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The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
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Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
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Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


Sports
Page 6-7: Trophy .-'-.
boats begin pad-
dling from
Gamboa to Las ..
Cruces during
the third and final day of the 45th Annual
Ocean-to-Ocean Cayuco Race Sunday.


S ropic
--*^k-^Hr


Times


Vol. XI No. 14


Fort Clayton, Howard Air Force Base and Rodman Naval Station Panama Canal, Republic of Panama
Serving the Joint Community


Thursday, April 9, 1998


-::
5
-7-

3
Irny-,


By a nose
Runners sprint across the
parade field during the 100-
yard dash, part of the
annual Sports Day activities
at Howard Air Force Base
April 3. After the day's 17
events had culminated, the
24th Medical Group stood
alone at the top. For more
on Sports Day, see Page 10.


Staff Sgt John Dendy IV ( U.S. Air Force)



Bottom line: SOUTHCOM will comply with treaty


'Way Ahead Workshop'designed to inform entire community


by Sgt. 1st Class Chris Calkins
NCOIC, USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - The Valent Recreation Center
was the site April 2 for the second in a series of quar-
terly U.S. Army South Commanding General's "Way
Ahead Workshops."
During the three-hour meeting, attendees were


briefed on several key issues
important to the community.
Among those were brief-
ings by subject matter experts
on topics such as treaty
implementation, tour lengths,
the USARSO housing draw-
down plan, the future of the
Department of Defense De-
pendent School system, medi-
cal and dental services avail-
able now and in the future
and quality of life issues for
Air Force, Army and Navy
service members and their
families.


* Update the community on support available dur-
ing the drawdown, and
*Identify the community's quality of life issues,
concerns and solutions.
"We don't necessarily have all the answers, but I
can promise you that when we do get them (answers),
we'll do whatever it takes to get the information out to


you," Runals said.
Not to be forgot-
ten. Runals said, is
the impact the draw-
down will have on
the civilian work-
force.
"Service members
become accustomed
to change; it's a part
of our life. But the
people most af-
fected by the uncer-
tainty around us is
the civilian work-
force and I want


Col. Stephen Runals, USARSO chief of staff, opened each and every one of them to know we will do every-
the session by encouraging everyone to maintain maxi- thing possible to help them in any and every way we
mum flexibility as drawdown approaches. can," Runals said.
He also reiterated the workshop's three main objcc- Following Runals' opening remarks. Lt. Col. Kevin
tives: Saderup, deputy director, U.S. Southern Command Cen-
* Update the community on theater-wide drawdown ter for Treaty Implementation, told the assembled
planning and milestones, crowd the drawdown will continue, regardless if the


proposed Multinational Counterdrug Center comes to
fruition or not.
"Dec. 31 is the only firm date we are dealing with.
The bottom line is this: SOUTHCOM will comply fully
with the treaty," Saderup said.
Tour lengths and restrictions were then discussed
by Sgt. 1st Class Lorenzo Daetz, noncommissioned of-
ficer in charge, Deputy Chief of Staff, Personnel.
Daetz said only those soldiers being assigned to
units that are either inactivating or relocating to CONUS,
will begin unaccompanied tours June 1, 1998.
"Other soldiers, on orders for units scheduled to
move with the Army Service Component Command or
ASCC - what USARSO will come to be known as -
will continue accompanied tours until Dec. 31, 1998,"
Daetz said.
The USARSO Housing Drawdown Plan, explained
by Lt. Col. Patrick L. Staffieri, director, Engineering &
Housing. triggered many questions and comments from
the crowd.
Many were in relation to the courses of action that
will ultimately mothball the Fort Clayton 700 Housing
Area and turn the 600 area into unaccompanied housing
for single soldiers current living in Cocoli.
One such concern was voiced by Karla Young
Phillips. a 600 area resident and a Family Support Group
coordinator with the 252nd Signal Company.
Phillips asked Staffierici if families could stay in the 600
area if they so desired, even if single soldiers would
See "Way Ahead," Page 3


Checks not in the mail
The U.S. Embassy announces that Civil
Service retirement check numbers CSF
017 35 71 W to CSA 208 69 26 have been
canceled by the U.S. Treasury. Replace-
ment checks are being reissued. The em-
bassy expects the checks will be re-
printed and shipped as soon as possible.


Commissary
The Corozal and
Howard AFB Com-
missaries will be
closed Friday in ob-
servance of Good Friday.
Plan to do your shopping accord-
ingly.


"Service members become accus-
tomed to change; it's a part of our life.
But the people most affected by the un-
certainty around us is the civilian
workforce and I want each and every
one of them to know we will do every-
thing possible to help them in any and
every way we can."
Col. Stephen Runals
USARSO chief of staff









2Tropic Times
April 9, 1998


L~eopte


� X


(Courtesy)
Very special audience
The Mayor of Panama City, Mayin Correa, and her son, James Woolford
C., Naval Station Panama Canal safety manager, are received by Pope
John Paul II. Mayor Correa and her son were invited to the Vatican March
25.




VOL UiTEER OF


THUE WEEK


FORT CLAYTON - Ethel Pifeiro
is the U.S. Army South Volunteer of
the Week for her outstanding support
to the community.
She is the mayor of Green Valley, a
child care monitor and a contact per-
son for the 79th Army Band Family
Support Group.
She is also a dental assistant at the
Howard Denial Clinic, a Cub Scout
Den Leader assistant, a youth coach,
and an instructor and record manager
for Army Fanmly Team Building.
What Piiheiro said she enjoys most
about volunteering is the training and
new tasks that challenge her capacity
as a person and the opportunity to
meet new enthusiastic volunteers.
Her hobbies include softball, vol-
leyball and coaching.
She said her major accomplish-
ment has been planning, organizing and
carrying out Pride Da. 1997 for
more than 200 Green Valley resi-
dents.
From ordering supplies and re-
freshments, issuing duties and work-
ing side by side with soldiers and fam-
ily members, she has remained smil-


gL. 1st Clss Chris Calkins (U.S. Army)
Ethel Pifeiro is this week's Vol-
unteer of the Week. A native of
Nicaragua, she is married to Staff
Sgt. Eduardo Pifieiro.
ing and ready to assist when needed.
Piieiro said her most rewarding
experience is to know that along the
way. her individualism has permitted
her to work and help others in one
way or another.
A native of Nicaragua, she is mar-
ried to Staff Sgt. Eduardo Pifieiro.
They have two children: Emmanuel, 8,
and Isabel, 3.


Sgt 1st Class Chris Calkins (U.S. Army)
Change of command
Capt. Carol M. Tschida, outgoing commander of Headquarters, Headquar-
ters Company, Theater Support Brigade, passes the company guidon to
Col. Richard B. Thomas, TSB commander, during a change of command
ceremony April 3 on Soldiers Field, behind Building 95, Fort Clayton. After
receiving the guidon from Tschida, Thomas then passed it on to Capt.
John W. Long, the company's new commander.


Retirement ceremony
Col. Stephen E. Runals, U.S. Army South chief of staff, presented Chief
Warrant Officer Clayton R. Parker Jr., deputy chief of staff for logistics
food services officer, with a Legion of Merit during his retirement cer-
emony March 30 at the Simon Bolivar Conference Room in Building 95,
Fort Clayton. Parker served 32 years in the military.


This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Contents of the Tropic Times
do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.


Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004.
Building 405, Field Printing Plant, Corozal One West
Phone: 285-6612/4666 or FAX 285-6613.
E-Mail: pbouchard@usarso-lanl.army.mil; USARSO LAN address:
pbouchard @ sopa @ usarso

Commander in Chief .................................................. Gen. Charles E. Wilhelm
Director, U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs ......... Col. Vicente C. Ogilvie
U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office ........................... (305) 437-1200
Chief, Tropic Times ................................................................ Rosemary Chong
Editor ................................................ ............................... Sgt. Paul Bouchard
Writer/Editor .......................................... Daniel Amores
W riter/Editor ...................................... .......................... Raymond E. Samuels
W riter/Editor ............................................... .......................... Griselda Sterling
Sports Editor ............................... ........................... Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett
Office Automation Clerk .................................. ..................... Tina Summerton
Volunteer ................. ............................. ........................ Sherril Harrill
Student Intern ............................................................................. A m anda M erkel
U.S. Army South Commanding General ... Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr.


U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office ............................................... 288-3143
Public Affairs Officer..................................................... Lt. Col. Joseph Curtin
Command Information............................................................. Gaby Capriles
NCOIC .................................................... Sgt. 1st Class Christopher C. Calkins
Caribbean Correspondent ......................................................... Marti Ostrander
Editor ............ .................................... .. ....................... Spc. A li Leone
24th Wing Commander ............................................... Col. Gregory L. Trebon
24th Wing Public Affairs Office ......................................................... 284-5459
Chief of Public Affairs .................................................... Capt. Michael Murk
NCOIC .................................................................... Tech. Sgt. Rick Burnham
Chief, Internal Information ... ......................... Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV
U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal
Commanding Officer........................................... Capt. Robert W. Bennett, Jr.
U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal Public Affairs Office .................... 283-4301
Public Affairs Specialist ........................... ............................ Sally Paramore
Director, Joint Interagency
Task Force South ............................................. Brig. Gen. Howard G. DeWolf
Joint Interagency Task Force South Public Affairs Office .............. 284-7502
Public Affairs Consultant ............................ ............................. Pete Calsetta












1News


Tropic Times 3
April 9,1998 J


'Our Job is to Care'


24th Medical Group explains current, future medical/dental care


(HOWARD AIR FORCE BASE) - In a little more than
a year from now, the redeployment of forces from
Howard Air Force Base will be in full swing. Active duty
and many civilian members of Team Howard will be leav-
ing. You may have heard about the gradual phase down
of support services, the closure of the flightline and an
orderly taking down of the facilities at Howard.
How will this affect your health care? What kinds of
health services will be available? What plans have been
made to take care of you and your family members if you
get sick during the last phases of the closedown?
Which of the clinical facilities will be open? Will there be
any changes in the way TRICARE reimburses for ser-
vices obtained on the civilian economy close to closure?
How should people plan for their relocation to CONUS?
To answer those questions and more, officials from
the 24th Medical Group have provided the following in-
formation:

What kinds of health services will be available as we
get ready to depart?
Everything that is available now. The military medical
care program in Panama has a strong primary care clinic
system, and the full services of the largest and best ci-
vilian health care organizations in Panama behind it.
These are provided under arrangements called memo-
randa of understanding. Because of the MOU's, we
have been able to provide health care with relatively few
people who will need to PCS back to CONUS. This
means we don't have a massive military presence to dis-
assemble and take back.
Because the 24th MG has relatively few people (391),
we can remain here longer, continuing to arrange the
care that we can't provide on base.
Also, the MOU's don't have fixed expiration dates,
like contracts would have. That means even if plans
change, we will still be able to deliver care beyond Dec.
31, 1999, if that becomes necessary.

When will the Clayton Clinic close?
There are no plans to close the Clayton Clinic facility
until virtually all the family members have left. The
number of people left on Fort Clayton will decrease dra-
matically after May 1999, and we will be under pressure
to move our operations to Howard so the Clayton clo-
sure program can proceed smoothly.
We will stay as long as we can, but toward late June
1999, when there are few folks left on Clayton, the outpa-
tient clinic services will shift to Howard.
Because we have an MOU with a large civilian ambu-
lance service, a call to 281-HELP will still get an ambu-
lance anywhere on the East Bank right through closure.
We are already moving the Corozal Mental Health Clinic
into Building 519, so there will be fewer different facili-
ties needing shutdown.
The inpatient service will be closed at Howard
around May or June, also.
Remember, the flightline will be closed after March
1999, and air evacuation flights will be arriving at and


leaving from Tocumen Airport after that time.
Capable inpatient care and excellent surgical services
will be available in Panama City to replace the inpatient
service at the Howard facility, and the emergency room
will remain open until August.
TRICARE will continue to fund the liaison officers at
the downtown facilities right through closure, so indi-
viduals hospitalized downtown will continue to have
access to translation services and help in communicat-
ing problems and resolving disputes.

Will services continue to be paid for by TRICARE the
way they are now through the end of our stay in
Panama?
Yes. The same rules about reimbursement will apply.
Since there will be military primary care providers avail-
able right through the deployment of our families, the
Referral for Civilian Medical Care form (DD Form 2161)
will still need to be coordinated with the TRICARE Of-
fice for all but true emergencies downtown.
Many of the administrative functions of the
TRICARE Service Center for Latin America and the
downrange personnel are being relocated to Region 3
in Miami before we redeploy, so there should not be a
big gap or delay in services when the TRICARE Service
Center in Panama is being closed.

How do family members learn about TRICARE ser-
vices in the region they are PCSing to?
As soon as you have a good idea where you are be-
ing PCS'd to, even before you have orders, call the
TRICARE Office or visit the offices at either Fort
Clayton or Howard to get information on how to relo-
cate. By 1999, all areas of the CONUS will have
TRICARE contracts stood-up.
"Portability," the ability to wait until you arrive at
your new PCS base to disenroll at Howard and re-enroll
in your new region, is an important feature of the pro-
gram.
Between now and then, since there are still a few ar-
eas that don't have their TRICARE contracts up and
running, call 284-6977 or 284-5514 for information. If you
are in the CONUS, call 1-888-777-8343, Ext. 2.
It is very important for you to have your TRICARE
PRIME Enrollment Card and the TRICARE Passport
with you at all times when you are traveling, TDY or
PCS.
The information contained in those two items can
make it much easier to get information about health care,
and the care itself, when you need it, whether you are
traveling stateside now, or going to PCS with your fam-
ily in 1999.
The 24th MG's TRICARE Office mailed 11,000 of
these to all the enrolled members, including family mem-
bers, in December and has been issuing them to each
new enrollee since then.
If you don't think you got one, or can't find it,
please contact the TRICARE Office at 284-6977 or 284-
5514.


(Courtesy photo)


OK. So the capabilities for primary care and referral
will be pretty much as they are now, right through
June 1999. Does this mean it isn't necessary to plan
ahead?
Absolutely not! If there is one thing that every mili-
tary family knows, few things go "business as usual"
around PCS time. It would be wise to try to relocate
them to the CONUS early, especially if you have family
members with special health needs. Seriously consider
not asking for a DEROS extension if you have family
members with serious health problems or special educa-
tional needs. Although we will be doing everything
within our power to give every family the best care pos-
sible, right through the end, if someone in your family
has needs that require a lot of medical care, getting that
care could mean a lot more trips into Panama City toward
the middle of 1999.
Investigate what the TRICARE capabilities are for
those special needs in the area you are PCSing to. Con-
sider having your family move to CONUS as early as
possible if there are special medical needs, so they can
be setting up a household and getting established with
the TRICARE health care system while you are com-
pleting the closing of your shop at Howard.
Since air-evacuations will be going in and out
through Tocumen for the past few months, individuals
who have conditions requiring repeated air-evac to and
from CONUS referred facilities will be especially affected
by the change.
Everyone on chronic medication needs to assure
they have at least a six-month supply of their medica-
tions on hand beginning in April 1999. Pharmacy stocks
can be expected to be running low in the last few
weeks of our presence in Panama, and that would not
be the time to run out of a difficult-to-obtain important
medicine.
The unit emblem of the 24th Medical Group reads
"Our Job Is To Care." We intend to do that, right
through the drawdown of the U.S. military community
in Panama and the closure of the installations. Thought-
ful planning and preparation on the part of our active
duty members and their families will help make unbro-
ken continuation of high-quality care possible. We are
working with you to make this happen.


'Way Ahead Workshop' meant to inform community


Continued from Page 1
families and single soldiers is not a good
idea," Thomas said. "We understand no
plan is going to make everyone happy,
but we will continue to make decisions
we feel are for the good of the commu-
nity," he added.
Current and future medical and dental
care was next explained by Col. Terrance
J. O'Neill, commander, 24th Medical
Group.
O'Neill said because there are approxi-
mately 2,800 more active duty service and
family members than was projected for
this point in time, the 24th Medical
Group has added four primary care phy-
sicians, two pediatricians, one OB-GYN
physician, one Air Force orthopedic sur-
geon (July, 1998) and has the authority
to hire six civilian dental technicians (for
more on the future of medical/dental care
in Panama, see story above.)
Changes in the 1998-99 school year


calendar are also in the works, according
to Dr. Charles Renno, assistant superin-
tendent, Department of Defense Schools.
"Schools will close May 20, 1999,
which means the early leave date for next
year's students is April 30," Renno said.
He also said the first semester will
conclude Dec. 21, 1998 - with an early
leave date set for Dec. 1.
The school year will begin, Renno
said, sometime in the Aug. 17 - 20 time
frame.
"What we ask everyone to do is plan
ahead and notify the school at least 30
days prior to the date you intend to
leave," he said.
24th Wing services and Army and
Navy Morale, Welfare & Recreation pro-
grams were next on the agenda.
Basically, the three services pre-
sented a timeline for operational closure
of their respective facilities.


The Howard Club, for instance, is
slated to close Jan. 1, 1999, while several
other services will remain open through
the summer of 1999.
At Rodman NS, virtually all MWR
programs will cease to exist after Feb. 28,
1999.
Odette Ortiz, assistant director, Com-
munity Activities, said all the majority of
Army MWR programs that are ad-
equately used will continue to operate
through June 30, 1999.
She also said consolidation of some
programs will allow for continued opera-
tion with a smaller staff.
"What people need to remember is
that the Air Force services and Army/
Navy MWR programs are theater-wide ...
and they have a quality of life effect on
all of us," said Pamela Robinson, work-
shop coordinator.
"If something is closing on one side-


of the bridge, make an effort to see if that
same program or class is being offered
somewhere c' se," she said.
Command Sgt. Maj. Arthur J.
Laughlin, Theater Support Brigade com-
mand sergeant major, one of several lead-
ers at the workshop, said quality of life
issues are vitally important to all com-
mands here.
"We can't fix problems if we don't
know they exist. We are asking for ev-
eryone in this great community to tell us
what services, programs and issues are
important to them. We are in a time of
great transition, and we need everyone's
help - on both sides of the bridge -to
make sure things go as smoothly as pos-
sible for the entire community," he said.
(Editor's note: Look for a "Quality of
Life" page in next week's Tropic Times.
A survey will be included to help iden-
tify key issues and concerns.)












4 Tropic Times
April 9,1998


~I'4.~


News


Range success
Active duty Air Force members
deployed from CONUS clear the
Balboa West Bombing Range of
scrap and target material.
According to Maj. Reynold N.
Hoover, commander, Task
Force 111 (EOD), the continuing
unexploded ordnance (UXO)
clearing efforts on the ranges
has seen the U.S. government
spend 6,000 man hours, remove
85,000 pounds of scrap and
target material anddispose of
365 pieces of ordnance on the
ranges deemed too hazardous
to move. A total of 90 acres
have been officially cleared.


10


Daniel Amores (Tropic Times)


by Tech. Sgt. Rick Burnham
, 24th Wing Public Affairs Office
HOWARD AFB - Officials from
Paramount Studios called this week to
notify me that I am one of only four
people on the planet who have not
seen their movie "Titanic."
Notables on the list include a 93-
year-old salmon fisherman from An-
chorage, Alaska, and a Buddhist Monk
who lives in a cave in central
Mongolia. The other is my wife.
On Monday, the list will dwindle to
three.
After much tormenting and pester-
ing and pleading and nagging, my wife
has finally convinced me to go see the
movie. I've promised her that the next
time Titanic comes to the Howard the-
ater, we'll go.
Staying away hasn't been easy. For
months and months, friends, coworkers
and neighbors have showered me with
superlatives about the movie.
Among them: "You'll laugh."
"You'll cry." "You'll keep going back
to see it until you're homeless."
"Leonardo DeCaprio should have been
nominated for an Oscar," "Great Spe-
cial Effects." "Man that theater is
cold."
I probably will laugh during the
movie ... I laugh at all movies. Being
able to see the humor in every situation
is a gift, I guess.
Like the time in "The Ghost and the
Darkness" when the lion dragged
Michael Douglas out of his tent and
swallowed him whole.
Or when Gweneth Paltrow got her
noggin chopped off by Kevin Spacey
in "Seven." Classic stuff.
I will not cry, though. Real men do


not cry in movie theaters. Not for
"Kramer vs. Kramer." not for "The
Brian Piccolo Story," not for
"Schindler's List," and certainly not
for "Titanic."
I did cry during "Home Alone." but
only because I w as laughing so hard
when McCauley Caulkin set Joe
Pesci's hair on fire with a blow torch.
My wife, on the other hand, will al-
most certainly cry. She has cried for
virtually every movie she's ever seen,
from "Steel Magnolias" to "Forrest
Gump."
For me to see "Titanic" more than
once, it will have to be good. And
when I say good, I mean "Raising Ari-
zona" good, or "Animal House" good,
or "Happy Gilmore" good. Just be-
cause the movie won 23 Oscars
doesn't necessarily mean it's a good
flick.
For example, look at "Caddyshack."
Arguably the best movie of all time,
and it never won a single Oscar, a
clear injustice if ever there was one. (I
laughed so hard I cried when Bill
Murray ate the chocolate bar in the
bottom of the pool.)
Which brings me to Leonardo
DeCaprio. I can't figure out what's all
the fuss about this kid, who looks like
my 12-year-old nephew.
I say Adam Sandier from "Happy
Gilmore" would have been much better
in "Titanic" than DeCaprio.
It will be interesting indeed to see if
he goes down with the ship into the icy
Atlantic.
Which brings me to the cold the-
ater.
But that's another story all-to-
gether. See you at the movies.


Reminders for firearm owners


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
Under Panamanian law, the Judicial
Technical Police issues firearm permits
for off-post. Interested parties must sub-
mit the following documentation:
* A completed form requesting the
permit from the PTJ director. Forms are
available at the Law Enforcement Activ-
ity, Military Police Investigations Sec-
tion, Building 131, Fort Clayton.
* Photocopy of bilingual identifica-
tion card
* Three identification card-sized pic-
tures
* Proof of ownership (purchase re-
ceipt, bill of sale or a certification that the
weapon has been donated or trans-
ferred.)
* Receipt of payment of registration
fees. This permit is valid for three years
and cost $33, at a rate of $11 annually.
This payment must be made at the Banco
Nacional de Panama. Location for the Pa-
cific community is at Balboa, and for the
Atlantic community it is either the New
Cristobal Area (across from the post of-
fice) or at 9th and Bolivar Streets in Co-
lon.
* If the weapon is being registered
for the first time, it must be physically
taken to the PTJ with three bullets for a
ballistic check (the PTJ will keep the
weapon for approximately two weeks).
* The PTJ will run a local police check
on every individual requesting a firearm
permit.
* A letter, issued by the requestor's
commander, stating that the soldier or ci-
vilian is assigned to his/her unit.Each
firearm permit can list up to nine weap-
ons.
The authorized calibers for privately
owned weapons are:
* Pistols: Cal. .22, .25, 7.62, 7.65, .380,
.40, .45,9 and 10 mil;
* Revolvers: Cal. 22, 32, 38, 45, Mag-
num 357, .41 and .44;
* Shotguns (hunting): of one and
two barrels or air-type pellet guns;
* Hunting rifles; and
* Carbine: Cal .22 extra long


The firearm permit is issued to carry
the weapon concealed. The right to carry
a weapon does not entail the bearer to
carry it inside governmental offices, com-
mercial establishments, consulates nor
private homes (unless specifically autho-
rized to do so by the home owner).
Owning a weapon off-post is different
from owning one on-post. U.S. Army
South Regulation 190-28 states that any
person who stores, transports or uses a
firearm on a USARSO installation must
register the firearm within three duty
days after acquiring the firearm or after
arriving in country.
Military personnel residing in the bar-
racks or transient quarters must store
their firearms in their unit's arms room.
Personnel who reside in family housing
may store their firearms at their quarters.
Privates through staff sergeants must
first obtain their commander's approval.
Civilian employees in the grades of NM-
1 through NM-6 must obtain approval
from a lieutenant colonel or GS-13 super-
visor. All others may register their fire-
arms without command approval. Storage
of firearms in an automobile, office or
with another person in their quarters is
specifically prohibited.
When transporting a weapon on-post
in a vehicle, the firearm must be stored in
the trunk compartment, when so
equipped or out of immediate reach of
the driver and all passengers in the stor-
age area of cars without trunks. The
weapon may also be transported in a
locked gun case or other locked con-
tainer inside the vehicle.
During on-post transportation, all fire-
arms must be unloaded and the ammuni-
tion kept separate from the firearm.
Registered gun owners on-post may
not transport a weapon off-post unless
they have a current permit for the
weapon issued by the Republic of
Panama.
For information about on-post regis-
tration call the Firearm Registration Office
at 288-4545 and for off-post registration
call the Military Police Investigations
Section at 288-7275.


Voices


r










SVoices


Tropic Times
April 9, 1998


Kensinger: A time of historic transition

JTF-Panama commander asks for patience, continued effort during these 'uncertain times'


by Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr.
Commander, Joint Task Force - Panama
FORT CLAYTON - As I approach the anniver-
sary of assuming command of both U.S. Army South
(USARSO) and the JTF-Panama, I am reminded daily
of what an honor and privilege I have been afforded to
command such a tremendous organization of dedi-
cated, top-notch professionals.
I never forget that I am part of a great team, and
without the consistent and constant efforts of all
individuals, we cannot succeed. That's why it's such
a fantastic achievement that for the third year in a row,
USARSO has been named a winner of the Army
Community of Excellence Award.
This is a tremendous accomplishment, especially in
such turbulent times as we are experiencing, and an
honor in which each and every USARSO member can
take full credit.
I've known all along that we are a first class, caring
organization - and now the entire Army knows it,
too.
I am aware of the uncertainty and, in some cases,
doubts and fears shared by many members of the JTF-
Panama team, especially in trying to foresee what will
occur in Panama and beyond.
I wish I could just answer all of those questions,
once and for all. But, I am still unable to do this.
Nevertheless, I can and will provide the information
I do have. You have my absolute, unequivocal
assurance that as more information becomes available,
I will use every means at our disposal to ensure that
this information gets out to you, as rapidly and
accurately as possible.
Let me tell you what I know. First, the status of the
Multinational Counterdrug Center, or MCC. I am
certain that you have heard reports that either the
MCC is a certainty, a "done deal" or other reports that
the MCC won't be established in Panama.
Neither of these reports is accurate. The MCC is
still being negotiated between the United States and
Panama.
There are issues to be resolved and it is possible
that they can be resolved in time to create the center
before noon, Dec. 31, 1999. And it's also just as
possible they won't.
You, like me, must await the outcome of these
negotiations. In the meantime, speculation about what


will or won't happen isn't productive.
Second, the pending USARSO move to Fort
Buchanan, Puerto Rico. You may have heard that the
Senate has written to the Secretary of Defense and
asked DoD to freeze spending on this move. That's
correct.
You may also have heard that the move is not
going to be ultimately approved, that USARSO will
either go to another location or be disestablished
altogether. I can positively report to you that none of
those rumors are true.
DoD is again studying whether the proposed move
to Puerto Rico is economically efficient and makes
sense, but there has been no decision to change our
course. Further, the Commander in Chief, U.S. South-
ern Command, as well as the Army leadership, are still
strongly committed not only to ensuring the contin-
ued vitality of USARSO as a major Army command
headquarters, but also its move to Fort Buchanan.
Until we receive clear direction otherwise, our
mandate is to stay on course. And that's exactly what
we will do.
Finally, let me acknowledge the obvious: we are
living through a time of historic transition. We are
fulfilling our sworn words through the 1977 Panama
Canal Treaty.
Through our efforts, the United States will suc-
cessfully accomplish its mission to revert the Panama
Canal to Panamanian control. We cannot lose sight of
our ultimate objective or fail to realize it.
As commander, I have a dual responsibility: ensure
mission success, and take care of the people who


make mission success happen. That means all of you.
It's easy during a turbulent time to become
confused and frustrated. I personally share your
concerns and frustrations.
Not knowing with certainty what will occur to your
position and your organization only heightens these
feelings.
Yet, we have work to do and it's with great pride I
can report we have not slacked an inch.
I can't predict the future any better than any of
you. But I can offer my advice.
To those who may have plans based on a contin-
ued military presence in Panama after 1999, I counsel
you not to rely solely on such expectations.
To those who wonder whether they should plan
now to find other employment, I advise you not to
rush to judgment on the fate of USARSO.
Take steps to protect your interests and your
family, but don't jump over the rail until you know for
sure where the ship is heading and where you
ultimately want to land.
To make those decisions, I reiterate: you will get
the information just as soon as I receive it.
Let me conclude by again thanking each one of
you personally for doing such a remarkable job for
your command and the United States.
You have shown tremendous dedication to duty,
selfless devotion to mission accomplishment and
uncompromising professionalism.
By earning the ACOE award, all of your co-workers
know it. The Army knows it. DoD knows it.
Of course, I've known it from day one.


Fort Sherman soldier unhappy with some shoppette prices


Dear Editor,
I want to complain about the prices
at the Fort Sherman shoppette. I am a
soldier assigned with the 245th
Support Battalion. I am stationed at
Fort Sherman every other month.
The prices at the shoppette at Fort
Sherman are twice as high as the
prices at Fort Clayton or Corozal.
Why is that?
I think someone should look at the
prices and make sure they aren't
hurting us over here. For example, the
price for a can of tuna fish on Corozal
is 55 cents - on Fort Sherman it is
about one dollar.
Please help us at Fort Sherman. At
times, the shoppette is out of milk,
bread and meat.
Either lower the prices or help do
something for the soldiers on Fort
Sherman.
Just because we are over here does
not mean we should have to pay
outrageous prices - I think that's
wrong.
We have to bring bags of food
here to support ourselves.
We cannot afford to pay the high


prices. Thank you very much. I hope charge the normal AAFES price.
to see or hear from you in the future. It is important to understand that
A concerned troop AAFES is a non-appropriated fund
operation and the commissary works
Dear troop, with appropriated funding. This
Thank you for allowing me to means that spoilage affects their
answer your concerns about the "bottom line. "
prices at the Fort Sherman Because of this, items that spoil
Shoppette. I spoke with Mr. Knox, the often run in short supply. If a commis-
community officer for Fort Sherman. sary item runs out the manager works
He explained in detail how he has hard at restocking the item as quick
worked at improving the quality as it is available.
of services available to the Knox also stated that a
soldiers on Fort Sherman. local vendor sells bread on
The Army and Air Force Fort Sherman daily.
Exchange Service, working in As for the cost of
conjunction with the Defense - tili tuna fish, you
Commissary Agency have were correct in the
developed a list of not - " fact that the price
more than 100 line I[. J was too high.
items, available from i As a line item
the commissary, for from the commissary
sale at the Fort and with the
Sherman shoppette. additional cost added, a can of tuna
AAFES charges five percent over should be priced at 70 cents.
the cost of the particular item from It was mismarked 80 cents. After
the commissary. This cost is calcu- this was brought to the manager's
lated after the additional five percent attention, the problem has been fixed.
is charged from the commissary. If you have a question about
If an item is at zero balance at the prices, want to see what items are
commissary, AAFES will draw the available from the commissary or you
item from the AAFES stock and want an item added to the list from


the commissary, talk to the shoppette
manager.
The staff at the Fort Sherman
Shoppette are there to serve you. If
they receive your input, they can
better serve you. Please communicate
with them.
Questions or concerns on Fort
Sherman can be referred to Knox at
289-6947. Thanks again for your
concern.
Sgt. 1st Class Michael Kewley
Community NCOIC (288-5913)




Dear Editor,
Many thanks - much kudos - to
everyone who made the "Teen's in the
Real World" conference held at Santa
Clara last weekend possible.
We were able to hear a minute-by-
minute of the entire weekend and from
the reports we received, the entire
weekend was a big hit with all the kids
lucky enough to go.
Thanks again. It's not everywhere
we have teen centers on both sides of
the bridge where young men and
women really are the total focus.
Thankful Mom and Dad


"Take steps to protect your in-
terests and your family, but don't
jump over the rail until you know for
sure where the ship is heading and
where you ultimately want to land.
To make those decisions, I reiterate:
you will get the information just as
soon as I receive it."
Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr.
commander, JTF - Panama














Tropic Times
April 9, 1998


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Composed of Tom Herring, Bobby Huerbsch, Ruben Prieto and Mike Commeau, Due Process was the overall winner of the 45th Annual Ocean-to-Ocean Cayuc
attracted all kinds of teams, including Snafu, which was a two-time winner in 1967-68. All four team members came back to Panama this year to compete once



Cayuco Race winner comes in 'Due


All 49 teams considered winners during 45th paddling of Ocean-to-


by Marti Ostrander
USARSO Public Affairs Office
DIABLO HEIGHTS - As the gun
went off, 49 cayucos raced to a desired
victory - 32 cayucos paddled 50 miles
for a trophy and another 17 for a patch
on a three-day, ocean-to-ocean race that
ended here Sunday.
It's the 45th version of the Atlantic to
Pacific Ocean race.
On Friday's first day of competition,
Brig. Gen. Robert Wagner, commanding
general, Special Operations Command
South, - he was also a paddler - pulled
the trigger for a clean, clear start, and the
beginning of a close race, where three
boats where side by side most of the time
for the first place spot.
Defiance won the first day; Due
Process the second and the Misconcep-
tion won the third and fourth legs while


Due Process won the fifth one.
Overall?
The Due Process took first place, with
a crew of Tom Herring, Bobby Huerbsch,
Ruben Prieto and Mike Commeau, while
the Defiance took second, Misconcep-
tion third, High Anxiety fourth and Rio
Senales fifth.
But the race is not only for guys.
Three of the top 10 boats are filled
with females, with the Almost running
right along with the men.
Overall, the Almost came in sixth, and
first in the female category.
The crewmembers are Annemarie
Fisher, Jackie Barnash, Megan Higgins
and Natalie Martinez.
The Deception, the Predator, Jungle
Crews and the Short Cut followed them,
in the female category.
In the coed category, the Sudden


Impact took the first place trophy, with a
crew of Thomas Page, Cambry Sanchez,
Carlos Morales and Alejandro Gutierrez,
followed by the Spontaneous Combus-
tion, Final Most and Delfin in fourth
place.

A great event
But the race is only the tip of the
event's iceberg. Three months of hard
training is what gets everybody in shape
to paddle the 50-mile stretch.
"This is the greatest event we have
because of all the work everybody puts in
getting ready, the hard work and prepara-
tion it takes.
And it's one of the hardest things the
kids do at this point in their life," Wagner
said.
"It's a pretty meaningful accomplish-
ment, too. Where else can you paddle


from the Atlantic to the Pacific, through
a Canal, with the teamwork needed?" he
said.
And every cayuco crew, it seems, has
a story to tell. Some are even true, most
are funny, a few are sad, and some of
them can be called unique.
That is the case of the Snafu crew,
now a patch boat, who are paddling
together 32 years later.
Yes, they paddled in 1966, won the
race in the Bejuco, and now are back
together.
The four crewmembers all flew from
different parts of the United States for
the "reunion."
They practiced only for a week, but as
one of the crewmembers said, "paddling
is like riding a bike; you just never
forget."
How do they feel to be here? "Ex-
cited. This is really
"- *q'_M thrilling," said the captain,
. ' Fred Garcia. And the other
ones seem to agree.
.... -. For Theodore Henter,
the race is just another
adventure. Paddling in the
Slave Galley, nobody
could tell he is visually
impaired.


- .....-.^.- ---" * . r .u. And no one can say
that the race is not a family
, .... .. " event. In the patch cat-
egory, the High Anxiety,
winner distinguishes itself
for having among its crew
MartiOsrander(U.S.Army) Wagner, daughter Annie,
son Van, and the general's
The winning team in the female division was the Almost. They finished the ocean-to-ocean paddle in 6:08:39. They also finished in aide, 1st Lt. Sam Fiol.
fifth place overall.


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Tropic Times P,
April 9, 1998


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High Anxiety, paddled by
(right to left) Brig. Gen.
Robert W. Wagner, com-
manding general, Spe-
cial Operations Com-
mand South, his daugh-
ter, Annie, his son, Van
and his aide, 1st Lt. Sam
Fiol, took first place in the
Patch Category with a
time of 5:45:52. They fin-
ished fourth overall.


pot


Mar OtrandrW (U.S. Army) �.
ce held Friday - Sunday. The trip .




process'


an Race '


The same thing goes on in El Tuco,
where the Wheelers and the Thorhas's
family paddle, and the Red-Ed, where
Dennis, Leonard and William Huff
paddle along with Robert Boyer.
In the trophy category, the Pinzon
brothers, along with a cousin, paddle in
Rio Senales, one of the top male boats,
while Albert and Stephanie Bodden
paddle in the Been There.
Behind the scenes there is also a story.
As an explores scout event, all the escort
boats, executive committee, coordinators
and helpers do it voluntarily, on their own
time, with absolutely no profit to them.
And it takes a lot of work to pull a race of
this magnitude together.
This year the race coordinator was
Hugh Thomas; the race master was
Marcos Ostrander, the assistant race
master was Billy McGann, the Post 21
adviser was Rick Williams and the
Gamboa Post 10 adviser was Jay Gibson.
Without them, and all those who
helped them pull the race together, as well
as the Panama Canal Commission, Armed
Forces and the help of the entire commu-
nity there would have been no race.
In all, teamwork is the key word for
those who paddle in the race.
And in the end, every single paddler is
a winner, because very few people can
handle the stress and physical resistance
it takes to paddle ... from ocean to ocean.
(Editor's note: Time and space did not
allow the Tropic Times to print the times
of all paddlers or the much-deserved
acknowledgments of those who made this
event possible. See next week's edition,
due out April 17 for more Cayuco Race
kudos and times).


.-i

P.J. Wagner
Lou Husted gets the Patch Category started
with a bang Friday afternoon.


Marti Ostrander (U.S. Army)
Defiance was looking pretty relaxed prior to the start of the first leg
Friday. They finished first that day, second overall.


Mart Ostrandr (U.S. Army)
Members of Jungle Crews carry their boat to the water Friday afternoon. The team, made up of four female Balboa
High School students, finished third in their category.


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.1Briefly


Tropic Times
April 9, 1998


Annual leave donations needed
Annual leave donations are currently being accepted
from civilian employees for Heidi Schroeder, deputy chief
of staff, Reserve Affairs, National Guard, who's baby
Kyle, is successfully recovering from open-heart surgery
at Fort Sam Houston. Schroeder has nearly exhausted
her leave donations and is in desperate need of more
since her and her husband Sgt. Paul Schroeder, of the law
enforcement activity, are having to remain at Fort Sam
Houston longer than expected to ensure baby Kyle's full
recovery before returning to Panama. The Schroeders'
wish to thank everyone for their thoughts and prayers and
those who have already donated their leave. If interested
in donating annual leave, go to Civilian Personnel, Room
201, Building 560, Corozal, to pick up an application, or
call Ms. Sykes at 285-4246.

Navy League event
The last day for reservations to attend the next event
for the United States Navy League is today. The event is
scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Caesar Park Hotel.
The guest'is Victoria H. Figge, director of the financial
analysis unit attached to the advisory committee for public
safety and national defense under the ministry of the
presidency of the Republic of Panama. For reservations,
call 270-2952.

Hilltop dining closed
The HHC, Theater Support Brigade "Hilltop" Dining Fa-
cility in Building 520, Fort Clayton, is closed for all meals
Friday through Monday in observance of Good Friday and
a training holiday. Normal dining hours resume 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday.

TEAMS supply closed
The TEAMS Supply Activity is closed for inventory
Monday - April 17. The deadline for submitting supply re-
quests is Wednesday. Only emergencies are excepted
during the closure dates. For more information, call 284-
5256.

Innovative Logistics courses
Innovative Logistics is holding a range operations
course 8 a.m. Monday and a unit level logistics sys-
tems course 8 a.m. Monday - April 24 on the 4th Floor of
Building 519, Fort Clayton. There is another range opera-
tions course slated for 8 a.m. April 17 in Room 9, Build-
ing 6523, Corozal. Military members must be in duty uni-
form. For more information call 288-7351.

Building Managers Training
Building Managers Training is slated for 9 - 11 a.m.
Monday at the Coronet Oak Conference Room, Building
237, Hangar 1, Howard AFB. Participants must bring the
updated appointment letter signed by their squadron com-
mander. For more information, call 284-4068.

Rodman ammo point closed
The Rodman Ammunition Supply Point is closed for in-
ventory during the week of Monday - April 17. All units
with scheduled training for this period need to contact the
ASP to reschedule their issue/turn-in dates. Also, cus-
tomer units are required to maintain updated access ros-
ters and their DA Form 1687. Units cannot access the
ASP if these documents are not updated. In addition,
units are reminded to submit DA Form 581s for ammuni-
tion transactions no later than 72 (duty day) hours prior to
issues and turn-ins. Late requests may require a unit site
fund code to cover the contractor's overtime. Operating
hours are 7 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Monday - Friday. For more
information call 283-5806/5642.

Volunteer ceremony
All Howard Air Force Base and Rodman Naval Sta-
tion volunteers are cordially invited to attend a Volunteer
Recognition Ceremony beginning at 10 a.m. Monday at
the Howard Tropic Breeze Club. The purpose of this
event is to give thanks and appreciation to each volunteer
for the outstanding support given to the community during
the past year.

Sealed-bid sale
A local sealed-bid sale is scheduled for 7:30 a.m. - 3
p.m. Tuesday - Thursday at the Defense Reutilization &
Marketing Office - Panama, Building 745, Corozal. No
one under 18-years-old is allowed on DRMO premises
during sales inspections and removal. For more informa-
tion, call 285-4754.

Senior Enlisted Advisor slot
The Air Force Personnel Center's Chiefs' Group, in
conjunction with Air Combat Command, is seeking volun-
teers for the senior enlisted advisor position at the JTF-
SWA, Eskan Village, Saudi Arabia, reporting no later than
June 1. For more information, call 284-3508 no later than
Tuesday.


All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or priority mission
requirements. Check with the Passenger Service Section for updated information on flights by calling 284-
4306/3608.
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
5:40 a.m. 7:10 a.m. 6:50 a.m. 5:40 a.m. 4:25 a.m. 9:05 a.m. 5:40 a.m.
C-130 C-141 B-727 C-130 C-130 C-5A C-130
Louisville, Ky. Charleston Atlanta IAP, San Salvador, Malquetia, Soto Cano Managua,
AFB, S.C.; Ga. (C); El Salvador Venezuela (V) AB, Honduras Nicaragua
Memphis, Charleston (V, CC); Soto (CC); (CC); Soto
Tenn. IAPS.C. CanoAB, 6:40 a.m. Charleston Cano AB,
Honduras (CC) C-141 AFB, S.C.; Honduras
Kelly AFB, Dover AFB, CC)
8 a.m. TX(M); Del.
C-141 Jackson, MS
Charleston 8:45 a.m.
AFB, S.C.; 8:45 -727
-l^ ,./ Jackson, Miss. Atlanta IAP,
---', 11:40 a.m. Ga. (C);
B-727 Charleston
- Soto Cano AB, IAP, S.C.
Honduras



A-Active duty only US-U.S. passport O-Overnight C-Commercial Contract V-Visa M-Medevac CC-Country Clearance


Travel tips
Effective 1 May 98, the Freedom Bird schedule for Howard AFB will change to the following:


Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday


ARRIVALS
1:10 p.m.
10:15 a.m.
3:50 p.m.
none


DEPARTURES
3 p.m. to Soto Cano AB, Honduras
12:05 p.m. to Atlanta, then Charleston
none
10:10 a.m. to Atlanta, then Charleston


Annunemnt


Tax form deadline
Authorized Military Post Office users pushing the deadline
for filing federal tax forms can acquire that invaluable April 15
postmark through midnight on Wednesday by depositing IRS-
bound envelopes in MPO drop-slots only. At Howard, all mail
deposited through the drop slot in the Postal Service Center by
midnight will get the April 15 postmark. Rodman Naval Sta-
tion and Fort Sherman customers can get the same service
through the drop slots at their Postal Service Centers. At Fort
Clayton, you'll need to visit the blue post box directly in front
of the MPO if you're running late. All other blue post boxes
will be checked on schedule April 15, and won't be emptied
again until late afternoon on April 16 - too late for an April
15 postmark. This special service will be available on April 15
only. For more information, call Tech. Sgt. Reccy Crews at
284-7219.

Credit management workshop
A Credit Management Workshop, in Spanish, takes place
from 8:30 -10:30 a.m. Thursday in the Howard Family Sup-
port Center. The workshop is designed to help personnel get
back on track with their credit. For more information, call the
FSC at 284-5650.

Smooth Move workshop
A Smooth Move Workshop takes place 9 - 11:30 a.m.
Thursday in the Howard Family Support Center. Participants
will receive current information on PSC entitlements and ser-
vices from the key agencies involved in moving, helpful hints
for travel and PCS financial planning. Spouses are welcome.
For more information or to sign up, call 284-5650.

Men of Honor Conference
The Men of Honor Conference is slated for May 16 at
Curundu Middle School. For registration information, call 288-
5878/3281.

Electric bill briefing
A briefing by IRHE (Panama's electric company) is slated
for 10 a.m. April 23 at the Howard Base Theater for all DoD
personnel residing off-base. This is to help everyone get a bet-
ter understanding of the electric company's billing process,
how to read the bill and how to conserve energy. Many
people are reporting their electric bill rising sharply during the
billing cycle that ended March 2. The Howard Housing Office
should be their first stop. For more information, call Lidia
Fonseca at 284-3301/3417.

FSC job available
The Howard Family Support Center is now accepting ap-
plications from NCOs interested in the Deputy Director posi-
tion. The candidate must be a volunteer, have achieved the
rank of master sergeant or above, (highly qualified technical
sergeants may apply), and must have at least nine months re-
maining on station at the time of assignment to the position.
Interested personnel should submit applications or resumes
and the last five enlisted performance reports to the director
of the Family Support Center, Bldg. 707, by May 1. For more
information, call 284-3153.


Supplemental promotion board
The next E-8/E-9 supplemental promotion board is sched-
uled for May 4. In addition, the suspense for receipt of supple-
mental request is today in order to allow sufficient time for
pre-board preparation. People should contact their command-
ers support staff'if they have questions concerning this
supplemental promotion board.

Pilot crossflow selection board
A centralized Air Force Fighter Crossflow Selection Board
will convene at the Air Force Personnel Center July 14 to
select 25 pilots from mobility and bomber type aircraft and
afford them the opportunity to crossflow to fighter cockpits.
Applications must arrive at the Air Force Personnel Center
by May 22. For more information on application procedures,
contact the Relocations Element at the Military Personnel
Flight.

Captain selection board
A selection board convenes June 2 to consider Army first
lieutenants for promotion to captain. Officers eligible for con-
sideration have the following active duty dates of rank: Sept.
30, 1996 and earlier; Oct. 1, 1996 and Sept. 30, 1997. To be
eligible for consideration, all mandatory or optional OERs must
be received, error free, in the Evaluation Reports Branch,
U.S. Personnel Command, no later than May 26. For more
information call 288-4656/4321.

Chief Warrant Officer board news
Officer Records Section has received the Officer Records
Brief for the upcoming Promotion Board. Due to the short
suspense due to technical difficulties, it is imperative that all
previously notified warrant officers report to Officer Records,
Building 519, Ground Floor and sign their form. A selection
board convenes May 12 to consider eligible chief warrant of-
ficers on the active duty list for promotion to CW3, CW4 and
CW5. Warrant officers with less than two years time in grade
while serving on active duty as of May 12 are not eligible for
consideration. For more information, call 288-4656/4321.

Aviator continuation pay
Only first-time fiscal 1997 and fiscal 1998 Aviator Con-
tinuation Pay eligible pilots are offered the fiscal 1998 ACP
rates and agreement length options as outlined in Air Staff and
Air Force Personnel Center messages. Pilots eligible for ACP
prior to fiscal 1997 who previously declined ACP either by
written declination, failure to return their ACP agreement, or
who have previously separated from active duty, are viewed
as having declined ACP and are not considered first-time eli-
gible pilots. Pilots who have previously declined ACP will be
offered the opportunity to enroll in the ACP program in effect
during the year of their initial eligibility so long as they con-
tinue to meet ACP eligibility requirements. Pilots who have
previously declined ACP and wish to reconsider, may request
ACP agreements at any time by contacting Maj. Tony Garton
at DSN 487-2459

OSI recruiting
Interested candidates for OSI, call 284-3810.




















April 9, 1998


Fort Clayton, Howard Air Force Base and Rodman Naval Station Panama Canal, Republic of Panama
Serving the Joint Community


story and photos
by Raymond E. Samuels
Tropic Times staff
FORT CLAYTON - It's not a mes-
sage they're trying to give you ... it's a
massage. And you can now get them by
a licensed massage therapist at the Fort
Clayton Reeder Gym. Just another ser-
vice made available to you by the Direc-
torate of Community Activities.
"One massage a week is what's rec-
ommended," said Gary D. Stump, DCA li-
censed massage therapist. "Of course
not everyone follows this, but neverthe-
less, that is what's recommended. Mas-
sage therapy provides structural integra-
tion, putting the body back in proper
alignment. When you work out - or
even from just walking all day or sitting
for extended periods of time - muscles
move your bones. That's when your
body begins to ache or feel uncomfort-
able."
Massage therapy is offered 9 a.m. - 9
p.m. Monday - Fridays and 9 a.m. - 5
p.m. Saturday. Reservations can be
made for 20-minute sessions or one hour
sessions.
"Of course, the hour sessions are a
lot more relaxing and thorough," Stump
said. "But a 20-minute session is just as
effective and beneficial after, let's say, an
aerobic workout or after working all day
in the office."
According to Stump and Chac6n,
stress is one of the biggest health prob-
lems here.
"The best alternative to medicine,
against all forms of stress, is a massage,"
said Giovanni A. Chac6n, DCA licensed
massage therapist. "One of my favorite
techniques to administer is aroma-
therapy. Just like in a restaurant, when
you get hungry from smelling something
good, the different aromas from the oils I
use provide a sense of relaxation. A mas-
sage like that, applied with a touch of
mood music, can be very relaxing."


Massage




therapy


Gary D. Stump, left, and Giovanni A. Chaco6n, above,
are licensed massage therapists hired by the Direc-
torate of Community Activities to help relieve sore
muscles and stress caused by a hard workout or just
a hard days work.


So you don't work out at the gym, but
you come home from a hard days work
and your back is killing you; or you've
been out in the field on a 10K roadmarch;
or you've been ... Seriously now, why do
I need a massage?
"It reduces muscle soreness," Stump
said. "People do better and train better
because their muscles feel better. Foot
reflexology (another technique offered) is
very important. Every step you make af-
fects your body. Soldiers out in the field
- they're the ones who benefit from
this. As for those who don't work out?
It's even better for them. Sedentary
people don't have that blood flowing
cleaning out their system. A massage
provides this relaxing workout."
According to Stump, there has not


been a high attendance for the massage
therapy being offered at Reeder.
"I guess people feel uncomfortable
with the idea of coming for massage
therapy not knowing what to expect. The
biggest concern people have is that they
think they have to be nude for their mas-
sage. That doesn't happen here. All of
our clients are expected to wear shorts.
Men and women will be covered at all
times. Their sessions are also private.
We've been given-our own room. More
importantly, we're professionals. We're
licensed therapists," Stump said.
Reservations must be made for mas-
sage therapy sessions. Make your reser-
vation today by calling the Reeder
Physical Fitness Center at 288-7861/
4713.


Everything you need is right here at Reeder


Gary D. Stump has been working as
a licensed massage therapist for over
three years. Stump earned his license
from the state of Florida.

Swedish. A much stronger mas-
sage, the Swedish technique centers
around the full body relieving muscle
tension. It is applied with long and
slow strokes. Great for easing stress
and tension.
Esalim. Similar to the swedish mas-
sage, long and slow strokes are applied
to calm and relax muscle tension and
stress.
Deep muscle. A harder massage
applied used to get deep into site spe-
cific parts, such as the small of your
back.
Neuro-muscular. Massaging the
head, this method is extremely helpful
to releave migraine head-aches.


Giovanni A. Chac6n has been work-
ing as a licensed massage therapist for
over four years. Chac6n earned his li-
cense from the Instituto Curvas Gym,
Panama and the Olympic Committee
Weight-Lifting Division.

Aromatherapy. This therapy uses
oils with aromas that help induce relax-
ation.
Manual lymphatic. This massage
provides stimulation for complete body
functions.
Neuromuscular. Massaging the
head, this method is extremely helpful
to relieve migraine headaches.
Reflexology. These massages are
centered on your feet.
Shiat-su. Also called acupressure,
Shiat-su is a finger-pressure therapy
- a massage with the fingers applied
to specific areas of the body.


Call Reeder Physical Fitness Center today at 288-786114713.


Air Force
Sharpen up your skills for the 15
Days Pool Tourney 11:30 a.m. - 1
p.m. Monday and you just may win
a professional pool stick.
The 24th Operations Support
Squadron is sponsoring a golf tour-
nament 7:30 a.m. April 17 at the
Horoko Golf Course. For more infor-
mation, call Master Sgt. Will Smith
at 284-3501.
Get ready for some family fun
with the best Eight Ball Pool Tour-
nament in Panama 4 p.m. April 17.
Participate in the tournament and
become eligible for the "Be a Hero"
vacation packet.
The opening ceremony for
Howard's 1998 Spring Soccer Sea-
son begins 8 a.m. April 18 at the Pa-'
rade Field. The 79th Army Band and
the Howard Honor Guard will par-
ticipate in this year's event.
An organizational meeting for
next month's ACC 3-on-3 Basket-
ball Tournament takes place April
24 at the Howard Fitness & Sports
Center. For more information, call
284-3451/5671.
In honor of the "Month of the
Military Child," the Howard Bowl-
ing Center is offering reduced
prices for children during open
bowling hours.

Army
The Directorate of Community
Activities Sports Office is located in
Building 519, Fort Clayton. For in-
formation about Army sporting
events, call 288-5201.
Signups for Intramural Soccer
conclude today. League play will
begin Monday.
The Fort Clayton Protestant
Women of the Chapel are sponsor-
ing a Fitness Walk 6:30 a.m. April
17 at the Community Park. For more
information, call Van Runals at 288-
4772 or Sherril Harrill at 272-7400.

Navy
Gym hours are 5:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Monday - Fridays and 10 a.m. - 6
p.m. holidays. For information about
Navy sports, call 283-4332/3040.
After a mean workout, drop by
for a refreshing frozen fruit drink
or a healthy salad at the Health Bar,
Building 73.

Local
The Isthmus Road Runners are
hosting a 21K run 6:30 a.m. April 19
starting from the Pedro Miguel Train
Station. The Panama Armed Forces
Running Association is having a
two-, three- and five-mile run 7 a.m.
April 25 starting from the Fort
Clayton Pedestrian Gate. For more
information, call Allen Jones at 288-
3310.
Cricket games are played on
Albrook field and other fields in
Panama? Watch the next game or
join a team by calling the Hindustani
Society of Panama at 227-1078.


Page 9


Ss rts









0 Tropic Times
1 April 9, 1998


-*5 ports


Top three

How they fared
Women's racquetball
Services
Weather
Mission Support
Men's racquetball
Logistics Group
Maintenance
Medical Group
Women's half-mile run
Medical Group
Operations Support
Communications
Men's half-mile run
Security Forces
JIATF - South
310th Airlift
Dizzy bat race
Security Forces
Transportation
Operations Support
Women's 100-yard dash
Security Forces
Supply
Communications
Men's 100-yard dash
Communications
Transportation
Air Postal
200 meter swim
Medical Group
Supply
Services
Basketball
Supply
Maintenance
310th Airlift
Women's Arm wrestling
Transportation
Medical Group
Operations Support
Men's arm wrestling
Services
Maintenance
Communications
Women's bike race
Medical Group
Weather
Communications
Men's bike race
Civil Engineers
Maintenance
Medical Group
Bowling
Civil Engineers
Maintenance
Communications
Egg toss
Medical Group
Mission Support
Air Postal
Golf chip
Medical Group
Comptroller
Maintenance
Horseshoes
Comptroller
Communications
Medical Group
640th Challenge
310th Airlift
Communications
Transportation
Softball
Civil Engineers
Communications
Security Forces
3-legged race
Mission Support
Medical Group
Weather
Tug of war
Medical Group
Maintenance
Supply
Volleyball
Supply
JIATF - South
Air Postal
Final Standings
Medical Group: 70
Communications: 49
Maintenance, Supply: 40


pnoTos Dy itan git. Jonn B. venoy iv (UOA-
Two competitors battle during the men's arm wrestling competition won by the 24th Services Squadron. Inset:
A participant rejoices after finishing the women's half-mile run, won by the Medics.


Sports Day



24th Medical Group gets the upper hand

by Tech. Sgt. Rick Burnham
24th Wing Public Affairs Office
HOWARD AIR FORCE BASE - The
24th Medical Group placed first, second or
third in 10 out of 17 events to capture the
championship in Howard Air Force Base's
annual Sports Day competition, hosted by the
640th Air Mobility Support Squadron April 3. _
The Medics dominated the competition fin-
ishing with 70 points on the day, 21 ahead of .3
the second-place finisher,-the 24th Commu
nications Squadron.
Seven points were awarded for a first-
place finish, five for second and three for %
third. Units were also given a single point for
each event they participated in.
The Medics finished first in the women's
half mile run, the 200-meter swim, the
women's bike race, the egg toss, the golf
chip, and the tug of war. They added second- 1-- 3_ " 9w,t * SPORTS DAY
place finishes in the women's arm wrestling
competition and the three-legged race.
The champs finished third in men's rac-
quetball, the men's bike race and horseshoes.
For their efforts, the Medics will host next Col. Gregory L. Trebon, 24th Wing commander, presents the first pla
year's competition, team trophy to members of the 24th Medical Group.


A unit pulls together in the tug of war competition won by the
24th Medical Group. A participant tries his luck in the horse-
shoes competition won by the 24th Comptroller Squadron.


ice











STraining


Tropic Times
April 9, 1998


New Horizons '98:


story and photo
by Sgt. Kelly C. Luster
354th Mobile Public Affairs Det.
BASE CAMP ALPHA, Hon-
duras - When you get hurt or
feel sick, what do you do? Most
people go to the hospital or the
doctor's office. But what if you
are a soldier located in the re-
mote, treacherous mountains of
western Honduras? You still go
to the doctor.
Operation New Horizons 1998
is an ongoing U.S. military train-
ing, humanitarian and civic-ac-
tion exercise bringing basic infra-
structure to the rural people here
in this Central American country
in the form of building medical
clinics and schools, as well as
giving medicine and supplies.
It's here the U.S. National
Guard has set up the Troop
Medical Clinic for the hundreds
of troops involved in New Hori-
zons. Members from several
Army National Guard units
throughout the United States will
be rotating through Base Camp
Alpha during their two weeks of
annual training this year.
"No mission can happen with-
out proper support," said Lt. Col.
Ellen Rinehart, officer in charge
of medical support. "My job here
is to make sure the troops can do
their job."
Rinehart, a trauma nurse
from Birmingham, Ala., does


that by maintaining a proficient
medical staff.
"Every two weeks, or so, we
get a new rotation of medics,
nurses and emergency medical
technicians," Rinehard said.
"Within a few (lays of arriving
here, you can't distinguish be-
tween the active duty soldiers
and the Guardsmen."
Although most of the time
things are calm at the clinic,
Rinehart said they have treated
about 300 patients for everything
from sunburn to heat exhaustion
to scrapes and bruises.
Sgt. Mary Burdgon-Curry, a
nurse from the 128th Medical De-
tachment headquartered in
Tuscumbia, Ala., said she has al-
ready treated several cases of
heat injuries.
"One of the biggest problems
is the troops are rotating in from
areas of the United States that
are 30 to 40 degrees and overcast
skies," she said. "The people ar-
rive here and get smacked with
100 to 115 degree temperatures
and extremely bright sunlight."
Burdgon-Curry, who hails
from Montgomery, Ala., said as
soon as she sees someone who
has stopped sweating or is hav-
ing cramps, she inevitably has to
start giving them fluids intrave-
nously to get them rehydrated.
Staff Sgt. Thomas E. Robinson,
an emergency medical technician


\n ongoing

and paramedic with the 128th
medical detachment, Tuscumbia,
Ala., said it's definitely hot, but
he's enjoying his time in Hondu-
ras. Robinson, as well as several
Guardsmen, have grown fond of
the Hondurans, particularly the
children. Robinson, who is from
Robertsdale, Ala., said they plan
to send clothes and shoes to
some of the needy children.
"I was shocked at the condi-
tions in Honduras," Robinson
said. "Some of the children here
don't even have clothes or shoes
to wear. We just want to help
out."
The mission in Honduras is
providing real-world training.
Staff Sgt. Albert T. Homburger, a
paramedic with the Alabama
Army National Guard's 128th
Medical Company based in
Ashland Ala., sees this assign-
ment as an excellent training op-
portunity, as well as his chance to
pay back some special people in
other National Guard units.
"When the blizzards stranded
part of New York, the National
Guard was called out to help res-
cue people. Some of the Guards-
men here were among those help-
ing out," Homburger said. "It just
so happens that one of the people
they helped to rescue was my
mother in Saranac Lakes, N.Y. This
is my way of saying thanks to
them."


training exercise


Working in more than 100-degree heat in tropical
Central America, Alabama Army National Guard
Sgt. Mary Burdgon-Curry, a nurse from the 128th
Medical Detachment, Tuscumbia, Ala., prepares
to rehydrate another fellow soldier intravenously
while performing her two-week annual training in
western Honduras.


Sgt. Justin Perry, a native of Merritt Island, Fla.,
pumps water from the Le Pine well, which was
drilled to a depth of 180 feet.


518th finishes


well at Le Pine
story and photos
by Staff Sgt. Seth M. McMullen
U.S. Support Group Public Afairs Office
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -The 518th En-
gineer Company recently completed another
one of their projects - a well located in the
city of Le Pine which is approximately 12
miles northeast of Port-au-Prince. The Fort
Kobbe-based heavy construction company


Residents of Le Pine gather around the newly completed well. Well drillers from the 518th Engi-
neer Company finished the project in little over a week.


completed the project in little over a week.
The well is hand pumped and is drilled to a depth
of 180-feet deep. It'll produce approximately six to
10 gallons of water per minute and will support a
population of 4,000.
Second Lt. Thomas Galli, project officer-in-
charge, said that this was his first well drilling
project and that everything went as planned. "This
was a nice, smooth project. No problems at all," he
said.
Galli said his crew didn't experience any prob-
lems because the ground was perfect for drilling.
"The ground was more cooperative, as opposed to
our first well. The drilling was nice. We drilled this
well in three days."
He also said that the experience was worth-
while. "This is pretty much a rare experience. There
are so few units that do it and it's a true science. It's
something I'll carry with me," Galli said.
He commended the job of his well drillers say-
ing that, "we have a lot of new soldiers - this was
their first well and they did a good job. They're the
best unit in the company."
Pfc. Adrianne Cowden of Missoula, Mont., said


she also learned a great deal from this experience.
"The project was a lot of work and was a lot to learn
but was beneficial," she said.
Cowden said that the project was meaningful to
her because she had the opportunity to help out the
community. "It's great coming to another country to
help out with a little thing like water. I didn't realize
that there were people who didn't have the bare ne-
cessities. It pays off in the end because these people
have water for the rest of their lives," she said.
At the ribbon cutting ceremony, Capt. Augustine
Galloway, commander of the 518th, said the well
project was an excellent training opportunity for her
well drillers and that it was a chance to provide a
valuable resource to the local community.
"We thank the people from the local community
for their patience during our training exercise. We
just ask that during each and every daily use, you al-
ways remember the 518th Engineer Company," she
said.
The well drillers of the 51 8th are in a league of
their own because they're only one of two active
duty drilling units in the Army, the other being at
Fort Bragg.


11










Tropic Times
April 9, 1998


LNews


JOTB dining facility staff claims


runner-up


story and photos by
Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett
USARSO Public Affairs Office

NORFOLK, Va. - The proof is in the
pudding, they say, and members of the
Headquarters, Headquarters Company,
Jungle Operations Training Battalion
dining facility proved that their pudding,
and all the food they serve, is some of
the best in the United States Army as
they were presented with a runner-up
award during a ceremony March 28 hon-
oring outstanding dining facilities.
In front of a crowd of hundreds, Col.
Stephen E. Runals, U.S. Army South
chief of staff, accepted the plaque for
the HHC JOTB dining facility as run-
ners-up, Small Garrison Category, at the
1998 Phillip A. Connelly Excellence In
Food Service awards presentation.
Awards are handed out in five dif-
ferent categories; large.garrison, small
garrison, field kitchen, reserve and na-
tional guard. The award presented to
the HHC JOTB dining facility, also
known as "The Galley," was for a gar-
rison dining facility serving 200 or
less soldiers per meal.
Before the formal presentation,
Runals said everyone in USARSO is al-
ways extremely proud of the JOTB din-
ing facility.
"This is some great recognition for
some folks who do an incredible job
out there at Fort Sherman," Runals
said.


The HHC JOTB dining facility run- The awards presentation, from left to right, Maj. Gen. James M. Wright,
ner-up plaque for U.S. Army small quartermaster general, Lt. Gen. John G. Coburn, U.S. Army deputy chief
garrison dining facility, serving 200 of staff for logistics, Col. Stephen E. Runals, USARSO chief of staff,
orless soldiers permeal.The plaque Fitzgerald V. Irish, HHC JOTB dining facility manager, and Sgt. George
currently resides at Fort Sherman. Lopez, rations NCO, JOTB dining facility.


"They take the extra step, they go
that extra mile to produce an
outstanding product."
Fitzgerald V. Irish, Galley man-
ager, said being recognized was very
important to him.
"This is a shining moment for
me," Irish said. "I spent 20 years in
the military and always strived to get


to this point but I never did."
Irish retired in 1990 and in May
1996, he became the manager of the
JOTB dining facility.
"Being here is very important to
me. It's a fantastic feeling."
Irish said his dining facility re-
ceived this honor because his staff
believes what he tells them every


day, "that our job is for the soldier."
"We have to take care of the sol-
dier so he can go out and do his job."
Sgt. George Lopez, representing the
soldiers from the dining facility, !said
that for him the Connelly awards was
like "being at the Oscars."
"I'm really looking forward to tak-
ing the award back to Panama."


3/75th Rangers make thunder in the jungle


story and photos by Spc. Kenneth K. Ro
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT SHERMAN - The jungle was a
thunder April 1 as soldiers from 3rd Battal
Ranger Regiment, out of Fort Benning, Ga.
played to Panama, made their way through t:
Operations Training Battalion's mortar r
course.
A platoon of soldiers from the Headqua
Headquarters Company, 3/75th, spe
mortarers to be exact, tested their meta
tackled what many consider to be JOTB's
course.
The course, designed for a light infantry
platoon (60 and 81 millimeter mortars) beg
a predetermined starting point.
At that point the platoon gathers their eq
secures the area and shortly thereafter mar
the jungle, and the unknown, as they
course.
Through a series of constant ups and do
soldiers lug their heavy mortars, ammuni
all other needed equipment and supplies thi


With limited visibility and the threat of
maintaining security was a constant
during the mortar maneuver course.


ockett thick underbelly of Fort Sherman's
jungle.
live with At designated points they stop, \
ion, 75th assemble their mortars and fire to
,and de- target coordinates. But it's not
he Jungle quite that simple as they soon
maneuver found out.
Along the way are booby traps, i;.
.rters and snipers and an ambush. All this,
-cialized given the jungle heat factor, the
I as they weight the soldiers must carry, and
toughest the constant running make for a
tough little hike.
ry mortar "This is good training for them,"
gins from said Staff Sgt. Supote Calveit,
Company A, JOTB instructor, ob-
uipment, server. "Stateside they can't get this
ches into kind of experience. This is prob-
enter the ably some of the best training in
the U.S. Army for mortars."
)wns, the Calveit also said the course is
tion, and great for future leaders, the corpo-
rough the rals and the sergeants, to come to
JOTB and experience the stressful .
:Z.--. situations the approximately three-
mile course places them in.
Soldiers such as Pfc. James
Wilkerson, 3/75th Ranger Regi-
ment, agreed, saying that after go-
ing through the mortar maneuver
course he now knows better what
to expect from a jungle environ-
ment.
4&W " "Every day I've learned something
new here," Wilkerson said. "This has
definitely helped me out." k
And how about the three-mile
course?
. "Three miles? Oh, really,"
:. ;. Wilkerson said. "It felt more like 15
- miles to me." Al
But that's the beauty of JOTB's Ri
snipers, mortar maneuver course - realistic Al
priority training constantly keeping soldiers ro
sharp and maintaining readiness. ar


v~.


bove top, a mortar infantryman from 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger
egiment "hangs"a mortar round the instant before discharge.
bove, the round is discharged leaving a cloud of smoke and a
Ill of thunder a few seconds later as the round hits the target
tea.


12


n food service awards


C-9�-5-3-016 -ctl


F


,r -.


1 X.,































April 9, 1998


Fort Clayton, Howard Air Force Base and Rodman Naval Station Panama Canal, Republic of Panama
Serving the Joint Community


Teens learn leadership, build



self-esteem, in three-day retreat


story and photos by Sgt. Paul Bouchard
editor, Tropic Times
M ost people would agree that a person's teen-
age years are instrumental in the shaping of his
or her personality and character. And no one would
argue against the fact that being a teenager isn't easy.
Fulfilling parent's expectations, deciding what career
to pursue, and the ever-present peer pressures that
are out there all add up to the importance, and the
stress, associated with being a teenager.
To help ease some of these pressures and fears, the
teen centers at Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force
Base organized a retreat for a select group of teenag-
ers.
The retreat, entitled "Teens in the Real World: How
to Find Your True Identity Without Losing Your
Friends," was held at the Baptist Campgrounds, Cresta
del Mar, in Santa Clara, Panama, April 3-5.

Earned their way
According to Pam Clark, the teenagers "earned
their way" to take part in this three-day retreat. Clark,
the program coordinator at Clayton's Teen Center,
said the teenagers were chosen to attend the retreat
based on:

Participating in Teen Center activities.
Volunteering and doing community work.
Maintaining a 2.8 grade point average.
Possessing good morals and ethical conduct.

Clark said these teenagers are very active in their
respective teen centers and that they are "our future
leaders - we're very proud of them."
She added that some of the teenagers helped raise
funds for the retreat by sponsoring car washes and
having bake sales. Many of these youths also
volunteered at the Directorate of Community Activi-
ties annual fair.


'ell




Retreat teenagers have a discussion on AIDS
awareness.


. , -



Finding one's identity
The retreat included various classroom sessions,
physical challenges, games, group sessions, personal
quiet times and social interaction among the teenagers
- all to help the participants find their true identity,
build their self esteem, make new friends and improve
their communication skills.
The ultimate goal of the retreat is to have these
teenagers continue their involvement in community
affairs and have them serve as positive role models for
their peers. Clark said about 20 adults served as
chaperones, instructors and counselors for the retreat.
Specifically, here are some of the classes, sessions
and challenges these teens took part in: basic water
rescue, drug and alcohol awareness, AIDS awareness,
a leadership session, teamwork challenge games,
sports such as kayaking, mountain biking, volleyball,
ping pong, and basketball, a poetry contest, a drawing
contest, and a class on education and career goals.


Fred Clark teaches basic water rescue skills to
some of the teenagers.


- *. The "Teens in the
SReal World" retreat,
held April 3-5 in Santa
Clara, Panama,
teaches teenagers
how to find their true
' identity, build their
self-esteem and
become positive role
models for their peers.
S- "This leadership
exercise involved
drawing a person,
writing down the
characteristics of a
S' good leader on that
drawing, and placing
j their (the students)
_ ~ initials next to those
characteristics they
felt they possessed.
Productive weekend
The retreat, in the words of Lisa Dyson, the
director of the Howard Teen Center, "is extremely
important. These teenagers are learning how to be
productive and effective members of society. It's a
positive-oriented retreat in that we're trying to build
up their self-esteem. These kids are great."
Dyson added that the retreat's importance is even
more prevalent, now that the military drawdown in
Panama is around the corner.
For Washington Dyson, one of the teens who
attended the retreat, the three-day event was "learn-
ing a lot about yourself, your friends and who you
should associate with." James Lewis, another partici-
pant, had this to say about the retreat: "I thought it
would be fun to come here. It's about finding what
you're really all about." And for Josh Foster, the
retreat was about "encountering challenges and
meeting those challenges. It's just a good experience "


Teen Participants
Clayton Teen Center


Daonna Young
Candice Lord
Quill Ferguson
James Lewis
Brian Reyes
Stephanie Case
Yeanina Parker
Nicole Ferguson
Latoya Lewis

H
Washington Dyson
Josh Foster
Jerrold Ray
Dustin Willford
Ray LeClair


Lauren Curtain
Emily Ferguson
Sasha Davilla
Stuart Melton
Ange McRary
Katrina McCRary
Fernando Perez
Shionna McCCrary
Kori Jones

toward Teen Center
Brandon Simpson
Andre Wilson
Anton Chisolm
Donnie Greenfield
Andrea Dyson
Rosetta Johnston


Krystin Jones
Falon Tenery
Eddie Sparks
Thomas Dumas
Mike Hougue
Peter Higgins
Jeff Ferguson
David Hopper
John Calkins
Jason Calkins
r
Jessica Julian
Tara Bivcens
Crystal Lebby
Desiree Hogan
Jodie Paramadore
Mike Davis


Community

Page B10: The Easter Bunny is
anxious to start hiding those
colored eggs for some great
family fun. Check out
the latest events, activi-
ties and worship ser- ..-
vices taking place.


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'rro ictivities
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Notices


Tis and0our


Air Force
*Outdoor Recreation: 284-6107
Tours depart from Howard Theater.
Italian dining in Panama 6 - 10 p.m.
Saturday, $7 per person.
Kayaking the Chagres River 8 a.m
- 2 p.m. Saturday, $20. Don't miss the
adventure of kayaking the Chagres
River. Cost includes: transportation,
guide, kayak, safety equipment and
barbecue.
Peacock bass fishing 5 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Saturday, $25. Be prepared to catch a
boat load of fish near Arenosa Village on
Gatun Lake. Transportation, boat with
guide, bait, ice and coolers for fish are
provided.
El Valle shopping and sight-seeing 7
a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday, $14. Travel by bus
to the beautiful mountains of El Valle, a
sleepy village in an extinct volcano ba-
sin. Enjoy shopping in the native market
and purchase handicrafts such as
soaptone carvings, bateas, baskets, na-
tive fruits, vegetables and beautiful
tropical plants and flowers.
Isla Grande snorkeling trip 8 a.m.
- 7 p.m. Sunday, $22. The abundant
coral reef makes Isla Grande a great
place for snorkelers..Come and explore
the spectacle coral reef.
Parara Puru Indian village tour 8


a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday, $24. Take a cayuco
ride along the Chagres River to visit the
unique Parara Puru Indian community
and experience their social lifestyle and
witness their primitive customs dating
500 years ago. Bring a sack lunch and
don't forget the camera.
Central Avenue and Via Espaiia shop-
ping 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Wednesday, $9.
Check out the great deals on Central Av-
enue and Via Espafia on this fabulous
shopping trip.
Jungle canopy tour Wednesday, $65.
Get a unique view of the jungle's canopy
on this exciting tour. You will traverse
from cable to cable through the jungle
tops, just like monkeys do. Sign up now.
Barro Colorado Island tour 6 a.m. - 3
p.m. Thursday, $65. See Mother Nature at
her best on this boat tour of Barro Colo-
rado, home to one of the Smithsonian
Institute's tropical research centers.
Visit the Atlantic community 7 am. - 5
p.m. April 17, $20. Take a trip to the Atlan-
tic side and enjoy the scenery and visit
Gatun Locks, Fort San Lorenzo and Fort
Sherman zoo. Stop for lunch at the Trapon
Club restaurant.
Old Panama and Miraflores Locks 9
a.m. - 4 p.m. April 18, $12. Take a trip back
to the 1600s and see the beautiful architec-
ture of Colonial Panama. Visit such histori-
cal sites as the French Plaza, the National


Cathedral, the Church of the Golden Altar
and the National Theater. Enjoy lunch at a
typical Panamanian restaurant, then visit
the Panama Canal Locks. Bring money for
lunch and purchases.
Army
*Outdoor Recreation Center: 288-
7355/6453
Reservations for outings are under
way at Building 178, Fort Clayton.
Barro Colorado Island April 18. Don't
miss this opportunity. Space is limited,
make your reservations now.
The Mamoni tradition overnight trip
is available. Includes a two-hour drive
into Chepo, and a three-hour horseback
ride. Enjoy typical food, rustic sleeping
accommodations and activities. Not
meant for the mild at heart. Call the cen-
ter for more information.
Ongoing features: Snorkel/divers at
Portobelo and Isla Grande can be ar-
ranged. For more information, call the
center.
*DCA Marina: 283-3147
Rodman Marina features ocean char-
ters for a minimum of three persons. Fee
includes bait, tackle, rods and guide. For
boating and fishing there are Boston
Whalers, Jon boats and canoes. Pontoon
boat packages available for parties or
fishing. Also motors, camping equip-


Air Force
*Howard Community Center:
284-6161
The center is located on the Ground
Floor of Building 707. New hours:
7:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. Monday - Fridays,
noon - 6 p.m. Saturday and closed
Sunday and holidays. Down days
noon - 6 p.m.
Stop by Cafe Seven-O-Seven and
try the deli menu. Featuring sand-
wiches served with chips, cole slaw or
pasta salad. Come and try the delicious
pastries and donuts at the House of
Pastries. Hours of operation: 6 - 7
p.m. Monday - Fridays, 7 - 11 a.m.
Saturday, Sunday and closed holi-
days. Call 284-6161/5237/5848.
Vista Panama 7 p.m. April 30, free.
The Howard Community Center is
sponsoring "Vista Panama" at the
Tropic Breeze Club Ballroom. Bring
your family, cameras and camcorders.
This exciting audio-visual presentation
features the Panama Tourism
Institute's fabulous three projector
slide show, the national Pollera, the
Kuna Indian dancers, a local art exhi-
bition and more. Come an enjoy an as-
sortment of Panama typical food.
*Howard Skills Development Cen-


ment, trailers and scuba equipment.
Opens 6 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday - Monday.
*Valent Recreation Center: 288-
6500
Make early reservations for tours:
Isla Grande 6:30 a.m. Saturday.
El Valle adventure and shopping
6:30 a.m. Sunday. Picturesque town
and market, great sightseeing loca-
tions.
Carlson Wagonlit offers the lowest
military air fares, hotel, car rental dis-
counts and more. Service also includes
special weekday rates at Gorgona
beachfront cabins; Chiva Parrandera
on Thursday, Fridays and Saturdays.
For more information, call 288-7077.

Navy
*Morale, Welfare & Recreation:
283-4314/4301
Coronado Gaviota Club Resort
Sunday. This is a resort area with an
excellent restaurant, bathroom facilities
and shower. Bring extra money for eat-
ing and shopping. Call Sally Paramore.
Los Pueblos shopping trip Thurs-
day.
Free Zone April 22. Tentative.
Panama City tour April 24.
Water World Park April 26.
For more information, call Hugo
Sealey.


ter: 284-6361
The Balloon Shop is located in the
Skills Development Center, Building
711. Check our daily specials and make
someone smile. The Skills Develop-
ment Center now has the Balloon Shop
and Pack-N-Wrap with gift, balloons,
wrapping for shipping for all
occasions.
*Outdoor Adventures: 284-6107
Rent Howard bohios and pools for
private parties or squadron functions.
If you wish to serve alcohol, you must
submit a letter of request to the 24th
Support Group deputy commander at
least four working days before the
event.
*Howard AFB Sports and Recre-
ation Rental Center: 284-610713539
Check out the wide variety of
equipment for rent, camping, fishing
and boating, home entertainment,
home improvement, outdoor, picnic &
party, sports and cooking equipment
for a minimal fee daily, weekend and
weekly rental. PCSing? If so, get $5 off
weekly and monthly rentals on TVs,
VCRs and TV/VCR combos. Must be
accompanied by orders. Rent a moun-
tain bike for a month or week and re-
ceive a free water bottle.


Art a'dcaft


Air Force
*Howard Skills Development
Center: 284-6361
The center accepts commercial
credit cards.
Registration and payment are re-
quired before attending classes.
Classes will be cancelled 24 hours
prior if minimum participation is not
met
Basic framing 1 - 3 p.m. Saturday.
Bring a photo, water color or needle-
work no bigger that 8x10.
Beginner's ceramics 10:30 a.m.
Saturday. Learn how to pour, paint
and glaze ceramic pieces.


Stenciling everywhere 5:30 - 7 p.m.
Tuesday; 9:30 - 11 a.m. Wednesday, $8
plus supplies.
Air brush class 5 - 7 p.m. Tuesday, $5
includes supplies and one lesson.
Introduction to colors 5 - 8 p.m. Tues-
day, $15 plus supplies.
Spring stamping 10 a.m. - 1 p.m
Thursday, $6 plus supplies.
Army
*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Cen-
ter: 288-595717360
Learn drawing, acrylic, watercolor
and oil painting techniques. Classes are
7 - 9 p.m. Wednesday and Thursdays
for eight sessions. Register in advance.


Crafts classes available:
Pottery class 1 p.m. Wednesday.
Woodworking qualification class
9:30 a.m. - noon Saturdays.
Guitar construction 7 - 9 p.m. Thurs-
day.
Framing instruction 6:30 - 9 p.m.
Thursday.
*Fort Clayton Ceramics Shop: 288-
4360
Ceramic instruction available:
Beginners ceramic painting 6 - 8
p.m. Thursday. Fee is $20.
Ceramic qualification 10 a.m. - 12:30
p.m. Saturday.
Ceramic orientation for pouring 2 - 3
p.m. Wednesday.


Pastel chalk technique 4 - 5 p.m.
Wednesday, $10 plus supplies.
Eye painting 7 p.m. Wednesday, $5.
Dry brush technique 2 - 3 p.m.
Thursday.
Airbrush classes, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
$5.
ClayFlowermaking11 a.m. -1 p.m.
Sunday, $15, four sessions.
Learn to apply Fiesta Color 2 - p.m.
Sunday. Cost $20. Four sessions.
Stone stroke class, Sundays. Cost
$10 for two sessions.
Children's classes: Art and Craft
workshops 10 - 11:30 a.m. Saturday.
Children 9- to 13-years-old, four ses-
sions, supplies included.


B2


Tropic Times
April 9, 1998


Rec center news









J jNotices


Army
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: 289-6699
Certified massage therapist by appointment, one hour
to 15-minute sessions, Mondays, Tuesdays and Thurs-
days.
Martial arts classes offered on a monthly basis 6 - 7
p.m. Tuesday. Monthly fee.
Spanish lessons available. Advance registration re-
quired.
Enjoy El Valle horseback riding Saturday.
Snorkel/dive April 25. Sail in a beautiful catamaran,
around Taboga and Chama Island.
Reservations are ongoing for April highlights: Deep
sea fishing trip, Contadora Island overnight and Taboga Is-
land day trip.
*Sherman Rental Center: 289-6104
Pontoon charters for fishing or cruising, $30/hour, 10-
person capacity. Fee includes captain, crew, tackle and ice.
The center has custom outings that can be arranged at
your convenience. Enjoy fishing trips at Gatun Lake aboard
the pontoon boats, snorkeling or diving at Orange Island.
Fee includes equipment, boat, operator and guide.
Motorboat operator's safety classes 8 a.m. - noon
monthly at the Sherman Lagoon. Fee is $10. Space is lim- -
ited to the first 10 participants. Sign up in advance.


'AT


P 18Apr1 begins at 3 pm1


Jarman Field, Ft . Clayton,

Great Live Entertainment, Refreshments on sale


Community Appreciation Day
Jamming at Jarmin is April 18 and features a children DoD magic show, mimes and
face painting 3 - 4:30 p.m.; Los Pescuzipelaos cumbia/folk rock 4:30 - 6 p.m.; DJ vari-
ety music 6 - 6:30 p.m.; WoodStock Classic rock & roll 6:30 - 7:30 p.m.; DJ variety music
7 - 8 p.m. and closing that day is Osvaldo Ayala typical music 8 - 10 p.m.


Art and Sale exhibition
* Howard Community Center:
Panamanian artist Edwin Ortiz and Julian Vasquez
will be featured at the Howard Community Center.
The art and sale exhibition starts 1 p.m. Wednesday
at the center. Stop by and view the painting which
are done in the "Costumbrista " style. For more in-
formation on the art and sale exhibition, call the cen-
ter.


Starlight cruise
* American Society of Panama:
The American Society of Panama is sponsoring a
Starlight Dinner Cruise on MV Fantasia del Mar. The
boat departs Balboa Pier 18, 6:30 - 10 p.m. May 7. The
cruise, out into Panama Bay under the stars, will fea-
ture a buffet dinner, pay as you go bar and music for
dancing. Tickets are $15 for members and $20 for non-
members. For tickets, call 264-8385 or 272-5177.


High School play
* International School of Panama:
International School of Panama students will
present the comedy "The Curious Savage" 8 p.m.
April 23, 24 and 25 at the Ancon Theater Guild. Writ-
ten by John Patrick, the play challenges society's ma-
terialistic values in a humorous tale about an eccentric
old woman who tricks her greedy relatives from the
confines of an institution.


Sops an*clsses


Air Force
*Howard Community Center:
284-6161
Okinawa Kenpo Karate classes 6
- 7:15 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays.
Cost $25 per month.
Beginner, intermediate and ad-
vanced English and Spanish classes.
Call the center for more information.
Violin classes available once a
week for 40 minutes. Group and indi-
vidual classes for 5-year-olds to adults.
Call for schedule and prices.
*Howard Pool: 284-3569
Hours of operation: 10 a.m. - 6
p.m. Tuesday - Sunday and holidays.
Closed Monday.
The Pool is offering a special for
kids Thursday - Monday. Swimming is
free for kids 11-years-old and under.
*Howard Auto Skills Center: 284-
3370
Hours: 9 a.m. - 9 p.m Tuesdays -
Fridays, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday, 11
a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday. Mechanics avail-
able 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tuesday - Satur-
days.
Services: Towing 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday - Fridays, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m Sat-
urdays (as long as a qualified driver is
on duty). If a tow extends beyond 5:30
p.m., there is an additional hourly
charge; air conditioning repair, brakes,
oil changes, tune-ups, front-end align-
ment and welding available.
Vehicle inspection services 9:30
a.m. -5 p.m. Tuesday - Friday and 9:30
a.m. -4:30 p.m. Saturday. No inspec-
tions Sunday or Monday. Cost is $10.
Have your vehicle inspected at the
center in Building 722. Vehicles cannot
be left for inspections.
Tow service 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tuesday
- Friday and 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday,


as long as a qualified driver is on duty.
Call the center for more information.
*Howard Wood Skills Center: 284-
4510
Open 2 - 9 p.m. Wednesday - Fridays,
9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sunday and holidays. Closed Mondays
and Tuesdays.
Woodworking class 1 - 4 p.m. Satur-
day, $25 plus supplies. This class covers
basic shop qualifications, planning and
building a project.
Machine qualification courses 10
a.m. - noon Saturday, $8 plus supplies.
This class is required for anyone inter-
ested in using the center.
Army
*Fort Clayton Pool: 288-6660
Swimming lessons begin Monday.
Four levels are available with four ses-
sions during three weeks. Space is lim-
ited to seven participants per class.
*Fort Clayton Boat & Scuba Shop:
288-735516453
Basic sailing classes are conducted
for two consecutive weekends Saturday
and Sunday and April 18 - 19. Register at
Building 178.
Fishing enthusiasts are invited to par-
ticipate in the ongoing heaviest bass of
the week (more than four pounds) com-
petition. Win a free day-boat rental.
Motorboat operator course offered 8
a.m. - noon monthly. Fee is $10 for Jon
boat certification, $20 for Boston Whaler/
ocean certification. Advance reservation.
Gatun Lake fishing charters avail-
able. $30/person, minimum of three
people, includes Jon boat w/30hp. In-
cludes boat, guide, cooler, fishing tackle
and bait and safety equipment.
Open-water dive classes begin Mon-


days. Minimum of six people required. In-
cludes pool sessions, theory sessions
and open-water dives. Register in ad-
vance. As a bonus, class participants re-
ceive 10 percent discount at the Twin
Ocean Pro Shop.
The Scuba Shop has equipment for
rent, advanced instruction and services
to include repairing spear guns, regula-
tors and gauges.
*Twin Oceans Pro Shop -
AquaCenter, Building 178, Fort
Clayton: 288-7355
The Pro Shop has lots of merchan-
dise on hand ... scuba swim wear and the
necessary equipment - whether a begin-
ner or advanced diver.
*Auto Craft Center:
The center is located in Buildings
178-A, B, C and Building 135, Fort
Clayton.
The shop features work area bays,
electric lifts and instruction and classes.
Electric engine analysis 4 - 9 p.m.
Monday.
Air-condition maintenance 2 p.m.
Monday, Thursdays and Fridays. Noon
- 5 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m Sun-
days.
Wheel alignment 3 - 9 p.m. Monday,
Thursday and Fridays.
Brake repair class 1 - 9:30 p.m. Fri-
days.
*Fort Sherman Auto Shop Building
153:
Hours of operation: noon - 4 p.m.
Sunday, closed Monday and Tuesday, 4
- 8 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Fri-
day and 10 a.m. - 6 p.m Saturday and holi-
days.
The shop has four bays with one en-
gine lift, tire-changing equipment, engine
hoist, a compressor to remove shocks,
and various other equipment.


*Valent Recreation Center: 288-
6500
New hours of operation: 12:30 -
9:30 p.m. Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. -9:30
p.m. Saturday, Sunday and holidays.
Register for ongoing classes.
Earth Day Display Wednesday -
Tuesday. Stop by and see what you
can do to help take better care of our
Mother Earth.
Spanish headstart class, 8-week
course, meets twice a week. Interme-
diate Spanish classes available. Fee
includes manual.
Acoustic and electric guitar les-
sons, Monday, Wednesday or Satur-
day, half-hour sessions.
Piano classes Mondays - Thurs-
days, half-hour sessions.
Basic English 10:10 a.m. Tuesday
and Thursday. Intermediate English
Monday and Wednesday.
Drum classes, half-hour session
between 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Monday -
Thursdays.
African dance movement, monthly
course 6 - 7 p.m Fridays.

Navy
*Rodman Recreation Center: 283-
422214332
Stop in and play pool, table tennis,
darts, football and lots of games. Join
us and enjoy our big screen TV.
*Rodman Pool: 283-4253/3150
Swimming lessons. Cost $15 for 12
lessons.
If you want to take a late swim, the
pool is open until 8 p.m. Thursday.
The Tropical Oasis is serving de-
licious frozen fruit drinks.
3-on-3 water basketball April 17.


Tropic Times
April 9,1998


B3


Special events


I ARMAN











B4 Tropic Times
SApril 9, 1998


Lt Potpourri


The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting
applications on a continuous basis for the following
announcements. All interested applicants need to re-submit an
updated SF-171every six months. Registers established from
these announcements will be used to fill temporary positions.
VB# 51-OC General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most clerical
positions).*
VB# 52-OC Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk
sch).*
*CASP NOTICE OF RATING REQUIRED. CASP exam is
currently offered only to U.S. citizens and military dependents
by the Recruitment and Examining Division (CEO/RED),
Building 363, ANCON,
Tel. 272-3584.
VB# 55-OC Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5,
specialized experience required.
OPEN UNTIL FILLED:
171-98-SC SECRETARY(OA), NM-318-07. SENSITIVE.
DOL, Office of the Director, Corozal, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr.
equiv. to NM-06. TIG: 1 yr. at NM-06. NOTE: Must be able to
obtain security clearance at the secret level. A qualified typist
is required.

229-98-SC MEMORIAL SERVICES ASSISTANT, NM-303-
05. DOL, Services Division, Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.:
1 yr. equiv. to NM-04. NOTE: Must be able to lift up to 70 lbs.
With reasonable accommodations without difficulty.
VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 04-10-
98 CLOSE: 04-21-98

066-98-LM SUPERVISORY PHYSICAL SECURITY
SPECIAL-IST, NM-080-12. SENSITIVE. Installation Provost
Marshal, Physical Security Section, Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec.
Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-11. TIG: 1 yr. at NM-11. NOTE: Must
be able to obtain security clearance at the secret level.
211 A-98-SS MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT(OA), NM-344-05/
07. SENSITIVE. 56th Signal Battalion, Corozal, Panama. Spec.
Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-04. NOTE: Must be able to obtain
security clearance. A qualified typist is required (40 wpm).
Office automation is required. This position will be relocating
outside of the Republic of Panama with USARSO in FY1999.
Selectee will be required to sign a mobility agreement,
concurring to the transfer as a condition of employment. Area of
Consideration: Career/career conditional employees in the
federal service and individuals with reinstatement eligibility.
Non-status applicants must apply through the Recruiting and
Examining Division, at Building 363, Ancon, Panama.
250-98-GC LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST, NM--
346-13. SENSITIVE.USARSO, Treaty Itisplementation Office,
Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-12. TIG:
1 yr. at NM-12. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security
clearance. TEMPORARY NTE: 09/30/98. Detail/temporary
promotion opportunity for permanent employee; temporary
appointment for non-status candidates. Position may be
extended for up to 1 yr. beyond 09/30/98 depending on funding.
251-98-GC TRAINING PROGRAM SPECIALIST, NM-301-09.
SENSITIVE. DCSOPS, Training Division, Fort Clayton,
Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-07. TIG: 1 yr. at NM-
07. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security clearance. Limited
to permanent employees only. Non-status applicants need to
apply through the Recruitment and Examining Division
(formerly CEO) at Ancon. This position will be relocating
outside the, Republic of Panama in CY 1999. Selected candidate
will be required to sign a Mobility Agreement agreeing to this
transfer as a condition of employment.
252-98-SC QUALITY ASSURANCE SPECIALIST, NM-1910-
09. DOL, Contract Management Division, Corozal, Panama.
Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-07. TIG: 1 yr. at NM-07. NOTE:
Driver's license is required.
254-98-SC AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT REPAIR INSPECT-
OR, MG-5823-11. Federal Supply Service, Corozal, Panama.
NOTE: Driver's license is required. Spec. Exp.: Must have had
at least four years of progressive practical experience in the
maintenance, overhaul and repair of combustion-powered
automotive vehicles, over-the-road trucks, or comparable
vehicles. The experience may have included an apprenticeship
plus specialized experience in a related occupation.
255-98-SS COMPUTER ASSISTANT(OA), NM-335-5. 56th
Signal Battalion, Corozal, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to
NM-04. NOTE: TEMPORARY NTE: 03/30/99. A qualified
typist is required (40 wpm),
256-98-SS LEAD TELEPHONE OPERATOR, NM-382-6.
SENSITIVE. 56th Signal Battalion, Fort Clayton, Panama.
NOTE: Must be able to obtain security clearance. TEMP NTE 1
yr. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-5. TIG: N/A. COMP TEMP
PROM NTE 1 yr. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-7. TIG: 1 yr. at
NM-5.
257-98-LM (3)WRITER-EDITOR, NM-1082-7/9. US Army
South, Tropic Times, Corozal, Panama. NOTE: Driver's license
is required. Grade NM-7 Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-05. TIG:
1 yr. at NM-05. For NM-9 Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-07.
TIG: 1 yr. at NM-7.
258-98-LM ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT COORDINATOR
(OA), NM-0342-07. SENSITIVE. USA Materiel Command,
Logistics Assistance Office, Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.:
1 yr. equiv. to NM-06. TIG: 1 yr. at NM-06. NOTE: Must be
able to obtain security clearance. A qualified typist is required.
Area of Consideration: Career/career conditional employees in
the federal service and individuals with reinstatement eligibility.
This position will be relocating outside the Republic of Panama
in CY 1999. Selected candidate will be required to sign a
Mobility Agreement agreeing to this transfer as a condition of
employment.
WORLDWIDE ANNOUNCEMENTS
VB# VACANCY, TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 03-20-
98 CLOSE: 04-20-98
WW-234-98-GC LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST,
NM-346-12. SENSITIVE. DCSLOG, Readiness Division, Fort
Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-11. TIG: 1
yr. at NM-11. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security clearance.
Area of Consideration: Career/career conditional employees in
the federal service and individuals with reinstatement eligibility.
This position will be relocating outside the Republic of Panama
in CY 1999. Selected candidate will be required to sign a
Mobility Agreement agreeing to this transfer as a condition of
employment.


Clb ew


Clayton
*The Loop: 288-7035
CJ's Sports Bar has daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.
- 1:30 p.m. Monday - Fridays. Dinner 5 - 9 p.m. Mon-
days - Fridays, noon - 9 p.m. Saturday and Sundays.
Enjoy the sports games on the big screen TVs Satur-
day and Sunday afternoons and Monday nights.
*Clayton Community Club: 288-4716
Easter Sunday brunch 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Sun-
day. Enjoy the hot and cold entrees, salads, breakfast
items, pastries and desserts. Great food and background
music.
Visit the new Forum and enjoy the new look.
Country buffet 5 - 9 p.m. Wednesday has features from
ham hocks and fried chicken to black-eyed peas. Italian
Thursday serves four pastas with four different sauces,
seafood Fridays and discover the new Hoko's Chinese
buffet Saturdays.
The Carol Cuisine is 6 - 9 p.m. Thursday. Enjoy a
delicious selection of Panamanian dishes and folkloric
entertainment.
Entertainment: Disco 9 p.m. - 3 a.m. Wednesday,
Friday & Saturdays in the ballroom.
Social hour is back 5 - 8 p.m. Friday.
Tecno Latin sounds 9 p.m. Friday and Saturdays in
The Underground.
*Casa Maria: 288-5767
Authentic Mexican cuisine served 5 - 9 p.m. Mon-
days - Saturdays. Delivery service available on Fort
Clayton.
The Corral 7 - 8 p.m. Tuesday. Learn how to Coun-
try and Western dance.
*La Mola Caf%: 288-4202
Breakfast 6:30 - 9:30 a.m. Monday - Fridays, 7 - 11
a.m. Saturday - Sundays; lunch 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Monday - Fridays, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday - Sun-
days; dinner 5 - 8 p.m. Daily.
*Cafe 519: 288-6007
Breakfast 6 - 11 a.m. Monday - Fridays.
Lunch begins at 11 a.m. with hot specials, a salad
bar and sandwiches. Enjoy a special buffet Thursdays.
*STRAC Jr. Club: 283-4119
STRAC Jr. Club is now open on the Ground Floor
of Cocoli Center building. The lounge opens 5 - 10 p.m.
Thursday - Sunday. Snacks and pool table available.

Sherman
*Sherman Community Club: 289-6116/6198
Disco nights 8 p.m. - 1 a.m. Friday and Saturdays.
Country and Western nights 8 - 11 p.m. Thursday.
Fast food menu items served 5 p.m. Sunday -
Tuesday, 6 p.m. Wednesday - Saturday.

Howard
*Howard Club Dining Room - Building 113: 284-
4680. Open to all ranks.
New all ranks evening dining menu 5:30 - 9 p.m.
Wednesday - Saturday. Join us and enjoy a fantastic
menu with a great selection to please everyone, great
appetizers, lite and healthy choice, hometown favorites,
variety of poultry dishes, beef plates, a selection of pas-
tas and more. Children menu is also available.
Easter Sunday brunch 10 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. $9.95.
Bring your whole family and feast on all your favorite
food. Reservations are recommended.
Weekly lunch buffet all-you-care-to-eat 11 a.m. - 1
p.m. $5.95. Monday: American buffet, Tuesday: Ital-
ian, Wednesday: Mexican, Thursday: Oriental, and
Friday: Southern buffet.
Lunch bunch buffet 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Monday - Fri-
day at Howard Club. You'll receive a free lunch after 10
visits. Just ask the cashier for your lunch bunch card.
Two-Can Officers' Lounge super social hour 4 p.m.
- midnight Friday. Bar open 4 - 10 p.m. Saturday and 4 -
9 p.m. Wednesday - Thursday. Closed Sunday - Tues-
day.
Howard Club closed 2 p.m. Monday and Tues-
days.
*Tropic Breeze Club: 284-4189
Cashier hours: Open 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Saturday -
Wednesdays, 9 a.m. - 10 p.m. Thursday, 9 a.m. -
midnight Fridays, and close for lunch 1:15 - 2 p.m. daily.
A la carte breakfast 6 - 9 a.m. Monday - Fridays.
Weekly lunch menu 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., $3.95. Fri-
days: Seafood lunch. Salad and taco bar also available
and sandwich bar open 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. weekly. Mon-
days: a little taste of Italy; Tuesdays: all-American hon-
estly; Wednesdays: Oriental specialties; Thursday:
Spicy Tex-Mex plate.
Breezeway open 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sunday - Thurs-
days, 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Friday and Saturdays.
*Tropic Breeze Club Ballroom: 284-4189
The new no-smoking ballroom is open for special


functions only.
*Tropic Breeze Club Casual Cove: 284-4189
All-night disco 9 p.m. - 5 a.m. Friday. The disco
party is open to enlisted club members and their guests.
Super social hour 5 - 6 p.m. Friday. Free food for
club members.
Friday classic rock 4 - 8 p.m. Classic rock with mu-
sic producers.
R & B with K.M. Productions in the dining room 5
- 9 p.m. Friday.
Disco dance with Rose's fabulous light and sound
show 8 p.m. - 2 a.m.
Variety music with Music Producers 8 p.m. - 1
a.m. Saturday, 8 - midnight Sunday and Monday.
Karaoke night 8 p.m. - 2 a.m. Tuesday
Rock & roll, variety music with Greg Norton and
Music Producers 8 p.m. - midnight Wednesday.
Dance the night away with Country Western mu-
sic and the Music Producers 8 p.m. - midnight Thurs-
days.
*Top Three Club: 284-4189
Club is closed Sundays.
Boss-N-Buddy night 4:30 - 9 p.m. Monday - Tues-
days.

Horoko
*Mulligan's on the Green at Horoko: 283-3295
Build-your-own breakfast 6 - 10 a.m. Saturday,
Sunday and holidays. Open for lunch and dinner weekly
10 a.m. - 8:30 p.m. Monday - Thursdays, 10 a.m. - 9:30
p.m. Friday, 6 - 9:30 p.m. Saturday and 6 a.m. - 8:30
p.m. Sunday and holidays.
Mongolian barbecue 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. $8.95, for the
first eight ounces and $4.95 for the vegetarian version.

Rodman
*Upper Deck Restaurant: 283-4498/4478
Breakfast served 6:30 - 8:30 a.m. Monday -
Fridays.
Early bird breakfast special. Come in between
6:30 - 7 a.m. and receive 10 percent off your breakfast
food.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.
- 1:30 p.m. weekdays, $4.95; Try our delicious soup and
salad bar. If you don't want the buffet, order from the
grill menu and get a cup of soup for $0.75.
Weekly lunch specials: Mondays: Pasta feast;
Tuesday: Mexican platter; Wednesdays: fried chicken;
Thursday: lasagna with garlic bread; and Fridays:
roasted turkey with dressing.
Family night 6 - 9 p.m. Wednesday, two delicious
specials to choose from, fried chicken or fish $5.50 per
person. Kids eat at half price. There is a clown to enter-
tain the kids with fun games, balloons and face paint-
ing.
Mongolian barbecue 6 - 9 p.m. Thursday, $8.95,
$0.50 each additional ounce. Select chicken, turkey,
shrimp and beef, add your favorite vegetables and spices.
Vegetarian also available for $4.50.
*Mulcahy's Bar & Grill: 283-4498
Open to all ranks 4:30 p.m. weekdays, 5 p.m.
weekends. Bar opens at 5 p.m.
Filler-up mug brought to you weekly, $1.50 refills
for $1 and you get to keep the mug. You can purchase
jumbo shrimp 5:30 - 7 p.m. or until gone. Lounge menu
available until 8 p.m.
Kicker specials are served daily for $1.
Ice bucket special Mondays for $1.50. Tuesday -
Sunday $1.75.
Fat Tuesday 6 - 9 p.m. Come in and ordi - from
Lounge Menu and receive 25 percent off your bill.
Seafood extravaganza Friday. Two delicious
specials seafood combo and lobster thermidor for
$17.25.
Sunday action movie starts at 5:30 p.m. and features
"Gang Related."
Girls' night out 7 - 10 p.m. Thursday. Bring five
friends and receive a gift. Appetizers served at 7 - 8 p.m.
Lounge menu available until 9 p.m.
Giveaways 8 p.m. every Fridays. Door prizes or a
weekend for two at the following locations: Hotel
Camping Resort, Costa Del Sol, Club Gaviota Coronado
or Gorgona Jayes and other prizes.
Lobster night 5 p.m. Saturday until gone.
Dance all night, tonight. Come on over and get on
the dancing floor, and dance the night away.
Sunday action movie 5:30 p.m., "The Game."
Karaoke night 8 p.m. Saturday. There is cash and
prizes.
4 Paradise Hut: 283-4498
Attitude Adjustment April 17. Come join the fun
and try your luck at wining door prizes or a weekend get
away trip.


RODMAN NS UPPER DECK RESTAURANT IS HOSTING
A FAMILY NIGHT 6 - 9 P.M. WEDNESDAY WITH TWO DELICIOUS
SPECIALS TO CHOOSE FROM: FRIED CHICKEN OR FISH, $5.50 PER
PERSON. KIDS EAT AT HALF PRICE. THERE IS A CLOWN TO ENTER-
TAIN THE CHILDREN ALONG WITH FUN GAMES, BALLOONS AND FACE
PAINTING.










~Movies


Tropic Times B
April 9, 1998 B5


Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

Howard AFB 6:30 pm: Kundun 4 pm: Sphere* 4:30 pm: Flubber** 7 pm: Wild 7 pm: Kundun 7 pm: Deperate 7 pm: Wild
Things* Measures Things*
284-3583 9 pm: Deperate 6:30 pm: Wild 6:30 pm: Spice
Measures Things* World
8:45 pm: Primary 8:30 pm: Deperate
Colors* Measures

Fort Clayton 6:30 pm: Spice 4:30 pm: Mr. 4 pm: Sphere 7 pm: Deperate 7 pm: Wild 7 pm: Kundun 7 pm: Deperate
288-7279 World Magoo** 6:30 pm: Wild Measures Things* Measures
8:30 pm: Wild Things*
Things* 8:45 pm: Primary
9 pm: Deperate Colors*
Measures


Fort Sherman
289-6251


7 pm:" U.S.
Marshalls*


7 pm: The Man
With The Iron
Mask*


Theaternews Movie GudeRain


Check the AAFES Home Page for up-to-the-minute changes
at:
www. panama.phoenix.net/~aafespan/default.html
Tickets are available in five price categories: $3.50, $3, $1.75,
$1.50 and $1. *First run movies $3.50 **Special Price


R Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent
or adult guardian.
PG-13 Parental guidance suggested for children under 13.
PG Parental guidance suggested.
G Suitable for general audience.


SNow showing


Desperate Measures
* Andy Garcia, Michael Keaton
San Francisco police officer Frank
* Connor must find a bone marrow donor
for his dying son. The only match is
* the vicious murderer, Peter McCabe. In
an effort to escape from prison McCabe
* agrees to donate his bone marrow. It
seems that all McCabe has on his mind
is freedom. R, 1 hr, 40 min.

: R Flubber
Robin Williams, Wil Wheaton
* Robin Williams plays the absent
* minded professor who accidently dis-
covers the magical mischievous stuff.
The gravity defying substance causes
* chaos in every application and
denergizes the lives of those it encoun-
ters. PG, 1 hr, 34 min.

Jackie Brown
9 Pam Grier, Samuel L. Jackson
Jackie Brown a stewardess, supple-
* ments her income by smuggling money
into the country from Mexico. She not
* only works for airline, she also works
for the notorious illegal arms dealer,
* Ordell. She is busted by Federal agents
and the only way she'll stay out of jail
* and keep her job, is to set up a sting
: operation. She has to bring in a half
* million dollars and bring down Ordell.
R, 2 hrs, 34 min.

Kundun
: Tenzin Thithob Tsarong,
Byurme Tethong
This drama spans the life of the Bud-
* dhist Dalai Lama from 1937 through
* 1950. The Buddhist principle of non-
violence was shattered by the Chinese
* invasion of Tibet. The Dalai Lama was
forced from Tibet by the conquering
* Communist Chinese and is now exiled
in India. PG-13, 1 hr, 23 min.

Mr. Magoo
Leslie Nielson, Kelly Lynch
* When a stolen gem lands in the
hands of nearsighted millionaire,
* Quincv Magoo, a sinister plot is
hatched to steal it back. Always the tar-
get of evil culprits, the elderly Magoo
manages to escape, oblivious to the
* dangers around him. Magoo ultimately
nabs the villains with the help of his


__________-f i


Showing today at Howard Theater.


nephew, Waldo, and his bulldog. PG, 1
hr, 25 min.

Primary Colors
John Travolta, Emma Thompson
Henry Burton is looking for something
or someone to believe in. He joins the
presidential campaign of Jack Stanton.
During the long campaign there are ru-
mors of sex scandals. Henry discovers
that politics and scandal are both part of
growing up in America. R, 2 hrs, 24 min.

U.S. Marshalls
Tommy Lee Jones, Wesley Snipes
Tommy Lee Jones returns to his FU-
GITIVE role as relentless US Marshal
Samuel Gerard. The fugitive in this ac-
tion suspense thriller is Wesley Snipes,
a secret government operative falsely ac-
cused of two murders. R, 2 hrs, 15 min.

Sphere
Dustin Hoffman, Sharon Stone
Hoffman, Stone and Samuel L. Jack-
son take the plunge in this big budget
adaptation of Michael Crichton's deep-
sea thriller. Director Barry Levinson helms
the story of a 300-year-old space craft
found at the bottom of the ocean.
Psycologist Hoffman, biochemist Stone
and mathematician Jackson are the lucky
crew hand picked to see what's inside.
PG-13, 2 hrs, 12 min.


Spice World
Richard E. Grant, The Spice
Girls
This musical comedy follows five
days in the lives of The Spice Girls.
The Spice Girls are Emma, Geri,
Victoria, Mel C and Mel B. The popu-
lar music group play themselves, as
they prepare for their first live con-
cert. PG, 1 hr, 33 min.

The Man in the Iron
Mask
Leonardo DiCaprio, Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons, John Malkovick, and
Gerald Depardieu portray the three
Musketeers at a point in their lives
where their best swashbuckling days
are behind them. Leonardo DiCaprio
takes on the dual roles of the wick-
edly tyrannical King Louis XIV, and
the title character. PG-13, 2 hrs, 12
min.

Wild Things
Kevin Bacon, Matt Dillon
When a High School Counselor is ac-
cused of raping a student, his care-
fully structured life is ruined. But, as
the investigating detective begins to
discover; there is a more devious plan
at work, the stakes are much higher
than anyone knew and nothing is as
it seems. R, 1 hr, 46 min.


0.0... 0..0 0 00*00*90 00 00.0 0 0 0* 0* 0.00 00 00.00 0*** *.... ...* 0000000000e000900**00*


-~1
I I


Howard AFB

6:30 pm: Krippendorf's
Tribe (PG-13)
Richard Dreyfuss,
Jenna Elfman


8:30 pm: The
Replacment Killers (R)
Chow Yun-Fat, Mira
Sorvino



Fort Clayton
6:30 pm: Lost in
Space (PG-13)*
William Hurt,
Gary Oldman

8:50 pm: Senseless
(R) Marion Wayans,
David Spade


7 pm: Jackie
Brown


NO SHOW


NO SHOW


NO SHOW


NO SHOW













B6 Tropic Times
_ Anril9, 1998


SSCN TV


Eary0mrnng6 datie T pogramin


Key: + Program time change due to live programming event; * Mature theme; " Series starts; **Series ends; "" Program moved to new day and/or time


6 Uo Today
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Jim Henson's Tale Of
Bunny Picnic
10:00 Sesame Street Special
10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
11:00 Oprah Winfrey
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:30 Guiding Light
2:00 General Hospital
3:00 Superman'96
3:30 Taz-Mania
4:00 Global Guts
4:30 Space Cases
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 Showbiz Today
See Prime Time table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 AMA Supercross:
World Championships
4:00 ISKA Karate
5:00 Headline News
5:30 CNN/SI


6:00 Today
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Jim Henson's Tale Of
Bunny Picnic
10:00 Sesame Street Special
10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
11:00 Oprah Winfrey
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:30 Guiding Light
2:00 General Hospital
3:00 Superman'96
3:30 Taz-Mania
4:00 Global Guts *
4:30 Space Cases
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 Showbiz Today
See Prime Time table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies: "Sister Act"
3:00 "Shipwrecked"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 CNN/SI


6:00 48 Hours
7:00 Early Edition
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Channel One/MBR
9:00 Good Morning America
1 1:00 Soccer: Mexico at
USA
2:00 Time And Again
3:00 PGA Tour:
Master's Tournament
(2nd round)
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 AMA Supercross:
World Championships
4:00 ISKA Karate
5:00 SportsCenter


7:00 Chicago Hope
8:00 Movie: Cowboy
10:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Cosby Show
11:30 Step By Step
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
1:00 National Geographic
3:00 Chicago Hope
4:00 Movie: Cowboy
See Prime Time table
12:00 Movie: A Big Hand For
A Little Lady
2:00 Hometime
2:30 Bob Vila's Home Again
3:00 Burt Wolf Eating Well
3:30 Tall Tales And Legends
4:30 California Dreams
5:00 Nick News
5:30 AJ's Time Traveler


6:00 Headline News
6:30 Classic Cartoons
7:00 Puzzle Place
7:30 Magic School Bus
8:00 Brand Spanking New
Doug
8:30 Sylvester And Tweety
9:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
9:30 Bonechillers
10:00 This Old House
10:30 Burt Wolf's Gatherings
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Air Force TV News
12:00 WWF Superstars
1:00 The Entertainers
2:00 Navy / Marine Corps
News
2:30 CBS PGA Golf: The
Master's Tournament
(3rd Rnd)
5:00 Americas Funniest
Home Videos
5:30 Headline News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 CNN/SI
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies: "Afterburn"
3:00 "Tyson"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 Hour Of Power





6:00 Headline News
6:30 Classic Cartoons
7:00 Puzzle Place
7:30 Magic School Bus
8:00 Brand Spanking New
Doug
8:30 Sylvester And Tweety
9:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
9:30 Bonechillers
10:00 This Old House
10:30 Burt Wolf's Gatherings
11:00 Hercules
12:00 WWF Superstars
1:00 The Entertainers
2:00 Navy / Marine Corps
News
2:30 CBS PGA Golf: The
Master's Tournament
(3rd Rnd)
5:00 Am. Funniest Home
Videos
5:30 Headline News
See Prime Time table
12:00 JAG
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies: "Afterburn"
3:00 "Tyson"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 Hour Of Power


6:00 48-Hours
7:00 Dateline
8:00 20/20
9:00 Showbiz
9:30 Style With Elsa
Klensch
10:00 Page One w/Nick
Charles
10:30 CNN Sports Preview
11:00 CNN Saturday
11:30 CNN Travelguide
12:00 CNN Saturday
12:30 Science & Technology
1:00 CNN Saturday
1:30 On The Menu
2:00 CNN Saturday
2:30 Managing
3:00 NASCAR Auto Racing:
Galaxy Foods 400
5:00 CNN Saturday
5:30 Headline News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 CNN/SI
1:00 Washington Week In
Review
1:30 Wall St Journal Report
2:00 NFL Europe:
Barcelona at Frankfurt
5:00 Sportscenter


6:00 Kenan & Kel
6:30 Guts
7:00 The Know Zone
7:30 Weird Science
8:00 Movie: A Big Hand For
A Little Lady
10:00 Hometime
10:30 Bob Vila's Home Again
11:00 Burt Wolf Eating Well
11:30 Tall Tales And Legends
12:30 California Dreams
1:00 Nick News
1:30 AJ's Time Traveler
2:00 Kenan & Kel
2:30 Guts
3:00 The Know Zone
3:30 Weird Science
4:00 Movie: A Big Hand For
A Little Lady
See Prime Time table
12:00 Easter Parade
2:00 Sunshine Factory
2:30 700 Club
3:00 Lifestyle Magazine
3:30 Real Videos
4:00 Touched By An Angel
5:00 Biography
Jesus (Pt 1)


6:30 On Main Street
7:00 Coral Ridge
7:30 Christopher Closeup
8:00 Sunday Today
9:00 Gargoyles
9:30 Arthur**
10:00 Sunshine Factory
10:30 Headline News
11:00 Major League Soccer:
Colorado at D.C.
United
1:00 Gymnastics:
International Team
Championships
3:00 PGA Golf: The
Master's Tournament
(Final Round)
See Prime Time table
12:30 America's Black Forum
1:00 Friday Night
2:00 Videolink
3:00 SCN Overnight Movie:
"Return Of The Native"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 News At Sunrise


6:30 On Main Street
7:00 Coral Ridge
7:30 Christopher Closeup
8:00 Sunday Today
9:00 Gargoyles
9:30 Arthur**
10:00 Walt Disney World
Happy Easter Parade
11:00 Major League Soccer:
Colorado at D.C.
United
1:00 Gymnastics:
International Team
Championships
3:00 PGA Golf: The
Master's Tournament
(Final Round)
See Prime Time table
12:30 America's Black Forum
1:00 Friday Night
2:00 Videolink
3:00 SCN Overnight Movie:
- "Return Of The Native"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 News At Sunrise


6:00 Motor Week
6:30 This Week In Motor
Sports
7:00 ABC Saturday Night
News
8:00 CBS Sunday Morning
9:30 Face The Nation .
10:00 Good Morning America
11:00 Headline News
11:30 NBA Showtime
12:00 NBA Basketball:
New York Knicks
at Miami Heat
2:30 NBA Basketball:
Houston Rockets
at Seattle Supersonics
5:00 CNN Sunday
5:30 Moneyweek
See Prime Time table
12:00 George Michael Sports
Machine
12:30 Headline News
1:00 ABC This Week
2:00 NHL Hockey:
(Teams TBA)
5:00 SportsCenter


6:00 Biography
Jesus (Pt 2)
7:00 Lois And Clark
8:00 Easter Parade
10:00 Sunshine Factory
10:30 700 Club
11:00 Lifestyle Magazine
11:30 Real Videos
12:00 Touched By An Angel
1:00 Biography
Jesus (Pt 1)
2:00 Biography
Jesus (Pt 2)
3:00 Lois And Clark
4:00 Easter Parade
See Prime Time table
12:00 Movie: "Dial 'M' For
Murder"
2:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Cosby Show
3:30 Step By Step
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
5:00 America's Castles


6:00 Today
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Busy World Of Richard
Scarry
10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
11:00 Oprah Winfrey Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:30 Guiding Light
2:00 General Hospital
3:00 What A Mess
3:30 The Mask
4:00 Captain Planet
4:30 Secret World Of Alex
Mack
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 Showbiz Today
See Prime Time table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies:
"Magnum Force"
3:00 "Bustin' Loose"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 News At Sunrise


6:00 Today
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Busy World Of Richard
Scarry
10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal
11:00 Oprah Winfrey Show
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:30 Guiding Light
2:00 General Hospital
3:00 What A Mess
3:30 The Mask
4:00 Captain Planet
4:30 Secret World Of Alex
Mack
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 Showbiz Today
See Prime Time table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies: "Magnum
Force"
3:00 "Bustin' Loose"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 News At Sunrise


6:00 Dateline
7:00 Early Edition
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Channel One/MBR
9:00 Good Morning America
11:00 Gymnastics: (T)
International de France
1:00 ISKA Karate (T)
2:00 Time And Again
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
4:30 Showbiz Today
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 Boxing: (T)
U.S. Amateur
Championships
3:30 Outside The Lines
4:00 CNN International
4:30 CNN/SI
5:00 SportsCenter


6:00 Savage Skies
7:00 ER
8:00 Movie: "Dial ""M""
For Murder"
10:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Cosby Show
11:30 Step By Step
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
1:00 America's Castles
2:00 Savage Skies
3:00 ER
4:00 Movie: "Dial 'M' For
Murder"
See Prime Time table
12:00 Movie: The Macomber
Affair
2:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Cosby Show
3:30 Step by Step
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
5:00 National Geographic


6:00 Today
8:00 SCN News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Fraggle Rock
10:30 Fitness Beach
11:00 Oprah Winfrey
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:30 Guiding Light
2:00 General Hospital
3:00 Sports Illustrated For
Kids
3:30 All Dogs Go To Heaven
4:00 Beakman's World
4:30 Saved By The Bell
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 Showbiz Today
See Prime Time table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies:
"The Adventures Of
Baron Munchausen"
3:00 "The Mask"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 News At Sunrise


6:00 Today
8:00 SCN News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Fraggle Rock
10:30 Fitness Beach
11:00 Oprah Winfrey
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:30 Guiding Light
2:00 General Hospital
3:00 Sports Illustrated For
Kids
3:30 All Dogs Go To Heaven
4:00 Beakman's World
4:30 Saved By The Bell
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 Showbiz Today
See Prime Time table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies:
"The Adventures Of
Baron Munchausen"
3:00 "The Mask"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 News At Sunrise


6:00 Dateline
7:00 20/20
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Channel One/MBR
9:00 Good Morning America
11:00 ISKA Karate (T)
12:00 NBA Inside Stuff
12:30 ESPN Aviation: (T)
Warbirds Of America
1:30 CNN Today
2:00 Time And Again
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
4:30 Showbiz Today
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 NHL Hockey: (T)
(Teams TBA)
5:00 SportsCenter


6:00 Nature
7:00 NYPD Blue
8:00 Movie: The Macomber
Affair
10:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Cosby Show
11:30 Step by Step
12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
1:00 National Geographic
2:00 Nature
3:00 NYPD Blue
4:00 Movie: The Macomber
Affair
See Prime Time table
12:00 Movie: Operation
Pacific
2:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Cosby Show
3:30 Step By Step
4:00 Star Trek: Voyager
5:00 Air Combat


6:00 Today
8:00 SCN News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Sesame Street Special
10:30 Bodyshaping
11:00 Oprah Winfrey
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:30 Guiding Light
2:00 General Hospital
3:00 Where...Is Carmen San
Diego
3:30 Happily Ever After
4:00 Taz-mania
4:30 Hidden Temple
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 Showbiz Today
See Prime Time table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies: "Topaz"
3:00 "Blazing Saddles"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 News At Sunrise


6:00 Today
8:00 SCN News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Sesame Street Special
10:30 Bodyshaping
11:00 Oprah Winfrey
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:30 Guiding Light
2:00 General Hospital
3:00 Where...Is Carmen San
Diego
3:30 Happily Ever After
4:00 Power Rangers ZEO
4:30 Hidden Temple
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 Showbiz Today
See Prime Time table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies: "Topaz"
3:00 "Blazing Saddles"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 News At Sunrise


6:00 Dateline
7:00 Early Edition
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Channel One/MBR
9:00 ABC Good Morning
America
11:00 ISKA Karate (T)
12:00 Snowboarding (T)
12:30 CNN Today
2:00 Time And Again
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
4:30 Showbiz Today
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 Major League Baseball:
(T) (Teams TBA)
5:00 SportsCenter


6:00 Submarines: Sharks Of
Steel
7:00 Law & Order
8:00 Movie: Operation
Pacific
10:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Cosby Show
11:30 Step By Step
12:00 Star Trek: Voyager
1:00 Air Combat
2:00 Submarines: Sharks Of
Steel
3:00 Law & Order
4:00 Movie: Operation
Pacific
See Prime Time table
12:00 Movie: American
Graffiti
2:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Cosby Show
3:30 Step By Step
4:00 Star Trek: Voyager
5:00 Invisible Places


6:00 Today
8:00 SCN News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Fraggle Rock
10:30 Fitness Beach
11:00 Oprah Winfrey
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:30 Guiding Light
2:00 General Hospital
3:00 Animaniacs
3:30 Taz-mania
4:00 "Eerie, Indiana"
4:30 Nick News
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 Showbiz Today
See Prime Time table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies:
"Finian's Rainbow"
3:00 "Stand By Me"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 News At Sunrise


6:00 Today
8:00 SCN News
8:30 Showbiz Today
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Fraggle Rock
10:30 Fitness Beach
11:00 Oprah Winfrey
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Wheel Of Fortune
1:00 Port Charles
1:30 Guiding Light
2:00 General Hospital
3:00 Animaniacs
3:30 Goof Troop
4:00 "Eerie, Indiana"
4:30 Nick News
5:00 Jeopardy!
5:30 Showbiz Today
See Prime Time table
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 SCN Overnight
Movies:;
"Finian's Rainbow"
3:00 "Stand By Me"
5:00 Headline News
5:30 News At Sunrise


6:00 Primetime Live
7:00 Early Edition
8:00 Headline News
8:30 Channel One/MBR
9:00 Good Morning America
11:00 NHL Hockey: (T)
(Teams TBA)
2:00 Time And Again
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Burden Of Proof
4:00 Inside Politics
4:30 Showbiz Today
5:00 Headline News
5:30 NBC Nightly News
See Prime Time table
12:00 Headline News
12:30 ESPNews
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Headline News
2:00 PGA Golf: (T) MCI
Classic (1st Round)
4:00 ISKA Karate (T)
5:00 SportsCenter


6:00 Biography
7:00 X-Files
8:00 Movie: American
Graffiti
10:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
10:30 Rugrats
11:00 Cosby Show
11:30 Step By Step
12:00 Star Trek: Voyager
1:00 Invisible Places
2:00 Biography
3:00 X-Files
4:00 Movie: American
Graffiti
See Prime Time table
12:00 Movie: First Monday In
October
2:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters
2:30 Rugrats
3:00 Cosby Show
3:30 Step By Step
4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
5:00 National Geographic


a













SSCN TV


Key: + Program time change due to live programming event; * Mature theme; " Series starts; *"Series ends; ** Program moved to new day and/or time, (AlP) Already in progress



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15 & 64 5 Headline CBS Evening ports Center Taesday Ngh Fights PBSNewhour Business
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16 & 65 MonstersR Shbow y Step by Step Star Trek: Voyager Invisible Places BioStraphy X-Fles

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16 & 65 AaaonshhRea Rugra Th Cowsby Step by Step Star Trek: Deep Space 9 Navisibonal Gegraphic Eplorer
SCN News Just Shoot SCN NCgLHtpShow


















10 :15 midnight - a.m. News and Information midnight -4 a.m. Adult Rock (60s and 70s Classic Rock)
E 1 -3Newsa.m. SCN Canal Country Pan 4-6a.m. Oama Common Nldes Radioerman
T 14 1 63 :15HeadleS:25 The Tonight Show wl Jay
















4 - 5 a.m. News and Sports Information 6-10a.m. Diamond FM Morning Show
Apr 5 . 7a.m. NPR Morning Edition, live via satellite 10- 11 a.m. Adult Rock (60s and 70s Classic Rock)
S7 -11a.m. Zippo in the Morning, Oldies Radio 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Diamond Cafe (NewsCAll request show)
a 11 a.m. noon Rush Limbaugh Show I - 3 p.m. Adult Rock (60's and 70's Classic Rock)
15 & 64noon- 1p.m. Dr. Laura, Paul Harvey 3 -6 p.m.ng PBS Afternoon arTunes
3p 6 - 8 p.m. AFN Jams (Urban Contemporary)
NewslRe1 - portp.m. News and Information










3 - 5 p.m. NPR All Things Considered live via satellite 8 p.m. - midnight Z - Rock (Alternative)
0 5 -11 p.m. SCN Canal Country live via satellite midnight - 2 a.m. Adult Rock (60's and 70's Classic Rock)
11 p.m. - midnight News and Information 2 - 7 a.m. Contemporary Hit Radio
4 7 - 11 a.m. Ric Dees' Top 40 Countdown

Midnight - 7 a.m. SCN Canal Country live via satellite 11 a.m. - noon Hot Jazz
5 - 7 a.m. NPR All Things Considered live via satellite noon - 4 p.m. Oldies Radio

O 9-10 a.m. NPR Car Talk W 4 - 6 p.m. Doug Banks Countdown (Top 20 Urban)
10a.m.- noon SCN Canal Country live via satellite 6 - 7 p.m. Diamond Traxx (Featured Artist)
S noon -10 p.m. News or Live sports 7 - Oldies9 p.m. Canal Country
W 10 p.m. - midnight American Country Countdown w/ Bob Kingsley 9 p.m. - midnight Rough Cuts
- midnight - 2 a.m. Adult Rock (60's and 70's Classic Rock)
Midnight - 2 a.m. American Country Countdown w/ Bob Kingsley > 2 - 11 a.m. Contemporary Hit Radio
noon2 - 7 a.m. SCN Canal Country live via satellite a.m. Aftnoon Jazz GemsrnoonCarTunes
7 7-9 a.m. NPR Weekend edition C noon -4p.m. American Country Countdown w/ Bob Kingsley
C 9-10 a.m. Religious Hr. I 4 -6 p.m. AFN Jams (Urban Contemporary)
S 10-11 a.m. Religious Hr. 2 6 - 7 p.m. Classical
II - midnight News and Live Sports 7 p.m. - midnight Oldies Radio


Tropic Times 7
April 9,1998 B









B 8 Tropic Times
8 April 9, 1998


Classified Ads


Cat, fem, adult, lovable,
friendly, gd w/kids free,
284-4183
Cocker spaniel pup, blk
& wht, all shots, kennel &
supplies $200,284-6222
Dalmatian pup, 8 wks,
dewormed $150, 284-
6536
Dalmatian pups, 2 mos
$150, 284-6536
Gerbils, gd mice $3.50/
ea., 272-2042
German shepherd, male,
avail for stud service,
279-0203
Husky mix pups, 3fem, 5
male, blue eyes $50,250-
0413
Pups, brn & blk $10/ea.,
232-4670 at 8 pm
Rottweiler avail for stud
service, AKC reg, exc
pedigree, 284-3094



American Avon, f/sz bro-
chures & samples free,
284-3028
Amway products, 261-
5456
Register/obtain birth cert
at Panama Civil Registry
223-2153/54 Darnell af-
ter 6 pm
Authorized certified Eng/
Span translation for docs
& more, 222-2602/03
Auto inspections and
registations, home deliv-
ery, 222-2602/03
Baby-sitter, anytime, Eng
spk, 288-7973
Baby-sitter, Eng spk, gd
w/kids, 221-4501 Sanidy
Baby-sitter, Eng spk,
wkends, exc w/kids, 288-
7024 before 4:30pm
Baby-sitter, even/
wkends, mature, grt w/
kids, 288-6743
Baby-sitter, Sat & Sun,
honest, 228-2140
Maribel after 6 pm
Baby-sitter, Span spk,
wkends nights, honest,
262-3923 after 5 pm
Body tense, stressed
out? Therapeutic mas-
sage $25, 288-7539
Cakes, all occasions,
some delivery, prof cake
decorator, 284-6608
Mary
Cakes, cinnamon rolls,
& cookies, 284-3431
Darlene
Cakes: V2 sheet $12.50,
f/sheet $20; 2 day's no-
tice, please 284-6875 Pat


Cakes; pooh bear,
barney, mickey, dinosaur
& more $15, 284-6608
Mary
Car-truck windshields or
leak repair, 195-9778
Complimentary make
overs, color analysis, skin
cond analysis 285-5895
Cindy
Computer upgrades,
diag/repair, memory,
drives, CD-ROM & more,
272-6369
Hair braiding , reas, any
style, 288-4771 Marcia
Hair styling, reas price,
cut, styles, wave & more,
260-4857
Hair styling, reas, cut
style, waves & more, 233-
1884 Stephanie
Dogs basic obedience
classes, start April, 232-
7156
Maid, biling, mature, reli-
able, honest, CPR cert,
p/time, ref, 285-4779
Maid, cleans, 284-5193
Dunya
Maid, gd worker, honest,
exc w/kids, Tues & Fri,
ref, 267-4858
Maid, honest, reliable,
hard worker, 2 days, 228-
4294 Martha
Maid, live-in, biling, 233-
3587
Maid, live-in, Eng spk, grt
w/kids, 233-1863
Maid, live-in, Span spk,
clean, iron, animals, & 2
kids, ref, 232-7156
Maid, live-in/out, biling,
Mon - Fri, honest, no
kids, 261-7387
Maid, live-out, biling, grt
w/kids, honest, reliable,
284-5377 after 4 pm
Maid, live-out, biling, reli-
able, honest, hard
worker, 229-5690
Maid, live-out, Eng spk,
days, grt w/kids, ref, 220-
0418
Maid, live-out, Eng spk,
grt w/kids, 6 - 10 pm, ref,
224-6571
Maid, live-out, Span spk,
clean, cook, 3 days, 288-
7194
Maid, live-out, Span spk,
Mon - Fri, honest, ma-
ture, 263-3203
Body sugaring-the natu-
ral method of hair re-
moval, 288-7831/6194
Amy
PADI scuba classes, can
meet any schedule, day
or even, 288-5045
Pampered chef-kitchen
store that comes to you,


free catalog & cooking
demos, 288-5879
Philippine food, individual
& group orders, delivery,
284-6178 Rene
Piano lessons for begin-
ning to intermediate stu-
dents, 284-6731 Alicia
Pickup truck to move misc
items, all posts, 264-7591
Professional dog training,
private, reas rates, we
come to you, 260-9079
Pwr window &dr lock re-
pair, home service, 195-
9778
Sheila family hair care,
free consult, 288-4625
Tired? overweight? no
gimmicks...just results,
284-6886
Tupperware parties & in-
dividual orders, 284-5531
Tutor, cert teacher, per-
k-12, all subjects, private
& group sessions, 288-
6799
Upholstery, curtains &
interior decoration, 264-
7591
US lic massage Thera-
pist, stress relief, back
problems, sports therapy,
272-2810
Windshield for Cherokee
$185, CJ Wrangler$150&
more, install inclu 195-
9778



17' Tracker deep V w 75
HP Mercury, trailer, &
more $7900, 288-7997
19' Glastron w/trailer,
272-2180
19' Glastron, 351 Ford,
16' fiberglass 140 HP
Volvo Penta, grt boats
$5000, 232-7027
21' open boat, bikini top,
225 Johnson & more, dty
pd $6100, 284-5691
21'Seabird, GPS, depth
sounder, 91 Johnson,
outrigger & more $8000,
232-4084
24' Cuddy cabin, 260 HP
$12,500, 272-2610 after
6 pm
5 seat cayuco w/rudder &
trailer, grt cond $975,
284-3328
95 Sea-Doo XP jet ski w/
trailer & extras $4500,
213-8272
97 ZXI1100 jet ski w/
trailer, 6 mos, 289-6431
Yamaha, new 25 HP out-
board $1700, 269-6728



74 Jaguar XJ6, refur-
bished, 232-7027


Duty-free merchandise
FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder, in
accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern Command
regulations, duty-free merchandise, whether new or used, cannot be
given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege holders. Violations
to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecution under both
military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes permissible to sell an
item, but only If Panamanian taxes are paid. Before such a sale, it is
strongly recommended that the seller contact the Contraband Control
Section for advice at 288-5814.
Access to installations is allowed for ID card holders & pass holders
only. All guests must be signed on by ID card holders. El acceso a las
instalaclones militares solamente Ie estd permitido a las personas con
tarjetas de identidad personal del Goblemo de los EEUU y el personal
con passes de acceso a las instalaciones. Todos los invitados deben ser
firmados a la entrada de las Instalaciones por una persona con tarjeta de
identidad personal de los EEUU.


76 Mercury Cougar, gd
for parts, you tow away
$1, 288-7082
77 Chevy Malibu, needs
some work $500/obo,
288-5930
77 Mercury sta/wgn $800/
obo, 261-5231
81 Buick LeSable, AT,
PS, PB, AC, am/fm cass,
dty pd $850, 224-9663
81 Cadillac, dsl, exccond,
232-7027
81 Toyota Corolla, 1.8
eng $1000, 284-3778
83 Pontiac 6000, runs, 4
cyl, 4 dr, new batt $1200/
obo, 272-6833
84 BMW 628 CSI, like
new, will trade for jeep or
pickup, 269-6728
84 Chevy Camaro Z-28,
wht, all pwr, 5 star rims,
bra $1500/obo, 288-5685
84 Mazda 929, runs gd,
needs some work, dty pd
$1200/obo, 261-3325
84 Toyota Camry, 4 dr, 5
spd, AC cass, grt cond
$2500, 288-5182
84 Toyota Corolla, 4 dr,
ST, AC, am/fm, gd cond
$3000, 288-5122
84 Volvo GLE sedan, gd
cond $2500/obo, 284-
3829 after 6 pm wkdays
85 Mustang conv, 6 cyl,
AT $3300/obo, 288-6789
85 Nissan Bluebird, 4 dr,
sedan, AC, PS, exc cond,
dty pd $3995/neg, 254-
0956
85 Pontiac Fiero GT, V6,
sunroof, CD player, 4 spd,
PW, exc cond, dty pd
$3500, 222-3451
86 Landcruiser sta/wgn,
AC, 4 spd, dsl, dty pd,
260-4696
87 Ford Escort wgn, AC,
am/fm cass, gd cond
$2500/obo, 284-3998
88 Beretta, runs gd,
needs AC work, dty pd
$2400/obo, 236-6303
88 Ford EscortSW, 5 spd,
AC, PB, PS, cruise, am/
fm cass, 1 owner, exc
cond $3300, 285-4393
88 Ford Escort, AC, AT,
tint, '98 inspection, 4 dr,
w/hback$2500/obo, 288-
6297
88 Hyundai Stellar, AT,
new tires, exc cond
$3200, 261-2863
89 Cadillac, LM, all pwr,
exc cond $11,000/obo,
213-8779
89 Chevy Celebrity, 4 cyl,
new eng & paint, AC, LM
$2950, 262-8950 Iv msg
89 Chevy Celebrity, AT,
AC, exccond $3495,284-
4286
89 Dodge Shadow, 4 dr,
PS, tilt, AC, AT, cruise,
280-6298
89 Mercury Sable, wht,
am/fm cass, dty pd
$6500/obo, 272-6841
90 Corsica $3000/obo,
272-6176
91 Toyota Tercel DX, 5
spd AC, new tires & rims,
tint $5500, 284-4898
92 Chevy Camaro $4200,
285-6571
92 Ford Taurus, leather
int, loaded, exc cond
$7200, 260-8264


92 Ford Tempo, tan, new
AC, AT, PS, am/fm, gd
cond $3500, 236-9653
92 Nissan Bluebird,
loaded, 260-8264
93 Dodge Shadow conv
$7000, 220-9521
93 Mazda 626, AT, LM,
exc cond $10,000, 272-
2475 Gladys Iv msg
93 Oldsmobile Cutlass
Supreme, new tires, AT,
PS, PB, exc cond, 223-
7661
94 BMW 325is, dual air
bags, f/extras, LM, exc
cond, 272-6275
94 Daewoo Racer ETI,
AC, '98 inspection, dty
pd $5500/obo, 230-1798
94 Daewoo Racer STI,
dty pd $6000, 235-9827
94 Ford Tempo, LM
$3900, 285-6571
94 Hyundai Elantra, brn,
AC, am/fm cass, LM
$8500, 284-6239
95 Ford Taurus, f/extras,
1 owner, exc cond, dty pd
$10,800, 230-0932
95 Ford Taurus, f/extras,
1 owner, exc cond, dty pd
$10,800, 230-0932
96 Mazda 323,5 spd, AC,
am/fm cass, LM, red, dty
pd $7500, 250-0311
Dodge Challenger, V8
eng, 4 spd, 260-5984



19" high resolution DEC
Sony color mon, exccond
$300, 276-6768
386, 540 MB w/printer,
sound, 14.4 modem &
more $550/obo, 284-
4635
486 66 DX color mon, 20
MB Ram, 14.4 modem &
more $1000, 288-7748
AT&T 486, 66 MHz, 14"
color mon, 420 MB &
more $1000, 235-9827
Cannon BJ-250 color
printer $125, 284-5593
Compaq 486 DX4, 100
MHz, 8 MB Ram, 4x CD-
ROM $400, 288-5384
Compaq 486, 66 MHz,
14.4 modem, 550 MB HD
& more $650, 288-5438
Misc printers, software,
parts & access, 284-4635
Packard Bell 75 MHz
Pentium, 32 MB Ram &
more $650/obo, 284-
5983



27" MagnavoxTV, Sharp
VCR, 272-2180
Alpine CD player w/de-
tach face, exc cond $200/
obo, 280-6244
Camcorder VHS w/Z24+
zoom $750,27"TV $225,
284-4635
Carvin 212 Bel Aircombo
amp $300, Tascam
424MKII 4 trk recorder
$250, 261-5231
Casiopedia handheld PC
A-11 $300, 260-4696
Direct TV Satellite dish
$475, 221-4501
Fax mach, Sharp UX-102
$75/obo, 263-2737
Kenwood stereo system
$185, 272-2314


Marantz dual tape deck,
high spd dub, cont play
$80/obo, mies tapes $2/
ea., 288-7519
Motorola alpha-numeric
beeper $45/obo, 284-
5616
Panasonic KX P1124 dot
matrix printer w/lg box
tractor feed paper $95,
272-6968
Pioneer SOB woofer for
auto $75, 284-5593
Pioneer stereo receiver
w/classic slide rule tuner,
over 300 w $100/obo,
288-7579
Sega Genesis w/10
games, 272-6833
Sega Saturn w/5 games
& extra control pad $100,
260-1392
Pioneer 6 CD changer,
Kenwood amp $100/ea.,
272-5054 Carlos
Smith Corona Deville 510
word processor $150,
288-5438
Sony 10 CD changer,
new, CD-505 RF w/re-
mote $250, 260-4094
Super Nintendo $50,
games $20/ea., Genesis
$50, 272-5054 Carlos
Super Nintendo w/4
games $100, 221-1181
Super Nintendo w/4
games, 2 controllers &
super game boy attach
$130, 284-3388
Symphonic VHS VCR w/
remote, grt cond $110/
obo, 236-7526
Yamaha synthesizer, like
new $380, 268-2633
Zenith VHS camcorder
PC w/batt charger, 2 batts
& case $300/obo, 260-
2427



17' Frostfree refrig $345,
7' office type refrig $100,
12,000 Panasonic AC
$225, 272-6210
2 single beds, desk w/
bkcase, 3 drawer chest,
2 drawer chest $600/obo,
288-6428
2-12x15 carpet $50/ea.,
9x12 carpets $40, 284-
6938
22' GE refrig, side by side
$400, 285-6571
22' refrig, exc cond $300,
285-6571
25' refrig $850, dryer,
AC's, tbl w/6 chairs, 272-
2180
3 pc LR set w/matching
lamp, hunter green $900,
288-5885
3 pc, computer desk w/
file & chair, exc cond
$275, 283-6375
4 pc German shrunk
$1500, 288-6639
All furniture & electrical
appliances, 272-6705
Baby crib $150, roll top
desk $225, double head-
board $40, 260-6160
Bkcase, oak veneer fin-
ish $125, 283-6375
Brass & glass, 4 pc DR
tbl & chairs $175, 284-
4138
Carpet 12' x 15' Igt grn
$85, 4 drawer oak desk
w/chair $150, 284-3491









Classified Ads


Tropic Times
April 9, 1998


Carpet71/2'x 101/2'blue
$50, gd cond 284-3491
Couch, Ivseat, recliner-set
$800, vertical blinds $45,
carpet $60, 284-4897
Curtains fortropical hous-
ing, 230-2384 after 5 pm
DR set, chrome & glass,
GE 14' refrig, needs re-
pair, 264-9676
DR set, Rosewood, like
new $1500, 285-6571
DR set, rosewood, seats
8 - 10, like new $3500,
228-3896
DR tbl w/6 chairs, 2
couches, 236-0978
DR tbl, rattan base, glass
top, 4 chairs $350, up-
right frzr, 13' $250, 223-
1216
Curtains, mini blinds,
rugs, kitchen wood block
tbl w/2 benches & 2
chairs, 272-2361
Household items at bar-
gain prizes, 236-0713
Lg DR set w/2 hutches,
seats 8, 272-1213
Lg stainless steel ice
mach $1200, floor buffer
$75. 272-6210
Mahogany & satin sofa &
chair, exc cond $400,
272-1136
Mahogany DR tbl, coffee
tbl, gas stove, washer,
261-3325
Oval tbl w/5 chairs $85,
reclinerw/stool $50,236-
0548
Panasonic micro $50,
288-6041
Portable dishwasher
Whirlpool washer needs
timer $25, 250-0413
Q/sz sleeper sofa, Ivseat
w/ottoman $600, 236-
1283
Wood baby changing tbl
$50, oak coffee tbl $200,
236-1283
Refrig, Ig, top/bottom
$300, 270-1289
Single bed complete,
wood head boards $75,
272-6838 after 3 pm
Sofa, Ivseat, off wht, loose
pillow, slip cover design,
exc cond $750,283-6375
Solid carved Mahogany
entertainment center w/
drawers & cab $1000,
284-6979
Tan carpet 6' x 10' $40,
284-4635
Twin bed, dresser, night
tbl w/glass $395, 272-
2314
Twin matt, box spring, K/
sz steel frame, curtains
w/rods, shelves, 272-
2180
Whirlpool AC, 5,900 BTU,
Kenmore washer, dryer,
hvy dty, exc cond, 288-
5327
Wht Jenny Lind crib, con-
vert to daybed $100/firm,
284-3798 9 am -7 pm
Wood f/sz bed frame $70/
obo, 236-7526
Woodgrain look metal
bkcase, 14 shelves $60,
272-6705



Graco baby stroller on the
road Pizza Hut & church
on Clayton, reward 236-
1283


1,2,3 high chair, stroller,
jump seat, car seat, car-
rier, 236-0976
12 string Yamaha guitar
w/hard case $350, 272-
1220 after 6 pm
13" clrTV, rugs, Nintendo
w/30 games & more
$250/obo, 284-6084
1983 Toyota Tercel new
parts & repair manual,
healthy cook books $10/
ea., 272-2042
3 tires 175/70R13 $15
ea./neg, Bissell Vac $20,
288-7785
4 suitcases, 2 med/2 Ig
$100, 263-9814
4 tires 185/60R 14, gd
cond $60, 288-5933
Beautiful formal lace
gown, new, wine $40,
226-8139
Bench & weights,
vacuum cleaners, GM
15" rims, fencing 272-
2180
Breast pump $15, mater-
nity belt $10, 284-4898
Century stroller $40,264-
9676
Complete Herbitrail set
for hamsters/gerbils$15,
226-8139 after 5 p.m.
CTC Physical Science
book $35, 288-7727
Executive resume on
Internet for life, guaran-
teed $24.95, 272-5377
For parts: 91 Ford Tau-
rus S.W., 85 Pontiac
Fiero, 86 Land Cruiser,
262-7983
Gerry baby monitor w/
night light $15,284-6526
Gerry baby backpack
$10, 284-6526
Hand tools, misc items,
236-1283
Jacuzzi Leisure Bay,
seats 4 - 5,8'x8'$2,795/
obo, 272-6845
Lawn chairs, shelf,
plants, 272-2361
Lawn, 12 HP, 38" cut, 7
spd w/utility trailer, needs
starter $450, 232-7113
Lg Sunbeam gas BBQ w/
tank $120, 284-3491
Little Tykes gym $150,
260-6160
LP Bongos, congas, tim-
bales, 288-7194 after 6
pm Greg
Men's Army dress blues,
worn once $100, 288-
4748
Moving sale; misc. furni-
ture, strollers, hi-chair &
more, 284-4484
Nordic Track, f/size mat-
tress, 288-5135
Patio tbls, plants, 261-
3325
Playstation games; Triple
play 97, Madden 97,
Nuclear strike $30 - $40,
272-6833
Roller blades $30, Little
Tykes Sand box $35 ,
284-4635
Seiko, wristwatch, wht
face, gold tone $95, 272-
6845
Sewing machine, cast
iron pots, couch & love
seat, kitchen tbl, 284-
6239


Sm animal carrier $15, lit-
ter box $5, waterbed
sheets $5 set, 284-4898
Stainless steel sink used
in darkrooms, 226-8139
after 5 pm
Warn 8000 Ib elect winch
$500, 270-1289
Weber gas grill w/bottle
$50, 284-3388
Wedding dress sz/7-8,
long train w/lots of sequins
& pearls $225/obo 262-
8950
Windshield for Cherokee
$185, Wrangler CJ $150,
install include, 195-9778



82 Kawasaki 750 LTD, ex
cond, LM, w/extras, dty
pd $1950/obo, 262-8950
Iv msg
91 Kawasaki GP2500,
LM, 2 helmets, 1 match-
ing $2200, 288-6626
91 Suzuki 450, runs grt,
LM, very clean, '98 in-
spection, $1100/neg,
229-7995
93 Yamaha 90cc, dty pd,
runs grt, $600, 288-7989
94 ZX900R, one owner,
D&D header, LM, very
clean w/extras, 289-6431
96 Yamaha XT 225, street
& trail, runs exc, LM
$2800/obo, 284-6592
97 DR 350 SE, LM, must
sell, dty pd $3600/obo,
284-6129
Harley Davidson
Sportster, 1000cc, iron
head w/extras, $3700,
226-8139 after 5 pm



Clayton 1060 A, 6 am -
Noon
Clayton 302 B, 8 am - 1
pm
Clayton 634 C, 7 - 10 am
Kobbe 441 A, 6:30- 10:30
am


Howard 10 A
Howard 108 A
Howard 593 B, 7 - 9 am



10 spd bike, ladies $50,
static bike $35 264-9676
Treadmill walking mach
$270, 272-2262
Complete reloading
equip, exc cond, many
items $150, 272-1213
SoloFlex mach $300,
283-4032
2 - 10 spd men's bikes,
racing style $30, $35,
288-7989
Super Alan 60 cm Italian
Road Race bike w/fork,
like new $695, 212-2914
Camouflage camel back
mule max, gear, 100 oz
reservoir $52/firm 288-
6674
Schwinn mountain bike,
15" frame, new $275,
284-6478
Complete scuba diving
gear, new, except tank
$750, 221-9532
Surfboard 6'4" x 18 1/4",
Rainbow" trac top & board
sock all for $180, 288-
5045
Exercise mach Pwr
Rider, new $195, 272-
6674 call 1-7 pm



76 Ford Bronco, exc
cond, dty pd $3200/obo
284-6129
77 Plymouth Voyager,
PS, PB, runs gd $600,
288-9226 before 5 pm
78 Jimmy GMC, 4 x 4,
AC, AT, exc cond $2500,
272-6026
84 Isuzu Trooper, 4x4,
AC, runs gd $2200, 239-
4320
85 Chevy S-10 Blazer,
AT, V6, AC, PS, PB, CD,
LM $2400/obo, 280-6170


86 Chevy S-10 Blazer, 4
x 4, 6 cyl, ATM, PL, PW,
AC $3700/obo, 284-6718
86 Isuzu Trooper, rebuilt
eng, new paint & tires
$4000, 250-0311
87 Dodge Dakota, 6 cyl,
4 x 4, AC, LM, new tires,
dty pd $5800, 272-5853
87 Jeep Wrangler, 5 spd,
soft top $7000,284-4484
88 Nissan Pathfinder, 4 x
4, AT, AC, exc cond
$8000, 270-1289
89 Chevy Sport van, , 8
cyl, seats 8 dty pd $2000/
obo, 272-5853
89 Jeep Cherokee Lim-
ited, 4 x 4, AC, AT, 6 cyl
$6000/obo, 250-0551
89S-15GMC,4x4,4.3L,
LM, exc cond $7500/neg,
284-6539
90 Dodge Dakota, new
AC, batt & radiator,
$9000, 221-4501
90 Isuzu, 4 cyl, AC,
camper w/hitch, TW, dty
pd $4900, 293-7741 Iv
msg
91 Chevy conversion van
w/many access, 272-
2180
91 Jeep Wrangler, needs
to be assembled $3800,
228-3896
92 Dodge Caravan, AC,
PS, PB, AT, 288-6570
93 Isuzu Rodeo, AC, PS
$11,200, 236-6987
94 Plymouth Grand Voy-
ager R/F Ac, exc cond
$10,500, 288-6321
94 Suzuki Vitara conv,
AC, custom wheels, exc
cond $8500, 230-1274
94 Toyota 4x4, ex cond,
LM, AC $10,500, 222-
0402
95 Ford Ranger XLT, AC,
CD changer, AT, LM
$10,000, 260-1392
95 Isuzu Rodeo V-6, AT,
will consider partial trade
288-5438
95 Jeep Wrangler, exc


cond, LM, wht w/spice soft
top/int, 288-5327after 4
pm
96 Ford ExplorerXLT, LM,
wht, 4 x 4, 5 D, tilt, AC, PS
$23,000, 223-2152
98 Honda CR-V, 4 x 4,
AT, new $18,300, 269-
3715
GMC van, 9 pass, 8 cyl,
PB, PS, AC, front & rear,
gd cond $5000,288-6133


229-7995
4 in 1 stroller, gd cond,
gender neutral, 236-7526
8 mm projector, gd oper-
ating cond 272-5344
Anyone interested in ob-
taining Heritage Health
products, 272-6968
Computer desk or work
station no more than
$100, 236-7073
DJ for party, also brief-
case, exc cond, 236-1283
Family for our maid, Span
spk $150/mo, 288-9288
Hobie cat, 16' or 18' w/
trailer, 288-7706 Lou
Maid, live-out for gen
housework, honest, reli-
able, 230-2384 after 5 pm
Q/sz box spring & matt,
gd cond 284-6270
4 Rims/tires for 1996
Nissan Sentra, gd cond,
216-2154
Sm refrig, toaster oven,
twin/sz matt, 233-3587
Joe Martinez
Someone to fix a Dirt Devil
vac, reas, 288-7785
Tutor for 12 yr old, 6th
grade math & Eng $7 hr,
285-6289
TV stand able to hold med
TV & mini system stereo
288-6799 Rachelle
Young person to play &
speak Eng to 3 yr old girl,
3-4 days, 3- 6 pm, 228-
6725


STropic Times Ad Form

Note: Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis to military members,
civilian DoD employees, and employees of other government agencies. Ads will be accepted only
for NON-COMMERCIAL services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immediate family member.
Suspected abuse of the ad services will results in non-publication of the ad(s) in questions. For
information 285-6612.
* Deadline for submitting ads is 9 a.m. Monday. If Monday is a holiday, the deadline is 1
p.m. the Friday before.
* Read instructions below, then completely fill out the ad form. Incomplete ads will not be
printed.


F-Animals
F- Available
F] Boats & Campers
Fl Cars
E Computers
[ Electronics
El Found
[ Household
Lost
- Miscellaneous
Motorcycles
l Patio Sale,
E Date: I
Sporting Goods
Trucks & Vans
El Wanted


PRICE HOME PHONE
* Check one category per ad form.
* Two ads per sponsor each week. Include a home and duty phone.
S15-word limit (the staff may edit to conserve space).
* Ads must be re-submitted each week.
* We will not take ads by phone or fax (Atlantic residents may fax ads).
* Ads offering weapons or commercial real estate will not be run.
* Ads offering tropical animals will not be run.
* Mail ads to: Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004 or deposit them in the
drop box at the Fort Clayton Post Office or Howard Public Affairs Office.
* Information below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication and
will not be released to third parties.


SPONSOR'S NAME


ORG.


RANK/GRADE - -


______________________DUTY PHONE____


B9










10 Tropic Times
BO April 9,1998


2Community


Passover celebrates miraculous redemption


by Capt. Matt Schweitzer
Tropic Times contributor
HOWARD AFB - The Jewish holi-
day of Passover is fast approaching and
with it brings the remembrance of some
of the most miraculous events in the his-
tory of the world. As told in the book of
Exodus, it is an amazing account of salva-
tion by the hand of God.
Unfortunately, many people today
have difficulty believing the story of the
10 plagues and the splitting of the sea,
and point out that we never see such
miracles in modern times. An objective
person would quickly counter such a
claim by saying that we do have miracles
today, you just have to open your eyes
and see them.
Although this is true, it is also true
that the kinds of miracles which happen
today are much more subtle than those
which occurred in Egypt 3,300 years ago.
So the question becomes why we don't
see blatant miracles today.
To answer, one must understand the
concept of free will. God created human
beings with the ability to choose, a qual-
ity which is unique from all the other
creatures who use instinct only. He
wants us to objectively look at the world


and realize that it is the product of a Di-
vine creator who controls everything.
If someone who doesn't believe this
happens to witness a miracle which is so
blatant that it could only be explained as
an act of God, that person would very
quickly become a believer.
But this is not what God wants to
happen, because the newfound belief
would be based solely on the miracle,
and as such it did not come about
through free will.
This concept is also one of the rea-
sons God allows some righteous people
to suffer and some wicked people to
prosper.
If a piece of candy fell from the sky
every time we did a good deed, and we
were zapped by lightning every time we
did something bad, then we would be-
come like trained mice whose actions are
based strictly on reward and punishment.
So if God does not want our belief in
Him to be based on blatant miracles,
then why did He cause such miracles to
occur in Egypt?
One reason is because the world at
that time was immersed in idolatry. The
concept of One God did not exist, except
among the descendants of Abraham. The


time had come for The Al-
mighty to publicly present .
Himself to the world, and
thereby begin the conversion
to monotheistic belief.
After the events in Exo-
dus, it became a Jewish
responsibility to spread mono-
theism to the nations.
Although some people do
not yet except God's One-
ness, monotheism has be- .
come a well known concept,
and therefore the need for
blatant miracles has dimin-
ished.
Now we must study the The tra
events of the past and try to that are
see the truth using our God in Egyp
given intellect and soul.
This is one reason Jews celebrate the
Holiday of Passover. So that the memory
of those ancient miracles will forever be
ingrained in our minds.
This year Passover begins at sun-
down Friday, and continues until sun-
down April 18. During this period there
are many festive meals and special
prayers, as well as certain days when
work is prohibited.


^Idi


-- I
(Courtesy)
ditional Seder meal contains foods
e symbolic of the Jewish experience
t.
It is also forbidden to eat any food
containing leaven, which is why matzos
are eaten throughout the Holiday, to re-
member the flat bread that did not have
time to rise when the Jews rushed to
leave the land of Egypt. All other grain
products are removed from the home.
For information or assistance with
Passover festivities, call Rabbi Aaron
Laine at 223-3383.


Air Force
West Bank Teen Club
2844775
Howard Youth Center
284-5615/4700 -
Child Development Center
284-3711/6135

Army
Clayton Youth Services
288-6451
School Age Services
288-6451
Clayton Teen Center
288-7464
Student Services Center
272-2834


Egg-celent
Eggs, eggs and more eggs of
all colors and designs. Go'
and get 'em kids.


I0 .I Co m niy refa


Holiday closures
The Community Bank, Clayton
and Diablo Vehicle Registration and
the Exonerations offices are closed
for the Easter holiday.

Passover festivities
The Jewish holiday of Passover
begins at sundown Friday and con-
tinues until sundown April 18. For
more information, contact Rabbi
Laine at 223-3383 or Capt. Matt
Schweitzer at 284-7773.

Omega Psi Phi meets
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity is meet-
ing 3 p.m. Saturday at the Fort
Clayton Valent Recreation Center.
For more information, call Maj.
Fisher at 260-7113 or Jesse Owens
at 288-9274.

Literature class
The Fort Clayton Education
Center is offering a GED Interpret-
ing Literature and the Arts work-
shop 9 a.m. - noon Monday -
Wednesday at the center. For more
information, call 288-9292.

Dog classes
The Club Canino de Panama is
offering basic dog obedience classes
7 - 8 p.m. Wednesday starting
Wednesday. For more information,
call Bridget Groome at 232-7156.

Scholarships
The Isthmian Chapter of the As-
sociation of the U.S. Army is
granting two scholarships for aca-
demic achievement to high school
seniors. Submit your applications
by Wednesday. For more informa-
tion, call Lina Norris at 285-9903.

Cocoli chapel event
The Horoko Assembly of God
"Cocoli Chapel" is having a special
Easter Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday followed by an Easter egg
hunt and a fellowship meal. For
more information, call 283-3220.

BSA employment
Submit your information for the
Boy Scouts of America office man-
ager and sales clerk position by
April 17. For more information,
call 285-4359.


Pinewood Derby race
Drop by for the annual Cub
Scout Pinewood Derby Race 2
p.m. April 18 at the Curundu El-
ementary School gymnasium. For
more information about the race,
call 288-6626.

Volunteer week
USARSO Volunteer Week will
be observed April 19 - 25 with a
kick-off ceremony 3 p.m. April 20
at Valent Recreation Center. For
more information, call the Installa-
tion Volunteer Center at 288-9303.

CTC update
Starting April 20, Pell Grant ap-
plications will be available at the
Central Texas College offices. Stu-
dents graduating must schedule an
appointment with the student ser-
vices specialist prior to the April
30 graduation registration deadline.
For more information, call 285-
4803/284-3150.

Texas A&M Muster
The Panama Texas A&M annual
Aggie Muster and Dinner takes
place 7 p.m. April 21 at the Club
de Golf Ejecutivo on Balboa Av-
enue. For more information, call
Lilibeth B. Lanoni at 272-5166.

Earth Day events
Celebrate Earth Day 7 - 9 a.m.
April 22 by cleaning up Veracruz
Beach, attending an open-base tour
10 - 2 p.m., a guided tour 10:30
a.m. - 1:30 p.m. of the Toucan Eco-
Trail or help plant trees at noon.

NAF sale
Howard Lodging is having a


NAF sale 8 a.m. - noon April 23 at
the Big Tree Bohio.

UO Office closed
The University of Oklahoma
Office located at the Howard Edu-
cation Center is closed Tuesdays
and Thursdays until April 23. For .
more information, call 285-6901.

Recognition day
An Army Community of Excel-
lence Recognition Day celebration
takes place 3 p.m. April 24 at Va-
lent Recreation Center.

Santa Clara Retreat
The Protestant Women of the
Chapel are hosting a Santa Clara
Retreat April 24 - 26 for all
women. For more information, call
Van Runals at 288-4772.

NAF sale/flea market
The 24th Services is hosting a
NAF sale and Flea Market April 25
on the Parade Field in front of
Building 714. For more informa-
tion, call 284-6107/7278.

Welfare requests
The Officers' and Civilians'
Spouses Club is accepting welfare
requests from community organi-
zations until April 30. Send your
requests to OCSC, Unit 1346,
APO AA 34004.

ACAP workshops
Attend a Job Search Workshop
9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tuesday or a Pre-
separation Briefing 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Thursday throughout April in
Building 128, Fort Clayton. For
more information, call 288-9277.


This year, all Panama-based military
personnel of the Jewish faith and their immedi-
ate families have the opportunity to attend the
Liberal Congregation Kol Shearith Israel service
and Seder 6:30 p.m. Friday in their social hall or
the Traditional Congregation Beth El prayer and
Seder 7:15 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Despite the
April 6 deadline, reservations can still be made. For
more information, call Rabbi Aaron Peller at 225-
4100/6412 or Beth El's Rabbi Aaron Laine at 223-3383.


Protestant Services 4
Saturday 5 p.m. Service
Sunday 9a.m. Service
12:30 p.m. Gospel Service


Jewish Events
Friday sundown Passover
Friday - Saturday Seder meals will be held in
local Synagogue

Catholic Services
Friday 3 p.m. Confessions
3:30 - 5 p.m. Stations of the Cross,
Good Friday Liturgy
Saturday 9 - 11:30 am. Easter Vigil Service
Sunday 10:30 a.m. Easter Sunday Mass

Fort Clayton's Easter Sunrise Service takes place 6
a.m. Sunday on the Youth Soccer Field next to the
Vehicle Registration Building. The service will be fol-
lowed by a continental breakfast at Mother's Bohio.
For more information, call 288-9312/9316.










S Community


Tropic Times
April 9,1998


Rhl


EJ,


Let the adventure begin
The Girl Scouts of America - Panama went
on a splashingly-fun trip to Fort Sherman.
Sabrina Dooley and Dorothy Jorgenson, top
left, were digging away at some beach fun.
The trip was exhausting but the girls proved
that they too can "be prepared" and better
- afterall, who needs sleeping bags when
you have a room with beds and who needs
radios when you have telephones. For infor-
mation about future trips or how you can
join the Girl Scouts of-America - Panama,
call 288-7817.


Military VIPs get 15 minutes of fame


MAXWELL AFB, Ala. (Defense Commissary
Agency) - Tony the Tiger has an even bigger reason
to shout "They're Gr-r-r-r-r-eat!"
The four 1997 "VIP" honorees from the National Mili-
tary Family Association (NMFA) will be sharing space
on his box of flakes during the early part of May. VIPs
are "Very Important Patriots" who perform significant
volunteer service in the military and civilian community.
For the first time, those outstanding people will be fea-
tured on a quarter of a million boxes of cereal in commis-
saries worldwide.
"They really are great," says NMFA VIP program
coordinator Tomi Busch. "We were fortunate to have a
diverse group of winners this year representing the
four services; women and men; active duty and
spouses; and enlisted and officers."
The featured VIPs are Tech. Sgt. Luke A. Humphrey,
Navy Commander Catherine Osman, Sgt. 1st Class
Tammie T. Holmes, and Marine spouse Peggy Milliman.


All four were chosen from among 219 nominations by
spouse clubs or family services support centers in 33
states and 11 countries. Six judges each picked their top
six candidates "blind" from a packet of nominations
they received. The four winners were chosen from 36 fi-
nalists.
The 1997 winners were all flown to Washington,
D.C., for sight-seeing and the annual NMFA luncheon
meeting in November where they received a plaque, a
$1,000 prize, and $1,000 for their nominating organiza-
tion. This year, according to Kellogg account executive
Lynn Curry, "we decided to go that extra mile - like the
volunteers do - and put the winners on special boxes of
Frosted Flakes." The four appear as a group on the
front of the package and are profiled individually on the
back, along with the NMFA.
The specially designed 25 ounce boxes will be avail-
able at commissaries for about two weeks in early May
or "while supplies last," according to Defense Commis-


Water conservation: Needed now more than ever
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The water situation is critical.
Your assistance to conserve water can help the community during this wa-
ter shortage crisis and reduce the chances for possible water rationing. Just
as we are conserving water to head off this possibility, the measures you
take can greatly assist our efforts. Here's your tip of the week.
* Always run full loads when running your washing machine or dishwasher.


sary Agency Promotions
Manager Joyce Chandler.
And according to Cereal
Category Manager Chuck
Prutch, "a quarter of a mil-
lion is not really that many
when you realize we have
298 commissaries. It's just
enough to be effective,
and not too many to create
logistics problems!"


(Courtesy)
Navy Commander Catherine Osman, Sgt. 1st
Class Tammie T. Holmes, Marine spouse
Peggy Milliman and Tech. Sgt. Luke A.
Humphrey will be sharing space with Tony in
the next few cereal boxes. The four were se-
lected 1997 "VIP" honorees for the National
Military Family Association


Need a ride? We know when and where to pick you up


New route available
Your shuttle bus service is now available
from the Howard Lodge, Building 708 to locations
on base and Horoko Golf Course daily. The ser-
vice is free to Howard Lodging guests. All other
patrons pay only $.25 one way.

Howard and Horoko


Lodging
Bus Stop #38 (Base Theater)
Bus Stop #35 (Commissary)
Bus Stop #845 (Farfan)
Bus Stop #1012(Gateway)
Rodman Gate
Horoko Golf Course
Lodging


9 a.m.**
9:02
9:04
9:08
9:10
9:13
9:15
9:30


** The shuttle bus runs from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
stopping at each location every half-hour.


Downtown hospitals via Clayton
Fort Clayton San Fernando Paitilla
Building 519 Hospital Hospital
7 a.m. 7:45+ a.m. 8+ a.m.
9 9:45+ 10:10+
11 11:45+ 12:10+ pm.
1 p.m. 1:45+p.m. 2:10+
3 3:45+ 4:10+
5 5:45+ 6:10+

Downtown hospitals via Howard


Howard
Theatre
7 a.m.
9
11
1 p.m.
3
5


San Fernando
Hospital
8:15+ a.m.
10:15+
12:15+
2:15+p.m.
4:15+
6:15+


Paitilla
Hospital
8:30+ a.m.
10:30+
12:30+ pm.
2:30+
4:30+
6:30+


For more information, call the Howard Lodg-
ing Office at 284-4914/6411 or the 24th Trans-
portation Squadron at 284-5058.


fit


111, t &









* Youth Scene


B 12 Tropic Times
B 12 April 9,1998


q A day at work
S Women's History Month in conjunction
with Career Day was a complete
challenge for little Kristen Dorby, a
second grader at Curundu Elementary
School. Kristen shadowed the school
nurse, Molly Idol. Since the beginning of
the school year, Kristen has been
volunteering her services in the school
clinic. She knows all the procedures
and requirements to take in a sick
student at the clinic. Kristen is seen here
reassuring Amanda Young, a student
who fell and hurt her wrist.


Griselda Stering (Tropic Tnies)


Award winners
Students Tasha Sanders
and Juan Carlos Aviles
from CES pose after receiv-
ing their Certificates of
Achievement from Barbara
Cairns, school principal
and Molly Idol, school
nurse, for the outstanding
article they wrote on
Praise.


*~ fr.~d


(Courtesy)


Happy birthday!


Snawn ivicuonougn, 4
April 7


April Malone, 2
April 10


Gionela Guillett, 3
April 8


Brandon Huynh, 1
April 11


Damaris Rodriguez, 6
April 8


Melissa Graham, 7
April 12


Robert Guillory, 4
April 10


Alexis Glaze, 4
April 13


AAFES Weekly

Challenge

Last Week's Winner: Philip French, 9


SEaster Egg
Hunt and

, Kid's

Karnival
Join the Easter Egg Hunt 8 a.m.
Saturday at the Howard Parade Field.
Kids, come join us and hunt for eggs and
have your photo taken with the Easter
Bunny. Immediately following the Easter
Hunt, show up for the Kid's Karnival in
the Howard Youth Center and Pavilion.
Fun for the whole family including
vendors, ballrooms, games for all ages,
Spritzes, fingerprinting and piture-taking,
Diaper Derby,
inform action/
display booths,
McOruff,
Sparky the Fire
Dog and lets of ,
other surprisesm.
I__________


Career Day
Dana Summerton and her teacher Amy
Lappe, left, Javier Hernandez, middle, and
Dakota Summerton, right, stand in front of
their classes after spending a day at work with
their parents on March 27. The students from-
',.,....Fort Clayton Elementary School went back to
their classroom to talk about what they
learned at work.



' j - , ,''




Full Text
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PAGE 1

Checks not in the mail Commissary Sports The U.S. Embassy announces that Civil The Corozal and Page 6-7: Trophy Service retirement check numbers CSF Howard AFB Comboats begin pad017 35 71 W to CSA 208 69 26 have been missaries will be ding from canceled by the U.S. Treasury. Replaceclosed Friday in obGamboa to Las ment checks are being reissued. The emservance of Good Friday. Cruces during bassy expects the checks will be rePlan to do your shopping accordthe third and final day of the 45th Annual printed and shipped as soon as possible. ingly. Ocean-to-Ocean Cayuco Race Sunday. r "PICnmes Vol. XI No. 14 Fort Clayiton, Howard Air Force Base and Rodman Naval Station Panama Canal Republic of Panama Thursday, April 9, 1998 Serving the Joint Comunuity By a nose Runners sprint across the parade field during the 100yard dash, part of the annual Sports Day activities at Howard Air Force Base April 3. After the day's 17 41 events had culminated, the 24th Medical Group stood alone at the top. For more on Sports Day, see Page 10. Staff Sgt John Dendy IV (US. Air Force) Bottom line: SOUTHCOM will comply with treaty 'Way Ahead Workshop'designed to inform entire community by Sgt. 1st Class Chris Calkins Update the community on support available durproposed Multinational Counterdrug Center comes to NCOIC, USARSO Public Affairs Office ing the drawdown, and fruition or not. FORT CLAYTON -The Valent Recreation Center *Identify the community's quality of life issues, "Dec. 31 is the only firm date we are dealing with. was the site April 2 for the second in a series of quarconcerns and solutions. The bottom line is this: SOUTHCOM will comply fully terly U.S. Army South Commanding General's "Way "We don't necessarily have all the answers, but I with the treaty," Saderup said. Ahead Workshops." can promise you that when we do get them (answers), Tour lengths and restrictions were then discussed During the three-hour meeting, attendees were we'll do whatever it takes to get the information out to by Sgt. Ist Class Lorenzo Daetz, noncommissioned ofbriefed on several key issues you," Runals said. ficer in charge, Deputy Chief of Staff, Personnel. important to the community. "Service members become accusNot to be forgotDaetz said only those soldiers being assigned to Among those were brieften, Runals said, is units that are either inactivating or relocating to CONUS, ings by subject matter experts tomed to change; it's a part of our life. the impact the drawwill bcgin unaccompanied tours June I, 1998. on topics such as treaty But the people most affected by the undown will have on "Other soldiers, on orders for units scheduled to implementation, tour lengths. the civilian workmove wx'ith the Army Service Component Command or the USARSO housing drawcertainty around us is the civilian 01c. ASCC -what USARSO will conie to be known as down plan, the future 0f the workforce and I want each and every 'Service members wx ill continue accompanied toLirs until Dec. 31, 1998," Department of Defense DebecsomC accustomed Daetz said. pendent School system, mledione of them to know we will do everyto change: it's a pat The USARSO Housing Drawdown Plan, explained cal and dental services availthing possible to help them in any and of our life. But the by Lt. Col. Patrick L. Stafficri direcor Enginceri ne & able now and in the futur every way we can." people mosi it lousin. triiered many uesionis and comlnents hrm and equality of life issues for sfeced Iy ts'he uuci t(he criiOwdc. Air Fice, Ann) and Navy Col. Stephen Runals ,l sAiFce, Anbrs and tNer USARSO chief of staff ainisi arOund uS Is Ivails xxerie in 'elation lo thL courses of action that service members and their the cixiliaii xxorkWill ulimuatey ioihhall the Forlt Cla iton 700 Housing families. force and I xwint r ond in the 6h( area into uiaccispaiied hmusiig Col. Steplheni Runals, IJSARSO( chiel'osiaf, opened cach and exers uri of lsem to kni o se will do ccir lor sile soldiers current lixig in Cocoli. the session by encouagimng everyone to maintain maxithing possible to help ihem iii r ansd cvers x" a e xx c OtiC such cuincerni xas voiccd hy Karla Younie mum flexibility as crawcowi approaches. caii' Russals said. Phillips, a 600 ea resideit and a Famil Support Iroup He also reiterated the okshop's three main oibjccFollow il Runals' opening reiIarl. lt. Col. Kcvin cinonidinato wi th Ihe 2521d Signal Couipany. iives: Sadclrup. deputy director. U.S. SoutlrnCI C'omsmsanxd C ePhillips asked Stalieri I: Iaitttlics could sIay it the 600 Update the coissmsunsity ois ilseater-\tide drawcoi r for Treat y ipliemenainold thc assemiibhlcd arca if tihe so dcesiel, cxci % il soldiers xxould planning and milestones, crowd the dlrawclowi xxill cosntisnuc. regardless if the See "WN as Ahead," Page 3

PAGE 2

2Tropic TimesPeople April 9, 1998 P o l (Courtesy) Very special audience The Mayor of Panama City, Mayin Correa, and her son, James Woolford C., Naval Station Panama Canal safety manager, are received by Pope John Paul II. Mayor Correa and her son were invited to the Vatican March 25. Sgt. 1st Class Chris Calkins (U.S. Army) Change of command Capt. Carol M. Tschida, outgoing commander of Headquarters, HeadquarV O U NE (ters Company, Theater Support Brigade, passes the company guidon to Col. Richard B. Thomas, TSB commander, during a change of command ceremony April 3 on Soldiers Field, behind Building 95, Fort Clayton. After FORT Wreceiving the guidon from Tschida, Thomas then passed it on to Capt. John W. Long, the company's new commander. FORT CLAYTON -Ethel Pineiro is the U.S. Army South Volunteer of the Week for her outstanding support to the community. She is the mayor of Green Valley, a child care monitor and a contact person for the 79th Army Band Family Support Group. She is also a dental assistant at the Howard Dental Clinic, a Cub Scout Den Leader assistant, a youth coach, and an instructor and record manager for Army Family Team Building. What Pileiro said she enjoys most sgt.1 cl.s Chris 'Cal n (U.S. Army) about volunteering is the training and Ethel Piieiro is this week's Volnew tasks that challenge her capacity unteer of the Week. A native of as a person and the opportunity to Nicaragua, she is married to Staff meet new enthusiastic volunteers. Sgt. Eduardo Pieiro. Her hobbies include softball, volleyball and coaching. ing and ready to assist when needed. She said her major accomplishPieiro said her most rewarding ment has been planning, organizing and experience is to know that along the carrying out Pride Day 1997 for way, her individualism has permitted Spe. All Leone (U.S. Army) more than 200 Green Valley resiher to work and help others in one Retirement cerem ony dents. way or another. From ordering supplies and reA native of Nicaragua, she is marCol. Stephen E. Runals, U.S. Army South chief of staff, presented Chief freshments, issuing duties and worktied to Staff Sgt. Eduardo Pineiro. Warrant Officer Clayton R. Parker Jr., deputy chief of staff for logistics ing side by side with soldiers and famThey have two children: Emmanuel, 8, food services officer, with a Legion of Merit during his retirement cerily members, she has remained smiland Isabel, 3. emony March 30 at the Simon Bolivar Conference Room in Building 95, Fort Clayton. Parker served 32 years in the military. This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Contents of the Tropic Times do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004. U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office .288-3143 Building 405, Field Printing Plant, Corozal One West Public Affairs Officer .Lt. Col. Joseph Curtin Phone: 285-6612/4666 or FAX 285-6613. Command Information .Gaby Capriles E-Mail: pbouchard@usarso-lanl.army.mil; USARSO LAN address: NCOIC .Sgt. 1st Class Christopher C. Calkins pbouchard@sopa @usarso Caribbean Correspondent .Marti Ostrander E ditor .S p c. A li L eone Commander in Chief .Gen. Charles E. Wilhelm 24th Wing Commander .Col. Gregory L. Trebon Director, U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs .Col. Vicente C. Ogilvie 24th Wing Public Affairs Office .284-5459 U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office .(305) 437-1200 Chief of Public Affairs .Capt. Michael Murk Chief, Tropic Times .Rosem ary Chong NCOIC .Tech. Sgt. Rick Burnham Editor .Sgt. Paul Bouchard Chief, Internal Information .Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV W riter/Editor ..Daniel Amores U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal W riter/Editor .Raymond E. Samuels Commanding Officer .Capt. Robert W .Bennett, Jr. W riter/Editor. Griselda Sterling U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal Public Affairs Office .283-4301 Sports Editor .Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett Public Affairs Specialist .Sally Param ore Office Automation Clerk .Tina Summerton Director, Joint Interagency Volunteer .Sherril Harrill Task Force South .Brig. G en. H oward G .DeW oif Student Intern .Amanda Merkel Joint Interagency Task Force South Public Affairs Office .284-7502 U.S. Army South Commanding General .Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr. Public Affairs Consultant .Pete Calsetta

PAGE 3

Tropic Times News Al3 'Our Job is to Care' 24th Medical Group explains current, future medical/dental care (HOWARD AIR FORCE BASE) -In a little more than leaving from Tocumen Airport after that time. Col. a year from now, the redeployment of forces from Capable inpatient care and excellent surgical services Terrance J. Howard Air Force Base will be in full swing. Active duty will be available in Panama City to replace the inpatient O'Neil, and many civilian members of Team Howard will be leavservice at the Howard facility, and the emergency room commander, ing. You may have heard about the gradual phase down will remain open until August. 24th Medical of support services, the closure of the flightline and an TRICARE will continue to fund the liaison officers at Group. orderly taking down of the facilities at Howard. the downtown facilities right through closure, so indiHow will this affect your health care? What kinds of viduals hospitalized downtown will continue to have health services will be available? What plans have been access to translation services and help in communicatmade to take care of you and your family members if you ing problems and resolving disputes. get sick during the last phases of the closedown? Which of the clinical facilities will be open? Will there be Will services continue to be paidfor by TRICARE the any changes in the way TRICARE reimburses for serway they are now through the end of our stay in vices obtained on the civilian economy close to closure? Panama? (Courtesy photo) How should people plan for their relocation to CONUS? Yes. The same rules about reimbursement will apply. To answer those questions and more, officials from Since there will be military primary care providers availOK. So the capabilities for primary care and referral the 24th Medical Group have provided the following inable right through the deployment of our families, the will be pretty much as they are now, right through formation: Referral for Civilian Medical Care form (DD Form 2161) June 1999. Does this mean it isn't necessary to plan will still need to be coordinated with the TRICARE Ofahead? What kinds of health services will be available as we fice for all but true emergencies downtown. Absolutely not! If there is one thing that every miliget ready to depart? Many of the administrative functions of the tary family knows, few things go "business as usual" Everything that is available now. The military medical TRICARE Service Center for Latin America and the around PCS time. It would be wise to try to relocate care program in Panama has a strong primary care clinic downrange personnel are being relocated to Region 3 them to the CONUS early, especially if you have family system, and the full services of the largest and best ciin Miami before we redeploy, so there should not be a members with special health needs. Seriously consider vilian health care organizations in Panama behind it. big gap or delay in services when the TRICARE Service not asking for a DEROS extension if you have family These are provided under arrangements called memoCenter in Panama is being closed. members with serious health problems or special educaranda of understanding. Because of the MOU's, we tional needs. Although we will be doing everything have been able to provide health care with relatively few How do family members learn about TRICARE serwithin our power to give every family the best care pospeople who will need to PCS back to CONUS. This vices in the region they are PCSing to? sible, right through the end, if someone in your family means we don't have a massive military presence to disAs soon as you have a good idea where you are behas needs that require a lot of medical care, getting that assemble and take back. ing PCS'd to, even before you have orders, call the care could mean a lot more trips into Panama City toward Because the 24th MG has relatively few people (391), TRICARE Office or visit the offices at either Fort the middle of 1999. we can remain here longer, continuing to arrange the Clayton or Howard to get information on how to reloInvestigate what the TRICARE capabilities are for care that we can't provide on base. cate. By 1999, all areas of the CONUS will have those special needs in the area you are PCSing to. ConAlso, the MOU's don't have fixed expiration dates, TRICARE contracts stood-up. sider having your family move to CONUS as early as like contracts would have. That means even if plans "Portability," the ability to wait until you arrive at possible if there are special medical needs, so they can change, we will still be able to deliver care beyond Dec. your new PCS base to disenroll at Howard and re-enroll be setting up a household and getting established with 31, 1999, if that becomes necessary. in your new region, is an important feature of the prothe TRICARE health care system while you are comgram. pleting the closing of your shop at Howard. When will the Clayton Clinic close? Between now and then, since there are still a few arSince air-evacuations will be going in and out There are no plans to close the Clayton Clinic facility eas that don't have their TRICARE contracts up and through Tocumen for the past few months, individuals until virtually all the family members have left. The running, call 284-6977 or 284-5514 for information. If you who have conditions requiring repeated air-evac to and number of people left on Fort Clayton will decrease draare in the CONUS, call 1-888-777-8343, Ext. 2. from CONUS referred facilities will be especially affected matically after May 1999, and we will be under pressure It is very important for you to have your TRICARE by the change. to move our operations to Howard so the Clayton cloPRIME Enrollment Card and the TRICARE Passport Everyone on chronic medication needs to assure sure program can proceed smoothly. with you at all times when you are traveling, TDY or they have at least a six-month supply of their medicaWe will stay as long as we can, but toward late June PCS. tions on hand beginning in April 1999. Pharmacy stocks 1999, when there are few folks left on Clayton, the outpaThe information contained in those two items can can be expected to be running low in the last few tient clinic services will shift to Howard. make it much easier to get information about health care, weeks of our presence in Panama, and that would not Because we have an MOU with a large civilian ambuand the care itself, when you need it, whether you are be the time to run out of a difficult-to-obtain important lance service, a call to 281-HELP will still get an ambutraveling stateside now, or going to PCS with your faimmedicine. lance anywhere on the East Bank right through closure. ily in 1999. The unit emblem of the 24th Medical Group reads We are already moving the Corozal Mental Health Clinic The 24th MG's TRICARE Office mailed 11,000 of "Our Job Is To Care." We intend to do that, right into Building 519, so there will be fewer different facilithese to all the enrolled members, including family memthrough the drawdown of the U.S. military community ties needing shutdown. bers, in December and has been issuing them to each in Panama and the closure of the installations. ThoughtThe inpatient service will be closed at Howard new enrollee since then. ful planning and preparation on the part of our active around May or June, also. If you don't think you got one, or can't find it, duty members and their families will help make unbroRemember, the flightline will be closed after March please contact the TRICARE Office at 284-6977 or 284ken continuation of high-quality care possible. We are 1999, and air evacuation flights will be arriving at and 5514. working with you to make this happen. 'Way Ahead Workshop' meant to inform community Continued from Page 1 families and single soldiers is not a good calendar are also in the works, according The Howard Club, for instance, is of the bridge, make an effort to see if that idea," Thomas said. "We understand no to Dr. Charles Renno, assistant superinslated to close Jan. 1, 1999, while several same program or class is being offered plan is going to make everyone happy, tendent, Department of Defense Schools. other services will remain open through somewhere ese," she said. but we will continue to make decisions "Schools will close May 20, 1999, the summer of 1999. Command Sgt. Maj. Arthur J. we feel are for the good of the commuwhich means the early leave date for next At Rodman NS, virtually all MWR Laughlin, Theater Support Brigade comnity," he added. year's students is April 30," Renno said. programs will cease to exist after Feb. 28, mand sergeant major, one of several leadCurrent and future medical and dental He also said the first semester will 1999. ers at the workshop, said quality of life care was next explained by Col. Terrance conclude Dec. 21, 1998 -with an early Odette Ortiz, assistant director, Comissues are vitally important to all comJ. O'Neill, commander, 24th Medical leave date set for Dec. 1. munity Activities, said all the majority of mands here. Group. The school year will begin, Renno Army MWR programs that are ad"We can't fix problems if we don't O'Neill said because there are apptoxisaid, sometime in the Aug. 17 -20 time equately used will continue to operate know they exist. We are asking for evmately 2,800 more active duty service and frame. through June 30, 1999. eryone in this great community to tell us family members than was projected for "What we ask everyone to do is plan She also said consolidation of some what services, programs and issues are this point in time, the 24th Medical ahead and notify the school at least 30 programs will allow for continued operaimportant to them. We are in a time of Group has added four primary care phydays prior to the date you intend to tion with a smaller staff. great transition, and we need everyone's sicians, two pediatricians, one OB-GYN leave," he said. "What people need to remember is help -on both sides of the bridge -to physician, one Air Force orthopedic sur24th Wing services and Army and that the Air Force services and Army/ make sure things go as smoothly as posgeon (July, 1998) and has the authority Navy Morale, Welfare & Recreation proNavy MWR programs are theater-wide .sible for the entire community," he said. to hire six civilian dental technicians (for grams were next on the agenda. and they have a quality of life effect on (Editor's note: Lookfor a "Quality of more on the future of medicaL/dental care Basically, the three services preall of us," said Pamela Robinson, workLife page in next week's Tropic Times. in Panama, see story above.) sented a timeline for operational closure shop coordinator. A survey will be included to help idenChanges in the 1998-99 school year of their respective facilities. "If something is closing on one side tify key issues and concerns.)

PAGE 4

4 Tropic TimsN w April 9,T1ms News 7W, IT"Range success Active duty Air Force members deployed from CONUS clear the Balboa West Bombing Range of scrap and target material. According to Maj. Reynold N. Hoover, commander, Task Force 111 (EOD), the continuing unexploded ordnance (UXO) -clearing efforts on the ranges has seen the U.S. government spend 6,000 man hours, remove 85,000 pounds of scrap and target material and'dispose of 365 pieces of ordnance on the ranges deemed too hazardous to move. A total of 90 acres have been officially cleared. Daniel Amores (Tropic Times) Reminders for firearm owners FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The firearm permit is issued to carry Under Panamanian law, the Judicial the weapon concealed. The right to carry Technical Police issues firearm permits a weapon does not entail the bearer to for off-post. Interested parties must subcarry it inside governmental offices, commit the following documentation: mercial establishments, consulates nor A completed form requesting the private homes (unless specifically authoby Tech. Sgt. Rick Burnham not cry in movie theaters. Not for permit from the PTJ director. Forms are rized to do so by the home owner). 24th Wing Public Affairs Office "Kramer vs. Kramer," not for "The available at the Law Enforcement ActivOwning a weapon off-post is different HOWARD AFB -Officials from Brian Piccolo Story," not for ity, Military Police Investigations Secfrom owning one on-post. U.S. Army Paramount Studios called this week to "Schindler's List," and certainly not tion, Building 131, Fort Clayton. South Regulation 190-28 states that any notify me that I am one of only four for "Titanic." + Photocopy of bilingual identificaperson who stores, transports or uses a people on the planet who have not I did cry during "Home Alone," but tion card firearm on a USARSO installation must seen their movie "Titanic." only because I was laughing so hard Three identification card-sized picregister the firearm within three duty Notables on the list include a 93when McCauley Caulkin set Joe tures days after acquiring the firearm or after year-old salmon fisherman from AnPesci's hair on fire with a blow torch. Proof of ownership (purchase rearriving in country. chorage, Alaska, and a Buddhist Monk My wife, on the other hand, will alceipt, bill of sale or a certification that the Military personnel residing in the barwho lives in a cave in central most certainly cry. She has cried for weapon has been donated or transracks or transient quarters must store Mongolia. The other is my wife. virtually every movie she's ever seen, ferred.) their firearms in their unit's arms room. On Monday, the list will dwindle to from "Steel Magnolias" to "Forrest + Receipt of payment of registration Personnel who reside in family housing three. Gump." fees. This permit is valid for three years may store their firearms at their quarters. After much tormenting and pesterFor me to see "Titanic" more than and cost $33, at a rate of $11 annually. Privates through staff sergeants must ing and pleading and nagging, my wife once, it will have to be good. And This payment must be made at the Banco first obtain their commander's approval. has finally convinced me to go see the when I say good, I mean "Raising AriNacional de Panama. Location for the PaCivilian employees in the grades of NMmovie. I've promised her that the next zona" good, or "Animal House" good, cific community is at Balboa, and for the 1 through NM-6 must obtain approval time Titanic comes to the Howard theor "Happy Gilmore" good. Just beAtlantic community it is either the New from a lieutenant colonel or GS-13 superater, we'll go. cause the movie won 23 Oscars Cristobal Area (across from the post ofvisor. All others may register their fireStaying away hasn't been easy. For doesn't necessarily mean it's a good fice) or at 9th and Bolivar Streets in Coarms without command approval. Storage months and months, friends, coworkers flick. Ion. of firearms in an automobile, office or and neighbors have showered me with For example, look at "Caddyshack." If the weapon is being registered with another person in their quarters is superlatives about the movie. Arguably the best movie of all time, for the first time, it must be physically specifically prohibited. Among them: "You'll laugh." and it never won a single Oscar, a taken to the PTJ with three bullets for a When transportig a weapon on-post "You'll cry." "You'll keep going back clear injustice if ever there was one. (I ballistic check (the PTJ will keep the in a vehicle, the firearm must be stored in to see it until you're homeless." laughed so hard I cried when Bill weapon for approximately two weeks). the, trunk compartment, when so "Leonardo DeCaprio should have been Murray ate the chocolate bar in the The PTJ will run a local police check equipped or out of immediate reach of nominated for an Oscar." "Great Spebottom of the pool.) on every individual requesting a firearm the driver and all passengers in the storcial Effects." "Man that theater is Which brings me to Leonardo permit. age area of cars without trunks. The cold." DeCaprio. I can't figure out what's all A letter, issued by the requestor's weapon may also be transported in a I probably will laugh during the the fuss about this kid, who looks like commander, stating that the soldier or cilocked gun casconmovie .I laugh at all movies. Being my 12-year-old nephew. vilian is assigned to his/her unit.Each During on-post transportation, all fireable to see the humor in every situation I say Adam Sandier from "Happy firearm permit can list up to nine weaparms must be unloaded and the ammuniis a gift, I guess. Gilmore" would have been much better ons. tion kept separate from the firearm. Like the time in "The Ghost and the in "Titanic" than DeCaprio. The authorized calibers for privately Registered gun owners on-post may Darkness" when the lion dragged It will be interesting indeed to see if owned weapons are: not transport a weapon off-post unless Michael Douglas out of his tent and he goes down with the ship into the icy Pistols: Cal. .22, .25, 7.62, 7.65, .380, they have a current permit for the swallowed him whole. Atlantic. .40, .45,9 and 10 mil; weapon issued by the Republic of Or when Gweneth Paltrow got her Which brings me to the cold the* Revolvers: Cal. 22, 32, 38, 45, MagPanama. noggin chopped off by Kevin Spacey ater. num 357, .41 and .44; For information about on-post regisin "Seven." Classic stuff. But that's another story all-to* Shotguns (hunting): of one and tration call the Firearm Registration Office I will not cry, though. Real men do gether. See you at the movies. two barrels or air-type pellet guns; at 288-4545 and for off-post registration Hunting rifles; and call the Military Police Investigations Carbine: Cal .22 extra long Section at 288-7275.

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~j~oicesTropic Times5 Voices 9,19985 Kensinger: A time of historic transition JTF-Panama commander asks for patience, continued effort during these 'uncertain times' Commander's Corner "Take steps to protect your inby Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr.te st anfmiy bu do t Commander, Joint Task Force -Panama but don't FORT CLAYTON -As I approach the anniverjump over the rail until you know for sary of assuming command of both U.S. Army South sure where the ship s heading and (USARSO) and the JTF-Panama, I am reminded daily of what an honor and privilege I have been afforded to where you ultimately want to land. command such a tremendous organization of dediTo make those decisions, I reiterate: cated, top-notch professionals. I never forget that I am part of a great team, and you will get the information just as without the consistent and constant efforts of all soon as I receive it." individuals, we cannot succeed. That's why it's such Maj. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr. a fantastic achievement that for the third year in a row, commander, JTF -Panama USARSO has been named a winner of the Army Community of Excellence Award. This is a tremendous accomplishment, especially in such turbulent times as we are experiencing and an will or won't happen isn't productive. make mission success happen. That means all of you. honor in which each and every USARSO member can Second, the pending USARSO move to Fort It's easy during a turbulent time to become take full credit. Buchanan, Puerto Rico. You may have heard that the confused and frustrated. I personally share your I've known all along that we are a first class, caring Senate has written to the Secretary of Defense and concerns and frustrations. organization -and now the entire Army knows it, asked DoD to freeze spending on this move. That's Not knowing with certainty what will occur to your too. correct. position and your organization only heightens these I am aware of the uncertainty and, in some cases, You may also have heard that the move is not feelings. doubts and fears shared by many members of the JTFgoing to be ultimately approved, that USARSO will Yet, we have work to do and it's with great pride I Panama team, especially in trying to foresee what will either go to another location or be disestablished can report we have not slacked an inch. occur in Panama and beyond. altogether. I can positively report to you that none of I can't predict the future any better than any of I wish I could just answer all of those questions, those rumors are true. you. But I can offer my advice. once and for all. But, I am still unable to do this. DoD is again studying whether the proposed move To those who may have plans based on a continNevertheless, I can and will provide the information to Puerto Rico is economically efficient and makes ued military presence in Panama after 1999, 1 counsel I do have. You have my absolute, unequivocal sense, but there has been no decision to change our you not to rely solely on such expectations. assurance that as more information becomes available, course. Further, the Commander in Chief, U.S. SouthTo those who wonder whether they should plan I will use every means at our disposal to ensure that em Command, as well as the Army leadership, are still now to find other employment, I advise you not to this information gets out to you, as rapidly and strongly committed not only to ensuring the continrush to judgment on the fate of USARSO. accurately as possible. ued vitality of USARSO as a major Army command Take steps to protect your interests and your Let me tell you what I know. First, the status of the headquarters, but also its move to Fort Buchanan. family, but don't jump over the rail until you know for Multinational Counterdrug Center, or MCC. I am Until we receive clear direction otherwise, our sure where the ship is heading and where you certain that you have heard reports that either the mandate is to stay on course. And that's exactly what ultimately want to land. MCC is a certainty, a "done deal" or other reports that we will do. To make those decisions, I reiterate: you will get the MCC won't be established in Panama. Finally, let me acknowledge the obvious: we are the information just as soon as I receive it. Neither of these reports is accurate. The MCC is living through a time of historic transition. We are Let me conclude by again thanking each one of still being negotiated between the United States and fulfilling our sworn words through the 1977 Panama you personally for doing such a remarkable job for Panama. Canal Treaty. your command and the United States. There are issues to be resolved and it is possible Through our efforts, the United States will sucYou have shown tremendous dedication to duty, that they can be resolved in time to create the center cessfully accomplish its mission to revert the Panama selfless devotion to mission accomplishment and before noon, Dec. 31, 1999. And it's also just as Canal to Panamanian control. We cannot lose sight of uncompromising professionalism. possible they won't. our ultimate objective or fail to realize it. By earning the ACOE award, all of your co-workers You, like me, must await the outcome of these As commander, I have a dual responsibility: ensure know it. The Army knows it. DoD knows it. negotiations. In the meantime, speculation about what mission success, and take care of the people who Of course, I've known it from day one. Fort Sherman soldier unhappy with some shoppette prices prices. Thank you very much. I hope charge the normal AAFES price. the commissary, talk to the shoppette to see or hear from you in the Future. It is important to understand that manager A concerned troop AAFES is a non-appropriated fund The staff at the Fort Sherman Dear Editor, operation and the comnmissary works Shoppette are there to serve you. If I want to complain about the prices Dear troop, with appropriated funding. This they receive your input, they can at the Fort Sherman shoppette. I am a Thank you for allowing me to means that spoilage affects their better serve you. Please communicate soldier assigned with the 245th answer your concerns about the bottomn line. with them. Support Battalion. I am stationed at prices at the Fort Sherman Because of this, items that spoil Questions or concerns on Fort Fort Sherman every other month. Shoppette. I spoke with Mr. Knox, the often run in short suppl. If a comiisSherman can be referred to Knox at The prices at the shoppette at Fort community officer for Fort Shernian. sary item runs out the manager works 289-6947. Thanks again for your Sherman are twice as high as the He explained in detail honw lie has hard at restocking the itenm as quick concern. prices at Fort Clayton or Corozal. worked at improving the quality as it is available. Sgt. 1st Class Michael Kewley Why is that? of services available to the Knox also stated that a Community NCOIC (288-5913) I think someone should look at the soldiers on Fort Sherman. local vendor sells bread on prices and make sure they aren't The Army and Air Force Fort Sherman daily. hurting us over here. For example, the Exchange Service, working in As for the cost of Kudos Corner price for a can of tuna fish on Corozal conjunction with the Defense the tuna fish, you is 55 cents -on Fort Sherman it is Commissary Agency have were correct in the Dear Editor, about one dollar. developed a list of not $ fact that the price Many thanks -mucho kudos -to Please help us at Fort Sherman. At more than 100 line was too high. everyone who made the "Teen's in the times, the shoppette is out of milk, items, available from As a line iten Real World" conference held at Santa bread and meat. the commissary, for front the commnissary Clara last weekend possible. Either lower the prices or help do sale at the Fort and with the We were able to hear a minute-bysomething for the soldiers on Fort Sherman shoppette. additional cost added, a can of tuna minute of the entire weekend and from Sherman. AAFES charges five percent over should be priced at 70 cents. the reports we received, the entire Just because we are over here does the cost of the particular item froni It was miisnarked 80 cents. After weekend was a big hit with all the kids not mean we should have to pay the conimissary. This cost is calcuthis was brought to the manager's lucky enough to go. outrageous prices -I think that's lated after the additionalfive percent attention, the problem has been fixed. Thanks again. It's not everywhere wrong. is charged from the commissary. If you have a question about we have teen centers on both sides of We have to bring bags of food If an item is at zero balamnce at the prices, want to see what items are the bridge where young men and here to support ourselves. connissary, AAFES will draw the available from the commissary or you women really are the total focus. We cannot afford to pay the high iteni from the AAFES stock and want an item added to the list from Thankful Mom and Dad

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6 Tropic Times Feat April 1998 Composed of Tom Herring, Bobby Huerbsch, Ruben Prieto and Mike Commeau, Due Process was the overall winner of the 45th Annual Ocean-to-Ocean Cayuc attracted all kinds of teams, including Snafu, which was a two-time winner in 1967-68. All four team members came back to Panama this year to compete once Cayuco Race winner comes in 'Due All 49 teams considered winners during 45th paddling of Ocean-toby Marti Ostrander Due Process won the fifth one. Impact took the first place trophy, with a from the Atlantic to the Pacific, through USARSO Public Affairs Office Overall? crew of Thomas Page, Cambry Sanchez, a Canal, with the teamwork needed?" he DIABLO HEIGHTS -As the gun The Due Process took first place, with Carlos Morales and Alejandro Gutierrez, said. went off, 49 cayucos raced to a desired a crew of Tom Herring, Bobby Huerbsch, followed by the Spontaneous CombusAnd every cayuco crew, it seems, has victory -32 cayucos paddled 50 miles Ruben Prieto and Mike Commeau, while tion, Final Most and Delfin in fourth a story to tell. Some are even true, most for a trophy and another 17 for a patch the Defiance took second, Misconcepplace. are funny, a few are sad, and some of on a three-day, ocean-to-ocean race that tion third, High Anxiety fourth and Rio them can be called unique. ended here Sunday. Senales fifth. A great event That is the case of the Snafu crew, It's the 45th version of the Atlantic to But the race is not only for guys. But the race is only the tip of the now a patch boat, who are paddling Pacific Ocean race. Three of the top 10 boats are filled event's iceberg. Three months of hard together 32 years later. On Friday's first day of competition, with females, with the Almost running training is what gets everybody in shape Yes, they paddled in 1966, won the Brig. Gen. Robert Wagner, commanding right along with the men. to paddle the 50-mile stretch, race in the Bejuco, and now are back general, Special Operations Command Overall, the Almost came in sixth, and "This is the greatest event we have together. South, -he was also a paddler -pulled first in the female category. because of all the work everybody puts in The four crewmembers all flew from the trigger for a clean, clear start, and the The crewmembers are Annemnarie getting ready, the hard work and preparadifferent parts of the United States for beginning of a close race, where three Fisher, Jackie Barnash, Megan Higgins tion it takes. the "reunion." boats where side by side most of the time and Natalie Martinez. And it's one of the hardest things the They practiced only for a week, but as for the first place spot. The Deception, the Predator, Jungle kids do at this point in their life," Wagner one of the crewmembers said, "paddling Defiance won the first day; Due Crews and the Short Cut followed them, said, is like riding a bike; you just never Process the second and the Misconcepin the female category. "It's a pretty meaningful accomplishforget." tion won the third and fourth legs while In the coed category, the Sudden ment. too. Where else can you paddle How do they feel to be here? "Excited. This is really -. -.-~ ,.,. .-s -.thrilling." said the captain, SFred Garcia. And the other -ones seem to agree. ~ For Theodore Henter, the race is just another adventure. Paddling in the -Slave Galley, nobody -could tell he is visually impaired. 9 And no one can say thatnthe race is not a family e gory, the High Anxiety, winner distinguishes itself for having among its crew ari Osirander (U.S. Armny) Wagner, daughter Annie, son Van, and the general's The winning team in the female division was the Almost. They finished the ocean-to-ocean paddle in 6:08:39. They also finished in aide, 1st Lt. Sam Fiol. fifth place overall. coe in"u

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Tropic Times P7 April 9, 1998 f 4T High Anxiety, paddled by (right to left) Brig. Gen. Robert W. Wagner, commanding general, Spe-'cial Operations Command South, his daugh/: ow ter, Annie, his son, Van ri and his aide, 1 st Lt. Sam Fiol, took first place in the Patch Category with a time of 5:45:52. They finished fourth overall. h L Soliver Munoz MarS aander U-SAnny) Race held Friday -Sunday The trip gain. cean Race The same thing goes on in El Tuco, where the Wheelers and the Thomnas's family paddle, and the Red-Ed, where P-J. Wagner Marti Ostrander (U.S. Army) Dennis, Leonard and William Huff Lou Husted gets the Patch Category started Defiance was looking pretty relaxed prior to the start of the first leg paddle along with Robert Boyer. In the trophy category, the Pinzon with a bang Friday afternoon Friday. They finished first that day, second overall. brothers, along with a cousin, paddle in Rio Senales, one of the top male boats, while Albert and Stephanie Bodden paddle in the Been There. Behind the scenes there is also a story. As an explores scout event, all the escort boats, executive committee, coordinators and helpers do it voluntarily, on their own time, with absolutely no profit to them. And it takes a lot of work to pull a race of this magnitude together. This year the race coordinator was Hugh Thomas; the race master was Marcos Ostrander, the assistant race master was Billy McGann, the Post 21 adviser was Rick Williams and the Gamboa Post 10 adviser was Jay Gibson. WIA() Without them, and all those who helped them pull the race together, as well as the Panama Canal Commission, Armed Forces and the help of the entire community there would have been no race. In all, teamwork is the key word for those who paddle in the race. And in the end, every single paddler is a winner, because very few people can handle the stress and physical resistance it takes to paddle .from ocean to ocean. (Editor's note: Time and space did not allow the Tropic Times to print the times of all paddlers or the much-deserved acknowledgments of those who made this v-am Ostrander(U.S Army) event possible. See next week's edition, Members of Jungle Crews carry their boat to the water Friday afternoon. The team, made up of four female Balboa due out April J7or more Cayuco Roce High School students, finished third in their category.

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Tropic Times Briefly April 9 1998 Annual leave donations needed All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or priority mission Annu l lavedonaion nededrequirements. Check with the Passenger Service Section for updated information on flights by calling 284Annual leave donations are currently being accepted 4306/3608. from civilian employees for Heidi Schroeder, deputy chief _______ of staff, Reserve Affairs, National Guard, who's baby Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Kyle, is successfully recovering from open-heart surgery 5:40 a.m. 7:10 a.m. 6:50 a.m. 5:40 a.m. 4:25 a.m. 9:05 a.m. 5:40 a.m. at Fort Sam Houston. Schroeder has nearly exhausted C-130 C-141 B-727 C-130 C-130 C-5A C-130 her leave donations and is in desperate need of more Louisville, Ky. Charleston Atlanta IAP, San Salvador, Malquetia, Soto Cano Managua, since her and her husband Sgt. Paul Schroeder, of the law AFB, S.C.; Ga. (C); El Salvador Venezuela (V) AB, Honduras Nicaragua enforcement activity, are having to remain at Fort Sam Memphis, Charleston (V, CC); Soto 6:40 a.m. (CC); (CC); Soto Houston longer than expected to ensure baby Kyle's full Tenn. IAP, S.C. Cano AB, C-141 Chaleson Cano AB, Honduras (CC) (CC);ABS. recovery before returning to Panama. The Schroeders' Kelly AFB, Dover AFB, Honduras wish to thank everyone for their thoughts and prayers and 8 a.m. TX(M); Del. those who have already donated their leave. If interested C-141 Jackson, MS in donating annual leave, go to Civilian Personnel, Room Charleston 8:45 a.m. 201, Building 560, Corozal, to pick up an application, or AFB, S.C.; B-727 call Ms. Sykes at 285-4246. Jackson, Miss. Atlanta IAP, 11:40 a.m. Ga. (C); B-727 Charleston Navy League event Soto Cano AB, IAP, S.C. The last day for reservations to attend the next event Honduras for the United States Navy League is today. The event is (C,CC) scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Caesar Park Hotel. The guest'is Victoria H. Figge, director of the financial A-Active duty only US-U.S. passport O-Ovemight C-Commercial Contract V-Visa M-Medevac CC-Country Clearance analysis unit attached to the advisory committee for public safety and national defense under the ministry of the presidency of the Republic of Panama. For reservations, Travel tips call 270-2952. Hilltop dining closed Effective 1 May 98, the Freedom Bird shedule for Howard AFB will change to the following: The HHC, Theater Support Brigade "Hilltop" Dining FaARRIVALS DEPARTURES cility in Building 520, Fort Clayton, is closed for all meals Friday 1:10 p.m. 3 p.m. to Soto Cano AB, Honduras Friday through Monday in observance of Good Friday and Saturday 10:15 a.m. 12:05 p.m. to Atlanta, then Charleston a training holiday. Normal dining hours resume 6:30 a.m. Sunday 3:50 p.m. none Tuesday. Monday none 10:10 a.m. to Atlanta, then Charleston TEAMS supply closed The TEAMS Supply Activity is closed for inventory Announcem cents Monday -April 17. The deadline for submitting supply requests is Wednesday. Only emergencies are excepted TaX form deadline Supplemental promotion board during the closure dates. For more information, call 2845256. Authorized Military Post Office users pushing the deadline The next E-8/E-9 supplemental promotion board is schedfor filing federal tax forms can acquire that invaluable April 15 uled for May 4. In addition, the suspense for receipt of suppleInnovative Logistics courses postmark through midnight on Wednesday by depositing IRSmental request is today in order to allow sufficient time for Innovative Logistics is holding a range operations bound envelopes in MPO drop-slots only. At Howard, all mail pre-board preparation. People should contact their commandcourse 8 a.m. Monday and a unit level logistics sysdeposited through the drop slot in the Postal Service Center by ers support staff if they have questions concerning this tems course 8 a.m. Monday -April 24 on the 4th Floor of midnight will get the April 15 postmark. Rodman Naval Stasupplemental promotion board. Building 519, Fort Clayton. There is another range operation and Fort Sherman customers can get the same service Pltcos o eeto o r tions course slated for 8 a.m. April 17 in Room 9, Buildthrough the drop slots at their Postal Service Centers. At Fort Pilot cross low selection board ing 6523, Corozal. Military members must be in duty uniClayton, you'll need to visit the blue post box directly in front A centralized Air Force Fighter Crossflow Selection Board form. For more information call 288-7351. of the MPO if you're running late. All other blue post boxes will convene at the Air Force Personnel Center July 14 to will be checked on schedule April 15, and won't be emptied select 25 pilots from mobility and bomber type aircraft and Building Managers Training again until late afternoon on April 16 -too late for an April afford them the opportunity to crossflow to fighter cockpits. Building Managers Training is slated for 9 -11 a.m. 15 postmark. This special service will be available on April 15 Applications must arrive at the Air Force Personnel Center Monday at the Coronet Oak Conference Room, Building only. For more information, call Tech. Sgt. Reccy Crews at by May 22. For more information on application procedures, 237, Hangar 1, Howard AFB. Participants must bring the 284-7219. contact the Relocations Element at the Military Personnel updated appointment letter signed by their squadron comFlight. wander. For more information, call 284-4068. Credit workshop A Credit Management Workshop, in Spanish, takes place p selection board Rodman ammo point closed from 8:30 -10:30 a.m. Thursday in the Howard Family SupA selection board convenes June 2 to consider Army first The Rodman Ammunition Supply Point is closed for inport Center. The workshop is designed to help personnel get lieutenants for promotion to captain. Officers eligible for conventory during the week of Monday -April 17. All units back on track with their credit. For more information, call the sideration have the following active duty dates of rank: Sept. with scheduled training for this period need to contact the FSC at 284-5650. 30, 1996 and earlier; Oct. 1, 1996 and Sept. 30, 1997. To be ASP to reschedule their issue/turn-in dates. Also, cusSMeligible for consideration, all mandatory or optional OERs must tomer units are required to maintain updated access rosSmooth Move workshop be received, error free, in the Evaluation Reports Branch, ters and their DA Form 1687. Units cannot access the A Smooth Move Workshop takes place 9 -11:30 a.m. U.S. Personnel Command, no later than May 26. For more ASP if these documents are not updated. In addition, Thursday in the Howard Family Support Center. Participants information call 288-4656/4321. units are reminded to submit DA Form 581s for ammuniwill receive current information on PSC entitlements and sertion transactions no later than 72 (duty day) hours prior to vices from the key agencies involved in moving, helpful hints Chief Warrant Officer board news issues and turn-ins. Late requests may require a unit site for travel and PCS financial planning. Spouses are welcome. Officer Records Section has received the Officer Records fund code to cover the contractor's overtime. Operating For more information or to sign up, call 284-5650. Brief for the upcoming Promotion Board. Due to the short hours are 7 a.m. -3:30 p.m. Monday -Friday. For more suspense due to technical difficulties, it is imperative that all information call 283-5806/5642. Men of Honor Conference previously notified warrant officers report to Officer Records, The Men of Honor Conference is slated for May 16 at Building 519, Ground Floor and sign their form. A selection Volunteer ceremony Curundu Middle School. For registration information, call 288board convenes May 12 to consider eligible chief warrant ofAll Howard Air Force Base and Rodman Naval Sta5878/3281. ficers on the active duty list for promotion to CW3, CW4 and tion volunteers are cordially invited to attend a Volunteer .i .CW5. Warrant officers with less than two years time in grade Recognition Ceremony beginning at 10 a.m. Monday at Electric bill briefing while serving on active duty as of May 12 are not elegible for the Howard Tropic Breeze Club. The purpose of this A briefing by IRHE (Panama's electric company) is slated consideration. For more information, call 288-4656/4321. event is to give thanks and appreciation to each volunteer for 10 a.m. April 23 at the Howard Base Theater for all DoD for the outstanding support given to the community during personnel residing off-base. This is to help everyone get a betAviator continuation pay the past year. ter understanding of the electric company's billing process, Only first-time fiscal 1997 and fiscal 1998 Aviator Conhow to read the bill and how to conserve energy. Many tinuation Pay eligible pilots are offered the fiscal 1998 ACP Sealed-bid sale people are reporting their electric bill rising sharply during the rates and agreement length options as outlined in Air Staff and A local sealed-bid sale is scheduled for 7:30 a.m. -3 billing cycle that ended March 2. The Howard Housing Office Air Force Personnel Center messages. Pilots eligible for ACP p.m. Tuesday -Thursday at the Defense Reutilization & should be their first stop. For more information, call Lidia prior to fiscal 1997 who previously declined ACP either by Marketing Office -Panama, Building 745, Corozal. No Fonseca at 284-3301/3417. written declination, failure to return their ACP agreement, or one under 18-years-old is allowed on DRMO premises who have previously separated from active duty, are viewed during sales inspections and removal. For more informaFSC job available as having declined ACP and are not considered first-time elidon, call 285-4754. The Howard Family Support Center is now accepting apgible pilots. Pilots who have previously declined ACP will be plications from NCOs interested in the Deputy Director posioffered the opportunity to enroll in the ACP program in effect Senior Enlisted Advisor slot tion. The candidate must be a volunteer, have achieved the during the year of their initial eligibility so long as they conThe Air Force Personnel Center's Chiefs' Group, in rank of master sergeant or above, (highly qualified technical tinue to meet ACP eligibility requirements. Pilots who have conjunction with Air Combat Command, is seeking volunsergeants may apply), and must have at least nine months repreviously declined ACP and wish to reconsider, may request teers for the senior enlisted advisor position at the JTFmaining on station at the time of assignment to the position. ACP agreements at any time by contacting Maj. Tony Garton SWA, Eskan Village, Saudi Arabia, reporting no later than Interested personnel should submit applications or resumes at DSN 487-2459 June 1. For more information, call 284-3508 no later than and the last five enlisted performance reports to the director Tuesday. of the Family Support Center, Bldg. 707, by May 1. For more OSI recruiting I information, call 284-3153. Interested candidates for OSI, call 284-3810.

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Sports April 9, 1998 Fort Clayton, Howard Air Force Base and Rodman Naval Station Panama Canal, Republic of Panama Page 9 Serving the Joint Community Sports shorts Massage Air Force Sharpen up your skills for the 15 Days Pool Tourney 11:30 a.m. -t P.M. Monday and you jUst May Will a professional pool stick. The 24th Operations Support Squadron is sponsoring a golf tournament 7:30 a.m. April 17 at the Horoko Golf Course. For more information, call Master Set. Will Smith at 284-3501. Get ready for some family fun with the best Eight Ball Pool Tournament in Panama 4 p.m. April 17. Participate in the tournament and become eligible for the "Be a Hero" vacation packet. The opening ceremony for Howard's 1998 Spring Soccer Season begins 8 a.m. April 18 at the Parade Field. The 79th Army Band and the Howard Honor Guard will participate in this year's event. An organizational meeting for next month's ACC 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament takes place April Gary D. Stump, left, and Giovanni A. Chac6n, above, 4 at the Howard Fitness & Sporfs are licensed massage therapists hired by the DirecCenter. For more information, call torate of Community Activities to help relieve sore 284-3451/5671 muscles and stress caused by a hard workout or just In honor of the "Month of the a hard days work. Military Child," the Howard Bowling Center is offering reduced story and photos So you don't work out at the gym. but been a high attendance for the massage prices for children during open by Raymond E. Samuels you come home from a hard days work therapy being offered at Reeder. bowling hours. Tropic Times staff and your back is killing you; or you've '1 guess people feel uncomfortable FORT CLAYTON -It's not a mesbeen out in the field on a 10K roadmarch; with the idea of coming for massage Arm y sage they're trying to give you .it's a or you've been .Seriously now, why do therapy not knowing what to expect. The massage. And you can now get them by I need a massage? biggest concern people have is that they The Directorate of Community a licensed massage therapist at the Fort "It reduces muscle soreness," Stump think they have to be nude for their masBctivities Sports Office is located n Clayton Reeder Gym. Just another sersaid. "People do better and train better sage. That doesn't happen here. All of building 519, Fort Clayton. For invice made available to you by the Direcbecause their muscles feel better. Foot our clients are expected to wear shorts. formation about Army sporting torate of Community Activities. reflexology (another technique offered) is Men and women will be covered at all events, call 288-520 1. "One massage a week is what's recvery important. Every step you make aftimes. Their sessions are also private. Signups for Intramural Soccer ommended," said Gary D. Stump, DCA lifects your body. Soldiers out in the field We've been given our own room. More conclude today. League play will censed massage therapist. "Of course -they're the ones who benefit from importantly, we're professionals. We're begin Monday. not everyone follows this, but neverhethis. As for those who don't work out? licensed therapists," Stump said. The Fort Clayton Protestant less, that is what's recommended. MasIt's even better for them. Sedentary Reservations must be made for masWomen of the Chapel as sage therapy provides structural integrapeople don't have that blood flowing sage therapy sessions. Make your resering a Fitness Walk 6:30 a.m. April tion, putting the body back in proper cleaning out their system. A massage vation today by calling the Reeder 17 at the Community Park. For more alignment. When you work out -or provides this relaxing workout." Physical Fitness Center at 288-7861/ information, call Van Runals at 288even from just walking all day or sitting .According to Stump, there has not 4713. 4772orSherrilHarrillat272-7400. for extended periods of time -muscles move your bones. That's when your Navy bdy begins to ache or feel uncomforiEverything you need is right here at Reeder Gym hours are 5:30 a.m. -9 p.m. able."Mondays -Fridays and 10 a.m. -6 Massage therapy is offered 9 a.m. -9 Gary D. Stump has been working as Giovanni A. Chac6n has been workModays Fr nd10aaimn -b6 Friday and 9 am. -5 a licensed massage therapist for over ing as a licensed massage therapist for Navy Sports, call 283-4332/3040. p.m. Saturday. Reservations can be three years. Stump earned his license over four years. Chac6n earned his fiAfter a mean workout, drop by made for 20-minute sessions or one hour from the state of Florida. cense from the Instituto Curvas Gym, for a refreshing frozen fruit drink sessions. Panama and the Olympic Committee or a healthy salad at the Health Bar, "Of course, the hour sessions are a Swedish. A much stronger masWeight-Lifting Division. Building 73. lot more relaxing and thorough," Stump sage, the Swedish technique centers said. "But a 20-minute session is just US around the full body relieving muscle Aromatherapy. This therapy uses effective and beneficial after, let's say, an tension. It is applied with long and oils with aromas that help induce relaxLocal aerobic workout or after working all day slow strokes. Great for easing stress ation. The Isthmus Road Runners are in the office." and tension. Manual lymphatic. This massage hosting a 21K run 6:30 a.m. April 19 According to Stump and Chac6n, Esalim. Similar to the swedish masprovides stimulation for complete body starting from the Pedro Miguel Train stress is one of the biggest health probsage, long and slow strokes are applied functions. Station. The Panama Armed Forces lems here. to calm and relax muscle tension and Neuromuscular. Massaging the Running Association is having a "The best alternative to medicine, stress. head, this method is extremely helpful two-, threeand five-mile run 7 a.m. against all forms of stress, is a massage," Deep muscle. A harder massage to relieve migraine headaches. April 25 starting from the Fort said Giovanni A. Chac6n, DCA licensed applied used to get deep into site speReflexology. These massages are Clayton Pedestrian Gate. For more massage therapist. "One of my favorite cific parts, such as the small of your centered on your feet. information, call Allen Jones at 288techniques to administer is aromaback. Shiat-su. Also called acupressure, 3310. therapy. Just like in a estaurant, when Neuro-muscular. Massaging the Shiat-su is a finger-pressure therapy Cricket games are played on you get hungry from smelling something head, this method is extremely helpful -a massage with the fingers applied Albrook field and other fields in good, the different aromas from the oils I to releave migraine head-aches. to specific areas of the body. Panama? Watch the next game or use provide a sense of relaxation. A masjoin a team by calling the Hindustani sage like ihat. applied with a touch 0if Call Reeder Physical Fitness Center today at 288-7861/4713. Society of Panama at 227-1078. mood music, can be very relaxing."

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1OTropic Times,~po t 10 Api Sports Top three How they fared 7 Women's racquetball Services Weather Mission Support Men's racquetball Logistics Group Maintenance Medical Group Women's half-mile run Medical Group Operations Support Communcations Men's half-mile run Security Forces JIATF -South 3 10th Airlift Dizzy bat race Security Forces N Transportation Operations Suppot Women's 100-yard dash Security Forces Supply Communications Men's 100-yard dash ^ Communications Transportation Air Postal 200 meter swim Medical Group photos by Staff Sgt. John B. Dendy IV (USAF) Supply Two competitors battle during the men's arm wrestling competition won by the 24th Services Squadron. Inset: Services A participant rejoices after finishing the women's half-mile run, won by the Medics. Basketball supply Maintenance 310th Airlift Women's Arm wrestling Transportation Medical Group Operations Support Maericen 24th Medical Group gets the upper hand Maintenance Communications by Tech. Sgt. Rick Burnham WMed'bic Grp 24th Wing Public Affairs Office Weather HOWARD AIR FORCE BASE -The Communications 24th Medical Group placed first, second or Men's bike race third in 10 out of 17 events to capture the Civil Engineers championship in Howard Air Force Base's Maintenance annual Sports Day competition, hosted by the Medical Group 640th Air Mobility Support Squadron Api i3. Bowling The Medics dominated the competition tinCivil Engineers ishing with 70 points on the day, 21 ahead of Maintenance the second-place finisher,-the 24th CommaCommunications nications Squadron. Egg toss Seven points were awarded for a first Medical Group place finish, five for second and three lot Mission Support third. Units were also given a single point lor Air Postal each event they participated in. Golf chip The Medics finished first in the wonen s Medical Group half mile run, the 200-meter swim, the Comptroller women's bike race, the egg toss, the golf Maintenance chip, and the tug of war. They added second___ __ _TS _AY Horseshoes place finishes in the women's artn wrestling Comptroller competition and the three-legged race. Conmunications The champs finished third in men's rae Medical Group quetball, the men's bike ]ace and horseshoes. 640th Challenge For their efforts, the Medics will host next Col. Gregory L. Trebon, 24th Wing commander, presents the first place 310th Airlift year's competition. team trophy to members of the 24th Medical Group. Communications Transportation Softball Civil Engineers Communications Security Forces 3-legged race Mission Support Medical Group Weather Tug of war Medical Group Maintenance Supply Volleyball Supply JIATF -South Air Postal Final Standings MedicalA unit pulls together in the tug of war competition won by the ComimunicatLions: 49Auntplsoghe Maintenance, Supply: 49 24th Medical Group. A participant tries his luck in the horseMaintenance, Suppy:_4 -shoes competition won by the 24th Comptroller Squadron.

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~~TraningTropic Times TrainingApril 9, 1998 New Horizons '98: An ongoing training exercise story and photo that by maintaining a proficient and paramedic with tihe 128th by Sgt. Kelly C. Luster medical stai. medical detachment, Tuscumbia, 354th Mobile Public Affairs Det. [very two weeks, oI so, we Ala., said it's definitely hot, but BASE, CAMP ALPHA, Honct I new rotation of medics he's enjoying his time if) Hondudtiras When yOL] 0i hurt Or nurses and mcrgency medical ras. Robinson, as well as several feel sick, what Jdo you Io? Most technician," Rinthard said. GtairCidsmni, have grown fond of people go to the hospital o tile "Within a few days of driving the Hondurans, particularly the doctor' s office. But what if you here, you can't distinguish bechildren. Robinson, who is lroi are a soldier located in the ictween tile actiVe (luty soldiers Roberiscale, Ala., said they plan mOte, treacherotus iiountainus of and the Gtiardsmen. to send clothes and shoes to western Honduras? You still go Although most of the time some of the needy children. to the doctor. dhi ns are cali at the clinic, "I was shocked al the condiOperation New Horizons 1998 Rinehart said they have treated tions in Honduras," Robinson is an ongoing U.S. military trainabout 300 patients fr everything said. "Sone of the children here in, hliumanitariaii and civic-acfroti sunburn to heat exhaustion don't even have clothes oi shoes tion exercise bringing basic infrato scrapes and bruises. to wear. We just want to help strUcttire to the riral people here Sgt. Mary Burdgon-CUrry, a out." in this Central American country nurse frtiiii the 128th Medical DeThe mission in Honduras is in the form of building medical tachment headquartered in providing real-world training. clinics and schools, as well as Tuscunbia, Ala., said she has alStaff Sgt. Albert T. Hoiiburger, a giving iiiediciiie and supplies. ready treated several cases of paramedic with the Alabana It's here the U.S. National heat injuries. Ariiy National Guard's 128th Guard has set tip the Troop "One of the biggest problems Medical Company based in Medical Clinic for the hundreds is the troops are rotating in froii Ashland Ala., sees this assignof troops involved in New Horiareas of the United States that ient as an excellent training opzons. Members from several are 30 to 40 degrees and overcast portunity, as well as his chance to Army National Guard units skies," she said. "The people arpay back some special people in throughOut the United States will rive here and get smacked with other National Guard tuits. be rotating through Base Camp 100 to 115 degree temperatUres "When the blizzards stranded Alpha during their two weeks of and extremely bright sunlight." part of New York, the National annual training this year. Burdgoii-CUrry, who hails Guard was called out to help res"No tnission can happen withfroi Montgomery, Ala., said as cue people. Some of the Guardsout proper support," said Lt. Col. soon as she sees someone who men here wc ationgb those helpWorking in more than 100-degree heat in tropical Ellen Rinehart, officer in charge has stopped sweating or is havinig out," Homiburger said. "It just Central America, Alabama Army National Guard of medical support. "My job here ing cramps, she inevitably has to so happens that one of the people Sgt. Mary Burdgon-Curry, a nurse from the 128th is to make stire the troops cart do start giving themii fLtids intravethey helped to rescue was my Medical Detachment, Tuscumbia, Ala., prepares their job." nously to get them reihydrated. mother in Saranac Lakes, N.Y. This to rehydrate another fellow soldier intravenously Rinehart, a trauma nurse Staff Sgt. Thomas E. Robinson, is ty way of saying thanks to while performing her two-week annual training in from Birmingham, Ala., does an eiergency medical technician them." western Honduras. Residents of Le Pine gather around the newly completed well. Well drillers from the 518th Engineer Company finished the project in little over a week. ctoiiipleted hic pr olect iin little over a week. she also heatrieth tgeat deal frim this expermeeice. The well is hintl pitmpieh antI is thrilled to a depth "Thitli potet twsas a Itut oh wturk amid wits ai hot to heatra of 1 80-feet deccp. It'II pmrhduce approximtiietcy six to btit was beneficiall" she said. Ill gallotis tof wattr pehi miinite andt will sUppor~tt a Ctmwdeti said that the project wvas mieatuitgftt to ptipitlatitin li4,00 en because she hiad the opportunity to help tott the Sgt. Justin Perry, a native of Merritt Island, Fla., Second Lt. Thma s Gailli, priojcct offirem-iii comiiiitnity. "It's great coming t) another country ti pumps water from the Le Pine well, which was charge, said that this was his first wvehl dirilling hielpi otit with a little thiing hike water. I didn't realize drilled to a depth of 180 feet. project and thiat evemyiimg wenii as planied. "This that there were people who didn't have the bare newas a nice, smiitth pmrotect. Nr prtbheims at ill, hit cessities. i pays tiff in the end becatise these people fh8 aidhiave water for the rest of their lives," she said. m1t i i s Glisid his crew di't expeice anyvli prbAt thie ribbon utigceremutiy, Capit. Augustine bem b c the ginouimd wais pcifecc for dtimting. i Gal howav, ctomimiaiider of the 5 18th, said the well I D~~~ "Th artun was miimcre coopecrmtivyr as opposed to project wsas an excel emit training opportun itys for icr WU-9 e or is wch I The dtIl Itg wais nic. Wr drih Ied this wsell dtiI hrs antI that ii swas a chance tim prvIde a I I ~weln ithee days.valuable resource to the local comiimiunity story and photos He mIt)so sid thiat the expii eict was ssurih "We thank ihe people ruin the hocah coimtmnity by Staff Sgt. Seth M. McMullen wh ime. "This is pmrcmiv much ate texhericnre. Themre fmor their piatieice dutrinag iltr irainin g exercise. We U.S. Support Group Public Afairs Office ar so Ie csutinits iii it dh it ani it's ii tintue cnce. Iis nist ask that during cach and every thaily tise. you ahPORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti --The 5 1 8th Enstumieihingi I II cry l wiiic C, Galhi said. ways remember the 51 8th Emiginecer Comp~any," she giieen Coimpamiy rece nily comupletctd ant hier Hr cimimiice icthe jliob tul hits welc hidri I ers saysaid. tume tin the ir proj ects -a well I ic atel iii thic in" tht iiwe have i llt ol ne x stutiersthis w5as The sseh Idti Iers of the 5 18th are in a league muf city tof Le Phine w hiichI is apprux imiatelhy 12~ them it i well -mud iiev tdid m 'mild tub. They'me thic thiir owna because thieysre un hy one of iwm actv iies northeast of Port-ati-Prinmce. The Fthit best tnit ini the romipamny.s dty drilling tuniits in the Armry, the umiher beinga Ktubbe-based heavy cionstrtictiton company Pit. Adr i aic Cuswdcii if ~Missiuha, Mtmnd. said Eturt Bra"g.

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Tropic Tis News 12 April 9 1998 ew JOTB dining facility staff claims runner-up in food service awards story and photos by Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett USARSO Public Affairs Office NORFOLK, Va. -The proof is in the pudding, they say, and members of the Headquarters, Headquarters Company, Jungle Operations Training Battalion dining facility proved that their pudding, and all the food they serve, is some of the best in the United States Army as -: they were presented with a runner-up award during a ceremony March 28 honoring outstanding dining facilities. In front of a crowd of hundreds, Col. Stephen E. Runals, U.S. Army South chief of staff, accepted the plaque for the HHC JOTB dining facility as runners-up, Small Garrison Category, at the 1998 Phillip A. Connelly Excellence In Food Service awards presentation. Awards are handed out in five different categories; large garrison, small The HHC JOTB dining facility runThe awards presentation, from left to right, Maj. Gen. James M. Wright, garrison, field kitchen, reserve and naner-up plaque for U.S. Army small quartermaster general, Lt. Gen. John G. Coburn, U.S. Army deputy chief tional guard. The award presented to garrison dining facility, serving 200 of staff for logistics, Col. Stephen E. Runals, USARSO chief of staff, the HHC JOTB dining facility, also orless soldiers permeal.The plaque Fitzgerald V. Irish, HHC JOTB dining facility manager, and Sgt. George known as "The Galley," was for a garcurrently resides at Fort Sherman. Lopez, rations NCO, JOTB dining facility. rison dining facility serving 200 or less soldiers per meal. "They take the extra step, they go to this point but I never did." day, "that our job is for the soldier." Before the formal presentation, that extra mile to produce an Irish retired in 1990 and in May "We have to take care of the solRunals said everyone in USARSO is aloustanding product." 1996, he became the manager of the dier so he can go out and do his job." ways extremely proud of the JOTB dinFitzgerald V. Irish, Galley manJOTB dining facility. Sgt. George Lopez, representing the ing facility. ager, said being recognized was very "Being here is very important to soldiers from the dining facility, said "This is some great recognition for important to him. me. It's a fantastic feeling." that for him the Connelly awards was some folks who do an incredible job "This is a shining moment for Irish said his dining facility relike "being at the Oscars." out there at Fort Sherman," Runals me," Irish said. "I spent 20 years in ceived this honor because his staff "I'm really looking forward to taksaid. the military and always strived to get believes what he tells them every ing the award back to Panama." 3/75th Rangers make thunder in the jungle story and photos by Spc. Kenneth K. Rockett thick underbelly of Fort Sherman's USARSO Public Affairs Office jungle. FORT SHERMAN -The jungle was alive with At designated points they stop, thunder April 1 as soldiers from 3rd Battalion, 75th assemble their mortars and fire to Ranger Regiment, out of Fort Benning, Ga., and detarget coordinates. But it's not ployed to Panama, made their way through the Jungle quite that simple as they soon Operations Training Battalion's mortar maneuver found out. course. Along the way are booby traps, A platoon of soldiers from the Headquarters and snipers and an ambush. All this, Headquarters Company, 3/75th, specialized given the jungle heat factor, the mortarers to be exact, tested their metal as they weight the soldiers must carry, and tackled what many consider to be JOTB's toughest the constant running make for a course. tough little hike. The course, designed for a light infantry mortar This is good training for them, platoon (60 and 81 millimeter mortars) begins from said Staff Sgt. Supote Calveit a predetermined starting point. Company A, JOTB instructor, obAt that point the platoon gathers their equipment, server. "Stateside they can't get this secures the area and shortly thereafter marches into kind of experience. This is probthe jungle, and the unknown, as they enter the ably some of the best training in course. the U.S. Army for mortars." Through a series of constant ups and downs, the Calveit also said the course is soldiers lug their heavy mortars, ammunition, and great for future leaders, the corpoall other needed equipment and supplies through the rals and the sergeants, to come to JOTB and experience the stressful situations the approximately threemile course places them in. Soldiers such as Pfc. James Wilkerson, 3/75th Ranger Regi ment, agreed, saying that after going through the mortar maneuver course he now knows better what to expect from a jungle environment. "Every day I've learned something new here," Wilkerson said. "This has definitely helped me out.And how about the three-nile course? Three miles? Oh, really," Wilkerson said. "It felt more like 15 miles to me." Above top, a mortar infantryman from 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger But that's the beauty of JOTB's Regiment "hangs"a mortar round the instant before discharge. With limited visibility and the threat of snipers, mortar maneuver course -realistic Above, the round is discharged leaving a cloud of smoke and a maintaining security was a constant priority training constantly keeping soldiers roll of thunder a few seconds later as the round hits the target during the mortar maneuver course. sharp and maintaining readiness. area.

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Showtime Community Check out the latest Page B10: The Easter Bunny is /'er atyon ai DOD Overseas Show anxious to start hidding those f 4-6:30 p.m. April 17 4 p.m. April 17 at the colored eggs for some great Free. Call 288-5507 International Fair at family fun. Check out Clayton Park and 3 .the latest events, activip.m. April 18 at ties and worship serJarman Field. vices taking place. Tro pictivities April 9, 1998 Fort Clayton, Howard Air Force Base and Rodman Naval Station Panama Canal, Republic of Panama Page B1 Serving the Joint Community Teens learn leadership, build self-esteem, in three-day retreat story and photos by Sgt. Paul Bouchard The "Teens in the editor, Tropic Times Real World" retreat, M ost people would agree that a person's teenheld April 3-5 in Santa ge ears are instrumental in the shapingof his lar Panaa, or her personality and character. And no one would teaches teenagers argue against the fact that being a teenager isn't easy. -identity, build their Fulfilling parent's expectations, deciding what career self-esteem and to pursue, and the ever-present peer pressures that become positive role are out there all add up to the importance, and the models for their peers. stress, associated with being a teenager. "" This leadership To help ease some of these pressures and fears, the exercise involved teen centers at Fort Clayton and Howard Air Force drawing a person, Base organized a retreat for a select group of teenagwriting down the ers. characteristics of a The retreat, entitled "Teens in the Real World: How 10 good leader on that drawing, and placing to Find Your True Identity Without Losing Your their (the students) Friends," was held at the Baptist Campgrounds, Cresta initials next to those del Mar, in Santa Clara, Panama, April 3-5. characteristics they felt they possessed. Earned their way According to Pam Clark, the teenagers "earned Finding one's identity Productive weekend their way" to take part in this three-day retreat. Clark, The retreat included various classroom sessions, The retreat, in the words of Lisa Dyson, the the program coordinator at Clayton's Teen Center, physical challenges, games, group sessions, personal director of the Howard Teen Center, "is extremely said the teenagers were chosen to attend the retreat quiet times and social interaction among the teenagers important. These teenagers are learning how to be based on: -all to help the participants find their true identity, productive and effective members of society. It's a build their self esteem, make new friends and improve positive-oriented retreat in that we're trying to build Participating in Teen Center activities. their communication skills. up their self-esteem. These kids are great." Volunteering and doing community work. The ultimate goal of the retreat is to have these Dyson added that the retreat's importance is even Maintaining a 2.8 grade point average. teenagers continue their involvement in community more prevalent, now that the military drawdown in Possessing good morals and ethical conduct. affairs and have them serve as positive role models for Panama is around the corner. their peers. Clark said about 20 adults served as For Washington Dyson, one of the teens who Clark said these teenagers are very active in their chaperones, instructors and counselors for the retreat. attended the retreat, the three-day event was "learnrespective teen centers and that they are "our future Specifically, here are some of the classes, sessions ing a lot about yourself, your friends and who you leaders -we're very proud of them." and challenges these teens took part in: basic water should associate with." James Lewis, another particiShe added that some of the teenagers helped raise rescue, drug and alcohol awareness, AIDS awareness, pant, had this to say about the retreat: "I thought it funds for the retreat by sponsoring car washes and a leadership session, teamwork challenge games, would be fun to come here. It's about finding what having bake sales. Many of these youths also sports such as kayaking, mountain biking, volleyball, you're really all about." And for Josh Foster, the volunteered at the Directorate of Community Activiping pong, and basketball, a poetry contest, a drawing retreat was about "encountering challenges and ties annual fair. contest, and a class on education and career goals. meeting those challenges. It's just a good experince." Teen Participants Clayton Teen Center Daonna Young Lauren Curtain Krystin Jones Candice Lord Emity Ferguson Faton Tenery Quill Ferguson Sasha Davilla Eddie Sparks James Lewis Stuart Melton Thomas Dumas N Brian Reyes Ange McRary Mike Hougue Stephanie Case Katrina McCRary Peter Higgins Yeanina Parker Fernando Perez Jeff Ferguson Nicole Ferguson Shionna McCCrary David Hopper Latoya Lewis Kori Jones John Calkins Jason Calkins Howard Teen Center Washington Dyson Brandon Simpson Jessica Julian Josh Foster Andre Wilson Tara Bivcens Jerrold Ray Anton Chisolm Crystal Lebby Retreat teenagers have a discussion on AIDS Fred Clark teaches basic water rescue skills to Dustin Willford Donnie Greenfield Desiree Hogan awareness. some of the teenagers. Ray LeClair Andrea Dyson Jodie Paramadore Rosetta Johnston Mike Davis

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B2Tropic TimesNotices B2Aprl9, 1998Noie Air Force a.m. -4 p.m. Sunday, $24. Take a cayuco Cathedral, the Church of the Golden Altar ment, trailers and scuba equipment. ride along the Chagres River to visit the and the National Theater. Enjoy lunch at a Opens 6 a.m. -6 p.m. Friday -Monday. *Outdoor Recreation: 284-6107 unique Parara Puru Indian community typical Panamanian restaurant, then visit *Valent Recreation Center: 288Tours depart from Howard Theater. and experience their social lifestyle and the Panama Canal Locks. Bring money for 6500 Italian dining in Panama 6 -10 p.m. witness their primitive customs dating lunch and purchases. Make early reservations for tours: Saturday, $7 per person. 500 years ago. Bring a sack lunch and Arm Isla Grande 6:30 a.m. Saturday. Kayaking the Chagres River 8 a.m don't forget the camera. El Valle adventure and shopping -2 p.m. Saturday, $20. Don't miss the Central Avenue and Via Espafia shop*Outdoor Recreation Center: 2886:30 a.m. Sunday. Picturesque town adventure of kayaking the Chagres ping 9 a.m. -2 p.m. Wednesday, $9. 7355/6453 and market, great sightseeing locaRiver. Cost includes: transportation, Check out the great deals on Central AvReservations for outings are under tions. guide, kayak, safety equipment and enue and Via Espaiia on this fabulous way at Building 178, Fort Clayton. Carlson Wagonlit offers the lowest barbecue. shopping trip. Barro Colorado Island April 18. Don't military air fares, hotel, car rental disPeacock bass fishing 5 a.m. -2 p.m. Jungle canopy tour Wednesday, $65. miss this opportunity. Space is limited, counts and more. Service also includes Saturday, $25. Be prepared to catch a Get a unique view of the jungle's canopy make your reservations now. special weekday rates at Gorgona boat load of fish near Arenosa Village on on this exciting tour. You will traverse The Mamoni tradition overnight trip beachfront cabins; Chiva Parrandera Gatun Lake. Transportation, boat with from cable to cable through the jungle is available. Includes a two-hour drive on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. guide, bait, ice and coolers for fish are tops, just like monkeys do. Sign up now. into Chepo, and a three-hour horseback For more information, call 288-7077. provided. Barro Colorado Island tour 6 a.m. -3 ride. Enjoy typical food, rustic sleeping El Valle shopping and sight-seeing 7 p.m. Thursday, $65. See Mother Nature at accommodations and activities. Not Navy a.m. -4 p.m. Sunday, $14. Travel by bus her best on this boat tour of Barro Colomeant for the mild at heart. Call the cen*Morale, Welfare & Recreation: to the beautiful mountains of El Valle, a rado, home to one of the Smithsonian ter for more information. 2834314/4301 sleepy village in an extinct volcano baInstitute's tropical research centers. Ongoing features: Snorkelldivers at Coronado Gaviota Club Resort sin. Enjoy shopping in the native market Visit the Atlantic community 7 am. -5 Portobelo and Isla Grande can be arSunday This is a resort area with an and purchase handicrafts such as p.m. April 17, $20. Take a trip to the Atlanranged. For more information, call the excellent restaurant, bathroom facilities soaptone carvings, bateas, baskets, natic side and enjoy the scenery and visit center. and shower. Bring extra money for eattive fruits, vegetables and beautiful Gatun Locks, Fort San Lorenzo and Fort *DCA Marina: 283-3147 ing and shopping. Call Sally Paramore. tropical plants and flowers. Sherman zoo. Stop for lunch at the Trapon Rodman Marina features ocean charLos Pueblos shopping trip ThursIsla Grande snorkeling trip 8 a.m. Club restaurant. ters for a minimum of three persons. Fee day. -7 p.m. Sunday, $22. The abundant Old Panama and Miraflores Locks 9 includes bait, tackle, rods and guide. For Free Zone April 22. Tentative. coral reef makes Isla Grande a great am. -4 p.m. April 18, $12. Take a trip back boating and fishing there are Boston Panama City tour April 24. place for snorkelers.Come and explore to the 1600s and see the beautiful architecWhalers, Jon boats and canoes. Pontoon Water World Park April 26. the spectacule coral reef. ure of Colonial Panama. Visit such historiboat packages available for parties or For more information, call Hugo Parara Puru Indian village tour 8 cal sites as the French Plaza, the National fishing. Also motors, camping equipSealey. Air Force ter: 284-6361 The Balloon Shop is located in thd -*Howard Community Center: Skills Development Center, Building 284-6161 711. Check our daily specials and make The center is located on the Ground someone smile. The Skills DevelopFloor of Building 707. New hours: ment Center now has the Balloon Shop STARL 1TE C ON CERT 7:30 a.m. -7 p.m. Mondays -Fridays, and Pack-N-Wrap with gift, balloons, / noon -6 p.m. Saturdays and closed wrapping for shipping for all THE 79TH ARMY BAND WILL Sundays and holidays. Down days occassions. BE PERFORM ING AT THE noon -6 p.m. *Outdoor Adventures: 284-6107 Stop by Cafe Seven-O-Seven and Rent Howard bohios and pools for SYMINGTON FlELD ON RODMAN try the deli menu. Featuring sandprivate parties or squadron functions. 7 -9 P.M. A PR L 18. BR I NCG wiches served with chips, cole slaw or If you wish to serve alcohol, you must 7 -pasta salad. Come and try the delicous submit a letter of request to the 24th YOUR BLANKETS OR CHAIRS pastries and donuts at the House of Support Group deputy commander at AND SIT BACK AND ENJOY T Pastries. Hours of operation: 6 -7 least four working days before the p.m. Mondays -Fridays, 7 -11 a.m. event. SHOW. A FOOD AND REFRESHSaturdays, Sunday and closed holi*Howard AFB Sports and RecreMENT STAND OPENS TO THE days. Call 284-6161/5237/5848. ation Rental Center: 284-6107/3539 Vista Panama 7 p.m. April 30, free. Check out the wide variety of COMMON ITY WITH BASE PRIVThe Howard Community Center is sponsoring "Vista Panama" at the equipment for rent, camping, fishing LEGES AT 6:30 P.M. CALL 283Brnping "lst Pam. B the and boating, home entertainment, 4314/4301 FOR DETAILS. your family, cameras and camcorders. home improvement, outdoor, picnic & This exciting audio-visual presentation party, sports and cooking equipment features the Panama Tourism for a minimal fee daily, weekend and Institute's fabulous three projector weekly rental. PCSing? If so, get $5 off -slide show, the national Pollera, the Veeks and mVVC ombos Meuast be s Kuna Indian dancers, a local art exhiVCRs and TV/VCR combos. Must be bition and more. Come an enjoy an asaccompanied by orders. Rent a mounsortment of Panama typical food. tain bike for a month or week and re*Howard Skills Development Cenceive a free water bottle. Stenciling everywhere 5:30 -7 p.m. Crafts classes available: Pastel chalk technique 4 -5 p.m. Air Force Tuesday; 9:30 -11 a.m. Wednesday, $8 Pottery class 1 p.m. Wednesdays. Wednesdays, $10 plus supplies. *Howard Skills Development plus supplies. Woodworking qualification class Eye painting 7 p.m. Wednesday, $5. Center: 284-6361 Air brush class 57p.m. Tuesday, $5 9:30 a.m. -noon Saturdays. Dry brush technique 2 -3 p.m. The center accepts commercial includes supplies and one lesson. Guitar construction 7 -9 p.m. ThursThursdays. credit cards. Introduction to colors 5 -8 p.m. Tuesday. Airbrush classes, 6:30 -8:30 p.m. Registration and payment are reday, $15 plus supplies. Framing instruction 6:30 -9 p.m. $5. quired before attending classes. Spring stamping 10 a.m. -1 p.m Thursday. Clay FlowermakingII a.m.1p.m. Classes will be cancelled 24 hours Thursday, $6 plus supplies. *Fort Clayton Ceramics Shop: 288Sundays, $15, four sessions. prior if minimum participation is not Arm 4360 Learn to apply Fiesta Coior 2 -p.m. met Ceramic instruction available: Sundays. Cost $20. Four sessions. Basic framing 1 -3 p.m. Saturday. *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts CenBeginners ceramic painting 6 -8 Stone stroke class, Sundays. Cost Bring a photo, water color or needleter: 288-595717360 p.m. Thursdays. Fee is $20. $10 for two sessions. work no bigger that 8x10. Learn drawing, acrylic, watercolor Ceramic qualification 10 a.m. -12:30 Children's classes: Art and Craft Beginner's ceramics 10:30 a.m. and oil painting techniques. Classes are p.m. Saturdays. workshops 10 -11:30 a.m. Saturday. Saturday. Learn how to pour, paint 7 -9 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays Ceramic orientation for pouring 23 Children 9to 13-years-old, four sesand glaze ceramic pieces. for eight sessions. Register in advance. p.m. Wednesday. sions, supplies included.

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Tropic Times Notices Apr9, B3 Army *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: 289-6699 Certified massage therapist by appointment, one hour to 15-minute sessions, Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Martial arts classes offered on a monthly basis 6 -7 p.m. Tuesday. Monthly fee. Spanish lessons available. Advance registration required. Enjoy El Valle horseback riding Saturday. Snorkel/dive April 25. Sail in a beautiful catamaran, around Taboga and Chama Island. Reservations are ongoing for April highlights: Deep sea Fishing trip, Contadora Island overnight and Taboga Is*Sherman Rental Center: 289-6104 Pontoon charters for fishing or cruising, $30/hour, 10person capacity. Fee includes captain, crew, tackle and ice. The center has custom outings that can be arranged at your convenience. Enjoy fishing trips at Gatun Lake aboard the pontoon boats, snorkeling or diving at Orange Island. Community Appreciation Day Fee includes equipment, boat, operator and guide. Jamming at Jarmin is April 18 and features a children DoD magic show, mimes and Motorboat operator's safety classes 8 a.m. -noon face painting 3 -4:30 p.m.; Los Pescuzipelaos cumbia/folk rock 4:30 -6 p.m.; DJ varimonthly at the Sherman Lagoon. Fee is $10. Space is limety music 6 -6:30 p.m.; WoodStock Classic rock & roll 6:30 -7:30 p.m.; DJ variety music ited to the first 10 participants. Sign up in advance. 7 -8 p.m. and closing that day is Osvaldo Ayala typical music 8 -10 p.m. Art and Sale exhibition Starlight cruise High School play Howard Community Center: + American Society of Panama: International School of Panama: Panamanian artist Edwin Ortiz and Julian Vasquez The American Society of Panama is sponsoring a International School of Panama students will will be featured at the Howard Community Center. Starlight Dinner Cruise on MV Fantasia del Mar. The present the comedy "The Curious Savage" 8 p.m. The art and sale exhibition starts 1 p.m. Wednesday boat departs Balboa Pier 18, 6:30 -10 p.m. May 7. The April 23, 24 and 25 at the Ancon Theater Guild. Writat the center. Stop by and view the painting which cruise, out into Panama Bay under the stars, will featen by John Patrick, the play challenges society's maare done in the "Costumbrista style. For more inture a buffet dinner, pay as you go bar and music for terialistic values in a humorous tale about an eccentric formation on the art and sale exhibition, call the cendancing. Tickets are $15 for members and $20 for nonold woman who tricks her greedy relatives from the ter. members. For tickets, call 264-8385 or 272-5177. confines of an institution. as long as a qualified driver is on duty. days. Minimum of six people required. In*Valent Recreation Center: 288Air Force Call the center for more information, eludes pool sessions, theory sessions 6500 *Howard Community Center: *Howard Wood Skills Center: 284and open-water dives. Register in adNew hours of operation: 12:30 284-6161 4510 vance. As a bonus, class participants re9:30 p.m. Monday -Friday, 9 a.m. -9:30 Okinawa Kenpo Karate classes 6 Open 2 -9 p.m. Wednesdays -Fridays, ceive 10 percent discount at the Twin p.m. Saturday, Sunday and holidays. -7:15 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. 9 a.m. -5 p.m. Saturdays, 11 a.m. -5 p.m. Ocean Pro Shop. Register for ongoing classes. Cost $25 per month. Sundays and holidays. Closed Mondays The Scuba Shop has equipment for Earth Day Display Wednesday Beginner, intermediate and adand Tuesdays. rent, advanced instruction and services Tuesday. Stop by and see what you vanced English and Spanish classes. Woodworking class 1 -4 p.m. Saturto include repairing spear guns, regulacan do to help take better care of our Call the center for more information. day, $25 plus supplies. This class covers tors and gauges. Mother Earth. Violin classes available once a basic shop qualifications, planning and *Twin Oceans Pro Shop -Spanish headstart class, 8-week week for 40 minutes. Group and indibuilding a project. AquaCenter, Building 178, Fort course, meets twice a week. Intermevidual classes for 5-year-olds to adults. Machine qualification courses 10 Clayton: 288-7355 diate Spanish classes available. Fee Call for schedule and prices. a.m. -noon Saturday, $8 plus supplies. The Pro Shop has lots of merchanincludes manual. *Howard Pool: 284-3569 This class is required for anyone interdise on hand .scuba swim wear and the Acoustic and electric guitar lesHours of operation: 10 a.m. -6 ested in using the center. necessary equipment -whether a beginsons, Monday, Wednesday or Saturp.m. Tuesday -Sunday and holidays. Army ner or advanced diver, day, half-hour sessions. Closed Monday. *Auto Craft Center: Piano classes Mondays -ThursThe Pool is offering a special for *Fort Clayton Pool:288-60 The center is located in Buildings days, half-hour sessions. kids Thursday -Monday. Swimming is Swimming lessons begin Monday. 178-A, B, C and Building 135, Fort Basic English 10:10 a.m. Tuesday free for kids 11-years-old and under. Four levels are available with four sesC a *Howard Auto Skills Center: 284sions during three weeks. Space is limClayton. and Thursday. Intermediate English 3370 ited to seven participants per class. The shop features work area bays, Monday and Wednesday. Hours: 9 am. -9 p.m Tuesdays -*Fort Clayton Boat & Scuba Shop: electric lifts and instruction and classes. Drum classes, half-hour session Friday, 9 a.m. -5 p.m. Saturdays, 11 288-7355/6453 Electric engine analysis 4 -9 p.m. between 11 a.m. -7 p.m. Mondays a ym. -5 p.m. Sundays. Mechanics availBasic sailing classes are conducted Mondays. Thursdays. able 9 am. -5 p.m. Tuesdays -Saturfor two consecutive weekends Saturday Air-condition maintenance 2 p.m. African dance movement, monthly days. and Sunday and April 18 -19. Register at Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays. Noon course 6 -7 p.m Fridays. Services: Towing 9 a.m. -5:30 p.m. Building 178. -5 p.m. Saturdays, 10 a.m. -5 p.m SunTuesdays -Fridays, 9 a.m. -5 p.m SatFishing enthusiasts are invited to pardays. Navy urdays (as long as a qualified driver is FsigetuatsrenvedoprWheel alignment 3 -9p.m. Mondays, N v on duty). If a tow extends beyond 5:30 ticipate in the ongoing heaviest bass of Thursdays and Fridays. *Rodman Recreation Center: 283p.m., there is an additional hourly the week (more than four pounds) comBrake repair class 1 -9:30 p.m. Fri4222/4332 charge; air conditioning repair, brakes, petition. Win a free day-boat rental. days. Stop in and play pool, table tennis, oil changes, tune-ups, front-end alignMotorboat operator course offered 8 *Fort Sherman Auto Shop Building darts, foosball and lots of games. Join ment and welding available. a.m. -noon monthly. Fee is $10 for Jon 153: us and enjoy our big screen TV. Vehicle inspection services 9:30 boat certification, $20 for Boston Whaler/ Hours of operation: noon -4 p.m. *Rodman Pool: 283-4253/3150 a.m. -5 p.m. Tuesday -Friday and 9:30 ocean certification. Advance reservation. Sunday, closed Monday and Tuesday, 4 Swimming lessons. Cost $15 for 12 a.m. -4:30 p.m. Saturday. No ispecGatun Lake fishing charters avail-8 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Frilessons. tions Sunday or Monday. Cost is $10. a day and 10 a.m. -6 p.m Saturday and holiHave your vehicle inspected at the ble. $30/person, minimum of three days If you want to take a late swim, the center in Building 722. Vehicles cannot people, includes Jon boat w/30hp. InTa~e shop has four bays with one enpool is open until 8 p.m. Thursdays. be left for inspections. eludes boat, guide, cooler, fishing tackle gine lift, tire-changing equipment, engine The Tropical Oasis is serving deTow service 9 a.m. -5 p.m. Tuesday and bait and safety equipment. hoist, a compressor to remove shocks, licious frozen fruit drinks. -Friday and 9 a.m. -5 p.m. Saturdays, Open-water dive classes begin Monand various other equipment. 3-on-3 water basketball April 17.

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B4 Tropic Times .L J L k I B4 1998; 1998dPotpourri The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting Clayton functions only. applications on a continuous basis for the following *Tropic Breeze Club Casual Cove: 284-4189 announcements. All interested applicants need to re-submit an *The Loon: 288-7035 All-night disco 9 p.m. -5 a.m. Friday. The disco updated SF-17tevery six months. Registers established from CJ's Sports Bar has daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m. party is open to enlisted club members and their guests. these announcements wil be used to fil temporary positions., -1:30 p.m. Monday -Fridays. Dinner 5 -9 p.m. MenVB# 5 t.OC General Ctericat, NM-4 (Used to fitt most clerical 1I0pmMnasFdysDne ~.Mn Super social hour 5 -6 p.m. Fridays. Free food for positions).* days Fridays, noon -9 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. club members. VB# 52-OC Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk Enjoy the sports games on the big screen TVs SaturFriday classic rock 4 -8 p.m. Classic rock with musch).* day and Sunday afternoons and Monday nights. sic producers. *CASP NOTICE OF RATING REQUIRED. CASP exam is *Clayton Community Club: 288-4716 R & B with K.M. Productions in the dining room 5 currently offered only to U.S. citizens and military dependents -Easter Sunday brunch 10:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sun-9 p.m. Friday. by the Recruitment and Examining Division (CEO/RED), day. Enjoy the hot and cold entrees, salads, breakfast Disco dance with Rose's fabulous light and sound building 363, ANCON, items, pastries and desserts. Great food and background show 8 p.m. -2 a.m. Tet. 272-3584. so ~.-2am music. Variety music with Music Producers 8 p.m. -I VB# 55-DC Secretary (Typing/Office Automation). NM-5, Visit the new Forum and enjoy the new look. a.m. Saturday, 8 -midnight Sunday and Monday. specialized experience required. Country buffet 5 -9 p.m. Wednesdays has features from Karaoke night 8 p.m. -2 a.m. Tuesday OPEN UNTIL FILLED: ham hocks and fried chicken to black-eyed peas. Italian Rock & roll, variety music with Greg Norton and 171-98-SC SECRETARY(OA), NM-318-07. SENSITIVE. Thursday serves four pastas with four different sauces, Music Producers 8 p.m. -midnight Wednesday. DOL, Office of the Director, Corozal, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. seafood Fridays and discover the new Hoko's Chinese Dance the night awa with Country Western muequiv. to NM-06. TIG: t yr. at NM-06. NOTE: Must be able to b obtain security clearance at the secret level. A qualified typist buffet Saturdays. sic and the Music Producers 8 p.m. -midnight Thursis required. The Carol Cuisine is 6 -9 p.m. Thursday. Enjoy a days. delicious selection of Panamanian dishes and folkloric *Top Three Club: 284-4189 229-98-SC MEMORIAL SERVICES ASSISTANT, NM-303entertainment. Club is closed Sundays. 05. DOL, Services Division, Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 3 Wednd 1 yr. equiv. to NM-04. NOTE: Must be able to lift up to 70 lbs. Entertainment: Disco 9 p.m. -a.m. ednesdays, Boss-N-Buddy night 4:30 -9 p.m. Monday -TuesWith reasonable accommodations without difficulty. Fridays & Saturdays in the ballroom. days. Social hour is back 5 -8 p.m. Fridays. VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 04-10oil-ori bc pm rdas as 98 CLOSE: 04-21-98 Tecno Latin sounds 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays in Horoko The Underground. *Mulligan's on the Green at Horoko: 283-3295 066-98-LM SUPERVISORY PHYSICAL SECURITY *Casa Maria: 288-5767 SPECIAL-IST, NM-080-12. SENSITIVE. Installation Provost Authentic Mexican cuisine served 5 -9 p.m. MonBuild-your-own breakfast 6 -10 a.m. Saturdays, Marshal, Physical Security Section, Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Sunday and holidays. Open for lunch and dinner weekly Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-11. TIG: 1 yr. at NM11. NOTE: Must days -Saturdays. Delivery service available on Fort 10 a.m. -8:30 p.m. Monday -Thursdays, 10 a.m. -9:30 be able to obtain security clearance at the secret level. Clayton. p.m. Fr8:30s, m.-9:3 dapsm. Turdays n.m. -9:30 The Corral 7 -8 p.m. Tuesday. Learn how to Counp.m. Friday, 6 -9:30 p.m. Saturday and 6 a.m. -8:30 21 IA-99-SS MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT(OA), NM-344-05/ try and Western dance. p.m. Sundays and holidays. 07. SENSITIVE. 56th Signal Battalion, Corozal, Panama. Spec. Mongolian barbecue 5:30 -8:30 p.m. $8.95, for the Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-04. NOTE: Must be able to obtain *La Mola Cafe: 288-4202sand$4.9uef5:3 the8:3 getmri8.95e security clearance. A qualified typist is required (40 wpm). Breakfast 6:30 -9:30 a.m. Mondays -Fridays, 7 -11 first eight ounces and $4.95 for the vegetarian version. Office automation is required. This position will be relocating a.m. Saturdays -Sundays; lunch 11 a.m. -1:30 p.m. outside of the Republic of Panama with USARSO in FY1999. Mondays -Fridays, 11 a.m. -1 p.m. Saturdays -SunRodman Selectee will be required to sign a mobility agreement, concurring lathe transfer as a condition of employment. Area of days; dinner 5 -8 p.m. Daily. *Upper Deck Restaurant: 283-4498/4478 Consideration: Career/career conditional employees in the *Cafe 519: 2886007 Breakfast served 6:30 -8:30 a.m. Mondays federal service and individuals with reinstatement eligibility. Breakfast 6 -11 a.m. Mondays -Fridays. Fridays. Non-status applicants must apply through the Recruiting and Lunch begins at 11 a.m. with hot specials, a salad Early bird breakfast special. Come in between Examining Division, at Building 363, Ancon, Panama. bar and sandwiches. Enjoy a special buffet Thursdays. 6:30 -7 a.m. and receive 10 percent off your breakfast 250-98-OC LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST, NM*STRAC Jr. Club: 283-4119 food. 346-13. SENSITIVE.USARSO, Treaty Ittplementation Office, STRAC Jr. Club is now open on the Ground Floor All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m. Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-12. TIG: of Cocoli Center building. The lounge opens 5 -10 p.m. -1:30 p.m. weekdays, $4.95; Try our delicious soup and 1 yr. at NM-12. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security-1:0pmwekas$49;Tyordlcusopan clearance. TEMPORARY NTE: 09/30/98 Detail/temporary Thursday -Sunday. Snacks and pool table available, salad bar. If you don't want the buffet, order from the promotion opportunity for permanent employee; temporary grill menu and get a cup of soup for $0.75. appointment for non-status candidates. Position may be Sherman Weekly lunch specials: Mondays: Pasta feast; extended for up to 1 yr. beyond 09/30/98 depending on funding. *Sherman Community Club: 289-6116/6198 Tuesdays: Mexican platter; Wednesdays: fried chicken; 251-98-GC TRAINING PROGRAM SPECIALIST, NM-301-09. Disco nights 8 p.m. -1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Thursdays: lasagna with garlic bread; and Fridays: SENSITIVE. DCSOPS, Training Division, Fort Clayton, Country and Western nights 8 -11 p.m. Thursdays. roasted turkey with dressing. Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-07. TIG: 1 yr. at NMFast food menu items served 5 p.m. Sunday .Family night 6 -9 p.m. Wednesday, two delicious 07. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security clearance. Limited Fst f p.m. Sundaya-dyaily nihtse prm. edne o delicious to permanent employees only. Non-status applicants need to Tuesday, 6 p.m. Wednesday -Saturday. specials to choose from, fried chicken or fish $5.50 per apply through the Recruitment and Examining Division person. Kids eat at half price. There is a clown to enter(formerly CEO) at Ancon. This position will be relocating Howard tain the kids with fun games, balloons and face paintoutside the. Republic of Panama in CY 1999. Selected candidate ing will be required to sign a Mobility Agreement agreeing to this *Howard Club Dining Room -Building 113: 284i ongolian barbecue 6 -9 p.m. Thursday, $8.95, transfer as a condition of employment. 4680. Open to all ranks. $0.50 each additional ounce. Select chicken, turkey, 252-98-SC QUALITY ASSURANCE SPECIALIST, NM-1910New all ranks evening dining menu 5:30 -9 pama shrimp and beef, add your favorite vegetables and spices. 09. DOL, Contract Management Division, Corozal, Panama. Wednesday -Saturday. Join us and enjoy a fantastic Vegetarian also available for $4.50. Spec. Exp,: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-07. TIG: 1 yr. at NM-07. NOTE: menu with a great selection to please everyone, great V Mulcahy's Bar & Grill: 283-4498 Driver's license is required. appetizers, lite and healthy choice, hometown favorites, Open to all ranks 4:30 p.m. weekdays, 5 p.m. 254-98-SC AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT REPAIR INSPECTvariety of poultry dishes, beef plates, a selection of panweekends. Bar opens at 5 p.m. OR, MG-5823-ll. Federal Supply Service, Corozal, Panama. ta and more. Children menu is also available.$50 refills NOTE: Driver's license is required. Spec. Exp.: Must have had Easter Sunday brunch 10 a.m. -1:30 p.m. $9.95. Fr-up ug bought to y ou a$ refils at least four years of progressive practical experience in the Bring your whole family and feast on all your favorite for $1 maintenance, overhaul and repair of combustion-powered food. Reservations are recommended. jumbo shrimp 5:30 -7 p.m. or until gone. Lounge menu automotive vehicles, over-the-road trucks, or comparable Weekly lunch buffet all-you-care-to-eat 11 a.m. -I available until 8 p.m. vehicles. The experience may have included an apprenticeship Kicker specials are served daily for $ 1. plus specialized experience in a related occupation. p.m. $5.95. Monday: American buffet, Tuesday: Italicke special Mn day for $1. ian, Wednesday: Mexican, Thursday: Oriental, and Ice bucket special Mondays for $1.50. Tuesday 255-98-SS COMPUTER ASSISTANT(OA), NM-335-5. 56th Southem buffet. Sunday $1.75. Signal Battalion, Corozal, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to Friday:uh n buffet. Fat Tuesday 6 -9 p.m. Come i and ordfrom NM-04. NOTE: TEMPORARY NTE: 03/30/99. A qualified Lunch bunch buffet 1 n.m. -1 p.m. Monday -Fri-b typist is required (40 wpm). day at Howard Club. You'll receive a free lunch after 10 Lounge Menu and receive 25 percent off your bill. visits. Just ask the cashier for your lunch bunch card. seafood extravaganza Friday. Two delicious 256-98-SS LEAD TELEPHONE OPERATOR, NM-382-6. Two-Can Officers' Lounge super social hour 4 p.m. specials seafood combo and lobster thermidor for SENSITIVE. 56th Signal Battalion, Fort Clayton, Panama. midnight Friday. Bar open 4 -10 p.m. Saturday and 4 -$17.25. NOTE: Must be able to obtain security clearance. TEMP NTE 1 -Sunday action movie starts at 5:30 p.m. and features yr. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-5. TIG: N/A. COMP TEMP 9 p.m. Wednesday -Thursday. Closed Sunday -Tues''G ay ation PROM NTE 1 yr. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-7. TIG: 1 yr. at day. "GangRlatd." Thursday. Bring NM-5. Howard Club closed 2 p.m. Mondays and TuesGins' night out 7 -10 p.m. five friends and receive a gift. Appetizers served at 7 -8 p.m. 257-98-LM (3)WRITER-EDITOR, NM-1082-7/9. US Army days. Lug euaalbeutl9pm South, Tropic Times, Corozal, Panama. NOTE: Driver's license *Tropic Breeze Club: 284-4189 Lounge menu available until 9 p.m. is required. Grade NM-7 Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-05. TIG: Cashier hours: Open 10 a.m. -10 p.m. Saturday -Giveaways 8 p.m. every Fridays. Door prizes or a 1 yr. at NM-05. For NM-9 Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-07. O aturays weekend for two at the following locations: Hotel TIG: yr. at NM-7. midnight Fridays, and close for lunch 1:15 -2 p.m. uail Camping Resort, Costa Del Sol, Club Gaviota Coronado 258-98-LM ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT COORDINATOR A In carte breakfast 6 -9 a.m. Monday -Fridays. or Gorgona Jayes and other prizes. (OA), NM-0342-07. SENSITIVE. USA Materiel Command, .mLobster nght 5 p.m. Saturday until gone. Logistics Assistance Office, Fort Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: Weekly lunch menu 11 a.m. -1:30 p.m., $3.95. FriDance all night, tonight. Come on over and get on I yr. equiv. to NM-06. TIG: 1 yr. at NM-06. NOTE: Must be days: Seafood lunch. Salad and taco bar also available able to obtain security clearance. A qualified typist is required. and sandwich bar open 11 a.m. -1 p.m. weekly. Monthe dancing floor, and dance the night away. Area of Consideration: Career/career conditional employees in Sunday action movie 5:30 p.m., The Game. the federal service and individuals with reinstatement eligibility. days: a little taste of Italy; Tuesdays: all-American o-aa p.m. The a This position will be relocating outside the Republic of Panama estly; Wednesdays: Oriental specialties; Thursday: Karaoke night 8 p.m. Saturday. There is cash and in CY 1999. Selected candidate will be required to sign a Spicy Tex-Mex plate. prizes. Mobility Agreement agreeing to this transfer as a condition of Breezeway open 11 a.m. -9 p.m. Sundays -Thurs* Paradise Hut: 283-4498 employment. days, 11 a.m. -10 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Attitude Adjustment April 17. Come join the fun WORLDWIDE ANNOUNCEMENTS *Tropic Breeze Club Ballroom: 284-4189 and try your luck at wining door prizes or a weekend get VB# VACANCY, TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 03-20The new no-smoking ballroom is open for special away top. 98 CLOSE: 04-20-98 WW-234-98-GC LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST, NM-346-12. SENSITIVE. DCSLOG, Readiness Division, Fort RODMAN NS U PAPER ECK ESTAUR A NT IS HOSTING Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp.: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-11. TIG: 1 yr.atNM-11. NOTE: Mustbeabletoobtainsecurityclearance. A FAMILY NIGHT 6 -9 P.M. \/VEDNESDAY WITH TWO DELICIOUS Area of Consideration: Career/career conditional employees in the federal service and individuals with reinstatement eligibility. SPECIALS TO CHOOSE FROM: FRIFED ClICKEN OR FISH, $5.u PER This position will be relocating outside the Republic of Panama PERSON. KIDS EAT AT HALF PRICE. THERE IS A CLOWN TO ENTERin CY 1999. Selected candidate will be required to sign a Mobility Agreement agreeing to this transfer as a condition of g TAIN THE CHILDREN ALONG WITH FUN GAMES, BALLOONS AND FACE employment. PAINTING.

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_____ ~ MoviesTropic Time M movies April 9T 19 B 5 Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 6:30 pm: Kundun 4 pm: Sphere* 4:30 pm: Fubber* 7 pm: Wild 7 pm: Kundun 7 pm: Deperate 7 pm: Wild .Tns*Measures Thin gs 284-3583 9 pm: Deperate 6:30 pm: Wild 6:30 pm: Spice Things Measures Things* World 8:45 pm: Primary 8:30 pm: Deperate Colors* Measures Fort Clayton 6:30 pm: Spice 4:30 pm: Mr. 4 pm: Sphere 7 pm: Deperate 7 pm: Wild 7 pm: Kundun 7 pm: Deperate 288-7279 World Magoo** 6:30 pm: Wild Measures Things* Measures 8:30 pm: Wild Things* Thin gs* 6:30 pm: Kundun 84 m rmr Things8:45 pm: Primary 9 pm: Deperate Colors* Measures Fort Sherman 7 pm:-U.S. 7 pm: The Man 7 pm: Jackie NOSHOW NOSHOW NOSHOW NOSHOW Marshalls* With The Iron Brown 289-6251 Mask* Check the AAFES Home Page for up-to-the-minute changes R Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian. www. panama.phoenix.netl-aafespan/default.html PG-13 Parental guidance suggested for children under 13. Tickets are available in five price categories: $3.50, $3, $1.75, PG Parental guidance suggested. $1.50 and $1. *First run movies $3.50 **Special Price G Suitable for general audience. Now showing Desperate Measures Andy Garcia, Michael Keaton San Francisco police officer Frank Connor must find a bone marrow donor for his dying son. The only match is the vicious murderer, Peter McCabe. In an effort to escape from prison McCabe agrees to donate his bone marrow. It ANDY ARCIA ,seems that all McCabe has on his mind ICHAU RION e is freedom. R, I hr, 40 min. -M Flubber Robin Williams, Wil Wheaton A Robin Williams plays the absent minded professor who accidently dis.covers the magical mischievous stuff The gravity defying substance causes *chaos in every application and denergizes the lives of those it encounHoward AFB ters. PG, I hr, 34 min. Hrd A F Showing today at Howard Theater. : Jackie Brown Tribe (PG-13) Pam Grier, Samuel L. Jackson nephew, Waldo, and his bulldog. PG, 1 Spice World : Richard Dreyfuss, Jackie Brown a stewardess, supplehr, 25 min. Richard E. Grant, The Spice 9 Jenna Elfman ments her income by smuggling money Girls 9 into the country from Mexico. She not Primary Colors This musicail comedy follows five only works for airline, she also works John Travolta, Emma Thoimpsoli days in the lives of The Spice Girls. 8:30 pm: The for the notorious illegal arms dealer, Henry Burton is looking for something The Spice Girls are Emma, Geri, Ordell. She is busted by Federal agents or someone to believe in. I-e joins the Victoria, Mel C and Mel B. The popuReplacment Killers (R) and the only way she'll stay out ofjail presidential campaign of Jack Stanton. lar music group play themselves, as Chow Yun-Fat, Mira and keep her job, is to set up a sting During the long campaign there are ruthey prepare for their first live conSorvino operation. She has to bring in a half ors of sex scandals. Henry discovers cert. PG, I hr,33 min. million dollars and bring down Ordell. that politics and scandal are both part of : R, 2 hrs, 34 mi. growing up in America. R, 2 hrs, 24 min. The Man in the Iron Mask Fort Clayton .Kundun U.S. Marshall LeonardoDiCaprio, JeremyIrons 6:30 pm: Lost in Tenzin Thuthob Tsarong, Tommy Lee Jones, Wesley Snipes Jeremy Irons,John Malkovick, and This drama spans the lifc of the BudTommy Lee Jones returns to his FUGerald Depardieu portray the three Space (PG-1 3)* dhist Dala Lana from 1937 through GITIVE role as relentless US Marshal Musketeers at a point in their lives W William Hurt, 1950. The Buddhist principle of nonSamuel Gerard. The fugitive in this acwhere their best swashbuckling days G violence was shattered by the Chinese tion suspense thriller is Wesley Snipes, are behind them. Leonardo DiCaprio Gary Oldman invasion of Tibet. The Dalai Lama was a secret government operative falsely actakes on the dual roles of the wickforced from Tibet by the conquering caused of two murders. R, 2 hrs, 15 min. edly tyrannical King Louis XIV, and : 8:50 pm: Senseless Communist Chinese and is now exiled the title character. PG-13, 2 firs, 12 -(R) Marlon Wayans, in India. PG-13, I hr, 23 min. Sphere 'i"' David Spade Dustin Hoffman, Sharon Stone Mr. Magoo Hoffman, Stone and Samuel L. JackWild Things Leslie Nielson, Kelly Lynch son take the plunge in this big budget Kevin Bacon, Matt Dillon When a stolen gem lands in the adaptation of Michael Crichton's deepWhen a High School Counselor is ac. hands of nearsighted millionaire, seathriller. Director Barry Levinson helms cused of raping a student, his care* Quincv Magoo, a sinister plot is the story of a 300-year-old space craft fully structured life is ruined. But, as * hatched to steal it back. Always the tarfound at the bottom of the ocean. the investigating detective begins to get of evil culprits, the elderly Magoo Psycologist Hoffman, biochemist Stone discover; there is a more devious plan a manages to escape, oblivious to the and mathematician Jickson are te icky at work, the stakes are much igner dangers around him. Magoo ultimately crew hand picked to see what's inside, than anyone knew and nothing is as n nabs the villains with the help of his PG-13, 2 hrs, 12 min. it seems. R, I lir, 46 min. 00.00.00000600. 00006000 .0000000**0000006 ** eo

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Ml Tropic Times B6Api 9,1998 SCN TV Key: + Program time change due to live programming event; -Mature theme; -Series starts; *Series ends; *Program moved to new day and/or time FriayApI11 Saturday AprilT 11MM I udy ApriEM 12 No= ==y Ep= M=usa, pi 4 Wdeda;Arl1 husaArl1 a:: Today 6:00 Hcadline News 6:30 On Main Street 6:00 Today 6:00 Today 6:00 Today 6:00 Today 0:0) Headline News 6:30 Classic Cartoons 7:00 C.ral Ridge 8:00 Headline News 8:00 SCN News 8:00 SCN News 8:00 SCN News 8:30 Shawhiz Today 7:00 Puzzle Place 7:30 Christopher Closeup 8:30 Showbiz Today 8:30 Showbiz Today 8:30 Showbiz Today 8:30 Shawbiz Today 9:00 Jim He.srns Tale Of 7:30 Magic School Bus 8:00 Sunday Today 9:00 Sesanse Street 9:00 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street Butny Picnic 8:00 Brand Syanking New 9:00 Gargoyles 10:00 Busy World Of Richard 10:00 Fraggle Rock 10:00 Sesame Street Special 10:00 Fraggle Rock o Il:n00 Sesame Street Syeciat Dong 9:30 Arthur*n Scarry 10:30 Fitness Beach 10:30 Bodyshaping 10:30 Fitness Beach 10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal 8:30 Sylvester And Tweety 10:00 Sunshine Factory 10:30 Kiana's Fle Appeal 11:00 Oprah Winfrey 11:00 Oprah Winfrey 11:00 Oprah Winfrey S 1:10 Oprah Winfrey 9:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters 10:30 Headline News ,1:00 Oprah Winfrey Show 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News t2:l0 Headline News 9:30 Bonechillers 11:00 Major League Soccer: 12:00 Headline News 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 10:00 This Old House Colorado at D.C. 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 1:00 Port Chaeles 1:00 Port Chueles 1:00 Port Charles (0) 1:00 Port Charles 10:30 Bnrt Wolf's Gatherings United 1:00 Port Charles 1:30 Guiding Light 1:30 Guiding Light 1:30 Guiding Light 1:30 Guiding Light 11:00 Headline News 1:00 Gymnastics: 1:30 Guiding Light 2:00 General Hospital 2:00 General Hospital 2:00 General Hospital 2:00 General Hospital 11:30 Air Force TV News International Team 2:00 General Hospital 3:00 Sports Illustrated For 3:00 Where.Is Carmten San 3:00 Animaniacs 3:00 Superman'96 12:00 WWF Superstars Championships 3:00 What A Mess Kids Diego 3:30 Ta-mania 3-30 Taz-Mania 1:00 The Entertainers 3:00 PGA Golf: The 3:30 The Mask 3:30 All Dogs Go To Heaven 3:30 Happily Ever After 4:00 "Eerie, Indiana" 4:00 Global Guts 2:00 Navy / Marine Corps Master's Tournament 4:00 Captain Planet 4:00 Beakman's World 4:00 Taz-maniua 4:30 Nick News 4:30 Space Cases News (Final Round) 4:30 Secret World Of Alex 4:30 Saved By The Bell 4:30 Hidden Temple 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:00 Jeopardy! 2:30 CBS PGA Golf: The See Prime Time table Mack 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today Master's Tournament 12:30 America's Black Forum 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today See Prime Time table See Prime Time table (3rd Rnd) 1:00 Friday Night 5:30 Showbiz Today See Prime Time table See Prime Time table 12:30 ESPNews 12:30 ESPNews 5:00 Americas Funniest 2:00 Videolink See Prime Time table 12:30 ESPNews 12:30 ESPNews 1:00 SCN Overnight 1:00 Nightline Home Videos 3:00 SCN Overnight Movie: 12:30 ESPNews 1:00 SCN Overnight 1:00 SCN Overnight Movies: 1:30 Headline News 5:30 Headline News "Return Of The Native" 1:00 SCN Overnight Movies: Movies: "T'opa" "Finian's Rainbow" 2:00 AMA Supercross: See Prime Time table 5:00 Headline News Movies: "The Adventures Of 3:00 "Blazing Saddles" 3:00 "Stand By Me" World Championships 12:00 Headline News 5:30 News At Sunrise "Magnum Force" Baron Munchausen" 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News 4:00 ISKA Karate 12:30 CNN/St 3:00 "Bastin' Laose" 3:00 "The Mask" 5:30 News At Sunrise 5:30 News At Sunrise 5:00 Headline News 1:00 SCN Overnight 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News 5:30 CNN/St Movies: "Afterburn" 5:30 News At Sunrise 5:30 News At Sunrise 3:00 "Tyson" 5:00 Headline News 5:30 Hour OfPower 6:00 Today 6:00 Headline News 6:30 On Main Street 6:00 Today 6:00 Today 6:00 Today 6:00 Today 8:00 Headline News 6:30 Classic Cartoons 7:00 Coral Ridge 8:00 Headline News 8:00 SCN News 8:00 SCN News 8:00 SCN News 8:30 Showbiz Today 7:00 Puzzle Place 7:30 Christopher Closeup 8:30 Showbhiz Today 8:30 Showbiz Today 8:30 Showbiz Today 8:30 Showbiz Today V) 9:00 Jim Henson's Tale Of 7:30 Magic School Bus 8:00 Sunday Today 9:00 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street 9:00 Sesame Street Bunny Picnic 8:00 Brand Spanking New 9:00 Gargoyles 10:00 Busy World Of Richard 10:00 Fraggle Rock 10:00 Sesame Street Special 10:00 Fraggle Rock 10:00 Sesame Street Special Doug 9:30 Arthur** Scarry 10:30 Fitness Beach 10:30 Bodyshaping 10:30 Fitness Beach 10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal 8:30 Sylvester And Tweety 10:00 Walt Disney World 10:30 Kiana's Flex Appeal 11:00 Oprah Winfrey 11:00 Oprah Winfrey 11:00 Oprah Winfrey I 11:00 Oprah Winfrey 9:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters Happy Easter Parade 11:00 Oprah Winfrey Show 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News -12:00 Headline News 9:30 Bonechillers 11:00 Major League Soccer: 12:00 Headline News 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 10:00 This Old House Colorado at D.C. 12:30 Wheel Of Fortune 1:00 Port Charles 1:00 Port Charles 1:00 Port Charles 1:00 Port Charles 10:30 Burt Wolf's Gatherings United 1:00 Port Charles 1:30 Guiding Light 1:30 Guiding Light 1:30 Guiding Light 1:30 Guiding Light 11:00 Hercules 1:00 Gymnastics: 1:30 Guiding Light 2:00 General Hospital 2:00 General Hospital 2:00 General Hospital CU 2:00 General Hospital 12:00 WWF Superstars International Team 2:00 General Hospital 3:00 Sports Illustrated For 3:00 Where.Is Cartoen San 3:00 Animaniacs ) 3:00 Superman'96 1:00 The Entertainers Championships 3:00 What A Mess Kids Diego 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Taz-Mania 2:00 Navy / Marine Corps 3:00 PGA Golf: The 3:30 The Mask 3:30 All Dogs Go To Heaven 3:30 Happily Ever After 4:00 "Eerie, Indiana" 4:00 Global Guts n News Master's Tournament 4:00 Captain Planet 4:00 Beakman's World 4:00 Power Rangers ZEO 4:30 Nick News 4:30 Space Cases 2:30 CBS PGA Golf: The (Final Ronnd) 4:30 Secret World Of Alex 4:30 Saved By The Bell 4:30 Hidden Temple 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:00 Jeopardy! Master's Tournament See Prime Time table Mack 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today (3rd Rnd) 12:30 America's Black Forum 5:00 Jeopardy! 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today See Prime Time table See Prime Time table 5:00 Am. Funniest Home 1:00 Friday Night 5:30 Showbiz Today See Prime Time table See Prime Time table 12:30 ESPNews 12:30 ESPNews Videos 2:00 Videolink See Prime Time table 12:30 ESPNews 12:30 ESPNews 1:00 SCN Overnight 1:00 SCN Overnight 5:30 Headline News 3:00 SCN Overnight Movie: 12:30 ESPNews 1:00 SCN Overnight 1:00 SCN Overnight Movies:' Movies: "Sister Act" See Prime Time table -"Return Of The Native" 1:00 SCN Overnight Mavies: Movies: 'Topaz" "Finian's Rainhow" 3:00 "Shipwrecked" 12:00 JAG 5:00 Headline News Movies: "Magnum "The Adventures Of 3:00 "Blazing Saddles" 3:00 "Stand By Me" 5:00 Headline News 1:00 SCN Overnight 5:30 News At Sunrise Force" Baron Munchausen" 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News 5:30 CNN/St Movies: "Afterburn" 3:00 "Bustin' Loose" 3:00 "The Mask" 5:30 News At Sunrise 5:30 News At Sunrise 3:00 "Tyson" 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News 5:30 News At Sunrise 5:30 News At Sunrise 5:30 Hour Of Power 6:00 48 Hours 6:00 48-Hours 6:00 Motor Week 6:00 Dateline 6:00 Dateline 6:00 Dateline 6:00 Primetime Live 7:00 Early Edition 7:00 Dateline 6:30 This Week In Motor 7:00 Early Edition 7:00 20/20 7:00 Early Edition 7:00 Early Edition 8:00 Headline News 8:00 20/20 Sports 18:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News 8:00 Headline News 8:30 Channel One/MBR 9:00 Showbic 7:00 ABC Saturday Night 8:30 Channel One/MBR 8:30 Channel One/MBR 8:30 Channel One/MBR 8:30 Channel One/MBR 9:00 Good Morning America 9:30 Style With Elsa News 9:00 Good Morning America 9:00 Good Morning America 9:00 ABC Good Morning 9:00 Good Morning America I1:00 Soccer: Mexico at Klensch 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 11:00 Gymnastics: (T) 11:00 ISKA Karate (T) America 11:00 NHL Hockey: (T) USA 10:00 Page One w/Nick 9:30 Face The Nation International de France 12:00 NBA Inside Stuff 11:00 ISKA Karnte(T) (Teamtse TBA) 2:00 Time And Again Charles 10:00 Good Morning America 1:00 ISKA Karate (T) 12:30 ESPN Aviation: (T) 12:00 Snowboarding (T) 2:00 Time And Again 3:00 PGA Tour: 10:30 CNN Sports Preview 11:00 Headline News 2:00 Time And Again Warbirds Of America 12:30 CNN Today 3:00 Headline News Master's Tournament 11:00 CNN Saturday 11:30 NBA Showlime 3:00 Headline News 1:30 CNN Today 2:00 Time And Again 3:30 Burden Of Proof (2nd round) 1:30 CNN Travelguide 12:00 NBA Baskethall: 3:30 Burden Of Proof 2:00 Time And Again 3:00 Headline News 4:00 Inside Politics 0 5:30 NBC Nightly News 12:00 CNN Saturday New York Knicks 4:00 Inside Politics 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Burden Of Proof 4:30 Showbiz Today CU See Prime Time table 12:30 Science & Technology at Miami Heat 4:30 Showbiz Today 3:30 Burden Of Proof 4:00 Inside Politics 5:00 Headline News L) 12:00 Headline News 1:00 CNN Saturday 2:30 NBA Baskethall: 5:00 Headline News 4:00 Inside Politics 4:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 NBC Nightly News 12:30 ESPNews 1:30 On The Menu Houston Rockets 5:30 NBC Nightly News 4:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Headlne News See Prime Time table 1:00 Nightline 2:00 CNN Saturday at Seattle Supersonics See Prime Time table 5:00 Headline News 5:30 NBC Nightly News 12:00 Headline News 1:30 Headline News 2:30 Managing 5:00 CNN Sunday 12:00 Headline News 5:30 NBC Nightly News See Prime Time table 12:30 ESPNews 2:00 A MA Supercross: 3:00 NASCAR Auto Racing: 5:30 Moneyweek 12:30 ESPNews See Prime Time table 12:00 Headline News 1:00 Nightline World Championships Galaxy Foods 400 See Prime Time table 1:00 Nightline 12:00 Headline News 12:30 ESPNews 1:30 Headline News 4:00 ISKA Karate 5:00 CNN Saturday 12:00 George Michael Sports 1:30 Headline News 12:30 ESPNews 1:00 Nightline 2:00 PGA Golf: (T) MCI 5:00 SportsCenter 5:30 Headline News Machine 2:00 Boxing: (T) 1:00 Nightline 1:30 Headline News Classic (1st Round) See Prime Time table 12:30 Headline News U.S. Amateur 1:30 Headline News 2:00 Major League Baseball: 4:00 ISKA Karate (T) 12:00 Headline News 1:00 ABC This Week Championships 2:00 NHL Hockey: (T) (T) (Teams TBA) 5:00 SpontsCenter 12:30 CNN/SI 2:00 NHL Hockey: 3:30 Outside The Lines (Teams TBA) 5:00 SportsCenter 1:00 Washington Week In (Teams TBA) 4:00 CNN International 5:00 SportsCenter Review 5:00 SportsCenter 4:30 CNN/SI 1:30 Wall St Journal Report 5:00 SportsCenter 2:00 NFL Europe: Barcelona at Frankfurt 5:01 Sporlscenter 7:00 Chicago Hope 6:00 Kenan & Kel 6:00 Biography 6:00 Savage Skies 6:00 Nature 6:00 Submarines: Sharks Of 6:00 Biography 8:00 Movie: Cowboy 6:30 Guts Jesus (Pt 2) 7:00 ER 7:00 NYPD Blue Steel 7:00 X-Files 10:00 Aaahh! Real Mnisters 7:00 The Know Zone 7:00 Lois And Clark 8:00 Movie: "Dial ""M" 8:00 Movie: The Macomber 7:00 Law & Order 8:00 Movie: American 11:30 Rugrats 7:30 Weird Science 8:00 Easter Parade For Murder" Affair 8:00 Movie: Operation Graffiti 1:00 Coshy Shuiw 8:00 Movie: A Big Hand For 10:00 Sunshine Factory 10:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters 10:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters Pacific 10:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters 11:30 Step By Step A Little Lady 10:30 700 Club 10:30 Rugrats 10:30 Rugrats 10:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters 10:30 Rugrats 12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 10:00 Hometime 11:00 Lifestyle Magazine 11:00 Cosby Show 11:00 Cosby Show 10:30 Rugrats 11:00 Cosby Show 1:00 National Geographic 10:30 Bob Vila's Home Again 11:30 Real Videos 11:30 Step By Step 11:30 Step by Step 11:00 Coshy Show 11:30 Step By Step 3:00 Chicago Hope 11:00 Burt Wolf Eating Well 12:00 Touched By An Angel 12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 12:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 11:30 Step By Step 12:00 Star Trek: Voyager 4:00 Movie: Cowboy 11:30 Tall Tales And Legends 1:00 Biography 1:00 America's Castles 1:00 National Geographic 12:00 Star Trek: Voyager 1:00 Invisible Places Q) See Prime Time table 12:30 California Dreams Jesus (Pt 1) 2:00 Savage Skies 2:00 Nature 1:00 Air Combat 2:00 Biography 12:00 Movie: A Big Hand For 1:00 Nick News 2:00 Biography 3:00 ER 3:00 NYPD Blue 2:00 Sabmarines: Sharks Of 3:00 X-Files A Little Lady 1:30 AJ's Time Traveler Jesus (Pt 2) 4:00 Movie: "Dial 'M' For 4:00 Movie: The Macomber Steel 4:00 Movie: American 2:00 Htmetime 2:00 Kenan & Kel 3:00 Lois And Clark Murder" Affair 3:00 Law & Order Graffiti 2:30 Bob Vila's Home Again 2:30 Gnts 4:00 Easter Parade See Prime Time table See Prime Time table 4:00 Movie: Operation See Prime Time table 3:00 Burt Wolf Eating Wel 3:00 The Know Zone See Prime Time table 12:00 Movie: The Macomber 12:00 Movie: Operation Pacific 12:00 Movie: First Monday In 3:30 Tall Tales And Legends 3:30 Weird Science 12:00 Movie: "Dial 'M' For Affair Pacific See Prime Time table October 4:30 California Dreams 4:00 Movie: A Big Hand For Murder" 2:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters 2:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters 12:00 Movie: American 2:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters 5:00 Nick News A Little Lady 2:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters 2:30 Rugrats 2:30 Rugrats Graffiti 2:30 Rugrats 5:30 AJ'sTimeTraveler See Prime Timetable 2:30 Rugrats 3:00 Cosby Show 3:00 Cosby Show 2:00 Aaahh! Real Monsters 3:00 Csby Show 12:00 Easter Parade 3:00 Cosby Show 3:30 Step by Step 3:30 Step By Step 2:30 Rugrats 3:30 Step By Step 2:00 Sunshine Factory 3:30 Step By Step 4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 4:00 Star Trek: Voyager 3:00 Cosby Show 4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 2:30 700 Club 4:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9 5:00 National Geographic 5:00 Air Combat 3:30 Step By Step 5:00 National Geographic 3:00 Lifestyle Magazine 5:00 America's Castles 4:00 Star Trek: Voyager 3:30 Real Videos 5:00 Invisible Places 4:00 Touched By An Angel 5:00 Biography Jesus (Pt 1)

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Tropic Times -A SS N TVApril 9, 1998 B7 Key: + Program time change doe to live programming event; Mature theme; Series starts; Series ends; Program moved to oem day and/or time, (AIP) Already in progress 'S&10 Ha oNihly rpsns rons StariTr/k Doop Spao 9 4o-Houro Hvadino Lvigh Lvaw w/Jay 14&6 o CNgtyd Simpsons Siar Trak Drop Gpara v Tho "Xv-Fure ir vndine Tonighi Ghro/Joy a/od WrrNis ldc rNos ejorma Apr." 1o -.hl NhighTt-.S46H it_ IgtSy.Bob Vra's Br/ Wvi Califria AJ' Tomn ThniKnow Woord 1on & v/ on/tima HmiiaAgan EPring Woll TaiTalcs and Logrnds Drdlims Torae Knani&vKni Grin zooe Sceaco 8& 1lO EPvsa A000 Fc T /V/ida Lon o nad. Nan 20/20 S ln Gritrday Sighn Lira St 140&53 EGSaawsAr Faorc TV MChdrn Loras .oa NSnuy 2O2adine aoirdoy Sighi Lion Apr. StT .t it 1 & 4 ary Maun SL vokoy Wshio ci Phlladolphla Capl CN/d CaBS EG-lWI 16& Doss Scar Cu Gasyo.gelVdos Tuhd ya nglBorah:Jsu pr iorpy Jss(ar osan lr Fannoy Magain roof t 8 c1o$diline AirForca TV Tfce ya ne trTe:De pc mrc' ate vedna See Explorer [unro 4 edline AIFo-o TV T dy AC dmado/na N-.,N--N ih E l Suenoa 12 14 & 64 Heoin N FrTV Maj0 Laoui eballouti at Lo Avgo.d CNN/Si Persperies 1ie&en dotrtRoei ngiras T Ctaosby Gieprby Suep Star Trak: Dop SpacoO dnAmra's Casiinr Savaga 5k/or ER CCN NLw .C. NNw. N-,e 2-Sh1ow igt 8 & 10 :1 00020i0 SOC Sighiiy SO0/Monur Euron For/ote Sea York Gnderovr :1o Hoadlrn The Tonight ShGm w/Jay a/Sevid Noao Coca News La Lelleora 140&63 iSHerd ie 5000 hl 0 iue le Fair NwYokUdroe 10 Hoadr The oight 000w00/Jay 0/urda Apr. 10 & 64 1Hleodrc coNw o/og vrdlvne NA Bdsktbail ivdiaoa ri GC/rar t0 rsioers 10 & 65 Minais She C Stop by Step Stat Trk Dccp Spor 9 C.t,oti Grograpi Nitur nYPD nirr 00N Seer SODChN O NeS~a t Late Shoc 8 & 10 :15 Hbd/Ina NoC 0h S//des 51 Drsdry Sight M0v/0. Sirk Trcy" t 000d//va TToight 550w w/Joy 0/Send Soar Nears Leera Apr. 14 & 63 0ear B Sidrs SC Tosdy Sight MoI: S/o Try. ear j T h nh Shoe / Jy Apr. 14 a15 & 64 H oS Evlng Spors Conte Tiuedey sigtitFights P Sewthar -a o BSels 1 & 6 2 /eat Rdgrair haCosby Stopryotop Str Trk:B1oger Combat S.-b.r-rins: Srk n1 10200 0rdcr SOS10 Sar 0.NCN.h."Sstr Hom0M.rs.la. HSC S e The Var/ght Siowaw/ Jay020ha SNw NNw Sit mpoNmn N -Le ta Mod 14 & 63 in5 Brioightly 0r, 1pOv* en Mairac e"" 10 B15 Herd/ine Loilo T/Aah Apr. 1CN Pas NCBHbalne Ngh 15r&/64 :M s Tms TBA N oSnAgiS js1r LBu ss iss N 00000 Nig SCN. yt NBCto Soa,1bN Trgh h. J, ORgrato 10 & 65 Aorh Rl ht Cosby Stop by Stop Stat Tr0k: Voyaget Inv/s/bl0 Piaras Oiography X-Filrs O & 1 H n S NBCsNightly F/oDnd Geintaid JusC T B o E0 0000 -la TD ight Doa /y r Thurs 14 & 63 1 Soa rBC NightFiends Scitad U. '0os X T E 15 H-adi TCoighi 0w0/ Jay/ d Apr. NN 14 SCN N000 H Nghty 15 & 64 :15 Hedli n NHL orkay 00ams TB Evbn.t PT .News Brrus s Soar NEwdo R0 erotSa epro & l Csby St.b St. Stat trk Spo 0 St/on G.og.phr Ep/o midnight -4a.m. Adult Rock (60's and 70's Classic Rock) idigh N!C .-m. News and Inforati 4 6a~. ldes RadioS1 -3a.m. SCN Canal Country 4 -5 a.m. News and Sports Information ~ 5 7 m. PR ornig Eitin, ive ia atelit a, 10 -11 am. Adult Rock (60's and 70's Classic Rock) 0 11 a.m. -1 p.m. Diamond Cafe (All request show) 111 m ipLi h onn, lisRdo1 -3 p.m. Adult Rock (60's and 70's Classic Rock) 1am. -noon Rush Limbaugh Show noon -1 p.m. Dr. Laura, Paul Harvey ~ 1 3 ~m.New andInfrmaion6 -8 p.m. AFN Jams (Urban Contemporary) 15~~~ 64m --S midnigh ZJ -gb Roc (A.iternat CS ve)N a,3 -5 p.m. NPR All Things Considered live via satellite8pm.-idghZ-RokAteave S5 -11 p.m. SCN Canal Country live via satellite a midnight -2 am. Adult Rock (60's and 70's Classic Rock) 11 p.m. -midnight News and Information >0 2 -7 am. Contemporary Hit Radio N 7 -11 a.m. Ric Dees' Top 40 Countdown Midnight -7 am. SCN Canal Country live via satellite S11 a.m. -noon Hot Jazz 7 -9 am. NPR All Things Considered live via satellite noon -4 p.m. Oldies Radio 0 9 -10 am. NPR Car Talk U) 4 -6 p.m. Doug Banks Countdown (Top 20 Urban) 10 am. -noon SCN Canal Country live via satellite 6 -7 p.m. Diamond Traxx (Featured Artist) noon -10 p.m. News or Live sports 7 -9 p.m. Canal Country C)10 p.m. -midnight American Country Countdown w/ Bob Kingsley 9 p.m. -midnight Rough Cus 1 midnight -2 a.m. Adult Rock (60's and 70's Classic Rock) Midnight -2 a.m. American Country Countdown w/ Bob Kingsley >o 2 -11 am. Contemporary Hit Radio >02 -7 am. SCN Canal Country live via satellite Cu 1am oo azGm NC noon -4 p.m. American Country Countdown w/ Bob Kingsley C 9 -10 a.m. Religious Hr. I 4 -6 p.m. AFN Jams (Urban Contemporary) 10 -11 am. Religious Hr. 2 6 -7 p.m. Classical 11 -midisight News and Live Sports 7 p.m. -midnight Oldies Radio

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8 Tropic Times April 9, 1998 Classified Ads 76 Mercury Cougar, gd 92 Ford Tempo, tan, new Marantz dual tape deck, for parts, you tow away AC, AT, PS, am/fm, gd high spd dub, cont play Duty-free merchandise $1, 288-7082 cond $3500, 236-9653 $80/obo, mies tapes $2! FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) -As a reminder, in 77 Chevy Malibu, needs 92 Nissan Bluebird, ea., 288-7519 accordance with the Panama CanalTreaty and U.S.Southern Command some work $500/obo, loaded, 260-8264 Motorola alpha-numeric regulations, duty-free merchandise, whether new or used, cannot be 288-5930 beeper $45/obo, 284given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege holders. Violations 93 Dodge Shadow conv to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecution under both 77 Mercury sta/wgn $800/ $7000, 220-9521 5616 military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes permissible to sell an obo, 261-5231 93 Mazda 626, AT, LM, Panasonic KX P1124 dot item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. Before such a sale, it is 81 Buick LeSable, AT, exc cond $10,000, 272matrix printer w/lg box strongly recommended that the seller contact the Contraband Control PS, PB, AC, am/fm cass, 2475 Gladys lv msg tractor feed paper $95, Section for advice at 288-5814. dty pd $850, 224-9663 272-6968 Access to installations is allowed for ID card holders & pass holders 93 Oldsmobile Cutlass only. All guests must be signed on by ID card holders. El acceso a las 81 Cadillac, dsl, exccond, Supreme, new tires, AT, Pioneer SOB woofer for Instalaciones militares solamente Is estd permitido a las personas con 232-7027 PS, PB, exc cond, 223auto $75, 284-5593 tarjetas de identidad personal del Gobierno de los EEUU y el personal 81 Toyota Corolla, 1.8 7661 Pioneer stereo receiver con pases de acceso a las Instalaciones. Todos los invitados deben ser eng $1000, 284-3778 94 BMW 325is, dual air w/classic slide rule tuner, firmados ala entrada de las instalaclones por una persona con tarjeta de over 300 w $100/obo, identidad personal de los EEUU. 83 Pontiac 6000, runs, 4 bags, f/extras, LM, exc 288-7579 cyl, 4 dr, new baft $1200/ cond, 272-6275 obo, 272-6833 94 Daewoo Racer ETI, Sega Genesis w/10 Cakes; pooh bear, free catalog & cooking 84 BMW 628 CSI, like AC, '98 inspection, dty games, 272-6833 barney, mickey, dinosaur demos, 288-5879 new, will trade for jeep or pd $5500/obo, 230-1798 Sega Saturn w/5 games Cat, fem, adult, lovable & more $15, 284-6608 Philippinefood, individual pickup, 269-6728 94 Daewoo Racer STI, & extra control pad $100, friendly, gd w/kids free, Mary & group orders, delivery, 84 Chevy Camaro Z-28, dty pd $6000, 235-9827 260-1392 284-4183 Car-truck windshields or 284-6178 Rene wht, all pwr, 5 star rims, 94 Ford Tempo, LM Pioneer 6 CD changer, Cocker spaniel pup, blk leak repair, 195-9778 Piano lessons for beginbra $1500/obo, 288-5685 $3900, 285-6571 Kenwood amp $100/ea., & wht, all shots, kennel& Complimentary make ning to intermediate stu84 Mazda 929, runs gd, 94 Hyundai Elantra, bin, supplies $200, 284-6222 overs, coloranalysis, skin dents, 284-6731 Alicia needs some work, dty pd AC, am/fm cass, LM Smith Corona Deville510 Dalmaian up, wks cond analysis 285-5895 -wr rcso 10 m Cindy Pickuptrucktomovemisc $1200/obo, 261-3325 $8500, 284-6239 word processor $150, dewormed $150, 284items, all posts, 264-7591 84 Toyota Camry, 4 dr, 5 95 Ford Taurus, f/extras, 6536 Computer upgrades, Professionaldogtraining, spd, AC cass, grt cond 1 owner,exccond,dty pd Sony 10 CD changer, Dalmatian pups, 2 mos diag/repair, memory, private, reas rates, we $2500, 288-5182 $10,800, 230-0932 new, CD-505 RF w/re$150, 284-6536 drives, CD-ROM & more, come to you, 260-9079 84 Toyota Corolla, 4 dr, 95 Ford Taurus, f/extras, mote $250, 260-4094 Gerbils, gd mice $3.50/ .Pwr window &dr lock reST, AC, am/fm, gd cond 1 owner, exc cond, dty pd Super Nintendo $50, ea., 272-2042 Hair braiding reas, any pair, home service, 195$3000, 288-5122 $10,800, 230-0932 games $20/ea., Genesis style, 288-4771 Marcia $50, 272-5054 Carlos German shepherd, male, 9778 84 Volvo GLE sedan, gd 96 Mazda323,5 spd, AC, avail for stud service, Hair styling, reas price, Sheila family hair care, cond $2500/obo, 284am/fm cass, LM, red, dty Super Nintendo w/4 279-0203 cut, styles, wave & more, free consult, 288-4625 3829 after 6 pm wkdays pd $7500, 250-0311 games $100, 221-1181 Husky mix pups, 3fem 5 260-4857 Tired? overweight? no 85 Mustang conv, 6 cyl, Dodge Challenger, V8 Super Nintendo w/4 male, blue eyes $50,250Hair styling, reas, cut gimmicks.just results, AT$3300/obo,288-6789 eng, 4 spd, 260-5984 games, 2 controllers & 0413 style, waves & more, 233284-6886 85 Nissan Bluebird, 4 dr super game boy attach 1884 Stephanie '_Cmpu___$1_,_84-38 Pups, brn & blk $10/ea., Dogs Tupperware parties & insedanAC, PS, excrcnd,$ 232-4670 at 8 pm Dogs basic obedience dividual orders, 284-5531 dty pd $3995/neg, 254Symphonic VHS VCR w/ classes, start April, 2320956 19" high resolution DEC remote, grt cond i110/ Rottweiler avail for stud 7156 Tutor, cert teacher, perSony color mon, exccond obo, 236-7526 service, AKC reg, exc Maid bilin mature relik-12, all subjects, private 85 Pontiac Fiero GT, V6 $300, 276-6768 Yamaha synthesizer, like pedigree, 284-3094 M bi m & group sessions, 288sunroof, CD player, 4 spd, able, honest, CPR cert, 6799 PW, exc cond, dty pd 386, 540 MB w/printer, new $380, 268-2633 p/time, ref, 285-4779 $3500, 222-3451 sound, 14.4 modem & Zenith VHS camcorder Madceas 24513Upholstery, curtains & maore $550/aba, 284PCw/bafttcharger, 2baits I Maid, cleans, 284-5193 interior decoration, 26486 Landcruiser sta/wgn, 4m6 & ca $0aba, 260American Avon, f/sz broDunya 7591 AC, 4 spd, dsl, dty pd, & case $300/obo, 260chures & samples free, Maid, gd worker, honest, 260-4696 486 66 DX color mon, 20 2427 284-3028 exc w/kids, Tues & Fri, stress Tlef c 87 Ford Escort wgn, AC, MB Ram, 14.4 modem & Ama rout,26 e,26-88pist, srsreifbak8FodEct gAmore $1000,288-7748 Amway products, 261ref, 267-4858 problems, sportstherapy, am/fm cass, gd cond 5456 Maid, honest, reliable, 272-2810 $2500/obo, 284-3998 AT&T 486, 66 MHz, 14" Register/obtain birth cert hard worker, 2 days, 228Windshield far Cherokee 88 Be retta, runs g d c ma$ 20 MB2& 17' Frostfree refrig $345, Winshild orCheoke 88Beett, rns more $1000, 235-9827 7' office type ref rig $100, at PanamaCivil Registry 4294 Martha $185,CJWrangler$150& needs AC work, dty pd 12,000 Panasonic AC 223-2153/54 Darnell afMaid, live-in, biling, 233more, install inclu 195$2400/obo, 236-6303 Cannon BJ-250 color $225, 272-6210 ter 6 pm 3587 9778 88 Ford EscortSW,5spd, printer $125, 284-5593 2 single beds, desk w/ Authorized certified Eng/ Maid, live-in, Eng spk, grt AC, PB, PS, cruise, am/ Compaq 486 DX4, 100 bkcase, 3 drawer chest, Span translation for docs w/kids, 233-1863 fm cass, 1 owner, exc MHz, 8 MB Ram, 4x CD2 drawer chest$600/obo, & more, 222-2602/03 cond $3300, 285-4393 ROM $400, 288-5384 288-6428 Auto inspections and cMean, iron, annma ss, 17' Tracker deep V w 88 Ford Escort, AC, AT, Compaq 486, 66 MHz, 2-12x15 carpet $50/ea., registations, home delivkids r ref a 232-7156 HP Mercury, trailer, & tint, '98 inspection, 4 dr, 14.4 modem, 550 MB HD 9x12 carpets $40, 284ery, 222-2602/03 ..more $7900, 288-7997 w/hback$2500/obo, 288& more $650, 288-5438 6938 Bay-2602/03 Maid, live-in/out, filing, 9 Glastron w/trailer, 6297 Misc printers, software, 22' GE refrig, side by side spk, 288-7973 kids, 261-7387 272-2180 88 Hyundai Stellar, AT, parts& access, 284-4635 $400, 285-6571 Baby-sitter, Eng spk, gd Maid live-out boiling grt 19' Glastron, 351 Ford, new tires, exc cond Packard Bell 75 MHz 22'refrig,exccond $300, w/kids, 221-4501 Sandy w/kids, honest, reliable, 16' fiberglass 140 HP $3200, 261-2863 Pentium, 32 MB Ram & 285-6571 Baby-sitter, Eng spk, 284-5377 after 4 pm $500,237027 89 Cadillac, LM, all pwr, more $650/obo, 284-25' refrig $850, dryer, wkends, exc w/kids, 288Maid, live-out, biling, reli21' open boat, bikini top, x3-8cond $11,000/aba, AC's, tbl w/6 chairs, 2727024 before 4:30pm able, honest, hard 225 Johnson & more, dty 21 3-877 2180 Baby-sitter, even/ worker, 229-5690 pd $6100, 284-5691 89 Chevy Celebrity, 4cyl' 3 pc LR set w/matching wkends, mature, grt w/ Maid, live-out, Eng spk, 21' Seabird, GPS, depth 27" Magnavox TV, Sharp lamp, hunter green $900, kids, 288-6743 -days, grt w/kids, ref, 220suner, 91 J pth 902 VCR, 272-2180 288-5885 Baby-sitter, Sat & Sun, 0418 sounder, 91 Johnson, 89 Chevy Celebrity, AT B outrigger & more $8000, AC, exc and $3495,'284: Alpine CD player w/de3 pc, computer desk w/ honest, 228-2140 Maid, live-out, Eng spk, 232-4084 4286 tachface,exccond$200/ file & chair, exc cond Maribel after 6 pm grt w/kids, 6 -10 pm, ref, 24' Cuddy cabin, 260 HP 8od obo, 280-6244 $275, 283-6375 Baby-sitter, Span spk, 224-6571 $12,500, 272-2610 after PS, tilt, AC, AT, cruise, Camcorder VHS w/Z24+ 4 pc German shrunk wkends nights, honest, Maid, live-out, Span spk, 6 pm 280-6298 zoom $750, 27"TV $225, $1500, 288-6639 262-3923 after 5 pm .clean, cook, 3 days, 2885 seat cayuco w/rudder & 284-4635 All furniture & electrical Body tense, stressed 7194 trailer, grt cond $975, 89 Mercur ss,abe, wt Carvin212BelAircombo appliances, 272-6705 out? Therapeutic masMaid, live-out, Span spk, 284-3328 $6500/obo, 272-6841 amp $300, Tascam Baby crib $150, roll top sage $25, 288-7539 Mon -Fri, honest, ma95 Sea-Doo XP jet ski w/ 424MKIl 4 trk recorder desk $225, double headCakes, all occasions, ture, 263-3203 trailer & extras $4500, 72-6Corsca $3000/obo, $250, 261-5231 board $40, 260-6160 some delivery, prof cake Body sugaring---the natu213-8272 Casiopedia handheld PC Bkcase, oak veneer findecorator, 284-6608 ral method of hair re97 ZX11100 jet ski w/ 91 Toyota Tercel DX, 5 A-11 $300, 260-4696 ish $125, 283-6375 Mary maval 288-7831/6194 trailer, 6 mos, 289-6431 sdCnetires& ms, Direct TV Satellite dish Brass & glass, 4 pc DR Cakes, cinnamon rolls, Amy Yamaha, new 25 H P outtint $5500, 284-4898 $475, 221-4501 tbl & chairs $175, 284& cookies, 284-3431 PADI scuba classes, can board $1700, 269-6728 92 Chevy Camaro $4200, Darlene meet any schedule, day bad$7026-28 285-6571 ,Fax mach, Sharp UX-1 02 4138 Daln me nyshdle a-2567 $75/obo, 263-2737 Carpet 12' x 15' Igt grn Cakes: sheet $12.50, or even, 288-5045 .92 Ford Taurus, leather $75/aba 263r73 Carpe 12'4 d x 1' ok desk f/sheet $20; 2 day's noPampered chef-kitchen int, loaded, exc cond Kenwood stereo system $w8 4 drawer 284-3491 tice, please284-6875 Pat store that comes to you, 74 Jaguar XJ6, refur$7200, 260-8264 bished, 232-7027

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Tropic Times Classified Ads Apri B9 Carpet7l/2'x 101/2' blue Sm animal carrier$1 5, litHoward 10 A 86 Chevy S-10 Blazer, 4 cond, LM, wht w/spice soft $50, gd cond 284-3491 sm ter box $5, waterbed Howard 108 A x 4, 6 cyl, ATM, PL, PW, top/int, 288-5327after 4 sheets $5 set, 284-4898 AC $3700/obo, 284-6718 pm Couch,lvseat, reclinerset 1,2,3 high ch Howard 593 B, 7 -9 am 8 $800, vertical blinds $45, m. c seat r, seatcar Stainless steel sink used 86 Isuzu Trooper, rebuilt 96 Ford ExplorerXLT, LM, carpet $60, 284-4897 rer 236-0976 in darkrooms, 226-8139 p.t. *.d eng, new paint & tires wht, 4x4,5 D, tilt, AC, PS __ft __r ____pm__$4000, 250-0311 $23,000, 223-2152 Curtains fortropicalhous12 string Yamaha guitar ar 8 lb elect winch $o s06-V4x4 ing, 230-2384 after 5 pm w/hard case $350 272Warn 8000 lb elect winch 10 spd bike, ladies $50, 87 Dodge Dakota, 6 cyl, 98 Honda CR-V, 4 x 4, $500, 270-1289 static bike $35 264-9676 4 x 4, AC, LM, new tires, AT, new $18,300, 269DR set, chrome & glass, 1220 after 6 pm deby gad $5ril, 272-5853 371dil5wl GE 14' refrig, needs re13" clrTV, rugs, Nintendo Weber gas grill w/bottle Treadmill walking mach dty pd $5800,g272-5853 3715 pair, 264-9676 w/30 games & more $50, 284-3388 $270, 272-2262 87 Jeep Wrangler5 spd, GMC van, 9 pass, 8 cyl, DR set, Rosewood, like $250/obo, 284-6084 Wedding dress sz/7-8, Complete reloading soft top $7000, 284-4484 PB, PS, AC, front & rear, new $1500, 285-6571 1983 Toyota Tercel new Iong train w/lots of sequins equip, exc cond, many 88 Nissan Pathfinder, 4x gdcond$5000,288-6133 DR set, rosewood, seats parts & repair manual, & pearls $225/obo 262items $150, 272-1213 4, AT, AC, exc cond 8 -10, like new $3500, healthy cook books $10/ 8950 SoloFlex mach $300, $8000, 270-1289 228-3896 ea., 272-2042 Windshield for Cherokee 283-4032 89 Chevy Sport van, 8 w DR tbl w/6 chairs, 2 3 tires 175/70R13 $15 $185, Wrangler CJ $150, 210 spd men's bikes cyl, seats 8 dty pd $2000/ 229-7995 couches, 236-0978 ea./neg, Bissell Vac $20, install include, 195-9778 racing style $30, $35, obo, 4 in 1 stroller, gd cond, DR tbl, rattan base, glass 281-7785 288-7989 89 Jeep Cherokee Limgender neutral, 236-7526 top, 4 chairs $350, up4 suitcases, 2 med/2 Ig Super Alan 60 cm Italian $6000/obo 250-0551 8 mm projector, gd operright trzr, 13' $250, 223$100, 263-9814 82 Kawasaki 750 LTD, ex Road Race bike w/fork, eating cond 272-5344 1216 4 tires 185/60R 14, gd cond, LM, w/extras, dty like new $695, 212-2914 89-1GMC,4x4,4.3L, atnyond 272-5344 Curtains, mini blinds, cond $60, 288-5933 pd $1950/obo, 262-8950 Camouflage camel back LM eAnyone interested in obCaofaecae ak284-6539 tamning Heritage Health rugs, kitchen wood block Beautiful formal lace lv msg mule max, gear, 100 oz 2-6968 tbl w/2 benches & 2 gown, new, wine $40, 91 Kawasaki GP2500, reservoir $52/firm 28890 Dodge Dakota, new products, 272696 chairs, 272-2361 226-8139 LM, 2 helmets, 1 match6674 AC, batt & radiator, Computer desk or work Household items at barBench & weights,ing $2200, 288-6626 Schwinn mountain bike, $9000, 221-4501 station no more than ganpie,26-73ngnh& wegt cwnnmuti ie $100, 236-7073 gain prizes, 236-0713 vacuum cleaners, GM 91 Suzuki 450, runs grt, 15" frame, new $275, 90 suzu, 4 cyl, AC, Lg DR set w/2 hutches, 15" rims, fencing 272LM, very clean, '98 in284-6478 camper w/hitch, TW, dty DJ for party, also briefseats 8, 272-1213 2180 spection, $1100/neg, Complete scuba di pd $4900ase, eond, p1 n Lg stainless steel ice Breast pump $15, mater229-7995 gear, new, except tank msg Family forour maid, Span mach $1200, floor buffer nity belt $10, 284-4898 93 Yamaha 90cc, dty pd, $750,221-9532 91 Chevyconversion van spk $150/mo, 288-9288 $75. 272-6210 Century stroller$40, 264runs grt, $600, 288-7989 Surfboard 6'4" x 18 1/4", /any access, 272trail 28706orL w/ Mahogany & satin sofa & 9676 94 ZX900R, one owner, Rainbow"tractop&board chair, exc cond $400, Herbitrail set D&D header, LM, very sock all for $180, 28891 Jeep Wrangler, needs Maid, live-out for gen 272x1136 n -,fComplete Herbilset cleanw/extras,289-6431 5045 to be assembled $3800, housework, honest, reli272-136for hamsters/gerbils$15,cenwetas 8-41 54 228-3896 able, 2_-2384 fter5 p Mahogany DR tbl, coffee 226-8139 after 5 p.m. 96 YamahaXT225, street Exercise mach Pwr 22 able,o230-2384 after pm tbI, gas stove, washer, CTC Physical Science & trail, runs exc LM Rider, new $1!95, 27292 Dodge Caravan, AC, Q/sz box spring & matt, 261-3325 s book $35, 288-7727 $2800/obo, 284-6592 6674 call 1-7 pm PS, PB, AT, 288-6570 gd cond 284-6270 Oval tbl /5 chairs $85, Executiver resum nn s7 D350 SE, LM, must T 93 suzu Rodeo, AC, PS 4 Rims/tires for 1996 reclinew~stDR 350236 SErne LMr mustarn elct d 30/bo $11,200, 236-698 7 Nissan Sentra, gd cond, 0548 teed $24.95, 272-5377 284-6129 7694 Plymouth Grand Voyexc Panasonic micro $50, Forpar-Harley D n cod d o pd $ager R/F Ac, exc cond Sm refrig, toaster oven, For parts: $10,500, 288-6321 twin/sz matt 233-3587 288-6041 -rus SW., 85 Pontiac Sportster, 1000cc, iron 284-6129 Praple dishwasher Fero 86 Land Cruiser,head w/extras, $3700, 94 Suzuki Vitara cony, Joe Martinez Poirtabl dishwaeeshe Fiero,8 Cruiser, 77te Plmot Voyge, AC, custom wheels, exc Someonetofixa Dirt Devil Wierl wahe needs413 262-7983run $ cond $8500, 230-1274 vac reas, 288-7785 timer $25, 250-0413 Gerry baby monitor w/ 288-9226 before 5 pm coa Q/sz sleeper sofa, Ivseat night light $15,284-6526 78 Jimmy GMC, 4 x 4, 94Toyota 4x4, ex condo, Tutor for 12 yr old, 6th w/ottoman $600, 236Gerry baby backpack Clayton 1060 A, 6 am -AC, AT, exc cond $2500, 0402 285-6289 1283 $10, 284-6526 Noon 272-6026 Woodbab chngig tb $1, 24-626 -Noo -72-02695 Ford Ranger XLT, AC, TV stand able to hold med Wood baby changing tbI Hand tools, misc items, Clayton 302 B, 8 am -1 84 Isuzu Trooper, 4x4, CD changer, AT, LM TV & mini system stereo $50, oak coffee tbl $200, 236-1283 pm AC, runs gd $2200, 239$1c, g0T,2LMTV92 mini systemse 236-1283 4320 $10,000, 260-1392 288-6799 Rachelle Jacuzzi Leisure Bay, Clayton 634 C, 7 -10 am 95 Isuzu Rodeo V-6, AT, Young person to play & $300, 270-1top/bottom seats 4-5 x8'$2,795/ Kb85 Chevy SBlazer, will consider partial trade speak Eng to 3 yr old girl, Single bed complete, Lawn chairs, shelf, LM$2400/obo,280-6170 95 Jeep Wrangler, exc 6725 wood head boards $75, plants, 272-2361 272-6838 after 3 pm S Lawn, 12 HP, 38" cut, 7 Sofa, Ivseat, off wht,loose spd w/utility trailer, needs pillow, slip cover design, starter $450, 232-7113 exc cond $750, 283-6375 Ip c _Tropic Times Ad Form Lgy Suneam gas BBQ w/ Solid carved Mahogany tank $120, 284-3491 entertainment center w/ drawers & cab $1000, Little Tykes gym $150, 284-6979 260-6160 Note: Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis to military members, Tan carpet 6' x 10' $40, LP Bongos, congas, timcivilian DoD employees, and employees of other goverment agencies. Ads will be accepted only 284-4635 bales, 288-7194 after 6 for NON-COMMERCIAL services orgoods offered bythe advertiseroran immediate family member. Twin bed, dresser, night p Greg Suspected abuse of the ad services will results in non-publication of the ad(s) in questions. For tbl w/glass $395, 272Men's Army dress blues, information 285-6612. 2314 worn once $100, 288* Deadline for submitting ads is 9 a.m. Monday. If Monday is a holiday, the deadline is 1 Twin matt, box spring, K 4748 p.m. the Friday before. sz steel frame, curtains Moving sale; misc. furni* Read instructions below, then completely fill out the ad form. Incomplete ads will not be w/rods, shelves, 272ture, strollers, hi-chair & printed. 2180 more, 284-4484 Whirlpool AC, 5,900 BTU, Nordic Track, f/size matFl A n i m a I s Kenmore washer, dryer, tress, 288-5135 Fl Available Eli Boats & Campers ___________________________________ hvy dty, exc cond, 288Patio tbis, plants, 261l Cars 5327 3325 E] Computers PRICE HOME PHONE WhtJenny Lind crib, conPlaystation games; Triple El Electronics vert to daybed $100/firm, play 97, Maddes; 97, El Found check one category per ad form. 284-3798 9 am -7 pm Nuclear strike $30 -$40, E-Household Two ads per sponsor each week. Include a home and duty phone. El Lost l5-word limit (the staff may edit to conserve space). Wood f/sz bed frame $70/ 272-6833 D Miscellaneous Ads must be re-submitted each week. obo, 236-7526 Roller blades $30, Little Motorcycles We will not take ads by phone or fax (Atlantic residents may fas ads). Woodgrain look metal Tykes Sand box $35 Patio Sale, Ads offering weapons or commercial real estate will not be run. 284-4635 Date: __ / Ads offering tropical animals will not be run. bkcase, 14 shelves $60, Seiko, wi c Sporting Goods Mail ads to: Tropic Times, Unit 7145, APO AA 34004 or deposit them in the 272-6705 Seiko, wristwatch, wht Trucks & Vans drop box at the Fort Clayton Post Office or Howard Public Affairs Office. face, gold tone $95, 272Wanted Information below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication and 6845 will not be released to third parties. Sewing machine, cast SPONSOR'S NAME RANK/GRADEGracobaby strolleronthe iron pots, couch & love road Pizza Hut & church seat, kitchen tbl, 284ORG. DUTY PHONE on Clayton, reward 2366239 1 1283

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BiOTropic Times ~ ~ o m nt B10 A 9,18ommunity Passover celebrates miraculous redemption by Capt. Matt Schweitzer and realize that it is the product of a Ditime had come for The AlTropic Times contributor vine creator who controls everything. mighty to publicly present HOWARD AFB -The Jewish holiIf someone who doesn't believe this Himself to the world, and day of Passover is fast approaching and happens to witness a miracle which is so thereby begin the conversion with it brings the remembrance of some blatant that it could only be explained as to monotheistic belief. of the most miraculous events in the hisan act of God, that person would very After the events in Exotory of the world. As told in the book of quickly become a believer. dus, it became a Jewish Exodus, it is an amazing account of salvaBut this is not what God wants to resonsibility to spread monotion by the hand of God. happen, because the newfound belief theism to the nations. Unfortunately, many people today would be based solely on the miracle, Although some people do have difficulty believing the story of the and as such it did not come about not yet except God's One10 plagues and the splitting of the sea, through free will. ness, monotheism has beand point out that we never see such This concept is also one of the reacome a well known concept, miracles in modern times. An objective sons God allows some righteous people and therefore the need for person would quickly counter such a to suffer and some wicked people to blatant miracles has diminclaim by saying that we do have miracles prosper. ished. Cauries) today, you just have to open your eyes If a piece of candy fell from the sky Now we must study the The traditional Seder meal contains foods and see them. every time we did a good deed, and we events of the past and try to that are symbolic of the Jewish experience Although this is true, it is also true were zapped by lightning every time we see the truth using our God in Egypt. that the kinds of miracles which happen did something bad, then we would begiven intellect and soul. today are much more subtle than those come like trained mice whose actions are This is one reason Jews celebrate the It is also forbidden to eat any food which occurred in Egypt 3,300 years ago. based strictly on reward and punishment. Holiday of Passover. So that the memory containing leaven, which is why matzos So the question becomes why we don't So if God does not want our belief in of those ancient miracles will forever be are eaten throughout the Holiday, to resee blatant miracles today. Him to be based on blatant miracles, ingrained in our minds. member the flat bread that did not have To answer, one must understand the then why did He cause such miracles to This year Passover begins at suntime to rise when the Jews rushed to concept of free will. God created human occur in Egypt? down Friday, and continues until sunleave the land of Egypt. All other grain beings with the ability to choose, a qualOne reason is because the world at down April 18. During this period there products are removed from the home. ity which is unique from all the other that time was immersed in idolatry. The are many festive meals and special For information or assistance with creatures who use instinct only. He concept of One God did not exist, except prayers, as well as certain days when Passover festivities, call Rabbi Aaron wants us to objectively look at the world among the descendants of Abraham. The work is prohibited. Laine at 223-3383. Community Briefs Holiday closures Pinewood Derby race NAF sale 8 a.m. -noon April 23 at The Community Bank, Clayton Drop by for the annual Cub the Big Tree Bohio. and Diablo Vehicle Registration and Scout Pinewood Derby Race 2 UO office closed the Exonerations offices are closed p.m. April 18 at the Curundu Elfor the Easter holiday. ementary School gymnasium. For The University of Oklahoma more information about the race, Off'ice located at the Howard EduProtestant Services Passover festivities call 288-6626. cation Center is closed Tuesdays Saturday 5 p.m. Service The Jewish holiday of Passover .and Thursdays until April 23. For Sunday 9 a.m. Service begins at sundown Friday and conVolunteer week more information, call 285-6901. 12:30 p.m. Gospel Service tinues until sundown April 18. For USARSO Volunteer Week will d more information, contact Rabbi be observed April 19 -25 with a Recognition day Jewish Events Laine at 223-3383 or Capt. Matt kick-off ceremony 3 p.m. April 20 An Army Community of ExcelFriday sundown Passover Schweitzer at 284-7773. at Valent Recreation Center. For lence Recognition Day celebration more information, call the Installatakes place 3 p.m. April 24 at VaFriday -Saturday Seder meals will be held in Omega Psi Phi meets tion Volunteer Center at 288-9303. lent Recreation Center. local Synagogue Omega Psi Phi Fraternity is meetSanta Clara Retreat ing 3 p.m. Saturday at the Fort CTC updateSatClrRe et Catholic Services Clayton Valent Recreation Center. Starting April 20, Pell Grant apThe Protestant Women of the Friday 3 p.m. Confessions For more information, call Maj. plications will be available at the Chapel are hosting a Santa Clara 3:30 -5 p.m. Stations of the Cross, Fisher at 260-7113 or Jesse Owens Central Texas College offices. StuRetreat April 24 -26 for all Good Friday Liturgy at 288-9274. dents graduating must schedule an women. For more information, call Sy9 appointment with the student serVan Runals at 288-4772. Saturday -11:30 a.m. Easter Vigil Service Literature class vices specialist prior to the April Sunday 10:30 am. Easter Sunday Mass The Fort Clayton Education 30 graduation registration deadline. NAF sale/flea market Center is offering a GED InterpretFor more information, call 285The 24th Services is hosting a Fort Clayton's Easter Sunrise Service takes place 6 ing Literature and the Arts work4803/284-3150. NAF sale and Flea Market April 25 a.m. Sunday on the Youth Soccer Field next to the shop 9 a.m. -noon Monday -on the Parade Field in front of Vehicle Registration Building. The service will be folWednesday at the center. For more Texas A&M Muster Building 714. For more informalowed by a continental breakfast at Mother's Bohio. information, call 288-9292. The Panama Texas A&M annual tion, call 284-6107/7278. For more information, call 288-9312/9316. Dog classesAggie Muster and Dinner takes __________________________Dog___classes__ place 7 p.m. April 21 at the Club Welfare requests The Club Canino de Panama is de Golf Ejecutivo on Balboa AvThe Officers' and Civilians' offering basic dog obedience classes enue. For more information, call Spouses Club is accepting welfare 7 -8 p.m. Wednesdays starting Lilibeth B. Lanoni at 272-5166. requests from community organiWednesday. For more information, zations until April 30. Send your call Bridget Groome at 232-7156. Earth Day events requests to OCSC, Unit 1346, Air F rce Celebrate Earth Day 7 -9 a.m. APO AA 34004. West Bank Teen Club S scholarships April 22 by cleaning up Veracruz 44775 The Isthmian Chapter of the AsBeach, attending an open-base tour ACAPworkshops Ho r sociation of the U.S. Army is 10 -2 p.m., a guided tour 10:30 Attend a Job Search Workshop Howard Youth Center granting two scholarships for acaa.m. -1:30 p.m. of the Toucan Eco9 a.m. -4 p.m. Tuesdays or a Pre284-5615/4700 -demic achievement to high school Trail or help plant trees at noon. separation Briefing 1:30 -3:30 p.m. $ seniors. Submit your applications Thursdays throughout April in Child Development Center by Wednesday. For more informaNAF sale Building 128, Fort Clayton. For 284-3711/6135 tion, call Lina Norris at 285-9903. Howard Lodging is having a more information, call 288-9277. Army Cocoli chapel event The Horoko Assembly of God P so e celbra ion Clayton Youth Services "Cocoli Chapel" is having a special 288.6451 Easter Worship service at 10 a.m. This year, all Panama-based military followed by an Easter egg personnel of the Jewish faith and their immediSchoolhunt and a fellowship meal. For ate families have the opportunity to attend the 288 51 (Fe) more information, call 283-3220. Liberal Congregation Kol Shearith Israel service Clayton Teen Center E -celent eand Seder 6:30 p.m. Friday in their social hall or 288-74 E BSA employment the Traditional Congregation Beth El prayer and Eggs, eggs and more eggs of Submit your information for the Seder 7:15 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Despite the Student Services Center all colors and designs. Go' Boy Scouts of America office manApril 6 deadline, reservations can still be made. For 272-2834 and get 'em kids. ager and sales clerk position by more information, call Rabbi Aaron Peller at 225April 17. For more information, 4100/6412 or Beth El's Rabbi Aaron Laine at 223-3383. call 285-4359.

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Tropic Times 1 1 (___ITCommunity April 9, 998 B11 photo co .1syof Girl Scouts -P-sms Let the adventure begin The Girl Scouts of America -Panama went on a splashingly-fun trip to Fort Sherman. Sabrina Dooley and Dorothy Jorgenson, top left, were digging away at some beach fun. The trip was exhausting but the girls proved that they too can "be prepared" and better -afterall, who needs sleeping bags when you have a room with beds and who needs radios when you have telephones. For information about future trips or how you can join the Girl Scouts of America -Panama, call 288-7817. Military VIPs get 15 minutes of fame MAXWELL AFB, Ala. (Defense Commissary All four were chosen from among 219 nominations by Agency) -Tony the Tiger has an even bigger reason spouse clubs or family services support centers in 33 to shout "They're Gr-r-r-r-r-eat!" states and 11 countries. Six judges each picked their top The four 1997 "VIP" honorees from the National Milisix candidates "blind" from a packet of nominations tary Family Association (NMFA) will be sharing space they received. The four winners were chosen from 36 fion his box of flakes during the early part of May. VIPs nalists. are "Very Important Patriots" who perform significant The 1997 winners were all flown to Washington, volunteer service in the military and civilian community. D.C., for sight-seeing and the annual NMFA luncheon For the first time, those outstanding people will be feameeting in November where they received a plaque, a tured on a quarter of a million boxes of cereal in commis$1,000 prize, and $1,000 for their nominating organizasaries worldwide. tion. This year, according to Kellogg account executive "They really are great," says NMFA VIP program Lynn Curry, "we decided to go that extra mile -like the coordinator Tomi Busch. "We were fortunate to have a volunteers do -and put the winners on special boxes of diverse group of winners this year representing the Frosted Flakes." The four appear as a group on the four services; women and men; active duty and front of the package and are profiled individually on the spouses; and enlisted and officers." back, along with the NMFA. The featured VIPs are Tech. Sgt. Luke A. Humphrey, The specially designed 25 ounce boxes will be availNavy Commander Catherine Osman, Sgt. Ist Class able at commissaries for about two weeks in early May Tammie T. Holmes, and Marine spouse Peggy Milliman. or "while supplies last," according to Defense Commissary Agency Promotions Water conservation: Needed now more than ever Manager Joyce Chandler. And according to Cereal FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The water situation is critical Category Manager Chuck (Courtesy) Your assistance to conserve water can help the community during this waPrutch, "a quarter of a milNavy Commander Catherine Osman, Sgt. 1st ter shortage crisis and reduce the chances for possible water rationing. Just lion is not really that many Class Tammie T. Holmes, Marine spouse as we are conserving water to head off this possibility, the measures you when you realize we have Peggy Milliman and Tech. Sgt. Luke A. take can greatly assist our efforts. Here's your tip of the week. 298 commissaries. It's just Humphrey will be sharing space with Tony in enough to be effective, the next few cereal boxes. The four were se*Always run full loads when running your washing machine or dishwasher, and not too many to create lected 1997 "VIP" honorees for the National logistics problems!" Military Family Association Need a ride? We know when and where to pick you up New route available Downtown hospitals via Clayton Your shuttle bus service is now available Fort Clayton San Fernando Paitilla from the Howard Lodge, Building 708 to locations Building 519 Hospital Hospital on base and Horoko Golf Course daily. The ser7 a.m. 7:45+ a.m. 8+ a.m. vice is free to Howard Lodging guests. All other 9 9:45+ 10:10+ patrons pay only $.25 one way. 11 11:45+ 12:10+ pm. 1 p.m. 1:45+p.m. 2:10+ Howard and Horoko 3 3:45+ 4:10+ 9a.m.* 5 5:45+ 6:10+ Bus Stop #38 (Base Theater) 9:02 Downtown hospitals via Howard Bus Stop #35 (Commissary) 9:04 Bus Stop #845 (Farfan) 9:08 Howard San Fernando Paitilla Bus Stop #1012(Gateway) 9:10 Theatre Hospital Hospital Rodman Gate 9:13 7 a.m. 8:15+ a.m. 8:30+ a.m. G Horoko Golf Course 9:15 9 10:15+ 10:30+ Lodging 9:30 11 12:15+ 12:30+ pm. For more information, call the Howard Lodg1 p.m. 2:15+p.m. 2:30+ ing Office at 284-4914/6411 or the 24th Trans** The shuttle bus runs from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 3 4:15+ 4:30+ portation Squadron at 284-5058. stopping at each location every half-hour. 5 6:15+ 6:30+

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Tropic Times ~o f B12 Ap9, 199Youh Scene Career Day Dana Summerton and her teacher Amy Lappe, left, Javier Hernandez, middle, and Dakota Summerton, right, stand in front of their classes after spending a day at work with their parents on March 27. The students from Fort Clayton Elementary School went back to their classroom to talk about what they learned at work. A day at work Women's History Month in conjunction with Career Day was a complete challenge for little Kristen Dorby, a second grader at Curundu Elementary School. Kristen shadowed the school nurse, Molly Idol. Since the beginning of the school year, Kristen has been volunteering her services in the school clinic. She knows all the procedures and requirements to take in a sick student at the clinic. Kristen is seen here reassuring Amanda Young, a student who fell and hurt her wrist. AAFES Weekly Gr iue S ling (Tropic Tms Challenge Award winners Students Tasha Sanders Last Week's Winner: Philip French, 9 and Juan Carlos Aviles 4, from CES pose after receiving their Certificates of Achievement from Barbara Cairns, school principal and Molly Idol, school nurse, for the outstanding and article they wrote on Praise. Kid's Karnival (Courtesy) Join the Easter Egg Hunt 8 a.m. H a p py birthW ayl Saturday of the Howard Parade Field. kids, come join us and hunt hr eggs and have your photo taken with the Easier Bunny. Immediately following the Easter Hunt, show up for the Kid's Karnival in the Howard Youth Center and Pavilion. Fun for the whole family including 5A vendors, ballrooms, games for all ages, Shawn McDonough, 4 Gionela Guillett, 3 Damaris Rodriguez, 6 Robert Guillory, 4 prizes, fingerprinting and ploture-taking, April 7 April 8 April 8 April 10 Dip Derby, information/ display booths, Sparky the Fire Dog and lots of 3 ~Other surprise$.* April Malone, 2 Brandon Huynh, 1 Melissa Graham, 7 Alexis Glaze, 4 April 10 April 11 April 12 April 13