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The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text




Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


Farewell Dinner
Page 16: A farewell dinner was held
April 16 at Fort Clayton's Community Club
for U.S. Army South Command Sgt. Maj.
Thomas J. Quinn. Find out Quinn's
thoughts on his Army career, and get the
significance of Quinn's tenure from guest
speaker Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger
Jr., USARSO commanding general.


ropic


Times


Vol. XII No. 16 Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama Friday, April 23,1999
Serving the Joint Community



Soldiers, Marines earn prestigious badge


story and photos by
Spc. Deborah Long
USARSO PAO
FORT KOBBE - A thankless, physi-
cally demanding job - the job of an in-
fantryman. What could be their symbolic
token of courage, something that repre-
sents the tough role of combat and sym-
bolize their proficiency in the infantry
arts?
In 1944, Army Chief of Staff George
Marshal asked that same question and
began the development of a badge that
would honor those infantrymen who ex-
celled in their career field. On March 29,
1944, after the Office of Heraldic Activity
of the Quartermaster General completed
the design of the badge, the first of 10
Expert Infantryman Badges were
awarded.
Since then, thousands have joined in
the exclusive group who exemplify the
high standards and professionalism of
the infantryman.
"The Expert Infantryman Badge is a
soldier's individual test of his own com-
petence to be the best that he can be,"
said Command Sgt. Maj. Daniel Oltesvig,
5/87th Infantry Battalion command ser-
geant major.
"Once you earn the EIB, it is yours to
keep," said Pvt. 2 Donald Hopson, the
youngest EIB recipient, who is assigned
to Headquarters Co., 5/87th Infantry Bat-
talion.
On April 16, 33 infantry soldiers, three
Marines and one Special Forces soldier
were awarded the Expert Infantry Badge
by Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger, Jr., U.S.
Army South commanding general.
In order to even qualify for the test-
ing, soldiers must score at least 70 per-
cent in each event of the physical train-
ing test and must qualify expert with the
M-16.
Training began April 12 with 123 can-
didates for the esteemed badge. How-
ever, as the days passed by, soldiers and
Marines were weeded out, primarily by
the hand grenades station, just one of 19


testing stations that
were set up.
The most grueling
part of the test is the
12-mile road march,
the final event,
Oltesvig claimed.
"This is where you ,
see all of the guts and
glory of the EIB," said
Oltesvig. "Three sol-
diers passed out a
few hundred meters
from the finish line,
barely missing their
EIB."
"It is a company
and squad effort get-
ting ready for EIB test-
ing. The hardest part
was the land naviga-
tion because of the
jungle. It wasn't easy, .
but I made it,"
Hopson said. '4:
The EIB testing '
proved to be a little -.;
harder for the Marines - .
from Company E, 2nd .
Battalion, 2nd Ma- r '-
rines, said Cpl. .... " '.-.
Stephen Wertz, one Maj. Gen. Phili
of only three Marines Infantryman Bi
awarded the presti- didates for the
gious badge.
"We had to forget
everything we were taught and learn it
the Army way, then get tested," he said.
"Everything is a different sequence and
it had to be done in an exact order. It
was mainly paying attention to detail,"
Wertz said.
After the presentation of their hard
earned EIB, family and friends gathered
to congratulate the awardees.
"To be awarded the EIB means that
the soldier is one of the best in his squad
and company. That he has succeeded at
doing his best," Oltesvig said.


"To be awarded the EIB means that the soldier is one of the best in his
squad and company. That he has succeeded at doing his best," said
Command Sgt. Maj. Daniel Oltesvig, 5/87th Infantry Battalion command
sergeant major.


p R. Kensinger Jr., U.S. Army South commanding general, pins the Expert
adge onto soldiers who've earned it. Training began April 12 with 123 can-
e esteemed badge. In all 37 service members earned the EIB.


Congratulations

Here is a list of soldiers who qualified and received the EIB.
Names in bold are those who recieved the Army Physical Fitness
Test Awards (295) and * denotes 100 percent first time goes.


A Co., 5/87th
ILt. Angel Davilalopez
*lLt. Kevin Williams
Spc. Dennis Dominski
Spc. Erik Gilmore
Spc. Anthony Gonzalez
Spc. Edilmer Salazar
Spc. Thurston Washington
Pvt. 1st Class Roy Frazier
Pvt.2 William Clements
Pvt.2 Maurice Hardy
B Co.
2 Lt. Alex Limkin
*2 Lt. Joshua SeGraves
2 Lt. Matthew Selcke
Sgt. Juan Dejesus
Sgt. Torry Rice
Spc. Anthony Ernst
Spc. Eric Luedke
Spc. Medardo Montano
*Spc. Eric Sanchez


*Pvt. 1st Class Robert Bagwill
*Pvt. 1st Class Martin Byrne
*Pvt. 1st Class Jeffrey Lacortiglia
Pvt. 1st Class Donald Morrow
Pvt. 1st Class Scot Kreinbrook
Pvt. 1st Class Shawn Reed
Pvt.2 Shane Burnham
HHC, 5/87th
ILt. Michael Harris
*Spc. Leonardo Brooks
Spc. Shaun Kelleher
Spc. Sean Keller
Spc. Richard Limon
Spc. Jason Rizzp
*Pvt.2 Donald Hopson
E Co. 2nd Marines
Cpl. Carey McCartney
Cpl. Andre Thompson
*Cpl. Stephen Wertz
3-7 Special Forces Group
Maj. Antonio Garcia


Organization Day
Page 11: U.S. Army South
held its last Organization Day
April 9, a day filled with fun ac-
tivities for the whole family.
Find out about all the action
such as a Hooah Run, softball,
basketball, golf. an egg toss, a
horseshoe competition.


Living/Working in P.R.
The Living and Working in Puerto
Rico Open Forum has been rescheduled
for 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
Valent Recreation Center Ballroom. All
military and civilian personnel and their
family members who are considering a
move to Puerto Rico are invited. For
more information call 288-5314.


,rw










2Tropic Times
April 23, 1999


- "~ .F


photos by Gaby Capriles (U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office)
Job well done
Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr., U.S. Army South commanding general,
presents Lily Urriola tokens of the command's appreciation for her outstand-
ing work on the eve of her departure. She also receives thanks from Greta
Kensinger, wife of the USARSO commanding general. Urriola leaves the
Command Group to go into the private sector after years of providing ad-
ministrative and clerical support. She also provided training to all levels of
the Command Group including the last three USARSO commanding gener-
als. Good luck to you and in your future endeavors.


S 01


Daniel Amores (Tropic Times)


24th Wing Job Fair
Erasmo Mendoza Patterson of the Armed Forces employees
union (right), gives a briefing to Gloria Hawkins (left) and
Carlos Antonio Moreno during the 24th Wing Job Fair on April
14. Sitting next to Patterson is Ana Luisa Sepulveda, also of the
AF employees union. For more on the Job Fair, see page 12.


Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004.
Building 405, Field Printing Plant, Corozal One West
Phone: 285-6612/4666 or FAX 285-6613.
E-Mail: pbouchard@usarso-lanl.army.mil
USARSO LAN address: pbouchard@sopa@usarso
Tropic Times on the World Wide Web at: www.tropictimes.com
E-Mail: daniel-amores@usa.net

Commander in Chief .......................................................... Gen. Charles E. Wilhelm
Director, U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs........... Col. Vicente C. Ogilvie
U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office............................... (305) 437-1200
Editor ................ ....................................................................Sgt. Paul Bouchard
Assistant Editor .................................... ............................Sgt. Tywanna Gordon
W riter/Editor.................................................... Daniel Am ores
W riter/Editor ....... ....... .... ...... ............................. Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett
W riter/Editor................................................................ ....................... G riselda Sterling


Sgt Tywanna Gordon (TropicTimes)

Tradition lives on
Girl Scouts in Panama gathered in the Valent Recreation Center Sunday for a
Bridging Ceremony. Although this is the last year these girls will be in Panama,
the tradition will live on. The presence of Girl Scouts in Panama will continue and
was symbolized by a flag ceremony. Odette Ortiz, U.S. Girl Scout Lone Troop
Committee chair (center), passes the flag to Inez Aguilar, international commis-
sioner of the Muchachas Guias de Panama (left), and then to Elaine Saxe, U.S.
Embassy Lone Troop Committee chair. This symbolizes the continuing partner-
ship between Muchachas Guias and the Girl Scouts.


Office Automation Clerk ...... ....................... .............................Tina Summerton
V volunteer ....................................................... ................................. D issenia O rtega
U.S. Army South Commanding General ............Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr.
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office .........................................................288-3143
Public Affairs Officer .....................................................Lt. Col. Byron D. Conover
Deputy Public Affairs Officer ...............................................Capt. Larry D. Winchel
Command Information........................... .......................................... Gaby Capriles
NCOIC ............................ ........................... Sgt. Ist Class Christopher C. Calkins
Editor ........................................................... .......................Spc. Deborah L. Long
24th Wing Commander .........................................................Col. Gregory L. Trebon
24th Wing Public Affairs Office .................................................................284-5459
Chief of Public Affairs................................................st Lt. Joseph Della Vedova
NCOIC .......................................................................Tech. Sgt. Miconna J. Boaldin
Editor ............................................. .................................. Staff Sgt. John B . D endy IV
Director, Joint Interagency Task Force South ................ Col. Barry J. Chisholm
Joint Interagency Task Force South Public Affairs Office ................... 284-7502


People


Tropic Times

This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forc-
es Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Contents of the Tropic
Times do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.












W News


Tropic Times 3
April 23, 1999


U.S. government VIP visits ranges


story and photo by Daniel Amores
Tropic Times staff
FORT CLAYTON - With a helicopter
ride over the Panama Canal and the range
areas, the Deputy Assistant Secretary of
State for Western Hemisphere Affairs
Susan Wood, got to see first hand the
U.S. government range clearing efforts in
Panama April 16.
After receiving a briefing at the Simon
Bolivar Conference
Room in Building 95
on Fort Clayton,
Wood overflew the whatsoever
ranges and was then going to c
given a ground tour of with our t
Empire Range. tions."
According to
Wood, the purpose of Deputy assistant
Deputy assistant
the orientation visit for Western
was "to see the
ranges and the enor-
mous efforts the United States is making
to clear the ranges fully and according to
treaty obligations, and fully to the extent
practicable before we turn them over to
the Panamanian government."
Wood is currently responsible for U.S.
policy toward Canada, Central America
and Panama and is the State
Department's Western Hemisphere coor-
dinator for the Year 2000 and for Women
in Democracy issues.
She stated that the level of coopera-
tion between the U.S. and the Panama-
nian government was positive when it
came to range clearing.
"We are working with (the Panama-
nian government) closely. We have in


is
Dr
c'
C4

rc


it
t


story by Aurora Rodriguez
DEH Public Relations Officer
COROZAL - Earth Day is an inter-
national event demonstrating concern
and mobilizing support for the environ-
ment.
Earth Day was first celebrated on
April 22, 1970, and rallied more than 20
million Americans to become involved
in environmental teachings.
This event was the largest
grassroots activity in U.S. history and
evolved into what is known as the envi-
ronmental movement.
Furthermore, Earth Day is credited
with sparking the first major pieces of
environmental legislation: the Clean Air
Act and the Water Act.
As in the last 29 years, on April 22,
the military community in Panama hon-
ored Earth Day as part of its year-round
commitment to the environment.
As announced by the Army Chief of
Staff on his 1999 Earth Day Message,
this year's theme is: "America's Army -
Sustaining the Land We Defend. "
This theme underscores the impor-
tance of maintaining the environment
while training and supporting the fight-
ing force.
Each of us - soldiers, civilians and
family members - makes a valuable
contribution to this effort every time we
act responsibly as environmental advo-
cates.


The Army sustains its lands by
teaching soldiers to be good environ-
mental stewards, planning training mis-
sions to minimize negative impacts on
the environment, monitoring the ef-
fects of training and making necessary
repairs.
While doing this, the Army main-
tains its power projection platform and
sustains bases for optimal response,
while simultaneously implementing
sound, cost-effective and proactive en-
vironmental practices.
It is important to remember that en-
vironmental responsibility is more than
a one-day event.
Army Earth Day exemplifies a daily
commitment to the stewardship of the
public resources entrusted to military
care.
It is the annual call for public atten-
tion towards environmental issues and
to share with others your practice to
save Mother Earth.
Sound environmental practices are
part of everything a soldier does, thus,
every day is Earth Day to the Army.
Earth Day also fosters a sense of
community by focusing on our shared
environment which is crucial to soldiers
who are spread across the globe to
"sustain the land we defend."
For more information about envi-
ronmental matters, call the DEH Envi-
ronmentalists at 285-3679/3685.


general excellent relations with the gov-
ernment of Panama and I believe they are
fully cognizant of the fact that we are
turning over a huge amount of land.
"We have made enormous efforts to
give that land to them in the best pos-
sible condition and there are going to be
limits to what we can do on the ranges,
but that's a very small percentage of the
total land and facilities that we are turning
over to Panama and
s no doubt they are areas
where it is very im-
that we are
portant to preserve
comply fully the natural environ-
eaty obliga- ment, to preserve
the ecosystem and
Susan Wood to preserve the spe-
secretary of state cies that are unique
Hemisphere Affairs to that area."
The wording of
the Carter-Torrijos Treaty of 1977 reads
that "at the termination of any activities
or operations under this agreement, the
United States shall be obligated to take
all measures to ensure insofar as may be
practicable that every hazard to human
life, health and safety is removed from
any defense site ..."
When asked if the United States will
fully comply with the treaty, Wood
stated: "There is no doubt whatsoever
that we are going to comply fully with
our treaty obligations."
The transfer of the Balboa West and
Pifia Range is scheduled for June 1999
and the transfer of Empire Range for Au-
gust 1999.


Fv -7


Susan Wood, the deputy assistant secretary of state for Western Hemi-
sphere Affairs talks to Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr., U.S. Army
South commanding general, after her range tour April 16, While Col.
Michael J. DeBow, deputy chief of staff, Engineer, listens in.


Two Howard VIPs receive

new assignments


story by Staff Sgt.
John B. Dendy IV
24th Wing Public Affairs Office
HOWARD AFB - Two key per-
sonnel at Howard have received fol-
low-on assignment notifications.
Col. Rob Jensik,
24th Wing vice
commander and
deputy com-
mander of JTF-
Panama will be-
come director,
C operations sup-
Col. Rob Jensk port and devel-
opment, Headquarters Air Force In-
spection Agency, Kirtland AFB,
N.M., with a report date not later than
July 31.
Col. Gus Mays Jr., 24th Logistics
Group commander, becomes com-
mander of the Defense Distribution
Depot, Defense Logistics Agency,
Richmond Va., with a report date not
later than Nov. 30.
Jensik's gaining unit, the Air
Force Inspection Agency, is a field
operating agency that reports to the
Office of the Inspector General of
the Air Force. The agency's mission
is to provide Air Force leadership
objectives and independent assess-
ments of Air Force readiness, disci-
pline and management efficiency and
effectiveness. -
The AFIA is made up of four in-
spection directorates and an inspec-
tion support staff, said Lt. Col.
David Roberts, director of communi-


cations and mission support at
AFIA.
"He (Jensik) will be in charge of
the entire mission support function
for the agency, including the public
affairs staff that publishes the TIG
Brief; plus the staff that operates the
resources, training, personnel, com-
munications and computer systems
functions," Roberts said. "He is re-
sponsible for all external and internal
support to the agency."
Mays succeeded Jensik as Logis-
tics Group commander at Howard
when Jensik became vice-commander
of the wing.
The Defense Logistics Agency
provides materiel and supplies to the
military services and supports their
acquisition of weapons and other
. equipment.

Sand I are
elated to be
returning to
Virginia,"
Mays said.
"Being se-
Col. Gus Mays Jr. elected to as-
sume com-
mand of one of DoD's 21 distribution
depots is quite an honor. I am
humbled by the faith that the Air
Force and Defense Logistics Agency
have placed in me. I am looking for-
ward to the challenges ahead even as
I strive to meet the redeployment
challenges here at Howard."


Earth Day 1999

'America's Army -Sustaining

the Land We Defend'










4 Tropic Times
April 23, 1999


4W News


NIMA plays key role in MOMEP,



helping two nations achieve peace


by John Gates
Panama NIMA Liaison
Ecuador-Peru: An Historic Peace Accord
Dignitaries from South American nations, the
United States, the Vatican, and the King and Queen of
Spain witnessed the long-awaited signing of the peace
agreement between Ecuador and Peru on Oct. 26.
1998, in Brasilia, Brazil. It seemed only fitting that the
peace accord would be consummated in Brazil. The
process of closing the border and arriving at a lasting
peace between these two nations began at a similar
ceremony in Rio de Janeiro 57 years ago.
Why did it take so long? Territorial disputes over
which blood has been spilled are not easily or quickly
settled through diplomacy: Israel and the Palestines,
Turkey and Greece, and the nations of the former Yu-
goslavia are struggling through their own unique set of
circumstances. And those are just a few of the many
ongoing disputes over territory, maritime access and
natural resources that are taking place today across
our globe. Ecuador and Peru have overcome their dis-
putes through dogged diplomatic efforts and the con-
stant vigil of the Military Observer Mission Ecuador
Peru (MOMEP) - both supported by advances in im-
aging and mapping technologies. That's where the Na-
tional Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and its
predecessors played a key role.

Historic Differences... and Similarities
A few historians argue that the territorial dispute
between Ecuador and Peru can be traced back to war-
ring factions within the pre-Colombian Incas. The
more probable cause was the poor definition of the
geo-political boundary between the two countries fol-
lowing the Spanish colonial period. After the Spanish
conquests in the 1530s, this part of South America was
under control of the viceroyalty of Peru.
In the early 1700s, what is now Ecuador was passed
to the control of the viceroy in Colombia. All told,
Ecuadorians and Peruvians share a common Incan and
Spanish heritage, including language, religion and cus-
toms. It is not an exaggeration to say that, in general,
cultural differences between Americans and Canadians
are more marked than those between Peruvians and Ec-
uadorians. Even President Fujimori of Peru remarked
that during visits to the front the only way he could dis-
tinguish his troops from Ecuadorian forces was by
their shoulder patches.
The squabbles over the border began shortly after
Peru and Ecuador broke from Spain in the early 1800s.
Since that time there have been frequent conflicts and
attempts to negotiate'a solution. In 1941, an uneasy
truce broke down and Peru invaded Ecuador in a short
but bloody war. The ad hoc coalition of interested na-
tions, known as the Guarantor Nations, made up of Ar-
gentina, Brazil, Chile and the U.S., helped the two
settle the conflict. Given the world politics at the
time, the Guarantors' missions were to bring about a
lasting peace and stabilize the region - and in a hurry.
Gearing up for World War II, the U.S. depended on
the rubber, minerals, and quinine that came from this
part of the world. In January 1942, with Guarantor
oversight, Ecuador and Peru signed the Rio de Janeiro
Protocol for Peace, Friendship, and Borders. It is only
now that this process is coming to closure.

The Controversy
The Rio Protocol is a short document taken up in
large measure with delineation of the border. There are
no annexed maps to the Protocol, so everything de-
pended on an accurate description of the border. For
several years following 1942, a binational commission
from Ecuador and Peru carried out geodetic surveys
and placed over 150 border monuments, effectively
demarcating almost 90(percent of their 1420 km bor-
der. All went relatively well until they came upon the
area known as the Cordillera del Condor (Condor
Mountain Range).
This is an extremely isolated area on the eastern
flank of the Andes which was poorly mapped due to its
rugged jungle terrain, almost permanent cloud cover,
and sparse population. The original inhabitants include
the Jivaros, a tribe renowned for the artistic ability to
shrink the heads of their fallen enemies. In this area of
the frontier, the border runs along a watershed line
between two major river systems. Because of the lack


of accurate maps, this
watershed line was
poorly described in
the Protocol.
In spite of the
Guarantor's best ef-
forts, the controversy
continued. In 1960,
Ecuador abandoned
the Protocol process
because it felt that the
Protocol was inex-
ecutable due to a per-
ceived fatal error in
the description of the
watershed line in the
Cordillera del Condor.
Since then, Ecua-
dor and Peru have had
years of uneasy peace
and periods of outright
breaks occurred in 198
have today came as a res
begun after signing a p
1995. The final solution
pended on arriving at a
spirit and letter of the P
thinking by the negotiate

The U.S. Mapping E
Seeing the urgent ne
Cordillera del Condor a
the U.S. technical advi
1940s, Dr. George McB
U.S. Army Air Force to


Jamil Mahuad, preside
Alberto Fujimori, pres
ter an agreement was
nations.
der. From 1943 to 1946,
and the first accurate to]
lera del Condor was con
tragic price. Two aircraft
and 14 U.S. airmen peris
nificant contribution to
but it did not end the coi
More and better maps
years through the efforts
vian geographic institute
ter American Geodetic
formed in 1946 in respo
American Institute of
Latin American mapping
DoD mapping activities
fense Mapping Agency (
In 1996, NIMA was
U.S. government agency
mapping. Since 1995, we
technologies to peer throw
jungled terrain. The new
computer simulations we
the diplomatic process.

Brokering a Solution
The overall peace ag
commerce and navigation


(Courtesy)
The NIMA team here in Panama (left to right) John Gates, John Armocida
and Don Wiley.
hostilities. Two major out- confidence, and the border. As expected, the border
1 and 1995. The solution we piece was the most controversial. After numerous
sult of diplomatic negotiations rounds of technical and juridical presentations by both
eace declaration in February sides, the Guarantor's brought forth their recommen-
of the border controversy de- dations as to where the border should run in May
delicate balance between the 1998. It was accepted by both sides except in a small
rotocol, and some innovative area on the Peruvian side of the Cordillera del Condor
ors. surrounding a small border post named Tiwintza. Like
almost all other military installations in the DMZ,
Effort Tiwintza had been abandoned after the 1995 conflict
eed for better maps over the under terms of the separation of forces.
nd other areas of the frontier, Tiwintza holds special significance to Ecuador-be-
sor to the Guarantors in the cause they had heroically defended it and had buried
ride, solicited the help of the their dead within its perimeter. Both sides were intran-
photograph and map the bor- sigent over this section of the border and the talks
soon stalled. Tensions grew during a period this past
summer and it was feared that armed conflict was im-
, -: ,l'minent.
The impasse was overcome by the Guarantors and
the two presidents: Jamil Mahuad of Ecuador and
. TAlberto Fujimori of Peru. In a flurry of shuttle diplo-
macy, Peru and Ecuador agreed to accept a final Guar-
antor solution that includes adjacent peace parks abut-
ting the border along the Cordillera del Condor and a
Peruvian secession of a one square kilometer area en-
compassing Tiwintza, not as sovereign territory, but a
private property transfer.

What's Next
None of the treaties are final until the last monu-
ment has been placed and surveyed. The Guarantors
will be ready to make sure that happens. NIMA may be
called upon to assist Ecuador and Peru to further refine
r the definition of the watershed and to assist with high-
(Courtesy) precision GPS surveys. The hard part is done, but we
lent of Ecuador (left), and must be ready to lend a hand in order to bring this last
3ident of Peru, embrace af- phase to a speedy conclusion.
reached between the two
A Collective Effort
numerous sorties were flown So many people from differing organizations and
pographic map of the Cordil- backgrounds have contributed to this effort. Of all the
piled - but that effort had a Guarantor's representatives, our own presidential en-
t crashed in separate incidents voy, Ambassador Luigi Einaudi, demonstrated incred-
shed. The new map was a sig- ible poise, savvy, and self-sacrifice during the many
our knowledge of the region, years he has participated in this process. The peace
ntroversy. accord would not have happened without the heroic
were made in the intervening efforts of Ambassador Einaudi and his staff at the De-
s of the Ecuadorian and Peru- apartment of State.
;s in collaboration with the In- MOMEP is without a doubt one of the most suc-
Survey (IAGS). IAGS was cessful observer missions ever run. Since 1995. they
)nse to U.S. DoD and the Pan have overseen the separation of forces, kept constant
Geography desires to assist vigil over the DMZ, and been a point of interchange for
efforts. IAGS was one of the all involved. This international mission will continue to
that was melded into the De- support the peace until the border is closed. Congratu-
(DMA) in 1972. lations all around for those have served so unselfishly.
formed from DMA and other The NIMA contribution was outstanding. Our prod-
es that deal with imaging and ucts spoke for themselves: with clarity, accuracy, and
have brought to bear the latest impartiality. The contributors to this effort cut across
)ugh the clouds shrouding the our agency in all phases of our expertise: cartogra-
images, topographic maps and phers in St. Louis, computer experts in Bethesda, and
ere important contributions to imagery analysts-in the Navy Yard.
My hat is off to all of you for the great job you all
did. A special thanks goes to my coworkers here in
n Panama, Don Wiley and John Armocida. No other
reement includes treaties on agency or organization in the world could have done
:n, border integration, mutual what we have accomplished.


z �%r %Imr - - . . - --


-


.........................












SNews


Tropic Times 5
April 23, 1999


Veterinary Command deactivates


story and photos
by Daniel Amores
Tropic Times Staff
COROZAL - After years of provid-
ing comprehensive veterinary service to
Panama's joint service community, the
Panama District Veterinary Command
held its deactivation ceremony April 15.
In a ceremony held at Building 6521
in Corozal, the Panama District Veteri-
nary Command encased its colors in
front of a crowd of military and civilian
leaders that included Col. Richard B.
Thomas, Theater Support Brigade com-
mander.


Lt. Col. Larry G. Carpenter, com-
mander of the Panama District Vet-
erinary Command, addresses the
crowd.


The commander of the U.S.
Army Veterinary Command,
Col. Gary L. Stamp, said that
the Panama District Veteri-
nary Command "has epito-
mized a joint service organiza-
tion."
"This has been the one vet-
erinary unit that has per-
formed all of the duties that a
veterinary unit could perform
... And although this is a deac-
tivation, it is a deactivation of
a unit and not of the spirit of
cooperation that exists be-
tween the different military
services and also between the
U.S. and the Panamanian
people," he said.
The Panama District Vet-
erinary Command, known as
the Army Veterinary Services
- Panama prior to 1980, had
been headquartered on Fort
Clayton in the former Canal Lt. Co
Zone. Comm
After implementation of PDVC
the Panama Canal Treaties of unit. C
1977, the Panama Veterinary sees tl
Services became a part of the
newly formed U.S. Army Medical De-
partment Activity - Panama.
In 1980, the Headquarters of Veteri-
nary Services - Panama relocated to
Building 237, Gorgas Hospital, on An-
con Hill.
The Panama Veterinary Services
changed names to the Panama Veteri-
nary Service Support District after for-
mally separating from USA MEDDAC -
Panama on Sept. 9, 1996.


I. Larry G. Carpenter, left, commander of the Panama District Veterinary
land, holds the command guidon while Master Sgt. Franklin E. Davis, right,
NCOIC, encases the unit colors protecting the integrity and history of the
ol. Gary L. Stamp, commander of the U.S. Army Veterinary Command, over-
he ceremony.


The Panama VSSD headquarters relo-
cated April 15, 1997 to Building 6521,
Corozal, when Gorgas Hospital was
transferred to the Panamanian govern-
ment. The name changed again to the
Panama District Veterinary Command
on July 1, 1998.
At the end of the ceremony, Lt. Col.
Larry G. Carpenter, commander of the
Panama District Veterinary Command,
hailed his assignment and spoke of the


positive view many others have about the
command.
"One of the comments that I hear the
most is that it is a shame that we no
longer will have Panama as a training
ground for our soldiers," he said.
The soldiers and civilians of the
Panama District Veterinary Command
continue their mission until July 1,'
1999, the effective date of the inactiva-
tion.


Navy Exchange in P.R. prepares for SOCSOUTH


story and photo by Bob Appin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
U.S. NAVAL STATION ROOSEVELT ROADS,
Puerto Rico (USARSO PAO) - The Navy Exchange
here is looking forward to its new clients from the
Special Operations Command - South.
"NEX Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico is very ex-
cited about the arrival of:SOCSOUTH," said Steve Ard,
interim general manager of the Navy Exchange.
"We are a highly successful, proactive exchange,"
Ard said. "NEX Roosevelt Roads will undergo a major
renovation and expansion later this year with the grand
opening scheduled for late 2000. This project will
nearly double the size of the Main Retail Store and
provide a model department store for our patrons," he
added.
NEX Roosevelt Roads has been in contact with rep-
resentatives of SOCSOUTH members to inquire about
their needs. According to Ard, efforts have begun to
be made to provide the basic military uniform items.
According to Ard, NEX Roosevelt Roads is a full-
scale exchange facility. "We offer a 28,000 square
feet Main Store soon to be expanded to 44,000 square


feet," he stated.
"The Main Store
features the retail
store containing all
the typical retail
departments found
in a major ex-
change," he said.
"We have the very
successful proto-
type Home Gallery
featuring full furni-
ture and major ap-
pliance selec-
tions," Ard added.
The NEX has 50


..r



Steve Ard, interim general
manager, Navy Exchange,
U.S. Naval Station Roosevelt
Roads.
major sale events scheduled in


1999. "There is virtually a sale every week and they
generally begin on Wednesday and end on Sunday,"
said Ard.
NEX also features various outlets such as the barber
shop, a beauty shop, laundry mat with tailor shop and
dry cleaning services, optical shop, flower shop, video
rental, Anchor Mail service, photo lab, deli, a pizza


galley, Vie de France bakery, Baskin Robbins Ice
Cream, Subway and McDonalds.
SOCSOUTH members will be working in the Bundy
area of Roosevelt Roads, therefore the hours of op-
eration of the Bundy Deli have been increased. "We
are working with MWR to provide video games, a pool
table, and other items for relaxation," said Ard.
According to Ard, NEX will have its new general
manager by the time of this publication. The new gen-
eral manager is Dave Ruiz.
"Ruiz is retired military with over 30 years in the
Navy, serving several tours as Navy Exchange Of-
ficer," he said. "Since his retirement from the Navy, he
has run two large Navy Exchanges," added Ard.
NEX Roosevelt Roads is the 11th largest NEX in
the world based on sales volume. In fiscal year 1997,
NEX here won the Bingham Award in their sales group.
The NEX Navy Lodge has won the Carlson Award as
the best Navy Lodge for three consecutive years as
well as the Hospitality Award.
"All of these awards are dependent on positive cus-
tomer feedback received at our headquarters in Vir-
ginia Beach, Va.," Ard said.


Roosevelt Roads Middle/High School welcomes new students


story and photo by Bob Appin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
U.S. NAVAL STATION
ROOSEVELT ROADS, Puerto Rico
(USARSO PAO) - All efforts have
been made to ensure that the Special
Operations Command - South reloca-
tion to its new home is smooth. One
vital area of interest to those moving
to NS RR is the Middle/High School.
"We have coordinated with the Pub-
lic Works Department to have more
buses to pick up those students who
live within a 25-mile radius," said
Ross L. Bickford, assistant principal
of Roosevelt Road Middle/High
School.


The increase in the number of stu-
dents will not affect the school's ac-
tivities in any way, he added.
"Registration dates have been se-
lected for the new SOCSOUTH stu-
dents," said Bickford. "The dates are
July 26 and 27. However, if they can
not register that day, they can do this
any time of the year since our enroll-
ment is opened 360 days of the year,"
he added.
What the school is extremely proud
of is the fact that many of the graduat-
ing students are able to get into the
best colleges in the country.
"They go on to such schools like
the military academies, Stanford,


Harvard and Princeton,"
said Bickford. This is
definitely a great
achievement consider-
ing that the student
population does not ex-
ceed 200, he added.
"We have been a Na-
tional Merit finalist in
the last two years - the
only one from the is-
land," Bickford said.
For more informa-
tion about Roosevelt
Road Middle/High
School, call DSN 865-
4000/4254.


........ . . ..... -- '


Roosevelt Roads Middle/High School produces
top-notch students.















Sports


Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama
Serving the Joint Community


April 23, 1999


IS Sprssot I


Air Force
The Howard Fitnes Sports Cen-
ter is sponsoring a series of tour-
naments. A Women's Softball
Tournament is scheduled for to-
day - Sunday. A Volleyball Tour-
nament is scheduled for April 30
- May 2. A Basketball Tourna-
ment is scheduled for May 21 -
23. Sign-ups for all tournaments
are underway. All tournaments are
open to the first eight teams to
sign up.
The Howard Bowling
Center is looking
for bowlers in
the upcoming
"Fun Mixed .-
Leagues." There
is also reduced
price bowling on Mon-
day and Tuesday. All
games on these days
are $1 with free
shoes. Bowl three W
games and get one free. For more
information, call 284-4190.
Free aerobics classes are held
at 5:45 a.m. and 9 a.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays. Also at
4:45 p.m. Monday - Fridays. For
more information, call the HFSC.
For more information on Air
Force sports, call the Howard Fit-
ness Sports Center at 284-3451.

Army
The hours of the
Clayton Bowling S
Center are as fol-
lows: 9 a.m. - 8-
p.m. Monday -
Thursdays, 9
a.m. - 10 p.m.
Friday, noon
- 9 p.m. Sat-
urdays and 1 - 7
p.m. Sunday.
Is your child hav-
ing a birthday and
you're wondering
what to do? Why not have a Kiddie
birthday party at the Bowling Cen-
ter. A special package is available.
For more information, call 288-
5460.
Aerobic classes are avialable at
the Fort Kobbe Elementary School
Gym. The cost is $1 per person.
Classes are 5:45 - 6:45 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays, and 9 - 10 a.m.
on Saturday. For more informa-
tion, call 284-3399.
Reeder Fitness '"enter has a
therapeutic massage service. Ex-
perienced massuers cover different
techniques including shiat-su,
acupressure, reflexology, deep
muscle massage and more. For
more information or an appoint-
ment, call 288-4713/7861.
Step aerobics instruction is
available at Reeder Fitness Center.
For more information, call 288-
5201.
For more information on
Army sports call DCA Sports at
288-5610/3866 or the Reeder
Gym at 288-4713/7861.


TSB softball champs


Back-to-back homers by Leone and Matuska clinch it all.


story and photos
by Sgt. Paul Bouchard
Tropic Times Editor
FORT CLAYTON (Clover Field) -
Clean up hitter Mike Leone hit a solo
home run in the eighth inning, and third
baseman Adam Matuska followed with a
dinger of his own to give the Theater
Support Brigade Headhunters an 11-10
victory in the Mens Championship Soft-
ball Tournament over a team comprised
of 202nd Military Intelligence Battalion
and 56th Signal Battalion players April
14.
Last inning rally
TSB had to rally for five runs in the
seventh inning to tie the game. Those
five runs came off timely hitting from
the middle of the lineup, keyed by RBIs
from pitcher Mike Shoaf, first baseman
Jeff Cassell and a 3-run single by extra
hitter Steve Parker.
TSB also scored a run in the first in-
ning (RBI double by Leone), fourth in-
ning (solo shot by Leone) and sixth in-
ning (RBI single by leadoff hitter Felix
Irizarry), besides scoring the two dra-
matic runs in the eight inning.
For the 202nd/56th, first baseman
Herm Wilkinson Jr. smashed a two-run
homer in the third inning and a sacrifice
fly in the seventh.
202nd/56th scored two runs in each
of the first three innings, three runs in
the seventh and a run in the extra inning.
Scott Allen, the coach and catcher
for TSB said his team simply "kept its


The TSB Headhunters went undefeated in the championship tournament
held at Clover Field on Fort Clayton.


head up and rallied at the end" to win the
game.
He went on to explain his one im-
portant managerial move of the game
when he changed pitchers in the fourth
inning. "I thought about it (the pitching
change) all day," he said. "I had planned
to replace Cassell with Shoaf. This
would give them (202nd/56th) a differ-
ent look. Plus they had problems hitting
Shoaf in the past."


Asked to sum up his game-winning
homer Matuska responded, "I was ner-
vous. I just wanted to get a base hit. I got
a good pitch and swung hard."
TSB finished second during the regu-
lar season (record of 13-7), but came
undefeated in the championship tourna-
ment, while 202nd/56th won the regular
season (record of 15-5), but had already
suffered a defeat in the championship,
double-elimination tournament.


There were plenty of high-fives when Matuska crossed the
plate in the eighth inning to win the game.


Mike Leone, clean-up hitter for the Theater Sup-
port Brigade Headhunters, gets ready to swing
at a pitch. Leone hit two solo homers in the
championship game.


TSB Headhunters
Felix Irizarry
Toby Cutlip
Aldo Rodriguez
Mike Leone
Adam Matuska
Mike Shoaf
Vincent Borom
Jeff Cassell
Steve Parker
John Hester
Ed Rosario
David McAdoo
Vic Fontan
Dean Lynch
Mike Parker
Player/Coach: Scott Allen


202nd/56th Signal
Brent Biggs
Mike Schriek
Eric Holland
Herm Wilkinson Jr.
Tony Cassort
Jeff Milos
Ken Kilbourne
Don Harris
Jeff Turner
Mario Caldron
Dirk Pilcher
Player/Coach: Ray Shafer

Congratulations
to both teams!


Page 6


Team Rosters


somomomm











~~ports


Tropic Times P
April 23, 1999


I ML Stadns I


American League
East
W L Pct.
Atlanta 9 5 .643
New York 9 6 .600
Philadelphia 7 8 .467
Montreal 6 8 .429
Florida 4 11 .267

Central
W L Pct.
St. Louis 9 5 .643
Houston 8 6 .571
Pittsburgh 8 6 .571
Milwaukee 6 9 .400
Chicago 5 8 .385
Cincinnati 5 8 .385


West
W L
San Francisco 10 .6-
Arizona 9 7
Los Angeles 8 8
San Diego 7 8
Colorado 5 6


GB

1/2
2 1/2
3
5 1/2


GB

1
1
3 1/2
3 1/2
3 1/2


GB

1
2
2 1/2
2 1/2


American League
East


Toronto 11 4
NY Yankees 9 5
Boston 8 6
Tampa Bay 9 7
Baltimore 3 11

Central
W L
Cleveland 11 2
Chicago 7 6
Minnesota 7 8


Detroit 6
Kansas City 5


West
w I
7 I
6 !
6 !
6 !


PCT
.733
.643
.571
.563



PCT
.846
.538
.467


8 .429 51%
9 .357 61/2


PCT
.467
.400
.400
.400


Scottie Pippen arrested


HOUSTON (AP) - Scottie Pippen was arrested on sus-
picion of driving while intoxicated early this morning after
running a red light, according to police.
The officer who stopped the Houston Rockets star about
1:30 a.m. in downtown Houston was said to have called a
member of the department's DWI task force after suspect-
ing Pippen was driving drunk.
Pippen did poorly on the field sobriety test and was taken
into custody where he was videotaped and given the opportu-
nity to take a breathalyzer test, said police spokesman Fred
King
After he refused, Pippen, 33, was booked on suspicion of
DWI and released just before 7 a.m.
Pippen, a seven-time NBA all-star with the Chicago
Bulls, appeared cooperative, King said.
"I don't have any kind information about any trouble at


all," he said.
Rockets spokesman Tim Frank would not discuss the ar-
rest.
"All I can tell you is that he was arrested," Frank said. "I
have not seen any of the documentation on this, so I'd prefer
not to comment."
How the arrest will affect Pippen's role with the team was
unclear. "I think we need to get all the facts before we start
looking at any team policy," Frank said. "I think that would be
premature."
In January, Pippen left the Bulls, where he had spent his
11-year pro career, and signed a five-year, $67.2 million
contract with the Rockets.
The 6-foot-7 Pippen scored just four points Wednesday
night in the Rockets' 109-95 loss to Dallas. He missed all
four of his 3-point tries and was 2-8 from the field.


us'


Eastern Conference

W L Pct GB
Miami 28 13 .683 -
Orlando 29 14 .674 -
Philadelphia 23 19 .548 5 1/2
New York 21 21 .500 7 1/2
Boston 16 26 .381 12 1/2
Washington 16 26 .381 121/2
New Jersey 13 29 .310 15 1/2

Central Division

Indiana 28 15 .651 -
Atlanta 25 17 .595 2 1/2
Detroit 23 19 .548 4 1/2
Milwaukee 23 19 .548 4 1/2
Charlotte 21 20 .512 6
Cleveland 21 21 .500 6 1/2
Toronto 21 21 .500 6 1/2
Chicago 12 31 .279 16

Westerm Conference
Midwest Division

W L Pct GB
x-Utah 32 10 .762 -
x-San Ant. 29 12 .707 2 1/2
Houston 27 15 .643 5
Minnesota 22 21 .512 10 1/2
Dallas 15 27 .357 17
Denver 13 29 .310 19
Vancouver 8 35 .186 24 1/2

Pacific Division
x-Portland 31 10 .756 -
L.A. Lakers 27 17 .614 5 1/2
Phoenix 22 21 .512 10
Seattle 20 22 .476 11 1/2
Sacramento 20 22 .476 11 1/2
Golden State 18 24 .429 13 1/2
L.A. Clippers 7 35 .166 24 1/2


*4.. -'


Senior Airman Jeremy Moore (U.S. Air Force)
Fishing Tournament

Ricardo Lawrence of the Publications Distribution Office participated in the 24th Communication Squad-
ron fishing tournament held April 16.


Texas
Anaheim
Oakland
Seattle


' Upcoming runs

The Panama Armed Forces
Running Association is sponsoring
2, 3 and 5-mile runs 7 a.m.
Saturday starting at the Fort
Clayton Pedestrian Gate.
A 5K run organized by the
- Isthmus Road Runners and
Samsung Electronics is scheduled
for 8 a.m. Sunday starting at Plaza
Panama on 50th Street. There is no
entry fee. You may sign up for this
run at the Saturday PAFRA run.
A 9K cross-country run
organized by the Isthmus Road
's Runners is scheduled for 8 a.m.
May 9, starting at Parque Omar in
I Via Porras.
For more information on runs,
call Allen Jones at 288-3310.


I









Tropic Times
April 23, 1999


A - we#
~~ a% IaS'4


Sgt. Tywanna Gordon (Tropic Times)
The windup ..., and the pitch. It's always fun
cooling someone off at the dunking tank.


I1


ir Y1
Sgt. Tywanna Gordon (Tropic 7T
Sgt. Scott Allen, HHC, TSB, (white shirt) receives second-place softball trophy from Maj. Gen. Philip
Kensinger Jr., USARSO commanding general. 202d MI Battalion won the overall softball title.


4N


ALTHIIOUGH 5/87TII INF C(II MS OVERALL ORGAi


The day started with
the last-ever "Hooah
Run," a four-mile
trek through Fort
Clayton. Following
the run, Maj. Gen.
Philip R. Kensinger
Jr., USARSO com-
manding general,
"got down and
knocked out 20." He
told the soldiers in
formation he was
doing so because
the run was 0:20
seconds slower than
the time he set for
the command.


Sgt. Twyanna Gordon (Tropic Tim
Beach volleyball was a big hit and had everyone looking up.


--If
, - . - .. _ . . . .D �. .Ar y

photos by Spc. Debbl Long (U.S. Army)


Sgt. l1t Class Christopher Calkins (U.S. Ann
Golfers get into the swing of things at the driving range.


41LOO

14".0mawr








feature


99-
- r :i\1 i


/


d


Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Calkns (U.S. Army)
As always, all the participants got a kick out of the soccer competition. Hundreds of USARSO soldiers
and civilian employees took advantage of the command's final organizational day fling April 9.


I


'1


Sgt. Tywanna Gordon (Tropic TIm.)
Participants in the bean bag race were told
to hop to it.


I
lid


IZATIONAL DAY TITLE, EVERYONE NAMED WINNER


.1. J


- ,f


Sgt. Tywanna Gordon (Tropic Times)
Lightfighters from 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry, celebrate on
Clayton's Jarman Field after being named overall winners of the
competition.


?9t1


Bandx


Musical entertainment was provided by - who else? - the 79th Army Band. Don't for-
get, the band's final Dry Season Concert is 6 p.m. Sunday at Goethal's Monument in
Balboa. The Armed Forces Day Concert is 7:30 p.m. May 15 at the Fort Clayton Theater.
..;.. T -*. .1', . Even those who didn't
. � have the energy to play
_ _,,_._ __,._ basketball, golf, horse-
shoes, softball or soccer,
could always find the
S' -strength to check out
one of the several free-
E .i2-food stands U.S. Army
South provided for all
who took part in the Or-
ganizational Day Activi-
ties.
. i photo by Sgt. 1st Class Chdwistopha Calkins (U.S.Army)


Tropic Times
April 23,1999










10 Tropic Times
SApril 23, 1999


* Briefly


DCA clearing
Clearing? Please note that all DCA clearing is now be-
ing processed 7:30 - 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 - 4:30 p.m. in
Room 449, Building 519 at the Financial Management
Division. For more information, call Delia Johnson at
288-6169.

NCO Enhancement seminar
The last NCO Enhancement Seminar concludes at 4
p.m. today with a ceremony at the Tropic Breeze Ball-
room. Master Sgt. Curtis L. Brownhill will be the guest
speaker. Everyone is invited.

Wing Quarterly Awards ceremony
The 24th Wing Quarterly Awards Ceremony is 3
p.m. today in the Howard Base Theater.

24th MSS Commander's Call
Commander's call for 24th Mission Support Squad-
ron is 3 p.m. Tuesday in the Tropic Breeze Club Ball-
room. Squadron members should be in place no later than
2:45 p.m.

Senior NCO Symposium
Team Howard invites senior NCOs to attend an NCO
Symposium Wednesday and Thursday. The symposium
will include briefings that effect NCOs careers and re-
sponsibilities. If interested, call your first sergeant or
284-4114.

Officer's Club sealed bid
The Howard Officer's Club is holding a sealed bid
sale. The Club will be open 7:30 - noon Wednesday -
Friday for public viewing. Items included are a 60" color
TV, pool table and industrial kitchen equipment. Sealed
bids are due no later than noon May 4. Open to ID card
holders only. For more information, call Mitch Herbert at
284-3856.

Outdoor Recreation NAF sale
There is a NAF sale 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. May I at the
Howard Outdoor Recreation Center parking lot. Equip-
ment will be sold on a first-come basis. All items must go.
For more information, call 284-6170.

Community Bank closures
Community Bank will close the following facilities
April 30; Howard Customer Service Center; Fort Kobbe
Mobile van; Fort Sherman banking facility and ATM. If
you have any questions, contact you Community Bank
manager. Community Bank will also be closed May I
for Labor Day.

Life in Motion Seminar
Learn how to successfully PCS in today's technologi-
cally advanced military. This Life in Motion Seminar will
take place at 2 p.m. in Building 200 on Fort Clayton on
May 4. Call 288-9235/34 for more information or to
make reservations.

Flushing water systems schedule
Water mains will be flushed on the following days and
locations between the hours of 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday on Fort Clayton. Low pressure will occur in
the sections being flushed and should not exceed one
hour. For more information, call Carlos Reyes at 285-
4710.

Right Start briefing
The new Right Start briefing is at the Mountain View
Chapel on the first and third Thursdays with the follow-
ing forecast dates: May 6 and 20, and June 3 and 17. For
more information, call Staff Sgt. Diana Miller at 284-
3508/3241.

Wing promotion ceremony
The Team Howard Monthly Enlisted Promotion and
Induction Ceremony for April is 3 p.m. Friday in the
Howard NCO Club. The ceremony recognizes enlisted
promotes in three phases. Everyone is invited to attend
this celebration and congratulate the new promotes. Re-
freshments will be served following the ceremony. For
more information, call 284-5363.

School physical
The Howard AirForce Base and Fort Clayton Pedi-
atric Clinics are increasing the number of school physical
appointments available. Physical appointments will be
offered 1 - 3:30 p.m. daily. If you are moving to Puerto
Rico and your child will require a school physical prior to
the start of the next school year, call the appointment
desk at 284-3832/3834/3837.


Due to commercial airline schedule changes, the Tocumen shuttle will only pickup passengers at
Building 708 on Howard Air Force Base. In addition, times of departure have changed. Passengers
should call Vehicle Dispatch at 284-5058/59 to RSVP to ensure vehicle capacity. Schedules are
available at the post office, Billeting Office and the Howard Enlisted Club.
Outbound flights
Arrive Building 708 Depart Howard Arrive Tocumen DepartTocumen


4 a.m.
5:05 a.m.
6:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m.


4:10 a.m.
5:15 a.m.
6:40 a.m.
10:40 a.m.


5 a.m.
6 a.m.
8 a.m.
noon


5:10 a.m.
6:10 a.m.
8:10 a.m.
1:15 p.m.


Inbound flights
Depart Howard Arrive Tocumen DepartTocumen Arrive Building 708

5 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 8 p.m. 9:15 p.m.
7:45 p.m. 9 p.m. 10:15 p.m. 11:30 p.m.
6:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m.



Travel tips

Pet tips - Pets may now be shipped space-available to CONUS. There is, however, a fee. For more infor-
mation, call the Howard AFB Passenger Terminal at 284-5702.


Annunemnt


Seven digit dialing
Effective May 1, personnel in Panama will have to dial all
seven digits of a phone number when calling on or between
military installations. This will apply to telephone service
in military quarters as well. This change is part of the De-
partment of Defense mandate to have all telephones changed
to conform to the North American dialing plan standards.
This will not affect dialing 119 or 110 for emergencies, dial-
ing "8" for access to DSN from an official line, or dialing 169
.when making morale calls. For more information contact the
24th Communications Squadron Telephone Liaison Office at
284-9211.

Records disposition
24th Medical Group officials remind patients who have
an appointment at Howard or Fort Clayton that their records
must remain at the 24th Medical Group. Health records are
the property of the Department of Defense, not the prop-
erty of the individual. Medical records must be maintained at
the medical facility to ensure the proper medical history is
available and documented in accordance with DOD instruc-
tions.

Physical Therapy reduces services
The 24th Medical Groups Physical Therapy Clinic has
reduced its services by 50 percent and will close July 1. In
preparation for this reduction in services, clinic personnel are
working closely with all providers in an effort to ensure the
transition is as painless as possible for all customers.

Howard Clubs drawdown
Effective May 1, the Howard Officer's Club will relocate
to the Top 3 Lounge and the Top 3 Lounge will become a
combined Top 3/Officers Lounge. Also, Officers' dues will
decrease to $6 a month to mirror the Top 3 Enlisted dues.
The new membership fee will be effective during the May 99
billing cycle.

Drug testing change
Drug testing/urine sampling is now being conducted in
the 24th Medical Group hospital, Building 192, in room 232
on the second floor. For further information, call Michelle
Tello at 284-5314.

Optometry Services Drawdown
Due to drawdown of medical facilities and the reduced
scope of care, Optometry Services will no longer be able to
offer comprehensive eyecare to those patients not eligible
for Tricare Prime. Optometry Services will continue to of-
fer routine optometry services, such as vision analysis and
eye health assessment to non-eligible Tricare Prime patients
on a space available basis until closure of the Optometry
Clinic. For more information, call the Optometry Clinic at
284-6149.

Classified burn
Due to a large demand by 24th Wing units to destroy
classified material, the Howard Fire Department will conduct
live fire burns in a dumpster next to Building 1010. The
burns will be conducted from 9-11 a.m. on the first and third
Monday of each month. Material brought for destruction
should be limited to classified and sensitive material. For ad-
ditional information, contact Tech. Sgt. Phillip Nixon or
Tech. Sgt. Anthony Wells at 284--5305.


SFC Selection Board
A Department of the Army Selection Board will con-
vene June 2 to consider soldiers for promotion to sergeant
first class. All staff sergeants with a DOR of 970630 and
earlier, and a BASD between 800630 and 930531 must
physically update and review their personnel qualification
records. Areas of special concern are DA Forms 2A and 2-
1 PQR, NCO evaluation reports, official photographs and
official military personnel files. The deadline to update
PQRs is April 30. For information on PQRs call 288-6406;
for information on photographs call 288-7403; for infor-
mation on NCOERs call 288-6652.

Nonavail statements not needed
Nonavailability statements are no longer needed for re-
tirees and family members receiving medical care at facili-
ties downtown due to the closure of the inpatient capa-
bilities at the 24th Medical Group. Call 284-6977
(Howard) or 288-4152 (Fort Clayton) for more informa-
tion.

New Housing Office procedures
Effective May 3, the 24th Civil Engineer Squadron's
Housing Office will operate in Building 2, at the south end
of the CES main building behind the Howard Commissary.
All walk-in customers will be handled at the existing in-
dustrial customer service area in Building 2. In addition, ef-
fective May 3, the Housing Office will change its operat-
ing hours to 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Fridays for
walk-in customers, and I to 4:30 p.m. by appointment
only. Call 284-3301 to schedule an appointment.

DOIM needs your help
DOIM Mail and Distribution Center needs your help.
Customers are reminded that only unit mail clerks are
authorized to post and pick up official mail from the MDC.
Personal mail is not authorized with one exception - re-
locating personnel are allowed to mail out change of ad-
dress cards, available from the Post Office, by presenting
a copy of their Official Travel Orders. Do not mail office
equipment, furniture, supplies, noncurrent working files,
computers and other IT equipment. These items should be
shipped through the Packing and Crating Section at Build-
ing 727, Corozal. You can call Ms. Chial at 285-5137 to
obtain packing materials and Mr. Lopez at 285-5610 to
arrange shipping. Also due to a manpower shortage and
space limitation, unit mail clerks must make an appoint-
ment when mailing more than five parcels.

Humanitarian Service Medal
The Humanitarian Service Medal will be awarded for
those personnel assigned to Ecuador El Niflo Disaster Re-
lief Effort. The award has been approved for those service
members who provided humanitarian assistance and were
assigned to the operation from May 9 - 24, 1998. For
more information, call ILt. Gillespie or Mrs. Wilson-
Carrasco at 288-6655/4155.

Optometry Clinic closes May 31
The Fort Clayton Optometry Clinic will provide ser-
vice until May 31. The Howard Optometry Clinic will
provide routine eye care until July 31. Flight Medicine re-
ferrals and emergency eyecare services only will be avail-
able during August. New military eyewear can be ordered
until May 31.










ji News


Tropic Times 11
April 23, 1999 jJ


Joint Task Force 518 mission ends


V


11.1.


.. .. .. . ., .. .. ..:. ,'_ ,

NS'
. � .. � .. ..

Commander Minutulo, left, Barbados Military
Group commander, watches while Spc. Kevin
Fowler and RonaldcGreen shake hands after
cutting the ribbon to officially turn the building
over to the Dominicans.


story and photos
by 1st Lt. Tamika P. Briggs
JTF 518 Public Affairs Officer
The mission of Joint Task Force 518 is at an end.
The soldiers have modified a community center built
by previous engineers, constructed a nine-room com-
munity center with basketball court and provided medi-
cal support.
On April 1, JTF 518 conducted a small closing cer-
emony celebrating the completion of the community
center in La Plaine, a quality project.
The completion of the sports center was released to
the Dominicans with pride. During the ceremony Min-
ister of Education, Sports, and Youth Ronald Green
could not begin to express how grateful he was for
such a successful project.
He commented on the teamwork and effort put
forth by the 518th Engineer soldiers. He said, "Watch-
ing the soldiers complete this project two weeks ahead
of schedule shows how much work can get accom-
plished when you work as a team. With this in mind,
my community will work together to maintain the
community/sports center and always use it with the re-
membrance of the hard work of the soldiers. The La
Plaine community is very grateful, and we thank you."
There was also a comment from the Barbados Mili-
tary Group commander, Mr. Minutolo. He commented
on the previous visits from engineers and explained
how happy he was for the opportunity to witness an-
other successful product.
He stated, "This group of soldiers did not only just
build a community center, but they helped build the
community. Providing such a facility, that can be of
use to all, will only bring the people closer. You all


I~Ir


Maj. Deoliveira, above, presents awardees
with Army Achievement Medals for their hard
work during the project. From left, Staff. Sgt.
Hopkins, Spc. Fowler, Spc. Henderson, Spc.
Giddings, Spc. Medina, Spc. Kendrick and
Spc. Stewart. (Right) a side view of the La
Plaine Community/Sports Center. Below
photo, the soldiers that made the La Plaine
Community/Sports Center project a success
were led by Staff Sgt. Dionne Davis and 1st
Lt. Katina Chesser.


should not only feel good about the project, but all the
people that you have now made happy."
The soldiers from the 518th Engineer Company
worked long, hard hours to ensure the success of the
project and are happy to return to Panama.
When asked to express his feelings about the de-
ployment and returning home, Spc. Cameron Baldwin
stated, "I'm happy to return to Panama and get the op-
portunity to take leave to see my family and friends,
whom I haven't seen in over a year. But overall, the de-
ployment was good. I learned a lot about steel fabrica-
tion and gained a better understanding of using con-
crete forms and placements. Dominica was a great
place to visit, and it's a beautiful country."
Staff Sgt. William Beadle said, "The sports/commu-
nity center is a good product. It allowed us to do a va-
riety of training tasks, compared to our previous
projects. I am looking forward to getting back."
Spc. Khari Philip felt the project went by quickly.
He said, "Placing the pad and excavating were phases
that went quickly and smoothly. I enjoyed the project
very much."
Spc. DeWayne Kendrick said, "I'm looking forward
to going to my next duty station, Fort Rucker, Ala. As
a light equipment construction operator, I received a
lot of operator time on the D7 dozer during this
project (not a piece of equipment that falls under his
MOS). I feel like I did a good job. I also learned a lot
about vertical construction. I had the opportunity to lay
block, paint, and help fabricate the stairs."
Sgt. Cornelius Bonds said, "I am looking forward to
seeing my son, Rashawn, daughter, Jasmine, and wife,
Salina. I felt like we really worked as a team on this
project. During my tour in Panama this was the best
project I've participated in. I'm looking forward to
going to my next duty station."
The soldiers working on these projects were not
only engineers. Spc. Andrew Billington, maintenance
technician, explains his feelings about the deployment.
"I liked the base camp, and I also liked working with
the engineers. I assisted with laying block and land-
scaping. After seeing what the engineers have done, I
realized that they work very hard. A lot of hard labor
was put into the project."
Sgt. Andre Franklin, 518th Engineer Company's
communications NCOIC said, "I felt that the leaders
took care of the troops. The project looks great. It
made me feel good to help the soldiers with any sup-
port, from sending and printing spouses e-mails, mak-
ing guard rosters, delivering messages, and any other
detail that needed attention."
Along with that, personnel from the 5th Medical
Group and 55th Medical Group from North Dakota
went to Dominica and tended over 1,200 patients with
cases such as dental, obstetrics, dermatology, and basic
health care.
It was a very fulfilling two weeks for the Air Force.
When asked how they enjoyed working in Dominica,
they all agreed that it was a wonderful feeling to know
that they can assist people that need it and appreciate
it. "It was really a pleasure working with the children,
and the look of happiness on their parents faces was
very rewarding," said Staff Sgt. Regena Hathorne, den-
tal assistant.
On the other hand, Sgt. William Philips, administra-
tion NCO, said, "I can't imagine doing dental work on a
child and feeling good about it. I heard about the way
they scream. But, in our line of work, helping some-
one is always a pleasure."
The Joint Task Force conducted the main closing
ceremony on April 12 for the completion of the exer-
cise. The ceremony was held in Roseau, Dominica
where UCT 1 and NMCB 74 constructed a 190' pier
able to accommodate vehicles. They also modified a
maintenance shed.
The Joint Task Force will depart Dominica around
the end of April. They will feel proud that they pro-
vided humanitarian assistance leaving the locals with
two community centers that will provide additional
recreational areas, a pier that can withhold over 6,000
pounds, and professional medical assistance.
Although the soldiers spent the majority of their
time working, they were able to see the "The Nature
Island of the Caribbean" on a few MWR trips. They
really enjoyed their stay.
The soldiers can't express their appreciation of thoN
grateful they are and how much they will miss thei
friendliness, support and hospitality from :all ot il,"-
Dominicans. They helped make the mission .1 cn'-.
success.









12 Tropic Times
SApril 23, 1999


News


24th Wing hosts Job Fair


by Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV
24th Wing Public Affairs Office
HOWARD AFB - Corporate Panama met hundreds
of civilian employees during an Air Force sponsored
Job Fair April 16 at Howard. The program was for per-
sonnel at Howard AFB whose jobs will go away when
all U.S. forces depart this nation as part of the Panama
Canal Treaty.
Howard organizers believe the event was the first of
its type in the Air Force. They invited Air Force, Panama
Canal Commission, domestic workers and laborers with
a stake in Howard's activities, said Lance Taylor, Fam-
ily Support Center director. The base invited a popula-
tion of 1,500 "and the line did not stop all day," added
Staff Sgt. Eugene Rooker, Family Support Center deputy
director. "The copy machines were busy all day,"
Rooker said. "Only 10 businesses of 72 had left by 2
p.m., so I'm happy that the employers are more than
satisfied."
The resume-bearing prospective employees worked
the company tables that were set up in an aircraft han-
gar. The enterprises were mostly from the services and
light manufacturing industries, with businesses such
as Glaxo, NIKE and Chase Manhattan sharing space


photos by Norma Martinez-Galvan
A job applicant discusses employment possi-
bilities with a Panamanian human resource
manager.


with other major Panamanian players such as Price
Waterhouse Coopers (consultants for small entrepre-
neurs), Nestle (light industry), Budget Rent-a-Car and
auto giant Toyota.
The headhunters were looking for mechanics, labor-
ers, computer experts, medical technicians, secretaries
and engineers. A volunteer administrative staff of air-
men and civilian employees provided copy machine
services for those in need of more resumes or company
documents. Food was sold at company cafeteria prices
and water was poured for all. All the attention allowed
the horn-rimmed company reps to sharp-eye the re-
sumes like poker players examining card hands.
Bringing the companies to the workers was a posi-
tive step, said Eugene Pert, a 15-year heating, ventila-
tion and air conditioning technician with the 640th Air
Mobility Support Squadron. "I put in at least 45 resumes
for myself and 45 for my daughter today. I don't know
who is receptive if I go downtown. Now I know the
people who want to pick up and select professionals,"
said Pert. "I got help with resume planning and self-
examination recently, and now I'm looking for what's
suitable for me."
Fair attendee Janet Sterling of the Howard Mental
Health Clinic agreed with Pert. "This fair was better than
we thought it would be," she said. Sterling was looking
for an administrative job, and she said she had several
positive responses from the company reps she ap-
proached during the fair.
A Cable and Wireless telephone company rep men-
tioned his company's strategy of accepting resumes
and getting back with applicants at a later date. "We
want to pick the most able, with the skills and educa-
tion," he said.
The event was "a good opportunity to tap into a
disciplined labor force with computer skills and a strict
work ethic," said Taylor. "I've heard many favorable
comments on the organization, the traffic flow ... you
could pick and choose, walk through, fill out forms ...
there were monitors to help if you needed it. We worked


__==II,
fri fs


I"o


for job


hard on this over the last few months. It was a team
effort, especially from our Panamanian staff who went
downtown and talked to the businesses. They were sold
on our employee quality and customer service training.
Now we have a weekly updated job list, 260-strong, and
sent each week to our civilian transition assistance pro-
gram contacts. The word is out that Howard is a class
act."
Meeting those corporate representatives in advance
were Family Support Center staffers such as Lizca
Fearon, a 21-year Air Force employee. "We shook the
hands of 137 resource managers," she said. "We have
to say thanks to the Air Force for the workshops they.
gave to make our employees ready for this first-time
event for local nationals. It will help the country keep
rolling. Some will retire; others will own their own busi-
nesses. If not all, most are going to be placed," in a job.


Howard AFB celebrates Earth Day 99


HOWARD AFB (24th Civil Engineer
Squadron) - Howard's personnel were
among the Earth Day 99 celebrants be-
fore the week's end as many airmen fo-
cused on ridding common hazardous
wastes in their homes.
"We are redeploying now," said
Scott Mendenhall, Howard HazWaste
manager.
"The base must be devoid of all haz-


ardous materials prior to transfer."
Capitalizing on the synergy of these
efforts, Mendenhall and fellow Environ-
mental Flight members designated
Work Center HazWaste Amnesty Days
on April 20-22 as the local theme for
Earth Day 99.
"We tried to make a well-advertised
Amnesty Day for folks who still may
have antifreezes or other wastes in their


closets," said Capt. Monte Harner, En-
vironmental Flight commander at
Howard.
"Our focus was on closure this year,"
he said. Howard observed Earth Day
and facilitated unit redeployment by
opening its work center closets and
storage rooms and carefully looking for
any hazardous materials, such as
paints, thinners,
pesticides, and
cleaners, Harner Currently,
and Mendenhall
said. When any ing units,
waste was managers a
found, people
contacted their supervisor
unit Hazardous utilize 1
Waste Accumu-
lation Point HazWaste
Manager or the
Civil Engineer- Days to en
ing Squadron areas are c
Environmental areas are c
Flight for dis- free of ha
posal instruc-
tions. materials
Currently, re- facility c
deploying units,
building manag-
ers and shop su-
pervisors should utilize future
HazWaste Amnesty Days to ensure
their areas are completely free of haz-
ardous materials prior to facility clo-
sure, Mendenhall said.
"Base personnel need to keep in
mind that hazardous wastes generated
at work centers are subject to strict regu-
latory management and must be ac-
counted for from the point of genera-
tion to ultimate disposal," he said.
Unit Hazardous Waste Accumula-
tion Point Managers and the Civil En-


gineer Squadron Environmental Office
perform the hazardous waste storage
and disposal functions.
Many base residents will be PCSing
this summer and need to reduce house-
hold hazardous materials prior to clear-
ing housing, Mendenhall noted.
He said that households should capi-
talize on the Earth Day 99 spirit by re-
ducing hazardous
materials in the home
edeploy- through proper usage
buildingg or by giving the prod-
ucts to an adult
nd shop neighbor who can
use them according
should to directions on the
future container label.
Household chemi-
,mnesty cals should never be
mixed, he said.
ure their Household mem-
)mpletely bers may turn-in used
oil and excess fuels
zardous to the Howard Auto
riorto Skills Center.
Base households
sure. are not subject to
strict controls be-
cause those house-
holds usually generate smaller quanti-
ties with lesser hazards than those
found in the workplace, Mendenhall
advised.
However, he said proper use of
household hazardous materials such as
paints, cleaners, and pesticides keeps
families safe and protects the environ-
ment.
Household hazardous waste can be
disposed with other household gar-
bage. For details call Mendenhall at
284-4802/4052.


ri
t
ai
rS

fL
A






-14


Staff Sgt. Mike Boquette (U.S. Air Force)
Deactivation ceremony
Maj. Paul Commeau, 24th Contracting Squadron commander,
became the first airman to case a 24th Wing unit flag as part of
the redeployment at Team Howard during the Contracting
Squadron Deactivation Ceremony April 14.













News


Red Cross seeks donations


The following article is courtesy from
the American Red Cross.
AMERICAN RED CROSS - Turned out of their
homes at gunpoint ... separated from other family
members carrying only the clothes on their backs ...
seeking safety and an uncertain welcome in a foreign
land ... That is the story for thousands of refugees
who have been forced to flee the Kosovo province
of the Federal Republic Yugoslavia during the latest
phase of bitter internal conflict that has torn the
country apart.
This grave humanitarian crisis has been building
for many long tense months. Now, as NATO planes
launch air strikes over Yugoslavia, the situation has
grown even more desperate. Thousands of Kosovars
- mainly women, children and the elderly - are cross-
ing the borders into Albania, Macedonia and the
Yugoslavian Republic of Montenegro.
According to the United Nations High Commis-
sioner for Refugees, as many as 550,000 people have
been displaced in Kosovo - a quarter of the
province's population. In less than a week's time, al-
most 100,000 refugees have poured into Albania,
Macedonia and Montenegro; and even more are ex-
pected as the conflict continues to escalate. The ma-
jority of these refugees, some experiencing extreme
emotional trauma, have few or no resources for shel-
ter or food, and many of them are turning to the Red
Cross for assistance.
This massive displacement of people requires an
extensive, well-organized humanitarian response. To
help meet the refugee's immediate needs for food,
clothing, shelter and medical attention, the American
Red Cross is cooperating with the International
Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the Interna-
tional Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent So-
cieties (IFRC), as well as the National Red Cross So-
cieties in Yugoslavia, Macedonia, Albania, and
Bosnia-Herzogovina. All assistance is provided in
accordance with Red Cross principles of neutrality
and impartiality.
The American Red Cross has been active in the
region since 1993, providing humanitarian assistance


to Muslims, Serbs, and Croats alike at a cost of more
than $35 million. Recently, Steve Bullock, acting
president of the American Red Cross, reaffirmed the
organization's commitment to assist the most vulner-
able victims of this conflict, saying, "The American
Red Cross, as part of the global Red Cross move-
ment, is acting in coordination with colleagues from
the ICRC, and IFRC and the National Red Cross Soci-
eties in the region to position relief supplies and per-
sonnel to meet a growing range of humanitarian
needs. According to assessments, the population
with the most dire human needs in the region will be
women, children and the elderly." No matter what
happens in the days and weeks ahead, the Red Cross
will be there, supporting the vital humanitarian mis-
sion that the world relies on us to provide.
There will be no quick solution to this crisis. In the
weeks and months to come, the Red Cross will con-
centrate on providing the resources to meet the refu-
gees' basic needs. But there is also a critical need for
long-term solutions as these people who have been
left with nothing try to rebuild their lives. The Red
Cross must also help Albania, Macedonia, and
Montenegro - countries with limited resources and
fragile economies - as they try to respond to the
pressing needs of thousands of refugees who are
pouring across their borders.The fastest and most
effective way to help the victims of this conflict is
through cash donations. The American Red Cross is
unable to accept any collections or individual offers
of in-kind goods.
Those who wish to support the people affected
by the conflict in Yugoslavia, including Kosovo, can
contribute to:
American Red Cross International Response Fund
P.O. Box 37243
Washington, D.C. 20013,
or call 1-800-HELP-NOW (435-7669)
or 1-800-257-7575 (Spanish)
Internet users can make a secure credit card
contribution online by filling out a donation form
and choosing "International Response Fund," as
their giving option.


Tropic Times 13
April 23, 1999 1X)



Prohibitions during


Panama elections
FORT CLAYTON (Law Enforcement Activity)
- Presidential elections will be held in the Repub-
lic of Panama on May 2. By virtue of this, the
Electoral Tribunal Office has issued the following
prohibitions:
* The use, consumption, transfer or sale of al-
coholic beverages, to include wine and beer, is
prohibited as of noon, May 1 through noon May
3. Anyone caught
consuming alco-
hol will be
sanctioned
with a fine
ranging from
$25 to $250 or
the equiva-
0 lent time in
prison. Alco-
hol consump-
tion and sale
within De-
fense sites (mili-
tary installations) is not pro-
hibited. The above restriction applies only off-
post.
* On the day of the elections, it is prohibited
to carry privately owned weapons. The only per-
sonnel exempted from this prohibition are law en-
forcement personnel and those, who by nature of
their duties, are required to carry them (i.e., secu-
rity guards). Personnel caught in possession of a
firearm will be sanctioned with a fine ranging from
$10 to $250, or the equivalent time in prison. The
weapon will be confiscated by the local author:
ties.
It is highly recommended that all United States
personnel avoid traveling downtown on May 2. If
you travel downtown, exercise caution and moni-
tor SCN for updates.


Telephone dialing change

FORT CLAYTON (56th Signal Battalion) - The 56th Signal Battalion is cur-
rently upgrading the Panama Canal Area military telephone system to seven-digit
dialing. This change will facilitate the Treaty
Implementation Plan drawdown and permit access
to currently blocked telephone central office pre-
fixes, three-digit basic service codes, emergency
service codes and other special service codes. _ _.--- .. -"
Also, this conversion will permit telephone calls
to the Fort Sherman area from May through June.
Telephone central office prefix 473 will be used for
subscriber lines in service at Fort Sherman during ' '
that time frame.
Further, special attention must be given to the
fact that "on-base four-digit dialing" will not be
available. Be sure to reprogram your automatic dialer. For example, a Corozal sub-
scriber calling another Corozal subscriber currently dials 6666. After May 1, the
subscriber must add the prefix and dial 285-6666.
The effective date of the subject dialing plan change is May 1. The point of
contact is Rolland Gleichman, project officer, at 285-9922.
Expanded Panama area calling access
The following previously restricted prefix numbers/codes will be accessible
from the military system:
101 Panama National Long Distance (Credit Card Only)
102 Panama Directory Assistance
103 Panama Fire Department
104 Panama National Police
105 Time (In Spanish)
106 Cable & Wireless International Long Distance Opera-


tor (Credit Card Only)
MCI Credit Card Long Distance
AT&T Credit Card Long Distance
Sprint Credit Card Long Distance
Cable & Wireless Sales, Residential Service
Panama Trunked Radio and Paging Service
Panama Trunked Radio and Paging Service
New Central Office prefixes programmed for local
Panama City area
Cable & Wireless Internet Access
Cable & Wireless Consultations and Claims
Cable & Wireless Sales, Commercial Service
Cable & Wireless Business Offices
Cable & Wireless Trouble Reports and Repairs


108
109
115
133
194
195
3XX

800-5555
880
882-2229
882-2102
888


Facts on Life Insurance


FORT CLAYTON (Directorate of Ci-
vilian Personnel, Benefits Branch) -
The Federal Employees' Group Life In-
surance 99 open enrollment period be-
gins April 24 and ends June 30.
During the open enrollment, all active
employees are eligible to participate ex-
cept those who are in a position that is
excluded from FEGLI coverage by law or
regulation. Employees in non-pay status
may also participate.
However, any coverage
during the open en-
rollment cannot be- .
come effective until
they are back in pay
and duty status.
There will be a
new coverage that
will be available dur- '-
ing the open enroll-
ment period. Until
now, Option C coverage, which is cover-
age on your eligible family members,
was limited to $5,000 for your spouse
and $2,500 for each eligible child. You
can now elect up to five multiples of
these amounts, making the maximum
amounts available $25,000 for your
spouse and $12,500 for each eligible
child. You have to elect the same number
of multiples for each family member.
Employees can elect any and all cov-
erage for which they are eligible. An em-
ployee who takes no action during the
open enrollment period will keep the
same coverage they have now. Coverage
elected during the FEGLI 99 open enroll-
ment period becomes effective the first
pay period beginning on or after April
23, 2000, which follows a pay period
during which the employee was in a pay
and duty status.


In order to continue FEGLI coverage
when you retire, you must retire on an.
immediate annuity and you must have
had the coverage for the five years of
service immediately before you retire. If
you do not have the coverage for five
years, you can continue it if you have
had it since your first opportunity to
elect it.
For instance, if you elect Option B
during the open enrollment period, you
will have to have it for five years before
you retire in order to continue Option B
you could have elected it when you
first became eligible for it. However,
since two-five multiples of Option C
coverage was never available
before, this open enrollment pe-
/riod is your first opportunity to
' elect them. If you do so and re-
S tire anytime after these additional
multiples go into effect in 2000, you
will be eligible to continue coverage
when you retire as long as you meet the
five-year requirement for your previous
Option C coverage.
The revised FEGLI booklet (RI 76-21)
and a special FEGLI 99 Open Enrollment
Pamphlet (FE 74 A) will give you infor-
mation about the FEGLI Program. We do
not have these materials as of yet, but as
soon as we do, it will be distributed to all
eligible employees.
If after reviewing the material you de-
cide you want to elect more coverage,
you must complete a special FEGLI 99
Open Enrollment Form (RI 76-27) which
you can obtain from the Directorate of
Civilian Personnel, Benefits Branch,
Building 560, Room 101 in Corozal, dur-
ing the open enrollment period.
If further information is needed,
please contact the Benefits Branch at
285-5745/5941/5284.


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1 Tropic Times
g 4April 23, 1999


~News


Sentry, Stratotanker airmen leave Panama


story and photos by Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV
24th Wing Public Affairs Office
HOWARD AFB - The relocation of one Air
Force counterdrug support deployment to Panama
that began under the Carter Administration is immi-
nent. This week, airmen relocate AWACS E-3 Sen-
try and KC-135 Stratotanker operations to Florida.
To stem the flow of illegal drugs, the Sentry was
tasked to provide continuous airborne surveillance
from Howard, and the Stratotanker to support the
Sentry with airborne refueling. This team flew its
final counterdrug patrol sortie April 18.
Other final mission transfer activities at Howard
this month included a departure ceremony April 16,
the packup of maintenance gear, and a few good-
byes among airmen. ,The crews are satisfied that
their recent mission capable rates hover near 99
percent, said Lt. Col. Ed Ryan, 24th Expeditionary
Airborne Control Squadron commander.
One departing expert who operates the KC-135
refueling boom - a pump that sends the gas into the
AWACS - was ready to leave Panama for Florida.
Tech. Sgt. Fuzzy Zoller is deployed to Panama from
MacDill AFB, Fla., the home of the counterdrug
AWACS outfit as of May 5. "You can't find me a
better job than this... I've got the best job in the
world," Zoller remarked while doing his part to gas
the last AWACS from Panama, aloft over the Atlan-
tic in proximity to South America. "I'm from
MacDill, so there's no sense of closure in this mis-
sion for me. I'll just do this from closer to home."
Somewhere, the architects of airpower and the
National Drug Control Policy must have been smil-
ing inside. Their move to transition infrastructure








40 ." - i-, .


Maj. Fred Girbert, 24th Expeditionary Airlift Squadi
erations officer, delivers remarks during the A
E-3 Sentry and KC-135 Stratotanker departure cer
April 16 at Howard AFB, Panama.


An AWACS soars the sky during counterdrug patrol duty near South America while deployed
with the 24th Expeditionary Airborne Control Squadron at Howard AFB, Panama.


that supports counterdrug efforts in the Western
Hemisphere is falling into place at the rank-and-file
level.
Following congressional approval, coordination
to roll the AWACS into the drug war be-
gan a year before the first Sentry was de-
livered to Tinker AFB, Okla., in 1977.
The first deployment of AWACS to
Howard occurred as the Carter Administra-
tion was inking the Panama Canal Treaty that
allows U.S. forces to depart Panamanian soil
before 2000. The last of the militarized
jl Boeing 707 aircraft will leave Panama
roughly seven months before the era of U.S.
forces in Panama ends.
AWACSs needs tankers to extend their
nine-hour unrefueled range, and to that
j end, Stratotankers deployed to Howard in
1983. The tanker aircraft commander for
the final AWACS refueling, Maj. Howard
Williams of Howard, said the planes were
ron op- in Panama off-and-on until 1991, when
WACS they deployed for counterdrug duty in the
emony region as a team.
The presence grew over time.


Three AWACS and tankers were dispatched in
late 1992. Colombian, Peruvian, Ecuadorian and
Bolivian observers, known around Howard as host
nation riders, flew onboard the Sentry in the allied
counternarcotics effort.
The peak presence was four aircraft each. in
1993-94, with the planes further deployed to host
Bolivian, Paraguayan and Ecuadorian airfields.
Capt. Kurt Barry, Sentry standards and evaluation
liaison officer and host nation flight commander at
Howard, was previously deployed to Panama during
the peak era. "I was down here at the time," Barry
said of the AWACS surge.
"We had four tails here and for one-week or two-
week periods we'd deploy to Bolivia, Ecuador or
Paraguay... It was pretty helter-skelter, but the ca-
maraderie of the crews kept it all together despite
having so many of us being deployed at the same
time."
Personnel drawdowns in the mid-1990s left
fewer AWACS personnel available for worldwide
duty, so the presence in Latin America was scaled
back briefly in 1994. The two Sentry and
Stratotanker counterdrug package returned to
Howard in 1995, officials interviewed said.


Staff 5gl Norma Galvan (U.S. Air Force)

Ship 'em h, ship 'em out
Aircraft and crewmembers crowd the India row while four F-16 Vipers from North Dakota (foreground) arrive April 9 to succeed five F-15 Eagles
from Oregon as part of the final Coronet Nighthawk deployment from Panama. The F-15s and support personnel departed Howard April 10.


I












News


Tropic Times15
April 23, 1999 1.


Marines run shore to shore


story by Gunnery Sgt. Allen McCaslin
U.S. Marine Corps Forces, South Panama
HOWARD AFB (U.S. Marine Corps Forces, South
Panama) - During the early morning hours of March
21, the six staff members from the U.S. Marine Corps
Forces, South Panama and a corpsman from Company E,
2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines, began a relay run across
the isthmus of Panama that would carry them from the
Pacific to the Atlantic in eight hours and 25 minutes.
Beginning at the back gate of Howard Air Force
Base near the Vera Cruz Beach, each of the six Marines
ran an initial 2-mile leg.
Thereafter, the run was broken down into individual
relays of approximately four miles each. The runners
then regrouped for a formation run of two miles to the
finish at Maria Chiquita on the Atlantic side of the isth-
mus.
Safety from Panama's notorious vehicle traffic was
maintained with two safety vehicles and a Navy corps-
man supporting the effort.
"As Marines, we are amphibious creatures and (we)


felt compelled to run from ocean to ocean. This run was
a small demonstration of the teamwork we practice every
day. Not only with our fellow Marines, but with all ser-
vices here in Panama," said Capt. Kevin Vail, operations
officer.
The initial relays passed quickly as the runners were
fresh and the temperatures were cool. As the tempera-
ture rose, each runner had to dig a little deeper into their
own reservoir of motivation to continue running up the
steep hills of the Panamanian interior.
In addition to their own motivation, each runner had
the collective pool of runners to keep him charging as
the hills grew steeper and the mercury climbed.
Maj. Al Logan, officer-in-charge of Marines de-
ployed to Panama, felt that teamwork was wholly what
this endeavor was about.
"This was not a great athletic event on par with run-
ning a marathon or even a half marathon; this was
about teamwork. As the cadence goes, 'we started to-
gether, we'll finish together.' We finished together and
that makes the run a complete success."


(Courtesy)
Marine runners from U.S. Marine Corps Forces,
South Panama, who ran from ocean to ocean
from left to right are Maj. Al Logan, Gunnery
Sgt. Allen McCaslin, Capt. Tom Brinegar, Staff
Sgt. David Wallis, Capt. Kevin Vail and Staff
Sgt. David Kinder.


Helpful information on CID investigations


story by Dan A. Walters
Special Agent-In-Charge, Panama CID
Many of you may have read the ar-
ticle submitted by Trial Defense Service
in the April 1 issue of the Tropic Times
entitled, "Silence is a virtue in the eyes
of the law." The article reflects the belief
that under no circumstances should a
suspect discuss offenses) under inves-
tigation with a CID agent without con-
sulting an attorney first. The purpose of
my article is to address the issue of the
legal rights of soldiers in CID investiga-
tions from our perspective, while giving
you, the reader, some insight as to what
motivates CID investigations.


I'd like to start by refuting a comment
in the TDS article which states, "The in-
vestigators goal is rarely to assist you in
clearing yourself, and usually it is to ob-
tain incriminating evidence against you."
In reality, CID's goal is to find the truth,
and if in doing so, the innocence of the
accused is established, then our job is
complete.
This is the angle we approach all our
investigations. Unfortunately, a myth
about CID surfaces occasionally in the
minds of the community (mostly in the
minds of the guilty, or those associated
with the guilty) in that we are sometimes
perceived as conducting our investiga-


tions for the "sole purpose" of placing
blame on individuals. Although perpetra-
tors are frequently identified in our inves-
tigations, this is only a byproduct of our
investigative efforts, and not what actu-
ally motivated a CID investigation. Army
CID units exist worldwide as "fact find-
ing" organizations.
As with TDS, CID units are tenant or-
ganizations on military installations
around the world. This allows us to con-
duct unbiased investigations free from
any potential command influence. Our
dedication in finding the truth is demon-
strated in the CID Agent's Oath, which
states in part ... "I shall at all times seek
diligently to discover the truth, deterred
neither by fear nor prejudice..."
It should be noted we in CID are not
concerned with who the "truth" may
help. Our responsibility is to conduct
felony investigations during which any
and all leads will be pursued, especially
those leads that may exonerate an al-
leged suspect.
The Panama CID Office actually has a
great working relationship with TDS, and
I would like to point out we frequently
accept information from them in an effort
to help resolve an issue with their clients
where a false accusation may exist.
Again, our primary focus is in "discover-
ing the truth," not in putting soldiers in
jail.
There might be some in the commu-
nity who would think our investigations
are one sided and single-minded. The
truth is CID investigations are closely
regulated and scrutinized. All CID units
are subject to detailed and frequent in-
spections by the Battalion Head Quar-
ters staff and CID Command IG officials.
One of the unique aspects of these in-
spections is the fact that no CID unit is
ever evaluated on their ability to "solve"
investigations, or "obtain confessions"
from suspects. These inspections are pri-
marily focused on evaluating the unit's
ability to provide the supported commu-
nity with quality felony investigative
support while ensuring the investiga-
tions are thorough, timely investigated,
and timely reported.
A visit to the CID Office as an al-
leged suspect should never be perceived
as "the end of the world." On the con-
trary, it could become the beginning of a
process of rehabilitation wherein a
soldier's career is salvaged, or be part of
a process wherein the alleged offender
may simply clear up a misunderstanding


of events which caused him/her to be
identified as a possible suspect in a CID
investigation.
All CID agents understand how diffi-
cult it is for a guilty person to waive their
rights and tell the truth, but consider for
a moment the following three of the
seven Army values: "Honor," "Integrity"
and "Personal Courage." Soldiers- of
USARSO, you are members of the great-'
est Army in the history of the world.
Look deep within your consciousness
and ask yourself if the Army Values in-
stilled in you since your inception into
our great Army are legitimate, or are they
just meaningless, hollow words? Martin
Luther King once said, "The true mea-
sure of a man is not how he stands in
comfort and convenience, by how he
stands in the midths of controversy and
challenge." How will you stand? What
degree of courage will you demonstrate
in the heat of controversy?
It does not take much imagination to
realize there are real situations where
only the suspect possesses the knowl-
edge to lead CID agents to the evidence
necessary to exonerate him/herself. If the
suspect remains silent under these situa-
tions, then obviously there is no way for
CID to resolve the issue under investiga-
tion in a timely fashion. Therefore, I dis-
agree with the "one size fits all" mentality
presented by TDS in suggesting it is
never appropriate to discuss your pos-
sible involvement in an offense without
first consulting TDS.
After all, today's Army is filled with
highly trained intelligent soldiers who
are certainly capable of making informed,
good, common sense type decisions.
In closing, should you ever be re-
quired to come to the CID Office as a
possible suspect, my best advise is to
keep an open mind and listen carefully to
your legal rights and the briefing pre-
sented by the agent. Ask any questions
you feel necessary to ensure you com-
pletely understand you legal rights, as
this is extremely important.
Then, if you feel it necessary to pro-
vide a statement, do so at that time. Re-
member, your honesty in any situation
can be perceived as a direct reflection of
your character, and in the case of a CID
investigation, could be a vital key in re-
solving the investigation in your favor.
In the event anyone has a situation
you think may be of CID interest, I en-
courage you to call me directly at 285-
5005.


Dislocation Allowance facts
FORT CLAYTON (U.S. Army South Finance and Accounting Office) - Dislo-
cation Allowance is an allowance which partially reimburses a member for the re-
location expenses of a PCS. Amounts are determined by rank and dependency
status. Advance DLAs are given to members with dependents of sergeants first
class and above without dependents upon request at the member's servicing Fi-
nance Office. Soldiers will bring a copy of their PCS orders to Finance within 30
days of the member's or dependent's departure from PDS.
Sergeants and below without dependents will receive DLA if authorized upon
inprocessing with Finance at their new duty station. A soldier without depen-
dents is normally entitled to DLA when PCSing to a new PDS where government
quarters are not assigned within 60 days of arrival. If a soldier moves off-post and
gets assigned govemement quarters within 60 days, the DLA must be repaid. Pay-
ment procedures applies to CONUS and OCONUS. For more information, please
contact the USARSO Finance and Accounting Office at 288-4208/4059.
The rates effective Jan. 1, 1999 are as follows:
Grade With Dependents Rates Without Dependents Rate
0-10 $2,702.99 $2,195.78
0-9 $2,702.99 $2,195.78
0-8 $2,702.99 $2,195.78
0-7 $2,702.99 $2,195.78
0-6 $2,433.81 $2,014.46
0-5 $2,345.95 $1,940.18
0-4 $2,067.98 $1,798.00
0-3 $1,710.93 $1,440.95
0-2 $1,460.93 $1,143.02
0-1 $1,305.97 $962.51
0-3E $1,838.73 $1,555.98
O-2E $1,659.02 $1,322.74
0-1E $1,532.81 $1,137.42
W-5 $1,996.09 $1,826.76
W-4 $1,829.95 $1,622.27
W-3 $1,676.59 $1,363.48
W-2 $1,542.40 $1,210.92
W-1 $1,333.92 $1,013.62
E-9 $1,756.47 $1,332.33
E-8 $1,619.08 $1,222.89
E-7 $1,503.26 $1,044.77
E-6 $1,389.04 $945.72
E-5 $1,249.25 $87224
B4 $1,086.31 $758.82
E-3 $1,011.23 $744.44
E-2 $962.51 $604.66
E-1 $962.51 $539.17









1 6 Tropic Times
SApril 23, 1999


SFeature


USARSO bids farewell to CSM Quinn

Farewell dinner held in his.. __. _,


honor at Fort Clayton's

Community Club.

story and photos by Sgt. Paul Bouchard
Tropic Times Editor
FORT CLAYTON - An estimated crowd of more than
100 guests that reflect the broad spectrum of U.S. Army
South - NCOs, officers, Department of the Army em-
ployees and retirees - filled the Main Ball Room of Fort
Clayton's Community Center April 16 to bid farewell to
USARSO's Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas J. Quinn Jr.
The evening began with Quinn and the Theater Sup-
port Brigade Command Sgt. Maj. John L. Humphries,
who served as the master of ceremonies for the event,
and Humphries' wife Colleen, greeting guests to the fare-
well dinner. That was followed by a cocktail hour and
then a dinner. Background music was provided by Staff
Sgt. William Washington of the 79th Army Band.
After dinner, various units and organizations pre-
sented Quinn with gifts of gratitude for his service dur-
ing his tenure. The gifts included plaques, a T-shirt,
certificates and framed photographs. The units and or-
ganizations presenting gifts were:
USARSO
The Jungle Operations Training Battalion
The Directorate of Community Activities
The 56th Signal Battalion
The Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers
The Exercise Support Command
The Theater Support Brigade
5th Battalion, 87th Infantry
245th Support Battalion
USARSO Reenlistment
SJS
Deputy Chief of Staff, Resource Management

After the presentation of gifts, the guest speaker for
the dinner, Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr., USARSO
commanding general, spoke about the significance of
having a command sergeant major such as Quinn serv-
ing USARSO. Kensinger's speech highlighted the fol-
lowing:
* How the Army that he and Quinn came into in the
1970s was very different than today's Army. Back then,
drug, alcohol and spouse abuse were rampant, officers
didn't trust their NCOs, and conducting PT was not
encouraged and enforced to the cheers of soldiers.
* How soldiers such as Quinn, through a profes-
sional NCO Corps, helped solve these problems which
led to today's modern, sophisticated and educated Army
force.
*How Quinn's foreign language abilities and knowl-
edge of the Central and South American and Caribbean
regions contributed to USARSO's Distinguished Visi-
tors Program.

Kensinger concluded by saying that Quinn has
served 11 years in Panama (three tours), and that
USARSO has "enjoyed the legacy of his leadership and
his legacy of caring for soldiers ... He's been a great
help to me, especially when going to our numerous TDY
sites."
The evening concluded with Quinn speaking about
his tours here in Panama. He also expressed his thoughts
on his 29-year Army career.
He said his job in the Army was quite simple. "All I
had to do was what I swore to do," he said, referring to


Born: 1951 in the Bronx, New York City.
Years in the Army: Twenty-nine. He plans to retire
next year in the Washington, D.C., area.
Current job: USARSO command sergeant major.
Next assignment: On special assignment at the Mili-
tary District of Washington in Washington, D.C.
Family: Wife Kim. Two school-age children -
Kathleen and Travis.

Quinn's thoughts/comments on:
His fondest memory of USARSO: "Being associ-
ated with such a professional group of soldiers and
civilians. It's been an honor to serve with them...
This (USARSO) is the best crowd I've run across.
We are quality. We are a class act."
The best part of being the USARSO command ser-
geant major: "Traveling through the region and ob-

the oath (which he quoted verbatim) that recruits recite
when they enlist in the military.
Quinn also said our Army is a good one, that "the
system does work. It does provide in many ways."
Quinn also spoke about the significance of Panama
in his Army career, how he served 11 years here in three
different decades; how he met his wife here; his daugh-
ter was born here; and the various ranks he achieved
while climbing the NCO advancement ladder. He summed
it up by saying "Panama has been very good to me."
His speech also featured his thoughts about the Mili-
tary Police Corps, his thoughts on leadership and why
he emphasizes selfless service and empowering employ-


serving the exercises in all the different countries. It
really convinces me .that we are doing good here as far
as the total force ... We live, eat and breathe the total
Army concept here."
The significant accomplishments of USARSO dur-
ing his tenure here: "Many come to mind. We've
won the Army Community of Excellence (Award) three
years in arow. Our dining facility has won two presti-
gious Connelly Awards for being the best dining fa-
cility in its category in the Army. And we never missed
the beat on relocating SOUTHCOM to Miami.
USARSO managed all of that."
One of his best assignments: "It was personally
gratifying to be the commandant of the USARSO NCO
Academy at Fort Sherman, to be able to have an im-
pact on the future leaders of the Army." The academy
was deactivated in September 1994.

ees or soldiers, and his thoughts on the theme "The End
of an Era." The theme, he said, reflects the military draw-
down, which, as time goes by, "is having more of an
impact on me."
Quinn concluded by speaking in fluent Spanish about
his career and his years here in Panama.
He thanked everyone who attended his farewell din-
ner and ended by saying (in Spanish) "Adios and God
bless you all."
Quinn departs USARSO May 7 for his next assign-
ment at the Military District of Washington in Washing-
ton, D.C., where he will serve on a special assignment
appointed by the sergeant major of the Army.


'Panama has been very good to me.'


Quinn-at-a-Glance


"He's been a great help to me, es-

pecially when going to our numer-

ous TDY sites."

"Through his 11 years here we've
Si enjoyed the legacy of his leadership

and his legacy of caring for sol-
diers."

Are- Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr.
.- USARSO commanding general and guest speaker for the farewell
- dinner, expressing some of his views on Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas
J. Quinn Jr.


4�?, / q -





























April 23, 1999


Tropictivities

Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama Page BI
Serving the Joint Community


an, one of El Valle's many attractions.


Visit the highland of El Valle de Anton


story and photos by Griselda Sterling
Tropic Times Staff
FORT CLAYTON - If you're looking for some-
thing to do for the weekend, the Valent Recreation
Center has something for you. El Valle de Anton is
located approximately 120 kilometers from Panama City
- a journey that takes about an hour and a half on
the PanAmerican highway (turn right after the town of
San Carlos).
The town is on the site of an extinct volcano - the
largest in Panama in prehistoric times. It's a resort
town which has become an important jewel in
Panama's ecotourism treasure chest.
"On the cordillera stands a beautiful mountain
which resembles the figure of a sleeping Indian
woman," said Arnulfo Archilbold, a tour guide and
bus driver to the Valley for more than 15 years.
El Valle de Anton is also known for its ideal soil for
flowers and vegetables, and for its cool and pleasant
climate.
"On the outskirts there is also an excellent zoo and
a greenhouse with exotic plants and flowers,"
Archibold said. "And thousands of Panamanians
have built beautiful villas and country homes there."
El Valle is a land of adventurers where you can
find a lot of action with the Canopy adventure
attractions. Visitors are able to imitate Tarzan or the
monkeys flying above the jungle floors through a
series of cables, platforms and pulleys. In this tour,
tourists can also fly above the El Macho waterfall,
one of the largest in the area.
Valent offers you the opportunity to visit this
wonderful land on Sunday tours which departs at 6:30
a.m. Join the center and enjoy shopping in the native
market which is only open on Sundays. You'll be able
to purchase handicrafts such as soapstone carvings,
beteas and pottery. The Valley's lush vegetation,
colorful flowers and waterfalls make it one of the most
popular tourist attractions in Panama.
If you want to explore Panama or just want to get
away from your daily routine, contact the Valent
Recreation Center at 288-6500, and make your reserva-
tion now.


(Left) Kuna
Indian
women
display
handcrafted
Molas ready
for sale.
(Bottom Left)
There are a
wide variety
of arts and
crafts to
choose from
when shop-
ping in El
Valle. (Bot-
tom) Bright,
colorful
flowers are
one of El
Valle's many
attractions.


4',':


-. 4

~ ,-~..-
:4 - -. -'


Band finale
The 79th Army Band's Jazz Combo
and Show Band is holding their final dry
season concert Sunday at Goethals
Monument at the base of the Panama
Canal Commission Administration steps.
0 rW 0 r


Free child care
Air Force staff sergeants and below
can receive up to 20 free hours of
childcare when they are within 90 days of
PCS departure from Howard Air Force
Base. The Child Development Center will
provide services. Members should bring
orders to the Family Support Center to
receive a certificate.


Free calls
All military ID card holders can
make up to two free five-
minute Military Affiliated
Radio System calls to any-
where in the United States
and Puerto Rico 3 - 5 p.m.
Friday and Sundays. For ap-
pointments, call 272-6968.


I




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B2 Tropic Times
B2 April 23,1999


Notices


Tris ndSous


Air Force
*Outdoor Recreation: 284-6107
Tours depart from Howard The-
ater.
Ecological Canal tour 9:30 a.m. -
5 p.m. today and May 3, $60. Don't
miss this unique tour of the Las
Americas Interoceanic National Park.
Includes a boat ride along the
Panama Canal and Gatun Lake and a
visit to a Chocoe Indian village.
Jungle canopy tour 7 a.m. - 5 p.m.
today, $55. Get a unique view of the
jungle's canopy on this exciting
tour. You will traverse from cable to
cable through the jungle tops, just
like the monkeys do. This adventure
features a canopy tour of El Chorro
Macho in El Valle.
Chagres River canoeing and bar-
becue 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday, $20.
You'll love the thrill of this canoe
trip down the beautiful, mighty
Chagres River. Cost includes trans-
portation, guide, canoes, safety
equipment and a delicious barbecue
lunch. Bring sunscreen, hat, snacks
and drinks for the river trip.
Parara Puru Indian village tour 8
a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday, $22. Take a
cayuco ride along the Chagres River
to visit the unique Parara Puru In-


dian community and experience their
social lifestyle and witness their primi-
tive customs dating back 500 years.
Bring a sack lunch and don't forget the
camera.
Corona Beach trip 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Sunday.
Crocodile photo safari 8 - 11 p.m.
Thursday, $40.Trained guides will cap-
ture the crocodiles, giving everyone
the chance to take pictures. Don't for-
get insect repellent, your camera, flash-
light and rain gear.
El Dorado Shopping Mall 9:30 a.m.
- 2 p.m.April 30, $7 per person.
Seafood dining at Siete Mares 6 - 10
p.m. May 7, $7 per person.


Army
*Outdoor Recreation Center: 288-
7355/6453
Reservations for outings are under
way at Building 178, Fort Clayton.
Snorkel/dive at Isla Grande Satur-
day.
Chagres River Rafting trip May 1.
Fee includes breakfast, lunch, trans-
portation, equipment and guide.
El Valle tour Sunday.
Snorkel/dive at Portobelo May 8.
Portobelo offers much more and its


about an hour and 20 minutes from the
city unless you stop off for a swim at
the black sand Maria Chiquita beach
which has changing facilities, or the
white sand Playa Langosta beach.'
El Valle day trip May 9. Join us
once a week, the otherwise quiet and
relaxed El Valle becomes a picturesque
country shopping center celebrating
its most popular tradition, the Sunday
Market. In this event, locals and resi-
dents of neighboring towns gather to
offer an impressive variety of flowers,
handicraft, rattan furniture, vegetables
and fruits.
The Mamoni overnight trip is avail-
able. Includes a two-hour drive into
Chepo and a three-hour horseback
ride. Enjoy typical food, rustic sleeping
accommodations and activities. Not
meant for the mild at heart. For more in-
formation, call the center.
*Valent Recreation Center: 288-
6500
Make early reservations for tours:
Visit historic Panama City founded
in 1506 and destroyed and sacked by
pirate Henry Morgan. Tour the Casco
Viejo founded in 1676, reminiscent of
its Spanish and French heritage. Stop
at San Jose Church to see their
Golden Altar, the National Theater,


Las Bovedas enjoy live music Fri-
days and Saturdays and the French
restauranrant 7 p.m. Monday - Fri-
days and the new Canal Museum.
Isla Grande 6:30 a.m. Saturday.
Stop at Portobelo to see the Black
Christ.
El Valle 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Enjoy
shopping in the native market which
is only open on Sundays. You'll be
able to purchase handicrafts such as
soapstone carvings, bateas, and pot-
tery. El Valle's lush vegetation, col-
orful flowers and waterfalls make it
one of the most popular tourist at-
tractions in Panama. Enjoy lunch at
Hotel Campestre.
Shopping tour 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Thursday. Visit Central Avenue, El
Dorado and Los Pueblos shopping
malls, the most popular shopping
area in town.
Dinner tours 7 p.m. Friday. A
different restaurant is visited each
week.
Carlson Wagonlit offers the lowest
military air fares, hotel, car rental dis-
counts and more. Service also in-
cludes: Special weekday rates at
Gorgona beachfront cabins; Chiva
Parrandera on Thursdays, Fridays
and Saturdays and partial Canal Tran-
sits. Call 288-7077 for details.


mU


Valent Recreation Center
;i1


Air Force
*Howard Community Center:
284-6161
The center is located on the Ground
Floor of Building 707. New hours:
7:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. Monday - Fridays,
noon - 6 p.m. Saturday, closed Sun-
days and holidays and noon - 6 p.m.
down days.
Jewelry show and sale 11 a.m. - 5
p.m. today. You don't have to go off
base to shop for fine jewelry.
Souvenir vendors bazaar 11 a.m. - 5
p.m. Saturday.
Ice cream social 6 - 9 p.m. Wednes-
day. Free ice cream and all toppings.
*Howard Skills Development
Center: 284-6361
The Balloon Shop is located in the
Skills Development Center, Building
711. Check our daily specials and make
someone smile. The Skills Develop-
ment Center now has the Balloon Shop
and Pack-N-Wrap with gifts, balloons
and wrappings for shipping for all oc-
casions.
*Outdoor Adventures: 284-6107
Rent Howard bohios and pools for
private parties or squadron functions.


If you wish to serve alcohol, you must
submit a letter of request to the 24th
Support Group deputy commander at
least four. working days before the
event.
*Howard AFB Sports and Recre-
ation Rental Center: 284-6107/3539
Check out the wide variety of
equipment for rent, camping, fishing
and boating, home entertainment,
home improvement, outdoor, picnic &
party, sports and cooking equipment
for a minimal fee daily, weekend and
weekly rental. PCSing? If so, get $5 off
weekly and monthly rentals on TVs,
VCRs and TV/VCR combos. Must be
accompanied by orders. Rent a moun-
tain bike for a month or week and re-
ceive a free water bottle.

Army
*Valent Recreation Center: 288-
6500
Private tours for 10 - 15 people can
be arranged. Advance reservation and
payment required for any tours listed
or other local tours. The center also
provides music rooms, movies on
weekends, slot machine, pool tables,
ping pong tables and rental service.


Art ad rat


Air Force
*Howard Skills. Development
Center: 284-6361
The center accepts commercial
credit cards.
Registration and payment are re-
quired before attending classes.
Classes will be cancelled 24 hours
prior if minimum participation is not
met.
Artificial flower arranging 10 a.m.
- noon May I - 5, $10 plus supplies.
One lesson.
Stained glass workshop 10 a.m. - 1
p.m. May 1 - 5, $12.50 plus supplies.
Three lessons.


Clay flowers 1 - 3 p.m. May 4, $25. In-
cludes three lessons. Students need to
purchase the supplies.


Army
*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Cen-
ter: 288-5957/7360
Drawing and acrylic painting 2 - 4
p.m. Sunday and 7 - 9 p.m. Wednes-
days. Watercolor and oil painting tech-
niques 7 - 9 p.m. Thursday. Painting sup-
plies are not included in the fee. Regis-
ter in advance. Call for details.
Crafts classes available:
Pottery class 1 p.m. Wednesday.
Woodworking qualification class


9:30 a.m. - noon Saturdays.
Framing instruction 6:30 - 9 p.m.
Thursday. Call for details.
Guitar construction 7 - 9 p.m. Thurs-
day.
*Fort Clayton Ceramics Shop: 288-
4360 Ceramics shop close May 31.
Ceramic instruction available: Learn
the fine art of ceramics. Classes are of-
fered at all levels.
Beginner's ceramic painting 6 - 8
p.m. Thursday. Fee is $20.
Ceramic qualification 10 a.m. - 12:30
p.m. Saturday.
Ceramic orientation for pouring 2- 3
p.m. Wednesday.


Pastel chalk technique 4 - 5 p.m.
Wednesday, $10 plus supplies.
Eye painting 7 p.m. Wednesday, $5.
Dry brush technique 2 - 3 p.m.
Thursday.
Airbrush classes, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Friday, $5.
Advance registration required for
the following courses:
Clay Flower making 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Sunday, $15. Four sessions. Join us
at the center and don't miss the won-
derful class.
Learn to apply Fiesta Color 2 - 4
p.m. Sunday. Cost $20. Four sessions.
Stone stroke class, Sundays, $10.


Red tenternews


-j


I


'oi









Tropic Times
F NotclULi'em s April 23,1999 0


Army
* Ocean Breeze Recreation Center:
289-6699
Deep Sea Fishing Saturday. Fee is .
based on the number of participants. -
Trip is limited to 10 persons.T
Take advantage of the last opportu-
nity to join the center's tour to
Cartagena, Colombia today - Monday.
Cartagena is a city full of contrast. Visi-
tors can see a burro hitched to a home-
made cart parked next to a Mercedes. An ancient 16th
century wall surrounds the city that contains a modern
convention center and luxury hotels. On the same street,
shoppers can pay thousands of dollars for precious em-
eralds cut from the heart of the country, or pennies for
an empanada made by a little old lady.
* Sherman Rental Center: 289-6104
Motorboat operator's safety classes are held 10 a.m.
Saturday at the Sherman Lagoon. Fee is $10. Space is
limited to the first 10 participants. Sign up in advance.
Call your Recreation Center now.
Charters aboard the pontoon boat: Great for fishing
or cruises. Fee is $30 hourly and includes captain, crew,
tackle and ice. Maximum 10 persons. For more informa-
tion call the center.


Speia evnt


Veronica's Room
* The Guild Theater
The Valent Recreation Center and the The Theater
Guild of Ancon are hosting the presentation of
Veronica's Room today - May 1. Featuring are: The
man (Dionisio Johnson), the woman (Myrna Castro),
the girl (Ana L. Broce) and the young man (Michael
Winfrey). For reservations call 272-6786, or go to the
Ancon Playhouse.


End of the Year Party
* Howard Youth Center
Michael J. Productions and Laker Enterprises pre-
sents the Fort Kobbe Elementary School End of the
Year Blow-out Party and Dance 5 - 8 p.m. today at
the school gym. Admission is free for teachers, stu-
dents, family members and school staff. For more
information, call the Youth Center at 284-4700/5615
or the school at 284-3106.


Philharmonie Der
* Atlapa Convention Center
The National Association of Concerts is hosting the
exceptional presentation of Philharmonie Der
Nationen directed by Justus Frantz 8 p.m. May 12 at
the Atlapa Convention Center. Tickets are available at
the association or at the center the night of the event.
Come join us and enjoy this cultural event.' For more
information, call 214-7236.


Shops nd6casse


Air Force
*Howard Community Center:
284-6161
Beginner, intermediate and ad-
vanced English and Spanish classes.
Call the center for more information.
*Howard Pool: 284-3569
Hours of operation: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Tuesday - Sunday and holidays.
Closed Monday.
Water Aerobics 8:30 - 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays, $2/class,
call for more information.
*Howard Auto Skills Center:
284-3370
Hours: 11 a.m. - 7 p.m Tuesdays -
Thursdays, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday, 9
a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sunday and closed Mondays and
holidays.
Vehicle resale lot: Planning to sell
your car? Contact Auto Skills at
Howard.
Services: Towing 11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Tuesday - Thursdays, 11 a.m. - 6
p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday
(as long as a qualified driver is on
duty). If a tow extends beyond 5:30
p.m., there is an additional hourly
charge. Air conditioning repair, brak-
es, oil changes, tune-ups, front-end
alignment and welding available.
Vehicle inspection services 11
a.m. - 7 p.m. Tuesday - Thursdays, 11
a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday
self help and closed Mondays. Cost
is $10.25. Have your vehicle inspect-
ed at the center in Building 722. Ve-
hicles cannot be left for inspections.
Call the center for details.


*Howard Wood Skills Center: 284-
4510
For wood shop needs, please contact
the Fort Clayton Wood Shop.


Army
*Fort Clayton Boat & Scuba Shop:
288-7355/6453
Fishing enthusiasts are invited to par-
ticipate in a Bass Fishing Tournament
through May. There's a $50 cash prize
per month and a $200 cash prize for the
Grand Finale. Register now at Building
178, Fort Clayton.
Motorboat operator course offered 8
a.m. - noon monthly. Fee is $10 for Jon
boat certification, $20 for Boston Whaler/
ocean certification. Advance reservation
required.
Gatun Lake fishing charters avail-
able, $30/person, minimum of three
people, includes Jon boat w/30hp. In-
cludes boat, guide, cooler, fishing tackle,
bait and safety equipment.
Open-water dive classes begin Mon-
days. Minimum of six people required.
Includes pool sessions, theory sessions
and open-water dives. Register in ad-
vance.
The Scuba Shop has equipment for
rent, advanced instruction and services
to include repairing spear guns, regula-
tors and gauges.
*Auto Craft Center:
The center is located in Buildings
178-A, B, C and Building 135, Fort
Clayton.
The shop features work-area bays,
electric lifts, instructions and classes.
Electric engine analysis 4 - 9 p.m.
Monday.


Air-conditioning
maintenance 2 p.m.
Monday, Thurs-
days and Fridays.
Noon - 5 p.m. Satur-
days, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m
Sunday.
Wheel alignment
3 - 9 p.m. Monday,
Thursday and Fri-
days.
Brake repair
class 1 - 9:30 p.m.
Friday. -
*Fort Sherman
Auto Shop Building
153:
Hours of opera-
tion: noon - 4 p.m.
Sunday, closed 4
Monday and Tues-
days, 4 - 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Thurs-
days and Fridays
and 10 a.m. - 6 p.m
Saturday and holi-
days.
The shop has four
bays with one en-
gine lift, tire-chang-
ing equipment, en-
gine hoist, a com-
pressor to remove shocks and various
other equipment.
*Valent Recreation Center: 288-
6500
New hours of operation: 9 a.m. -9
p.m. Monday - Fridays, noon - 9 p.m.
Saturday, Sundays and holidays. Regis-
ter for ongoing classes.
Spanish headstart class, eight week
course, meets twice a week. Intermediate


Spanish classes available.
Fee includes manual. For more infor-
mation, call the center.
Piano classes Mondays - Thurs-
days, half-hour sessions.
Basic English classes 10 a.m. -
12:10 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Intermediate English Mondays and
Wednesday. For more information,
call the center at 288-6500.


A


Spc. Brian Murphy (U.S. Army)
El Morro Castle
El Morro Castle is one of the oldest castles in Puerto Rico. The view from El Morro is
exceptional.










B 4 Tropic Times
B April 23,1999


Potpourri


The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications
on a continuous basis for the following announcements.All
interested applicants need to re-submit an updated SF-171 every
six months. Registers established from these announcements will
be used to fill temporary positions.
VB# 51-OC General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most clerical
positions). *
VB# 52-OC Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch).

* Until further notice, the written test for all temporary
appointments to clerical positions at grades NM-2, 3, and 4 is
waived.
VB# 55-OCSecretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5,
specialized experience required.
56th Signal Battalion Open Continuous Announcements
OPEN: 10-17-97 CLOSE: Will remain open until further
notice
NOTE: The announcements listed below will be used to fill
recurring (temporary/permanent) vacancies within various
divisions of the 56th Signal Battalion. Interested candidates
should ensure that their application package is complete in order
to receive proper consideration (i.e. SF171, OF-612, Resume,
DD-214 if claiming veteran's preference, SF-50, current
performance appraisal).
NON-MANUAL POSITIONS:
VB# 21SIG Telecommunication Specialist, NM-391-11
VB# 26SIG Telecommunication Specialist, NM-391-09
VB# 30SIG Telecommunication Specialist, NM-391-7/9
Directorate of Community Activities, CRD, Open
Continuous Announcements
OPEN: 03-05-99 CLOSE: 30 April 1999
VB# 212-99-SC Recreation Assistant, NM-189-04
VB# 213-99-SC Recreation Assistant, NM-189-04
VB# 214-99-SC Recreation Specialist (Outdoor Activities), NM-
188-09
VB# 215-99-SC Recreation Specialist, NM-188-07
VB# 216-99-SC Recreation Assistant, NM-189-05
VB# 217-99-SC Supervisory Recreation Assistant, NM-188-09
VB# 08A-99-SC Recreation Assistant (Lifeguard), NM-189-04
VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 04-
23-99 CLOSE: 05-04-99
246-99-SC SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATOR, NM-1101-
07. DCA, Business Operations, Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec.
Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-06. NOTE: Position requires working
irregular hours to include weekends and evenings.Temporary
NTE: 07/06/99.
253-99-LG SECRETARY (OA), NM-318-06. DCSRM Program
Budget Div. , Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to
NM-05. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security clearance. Must
be a qualified typist (40 wpm). Temporary NTE 10/15/9,9.
254-99-SC EDUCATION SPECIALIST, NM-1710-07. DCA,
Child and Youth Services, Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: I
yr. equiv. to NM-05. NOTE: Driver's license is required. Selectee
will be required to undergo a background investigation lAW 608-
10. All applicants must complete and sign supplemental
questionnaire and provide pertinent information for CID/MP
check. Incumbent must be able to walk, bend, and stand for
prolonged periods and must be able to lift 40 pounds. May be
required to work on weekends and during special openings of the
center. Temporary NTE 07/06/99.
256-99-SC MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST,
NM-301-09. TSB, DOL, Corozal, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr.
equiv. to NM-07. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security
clearance at the Secret level. Work conditions: Work is performed
inside and outside of the facility and could occasionally be dirty,
dusty, and greasy. The incumbent could be exposed to strains,
cuts, scrapes, bruises, burns, slipping on wet surfaces, falls from
ladders, etc. Existing conditions are minimized by the appropriate
use of required safety equipment. Temporary NTE 10/30/99.
257-99-SC QUALITY ASSURANCE SPECIALIST, NM-1910-
09. DOL, Contract Management Division. Spec. Exp.: I yr.
equiv. to NM-07. NOTE: Driver's license is required.The
incumbent is exposed to bad smelling fumes, to high degrees of
heat, and the possibility of strains, cuts, scrapes, bruises, burns,
slipping, falling from ladders, stacks, etc. These conditions are
minimized by the appropriate use of safety equipment. Temporary
NTE 10/03/99.
258-99-SS TELECOMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, NM-391-12.
56th Signal Battalion, Technical Control Facility, Corozal.
Spec. Exp.: 1 yr equiv to NM-11. TIG: I yr at NM-11. NOTE:
Must be able to obtain security clearance at the TOP SECRET
LEVEL. Competitive Temporary promotion NTE 09/30/99.
Limited to 56th Signal employees.
USAID/Panama
USAID/Panama requires the services of a Voucher Examiner FSN-
6. Qualifications: Completion of high school, two years of college
or technical study in accounting is highly desirable, two to three
years of experience in voucher examining or related fiscal clerical
work, level III (good working knowledge) English ability is
required, basic knowledge and understanding of professional
accounting principles, theories, practices and terminology and a
familiarity with laws, regulations and procedures governing
USAID accounting and payment procedures. The candidate should
be a Panamanian. Those interested in applying, should contact
USAID/Panama or submit a resume to the Personnel Office, Unit
0949 APO 34002, NLT Monday.
Mail and File Clerk Qualifications: Complete high school,
minimum of two years of mail handling experience, one year
experience in a U.S. Agency, level III (good working knowledge)
English ability is required, general records filing and mail
procedures and ability to expeditiously and accurately handle
large volume of documents is necessary. Those interested in
applying, should contact USAID/Panama or submit a resume to
the Personnel Office, Unit 0949 APO 34002, NLT May 5, or call
263-6011


Clb ew


Clayton
*The Loop: 288-7035.
Enjoy the sports games on the TVs available in
CJ's Sports Bar and Grill. Delicious appetizers
available. Lunch is 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Monday -
Fridays, dinner 5 - 9 p.m. Monday - Fridays and 4:30
- 9 p.m. Saturday and Sundays.
Prizmz opens until 11 p.m. Wednesday and
Thursday, I a.m. Friday, Saturdays and Sundays.
Ladies night 9 p.m. Saturday.
Select your favorite tunes tonight at 5 p.m. Over
100 CDs to choose from the 1950s to the 1990s.
*Clavton Community Club: 288-4716.
The Forum features Chef Rangel's special buf-
fets. Country buffet 5 - 9 p.m. Wednesday features
from ham hocks and fried chicken to black-eyed
peas. Seafood Fridays. Each evening is a treat on its own.
The Valent Recreation Center features the last
Carol's Cuisine 6 - 9:30 p.m. Thursday. Special guest is
Osvaldo Ayala. Enjoy the folkloric dancer and dinner mu-
sic.
Sunday brunch 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. The best
deal in town, best value and best entertainment. En-
joy the hot and cold entrees, salads, breakfast items,
pastries and desserts. Great food and background
music.
The club features a special buffet 4:30 - 8 p.m.
Sunday in the ballroom. Members pay $5.95, special
rate for children 5 to 11-years-old and under 5 free.
Non-member fee available.
Entertainment: Enjoy Disco Wednesdays, Fri-
days and Saturdays in the Ballroom.
The Corral is open 7 p.m. - 2 a.m. Wednesday,
Friday and Saturdays. Join in for great country
sounds.
Tecno Latin Sounds 9 p.m. Wednesday, Fridays
and Saturdays at The Underground.
*Casa Maria: 288-5767
Authentic Mexican cuisine served 5 - 9 p.m.
Tuesday - Saturdays. Delivery service available on
Fort Clayton.
*La Mola Cafe: 288-4202
Breakfast 6:30 - 9:30 a.m. Monday - Fridays, 7 -
11 a.m. Saturday - Sundays; lunch 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Monday - Fridays, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday - Sun-
days; dinner 5 - 8 p.m. daily.
*Cafe 519: 288-6007
Breakfast 6 - 11 a.m. Monday - Fridays.
Lunch 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. with hot specials, a salad
bar and sandwiches. Enjoy special buffet Thurs-
days.
*STRAC Jr. Club: 283-4119
STRAC Jr. Club is now open at Cocoli 5 - 10 p.m.
Thursday - Sundays. Snacks and pool table are
available.

8Sherman
*Sherman Community Club: 289-6116/6198
Disco nights 8 p.m. - I a.m. Friday and Saturdays.
Country and Western nights 8 - 11 p.m.
Thursday.
Fast food menu items served 5 p.m. Sunday -
Tuesdays, 6 p.m. Wednesday - Saturdays.
O'Club special Close the Door with Us. Live
Rock with Gabby and DJ music 8 p.m. April 30.

Howard
*Howard Club-Building 113: 284-4680.


Two Can Officers' Lounge, super social hour
5:30 -7 p.m. Friday. Live entertainment, DJ, great
food and company starts at 5:30 p.m.
Pub Fare 5 - 9 p.m. Wednesday - Saturdays.
*Tropic Breeze Club-Building 710: 284-4189
Cashiers hours: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Saturday -
Wednesdays, 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Thursday, 9 a.m. - noon
Friday.
Closed for lunch 1:15 - 2 p.m. daily.
"A la Carte" Sunday breakfast 9 a.m. - noon.
Eggs-to-order, pancakes, bacon, sausage,
omelets, fresh breads, croissants and more.
A la Carte breakfast 6 - 9 a.m. Monday - Fridays.
International lunch buffet 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
$4.95. Friday: Southern buffet. Monday: All
American. Tuesday: Italian. Wednesday:
Mexican. Thursday: Oriental.
All ranks a la carte dining. 5:30 - 9 p.m.
Wednesday - Saturdays. A great menu with
appetizers, salads, soups and entrees to please
everyone.
Breezeway open 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Monday -
Wednesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Tuesday and Fridays, 1 la.m. - 11:30 p.m. Saturday
and Sundays, noon - 11 p.m. Sunday.
Steak out 2:30 - 8 p.m. Sunday.
*Tropic Breeze Club Ballroom
Open for special functions only.
*Tropic Breeze Club Casual Cove: 284-4189.
Open 11 a.m. - midnight Mondays, Wednesdays
and Thursdays.
Members super social hour 11 a.m. - 1:30 a.m.
Friday.
Pool tournaments 6 p.m. Friday followed by
Alternative Rock, and Tecno.
Variety music noon - midnight Saturdays and
9 p.m. Sunday.
Karaoke evening with Rick 6 p.m. Sunday
and 11 a.m. - 2 a.m. Tuesday.
Wednesday night new draft beer special.
Country dance lesson 7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Members night and club card drawing 6:30 p.m.
Thursday. Social hour reduce price 4:30 - 7:30 p.m.
All nighters 9' a.m. today and April 30. Open
to enlisted members and their guest.
*Top 3 Enlisted Lounge: 284-4189
Live jazz with Barbara Wilson 6:30 - 11 p.m.
Sunday. All enlisted are welcome.
Open 4 - 9 p.m. Monday - Thursdays and 4 - 11
p.m. Friday.
Live jazz "blue notes" 6:30 p.m. Sunday. All
enlisted are welcome.
Boss and buddy night social hour snacks 5:30
- 6:30 p.m. Monday.
*Mulligan's on the Green at Horoko: 283-
3295
Build your own breakfast 6 - 10 a.m. Saturday,
Sunday and holidays.
Weekly lunch and dinner 10 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Monday - Thursdays, 10 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. Friday,
6 - 9:30 p.m. Saturday and 6 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Sunday and holidays.
Mongolian barbecue 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. Monday,
$8.95 for the first 8-ounce and $4.95 for the
vegetarian version.
*Cafe Seven-O-Seven-Building 707: 284-5848
Open 6 a.m. - 7 p.m. Monday - Friday. Try our deli
sandwiches and pastries.


Great - P-M. FRIDAY5. COM E
JOIN U5 AT THE FORT

I7 CLAYTON COMM U- I







FORMATIONCALL

I 288-4716

I-- ----------









Movies


Tropic Times B
April 23, 1999


Location Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Howard AFB 6:30 pm: Forces of 4 pm: At First 4:30 pm: The 7 pm: My Favorite 7 pm: 200 Ciga- 7 pm: True Crime* 7 pm: My Favorite
284-3583 Nature Sight" Rugrats Movie" Martian rettes Martian
8:30 pm: True 6:30 pm: My 6:30 pm: Forces of
Crime* Favorite Martian Nature*
8:30 pm: 200 8:30 pm: True
Cigarettes Crime*

Fort Clayton 6:30 pm: My Favorite 4:30 pm: The 4 pm: At First 7 pm: True Crime* 7 pm: My Favorite 7 pm: 200 Cigarettes 7 pm: True Crime*
288-7279 Martian Rugrats Movie"* Sight"* Martian
8:30 pm: 200 6:30 pm: Forces of 6:30 pm: My
Cigarettes Nature Favorite Martian
8:30 pm: True 8:40 pm: 200
Crime* Cigarettes




All movies are subject to change depending on R Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent
arrival in country or adult guardian.
Tickets are available in five price categories: $3.50, $3, $1.75, PG-13 Parental guidance suggested for children under 13.
$1.50 and $1. *First run movies $3.50 **Special Price PG Parental guidance suggested.
AAFES Home Page: www.panama.phoenix.net/-aafespan.default.html G Suitable for general audience.


: _Now showing


At First Sight wedding. How
Mira Sorvino, Val Kilmer automobiles?N
When Amy falls in love with Virgil she convinces him to un- Ben has to won
dergo eye surgery to restore his sight. They soon learn that all thing. R, 1 hr,
gifts come with a price and vision is comprised of a multitude of
senses. R, 2 hrs, 9 min.

Forces of Nature Based on theI
ambitious telev
Sandra Bullock, Ben Affleck Martian whose
Ben has two days to get from New York to Savannah for his earth. PG, 1 h


IT'S 11:59 ON NEW YEARS EVE.
DO YOU KNOW WHERE YOUR DATE IS?


Ben Affleck C y Affleck Dave Chappelle
Guillermo Diaz Angela Featherstone Janeane Geoflo
Gaby Hoffmann Kate Hudson Courtney Love Jay
Martha Plimpton Christina Ricci Paul Rudd


PARAMOUNTPICiRESM AKESHOREENERIAINMEN Im IONITMIV FILMS DOGSTARFILMS
. "20, CIAREIES" aM iEN AFFLECK CASEYAFFLECK DAVE CAPPELE ANGELAFEAIHERSIONE COURNEY LOVE
JAYIMOR MARIHAFLIMPON CHRISTINA RICCI PAULRUDD p C, CECILIA KATE ROUE ANDREIAMAL SMIENL BERNSEIN
u* SuPmIANE0DALL PiSMi c BOBYan MARK MOHERSBAiUGH s,u,IISSANELY A "'lE 0ILSA. ZENOCHURGIN "iOSllIINAMAYHEW
0 DIRECTOR OF XCLITr
a o11D01 FRAHiYANKPMINlI IDOMlROSENBERO MIKE NEELL ALAN REENSAN TEDIANNEBAUM SIGURJdONIHVATISSON
166]V ? U ? I TTE m DPIRRODT 6 j f....
BTSYMEERS DAVID GALE VAN TOFFLER u, SHANALARSEN u.RE ISABHAMDNGARCIA , '.

*R www il2a0iglaS.rlene co P___..w.....
* Original SintackAh lOn MERCURYRECORDS Readle NeovelFFrnMIVMBOKS ..

* Showing tonight-at the Fort Clayton Theater.
******** 0000000* 000 00000000000 .***** O*** 0OOO O O


w hard can that be in this age of planes, trains and
Various circumstances hinder his trip to Savannah.
under if somebody up there is trying to tell him some-
49 min.

My Favorite Martian
Jeff Daniels, Christopher Lloyd
television series, "My Favorite Martian,"
vision reporter Tim O'Hara stumbles upon a
spaceship has accidentally crash landed on
r, 28 min.


The Rugrats :
Movie
Animated
The Pickles family faces
the biggest adventure of any
household, the birth of a .
new child, Dil Pickle. Big
brother Tommy and his *
pals decide that the baby is o
cramping their style and *
decide to take him back to
the hop-sickle. G, 1 hr, 23 *
min.

True Crime :
Clint Eastwood, Isaiah *
Washington
Clint Eastwood portrays *
a self-destructive investiga-
tive reporter with less than 0
12 hours to save the life of .
a man he knows is innocent. *
Eastwood's first assign-
ment with the Oakland Tri-
bune is to cover the execu- *
tion of a convicted mur-
derer, played by Isaiah *
Washington. When the o
facts of the case don't add
up, Eastwood begins a
manic search for the infor- o
nation, which will stay *
Washington's execution.
R, 2 hrs, 7 min.

200 Cigarettes
Ben Affleck, Courtney *
Love
Courtney Love, Ben
Affleck and Paul Rudd star
in a comedy set in New
York's East Village on *
New Year's Eve 1981.
Love, Rudd, and an en-
semble cast bar hop miser-
ably through the East Vil- *
lage looking to have a good
time and intersecting at a
bash thrown by Martha .
Plimpton. R, 1 hrs, 42
min.
O O � �


Howard AFB


6:30 pm: Forces of
Nature (PG-13) Ben
Affleck, Sandra Bullock


8:30 pm: True Crime
(R) Clint Eastwood,

Isaiah Washington



Fort Clayton


6:30 pm: 10 Things I
Hate About You (PG-
13) Larisa Oleynik,
Julia Styles


8:30 pm: 200 Ciga-
rettes (R) Ben Affleck,
Courtney Love


L


e;) 6 OP
C�l

















B 6 Tropic Times
0 April 23, 1999


1 SCN TV


Key: + Program time change due to live programming event; * Mature theme; *" Series starts; "*Series ends; "" Program moved to new day and/or time


I edesay Ari 2.


- 6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
Co 9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Barney & Friends
10:30 Kiafna's Flex Appeal
0 11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
C Show
C 12:00 Headline News
(0 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
� 1:00 Port Charles
O 1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Sylvester &
Tweety Mysteries
3:30 Kratt's Creatures
4:00 Sesame Street
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:35 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 NHL Playoffs: (T)
Oilers at Stars
5:00 Headline News
5:30 ESPNews


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
ad 8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Barney & Friends
'" 10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
g 11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
- Show
12:00 Headline News
1 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
l 1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Sylvester &
Tweety Mysteries
3:30 Kratt's Creatures
4:00 Xena: Warrior Princess
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 Unlawful Entry (TV-
PG)
3:00 The Adventures Of
Baron Munchausen(TV-
PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 ESPNews







(D 6:00 CBS 48Hours
oa 7:00 ABC Crime & Justice
8:00 Headline News
V) 8:30 Morning Business
Report
� 9:00 ABC Good Morning
a, America
11:00 AMA Supercross
S1:00 NHL 2Night
1:30 NBA 2Night
2:00 MSNBC Time and Again
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
5:00 Showbiz Today
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 NHL Playoffs: (T)
Oilers at Stars
5:00 Sportscenter


7:00 Homicide: Life on/
Streets
8:00 Young Ivanhoe (TV-
PG)
10:00 Doug
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Simpsons
11:30 Home Improvement
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
1:00 National Geographic
Explorer
3:00 Homicide: Life on/
Streets
4:00 Young Ivanhoe (TV-
PG)
See Prime Time table
12:00 Flipper (TV-G)
2:00 The View
3:00 Interior Motives
3:30 Home Matters
4:00 Grace Under Fire
4:30 Ellen
5:00 Murphy Brown
5:30 Mad About You


6:00 Headline News
6:30 Classic Cartoon
Marathon
9:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
9:30 Are You Afraid of the
Dark?
10:00 America's Family
Kitchen
10:30 California's Gold
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Navy/Marine Corps
News
12:00 Soul Train
1:00 Nova
2:00 NHL Playoffs:
Quarterfinals (Game 2)
Blues at Coyotes
5:00 Dateline NBC
See Prime Time table
12:00 Baywatch
1:00 Crooked Hearts (TV-
PG)
3:00 Stir Crazy (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 Hour of Power


6:00 Headline News
6:30 Classic Cartoon
7:00 New Adventures of
Winnie The Pooh
7:30 Muppet Babies
8:00 The Little Mermaid
8:30 Disney's Recess
9:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
9:30 Are You Afraid of the
Dark?
10:00 America's Family
Kitchen
10:30 California's Gold
1 1:00 Headline News
11:30 Navy/Marine Corps
News
12:00 Soul Train
1:00 Hercules: Legendary
Journeys
2:00 NHL Playoffs:
Quarterfinals (Game 2)
Blues at Coyotes
5:00 WWF -Wrestling
See Prime Time table
12:00 Baywatch
1:00 Crooked Hearts (TV-
PG)
3:00 Stir Crazy (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 Hour of Power





6:00 Dateline NBC Fri
7:00 ABC 20/20 Fri
8:00 CNN Saturday Morning
9:00 Showbiz
9:30 Style with Elsa Klensch
10:00 CNN Saturday
10:30 Page One with Nick
Charles
11:00 Snowboarding
12:00 IROC Auto Racing:
1:00 Major League Baseball:
Tigers at White Sox
4:00 AMA Supercross
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 Washington Week In
Review
1:30 Wall Street Journal
Report
2:00 Major League Baseball:
(T)
Blue Jays at Yankees
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 Beverly Hills, 90210
7:00 Party of Five
8:00 Flipper (TV-
PG)
10:00 The View
11:00 Interior Motives
11:30 Home Matters
12:00 Grace Under Fire
12:30 Ellen
1:00 Murphy Brown
2:00 Beverly Hills 90210
3:00 Party of Five
4:00 Flipper (TV-PG)
See Prime Time table
12:00 The Attic: Hiding Of
Anne Frank
(TV-PG)
2:00 Worship for Kids
2:30 On Main Street
3:00 700 Club
3:30 Real Videos
4:00 Touched By An Angel
5:00 Road to Avonlea


6:00 The Coral Ridge Hour
6:30 Outreach of Love
7:00 The Field Afar
7:30 Day of Discovery
8:00 Sunday Today
9:00 Magic School Bus
9:30 Arthur
10:00 Promised Land
1 1:00 Headline News
11:30 Air Force TV News
12:00 Americas Funniest
Home Videos
12:30 SCN Special:
Incredible Animal Rescues II
1:30 Motor Week
2:00 Dr. Quinn Medicine
Woman
3:00 7' Heaven
4:00 NASCAR Winston Cup
Auto Racing: (T)
Die Hard 500
(Talladega)
See Prime Time table
12:30 America's Black Forum
1:00 Friday Night
2:00 Videolinks
3:00 Nobody's Child (TV-
PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News At Sunrise






6:00 The Coral Ridge Hour
6:30 Outreach of Love
7:00 The Field Afar
7:30 Day of Discovery
8:00 Sunday Today
9:00 Magic School Bus
9:30 Arthur
10:00 Promised Land
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Air Force TV News
12:00 Americas Funniest
Home Videos
12:30 SCN Special:
Incredible Animal Rescues II
1:30 NBA Showtime
2:00 NBA Basketball:
Knicks at Heat
4:30 NBA Basketball:
Sonics at Jazz
See Prime Time table
12:30 America's Black Forum
1:00 Friday Night
2:00 Videolinks
3:00 Nobody's Child (TV-
PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News At Sunrise


6:00 Motor Week
6:30 This Week In Motor
Sports
7:00 Sunday Morning
8:00 CBS Sunday Morning
9:30 CBS Face the Nation
10:00 Headline News
10:30 Air Force TV News
11:00 PGA Golf:
Greater Greensboro
Chrysler Classic
(31 Round)
1:00 Major League Baseball:
Mets at Cubs
4:00 NASCAR Winston Cup
Auto Racing: (T)
Die Hard 500
(Talladega)
See Prime Time table
12:00 George Michael Sports
Machine
12:30 Headline News
1:00 ABC This Week
2:00 PGA Golf:
Greater Greensboro
Chrysler Classic
(Final Round)
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 Dr.Quinn Medicine
Woman
7:00 7th Heaven
8:00 The Attic: Hiding Of
Anne Frank
(TV-PG)
10:00 Worship for Kids
10:30 On Main Street
11:00 700 Club
11:30 Real Videos
12:00 Touched By An Angel
1:00 Road to Avonlea
2:00 Dr.Quinn Medicine
Woman
3:00 7th Heaven
4:00 The Attic: Hiding Of
Anne Frank
(TV-PG)
See Prime Time table
12:00 Young Mr. Lincoln
(TV-PG)
2:00 Doug
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Simpsons
3:30 Home Improvement
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
5:00 America's Castles


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Mister Rogers'
Neighbrhd
10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
1 1:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Sesame Street
4:00 California Dreams
4:30 All That
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 Judgement at Nuremburg
(TV-PG)
4:30 Movie Magic
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News At Sunrise


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Mister Rogers'
Neighbrhd
10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
1 1:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Bonkers
3:30 Superman
4:00 California Dreams
4:30 All That
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 Judgement at Nuremburg
(TV-PG)
4:30 Movie Magic
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News At Sunrise


6:00 Dateline NBC Sun
7:00 Navy/Marine Corps
News
7:30 Air Force TV News
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Morning Business
Report
9:00 ABC Good Morning
America
11:00 NHL Playoffs:
Quarterfinals (Game
3)(T)
Senators at Sabres
2:00 ABC 20/20 Sun
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
5:00 Showbiz Today
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 NHL Playoffs:
Quarterfinals (T)
Hurricanes at Bruins
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 Antiques Roadshow
7:00 ER
8:00 Spectrum Movie
8:30 Young Mr. Lincoln
(TV-PG)
10:00 Doug
10:30 Rugrats
I 1:00 Simpsons
I 11:30 Home Improvement
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
1:00 America's Castles
2:00 Antiques Roadshow
3:00 ER
4:00 Spectrum Movie
4:30 Young Mr. Lincoln (TV-
PG)
See Prime Time table
12:00 The Front (TV-PG)
2:00 Doug
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Simpsons
3:30 Home Improvement
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
5:00 Amazing Machines


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Blues Clues
10:30 Co-Ed Training
1 1:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00Talespin
3:30 Newton's Apple
4:00 Nick News
4:30 Scholastic Sports
America
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 The Birdcage (TV-PG)
3:00 Mistrial (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News At Sunrise


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Blues Clues
10:30 Co-Ed Training
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Talespin
3:30 Newton's Apple
4:00 Nick News
4:30 Scholastic Sports
America
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 The Birdcage (TV-PG)
3:00 Mistrial (TV-PG)
5.00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News At Sunrise


6:00 Dateline NBC Mon
7:00 ABC 20/20 Mon
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Morning Business
Report
9:00 ABC Good Morning
America
1 1:00 NASCAR Busch Series
Auto Racing: (T)
Touchstone Energy 300
1:30 NBA Inside Stuff
2:00 MSNBCTime and
Again
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
5:00 Showbiz Today
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 NBA Basketball: (T)
Jazz at Sonics
4:30 RPM 2 Night
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 Ancient Mysteries
7:00 Gun
8:00 The Front (TV-PG)
10:00 Doug
10:30 Rugrats
I 1:00 Simpsons
I1:30 Home Improvement
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
1:00 Amazing Machines
2:00 Ancient Mysteries
3:00 Gun
4:00 The Front (TV-PG)
See Prime Time table
12:00 Three Amigos (TV-PG)
2:00 Doug
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Simpsons
3:30 Home Improvement
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
5:00 The Aviators


6:00 Today Show 6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today 8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Barney & Friends 10:00 Blues Clues
10:30 Bodyshaping 10:30 Co-Ed Training
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey Show 11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
12:00 Headline News Show
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:00 Headline News
1:00 Port Charles 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:25 Guiding Light 1:00 Port Charles
2:15 General Hospital 1:25 Guiding Light
3:00 Sesame Street 2:15 General Hospital
4:00 Saved By Bell: New Class 3:00Animaniacs
4:30 Legends of the Hidden 3:30 Sesame Street
Temple 4:30 Blues Clues
5:00 Jeopardy! 5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table See Prime Time table
12:35 ESPNews 12:35 ESPNews
1:05 Lantern Hill 1:05 Jumpin' Jack Flash
3:00 Moonstruck (TV-PG) (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News 3:00 Husbands And Wives
5:30 NBC News At Sunrise (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News At Sunrise


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Barney & Friends
10:30 Bodyshaping
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Goof Troop
3:30 Disney's Aladdin
4:00 Saved By Bell: New
Class
4:30 Legends of the Hidden
Temple
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly'News
See Prime Time table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 Lantern Hill
3:00 Moonstruck (TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News At Sunrise


6:00 Dateline NBC Tues
7:00 Early Edition
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Morning Business
Report
9:00 ABC Good Morning
America
11:00 NHL Playoffs:
Quarterfinals (Game 4)
Devils at Penguins
2:00 MSNBC Time and Again
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
5:00 Showbiz Today
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 NHL Playoffs:
Teams To Be Announced
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 "Vietnam: The 10,000
Day War"
7:00 Melrose Place
8:00 Three Amigos (TV-PG)
10:00 Doug
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Simpsons
11:30 Home Improvement
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
1:00 The Aviators
2:00 "Vietnam: The 10,000
Day War"
3:00 Melrose Place
4:00 Three Amigos (TV-PG)
See Prime Time table
12:00 You Must Remember
This
(TV-PG)
2:00 Doug
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Simpsons
3:30 Home Improvement
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
5:00 Understanding


6:00 Today Show
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Blues Clues
10:30 Co-Ed Training
11:00 The Oprah Winfrey
Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:25 Guiding Light
2:15 General Hospital
3:00 Animaniacs
3:30 Waynehead
4:00 Hercules: Legendary
Journeys
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:35 ESPNews
1:05 Jumpin' Jack Flash
(TV-PG)
3:00 Husbands And Wives
(TV-PG)
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC News At Sunrise


6:00 Dateline NBC Wed
7:00 ABC 20/20 Wed
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Morning Business
Report
9:00 ABC Good Morning
America
11:00 Major League
Baseball: (T)
Blue Jays at Angels
2:00 CBS News 60-MIN II
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
5:00 Showbiz Today
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 ABC Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 NHL Playoffs: (T)
Teams To Be
Announced
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 Biography:
Lewis and Clark
7:00 X-Files
8:00 You Must Remember
This
(TV-PG)
10:00 Doug
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Simpsons
I 1:30 Home Improvement
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
9
1:00 Understanding
2:00 Biography
Lewis and Clark
3:00 X-Files
4:00 You Must Remember
This
(TV-PG)
See Prime Time table
12:00 Strangers on a Train
(TV-PG)
2:00 Doug
2:30 Rugrals
3:00 Simpsons
3:30 Home Improvement
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
9
5:00 National Geographic
Explorer


I_ Thursday, April 29 1













* SCN TV


Tropic Times
April 23,1999 7


Key: + Program time change due to live programming event; * Mature theme; " Series starts; ***Series ends; "" Program moved to new day and/or time, (AIP) Already in progress

PRIMETIME 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30
SCN News
0SCN Ne Showbiz ABC World isterHeadline SCN News :35 Late Show
8 & 10 eadne Today w Sister" Star Trek: Deep Space 9 X Files News Tonight Show w/ Jay w/ David
News (JIP) Tonigh Leno Letterm an

Fri. 14 5 Showhiz Boy Meets "Sister, tar Tk Deep Space 9 X Files Headline SCN News :35 Late Show
14Headline Today W3rd S- S Tonight Show w/ ]ay w/ David
April News (JIP) Leno Letterman
23 ABC World CBS
15 & 64 Nightly Evening NBA Basketball: Raptors at M agic NBA Basketbhall: Trailblazers at Jazz
News News
16 & 65 The View Interior Honme Grace
16 & 65 The iew Motive Matrs nder Fire Ellen Murphy Brown Beverly Hills 902J Pary f Five

8 & 10 Newsad ne Air Force Beverly H ills 902 10 Melrose Place ABC 20/20 Friday Headline Saturday Night Live

Sat. 14 & 63 MHeadline Air FPree Beverly Hills 911211I Melrose Place ABC 20/20 Friday Newsadine Saturday Night Live
April
24 15 & 64 H die ne Corp NB lim NBA Basketball: Lakers at Spurs Sports Tonight Hedline McLghli-
News
Worship fir On Mam 7 C Iu Real Dr. uinn Medicine
16 & 65 orshifo Streetain 700 Club Videos Touched By An Angel Road to Avonlea DrmaQuinn Medicine 7h Heaven

Austin City
Lim its
8 & 10 Cone:NASCAR Winston Cup Racing (T) Die Hard 500 (Talladega Wot men's Soeccr China vs U.S. Women's Headline Nova Buddy
N ational Team N ews 0Guy/Story-
ville

Kids Say Austin City
Sun. 14 63 Cnt NBAasketball: The Maggie Circle of Deceitt (TV-PG) Headline Nova Buddy
Apri Sorntis at Jazz D ar..dest Winterls NewsG

Thnga USThis Week
15 & 64 Cont:NASCAR Winston Cup Racing (T) Die Hard 500 (Talladega) Wo men's Soccer China vs U.S. Women's Sports IN BA Perspectives
National Team Tionight Basketball
Home
16 & 65 Doug Rugrats Simpsons Improvem- Star Trek: Deep Space 9 America's Castles Antiques Roadshow ER
ent _
SCN News SCN News :35 Late Show
8 & 10 adli5 Showbiz. 60 Minutes Dateline NBC ABC 20/201 Headline Tonight Show w/ Jay with David
News (IP) y Leno Letterman
SCN News Everybody . SCN News :35 Late Show
Son. 14 & 63 deadline Todayi Minutes its LeryTod hey Practice Headline Tonight Show w/ Jay w/ David
Headline Today Night' Raymond News Lenoi Letterm an
April News
26 ABC World CBS Headline Nightly
15 & 64 News NHL Playoffs: Quarterfinals Maple Leafs at Flyers Evening PBS Newshour News Business
Tonight News I Report

16 & 65 Doug Rugrats Simpsons Improvem- Star Trek: Deep Space 9 Amazing Machines Ancient Mysteries Gun
ent
SCN News deadline SCN News :35 Late Show
8 & 10 Headline:' Sh iz Touched By An Angel Miss Rose White (TV-PG) Headlne Tonight Show w/ Jay w/ David
N ews (JIP) Leno Letterman
News (JIP)
SCN News SCN News : 35 Late Show
Headline' n t J w/David
Tue. 14 & 63 adline5 Showbiz Touched By An Angel Miss Rose White (TV-PG) Hews Tonigh Show w/ Jay . w/ David
A pril News (JIP) Len Letterman.
27 ABC World CBS NBA Headline Nightly
15 & 64 News Evening NBA Baskethall: Magic at Pacers Fantastic PBS Newshour News Business
Tonight News Series Report

16 & 65 Doug Rugrats Simpsons Improvem- Star Trek: Deep Space 9 The Aviators Day War" *Melrose Place
ent
HSCN News : 35 Late Show
8 & 10 SCN News:05 Latern Hill :10 Moonstruck (TV-PG) Tonight Show w/ Jay w/ David
News Leno Letterm an

SCN News Home SCN News: 35 Late Show
Wed. 14 & 63 'Hedline Tdahwiz M oesha Im provem- Dawson's Creek Buffy The Vampire Slayer News Tnight Show w/ Jay w/ David
April News (IP)
ABC World CBS Headline Nightly
28 15 & 64 News Major League Baseball: Yankees at Rangers Evening PBS Newshour News Business
Tonight News Report

16 & 65 Doug Rugrats Simpsons wlmprovem- Star Trek: Deep Space 9 Understanding Clark X-Files
ent
SCN News SCN News :35 Late Show
10 Showbiz Friends Working Frasier Mad About R eadline Tonight Show w/ Jay w/ David
8 & 10 Headline Today You News Leno Lctterman
News (JIP)
SCN News SCN News :35 Late Show
Thur. 14 & 63 5 Showbiz Friends Working Frasier Mad About ER Headline Tonight Show w/ Jay w/ David
Thur. 14 & 63 Headline Today You News Leno Leittelrman
April News (JIP)
29ABC World CBS Headline BuNinessghtly
15 & 64 News NHL Hockey Playoffs: Teams to bhe Announced Evening PBS Newshour News Business
Tonight News Report

16 & 65 Doug Rugrats Simpsons Improvem- Star Trek: Deep Space 9 - National Geographic Explorer Homicide: Life on Streets
I en






SCN Prime Time Movies & Specials SCN Weekend Sports

CIRCLE OF DECEIT. A woman vows revenge after she meets with a terrible be- NBA Basketball:
trayal at the hands of her husband and best friend. Starring Joanna Cassidy, 7:00p m Tonigh Raptor,. at Magic Cable 15
Esai Morales, and Janine Turner. (Drama, 1991, TV-PG) 8 p.m. Sunday. 9:30 p m Tonight .".. Trailblazersat Jazz . Cable 15

MISS ROSE WHITE. 1940s N.Y. career woman who has hidden her Jewishness 7:30 p m Saturda ' Lakers at Spurs Cable 15
comes to grips with her Polish immigrant sister, long thought to have died in the 2:00p.m Sunday ' Knicks at Heat Cable 14
Holocaust. Starring Penny Fuller, Gina Gershon, and Amanada Plummer. (Drama, 4:30 p.m Sunda. SonIcs .it Jj/.z Cable 14
1992, TV-PG) 8 p.m. Tuesday. Major League Baseball:
Major League Baseball:

SCN's VCR Alert - Recommended for videotaping 1:00p m Saturda. Tiger, .at White So\ Cable 15
1:00p.m.Sundad Meti. at Cubs Cable 15
JUDGEMENT AT NUREMBURG. It has been three years since the most important Auto Racing: , ' ' '
Nazi leaders had,-already been tried. This trial is about 4 Judges who used their : n C Sd500 (T) Cable 15
offices to conduct Nazi sterilization and cleansing policies. Retired American 4:00 P.M. Sunday . 500 (T) Cable 15
Judge, Judge Dan Haywood has a daunting task ahead of him. The Cold War is NHL Hockey Playoffs:
heating up and no one wants any more trials as Germany, and allied Govern- 7:00 p.m. Saturday Blues at Coyotes Cable 14
ments, want to forget the past. But is that the right thing to do is the question
that the tribunal must decide. Starring Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, and Rich- Senior's PGA Golf:
ard Widmark. (War Drama, 1961, TV-PG) 1:05 a.m. Tuesday. 11:00 a.m. Sunday PGA Championship (Final Round) Cable 14











B8 Tropic Times
SApril 23,1999


* Classified Ads


Beagle pups, show quality,
263-5986
Big live amazon plant, spe-
cially for angel fish, 20" high
$10, 272-1216
Cat, tabby/wht, fem, 2 yrs,
fem, grt mouser, free, 272-
6162
Cocker spaniel, 2 adult, 1 pup
w/kennels, 284-6124
German shepherd, fern, fixed,
inside dog, very obedient, gd
w/kids, 284-4430
Pit bull type dog, fem, 2 yrs,
micro-chip, all shots, fixed,
free, 284-5987
Toy poodle, blk, male, 4 mos,
grt w/kids $100, 284-4236




All occasion cakes, prof cake
decorator, 2 day notice, 284-
6608 Mary
Assist reg/obtaining birth cert
at Panama civil registry, 223-
2153 after 6 pm, Darnell
Avon Christmas books, free,
284-3028
Awesome cakes, banana
bread, cinnamon rolls, 284-
3798 Erica
Baby-sitter, my house or
yours, 284-6790 Raquel
Baby-sitter, Red Cross cert,
knights, wkends, overnight,
grt w/kids & pets, 288-7093
Baby-sitter, responsible, de-
pendable; light housework,
wkdays/wkends, ref, 290-
0595 Carmon
Baby-sitter, wkends, mature,
gd w/kids, reliable, 233-1652
Car inspection or registration,
home delivery, 222-2602
Cert Eng/Span translation for
all docs, 222-2602
Christmas around the World
and House of Lloyd, $50 free
merchandise & free catalogs,
284-3028
Computer consulting, repairs,
CD back-ups and web de-
signing, 233-2387
Home video back-ups, VHS
to VHS, 233-2387
Maid, best in Panama, 284-
5226
Maid, biling, clean, cook, Mon,
Wed - Fri, 285-4093
Maid, biling, f/time, Mon - Fri,
grt w/kids, live-in, 288-4293
Maid, Eng spking, exc w/kids,
honest, very reliable, ref, 284-
3923
Maid, Eng spking, live-in/out,
gd housekeeper, gd w/kids,
prefer off-base, 224-8159
Janet
Maid, grt w/kids & house-
keeping $150, 284-3475
Maid, live-in/out, Mon - Fri,
hardworker, dependable,
honest, 250-0636
Never shave again! Body
sugaring-the natural method
of hair removal, 284-3729


Pick up to move misc items, all
posts, 261-6699
Upholstery, curtains, interior
decoration, 261-6699




15V2' Orlando clipper, 55 HP
Evinrude, galv trailer, radio,
fishfinder, rods & reels $4000,
276-6323
16' Tri-hull, center console,
60 HP mariner $5000/obo,
272-5642
17' Deep V Tracker bass boat,
75 Hp O/B Mercury, exc cond
$7000/obo, 285-4381
18' Tri-hull, 140 HP Evinrude,
15 HP Johnson kicker, loads
of equip $6500, 272-2870
21.5' Chris craft 200 HP
Johnson 0/B, 25 HP kicker,
cuddy cab & more $18,000,
272-6900
21' Wellcraft, 200 HP mariner,
kicker, many extras, exc cond
$19,000/obo, 272-5642
23' Mayco, center console,
twin 140 HP Evinrude engs &
more, dty pd $15,000, 272-
2080
2-wheel car tow trailer $350,
228-4061
3 fiberglass boats, 26' Flying
Bridge, dsl, 21' 351 Ford, 14'
14 HP O/B, all/$10,000, 612-
2069
Lg utility trailer $400, 226-
6174
Military type utility trailer w/
mounting, spare, new tires,
paint & bearings $575, 272-
7188
Trailer for jet ski or sm boat,
galv, new $475, 272-2121




65 Ford Mustang, 2 dr, 3 spd,
am/fm cass $4200/obo, 284-
6297
72 Beetle 1600cc, dty pd $800,
277-6946
80 Chevy Malibu, V-6, 2 dr,
std, runs gd, dty pd $1500/
obo, 232-7130
80 Chevy Malibu, V-6, runs
gd, std, dty pd $1500, 259-
8319
80 Fiat Bertone X19 $1200/
obo, 288-5804
81 Cadillac sedan DeVille, AC,
leather int, dsl $500,226-0856
82 BMW 315, 4 spd, sunroof,
new brakes & tires, am/fm
cass, runs grt $1500, 288-
4742
82 VW Bug, peach color,
rusted, exc short car, exc
running cond $500, 280-3071
83 Datsun 280 ZX, 2 dr, hatch,
5 spd, t-top, CD, AC PW$2500/
obo, 284-6297
84 Monte Carlo, rebuilt eng &
trany $1700/neg, 259-0853
84 Volvo 240 GL, 4 dr, sedan,
AT, AC, runs, needs some
work $700/obo, 280-3734
after 5 pm


85 Mercedes Benz 280 SE,
loaded, 1 owner, LM, like new
$9800, 272-5792
85 Toyota Supra, sporty, grt
looking $3500, 263-5022
85 VW Golf, 5 spd, 2 dr, AC,
Pioneer stereo $2000, 288-
7292
86 Chevy Nova, 5 dr, AC, am/
fm cass $1800/neg, 223-2072
86 Chrysler 5th Avenue, exc
cond, 236-4756 after 5 pm
86 Mazda 323 LX, 4 dr, 5 spd
$2500/obo, 284-6297
86 Nissan 200SX, needs
work $750, 264-3675
86 Toyota Cressida, gd cond,
dty pd $3100/obo, 232-7533
87 Nissan Maxima, sunroof,
PW, runs gd $2000,288-5637
88 Ford Escort, 5 spd, 2 dr, 4
cyl, runs gd $2000/obo, 285-
4093
88 Honda Civic DX, 2 dr, hatch-
back, AC, am/fm cass, exc
cond $3300/neg, 284-3731
89 Ford Tempo, 4 dr, gd cond
$2500/obo, 284-5578 iv msg
89 GEO Spectrum, 5 spd, 2 dr,
AC, gd cond $1250,288-7585
89 GEO Spectrum, 6 spd, AC,
gd cond $1150, 288-7585
89 Mercury Cougar, blk, am/
fm cass, AT, PS, V-6, tilt, PW
$2000/obo, 288-5392
89 Nissan Sentra, bik, AC, 5
spd, am/fm cass, exc cond
$2000, 288-6778
89 Pontiac Grand Am, 4 dr,
AC, am/fm cass $2300/neg,
223-2072
89 Toyota Cressida, V-6,
leather int, new paint, exc
cond $4000, 269-8639
90 Ford Probe, 2.2 It turbo,
AT, AC, sun roof, exc cond
$4750, 288-7585
90 Ford Taurus SW, AC
$4500, 288-5998
90 Hyundai Excell, 2 dr, AC,
AT, gd cond, dty pd $3200/
obo, 259-9809
91 Mazda 626, 5 spd, 4 dr,
PW, PL, am/fm cass, AC, exc
cond, dty pd $4500,284-4771
91 Nissan Sentra, 4 dr, AT,
AC, PS, PB, new tires, brakes,
CD, spkrs, tint, runs grt$2500,
253-6927
92 Dodge Shadow, AT, PS,
PB, AC, very reliable $3000/
obo, 251-0259
92 Fiat Uno 45, 4 dr, AC, dty
pd, 263-2936
92 Ford Tempo GL, PS, PB, 5
spd, am/fm cass $3800/obo,
232-7130
92 Pontiac Sunbird, AC, am/
fm cass, 284-4596
92 Toyota Tercel $3800, 288-
5083
93 Mazda 626,5 spd, 4 dr, Lm,
CD, loaded, dty pd $6500,
230-3726
93 Mitsubishi Diamante,
loaded, exc cond $8400, 264-
9440
93 Nissan Sentra, new parts,
gd cond $3200, 236-1743


Duty-free merchandise
FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder, in
accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern Com-
mand regulations, duty-free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes per-
missible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. Before
such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact the
Contraband Control Section for advice at 288-5814.
Access to installations is allowed for ID card holders & pass holders
only. All guests must be signed on by ID card holders.
El acceso a las instalaciones militares solamente le estd permitido
a las personas con tarjetas de identidad personal del Gobierno de los
EEUU y el personal con pases de accesoa las instalaciones. Todos los
invitados deben ser firmados a la entrada de las instalaciones por una
persona con tarjeta de identidad personal de los EEUU.


93 Oldsmobile Cutlass Su-
preme, 2 dr, red, looks gd,
runs grt, LM $4500, 285-5185
93 Pontiac Grand Am, grtcond,
runs grt $5000, 288-5039
94 Hyundai Excel, 5 spd, LM,
exc cond $3500, 288-7176
94 Terrano, exc cond
$10,000, 226-8209
94 Toyota Corolla, AC, 5 spd,
LM, exc cond, dty pd $8500,
272-2621
95 Buick Century, LM, loaded,
dty pd $8500, 226-8209
95 Chevy Camaro, blk, V-6, 5
spd, am/fm cass, LM, exc
cond $10,000/obo, 284-3792
after 4 pm
95 Dodge Neon, LM $7500,
236-0089
95 Ford Escort $5900, 236-
0089
95 Oldsmobile Cutlass, LM,
dty pd $5700, 223-3786
95 Volvo 940, 4 dr, LM, AT,
sunroof, silver, leather int
$17,000, 210-1522
95 Volvo 960, 4 dr, leather int,
sunroof, AT, AC, CD, gray,
loaded $18,000/obo, 260-
2847
97 Chevy Camaro, LM, war-
ranty, PW, PL $14,000, 288-
7334
97 Mitsubishi Lancer GLXI,
AC, am/fm cass, alarm, tint,
like new $8500, 873-3272
97 Mitsubishi Lancer GXLI,
AC, am/fm cass, like new, dty
pd $8500, 873-3272
97 Nissan Sentra, Exc cond,
dty pd $8000, 260-6179
97 Volvo S-40, loaded, 16
valve, AT, dty pd $19,000,
223-0250
98 BMW 523i, loaded, AT
$30,000, 268-6584
98 Nissan 240 SX, loaded,
285-9293
98 Toyota Tercel, wht, AC,
AT, exc cond $9000/obo,
260-8293




Acermate 450d, 486DX2, 8
KB Ram, CD-ROM, w/spkrs,
14" mon, mouse, Win 3.1, MS
Office, IBM Antivirus $300,
236-0548 after 6 pm
Epson printer$185,269-6728
Gateway 2000 color note-
book, 486,8 MB Ram, w/case
$600, 260-3736
IBM thinkpad, P150 MMX, 32
MB Ram, 2.1 GB, CD-ROM, li-
ion batt, 21.1 active display,
like new $995/obo, 272-6042
Macintosh powerbook duo
230 laptop w/modem, style
writer II, printer, Word, Excel
& more $500, 269-8639
Pentium 233 MMX, 32 MB Ram,
3GB HD, 15" mon $1400,260-
3736
Scantron & software $1150,
265-6394
Scantron computerized test
grading system w/card
reader, computer, printer &
software $1850, 265-6394




15w guitar amp $100,
Yamaha keyboard $250,
Yamaha sequencer $250,
261-1415
19" Sony color TV w/remote,
272-2621
21" Crown TV w/remote
$160, 224-9663
26" Hitachi TV, A/V inputs/
outputs, stereo, 2 RF inputs
$200, 284-5279
27" Sony TV, 284-5720
51" TV $1000, 288-7869 af-
ter 6 pm


Audio Techniz VHF wireless
headworn mic system, new
$295/neg, 268-4732
DJ equip, equalizer, dbl CD
player, 6 channel mixing
board, light, pwr rack & more
$1800, 284-6297
Elec. Organ, Casio portable
$195/obo, 272-6843
Fender 2 amp PA 130 w/4
vocal channels, 8 inputs,
350w $200, 2 spkrs $300,
269-5700 Iv msg
JVC mini stereo system $150,
284-7074
Magnavox stereo console
150w, Pioneer spkrs, 230-
2384
Nintendo 64 cassettes, gd
cond, 237-9194
Nintendo 64, Quest, NFL Mad-
den 99, extra control $210,
284-3183
Panasonic office laser printer
$375, 264-9440
Panasonic printer, quiet,
Relisy mon $300, 285-4093
Peavy amp for bass 300x
$300, Marshall spkrs, 1 unit, 4
spkrs $300, 269-5700 Iv msg
Sansui tuner & tape player
$125, 272-6239
Sega Genesis, 232-5997
Sega Saturn w/9 games $175/
obo, 284-4430
Sony TV, 232-5997
Zenith console TV, gd cond
$200, 285-4093



Backpack on Fort Clayton,
must identify, 272-1007
Rita Smith's high school year
book, must identify, 288-5986




10,000 AC, needs repair but
works $50, 212-3280
11 x 1lit gray berber carpet
w/padding $90,18,000 Whirl-
pool AC $125, 272-2454
13,000 AC $175, 18,000 AC
$195, Bali blinds $20, 272-
5792
14' upright frzr $200, student
desk $125, kitchen tbl $80,
272-5593
15' Admiral refrig, frost free
$350/obo, 272-6845
18' frost free refrig $290, 236-
5132
19.5' upright frzr, dresser,
260-8159
19.7' GE refrig $600, 288-
6428
2 BR sets, exc cond $450/ea,
284-6691
2 LR set, DR set & more, 264-
9440
20' chest frzr $275, 272-6900
20'frzr$395,18,000 AC $260,
272-6239
20' GE refrig, 17' refrig, stove,
dryer, tbl, chairs & more, 226-
8209
21.8' refrig, curtains, blinds,
2 rugs, 272-2870
24,000 National AC $300,
12,000 York AC $250, 10,000
GE AC $250, 223-2072
50' stainless steel refrig
$2000, 272-2121
6 drawer dresser w/mirror,
brn, end tbl, 6' x 11/2 x 1Y2
shelves, 288-7796
7' vertical blinds, It blue, lou-
vers 8' & 6' $50, 284-3281
8000 AC $100, 284-5131
Bkshelves $45, teak tbl $250,
288-6505
Bkshelves, tbl, 2 - 8 x 11
orient style rugs, 284-6492
Blinds, carpets, 5 pc DR set,
5 pc kitchen set, hope chest,
dresser, filing cab, 232-5996


BR Q/sz $400, refrig $70, DR
tbl w/6 chairs $300, Q/sz matt
$400, 288-5083
BR set $400, drapes $75,
ceiling lamps, 272-6162
BR set w/desk/bkcase $300,
223-2072
BR set, ceiling fan, round tbl,
10,000 AC & more, 230-3726
BR set, dbl bed, nite tbls, van-
ity, 6 drawers w/mirror, chest
& more $450/obo, 220-2421
Iv msg
Bunk bed, dbl/twin combo
$350, upright frzr $400, 272-
2620
Ceiling fans, reclining chair,
draw curtain, 263-2390
Chest frzr $300, DR glass tbl
w/6 chairs, leather $350, 232-
7533
Chest, desk, room divider, BR
set, 272-1175
Coffee tbls, DR set, K/sz bed,
288-4275
Computer cab, end tbls,
wicker chests & chair, rugs,
288-5591 after 7 pm
Computer desk w/printer
stand & shelves $70, 284-
6975
Computer desk, chair $250,
264-9440
Computer hutch $75, ceiling
fans, AC units, bkshelves &
more, 272-5397
Dehumidifier $40, 284-3437
after 5 pm
DR set w/6 chairs, chrome &
glass $250, 264-9676
DR set, tbl, china cab $850,
sofa bed $175, 3 pc LR set,
need upholstery $125, 284-
4181 Iv msg
DR tbl w/4 chairs $100, 284-
3454
DR tbl w/4 chairs $125, sofa,
rattan trim $275, area rugs
$50, stereo cab $25, 213-
8825
DR tbl w/4 chairs $300, 284-
4724
DR tbl w/4 chairs, like new,
284-5720
DR tbl w/8 chairs & 3 exten-
sions $850, 272-2860
DR teak tbl w/8 chairs, exc
cond $1100, teak Ig roll top
desk w/marble $500, 272-
2454
Dresser, nite tbl, Q/sz bed w/
frame, computer desk, 284-
6492
Entertainment center, 284-
5575
File cab, 2 drawer $40, 232-
7016
Futon mattw/cover, 284-6720
German shrunk, DR tbl w/
chairs, picnic furniture & more,
288-7633 after 6 pm
Goldstar 15,000 AC $299,
upright frzr $250, chest frzr
$250, BR set $500, 232-6498
K/sz bed, 232-5997
K/sz bed, sectional sofa,
dryer, bunk bed, AC, 260-
3086
K/sz water bed w/orthope-
dic matt $200, 288-5398
K/sz waterbed w/drawers
$300, 284-6598
L shaped sectional sofa, off
wht $650, 232-7533
Lg roll top desk w/marble
counter top $650, 272-2379
Lg roll top desk, like new,
beds, sofas, tbls, chairs, 612-
2069
Lg sectional sofa, new $750,
GE refrig $265, 10,000 AC
195, 272-6210
LR set w/sofa bed $600, 2
twin beds, nite tbl $300, 8000
AC $260, 229-8610
LR set, sofa, Ivseat $550, 2
coffee tbls & center tbl $300,
223-2072












Classified Ads


LR tbl set of 3 $75, 284-3632
Magic Chef gas stove $225,
GE washer/dryer $450, 3 pc
LR set $200/neg, 220-2442
Mini blinds, yellow, wht, tan,
exc cond, 272-2034
Oriental furniture, rosewood
curious cab, 272-1175
Piano, . Chinese carpet,
screen, sofa, Ivseat, coffee
tbl, entertainment center, rugs
& more, 232-5997
Q/sz bed complete $250,226-
0856
Q/sz BR set w/2 nite tbls,
headboard, mirror, 7 draw-
ers $400, 261-8106
Q/sz matt & box spring $80,
288-7980
Q/sz sofa bed, It grn, wht
design $300, 288-6486
Refrig, frost free $90, 259-
9809
Refrig, furniture, fans,
washer, patio set, micro, AC
units & more, 236-8872
Side-by-side refrig $750, gas
stove $400, piano $1500,288-
5376
Sm BR bar refrig w/frzr, 3',
like new $120, 226-8139
Sofa bed, autumn print, wood
trim $300, 226-4090
Sofa sleeper $275 & $250,
DR tbl w/6 chairs $175, 272-
6162
Sofa, Ivseat, DR tbl, bkcase,
coffee tbl, end tbl, video
shelves, 284-5279
Sofa, Ivseat, end tbls, coffee
tbl $500, 260-3485
Sofa, Ivseat, new $900, 272-
2671
Sofa, Ivseat, single bed, mi-
cro, tbi w/chairs & more, 236-
4756
Sofa, Ivseat, vinyl print for
patio, matching rattan coffee
tbl $350, 226-4090
Sofa, matching Ivseat, gd
cond $175/obo, 288-5321
Student desk, recliner, patio
furniture, orthopedic twin matt
& box spring, 230-2384
Teak entertainment center, 3
pcs $500, 272-5642
Teak hope chest $200, 272-
5642
Twin bed $150, dresser $150,
nite tbl $50, 9 x 12 It blue rug
$50, 272-2314
Twin bed w/matt $150, 6 pc
patio set $150, wet vacuum
$75, 288-7297
Twin matt & box spring $180,
260-6002
Twin/sz matt, exc cond, 263-
2936
Whirlpool 10,000 AC, exc
cond $175, ceiling fans $15-
20, 9 x 12 carpets $40, 226-
8139
Whirlpool 2 dr refrig, gd cond
$600, 233-1080
Whirlpool dehumidifier, 25 pt
cap $50, 284-3454
Whirlpool upright frzr $600,
antique dresser w/mirror
$350, waterbed $200, 272-
5397
Wood bar $500, 269-6728
Wrought iron glass top patio
tbl & bench, vertical blinds,
232-5997



100 LP classical records $50,
272-5792
14" rims for Ford Mercury, gd
cond $125, 284-6783
2 class A uniforms, sz/35 &
40 $25/ea, field grade garri-
son hat sz/6 7/8 $25, 272-
2314
2 wool sweaters $20/ea,
272-2314


30 gal portable gas tank, 71/2
HP kicker mount $35, 20 HP
kicker mount $75, 272-6900
4 13" rims from 94 .Nissan
Sentra $40, 288-7830
4 14" rims, alum, for Ford
Mercury $125/neg, 284-6783
415" rims, 5 holes, alum, GMS
$200/obo, 237-9194
4 cyl 87 Buick eng/trany, 6 cyl
Ford eng, Toyota gas engs,
228-4061
5 computer games, Starcraft,
Age of Empires, F22V, Max 2
& Paint Brawl $100,28.4-3171
5 pc luggage, like new, 284-
5720
84 Toyota SR-5 trany 5 spd
AT $200, 277-6946
97 Mitsubishi Lancer & 94
Lada Samara for parts, 228-
4061
99 BHS commemorative pen/
ink note cards 10 for $15,
288-7195
99 BHS commemorative pen/
ink print 11 x 17 $10, 288-
7195
Antiques, desk, sewing
mach, frames, silver trays,
272-2042
Auto harp $60, 272-6900
Baby crib, matt $120, car seat
$15, baby seat$10,229-8610
Baby swing $40, hammock
$20, stroller, exc cond $60,
284-4724
Bike carrier $20, 236-5132
Carport roof 15 x 20 $225,
272-5593
Century stroller $50, 264-
9676
Changing tbl, gas tankfor grill,
exc cond, 263-2936
Changing tls $25, baby swing
$15, play pen $50 284-5575
Child's bike seat $10, 284-
3632
Coach purse, blk, nice $35,
284-6975
Coppermilkcan, antique, 272-
6162
Craftsman tools, 2 complete
chests $1100/set, 269-6728
Crib, changing tbl, toys, ma-
ternityclothes, exc cond, 263-
2936
Cross stitching patterns, ma-
terial & access, like new $25,
272-1213 after 5 pm
Enclosed patio $80, sm dog
carrier $10, xlg dog carrier
$80, 284-5077
F-22 and ATF Flight Simulator
games $15/ea, 284-7074
Gas grill $50, 284-6691
Gas grill, new, 284-6720
Hammond Ig organ $800,226-
6174
High chair, video rack, diaper
genie, toys, boy's items, 288-
7625
Lawn mower, BBQ grill, 284-
4724
Lg outdoors metal cab w/
shelves, Ig work tbl, tools &
more, 284-3028
Make-up tbl $30, 2 boxes
women's clothes $25, 212-
3280
Many house plants, over 6'
tall $10, 260-1642
Minnie mouse comforter, blan-
ket, dust ruffle, sheets for dbl
bed w/pillows shams & more
$50, 284-6975
Motor mount for kicker O/B
maximum to 15 HP, perfect
cond $25, 272-1213
Oakley eye jacket sun
glasses, bik $70/obo, 614-
6903-
Original oil painting, water-
colors, pastels & charcoals
by mid-western artist, 284-
6916
Plants, stepping stones, 232-
5997


Playpen, walker, TV stand,
dbl stroller, 284-6165
Portable generator, 8 HP, gas,
22/110 volt $250, 232-7113
Potted & garden plants, 272-
1213
Potted plants & more, 272-
2034
Potted plants, 260-6002
Potted plants, garden tools,
utility tbls, 272-2671
Rubbermaid patio shed, car-
port roof, drapes, 232-5997
Spkrs bod, 2 12" spkrs $50,
284-6783
Stainless steel water foun-
tain $150, 272-6239
Step 2 playhouse, Little Tykes
truck $35, Little Tykes wagon
$20, 284-5131
Sterling silver flatware ser-
vice for 8 $2500, 272-2860
Voltage regulator for elec
equipment, 232-7053
Wht crib w/orthopedic matt,
260-3086
Wht outside storage cab w/
shelves, 284-3028
Wht wicker baby changing tbl
w/storage, 284-3028
Xlg dog kennel, new $100,
288-7690



91 Kawasaki Ninja ZZR-11,
1100cc, grt bike, very fast
$7900, 263-5022
97 Kawasaki KX-250, exc
cond $3000, 276-6323



Bettnai Condado Del Rey 392
Clayton 1009D
Clayton 1024A, 7 - 10 am
Clayton 1026B
Clayton 1172, 6 - 10 am
Clayton 471A, 6 - 10 am
Clayton 575B, 7 - 11 am
Clayton 76, 7 - 10 am
Curundu 2164, 7:30 - noon
Diablo 5775A
Diablo 5779B
Diablo 5787B, 7 - 11 am
El Busque B-52, 9 am
Howard 126A, 6:30 am-noon
Howard 636A, 7 - 11 am


Howard 671A, 7 am
Kobbe 301,7- 11 am
La Boca 958A, 5 - 9 am
Los Rios 6338A 7 am - 3 pm
Pacific Hills Tower 100 Apt.
17-B



Aerobic instructor equip, 268-
4732
Aquashot II underwater cam-
era housing for disposal cam-
eras w/strobe & macro kit
$150, 272-5642
Basketball court, 260-3086
Bike for 3 yr girl, gd cond $20/
obo, 284-5578
Cardio glide $180, 236-5132
Diving equip, BCDs tank, 236-
0005
Exerstepper, mountain bikes,
surfboard, 232-5997
Home gym system $300,272-
2860
Iron horse $150, rowing mach
$80, 272-2620
Ladies 10 spd bike, 230-2384
Miyata mountain bike, Eevation
2000, blue, exc cond $800,
236-5910
Multi-sytem home gym, Joe
Welder $250/obo, 614-6903
Nikonos III underwater cam-
era w/2 35 mm lenses & 0 ring
kits, like new $350, 272-2656
Roller blades, sz/4, new $20,
284-6975
Scuba regulator by Poseidon,
Cyklone 300 w/octopus $500,
236-6302
Scuba regulator by scuba pro,
MK20LiL ultralight $500,236-
6302
Scuba regulator by US divers
SE-2 w/conshelf octopus
$280, 236-6302
Weight bench, golf clubs,
bowling ball, 272-2621



70 Ford Bronco, 4 x 4 $800,
229-8570
74 Chevy pickup, perfor-
mance eng $1700/neg, 259-
0853
77 Chevy K-5 Blazer, 4 x 4,
305 V-8, runs grt, dty pd
$1500, 288-7194


79 Dodge window van, 8 cyl,
AT, PS, AC $500, 272-6246
80 Ford Bronco, f/sz, 4 x 4, 4
spd, 302 V-8, 2 bbl, new
clutch, muffler, gd cond
$3700, 250-1197
81 150 Dodge Ram van, AT,
PS, PB, V-6 $1700,232-7016
82 Jeep CJ-5 Jeep, 1" lift,
hard, soft & bikini tops, 6 cyl
& more $3500, 272-6846
85 Chevy Blazer, 4 x 4, AC,
AT, PS, PB, am/fm cass, exc
cond $3600, 285-4734
85 Chevy Blazer, 4 x 4, AT,
AC, PS, PB, am/fm cass, exc
cond $3600, 285-4734
86 Colt Vista, 7 pass, AT,
needs minor work, dty pd.
$2200/obo, 259-9809
86 Daihatsu Jeep, 4 x4,5 spd,
AC, stereo, alarm, tint, new
muffler, paint, LM $3900,264-
9228
87 Plymouth Voyager van,
PS, PB, AC, AT, exc cond
$4000, 272-2671
88 Ford Bronco XLT, f/sz, big
tires $12,000, 236-0005
88 Isuzu Trooper II, 4 x 4, new
clutch, brakes, shocks, ex-
haust system & batt $4800/
obo, 214-1481
89 Chevy Blazer, AC, PS, 4 x
4, dty pd $4700, 223-0064
89 Dodge Grand Caravan LE
$3500/neg, 220-2442
89 Ford Aerostar, exc cond
$3000, 288-5637
89 Isuzu pickup, long bed,
AC, 5 spd, bed liner, gd cond,
dty pd $3800/obo, 259-9809
89 Jeep Cherokee Laredo,
AT, PW, 4 x 4, AC, super
stereo, exc cond $5575/obo,
272-5397
89 Pathfinder, 2 dr, AC, blk, 6
cyl, AT, exc cond, 263-2936
90 Aerostar van, 7 pass, AC,
AT, over drive, wht $5500,
232-7113
90 Dodge Caravan, AC, PS
$3800, 232-7293
90 Isuzu Trooper, 4 dr, std, 4
cyl, AC, am/fm cass $7900/
obo, 236-8872
90 Isuzu Trooper, exc cond,
284-3825
90 Jeep Cherokee chief,
loaded $8000, 272-2121
90 Mitsubishi Pajero, 4 x 4, 4
cyl, 5 dr, AC, PB, PS, runs grt,
dty pd $6000, 232-5998


91 Jeep Wrangler, 4 x 4, 5
spd, CD, PS, PB, LM, 3" lift, 33"
tires, exc cond $8500, 284-
7817
92 Ford Ranger w/camper,
PB, PS, AC, stereo, exc cond
$6000/obo, 226-8139
92 Jeep Wrangler, 4 x 4, LM,
hitch, runs grt $6000, 288-
7361
93 Chevy Lumina APV
minivan, 7 pass, AC, am/fm
cass, PW, PS, PB, luggage
rack, LM $7500, 260-4411
93 Chevy S-10 ext cab,
camper, V-6, AT, exc cond
$6000, 284-5226
93 Isuzu Rodeo, very clean
$10,500, 288-6874
93 Toyota 4Runner, AT, AC,
PS, PB, Kenwood stereo, exc
cond $15,000/obo, 288-7292
94 Jeep Cherokee, AC, am/
fm, ABS, grt cond, dty pd
$9800, 288-4244
94 Jeep Cherokee, AC, PW,
PS, am/fm, ABS, 4 x 4, very
clean $10,500, 288-4244
94 Jeep Cherokee, LM, dtypd
$9200, 223-3786
94 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, 5
spd, 6 cyl, LM, soft top, bikini
top, class III hitch $10,500,
285-4381
96 Chevy S-10, 639-6867
96 Ford Explorer XLT, loaded,
exc cond, 288-4275
97 Isuzu Trooper LS, AT, 4 x
4, PW, PL, PM, drk gm, LM,
exc cond $22,p00, 264-8768
98 Jeep Wrangler, 4 x 4, 5
spd, LM, Ig tires, alarm, exc
cond $15,000, 284-5371
99 Toyota Hi-Lux, loaded
$18,000, 285-9293



Baby crib, 288-6678
Curtains for Howard tropical,
315-0916
Dryer, will pay up to $150,
272-2267
Employment for outstanding
housekeeper, does every-
thing, ref, 264-9440
Gd family for exc maid, Eng
spking, honest, dependable,
hard working, grt w/kids, 284-
3595
Someone to make/sew a Ig
dog bed, 214-1481


Note: Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis to military mem-
bers, civilian DoD employees, and employees of other government agencies. Ads will be ac-
cepted only for NON-COMMERCIAL services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immedi-
ate family member. Suspected abuse of the ad services will results in non-publication of the
ad(s) in question. For more information, call 285-4666/6612.
* Deadline for submitting ads is 9 a.m. Monday. If Monday is a holiday, the deadline
is 1 p.m. the Friday before.

* Read instructions below, then completely fill out the ad form. Incomplete ads will
not be published.


- Animals
U-l Available
" Boats & campers
[]Cars
Ml Computers
M Electronics
S-1Found
M Household
M Lost
M Miscellaneous
r- Motorcycles
Ml Patio sales
Date /
Q Sporting Goods
Trucks & Vans
-1 Wanted


Price Home Phone
* Check one category per ad form
* Two ads person each week. Include home and duty phone.
* 15-word limit (the staff may edit to conserve space).
* Ads must be re-submitted each week.
* We will NOT take ads by phone or fax (Atlantic residents may fax ads).
* Ads offering exotic animals, weapons or real estate will Not be run.
* Ads offering, foods, hair care or translation will Not be run without a copy
of licenses to operate on post/base.
* Mail ads to: Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004 or deposit them in
the drop box at the Clayton Post Office.
* Information below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication.


Sponsor's Name


Rank/Grade


Organization Duty Phone


Tropic Times
April 23,1999


B9









Tropic Times
April 23, 1999


j Community


Co mniybres


Veronica's Room
Veronica's Room, an adult,
mystery thriller, is now playing at
the Ancon Playhouse through
May 1. For reservations, call 272-
6786.

Volunteer workshop
Volunteers are invited to attend a
Flower Arranging workshop 1 p.m.
May 5 at the Valent Recreation
Center. Space is limited to 30 vol-
unteers. For more information or to
make reservations, call the Quality
of Life/Installation Volunteer Cen-
ter no later than April 30 at 288-
9303/9304.

Summer Program
Registration for the summer
program is May 14 and 15 at Build-
ing 155 on Fort Clayton. The free
program begins in June and will in-
clude a Toddler/Preschool Camp
for 2 - 5 year-olds, a school age
camp for 5 - 12 year-olds, youth
volleyball, basketball and racquet-
ball clinics; instructional karate, pi-
ano, guitar and gymnastics classes
and a teen program with trips and
tours, outdoor activities, center
based leisure activities and life
skills workshops. For more infor-
mation, call 288-6810.

BHS celebration
The parents of the last graduat-
ing class of Balboa High School,
the class of '99, will be sponsoring
a celebration party on May 15 at
the Plaza Paitilla Inn for the se-
niors and their guests. In order to
provide moments and gifts, many
of the interested community have
donated various items for door
prizes. If you wish to donate to
this last celebration activity, call
Sherry Barnish at 284-4023.

BHS alumni reunion
The Balboa High School Grand
Alumni Reunion is 7:30 - 12:40
p.m. May 15 at the Hotel Conti-
nental. The cost is $16.50 and the
dress is casual. Price includes
food, live music, dancing and a
bunch of sharing of memories.
For information and reservations,
call Lourdes Townhend at 226-
0503. Seating is limited and ad-
vance reservations are required by
Thursday.

Teen Talent Contest
The Howard AFB West Bank
Teen Center is sponsoring a Teen
Talent Contest 7 - 10 p.m. to-
night. Categories for competition
are female/male vocalist solo, vo-
cal group, instrumental solo, in-
strumental group, dance musical
variety and specialty act. The
contest will be judged by a panel
on the basis of technical excel-
lence, showmanship and treat-
ment and interpretation of mate-
rial. Winners will be videotaped
and the tape forwarded to the Air
Force for worldwide competition.
Winners of the worldwide compe-


tition will be announced July 2.
For more information, call 284-
4700/5615.

79th Army Band
The 79th Army Band's Jazz
Combo and Show Band is holding
their final dry season concert Sun-
day at Goethals Monument at the
base of the PCC Administration
steps. The 79th Army Band's
Armed Forces Day concert is 7:30
p.m. May 15 at the Fort Clayton
Theater.

Free calls
All military ID holders can make
up to two free five minute Mili-
tary Affiliated Radio System calls
to anywhere in the U.S. and Puerto
Rico 3 - 5 p.m. Friday and Sun-
days. For appointments, call 272-
6968.

Layaways
Effective immediately layaways
for $200 or more, 180 day duration
will cease. Layaways of 90 days
will continue for all layaways of
over $25, and clothing layaways
are for 45 days. All layaways will
cease May 1. By Aug. 30 all
layaways must be picked up or
cancelled. For details, call 285-
4121.

Volunteer register
Volunteers and volunteer coordi-
nators should ensure that all volun-
teer hours are registered with the
Howard Family Support Center's
Volunteer Program. Also, any vol-
unteers who are PCSing in the near
future should come by the FSC to
pick up a letter stating their volun-
teer hours. For more information,
call Lizca Fearon at 284-5650.

Pet supplies
Since the Corozal Veterinary
Treatment Facility approaches clo-
sure Aug. 31, the VTF is reminding
pet owners to stock up on rou-
tinely used medications to last
through their PCS move. The last
order for pet supplies is June 1 and
when supplies run out they will not
be replenished. Also, the VTF is
requesting that if your pet is no
longer in Panama or has been
adopted to another family, call
them at 285-5866/5867 to help up-
date their records.

USARSO volunteers
The Quaility of Life/Installation
Volunteer Center is currently pre-
paring "Statement of Service" let-
ters for all registered volunteers. To
receive your letter, stop by the
QOL/LVC Office 2nd Floor, Build-
ing 200 Fort Clayton. For more in-
formation, call Tina Hobson at 288-
9303/9304.

Mailing packages
The Fort Clayton Post Office
has implemented an appointment
system for individuals who need
to mail five parcels or more. Due


to an increase in moves we sug-
gest that people call the number
listed below and arrange an ap-
pointment between 9 - 9:20 a.m.
and the staff will assist those in-
dividuals before opening for regu-
lar customer service. In return,
this will decrease the lines and
waiting time for other customers.
All forms and documentation
need to be ready prior to the ap-
pointment date. For more infor-
mation, call 288-5522/4802.

Free child care
Air Force staff sergeants and be-
low can receive up to 20 free hours
of childcare when they are within
90 days of PCS departure from
Howard Air Force Base. The Child
Development Center will provide
services. Members should bring or-
ders to the Family Support Center
to receive a certificate.

Parent support
The New Parent Support Pro-
gram is located at ACS Building
155 on Fort Clayton. Monthly
classes available include Breast
Feeding (Spanish and English),
Parenting and Infant Care. There
are also support group meetings.
For more information, call Nelida
Holnes at 288-4921/5307.

Clayton Library
The Clayton Library has a
home page on the World Wide Web
listing hours, resources and ser-
vices. Also included are guides to
using the library. There are photo
albums and an e-mail address for
feedback, comments and even ref-
erence questions. The address is:
http://www.army.mil/usarso/libr/
claytonm/.

Foster Care
The Family Advocacy Program
welcomes participants interested
in becoming Certified Foster Care
Parents. The program provides
training that enables you to gain
rewarding experiences. Earn some
extra money while in your home
and "open your heart to a child"
in need of temporary placement
due to an emergency situation.
Applicants must reside on a mili-
tary installation. For more infor-
mation, call Nelida Holnes at
288-6643.

Laundry service
Super Suds Laundromat offers
a drop-off, same day pick up ser-
vice Monday - Friday. The
laundromat is located next to
Burger King on Fort Clayton.

Donations accepted
The Salvation Army is accepting
donations of clothes, books, toys
and canned goods to support their
various social help group programs
such as senior citizen homes, home-
less girls homes and poor children's
feeding programs. For more infor-
mation, call 262-2545.


Relocation Center
The Relocation Assistance Cen-
ter offers a variety of services. For
those PCSing, there are computers
with Internet access and a well-
stocked lending closet to tide you
with all your basic household
needs. For more information, stop
by Building 200, Fort Clayton, or
call 288-9234/9235.

Vehicle registration
Personnel moving to Puerto
Rico can register their vehicle at
the LEA Vehicle Registration in
Building 519, 2nd Floor, Room
246 from 8 a.m. - noon and 1 - 4
p.m. Mon. - Fri. You will need the
vehicle title, proof of insurance
and orders for Puerto Rico to ob-
tain installation decals. Those who
have already shipped their vehicle
to Puerto Rico can also obtain
their decals at this office. For more
information, call 288-4916/4919.

School Age Services
School Age Services offers piano,
guitar, typical dance and karate
classes. For more information and
to register, go to Building 155 Fort
Clayton.

Child Services
The Month of the Military Child
celebration continues with a kite
flying day, 3:30 - 5 p.m. Thursday
at Mother's Inn Field. There will
be prizes for the best team. The
month will round off with Family,
Day at the pool April 30.

Planning a party
SAS has inflatables for rent. The
colorful balloons include the
Happy Clown Typhoon, the
Amazing Castle Maze and games
galore. Rentals are run by the CYS


Congratulations to...
Robert and Eltressa Spencer on the birth of their baby girl, Kiara Shiress. Kiara was born February
19 at San Fernando Hospital and weighed 6 lbs. 13 ozs. and was 20 V2 inches long.
David Malcolm and Julie Ann Shelly on the birth of their baby boy, Matthew Bennett. Matthew was
born February 19 at San Fernando Hospital and weighed 7 lbs. 15 ozs. and was 20 inches long.
Douglas and Melisa Brook on the birth of their baby boy, Erin. Erin was born February 23 at San Fernando Hospital and
weighed 6 lbs. 10 ozs. and was 20 inches long.
Roman and Isabel Ramirez on the birth of their baby girl, Rachelle G. Rachelle was born April 3 at San Fernando Hos-
pital and weighed 7 lbs. and was 21 inches long.


staff. You do nothing but take care
of your party. For more informa-
tion, call 288-6451.

Teen Center
A computer lab is located on the
Ist Floor of Building 155 and is
open 6 - 9 p.m. Monday - Thurs-
day.

Girl Scout update
The Girl Scout Office is located in
Building 167 on Fort 'Clayton.
Hours of operation are noon - 4:30
p.m. Monday - Fridays. Their
new numbers are 285-4046, FAX
285-4157.

Attention volunteers
If you are presently volunteer-
ing or have volunteered in the past
at Howard AFB, sign up with the
Volunteer Coordinator in the Fam-
ily Support Center and receive
credit for the experience you
gained. For more information, call
284-5650.

Typing course
The Howard Family Support
Center's Computer Resource
Center offers computerized,
multimedia typing tutorial soft-
ware. Beginners can learn how
to type at their own pace. To
sign up for an appointment, call
Dave Krier, at 284-5650. For
more information, call 284-
5650.

Final CCF graduation
The final Community College
of the Air Force graduation is 3
p.m. Thursday in the Tropic
Breeze Club Ballroom.

Pens pose peril
The 24th Medical Group is re-
calling all the "Putting Prevention
into Practice" pens. The pens have
a dangerous detect causing the top
along with the spring to pop off
and go shooting across the room.
Return the pens to the Primary
Care Clinics on Howard AFB or
Fort Clayton.

Fax service
The Corozal PX offers fax ser-
vices at the customer service
counter. The cost is $1 per page,
plus telephone charges.

Shipping your pet
Shipping your pet? For infor-
mation, call 284-3069 or 288-5946.


B10


The American Red Cross

needs donations
There is still a great deal of troop activity in Bosnia and
the American Red Cross personnel report a continuing need for
the following: hot chocolate/cider mix, microwave popcorn, as-
sorted candy, cold beverage mixes, small games and playing
cards. Soldiers are also requesting high school English grammar
books to help teach language skills to their foreign counterparts.
You can send needed materials to:
Bosnia: American Red Cross
Attn: Station Manager
HQS 1st CD G-1 Tuzla Main
Operation Joint Forge
APO AE 09789
You can also send donations to the following address or by
calling 1-800-help-now (435-7669) or 1-800-257-7575 (Spanish).
Internet users can make a secure online credit card contribution by
filling out a donation form and choosing "International Response
Fund" as their giving option.
American Red Cross Internation Response Fund
P.O.Box 37243
Washington DC 20013
For more information, contact Lionel Grant at the
American Red Cross by calling 288-5509/6306.


I










* Community


Tropic Times B ll
April 23, 1999 B L1


Qy9 hS orom

story by Tina Summerton
Tropic Times Staff
FORT CLAYTON - As dazzling gowns and tuxedos
glided on the dance floor, approximately 310 students
eagerly awaited the announcement of who would be
crowned king and queen during Balboa High School's
1999 Prom held Saturday at the Valent Recreation
Center.
The Valent Recreation Center was elegantly decorated
in white, silver and ecru.
"There were stars, balloons, a water fountain and even
pillars with draped material. It had an almost early Roman
look," said Tammy Kraft, head organizer for the '99
prom.
The anticipation grew as couples spent the night
dancing away to salsa, merengue, R&B, techno and talking
with their sweethearts and friends.
The wait was finally over at approximately 10:15 p.m.
Fred Bales, athletic director for Balboa High School, took
the stage and announced the winners of the 1999 Prom
Court. Crowned were Chantall Agueda as queen and
Anthony Somoza as king, Ange McCrary as princess and
Luis Somoza as prince.
After the announcement, the couples took the dance
floor and danced gracefully to "Everything I Do I Do For
You" by Bryan Adams.
A few moments later everyone joined the couples in a the co
moment that will last forever in their memories.


- Saving the best for last


Davila and Peter Higgins make quite Lora Paulson and Felix Hernandez, both se-
uple. niors, were definitely dressed for the occasion.


Cambry Sanchez and Larry Quinn, both seniors, are all smiles. Queen Chantall Agueda and King Anthony Somoza danced gracefully
to "Everything I Do I Do For You" by Bryan Adams.


ACAP Providing transition services to the force


story by Lilia Strothers
ACAP Office
FORT CLAYTON - The Army
Career and Alumni Program is a
comprehensive program offering a
broad range of transition services for
soldiers, DA civilians and family
members.
Services include pre-separation
counseling, benefits counseling, job
search training, and access to
numerous employer and job informa-
tion databases, making it an integral
part of the military's personnel life
cycle program. The following are
some of the classes offered at ACAP.

Pre-separation Briefings. Every
Thursday (including completion of the
DD Form 2648 "Pre-separation Counsel-
ing Checklist) soldiers learn about their
rights and benefits as well as the types of
services that are available to them.
Additionally, they receive assistance in
identifying their needs and developing an
individual transition plan.

Job Assistance Workshops in English
and Spanish: Every Tuesday, and other
classes as needed. This class provides


nities, prepare for interviews and
job fairs, and negotiate salary and
benefits.


clients with the basic knowledge and skills
necessary to plan and execute a successful
job search. This includes selection of a job
search objective, networking, resume and
cover letter writing, identification of job
opportunities, interviewing, and salary/
benefit negotiations.

Individual Counseling, available in
English and Spanish, is provided using the
information discussed in the workshops.
Counselors help clients identify an
objective, write resumes and cover letters,
complete applications, find job opportu-


Job Search Resources Civilian
and federal jobs and an internet
search is available for clients to
use including an automated job
listings such as the ACAP Job
i Hot Leads, America's Job Bank
(AJB), and the Transition Bulletin
Board (TBB).
The TBB contains job listings
and news regarding events such as
job fairs, automated resume
writer, Standard Form 171 and the
Optional Form 612, Application for
Federal Employment software, job
assistance library, as well as access to the
Defense Outplacement Referral System
(DORS).
The DORS is a system designed to
help job seekers present their qualifica-
tions to interested employers.
Access the ACAP Home Page on the
Internet at http://www.acap.army.mil.
The ACAP Center is located in
Building 128, Fort Clayton and the office
hours are 8:00 - 5:00 p.m. Monday -
Friday. For appointments, call 288-9277.


School Records transfer
ARLINGTON, Va. (Department of
Defense Education Activity) - The
DoDEA Records Center located at
Fort Benning, Ga., is the repository
for elementary and secondary school
records. The DoDEA Records Center
is available to assist former students,
parents and schools with questions
concerning transcripts, student
records or administrative records.
At this time, only student records
from Panama, Bermuda, Fort
McClellan and the Panama Canal Col-
lege are being accepted.
The Educational Testing Service
will maintain secondary student tran-
scripts in Princeton, N.J. All Panama
Canal College student and administra-
tive records will be transferred to the
DoDEA Records Center by June
1999.
All student transcripts continue to
be maintained at (ETS) in Princeton,
N.J. For more information, call Rena
Karlin at 609-720-6740 or you may call
the DoDEA Records Center at 706-
545-8246/4785 or write to the follow-
ing address:
Educational Testing Service
P.O. Box 6605
Princeton, NJ 08541-6605









B12 Tropic Times
B i l April 23, 1999


v Youth Scene


Everything planted
around Curundu Elemen-
tary School grows
beautifully under the
tender loving care of ,..
school counselor Fred "
Costin. He considers the
outside environment to
be his greenhouse.
Everyone eagerly
watched the daily
growth of the banana
trees donated by host
nation teacher Gladys
Frazier. Finally the day
arrived to pick the first
stalk of bananas and ..
Prentice Kimble, An- .
thony Back and Melvin
Stewart volunteered to ..
help Costin with this
task. t.
Molly Idol


The Red

Machine
The Red Machine
is Balboa High
School's last
Volleyball'team.
Back row: Emily
Duffus, Shary
Perez, Silvia
Ramery and
Jonelle Medestin.
Front row: Carrie
Mercier, Mariel
Romero, Lora
Paulson, Jenny
Antequera and
Veronica Grant.
Good luck to the
team.


The Fort Clayton Community Club is the stage
for Curundu Middle School's induction for the
Crossroads Chapter of the National Honor Soci-
ety 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Guest speaker is Greta
Kensinger, wife of Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger
Jr., U.S. Army South commanding general.
And Balboa High School is presenting a
Mock Trial in celebration of Law Day 2 p.m. April
30.


(Courtesy)


iqnfl',


John Lanier, 2
April 9


Melissa Graham, 8
April 12


Lorraine Graham, 10 Deilanni Parrilla, 1
April 19 April 22


Mattiah Cook, I
April 23


Ana Rynecki, 10
April 24


Let us print your stories, poems, drawings or
funny photos on the Youth Scene Page.
Send them through MPS to: Tropic Times,
Unit 7145, APO AA 34004 or drop them in our
box at the Fort Clayton Post Office by 9 a.m.
Monday.
Make sure you put a return address on your
photos and artwork so we can return them. If you
have any questions, call Griselda Sterling at 285-
4666.


AAFES Weekly


Challenge


Learning Spanish

1. oficina chicken

2. direcci6n cat

3. scenario _ rice

4. verde duck

5. gallina _- justice

6. gato _ address

7. arroz _ stage

8. event _green

9. justicia _ event

10. pato _ office
Send your answers through MPS to Tropic Times Unit 7145
APO AA 34004 or drop it in our box at the Fort Clayton Post Of-
fice. Be sure to write your full name and age (14-years-old and
under, please) somewhere on the entry.
We'll need your entry by the Wednesday after the paper
comes out, and the winner's name will be in the following week's
paper. The correct response, or the response drawn from more
than one correct response, will win a pair of free movie passes
from the Army and Air Force Exchange Service.
The winner will need to call Donna Kelso at 285-5776 then
visit Building 654 Corozal to receive the movie passes.
Last Week's Winner: No winner

r-----------------
Lunch Menu

April 26 - 30

Curundu Middle and Balboa
High Schools

Monday - Hamburger, let-
tuce and tomato, pickles, cu-
cumber, potato wedges,
fruit, gelatine, milk.
Tuesday -- Turkey sand-
wich, lettuce and tomato,
pickles, cucumber, pretzels,
peaches, vanilla pudding,
1, milk.
Wednesday- Frank's day,
baked beans, carrot and cel-
ery sticks, pears, milk.
Thursday - Chicken fajitas, Spanish rice, refried
beans, applesauce, milk.
Friday - Pizza, corn, fruit cocktail, gelatine, milk.
L--_------- -- -----------




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Farewell Dinner Organization Day Living/Working in P.R. Page 16: A farewell dinner was held Page 11: U.S. Army South The Living and Working in Puerto April 16 at Fort Clayton's Community Club held its last Organization Day K Rico Open Forum has been rescheduled for U.S. Army South Command Sgt. Maj. April 9, a day filled with fun acfor 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Thomas J. Quinn. Find out Quinn's tivities for the whole family. Valent Recreation Center Ballroom. All thoughts on his Army career, and get the Find out about all the action military and civilian personnel and their significance of Quinn's tenure from guest such as a Hooah Run, softball, family members who are considering a speaker Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger basketball, golf, an egg toss, a move to Puerto Rico are invited. For Jr., USARSO commanding general. horseshoe competition. more information call 288-5314. *Tropic es Vol. XII No. 16 Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama Friday, April 23, 1999 Serving the Joint Community Soldiers, Marines earn prestigious badge story and photos by testing stations that Spc. Deborah Long were set up. USARSO PAO The most grueling FORT KOBBE -A thankless, physipart of the test is the cally demanding job -the job of an in12-mile road march, fantryman. What could be their symbolic the final event, token of courage, something that repreOltesvig claimed. sents the tough role of combat and sym"This is where you bolize their proficiency in the infantry see all of the guts and arts? glory of the EIB," said In 1944, Army Chief of Staff George Oltesvig. "Three solMarshal asked that same question and diers passed out a began the development of a badge that few hundred meters would honor those infantrymen who exfrom the finish line, celled in their career field. On March 29, barely missing their 1944, after the Office of Heraldic Activity EB." of the Quartermaster General completed "It is a company the design of the badge, the first of 10 and squad effort getExpert Infantryman Badges were ting ready for EIB testawarded. ing. The hardest part Since then, thousands have joined in was the land navigathe exclusive group who exemplify the tion because of the high standards and professionalism of jungle. It wasn't easy, the infantryman. but I made it," "The Expert Infantryman Badge is a Hopson said. soldier's individual test of his own comThe EIB testing petence to be the best that he can be," proved to be a little said Command Sgt. Maj. Daniel Oltesvig, harder for the Marines 5/87th Infantry Battalion command ser from Company E, 2nd geant major. Battalion, 2nd Ma. 7 "Once you earn the EIB, it is yours to Bin, 2d Makeep," said Pvt. 2 Donald Hopson, the rines, said Cpl p youngest EIB recipient, who is assigned Stephen Wertz, one Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr., U.S. Army South commanding general, pins the Expert to Headquarters Co., 5/87th Infantry Batof only three Marines Infantryman Badge onto soldiers who've earned it. Training began April 12 with 123 cantalion. awarded the prestididates for the esteemed badge. In all 37 service members earned the EIB. On April 16, 33 infantry soldiers, three gious badge. Marines and one Special Forces soldier "We had to forget were awarded the Expert Infantry Badge everything we were taught and learn it by Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger, Jr., U.S. the Army way, then get tested," he said.Co g a u ti n Army South commanding general. "Everything is a different sequence and In order to even qualify for the testit had to be done in an exact order. It Here is a list of soldiers who qualified and received the EIB. ing, soldiers must score at least 70 perwas mainly paying attention to detail," Names in bold are those who recieved the Army Physical Fitness cent in each event of the physical trainWertz said. Test Awards (295) and denotes 100 percent first time goes. ing test and must qualify expert with the After the presentation of their hard M-16. earned EIB, family and friends gathered Training began April 12 with 123 canto congratulate the awardees. A Co., 5/87th *Pvt. 1st Class Robert Bagwill didates for the esteemed badge. How"To be awarded the EIB means that ILt. Angel Davilalopez *Pvt. 1st Class Martin Byrne ever, as the days passed by, soldiers and the soldier is one of the best in his squad *1Lt. Kevin Williams *Pvt. 1st Class Jeffrey Lacortiglia Marines were weeded out, primarily by and company. That he has succeeded at Spc. Dennis Dominski Pvt. Ist Class Donald Morrow the hand grenades station, just one of 19 doing his best," Oltesvig said. Spc. Erik Gilmore Pvt. Ist Class Scot Kreinbrook Spc. Anthony Gonzalez Pvt. 1st Class Shawn Reed Spe. Edilmer Salazar Pvt.2 Shane Burnham Spc. Thurston Washington HHC, 5/87th Pvt. 1st Class Roy Frazier I Lt. Michael Harris Pvt.2 William Clements *Spc. Leonardo Brooks Pvt.2 Maurice Hardy Spc. Shaun Kelleher B Co. Spe. Sean Keller 2 Lt. Alex Limkin Spe. Richard Limon *2 Lt. Joshua SeGraves Spc. Jason Rizzp 2 Lt. Matthew Selcke *Pvt.2 Donald Hopson Sgt. Juan Dejesus E Co. 2nd Marines Sgt. Torry Rice Cpl. Carey McCartney Spc. Anthony Ernst Cpl. Andre Thompson "To be awarded the EIB means that the soldier is one of the best in his Spe. Eric Luedke *Cpl. Stephen Wertz squad and company. That he has succeeded at doing his best," said Spc. Medardo Montano 3-7 Special Forces Group Command Sgt. Maj. Daniel Oltesvig, 5/87th Infantry Battalion command *Spc. Eric Sanchez Maj. Antonio Garcia sergeant major.

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Tropic Times ~~o~ April23, 1999eop le photos by Gaby Capriles (U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office) Job well done Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr., U.S. Army South commanding general, presents Lily Urriola tokens of the command's appreciation for her outstanding work on the eve of her departure. She also receives thanks from Greta Kensinger, wife of the USARSO commanding general. Urriola leaves the Command Group to go into the private sector after years of providing administrative and clerical support. She also provided training to all levels of the Command Group including the last three USARSO commanding generals. Good luck to you and in your future endeavors. Sgt. Tywanna Gordon (Tropic Times) Tradition lives on Daniel Amores(Tropic Times) Girl Scouts in Panama gathered in the Valent Recreation Center Sunday for a Bridging Ceremony. Although this is the last year these girls will be in Panama, 24th W ing Job Fair the tradition will live on. The presence of Girl Scouts in Panama will continue and Erasmo Mendoza Patterson of the Armed Forces employees was symbolized by a flag ceremony. Odette Ortiz, U.S. Girl Scout Lone Troop union (right), gives a briefing to Gloria Hawkins (left) and Committee chair (center), passes the flag to Inez Aguilar, international commisCarlos Antonio Moreno during the 24th Wing Job Fair on April sioner of the Muchachas Guias de Panama (left), and then to Elaine Saxe, U.S. 14. Sitting next to Patterson is Ana Luisa Sepulveda, also of the Embassy Lone Troop Committee chair. This symbolizes the continuing partnerAF employees union. For more on the Job Fair, see page 12. ship between Muchachas Guias and the Girl Scouts. Tri T This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Contents of the Tropic Times do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004. Office Automation Clerk .Tina Summerton Building 405, Field Printing Plant, Corozal One W est Volunteer .Dissenia Ortega Phone: 285-6612/4666 or FAX 285-6613. U.S. Army South Commanding General.Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr. E-Mail: pbouchard@usarso-lanl.army.mil U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office .288-3143 USARSO LAN address: pbouchard@sopa@usarso Public Affairs Officer .Lt. Col. Byron D. Conover Tropic Times on the World Wide Web at: www.tropictimes.com Deputy Public Affairs Officer .Capt. Larry D. Winchel E-M ail: daniel-amores@ usa.net Command Information. .Gaby Capriles NCOIC .Sgt. I st Class Christopher C. Calkins Commander in Chief .Gen. Charles E. Wilhelm Editor .Spc. Deborah L. Long Director, U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs .Col. Vicente C. Ogilvie 24th Wing Commander .Col. Gregory L. Trebon U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office .(305) 437-1200 24th W ing Public Affairs Office .284-5459 Editor .Sgt. Paul Bouchard Chief of Public A ffairs .1st Lt. Joseph D ella V edova Assistant Editor .Sgt. Tywanna Gordon NCOIC .Tech. Sgt. Miconna J. Boaldin W riter/Editor ..r. .e. D anielA m ores Editor .Staff Sgt. John B. D endy IV W riter/Editor .Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett Director, Joint Interagency Task Force South .Col. Barry J. Chisholm Writer/Editor ...Griselda Sterling Joint Interagency Task Force South Public Affairs Office .284-7502

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Tropic Times News April 23, 1999 U.S. government VIP visits ranges story and photo by Daniel Amores general excellent relations with the govTropic Times staff ernment of Panama and I believe they are FORT CLAYTON -With a helicopter fully cognizant of the fact that we are ride over the Panarma Canal and the range turning over a huge amount of land. areas, the Deputy Assistant Secretary of "We have made enormous efforts to State for Western Hemisphere Affairs givethat land to them in the best posSusan Wood, got to see first hand the sible condition and there are going to be U.S. government range clearing efforts il limits to what we can (do oir the ranges, Panarma April 16. but that's a very small percentage of the After receiving a briefing at the Simon total land and facilities that we are turning Bolivar Conference over to P'nant and Room ir Building 95 "There is no doubt they are areas on Fort Clayton, where it is very imWood overflew the whatsoever that we are portant to preserve ranges and was then going to comply fully the natural environgiven a ground tour of with our treaty obligament, to preserve Empire Range. According to tonss" the ecosystem and Susan Wood to preserve the speWood, the purpose of Deputy assistant secretary of state cies that are unique the orientation visit for Western Hemisphere Affairs to that area." was "to see the The wording of ranges and the enorthe Carter-Torrijos Treaty of 1977 reads rssous efforts the Ursited States is making that "at the termination of any activities to clear the ranges fully and according to or operations under this agreement, she treaty obligations, and fully to the extent United States shall be obligated to take practicable before we turn them over to the Panamanian government." all measures to ensure insofar as may be Wood is currently responsible for U.S. practicable that every hazard to human policy toward Canada, Central America life, health and safety is removed from and Panama and is the State any defense site Department's Western Hemisphere coorWhen asked if the United States will dinator for the Year 2000 and for Women fully comply with the treaty, Wood in Democracy issues. stated: "There is no doubt whatsoever She stated that the level of cooperathat we are going to comply fully with tion between the U.S. and the Panamaour treaty obligations." nian government was positive when it The transfer of the Balboa West and Susan Wood, the deputy assistant secretary of state for Western Hemicame to range clearing. Pifra Range is scheduled for June 1999 sphere Affairs, talks to Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr., U.S. Army "We are working with (the Panamaand the transfer ofEmpire Range for AuSouth commanding general, after her range tour April 16, while Col. nian government) closely. We have in gust 1999. Michael J. DeBow, deputy chief of staff, Engineer, listens in. Earth Day 1999 Two Howard VIPs receive 'America's Army -Sustaining new assignments the Land W e Defend' story by Staff Sgt cations and mission support at John B. Dendy IV AFIA. story by Aurora Rodriguez The Army sustains its lands by 24th Wing Public Affairs Office "He (Jensik) will be in charge of DEH Public Relations Officer teaching soldiers to be good environHOWARD AFB -Two key perthe entire mission support function COROZAL -Earth Day is an intermental stewards, planning training missonnel at Howard have received folfor the agency, including the public national event demonstrating concern sions to minimize negative impacts on low-on assignment notifications. affairs staff that publishes the TIG and mobilizing support for the environthe environment, monitoring the efCol. Rob Jensik, Brief; plus the staff that operates the ment. fects of training and making necessary 24th Wing vice resources, training, personnel, comEarth Day was first celebrated on repairs. commander and munications and computer systems April 22, 1970, and rallied more than 20 While doing this, the Army maindeputy coifunctions," Roberts said. "He is remillion Americans to become involved tains its power projection platform and manner ofw JTFsponsible for all external asd internal in environmental teachings. sustains bases for optimal response, Panama will besupport to the agency." This event was the largest while simultaneously implementing operations suptics Group commander at Howird grassroots activity in U.S. history and sound, cost-effective and proactive enCol. Rob Jensik port and develwhen Jensik became vice-comsd ander evolved into what is known as the envivironmental practices. opment, Headquarters Air Force Inof the wing. ronmental movement. It is important to remember that enspection Agency, Kirtland AFB, The Defense Logistics Agency Furthermore, Earth Day is credited virontmental responsibility is more than N.M., with a report date not later thars provides materiel and supplies to the with sparking the first major pieces of a one-day event. July 31. military services and supports their environmental legislation: the Clean Air Army Earth Day exemplifies a daily Col. Gus Mays Jr., 24th Logistics acquisition of weapons and other Act and the Water Act. commitment to the stewardship of the Group commander, becomes coinequipment. As in the last 29 years, on April 22, public resources entrusted to military mander of the Defense Distribution "My wife the military community in Panama honcare. Depot, Defense Logistics Agency, and I are ored Earth Day as part of its year-round It is the annual call for public attersRichmond Va., with a report date not elated to be commitment to the environment. tion towards environmental issues and later than Nov. 30. returning to As announced by the Army Chief of to share with others your practice to Jensik's gaining unit, tile Air V i r g i n ia, Staff on his 1999 Earth Day Message, save Mother Earth. Force Inspection Agency, is a fie d Mays said this year's theme is: "America's Arny -Sound environmental practices are operating agency that rep erls to the IBcig sSustaining the Land We Defend. part of everything a soldier does, thus, the Air Firce. The agency's ion sonic comiThis theme underscores the imporevery day is Earth Day to the Army. is to prvid Air Force leadership mand of ine of DoD s 21 distribution tance of maintaining the environment Earth Day also fosters a sense of objectives and independent assessdepots is quite an honor. I am while training and supporting the fightcommunity by focusing on our shared cents of Air Force readiness, discihumbled by the faith that the Air ing force. environment which is crucial to soldiers pline arid manageincrit efficiency and Force and Defense Logistics Agency Each of us -soldiers, civilians and who are spread across the globe to effectiveness. -have placed in ise. I am looking forfamily members -makes a valuable "sustain the land we defend." The AFIA is made up of four inward to the challenges ahead even as contribution to this effort every time we For more information about envispection directorates and an inspecI strive to meet the redeployment act responsibly as environmental advoronmental matters, call the DEH Envition support staff, said Lt. Col. challenges here at Howard." cates. ronmentalists at 285-3679/3685. David Roberts, director of communi-

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Tropic Times April 23, 1999 N ew s NIMA plays key role in MOMEP, helping two nations achieve peace by John Gates of accurate maps, this Panama NIMA Liaison watershed line was Ecuador-Peru: An Historic Peace Accord poorly described in Dignitaries from South American nations, the the Protocol. United States, the Vatican, and the King and Queen of In spite of the Spain witnessed the long-awaited signing of the peace Guarantor's best efagreement between Ecuador and Peru on Oct. 26, forts, the controversy 1998, in Brasilia, Brazil. It seemed only fitting that the continued. In 1960 peace accord would be consummated in Brazil. The Ecuador abandoned process of closing the border and arriving at a lasting the Protocol process peace between these two nations began at a similar because it felt that the ceremony in Rio de Janeiro 57 years ago. Protocol was incxWhy did it take so long? Territorial disputes over ecutable due to a perwhich blood has been spilled are not easily or quickly ceived fatal error in settled through diplomacy: Israel and the Palestines, the description of the Turkey and Greece, and the nations of the former Yuwatershed line in the goslavia are struggling through their own unique set of Cordillera del Condor circumstances. And those are just a few of the many Since then, Ecua(Couresy) ongoing disputes over territory, maritime access and dor and Peru have had The NIMA team here in Panama (left to right) John Gates, John Armocida natural resources that are taking place today across years of uneasy peace and Don Wiley. our globe. Ecuador and Peru have overcome their disand periods of outright hostilities. Two major outconfidence, and the border. As expected, the border putes through dogged diplomatic efforts and the conbreaks occurred in 1981 and 1995. The solution we piece was the most controversial. After numerous stant vigil of the Military Observer Mission Ecuador have today came as a result of diplomatic negotiations rounds of technical and juridical presentations by both Peru (MOMEP) -both supported by advances in imbegun after signing a peace declaration in February sides, the Guarantor's brought forth their recommenaging and mapping technologies. That's where the Na1995. The final solution of the border controversy dedations as to where the border should run in May tional Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and its pended on arriving at a delicate balance between the 1998. It was accepted by both sides except in a small predecessors played a key role. spirit and letter of the Protocol, and some innovative area on the Peruvian side of the Cordillera del Condor thinking by the negotiators. surrounding a small border post named Tiwintza. Like Historic Differences. and Similarities almost all other military installations in the DMZ, A few historians argue that the territorial dispute The U.S. Mapping Effort Tiwintza had been abandoned after the 1995 conflict between Ecuador and Peru can be traced back to warSeeing the urgent need for better maps over the under terms of the separation of forces. ring factions within the pre-Colombian Incas. The Cordillera del Condor and other areas of the frontier, Tiwintza holds special significance to Ecuador.bemore probable cause was the poor definition of the the U.S. technical advisor to the Guarantors in the cause they had heroically defended it and had buried geo-political boundary between the two countries fol1940s, Dr. George McBride, solicited the help of the their dead within its perimeter. Both sides were intranlowing the Spanish colonial period. After the Spanish U.S. Army Air Force to photograph and map the borsigent over this section of the border and the talks conquests in the 1530s, this part of South America was soon stalled. Tensions grew during a period this past under control of the viceroyalty of Peru. summer and it was feared that armed conflict was imIn the early 1700s, what is now Ecuador was passed mient. to the control of the viceroy in Colombia. All told, The impasse was overcome by the Guarantors and Ecuadorians and Peruvians share a common Incan and the two presidents: Jamil Mahuad of Ecuador and Spanish heritage, including language, religion and cusAlberto Fujimori of Peru. In a flurry of shuttle diplotoms. It is not an exaggeration to say that, in general, macy, Peru and Ecuador agreed to accept a final Guarcultural differences between Americans and Canadians antor solution that includes adjacent peace parks abutare more marked than those between Peruvians and Ecting the border along the Cordillera del Condor and a uadorians. Even President Fujimori of Peru remarked Peruvian secession of a one square kilometer area enthat during visits to the front the only way he could discompassing Tiwintza, not as sovereign territory, but a tinguish his troops from Ecuadorian forces was by private property transfer. their shoulder patches. The squabbles over the border began shortly after What's Next Peru and Ecuador broke from Spain in the early 1800s. None of the treaties are final until the last monuSince that time there have been frequent conflicts and ment has been placed and surveyed. The Guarantors attempts to negotiate'a solution. In 1941, an uneasy will be ready to make sure that happens. NIMA may be truce broke down and Peru invaded Ecuador in a short called upon to assist Ecuador and Peru to further refine but bloody war. The ad hoc coalition of interested nathe definition of the watershed and to assist with hightions, known as the Guarantor Nations, made up of Ar(Couresy) precision GPS surveys. The hard part is done, but we gentina, Brazil, Chile and the U.S., helped the two Jamil Mahuad, president of Ecuador (left), and must be ready to lend a hand in order to bring this last settle the conflict. Given the world politics at the Alberto Fujimori, president of Peru, embrace afphase to a speedy conclusion. time, the Guarantors' missions were to bring about a ter an agreement was reached between the two lasting peace and stabilize the region -and in a hurry. nations. A Collective Effort Gearing up for World War II, the U.S. depended on der. From 1943 to 1946, numerous sorties were flown So many people from differing organizations and the rubber, minerals, and quinine that came from this and the first accurate topographic map of the Cordilbackgrounds have contributed to this effort. Of all the part of the world. In January 1942, with Guarantor lera del Condor was compiled -but that effort had a Guarantor's representatives, our own presidential enoversight, Ecuador and Peru signed the Rio de Janeiro tragic price. Two aircraft crashed in separate incidents voy, Ambassador Luigi Einaudi, demonstrated incredProtocol for Peace, Friendship, and Borders. It is only and 14 U.S. airmen perished. The new map was a sigible poise, savvy, and self-sacrifice during the many now that this process is coming to closure. nificant contribution to our knowledge of the region, years he has participated in this process. The peace but it did not end the controversy. accord would not have happened without the heroic The Controversy More and better maps were made in the intervening efforts of Ambassador Einaudi and his staff at the DeThe Rio Protocol is a short document taken up in years through the efforts of the Ecuadorian and Perupartment of State. large measure with delineation of the border. There are vian geographic institutes in collaboration with the InMOMEP is without a doubt one of the most sucno annexed maps to the Protocol, so everything deter American Geodetic Survey (IAGS). lAGS was cessful observer missions ever run. Since 1995, they pended on an accurate description of the border. For formed in 1946 in response to U.S. DoD and the Pan have overseen the separation of forces, kept constant several years following 1942, a binational commission American Institute of Geography desires to assist vigil over the DMZ, and been a point of interchange for from Ecuador and Peru carried out geodetic surveys Latin American mapping efforts. IAGS was one of the all involved. This international mission will continue to and placed over 150 border monuments, effectively DoD mapping activities that was melded into the Desupport the peace until the border is closed. Congratudemarcating almost 90:percent of their 1420 km borfense Mapping Agency (DMA) in 1972. nations all around for those have served so unselfishly. der. All went relatively well until they came upon the In 1996, NIMA was formed from DMA and other The NIMA contribution was outstanding. Our prodarea known as the Cordillera del Condor (Condor U.S. government agencies that deal with imaging and ucts spoke for themselves: with clarity, accuracy, and Mountain Range). mapping. Since 1995, we have brought to bear the latest impartiality. The contributors to this effort cut across This is an extremely isolated area on the eastern technologies to peer through the clouds shrouding the our agency in all phases of our expertise: cartograflank of the Andes which was poorly mapped due to its jungled terrain. The new images, topographic maps and phers in St. Louis, computer experts in Bethesda, and rugged jungle terrain, almost permanent cloud cover, computer simulations were important contributions to imagery analysts in the Navy Yard. and sparse population. The original inhabitants include the diplomatic process. My hat is off to all of you lor the great job you all the Jivaros, a tribe renowned for the artistic ability to did. A special thanks goes to my coworkers here in shrink the heads of their fallen enemies. In this area of Brokering a Solution Panama, Don Wiley and John Armocida. No other the frontier, the border runs along a watershed line The overall peace agreement includes treaties on agency or organization in the world could have done between two major river systems. Because of the lack commerce and navigation, border integration, mutual what we have accomplished.

PAGE 5

N ws Tropic Times April 23, 1999 Veterinary Command deactivates story and photos The commander of the U.S. by Daniel Amores Army Veterinary Command, Tropic Times Staff Col. Gary L. Stamp, said that COROZAL -After years of providthe Panama District Veteriing comprehensive veterinary service to nary Command "has epitoPanama's joint service community, the mized a joint service organizaPanama District Veterinary Command tion." held its deactivation ceremony April 15. "This has been the one vetIn a ceremony held at Building 6521 erinary unit that has perin Corozal, the Panama District Veteriformed all of the duties that a nary Command encased its colors in veterinary unit could perform front of a crowd of military and civilian .And although this is a deacleaders that included Col. Richard B. tivation, it is a deactivation of Thomas, Theater Support Brigade coma unit and not of the spirit of mander. cooperation that exists between the different military services and also between the U.S. and the Panamanian people," he said. The Panama District Veterinary Command, known as the Army Veterinary Services Panama prior to 1980, had been headquartered on Fort Clayton in the former Canal Lt. Col. Larry G. Carpenter, left, commander of the Panama District Veterinary Zone. Command, holds the command guidon while Master Sgt. Franklin E. Davis, right, After implementation of PDVC NCOIC, encases the unit colors protecting the integrity and history of the the Panama Canal Treaties of unit. Col. Gary L. Stamp, commander of the U.S. Army Veterinary Command, over1977, the Panama Veterinary see-s the ceremony. Services became a part of the newly formed U.S. Army Medical DeThe Panama VSSD headquarters relopositive view many others have about the partment Activity -aam.cated April 15, 1997 to Building 6521, command. In 1980, the Headquarters of VeteriCorozal, when Gorgas Hospital was "One of the comments that I hear the nary Services -Panama relocated to transferred to the Panamanian governmost is that it is a shame that we no Building 237, Gorgas Hospital, on Anment. The name changed again to the longer will have Panama as a training con Hill. Panama District Veterinary Command ground for our soldiers," he said. The Panama Veterinary Services on July l, 1998. The soldiers and civilians of the Lt. Col. Larry G. Carpenter, comchanged names to the Panama VeteriAt the end of the ceremony, Lt. Col. Panama District Veterinary Command mander of the Panama District Vetnary Service Support District after forLarry G. Carpenter, commander of the continue their mission until July 1, erinary Command, addresses the mally separating from USA MEDDAC -Panama District Veterinary Command, 1999, the effective date of the inactivacrowd. Panama on Sept. 9, 1996. hailed his assignment and spoke of the tion. Navy Exchange in P.R. prepares for SOCSOUTH story and photo by Bob Appin feet," he stated. galley, Vie de France bakery, Baskin Robbins Ice USARSO Public Affairs Office "The Main Store Cream, Subway and McDonalds. U.S. NAVAL STATION ROOSEVELT ROADS, features the retail mww SOCSOUTH members will be working in the Bundy Puerto Rico (USARSO PAO) -The Navy Exchange store containing all area of Roosevelt Roads, therefore the hours of ophere is looking forward to its new clients from the the typical retail ration of the Bundy Deli have been increased. "We Special Operations Command -South. departments found are working with MWR to provide video games, a pool "NEX Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico is very exin a major extable, and other items for relaxation," said Ard. cited about the arrival o>fSOCSOUTH," said Steve Ard, change," he said. According to Ard, NEX will have its new general interim general manager of the Navy Exchange. "We have the very manager by the time of this publication. The new gen"We are a highly successful, proactive exchange," successful protoeral manager is Dave Ruiz. Ard said. "NEX Roosevelt Roads will undergo a major type Home Gallery "Ruiz is retired military with over 30 years in the renovation and expansion later this year with the grand featuring full furniSteve Ard, interim general Navy, serving several tours as Navy Exchange Ofopening scheduled for late 2000. This project will ture and major apmanager, Navy Exchange, ficer," he said. "Since his retirement from the Navy, he nearly double the size of the Main Retail Store and pliance selecU.S. Naval Station Roosevelt has run two large Navy Exchanges," added Ard. provide a model department store for our patrons," he tions," Ard added. Roads. NEX Roosevelt Roads is the 1 1th largest NEX in added. The NEX has 50 major sale events scheduled in the world based on sales volume. In fiscal year 1997, NEX Roosevelt Roads has been in contact with rep1999. "There is virtually a sale every week and they NEX here won the Bingham Award in their sales group. resentatives of SOCSOUTH members to inquire about generally begin on Wednesday and end on Sunday," The NEX Navy Lodge has won the Carlson Award as their needs. According to Ard, efforts have begun to said Ard. the best Navy Lodge for three consecutive years as be made to provide the basic military uniform items. NEX also features various outlets such as the barber well as the Hospitality Award. According to Ard, NEX Roosevelt Roads is a fullshop, a beauty shop, laundry mat with tailor shop and "All of these awards are dependent on positive cusscale exchange facility. "We offer a 28,000 square dry cleaning services, optical shop, flower shop, video tomer feedback received at our headquarters in Virfeet Main Store soon to be expanded to 44,000 square rental, Anchor Mail service, photo lab, deli, a pizza ginia Beach, Va.," Ard said. Roosevelt Roads Middle/High School welcomes new students story and photo by Bob Appin The increase in the number of stuHarvard and Princeton," USARSO Public Affairs Office dents will not affect the school's acsaid Bickford. This is U.S. NAVAL STATION tivities in any way, he added. definitely a great ROOSEVELT ROADS, Puerto Rico "Registration dates have been seachievement consider(USARSO PAO) -All efforts have lected for the new SOCSOUTH stuing that the student been made to ensure that the Special dents," said Bickford. "The dates are population does not exOperations Command -South relocaJuly 26 and 27. However, if they can ceed 200, he added. tion to its new home is smooth. One not register that day, they can do this "We have been a Naivital area of interest to those moving any time of the year since our enrolltional Merit finalist in to NS RR is the Middle/High School. ment is opened 360 days of the year," the last two years -the "We have coordinated with the Pubhe added. only one from the islie Works Department to have more What the school is extremely proud land," Bickford said. buses to pick up those students who of is the fact that many of the graduatFor more informalive within a 25-mile radius," said ing students are able to get into the tion about Roosevelt' Ross L. Bickford, assistant principal best colleges in the country. Road Middle/High of Roosevelt Road Middle/High "They go on to such schools like School, call DSN 865Roosevelt Roads Middle/High School produces School. the military academies, Stanford, 4000/4254. top-notch students.

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SporS Page 6 Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama April 23, 1999 Serving the Joint Community The F""" TSB softball champs A he Howard Fitnes Sport Cen B ter is sponsoring a series of -Back-to-back homers by Leone and Matuska clinch it all. naments. A Women's Softball Tournament is scheduled for tostory and photos day -Sunday. A Volleyball TourTropic Times Editor nament is scheduled for April 30 FORT CLAYTON (Clover Field) -May 2. A Basketball TournaClean up hitter Mike Leone hit a solo ment is scheduled for May 21 ~ home run in the eighth inning, and third 23. Sign-ups for all tournaments baseman Adam Matuska followed with a are underway. All tournaments are dinger of his own to give the Theater open to the first eight teams to Support Brigade Headhunters an 11-10 sign up. victory in the Mens Championship SoftThe Howard Bowling ball Tournament over a team comprised Center is looking of 202nd Military Intelligence Battalion for bowlers in and 56th Signal Battalion players April the upcoming 14. "Fun Mixed .Last inning rally Leagues." There TSB had to rally for five runs in the is also reduced seventh inning to tie the game. Those price bowling on Monfive runs came off timely hitting from day and Tuesday. All the middle of the lineup, keyed by RBIs games on these days from pitcher Mike Shoaf, first baseman are $1 with free Jeff Cassell and a 3-run single by extra shoes. Bowl three hitter Steve Parker. games and get one free. For more TSB also scored a run in the first inThe TSB Headhunters went undefeated in the championship tournament information, call 284-4190. ning (RBI double by Leone), fourth inhedaClvrFldoFrtlyon Free aerobics classes are held ning (solo shot by Leone) and sixth inheld at Clover Field on Fort Clayton. at 5:45 a.m. and 9 a.m. Mondays, ning (RBI single by leadoff hitter Felix Wednesdays and Fridays. Also at Irizarry), besides scoring the two drahead up and rallied at the end" to win the Asked to sum up his game-winning 4:45 p.m. Mondays -Fridays. For matic runs in the eight inning. game. homer Matuska responded, "I was nermore information, call the HFSC. For the 202nd/56th, first baseman He went on to explain his one imvous. I just wanted to get a base hit. I got For more information on Air Herm Wilkinson Jr. smashed a two-run portant managerial move of the game a good pitch and swung hard." Force sports, call the Howard Fithomer in the third inning and a sacrifice when he changed pitchers in the fourth TSB finished second during the reguness Sports Center at 284-3451. fly in the seventh, inning. "I thought about it (the pitching lar season (record of 13-7), but came 202nd/56th scored two runs in each change) all day," he said. "I had planned undefeated in the championship tournaA my of the first three innings, three runs in to replace Cassell with Shoaf. This ment, while 202nd/56th won the regular the seventh and a run in the extra inning. would give them (202nd/56th) a differseason (record of 15-5), but had already The hours of the Scott Allen, the coach and catcher ent look. Plus they had problems hitting suffered a defeat in the championship, Clayton Bowling for TSB said his team simply "kept its Shoaf in the past." double-elimination tournament. Center are as follows: 9 a.m. p.m. Mondays Thursdays, 9 a.m. -10 p.m. Fridays, noon -9 p.m. Saturdays and -7 p.m. Sundays. Is your child having a birthday and you're wondering T what to do? Why not have a Kiddie birthday party at the Bowling Center. A special package is available. For more information, call 288IV 5460. .aThere were plenty of high-fives when Matuska crossed the the Frobic class are av hlable plate in the eighth inning to win the game. Gym. The cost is $1 per person. Classes are 5:45 -6:45 p.m. TuesTeam Rosters days and Thursdays, and 9 -10 a.m. on Saturdays. For more informaTSB Headhunters 202nd/56th Signal tion, call 284-3399. Figs Reeder Fitness 'Center has a Felix Irizarry Brent Biggs therapeutic massage service. ExToby Cutup Mike Schriek peincdmuser ovrdifretAldo Rodriguez Eric H olland perienced massuers cover different --Mike Leone Herm Wilkinson Jr. techniques including shiat-su, ikAdam Matuska T nsor. acupressure, reflexology, deep Mike Shoaf Jeff Milos muscle massage and more. For Vincent Borom Ken Kilbourne more information or an appointJeff Cssell Don Harris ment, call 288-4713/7861. Steve Parker Jeff Turner Step aerobics instruction is John Hester Mario Caldron available at Reeder Fitness Center. Ed Rosario Dirk Pilcher For more information, call 288David McAdoo Player/Coach: Ray Shafer 5201. Vic Fontan Fur more information on Mike Leone, clean-up hitter for the Theater SupDean Lynch Congratulations Army sports call DCA Sports at port Brigade Headhunters, gets ready to swing Mike Parker 288-5610/3866 or the Reeder at a pitch. Leone hit two solo homers in the Player/Coach: Scott Allen to both teams! Gym at 288-4713/7861. championship game.

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Tropic Times01 Spo tsApril 23, 1999 """""0 Scotti) Pippen arrested American LeagueP East HOUSTON (AP) -Scottie Pippen was arrested on susall," he said. Atlanta .picion of driving while intoxicated early this morning after Rockets spokesman Tim Frank would not discuss the arNew York 9 6 .600 1/2 running a red light, according to police. rest. Philadelphia 7 8 .467 2 1/2 The officer who stopped the Houston Rockets star about "All I can tell you is that he was arrested Frank said Montreal 6 8 .429 3 1:30 a.m. in downtown Houston was said to have called a have not seen any of the documentation on this, so I'd prefer Florida 4 11 .267 5 1/2 member of the department's DWI task force after suspectnot to comment." ing Pippen was driving drunk. How the arrest will affect Pippen's role with the team was Central Pippen did poorly on the field sobriety test and was taken unclear. "I think we need to get all the facts before we start W L Pct. _GB into custody where he was videotaped and given the opportulooking at any team policy," Frank said. "I think that would be St. Louis 9 5 .643 -nity to take a breathalyzer test, said police spokesman Fred premature." Houston 8 6 .571 1 King In January, Pippen left the Bulls, where he had spent his Pittsburgh 8 6 .571 1 After he refused, Pippen, 33, was booked on suspicion of 11-year pro career, and signed a five-year, $67.2 million Chicago 5 8 .385 3 1/2 DWI and released just before 7 a.m. contract with the Rockets. Cincinnati 5 8 .385 3 1/2 Pippen, a seven-time NBA all-star with the Chicago The 6-foot-7 Pippen scored just four points Wednesday Bulls, appeared cooperative, King said. night in the Rockets' 109-95 loss to Dallas. He missed all West "I don't have any kind information about any trouble at four of his 3-point tries and was 2-8 from the field. W L Pct. GB San Francisco 10 .6 .625 Arizona 9 7 .563 1 Los Angeles 8 8 .500 2 San Diego 7 8 .467 2 1/2 Colorado 5 6 .455 2 1/2 American League East W L PCT GB Toronto 11 4 .733 NY Yankees 9 5 .643 1 Boston 8 6 .571 21/2 Tampa Bay 9 7 .563 21/ Baltimore 3 11 Central W L PCT GI3 Cleveland 11 2 .846 Chicago 7 6 .538 4 Minnesota 7 8 .467 5 Detroit 6 8 .429 5 Kansas City 5 9 .357 6 West W L PCT _G Texas 7 8 .467 Anaheim 6 9 .400 1 Oakland 6 9 .400 1 Seattle 6 9 .400 1 Eastern Conference W L Pct GB Miami 28 13 .683 Orlando 29 14 .674 Philadelphia 23 19 .548 5 1/2 New York 21 21 .500 7 1/2 Boston 16 26 .381 12 1/2 Washington 16 26 .381 12 1/2 New Jersey 13 29 .310 15 1/2 Central Division Senior Airman Jeremy Moore (U.S. Air Force) Indiana 28 15 .651 -Fishing Tournament Atlanta 25 17 .595 2 1/2 Detroit 23 19 .548 4 1/2 Ricardo Lawrence of the Publications Distribution Office participated in the 24th Communication SquadMilwaukee 23 19 .548 4 1/2 ron fishing tournament held April 16. Charlotte 21 20 .512 6 Cleveland 21 21 .500 6 1/2 Toronto 21 21 .500 61/2 Chicago 12 31 .279 16 ..} pcoming runs Westerm Conference The Panama Armed Forces Midwest Division Running Association is sponsoring 2, 3 and 5-mile runs 7 a.m. W L Pct GB Saturday starting at the Fort x-Utah 32 10 .762 -Clayton Pedestrian Gate. x-San Ant. 29 12 .707 2 1/2 i---A 5K run organized by the Houston 27 15 .643 5 Isthmus Road Runners and Minnesota 22 21 .512 10 1/2 Samsung Electronics is scheduled Dallas 15 27 .357 17 for 8 a.m. Sunday starting at Plaza Denver 13 29 .310 19 Panama on 50th Street. There is no Vancouver 8 35 .186 24 1/2 entry fee. You may sign up for this run at the Saturday PAFRA run. Pacific Division A 9K cross-country run x-Portland 31 10 .756 -organized by the Isthmus Road L.A. Lakers 27 17 .614 5 1/2oraiebyteIhmsRd Pho.ex 22 1 .51425 1/2 -Runners is scheduled for 8 a.m. Seattle 20 22 .476 1/2 May 9, starting at Parque Omar in Sacramento 20 22 .476 11 1/2 Via Porras. Golden State 18 24 .429 13 1/2 For more information on runs, L.A. Clippers 7 35 .166 24 1/2 call Allen Jones at 288-3310.

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8 Tropic Times April 23, 1999 Sg. Tywanna Gordon (T-pl. TIm.0 Sgt. Tywann, Gordon (Trp T The windup .,and the pitch. It's always fun Sgt. Scott Allen, HHC, TSB, (white shirt) receives second-place softball trophy from Maj. Gen. Philip cooling someone off at the dunking tank. Kensinger Jr., USARSO commanding general. 202d M1 Battalion won the overall softball title. ALTfHOUGM 5/1177T INF CLIDS OVERALL O1GAi The day started with the last-ever 'Hoah Run," a four-mile !Bac oyb wsabghiadhdevrneokgup trek through Fort Clayton. Following the run, Maj. Gen. "p Philip R. Kensinger Jr., USARSO commanding general, ",got down and knocked out 2?." H~e told the soldier in Pm A formation he wasGT doing so because the run was 0:20 seconds slower than I the time he set for the command.~ Sgt. C o Class Chrnop Calkins (U.S. Am photos by Spe. Debb4* Long (U.S. Armny) Golfers get into the swing of things at the driving range.

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feature Tropic Times 9 Sgt. lat Class Christophor Calkn(U.S. Army) Sgt. Tywanna Gordo (Tropoc Time) As always, all the participants got a kick out of the soccer competition. Hundreds of USARSO soldiers Participants in the bean bag race were told and civilian employees took advantage of the command's final organizational day fling April 9. to hop to it. F A ER'A IZATIONAL DAY TITr, EVERYONE NAMED WINNE jiL Musical entertainment was provided by -who else? -the 79th Army Band. Don't fora get, the band's final Dry Season Concert is 6 p.m. Sunday at Goethal's Monument in Balboa. The Armed Forces Day Concert is 7:30 p.m. May 15 at the Fort Clayton Theater. Even those who didn't have the energy to play basketball, golf, horseshoes, softball or soccer, could always find the strength to check out one of the several freefood stands U.S. Army South provided for all who took part in the OrSgt. Tywanna Gordon (Trnplc Ti) ganizational Day ActiviLightfighters from 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry, celebrate on s Clayton's Jarman Field after being named overall winners of the photo by St. It Class Chdrstopl CulIns (U.S. Ary) competition.

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1Tropic Timecs0 10 Apil23,999Briefly CAclearing Du commercial airline schedule changes, the Tocumen shuttle will only pickup passengers at C c n n b Building 708 on Howard Air Force Base. In addition, times of departure have changed. Passengers Clearing? Please note that all DCA c trim should call Vehicle Dispatch at 284-5058/59 to RSVP to ensure vehicle capacity. Schedules are ing processed 7:30 -11:30 am. and 12:30 -4:30 p.mi. n available at the post office, Billeting Office and the Howard Enlisted Club. Division. For more information, call Delia Johnson at Outbound flights 288-6169. Arrive Building 708 Depart Howard Arrive Tocumen Depart Tocumen NCO Enhancement seminar 4 a.m. 4:10 a.m. 5 a.m. 5:10 a.m. The last NCO Enhancement Seminar concludes at4 5:05 a.m. 5:15 a.m. 6 a.m. 6:10 a.m. p.m. today with a ceremony at the TrIpic Brieze Ball6:30 a.m. 6:40 a.m. 8 a.m. 8:10 a.m. room. Master Sgt. Curtis L. Brownhill will he the guest 10:30 a.m. 10:40 a.m. noon 1:15 p.m. speaker. Everyone is invited. Inbound flights Wing Quarterly Awards ceremony Depart Howard ArriveTocumen DepartTocumen Arrive Building 708 The 24th Wing Quarterly Awards Ceremony is 3 5 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 8 p.m. 9:15 p.m. pi. iday in the How3arpm Base Theater. 7:45 p.m. 9 p.m. 10:15 p.m. 11:30 p.m. 24th MSS Commander's Call 6:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m. Commander's call for 24th Mission Support Squadron is 3 p.m. Tuesday in ihe Tropic Breeze Club Ballroom. SqLuadron members should be in place no later than 245 p. Travel tips Senior NCO Symposium Pet tips -Pets may now be shipped space-available to CONUS. There is, however, a fee. For more inforTeam Howard invites senior NCOs to attend aii NCO mation, call the Howard AFB Passenger Terminal at 284-5702. Symposium Wednesday and Thursday. The symposium will include briefings that effect NCOs careers and responsibilities. If interested, call your first sergeant orA 284-4114. Seven digit dialing SFC Selection Board Officer's Club sealed bid Effective May 1, personnel in Panama will have to dial all A Department of the Army Selection Board will conThe Howard Officer's Club is holding a sealed bid seven digits of a phone number when calling on or between vene June 2 to consider soldiers for promotion to sergeant sale. The Club will be open 7:30 -noon Wednesday -military installations. This will apply to telephone service first class. All staff sergeants with a DOR of 970630 and Friday for public viewing. Items included are a 60" color in military quarters as well. This change is part of the Deearlier, and a BASD between 800630 and 930531 must TV, pool table and industrial kitchen equipment. Sealed partment of Defense mandate to have all telephones changed physically update and review their personnel qualification bids are due no later than noon May 4. Open to ID card to conform to the North American dialing plan standards. records. Areas of special concern are DA Forms 2A and 2holders only. For more information, call Mitch Herbert at This will not affect dialing 119 or 110 for emergencies, dialI PQR, NCO evaluation reports, official photographs and 284-3856. ing "8" for access to DSN from an official line, or dialing 169 official military personnel files. The deadline to update .when making morale calls. For more information contact the PQRs is April 30. For information on PQRs call 288-6406; Outdoor Recreation NAF sale 24th Communications Squadron Telephone Liaison Office at for information on photographs call 288-7403; for infor284-9211. mation on NCOERs call 288-6652. There is a NAF sale 9 a.m. -1 p.m. May I at the Howard Outdoor Recreation Center parking lot. Equipment will be sold on a first-come basis. All items must go. Records disposition Nonavail statements not needed For more information, call 284-6170. 24th Medical Group officials remind patients who have Nonavailability statements are no longer needed for rean appointment at Howard or Fort Clayton that their records tirees and family members receiving medical care at faciliCommunity Bank closures must remain at the 24th Medical Group. Health records are ties downtown due to the closure of the inpatient capaCommunity Bank will close the following facilities the property of the Department of Defense, not the propabilities at the 24th Medical Group. Call 284-6977 30CHo wa Custoe ervice Centewrng FrtKithe erty of the individual. Medical records must be maintained at (Howard) or 288-4152 (Fort Clayton) for more informaApril 30; Howard Customer Service Center; Fort Kobbe the medical facility to ensure the proper medical history is tion. Mobile van; Fort Sherman banking facility and ATM. If available and documented in accordance with DOD instrucyou have any questions, contact you Community Bank tionsN manager. Community Bank will also be closed May 1 New Housing Office procedures for Labor Day. Effective May 3, the 24th Civil Engineer Squadron's Physical Therapy reduces services Housing Office will operate in) Building 2, at the south end Life in Motion Seminar The 24th Medical Groups Physical Therapy Clinic has of the CES main building behind the Howard Commissary. Learn how to successfully PCS in today's teeisologireduced its services by 50 percent and will close July 1. In All walk-in customers will he handled at the existing incallyadvanced military.This Life in Motion Seminar will preparation for this reduction in services, clinic personnel are dustrial customer service area in Building 2. In addition, eftake place at 2 p.m. in Building 200 ot Fort Clayton ot working closely withL all providers in an effort to ensure the fective May 3, the Housing Office will change its operaiMae p. Cal 288-92 3 f inBdg2 nform Caton o to transition is as painless as possible for all customers. ing hours to 7:30 a.m. to I p.m. Mondays to Fridays for may4 Ceserations. walk-in customers, and I to 4:30 p.m. by appointment make reservations. Howard Clubs drawdown only. Call 284-3301 to schedule an appointment. Flushing water systems schedule Effective May 1, the Howard Officer's Club will relocate DOIM needs our hel Water minds will he hushed on the following days atd to the Top 3 Lounge and the Top 3 Lounge will become a y h locations between the hours of 6 a.m. -10p.m. Saturday combined Top 3/Officers Lounge. Also, Oflicers' dues will DOIM Mail and Distribution Center needs your help. anid Sunday on Fort Clayton. Low pressure wl Occur it decrease to $6 ai month to mirror the Top 3 Enlisted dues. Customers tire reminded that only unit mail clerks are the sections eint laynshed and should not exceed one The new membership fee will he effective during the May 99 authorized to post and pick up official mail from the MDC. ho seFtions beingforshednd shlld o eeyed a nt 285bPersonal mail is not authorized with one exception -rehour. For more information, call Carlos Reyes at 285killing cycle, locating personnel are allowed to mail out change of ad4710. testing dress cards, available from the Post Office, by presenting Drug testing change a copy of their Official Travel Orders. Do not mail office Right Start briefing Drug tesig/trine sampling is niw heing conducted it equtiptIment, furniture, supplies, noncurrent working files, The new Right Start briefing is at the Mountain View the 24th Medical Group hospital, Building 192, int room 232 computers and other IT equipment. These items should he Chapel on the first and third Thursdays with the followon the second floor. For further information, call Michelle shipped through the Packing and Crating Section at Building forecast dates: May 6 and 20, and June 3 and 17. For Tello at 284-5314. ing 727, Corozal. You can call Ms. Chial at 285-5137 to more information, call Staff Sgt. Diana Miller at 284obtaiTs packing materials arid Mr. Lopez at 285-5610 to 3508/3241. Optometry Services Drawdown arrange shipping. Also due its a manpower shortage and Due to drawdown of medical facilities and the reduced space litnitation, unit mail clerks must make an appointWing promotion ceremony scope of care, Optoieiry Services will no longer he ahle to meant when mailing more than five parcels. The Team Howard Monthly Enlisted Promotiotn arid oifer comprehensive eyecare ito those patients not eligible Induction Ceremony for April is 3 p.m. Friday in the for Tricare Prime. Optometry Services will continue to ofHumanitarian Service Medal Howard NCO Cluh. The ceremony recognizes e listed fer routine Optometry services, such as vision analysis and The Hunsanitarian Service Medal will be awarded lor promotees in three phases. Everyone is invited to attend eye health assessment to non-eligible Tricare Prime patients those personnel assigned to Ecuador El Nino Disaster Rethis celehraion and congratulate the sew lrinites eon a space available basis until closure of the Optometry lief Effort. The award has been approved for those service freshments will he served following the ceremony. Fr Clinic. For more information, call the Optuoetry Clinic at mCTshers who provided humanitarian assistace and were more information, call 284-5363. 284-6149. assigned to the operation froi May 9 -24, 1998. For more information, call ILt. Gillespie or Mrs. WilsonSchool physicals Classified burn Carrasco at 288-6655/4155. The Howard Air.Force Base and Fort Clayton PediDue to a large demand by 24th Wing units to destroy ahic Clinicware irFean Be n r For schlysil classified material, the Howard Fire Department will conduct Optometry Clinic closes May 31 aric Clinics are increasing [he number of school physical e ve fire burns in a dumpster next to Building 1010. The The Fort Clayton Optometry Clinic will provide serappointments available. Physical appointments will be burns will be conducted from 9-11 am. on the first and third vice until May 3L. The Howard Optometry Clinic will offered I -3:30 p.m. daily. If you are moving to Puerto Monday of each month. Material brought for destruction provide routine eye care until July 31. Flight Medicine reRico and your child will require a school physical prior to should be limited to classified and sensitive material. For adferrals and emergency cyccare services only will he availthe start of the next school year, call the appointment ditional information, contact Tech. Sgt. Phillip Nixon or able during August. New military eyewear can he ordered desk at 284-3832/3834/3837. Tech. Sgt. Anthony Wells at 284-5305. until May 31.

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N Tropic Times ew s April 23, 1999 Joint Task Force 518 mission ends story and photos should not only feel good about the project, but all the by 1st Lt. Tamika P. Briggs people that you have now made happy." JTF 518 Public Affairs Officer The soldiers from the 518th Engineer Company hThe mission of Joint Task Force 518 is at an end. worked long, hard hours to ensure the success of the The soldiers have modified a community center built project and are happy to return to Panama. by previous engineers, constructed a nine-room comWhen asked to express his feelings about the demunity center with, basketball court and provided mediployment and returning home, Spc. Cameron Baldwin cal support. stated, "I'm happy to return to Panama and get the opOn April 1, JTF 518 conducted a small closing cerportunity to take leave to see my family and friends, emony celebrating the completion of the community whom I haven't seen in over a year. But overall, the decenter in La Plaine, a quality project. ployment was good. I learned a lot about steel fabricaThe completion of the sports center was released to tion and gained a better understanding of using conthe Dominicans with pride. During the ceremony Mincrete forms and placements. Dominica was a great ister of Education, Sports, and Youth Ronald Green place to visit, and it's a beautiful country." could not begin to express how grateful he was for Staff Sgt. William Beadle said, "The sports/commusuch a successful project. nity center is a good product. It allowed us to do a vaHe commented on the teamwork and effort put riety of training tasks, compared to our previous forth by the 518th Engineer soldiers. He said, "Watchprojects. I am looking forward to getting back." ing the soldiers complete this project two weeks ahead Spc. Khari Philip felt the project went by quickly. of schedule shows how much work can get accomHe said, "Placing the pad and excavating were phases plished when you work as a team. With this in mind, that went quickly and smoothly. I enjoyed the project my community will work together to maintain the very much." community/sports center and always use it with the reSpc. DeWayne Kendrick said, "I'm looking forward membrance of the hard work of the soldiers. The La to going to my next duty station, Fort Rucker, Ala. As Plaine community is very grateful, and we thank you." a light equipment construction operator, I received a There was also a comment from the Barbados Mililot of operator time on the D7 dozer during this tary Group commander, Mr. Minutolo. He commented project (not a piece of equipment that falls under his on the previous visits from engineers and explained MOS). I feel like I did a good job. I also learned a lot how happy he was for the opportunity to witness anabout vertical construction. I had the opportunity to lay Commander Minutulo, left, Barbados Military other successful product. block, paint, and help fabricate the stairs." Group commander, watches while Spc. Kevin He stated, "This group of soldiers did not only just Sgt. Cornelius Bonds said, "I am looking forward to Fowler and RonaldGreen shake hands after build a community center, but they helped build the seeing my son, Rashawn, daughter, Jasmine, and wife, cutting the ribbon to officially turn the building community. Providing such a facility, that can be of Salina. I felt like we really worked as a team on this over to the Dominicans. use to all, will only bring the people closer. You all project. During my tour in Panama this was the best project I've participated in. I'm looking forward to going to my next duty station." The soldiers working on these projects were not only engineers. Spc. Andrew Billington, maintenance technician, explains his feelings about the deployment. -"I liked the base camp, and I also liked working with the engineers. I assisted with laying block and landscaping. After seeing what the engineers have done, I realized that they work very hard. A lot of hard labor 41 was put into the project." Sgt. Andre Franklin, 518th Engineer Company's communications NCOIC said, "I felt that the leaders took care of the troops. The project looks great. It made me feel good to help the soldiers with any support, from sending and printing spouses e-mails, making guard rosters, delivering messages, and any other detail that needed attention." Along with that, personnel from the 5th Medical Group and 55th Medical Group from North Dakota went to Dominica and tended over 1,200 patients with cases such as dental, obstetrics, dermatology, and basic health care. It was a very fulfilling two weeks for the Air Force. When asked how they enjoyed working in Dominica, they all agreed that it was a wonderful feeling to know that they can assist people that need it and appreciate it. "It was really a pleasure working with the children, and the look of happiness on their parents faces was very rewarding," said Staff Sgt. Regena Hathorne, dental assistant. On the other hand, Sgt. William Philips, administration NCO, said, "I can't imagine doing dental work on a Maj. Deoliveira, above, presents awardees child and feeling good about it. I heard about the way with Army Achievement Medals for their hard they scream. But, in our line of work, helping somework during the project. From left, Staff. Sgt. one is always a pleasure." Hopkins, Spc. Fowler, Spc. Henderson, Spc. The Joint Task Force conducted the main closing Giddings, Spc. Medina, Spc. Kendrick and ceremony on April 12 for the completion of the exerSpc. Stewart. (Right) a side view of the La cise. The ceremony was held in Roseau, Dominica Plaine Community/Sports Center. Below where UCT 1 and NMCB 74 constructed a 190' pier photo, the soldiers that made the La Plaine able to accommodate vehicles. They also modified a Community/Sports Center project a success maintenance shed. were led by Staff Sgt. Dionne Davis and 1st The Joint Task Force will depart Dominica around Lt. Katina Chesser. the end of April. They will feel proud that they provided humanitarian assistance leaving the locals with two community centers that will provide additional recreational areas, a pier that can withhold over 6,000 pounds, and professional medical assistance. j Although the soldiers spent the majority of their tsme working, they were able to see the "The Nature -Island of the Caribbean" on a few MWR trips. They 14 2 really enjoyed their stay. The soldiers can't express their appreciation of 1o grateful they are and how much they wNill mi-s 1hfriendliness, support and hospitality tromn all of 11w Dominicans. They helped make the mis"u0" .1 success.

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Tropic Times 12 April 23, 1999 News 24th Wing hosts Job Fair by Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV with other major Panamanian players such as Price 24th Wing Public Affairs Office Waterhouse Coopers (consultants for small entrepreHOWARD AFB -Corporate Panama met hundreds neurs), Nestle (light industry), Budget Rent-a-Car and of civilian employees during an Air Force sponsored auto giant Toyota. Job Fair April 16 at Howard. The program was for perThe headhunters were looking for mechanics, laborsonnel at Howard AFB whose jobs will go away when ers, computer experts, medical technicians, secretaries all U.S. forces depart this nation as part of the Panama and engineers. A volunteer administrative staff of airCanal Treaty. men and civilian employees provided copy machine Howard organizers believe the event was the first of services for those in need of more resumes or company its type in the Air Force. They invited Air Force, Panama documents. Food was sold at company cafeteria prices Canal Commission, domestic workers and laborers with and water was poured for all. All the attention allowed a stake in Howard's activities, said Lance Taylor, Fainthe horn-rimmed company reps to sharp-eye the reily Support Center director. The base invited a populasumes like poker players examining card hands. tion of 1,500 "and the line did not stop all day," added Bringing the companies to the workers was a posiStaff Sgt. Eugene Rooker, Family Support Center deputy tive step, said Eugene Pert, a 15-year heating, ventiladirector. "The copy machines were busy all day," tion and air conditioning technician with the 640th Air Rooker said. "Only 10 businesses of 72 had left by 2 Mobility Support Squadron. "I put in at least 45 resumes p.m., so I'm happy that the employers are more than for myself and 45 for my daughter today. I don't know satisfied." who is receptive if I go downtown. Now I know the The resume-bearing prospective employees worked people who want to pick up and select professionals," the company tables that were set up in an aircraft hansaid Pert. "I got help with resume planning and selfSeveral job applicants filled Hanger 4 for job gar. The enterprises were mostly from the services and examination recently, and now I'm looking for what's opportunities. light manufacturing industries, with businesses such suitable for me." as Glaxo, NIKE and Chase Manhattan sharing space Fair attendee Janet Sterling of the Howard Mental hard on this over the last few months. It was a team Health Clinic agreed with Pert. "This fair was better than effort, especially from our Panamanian staff who went we thought it would be," she said. Sterling was looking downtown and talked to the businesses. They were sold for an administrative job, and she said she had several on our employee quality and customer service training. positive responses from the company reps she apNow we have a weekly updated job list, 260-strong, and preached during the fair. sent each week to our civilian transition assistance proA Cable and Wireless telephone company rep mengram contacts. The word is out that Howard is a class tioned his company's strategy of accepting resumes act." and getting back with applicants at a later date. "We Meeting those corporate representatives in advance want to pick the most able, with the skills and educawere Family Support Center staffers such as Lizca y tion," he said. Fearon, a 21-year Air Force employee. "We shook the The event was "a good opportunity to tap into a hands of 137 resource managers," she said. "We have disciplined labor force with computer skills and a strict to say thanks to the Air Force for the workshops they work ethic," said Taylor. "I've heard many favorable gave to make our employees ready for this first-time A job applicant discusses employment possicomments on the organization, the traffic flow .you event for local nationals. It will help the country keep bilities with a Panamanian human resource could pick and choose, walk through, fill out forms .rolling. Some will retire; others will own their own busimanager. there were monitors to help if you needed it. We worked nesses. If not all, most are going to be placed," in ajob. Howard AFB celebrates Earth Day 99 HOWARD AFB (24th Civil Engineer ardous materials prior to transfer." closets," said Capt. Monte Harner, Engineer Squadron Environmental Office Squadron) -Howard's personnel were Capitalizing on the synergy of these vironmental Flight commander at perform the hazardous waste storage among the Earth Day 99 celebrants beefforts, Mendenhall and fellow EnvironHoward. and disposal functions. fore the week's end as many airmen fomental Flight members designated "Our focus was on closure this year," Many base residents will be PCSing cused on ridding common hazardous Work Center HazWaste Amnesty Days he said. Howard observed Earth Day this summer and need to reduce housewastes in their homes. on April 20-22 as the local theme for and facilitated unit redeployment by hold hazardous materials prior to clear"We are redeploying now," said Earth Day 99. opening its work center closets and ing housing, Mendenhall noted. Scott Mendenhall, Howard HazWaste "We tried to make a well-advertised storage rooms and carefully looking for He said that households should capimanager. Amnesty Day for folks who still may any hazardous materials, such as talize on the Earth Day 99 spirit by re"The base must be devoid of all hazhave antifreezes or other wastes in their paints, thinners, ducing hazardous pesticides, and materials in the home cleaners, Harner Currently, redeploythrough proper usage and Mendenhall or by giving the prodsaid. When any Ing units, building ucts to an adult waste was managers and shop neighbor who can found, people use them according contacted their -supervisors should to directions on the unit Hazardous utiz future container label. Waste AccumuHousehold chemilation Point HazWaste Amnesty cals should never be Manager or thesaid. Civil EngineerDays to ensure their Household meming Squadron areas are completely hers may turn-in used Environmental oil and excess fuels Flight for disfree of hazardous to the Howard Auto 0 posal instrucSkills Center. tons. materials prior to -s Base households Currently, refacility closure. are not subject to deploying units, strict controls bebuilding managcause those houseers and shop suholds usually generate smaller quantipervisors should utilize future ties with lesser hazards than those HlazWaste Amnesty Days to ensure \ Ha~ase Anesy Das t enurefound in the workplace, Mendenhall their areas are completely free of haz. ardous materials prior to facility clo-. advised. sure, Mendenhall said. However, he said proper use of StaffSgt. Mike oquette(U.S.AirForce) "Base personnel need to keep in household hazardous materials such as Deactivation cerem ony mind that hazardous wastes generated paints, cleaners, and pesticides keeps at work centers are subject to strict regufamilies safe and protects the environMaj. Paul Commeau, 24th Contracting Squadron commander, latory management and must be acment. became the first airman to case a 24th Wing unit flag as part of counted for from the point of generaHousehold hazardous waste can be the redeployment at Team Howard during the Contracting tion to ultimate disposal," he said. disposed with other household garSquadron Deactivation Ceremony April 14. Unit Hazardous Waste Accumulabage. For details call Mendenhall at tion Point Managers and the Civil En2844802/4052.

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Tropic Times N ew s April23, 1999 Red Cross seeks donations Prohibitions during The following article is courtesy from to Muslims, Serbs, and Croats alike at a cost of more the American Red Cross. than $35 million. Recently, Steve Bullock, acting Panar a eleCtions AMERICAN RED CROSS -Turned out oftheir president of the American Red Cross, reaffirmed the homes at gunpoint .separated from other family organization's commitment to assist the most vulnerFORT CLAYTON (Law Enforcement Activity) members carrying only the clothes on their backs .able victims of this conflict, saying, "The American -Presidential elections will be held in the Repubseeking safety and an uncertain welcome in a foreign Red Cross, as part of the global Red Cross movelie of Panama on May 2. By virtue of this, the land .That is the story for thousands of refugees ment, is acting in coordination with colleagues from Electoral Tribunal Office has issued the following who have been forced to flee the Kosovo province the ICRC, and IFRC and the National Red Cross Sociprohibitions: of the Federal Republic Yugoslavia during the latest eties in the region to position relief supplies and per* The use, consumption, transfer or sale of alphase of bitter internal conflict that has torn the sonnel to meet a growing range of humanitarian coholic beverages, to include wine and beer, is country apart. needs. According to assessments, the population prohibited as of noon, May I through noon May This grave humanitarian crisis has been building with the most dire human needs in the region will be 3. Anyone caught for many long tense months. Now, as NATO planes women, children and the elderly." No matter what consuming alcolaunch air strikes over Yugoslavia, the situation has happens in the days and weeks ahead, the Red Cross hol will be grown even more desperate. Thousands of Kosovars will be there, supporting the vital humanitarian missanctioned -mainly women, children and the elderly -are crosssion that the world relies on us to provide. with a fine ing the borders into Albania, Macedonia and the There will be no quick solution to this crisis. In the ranging from Yugoslavian Republic of Montenegro. weeks and months to come, the Red Cross will con$25 to $250 or According to the United Nations High Commiscentrate on providing the resources to meet the refuthe equivasioner for Refugees, as many as 550,000 people have gees' basic needs. But there is also a critical need for 0 lent time in been displaced in Kosovo -a quarter of the long-term solutions as these people who have been prison. Alcoprovince's population. In less than a week's time, alleft with nothing try to rebuild their lives. The Red hol consumpmost 100,000 refugees have poured into Albania, Cross must also help Albania, Macedonia, and tion and sale Macedonia and Montenegro; and even more are exMontenegro -countries with limited resources and within Depected as the conflict continues to escalate. The mafragile economies -as they try to respond to the fense sites (milijority of these refugees, some experiencing extreme pressing needs of thousands of refugees who are tary installations) is not proemotional trauma, have few or no resources for shelpouring across their borders.The fastest and most hibited. The above restriction applies only offter or food, and many of them are turning to the Red effective way to help the victims of this conflict is post. Cross for assistance. through cash donations. The American Red Cross is On the day of the elections, it is prohibited This massive displacement of people requires an unable to accept any collections or individual offers to carry privately owned weapons. The only perextensive, well-organized humanitarian response. To of in-kind goods. sonnel exempted from this prohibition are law enhelp meet the refugee's immediate needs for food, Those who wish to support the people affected forcement personnel and those, who by nature of clothing, shelter and medical attention, the American by the conflict in Yugoslavia, including Kosovo, can their duties, are required to carry them (i.e., secuRed Cross is cooperating with the International contribute to: rity guards). Personnel caught in possession of a Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the InternaAmerican Red Cross International Response Fund firearm will be sanctioned with a fine ranging from tional Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent SoP.O. Box 37243 $10 to $250, or the equivalent time in prison. The cieties (IFRC), as well as the National Red Cross SoWashington, D.C. 20013, weapon will be confiscated by the local authoricieties in Yugoslavia, Macedonia, Albania, and or call 1-800-HELP-NOW (435-7669) ties. Bosnia-Herzogovina. All assistance is provided in or 1-800-257-7575 (Spanish) It is highly recommended that all United States accordance with Red Cross principles of neutrality Internet users can make a secure credit card personnel avoid traveling downtown on May 2. If and impartiality. contribution online by filling out a donation form you travel downtown, exercise caution and moniThe American Red Cross has been active in the and choosing "International Response Fund," as tor SCN for updates. region since 1993, providing humanitarian assistance their giving option. Telephone dialing change Facts on Life Insurance FORT CLAYTON (Directorate of CiIn order to continue FEGLI coverage FORT CLAYTON (56th Signal Battalion)-The 56th Signal Battalion is curvilian Personnel, Benefits Branch) -when you retire, you must retire on an rently upgrading the Panama Canal Area military telephone sytem to seven-digit The Federal Employees' Group Life Inimmediate annuity and you must have dialing. This change will facilitate the Treaty surance 99 open enrollment period behad the coverage for the five years of Implementation Plan drawdown and permit access gins April 24 and ends June 30. service immediately before you retire. If to currently blocked telephone central office preDuring the open enrollment, all active you do not have the coverage for five fixes, three-digit basic service codes, emergency employees are eligible to participate exyears, you can continue it if you have service codes and other special service codes. cept those who are in a position that is had it since your first opportunity to Also, this conversion will permit telephone calls excluded from FEGLI coverage by law or elect it. to the Fort Sherman area from May through June. regulation. Employees in non-pay status For instance, if you elect Option B Telephone central office prefix 473 will be used for may also participate. during the open enrollment period, you subscriber lines in service at Fort Sherman during However, any coverage will have to have it for five years before that time frame. during the open enyou retire in order to continue Option B Further, special attention must be given to the rollment cannot be' you could have elected it when you fact that "on-base four-digit dialing" will not be come effective until first became eligible for it. However, available. Be sure to reprogram your automatic dialer. For example, a Corozal subthey are back in pay since two-five multiples of Option C scriber calling another Corozal subscriber currently dials 6666. After May 1, the and duty status. coverage was never available subscriber must add the prefix and dial 285-6666. There will be a before, this open enrollment peThe effective date of the subject dialing plan change is May 1. The point of new coverage that Ariod is your first opportunity to contact is Rolland Gleichman, project officer, at 285-9922. will be available durelect them. If you do so and reExpanded Panama area calling access ing the open enrolltire anytime after these additional The following previously restricted prefix numbers/codes will be accessible ment period. Until multiples go into effect in 2000, you from the military system: now, Option C coverage, which is coverwill be eligible to continue coverage 101 Panama National Long Distance (Credit Card Only) age on your eligible family members, when you retire as long as you meet the 102 Panama Directory Assistance was limited to $5,000 for your spouse five-year requirement for your previous 103 Panama Fire Department and $2,500 for each eligible child. You Option C coverage. 104 PanamaNational Police can now elect up to five multiples of The revised FEGLI booklet(RI 76-21) 105 Time (In Spanish) these amounts, making the maximum and a special FEGLI 99 Open Enrollment 106 Cable & Wireless International Long Distance Operaamounts available $25,000 for your Pamphlet (FE 74 A) will give you infortor (Credit Card Only) spouse and $12,500 for each eligible nation about the FEGLI Program. We do 108 MCI Credit Card Long Distance child. You have to elect the same number not have these materials as of yet, but as 109 AT&T Credit Card Long Distance of multiples for each family member. soon as we do, it will be distributed to all 115 Sprint Credit Card Long Distance Employees ca elect any and all coveligible employees. 133 Cable & Wireless Sales, Residential Service erage for which they are eligible. Al emIf after reviewing the material you de194 Panama Trunked Radio and Paging Service cide you want to elect more coverage, 195 Panama Trunked Radio and Paging Service ployee who takes no action during the you must complete a special FEGLI 99 3XX New Central Office prefixes programmed for local open enrollment period will keep the Open Enrollment Form (RI 76-27) which Panama City area same coverage they have now. Coverage you can obtain from the Directorate of 800-5555 .Cable & Wireless Internet Access elected during the FEGLI 99 open enrollCivilian Personnel, Benefits Branch, 880 Cable & Wireless Consultations and Claims ment period becomes effective the first Building 560, Room 10 1 in Corozal, dur882-2229 Cable & Wireless Sales, Commercial Service pay period beginning on or after April ing the open enrollment period. 882-2102 Cable & Wireless Business Offices 23, 2000, which follows a pay period if further information is needed, 888 Cable & Wireless Trouble Reports and Repairs during which the employee was in a pay please contact the Benefits Branch at and duty status. 285-5745/5941/5284.

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Tropic Times 1 4 April 23, 1999 Sentry, Stratotanker airmen leave Panama story and photos by Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV 24th Wing Public Affairs Office HOWARD AFB -The relocation of one Air Force counterdrug support deployment to Panama that began under the Carter Administration is imminent. This week, airmen relocate AWACS E-3 Sentry and KC-135 Stratotanker operations to Florida. To stem the flow of illegal drugs, the Sentry was tasked to provide continuous airborne surveillance from Howard, and the Stratotanker to support the Sentry with airborne refueling. This team flew its final counterdrug patrol sortie April 18. Other final mission transfer activities at Howard this month included a departure ceremony April 16, the packup of maintenance gear, and a few goodbyes among airmen.,The crews are satisfied that their recent mission -apable rates hover near 99 percent, said Lt. Col. Ed Ryan, 24th Expeditionary Airborne Control Squadron commander. One departing expert who operates the KC-135 refueling boom -a pump that sends the gas into the AWACS -was ready to leave Panama for Florida. Tech. Sgt. Fuzzy Zoller is deployed to Panama from MacDill AFB, Fla., the home of the counterdrug AWACS outfit as of May 5. "You can't find me a better job than this. I've got the best job in the world," Zoller remarked while doing his part to gas the last AWACS from Panama, aloft over the AtlanAn AWACS soars the sky during counterdrug patrol duty near South America while deployed tic in proximity to South America. "I'm from with the 24th Expeditionary Airborne Control Squadron at Howard AFB, Panama. MacDill, so there's no sense of closure in this mission for me. I'll just do this from closer to home." that supports counterdrug efforts in the Western Three AWACS and tankers were dispatched in Somewhere, the architects of airpower and the Hemisphere is falling into place at the rank-and-file late 1992. Colombian, Peruvian, Ecuadorian and National Drug Control Policy must have been smillevel. Bolivian observers, known around Howard as host ing inside. Their move to transition infrastructure Following congressional approval, coordination nation riders, flew onboard the Sentry in the allied to roll the AWACS into the drug war becounternarcotics effort. gan a year before the first Sentry was deThe peak presence was four aircraft each in livered to Tinker AFB, Okla., in 1977. 1993-94, with the planes further deployed to host The first deployment of AWACS to Bolivian, Paraguayan and Ecuadorian airfields. Howard occurred as the Carter AdministraCapt. Kurt Barry, Sentry standards and evaluation tion was inking the Panama Canal Treaty that liaison officer and host nation flight commander at allows U.S. forces to depart Panamanian soil Howard, was previously deployed to Panama during -before 2000. The last of the militarized the peak era. "I was down here at the time," Barry a Boeing 707 aircraft will leave Panama said of the AWACS surge. roughly seven months before the era of U.S. "We had four tails here and for one-week or twoforces in Panama ends. week periods we'd deploy to Bolivia, Ecuador or AWACSs needs tankers to extend their Paraguay. It was pretty helter-skelter, but the canine-hour unrefueled range, and to that maraderie of the crews kept it all together despite end, Stratotankers deployed to Howard in having so many of us being deployed at the same 983. The tanker aircraft commander for time." the final AWACS refueling, Maj. Howard Personnel drawdowns in the mid-1990s left Williams of Howard, said the planes were fewer AWACS personnel available for worldwide Maj. Fred Girbert, 24th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron opin Panama off-and-on until 1991, when duty, so the presence in Latin America was scaled erations officer, delivers remarks during the AWACS they deployed for counterdrug duty in the back briefly in 1994. The two Sentry and E-3 Sentry and KC-135 Stratotanker departure ceremony region as a team. Stratotanker counterdrug package returned to April 16 at Howard AFB, Panama. The presence grew over time. Howard in 1995, officials interviewed said. -Staf Sgt. Norma Gavan (U.S. Air Force) Ship 'em h, ship 'em out Aircraft and crewmembers crowd the India row while four F-16 Vipers from North Dakota (foreground) arrive April 9 to succeed five F-15 Eagles from Oregon as part of the final Coronet Nighthawk deployment from Panama. The F-15s and support personnel departed Howard April 10.

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N e Tropic Times ews April 23, 199915 Marines run shore to shore story by Gunnery Sgt. Allen McCaslin felt compelled to run from ocean to ocean. This run was U.S. Marine Corps Forces, South Panama a small demonstration of the teamwork we practice every HOWARD AFB (U.S. Marine Corps Forces, South day. Not only with our fellow Marines, but with all serPanama) -During the early morning hours of March vices here in Panama," said Capt. Kevin Vail, operations 21, the six staff members from the U.S. Marine Corps officer. Forces, South Panama and a corpsman from Company E, The initial relays passed quickly as the runners were 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines, began a relay run across fresh and the temperatures were cool. As the temperathe isthmus of Panama that would carry them from the ture rose, each runner had to dig a little deeper into their Pacific to the Atlantic in eight hours and 25 minutes. own reservoir of motivation to continue running up the Beginning at the back gate of Howard Air Force steep hills of the Panamanian interior. Base near the Vera Cruz Beach, each of the six Marines In addition to their own motivation, each runner had ran an initial 2-mile leg. the collective pool of runners to keep him charging as Thereafter, the run was broken down into individual the hills grew steeper and the mercury climbed. relays of approximately four miles each. The runners Maj. Al Logan, officer-in-charge of Marines dethen regrouped for a formation run of two miles to the ployed to Panama, felt that teamwork was wholly what (couresy) finish at Maria Chiquita on the Atlantic side of the isththis endeavor was about. Marine runners from U.S. Marine Corps Forces, mus. "This was not a great athletic event on par with runSouth Panama, who ran from ocean to ocean Safety from Panama's notorious vehicle traffic was ning a marathon or even a half marathon; this was from left to right are Maj. Al Logan, Gunnery maintained with two safety vehicles and a Navy corpsabout teamwork. As the cadence goes, 'we started toSgt. Allen McCaslin, Capt. Tom Brinegar, Staff man supporting the effort. gether, we'll finish together.' We finished together and Sgt. David Wallis, Capt. Kevin Vail and Staff "As Marines, we are amphibious creatures and (we) that makes the run a complete success." Sgt. David Kinder. Helpful information on CID investigations story by Dan A. Walters I'd like to start by refuting a comment tions for the "sole purpose" of placing of events which caused him/her to be Special Agent-In-Charge, Panama CD in the TDS article which states, "The inblame on individuals. Although perpetraidentified as a possible suspect in a CID Many of you may have read the arvestigators goal is rarely to assist you in tors are frequently identified in our invesinvestigation. ticle submitted by Trial Defense Service clearing yourself, and usually it is to obtigations, this is only a byproduct of our All CID agents understand how diffiin the April 1 issue of the Tropic Times tain incriminating evidence against you." investigative efforts, and not what actucult it is for a guilty person to waive their entitled, "Silence is a virtue in the eyes in reality, CID's goal is to find the truth, ally motivated a CID investigation. Army rights and tell the truth, but consider for of the law." The article reflects the belief and if in doing so, the innocence of the CID units exist worldwide as "fact finda moment the following three of the that under no circumstances should a accused is established, then our job is ing" organizations. seven Army values: "Honor," "Integrity" suspect discuss offense(s) under invescomplete. As with TDS, CID units are tenant orand "Personal Courage." Soldiers of tigation with a CID agent without conThis is the angle we approach all our ganizations on military installations USARSO, you are members ofthe greatsulting an attorney first. The purpose of investigations. Unfortunately, a myth around the world. This allows us to conest Army in the history of the world. my article is to address the issue of the about CID surfaces occasionally in the duct unbiased investigations free from Look deep within your consciousness legal rights ofsoldiers in CID investigaminds of the community (mostly in the any potential command influence. Our and ask yourself if the Army Values intions from our perspective, while giving minds of the guilty, or those associated dedication in finding the truth is demonstilled in you since your inception into you, the reader, some insight as to what with the guilty) in that we are sometimes motivates CID investigations. perceived as conducting our investigastrayed in the CID Agent's Oath, which, our great Army are legitimate, or are they states in part ."I shall at all times seek just meaningless, hollow words? Martin diligently to discover the truth, deterred Luther King once said, "The true meaD ISI C atiOn A IIow ance facts neither by fear nor prejudice." sure of a man is not how he stands in It should be noted we in CID are not comfort and convenience, by how he FORT CLAYTON (U.S. Army South Finance and Accounting Office) -Disloconcerned with who the "truth" may stands in the midths of controversy and cation Allowance is an allowance which partially reimburses a member for the rehelp. Our responsibility is to conduct challenge." How will you stand? What location expenses of a PCS. Amounts are determined by rank and dependency felony investigations during which any degree of courage will you demonstrate status. Advance DLAs are given to members with dependents of sergeants first and all leads will be pursued, especially in the heat of controversy? class and above without dependents upon request at the member's servicing Fithose leads that may exonerate an alIt does not take much imagination to nance Office. Soldiers will bring a copy of their PCS orders to Finance within 30 leged suspect. realize there are real situations where days of the member's or dependent's departure from PDS. The Panama CID Office actually has a only the suspect possesses the knowlSergeants and below without dependents will receive DLA if authorized upon great working relationship with TDS, and edge to lead CID agents to the evidence inprocessing with Finance at their new duty station. A soldier without depenI would like to point out we frequently necessary to exonerate him/herself. If the dents is normally entitled to DLA when PCSing to a new PDS where government accept information from them in an effort suspect remains silent under these situaquarters are not assigned within 60 days of arrival. If a soldier moves off-post and to help resolve an issue with their clients tions, then obviously there is no way for gets assigned government quarters within 60 days, the DLA must be repaid. Paywhere a false accusation may exist. CID to resolve the issue under investigament procedures applies to CONUS and OCONUS. For more information, please Again, our primary focus is in "discovertion in a timely fashion. Therefore, I discontact the USARSO Finance and Accounting Office at 288-4208/4059. ing the truth," not in putting soldiers in agree with the "one size fits all" mentality The rates effective Jan. 1, 1999 are as follows: jail. presented by TDS in suggesting it is Grade With Dependents Rates Without Dependents Rate There might be some in the communever appropriate to discuss your pos0-10 $2,702.99 $2,195.78 nity who would think our investigations sible involvement in an offense without 0-9 $2,702.99 $2,195.78 are one sided and single-minded. The first consulting TDS. 0-8 $2,702.99 $2,195.78 truth is CID investigations are closely After all, today's Army is filled with 0-7 $2,702.99 $2,195.78 regulated and scrutinized. All CID units highly trained intelligent soldiers who 0-6 $2,433.81 $2,014.46 are subject to detailed and frequent inare certainly capable ofmaking informed, 0-5 $2,345.95 $1,940.18 spections by tie Battalion Head Quargood, common sense type decisions. 0-4 $2,067.98 $1,798.00 ters staffand CID Command IG officials. In closing, should you ever be re0-3 $1,710.93 $1,440.95 One of the unique aspects of these inquired to come to the CID Office as a 0-2 $1,460.93 $1,143.02 spections is the fact that no CID unit is possible suspect, my best advise is to P-1 $1,305.97 $962.51 ever evaluated on their ability to "solve" keep an open mind and listen carefully to O-3E $1,838.73 $1,555.98 investigations, or "obtain confessions" your legal rights and the briefing preO-2E $1,659.02 $1,322.74 from suspects. 'These inspections are prisented by the agent. Ask any questions 0-lE $1,532.81 $1,137.42 marily focused on evaluating the unit's you feel necessary to ensure you comW-5 $1,996.09 $1,826.76 ability to provide the supported commupletely understand you legal rights, as W-3 $1,829.95 $1,622.27 nity with quality felony investigative this is extremely important. W-3 $1,676.59 $1,363.48 support while ensurig the investigaThen, ifyou feel it necessary to proW-2 $1,333.92 $1,013.62 tions are thorough, timely investigated, vide a statement, do so at that time. ReE-9 $1,756.47 $1,332.33 and timely reported. member, your honesty in any situation E-8 $1,619.08 $1,222.89 A visit to the CID Office as an alcan be perceived as a direct reflection of E-7 $1,503.26 $1,044.77 leged suspect should never be perceived your character, and in the case of a CID F6 $1,389.04 $945.72 as "the end of the world." On the coninvestigation, could be a vital key in reB-5 $1,249.25 $872.24 trary, it could become the beginning of a solving the investigation in your favor. B4 $1,086.31 $758.82 process of rehabilitation wherein a In the event anyone has a situation F-3 $1,011.23 $744.44 soldier's career is salvaged, or be part of you think may be of CID interest, I enE-2 $962.51 $604.66 a process wherein the alleged offender courage you to call me directly at 285E$962.51 $539.17 may simply clear up a misunderstanding 5005.

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Tropic Times April 23, 1999 USARSO bids farewell to CSM Quinn Farewell dinner held in his honor at Fort Clayton's Community Club. story and photos by Sgt. Paul Bouchard Tropic Times Editor FORT CLAYTON-An estimated crowd of more than 100 guests that reflect the broad spectrum of U.S. Army South -NCOs, officers, Department of the Army employecs and retirees -filled the Main Ball Room of Fort Clayton's Community Center April 16 to bid farewell to USARSO's Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas J. Quinn Jr. The evening began with Quinn and the Theater Support Brigade Command Sgt. Maj. John L. Humphries, who served as the master of ceremonies for the event, and Humphries' wife Colleen, greeting guests to the farewell dinner. That was followed by a cocktail hour and then a dinner. Background music was provided by Staff Sgt. William Washington of the 79th Army Band. After dinner, various units and organizations presented Quinn with gifts of gratitude for his service during his tenure. The gifts included plaques, a T-shirt, certificates and framed photographs. The units and organizations presenting gifts were: USARSO The Jungle Operations Training Battalion The Directorate of Community Activities The 56th Signal Battalion The Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers The Exercise Support Command The Theater Support Brigade 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry h 245th Support Battalion Panama has been very good to me. USARSO Reenlistment SJS Deputy Chief of Staff, Resource Management Quinn-at-a-Glance Born: 1951 in the Bronx, New York City. serving the exercises in all the different countries. It After the presentation of gifts, the guest speaker for Years in the Army: Twenty-nine. He plans to retire really convinces me.that we are doing good here as far the dinner, Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr., USARSO next year in the Washington, D.C., area, as the total force .We live, eat and breathe the total commanding general, spoke about the significance of Currentjob: USARSOcommand sergeant major. Army concept here." having a command sergeant major such as Quinn servNext assignment: On special assignment at the MiliThe significant accomplishments of USARSO during USARSO. Kensinger's speech highlighted the foltary District of Washington in Washington, D.C. ing his tenure. here: "Many come to mind. We've lowing: Family: Wife Kim. Two school-age children -won the Army Community of Excellence (Award) three 0 How the Army that he and Quinn came into in the Kathleen and Travis. years in a row. Our dining facility has won two presti1970s was very different than today's Army. Back then, gious Connelly Awards for being the best dining fadrug, alcohol and spouse abuse were rampant, officers Quinn's thoughts/comments on: cility in its category in the Army. And we never missed didn't trust their NCOs, and conducting PT was not HisfondestmemoryofUSARSO: "Being associthe beat on relocating SOUTHCOM to Miami, encouraged and enforced to the cheers of soldiers. ated with such a professional group of soldiers and USARSO managed all of that." N How soldiers such as Quinn, through a profescivilians. It's been an honor to serve with them. One of his best assignments: "It was personally sional NCO Corps, helped solve these problems which This (USARSO) is the best crowd I've run across, gratifying to be the commandant of the USARSO NCO led to today's modern, sophisticated and educated Army We are quality. We are a class act." Academy at Fort Sherman, to be able to have an imforce. The best part of being the USARSO command serpact on the future leaders of the Army." The academy MHow Quinn's foreign language abilities and knowlgeant major: "Traveling through the region and obwas deactivated in September 1994. edge of the Central and South American and Caribbean regions contributed to USARSO's Distinguished Visitors Program. the oath (which he quoted verbatim) that recruits recite ees or soldiers, and his thoughts on the theme "The End when they enlist in the military. ofan Era." The theme, he said, reflects the military drawKensinger concluded by saying that Quinn has Quinn also said our Army is a good one, that "the down, which, as time goes by, "is having more of an served 11 years in Panama (three tours), and that system does work. It does provide in many ways." impact on me." USARSO has "enjoyed the legacy of his leadership and Quinn also spoke about the significance of Panama Quinn concluded by speaking in fluent Spanish about his legacy of caring for soldiers .He's been a great in his Army career, how he served 11 years here in three his career and his years here in Panama. help to me, especially when going to our numerous TDY different decades; how he met his wife here; his daughHe thanked everyone who attended his farewell dinsites." ter was born here; and the various ranks he achieved ner and ended by saying (in Spanish) "Adios and God The evening concluded with Quinn speaking about while climbing the NCO advancement ladder. He summed bless you all." his tours here in Panama. He also expressed his thoughts it up by saying "Panama has been very good to me." Quinn departs USARSO May 7 for his next assignon his 29-year Army career. His speech also featured his thoughts about the Miliment at the Military District of Washington in WashingHe said his job in the Army was quite simple. "All I tary Police Corps, his thoughts on leadership and why ton, D.C., where he will serve on a special assignment had to do was what I swore to do," he said, referring to he emphasizes selfless service and empowering employappointed by the sergeant major of the Army. "He's been a great help to me, especially when going to our numerous TDY sites." "Through his 11 years here we've enjoyed the legacy of his leadership and his legacy of caring for soldiers." Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr. USARSO commanding general and guest speaker for the farewell dinner, expressing some of his views on Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas J. Quinn Jr.

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Band finale Free child care Free calls The 79th Army Band's Jazz Combo Air Force staff sergeants and below All military ID card holders can and Show Band is holding their final dry can receive up to 20 free hours of make up to two free fiveseason concert Sunday at Goethals childcare when they are within 90 days of minute Military Affiliated Monument at the base of the Panama PCS departure from Howard Air Force Radio System calls to anyCanal Commission Administration steps. Base. The Child Development Center will where in the United States provide services. Members should bring and Puerto Rico 3 -5 p.m. orders to the Family Support Center to Fridays and Sundays. For apreceive a certificate. pointments, call 272-6968. Tropictivities April 23, 1999 Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama Page BI Serving the Joint Community If you take a closer look at this mountain range you can see the Sleeping Indian, one of El Valle's many attractions. Visit the highland of El Valle de Anton story and photos by Griselda Sterling t (Left) Kuna Tropic Times Staff Indian FORT CLAYTON -ifyou're looking for somewomen thing to do for the weekend, the Valent Recreation display Center has something for you. El Valle de Anton is handcrafted located approximately 120 kilometers from Panama City Molas ready a journey that takes about an hour and a half on for sale. (Bottom Left) the PanAmerican highway (turn right after the town of -Ttom efa SanThere are a San Calos).wide variety The town is on the site ofan extinct volcano -the wide arty of arts and largest in Panama in prehistoric times. It's a resort crafts to town which has become an important jewel in choose from Panama's ecotourism treasure chest. when shop"On the cordillera stands a beautiful mountain ping in El which resembles the figure of a sleeping Indian Valle. (Botwoman," said Arnulfo Archilbold, a tour guide and tom) Bright, bus driver to the Valley for more than 15 years. colorful El Valle de Anton is also known for its ideal soil for flowers are flowers and vegetables, and for its cool and pleasant one of El climate.Valle's many "On the outskirts there is also an excellent zoo and attractions. a greenhouse with exotic plants and flowers," Archibold said. "And thousands of Panamanians have built beautiful villas and country homes there." El Valle is a land of adventurers where you can find a lot of action with the Canopy adventure attractions. Visitors are able to imitate Tarzan or the monkeys flying above the jungle floors through a series of cables, platforms and pulleys. In this tour, tourists can also fly above the El Macho waterfall, one of the largest in the area. Valent offers you the opportunity to visit this wonderful land on Sunday tours which departs at 6:30 a.m. Join the center and enjoy shopping in the native market which is only open on Sundays. You'll be able e to purchase handicrafts such as soapstone carvings, beteas and pottery. The Valley's lush vegetation, colorful flowers and waterfalls make it one of the most popular tourist attractions in Panama. If you want to explore Panama or just want to get away from your daily routine, contact the Valent Recreation Center at 288-6500, and make your reservation now.

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Tropic Times N t e April 23, 1999 N otce 5A .toy aLas Bovedas enjoy live music Frii s e ran community and experience their about an hour and 20 minutes from the days and Saturdays and the French +Outdoor Recreation: 284-6107 social lifestyle and witness their primicity unless you stop off for a swim a' tauarn ~.Mnas-Fi Tours depart from Howard Thetive customs dating back 500 years. the black sand Maria Chiquita beach reysarant 7e Cana. Munas-m. ater. Bring a sack lunch and don't forget the which has changing facilities, or the Isla Grande 6:30 a.m. Saturday. Ecological Canal tour 9:30 a.m. -camera. white sand Playa Langosta beach.Stop at Portobelo to see the Black 5 p.m. today and May 3, $60. Don't Corona Beach trip 8 a.m. -4 p.m. El Valle day trip May 9. Join us Chr ist. miss this unique tour of the Las Sunday. once a week, the otherwise quiet and El Valle 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Enjoy Americas Interoceanic National Park. Crocodile photo safari 8 -I I p.m. relaxed El Valle becomes a picturesque shopping in the native market which Includes a boat ride along the Thursday, $40.Trained guides will capcountry shopping center celebrating is only open on Sundays. You'll be Panama Canal and Gatun Lake and a ture the crocodiles, giving everyone its most popular tradition, the Sunday able to purchase handicrafts such as visit to a Chocoe Indian village. the chance to take pictures. Don't forMarket. In this event, locals and resisoapstone carvings, bateas, and potJungle canopy tour 7 atm. -5 p.m. get insect repellent, your camera, flashdents of neighboring towns gather to tery. El Valle's lush vegetation, coltoday, $55. Get a unique view of the light and rain gear. offer an impressive variety of flowers, orful flowers and waterfalls make it jungle's canopy on this exciting El Dorado Shopping Mall 9:30 a.m. handicraft, rattan furniture, vegetables one of the most popular tourist attour. You will traverse from cable to -2 p.m.April 30, $7 per person. and fruits. tractions in Panama. Enjoy lunch at cable through the jungle tops, just Seafood dining at Siete Mares 6 -10 The Mamoni overnight trip is availHotel Campestre. like the monkeys do. This adventure p.m. May 7, $7 per person. able. Includes a two-hour drive into Shopping tour 9 a.m. -4 p.m. features a canopy tour of El Chorro Chepo and a three-hour horseback Thursday. Visit Central Avenue, El Macho in El Valle. ride. Enjoy typical food. rustic sleeping Dorado and Los Pueblos shopping Chagres River canoeing and barArmy accommodations and activities. Not malls, the most popular shopping becue 8 a.m. -2 p.m. Saturday, $20. *Outdoor Recreation Center: 288meant for the mild at heart. For more inarea in town. You'll love the thrill of this canoe 7355/6453 formation, call the center. Dinner tours 7 p.m. Fridays. A trip down the beautiful, mighty Reservations for outings are under *Valent Recreation Center: 288different restaurant is visited each Chagres River. Cost includes transway at Building 178, Fort Clayton. 6500 week. portation, guide, canoes, safety Snorkel/dive at Isla Grande SaturMake early reservations for tours: Carlson Wagonlit offers the lowest equipment and a delicious barbecue day. Visit historic Panama City founded military air fares, hotel, car rental dislunch. Bring sunscreen, hat, snacks Chagres River Rafting trip May 1. in 1506 and destroyed and sacked by counts and more. Service also inand drinks for the river trip. Fee includes breakfast, lunch, transpirate Henry Morgan. Tour the Casco eludes: Special weekday rates at Parara Puru Indian village tour 8 portation, equipment and guide. Viejo founded in 1676, reminiscent of Gorgona beachfront cabins; Chiva a.m. -4 p.m. Saturday, $22. Take a El Valle tour Sunday. its Spanish and French heritage. Stop Parrandera on Thursdays, Fridays cayuco ride along the Chagres River Snorkel/dive at Portobelo May 8. at San Jose Church to see their and Saturdays and partial Canal Tranto visit the unique Parara Puru InPortobelo offers much more and its Golden Altar, the National Theater, sits. Call 288-7077 for details. Air orceIf you wish to serve alcohol, you must Air Force submit a letter of request to the 24th *Howard Community Center: Support Group deputy commander at 284-6161 least four. working days before the The center is located on the Ground event. Floor of Building 707. New hours: *Howard AFB Sports and Recre7:30 a.m. -7 p.m. Mondays -Fridays, ation Rental Center: 284-6107/3539 noon -6 p.m. Saturdays, closed SunCheck out the wide variety of days and holidays and noon -6 p.m. equipment for rent, camping, fishing down days. and boating, home entertainment, Jewelry show and sale 11 a.m. -5 home improvement, outdoor, picnic & p.m. today. You don't have to go off party, sports and cooking equipment base to shop for fine jewelry. for a minimal fee daily, weekend and Souvenir vendors bazaar 11 a.m. -5 weekly rental. PCSing? If so, get $5 off -p.m. Saturdays. weekly and monthly rentals on TVs, Ice cream social 6 -9 p.m. WednesVCRs and TV/VCR combos. Must be day. Free ice cream and all toppings. accompanied by orders. Rent a moun*Howard Skills Development tain bike for a month or week and reCenter: 284-6361 ceive a free water bottle. The Balloon Shop is located in the Skills Development Center, Building Army C. 711. Check our daily specials and make *Valent Recreation Center: 288someone smile. The Skills Develop6500 ment Center now has the Balloon Shop Private tours for 10 -15 people can and Pack-N-Wrap with gifts, balloons be arranged. Advance reservation and and wrappings for shipping for all ocpayment required for any tours listed casions. or other local tours. The center also i 3 M*Outdoor Adventures: 284-6107 provides music rooms, movies on Rent Howard bohios and pools for weekends, slot machine, pool tables, Valent Recreation Center private parties or squadron functions. ping pong tables and rental service. Air Force Clay flowers I -3 p.m. May 4, $25. In9:30 a.m. -noon Saturdays. Pastel chalk technique 4 -5 p.m. *Howard Skills Develoement eludes three lessons. Students need to Framing instruction 6:30 -9 p.m. Wednesdays, $10 plus supplies. Center: 284-6361 purchase the supplies. Thursday. Call for details. Eye painting 7 p.m. Wednesday, $5. The center accepts commercial Guitar construction 7 -9 p.m. ThursDry brush technique 2 -3 p.m. credit cards. Army day. Thursdays. Registration and payment are re*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Cen*Fort Clayton Ceramics Shop: 288Airbrush classes, 6:30 -8:30 p.m. quired before attending classes. ter: 288-5957/7360 4360 Ceramics shop close May 31. Fridays, $5. Classes will be cancelled 24 hours Drawing and acrylic painting 2 -4 Ceramic instruction available: Learn Advance registration required for prior if minimum participation is not p.m. Sundays and 7 -9 p.m. Wednesthe fine art of ceramics. Classes are ofthe following courses: met. .days. Watercolor and oil painting techfered at all levels. Clay Flower making I I a.m. -1 p.m. Artificial flower arranging 10 a.m. niques 7 -9 p.m. Thursday. Painting supBeginner's ceramic painting 6 -8 Sundays, $15. Four sessions. Join us -noon May I -5, $10 plus supplies. plies are not included in the fee. Regisp.m. Thursdays. Fee is $20. at the center and don't miss the wonOne lesson. ter in advance. Call for details. Ceramic qualification 10 a.m. -12:30 derful class. Stained glass workshop 10 a.m. -I Crafts classes available: p.m. Saturdays. Learn to apply Fiesta Color 2 -4 p.m. May 1 -5, $12.50 plus supplies. Pottery class 1 p.m. Wednesdays. Ceramic orientation for pouring 2 -3 p.m. Sundays. Cost $20. Four sessions. Three lessons. Woodworking qualification class p.m. Wednesday. Stone stroke class, Sundays, $10.

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Tropic Times Notices April23 999B3 Army Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: 289-6699 Deep Sea Fishing Saturday. Fee is based on the number of participants. Trip is limited to 10 persons. Take advantage of the last opportunity to join the center's tour 10 Cartagena, Colombia today -Monday. Cartagena is a city full of contrast. Visitors can see a burro hitched to a homemade cart parked next to a Mercedes. An ancient 16th century wall surrounds the city that contains a modern convention center and luxury hotels. On the same street, Ri r shoppers can pay thousands of dollars for precious emeralds cut from the heart of the country, or pennies for an empanada made by a little old lady. Sherman Rental Center: 289-6104 Motorboat operator's safety classes are held 10 a.m. Saturdays at the Sherman Lagoon. Fee is $10. Space is limited to the first 10 participants. Sign up in advance. Call your Recreation Center now. Spc. Brian Murphy (U.S. Army) Charters aboard the pontoon boat: Great for fishing El Morro Castle or cruises. Fee is $30 hourly and includes captain, crew, tackle and ice. Maximum 10 persons. For more informaEl Morro Castle is one of the oldest castles in Puerto Rico. The view from El Morro is tion call the center. exceptional. Veronica's Room End of the Year Party Philharmonie Der SThe Guild Theater Howard Youth Center Atlapa Convention Center The Valent Recreation Center and the The Theater Michael J. Productions and Laker Enterprises preThe National Association of Concerts is hosting the Guild of Ancon are hosting the presentation of sents the Fort Kobbe Elementary School End of the exceptional presentation of Philharmonie Der Veronica's Room today -May 1. Featuring are: The Year Blow-out Party and Dance 5 -8 p.m. today at Nationen directed by Justus Frantz 8 p.m. May 12 at man (Dionisio Johnson), the woman (Myrna Castro), the school gym. Admission is free for teachers, stuthe Atlapa Convention Center. Tickets are available at the girl (Ana L. Broce) and the young man (Michael dents, family members and school staff. For more the association or at the center the night of the event. Winfrey). For reservations call 272-6786, or go to the information, call the Youth Center at 284-4700/5615 Come join us and enjoy this cultural event: For more Ancon Playhouse. or the school at 284-3106. information, call 214-7236. Air Force +Howard Wood Skills Center: 284Air-conditioning 4510 maintenance 2 p.m. SHoward Community Center: For wood shop needs, please contact Mondays, Thurs284-6161 the Fort Clayton Wood Shop. days and Fridays. Beginner, intermediate and adNoon -5 p.m. Saturvanced English and Spanish classes. days, 10 a.m. -5 p.m Call the center for more formation. :30 Sundays. c Howard Pool: 284-3569 *Fort Clayton Boat & Scuba Shop: Wheel alignment Hours of operation: 10 a.rn. -e6 p.m. 288-735/64 3 3 -9 p.m. Monday, Tuesday -Sunday and holidays. Fishing enthusiasts are invited to parThursdays and FriClosed Monday. ticipate in a Bass Fishing Tournament days. Water Aerobics 8:30 -9:30 a.m. through May. There's a $50 cash prize Brake repair Tuesdays and Thursdays, $2/class, per month and a $200 cash prize for the class 1 -i9:30 p.m. call for more information. Grand Finale. Register now at Building Fridays.* Howard Auto Skills Center: 178, Fort Clayton. *Fort Sherman 284-3370 Motorboat operator course offered 8 Auto Shop Building Hours: I a.m. -7 p a.m 5sdam.e. -noon monthly. Fee is $10 for Jon 1c3: Tursdays, II a.m. -6 p.m. Fridays, 9 boat certification, $20 for Boston Whaler/ Hours of operaa.m. -5 p.m. Saturdays, I I a.m. ocean certification. Advance reservation tion: noon -4 p.m. Sunday and closed Mondays and required. Sundays, closed holidays. Gatun Lake fishing charters availMondays and TuesVehicle resale lot: Planning to sell able, $30/person, aminiu of three days, 4 -8 p.m. Your car? Contact Auto Skills at people, includes Jon boat w/30hp. InWednesdays, ThursHoward. cludes boat, guide, cooler, fishing tackle, days and Fridays Services: Towing I I a~m. -7 p.m. bait and safety equipment. and 10 a.m. -6 p 'm Tuesdays -Thursdays, i I a.m. -6 Open-water dive classes begin MonSaturdays and holip.m. Fridays, 9 a.m. -5 p.m. Saturdays days. Minimum of six people required. days. (as long as a qualified driver is on Includes pool sessions, theory sessions The shop has four duty). If at tow extends beyond 5:30 and open-water dives. Register in adbays with one enp.m., there is an additional hourly vance. gine lift, tire-changcharge. Air conditioning repair, brakThe Scuba Shop has equipment for ing equipmne -[ es, oil changes, tune-ups, front-end rent, advanced instruction and services gine hoist, a coinalignment and welding available. to include repairing spear guns, regulapressor to remove shocks and various Spanish classes available. Vehicle inspection services I I tors and gauges. other equipment. Fee includes manual. For more infora.m. -7 p.m. Tuesdays -Thursdays, I I +Auto Craft Center: *Valent Recreation Center: 288mation, call the center. a.m. -6 p.m. Fridays, 9 a.m. -5 p.m. The center is located in Buildings 650_0 Piano classes Mondays -ThursSaturdays, I I a.m. -5 p~m. Sundays 178-A, B, C and Building 1 35, Fort New hours of operation: 9 a.m., -9 days, half-hour sessions. self help and closed Mondays. Cost Clayton. p.m. Mondays -Fridays, noon -9 p.m. Basic English classes 10 a.mn.is $10.25. Have your vehicle inspectThe shop features work-area bays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. Regis12: 10 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. ed at the center in Building 722. Veelectric lifts, instructions and classes. ter for ongoing classes. intermediate English Mondays and hicles cannot be left for inspections. Electric engine analysis 4 -9 p m. Spanish headstart class, eight week Wednesdays. For more information, Call the center for details. Mondays. course, meets twice a week. Intermediate call the center at 288-6500.

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B4 April 23,999 Potpourri The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications Two Can Officers' Lounge, super social hour on a continuous basis for the following announcemseuts. All Clayton rsled applicants need to re-submitan updated SF-171 every f:3d -7 p a Fdas et DJ, grea six months. Registers established from these announcements will *The Loop: 288-7035. food and company starts at 5:30 p.m. be used to fill temporary positions. Enjoy the sports games on the TVs available in Pub Fare 5 -9 p.m. Wednesdays -Saturdays. VB# 51-OC General Clerical. NM-4 (Used to fill most clerical CJ's Sports Bar and Grill. Delicious appetizers *Tropic Breeze Club-Building 710: 284-4189 positions) available. Lunch is 11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Mondays -Cashiers hours: 10 a.m. -9 p.m. Saturdays VB# 52-OC Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch). Fridays, dinner -9 p.m. Mondays -Fridays and 4:30 Wednesdays, 9 a.m. -9 p.m. Thursdays, 9 a.m. -noon -9 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Fridays. Prizmz opens until I I p.m. Wednesdays and Closed for lunch 1:15 -2 p.m. daily. *UntlIte noto ical written test for .1l tmor 4ery Thursdays, I a.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. "A la Carte" Sunday breakfast 9 a.m. -noon. appoIntu to 6-eica rosiins at grades NM-2, 3, and 4 is gained. Ladies night 9p.m. Saturdays. Eggs-to-order, pancakes, bacon, sausage, Select your favorite tunes tonight at 5 p.m. Over omelets, fresh breads, croissants and more. VIB# 55-OCSecretary Ty pitg/Office Antotatisst, NM-5, 100 CDs to choose from the 1950s to the 1990s. A la Carte breakfast 6 -9 a.m. Mondays -Fridays. specialized experietncereqired. *Clavton Community Club: 288-4716. International lunch buffet 11 a.m. -1:30 p.m. 56th Signal Battalion Open Continuous Annonements The Forum features Chef Rangel's special buf$4.95. Fridays: Southern buffet. Mondays: All OPEN: iO-i7-97 CLOSE: Will remain open until further fets. Country buffet 5 -9 p.m. Wednesday features American. Tuesdays: Italian. Wednesdays: notice from ham hocks and fried chicken to black-eyed Mexican. Thursdays: Oriental. NOTE: Thte attttctes listed below will housed to fill peas. Seafood Fridays. Eacheveningisareatonitsown. All ranks a la carte dining. 5:30 -9 p.m. recurring ltettporary/pertstedt vacancies wittit various The Valent Recreation Center features the last Wednesdays -Saturdays. A great menu with divisions of the 56th Signal Battalion. Interested candidates Carol's Cuisine 6 -9:30 p.m. Thursday. Special guest is appetizers, salads, soups and entrees to please should ensure that their application package is complete in order Osvaldo Ayala. Enjoy the folkloric dancer and dinner mueveryone. to receive proper consideration (i.e. SF171, OF-612, Resume, si Breezeway open 11 a.m. -10 p.m. Mondays DD-214 if claiming velera's preference, SF-50, current sic. pem. performance appraisal). Sunday brunch 10:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. The best Wednesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m. -11 p.m. deal in town, best value and best entertainment. EnTuesdays and Fridays, 1 a.m. -11:30 p.m. Saturdays NON-MANUAL POSITIONS: joy the hot and cold entrees, salads, breakfast items, and Sundays, noon -11 p.m. Sunday. VB# 21SIG Telecouuicasion Specialist, NM-391-tI pastries and desserts. Great food and background Steak out 2:30 -8 p.m. Sundays. VB# 26SG Telecottmtonttication Specialist, NM-391-09 *Troic Breeze Club Ballroom VB# 30SIG Telecommunicatiott Specialist, NM-391-7/9 music. *TropicBreezeClubBallroom The club features a special buffet 4:30 -8 p.m. Open for special functions only. Directorate of Community Activities, CRD, Open Sundays in the ballroom. Members pay $5.95, special *Tropic Breeze Club Casual Cove: 284-4189. Continuous Announcements rate for children 5 to I 1-years-old and under 5 free. Open 11 a.m. -midnight Mondays, Wednesdays OPEN: 03-05-99 CLOSE: 30 April 1999 Non-member fee available, and Thursdays. Entertainment: Enjoy Disco Wednesdays, FriMembers super social hour 11 a.m. -1:30 a.m. VB# 212-99-SC Recreation Assistant, NM-189-04 days and Saturdays in the Ballroom. VB# 213-99-SC Recreation Assistant, NM-189-04 Fridays. VB# 214-99-SC Recreation Specialist (Outdoor Activities), NMThe Corral is open 7 p.m. -2 a.m. Wednesdays, Pool tournaments 6 p.m. Fridays followed by 188-09 Fridays and Saturdays. Join in for great country Alternative Rock, and Tecno. VB# 215-99-SC Recreation Specialist, NM-188-07 VB# 216-99-SC Recreation Assistant, NM-189-05 soundsVariety music noon -midnight Saturdays and VB# 217-99-SC Supervisory Recreatiot Assistant, NM-188-09 Tecno Latin Sounds 9 p.m. Wednesdays, Fridays 9 p.m. Sundays. VB# 08A-99-SC Recreation Assistant (Lifeguard), NM-189-04 and Saturdays at The Underground. Karaoke evening with Rick 6 p.m. Sunday VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 04*Casa Maria: 288-5767 and 11 a.m. -2 a.m. Tuesdays. 23-99 CLOSE: 05-04-99 Authentic Mexican cuisine served 5 -9 p.m. Wednesday night new draft beer special. 246-99-SC SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATOR, NM-1101Tuesdays -Saturdays. Delivery service available on Country dance lesson 7:30 p.m. Thursdays. 07. DCA, Business Operations, Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Fort Clayton. Esp.: I yr. equiv. to NM-06. NOTE: Position requires working *La Mola Caf6: 288-4202 Members nigbt and club card drawing 6:30 p.m. irregular hours to include weekends and evenings.Temporary BreakfastThursday. Social hour reduce price 4:30 -7:30 p.m. NTE: 07/06/99. 9I a~m. Saturdays -Sundays;Flunch 1 a.m. -1:30 p.m. All nighters 9 a.m. today and April 30. Open 253-99-LG SECRETARY (OA), NM-318-06. DCSRM Program Mondays -Fridays, I I a.m. -1 p.m. Saturdays -Sunto enlisted members and their guest. Budget Div. Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: I yr. equiv. to d NM-05. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security clearance. Must Lays; dinner -8 p.m. daily. *Top 3 Enlisted Lou r 284-4189 be a qualified typist (40 wpm). Temporary NTE 10/15/9,9,. *Cafe 519: 288-6007 Live jazz with Barbara Wilson 6:30 -11 p.m. Breakfast 6 -11 a.m. Mondays -Fridays. Sundays. All enlisted are welcome. 254-99-SC EDUCATION SPECIALIST, NM-1710-07. DCA, Lunch I 1 a.m. -2 p.m. with hot specials, a salad Open 4 -9 p.m. Mondays -Thursdays and 4 -11 Child and Youth Services, Fort Clayton, Panata. Spec. Exp.: I yr. equiv. to NM-05. NOTE: Driver's license is required. Selectee bar and sandwiches. Enjoy a special buffet Thursp.m. Fridays. will be required to undergo a background investigation IAW 608days. Live jazz "blue notes" 6:30 p.m. Sunday. All 10. All applicants must complete and sign supplemental *STRAC.1r. Club: 283-4119 enlisted are welcome. questionnaire and provide pertinent information for CID/MP check. Incumbent runst be able to walk, bend, and stand for STRAC Jr. Club is now open at Cocoli 5 -10 p.m. Boss and buddy night social hour snacks 5:30 prolonged periods and must be able to lift 40 pounds. May be Thursdays -Sundays. Snacks and pool table are -6:30 p.m. Mondays. required to work on weekends and during special openings of the available. center.Muligan's on the Green at Horoko: 283256-99-SC MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST, Build your own breakfast 610a.m. Saturday, NM-301-09. TSB, DOL, Corozal, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. *Sherman Community Club: 289-6116/6198 Sudy a n olidays. equiv. to NM-07. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security Sundays and holidays. clearance a[t he Secret level. Work conditions: Work is performed Disco nights 8 p.m. -I a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Weekly lunch and dinner 10 a.m. -8:30 p.m. inside and outside of the facility and could occasionally be dirty, Country and Western nights 8 -11 p.m. dusty, and greasy. The incumbent could be exposed to strains, Mondays -Thursdays, 10 a.m. -9:30 p.m. Friday, cuts, scrapes, bruises, burns, slipping on wet surfaces, falls from Thursdays. 6 -9:30 p.m. Saturdays and 6 a.m. -8:30 p.m. ladders, etc. Existing conditions are minimized by the appropriate Fast food menu items served 5 p.m. Sundays use of required safety equipment. Temporary NTE 10/30/99. Tuesdays, 6 p.m. Wednesdays -Saturdays. Sunday and holidays. 257-99-SC QUALITY ASSURANCE SPECIALIST, NM-1910O'Club special Close the Door with Us. Live 09. DOL, Contract Management Division. Spec. Esp.: I yr. Rock with Gabby and DJ music 8 p.m. April 30. $8.95 for the first 8-ounce and $4.95 for the equiv. to NM-07. NOTE: Driver's license is required.The vegetarian version. incumbent is exposed to bad smelling fumes, to high degrees of *Cafe Seven-O-Seven-Buildine 707: 284-5848 heat, and the possibility of strains, cuts, scrapes, bruises. buns, Howard slipping, falling from ladders, stacks, etc. These conditions are Open 6 a.m. -7 p.m. Monday -Friday. Try our dell minimized by the appropriate use of safety equipment. Temporary *Howard Club-Building 113: 284-4680. sandwiches and pastries. NTE 10/03/99. 258-99-SS TELECOMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, NM-391-12. 56th Signal Battalion, Technical Control Facility, Coronal. Spec. Exp.: I yr equiv to NM-Il. TIG: I yr at NM-1. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security clearance at the TOP SECRET LEVEL. Competitive Temporary promotions NTE 09/30/99. Limited to 56th Signal employees. STEA FOOD UFFET 5 -9 USAID/Panama F E 1 USAID/Patama requires the services ofa Voucher Exaineir FSN./ Y .M 6. Qualifications: Completion of high school, twi years of college H .TI1dL CO,4' or technical study in accounting is highly desirable, two to three years of experience in voucher examining or related fiscal clerical /O /N U AT THE FORT work, level III (good working knowledge) English ability is required, basic knowledge and understanding of professional AYT N O M U accountig principles, theories, practices and terminiology and a LAiTI I C( / vI familiarity with laws, regulations and procedures governing USAID accounting and paymneilt procedures. The candidate should N /TY I/U A A/f) be a Panamanian. Those interesied in applying, should contact U USAID/Patnatt subtii a resuise ts the Persisitiel Office, Uttit Ie/ U ~ / / U 10949 APO3 340112. NLT Mittday. O f OYOU/? DEL ICIO(J5 Mail and File Clerk Qualifications: Complete high school, minimum if two years if mtil handling experience, one year OffIDPaic Oi ol 11949 um At) 341112 esn ne May ce UOnit F0M E IN experience in a U.S. Agency, level III (good working knowledge) English ability is required, general records filing and mail FORM A T/ON CA L procedures and ability to expeditiously and accurately handle large volutte of documents is necessary. Those initerested in applying, should contact USAID/Panana or submit a resune to tfme Personnel Office, Unit 0949 APO 34002, NLTIMay 5, or call 2 263-6011

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__ L Tropic Times B5 M ovies April 23, 1999 Location Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 6:30 pm: Forces of 4 pm: At First 4:30 pm: The 7 pm: My Favorite 7 pm: 200 Ciga7 pm: True Crime* 7 pm: My Favorite 284-3583 Nature SightRugrats Movie** Martian rttes Martian 8:30 pm: True 6:30 pm: My 6:30 pm: Forces of Crime* Favorite Martian Nature* 8:30 pm: 200 8:30 pm: True Cigarettes Crime' Fort Clayton 6:30 pm: My Favorite 4:30 pm: The 4 pm: At First 7 pm: True CrIme* 7 pm: My Favorite 7 pm: 200 Cigarettes 7 pm: True Crime* 288-7279 Martian Rugrats Movier Sighta Martian 8:30 pm: 200 6:30 pm: Forces of 6:30 pm: My Cigarettes Nature Favorite Martian 8:30 pm: True 8:40 pm: 200 Crime* Cigarettes All movies are Subject to change depending on R Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent arrival in country or adult guardian. Tickets are available in five price categories: $3.50, $3, $1.75, PG-13 Parental guidance suggested for children under 13. $1.50 and $1. *First run movies $3.50 **Special Price PG Parental guidance suggested. AAFES Home Page: www.panama.phoenix.netl-aafespan.default.html G Suitable for general audience. Now showing At First Sight wedding. How hard can that be in this age of planes, trains and 9 Mira Sorvino, Val Kilmer automobiles? Various circumstances hinder his trip to Savannah. 6 When Amy falls in love with Virgil she convinces him to unBen has to wonder if somebody up there is trying to tell him some: dergo eye surgery to restore his sight. They soon learn that all thing. R,1 hr, 49 min. gifts come with a price and vision is comprised of a multitude of senses. R, 2 hrs, 9 min. My Favorite Martian Jeff Daniels, Christopher Lloyd -FBased on the television series, "My Favorite Martian," ambitious television reporter Tim O'Hara stumbles upon a .Sandra Bullock, Ben Affleck Martian whose spaceship has accidentally crash landed on Ben has two days to get from New York to Savannah for his earth. PG, 1 hr, 28 min. The Rugrats IT'S 1159 ON NEW YEARS EVE. Movie DO YO KNOWIt'IAnimated 00 YOU KNOW WHERE YOUR DATE IS? : The Pickles family faces the biggest adventure of any household, the birth of a * new child, Dil Pickle. Big brother Tommy and h oward AFB ...~ pals decide that the baby is .o ar F cramping their style and 0 decide to take him back to 0 the hop-sickle.G,lhr,23 6:30 pm: Forces of Nature (PG-13) Ben True Crime Affleck, Sandra Bullock Clint Eastwood, Isaiah Washington *.Clint Eastwood portrays 8:30 pm: True Crime a self-destructive investiga: *tive reporter with less than (R) Clint Eastwood, -12 hours to save the life of C amanheknowsisinnocent v Isaiah Washington Eastwood's first assignment with the Oakland Tribune is to cover the execu* e tion of a convicted mur* derer, played by Isaiah :Fort Clayton Ben Affleck Casey Affleck Dave Chappelle faces nf hecasedon't add Gufflezmo Dka Angela Featherstone Janeune Garofalo a 6:30 pm: 10 Things I Gaby Hoffmann Koae Hudson Courtney Love Jay Mohr mation, which will stay : Hate About You(PGMartha Plimpton Chstina Ricci Paul Rudd Washington's execution. 13) A o Y nik, R, 2 hrs, 7min. 13) Larisa Oleynik, 0 r Julia Styles 200 Cigarettes VBen Affleck, Courtney Love 8:30 pm: 200 CigaCourtney Love. Be n AfleckandPaul Rudd star rettes (R) Ben Affleck, A[AO(ESVDDEENVEIAIN NTPDESnu MIPIW~f DOYVA [IRIS in a comedy set in New Courtney Love "200 CIAD[II" PwtnsaestIN DENAWECO CASRA [E1 DAVECHAPPFliF APILArFEAW F rInE York's East Village on * 1AYUO MADDAIMV OIINAI PA1VO 11JYE[iAYED[ UUWIUM[ M lfl[ New Year's Eve 1981. A MH MAitt A MUIN i rA n nl iN U BIDU Ai 1 AOE [AMAL STE EDNSIEIN Love, Rudd, and an en* t4t'01 ANDAL POSTE amss1" DOD A MANWO V11HAN M TMEII f1L~bl~assINMfl~ P R flER ZAN M sit A IflHR[NO tNA iA semble cast bar hop miser* 12tsw EDANOYRINI P R DS[EDG MEB ME HE EENSPN TA0 VNNDOUM SIODJON SMAISSON ably through the East Vil* BETR DID DAVI SALE N TO1 FLED SNAADN t116 TDEADOAMO ARIA .lage looking to have a good : time and intersecting at a R W.200ciaeltes.acm PR --mm" bash thrown by Martha OrillaSm ck AhnfOnlERYtECORS RtsdThskNo fssMVtOS ^t"'''' Plimpton. R, 1 hrs, 42 0 rein.0 .Showing tonight-t the Fort Clayton Theater. 0. ....0S. .o -..........

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B6Tropic Timeis L C B6April23, 1999 TV Early morning & dayt me TVprograimm Ing. Key: + Program time change due to live programming event; Mature theme; ** Series starts; "Series ends; ** Program moved to new day and/or time y6:00 Today Show 6:00 Hetalvic Ns 6:00 Th Cordl Ridge Hour 6:00 Today Show 6:00 Today Show 6.00 Today Show 6:00 Today Show 800 Heidlive News 6:30 Classic Cartooi 6 30 Outretch of Lovo 8:00 Headlino News 8:00 Headlin, News 8 00 Headline Newv 8:00 Headline Newv 8:30 Showbiz Today Marathon 700 1he Field Alar 8:30 Showbiz Today 0:30 Showbiz Today 8:30 Showbiz Today 8:30 Showbiz Today ) 9:00 Sovamo Shreet 9:00 Aaahhi! Roal Monsiers 7:30 Day .1 Discovery 9 00 Sesame StroLe 9:00 Sesamo Street 9:00 Sovamo Street 9:00 Sesame Street 10:00 Baeney & Friends 9:30 Are You Afraid of h 1:00 Sunday Today 10:00 Mister Rogers' 10:00 Blues Clves 10:00 Barney & Friends 10:00 Bluev Claes 10:30 Kiaas Fex Appeal Dark? 900 Magi, Svhool Bus Neighbrhd 10:30 Co-Ed Traning 10:30 Bodyshaying 10:30 Co-Ed Training 1) I 00 The Oprah Winrey 10:00 America's Family 9:30 Antie "a30 Kiana's Flex Appeal 11:00 The Prah Winfrey 11:00 The Oprah Winirey Show 11:00 The Oprah Winfrey C Show Kitchen 1001) Fromisvd Lrid I. 11 The Oprah Winfrey Show 12:00 Headline News Show' C 12 00 Headline News 10:30 California's Gold I 100 Heidlin News Show 12:00 Headlinv News 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:00 Headline News 12:30 WhIeel Of Forlune 1:00 Headline News I 310 Air Force TV News 12:00 Headline News 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 1:00 Fort Charles 12:30 Wheel Of Forlune S1:00 Port Clsarles 1:30 Navy/Marine Corys 12:00 Americas I vniest 1130 Wheel Of Forune 1:00 Fort Charles :25 Guiding Light 1:00 Port Charles O 25 Guiding Light News H0 ort Charles 1:25 Guiding Light 2:15 General Hospital 1:25 Giding Lighi 2:1S General Hospital 12:00 Soul Train 12:311 SCNSpial: 1:25 Guiding Light 2:15 General HospiIa 3:00 Sesame Street 2:15 General Hospital 3:00 Sylvester & 1:10 Noon Incrediblv Animal Rvsnces 1 2:S General Hospital 3:00 Talespin 4:00 Saved By Bell: New Class 3:00Animaniacs Tweely Mysteries 2:00 NHI_ Playof's: 1:30 Motor Week 3:00 Sesame Street 3:30 Newton's Apple 4:30 Legends (if the Hidden 3:30 Sesame Street 3:30 Krati's Creatures Quarterfinals (Game 2) 2:00 Dr. Quint Medicine 4:00 California Dreams 4:00 Nick News Temple 4:30 Blues Clues 4:00 Sesame Stree Bluen at Coyotes Woman 4:30 All T'flat 4:30 Scholastic Sports 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:00 Jecpardy! 5:00 Dateline NBC 3:00 7' Hea-n 500 Jeopardy! America 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:30 NBC Nightly News See Prime Time tahte 4:00 NASCAR Winston Cup 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:00 Jeopardy! See Prime Time table See Prime Time table See Prie Time tahle 12:00 Baywualch Auto Racing: (I) See Piie Time table 5:30 NBC Nightly News 12:35 ESPNews 12:35 ESPNews 12:35 ESPNes 1:00 Crooked Hearts (TVDie Hard 500 12:35 ESPNews See Prime Time table 1:05 Lantern Hill 1:05 Jumpin' Jack Flash 1:00 ABC Nightline PG) (Taliadega) 1:05 Judgement at Nurerburg 12:3.5 ESPNews 3:00 Moonstruck (TV-PG) (TV-PG) 1:30 Headline News 3:00 Stir Crazy (TV-PG) See Prime Time table (TV-PG) 1:05 The Birdcage (TV-PG) 5:00 Headline News 3:00 Husbands And Wives 2:00 NHL Playoffs: (T) 5:00 Headline News 12:30 America's Black Form 4:30 Movie Magic 3:00 Mistrial (TV-PG) 5:30 NBC News At Sunrise (TV-PG) Oilers at St-rs 5:30 Hour of Pwer 1:00 Friday Night 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Hesdline News 2:00 Videolinks 5:30 NBC News At Sunrise 5:30 NBC News-At Sunrise 5:30 NBC News At Suntise 5:30 ESPNesvs 3:00 Nobody's Child (TV PG) 5:00 Headline News 5:30 NBC News A, Sunrise M 6 00 Today Show 6:00 Headline News 6:00 The Coral Ridge Hour 6:00 Today Show 6:00 Today Show 6:00 Today Show 6:00 Today Show 0 00 Headline News 6:30 Classic Carbon 6:30 Oulreac:h of Love 8:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News 8 30 Showbiz Today 7:00 New Adenturesof 7:00 The Field Afar 8:30 Showbi Today 8:30 Showbiz Today 8:30 Sbowbiz Today 8:30 Shrowbiz Today 9:00 Sesame Streer Winnie The Pooh 7:30 Day of Discovery 9:00 Sesame Sireel 9:00 Sesame See 9:00 Sesame Sireet 9:00 Sesame Street 1000 Barney & Friends 7:30 Mupper Babies 8:00 Sunday Today 10:00 Mister Rogers' 10:00 Blues Clues 10:00 Barney & Friends 10:00 Blues Clues 10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal 8:00 The Little Mermaid 9:00 Magic School Bus Neighbrhld 10:30 Co-Ed Training 10:30 Bodyshaping 10:30 Co-Ed Traming L) 1:00 The Oprah Winfrey 8:30 Disney's Recess 9:30 Arthur 10:30 Kiana's Fle Appeal 1:00 The Oprah Winfrey 11:00 The Oprah Winfrey 1:00 The Oprah Winfrey Show 9:00 Aaahh! Real Mottsters 10:00 Promised Land 11:00 The Opeah Winfrey Show Show -Show 12:00 Headline News 9:30 Are You Afraid of the 11:00 Headline News Show 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News i2:30 Wheel Of Forture Dark? 11:30 Air Ioece TV News 12 00 Headline News 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 001: Port Charles 10:00 Anerica's Family 12:00 Americas Frnries .12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 1:00 Port Charles 1:00 Port Charles 1:00 Port Charles 1:25 Guiding Light Kitchen Home Videos 1:00 Port Charles 1:25 Guiding Light 1:25 Guiding Light 1:25 Guiding Light 2:15 General Hospital 10:30 California's Gold 12:30 SCL SpecuL 1:25 Guiding Light 2:15 General Hospital 2:15 General Hospital 2:15 General Hospital 3:00 Sylvester & 11:00 Headline News incredible Aris-l Rescuvs Ii 2:I5 General Hospital 3:00 Talespin 3:00 Goof Troop 3:00 Animaniacs Tweety Mysteries 11:30 Navy/Marine Corps 1:30 NBA Showinti, 3:00Bonkers 3:30 Newton's Apple 3:30 Disney's Aladdin 3:30 Waynehead 3:30 Kert's Creatures News 2:00 NBA Biskoibal: 3:30 Supermtn 4:00 Nick News 4:00 Saved By Bell: New 4:00 Hercules: Legendary 4:00 Xena: Warrior Princess 12:00 Soul Train Knicks a Heal 4:00 California Dreams 4:30 Scholastic Sports Class .Journeys 5:00 Jeopardy! 1:00 Hercules: Legendary 4:30 NBA Basketbil: 4:30 All That America 4:30 Legends of the Hidden 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:30 NBC Nightly News Journeys Sonics atj 500 Jeopardy! 5:00 Jeopardy! Temple 5:30 NBC Nightly News See Prime Time table 2:00 NHL Playoffs: Bee Prime Time table 5 30 NBC Nightly News 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:00 Jeopardy! See Prime Time tabe 12:35 ESPNews Quartervfials (Ga.e 2) 12:30 America's Black Forum See Prime Time tahle See Prime Time table 5:30 NBC Nightly' News 12:35 ESPNews 1:05 Unlawful Entry (TVBlues at Coyotes 1:00 Friday Night 1235 ESPNews 12:35 ESPNews See Prime Time table 1:05 Jumpir' Jack Flash PG) 5:00 WWF -W resting 2:00 Videol nks :05 Judgement at Nuromburg 1:05 The Birdcage (TV-PG) 12:35 ESPNews (TV-PG) 3:00 The Adventures Of See Prime Time etble 3:00 Nobody's Child (TV(TV-PG) 3:00 Mistrial (TV-PG) 1:05 Lantern Hill 3:00 Husbands And Wives Baron Munchausen(TV12:00 Baywat ch PG) 4:30 Movie Magic 5.00 Headline News 3:00 Moonstruck (TV-PG) (TV-PG) PG) 1:00 Crooked Hearus (TV5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News 5:30 NBC News At Sunrise 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News PG) 53 0 NBC News At Sunrise 30 NBC News Ar Sunrise 5:30 NBC News At Sunrise 5:30 NBC News Ar Sunrise 5:30 ESPNews 3:00 Stir Crazy (TV-PG) 5:00 Headline News 5:30 Hour of Power 6:00 CBS 48Hours 6:00 Dateline NBC Fri b:00 Motor Week 6:00 Datelise NBC Sun 6:00 Dateline NBC Mon 6:00 Dateline NBC Tues 6:00 Dareline NBC Wed ad 7:00 ABC Crime & Justice 7:00 ABC 20/20 Fri 6:30 This Week In Motor 7:00 Nanvy/Marine Corps 7:00 ABC 20/20 Mon 7:00 Early Edition 7:00 ABC 20/20 Wed 8:00 Headline News 8:00 CNN Satuday Morning Sports News 8:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News 8:30 Morning Business 9:00 Showbiz 7:00 Sunday Morning 7:30 Air Force TV News 8:30 Morning Business 8:30 Morning Business 8:30 Morning Business Report 9:30 Style wi E!sa Klensch 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 8:00 Headline News Report ReporI Report -)9:00 ABC Good Morning 10:00 CNN Onudy 9:30 CBS Face the Ntion 8:30 Morning Business 9:00 ABC Good Morning 9:00 ABC Good Morning 9:00 ABC Good Morning America 10:30 Page 0, with Nick :00 Hundhire News RepHort America America America 11:00 AMA Supercross NChales 0:30 Air Force TV News 9:00 ABC Good Morning 11:00 NASCAR Busch Series 11:00 NHL Playoffs: 11:00 Major League 1:00 NHL 2Night 11:00 Snowboarding 11:00 PGA Golf: America Auto Racing: (T) Quarerfisais (Game 4) Baseball: (T) 1:30 NBA 2Night 12:00 IROC Auto Racing: Greater Greensboro 11:00 NHL Playoffs: Touchstone Energy 300 Devils at Penguins Blue Jays at Angels 2:00 MSNBC Time and Again 1:00 Major League Baseball: Chrysler Classic Quarrerfinals (Game 1:30 NBA Inside Stuff 2:00 MSNBC Time and Again 2:00 CBS News 60-MIN If 3:00 Headline News Tigers at White Sax (3oundi 3)(T) 2:00 MSNBC Time and 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Burden Of Proof 4:00 AMA Supercross 1:00 Major League Baseball: Senators at Sabres Again 3:30 Burden Of Proof 3:30 Burden Of Proof 4:00 Inside Politics See Prime Time tble MeIs at Cubs 2:00 ABC 20/20 Sun 3:00 Headline News 4:00 Inside Politics 4:00 Inside Politics 5:00 Showbiz Today 12:00 Headline News 4:00 NASCAR Winston Cup 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Burden Of Proof 5:00 Showbiz Today 5:00 Showbiz Today 5:30 NBC Nightly News 12:30 ESPNews Auto Racing: (T) 3:30 Burden Of Proof 4:00 Inside Pohirics 5:30 NBC Nightly News 5:30 NBC Nightly News See Prime Time table 1:00 Washington Week to Die Hard 500 4:00 Inside Politics 5:00 Showbie Today See Prime Time table See Pime Time table 12:00 Headline News Review (Talladega) 5:00 Showbiz Today 5:30 NBC Nightly News 12:00 Headline News .12:00 Headline News 12:30 ESPNews 1:30 WaIl Street Journal See Prime Time table 5:30 NBC Nighily News See Prime Time table 12:30 ESPNews 12:30 ESPNews 1:00 ABC Nightline Report 12:00 George Michael Sports See Prime Time table 12:00 Headline News 1:00 ABC Nighilire 1:00 ABC Nightline 1:30 Headline News 2:00 Major League Baseball: Machine 12:00 Headline News 12:30 ESPNews 1:30 Headline News 1:30 Headline News 2:00 NHL Playoffs: (T) (T) 12:30 Headline News 12:30 ESPNews 1:00 ABC Nightlime 2:00 NHL Playoffs: 2:00 NHL Playsoffs: (T) Oilers at Stars Blue Jays at Yankees 1:00 ABC This Week 1:00 ABC Nightline 1:30 Headline News Teams To Be Announced Teams To Be 5:00 Sportscenrer 5:00 Sporiscenter 2:00 PGA Goor. 1:30 Headline News 2:00 NBA Barsketball: (T) 5:00 Optrtseiter Anrounced Groaner Greensboro 2:00 NHL Playoffs: Jazz at Soics 5:00 Sporsceter Chrysler Classis (T) 4:30 RPM 2 Night (Final Ron) Hurr i t Bruins 5:00 Sportscetter 5:00 Sportseener 5:00 Sports.oer 7:00 Homicide: Life on/ 6:00 Beverly Hills, 90210 6:00 Dr.Quinn Medicine 6:00 Antiques Roadshow 6:00 Ancient Mysteries 6:00 "Vietnt: The 10,000 6:00 Biography: Streets 7:00 Party of Fine Wouman 7:00 ER 7:00 Gun Day War" Lewis and Clark 8:00 Young Ivanhoe (TV8:00 Flipper (TV7:00 7th Heaven 8:00 Specurum Movie 8:00 The Froni (TV-PG) 7:00 Melrose Place 7:00 X-Files ID PG) PG) 8:00 The Attic: Hiding Of 8:30 Young Mr. Lincoln 10:00 Doug 8:00 Three Amugos (TV-PG) 8:00 You Must Remember 10:00 Doug 10:00 The View Anne Frank (TV-PG) 10:30 Rugrats 10:00 Doug This 10:30 Rugrats 11:00 Interior Motives (TV-PG) 10:00 Doug 11:00 Sinhmpsons 10:30 Ruugr"s (TV-PG) 11:00 Simpsons 11:30 Home Matters 10:00 Worship for Kids h.30 Rugrars 11:30 Home Improvement 11:00 Simpsons 10:00 Doug l 1:30 Home Improement 12:00 Grace Under Fire 10:30 On Main Street :00 Sit mpso.s 12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 11:30 Home Improvement 10:30 Rugts (g 12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 12:30 Ellen : 1:00 700 Club 30 Home Improvenuo 1:00 Amatzing Machines 12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 11:00 Simpsns 1:00 National Geographic 1:00 Murphy Brown 11:30 Rual Videos 12:00 Sir Trek: Deep Space 9 2:00 Ancient Mysteries 1:00 The Aviators 11:30 Houe Imp.rovemernt Explorer 2:00 Beverly Hills 90210 12:00 Touched By An Angel 1 00 Anerica's Castles 3:00 Guts 2:00 "Vietism: The 1)000 12:00 Stau Trek: Deep Space 3:00 Homicide: Life o./ 3:00 Party of Five 1:00 Road to Avoslea 2 :00 Antiques Roadshow 4:00 The Front (TV-PG) Day War" 9 Streets 4:00 Flipper (TV-PG) 2:00 Dr.Quinn Medicine 3:00 ER Bee Prime Time table 3:00 Melrose Place 1:00 Understanding 4:00 Young Ivanhoe (TVSee Prime Time table Woman 4:00 Spectrun Movie 12:00 Three Amigos (TV-PG) 4:00 Three Amigos (TV-PG) 2:00 Biography PG) 12:00 The Attic: Hiding Of 3:00 7th Heaven 4:30 Young Mr. Lincoln (TV2:00 Doug See Prime Time table Lewis and Clark See Prime Time table Anne Frank 4:00 Tne Attic Hiding Of PG) 2:30 Rugrats 12:00 You Mmst Remember 3:00 X-Files 12:80 Flipper (TV-G) (TV-PG) Anne Frank See Prime Time table 3:00 Siumpsons This 4:00 You Must Rememober 2:00 The View 2:00 Worship for Kids (TV-PG) 12:00 Tie Front I (TV-PG) 3:30 Hone Ins provement (TV-PG ls 3:00 Interior Motives 2:50 On Main Street See Prime Time tabie 2:00 Doug 4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 2:00 Doug (TV-PG) 3:30 Home Muatters 3:00 700 Club 12:00 Young Mr. Lincoln 2:30 Rugrats 5:00 The Aviattrs 2:30 Rugrats See Prime Time table 4:00 Grace Under Fire 3:30 Real Videos (TV-PG) 3:00 Simpsons 3:00 Sinsons 12 00 Strangers o a Train 4:30 Ellen 4:00 Touched By An Angel 2:00 Doug 30 Home Iprovemeni 3:30 Home lmiro ent (V-PG) 5:00 Murphy Brown 5:00 Road to Avonle 2:30 Rugnats 4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 4:00 So's Trek: Doep )ce ) 0 Doug 5:30 Mad About You 3:00 Simpsons 5:00 Amazing Machines 5:00 Understanding Rugrats 3:30 Home Improvemvnr -( I 4:00 Star Trek. Deep Spac 9 30 Homelmrvemsnt 5:00 Americas Castles 4:00 Star irk: Deep Spaco :00 Ntional Geographic Explorer

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SCNTropic TimesB7 T V April23, 1999 L Key: + Program time change due to live programming event; Mature theme; Series starts; -Series ends; Program moved to new day and/or time, (AIP) Already in progress PRIMETIME 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 :0 S wCN ABC W-rld sit, ieadtine SCN NIws :35 Laie ShCNw. 8 & 10 H n t Sit" St, Trk: Deep Sytce S Fie News Ttnight Shw w/ Ipy w./ Dt1id N -ws (JIP) 'Itntght Len. Letterman Fri. SCN N-,wsI 14 & 63 H!ty ehin T Worl M ittr" Sta, Trek D-,p Spac 9 X Filt, N tws TCnight Sh 5w w hy L/ _hv1 April New, (JIP) a WI. Leema 23 ABC W-rld CS 15 & 64 Nightly E-vvtig NBA B-skt tball: R tiri ii M tgi, NBA BSkethal Tra i tlbl ,es tl.az 16 & 65 Th, V-wr .o r) F ire E 1 Mtrph1ty BrtwB.rly Hill, 90211) Paty ,f Fi 8& 10 H$ A,, F,',1 'rly ((ilt 't2 Il M1r1-1 PL1ce ABC 211/211 Frily i edline S uday Night Liv, S at. 14 & 63 "N B ly ((ilt 9021) Mr sL Pl. j ABC 20/20 Fiday adltne s u y Night Li,. A pril Ntty 24 15 & 64 N t, Sh i m N BA B Sktlttll: Lk ., t Srp,, Sp tst, Tig t Ned n M L ghli16 & 65 K'ht,,,lP O t I 700 C h A T.uth By A. Atgel R-id ttAvvl, Dr Quin Medici 7th H.ve Autin City Livli it 8 & 10 Cion:NASCAR Wittti Cup Racing (T) Dit Hard 500 (Talltdegt) eN httttcer Chit-, U.S W :,men' Hedltine N,N Gy/Storytilt, Kid Sty Auti, City Sun. 14 & 63 C t: NSA B ktball: Sty Msggie Crle it Dettitt (TV-yG) Headline NL td April 14 I" D" r'itWd t tr N.ws G1y/Sttry25 1 _____ U___IjT W 15 & 64 C:nt:NASCAR Witt:, Ctp Raiitg (T) Di. H.rd 500 (Talladega) r Sit.er Ctina vs US. Wtmv'i Sp0 In NSA P1rtv1uiv3 T,.t. T~t~t ttt B atketball 16 & 65 D u R r SimuR. -Itit lt itprvi tS T,,Trek: Dep Spa-v 9 A.rica's Cste, Antiqu. Rtadh w ER SCN Nw 8 & 10 i/ h" 60 M ii, D-lin NBC ABC 20/20 HT i w J.y vwiih David News (1iP) L. Lviirman Mon 14 & 63 1Nlws Evrytdy H .SCN Nyb :35 Lv Shw Nitidli Lvte Thy aiie I Sh:w w/ Uty w/ Da.vi/ A april New R symitd N y Lv ii,,L., 26 ABC Witld CBS H'dtin Nightly 15 & 64 N_, NHL P tyitff,: Q te.initI Mapl. Leaii -1 FlyrE Ving PBS NNews Busitess Titrght N -ws Rp rt 16 & 65 D-ug Ru'.t P-m ps 1n rtveS1,, Trek: Deep SpC771,e. 9 mzigMa,,ine Arct, M ystrie Gunu SCN N w S :h 8e. 14 & 63 di Sh thi, Tiucht d By A, AngVl Miii RSit Whit (TV-PG) HN dlin T Nh w // vi TueH 14li &id~ 63 TiL.v By A, Av~ itRWi.IVy/H~li CNN~:v.1 O.,id Sht7t Nen Lvtvr,,. April News (iP) -____ INSBA IH~lv ihl 27 ABC World CBS Nightly 15 & 64 Nw E.ing NBA B skethll: M gi, i P,-, Fy tsii, PBS N w u N w BSi TtihA N T rs I Reptr16& 65 Nw :iT 35Rvgh 8 & 10 SCN News:05 L,[,r, Hill It) M trutk (TV-PG) Hvdline TCN Nt S 35I .Shvd N t Tittg i h iv .1 tity v/ ti Lenii Levterman SCN Nvews HW ed. 14 & 63 ilv~dtid~ Trht/ybe M tv iy protvvemD.s-', Creek B./Iy Thy Virei, Slavi Nvvdi TighiShw w/iJy w/_David LWed. Li's,,, ,,d Nws (11P) April ABC Wtrld CBS i Ni 28 15 & 64 Nvws Maj-r League BasehblI: Yankee it Rungvii EPving PBS New-h-, N ws Bi nesly Ttnighi NNvs Repit 16 & 65 Doug Rugrs Simpos,, yrvmStXTk:Deep Space 9 d tavi g BwFi, SCN N141.t SCN News B SCN Nws :35 LNa. Shw 8 & 10 : ShH-1i Fr Wvrking Fr. Mid Ah,:, ER dIn Titight Sh tw w/ ty w/ DhviI E Hveadline Totday Pii6 Yitu eNsv Lvn: Letv erma N-w, 01P) SCN N-w.SN1e s:5 aeS o T hur. 14 & 63 :05~ i IThoB, iz F-ried, W-rking Fraier MYANot E e n Tnih h ww/Jy /D vi April N-w. (JIP) 29 ABC Wtrld CBS He-ini Nightily 15 & 64 N _w. NHL H-kevy Play ff: Tam., ,, b Avunttttd Evvning PBS Newst ur Ns Busitiss Totight N-ws Reptt 16 & 65 D-:g RIgrat Sim.yutnv ntpr,:vemSt.r Trek: Dvep Spite 't Nittatti tlDG grpiEl ExplSr: r H i-id.: Li ,it St11,t SCN Prime Time Movies & Specials SCN Weekend Sports CIRCLE OF DECEIT. A woman vows revenge after she meets with a terrible beNBA Basketball: trayal at the hands of her husband and best friend. Starring Joanna Cassidy, 7:00 p.m.Tonight -Raptors at Magic Cable 15 Esai Morales, and Janine Turner. (Drama, 1991,TV-PG) 8 p.m. Sunday. 9:30p.m.Tonight Trailblazers at Jazz Cable 15 MISS ROSE WHITE. 1940s N.Y. career woman who has hidden her Jewishness 7:30 p.m.Saturday Lakers at Spurs Cable 15 comes to grips with her Polish immigrant sister, long thought to have died in the 2:00 p.m.Sunday Knicks at Heat Cable 14 Holocaust. Starring Penny Fuller, Gina Gershon, and Amanada Plummer. (Drama, 4:30 p.m.Sunday Sonics at Jazz Cable 14 1992, TV-PG) 8 p.m. Tuesday. Major Lea Baseball: Mao egueBsea: SCN's VCR Alert -Recommended for videotaping 1:00 p.m. Saturday Tigers at White Sox Cablc 15 1:00 p.mn.Sunday Mets at Cubs Cable 15 JUDGEMENT AT NUREMBURG. It has been three years since the most important Auto Racing: Nazi leaders had, already been tried. This trial is about 4 Judges who used their offices to conduct Nazi sterilization and cleansing policies. Retired American 4:00 P.M. Sunday Winston Cup Series: Die Hard 501 (T) Cable 15 Judge, Judge Dan Haywood has a daunting task ahead of him. The Cold War is NHL Hockey Playoffs: heating up and no one wants any more trials as Germany, and allied Govern7:00 p.m.Saturday Blues at Coyotes Cable 14 ments, want to forget the past. But is that the right thing to do is the question that the tribunal must decide. Starring Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, and RichSenior's PGA Golf: ard Widmark. (War Drama, 1961, TV-PG) 1:05 a.m. Tuesday. 11:00 a.m. Sunday PGA Championship (Final Round) Cable 14

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BTropic imnesAd B8 April231999 Classified Ads 93 Oldsmobile Cutlass SuAudio Techniz VHF wireless BR O/sz $400, refrig $70, DR Duty-free merchandise preme, 2 dr, red, looks gd, headworn mic system, new tblw/6 chairs$300, Q/szmatt runs grt, LM $4500, 285-5185 $295/neg, 268-4732 $400, 288-5083 FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) -As a reminder, in o Ga A accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern CmPontiacGrandAm,gcond, DJ equip, equalizer, dbl CD BR set $400, drapes $75, mand regulations, duty-free merchandise, whether new or used, runs grt $5000, 288-5039 player, 6 channel mixing ceilinglamps, 272-6162 cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold94 Hyundai Excel, 5 spd, LM board, light, pwr rack & more BR set w/desklbkcase $300, ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu exc cond $3500, 288-7176 $1800, 284-6297 223-2072 tion under both military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes per94 Terrano, exc cond Elec Organ, Casio portable BR set, ceiling fan, round tbl, missible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. Before $10,000, 226-8209 10,000 AC & more, 230-3726 such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact the 94 Toyota Corolla, AC, 5 spd, Fender 2 amp PA 130 w/4 BR set dbl bed, nite ibis, vanContraband Control Section for advice at 288-5814. LM, exc condo, dty pd $8500, vocal channelspkrs inpus, ity, 6 drawers mirror, chest Access to installations is allowedfor ID card holders & pass holders 272-2621 -269-5700 IV msg $ & more $450/obo, 220-2421 only. All guests must be signed on by ID card holders. 95 Buick Century, LM,loaded, lv msg El acceso a las instalaciones militares solamente le esta permitido dty pd $8500, 226-8209 JVC mni stereo system$150 Bunk bed, dbl/twin combo a las personas con tarjetas de identidad personal del Gobierno de los 95 Chevy Camaro, blk, V-6, 5 2 $350, upright frzr $400, 272EEUU y el personal con pases de acceso a las instalaciones. Todos los spd, am/fm cass, LM, exc Magnavox stereo console 2620 invitados deben ser firmados ala entrada de las instalaciones por una cond $10,000/obo, 284-3792 150w, Pioneer spkrs, 230Ceiling fans, reclining chair, persona con tarjeta de identidad personal de los EEUU. after 4 pm draw curtain, 263-2390 1 95 Dodge Neon, LM $7500, Nintendo 64 cassettes, gd Chest frzr $300, DR glass tbi Pick up tomovemiscitems,all 85 Mercedes Benz 280 SE, 236-0089 cond, 237-9194 w/6 chairs, leather $350, 232posts, 261-6699 loaded, 1 owner, LM, like new 95 Ford Escort $5900, 236Nintendo 64, Quest, NFL Mad7533 $9800, 272-5792 0089 den 99, extra control $210, Chest, desk, room divider, BR Beagle pups, show quality, Upholstery, curtains, interior 284-3183 set 272-1175 263-5986 decoration, 261-6699 85 Toyota Supra, sporty, grt 95 Oldsmobile Cutlass, LM, P s -fc sastr 272n1175 looking $3500, 263-5022 dty pd $5700, 223-3786 Panasonic office laser printer Coffee tbls, DR set, K/sz bed, Big live amazon plant, spe-$375, 264-9440 2847 cially for angel fish, 20" high Bo' s& am er 85 VW Golf, 5 spd, 2 dr, AC, 95 Volvo 940, 4 dr, LM, AT, Pa___ pr8nter,4qu75_ $10, 272-1216 E Pioneer stereo $2000, 288sunroof, silver, leather int Panasonic printer, quiet, Computer cab, end tbls, 7292 $17,000, 210-1522 Relisy mon $300, 285-4093 wicker chests & chair, rugs, Cat, tabby/wht, m, 2 yrs, 15' Orlando clipper, 55 HPPeavy amp for bass 300x 288-5591 after 7 pm fem, grt mouser, free, 272Evinrude, galv trailer, radio, 86 Chevy Nova, 5 dr, AC, am/ 95 Volvo 960, 4 dr, leather lot, $eav Mamphtr sps 10ni 6162 fishfinder,rods&reels$4000, fmcass$1800/neg,223-2072 sunroof, AT, AC, CD, gray, $300, Marshall spks, 1 unit, 4 Computer desk w/printer Cockersaniel 2adult,1 p 276-6323 86 Chrysler 5th Avenue, exc loaded $18,000/obo, 260spkrs $300, 269-5700 V mg stand & shelves $70, 284k p pup 2847 Sansui tuner & tape player 6975 w/kennels, 284-6124 16' Tri-hull, center console, cond, 236-4756 after 5 pm $125 272-6239 C 60 HP mariner $5000/obo, 97 Chevy Camaro, LM, warComputer desk, chair $250 German shepherd, e 6 4 HIP mbn 234 dr, 5 spd ranty, PW, PL $14,000, 288Sega Genesis, 232-5997 264-9440 inside dog, very obedient, gd 272-6642 $2500/obo, 284-6297 ___________ eaStr / gms15 optrhth$5 eln w/kds,284443 1'DepV~ackrbss oat 86Nisan207X3n3d Sega Saturn w/9 games $175/ Computer hutch $75, ceiling in/kids, 284-4430 17'Deep VTracker bass boat, 86 Nissan 2005X, needs 97 Mitsubishi Lancer GLXI, obo, 284-4430 fans, 'AC units, bkshelves & Pit bull type dog, fem, 2 yrs 75 Hp O/B Mercury, exc cond work $750, 264-3675 AC, am/tm cass, alarm tint b 44n, A utb397 $7cro/cbi, 2l5-43t1,ACxed/fm cass,73-3r7, tt,_SonyTV 232-5997 more, 272-5397 micro-chip, all shots, fixed 86 Toyota Cressida, gd cond, like new $8500, 873-3272 SonyuTVi32-59970Dhum4 free, 284-5987 18' Tri-hull, 140 HP Evinrude, dty pd $3100/obo, 232-7533 Zenith console TV, gd cond e$40, 284-3437 Toy poodle, bik, male, 4 moe, 15d97 Mitsubishi Lancer GXLI, $200 285-4093 after 5 pm rt i/kids $100, 284-4236 of equip $6500, 272-2870 87 Nissan Maxima, sunroof, AC, am/fm cass, like new, dty DR set w/6 chairs, chrome & 9 C crat 2" PW, runs gd $2000, 288-5637 pd $8500, 873-3272 DRaset w6hrcoe 21.5' Chris craf20 HPF u dgas25,2467 Johnson O/B, 25 HP kicker, 88 Ford Escort, 5 spd, 2 dr, 4 97 Nissan Sentra, Exc cond, DR set 2, china cab $850 AvaiabMe cuddy cab & more $18,000, cyl, runs gd $2000/obo, 285dty pd $8000, 260-6179 Backpack on Fort Clayton, sofa bed $175, 3 pc LR set, 272-6900 4093 97 Volvo S-40, loaded, 16 must identify 272-1007 need upholstery $125, 284decorator, 2 day notice, 28421'Wellcraft, 200 HP mariner, 88HondaCivicDX,2dr, hatchvalve, AT, dty pd $19,000, 4181 Iv msg d608rar, 2 daeyc condo back, AC, am/fm cass, exc 223-0250 Rita Smith's high school year 6608 Mary kicker, many extras, cond $3300/neg, 284-3731 98 BMW 523i, loaded, AT book, must identify, 288-5986 DR tbl w/4 chairs $100, 284$19,000/obo, 272-5642 _' 98 BMW 523_, loaded, AT3454 Assist reg/obtaining birth cert _______________272-5642 at Panama civil registry, 22323' Mayco, center console, 89 Ford Tempo, 4 dr, gd cond $30,000, 268-6584 ousehol DR tbl w/4 chairs $125, sofa, 2153 after 6 pm, Darnell twin 140 HP Evinrude engs & $2500/obo, 284-5578 lV wag 98 Nissan 240 SX, loaded, rattan trim $275, area rugs more, dty pd $15,000, 27289GEOSpectrum,5spd,2dr, 285-9293 $50, stereo cab $25, 213Avon Christmas books, free, 2080 AC, gdcond$1250, 288-7585 10,000 AC, needs repair but 8825 284-3028 98 Toyota Tercel, wht, AC, works $50, 212-3280 2-wheel car tow trailer $350, 89 GEO Spectrum, 6spd, AC, AT, exc cond $9000/obo, DR tbl w/4 chairs $300, 284Awesome cakes, banana 228-4061 gd cond $1150, 288-7585 260-8293 11 x 11t gray berber carpet 4724 bread, cinnamon rolls, 284-w/padding $90, 18,000 Whirl3798 Erica 3 fiberglass boats, 26' Flying 89 Mercury Cougar, bilk, am/ pool AC $125, 272-2454 DR Ib w/4 chairs, like new, Bridge, dsl, 21' 351 Ford, 14' fm cass, AT, PS, V-6, tilt, PW 1,0C 7,80A 284-5720 Baby-sitter, my house or 14 HP O/B, all/$10,000, 612$2000/obo, 288-5392 13,000 AC $175, 18,000 AC yours, 284-6790 Raquel 2069 $195, Bali blinds $20, 272DR tb w/8 chairs & 3 exten89 Nissan Sentra, blk, AC, 5 Acermate 450d, 486DX2, 8 5792 sions $850, 272-2860 Baby-sitter, Red Cross cert, Lg utility trailer $400, 226spd, am/fm cass, exc cond KB Ram, CD-ROM, w/spkrs, wknights, wkends, overnight, 6174 $2000, 288-6778 14"mon, mouse, Win 3.1, MS 14' upright frzr $200, student DR teak tbl w/8 chairs, exc grt w/kids & pets, 288-7093 Office, IBM Antivirus $300 desk $125, kitchen tbi $80, cond $1100, teak Ig roll top Baby-sitter, responsible deMilitary type utility trailer w/ 89 Pontiac Grand Am, 4 dr, 236-0548 after 6 pm 272-5593 desk w/marble $500, 272respo b mounting, spare, new tires, AC, am/fm cass $2300/neg, 2454 pendable; light housework, paint & bearings $575, 272223-2072 Epsonprinter$185,269-6728 15' Admiral refrig, frost free 2 wkdays/wkends, ref, 2907188 $350/obo, 272-6845 Dresser, nite tbl, Q/sz bed w/ 0595 Carmon 89 Toyota Cressida, V-6, Gateway 2000 color noteframe, computer desk, 284Trailer for jet ski or sm boat, leather int, new paint, exc book, 486, 8 MB Ram, w/case 18' frost free refrig $290, 2366492 Baby-sitter, wkends, mature, galv, new $475, 272-2121 cond $4000, 269-8639 $600, 260-3736 5132 gd w/kids, reliable, 233-1652 Entertainment center, 28490 Ford Probe, 2.2 It turbo, IBM thinkpad, P150 MMX, 32 19.5' upright frzr, dresser, 5575 Carinspectionorregistration, s AT, AC, sun roof, exc cond MBRam,2.1 GB,CD-ROM,li260-8159 F home delivery, 222-2602 $4750, 288-7585 ion batt, 21.1 active display, 19.7' GE refrig $600, 2887F cab, 2 drawer $40, 232Cert Eng/Span translation for 65 Ford Mustang, 2 dr, 3 spd, 90 Ford Taurus SW, AC like new $995/obo, 272-6042 6428 all docs, 222-2602 am/fm cass $4200/obo, 284$4500, 288-5998 MacIntosh powerbook duo 2 BR sets, exc cond $450/es, Futon matw/cover, 284-6720 Christmas around the World 6297 230 laptop w/modem, style 284-6691 German shrunk, DR tbl w/ and House of Lloyd, $50 free 72 Beetle 160cc, dty pd $800, AT, gd cond, dty pd writer II, printer, Word Exce 2 LR set, DR set & more, 264chairs picnicfurniture & more, merchandise & free catalogs, 277-6946 obo, 259-9809 9440 28-08Pentium 233 MMX, 32MB RawGlsa 500A 29 284-3028 80 Chevy Malibu, V-6, 2 dr, 91 Mazda 626, 5 spd, 4 dr, 3GBHD15"mon$1400,26020' chest frzr$275, 272-6900 Goldstar 15,000 AC $299, Computer consulting, repairs, std, runs gd, dty pd $1500/ PW, PL m/fcassACexc 3736 m 4 0 upright frzr $250, chest trzr CD back-ups and web deobo, 232-7130 cond,dtypd $4500,284-4771 20frzr$395,18,OOAC$260, $250, BRset$500, 232-6498 signing, 233-2387 80 Chevy Malibu, V-6, runs 91 Scantron & software $1150, K/sz bed, 232-5997 Home video back-ups, VHS gd, std, cty pd $1500, 259AC, PS, PB,rnewfrig, stove, K/sz bed, sectional sofa, to VHS, 233-2387 -8319 CD, spkrs, tint, runs grt $2500, Scantron computerized test dryer, tbl, chairs & more, 226 dryer, bunk bed, AC, 260Maid, best in Panama, 28480 Fiat Bertone X19 $1200/ 253-6927 grading system w/card 80 3086 5226 obo, 288-5804 92 D A reader, computer, printer & 21.8' refrig, curtains, blinds, K/sz water bed w/orthope92 Dodge Shadow, AT PS software $1850, 265-6394 2 rugs, 272-2870 Maid, biling, clean, cook, Mon, 81 Cadillacsedan DeVille, AC, PB, AC, very reliable $3000/ dic matt $200, 288-5398 Wed -Fri, 285-4093 leatherint, dsl $500, 226-0856 obo, 251-0259 24,000 National AC $300, K/sz waterbed w/drawers Maid, biting, f/time, Mon -Fri, 82 BMW 315, 4 spd, sunroof, 92 Fiat Uno 45, 4 dr, AC, dty E r 00 Yk AC $250, 10,000 $300, 284-6598 grt w/kids, live-in, 288-4293 new brakes & tires, am/fm pd, 263-2936 -1 g r amp L shaped sectional sofa, off ~15w guitar amp $100, 50' stainless steel refrig wht $650, 232-7533 Maid, Eng spking, exc w/kids, cass, runs grt $1500, 28892 Ford Tempo GL, PS, PB, 5 Yamaha keyboard $250, $2000, 272-2121 honest, very reliable, ref,2844742 spd, am/fm cass $3800/obo, Yamaha sequencer $250, -Lg roll top desk w/marble 3923 82 VW Bug, peach color, 232-7130 261-1415 rndrawer dresser w/mirror, counter top $650, 272-2379 __________________ 82 V Bugpeac colr, 23-713 2611415 ____bi, end fbI1, 6' x 1 /2 x 11/2 __________ Maid, Eng spking, live-in/out, rusted, exc short car, exc 92 Pontiac Sunbird, AC, am/ 19" Sony color TV w/remote, shelves, 288-7796 Lg roll top desk, like new, gd housekeeper, gd w/kids, running cond $500, 280-3071 fm cass, 284-4596 -272-2621 -beds, sofas, tbils, chairs, 612-7' vertical blinds, It blue lou2069' prefer off-base, 224-8159 83 Datsun280ZX, 2 dr, hatch, 92 Toyota Tercel$3800, 28821" Crown TV w/remote vera 8' & 6' $50, 284-3281 -2 Janet --spdt-top,CD,ACPW$2500/ 5083 $160, 224-9663 Lg sectional sofa, new $750, Maid, grt w/kids & houseobo, 284-6297 G3Mzds626spd4drLm 26" 8000 AC $100, 284-5131 CE refrig $265, 10,000 AC keeping ~ ~ ~ ~ 93ada2,5ar $1n 50224-47 Hitachi TV, A/V inputs/ khvs$4,taIb$20 19,7-60 keeping $150, 284-3475 84 Monte Carlo, rebuilt eng & CD, loaded, dty pd $6500, outputs, stereo, 2 RF inputs Bkshelves $45, teak tb $250, 195, 272-6210 Maid, live-in/out, Mon -Fri, trany $1700/neg, 259-0853 230-3726 $200, 284-5279 288-6505 -LR set w/sofa bed $600, 2 hardworker, dependable, 84Volvo240GL,4dr,sedan, 93 Mitsubishi Diamanta, 27" Sony TV, 284-5720 Bkshelves, tbl, 2 -8 x 11 twin beds, nite tbl $300, 8000 honest, 250-0636 AT, AC, runs, needs some loaded, exc cond $8400, 264orient style rugs, 284-6492 AC $260, 229-8610 Never shave again' Body work $700/obo, 280-3734 9440 51" TV $1000, 288-7869 afBlinds, carpets, 5 pc DR set, LR set, sofa, Ivseat $550, 2 sugaring-the naturalmethod after 5 pm 93N n w ter 6 pm ---5 pc kitchen set, hope chest, coffee tbls & center tbl $300, sugaing-he naural, method after$5pm323Nis r, n s dresser, filing cab, 232-996 223-2072 of hair removal, 284-3729 gd coed $3200, 236-1743 dresser, ______ filng ab 23-596 23-07

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Tropic TimesB Classified Ads April23 1999 9 LR tbl set of 3 $75, 284-3632 30 gal portable gas tank, 7/2 Playpen, walker, TV stand, Howard 671A, 7 am 79 Dodge window van, 8 cyl, 91 Jeep Wrangler, 4 x 4, 5 Magic Chef gas stove $225, HP kicker mount $35, 20 HP dbi stroller, 284-6165 Kobbe 301, 7 -11 am AT, PS, AC $500, 272-6246 spd, CD, PS, PB, LM, 3"lift,33" GE washer/dryer $450, 3 pc kicker mount $75, 272-6900 Portable generator, 8 HP, gas, La Boca 958A, 5 -9 am 80 Ford Bronco, f/sz, 4 x 4,4 tires exo cond $8500, 284LR set $200/neg, 220-2442 4 13" rims from 94 Nissan 22/110 volt $250, 232-7113 spd, 302 V-8, 2 bbl, new 7817 Mini blinds, yellow, wht, tan, Sentra $40, 288-7830 Potted & garden plants, 272Los Rios 6338A 7 am -3 pm clutch, muffler, gd cond 92 Ford Ranger w/camper, exc cond, 272-2034 4 14" rims, alum, for Ford 1213 Pacific Hills Tower 100 Apt. $3700, 250-1197 PB, PS, AC, stereo, exc cond Oriental furniture, rosewood Mercury $125/neg, 284-6783 Potted plants & more, 27217-B 81 150 Dodge Ram van, AT, $6000/obo, 226-8139 curious cab, 272-1175 415" rims, 5 holes, alum, GMS 2034 PS, PB, V-6 $1700, 232-7016 92 Jeep Wrangler, 4 x 4, LM, Piano, Chinese carpet, $200/obo, 237-9194 Potted plants, 260-6002 82tgdp CJ-5 7361Jeep 1 lift screen, sofa, Ivseat, coffee 4 cyl 87 Buick eng/trany, 6 cyl hard, soft & bikini tops, 6 cyl en a et, Potted plants, garden tools, Aerobic instructor equip, 268& more $3500, 272-6846 93 Chevy Lumina APV tbl, entertainment center, rugs Ford eng, Toyota gas engs, utility tbis, 272-2671 43 5CeyBae,4x4 C mnvn as C mf & more, 232-5997 228-4061 4732 85 Chevy Blazer, 4 x 4, AC, minivan, 7 pass, AC, am/fm Q/sz bed complete $250,2265 computer games, Starcraft, Rubbermaid patio shed, carAquashot i underwater camAT, PS, PB, am/fm cass, exc Cs, M, P5, PB, luggage 0856 Age of Empires, F22V, Max 2 port roof, drapes, 232-5997 era housing for disposal camcond $3600, 285-4734 rack, LM $7500, 260-4411 &/sz BR set w/2 nite tbls, &Paint Brawl$100,28.4-3171 Spkrs bod, 2 12" spkrs $50, eras w/strobe & macro kit 85 Chevy Blazer, 4 x 4, AT 93 Chevy -10 ext cab, headbard mi, 7 draw-ls 284-6783 $150, 272-5642 AC, PS, PB, am/fm cass, ex' camper, V-6, AT, exc cond headboard, mirror, 7 draw5 pc luggage, like new, 284' -$6000, 284-5226 ers $400, 261-8106 5720 Stainless steel water founBasketball court, 260-3086 cond $3600, 285-4734 Q/sz matt & box spring $80, 84 Toyota SR-S trany S spd tain $150, 272-6239 Bikefor3yrgirl,gdcond$20/ 86 Colt Vista, 7 pass, AT 9 Isuzu Rodeo, very clean 288-7980 AT $200, 277-6946 Step 2 playhouse, Little Tykes obo, 284-5578 needs minor work, dty pd $ Q/sz sofaIbed, It gin, wht-97 Mistruck $35, Little Tykes wagon 36-5132 $2200/obo, 259-9809 93 Toyota 4Runner, AT, AC, /sz sofa bed, It grm, wht 97 Mitsubishi Lancer & 94 $20, 284-5131 Cardio glide $180, 2 86DaihatsuJeep,4x4,5spd, PS, PB,Kenwoodstereo, exc design $300, 288-6486 Lada Samara for parts, 228Diving equip, BCDs tank, 236' cond $15,000/obo, 288-7292 -4061 Sterling silver flatware ser0005 AC, stereo, alarm, int, new Refrig, frost free $90, 259vice for 8 $2500, 272-2860 muffler, paint, LM$3900,26494 Jeep Cherokee, AC, am/ 9809 99 BHS commemorative pen/ Exer stepper, mountain bikes, 9228 fm, ABS, grt cond, dty pd Refrig, furniture, fans, in-note cards 10 for $15, Voltage regulator for elec surfboard, 232-5997 87 Plymouth Voyager van, $9800, 288-4244 washer, patio set, micro, AC 2 Home gym system$300,272PS, PB, AC, AT, exc cond 94 Jeep Cherokee, AC, PW, units & more, 236-8872 99 BHS commemorative pen/ Wht crib w/orthopedic matt, 2860 $4000, 272-2671 PS, am/fm, ABS, 4 x 4, very Side-by-side refrig $750, gas ink print 11 x 17 $10, 288260-3086 Iron horse $150, rowing mach 88 Ford Bronco XLT, f/sz, big clean $10,500, 288-4244 stove$400, piano$1500, 2887195 Wht outside storage cab w/ $80, 272-2620 tires $12,000, 236-0005 94Jeep Cherokee, LM, dty pd 5376 Antiques, desk, sewing shelves, 284-3028 Ladies 10 spd bike, 230-2384 88 lsuzu Trooper 11,4 x 4, new $9200, 223-3786 Sm BR bar refrig w/frzr, 3' mach, frames, silver trays, Wht wicker baby changing tbl clutch, brakes, shocks, ex94 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, 5 lie ew$10,22-839 272-2042 wtrae28-08 Miyatamountain bike, Eevalion aesok, x 4Je rage aaa like new $120, 226-8139 w/storage, 284-3028 haust system & batt $4800/ spd, 6 cyl, LM, soft top, bikini Sofa bed, autumn print, wood Auto harp $60, 272-6900 Xlg dog kennel, new $100, 236-5910 obo, 214-1481 .top, class Ill hitch $10,500, trim $300, 226-4090 Babycrib, matt $120, carseat 288-7690 Multi-sytem home gym Joe 89 Chevy Blazer, AC, PS, 4 x 285-4381 Sofa sleeper $275 & $250, $15, baby seat$10, 229-8610 Weider $250/obo, 614-6903 4, dty pd $4700, 223-0064 96 Chevy S-10, 639-6867 DR tbl w/6 chairs $175, 272Baby swing $40, hammock s Nikonos ll underwater cam89 Dodge Grand Caravan LE 96 Ford ExplorerXLT, loaded, 6162 $20, stroller, exc cond $60, erI/23mmslunses&Orcng $3500/neg, 220-2442 exc cond, 288-4275 Sofa, lvseat, DR tbl, bkcase, 284-4724 91 Kawasaki Ninja ZZR-1 1, kits, like new $350, 272-2656 89 Ford Aerostar, exc cond 97 Isuzu Trooper LS, AT, 4 x coffee tbI, end tbl, video Bike carrier $20, 236-5132 1100cc, grt bike, very fast $3000, 288-5637 4, PW, PL, PM, drk gn, LM, shelves, 284-5279 $700 26-5022 Roller blades, sz/4, new $20, $30,28-674,76P,8M r gn M Carport roof 15 x 20 $225, 284-6975 89 Isuzu pickup, long bed, exc cond $22,POO, 264-8768 Sofa, lvseat, end tbls, coffee 272-5593 97 Kawasaki KX-250, exc AC, 5 spd, bed liner, gd cond, 98 Jeep Wrangler, 4 x 4, 5 tbl$500, 260-3485 Cnurystr r$,2-cond $3000, 276-6323 Scuba rgulCor o dty pd $3800/obo, 259-9809 spd, LM, Ig tires, alarm, exc Sofa, lvseat, new $900, 2729676 236-6302 89 Jeep Cherokee Laredo, condo $15,000, 284-5371 2671 Changing tbl, gas tankfor grill, Scuba regulator byscuba pro, AT, PW, 4 x 4, AC, super 99 Toyota Hi-Lux, loaded Sofa, lvseat, single bed, miexc cond, 263-2936 MK20LiLultralight$500, 236stereo, exc cond $5575/obo, $18,000, 285-9293 cr0, fbI in/chairs & more, 236Bettnai Condado Del Rey 392 6302 272-5397 crotbiw/chirs& moe, 36-Changing tis$25, baby swing 60 4756 $15, play pen $50 284-5575 Clayton 1009D Scuba regulator by US divers 89 Pathfinder, 2 dr, AC, bik, 6 Sofa, lvseat, vinyl print for Child's bike seat $10, 284Clayton 1024A, 7 -10 am SE-2 w/conshelf octopus cyl, AT, exc condo, 263-2936 patio, matching rattan coffee 3632 Clayton 1026B $280, 236-6302 90 Aerostar van, 7 pass, AC, Baby crib, 288-6678 tbC $350, 226-4090 Weight bench, golf clubs, AT, over drive, wht $5500, Curtains for Howard tropical, Coach purse, blk, nice $35, Clayton 1172, 6 -10 am 9 9 '232-7113 Sofa, matching lvseat, gd 284-6975 bowling ball, 272-2621 315-0916 cond $175/obo, 288-5321 Clayton 471A, 6 -10 am 90 Dodge Caravan, AC, PS Dryer, will pay up to $150, Student desk, recliner, patio antique, 272Clayton 575B, 7 -11 am $3800, 232-7293 272-2267 funtre, roedcin atto 66 furniture, orthopedictwin matt Clayton 76, 7 -10 am 90 Isuzu Trooper, 4 dr, std, 4 Employment for outstanding & box spring, 230-2384 Craftsman tools, 2 complete 70 Ford Bronco, 4 x 4 $800, cyl, AC, am/fm cass $7900/ housekeeper, does everyTeak entertainment center, 3 chests $1100/set, 269-6728 Curundu 2164, 7:30 -noon 229-8570 obo, 236-8872 thing, ref, 264-9440 pcs $500, 272-5642 Crib, changing tbl, toys, maDiablo 5775A 74 Chevy pickup, perfor90 Isuzu Trooper, exc cond, Gd family for exc maid, Eng Teak hope chest $200, 272ternityclothes, exccond, 263Diablo5779B mance eng $1700/neg, 259284-3825 spking, honest, dependable, 5642 2936 Diablo 5787B, 7 -11 am 0853 90 Jeep Cherokee chief, hard working, grt w/kids, 284Cross stitching patterns, malode $8000, 272-2121 3595 Twin bed $150, dresser$150, terial & access, like new $25, El Busque B-52, 9 am 77 Chevy K-5 Blazer, 4 x 4, loaded $8 nite tbI $50, 9 x 12 It bluerug ' r305 V-8, runs grt, dty pd 90 Mitsubishi Pajero, 4 x4, 4 Someone to make/sew a Ig $50, 272-2314 ter 5 pm Howard 126A,6:30am-noon $1500, 288-7194 cyl, 5 dr, AC, PB, PS, runs grt, dog bed, 214-1481 T Enclosed patio $80, sm dog Howard 636A, 7 -11 am dty pd $6000, 232-5998 Twin bed w/maft $150, 6 PC carrier $10, xlg dog carrier patio set $150, wet vacuum $80, 284-5077 $75, 288-7297 F-22 and ATF Flight Simulator Twin matt & box spring $180, games $15/ea, 284-7074 260-6002 Gas grill $50, 284-6691 Twin/sz matt, exc cond, 263_$L 2936 Gas grill, new, 284-6720 Whirlpool 10,000 AC, exc Hammond Ig organ $800,226cond $175, ceiling fans $15 -6174 1 Note: Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis to military mem20, 9 x 12 carpets $40, 226High chair, video rack, diaper bers, civilian DoD employees, and employees of other goverment agencies. Ads will be ac8139 genie, toys, boy's items, 288cepted only for NON-COMMERCIAL services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immediWhirlpool 2 dr refrig, gd cond 7625 ate family member. Suspected abuse of the ad services will results in non-publication of the $600, 233-1080 Lawn mower, BBQ grill, 284ad(s) in question. For more information, call 285-4666/6612. Whirlpool dehumidifier, 25 pt 4724 cap $50, 284-3454 -Lg outdoors metal cab w/ Deadline for submitting ads is 9 a.m. Monday. If Monday is a holiday, the deadline Whirlpool upright frzr $600, shelves, Ig work tbl, tools & is 1 p.m. the Friday before. antique dresser w/mirror more, 284-3028 Read instructions below, then completely fill out the ad form. Incomplete ads will $350, waterbed $200, 272Make-up tbl $30, 2 boxes 5397 -women's clothes $25, 212not be published. Wood bar $500, 269-6728 3280 Animals Wrought iron glass top patio Many house plants, over 6' Available tbl & bench, vertical blinds, tall $10, 260-1642 B___oats&campers 232-5997 Minnie mouse comforter, blanket, dust ruffle, sheets for dbl F-1 Cars bed w/pillows shams & more M Computers Pce necategoryper Home Phone $50, 284-6975 EElectronics Check one category per ad form Two ads per person each week. Include home and duty phone. 100 LP classical records $50, Motor mount for kicker O/B L2Found 15-word limit (the staff may edit to conserve space). 272-5792 maximum to 15 HP, perfect E] Household Ads must be re-submitted each week. 14" rims for Ford Mercury, gd cond $25, 272-1213 -Lost We will NOT take ads by phone or fax (Atlantic residents may fax ads). cond $125, 284-6783 Oakley eye jacket sun l Miscellaneous + Ads offering exotic animals, weapons or real estate will Not be run. glasses, blk $70/obo, 614+ Ads offering, foods, hair care or translation will Not be run without a copy 2 class A uniforms, sz/35 & 61 -Motorcycles of licenses to operate on post/base. 40 $25/ea, field grade garri6903 son $2h/aOriginal oil pad gn Patio sales + Mail ads to: Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004 or deposit them in son hat sz/6 7/8 $25, 272Orgnlolpainting, waterDt /tedo o tteCatnPs fie 2314 colors, pastels & charcoals Date /the drop box at the Clayton Post Office. 23 w / by mid-western artist, 284ESportingGoods Information below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. 72-2314sweaters $20/ea, 6916 L Trucks & Vans Sponsor's Name Rank/Grade Plants, stepping stones, 232Wanted Organization DutyPhone 5997

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B10 Apri C39ommunity Community briefs Veronica's Room tition will be announced July 2. to an increase in moves wesugVeronica's Room, an adult, For more information, call 284gest that people call the number The A m erican Red Cross mystery thriller, is now playing at 4700/5615. listed below and arrange an apthe Ancon Playhouse through pointment between 9 -9:20 aim. needs donations May I. For reservations, call 27279th Army Band and the staff will assist those in6786. The 79th Army Band's Jazz dividuals before opening for regu. There is still a great deal of troop activity in Bosnia and Combo and Show Band is holding tar customer service. In return, the American Red Cross personnel report a continuing need for Volunteer workshop their final dry season concert Sunthis will decrease the lines and the following: hot chocolate/cider mix, microwave popcorn, asV day at Goethals Monument at the waiting time for other customers. sorted candy, cold beverage mixes, small games and playing Flower Arranging workshop I p.m. base of the PCC Administration All forms and documentation cards. Soldiers are also requesting high school English grammar May 5 at the Vaent Recreation steps. The 79th Army Band's need to be ready prior to the apbooks to help teach language skills to their foreign counterparts. Center. Space is limited to 30 volArmed Forces Day concert is 7:30 pointment date. For more inforYou can send needed materials to: unteers. For more information or o pim. May 15 at the Fort Clayton nation, call 288-5522/4802. Bosnia: American Red Cross make reservations, call the Quality Theater. Attn: Station Manager of Life/Installation Voltnteer CenFree child care HQS 1st CD G-1 Tuzia Main ter no later than Apri 30 at 288Free calIs Air Force staff sergeants and beOperation Joint Forge 9303/9304. All military ID holders can make low can receive up to 20 free hours APO AE 09789 up to two free five minute Miliof childcare when they are within Summer Program tary Affiliated Radio System calls 90 days of PCS departure from callinY 1800 lpow (435 669 )to ort f02w75 address or by and 5 sumer to anywhere in the U.S. and Puerto Howard Air Force Base. The Child clig180hl-o 4576)o -0-5-55(pns) Registration for the summer ico 3 -5 p.m. Friday and SunDevelopment Center wilT provide Internet users can make a secure online credit card contribution by program is May 14 and 15 at Buildday .F idens ad 272service. M ee s ild brid filling out a donation form and choosing "International Response ing 155 on Fort Clayton. The free days. For appointments, call 272services. Members should bring orFund" as their giving option. program begins in June and will inders to the Family Support Center clude a Toddler/Preschool Camp to receive a certificate. American Red Cross Internation Response Fund for 2 -5 year-olds, a school age Layaways P.O.Box 37243 camp for 5 -12 year-olds, youth Effective immediately layaways Parent support Washington DC 20013 volleyball, basketball and racquetfor $200 or more, 180 day duration The New Parent Support ProFor more information, contact Lionel Grant at the ball clinics: instuctional karate, piwill cease. Layaways of 90 days gram is located at ACS Building American Red Cross by calling 288-5509/6306. ano, guitar and gymnastics classes will continue for all layaways of 155 on Fort Clayton. Monthly I and a teen program with trips and over $25, and clothing layaways classes available include Breast tours, outdoor activities, center are for 45 days. All layaways will Feeding (Spanish and English), staff. You do nothing but take care based leisure activities and life cease May 1. By Aug. 30 all Parenting and Infant Care. There Relocation Center of your party. For more informaskills workshops. For more inforlayaways must be picked up or are also support group meetings. The Relocation Assistance Cention, call 288-6451. mation, call 288-6810. cancelled. For details, call 285For more information, call Nelida ter offers a variety of services. For 4121. Hones at 288-4921/5307. those PCSing, there are computers Teen Center BHS celebration with Internet access and a wellA computer lab is located on the The parents of the last graduatVolunteer register Clayton Library stocked lending closet to tide you Ist Floor of Building 155 and is ing class of Balboa High School, Volunteers and volunteer coordiThe Clayton Library has a with all your basic household open 6 -9 p.m. Monday -Thursthe class of '99, will be sponsoring nators should ensure that all volunhome page on the World Wide Web needs. For more information, stop day. a celebration party on May 15 at leer hours are registered with the listing hours, resources and serby Building 200, Fort Clayton, or the Plaza Paitilla Inn for the seHoward Family Support Center's vices. Also included are guides to call 288-9234/9235. Girl Scout update niors and their guests. In order to Volunteer Program. Also, any volrising the library. There are photo The Girl Scout Office is located in provide mementos and gifts, many unteers who are PCSing in the near albums and an e-mail address for Vehicle registration : Building 167 on Fort 'Clayton. of the interested community have future should come by the FSC to feedback, comments and even refPersonnel moving to Puerto Hours of operation are noon -4:30 donated various items for door pick up a letter stating their volunerence questions. The address is: Rico can register their vehicle at p.m. Mondays -Fridays. Their prizes. If you wish to donate to teer hours. For more information, http://www.army.mil/usarso/libr/ the LEA Vehicle Registration in new numbers are 285-4046, FAX this last celebration activity, call call Lizca Fearon at 284-5650. claytonm/. Building 519, 2nd Floor, Room 285-4157. Sherry Barnish at 284-4023. Pet Foster Care 246 from 8 a.m. -noon and I -4 supplies p.m. Mon. -Fri. You will need the Attention volunteers BHS alumni reunion Since the Corozal Veterinary The Family Advocacy Program vehicle title, proof of insurance If you are presently volunteerThe Balboa High School Grand Treatment Facility approaches clowelcomes participants interested and orders for Puerto Rico to obing or have volunteered in the past Alumni Reunion is 7:30 -12:40 sure Aug. 31, the VTF is reminding in becoming Certified Foster Care tain installation decals. Those who at Howard AFB, sign up with the p.m. May 15 at the Hotel Contipet owners to stock up on rouParents. The program provides have already shipped their vehicle Volunteer Coordinator in the Famnental. The cost is $16.50 and the tinely used medications to last training that enables you to gain to Puerto Rico can also obtain ily Support Center and receive dress is casual. Price includes through their PCS move. The last rewarding experiences. Earn some their decals at this office. For more credit for the experience you food, live music, dancing and a order for pet supplies is June I and extra money while in your home information, call 288-4916/4919. gained. For more information, call bunch of sharing of memories. when supplies run out they will not and "open your heart to a child" 284-5650. For information and reservations, be replenished. Also, the VTF is in need of temporary placement School Age Services call Lourdes Townhend at 226requesting that if your pet is no due to an emergency situation Typing course 0503. Seating is limited and adlonger in Panama or has been Applicants must reside on a millSchool Age Servtces offers piano, vance reservations are required by adopted to another family, call tary installation. For more inforguitar, typical dance and karate The Howard Family Support Thursday. them at 285-5866/5867 to help upmation, call Nelida Holnes at classes. For more information and Center's Computer Resource date their records. 288-6643. to register, go to Building 155 Fort Center offers computerized, Teen Talent Contest Clayton. multimedia typing tutorial softThe Howard AFB West Bank USARSO volunteers Laundry service ware. Beginners can learn how Teen Center is sponsoring a Teen The Quaility of Life/Installation Super Suds Laundromat offers Child Services to type at their own pace. To Talent Contest 7 -10 p.m. toVolunteer Center is currently prea drop-off, same day pick up serIeThe Month of tie Military Child sign IP for an appolutm565, call night. Categories for competition paring "Statement of Service" letvice Monday -Friday. The celebration continues with a kite Dave Krier, at 284-5650. For are female/male vocalist solo, voters for all registered volunteers. To laundromat is located next to flying tesy, 3:30 -5 p.m. Thursday more information, call 284receive your letter, stop by the Burger King on Fort Clayton. at Mother's inn Field. There wilt 5650. cal group, instrumental solo, in/LVC Office 2nd Floor, btildbe prizes for the best team. The strumental group, dance musical l 00 Fort Clayton. For more inDonations accepted month will round off with Family, Final CCF graduation variety and specialty act. The Day 2ttepo pi 0 h ia omnt olg contest will be judged by a panel formation, call Tina Hobson at 288The Salvation Army is tcceptitng Day at the pool April 30. The final Conedunity College on the basis of technical excel9303/9304. donations of clothes, books, toys of thre Air Force graduation is 3 lence, showmanship tnd treatand canned goods to support their Planning a party p.m. Thursday in the Tropic meant and interpretation of mateMailing packages various social help group programs SAS has inflatables for ent. The rial. Winners will be videotaped The Fort Clayton Post Office such as senior citizen homes, homecolorful balloons include the and the tape forwarded to the Air has implemented an appointment less girls homes and poor children's Happy Clown Typhoon, the Force for worldwide competition. system for individuals who need feeding programs. For more inforAtmazing Castle Maze and ganes The 24th Medical Group is reWinners of the worldwide competo mail five parcels or more. Due mation, call 262-2545. galore. Rentals are run by the CYS calling all the "Putting Prevention into Practice" pens. Tie pens have :t dangerous dleec causing thle tt N w Addiios aloisg ith tilte spi ttg to pop ttff aInd go shooting across the room. Return the pens to the Primary Care Clinics on Howard AFB or C ongratulations to .Fort Clayton. Robert and Eltressa Spencer on the birth of their baby girl, Kiara Shiress. Kiara was born February -Fax service 19 at San Fernando Hospital and weighed 6 lbs. 13 ozs. and was 20 1a inches long. The Corozal PX offers ax serDavid Malcolm and Julie Ann Shelly on the birth of their baby boy, Matthew Bennett. Matthew was vices at the cussomter service born February 19 at San Fernando Hospital and weighed 7 lbs. 15 ozs. and was 20 inches long. counter. The cost is $1 per page. Douglas and Melisa Brook on the birth of their baby boy, Erin. Erin was born February 23 at San Fernando Hospital and plus telephone charges. weighed 6 lbs. 10 ozs. and was 20 inches long. Roman and Isabel Ramirez on the birth of their baby girl, Rachelle G. Rachelle was born April 3 at San Fernando HosShipping your pet pital and weighed 7 lbs. and was 21 inches long. Shipping your pet? For intormation, call 284-3069 or 288-5946.

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~j~AU UI1ILLIL1L~Tropic TimesT1 Community A 1999B11 99JFS lrom -S aving the best for last story by Tina Summerton Tropic Times Staff FORT CLAYTON -As dazzling gowns and tuxedos glided on the dance floor, approximately 310 students eagerly awaited the announcement of who would be crowned king and queen during Balboa High School's 1999 Prom held Saturday at the Valent Recreation Center. The Valent Recreation Center was elegantly decorated in white, silver and ecru. "There were stars, balloons, a water fountain and even pillars with draped material. It had an almost early Roman look," said Tammy Kraft, head organizer for the '99 prom. The anticipation grew as couples spent the night dancing away to salsa, merengue, R&B, techno and talking with their sweethearts and friends. The wait was finally over at approximately 10:15 p.m. Fred Bales, athletic director for Balboa High School, took the stage and announced the winners of the 1999 Prom Court. Crowned were Chantall Agueda as queen and Anthony Sotnoza as king, Ange McCrary as princess and Luis Somoza as prince. After the announcement, the couples took the dance floor and danced gracefully to "Everything I Do I Do For You" by Bryan Adams. photos by Tammy Kraft A few moments later everyone joined the couples in a Sasha Davila and Peter Higgins make quite Lora Paulson and Felix Hernandez, both semoment that will last forever in their memories. the couple. niors, were definitely dressed for the occasion. Cambry Sanchez and Larry Quinn, both seniors, are all smiles. Queen Chantall Agueda and King Anthony Somoza danced gracefully to "Everything I Do I Do For You" by Bryan Adams. ACAP Providing transition services to the force School Records transfer ARLINGTON, Va. (Department of story by Lilia Strothers nities, prepare for interviews and Defense Education Activity) -The ACAP Office job fairs, and negotiate salary and DoDEA Records Center located at FORT CLAYTON -The Army benefits. Fort Benning, Ga., is the repository Career and Alumni Program is a for elementary and secondary school comprehensive program offering a Job Search Resources Civilian records. The DoDEA Records Center broad range of transition services for and federal jobs and an internet is available to assist former students, soldiers, DA civilians and family .search is available for clients to parents and schools with questions members. use including an automated job concerning transcripts, student Services include pre-separation 7 (.t,-listings such as the ACAP Job records or administrative records. counseling, benefits counseling, job nHot Leads, Aerica's Job Btik At this time, only student records search training, and access to (AJB), and the Transition Bulletin from Panama, Bermuda, Fort numerous employer and job informaBoard (TBB). McClellan and the Panama Canal ColLion databases, making it an integral The TBB contains job listings lege ae Ebdecitn eating Service part of the military's personnel life and news regarding events such as will maintain secondary student trancycle program. The following are job fairs, automated resume scripts in Princeton, N.J. All Panama some of the classes offered at ACAP. writer, Standard Form 171 and the Canal College student and administraclients with the basic knowledge and skills Optional Form 612, Application for tive records will be transferred to tre Pre-separation Briefings. Every necessary to plan and execute a successful Federal Employment software, job DoDEA Records Center by June Thursday (including completion of the job search. This includes selection of ajob assistance library, as well as access to the 1999 DD Form 2648 "Pre-separation Counselsearch objective, networking, resume and Defense Outplacement Referral System All student transcripts continue to ing Checklist) soldiers learn about their cover letter writing, identification of job (DORS). be maintained at (ETS) in Princeton, rights and benefits as well as the types of opportunities, interviewing, and salary/ The DORS is a system designed to N.J. For more information, call Rena services that are available to them. benefit negotiations. help job seekers present their qualificaKarlin at 609-720-6740 or you may call Additionally, they receive assistance in tions to interested employers, the DoDEA Records Center at 706identifying their needs and developing an Individual Counseling, available in Access the ACAP Home Page on the 545-8246/4785 or write to the followindividual transition plan. English and Spanish, is provided using the Internet at http://www.acap.army.mil, ing address: information discussed in the workshops. The ACAP Center is located in Educational Testing Service Job Assistance Workshops in English Counselors help clients identify an Building 128, Fort Clayton and the office P.O. Box 6605 and Spanish: Every Tuesday, and other objective, write resumes and cover letters, hours are 8:00 -5:00 p.m. Monday -Princeton, NJ 08541-6605 classes as needed. This class provides complete applications, find job opportuFriday. For appointments, call 288-9277.

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B12 'A Youth Scene AAFES Weekly ~IIIIlII~;~~ ~Challenge Let Us Print Your stories, pes drw ngs r The Fort Clayton Community Club is the stage funny photos on the Youth Scene Page. for Curundu Middle School's induction for the Send them through MPS to: Tropic Times, Learning Spanish Crossroads Chapter of the National Honor SociUnit 7145, APO AA 34004 or drop them in our ety 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Guest speaker is Greta box at the Fort Clayton Post Office by 9 a.m. Kensinger, wife of Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Monday. 1. oficina _chicken Jr., U.S. Army South commanding general. Make sure you put a return address on your And Balboa High School is presenting a photos and artwork so we can return them. If you 2. direcci6n __ cat Mock Trial in celebration of Law Day 2 p.m. April have any questions, call Griselda Sterling at 28530. 4666. 3. escenario __ rice 4. verde duck 5. gallina -justice Everything planted 6. gato address around Curundu Elementary School grows 7. arroz __ stage beautifully under the tender loving care of 8. event green school counselor Fred Costin. He considers the outside environment to 9. justicia -event be his greenhouse. Everyone eagerly 10. pato -office watched the daily growth of the banana Send your answers through MPS to Tropic Times Unit 7145 trees donated by host APO AA 34004 or drop it in our box at the Fort Clayton Post Ofnation teacher Gladys fice Be sure to write your full name and age (14-years-old and under, please) somewhere on the entry. Frazier. Finally the day We'll need your entry by the Wednesday after the paper arrived to pick the first comes out, and the winner's name will be in the following week's s b paper. The correct response, or the response drawn from more Prti KmblenS And than one correct response, will win a pair of free movie passes Prentice Kimble, Anfrom the Army and Air Force Exchange Service. thony Back and Mevin The winner will need to call Donna Kelso at 285-5775 then thn akadMelvin viibeAmanAiFocEcuneSrc. SIewr Building 654 Corozal to receive the movie passes. Stewart volunteered to help Costin with this Last Week's Winner: No winner task. Molly Idol ------------Lunch Menu The Red April 26 -30 Machine Curundu Middle and Balboa The Red Machine High Schools is Balboa High School's last I Monday -Hamburger, let Volleyball team. tuce and tomato, pickles, csBack row: Emily cumnber, potato wedges Duffus, Shary fruit, gelatine. iilk. Perez, Silvia Tuesday -Tukey sandRamery and wicth, liure id tito Jonelle Medestin. piukies cuutber pittzels Front row: Carrie IlchsIlS vnill t puddingt Mercier, Mariel ilk. I Romero, Lora Wednesday-Frank's day Paulson, Jenny baked beans, carrot and celAntequera and cry sticks, peals. milk. Veronica Grant. Thursday -Chicken 'aitas, Spanish ice, re'ried Good luck to the beatss, applesauce, milk. team. Friday -Pizza. curs, fruit cocktail. gelatite, milk. (C-utesy) John Lanier, 2 Melissa Graham, 8 Lorraine Grahan, 10 Deilanni Parrilla, I liii Ch kost, 1 Ana il, 10 April 9 April 12 April 19 April 22 April 23 April 24