & box springs
$100/set, 272-2621
2 x 4 Karastan foyer rug, like
new $125, 269-3254
21' GE upright frzr $400, 272-
6273 after 5 pm
22' refrig side-by-side w/ice
maker $950, micro $55, refrig
$55, 232-7028
23.7' side-by-side refrig/frzr,
GE, 272-6277
23' side-by-side GE refrig
$650, GE stove $400, piano
$1200, 288-5376
24' Whirlpool refrig, exc cond
$700/obo, 232-7051 -
3 pc LR set $800, Lazy Boy
recliner $150, 8' wall-unit w/
desk $300, 272-2723
3 pc sofa sectional, off wht
$600, 232-6490
3 pc wall unit $150, futon sofa,
Q/sz $125, 288-4422
4 AC $100, 272-5642
4 x 6 ivory Spanish wool rug,
like new $75, 269-3254
50' commercial stainless steel
refrig $2000, 272-2121
6 pc LR set $650, 12 pc DR set
$650, 10' refrig $195, 272-
6239
8 pc sectional sofa, needs re-
upholstered, 284-6252
9 x 12 carpets, dishwasher,
232-5996
Bali blinds 75x50 taupe, 4
$20, 272-2979
Bamboo DR set, micro, 223-
2153 after 6 pm
Bkshelves $45, teak tbl $249,
interior rocker, leather $110,
264-9228
BR furniture, dr chest, dresser,
headboard, bkcase, 2 night
tbi, gd cond $1500, 272-2656
BR Q/sz $300, stove gas $225,
236-5511


BR wall shelves, rug, ceiling
fans, AC, patio furniture, 232-
6498
Bunk beds $300, entertain-
ment center $200, dresser $50,
288-7234
Bunk beds, f/sz bottom, twin
top w/matts $375/obo, 5 x 7
rug $25, 288-6376
Captain twin bed $150, patio
set, 6 pc $150, 288-7297
Ceiling fans, reclining chair,
draw curtain, 263-2390
Chest frzr, chest 8 drawer, gas
grill, 230-2384
China cab $500, computer
stand $55, computer desk/work
station $600, 2 drawer file cab
$100, 272-6547
Chinese screen, wall to wall
carpets, vertical mini blinds,
232-5997
Coffee tbl, end tbls $200,
kitchen tile tbi for 7 $150, gray
9 x 12 rug $10, 272-2028
DR set, seats 8, French Provin-
cial w/china cab & buffet
$3500, 272-1182
DR set, tbl w/8 chairs, china
cab, wood carved $500, 272-
6553
DR tbl w/4 chairs $150, 284-
6127
DR tbl w/4 chairs $225, desk
$60, bkshelf $25, mini blinds
$5, 288-4597
DR tbl w/4 chairs & leaf $400,
sofa & Ivseat, multi-colored
'$600, 288-4572
DR tbl w/4 chairs, Q/sz matt w/
box spring, 284-5720
DR tbl w/6 chairs & 2 leaves
$175, beige carpet, curtains,
272-6162
DR tbl w/6 chairs & china cab,
cherry $3500, 272-2671
Dr tbl w/6 chairs, chrome &
glass $250, 264-9676
Dresser w/mirror $150, 272-
5642
Dresser, K/sz sofa, f/sz bed
fame, DR tbl w/6 chairs, lawn
chairs, girls student desk, patio
furniture, 230-2384 '
Dryer $125, 272-7400
Dryer $200, 272-2947
Entertainment center $250,
sofa $200, 2 armchairs $75/
ea, 272-6553
Entertainment center $75, re-
cliner $100, 284-5833
Entertainment center, K/sz
bed, 232-5997
Executive desk & chair $500,
272-2241
F/sz bed box springs & matt,
stereo, micro, 288-5591
F/sz bed w/lighted headboard
$150, 284-6605
F/sz bed w/matt & box spring,
288-6228
GE dishwasher, 272-6393
GE washer, new $500, GE refrig
$900, Whirlpool frzr $600, 232-
7164
Glass & chrome coffee tbl, sofa,
Ivseat, piano, Chinese carpet,
rugs, 232-5997
Hot Point dryer, like new $200,
284-6636
Household items, everything,
260-2427
Household items, Furniture,
refrig, stove, BR set & more,
270-1018
Hutch, Ig tbl w/chairs $550,
cream sofa & Ivseat $550/both
$1000, 232-5996
K/sz bed, coffee tbl, 288-4275
K/sz BR set, water bed, hutch,
dresser, mirrored headboard,
lamps, bkshelve, gd cond $700,
284-4620
K/sz water bed $500, 272-2241
Kids dresser $60, kids chest of
drawers $60, 226-4090
Kitchen tbl w/2 chairs, 232-
5997
Kitchen tbl w/4 chairs $75,
corner sectional sofa w/2 re-
cliners $100, TV/VCR stand
$20, 288-5924
Kitchen/BR curtains w/Kirsh
brass rod, 232-5997
Lg sectional sofa w/f/sz sleeper,
2 recliners, gd cond $500, 284-
4620 after 6 pm
LR set, sofa, Ivseat, 4 tbls
$1400, 272-1182
LR sofa, Ivseat, pastel colored,
gd cond $300/set, 288-5137













I Classified Ads


Tropic Times B 9
May 7,1999 UB


L-shaped sofa sectional w/re-
cliner & hide away bed $800,
288-7234
Magic Chef micro w/cab $200,
twin matt & box spring $60,
262-1251
Micro cart w/3 shelves, 232-
6085
Oriental k/sz headboard $150,
teak dbl dresser w/lg mirror
$200, end tbls, 272-2676
Ortopedic matt & box spring,
twin & f/sz, recliner, bkshelves
& more, 230-2384
Q/sz bed $200, sleep sofa
$300, sofa, Ivseat $350, 226-
4090 .
Q/sz bed frame, box springs,
matt, exc cond $250, 284-
4620 after 6 pm
Rattan sofa, Ivseat, chair & tbl,
china cab, buffet $600, bunk
beds $300, 272-6829
Reclining sofa & Ivseat w/cof-
fee & end tbI $800, deep chest
frzr $350, 288-6498
Refrig, dishwasher, LR furni-
ture, DR chairs, computer
desks, twin bed, 265-5691
Roll top desk w/marble counter
top $600, 272-2379
Rustic log bunk beds $350,
25.6' refrig $600, 272-2979
Sectional sofa, multi-colored
$800, roll top desk $550, 288-
7194_
Semi-circular sofa, like new
$600, Queen Anne sofa tbi
$100, twin bed $100, 223-
1375
Sofa & Ivseat, blk $130, 288-
7332
Sofa & Ivseat, exc cond $1000,
Ig chair & ottoman, exc cond
$300, 284-6539
Sofa hide-a-bed, Q/sz $250, f/
length mirror $5, 288-5474
Sofa rattan trim $275, dinette
set w/4 chairs $150, rugs $75,
girl's desk $150, tbls $75, 213-
8825
Split Panasonic AC, 48,000
BTU $875, 265-8113
Tbl w/6 chairs $250, 18,000
AC $500, Q/sz BR set $100,
288-5083
Tbls, chairs, lamps, sofas, bar
w/stools, Ig roll top desk, beds,
dresser, 612-2069
Teak DR tbi w/8 chairs, glass
top w/lazy susan w/hutch $200,
260-6527
Teak entertainment center, 3
pc $500, 272-5642
Teak hope chest $200, 272-
5642
Twin bed $150, dresser $150,
night stand $50, 9 x 12 rug, It
blue $50, 272-2314
Twin/sz matt & box springs,
263-2936
Wall to wall carpet, 272-1096
Washer & dryer $350, wall to
wall carpet $150/obo, 14,000
Whirlpool AC $250, 272-6553
Washer & dryer, gd cond $300
& more, 233-0074
Waterbed w/headboard $100,
kitchen tbl w/4 chairs $175, 15'
frzr $275, 272-5678
Whirlpool 2dr refrig, gd cond
$550, 233-1080
Whirlpool dehumidifier, 25 pt
capacity w/drain hose $50,
284-3893
Whirlpool refrig $350, 272-
5642
Wht 9 x 12 rug, new $80, di-
nette w/4 swivel chairs $200,
272-2028
Wood bar $500, 269-6728
Wood bkcase, 4 shelves, glass
dr $75, oak tbi & 4 chairs $400,
284-6539
Wooden kitchen tbi w/4 chairs,
232-6026



100 LPs classical records $50,
272-5792
2 basket hampers $5/ea, brass
tone shelves $8, 288-5474
2 wood video shelves, holds
60 VHS tapes, gd cond $60,
284-4620 after 6 pm
25 gal fist tank w/gravel $30,
Toro lawnmower, auto pro-
pelled $250, trailer hitch a/2"
ball, 272-2947
4 -205x15 tires w/rims, 5 holes,
new $300, 232-7028


4 -13" steel rims from 95 Toyota
Corolla $50, 272-2314
4" suspension for 86 - 95
Toyota pickup, 4Runner, pro
comp w/shocks, new $800, 236-
6987
6 x 6 x6 walk in cage $50, 12'
alum antenna mast $15, 272-
2947
Air Force jacket 40R, 288-4572
Animal cage 24"x24"x36" $30,
272-2671
Baby crib, wooden w/matt $150,
229-0400
BBQ gas grill $50, 284-4773
Beach umbrella, ceiling fans,
272-2621
Beanie babies to gd home, Ig
selection $8 - 10, 288-5029
Beer soda vending mach $350/
obo, 272-5083
BHS commemorative pen &
ink drawings, 11 x 17 $10, set
of 10 6x8 notecards $15, 288-
7195
Books, Cuisinart food proces-
sor & more, 236-8872
Carport roof, Rubbermaid out-
side storage shelter, 232-5997
Carport, security iron bars, 272-
1096
Century baby stroller $50, 264-
9676
Clothes, comforter set, 288-
6228
Copper milk can, 272-6162
Craftsman mechanic tool set
complete 2 tool chests $1100,
269-6728
Day runner agenda w/binder &
extra pages, new $60, 284-
6316
Dbl jogging stroller w/nyloh
sun canopy, like new, 288-
5344 after 6 pm
De Walt hvy dty 12" hammer
drill $160, 272-2671
Drafting tbl $50, Oriental lamps
$50/ea, fishing rods $25/ea,
272-2676
Encyclopedia Britanica, com-
plete w/all year books,
children's books, 54 great books
$500, 269-6310
Gas tank for grill, treadmill,
maids uniforms, 263-2936
Half dollar coins, walking lib-
erty 25/ea, 1917 - 1936 in
Whitman coin folder $95, 226-
7450
Hooked on Phonics educa-
tional program math & En-
glish, elementary to adult $75,
288-5196
Jogging stroller $100, 272-
6860
Jogging stroller, girls clothes
2t, 3t, exc cond, shoes, 263-
2936
Ladies Argentinan blk leather
jacket, lined, peak lapels, waist
length, sz/7 $300, 288-6326
Ladies Argentinan waist length
denim blue leather jacket,
lined w/short skirt, sz/7 $300/
both, 288-6326
Lamps, stepping stones,
wrought iron bench, plants,
luggage, 232-5997
Lg dog kennel $45, Little Tykes
desk w/chair $25, 288-6829
Maternity clothes, crib, chang-
ing tbi, bath tub, 4 in 1 stroller,
263-2936
Med pet carrier $15, 260-8252
Minnie mouse dbl comforter,
blanket, dust ruffle, sheets &
more $50, 284-6975
Neck traction $25, hammock
chair $40, 264-92281ron & iron-
ing board $75/both, 288-5474
Patio enclosure for gateway
housing $60, Ig pet cage $60,
sm pet cage $10, 284-5077
Dave, after 7:30 pm
Patio plants, 232-6085
Plants, big & sm, 272-2028
Porch swing $25, fish tanks,
272-2947
Potted plants, ficus trees $5-
40, 272-2621 _
Shelf for kids toys, TV $125/
obo, 288-6376
Shower curtain, 6 bath towels,
8 hand towels, 8 wash cloths,
bath mat, rugs, blue $25, 284-
6975
Silver coin, American silver
eagle one oz silver $9, 226-
7450
Singer sowing mach, dual
voltage $200/obo, 284-6252


Sm desk $25, baby bike seat
$10, 284-5820
Step 2 swing set $250/obo,
Little Tykes sandbox $35/obo,
carseat $35/obo, 232-7265
Storage shed $300, plants,
Bali blinds 70 x 90 $100, car-
peting, 232-7053
Vacuum cleaner, TV & more,
288-4275
Wagon $25/obo, 284-5578
Wall locker $60, 288-6376
Wedding dress, wht, long train,
sz/6 $300/obo, 288-6376
Wet-vac $50, 288-7297
Winnie the Pooh mobile &
comforter set, teddy bear deco-
ration, toys & more, 263-2936
Wood desk, padder bar w/4
stools $200, 262-1251
Wrought iron baker's rack, Ig,
like new $110, 284-4620 after
6 pm
Zinc roof 15 x 20 $200/obo,
272-5593



91 Honda Nighthawk 250, dty
pd $1600/obo, 284-4970



42A Altos De La Montana
Tumba Muerto, 9 am
46A Howard
Balboa 2317A Las Cruces
Balboa 2422, 5:30 - 8:30 am
Cardenas 7250 B
Cardenas 7273A
Cardenas 7304A
Clayton 463B, 7 - 11 am
Clayton 472B, 7 am
Clayton 509B, 7 - 11 am
Clayton 689C, 7 - 9 am
Clayton 6B, 6 - 10 am
Clayton 83
Clayton 853A, 7 am - noon
Clayton 856B, 6 - 10 am
Clayton 1055 B
Clayton 1173A
Curundu 2148 7th St
Diablo 5064A, 7 - 10 am
Diablo 5277, 7 - 11 am
Diablo 5755 B, 7 - 11 am
Diablo 5775B
Howard 55 A, 7 am - noon
Howard 55A, 6 am - noon
Saturday & Sunday
Howard 96A, 7 - 11 am
Howard 597, 6 am - noon
Howard 603A, 6 - 11 am
Marbella, Torres Del Pacifico,
torre B, Apto 16B


2 boy's bikes, new $50/ea, 272-
2671
Aerobic instructor equip, 268-
4732
Aguashot II underwater cam-
era, housing for disposal cam-
eras w/strobe & macro kit $150,
272-5642
Basketball hoop $95, 232-
7028
Boy's 18" Schwinn bike $30,
272-2947
Diving equip, regulator,
octoris, computer, packed, top
of line $950, 232-6422
Fishing rod & reel $35, Penn
Senator 4/0 special, 272-2979
Golf clubs $50, 288-4993
Golf clubs Taurus, bubble
driver 46" $50, 265-8113
Golf clubs Titliest 1, 3, 4 woods
& 3 - 9 irons & bag $250, 272-
6845
International fishing rods, 50's
& 80's flying gapps, 272-2078
Kids bike $15/obo, 284-5578
Lg trampoline $150, 272-2028
Male & fem bikes $75, 232-
7265
Nikonos III underwater camera
w/2 35mm lenses & o ring kit,
new cond $275, 272-2656
Nordic Ryder, 288-5591
Nordic track skier $175, 288-
4422
Outburst aggressive, 4 fareway
driver $50, 58 degree wedge
$20, 3 wood metal $30, 265-
8113
Roller blades, men's sz/11, grt
cond $25, 284-4620 6 pm
Scuba dive computer by Oce-
anic Data Max in 3 gage con-
sole w/pressure gage & com-
pass $410, 236-6302
Scuba dive computer by Oce-
anic Prodigy in console w/pres-
sure gage & compass $400,
236-6302
Scuba regulator by scuba pro,
ultra light $500, 236-6302
Scuba regulator by US divers
w/conshelf octopus $280, 236-
6302
Surfboard, Mountain bike, 232-
5997
Wind surfing equip, 269-2756
after 5 pm
Women's 10 spd bike w/lock
$50, racquet ball racquet $5,
inflatable ski bandit $25, 272-
7400
Women's bike, golf clubs, 272-
2621
Women's Schwinn 26" bike, 5
spd $150, 272-2947


78 Ford E-100 Eco-line cargo
van, 1/2 ton, 6 cyl, AT, PS, PB,
trailer hitch, cargo rack, dty pd
$1850/obo, 288-4177
80 Ford E-150 van, 4.9'L, 6 cyl,
AT, AC, PS, PB, LM, rebuilt
eng $3500, 288-4493
83 GMC pickup, AC, 6 cyl, new
eng, ext cab, 2 new tires $2200,
288-6470
84 Dodge pick up, 4 x 4, 4 spd,
new brakes, tires, camper top,
runs grt $4000/obo, 284-4457
85 Mitsubishi Montero, 4 x 4,
AC, dty pd $3700, 315-0801
85 Nissan Patrol, 4 dr, 272-
6277
86 Chevy Astro van, dty pd
$4000/obo, 226-6474 after 7
pm
86 Colt Vista, 7 pass, AT, needs
some work, dty pd $1900, 259-
9809
86 Isuzu Trooper, 4 x 4, new
paint, tires, rebuilt motor
$2500, 250-0311
87 Dodge Caravan, 4 cyl, AT,
PS, PB, AC, dty pd $3500,
261-6845
87 Ford Bronco II, 6 cyl, runs
well $2500, 284-6335
87 Nissan Pathfinder, 2 dr, 6
cyl, 4 x 4, new wheels & tires,
looks grt $9000, 284-5820
87 Plymouth Voyager van LE,
gd cond $3000, 272-2671
88 Ford Bronco II, AT, AC
$4300, 315-0801
88 Mitsubishi Montero, blue, 4
dr, loaded, exc cond $5500,
272-6079
89 GMC cony van, V-8,
loaded, runs exc $4750/obo,
284-6050
90 GMC Jimmy S-16, V-6, 4 x
4, AT, AC, dty pd $5550, 232-
7053
90 Isuzu Trooper, 4 x 4, 6 cyl,
5 spd, AC, am/fm cass $7500/
obo, 236-8872
91 Jeep Wrangler, 4 x 4, 5 spd,
CD, PS, PB, LM, 33" tires, exc
cond $8500, 284-4056
92 Chevy Lumina van, PS,
PB, AC, PW, 7 pass, grt cond
$8000, 284-3634
92 GMC Jimmy, 4 x 4, SL
aspen, blue, V-6, AT, AC, ABS,
loaded $8000, 265-3685
92 Isuzu Rodeo, V6, 5 spd, AC,
4 x 4, CD, exc cond $9000,
284-6636
93 Chevy Lumina minivan, 7
pass, PW, PD, PS, PB, AC, LM,
luggage rack, dty pd $7500,
260-4411
93 Chevy S-10, exc cond $600/
obo, 284-5226
93 Ford Aerostar, gd cond
$6500, 272-6547


93 Ford Explorer, 4 dr Eddie
Baver $13,000, 213-8272
93 Jeep Grand Cherokee lim-
ited, loaded, LM $14,000, 272-
1224
93 Toyota 4Runner, AT, AC,
PS, PB, 4 x 2, Kenwood stereo,
exc cond $15,000/obo, 288-
7292
94 Isuzu, dty pd $12000, 264-
8050
94 Jeep Cherokee Country,
LM, PE, AC, am/fm cass &
more $14,000/obo, 264-0158
after 6 pm
94 Jeep Cherokee, AC, ABS,
PS, PB, red, dty pd $9800,
288-4244
94 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, 5
spd, 6 cyl, LM, soft top, bikini
top, class III hitch $10,500,
285-4381
94 Jeep Wrangler, 4 x 4, 5 spd,
4 cyl, hard & bikini top, hitch
$8500, 213-0414
95 Jeep Wrangler, Rio Grande,
4 x 4, 5 spd, loaded, exc cond
$12,000/obo, 284-6659
96 Ford Aerostar XLT $13,500/
obo, 288-6376
96 Ford Explorer XL, 4 dr, 4 x
4, 5 spd, LM $18,000, 232-
6498
96 Ford Explorer XLT, 2 x 2,
exc cond, 288-4275
96 Ford Explorer, XLT, 4 dr,
FL, LM, exc cond $22,000/
pbo, 260-3536 after 6 pm
97 Isuzu Trooper LS, AT, 4 x 4,
PW, PL, PM, LM, hunter green,
exc cond $21,000, 264-8768
Jeep Daihatsu, 4 x 4, 5 spd,
PE, LM, AC, stereo, exc cond
$3900, 264-9228
Rocky, AC, LM, PS, wht, new
paint, am/fm, exc car $3900,
264-9228



205/75R15 tire, 260-9976
Coin collector interested in ac-
quiring Army organizational
coins, 225-8159 Danny
Fem dog, for young girl, free,
272-2620
Gas BBQ, the bigger the bet-
ter, 223-4170
Gas clothes dryer, 272-2497
Gd family for grt day maid,
Span spking, honest, depend-
able, hard worker, ref, 272-
2979
Mrs. Barbara please be in con-
tact w/us, sister MAF, 232-2072
Panamanian antique china
cab w/curved glass, 272-2028
Sm generator, portable 100 -
2500 watts, 232-7039
Sz/8�/ - 9 tap shoes, 272-2947


^W TropicTimes Ad Form

Note: Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis to military mem-
bers, civilian DoD employees, and employees of other government agencies. Ads will be ac-
cepted only for NON-COMMERCIAL services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immedi-
ate family member. Suspected abuse of the ad services will results in non-publication of the
ad(s) in question. For more information, call 285-4666/6612.

* Deadline for submitting ads is 9 a.m. Monday. If Monday is a holiday, the deadline
is 1 p.m. the Friday before.

* Read instructions below, then completely fill out the ad form. Incomplete ads will


not be published.

I-1 Animals
Ml Available
-I Boats & campers
SCars
- Computers
Electronics
SFound
Household
Lost
Miscellaneous
- Motorcycles
El Patio sales
Date
'-1 Sporting Goods
--I Trucks & Vans
-1 Wanted


Price Home Phone
* Check one category per ad form
* Two ads per person each week. Include home and duty phone.
* 15-word limit (the staff may edit to conserve space).
* Ads must be re-submitted each week.
* We will NOT take ads by phone or fax (Atlantic residents may fax ads).
* Ads offering exotic animals, weapons or real estate will Not be run.
* Ads offering, foods, hair care or translation will Not be run without a copy
of licenses to operate on post/base.
+ Mail ads to: Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004 or deposit them in
the drop box at the Clayton Post Office.
* Information below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication.
Sponsor's Name Rank/Grade


Organization


Duty Phone












: Community


Co mniybres


Pre-Teen Jam
The Howard Youth Center is
holding a Pre-Teen Jam for chil-
dren 9 - 12 years old 7 - 10:30 p.m.
today. Cost is $2.50 with activity
card and $3.50 without activity
card. There will also be a School's
Out Pre-Teen Jam 7:30 p.m. -
midnight May 21which will be free
of charge. For more information,
call 284-4700/5615.

NAF Sales
The Auto Skill Center is holding
a NAF sale 9 a.m. - noon Saturday
at the Auto Skills Center Building
722 on Howard. The Howard
0' Club is also conducting a sale 8
a.m. - noon May 15 at Building
113. Items for sale include; tables,
chairs, bar stools, table clothes and
more.

Semi-formal dance
Join the West Bank Teen Center
for "The Final Crossing" semi-for-
mal dance 6 p.m. - I a.m. Saturday
at the Tropic Breeze Club. Cost is
$5 per ticket and tickets will only
be sold until today. Social hour is 6
- 7 p.m., dinner 7 - 8 p.m. and the
dance is 8 p.m. - I a.m. This is for
teens ages 13 - 18 and a photogra-
pher will be present. No jeans or T-
shirts and dresses must be at least
fingertip length. For more informa-
tion, call 284-4700/5615.

FSU Commencement
The Florida State University
Panama Canal Branch cordially in-
vites you to its 1998-99 Com-
mencement Ceremony 10 a.m. Sat-
urday at the Panama Canal College
Auditorium, La Boca, Balboa. For
more information, call 285-6386/
6388.

Miss Pam at the PX
Miss Pam will be at the
Corozal Main Exchange 1 - 3 p.m.
Sunday signing autographs, hand-
ing out flowers and candy to all
mothers and playing her music.
There will be CDs and cassettes for
sale.

Revival
The Abundant Life Christain
Center is holding a revival 7 - 8:30
today and Saturday and 10:30 -
noon Sunday. Child care provided
for toddlers - 6 year olds each
night. For more information, call
272-2501/2220.

Summer Program
Registration for the summer
program is May 14 and 15 at Build-
ing 155 on Fort Clayton. The free
program begins in June and will in-
clude a Toddler/Preschool Camp
for 2 - 5 year-olds, a school age
camp for 5 - 12 year-olds, youth
volleyball, basketball and racquet-
ball clinics; instructional karate, pi-
ano, guitar and gymnastics classes
and a teen program with trips and
tours, outdoor activities, center
based leisure activities and life
skills workshops. For more infor-
mation, call 288-6810.

79th Army Band
The 79th Army Band's Armed
Forces Day concert is 7:30 p.m.
May 15 at the Fort Clayton The-
ater.

CCAF degree
To all those in line' for senior
master sergeant, if you are com-
pleting or near completing your
CCAF degree, please stop by the
Education Office ASAP to have
your records updated to reflect


your current CCAF standing. Just a
reminder, the Education Office will
be relocating to Building 707 May
15 and is scheduled to close July
31. For more information call Lisa
Poland at 284-3263/4863/3264.

Red Cross training
The American Red Cross is of-
fering the following courses for the
month of May. May 18 - 20 Com-
munity First Aid and Safety (En-
glish) May 22 Spanish. May 29
Cardipulmonary Resuscitation for
Professional Rescuer. You can sign
up and pay for classes in Room
344, Building 519, Fort Clayton.
For more information, call 288-
5509/5647.

Family Support hours
The Family Support Center has
new hours of operation. They are
now open Monday through Friday
from 8 to 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 to 4
p.m. They will be closed from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for lunch.
For more information call the cen-
ter at 284-5010.

Summer registration
Howard's Summer Program for
3 - 5 year-olds registration begins
May 17 at the Child
Development Center. To register,
bring shot records and a Leave and
Earnings Statement. Spaces are lim-
ited. For more information, call
284-3711/6235.

Volunteer register
Volunteers and volunteer coordi-
nators should ensure that all volun-
teer hours are registered with the
Howard Family Support Center's
Volunteer Program. Also, any vol-
unteers who are PCSing in the near
future should come by the FSC to
pick up a letter stating their volun-
teer hours. For more information,
call Lizca Fearon at 284-5650.

Pet supplies
Since the Corozal Veterinary
Treatment Facility approaches
closure Aug. 31, the VTF is re-
minding pet owners to stock up
on routinely used medications to
last through their PCS move. The
last order for pet supplies is June
1 and when supplies run out they
will not be replenished. Also, the
VTF is requesting that if your pet
is no longer in Panama or has
been adopted to another family,
call them at 285-5866/5867 to
help update their records.

USARSO volunteers
The Quaility of Life/Installation
Volunteer Center is currently pre-
paring "Statement of Service" let-
ters for all registered volunteers. To
receive your letter, stop by the
QOULLVC Office 2nd Floor, Build-
ing 200 Fort Clayton. For more in-
formation, call Tina Hobson at 288-
9303/9304.

Mailing packages
The Fort Clayton Post Office
has implemented an appointment
system for individuals who need
to mail five parcels or more. Due
to an increase in moves, we suggest
that people call the number listed
below and arrange an appointment
between 9 - 9:20 a.m. and the
staff will assist those individuals
before opening for regular cus-
tomer service. In return, this will
decrease the lines and waiting time
for other customers. All forms and
documentation need to be ready
prior to the appointment date. For
more information, call 288-5522/
4802.


Free child care
Air Force staff sergeants and be-
low can receive up to 20 free hours
of childcare when they are within
90 days of PCS departure from
Howard Air Force Base. The Child
Development Center will provide
services. Members should bring or-
ders to the Family Support Center
to receive a certificate.

Parent support
The New Parent Support Pro-
gram is located at ACS Building
155 on Fort Clayton. Monthly
classes available include Breast
Feeding (Spanish and English),
Parenting and Infant Care. There
are also support group meetings.
For more information, call Nelida
Holnes at 288-4921/5307.

Clayton Library
The Clayton Library has a
home page on the World Wide Web
listing hours, resources and ser-
vices. Also included are guides to
using the library. There are photo
albums and an e-mail address for
feedback, comments and even ref-
erence questions. The address is:
http://www.army.mil/usarso/libr/
claytonm/.

Foster Care
The Family Advocacy Program
welcomes participants interested in
becoming Certified Foster Care Par-
ents. The program provides train-
ing that enables you to gain re-
warding experiences. Earn some ex-
tra money while in your home and
"open your heart to a child" in
need of temporary placement due
to an emergency situation. Appli-
cants must reside on a military in-
stallation. For more information,
call Nelida Holnes at 288-6643.

Relocation Center
The Relocation Assistance Cen-
ter offers a variety of services. For
those PCSing, there are computers
with Internet access and a well-
stocked lending closet to help you
with all your basic household
needs. For more information, stop
by Building 200, Fort Clayton, or
call 288-9234/9235.

Vehicle registration
Personnel moving to Puerto Rico
can register their vehicle at the
LEA Vehicle Registration in Build-
ing 519, 2nd Floor, Room 246, 8
a.m. - noon and 1 - 4 p.m. Monday
- Friday. You will need the vehicle
title, proof of insurance and orders
for Puerto Rico. Those who have
already shipped their vehicle to
Puerto Rico can also obtain their
decals at this office. For more in-
formation, call 288-4916/4919.

Planning a party
SAS has inflatables for rent. The
colorful balloons include the
Happy Clown Typhoon, the
Amazing Castle Maze and games
galore. Rentals are run by the CYS
staff. For more information, call
288-6451.

Teen Center
A computer lab is located on the
1st Floor of Building 155 and is
open 6 - 9 p.m. Monday - Thurs-
day.

Attention volunteers
If you are presently volunteer-
ing or have volunteered in the past
at Howard AFB, sign up with the
volunteer coordinator in the Family
Support Center and receive credit
for the experience you gained. For


Tickling stress before it tackles you
The Directorate of Community Activities. ACS Family Advo-
cacy Piogram invites you to participate in a two-hour workshop
on Humor and Stress Management. Classes being 9 - 11 a.m. and
1 - 3 p.m. Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center and 9:30 -
11:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Clayton
Theater. There will also be another
class Wednesday. 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. at
the Howard Theater.
This program is designed to be fun,
but not for fun. In a supportive, laughter
Spilled, relaxing yet productive environ-
ment, you will experience and learn
practical ways to use humor and
other skills to manage stress in
your life, farruly, work and orga-
nization.
Dr. Joel Goodman, psychologist and director of the Human
Project is a popular speaker, consultant and workshop leader
throughout the U.S and aboard. His presentations, publications
and media appearances on the positive power of humor and cre-
ativity have touched and tickled the lives of millions throughout
the world.
Author of nine books, hundreds of articles and several col-
umns, Joel is presently co-authoring Chicken Soup for the Laugh-
ing Soul with Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen.
He was featured three times on an ABC News prime-time spe-
cial with John Stossel on the "Mystery of Happiness.".
Family members are welcome to attend. For more
information, call Majorie Arias at 288-5073.


Kennels for sale
The Corozal PX has airline approved kennels in all
sizes to keep pets safe during flight. The approximate
weights of the kennels are listed below as a conve-
nience in figuring total weight for pets and kennels to
meet airline restricnons:
Small #21103 wt. 3 bs. 21"L x 16"W x 15"H d
Medium #21104 9 lbs. 27"L x 20"W x 19"H
Large #21106 20 Ibs. 36"L x 24"W x 26"H
X-large #21107 24 lbs. 40"L x 27"W x 30"H
Giant #21108 43 lbs. 48"L x 32"W x 35"H
Int. #21000 5 lbs. 24"L x 6 1/2"W x 14 1L
Cabin #21009 3 lbs. 19"L x 12 1/2"Wx 10:


V


/4"H
3/4"H


Recycling Marathon
The Theater Support Brigade is conducting a Recycling Mara-
thon to raise the aw areness of the community regarding the Army's
policy to prevent pollution, reduce waste and conserve natural re-

This program focuses on identifying re-
cyclable items within the community. The
, intention is to create an interesting, spir-
ited and competitive process.
The competition features individual
awards to recognize the efforts of persons
leading collection and turn-ins, and an orga-
nizational award in each category.
Remember, the second stage began on
April 8. Get ready and contribute to the recycling process. Collect
. paper, metals, aluminum, glass and plastic


more information, call 284-5650.

Typing course
The Howard Family Support
Center's Computer Resource Cen-
ter offers computerized, multime-
dia typing tutorial software. Be-
ginners can learn how to type at
their own pace. To sign up for an
appointment, call Dave Krier at
284-5650.

Charitable donations
The Chapel, Building 500, col-
lects clothing, small household ap-
pliances, toys, and non-perishable
food for distribution to Panama's
needy. Stop by anytime Monday -
Friday 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. For
more information, call 284-3948

Fax service
The Corozal PX offers fax ser-
vices at the customer service
counter. The cost is $1 per page,
plus telephone charges.


Layaways
All layaways will cease Satur-
day. By Aug. 30 all layaways
must be picked up or cancelled.
For details, call 285-4121.

Laundry service
Super Suds Laundromat offers
a drop-off, same-day pick-up
service Monday - Friday. The
laundromat is located next to the
Fort Clayton Burger King.

Shipping your pet
Shipping your pet? For infor-
mation, call 284-3069 or 288-
5946.

Free calls
All military ID holders can
make up to two free five
minute Military Affiliated Ra-
dio System calls to anywhere
in the U.S. and Puerto Rico 3 -
5 p.m. Friday and Sundays.
For appointments, call 272-
6968.


B10


Tropic Times
May 7,1999


!


I


I miscellaneous .1


4









Community Tropic TiesBll
COll U May 7, 1999


It's that time again - signing up for the Summer Program


story and photos
by Tina Summerton
Tropic Times Staff
FORT CLAYTON - Even as the
drawdown continues there is still
plenty for children to do this sum-
mer. The Child and Youth Services is
offering a Summer Program for chil-
dren of all ages. The Summer Camp
program is being offered at no cost
to the customer and on a 'first-come
first-served' basis. Spaces are lim-
ited so don't delay.
The Summer Program includes
toddler/preschool and school age
camps, sports clinics, instructional
classes and a teen program.
The Toddler/Preschool Program
is for children 2 - 5 years old and is
from 9 a.m. - noon, Monday - Friday,
June 7 through July 2. The camps
weekly themes include. Wet and
Wonderful, Dinosaurs, Puppet Fun
and Adi6s Panama.
The School Age Program is for
children 5 - 12 years old and is from
9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Monday - Friday ,
June 7 through July 30. The camps
weekly . themes include. Tunnel
through Time, Traveling through the
Seven Seas, Olympic Spirit, Final
Voyage and more. Daily planned ac-
tivities include field trips, swim-
ming, arts and crafts, games, cook-


7 - .4"
/ /


I


outs, hikes and much more.
The Teen Program is May 25
through July 30 and offers a variety
of center-based leisure activities,
life skills workshops, outdoor activi-
ties and trips-and tours. Some of the
trips and tours include Shimmy


Beach, Sierra Club, El Valle,
Portobelo and many more.
If the summer camp is not what
you are looking for, DCA also offers
sports clinics for racquetball, soc-
cer, volleyball and junior and senior
teens basketball. They also have ka-


rate, piano, gymnastics and guitar
instructional classes.
The Summer Program sign-up is 1
- 5 p.m. May 14 and 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
May 15 on the 1st Floor, Building
155 Fort Clayton. For more informa-
tion, call 288-6816.


BHS students take part in Law Day


story and photos by Rita Sosa
Assistant principal, BHS
On March 18, students from
Balboa High School staged a mock
trial in the JAG Office courtroom on
Fort Clayton. As part of the street
law course requirement, students
tested their knowledge of the legal -. <.
system by participating in a simu-
lated trial. Capt. Dean Lynch, Trial
Counsel at the Staff Judge
Advocate's Criminal Law Division
served as judge.
Students assumed the roles of
prosecuting and defending attor-
neys, defendant, witness, bailiff and
jury members. Their case involved a
young woman who charged her
boyfriend with rape. Capt. Lynch
guided the students through the ....
trial procedures as they performed
their roles. Undoubtedly all the
effort and hard work paid off and the students
were very pleased with the end result. All the
terms and concepts came alive as each indi-
vidual applied the knowledge from the course
to a trial situation. Capt. Lynch visited Balboa
High School after the trail and critiqued each
performance. Students asked questions and he
provided information which will help them in
their next trial. Capt. Lynch congratulated the


U---


students on a job well done.
On April 30, another trial was scheduled as
part of the Law Day celebration. This was held
in the Balboa High School library with Capt.
Lynch presiding as judge. The case involved an
alleged murder. The partnership between the
school and the community has provided Balboa
High School students with an excellent oppor-
tunity to witness the legal system in action.
-





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l" '" S k-? -
*^ ,* ML "- ._ ., - - - - - _ - a


(


BHS graduation
The Balboa High School Graduation will be May
15 on the front lawn of the high school. Due to the
large number of visitors and alumni guests who
will be in attendance, each family of a senior will
receive eight tickets for reserved seating. These
tickets guarantee a seat for graduation. Any addi-
tional guest will be placed in the general seating
area. Gate A, which is for ticketed guest will open
at 6:30 a.m. The general seating gate will open at 7
a.m. The only gates which will be open will be
those located along Roosevelt Road. All gates will
be marked either A or General Seating. All parking
will be in the football field or surrounding areas.
All registered alumni must pick up their reserved
tickets 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. by May 14 in the main office
of the high school.

The Alumni Brunch
The Balboa High School Graduation Alumni
Brunch will be held May 15 immediately following
the graduation which begins at 7:30 a.m. This
brunch will provide an opportunity for returning
alumni to visit with their former classmates. The
brunch will be held at the Fort Clayton Commu-
nity Club. Selected vendors will sell memorabilia at
the champagne brunch. The cost is $10 per person
and reservations can be made by contacting Ms.
Zenia Morris at tzmorris@panebm.net.
Payments must be made by check or money
order, payable to the Clayton Community Club.
Send your checks to
Ms. Zenia Morris
PSC 4 Box 1167
APO AA 34004.
Tickets can be picked up at the Balboa High
School Main Office prior to graduation.

The celebration
The parents of the last graduating class of
Balboa High School, the class of '99, will be spon-
soring a celebration party on May 15 at the Plaza
Paitilla Inn for the seniors and their guests.
In order to provide mementos and gifts, many
interested community members donated various
items for door prizes. If you wish to donate to this
last celebration activity, call Sherry Barnish at
284-4023.











B12 Tropic Times
B12 May 7,1999


Hi Youth Scene


Students from the Sunshine room at the Child Development Center show their happy faces
after the delivery of the Children are Special People bags. Standing left to right are Martha
Pullmalis, Director CDC; Marjorie M. Arias, Family Advocacy Program Manager; Dana Pohl,
CDC teacher; Nivia Barroso, ACS staff and Diana McFarlane, CDC teacher.


Children are Special People


mt, -

Marjorie M. Arias, Family Advocacy Program
Manager, explains the importance of pre-
venting child abuse.
; " * "- .. s


Teacher Anick Buval and her students at
Curundu Elementary School enjoy the visit of
Marjorie M. Arias and Nelida Holnes of the
Family Advocacy Program Office, April 28.


story and photos by Griselda Sterling
Tropic Times Staff
The U.S. Army South joined the National Com-
mittee to Prevent Child Abuse in promoting April
as Child Abuse Prevention Month.
Children are Special People is the slogan that
identified the Army Community Service Family Ad-
vocacy Program during this month.
"The blue ribbon is the identification of the
event," said Marjorie M. Arias, ACS Family Advo-
cacy Program manager.
ACS/Family Advocacy Program work in con-
junction with the Department of Defense Depen-
dents Schools to get the word out.
"'This w ill be the last celebration of this event in
Panama. and we want to be sure it contributes to
building healthy and loving families. The program
dedicated thousands of hours selecting the correct
materials and toys for children and their parents.
We enjoyed it," Arias said.
More than three million children are reported
abused or neglected each year and three die each
day because of maltreatment. Every single person
in the community has a major role in prevention.
ACS Family Advocacy Program activities
throughout April included:
*Articles. news releases and radio/TV scripts
through local media in partnership with the
USARSO Public Affairs Office.
*Educational materials, stickers, magnets,
stress balls and other freebies at Building 519
and the PX the last week of April.
*Banners displayed throughout the month of
April
The event culminated with the distribution of
Children Are Special People bags at
Playmorning, Child Development Center, Part-
Day Preschool Program and kindergarten
through third graders at Fort Clayton, Curundu
and Fort Kobbe Elementary Schools.


Pet of the week
This is Matthew Vest and his best friend Misty.
Misty beat Matthes back to the states as she is
already gone to Oklahoma, where she is anx-
iously awaiting for her partner Matthew.
Kids: If you'd like to see a picture of yourself and your pet in the
Tropic Times, send it through MPS to Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO
AA 34004 or drop it in our box at the Fort Clayton Post Office. Be
sure to include your name, as well as your pet's name. (You can
also send us a little information about your pet.) Write your name and
address on the back of the photo so we can send it back to you.

r - - - - - - - - - - - - - ----I
Lunch Menu
May 10 -14

Curundu Middle and Balboa
High Schools

Monday - Hamburger,
lettuce and tomato, po-
tato wedges, fruit, ge-
latine, milk.
Tuesday - Chicken
barbecue, mashed po-
tatoes, brown gravy,
carrots, applesauce,
milk.
Wednesday - Frank's
baked beans, carrots
and celery sticks, fruit, milk.
Thursday - Sloppy Joe on a bun, potatoes
I wedges, green peas, vanilla pudding, milk.
I Friday - Pizza, corn, pineapple, gelatine, milk.
L- ---------------- J
r-------------------
Lunch Program

May 10- 14
Howard and Fort Kobbe

Elementary Schools

Monday - Ham and cheese
sandwich, cucumber slices, "
apple, cookie, milk.
Tuesday - Peanut butter *
and jelly sandwich, carrot
stick, grapes, cookie, milk.
Wednesday - Ham sand- A
which, celery sticks, banana,
cookie, milk.
Thursday - Cheese sand-
wich, lettuce and tomato,
pear, cookie, milk.
Friday - Tuna salad sandwich, tomato wedges,
oranges, cookie, milk.
L --------------- -J


000 -



to U-







Francesca Arzola, 1 Frederick Spertina, 7 Steve Sanchez, 16 Alyssa Purvis, 2 Marcelis Long, 1 Maria Cassort, 3 Anngella Hobson,
April 26 May 2 May 5 May 6 May 8 May 8 May 9




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PAGE 1

Town Hall Meeting "Heroes Welcome" BHS Graduation The next U.S. Army South Town Hall Throughout the month of May, SCN will The BHS Graduation will be held 7:30 Meeting will be held May 13 at Fort air the "Heroes Welcome" videotape dia.m. May 15 on the front lawn of the high Clayton's Valent Recreation Center. Memrectly after its Friday evening broadcasts. school. Each family of a senior will be bers of the community are invited to atThe videotape segment, which showcases given eight tickets for their guests. All regtend. These Town Hall Meetings are an the achievements and legacy of U.S. Army istered alumni and guests must pick up exce!lent forum to learn about upcoming South, can be recorded via a video cassette their reserved tickets between 8 a.m.-4 events. For more information call 288recorder for strictly personal, not business, p.m. by May 14 in the main office of BHS. 9303. reasons. For information, see Page B11. YO 1C 11Tmes Vol. X11 No. 18 Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama Friday, May 7, 1999 Serving the Joint Community JIATF-S outh -'mIsson complete' story by Tech. Sgt. Miconna J. interagency team at JIATF-South proved Boaldin their exceptional worth over the past two NCOIC, 24th Wing Public Affairs Office years and left a trail of accomplishments. HOWARD AFB -A ceremony that "To my friends at JIATF-South whom officially marked the closure of Joint InI will terribly miss," he said, "We have teragency Task Force-South was held been part of a very worthwhile effort. Wednesday at Howard Air Force Base. The fact that you could accomplish what To highlight the event, JIATF-South you did in a relatively short period of was awarded the Joint Meritorious Unit time speaks extremely well for your ability Award for the organization's outstandto take advantage of your diversity and ing contributions to the counterdrug cpapply so many differing talents and backerations in Panama and South America ground to achieve success. from June 11, 1997, through May 1. JIATF-South supported international The unscheduled announcement of partners that led to substantial disruption the award bestowed an even greater of the illegal narco-industry in the resense of pride, and accomplishment, to gion. "I'm proud to have had a leadership the deactivation for those who served role in this international, communal efwith JIATF-South. fort," noted Chisholm. "As a direct result Members of the ceremony official of JIATF-South support, participating party were U.S. Ambassador Simon nation Drug Law Enforcement and SecuI Ferro, presiding official; Col. Barry J. rity Forces have seized 145 metric tons Chisholm, JIATF-South director; and Seof cocaine, hundreds of narcotraffickers nior Master Sgt. Bertrand C. Blain, senior have been arrested, and 38 drug planes enlisted manager. have been destroyed, forced down, or Blain was the opening speaker for the seized on the ground." ceremony by saying the day was a show"Many of the Guard and Reservists case of the men and women of JIATFhave spent up to or over a year of tempo. South. "These men and women are the rary duty here," he said. "That dedica4W true lynch-pens to the JIATF-South option has been an absolute necessity for 49 erations." He talked of manpower shortmission accomplishment. ages and difficult missions. "We "My congratulations and thanks are muddled through it and we have emerged to all of you." he said. "We take pride victorious," he said. "We are part of the that our team at JIATF-South can say, as USARSO and team Howard family. we close our unit -mission complete. "JIATF-South consists of all four Ferro was that last to speak. He bebranches of the service," he said. "We gan with recognizing the hard work the worked together and became all we men and women of JIATF-South have Staff Sgt. Norma Martinez-Gavan (USAF) wanted to be." completed over the years. "You have Senior Master Sgt. Bertrand Blain, the unit's last senior enlisted manChisholm then made his farewells to served the U.S. with distinction in a way ager (left) and Col. Barry Chisholm, JIATF-S's outgoing director, loop the unit; it's people and those they have that has also helped our neighbors in the Joint Meritorious Unit Award on their organization's flag as part of worked with over the years. "JIATFLatin America and in the Caribbean. Your departure ceremonies Wednesday at Howard Air Force Base. South has had a short but significant hishard work has been crucial to this suctory," he said. "The joint, international, cess story. "With the important contributions The mission JIATF-South performed made by JIATF-South, we have been from Howard is now transferred to able to establish great working relationJIATF-East in Key West, Florida. This ships with the Panamanian public forces, unit will be the headquarters element ofa as well as with authorities from other new U.S. Southern Command countries its the regions, in the fight counterdrug architecture with Forward against drugs," lie said. "1999 is a crucial Operating Locations for counterdrug airyear for forging a new relationship becraft in tle Netherlands Antilles and Ectween Panama and the United States. uador. JIATF-South is furling their flag, but the Narrator for the ceremony was Capt. mission goes on. Roberto V. Richards. "As the President's representative to Throughout the ceremony there was Panama, it is my honor to thank you for a flight of JIATF-South members led by your valuable service to our country," he Lt. Col. Bryan P. Newman with Spc. Jussaid. "I know those of you who will be tin Mullens as flag bearer. moving to ny home state of Florida to The color guard represented the unit work with JIATF at Key West will be jointness with members from four serwelcomed in the spirit of southern hospivices. tality." They were Air Force Staff Sgt. Kelly The closure is part of the U.S. SouthWinston, 24th Security Forces Squademn Command's implementation of the ron; Navy Scaian Heather Stevens, Staff Sgt. Norma Martinez-Galvan (USAF) Panama Canal Treaties of 1977. The unit JIATF-South; Marine Cpl. Paul M. Reno, Col. Barry Chisholm, Joint Interagency Task Force-South outgoing direcwas the command's operational headE Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines; tor, speaks with U.S. Ambassador Simon Ferro after the ceremony inacquarters for counterdrug operations in and Army Sgt. Scott M. Detnier, JIATFtivating the unit. To the left is Carmen Ferro, wife of the ambassador. Panama and South America. South.

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Tropic Times p May 7, 1999 Griselda Sterling (Tropic Times) Spc. Deborah Long (USARSO PAO) Curundu gardener Congratulations, Sir! Fred Costin, guidance counselor and volunteer gardener Lt. Col. Daniel McCallum, the U.S. Army South Staff Judge Advocate, was proat Curundu Elementary School, was recently honored moted to colonel May 3 during a ceremony in the Simon Bolivar Conference Room with a plaque due to the many hours he spent creating a in Building 95. Friends and family surrounded him as his wife Diane and Maj. Gen. btfor haetroualgtde muche tol tudens aens and Philip R. Kensinger Jr., USARSO commanding general, pinned on his rank. forts have brought much pride to students, parents and I faculty. Volunteer of FOTthe Week FOR CLAYTON (Installation Volunteer Coordinator's Office) Dissenia Ortega has been chosen as the U.S. Army South Volunteer of the Week for her outstanding support to the community. Ortega has volunteered with the Tropic Times for the past year. She states what she likes most about volunteering is having the opportunity to learn various computer skills, courses that are made availSgt. Tywanna Gordon(Tropic Times) able to her and the opportunity to Dissenia Ortega Is the U.S. Army W ho's the Headhunter of the Month? improve her English skills. i mpo herdngi is South Volunteer of the Week. Sgt. David E. Shaffer is the Headhunter of the Month for Headquarters seeing the outcome ofher work in the giving her dog and two parakeets and Headquarters Company, Theater Support Brigade. He is congratuseig T me ot hr wg n iognd slated by 1st Sgt. Paul Kelly, first sergeant of HHC, TSB. Shaffer comTropic Time s. lot of attention. peted against three others for the Headhunter title Monday at the comIn her spare time, Ortega enjoys Ortega is a native of Panama. pany headquarters. Congratulations Shaffer. This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Contents of the Tropic Times do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004. Writer/Editor .Carnela Lowe Gobem Building 405, Field Printing Plant, Corozal One West Office Automation Clerk .Tina Summerton Phone: 285-6612/4666 or FAX 285-6613. Volunteer .Dissenia Ortega E-Mail: pbouchard@usarso-lanl.army.mil U.S. Army South Commanding General.Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr. USARSO LAN address: pbouchard@sopa@usarso U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office .288-3143 Tropic Times on the World Wide Web at: www.tropictimes.com Public Affairs Officer .Lt. Col. Byron D. Conover E-Mail: daniel-amores@usa.net Deputy Public Affairs Officer .Capt. Larry D. Winchel Com m and Information. ..Gaby Capriles Commander in Chief .Gen. Charles E. Wilhelm NCOIC .Sgt. 1st Class Christopher C. Calkins Director, U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs .Col. Vicente C. Ogilvie 24tor. d. .C. eor L. Lon 24th Wing Commander .Col. Gregory L. Trebon U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office .(305) 437-1200 24th Wing Public Affairs Office .284-5459 Editor .Sgt. Paul Bouchard C hief of Public A ffairs .I st Lt. Joseph D ella V edova A ssistant Editor .Sgt. Tyw anna Gordon NCO IC ..T ech. Sgt. M iconna J. Boaldin W riter/Editor .D aniel A m ores Editor ...Staff Sgt. John B. D endy IV Writer/Editor .Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett Director, Joint Interagency Task Force South .Col. Barry J. Chisholm Writer/Editor .Griselda Sterling Joint Interagency Task Force South Public Affairs Office .284-7502

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Tropic Times ews May 7,1999 Air Force Quarterly Awards Ceremony story by Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV 24th Wing Public Affairs Team Howard held its second quarter quarter) awards ceremony April 23 at the Howard Theater. The second quarter award categories, selected names and duty titles are: Airman of the Quarter-Senior Airman Larry Knoll, 24th Security Forces Squadron; NCO of the Quarter-Stall Sgt. Tim Dinon, 24th Security Forces Squadron; Senior NCO of the Quarter-Master Sgt. Robert Spencer, 24th Medical Group; Company Grade Officer of the Quarterst Lt. Justin Anderson, 24th Weather Squadron; Civilian Manual Grade Employee of the Quarter-Kenneth Wampler, 24th Civil Engineer Squadron; Civilian Non-Manual Employce of the Quarter-Maria Eleta, 24th Comptroller Squadron; and Civilian Manager of the Quarter-Robert Harris, 24th Transportation Squadron. Key player! Unit's Best! Model senior NCO! Received laudatory praise! True professional! Customer focused! Extremely versatile! These were some of the words used to describe job performance, self-improvement and other accomplishments of this quarter's finalists. Knoll's performance on Howard's intrusion detection system contributed to a 30-percent decrease in thefts on Howard. Dimon not only got slots in the Staff Sgt. Mike Boquette (U.S. Air Force) Army Air Assault School for his fellow airmen, but the Col. Gregory L. Trebon, 24th Wing Commander (far left) and 24th Wing Command Chief Master personnel selection procedures he put together helped Sgt. Curtis Brownhill (far right), flank Howard's 1999 second quarter quarterly awards finalists ensure 100 percent of those airmen graduated. (from left of Trebon): 1st Lt. Justin Anderson, Master Sgt. Robert Spencer, Staff Sgt. Tim Dimon, Spencer's role as a Task Force-Redeployment member Senior Airman Larry Knoll, Robert Harris, Maria Eleta, and Kenneth Wampler. included responsibility for transferring medical airmen and equipment to gaining units as part of the 18-bed age at Florida State University, and she recouped a Jan.-March period. Though we publicly recognized medical and surgical unit closure at Howard. Anderson whopping $150,000 for taxpayers through aggressive both our nominees and our winners at our Team became a player in weather closure actions at Howard research on outstanding travel vouchers. Harris re-engiHoward Quarterly Awards ceremony last week, I'd apby routing tactical weather and communication equipneered local aircrew vehicle dispatch processes to enpreciate your further acknowledgment of their strong meant to counterparts at 10 gaining bases. sure no transportation-related aircraft departure delays performance throughout your respective units. Wampler is now a nationally-registered emergency from Howard. I am very proud to have all of these outstanding medical technician, and he prevented buildings in The award program results were acknowledged by people working on our team. Without their valuable Panama's capitol from possibly burning when he was Col. Gregory L. Trebori, 24th Wing commander, in an contributions, day-in and day-out, we could not get our among Air Force people helping out during a wareApril 23 memo: "It is with great pleasure that I conjob done. Many thanks, and again, my congratulahouse fire there. Eleta maintains a 3.7 grade point avergratulate our Team Howard award winners for the tions." Household goods shipment update Space available travel becomes story by Jim Winfrey month of May. You will get the earliest USARSO Director of Logistics packing date available, which is currently m ore lim cited at H o ward AFB June 7, or maybe even June 14 now. m r i ie a ~ w r F FORT CLAYTON -Now that we Do not wait to make your appointment have entered the month of May, the peak with the Transportation Office. There are story by Master Sgt. Dennis Due to our ongoing drawdown, of the drawdown, I would like to take the only three agents that are packing household Broughton space available sign up must now be time to thank all of you for your patience goods out. Even though these agents have in640th AirMobility Support Squadron done in person and we will no longer during this turbulent evolution. A PCS is a creased their capacity to accommodate our b stressful time that requires lots of planexodus from Panama, and the Transportation The 640th Air Mobility Support be able to accept space available sign ning, and I would like to share some inforOffice has provided material to assist them in Squadron leaves Howard Air Force up via E-mail or fax. mation, as well as tips, with you. continuing to move personnel, there is a limiBase on June 1. In keeping with our All flight information will be availDuring the month of April, the Transtation to the number of shipments they can unit closure plans, the Air Mobility able on a recorded message by callportation Office booked 652 household do every day .C ing 284-3353. As in the past you will goods shipments. Our projections did not Since, Jan. 1, there have been approxiComm'nd Passenger Terminal will show this amount for April; and as a relately 2835 families requiring household close its doors on Monday, but still be responsible for showing up for sult, our surge capacity was used one goods shipment. As of April 30, 1564 this does not mean there will not be the space available roll call and you month earlier than expected. shipments have been picked up. With an space available travel opportuniwill need to have all the proper travel Additionally, as of April 29, there were estimated 680 shipments already schedties. documentation. over 680 shipments booked for the month uled for May, there is a remainder of almost Space available travel will still AMC will not transport personof May, and the first week of June is also 600 shipments. The shipping agents will be be a possibility, but much more limnel to or from Tocumen Internaclosed out. Therefore, in order to provide a operating at surge capacity during May, Th wl tional Airport. It will be the better service to all our future customers, with little feasibility to handle emergency ,tertan in the past.sThingt w passenger's responsibility to meet we will not be accepting changes to pack s.tain.Yu ainei hspoesi certainly not be the same but we psegrsrsosblt ome out dates for the month of May. situation. Your patience in this process will work hard to provide the same an AMC contractor at Tocumen The Transportation Office is doing evgreatly appreciated. Overbooking the level of quality customer service IAP. Information on when and erything possible to assist you in the shipa wil not on nease youruave o wa toe r srvi where to meet the contractor will be ment of your household goods, but you lion, but will cause inconveniences to other you have grown to expect from Air wrve to the o mbtrs e must be aware of some important issues. If members as well. Emergencies wilt be Mobility Command's Passenger provided to those members se you have been in possession of PCS orders handled on a case by case basis. Service operation. elected for a flight. for more than three months and are just I thank you again for your patience and On Monday we will move from We will still be able to take all catnow coming to the Transportation Office, understanding and wish you good luck in building 228 to building 231, the air egories of space available passenyou will not get an appointment for the your next assignment. freight terminal on Howard AFB. To gers, and we can still ship pets out enter this facility, you must approach space available. the entrance between buildings 227 One new option available to unacDOIM Mail and Distribution Center Needs and 231. companied personnel assigned in Here you'll find a telephone with Panama is dependent travel. If you Your Help instructions on what number to call to are assigned to a unit in Panama, FORT CLAYTON (DOIM) -Customers are reminder of the following: contact our passenger service repreyour commander can now sign a let1. Only unit mail clerks are authorized to post and pick up official mail from sentatives. It's necessary to restrict ter stating that the sponsor is on an the MDC. Personal mail is not authorized with one exception -relocating entry into this facility due to force unaccompanied tour assigned to their personnel are allowed to mail out change-of-address cards, available from the protection concerns. unit. post office, by presenting a copy of their official travel orders. They will escort you to the space The family member then can travel 2. Do not mail office equipment, furniture, supplies, noncurrent working available sign up area where you will category five into and out of Panama files, computers and other IT equipment. be briefed on travel procedures and, without the sponsor, or they may 3. Due to a manpower shortage and space limitation, unit mail clerks, in orallowed to sign-up for space available travel with the sponsor in category der to be attended, must make an appointment when mailing more than 5 partravel. Although our location three, ordinary leave. cels. Unit mail clerks without appointment will be required to return at an apchanges our hours remain the same -For more information, call Cuspointed time on another date. 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. tomer Service Personnel at 284-3551.

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4 Tropic Times May 7, 1999 News MWR offers plenty at Roosevelt Roads NS story and photoby BobAppin Montalez Torres, MWR attendant of USARSO Public Affairs Office the "All Hands" beach hut. U.S. NAVAL STATION ROOSEVELT For those who may be too busy to ROADS, Puerto Rico USARSO PAO)drive down to the beach, there is the The Special Operations Cormmand -Bundy Fitness Center. South members have many Morale, "We have a weight room, Nautilus Welfare and Recreation activities to enmachines, a racquetball court and has joy here such as beaches, a marina and ketball court," said Luis M. Rodriguez exercise facilities. recreation aid at the Bundy Fitness Many of the MWR activities are loCenter. cated on this naval base. One of the In addition, the fitness center has more popular areas is the "All Hands" saunas as well as a swimming pool that beach. This beach is about a 10is currently being repaired, Rodriguez minute drive from the furthest distance added. on post. "The marina offers many different There is no fee to use the beach and services which include rental of boats, if you forget to bring your beverages kayaks and swimming gear," said and food, don't worry because there is Sedith I. Ayala, cashier/clerk of the Bathers frolic in the waves at a beach in Puerto Rico. an MWR beach hut (kiosk) that sells Pelican's Roost MWR Marina shop. these items on the beach front. There are services such as slip fees There are several other MWR activithat the SOCSOUTH members will be "We are open on weekends and holifor living-aboard or not, trailer space as ties such as bowling lanes and the golf able to use to re-create themselves. days from noon to 4 p.m.," said William well as launch ramp fees, added Ayala. course that includes a driving range Successful security sweeps key to national security This story is courtesy of the other structure housing a unit floor. *Empty security containto re-enter the area. US. Army South Security Manand/or organization. *Clean trashcans inside ers and pull out drawers. Reset The security manager or ager Office. The area to be inspected and out. Remove all plastic combinations to the standard accountable officer will enFORT CLAYTON -The should be prepared in the folbags from the trashcans and 50-25-50. sure the removal, transportafollowing procedures will prolowing manner: place the trashcans upside *Unlock all inspectable artion and/or destruction of vide security managers or ac*The area will be neat and down on the floor. eas. If any room requires a ciclassified and unclassified incountable officers the foundaorderly. *Remove all objects from pher lock code, this must be formation and the proper distion for a very successful *Remove all trash prior to walls. unlocked as well. position of automated inforcounterintelligence security any sweep. *If the ceiling is made up Move all furniture apmation systems and/or media sweep. *Remove all personal items ofceiling tiles, remove at least proximately eight inches away is conducted in accordance Strict adherence is imperafrom the offices prior to inspecthree tiles from the ceiling in from walls and doors. with established guidelines. tive in order to safeguard the tion. order to facilitate inspection. If This will help you as you For more information or to national security of the United *Remove all objects from a building has an attic, clean it clean your respective areas and schedule and appointment. States. desks and workstations and and have it unlocked and acfacilitate the security inspecplease contact Evelyn White.or Coordinate a security sweep remove drawers. Place drawers cessible. tion. Lucy Ortiz, U. S. Army South fifteen days before vacating an upside down on top of the *Empty file cabinets and After a room is swept, do not Security Manager at 288-3512/ office space, building or any desk/workstation or on the pull out drawers. allow personnel or equipment 13. Puerto Rico Congregations ready for incoming troops, looks at military impact in church history, development This article is courtesy of the Episcopal Cathedral As the only English-speaking, non-Roman Catholic building was laid in Old San Juan. ofSt. John the Baptist in San Juan Puerto Rico. denomination on the island at that time, the Anglican St. John's remained at the Old San Juan plaza locaSAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO -The English-speakchurch swiftly moved to begin services in San Juan to tion until 1930, when it moved to its current location in ing churches and congregations in the greater San Juan meet the needs of the Protestant church-going military what has been called "New" San Juan, to reflect the metropolitan area are preparing to welcome military mempersonnel. growth and population shift in the greater metropolitan bers from Panama to their new home in Puerto Rico, The newly formed Anglican mission congregation area. "The Island of Enchantment." ofSt. John the Baptist had its first service on March 12, In 1938, the parish ofSt. John became the Cathedral The leaders ofmany of these churches are in contact 1899 in a hall on the plaza of what is now known as Old for the Episcopal Diocese of Puerto Rico. with the local military chaplains-some of whom are San Juan. The Episcopal Cathedral of St. John the Baptist conthemselves new to the island-to offer their assistance Approximately half of the parishioners were memtinues to meet the needs of San Juan's English-speakas the arriving personnel look to find.a church home for bers of the U.S. military occupation force. ing Episcopalians and Anglicans. themselves and their families. The year 1901 not only saw the transferal of the AnThe makeup of St. John's English-speaking conOn an interesting if not ironic note, one ofthese San glican churches in Puerto Rico to thejurisdiction ofthe gregation is multiracial, multinational and Juan English-speaking churches, the Episcopal CatheEpiscopal Church ofthe United States, but also the withmulticultural and as such, is similar to that of the first dral of St. John the Baptist, likely owes its very existdrawal of a large contingent of the U.S. military from St. John's congregation of 1901 Old San Juan: U.S. ence to the arrival of U.S. military troops to Puerto San Juan. St. John's average attendance at services Continentals, West Indians, British, and Puerto Rico-those who arrived in 1898 during the United plummeted. Ricans, several of whom are active-duty or retired States' war with Spain. However, the church continued to grow and on members of the U.S. military. At the time ofthe Spanish-American War, there were Christmas Eve, 1901, St. John's became a full-fledged The Episcopal Cathedral of St. John is located at only two Anglican (Church of England) churches in parish church with its own Rector. A year later, the 1401 Ponce de Leon Avenue and the Rector is Fr. David Puerto Rico: one in Ponce on the southern coast, and cornerstone for St. Silva Howell. Regular Sunday services ofthe Englishone on the small island of Vieques to the east. John's first speaking congregation are held at 8:00 a.m. and 11:00 These churches had been founded under the ausa.m. (St. John's is also home to a separate Spanishpices of the Anglican Bishop of the island ofAntigua speaking congregation that holds it Sunday service at to serve a Dutch, English and immigrant West In9:15 a.m.). The church telephone number is (787) 722dian population. 3254 and its website is www.hows.net/00907ECOSJ. On July 25, 1898, more than 16,000 U.S. troops, Other English-speaking churches and services in the under the command of General Nelson A. Miles, Greater San Juan area include: landed at Guinica, Puerto Rico on the southern coast Abundant Life Fellowship by the Sea -727-2101 of the island. The forces took that town, moved Calvary Baptist Church (S.B.C.) -782-8632 immediately to Ponce a few miles away and soon Calvary Chapel of Puerto Rico -744-1651 proceeded north toward San Juan. Freedom Chapel Assembly ofGod -721-4187 Before engaging the main Spanish force there, Grace Lutheran Church -722-5372 however, hostilities between the United States and Isla Verde Baptist Church -761-4206 Spain ended on August 12 with the signing of a Our Lady of Perpetual Sorrow Roman Catholic peace protocol. Church -721-1015 The formal document of peace between the two Palmas Community Church -850-5902 nations, the Treaty of Paris, was signed on DecemPark Gardens Church of Christ -748-3025 ber 10,1898. Revival and Restoration Fellowship -722-2688 The United States Army became the governing Second Union Church -720-4423 force in Puerto Rico and the capital of San Juan saw Stila Manrs Roman Catholic Church -723-2240 the presence of several thousand troops for the next Union Church of San Juan -726-0280 year and a half. Wesieyan Community Church -720-2595

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NN w Tropic Times May 7, 1999 TEAMS to shut down operations by Lt. Col. Don Potter while other states would be recruited at the bi-annual equipment up to fully mission capable level for reTEAMS Commander Oversea Contingency Conferences which are sponlease to the next JCS task force. We coordinated, FORT KOBBE -The Theater Equipment And Mainsored by USARSO. By this time, TEAMS had also esloaded and moved this equipment to the Port of tenance Site located at Fort Kobbe Panama shut down tablished a Supply Support Agency with Standard Army Balboa, where TEAMS, with the support of MTMC, its operation April 30. Retail Supply System-I and a Property Book section preformed the Port Support Activity. TEAMS also TEAMS came into being as a result of a concept using Standard Property Book System-Redesign. The built, requisitioned and loaded the necessary PreCol. Clyde Vaughn had while serving on the staff of maintenance activity used Unit Level Logistics Sysscribed Load List for each exercise. U.S. Army South and as a Task Force Commander in tems and Standard Army Maintenance System in its While the exercises were on going down range, Panama during the 1980's. operation. TEAMS supported each exercise and anyone else in The idea was to have a set of engineer equipment By 1995, TEAMS had grown to having over 450 theater, for its CLIX repair parts. Additionally, and base camp supplies, staged in Panama, which could major end items, and enough base camp supplies to TEAMS sent maintenance back-up support personnel be utilized by company size Oversea Deployments for support two 500 man base camps and a 100 man base to the ARNG exercises when requested Training rather than continuing to pay the expensive camp simultaneously. There were 44 rotations of 40 TEAMS has supported exercises which have resea and air lift that would be required to transport this service members each coming to TEAMS in overlapsulted in the following completed projects: The buildtype equipment from the states. This idea became a ping weeks. ing of over 300 schools, over 50 clinics, nearly 400 reality in 1993 when USARSO and National Guard The rotations were locally billeted, fed and transKM of roads built, 50 wells dropped, over 200 water Bureau agreed to a plan. ported at USARSO expense. In fact, USARSO and pups installed, 50 bridges erected, and many other The initial equipment and supplies TEAMS would NGB split the transportation cost from home station to projects completed within the theater. be provided by USARSO. This was done using equipPanama and return, which made going to TEAMS not TEAMS has had the support of over 6000 rotational ment that was excess to USARSO units. The manning only a good recruitment tool, real time sensitive MOS guardsmen during its existance in accomplishing its and support of the equipment would be provided by training, but also a financial benefit to the state and many and varied mission, In fact, no USARSO exercise NGB through the use of Active Guard Reserve, Active unit, as well as to USARSO. or add on missions are completed in theater without Duty for Special Work and rotational maintenance The original mission of TEAMS was primary supsome form of TEAMS involvement. units on their annual training. port to the ARNG ODT's and back-up support for the As of April of this year, about 30 pieces of rolling The first year saw the establishment of the organizaJoint Chiefs of Staff exercises that took place within stock and 19 milvans of equipment and supplies were tion and collection of about 20 pieces of equipment the theater. In 1996, this mission changed when ODT's sent to USARSO's new headquarters in Puerto Rico and some basic supplies needed for a base camp. As were dropped and TEAMS became the primary supwhere a USAR operated "TEAMS" will be established, the concept and idea took root, TEAMS expanded to a port for all JCS excersies. under different mission guidance and name. 20 acre compound with buildings, a maintenance faThat meant coordinating, preparing, loading and As TEAMS closed operations, I would like to thank cility and headquarters building. shipping all equipment and supplies for the two major the thousands of rotational Guard men and women, the The amount of equipment and supplies continued to New Horizon JCS excersies (one for the USAR and numerous ADSW supporters, the coordination and sugrow as USARSO drew down in size. During this time one for ARNG) and all other exercises for FY97 and pervision provided by the AGR staff, the limiless supan agreement was made with the 167th Corps Support FY98. Once the ODTs and JCS exercises were comport from USARSO DCSLOG, MTMC and DOL. Most Command of Alabama Army National Guard to supply pleted for FY96, TEAMS had only 100 days of mainimportantly, I thank lSG Mark Adkins, who has served regular rotations of maintenance units to TEAMS tenance time in which to reconstitute and bring this as "TOP" for over 3 3/4 years. Cold War Recognition Certificates approved HOWARD AFB (Public Affairs Ofment for military or a SF51 for civilThe U.S. Army is the executive agent cant within seven weeks. Note that no fice) -In accordance with section ians. Applicants are asked to send a copy for this effort for the entire federal govmedal has been authorized or issued for 1084 of the Fiscal Year 1998 National of your documentation not the original ernment. Ceremonies are not required Cold War Recognition and contractors Defense Authorization Act, the Secredocument since the documents cannot to present these certificates and the and volunteers are not eligible. tary of Defense approved awarding Cold be returned. Army's goal is to respond to each appliWar Recognition Certificates to all The certificate may be awarded postmembers of the armed forces and qualihumously to those whose relatives apply fied federal government civilian personon their behalf. nel. There is no charge for a Cold War The time frame covered under the act Recognition Certificate. The program isM o th e r's D a y is Sept. 2, 1945, to Dec. 26, 1991. scheduled to run for 10 years, so there The certificate is for those who is plenty of time to send in your request by Carmela Lowe Gobern faithfully and honorably served the and supporting documentation. You have Tropic Times Staff United States anytime during the Cold up to one year after requesting a certifiSunday, May 9, is Mother's Day. This (i War era including active-duty, National cate to supply the supporting documencelebration, which originated in the Guard and Reservists, and civilians. tation. United States in 1907, was the idea of Those who are currently active duty Orderly rooms may apply for the enAnna M. Jarfis, a teacher from Grafton, military or civilian employees of the tire squadron or unit. They must supply W. Va., who never married nor had U.S. government are also eligible. the names and identification numbers children, but was concerned because To receive the certificate, applicants for each of the recipients. she felt many mothers were neglected must certify or prove that their service The certificates will be mailed in one and unappreciated. was "faithful and honorable" and that package to the address provided. MiliJarvis was extremely attached to they served for any period during that tary groups should be advised that Army her mother, Anna Maria Reese Jarvis, time. MILPER Message 99-125 contains deand took care of her for many years. Any official government or military tailed procedures for applying as a unit. Her mother, who was the founder of document with recipient's name, social While the message applies specifithe Mother's Day Work Clubs, died on security number/military service numcally to Army personnel, the other serMay 9, 1905, at the age of 73 ber/foreign service number and date of vices have agreed to follow the same Two years later, on the anniversary of her service is acceptable. procedures. mother's death, May 12, 1907, Jarvis initiated a Military service numbers were issued The easiest way to request a certificampaign to gain support for the observance of a to members of the armed forces before cate is by using the U.S. or international day devoted to mothers. social security numbers were used to request forms which can be found on the As a result of her efforts, in 1908, a service was identify personnel. coldwar.army.mil web page. held at Andrews Methodist Church in Grafton to tribute The changeover to social security The site is secure, but if you are unmothers. Carnations, her mother's favorite flowers, were numbers occurred in the late 1960s, so comfortable sending your social secufurnished at the service by Jarvis and given to those in atmany retirees who are eligible for the rity number over the web, you may send tendance to symbolize the purity, fidelity, prayers and encertificate might have only a military in a letter to request a certificate. during love of mothers. service number on their supporting Also note that any request must conToday, carnations continue to symbolize motherhood. The tradition includes documentation. tain the words "I certify that my service the wearing of white carnations on Mother's Day as a symbol that one's mother The foreign service number is used was honorable and faithful" or it will be has died, andred carnations as a symbol of a living mother. to maintain records for foreign nationrejected. In 1914 a resolution was passed by the U.S. Congress designating the second als who work for the U.S. government You can either mail the package to Sunday in May as Mother's Day, a day of public expression of love and reverand who do not have social security Cold War Recognition, 4035 Ridge Top ence for mothers. numbers. Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22030, fax it to Today, Mother's Day is celebrated worldwide with various activities: It is Make note that the number supplied 1-800-723-9262 or 1-703-275-6749, observed in schools; there are mother-daughter banquets; programs are sponon your initial request, be it SSN, MSN, or e-mail it to coldwar@fairfaxsored by churches and clubs; mothers are guests of honor at programs, lunor FSN, must match the number supemhl.Army.niil. cheons and dinners; and flowers, gifts, and greetings cards are sent not only to plied on your supporting documentation. The coldwar.army.mil webpage is one's mother, but also to grandmothers, aunts, mothers-in-law, foster mothers, Examples of acceptable documentalinked to the official Army Home Page stepmothers and godmothers. tion include a Leave and Earnings Stateand can be accessed from that web page.

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Sports Page 6 Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama May 7, 1999 Serving the Joint Community Panama beats Howard 91-70 Air Force The Howard Fitness Howard Youth Activities director coaches Olympic hopefuls Sports Center is sportsoring a Basketball by Tech. Sgt. Miconna J. Boaldin Tournament May NCOIC, 24th Wing Public Affairs 21 -23. SignHOWARD AFB -The Panamanian up is underInternational Basketball team beat way. TournaHoward Air Force Base 91-70 in a late ment is open April scrimmage designed to prepare to the first eight both teams for future challenges. teams to sign up. The Panamanian team is now off to Maximum 12 per Cuba with their sights set on the Pan Am son roster. Coaches Games, the Americas Cup in Puerto meeting 3 p.m.May 19. Rico, and eventually the Olympics. The HFSC invites you to shape The team is made up of college playup for the millennium by particiers that have returned to Panama from pating inthe 14th Annual May Fitcolleges in various states throughout the ness Month. Win T-Shirts, a $150 U.S. sports apparel gift certificate, Their coach is none other than phone cards, wrist pouches, sports Vicente Duncan, director of Youth Actowels, neck pouches and even a tivities at Howard. Duncan played on trip for four to see the Brickyard the team himself for eight years after 400 Car Race in Indianapolis, lettering in the sport for four years in with airfare, hotel and rental car college. included. There is also a Armed The Howard squad is made up in part Forces Day 5K Run/1.5 mile of Vincent Henderson of the 24th Serwalk scheduled. For more inforvices Squadron, along with Staff Sgt. mation, call the HFSC. Robert Briggs, 24th Security Forces The Howard Bowling CenSquadron; and Tech. Sgt. Bernon Mills ter is looking for and Senior Airman Tharin Payne, both of bowlers in the the 24th Supply Squadron. upcoming "Fun The group also makes up the Howard M 1 x e d squad competing for Air Combat Leagues." There Command's 3-on-3 Basketball Tournais also reduced ment at Offut AFB, Neb. If they are one price bowling on Monof the top-two teams there, they will go Sian Sgt Norma Martnez-Ga van (U.S A Farce) day and Tuesday. All onarona torae. gamesHenderson was very pleased with his Jason Wallace jumps for the hoop while Staff Sgt. Robert Briggs takes aes on thfee team's score of 70 and keeping the the charge. Marine 1st Sgt. Sidney Thomas, #13; Tech. Sgt. Kevin McGee shoes. Bowl three Panamanians under 100. "These guys and Derick Simmons, far right, wait for a possible rebound. Wallace and oes n gowl ree. are Olympic contenders," he said. "Not Simmons are members of the Panamanian International Basketball team information, call 284-4190. to mention we are just a group of guys coached by Howard's own Vicente Duncan, director of Youth Activities. Free aerobics classes are held who like to play ball. Most of our playBriggs, 24th Security Forces Squadron; Thomas, Company E, 2nd Batat 5:45 am. and 9 a.m. Monday, ers are older and they hadn't even had a talion, 2nd Marines; and McGee, 24th Medical Group; all volunteered to Wednesday and Fridays. Also at practice together as a team before the play for the Howard team against the Panamanians. scrimmage with the Panamanian team." 4:45 p.m. Mondays -Fridays. For Duncan, meanwhile, is optimistic more information, call the HFSC. about his team's future. "I never made it very young and very athletic. average age of 28 and all of them having For more information on Air to the Olympics as a player but maybe I "I am optimistic about our chances college experience. We have a very Force sports, call the Howard Fitcan make it as a coach," Duncan said. "I to reach the Olympics," he said. "We good chance of making it to the Olymness Sports Center at 284-3451. am very confident in our team. They are have a good nucleus of players with an pics and even winning." Army The hours of the Clayton Bowling Center are as follows: 9 a.m. -8 p.m. Mondays -Thursdays, 9 a.m. -10 p.m. Fridays, noon -9 p.m. Saturdays and I -7 p.m. Sundays. Is your child having a birthday and you're wondering what to do? Why not have a Kiddie birthday party at the Bowling Center. A special package is available. For more information, call 288-5460. Aerobic classes are available at the Fort Kobbe Elementary School Gym. The cost is $1 per person. Classes are 5:45 -6:45 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 9 -10 a.m. on Saturdays. For more information, call 284-3399. Step aerobics instruction is available at Reeder Fitness Center. For more information, call 288runs 520L. .A 9K run organized by the Isthmus Road Runners is scheduled for 7 a.m. Sunday, starting at Parque Omar in Via Porras. Frr nne information on The Panama Armed Forces Running Association is sponsoring 2, 3 and 5-mile runs 7 a.m. May 15 starting at the Fort Army sports call DCA Sports at Clayton Pedestrian Gate. The Gold Coast Triathlon is set for 7 a.m. May 22 in Portobelo. This event is organized by John 288-5610/3866 or the Reeder Collins -founder of the Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon. For more information on runs, call Allen Jones at 288-3310. Gym at 288-4713/7861.

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Tropic Times SPOASMay 7, 1999 ML Stnig rtad __________A A A _4 National League Road o the NBA Championships W L Pct. GB Atlanta 19 8 .704 -by Chris Sheridan New York 17 11 .607 2 1/2 AP Basketball Writer Philadelphia 14 13 .519 5 The road to the NBA championship otreal 8 will go through San Antonio as long as the Spurs can continue winning. As for Central Allen Iverson, the next time he walks on W ,L_ Pct. GB the court, he'll be known as the league's Houston 17 fO .630 -leading scorer. St. Louis 15 11 .577 1 1/2 The Spurs clinched the No. I seed in Chicago 13 12 .520 3 the West and homecourt advantage Pittsburgh 13 13 .500 3 1/2 throughout the playoffs with an 88-81 Milwaukee 13 14 .481 4 victory at Golden State. They'll begin Cincinnati 11 15 .423 5 1/2 their postseason Sunday against Minnesota. West It'll be a different postseason this W L Pct. GB year, with five playoff teams from last San Francisco 17 12 .586 Los Angeles 16 12 .57 1 1/2 season, Seattle, Charlotte, Cleveland, Arizona 15 14 .517 2 New Jersey and -of course -the deColorado 11 13 .458 3 1/2 fending champion Chicago Bulls, sitting San Diego 10 17 .370 6 this one out. The last night of the regular season American League was a wild one Wednesday night, with East each of the 16 playoff teams having to W L Pct. GB wait until the games ended to learn their New York 17 9 .654 futures. Tampa Bay 15 14 .517 3 1/2 When the last game ended at 1:09 Toronto 15 14 .517 3 1/2 a.m. EST, the postseason picture for this Boston 12 14 .462 5 lockout-abbreviated, hectic season fiBaltimore 9 17 .346 8 nally became clear. In the first round, it will be MiamiCentral New York, Indiana-Milwaukee, OrlandoW L Pct. GB Philadelphia and Atlanta-Detroit in the f Cleveland 18 8 .692 -Eastern Conference. Chicago 13 12 .520 4 1/2 In the West, it will be San AntonioPaul Sakuma (AP Detroit 13 15 .464 6 Kansas City 11 14 .440 61/2 Minnesota, Portland-Phoenix, Utah-SacSan Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan closely guards Golden State Minnesota 11 16 .407 7 1/2 ramento and L.A. Lakers-Houston. Warriors forward Antwan Jamison at the Oakland Arena on Wednesday "Now the fun starts," said Miami night. West Heat coach Pat Riley, whose team will W L Pct. GB renew its rivalry with the Knicks. "You Iverson, who grabbed a microphone and ing off a career-high 31 points, hit five Texas 15 12 .556 -can never say that something crazy isn't thanked the fans as he walked off the 3-pointers and scored 27 points as Oakland 14 15 .483 2 going to happen." court. "It was just like a gift for those Houston spoiled Denver's final game at Seattle 13 14 .481 2 In the statistical races, Iverson won people. They supported us all year long, McNichols Arena. Anaheim 13 15 .464 2 1/2 the scoring title over Shaquille O'Neal, and now we're able to give them someHawks 100, Wizards 92 Chris Webber won the rebounding title, thing back." At Atlanta, Grant Long scored a seaJason Kidd led in assists, Kendall Gill Lakers 119, Trail Blazers 91 son-high 22 points and the Hawks seSled in steals and Alonzo Mourning led in O'Neal went into the game knowing cured the No. 4 seed. They have never blocked shots. he needed 40 poits to surpass Iverson, gotten past the second round of the Eastern Conference On the scoreboard, it was Philadelbut scored only 18 and sat out the fourth playoffs since moving to Atlanta in phia 105, Detroit 100 in overtime; the quarter. 1968. Los Angeles Lakers 119, Portland 91; O'Neal scored six points in the first Kings 99, Grizzlies 95 ..m W L Pct GB New York 101, Miami 88; Orlando 103, six minutes, but only seven more in the At Sacramento, Vlade Divac scored x-Orlando 3 17 .653 Chicago 83; Houston 95, Denver 88; rest of the first half. He sat out the nine of his season-high 29 points in the x-Philadelphia 27 22 .551 6 Atlanta 100, Washington 92; Sacrafourth period after watching Glen Rice final three minutes and also grabbed a x-New York 26 23 .531 7 mento 99, Vancouver 95; Phoenix 100, go 6-for-6 on 3-pointers in the third season-high 17 rebounds. Boston 19 a0 .388 14 Minnesota 96; New Jersey 115, Milquarter. Rice finished with 40, just what The Kings advanced to the playoffs Washington 18 31 .367 15 waukee 107; Toronto 96, Cleveland 87; O'Neal needed at the Forum. for the third time in their 14 Northern New Jersey 15 34 .306 18 Charlotte 133, Boston 129 in double "Winning this game was more imporCalifornia seasons. overtime and Seattle 107, the Los Angetant to me than winning the title," Suns 100, Timberwolves 96 Central Division les Clippers 105. O'Neal said. "I got the ball to my teamAt Phoenix, Tom Gugliotta scored y-indiana 33 17 .660 -Spurs 88, Warriors 81 mates. It would have been very selfish four points, chased down a crucial ofx-Atlanta 30 19 .612 2 1/2 Golden State pulled within two for me to try and get 40 tonight." fensive rebound and stole the ball -all x-Detroit 29 20 .592 3 1/2 points on a 3-pointer by John Starks Knicks 101, Heat 88 in the final 42 seconds. Charlotte 25 24 .510 7 1/2 with 4:36 left. They got no closer, howAt New York, the game became Nets 115, Bucks 107 Cleveland 22 27 .449 10 1/2 ever, as San Antonio went 8-of-10 from meaningless early in the fourth quarter Stephon Marbury had a career-high Toronto 22 27 .449 101/2 the foul line in the closing minutes. when the teams learned that Philadel41 points and I1 assists as New Jersey Chicago 13 36 .265 19 1/2 Tim Duncan had 12 of his 28 points phia won -ending any possibility of finished its season with a win at home. in the fourth quarter and David the Knicks moving up from the eighth The loss dropped Milwaukee (28-22) to Western Conference Robinson, who played his best ball of seed. the seventh seed in the East, meaning the the season down the stretch, had 23 New York coach Jeff Van Gundy orBucks' first-round opponent will be InMidwest Division points and a season-high 20 rebounds. dered the out-of-town scoreboard kept diana -a team that has beaten them W L P -The Spurs went 31-5 after starting the dark so that his players wouldn't spend seven straight times. x-Utah 37 13 .740 -season 6-8 and finished the season with the game distracted by updates from the Raptors 96, Cavaliers 87 x-San Antonio 36 13 .735 1/2 five straight wins. Detroit-Philadelphia game. At Toronto, Rookie of the Year fax-Minnesota 25 24 .510 11 1/2 "This is step one in what we want to This will be the third straight year the vorite Vince Carter left in the third Dallas 19 31 .380 18 accomplish. You build on it. You feel teams have met in the playoffs. quarter after straining his right shoulder Denver 14 35 .286 22 1/2 good about yourselves," Robinson said. Magic 103, Bulls 83 while going for a layup. He lay grimacVancouver 8 41 .163 28 1/2 "I still feel Utah is the team we have to At Chicago, the Magic earned ing in pain on the court for a few mmPacific Division get over (in the playoffs), because homecourt advantage at least through utes before being helped off. y-Portland 35 '14 .714 -they're so experienced and so good." the first two rounds. Hornets 133, Celtics 129, 20T x-L.A. Lakers 30 19 .612 5 76ers 105, Pistons 100, OT The Bulls finished the 50-game At Boston, rookies Brad Miller and x-Sacramento 26 23 .531 9 At Philadelphia, Iverson won the schedule averaging 81.9 points, shatterRicky Davis each scored season-highs x-Phoenix 26 23 .531 9 scoring title over O'Neal with 33 points. ing the record for lowest scoring averof 32 points for Charlotte. Seattle 24 25 .490 11 Iverson hit a clutch jumper with 8 secage in NBA history. The previous record SuperSonics 107, Clippers 105 Golden State 21 28 .429 14 onds left in regulation, then dribbled out was 87.4 points in 72 games by the MilThe Clippers lost their final game at L.A. Clippers 9 40 .184 26 the final seconds of overtime -laughwaukee Hawks in 1954-55, the season the L.A. Sports Arena. A lively crowd of x-clinched playoff berth ing and high-stepping around former the shot clock was adopted. 15,372, about double the Clippers' usual y-clinched division title teammate Jerry Stackhouse. Rockets 95, Nuggets 88 draw, attended at the NBA's oldest z-clinched conference title "We got what we wanted," said At Denver, Michael Dickerson, comarena.

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8Tropic Times May 7, 1999 Crossing the Bridge COROZAL -Most people cross the Bridge of the Americas in their /A cars. Some even cross on foot. A bunch of athletic types ran the length of the bridge (and a few more miles to boot) during the last Bridge of the Americas run in December. But very few fly over it. The exception would be 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment, who have flown over the bridge, and just about everywhere else in Panama, many, many times. But, like so many other U.S. Army South units in Panama, the old days are coming to an end. A proud chapter in history is closing and it's no different for the UH-60 Blackhawk and CH-40 Chinook Helicopters of 1/ 228th. April 29 was most likely the last time these two helicopters will be seen over the Bridge of the Americas, or in the skies of Panama. As part of USARSO's move, the assets of 1/228th are headed to Soto Cano Air Base in Honduras in the coming months. Seeing the helicopters hovering over the bridge, over the canal, and passing ships making the transit signalled, once more, the end of an era. And much like the helicopters left ripples in the water from their powerful churning propellers, so do the men and women who flew them countless times in countless missions leave a lasting legacy. I II 4 '4 story and photos by Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett Tropic Times staff wri ter

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LN w Tropic TimesO News 7,1999 Trebon: 'Operationally, we're done' Airmen move two flying missions from Panama story by Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV 24th Wing Public Affairs Office HOWARD AFB -Ten airplanes and roughly 170 airmen representing two Air Force flying missions moved from Howard Air Force Base for good May 1 as part of the U.S. pullout from Panama. The 10 final take-offs were by six C-130 and four F-16 aircraft assigned to the 24th Wing. The planes are flying their intratheater airlift and counterdrug support routes from airfields in San Juan, Puerto Rico and Curacao's international airport, respectively. From contingency to disaster relief duty, U.S. airmen have flown missions from Panama to nearly all countries in the Western Hemisphere south of Mexico under the C-130 program codenamed Coronet Oak. The Puerto Rico-based C-130 unit was in Panama 37 years-the first 15 were fulfilled by active duty airmen and the closing 22 by a mix of Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve airmen. "We're bringing an era to a close," Lt. Col. Peter Kehoe, the outgoing 24th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron commander, told a Southern Command Network Staff Sgt. John B. Dondy IV (U.S. Air Force) reporter. "We'll do the same job from Puerto Rico." Kehoe's C-130 crews began flying New Horizons An F-16 soars on counterdrug patrol while deployed with the Cornet Nighthawk mission during airlift missions for SOUTHCOM from Puerto Rico on the late 1990's. May 2. Ground support personnel include members from the Puerto Rico Air National Guard and deployees from Davis-Monthan AFB, Ariz. The C-130 slurped into the clouds overhead. "A couple of months and transferred for re-use." staff includes roughly 120 temporary duty airmen. ago you couldn't find a place to park an airplane here. To that end, said Maj. Fred Girbert, outgoing 310th The first payload of redeploying C-130 gear was Since then we've transferred counterdrug radar, Airlift Squadron commander, the hangar that once flown into San Juan April 29 by a "rainbow crew with AWACS, tanker, medical alert, U.S. Customs, Coast housed the C-130 airmen will be pickled immediately. rainbow equipment" of airmen from various elements of Guard, Army and the total force, said Col. Ron Mehan, mission comNavy aircraft from mander, 166th Airlift Wing (Deployed), Delaware this airfield." ANG. The departed jets That aircrew included a pilot from the 24th Operaand airlifters were tions Group; a pilot and a navigator from the 166th; a not the only Air pilot front the Texas ANG; a flight engineer from the Force infrastructure Oklahoma ANG; and a loadmaster from the New York in Panama, so more ANG. Extra crewmembers frequently travel on Corolabor awaits airmen net Oak aircraft as observers to enhance safety of at Howard before flight. The airplane was from Nashville, Tenn. the deployment orIn the mid-1990's a yearly deployment of 30-plus der ends, Trebon ANG and AFRES fighter units to Panama began to supsaid. port a counterdrug tasking known as Coronet Night"We've been rehawk. deploying material The Panama deployment order for Nighthawk ended in 23 sea-land vans as a four-ship formation of F-16s from North Dakota a month, and we're succeeded five F-15 Eagles from Oregon on April 9, ramping to 50 vans before flying missions from Panama and zooming to per month very the Dutch West Indies on May 1, with a staff of 50 airsoon," Trebon said men following them. of the tractor"The 24th Wing was outstanding integrating the Air trailer-sized shipNational Guard into their total force," Chief Master ping containers the Sgt. Dave Smale, the last 24th Expeditionary Fighter base is packing. Squadron superintendent, summarized on behalf of his "We're taking fellow airmen. care of our people "Operationally, we're done. This is it," said Col. and the base while Gregory L. Trebon, 24th Wing commander, as he ensuring that our watched aircraft formerly under his leadership being property is turned in Senior Airman Jeremy Moore (U.S. Air Force) Col. Dave Scott, 24th Operations Group commander, pilots the first payload of C-1 30 gear to deploy from Panama to Puerto Rico April 29. (Right photo) Airmen in Puerto Rico April 29 remove the first palette of Coronet Oak cargo to arrive on the island as part of the U.S. pullout from Panama. Senior Airman Jeremy Moore (US. Air Force)

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1OTropic Timtes rey 10 May 7,1999Briefly Co in up. S S mq -shtlschdul Spot bid sale Due to commercial airline schedule changes, the Tocumen shuttle will only pickup passengers at The General Service Administration, Fleet ManageBuilding 708 on Howard Air Force Base. In addition, times of departure have changed. Passengers methCener ise hting adnotraehic ction and should call Vehicle Dispatch at 284-5058/59 to RSVP to ensure vehicle capacity. Schedules are spot hid sale of U.S. government trucks, sport utility yeavailable at the post office, Billeting Office and the Howard Enlisted Club. hicles and sedans. Vehicle inspections are from 9 a.m. -3 Outbound flights p.m. today and the vehicle sale begins 9 a.m. Saturday ADepart Howard Arrive Tocumen Depart Tocumen near the TMP and Cold Storage Facility on Corozal. For arrive Building 708 more information, call John B. Stobie at 285-4634. 4 a.m. 4:10 a.m. 5 a.m. 5:10 a.m. 5:05 a.m. 5:15 a.m. 6 a.m. 6:10 a.m. Mother's Day Brunch 6:30 a.m. 6:40 a.m. 8 a.m. 8:10 a.m. The Tropic Breeze will have a Mother's Day Brunch 10:30 a.m. 10:40 a.m. noon 1:15 p.m. Sunday from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Adult cost is $7.95, children 5-12 is $3.95 and under 5 is free. Inbound flights Arrive Tocumen Depart Tocumen Arrive Building 708 Depart Howard JAG closure The Trial Defense Service Panama Field Office will 5 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 8 p.m. 9:15 p.m. not he seeing clients this week due to a court-martial. All appointments will be tentatively scheduled for May 14 7:45 p.m. 9 p.m. 10:15 p.m. 11:30 p.m. starting at 9 a.m. For more information, call 288-3636/ 6:30 a.m. 3638. 10:30 a.m. Hasta Luego T-shirt sale The American Red Cross is having an Hasta Luego Tshirt sale. All prices have been drastically reduced. To purchase your T-shirt stop by the Red Cross Office 8 a.m. -4 p.m. starting Monday in Room 344, Building Pet tips -Pets may now be shipped space-available to CONUS. There is, however, a fee. For more infor519. mation, call the Howard AFB Passenger Terminal at 284-5702. Final AUSA luncheon The final Association of U.S. Army lsthmian Chapter luncheon is 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Fort Clayton Coinmunity Club. During the luncheon the NCO of the 3rd DCA Clearing closure of the Optometry Clinic. For more information, Quarter, the Soldier of the 3rd Quarter and the AUSA scholarship winners will be recognized. Maj. Gen. Philip Clearing? Please note that all DCA clearing is now being call the Optometry Clinic at 284-6149. R. Kensinger Jr. will be the guest speaker. processed 7:30 -11:30 a.m. and 12:30 -4:30 p.m. in Room 449, Building 519 at the Financial Management Division. For Classified burn USARSO Town Hall Meeting more information, call Delia Johnson at 288-6169. Due to a large demand by 24th Wing units to destroy The USARSO Town Hall Meeting is 9 -11 a.m. classified material, the Howard Fire Department will Thursday at the Valent Recreation Center. The agenda Physical Therapy reduces services conduct live fire burns in a dumpster next to Building will feature an events update, drawdown information and The 24th Medical Group Physical Therapy Clinic has re1010. The burns will be conducted from 9-1 1 a.m. on shuttle bus to Tocumen. In addition Dr. Joel Goodman, duced its services by 50 percent and will close July 1. In the first and third Monday of each month. Material psychologist and director of the Human Project, will ofpreparation for this reduction in services, clinic personnel are brought for destruction should be limited to classified fer a special presentation at 8 a.m. prior to the meeting. working closely with all providers in an effort to ensure the and sensitive material. For additional information, conHasta Luego Panama transition is as painless as possible for all customers. tact Tech. Sgt. Phillip Nixon or Tech. Sgt. Anthony Hast Lueo PaamaWelts at 284-5305. If you've got a PCS move coming up you should plan to attend an Hasta Luego reception. The Commanding Drug testing change Veterinary Clinic General or his designated representative attends each Drug testing/urine sampling is now being conducted in The Panama District Veterinary Command will have a Vetevent and presents each departing soldier with a the 24th Medical Group hospital, Building 192, in Room heaCnm twric tir omand B illn ha2, etUSARSO coin. The next Hasta Luego for soldiers de232 on the second floor. For more information, call Michelle eriary Clinic at Howard Air Force Base, Building 202, beginparting USARSO in July, August and September is May Tello at 284-5314. ning May 17. Daily operation hours will be Monday through 20 at the Fort Clayton Community Club. For more inFriday from 8 a.m. -2 p.m. formation, call 288-9268/9235. New lightning warning procedures Rations inspections Housing Office hours extended Howard AFB has adopted new lightning warning notifiThe Ration Inspection Program is designed to ensure The Fort Clayton Housing Office will be open 7 a.m. cation procedures to alert the base community of the obserwholesomeness of operational rations and to keep units mis-5:30 p.m. Monday -Friday and 8 a.m. -noon Saturvance of lightning within five nautical miles of the base. sion ready. Air Force units storing rations, such as Meals days. Scheduled pre-final and final housing inspections When this occurs, Command Post will sound the base siren. Ready-to-Eat or survival rations, should notify the Public and assignments to set-aside housing will be conducted In response to this warning, the base populace is encourHealth Flight to ensure inspections are completed as required until 2 p.m. on Saturdays. This schedule will stay in effect until further notice. aged to take precautions as outlined in the April 1 article, by regulations. For more information, call Senior Airman Jet"Howard Braces for Rainy Season, Lightning Storms." frey Rigdon at 284-4371/4539. If you are moving to Puerto Seven digit dialing Lightning Warnings will remain in effect for at least 15 minRico and your child will require a school physical prior to the Personnel in Panama will now have to dial all seven utes after the last strike. To find out if the warning has been start of the next school year, call the appointment desk at digits of a phone number when calling on or between lifted, call the Safe Line at 284-SAFE. 284-3832/3834/3837. military installations. This will not affect dialing 119 or 110 for emergencies, dialing "8" for access to DSN Wing promotion/induction ceremony from an official line, or dialing 169 when making moforms required to The Team Howard Monthly Enlisted Promotion and Inrale calls. For more information, contact the 24th ComAll members and their families who depart from Tocumen h eemoHowar Monthl ay Po in and Inmunications Squadron Telephone Liaison Office at 284International Airport are required to have SOUTHCOM auction Ceremony for May is 3 p.m. May 27 in the Howard 9211. Form 4, Certificate of Exemption from the Passenger Service NCO Club. The ceremony recognizes enlisted promotees in a New Housing Office procedures Fee. In addition, if there are any changes to the original port three-phase ceremony. Everyone is invited to attend and reThe 24thCivil Engineer Squadron's Housing Office call date, SOUTHCOM Form 5, Travel Authorization, is ccfreshments will be served following the ceremony. For more will operate in Building 2, at the south end of the CES quired. After receiving orders, everyone should report to information call 284-5363. main building behind the Howard Commissary. All walktheir orderly room with a copy of orders in hand to be issued in customers will be handled at the existing industrial custhe forms needed. Call unit orderly rooms for more informa24th Services Squadron inactivation tomer service area in Building 2. In addition, Monday, tion. The 24th Services Squadron inactivation will be at 3 p.m., the Housing Office operating hours will be 7:30 a.m. to May 26 in the Tropic Breeze Ballroom. Everyone is invited 1 p.m. Mondays to Fridays for walk-in customers, and SFC Selection Board to attend. 1 to 4:30 p.m. by appointment only. To make an apA Department of the Army Selection Board will convene Humanitarian Service Medal pointment, call 284-3301. Hmntra evc ea June 2 to consider soldiers for promotion to sergeant first The Humanitarian Service Medal will be awarded for those Right Start Briefing class. All staff sergeants with a DOR of 970630 and earlier, personnel assigned to the Ecuador El Nifo Disaster Relief EfThe new Right Start Briefing is at the Mountain View and a BASD between 800630 and 930531 must physically fort. The award has been approved for those service memChapel on the first and third Thursdays with the followupdate and review their personnel qualification records. Arhers who provided humanitarian assistance and were assigned ing forecast dates: May 20, and June 3 and 17. For more F 2 Q information, call Staff g. Diana Miller at 284-3508. eas of special concern are DA Forms 2A and 2-1 PQR, to the operation from May 9 -24, 1998. For more informaNCO evaluation reports, official photographs and offition, call ILt. Gillespie or Mrs. Wilson-Carrasco at 288Services reduced at DOIM cial military personnel files. The deadline to update 6655/4155. The services offered by the 56th Signal Battalion PQRs is April 30. For information on PQRs call 288DOIM Information Center will be reduced. Services 6406; for information on photographs call 288-7403; for Exceptional Family Member Program available within the customer area of IC will be as folinformation on NCOERs call 288-6652. AR 608-75, chapter 2, para 2-1, b, 1, the following perlows; USARSO LAN access, Internet connectivity, .ofsonnel must be screened prior to PCS: Family members fice automation software, black and white laser printing Optometry Services Drawdown PCSing from OCONUS to OCONUS. Family members and DCPS connectivity. Due to the drawdown of medical facilities and the rePCSing from U.S. to overseas. Family members already enOptometry Clinic closes May 31 duced scope of care, Optometry Services will no longer rolled in EFMP. NOTE: Family members PCSing to COThe Fort Clayton Optometry Clinic will provide serbe able to offer comprehensive eyecare to those patients NUS do not need to be screened. For more information, call vices until May 31. The Howard Optometry Clinic will not eligible for Tricare Prime. Optometry Services will 288-6365 Monday, Wednesday, Friday and 288-6695 Tuesprovide routine eye care until July 31. Flight Medicine notice or rie Optometry service widay-63d Monday, Wednsy, i and 2 6 TC referrals and emergency eyecare services only will be continue to offer routine optometry services such as viday and Thursday. A list of no shows will be given to LTC available during August. New military eyewear can be sion analysis and eye health assessment to non-eligible Wilhelm and CSM Humphries. Questions and concerns can ordered until May 31 Tricare Prime patients on a space available basis until be addressed to SFC Agueda at 288-6268.

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~1j~iiatureTropic Times Feature a7,1999 Americans from the Canal Zone recall an idyllic life that's just a memory (This article recently appeared in the Los Angeles because your dad could lose his job and we would get ies, schools and recreation-including swimming pools Times). shipped out,' Egger said. and tennis courts-were all subsidized by proceeds BALBOA, Panama-Their culture began disappearLuke Lambert, now in his 60s, knows that was no idle from canal fees. "We weren't raised from a capitalist ing 20 years ago, and by the end of this year it will be threat. When he was 16, he argued with a Canal Zone viewpoint, so none of us ever had any push or drive," completely gone. No one even considered trying to police officer. "He hit me with a stick, and I hit him Egger said. "I grew up in a town that when the pipes save it. back," he recalled. "They deported me from the Canal broke, you called maintenance." Theirs was a tiny civilization of fewer than 100,000 Zone," allowing his father to keep his job only on the In fact, in the Zonian version of the old "how-manypeople that existed on a narrow strip of land for a few condition that Lambert leave home. Assimilating into does-it-take-to-change-a-light-bulb?" joke, the answer generations, not quite spanning the 20th century. In Panama proper was no easy task for the third-generation is: "Two, one to pour the drinks and another to call the fact, it was in many ways the ultimate expression of Zonian, who attended Canal Zone schools and spoke Canal Zone electrician." what has been called the American Century: a bit of little Spanish. Even after he got accepted back into the This lifestyle of orderly concrete houses, shaded Americana tucked into the tropics that, perhaps approCanal Zone family, Lambert made sure that his own lawns and wide streets contrasted increasingly with the privately, will be erased with barely a trace on Dec. 31 eight sons learned Spanish. chaotic, deforested growth of cities outside the zone. when Panama takes over the canal from the United Zonians are reluctant to discuss some aspects of Panamanian resentment was manifested in riots, beginStates. All that will remain will be the annual reunion their society. Particularly delicate is "the enormous disning in the 1960s, that finally resulted in the 1977 treaty party, a few Web sites and the rich memories of the crepancy between black and white society along the to turn over control of the canal to Panama. people who call themselves Zonians, the inhabitants of same jungle corridor," as it was termed by David Panamanians were to be hired and trained to take oecaal operations. In 1979, the zone became part of the old Panama Canal Zone. McCullough, author of "Path Between the Seas: The Panama, except for the bases that until 1997 housed the Extending five miles along each side.of the waterCreation of the Panama Canal." U.S. military's Southern Command. The last base will way, the zone was the absolute company town, a U.S. What McCullough calls a "rigid caste society" began close when the canal is turned over to Panama. territory that housed the people who ran and protected with the canal's construction. Unskilled West Indian laZonians like Egger, who had moved away but the canal. For Panamanians, it became a slash that diborers-recruited mainly from Barbados, Martinique wanted to return, found they could not get hired. While vided their country, a visible reminder of U.S. dominaand Guadeloupe-were paid in Panamanian silver those with seniority could stay on, there were no new tion. The zone was officially balboas. Skilled Americans jobs for Americans, just two-year contracts. eliminated in 1979, two years The Canal Zone was were paid in gold-backed U.S. What hurt Lambert most was seeing what happened after then-presidents Jimmy dollars. to his alma mater, Paraiso High School. The school was Carter and Omar Torrijos America's experiment in The "gold" and "silver" supposed to continue operating as part of the Panamasigned a treaty promising that standards persisted throughnian school system, he said. "We had a welding shop Washington would turn over socialism, and'it was a very out the zone's existence, and a plumbing shop, probably $48,000 worth of eqdipcontrol of the canal to Panama successful experiment .It largely because they were ment," he recalled. "By December, there was nothing gradually over two decades, nominally based on citizenthere." That's when the diaspora was not utopia, but it was ship, not race. Americans Panamanian employees took the lights from the began: Retired electrician close. You weren't rich, but lived in gold towns, with their ballpark, pried loose the air conditioners and replaced Robert Christenson moved to own schools and. playthe cedar doors with plywood, he said. The school is Texas, and Scott Foster, a you knew there was somegrounds, and were eligible for now a government building, and students are bused to fourth-generation Zonian, to thing to eat every day. better-paying jobs. Heavy laanother location. Chula Vista. Dave Furlong bor was for the West Indian The last of the Zonians are now collecting memenjoined the military and ended workers' descendants, who tos for a future museum in Florida. The Balboa High up in Guam. Some Zonians tried to re-create their comlived in silver towns. School plaque, a reproduction of the Canal Zone seal munity in Orlando, Fla., site of the annual reunion that The soldiers and sailors who protected the canal, that numerous freshmen polished at the behest of sedraws 100 or more expatriates. passing through on twoor three-year tours of duty, niors, was removed from the school in February along A few, like childhood friends Peggy Acker and Kay fell somewhere in between. Young women from Canal with several other class gifts. Hamilton, stayed in Panama to teach on the military Zone families did not usually date military men. Many landmarks will exist only in memories. The bases that are all that is left of the zone. In May, when "It was an extremely segregated place," Egger said. Balboa Yacht Club, the setting for many a first drink and the last class graduates from Balboa High School, the When Zidbeck was 12, back in 1943, one of his neighfirst date in the zone, burned to the ground in February, teachers will be transferred to bases far from Panama. bors here in Balboa invited children from the silver comprovoking the suspicions of many Zonians. "Even though we may no longer be here, the spirit is munity of La Boca, about a mile away, to play softball. And those memories are starting to fade. On Canal being kept alive," Acker said. "Even just the word Just as the game was starting, a playground director Zone Web sites with names like "lostparadise," amid 'Zonian.' All of us growing up down here were such a appeared and told the children they could not play recipes for the rice dishes that West Indian maids once close-knit, extended family. That is the spirit." "We were so disappointed that we didn't think of an pr .epared and inquiries about old classmates, someone Zonians themselves struggle to capture that spirit in alternative," he said. "We knew there was a color line, will post a request for directions to, say, the riding words. "What is strange to me is everyone who and we didn't tempt it." stables that no longer exist. Remarkably, someone else doesn't have that," Christenson said. He acknowlLambert, who still lives in will respond with precise instructions-and often a quip edged, with a catch in his voice, that he misses the zone the quadruplex where he DDT i "every waking minute." raised his family in the old In fact, it (the Canal Zone) "My hometown is on the Over the decades, Zonians developed their own culsilver town of Paraiso, said ture, a mixture of Panama and Americana. George C. he feels no bitterness. was in many ways the ultiInternet," Egger said ruefully. Because the land has been Zidbeck, grandson of a machinist who arrived in His great-grandfather mate expression of what has returned gradually, its sale Panama in 1907 to help build the canal, recalls a child-' came to Panama from b adm d b hood of saying the Pledge of Allegiance in the morning Martinique to work on a been called the American cinagaenmi ste yanaamaand playing "tree tag" in the jungle in the afternoon. failed French canal-building Century: a bit of Americana nian government, Zonians The banyan trees in his neighborhood grew so thick effort at the end of the 19th t who still live in Panama have that children could jump from branch to branch, not century. When the company tucked into the tropics that, become accustomed to the touching the ground for hours. went bankrupt, workers were perhaps appropriately, will loss of their hometown. But it Roads literally melted in the Panama heat, and kids stranded. They were relieved is still hard. picked tar off the street to chew. In addition to cats and to sign on with the Ameibe erased with barely a trace I drive through and expect dogs, favored pets included sloths, parrots and moncans, vho arrived in 1904on Dec. 31 when Panama to see Americans there," keys. At twilight, children followed the trucks that Lambert's father and Acker said of the old zone, in drove through the neatly manicured streets of identical grandfather also worked for takes over the canal from the a soft voice cultivated duplexes and quadruplexes, spraying DDT to keep the canal, and once his disUnited States. through decades of comfortdown mosquitoes that spread malaria. Now that the agreement with the canal poing third-graders. "When risks of the insecticide are known, Zonians jokingly lice blew over, Lambert got a they're not, it's a shock." blame any memory lapses on those nightly chases. job in the maintenance division. After 30 years of serAcker moved to the Zone in 1940, at age 2. She left to Life here moved to a calypso beat, and even Zonians vice, he retired in 1987 as a $5-an-hour liaison for the complete her elementary teaching degree in Michigan who barely speak Spanish take pride in their salsa dancsecurity division, good wages for Panama. and came home to the Zone to teach in 1960. ing moves. Patricia Egger, whose grandparents moved "You were sure you would get a fair break, even Over the years, she adopted three children, two of to Panama when her parents were children, discovered though they had a double system," he said. "I don't them Panamanian. Hamilton also adopted two children, subtle divisions when she went away to college in have any resentment against the U.S. government beand the longtime friends helped each other raise their 1963. Everybody in Panama had pierced ears," common cause it made sure I had a job. That's why we were so families. When the Zone reverted to Panamanian conin Latin culture, she said in a telephone interview from loyal to the U.S. government." trol, Acker and Hamilton continued teaching but lost her Virginia home. For a place so regimented on issues such as race, the more spacious housing that seniority had earned But at the University of Arkansas, "I was told that the Canal Zone also had its progressive side. "The Cathem. Now, the pair are waiting to hear where they will nice girls didn't pierce their ears." She had to wear clip nal Zone was America's experiment in socialism, and it be assigned for the next school year. "We're hoping earrings to be accepted. Going barefoot and feeling safe was a very successful experiment," Zidbeck said. "It that when we transfer, we'll be together," Acker said. are common threads in Zonian memory. Theirs was a was not utopia, but it was close. You weren't rich, but "When you are going away from the only home you well-ordered society, like some Greek city-state where you knew there was something to eat every day." have ever known, you want support." troublemakers were banished. "We were the children of tradespeople who were "It's going to be very difficult to leave," she said. "We were raised [thinking], 'Don't get into trouble, making very good salaries," he said. Housing, grocer"But I am looking forward to the next chapter."

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1 2 Tropic Times May 7,1999 News photos by Sgt. 1st Clas Christopher C. Calkins (USARSO PAO) The Final March After more than five decades of activity, the Balboa High School Junior Reserve Officer Training Course cased its colors during an impressive ceremony held April 30 at the BHS stadium. Prior to the casing, class officers (above) marched into formation to receive the colors. Later, cadets Gina Leonard -Zinno (left) and Maritzel LaPlaca were individually honored. Guest speaker for the event was BHS Principal Tom Price, who also participated in review of the troops. Music was provided by the 79th Army Band. Howard AFB celebrates Just in case you were wondering National Polce W eek FORT CLAYTON (Law Enforcement Activity) -Just in case you wanted to know where are story by Master Sgt. Daniel Hogan At 2 p.m., Security Forces will start a field day where the MPs, we have an answer for you. 24th Security Forces Squadron they will have their weapons on display, as well as a Look carefully! The Military Police vehicles HOWARD AFB -In recognition of National Police horse and dog demonstration that begins at 5 p.m. A have a new appearance! Recently, many of the Week, May 9-15, the Howard Security Forces have softball tournament will start at 6 p.m. and will be the fitraditional MP cars provided by General Service planned several activities for the base to participate in. nal event of the week ending on Sunday. Administration have been replaced by locally Monday is Abandoned Vehicle Amnesty Day. SecuThe Police Week champions will be crowned on leased smaller versions. rity Forces investigators will dedicate an individual who Sunday after the championship game. Come on out and The new MP cars are Mitsubishi Lancers and will be available throughout the day to help you process show your support for the Cops! For more information come in a variety of colors. Although the new your old vehicles to DRMO that you know you won't call 284-3415. vehicles have ship to your next location. By turning your vehicle in History of National Police Week no light bars now, you will avoid a possible fine of $400 Every day, thousands of police officand no sirens, -$500 if the Security Forces finds it abaners put their lives on the line, they are doned after you depart. National Police Week, which runs equipped with As a reminder, even if you separate, A from May 9-15, is an opportunity to reca smaller blue the Air Force may recoup money through ognize police officers for the important flashing light the Internal Revenue Service if warwork they perform, and to remember on the dashrne.those who made the ultimate board and are Tuesday is Gotcha Day. sacrifice for their coinmumarked with It s d al members nities. "Military Powill post "Gotcha"ts on National Police Week has its lice" on the all insecure property. Hope foundations in a Joint Resolusides. If you fully this will open your eyes to f t i n e should Ifyd some of the items that unauthorized tion enacted Oct. 1, 1962 in the shu need personnel usually target for thefts. Congress of the United States. m el assisShoes on porches, unsecured biI, t 1 This resolution authorized the sure your MPs are continuing to ook out for cycles, and unattended offices, president ofthe United States, your safety. for example. then John F. Kennedy, to proIf you are asked "may I see your authorizaThere will also be a memorial claim May 15th of each year tion, please," then this may be the situation. service at noon Tuesday to recognize Security as Peace Officers Memorial Day. Does that computer in your car belong to Force members who have lost their lives in the line of The designation of May 15th, to honor those you? If not, don't risk the embarrassment of beduty. law enforcement officers, federal, state and municipal, ing detained at the MP gate while a telephone On Thursday, McGruff will visit the Howard and who have been killed or disabled in the line-of D-duty, call is made to your supervisor to verify your auKobbe schools along with some on duty police, recognizes police officers around the world for their pathorization to transport the equipment. McGruff and his helpers will be available to answer triotic service, dedicated efforts and devotion to duty, Soldiers and civilians are reminded to never questions and visit with the students about their duties regardless of the perils or hazards to themselves. transport Government-owned office equipment and what types ofthings a student should look out for. The 103rd Congress, as part of the Violent Crime in a POV or GOV without written authorization Later that day, SF will conduct retreat at ten e Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, amended from a supervisor in the respective chain of coinflagpole and everyone is welcome to attend. PulC Lw8-26s e b rsdet h F ad May 14th will top off the week's activities starting Public Law 87-726, signed by President John F. mand. with a marathon relay lasting 24 hours. A SF member Kennedy in 1962. President Bill Clinton signed Public The MPs have increased their random inwill be running around the parade field in 30-minute inLaw 103-322 which directs that the flag of the United spections, and all drivers of vehicles containing crements until relieved by another SF member. The relay States on all government buildings be displayed at halfoffice equipment will be required to provide begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 8 a.m., May 15. Pledge dostaff on May 15, National Peace Officers' Memorial proper documentation for transport. nations may be made by calling 284-3415. Day.

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Tropic Times1 ~News 1 *NewsMay 7, 1999 13) Command post redeploying By Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV work," said Tech. Sgt. Tony Squadron) Howard Control 24th Wing Public Affairs Office Breeze, acting NCOIC of the Center the first week of June, afHOWARD AFB -The comHoward Command Post. "Our ter the runway closes." mand post operators at Howard communications) equipment Breeze said the wing's conare preparing to meet deadlines goes to the 24th Communications trollers would run overall comfor the pullout from Panama. Squadron. Some of our office mand and control for base funcControllers assigned to the equipment has gone to DRMO tions when they move, and the % Howard Air Mobility Command or the supply system. A lot of the exit will allow the base to pickle Control Center close that operamaterial that the AMC Command Building 703 on time. tion May 31. The 24th Wing Center owns has been tagged for "Our last day of operation is Command Post staff will reloother AMC bases. scheduled-to be Sept. 15 and at .. cate this summer from Building "You'd be amazed at what that point the folks at Davis703 to another facility on base, this place looks like now. like a Monthan (AFB, Ariz.) will be but their phone numbers and ghost town with tumbling turntaking over. We will still be aclevel of support will remain the bleweeds," Breeze said. "We're tive supporting normal base same through Oct. 3 1. operating the files out of functions. Notifying people for The wing and AMC posts boxes. Until recently we were exercises is part of the command provide command and control co-located with the (now redeand control structure and the for their respective local leaders ployed) Flight Monitoring Facilmove will have no effect on that. while the respective controllers ity and we're still co-located The HANDS demonstration by SeniorAlrman Jeremy Moore (U.S. AirForce) shed excess gear, and transfer with the Howard AMC Control and weather advisories, the Tech. Sgt. Edna Johnson-Smith, NCOIC of training, responsibilities to gaining units. Center. The AMCC will draw 284-SAFE number and weather 24th Wing command post, coordinates the redeploy"We've already turned in a lot down and will go away the end notifications will continue for as ment-related removal of her outfit's tape recorder. of equipment associated with the of May. We'll co-locate with long as the weather shop operAfter June 1, hers will be the only command and conJTF-Panama communications netthe (24th Security Forces ates at Howard," Breeze said. trol agency left at Howard. AF hosts final community college graduation by Gail Fuller Staff Sgt. Ramon Jimenez-Fitness 24th Mission Support Squadron t Recreation and Services Management The last Community College of the 24th Supply Squadron Air Force Graduation at Howard Air Senior Master Sgt. Dana ScottForce Base was held at the Howard NCO Information Systems Technology Club on April 29. Logistics Col. Dave Scott, 24th Operations Master Sgt. Malissa Thompkins-. Group commander, gave the commenceLogistics ment address, and Maj. Connie Davis, 24th Transportation Squadron 24th Mission Support Squadron comStaffSgt. Licci Barham-Logistics mander, conferred the diplomas with asStaff Sgt. Tammy Ulmer-Transportation sistance from Lisa Poland of the Howard 24th Weather Squadron Education Center. Staff Sgt.-Johnnie Church-Weather Closing remarks were given by Col. Technology Gregory L. Trebon, 24th Wing comTech. Sgt. Thomas Zipprich-Weather mander, and Bud Goode, Education SerTechnology vices chief was the Master of Ceremonies. 24th Wing (Det. 1) -1k "This graduation is an historic StaffSgt. Michael Bardsley-Airway event," said Goode. "We have 38 graduScience ates, even though we are in a drawdown Tech. Sgt. Kevin Bennett-Avionic by Systemsa TechnologyUS.Ai Fxe status. This is due to the outstanding Systems Technology professional staff. We could not have acSenior Airman Douglas Hunter24th Medical Operations Squadron Master Sgt. Jose Pizano-Criminal Justice complished this without them." Electronic Systems Technology Senior Airman Darnell NewkirkTech. Sgt. Mark Romero-Information The graduates were: Senior Airman Derek Nivens-Electronic Pharmacy Technology Management AFOSI Det. 214 Systems Technology 24th Mission Support Squadron StaffSgt. Reid Woodard-Airway Special Agent Robert Meekins-Criminal Tech. Sgt. Deborah Pollen-Information Staff Sgt. Roderick Campbell-Personnel Science Justice Electronic Systems Technology Systems Technology Administration 310 Airlift Squadron Special Agent Richard RamsdaleTech. Sgt. Michael Taylor-Avionic Tech. Sgt. Gertrude Elboume-Personnel TSgt Anthony Hunter-Information Avionic Systems Technology Criminal Systems Technology Administration Management Justice Tech. Sgt. Jacqueline Young-Electronic 24th Operations Support Squadron Senior Airman Jennifer Johnson24th Aerospace Medicine Squadron Systems Technology Staff Sgt. David Johnson-Airport Personnel Administration Staff Sgt. Kimberly Bentley-EnvironLogistics Group Resource Management Tech. Sgt. Alfred Jones-Electronic mental Medicine Technology Staff Sgt. Antonio Bates-Aerospace 24th Security Forces Squadron Systems Technology 24th Civil Engineering Squadron Ground Equip Technology Staff Sgt. Neil Keifer-Avionic Systems 640 Air Mobility Squadron Tech. Sgt. Gerald Adams-Fire Science 24th Maintenance Squadron Technology Education and Training Master Sgt. Jimmy Jalil-Avionic Staff Sgt. Lorenzo Williams-Fire Science Senior Ainnan Roy Joyner ll-Munitions Management Systems Technology 24th Communications Squadron Systems Technology Tech. Sgt. Kevin McCaw-Criminal Master Sgt. Martin Taylor-TransportaSenior Airman Jamie Guerra-Information 24th Medical Support Squadron Justice tion Systems Technology Senior Airman Leta Young-Logistics 24th Services Squadron Tech. Sgt. Terri Taylor-Logistics Howard Spouse Club awards eight scholarships HOWARDAFBMembers of the Howard The honorable mention selectees and the Officer and Enlisted Spouses' Clubs hosted their school they plan to attend were Carlos Bravo ($600, final scholarship tea April 30 in the 24th Wing Princeton University); Eduardo Diaz Salgado ($600, Conference Room to honor seven graduating high Universidad de Puerto Rico); Neil Reaves ($600, school seniors and one university student conTarleton State University); and Antonio Somoza tinuing his education. ($600, University of Richmond). The funds for these scholarships come from a The spouses' clubs have also made contribuvariety ofsources, however the main funding came tions to Howard's Women's History Month annual through the profits ofthe Howard Thrift Shop, said award winners, Girl Scouts, Arraijan Orphanage, Janet Lowe, a spokesperson for the two clubs. Air Force Ball, softball tournaments, Rodeo '98, 7 The recipients, scholarship values and the Fire Prevention Month, childcare for town hall schools they plan to attend are: first prize selectee meetings and other organizations onand off-base. Jaclyn Barnash ($2,500, University of Southern The continuing education award selectee was California); second prize selectee Sharmon Lebby Col. Gus Mays Ill, ($600, Virginia Commonwealth ($1,500, University of South Carolina); third prize University). Selectees from left are: Mays, Bravo, selectee Annette O'Neil ($1,000, University of Reaves, Lebby, Salgado, Somoza, Barnash, and, for Southern California). Annette O'Neil, not pictured, Col. T.J. O'Neil.

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14 Tropic Times May 7, 1999 News USA RSO Weather Team Keepo-ingan eye on the skies story and photo by briefings to the JTF-Panama and weather personnel as well. The SWO dio allowing them communication caStaff Sgt. Cathy Richards USARSO Commander and staff. Staft worked the logistical challenges of pabilities to their aircraft while in the USARSO WETM support is also provided for all deploying weather personnel and reDemilitarized Zone (DMZ). HOWARD AFB -Everyone has USARSO and JTF-Panama plans and sources from CONUS bases to mulIn August 98, weather personnel seen weather reports on CNN, local exercises/contingency operations. tiple exercise locations sometimes in installed a compact weather satellite television news and our very own The SWO is the liaison between the austere environments, system for deployed MOMEP weather SCN. Multinational Observer Mission EcThe weather team deployed to San personnel to use in daily mission Weather reports seen on televiuador/Peru (MOMEP) and the Air Isidro AB, Dominican Republic in briefings. sion are very general compared to Force weather community. support of the 1/228th and Delta Cointhose used in the military. The USARSO SWO provides mopany 160th Special Operations Aerial Hurricanes The military has several rules and bility training for eight 24th Weather Regiment. The team provided With the Caribbean as an Area of regulations governing the weather Squadron personnel. weather forecasts for hurricane relief Operations, the weather team prodata generated for military use. This training provides mission efforts. vided six-hour updates on nine hurriA forecast developed by a U.S. Air ready weather personnel the In 1998, weather personnel decanes to USARSO personnel. Force weather forecaster must give availabliltiy to deploy on a moments ployed seven times in support of The updates were focused on and very specific data such as what time notice throughout Latin America. The counter drug efforts. These TDY's inhighlighted the dangers of hurricanes a thunderstorm will begin or end, or 24th Weather Squadron at Howard volved redeploying and maintaining striking Puerto Rico or the U.S. Virwhat type and what amount of cloud AFB provides the personnel for automated weather observation gin Islands. coverage there will be at a given time. USARSO support. equipment The weather It is a little know fact that the Air at Ground The USeARSO S O coordi* also proForce weather team is responsible, Who have they supported? Based Ravided a denot only for providing Air Force units The USARSO SWO coordinated dar sites nated with all Army National tailed damage with weather support, but also for with all Army National Guard nationthl roLu ghreport of supporting all U.S. Army units with building exercises throughout Latin out CoGuard nation-building exerPuerto Rico weather support. America, including New Horizons 99 lombia in cises throughout Latin after Hurri. In fact, there is a small office loEl Salvador, Jamaica, Haiti and Guasupport of cane Georges cated in Buildtemala. The Joint Inter America, including New Hostruck to the ing 95 on Fort SWO enAgency USARSO Clayton called s u r e d Task Force riZons 99 El Salvador, JaChiefofStaff the cae This ir Force support w e a t h e r South mismaica, Haiti and Guatemala. and essential Weather Ofto Army operations includes support iss i o n s .personnel. fice that prosues were One team The SWO ensured weather T h e vides weather specialized briefings to the included in member inU S A R S O support for JTF-Panama and USARSO all aspects stalled one support issues were included SWO has USARSO. of planning of these in all aspects ofplanningand clearly deThis office Commander and staff. Staff and execur e d e -fined responis the .tion. p I o y e d execution. sibilities assoU S A R S 0 Support is also provided for all Other typisystems at cited with Weather Team USARSO and JTF-Panama cal staff Soto Cano any develop(WETM) and work inAir Base, ing storms it consists of plans and exercises/continc I u d e s Honduras. These systems allow forethat might impact these areas. three weather w e a t h e r casters access to critical data needed p e r s o n n e I .gency operations. support iswhen making forecasts for these dataMove to Puerto Rico The Deputy sues assosparse locations. The weather team is fully inteChief of Staff ciated with The SWO also served as the liaison grated in the USARSO move to Puerto for Intelligence (DCSINT) is responAllied Forces 98 in Guatemala and between the Military Observer Mission Rico. They participated in all planning sible for taking care of the needs and Blue Advance 98. Ecuador/Peru (MOMEP), the24th Wing, meetings and identified weather well-being of the weather team. 12th Air Force and Air Combat Comunique requirements. Providing for exercises inand. In this capacity, the SWO asWeather team support was proUSARSO Weather Team Mission For these exercises, the weather sisted in troubleshooting the tactical vided for JTF-South Battle Training The Staff Weather Officer (SWO) team provided realistic scenarios of weather radar and resolving weather-reCommand Seminar. provides direct staff support to both weather to bring some tropical reality lated problems that occurred. This was a training exercise coverUSARSO and JTF-Panama. to operations. In February 98, the 24th Weather ing the JTF-South AOR in which This unique Air Force support to Weather support also includes loSquadron provided the Brazilian opweather was a critical element for sucArmy operations includes specialized gistical requirements for deploying erations center a high frequency racessful planning and execution. The SWO provided daily briefings outlining mission impact on operations and drew accolades from command staff for relevance to the operations. Weather support was also provided for the Tactical Exercise without Troops (TEWT). This exercise covered the JTF-Panaina AOR and focused on the threat to military personnel. equipment and installations. The weather team provided an initial briefing on the mission impacts for ground, air, sea and communications. Although the Air Force weather support to the Army may not be well known, the Staff Weather Office stays busy. Though the people currently supporting USARSO will not relocate to Puerto Rico, there will be Air Force weather bodies going to Fort Buchanan as well as some Guard weather augmentees to provide weather support to USA RSO. The office will consist of two active duty U.S. Air Force weather personnel and one National guardsman or Reservist. Just remember they may be small in numbers, but they will be capable Watching the skie is important to the USARSO mission. Senior Airman Jame uurio, a weather observer, helps of providing any weather information to keep folks informed of life in the skies. you may need.

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Tropic Times 1 News May 7, 199915 Dra wdown considerations Mental health related services in Panama to open by Col. Terrence Jay O'Neil with someone and then leave within a 24th Medical Group may be handled will terminate July 16 at Howard AFB. USAF, MC Commander few days, only emergency psychologithrough the Acute Care Clinic. Patients Family Advocacy Prevention Programs HOWARD AFB -Drawdown and cal services will be provided on-station being seen by TRICARE-approved terminate June 30. Substance Abuse closure are upon us. Most of our JTFafter June 1. Non-urgent referrals will be providers downtown who currently recounseling services for family members Panama team is departing for new adsent to TRICARE providers in Panama fill their medications at a 24MDG Pharterminate July 16. ventures worldwide. City. macy may continue to do so through Educational and Development InterIt is important to recognize that in Patients requiring detoxification will Sept. 1. vention Services (EDIS: used to be this very stressful time, the personnel be admitted to a civilian facility in However, once we are a Troop called EIS/MRS) will end at Fort who provide our psychological supPanama City, detoxified, and air-evacuClinic, only active duty personnel can Clayton June 30. port services must leave Panama in ated to CONUS for inpatient treatment. have their prescriptions filled at MediExceptional Family Member Program time to get to their next duty stations, Once the patient is medically cal Group facilities. Any family memservices after the end of May will be as well. cleared, if commercial air travel is the bers remaining in Panama after that limited strictly to reassignment of QAlthough a psychologist will be fastest and safest mode of travel, the date will have to use civilian pharmaCode families and EFMP re-assignon-station at Fort Clayton until Sept. member's unit will provide a non-medicies for refills. ments. 1, 1999 to provide emergency evaluacal escort. Family Advocacy Program direct We apologize for the inconvenience tions, all persons requiring ongoing After Sept. I, a flight surgeon with services will be limited to brief interwhich termination of services may treatment will be referred to a Panama additional training in mental health proventions and assuring victim safety cause some individuals.All families City provider after our psychiatrist cedures will be available to perform only, and will be managed by an availneeding the above services are urged departs on June 30. Commander-Directed Mental Health able military health provider only until to re-locate stateside or to their The psychologist at Howard will Evaluations through closure. expeditious return stateside can be arOCONUS follow-on locations early, to depart June 18. Because it is not good Routine prescription refills of some ranged. avoid discomfort or inconvenience remedicine to start up what should be a mental health-related medications for Family Advocacy Program services suiting from necessary phased closelong-term therapeutic relationship patients already under treatment by the at Fort Clayton cease in mid-April and down of 24MDG operations in Panama. West Bank vet clinic to Times are changing by Richard K. Robinson begin operations May 17 FORT CLAYTON -Yes, the times are changing, by Monica D. Daes "The day of the appointment, your pets' record and so is the Ambulance Service at the Fort Clayton TSB Marketing Specialist will be transferred from the Corozal Clinic to the West Clinic. Due to the treaty mandated drawdown, the HOWARD AFB -Starting on May 17, Howard Bank Clinic. At the end of the day the records will be last TDY aMbulance crew will be departing PanamaAFB and Fort Kobbe residents will no longer have to transferred back to the Corozal VTF for in early May. The 24th Medical Group has contravel to the Corozal Veterinary Treatment Facility outprocessing and transmittal of the export certifitracted with a civilan ambulance company to con(VTF) for their pet's appointment. cate. Records and export certificates will be given to tinue to provide high quality emergency response In another effort to assist pet owners during the the owner upon completion of the final exam for services the East Bank, whichbegan Saturdayt drawdown, the Panama District Veterinary Command, screwworms and ticks, which should be done within According to Capt. Christopher Alexander, Fort U.S. Army South and the 24th Wing have coordi48 hours of departure. Clayton Ci c administrator, 'All ambulances willbe nated the establishment of the West Bank Veterinary "There is no need for west bank pet owners to equipped with state-of-the art medical equipment Clinic at the Old Howard Thrift Shop, Building 202, travel to the Corozal VTF," he said. This second apand will be staffed by bilingual, U.S. certified NaHoward AFB. pointment for screwworms and ticks will also be tional Registry ofEmergency Medical Technicians. Among the many services available at the upcomscheduled at the West Bank Clinic, if the owner so This isthesameregistry thatcertifiesallDepartment ing clinic, pet owners will be able to obtain health desires. our-hour amugncy eicaltecats. Twt certificates and complete pet outprocessing, includThe West Bank clinic will be open 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Clayton through July 31. After that date the ambuing a final medical exam for screwworms and ticks. Monday through Friday .lances will respond from offpost. Other services offered include vaccinations, heartIt will cease operations on Aug. 13 when most The steps to request an ambulance remain the worm tests, heartworm preventatives, as well as tick pets will have been shipped out of Panama. The same Simply call 281-HELP or 284-BELP and the reand flea control medications and information on Corozal VTF will continue operations until its schedsponge plan will be put into action. "This transition PCSing with pets. uled closure on Aug. 31, in accordance with the TIP will be seamless," Alexander said, "The community According to Lt. Col. Larry Carpenter, commander drawdown. can expect to see the same level of emergency reof the Veterinary Command, the clinic will result in To schedule an appointment at the West Bank sponse services as it oad before, m great savings in time for pet owners. clinic, please contact 285-5866 or 285-5867. Best of the Best Most of the 430 people who make up the 24th Medical Group -250 military members, approximately 180 Department 0 A D of Defense civilians, civilian A &contractors, TRICARE partner physicians and civilian overhires -gathered for a -post-inspection celebration April 30 at Howard. The members enierged from a combined inspection by the Joint ComA mission for the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and the Health Services Inspection Agency with a rating of 97, better than 95 percent of all ambulatory care institutions that have gone through the inspection. In addition, JCAHO & inspectors found three "best practices" being employed by 24th MDG personnel which -.they'll take back and encour-age healthcare organizations --across the United States to -adopt. photo by Senior Airman Jeremy Moore (USAF)

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1 ~ Tropic Times 16 May 7, 1999 6/ Rodman transfers to the Government of Panama One last time (Top photo) GMC (SW) Gelenn McFarlin, security officer, Rodman Naval Station (right) and MA2 (PJ) Bill Gallagher, assistant security officer, Rodman Naval Station, fold the U.S. flag one last time April 30 in front of the former headquarters building on Rodman. Rodman Naval Station officially transferred to the Government of Panama May 1. (Right photo) Sailors at Rodman Naval Station lower the U.S. flag for the final time. photos by Spc. Kenneth K. Rocket Crash claims first U.S. deaths in Balkans Orientation for WASHINGTON (American Forces Press Service)against Yugoslavia is to create "the kind of world where To slirs killed Tuesday in the crash of their Apache an innocent people are not singled out for repression, helper in Albania are the first U.S. troops to die i the for expulsion, for destruction just because of theii reliN on-D oD schools NATO air offensive against Yugoslavia. gious and ethnic heritage." FORT CLAYTON -Command sponsored miliPresident Clinton, in Spangdahlern, Germany, NATO stands for the freedom and unity of Europe, tary personnel and civilian employees with schoolWednesday to visit airmen and soldiers involved in Ophe said, yet the Yugoslav persecution of the ethnic Alage dependents remaining in Panama past August eration Allied Force, said the jobs service members do banians in Kosovo is "occurring in the heart of Europe, 1999 are urged to attend one of the non-DoD schools are inherently dangerous. on NATO's doorstep. We must repudiate it. We must orientations to be held May 17, 1999 at 1 p.m. at the "Just yesterday we lost two brave Americans in a reverse it, and we intend to do that." Howard Elementary School Auditorium and at 5 p.m. helicopter training accident in Albania, and today we Clinton stressed NATO has no quarrel with the Serh at the Valent Recreation Center on Fort Clayton. grieve with their families and pray for them," he said. people. The orientation will be conducted by Dr. Charles Officials will not comment further on the crash until Our quarrel is with ethnic cleansing and systematic Renno, DoDDS Panama/Cuba Non-DoD School lithe Army completes its investigation of the accident.To killing and uprooting and bigotry," he said. aison and Miriam Borras, DoDDS Panama/Cuba date, the United States has lost an F-I 17 and an F-16 He reiterated NATO's goals: Milosevic must agree Non-DoD specialist who have been administering over Yugoslavia. Combat search and rescue specialists to withdraw all army, police and paramilitary units in the non-DoD school program for Mexico, the Caribrescued both pilots. Last week, a Marine AV-8B Harrier Kosovo. NATO must be the core of any security force bean, Central and South America. crashed during carrier qualifications and another Apache in the province, and the ethnic Albanians who lived there At the orientation, parents will be provided with crashed during a training exercise in Albania; no one must be allowed to return, an Application for Enrollment in a Non-DoD School was injured in these incidents. "We will continue to pursue this campaign in which for each of their school-age children, and an exClinton told the airmen, soldiers and their families that we are now engaged," he said. "We will inicnsify it in an planation of the covered and non-covered educaYugoslav action in Kosovo is an affront to everything unrelenting way until these objectives are met." tional expenses. Those schools in Panama which the United States and the other 18 countries of NATO He said he understands the stresses on U.S. pilots have an English or bilingual program are being instand for. flying missions in support of Allied Force. He also symvited to send representatives to the meetings to "Two months ago there were 1.8 million ethnic Albapathized with families. "I know this is hard," he said. "I explain their programs, requirements, and answer nians living [in Kosovo]," he said. "Now more than 1.5 know too many of these pilots are flying long hours with questions from parents. Private schools in Panama million have been forced from their homes. Their villages too little rest. I know the stress and anxiety must be have selective enrollment policies, which means they bUrned, their men often separated fromn their families and unbearahle." do not take all applicants. Some also have Waiting killed -some of them bundled and set on fire." But, Clinton said, service members who wonder if it is lists. It is, there fore, imperative to complete enrollThis violence, he said, is the result of a deliberate, worth it should look around when they meet other serment early to be sure that children will he able to calculated 10-year campaign by Yugoslav President vice memhcrs. The U.S. military is the best in the world attend school this fall. Slobodan Milosevic to exploit the religious and ethnic and it includes all ethnic, religious and racial segments For those parents Who can not find an acceptdifferences in the former Yugoslavia to preserve and of the United States, he said. able school locally, the non-DoD school program enhance his dictatorial powers. Clinton pointed to earlier "Together we make a stronger military," he said. can support home schooling for grades K-8 through conflicts in Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia as proof of "Thank God you live in a society that honors the differthe Calvert Home School Program and for grades 9Milosevic's intent.He said Milosevic's so-called ethnic ences [among people]. Think how terrible it would he to 12 through the University of Nebraska Indepencleansing has includedconcentration camps, murder and live in a society that didn't. dent Study High School. Military members who rape. It has also entailed the destruction of priceless re"A few years ago you helped end the cruel War in brought their dependents to Panama at their own ligious, cultural and historical sites and of the hooks and Bosnia, and I'm sorry you have to do it all over again, expense and civilians without a travel agremttent do records of other ethnic groups. "It is evil," Clinton said. but I'm proud of the joh you're doing today in KososoC not qualify for educational benefits under the nonClinton said the ultimate goal of the air campaign Clinton said. DoD school program.

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Hasta Luego Tshirt School physicals FSU Commencement The American Red Cross is having The Howard Air Force Base and Fort The Florida State University Panama an Hasta Luego Tshirt sale. All prices Clayton Pediatric Clinics are inCanal Branch cordially invites have been drastically reduced. To purcreasing the number of school you to its 1998 -99 Commencechase your Tshirt, stop by the Red Cross physical appointments availment Ceremony 10 a.m. SaturOffice 8 a.m. -4 p.m. starting Monday in able. Physical appointments day at the Panama Canal ColRoom 344, Building 519 on Fort Clayton. will be offered I -3:30 p.m. lege Auditorium, La Boca, For more information, contact the Red daily. For more information, Balboa. For more information, Cross at 288-5509. contact your local clinics. call 285-6386/6388. T ropictivities May 7, 1999 Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama Page B1 Serving the Joint Community 44e beauty o/nature story and photos by animal life here not found hardly Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett anywhere else in the world. Tropic Times Staff Do a little research and read about Hard day at work, huh? Maybe a different types of birds or insects little bit of stress at home too? Or there are, then grab a pair of binocumaybe that's not it at all. lars and try to find them. Maybe you're just tired of the Visit El Valle, or Chiriqui or the same old routine of going out to the Barro Colorado Island Nature Preclub, or going to the movies or just serve. If you don't feel comfortable sitting in front of the television traveling that far then you could visit wasting who-knows-how-many hours the Smithsonian Tropical Research of your life. Institute out on the causeway past Well, I have a suggestion. Go what used to be Fort Amador. Or get nature watching. Step out of the close to a crocodile during a crocodile routine and enter a world where photo safari. things operate on a much simpler Many of these trips are just a level. phone call away through the Air It's real easy, too. No crowds, no Force and Army Outdoor Recreation long lines for tickets, no commercials, Centers. just the world around you and the You could even turn nature creatures that live in it. watching into a hobby. Take pictures You don't have to go far, either. to document your experience or start There are many animals right outside an insect collection. your door just waiting to be discovBut more than anything, just relax ered, observed and appreciated. and observe. Without trying to sound I remember when I was a kid corny, become nature. growing upin western North Carolina Just remember, nature watching is and I used to sit on the porch at home nature watching, not touching. and watch spiders meticulously Some animals are dangerous, and weaving their webs or lizards basking it's a good idea to keep your distance. in the midday sun. Squirrels ran So, when you grab for that insect that around looking for nuts while robins you just have to have for your carried worms back to the nest where collection, make sure you know what the young waited for their lunch to you're touching. arrive. So what are you waiting for? Open And it's no different here in your eyes and take advantage of a Panama. In fact, there is a diversity of precious natural resource.

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Tropic Times B2 May7 1999 Notices Ai orecapture the crocodiles, giving everyone Reservations for outings are under in 1506 and destroyed and sacked by Air orcethe chance to take pictures. Don't forget way at Building 178, Foil Clayton. pirate Henry Morgan. Tour the Casco *Outdoor Recreation: 284-6107 llent, you camera, flashlight Snorkel/dive at Portobelo Saturday. Viejo founded in 1676, reminiscent of Tours depart from Howard Theater, and rain gear. Portobelo offers much more and its its Spanish and French heritage. Stop Visit Gatun Lake 8 a.m. -5 p.m. Panama Museums tour9 a.m. -3 pm. about an hour and] 20 Minutes from the at San Jose Church to see their Saturday, $20. Take a trip to the AtMay 14, $10. Visit the Natural Science, city unless you stop off for a swim at the Golden Altar, the National Theater, lantic Side and enjoy the scenery and Reina Torres and the New Canal Museblack sand Maria Chiquita beach which Las Bovedas enjoy live music Fridays visit Gatun Locks, Fort San Lorenzo ums in Casco Viejo. Discover the culture, has changing facilities, or the white sand and Saturdays and the French restauand the Fort Sherman Zoo. Stop for art, history, flora and fauna of this wonPlaya Langosta beach. rant 7 p.m. Mondays -Fridays and the lunch at the Tarpon Club Restaurant. derful country. Bring some extra money El Valle day trip Sunday and May 16. new Canal Museum. Horseback riding at Cernefo to pay for the small entrance fees and for Join us once a week, the otherwise quiet Isla Grande 6:30 a.m. Saturday. Stop 8 a.m. -4 p.m. Sunday, $24. Experience lunch. and relaxed El Valle becomes a picturat Portobelo to see the Black Christ. an exciting ride at Cermefio Ranch m Old Panama and Miraflores Locks esque country shopping center celebratEl Valle 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Enjoy the valley of Capira. The spirited tour 9 a.m. -4 p.m. may 15, $10. ing its most popular tradition, the Sunshopping in the native market which is horses will delight you as you explore Peacock Bass fishing 5 a.m. -2 p.m. day Market. only open on Sundays. You'll be able the beautiful surrounding area, faMay 15, $25. Be prepared to catch a boat Horseback riding in El Valle May to purchase handicrafts such as soapmous for its rolling hills and breathtakload of fish while peacock bass fishing 15. Fee includes transportation, guide stone carvings, bateas, and pottery. El ing vista. Cost includes transportanear Arenosa Village on Gatun Lake. and horse. Valle's lush vegetation, colorful flowtion, horses, gear and guide. Bring Bring your own fishing gear, lunch and Ocean Kayaking May 22. ers and waterfalls make it one of the your own lunch and a change of clothrefreshments. Transportation, boat with El Valle Canopy May 29. This advenmost popular tourist attractions in ing if you desire. guide, bait, ice and coolers for fish and ture features a canopy tour of El Macho. Panama. Enjoy lunch at Hotel Portobelo and Langosta Beach fish cleaning are provided. You will traverse from tree to tree and Camipestre. tour 7 a.m. -4 p.m. Sunday, $14/perDrake's Island snorkeling trip 7 a.m. platform to platform using pulleys. Shopping tour9 a.m. -4p.m. Thursson. The historic site of Portobelo 15 -5 p.m. May 16, $22. Isla Drake, the hisThe Mamoni overnight trip is availday. Visit Central Avenue, El Dorado located on the Atlantic coast in a torical burial site of Sir Francis Drake, able. Includes a two-hour drive into and Los Pueblos shopping malls, the large and beautiful bay which once located on the Atlantic side near Chepo and a three-hour horseback ride. most popular shopping area in-town. had the capacity for as many as 100 Portobelo, offers a unique opportunity to Enjoy typical food, rustic sleeping acCarlson Wagonlit offers the lowest Spanish galleons. After Portobelo, we the novice snorkeler to explore a reef, commodations and activities. Not meant military aii fares, hotel, car rental diswill stop at Langosta Beach where you see exotic fish and enjoy the beautiful for the mild at heart. For more informacounts and more. Service also incan snorkel, go shelling or sun bathe. Atlantic Ocean. tion, call the center. eludes: Special weekday rates at Be sure to bring coolers with drinks, *Valent Recreation Center: 288Gorgona beachfront cabins; Chiva beachwear and snorkeling gear. Army 6500 Parrandera on Thursdays, Fridays Crocodile photo safari 8 -11 p.m. *Outdoor Recreation Center: 288Make early reservations for tours: and Saturdays and partial Canal TranThursday, $40. Trained guides will 7355/6453 Visit historic Panama City founded sits. Call 288-7077 for details. Chid and Youth Services to the 24th Support Group deputy commander at least four working *Howard Community Center: days before the event. 284-6161 *Howard AFB Sports and RecreRegistration The center is located on the ation Rental Center: 284-6107/ Ground Floor of Building 707. New 3539 14 -15 MAY hours: 7:30 a.m. -7 p.m. Mondays -Check out the wide variety of building 155, Ft Clayton Fridays, noon -6 p.m. Saturdays, equipment for rent, camping, fishing closed Sundays and holidays and and boating, home entertainment, noon -6 p.m. down days. home improvement, outdoor, picnic \Q Jewelry show and sale I1 a.m. -5 and party, sports and cooking equipp.m. today. You don't have to go off ment for a minimal fee daily, weekend base to shop for fine jewelry. and weekly rental. PCSing? If so, get Souvenir vendors bazaar 11 a.m. -$5 off weekly and monthly rentals on Ss' e 9 5 p.m. Saturdays. TVs, VCRs and TV/VCR combos. -\.*Howard Skills Development Must be accompanied by orders. Center: 284-6361 Rent a mountain bike for a month or Youth sports The Balloon Shop is located in week and receive a free water bottle. tceecr. wosix x~ ~"J Oi"' '*" the Skills Development Center, Building 7 11. Check our daily specials and Army tna Clmssesake someone smile. The Skills De*Valent Recreation Center: s aCow rase velopment Center now has the Bal288-6500 on wear tms .4+ : cry J loon Shop and Pack-N-Wrap with Private tours for 10 -15 people r F I. .gifts, balloons and wrappings for can be arranged. Advance reservaNjJot'tst2,-Ui ,shipping for all occasions. tions and payment required for any min *Outdoor Adventures: 284-6107 tours listed or other local tours. The Cl Spwit Iin 5d o Vao .a. thRent Howard bohios and pools for center also provides music rooms, Di, --,4,4, Itd 1, private parties or squadron funcmovies on weekends, slot machine, INFO.: 288-6816/6810/7506 tions. If you wish to serve alcohol, pool tables, ping pong tables and you must submit a letter of request rental service. Air Force p.m. May 15, $12.50 plus supplies. Three Woodworking qualification class Pastel chalk technique 4 -5 p.m. Howard Skills Development lessons. 9:30 a.m. -noon Saturdays. Wednesdays, $10 plus supplies. Center: 284-6361 Clay flowers I -3 p.m. May 18, $25. Framing instruction 6:30 -9 p.m. Eye painting 7 p.m. Wednesday, $5. New hours of operation 10a.m. 4 Includes three lessons. Students need to Thursday. Call for details. Dry brush technique 2 -3 p.m. p.m. Tuesdays -Saturdays. purchase the supplies. Guitar construction7-9 p.m.1sunday. Thursdays. The center accepts commercial Army *Fort Clayton Ceramics Shop: 288Airbrush classes, 6:30 -8:30 p.m. credit cards. *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Cen4360 Ceramics shop close May 3 1. Friday, $5. Registration and payment are reter: 288-5957/7360 Ceramic instruction available: Learn Advance registration required for quired before attending classes. Drawing and acrylic painting 2 -4 the fine art of ceramics. Classes are ofthe following courses: Classes will be cancelled 24 hours p.m. Sundays and 7 -9 p.m. Wednesfered at all levels. Clay Flower making I I a.m. -I p.m. prior if minimum participation is not days. Watercolor and oil painting techBeginner's ceramic painting 6 -S Sundays, $15. Four sessions. Join us met. niques 7 -9 p.m. Thursday. Painting supp.m. Thursdays. Fee is $20. at the center and don't miss the wonArtificial flower arranging 10 a.m. plies are not included in the fee. RegisCeramic qualification 10 a.m. -12:30 derful class. -noon Saturday -May 15, $10 plus ter in advance. Call for details. p.m. Saturdays. Learn to apply Fiesta Color 2 -4 supplies. One lesson. Crafts classes available: Ceramic orientation for pouring 2 -3 p.m. Sundays. Cost $20. Four sessions. Stained glass workshop 10 a.m. -I Pottery class I p.m. Wednesdays. p.m. Wednesday. Stone stroke class, Sundays, $1(.

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Tropic Times Notices Ma B71999 3 Revival May 5 -9, 1999 /erw n C uno d m 5orlf 'JO wti gspmp a ss I r NightlyG Gospe' Singing Chi0care -c P"L janovtdedfor ensaard Al ,i El Nispero Zoo Visit El Nisoero Zoo in El Valle and say hello to Mr. crocodile. contact your Outdoor Recreation Center and set up your trip or tour now. Call 284-6107 or 288-7355. Smor ,i>m ation an d s, s :A bsdss,,t bu 1 Christia Cenra Philharmonie Der Town Hall Meeting Recycling Marathon SAtlapa Convention Center + Fort Clayton Fort Clayton The National Association of Concerts is hosting The U. S. Army South is hosting a Town Hall The Directorate of Community Activities is hostthe exceptional presentation of Philharmonie Der Meeting 9 a.m Thursday at the Fort Clayton Vaing a Recycling Ma rathon May 14. Collect bond paNationen directed by Justus Frantz 8 p.m. Wedneslent Recreation Center. Family and members of per, color paper and cardboard, non ferrous and ferday at the Atlapa Convention Center. Tickets are the entire community are welcome to participate rous metals, glass and aluminum cans. The delivery available at the association or at the center the night and get updated information and learn about upplace is at the Recycling Collection Center locates of the event. Come join us and enjoy this cultural coming events. For more information, call 288in Building 163, Fort Clayton. For more information, event. For more information, call 214-7236. 9303. call 288-4838. Air Force *Howard Wood Skills Center: 284Air-conditioning 4510 maintenance 2 p.m. *Howard Community Center: For wood shop needs, please contact Mondays, Thurs284-6161 the Fort Clayton Wood Shop. days and Fridays. Beginner, intermediate and adNoon -5 p.m. Saturvanced English and Spanish classes. days, 10a.m. -5 p.m Call the center for more information. Army Sundays. *Howard Pool: 284-3569 *Fort Clayton Boat & Scuba Shop: Wheel alignment Hours of operation: 10 am. -6 p.m. 288-7355/6453 3 -9 p.m. Mondays, Tuesday -Sunday and holidays. Fishing enthusiasts are invited to parThursdays and FriClosed Monday. ticipate in a Bass Fishing Tournament days. Water Aerobics 8:30 -9:30 a.m. through May. There's a $50 cash prize Brake repair Tuesdays and Thursdays, $2/class, per month and a $200 cash prize for the class 1 -9:30 p.m. call for more information. Grand Finale. Register now at Building Fridays. *Howard Auto Skills Center: 178, Fort Clayton. *Fort Sherman 284-3370 Motorboat operator course offered 8 Auto Shop Building Hours: I I a.m. -7 p.m Tuesdays -a.m. -noon monthly. Fee is $10 for Jon 153: Thursdays, I 1 a.m. -6 p.m. Fridays, 9 boat certification, $20 for Boston Whaler/ Hours of operaa.m. -5p.m. Saturdays, II a.m. -5 p.m. ocean certification. Advance reservation: noon -4 p.m. Sundays and closed Mondays and tions required. Sundays, closed holidays. Gatun Lake fishing charters availMondays and TuesVehicle resale lot: Planning to sell able, $30/person, minimum of three days, 4 -8 p.m. your car? Contact Auto Skills at people, includes Jon boat w/30hp. InWednesdays, ThursHoward. cludes boat, guide, cooler, fishing tackle, days and Fridays Services: Towing 1 I a.m. -7 p.m. bait and safety equipment. and 10 a.m. -6 p. I Tuesdays -Thursdays, I 1 a.m. -6 Open-water dive classes begin MonSaturdays and holip.m. Fridays, 9 a.m. -5 p.m. Saturdays days. Minimum of six people required. days. (as long as a qualified driver is on Includes pool sessions, theory sessions The shop has four duty). If a tow extends beyond 5:30 and open-water dives. Register in adbays with one enp.m., there is an additional hourly vance. gine lift, tire-changcharge. Air conditioning repair, brakThe Scuba Shop has equipment for ing equipment, enes, oil changes, tune-ups, front-end rent, advanced instruction and services gine hoist, a comalignment and welding available. to include repairing spear guns, regulapressor to remove shocks and various Spanish classes available. Vehicle inspection services 11 tors and gauges. other equipment. Fee includes manual. For more infora.m. -7 p.m. Tuesdays -Thursdays, I 1 *Auto Craft Center: *Valent Recreation Center: 288mation, call the center. a.m. -6 p.m. Fridays, 9 a.m. -5 p.m. The center is located in Buildings 6500 Piano classes Mondays -ThursSaturdays, 11 a.m. -5 p.m. Sundays 178-A, B, C and Building 135, Fort New hours of operation: 9 a.m. -9 days, half-hour sessions. self help and closed Mondays. Cost Clayton. p.m. Mondays -Fridays, noon -9 p.m. Basic English classes 10 a.m. is $10.25. Have your vehicle inspectThe shop features work-area bays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. Regis12:10 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. ed at the center in Building 722. Veelectric lifts, instructions and classes. ter for ongoing classes. Intermediate English Mondays and hicles cannot be left for inspections. Electric engine analysis 4 -9 p.m. Spanish headstart class, eight week Wednesdays. For more information, Call the center for details. Mondays. course, meets twice a week. Intermediate call the center at 288-6500.

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TropicTimes Potpourri The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is Clayton omelets, fresh breads, croissants and more. accepting applications on a continuous basis for *The Loop: 288-7035. A la Carte breakfast 6 -9 a.m. Mondays the following announcements. All interested Enjoy the sports games on the TVs available in Fridays. applicants need to re-submit an updated SF-171 CJ's Sports Bar and Grill. Delicious appetizers International lunch buffet 11 a.m. -1:30 p.m. every six months. Registers established from these available. Lunch is 11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Mondays $4.95. Fridays: Southern buffet. Mondays: All announcements will be used to fill temporary -Fridays, dinner -9 p.m. Mondays -Fridays and American. Tuesdays: Italian. Wednesdays: positions. 4:30 -9 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Mexican. Thursdays: Oriental. Prizmz opens until 11 p.m. Wednesdays and All ranks a la carte dining. 5:30 -9 p.m. VB#51-OC General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill Thursdays, I a.m. Fridays, Saturdays and SunWednesdays -Saturdays. A great menu with most clerical positions). days. appetizers, salads, soups and entrees to please Select your favorite tunes tonight at 5 p.m. everyone. VB# 52-OC Sales Store Checker, NM-3 Over 100 CDs to choose from the 1950s to the Breezeway open 11 a.m. -10 p.m. Mondays (Intermittent wk sch).* I990s. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m. -11 p.m. *Clayton Community Club: 288-4716. Tuesdays and Fridays, I1a.m. -11:30 p.m. Until further notice, the written test for all The Forum features Chef Rangel's special bufSaturdays and Sundays, noon -11 p.m. Sundays. temporary appointments to clerical positions at fets. Country buffet 5 -9 p.m. Wednesday feaSteak out 2:30 -8 p.m. Sundays. grades NM-2, 3, and 4 is waived. tures from ham hocks and fried chicken to black*Tropic Breeze Club Ballroom eyed peas. Seafood Fridays. For those who prefer Open for special functions only. R & B 8 p.m. VB# 55-OC Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), beef, the Forum is offering steak choices a la carte. midnight Fridays. NM-5, specialized experience required. Each evening is a treat on its own. *Tropic Breeze Club Casual Cove: 284-4189. Sunday brunch 10:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. The best Open 11 a.m. -midnight Mondays, 56th Signal Battalion Open Continuous Announdeal in town, best value and best entertainment. EnWednesdays and Thursdays, and 11 a.m. -1:30 cements joy the hot and cold entrees, salads, breakfast items, a.m. Fridays. pastries and desserts. Great food and background Members only Social hour 5:30 p.m. Fridays. OPEN: 10-17-97 CLOSE: Will remain open music. Pool tournaments 6:30 p.m. Fridays. until further notice The club features a special buffet 4:30 -8 p.m. Alternative Rock and Tecno 4 -8 p.m. Sundays in the ballroom. Members pay $5.95, special Variety music 8 p.m. -midnight Saturdays NOTE: The announcements listed below will rate for children 5 to 11-years-old and under 5 free. Karaoke plus Late Night Disco 11a.m. be used to fill recurring (temporary/permanent) Non-member fee available. midnight Monday and more Karaoke until 2 a.m. vacancies within various divisions of the 56th The Corral is open 7 p.m. -2 a.m. WednesTuesday. Signal Battalion. Interested candidates should days, Fridays and Saturdays. Join in for great Free juke box 11 a.m. -2 a.m. Tuesday. ensure that their application package is complete country sounds. Service members appreciation day and draft in order to receive proper consideration (i.e. Tecno Latin Sounds 9 p.m. Wednesdays, Fribeer special all day Wednesday. SF171, OF-612, Resume, DD-214 if claiming days and Saturdays at The Underground. Pool tournament 7 p.m. Wednesday veteran's preference, SF-50, current performance *Casa Maria: 288-5767 Social hour with snack 6 -8 p.m. Wednesday appraisal). Authentic Mexican cuisine served 5 -9 p.m. Country and Western night 8 -11 p.m. Tuesdays -Saturdays. Delivery service available Thursdays. NON-MANUAL POSrIONS: on Fort Clayton. Members night and club card drawing 8:30 p.m. *La Mola Caf6: 288-4202 Thursdays. Social hour reduced prices 4:30 -7:30 VB# 21SIG Telecommunication Specialist, NMBreakfast 6:30 -9:30 a.m. Mondays -Fridays, 7 p.m. 391-11 -11 a.m. Saturdays -Sundays; lunch 11 a.m. -1:30 All nighters 9 p.m. May 15 Los Almirantes VB# 26SIG Telecommunication Specialist, NMp.m. Mondays -Fridays, I 1 a.m. -1 p.m. Saturdays and May 30 Castalia y los Salchichas. Open to 391-09 -Sundays; dinner 5 -8 p.m. daily. enlisted members and their guest. VB# 30SIG Telecommunication Specialist, NM*Cafe 519: 288-6007 *Top 3 Enlisted Lounge: 284-4189 391-7/9 Breakfast 6 -11 a.m. Mondays -Fridays. Open 4 -9 p.m. Mondays -Thursdays and 4 Lunch 11 a.m. -2 p.m. with hot specials, a salad I 1 p.m. Fridays. Directorate of Community Activities, Sports & bar and sandwiches. Enjoy a special buffet Super social hour 5:30 -6:30 p.m. Sunday. Leisure -Open Continuous Announcements Thursdays. Blue note 7 p.m. Sunday. All ranks welcome. Boss and buddy night social hour snacks 5:30 OPEN: 04-30-99 CLOSE: Until further notice Howard p.m. Mondays. *Howard Club-Building 113: 284-4680. *Mulligan's on the Green at Horoko: 283VB# 235A-99-SC Recreation Specialist, NM188The Officers Lounge has relocated to a co-lo3295 05/07 cated Top 3 Enlisted and Officer's lounge at Breakfast menu 6 -10 a.m. Saturdays, Sundays Building 707. and holidays. Open for lunch and dinner. RECRUITMENTINFORMATION: *Tropic Breeze Club-Building 710: 284Weekly lunch and dinner 10 a.m. -8:30 p.m. 4189 Mondays -Thursdays, 10a.m. -9:30 p.m. Fridays, HOW TO APPLY: Submit an SF-171, OF-612 or Cashiers hours: 10 a.m. -9 p.m. Saturdays -6 -9:30 p.m. Saturdays and 6 a.m. -8:30 p.m. Resume to the Job Information Center, JIC, Wednesdays, 9 a.m. -9 p.m. Thursdays, 9 a.m. -Sundays and holidays. Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, by 4:14 PM on noon Fridays. Mongolian barbecue 5:30 -8:30 p.m. Mondays, the closing date of the announcement. YOUR Mother's Day Brunch 10 a.m. -1:30 p.m. $8.95 for the first 8-ounce and $4.95 for the application must include: (1) Member 4 copy of Sunday. Costs are $7.95 adults, $3.95 children ages vegetarian version. the DD-214, if claiming veterans preference, (2) 5 -12 and under 5-years-old eat free. *Cafe Seven-O-Seven-Building 707: 284-5848 copy of college transcripts or PBCE Form 540, if Closed for lunch 1:15 -2 p.m. daily. Open 6 a.m. -7 p.m. Mondays -Fridays. Noon -5 claiming education, (3) copy of CASP notice of "A la Carte" Sunday breakfast 9 a.m. -noon. p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Try our deli rating, if applicable, (4) copy of latest SF-50 if you Eggs-to-order, pancakes, bacon, sausage, sandwiches and pastries. are a current or previous federal employee. (If you are a temporary federal employee and have not received an official performance rating, please submit a memo/letter from your current supervisor regarding your performance). IMPORTANT NOTE: All U.S. citizens and third The Tropic country nationals applying for positions Breeze Club is announced by this agency must attach copy of hosting a one the following documents: U.S. citizen/third Mother's Day country national bilingual ID card, issued te Brunch 10 a.m. civilian/military command sponsored family 1:30 p.m. members; cedula; VI-2 card; VI-3 card, provisional Sunday. Costs permit of permanency card, permit in process. are $7.95 for adults and $3.95 VB# VACANCY, TITLE AND LOCATION for children OPEN: 05-07-99 CLOSE: 05-18-99 ages 5 -12. For more informa-W 259-99-SS CONTRACT SPECIALIST, NM-1 12 1 don, call 28409. 9th ASC, 56th Signal Battalion, Resource 4189. Management Div., Contract Managemen Br anch Fort CI1ayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equi. to NM-07. NOTE: Most he hilingUal (SpTaII.sh/ English). Temporary NTE: 07/18/99.

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Tropic Times Movies May 7 B5 Location Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 6:30 pm: Simply 4:30 pm: Forces of 4:30 pm: My 7 pm: October Sky 7 pm: The Matrix* 7 pm: 10 Things 7 pm: Shakespeare 284-3583 irresistible Nature** Favorite Martian" Hate About You in Love 8:30 pm: The 6:30 pm: October 6:30 pm: Simply Matrix* Sky Irresistible 8:30 pm: 10 Things I 8:30 pm: The Matrix* Hate About You Fort Clayton 6:30 pm: October 4:30 pm: My 4:30 pm: Forces of 7 pm: The Matrix* 7 pm: Shakespeare 7 pm: The Matrix* 7 pm: Rushmore 288-7279 Sky Favorite Martian** Nature" In Love 8:30 pm: 200 6:30 pm: Simply 6:30 pm: October Cigarettes Irresistible Sky 8:30 pm: The 8:40 pm: 10 Things Matrix' I Hate About You All movies are subject to change depending on R Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent arrival in country or adult guardian. Tickets ar-e available in five price categories: $3.50, $3, $1.75, PG-1 3 Parental guidance suggested for children under 13. $1.50 and $1. *First run movies $3.50 **Special Price PG Parental guidance suggested. AAFES Home Page: www.panama.phoenix.net/-aafespan.default.html G Suitable for general audience. Now showing Forces of Nature October Sky Sandra Bullock, Ben Affleck Jake Gyllenhaall, Laura Dern Ben has two days to get from New York to Savannah for his Jake Gyllenhaal stars as former NASA science engineer Homer wedding. How hard can that be in this age of planes, trains and Hickam. Growing up in a small town, Hickam is destined to folautomobiles? Various circumstances hinder his trip to Savannah. low in the footsteps of his coal mining father until the soviet satele Ben has to wonder if somebody up there is trying to tell him somelite Sputnik flies over his town and inspires him and his friends to 0 thing. R, 1 hr, 49 min. build and launch their own homemade rockets. R, 1 hr, 48 min. 0 The Matrix Shakespeare In Love Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne Gwyneth Paltrow, Ralph Fiennes .Keanu Reeves stars in a cyberpunk thriller where human life is Fiennes stars as a young William Shakespeare with writers * discovered to be a virtual dream. Reeves is a computer hacker block in this elizabethan comedy. Gwyneth Paltrow won the 1999 0 who uncovers an elaborate campaign of deceit. Computer overOscar for Best Actress while Judi Dench won Best Supporting .lords have created an extensive earthly facade with plans to domiActress for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth. The movie won Best nate the "real world. Rebels Laurence Fishburne and CarriePicture. R, 1 hr, 49 min. Anne Moss team with Reeves to combat the Matrix. R, 2 hr, 10 Rushmore M v e tJ Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray t JMy Favorite Martian Jason Schwartzman stars as a student who loves attending the Jeff Daniels, Christopher Lloyd Rushmore Academy. He's the editor of the newspaper and yearHow ard A FB Based on the television series, "My Favorite Martian," ambibook; and involved in every club from the dodgeball society to tious television reporter Tim O'Hara stumbles upon a Martian the debate team. He's also one of the worst students. Amidst the .whose spaceship has accidentally crash landed on earth. PG, 1 threat of expulsion, Schwartzman falls for first grade teacher hr, 28 min. Olivia Williams, as does his tycoon mentor Bill Murray. 6:30 pm: October Sky Simply Irresistible R,hr,49min. (PG) Jake Gyllenhaal, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Sean Patrick Flannery 10 Things I Hate About You Laura Dern Sean Patrick Flannery stars as a department store clerk who Larisa Oleynik, Julia Stiles falls prey to restaurateur Sara Michelle Gellar. While he tries to A high school version of "Taming of the Shrew." A rule in the resist the young chef's charms, Gellar struggles to keep her Stratford household forbids Oleynik from dating until her ill-tem: 8:30 pm: The Matrix mother's business afloat. Her fortunes change when she discovpered sibling does so first. In desperation, wannabe boyfriend i (R) Keanu Reeves ers a magical crab that gives her the power to cook up anything -Joseph Gordon-Levitt tries to find one who can tame and woo e even love. PG-13,1 hr, 15 min. the older sister's heart. PG, 1 hr, 43 min. Laurence Fishburne Fort Clayton 6:30 pm: Simply IrreIT~ sistible (PG-1 3) Sarah ACADEMY ___ : Michelle Gellar, Sean ING Patrick Flannery 8:30 pm: Life (R) :7tB ST ICTrl'%ll' -Eddie Murphy, Martin --Lawrence Showing Tuesday at the Fort Clayton Theater. .000 000 0000000000000000000000000** *0

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B6 May 7, 1998 SCN TV Key: + Program time change due to live programming event: Mature theme; Series starts; -Series ends; ** Program moved to new day and/or time Frid0y, moo= = Satur;mmy May M Sudysa z01md 0Qesa~a enedy ly1 TusaMy1 -600 Today Show 6:00 Headline News 6:00 'hes Coral Ridgs H u, 600 Today Show (s 00 1 cday Show 6:00 Today Stow 6:00 Today Show 8:00 Headline News 6:30 Classic Caroi 6:30 Otech .1 Love 8:00 Headline News 8:001 Headlin News 0:10 Headlive News 8:00 Headline News 8 30 Showbiz fday 7:00 Sesamve Street Speiats 7:00 Th o Field Aler 8:30 Shtrwaizc Today 0:30 Showbiz today 8:30 S eowbiz Today 8:30 Showbiz Today 9:00 Ssisoe Stre, 7:30 Classic Caruern 7:30 Day of s) r 9:00 Sesame Stee 9:01 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street t0 00 Barcey & Friends MsrItibss 8:o Sunday T day 10:1on Mister Rogers' 10:00 Blues Clues 10:00 Barney & Friends 10:00 Blues Cltes t0:30 Kinsa's Flrx Appeal 9:00 Aaahh! Real Msnstsrs 9:00 Air Force IV News Neighbrhd 10:30 Ce-Ed training 10:30 Bodyshapivg 10:30 CoEd Training ,) I 11 The Opath Wirtrey 9:30 Ace Yoa Afraid of te 9:30 Advitrios Book Of 10:30 Kiana's Fles Appeal 1: 00 Tr ycits Wisfcy 11:00 The Hpcah Winfrey 11:00 The -Oyah Winfrey C Show Dark? Virtues. 11:00 The Opah Wiofrey Show Show Show C Grea Moms 10:00 Nasy/Muarire Corps :0 0 Promissd Land Sh", w 12:00 Headlin News 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News M 12.00 Headtine News News t t:00 MLS S 12:00 Headline News 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Whel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune .12 :30 Wheel Of [orrtre 10 30 Air Force TV New, NY/NJ Mtrcsars 12:3 Whed 0) Forine 1:00 Port Chrles 1:00 Port Charles 1:00 Port Charles O I:00 Pr Charles :1:00 Nova at D.C Uid 1:10 orri Charres 1:25 Guiding Light 1:25 Guiding Light 1:25 Guiding Light 1:2 Guiding Light -00 Dateline NBC 1:00 AMA Supros :25 Guiding Light 2:15 Generar Hospitar 2:15 Genecal Hosyiral 2:15 General Hosyital 2.15 Gererar Hosrit I:00 34thAnnmaIl Acemry 3: ThfIrsdAfaI 2:15 General Hospital 3:00 Blos Clues 3:00 Sesame Ste 3:00 Animanaics 3:00 Sylvester & Twvsny of Cointry Music 3:31 Tie Joy Lick Clue (It V 3:30 Newton's Apple 4:00 Saved By Belt:New 3:30 Sesame Street Mysierie Awards :1) 3:00 Bonkers d:00 Nick News Class 4:30 Olsen Clues 3:30 Kertt's Crtriese 400 Scat Trii Ser Printmeti tabte 3:30 Misrer Rogers' 4:31 Scholastic Sports 4:30 LegendsOf/Hidden 5:00 Jeopardy! 4:1 1ns1e1 Street :00 NASCAR Crafsoan 12 30 Amrcise' s Back Fsrum Neighhrhd America Temple 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:00 Jeopredy! Tracks: I: 11IceNriy gh:00 Californir Dreams 5:00 Jeopardy) 5:00 Jeopardy! See Primetime table 5:30 NBC Nightly News Memiphris 200 200 Vidoli"k 4:30 All That 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:30 NBC Nightly News 12:35 ESPNews See Primetime table See Priteti tire title 3 00 Hot, Party I (TV-FG) 5:00 Jeopardyf See Primetime taie See Primetime table 1:05 The French 12:35 ESNews 1200 Baywaiti 5:00 Headline News 5:30 NBC Nightly News 12:35 ESPNews 12:35 ESPNews Connection (TV-PG) 1:00 ABC Nighiline 1 00 Madame rouseteka (TVS 30 NOC News at Suris. See Primetime ttle 1:05 Margnm Frce (TV-PG) 1:05 1. The Line Of Fire (TV3:00 Robocop 3 (TV-PG) 1:30 CNN Headline News PG) 2:35 ESPNews 3:30 Cagney & Lacey: View PG) 5:00 Headline News 2:00 PGA Gdf: 3:00 Teaniseer Bess: Jackie 1:05 The Uniouchables (TVThrough Glass Ceil 3:00 Full Eclipse (TV-PG) 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise Ccrmpaq Clusic Presser PG) (TV-PG) 5:00 Headline News (2nd Rond) (TV-PD) 3:00 48 Hours (TV-PD) 5:00 Headline News 5:30 NBC News at Sanrise 4:00 Baskethall: 5:00 Headline Ness 5:00 Headline News 3:30 NBC News at Savrise Hertem Gtobetrooter's 5:30 Hovr 0f Power 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise vs College All-Stars 6 00 Today Show 6:00 Headline News 6:00 The Coral Ridg H u, 6:00 Today Show 6:00 Today Show 6:00 Today Show 6:00 Today Show 0 8:00 Heedlirne News 6:30 Classic Cartoon 6:30 Oiutrecl of Love 0:00 Headline Ns-s 8:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News 8 30 Showbiz Today 7:00 Sesame Street Specials 7:00 The Field Are 8:30 Showbiz Today 8:30 Shobiz Today 8:30 Srowbiz Today 8:30 Showbiz Today 9:000 Sesame Street 7:30 Muppet Bahies 7:30 Day of Discasery 9:00 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street tO:00 Barney & Friends 8:00 Disney's Pepper Ann 8:00 Sunday Today 10:00 Mister Rogers' 10:00 Blues Clues 10:00 Barney & Friends 10:00 Blues Clues :30 Kiana's Flex Appeal 8:30 Disney's Recess 9:00 Air Force TV News Neighbrhd 10:30 Co-Ed Training 10:30 Bvdyshaping 10:30 CoEd Training 1I1:00 The Oprah Winfrey 9:00 Aaahh! Real Mvnsters 9:30 Adventures Book Hf 10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal 11:00 The Oprah Winfrey t 1:00 The Oprah Winfrey' 11:00 The Oprah Wirfey S Show 9:30 Are You Afraid of the Virtues* 1 1:00 The Oprah Winfrey Show Show Show Great Moms Dark? 10:00 Promiised Land Show 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News 10:00 Navy/Marine Corps 11:00 NBA Playoffs 12:00 Headline News 12:30 Wheel Hf Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune News Triplehederd: 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 1:00 Port Charles 1:00 Poet Charles 1:00 Port Charles 1:00 Port Charles 10:30 Air Force TV News (First Round) 1:00 Port Charles 1:25 Guiding Light 1:25 Guiding Light 1:25 Guiding Light I:25 Guiding Light 11:00 NBA Playoffs See Primetime table 1:25 Guiding Light 2:15 GsneraI Hospital 2:15 General Hospital 2:15 General Hospital 2: 15 General Hospital Tripleheader: 12:30 America's Black Foir 2:15 General Hospieal 3:00 Disrey's Mighty 3:00 Goof Troop 3:00 Animanaics 3:00 Sylnester & Twceety (First Roand) t O Friday Night 3:00 Boekers Ducks 3:30 Gargoyles 3:30 Waynehead Mysteries See Primetime table 2:00 Videlitik 3:30 Supermn 3:30 Newioi's Apple 4:00 Sased By Belt:New 4:00 Hercules: The 3:30 Kraft's C,eatres 12:00 Baywatch 3:00 Hoise Pary I (TV-PG) 4:00 Crlifornii Drerns 4:00 Nick News Class Legeudary Journeys 4:00 Xena: Warrior Princess 1:00 Madame Sousatzka((TV5:00 Headline News 4:30 All Trat 4:30 Scholastic Sports 4:30 LegendsOf/Hidden 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:00 Jeopardy) PD) 5:30 NBC News at Sumrise 5:00 Jeopardy! America Temple 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:30 NBC Nightly News 3:00 Teamster Boss: Jackie 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:00 Jeopardy) 5:00 Jeopardy! See Primetime table See Primetime tahte Presser See Primetime table 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:30 NBC Nightly News 12:35 ESPNews 12:35 ESPNews (TV-PG) 12:35 ESPNews See Primetime table See Prmetime table 1:05 The French 1:05 Ghost (TV PG) 5:00 Headline News 1:05 The Untouchables (TV123 ES News 12:5 ESPNews Connection (TV-PG) 3:30 Shipmwrked (TV-G) 5:30 Hou of Power PG) 1:05 gnum HFre (TV-PG) I:05 In The Li., Of Fire 3:00 Robcop 3 (TV-P) 500 Headline News 3:0030 C4y & Lacey: (TV-P ( TVPG) 5:00 Headline News 5:30 ESPNews 5:00 Headline News Through Glass Ceil 3:00 Full pe TVPG 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise (TV-PG) 5 00 Headline News 5:O0 Headline News 5 :30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News .1 Sunse 6 00 CBS 48-Hours 6:00 Dateline NBC Fri 6:00 Motor Week 6:00 Dateline NBC Sun 6:00 DateHne NBC Man 6:00 Dateline NBC Tuesday 6:00 Dateline NBC Wed 7:00 ABC Crime & Ju e 700 ABC 20/20 Fri 6:30 TIs Week In Mcior 7:00 Navy/Marine Corps 7:00 Early Edition 7:00 Early Edition 7:00 ABC 20)20 Wed 8:00 Head ine News :00 Saturday Morning Sports News 800 Head ihe News 8:00 Head n, New 8:00 Headline News 830 Mornng Business 9:00 Showbiz 7:00 Surday Moreing 7:30 Air Force TV News 8:30 Morning B 0:0 Mo v By n 30 Mo g Business L0 Repor 9:30 Style with Elsa Klensch 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 8:00 Headine News Repr Repo Repart 9 00 ABC Good Morning 10:00 Saturday 9 30 CBS Face the Nation 8:30 Morning Business 9:00 ABC Good Morning 900 ABC Good Morning 9:00 ABC Good Morning America 10:30 Page One wiihNick 10:00 Irternational Report America America America S11:00 NHL Playoffs: (T) Charles 10:30 Style withElsa Kleinsch 9:00 ABC Good Morning 11:00 NBA Playoffs: (T) 11:00 NHL Playoffs: (T) 11:00 Major League Teams To Be Announced 11:00 Saturday I1:00 ILS Soccer: America Teams To Be Annoanced Teams To Be Announced Baseball: (T) 2:00 MSNBC Time and Again 11:30 Headline News NY/NJ Metrostors 1:00 NHL Playoffs: (T) 1:30 ESPNews 2:00 MSNBC Time and Teais To Be 300 Headline News 12:00 Major League Baseball: at D.C. United Teams To Be Announced 2:00 MSNBC Time and Again Arnouncsed 3:30 Burden Of Proof Angels at Red Sox 1:00 AMA Supercross 2:00 ABC 20/20 Sun Agair. 3:00 Headline News 2:00 MSNBC 4:00 Inside Politics 3:00 PGA Golf: 3:00 Major League Baseball: 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headlire News 3:30 Borden Hf Proof 300 Headline Nes 5:00 Showhiz Today Compaq Classic: New Hrleans Brerves at Padres 3:30 Burden Of Pr-of 3:30 Burden Of Proof 4:00 Inside Politics 3:30 Burden Of Proof 5:30 NBC Nightly News Entergy See Primetime table 4:00 rnrs. Politics 4:00 Inide Politics 5:00 Showbie Today ide Politics See Primetime t.ble 5:00 NASCAR Craftsnan 12:00 George Michel Strrts 5:00 Showbiz Today 5:00 Stwb'iz Today 5:30 NBC Nigtly Neon 9:00 howhie Tody 12:00 Headline News Traks Meachine 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:30 NBC Nightly News See Primetime table 9 530 NBC Nightly Nerv 12:30 ESPNews Memphis 200 130 0 Hedline News See Prinetime table See Prinetime table 12:00 Head ise New' See Primetime table 1:00 ABC Nightline See Primetime table 1:00 ABC Tthis Week 12 00 Hs.'rdlsne News 12:30 ESPNews 12:30 ESPNews I:00 Headline Ns 1:30 Herd2ive News 12:00 Headline News 2:00 ABC PGA Golf: (T) 12:30 ESPNews 1:0) ABC Nightline 1:00 ABC Nightiline 12 30 ESPNews 2:00 FDA Golf: (T) 12:30 ESPNews Compac Classic: Energy I:00 ABC Nightine 1:30 Heradire News t:30 Head ine News I:00 ABC Nightlise Compaq Classic 1:00 Washingtos Week In (Fines Round) I:30 Headline News 2:00' NBA Playoffs: (T) 2:00 NBA Payoffs: (T) 1:30 Headline News (2nd Round) Review 5:00 Sptrtscenter 2:00 NBA Playoffs (T) Teas To Be Annonice Teams To Be Anounced 2:00 NH LPlayrffs: (T) 4:00 Basketheat: IT) 1:30 Wall Street Journal Teeram 'I Be Announced 4:30 ESFNews 5:00 Sportscenter Teos T a An n'' Harlem Glohetrottesr' Report 5:00 Sporiscetier 5:00 Sportscenter 00 cp vs College Alt-SIrs 2:00 NHL Playoffs: (T) Teams To Be Ans ouncs.e. 5:00 Spsorscennter 7:00 Homicide: Life on the 8:00 Rasputin (TV-PG) 6:00 NatI. Geographic 6:00 New Detectives 6:00 Acient Mtysteries 6:00 Vie Inst:The 10,000 A BiograThy: Streets 10:00 The View Speciers 7:00 ER 7:00 Gun Dy ArVil 8:00 Housesiuter (TV-PG) 1:00 Better Homes & Gardens 7:00 Thre Field Afar 8:00 The Harder They Fall 8:00 Laura Lansig Slept 7:00 Melrose Place 7:00 XFiirs tO:00 Doug 11:30 Home Matters 7:30 The Jy Luck Club (TV(TV-PG) Here (TV-PG) 8 00 Twins (TV-PG) 8:00 Everybodys Baby: 10:30 Rugrats 12:00 Grace Under Fire PG) 10:00 Doug 10:00 Doug t0:Oh DOug The Rescue of Jessica 1 I:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 12:30 Elen 10:00 Worship for Kids 10:30 Rugcats 10:30 Rigras t0:3 0 Rugrats H000 Do'g 1 :00 Cats And Dogs 1:00 34th Annual Academy 10:30 On Meain Street 11:00 Simpsns 11:00 Simlsons 1 :00 Simesons 10:30 Rgs 3:100 Homicide: Life an the of Coutry Music 11:00 700 Club 11:310 Home Improeuent 11:30 Homnne Improvement I :30 Homres Improvement 1:00 sin s Streets Awards 11:30 Real Videos I2:00 Sere Trek: Deep Space 9 12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 12:00 Slur Trek' Deep Space 9 H 4:00 Housesiter (TV-PG) 4:00 Rasputio (TV-PG) 12:00 7th Heaven 1:00 CBS: W Were There 1:00 Anmazing Machines 1 00 The Assato 2:00 Star Trek: Deep spa" See Primetime table See Primetime table 1:00 Road to Avonlea 2:00 New Detecuices 2:00 Ancient Mysteries 200 Vieram :The 10,000 9 12 00 Rasputin (TV-PG) 2:00 Worship for Kids 2:00 Naill. Geographic 3:00 ER 3:00 Gn Day War 00 2:00 The View 2:30 Dv Main Street Specials 4:00 The Harder Thecy Fall 4:00 Lanra Lynsieng Slept 3:00 Mseross PL-s 2:00 A&E Biography. 3:00 Better Homes & Gardens 3:00 700 Club 3:00 The Field Afer (TV-PG) Here (TV-PG) 4 00 Twins (I V-PG) Pencho Villa 3:30 Hame Matters 3:30 Real Videos 3:30 The Joy Luck Club (TVSee Primetime tlte See Primetime table Set Primetiume table 3 00 XFils 4:00 Grace Under Fire 4:00 7th Heaven PD) I2:00 Leua Lansing Slept 12:00 Twins (TV-PG) 12 00 Everybody s Baby: 4.00 Ererybdy's nlby: 4:30 Ellen 5:00 Road to AonIea See Primetime table Here (TV-PG) 2:00 Doug Thhe Rscse oh Jesia Te Rescu, of tessica 5:00 34th Annual Academy 12:00 Te Harder They Fall 2:00 Doug 2:30 Ragrals 2,00 Doug See Printetinme tatle f Cuontry Music (TV-PG) 2:30 Rugrets 3:00 SiTsons 2:30 Ragerais 12 00 Tin Saldier Awards 2:00 Doug 3:00 Simpscns 3:30 Honme Iprovement 3 00 Simpsons 2 01 Doug 2:30 Rugrats 3:30 Home Improvewent 4:00 Ster Trek. Deep Spece 9 3:30 Honmnse Iov1es.meni O3 Rugeras 3:00 SimPsons 4:00 Sear Trek: Deep Space 9 5:00 Tre Asiators 4:00 Sar Tek Deep Space 9 3 00 Simpsns 3:30 Home uprovement (TV-PD) 5:00 Undestanding 130 H rt Impr.em. 4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 5:00 Amazing Machines 4 00 Sr Tek: Heels space 5:00 CBS: We Were There 9 5 00 Ameica Ex erierce: Here

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NNews:3T 33 Laue T h u r. 1 4 & 6 3 1ad il o N ,day F ie o d s W rk ing pra;;; r Mh O: ;; E R I L ih; ;, ;'w11 13 AOBC W;r d CBS 15 & 64 N -ws 1 Evening NSA PTy1-1 : Toams 1:10; Anounoed NSA Ply;:lfs: Team;;s; o A An :aned T ; nig hl NA 16 & 65 Do g Rugrais Simp;o s r: vemSia; Took Deep 5;;-' 5 A rican Espeou;;;;: Si;gr:phy C;;i Pow;'o H;micidl: Li 'e n Str;cs SCN Prime Time Movies & Specials SCN Weeken Sports 8~~~~~~~ ~ ~ & 0Bsc T ,da '-' 1L1 MOTHER. After two failed marriages, a science fiction writer decides coming to NABsebl lyfs :. NBA Bas1Pa) PSyINs N, 35Sterms with his mom will improve hs chances for a successful relationship, so he moves in with his mom. (Comedy, 1996, TV-PG) 8 pm. Sunday.a 1am. Sunday Playoff Tpleheader Cable 14 MEN IN BLACK. Agent K is a member of an organization that has been keeping track of extra-terrestrial aliens on earth for over 40 years. 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But as a host he can not be seen or heard by the living, and so he tries to communicate with Molly through Oda Mae Brown, a psychic who didn't even realize that her NLEuoe S8p.m Saturday Berlin Thunder vs Amsterdam Admirals Cable 15 19wers wer p.Tea. aneDrm,99,T-G :3a.Strdy

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Tropic Classified Ads B8May7,1 19 9sC qsfe d 95 Volvo 940, 4 dr, AT, LM, Sega Genesis, Sony color TV, BR wall shelves, rug, ceiling sunroof, silver leather int, 232-5997 fans, AC, patio furniture, 232Duty-free merchandise loaded $16,000, 210-1522 Smith Corona electric type6498 FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) -As a reminder, in 96 Ford Taurus, dty pd $9500, writer, like new, 232-6026 Bunk beds $300, entertainaccordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern CoM276-6336 Smith Corona portable typement center $200, dresser $50, mand regulations, duty-free merchandise, whether new or used, 96 Honda Accord, 4 dr, AT, writer $25, 288-5474 cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege holdAC, am/fm cass, exc cond Bunk bed f/s7 oto, twin $13,800, 284-5039 Sony 8mm Handy Cam, CCDBunk bedts f/sz boo, twin7 ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecuF 500 w/hard side case $350/ rug $25, 288-6376 tion under both military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes percanger oade $1500 284 oni 2 etanl4 Captain twin bed $150, patio unde military Pana ania set500 684 pc $10 288-7297i missible to sell an item, but only If Panamanian taxes are paid. Before 6619 ek ro$n3000 2722rum27 ly m asg t t ba $ such a sale, It Is strongly recommended that the seller contact the 97 Mazda 323F, dty pd $8500, ..l. .Ceiling fans, reclining chair, Contraband Control Section for advice at 288-5814. 233-0074 "'x.,oscillsoe $1d g -draw curtain, 263-2390 Access to installations is allowed for ID card holders & pass holders 97 Nissan Sentra, Kenwood obo, 272-2227 lv msg Chest frzr, chest 8 drawer, gas only. All guests must be signed on by ID card holders. stereo, CD changer, exc cond, VCR Panasonic, 4 head $45 grill, 230-2384 El acceso a las instalaciones militares solamente le esti permitido dty pd $8000/obo, 260-6179 285-4093 China cab $500, computer a las personas con tarjetas de identidad personal del Gobierno de los 98 Mitsubishi Lancer, 5 spd, Yamaha Pacifica quitar elec, stand $55, computer desk/work spoiler, tint, exc cond, dty pd crt'2 mp$5,27 station $600, 2 drawer file cab EEUU y el personal con pases de acceso a las instalaciones. Todos los $9800, 3c11 crate 12w amp $250, 217 $1ation600, 2 dra invitados deben ser firmados a la entrada de las instalaciones por una 1931 C36n551 193n w100 272-654 Zenih clorconsle V $50, Chinese screen, wall to wall persona con tarjeta de identidad personal de los EEUU. C Zenith r console TV $250, carpets, vertical mini blinds, 288-7234 .232-5997 AMOK6 II, 300 MHz, 40X 32 Ho seol Coffee tbl, end tbls $200, A 18 / Tn-hull, open bow, 115 86 Toyota Cressida, AT, AC, Ram, 56K, 3.2 GB, 3D sound, kitchen tile tbl for 7 $150, gray HP, trailer, many extras $4500, alarm, sunroof, dty pd $4500/ AGP 8 MB, 14" mon $750, 9 x 12 rug $10, 272-2028 Cocker Spaniel, 1 pup, 2 adult 288-5809 obo, 614-0159 231-1915 1.2' GE micro, turntbl $80, DR set, seats 8, French Provinwi/kennels, 284-6124 21' FG boat, 351 eng w/trailer 87 Honda, dty pd $2550, 264AST 486DX2, 66 MHz, 36 MB, 260-1642 cial w/china cab & buffet Cocker-poo, wht & tan, fem, $4000, 612-2069 8050 3GIG,CD-ROM,modem,spkrs, 10,000, 13,000, 18,000 AC's, $3500, 272-1182 spayed, grt w/kids, free, 22321' Wellcraft, 200 HP Mariner, 87 Nissan Lancer, AT, AC, keyboard, mouse, Win 95, Of272-2028 -DR set, bi w/8 chairs, china 0441 kicker, many extras, exc cond, loaded, dty pd $3800, 272fice 97 Pro, IE 4.01 & Epson 14" Upright frzr $200/obo, 272cab, wood carved $500, 272dty pd $19,000/obo, 272-5642 2621 Stylus 300 ink jet printer w/7 Husky German shepherd, mix, cartridges $550/all, 250-00696553 14 mos, free, 284-6050 24' fbra, 1/O Volvo, sleeps 4, 87 Toyota Corona, AC, AT, 4 i15' Admiral refrig $3/obo, DR tbl w/4 chairs $150, 284built in frzr & more $8900/obo, .dr, dty pd $3000/obo, 277AST P5, 150 MHz, 8X, 33.6K, 272-6845 6127 Pekinese, 1 yr, shots $150/ 272-2227 7585 16 Ram, 1 GIG HD, sound/ obo, 261-0971 video, 14' mon $475, 23116.5' frzr, bkcase, headboard, DR tbl w/4 chairs $225, desk Pit Bull,8 HP motor $800, 284-6127 87 Toyota, AC, right hand 1915 f/sz mirrored headboard,.night $60, bkshelf $25, mini blinds papers, 1 mos, 230-0663 after 9' inflatable boat w/wooden 224-7284 Computer games, IBM, CDstands, 315-0653 $5, 288-4597 6 pm floor, 5 HP Nissan O/B motor, ROM, Warcraft 11, Fallout & 18,000 & 12,000 AC, Desk $60, DR tbt w/4 chairs & leaf $400, like new $1600, 225-1375 86 Chysier sta/wag, 4 dr, 4 cyl, more $10/ea, 288-5953 Hot Point dryer $125, 232sofa & Ivseat, multi-colored Yellow cockatiel in/cage $50, -AT, AC, rebuilt $1600, 61571 $0,2847 272-2028 97 16' Orlando Clipper, 70 HP 2613 Computer programs Win 95, 7016 '$600, 288-4572 Evinrude, power trim, tilt lake -works, quicken 98, money 97, 18,000 & 6000 AC, refrig, Lafter DR tbI w/4 chairs, Q/sz matt w/ $4500, 272-1170 88 Ford Escort, 5 spd, exc cond educational & more, 284-6975 LR set, BR set, rattan sofa pabox spring, 284-5720 A bKnee bardwavb ,$1500, 285-4093 Computrade 486/33 computer -Io set, 236-8872 DR tbi w/6 chairs & 2 leaves All occasion cakes, prof 272-6829 88 Mitsubishi Lancer, PW, AC, $200, 284-6895 18,000 AC $75, 10,000 AC $175, beige carpet, curtains, coraton 2aksrnotce 284Lg canoe w/trailer, 272-1096 mdty pd $3500/obo, 232 $50 2 dehumidifiers, exc cond 272-6162 7028 _________ Epson LO 1070, wide, car-$54,2-97 6608 Mary Military type utility trailer w/ 88 Toyota Corolla F 2 dr, 'iage printer $185, 269-6728 DR tbl w/6 chairs & china cab, Awesome cakes, giant cinnamounted spare, new tires, paint 18000 Westinghouse AC cherry $3500, 272-2671 won rolls, banana bread, 284& bearings $600, 272-2656 AT, AC, looks & runs gd, dty pd IBM computer & printer $200, $290, 6000 Whirlpool AC m8nos $3500, 259-9809 272-2947 $125, 272-6210 Dr tbl w/6 chairs, chrome & 3798 Erica Sailboat trailer, boats to 30', 88 Volvo 240 DL Wagon, 5 Macintosh 14" RGB mon $40, 18000 Whirlpool AC $175 glass $250, 264-9676 Baby-sitter, anytime, wkdays, grt shipping cradle $1250, spd, AC, now tires, g cond Style writer 11 printer $40, 265' Bali blinds $20, 272-5792 Dresser w/mirror $150, 272wknight & wkends, 288-7394 232-5996 $4200, 272-2618 5691 -5642 Sandra Trailer for sin boat or jet skis, 89 Ford Escort, wht, 5 spd, gd Packard Bell, 100 MHz, 80 MB 18GE refrig $275/obo, 272Dresser, K/sz sofa, f/sz bed Baby-sitter, available, houseall galvanized, new wheels, condo $1500, 260-1642 Ram, 8.4 GIG HD, 4X CD2915fame, DR b w/6 chairs, awn keeper $150, 266-4348 call exc condo $450, 272-2121 ROM, modem, 17" mon, spkrs 18' upright frzr $175, wrought chairs, girls student desk, patio 5:30 pm Felicia Water skis $40, 272-6829 89 Ford Tempo, 4 dr $2000/ $550, 264-9440 iron patio tbi w/4 chairs $350, furniture, 230-2384' obo, 284-5578 iv msg 2224 Baby-sitter, dependable, rePentium, 266 MHz, 100 MHz 272-2947 Dryer $125, 272-7400 sponsible, housework, wkdays 89 Ford Tempo, many extras, Bus, computer, Mid ATX case 18' Whirlpool frzr $350, 15' GE Dryer $200, 272-2947 & wkends, available w/ref, 290exc car $2300/obo, 272Sony, 15" Multi scan mon, refrig $285, 272-6210 0595 Carmon 287290 Jeep Cherokee Chief, Canon BJC-620 printer w/mulEntertainment center $250, 31 Ford Model A, extra parts, loaded, gd cond $7000, 272timedia acce $1100, 2882 beige 9 x 15 carpets $40/es, sofa $200, 2 armchairs $75/ Doughnuts, jelly filled & reguruns $5000/obo, 272-2227 Iv 2121 6574 284-5131 eas, 272-6553 lar, 284-3798 Erica s2 ltaDR&mr,64 msg 89 Ford Tempo, standard shift, Scantron & software $1100, LR teak DR & more, 264Entertainment center $75, reMaid, boiling, reliable, f/p time, 65 Ford Mustang, 3 spd, am/ 4 dr, AC, am/fm cass $1500/ 265-6394 9440 liner $100, 284-5833 exc w/children & pets, 284fm cass radio, exc cond $4200/ obo, 227-8005 2 night stands, brass lam 3198 ob,2469Scantron computerized test desr dco, laP, Entertainment center, K/sz Min obo, 284-6297 90 Chevy Corsica, V-6, AT, grading system picard reader, dresser, gd cond, 284-4620 bed, 232-5997 Maid, Engde endablr wks, 79 Chevy Caprice, 350 V-8, AC, am/fm cass $2500, 288computer, printer & software 2 sets f/sz matt & box springs Executive desk & chair $500 4ns ,, aut, nw supon0, du288x-7177 $1800, 265-6394 $100/set, 72-2621 272-2241 4970 haust, dty pd $750/obo, 28890 Hyundai Excell, AT, LM, 2 x 4 Karastan foyer rug, like bedboxsp Maid, Eng spking, hard work7131 dty pd $3200, 259-9809 x new $125, 269-324 F/sz bed box springs & watt, ing, grt cook, exc w/kids & pets, 80 Chevy Malibu Coupe, V-6 90 Volvo new $ 25, 269-3254 stereo, micro, 288-5591 honest, reliable, 284-3538 2 dr, runs gd, dty pd $1200, 9e Volvo GL, 4 dr, PW, AC, AT, 21' GE upright frzr $400, 272F/sz bed w/ighted headboard Maid,d w/htch, exc con $5500, Crown TV w/remote $160, 6273 after 5 pm $150, 284-6605 keeper, live-in/out, Mon-Wed81 Cadillac, AC, 4 dr, brin, 2 22' refrig side-by-side w/ice F/sz bed w/matt & box spring, Frin, ivend on-Wd81 adil, AxCnd$0 91 Geo Storm GSI, AC, LM, 5 25" Zenith console TV, 272maker $950, micro $55, refrig 288-6228 Fri, honest, dependable, gd w/ leather, dsi, exc condo $5 00 spd, stereo, new tires, gd cond, 6393 $55, 232-7028 kids, 266-5164 226-0856 260-4094 GE dishwasher, 272-6393 Maid, housekeeper & child 81 Dodge Ram Van, V-6, new 9 27" Sony TV, RCA, VCR, 28423.7' side-by-side refrig/rzr, Ewasher, G care, live-in/out w/ref, 284tires, dty d $1400, 232-7016 91 Mustang 5.0, AT, M $4000, 5720 GE, 272-6277 GE washer, new $500, GE refrig 4791 ty p 263-3789 ..__$900, Whirlpool trzr $600, 2324791 263-s78n 2 Z spA31" Sanyo TV w/remote $450, 23' side-by-side GE refrig 7164 Maid, live-in/out, Mon-Fri, de83 t 280 ZX, 5 spd, AC 92 Ford Tempo GL, PS, PB, 260-1642 $650, GE stove $400, piano pendabe, gd in/kids, ret, 228I-op, am/m CAC, 5 spd, am/fm cass $3500/ $1200 288-5376 Glass & chrome coffee Ib, sofa, 2836 Nedy obo, 284-6297 neg, 232-7130 Amp, turntable, tape deck & $ 28Ivseat, piano, Chinese care 83 Oldsmobile Cutlass Sumore, 233-0074 24' Whirlpool refrig, exc cond us, 232eeat honest, reliable, gd i/kids, 288preme, gd condo $1300/neg, $5500, 272-2078 Audio technical VHF, wireless, $700/obo, 232-7051 dryer like new $200, 6728 , g 284-3693 headworn, mic system, new 3 pc LR set $800, Lazy Boy 2 P4,ke 0 672884 Buick Centur 4 dr $1500/ 92 Nissan Altima, AT, AC, dty $295/neg, 268-4732 recliner $150, 8' wall unit w/ Never shave again! Body sugobo, 284-5578 Iv msg pd $6800/obo, 614-0159desk $300, 272-2723 Household items, everything, aring the natural metho of -Bs pr60$2,27542260-2427 harngthenauralmethod bo, 92 Nissan Atima, LM CD player, 5 pack $125 2723 pc sofa sectional, off wht d n d ne 5obo, 236-6295 alter 5 P $600, 232-6490 Household items, Furniture, Pick up to move misc items all 288-7114 92 Pontiac Sunbird SE Coupe, -67 3 pc wall unit $150, futon sofa, refrig, stove, BR set & more, posts, 261-6694 V-6, AC, am/fm cass, 284-4596 DJ equip set, dbl CD player, Q/sz $125, 288-4422 270-1018 Power window dr lock repair, 84 Toyota Corona, AC, needs 1200w amp, 6 channel, board, Hutch, Ig tbl w/chairs $550, P2-47 n d p body work, runs gd $1500, 27092 Toyota Corona, AT, AC, light, microphone, 8 plug, p/ 4 AC $100, 272-5642 cream sofa & Ivseat $550/both 222-4972_1016 stereo, dty pd $4900, 260-8252 source & light tubes $1500/ 4 x 6 ivory Spanish wool rug, $1000, 232-5996 Translation authorized, Span/ 85 Mercedes Benz 280 SE, 93 Mazda 626, 4 dr, blue, LM, obo, 284-6297 like new $75, 269-3254 Ksz bed coffee tbl, 288-4275 Eng or viceversa, 251-0158 tM, gd cond $7000, 272-5792 loaded, dty pd $7000/obo, Electric portable typewriter 50' commercial stainless steel t Upholstery curtains & interior 85 Nissan Sentra, motor re272-1226 $10, 262-1251 _ fricornmr0ia2s2nsss1 K/sz BR set, water bed hutch, decoration, 261-6694 built, gd cond $2200, 288272122 $80,ur 262-125 refrigo $2000, 27-12 dresser, mirrored headboard, Usborneos, E1cat4i bul gd ndMercuryTopaz $3000/obo, Fax machine $75, 272-5642 6 pc LR set $650, 12 pc DR set lamps, bksheive, gd cond $700, 226-6474Eafter-73p Fender Rhodes elec piano $650, 10' refrig $195, 272284-4620 Award Winning, 288-7319 85 Pontiac, 4 dr, FL, AC, runs 93 Mitsubishi Diamante, model 73 $350/obo, 272-5083 6239 K/sz water bed $500, 272-2241 exc $1800, 285-4093 loaded, exc cond, 264-9440 B Mini stereo, 223-2153 after 6 8 pc sectional sofa, needs reKids dresser $60, kids chest of 85 Porsche 944, 5 spd, red, 94 C280 Mercedes Benz, 4 dr pm upholstered, 284-6252 drawers $60, 226-4090 exc cond, dty pd $6900, 288Sedan, exc cond $25,000, 27214' FG boat, 14 HP O/B w/ 6574 2080 Multi-meter fluke 27, exc cond 9 x 12 carpets, dishwasher, Kitchen tbl w/2 chairs, 232trailer $1500, 612-2069 85 Subaru 1800, 5 spd, 2 dr, 94 Chevy Lumina, V-6, AT, $ --59 5997 16' canoe w/paddles $150, AC, RC, gd cond, dty pd $1800, AC, gray, dty pd $6000, 260Panasonic elec typewriter $50, Bali blinds 75x50 taupe, 4 Kitchen tbi w/4 chairs $75, 284-4530 262-5843 5675 284-6252 $20, 272-2979 corner sectional sofa w/2 re16' Tri-hull, center console, 85 Toyota Camry, 4 dr, AT, 94 Ford Escort wag, AC, exc RCA 21" color TV $550, 288Bamboo DR set, micro, 223diners $100, TV/VCR stand 60 HP Mariner $5000/obo, AC, am/tm radio, new tires & cond $6500/obo, 288-5196 7194 2153 after 6 pm $20, 288-5924 272-5642 batt, runs grt $2900/obo, 22394 Toyota Corolla S/W, AT, Samsung stereo, 230-2384 shelves $45, teak tbl $249, Kitchen/BR curtains w/Kirsh 3265 9n4ro rTokor, Corolla $11, bras Samdn 232-59970238 17' tracker bass boat, deep V, AC, LM, air bags $8750, 260Sega games $5, 288-7036 interior rocker, leather $110, brass rod, 232-5997 75 HP O/B Mercury, exd condo 85 VW Golf, 5 spd, 2 dr, AC, 2693 264-9228 Lg sectional sofa w/f/sz sleeper, d-Sega Genesis 11/0 games BR furniture, dr chest, dresser, 2 recliners, gd cond $500, 284$6500, 285-4381 Pioneer stereo $2000, 28894 Toyota Cressida, dty pd $100, 284-6895W headboar, bkcae, 2rnight,4620e ater 6 pm -77, 7292 $50 7-36headboard, bkcase, 2 night 4620 after 6 pmi 18' fiberglass pangs "Argos", 79 $5500, 276-6336 95 b pn Sega Genesis /extras $40, b, gd condo $1500, 272-266 LR set, sofa, lvseat, 4 tbls rocket trailer, 40 HP Evinrude, 86 Chysler 5th Avenue $4700/ 95 BMW 318i, LM, alarm $1R/ gset sofa n15est 472bi5 loaded, new, dty pd $7500, obo, 236-4756 $18,900, 288-6826 games $10/ea Suer nes BR Q/sz $300, stove gas $225, $1400, 272-1182 236-6987 86 Mazda 323 LX, AC, 5 spd, 236-5511 --_ LR sofa, Ivseat, pastel colored, sunroof $2200/nbo, 284-6297 gd cond $300/set, 288-5137

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_ L Tropic Times Classified Ads May7,1999 B9 L-shaped sofa sectional w/re4 -13" steel rims from 95 Toyota diner & hide away bed $800, Corolla $50, 272-2314 Sm desk $25, baby bike seat p i d k 93 Ford Explorer, 4 dr Eddie 288-7234 $10, 284-5820 Baver $13,000, 213-8272 4" suspension for 86 -95 213 Magic Chef micro W/cab $200, Toyota pickup, 4Runner, pro Step 2 swing set $250/obo, 2 boy's bikes, new $50/ea, 27278 Ford E-100 Eco-line cargo 93 Jeep Grand Cherokee limtwin matt & box spring $60, comp w/shocks, new $800, 236Little Tykes sandbox $35/obo, 2671 van, 1/, ton, 6 cyl, AT, PS, PB, ited, loaded, LM $14,000, 272262-1251 6987 carseat $35/obo, 232-7265 trailer hitch, cargo rack, dity pd 1224 Aerobic instructor equip, 268Micro cart w/3 shelves, 2326 x 6 x6 walk in cage $50, 12' Storage shed $300, plants, 4732 $1850/obo, 288-4177 93 Toyota 4Runner, AT, AC, 6085 alum antenna mast $15, 272Bali blinds 70 x 90 $100, car80 Ford E-150 van, 4.9'L, 6 cyl, PS, PB, 4 x 2, Kenwood stereo, Oriental ksz247 peting, 232-7053 Aguashot II underwater camAT AC, PS, PB, LM, rebuilt exc cond $15,000/obo, 288tiea__k/sz hadbord $15,era, housing for disposal cam' '8 7292 teak dbl dresser wn/Ig mirror Air Force jacket 40R, 288-4572 Vacuum cleaner, TV & more, eras w/strobe & macro kit $150, eng $3500, 288-4493 $200, end ibls, 272-2676 Animal cage 24"x24"x36" $30, 288-4275 272-5642 83 GMC pickup, AC, 6 cyl, new 94 lsuzu, dty pd $12000, 264Ortopedic matt & box spring, 272-2671 Wagon $25/obo, 284-5578 Basketball hoop $95, 232eng, ext cab, 2 new tires $2200, 8050 twin & f/sz, recliner, bkshelves Babycrib wooden w/matt$150 Wall locker $60, 288-6376 7028 288-6470 94 Jeep Cherokee Country, & more, 230-2384 B4 d4PE, AC, am/fm cass & 229-0400 Wedding dress, wht, long train, Boy's 18" Schwinn bike $30,84 Dodge pick up, , 4 spd, .more $14,00s 4 $300, sofa, Ivseat $350, 2 BBQ gas grill $50, 284-4773 sz/6 $300/obo, 288-6376 272-2947 era top, $400/O,,84-:0a158 O/sz0 bed$20-le oa___________ runs grt $4000/obo, 284-4457 after 6 pm 4090 -Beach umbrella, ceiling fans, Wet-vac $50, 288-7297 Diving equip, regulator, 85 Mitsubishi Montero, 4 x 4, 94 Jeep Cherokee, AC, ABS, 272-2621 Winnie the Pooh mobile & ctoris, coputor packed, top AC, dty pd $3700, 315-0801 PS, PB, red, dty pd $9800, Q/sz bed frame, box springs, of line$950, 232-6422 288424 matt, exc cond $250, 284Beanie babies to gd home, Ig comforter set, teddy bear deco0, N2ss3n2P-6r42,24dr,272 4620 after 6 pm selection $8 -10, 288-5029 ration, toys & more, 263-2936 Fishing rod & reel $35, Penn 85 Nissan Patrol, 4 dr, 272Senator 4/0 special, 272-2979 6277 94 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, 5 Rattan sofa, lvseat, chair & tbl, Beer soda vending mach $350/ Wood desk, padder bar w/4 van, ty pd p, 6 cyl LM soft top, bikini china cab, buffet $600, bunk obo, 272-5083 stools $200, 262-1251 Golf clubs $50, 28-4993 o t top, class I hitch $10,500, beds___$3__0___272_ $4000/obo, 226-6474 after 7 285-4381 beds $300, 272-6829 BHS commemorative pen & Wrought iron baker's rack, Ig, Golf clubs Taurus, bubble pm Reclining sofa & Ivseat w/cofink drawings, 11 x 17 $10, set like new $110, 284-4620 after driver 46" $50, 265-8113 86 Colt Vista, 7 pass, AT, needs 4cy harn & n 4p hd tee & end tbi $800, deep chest of 10 6x8 notecards $15, 2886 pm Golf clubs Titliest 1, 3, 4 woods some work, dty pd $1900, 259$8500, 213-0414 frzr $350, 288-6498 7195 Zinc roof 15 x 20 $200/obo, & 3 -9 irons & bag $250, 2729809 6845 95 Jeep Wrangler, Rio Grande, Refrig, dishwasher, LR furniBooks, Cuisinart food proces272-5593 6845 86 lsuzu Trooper, 4 x 4, new 4 x 4, 5 spd, loaded, exe cond ture, DR chairs, computer sor & more, 236-8872 International fishing rods, 50's paint, tires, rebuilt motor $12,000/obo, 284-6659 desks, twin bed, 265-5691 Carport roof, Rubbermaid out& 80's flying gapps, 272-2078 $2500, 250-0311 96 Ford Aerostar XLT $13,500 Roll top desk w/marble counter side storage shelter, 232-5997 Kids bike $15/obo, 284-5578 87 Dodge Caravan, 4 cyl, AT, obo, 288-6376 top $600, 272-2379 Carport, security iron bars, 27291 Honda Nighthawk 250, dty Lg trampoline $150, 272-2028 PS, PB, AC, dty pd $3500, F Rustic log bunk beds $350, 1096 pd $1600/obo, 284-4970 26 84, 5 spd, LM $18,000, 23225.6' refrig $600, 272-2979 Century baby stroller $50, 264$75, 2387 Ford Bronco 11, 6 cyl, runs 6498 : ___7265 ________ well $2500, 284-6335 Sectional sofa, multi-colored 9676 PNikonos It underwater camera w 96 Ford Explorer XLT, 2 x 2, $800, roll top desk $550, 288Clothes, comforter set, 288w/2 35mm lenses & o ring kit, 87 Nissan Pathfinder, 2 dr, 6 exc cond, 288-4275 7194 6228 42A Altos De La Montana new cond $275, 272-2656 cyl, 4 a 4, new wheels & tires, Semi-circular sofa, like new -Tumba Muerto, 9 am lok-t$00 284-5820 96 Ford Explorer, XLT, 4 dr, $600, Oueen Anne sofa nlw Copper milk can, 272-6162 Nordic Ryder, 288-5591 FL, LM, exc cond $22,0001 $60 Qen ne oa-b 46A Howard 87 Plymouth Voyager van LE, clbo, 260-3536 after 6 pmin $100, twin bed $100, 223Craftsman mechanic tool set Nordic track skier $175, 288gd cond $3000, 272-2671 1375 complete 2 tool chests $1100, Balboa 2317A Las Cruces 4422 A 97 Isuz Trooper LS, AT, 4 x 4, 269-6728 88 Ford Bronco 11, AT, AC PM, LM, hunter green, Sofa & Ivseat, blk $130, 2888Balboa 2422, 5:30 -8:30 am Outburst aggressive, 4 faraway $4300, 315-0801 -x cond $21,000, 264-8768 7332 Day runner agenda w/binder & Cardenas 7250 B driver $50, 58 degree wedge 88 Mitsubishi Montero, blue, 4 Jeep Daihatsu, 4 a 4, 5 spd, Sofa & Ivseat, exc cond $1000, extra pages, new $60, 284$20, 3 wood metal $30, 265dr, loaded, exc cond $5500, PE, LM, AC, stereo, exc cond Ig chair & ottoman, exc cond 6316 Cardenas 7273A 8113 272-6079 $3900, 264-9228 $300, 284-6539 Dbl jogging stroller wi/nylon Cardenas 7304A Roller blades, men's sz/11, grt Sofa hide-a-bed, Q/sz $250, f/ sun4canopy, ike new, 288Clayton 4636, 7 -11 am cond $25, 284-4620 6 pm loaded, runs ec $4750/obo, paint, am/fim, exc car $3900, length mirror $5, 288-547m Clayton 4726, 7 am Scuba dive computer by Oce284-6050 264-9228 Sofa rattan trim $275, dinette De Walt hvy dty %" hammer 11 aic Data Max in 3 gage con90 GMC Jimmy S-16, V-6, 4 x set w/4 chairs $150, rugs $75, drill $160, 272-2671 Clayton 69, 7 -1 am sole w/pressue gage & com4, AT, AC, dty pd $5550, 232girl's desk $150, tbis $75, 213Drafting tbL $50, Oriental lamps Clayton 689C, 7 -9 am p 7053 8825 $50/ea, fishing rods $25/ea, Clayton 6B, 6 -10 am Scuba dive computer by Oce90 Isuzu Trooper, 4 x 4, 6 cy1, 205/75R15 tire 260-9976 Split Panasonic AC, 48,000 272-2676 Clayton 83 anic Prodigy in console w/pres5 spd, AC, am/fm cass $7500/ TU $875, 265-8113 Encyclopedia Brita m -sure gage & compass $400' obo, 236-8872 Coin collector interested in acleda Banoak, Clayton 853A, 7 am -noon 236-6302 quiring Army organizational Tbl w/6 chairs $250, 18,000 plete inall yea b 91 Jeep Wrangler, 4 x 4, 5 spd, coins, 225-8159 Danny AC $500, Q/sz BR set $100, children's books, 54 great books Clayton 856B, 6 -10 am Scuba regulator by scuba pro, CD PS PB, LM, 33" tires, exc 288-5083 $500,Clayton 1055 Butra light $500, 236-6302 cond $8500, 284-4056 Few dog, for young girl, free, Tbls, chairs, lamps, sofas, b Gas tank for grill, treadmill, Scuba regulator by US divers 92 Chevy Lmina van, 272-2620 to, Ig rol top de eds maids uniforms, 263-2936 Clayton 1173A w/conshelf octopus $280, 236P, CePW 7 ass,vgrt cond Gas BBQ, the bigger the betdresser, 612-2069 Half dollar coins, walking libCurundu 2148 7th St 6302 $8000, 284-3634 ter, 223-4170 Teak DR tbI w/8 chairs, glass erty 25/ea, 1917 -1936 in Diablo 5064A, -10 am Surfboard, Mountain bike, 23292 GMC Jimmy, 4 x 4, SL Gas clothes dryer, 272-2497 top w/lazy susan w/hutch $200, hitman coin folder $95, 226Diablo 5277 7 -11 am aspen, blue, V-6, AT, AC, ABS, Gd family for gri day maid, 260-6527 7450 Diablo_5277,_7_-_11_am -Wind surfing equip, 269-2756 loaded $8000, 265-3685 Span spking, honest, dependTeak entertainment center, 3 Hooked on Phonics educaDiablo 5755 B, 7 -11 am after 5 pm 92 Isuzu Rodeo, V6, 5 spd, AC, able, hard worker, ref, 272pc $500, 272-5642 tional program math & EnDiablo 5775B Women's 10 spd bike w/lock 4 x 4, CD, exc cond $9000, 2979 -glish, elementary to adult $75, $50 racqet_5, _84-636_rs.Bararapleaebincon Teak hope chest $200, 272288-5196 Howard 55 A, 7 am -noon $50, racquet ball racquet $5, 284-6636 Mrs. Barbara please be in con5642 inflatable ski bandit $25, 272 93 Chevy Lumina minivan, 7 tact w/us, sister MAF, 232-2072 Jogging stroller $100, 272Howard 55A, 6 am -noon 7400 pass, PW, PD, PS, PB, AC, LM, Panamanian antique china Twin bed $150, dresser $150, 6860 Saturday & Sunday Women's bike, golf clubs, 272luggage rack, dty pd $7500, cab w/curved glass, 272-2028 night stand $50, 9 x 12 rug, It Jogging stroller, girls clothes Howard 96A, 7 -11 am 2621 260-4411 blue $50, 272-2314 Sm generator, portable 100 21, 3t, exc cond, shoes, 263Howard 597, 6 am -noon Women's Schwinn 26" bike, 5 93 Chevy S-10, exc cond $600/ 2500 watts, 232-7039 Twin/sz matt & box springs, 2936 spd $150, 272-2947 bo, 284-5226 263-2936Howard 603A, 6 -11 am spdshoes, 272-2947 Ladies Argentinan blk leather 93 Ford Aerostar, gd cond Wall to wall carpet, 272-1096 jacket, lined, peak lapels, waist Marbella, Torres Del Pacifico, $6500, 272-6547 Washer & dryer $350, wall to length, sz/7 $300, 288-6326 torre B, Apto 16B wall carpet $150/obo, 14,000 Ladies Argentinan waist length Whirlpool AC $250, 272-6553 denim blue leather jacket, Washer & dryer, gd cond $300 lined w/short skirt, sz/7 $300/ & more, 233-0074 both, 288-6326 Waterbed w/headboard $100, Lamps, stepping stones,Ti e A d F r kitchen tbl w/4 chairs $175, 15' wrought iron bench,spa Tropic Tim es A d Form frzr $275, 272-5678 luggage, 232-5997 Wrlpoo7l 2dr refrigLg dog kennel $45, Little Tykes Note: Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available baSiS to military mem,2 r refrig, gd cond desk w/chair $25, 288-6829 bers, Civilian DoD employees, and employees of other goverment agencies. Ads will be acWhirlpool dehumidifier, 25 p1 Maternity clothes, crib, changCepted only for NON-COMMERCIAL services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immedicapacity w/drain hose $50, ng tbath tub, 4 in 1 stroller, ate family member. Suspected abuse of the ad services will results in non-publication of the 284-3893Med pet carrier $15, 260-8252 ad(s) in question, For more information, Call 285-4666/6612. Whirlpool refrig $350, 2725642 Minnie mouse dbl comforter, Deadline for submitting ads is 9 a.m. Monday. If Monday is a holiday, the deadline Wht 9 x 12 rug, new $80, diblanke dust r4-flesheets & is 1 p.m. the Friday before. nette w/4 swivel chairs $200, 272-2028 Neck traction $25, hammock Read instructions below, then completely fill out the ad form. Incomplete ads will Wood bar $500, 269-6728 chair $40, 264-92281ron & ironing board $75/both, 288-5474 not be published. Wood bkcase, 4 shelves, glass Patio enclosure for gateway Animals dr $75, oak b & 4 chairs $400, housing $60, ig pet cage $60, Available 284-6539 _________sm pet cage $10, 284-5077 El Available Wooden kitchen fbl w/4 chairs, Dave, alter 730 pm Boats & campers 232-6026 Patio plants, 232-6085 F Cars Plants big & sm, 272-2028 Computers Price Home Phone Porch swing $25, fish tanks, E1 Electronics + Check one category per ad form 100 LPs classical records $50, 272-2947 -Found 4 Two ads per person each week. Include home and duty phone. 272-5792 Potted plants, ficus trees $5Hou-sehold 15-word limit (the staff may edit to conserve space). 2 basket hampers $5/e_, brass 4_, 27 _62 Ads must be re-submitted each week. tone shelves $8, 288-5474 Shelf for kids toys, TV $125/ Lost We will NOT take ads by phone or iax (Atlantic residents may fax ads). 2 wood video shelves, holds bo, 28-6376 Misceltraneous Ads offering exotic animals, weapons or real estate will Not be run. 50 VHS tapes, gd cond $60, Shower curtain, b bath towe-s, M' rcc-Ads offering, lods, hair care or translation will Not be run without a copy 284-4620 after 6 pmF3 ha towel, 8 --h cloth uf licenses to os-iti ,n post/base. L -ath rral eug hlc$uSC 284Vs-i i a it 'soflcnetooirtonptas 25 ga) fist tank w/gravel $30, 39b $ -Mail ads ic: Tropic Tmes Unit 7145, AP0 AA 34004 or deposit thrn in Toro lawenmwer, auto pro-the drop box at the Clayton Post Office. polled $250, trailer hitch a/'2 Siivi rir, n cnver ( Sp tl gOtds -iformation below Is not included in ihe ad, but is required for publication. ball, 272-2947 eager 0 ser e 226Sposo'sName 4-205x15 tires w/rims, 5 hoies, 7450 -Sponsor's new $300, 232-7028 -Singer swing mae, dual t Organization DutyPhone voltage $200/254-6252

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B10 May 1999Commuty Community briefs Pre-Teen Jam your current CCAF standing. Just a Free child care The Howard Youth Center is reminder, the Education Office will Air Force staff sergeants and beholding a Pre-Teen Jam for chilbe relocating to Building 707 May low can receive up to 20 free hours dren 9 -12 years old 7 -10:30 p.m. 15 and is scheduled to close July of childcare when they are within today. Cost is $2.50 with activity 31 For more information call Lisa 90 days of PCS departure from card and $3.50 without activity Poland at 284-3263/4863/3264. Howard Air Force Base. The Child Tickling stress before it tackles you card. There will also be a School's Development Center will provide The Directorate of Community Activities, ACS Family AdvoOut Pre-Teen Jam 7:30 p.m. -training services. Members should bring orcacy Program invites you to participate in a two-hour workshop midnight May 21which will be free The American Red Cross is ofders to the Family Support Center on Humor and Stress Management. Classes being 9 -11 asm. and of charge. For more information, fering the following courses for the to receive a certificate. 1 -3 p.m. Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center and 9:30 call 284-4700/5615. month of May. May 18 -20 Com11:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Clayton munity First Aid and Safety (EnParent support Theater. There will also be another NAF Sales glish) May 22 Spanish. May 29 The New Parent Support Proclass Wednesday, 1:30 -3:30 p.m. at The Auto Skill Center is holding ardipulmonary Resuscitation for gram is located at ACS Building the Howard Theater. a NAF sale 9 a.m. -noon Saturday Professional Rescuer. You can sign 155 on Fort Clayton. Monthly This program is designed to be fun, at the Auto Skills Center Building up and pay for classes in Room classes available include Breast but not for fun. In a supportive, laughter 722 on Howard. The Howard 344, Building 519, Fort Clayton. Feeding (Spanish and English), filled, relaxing yet productive environ0' Club is also conducting a sale 8 For more information, call 288Parenting and Infant Care. There ment, you will experience and learn a.m. -noon May 15 at Building 5509/5647. are also support group meetings. practical ways to use humor and 113. Items for sale include; tables, F ho For more information, call Nelida other skills to manage stress in chairs, bar stools, table clothes and Family Support ours Holnes at 288-4921/5307. your life, family, work and orgamore. The Family Support Center has nization. new hours of operation. They are Clayton Library Dr. Joel Goodman, psychologist and director of the Human Semi-formal dance now open Monday through Friday The Clayton Library has a Project is a popular speaker, consultant and workshop leader Join the West Bank Teen Center from 8 to 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 to 4 home page on the World Wide Web throughout the U.S and aboard. His presentations, publications for "The Final Crossing" semi-forp.m. They will be closed from listing hours, resources and serand media appearances on the positive power of humor and cremal dance 6 p.m. -I a.m. Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for lunch. vices. Also included are guides to ativity have touched and tickled the lives of millions throughout at the Tropic Breeze Club. Cost is For more information call the cenusing the library. There are photo the world. $5 per ticket and tickets will only ter at 284-5010. albums and an e-mail address for Author of nine books, hundreds of articles and several colbe sold until today. Social hour is 6 feedback, comments and even refumns, Joel is presently co-authoring Chicken Soup for the Laughbesod niltoa. ocalhuris6 Summer registration .edak omnsadee e ing Soul with Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen. -7 p.m., dinner 7 -8 p.m. and the erence questions. The address is: .k. dance is 8 p.m. -I a.m. This is for Howard's Summer Program for http://www.army.mil/usarso/libr/ He was featured three times on an ABC News prime-time speteens ages 13 -18 and a photogra3 -5 year-olds registration begins claytonm/. cial with John Stossel on the "Mystery of Happmess. pher will be present. No jeans or TMay 17 at the Child Family members are welcome to attend. For more shirts and dresses must be at least Developement Center. To register, Foster Care information, call Majorie Arias at 288-5073. fingertip length. For more informabring shot records and a Leave and The Family Advocacy Program tion, call 284-4700/5615. Earnings Statement. Spaces are limwelcomes participants interested in Kennels for sale cited. For more information, call becoming Certified Foster Care ParThe Corozal PX has airline approved kennels in all FSU Commencement 284-3711/6235. ents. The program provides trainsizes to keep pets safe during flight. The approximate The Florida State University Volunteer register ing that enables you to gain reweights of the kennels are listed below as a convePanama Canal Branch cordially in.warding experiences. Earn some exnience in figuring total weight for pets and kennels t vites you to its 1998-99 CoinVolunteers and volunteer coordItra money while in your home and meet airline restrictions: mencement Ceremony 10 a.m. Satnators should ensure that all volun"open your heart to a child" in Small #21103 wt. 3 lbs. 21"L x 16"W x 15"H urday at the Panama Canal College teer hours are registered with the oeMedium #21104 9 lbs. 27"L x 20"W x 19"H Auditorium, La Boca, Balboa. For Howard Family Support Center's need emr y slacement due Large #21106 20 lbs. 36"L x 24"W x 26"H more information, call 285-6386/ Volunteer Program. Also, any volto an emergency situation. AppliX-large #21107 24 lbs. 40"L x 27"W x 30"H 6388. unteers who are PCSing in the near cantG must reside on a military in giant #21108 43 lbs. 48"L x 32"W x 35"H future should come by the FSC to stallation. For more information, Int. #21000 5 lbs. 24"L x 6 1/2"W x 14 1/4"H Miss Pam at the PX pick up a letter stating their voluncall Nelida Holnes at 288-6643. Cabin #21009 3 lbs. 19"L x 12 1/2"W x 10 3/4"H Miss Pam will be at the teer hours. For more information, call Lizca Fearon at 284-5650. 'Relocation Center Corozal Main Exchange 1 -3 p.m. The Relocation Assistance CenRecycling Marathon Sunday signing autographs, handPet supplies ter offers a variety of services. For The Theater Support Brigade is conducting a Recycling Maraing out flowers and candy to all C those PCSing, there are computers thon to raise the awareness of the community regarding the Army's mno thers and playing her music. Since the Corozal Veterinary with Internet access and a wellpolicy to prevent pollution, reduce waste and conserve natural reThere will be CDs and cassettes for Treatment Facility approaches stcke lendingclosetato help you sale. closure Aug. 31, the VTF is rewith all your basic household This program focuses on identifying reminding pet owners to stock up needs. For more information, stop .cyclable items within the community. The Revival on routinely used medications to by Building 200, Fort Clayton, or intention is to create an interesting, spirThe Abundant Life Christain last through their PCS move. The call 288-9234/9235. ited and competitive process. Center is holding a revival 7 -8:30 last order for pet supplies is June The competition features individual today and Saturday and 10:30 -I and when supplies run out they Vehicle registration awards to recognize the efforts of persons noon Sunday. Child care provided will not be replenished. Also, the Personnel moving to Puerto Rico leading collection and tum-ins, and an orgafor toddlers -6 year olds each VTF is requesting that if your pet can register their vehicle at the nizational award in each category. night. For more information, call is no longer in Panama or has LEA Vehicle Registration in BuildRemember, the second stage began on 272-2501/2220. been adopted to another family, ing 519, 2nd Floor, Room 246, 8 April 8. Get ready and contribute to the recycling process. Collect call them at 285-5866/5867 to a.m. -noonand4p.m. Monday .paper, metals, aluminum, glass and plastic Summer Program help update their records. -Friday. You will need the vehicle Registration for the summer USARSO volunteers title, proof of insurance and orders program is May 14 and 15 at Buildfor Puerto Rico. Those who have ing 155 on Fort Clayton. The free The Quaility of Li fe/nstallation already shipped their vehicle to more information, call 284-5650. Layaways program begins in June and will inVolunteer Center is currently prePuerto Rico can also obtain their All layaways will cease Saturclude a Toddler/Preschool Camp paring "Statement of Service" letdecals at this office. For more inTyping course day. By Aug. 30 all layaways for 2 -5 year-olds, a school age ters for all registered volunteers. To formation, call 288-4916/4919. The Howard Family Support must be picked up or cancelled. camp for 5 -12 year-olds, youth receive your letter, stop by the Center's Computer Resource CenFor details, call 285-4121. volleyball, basketball and racquetQOL/LVC Office 2nd Floor, BuildPlanning a party ier offers computerized, multimeball clinics; instuctional karate, piing 200 Fort Clayton. For more inSAS has inflatables for rent. The dia typing tutorial software. BeLaundry service ano, guitar and gymnastics classes formation, call Tina Hobson at 28 -colorful balloons include the gisners can learn how to type at Super Suds Laundromat offers and a teen program with trips and 9303/9304. Happy Clown Typhoon, the their own pace. To sign up for i a drop-off, same-day pick-up tours, outdoor activities, center Mailin ackaAes Amazing Castle Maze and games appointment, call Dave Krier at service Monday -Friday. The bated leisure activities and life O galore. Rentals are run by the CYS 284-5650. laundromat is located next to the skills workshops. For more inforh e te an potment staff. For more information, call Fort Clayton Burger King. mation, call 288-6810. ss em endan appointment 288-6451. Charitable donations system for individuals who need The Chapel, Building 500, colShipping your pet 79th Army Band to mail five parcels or more. Due Teen Center lects clothing, small household apShipping your pet? For inforre 79Day ncer s 7 pm. that people call the number listed A computer lab is located on the pliances, toys, and non-perishable mation, call 284-3069 or 288Forces Day concert isaytnpThe below and arrange an appointment Ist Floor of Building 155 and is food for distribution to Panama's 5946. May 15 at the Fort Clayton Thebetween 9 -9:20 am. and the open 6 -9 p.m. Monday -Thursneedy. Stop by anytime Monday ater. staff will assist those individuals day. Friday 7:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. For Free calls before opening tot regular cusmore information, call 284-3948 All military ID holders can CCAF degree tomer service. In return, this will Attention volunteers make up to two free five To all those in line' for senior decrease the lines and waiting time If you are presently volunteerFax service minute Military Affiliated R amaster sergeant, if you are comfor other customers. All forms and ing or have volunteered in the past The Corozal PX offers fax serdio System calls to anywhere pleting or near completing your documentation need to be ready at Howard AFB, sign up with the vices at the customer service in the U.S. and Puerto Rico 3 CCAF degree, please stop by the prior to the appointment date. For volunteer coordinator in the Family counter. The cost is $1 per page, 5 p.m. Fridays and Sundays. -Education Office ASAP to have more information, call 288-5522/ Support Center and receive credit plus telephone charges. For appointments, call 272your records updated to reflect 4802. for the experience you gained. For 6968.

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1~j UFLJLJ~hRJIUULLIJLLJTropic Tims D 1 Community May7 1999B11 It's that time again -signing up for the Summer Program story and photos by Tina Summerton Tropic Times Staff FORT CLAYTON -Even as the drawdown continues there is still plenty for children to do this sumY mer. The Child and Youth Services is offering a Summer Program for children of all ages. The Summer Camp program is being offered at no cost to the customer and on a first-come first-served' basis. Spaces are liiited so don't delay. The Summer Program includes toddler/preschool and school age camps, sports clinics, instructional classes and a teen program. The Toddler/Preschool Program is for children 2 -5 years old and is from 9 a.m. -noon, Monday -Friday, June 7 through July 2. The camps weekly themes include. Wet and Wonderful, Dinosaurs, Puppet Fun and Adi6s Panama. The School Age Program is for children 5 -12 years old and is from K 9 a.m. -3 p.m. Monday -Friday June 7 through July 30. The camps outs, hikes and much more. Beach, Sierra Club, El Valle, rate, piano, gymnastics and guitar weekly themes include. Tunnel The Teen Program is May 25 Portobelo and many more. instructional classes. through Time, Traveling through the through July 30 and offers a variety If the summer camp is not what The Summer Program sign-up is I Seven Seas, Olympic Spirit, Final of center-based leisure activities, you are looking for, DCA also offers -5 p.m. May 14 and 9 a.m. -1 p.m. Voyage and more. Daily planned aclife skills workshops, outdoor activisports clinics for racquetball, socMay 15 on the 1st Floor, Building tivities include field trips, swimties and trips-and tours. Some of the cer, volleyball and junior and senior 155 Fort Clayton. For more informaming, arts and crafts, games, cooktrips and tours include Shimmy teens basketball. They also have kation, call 288-6816. BHS students take part in Law Day G story and photos by Rita Sosa BHS graduation Assistant principal, BHS frThe Balboa High School Graduation will be May Balboa High School staged arm 15 on the front lawn of the high school. Due to the trial ith JAG sage mon large number of visitors and alumni guests who Fral Cit .JAs partce ourthetreem will be in attendance, each family of a senior will Fort Clayton. As part of the street receive eight tickets for reserved seating. These law course requirement, students tickets guarantee a seat for graduation. Any addisystem by participating in a simutional guest will be placed in the general seating sytem bya partpteng Lynh iau,,area. Gate A, which is for ticketed guest will open late trial. Capt. Dean Lynch, Trial at 6:30 a.m. The general seating gate will open at 7 Counsel at the Staff Judge a.m. The only gates which will be open will be Advocate's Criminal Law Division those located along Roosevelt Road. All gates will served as judge. be marked either A or General Seating. All parking Students assumed the roles of will be in the football field or surrounding areas. prosecuting and defending attorAll registered alumni must pick up their reserved neys, defendant, witness, bailiff and tickets 8 a.m. -4 p.m. by May 14 in Lhe main office jury members. Their case involved a of the high school. young woman who charged her boyfriend with rape. Capt. Lynch The Alumni Brunch guided the students through the The Balboa High School Graduation Alumni trial procedures as they performed Brunch will be held May 15 immediately following their roles. Undoubtedly all the the graduation which begins at 7:30 a.m. This effort and hard work paid off and the students students on a job well done. brunch will provide an opportunity for returning were very pleased with the end result. All the On April 30, another trial was scheduled as alumni to visit with their former classmates. The terms and concepts came alive as each indipart of the Law Day celebration. This was held brunch will be held at the Fort Clayton Comtnuvidual applied the knowledge from the course in the Balboa High School library with Capt. nty Club. Selected vendors will sell memorabilia at to a trial situation. Capt. Lynch visited Balboa Lynch presiding as judge. The case involved an the champagne brunch. The cost is $10 per person High School after the trail and critiqued each alleged murder. The partnership between the and reservations can be made by contacting Ms. performance. Students asked questions and he school and the community has provided Balboa Zenia Morris at tzmorris@panebm.net. provided information which will help them in High School students with an excellent opporPayments must be made by check or money their next trial. Capt. Lynch congratulated the tunity to witness the legal system in action. order, payable to the Clayton Community Club. Send your checks to Ms. Zenia Morris PSC4Box 167 APO AA 34004. Tickets can be picked up at the Balboa High School Main Office prior to graduation. The celebration The parents of the last graduating class of Balboa High School, the class of '99, will be sponsotling a celebration party on May 15 at the Plaza Paitilla Inn for the seniors and their guests. In order to provide mementos and gifts, many interested community members donated various items for door prizes. If you wish to donate to this last celebration activity, call Sherry Barnish at 284-4023.

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B12 May7 Youh Scene Clubi Pet of the week This is Matthew Vest and his best friend Misty. Misty beat Matthes back to the states as she is already gone to Oklahoma, where she is anxiously awaiting for her partner Matthew. Kids: If you'd like to see a picture of yourself and your pet in the Tropic Times, send it through MPS to Tropic Times Unit 7145, APO AA 34004 or drop it in our boo at the Fort Clayton Post Office. Be sure to include your name, as well as your pet's name. (You can also send us a little information about your pet.) Write your name and address on the back of the photo so we can send it back to you. Students from the Sunshine room at the Child Development Center show their happy faces after the delivery of the Children are Special People bags. Standing left to right are Martha r---------------Pulimalis, Director CDC; Marjorie M. Arias, Family Advocacy Program Manager; Dana Pohl, Lunch Menu CDC teacher; Nivia Barroso, ACS staff and Diana McFarlane, CDC teacher. May 10 -14 Children are Special People Curundu. Middle and Balboa story and photos by Griselda Sterling High Schools Tropic Times Staff The U.S. Army South joined the National CornMondayHamburger, mittee to Prevent Child Abuse in promoting April lettuce and tomato, poas Child Abuse Prevention Month. tato wedges, fruit, geChildren are Special People is the slogan that latme, milk. Chicken identified the Army Community Service Family Ad-rTuea hidken vocacy Program during this month. barbecue, mashed po"The blue ribbon is the identification of the tatoes, brown gravy, -vent," said Marjorie M. Arias, ACS Family Advom1ldc s a k's cacy Program manager. ensa rn' ACS/Family Advocacy Program work in co~ baked beans, carrots junction with the Department of Defense Depen and celery sticks, fruit, milk. dents Schools to get the word out. Thursday -Sloppy Joe on a bun, potatoes "This will be the last celebration of this event in wedges, green peas, vanilla pudding, milk. Panama, and, we want to be sure it contributes to Friday -Pizza, corn, pineapple, gelatin, milk. building healthy and loving families. The program L-------------dedicated thousands of hours selecting the correct materials and toys for children and their parents. We enjoyed it," Arias said. Lunch Program More than three million children are reported Ma Marjorie M. Arias, Family Advocacy Program abused or neglected each year and three die each Manager, explains the importance of preday because of maltreatment. Every single person I oward and Fort Kobbe venting child abusein the community has a major role in prevention. ACS Family Advocacy Program activities Elementary Schools throughout April included: *Articles, news releases and radio/TV scripts through local media in partnership with the Monday -Ham and cheese USARSO Public Affairs Office. sandwich, cucumber slices, *Educational materials, stickers, magnets, apple, cookie, milk. stress balls and other freebies at Building 519 Tuesday Peanut butter and the PX the last week of April. and jelly sandwich, carrot *Banners displayed throughout the month of stick, grapes, cookie, milk. April. Wednesday -Ham sandThe event culminated with the distribution of wh, celery sticks, banana, Children Are Special People bags at cookie, milk. Teacher Anick Buval and her students at Playmorning, Child Development Center, PartIThursday Cheese sandCurundu Elementary School enjoy the visit of Day Preschool Program and kindergarten wica, letkue ailk. Marjorie M. Arias and Nelida Holnes of the through third graders at Fort Clayton, Curundu I Friday -Tuna salad sandwich, tomato wedges, Family Advocacy Program Office, April 28. and Fort Kobbe Elementary Schools. oranges, cookie, milk. _______________________________________ IL_ L-----------------------------Francesca Arzola, I Frederick Spertina, 7 Steve Sanchez, 16 Alyssa Purvis, 2 MarecIs L ong, I Maria Cassort, 3 Annella lshon, 17 April 26 May 2 May 5 May 6 May 8 May 8 May 9