Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text


Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


rTropic
Jff~l^_ L __


VoL VII, No. 44


Quarry Heights, Rep


Times

public of Panama Friday, Nov. 4, 1994


< Cubans tear down
Sgate over cigarettes
4' 'W - , PANAMACITY(Reuters)-FiveU.S.soldiersandthree
.. . Cuban migrants were injured during a stone-throwing
confrontation at one of the Cuban camps in Panama, offi-
cials said Monday.
S, A group of about 50 to 75 Cubans threw stones at U.S.
'; "l. "i; ,- : B soldiers and tore down a gate late Sunday at one of four
camps holding about 9,000 Cuban boat people.
A dispute among the Cubans over cigarettes sparked the
Incident, a military official told Reuters.
One U.S. soldierrequired five stitches after stone hithis
S. .,i.. O, head, but no one needed hospitalization, the official said.
SCThe three injured Cubans were hurt by other Cubans during
4". the confrontation, the official added.
i lifek i i hThe incident reflects rising tension at the camps, where
migrants who fled Cuba this summer in tiny rafts are upset
Sat U.S. policy says that they must return to Cuba before
seeking legal migration to the United States.
On Saturday, several hundred camp residents protested
their plight during a visit by Cuban-born baseball star Jose
Canseco.
U.S. soldiers at the camps are unarmed, but have access
- Sto riot shields to protect themselves from migrant protests,
U.S. military officials said.
"We will do anything short of weapons to protect our
. n . forces...but we don't want this to appear like prison camp,"
U.S. military spokesperson Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder told
Staff Sgt. Ran Clawson (U.S. Air Force) reporters.
Officials downplayed the recent incidents and said most
AVolunteering at cam p of the tension was limited to one of the four camps that sit
near the Panama Canal.
Operation Safe Haven Reception Center volunteer Betsy Dunn listens as a Cuban describes "It was a combination ofagitators' fueling unrest with a
his life in his homeland. Volunteers like Dunn are an integral part of the reception center's staff. frustration on the part of the rest of the camp members at
For more information on the center and its staff, see story and photos on Page 3. theirsituation," Brig. Gen. Jim Wilson, commanderofJoint
Task Force Safe Haven, told Reuters.



Fight against drugs continues


Military spearheads interagency counterdrug efforts
by Capt. Jim Knotts international drug control policies to inter- The strategy concentrates on the follow- prioritize our missions. We all recognize
SOUTHCOM Public Affairs Office dict and reduce the supply of illegal drugs ing areas: that this is not a short-term problem, and
entering the United States. *Assisting "source countries" in ad- there are no short term solutions. We in-
WASHINGTON - "Illegal drugs kill One conference was sponsored by the dressing the root causes of narcotics pro- tend to fight this problem on every front,
10,000 Americans each year and cost $75 U.S. Interdiction Coordinator, Adm. Rob- duction and trafficking through assistance from the jungles of Peru to the streets of
billion in crime and health care costs," Gen. ert E. Kramek, U.S. Coast Guard comman- for sustainable development, strengthen- the United States," Brown said.
Barry R. McCaffrey, commander in chief, dant. The other was co-sponsored by ing democratic institutions, and coopera- McCaffrey, who co-sponsored the con-
U.S. Southern Command, told an inter- Brown and McCaffrey. tive programs to counter narcotics traffick- ference to discuss how the Southern Com-
agency counterdrug conference in Wash- During the conferences, the interagen- ers, money laundering and supply of mand can better support the lead agencies,
ington, D.C. last week. cy group re-evaluated the counterdrug chemical precursors. reiterated that this is not a military prob-
McCaffrey also emphasized that while threat, assessed past actions and examined *Combating international narco-traf- lem with a military solution, but the DoD
there can be- no short-term victory in the how best to implement their portion of the picking organizations. remains committed to the effort.
war on drugs, the cost to all countries is so national drug control strategy as directed *Emphasizing more selective and flex- Since becoming involved in the
devastating that the United States and its by President Clinton. ible interdiction programs near the U.S. counterdrug effort in 1989, the U.S. mili-
allies must remain engaged to fight this "Last year, the President signed Presi- border, in the transit zone, and in the source tary has been under strict policy guidance
problem for the next generation. dential Directive 14, which lays out our countries. not to become involved in actual
Although there are no "silver bullets" International Supply Reduction policy. An The interagency representatives from counterdrug field operations. This means
that can quickly end the problem of drug important part of that policy is shifting the the Department of State, Drug Enforce- the military provides training, intelligence,
trafficking, the Clinton administration's in- focus of our efforts to the cocaine source ment Agency, U.S. Customs Service, and equipment and planning assistance, but the
teragency counterdrug team reaffirmed the countries," Brown said. Department of Defense reevaluated the U.S. military does not arrest anyone or con-
U.S. commitment to remain engaged in the The source area refers to the Andean drug threat and agreed that a gradual, pre- duct raid operations.
fight against narcotrafficking. Ridge countries of Colombia, Ecuador, meditated shift in resources from the tran- According to Brown, the successes in
"Illegal drug trafficking is a threat to Peru and Bolivia where 90 percent of the sit area to the source area was the most the counterdrug effort are not widely
the security of the United States and our world's coca is grown and refined into co- prudent course of action for the future. known or accepted in the U.S. Congress.
counterdrug efforts will always be a high caine. However, with so many U.S. and in- Brown suggested that the interagency
national priority," said Dr. Lee Brown, di- President Clinton's shift in the interna- ternational agencies involved, close coor- must develop measures of effectiveness,
rector of the White House Office of Na- tional supply reduction effort is known as dination is crucial. by which they can better articulate how re-
tional Drug Control Policy, at a press con- the source nation strategy. The intent is to "We recognize that we need to work sources match the strategy, better measure
ference Oct. 27. concentrate efforts in a relatively confined together, especially as resources become the results, and better hold agencies and
The remarks came at the end of two in- area to catch the drugs before they become tighter," said Brown. individuals accountable for their perfor-
teragencv conferences that focused on U.S. dispersed in the transit nineline "Wewill havetonool ourrresourcesand mance.


More cases of Dengue fever are
confirmed and several active breed-
ing sites are found in housing areas.


Community members raise their
spirits during local Halloween fes-
tivities.


*New housing policies, Page 4
*Distant Haven closes, Pages 8&9
*Girls basketball champs, Page 9


- U�� UM.


............. j[.- ................











2 Tropic Times
Nov. 4, 1994


Tropic Times changes
deadline for holiday
The next issue of the Tropic Times will
be dated Nov. 10. The Tropic Times office
will be closed Nov. 11, Veterans Days. All
organizations that pick up the Tropic Times
from the print plant, Building 405, Corozal,
can pick up the newspaper beginning at
6:30 a.m. Thursday. Deadlines for classi-
fied ads and news articles will be noon, to-
day. For additional information, call 285-
6612/4666.

Power outage at
Fort Davis Saturday
Fort Davis will experience a power out-
age 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday for substa-
tion switches hook-up.

Future Community Bank
closing announced
The Community Bank will be closed
Thursday for the Primer Grito Los Santos.

Servicemembers offered
pre-separation briefing
A career information team from
Charleston, S.C., will give a pre-separation
briefing for anyone retiring or separating
from the military within the next six
months. The briefing will be held 8 a.m.-1
p.m. Wednesday at the Family Service
Center, Building 40, Rodman NS. For
more information, call 283-5749.

Adopt-An-Airman
program under way
The 24th Wing is sponsoring a program
in which members of the Howard and Al-
brook community may invite unaccompa-
nied airmen stationed in Panama into their
homes for the holiday meals. People may
sponsor airmen any day (or days) from
Nov. 23-27 for the Thanksgiving meal, and
from Dec. 23 - 27 for the Christmas meal.
To sign up or for more information, call
Lizca Fearon at 284-5650/3153.

CGOC holds moonlight
pool party at Albrook
The Company Grade Officers Council
invites all CGOs and their families or
friends to a moonlight pool party 6-10 p.m.
Nov. 19 at the Albrook pool. Food and
beverages will be "potluck," and CGOC
sponsors are asking for small donations to
cover additional expenses-$2 for singles,
$4 for couples, and $5 for entire families.
For more information, call 2nd Lt. Milo
Quesinberry at 284-4140/3114.

CID recruiting briefings
set for Fridays
The Criminal Investigations Division
holds recruiting briefings 10 a.m. Friday
at Building 705, Corozal. For information,
call Special Agent Erin Milanes at 285-
4314/4745.

Health clinics announce
upcoming closings
The medical clinics at Gorgas Army
Community Hospital and Fort Sherman
Health Clinic will close Nov. 11 and 24 in
celebration of Veteran's Day and Thanks-
giving. No appointments will be made, but
the Emergency Room at Gorgas and Fort
Sherman will be open.

MEDDAC closes for
change of command
U.S. Army MEDDAC is holding a
change of command ceremony Wednes-
day. The medical clinics at Gorgas Army
Community Hospital will be closed until 1


tIRdefly

AMCfih scheul


All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for priority mission
requirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608.


Saturday
5:45am B-727 Howard AFB
Atlanta lAP, GA (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
1:45pm C-5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Dover AFB, DE
Sunday
4:45pm B-757 Howard AFB (C,0)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Monday
5:40am C-130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB


p.m. No appointments will be made dur-
ing the morning, but the Emergency
Room will remain open.

Equal opportunity rep
course offered at Clayton
An Equal Opportunity Representative
Course will be held Nov. 14-18 in Build-
ing 156, Fort Clayton. Names must be
submitted to the U.S. Army South EO Of-
fice no later than Monday. For informa-
tion, call 287-4260/4268.

Special Olympics needs
volunteers for 1995
The planning committee for the 1995
Special Olympics-Panama Canal Region
is looking for volunteers to chair various
committees. A meeting will be held 2:30
p.m. Tuesday on the 3rd floor of Building
156, Fort Clayton.

Team building program
to meet in November
The Army Family Team Building
training program will hold classes Nov.
28-Dec. 2. The training is for volunteers
and family members. It develops leader-
ship abilities and prepares families to take
advantage of available services. The train-
ing also enhances family life and overall
Army readiness.
Training coordinators are looking for a
cross representation of the community.
People should have at least 12 months left
in country to participate. Volunteers will
be certified as master trainers and will, in
turn, share their knowledge and skills with
others in the community. Applications for
training must be completed and returned
as soon as possible to participate. Call
Paul Ries at 287-6338/6322 to sign up, or
for more information.

Youth 2000 mentors
looking for students
The Youth 2000 Program currently has
22 professional mentors available to local
students. Mentors can assist students with
assignments, provide opportunities to ob-
serve a work area and motivate them to
think about their future. Parents who wish
to have a mentor assigned to their child
can call Laila Yeager at 284-5650.


New drop-off point for
Safe Haven donations
Donations for Safe Haven will now be
received at Building 4 on Rodman NS, in-
stead of Building 5. All donations will be
coordinated at this site. For information,
call 283-4014/4016.

Dengue fever briefings
available upon request
Upon request, the Entomology section,
Preventive Medicine Services at Gorgas


9:40am B-757 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP, GA (C)
Charleston lAP, SC
Tuesday
5:40am C-141 Howard AFB
Brasilia, Brazil (V,0)
Riode Janeiro, Brazil
Asuncion, Paraguay (0)
Brasilia, Brazil
Wednesday
5:25am C-130 Howard, AFB
San Jose, Costa Rica
Howard, AFB
Thursday
5:45am C-5A Howard AFB


Army Community Hospital can present
20-45 minute briefings, in Spanish and
English on Dengue Fever.
The briefing covers the signs and
symptoms, the mode of transportation of
the disease, the biology of the mosquito
vector and the action to take to control
Dengue. Units or activities wanting a
Spanish briefing, 282-5618/5212. For an
English briefing, call Maj. Nelson Powers
or Manuel Correa at 282-5269.

142nd Medical Bn.
inactivates Thursday
An inactivation ceremony for the 142nd
Medical Battalion will be held on Soldiers
Field 10:30 a.m. Thursday. As part of the
ceremony, the 245th Support Battalion
(Provisional) will be activated. For more
information, call 287-6604.

New group helps parents
of disabled youths
The 24th Medical Group's family ad-
vocacy program is sponsoring a support
group for parents of children with attention
deficit disorder and attention deficit hyper-
activity disorder, as well as other learning
disabilities. The next meeting will be 6:30-
8 p.m. Tuesday at the Howard Family Sup-
port Center, Building 707. For more infor-
mation, call 284-6410/6457.

24th Medical Group
announces closings
The 24th Medical Group on Howard
AFB will close noon Thursday for medi-
cal readiness training. They will again
close at noon Nov. 18 for the group's an-
nual Thanksgiving celebration and quarter-
ly hail and farewell.

Communications skills
workshop available
The family advocacy program has ar-
ranged a workshop for people who would
like to improve their interpersonal commu-
nication skills. The workshop will be 6-
7:30 p.m. Nov. 17 at the Howard Family
Support Center, Building 707, and free
child care is available. For more informa-
tion, or to make a reservation, call family
advocacy at 284-6410/6457.

BHS needs speakers for
Engineer Club meeting
Guest speakers are needed for Balboa
High School bi-monthly Engineer Club
meeting. Engineer professionals or people
in engineer fields are preferred. To sign-
up, call 285-5707.

193rd warehouses close
for wall-to-wall inventory
The Company A and B warehouses of
the 193rd Support Battalion will be closed
until Wednesday. Warehouse personnel
are conducting wall-to-wall inventories


Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Charleston AFB, SC
Nov. 11
5:40am C-130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB
A- Active duty only
US- U.S. passport
0-Overnight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Vlsa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance


during this time. For information, call 287-
5365.

Corozal local spot bid
sales announced
A Local spot bid sale will be held 7:30
a.m. Nov. 14 at Building 745, Corozal. A
large variety of items will be up for sale.
The inspection and sale will be held on the
same day. For information, call Ada
Tweed at 285-4754.
A Spot Bid sale will be held 9 a.m.
Nov. 19 at Building 308, Corozal. Used
U.S. government cars, 4x4s, diesels and
trucks will be up for bid. Inspections will
be held 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov 17-18. For in-
formation, call 285-5417.

Single soldiers meetings
at Valent announced
A BOSS (Better Opportunities for Sin-
gle Soldiers) meeting will be held 2 p.m.
Nov. 17 and Dec. 7 at the Valent Recre-
ation Center. The meeting is open to all
who would like to attend. For information,
call 287-6500.

First aid, safety courses
set for Clayton, Sherman
A community first aid and safety
course will be held, 6-10 p.m. Nov. 15-17
at Building 519, Fort Clayton. The course
teaches adult, infant and child CPR, first
aid and safety. There will also be a first aid
class for maids 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 19. The
class is taught entirely in Spanish. For in-
formation, call Abbe Lester at 287-5509.
The Atlantic Community will hold a
first aid class for maids will 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Nov. 12 at The Ocean Breeze Recreation
Center, Fort Sherman. The class is taught
entirely in Spanish. For information, call
289-6302/6699.

Clayton estate planning
seminar set for Monday
There will be an estate planning semi-
nar 9 a.m. Monday in the Simon Boliver
Conference Room, Building 95, Fort
Clayton. This will be a dynamic informa-
tive briefing that demystifies the many as-
pects of estate planning and financial plan-
ning. The seminar leader is Col. (retired)
Arnie Kropf, Army and Air Force Mutual
Aid Association. Seating will be limited.
For more information, call 287-6410.

American Society hosts
evening at Smithsonian
The American Society of Panama is
sponsoring an evening at the Smithsonian
Tropical Research Institute in Ancon
Wednesday. Three scientists will give pre-
sentations on current projects. Dress is ca-
sual. Wine and cheese will be served at 6
p.m. and the presentations will begin at 7
p.m. The cost is $5 for members and $10
for others. For tickets, call 252-5739; 228-
2331; 252-2263; or 229-4009.


--------------- I












S News


Tropic Times
Nov. 4,1994 3


Wing workers A .


greet, process


arriving Cubans


by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs Office

HOWARD AFB - Since the start of Operation Safe
Haven Aug. 29, men and women from various 24th Wing
agencies-airmen, non-commissioned officers and offic-
ers-have worked relentlessly to process nearly 8,500
Cuban migrants for their temporary stay in Panama.
The Joint Task Force Safe Haven Reception Center has
tapped agencies throughout the base for its staff, although
it has drawn the most heavily from the 24th Support
Group.
, "We have nearly 60 men and women working full-time
min the reception center, and almost all of them are the same
people who started with us almost two months ago," said
the commander of the reception center, Lt. Col. Luis
Ramos. "These people are performing a very important
function out here, and they're doing it in an outstanding
manner."
"Our methods and processes have changed over the
course of Safe Haven," said reception center superinten-
dent Chief Master Sgt. Don Hensley, "but the primary
function of our people is still the same-to get the Cubans
from the airplanes to the Safe Haven camps. In the pro-
cess, they do everything from operating multi-million dol-
lar computer equipment and evaluating medical histories,
to helping sort through luggage, explaining a question-
naire and even getting someone some water."
The process takes the Cubans through a half-dozen dif-
ferent stations-check in, positive identification, enroll-
ment interview, medical screening, personal data and
manifest-and generally takes a little less than three hours
to complete.
While at Guantanamo Bay, each Cuban received a mi-
crochip ID bracelet imprinted with their personal identifi-
cation number. The check-in staff verifies the migrants'
identities and checks them off against an aircraft mani-
fest. The Cubans then get an ID badge with their finger-
print and photograph, courtesy of the positive identifica-
tion staff and its $1.5 million Deployable Mass Popula-
tion Identification System. Later, the air transportable
hospital staff-temporary duty personnel from Minot,
Barksdale, Offutt and Nellis Air Force Bases-do medi-
cal screenings and create medical histories for the Cubans,
most of which have absolutely no documentation of this
type. Diagnosis or treatment of any minor ailments that
are found is generally done at the camps.
"For the most part, these are good, warm-hearted, car-
ing people who have left behind friends, family, posses-
sions, everything in this world that is precious to them,"


Staff Sgt Rian Clawson (U.S. Air Force)
Members of the 24th Medical Operations Squadron and volunteers gather medical profiles on
Cuban migrants at the JTF-Safe Haven Reception Center.


said Maj. Paul Pyles, staff physician, psychiatrist, and
chief of mental health services at the Camp No. 4. "They
face a totally uncertain future, which makes them very
susceptible to acute stress, and that's where I come in."
Pyles also offers stress management assistance to the
active duty members assigned at the camps.
At other stations, specialists interview the Cubans to
provide personal data and enrollment information, all of
which is entered in the center's computerized data base
and reproduced in the form of five separate reports for
base, command and Panamanian officials.
For many of the people in the reception center, work-
ing with the Cubans has meant a lot of long hours for days
on end, but they haven't been complaining.
Working in the reception center "has been a real expe-
rience," said Senior Airman Alan Roy, an administrative
specialist assigned to the command center. "It's a lot of
hard work, but it's for a good cause and it makes me feel
like I'm finally part of a real mission."
Tragic tales of the violence, the hardships and horror
Cubans often had to endure in their home country have
touched and deeply affected many reception center staff
members. Some of the migrants even told of seeing sharks
attack friends and relatives who fell off their leaky, make-
shift rafts.
One migrant woman explained that she left her home
in Cuba because she "had no choice."
"I couldn't support another day of waking to the sound


of my son crying from hunger," she said. "I thought, 'no
matter what happens, it will be better here' (in Panama.)"
"I didn't know what to think when I first got here,"
said Staff Sgt. Edna Johnson, administration NCO of the
command center. "When the Cubans started coming-
many with nothing but the clothes on their backs-and I
saw how happy and how thankful they were just to be here,
it brought tears to my eyes. It really made me appreciate
some of the small things I've always kind of taken for
granted."
Most of the people working at the center were selected
-rather than volunteered-for the job, Hensley ex-
plained.
"Despite that, after we've talked to these Cubans, lis-
tened to their experiences, and gotten to know them, no-
body says they want to leave, or go back to doing what
they were before Safe Haven kicked off. We've become a
cohesive team and we really care about these people we're
helping."
When the numbers in the migrant camps reach 10,000
-the limit set by Panamanian president Ernesto Perez
Balladares-the reception center is scheduled to be "inac-
tivated," but officials plan to leave it intact, so it can be
'fired up' easily to handle the processing requirements
when the Cubans later leave Panama.
"We don't know when that will be or where they will
be going," Ramos said, "but we'll be here to help them on
their way."


Volunteers vital to migrant reception


by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs Office


HOWARD AFB - "Volunteers are the
lifeblood of this activity," said Ann Brown,
during one of her own stints at volunteer-
ing in the Joint Task Force Safe Haven Re-
ception Center, located in Hangar 3 here.
"When the Cubans first step off the
buses at the reception center, a lot of them
look scared to death," added the wife of
the 24th Wing commander. "Then groups
of friendly volunteers approach them,
greeting them with kind words and smiles,
and the Cubans can't help but respond.
You can actually see them relax a little
bit."
Lt. Col. Luis Ramos, reception center
commander, echoed Brown's sentiments.
"We've had about 20-25 volunteers out
here every day," Ramos said. "Volunteers
do everything, from sorting donations,
greeting and calming the migrants' fears,
and helping them fill out personal informa-
tion forms, to dispensing food and drinks
to them, and even running the snack bar
set up for volunteers and reception center
staff. We literally couldn't have done it
without them."
Anyone who would like to volunteer to
help in the reception center can do so by
calling the Howard Family Support Cen-
ter at 284-5650/5010.


"We've even had active duty people
that are TDY (temporary duty) here from
the states and they are volunteering their
off-duty time to help us out with the Cu-
bans," said Tech. Sgt. Annette Henry, the
Howard Family Support Center volunteer
coordinator. "I think that's great!"
Actually, an incredibly varied group of
people comprise the reception center's
bank of nearly 300 volunteers, said Lizca
Fearon, the other primary FSC volunteer
coordinator. "We have active duty military
and civilian members, family members,
contractors, even students from local col-
leges."
This large group of people also have


Senior Airman S
Volunteers greet Cubans arriving
Force Safe Haven Reception Center


varied and individual reasons
out with the Cuban migrants.
"I just got here about three n
and this is my first time out to
but I really want to do what I ca
said one civilian volunteer. Witi
children, Betsy Dunn says chil
constant concern which limits t
of time she can volunteer. Still,
get out as often as she can.
"When I was back in the Ui
I'd often watch the evening ne
people working on humanitarian
forts," she explained. "I neve
been able to take part in those d
in Mississippi, but here in Panar
feels go
I can a
-. , - '---" someth
. - -- .... help."
sn i This
mantan
in the
." ' . ily. Be
" , band,
..i'J liam D
, dentist
Howard
he also
Cubans
medical
teve McNally (U.S. Air Force) rotation
at the Joint Task the Sa
r. camps.


center operation
for helping "I like people and when I heard that the
Cubans were coming-and found out
months ago, some of what they were going through to
the center, get here-I really wanted to help," said
an to help," Mayra Urena, another civilian volunteer.
h two small She and her aunt, Estela Shaffer, along
Id care is a with Estela Alvarez and Marcia Irwins,
the amount collect, size, separate and distribute the
she tries to clothing community members donate for
the Cubans' benefit.
united States They, and other Spanish-speaking vol-
ws and see unteers, also greet the arriving Cubans, talk
in relief ef- with them, share stories, and often just lis-
r would've ten to the migrants' experiences. Most of
things back the volunteers working at the reception
ma, it really center are bilingual, but even those who
rod because aren't fluent in Spanish can help out.
actually do Volunteers who don't speak Spanish
ling to can still greet arriving Cubans, serve them
food and drinks, and point out the areas
s good Sa- where the Cubans need to go next, Fearon
drive runs explained. They also regularly run the
Dunn fam- snack bar set up for reception center staff
:tsy's hus- and volunteers.
Maj. Wil- "I don't 'habla bien el Espanol,' but I
)unn, is a know a few words and I can usually get
at the the message across with signs or gestures,"
I Clinic and Henry explained. "Besides, a smile's the
helps the same in English or Spanish and if I get in
, providing over my head I can holler for 'help.'
l care on a There's always someone around who can
nal basis at translate for me. The bottom line is, if you
ife Haven have a good heart and you want to help,
you can."


I









4 Tropic Times
Nov. 4, 1994


L News


MTMC says POVs

ready for pick-up
BALBOA (MTMC) - The following customers
have privately owned vehicles ready for pick up at
the POV Processing Center, Building 1501, Balboa,
adjacent to Pier 18:
Augilar G.; Belter M.S.; Chisholm D.P.; Coates
C.M.; Culver K.D.; Daly G.J.; Desanchez A.M.;
Fletcher L.L.; Fullerton D.F.; Funk R.E.; Giardina
F.; Hilbish F.F.; Hill D.A.; Homer R.A.; Iglesias A.;
Jean-Pierre H.; Johnson V.M.; Krist D.J.; Layton
M.M.; Lerose N.J.; Lewis A.W.; Little A.S.;
Mandigo J.D.; Marcelino W.V.; Maye J.E.;Mejia-
Rangel 0.; Middaugh C.D.; Miranda J.L.; Moore
J.D.; Morgan T.C.; Oconner M.L.; Ortmeier W.;
Parker B.;Phlps B.; Range M.D.; Rice T.L.;
Robinson N.M.; Rodriguez J.A.; RuoffF.F.;Salazar
J.C.; Sancya K.P.; Sanders L.M.; Shavers J.B.;
Sliwicki R.M.; Stewart N.; Thomas H.L.; Thomas
B.; Wilson R.T.
Customers must have the following documents
for pick up of their POVs:
*ID card (current military, dependent, or civilian)
*Driver license (must have Panamanian license for
second POV)
*POV shipping document (DD Form 788)
*Vehicle registration or title
*Vehicle keys
*Power of Attorney and photo copies of the
sponsor's bilingual ID card and driver's license
(when the sponsor on orders cannot be present for
pick up)
MTMC will be closed today and unable to re-
lease imorted POVs to customers, however the of-
fice will be open today to receive POVs for turn-in.
The list is current as of Tuesday. For updates,
call customer service at 282-4642/3853 or the POV
arrival tape recording at 282-4641. Customer ser-
vice hours are Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 2:30
p.m. Wednesday hours are 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
People expecting POVs are reminded to call cus-
tomer service to leave a contact phone number.

Customer service

office at 519 moves
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The Ad-
jutant General Customer Service Office has be re-
located to the lobby of the ground floor, Building
519, Fort Clayton.
The move comes because of the installation of
the Real Time Automated Personnel Identification
System Automated ID Card system, said Warrant
Officer Mona Ellington, chief of the Personnel Ser-
vices Branch.
AG Customer Services and the Civilian Pass/
ID Card Section, also in the lobby provides civil-
ian ID cards, civilian bilingual ID cards, privilege
cards. certificates of Naturalization, statement of
services, AG certifications, family member de-
ployment screening sheets, evaluations of learning
experience during military service, housing appli-
cations and tax exemptions for departure from
Tocumen and purchase of airline tickets.
Military Pass and ID Sections provides active
duty, Reserve, retired and dependent ID cards,
military and dependent bilingual ID cards,
outprocessing for ID cards, DA photo processing
and defense enrollment eligibility reporting system
updates. For more information, call Richard
Bartlett 4t 287-6406.

Air Force housing

changes policies
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PAO) - To reduce
waiting time for its customers, the Howard/Albrook
housing office will implement some new policies
Nov. 1. An appointment system will even out the
work flow and allow counselors to dedicate their
time to specific customers. People won't need ap-
pointments to take care of simple items (temporary
lodging allowances, housing applications, and
simple questions that can be answered by the re-
ceptionist) but more complex matters will be
handled by appointment.
Supplementing these changes will be weekly
group briefings, which will replace the former indi-
vidual sessions. Housing officials encourage spon-
sors of inbound individuals to schedule those mem-
bers in advance of their arrival. For more informa-
tion, call 284-3417/5814.


More Dengue in Panama


GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
(MEDDAC PAO) - The Panama Ministry of Health re-
ported more than 260 confirmed cases of dengue fever in
Panama City as of October 1994.
The mosquito-transmitted disease is caused by a virus,
and presently, there is no protection by immunization.
"Because the mosquito (Aedes aegypti) responsible for
transmitting this disease breeds primarily in artificial con-
tainers, the best way to control this disease is by removal
of such containers," said Maj. Nelson Powers, chief of
Entomology, Preventive Medicine Service at Gorgas
Army Community Hospital. He adds that such action has
to be taken before an epidemic occurs.
The symptoms of dengue fever are like a severe flu:
sudden onset of high fever, severe headache, backache,
pain in the back of the eyes and in the joints, muscles, and
bones, and occasionally a rash.
"The pain is so intense that dengue is sometimes called
'break bone fever'" said Lt. Col. (Dr.) Wilfredo Souffront,
chief of Preventive Medicine Service at Gorgas Army
Community Hospital. "After the illness is over, people
may feel very weak, tired and not be able to do their usual
work for some time."
About a week after an Aedes aegypti mosquito bites
someone who is ill with dengue, it is able to transmit the


Atlantic residents


honor National


Consumer Week
MARGARITA COMPLEX (USARSO PAO - Atlan-
tic) - National Consumer Week brought some informative
classes and prize giveaways to the Atlantic community.
The classes and workshops offered were: Checkbook
Management, Money Management and "Know Your
Rights," a consumer workshop.
In the consumer workshop-offered ir Spanish and
English-representatives from such agencies as the Fi-
nance and Accounting Office, Adjutant General's office,
Passport and Visa, the Commissary and Army and Air
Force Exchange Service addressed consumers' rights and
answered questions.The workshop attracted 55 people.
"The workshop let people know what rights they have
as consumers and the rights they have at certain agencies
in the Atlantic community," said Luz M. Ballestero, Con-
sumer Affairs and Financial Program coordinator.
Additionally, representatives from Contraband Con-
trol-Atlantic spoke to Cristobal High School students
about contraband items and shoplifting, Ballestero added.
The close of the week was marked by Commissary and
Post Exchange giveaways.
The Commissary gave out 26 prizes including: a cam-
era, a $50 shopping spree and free bags of groceries. The
16 Post Exchange prizes included: a camera, a free oil
change, a basket of AAFES products, a free boat rental
and a coupon for free brunch for two at the Fort Davis
Community Club.
The community got more than just prizes out of Na-
tional Consumer Week, however.
"I think National Consumer Week was successful in
informing individuals of their rights as consumers,"
Ballestero said. "They were more aware of what to expect
and of what to ask as consumers."


virus each time it bites a susceptible person during its
three- to four-week lifetime.
In a recent housing area survey conducted by the Ento-
mology Section, several potential and active breeding sites
were found. Among them were trash cans and lids col-
lecting water, barbecue grills and bird baths. In addition, a
few natural containers were found to be potential breed-
ing sites: tree holes, fallen hollow coconuts and Bromeli-
ads. At one site, the area was strewn with beverage con-
tainers filled with water and found to contain Aedes
aegypti larvae, the immature stage of the mosquito.
Residents should also be aware that this mosquito also
breeds in hollow fence posts and roof drain gutters that
fill with water. Residents in installations that are part of
the Directorate of Engineering and Housing Self Help
Program may get sand or gravel to fill in hollow fence
posts and ladders to gain access to roof drain gutters to
inspect and clean them. Residents on installations are re-
minded that they are responsible for cleaning the roof gut-
ters that are 12 feet or lower from the ground. For roof
gutters that are higher than 12 feet, residents must submit
a work order to have them cleaned.
Navy and Air Force personnel who do not have access
to the DEH Self Help Program must to submit work or-
ders. For more information, call 282-5269/5440.


Paam nessumr


Editor's note: The following summary of news is
taken from the Panamanian press. The translation
and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is made
by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of reporting
or statements made here. Selection of these stories
does not imply any emphasis, judgement or endorse-
ment by the U.S. government. These synopses are in-
tended only to give non-Spanish speaking people a
flavor for news events in Panama.

Oct. 27
La Estrella: Paper reports an ARI document report-
ing that 13 areas currently under U.S. military use will
be turned over to Panama between 1995 and 1997.

Oct. 28
Critica Libre: Paper reports Panamanian authorities
are investigating the possible participation by Cuban
organizations exiled in Miami in the escape of 21 Cu-
bans from the Panamanian camps.


Oct. 31
El Siglo: Paper reports Colon jail inmates offered to
cut down grass in the areas of the Colon Corridor. A com-
pany recently donated 50 machetes to be used for clean-
ing public areas. The inmates are complying with minor
sentences and not considered dangerous.

Nov. I
El Panama America: Paper reports that Panama's PTJ
intelligence division says some 25 people have been mur-
dered in the last 18 months by foreign and native hood-
lums. An official said the contracts for the killing vary
between $500 and $15,00.

El Panama America: Paper reports the draft bill that
privatizes the phone company INTEL has the support of
some legislators, but the Republic of Panama Workers
Confederation says the bill would create an increase in
phone rates and cause many INTEL employees to lose
their jobs.


SgL Robin A. Shawlinski (U.S. Army)
New commander
U.S. Army Garrison commander, Col. Silas
Smalls passes the battalion colors to in-
coming U.S. Army Garrison-Pacific com-
mander Lt. Col. Charles Hunsaker during a
change of command ceremony, Oct. 27.
Maj. Stephen Duckworth, who has been the
interim commander since Sept. 30, relin-
quished command to Hunsaker. Hunsaker
has been assigned to Fort Benjamin Harrison,
Ind., Fort Knox, Ky., West Point and has been
previously stationed in Panama.












* Voices


Tropic Times 5
Nov. 4, 1994


Pesky stray cats trouble base resident


Dear Mayors' Corner,
I live in tropical housing on Howard AFB and have a
problem no one else can solve...stray cats. I have asked
around to find out who owns them, but only two neigh-
bors have cats.
One pet owner says she's afraid to let her cat outside
because of the possibility of impregnation by one of the
strays. Meanwhile, the other neighbor has a male cat and
lets it stay outside. This person obviously doesn't care be-
cause I have seen the cat running with the pack of strays.
All of my other neighbors wish these cats would go away,
but they don't.
These cats use my garden as a litter box, bushes as a
mating area and back stairs as a safe haven. I thought that
by getting a dog this would solve the problem, but she is
just a puppy and these cats terrorize her. I have called the
housing office and was told, "We can do nothing but tell
new housing members to keep their cats under control."
What good does this do, since most of these cats do not
have owners? I have also called the security police. They
have taken my complaint, but have not tried to catch these
pests.
As a dog owner, I feel discriminated against because I
am not allowed to let my pet run free. She must always be
on a leash, rather than under voice control. Yet, cat own-
ers can let their cats roam the streets without fear of reper-
cussions.
I am almost to the point of chasing these cats with a
softball bat or setting traps for them. But this is too cruel-


even for a cat. I wish someone would do something to rid
us of this problem, before my neighbors and I lose our
cool.
'Cat'astrophe waiting to happen

Dear 'Cat,'
Stray animals are a challenge. You are correct in say-
ing that the security police have a responsibility to pick up
stray animals, and in my experience, they try to do this.
However, the animals frequently disappear before some
one can be dispatched to the site of a complaint.
Meanwhile, we have come up with a possible self-help
solution. You can now check out an animal trap from the
pest management shop. When you have trapped the cat,
call the security police to pick up the animal. We hope
this will resolve your problem.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
When I drive past my neighbor's house everyday, I
see a "Yard of the Quarter" sign up and wonder what they
did to deserve it.
They have a gardener who does all of their yard work,
gardening and planting. He even gets plants from other
houses when the people move. He puts everything in or-
der, and I have to admit the yard does look nice. But what
does the housing office give him? The people who live
there get new appliances, dinner for two, free bowling,
and free swimming for a month. Meanwhile, all they did
was pay their gardener $15-$20 per month-and maybe a
little extra for winning.
I'm not saying they don't deserve it, because they do.
Their yard looks great, but give credit where credit is due.


The housing office should give the gardener something
for his hard work. Maybe they could hold a competition
between the housing area gardeners to see who can earn
the most "Yard of the Months and Quarters" during the
year. Then run the winner's photo in the Tropic Times
and give him a cash prize or free dinner. The gardeners
work very hard and deserve some recognition for their ac-
complishments.
I do my own yard and take great pride in my work.
The housing office does not recognize me and it's the
same for the others who work on their own yards. For
those who win with hired gardeners, it's like getting vale-
dictorian when someone else did your homework.
A Little Green

Dear Green,
The "Yard of the Quarter" program is for the occu-
pants of military family housing not their gardeners. Gar-
deners work for the occupant, not the government. Occu-
pants are responsible for basic yard care. However, when
they go beyond the expected, the housing office likes to
recognize them.
It is the occupant who decides how they want to main-
tain their yard, not their gardener. Granted, they may not
physically do the work, but they are the ones who are pay-
ing for it and decide how they want their yard to look.

Editor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral
Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity
chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will
be granted upon request. The Tropic Times reserves
the right to edit letters and responses for brevity.


Thief lifts $500 in travelers' checks off servicemember


Stolen travelers' checks
A U. S. servicemember had $500 in
travelers' checks stolen from him last
week. The alleged thief cashed the checks
at the post office.
Keep this type of item under lock and
key, or with you at all times. It is also rec-
ommended that people keep receipts with
the serial numbers on them.

Fingerprinting hours
The Provost Marshal Office will pro-
vide fingerprinting to those who need
prints taken. Normal fingerprinting hours
are 9-11 a.m. Tuesday and 1-3 p.m.
Thursday at Building 131, Fort Clayton.
Identification cards are required.

POV insurance required
The military police remind everyone
that, in accordance with U.S. Southern
Command Regulation 190-5, anyone op-
erating a privately-owned vehicle must
show proof of insurance upon demand.
For more information, refer to the reg-
ulation or call the Military Police Traffic
Section at 287-3203.

DARE Program
The Drug Abuse Resistance Education
program has been in operation for three
years in Panama. A 17-week course in
Drug Resistance Training is taught to all
sixth graders attending Department of De-
fense Dependents Schools. Younger stu-
dents also receive an introduction to the


DARE program. Housing area crimes 800 area - one larceny of secured private
For more information, contact the The following criminal activities oc- property
DARE coordinator at 287-6762 or 287- curred at on and off post housing areas Fort Amador
3261. Oct. 15-21. 400 area - one larceny unsecured private


Panama Jack anonymous hotline
Anyone with information about drug
smuggling should immediately call the
Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-
4185.


Pacific
Fort Clayton
200 area (Herrick Heights) - one larceny
of secured private property
400 area - one larceny unsecured private
property


property
Off post
Panama City - one larceny of secured pri-
vate property
Balboa - one larceny unsecured private
property


STropic Times


Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666


This authorized unofficial command information publica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pub-
lished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Pro-
gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of
the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the
U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002

Commander in Chief........................Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs..............................Col. James L. Fetig
Chief....................................... Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Managing Editor...................Sgt. 1st Class Zakiyyah Waheed
Editor.............................. ........................... M aureen Sam pson


Assistant Editor..............................................Sgt. Cass Purdum
Entertainment Editor.....................................Rosemary Chong
Sports Editor...................................................Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editor/Writer......................................Spc. Tom Findtner

Southern Command Public Affairs Office..................282-4278
Command Information Officer.....................Patrick Milton

U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office......................287-3007
Public Affairs Officer...................Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer.........................Beth Taylor
Managing Editor..................................Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Editor...............................................Sgt. Robin Shawlinski
Journalists.................................................... Sgt. Eric Hortin
Spc. Brian Thomas


U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic................................289-4312
N CO IC......................... ........................... Sgt. Rick Em ert

24th Wing Public Affairs Office................................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer...................Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.......Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists......................................Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush

U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..................283-5644
Public Affairs Officer.................................Diane Gonzalez
Assistant Public Affairs Officer...........................John Hall
Photographers.....Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays








Tropic Times
Nov. 4, 1994


me and


The camp may ne


but they proved t


I,








N


Suriname in brief
Location: East coast of South
America
Geography: 63,000 square
miles, slightly larger than the state
of Georgia
Population: 402,000 (1991 est.)
Government: Republic
Religions: Moslem, 19%; Hindu,
27%; Christian, 47%
Economy: Per capital Gross
Domestic Product, $3,200
History: The Netherlands acquired
Suriname in 1667 from Britain, in
exchange for New Netherlands
(New York). The 1954 Dutch
constitution raised the colony to a
level of equality with the
Netherlands and the Netherlands
Antilles. In the 1970s the Dutch
government pressured for
Suriname independence, which
came on Nov. 25, 1975. The
military council took over control
of the government in February
1982. The government came
under democratic leadership in
1988.


K


by Sgt. Eric Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
S 7 hen they deployed, they had no
idea when they would return. It took
nearly two months of building and
preparing before they could return to their
families.
The soldiers, airmen, sailors and
Marines that made up the force deployed
in support of Operation Distant Haven
returned Oct. 25 to Panama. Other soldiers
stationed in the United States, who traveled
through Panama on their way home, were greeted
as well before departing to their home stations.
When migrant camps in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
were becoming overcrowded with the increasing
number of Haitians fleeing their country, a new camp
was needed.
The U.S. State Department, in cooperation with
the United Nations High Commission on Refugees
and the government of Suriname, asked the U.S.
Southern Command to build a camp to temporarily
house up to 2,500 people.


~~RWL


*."'j


K
K

~
'I
~Z~t


An aerial view of the Operation Distant Haven camp.


While we're there, why not an


interchange between nations?


by Spc. Brian Thomas
USARSO Public Affairs Office
PARAMARIBO, SURINAME - In an exchange
of ideas between two militaries, Col. Louis D.
Huddleston gave a course on officer professional
development to a group of Surinamese senior
officers Oct. 28.
Huddleston, the Joint Task Force-Suriname
commander, was in Suriname to oversee the
conversion of Operation Distant Haven as it
becomes a care-taker operation. Most of the troops
returned earlier in the week, but about 65 will
remain behind.
"This is very important to me," Huddleston said
to the Surinamese officers as he began his lecture
on military decision making.
"One of the benefits I have as a senior officer is
I get the opportunity to travel to foreign countries
and meet with foreign officers," Huddleston said.


"This is very important to the U.S. military."
Huddleston said his course had two purposes.
The first was to offer Surinamese senior officers
background on U.S. Army military decision-
making and planning, and the second was to
provide an opportunity to exchange views.
Huddleston's course is one that is taught at the
Command and General Staff College in Fort
Leavenworth, Kan.
Surinamese Army Chief of Staff, Col. Glenn
Sedney, attended and was pleased with
Huddleston's lecture. "It was a very interesting
subject," Sedney said. "Since our officers have to
deal with these kinds of subjects it was good to
refresh their minds."
Sedney said the class was not anticipated when
Operation Distant Haven began in August.
"It was not planned to do this but he found the
space to have this discussion," Sedney said. "We
thank the colonel very much."


Col. Louis D. Huddleston, JTF-Suriname comma
class to Surinamese army officers.


IL-


I


..,








Tropic Times 7
Nov. 4,1994 I


er be used,


ey could do it

Joint Task Force-Suriname was quickly formed
and the deployment of troops, equipment and
supplies from Panama and the United States began in
late August.
In record time, engineers, military police and all
manner of military specialists from all the services
were flown to Suriname to construct the migrant and
base camps. The camps were quickly built. About
1,500 cubic meters of concrete were used to con-
struct 300 tent and utility pads. Some 190 general
purpose medium tents, 10 general purpose large
tents, 2,500 cots and more than 2,000 meters of
fence were quickly put up.
Then the waiting began, but would come to an
end when Haiti's ruling military dictatorship
volunteered to leave Oct. 15.
Small numbers of troops started returning from
Suriname soon after the dictatorship's departure, but
the main body of about 200 servicemembers did not
return until ten days later.
A small detachment of approximately 65 mainte-
nance and security personnel are still in Suriname in
case the camps are needed in the future. The time of
return for those personnel is not known.


Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army)
Joint Task Force-Suriname members return to Panama enroute to their home stations. For many,
that was Panama, but several units from the United States also participated in the project.


'-V


,49~


Spc. Brian Thomas (U.S. Army)
der, gives an officer professional development


Spc. Brian Thomas (U.S. Army)
Work continues at the camp as engineers from
Fort Stewart, Ga., upgrade electrical wiring.


Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army)
Staff Sgt. Richard Cannon, 534th Military Police
Co., gets a big hug from his wife Vickie.










8Tropic Times
Nov. 4,1994


Feature


FRIGHT






Halloween festivities

bombard community
A another Halloween has passed through the
isthmus. The American community celebrated
the ghoulish holiday in a variety of ways.
More than 1,500 children and adults celebrated their
Halloween at Rodman NS going through the haunted
house at the old Anchorage Club Oct. 28 and 29.
About 60 participants served as guides, ghouls and
makeup artists during the eight hours of frightening fun.
Naval Command Master Chief John Myers has been
involved with the Navy's haunted house the last two
years.
"It was quite a bit better this year than last. This year
we had more space, more rooms, air conditioning and
more participants," he said.
"Not one person complained and lots thanked us. We
got great compliments," Myers said.
Among the participants were; sections from Rodman
NS, Naval Special Warfare Unit 8, U.S. Southern
Command, Morale, Welfare and Recreation and the
Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training
School.
The funds raised at the haunted house will be used for
a picnic for all Navy commands, Myers said.
Meanwhile, frightful things were also happening
across the canal at Fort Clayton. Halloween adventurers
of all ages were busy either tricking or treating.
An army of Power Rangers descended to do battle
with the ghosts and ghoulies and spooks of all shapes
and sizes that were out and about Monday evening.
Haunted houses sprouted like mushrooms around
post, putting the willies into pint-sized wanna-be
monsters.
Little goblins who chose the "safe" Halloween
activities made the rounds in the housing areas, collect-
ing their ill-gotten goodies from those who were home.
Judging from the amount of candy collected, it
should be safe to say, the folks over at U.S. Army Dental
Activity-Panama will not have to worry about losing
their jobs anytime soon.


Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army)
In fairy tales the princess kisses the frog, but at Valent Recreation Center's haunted house the
young bride Erin Radtke gives Pimento the snake a smooch.


.-. . .. :. ., , ,,


Petty Officer 2nd Class Edward Archie
was one of two "Jasons" at Rodman's
haunted house.


John Hall (U.S. Navy)
Petty Officer 2nd Class Marty Enriquez was one of the dancing
ghouls at Rodman's monster mash.


Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army)
Chyanna Pauch waits patiently to get
Halloween goodies on Fort Clayton.


John Hall (U.S. Navy)
Diane Gonzalez applies makeup on
Carrie Corona before the opening of
Rodman's haunted house.















Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Page 9


Bulldogs win basketball title


Sgt. Lori Davis (Tropic Times)
The Bulldogs' Noni Robinson dives out of bounds trying to save the ball. Robinson
scored six baskets and hit two of four foul shots to contribute eight points to the
Bulldogs' victory.


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor
BALBOA - The Bulldogs
came back from a 12-5 first quar-
ter deficit to route the Green Dev-
ils 32-26 in the women's basket-
ball championship game Oct. 28.
Leading the Bulldogs to victo-
ry was guard Janelle Hauser.
Hauser remained scoreless in the
first half, but she was on fire in the
second half, capping offthe Bull-
dog's run on the scoreboard.
The Bulldogs didn't look like
awinningteam inthe firstquarter.
Its sole score from the floor came
from Kristen Nolte. Three free
throws boosted their score to five
points.
The Devils owned the court
between forwards Michelle
Womble and Audrey Ernest. Their
"too-tall" attack plan served the
Devils well, feeding the ball in-
side where Ernest scored sixpoints
and Womble added four. Maria
Rodriguez added a basket to put
the Devils up 12-5.
The Bulldogs bounced back in
the second quarter, blocking
Womble and holding Ernest to
one basket. The Devil's other


score came from Daniela Garcia.
The Bulldogs' offense took
over in the second quarter. Noni
Robinson, Cheryl Stanford and
Yarissa Peart each scored four
points, and Nolte added another
basket. The Bulldogstook the lead,
19-16.
The third quarter turned into a
tug-of-war. The Devils edged the
Bulldogs by one point, narrowing
the gap to 25-23.
The last quarter of the game
and the season was all Bulldogs.
Its tough defense blocked the
Devils again and again. Ernest
was the only Devil to sink a shot,
and the only player of the game,
on either team, to score in every
quarter.
But it was Hauser who stood
out, driving to the top of the key,
then pulling up short to shoot for
three points. As the ball sunk so
did the Devils. Hauser spun and
went up the court, doing a victory
dance on the way.
These teams had split games in
the regular season.
"Both of these teams have tal-
ented athletes who deserve a lot of
credit," Bulldog coach Cleve
Oliver said.


Talkin' Turkey Bowl


Sailors plan to weather


Turkey Bowl hurricane


by John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office
RODMAN NS - During last year's Turkey Bowl,
Navy's assistant coach Kenneth Simmons watched the
weather dictate his team's game plan. This year, he's
back with new players, new coaches and a new game
plan.
"Last year, the weather played a big part," Simmons
said. "It was a beautiful day before the kickoff. But then
it was like someone just turned a faucet on. It didn't let
up until there were two minutes left in the game," he
said.
That game was a
38-3 loss to Army in
the opening game.
The Army went on
to win the champi-
onship game over
the Air Force 7-0.
For people new
to Panama, the Tur-
key Bowl is an
interservice flag
football tournament
played annually at
Balboa Stadium.
The Navy faces the John Hall (U.S. Navy)
Air Force at 6 p.m. Stephan Jones returns to
and the Army bat- play for the Navy.


I NF icsPge1


TroyAikman has
what excuse ca
ticators use for 1


s a concussion, but
n football prognos-
their picks?


ties the Marines 7:30 p.m. Nov. 19. The losers of the
Nov. 19 games face off for third place 6 p.m. Nov. 23.
The winners vie for the Turkey Bowl title at 7:30 p.m.
Like in years past, Simmons said the Navy doesn't
have a big pool of players to choose from like other
teams. "We don't have many big guys, so our philos-
ophy will be to rely on quickness," Simmons said.
That quickness will be seen in the modified wish-
bone-style offense and aggressive defense the team
plans to run. The modified wishbone came into play
halfway through the Howard flag football season.
"We were running a pro-style offense and not doing
very well," Simmons said. "Commander (co-coach
Greg) Da Costa installed the (modified) wishbone and
it was very successful," Simmons said.
Simmons said the players liked the offense that tired
out opposing defenses and led to victories. "When
you're losing, players can get bad attitudes...but when
we switched you could see the effects."
Although Simmons said the Navy uses the flag
football league as a tool for picking Turkey Bowl
players, bowl experience is a big factor.
The Navy will have six players returning from last
year's Turkey Bowl. On offense they are: quarterback
Paul Joyce, quarterback/running back Stephan Jones
and offensive lineman Terry Rogers. On the defensive
side, defensive back/end Archie Elam, defensive tack-
le Derrick Cumberbatch, safety Rafael Myrie,
cornerback Robert Falcones and linebacker Lloyd
Nolan.


*SCN AM radio schedule
*Quiz answers
*Sports standings


Nov. 4, 1994


Jose Canseco Spc. Tom Findtner (Tropic Times)
Jose Canseco
Jose Canseco puts on a batting demonstration for
Cuban migrants living at Camp No. 2 and the
servicemembers staffing the camp. Canseco, a
Cuban-American, visited the Cubans in the camp
Oct. 29 to boost morale and lend his support to
their quest for freedom.


The Cougars bounce back from
defeat with a big win against the
Red Machine.











0 Tropic Times
Nov. 4,1994


Football




l . i - ^ .I


The Cougars' Olin Crouch (#66) and William Huff (#76) zero in on the Machine's Jared Holzworth. DnnaMarinez(courtesy)


Cougars shred Machine, 28-9


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor

BALBOA - The Cougars got back on
track this week, pounding the Machine
28-9.
The Cougars wasted no time getting
the lead courtesy of Lance VonHollen.
VonHollen added to his mushrooming
rushing and scoring records by chugging
four yards into the end zone for a Cougar
touchdown early in the first quarter.
The Cougars went to VonHollen for
the score again in the first quarter. Fredrik
Adams made good on the extra point run
to put the Cougars out to a 14-0 lead.
The Machine found it's way to the
scoreboard with a field goal by Donny
Husted in the second quarter, but the
three points didn't amount to much as the
Cougars' Buddy Martens dove into the
end zone on a quarterback sneak to put
the Cougars ahead 20-3.


VonHollen defied the Machine de-
fense again in the third quarter, running
for 46 yards and following up with a one-
yard touchdown plunge. The two-point
conversion by Jelani Jordan capped the
Cougar scoring to put it ahead 28-3.
The Machine rallied in the third quar-
terwith its bigplayofthe game. Holzworth
connected with Jerry Smith for a 65-yard
touchdown pass play. For a team that is0-
7, pulling off the big plays is cause for
celebration.
The Machine was stalled on offense
through the entire game. Smith turned in
the team's best rushing play with a six-
yard gain. After adding up lost yardage,
the Machine checked in at minus seven
yards.
The passing game fared no better as
Jared Holzworth hit only three of 21
passes for 85 yards. The relentless Cou-
gar defense did more than interrupt
Holzworth passing game, it also knocked


him for a 15-yard loss early in the game.
Meanwhile the Cougar offense was
blazing trails across the Machine's de-
fense.
Martens threw all over the field, toss-
ing three-yard screens to Adams and Jor-
dan forextra points, and airing the ball out
for a 35-yard pass to Jordan during a
drive. Martens completed 11 of26 passes
for the night for 126 yards.
The Cougar ground game keptup with
Martens' throwing arm. VonHollen
rushed for 117 yards on 19 carries, fol-
lowed by Jordan's 54 yards on seven
carries.
VonHollen said he lost track of how
many touchdowns he scored in a post-
game interview with the Southern Com-
mand Network.
The Cougars and Devils settle the tie
for first place 5:30 p.m. today at Balboa.
The Cougars beat the Devils 32-23 the
first time these teams faced each other.


Donna Martinez (courtesy)
A Machine defender tries to bring down
the Cougars' Robert Reyes.


Scoreoard


Team statistics


Yards rushing Yards passing


-] Kolts 1 Machine Tigers


Source: Robert Best


League Leaders
Team standings
W L T Pct. PF PA
Cougars 7 1 0 .875 139 78
Devils 7 1 0 .875 130 38
Bulldogs 5 3 0 .625 75 73
Tigers 4 4 0 .500 62 78
Kolts 1 7 0 .125 80 169
Machine 0 8 0 .000 29 110
Last weeks game
Devils 14, Tigers 6
Bulldogs 21, Kolts 7
Tonight's games
Bulldogs vs. Tigers, 6 p.m. (CHS)
Devils vs. Cougars, 5:30 p.m. (BHS)
Kolts vs. Machine, 7:30 p.m. (BHS)
Quarterbacks
PA PC % Yds TD
Martens, Cg. 155 65 42 10838
Beach, BD 72 25 35 679 4
Lampas, Dev. 64 33 51 427 3
Interceptions
Beach, Bulldogs 6


Smith, Machine 5
Alvarez, Tigers 4
Thayer, Kolts 4
Scoring
TD XP To
Reese, Devils 14 4 92
VonHollen, Cg. 8 6 56
Guerra, Tigers 9 54
Rushing
Carr. Yds.
Reese, Devils 163 1050
Guerra, Tigers 134 947
Hall, Bulldogs 140 705
Kick offs
Kicks Yds.
VonHollen, Cg. 31 1456
Lampas, Devils 28 1287
Beach, Bulldogs 22 991
Punts
Kicks Yds.
Husted, Machine 16 529
Price, Tigers 27 826
Beach, Bulldogs 22 629


total

4

Avg.
6.4
7.0
5.0

Avg.
46.9
45.9
45.0

Avg.
33.0
30.6
28.5


1600

1400

1200

1000

800

600

400

200


0 1


1: Bulldogs . Cougars Devils











-Ls ports



Football action runs hot,



cold in ugly week nine


by John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office
RODMAN NS - Week nine ofthe NFL season was like
night and day, hot and cold...(fill in your favorite cliche
here) . Six games were decided by three points
or less, and others were 12, 20, 23 and 34. It's enough to
give handicappers gray hair and shortness ofbreath. Espe-
cially winded were "experts" who said Dallas was stupid
for letting Troy Aikman play after receiving his sixth
concussion in as many years. Because the Cowpokes were
playing the 0-7 Kitties, many argued Dallas could win with
Jerry Jones behind center. When Cincy took a 14-0 lead,
many people were asking who is this Jeff Blake guy?
There are some really ugly week nine games. Here are
five of them.
To live and die in L.A.- In their first matchup ofthe 90s,
the Broncos take their rejuvenated team to Anaheim. The
Broncos are on a good three-game streak- nearly beating
K.C., toppling the Bolts and bashing the Brownies. The
Rams are coming off an open date and a wild 37-34 loss to
the Saints. The Broncos are in the soft part oftheir schedule,
with three home games against Seattle, Atlanta and Cincin-
nati coming up. After an 0-4 start, the Broncos are on a roll,
but aren't ready for the Rams' strong defensive line and
Jerome Bettis. RAMS 23, Broncos 13.
Flock fight in Philly - The Cardinals and Eagles are two
teams flying in different directions. The Eagles were the
hottestteam in the league after 32-pointwin overthe 49ers
in week five. After that they edged Washington, lost to
Dallas, beat Houston (by 15 but it was closer than that) and
edged Washington again. The Cards' recent history in-
cludes an overtime win over the Skins, a near-win over
Dallas and another overtime win over (5-2) Pittsburgh.
Buddy Ball may have worked at home against a team not
acquainted to the Arizona heat, but at Veterans Stadium
againstRyan's formerteam? As if! EAGLES 24, Cards 10.
Bolts and Birds, oh my! - Atlanta plays its third straight
west coast team and is 0-2 so far. The Falcons lost to the
Niners and Raiders by an average score of 36-10. The
Chargers rebounded nicely after their first loss, bashing the
Hawks 35-15. The Bolts paid a heavy price, as quarterback
Stan Humphries dislocated his left elbow. Serving as his
backup is Gale Gilbert who played all of one game with
Buffalo last season. Atlanta's open date should help them
heal from those beatings and keep the game close. Bolts 24,
FALCONS 20.
Berman and Boyz - ESPN's Chris "Boomer" Berman
and his staff get their first Sunday night game of the year
and it's a doozy. It's a grudge match as Harvey Williams
and Marcus Allen face the teams that let them go. The
Raiders are coming off a scary 17-14 win over hapless
Houston. The Chiefs had their heads handedto them, losing
by 34 at Rich Stadium. K.C. has won an incredible eight of
the last nine in this series. Joe Montana rarely has two bad
games in a row. CHIEFS 19, Raiders 17.
Are you ready for a concussion? - When the Giants





SCN AM Radio
790/1420
Friday
8:30 p.m., NBA: New Jersey Nets at Houston Rock-
ets
Saturday
1:30 p.m., NCAA: Air Force at Army
4:30 p.m., NCAA: USC at Washington State
Sunday
1 p.m., NFL: Detroit Lions at Green Bay Packers
4 p.m., NFL: New England Patriots at Cleveland
Browns
8 p.m., NFL: Los Angeles Raiders at Kansas City
Chiefs
Monday
9 p.m., NFL: New York Giants at Dallas Cowboys
Schedule
Women's Basketball
Howard Sports and Fitness Center
Monday
6:05 p.m.: Semifinal round
Tuesday
6:05 p.m.: Championship game


started the season 3-0, the Dallas-N.Y. game looked like the
Monday nighter of the year. The Giants then did the
unthinkable; they lost five straight. The Cowpokes were
shocked by the Kitties and should be concerned about
playing on Monday night. After all, the Cryboys only loss
ofthe season was on ABC to the Lions. Some ofthe reasons
Dallas played so badly last week were: 1. So much was
made ofAikman's injury. 2. They looked past the Bengals,
who are insignificant; and 3. It was an inter-conference
road game before a divisional rival. Remember, the Cow-
boys beat the Giants with Jason Garrett at quarterback after
Aikman pulled a hamstring last season. COWPOKES 27,
Giants 17.
In other games: Bills 30, JETS 13; Bears 23, BUCS 16;
Bengals 24, HAWKS 20; PACKERS 19, Lions 16; DOL-
PHINS 27, Dolts 13; BROWNIES 23, Patsies 17; VIKES
24, Saints 10; Steelers 20, OILERS 14; 49ers 23, SKINS 9.
Last week 6-6, season 69-44, Monday night 7-2.
National Football League
American Conference


Miami
Buffalo
N.Y. Jets
Indianapolis
New England
Cleveland
Pittsburgh
Houston
Cincinnati
San Diego
Kansas City
LA Raiders
Denver
Seattle

Dallas
Philadelphia
Arizona
N.Y. Giants
Washington
Minnesota
Chicago
Detroit
Green Bay
Tampa Bay
San Francisco
Atlanta
LA Rams
New Orleans


East
W L T Pct.
6 2 0 .750
5 3 0 .625
4 4 0 .500
4 5 0 .444
3 5 0 .375
Central
6 2 0 .750
5 3 0 .625
1 7 0 .125
0 8 0 .000
West
7 1 0 .875
5 3 0 .625
4 4 0 .500
3 5 0 .375
3 5 0 .375
National Conference
East
7 1 0 .875
6 2 0 .750
3 5 0 .375
3 5 0 .375
2 7 0 .222
Central
6 2 0 .750
4 4 0 .500
4 4 0 .500
4 4 0 .500
2 6 0 .250
West
6 2 0 .750
4 4 0 .500
3 5 0 .375
3 5 0 .375


Tropic Times 1
Nov. 4, 1994


Special events
The 3rd Special Operations Support Command
(Airborne) is sponsoring a softball tournament
Nov. 25-27 at Fort Clayton Cloverleaf field. The
entry fee is $150 per team. The limit is 16 teams.
Trophy and cash prizes will be given to the top
teams. For information, call 287-6554 before 5
p.m. or 282-3930 after 5 p.m.
Gorgas Army Community Hospital and U.S.A.
Medical Department Activity are sponsoring the
4th Annual 10K Bridge of the Americas Run
starting 6:30 a.m. Dec. 10. People can registeratthe
Corozal Post Exchange or by contacting Julie Bright
at 287-5101/3065. Registration is open through
Dec. 10. Early registration is $7, registration the
day of the race is $8. The fee includes a T-shirt,
refreshments, transportation to and from Farfan
Beach and Gorgas, trophies in each running catego-
ry and doorprizes. Runners may register as individ-
uals orasfive-memberteams. Call Milton Gillespie
at 282-5206/5178 for more information.
Amador
The Amador Golf Course is sponsoring a two-
person, best ball Thanksgiving Turkey Shoot
7:30 a.m. Nov. 12, $8. Call 282-4511 to register by
Wednesday.
Albrook/Howard
Registration for youth baseball for ages 5-18
years will run through Dec. 3 at the Howard and
Albrookyouth centers. A physical exam is required
before a child can be registered. There is a $25 fee
for all family members of active duty
servicemembers and a $30 fee for other people.
Competitive swim team tryouts will be held
10 a.m. Nov. 12 at the Howard and Albrook Pools.
Teams are foryouths 8-18 years. Fee will be $15 per
month. Tryouts will be at both pools and practices
begin the following week. Competitions will be by
age groups. Call Lisa Nofi at 284-3569 or Rose
Coville at 236-2035 for more information.
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers
lunch bunch sports and fitness activities week-
days. Events are; aerobics noon-1 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays, basketball 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Tuesday, volleyball 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Thurs-
days.
Clayton
A coach for the Army Turkey Bowl
cheerleading squad is needed. If interested, call
the Sports Division at 287-4050/5618.
Registration for women's softball is under-
way at the Sports Office, Building 154. Call 287-
4050 for more information.
An instructor is needed to teach the 9:15-10:30
a.m. aerobics class at Reeder Physical Fitness Cen-
ter. Anyone who is interested can call Eva Foster at
287-3861.
Curundu
Anyone interested in joining a mixed bowling
league at the Curundu Bowling Center can call
286-3914 for information.
Horoko
The Horoko Golf Course is sponsoring the
Canon Latin America Tournament Nov. 26.
The event is four-person Mexican best ball format,
$20 entry fee for members. Pick your own team or
enter on a draw. All entry fees will be given back as
prizes. Sign up at the Horoko Pro Shop at 283-
6323.
The Horoko Golf Club Restaurant now serves a
hot breakfast buffet Saturdays, Sundays, and hol-
idays starting at 6 a.m.
Rodman
Rodman Fitness Center is sponsoring a 5-kilo-
meter fun run 6:30 a.m. Thursday opento all Navy
and Marine Corps military, Defense Department
civilians and family members. The unit with the
most runners wins an award. First and second place
awards will be given in the men's and women's
division. Call 283-4222/4061 for information.
An intramural swim meet will be held 6:30
a.m. Nov. 18 at the Rodman Pool. The meet is open
to all Navy and Marine Corps military, Defense
Department civilians and family members 18 years
and older. There is a maximum of 12 swimmers per
team and a limit of one team per unit. Events are: a
100-meter freestyle, 100-meter breaststroke and a
200-meterrelay. The registration deadline isThurs-
day. For more information, call 283-4222/4061.


Quiz answers
The answers to last week quiz are: Iw, 2t, 3u, 4y,
5s, 6p, 7o, 8r, 9q, 10z, 11B, 12A, 13y, 14x, 15a, 16e,
17d, 18b, 19c, 20g, 21 f, 221, 23h, 24j, 251, 26m, 27k,
28n.


Unit-level volleyball
Reeder Physical Fitness Center
Monday
6 p.m.: 92nd PSC vs. Co. A, 310th MI
7 p.m.: Panama MP Co. vs MEDDAC
Wednesday
6 p.m.: Co. A, 310th MI vs. Panama MP Co.
7 p.m.: 92nd PSC vs. MEDDAC
Standings
Navy Intramural Volleyball
W L GB
NSWU 8 4 0
PWD 4 1 .5
NSCIATTS 2 2 2
Marines 1 3 3
Med. Dep. 0 5 4.5


*as of Tuesday


I










12 Tropic Times
1 Nov. 4, 1994


Air Force


'MASH' 1


doctors
iviA~~~~at wa .,.


Cubans
by Senior Airmen Lori Wise and
Joel Langton
JTF Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau
EMPIRE RANGE - Members of the
four Cuban Community Camps as well as
military troops working in Operation Safe
Haven can feel "safe" if they happen to ex-
perience a medical emergency-even in
the midst of the jungle.
Safe Haven's Air Transportable Hospi-
tal became functional with the help of an
118-person deployed medical team within
three days of its arrival from Minot AFB,
N.D. The medical facility, complete with
its own equipment and supplies, began 24-
hour operations Sept. 11 and has helped ap-
proximately 9,055 patients.
The ATH is home away from home for
deployed medical specialists from Minot,
Offutt AFB, Neb., Andrews AFB, Md.,
Barksdale AFB, La., Nellis AFB, Nev.,
and Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio.
"We're the Air Force's version of
MASH," said Airman 1st Class Mike
Weahlee, a military public health techni-
cian from Offutt.
Airman 1st Class Troy Smith said he
affectionately refers to it as "Doc in a box."
Whatever the description, the patients
are receiving treatment from dedicated
medical professionals. The hospital's mis-
sion is to provide immediate medical care
for the Cubans and military troops in the
camps. An ATH is usually deployed for
war, but according to Lt. Col. Norman


a-'

I


Senior Airman Steve McNally (U.S. Air Force)
Air Force pediatrician, Capt. Ed Heard, examines three-year-old Orlando
Morell Diaz at the Cuban Reception Center.


Gardner, chief of General Surgery, the
Safe Haven humanitarian mission is pro-
viding valuable real-world experience and
training for the medical staff.
"For many of us, this is a first real-
world deployment with an ATH," said the
surgeon from Nellis AFB. "Some of us re-
cently received ATH training and, just by
coincidence, it was good timing for this
deployment. We're striving to provide our
patients with the best care possible, and at
the same time benefit from the experience
of using our individual skills and talents
in a unique environment."
The hospital has many resources avail-
able, including laboratory, X-ray, phar-
macy, operating room, emergency room,
obstetrics, pediatrics, dentistry, helicopter
pad and three ambulances. Army aid sta-


tion staffers at each community camp pro-
vide medical care for minor illnesses.
The unique situation has challenged the
ATH staff. Medical forms must be trans-
lated into Spanish by the administrative
staff to help bridge the language barrier.
Also, since an ATH facility is normally
used in war, there is not an established area
for pediatric patients. Pediatric supplies
and equipment had to be ordered and set-
up by the pediatricians, to accommodate
the Cuban children.
"The children we have seen are well-
immunized and well-nourished," said
Capt. Ed Heard, a pediatrician from Nellis.
"This has been a challenge from the start
-from putting up the hospital ourselves to
supplying our areas, but its worth it to see
the relief on our patients' faces."


Residents


perform at


Camp No.3
EMPIRE RANGE (Safe Haven JIB) -
Cubans moved to the rhythm of African-
Cuban folk music at the newly constructed
stage in Operation Safe Haven's Commu-
nity Camp No.3 Oct. 27.
African-Cuban musicians from the
camp played home-made, wooden instru-
ments that included drums, chacaras, hol-
low blocks and sticks. Dancers and sing-
ers accented the cultural and rhythmic beat
of the concert, that was organized to enter-
tain fellow community residents.
"We encourage cultural expression and
activities because the community members
enjoy it and it seems to give them com-
fort," said Cmdr. Richard Smith, Camp
No. 3 commander. "For a while now the
musicians have spontaneously gathered
together to play the instruments, so the
concert was organized to enable them to
perform for the entire community."
Safe Haven's Community Relations
Service staff coordinated the concert, and
is organizing entertainment and sports ac-
tivities for all four camps.
"Our mission is to provide morale, wel-
fare and recreation opportunities for the
Cubans," said Gus Duenas, a Cuban-
American CRS staff member. "If the
people do not have music or baseball, it's
like taking life away from them. We're
working to get regular musical instruments
for the community members and we're set-
ting -up sports tournaments within the
camps as well as entertainment events."
The Cubans seem to appreciate the ef-
fort involved.
"It uplifts us to hear the music and it's
part of our culture," community 'resident
Marcelo Gomez said. "We hope to soon
be able to listen to it as free citizens."


Mandatory flu vaccines arrive


GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
(MEDDAC PAO) - With the arrival of the newly-for-
mulated Influenza Vaccine supply, active duty military
are once again required to receive their annual flu shot,
while others may do so on a voluntary basis.
"Now is the time for certain segments of the popula-
tion to get influenza shots," said Lt. Col. Catherine
Bonnefil, chief of Army Community Health Nursing,
Preventive Medicine Services at Gorgas Army Com-
munity Hospital. "The vaccine will be available for the
general public in mid-November."
While flu season usually arrives in late fall or early
winter in the states, Panama is considered to be a year-
round threat.
The flu vaccine must be given in advance for immu-
nity to develop.
"It is generally recommended that individuals who
need flu shots get them in October, November and De-
cember," Bonnefil said.
The flu is a viral infection which comes on suddenly,
affecting the nose, throat and lungs. It can be confused
with the common cold, but normally includes a high
fever and muscle aches, whereas a cold is characterized
primarily by nasal congestion.
Though the flu is usually a mild disease in healthy
children, young adults and middle-aged people, it can
be life-threatening for older adults and others with
chronic illnesses. It is life-threatening because it lowers
the body's resistance, making a person more suscep-
tible to secondary infections such as pneumonia.
In the last 20 years, influenza has killed one-half
million Americans. It also causes the loss of more than
15 million workdays annually.
"It is extremely important that the influenza vaccine
be administered to people at high risk for developing
complications from the flu," Bonnefil said. "Those in
the high-risk group who should receive the flu vaccina-
tion include adults over age 65, adults and children with
chronic heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease, dia-
betes, or lowered immunity. Also at risk are children
and adolescents receiving long-term aspirin therapy,


because the combination of aspirin use and the flu in-
creases the risk for Reye's Syndrome."
In addition, physicians, nurses and others, including
family members, who have a lot of contact with high-
risk persons in health care settings or at home should
also take the shot.
Because the flu viruses usually vary each year and
the immunity provided by the flu shot declines over
time, re-vaccination is needed annually.
While the flu shot is safe and contains only dead vi-
ruses that cannot cause influenza, there are sometimes
mild side effects such as soreness around the injection
site or low-grade fever.
"These side effects last for only one to two days and
occur in less than one-third of the vaccine recipients,"
Bonnefil said. "Also, the side effects are far less severe
than the flu itself."
The only people who should not receive the vaccina-
tion are those who cannot eat eggs because of an aller-
gic reaction such as hives, swelling of the lips or tongue,
or sudden respiratory problems.
Most healthy people can fight off the flu with a few
additional days of rest, acetaminophen (Tylenol), and
plenty of liquids to drink. If you or members of your
family exhibit flu-like symptoms, talk to your physician
or health care provider for information on treatment.
The flu vaccine will be available on a walk-in basis
to everyone except children who must have a doctor's
prescription in order to be vaccinated. Come in during
regular Immunization Clinic hours at the Gorgas Immu-
nization Clinic (for adults, 282-5418); Pediatric Clinic
(for children, 282-5171); Fort Clayton's Building 519
Health Clinic, 287-3900; Fort Sherman Health Clinic,
289-6655; Howard Health Clinic, 284-6157; or at any
of the outlying troop medical clinics.
Special unit-level immunization programs must be
arranged directly with the unit's servicing immunization
clinic. For instance, most Army units will receive their
shots at the Immunization Clinic, Building 519.
For more information, call the Army Community
Health Nursing at Gorgas, 282-5418/5419.


Military personnel flight

renovations complete
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PAO) - Eleven months
of section shuffling concluded Monday when the Mili-
tary Personnel Flight here re-opened with all its renova-
tions completed.
Since December 1993, the elements within the flight,
personnel relocation, career enhancements, administra-
tion, personnel systems, personnel contingency opera-
tions, wing manpower, employment, pass and registra-
tion, and customer service, have had to move into vacant
rooms inside the building while their offices received a
facelift.
New carpet, light fixtures and furniture are
complimented by freshly painted walls and provide a dra-
matic change from the old offices, according to Senior
Master Sgt. Rick Hofsommer, personnel flight superin-
tendent.
Prior to the construction, the MPF suffered from poor
lighting; ugly, dirty brown carpeting; and moldy wallpa-
per that was falling off the walls in many places,
Hofsommer said.
"Now we have a much cleaner and nicer working at-
mosphere," he said. "This is more cheery and provides
more favorable working conditions."
Patience has paid off for MPF workers since their of-
fices are now more pleasant as well as air-conditioned
24-hours a day. However, MPF customers enjoy these
same rewards as well.
"It creates a favorable impression to walk into a place
that looks clean and nice," Hofsommer said. "I've heard
a lot of good things from customers already. They form
an opinion from this (appearance) and from there it just
goes up. We've got the foundation built, now we try to
improve on it by working in a quality atmosphere."
Brig. Gen. Richard Brown, 24th Wing commander,
and Capt. Art Rowley, U. S. Naval Station Panama Ca-
nal commander, officiated a ribbon-cutting ceremony to
re-open the pass and registration and customer service
sections. The two commanders were present to see busi-
ness begin in pass and registration where members of
both services may receive service.
The consolidation of Navy and Air Force offices is
part of the Treaty Implementation Plan.


News


A


1(4











Tropictivities
A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama


Nnv 4 1994


Page Bl


44


(courtesy)


White water adventure
Rafters plunge down the raging waters of the Chagres River, during a day-long jungle safari that included four-wheel driving, horseback riding and
white water rafting through Chagres National Park. For story and photos, see Page B3.


Com-niy ag


Fcs Pge-B4 &B


The Officers and Civilians Wives' A historical overview examines *Movies, Page B8
Club-Pacific raisesfundsforcom- Panama's independence and its *TV, Page B9
munity organizations in need. establishment as a new nation. *Potpourri, Page B12


I an mor -I


Iu . . 77


I









B 2 Tropic Times
B Nov. 4, 1994


*Community


OCWC-Pacific changes from social

club to caring, charitable organization


by Sgt. Eric Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Gone are the
days when the members of the Officers Wives' Club wore
their husband's rank on their shoulders. When the club
hierarchy matched that of the chain of command, no mat-
ter who was best qualified for the different positions.
These days, the Officers and Civilians Wives' Club-
Pacific looks less like a social club than it does a charita-
ble organization.
Part of what the OCWC does is help support the mili-
tary community and humanitarian organizations through
donations supported by the club's various fund raising ac-
tivities.
The OCWC makes a lot of its money from activities
such as the Spring Bazaar and the recent Christmas Pump-
kin Patch Bazaar, which netted the OCWC nearly $8,500.
Auctions and bingo nights also make up a large portion of
the donated funds.
Part of the money distributed, roughly $9,000 worth,
is earmarked for scholarships. Both students and adults
continuing their education have been recipients of OCWC
scholarships.
Organizations as well-known as the Boy Scouts, Girl
Scouts and the Salvation Army benefit from the OCWC
contributions, said Terry Baker, OCWC welfare commit-


Communi~iiity ativiie


Clayton
The next pre-marital seminar will be held the first
four Wednesdays in December at the U.S. Army South
Chaplain Family Life Center, Building 156, Fort Clayton.
Anyone wanting to be married in the Church, on or off
post, must attend the seminar. The seminar is conducted
in English. It is non-denominational and can be used for
marriage in the Protestant and Catholic Churches in Pana-
ma and in the states. A one-hour interview with the Fam-
ily Life chaplain is required prior to admission to the sem-
inar. For information, call Chaplain Len Kircher at 287-
5255.
A support group for all those living in an addictive
or abusive relationship is held 7-8:30 p.m. the first and
third Thursdays of every month in the USARSO Chap-
lain Family Life Center, Building 156, Fort Clayton. For
information, call Chaplain Len Kircher at 287-5255/3497.
Various worship services are held at the Christian
Servicemen's Center in Balboa. An English Bible study
is held 7-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. A Spanish service is held
7-9 p.m. Friday and Fellowship services are heldl0:30
a.m. Sunday.
The 154th Signal Battalion is sponsoring a garage
sale 7 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Nov. 12 at the large bohio at Fort
Clayton Park. This sale is to raise money, gifts and sup-
plies for the Penonome School in Panama. For informa-
tion, call 287-3864.
Super Suds Laundromats announces its new Drop-
off Service. Clothes dropped between 7 and 11 a.m. will
be ready the same day. Drop-off after 11 a.m. will be
ready for pick up the next day. Pay will be by pound.
Clothes are dried and folded. Call 287-3755 for details.

Howard/Albrook
The Family Support Center offers an orientation
course twice a month for spouses attending the Right
Start program. The next course (in English) will be 10-
11 a.m. Thursday at the FSC, Building 707. The informa-
tion given at the orientation will help make a stay in Pan-
ama more enjoyable. For more information, call 284-
5650.
The Family Support Center will offer a job search
workshop at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the FSC conference
room, Building 707. The workshop will teach people how
to effectively search for a federal job. For reservations or
more information, call 284-5650.
The Howard Family Support Center has a Smooth
Move relocation seminar planned to assist members
who will be making a major move within the next three
months. It will be held 1-2:30 p.m. Thursday at the FSC
conference room. Attendees will meet face-to-face with
representatives from the finance, legal, transportation and
housing offices, as well as others. These experts will be
available to provide information and address people's re-
location concerns. For more information, or to make a
reservation, call 284-5010.


tee director. Other organizations, such as the Panama
Christian Medical Mission, Army Community Services
and even U.S. Army Dental Activity-Panama have had
programs partially supported by OCWC funds.
"There are even more organizations requesting money
which haven't been chosen at this time," Baker said.
"We're spread pretty thin with contributions being dis-
tributed throughout the whole community."
With so many organizations applying for donations,
the biggest problem the OCWC has now is that they run
out of funds before they run out of organizations.
"Each year, we have two different times when we ac-
cept welfare requests," said Deana Sawdey, OCWC-Pa-
cific president. "A committee evaluates each of them for
need and validity.
"Last year we had a lot of requests from DoD (Depart-
ment of Defense) schools. Many people say that it's not
fair and that the schools get funding. But we try to help
provide things not normally provided by the school sys-
tem," Sawdey said.
Providing those opportunities to people and organiza-
tions would be more difficult if not for the hard work of
the OCWC members, Sawdey said.
"We have a really good group of spouses here,"
Sawdey said. "They work a lot of hours, taking time out
from their families to help with these activities, putting
money back into the community."


The Howard Family Support Center is spon-
soring a "Hearts Apart" support program for
spouses of members who are currently serv-
ing--or projected to serve-an unaccompanied
assignment or extended temporary duty assign-
ment. The group will meet at 6:30 p.m. Thursday
in the FSC conference room. Anyone wanting to
make new friends or gain from the support offered
through the group may call for a reservation, 284-
5010.
The Family Advocacy Outreach Program and
Howard AFB Child Development Center is spon-
soring a "Stress-free Holiday Shopping" event.
Free child care will be available at Howard CDC
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Nov. 15. Parents should
register with the center three days prior to use the
service. This is open to Air Force personnel only.
Call 284-3711/6135 to register.
The Howard Child Development Center is look-
ing for potential Family Day Care Providers for
the Albrook Area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/
6135 for more information.
The Family Support Relocation Assistance
Center to help with the loan closet, base brochure
library and the coupon cabinet. Family services is
open from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, and
flexible hours are available. Limited child care is
free for volunteers. Anyone who is interested, call
284-5860.

Atlantic
A Welcome to Panama orientation will be
held 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Thursday at the Fort Davis
Community Club.
The orientation will include an information
fair, free lunch and child care and a tour of the
Atlantic community. For reservations, call Alina
Shoy at 289-4955.
The Army Community Service Relocation
Assistance Office helps in the search for housing,
employment and educational possibilities for ser-
vicemembers and their family members. Call 289-
4021/4636 for more information.

Miscellaneous
The Enlisted Spouses Club-Panama takes
pride in serving the community. The club will
meet 7 p.m. Monday at the Fort Clayton NCO
Club. For information, call Barb Johnson at 284-
4523 or Amy Gross at 287-3071.
The Isthmian College Club will meet 4:30-6
p.m. Wednesday at Club Amador. The program
will be on Tagua Carvings as an art form. The
lecture will be presented by Ellie Gale. For infor-
mation, call Anona Kirkland at 264-1585 or
Carolyn Harvey at 286-3532.


Yu atvi


Albrook/Howard
Competitive swim team tryouts, 10 a.m. Nov.
12 at Howard and Albrook Pools for youths 8-18
years old. Call Lisa Nofi, 284-3569, or Rose
Coville, 236-2035, for more information.
*Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Preteen Dance 7:30-10:30 p.m. today and
Nov. 18 at Howard.
Baseball, softball and T-ball open registra-
tion for the 1994-1995 baseball season until De-
cember 3.
Spanish lessons for children and adults 4 and 5
p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Cheerleading lessons, Fridays at Albrook, Sat-
urdays at Howard.
Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday eve-
nings.
Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for mem-
bers and $35 for non-members.
Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturday.
Spanish lessons 4 and 5 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday.
Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesday.
Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four
days a week. Special preschooler class Saturdays.
Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available
for ages four to adult.
*Just for teens:
Basket-Bowl noon today starts at the Howard
Bowling Center for 50 cent games, and then at 1
p.m. proceeds to the Howard Sports and Fitness
Center for basketball.
Top Twenty Teen Dance 8-11 p.m. Nov. 19.
Party with your friends at the Howard Enlisted
Members Club Ballroom. Register in advance for
transportation from the Albrook center.
Teen Turkey Splash Pool Party 6-9 p.m. Nov.
25. Teens can have their own private pool party
with friends at the Albrook pool. Register in ad-
vance for transportation from the Howard center.


Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Junior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays Building 155.
Video day Wednesdays.
Arts and crafts Mondays.
Cooking experiences Tuesdays.
Outdoor games Thursdays.
Cooking classes Thursdays.
Youth Services is looking for piano and gym-
nastics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at
287-3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Gift wrapping workshop 9 a.m.-noon Satur-
day at the Valent Recreation Center.
Movie marathon in dolby surround sound 1-8
p.m. Sunday.
Popcorn and movies, Sundays.
Senior Teen Employment Program, year-
round program to develop job skills and earn mon-
ey for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are avail-
able at the center.
*Child Development Services 287-3301:
Spaces are available in the CDS part-day
program, Building 156, Fort Clayton, in the after-
noon session from 1-3 p.m. Preschoolers must be 3
years old and toddlers must be 2 years. For infor-
mation, call 287-5507/5104 or stop by the center
for a tour of the facilities. Office hours are from
7:15 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Children may be registered in
Building 155, 7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. weekdays.

Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Shotokan Karate 4-5 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday, $20 per person.
Arts and crafts 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Saturday sports noon to 6 p.m.
Piano classes 4-6 p.m. for 30-minute lessons
Monday and Wednesdays. There is a fee of $20
per person per month.
Girl Scouts of USA-Panama are seeking Atlan-
tic side member participation. To sign up or for
more information, call the Girl Scout Service Cen-
ter at 285-6867. The center is open 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays, noon-6 p.m. Wednesday
and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. the first and third Saturdays of
the month.


I











* Travel


Tropic Times B3
Nov. 4, 1994B


'k


(courtesy)
White water engulfs a group of rafters as they float through the Chagres River gorge during the final stage of a day-long, remote jungle trek.





Chagres jungle safari


F or most of us, the "concrete jungle" of Panama
City is an adventure in itself-dodging speeding
taxis and negotiating the numerous potholes.
However, some people are constantly seeking new
challenges.
For these individuals, an exhilarating day-long jungle
safari through some of Panama's most remote and pristine
wilderness may be just the cure for the metropolitan blues.
River rafting has become a popular sport in Panama
since people have "discovered" the Chiriqui and Chagres
rivers. Fort Clayton's Outdoor Adventures sponsors river
rafting on the Chiriqui, and just recently, Aventuras
Panama has opened up the Chagres to exploration.
River trips and jungle safaries can be arranged through
your favorite military travel office, various local travel
agencies, or Aventuras Panama at 260-0044.
Since the age of 16, outdoor guide Javier Romero, of
Aventuras Panama, S.A., has dedicated his life to
exploring the gin-clear rivers and virgin, tropical
rainforest of Chagres National Park.
Relying upon his vast knowledge of the area, Romero
has organized a unique jungle encounter that transports
people by four-wheel drive, horseback and rubber raft
deep into an area completely void of civilization.
The jungle trip began at 5:30 a.m. when Romero
picked up his clients from a downtown hotel. From there,
the group climbed high into the rugged Cerro Azul
mountain range along a primative dirt road in a four-
wheel drive vehicle. Upon reaching the summit of Cerro
Jeffe at an elevation of 1,007 meters, the sightseers
enjoyed a view of Madden Lake far below. After two
hours, they arrived in the tiny village of Alto Pacora for a
final stop before descending toward the Chagres River
basin.
Within another half hour, the party reached a small
family farm called San Cristobal. The landowner tends
cattle and raises crops of rice. Romero has worked out an
agreement with the farmer by giving him horses in
exchange for property access and the right to use them on
his outfitting trips.
The farmer mentioned that a jaguar raided his farm the
night before and killed a horse and two chickens. A
nervous excitement began to build inside the visitors as
they pondered the possible dangers that lurked in the
dense undergrowth of the jungle during their journey.
After a light breakfast, the explorers saddled up on
small, white horses distinctively marked with a smattering
of black speckles and embarked on a two-hour horseback
ride through the scenic jungle.
Romero's love and knowledge of the area was obvious
as he led the caravan along a steep, muddy trail. He
stressed the importance of maintaining silence and being
on the lookout for the exotic flora and fauna known to
inhabit the region. The horses crossed several small,
crystal clear creeks that are cooled by the shade of the
rainforest. Periodically, he pointed out unique flowers,
insects and wildlife that are of interest to the group.
Eventually, the travelers made their way to a farm
located in a meadow along the edge of the Piedras River.
Waiting for the saddle-sore riders on the stream's bank


was a large raft, oars, life jackets and helmets. Romero
informed the group that the Piedras is a gentle-flowing
tributary of the Chagres River. He pointed out that it is a
good place to learn proper paddling techniques, before
reaching the more challenging Chagres. After a briefing
on water safety and instructions on navigation, the rafters
pushed off on the next leg of their journey.
The Piedras is a relatively shallow stream that is
forgiving of novice paddlers' mistakes. However, as
Romero barked out commands, he quickly pointed out
that this would not be the case on the Chagres, where poor
decisions and slow reactions can lead to tragic conse-
quences. Capsizing the raft in raging waters had to be
avoided at all costs, so the rafters needed to learn to work
as a team before they reach the mighty river.
As the rafters floated through a series of pools and
rapids, Romero listed an assortment of wildlife commonly
spotted along the stream's edge. He said he often observes
monkeys, otters, iguanas, hawks, and various kinds of
exotic birds and fish while rafting. Occasionally, he has
captured a glimpse of an unsuspecting jaguar or tapir.
After several hours, the rafters reached the confluence
of the Piedras and Chagres rivers.
A heavy downpour the night before left the normally
clear Chagres River clouded with sediment and swelling
at its banks. The river was much wider, deeper and
stronger than its feeder stream. In addition, the dangers
and obstacles increased at this point, as well.
"As we float farther downstream, the grade of the river
will get steeper and that means big rapids," Romero said.
The edges of the stream gradually changed from sand
and gravel to basalt boulders and jagged cliffs. The river
funneled into a canyon, highlighted by waterfalls of run-
off from tiny springs. Few of the rafters spoke a word.
Instead, they chose to absorb the incredible surroundings.
Eventually, the sun's sweltering heat had become
by Spc. Tom Findtner,


unbearable to the explorers. When the raft entered the
long, deep gorge, Romero suddenly plunged backwards
into the cool water. The delighted paddlers immediately
followed. After clinging to the side of the raft while
floating in the water for some distance, Romero told the
crew to get back in and prepare for the most difficult
aspect of the trip.
"The next two falls are the most dangerous white
water," Romero said.
The first was a steep drop...The second was even more
tricky, consisting of a chute rushing between a rock wall
and large boulder. Each time a person was hurled from the
raft by the pounding water, before quickly being pulled
back to the safety of the raft.
The worst of the rapids were behind them so the group
relaxed until rounding a bend in the river, where a dugout
canoe with motor was waiting. The raft would be towed
the remaining distance to a take-out site at Madden Lake.
However, there was a final stop on the excursion. The
raft was pulled to an Indian village located along the edge
of the river. When the natives spied the approaching raft
they congregated along the trail leading up from the water
to greet each rafter with a smile and a handshake. The
women's faces and arms were stained with a brightly
colored dye, produced from a local root and applied like
make-up. The men brought out wood carvings and other
crafts that they hoped might interest the tired rafters.
However, nightfall was approaching fast so the rafters bid
farewell after a short visit.
For the rafters, the experience had been challenging,
but rewarding. It was not the kind of trip where they could
sit back and relax. It was hard work paddling, but the
scenery and abundance of wildlife was spectacular. The
opportunity to explore some of the most remote wilder-
ness Panama has to offer is a truly unforgettable adventure
that only a handful of people can claim to have done.
Tropic Times staff


... . ,


(courtesy)
A caravan of horseback riders creep along the narrow jungle trail enroute to the Chagres River.


a









B4 Tropic Times
B Nov. 4. 1994


jFocus on Panama


Panama, part 2: Independence



A history of a nation that helped shape the world


(Editor's note: Panama celebrates its independence
from Colombia Thursday. This is the second part of
a five-part series on the history of Panama: Part 1:
The Early Days; Part 2: Independence; Part 3:
Canal Building; Part 4: The Canal Zone; and Part 5:
A New Future. The history was adapted from an
unpublished manuscript by Dr. Miguel A. Bernal
and Thomas J. Hofer, Florida State University and
David MccCullough 's Path Between the Seas.)

In 1901, the United States signed the Hay-
Pauncefote Treaty with Great Britain, effec-
tively nullifying the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty of
1850 (See last week's story). Its provisions gave the
United States a free hand in building a canal any-
where in Central America with guarantees of
neutrality. To the British, it was quid pro quo. They
needed a free hand with the Suez Canal and the
North Americans gave it to them. Despite British
insistence on leaving a Central American canal
demilitarized, the United States refused to give any
promises, citing the need to build fortifications.
During the Spanish-American War, one of the
few points of high drama was reached when the
battleship Oregon raced around the tip of South
America enroute to reinforce the Pacific Squadron of
Admiral George Dewey. In the aftermath, President
Roosevelt was convinced that America needed a
canal and could no longer afford to wait. The
Spooner Act in June 1902 and the Hay-Herran
Treaty in January 1903 both authorized the ambitious
venture.
The Spooner Act authorized the President of the
United States to specifically negotiate with Colombia
over the lease or purchase of land necessary to build
a canal in Panama. Failing negotiations with
Colombia, the President was empowered to enter into
agreements with Costa Rica and Nicaragua over a
route that would extend from Greytown on the
Atlantic side, following Lake Nicaragua to Brito on
the Pacific Ocean. A sum of up to $40 million was
permitted to secure a concession in either location.
A battle over ratification ensued in the U. S.
Senate where attempts to attach 60 amendments to
the treaty were rejected. The Senate then passed the
treaty as originally written. Upon receipt of the
treaty, the Colombian government claimed an
indemnity of 50,000 francs from the defunct French
company. Secure in the knowledge that the French
concession would expire in 1906 and Colombia
would regain the title to her land, proposals were
made to the United States to agree to modifications
of the treaty. Finally, the Colombian Legislature
adjourned for the summer, without ratifying the
treaty. When they returned on Nov. 2, 1903, the
treaty was referred to the President of Colombia to
renegotiate changes. The next day, Panama declared
its independence.

Seeds of discontent
The United States played a pivotal role in this
drama, but in answer to the question, "Is the United
States responsible for the independence and creation
of the Panamanian state?" the unequivocal answer
must be no. Although United States participation and
the actions of French engineer Phillipe Bunau-Varilla
would help with the Panama revolt of 1903, the
seeds of discontent were already present in Panama.
There are many other associated reasons that
pointed toward an independent and free Panama: the
revolts of 1830, 1831, and 1840; the cultural,
economic and political incompatibility of Colombia
and Panama; and the French canal fiasco.
On Aug. 12, 1903, the Colombian Senate
formally rejected the Hay-Herran Treaty and refused
to extend the concession to the French Universal
Canal Company beyond Oct. 30, 1903. The Colom-
bians believed that in the aftermath of the confisca-
tion of French property that they could sell the
machinery and rights to the North Americans for $40
million dollars.
As the treaty was being voted down in Colombia,
a Panamanian revolutionary junta was forming,
headed by Jose Augustin Arango, a lawyer and
adviser for the Panama Railroad. His purpose, as


(Courtesy)
The founding fathers of Panama. Seated (left to right): Jose Agustin Arango, Dr. Manuel Amador
Guerrero, Federico Boyd. Standing (left to right): Nicanor de Obarrio, Carlos C. Arosemena,


Manuel Espinosa, Tomas Arias, Ricardo.Arias.
indicated in his memoirs, "to save the Isthmus from the
ruin to which it was being led." To Arango's group
came Dr. Manuel Amador Guerrero, Ricardo Tomas
Arias, Nicanor de Obarrio, Manuel Espinosa and
Federico Boyd. All were from prominent Panamanian
families and remained in contact with U.S. officials.
Concern over the position of the United States as
Panama declared its independence was uppermost in the
conspirators' minds. Would the United States be
persuaded that this was a genuine movement of the
people or would it provide help to Colombia to force the
recalcitrant province to return?


A move toward independence
The answer came when the USS Nashville sailed into
the Bay of Panama Nov. 2.
The ship's arrival at Colon was not any particular
cause for alarm by Colombian or local officials who
knew nothing of the schemes afoot. To Amador's fellow
conspirators, however, it was the long-awaited decisive
moment, the irrefutable sign that the United States stood
prepared to guarantee their success.
Then, on the night of Nov. 2, the Colombian warship
Cartagena steamed into the Bay of Panama, her lights
aglow. At daybreak, Nov. 3, Commander Hubbard of
the Nashville took a launch to the Colombian ship, went
aboard, and was informed by Gen. Juan Tobar that it
was carrying nearly 500 troops and that he, Tobar,
intended to put them ashore at once.
Hubbard made no protest, despite what he knew. He
had no orders to prevent such a landing and as yet there
was not a sign of disturbance of any kind by which he
might have justified his own intervention.
News of the landing was immediately telephoned to
Panama City, and to those conspirators who had been
kept in the dark this whole time, it was a crushing
revelation. Word of a Colombian warship standing off
Colon would in itself have had a devastating effect; but
far worse was the realization that the American ship had
made no move to prevent the Colombian troops-and
assuredly a Colombian firing squad-from coming
ashore. All the bravado engendered by the arrival of the
Nashville the evening before was undone in an instant.
The conspirators saw themselves as the victims of a
diabolic Yankee betrayal. Even Amador, who was
having his own bleak second thoughts, might have
called the whole thing off right then, early on the
morning of the 3rd, had it not been for the stately
Arango, who declared himself ready to stand by his old


friend, and for Senora Amador, a woman "of courage
and snap" (as William Howard Taft would later describe
her) who was considerably younger than her husband
and who declared that it was time to get on with the
fight, soldiers or no soldiers.
A plan was hurriedly improvised, an extremely heat
stratagem that appears also to have been the inspiration
of Senora Amador.
Tobar and the Tiradores Battalion landed at the old
Panama Railroad wharf near Colon. They were received
with customary deference by various local officials
when Col. James Shaler, superintendent of the Panama
Railroad, introduced himself, bid the officers welcome,
and calmly recommended that tley depart at once for
Panama City on a special train, a single car and a
locomotive, which had been arranged for their conve-
nience.
The troops could not be transported immediately
because of a temporary shortage of equipment, he
explained, but they would follow shortly. Tobar
hesitated; Shaler was insistent, saying that the time fixed
for departure had already passed and that there was no
reason in the world why the officers should have to
stand about in the killing heat a moment longer.
A young officer was picked to remain in command of
the battalion, a Col. Eliseo Torres. But just as Tobar and
his aides-l15 men in all-were being comfortably
settled in their special car, Tobar's second-in-command,
Gen. Ramon Amaya, grew suddenly uneasy about the
arrangement, saying he must get off at once. Tobar
objected, claiming it would be unseemly if the two of
them were not to arrive in Panama City together. The
issue was resolved only when Shaler stepped quietly to
the rear of the car, pulled the signal cord, and hopped off
the train. He was smiling broadly and waving as the train
steamed away.
Meanwhile, a plan was being formed in the event that
the soldiers demanded a train at gunpoint. The plan, as
Shaler later explained, was to put all their rifles and
ammunition in the rear car. When the train reached Lion
Hill, someone would pull the rear coupling pin and leave
the arms stalled in the jungle. The engineer would then
run the train full steam to Culebra, where he would
abandon his engine and let the stranded, unarmed
soldiers walk out whichever direction they chose.
The trap for Tobar and Amaya, on their way to
Panama City, was being set in the meantime. As soon as
Herbert Prescott, assistant superintendent of the Panama
Railroad, received Shaler's message that the generals
were on their way, he went to Amador's house and told


A










L Focus on Panama


Tropic TimesB5
Nov. 4,1994B


Panama, part 2: Independence



A history of a nation that helped shape the world


him it would have to be "now or never." Some very fast
thinking was called for, as they had about two hours to
get things ready. Amador was also convinced, from
what he had learned during his trip to New York, that
excessive bloodshed would seriously jeopardize
American sympathy for their cause.
The revolution, it was decided, would take place that
afternoon. Amador at once ordered his carriage and
drove to the Cuartel de Chiriqui, the barracks of the
Colombian garrison, a large pale building by the
seawall, facing onto the Plaza Chiriqui. In command of
the garrison was Gen. Esteban Huertas, small, smooth-
faced, impeccable, young man, and very ambitious, as
Amador well knew.
According to the recollection of one of Huertas' own
men, who was standing nearby when Huertas received
the white-haired doctor, Amador said that he himself
was old and tired but that Panama and the general had a
great future ahead.
"If you will aid us, we shall reach immortality in the
history of the new republic." An American ship had
arrived, more were coming, Amador added. "You and
your battalion can accomplish nothing against the
superior force of the cruisers, which have their orders.
Choose here, glory and riches; in Bogota, misery and
ingratitude."
Huertas is said to have remained "impassive" for a
moment, then put out his hand. "I accept."
But since this appears to have been the only time the
two met more or less privately that morning, an agree-
ment must also have been reached regarding the sums
Huertas and his men were to receive for their part,
unless, of course, the bargain had already been worked
out in secret in the days preceding, which is perfectly
possible.
In any event, payment to the soldiers was to be $50
per man, while Huertas was to be compensated for his
revolutionary fervor with $65,000, an absolute fortune in
Panama in the year 1903.

No warning
At 10:30 a.m., in full uniform, Huertas marched at
the head of his regiment down the Avenida Central to
receive the generals at the railroad station.
At 11:30 a.m. the train pulled in and Tobar, Amaya,
and their aides stepped down to an amazing welcome.
Governor Obaldia was there, accompanied by all his
official family; Gen. Francisco Castro, military com-
mander of Panama, with his aides; U.S. Vice-Consul
Ehrman, who was also head of the important Ehrman
bank in Panama City; and Huertas with his troops,
drawn up on the dusty little plaza across from the station.
There was much saluting, much cheering, Obaldia was
full of words of welcome, and a line of sleek carriages
stood waiting.
An elaborate luncheon followed at the Government
House. But as the afternoon wore on, with still no sign
of his troops, Gen. Tobar grew increasingly suspicious
and finally demanded to be taken to military headquar-
ters at the Cuartel, where he promptly assumed com-
mand. An officer confided to him that rumors of an
uprising were sweeping the city. Meanwhile, a cryptic
message from a prominent local citizen warned Tobar to
trust no one.
Sometime near 2 p.m. the anxious general sent
several of his aides to Obaldia to inform him of these
rumors and to request that Obaldia order the immediate
dispatch of the troops from Colon. The aides returned
saying the governor had assured them that everything
would be taken care of.
Apparently satisfied by this, Tobar and a number of
his officers crossed to the barracks, where, joined by
Huertas and Huertas' own retinue of officers, they
inspected the local troops. The seawall was next, Tobar
showing Huertas where he wanted the best marksmen
placed to command the streets running from the harbor
to Cathedral Plaza.
At about 5 p.m. as Tobar, his officers, and Huertas sat
conferring on a bench outside the barracks near the gate
to the seawall, Tobar was informed that a crowd had
begun gathering at the front of the building. Gen. Amaya
went out and returned to confirm the report. Huertas
asked if it was not time to order out the first patrol.
Tobar assented and Huertas, excusing himself to change
out of his dress coat, went inside, followed by Gen.
Castro.
When a company of soldiers marched out with fixed


Gen. Esteban Huertas (center) sold out the Colombian military and joined Panama.


bayonets, the generals were still sitting in the same
place.
The soldiers wheeled to the right of the seawall gate,
as if to pass in front of the generals, but then suddenly
opened into two files, one going in front of the seated
men, the other behind. At a command the soldiers
stopped and swung about with bayonets lowered at the
astonished generals.
"Generals, you are my prisoners," said the officer in
command, a young captain named Salazar.
"By whose orders?" Tobar asked.
"General Huertas."
Tobar lunged at the nearest soldier in an effort to
escape, but was instantly hemmed in by bayonets. He
appealed to Salazar, begging him not to be a traitor. He
called on sentinels along the wall, the other soldiers, to
come to the defense of their country, all to'no avail. But
neither he nor any of his companions had attempted to
draw a sword or reach for a side arm.
Disarmed, they were marched out the seawall gate,
through a crowd of several thousand people, and on to
Cathedral Plaza, across the plaza and up Avenida
Central to the jail, the crowd shouting "Viva Huertas! ..
Viva Amador! ... Viva el Istmo Libre!"
Those in the crowd who were armed began firing
shots in the air. Minutes after the generals were locked
up, at 5:49 p.m. by the wall clock in the railroad office,
Herbert Prescott was on the phone to tell Shaler and
Melendez. It was "the hour of freedom."
At dusk, as the municipal council met to give the
junta its formal recognition, the Colombian gunboat
Bogota opened fire, throwing five or six shells into the
city, killing one man-a Chinese shopkeeper who had
been asleep in bed-and a donkey. These were the day's
only casualties. When a shore battery responded, the
ship withdrew behind an island in the bay and was heard
from no more.
So by nightfall there remained only the problem of
the troops at Colon.

Establishing a new nation
It was very early on the morning of Nov. 4 that
Commander Hubbard of the Nashville issued the order
addressed to Superintendent Shaler forbidding the
movement of "troops of either party [Colombian or
insurgent] or in either direction by your railroad."
So when the young Colombian colonel, Eliseo
Torres, who had been left in charge, appeared again at
Shaler's office that same morning to resume his effort to
get transportation for his men, Shaler had only to tell
him that his hands were tied. A standoff followed
between the Colombians and Americans.
Two extremely critical hours followed. Hubbard had
all American women and children put on board a


German steamer then in port and on another ship
belonging to the railroad. He gathered the men inside the
railroad's stone warehouse and landed a detachment of
forty sailors with an extra supply of arms. Cleared for
action, the Nashville weighed anchor and moved in
closer to shore, her guns trained on the railroad wharf
and on the Cartagena, which to the surprise of everyone
got up steam and departed at full speed.
The Colombians had the railroad building surrounded
almost immediately, their purpose being, in Hubbard's
view at least, to provoke an attack. It was a situation ripe
for catastrophe. Yet for all the tension on both sides, no
shots were fired and a little after 3 p.m. Torres walked
up to the barricaded building and told Hubbard that in
fact he was "well disposed toward the Americans" and
wished only to make contact with Gen. Tobar to find out
what he was supposed to do. He proposed that he
withdraw his own troops to Monkey Hill, that Hubbard
and his force return to the Nashville, and that he be
permitted to dispatch an emissary to Tobar to explain the
gravity of the situation and to bring back Tobar's
answer.
At Panama City it was decided that a personal appeal
by Amador (El Presidente, as the crowds were now
calling him) might do the trick. The day at Panama City
had been a very different one from that at Colon. The
junta was riding high; the whole city was celebrating;
the new flag had been raised at the Government House
and at Cathedral Plaza.
In Panama City the next morning, Senor Don
Eduardo Ycaza, who had been appointed paymaster by
the junta, began writing checks drawn on the Brandon
bank-$30,000 to Huertas, who was to get another
$50,000 later on (why he wound up with $80,000 all
told, rather than the $65,000 originally promised, has
never been explained); $35,000 for General Varon of the
Padilla, $10,000 each for Captain Salazar, who had
handled the actual arrest of the generals, and several
other of Huertas' officers whose loyalty was deemed
important.
Tobar and his generals, who had been returned to
police headquarters, were again released and transported
by train to Colon to await passage on the next ship to
Cartagena.
Cables to Secretary of State Hay were composed and
sent in the meantime, one from Arango, Arias, and
Boyd, the other from Vice Consul Ehrman. The
authority of the new republic, the cables said, had been
established and enthusiastically received throughout the
entire Isthmus and Philippe Bunau-Varilla had been
appointed "confidential agent" in Washington.
The reply came the next afternoon. It was dated Nov.
6, 1903 at 12:51 p.m. The United States government had
formally recognized the new Republic of Panama.









B6 Tropic Times
B.6 Nov. 4, 1994


* * * ** I't


Rodman
*Information, Tour and Travel:
Free Zone shopping trip 7 a.m.
Wednesday, $12.
Downtown shopping 9 a.m. Thurs-
day, Nov. 16 and 18 $8. Shop Panama's
Central Avenue and Via Espana.
Moonlight cruise 6:30 p.m. Nov. 12,
$21. Cruise out to Taboga Island for cock-
tails and hors d'oeuvres by moonlight,
while viewing Panama City's dramatic
skyline at night.
Bottom-fishing on the Vargas Nov.
13 and 27 $35 adults, $20 children under
14. Fee includes captain, gear, live bait
and iced coolers.
Two-day deep seas fishing trip Sat-
urday and Sunday. Fish the fertile waters
of Isla del Rey, San Jose and Galera
aboard the 42' Vargas, $220 fee includes
captain, gear and bait.
San Bias Islands scuba safari Nov.
20, $140/person includes roundtrip
ground transportation, guide, lunch, and
scuba gear.
Portobelo Saturday, $70/person in-
cludes transportation, tours by boat, trip
to island beaches, lunch and guide.
Chiriqui River rafting Saturday and
Sunday, $150 includes roundtrip trans-
portation, meals, lodging, rafting and riv-
er guides.
Panama City tour 9 a.m. Nov. 19, $8.
San Andres Island, Colombia Nov.
11-14, $286/person includes roundtrip
airfare, three nights lodging at the Caribe


/ , ;///,////,/


Hotel, tours and most meals.
Rainforest adventure Nov. 12 and
26, $65, 6 a.rh. departure. Explore Barro
Colorado Island.
Trolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. Nov.
12 and 26, $48/person. Fish for marlin,
sailfish, dolphin (fish), bonita, Spanish
mackeral and more. Fee includes cap-
tain, gear, lures and iced coolers.
El Valle 7 a.m. Nov. 13 and 27, $12.
Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits
and vegetables and visit nature preserve.
Bird watching and nature trip Nov.
17, $42/person, includes transportation,
meal, guide and binoculars. Bring a swim-
suit and take a dip in the waterfall.
Contadora Nov. 25-27, $179/person
double occupancy, $219/person single
occupancy, $135/kids 2-11, includes
transportation, 2 nights lodging, all meals
and drinks, and use of all resort facilities.
Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
ter:
Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fri-
days, $13.
Colonial Panama and locks tour 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Nov. 30, $10/
person, $25/family.
El Valle shopping 6:30 a.m. - 4:30
p.m. Sunday, $13.
Dining at Tambal 7-10 p.m. Wednes-
day, $6 per person, $15/family.
Shopping in Panama City 8:30 a.m.-
3:30 p.m. Nov. 12, $6.
Pollera dancing and dining 7-11 p.m.


/


Nov. 16, $6/person, $15/family.
Vegetable and fruit market shop-
ping 8 a.m.-l p.m. Nov. 19, $5.
Horse racing at the Hippodrome
noon-4:30 p.m. Nov. 20, $5.
Thanksgiving in Chiriqui Nov. 23-
27, $371 single, $245 double, $139 third
person.
Christmas shopping on Central
Avenue 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 28, $4.
*Outdoor adventures:
Gold Panning in Bique 8 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Wednesday and Nov. 22, $12.
Peacock bass fishing in Lake Gatun
5 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov. 12, 15,20 and 26, $25.
Bring fishing gear and bags.
El Valle horseback riding 7-4 p.m.
Sunday and Nov. 25, $24.
Bocas Del Toro weekend trip Nov.
11-13, $280 divers, $260 snorkelers, $142
children under 12 based on double occu-
pancy. Fee covers transportation to air-
port, airfare, lodging, meals, five dives,
entertainment, airtanks and weights. Per-
sonal equipment and gratuities not in-
cluded. Sign-up in advance.
Drake Island-Snorkeling'and Scu-
ba 7 a.m.- 5 p.m. Nov. 13 and 27, $22
snorkelers, $47 divers.
Barro Colorado Island tour 6 a.m.-
3p.m. Nov. 17, $65.
Clayton
*Valent Recreation Center:
Panama City shopping 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Saturday.
El Valle 6:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.


//


Chiriqui highlandsThursday-Nov. 13.
Museums and art galleries 9 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Nov. 12.
Free Zone 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 16.
*Outdoor Recreation Center:
Whitewater rafting in Chiriqui Nov.
11-13, $130/person covers transportation,
rustic lodging, meals, equipment and guide.
Partial transits of the Panama Canal
are available 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday.
A minimum of 20 people are needed for
transits for other days. The adult fee is $35,
children under 12 years of age pay $20.
Food and beverages will be sold on board.
Small coolers may be brought on board.
The Contadora Island transit service
is now only offered on Sundays. Fees are
$35 adults and $20 children 12 and under
round trip, $25 adults and $15 children one
way.
Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel
opportunity to Montego Bay Sundays
through Wednesdays. Packet includes air-
fare, three nights hotel accommodations,
and transfer. Prices vary from $300-$600
depending on the hotel.

Balboa
*Balboa Dive Club:
The club is now accepting new mem-
bers. Divers must show a certification card.
Annual fee is $12. Members receive a
newsletter, use of the club tanks, library
and videos for loan, information and class-
es and dive trips. Call 263-8077 or 260-
0075 or write Unit 0967, APO AA 34002.


No more Nunsense II
The Little Sisters of Hoboken cast members perform the opening
number In Nunsense II. The final performances of the musical
comedy will be tonight and Saturday at the Ancon Theatre Guild.
Curtain time is 8 p.m. Tickets cost $8. Call 252-6786 for reserva-
tions.


Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
ter
Tae Kwon Do 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Thursday and Fridays.
Beginner and advanced dog obedi-
ence Saturday 9-10:15 a.m. $32 for 4
weeks.
Beginner and advanced English and
Spanish is offered monthly.
*Howard and Albrook Youth Cen-
ters:
Guitar 1-6 p.m. Saturday at Albrook.
Spanish 4-5 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
days at Albrook.
Martial arts at Howard and Albrook
284-4700.
*Howard and Albrook pools
Intro to scuba free, call for appoint-
ment.
Open water scuba Monday at Al-
brook, Nov. 21 at Howard, $145.
Advanced scuba Nov. 16 at Albrook,
$105.
Rescue scuba Nov. 29 at Howard,
$125.
Water aerobics for advanced adult
swimmers at Howard and Albrook.
*Albrook Auto Skills Center:
Air conditioning service and repair
12:30-5 p.m. daily except Tuesday and
Wednesday.
Wheel alignment diagnostic and ser-
vice classes are held 3-9 p.m. Monday,
Thursday and Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday and Sundays.
Brake Pad class 1-3 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday, $5.
Pnuematic air machine workshop,
1-4 p.m. Nov. 12 and 13, $5.
Oil change special for women 1-4
p.m. Nov. 19 and 20, $5. Bring supplies.
Battery maintenance workshop 1-4
p.m. Nov. 26 and 27.
Amador
*Amador Pool:
Water aerobics 5-6 p.m. Wednes-


/



days, 9-10 a.m. Saturday, $16 for eight
sessions.
Swim classes are cancelled until De-
cember.
Clayton
*Fort Clayton Pool:
All swimming classes will be discon-
tinued until December because of in-
clement weather.
*Fort Clayton Boat/Scuba Shop:
Open water scuba class meets the
first and third Monday of each month,
$125. The class includes five pool ses-
sions, five theory sessions and four open
water dives and one skin diving.
Long set equipment rental $19 per
day.
+Valent Recreation Center:
Private piano and guitar lessons avail-
able weekday evenings.
Korean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday.
Curundu
*Twin Oceans Pro Shop:
The Pro Shop will soon be moved
next to the boat and scuba rental shop on
Fort Clayton. There will be a grand open-
ing sale.
*Pacific Theatre Arts Centre:
Reservations for Christmas Village
tables is under way 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at the
Centre.
Volunteers and performers are need-
ed for the upcoming Christmas Village.
People interested in serving as master of
ceremonies, or groups, live music shows
and dancers can call 286-3814 to register.
The following classes are ongoing:
Saxaphone 5-8 p.m. Monday and
Thursday.
Piano 3-7 p.m. Monday, Tuesdays,
Wednesday and Fridays. Open to stu-
dents ages 6 and older.
Martial arts 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays. Open to all ages.
Monthly classes are available in
dance, music and martial arts. Call the
centre for more information.











ices



*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts
Center:
The Ceramic Center, Building
198, is located near the Crafts Shop.
*Canal Crafters:
Canal Crafters is a volunteer
organization providing scholar-
ships for the community. Hand-
made arts and crafts are avail-
able, consignments and volunteers
are welcome. The shop hours are 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Satur-
day. The shop is now accepting
holiday consignments, Building
804, Albrook.
The stencil demo scheduled for
Oct.27 has been changed to 10:15
a.m. today. Free class, bring sten-
cil and paint.
Register for the following class-
es at the shop:
Bow making 10:15 a.m. Satur-
day, $3, all supplies included.
Beginner quilting 10:15 a.m.,
starts Tuesday, runs four weeks,
$32, complete kit.
Tole-painting, Santa quartet
10:15 a.m. Wednesday and Thurs-
day, two-day class.
Cross-stitch demo, angel 10:15
a.m. Nov. 11, free, bring supplies.
*Howard Skills Development
Center:
The Howard Skills Development
Center now accepts charges on
club cards from the Howard/Al-
brook Officers' and Enlisted Clubs.
Center will be closed Nov. 11 in
observance of Veteran's Day and
Nov. 24 for Thanksgiving.
Multi-colored floss and flower
thread sale today and Saturday, 25


a .


*Valent Recreation Center:
Effective Tuesday the center
will be open 12:30-9:30 p.m. dai-
ly.
Better Opportunities for
Single Soldiers will meet 2 p.m.
Nov. 17.
The screening room offers free
movies. Call the 24-hour movie
line, 287-4367 for days and times.
Panama arts and crafts dis-
play through Nov. 12.


Tropic Times B
Nov. 4, 1994

,Wft^Z^^^
"""Oftaft.


/ ///m


percent off.
Greenware 25 percent off, Nov.
12.
Paint Sale Nov. 18-19, 25 per-
cent off selected paints.
Artist's Sale Nov. 25-26, 25
percent off art books, easels and
other art supplies.
All classes must be pre-regis-
tered and paid for prior to at-
tending. Classes will be cancelled
24 hours prior if minimum partici-
pation is not met.
Clay flower class 11 a.m.- 2
p.m. Saturday, $5 plus supplies.
For all levels.
Oil painting class 9 a.m.-noon.
Wednesday, $30 plus supplies. Sec-
ond of four classes.
Beginning pottery 10:30-12:30
p.m., Tuesday, $15 plus supplies.
Second week of three week class.
Photo album class 10:30-1:30
p.m. Tuesday, $5 plus supplies.
Drybrushing class 1-4 p.m. Tues-
day and Nov. 29, $5. Prep work
necessary before class.
Brushstroke class 1-3 p.m.
Wednesday, $5. Learn techniques
used for ceramics or tole painting.
Paper caper basket class 10:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m. Nov. 12, $5 plus
supplies. Make baskets using box-
es and paper ribbon.
Airbrushing Demonstration 5-
7 p.m. Nov. 16, free. Learn tech-
niques that can be applied to ceram-
ic or T-shirt painting.
Ceramic pouring class 5-7 p.m.
Nov. 17, free. Learn how to pour
your own ceramic molds.
Stamping Class 6:30-8:30 p.m.


Nov. 17, $5. Learn many applica-
tions for rubber stamps.
Colorpoint class 2-4 p.m. Nov.
18, $5. Bring a T-shirt and learn
how to do colorpoint painting.
Beginning ceramic painting 1-
4 p.m. Nov. 22, $15. Learn to use
overcoats, stains and glazes in this
three week course.
Beginning crosstitch 2-4 p.m.
Nov. 23. Learn the basics to enjoy
this popular pasttime.
Framing class 10:30 a.m.-2
p.m. Nov. 26, $20 plus supplies.
Clay flower classes 11 a.m.- 2
p.m. Saturday, $5 plus supplies.
For all levels.
Ongoing classes: stained glass,
framing, air brush, lamp assembly,
pottery wheel throwing, cross stitch,
macrame, clay flower, ceramic and
"how to videos."
Anyone interested in forming a
craft club to meet and share ideas,
patterns, socializing and more call
284-6361 or leave your name and
number at the Center.
The center is looking for
crafters to sell items in the new
consignment boutique.
Instructors are needed to teach
classes on a contract basis for a
variety of crafts, decorative paint-
ing, calligraphy, watercolors and
oil painting.
*Fort Sherman Multicraft Cen-
ter
Woodworking qualification
classes Saturdays, free. The class
covers safe and correct use of wood
shop equipment. Qualification
cards will be issued.


. -P "- /`
Adz


*Cocoli Community Center:
Children's videos 4 p.m. Thurs-
days.
Laser disc movies 7 p.m.
Friday.
*Sports and Recreation Rental
Center
Veteran's Day weekend spe-
cial, Nov. 11-13, rent a three-man
tent, sleeping bag and lantern for
$6.25 a day, $9 for the weekend.
Monday-Nov. 12 special, rent


cooking utensils at half price.
+Zodiac Community Center:
Subs on Top offers eat-in, take
out, delivery services. Subs on Top
is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-
Fridays, 11 a.m.- 3 p.m. Saturday. It
is located in the Zodiac Community
Activities Center, Howard AFB.
Phone orders to 284-5848, fax to
284-6109.
Rent the activities room and the
Big Tree Bohio for parties.


Phone guide


Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports
and Recreational Rental Center 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop 286-3613
Albrook Club 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989
Amador Pool 282-4247
Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-0075
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club 287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center 287-3363
Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center 287-3010
Corozal Thrift Shop 285-5989
Howard Auto Craft Shop 284-3370
Howard Enlisted Members' Club 284-4107
Howard Officers' Club 284-4680
Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Howard Skills Development Center 284-6361
Howard Teen Center 284-4700
Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
The Loop 287-3035
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Quarry Heights Officers' Club 282-4380
Rodman Annex 283-5475
Rodman Club 283-4498
Rodman Marina 283-3147/3150
Rodman Naval Station Information
Tour and Travel Office 283-5307/4454
Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
Valent Recreation Center 287-6500
Zodiac Community Activities Center 284-6161


Atlantic
Aquativity Center
Davis Arts and Crafts Center
Davis Community Club
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center
Outdoor Recreation
Sherman Arts and Crafts Center
Sherman Scuba Shop
Sundial Recreation Center


289-4009
289-5201
289-5160
289-6402
289-4077
289-6313
289-6104-
289-3889/3300


A


Show time
*Pacific Theatre Arts Center:
The family musical Bye, Bye Birdie runs through
ov. 12 at the Pacific Theatre Arts Center. Curtain
ime is 8 p.m. Tickets are $10, call 286-3152 for
reservations.
tylin'
+Zodiac Community Activity Center:
The Zodiac Community Activity Center will present
hair and clothing show 6-11 p.m. Nov. 12. Door
rizes will be awarded. There is a $5 fee.
local stars
*Zodiac Community Activity Center:
Be entertained by talented members of the commu-
ity in a talent show at the Howard Base Theater 7 p.m.
ov. 18. Entrance is free. For more information
contact the Zodiac Recreation Center.
un for all
*Atlantic Community:
The Atlantic Fun Fair will be at Fort Davis Nov. 19.
ere will be various activities and games available for
he community.


Atlantic tours
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Isla Grande 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun-
day.
Panama City historical tour 8
a.m.-5 p.m. Monday.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation
Center:
Portobello/ Playa Langosta 8
a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday.
Rio Mar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday.
Playa Corona 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov.
13.
Rec center news
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Horseshoe tournament 2 p.m.
Saturday.
Beginning painting 6-8 p.m.
Monday.
Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday.
Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mon-
days, Wednesdays and Fridays.


Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and
Friday.
Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday.
Piano 10:30-11 a.m. Wednes-
days.
Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6
p.m. Thursday.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation
Center:
Atlantic community shark fish-
ing will be offered Dec. 3, registra-
tion deadline is Nov. 23. Tackle, bait
and ice is provided, bring food and
drinks.
Fort Sherman goes bowling
Nov. 22, 29 and Dec. 6, 13. Bowl at
reduced prices, shoes are free, round-
trip transportation is free. Bus leaves
the center at 6 p.m. and returns to
Fort Espinar at 10:30 p.m.
The center will offer a CPR and
first aid class for maids and
babysitters 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 12 at
the center. There is a $15 fee and


servicemembers must sign up maids
and babysitters. The class is open to
spouses, as well.
The center offers the following
classes and events coordinated
through local agencies:
Horse grooming, care, equipment
and riding lessons.
Dog obedience classes run an hour
a day, two days week for a month.
Line handling for sailboats and
yachts allows people to be involved
with transferring the boats through
the canal.
Deep seas fishing charters are
day-long fishing trips that departfrom
Cristobal Yacht Club. Call 289-6402
for more information.
Instructors are needed for vari-
ous classes.
The center is open 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
daily.
People are needed to line handle
transiting boats from Cristobal to
Balboa. Sign up now.


. . .


A �k









B8Q Tropic Times
BDO Nov. 4, 1994


T Movies


Location


Today


Saturday


.............Y....ndayTI d Y VWe ...n.AC.y ITIVh..... . .. . Th.....y
Howard AFB 7pm: Milk Money 2pm: Blankman 2pm: Milk Money 7pm: A Good Man in 7pm: Blankman 7pm: A Simple Twist 7pm: Corrina, Corrina
284-3583 (PG-13) Melanie (PG-13) Damon (PG-13) Melanie Africa (R) Sean (PG-13) Damon of Fate (PG-13) Steve (PG) Whoopi
Griffith, Ed Harris Wayans, David Alan Griffith, Ed Harris Connery, Colin Friels Wayans, David Alan Martin, Gabriel Byrne Goldberg, Ray Liotta
9pm: True Lies Grier 7pm: Blankman 9pm: Milk Money Grier 9pm: Corrina, Corrina 9pm: The Mask
(R) Arnold 7pm: A Good Man in (PG-13) Damon (PG-13) Melanie 9pm: Milk Money (PG) Whoopi (PG-13) Jim Carrey,
Schwarzenegger, Africa (R) Sean Wayans, David Alan Griffith, Ed Harris (PG-13) Melanie Goldberg, Ray Liotta Richard Jeni
Jamie Lee Curtis Connery, Colin Friels Grier Griffith, Ed Harris
9pm: True Lies 9pm: A Good Man in
(R) Arnold Africa (R) Sean
Schwarzenegger, Connery, Colin Friels
Jamie Lee Curtis


Fort Clayton 7pm: The Little 2pm: The Little 2pm: Wagons East 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: Natural Born 7pm: Milk Money 7pm: Blankman
Rascals (PG) Rascals (PG) Travis (PG-13) John Candy, (PG-13) Killers (R) (PG-13) Melanie (PG-13) Damon
287-3279 Travis Tedford, Tedford, Bug Hall Richard Lewis John Candy, Woody Harrelson, Griffith, Ed Harris Wayans, David Alan
Bug Hall 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: Wagons East Richard Lewis Juliette Lewis 9pm: A Good Man in Grier
9pm: Natural Born (PG-13) John Candy, (PG-13) 9pm: Natural Born 9pm: True Lies Africa (R) Sean 9pm: A Good Man in
Killers (R) Richard Lewis 9pm: Natural Born Killers (R) (R) Arnold Connery, Colin Friels Africa (R) Sean
Woody Harrelson, 9pm: Natural Born Killers (R) Woody Woody Harrelson, Schwarzenegger Connery, Colin Friels
Juliette Lewis Killers (R) Woody Harrelson, Juliette Juliette Lewis Jamie Lee Curtis
Harrelson, Juliette Lewis
Lewis

Fort DaviS 7pm: Clear and 7pm: Clear and 2pm: Angels in the 7pm: Clear and Present 7pm: Color of Night 7pm: Clear and 7pm: Wagons East,
289-5173 Present Danger (PG- Present Danger (PG- Outfield (PG) Danny Danger (PG-13) (R) Bruce Willis, Jane Present Danger (PG- (PG-13) John Candy,
289-5173 13) Harrison Ford, 13) Harrison Ford, Glover, Tony Danza Harrison Ford, Willem March 13) Harrison Ford, Richard Lewis
Willem Dafoe Willem Dafoe 9:30pm: Color of Dafoe Willem Dafoe
9:30pm: Color of 9:30pm: Speed (R) Night (R) Bruce
Night (R) Bruce Keanu Reeves, Dennis Willis, Jane March
Willis, Jane March Hopper (Reduced
Admission)
Fort Sherman 7pm: The Mask 7pm: Color of Night 7pm: Clear and No show No show No show 7pm: Natural Born
289-5173 (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (R) Bruce Willis, Jane Present Danger Killers (R) Woody
Richard Jeni March (PG-13) Harrison Harrelson, Julliette
Ford, Willem Dafoe Lewis

Fort Amador 7pm: The Mask 7pm: Camp Nowhere 7:30pm: Corrina, No show No show 7pm: The Mask 7pm: A Simple Twist
284-3583 (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (PG) John Putch, Corrina (PG) Whoopi (PG-13) Jim Carrey, of Fate (PG-13) Steve
Richard Jeni Peter Scolari Goldberg, Ray Liotta Richard Jeni Martin, Gabriel Byrne
_ I


Nov. 11


Howard AFB
7pm Camp Nowhere (PG)
John Putch,
Peter Scolari
9 pm Corrina, Corrina
(PG) Whoopi
Gold berg, Ray Liotta


Fort Clayton
7pm Milk Money (PG-13)
Melanie Griffith
Ed Harris
9 pm True Lies (R)
Arnold
Schwarzenegger
Tom Arnold


Fort Davis
7pm WagonsEast(PG-13)
Jim Carrey,
Richard Jeni
9pm Natural Born Killers
(R) Woody
Harrelson, Juliette
Lewis


Fort Sherman
7pm Speed (R)
Keanu Reeves,
Dennis Hopper


Fort Amador
7pm Clear and Present
Danger (PG-13)
Harrison Ford,
Willem Dafoe


Blankman
Damon Wayans, David Alan Grier
He's got no super powers, no money and no
name. He's BLANKMAN, a self-appointed
super hero who's so broke he fights crime in
his long johns. PG-13 (off-color humor) 1
hr, 32 min.

Camp Nowhere
John Putch, Peter Scolari
Instead of going off to computer, military,
diet and theatrical camps, kids scheme to cre-
ate their own dream summer camp with no
counselors or rules. PG (some mild adoles-
cent language, sensuality) 1 hr, 36 min.

Clear & Present Danger
Harrison Ford, Willem Dafoe
In this movie adaptation of the Tom Clancy
novel, Jack Ryan (Harrison Ford) finds him-
self once again drawn into global intrigue.
This time he's up against a Colombian drug
cartel. Also features Ann Archer and James
Earl Jones. PG-13 (action, violence, lan-
guage) 2 hrs, 22 min.

Color of Night
Bruce Willis, Jane March
Haunted by the bizarre suicide of a patient,
New York psychologist Dr. Bill Capa (Bruce
Willis) abandons his successful practice and
relocates to Los Angeles. His encounters
there prove as shocking as the chilling event
he has run away from. He immediately finds
himself entangled in an explosive sexual re-
lationship with a beautiful and enigmatic
woman named Rose, and the investigation
into the brutal stabbing murder of a friend
and colleague. R (sexuality, violence, lan-
guage) 2 hrs.

Corrina, Corrina
Whoopi Goldberg, Ray Liotta
Ray Liotta is a widowed dad with a grieving
daughter who's withdrawn into silence.
Whoopi's the housekeeper who brings sun-
shine into their lives and falls in love with
her employer. PG (thematic material) 1 hr,
55 min.

A Good Man in Africa
Sean Connery, Colin Friels
Sean Connery is a reluctant diplomat in this
story of a man assigned to a newly indepen-


COMING TO SAVE
YOUR BUTT!


Now showing at Howard and
Clayton theaters.
dent African state. He wants out, but a com-
plicated political situation inspires him to
stay. R (language and sexuality) I hr, 36
min.

The Little Rascals
Travis Tedford, Bug Hall
Steven Spielberg produces an appealing up-
date of the Hat Roach comedy series from
the '20s, '30s and '40s. The gang has estab-
lished a boy's only club, but things change
when Alfalfa falls for Darla. PG (language)
1 hr, 22 min.

The Mask
Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni
Nobody does super powers like Jim
Carrey. An ordinary, mild-mannered bank
clerk is transformed into the weirdest su-
per hero of all time when he dons his mask.
PG-13 (some stylized violence) I hr, 40
min.


Milk Money
Melanie Griffith, Ed Harris
Melanie Griffith is a streetwise woman who
rescues three young boys. The boys drifted
into the city from rural locales in hopes of
seeing a living, breathing, naked woman.
PG-13 (sexual themes) 1 hr, 42 min.

Natural Born Killers
Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis
This is the saga of Mickey and Mallory
Knox, two thrill-killers who truly enjoy
their work. They live in a interesting zone:
pillowtalk and ultra-violence; insanity and
comedy; demons and heroes. R (violence,
shocking images, language, sex) 2 hrs.

A Simple Twist of Fate
Steve Martin, Gabriel Byrne
A mother dies in a snowstorm, leaving her
toddler to wander into the house of a strang-
er (Martin) and transform the man's reclu-
sive and miserely life. PG-13 (a drug relat-
ed situation) I hr, 42 min.

Speed
Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper
LAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played by
Keanu Reeves, is known as a man with an
attitude. Dennis Hopper, the sociopath who
nearly killed him before, is back for an ex-
plosive reunion. R (violence, language) 1
hr, 51 min.

True Lies
Arnold Schwarzenegger,
Jamie Lee Curtis
Harry Tasker is a special agent for Omega
Sector, a top secret agency charged with
nuclear terrorism intervention. Fluent in six
languages and skilled in all forms of counter
intelligence, Harry is an international spy
who has kept his real profession secret from
his wife. R (action, violence, language) 2
hr, 42 min.

Wagons East
John Candy, Richard Lewis
Phil Taylor (Richard Lewis) is a frontiers-
man who rallies discontented neighbors to
leave the West and return East. James
Harlow (John Candy) is the hard-drinking
wagon master hired to lead the convoy East.
PG-13 (off-color humor) I hr, 47 min.


I
Sundav i


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday














TV Schedule


Tropic Times B
Nov. 4,1994B


Chanels & 1


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


i C


Today


5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30
6:00 Headline News 7:00
7:00 Good Morning America 7:30
w/Panama Now (7:25) 8:00
9:00 Basic Training Workout 8:30
9:30 Sesame Street 9:00
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
?2:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sponrtscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey 10:30
3:00 Price is Right 11:00
4:00 Think Fast! c 12:00
4:30 I Love Lucy 12:30
5:00 Family Feud , 2:15
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight .4:30
7:00 Jeopardy
7:25 Panama Now
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 America's Funniest
People 6:30
8:30 Evening Shade 7:30
9:00 In the Heat of the-Night 8:30
10:00 SCN Late Edition '10:30
10:05 Cheers 12:00
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show 1:00
12:30 RenandStimpy 2:00
1:00 Movies: "Ladyhawke"
3:00 "Jumpin Jack Flash" 4:00
5:00 "Bad Dreams"


Saturday Sunday Monday

Headline News 6:00 Real Videos 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:3
Navy/Mariqe Corps News 6:30 The Hour of Power 6:00 Headline News 6:(
Guts 7:00 Take 2 6:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:2
Tiny Toon Adventure 7:30 The 700 Club 7:00 Good Morning America 7:(
Channel One/Newsroom 8:00 The Old House 9:00 Basic Training Workout 7
Just for Kids! 8:30 Amish Cooking from I 9:30 Sesame Street 9:
Muppets Babies Quilt Country 10:25 Guiding Lightti 9:3
Teenage Mutant Ninja 9:00 CBS Sunday Morning M 11:10 General Hospital 10:
.Turtles 10:30 This Week w/Brinkley ' 12:00 Headline News 11:
Biker Mice from Mars 11:30 Face the Nation 12:30 Sports Machine 12
Batman Cartoon 12:00 Inside the NFL 1:00 Oprah Winfrey 12
Cartoon Classics 12:30 On Stage 2:00 Another World 12:
Faerie Tale Theater 1:00 Movie: "Pollyanna" 3:00 Price is Right 1:1
Spies 3:30 Special: Ken Bum's 4:00 Guts 2:1
Headline news "Baseball" 4:30 I Love Lucy 3:1
Movie: "Old Yeller" Ninth Inning "Home' 5:00 Family Feud 4:1
Special: Ken Burn's 6:00 Hearts Afire 5:30 The Cosby Show 4:3
"Baseball" 6:30 Dr. Quinn: Medicine 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:C
Seventh Inning "The Woman 6:15 Headline News Break 5:
Capital of Baseball" 7:30 Mini series: "The Return 6:30 WorldNews Tonight 6:
Special: Ken Bum's to Loneseome Dove"' 7:00 Jeopardy 6:
"Baseball" (Part 3 of 4) 7:25 Panama Now 6:
Eighth Inning 9:00 ABC 20/20 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:
"A Whole New 10:00 Top Cops 8:00 Mad About You 7:
Ballgame" 11:00 Miami Vice 8:30 Cops 7:
Rescue 911 + 12:00 Movies: "Days of Wine 9:00 60 Minutes 8:
Walker: Texas Ranger and Roses" 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:
Movie: "Mermaids" 2:00 "Seven Days in May" 10:05 Cheers 10
Saturday Night Live 4:00 "The Nanny" '11:30 Tonight Show 10
WWF Superstars of 12:30 Nightline 10
Wrestling 1:00 Movies:"Sweet Liberty" 11I
Friday Night Videos 3:00 "Last Sunset" 12
Movies: "The Silence of I 5:00 Headline News 1:
the Lambs"
"Grease" 3:


Wednesday Thursday
5:30NBCNewsat unrie 530 NC Nws a Suris


Tuesday

30 NBC News at Sunrise
00 Headline New
10 NBC News at Sunrise
00 Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
00 Bodyshaping
10 Sesame Street
25 Guiding Light
10 General Hospital
:00 Headline News Break
:25 Panama Now
:30 Sportscenter
30 Sally Jesse Raphael
300 Another World
00 Price is Right
00 Reading Rainbow
30 I Love Lucy
00 Family Feud
30 The Cosby Show
00 SCN Evening Report
15 Headline News Break
30 World News Tonight
00 Jeopardy
25 Panama Now
30 Entertainment Tonight
00 L.A. Law +
00 Northern Exposure
:00 SCN Late Edition
:05 Cheers
:30 David Letterman
:30 Tonight Show
.:30 Nightline
:00 Movies: "The Longest
Yard"
:00 "North Dallas Forty"
:00 Headline News


NBC News at Sunrise
Headline News
NBC News at Sunrise
Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
Basic Training Workout
Sesame Street
Guiding Light
General Hospital
Headline News Break
Panama Now
Sportscenter
Oprah Winfrey
Another World
Price is Right
Shining Time Station
I Love Lucy
Family Feud
The Cosby Show
SCN Evening Report
Headline News Break
World News Tonight
Jeopardy
Panama Now
SEntertainment Tonight
Beverly Hills 90210**
Murder, She Wrote **
SCN Late Edition
Cheers
SDavid Letterman
I Tonight Show
I Nightline
Movies: "Star Trek: The
Motion Picture"
"Airplane"
Headline News


5:30
6:00
7:00

9:00
9:30
10:25
11:10
12:00
12:25
12:30
, 1:00
2:00
3:00
4:00
S4:30
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:15
6:30
7:00
7:25
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:30
10:00
10:05
10:30
1 1:30
12:30
1:00
3:00
5:00


NBC News at Sunrise
Headline News
Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
Bodyshaping
Sesame Street
Guiding Light
General Hospital
Headline News Break
Panama Now
Sportscenter
Donahue
Another World
Price is Right

Mister Roger's
Neighborhood
I Love Lucy
Family Feud
The Cosby Show
SCN Evening Report
Headline News Break
World News Tonight
Jeopardy "
Panama Now
Entertainment Tonight
ALF
Touched by an Angel
Love and War
SCN Late Edition
Cheers
David Letterman
Tonight Show
Nightline
Movies: "Mask"
"The Electric Horseman"
Headline News


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

5:30 Oprah Winfrey 5:30 Headline News 6:00 Washington Week in 5:30 Oprah Winfrey 5:30 Donahue 5:30 Oprah Winfrey 5:30 Sally Jesse Raphael
6:00 Simulcasw/Ch.8& 10 6:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8& 10 Review 6:30 Simulcastw/Ch. 8& 10 6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8& 10 6:30 Simulcastw/Ch. 8& 10 6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
9:00 Oprah Winfrey 9:00 Young Adult Theater 6:30 Mister Roger's 9:00 Oprah Winfrey 9:00 Donahue 9:00 Oprah Winfrey 9:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
10:00 Today "The Incredible Book Neighborhood 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek i Escape" 7:00 Quigley's Village 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break "The Three Worlds of 7:25 GoofTroop '12:30 All My Children 12:25 Panama Now 112:25 Panama Now 12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now Gulliver" 7:45 Muppet Babies 1:30 One Life to Live 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children 11:30 Superman 8:10 Disney's The Little 2:30 Young and the Restless 1:30 One Life to Live 11:30 One Life to Live 12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live 112:00 Silver Spoons Mermaid 3:30 Batman 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless 12:30 Movie: "The Story of 8:35 Batman 4:00 Fraggle Rock 3:30 Bobby's World 3:30 GoofTroop 2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja Robin Hood" 9:00 Bobby's World ** 4:30 The Adventures of Pete '4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 3:30 Muppet Babies
Turtles *** 3:30 Sports Special 9:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja & Pete 4:30 Legends of the Hidden 4:30 Guts 4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:00 Fraggle Rock a 4:30 Dinosaurs. Turtles 5:00 In the Mix Temple 5:00 Beakuman's World ' 4:30 Get the Picture **
4:30 Reading Rainbow 5:00 Movie: "Blossom" 10:30 Movie: "The First Men 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Disney's Raw Toonage 5:30 Showbiz Today . 5:00 Fact of Life
5:30 Showbiz Today 8:00 Star Trek: Deep Space in the Moon" 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening NewsToday Nine 12:00 This Old House 6:15 Headline News Break I 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break 9:00 Me and the Boys 12:30 NFL Pre-Game Show 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evenin News (New Fall Series) 1:00 NFL Football: TBA 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 6:30 NBC Nightly News 17:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 6:30 NBCTrek:ghtlyheNews
O7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 9:30 Married With Children 4:00 NFL Football: TBA Nine 7:00 Slar Trek: Deep Space Nine r Trek Th Next
Nine 110:00 Movies: "Little Man Tate" 7:00 Wonderful World of 7:55 Panama Now Nine 7:55 Panama Now Generation
7:55 PanamaNow "Flatliners" i Disney + 8:00 MacGyver 7:55 Panama Now 8:00 Sinbad Show 7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Roseanne 1:30 Science & Technology 8:00 NFL Football: TBA 9:00 Monday Night Football: 8:00 Home Improvement 8:30 Family Matters 8:00 Boy Meets World
8:30 The Boys are Back Week 11:00 The Fresh Prince of TBA 8:30 My So Called Life 9:00 Wise Guy 8:30 John Larroquette
(New Fall Series) 2:00 McLaughlin Group Bel-Air 12:00 M*A*S*H (New Fall Series) 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:00 CNN Presents
9:00 Primetime Live 2:30 Sports Latenight 11:30 Phenom 112:30 Nightline 9:30 Frasier 10:05 Tour of Duty 10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:00 SCN Late Edition 3:00 Entertainment this week 12:00 Eye to Eye w/C. Chung 1:00 CNN Presents 10:00 SCN Late Edition 11:00 Headline News 10:05 L.A. Law
10:05 Renegade 4:00 Headline News 1:00 Headline News 2:00 Headline News 10:05 Heartbeat 1l:30Cheers 11:00 Headline News
11:00 Headline News 4:30 Saturday Night Live 1:30 Meet the Press 2:30 Sports Latenight 11:00 Headline News 12:00 M*A*S*H 11:30 Cheers
11:30 Cheers 2:30 Sports Machine 3:00 David Letterman 11:30 Cheers 12:30 Nightline 12:00 M*A*S*H
12:00 M*A*S*H 3:00 Sports Latenight 4:00 Headline News 12:00 M*A*S*H 1:00 NBC Now 12:30 Nightline
12:30 Nightline 3:30 Frugal Gourmet 4:30 Wheel of Fortune 12:30 CNN Election Coverge 2:00 Headline News 1:00 Eye to Eye w/C. Chung
1:00 ABC 20/20 4:00 Headline News 5:00 Jeopardy 3:00 Nightline (Election 2:30 Sports Latenight 2:00 Headline News
2:00 Headline News 4:30 Wheel of Fortune Special) 3:00 David Letterman 2:30 Sports Latenight
3:00 David Lettermanght5:00 Jeopardy 4:00 Headline News 4:00 Headline News 3:00 David Letterman
3:00 David Letterman r 4:30 Sportscenter 4:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:00 Headline News
4:30 Military News 5:00 Jeopardy 5:00 Jeopardy 4:30 Wheel of Fortune
5:00 Tom & Jerry Kids 4:30 Oprah Winfrey 5:00 Jeopardy


Channels 8 & 10
Sports


Cable Channel 14
Sports


Ken Burn's Baseball , r or l oota
Seventh inning, The Capital of Baseball, 2:30 p.m. Saturday ... All Teams TBA
Eighth inning, A Whole New Ballgame, 2:30 p.m. Saturday.', ", Series.starts
Ninth inning, Home, 3:30 p.m. Sunday ,-'jaturday "Star Trek - The Next Generation," 7 p.m. Thursday
Series starts The great adventure resumes as the advanced Enterprise em-

Murder, She Wrote, 9 p.m. Wednesday. barks on its continuing mission to boldly go where no one

The murder capital of the Northeast shifts from Cabot Cove, has gone before. Stars Patrick Stewart and Jonathan Frakes.
Maine to the Big Apple as mystery writer and amateur sleuth Movies
par excellence Jessica Fletcher moves her address to New ,. , The Story of Robin Hood, 12:30 p.m. Saturday
York City. Angela Lansbury returns to her role as Jessica as esty, colorful retelling of the familiar story, filmed in England by
this enduring whodunit series returns. .Walt Disney with excellent cast. Not as personality-oriented as other
dMini-eseries versions, but just as good in its own way. Stars Peter Finch and Joan Rice.

Return to Lonesome Dove7:30 p.m. Sunday. Prime time movies
Clara Allen loses her ranch in a blazing fire, but all of her horses are saved. She %- "Little Man Tate," 10 p.m. Saturday
teams up with Gideon Walker and heads for Montana where Woodrow Call waits to A blue-collar single mother copes with raising her seven-year-old genius son and
realize his vision of breeding horses in the Big Sky country. learns to accept and trust the help of others, including a teacher of the gifted. Stars
Prime time movies Jodie Foster and Dianne Wiest.
Mermaids, 8:30 p.m. Saturday. "Flatliners," 11:40 p.m. Saturday
Inthis fond look at life in the early 1960s, Cher is a saucy, single mother of two who's A group of young medical students devise a dangerous experiment in which they'll
a constant source of embarrassment to her teenage daughter, who just happens to be deliberately create a condition of clinical death, sample the afterlife experience and
struggling with her own personal awakening. Stars Cher and Winona Ryder. then be brought back to life. Stars Julia Roberts and Kiefer Sutherland.


5:30
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12:25
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2:00
3:00
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5:00
5:30
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I A


5:1














SClassified Ads


B1 I Tropic Times
B O Nov. 4, 1994


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder,
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
.cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
B: fore such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.


2 yr old calico female cat, free; 8 wk
old black/white, male, free. 283-6231.

Two female kittens, 6 wks old, very
affectionate and mild mannered, free.
252-6952.

Cocker-poodle, male, 3 mos old, $80.
260-2514 for Maggie or Ken.

CFA registered seal point himalayan
male for stud services. 284-3990 for
Mindy evenings.

Cocker spaniel, male, 14 wks old,
shots, tan/beige, playful, $150. 260-
5809.

English bull terrier puppies. Exc ped-
igree. Male, brown/white champion
bloodline. Female brindle. 260-2994
after 6 pm.

Mix poodle/cocker, 2 females and a
male, 5 wks old, $50. 287-6470.

Female and male cat, fixed, declawed,
shots and access. Prefer kept together,
free. 287-3685.

Male dalmation, shots included, 3 wks
old, sharp looking, $200. 289-4166.

Toy French poodle puppies, six wks,
tails docked, dewormed, CCP regis-
tered parents, $225. 226-5395.

Small poodle puppies, purebred, white,
shots, wormed, 8 wks, $75. 286-4774.

10 month old golden lab, female, all
shots, gd w/kids, $250/obo. 283-4295.

Mini toy white French poodle, male, 4
pounds, for stud service. 226-7176.

Fawn and brown puppy, free. 287-
6638.

Black male chihuahua for stud ser-
vice. 284-6774.

9mosold female cocker spaniel, house
broken, shots, buff, $125. 286-4894.

Shepherd, pure black, healthy, females
and males, 6 wks, parents avail, $200.
282-5494.

Shephard puppy, 7 mos, all shots, CCP
reg, house broken; calico kitten, fe-
male, 6 wks, free. 283-3031.

2 dachshund puppies, females, 7 wks,
$175. 266-7930.

Rottweilers, 3 wks old, docked, dew-
ormed, reg, $500. 235-4190.

Cuddly baby bunnies, all colors, $5.
262-2665.

Pure shepherd, black, no papers,
healthy, $200. 282-5494.

Horse, male, 2 yrs, $95. 252-2889.

6 wks old chihuahau puppies, ador-
able, dewormed and sweet disposi-
tion, $150. 252-2577.

Three cats, Wanda, Peanut and Ruben,
neutered, indoor-outdoor, litter
trained, free. 286-4972.

Free small terrier, lovable, grt w/kids,
house broken, all shots. 287-3097.

Free 5 mos old poodle/schnauzer
mixed. Really playful. 286-4996.

Freshwater fish, $10. 287-6672.

Mixed-breed dog expecting puppies
within 1 mo, $25. 287-6721.




1990 Ford Probe, V6, 5spd, ac, cruise,
tilt, sun roof, am/fm cass, low miles,
$8,000/obo. 287-6654.

1988 Mazda RX-7, cherry red, 5 spd,
sunroof, tint, am/fm cass,$9,000.287-
3171.

Spot bid sale, used govt cars, 4x4s,
diesels, trucks, 9am Nov. 19, Bldg
308 Corozal. Inspection 9am-3pm
Nov. 17-18. 285-5417.

1974 Chevy Impala, $800. 286-3245.


1983 Prelude, all power, ac, new paint,
$2,900. 252-2033.

1986 Ford econoline van 150, at, ac,
TV, reserve gas tank, dty pd, loaded,
$8,500/obo. 269-5700.

1989 Mercury Cougar, 3.8L eng, auto,
ac, pw, pl, dty pd, $8,500. 228-4061.

1993 Ford Explorer XLT, 4 dr, 2wd,
w/positraction, auto, JBL stereo, low
miles, not dty pd, $22,300.252-5556.

1994 Chevy Cavalier, exc cond, 4 cyl,
5 spd, am/fm cass, not dty pd, $8,950/
neg. 252-2392.

1991 Ford Ranger XLT w/matching
fiberglass shell, 29K miles, ac, 5 spd,
4 cyl, $8,300. 287-5536.

1989 Dodge Conversion van, V8, dual
ac, low miles, not dty pd, exc cond.
252-6815.

1992 Chevy Corsica, 15K miles, 6 cyl,
ac, ps, pb, am/fm cass, $9,950. 284-
5073.

1982 BMW, new eng, new paint, un-
der warranty, $8,000/obo. 287-6348.

1976 Ford Elite, runs, needs work or
sale as parts, lots of new parts, $600.
283-4283.

Honda elite scooter, 150cc, electric
start, exc cond, helmet, vest, tool kit,
$1,200. 284-4282.

SAAB 900 Turbo, new auto trans,
tires, battery, air cond, electric wind,
sunroof, stereo, $3,800. 286-4777.

1989 Ford Festiva, ac, am/fm cass, at,
ps, pb, not dty pd, $4,900. 289-4982.

1979 MGB, red, gd cond, new elec
system, exhaust, new tires, grt fun,
best offer. 289-3824.

1985 S10 Blazer, new paint, blue, am/
fm cass, ac, 4x4, V6, gd tires, $5,000/
obo. 289-5461.

1988 Renault Medallion, 4 dr, auto,
ps, pb, pd, am/fm cass, gd tires, dty pd,
$3,500/obo. 287-5121.

1986 Ford Tempo, 5 spd, ac, 4 dr, am/
fm cass, 4 cyl, gd cond, gray, dty not
pd, one owner, $5,300. 282-3737.

1984 VW Quantum, sedan, 4 dr, at, ac,
pb, lots of new parts, dty pd, $2,950.
286-4641.

1988 Mitsubishi Lancer, am/fm cass,
auto, gd cond, tint, $4,500.251-1208.

1989 Ford Festiva, ac, am/fm cass, ps,
pb, at, not dty pd, $4,800/obo. 289-
4982.

1985 Porsche 944, 5 spd, ac, all pow-
er, tint, cd stereo, cruise, alarm,
$10,000/obo. 284-4227.

1983 Ford Bronco, full size, 4 spd, ac,
nice stereo, 4wd, offroad pkg, roll bar,
$7,000/obo. 284-4227.

1989 Camaro 5.0, ac, pl, pw, JVC pull
out stereo, speakers, $6,000/obo. 287-
5827.

1986 Chevy custom deluxe full size
black w/silver stripe, 4.3L, V6, gd
cond, $5,000. 287-6827.

1992 Chevy S-10 Blazer, tahoe pkg,
red, 2 dr, ps, pb, tw, am/fm cass, ac, 5
spd, new tires, V6, 4.3L, low miles,
$16,000. 287-6645._

1989 Ford Escort, ps, pb, ac, am/fm
cass, new tires, low miles, auto, red,
$6,000. 287-6623.

1984 Dodge Daytona Turbo, ps, pb,
pw, ac, tilt, new interior, $3,000/obo.
285-4056 for Slate.

1991 Ford Escort LX, grt mpg, ac, ps,
pb, new tires, exc cond, one owner,
$7,500/obo. 284-4125. -

1988 Mitsubishi montero, auto, die-
sel,all power, loaded,dtypd, $12,500/
obo. 269-5700.

1989 Jeep Cherokee, low miles, not
dty pd, $8,000, 260-9326.


bought new at Howard, $8,000. 286-
3171.

1993 Ford Explorer XLT, 4wd, 4 dr,
4.0L, V6, auto, low miles, loaded,
$23,500. 284-6887.

1988 Dodge Daytona, red, pm, elec
injection, interior looks new, tint,
$4,200. 285-6880.

1992 GMC Jimmy 4x4, 4dr, am/fm
cass ac, ps, pb, tint, $17,500. 287-
3856.

1989 Olds Cutlass Calais Quad 4, pw,
pd, ac, ps, pb, 2 dr, ct, 50K miles,
$9,000. 261-3568.

1985 Toyota 4x4 truck, long bed, w/
camper toO, 5 spd, ps, pb, ac, exc cond,
$5,500. 252-6017.

1993 Geo Tracker 4x4, nice stereo,
alarm, big tires, $14,500. 286-4172.

1989 Camaro RS, V6, auto, t-tops,
looks new, $6,000/obo. 230-1926.

1989 Eagle Premier, 3.0L, V6, 4 spd,
at, ac, loaded, sharp, price neg. 289-
3531.

1990 Ford F150 p/u, fully loaded,
been badly wrecked, $2,000. 287-
6138.

Ford Telstar, exc cond, dty pd, 5 spd,
ac, am/fm cass, $3,600. 252-2414.

1992 Ford Escort LX, 4 dr, 5 spd, ac,
blue, mint cond, 8,600 miles, $8,500.
284-6298.

1987 Dodge Shadow turbo, 2 dr, 5
spd, runs gd, front end damaged but
still drivable, $3,500/obo. 284-3586.

Chevy S-10 Tahoe, ext cab, w/camper
and liner, 4.3L V6, auto, ac, ps, pb,
am/fm cass, exc cond, 27K miles,
$10,500. 283-6785.

1988 Ford Bronco XLT, 4x4, 5.8L,
43K miles, auto, fully loaded, exc
cond, 11,500/obo. 289-3234.

1990 Chevy Cavalier, auto, 2.2L, ac,
am/fm cass, pb, ps, $5,500.284-3167.

1992 Jeep Wrangler, $12,000. 282-
3297.

1985 Olds Cutlass cruiser station wag-
on, V6, fully loaded, not dty pd, exc
cond, $5,000/obo. 287-6130.

1974 Mercedes Benz, AMG, gd cond,
$2,900. 285-4045.

1985 Toyota4x4 p/u w/long bed camp-
er top, ps, pb, ac, exc cond, $5,500.
252-6017.

1988 Blue Blazer S-10, w/tahoe pkg,
pw, ac, pb, tilt, leather interior, 65K
miles, exc cond, $7,000/obo. 287-
4974.

1989 Toyota supra targa, 5 spd, leath-
er, cd player, cellular phone, USspecs,
$15,000. 224-2030.

1989 Pontiac Firebird, mint cond, ac,
auto, pwr, $7,750/obo. 285-5006.

1988 burgandy Mazda 929, auto, ac,
stereo, alarm, new tires, tint, V6 sun
roof, clean, $8,500. 283-6287.

1991 Isuzu p/u, grt work truck, dty pd,
ac, cass, 2.3L, 4 cyl, 5 spd, $6,900/
neg. 239-6485.

1976 Ford LTD II, best offer as is, runs
and drives. 284-4525.

1986 Ford Mustang 5.0L, 5 spd, V8,
tilt, ac, am/fm cass, exc cond, not dty
pd, $5,500. 230-1632.

1989 Ford Escort, auto, ps, pb, ac, am/
fm cass, new tires, 58K miles, runs grt,
$6,000. 287-6623.

1989 Ford 12 pass van, dual tanks, am/
fm radio, moe, $9,900/obo. 260-3325.

1986 Ford Escort GT, new eng, trans
and ac, $5,000. 287-5839.

5 rims, momo evolution, 16" forBMW,
5 holes, new 3 series, exc cond, $1,200/
obo. 268-2678.


1991 Plymouth Sundance, auto, ac, 1991 Ford Ranger, V6, 3.0, camper


shell, new paint, ps, pb, ac, alarm,
$9,600. 229-3915.

1988 Jeep Commanche 4x4, 4 cyl,
long bed, Kenwood am/Im cass, ac,
ps, ph, new tires, sport wheels, best
offer. 261-6418.

1979 Buick electra, gd trans, loaded,
$2,200/obo. 283-6499.

1992 Dodge Caravan AWD, at, ac, ps,
pb, pl, am/frm, cruise, tilt, 6 cyl, 3.3L,
not dty pd, $13,000/obo. 289-3150.

1991 Jeep Cherokee 4x4, 4.0L, 6 cyl,
ac, pb, am/fm cass, tint, exc cond,
standard, $12,500/obo. 287-6492.

1990 Chevy Cavalier, 2 dr, sedan, ac,
ps, pb, tw, cd, $6,800/obo. 287-6337
after 6pm.

1988 Nissan p/u, 2wd, 5spd, am/fm
cass, ac, sport wheels, low miles, gd
cond, $5,650. 284-3592.

1971 Datsun 240Z, classic, gd second
car, 5 spd, 6 cyl, $1,800. 287-3180
after 5pm.

1989 VW Golf, 4 dr, 5 spd, sun roof,
removable am/fm cass, ac, low miles,
$5,200. 252-1273 after 5pm.

1990 Geo Storm, 5 spd, sun roof, ac,
not dty pd, ps, pb, $6,800. 232-6309.

1990 Mitsubishi Lux van, sun roof,
dual ac, runs grt, $8,500/obo. 287-
6229.

1993 Dodge Caravan LE, loaded, low
miles, V6, quad seating, $20,000.1993
Dodge Dakota LE, extra cab, low
miles, V8, 4x4, loaded, $17,900.268-
3085.

1978 Pontiac Firebird, runs well, auto,
400 eng, needs exhaust, $2,200/obo.
284-6874.

1987 Toyota 4-Runner, 4 cyl, gas, not
dty pd, $6,900. 252-2906.

1990 Cherokee Laredo, at, ac, option
pkg, exc cond, dty not pd, $14,800/
neg. 252-6026.

1988 Mustang LX, 4 cyl, 5 spd, ps, pb,
sunroof, gd cond, $3,850/obo. 252-
2889.

1986 Nissan Bluebird, 5 spd, full ex-
tras, gas, $4,500. 235-9137.

1991 Hyundai Excel, at, ac, EFI, US
specs, exc cond and mpg, It blue,
$4,500. 289-3243.

1983 CJ-7 Jeep, laredo pkg, gd cond,
$6,000. 252-5024.

1986 Volvo, auto, ps, pb, pw, ac, sun
roof, am/fm, $7,500/obo. 264-4491.

1991 Pontiac Grand Am, neg. 286-
4885 after 6 pm.

1986 Chrysler LeBaron, auto, power
everything, tilt, cass, not dty pd,
$3,500. 261-8791.

1987 Hyundai Excel, 5dr, ac, 5 spd,
sun roof, $3,500. 287-3872.

1988 Toyota Corolla Sport, ac, luxury
rims, sun roof, am/fm cass, $6,800.
252-4677.

1985 Chevy S-10 Blazer, auto, ac, dty
pd, $7,000/neg. 260-4906 evenings.

1989 Cadillac sedan Deville, fully
loaded, runs grt, $11,000/obo. 287-
4836.




Family haircare, fully equipped salon,
professional products, free consulta-
tions. 284-3683 for Max.

Efig spking maid, M-F, live-in, hon-
est, reliable, grt w/kids. 286-3230.

Motherof2 to babysitpart-time, days,
nights, weekends, holidays. 283-6231.

Exc bilingual part-time day maid,
babysitter, honest, mature, reliable,
w/rcf. 287-4977.

Eng spk maid, honest, gd w/kids, ref,
live-out. 221-3029 for Tina.

Eng spk maid, honest, gd w/kids, ref,
live-out. 221-6204 for Norma.

Span spk housekeeper, honest, reli-
able, hard wking. 224-2350.

Span spk person for cleaning or
babysitting Saturdays. 252-2314.

Honest, reliable maid, M-F, cook,
clean, iron, grt w/kids. 224-0228 for
Leslie.

Honest, reliable, Eng spking maid, I -
2 days weekly. 224-7521.

Eng spking babysitter, exc ref, live-in/
out, gd w/kids. 261-7387.


Engspkingmaid, honest, reliable, live-
out, gd w/kids, M-F. 224-8458.

Will tutor conversational Spanish.
228-2691.

I longest, dependable maid avail, Tues,
Wed, and Fri. 224-8090.

Seamstress to sew clothing or home
access. Experienced w/tailoring and
design. Prices vary w/difficulty. 287-
5072.

Reliable Eng spking day maid, 2-3
days a week. 221-0842 for Olivia.

Reupholster or refinish furn, carhead-
liner, etc, work in your home. 221-
3467 for Dennis.

Translation services. 228-2691.

Computer trouble shooting, tutor and
repair; Span classes. 252-2657 for
Jerry.

Handcrafts for birthday parties, bas-
kets, home decorations, and gift box
decoration. 252-2883.

Dress maker to sew or babysit, nights
only, Eng spk only. 229-2045 for
Marrion.

Cake decorating. 287-6222.

Reliable babysitting in my home any-
time, Eng spk only. 286-4294.

Specialized woodworking, deacon
benches, quilt racks, craft items or
will build to suit. 284-4860.

English spk housekeeper, babysitter,
gd w/kids, cleans, irons, exc ref. 286-
4629.

Honest, dependable, live-in maid, grt
w/kids, flex hours. 289-3243.

Eng spking live-out maid, gd w/kids,
cook, clean, M-F. 283-5228.

Eng spking live-in/out, honest, reli-
able. 221-7883.

Eng spking live-in, housekeeper/
babysitter, gd w/kids, cleans, irons,
exc ref. 286-4893.

Ifyourhair isn't becoming to you, you
should be coming to me. 284-4339 for
Candy.

Honest, reliable day maid, clean,
babysit w/ref. 226-7562 for Vielka
10am-5pm.

Dedicated, hard wking, Span spking
day maid, exc w/kids, M-F. 287-5570.

Real world conversational Span, will
tutor. 228-2691.

British housewife babysitter, gd w/
kids, early morning until, part or full
time. 286-4285 for Marilyn.





1985 235hp Evenrude powerhead,
needs new rings, lower unit in gd
cond, all newelec components, $1,500/
obo. 285-6289.

Chevy Blazer full-size trailer hitch, w/
attachments, new, $150. 252-5853.

19' open fisherman. Yamaha 90, 1994
w/30 hours, fully loaded, $12,000.
252-5024.

1992 SeaDoojetski 580cc, 30hurson
engine, knee board, rope, cover, vests,
$3,800/neg. 283-3878.

Tycoon fin-nor fishing reels, 71/2 and
9/0 w/matching rods, exc cond, $1,800.
252-2080.

1991 Evinrude 70 w/new 1994
powerhead. Includes all controls,
$3,000. 252-5024.

90hp Evenrude in box, new, $3,900;
90hp Evenrude less than 50 hrs,
$2,900. 256-6830.




Sega Genesis games, Madden 94,
Maximum Carnage, World Series,
more. 260-9156.

IBM, Wang, Zenith, 286, 386, XTS,
S250/up. 230-0008.

New IBM 286 in box, 130mb hd,
$700. 230-0008.

IBM comp, 386DX, 4meg Ram,
50mbz, VGA monitor, dual drive,
mouse, Windows 3/1, WP, antivirus
screen filter, $950/obo. 236-4239.

27" Sony stereo TV, console model,
surround sound, wood cabinet, exc
cond, remote, best offer. 287-4180.

Tandy 1000EX comp w/color moni-
tor and software, $100. 284-6232.


Commodore 64 personal comp, over
100 games/programs, $200/obo. 287-
4324.

Epson 9 pin printer, 50 sheet tray/or
tractor feed, hardly used, exc cond,
$60. 284-5930.

Samsung 13" color TV, $100; VCR
$100; Sanyo VCR4-head, $100.287-
4546.

Magnavox 286 comp, 40mb hd, dual
drives, modem, software, $200. 283-
5436.

27" colorTV, $350, small micro, needs
repair, $10. 269-0579.

386SX25, 4mb Ram, 120mb hd,
WP5.2, Windows, Winfax, Prodigy,
ProCom, printer, desk and more,
$1,000. 284-4989.

Electric home organ by Organsonic,
gd cond, $100/obo. 282-3030.

64 Commodore comp, Commodore
1571 disk drive, and Panasonic print-
er, $175/obo. 286-4928.

Nintendo w/gun, 2 controls, and game.
Plus Nintendo games, game genie.
261-1638.

Whirlpool 14cu ftrefrig, white, $395;
Kenmore washer, white, exc cond,
$395. 252-2476.

LXI series stereo rack system w/tape
deck, amp, turntable, receiver, 2 speak-
ers, cabinet included, glass door, $200/
firm. 284-3977.

Camera lenses, 80-200mm with zoom
lock and 28-105mm, $50 and $80/
obo. 282-4598.

Apple II GS comp, dual drives, color
monitor, mouse, image writer, printer,
programs and manuals, $750/obo. 282-
4598.

Takamine 12 string guitar w/pick-up,
1970 model, hard case, strings, exc
cond, $350. 286-3381.

Aria 4 channel multi track recorder,
model R504, exc cond, $350t 286-
3381.

Sound card w/speakers, $85; PC tools
for windows verl, $50; more win-
dows ver 3, S5; double tools, $30.
286-3373 after 5pm.

Sony 15" color TV, $75. 287-5237.

Packard Bell 486SX w/monitor, key-
board, $900; Pioneer stereo dual cass,
ed player, $500. 284-3481.

Nintendo ent system w/2 pads, a glove,
a turbo pad, Super Mario three, $140;
Nintendo tapes, $15 each/obo. 285-
4997.

Sega Genisis game system w/control-
lers and five games. $140. 286-4988.

Micron 486 DX266, 8mb Ram, 213mb
hd, 2xcdRom, sound blaster 16, much
more software, $2,500. 286-3736.

386 comp, Epson printer, and many
access, $900. 286-4428.




Tagged homing/racing pigeon w/
clipped wings, #279535, RFCE/
AGERRA-ALCALA-10, 867441.
Owner or other call to claim. 287-
5097.

One chime/bell in bag at Amador Ba-
zaar. Call to claim. 284-5197.




BR set, quality, custom made, Philip-
pine mahogany wood, large chest, tri-
ple dresser 2 mirrors, 2 nightstands,
full/queen headboard, firm queen foam
bed, $2,400/obo. 283-3220.

Carpet, 18" squares, fiberglass back-
ing, beige pattern, $3 yard. Lays w/out
glue or pad, large quantity avail. 283-
3220.

Q/size brass bed, $300. 284-3924.

7,OOOBTU ac National, $215;
5,000BTU ac Fedders, $115. 256-
6830.

3 piece dresser set, $150/obo. 260-
6602.

Lgsofa, It blue design, exc cond, $600.
269-5700.

Baby crib, pay pen, care seat, and
other baby items. 226-2438.

Chinese furniture, one round coffee
table w/stools, set end tables, set sea-
sons wall pictures, $350. 236-4475.

Refrig/freezer upright, sail board,elec
stove, more. 264-9522.


I.--













'Classified Ads


Tropic Times B1
Nov. 4, 1994B .11


Sofa, love seat, dinnette set and misc
items. 284-4581.

Super single waterbed, cedar, Hondu-
ran rocking chair, 6 pc BR set. 256-
6407 9-1 1pm.

Queen size metal frame, one year old,
$35. 260-7645.

LRsetw/coffee and end tables, $1,200.
287-4637.

5 piece BR set, $1,000/neg; crib w/
linens and comforter set; sofa bed and
love seat. 284-5073.

Tan love seat, hardly used, whirlpool
ac, 5,000BTU, I yr old. 284-5073.

8 piece LR set, 2 couches, love seat,
end tables, coffee table, ottomans,
$600. 284-4282.

Heavy duty Hot Point dryer/Maytag,
1 yr old, large capacity heavy washer,
$600 for both. 284-4499.

Round wrought iron patio set, four
chairs, w/umbrella and stand. Needs
paint, $130/obo. 282-3737.

Cherry queen Anne DR set, wood
shelving. 287-5021.

Sofa soft colors, 3 space, gd cond,
$100. 284-3727.

Cosco recliningcloth covered car seat,
0-40 lbs, $35; Today's Kids activity
rocker, 8 activities, grtcond, $27.289-
4111.

Roll-a-way bed, new in box, $75.284-
6382.

Sofa and love seat in fair cond, $250.
284-4137.

Desk chair, Swedish kneeling style,
brown velourpadding, $20.287-6860.

13" GE color TV. 286-4399.

Bassett BR set, 7 pieces, no bed, white
w/gold trim. 284-5833.

Sunray elec stove, four burners and
oven, exc cond, $100. 233-3859.

Refrig, gd cond, $385; Dryer, white,
gd cond. 287-5092.

Large overstuffed style sofa, light blue
deign, like new, $600. 269-5700.

New quilt 86x86, full/queen, wedding
ring pattern, beige, blue and green,
$49. 284-5479.

Whirlpool large capacity washer/dry-
er, exc cond, $500. 284-3672.

Lamp shades, perfect complete ce-
ramic projects, cloth w/rust proof metal
parts-many styles, colors and prices.
243-5617.

Danish comer wht lamp, $60, Danish
LR w/china cabinet, Nintendo games,
$12ea, 2 wht blinds 69x441/2 long.
236-0984.

4 piece sectional w/hide a bed, 4 yrs
old, $700. 287-4324.

Brown carpet w/pad, $80; blue carpet
w/pad $55; one set beige miniblinds,
36" wide, $25. 282-4691.

GE Hot Point 20cu ft refrig, freezeron
top w/ice maker, glass shelves, gd
cond, $675. 282-3030.

Persion wool carpet, 10x7, new, never
used, $2,000/neg. 264-9153.

PCS everything goes sale. 282-3297.

Country blue Barclay couch, 4 match-
ing accent pillows incl, 4 mos old,
scotchguard fabric protector, $500.
283-3825.

Roll top desk, $300; woman's bike,
$75 like new; gas grill $75. 264-1697.

Danish LR set, 4 pc, $150/obo. 260-
5682.

DR w/4 chairs, $400; Bar set w/2 high
chairs,$380; Carpet, browncolor, $85;
telephone table, $20. 252-2883.

Danish leather black LR, Marmole
white table and 3 blk comer tables.
236-0984.

New 9x12 light blue carpet, almond
bar/counter stools, cd/VHS solid oak
rack, new food processor, lamps. 229-
2916.

Whirlpool large capacity washer and
dryer, used 6 mos, exc cond, $400
each/obo. 284-6738.

LR set, $800; RCA 25" color console
TV, $200; child's twin bed $200.286-
3541.

9x12 Salmon carpet, $85; home elec
gym $500; micro, $150; Nintendo,
$70. 260-1740.
9x 12 greenrug, $40; Hooverrugsham-
poo and floor polisher, $60; ladies


long leather coat, $95. 260-5386.

Queen size BR set, includes matt, like
new, $400. 284-6683.

Queen size matt/box spring and frame,
$150; child's bike seat, $20.286-3230.

Plants, trees, ferns, prayer plants and
more. 287-6337 after 6pm.

Boudoir chair $125; pine student's
desk, $40. 226-8516.

Sofa sleeper and love seat, light pink
and mauve, $700/obo. 287-3284.

19,000 Freidrich ac $325; 10,000
Whirlpool ac $215. 252-2287.

White daybed w/trundle, $200; cedar
dress headboard, footboard, $150;
Samsung VCR needs cleaning $50.
284-4860.

Dorm room hutch, ent center, $80.
284-3481.

Complete LR set $800; complete DR
set $700; complete BR set, 2 oak curios
$300. 282-5523.

Two federal blue rugs 12xl5 w/pads,
$135; 12x9, $75, clean. 287-5237.

Beautiful glass top DR set, 6 chairs,
$450. 286-3380 after 5pm.

Love seat, sofa sleeper, washer, stove,
dish washer, more. 223-8159 after
5pm.

Sectional sofa, rose color, w/6 pil-
lows, $1,500; GE white dryer, almost
new, $400. 263-4502.

DR set, beds, ceiling fans, sofa bed,
16' pool w/filter and pump, TVs,
VCRs, lots more, selling everything.
268-3085.

Wooden bed frame w/drawers $115;
single beds-sets, $150; patio table and
chairs, $175. 287-5592.

SGas weed eater, $125, girls bike $50,
basketball hoop and poles $100. 287-
5592.

Glass coffee table $60, 2 glass end
tables $40each, micro stand $60,
Amiga 500 comp $300. 286-4679.

Kenmore micro $125; swing set $35;
BR set w/ hutch and lights, solid pine,
$1,100. 252-2028.

Bunk bed, tubular, w/new full and
twin mattresses, $750; queen mattress
unused, $165. 252-2180.

GE refrig, 24cu ft, $925; GE washer,
$425; full size matt w/box spring $195,
recliner $350. 252-2180.

Vacuum cleaner, 11/2 yrs old, encore
Hoover, exc cond, $65.282-3497.

Somna waterbed $400, 2 twin bed
frames, $150 for both. 286-4590.

DRsetw/6 chairs, $200; Bassettcouch
and chair, gray, $500; carpets, 12x1 5,
tan, $125, 9x12 tan $100. 286-4590.

Bathroom fixtures, light blue, com-
plete set, $100; gas stove w/griddle,
$150. 260-2847.

Sunray electric stove, 4 burners, oven,
timer and clock, exc cond, $100. 233-
3859.

Rug shampoo polisher, Hoover, $75;
ceiling country lamp $125; top for CJ-
7 Jeep, soft, $150/obo. 252-2675.

Whirlpool dehumidifier, new, 20 pint
water capacity, $160. 252-2533.

Recliner $75, swivel rocker $75, both
gd cond. 226-2605.

New ent center w/video tape storage,
$170. 286-6435.

Disney crib set, comforter, skirt,
bumper, pad wall hangings, sheets,
receiving blankets, $25. 286-3256.

Matching washer/dryer Kenmore,
large capacity, heavy dty, like new,
$550/obo. 287-4078.

Sofa w/double recliner, $600. 286-
6398.

Reasonably priced electric ranges to
be donated as part of Christmas spon-
sorship program to needy schools in
Panama. 287-3204.

Stanley BR set, real oak/antique pe-
can finish, large chest, triple dresser
and mirror, 2 nightstands, queen head-
board, quality firm foam matt/springs,
$1,700.obo. 283-3220.

Kenmore freezer, large chest type,
$225. 287-4836.




Duffle bag and waterproof bag,
Howard AFB on Oct. 12, name is on


duffle. 260-9630.

Cat, Clayton 600s, dark gray and black
striped, "Beauford," 11 yrs old, male,
any information wanted. 287-5489.




Generator 4000watts, 2 yrs old, $450.
251-3904 LD#.

Lawn mower, grtcond, self-propelled,
catcher, mulcher $250, movie proj,
wks grt $150, twin matts & pop up
frame, new $425. 283-3220.

Weider cross trainer master gym, new
$375/neg. 260-3363.

6' artificial Christmas tree $30. 287-
5193.

6pc girl's French BR set, Nintendo w/
3 games. 260-5947.

5' artificial Christmas tree $25. 235-
4890 eves.

New football visor, clear color $20.
286-3630.
Frzer $400, hide-a-bed $100, bbq
$175,patioenclosure $150.252-2033.

Two bronze boat propellers, L-R, 2"
axis, 28" diam, 4-blade $800 ea. 269-
5700.

5 spd transm '87 Escort rack & pin-
ions for 87 Escort/Cavalier and other
parts. 228-4061.

Port car ramps $40-, carpet foam
pading, Radio Shack electronic parts,
new $65, cowboy boots sz 9 1/2.252-
2042.

Toddler car seat $15, fun infant seat
$30, new bottle warmer$8, safety bed
rail $15, antique tools. 252-2042.

Carpet steamer & shampoo machines
$500. 230-0008.

Disney Store 4T girl's Christmas dress,
bik background $18. 287-4182.

30 gal gas water heater, new $175.51 -
3904 LD#.

Wt machine $125, exer bike $100,
Commodore 64, printer, disk drive,
100 pgrms $100, papasan frame $20.
287-5876.

2 new twin box springs $75 ea. 252-
2314.

Tri fin surfboard $100. 256-6815.

Lt gray vert blinds w/rod for 12' wind
$275, crib/bed w/5 drawers $450, car
seat $50. 223-1829.

Trombone w/case, good cond $200, 3
step ladder for van, polished alum,
new $20. 287-3490.

Little Tykes castle, 7 mos old $200.
285-4434.

Atari w/games $50, roller blades w/
complete pad set $75. 287-6827.

Yamaha elec guitar $95, Conn alto
saxophone w/case $100. 287-6827.

Wht wash ent ctr, dk chrome floor
lamp, misc baby toys, best offer. 287-
5523.

Parrot 6 ft stand from El Valle $35,
chrome truck steps universal mount
$30. 287-3549.

Wedding dress bodice embroidered
w/pearls, sequins sz 6 $250.287-3549.

Wedding dress sz 5/6 $150.286-4083.

RCA camcorder, BR fum, area car-
pets, rattan loveseat. 287-5928.

Wire fence w/poles $35. 287-5092.

Vacuum cleaner 420, LT swing $10,
booster seat $5, toddler car seat $15,
all good cond. 284-5197.

Fishing poles, golfclubs, utility shelf.
283-3373.

1992 Encyclopedia Britannica, exc
cond $1,200. 283-5671.

Lead bottom jigs, 6-ounce w/l%
mustad cadmium hook$50.243-5617.

Power saw, table saw, extra blades
$50 ea. 287-5575.

Crib sheet sets, 7pc Teddy Bears de-
sign $50, 6pc Disney baby collection
$40. 287-4788.

Stamina rowing mach $30, Silvereed
memory typewriter $75/obo, dual cass,
radio 420. 286-4797.

Lg executive mahogany desk $1,200,
filing cab $100, sm office fridge $90,
paper shredder & tbi $250, Ig wht
bookcase $80. 269-0579.
Nordic track pro $400, GE 40pt dehu-
midifier $260. 287-5676.


Sports cards, sets, Stars, Rookies, rea-
sonably priced. 287-3097.

41 vols EnclyclopediaBritannica plus
15 vols Britannica Jr, like new $200.
262-1251.

Asst comics available. 252-2657.

Camper shell for Ranger p/u truck
$250, trailer for boat/cayuco $275/
obo. 252-2675.

Chevy parts, brake booster, alt, cata-
lytic convert, $200-$175. 252-6956.

4 tires 255x60SR15 BR Goodrich ra-
dial t/a, used I mo $375/neg. 226-
7758.

Whirlpool vert frzer, frost free, like
new, avail Nov. 10 $455. 286-4421.

Never used complete home alarm sys
$240. 284-5923.

Wt bench w/110 lbs, swings, VCR,
cordless weedeater, boy's bike, exer
bike. 260-1290.

Diving gear complete w/bag $100.
286-3631.

Round trip ticket to NC from Panama,
$380/obo. 285-4532 SGT Remaley
Rm 204.

Wts 110 bis, new $75,Nintendo games
$10 ea, mil compass $27, ruck w/
frame no straps $32, elec guitar $60.
287-6289.

Slant top rolling computer tbl w/print-
er shelf$85, childcraft book set $220.
260-3325.

SNES games, Sunset Riders $25,
Mortal Kombat $35, Street Fighter II
$35, Super Mario Bros $20, Battle
Toads $25. 286-4674.

Formal wht jacket & skirt, embroi-
dered lace, sz 13/14, worn once $40.
286-4674.

Hurricane alum rims 10xl 5, sets of 5
fit Jeep & early model Fords w/o
31x10.50 a/t, best offer. 286-3320.

Entertainment ctr $ 150, Sony 19" col-
or TV $100, Yaesu HF trans $500.
287-5839.

Stair stepper, used twice, exc cond
$100/obo. 287-3382.

Crib $10, rocking plane toy $15, tricy-
cle $14, in-line skates $25.285-4997.

Dbl baby stroller $60, baby bath tub,
$5 Cosco day cradle $10. 286-3320.

Crib/changing tbl $120, crib set $60,
boy's baby clothes, carrier $30. 286-
6377.

Oster kitchen center $100, ladies 18k
gold itecklace $850, ladies 1k dia-
mond ring $4,500. 226-8516.

5 rims Momo Evolution 16 for BMW,
5 holes, new 3 series, exc cond $1,200/
obo. 268-2678.

Rollerblade cool blade ABT skates,
new sz 8 $245. 252-2582.

Graco royal xt stroller, like new $50/
obo. 287-4498.

Clothes, Aiwa tumtbl $40.284-3689.

4 31x11.50xl5 Goodyear a/t tires on
Ford Factory mags $400. 260-9058.

Women's shoes sz 8, 8 1/2, 22 shoes
remaining sandals, flats, heels, $7-
$10. 287-4788.

Wilson's righthand fielders baseball
glove, leather $35. 252-2211.

SCX-100 voit stair climber $90, girl


baby clothes, Graco baby swing $25.
286-6277.

Sega Genesis w/controller $55, 9
games $35 ea, SNES Pebble beach
golf $40, 3 Gameboy games. 287-
5536.

Couch $150, recliner$50, Tandy com-
puter & printerw/software $275.286-
3334.

Yamaha electone HX-3 electric or-
gan, many tunes, functions, features,
2 spkers, like new $10,500.264-8427.

Infant carseat, men's mt bike, baby
clothes, misc baby items. 282-3776.

Water purifier $20, wht plastic shelf
$5, misc silverware $8, plants $10.
283-4376.

20 vols Encyclopedia Harvard Clas-
sics, 4 vols medical/health set $900.
284-3489.

Backpack, R&I, internal frame, new
$120.252-2533,waterpurifierw/blad-
der bags, new $136. 252-2533.




1993 Honda shadow deluxe, 600cc,
windshield, backrest, low mi, exc cond
$3,500. 284-6327.

1993 Yamaha Enduro 250cc, 100 mi,
w/helmets $2,400. 287-3856.

1988 Suzuki 50cc motorbike $200.
287-5592.

1987 Yamaha 200cc, US specs, dty
pd, low mi. 287-4632.

1983 Kawasaki 550Ltd incl shop man-
ual, parts book, needs batt, mufflers,
tires $1,200/obo. 235-6079.

1982 Yamaha Maxium 400 dty pd
$1,400.284-4525.

1981 Yamaha Maxim 650w/helmets,
dty pd $1,100. 260-9630.

Cushman engine and body parts need-
ed, prices neg. 245-2503.




Qtrs. 75A Howard, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 351B Clayton, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 2040B Curundu, 7am-noon

Qtrs. 1555B Howard.

Qtrs. 445A Howard, 8am-noon

Qtrs. 819A Clayton, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 510A Clayton, 7am-noon

Qtrs. 541C Clayton, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 553B Clayton, 7am-I p.m.

Qtrs. 854A Clayton, 7am-?

Qtrs. 510A Clayton, 7am-noon

Qtrs. 668A Clayton.

Qtrs. 440A Kobbe, 8am-2 pm.

Qtrs. 7231B Cardenas, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 707A Clayton, 7am-l pm.

Qtrs. 52B Howard, 7:30am-5pm.

QLrs. 2123 Curundu, 6-10am.

Qtrs. 62B Howard, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 57B Howard, 6am-noon.

Qtrs. 1514F Howard, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 1549E Howard, 8am.


Qtrs. 1539E Howard.

Qtrs. 234B Albrook, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 843B Clayton, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 6308 Balboa.

Qtrs. 43 Albrook, 7:30am-noon.

Qtrs. 385A Clayton, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 684C Clayton.

Qtrs. 704 Curundu, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 302B Balboa, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 1000B Clayton, 7-10am.

Altos de Bethania, 74C St, Hse 23.




2Eng-spklive-in maids, reliable, flex-
ible for hse work, pet care. 282-3126.

Honest, reliable, bilingual mature.
maid, gd w/kids, dog. 260-2514.

Bilingual live-in housekeeper, child
care, refs. 227-5028.

Boys, girls & Ig ladies' maternity
clothes. Can pick at your home. 287-
3929.

Seamtress to sew in my home dresses
for 14 year old daughter; will provide
sewing machine. 287-3929.
Gortex jacket, sz44-46, Gortex pants,
sz 34, reasonable price/obo. 260-5809.

Day maid, 8am-5pm, once a week,
hvy cleaning, washing, ironing, reli-
able, punctual, honest, refs. 284-6597.

Seamtress to sew in my home, clothes/
draperies $25 per day. 287-4691.

Old US, Panamanian and Spanish
coins, gold, silver, proof sets. 264-
9153.

WWI&II items, helmets, daggers, pis-
tols, flags, uniforms. 264-9153.

Live-in maid to cook, clean, Span-'
spk, refs. 226-5436.

Live-in bilingual maid w/refs, honest,
grt w/kids, flexible, shift worker. 263-
1676.

Sewing lady in my home, reasonably
priced. 236-2070.

MolT Club wants parents & expected
parents of twins, multiples. 287-5889
Angela.

Housekeeper, care for 3 children, hse
cleaning, cook, M-Sat, $150. 252-
5036.

Aikido instruction. 252-6929.

Air conditioners for parts, any size,
cond. 252-2287.

Med dog kennel, reasonable price.
284-6386.

Seamstress in my home, need 3 or 4
days. 283-4376.

X-Ig dog kennel for 100 lb dog. 285-
6374.

Eng-spk live-in maid, refs, experience,
M-Sat. 223-7111 Rm 20, Iv msg.

Drummer/guitarist looking for band,
interests in varied entertainment. 287-
5651 Paul.

Live-out maid, M-F, refs, clean, iron,
careofchildren. 286-3593 6-9pmonly.

Patio enclosure for 500 area, Clayton.
Moving on post Nov. 18. 269-7874.


L _Tropic Times Ad Form


F] ANIMALS
F] AUTOMOBILES
Z] AVAILABLE
Z] BOATS & CAMPERS
[] ELECTRONICS
LI FOUND
[] HOUSEHOLD
LI LOST
F] MISCELLANEOUS
Q MOTORCYCLES
Q PATIO SALES
Q WANTED


PRICE HOME PHONE

Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each
week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited
more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed
below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This
information will not be released to third parties. Deadline for the receipt
of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are run on a space
available basis and the staff makes no guarantee of ads running. Ads must
include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times,
Unit 0936, APO AA 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post
Office. Ads offering weapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not be
run.


SPONSOR'S NAME

ORG. _ __.


RANK/GRADE

DUTY PHONE










B12 ^Tropic Times
2JL Nov. 4, 1994




HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if
claiming veteran preference, a copy of college tran-
scripts if claiming education and a copy of CASP
notice of rating if applicable. Submit a copy of latest
SF-50 if you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army vacancy
announcements (forms required, job related criteria,
etc.), visit the Directorate of Civilian Personnel,
Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 285-5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling
should be the first step in the job search.
SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at
NM-5 level and above require specialized experi-
ence. Specialized experience is either education
above the high school level or work experience di-
rectly related to the position being filled. Example:
Budget positions at or above the NM-5 level required
Budget experience or equivalent education.
Vacancy announcements are also available at the
Sundial Recreation Center.
Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting ap-
plications on a continuous basis for the following po-
sitions. Registers established from these announce-
ments will be used to fill permanent and temporary
positions.

VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill
most clerical position).
VB# 001 A * General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to
fill most clerical position).
VB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3
(Intermittent wk sch)
* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is
required.
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4
(Lifeguard) Requires Cert + 6 mos recreation exp in
the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Requires
6 mos recreation exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation),
NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office
Automation), NM-6
VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant,
NM-5. Limited to permanent status employees only.
VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant,
NM-6. Limited to permanent status employees only.

The following positions are Perm/temp, Full-
time, Part-time, Intermittent.

VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/
14.
VB# 008 ** CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license
required), NM-9/10/11.
VB# 009 ** PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN
licence required), NM-5.
VB#019 ** EMERGENCY MEDICAL
TECHNICIAN, NM-640-4/5/6.

** Selectees for nurse, medical officer and EMT
positions will undergo a background check.

Pacific
VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION
OPEN: 11-04-94 CLOSE: 11-15-94

059-95-KF BUDGET ASSISTANT (OA), NM-
561-7. SENSITIVE.TEMP NTE:180 days.
DCSRM, Program Budget Div., Mission Support
Branch, Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Security clearance is
required.

060-95-NC KITCHEN EQUIPMENT RE-
PAIRER, MG-5310-8. USAG, DEH, Operations
Div., Maint & Service Branch, Kitchen Equip Shop,
Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Knowledge of English. Driver's
license required.

061-95-NC ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN,
NM-525-5. USAG, DEH, Resources Div., Budget
Branch, Corozal. NOTE: Limited to permanent
employees only.

062-95-ES NURSE PRACTITIONER, NM-610-
11. TEMP NTE: 09-30-95. USA MEDDAC,
GACH, Dept. of Medicine, Ancon. NOTE: U.S.
license required.

NOTE: Amendment to VB#054-95-NC, EDUCA-
TIONAL AID, NM-1702-4. This position is located
at Margarita Colon.


Popou rri


Clb ew


Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club: 282-3439
The club will be closed to the public for renovations
through Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be
available 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Addition-
ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and
during lunch hours 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Amador
*Club Amador: 282-4334
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring
soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights.
Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno
at noon the first Sunday of each month.
The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during
renovations of the Quarry Heights Officers' Club.
Clayton
*The Loop: 287-3035
CJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments 3:30 p.m. Sunday.
Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
*NCO Club: 287-4716
Mexican buffet Mondays.
Country buffet Wednesdays featuring barbecue pork
ribs, fried chicken, pork knuckles, collards green, sweet po-
tato, rice, black-eyed peas and corn bread.
All-you-can-eat family buffet Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Seafood buffet Fridays features broiled lobster, garlic
shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab.
12-oz prime rib special Saturdays.
Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m.
Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Sun-
days and Mondays.
Disco 9 p.m. Wednesday, Fridays and Saturdays. There
will be a midnight buffet.
Casa Maria buffet 5-9 p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Curundu
*STRAC Club: 286-3511
Eight-ball tournament 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Entry fee in-
cludes snacks, trophies awarded.
Game or movie night Tuesdays. TVs available.
Ladies night 7-midnight Thursdays.
Get together 4:30 p.m. Friday.
Free pizza 7 p.m. Saturday.
Albrook
*Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582
Friday night flambe 6-8:30 p.m. Tableside cooking.
Tonight's entertainment: Jazz it with Lowell Hopper in
the lounge.
Saturday afternoon football 2 p.m. in the lounge during
football season with bar service.
New Sunday saloon breakfast 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the
lounge. Choose from three menus.
Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-l p.m. offers break-
fast from cooked-to-order omelets, roast beef, fresh fruits,
breakfast and lunch items and ice cream bar.
Mongolian barbecue 5:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Choose
the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have chefs do the
job outside on the open grills.
Lombardi a la Italiana 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Menu
includes: antipasta, chicken parmesan, bragoi, garlic linguini,
tortellini soup and Italian ice cream.
Seafood Feast 6-9 p.m. Saturday and Nov. 12.
Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday.
Country western night Thursdays with free dance les-
sons 7:30-10:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples
dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing.
Howard
*Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718
Weekday lunch includes buffet, salad and potato bar.
Order a la carte 6-8:30 p.m. in the dining room Fridays
and Saturdays.
Friday evenings in the lounge include beer specials,


music, games and club card drawings.
Hillbilly night 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday.
Fajita special 6-8:30 p.m. Nov. 12. Choose from steak or
chicken fajitas for $8.95. Mexican beer special.
Dining room is closed Sunday through Thursday.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club - Dining Room:
284-4189
Sunday all- you-can-eat breakfast buffet 8-11:30 a.m.
featuring eggs, ham, bacon, fresh fruits, waffles, pancakes
and more.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30
a.m. Saturday.
New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade
roast beef, turkey, turkey salad and tuna fish sandwiches with
all the trimmings.
Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. featuring
tableside preparation with tuxedo service.
Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Select a
cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or fillet. All steaks are
U.S. choice beef.
Family menu Tuesdays-Fridays featuring all the favor-
ites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand made 1/2
pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more.
Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or
take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot
wings.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom: 284-
4189
New Thursday nights disco 8:30 p.m. until closing.
Friday night disco 4:30 p.m.- 1 a.m.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove:
284-4189
Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays.
Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Monday night football and mug special in the lounge.
Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcorn and nachos.
Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Free Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m.
Wednesday in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line danc-
ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until mid-
night.
Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with
your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills.
Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.-
midnight Thursdays.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday.
*Top Three Club: 284-4189
Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday.
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat com-
plimentary taco bar.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. Members
must have a card and be present to win.
Club closed Saturdays.
Rodman
*Rodman Club - Open to all ranks: 283-4498
Right arm nite, DJ 6-11 p.m. today in the Laguna
Lounge with complimentary hors d'oeuvres.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.- 1
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Monday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with all-
you-can-eat taco bar 6-9 p.m. at the Laguna Lounge.
Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
All-you-can-eat fried chicken 4:30-8:30 p.m. Wed-
nesdays. Grill menu is also available.
Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Rodman Bohio.
Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-9
p.m. Fridays-Sundays.
Attitude adjustment 4:30-11 p.m. Thursday at the
Rodman Bohio.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-
9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays.
*Rodman Annex - Open to all ranks: 283-4498
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
The club is closed for evening and weekend service.


ChapeI scedul


Pacific
Amador Chapel
Buildlag 108, Phone: 282-3610
8:30am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
9:30am CCD Catholic, Building 109
(Sunday)
10am Episcopal Worship Service
(Sunday)
Clayton Chapel
Building 64, Phone: 287-5859
113-0am Daily Catholic Mass
5pom Catholic Mass (Saturday)
8:45am Colleethe Protestant Service
(Sunday)
lO30am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
10:30am Protestant Sunday School (Sun-
day.Bunlding 156,287-3497)
12:30pm Gospel Service (Sunday)
5:30pm CCD Catholic, Building. 156
(Sunday)
6pm Evening Service (Sunday)
Corozal Chapel
Building 112, Phone: 285-6717
7:30pm Jewish (first Friday of month)
10am Hispanic Catholic Mass (Sunday)
1pm Pentecostal Worship (Sunday)
7pm Sunday School (Friday)


l-2pm Protestant Coufirmation

Atlantic.
Davis Chapel
Building 32, Phone: 289-3319
11:30am Catholi Mass (Tuesday-Friday)
Noon Catholic Spanish Mass (Sunday)
1:30pm Protestant Hispsani Senice
(Sunday)
Sherman Chapel
Building 152, Phone: 289-6481
8-30am Collective Protestant Worship
(Sanday)
I am Prolestant Sunday School
Espinar Chapel
Building 224, Phone: 289-4616
9am Catholic Englsh Mass (Suday)
9am Protestant Sunday School at
Espluar Elementary
10:15am CCD Catholic Sunday School at
Espinar Elementary
10:15am Collective Protestant Worship
: (Sunday)
11:30pm Gospel Sunday School
12:20pm Gospel Service (Sunday)
6:30pm Gospel Bible Study (Sunday)
Islamic Prayer Services 12:30-1:30 p.m. Fri-
days, Fort Clayton ChapeL 287-5859.


Gorgas Hospital
Building 254, Phone: 282-5507
12:15pm Daily Catholic Mass (2nd Door)
Weekday worship (As an-
nounced)
Albrook Chapel
Building 860, Phone: 284-3948
8m Spanish Catholic Mass (Sunday)
9am Confessions (Sunday)
9:15am Catholic Mass (Snnday)
9:45am Protestant Sunday School
I lam General Protestant Service
Howard Chapel
Bu'ding 500, Phone: 284-3948
11:30am Daily Catholic Ma
4:30pm Confessions (Saturday)
Spm Catholc Masu (Saturday)
9:30am General Protestant Service (Sun-
day)
I lam Catholic Mass (Sunda3)
12:30pm Gospel Service (Sunday)
Rodman Chapel
Building 40, Phone: 283-4148
8-9am Catholic Mass
10-11am General Protestant Service (Sun-
day)
11:15am Protestant Communion (Luthern
Tradition)


I I




Full Text

PAGE 1

e es VoL VII, No. 44 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Nov. 4, 1994 Cubans tear down gate over cigarettes PANAMA CITY(Reuters)-Five U.S. soldiersandthree Cuban migrants were injured during a stone-throwing confrontation at one of the Cuban camps in Panama, officials said Monday. A group of about 50 to 75 Cubans threw stones at U.S. soldiers and tore down a gate late Sunday at one of four camps holding about 9,000 Cuban boat people. A dispute among the Cubans over cigarettes sparked the incident, a military official told Reuters. One U.S. soldierrequired fivestitches after a stonehithis head, but no one needed hospitalization, the official said. The three injured Cubans were hurt by other Cubans during the confrontation, the official added. The incident reflects rising tension at the camps, where migrants who fled Cuba this summer in tiny rafts are upset at U.S. policy says that they must return to Cuba before seeking legal migration to the United States. On Saturday, several hundred camp residents protested their plight during a visit by Cuban-born baseball star Jose a Canseco. U.S. soldiers at the camps are unarmed, but have access to riot shields to protect themselves from migrant protests, U.S. military officials said. "We will do anything short of weapons to protect our forces.but we don't wantthis to appearlike aprisoncamp," U.S. military spokesperson Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder told Staff Sgt. Rian Ciaweon (U.S. Air Force) reporters. Officials downplayed the recent incidents and said most Volunteering at cam p of the tension was limited to one of the four camps that sit near the Panama Canal. Operation Safe Haven Reception Center volunteer Betsy Dunn listens as a Cuban describes "It was a combination ofagitators' fueling unrest with a his life in his homeland. Volunteers like Dunn are an integral part of the reception center's staff. frustration on the part of the rest of the camp members at For more information on the center and its staff, see story and photos on Page 3. theirsituation," Brig. Gen. Jim Wilson, commanderofJoint Task Force Safe Haven, told Reuters. Fight agaMnst drugscntn s mr-1aincontinues Military spearheads intera agency counterdrug efforts by Capt. Jim Knotts international drug control policies to interThe strategy concentrates on the followprioritize our missions. We all recognize SOUTHCOM Public Affairs Office dict and reduce the supply of illegal drugs ing areas: that this is not a short-term problem, and entering the United States. *Assisting "source countries" in adthere are no short term solutions. We inWASHINGTON -"Illegal drugs kill One conference was sponsored by the dressing the root causes of narcotics protend to fight this problem on every front, 10,000 Americans each year and cost $75 U.S. Interdiction Coordinator, Adm. Robduction and trafficking through assistance from the jungles of Peru to the streets of billion in crime and health care costs," Gen. ert E. Kramek, U.S. Coast Guard commanfor sustainable development, strengthenthe United States," Brown said. Barry R. McCaffrey, commander in chief, dant. The other was co-sponsored by ing democratic institutions, and cooperaMcCaffrey, who co-sponsored the conU.S. Southern Command, told an interBrown and McCaffrey. tive programs to counter narcotics traffickference to discuss how the Southern Comagency counterdrug conference in WashDuring the conferences, the interageners, money laundering and supply of mand can better support the lead agencies, ington, D.C. last week. cy group re-evaluated the counterdrug chemical precursors. reiterated that this is not a military probMcCaffrey also emphasized that while threat, assessed past actions and examined *Combating international narco-traflem with a military solution, but the DoD there can beno short-term victory in the how best to implement their portion of the ficking organizations. remains committed to the effort. war on drugs, the cost to all countries is so national drug control strategy as directed *Emphasizing more selective and flexSince becoming involved in the devastating that the United States and its by President Clinton. ible interdiction programs near the U.S. counterdrug effort in 1989, the U.S. miliallies must remain engaged to fight this "Last year, the President signed Presiborder, in the transit zone, and in the source tary has been under strict policy guidance problem for the next generation. dential Directive 14, which lays out our countries. not to become involved in actual Although there are no "silver bullets" International Supply Reduction policy. An The interagency representatives from counterdrug field operations. This means that can quickly end the problem of drug important part of that policy is shifting the the Department of State, Drug Enforcethe military provides training, intelligence, trafficking, the Clinton administration's infocus of our efforts to the cocaine source ment Agency, U.S. Customs Service, and equipment and planning assistance, but the teragency counterdrug team reaffirmed the countries," Brown said. Department of Defense reevaluated the U.S. military does not arrest anyone or conU.S. commitment to remain engaged in the The source area refers to the Andean drug threat and agreed that a gradual, preduct raid operations. fight against narcotrafficking. Ridge countries of Colombia, Ecuador, meditated shift in resources from the tranAccording to Brown, the successes in "Illegal drug trafficking is a threat to Peru and Bolivia where 90 percent of the sit area to the source area was the most the counterdrug effort are not widely the security of the United States and our world's coca is grown and refined into coprudent course of action for the future. known or accepted in the U.S. Congress. counterdrug efforts will always be a high caine. However, with so many U.S. and inBrown suggested that the interagency national priority," said Dr. Lee Brown, diPresident Clinton's shift in the internaternational agencies involved, close coormust develop measures of effectiveness, rector of the White House Office of National supply reduction effort is known as dination is crucial. by which they can better articulate how retional Drug Control Policy, at a press conthe source nation strategy. The intent is to "We recognize that we need to work sources match the strategy, better measure ference Oct. 27. concentrate efforts in a relatively confined together, especially as resources become the results, and better hold agencies and The remarks came at the end of two inarea to catch the drugs before they become tighter," said Brown. individuals accountable for their perforteragency conferences that focused on U.S. dispersed in the transit pipeline. "We will have to pool our resources and mance. More cases of Dengue fever are Community members raise their *New housing policies, Page 4 confirmed and several active breedspirits during local Halloween fes*Distant Haven closes, Pages 8&9 ing sites are found in housing areas. tivities. *Girls basketball champs, Page 9

PAGE 2

2 Tropic Times Nov. 4, 1994 B__ _ _ Tropic Times changes A I M flight Schedule deadline for holiday The next issue of the Tropic Times will All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for priority mission be dated Nov. 10. The Tropic Times office requirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608. will be closed Nov. 11, Veterans Days. All that pick up the Tropic Times Saturday 9:40am B-757 Howard AFB Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) organizations 5:45am B-727 Howard AFB Atlanta lAP, GA (C) Charleston AFB, SC from the print plant, Building 405, Corozal, Atlanta IAP, GA (C) Charleston IAP, SC Nov.11 can pick up the newspaper beginning at Charleston IAP, SC Tuesday 5:40am C-130 Howard AFB 6:30 a.m. Thursday. Deadlines for classi1:45pm C-5A Howard AFB 5:40am C-141 Howard AFB Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC) fled ads and news articles will be noon, toCharleston AFB, SC (0) Brasilia, Brazil (V,O) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) day. For additional information, call 285Dover AFB, DE Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Howard AFB 6612/4666. Sunday Asuncion, Paraguay (0) 4:45pm B-757 Howard AFB (C,O) Brasilia, Brazil AActive duty only Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Wednesday USU.S. passport Power outage at Monday 5:25am C-130 Howard, AFB 0-Overnight 5:40am C-13O Howard AF8 San Jose, Costa Rica C-CommercIal Contract Fort Davis Saturday Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC) Howard, AFB V-Visa Fort Davis will experience a power outSoto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Thursday M-Medevac age 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday for substaHoward AFB 5:45am C-5A Howard AFB CC-Country Clearance tion switches hook-up. p.m. No appointments will be made durArmy Community Hospital can present during this time. For information, call 287Future Community Bank ing the morning, but the Emergency 20-45 minute briefings, in Spanish and 5365. closing announced Room will remain open. English on Dengue Fever. The briefing covers the signs and Corozal local spot bid The Community Bank will be closed Eqa r ty symptoms, the mode of transportation of Thursday for the Primer Grito Los Santos. qua oppo uniy rep the disease, the biology of the mosquito sales announced course offered at Clayton vector and the action to take to control A Local spot bid sale will be held 7:30 Servicemembers offered An Equal Opportunity Representative Dengue. Units or activities wanting a a.m. Nov. 14 at Building 745, Corozal. A briefing Course will be held Nov. 14-18 in BuildSpanish briefing, 282-5618/5212. For an large variety of items will be up for sale. pre-separaion ing 156, Fort Clayton. Names must be English briefing, call Maj. Nelson Powers The inspection and sale will be held on the A career information team from submitted to the U.S. Army South EO Ofor Manuel Correa at 282-5269. same day. For information, call Ada Charleston, S.C., will give a pre-separation fice no later than Monday. For informaTweed at 285-4754. briefing for anyone retiring or separating tion, call 287-4260/4268. 142nd Medical Bn. A Spot Bid sale will be held 9 a.m. from the military within the next six Nov. 19 at Building 308, Corozal. Used months. The briefing will be held 8 a.m.-l 5pcialOlympics needs inactivates Thursday U.S. government cars, 4x4s, diesels and p.m. Wednesday at the Family Service pe y n An inactivation ceremony for the 142nd trucks will be up for bid. Inspections will Center, Building 40, Rodman NS. For volunteers for 1995 Medical Battalion will be held on Soldiers be held 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov 17-18. For inmore information, call 283-5749. The planning committee for the 1995 Field 10:30 a.m. Thursday. As part of the formation, call 285-5417. Special Olympics-Panama Canal Region ceremony, the 245th Support Battalion Adopt-An-Airman is looking for volunteers to chair various (Provisional) will be activated. For more le soldiers meetings committees. A meeting will be held 2:30 information, call 287-6604. program under way p.m. Tuesday on the 3rd floor of Building at Valent announced The 24th Wing is sponsoring a program 156, Fort Clayton. New group helps parents A BOSS (Better Opportunities for Sinin which members of the Howard and Algle Soldiers) meeting will be held 2 p.m. brook community may invite unaccompaofmdprogram y Nov. 17 and Dec. 7 at the Valent Recrenied airmen stationed in Panama into their building The 24th Medical Group's family adaction Center. The meeting is open to all homes for the holiday meals. People may to meet in November vocacy program is sponsoring a support who would like to attend. For information, sponsor airmen any day (or days) from The Army Family Team Building group for parents of children with attention call 287-6500. Nov. 23-27 for the Thanksgiving meal, and training program will hold classes Nov. deficit disorder and attention deficit hyperfrom Dec. 23 -27 for the Christmas meal. 28-Dec. 2. The training is for volunteers activity disorder, as well as other learning First aid, safety courses To sign up or for more information, call and family members. It develops leaderdisabilities. The next meeting will be 6:30Lizca Fearon at 284-5650/3153. ship abilities and prepares families to take 8 p.m. Tuesday at the Howard Family Supset for Clayton, Sherman advantage of available services. The trainport Center, Building 707. For more inforA community first aid and safety moonlight ing also enhances family life and overall mation, call 284-6410/6457. course will be held, 6-10 p.m. Nov. 15-17 CGOC EBOELs m nigt Army readiness. at Building 519, Fort Clayton. The course pool party at Albrook Training coordinators are looking for a 24th Medical Group teaches adult, infant and child CPR, first The Company Grade Officers Council cross representation of the community. aid and safety. There will also be a first aid invites all CGOs and their families or People should have at least 12 months left announces closings class for maids 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 19. The friends to a moonlight pool party 6-10 p.m. in country to participate. Volunteers will The 24th Medical Group on Howard class is taught entirely in Spanish. For inNov. 19 at the Albrook pool. Food and be certified as master trainers and will, in AFB will close noon Thursday for mediformation, call Abbe Lester at 287-5509. beverages will be "potluck," and CGOC turn, share their knowledge and skills with cal readiness training. They will again The Atlantic Community will hold a sponsors are asking for small donations to others in the community. Applications for close at noon Nov. 18 for the group's anfirst aid class for maids will 8 a.m.-5 p.m. cover additional expenses-$2 for singles, training must be completed and returned nual Thanksgiving celebration and quarterNov. 12 at The Ocean Breeze Recreation $4 for couples, and $5 for entire families. as soon as possible to participate. Call ly hail and farewell. Center, Fort Sherman. The class is taught For more information, call 2nd Lt. Milo Paul Ries at 287-6338/6322 to sign up, or entirely in Spanish. For information, call Quesinberry at 284-4140/3114. for more information. Communications skills 289-6302/6699. CID recruiting briefings Youth 2000 mentors workshop available Clayton estate planning The family advocacy program has arset for Fridays looking for students ranged a workshop for people who would seminar set for Monday The Criminal Investigations Division The Youth 2000 Program currently has like to improve their interpersonal commuThere will be an estate planning semiholds recruiting briefings 10 a.m. Fridays 22 professional mentors available to local nication skills. The workshop will be 6nar 9 a.m. Monday in the Simon Boliver at Building 705, Corozal. For information, students. Mentors can assist students with 7:30 p.m. Nov. 17 at the Howard Family Conference Room, Building 95, Fort call Special Agent Erin Milanes at 285assignments, provide opportunities to obSupport Center, Building 707, and free Clayton. This will be a dynamic informa4314/4745. serve a work area and motivate them to child care is available. For more informative briefing that demystifies the many asthink about their future. Parents who wish tion, or to make a reservation, call family pects of estate planning and financial planHealth clinics announce to have a mentor assigned to their child advocacy at 284-6410/6457. ning. The seminar leader is Col. (retired) can call Laila Yeager at 284-5650. Arme Kropf, Army and Air Force Mutual upcoming closings BHS needs speakers for Aid Association. Seating will be limited. The medical clinics at Gorgas Army For more information, call 287-6410. Community Hospital and Fort Sherman New drop-off point for Engineer Club meeting Health Clinic will close Nov. II and 24 in Safe Haven donations Guest speakers are needed for Balboa American Society hosts celebration of Veteran's Day and ThanksHigh School bi-monthly Engieer Club giving. No appointments will be made, but Donations for Safe Haven will now be meeting. Engineer professionals or people evening at Smithsonian the Emergency Room at Gorgas and Fort received at Building 4 on Rodman NS, inin engineer fields are preferred. To signThe American Society of Panama is Sherman will be open. stead of Building 5. All donations will be up, call 285-5707. sponsoring an evening at the Smithsonian coordinated at this site. For information, Tropical Research Institute in Ancon MEDDAC closes for call 283-4014/4016. 193rd warehouses close Wednesday. Three scientists will give presentations on current pojects. Dress is cachange of command .for wall-to-wall inventory sual. Wine and cheese will be served at 6 U.S. Army MEDDAC is holding a Dengue fee briens The Company A and B warehouses of p.m. and the presentations will begin at 7 change of command ceremony Wednesavailable upon request the 193rd Support Battalion will be closed p.m. The cost is $5 for members and $10 day. The medical clinics at Gorgas Army Upon request, the Entomology section, until Wednesday. Warehouse personnel for others. For tickets, call 252-5739; 228Community Hospital will be closed until I Preventive Medicine Services at Gorgas are conducting wall-to-wall inventories 2331; 252-2263; or 229-4009.

PAGE 3

Tropic Times News Nov 4 Wing workers 4 greet, process arriving Cubans by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson 24th Wing Public Affairs Office HOWARD AFB -Since the start of Operation Safe Haven Aug. 29, men and women from various 24th Wing agencies--airmen, non-commissioned officers and officers-have worked relentlessly to process nearly 8,500 Cuban migrants for their temporary stay in Panama. The Joint Task Force Safe Haven Reception Center has tapped agencies throughout the base for its staff, although it has drawn the most heavily from the 24th Support Group. "We have nearly 60 men and women working full-time the reception center, and almost all ofthem are the same people who started with us almost two months ago," said the commander of the reception center, Lt. Col. Luis Ramos. "These people are performing a very important function out here, and they're doing it in an outstanding manner." mane."sief sgi. Rian Ciaweon IU. Air Fore "Our methods and processes have changed over the course of Safe Haven," said reception center superintenMembers of the 24th Medical Operations Squadron and volunteers gather medical profiles on dent Chief Master Sgt. Don Hensley, "but the primary Cuban migrants at the JTF-Safe Haven Reception Center. function of our people is still the same-to get the Cubans said Maj. Paul Pyles, staff physician, psychiatrist, and of my son crying from hunger," she said. "I thought, 'no from the airplanes to the Safe Haven camps. In the prochief of mental health services at the Camp No. 4. "They matter what happens, it will be better here' (in Panama.)" cess, they do everything from operating multi-million dolface a totally uncertain future, which makes them very "I didn't know what to think when I first got here," lar computer equipment and evaluating medical histories, susceptible to acute stress, and that's where I come in." said Staff Sgt. Edna Johnson, administration NCO of the to helping sort through luggage, explaining a questionPyles also offers stress management assistance to the command center. "When the Cubans started comingnaire and even getting someone some water." active duty members assigned at the camps. many with nothing but the clothes on their backs-and I The process takes the Cubans through a half-dozen difAt other stations, specialists interview the Cubans to saw how happy and how thankful they were just to be here, ferent stations-check in, positive identification, enrollprovide personal data and enrollment information, all of it brought tears to my eyes. It really made me appreciate ment interview, medical screening, personal data and which is entered in the center's computerized data base some of the small things I've always kind of taken for manifest-and generally takes a little less than three hours and reproduced in the form of five separate reports for granted." to complete. base, command and Panamanian officials. Most of the people working at the center were selected While at Guantanamo Bay, each Cuban received a miFor many of the people in the reception center, work-rather than volunteered-for the job, Hensley excrochip ID bracelet imprinted with their personal identifiing with the Cubans has meant a lot of long hours for days plained. cation number. The check-in staff verifies the migrants' on end, but they haven't been complaining. "Despite that, after we've talked to these Cubans, lisidentities and checks them off against an aircraft maniWorking in the reception center "has been a real expetened to their experiences, and gotten to know them, nofest. The Cubans then get an ID badge with their fingerrience," said Senior Airman Alan Roy, an administrative body says they want to leave, or go back to doing what print and photograph, courtesy of the positive identificaspecialist assigned to the command center. "It's a lot of they were before Safe Haven kicked off. We've become a tion staff and its $1.5 million Deployable Mass Populahard work, but it's for a good cause and it makes me feel cohesive team and we really care about these people we're tion Identification System. Later, the air transportable like I'm finally part of a real mission." helping." hospital staff-temporary duty personnel from Minot, Tragic tales of the violence, the hardships and horror When the numbers in the migrant camps reach 10,000 Barksdale, Offutt and Nellis Air Force Bases-do mediCubans often had to endure in their home country have -the limit set by Panamanian president Ernesto Perez cal screenings and create medical histories for the Cubans, touched and deeply affected many reception center staff Balladares-the reception center is scheduled to be "inacmost of which have absolutely no documentation of this members. Some ofthe migrants even told ofseeing sharks tivated," but officials plan to leave it intact, so it can be type. Diagnosis or treatment of any minor ailments that attack friends and relatives who fell off their leaky, make'fired up' easily to handle the processing requirements are found is generally done at the camps. shift rafts. when the Cubans later leave Panama. "For the most part, these are good, warm-hearted, carOne migrant woman explained that she left her home "We don't know when that will be or where they will ing people who have left behind friends, family, possesin Cuba because she "had no choice." be going," Ramos said, "but we'll be here to help them on sions, everything in this world that is precious to them," "I couldn't support another day of waking to the sound their way." Volunteers vital to migrant reception center operation "We've even had active duty people varied and individual reasons for helping "I like people and when I heard that the by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson that are TDY (temporary duty) here from out with the Cuban migrants. Cubans were coming-and found out 24th Wing Public Affairs Office the states and they are volunteering their "I just got here about three months ago, some of what they were going through to off-duty time to help us out with the Cuand this is my first time out to the center, get here-I really wanted to help," said HOWARD AFB -"Volunteers are the bans," said Tech. Sgt. Annette Henry, the but I really want to do what I can to help," Mayra Urena, another civilian volunteer. lifeblood ofthis activity," said Ann Brown, Howard Family Support Center volunteer said one civilian volunteer. With two small She and her aunt, Estela Shaffer, along during one of her own stints at volunteercoordinator. "I think that's great!" children, Betsy Dunn says child care is a with Estela Alvarez and Marcia Irwins, ing in the Joint Task Force Safe Haven ReActually, an incredibly varied group of constant concern which limits the amount collect, size, separate and distribute the ception Center, located in Hangar 3 here. people comprise the reception center's of time she can volunteer. Still, she tries to clothing community members donate for "When the Cubans first step off the bank of nearly 300 volunteers, said Lizca get out as often as she can. the Cubans' benefit. buses at the reception center, a lot of them Fearon, the other primary FSC volunteer "When I was back in the United States They, and other Spanish-speaking vollook scared to death," added the wife of coordinator. "We have active duty military I'd often watch the evening news and see unteers, also greet the arriving Cubans, talk the 24th Wing commander. "Then groups and civilian members, family members, people working on humanitarian relief efwith them, share stories, and often just lisof friendly volunteers approach them, contractors, even students from local colforts," she explained. "I never would've ten to the migrants' experiences. Most of greeting them with kind words and smiles, leges." been able to take part in those things back the volunteers working at the reception and the Cubans can't help but respond. This large group of people also have in Mississippi, but here in Panama, it really center are bilingual, but even those who You can actually see them relax a little feels good because aren't fluent in Spanish can help out. bit." I can actually do Volunteers who don't speak Spanish Lt. Col. Luis Ramos, reception center something to can still greet arriving Cubans, serve them commander, echoed Brown's sentiments. help." food and drinks, and point out the areas "We've had about 20-25 volunteers out This good Sawhere the Cubans need to go next, Fearon here every day," Ramos said. "Volunteers maritan drive runs explained. They also regularly run the do everything, from sorting donations, in the Dunn famsnack bar set up for reception center staff greeting and calming the migrants' fears, ily. Betsy's husand volunteers. and helping them fill out personal informaband, Maj. W il"I don't 'habla bien el Espanol,' but I tion forms, to dispensing food and drinks liam Dunn, is a know a few words and I can usually get to them, and even running the snack bar dentist at the the message across with signs or gestures," set up for volunteers and reception center Howard Clinic and Henry explained. "Besides, a smile's the staff. We literally couldn't have done it he also helps the same in English or Spanish and if I get in without them." Cubans, providing over my head I can holler for 'help.' Anyone who would like to volunteer to medical care on a There's always someone around who can help in the reception center can do so by Senior Airman Steve McNally (U.S. Air Force) rotational basis at translate for me. The bottom line is, if you calling the Howard Family Support CenVolunteers greet Cubans arriving at the Joint Task the Safe Haven have a good heart and you want to help, ter at 284-5650/5010. Force Safe Haven Reception Center. camps. you can."

PAGE 4

4 Tropic Times v w s ___ __ _ N ov.N4, 1994 At News MTMCsays POVs More Dengue in Panama ready for pick-up GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL virus each time it bites a susceptible person during its BALBOA (MTMC) -The following customers (MEDDAC PAO) -The Panama Ministry of Health rethreeto four-week lifetime. have privately owned vehicles ready for pick up at ported more than 260 confirmed cases of dengue fever in In a recent housing area survey conducted by the Entothe POV Processing Center, Building 150 1, Balboa, Panama City as of October 1994. mology Section, several potential and active breeding sites adjacent to Pier 18: The mosquito-transmitted disease is caused by a virus, were found. Among them were trash cans and lids colAugilar G.; Belter M.S.; Chisholm D.P.; Coates and presently, there is no protection by immunization. lecting water, barbecue grills and bird baths. In addition, a C.M.; Culver K.D.; Daly G.J.; Desanchez A.M.; "Because the mosquito (Aedes aegypti) responsible for few natural containers were found to be potential breedFletcher L.L.; Fullerton D.F.; Funk R.E.; Giardina transmitting this disease breeds primarily in artificial coning sites: tree holes, fallen hollow coconuts and BromeliF.; Hilbish F.F.; Hill D.A.; Homer R.A.; Iglesias A.; tainers, the best way to control this disease is by removal ads. At one site, the area was strewn with beverage conJean-Pierre H.; Johnson V.M.; Krist D.J.; Layton of such containers," said Maj. Nelson Powers, chief of tainers filled with water and found to contain Aedes M.M.; Lerose N.J.; Lewis A.W.; Little A.S.; Entomology, Preventive Medicine Service at Gorgas aegypti larvae, the immature stage of the mosquito. Mandigo J.D.; Marcelino W.V.; Maye J.E.;MejiaArmy Community Hospital. He adds that such action has Residents should also be aware that this mosquito also Rangel 0.; Middaugh C.D.; Miranda J.L.; Moore to be taken before an epidemic occurs. breeds in hollow fence posts and roof drain gutters that J.D.; Morgan T.C.; Oconner M.L.; Ortmeier W.; The symptoms of dengue fever are like a severe flu: fill with water. Residents in installations that are part of Parker B.;Phlps B.; Range M.D.; Rice T.L.; sudden onset of high fever, severe headache, backache, the Directorate of Engineering and Housing Self Help Robinson N.M.; Rodriguez J.A.; Ruoff F.F.;Salazar pain in the back of the eyes and in the joints, muscles, and Program may get sand or gravel to fill in hollow fence J.C.; Sancya K.P.; Sanders L.M.; Shavers J.B.; bones, and occasionally a rash. posts and ladders to gain access to roof drain gutters to Sliwicki R.M.; Stewart N.; Thomas H.L.; Thomas "The pain is so intense that dengue is sometimes called inspect and clean them. Residents on installations are reB.; Wilson R.T. 'break bone fever' said Lt. Col. (Dr.) Wilfredo Souffront, minded that they are responsible for cleaning the roof gutCustomers must have the following documents chief of Preventive Medicine Service at Gorgas Army ters that are 12 feet or lower from the ground. For roof for pick up of their POVs: Community Hospital. "After the illness is over, people gutters that are higher than 12 feet, residents must submit *ID card (current military, dependent, or civilian) may feel very weak, tired and not be able to do their usual a work order to have them cleaned. *Driver license (must have Panamanian license for work for some time." Navy and Air Force personnel who do not have access second POV) About a week after an Aedes aegypti mosquito bites to the DEH Self Help Program must to submit work or*POV shipping document (DD Form 788) someone who is ill with dengue, it is able to transmit the ders. For more information, call 282-5269/5440. *Vehicle registration or title *Vehicle keys *Power of Attorney and photo copies of the Atlantic residents sponsor's bilingual ID card and driver's license (when the sponsor on orders cannot be present for pick up) honor National MTMC will be closed today and unable to release imorted POVs to customers, however the of fice will be open today to receive POVs for turn-in. Consumer Week The list is current as of Tuesday. For updates, call customer service at 282-4642/3853 or the POV MARGARITA COMPLEX (USARSO PAO Atlan arrival tape recording at 282-4641. Customer sertic) -National Consumer Week brought some informative vice hours are Monday -Friday, 7:30 a.m. -2:30 classes and prize giveaways to the Atlantic community. p.m. Wednesday hours are 9 a.m. -2:30 p.m. The classes and workshops offered were: Checkbook People expecting POVs are reminded to call cusManagement, Money Management and "Know Your tomer service to leave a contact phone number. Rights," a consumer workshop. In the consumer workshop-offered in Spanish and Custom er service English-representatives from such agencies as the Finance and Accounting Office, Adjutant General's office, office at 519 m moves Passport and Visa, the Commissary and Army and Air Force Exchange Service addressed consumers' rights and FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The Adanswered questions.The workshop attracted 55 people. jutant General Customer Service Office has be re"The workshop let people know what rights they have located to the lobby of the ground floor, Building as consumers and the rights they have at certain agencies 519, Fort Clayton. in the Atlantic community," said Luz M. Ballestero, ConThe move comes because of the installation of summer Affairs and Financial Program coordinator. the Real Time Automated Personnel Identification Additionally, representatives from Contraband ConSystem Automated ID Card system, said Warrant trol-Atlantic spoke to Cristobal High School students Officer Mona Ellington, chiefof the Personnel Serabout contraband items and shoplifting, Ballestero added. 51. ROin A Shawlinski (U.S. Army) vices Branch. The close ofthe week was marked by Commissary and New com m ander AG Customer Services and the Civilian Pass/ Post Exchange giveaways. ID Card Section, also in the lobby provides civilThe Commissary gave out 26 prizes including: a camU.S. Army Garrison commander, Col. Silas ian ID cards, civilian bilingual ID cards, privilege era, a $50 shopping spree and free bags of groceries. The Smalls passes the battalion colors to incards. certificates of Naturalization, statement of 16 Post Exchange prizes included: a camera, a free oil coming U.S. Army Garrison-Pacific comservices, AG certifications, family member dechange, a basket of AAFES products, a free boat rental mander Lt. Col. Charles Hunsaker during a ployment screening sheets, evaluations oflearning and a coupon for free brunch for two at the Fort Davis change of command ceremony, Oct. 27. experience during military service, housing appliCommunity Club. Maj. Stephen Duckworth, who has been the cations and tax exemptions for departure from The community got more than just prizes out of Nainterim commander since Sept. 30, relinTocumen and purchase of airline tickets. tional Consumer Week, however. squished command to Hunsaker. Hunsaker Military Pass and ID Sections provides active "I think National Consumer Week was successful in has been assigned to Fort Benjamin Harrison, duty, Reserve, retired and dependent ID cards, informing individuals of their rights as consumers," Ind., Fort Knox, Ky., West Point and has been military and dependent bilingual ID cards, Ballestero said. "They were more aware ofwhat to expect p outprocessing for ID cards, DA photo processing and of what to ask as consumers." previously stationed in Panama. and defense enrollment eligibility reporting system updates. For more information, call Richard Bartlett qt 287-6406. Panama news summary Air Force housing Editor's note: The following summary of news is Oct. 31 changes policies taken from the Panamanian press. The translation El Siglo: Paper reports Colon jail inmates offered to and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is made cut down grass in the areas of the Colon Corridor. A comHOWARD AFB (24th Wing PAO) To reduce by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of reporting pany recently donated 50 machetes to be used for cleanwaiting time for its customers, the Howard/Albrook or statements made here. Selection of these stories ing public areas. The inmates are complying with minor housing office will implement some new policies does not imply any emphasis, judgement or endorsesentences and not considered dangerous. Nov. 1. An appointment system will even out the meant by the U.S. government. These synopses are inwork flow and allow counselors to dedicate their tended only to give non-Spanish speaking people a Nov. 1 time to specific customers. People won't need apflavor for news events in Panama. El Panama America: Paper reports that Panama's PTJ pointments to take care of simple items (temporary intelligence division says some 25 people have been murlodging allowances, housing applications, and Oct. 27 dered in the last 18 months by foreign and native hoodsimple questions that can be answered by the reLa Esrella: Paper reports an ARI document reportlums. An official said the contracts for the killing vary ceptionist) but more complex matters will be ing that 13 areas currently under U.S. military use will between $500 and $15,00. handled by appointment. be turned over to Panama between 1995 and 1997. Supplementing these changes will be weekly El Panama America: Paper reports the draft bill that group briefings, which will replace the former indiOct. 28 privatizes the phone company INTEL has the support of vidual sessions. Housing officials encourage sponCritica Libre: Paper reports Panamanian authorities some legislators, but the Republic of Panama Workers sors of inbound individuals to schedule those memare investigating the possible participation by Cuban Confederation says the bill would create an increase in bers in advance of their arrival. For more informaorganizations exiled in Miami in the escape of 21 Cuphone rates and cause many INTEL employees to lose tion, call 284-3417/5814. bans from the Panamanian camps, their jobs.

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Tropic Times Voices Nov. 4,1994 Pesky stray cats trouble base resident even for a cat. I wish someone would do something to id The housing office should give the gardener something Mayors' Corner us of this problem, before my neighbors and I lose our for his hard work. Maybe they could hold a competition cool. between the housing area gardeners to see who can earn Dear Mayors' Corner, 'Cat'astrophe waiting to happen the most "Yard of the Months and Quarters" during the I live in tropical housing on Howard AFB and have a year. Then run the winner's photo in the Tropic Times problem no one else can solve.stray cats. I have asked Dear 'Cat,' and give him a cash prize or free dinner. The gardeners around to find out who owns them, but only two neighStray animals are a challenge. You are correct in saywork very hard and deserve some recognition for their acbors have cats. ing that the security police have a responsibility to pick up complishments. One pet owner says she's afraid to let her cat outside stray animals, and in my experience, they try to do this. I do my own yard and take great pride in my work. because of the possibility of impregnation by one of the However, the animals frequently disappear before some The housing office does not recognize me and it's the strays. Meanwhile, the other neighbor has a male cat and one can be dispatched to the site of a complaint. same for the others who work on their own yards. For lets it stay outside. This person obviously doesn't care beMeanwhile, we have come up with a possible self-help those who win with hired gardeners, it's like getting valecause I have seen the cat running with the pack of strays. solution. You can now check out an animal trap from the dictorian when someone else did your homework. All of my other neighbors wish these cats would go away, pest management shop. When you have trapped the cat, A Little Green but they don't. call the security police to pick up the animal. We hope These cats use my garden as a litter box, bushes as a this will resolve your problem. Dear Green, mating area and back stairs as a safe haven. I thought that The "Yard of the Quarter" program is for the occuby getting a dog this would solve the problem, but she is Dear Mayors' Corner, pants of military family housing not their gardeners. Garjust a puppy and these cats terrorize her. I have called the When I drive past my neighbor's house everyday, I deners work for the occupant, not the government. Occuhousing office and was told, "We can do nothing but tell see a "Yard of the Quarter" sign up and wonder what they pants are responsible for basic yard care. However, when new housing members to keep their cats under control." did to deserve it. they go beyond the expected, the housing office likes to What good does this do, since most of these cats do not They have a gardener who does all of their yard work, recognize them. have owners? I have also called the security police. They gardening and planting. He even gets plants from other It is the occupant who decides how they want to mainhave taken my complaint, but have not tried to catch these houses when the people move. He puts everything in ortain their yard, not their gardener. Granted, they may not pests. der, and I have to admit the yard does look nice. But what physically do the work, but they are the ones who are payAs a dog owner, I feel discriminated against because I does the housing office give him? The people who live ing for it and decide how they want their yard to look. am not allowed to let my pet run free. She must always be there get new appliances, dinner for two, free bowling, on a leash, rather than under voice control. Yet, cat ownand free swimming for a month. Meanwhile, all they did Editor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral ers can let their cats roam the streets without fear of reperwas pay their gardener $15-$20 per month-and maybe a Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity cussions. little extra for winning. chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will I am almost to the point of chasing these cats with a I'm not saying they don't deserve it, because they do. be granted upon request. The Tropic Times reserves softball bat or setting traps for them. But this is too cruelTheir yard looks great, but give credit where credit is due. the right to edit letters and responses for brevity. Thief lifts $500 in travelers' checks off servicemember Stolen travelers' checks A U. S. servicemember had $500 in travelers' checks stolen from him last week. The alleged thief cashed the checks at the post office. Keep this type of item under lock and key, or with you at all times. It is also recommended that people keep receipts with the serial numbers on them. Fingerprinting hours The Provost Marshal Office will provide fingerprinting to those who need prints taken. Normal fingerprinting hours are 9-11 a.m. Tuesdays and 1-3 p.m. Thursdays at Building 131, Fort Clayton. Identification cards are required. POV insurance required The military police remind everyone that, in accordance with U.S. Southern Command Regulation 190-5, anyone operating a privately-owned vehicle must show proof of insurance upon demand. For more information, refer to the regulation or call the Military Police Traffic Section at 287-3203. DARE program. Housing area crimes 800 area -one larceny of secured private For more information, contact the The following criminal activities ocproperty DARE Program DARE coordinator at 287-6762 or 287curred at on and off post housing areas Fort Amador The Drug Abuse Resistance Education 3261. Oct. 15-21. 400 area -one larceny unsecured private program has been in operation for three Pacific property years in Panama. A 17-week course in Panama Jack anonymous hotline Fort Clayton Off post Drug Resistance Training is taught to all Anyone with information about drug 200 area (Herrick Heights) -one larceny Panama City -one larceny of secured prisixth graders attending Department of Desmuggling should immediately call the of secured private property vate property fense Dependents Schools. Younger stuPanama Jack anonymous hotline at 285400 area -one larceny unsecured private Balboa -one larceny unsecured private dents also receive an introduction to the 4185 property property .#T ropic Times Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666 This authorized unofficial command information publicaAssistant Editor.Sgt. Cass Purdum U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pubEntertainment Editor.Rosemary Chong NCOIC. .Sgt. Rick Emert wished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information ProSports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of Staff Editor/Writer.Spc. Tom Findtner 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Public Affairs Oficer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Public Affairs Superintendent.Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Journalists.Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson U.S. Southern Command. Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 U.S. Army South Public Alfairs Office.287-3007 Public Affairs Officer.Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Commander in Chief.Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig Managing Editor.Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Assistant Public Affairs Officer.John I all Chief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Editor.Sgt. Robin Shawlinski Photographers.Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Managing Editor.Sgt. I st Class Zakiyyah Waheed Journalists.Sgt. Eric Hortin Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays Editor.M aureen Sam pson Spc. Brian Thomas

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Tropic Times Nov. 4, 1994 T, burim., and The camp may ne but they proved t f ~by Sgt. Eric Hortin USARSO Public Affairs Office W hen they deployed, they had no idea when they would return. It took nearly two months of building and preparing before they could return to their families. The soldiers, airmen, sailors and Marines that made up the force deployed in support of Operation Distant Haven returned Oct. 25 to Panama. Other soldiers stationed in the United States, who traveled through Panama on their way home, were greeted as well before departing to their home stations. When migrant camps in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, were becoming overcrowded with the increasing number of Haitians fleeing their country, a new camp was needed. The U.S. State Department, in cooperation with Suriname in brief the United Nations High Commission on Refugees Location: East coast of South X and the government of Suriname, asked the U.S. America I Southern Command to build a camp to temporarily Geography: 63,000 square house up to 2,500 people. miles, slightly larger than the state of Georgia Population: 402,000 (1991 est.) Government: Republic Religions: Moslem, 19%; Hindu, 27%; Christian, 47% Economy: Per capita Gross Domestic Product, $3,200 History: The Netherlands aquired Suriname in 1667 from Britain, in exchange for New Netherlands (New York). The 1954 Dutch constitution raised the colony to a level of equality with the Netherlands and the Netherlands K Antilles. In the 1970s the Dutch government pressured for AK Suriname independence, which came on Nov. 25,1975. The military council took over control of the government in February '7 1982. The government came under democratic leadership in 1988. An aerial view of the Operation Distant Haven ca mp. While we're there, why not an interchange between nations? by Spc Brian Thomas "This is very important to the U.S. military." USARFISO Pubic Affa rs Off ce Huddleston said his course had two purposes. ---The first was to offer Surinamese senior officers PARAMARIBO, SURINAME -In an exchange background on U.S. Army military decisionof ideas between two militaries, Col. Louis D. making and planning, and the second was to Huddleston gave a course on officer professional provide an opportunity to exchange views. development to a group of Surinamese senior Huddleston's course is one that is taught at the officers Oct. 28. Command and General Staff College in Fort Huddleston, the Joint Task Force-Suriname Leavenworth, Kan. commander, was in Suriname to oversee the Surinamese Army Chief of Staff, Col. Glenn conversion of Operation Distant Haven as it Sedney, attended and was'pleased with becomes a care-taker operation. Most of the troops Huddleston's lecture. "It was a very interesting returned earlier in the week, but about 65 will subject," Sedney said. "Since our officers have to remain behind, deal with these kinds of subjects it was good to "This is very important to me," Huddleston said refresh their minds." to the Surinamese officers as he began his lecture Sedney said the class was not anticipated when on military decision making. Operation Distant Haven began in August. "One of the benefits I have as a senior officer is "It was not planned to do this but he found the I get the opportunity to travel to foreign countries space to have this discussion," Sedney said. "We Col. Louis D. Huddeston, JTF-Suriname comma and meet with foreign officers," luddleston said. thank the colonel very much." class to Surinamese army officers.

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Tropic Times Nov. 4, 1994 I ack er be used, ey could do it Joint Task Force-Suriname was quickly formed and the deployment of troops, equipment and supplies from Panama and the United States began in late August. In record time, engineers, military police and all manner of military specialists from all the services were flown to Suriname to construct the migrant and base camps. The camps were quickly built. About 1,500 cubic meters of concrete were used to construct 300 tent and utility pads. Some 190 general purpose medium tents, 10 general purpose large tents, 2,500 cots and more than 2,000 meters of fence were quickly put up. Then the waiting began, but would come to an end when Haiti's ruling military dictatorship volunteered to leave Oct. 15. Small numbers of troops started returning from Suriname soon after the dictatorship's departure, but the main body of about 200 servicemembers did not return until ten days later. A small detachment of approximately 65 maintenance and security personnel are still in Suriname in case the camps are needed in the future. The time of return for those personnel is not known. Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) Joint Task Force-Suriname members return to Panama enroute to their home stations. For many, that was Panama, but several units from the United States also participated in the project. (U.S. Army) Spc. Brian Thomas (U.S. Army) Spc. Brian Thomas (U.S. Army) Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) der, gives an officer professional development Work continues at the camp as engineers from Staff Sgt. Richard Cannon, 534th Military Police Fort Stewart, Ga., upgrade electrical wiring. Co., gets a big hug from his wife Vickie.

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8 Tropic Times Nov. 4,1994 Halloween festivities bombard community A another Halloween has passed through the isthmus. The American community celebrated the ghoulish holiday in a variety of ways. More than 1,500 children and adults celebrated their Halloween at Rodman NS going through the haunted house at the old Anchorage Club Oct. 28 and 29. About 60 participants served as guides, ghouls and makeup artists during the eight hours of frightening fun. Naval Command Master Chief John Myers has been involved with the Navy's haunted house the last two years. "It was quite a bit better this year than last. This year we had more space, more rooms, air conditioning and more participants," he said. "Not one person complained and lots thanked us. We got great compliments," Myers said. Among the participants were; sections from Rodman NS, Naval Special Warfare Unit 8, U.S. Southern Command, Morale, Welfare and Recreation and the Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School. The funds raised at the haunted house will be used for a picnic for all Navy commands, Myers said. Meanwhile, frightful things were also happening across the canal at Fort Clayton. Halloween adventurers of all ages were busy either tricking or treating. An army of Power Rangers descended to do battle with the ghosts and ghoulies and spooks of all shapes and sizes that were out and about Monday evening. Haunted houses sprouted like mushrooms around post, putting the willies into pint-sized wanna-be monsters. Little goblins who chose the "safe" Halloween activities made the rounds in the housing areas, collecting their ill-gotten goodies from those who were home. Judging from the amount of candy collected, it should be safe to say, the folks over at U.S. Army Dental Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) Activity-Panama will not have to worry about losing In fairy tales the princess kisses the frog, but at Valent Recreation Center s haunted house the theirjobs anytime soon. young bride Erin Radtke gives Pimento the snake a smooch. Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) Haunted house denizens greet the visitors at Valent Recreation Center. John Hall (U.S. Navy) Petty Officer 2nd Class Edward Archie F ~ .was one of two "Jasons" at Rodman's haunted house. John Hall (U.S. Navy) John Hall (U.S. Navy) Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) Diane Gonzalez applies makeup on Petty Officer 2nd Class Marty Enriquez was one of the dancing Chyanna Pauch waits patiently to get Carrie Corona before the opening of ghouls at Rodman's monster mash. Halloween goodies on Fort Clayton. Rodman's haunted house.

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Sports Nov. 4, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 9 Bulldogs win basketball title by Sgt. Lori Davis score came from Daniela Garcia. Tropic Times sports editor The Bulldogs' offense took over in the second quarter. Nom BALBOA -The Bulldogs Robinson, Cheryl Stanford and came back from a 12-5 first quarYarissa Peart each scored four ter deficit to route the Green Devpoints, and Nolte added another ils 32-26 in the women's basketbasket.The Bulldogstook thelead, ball championship game Oct. 28. 19-16. Leading the Bulldogs to victoThe third quarter tumed into a ry was guard Janelle Hauser. tug-of-war. The Devils edged the Hauser remained scoreless in the Bulldogs by one point, narrowing firsthalf, but she was on fire inthe the gap to 25-23. second half, capping offthe BullThe last quarter of the game dog's run on the scoreboard. and the season was all Bulldogs. The Bulldogs didn't look like Its tough defense blocked the awinningteam inthe firstquarter. Devils again and again. Ernest Its sole score from the floor came was the only Devil to sink a shot. from Kristen Nolte. Three free and the only player of the game, throws boosted their score to five on either team, to score in every points. quarter. The Devils owned the court But it was Hauser who stood between forwards Michelle out, driving to the top of the key, WombleandAudrey Ernest.Their then pulling up short to shoot for "too-tall" attack plan served the three points. As the ball sunk so Devils well, feeding the ball indid the Devils. Hauser spun and side where Ernestscoredsixpoints went up the court, doing a victory and Womble added four. Maria dance on the way. Rodriguez added a basket to put Theseteamshadsplitgames in the Devils up 12-5. the regular season. Sgi. Lori Davis (Tropc Times) The Bulldogs bounced back in "Both ofthese teams have talThe Bulldogs' Noni Robinson dives out of bounds trying to save the ball. Robinson the second quarter, blocking entedathleteswhodeserveealotof scored six baskets and hit two of four foul shots to contribute eight points to the Womble and holding Ernest to credit," Bulldog coach Cleve Bulldogs' victory. one basket. The Devil's other Oliver said. Talkin' Turkey Bowl Sailors plan to weather Turkey Bowl hurricane __ b ntles the Marines 7:30 p.m. Nov. 19. The losers of the by John Hall Nov. 19 games face offfor third place 6 p.m. Nov. 23. Rodman NS Public Affairs Office -_ The winners vie for the Turkey Bowl title at 7:30 p.m. RODMAN NS -During last year's Turkey Bowl, Like in years past, Simmons said the Navy doesn't Navy'sassistantcoach Kenneth Simmons watchedthe have a big pool of players to choose from like other weather dictate his team's game plan. This year, he's teams. "We don't have many big guys, so our philosback with new players, new coaches and a new game ophy will be to rely on quickness," Simmons said. plan. That quickness will be seen in the modified wish"Lastyear, theweatherplayedabigpart," Simmons bone-style offense and aggressive defense the team said. "Itwasabeautifulday beforethekickoff. Butthen plans to run. The modified wishbone came into play it was like someone just turned a faucet on. It didn't let halfway through the Howard flag football season. up until there were two minutes left in the game," he "We were running apro-style offense and notdoing said. very well," Simmons said. "Commander (co-coach That game was a Greg) Da Costa installed the (modified) wishbone and 38-3losstoArmyin it was very successful," Simmons said. the opening game. Simmons saidtheplayers likedthe offense thattired The Army went on out opposing defenses and led to victories. "When to win the champiyou're losing, players can get bad attitudes.but when onship game over we switched you could see the effects." the Air Force 7-0. Although Simmons said the Navy uses the flag For people new football league as a tool for picking Turkey Bowl Jose Canseco Spc.Tomindner(TropicTims o Panama, the Turplayers, bowl experience is a big factor. key Bowl is an The Navy will have six players returning from last Jose Canseco puts on a batting demonstration for interservice flag year's Turkey Bowl. On offense they are: quarterback Cuban migrants living at Camp No. 2 and the football tournament Paul Joyce, quarterback/running back Stephan Jones servicemembers staffing the camp. Canseco, a played annually at and offensive lineman Terry Rogers. On the defensive Balboa Stadium. side, defensive back/end Archie Elam, defensive tackCuban-American, visited the Cubans i the camp The Navy faces the John Hall (U.S. Navy) le Derrick Cumberbatch, safety Rafael Myrie, Oct. 29 to boost morale and lend his support to Air Force at 6 p.m. Stephan Jones returns to cornerback Robert Falcones and linebacker Lloyd their quest for freedom. and the Army batplay for the Navy. Nolan. The Cougars bounce back from Troy Aikman has a concussion, but *SCN AM radio schedule defeat with a big win against the what excuse can football prognos*Quiz answers Red Machine. ticators use for their picks? *Sports standings

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1OTropic Times A jo t ai_ _ 10 Nov.4,1994ootball The Cougars' Olin Crouch (#66) and William Huff (#76) zero in on the Machine's Jared Holzworth. LofaMarinez (courtesy) Cougars shred Machine, 28-9 by Sgt. Lori Davis VonHollen defied the Machine dehim for a 15-yard loss early in the game. Tropic Times sports editor fense again in the third quarter, running Meanwhile the Cougar offense was for46yardsand followingupwithaoneblazing trails across the Machine's deBALBOA -The Cougars got back on yard touchdown plunge. The two-point fense. track this week, pounding the Machine conversion by Jelani Jordan capped the Martens threw all over the field, toss28-9. Cougar scoring to put it ahead 28-3. ing three-yard screens to Adams and JorThe Cougars wasted no time getting The Machine rallied in the third quardan forextrapoints, and airing the ball out the lead courtesy of Lance VonHollen. terwithitsbigplayofthegame. Holzworth for a 35-yard pass to Jordan during a Vonollen added to his mushrooming connected with Jerry Smith for a 65-yard drive. Martens completed 11 of26 passes rushing and scoring records by chugging touchdown pass play. For ateam that is 0for the night for 126 yards. four yards into the end zone foraCougar 7, pulling off the big plays is cause for The Cougar ground game keptup with touchdown early in the first quarter. celebration. Martens' throwing arm. VonHollen The Cougars went to VonIHollen for The Machine was stalled on offense rushed for 117 yards on 19 carries, folthe score again inthe first quarter. Fredrik through the entire game. Smith turned in lowed by Jordan's 54 yards on seven Adams made good on the extra point run the team's best rushing play with a sixcarries. to put the Cougars out to a 14-0 lead. yard gain. After adding up lost yardage, VonHollen said he lost track of how The Machine found it's way to the the Machine checked in at minus seven many touchdowns he scored in a postscoreboard with a field goal by Donny yards. game interview with the Southern ComHusted in the second quarter, but the The passing game fared no better as mand Network. three points didn'tamountto much as the Jared Holzworth hit only three of 21 The Cougars and Devils settle the tie Cougars' Buddy Martens dove into the passes for 85 yards. The relentless Coufor first place 5:30 p.m. today at Balboa. Donna Martinez (courtesy) end zone on a quarterback sneak to put gar defense did more than interrupt The Cougars beat the Devils 32-23 the A Machine defender tries to bring down the Cougars ahead 20-3. Holzworth passing game, it also knocked first time these teams faced each other. the Cougars' Robert Reyes. T m a C --Ties League Leaders 500h6 7Mo hine 5 Tolt 1aTeam standings Taerr, Tigers 4 1600 W L T Pct. PF PA Thyr ot .4 Cougars 7 1 0 .875 139 78 Scoring 1400 -----------Devils 7 1 0 .875 130 38 TD XP Total Bulldogs 5 3 0 .625 75 73 Reese, Devils 14 4 92 1200 -Tigers 4 4 0 .500 62 78 VonHollen, Cg. 8 6 56 Kolts 1 7 0 .125 80 169 Guerra, Tigers 9 54 1000 -: ___ __ Machine 0 8 0 .000 29 110Rshn Last weeks game Carr. Ydls. Avg. 800 ----Devils 14, Tigers 6 Reese, Devils 163 1050 6.4 60-Bulldogs 21, Kolts 7 Guerra, Tigers 134 947 7.0 60Tonight's games Hall, Bulldogs 140 705 5.0 Bulldogs vs. Tigers, 6 p.m. (CHS) Kick offs 4va Devils vs. Cougars, 5:30 p.m. (BHS) Kicks Yds. Avg. Kolts vs. Machine, 7:30 p.m. (BHS) VonHollen, Cg. 31 1456 46.9 Quarterbacks Lampas, Devils 28 1287 45.9 PA PC % Yds TD int Beach, Bulldogs 22 991 45.0 YYMartens, Cg. 155 65 42 10838 10 Punts Yards rushing Yards passing Beach, BD 72 25 35 679 4 8 Kicks Yds. Avg. Buldogs cougars U Devils F]Kolts Machine Tigers Lampas, Dev. 64 33 51 427 3 2 Husted, Machine 16 529 33.0 Interceptions Price, Tigers 27 826 30.6 Source: Robed Best Beach, Bulldogs 6 Beach, Bulldogs 22 629 28.5

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Sports Tropic Times 1 # spofts Nov.4,1994 II Football action runs hot, S Special events d I The 3rd Special Operations Support Command nen nU CO 9(Airborne) is sponsoring a softball tournament co ld in ug l w eNov. 25-27 at Fort Clayton Cloverleaf field. The entry fee is $150 per team. The limit is 16 teams. started the season 3-0, the Dallas-N.Y. game looked like the Trophy and cash prizes will be given to the top NFL week in review Monday nighter of the year. The Giants then did the teams. For information, call 287-6554 before 5 unthinkable; they lost five straight. The Cowpokes were p.m. or 282-3930 after 5 p.m. by John Hall shocked by the Kitties and should be concerned about Gorgas Army Community Hospital and U.S.A. Rodman NS Public Affairs Office playing on Monday night. After all, the Cryboys only loss Medical Department Activity are sponsoring the ofthe season was on ABC to the Lions. Some ofthe reasons 4th Annual 10K Bridge of the Americas Run RODMAN NS -Weeknine ofthe NFL season was like Dallas played so badly last week were: 1. So much was starting 6:30 a.m. Dec. 10. People can register at the night and day, hot and cold (fill in your favorite cliche made ofAikman's injury. 2. They looked pastthe Bengals, CorozalPostExchangeorby contacting JulieBright here) .Six games were decided by three points who are insignificant; and 3. It was an inter-conference at 287-5101/3065. Registration is open through or less, and others were 12, 20, 23 and 34. It's enough to road game before a divisional rival. Remember, the CowDec. 10. Early registration is $7, registration the give handicappers gray hair and shortness ofbreath. Espeboys beat the Giants with Jason Garrett at quarterback after day of the race is $8. The fee includes a T-shirt, cially winded were "experts" who said Dallas was stupid Aikman pulled a hamstring last season. COWPOKES 27, refreshments, transportation to and from Farfan for letting Troy Aikman play after receiving his sixth Giants 17. Beach and Gorgas, trophies in each runningcategoconcussion in as many years. Because the Cowpokes were In other games: Bills 30, JETS 13; Bears 23, BUCS 16; ry and doorprizes. Runners may register as individplaying the 0-7 Kitties, many argued Dallas could win with Bengals 24, HAWKS 20; PACKERS 19, Lions 16; DOLuals oras five-memberteams. Call Milton Gillespie Jerry Jones behind center. When Cincy took a 14-0 lead, PHINS 27, Dolts 13; BROWNIES 23, Patsies 17; VIKES at 282-5206/5178 for more information. many people were asking who is this Jeff Blake guy? 24, Saints 10; Steelers 20, OILERS 14; 49ers 23, SKINS 9. Amador There are some really ugly week nine games. Here are Last week 6-6, season 69-44, Monday night 7-2. five of them. National Football League The Amador Golf Course is sponsoring a twoTo live anddie in L.A. -Intheirfirst matchup ofthe 90s, American Conference person, best ball Thanksgiving Turkey Shoot the Broncos take their rejuvenated team to Anaheim. The East 7:30 a.m. Nov. 12, $8. Call 282-4511 to register by Broncos are on a good three-game streak -nearly beating East Wednesday. K.C., toppling the Bolts and bashing the Brownies. The W L T Pct. PF PA Albrook/Howard Rams are comingoffan opendate and awild37-34 loss to Miami 6 2 0 .750 203 Registration foryouth basebalforages 5-18 Buffalo 5 3 0 .625 178 153 Rgsrto o ot aea o gs51 the Saints.The Broncos are inthe softpart oftheir schedule, N.Y. Jets 4 4 0 .500 141 150 years will run through Dec. 3 at the Howard and with three home games against Seattle, Atlantaand CincinIndianapolis 4 5 0 .444 195 211 Albrookyouth centers. Aphysical exam is required nati coming up. After an 0-4 start, the Broncos are on a roll, New England 3 5 0 .375 178 206 before a child can be registered. There is a $25 fee but aren't ready for the Rams' strong defensive line and Central for all family members of active duty Jerome Bettis. RAMS 23, Broncos 13. Cleveland 6 2 0 .750 180 105 servicemembers and a $30 fee for other people. Flockfightin Philly -The Cardinals and Eagles aretwo Pittsburgh 5Competitive swim team tryouts will be held Houston 1 7 0 .125 107 172 Cmeiiesi emtyuswl ehl teams flying in different directions. The Eagles were the Cincinnati 0 8 0 .000 121 203 10 a.m. Nov. 12 at the Howard and Albrook Pools. hottestteam in the league aftera 32-point win overthe 49ers West Teams are foryouths 8-18 years. Fee will be $15 per in week five. After that they edged Washington, lost to San Diego 7 1 0 .875 220 141 month. Tryouts will be at both pools and practices Dallas, beat Houston (by 15 but it was closer than that) and Kansas City 5 3 0 .625 169 175 begin the following week. Competitions will be by edged Washington again. The Cards' recent history inLA Raiders 4 4 0 .500 180 192 age groups. Call Lisa Nofi at 284-3569 or Rose cludes an overtime win over the Skins, a near-win over Denver 3 5 0 .375 182 206 Coville at 236-2035 for more information. Dallas and another overtime win over (5-2) Pittsburgh. Seattle 3 5 0 .375 168 159 The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers Dalls ad aothr ovrtie wn oer (-2)Pitsbugh.National Conference Buddy Ball may have worked at home against a team not East lunch bunch sports and fitness activities weekacquainted to the Arizona heat, but at Veterans Stadium Dallas 7 1 0 .875 210 110 days. Events are; aerobics noon-l p.m. Mondays, againstRyan'sformerteam?As if! EAGLES24,Cards 10. Philadelphia 6 2 0 .750 192 141 Wednesdays and Fridays, basketball 11 a.m.-I Bolts and Birds, oh my! -Atlanta plays its third straight Arizona 3 5 0 .375 109 172 p.m. Tuesdays, volleyball 1 1 a.m.-1 p.m. Thurswest coast team and is 0-2 so far. The Falcons lost to the N.Y. Giants 3 5 0 .375 152 172 days. Niners and Raiders by an average score of 36-10. The Washington 2 7 C tral.222 198 242 0C .22t 19a24 Clayton Chargersreboundednicelyaftertheirfirstloss,bashingthe Minnesota 6 2 0 .750 183 118 A coach for the Army Turkey Bowl Hawks 35-15. The Bolts paid a heavy price, as quarterback Chicago 4 4 0 .500 135 162 cheerleading squad is needed. If interested, call Stan Humphries dislocated his left elbow. Serving as his Detroit 4 4 0 .500 155 170 the Sports Division at 287-4050/5618 backup is Gale Gilbert who played all of one game with Green Bay 4 4 0 .500 150 103 t S a 0. Buffalo last season. Atlanta's open date should help them Tampa Bay 2 6 0 .250 109 195 Registration for women's softball is underheal from those beatings and keepthe game close. Bolts 24, West way at the Sports Office, Building 154. Call 287San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 237 150 4050 for more information. FALCONS 20. Atlanta 4 4 0 .500 158 184 Aninstructorisneededtoteachthe9:15-10:30 Berman and Boyz -ESPN's Chris "Boomer" Berman LA Ramns 3 5 0 .375 135 156 a m. aerobics class at Reeder Physical Fitness Cenand his staff get their first Sunday night game of the year New Orleans 3 5 0 .375 156 208 ter. A eo is ateed Physcal Fte C and it's a doozy. It's a grudge match as Harvey Williams ter yone who is interested can call Eva Foster at and Marcus Allen face the teams that let them go. The Raiders are coming off a scary 17-14 win over hapless Q UiZ answ ers Curundu Houston. The Chiefs had theirheads handed to them, losing The answers to last week quiz are: 1w, 2t, 3u, 4y, Anyone interested in joining a mixed bowling by34 atRich Stadium. K.C. has wonan incredible eightof 5s, 6p, 7o, 8r, 9q, IOz, 1 B, 12A, 13y, 14x, 15a, 16e, league at the Curundu Bowling Center can call the last nine in this series. Joe Montana rarely has two bad 17d, 18b, 19c, 20g, 21f, 221, 23h, 24j, 251, 26m, 27k, 286-3914 for information. games in a row. CHIEFS 19, Raiders 17. 28n. Horoko Are you ready for a concussion? -When the Giants I The Horoko Golf Course is sponsoring the Canon Latin America Tournament Nov. 26. The event is four-person Mexican best ball format, $20 entry fee for members. Pick your own team or enter on a draw. All entry fees will be given back as SCN AM Radio Unit-level volleyball prizes. Sign up at the Horoko Pro Shop at 283Reeder Physical Fitness Center 6323. 790/1420 Monday The Horoko GolfClub Restaurant now serves a Friday 6 p.m.: 92nd PSC vs. Co. A, 310th MI hot breakfast buffet Saturdays, Sundays, and hol8:30 p.m., NBA: New Jersey Nets at Houston Rock7 p.m.: Panama MP Co. vs MEDDAC idays starting at 6 a.m. Wednesday Saturday 6 p.m.: Co. A, 310th MI vs. Panama MP Co. Rodman 1:30 p.m., NCAA: Air Force at Army 7 p.m.: 92nd PSC vs. MEDDAC Rodman Fitness Center is sponsoring a 5-kilo4:30 p.m., NCAA: USC at Washington State Standings meterfun run6:30 a.m. Thursday opentoallNavy Sunday and Marine Corps military, Defense Department 1 p.m., NFL: Detroit Lions at Green Bay Packers Navy Intramural Volleyball civilians and family members. The unit with the 4 p.m., NFL: New England Patriots at Cleveland W L GB most runners wins an award. Firstand second place Browns NSWU 8 4 0 -awards will be given in the men's and women's 8 p.m., NFL: Los Angeles Raiders at Kansas City PWD 4 1 .5 division. Call 283-4222/4061 for information. Chiefs NSCIATTS 2 2 2 Monday Marines 1 3 3 An intramural swim meet will be held 6:30 9 p.m., NFL: New York Giants at Dallas Cowboys Med. Dep. 0 5 4.5 a.m. Nov. 18 at the Rodman Pool. The meet is open *as of Tuesday to all Navy and Marine Corps military, Defense Schedule Department civilians and family members 18 years Women's Basketball and older. There is a maximum of 12 swimmers per Howard Sports and Fitness Center team and a limit of one team per unit. Events are: a Monday 100-meter freestyle, 100-meter breaststroke and a 6:05 p.m.: Semifinal round 200-meterrelay. The registration deadline is ThursTuesday day. For more information, call 283-4222/4061. 6:05 p.m.: Championship game

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12Tropic Times 12Nov.4, Nes Air Force Residents 'MASH' perform at Camp No.3 EMPIRE RANGE (Safe Haven JIB) Cubans moved to the rhythm of AfricanCuban folk music at the newly constructed C bans stage in Operation Safe Haven's Commu--nity Camp No.3 Oct. 27. by Senior Airmen Lori Wise and African-Cuban musicians from the Joel Langton camp played home-made, wooden instruJTF Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau ments that included drums, chacaras, hollow blocks and sticks. Dancers and singers accented the cultural and rhythmic beat four Cuban Community Camps as well as ofthe concert, that was organized to entermilitary troops working in Operation Safe tain fellow community residents. Haven can feel "safe" if they happen to ex"We encourage cultural expression and perience a medical emergency-even in activities because the community members the midst of the jungle. enjoy it and it seems to give them comSafe Haven's Air Transportable Hospifort," said Cmdr. Richard Smith, Camp tal became functional with the help of an No. 3 commander. "For a while now the 118-person deployed medical team within musicians have spontaneously gathered three days of its arrival from Minot AFB, together to play the instruments, so the N.D. The medical facility, complete with Senior Airman Steve McNally (U.S. Air Force) concert was organized to enable them to its own equipment and supplies, began 24Air Force pediatrician, Capt. Ed Heard, examines three-year-old Orlando perform for the entire community." hour operations Sept.11 and has helped apMorell Diaz at the Cuban Reception Center. Safe Haven's Community Relations proximately 9,055 patients. Gardner, chief of General Surgery, the tion staffers at each community camp proService staff coordinated the concert, and The ATH is home away from home for Safe Haven humanitarian mission is provide medical care for minor illnesses. is organizing entertainment and sports acdeployed medical specialists from Minot, viding valuable real-world experience and The unique situation has challenged the tivities for all four camps. Offutt AFB, Neb., Andrews AFB, Md., training for the medical staff. ATH staff. Medical forms must be trans"Our mission is to provide morale, welBarksdale AFB, La., Nellis AFB, Nev., "For many of us, this is a first reallated into Spanish by the administrative fare and recreation opportunities for the and Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. world deployment with an ATH," said the staff to help bridge the language barrier. Cubans," said Gus Duenas, a Cuban"We're the Air Force's version of surgeon from Nellis AFB. "Some ofus reAlso, since an ATH facility is normally American CRS staff member. "If the MASH," said Airman 1st Class Mike cently received ATH training and, just by used in war, there is not an established area people do not have music or baseball, it's Weahlee, a military public health technicoincidence, it was good timing for this for pediatric patients. Pediatric supplies like taking life away from them. We're cian from Offutt. deployment. We're striving to provide our and equipment had to be ordered and setworking to get regular musical instruments Airman 1st Class Troy Smith said he patients with the best care possible, and at up by the pediatricians, to accommodate for the community members and we're setaffectionately refers to it as "Doc in a box." the same time benefit from the experience the Cuban children. ting up sports tournaments within the Whatever the description, the patients of using our individual skills and talents "The children we have seen are wellcamps as well as entertainment events." are receiving treatment from dedicated in a unique environment." immunized and well-nourished," said The Cubans seem to appreciate the efmedical professionals. The hospital's misThe hospital has many resources availCapt. Ed Heard, a pediatrician from Nellis. fort involved. sion is to provide immediate medical care able, including laboratory, X-ray, phar"This has been a challenge from the start "It uplifts us to hear the music and it's for the Cubans and military troops in the macy, operating room, emergency room, -from putting up the hospital ourselves to part of our culture," community 'resident camps. An ATH is usually deployed for obstetrics, pediatrics, dentistry, helicopter supplying our areas, but its worth it to see Marcelo Gomez said. "We hope to soon war, but according to Lt. Col. Norman pad and three ambulances. Army aid stathe relief on our patients' faces." be able to listen to it as free citizens." Military personnel flight Mandatory flu vaccines arrive renovations complete GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL because the combination of aspirin use and the flu inHOWARD AFB (24th Wing PAO) -Eleven months (MEDDAC PAO) -With the arrival of the newly-forcreases the risk for Reye's Syndrome." of section shuffling concluded Monday when the Milimulated Influenza Vaccine supply, active duty military In addition, physicians, nurses and others, including tary Personnel Flight here re-opened with all its renovaare once again required to receive their annual flu shot, family members, who have a lot of contact with hightions completed. while others may do so on a voluntary basis. risk persons in health care settings or at home should Since December 1993, the elements within the flight, "Now is the time for certain segments of the populaalso take the shot. personnel relocation, career enhancements, administration to get influenza shots," said Lt. Col. Catherine Because the flu viruses usually vary each year and tion, personnel systems, personnel contingency operaBonnefil, chief of Army Community Health Nursing, the immunity provided by the flu shot declines over tions, wing manpower, employment, pass and registraPreventive Medicine Services at Gorgas Army Comtime, re-vaccination is needed annually. tion, and customer service, have had to move into vacant munity Hospital. "The vaccine will be available for the While the flu shot is safe and contains only dead virooms inside the building while their offices received a general public in mid-November." ruses that cannot cause influenza, there are sometimes facelift. While flu season usually arrives in late fall or early mild side effects such as soreness around the injection New carpet, light fixtures and furniture are winter in the states, Panama is considered to be a yearsite or low-grade fever. complimented by freshly painted walls and provide a draround threat. "These side effects last for only one to two days and matic change from the old offices, according to Senior The flu vaccine must be given in advance for immuoccur in less than one-third of the vaccine recipients," Master Sgt. Rick Hofsommer, personnel flight superinnity to develop. Bonnefil said. "Also, the side effects are far less severe tendent. "It is generally recommended that individuals who than the flu itself" Prior to the construction, the MPF suffered from poor need flu shots get them in October, November and DeThe only people who should not receive the vaccinalighting; ugly, dirty brown carpeting; and moldy wallpacember," Bonnefil said. tion are those who cannot eat eggs because of an allerper that was falling off the walls in many places, The flu is a viral infection which comes on suddenly, gic reaction such as hives, swelling of the lips or tongue, H ofsommer said. affecting the nose, throat and lungs. It can be confused or sudden respiratory problems. "Now we have a much cleaner and nicer working atwith the common cold, but normally includes a high Most healthy people can fight off the flu with a few mosphere," he said. "This is more cheery and provides fever and muscle aches, whereas a cold is characterized additional days of rest, acetaminophen (Tylenol), and more favorable working conditions." primarily by nasal congestion. plenty of liquids to drink. If you or members of your Patience has paid off for MPF workers since their ofThough the flu is usually a mild disease in healthy family exhibit flu-like symptoms, talk to your physician fices are now more pleasant as well as air-conditioned children, young adults and middle-aged people, it can or health care provider for information on treatment. 24-hours a day. However, MPF customers enjoy these be life-threatening for older adults and others with The flu vaccine will be available on a walk-in basis same rewards as well. chronic illnesses. It is life-threatening because it lowers to everyone except children who must have a doctor's "It creates a favorable impression to walk into a place the body's resistance, making a person more suscepprescription in order to be vaccinated. Come in during that looks clean and nice," lofsommer said. "I've heard tible to secondary infections such as pneumonia. regular Immunization Clinic hours at the Gorgas Immua lot of good things from customers already. They form In the last 20 years, influenza has killed one-half nization Clinic (for adults, 282-5418); Pediatric Clinic an opinion from this (appearance) and from there it just million Americans. It also causes the loss of more than (for children, 282-5171); Fort Clayton's Building 519 goes up. We've got the foundation built, now we try to 15 million workdays annually. Health Clinic, 287-3900; Fort Sherman Health Clinic, improve on it by working in a quality atmosphere." "It is extremely important that the influenza vaccine 289-6655; Howard I Icalth Clinic, 284-6157; or at any Brig. Gen. Richard Brown, 24th Wing commander, be administered to people at high risk for developing of the outlying troop medical clinics, and Capt. Art Rowley, U. S. Naval Station Panama Cacomplications from the flu," Bonnefil said. "Those in Special unit-level immunization programs must be nal commander, officiated a ribbon-cutting ceremony to the high-risk group who should receive the flu vaccinaarranged directly with the unit's servicing immunization re-open the pass and registration and customer service tion include adults over age 65, adults and children with clinic. For instance, most Army units will receive their sections. The two commanders were present to see busichronic heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease, diashots at the Immunization Clinic, Building 519. ness begin in pass and registration where members of betes, or lowered immunity. Also at risk are children For more information, call the Army Community both services may receive service. and adolescents receiving long-term aspirin therapy, Health Nursing at Gorgas, 282-5418/5419. The consolidation of Navy and Air Force offices is part of the Treaty Implementation Plan.

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Trom ictivities Nov. 4, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI (courtesy) White water adventure Rafters plunge down the raging waters of the Chagres River, during a day-long jungle safari that included four-wheel driving, horseback riding and white water rafting through Chagres National Park. For story and photos, see Page B3. The Officers and Civilians Wives' A historical overview examines *Movies, Page B8 Club-Pacific raises funds for comPanama's independence and its +TV, Page B9 mrnuniy organizations in need. estaishment Cs e ntonotpcurri, ~ P 1

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B2 ,Te Community OCWC-Pacific changes from social I club to caring, charitable organization Albrook/Howard tee director. Other organizations, such as the Panama 1Competitive swim team tryouts, 10 a.m. Nov. by Sgt. Eric Hortin Chitiae d eica Mther ition s, srmyComuny aSer 12 at Howard and Albrook Pools for youths 8-18 USARSO Public Affairsi Chstian Medical Mission, Army Communitears old. Call Lisa Nofi, 284-3569, or Rose -SROPbi far f_ ---and even U.S. Army Dental Activity-Panama have had Coville, 236-2035, for more information. FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Gone are the programs partially supported by OCWC funds. +Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700: days when the members of the Officers Wives' Club wore "There are even more organizations requesting money Preteen Dance 7:30-10:30 p.m. today and their husband's rank on their shoulders. When the club which haven't been chosen at this time," Baker said. Nov. 18 at Howard. hierarchy matched that of the chain of command, no mat"We're spread pretty thin with contributions being disBaseball, softball and T-ball open registrater who was best qualified for the different positions. tributed throughout the whole community." tion for the 1994-1995 baseball season until DeThese days, the Officers and Civilians Wives' ClubWith so many organizations applying for donations, cember 3. Pacific looks less like a social club than it does a charitathe biggest problem the OCWC has now is that they run Spanish lessons for children and adults 4 and 5 ble organization. out of funds before they run out of organizations. p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Part of what the OCWC does is help support the mili"Each year, we have two different times when we acCheerleading lessons, Fridays at Albrook, Sattary community and humanitarian organizations through cept welfare requests," said Deana Sawdey, OCWC-Paurdays at Howard. donations supported by the club's various fund raising accific president. "A committee evaluates each of them for Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday evetivities. need and validity. nings. The OCWC makes a lot of its money from activities "Last year we had a lot of requests from DoD (DepartArt classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for memsuch as the Spring Bazaar and the recent Christmas Pumpment of Defense) schools. Many people say that it's not bers and $35 for non-members. kin Patch Bazaar, which netted the OCWC nearly $8,500. fair and that the schools get funding. But we try to help Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturdays. Auctions and bingo nights also make up a large portion of provide things not normally provided by the school sysSpanish lessons 4 and 5 p.m. Tuesdays and the donated funds. tem," Sawdey said. Thursdays. Part of the money distributed, roughly $9,000 worth, Providing those opportunities to people and organizaArts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesday. is earmarked for scholarships. Both students and adults tions would be more difficult if not for the hard work of Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four continuing their education have been recipients of OCWC the OCWC members, Sawdey said. ,, Balwet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available scholarships. "We have a really good group of spouses here," for ages four to adult. Organizations as well-known as the Boy Scouts, Girl Sawdey said. "They work a lot of hours, taking time out *Just for teens: Scouts and the Salvation Army benefit from the OCWC from their families to help with these activities, putting Basket-Bowl noon today starts at the Howard contributions, said Terry Baker, OCWC welfare commitmoney back into the community." Bowling Center for 50 cent games, and then at 1 p.m. proceeds to the Howard Sports and Fitness Com m hiy ac iviiesCenter for basketball. Top Twenty Teen Dance 8-11 p.m. Nov. 19. The Howard Family Support Center is sponParty with your friends at the Howard Enlisted Clayton soring a "Hearts Apart" support program for Members Club Ballroom. Register in advance for The next pre-marital seminar will be held the first spouses of members who are currently servtransportation from the Albrook center. four Wednesdays in December at the U.S. Army South mg-or projected to serve-an unaccompanied Teen Turkey Splash Pool Party 6-9 p.m. Nov. Chaplain Family Life Center, Building 156, Fort Clayton assignment or extended temporary duty assign25. Teens can have their own private pool party Swanin fe C riding r, or o ment. The group will meet at 6:30 p.m. Thursday with friends at the Albrook pool. Register in adin the FSC conference room. Anyone wanting to vance for transportation from the Howard center. post, must attend the seminar. The seminar is conducted ak e fren rom the pt ofored in English. It is non-denominational and can be used for make new friends or gain from the support offered marnage in the Protestant and Catholic Churches in Panathrough the group may call for a reservation, 284Clayton ma and in the states. A one-hour interview with the Fam5010. ily Life chaplain is required prior to admission to the semThe Family Advocacy Outreach Program and *Youth Center 287-645 1: mnar. For information, call Chaplain Len Kircher at 287Howard AFB Child Development Center is sponJunior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. Tues5255. soring a "Stress-free Holiday Shopping" event. days and Thursdays Building 155. 5255 r g Free child care will be available at Howard CDC Video day Wednesdays. A support group for all those living in an addictive 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Nov. 15. Parents should Arts and crafts Mondays. third Thursdays of every month in the USARSO Chapregister with the center three days prior to use the Cooking experiences Tuesdays. lain Family Life Center, Building 156, Fort Clayton. For service. This is open to Air Force personnel only. Outdoor games Thursdays. information, call Chaplain Len Kircher at 287-5255/3497. Call 284-3711/6135 to register. Cooking classes Thursdays. Various worship services are held at the Christian The Howard Child Development Centeris lookYouth Services is looking for piano and gymServicemen's Center in Balboa. An English Bible study ing for potential Family Day Care Providers for nastics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at is held 7-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays. ASpanish service isheld the Albrook Area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/ 287-3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton. 7-9 p.m. Fridays and Fellowship services are heldlO:30 6135 for more information. *Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: a.m. Sunday. The Family Support Relocation Assistance Gift wrapping workshop 9 a.m.-noon SaturThe 154th Signal Battalion is sponsoring a garage Center to help with the loan closet, base brochure day at the Valent Recreation Center. sale 7 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Nov. 12 at the large bohio at Fort library and the coupon cabinet. Family services is Movie marathon in dolby surround sound 1-8 Clayton Park. This sale is to raise money, gifts and supopen from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, and p.m. Sunday. plies for the Penonome School in Panama. For informaflexible hours are available. Limited child care is Popcorn and movies, Sundays. tion, call 287-3864. free for volunteers. Anyone who is interested, call Senior Teen Employment Program, yearSuper Suds Laundromats announces its new Dropround program to develop job skills and earn monoff Service. Clothes dropped between 7 and 11 a.m. will ey for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are availoff ervce.Clohesdropedbetwen an 11a~m wil -able at the center. be ready the same day. Drop-off after 11 a.m. will be Atlantic +b ld ee pmes 7 read fo pik u th net da. Py wll e b pond.*Child Development Services 287-3301: ready for pick up the next day. Pay will be by pound. A Welcome to Panama orientation will be Spaces are available in the CDS part-day held 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Thursday at the Fort Davis program, Building 156, Fort Clayton, in the afterCommunity Club. noon session from 1-3 p.m. Preschoolers must be 3 Howard/Albrook The orientation will include an information years old and toddlers must be 2 years. For inforThe Family Support Center offers an orientation fair, free lunch and child care and a tour of the mation, call 287-5507/5104 or stop by the center course twice a month for spouses attending the Right Atlantic community. For reservations, call Alina for a tour of the facilities. Office hours are from Start program. The next course (in English) will be 10Shoy at 289-4955. 7:15 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Children may be registered in 11 a rm. Thursday at the FSC, Building 707. The inform1The Army Community Service Relocation Building 155, 7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. weekdays. tion given at the orientation will help make a stay in PanAssistance Office helps in the search for housing, ama more enjoyable. For more information, call 284employment and educational possibilities for serAtlantic ejybe Fvicemembers and their family members. Call 289The Family Support Center will offer a job search 4021/4636 for more information. *Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: The amiy Sppor Ceterwil offr ajobseach 421/636formoremfomaton.Shotokan Karate 4-5 p.m. Mondays and workshop at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the FSC conference .edesa $2 t per p room, Building 707. The workshop will teach people how M miscellaneous Wednesdays, $20 per person. M isc llan ousArts and crafts 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesdays. to effectively search for a federal job. For reservations or more information, call 284-5650. The Enlisted Spouses Club-Panama takes Saturday sports noon to 6 p.m. The Howard Family Support Center has a Smooth pride in serving the community. The club will Piano classes 4-6 p.m. for 30-minute lessons Move relocation seminar planned to assist members meet 7 p.m. Monday at the Fort Clayton NCO Mondays and Wednesdays. Theisafeeof$20 who will be making a major move within the next three Club. For information, call Barb Johnson at 284per person per month. months. It will be held 1-2:30 p.m. Thursday at the FSC 4523 or Amy Gross at 287-3071. Girl Scouts of USA-Panama are seeking Atlanconference room. Attendees will meet face-to-face with The Isthmian College Club will meet 4:30-6 tic side member participation. To sign up or for representatives from the finance, legal, transportation and p.m. Wednesday at Club Amador. The program more information, call the Girl Scout Service Cenhousing offices, as well as others. These experts will be will be on Tagua Carvings as an art form. The ter at 285-6867. The center is open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. available to provide information and address people's relecture will be presented by Ellie Gale. For inforTuesdays and hursdays, noon-6 p.m. Wednesdays location concerns. For more information, or to make a mation, call Anona Kirkland at 264-1585 or reservation, call 284-5010. Carolyn Harvey at 286-3532. the month.

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Tropic limes 1 ) NoTravel 34,1994 (courtesy, White water engulfs a group of rafters as they float through the Chagres River gorge during the final stage of a day-long, remote jungle trek. Chagres jungle safari or most of us, the "concrete jungle" of Panama was a large raft, oars, life jackets and helmets. Romero unbearable to the explorers. When the raft entered the City is an adventure in i.tself-dodging speeding informed the group that the Piedras is a gentle-flowing long, deep gorge, Romero suddenly plunged backwards taxis and negotiating the numerous potholes. tributary of the Chagres River. He pointed out that it is a into the cool water. The delighted paddlers immediately However, some people are constantly seeking new good place to learn proper paddling techniques, before followed. After clinging to the side of the raft while challenges. reaching the more challenging Chagres. After a briefing floating in the water for some distance, Romero told the For these individuals, an exhilarating day-long jungle on water safety and instructions on navigation, the rafters crew to get back in and prepare for the most difficult safari through some of Panama's most remote and pristine pushed off on the next leg of their journey. aspect of the trip. wilderness may be just the cure for the metropolitan blues. The Piedras is a relatively shallow stream that is "The next two falls are the most dangerous white River rafting has become a popular sport in Panama forgiving of novice paddlers' mistakes. However, as water," Romero said. since people have "discovered" the Chiriqui and Chagres Romero barked out commands, he quickly pointed out The first was a steep drop.The second was even more rivers. Fort Clayton's Outdoor Adventures sponsors river that this would not be the case on the Chagres, where poor tricky, consisting of a chute rushing between a rock wall rafting on the Chiriqui, and just recently, Aventuras decisions and slow reactions can lead to tragic conseand large boulder. Each time a person was hurled from the Panama has opened up the Chagres to exploration. quences. Capsizing the raft in raging waters had to be raft by the pounding water, before quickly being pulled River trips and jungle safaries can be arranged through avoided at all costs, so the rafters needed to learn to work back to the safety of the raft. your favorite military travel office, various local travel as a team before they reach the mighty river. The worst of the rapids were behind them so the group agencies, or Aventuras Panama at 260-0044. As the rafters floated through a series of pools and relaxed until rounding a bend in the river, where a dugout Since the age of 16, outdoor guide Javier Romero, of rapids, Romero listed an assortment of wildlife commonly canoe with motor was waiting. The raft would be towed Aventuras Panama, S.A., has dedicated his life to spotted along the stream's edge. He said he often observes the remaining distance to a take-out site at Madden Lake. exploring the gin-clear rivers and virgin, tropical monkeys, otters, iguanas, hawks, and various kinds of However, there was a final stop on the excursion. The rainforest of Chagres National Park. exotic birds and fish while rafting. Occasionally, he has raft was pulled to an Indian village located along the edge Relying upon his vast knowledge of the area, Romero captured a glimpse of an unsuspecting jaguar or tapir. of the river. When the natives spied the approaching raft has organized a unique jungle encounter that transports After several hours, the rafters reached the confluence they congregated along the trail leading up from the water people by four-wheel drive, horseback and rubber raft of the Piedras and Chagres rivers. to greet each rafter with a smile and a handshake. The deep into an area completely void of civilization. A heavy downpour the night before left the normally women's faces and arms were stained with a brightly The jungle trip began at 5:30 a.m. when Romero clear Chagres River clouded with sediment and swelling colored dye, produced from a local root and applied like picked up his clients from a downtown hotel. From there, at its banks. The river was much wider, deeper and make-up. The men brought out wood carvings and other the group climbed high into the rugged Cerro Azul stronger than its feeder stream. In addition, the dangers crafts that they hoped might interest the tired rafters. mountain range along a primative dirt road in a fourand obstacles increased at this point, as well. However, nightfall was approaching fast so the rafters bid wheel drive vehicle. Upon reaching the summit of Cerro "As we float farther downstream, the grade of the river farewell after a short visit. Jeffe at an elevation of 1,007 meters, the sightseers will get steeper and that means big rapids," Romero said. For the rafters, the experience had been challenging, enjoyed a view of Madden Lake far below. After two The edges of the stream gradually changed from sand but rewarding. It was not the kind of trip where they could hours, they arrived in the tiny village of Alto Pacora for a and gravel to basalt boulders and jagged cliffs. The river sit back and relax. It was hard work paddling, but the final stop before descending toward the Chagres River funneled into a canyon, highlighted by waterfalls of runscenery and abundance of wildlife was spectacular. The basin. off from tiny springs. Few of the rafters spoke a word. opportunity to explore some of the most remote wilderWithin another half hour, the party reached a small Instead, they chose to absorb the incredible surroundings. ness Panama has to offer is a truly unforgettable adventure family farm called San Cristobal. The landowner tends Eventually, the sun's sweltering heat had become that only a handful of people can claim to have done. cattle and raises crops of rice. Romero has worked out an by Spc. Tom Findtner, Tropic Times staff agreement with the famer by giving him horses in exchange for property access and the right to use them on his outfitting trips. The farmer mentioned that a jaguar raided his farm the night before and killed a horse and two chickens. A nervous excitement began to build inside the visitors as they pondered the possible dangers that lurked in the dense undergrowth of the jungle during their journey. After a light breakfast, the explorers saddled up on small, white horses distinctively marked with a smattering of black speckles and embarked on a two-hour horseback ride through the scenic jungle. Romero's love and knowledge of the area was obvious as he led the caravan along a steep, muddy trail. He stressed the importance of maintaining silence and being on the lookout for the exotic flora and fauna known to inhabit the region. The horses crossed several small, crystal clear creeks that are cooled by the shade of the rainforest. Periodically, he pointed out unique flowers, insects and wildlife that are of interest to the group. Eventually, the travelers made their way to a farm located in a meadow along the edge of the Piedras River. (courtesy) Waiting for the saddle-sore riders on the stream's bank A caravan of horseback riders creep along the narrow jungle trail enroute to the Chagres River.

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B4Toi Times Focus on Panama Panama, part 2: Independence A history of a nation that helped shape the world (Editor's note: Panama celebrates its independence from Colombia Thursday. This is the second part of afive-part series on the history of Panama: Part I: The Early Days; Part 2: Independence; Part 3: Canal Building; Part 4: The Canal Zone; and Part 5: A New Future. The history was adapted fiom an unpublished manuscript by Dr. Miguel A. Bernal and Thomas J. Hofrr, Florida State University and K David MccCullough 's Path Between the Seas.) n 1901, the United States signed the HayPauncefote Treaty with Great Britain, effectively nullifying the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty of 1850 (See last week's story). Its provisions gave the United States a free hand in building a canal anywhere in Central America with guarantees of neutrality. To the British, it was quidpro quo. They needed a free hand with the Suez Canal and the North Americans gave it to them. Despite Britith insistence on leaving a Central American canal demilitarized, the United States refused to give any promises, citing the need to build fortifications. During the Spanish-American War, one of the few points of high drama was reached when the battleship Oregon raced around the tip of South America enroute to reinforce the Pacific Squadron of Admiral George Dewey. In the aftermath, President Roosevelt was convinced that America needed a canal and could no longer afford to wait. The Spooner Act in June 1902 and the Hay-Herran Treaty in January 1903 both authorized the ambitious venture. (Courtesy) The Spooner Act authorized the President of the The founding fathers of Panama. Seated (left to right): Jose Agustin Arango, Dr. Manuel Amador United States to specifically negotiate with Colombia Guerrero, Federico Boyd. Standing (left to right): Nicanor de Obarrio, Carlos C. Arosemena, over the lease or purchase of land necessary to build Manuel Espinosa, Tomas Arias, Ricardo.Arias. a canal in Panama. Failing negotiations with indicated in his memoirs, "to save the Isthmus from the friend, and for Senora Amador, a woman "of courage Colombia, the President was empowered to enter int ruin to which it was being led." To Arango's group and snap" (as William Howard Taft would later describe route that would extend from Greytown on the came Dr. Manuel Amador Guerrero, Ricardo Tomas her) who was considerably younger than her husband Atlantic side, following Lake Nicaragua to Brito on Arias, Nicanor de Obarrio, Manuel Espinosa and and who declared that it was time to get on with the teacitic Odefan LAke Nisaragma of rion Federico Boyd. All were from prominent Panamanian fight, soldiers or no soldiers. the Pacific Ocean. A sum of up to $40 million was families and remained in contact with U.S. officials. A plan was hurriedly improvised, an extremely neat permitted to secure a concession in either location. Concern over the position of the United States as stratagem that appears also to have been the inspiration A battle over ratification ensued in the U. S. Panama declared its independence was uppermost in the of Senora Amador. Senate where attempts to attach 60 amendments to the treaty were rejected. The Senate then passed the conspirators' minds. Would the United States be Tobar and the Tiradores Battalion landed at the old treaty as originally written. Upon receipt of the persuaded that this was a genuine movement of the Panama Railroad wharf near Colon. They were received treaty, the Colombian government claimed an people or would it provide help to Colombia to force the with customary deference by various local officials dety of 50,000 f from the dfun French recalcitrant province to return? when Col. James Shaler, superintendent of the Panama memnity f rancs e ct Railroad, introduced himself, bid the officers welcome, company. Secure in the knowledge that the French and calmly recommended that tliey depart at once for concession would expire in 1906 and Colombia A move toward independence Panama City on a special train, a single car and a would regain the title to her land, proposals were The answer came when the USS Nashville sailed into locomotive, which had been arranged for their convemade to the United States to agree to modifications the Bay of Panama Nov. 2. niece. of the treaty. Finally, the Colombian Legislature The ship's arrival at Colon was not any particular The troops could not be transported immediately treaty. When they returned on Nov. 2, 1903, the cause for alarm by Colombian or local officials who because of a temporary shortage of equipment, he treaty was referred to the President of Colombia to knew nothing of the schemes afoot. To Amador's fellow explained, but they would follow shortly. Tobar rengtaty w aefe.ed The Pesdnt d, Cama t d conspirators, however, it was the long-awaited decisive hesitated; Shaler was insistent, saying that the time fixed itstindepcndence. moment, the irrefutable sign that the United States stood for departure had already passed and that there was no prepared to guarantee their success. reason in the world why the officers should have to Then, on the night of Nov. 2, the Colombian warship stand about in the killing heat a moment longer. Seeds of discontent Cartagena steamed into the Bay of Panama, her lights A young officer was picked to remain in command of The United States played a pivotal role in this aglow. At daybreak, Nov. 3, Commander Hubbard of the battalion, a Col. Elisco Torres. But just as Tobar and drama, but in answer to the question, "Is the United the Nashville took a launch to the Colombian ship, went his aides-l 5 men in all-were being comfortably States responsible for the independence and creation aboard, and was informed by Gen. Juan Tobar that it settled in their special car, Tobar's second-in-command, of the Panamanian state?" the unequivocal answer was carrying nearly 500 troops and that he, Tobar, Gen. Ramon Amaya, grew suddenly uneasy about the must be no. Although United States participation and intended to put them ashore at once. arrangement, saying he must get off at once. Tobar the actions of French engineer Phillipe Bunau-Varilla Hubbard made no protest, despite what he knew. He objected, claiming it would be unseemly if the two of would help with the Panama revolt of 1903, the had no orders to prevent such a landing and as yet there them were not to arrive in Panama City together. The seeds of discontent were already present in Panama. was not a sign of disturbance of any kind by which he issue was resolved only when Shaler stepped quietly to There are many other associated reasons that might have justified his own intervention. the rear of the car, pulled the signal cord, and hopped off pointed toward an independent and free Panama: the News of the landing was immediately telephoned to the train. He was smiling broadly and waving as the train revolts of 1830, 1831, and 1840; the cultural, Panama City, and to those conspirators who had been steamed away. economic and political incompatibility of Colombia kept in the dark this whole time, it was a crushing Meanwhile, a plan was being formed in the event that and Panama; and the French canal fiasco. revelation. Word of a Colombian warship standing off the soldiers demanded a train at gunpoint. The plan, as On Aug. 12, 1903, the Colombian Senate Colon would in itself have had a devastating effect; but Shaler later explained, was to put all their rifles and formally rejected the Hay-Herran Treaty and refused far worse was the realization that the American ship had ammunition in the rear car. When the train reached Lion to extend the concession to the French Universal made no move to prevent the Colombian troops-and Hill, someone would pull the rear coupling pin and leave Canal Company beyond Oct. 30, 1903. The Colomassuredly a Colombian firing squad-from coming the arms stalled in the jungle. The engineer would then bians believed that in the aftermath of the confiscaashore. All the bravado engendered by the arrival of the run the train full steam to Culebra, where he would tion of French property that they could sell the Nashville the evening before was undone in an instant. abandon his engine and let the stranded, unarmed machinery and rights to the North Americans for $40 The conspirators saw themselves as the victims of a soldiers walk out whichever direction they chose. million dollars. diabolic Yankee betrayal. Even Amador, who was The trap for Tobar and Amaya, on their way to As the treaty was being voted down in Colombia, having his own bleak second thoughts, might have Panama City, was being set in the meantime. As soon as a Panamanian revolutionary junta was forming, called the whole thing off right then, early on the Herbert Prescott, assistant superintendent of the Panama headed by Jose Augustin Arango, a lawyer and morning of the 3rd, had it not been for the stately Railroad, received Shaler's message that the generals adviser for the Panama Railroad. His purpose, as Arango, who declared himself ready to stand by his old were on their way, he went to Amador's house and told

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Tropic Times # Focus on Panama Tv s9B5 Panama, part 2: Independence A history of a nation that helped shape the world him it would have to be "now or never." Some very fast thinking was called for, as they had about two hours to get things ready. Amador was also convinced, from 7 what he had learned during his trip to New York, that excessive bloodshed would seriously jeopardize American sympathy for their cause. The revolution, it was decided, would take place that afternoon. Amador at once ordered his carriage and drove to the Cuartel de Chiriqui, the barracks of the 4 Colombian garrison, a large pale building by the seawall, facing onto the Plaza Chiriqui. In command of the garrison was Gen. Esteban Huertas, small, smoothfaced, impeccable, young man, and very ambitious, as Amador well knew. According to the recollection of one of Huertas' own men, who was standing nearby when Huertas received the white-haired doctor, Amador said that he himself was old and tired but that Panama and the general had a great future ahead. "If you will aid us, we shall reach immortality in the history of the new republic." An American ship had arrived, more were coming, Amador added. "You and your battalion can accomplish nothing against the superior force of the cruisers, which have their orders. Choose here, glory and riches; in Bogota, misery and ingratitude." Huertas is said to have remained "impassive" for a moment, then put out his hand. "I accept." But since this appears to have been the only time the two met more or less privately that morning, an agreement must also have been reached regarding the sums Huertas and his men were to receive for their part, Gen. Esteban Huertas (center) sold out the Colombian military and joined Panama. unless, of course, the bargain had already been worked out in secret in the days preceding, which is perfectly bayonets, the generals were still sitting in the same German steamer then in port and on another ship possible. place. belonging to the railroad. He gathered the men inside the In any event, payment to the soldiers was to be $50 The soldiers wheeled to the right of the seawall gate, railroad's stone warehouse and landed a detachment of per man, while Huertas was to be compensated for his as if to pass in front of the generals, but then suddenly forty sailors with an extra supply of arms. Cleared for revolutionary fervor with $65,000, an absolute fortune in opened into two files, one going in front of the seated action, the Nashville weighed anchor and moved in Panama in the year 1903. men, the other behind. At a command the soldiers closer to shore, her guns trained on the railroad wharf stopped and swung about with bayonets lowered at the and on the Cartagena, which to the surprise of everyone No warning astonished generals. got up steam and departed at full speed. At 10:30 a.m., in full uniform, Huertas marched at "Generals, you are my prisoners," said the officer in The Colombians had the railroad building surrounded the head of his regiment down the Avenida Central to command, a young captain named Salazar. almost immediately, their purpose being, in Hubbard's receive the generals at the railroad station. "By whose orders?" Tobar asked. view at least, to provoke an attack. It was a situation ripe At 11:30 a.m. the train pulled in and Tobar, Amaya, "General Huertas." for catastrophe. Yet for all the tension on both sides, no and their aides stepped down to an amazing welcome. Tobar lunged at the nearest soldier in an effort to shots were fired and a little after 3 p.m. Torres walked Governor Obaldia was there, accompanied by all his escape, but was instantly hemmed in by bayonets. He up to the barricaded building and told Hubbard that in official family; Gen. Francisco Castro, military comappealed to Salazar, begging him not to be a traitor. He fact he was "well disposed toward the Americans" and mander of Panama, with his aides; U.S. Vice-Consul called on sentinels along the wall, the other soldiers, to wished only to make contact with Gen. Tobar to find out Ehrman, who was also head of the important Ehrman come to the defense of their country, all tono avail. But what he was supposed to do. He proposed that he bank in Panama City; and Huertas with his troops, neither he nor any of his companions had attempted to withdraw his own troops to Monkey Hill, that Hubbard drawn up on the dusty little plaza across from the station. draw a sword or reach for a side arm. and his force return to the Nashville, and that he be There was much saluting, much cheering, Obaldia was Disarmed, they were marched out the seawall gate, permitted to dispatch an emissary to Tobar to explain the full of words of welcome, and a line of sleek carriages through a crowd of several thousand people, and on to gravity of the situation and to bring back Tobar's stood waiting. Cathedral Plaza, across the plaza and up Avenida answer. An elaborate luncheon followed at the Government Central to the jail, the crowd shouting "Viva Huertas! ..At Panama City it was decided that a personal appeal House. But as the afternoon wore on, with still no sign Viva Amador! .Viva el lstmo Libre!" by Amador (El Presidente, as the crowds were now of his troops, Gen. Tobar grew increasingly suspicious Those in the crowd who were armed began firing calling him) might do the trick. The day at Panama City and finally demanded to be taken to military headquarshots in the air. Minutes after the generals were locked had been a very different one from that at Colon. The ters at the Cuartel, where he promptly assumed comup, at 5:49 p.m. by the wall clock in the railroad office, junta was riding high; the whole city was celebrating; mand. An officer confided to him that rumors of an Herbert Prescott was on the phone to tell Shaler and the new flag had been raised at the Government House uprising were sweeping the city. Meanwhile, a cryptic Melendez. It was "the hour of freedom." and at Cathedral Plaza. message from a prominent local citizen wamed Tobar to At dusk, as the municipal council met to give the In Panama City the next morning, Senor Don trust no one. junta its formal recognition, the Colombian gunboat Eduardo Ycaza, who had been appointed paymaster by Sometime near 2 p.m. the anxious general sent Bogota opened fire, throwing five or six shells into the the junta, began writing checks drawn on the Brandon several of his aides to Obaldia to inform him of these city, killing one man-a Chinese shopkeeper who had bank-$30,000 to Huertas, who was to get another rumors and to request that Obaldia order the immediate been asleep in bed-and a donkey. These were the day's $50,000 later on (why he wound up with $80,000 all dispatch of the troops from Colon. The aides returned only casualties. When a shore battery responded, the told, rather than the $65,000 originally promised, has saying the governor had assured them that everything ship withdrew behind an island in the bay and was heard never been explained); $35,000 for General Varon of the would be taken care of. from no more. Padilla, $10,000 each for Captain Salazar, who had Apparently satisfied by this, Tobar and a number of So by nightfall there remained only the problem of handled the actual arrest of the generals, and several his officers crossed to the barracks, where, joined by the troops at Colon, other of Huertas' officers whose loyalty was deemed Huertas and Huertas' own retinue of officers, they important. inspected the local troops. The seawall was next, Tobar Establishing a new nation Tobar and his generals, who had been returned to showing Huertas where he wanted the best marksmen It was very early on the morning of Nov. 4 that police headquarters, were again released and transported placed to command the streets running from the harbor Commander Hubbard of the Nashville issued the order by train to Colon to await passage on the next ship to to Cathedral Pluz. addressed to Superintendent Shaler forbidding the Cartagena. At about 5 p.m. as Tobar, his officers, and Huertas sat movement of "troops of either party [Colombian or Cables to Secretary of State Hay were composed and conferring on a bench outside the barracks near the gate insurgent] or in either direction by your railroad." sent in the meantime, one from Arango, Arias, and to the seawall, Tobar was informed that a crowd had So when the young Colombian colonel, Elisco Boyd, the other from Vice Consul Ehrman. The begun gathering at the front of the building. Gen. Amaya Torres, who had been left in charge, appeared again at authority of the new republic, the cables said, had been went out and returned to confirm the report. Huertas Shaler's office that same morning to resume his effort to established and enthusiastically received throughout the asked if it was not time to order out the first patrol. get transportation for his men, Shaler had only to tell entire Isthmus and Philippe Bunau-Varilla had been Tobar assented and Huertas, excusing himself to change him that his hands were tied. A standoff followed appointed "confidential agent" in Washington. out of his dress coat, went inside, followed by Gen. between the Colombians and Americans. The reply came the next afternoon. It was dated Nov. Castro. Two extremely critical hours followed. Hubbard had 6, 1903 at 12:51 p.m. The United States government had When a company of soldiers marched out with fixed all American women and children put on board a formally recognized the new Republic of Panama.

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Tropic Times Nov. 4, 1994 0 /// ,// / // / 4 // / R odman Hotel, tours and most meals. Nov. 16, $6/person, $15/family. Chiriquihighlands Thursday-Nov. 13. Rainforest adventure Nov. 12 and Vegetable and fruit market shopMuseums and art galleries 9 a.m.*Information, Tour and Travel: 26, $65, 6 a.ih. departure. Explore Barro ping 8 a.m-l p.m. Nov. 19, $5. 1:30 p.m. Nov. 12. Free Zone shopping trip 7 a.m. Colorado Island. Horse racing at the Hippodrome Free Zone 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 16. Wednesday, $12. Trolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. Nov. noon-4:30 p.m. Nov. 20, $5. *Outdoor Recreation Center: Downtown shopping 9 a.m. Thurs12 and 26, $48/person. Fish for marlin, Thanksgiving in Chiriqui Nov. 23Whitewater rafting in Chiriqui Nov. day, Nov. 16 and 18 $8. Shop Panama's sailfish, dolphin (fish), bonita, Spanish 27, $371 single, $245 double, $139 third 11-13, $130/person covers transportation, Central Avenue and Via Espana. mackeral and more. Fee includes capperson. rusticlodging,meals,equipment andguide. Moonlight cruise 6:30 p.m. Nov. 12, tain, gear, lures and iced coolers. Christmas shopping on Central Partial transits of the Panama Canal $21. Cruise out to Taboga Island for cockEl Valle 7 a.m. Nov. 13 and 27, $12. Avenue 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 28, $4. are available 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays. tails and hors d'oeuvres by moonlight, Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits *Outdoor adventures: A minimum of 20 people are needed for while viewing Panama City's dramatic and vegetables and visit nature preserve. Gold Panning in Bique 8 a.m.3 p.m. transits for other days. The adult fee is $35, skyline at night. Bird watching and nature trip Nov. Wednesday and Nov. 22, $12. children under 12 years of age pay $20. Bottom-fishing on the Vargas Nov. 17, $42/person, includes transportation, Peacock bass fishing in Lake Gatun Food and beverages will be sold on board. 13 and 27 $35 adults, $20 children under meal, guide and binoculars. Bring a swim5 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov. 12, 15, 20 and 26, $25. Small coolers may be brought on board. 14. Fee includes captain, gear, live bait suit and take a dip in the waterfall. Bring fishing gear and bags. The Contadora Island transit service and iced coolers. Contadora Nov. 25-27, $179/person El Valle horseback riding 7-4 p.m. is now only offered on Sundays. Fees are Two-day deep seas fishing trip Satdouble occupancy, $219/person single Sunday and Nov. 25, $24. $35 adults and $20 children 12 and under urday and Sunday. Fish the fertile waters occupancy, $135/kids 2-11, includes Bocas Del Toro weekend trip Nov. roundtrip, $25 adultsand$5 childrenone of Isla del Rey, San Jose and Galera transportation, nights lodging, all meals 1 l-13,$280divers, $260 snorkelers, $142 way. aboard the 42' Vargas, $220 fee includes and drinks, and use of all resort facilities. children under 12 based on double occuSun Splash tour to Jamaica travel captain, gear and bait. .A brook/Howard pancy. Fee covers transportation to airopportunity to Montego Bay Sundays San Blas Islands scuba safari Nov. A port, airfare, lodging, meals, five dives, through Wednesdays. Packet includes air20, $140/person includes roundtrip *Zodiac Community Activities Cenentertainment, airtanks and weights. Perthr eesghs accmdairground transportation, guide, lunch, and ter: sonal equipment and gratuities not infare, three nights hotel accommodations, scuba gear. Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fricluded. Sign-up in advance. and transfer. Prices vary from $300-$600 Portobelo Saturday, $70/person indays, $13. Drake Island-Snorkeling and Scudepending on the hotel. cludes transportation, tours by boat, trip Colonial Panama and locks tour 9 ba 7 a.m.5 p.m. Nov. 13 and 27, $22 Balboa to island beaches, lunch and guide. a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Nov. 30, $10/ snorkelers, $47 divers. Chiriqui River rafting Saturday and person, $25/family. Barro Colorado Island tour 6 a.m.*Balboa Dive Club: Sunday, $150 includes roundtrip transEl Valle shopping 6:30 a.m. -4:30 3p.m. Nov. 17, $65. The club is now accepting new memportation, meals, lodging, rafting and rivp.m. Sunday, $13. bers. Divers must show a certification card. er guides. DiningatTambal7-10p.m. WednesAnnual fee is $12. Members receive a Panama City tour 9 a.m. Nov. 19, $8. day, $6 per person, $15/family. *Valent Recreation Center: newsletter, use of the club tanks, library San Andres Island, Colombia Nov. Shopping in Panama City 8:30 a.m.Panama City shopping 9 a.m.1 p.m. and videos for loan, information and class11-14, $286/person includes roundtrip 3:30 p.m. Nov. 12, $6. Saturday. es and dive trips. Call 263-8077 or 260airfare, three nights lodging at the Caribe Pollera dancing and dining 7-l 1p.m. El Valle 6:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 0075 or write Unit 0967, APO AA 34002. Albrook/Howard days, 9-10 a.m. Saturdays, $16 for eight sessions. *Zodiac Community Activities CenSwim classes are cancelled until Deter cember. Tae Kwon Do 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Beginner and advanced dog obedi*Fort Clayton Pool: ence Saturday 9-10:15 a.m. $32 for 4 All swimming classes will be disconweeks. tinued until December because of inBeginner and advanced English and clement weather. Spanish is offered monthly. *Fort Clayton Boat/Scuba Shop: *Howard and Albrook Youth CenOpen water scuba class meets the terms: first and third Monday of each month, Guitar 1-6 p.m. Saturdays at Albrook. $125. The class includes five pool sesSpanish 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thurssions, five theory sessions and four open days at Albrook. water dives and one skin diving. Martial arts at Howard and Albrook Long set equipment rental $19 per 284-4700. day. *Howard and Albrook pools *Valent Recreation Center: Intro to scuba free, call for appointPrivate pianoand guitarlessons availment. able weekday evenings. Open water scuba Monday at AlKorean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays and brook, Nov. 21 at Howard, $145. Thursdays. Advanced scuba Nov. 16 at Albrook, Curundu $105. Rescue scuba Nov. 29 at Howard, *Twin Oceans Pro Shop: $125. The Pro Shop will soon be moved Water aerobics for advanced adult next to the boat and scuba rental shop on swimmers at Howard and Albrook. Fort Clayton. There will be a grand openswAmbroo ator Skillenter ing sale. *Albrook Auto Skills Center: *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: Air conditioning service and repair Reservations for Christmas Village 12:30-5 p.m. daily except Tuesday and tables is under way 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at the Wednesday. Centre. Wheel alignment diagnostic and serVolunteers and performers are needvice classes are held 3-9 p.m. Mondays, ed for the upcoming Christmas Village. Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. People interested in serving as master of Saturday and Sundaysceremonies, or groups, live music shows Brake Pad class 1-3 p.m. Saturday and dancers can call 286-3814 to register. and Sunday, $5-. The following classes are ongoing: John Hall (U.S. Navy) Pnuematic air machine workshop, Saxaphone 5-8 p.m. Mondays and No m ore Nunsense ,, 1-4 p.m. Nov. 12 and 13, $5. Thursdays. Oil change special for women 1-4 Piano 3-7 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, The Little Sisters of Hoboken cast members perform the opening p.m. Nov. 19 and 20, $5. Bring supplies. Wednesdays and Fridays. Open to stunumber in Nunsense AI. The final performances of the musical Battery maintenance workshop 1-4 dents ages 6 and older. comedy will be tonight and Saturday at the Ancon Theatre Guild. p.m. Nov. 26 and 27. Martial arts 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays Curtain time is 8 p.m. Tickets cost $8. Call 252-6786 for reservaAmador and Thursdays. Open to all ages. tions. Monthly classes are available in *Amador Pool: dance, music and martial arts. Call the Water aerobics 5-6 p.m. Wednescentre for more information.

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Tropic Times ices Nov. 4, 1994 *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts percent off. Nov. 17, $5. Learn many applicaCenter: Greenware 25 percent off, Nov. tions for rubber stamps. The Ceramic Center, Building 12. Colorpoint class 2-4 p.m. Nov. 198, is located near the Crafts Shop. Paint Sale Nov. 18-19, 25 per18, $5. Bring a T-shirt and learn *Canal Crafters: cent off selected paints. how to do colorpoint painting. Canal Crafters is a volunteer Artist's Sale Nov. 25-26, 25 Beginning ceramic painting 1organization providing scholarpercent off art books, easels and 4 p.m. Nov. 22, $15. Learn to use ships for the community. Handother art supplies. overcoats, stains and glazes in this made arts and crafts are availAll classes must be pre-registhree week course. able, consignments and volunteers tered and paid for prior to atBeginning crosstitch 2-4 p.m. Phone guide are welcome. The shop hours are 10 tending. Classes will be cancelled Nov. 23. Learn the basics to enjoy a.m.-2p.m. Monday through Satur24 hours prior if minimum particithis popular pasttime. Pacific day. The shop is now accepting pation is not met. Framing class 10:30 a.m.-2 24th Services Squadron Sports holiday consignments, Building Clay flower class 11 a.m.2 p.m. Nov. 26, $20 plus supplies. and Recreational Rental Center 284-6107 804, Albrook. p.m. Saturdays, $5 plus supplies. Clay flower classes 11 a.m.2 Albrook Auto Craft Shop 286-3613 The stencil demoscheduled for For all levels. p.m. Saturdays, $5 plus supplies. Albrook Club 286-4128 Oct.27 has been changed to 10:15 Oil painting class 9 a.m.-noon. For all levels. Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333 a.m. today. Free class, bring stenWednesday, $30 plus supplies. SecOngoing classes: stained glass, Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989 cil and paint. ond of four classes. framing, air brush, lamp assembly, Amador Pool 282-4247 Register forthe following classBeginning pottery 10:30-12:30 pottery wheel throwing, cross stitch, Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-0075 es at the shop: p.m., Tuesday, $15 plus supplies. macrame, clay flower, ceramic and Canal Crafters 286-4500 Bow making 10:15 a.m. SaturSecond week of three week class. "how to videos." Clayton Arts and Crafts Center 287-5957 day, $3, all supplies included. Photo album class 10:30-1:30 Anyone interested in forming a Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 Beginner quilting 10:15 am., p.m. Tuesday, $5 plus supplies. craft club to meet and share ideas, Clayton Ceramic Center 287-4360 starts Tuesday, runs four weeks, Drybrushing class 1-4 p.m. Tuespatterns, socializing and more call Clayton NCO Club 287-3586 $32, complete kit. day and Nov. 29, $5. Prep work 284-6361 or leave your name and Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center 287-3363 Tole-painting, Santa quartet necessary before class. number at the Center. Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355 10:15 a.m. Wednesday and ThursBrushstroke class 1-3 p.m. The center is looking for Club Amador 282-3534 day, two-day class. Wednesday, $5. Learn techniques crafters to sell items in the new Cocoli Recreation Center 287-3010 Cross-stitch demo, angel 10:15 used for ceramics or tole painting. consignment boutique. Corozal Thrift Shop 285-5989 a.m. Nov. 11, free, bring supplies. Paper caper basket class 10:30 Instructors are needed to teach Howard Auto Craft Shop 284-3370 *Howard Skills Development a.m.-1:30 p.m. Nov. 12, $5 plus classes on a contract basis for a Howard Enlisted Members' Club 284-4107 Center: supplies. Make baskets using boxvariety of crafts, decorative paintHoward Officers' Club 284-4680 The Howard Skills Development es and paper ribbon. ing, calligraphy, watercolors and Howard Riding Stables 284-3770 Center now accepts charges on Airbrushing Demonstration 5oil painting. Howard Skills Development Center 284-6361 club cards from the Howard/Al7 p.m. Nov. 16, free. Learn tech*Fort Sherman Multicraft CenHoward Teen Center 284-4700 brook Officers' and Enlisted Clubs. niques that can be applied to ceramtLer Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510 Center will be closed Nov. 11 in ic or T-shirt painting. Woodworking qualification The Loop 287-3035 observance of Veteran's Day and Ceramic pouringclass5-7p.m. classes Saturdays, free. The class Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 Nov. 24 for Thanksgiving. Nov. 17, free. Learn how to pour covers safe and correct use of wood Quarry Heights Officers' Club 282-4380 Multi-colored floss and flower your own ceramic molds. shop equipment. Qualification Rodman Annex 283-5475 thread sale today and Saturday, 25 Stamping Class 6:30-8:30 p.m. cards will be issued. Rodman Club 283-4498 Rodman Marina 283-3147/3150 Rodman Naval Station Information Tour and Travel Office 283-5307/4454 -Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 Valent Recreation Center 287-6500 Zodiac Community Activities Center 284-6161 +Valent Recreation Center: *Cocoli Community Center: cooking utensils at half price. Effective Tuesday the center Children'svideos4p.m.Thurs*Zodiac Community Center: / Atlantic will be open 12:30-9:30 p.m. daidays. Subs on Top offers eat-in, take Aquativity Center 289-4009 ly. Laser disc movies 7 p.m. out, delivery services. Subs on Top Davis Arts and Crafts Center 289-5201 Better Opportunities for Fridays. is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. MondaysDavis Community Club 289-5160 Single Soldiers will meet 2 p.m. *Sports and Recreation Rental Fridays, 11 a.m.3 p.m. Saturdays. It Ocean Breeze Recreation Center 289-6402 Nov. 17. Center is located in the Zodiac Community Outdoor Recreation 289-4077 The screening room offers free Veteran's Day weekend speActivities Center, Howard AFB. Sherman Arts and Crafts Center 289-6313 movies. Call the 24-hour movie cial, Nov. 11-13, rent a three-man Phone orders to 284-5848, fax to Sherman Scuba Shop 289-6104 line, 287-4367 for days and times. tent, sleeping bag and lantern for 284-6109. Sundial Recreation Center 289-3889/3300 Panama arts and crafts dis$6.25 a day, $9 for the weekend. Rent the activities room and the play through Nov. 12. Monday-Nov. 12 special, rent Big Tree Bohio for parties. Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays and servicemembers must sign up maids Show time Atlantic tours Fridays. and babysitters. The class is open to *Pacific Theatre Arts Center: *Sundial Recreation Center: Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. spouses, as well. The family musical Bye, Bye Birdie runs through Isla Grande 8 a.m.-5 p.m. SunWednesdays. The center offers the following ov. 12 at the Pacific Theatre Arts Center. Curtain day. Piano 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesclasses and events coordinated ime is 8 p.m. Tickets are $10, call 286-3152 for Panama City historical tour 8 days. through local agencies: eservations. a.m.-5 p.m. Monday. Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6 Horse grooming, care,equipment +Ocean Breeze Recreation p.m. Thursdays. and riding lessons. tylin Center: *Ocean Breeze Recreation Dog obedience classes run an hour *Zodiac Community Activity Center: Portobello/ Playa Langosta 8 Center: a day, two days week for a month. TheZodiac Community Activity Center will present a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Atlantic community shark fishLine handling for sailboats and hair and clothing show 6-11 p.m. Nov. 12. Door Rio Mar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. ing will be offered Dec. 3, registrayachts allows people to be involved rizes will be awarded. There is a $5 fee. Playa Corona 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov. tion deadline is Nov. 23. Tackle, bait with transfering the boats through local stars 13. and ice is provided, bring food and the canal. drinks. Deep seas fishing charters are *Zodiac Community Activity Center: Rec center news Fort Sherman goes bowling day-longfishingtripsthatdepartfrom Be entertained by talented members of the commu*Sundial Recreation Center: Nov. 22, 29 and Dec. 6, 13. Bowl at Cristobal Yacht Club. Call 289-6402 ity in a talent show at the Howard Base Theater 7 p.m. Horseshoe tournament 2 p.m. reduced prices, shoes are free, roundfor more information. ov. 18. Entrance is free. For more information Saturday. trip transportation is free. Bus leaves Instructors are needed for variontact the Zodiac Recreation Center. Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. the center at 6 p.m. and returns to ous classes. un for all Mondays. Fort Espinar at 10:30 p.m. The center is open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday and The center will offer a CPR and daily. *Atlantic Community: Wednesdays. first aid class for maids and People are needed to line handle The Atlantic Fun Fair will be at Fort Davis Nov. 19. Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Monbabysitters 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 12 at transiting boats from Cristobal to ere will be various activities and games available for days, Wednesdays and Fridays. the center. There is a $15 fee and Balboa. Sign up now. he community.

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B8Tropic Times ~! v e B8 N1 Movies Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7p.: Milk Money 2pm: Blankman 2pm: Milk Money A Go Man in 7pm: Blankman 7pm: A Simple Twist Howard) AFBni 7pm:Go Mni p: lnmn7pi otna or 284-3583 (PG-13) Melanie (PG-13) Damon (PG-13) Melanie Africa (R) Sean (PG-13) Damon of Fate (PG-13) Steve (PG) Whoopi Griffith, Ed Harris Wayans, David Alan Griffith, Ed Harris Connery, Colin Friels Wayans, David Alan Martin, Gabriel Byrne Goldberg, Ray Liotta 9pm: True Lies Grier 7pm: Blankman 9pm: Milk Money Grier 9pm: Corrina, Corrina 9pm: The Mask (R) Arnold 7pm: A Good Man in (PG-13) Damon (PG-13) Melanie 9pm: Milk Money (PG) Whoopi (PG-13) Jim Carrey, Schwarzenegger, Africa (R) Sean Wayans, David Alan Griffith, Ed Harris pm: Ml ne Goldberg, Ray Liotta Richard Jeni Jamie Lee Curtis Connery, Colin Friels Grier Griffith, Ed Harris 9pm: True Lies 9pm: A Good Man in (R) Arnold Africa (R) Sean Schwarzenegger, Connery, Colin Friels Jamie Lee Curtis Fort Clayton 7pm: The Little 2pm: The Little 2pm: Wagons East 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: Natural Born 7pm: Milk Money 7pm: Blankman Rascals (PG) Rascals (PG) Travis (PG-13) John Candy, (PG-13) Killers (R) (PG-13) Melanie (PG-13) Damon 287-3279 Travis Tedford, Tedford, Bug Hall Richard Lewis John Candy, Woody Harrelson, Griffith, Ed Harris Wayans, David Alan Bug Hall 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: Wagons East Richard Lewis Juliette Lewis 9pm: A Good Man in Grier 9pm: Natural Born (PG-13) John Candy, (PG-13) 9pm: Natural Born 9pm: True Lies Africa (R) Sean 9pm: A Good Man in Killers (R) Richard Lewis 9pm: Natural Born Killers (R) (R) Arnold Connery, Colin Friels Africa (R) Sean Woody Harrelson, 9pm: Natural Born Killers (R) Woody Woody Harrelson, Schwarzenegger, Connery, Colin Friels Juliette Lewis Killers (R) Woody Harrelson, Juliette Juliette Lewis Jamie Lee Curtis Harrelson, Juliette Lewis Lewis Fort Davis 7pm: Clear and 7pm: Clear and 2pm: Angels in the 7pm: Clear and Present 7pm: Color of Night 7pm: Clear and 7pm: Wagons East, 289-5173 Present Danger (PGPresent Danger (PGOutfield (PG) Danny Danger (PG-13) (R) Bruce Willis, Jane Present Danger (PG(PG-13) John Candy, 13) Harrison Ford, 13) Harrison Ford, Glover, Tony Danza Harrison Ford, Willem March 13) Harrison Ford, Richard Lewis Willem Dafoe Willem Dafoe 9:30pm: Color of Dafoe Willem Dafoe 9:30pm: Color of 9:30pm: Speed (R) Night (R) Bruce Night (R) Bruce Keanu Reeves, Dennis Willis, Jane March Willis, Jane Much Hopper (Reduced Admission) Fort Sherman 7pm: The Mask 7pm: Color of Night 7pm: Clear and No show No show No show 7pm: Natural Born 289-5173 (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (R) Bruce Willis, Jane Present Danger Killers (R) Woody Richard Jeni March (PG-13) Harrison Harrelson, Julliette Ford, Willem Dafoe Lewis Fort Amador 7pm: The Mask 7pm: Camp Nowhere 7:30pm: Corrina, No show No show 7pm: The Mask 7pm: A Simple Twist 284-3583 (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (PG) John Putch, Corrina (PG) Whoopi (PG-13) Jim Carrey, of Fate (PG-13) Steve Richard Jeni Peter Scolari Goldberg, Ray Liotta Richard Jeni Martin, Gabriel Byrne COMING TO SAVE Milk Money Nov. 11 Blankman Melanie Griffith, Ed Harris Damon Wayans, David Alan Grier YOUR BUTT! Melanie Griffith is a streetwise woman who He's got no super powers, no money and no rescues three young boys. The boys drifted H r Ainto the city from rural locales in hopes of Howard AFB name. He's BLANKMAN, a self-appointed seeing a living, breathing, naked woman. super hero who's so broke he fights crime in se ual themes)e1hhn, 42 rui n. 7pm Camp Nowhere (PG) his long johns. PG-13 (off-color humor) 1 PG-13 (sexual themes) I hr, 42 min. John Putch, ,Natural Born Killers Peter Scolari Camp Nowhere Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis 9 pm Corrina, Corrina John Putch, Peter Scolari This is the saga of Mickey and Mallory (PG) Whoopi Instead of going off to computer, military, Knox two thrill-killers who truly enjoy diet and theatrical camps, kids scheme to cretheir work. They live in a interesting zone: Goldberg, Ray Liotta adutavoec;isnt n ate their own dream summer camp with no pillowtalk and ultra-violence; insanity and counselors or rules. PG (some mild adolescomedy; demons and heroes. R (violence, cent language, sensuality) 1 hr, 36 min. shocking images, language, sex) 2 hrs. Fort Clayton 7pm Milk Money (PG-13) Clear & Present Danger A Simple Twist of Fate Melanie Griffith Harrison Ford, Willem Dafoe Steve Martin, Gabriel Byrne Ed Harris In this movie adaptation of the Tom Clancy A mother dies in a snowstorm, leaving her novel, Jack Ryan (Harrison Ford) finds himtoddler to wander into the house of a strang9 pm True Lies (R) self once again drawn into global intrigue. er (Martin) and transform the man's recluArnold This time he's up against a Colombian drug sive and miserely life. PG-13 (a drug relatcartel. Also features Ann Archer and James ed situation) I hr, 42 min. Schwarzenegger Earl Jones. PG-13 (action, violence, lanTom Arnold guage) 2 brs, 22 min. S Color of Night .Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper sCe li, J e MhLAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played by Fort Davis Bruce Willis, Jane March -Keanu Reeves, is known as a man with an Haunted by the bizarre suicide of a patient, Now showing at Howard and attitude. Dennis Hopper, the sociopath who 7pm WagonsEast (PG-13) New York psychologist Dr. Bill Capa (Bruce Clayton theaters. nearly killed him before, is back for an exJim Carrey, Willis) abandons his successful practice and plosive reunion. R (violence, language) 1 Richard Jeni relocates to Los Angeles. H-[is encounters dent African state. He wants out, but a comhr, 51 rin. there prove as shocking as the chilling event plicated political situation inspires him to 9pm Natural Born Killers he has run away from. He immediately finds stay. R (language and sexuality) I hr, 36 True Lies (R) Woody himself entangled in an explosive sexual remin. lationship with a beautiful and enigmatic ArnoldSchwarzenegger, Harrelson, Juliette woman named Rose, and the investigation Jamie Lee Curtis Lewis into the brutal stabbing murder of a friend The Little Rascals Harny Tasker is a special agent for Omega and colleague. R (sexuality, violence, IanTravis Tedford, Bug Hall Sector, a top secret agency charged with -hguage) 2 hrs. Steven Spielberg produces an appealing upnuclear terrorism intervention. Fluent in six Fort Sherm an date of the Hat Roach comedy series from languages and skilled in all forms of counter Corrina, Corrina the '20s, '30s and '40s. The gang has estabintelligence, Harry is an international spy 7pm Speed (R) Whoopi Goldberg, Ray Liotta lished a boy's only club, but things change who has kept his real profession secret from Keanu Reeves, Ray Liotta is a widowed dad with a grieving when Alfalfa falls for Darla. PG (language) his wife. R (action, violence, language) 2 Dennis Hopper daughter who's withdrawn into silence. I hr, 22 min. hr, 42 min. Whoopi's the housekeeper who brings sunshine into their lives and falls in love with The Mask Wagons East Fort Am ador her"eployer. PG (thematic material) 1 hr' Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni John Candy, Richard Lewis Nobody does super powers like Jim Phil Taylor (Richard Lewis) is a frontiers7pm Clear and Present -Carrey. An ordinary, mild-mannered bank man who rallies discontented neighbors to Danger (PG-13) A Good Man in Africa clerk is transformed into the weirdest suleave the West and return East. James Harrison Ford Sean Connery, Colin Friels per hero of all time when he dons his mask. Harlow (John Candy) is the hard-drinking Sean Connery is a reluctant diplomat in this PG-13 (some stylized violence) I lr, 40 wagon master hired to lead the convoy East. Willem Dafoe story ofa man assigned to a newly indepenmin. PG-13 (off-color humor) I hr, 47 min.

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~cI~u~u ~Tropic Times B9i TV Schedule Nov 4,99 B9 -* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:3 0 NBC News atSurise 6:30 Headline News 6:00 Real Videos 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrtse 5.30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Headline News 7:00 Navy/Marine Carps Ness 630 The Hour olPawer 6:00 -tadline Nesws 6:00 H-eadline New 6:00 Headline News 6:00 Headline News 7:00 Good Moring America 7:30 Nts y7:100 Take 2 6:30 NB C News at sunrise 6:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30 NBC News at Sunrise 7:00 Good Morning America 7:00 G/Panamnia Nog 17:251 :00 'tiny 'Fuon Adsensate 7:311 ThIe 700 Club 7:00 Good Morning America 7:00 Good Morning America 7:00 Good Morning America w/Panama Now (7:25 1 9:00 Basic Training Workout 0:30 Channel e/N wsoot 8:01 Te old Htous 9:00 Basic Training Workout w/Panama Now (7:25) w/Pa9a:ma Now (7:25 9:00 Bdya ping 9:30 Sesame Street 9:00 Just [-Kids 8:30 Atn is Cooking fromt 9:30 Sesame Steer 9:00 Bodshapi g 9:00 Basic Taming Workout 9:30 Sesame Street I0:25 Guidingt Light Mptses Babies Qcilt Country 1 0:25 Guidissg Light 9:30 Sesame Stree 9:30 Sesamre Street 10:2 5 Guiding Light 11:10 Gendrg ight tpnagc Mains Nt-a 9:0 CBS Susday Morning t 1:10 Genera Hospital 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 11:10 General Hospital 12:10 Gteane s Nesws Break I M l n 11130 Tsis Week w/Brinktey 12110 Hadn New 1:10 General Htospital 11:10 General Hospital 12:00 Headline News Break 225 Panama Nows BBiker Mtce trsm Mars t 1:30 Face the Nation 12:30 Sports Macin 1200 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline Ncws Break 12:25 Panansa Noa 12:30 Sporsscestser Balaoso Cat12:)0 Inside the NFt LOlt Oprah Wtntrcy 12:25 Panama Nsw 12:25 Paana Now 112:30 Sportscenter 1:00 Anothsr World Larton Cl t2t Ot Stage 200 Assole W12:10 Sporscenter 12:30 Sportscener 0 Donahue 2100 noperi Wired 1 5 Carc pa sIc ss :00 ovie '''ltyanna' 3-00 Pis Right 1:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 1:00 Oprats Winfrey 2:00 Another World 3:00 Pr Rigis 11110 Spie r 30 Mv ie: uss 1tsrs's 4:0t Guts 2s0 Another World 2:00 Aothier World 3:00 Price is Right 4:00 1 r10 Head ins 3:3 Bsball' 4:30 1 Lo, Lucy 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 4:00 Mister Roger's 4:30 iLone Lcy 230 Msic 'DiOd eiser" Ninth Iiing "Ith-sme" 5:00 Ftmly iUd 400 Reading Rainbow 4:00 Shining Time Station Neigthbohood r00 t:aily Feu 2:15 Special Ken itr's o:00 Hearts Alise 5930 The Coby Show 4:30 1 Love Ltcy 4:30 1 Loe Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lucy 5:30 Cs Ccsob S"ss" 6 30 Dr. Quisn: Medicine 6:00 SCN Evaning Rcport 5 00 Famsoi)y Feud 5:00 Family F0d :t amily Feud 6:00 CN 1vshing p k Wa 6 15 Headline Nets Beck 530 Tse Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 Fhe Cosby Show 6:15 1 eadlin N e reak Cepitals Ia t a bal 7:30 Mi ries: "The Return 6:10 World News osight 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Esening Report 6:90 SCN Evening Report 6:35 World N ew Tonights 4311 Spistal Rat B Losos Dove' 7.00 oped -:15 Headline News Brook 6:15 Hteadline Nes Break 6:15 Headline Nws Break 7:0 O rdNs Tngh : Seal:i (Part 3 Df4 7:25 Panasa Now 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News tonight 6:30 World News Fonigt 7:25 Panma N Eighth timing 9:00 ABC 20/20 7:31 Entertiainment Toiht 7 00 Jeopardy 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 Jeopardy 0 E igh "A Whole Net 10:00 Top Cops 8:00 Mad About You 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panana Now 7:25 Panama Nos 7:30 E Anerica' unies Ba e" 11:00 I IOsMi ice 0:30 Cops 7:30Entertinnent Tonigh 7:30" Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertin ent Tonight People :30 Rescue 911 + 12:00 Movies: Days of Wine 9:00 60 Minutes 8:00 L.A. Law + 0:00 Beverly Ifills 90210 **** 800 ALP 0:30 Evening Shade 7:30 Walke Tesas Ranger and Roses" 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:00 Northern Exposure 9:00 Murder, She Wrote 8:30 Touched by an Angel 9:00 In the Heat ote-Night 0:30 Movie: 'Meriaids" 2:00 "Seven Days in May' 10:05 Cheers 1000 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 Love ad War 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:30 Saturday Night Live 4:00 "The Nanny" 11:30 Tonight Sh C eers05 Cheers 1000 SCN La Edition 0:05Cheers 12:00 WWF Supears o' 12:30 Nightline 10:30 David Letteriman 10:30 David Lettera 10:05 Cheers 10:30 Dvei Le:ean Wrestling 1:00 Moies:"hwaet Liberty" 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Letterman 11:30 sig lton 1:00 Priday Night Videos 3:00 "Last Sunsat" 12:30 Nightline 12:30 Nightline 1 1:30 tonight Show 12:30 Em and Shiwnpy 2:00 Movies: "Ie sileeof 5:00 Ieadline News 1 00 Movies: "hlie Longest 1:00 Movies: "Star Trek: he 12:30 Nightline 1:00 Movies: TLady he Lambs" Yard" Motion Picture" 1:00 Movies: "Mask" 3:00 "Jumpies Jack Flasdhw" 4 eamse 300 "North Dallas Forty" 3:15 "Airplane" 3:10 "The Ele00rie Horseman" 5:00 "Bad Dreais' 4:00 500 Headline News 5:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline Newt Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of ive event ***Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday -Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 op h Wifrey 5:30 Headline News 6:00 Washingion Week in 5:30 Opran Wintrey 5 30 Donahue 5:30 Oprah Winfirey 5:30 Salty Jesse Raphael 6:00 SimulcasttwsL. 0 & 50 6:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 Review 6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6 30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 9:00 Oprah Winfrey 9:00 Young Adult Theater 6:30 Mister Roger's 9:00 Oprah Winfrey 9 00 Donahue 9:00 Oprah Winfrey 9:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 10:00 Today "The Incredible Book Neighborhood 10:00 Today 10:00 Today lB:00 Today 10:00 Today i1 00 Star Trek Escape" 7:00 Quigley's Village 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News Break 1200 Headline News Break :11:00 Star Trek 12:00 Headline News Break "The Three Worlds of 7:25 GoofTroop 12:30 All My Childen 12:25 Panama Now 12 25 Panama Now 12:ft Headline News Break 12:25 Panama Now Gulliver" 7:45 Muppet Babies 1:30 One Life to Live :2:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children '12:25 Panama Now 12 30 All My Chldren I 1:30 Superman 8:10 Disney's The Little 2:30 Young and the Restless 1:30 One Life so Live 1:30 One Life to Live 12:30 All My Children I:30 One Life so Live 12:00 Silver Spoons Mermaid 3:30 Batman 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 1:30 One Life to Live 2:30 Young and the Restless 12:30 Movie "The Story of 8:35 Batman 4:00 Fraggle Rork 3:30 Bobby's World 3:30 Goof Troop 2:31) Young and the Restless 330 Teenage Muant Ninja Robin Hood" 9:00 Bobby's World ** 4:30 The Adventures of Pete 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 3:30 Muppet Babies Turtles *3:30 Sports Special 9:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja & Pete 4:30 Legends of the Hidden 4:30 Gutis. 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Reading Raibow 4:30 Dinaosaurs .Turtles 5:00 In the Mis Temple 5:00 Beaklnan's World 4:30 Get the Picture 4:30 R5:00 Movie: "Blossom" 10:30 Movie: "The First Men 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Disney's Raw Toonage i5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Fact of Life 5:30 Showbie Today' :00 Star Trek: Deep Space in the Moon" 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN EveningNeo Nine 12:00 This Old House 6:15 Headline News Break 600 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 9:00 Me and the Boys 12 30 NFL Pre-Game Show 6:30 NBC Nightly Newt 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 Headline News Break 16:30 CBS Evening Nest (New Fall Series) 1:00 NFL Football: TBA 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 6:30 NBC Nightly News '7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 6:30 NBC Nightly News -:00 Star Trek e Space 9:30 Married With Children 4:00 NFL Football: TBA Nine 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space : Nine .7:00 S e The Nest N 10:00 Monies: "Little Man Tate" 7:00 Wonderful World of 7:55 Panama Now Nine 7:55 Panama Generatin Panama Now "a Disney + 8:00 MacGyver 7:55 Panama Now 0:00 Sinbad Show 7:55 Panama Now :0 Roseanne 1:30 Scie ce & Technology 8:00 NFL Football: TBA 9:00 Monday Night Football: 000 Home Improvement 0:30 Family Masters ':0 Boy Meets World 0:30 The Boys are Back Week 11 00 The Fresh Prince of TBA 8:30 My So Called Life 9:00 Wise Guy 8:30 John Larroquette (New Fall Series) 2:00 McLaughlin Group Bel-Air 12:00 M*A*S*H (New Fall Series) 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:00 CNN Presents 9:00 Primetime Live 2:30 Sports Latenight I11 30 Phenm 12:30 Nightline 9:30 Frasier 10:05 Tour ofDuty 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 3:00 Entertainment this week 12:00 Eye to Eye w/C. Chung 1:00 CNN Presents 10:00 SCN Late Edition 11:00 Headline News 10:05 L.A. Law 10:05 Renegade '4:00 HeadlineNews 1:00 Headline News 2:00 Headline News 1005 Heartbeat ll:30Cheers 11:03 Headline News 11:00 Headline News 4:30 Saturday Night Live 1:30 Meet the Press 2:30 Sports Latenight I11:00 Headline News 12:00 MA*S*H 1:30 Cheers 1:0Cheers I OCer 1:30 Cheers 2:30 Sports Machine 3:00 David Letterman 11:30 Cheers 12:30 Nightline 12:00 M*ASH 12:00 MASH 3:00 Sports Latenight 4:00 Headline News 120 M*A*SH 1:00 NBCNnw 12:30 Nighthine 12:30 Nightline 3:30 Frugal Gourmet 4:30 Wheel of Fortune 12:30 CNN Election Coverge 2:00 Headline Nests 1:00 Eye to Eye w/C. Chung 100 ABC 20/20 33 rglGumt 43 he foae!20 edieNw 2:00 Headline News 4:00 Headline News 5:00 Jeopardy 3:00 Nightline (Election 2:30 Sports Latenght 2:00 Headline News 2:30 Spnrts Ltenight 4:30 Wheel nf Fortune Special) 3:00 David Letterman 2:30 Sports Latenight 3:00 David Leterih 5:00 Jeopardy 4:00 Headline News 4:00 Headline News 3:00 David Letterman 4:30 Military News 4:30 Sportcenter 4:30 Wheel ofFortune 4:00 Headline News 5:00 Tom & Jerry Rids 5:00 Jeopardy 5:00 Jeopardy 4:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:30 Oprah Winfrey 5:00 Jeopardy Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Sports Sports Ken Burn's Baseball NFL Football Seventh inning, The Capital of Baseball, 2:30 p.m. Saturday All Teams TBA Eigth inning, A Whole New Ballgame, 2:30 p.m. Saturday Sertes starts Ninth inning, Home 3:30 p.m. Sunday "Star Trek -The Next Generation," 7 p.m. Thursday Series starts The great adventure resumes as the advanced Enterprise embarks on its continuing mission to boldly go where no one The murder capital of the Northeast shifts from Cabot Cove, has gone before. Stars Patrick Stewart and Jonathan Frakes. Maine to the Big Apple as mystery writer and amateur sleut Movies par excellence Jessica Fletcher moves her address to New The Story of Robin Hood, 12:30 p.m. Saturday York City. Angela Lansbury returns to her role as Jessica as Zesty, colorful retelling of the familiar story, filmed in England by this enduring whodunit series returns. I' Walt Disney with excellent cast. Not as personality-oriented as other Mini-series versions, but just as good in its own way. Stars Peter Finch and Joan Rice. Return to Lonesome Dove7:30 p.m. Sunday. Prime time movies Clara Allen loses her ranch in a blazing fire, but all of her horses are saved She "Little Man Tate," 10 p.m. Saturday teams up with Gideon Walker and heads for Montana where Woodrow Call waits to A blue-collar single mother copes with raising her seven-year-old genius son and realize his vision of breeding horses in the Big Sky country. learns to accept and trust the help of others, including a teacher of the gifted. Stars Prime time movies Jodie Foster and Dianne Wiest. Mermaids, 8:30 p.m. Saturday. "Flatliners," 11:40 p.m. Saturday In this fond look at life in the early 1960s, Cher is a saucy, single mother of two who's A group of young medical students devise a dangerous experiment in whi h hey'll a constant source of embarrassment to her teenage daughter, who just happens to be deliberately create a condition of clinical death, sample the afterlife experience and struggling with her own personal awakening. Stars Cher and Winona Ryder then be brought back to life. Stars Julia Roberts and Kiefer Sutherland.

PAGE 22

B1 Tropic Tises B10. Nov. 4. 1994 shell, r"w paint, ps. ph. c alarm !ngspking maid. hons ] reliable, live. Cemmodre 64 personal camp. acer -9,6,oi. 229-395. cal, gd w/kids, M-F. 224-6458. 1l0 eamnes pragrns. 2111/toe. 2.7D u60fres .c. 166 ree Commache 4x4 4 vI, Will tutorconversamoral Spanish. FORT CLAYTON (Contraband ControH Office) -As a reminder, long bed, Ke.w.d am/.e m cass a, 228H2s F1. Epson 9m pi p e st nay/(or ps, ph, rew tires, p-r, wheds, es1 tractor Ceed, hardly used, exc caond. in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern tfer. 261-6418. ho1test, dependable maid avail, Toes, $60. 284-5930. Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, 1979 nik electr, gd trans loaded, Wed, 4amsn 13 eclor V,51110; VC1"R cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold$2,200/obo. 283-6499. Seamstress to s-w clothing or home $100; Sanyo VCR4-head,$100. 27to ----access. Experienced i/tailoring and 4546 ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu1992 Dodge Carano A WD, at, ac, ps, design. Prices vary w/difficolty. 287tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes pb, pI, am/fm, raise, tilt, 6 cyl, 3.3L, 5072. Magnavox 286 camp, 40mb hd, dual not hy Id, 13,00/oo. 89-350.drives, modrm, software, $200. 203permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. d d13,000/oo.29-3150 Reliable Eng spring day m 23 Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact 1991 Jeep Cherokee 4x4, 4.OL, 6 cyl, days a week. 221-0842 for Olivia. 2 ac, ph, am/fm cast, lint, evC ron colorTv,$35osmallmicro, needs t Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117tandard, 2,500/obo.27-6492. Reupholsterorrefiish fun, carheadrepair, $10. 269-0579. liner, etc, work in your home. 2211990 Chevy Caalier, 2dr, sedan, ac, 3467 for Dennis. 386SX25, 4mb Ram, 120mb hd, 1983 Ptelade,allpower, ac, newpaio, boght new at Howard, $8,000. 286ps, ph, tw, ed, $6,800/aba. 287-6337 WP5.2, Windows, Winfoa, Prodigy, AnimaJs $2,900. 252-2033. 3171. afer 6pm. Translation services. 228-2691. ProCom, printer, desk and more, $1,000. 284-4989. 1986 Ford econoline van 150, at, ac, 1993 Ford Explorer XLT, 4wd, 4 dr, 1988 Nissan p/u, 2wd, 5spd, am/fm Computer trouble shooting, tuor and 2 yr old calico female cat, free; 8 wk TV, reserve gas tank, dty pd, loaded, 4.OL, V6, auto, low miles, loaded, cast, ac, sport wheels, low miles, gd repair; Span classes. 252-2657 for Electric home organ by Qrgansonic, old black/white, male, free. 283-6231. $8,500/abo. 269-5700. $23,500. 284-6887. cond, $5,650. 284-3592. Jerry. gd rond, $100/nba. 282-3030. Two female kines, 6 wiks old, very 1989 Mercury Cougar,3.8L eng, auto, 1988 Dodge Daytona, red, pm, elec 1971 Datsn240Z, classic, gdsecond Handcrafts for birthday parties, has64 Commodore comp, Commodore affectionate and mild mannered, free. a, pm, pl, dty pd, $8,500. 228-4061. injection, interior looks new, tint, car, 5 spd, 6 cyl, $1,800. 287-3180 ketas, home decorations, and gift box 1571 disk drive, and Panasonic print252-6952. $4,200. 285-6880. after 5pm. decoration. 252-2883. er, $175/obo. 286-4928. 1993 Ford Explorer XLT, 4 dr, 2wd, Cocker-poodle, male, 3 ms old, $80. w/positraction, onto, JBL stereo, low 1992 GMC Jimmy 4x4, 4dr, am/fm 1989 VW Golf, 4 dr, 5 spd, sun roof, Dress maker to sew or babysit, nights Nintendow/gun,2controls, andgae. 260-2514 for Maggie or Ken. miles, not dly pd, $22,300. 252-5556. cass ac, ps, ph, tint, $17,500. 287removable am/fm cess, ac, low miles, only, Eng spk only. 229-2045 for Plus Nintendo games, game genie. CFA registered seal point himalayan 1994 Chevy Cavalier, exc cond, 4 cyl, 3856 $5,200 252-1273 after 5pm. Maerion. 261-1638. male for stud services. 284-3990 for 5 spd, am/fm cass, not dty pd, $8,950/ 1989 Olds Cutlass Calais Quad 4, pw, 1990 Gen Storm, 5 spd, son roof, or, Cake decorating. 287-6222. Whirlpool 14cu ft refig, white, $395; Mindy evenings. neg. 252-2392. pd, ac, ps, ph, 2 dr, et, 50K miles, not dty pd, ps, ph, $6,800. 232-6309. Kenmore washer, white, exc cond, $9,000. 261-3568. Reliable babysitting in my home any$395. 252-2476 Cocker spaniel, male, 14 iks old, 1991 Ford Ranger XLT w/matching 1990 Mitsubishi Lux van, sun roof, time, Eng spk only. 286-4294. shots t beige, playful, $150. 260-. fiberglass shell, 29K miles, ac, 5 spd, 1985 Toyota 4x4 truck, long bed, w/ dual ac, rans grt, $8,500/obo. 287LX series stereo rack system wape 5809. 4 cyl, $8,300. 287-5536. campertoO,5spd,ps,pb,ac,exccond, 6229. Specialized woodworking, deacon deck,amp,turntable,receiver,2speak$5,500. 252-6017. benches, quilt racks, craft items or English bull terrier puppies. Exc ped1989 Dodge Conversion van, V8, dual 1993 Dodge Carmnan LE, loaded, low will build to suit. 284-4860. ervcabinetincladed, gsdoor43200/ igree. Male, brown/white champion ac, low miles, not dty pd, exc cond. 1993 Geo Tracker 4x4, nice stereo, miles,V6,quadseating,$20,000. 1993 bloodline. Female brindle. 260-2994 252-6815. alarm, big tires, $14,500. 286-4172. Dodge Dakota LE, extra cab, low English spk housekeeper, babysitter, Cameraleses, 80-200mm with zoom after 6 pr. miles,VS,4x4,loaded,$17,900.268gd w/kids, cleans, irons,exc ref. 286lock and 28-105mm, $50 and $80/ 1992Chevy Corsica, I5Kmiles,6cyl, 1989 Camaro RS, V6, auto, t-tops' 3085 4629. abe. 282-4598 Mix poodle/cocker, 2 females and a a, ps, ph, am/fm cass, $9,950. 284looks new, $6,000/abo. 230-1926. .282-4598 male, 5 wks old, $50. 287-64705073. 1978 Pontiac Firebird runswell auto Honest, dependable, live-in maid, go Apple 11 GS comp, dua drives, color 1989 Eagle Premier, 3.OL, 'V6, 4 spd' 400 ng, needs exhast, i2,20nobo. w/kids, flex houts. 289-3243. mppetor, m mae rie, cr Female and male cat, fixeddeclawed, 1982 BMW, new eng, new paint, anat, or, loaded, sharp, price org. 2898-84 n p glieotmig /is progitruse mauawte,$7 pr/ter,0 shots andaccess. Prefr toeher, 8000/obo 287-63 31, 284-6874. Eng spking live-out maid, gd w/kids, pro .andmanua,$750/9b0.282free. 287-3685. 1976 Ford Elite, rant, needs work or 1990 Ford4-Runner, 4 cyl, gas, not cook, clean, M-F. 283-5228. 4599. Male dalmation,shots included, 3 wks sale as parts, lota of new parts, $600. been badly wrecked, $2,000. 287dty pd, $6,900. 252-2906. Eng spking live-in/out, honest, reliTakamine 12 string guitar w/pick-up, old, sharp looking, $200. 289-4166. 283-4203. 6138. 1990 Cherokee Laredo, at, or, able. 221-7883. 1970 model, hard case, strings, exc ________6138_199_CheokeeLareo,_a,_ac optionrood, $350. 286-338 1. Toy French poodle puppies, six wks, Honda elite scooter, 150cc, electric Ford Telstar, exc cond, dty pd, 5 spd, pkg, exc cond, dty not pd, $14,800/ Eng spking live-in, housekeeper/ tails docked, dewormed, CCP regisstart, etc rond, helmet, vest, tool kit, ac, am/fm cass, $3,600. 252-2414. neg. 252-6026. babysitter, gd w/kids, cleans, irons, Aria 4 channel multi track recorder, tered parents, $225. 226-5395. $1,200. 284-4282. 1988 MestangLX 4 5 sp ps etc f. 286-4893. .model R504, exc cond, $350 2861992 Ford Escort LX, 4 dr, 5 spd, ac, 3381. Smallpoodlepappies,prebred,white, SAAB 900 Turbo new auto tras, blue, mint cond, 8,600 miles, $8,500. su' F, gd cond, $3,850/obo. 252Ifyourhairisn'tbecomingtoyou,you shots, wormed, 8 wks, $75. 286-4774. tires, battery, air cond, electric wind, 284-6298. 2889. should be comingto me. 284-4339 for Sound card w/speakers, $85; PC tools Candy for windows verl, $50; more win10 month old golden1987 Dodge Shadow trba, 2 dr, 1986 Nissan Bluebird, 5 spd, full ex-dows ver 3, S5; double tools, $30. shots, gd w/kids, $250/obo.283-4295. 1989 Ford Fesliva, or, am/fm cast, at, spd, runt gd, front end damaged hut ma, gas, $4,500. 235-9137. Honest, reliable day maid, clean, 286-3373 after 5pm. 989 ordFesivaaainufin ass at spd maes O, fontenddemigedbutbabysit w/ref. 226-7562 for Vielka Mini toy white French poodle, male, 4 ps, ph, not dty pd, $4,900. 289-4982. still drivable, $3,500/obo. 284-3586. 1991 Hyundai Excel, at, or, EFI, US babysire. Sony 15" color TV, 575. 287-5237. pounds, for stud service. 226-7176. 1979 MOB, red, gd cond, new elect Chevy S-b Taboe, ext cab, w/camper 0e209-3243.nd mp,_ e Dedicated, hard king, Span spking Packard Bell 486X w/monitor, keyFawn and brown puppy, free. 287system, exhaust, new tires, go fun, and liner, 4.3L V6, outs, or, ps, ph, day maidetc w/kids, M-F. 207-5570 beard,$900; Pioneer stereo dual cast, 6638. best offer. 289-3824. ant/fm cass, exc cond, 27K miles, 1983 CJ-7 Jeep, laredo pkg, gd cood, 7 cd player, $500. 284-348 1. $10,500. 283-6785. $6,000. 252-5024. Real world conversational Span, will Black male chihaahua for stud ser1985 SlOBlazer,newpaint, blue,am/ tutor 228-2691 Nintendoentsystemw/2 pads, aglove, vice. 284-6774. fm cass, ac, 4x4, V6, gd tires, $5,000/ 1988 Ford Bronco XLT, 4x4, 5.8L, 1986 Volvo, auto, ps, ph, pw, ac, sun t 2 a turbo pad, Super Mario three, $140; aba. 289-5461. 43K miles, auto, fully loaded, exc roof, ant/fm, $7,500/obo. 264-4491. British housewife babysitter, gd w/ Nintendo tapes, $15 each/obo. 2859 mos old female cockerspaniel, house cond, 11,500/obo. 289-3234. kids, early morning until, part or full 4997 broken, shots, buff, $125. 286-4894. 1988 Renault Medallion, 4 dr, auto, 1991 Pontiac Grand Am, neg. 286kide mor untily f ps, pb, pd, am/fm cass, gd tires, dry pd, 1990 Chevy Cavalier, auto, 2.2L, ac, 4885 after 6 pm. ime. 286-4285 for Marilyn.systemw/controlShepherd, pure black, healthy, females $3,500/obo. 287-5121. am/fm cass, pb, ps, $5,500. 284-3167. -len and nie games. $140. 286-4988. and males, 6 wks, parents avail, $200. 1986 Chrysler LeBaron, auto, power n -----4. 282-5494. l986FardTempo,5spd,ac,4dr,am/ 1992 Jeep Wrangler, $12,000. 282everything, tilt, cass, not dty pd, Micrn486DX266,8mbRam,213mb fm cass, 4 cyl, gd cond, gray, dty not 3297. $3,500. 261-879 1. hd,2xcdRom, sound blaster 16, much Shephardpuppy,7mns,allshots,CCP pd, one owner, $5,300. 282-3737. .O 1985 235hp Evenrude powerhead, more software. $2,500. 286-3736. reg, house broken; calico kitten, fe1985OldsCutlsscruiserstationwag1987 Hyundai Excel, 5dr, or, S spd, needs new rings, lower unit in gd male, 6 wks, free. 283-3031. 1984 VWQuantumsedan,4dr,a,ac, on, V6, fully loaded, not dty pd, exc sun roof, $3,500. 287-3872. cond,allneweleccomponents,$1,500/ 386 comp, Epson printer, and many ph, lots of new parts, dty pd, $2,950. rood, $5,000/obo. 287-6130. access $900. 286-4420. 2 dachshund puppies, females, 7 whs, 286-4641. 1 988 Toyota CorollaSport, ac, luxury ahos 285-6289. $175. 266-7930. 1974MercedesBenz,AMG,gdcand, rims, sun cool am/fm cass, $6,800. Chevy Blaerfull-size trailerhitch w/ 1988 Mitsubishi Lancer, am/fm cass, $2,900. 285-4045. 252-4677. attachments, new, $150. 252-5853 E ound Rottweilers, 3 wks old, docked, dewauto, gd cood, tint, $4,500.251 -1208. rmed, ceg, $500. 235-4190. 1985 Tayota4x4 p/uw/langbedramp1985 Chevy S-10 Blazer, auto, a, dty 19' open fisherman. Yama 90, 1994 1989 Ford Festiva, ac, am/fm cass, ps, er top, ps, ph, ac, exc cond, $5,500. pd, $7,000/neg. 260-4906 evenings. w/30 hours, fully loaded, $12,000. Tagged homing/racing pigeon w/ Cuddly baby bunnies, all colors, $5. ph, at, not dty pd, $4,800/obo. 289252-6017. 252-5024 clipped wings, #279535, RFCE/ 262-2665. 4982. 1989 Cadillac sedan Deville, fully -----------AGERRA-ALCALA-10, 867441. 1988 Blue Blaer S-10, w/tahoe pkg, loaded, rans go, $11,000/obo. 2871992 SeaDoojetski580cc,301hurson Owner or other call to claim. 287Pure shephard, black, no papers, 1985 Porsche 944, 5 spd, ac, all powpw, ac, ph, tilt, leather interior, 65K 4836. engine, knee board, rope, cover, vests, 5097. healthy, $200. 282-5494. er, tint, ad stereo, cruise, alarm, miles, etc cond, $7,000/obo. 287-$3,800/neg. 283-3878. $10,000/aba. 284-4227. 4974. --,---One chime/bell in bag at Amador BaHorse, male, 2 yes, $95. 252-2809. --------------Av a ie Tycoon In-nor fi shing reels, 71/2 and z-ar. Call to claim. 284-5197. S983 Fard Brco, full size, 4spd, ac, l989 Toyot upra targa,S5spd, rubh 9/0 /maching rads, excecond,S$l,800. 6 wks old chihuaha puppies, adornicestereo,4wd,offroad pkg,roll bar, er, cd player,cellularphone, USspecs' -252 20S 0 able, dewormed and sweet disposi$7,000/aba. 284-4227. $15,000. 224-2030. Family haircure, fullyequippedsalon, 2522080._ H tion, $150. 252-2577. ----professional products, free consulta1991 Evinrde 70 w/new 1994 19899Camaro5.0,ac,pl,pw,JVCpII 1989 Pontiac Firebird, mint cond, ac, ions. 284-3683 for Max. powerheud. Includes all controls, nThures, WndaPea.ntandRuben, out stereo, speakers, $6,000/obo. 287auto, pwr, $7,750/obo. 285 5006.E -g spkidg $l3,00022 2 BR set, quality, custom made, Philipneutered, indoor-outdoor, litter 5827. Eng pkmg maid, M-F, ti-in, hen,0 .-2 pine mahgany wood, largechest, titrained, free. 286-4972. -----1988 burgundy Mazda 929, auto, ac, eat, reliable, grt iw/kids. 286-3230. 90hp E.encode in ban, new, $3,900; plc dresser 2 mirrors, 2 nightstands, 1986 Chevy custo deluxe full ie ster, alr, new tires, tint Mother 2 to babysipart-timedays 90hp E rude less than 50 his, fullqueenheadboard, firmqueen foam Free small terrier, lovable, gr cs/kids, black w/silnec stripe, 4.3L, V6, gd root, clean, $8,500. 283-6287. .Mth' 'sip-imcdas $2,900 256-6830. bed, $2,400/obo. 283-3220. house broken, all shots. 287-3097. cnd, $5,000. 287-6827. ghts,sveekendsltolidays.203-231. 1991 lsuzu p/u, grt work truck, dty pd, Carpet 18' squares fiberglass backFree 5 mos old poale/schnauzer 1992 Chevy S-10 Blazer, tahe pkg, at, cass, 2.3L, 4 cyl, 5 spd, $6,900/ bin -ingbige patter, yard. ay w/out mined. Really playful. 286-4996 red, 2 dr, ps, ph, ti, am/fm cast, ac, 5 neg. 239-6485. babsir, honest, ture, reliable. glue or pad, large c87-itty avail. 283Freshinater fsh, $10. 207-6672. new tires, V6, 4.3L, lo miles, 3220. Fsw rs .27 7. 16,0.287-6645.' 1976 Ford LTD II, best offers is, runs Eng spk maid, honest, gd w/kids, ref, Sega Gecsis games, Madden 94, Mixed-breed dog expecting puppies 1 -and drives. 284-4525. live-out. 221-3029 for fina. Maximum Carage, World Series, Q/size htss bed, $300. 284-3924. within I m 25. 287-6721 Ford Escort, ps, pb, ac, am/fm 1986 Ford Mustang SOL 5pdm -mOre. 260-9156. c n 7,OOoBTD ac National, S215; within1 mo, 25. 28-6721. cuss, new tires, lain miles, auto, red, tilt, Ford amcstn etcL rosd, EnFg spk mtaid, htotist, gd w/akids, ref 0BUa Naina,2 ; $6,000. 287-6623. tilt, ac, am/fm cass, exe cond, not dy -2 IBM, Wang, Zenith, 286, 386, XTS, SOOOBTU ac Fedders, $115. 256Automobileps -----d, $5,500230-1632. ive--t. 221-6204 for Norma. $250/up. 230-0008. 6830. .1984 Dodge Daytona Turbo, ps, pbha p oskepr oet ei pm, ac, tilt. new interior, $3,000/aba 989 Ford Escort, auto, p, pb ant/ Spu epk huar ekee, honest. 2.iNew IBM 286 in box, 130mb hd, 3 piece dresser set, 150/obo. 260-patlnwitro,$,0/b. fnt css,inew tires 58K mila es, runts gn, able, hard winktng. 22-30 $0.20008 62 1990 Ford Probe, V6, 5spd, ac, cruise, 285-4056 for Slate. I s s700. 230-0008, 6602 tilt, sun roof, am/fm cast, low tilet, -$6,000. 287-6623. Span spk person for cleaning or $8,000/obo. 287-6654. 1991 Ford Fcart LX, grmpg, ac, ps babysitting Saturdays. 252-2314. IBM comp, 36DX, 4meg Ram, Lgsoa,tbluedesign,excond,$600. ph, new tires, exe cond, one awner, 1989Ford 2pssvan,dualtanks,am/ 50mbz, VGA monitor, dual drive, 269-57. 1988 Mazda RX-7, cherry red, 5 spd, $7,500/aba. 284-4125.m radiomme,$9,9O0/ob.26O-3325. Honest, ,liable aid, M-F, couk, mos, Windows 3/1, WP, ,ntivir. stnroof tint,am/fm cuss,$9,000.2871906 Ford Escort GT, new eng, r clean iron, git /kids. 224-0228 for screen Slter, $950/aba. 236-4239. a ri, iye s. seat, and 3171. 19-Mitubis--i tsw oaet, auto,, and ac, $5,000.287-5839. c27" rny stereo tV,tcons.le model,220243 -&d.ac 27" Sony stre I~ console model,, n .ndc. Spot bid sale, used gov1 cars, 4x4s, lao 269-a700 ,0 -Hes, reliable, E spking maid, .surround sound, mood cabinet etc Chinese fumiture, ton round coffer diesels, tracks. 9am Nov. 1 9, Bldg ----i-t-e.rnmst smeroi, x'econd SMW, 2 days weekly. 224-7521. cond, remote, best offer. 207-4 I80. table in/stitti s, set cnd tables, set sea308 Corozal. Inspection 9uan-3pm 1989 Jeep Cherokee, lots miles, not holes nw3series,execond,$1,200/ sons mall pinurcs, $350. 236-4475. Nov. 17-18 205-5417. dly pd, $8,000. 260-9326. oho. 268-2676. Engspkingbabysitter,-excref,live-in/ landy I OIIEX camp w/color moni9ot, gd w/kids. 261-7387. tor and software, $100. 284-6232. Refrig/freezeraprightsailbardelec 1974 Chevy Impada,5800. 286-3245. 1991 Plymouth Sundance, auto, ac, 1991 Ford Ranger, V6, 3.0, acpr -stove, mre. 264-)9522.

PAGE 23

#~-Ias1L~e AdsTropic Times 1 Classified Ads v 4,14B11 Sofa, love seat, dinnette set and misc long leather coat, $95. 260-5386. duffle. 260-9630. Sports cardses, Stars, Rookies, reababy clothes, Graco baby swing $25. Qos. I 539E Howard. items. 284-4581. Queen size BR set, includes matt, like Cat, Clayton600s, dark gray and black sonablypriced.287-3097.286-6277 -Qors. 234B Albrook, 7-1 lam. Supersingle waterbed, cedar, Hondunew, 400. 284-6683. striped, Beauford," I I yrs old, male, 41 volsEnclyclopediaBritannicaplus Sega Genesis w/controller $55, 9 ran rocking chair, 6 pc BR set. 256any information wanted. 207-5489. 15 vols Britannica Jr, like new $200. games $35 ea, SNES Pebble beach Qtrs. 943B Clayton, 8am-naon. 6407 9-1Ipm Queensizematt/boxspringand frame, 262-1251. golf $40, 3 Gameboy games. 287$150;child'sbikeseat,$20.286-32305536 Qtrs. 6300 B oa. Queensize metal frame, oneyearold, Plants, trees, f p lsisCellaneous Asst comics available. 252-2657. Qtrs.43 Aibrook 7:30am-noon. $35. 260-7645. s t ons, pryr plains and --Couch $15,reliner50,Tandycommore. 287-6337 Otfer 6pm. Generator4000watts 2yrsold $450. Camper shell for Ranger p/u truck puter&printerw/software$275.286Qtrs. 385A Clayton, 7am-noon. LRsetw/coffeeandendtables,$1,200. .2 l $250, trailer for boat/cayuco $275/ 3334. 287-4637. Boudoir chair $125; pine student's 251-3904 LD#. oba. 252-2675. Qtrs. 684C Clayton. desk, $40. 226-8516. Yataba electone HX-3 electric or5 piece BR set, $1,000/neg; crib w/ Lawnmower, gncond,self-propelled, Chevy parts, brake booster, all, Caagan, many tnes, functions, features, Qtrs. 704 Curundu, 7am-noon. linens and comforterset; sofa bed and Sofa sleeper and love seat, light pink catcher, mulcher $250, movie proj, lytic convert, $200-S175. 252-6956. 2spkers,likenew$10,500.264-8427. love seat. 284-5073. and mauve. $700/nba. 207-3284. wks grt $150, twin matts & pop up Qtrs. 302B Balboa, 8am-noon. frame, new $425. 283-3220. 4 tires 255sx60SR I5 BR Goodrich raInfant carseot, men's mt bike, baby Tan love seat, hardly used, whirlpool 19,000 Freidrich at $325; 10,000 dial t/a, used I mo $375/neg. 226clothes, misc baby items. 282-3776. Qtrs. IQOOB Clayton, 7-l0am. ac, 5,OOOBTU, 1 yr old. 284-5073 Whirlpool ac $215. 252-2287. Weider cross trainer mastergym, new 7758. $375/neg. 260-3363. Water purifier $20, wht plastic shelf Altos de Bethania, 74C St, Hse 23. 8 piece LR set, 2 couches, love seat, White daybed w/trundle, $200; cedar Wirlpoo vent frzer, frost tree, like $5, mi ifverware $8, plants $10. osns dress headboard, footboard, $150; 6 artificial Christmas tree $30. 287new, rail Ivs 10 $455. 286-4421. 283-43f7,6. Wen $600. tables, Samsung VCR needs cleaning $50. 5193. .284-4202. 284-4860. .-Never used complete home alarm sys 20 vols Encyclopedia Harvard ClasHeavy duty Hot Point dryer/Maytag, 6pc girl's French BR set, Nintendo w/ $240. 284-5923. sics, 4 vols medical/bealth set $900. 2 Eng-spk live-in maids, reliable, flexy r yhe yshe, Dorm room hutch, ent center, $80. 3 games. 260-5947. 284-3489. bible forse work, pet care. 282-3126. 1 yro a284-3481. Wt bench w/110 lb, swings, VCR, $600 for bh.204-4499.-0-41 5' artificial Christmas tree $25. 235W ec il bs~g.VR ____________ il nheokplae 0-16 cordless weedeater, boy's bike, exer Backpack, R&i, internal frame, new Honest, reliable, bilingual mature Round wrought iron patio set, four Complete LR set $800; complete DR 4890 eves. bike. 260-1290. $120.252-2533,waterpurifierw/bladmaid, gd w/kids, dog. 260-2514. chairs, w/umbrella and stand. Needs set$700; complete BR set, 2oak curios New football visor, clear color $20 der bags, new $136. 252-2533. Newntfootbal.l2v-3sor,$3clear2-co3.or8$320.Diving gear complete w/bag $100Bilingual live-in boasekeeper, child paint, 2130/obo. 282-3737. $300.ref. 227-5028. Cherry queen Anne DR set, wood Two federal blue rugs 12x15 w/pads, p$tiea-ed 50 0 bb 31.caerfy2750 hel 287-021 $135; 12x9, $75, clean. 287-5237. Prder $400, ide-a-bed RoundtriptickettoNCtromPanama, Boys, girls & Ig ladies' maternity s____ig. 287-5021. $175, patio enclosure$150.252-2033. $380/obo. 285-4532 SGT Remaley clothes. Can pick at your home. 287Sofa soft colors, 3 space, gd cond, Beautiful glass top DR set, 6 chairs, Two brz boat propellers, L-R, 2" Rm 204. 1993 Honda Shadow deluxe, 600c, 3929. $100. 204-3727. $450. 286-3380 after p.2 diam, 4-blade $800 ca. 269windshield, backrest, law mi,exccond axis 28 dia, 4Wis 110 bils, new$75,Nintendo games $3,500. 284-6327. Scamp-es to sew in my home dresses Coscoecliningclothcoveredcarseat, Loveseat, sofasleeper,washer,stove, 5700. $10 en, mil compass $27, rack w/ for 14 year old daughter; will provide 040 lbs, $35; Today's Kids activity dish washer, more. 223-8159 after frame no straps $32, elect guitar $60. 1993 Yamaha Enduro 250cc, 100 mi, sewing machine. 287-3929. rocker,8'activities, grtcond,$27.2895pmions for 07 Escrt/Cavlier and nther 287-6289. w/helmets $2,400. 287-3856. 4--.,. /Cvlirad te Gornex jacket, sz414-46, Gortex pants, 4111. Sectional sofa, rose color, w/6 pilparts. 228-4061. Slanttoprollingcomputertblw/print1988 Suzuki 50cc motorbike $200. s3rteacsz4446,cote26pants, Roll-a-way bed,newinbox,$75.24lows,$1,500;GIF white dryer, almost Port car ramps $40-, carpet foam ershelf$85,childcraftbookset$220. 287-5592. 6382 new, $400. 263-4502. _260-3325. Day maid, 8am-5pm, once a week, 62. npading, Radio Shack electronic parts, -1987 Yamaha 200cc, US specs, dty hvy cleaning, washing, inning, elS Ca and love Seat in fair cond, $250. DR set, beds, ceiling fans, sofa bed, new $65, cowboy boots sz 9 1/2.252SNES games, Sunset Riders $25, Pd, low mi. 2874632. abyleapunt, honest, refs.g24-6597. 2844137. 16' pool w/filter and pump, TVs, 2042. Mortal Kombat $35, Street Fighter II 1d8 Kawasakitul0honstnres.2846597 VCRs, lots more, selling everything. Toddler car seat $15, fun infant seat $35, Super Mario Bros $20, Battle 1903 Kawasakio5LedinclshnpmanSeamresstosewinmyhome,clathes/ Desk chair, Swedlish kneeling style, 268-3085. $30, newbottle warmea$er4, safety bed Toads $25. 206-4674. trs bok eesa,079 r draperies $25 per day. 287-4691. brownveloarpadding,$20.287-6860. $,nebtlewrr$,saeybd-tires $1,200/obo. 235-6079. drpie$2prda.0761 Wooden bed frame w/drawers $115; rail $15, antique tools. 252-2042. Formal wht jacket & skirt, embroiOld US, Panamanian and Spanish 13" GE colorTV. 286-4399. single beds-sets, $150; patio table and dered lace, sz 13/14, worn once $40. 9 apd coins, gold, silver, proof sets. 264chairs, $175. 287-5592. Carpetstsamer& shampoo machines ered $1,400. 2844525. 9153 Bassett BRset, 7 pieces, no bed, white $500. 230-0008. 2064674. 9153. w/gold trim. 284-5833. -Gas weed eater, $125, girls bike $50, Hurricane alum ri 1981 YamahaMaxim650 w/heimets, WWI&II items,helmets, daggers, pisbasketball hoop and poles $100. 287D sneyStore4Tgil'sChnstmasdress, Hicne & er model Fords w/o ty a 60 w/helme tols, flags, uniforms. 264-9153. Sunday elec stave, four bamers and 5592. blk background $10. 207-4182. 3 .fit Jeep & early oerd oven, exc cond, $100. 233-3859. --. 0.50 a/t, best offer. 206-3320. Cushman engineand bodyparts needLive-in maid to cook, clean, Span-' Glass coffee table $60, 2 glass end 30galgaswaterheaternew$175.51Enterainmentetr$150, Sony 19" coted, prices neg. 245-2503. spk, refs. 226-5436. Refrig, gd cond, $385; Dryer, white, tables $4oeach, micro stand $60, 3904 LD#. or TV $100, Yaesu HF trans $500. gd cond. 287-5092. Amiga 500 comp $300. 2864679. Wt machine $125, exer bike $100, 287-5839. Pat Sa sLive-in bilingal maid w/refs, honest, Large overstuffed style safa, light blue Kenmore micra $125; swing set $35; Commodore 64, printer, disk drive, 1676 deign, like new, $600. 269-5700. BR set w/ hutch and lights, solid pine, 100 pgrms $100, papasan frame $20. Stair stepper, used twice, etc cond 1676. un, wedding $100. 252-2020. 287-5876. $300/aba. 207-3302. Qtr. 75A Howard, 7a.-noo. Sewing lady in my home, reasonably Newquit6x86, full/queen en 2 new twin b springs $75 a. 252Crib$]0,rockingplanetoy$15,tricyQtrs. 351B Clayton, 8am-noon. priced. 236-2070. ng pattern, beige, blue and green, B mok bed, tubular, w/new full and 2314. cle $14, in-line skates $25. 2854997. $49. 284-5479. twin mattresses, $750; queen mattress Qtrs. 2040B Curundu, 7am-noon MofT Club wants parents & expected Whirlpollarge capacity washer/dry unused, $165. 252-2180. TDb fin surfboard $100. 256-6815. bI baby stroller $60, baby bath tub, parents of twins, multiples. 287-5889 W $5 Cosco day cradle $10. 206-3320. Qtrs. 15550 Howard. Angela. er, exc cond, $500. 284-3672. GE refrig, 24cu ft, $925; GE washer, Lt gray vert blinds w/rod for 12' wind $425; full sizemattw/bax spring$195, $ Crib/changing t $120, crib set $60, __s4AHwd8 -nH skp,_rr3hdes Lama sadspefeta omleeserepeerr5f22-280 $75ocibbe wetraer $50ecr ibchagigbl$10,crb/et$6,dtr.w/55Hwadramnwerouekeprcoe5ar3,bidrnars ramic projects, clthw/rst proofmeta recliner $350. 252 seat $50. 223-1829. boy's baby cothes, carrier $30. 286Qtrs. 819A Clayton, 7am-noon. cleaning, cook, M-Sat, $150. 252cmnpoetcohwrmaofca-6377. -5036.parts-many styles, colors and prices. Vacuum cleaner, 1 /2 yrs old, encore Trombone w/case, good cond $200,3 Quas. 510A Clayton, 7am-noon 243-5617. Hoover, etc cond, $65. 282-3497. step ladder for van, polished alum, Oster kitchen center $100, ladies 18k Aikido instruction. 252-6929. Danish comer wht lamp, $60, Danish Somna waterbed $400, 2 twin bed new $20. 287-3490. gold deckluce $050, ladies 1k diaQtrs. 541C Clayton, Sam-noon. Air conditioners far parts, any size, LR w/china cabinet, Nintendo games, frames, $150 for both. 286-4590. Little Tykes castle, 7 ins old $200. Qrs. 553B Clayton, 7am-l p.m.cond. 252-2287. $l2ea, 2 wht blinds 69x441/2 long. 5rimsmo lution16F,BMW, 236-0984. DRsetw/6cairs,$200;BsettouchSholes,ne3series,eccond$l,200/ Qs.54A Clayton, 7am-? Med dog kennel, reasonable price. and chair, gray, $500; carpets, 12x15, Atari w/games $50, roller blades w/ obo. 268-2678. 284-6786. 4 piece sectional w/hide a bed, 4 yrs tan, $125, 9x12 tan $100. 286-4590. cQoplete pad set $75. 207-6027. -5trs. 51OA Clayton, 7am-noon old, $700. 2874324. --mpaehroom ses $75. 287-Rollerblade cool blade ABT skates, Smr 6n my daye 2ee-3376 Bathroom fixtures, ligbt blue, camYamaha elec guitar $95, Cann alto new sz 8 $245. 252-2582. -Qrs. 668A Clayton. days. 203-4376. Brown carpet w/pad, $80; blue carpet plete set, $100; gas stove w/griddle, Saxophone w/cae $100. 207-6827. Qtrs 440A obbe,8-2pm. X-gdog kennel for 1OO lb dog. 205w/pad $55; one set beige miniblinds, $150. 260-2847. Graco royal xt stroller, like new $50/ sdb 36" wide, $25. 282-4691. Wht wash cot cdr, dk chrome floor obo. 287-4498. Qtrs. 7231B Cardenas, 7-I lam. 6374. Suraylamp, misc baby toys, best offer. 27Eng-spk ive-in maid, refs, experience, GE Hot Point 20cu ftrefrig, frees, on timerand clock, exccond, $100. 2335523. Clothes, Aiwaturtbl $40.284-3689 Qtrs. 707A Clayton, 7am-I pm. M-Satp 223-7111 Rtn 20, lexmsg. top w/ice maker, glass shelves, gid 3859. -31I15s5Goyaattrso-Qs 2 oad :0m5. condo, $675. 282-3030. __ Parrot 6 ft stand from El Valle $35 4 31x IS.xS Goodyear a/ tires an Qors. 520 Howard, 7:30am-pm. -Drummer/guitarist looking for band, -Rug shampoo polisher, Hoover, $75; chrome track steps universal mount Ford Factory mags $400. 260-9058. d t.287 Persionwoolcarpet, 10x7,new,never ceiling country lamp $125; top for CJ$30.Qrs. 2123 Curundu, 6-luam. interests in varieentertainmen. used, $2,000/neg. 264-9153. 7 Jeep, soft, $150/obo. 252-2675. --W5651' PhauS s 8, 8 1/2, 22 hoes a Pl. Wedding dress bodice embroidered remaining sandals, flats, heels, $7Qtrs. 62B Howard, 7lam. mad M-F refs io PCS everything goes sale. 282-3297 Whirlpool dehumidifier, new, 20 pint $10Howard, 6am-nn. ive-t maid, -, ean, iron, water capacity, $160. 252-2533. x/erssqisz$5.8-59 ts5BHwra-on aefhlrn263969mny Country blue Barclay couch, 4 match---------------W rg a S .b ing accent pillows inl, 4 mos old, Rcliner$7,swivel rcker$75, bl Weddingdresssz/6$50.26 4083. g lether$35,252-2211. Q 1514F Howard, 7am scotchguard fabric protector, $500. gd cand. 226-2605. RCA camcorder, BR fIn, area car-Qrs. 1549E Howr 8am. Moving on post Nov. 18. 269-7874. 203-3825. --pets, rattan laveseat. 287-5928. SCX-100 vOit stair climber $90, girl New ent center w/video tape storage, Roll top desk, $300; woman's bike, $170. 286-6435. Wire fence w/pales $35. 287-5092. $75 like new; gas grill $75. 264-1697. Disney crib set, cotorter, skirt, Vacuum cleaner 420, LT swing $10, Danish LR set, 4 pc, $150/obo. 260bumper, pad wall hangings, sheets, booster seat $5, toddler car seat $15, 5682. receiving blankets, $25. 286-3256. all good cond. 284-5197. j opic T im es A d Form DR w/4chairs,$400;Barsetw/2high Matching washer/dryer Kenmore, Fishingpoles, golfclubs, utilityshelf. chairs,$380;Carpet,browncolor,$85; large capacity, heavy dty, like new, 283-3373. L ANIMALS telephone table, $20. 252-2883. $550/aba. 287-4078. 9r AUTOMOBILES 1992 Encyclopedia Britannica, exl E] AVAILABLE Danish leather black LR, Marmole Sofa w/double recliner, $600. 286cond $1,200. 283-5671. A A BEwhite table and 3 blk corner tables. 6398. E BOATS & CAMPERS --------236-0984. ----~--Lead bottom jigs, 6-ounce w/l% [_ ELECTRONICS PRICE HOME PHONE Reasonably priced electric ranges to mustad cadmium hook$50.243-5617. F] FOUND New 9x 12 light blue carpet, almond be donated as part of Christmas spon[-] HOUSEHOLD Check only onc category per ad form. Only two ads per person each bar/counter stools, cd/VHS solid oak sorship program to needy schools in Power saw, table saw, extra blades ] LOST week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited rack, new foodprocessor, lamps. 229Panama. 207-3204. $50 ca. 287-5575. -0 MISCELLANEOUS more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed 2916. Stanley BR set, real ak/aantique peCrib sheet sets, 7pc Teddy Bears de] MOTORCYCLES below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This Whirlpool large capacity washer and can finish, large chest, ripple dresser sign $50, 6pc Disney baby collection ] PATIO SALES information will not be released to third parties. Deadline for the receipt dryer, used 6 mos, exc cond, $400 andmirror,2nightstands,queenhead140. 287-4788. J WANTED of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are run on a space each/aba. 284-6738. baard, quality firmfoam matt/springs, available basis and the staff makes no guarantee of ads running. Ads must $2,700.obo. 283-3220. Stamina rowing tmah $30, Silvereed include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, LR set, $800; RCA 25" color console -3 -memory typewriterS75/ob, dua cass, Unit 0936, APO AA 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post TV,$200;chitd's twinbed$200.286Kenmore freezer, large chest type, radio 420. 2064797. Office. Ads offering weapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not be 3541. -_____ $2 2 5.2 207-4 83 6, Lg executivesmahgany desk $1,200, n. 9x12 Salmon carpet, $85; home eFec fiingcab SI0l, smoffice fridge $90, gym $500; micro, $150; Nintendo, s paper shredder & bI $250, Ig wht SPONSOR'S NAME RANK/GRADE $70. 260-1740. bookcase $80.269-0579 9xt2greenrug,$40;Hooverrugssam. Duffle bag and waterpronf hag. NordictrackyroS400ilGE40lptdehuORG. poo and floor polisher, $60; ladies Hosard AFB on Oct. 12, name is on midifier $260. 207-5676-

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12Tropic Times __ J tp u r B 2 Nov. 4, 1994 B12-.4-Potpourri CEbpoyme music, games and club card drawings. Hillbilly night 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday. HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if Quarry Heights Fajita special 6-8:30 p.m. Nov. 12. Choose from steak or claiming veteran preference, a copy of college tranOficers' Club: 282-3439 chicken fajitas for $8.95. Mexican beer special. scripts if claiming education and a copy of CASP The club will be closed to the public for renovations Dining room is closed Sunday through Thursday. notice of rating if applicable. Submit a copy of latest through Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be *Howard Enlisted Members' Club -Dining Room: SF-50 if you are a Federal employee. available 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Addition284-4189 For more information regarding Army vacancy ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and Sunday allyou-can-eat breakfast buffet 8-11:30 am. durig lnchhour 11.30a~m. I 30 featuringg eggs, ham, bacon, fresh fruits, waffles, pancakes announcements (forms required, job related criteria, durig lunch hours 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. and more. etc.), visit the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Amador Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30 Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 285-5201. a.m. Saturdays. *Note: One-on-one employment counseling +Club Abador: 2824334 New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade should be the first step in the job search. Allyoi-caiieat roast beef, turkey, turkey salad and tuna fish sandwiches with SPECILIZE EXPERIENCrst:t Postion. .t soup, salad, selection of'entree, special return rights. all the trimmings. SPECIAL IZED EXPE RENCE: Positions at Sunday brunch leaturcs the Ballet Folklorico Panameno Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. featuring NIM-5 level and above reouire specialized experiat soon the first Sunday of each month. tableside preparation with tuxedo service. ence. Specialized experience is either education The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Select a above the high school level or work exoerience direnovations of the Quarry i leights Officers' Club. cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or fillet. All steaks are rectly related to the position being filled. Ixamole: ClaytonU.S. choice beef. Budetosiionat t -ec ired family menu Tuesdays-Fridays featuring all the favordoget positions at 01 aove the .NIM5i :e uird1 e Loop: 287-3035 ites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand made 1/2 Budget experience or equivalent education. CJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-I p.m. pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more. Vacancy announcements are also available at the Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments 3:30 p.m. Sundays. Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or Sundial Recreation Center. Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music WednesLake-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting apdays-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sundays. wings. 4NCO lub:287-716 Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom: 284plications on a continuous basis for the following poMexican buffet Mondays. 4184 sitions. Registers established from these announceCountry buffet Wednesdays featuring barbecue pork New Thursday nights disco 8:30 p.m. until closing. ments will be used to fill permanent and temporary ribs, fried chicken, pork knuckles, collards green, sweet poFriday night disco 4:30 p.m.I a.m. positions. tato, rice, black-eyed peas and corn bread. *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove: AIL-you-can-eat family buffet Tuesdays and Thursdays. 284-4189 VB# 001 General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill Seafood buffet Fridays features broiled lobster, garlic Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays. most clerical position). shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab. Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-l a.m. VB# 001A General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to 12-oz prime rib special Saturdays. Monday night football and mug special in the lounge. fil mot cerial osiionl.Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m. Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcorn and nachos. fill most clerical position) ree country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. SunKaraoke 7:30 p.m. Sunda s, 8 p.m. Tuesdays. VB# 002 Sales Store Checker, NM-3 days and Mondays. Free Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. (Intermittent wk sch) Disco 9 p.m. Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. There Wednesdays in the Casual Cove. Leam the latest in line danc* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is will be a midnight buffet. ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midrequired. Casa Maria buffet 5-9 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. night. VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 Curundu Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with (Lifeguard) Requires Cert + 6 mos recreation exp in *STRAC Club: 286-3511 your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills. the field. Eight-ball tournament 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Entry fee inRock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.eludes snacks, trophies awarded. midnight Thursdays. VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Requires Game or movie night Tuesdays. TVs available. Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. 6 mos recreation exp in the field. Ladies night 7-midnight Thursdays. *Top Three Club: 2 4-4189 VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5 Get together 4:30 p.m. Fridays. Karaoke 6 p.m. Fridays. VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6 Free pizza 7 p.m. Saturdays. Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat comVB#006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), Aibrook Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. Members NM-5 *Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582 must have a card and be present to win. VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Friday night flambe 6-8:30 p.m. Tableside cooking. Club closed Saturdays. Automation), NM-6 Tonight's entertainment: Jazz it with Lowell Hopper in Rodman VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, the lounge. NM-5. Limited to permanent status employees only. Saturday afternoon football 2 p.m. in the lounge during *Rodman Club -Open to all ranks: 283-4498 VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, football season with bar service. Right arm nite, DJ 6-11 p.m. today in the Laguna t o New Sunday saloon breakfast 10 a.m.-l p.m. in the Lounge with complimentary hors d'oeuvres. NM-6. Limited to permanent status employees only. lounge. Choose from three menus. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.1 Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-l p.m. offers breakp.m. Mondays-Fridays. The following positions are Perm/temp, Fullfast from cooked-to-order omelets, roast beef, fresh fruits, Monday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with alltime, Part-time, Intermittent. breakfast and lunch items and ice cream bar. you-can-eat taco bar 6-9 p.m. at the Laguna Lounge. Mongolian barbecue 5:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Choose Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Grill menu VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/ the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have chefs do the is also available. job outside on the open grills. All-you-can-eat fried chicken 4:30-8:30 p.m. Wed14. Lombardi a la Italiana 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Menu nesdays. Grill menu is also available. VB# 008 ** CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license includes: antipasta, chicken parmesan, bragoi, garlic linguini, Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays required), NM-9/I 0/11. tortellini soup and Italian ice cream. at the Rodman Bohio. VB# 009 ** PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN Seafood Feast 6-9 p.m. Saturday and Nov. 12. Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-9 licence required), NM-S. Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursdays. p.m. Fridays-Sundays. e) EMERGENCY MEDICAL Country western night Thursdays with free dance lesAttitude adjustment 4:30-11 p.m. Thursdays at the VB#019 sons 7:30-10:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples Rodman Bohio. TECHNICIAN, NM-640-4/5/6. dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6** Selectees for nurse, medical officer and EMT owar 9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays. positions will undergo a background check. *Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718 *Rodman Annex -Open to all ranks: 283-4498 Weekday lunch includes buffet, salad and potato bar. Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays. Order a [a carte 6-8:30 p.m. in the dining room Fridays All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.Pacific and Saturdays. 1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION Friday evenings in the lounge include beer specials, The club is closed for evening and weekend service. OPEN: 11-04-94 CLOSE: 11-15-94 059-95-KF BUDGET ASSISTANT (OA), NM561-7. SENSITIVE.TEMP NTE :180 days. Ch p ls ed e -m rtt oniain DCSRM, Program Budget Div., Mission Support Pacific Gorgas Hospital Branch, Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Security clearance is Buding254,Pume:2V"507 Atlantic. required. Amador Chapel 1215pm Daiy Cathim (2nd foor) Davis Chapel Building 108, Phone: 282-3610 Weekday worship (As anBuildis 1 32, Phone: 299-3319 8:30am Catholic Moss (Sunday) mounced) 11:30.m Cat.=eM.s Tusday-Fr1da) 060-95-NC KITCHEN EQUIPMENT RE9:30am CCDCathoilcBuildi6g09 Albrook Chape Noon CatholicSpaaisbMass(Sunday) PAIRER, MG-5310-8. USAG, DEH, Operations (Sunday) p0 r:3ipm Proesc Spanic Suday) Div., Maint & Service Branch, Kitchen Equip Shop, r0m Episcopl Worship Service Biding 860, Phone: 2W3940 Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Knowledge of English. Driver's 9am Confessions (Sunday) Sherman Chapel license required. Clayton Chapel 9:15am Catholic Mass (Sunday) Building 152, Phone: 289-6481 Building 64, Phone: 287-5859 9:45am Protestat Sunday School 8:30am Colective Protestant Worship 11:30am Daly CathoeMans 11am General Protestant Service (Sunday) 061-95-NC ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN, 5pm CathoilMas (Saturday) Howard Chapel 10am ProtestantSunday Schooi NM-525-5. USAG, DEH, Resources Div., Budget 8:45am ColleetiveProtestant Service Building 50,Phone:284-348p Branch, Corozal. NOTE: Limited to permanent 10:30am (Sunday) 11:30am Di-aily Catholic Ma y Bsain ha:2l Branch, Catholic Man (Sunday) 4:3Opm Confessions (Saturday) Building 224, Phone: 2894616 employees only. 10:30am Protestant Sunday School (Sun5pm Catholic Mass (Saturday) 9am Catholic English Mass (Sunday) day,Bulding 156,287-3497) 9:30am General Protestant Service (Sun9am Protestant Sunday School at 0230pm Gospel Service (Sunday) day) Espinar Elementary 062-95-ES NURSE PRACTITIONER, NM-6105:30pm CCD Catholic, Building. 156 11am Catholic Mass (Sunday) 10:15am CCD Catholic Sunday School at 11. TEMP NTE: 09-30-95. USA MEDDAC, (sunday) 12:30pm GospelService(Sunday) Espinar Elementary GACH, Dept. of Medicine, Ancon. NOTE: U.S. 6pm EveningService (Sunday) Rodman Chapel 1:15am Clectie Protestant Worship Rodmn Chpel(Sunday) license required. Corozal Chapel Building 40, Phone: 283-4148 11:30pm Gospel Sunday School Building 112, Phone: 285-6717 8-9am Catholic Mass 12:20pm Gospel Service (Sunday) NOTE: Amendment t VB#054-95-NC, EDUCA?:3Opm Jewish (first Friday of month) 10-11am General Protestant Scrvicc (Sun6:30pm Gospel Bible Study (Sunday) NOTis positiont is located, am Hispanic Catholic Mass (Sunday) day) TIONAL AID, NM-1702-4.This position is located I m Pentecostal Worship (Sunday) 11:15am Protestant Communion (Luthern islamic Prayer Services 12:30-1:30 p.m. Friat Margarita Colon. 77 Sunday School (Friday) Tradition) days, Fort Clayton ChapeL 287-5859.


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