Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



Gift of the Panama Canal Museum
�"b .~ -


Tropic

Quarry Heights, Republic


Times

Sof Panama Friday, Oct. 28, 1994


Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army)
Distant Haven homecoming
1st Lt. Willie Copeland, 534th Military Police Company, hugs his son
Willie Jr. after arriving at Howard AFB from Operation Distant Haven
in Suriname. Approximately 200 servicemembers returned to Panama
from Suriname Tuesday.


Navy, Marine housing to be

inspected for lead, asbestos


RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) -
The Public Works Center from Pensacola,
Fla., will conduct routine inspections of
military family housing units here in mid
November. The inspection's purpose is to
determine if there are measurable amounts
of lead and asbestos, local Navy housing
officials said.
The Lead and Asbestos Assessment Pro-
gram, which began in early 1993, will even-
tually include all Navy and Marine Corps
housing units world-wide, officials said.
They estimate these inspections will take
about four years to complete.
The program's purpose is to identify the


location of lead and asbestos and to deter-
mine what safety precautions can be taken.
The program determines if maintenance or
repairs are needed. Officials said the pres-
ence of lead or asbestos does not mean these
substances present a health risk.
Inspections include sampling of suspect
asbestos materials and sampling of dust and
soil for lead and X-ray fluorescence of all
painted components in the residence. The
inspection time varies depending on the
size of the house, but officials said most
should take two to three hours.
The local Navy Housing Office will
notify residents of inspection dates.


Relief in sight for


housing residents

Increased funding means more

DEH service to living quarters


by Gaby Capriles
DEH Public Relations
COROZAL - New funding guidance for
Fiscal Year 1995 promises some relief from
last year's severe cutbacks in service calls
for Army on-post family housing residents,
according to Lt. Col. Patrick Staffieri, Di-
rector of Engineering and Housing.
The new funding for the operation and
maintenance of Army family housing will
allow full operation and maintenance ser-
vice to resume in family housing quarters,
as well as between-occupancy repairs, he
said.
Work on major projects, however, will
continue to be on hold until the outstanding
backlog of service orders is eliminated.
Last year's $6 million dollar shortfall in
the overall family housing budget caused
critical reductions allowing only minimum
essential operations through September. All
new (FY94) upgrade projects were also
deferred.
During this time, the Army's self-help
program was aggressively promoted to cus-
tomers as an alternate means of repairs. A
systematic approach to self-help training
was initiated at the PACE Improvement
Center, the Army's self-help store, in order
to make self-help a more viable approach.
Self-help supplies were also restocked in
greater quantities at the store.
"The DEH alone could not have sur-
vived the budget crunch without the sup-
port from the community in general. We
asked for your assistance and participation
through self-help measures and your enthu-


siastic response strongly contributed towards
relieving the critical situation which af-
fected the entire Army Family Housing
population.
"By working together as a community,
we again were able to pull through the hard
times as we have done in the past," Staffieri
said.
Despite the budget crunch, the DEH
continued to respond.
"During Fiscal year 94, 25,380 service
calls from family housing residents were
received at the DEH Service Order Desk,
about 2,115 calls per month," said Mr.
Antonio Reina, chief of DEH Management
Branch. "Ninety percent of family housing
service orders that were called in were com-
pleted (22,800 jobs)."
"Our customer satisfaction surveys also
continued to show our customers' support
throughout the ordeal. Of 590 customers
that were randomly surveyed from Febru-
ary through October, roughly 90 percent
rated our overall service as excellent,"
Staffieri said.
"We may have won the battle but not the
war. I would still ask family housing
residents to continue to use self help as
much as possible," Staffieri said. " I thank
you for accepting the responsibility of being
proud and prudent residents during lastyear's
crisis and would urge you to continue taking
advantage of our self-help program and
store, especially the tailor-made training we
have devised for our customers."
DEH offers an expanded series of self-
help classes on a regularschedule that cover
most aspects of self-help repairs.


Reenlistment program changes

to affect junior enlisted soldiers


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
Several changes to the reenlistment pro-
gram will affect junior enlisted soldiers
during 1995.
The changes came about because of the
increased amount ofsoldiers in overstrength
military occupational specialties.
The first change will allow specialists
and below, serving in a balanced or
overstrength MOS, who are within 12
months of their estimated time of separa-
tion to request reenlistment for retraining
into the following critical MOSs: 11 B, 11 C,
I 11H, I IM, 12B, 13B, 13F, 13M, 16S, 19D,
19K, 77F, 92A, 96B,-and 98G. They may
also receive station of choice.
If otherwise qualified, soldiers may also
have the 110 general technical score and
new MOS Armed Sevices Vocational Ap-
titude Battery score waived, but must still
meet the minimum ASVAB required for


the requested MOS.
The second change is the addition of new
MOSs to the Bonus Extension and Retrain-
ing Program. The MOSs are I IM, 13B, 13F
and 19K.
The BEAR program permits eligible sol-
diers an opportunity to extend their enlist-
ment for formal training in a shortage MOS
that is in the Selection Reenlistment Bonus
program. Upon completion, the soldier will
be awarded with the new primary MOS,
reenlist and receive an SRB in the new
MOS.
Specialists and below who are outside
the 12-month window who are in an
overstrength or balanced MOS may also
reclassify into one of the critical MOSs.
Soldiers outside their window should
call their Personnel Action Center for infor-
mation. Soldiers inside their 12-month win-
dow should call their unit retention NCO.


Community members combine ef-
forts during annual "Make a Differ-
ence Day."


*Galeta Navy Ball, Page 4
*Cuban soldier, Page 11
*Interservice basketball, Page 13


Air Force kicks off the 1994 Com-
bined Federal Campaign with hopes
of raising $60,000.


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Tropic Times
Oct. 28, 1994


* Bfifly


Tropic Times sets two
week deadline changes
Because Thursday is a Panamanian hol-
iday, the Tropic Times will be printed a day
early. However, delivery will be made on
Nov. 4. The deadline for classified ads will
be 3 p.m. today. Deadline for news articles
will be 9 a.m. Monday. The Tropic Times
will be closed Thursday.
The issue for the next week will be dat-
ed Nov. 10. The Tropic Times office will
be closed Nov. 11, Veterans Days. All or-
ganizations that pick up the Tropic Times
from the print plant, Building 405, Corozal,
can pick up the newspaper beginning at
6:30 a.m. Nov. 10. Deadlines for classified
ads and news articles will be noon, Nov. 4.
For additional information, call 285-
6612/4666.

Future Community Bank
closings announced
The Community Bank will be closed
Thursday to celebrate the separation of
Panama from Colombia and Nov. 10 for
the Primer Grito Los Santos.

Safety awareness
prompts Amnesty Day
In conjunction with U.S. Army South's
Safety Awareness Day, the 36th Ordnance
Detachment will conduct Amnesty Day 8
a.m.-1 p.m. today at the following areas:
Luzon Field, Fort Clayton; the softball
field, Fort Davis; Building 533, Corozal;
Building 734, Howard AFB; and Ammu-
nition Supply Point 1 at Rodman Naval
Station.

Clayton has job seminar
for family members
The Department of Defense Family
Member Job Information Seminar will be
held 9-11 a.m. Tuesday at the Corral room
of the Fort Clayton NCO Club. For reser-
vations, call 285-5201.

FSC needs volunteers
for relocation section
The Howard Family Support Center
needs volunteers who are interested in
learning about world-wide assignments
and those who enjoy creating graphic pre-
sentations to work in the FSC's relocation
division. There are a variety of positions
available for several different relocation
programs. For more information, stop by
the FSC, Building 707, or call 284-5650.

St. Andrew's Society
sets date for annual ball
The St. Andrew's Society of Panama
will hold its annual ball 7 p.m. Nov. 19 at
Las Tinajas Restaurant. For tickets or more
information, call Neil McColl at 226-8066
or 264-4211.

Servicemembers offered
pre-separation briefing
A career information team from
Charleston, S.C., will give a pre-separation
briefing for anyone retiring or separating


Temperatu
High: 90
Low: 77

High: 91
Low: 76


AM flgh6sheul


All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for priority mission
requirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608.


Saturday
5:45am B-727 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP, GA (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
9:40am C-141 Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC
1:45pm C-5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Kelly AFB, TX
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
No scheduled flights


from the military within the next six
months. The briefing will be held 8 a.m.- 1
p.m. Nov. 9 at the Family Service Center,
Building 40, Rodman NS. For more infor-
mation, call 283-5749.

1994 competition for
Nick Hoge Award begins
The Deputy Chief of Staff for Person-
nel has announced competition for the
1994 Nick Hoge Award for Professional
Development, an annual essay program
dedicated to promoting excellence in ci-
vilian personnel administration and man-
agement.
Army military and civilian personnel
from all career fields, including local na-
tionals and nonappropriated fund employ-
ees, are encouraged to participate. Single
and group authorship is permitted. Dead-
line for submission is Dec. 1. Call Aichel
Tam at 285-5611 for more information.

Corozal cemetery
changes hours
The American Battle Monuments
Commission announces that effective
Tuesday, the Corozal American Cemetery
and Memorial will be open 7 a.m. to 4
p.m. daily. The cemetery office will be
open 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day. The office will be closed on week-
ends and holidays.

Atlantic community
hosts 'Hasta Luego'
Army Community Service's Hasta
Luego reception will be held at the Fort
Davis Community Club 2:45-4 p.m. Tues-
day. The reception is for all military and
Department of Defense civilian employ-
ees departing Panama through December.
Servicemembers and their family mem-
bers will receive tokens of appreciation for
their service. Dress is duty uniform. For
more information, call 289-4021.

Adopt-An-Airman
program under way
The 24th Wing is sponsoring a pro-
gram in which members of the Howard
and Albrook community may invite unac-
companied airmen stationed in Panama -
including those on temporary duty sup-
porting Operation Safe Haven-into their
homes for the upcoming holiday meals.


Weekend weather


re Tides Temperature Tides
11:13 p.m. at 13.3 feet High: 87 8:09 a.m. t.
4:56 p.m. at 4.2 feet Low: 75 1:27 a.m.
Sunday Sunday
11:46 a.m. at 13.2 feet High: 89 4:42 a.m. a
5:59 p.m. at 3.7 feet Low: 75 1:51 a.m. a
Forecast: Partly cloudy with afternoon thunderstorms and showers.


Send weather questions to 24th Weather Squadron ATTN: Weather Wise, Howard AFB, Panama (MPS)


Wednesday
5:55am C-130 Howard, AFB
San Salvador, El Salvador
(V,CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard, AFB
5:40am C-141 Howard AFB
Kelly AFB, TX (M)
Charleston AFB, SC
Thursday
5:45am C-5A Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Charleston AFB. SC (0)


People may sponsor airmen any day (or
days) from Nov. 23-27 for the Thanksgiv-
ing meal, and from Dec. 23 - 27 for the
Christmas meal. Those interested in spon-
soring airmen for the Thanksgiving meal
should sign up with Howard's Family Sup-
port Center before Nov. 15. To sign up or
for more information, call Lizca Fearon at
284-5650/3153.

CGOC holds moonlight
pool party at Albrook
The Company Grade Officers Council
invites all CGOs and their families or
friends to participate in a moonlight pool
party 6-10 p.m. Nov. 19 at the Albrook
pool. Food and beverages will be "pot-
luck," and CGOC sponsors are asking for
small donations to cover additional ex-
penses-$2 for singles, $4 for couples, and
$5 for entire families. For more informa-
tion, call 2nd Lt. Milo Quesinberry at 284-
4140/3114.

Howard Education
Center sets new hours
Effective immediately, the Howard Ed-
ucation Center will close 2-4 p.m. Fri-
days for in-house training. Also, begin-
ning in November, the education center
testing schedule will be noon-4 p.m. Mon-
days and Wednesdays and 8 a.m.-noon
Friday. All testing will be held in Room
110. Officials recommend calling or stop-
ping by the center at least 24 hours in ad-
vance to schedule a test. For more infor-
mation, call George Galindo at 284-4863.

CID recruiting briefings
set for Fridays
The Criminal Investigations Division
holds recruiting briefings 10 a.m. Friday
at Building 705, Corozal. For information,
call Special Agent Erin Milanes at 285-
4314/4745.

BHS needs speakers for
Engineer Club meeting
Guest speakers are needed for Balboa
High School bi-monthly Engineer Club
meeting. Engineer professionals or people
in engineer fields are preferred. To sign-
up, call 285-5707.

Health clinics announce
upcoming closings
The medical clinics at Gorgas Army
Community Hospital and Fort Sherman
Health Clinic will be closed Thursday
Nov. 11 and 24 in celebration of Panama's
Independence, Veteran's Day and Thanks-
giving. No patient appointments will be
made for that day, but the Emergency
Room at Gorgas and Fort Sherman will be
open for emergency care.

MEDDAC closes for
change of command
U.S. Army MEDDAC is holding a


Kelly AFB, TX
Nov. 4
5:40am C-130 Howard AFB
Managua, Nicaragua (CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB
A- Active duty only
US- U.S. passport
O-Overnight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Vise
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance


change of command ceremony Nov 9. The
medical clinics at Gorgas Army Commu-
nity Hospital will be closed until 1 p.m. No
appointments will be made during the
morning, but the Emergency Room will
remain open for emergency care.

Spanish course offers
four promotion points
The Mini-Immersion Spanish Course
will be held 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 7-21 in
Building 128, Fort Clayton. Non-Spanish
speaking soldiers can earn four promotion
points unpon completion of the course. To
register, call 287-5412/3960.

Equal opportunity rep
course offered at Clayton
An Equal Opportunity Representative
Course will be held Nov. 14-18 in Build-
ing 156, Fort Clayton. Names must be sub-
mitted to the U.S. Army South EO Office
no later than Nov. 7. For information, call
287-4260/4268.

Selection boards being
conducted at Clayton
The Personnel Qualification Reviews
are being conducted until Nov. 4 at the
Enlisted Records Section, Building 519.
The PQRs are being processed for promo-
tion to master sergeant and Quality Man-
agement Program selection board for ser-
geant first class and sergeant. For informa-
tion, call 287-4658.

Special Olympics needs
volunteers for 1995
The planning committee for the 1995
Special Olympics-Panama Canal Region
is looking for volunteers to chair various
committees. A meeting will be held 2:30
p.m. Nov. 8 on the 3rd floor of Building
156, Fort Clayton.

All Saints Festival
set for Monday
The All Saints Harvest Festival, cele-
brating missions in Panama will be held 5
p.m. Monday at the Curundu cafetorium.
Missionaries from Panama will display
their work. Some activities throughout the
evening will include a chili cook-off con-
test, the movie "The Greatest Story Never
Told," and seeing a special choreographed
version of"We Shall Behold Him." For in-
formation, call Sherril Harrill at 252-6968.

Team building program
to meet in November
The Army Family Team Building train-
ing program will hold classes in Novem-
ber. The training is for volunteers and fam-
ily members. It develops leadership abili-
ties and prepares families to take advan-
tage of available services. Contact Army
Community Service to sign up. Call Paul
Ries at 287-6338/6322 for more informa-
tion.


I


I


Pacific
Saturday


Atlantic
Saturday


�s
at 0.9 feet
at 0.0 feet'

at 0.9 feet
at 0.0 feet










'* News


Tropic Times 3
Oct. 28, 1994


Holiday hours set
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The hours
of operation for the Army and Air Force Exchange
System - Panama Thursday in observance of Pana-
manian Independence Day are as follows:

Corozal
Main PX - 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Sweets Reflections - 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Frank's Franks - 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Wok Works - closed
Casa de Amigos - closed
Bakery - closed
Commissary Frank's Franks - closed

Fort Clayton
Shoppette (95) - closed
Frank's Franks (95) - closed
Anthony's Pizza - 4 p.m.-8 p.m.
Burger King - 6:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
Popeye's - 11 a.m.-10 p.m.
Frank's Franks (by Burger King) - closed
Clayton Plaza Shoppette - 7 a.m.-midnight
Shoppette (519) - 8 a.m.-10 p.m.
Snack bar (519) - closed
Auto parts store - 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Car Care Center - closed
Clothing Sales - closed

Amador
Shoppette - 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Albrook
Shoppette - 7 a.m.-10 p.m.
Snack bar - 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Frank's Franks - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Video rental - 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Furniture store - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Shoe store - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Toyland/Outdoor living - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Class Six - 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

Howard
Main PX - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Shopppette - open 24 hours
Class Six - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Cafeteria - 7 a.m.-2 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Clothing Sales - closed
Service station - 8 a.m.-6 p.m.

Fort Kobbe
Shoppette/video rental - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Burger King - 8 a.m.-3 p.m.

Miscellaneous
Quarry Height shoppette - closed
Gorgas Hospital shoppette - closed
Curundu School cafeteria - closed
Cocoli shoppette - closed
Balboa school cafeteria - closed
Curundu Service Station - 6 a.m.-midnight
Fort Espinar
Shoppette - closed

Fort Davis
Main PX - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Auto parts store - 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Gas station - 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Cafeteria - 8 a.m.-1 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-10 p.m.
Burger King - 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Clothing Sales - closed
Shoppette - 10 a.m. -6 p.m.
Mini-shoppette - 8 a.m. -6 p.m.

Fort Sherman
Shoppette - noon-6 p.m.
Gas station - closed
Anthony's Pizza - noon-4 p.m.

CONCESSIONAIRES
The Army and Air Force Exchange System Pacif-
ic and Atlantic Community Concessionaires will be
closed Thursday in honor of Panamanian Indepen-
dence Day.

COMMISSARIES
All commissaries will be closed Thursday in honor
of Panamanian Independence Day.


24th Wing



kicks off



'94 CFC


Air Force hopes


to raise $60,000

HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) - The Combined
Federal Campaign sign-located on Andrews Boulevard
near the commissary-reflects the 24th Wing's progress
toward its 1994 goal of $60,000.
The CFC gives people the chance to contribute to any
of literally hundreds of worthy organizations, with con-
tributors deciding where their gift goes. The campaign
began Oct. 17 and will run through Nov. 30.
Maj. Kevin Illsley, 24th Wing CFC project officer,
emphasized that some contribution policies from last year
have changed.
"Previously, a portion of all undesignated contribu-
tions people made to the CFC went to overseas family
support and youth activities programs," he said. "This
year, however, people wanting to support these programs
must specify with the four-digit code "FSYP" on their
pledge cards."
To find out more information about the '94 CFC,
people may call the wing's assistant project officer, 2nd
Lt. Rick Jones, at 284-4118/5850.


(U.S. Air Force)
24th Wing CFC project officer Maj. Kevin IIIsley
(left) and assistant project officer 2nd Lt. Rick
Jones flank the giant thermometer that will
reflect contributions made during the 1994 cam-
paign.


Soldier show seeks talent


ALEXANDRIA, Va. (USARSO PAO) - Active duty
Army personnel who would like to audition for the 1995
United States Army Soldier Show should "get their act
together."
"We're looking for soldiers who love to perform, are
talented, have lots of energy and will work hard," said
Nick Credington, the show's artistic director. "Because
they represent the Army's finest, the soldiers we choose
have got to be tops in their unit as well as tops in talent."
Soldiers who sing, dance, perform a specialty act (such
as magic or comedy), or have lighting or sound technician
experience will be selected to make up the cast and crew
of the 1995 Army Soldier Show. Applicants must have a
minimum of 90 days left on active duty after Oct. 31,
1995.
To be considered for selection, soldiers must mail the
following information and visuals to arrive no later than


Dec. 15:
*A half-inch video tape of talent performance
*Department of the Army Personnel Form 2A and 2-1
*Letter of commanders intent to release for 179-day tem-
porary duty
*Entertainment/technical experience resume
*Full-length official military photograph
*The package must be mailed to:
Army Entertainment Division
Attn: Army Soldier Show Selection Committee
P.O. Box 439
Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-0439
Selected soldiers will receive notification in mid-Feb-
mary.
For additional details, contact the local community rec-
reation staff or the U.S. Army Soldier Show, DSN 656-
6393/6394, or commercial (703) 806-6393.


Reserve general selected D-CINC


for mobilization, reserve affairs
FORT CLAYTON (SCRA-AR) - The 65th Army Re- Special Forces Officer course at Fort Bragg, N.C., he was
serve Command's commanding general, Brig. Gen. Jorge assigned to the 46th Special Forces Company in Thai-
Arzola, stationed at Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico, has been land.
selected as deputy commander in chief for mobilization He began his service In the Army Reserve in 1972, as
and reserve affairs. commander of the Headquarters Com-
Arzola will represent the U.S. pany, 166th Support Group.
Southern Command and act as a In 1984, he began a three year tour
pointman in Washington for as Commander of the 246th Quarter-
SOUTHCOM programs, according master Battalion, later returning to the
to Col. Ray Moss, Chairman of Re- Headquarters as Director of Training.
serve Component Fusion Cell. In November, 1987, he was designated
Arzola will be responsible for Deputy Commander for Training of the
the missions of 30,000 reservists USARF-PR, and in February of 1990,
who annually train in the assumed command of the 2nd MTC.
SOUTHCOM area. He was then selected as Commander
Among Arzola's many duties of the USARF-PR in August 1991 and
will be assisting Latin American was promoted to his present rank on
nations develop Army Reserve pro- June 2, 1993. On Jan. 16, 1993, he be-
grams in their own countries, Moss came the first Commanding General of
said. the 65th U.S. Arrny Reserve Com-
Arzola will be replacing Maj. mand.
Gen Felix A. Santini as D-CINC. (courtesy) Arzola holds a Master's Degree in
Arzola was commissioned as an Brig. Gen. Jorge Arzola Industrial and Interpersonal Relations
infantry officer upon graduation from the University of from the Interamerican University.
Puerto Rico's ROTC program in 1966. He entered active In his civilian career he works as the Director of Sup-
duty and attended the Infantry Officer Basic and Airborne port Services, Antilles Consolidated School System at
courses at Fort Benning, Ga. After graduation from the Fort Buchanan.


a









Tropic Times
Oct. 28, 1994News


Traffic Command says

POVs ready for pick up
BALBOA (MTMC) - The following customers have
privately owned vehicles ready for pick up at the POV
Processing Center, Building 1501, Balboa, adjacent to
Pier 18:
Aguilar G.; Belter M.S.; Chisholm D.P.; Cooley S.E.;
Drach, J.E.; Elick R.L.; Fullen R.E.; Giardina F.; Hardy
J.M.; Herron T.G.; Hilbish, F.F.; Johnson V.M.; Kasten
W.A.; Layton M.M.; Lerose N.J.; Mandigo J.D.;
Marcelino W.V.; Mejia-Rangel 0.; Moore J.D.; Morgan 'y _
T.C.; Oconner M.L.; Parker B.; Pence R.A.; Range M.D.;
Reyes N.; Rice T.L.; Schaul D.E.; Sliwicki R.M.; Tekle
S.D.; Williams L.D.; Wilson R.T.

Customers must have the following documents for
pick up of their POVs:
*ID card (current military, dependent, or civilian)
*Driver license (must have Panamanian license for sec-
ond POV)
*POV shipping document (DD Form 788) .
*Vehicle registration or title
*Vehicle keys
*Power of Attorney and photo copies of the sponsor's
bilingual ID card and driver's license (when the sponsor
on orders cannot be present for pick up) Cuban scho
The list is current as of Tuesday. For updates, call cus-
tomer service at 282-4642/3853 or the POV arrival tape Teachers at Camp No.2
recording at 282-4641. Customer service hours are Mon- opening ceremony Oct
day - Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Wednesday hours are English taught by othel
9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. - Safe Haven command
People expecting POVs are reminded to call customer event.
service to leave a contact phone number.


-. -.-
Bushmaster Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays (U.S. Navy)

This 4 1/2-foot bushmaster was found Oct. 19 near the enlisted
members housing area on Radio Farfan. Department of Defense
patrolman Arturo Gordon captured the deadly, poisonous snake
with a snare-type device. If Navy or Air Force personnel see a snake
or any other potentially dangerous animal they should call their
security police. Army personnel should call the Directorate of Engi-
neering and Housing.


Paaa ew umr


Last dance


Galeta Island celebrates


final Navy Birthday Ball
FORT DAVIS (USGA Galeta PAO) - "I can honestly say that I've never seen
The soldiers, sailors and Marines of the Na- so many Army uniforms at a Navy Day
val Security Group Activity, Galeta Island, Ball before," said Perkins about the high
celebrated the command's final Navy Ball attendance of Army personnel.
Oct. 13 at the community club here. The live dinner music performed by lo-
It was more than being the command's cal guitarist Amsecy Ross was appreciated.
final ball that made it special, said Chief "The guitarist was great-it was up-to-
Warrant Officer Larry J. Galloway, event date music and everyone seemed to enjoy
coordinator, it," said Petty Officer 2nd Class David C.
"Everything went smoothly from begin- Anderson.
ning to end," Galloway said. "The whole The traditional cake-cutting ceremony
thing took a lot of planning and coordina- was done with a native flair. A stainless
tion, but it all boiled down to having a good steel machete held by the youngest and old-
time." est sailors in attendance, sliced effortlessly
The ball's guest speaker, Rear Adm. through the cake. The oldest sailor in at-
James Blenn Perkins III, deputy com- tendance, Petty Officer 1st Class Peter J.
mander in chief, U.S. Southern Command, Jez, passed a piece of cake to the youngest
spoke about pride and professionalism. He sailor, Seaman Apprentice Douglas E. En-
also touched on bits of the Navy's proud gland.
fighting history. This tradition signifies the passing of
While the command is not technically a wisdom from the oldest to the youngest
joint-service command, you wouldn't sailor. In return, the youngest sailor is pass-
know it by looking around, Perkins said. ing on his respect to the oldest sailor.


Editor's note: The following summary of news is
taken from the Panamanian press. The translation
and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is made
by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of reporting
or statements made here. Selection of these stories
does not imply any emphasis, judgement or endorse-
ment by the U.S. government. These synopses are
intended only to give non-Spanish speaking people
a flavor for news events in Panama.

Oct. 20
Critica Libre: Paper reports the PTJ confiscated 150
kilos of cocaine from the Cali Cartel and arrested two
Colombians and a Panamanian during an anti-narcotics
operation conducted in El Cangrejo neighborhood of
Panama City. (Article repeated in all newspapers)

Oct. 21
La Prensa: Paper reports Panama's President


Ernesto Perez Balladares as replying to an article in the
Miami Herald by saying he is not servile to the United
States. "I am not servile to anyone," he said. "I defend the
national interests and what I have done is not because I
am paying or collecting points from anyone, much less
the U.S. government."

La Prensa, El Panama America: Papers report that
former Haitian leader Raoul Cedras visited Panama im-
migration offices yesterday to legalize his status in the
country and obtained permission to remain in Panama for
at least one year. Cedras reportedly said he wants to leave
Panama next week. Panama authorities said no such for-
mal request has been received, but according to regula-
tions, there is nothing the government can do to stop him.
Minister of Commerce Nitzia Villarreal is quoted as say-
ing that having Cedras stay in Panama attracts interna-
tional tourism and reminds other nations that Panama is
still on the map.


Oct. 24
El Panama America: Paper reports that Panamanian
President Ernesto Perez Balladares will travel to Hon-
duras to attend the Central American international peace
and development conference.

El Panama America: Paper reports the PRD politi-
cal party has given President Perez Balladares until
January to comply with his promises to provide jobs
for his party members. In the past few months, discon-
tent within the PRD has been very obvious. They are
demanding employment in exchange for their past po-
litical support.

El Siglo: Paper reports according to the PRD politi-
cal party president Gerardo Gonzalez, PRD members
who were dismissed during the Endara administration
will be reinstated into government positions within the
next three months.


2's new Carlos J. Finley School at Empire Range sing at the facility's
A. 17. Cuban children will learn subjects such as math, Spanish and
r Cubans at the school. Brig. Gen. James L. Wilson, Joint Task Force
er, and Lt. Col. Mario A. Valdez, Camp No. 2 commander officiated the


I










Training


Tropic Times
Oct. 28, 1994


Z,,





t- ..z,






Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army)


Spc. Richard Bulnes ground guides a high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle driver.


On the road


Military driving class teaches


soldiers to be 'street-wise'


by Sgt. Eric Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office

ALBROOK AS - Driving in Panama. For some,
that phrase brings a shiver and feelings of dread.
For those in the military who drive for a living,
every day is a challenge. Driving the military vehicles
on narrow streets, over the Bridge of the Americas and
from one ocean to the other, soldiers are constantly
faced with the hazards of driving in Panama.
Soldiers of Company B, 193rd Support Battalion
went through a three-phase drivers training to help
them become safer drivers during their tour overseas.
Besides safety reasons, the unit's mission requires all
soldiers to have the knowledge to operate several
different vehicles.
"Our mission covers the Pacific to the Atlantic, 24
hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year," said
2nd Lt. Samuel Lopez-Santana, Maintenance Platoon
leader and unit motor officer. "Our unit put more than
15,000 miles on vehicles last month. We have drivers


in Suriname, Honduras and up in Fort Chaffee, Ark.
"The training we're conducting is training every
soldier in Panama should have. It's important because
you never know when you'll be pulled to drive a piece
of equipment," he said.
The soldiers were trained on several vehicles,
including the Humvee, two-and-a-half ton and five ton
trucks. The training covered everything from perform-
ing operator maintenance, maintenance checks and
services to familiarization with the vehicles and driv-
ing. The leaders believe this training will accomplish
what is important...fewer accidents.
"If every unit in Panama had this type of training,
the accident rate would be a lot less for soldiers and
civilians," Lopez-Santana said. "We can't wait for an
accident to start this training."
As well as training safer drivers, the unit is practic-
ing for the upcoming truck rodeo and preparing for the
judging for the Army Maintenance Excellence Award.
The unit took third place in the Army last year for
maintenance and are hoping to take the top spot this
time around.


Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army)
Spc. Michael Backman uses his driver's side
mirror, watching the ground guide, while
backing up a two-and-a-half-ton truck.


U.S. troops, Panamanians learn rescue techniques


by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs


HOWARD AFB - The latest search
and rescue techniques were taught to
military members and local officials
during a seminar Oct. 11-14 at the Zo-
diac Recreation Center here.
Local personnel from Joint Rescue
Coordination Center, Army aviation and
special operations made up halfthe class.
The remaining students represented
Panama's National Air Service, National


Maritime Service, Civil Aeronautics
Directorate, and the Paitilla Aero Club.
The course, taught by U.S. Coast
Guard experts, is designed primarily for
U.S. state and county law enforcement/
emergency services and Civil Air Patrol
students, according to Master Sgt. Rene
Zapata of the Joint Rescue Coordination
Center here. Instructors are based at the
National Search and Rescue School,
USCG Reserve Training Center,
Yorktown, Va.
Panama is in the process of estab-


lishing independent search and rescue
procedures in anticipation of the further
drawdown of the U.S. military presence
in the country, according to Zapata. The
government is trying to build its pro-
gram based on the United States model.
"This course will help them become
independent. They'll be able to run res-
cue missions on their own rather than
rely on SOUTHCOM (U.S. Southern
Command) to assume the responsibility
of providing SAR capability for the in-
ternational aviation and maritime com-


munities."
Topics discussed included "How
Not to Conduct a Search," "Lost Subject
Behavior," and "Legal Aspects of SAR."
Attendees also learned about various
high- and low-tech SAR equipment;
from infrared vision, radar and sonar to
dogs, pigeons, seals and dolphins.
The National SAR School offers 20
courses each year at its Yorktown facil-
ity. In addition, the five-day course is
held at locations around the United States
six times a year.


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6Tropic Times
Oct. 28, 1994


Voices


Safe Haven still needs donations


Dear Mayors' Corner,
The Tropic Times had an article requesting donations
of clothing, games, magazines, videos and toys for Oper-
ation Safe Haven.
Please provide the community with additional irifor-
mation for those wishing to make donations to both Oper-
ation Safe Haven and Operation Distant Haven.
Information Seeker

Dear Seeker,
I sent your letter to the non-commissioned officer in
charge of the Safe Haven Family Support Center, Tech.
Sgt. Annette Henry, who provided the following response.
Although Operation Safe Haven is up and running
strong, we have not advertised for donations for the well-
being of Haitian refugees at Operation Distant Haven. The
camps never received Haitian migrants and Operation
Distant Haven is now folding up, sending our troops
home.
To volunteer for Operation Safe Haven, inquire about
donation points, or for more information call 284-3153.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
I take exception to the 24th Air Postal Squadron
spokesperson's statement about mail delivery to Panama
in the July article, "Troops: Panama Mail On Slow Boat"
in the Army Times. In the article, the spokesperson stated,
"There is a perceived delay by the people in Panama."
Perception? I can state in no uncertain terms that there is a
problem with 2nd, 3rd and 4th class mail delivery from
the continental United States.
After forwarding my fifth complaint citing specific ex-


amples of late delivery to the 24th Postal Squadron, I am
writing to the Mayors' Comer, hoping for a response. The
local postal clerks assure me the inquiries were forwarded
to the 24th Air Postal Squadron Operation section for re-
view.
I will cite a couple of my recent problems: Receiving a
March issue of a magazine in July, a 4th class package
that took 52 days to arrive from Colorado, but the replace-
ment package took only six days.
I have done all that the 24th spokesperson initially told
me to do in February: I checked with all magazine pub-
lishers to re-verify mailing addresses and informed the
24th about each instance of late delivery.
Christmas is almost upon us. What will the added strain
of Christmas orders and packages do to an already ailing
system?
What is being done about the problem? It has been at
least 30 days since the 24th said they forwarded the prob-
lems to the U.S. Postal Service. What is the latest update?
Was the problem found? When can we expect prompt
mail delivery within the Postal Service's own 30-45 day
delivery window. Until the problem is corrected, it would
be a good idea if the 24th could update their APO custom-
ers from time to time through the Tropic Times.
Is It In The Mail?

Dear In The Mail,
Capt. Karen Jordan, 24th Air Postal Squadron com-
mander wrote: I sincerely apologize for not answering
your complaints; however, I cannot answer what I do not
receive. Upon receiving your letter I contacted the postal
clerk in question. She remembered "taking care" of two
complaints.
Please let my clarify what was meant in the July article
in the Army Times. The U.S. Postal Service sets standards


of delivery for each class of mail based on point of origin
and destination. For surface mail destined to Panama, the
USPS standard is 45-60 days. While that is a long wait for
customers, surface mail arriving within that time standard
(usually large parcels) is considered acceptable by the
USPS. If the delivery date exceeds 75 days, a claim can
be filed by the originator for the value of the price it was
insured, or for the cost of postage if it was not.
Recently the commander of the Joint Military Postal
Activity-Atlantic and a USPS representative from the
Bulk Mail Center in New Jersey visited the 24th Air Post-
al Squadron to discuss transportation issues. This was a
result of the involvement of senior leadership from the
24th Wing and the U.S. Southern Command to help solve
this problem. As a result, the port of departure for mail
destined to Panama was shifted from Lake Charles, La.
back to Port Everglades, Fla.. This should cut transit time
by several days. JMPA is also working to reduce dead
time in the transit cycle from the BMC to Port Everglades,
and the possibility of using non-U.S. flag ships to carry
the mail.
As for the 24th Air Postal Squadron, we will do a bet-
ter job of keeping our customers updated on the status of
these and other initiatives. To that end, we have assigned
an individual as community relations non-commissioned
officer, who will keep the community abreast of changes,
and we will also post magazine advisories in all post of-
fices when we are notified of late arrivals to the Bulk Mail
Centers.
Editor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral
Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity
chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will
be granted upon request. The Tropic Times reserves
the right edit letters and responses for brevity.


Soldiers brawl in Howard NCO Club


Club fight
Two soldiers were involved in a fight
after one soldier threw a beer bottle at the
other in the Howard NCO Club. The first
bottle hurled missed, but the second bottle
hit the soldier in the head, causing severe
cuts. Another soldier was taken to Gorgas
Army Community Hospital for reconstruc-
tive surgery to his hand.
Alcohol is the catalyst for many acts of
violence. Know your limit and never drive
under the influence of alcohol

Eye-struck
A servicemember reported he was
struck in the eye by another
servicemember at the My Place Bar in
Panama City. The servicemember was tak-
en to Gorgas Army Community Hospital
and released after treatment.

Decal abuse
Because of the abuse of the current
handicapped decals, the Fort Clayton Ve-
hicle Registration Office will be issuing a
handicap placard. According to U.S.
Southern Command regulation 190-5,
paragraph 6c, people authorized a handi-
capped decal are those who are permanent-
ly disabled by the loss of use of one or both


legs or is unable to get around without a
wheelchair or other mechanical device.
People who require a decal need to pick
up the request from the Vehicle Registra-
tion Office, Building 849, Fort Clayton,
and have it filled out by a medical officer
and returned before Nov. 30. After that
date, people without the new handicapped
decal who park in handicapped slots will
be cited with a DD Form 1408.

Recovered property
A bicycle was found in the Fort Kobbe
area, while a cooler was recovered from
the Curundu housing area between Sept.
23-28.
If you have any information about this
property or are missing them and have not
made a report, call the Fort Clayton Mili-
tary Police Investigations Office at 287-
3808/5252.

Stolen jewelry
While performing routine security at
the main exchange, Army and Air Force
Exchange Services security observed a
family member take three necklaces from
a display and put them in her front pocket.
She left the store without paying and was
stopped by security.
The military police remind shoppers
that shoplifting is a crime which can result
in Uniform Code of Military Justice action


and the loss of shopping privileges in
AAFES stores.

Child neglect
The military police want to remind par-
ents not to leave young children unattend-
ed at any time. According to U.S. Army
Garrison Regulation 210-1, children 9
years and younger, must be accompanied
by an adult or supervised by a responsible
person 13 years or older at all times. Peo-
ple caught violating this regulation will be
cited for child neglect.

Bicycles stolen
A quarters at Fort Amador was broken
into and two bicycles were stolen from a
storeroom. The last time the occupant
checked his storeroom was nine days be-
fore the theft.

Bruja speeding
Many citations have been issued for
speeding and reckless driving on Bruja
Road. Exceeding the posted speed limit by
25 mph is considered reckless driving and
takes six points off a person's driver's li-
cense.

Panama Jack anonymous hotline
Anyone with information about drug
smuggling should contact the Panama Jack
anonymous hotline at 285-4185.


Dear Editor,
Quality child care comes from
those who believe in each child as an
individual who can and who will do.
A big thank you to the staff at
the Howard Child Development Cen-
ter.


Also a word of thanks to a very
special lady who has taught me
that a little tact and a lot of class will
take a military wife far. I owe you
one, Marie. I'll keep in touch
from Fitzsimmons, Colo.


Apryl


Housing area crimes
Pacific
Fort Clayton 600 area - one larceny of se-
cured private property
Herrick Heights 200 area - one larcenyof
secured private property
Atlantic
Fort Espinar 100 area - one larceny of se-
cured private property
Off post
Los Angeles - one larceny of secured pri-
vate property
Veracruz - one larceny of secured private
property
Margarita - one larceny of secured private
property


LTropic Times


Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666


This authorized unofficial command information publica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pub-
lished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Pro-
gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of
the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the
U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002

Commander in Chief........................Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs..............................Col. James L. Fetig
Chief......................................Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor.............................. .......................... M aureen Sam pson


Sports Editor....................................................Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editors..................................................Sgt. Cass Purdum
Spc. Tom Findtner
Rosemary Chong

Southern Command Public Affairs Office.....................282-4278
Command Information Officer.....................Patrick Milton

U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.........................287-3007
Public Affairs Officer......................Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer.........................Beth Taylor
Managing Editor..................................Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Editor...............................................Sgt. Robin Shawlinski
Journalists....................................................Sgt. Eric Hortin
Spc. Brian Thomas


U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic................................289-4312
NCOIC........................... ......................... Sgt. Rick Emert

24th Wing Public Affairs Office...................................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer......................Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.......Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists......................................Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush

U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.....................283-5644
Public Affairs Officer....................................Diane Gonzalez
Assistant Public Affairs Officer..............................John Hall
Photographers.....Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays


I








Tropic Times 7
Oct. 28, 1994


Commentary



Pet dumping


Homes needed for stray animal population


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs
Those eyes. Those big, brown innocent eyes.
They look up with hurt and fear as if to ask,
"What have I done? I love you, I thought you
loved me too." And as the car drives away, he runs a
while trying to keep up, barking and crying as if
screaming, "Why are you leaving me here? I'm scared.
Please come back and take me home!"
As night comes and a light rain begins to fall, he
crawls under a bush, shivering and whimpering quietly.
Though he is hungry, he is afraid to leave this spot. His
family might come back and he would miss them.
Surely they were coming back. He had done nothing
wrong.
He spent his two years of life with his family.
Playing with the children in the yard, protecting his
family's property when they were gone and loving them
unconditionally.
But they don't come back that night-or ever. This
little dog, who once lived well and secure in the warmth
and love of a family he cherished, now spends his days
dodging fast moving cars, fighting other dogs for what
little food he can scrounge from garbage cans and
running from people who want nothing but to hurt him.
He will never understand what happened to his
family or why they hated him so much that they left him
to live as he does now.
To be quite honest, I don't understand how people
can do this either. To adopt a pet, whether a cat or a dog,
love it and take care of it and then, just dump it some-
where and take off as if this is a normal part of life.
I have heard the excuses-I didn't have the heart to
put him to sleep; I couldn't find a good home; I just
couldn't take care of him anymore; I am going back to
the states and can't afford to take him with me; It's
better this way, at least he has a chance for life.
I'm here to tell you, these or any other excuses, are
nothing but lame, inexcusable, fool-hearted and asinine
bull...puckey.
Didn't they think before they took this living creature
into their home that this was a lifetime deal? Didn't they
think that one day they would be going back to the
states? Didn't they think that dumping him off some-
where would make his life miserable and that he would
suffer, be lonely and live a very short and painful life?
That's the problem. People who are cruel and
uncaring enough to just dump a family pet off and drive
away don't have the gray matter it takes to think.
Whatever the reason, I personally think they are the
scum of the Earth.


This tabby kitten is one of many pets available
for adoption at the Corozal Veterinary Treat-
ment Facility. For information, call 285-5866.
And for those who think that abandoned pets aren't a
serious problem and that I shouldn't be wasting my or
their time, I have done a little research.
According to the book, "Train Your Cat," by animal
psychologist Terry Jester, approximately seven million
cats were destroyed in the U.S. in 1989 at animal shelters
and pounds. This number doesn't even come remotely
close to the number of animals that are killed each year
by starvation, disease or injury after being abandoned by
their owners.
Closer to home, the numbers aren't nearly as omi-
nous. But, comparing the population of the United States
to that of the military stationed here, the numbers are just
as painful.
The Corozal Veterinary Treatment Facility received
1,115 stray animals over the past 18 months. Of those,
163 were reclaimed by their owners and 433 were
adopted-thankfully, but hopefully to homes where they
won't end up back on the streets.
Still, this leaves 519 that either died of complications
to illness or injury, or that had to be humanely destroyed.
And these were the lucky ones. Many thousands more


still roam the streets in search of food, shelter and maybe
just a little kindness and love. Most never find anything
but the wheels of a passing car and lay unmoumed along
the side of a busy road.
Cats and dogs are not wild animals, they are domesti-
cated. Just because they are animals, it doesn't mean
they can make it on their own. We domesticated them, it
is our responsibility to care for them.
If you have a pet of your own, remember that for
every pooch that lays at your feet and every purring fur-
ball that curls up in your lap, there are thousands more
that are laying in muddy ditches or curled up in damp
holes. Make sure your family pet doesn't end up the
same way.
For those who don't have pets but may one day want
one, think it through BEFORE you take that cute and
cuddly fur-ball home. It is a lifetime commitment that
not everyone is ready for.
If you are absolutely positive you will be keeping this
animal for the rest of its life, take him home and fill his
life with love because that is what he will do for you. If
you are not sure, do yourself and the animal a favor and
don't take him.
If you do take the little fellow home, do him another
favor and have him fixed as soon as he is old enough. A
big contributor to the stray population is unwanted litters
from both family pets and those animals who were so
cruelly abandoned.
When you see an abandoned pet, report it to the
military police or the nearest veterinary facility. If you
see someone or know of someone who has or is
planning to abandon a pet, report them as well.
Abandoning a pet is not only cruel, inhumane and
coldhearted, but it is also against Army regulations and,
if stateside, it is against the law. There are many avenues
that can be taken if an emergency situation comes up
and you can no longer care for your pet. Advertise for a
good home, ask friends, ask the veterinary facility or
even board them until the situation is resolved-just
don't take them out and dump them.
If the reasons are actually lame excuses and you just
don't feel like keeping your pet, you can seek the same
avenues instead of abandoning them. Just because a
human can't make a responsible, mature decision and
stick to it, doesn't mean the animal should suffer for it.
So, the next time you feel like cursing out that skinny
little cat that rummages through your garbage at 3 a.m.
or you feel like throwing a stick at that scrawny little
pooch that always tries to follow you home, remem-
ber-it isn't their fault. Curse out those uncaring
individuals who dumped them and left them to fend for
themselves.


I Dret uoes


What should happen to people who abandon their pets?


"Ifthey can find the
person, they should be
fined because it's ani-
mal abuse."


Tech. Sgt. David Santos
24th Logistics Group


"When people get a
pet, it's a commitment.
They should assume the
responsibility and find
someone to adopt it."


Lt. Dan Durn
USS Lewis B. Puller


/


"I think they should be
fined, if they can be
found."


Cinda Beach
Family member


"I think they shouldn't
be able to have pets.
They should be tracked
so they know who's
bringing pets over."


Cpl. Shushen Boone
565th Ordnance Det.


"I don't really like pets.
I don't have any. I don't
really think there's that
kind of problem."


Staff Sgt. Jorge Garagate
HHC, 106th Signal Brigade


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries-or responses to commentaries-to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for
brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.






Tropic Times
Oct. 28, 1994


story and photos by Sgt. James Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
D on't call them bluesuiters while they're in
Panama. For the duration of their deployment in
support of Operation Safe Haven, the Air Force
members at Camp No. 2 will be dressed in green, black,
and brown camouflage.
More than 150 people are deployed to operate the
camp. The majority are Air Force members from all
comers of the United States: from Nellis AFB, Nev., and
Langley AFB, Va.; to Offutt AFB, Neb., and Barksdale
AFB, La.
"We've got people from bases all over and they've
gelled as a team quickly to meet our objectives," said Lt.
Col. Mario A. Valadez, Camp No. 2 commander. Valadez
is from Headquarters 12th Air Force, Davis-Monthan
AFB, Ariz.
Valadez also gave credit to the airmen of the 24th
Wing and soldiers from U.S. Southern Command and
U.S. Army South who account for the rest of the Camp
No. 2 crew. Together they have tackled what he calls a
most unusual assignment.
"We are responsible for the humanitarian needs of
more than 2,000 people. There is a unique and challeng-
ing mission here, but it's one we've been very successful
at," Valadez said. "I often get stopped in the camp to be
thanked (by Cubans) for three things: the facilities, the
way we treat them and the food."
By Oct. 13, the camp's population had reached 2,156;
however, up to 2,500 Cubans could eventually relocate
here from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
"We treat this like it is a small town," said Master Sgt.
William A. Schmidt, the Non Commissioned Officer in
Charge of camp's tactical operations center. "We have to
care for their medical needs, give them food and provide
shelter. We also lend the Cubans tools, concrete gravel
and help them build things for themselves."
Schmidt, who is also the camp's signal officer, is from
Tinker AFB, Okla., and sees this assignment as a change
of pace for Air Force members. A former security
policeman, the NCO was used to keeping people out of
installations.
"On the other hand, the SPs (security police) here keep
people in, but they have to handle it very carefully," he
said.
More than 80 security police are deployed to the 20-
acre site from units at Andrews AFB, Md., and Davis-
Monthan. Despite not having a single bilingual person
among them, the security police encourage the "protec-
tors" image by conducting unarmed foot patrols within
the fence and manning a 24-hour precinct house and
information booth in the middle of the camp.
"We try to show that we're there for them," said
Master Sgt. Steve Hersh, the SP day shift flight sergeant.
"We stop and chit-chat, try to fit the image of a friend or
older brother, and as a result I think the majority of the
public trusts us."
Two-by-two, the foot patrols hike through the camp.
For half of their 12-hour shift they walk, dodging mud
puddles the blazing sun hasn't dried up, breaking up an
occasional disturbance, but more often pausing to
challenge the language barrier by swapping words. Their
goal, according to Hersh, is to develop a "beat cop"
atmosphere where community members are familiar with
their law enforcement officials and see them as friends.
During one of its frequent stops at the precinct house
to refill canteens, a patrol is just as likely to sit down with
a Cuban as it is with an American. Tech. Sgt. Richard T.
Kendall, of the 24th Security Police Squadron at Howard
AFB, recruited five community members to act as liaisons
by fielding questions and helping to man the desk.
Kendall speaks Spanish but admits his mastery of the
language has "improved 100 percent" while teaching the
liaisons English police phrases such as "this person wants
to report a theft," "There is an injury," and "Here is a
public address announcement."
"And they've picked it up very quickly," he said. "In
fact, they've done so well, it's been OK'd to keep them
on full-time."
On the outside, police keep vigil at several guardposts
and patrol three-quarters of a mile of fence line on four-
wheel all-terrain vehicles. To date, only two immigrants
have successfully climbed the fence and both were


stopped and returned to the camp within minutes.
"The first couple of weeks were tough. We weren't
used to the heat and humidity," Hersh, who is from
Andrews AFB, said. "We've got a good crew here
though and they've come through well
"We modeled our security after programs used at
bases in the U.S. Once we assessed our weaknesses and
our strengths, we built an operating instruction so that
the next team can step right in," Hersh said.
While the security police work to ensure domestic
tranquility at the camp, others provide for the needs of
both the immigrants and military members assigned
there. The team includes civil engineering NCOs on
temporary duty here to offer guidance for camp con-
struction projects, a 24th Medical Squadron dentist with
two assistants, and chaplains who see to the spiritual
welfare of Cubans and Americans alike.
Providing support for all of the camp's airmen and
soldiers is the S-1 element that acts as a combined
military personnel flight and orderly room. They track
career issues like reenlistments and career-job-reserva-
tions, process emergency leave requests, and provide
other administrative support such as relaying informa-
tion from the joint task force headquarters.
Working in the field environment and trying to meet
the needs of people from so many different bases has
proven to be challenging for the personnel staff.
"When we got here, we had computers, but no
electricity for them," Senior Airman Christine E.
Harwood, an information manager from Nellis AFB,
said. "Now we've been moved inside a building, but
before we had to go to JTF headquarters or Howard for
personnel jobs."
One key ally of Harwood and her co-workers has
been the Personnel Support for Contingency Operations
office here.
"Our customers are from various bases throughout
CONUS (continental United States) and we have to
communicate with our base counterparts at these
locations," Staff Sgt. Dave Gordon, NCOIC of person-
nel, said. "To do this we go through PERSCO. They
have played a significant role in helping with Camp 2
personnel jobs."
Personnel's labors aren't limited to military mem-
bers. They've drawn the Cuban immigrants under their
wings as well. The section is responsible for maintain-
ing the Deployable Mass Population Identification and
Tracking System, a computer program designed to
monitor the names and other personal information of the
Cubans occupying the camp.
"Each of us had to get trained on the system when we
got here, but now it can tell us the occupation, age,
marital status and more about any of the Cubans in the
camp," Gordon, TDY from Barksdale AFB, La., said.
"It's a lot of work, but when you look out there and
see all those faces, it makes you feel like you're doing
something worthwhile. They are glad to be in a safe
and better life."
More than one airman has picked up on this current
of optimism that runs through the Cubans. Tech. Sgt.
Carlos F. Ruiz of the 24th Services Squadron monitors
the food contractor providing three meals a day to the
immigrants.
Ruiz and other services specialists must ensure the
food being served is of high quality and that proper
sanitary standards are being met. Camp attendance is
also taken at meal times as the Cubans file through the
chow line before sitting down to eat.
The job is fast-paced and completed in military
fashion. More than 2,000 people get their food, sit and
eat quickly before surrendering their seat to another
diner.
Yet Ruiz always makes time to talk to the many
friends he has made during deployment. During his
rounds of the seven 100-person tents in the seating area,
the NCO is like that hometown bartender with a
sympathetic ear.
"Being able to communicate with them, I can share
my experiences and listen to their stories in turn," he
said. "When you get to share with them, to know them,
it's great. It gives them hope. There are doctors, lawyers
and people of all classes here who are now neighbors
and they've come together for one reason ... the dream
of freedom."


Senior Airman Susan M. Santoro helps 15-year-old


r


Staff Sgt. James R. Bruce helps Cubans at Camp N





Tropic Times 9
Oct. 28, 1994


rP1111""
a"-o-


C/


Capt. (Dr.) Darell J. Evans prepares Luis Manuel
Farres Cespedes for a tooth extraction.


" U l.. , -' .., .'
. , _.- a- -'.. .: ,


I~q. >

L


arien P. Lleva expand his English vocabulary.


. 2 build a framework for bathrooms.


Master Sgt. Raul G. Castro announces birthdays
and anniversaries, among other announcements,
over the camp public address system.







%\ i


Airman 1st Class Melvin A. Martin finds the bottom of his canteen during a patrol.


e...A


OA
a^ N







SO Tropic Times
10 Oct. 28, 1994


Top enlisted, NCO of the year selected


COROZAL (Tropic
Times) - Air Force Master
Sgt. Charles E. Watts Jr.
was named the U.S. South-
ern Command's non-com-
missioned leader of the
year.
As SOUTHCOM Intel-
ligence superintendent for
the Reconnaisance Opera-
tions Branch at Albrook
AFS, his duties include
managing all recon assets
and airborne platforms.
Watts has received both
the Defense Meritorious
Service Medal and Merito-
rious Service Medal.
He served three years at
Offutt AFB, Neb., before
coming to Panama in 1987.
He and his wife,
Cordula, have two chil-
dren, Joshua, 8, and
Tabitha, 4.


Master Sgt. Charles E. Watts Jr.


COROZAL (Tropic
Times) - Spc. Calvin B.
Merritt was selected as the
U.S. Southern Command's
servicemember of the year.
He is a travel clerk as-
signed to Special Operations
Command South at Albrook
AFS. He also produces the
SOCSOUTH quarterly
newsletter.
Merritt arrived in
Panama in 1992, after three
years with the 5th Special
Forces Group at Fort
Campbell, Ky.
He is studying sociology
at Florida State University.
Merritt is the son of Mas-
ter Sgt. Patricia A. Merritt of
the Pennsylvania Air Na-
tional Guard. He and his
wife, Dalys, have two
daughters, Grethel, 8, and
Jalle, 1.


Spc. Calvin B. Merritt


Maureen Sampson (Tropic Times)
VFW member Dannie Cooper is involved in many local
groups, including the Abou Saad Shriners and the Road
Knights motorcycle club.


Local AUSA

liaison wins

President's

service medal
ARLINGTON, VA (AUSA) - William
Hinkle, the liaison for the corporate mem-
bership of the Isthmian Chapter of the As-
sociation of the United States Army was
awarded the President's Medal for excep-
tional service to AUSA Oct. 17 during the
AUSA's 40th annual meeting in Washing-
ton, D.C.
Hinkle has served the U.S. Army and
AUSA for more than a decade. He has es-
tablished numerous programs that focused
on military and civilian understanding and
cooperation towards the U.S. Army. He
has also championed causes that directly
benefitted American soldiers, their fami-
lies and the people of the Republic of Pan-
ama.


VFW member


appointed to


National POW/


MIA Committee
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (VFW Headquarters) - Dannie
Cooper, a member of Veterans-of Foreign Wars Post 3822
in Ancon, Republic of Panama, has been appointed to serve
as a member of the organization's National Prisoners of
War/Missing in Action Committee, by the Commander in
Chief of the VFW of the United States Allen F. Kent.
In announcing the appointment, Kent said Cooper's
record of service and achievement to both the nation and
the VFW were the key considerations in making the selec-
tion.
The National POW/MIA Committee is responsible for
establishing the goals and objectives for the VFW during
the 1994-95 administrative year.
The over two-million member VFW is celebrating its
95th anniversary of service to the country's 28 million liv-
ing veterans and their families.
Cooper is involved in many community activities and
social groups such as the Boy Scouts of America, the Abou
Saad Shriners and works in Panama as the administrator of
the Corozal memorial cemetery.


Capt. John Leggett (U.S. Army)
U.S. Army South set up a display of the USARSO mission at the Associa-
tion of the U.S. Army Annual Convention in Washington D.C. Oct. 17-20.


He has also been instrumental in ar-
ranging social events such as the annual
AUSA Open House Christmas Ball and
the command Family Day program and
picnic.
With Hinkle's help, the Isthmian chap-


ter has been selected three times since
1991 as AUSA's best overseas chapter
and has received numerous awards for
best chapter overall, best corporate mem-
bership support and greatest percentage
increase of membership.


The following 24th Wing members
were selected for promotion by the CY
94A Major's Central Selection Board,
convened in August: Michael R. Drake
and William S. Racho, 24th Air Support
Operations Squadron; Patrick J. Johnson,
24th Operations Group; Eric A. Pohland,
24th Security Police Squadron; Brenda M.
Robinson, 24th Wing *; and Andrew M.
Shoop, 310th Airlift Squadron (5351).
Congratulations, selectees.
(*Maj. Robinson is now chief of the
11th Supply Squadron's management sys-
tems flight, Boiling AFB, Washington
D.C.)



The Deputy Chief of Staff of Resource
Management gave out the following civil-
ian awards:

Sustained Superior Performance
Award - Irma Finocchiaro, David Reilly,
Isolina Norris, Omaira Castillo, Janet Lam
Ho, Magda Buchanan, Rina Cabrinha,
Norma Chavoya, Yolanda Jimenez,
Alberto Lombardo, Esmie McLaughlin,
Javier Oberto and Brinett Young.

Special Act Award - Elizabeth Brown,
Roberto Atherley and Lonnie Iglesias.

Quality Step Increase - Sandra
Goodman.

Certificate of Promotion - to grade 5,
Juan Wong, Paulina Camacho. To grade 6,
Deborah Cornejo, Elida Samaniego,
Brinett Young and Clara Deceno. To grade
7, Kathy Degroff, Victoria Steppy,
Charlene Ladd, Olga Abadia Kelson and
Tracy Grimberg. To grade 9, Iram Clunie,
Michael Lopez and Robert Rogers. To
grade 11, Renee Nellis, Yvonne Walcott
and Miguel Charris. To grade 12, Lisa
Samson.

Years of Service - Five years - Chris-
tina Chial, Yenny Villalobos, Lucas
Angulo and Maria De Leon. Ten years -
Iram Clunie and Jonelle Hidreth. Fifteen
years - May Neill, Genell Escala, Ailsa
Mokillo, Maria Clara Guzman, Marily
Gordon and Elena Anderson. Twenty
years - Raul Campbell, Sydney Richards,
Roberto Atherley, Aixa Nunez, Arthur
Williams and Antonio Morena.


4


-a:


40W


,.*-Milestones


, .,..�
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.,g











Features


Tropic Times 1
Oct. 28, 1994 1


Air Force people 'make a difference'


by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - Active duty mem-
bers, civilians and family members from
several local military organizations
baked cookies, clipped coupons, served
meals, fingerprinted children, pounded
nails and scraped and painted buildings,
and even pricked fingers and blew air in
people's eyes Saturday to try and "make
a difference" in the local community.


This is the fourth year the annual
"Make a Difference Day" event has
been celebrated in the U.S.-and the
second year it has been celebrated in the
Panama community, said Laila Yeager,
project manager for this year's activi-
ties.
"Many people would like to 'make a
difference' every day, but with their
jobs and their kids and all the things that
are happening in their lives, they often
simply run out of time," she explained.

,.. ~


(U.S. Air Force) �
Staff Sgt. J.C. Wheeler, 24th Security Police Squadron, fingerprints 5-
year-old Casey Williams.


"Others really don't believe they can
make a significant difference by them-
selves."
"Make a Difference Day" addresses
both issues, letting people set aside a
specific day to work out their schedules
and get together with others, to combine
their efforts toward a common good.
Some of the people who pooled their
efforts and those who benefited from
them included:
*People from the Family Support
Center delivered home-baked cookies
to unaccompanied airmen living in the
dormitories, and also handed out cou-
pons at the Howard and Corozal com-
missaries.
*24th Security Police Squadron per-
sonnel registered bicycles and finger-
printed children for Project FIND at the
Howard theater and the Albrook
Shoppette area while the 24th Civil En-
gineer Squadron members performed
bicycle safety inspections at the same
locations.
*Members of the 24th Operation
Support Squadron worked to beautify
Albrook AFS by planting young trees
along the road leading from the back
gate.
*24th Medical Group optometry spe-
cialists performed glaucoma screening
and collected.used eyeglasses to "re-
cycle" among people who have none,
while health promotions specialists did
cholesterol screening at the Howard
commissary.
*The 310th Airlift Squadron spear-
headed a project to paint and renovate
areas of the dormitory in Building 810 at
Albrook AFS. Other dorm residents as-
signed to other organizations also par-
ticipated in "sprucing up" the place in
which they live.
*The Howard/Albrook Enlisted
Spouses' Club put on a dinner for more


than 40 homeless men at the "Luz y
Vida" Men's home in Casco Viejo,
Panama.
*People from the 24th Air Support
Operations Squadron put on a used cloth-
ing drive, and the Howard and Albrook
youth centers and AAFES collected both
clothing and toys for donation to under-
privileged children.
"A lot of people got together to work
on our consolidated dorm," said Senior
Airman Scott Reed, 24th Air Postal
Squadron. "We did some cleaning and
painting, we replaced broken fixtures,
we hung some pictures and generally
tried to make the dorm more livable. I
expected dorm residents would partici-
pate, 'cause we live here, but it was great
to see other people working on a project
that didn't benefit them. They were just
doing something nice for someone else
-us."
"The bike registration program is a
mandatory program which all commu-
nity members must participate in," said
Staff Sgt. Jacqueline Wheeler, installa-
tion crime prevention monitor. "Unfor-
tunately, because of people's work
schedules and other factors, it's some-
times difficult for them to come to us.
We decided to 'make a difference' by
setting up in a central location during
non-duty hours and making it easier for
them to find us."
As Make A Difference Day project
manager, Yeager expressed her appre-
ciation for the many volunteers' efforts,
"especially those active-duty members
who put in all those extra hours, in
addition to the already heavy loads
they're working."
"When communities get organized
and pool their efforts, more people can
benefit from those efforts," she said.
"People really can take a single day and
use it to make life better for others."


Soldier shares common bond with


by Spc. Brian Thomas
USARSO Public Affairs Office
EMPIRE RANGE - Sgt. Danilo Delpino is mag-
netic. The attraction people have to him is undeniable.
As he walks through the compound of Community
Camp No. 3 he draws people from all angles. Some
have questions, some have complaints, others just
want to say hello to their friend.
The Cubans at Camp No. 3 flock to Delpino be-
cause in him, they see one of their very own. And not
just because he is Cuban.
Delpino, assigned to Bravo Company, 193rd Sup-
port Battalion, shares a special kinship with these
people because 14 years ago, he was one of them. He
not only shares a homeland with the Cuban population
of Camp No. 3, he also shares an experience.
He too took to the waters of the Caribbean Sea in
search of freedom. Delpino was part of the Mariel
boatlift in 1980, and came to the United States on
May 22 of that year.
Now, after becoming a U.S. citizen and spending 1
nine years in the Army, Delpino is here to welcome
this generation of freedom-seekers.
"I was dreaming about this," Delpino said. "When
I saw what was happening in Cuba I thought maybe
there would be another Mariel boatlift."
The key distinction between Delpino's experi-
ence and that of this new generation, however, is
this: Delpino went right to the United States in 1980,
these Cubans are in Panama.
Delpino spent 71 days at Fort Indian Town Gap in
Pennsylvania, arriving there the day after the boat he
and 11 others sailed in was towed to Key West by the
U.S. Coast Guard.
On July 31, 1980, he was given a plane ticket to
Miami, $10 in cash and paperwork showing that he 3
was in the country legally. Four years later he be-
came a U.S. citizen.
Since then, Delpino has been in the Army, spend-


ing the last three years in Panama. His current assign-
ment appears to be one he was fated for.
His job at Camp No. 3 is critical to the Cubans: the
issue and resupply of the essential items needed for
daily life. Working in supply, he gave the Cubans their
initial issue upon arrival at the camp: clothing, toilet-
ries and other items needed by people who brought
nothing with them when they fled their country.
As Camp No. 3 took on over 300 Cubans a day in
early October, Delpino was there to greet them.
"When they arrived on the first day, I made a speech
as a welcome," he said.
Delpino volunteered for this duty. He worked part
time for awhile at Camp No. 1, and has worked full
time at Camp No. 3.
"It is very, very exciting for me, and they are happy
to see me here," he said. "They are glad to see a Cuban
here.


Spc. Brian Thomas (U.S. Arm
Sgt. Danilo Delpino talks with Cubans at Camp No
3. As a member of the Mariel boatlift in 198(
Delpino shares a bond with this new generation c
migrants.


Cuban migrants
"They ask me a lot ofquestions. They ask, 'What do
you think about us?' I tell them to have faith, patience
and belief in God because they will have a better
future."
Delpino said he made his voyage for political
reasons.
"When I was 20 years old I had my mind already
made up," Delpino said. "Tourists were allowed to
come to Cuba and they opened my eyes. When I talked
to foreigners, I saw the difference between the socialist
and capitalist systems.
"In Cuba, there is no freedom of speech, there is no
opposition in the government. You cannot express
your feelings. There is no freedom of religion."
In 1980, before he sailed for the United States,
Delpino said he jumped the fence to the Peruvian
Embassy in Havana and received asylum to Peru.
"After I was granted asylum, the Cuban govern-
ment offered for me to go to the United States,"
Delpino said. "I chose that because the United States
is the best country in the world."
Now, as he watches a repeat of the effort that
brought him his freedom, Delpino said he has had
mixed feelings.
"I felt happy and sad at the same time," he said.
"Happy because now they have freedom and make a
new life. They have a better future. I was sad because
I saw how they came, how they have nothing."
Delpino, who is married and has two children, left
his parents and two sisters in Cuba in 1980. One
sister, who now lives in Miami, also was a part of the
Mariel Boatlift. He said his parents have visited
Panama, but returned to Cuba.
"The reason they went back is because I have a
nephew and niece and they would not be allowed to
. go," Delpino said. "I was expecting them in this
group."
, He said his remaining sisters and their children did
)f not make the voyage, however. A cousin did, Delpino
said, and is currently at Guantanamo Bay.










1 Tropic Times
12 Oct. 28, 1994


* lisry


* . ... -a.


(Courtesy)
Fort Kobbe's Gun Emplacement No. 1, equipped with a 155mm Panama Mount artillery weapon, stands watch along the Panama Canal'at Bruja'
Point Jan. 31, 1929.


Panama gun mount plays key role in WWII


by Dolores De Mena
U.S. Army South Historian
During World War I the French
155mm gun, a heavy tractor-drawn weap-
on, was put into production with slight
modifications by the United States as the
Model 1918. The Grande Puissance
Filloux, more commonly in the American
service as the GPF, was the most widely
used of the mobile artillery pieces adopted
for seacoast defense after WWI.
In the 1920's shortly after WWI, sur-
plus 75mm guns (Models 1897 and 1917)
and 155mm GPF guns (Model 1918) were
assigned to the Canal Zone for beach de-
fense use. Accordingly, 42 75mm and 46
155mm guns were sent to the Canal Zone.
(This is notable since only 65 155mm
guns had been produced prior to the attack
against Pearl Harbor).
A project was prepared for their em-
placement at key points to cover the beach-
es and for the construction of light maga-
zines to serve them. Strategically located,
the guns were intended to serve a threefold
purpose: to provide close-in harbor de-
fense, to deliver enfilading fire on landing
craft, and to protect the major harbor de-
fense fortifications. The weapons were
emplaced in the vicinity of the harbor de-
fense batteries and other key sites and were
manned by Coast Artillery personnel.
The GPF was greatly improved be-
tween the two world wars, mainly to in-
crease its mobility by providing it with
modern wheels and pneumatic tires in
place of the old cast-steel wheels. It was
used throughout the 1920s and 1930s to
train thousands of reserve and National
Guard coast artillerymen, and after Pearl
Harbor was rushed in large numbers to
guard unfortified positions along both
coasts of the United, States, the Panama
Canal and in the Pacific.
Although the carriage of the 155 al-


lowed a wider scope of traverse than the
average for guns designed for field use, the
lateral movement was still insufficient for
fire against moving targets.
An experimental permanent mount in a
concrete emplacement for the 155mm guns
was designed and built jointly by the Dis-
trict Engineer force and the Coast Artillery
troops to increase the rate of fire and to fa-
cilitate traversing. By replacing the trails
spades with small flanged wheels which
ran on a permanently installed track encir-
cling the gun, it was possible to swing the
weapon in a 360 degree traverse with great
rapidity.
The result was a simple and relatively
inexpensive platform consisting essential-
ly of a segment of curved rail embedded in
concrete, along which the gun's twin trails
could easily be moved.
Several of the batteries in the Panama
Canal Zone were equipped with the circu-
lar track and a number with a semicircular
adaptation which permitted a 180 degree
traverse. Because this type of emplacement
was initially developed and tested in the
Panama Canal Zone, it came to be known
as the "Panama Mount." However, in spite
of the demonstrated usefulness of the Pan-
ama Mount, it was not until just before
WWII that all the 155mm guns were so
equipped.
These 155mm GPF guns were
emplaced at Tortuguilla Point, Naranjitos
Point, Fort Sherman, Fort Randolph,
Palma Media Island, and Galeta Island on
the Atlantic side and on Flamenco Island,
Culebra Island, Taboguilla Island, Urava
Island, Taboga Island, and Fort Kobbe on
the Pacific side.
From the very start of WWII most ord-
nance officers were advocates of heavy ar-
tillery, a term that generally included
weapons ranging from the 155mm gun (or
the medium 155mm howitzer) to the
240mm howitzer.


By 1 December 1944, the U.S. Ord-
nance Department was directed to step up
its production of light and medium artil-
lery ammunition. The monthly rate of pro-
duction for ammunition for the 155mm
gun was to be increased by 50 percent,


from four hundred thousand per month to
six hundred thousand.
The 155mm proved to be particularly
useful in the war zones and served as the
principal coast defense weapon on a num-
ber of Pacific islands.


I&1~~~1 & .JOEc~~~�'-
Iv


r A


,t,,














Sports

larry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13


Grunts slam Air Force


by Senior Airman Joel Langton
Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau


Women selected for
'94 All-isthmian team
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - Five women were
selected for the 1994 All-isthmian basketball team
Monday.


Coaches from the league vote for players to be HOWARD AFB - The dirty boots of infiintry soldiers
named to the team. The players selected are: stomped all over the fly boys in the Panama Interservice
Player Team School Basketball Championship at Howard AFB last week.
Abby Higley Cougars BHS The Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th
Karen Kemp Machine BHS Battalion 87th Infantry Regiment from Fort Davis whipped
Audrey Ernest Devils BHS Howard's 24th AirIntelligence Squadron/Operational Sup-
Janelle Hauser Bulldogs BHS port Squadron 60-49.
Joanna Diaz Machine BHS The grunts edged ahead by five points at the end of the
The women's championship tournament con- secondhalf.ThreepointersbyJeffreyDeuitchandSenordor
cludes 5:30 p.m. today at Balboa High School. The Hines with a minute and a half left helped provide 5-87th
Green Devils take on the Bulldogs for the league the five-point cushion. A 13-point second-half scoring
title. burst from Norris Davis gave it everything else it needed as
their lead swelled to as much as 14-points.
Fishing event serves Championships were nothing new to the Army five;
they won the Fort Davis championship and the U.S. Army
injured child funding South championship before taking the interservice title.
Deuitch said the championships had given them plenty of
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - The Legion of confidence.
Abou Saad Temple will host their annual fishing "We were neverworried. We playtogetheras ateamand
tournament Thursday at Gatun Lake. Prizes will be we knew that would make the difference," he said.
presented for largest fish, heaviest stringer and most However, the 5-87th coach had high praise for their Air
fish caught over 15 inches. All proceeds will be Force competitors from the Pacific side of the isthmus.
donated to the Transportation Fund that is used to "I thought they were the best team in the tournament,
send crippled and burned children here in Panama other than us. Theyjust didn'thave enough horses," he said.
to the United States and return. A concession stand The Air Force "horse" that kept them in the game was
will be available to the public. For information, call guard Johnny Taylor, who managed to bomb the 5-87th for
Terry Zittle at 261-8018. twenty-five points.
Taylor nailed 14 ofhis points in the first half. Taylor said
when the grunt club tightened their defense in the second


Special Boat Unit 26 wins


Navy three-event tourney F


RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) - Special
Boat Unit 26 combined its efforts to best Naval
Special Warfare Unit 8, compiling 110
points to NSWU's 81 in the Rodman
Intramural Three-Event Competition
here Oct. 19-21.
The units were tied after the first two
events, the tug-o-war and the 50-meter a
swim. In the 5-kilometer run, SBU had
the edge, 42 runners to NSWU's 22,
and took the lead in points, 70 to
NSWU's 41, to earn the win.
Event coordinator Morise Conerly
was surprised at some of the athletes'
mettle.
"Of the 150 people we had overall, a
handful were competing in another Miguel
triathlon at Howard the next day," their st<


Conerly said. "I couldn't believe it...I guess some
people can do stuff like that."


Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays (U.S. Navy)
Toyloy (left) and Morise Conerly look at
opwatches during the 50-meter swim race.


. -




Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto Taylor (U.S. Navy)
Members of Naval Special Warfare Unit 8 combine efforts on the tug-o-war.


N..,W













in the 5-kilometer race. Skalski and Duerr finished first and
second respectively.


The mighty Cougars fall to the Ti-
gers off a Jon Guerra touchdown
and a Ricky Alvarez interception.


Special teams provided some of
the best plays, and one of the strang-
est, in last week's action.


Oct. 28, 1994


half, he was hobbled.
"Everywhere I went, I had two people with me. It was
a lot harder. They forced us to make adjustments and then
we couldn't keep up," he said.
That was the game plan, 5-87th head coach Lewis
Fergerson said.
"We took him out of the game. They try to live and die
by their three-point shot and we took that away from them,"
he said.
However, Air Force coach Glenn Richard called it a
mere breakdown in execution.
"We took them out of their game in the first half but we
had a breakdown in execution in the second half and they
took advantage of it," he said.
A vital part of the Army game plan was 6-foot, 6-inch,
203 pound center Davis. The former junior college stand
out blocked six shots in addition to his 18 points.
Davis and Fergerson said getting him the ball was part
of the game plan.
"At first, we weren't in the game plan. In the first half,
I wasn't getting the ball (2 blocks, 5 points). In the second
half, they started getting me the ball and I started producing
(4 blocks, 13 points)," Davis said.
The 5-87th players learned they didn't like losing early
in the season. Their only loss was their season opener.
The Air Force club wasn't quite as dominating. They
finished second in their base championship, but even then,
Richard optimistically predicted their team would end up in
the intraservice championship.
Despite the loss, Richard's confidence in his club hadn't
wavered. "I still think we had the best team in the tourna-
ment. We just didn't play together."


*SCN AM radio schedule
*NFL name game
*Sports standings










14 Tropic Times
Oct. 28, 1994


Tigers end Cougars' streak


by Sgt. Rick Emert
U.S. Army South Public Affairs-Atlantic
CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL - The Curundu Cou-
gars' "roll down victory lane" led them into Tiger Country
Friday, and the Cougars hit a road block in the form of Jon
Guerra and a fourth quarter 69-yard run into the end zone
that put the Tigers over the top, 19-16.
The Tigers took an early lead in the first quarter with a
50-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Ricky Alvarez
to Carlos Roman. Rob Bernhardt kicked in the extra point
and it was 7-0.
The Cougars also scored in the first quarter off a one-
yard punch into the end zone by Lance VonHollen.
VonHollen took the ball in for the two-point conversion,
putting the Cougars on top 8-7. That lead would take them
into the second half.
The Cougars owned the ball in the third quarter.
VonHollen charged into the end zone from the two-yard
line for the Cougars' second touchdown. Another two-
point conversion off a Buddy Martens three-yard pass to
Frederik Adams took the score to 16-7, Cougars.
Just as it looked like the Cougars were home free, Ricky


Alvarez threw a six-yard pass into the endzone into the
hands of Nick Frank. The kick was no good, but the Tigers
had edged closer, 16-13.
The Cougars' next possession went nowhere, and they
punted it into the end zone. The Tigers moved the ball 11
yards to the 31-yard line.
The Tigers had 69 yards between themselves and the
upset victory of the season. Ricky Alvarez opted for his
league-leading rusher and handed off to Jon Guerra who
went the distance for another fourth-quarter touchdown,
putting the Tigers in front, 19-16.
In their final possession, the Cougars drove the ball to
the Tigers' 33-yard line, buttheirfinal play of the game was
a pass intercepted by Alvarez.
Ironically, in their first year under coach Richard Elliott,
the Tigers blemished an undefeated Cougars record in the
final game of the season. In this, the Tigers last year, they
did it again.
"It was thrilling," said Elliott. "To score two fourth
quarter touchdowns to beat an undefeated team shows a lot
of character. I can't remember, in 22 years of coaching,
anything more thrilling than coming from behind in the
fourth quarter and beating an undefeated team."


"I have to congratulate the Tigers' for their great prep-
aration and for not giving up in the fourth quarter. They
have a lot of good kids and it was a great win," said Cougar
coach Fred Bales.
"I'm still proud ofmy kids, and I expect them to win. We
just made some mistakes we don't usually make, but we'll
bounce back strong," he said.
One thing the Tigers won't be doing is savoring the
victory, Elliott said. r
"These victories are short lived," he said. "Monday at
practice we were at work on the (PCC) Green Devils. We
can think back about how we felt Friday night later on, but
for now we have to forget it."
And what's the Tigers' goal for the rest of the final
season?
"To finish at 7-3 is our goal," Elliott said. "Before, I
didn't want to think of it as the final season. Now, we're in
the second half of the season and playing everyone for the
final time. We're dedicating these last Tigers' games to the
legacy of the past Tigers' players."
The Cougars, at 6-1, are tied for first place with the
Devils, and the Tigers have edged up to a third place tie with
the Balboa Bulldogs at 4-3.


Bulldogs break Red Machine, 20-7


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor
BALBOA - The Machine's quest for a
win remains unanswered after falling to the
Bulldogs 20-7 Oct. 21.
The 4-3 Bulldogs maintained it's third
place tie with the Tigers, who also ad-


vanced to 4-3 with their 19-16 upset of the
Cougars. The Machine owns sixth place, a
half-game back from the Kolts. The Kolts
owe it's sole win to the Machine.
Although the game stats show a team
dead last in the league, the Machine put up
a lively fight against the Bulldogs.
The Machine got some help from a foul-


mouthed Bulldog and advanced to the Bull-
dog 20-yard line following a cussing penal-
ty.
After advancing to the five-yard line, the
Machine opened the scoring with a touch-
down by Jerry Smith. Donny Husted made
good on the extra point kick, putting the
Machine in the lead 7-0.


Sgt. Lori Davis (Tropic Times)
Bulldog defenders gun for the Machine's quarterback Jared Holzworth. Holzworth threw for 80 yards against
the Dogs.


The Bulldogs failed to score on it's next
possession, but took advantage of a short
punt and took over inside the Machine 20-
yard line.
The Bulldogs moved to the Machine's
goal line, where Adam Beach plowed in for
a Bulldog touchdown. Beach nailed the
extra point to tie the score 7-7.
The Bulldogs wrapped up the first half
with a razzle-dazzle play when Beach con-
nected with Julius Graham midfield. Gra-
ham snagged the ball and left the Machine
in the dust on the a 60-yard play, dashing
into the end zone.
Beach hit the extra point, putting the
Bulldogs ahead 14-7.
Both teams spent the third quarter grind-
ing up and down the field, neither scoring
but mangling each other in the process. The
Bulldogs' Cardova Hall went down for a
few minutes, but was able to return the
game after a break.
The Machine's Roberto George turned
into "the punisher," doling out hard-hitting
tackles. George pegged Carlos Martinelli,
sacked Beach and stuffed Hall all in the
third quarter.
In the closing quarter of the game Hall
came back to drive past George.
The Bulldogs moved the ball to the
Machine's one-yard line where Hall went
in for the final touchdown of the game.
Beach scored on the extra point, making the
final score 20-7.


Scoreboard

Team statistics
1600
1400 '-------------------------
1 4 0 0 .. .............. ....... ... . ...... .. ....

1200

1000

800

600

400

200
0
Yards rushing Yards passing
F-] Bulldogs s Cougars Devils Kolts Machine Tigers


Source: Robert Best


League Leaders
Team standings
W L T Pct. PF PA
Cougars 6 1 0 .857 111 69
Devils 6 1 0 .857 116 32
Bulldogs 4 3 0 .571 54 66
Tigers 4 3 0 .571 56 64
Kolts 1 6 0 .142 73 148
Machine 0 7 0 .000 20 82
Last weeks game
Devils 20, Kolts 0
Tonight's games
Devils vs. Tigers, 6 p.m. (CHS)
Machine vs. Cougars, 5:30 p.m. (BHS)
Kolts vs. Bulldogs, 7:30 p.m. (BHS)
Quarterbacks
PA PC % Yds TD Int
Martens, Cg. 129 54 41 957 8 8
Lampas, Dev. 61 32 52 421 3 2
Beach, BD 61 20 32 477 2 7
Interceptions
Beach, Bulldogs 6
Alvarez, Tigers 4


Smith, Machine 4
Scoring
TD XP Total
Reese, Devils 12 3 78
Guerra, Tigers 8 48
VonHollen, Cougars 5 6 38
Rushing
Carr. Yds. Avg.
Guerra, Tigers 123 926 7.5
Reese, Devils 134 920 6.8
Hall, Bulldogs 118 646 5.4
Kick offs
Kicks Yds. Avg.
VonHollen, Couaars 26 1236


47.5
Lampas, Devils
Beach, Bulldogs


Husted, Machin
Price, Tigers
Beach, Bulldogs


25 1142
s 18 798
Punts
Kicks Yds.
ie 11 355
26 795
s 18 522


45.6
44.3

Avg.
32.2
30.5
29


"I * FootbaU












SSports


Don't forget the rules


Bailey's return shocks Saints


by John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office
RODMAN NS - There was so much returning going on
last Sunday in the NFL, it looked like the exchange window
at the PX the day after Christmas. Not only did the Saints'
Tyrone Hughes return two kicks for touchdowns, but he
also set the NFL record for return yards in a game. In the
same game, the Rams' Robert Bailey set another record
withafreaky 103-yard puntreturn. Cleveland's Eric Metcalf
did his usual deed, in the form of a 73-yard punt return.
Here are the week nine picks. Home teams are in CAPS.
Buffs clock K.C. - The Bills and Chiefs split their games
last year with K.C. winning the regular season game 23-7
and Buffalo taking the AFC Championship game 30-13. In
the title game, the Bills held Joe Montana to nine comple-
tions for 125 yards. The Chiefs seem to be back in the saddle
with back-to-back division wins. The Bills had a week to
recover from their loss to the Dolts. With Miami battling
New England, the Bills have first-place incentive and
homefield-advantage. BILLS 26, Chiefs 16.
Fish fry at Foxboro - The Dolphins have revenge on
the brain. In week 18 last year, the Patsies knocked the Fish
out ofthe playoffrace with a 33-27 overtime win atthe Fox.
That win was New England's first over Miami since 1988.
The Pats would like a little revenge after they scored 35
points on opening day, but lost by four to the Fish. The Pats
are continuing to play it close to the vest this season, with
no final score separated by more than seven points. Look
for the late October Foxboro chill to put the Fish on ice.
PATS 30, Fish 26.
Bumbling Browns - The Broncos have taken the last
three in their series with the Brownies, including a 29-14
win last year. John Elway riddled the Brownies' secondary
with three scores in Cleveland. Denver may be due for a
letdown after knocking the Bolts from the unbeaten ranks
last week, but have homefield advantage. The Browns have
not beaten a team with a winning record this year. Although
the Broncos are 2-5, they're playing like a 5-2 team after
losing a squeaker vs. K.C. and beating the Bolts. BRON-
COS 23, Browns 16.
Not in the Cards - The Steelers travel to valley of the
sun for their second of three straight road games. Although
the boys of steel are 5-2, this is a must win. When the
Steelers finally do get home, they play Buffalo and Miami
back to back. After that, they play at the Raiders. Thank the
league for that second-place schedule. The Cards gave the
Cowpokes a scare last week after knocking Troy Aikman
out early with a concussion. This inter-conference game
was sandwiched in between two division foes (Dallas and
Philly) for Arizona. That, and Steelers rookie running back
Bam Morris, (140+ yards last week) will be too much.
Steelers 16, CARDS 10.


Monday's Monsters of the Midway - The Packers
have had entirely too much time to stew after a Thursday
night loss to the Vikes. The Bears welcomed back Erik
Kramer who responded for more than 300 yards in the loss
to the Lions. Despite spotting Detroit a 14-0 lead, the Bears
were in the game until the final seconds. After losing Neal
Anderson (retirement) and Merril Hoge (career-ending
injury) the Bears seem to have a running game to comple-
ment Kramer. Lewis Tillman and Raymont Harris give the
Bears a one-two punch the Packers could only dream of.
BEARS 24, Pack 13.
In other games: No matter who's Q, Cowpokes 30,
BUNGALS 10; N.Y. makes it five straight, GIANTS 20,
Lions 14; L.A. breaks losing streak to Houston, RAIDERS
21, Oilers 13; Tampa catches Minny napping, BUCS 16,
Vikes 13; Faulk falters, Jets 19, COLTS 3; Gus, Heath,
whoever, Eagles 27, REDSKINS 10; Bolts are back,
CHARGERS 22, Seahawks 13.
There are open dates for Atlanta, New Orleans, San
Francisco and the L.A. Rams.
Last week 10-2, season 63-38, Monday night 7-1.
National Football League
American Conference


Miami
Buffalo
N.Y. Jets
New England
Indianapolis

Cleveland
Pittsburgh
Houston
Cincinnati

San Diego
Kansas City
LA Raiders
Seattle
Denver


Dallas
Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Arizona
Washington

Minnesota
Chicago
Detroit
Green Bay
Tampa Bay

San Francisco
Atlanta
LA Rams
New Orleans


East
W L T Pct.
5 2 0 .714
4 3 0 .571
4 3 0 .571
3 4 0 .429
3 5 0 .375
Central
6 1 0 .857
5 2 0 .714
1 6 0 .143
) 7 0 .000
West
6 1 0 .857
5 2 0 .714
3 4 0 .429
3 4 0 .429
2 5 0 .286
National Conference
East
6 1 0 .857
5 2 0 .714
3 4 0 .429
2 5 0 .286
2 6 0 .250
Central
5 2 0 .714
4 3 0 .571
i 4 0 .429
3 4 0 .429
2 5 0 .286
West
6 2 0 .750
4 4 0 .500
i 5 0 .375
3 5 0 .375


Football quiz puts fans to the test


(RODMAN NS) - Here's a cool mind teaser to try
during those long commercial breaks during NFL games,
provided by a big NFL fan, Naval Command Master Chief
John Myers.
Match the NFL team with its nickname.
1. Cody and Clinton a. Cowboys
2. Girls' toy with fish arms b. Cardinals
3. Scud opponents c. Redskins
4. 747s d. Giants
5. Equalizers of the old west e. Eagles
6. James and Hash f. "VI" kings
7. Thieves g. Bears
8. Lubricators h. Lions
9. India tabbys i. Packers
10. Credit card users j. Buccaneers
11. Navy's senior NCOs k. Rams
12. Coastal birds 1. Falcons

Loalsorsgud


SCN AM Radio
790/1420
Saturday
11 a.m., NCAA: Colorado at Nebraska
2:30 p.m., NCAA: Virginia Tech. at
Miami
Sunday
1 p.m., NFL:Philadelphia Eagles at
Washington Redskins
4 p.m., NFL:Miami Dolphins at New
England Patriots


13. Midnight snackers m. 49ers
14. Mustangs n. Saints
15. Half bovine, half man o. Steelers
16. Two under par p. Browns
17. Dad's Army sister q. Bengals
18. Primary rules r. Oilers
19. Sun worshippers s. Colts
20. Yogi and Smokey t. Dolphins
21. Six rulers u. Patriots
22. Movers v. Jets
23. Pontiac pumas w. Bills
24. Dollar for corn x. Broncos
25. One of Ford's better ideas y. Raiders
26. Gold miners z. Chargers
27. Ewe's mate A. Seahawks
28. Jude and Christopher B. Chiefs
The answers will be in next week's issue.


8 p.m., NFL: Pittsburgh Steelers at
Arizona Cardinals
Standings
Navy Intramural Volleyball
W L GB
NSWU 8 3 0 -
PWD 2 1 .5
NSC IATTS 2 1 .5
Marines 1 3 2.5
Med. Dep. 0 3 3
- as of Oct.19


Schedule
Army unit-level soccer
Mother's Field, Fort Clayton
Monday
6 p.m.:470th MI vs. 128th Av.
7 p.m.: 142nd Med. vs. HHC, 536th
Eng.
Tuesday
6 p.m.: HHC, USAG vs. 142nd Med.
7 p.m.: Co. C, 1-228th vs. 128th Av.


Tropic Times 15
Oct. 28, 199415


Amador
The Fort Amador Golf Course will have ladies
beginner lessons 3:30-4:30 p.m. and 4:30-5:30
p.m. Tuesday for five weeks, registration is ongo-
ing. There is a $20 fee.Call 282-4511 for informa-
tion.
The Amador Golf Course is sponsoring a two-
person, best ball Thanksgiving Turkey Shoot
7:30 a.m. Nov. 12, $8. Call 282-4511 to register by
Nov. 9.
Albrook/Howard
Registration for youth baseball for ages 5-18
years will run Monday to Dec. 3 at the Howard and
Albrook youth centers. A physical exam is required
before a child can be registered. There is a $25 fee
for all active duty card holders and a $30 fee for
other people.
The Howard and Albrook Bowling Centers
have sign ups for intramurals, mixed, men, women
and youth winter leagues.
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center is spon-
soring a tennis ladder tournament. Call 284-
3451 for information.
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers
body fat analysis for a small fee. The test helps
people monitor their work-out program success.
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers
the Fitness In Training class 5:30-6:30 a.m. Mon-
days, Wednesdays and Fridays. It consists of a
calisthentic super circuit work-outto improve mus-
cular endurance, the cardiovascular system and
flexibility.
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers
lunch bunch sports and fitness activities every
week. Scheduled events are; aerobics noon-1 p.m.
Monday, Wednesdays and Fridays, volleyball-11
a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, basketball 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Tuesday.
Clayton
The Clayton Bowling Center has lunch-time
specials 11 a.m.-1 p.m. weekdays. Games are 50
cents and shoes are free. Call 287-6366 for more
information.
Reeder Physical Fitness Center has free
aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. Monday- Friday. Call
287-3861 for information.
Curundu
Tang Soo Do is taught 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays at the Pacific Theater Arts Center,
Building 2060 in the Curundu housing. Classes are
open to adults and children 4 years old and up. Call
286-3814 for information.
Anyone interested in joining a mixed bowling
league at the Curundu Bowling Center can call
286-3914 for information.
Rodman
The Rodman Marina will hold a bass fishing
tournament on Gatun Lake 5:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov.
11. The entry fee is $10 and cash awards will be
given for the largest and second largest fish caught.
Call the Rodman Marina at 283-3150 to register.
An intramural swim meet will be held at the
Rodman Pool 6:30 a.m. Nov. 18. The competition
is open to all Navy/Marine Corps military, Depart-
ment of Defense civilians and family members 18
and older. There is a limit of one team per unit.
Register by Nov. 10. Call Rodman Athletics at
283-4222 for information or to register.
The 61-foot Black Stallion is available for Pinas
Bay Marlin fishing, deep-sea fishing, cruising or
moonlight cruise charters for large or small groups.
The 42-foot Vargas is also available'for charter.
Call the Rodman Marina at 283-3147.
Atlantic community
An aerobics workshop and certification test
is being organized in the Atlantic community. The
testing will be given by the American Aerobic
Association International and International Sports
Medicine Association from Pennsylvania. The cer-
tification is valid for two years. A minimum of 15
people are required for the class. For information,
call Delinda May at 289-3163.
The Club Nautico Caribe, Panama Canal Tar-
pon Club and the Panama Canal Yacht Club are
sponsoring the second annual Atlantic Interclub
Fishing Tournament through Nov. 30. Call the
Club Nautico Caribe at 241-2220, the Panama
Canal Tarpon Club at 243-5316 or the Panama
Canal Yacht Club at 241-5882 to register.










Tropic Times N ew s
O6ct. 28, 1994 N w


S\ V.. .
'I














- -
* u ' . ' .-
.-i

i . . - .













(courtesy)
The Pride of Baltimore
The tall ship, The Pride of Baltimore, will be in port at Rodman NS Sunday through Nov.
4 The ship will conduct open house tours during its stay. For more information, call the
Rodman Public Affairs Office at 283-5644.



Popular Panamanian singer


performs for camp residents

EMPIRE RANGE (JTF - Safe Haven JIB)
- Popular Panamanian singer Leoni Herrera
and her group entertained Cubans at Commu-
nity Camp No. 2 during an hour-long concert

"It was great to be able to bring a little
happiness to them through music," said Herrera,
a native of the Darien Province.
However, according to Herrera, the Cu-
bans weren't the only ones who benefited from
the show that offered cumbia, salsa and boleros
music.
"It was a very exciting moment in my life.
I won't forget this experience as long as I live,"
Herrera said.
"It was very well-received by the camp
residents," said Brig. Gen. James Wilson, Joint (U.S. Air Force)
Task Force Safe Haven commander. "In fact, Popular Panamanian recording artist Leoni Herrera
they loved her." performs for Cubans at Camp No. 2.
The female vocalist, who recently released
a compact disc, was backed up by a set of bongos, an Coe, Camp No. 2 executive officer. "She could tell
electric guitar, a bass guitar and a set of drums. what the audience wanted and she had a wonderful
Despite inclement conditions throughout the af- stage presence."
ternoon, the majority of the camp residents turned out Herrera has offered to return and perform for the
for the show. Other three camps in the future. Military officials said
"She was very good," said Air Force Maj. Beverly they look forward to having her back.

Cubans file suit against U.S government


MIAMI (Reuters) - A group of prominent Cuban-
American lawyers filed suit Monday against the U.S.
government seeking an end to U.S. detention of Cuban
migrants at Guantanamo Bay and Panama.
The attorneys, who included Xavier Suarez, a
former mayor of Miami, said they were seeking due
process for all migrants, an end to coerced repatriation
back to Cuba, humane treatment for the migrants and
an end to their indefinite detention.
There currently are about 32,000 Cubans, all of


them migrants picked up at sea this summer, being
held at U.S. military bases at Guantanamo Bay in
Cuba and in Panama.
Though the Clinton administration has announced
plans to allow some children and elderly Cuban
migrants to enter the United States, the only options
now for the others are to remain at the U.S. bases
indefinitely or return to Cuba and apply there for some
of the 20,000 visas per year the United States has
agreed to grant Cuban migrants.


Air Force lists


demographics

RANDOLPH AFB, Texas (AFNS) - The Air Force
Military Personnel Center here recently published a
point paper containing information about Air Force
demographics.
The "Demographic One-Liners" paper provides
statistics and trend comparisons on a variety of topics
concerning the people who make up the active-duty
Air Force.The latest version covers the period through
Sept. 30. Unless otherwise noted, all data are for active
duty-Air Force members.
Total Force Strength
*Approximately 422,300 individuals are on active
duty--81,000 officers and 341,300 enlisted personnel.
*The Air Force has approximately 15,700 pilots,
6,300 navigators and 32,800 non-rated line officers in
the grades of lieutenant colonel and below.
Age
*The average age of the officer force is 35, for the
enlisted force it's 29.
*Of the total force, 37 percent are below the age of 26
(43 percent of enlisted vs. 15 percent officer).
Sex
16 percent of the force are women (15 percent of the
officers and 16 percent of the enlisted).
*The population of women has increased from 33,000
in 1975 to 65,800.
*Currently there are 306 female pilots and 103 female
navigators.
Race/Ethnic,Group
*Racial minority representation has risen from 14
percent in 1975 to 22 percent.
*78 percent of the force are Caucasian, 15 percent
Black, 4 percent Hispanic, and 3 percent other (for
officers-89 percent Caucasian, 6 percent Black, 2
percent Hispanic, and 3 percent Other; for enlisted-
76 percent Caucasian, 17 percent Black, 4 percent
Hispanic, and 3 percent other).
Marital Status
*69 percent of the current force are married (76
percent of the officers and 67 percent of the enlisted).
*There are 20,119 military couples in the Air Force.
Family members
*Active-duty members supported approximately
675,000 family members (over 562,000 are depen-
dents-in-household)
Overseas
*21 percent of the current force are assigned overseas
(approximately 11,300 officers and 77,300 enlisted
members)
Total Active Federal Military Service
*The average total active federal military service is 11
years for officers and nine for enlisted
Academic Education
*55 percent of the officers have advanced or profes-
sional degrees (42 percent have a master's, 9 percent
have professional degrees, and 1 percent have doctor-
ates)
*3 1 percent of company grade officers have advanced
degrees (24 percent have a master's, 6 percent have
professional degrees, and 4 percent have doctorates)
*87 percent of field grade officers have advanced
degrees (70 percent have a master's, 14 percent have
professional degrees, and 2 percent have doctorates)
*99 percent of the enlisted force have at least a high
school education (16 percent have an associate's de-
gree or higher, 62 percent have some semester hours
toward a degree)
Component
*67 percent of the officers have a regular commission
(74 percent of line officers)
Professional Military Education
*62 percent of the officers have completed one or
more PME courses (as their highest PME, about 7,800
have completed at least one senior service school,
nearly 12,000 have completed an intermediate service
school, while over 30,000 have completed Squadron
Officer School)
Source of Commission
*18 percent ofthe officers were commissioned through
the Air Force Academy, 42 percent through ROTC,
and 23 percent through OTC orOCS (the remaining 17
percent were commissioned from other sources such as
other service academies, direct appointment, aviation
cadet)
Term of Enlistment
+29 percent of the enlisted members are serving in
their first term of enlistment, 23 percent are on their
second and 48 percent are on their third or greater term
of enlistment










Tropictivities
Oct 28, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI








































Maureen Sampson (Tropic Times)
Bye Bye Birdie
Devon Sprague, left, swoons as Conrad Birdie, played by Carlos Royo, sings about sincerity. Birdie is accompanied by Jeremy Middleton on guitar,
right. These characters are part of the current Pacific Theatre Arts Center and Balboa High School production of "Bye Bye Birdie." For story and
photos, see Page B3.


National conference focuses on
gang violence, youth employment
and teen activities.


Find out how to celebrate this
Halloween with a listing of haunted
houses and trick-or-treating.


I an more


*Movies, Page B8
*TV, Page B9
*Potpourri, Page B12


-,%-









B2 Tropic Times
Oct. 28, 1994


SYouth news


The Enlisted Spouses Club of Written on the paper angels
U.S. Army South and Army Com- will be the sex and age of a spe-
munity Service is sponsoring the second an- cific child, along with a code number to identify
nual Angel Tree for all local military children the child from a master list.
in need. Exchange customers will be able to take an
The trees will be set up at the Main Ex- angel and purchase a gift appropriate to the sex
change at Corozal, Howard Exchange and Fort and age of the child selected.
Davis Exchange, and will contain "Angels" Customers are asked to wrap the gift and tape
from all services. %.- the angel to the outside. The gifts can then be
The names of the children will remain con- dropped off at one of three location: ACS, Fort
fidential. Clayton; ACS, Atlantic; or the Howard Youth Center.



Gang violence

DoD, TRADOC conference will focus on teen issues


by Sgt. 1st Class Stephen Barrett
American Forces Information Service


WASHINGTON D.C. - Gang violence, youth employ-
ment and teen activities will highlight discussions at the
Department of Defense Youth Action Conference Mon-
day through Nov. 4 in Tampa, Fla.
Hosted jointly by DoD and the Army's Training and
Doctrine Command, conference participants will identify
approaches that may help youngsters resist joining gangs,
resist engaging in violence and avoid using drugs. DoD
expects about 750 participants.
"This is really the first time we've zeroed in on adoles-
cent issues," said Gail McGinn, DoD's family policy sup-
port and services director. She intends to review DoD pol-
icies during the conference, focusing on programs that will
help teens become more active in communities.
McGinn said commanders are concerned about gang
activity and gang violence. According to Army Col. Ri-
chard A. Pomager Jr., law enforcement and security di-
rector for the TRADOC, the problem of youth violence
goes deeper than a social or an installation issue for the
military.
"It is a readiness issue," he said. Pomager said military
parents distracted because of family problems are less
likely to be able to effectively perform their duties. "The
perception that gangs are infiltrating installations is rein-
forced by the fact that there has been an increase in vio-
lence and crime among young family members."
Part of the problem is that "gang life" is intruding more
on the military community. "In some areas, gangs are us-
ing our installations as neutral turf," Pomager said, "and
sometimes their presence can lead to problems."
He explained one case involving a military youth who
invited local kids to a party at his on-post home. Unknow-
ingly, some kids he asked belonged to two rival gangs.
When the two gangs met, a fight occurred prompting mil-
itary police assistance.
The traditional military approach to dealing with
"problem kids" on installations is to remove families from
post housing. "That only relocates the problem, it does
not solve it," said Pomager. "We have to help youths, par-
ents and commanders to head off such crises."
Pomager added military youths face the same pressures


DoDDS, ACS conduct

'Child Find Activities'
The Department of Defense Dependent Schools
in Panama, along with Army Community Service,
are conducting on-going "Child Find Activities" in
an effort to locate all eligible family members with
disabilities in need of special educational or medical
services.
Newly arrived military and U.S. government-
sponsored personnel with family members in need
of special education and special medically related
services should contact their local DoDDS school for
program planning and enrollment.
People who know of a child with a disability in
the community who is the family member of a U.S.
government-sponsored or military person and is not
receiving services, should encourage the family to
contact any local DoDDS school. People can also call
the Exceptional Family Member Program manager
at 287-4921/5073 for assistance or for more infor-
mation.


as all youngsters, but frequent relocations may add to the
problem of socialization and adjustment. "Kids who move
frequently with their parents are probably more vulnera-
ble to negative influences," he said.
To help combat the problem, McGinn plans to suggest
commanders design more comprehensive youth programs
for their installations. "Programs should involve a variety
of installation programs and resources," she said. "The
transition program should include informing kids on ser-
vices and agencies available to them during their stay.
Family member employment programs should provide
job information for those wanting to work after school."
Commanders should design programs where commu-
nity leaders, health officials, military police and family
service centers listen to teen concerns. "We've spent a lot
our time and efforts with child development and family
advocacy programs and haven't really focused on teen is-
sues," said McGinn.
Listening to youngsters has been the keystone of an
Army program in existence since 1991. Teen Discovery
is an annual gathering of youngsters from Army installa-
tions who offer advice about intervention methods.
"We get realistic advice," said Lee Morrison, head of
the Training and Doctrine Command's youth services and
Teen Discovery manager. "Some of the kids who attend
the conferences 'have been there.' They've been into
scrapes on Army posts and are trying to help keep other
kids from repeating their experiences."
Civilian communities and military installations have
programs in existence that will be examples during the
conference. One highlighted program is Fort Sill's Wings
of Eagles in Oklahoma.
"We target sixth graders who are about to move into
junior high school," said Army Maj. Randy Garibay, who
runs the Fort Sill program. "We want to instill in them the
confidence and independence to resist gang involvement,
and to show them the benefits of getting a good educa-
tion."
Pomager said each service has programs to help youths
to develop their potential, self-esteem, independence and
values. The conference will highlight these programs.
"We want to identify possible solutions that commanders
can use to immunize military kids against imitating the
gang culture," he said.

Local pathologist visits

Curundu Jr. High classes
CURUNDU (DoDDS) - "Wow, that was great. When
can we do that again?"
This was asked by one of the 24 Curundu Junior High
School students who attended a slide show presentation
given by Dr. Richard Wahl, a pathologist from Gorgas
Community Hospital.
The students, many of whom participate in the School
Wide Enrichment Program, were entertained and educat-
ed by Wahl's presentation. He shared facts ranging from
how one may become a pathologist, a scientist who stud-
ies diseases, to the analysis of microscopic organisms to
determine the cause of disease or death or the treatment of
disease.
"I felt the presentation was very educational because I
want, someday, to be a forensic pathologist," Denise
Holmes, an eighth grade student, said. "Doctor Wahl
helped me to be better prepared for the work I will be do-
ing."
The junior high students look forward to many more
educational visits from trained professionals in the com-
munity.


Albrook/Howard
Competitive swim team tryouts, 10 a.m. Nov.
12 at Howard and Albrook Pools for youths 8-18
years old. Call Lisa Nofi, 284-3569, or Rose
Coville, 236-2035, for more information.
*Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Preteen Dance 7:30-10:30 p.m. Nov. 4 and 18
at Howard.
Baseball, softball and T-ball open registra-
tion for the 1994-1995 baseball season until De-
cember 3.
Spanish lessons for children and adults 4 and 5
p.m..Ttuesdays and Thursdays.
Cheerleading lessons, Fridays at Albrook, Sat-
urdays at Howard.
Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday eve-
nings.
Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for mem-
bers and $35 for non-members.
Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturday.
Spanish lessons 4 and 5 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday.
Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesday.
Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four
days a week. Special preschooler class Saturdays.
Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available
for ages four to adult.
*Just for teens:
Falltime party 8:30-11:30 p.m. today. Wear
orange and black and get in for half price. The
'Anthill Posse' will be playing in the Albrook Club
ballroom. Transportation provided from Howard
Youth Center.
Top Twenty Teen Dance 7:30-11:30 p.m Nov.
19. Party with your friends at the Howard Enlisted
Members Club Ballroom.
Teen Turkey Splash Pool Party 6-9 p.m. Nov.
25. Teens can have their own private pool party
with friends.

Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Young Americans Bowling Association
leagues for ages 6-18 will begin Saturday at the
Fort Clayton Bowling Center. Dues will be $4 per
week and includes bowling, shoe rental, a trophy
for each child and a party upon completing the
league.
Not So Scary Halloween is a happy Halloween
activity for toddlers to 10 years old. It will be held
4-7 p.m. Monday. A $1 fee includes game prizes,
candy and a lot of fun.
Halloween costume dance Saturday. Pre-teens
6-9 p.m. and junior teens 8-11 p.m. Fee is $2.
Halloween party Monday.
Junior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays Building 155.
Video day, Wednesdays.
Arts and crafts, Mondays.
Cooking experiences, Tuesdays.
Outdoor games, Thursdays.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Spooktacular movie lock-in 8 p.m.-8 a.m. to-
day. All night horror movies.
Gift wrapping workshop 9 a.m.-noon Nov. 5
at the Valent Recreation Center.
Movie marathon in dolby surround sound 1-8
p.m. Nov. 6.
Teen art exhibit all day Saturday.
Popcorn and movies, Sundays.

Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Shotokan Karate, 4-5 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday, $20 per person.
Halloween costume contest 5 p.m. Saturday.
Arts and crafts, 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Saturday sports, noon to 6 p.m.
Piano classes, 4-6 p.m. for 30-minute lessons
Monday and Wednesdays. There is a fee of $20
per person per month.

Rodman
There will be ghoulish fun for kids 5-7 p.m.
today at a Halloween bash in the Laguna Lounge,
Rodman NS. Festivities include apple bobbing, a
pinata and "frightful" games. Prizes will be award-
ed for the best costumes.









Entertainment
+fJ!fJ?^T''^ ?^ fiB8K^^ jlS~llll * "''-

--rXK" �i -


Star-struck teenage girls sing "We Love You, Conrad" for the umpteenth time.


Musical comedy

soars on stage


An evening of thorough entertainment and laughs
is in the works for anyone interested in the cur-
rent Pacific Theatre Arts Centre's production of
the musical comedy "Bye Bye Birdie." The show opened
Oct. 21 and runs through Nov. 12. Performances start 8
p.m. Thursday through Saturday.
The production is one for all ages. From Shriner sere-
nades to the Ed Sullivan Show, Birdie has everything.
The play is centered around life in the late 1950s. It
shows how one teen idol, namely Conrad Birdie, can have
potent effects on the lives of people in a small Ohio town.
When Conrad's agent wants to retire from the music
business, go back to school and start a family, he takes
one more stab at raking in some cash. He encourages
Conrad to venture to Sweet Apple, Ohio, where he will
broadcast his final song, kiss an adoring fan, and stir up a
ruckus before the megastar is drafted in the Army.


Albert Peterson, Conrad's agent, is portrayed by Rich-
ard Koechlein. His secretary and soon-to-be-wife is
played by Linda Dahlstrom. Conrad is represented stu-
pendously by Balboa High School senior Carlos Royo.
The cast also includes countless citizens, ranging from
the Conrad Birdie fan club, to manipulative reporters, to a
hoard of jealous teenage guys.
The production is directed by Jerry Brees and JoAnne
Mitchell-well-known stagemasters of the local commu-
nity. Melanie Bales is the musical director and Barbara
Berger is the choreographer. The 79th Army Band is fea-
tured throughout the production, which is sure to be a
memorable one.
Tickets cost $10 and are on sale at the Pacific Theatre
Arts Centre box office, or by contacting the theater at 286-
3152. Tickets are selling fast, so don't miss your opportu-
nity to witness this wonderful musical spectacle.


Bob Mitchell as Hugo Peabody is not too pleased
about his girl Kim MacAffee, played by Chris-
tine Estill, having to kiss Conrad.


story by
Jack Miller
photos by
Maureen
Sampson


High school tough guys sing "We Hate You, Conrad."


Tropic Times
Oct. 28, 1994 3


Linda Dahlstrom, as Rosie, twirls during her
dance solo.










B 4 Tropic Times
' Oct. 28, 1994


LFocus on Panama


Panama, part 1: The early days



A history of a nation that helped shape the world


(Editor's note: Panama celebrates its independence
from Colombia Thursday. This begins a five-part series
on the history of Panama: Part 1: The Early Days; Part
2: Independence; Part 3: Canal Building; Part 4: The
Canal Zone; and Part 5: A New Future. The history was
adapted from an unpublished manuscript by Dr. Miguel
Antonio Bernal and Thomas J Hofer, Florida State
University and David McCullough's Path Between the
Seas.)
Since the discovery of America, the importance
of the Panama isthmus and its economic
potential as a collection point for the riches of
South America has been a focal point in the history of
this small strip of land.
Panama was "put on the map" because of its
importantance to the Spanish crown in the early 1500s.
The sighting of the South Sea (Pacific Ocean) by Vasco
Nunez de Balboa signalled the beginning of the Panama-
nian colonial era. On behalf of the Spanish kings,
political power over the isthmus was exercised by the
royal governor and his staff. The governors established
royal courts (audiencias), with the Panamanian audiencia
dating from 1563. Even when Panama was subordinated
to Peru for administration matters, the isthmus retained
its audiencia.
Beginning in the early 16th century, Nombre de Dios
(Atlantic Coast, Panama); Veracruz (Mexico) and
Cartagena (Colombia) were the only three authorized
ports for trade with Spain. Indeed, Spain forbid the
colonies from trading with other nations, which was to
lead to periodic invasions from English and Dutch
privateers. Annually, Spain sent a fleet loaded down
with shipments of gold and precious metals from the
mines of Peru and Bolivia to Panama City, where.it was
transferred across the isthmus to Nombre de Dios,
reloaded and then convoyed to Spain. Panama's
prosperity depended on the frequency and amount of
these shipments.

Pirates and treaties
Panama suffered greatly from the English pirates
under Sir Francis Drake and his colleagues. They began
by raiding Nombre de Dios for its warehouses and
riches, compelling the Spanish to move to a more
defensible location at Portobelo.
The English establishment of colonies in the Caribbe-
an allowed English commerce raiders to more easily
prey on the Spanish trade and thus gave rise to English
interests in this region. The culmination of the English
effort was the destruction of Panama City in 1671 by the
English raider Sir Henry Morgan. Thereafter piracy and
commerce lost its importance as England came to adopt
a mercantilist policy toward its own colonies.
Events in Europe were to shape the future of Panama
as the Bourbon kings ascended the Spanish throne in
1713, following the Treaty of Utrecht. Although they
espoused a policy of trade liberalization, this came too
late for Panama.
As the eighteenth century wore on, a combination of
Panamanian inadequacies in coastal defense and the
actions of Peruvian merchants, tired of the corruption
and venality of their Panamanian counterparts, sought to
establish alternate trade routes for their merchandise.
The final blow came with the destruction of Portobelo in
1739.

An idea for a canal
The idea for a canal spanning the isthmus originated
with Spanish King Charles V in 1523.
He ordered that the Rio Bravo (Rio Grande) in
Mexico and the Chagres (Panama) be explored to
determine the feasibility of such a project. King Phillip
II undertook another investigation, finally concluding
that "Man should not frustrate the will of God. If He had
wanted the two oceans to be joined, He would have
done so." The project was revived again during the reign
of King Phillip III. The Council of the Indies recom-
mended against the idea, claiming that it would encour-
age attacks by other European nations, thus weakening
Spain even more. Spain never undertook any serious
efforts to explore the possibility of a canal project, being
absorbed in its own domestic affairs.
In a break from its protective past, the Spanish crown
permitted the German geographer and explorer
Alexander von Humboldt to tour the Americas from


.,, '..% - , < ... , .. . � ?
Martha K. Taylor (courtesy)
The cannons used 400 years ago to defend
Portobelo still overlook the Atlantic ocean.
1799 to 1804 in the name of scientific progress.
Humboldt's "Political Essay on New Spain" rekindl-
ed interest in the Central American region and focused
attention on Panama and Nicaragua. In his work,
Humboldt called for the building a transoceanic canal.
The dream was perhaps close to realization of uniting
Asia with the Americas and Europe.
After the overthrow of Spanish dominion and the
independence of the new Latin American states,
promoters, engineers and dreamers, all with the idea of a
transoceanic canal started to arrive in the capitals of
Latin America.
Seeking autonomy or independence, Panama
declared independence from Spain on Nov. 28, 1821.
Almost immediately, Panama decided to affiliate itself
with the province of New Granada, which would later be
Colombia, and its charismatic leader Simon Bolivar.
To show its loyalty to the cause of independence,
Panama sent 700 soldiers to assist Bolivar in securing
independence from Spain. Panama's historical links to
Colombia date from this period. And lacking any strong
feelings of allegience to Colombia, Panama would seek
either autonomy or independence from Colombia
several times during the next 80 years.
With the disappearance of Spain from the scene, the
newly independent states lacked stability in their
political institutions and sufficient will to undertake or
protect a concessionaire in such a comprehensive project
as building a canal through Central America.
Under such circumstances, it was clear that only one
of the leading powers, France or Britain in Europe or the


United States as the growing regional power, possessed
the resources necessary to see a project of this magnitude
through to completion.
In the 19th century, diplomatic treaty making was the
essential ingredient in foreign policy making. As a result
there was a variety of agreements reached between the
leading powers and the Latin American states and even
among the three leading powers to insure their interests
were protected, even if they were only of marginal
importance.
During the 1800s, the United States entered into two
treaties that had a direct effect on Latin America:
*The Bidlack-Mallarino Treaty: President Andrew
Jackson sent Charles Biddle in the 1830s to investigate
the feasability of a canal in Nicaragua and Panama.
Biddle negotiated with New Grenada (Colombia) over a
private concession to the United States. In 1846,
Benjamin A. Bidlack concluded a commercial treaty
with M.M. Mallarino of New Grenada titled a "Treaty of
Peace, Amity, Navigation and Commerce between the
United States and New Grenada." The treaty provisions
ran for 20 years and gave the United States the same
privileges and immunities regarding commerce and
navigation that citizens of New Grenada enjoyed.
Furthermore, the United States guaranteed New
Grenada's exercise of sovereignty in the isthmus and
pledged to protect it.
*The Clayton-Bulwer Treaty: This treaty was
designed to reduce friction between the United States
and Great Britain by forbidding either one from building
a canal at Tehuantepec, Mexico, or Panama without the
active cooperation of the other. Both nations also agreed
to the concept that any proposed canal would be neutral
and that both sides would respect its neutrality. The
treaty was sufficiently open-ended to allow either side to
abrogate the treaty after prior notification.
In the context of United States-British relations, the
Clayton-Bulwer Treaty was another in a series of treaties
defusing United States and British rivalry in the Western
Hemisphere.

The Panama Railroad
A group of New York financiers organized the
Panama Railroad Company in 1847. The railroad was
completed in 1855. Between 1848-1869, about 375,000
persons crossed the isthmus from Pacific to Atlantic;
while about 255,000 crossed from Pacific side to
Atlantic side.
Prices for food and services were greatly inflated,
resulting in a resurgence of prosperity for Panama.
Building the railroad created a new port and city on the
Atlantic side. United States investors named the new city
Aspinwall after one of the owners of the railroad.
Panamanians named the town Colon. Gold miners
heading to California continued to use the railroad to
transit the isthmus until 1869, when the transcontinental
railroad was completed in the United States.
For the use of the concession, Panama received a
$25,000 annuity from Colombia from the royalties paid
by the railroad. For a capital investment of $7 million
dollars, American investors received nearly $38 million
dollars in dividends between 1855 and 1903.


In the 1500s, Portobelo was an important port because it was easier to defend than others.









^ Community news


Tropic Times B 5
Oct. 28, 1994 lB


HALLOWEN rOirOpS


John Hall (U.S. Navy)
Devils, wolves and ghouls will "scare the pants" off children and adults at the Rodman's Haunted
house 6-10 p.m. tonight and Saturday at Building 73. The price for children 11 and under is $1. The
price for adults and children 12 and older is $2.


HAUNTING ECNS.

MONSTERS, % VLS AW WITCRES LOOTE ON RODWAN


RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) - Devils, monsters
and witches will give guided tours of their haunted house
6-10 p.m. tonight and Saturday at the old Anchorage Club
at Building 73, between the base gym and the chapel here.
Highlights ofthe house include an electric chair, Dracula
in his coffin, an eerie disco, and a monster mash with
dancing ghouls. Also, members of Naval Special Warfare
Unit 8 will "operate" on live people.
While guides take groups through, hot dogs and soft
drinks will be sold in the lobby of the haunted house.

ADA NICE PLACE SWAMPED


The community of Ada Nice Place is sponsoring a
haunted house 6-9 p.m. today through Monday in Building
695, Fort Clayton. The cost will be 50 cents for children and
$1 for adults.


Outriders Charity presents "Crypt Nightmares" 7-9
p.m. Saturday through Monday at the Valent Recreation
Center. They promise lots of ghosts, goblins and various
monsters. They invite you to come and get scared.

ATLAWNIC wVADvE 1Y


The Atlantic Community monsters can be found at the
haunted house 6-10 p.m. today and Saturday, and 5-9 p.m.
Sunday in Building 219, Fort Espinar.


*Air Force officials in the local military community
have established guidelines for this year's "Trick or
Treat" activities.
On Howard AFB and Albrook AFS, Fort'Kobbe and
Farfan, the established hours are 5 to 8 p.m. Monday, for
children 12 and younger.
People who welcome trick or treaters should leave
their porch lights on; all others should leave porch lights
off.
For more information, call Tech. Sgt. Brenda Gra-
ham at 284-3754/9786.

*The Army and Navy's established hours for"Trick
or Treating" in the Pacific community are 5-8 p.m


Screams and Halloween music will fill the air while people
anticipate their near 10-minute tour.
Last year's haunted house at Building 40 here was
popular.
"My daughter liked it, she was scared and had a good
time," said Petty Officer 1 st Class Lynn Flores. "I liked the
way they did the blood and the people laying on the
gurney."
The cost for the tour is $2 for adults and children 13 and
up and $1 for children 12 and under.


Monday. The age limit is 12 years old. Teens, 13 years
and older are encouraged to participate in the Directorate
of Community Activities events.
People who have a valid installation pass can escort
five immediate family members only for Trick or Treat-
ing. People with vehicles registered with the Provost
Marshal Office can drive their vehicles onto any instal-
lation to an authorized parking area.
Sponsors are accountable for the behavior of their
guests while on the installations. Failure to control guests
will result in appropriate action taken against the sponsor.
All visitors to Army and Navy installations must be
off post no later than 9 p.m. For information, call Master
Sgt. Scott Carr at 287-3716.


Clayton
A special evening Protestant service, spon-
sored by the Clayton Warriors youth group, will be
held 6 p.m. Sunday at Fort Clayton Chapel.
Episcopal services will be held 10 a.m. Sunday
at Amador Chapel instead of 10:30 a.m.
The Protestant Women of the Chapel meeting
will be held 9 a.m. Wednesday at the Fort Clayton
Chapel. The program will be "Happy Holidays,
Even in the Military." Sandi Holzwarth, a military
wife with many years of experience in moving and
celebrating the holidays in new places will share her
ideas on how to get through the holiday season with
minimum stress and maximum joy. Child care is
provided. For information, call Joyce Walker at
282-3247.
The Toastmaster International meeting will
be held 5 p.m. Wednesday at the PCC Training
Center. For information, call 287-5689.
AL-ANON, a 12-step support group for fam-
ily and friends of alcoholics, meets 8 p.m. Tuesday
and Fridays in Building6550, Corozal. AL-ATEENS
may attend Fridays. For information, call 223-7193.
U.S. Army South Public Affairs is coordinat-
ing the 1994 Joint Task Force-Panama Christ-
mas Sponsorship Program. Units or community
groups wanting to participate this year should call
USARSO PAO at 287-3007/4109.

Howard/Albrook
The Family Advocacy Outreach Program and
Howard AFB Child Development Center is spon-
soring a "Stress-free Holiday Shopping" event.
Free child care will be available at Howard CDC for
parents who want to shop without the stress of taking
their children. The service is available 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Tuesday and Nov. 15. Parents should
register children with the center at least three days
prior to the day they want to use the service. This is
open to Air Force personnel only. Call 284-3711/
6135 to register.
The Howard Child Development Center is lobk-
ing for potential Family Day Care Providers for
the Albrook Area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135
for more information.
The family services section of the Family
Support Center needs volunteers to help with the
loan closet, base brochure library and the coupon
cabinet. Family services is open from 7:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. weekdays, and flexible hours are avail-
able. Limited child care is free for volunteers. Any-
one who is interested, call 284-5860.
The Albrook Stables is offering trail rides and
pony rides by appointment only. Call 287-3333/
4411 for appointments.

Miscellaneous
The Enlisted Spouses Club-Panama takes pride
in serving the community. The club meets 7 p.m. the
first Monday of the month at the Fort Clayton
Noncommissioned Officers Club. For information,
call Barb Johnson at284-4523 or AmyGross at287-
3071.
The Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses Club
is sponsoring its annual bazaar 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Saturday at the Howard Enlisted Members Club.
For information, call 284-6874.

Atlantic
The Army Community Service Relocation
Assistance Office helps in the search for housing,
employment and educational possibilities for ser-
vicemembers and their family members. Call 289-
4021/4636 for more information.
A Welcome to Panama orientation will be held
9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Nov. 10 at the Fort Davis Commu-
nity Club. The orientation will include an informa-
tion fair, free lunch and child care and a tour of the
Atlantic community. For reservations, call Alina
Shoy at 289-4955.
Atlantic Youth Services is sponsoring Hal-
loween activities Friday-Sunday. The haunted house
will be open 6-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 5-
9 p.m. Sunday in Building 219, Fort Espinar. A
children's Haunt treat will be held 3-5 p.m. Sunday
at the Fort Davis Club. Other activities will include
food, games, live entertainment and train rides.


Tpicw op TREAT SC"EVULF? rOLYCIES










Tropic TimesN
B6 Oct. 28. 1994


Rodman
Iln ormationn Tour and Travel:


//1
//



7'/
/7/

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-1


Rainforest adventure, Nov. 12 and
26. $65, 6 a.m. departure. Explore Barro
Colorado Island.
Trolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. Nov.
12 and 26. $48/person. Fish for marlin,
sailfish. dolphin (fish), honita. Spanish
mackeral and more. Fee includes cap-
tain, gear, lures and iced coolers.
El Valle 7 a.m. Nov. 13 and 27, $12.
Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits
and vegetables and visit nature preserve.
Bird watching and nature trip. Nov.
17, $42/person. includes transportation,
meal, guide, and binoculars. Bring a
swimsuit and take a dip in the waterfall.
Contadora, Nov. 25-27, $179/per-
son double occupancy. $219/person sin-
gle occupancy. $135/kids 2-1 1, includes
transportation, 2 nights lodging, all meals
and drinks, and use of all resort facilities.
Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
ter:
Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fri-


$6 per person. $15/family.
Shopping in Panama City, 8:30 a.m.-
3:30 p.m. Nov. 12, $6.
Vegetable and fruit market shop-
ping. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 19, $5.
Horse racing at the Hippodrome,
noon-4:30 p.m. Nov. 20. $5.
Thanksgiving in Chiriqui, Nov. 23-
27. $371 single. $245 double, $139 third
person.
Christmas shopping on Central
Avenue 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 28, $4.
*(Outdoor adventures:
Peacock bass fishing in Lake Gatun
5a.m.-2p.m. Saturday. Wednesday. Nov.
12, 15, 20 and 26, $25. Bring fishing gear
and bags.
El Valle horseback riding, 7 a.m.-4
p.m. Nov. 6 and 25, $24.
Gold Panning in Bique, 8 a.m.- 3
p.m. Nov. 9 and 22, $12.
Bocas Del Toro weekend trip, Nov.
S11 -13, $280divers, $260 snorkelers. $142
children under 12 based on double occu-
pancy. Fee covers transportation to air-


Portobelo jungle tour. Nov. 4. S60/ days, $13. port. airfare, lodging, meals, five dives, 12 years old and younger. A minimum ol
person roundtrip transportation. guided El Valle shopping 6:30 a.m.-4:30 entertainment, airtanks and weights. Per- 20people is needed fora partial transit any
hike of local rainforest, meals. p.m. Sunday, $13. sonal equipment and gratuities not in- other day of the week.
Portobelo, Nov. 5. $70/person in- Chitre Pottery Shopping, 7 a.m.-7 eluded. Sign-up in advance. alb
eludes transportation, tours by boat, trip p.m. Tuesday, $20. Drake Island-Snorkeling and Scu- Balboa
to island beaches, lunch and guide. Pollera dancing and dining, 7-11 ba, 7 a.m.- 5 p.m. Nov. 13 and 27, $22 *Balboa Dive Club:
Chiriqui River rafting. Nov. 5-6. p.m. Wednesday and Nov. 16. $6/per- snorkelers. $47 divers. The club is accepting new members.
$150 includes roundtrip transportation, son, $15/family. BarroColoradoIslandTour,6a.m.- Divers must show a certification card to
meals, lodging, rafting and river guides. Colonial Panama and Locks Tour, 3p.m. Nov. 17, $65. join. Annual fee is $12. Member's receive
Panama City tour 9 a.m. Nov. 19. $8. 9a.m.-5p.m. Nov. 5 and 30, $10/person, Clayton a newsletter, use of the club tanks, library
San Andres Island, Colombia. Nov. $25/family. and videos for loan, information and class-
11-14, $286/person includes roundtrip El Valle shopping. 6:30 a.m. - 4:30 +Valent Recreation Center: es and dive trips. Call 263-8077 or 260-
airfare, three nights lodging at the Caribe p.m. Nov. 6. $13. Adventures in nature jungle walk 8 (X)75 or write the club at Unit 0967. APO
hotel, tours and most meals. Dining at Tambal, 7-10 p.m. Nov. 9. a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday. AA 34(X002.






Albrook/Howlard $125. Open water scuba class meets first *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: /
lro oward Water aerobics for advanced adult and third Monday of each month, $125. Reservations for Christmas Village
*Zodiac Community Activities Cen- swimmers at Howard and Albrook. Includes five pool sessions, five theory tables is under way 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at the
ter: �Albrook Auto Skills Center: sessions and four open water dives. Centre.
Tae Kwon Do 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Air conditioning service and repair Long set equipment rental $19 per Volunteersand performers are need-
Thursdays and Fridays. . 12:30-5 p.m. daily except Tuesday and day. ed for the upcoming Christmas Village.
Beginner and advanced dog obedi- Wednesday. *Valent Recreation Center: People interested in serving as emcee, or
ence, Saturday 9-10:15 a.m. $32 for 4 Wheel alignmentdiagnostic and ser- Privatepianoandguitarlessonsavail- groups, live music shows and dancers
weeks, vice classes are held 3-9 p.m. Monday, able weekday evenings, should call 286-3814 to sign up.
Beginner and advanced English and Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Korean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesday and Piano lessons are held 3-7 p.m. Mon-
Spanish is offered monthly. Saturday and Sundays. Thursday. days, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
*Howard and Albrook Youth Cen- Am Rodman Open to students ages 6 and older.
ters:Amador R dman Martial arts 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday and
uitar 1-6 p.m.Saturdaysat Albrook. Amador Pool: +Navy Morale, Welfare and Recr- Thursdays. Open to all ages.
Guitar 1-6 p.m. Saturday at Albrook. ,Amador Poolog
Spanish4-5p.m. Tuesday andThurs- Water aerobics 5-6 p.m. Wednes- ation )ffAe: The following classes are ongoing;
aysThe Navy MWR is seeking qualified Jazz15-6p.m. Monday and Wednes-
/$instructorsptowteachuSpanishandsFrench da ifs. $3
Martial arts at Howard and Albrook sessions. a t n t oe. Raes. $ ai.
odiaCs at Howard and Albrooks. languagecourses. Applicants should have Jazz II 6-7 p.m. Monday and
84-47(X). Swim classes are cancelled until De- prior experience in teaching elementary Wednesdyas., $32.
THoward and AlDrook pools ceAier c s an ra Ln se e rna $ pe Vr -
Thuowrsdays and Fridas 1 - and conversational language courses. Call Voice 3-5:30 p.m. Wednesday and
Intro to scuba, free, call for appoint- nClaytn 283-4301. Thursday s.

Open water scuba, Nov. 7 at Al- kFort Clayton Pool: Curundu Guitar 3-6 p.m. Tuesday.
Folkloric dance 5-6 p.m. Tuesday
brook, Nov. 21 at Howard, $145. All swimming classes will be discon- 4Twin Oceans Pro Shop: and Fridas.m.
Advanced scuba,Nov. 16at Albrook tinued until December because of in- The Pro Shop will soon be moved Salsa andays Merenue 7-8 p.m. Mon-
$105. clement weather. next to the boat and scuba rental shop days.
Rescue scuba, Nov. 29 at Howard, aFort Clayton Boat/Scuba Shop: in Fort Clayton. Dance and music are available.
S.^^/ 284-47(X). /^ ^ *" ''/ *' ^^-'////' sessions. languagecourses. Applicantsshouldhave Jazz II 6-7 p / /' ^ //// / /'/' ///'/ //'/'/'/'/ ////' m. Mondays/// and/ //*//


Show time Tickle the ivories The Howard Riding Stables is sponsoring Harvest
SFestival pony rides, 9 a.m.- 1p.m. Nov. 5 at the
*Theatre Guild of Ancon: *National Theatre of Panama: stables. There is a $1 fee for the pony rides. There will /
The musical comedy Nunsense II runs through Nov. 5 at Israeli pianist, Amiram Rigai, will play works from he a baked goods sale and drinks available at the
the Theatre Guild of Ancon. Curtain time is 8 p.m., tickets are such musicians as Bach, Tausig. Chopin and Beethoven stables. Come dressed asacowpoke orin any halloween
$8, call 252-6786 for reservations . during a concert at 8 p.m. Monday at the National costume.
*Pacific Theatre Arts Center: Theatre of Panama. Those members holding tickets for Stylin
The family musical Bye, bye Birdie opens 8 p.m. today at the 1995 season are eligible to get one free ticket. For li
the Pacific Theatre Arts Center. The show runs through Nov. information, call 225-4951. /Zodiac Community Activity Center:
12. Tickets are $10, call 286-3152 to reservations. Back in the saddle The Zodiac Community Activity Centerwill present
Editor's note: See page B1 and B3 for story and a hair and clothing show 6-11 p.m. Nov. 12. Door
photos. *Howard Riding Stables: prizes will be awarded. There is a $5 fee. H
CIIUWLEEIC Tikle th ivoris Festial-pon-rides-9-aIm--p-- No.--a-te-


Free Zone shopping trip 7 a.m. Nov.
9, $12.
Downtown shopping. 9 a.m. Nov. 10,
16 and 18 $8. Shop Panama's Central
Avenue and Via Espana.
Moonlight cruise 6:30(p.m. Saturday
and Nov. 12, $21. Cruise out to Taboga
Island for cocktails and hors d'oeuvres by
moonlight, while viewing Panama City's
dramatic skyline at night.
Bottom-fishing on the Vargas, Sun-
day, Nov. 13 and 27 $35 adults, $20
children under 14. Fee includes captain.
gear, live bait and iced coolers.
Two-day deep seas fishing trip. Nov.
5-6. Fish the fertile waters ofl Isla del Rey,
San Jose and Galera aboard the 42' Vargas.
$220 fee includes captain, gear and bait.
San Bias Islands scuba safari, Thurs-
day and Nov. 20. $140/person includes
roundtrip ground transportation, guide.
lunch and scuba gear.
. . . . . ..- l. ..


El Valle 6:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 5.
Panama City shopping 9 a.m.- 1 p.m.
Nov. 6.
Chiriqui highlands Nov. 10-13.
*( )Outdoor Recreation Center:
Isla Iguana dive trip Thursday - Nov.
5, $125 for divers, $80 lfor non-divers. Fee
covers transportation, rustic lodging,
meals, boat service and three guided dives.
Whitewater rafting in Chiriqui Nov.
S1 -13, $130/person covers transportation,
rustic lodging, meals, equipmentand guide.
There is Contadora Island transit ser-
vice Friday through Monday. Fees are $35
adults and $20children 12 and under round
trip. $25 adults and $15 children one way.
Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel
opportunity to Montego Bay Sundays
through Wednesdays. Packet includes air-
fare, three nights hotel accommodations,
and transfer. Prices vary from $3(X)-$6(X)
depending on the hotel.
Partial transits of the Panama Canal
are offered 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday.
The fee is $35 for adults, $15 for children


I


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tices







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7 .- -












SRow, row, row your boat
/ A couple enjoy an afternoon of canoeing on a placid stream. A va
/I through recreation and travel offices. Check the Tropic Tim
community about upcoming events.
V///E


.4'


triety of boating ti
es and call the


// / / // '/ / / / / /' / /


/,//////Z/Z


Tropic Times
Oct. 28, 1994

,i


/f. JJlJJJ/


*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Book sale Sunday and Monday. Nov. 17. $5, Learn many applica- , Corozal Thrift Shop, 285-5989 /
Center: 25 percent off all Colorpoint books. tions for rubber stamps. / Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 /
The Ceramic Center, Building Multi-colored floss and flower Clay Flower Classes, 11 a.m.- Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 /
198, is located near the Crafts Shop. thread sale Nov. 4 and 5. Take 25 2 p.m. Saturday. $5 plus supplies. 'y Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680 /
*Canal Crafters: percent off. For all levels. Howard Riding Stables 284-3770 /
Canal Crafters is a volunteer Clay flower class, 11 a.m.- 2 Ongoing classes, stained glass, / Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361 /
organization providing scholar- p.m. Saturday, $5 plus supplies, framing, air brush, lamp assembly, , Howard Teen Center, 284-47(X)
ships for the community. Hand- For all levels, pottery wheel throwing,cross stitch, 4 Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510 /
made arts and crafts are avail- Oil painting class, 9 a.m.-noon. macrame, clay flower, ceramic and X The Loop, 287-3035 /
able, consignments and volunteers Wednesday,$30 plus supplies. Four "how to" videos. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 /
are welcome. The shop hours are 10 weeks. Anyone interested in forming a Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380
a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Satur- Stained glass class, 4-7 p.m. craft club to meet and share ideas, X Rodman Annex, 283-5475 /
day. The shop is now accepting Saturday, $20 plus supplies, patterns, socializing, and more call Rodman Club, 283-4498 /
holiday consignments, Building Beginningpottery, 10:30-12:30 84-6361 or leave your name and Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 /
> 804. Albrook. p.m.,beginsTuesday,$15plussup- number at the Skills Development Rodman Naval Station Information Tour /
S-. Register for the following class- plies. Class meets Tuesday and Center. and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454 /
/ es at the shop: Thursday for three weeks. The center is looking for Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 /
Perforated paper, cross-stitch, Photo album class, 10:30-1:30 crafters to sell items in the new Valent Recreation Center, 287-65(X) /
Christmas card, 10:15 a.m. Tues- p.m. Nov. 8. $5 plus supplies. Learn consignment boutique. Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-6161 /
day, $5, all supplies included, how to make beautiful covers for Instructorsareneededtoteach /
Cross-stitchdemo, angel. 10:15 great gifts. classes on a contract basis for a Atlantic
a.m. Nov. 11, free, bring supplies. Drybrushing class, 1-4 p.m. variety of crafts, decorative paint-
* *Howard Skills Development Nov. 8, $5. Prep work necessary ing, calligraphy, watercolors and Aquativity Center, 289-4(X)9 /
Center: before class oil painting/ Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201 /
The Howard Skills Development class oil painting.
The Howard Skills Development Brushstroke class, 1-3 p.m. *Fort Sherman Multicraft Cen- Davis Community Club, 289-5160 /
Center now accepts charges on Nov. 9, $5. Learn techniques used ter: / Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 /
/ club cards from the Howard/Al- for ceramics or tole painting. Woodworking qualification Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077 "
brook Officers' and Enlisted Clubs. Paper caper basket class, classes Saturdays, free. Class cov- Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313 /
Center will be closed Thursday 10:30-1:30 p.m. Nov. 12, $5 plus ers safe and correct use of wood Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
in observance of Panamaian Inde- supplies. Make baskets using box- shop equipment. Qualification Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300 /
pendence Day and Nov. 11 in o- es and pape ribbon. cards will be issued after course
servance of Veteran's Day. Stamping Class, 6:30-8:30 p.m. completion. '

. . . . . . . . . ./ .//




/ Valent Recreation Center: Haunted House Saturday. Veteran's Day weekend special, Nov. and delivery service. Open 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Effective Monday the center will be +Cocoli Community Center: 11-13, rent a three-man tent, sleeping bag, Mondays- Fridays, 11 a.m.- 3 p.m. Satur- /
open 12:30-9:30 p.m. daily. Videos for children 4 p.m. Thursday. and lantern for $6.25 a day. $9 for the days. It is in the Zodiac Community Activ-
The screening room offers free mov- Laser disc movies 7 p.m. Friday. weekend. cities Center. Phone in orders by calling /
ics. Call the 24-hour movie line, 287-4367 +Sports and Recreation Rental Center Nov. 7-12 special, rent cooking utensils 284-5848, fax to 284-6109. /
Sfor days and times. Panamanian Independence Day spe- at half price. Rent the activities room and the Big
Volunteersagel8andolderareneed- cial, Wednesday-Nov. 4, free ice fill-up *Zodiac Community Center: Tree Bohio for parties or any other func- /
ed to perform as horror characters for the with rental of a 16-quart cooler. Subs on Top offers eat-in, take out tion. /
/ 4




Portobello/ Playa Langosta Nov. 5. Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and Fri- aid, CPR, yoga. martial arts, various
Atlantic tours Rio Mar Nov. 6. days. sports, English, Spanish and dog obedi-
*Sundial Recreation Center: nFamily exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. ence.
n El Valle 5:30 am. Sunday. Rec center neWs Wednesdays. The center is open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 7
/ Free Zone 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday. *Sundial Recreation Center: Piano 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesday. daily.
/ Isla Grande 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 6. Rock, mineral and seashell exhibit, Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6 p.m. The center offers deep sea fishing
Panama City historical tour 8 a.m.-5 Saturday-Sunday. Thursday. charters. Call 289-6402 for more infor-
p.m. Nov. 7. Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. Mon- *O()cean Breeze Recreation Center: nation.
( )cean Breeze Recreation Center: days. The center is looking for instructors People are needed to line handletran-
Remon Race Track 8 a.m. Saturday. Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Monday, to teach the following classes: cooking, siting boats from Cristobal to Balboa.
/ El Valle 5 a.m. Sunday. Wednesday and Fridays. dance, arts and crafts, music, aerobics, first Sign up now. Call for details.


S '-./////-. //
/

















(courtesy photo) /


/
office in your t /
,�


Phone guide

Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989.
Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-(X)75
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center. 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club.-287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363
Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador, 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010


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B8 Tropic Times
B Oct. 28, 1994


Movies


Location


Howard AFB 7pm: The Little 2pm: The Little 2pm: Wagons East 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: Natural Born 7pm: Milk Money 7pm: Blankman
284-3583 Rascals (PG) Rascals (PG) (PG-13) (PG-13) Killers (R) (PG-13) Melanie (PG-13) Damon
Travis Tedford, Travis Tedford, John Candy, John Candy, Woody Harrelson, Griffith, Ed Harris Wayans, David Alan
Bug Hall Bug Hall Richard Lewis Richard Lewis Juliette Lewis 9pm: A Good Man in Grier
9pm: Natural Born 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: Wagons East 9pm: Natural Born 9pm: True Lies Africa (R) Sean 9pm: A Good Man in
Killers (R) (PG- 13) (PG- 13) Killers (R) (R) Arnold Connery, Colin Friels Africa (R) Sean
Woody Harrelson, John Candy, John Candy, Woody Harrelson, Schwarzenegger, Connery, Colin Friels
Juliette Lewis Richard Lewis Richard Lewis Juliette Lewis Jamie Lee Curtis
9pm: Natural Born 9pm: Natural Born
Killers (R) Killers (R)
Woody Harrelson, Woody Harrelson,
Juliette Lewis Juliette Lewis


Fort Clayton 7pm: Clear and 2pm: Clear and 2pm: Angels in the 7pm: Color of Night 7pm: Angels in the 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: The Little
Present Danger (PG- Present Danger (PG- Outfield (PG) Danny (R) Bruce Willis, Jane Outfield (PG) Danny (PG- 13) John Candy, Rascals (PG) Travis
287-3279 13) Harrison Ford, 13) Harrison Ford Glover, Tony Danza March Glover, Tony Danza Richard Lewis Tedford, Bug Hall
William Defoe 7pm: Clear and 7pm: Clear and 9:15pm: Clear and 9pm: Clear and Present 9pm: Natural Born 9:30pm: Wagons
9pm: Color of Night Present Danger (PG- Present Danger (PG- Present Danger (PG- Danger(PG-13) Killers (R) Woody East, (PG-13) John
(R) Bruce Willis, Jane 13) Harrison Ford 13) Harrison Ford, 13) Harrison Ford, Harrison Ford, William Harrelson, Julliette Candy, Richard Lewis
March 9:45pm: Speed (R) William Defoe William Defoe Defoe Lewis
Keanu Reeves, Dennis 9:30pm: Color of
Hopper (Reduced Night (R) Bruce
Admission) Willis, Jane March

Fort Davis 7pm: Andre (PG) 2pm: The Mask (PG- 7pm: Andre (PG) 7pm: In the Army Now 7pm: The Mask (PG- 7pm: Color of Night 7pm: Clear and
289-5 173 Keith Carradine, Tina 13) Jim Carrey, Keith Carradine, Tina (PG) Pauly Shore, Lori 13) Jim Carrey, (R) Bruce Willis, Present Danger (PG-
289-5173 Mojoring Richard Jeni Majoring Petty Richard Jeni Jane March 13) Harrison Ford,
9pm: The Mask (PG- 7pm: In the Army 9pm: The Mask (PG- William Dafoe
13) Jim Carrey, Now (PG) Pauly Shore, 13) Jim Carrey,
Richard Jeni Lori Petty Richard Jeni
9pm: The Mask (PG-
1_3)
Fort Sherman 7pm: True Lies 7pm: Andre (PG) 7pm: In the Army No show No show No show 7pm: Color of Night
(R) Arnold Kieth Carradine, Tina Now (PG) Pauly (R) Bruce Willis, Jane
289-5173 Schwarzenegger, Mojoring Shore, Lori Petty March
Jamie Lee Curtis

Fort Amador 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: A Good Man in 7:30pm: Milk Money No show No show No show 7pm: Natural Born
284-3583 (PG-13) John Candy, Africa (R) Sean (PG-13) Melanie Killers (R) Woody
84-3583Richard Lewis Connery, Colin Friels Griffith, Ed Harris Harrelson, Julliette
Lewis


Nov. 4

Howard AFB
7pm Milk Money (PG-13)
Melanie Griffith
Ed Harris
9 pm True Lies (R)
Arnold
Schw arzenegger
Tom Arnold


Fort Clayton
7pm The Little Rascals
(PG) Travis Tedford,
Bug Hall
9pm Natural Born Killers
(R) Woody
Harrelson. Juliette
Lewis


Fort Davis
7pm Clear and Present
Danger (PG-13)
HarrisonFord,
Willem Dafoe
9:45pm Color of Night (R)
Bruce Willis
Jane March


Fort Sherman
7pm The Mask (PG-13)
Jim Carrey


Fort Amador
7pm The Mask (PG-13)
Jim Carrey


Andre
Keith Carradine, Tina Majorino
An amazing true story of the seal that became
a living legend. An adorable newborn seal is
orphaned after his mother is caught in a fish-
erman's net. The pup is nursed back to health
by the animal loving Whitney family, who
name him Andre. PG (teen mischief, mild vi-
olence, language) 1 hr, 34 min.

Blankman
Damon Wayans, David Alan Grier
He's got no super powers, no money and no
name. He's BLANKMAN, a self-appointed
super hero who's so broke he fights crime in
his long johns. PG-13 (off-color humor) 1
hr, 32 min.

Clear & Present Danger
Harrison Ford, Willem Dafoe
In this movie adaptation of the Tom Clancy
novel, Jack Ryan (Harrison Ford) finds him-
self once again drawn into global intrigue.
This time he's up against a Colombian drug
cartel. Also features Ann Archer and James
Earl Jones. PG-13 (action, violence, lan-
guage) 2 hrs, 22 min.

Color of Night
Bruce Willis, Jane March
Haunted by the bizarre suicide of a patient,
New York psychologist Dr. Bill Capa (Bruce
Willis) abandons his successful practice and
relocates to Los Angeles. His encounters
there prove as shocking as the chilling event
he has run away from. He immediately finds
himself entangled in an explosive sexual re-
lationship with a beautiful and enigmatic
woman named Rose, and the investigation
into the brutal stabbing murder of a friend
and colleague. R (sexuality, violence, lan-
guage) 2 hrs.

A Good Man in Africa
Sean Connery, Colin Friels
Sean Connery is a reluctant diplomat in this

Beginning Saturday, admission
for first run movies will increase
to $3 for adults, $1.50 for
children. Second run movies w ill
be S2.50 for adults, $1.25 fur
children.


Starts Saturday at Fort Amador and Wednes-
day at the Howard AFB theater.
story of a man assigned to a newly indepen-
dent African state. He wants out, but a com-
plicated political situation inspires him to
stay. R (language and sexuality) 1 hr, 36 min.

In the Army Now
Pauly Shore, Lori Petty
Pauly Shore is not the ideal troop. In fact, he
joined the Army Reserves for the bennies and
the regular salary. Reality kicks in when he
becomes a part of a mission involving actual
combat. PG (some war action, mild language)
1 hr, 31 mrin.

The Little Rascals
Travis Tedford, Bug Hall
Steven Spielberg produces an appealing up-
date of the Hat Roach comedy series from
the '20s, '30s and '40s. The gang has estab-
lished a boy's only club, but things change
when Alfalfa falls for Darla. PG (language)
1 hr, 22 min.


The Mask
Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni
Nobody does super powers like Jim Carrey.
An ordinary, mild-mannered bank clerk is
transformed into the weirdest super hero of
all time when he dons his mask. PG-13
(some stylized violence) 1 hr, 40 min.

Milk Money
Melanie Griffith, Ed Harris
Melanie Griffith is a streetwise woman who
rescues three young boys. The boys drifted
into the city from rural locales in hopes of
seeing a living, breathing, naked woman.
PG-13 (sexual themes) 1 hr, 42 min.

Natural Born Killers
Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis
This is the saga of Mickey and Mallory
Knox, two thrill-killers who truly enjoy
their work. They live in a interesting zone:
pillowtalk and ultra-violence; insanity and
comedy; demons and heroes. R (violence,
shocking images, language, sex) 2 hrs.

Speed
Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper
LAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played by
Keanu Reeves, is known as a man with an
attitude. Dennis Hopper, the sociopath who
nearly killed him before, is back for an ex-
plosive reunion. R (violence, language) 1
hr, 51 min.

True Lies
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Harry Tasker is a special agent for Omega
Sector, a top secret agency charged with
nuclear terrorism intervention. Fluent in six
languages and skilled in all forms of counter
intelligence, Harry is an international spy
who has kept his real profession secret from
his wife. R (action, violence, language) 2
hr, 42 min.

Wagons East
John Candy, Richard Lewis
Phil Taylor (Richard Lewis) is a frontiers-
man who rallies discontented neighbors to
leave the West and return East. James
Hlarlow (John Candy) is the hard-drinking
wagon master hired to lead the convoy East.
PG-13 (off-color humor) 1 hr, 47 min.


A OODMAN

"'AFRICA

Dt:p in rhe heart -f Africa
the Briish pra lict bizarre rituals.


Today


Sunday


Tuesday


Saturday


Monday


Wednesday I Thursday











* TV Schedule


Tropic Times B 9
Oct. 28, 1994 B9


g * Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30 Headline News 6:00 Real Videos 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 3:00 "Aliens" 5:00 Headline News
6:00 Good Morning America 7:00 Navy/Marine Corps News 6:30 The Hour Of Power 6:00 Headline News 6:00 Headline News 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
w/ Panama Now (7:25) 7:30 Channel One / Newsroom 7:00 Take 2 6:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Headline News 6:00 Headline News
8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Guts 7:30 The 700 Club 7:00 Good Morning America 7:00 Good Morning America 6:30 NBC News at Sunrise 7:00 Good Morning America
8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Just for Kids! 8:00 This Old House 9:00 Basic Training Workout . w/Panama Now ( 7:25) 7:00 Good Morning America w/ Panama Now (7:25)
9:30 Portrait of America Muppet Babies 9:00 CBS Sunday Morning 9:30 Sesame Street 9:00 Bodyshaping w/ Panama Now (7:25) 9:00 Bodyshaping
10:25 Guiding Light Teenage Mutant Ninja 10:30 This Week With Brinkley 10:25 Guiding Light 9:30 Sesame Street 9:00 Basic Training Workout 9:30 Sesame Street
11:10 General Hospital Turtles 11:30 Face the Nation 11:10 General Hospital 10:25 Guiding Light 9:30 Sesame Street 10:25 Guiding Light
12:00 Headline News Break Biker Mice From Mars 12:00 Inside the NFL 12:00 Headline News 11:10 General Hospital 10:25 Guiding Light 11:10 General Hospital
12:25 Panama Now Batman Cartoon 1:00 Movies:" A Disney 12:30 Sports Machine 12:00 Headline News Break 11:10 General Hospital 12:00 Headline News Break
12:30 Sportscenter 10:30 -Faerie Tale Theater Halloween Treat" 1:00 Oprah Winfrey 12:25 Panama Now 12:00 Headline News Break 12:25 Panama Now
1:00 Another World 11:00 College Football: Colorado 2:00 "The Monster Squad" 2:00 Another World 12:30 Sportscenter 12:25 Panama Now 12:30 Sportscenter
2:00 Oprah Winfrey vs Nebraska 3:30 Ken Bum's "Baseball" 3:00 Price is Right 1:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 12:30 Sportscenter 1:00 Donahue
3:00 Price is Right 2:30 College Football: Ohio Sixth Inning "The Nation 4:00 Guts 2:00 Another World 1:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Another World
4:00 Think Fast! State vs Penn State al Past Time" 4:30 I Love Lucy 3:00 Price is Right 2:00 Another World 3:00 Price is Right
4:30 I Love Lucy 5:30 Headline News 6:00 Hearts Afire 5:00 Family Feud 4:00 Reading Rainbow 3:00 Price is Right 4:00 Mister Rogers
5:00 Family Feud 6:00 College Football: Georgia 6:30 Dr. Quinn: Medicine 5:30 The Cosby Show 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:00 Shining Time Station Neighborhood **
5:30 The Cosby Show vs Florida Woman 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:00 Family Feud 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy
6:00 SCN Evening Report 9:30 Ken Bum's "Baseball" 7:30 Mini Series: "The Return 6:15 Headline Break 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud
6:15 Headline News Break Fifth Inning "Shadow Ball' To Lonesome Dove Pt 3 6:30 World News Tonight 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show
6:30 World News Tonight 11--30 Saturday Night Live of 4" 7:00 Jeopardy 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 Headline News
7:00 Jeopardy 1:00 WWF Superstars of Wres 9:00 ABC 20/20 7:25 Panama Now 6:30 World News Tonight 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 World News Tonight
7:25 Panama Now tling 10:00 Top Cops 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:00 Jeopardy 6:30 World News Tonight 7:00 Jeopardy
7:30 Entertainment Tonight 2:00 Movies:"Psycho" 11:00 Miami Vice 8:00 Mad About You 7:25 Panama Now 7:00 Jeopardy 7:25 Panama Now
8:00 America's Funniest 4:00 "Frenzy" 12:00 Movie:"Deliverance" 8:30 Cops 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:25 Panama Now 7:30 Entertainment Tonight
People 2:00 "Magnum Force" 9:00 60 Minutes 8:00 L.A. Law + 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 8:00 ALF
8:30 Evening Shade 4:00 Videolinks 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:00 Northern Exposure 8:00 Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air 8:30 Touched By An Angel
9:00 In the Heat of the Night 5:00 Headline News 10:05 Cheers 10:00 SCN Late Edition 8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 9:30 Love and War
10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:30 David Letterman 10:05 Cheers 9:30 Culture Clash 10:00 Cheers
10:05 Cheers 11:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Letterman 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:30 David Letterman
10:30 David Letterman 12:30 Nightline 11:30 Tonight Show 10:05 Cheers 11:30 Tonight Show
11:30 Tonight Show 1:00 Movies:'The Unforgiven" 12:30 Nightline 10:30 David Letterman 12:30 Nightline
12:30 Ren and Stimpy 3:05 "One, Two, Three" 1:00 Movies:"Wait Until Dark" 11:30 Tonight Show 1:00 Movies:"Warlock"
1:00 Movies:"Starflight One" 5:00 Headline News 12:30 Nightline 3:00 "The Fly"
3:00 "Conan the Barbarian" 1:00 Movies:"Die Hard" 5:00 Headline News
4:40 "Conan the Destroyer" 3:00 "Predator"






- I * Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday


5:30 Simulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek***
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Reading Rainbow
5:00 Silver Spoons
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Roseanne
8:30 The Boys Are Back
(New Fall Series)
9:00 Primetime Live
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Renegade
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Nightline
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Letterman
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Military News
4:00 Tom & Jerry Kids
4:30 Tiny Toons Adventures
5:00 CRO
5:30 Videolinks


6:30 Simulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10
8:30 Young Adult Theater
"Bugs Bunny
Howl-O-Ween"
"Which Witch is Which?"
"The Haunting of
Harrington House"
"The Peanut Butter
Solution"
11:35 Channel One/ Newsroom
12:05 Silver Spoons
12:30 Movies:
"Midnight Madness"
"Pee Wee's Big
Adventure"
4:00 21 Jump Street
5:00 Sports Special
6:00 Doctor, Doctor
6:30 Dinosaurs
7:00 Seaquest DSV**
8:00 Star Trek: "Deep Space
Nine"
9:00 Me and the Boys
(New Fall Series)
9:30 Married With Children
10:00 Movie:"Fright Night"
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Science and Technology
Week
1:00 The McLaughlin Group
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Entertainment This week
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Saturday Night Live
5:00 Videolinks
5:30 Headline News Break


6:00 Washington Week in Re
view
6:30 Mister Roger's
Neighborhood **
7:00 Quigley's Village **
7:25 Goof Troop
7:45 Muppet Babies
8:10 Disney's the Little Mer
maid
8:30 Batman
8:50 Bobby's World
9:10 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
9:30 Movie: "Ghostbusters U1"
12:00 This Old House
12:30 NFL Pre-Game Show
1:00 NFL: Kansas City Chiefs
vs Buffalo Bills
4:00 NFL: Seattle Seahawks
vs San Diego Chargers
7:00 Halloween Special: "A
Disney Halloween"
8:00 NFL: Pittsburgh Steelers
vs Arizona Cardinals
11:00 The Fresh Prince of
Bel Air +
11:30 Phenom +
12:00 Eye To Eye W/ C. Chung
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Meet the Press
2:30 Sports Machine
3:00 Sports Latenight
3:30 Frugal Gourmet
4:00 Headline News
4:30 Wheel of Fortune
5:00 Jeopardy
5:30 Oprah Winfrey


6:30 Simulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10
9:00 Oprah Winfrey
10:00 Today
12:00 Headline News
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Batman
4:00 Fraggle'Rock
4:30 The Adventures of Pete &
Pete
5:00 In the Mix
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 MacGyver**
9:00 Monday Night Football.
Green Bay Packers vs
Chicago Bears
12:00 M*A*S*H*
12:30 Nightline
1:00 CNN Presents
2:00 Headline News
2:30 Sports Latenight
3:00 David Letterman
4:00 Headline News
4:30 Wheel Oo Fortune
5:00 Jeopardy
5:30 Donahue


6:30 Simulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10
9:00 Donahue
10:00 Today
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Bobby's World
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Legends of the Hidden
Temple**
5:00 Disney's Raw Toonage
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Home Improvement
8:30 My So Called Life
(New Fall Series)
9:30 Frasier
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Heartbeat **
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Cheers
12:00 M*A*S*H*
12:30 Nightline
1:00 Dateline
2:00 Headline News
2:30 Sports Latenight
3:00 David Letterman
4:00 Headline News
4:30 Wheel of Fortune
5:00 Jeopardy
5:30 Oprah Winfrey


6:30 Simulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10
9:00 Oprah Winfrey
10:00 Today
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Goof Troop
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Guts
5:00 Beakman's World
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Sinbad Show
8:30 Family Matters
9:00 Wise Guy
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Tour of Duty
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Cheers
12:00 M*A*S*H*
12:30 Nightline
1:00 NBC Now
2:00 Headline News
2:30 Sports Latenight
3:00 David Letterman
4:00 Headline News
4:30 Wheel of Fortune
5:00 Jeopardy
5:30 Sally Jesse Raphael


6:30 Simulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10
9:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
10:00 Today
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Muppet Babies
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Nick Arcade
5:00 The Facts of Life
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek. Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Boy Meets World
8:30 John Larroquette
9:00 Dateline
10:00 L. A- Law
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Cheers
12:00 M*A*S*H*
12:30 Nightline
1:00 Eye to Eye w/ Connie
Chung
2:00 Headline News
2:30 Sports Latenight
3:00 David Letterman
4:00 Headline News
4:30 Wheel of Fortune
5:00 Jeopardy


0Spor s ad *peia


Channels 8 & 10
Sports
College Football
Colorado Buffalos vs Nebraska Comhuskers 11 a.m. Saturday
Ohio State Buckeyes vs Penn State Nittany Lions 2:30 p.m. Saturday
Georgia Bulldogs vs Florida Gators 6 p.m. Saturday
Miniseries
Return To Lonesome Dove (Part 3 of 4) 7:30 p.m. Sunday
Clara Allen loses her ranch in a blazing fire, but all of her horses are saved. She teams
up with Gideon Walker and heads for Montana where Woodrow Call waits to realize
his vision of breeding horses in the Big Sky country.
Late night movies
Saturday Tuesday
"Conan the Barbarian" 3 a.m. "The Unforgiven" I a.m.
Arnold Schwarzenegger is a sword- Clint Eastwood returns to his gunfighting
wielding warrior seeking vengence. days after the death of his wife.


Sunday
"Psycho" 2 a.m.
Anthony Perkins stars in Alfred
Hitchcock's classics thriller.
Monday
"Deliverance" midnight
Burt Reynolds gets more than he bar-
gained for on a weekend canoe trip.


Wednesday
"Aliens" 3 a.m.
Sigoumey Weaver returns to battle the
fiercest aliens encountered by humans.
Thursday
"Die Hard" I a.m.
Bruce Willis is the "fly in the ointment"
for a group off terrorists.


Cable Channel 14
Sports
NFL football
Kansas City Chiefs vs Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Sunday
Seattle Seahawks vs San Diego Chargers 4 p.m. Sunday
Pittsburgh Steelers vs Arizona Cardinals 8 p.m. Sunday
Green Bay Packers vs Chicago Bears 9 p.m. Monday
Series starts
"Heartbeat"
10 p.m. Tuesday
The physicians must deal with a surrogate mother who refuses to give up the child she
was carrying for an infertile couple and Eve is threatened by a patient's boyfriend
when she discovers he carries the AIDS virus.
Halloween specials
"Bugs Bunny Howl-O-Ween" 8:30 a.m. Saturday
"Which Witch is Which?" 9 a.m. Saturday
"A Disney Halloween" 7 p.m. Sunday
Prime time movies
"Fright Night"
10 p.m. Saturday
It's Dracula-versus-the-teenagers time when an average kid named Charley begins to
suspect the guy next door is actually the descendant of a certain thirsty count from
Transylvania.
Stars: William Ragsdale and Chris Sarandon.













.Classified Ads


10 Tropic Times
BOJ Oct. 28, 1994


Rottweilers, 2wks old, tails docked,
dewormed, $500. 235-4190.

Toy French poodle puppies, 6 wks
old, dewormed, parents 4 lbs, CCP
registered, $225. 226-5395.

German Shepard mix puppies, $40
male, $30 female, ready now. 283-
3499.

Purebred Dalmations, 2 males, beau-
tiful quality, $200 ea. 2894166.

Akita female puppy, white w/ gray
markings, 2.5 mo old, CCP registered,
$500. 289-5860.

Pit Bull, male, white, 8 mo old, $150.
233-1342.

10 wk old kitten free, loving, playful,
grt w/ kids. 286-6175.

Doberman, 6 mo old, has shots, tail
docked, ears cropped, housebroken,
free. 286-3433.

AKC registered Boston Terrier pup-
pies, 1 male, I female, $350 ea. 287-
3627.

CCP reg Irish Setter puppies, 8 mo
old, champion father, exc mother. 232-
5622.

American Pit Bull Terrier pups, 6 wks
old, ADBA reg, dewormed, 1 male, 1
female, $200. 252-6167.

2 yr old male Doberman, fixed, nice,
grt w/ kids, $175. 252-5103.

Calico ecat, fixed, shots up to date, free.
287-4879.

Dachsund puppies, 2 females, $175.
266-7930.

Toy French Poodles, 6 wks old, $180.
261-3325.

Male collie puppy, 10 wks old, pure-
bred, 1st shots, $225. 261-7909.

Kittens free,dog, all shots, fixed, neg.
285-4394.

White Poodle puppies, purebred, de-
wormed, shots, gentle and smart, last
litter, $125. 286-4774.

Parakeet w/ Ig cage and accessories,
$20. 284-6777.

2 Angelfish, I algae eater (5"), $5 ea,
286-3143 after 3 p.m.

Female Golden Lab, 10 mo old, all
shots, housebroken, gri w/ kids, $250.
283-4295.

Kitten free, white w/ calico markings,
sweet disposition. 287-4428.

Male Shepard, 7 mo old, Reg, house-
broken, $300, 5 mo old kitten, b&w,
female, free. 283-3031.

2 boxer pups, male, 7 wks old, fawn w/
white markings, tails docked, $175.
286-3775.

Wanted, golden retriever or golden
lab puppy. 252-5163.




1990 Jeep Cherokee 4x4, 4.0, 6 cyl,
ac, pb, pw, am/fin cass, sun roof, exc
cond, $12,500 obo. 223-7193.

1978 Ford Thunderbird, 302 eng, ac,
am/fin/eb, gd cond, not dty pd, $1,800
obo. 252-2838.

1984 Pontiac Bonneville, 4dr, ac, am/
fin, gd cond, not dty pd, $3,500. 284-
6894.

1987 Ford Escort GT, white, 2.0L,
am/, n/cass, new tires, tinted glass,
$4,'0>. 284-5684.

1988 Toyota 4x4 truck, hfled, no ac,
incredible looking, $7,000. 263-2382,
ask for Lamb.

Par for 1989 4-Runnmer Toyota, 4 cyl,
22 � eng, cyl head assem and crank
sha 233-6096

1990 Mazda B-2,200, ac, pb, am/fin/


cass, alarm, not dty pd, 46k mi,
bedlhner, stand. 287-5728.

Jeep, 6 cyl, dty pd, new tires, brakes,
exhaust, paint, top, will trade for truck
or car, $2,995. 283-5723.

1994 Subaru Impreza, 5 spd, not dty
pd, 4 dr, ac, am/fin/cass, exc cond,
$10,500. 230-1001.

1988 Ford Escort, 4 cyl, auto, new
tires, gd cond, will trade for truck,
$2,995. 283-5723.

1993 Ford Explorer Sport 4x4, 5 spd,
loaded w/ sun roof, extras, 12k mi,
like new, $21,500. 282-4473.

1991 Nissan Maxima, loaded, leather
seats, spoiler, Bose stereo syst, 21k
mi, like new, $16,500. 286-6346.

1989 Chevy Camaro RS, v6, auto, t-
tops, new paint, $6,000. 230-1926
evenings.

1990 Chevy Cavalier, low mi, ps, pb,
ac, am/fin/cass, $6,900. 264-3143.

1991 Plymouth Sundance, auto, ac,
bought new at Howard car sales,
$8,000. 286-3171.

1992 Ford Ranger, v6, 5 spd, am/fin/
cass, camper shell, $9,500 obo. 232-
5419.

1988 Ford Bronco XLT 4x4, loaded
43k mi, exc cond, not dty pd, $11,500.
289-3234.

1989 Nissan truck, Leer shell, ac, ste-
reo cass, 15" tires, star rims, 44k ma,
$5,500 firm. 260-1948.

1991 Suzuki Samurai, soft top, 4wd,
ac, 15k mi, $6,500. 289-5960.

1985 GMC van, model vandura 2500,
$7,500obo or will trade for boat w/
motor and trailer. 287-6244.

1987 Ford Escort, $3,000obo. 289-
4267

1985 Chevy Blazer S-10, 5 spd,ps, pb,
pw, new tires, runs gMt, gd body,
$4,000. 2894166.

1979 Mercedes 350SE, auto, ps, pb,
ac, pw, am/fin/cass, sun roof, $2,500.
284-6699.

1991 Mercury Capri cony, ac, pw,
new breaks and tires, 35k mi, $8,400
obo. 287-4692.

1991 Honda Civic, 3 dr, 16 valve fuel
inj, runs grt, booming music sys. 284-
6137.

1981 Pontiac Grand Prix, new paint,
tinted wind, runs gd, pw, v6, $2,000.
235-9390.

1985 Ford Ranger, flatbed, 4x4, on/
off road equipped, lift kit, roll cage,
oversized tires, many spare parts,
$4,000. 289-5942.

1986 Pontiac Fiero SE, auto, ac, pw,
pl, runs gd. 285-6876.

1987 VW Golf GT, 2 dr, 5 spd, pb,
BMW runims, new tires, $1,750. 289-
3573 after 5pin for Fleming.

1993 Dodge Caravan LE, loaded, paid
$28,000, owe $19,670, 1993 Dodge
Dakota LE extra cab 4x4, v8, loaded,
camper shell, paid $25,000, owe
$17,900. 268-3085.

1993 Toyota Corona 2.0i, loaded, 15"
sport wheels, under 10k mi, $17,500
obo. 2634671.

1984 Toyota Corolla, spec edit, ac, ps,
pb, am/fin/cass, vynal top, exc cond,
$3,800. 286-4893.

1993 Ford Explorer XLT, 4dr, 2wd,
positraction, auto, JBL am/fin/cass,
loaded, low mi, not dty pd, $22,300.
252-5556.

1976 Chevy Nova, v8/305, auto, 4dr,
body needs wrk, runs grt, $1,000.252-
6804.

1992 Nissan Terrano, ac, stereo, 44k
mi, exc cond, duty free, $13,000. 226-
1305.

1982 Chevy truck, ps, pb, ac, runs grt,
pw cap, new brakes, tires, eng like


new, camper shell, $3,500 neg. 256-
6407.

1991 Hyundai XL 4dr sedan, low mi,
ac, cass, dty pd, $6,000. 252-6110.

1994 Jeep Cherokee, $18,500. 1984
VW Quantum, at, radio/cass, 4dr, dry
pd, $3,000. 287-3335.

1986 Ford Escort, 1.91 eng, 5 spd, runs
grt, not dty pd, $2,200. 287-5288.

1978 Chevy Classic Supreme, new
paint, auto, gd cond, dty pd. 264-
8720.

1994 Chrysler Lebaron GTC, 2 dr
conv, 3.01 mpi, v6, 4spd auto, elect
trans, al brakes, tilt steer, $15,500.
284-4991.

1990 Ford Bronco II1, ps, pb, am/fmin/
cass, XLT pack, immac wht ext,
$15,000. 260-3433.

1989 VW Golf, 4dr, 5 spd, remov am/
fin/cass, ac, lowmi, $5,200.252-1273.

1993 Integra LS, 4 dr, 5 spd, loaded,
sun roof, 18k mi, not dty pd, $17,900.
283-6425.

1992 Chevy S10 truck, dty pd, ac, 5
spd, am/fin/cass, $9,300 obo. 263-
7919.

1985 Mustang LX, ac, ps, am/fin/cass,
tint win, new paint, tires, runs grt, exc
cond, $4,000. 284-3798.

1987 Blazer S10 v6 fuel inj, ac, ps,
$8,500, 2864676.

1989 Montero, US specs, gas, exc
cond, $11,000. 252-5023.

1981 Cadillac Coupe deVille, dty pd,
exc cond, loaded, ac, cass, cb, pe,
$8,500. 282-3580.

1991 Nissan Sentra, ac, stereo, clean,
22k mi, $5,250. 286-6188.

1987 Nissan Sentra, 2 dr, gray, dty pd,
$3,400 230-1280.

1984 Audi 80GL, 4 dr, auto, ps, $2,500
obo. 223-7780.

1991 Nissan Sentra, US specs, am/fm/
cass, 4 dr, $6,000. 284-5160.

1981 Datsun 200 Sx, 5 spd, not dry pd,
$2,500. 286-4632.

1989 Ford Tempo, mint cond, auto,
iany extras, comp car care records,
$5,750 neg. 284-6381.

1989 Honda Trans alp, 17k mi, exc
cond, dty pd, $2,800. 260-9899.

1990 Pontiac Grand Prix, v6, loaded,
am/fin/cass, $8,900. 286-6298.

1985 Ford Bronco II 4x4, auto, new
susp, $3,500. 287-3793.

1994 Dailhatsu Charade, exc cond, am/
fm/cass, ac, 5 spd, grt gas mi, $5,400.
264-4105.

1989 Honda Accord LKi, 57k mi, 5
spd, 4 dr, ac, loaded. $9,500. 284-
3481.

1985 S10 Tahoe, loaded, nuns grt,
some rust w/camper, $3,600. 287-
5225.

1979 Grand Wagoneer, gd cond, load-
ed, $3,900. 2854045.

1988 S10 Blazer, blue, ps, pb, pw,
auto, leather seats, exc cond, $6,750.
287-4974.

1974 Ranchero truck, $800,1977 Ford
truck, $1,000, 1975 Ford Pinto, $800,
dty pd. 283-3487.

1983 Chevy Cavalier, 2 dr, 4 spd, runs
grt, $1,800 neg. 282-3694 after 6pm.

1986 Renault Encore, 4 dr, runs gd, 5
spd, 47k mi, $2,200 obo. 251-0968.

1978 Ford Granada, ps, pb, auto, ac,
pw, new paint, am/fin/cass, $1,200.
242-4925.

1983 Nissan Stanza, ac, 4 dr, hatch-
back, $2,800. 286-4678.

1990 Volvo 740, ac, am/fin/cass, ps,
pb, exc cond, $9,000. 226-6341.

1981 Honda Civic, ac, cass, 4 spd,


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - A,. a reminder,
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both. military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item. but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
Before such a sale. it is strongly recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.


body gd, needs head gasket, $900 obo.
284-5538 after 5pm.

1992 Honda Civic VX, red, 17k mni,
cd, 5 spd, $8,500 neg. 284-5833.

Toyota Carolla, at, ac, low mn, am/fin/
cass, dty pd. 261-6037.

1983 CJ-7 Jeep Laredo package, gd
cond, $6,000. 252-5024.

1992 Ford Ranger XLT, ps, pb, am/
fin/cass, 5 spd, 4 cyl, $7,000. 284-
4634.

1983 Jeep CJ-7 4x4, ps, cass, runs gd,
$3,000. 287-6138.

1988 VW truck, 4 spd, gas, not dty pd,
small, $2,200. 252-2885.

1987 Ford Tempo, 2 dr, 5 spd, am/fin/
cass, gd cond, econ, $3,300.287-4772.

1977 VW bus, 2k cc eng, solid cond,
grt mpg, will finance to servicemem-
ber, $2,500 obo. 282-4489 for Eric.

1988 Jeep Commanche 4x4, Kenwood
am/fin/cass, ac, ps, pb, new tires, sport
wheels, bo. 261-6418.

1985 Mitsubishi Lancer, 5 spd, am/
fin, dty pd, 4 dr, exc cond, $2,700.
261-2525.

1980 Honda Accord, 2 dr, $2,000 neg.
285-4659.

1984 S10 Blazer 4x4, auto, stereo,
alarm, exc cond, new paint, no rust,
$5,250 obo. 286-4734.

1988 318i BMW, 2 dr, sun roof, am/
fin/cass, ac, 5 spd, not dty pd, Euro
specs, $7,500. 261-6119.

1985 Chrysler Laser XT turbo, clean,
runs grt, new tires, $4,500 obo or
trade. 261-7788.

1986 Honda Prelude, 5 spd, am/fin/
not dty pd, ac needs comp, $2,800.
1981 Ford Thuderbird, gd cond,
$1,800. 252-2197.

Chevy parts, brake booster, alterna-
tor, like new, $200/$175 obo. 252-
6956.

1988 Dodge Dakota, 65k mi, v6, 5
spd, ac, extras, $5,900. 286-3744.

1973 IHC Scout II, 394 v8, at, rebuilt,
spare eng,mechperfect,dtypd,$3,000.
2864370.

1984 VW Westfalia camper, diesel w/
stove, sink, tables, sleeps 4, grt cond,
$8,000. 252-2559.

1991 Hyundai Excel, at, ac, efi, US
specs, exc cond and mpg, It blue,
$4,500. 289-3243.

1977 Ford Bronco, ps, pb, hard/soft
tops, halfdrs, 302 v8, runs grt, $4,500.
282-3326.

1989 Buick Skylark, at, ac, tilt wheel,
cruise control, 4 cyl, tint, 65k mi,
$5,500. 284-3670.

1983 Toyota Supra, ac, new tires, 5
spd, sun roof, am/fin/cass, pw, pb,
$5,800 firm. 227-6306.

1917 model T Ford touring conv, gd
cond, bo, consider trade. 252-6110.

1969 Firebird 350, hurst shifter, for
racing or street, dty pd. 252-2287.

1992 hyundai Excel, 4 dr, ac, 5 spd,
radio/cass, not dty pd, exc cond,
$6,500. 228-6027.

1980 Datsun 280 zx, 5 spd, ps, pw, pb,
cc, new paint and tires, exc cond,
$3,500 obo. 286-6228.

1984 Ford LTD, 49k mi, $3,900 neg.
261-7085.

1989 Dodge Conversion Van, v8, at,
2ac, low mi, extra nice, not dty pd.
252-6815.

Timuning chain and gear for Chevy Cav-
alier 1984 eng 2.0, 4 cyl, $50. 238-
8015.




Professional stylist, family hair care,
professional products, free consult.
284-3683 for Max.

Bilingual day maid. 261-9142 for
Isabel.

Eng spk maid, live in/out, gd w/kids.
262-9095.

Certified public translator, Eng to
Span/Span to Eng. 269-3056, 6-9 p.m.
for David Miranda.

Bilingual woman seeks part-tune of-
fice job, nights and weekends. 263-
3665 for Mitzi.

Professional cake decorator, 13 yrs
exp. 284-5776.

Reliable babysitter in hliome anytime-


Howard 284-6385.

Professional soccer lessons for all ages
and positions. 256-6260.

Certified FCC provider on Curundu
has opemnigs for hourly drop-offs. 286-
3790 for Becky.

Reliable live-out maid, some eng, grt
w/ kids, honest. 287-3878.

Maid, babysitter Mon, Wed, Fri and
weekends, ref avail. 286-3273.

In home art classes, water color, oil,
acrylic, bilingual instructor. 260-3433.

Cleaning woman w/our family 15 yrs,
avail Thrs, honest, self motivator, $20
day. 283-6425 for Toni.

Customized photography by appt, fam-
ilies, weddings, formals. 284-4392.

Live-in maid, bilingual, clean, care
for kids, laundry, iron, honest,hd wker.
228-2909 for Imelda.

To all Jewish persons interested in
Hanukah party. 260-8008.

Trail rides, reasonable rates. 252-2889
after 6pm.

Day maid, M-F, exc childcare, spk
Eng, ref. 287-4280, 6-9pm.

Honest, mature, dependable, grt work-
er, grt w/ kids, Span spk maid, ref
avail, M-F. 282-3326.

Reliable live-in babysitter, housekeep-
er, w/ref. 286-4393 for Patricia.

Eng spk live out maid, M-F, care for
baby, off post. 228-8503.

Exc babysitter w/ ref, 17 yrs, M-S
evenings. 2874546.

Span spk live-out maid, reliable, exc
worker, Tues/Fri. 261-7939.

Sat maid for cleaning or babysitting.
252-2314.

Gift baskets. 282-3673.

Honest, dependable, live-in maid, grt
w/ kids, flex hrs. 289-3243.

Span spk live-in maid, honest, M-F.
282-3790 for Benita.

Bilingual day maid, Tues/Thurs. 286-
6376 M/W/F after 8 a.m.

Eng spk maid, gd w/ kids. 221-2458.

Shaved ice machine w/natural exotic
flavors for unit functions. 284-3338

Cake decorating. 287-6222.

Depend, hd-wker will babysit, clean,
iron, etc, refavail. 231-2276 for Melida
Alley.




10' Zodiac inflatable with wooden
bottom, includes oars, pump and case,
$650. 260-7521.

16' Corsair Sunbird, 3.0L inboard
Mercruiser, fish finder, M-radio, am/
fin cass, new trailer, runs grt, $6,500/
obo. 282-4722.

26' w/225hp Johison ob, mint cond,
new trailer, $20,000. 286-4676.

71/2 and 9 Tycoon Fin-Nor reels w/
matching Fin-Nor rods, exc cond,
$1,800. 252-2080.

18' fiberglass tri-hull, 120hp
Mercruiser w/some extras, kicker
mount, fish finder, $2,000. 260-4385.

Jet ski, Kawasiki, 440cc, $1,450/obo.
252-2889 after 6pm.

30' sailboat, diesel, eqniped for cruis-
ing, $22,500. 252-5103.

1991 Evinrude 70 w/new 1994
powerhead, includes all controls,
$3,000. 2524848.

22' Wellcraft, 200hp mariner, 2 depth
finders, radio, many extras, 15hp kick-
er, $14,500. 264-3310.

19' open fisherman, Yamalha 90 1994
w/30 hours, fully loaded, $12,000.
252-5024.

Square end Gnumnian alunmiun ca-
noe/trailer, $1,100; wood/fiberglass
8' sailing dinghy/trailer, $500. 282-
4688.




386DX33 toner system, 4mb Ram,
210hd, SVGA, $850; Okidata
microlhne 390 24 pin printer, $175;
comp desk w/hutch, $75; $1,100 for
all. 223-7193.

Canon EOS/Elan camera w/case, 28-
80 ultrasonic lens w/EW-62 hd, $600/
obo 287-6125.
AST 386SX 25H2, 4mb Ram, many


programs, printer and desk, $1,000.
284-4989.

Epson daisy wheel comp 1 letter qual-
ity printer, $75. 282-3030.

RCA 20" color TV, $250; Kay pro
8088 CPU monitor, Epson FX8S print-
er $200. 263-3280.

Nintendo, gun, 2 controllers, 8 games,
game genie, $115. 289-4249.

Epson XT and TI laptop comps, $300
and $200285-5901.

CD Rom inter active game
Lawnmower Man, new, $25. 284-
4780.

Mitsumi CD Rom w/interface card
and cables, lots of software, never
used, $200. 289-5942.

Kenwood CD player DP-M7740 w/
remote, holds 7 cds, loaded, $215.
287-5985.

Nintendo Game Boy w/7 games, re-
chargerpack, carrying case, $100/obo.
286-3122 after 6pm.

Sega Genesis, 2 controllers, laser gun,
11 games, storage cabinet, $200/obo.
286-3122.

Tandy comp w/monitor, CM2, model
1000, $700. 267-6930 for Lizbeth.

CD Rom drive, Plextor 2X, new, un-
opened, I will help you install it, $275.
284-3132.

Typewriter, IBM correcting electric
11 in gd cond. 252-2506.

IBM PS12, full of games and gd soft-
ware for kids, $275. 230-0008.

New in box, IBM 286 w/new segate
130m hd, $750; fax machine, $180.
230-0008.

27" TV Sony Trinitron stereo, $400.
260-3433.

Panasonic VCR w/program director
remote control, new, $200. 224-6689.

PB 486DX2, 250mb hd, 8mb Ram,
cdrom, multimedia set, monitor, color
printer, desk, chair, software, $2,900/
obo. 287-3871.

Commodore 64 w/modem, keyboard,
printer, disk drive, joysticks and
games, $100. 284-3798.

Smith Corona 8,000 WP, recharg bat-
tery, fax'modem, 3.5 drive, 1 yr old,
$290. 236-0984.

Micron 486DX2/66, 8mb Ram, vesa
lb video, 213mb hd, 15" monitor,
2XCD-Rom, $2,500. 286-3736.

Guitar, harmony beginner electric,
new, $90; harmony port amplifier, $40.
252-6277.

Camera zoom lenses, Kiron 80-
200mm w/zoomlock and versatile 28-
105mm, $50 and $80. 282-4598.

Sony speakers, 50 watts $125/pr; Sony
am/fin stereo tuner $60; KenwoodTH-
215A transceiver, $100. 226-1158.

Panasonic camcorder, VHS, tripod, 3
batts, 2 cases, charger, AC adapter,
$499. 286-4589.

386SX IBM clone, 4mb Ramn, dual
drives, 40mb lid, VGA monitor, 24
pin printer, software, modem, $1,200.
286-6277.

Gameboy w/7 games and lots of ex-
tras,hardly used, $225/obo. 287-4596.

Comp complete, $750, TV, radio, tape
rec, VHS camcorder. 282-3297.

Kenwood receiver and cass, models
KR-V8540 and KX-W8040, pro log-
ic, dolby C and sync recording, $500.
284-4135.

IBM comp, 20mb hd, monitor, key-
board, and more, $150. 269-9669.

Sony 21" multi color TV, $220. 269-
9669.

Pioneer stereo receiver w/dolby sur-
round pro logic, double cas, cd player
and speakers, new, $1,000.236-1256.

Apple 11 Gs comp, dual drives, color
monitor, mouse, image writer, printer,
programs and manuals, $750. 282-
4598.

EP-7 digital piano $700, Pioneer cd,
dual cass stereo, $500. 284-3481.

Pioneer SR-60 reverb/amplifier, $60.
223-2483 leave msg.

Pioneer 6 disc cd player $100, 5yr old
14" Radio Shack color TV, $100.287-
5634.

Alfa numeric beeper w/chargcr and 2
batts, $100. 287-3521.

Casio musical keyboard, exc cond,
almost new, $390/obo. 286-3838.
















Epson 9 pin printer, exc cond, w/new
ribbon, stand and cables, $70. 269-
5424.

IBM compatible comp, 386SX, mon-
itor, printer, software, $1,100; gas grill
w/2 tanks, $45. 287-4428.




Kuckoo clocks, geniune, handcrafted,
from the Black Forest, Germany. 287-
5897.

Lg sofa bed, comp w/desk and access,
3 TVs, 2 VCRs, 5 beds, stereo, port
pool w/filter, bikes, DR set, and more.
268-3085.

Sofa, loveseat and coffee table w/hard
wood in gd cond. 284-3692.

Hdwood rock chair w/pads, small ste-
reo system w/speakers, matching sofa
and love seat. 287-5021.

13" GE color TV. 286-4399.

Queen size brass bed, solid oak dining
room table, $300. 284-3924.

Bassett bedroom set, 7 pieces, no bed,
white w/gold trim. 284-5833.

Chinese LR in black laquer, exc cond,
$1,500. 252-3395.

King size BR w/hdboard, 2 night ta-
bles, dresser, exc cond, $1,800. 252-
3395.

Monitor $30, car seat $30, bassinette
$50, baby bath $5, prom dress $30,
camera $30, auto guitar $80. 286-
4129.

Sharp umcro and deluxe cart, $100 or
sell sep; 14000BTUac, 110volt, $225;
car stereo box, $50. 283-3739.

4 ceiling fans w/light fixtures, $20ea.
284-6382.

Frame carrier, walker/stationary horse,
stroller, car seat. 287-5221.

2 rattan sofas $600, coffee table w/
mirror $100, BR set $700, curtains
$30, Barbie bike $50, and more. 287-
6793.

New 5.6cu ft frig $150, antique dining
set w/6 chairs, $250. 284-6382.

New 220v toaster $25, skillet $35,
used 220v coffee maker w/extra pot,
$40. 269-8583.

Electric home food sheer $50, gas
powered leaf vacumn and blower w/
bag, $70. 269-8583.

Sofa bed and love seat w/oak trim
$900, crib w/matt, white $125, comf
set $35,chevalmirror$100.261-4702.

Kemnore washer/dryer, exc cond,
$700. 284-5685.

Baby bed w/waterproofmatt and dress-
er w/shelves, $200. 287-6790.

Kenmore washer/dryer, $600/neg.
287-5586.

Floor model TV, Zenith, one year old.
260-2782.

GE dryer for parts, motor, timer, as is,
$40/obo. 252-2476.

Blue 3 cushion sofa, exc cond, $500/
obo. 2284514.

Overstuffed modern chair w/ottman
$500, swing carrier $20, med suitcase
$10, Century baby walker $20, misc
items. 286-6521.

Blue curtains $15, Kenmore micro
$150, swing set $35, BR set w/hutch
and lights, solid pine, $1,100. 252-
2028.

Couch, recently reupholstered $350,
queen mattress set, $300. 287-3878.

Twm bed, headboard, box spring, matt,
frame, like new, $250. 286-3541.

Q/ size sleeper sofa, matching love
seat, 2 end tables, 2 lamps, all beige or
brown, $300. 287-3534.

Sofa and love seat, gd cond, surfboard
w/board bag. 256-6407 9-1 1pm.

AC, patio enclosure, freezer, fridge,
misc. 252-2033.

Krups 10 cup coffee :.aker $20, 2
patio chairs .20ea, Drass lamp $30.
287-5237.

Ent center $75, rugs $40ea, VCR $50,
glass table $75. 287-4546.

Hot point electric range, $50. 286-
6431.

Sofa w/built in recliner, dark santa fe
colors, $300. 286-4674.

Almond side-by-side refrig, 25.7cu ft,
ice/water dispensers, $750; gas grill,
$35. 286-6188.

Security system, printer stand, full


bedspread, CD case, hanging ironing
board. 2874280, 6-9pm.

9x12 rusty red carpet, best offer. 260-
9303.

2 King w/bed matt, new $150, used
$110; waterbed heater $60.233-2410.

Kids custom made race-car bed w/
matt, seldom used, solid mahogany,
$600. 233-2410.

New 9x12 light blue carpet, ahnond
bar/counter stools, CD/VHS solid oak
rack, new food processor, lamps. 229-
2916.

Baby crib w/matt, solid wood, white,
classic, $100. 286-4589.

Wrought iron bench $30, white
whicker hdboard, full size, $45. 282-
3497.

Old wood desk, small, gd cond, $75.
252-1174.

18cu ft Hotpoint refrig, 17cu ft admi-
ral freezer, 4 burner GE stove. 264-
9522.

Gennan schirank $800, desk and chair
$170, dressers $130, book shelves,
metal shelves, stroller and more. 282-
3297

Recliner, large size, $350; full size
matt w/boxspring, $195; bothgd cond.
252-2180.

GE refrig 24cu ft $925, GE washer
$425, matt queen unused $175, bunk
bed tubular, new matt queen and twin.
252-2180.

Sofa and love seat $500, micro stand
$50, micro $125. 286-4893.

Whirlpool Ig capacity washer/dryer,
exc cond, $800/finn. 284-6738.

9 drawer dresser w/mirror, shelves on
side, men's 5 drawer dresser, wood,
like new, stain, water and scratch re-
sistamt, $450. 287-5678.

Whirlpool 14' refrig, gd cond, white,
$395. 252-2476.

Brown Hotpoint refrig/freezer l8cu
ft, gd cond, $375/obo. 263-2830 after
6:30pm.

24 drawer dressers, clina cabinet w/
table sits 6, vert blinds, Q hd/fl board
solid wood, 2 bluehead pionus birds.
284-4487.

King size w-bed w/solid wood
hdboard, fiboard, and side rails, exc
cond, $500. 226-6851.

Sofa bed, blue and pink, exc cond.
284-3481.

40x30 glass top iron table $100,30x60
metal desk $125, 40x62 utility table
$100. 226-1158.

Kenmore washing machine, exc cond,
white color, 5 yrs old, $395. 252-
2476.

6pc dinner set, wood, gd cond; peach
recliner, gd cond. 261-2525.

Love seat and chair $400; dining room
table $500; gas grill $55. 287-4527.

Color TV, $50; portable radio $50;
Trek racing bike, $600; drafting table
$50; AD&D books; solid wood DR
table w/4 chairs, $150. 286-4520.

Ping pong table, exc cond, $190/obo.
286-3833.

13000 BTU Goldstar GA-1320LC ac,
$350. 283-3677.

Washer/dryer, heavy duty, $550; hor-
izontal freezer, $375 ;4pc sofaset $500.
263-7919.

GE heavy duty dryer, gd cond, $80.
252-2368.

Daybed, wlutc w/hcarts matt and
sheets, exc cond, $200. 284-3670.

Washer/dryer $600, TV $120, VCR
$100, micro $100, office desk $25.
284-4884 after 5pm.

2-12000 BTU window ac, new, still in
box, $695 ea. 287-5676.

Freezer, large, $350; 18000 Whirl-
pool ac, $325; 10000 Freidrich ac,
$225. 252-2287.

Baby crib w/matt, gd cond, org $250
sell for $110. 287-3684.

End tables $40, coffee table $60, mic
curtains and blinds. 286-4679.




Religious 2-sided gold medallion w/
necklace, dropped at Bldg 519 Oct.
17. Sent value. 287-6470.

Rains hat at Los Rios playground, has
"Underwood" embroidered on back.
252-2028.


Sofa sleeper, refrig, sofas, dishwash-
er, twin beds, and more. 223-8159
after 5pin.

New 18kt gold, saphire/diamond
earings/ring set valued at $1,800 for
$1,600. 230-1001.

Zenith stereo console TV, $400/obo;
Q size bookcase w/mirror and light
hdboard, $200/obo. 284-3722.

Men's right hand golf clubs w/bag;
FSU books. 232-5419 for Chris.

Almost new Sega game system, 2
games, $70. 223-6105 before 1pm.

Electric water heater, $70; air purifier
$125; store display cabinet, wood/
glass, $100. 226-8626.

Breast pump $10, Graco baby swing
$20; 80 fl fence, wooden poles and
gate, $40. 284-4879.

ENC 1102 The Little Brown Reader
$25, MAC 1101 College Algebra $45.
284-6690.

Surfboard, Matt Kechele design 6'8"
with racks, $195. 284-4276.

8" gold bracelet, 22kt, 12" boy's bicy-
cle w/new tires. 284-3692.

Home protection system, like new,
$35; cds and videos, large selection.
287-3230 for Ken.

Corsco toddler car seat, $10;
stairclimbeer w/monitor, $110; 96x48
pair beige curtains, $18. 284-4133.

Ladies golf clubs w/bag, 1,3w,
2,3,5,7,9 and P Northwestern, exc
cond, $100/obo. 2864797.

Backpack carrier/stroller $15, wood-
en high chair/desk $50, baby monitor
$15, white crib w/complete bedding
$50. 284-6671.

Corcoran U jump boots worn twice,
91/2D, $60; 2 pairs rose drapes tropi-
cal, $28; adult tae kwando suit, $25.
284-6671.

Bridal dress, white, size 9, $800;
weight bench w/wts, long bar, diunbell
bars, approx 3601bs, $350. 261-4702.

Light gray vert blinds w/rod for 12'
wind, $275; baby crib/bed w/5 draw-
ers, $450; baby car seat, $50. 223-
7829.

FSU book SYG 1000 6th ed, new,
leave message. 287-3547.

Flex machine, 1801bs legs and lats,
stepper $200; FSU Bio 1005 book, 1/
2 price; bikes for male and female,
$50. 289-5860.

Metal detector, case, recharge batter-
ies, Fisher 128ox, aquanaut, 101/2"
coil, use in water/land, $450. 227-
1777.

Roman and Greek coins, 2,000 years
old. All 20 for $50. 264-8809 after
6pm.

Les Paul guitar $950, Fender amp
$500, numerous guitar effects, make
offer. 287-4650.

Sears 2.5 hp gas edger, exc cond,
$175. 284-3326.

Variety of Sega cds, $30ea. 284-3326.

2 new twin box springs, $75ea. 252-
2314.

Leather belt and holster for revolver
$60, cowboy boots 91/2 $60, toddler
mid infant car seats, mechanic's car
ramps. 252-2042.

Limoge porcelain flower vase, France
$200, soldering torch and reg $60,
Toyota Tercel repair manual and parts,
ladies shoes size 6. 252-2042.

Oak DR tble w/4 upholstered chairs
$600, infant car seat $20. 2864439.

Baby and maternity clothes, baby
items, misc toys and more. 284-6386.

Snap on extractor set $135, AT&T
cordless phone, $50. 2864184.

Stepper exercise machine, $85/obo.
282-3783.

Firm Flex exercise machine by Body
by Jake, new cond, includes video,
$50. 252-2621.

Like new roller blades size 7, $20;
Sega Genesis w/3 games, 2 controls,
$100. 286-3325.

Carpet cleaning equipment, steamers
$550, shampoo machine $550. 230-
0008.

Exercise static manual bicycle, 3yrs
old, $45. 287-3521.

Treadmill, gd cond, speed up to 8
miles per hour, $200. 260-2317.


Yashica FX3 camera, 80-200 zoom,
135mm, 28mm, 2x converter, bag and
more, $225. 287-5177.

20" custom built BMX racing bike,
cro-moly frame, $150. 286-6431.

House plants, different types, $4 and
$5/ca. 286-6196.

Portable gym/solo flex type, new nev-
er used, $150. 286-4488.

Singer sewing machine $100, med
animal carrier $25, MXT motivation-
al exercise trainer, $250. 287-3799.

FSU Chemistry 5th edition, FSU En-
glish grammar, PCC Comp 1, PCC
Sociology, and child development.
260-9303.

Tap shoes size 7 and 11/2, $10; roller
blades, never used, size 7 man and 9
woman, $50; new 2-man raft w/oars,
$30. 252-6829.

11,500 BTU ac, $180; Wilson base-
ball glove for left handed person $45;
Lady's Huffy 10 spd touring bike,
$95. 284-3437.

Golf bag, Wilson levitator w/o strap,
$65. 252-6277.

JC Penney color TV, 25" w/remote,
floor model, $250. 2864378.

15" girl's bike, 12" boy's bike, gd
cond, $30. 252-6547.

Cannondale M600 Mountain bike,
almost new, triple-butted frame, all
access, $670. 287-5897.

Voit SCX-100 stair climber, $100.
286-6277.

1 st edition Great Books s/walnut case,
mint cond, $1,350/neg. 2864421.

Doulton & Co figurine "Falstaff," $75.
286-3773.

65' of 4' tall cyclone fence; full mat-
tress. 287-5634.

Toddler shoes for boys size 8, $15;
women's shoes size 51/2, $15; new
typewriter SC $100. 264-7730.

Wedding dress, size 5/6, white, new
cond; typewriter SC $100. 264-7730
for Nilda.

Weight bench w/l l01b set, swing set,
cordless weed eater, Ency Britanica
w/grt books. 260-1290.

Golf metal driver w/grafite shaft, $35,
pitching wedge $5; 27 and 30" girls'
bikes, $5ea. 282-3497.

2 air conditioners, lawn mower, leath-
erjacket, $75. 287-3159.

5 yr old, 14" Radio Shack color TV,
$100/obo; full matt; singerjuicer. 287-
5634.

Danish comer wht lamp $60; DR w/
china cabinet, plants, Nintendo games,
$12ea. 236-0984. ,

Large concrete pots, some w/plants.
269-2972.

Swing set, $200. 287-6939.

National 12BTU ac compressor needs
to be checked, $70. 236-0984.

Child craft Children's books ofknowl-
edge, $125/obo. 260-3325.

Girl's 24" 3-speed bike, $65; men's
26" 10-speed, $85; $140 for both, exc
cond. 282-3624.

Misc baby items, stroller, walker,
swing, clothes. 286-4675.

Bird cage Parrott, cots, Betamax-Sony,
DR set 9 pc, Bamboo DR set tble, 4
chairs. 264-6713.

250 feet offence w/3 gates and poles,


$250. 252-2499.

Vacuum cleaner, Christmas ornaments,
maternity clothes, child clothes, wom-
en shoes. 252-2228.

Maternity pants, size 14-16, snap sides;
denim skirt, $10; 3 dresses and
jumpsuit, $5 ea. 287-4931.




Honda Alpine star motorcross racing
boots, size 8-9, exc cond, $50. 252-
5260.

1978 Kawasaki KZ 650 BI, dty pd, w/
helmet, extra parts, $800/obo. 284-
5458 for Hill, Room 222.

1979 Kawasaki KZ 1000 ZlR classic,
low miles, dty pd, $1,200. 252-5167.

Harley Davidson Sportster 1200. 252-
1130 for Mike.

1982 Yamaha 400 special, exc trans,
$1,000. 286-4675.

1994 Suzuki GSX750F Katana, per-
fect cond, almost new, less than 1K
miles, $7,100/obo. 263-4671.




Qtrs 146A Howard, 6am-noon.

Qtrs 313A Albrook, 8-1 lam.

Qtrs 463A Clayton, 7am-lpm.

Trailer 2047 Curundu, 7am.

Qtrs 541C Clayton, 8am-lpm.

Qtrs 575A Clayton, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 557A Clayton, 7am-lpm.

Qtrs 3026B Marine Barracks, 8am-
noon.

Qtrs 2541C Cocoli, 9am-lpm.

Qtrs 653D and B Clayton, 7am-
12:30pm.

Qtrs 6590B Corozal.

Qtrs 5513B Diablo Heights, 8am-2pm.

Qtrs 410A Clayton, 8am-lpm.

Qtrs 100 Albrook, 7am.

1055A Clayton, 8am-lpm.

Qtrs 910B Clayton, 6:30-1 lam.

Qtrs 413A Kobbe, multi-family, 8am-
noon.

Qtrs 1993A Curundu.

Qtrs 321B Morgan Ave, Balboa, 8am-
noon.

Qtrs 401A Amador, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 261B Albrook, 7-llam.

Qtrs 115 Albrook, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 2027A Curundu, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 7273A Cardenas.

Qtrs 2123 Curundu, 6-10am.

Lot 25, Final Ave, Walker Diablo.

Qtrs 600 area, community sale, 7am-
2pm.

Qtrs 213B Albrook, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 549B Howard, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 82A Albrook, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 16B Howard, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 1557B Howard, 7-lam.

Qtrs 2327 Las Cruces, Balboa.

Qtrs 224B Albrook, 7am-noon.


CClassified Ads


Tropic Times Ad Form


ANIMALS
AUTOMOBILES
AVAILABLE
BOATS & CAMPERS
ELECTRONICS
FOUND
HOUSEHOLD
LOST
MISCELLANEOUS
MOTORCYCLES
PATIO SALES
WANTED


PRICE


HOME PHONE


Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each
week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited
more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed
below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This
information will not be released to third parties. Deadline for the receipt
of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are run on a space
available basis and the staff makes no guarantee of ads running. Ads must
include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times,
Unit 0936, APO AA 34002 ordeposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post
Office. Ads offering weapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not be
run.


SPONSOR'S NAME


RANK/GRADE

DUTY PHONE


ORG.


Tropic Times B
Oct. 28, 1994 I l


Qtrs 1998B Curundu, 6am-2pm.

Qtrs 307 Albrook, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 419A Kobbe, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 1516E Howard.

Qtrs 263B Corozal, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 961A La Boca, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 43 Albrook, 7:30amn-2pm.




Old bottles, old coins, old books on
Panama. 264-8809 after 6pm.

Japanese WW1U items, gd prices pd.
264-8809 after 6pm.

Car washer/gardener. 252-2108.

Artists needed, people interested in
making a comic book, ages 12-17,
Atlantic side only. 289-4249 or 242-
4804.

FSU SYG 1000, Socialogy book, 6th
Edition, gd cond preferred, $40. 284-
3338.

Live-out Eng spking maid, reliable,
honest, grt w/kids and able to do little
girl's hair. 287-4771.

Marine detroit diesel mechanic to work
on my boat. 252-2066.

Live-in maid, must spk Eng, must be
flexible, shift worker. 282-4320 after
6pm.

Bicycle built for two, gd cond, reason-
ably priced. 252-2541.

Woman to teach sewing; used pat-
terns, girls size 12 and 14. 260-6791.

Maid, M-F days or live-in, clean, iron,
care.for 2 yr old. 287-5177.

Barbie dolls, clothing and access, must
be 20 years or older. 286-6196.

Person leaving Panama to recommend
their live-in maid, infant care, clean,
iron. 287-4280, 6-9pm only.

Housekeeper w/refs, cook, clean,
watch children, live-in, M-F. 252-
6328.

Depend, honest, billing live-in maid,
over 26yrs old. 287-3972 Sat only.

Dresser w/mirror or chester drawer in
gd cond and inexpensive. 260-3270.

Snorkeling equipment and spear gun,
gd cond, and gd price. 252-7400.

House to rent at least 3 BR, 2BA,
plenty ofpking. Norealtors. 268-0575.

Dog lover to babysit our 4mo old
Dalmation for 2wks. 287-5634.

Female husky puppy, no papers nec,
will pay $200. 283-3031.

SGI, U.S.A member. 282-3036.

Someone for tennis on weekdays, 2-
8pm. Canal area, intermediate skills.
252-2229 for Aaron.

Live-in Span spking maid, general
cleaning, iron, 2 children, M-Sat. 286-
4896.

Live-out bilig maid, M-F, no child
care, clean, care for 2 dogs, ref re-
quired, honest and hd wker. 284-4791.

Royal Doulton "Fox Hunting" china,
any pieces. 269-2972.

Patio cover for gateway housing, pre-
fer end unit, reasonable price. 284-
6838.

Professional upholstery cleaner to
clean sofa and love seat, will pay rea-
sonable price. 286-3484.










B 12 Tropic Times
B 12A Oct. 28, 1994




HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming
veteran preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming edu-
cation and a copy of CASP notice of rating if applicable. Sub-
mit a copy of latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army vacancy announce-
ments (forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Direc-
torate of Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal,
or call 285-5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should be the
first step in the job search.
SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at NM-5 level
and above require specialized experience. Specialized experi-
ence is either education above the high school level or work ex-
perience directly related to the position being filled. Example:
Budget positions at or above the NM-5 level required Budget
experience or equivalent education.
Vacancy announcements are also available at the Sundial
Recreation Center.
Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications
on a continuous basis for the following positions. Registers es-
tablished from these announcements will be used to fill perma-
nent and temporary positions.
VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most
clerical position).
VB# 001A * General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most
clerical position).
VB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk
sch)
* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires
Cert + 6 mos recreation exp in the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Requires 6 mos
recreation exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6
VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5. Limited
to permanent status employees only.
VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6.
Limited to permanent status employees only.

The following positions are Perm/temp, Full-time, Part-time,
Intermittent.

VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14.
VB# 008 ** CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license required),
NM-9/10/1 1.
VB# 009 ** PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required),
NM-5.
VB#019 ** EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN,
NM-640-4/5/6.

** Selectees for nurse, medical officer and EMT positions
will undergo a background check.
Pacific
OPEN: 10-28-94 CLOSE: 11-08-94
049-95-LA (2) ELECTRONICS MECHANICS, MG-2604-
10. SENSITIVE (SCI). 106th Sig Bde., Corozal. NOTE: Re-
quires Certificate of Training verified by DD1435 COMSEC
Equipment Training of reach equip needed to be repaired and
annual voluntary polygraph examination. Top Secret SCI is re-
quired. Driver's license required.
050-95-LA ELECTRONIC TECHNICIAN, NM-0856-11.
SENSITIVE. 106th Sig Bde., Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Work re-
quires some physical exertion such as long periods of standing,
recurring bending, crouching, and stooping. Security clearance
is required. Driver's license is required.
051-95-LA INFORMATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT
SPECIALIST, NM-0301-11. SENSITIVE. 106th Sig Bde,
DOIM, LAN SUPPORT, Ft., Clayton. NOTE: Security clear-
ance is required. Position may require incumbent to perform
travel and TDY assignments/training on a worldwide basis on
short notice and, at times, for extended periods of time. Travel
will be accomplished by commercial and military aircraft, as well
as other authorized modes of transportation.
052-95-LA SUPERVISORY ELECTRONICS TECHNI-
CIAN, NM-0856-12. SENSITIVE. 106th Sig Bde., Ft. Clay-
ton. TOP Secret clearance is required.
053-95-MW SUPPLY MANAGEMENT OFFICER, NM-
2003-12. SENSITIVE. USAG, DOL, Supply Div., Corozal.
NOTE: Security clearance is required.
054-95-NC EDUCATIONAL AID, NM-1702-4. PART-
TIME. DCA, Child Development Center, Ft. Clayton. NOTE:
Selectee will be required to undergo a background investigation.
056-95-ES CIVILIAN PAY TECHNICIAN, NM-544-5.
TEMP NTE: 09-30-95. DCSRM, F&AO, Ft. Clayton.
057-95-ES(2) SUPERVISORY ENGINEERING TECHNI-
CIAN, NM-802-12. SENSITIVE. TEMP PROM NTE: 6 mo.
USA Material Cmd, USA TMDE Activity, Corozal. NOTE:
Security clearance is required.

Atlantic
055-95-NC ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN, NM-802-8/9.
USAG, DEH, Operations Div., Family Housing Branch., Ft.
Davis. NOTE: Driver's license required. Position may be filled
at the NM-8 or NM-9 level-
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
OPENS: 10-28-94 CLOSES: 11-14-94
005WW-95 PROGRAM ANALYST, NM-343-12. SENSI-
TIVE. Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel Community & Fam-
ily Support Div., Ft. Clayton.
NOTE: Security clearance is required. How to apply: sub-
mit Form-171 to, USAACFSC-HRP-S, MWR Staffing Office,
2461 Eisenhower Avenue, Room 1222, Alexandria. For addi-
tional Info. call DSN 221-8797.

Navy
The Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation Community
Recreation Department is seeking a personnel assistant. The
position will remain open until filled. Interested people can call
Ricardo Torres, 283-4301/5341.


'*Potpourri


Clb ew


Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club: 282-3439
The club will be closed to the public for renovations
through Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be
available 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Addition-
ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and
during lunch hours 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Amador
*Club Amador: 282-4334
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring
soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights.
Sunday brunch features the Jazz Junction noon Sunday.
The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during
renovations of the Quarry Heights Officers' Club.
Clayton
*The Loon: 287-3035
CJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments 3:30 p.m. Sunday.
Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
*NCO Club: 2874716
All-you-can-eat family buffet Thursdays.
Seafood buffet Fridays features broiled lobster, garlic
shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab.
12-oz prime rib special Saturdays.
Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m.
Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Sun-
days and Mondays.
Disco 9 p.m. Wednesday, Fridays and Saturdays. There
will be a midnight buffet.
Albrook
*Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582
Friday night flambe 6-8 p.m. Tableside cooking.
Tonight's entertainment: Karaoke in the lounge and
club card drawings.
Saturday afternoon football 2 p.m. in the lounge during
football season with bar service.
Prime rib dinner and seafood feast 6-9 p.m. Saturday.
Menu also includes: Cream of broccoli soup, garden salad,
12 oz. prime rib, baked potato, baby carrots, and sherbert.
Mongolian barbecue 5:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Choose
the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have chefs do the
job outside on the open grills.
Oriental night 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. ChefTong Lau's
special cuisine. Won Ton soup, Oriental Spice salad, Pork
Moo Gai Pan or Sweet & Sour chicken, fried rice, eggroll,
and fortune cookies.
Seafood Feast 6-9 p.m. Nov. 5 & 12.
Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday.
Country western night Thursdays with free dance les-
sons 7:30-10:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples
dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing.
Curundu
*STRAC Club: 286-3511
Celebrate Panama's Independence Day 6 p.m.
Wednesday. Music and free snacks.
Howard
*Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718
Weekday lunch includes buffet, salad and potato bar.
Order a la carte 6-8:30 p.m. in the dining room Fridays
and Saturdays.
Friday evenings in the lounge include beer specials,
music, games and club card drawings.
Italian night 6-8:30 p.m. Nov. 4. A Variety of Italian
specialities.
Hillbilly night 6-8:30 p.m. Nov. 5. Find out what
"Counter Culture" is all about.
Fajitas junction 6-8:30 p.m. today. Enjoy the Tex-Mex
favorite, beef or chicken fajitas in the dining room.
Dining room is closed Sunday through Thursday.


A *gg dule


SCN FM Radio
91.5 Pacific/ 98.3 Atlantic
The Southern Command Network announced
changes to the Diamond FM Radio program schedule.
The new schedule is as follows:


2-9 a.m.
9 a.m.-noon
Noon-4 p.m.
4-6 p.m.
6 p.m.-2 a.m.

2-9 a.m.
9-9:30 a.m.
9:30-10 a.m.
10-11 a.m.
11 a.m.-Noon
Noon-4 p.m.
4-7 p.m.
7 p.m.-5 a.m.


5 a.m.-Noon
Noon-1 p.m.
1-6 p.m.


Saturday
Adult contemporary music live from U.S.
Diamond FM Weekend Music Mix
Rick Dee's Weekly Top 40
The Countdown-Soul countdown
Adult Rock Live from U.S.
Sunday
Adult Contemporary music live from U.S.
Cross Currents-Christian Rock
Love on the Rock - Father Henry
20 The Countdown Magazine
All That Jazz
American Country Countdown
Dick Clark
Adult contemporary music live from the
U.S.
Weekdays
Diamond FM Music Mix
Diamond Cafe-All request oldies
Diamond FM Music Mix


6-7 p.m. Don Tracy Show-soul
7-11 p.m. Adult Rock live from U.S.
11 p.m.-5 a.m. Adult contemporary live from U.S.

SCN AM Radio
790 Pacific/1420 Atlantic
The Southern Command Network's AM Radio
station features America's most-listened to radio
programs and provides live coverage of breaking news
stories and special events.
Monday-Friday
6 a.m. NPR Morning Edition
8 a.m. News, commentary, features, sports
Noon Rush Limbaugh Show
1 p.m. News, commentary, features, sports
5 p.m. All Things Considered
6:30 p.m. Country USA
Saturday
Midnight Country USA
8 a.m. NPR Weekend Edition
10 a.m. NPR's Car Talk
11 a.m. Country USA
Sunday
8-10 a.m. NPR Weekend Edition
All day Country USA, live from the U.S.


*Howard Enlisted Members' Club - Dining Room:
284-4189
Sunday breakfast buffet 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30
a.m. Saturday.
New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade
roast beef, turkey, turkey salad and tuna fish sandwiches with
all the trimmings.
Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. featuring
tableside preparation with tuxedo service.
Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Select a
cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or fillet. All steaks are
U.S. choice beef.
Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or
take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot
wings.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom: 284-
4189
Friday night disco 4:30 p.m.- 1 a.m. Dance and relax to
the music.
New Thursday night disco 8:30 p.m. until closing.
Halloween all night disco 10 p.m. Saturday -5 a.m. Sun-
day.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove:
284-4189
Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays.
Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Monday night football and mug special in the lounge.
Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcorn and nachos.
Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m.
Wednesday in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line danc-
ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be played until
midnight.
Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with
your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills.
Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.-
midnight Thursdays.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday.
*Top Three Club: 284-4189
Closed on Saturdays. For special functions, call 284-
4189.
Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday.
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat com-
plimentary taco bar.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. Members
must have a card and be present to win.
Rodman
*Rodman Club - Onen to all ranks: 283-4498
Happy hour 4:30-11 p.m. in the Laguna Lounge with
complimentary hors d'oeuvres.
Halloween bash 7-11 p.m. today in the Laguna Lounge.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-l
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Monday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with all-
you-can-eat taco bar 6-9 p.m. at the Laguna Lounge.
Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
All-you-can-eat spaghetti 4:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Grill menu is also available.
Open mike night 6-11 p.m. Thursday in the Laguna
Lounge.
Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Rodman Bohio.
Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-9
p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-
9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays.
*Rodman Annex - Open to all ranks: 283-4498
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
The club is closed for evening and weekend service.
Davis
*Davis Community Club: 289-5160
Sunday brunch 10:30-1:30 p.m.


I


I




Full Text

PAGE 1

* 0 Vol. Vil, No. 43 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Oct. 28, 1994 Iif in sight for housing residents Increased funding means more DEH service to living quarters -----siastic responsestronglycontributedtowards by Gaby Capriles relieving the critical situation which afDEH Public Relations fected the entire Army Family Housing COROZAL -New funding guidance for population. Fiscal Year 1995 promises some relief from "By working together as a community, last year's severe cutbacks in service calls we again were able to pull through the hard for Army on-post family housing residents, times as we have done in the past," Staffieri according to Lt. Col. Patrick Staffieri, Disaid. rector of Engineering and Housing. Despite the budget crunch, the DEH The new funding for the operation and continued to respond. A maintenance of Army family housing will "During Fiscal year 94, 25,380 service allow full operation and maintenance sercalls from family housing residents were vice to resume in family housing quarters, received at the DEH Service Order Desk, as well as between-occupancy repairs, he about 2,115 calls per month," said Mr. said. Antonio Reina, chief of DEI Management Work on major projects, however, will Branch. "Ninety percent of family housing continue to be on hold until the outstanding service orders that were called in were combacklog of service orders is eliminated. pleted (22,800 jobs)." Last year's $6 million dollar shortfall in "Our customer satisfaction surveys also the overall family housing budget caused continued to show our customers' support critical reductions allowing only minimum throughout the ordeal. Of 590 customers essentialoperationsthroughSeptember.All that were randomly surveyed from Februnew (FY94) upgrade projects were also ary through October, roughly 90 percent deferred. rated our overall service as excellent," During this time, the Army's self-help Staffieri said. program was aggressively promoted to cus"We may have won the battle but not the tomers as an alternate means of repairs. A war. I would still ask family housing systematic approach to self-help training residents to continue to use self help as was initiated at the PACE Improvement much as possible," Staffieri said. I thank Center, the Army's self-help store, in order you foraccepting the responsibility ofbeing to make self-help a more viable approach. proud and prudentresidents during lastyear's Self-help supplies were also restocked in crisis and would urge you to continue taking greater quantities at the store. advantage of our self-help program and "The DEN alone could not have surstore, especiallythe tailor-made training we vived the budget crunch without the suphave devised for our customers." sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) port from the community in general. We DEH offers an expanded series of selfDistant Haven hom ecom ing asked for your assistance and participation help classes on a regular schedule that cover 1 stLt.Wilie opeand 53th ilitry olie Cmpay, ugshisson through self-hel p measures and your enthumost aspects of self-help repairs. 1st Lt. Willie Copeland, 534th Military Police Company, hugs his son Willie Jr. after arriving at Howard AFB from Operation Distant Haven R een'istm ent program in Suriname. Approximately 200 servicemembers returned to Panama .p changes from Suriname Tuesday. to affect junior enlisted soldiers FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -the requested MOS. N avy M a rine ho using to be Several changes to the reenlistment proThe second change is the addition ofnew gram will affect junior enlisted soldiers MOSs to the Bonus Extension and Retrainduring 1995. ing Program. The MOSsare I IM, 13B, 13F inspected for lead, asbestos The changes came about because of the and 19K. increased amount ofsoldiers in overstrength The BEAR program permits eligible solRODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) -location of lead and asbestos and to determilitary occupational specialties. diers an opportunity to extend their enlistThe Public Works Center from Pensacola, mine what safety precautions can be taken. The first change will allow specialists ment for formal training in a shortage MOS Fla., will conduct routine inspections of The program determines if maintenance or and below, serving in a balanced or that is in the Selection Reenlistment Bonus military family housing units here in mid repairs are needed. Officials said the presoverstrength MOS, who are within 12 program. Upon completion, the soldier will November. The inspection's purpose is to ence oflead orasbestos does not mean these months of their estimated time of separabe awarded with the new primary MOS, determine if there are measurable amounts substances present a health risk. tion to request reenlistment for retraining reenlist and receive an SRB in the new of lead and asbestos, local Navy housing Inspections include sampling ofsuspect into the following critical MOSs: I I B, II C, MOS. officials said. asbestos materials and sampling ofdust and I llH, I IM, 12B, 13B, 13F, 13M, 16S, 19D, Specialists and below who are outside The Lead and Asbestos Assessment Prosoil for lead and X-ray fluorescence of all 19K, 77F, 92A, 96B,-and 98G. They may the 12-month window who are in an gram, which began in early 1993, will evenpainted components in the residence. The also receive station of choice. overstrength or balanced MOS may also tually include all Navy and Marine Corps inspection time varies depending on the Ifotherwise qualified, soldiers may also reclassify into one of the critical MOSs. housing units world-wide, officials said. size of the house, but officials said most have the 110 general technical score and Soldiers outside their window should They estimate these inspections will take should take two to three hours. new MOS Armed Sevices Vocational Apcall their Personnel Action Center for inforabout four years to complete. The local Navy Housing Office will titude Battery score waived, but must still mation. Soldiers inside their 12-month winThe program's purpose is to identify the notify residents of inspection dates. meet the minimum ASVAB required for dow should call their unit retention NCO. Air Force kicks off the 1994 ComCommunity members combine ef*Galeta Navy Ball, Page 4 bined Federal Campaign with hopes forts during annual "Make a Differ*Cuban soldier, Page 11 of raising $60,000. ence Day." *nterservice basketball, Page 13

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2 Tropic Times Oct. 28, 1994 Briefly Tropic Times sets two AM f week deadline changes Because Thursday is a Panamanian holAll flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for priority mission iday, the Tropic Times will be printed a day requirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-430613608. early. However, delivery will be made on Saturday Wednesday Kelly AFB, TX Nov. 4. The deadline for classified ads will 5:45am B-727 Howard AFS 5:55am C-130 Howard, AFB Nov. 4 be 3 p.m. today. Deadline for news articles Atlanta IAP, GA (C) San Salvador, El Salvador 5:40am C-130 Howard AFB will be 9 a.m. Monday. The Tropic Times Charleston IAP, SC (VCC) Managua, Nicaragua(CC) will be closed Thursday. 9:40am C-141 Howard AFB Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) The issue for the next week will be datCharleston AFB, SC Howard, AF8 Howard AFB ed Nov. 10. The Tropic Times office will 1:45pm C-SA Howard AFB 5:40am C-141 Howard AFB AActive duty only be closed Nov. 11, Veterans Days. All orCharleston AFB, SC (0) Kelly AFB, TX (M) USU.S. passport ganizations that pick up the Topic Times KellyArBTX Charleston AFB, SC O-Overnight from the print plant Building 405, Corozal, Sunday Thursday C-Commercial Contract Monday 5:45am C-SA Howard AFB V-Visa can pick up the newspaper beginning at Tuesday Soto Cano AS, Honduras(CC) M-Medevac 6:30 a.m. Nov. 10. Deadlines for classified No scheduled flights Charleston AFB, SC (0) CC-Country Clearance ads and news articles will be noon, Nov. 4. For additional information, call 2856612/4666. from the military within the next six People may sponsor airmen any day (or change command ceremony Nov 9. The months. The briefing will be held 8 a.m.I days) from Nov. 23-27 for the Thanksgivmedical clinics at Gorgas Army Commup.m. Nov. 9 at the Family Service Center, ing meal, and from Dec. 23 -27 for the nity Hospital will be closed until 1 p.m. No Future Community Bank Building 40, Rodman NS. For more inforChristmas meal. Those interested in sponappointments will be made during the closings announced mation, call 283-5749. soaring airmen for the Thanksgiving meal morning, but the Emergency Room will The Community Bank will be closed should sign up with Howard's Family Supremain open for emergency care. Thursday to celebrate the separation of 1 994 competition for port Center before Nov. 15. To sign up or for more information, call Lizca Fearon at Spanish course offers Panama from Colombia and Nov. 10 for Nick Hoge Award begins 284-5650/3 153. the Primer Grito Los Santos. The Deputy Chief of Staff for Personfour promotion points nel has announced competition for the CGOC holds moonlight The Mini-Immersion Spanish Course Safety awareness 1994 Nick Hoge Award for Professional will be held 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 7-21 in prompts Amnesty Day Development, an annual essay program pool party at Albrook Building 128, Fort Clayton. Non-Spanish In conjunction with U.S. Army South's dedicated to promoting excellence in ciThe Company Grade Officers Council speaking soldiers can earn four promotion Safety Awareness Day, the 36th Ordnance vilian personnel administration and maninvites all CGOs and their families or points unpon completion of the course. To Detachment will conduct Amnesty Day 8 agement. friends to participate in a moonlight pool register, call 287-5412/3960. a.m.-l p.m. today at the following areas: Army military and civilian personnel party 6-10 p.m. Nov. 19 at the Albrook Luzon Field, Fort Clayton; the softball from all career fields, including local napool. Food and beverages will be "potEqual opportunity rep field, Fort Davis; Building 533, Corozal; tionals and nonappropriated fund employluck," and CGOC sponsors are asking for course offered at Clayton Building 734, Howard AFB; and Ammuees, are encouraged to participate. Single small donations to cover additional exnition Supply Point I at Rodman Naval and group authorship is permitted. Deadpenses-$2 for singles, $4 for couples, and An Equal Opportunity Representative Station. line for submission is Dec. 1. Call Aichel $5 for entire families. For more informaCourse will be held Nov. 14-18 in BuildTam at 285-5611 for more information. tion, call 2nd Lt. Milo Quesinberry at 284ing 156, Fort Clayton. Names must be sub4140/3114. mitted to the U.S. Army South EO Office Clayton has job seminar no later than Nov. 7. For information, call Corozal cemetery 2874260/4268. for family members Howard Education The Department of Defense Family changes hours Member Job Information Seminar will be The American Battle Monuments Center sets new hours Selection boards being held 9-11 a.m. Tuesday at the Corral room Commission announces that effective Effective immediately, the Howard EduCted at Clayton of the Fort Clayton NCO Club. For reserTuesday, the Corozal American Cemetery ucation Center will close 2-4 p.m. FriThe Personnel Qualification Reviews nations, call 285-5201. and Memorial will be open 7 a.m. to 4 days for i-house training. Also, beginp.m. daily. The cemetery office will be ning in November, the education center are being conducted until Nov. 4 at the FSC needs volunteers open 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Fritesting schedule will be noon-4 p.m. MonEnlisted Records Section, Building 519. day. The office will be closed on weekdays and Wednesdays and 8 a.m.-noon The PQRs are being processed for promofor relocation section ends and holidays. Fridays. All testing will be held in Room tion to master sergeant and Quality ManThe Howard Family Support Center 110. Officials recommend calling or stopagement Program selection board for serneeds volunteers who are interested in Atlantic community ping by the center at least 24 hours in adgeant first class and sergeant. For informalearning about world-wide assignments vance to schedule a test. For more infortion, call 2874658. and those who enjoy creating graphic prehosts 'Hasta Luego' mation, call George Galindo at 284-4863. sentations to work in the FSC's relocation Army Community Service's Hasta Special Olympics needs division. There are a variety of positions Luego reception will be held at the Fort CID recruiting briefings volunteers for 1995 available for several different relocation Davis Community Club 2:45-4 p.m. Tuesprograms. For more information, stop by day. The reception is for all military and set for Fridays The planning committee for the 1995 the FSC, Building 707, or call 284-5650. Department of Defense civilian employThe Criminal Investigations Division Special Olympics-Panama Canal Region ees departing Panama through December. holds recruiting briefings 10 a.m. Fridays is looking for volunteers to chair various S S Servicemembers and their family memat Building 705, Corozal. For information, committees. A meeting will be held 2:30 St. Andrew's Society bers will receive tokens of appreciation for call Special Agent Erin Milanes at 285p.m. Nov. 8 on the 3rd floor of Building sets date for annual ball their service. Dress is duty uniform. For 4314/4745. 156, Fort Clayton. The St. Andrew's Society of Panama more information, call 2894021. will hold its annual ball 7 p.m. Nov. 19 at .BHS needs speakers for All Saints Festival Las Tinajas Restaurant. For ticketsor more Adopt-An-Airman Engineer Club meeting set for Monday information, call Neil McColl at 226-8066 or 264-421 a program under way Guest speakers are needed for Balboa The All Saints Harvest Festival, celeThe 24th Wing is sponsoring a proHigh School bi-monthly Engineer Club brating missions in Panama will be held 5 Servicemembers offered gram in which members of the Howard meeting. Engineer professionals or people pm. Monday at the Curundu cafetorium. briefing and Albrook community may invite unacin engineer fields are preferred. To signMisoaesfmPnmawldspy pre-separation briefing companied airmen stationed in Panama -up, call 285-5707. their work. Some activities throughout the A career information team from including those on temporary duty supevening will include a chili cook-off conCharleston, S.C., will give a pre-separation porting Operation Safe Haven-into their Health clinics announce test the movie "The Greatest Story Never briefing for anyone retiring or separating homes for the upcoming holiday meals. clCsTold," and seeing a special choreographed upcoming clsn version of"We Shall Behold Him." For inThe medical clinics at Gorgas Army formation, call Sherril Harrill at 252-6968. W eekend weather Community Hospital and Fort Sherman Health Clinic will be closed Thursday Team building program Pacific Atlantic Nov. I I and 24 in celebration of Panama's Saturday Saturday Independence, Veteran's Day and Thanksto meet in November Temperature Tides Temperature Tides giving. No patient appointments will be The Army Family Team Building trainHigh: 90 11:13 p.m. at 13.3 feet High: 87 8:09 a.m. at 0.9 feet made for that day, but the Emergency ing program will hold classes in NovemLow: 77 4:56 p.m. at 4.2 feet Low: 75 1:27 a.m. at 0.0 feet Room at Gorgas and Fort Sherman will be ber. The training is for volunteers and faiSunday Sunday open for emergency care. ily member. It develops leadership abilHigh: 91 11:46 a.m. at 13.2 feet High: 89 4:42 a.m. at 0.9 feet ties and prepares families to take advanLow: 76 5:59 p.m. at 3.7 feet Low: 75 1:51 a.m. at 0.0 feet MEDDAC closes for tage of available services. Contact Army Forecast: Partly cloudy with afernoon thunderstorms and showers. change of command Ries at 287-6338/6322 for more informaSend weather questions to 24th Weather Squadron ATN: Weather Wise, Howard AFB, Panama(MPS) U.S. Army MEDDAC is holding a tion.

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Tropic Times ews Oc.28,1994 Holidayhoursset 24th Wing FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The hours of operation for the Army and Air Force Exchange System -Panama Thursday in observance of Panamanian Independence Day are as follows. K ic k O ff 6C,0 Corozal 0 Main PX -9 a.m.-9 p.m. Sweets Reflections -9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. '45,001 Frank's Franks -10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. 401000 Anthony's Pizza -10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. 35, Wok Works -closed Casa de Amigos -closedAiFo c h pe 2,0 Commissary Frank's Franks -closed r Fort Clayton to raise $60,000 Shoppette (95) -closed 5 000 Frank's Franks (95) -closed HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) -The Combined Anthony's Pizza -4 p.m.-8 p.m. Federal Campaign sign-located on Andrews Boulevard Burger King -6:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. near the commissary--reflects the 24th Wing's progress Popeye's -11 a.m.-10 p.m. toward its 1994 goal of $60,000. Frank's Franks (by Burger King) -closed The CFC gives people the chance to contribute to any Clayton Plaza Shoppette -7 a.m.-midnight of literally hundreds of worthy organizations, with conShoppette (519) -8 a.m.-]0 p.m. tributors deciding where their gift goes. The campaign Snack bar (519) -closed began Oct. 17 and will run through Nov. 30. Auto parts store -9 a.m.-2 p.m. Maj. Kevin Illsley, 24th Wing CFC project officer, Car Care Center -closed emphasized that some contribution policies from last year Clothing Sales -closed have changed. "Previously, a portion of all undesignated contribuAmador tions people made to the CFC went to overseas family Shoppette -9 a.m.-5 p.m. support and youth activities programs," he said. "This(Air Force) year, however, people wanting to support these programs 24th Wing CFC project officer Maj. Kevin IFisley Albrook must specify with the four-digit code "FSYP" on their Shoppette -7 a.m.-10 p.m. pledge cards." (left) and assistant project officer 2nd Lt. Rick Snack bar -8 a.m.-2 p.m. To find out more information about the '94 CFC, Jones flank the giant thermometer that will Anthony's Pizza -II a.m.-8 p.m. people may call the wing's assistant project officer, 2nd reflect contributions made during the 1994 camFrank's Franks -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Lt. Rick Jones, at 284-4118/5850. paign. Video rental -9 a.m.-9 p.m. Furniture store -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Shoe store -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Toyland/Outdoor living -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cls Sx-10a--9PM Soldier show seeks talent ALEXANDRIA, Va. (USARSO PAO) -Active duty Dec. 15: Howard Army personnel who would like to audition for the 1995 *A half-inch video tape of talent performance Main PX -10 a.m.-6 p.m. United States Army Soldier Show should "get their act *Department of the Army Personnel Form 2A and 2-1 Shopppette -open 24 hours together." *Letter of commanders intent to release for 179-day temClass Six -10 a.m.-6 p.m. "We're looking for soldiers who love to perform, are porary duty Cafeteria -7 a.m.-2 p.m. talented, have lots of energy and will work hard," said *Entertainment/technical experience resume Anthony's Pizza -11 a.m.-8 p.m. Nick Credington, the show's artistic director. "Because *Full-length official military photograph Clothing Sales -closed they represent the Army's finest, the soldiers we choose *The package must be mailed to: Service station -8 a.m.-6 p.m. have got to be tops in their unit as well as tops in talent." Army Entertainment Division Soldiers who sing, dance, perform a specialty act (such Attn: Army Soldier Show Selection Committee Fort Kobbe as magic or comedy), or have lighting or sound technician P.O. Box 439 Shoppette/video rental -10 a.m.-6 p.m. experience will be selected to make up the cast and crew Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-0439 Burger King -8 a.m.-3 p.m. of the 1995 Army Soldier Show. Applicants must have a Selected soldiers will receive notification in mid-Febminimum of 90 days left on active duty after Oct. 31, ruary. Miscellaneous 1995. For additional details, contact the local community recQuarry Height shoppette -closed To be considered for selection, soldiers must mail the reation staff or the U.S. Army Soldier Show, DSN 656Gorgas Hospital shoppette -closed following information and visuals to arrive no later than 6393/6394, or commercial (703) 806-6393. Curundu School cafeteria -closed Cocoli shoppette -closed Balboa school cafeteria -closed Curundu Service Station -6 a.m.-midnight Fort Espinarre ev af is Shoppette -closed for mobilization, reserve affairs FORT CLAYTON (SCRA-AR) -The 65th Army ReSpecial Forces Officer course at Fort Bragg, N.C., he was Fort Davis serve Command's commanding general, Brig. Gen. Jorge assigned to the 46th Special Forces Company in ThaiMain PX -10 a.m.-6 p.m. Arzola, stationed at Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico, has been land. Auto parts store -10 a.m.-2 p.m. selected as deputy commander in chief for mobilization He began his service In the Army Reserve in 1972, as Gas station -8 a.m.-6 p.m. and reserve affairs. commander of the Headquarters ComCafeteria -8 a.m.-I p.m. Arzola will represent the U.S. pany, 166th Support Group. Anthony's Pizza -11 a.m.10 p.m. Southern Command and act as a In 1984, he began a three year tour Burger King -11 a.m.-9 p.m. pointman in Washington for as Commander of the 246th QuarterClothing Sales -closed SOUTHCOM programs, according master Battalion, later returning to the Shoppette -10 a.m. -6 p.m. to Col. Ray Moss, Chairman of ReHeadquarters as Director of Training. Mini-shoppette -8 a.m. -6 p.m. serve Component Fusion Cell. In November, 1987, he was designated Arzola will be responsible for Deputy Commander for Training of the Fort Sherman the missions of 30,000 reservists USARF-PR, and in February of 1990, Shoppette -noon-6 p.m. who annually train in the assumed command of the 2nd MTC. Gas station -closed SOUTHCOM area. He was then selected as Commander Anthony's Pizza -noon-4 p.m. Among Arzola's many duties of the USARF-PR in August 1991 and will be assisiting Latin American was promoted to his present rank on CONCESSIONAIRES nations develop Army Reserve proJune 2, 1993. On Jan. 16, 1993, he beThe Army and Air Force Exchange System Pacif grams in their own countries, Moss came the first Commanding General of ic and Atlantic Community Concessionaires will be said. the 65th U.S. Arrny Reserve Comclosed Thursday in honor of Panamanian IndepenArzola will be replacing Maj. mand. dence Day. Gen Felix A. Santini as D-CINC. courtesyy) Arzola holds a Master's Degree in Arzola was commissioned as an Brig. Gen. Jorge Arzola Industrial and Interpersonal Relations COMMISSARIES infantry officer upon graduation from the University of from the Interamerican University. All commissaries will be closed Thursday in honor Puerto Rico's ROTC program in 1966. He entered active In his civilian career he works as the Director of Supof Panamanian Independence Day. duty and attended the Infantry Officer Basic and Airborne port Services, Antilles Consolidated School System at courses at Fort Benning, Ga. After graduation from the Fort Buchanan.

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4 Tropic Times ~w s_ _ _ _ _ _ Oct. 28, 1994 Traffic Command says POVs ready for pick up BALBOA (MTMC) -The following customers have privately owned vehicles ready for pick up at the POV Processing Center, Building 150 1, Balboa, adjacent to Pier 18: Aguilar G.; Belter M.S.; Chisholm D.P.; Cooley S.E.; Drach, J.E.; Elick R.L.; Fullen R.E.; Giardina F.; Hardy J.M.; Herron T.G.; Hilbish, F.F.; Johnson V.M.; Kasten W.A.; Layton M.M.; Lerose N.J.; Mandigo J.D.; Marcelino W.V.; Mejia-Rangel 0.; Moore J.D.; Morgan T.C.; Oconner M.L.; Parker B.; Pence R.A.; Range M.D.; Reyes N.; Rice T.L.; Schaul D.E.; Sliwicki R.M.; Tekle S.D.; Williams L.D.; Wilson R.T. Customers must have the following documents for pick up of their POVs: y *ID card (current military, dependent, or civilian) +Driver license (must have Panamanian license for second POV) *POV shipping document (DD Form 788) *Vehicle registration or title *Vehicle keys *Power of Attorney and photo copies of the sponsor's bilingual ID card and driver's license (when the sponsor (U.S. Air Force) on orders cannot be present for pick up) Cuban The list is current as of Tuesday. For updates, call customer service at 282-4642/3853 or the POV arrival tape Teachers at Camp No. 2's new Carlos J. Finley School at Empire Range sing at the facility's recording at 282-4641. Customer service hours are Monopening ceremony Oct. 17. Cuban children will learn subjects such as math, Spanish and day -Friday, 7:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m. Wednesday hours are English taught by other Cubans at the school. Brig. Gen. James L. Wilson, Joint Task Force 9 a.m. -2:30 p.m. -Safe Haven commander, and Lt. Col. Mario A. Valdez, Camp No. 2 commander officiated the People expecting POVs are reminded to call customer event. service to leave a contact phone number. Last dance Galeta Island celebrates final Navy Birthday Ball FORT DAVIS (USGA Galeta PAO) -"I can honestly say that I've never seen The soldiers, sailors and Marines of the Naso many Army uniforms at a Navy Day val Security Group Activity, Galeta Island, Ball before," said Perkins about the high celebrated the command's final Navy Ball attendance of Army personnel. Oct. 13 at the community club here. The live dinner music performed by loIt was more than being the command's cal guitarist Amsecy Ross was appreciated. final ball that made it special, said Chief "The guitarist was great-it was up-toWarrant Officer Larry J. Galloway, event date music and everyone seemed to enjoy coordinator. it," said Petty Officer 2nd Class David C. "Everything went smoothly from beginAnderson. ning to end," Galloway said. "The whole The traditional cake-cutting ceremony thing took a lot of planning and coordinawas done with a native flair. A stainless Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays (U.S. Navy) tion, but it all boiled down to having a good steel machete held by the youngest and oldBushm aster time." est sailors in attendance, sliced effortlessly The ball's guest speaker, Rear Adm. through the cake. The oldest sailor in atThis 4 1/2-foot bushmaster was found Oct. 19 near the enlisted James Blenn Perkins Ill, deputy comtendance, Petty Officer Ist Class Peter J. members housing area on Radio Farfan. Department of Defense mander in chief, U.S. Southern Command, Jez, passed a piece of cake to the youngest patrolman Arturo Gordon captured the deadly, poisonous snake spoke about pride and professionalism. He sailor, Seaman Apprentice Douglas E. Enwith a snare-type device. If Navy or Air Force personnel see a snake also touched on bits of the Navy's proud gland. or any other potentially dangerous animal they should call their fighting history. This tradition signifies the passing of security police. Army personnel should call the Directorate of EngiWhile the command is not technically a wisdom from the oldest to the youngest neering and Housing. joint-service command, you wouldn't sailor. In return, the youngest sailor is passknow it by looking around, Perkins said. ing on his respect to the oldest sailor. Editor's note: The following summary of news is Ernesto Perez Balladares as replying to an article in the Oct. 24 taken from the Panamanian press. The translation Miami Herald by saying lie is not servile to the United El Panama America: Paper reports that Panamanian and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is made States. "I am not servile to anyone," lie said. "I defend the President Ernesto Perez Balladares will travel to Honby the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of reporting national interests and what I have done is not because I duras to attend the Central American international peace or statements made here. Selection of these stories am paying or collecting points from anyone, much less and development conference. does not imply any emphasis, judgement or endorsethe U.S. government." ment by the U.S. government. These synopses are El Panama America: Paper reports the PRD politiintended only to give non-Spanish speaking people La Prensa, El Panama America: Papers report that cal party has given President Perez Balladares until a flavor for news events in Panama. former Haitian leader Raoul Cedras visited Panama imJanuary to comply with his promises to provide jobs migration offices yesterday to legalize his status in the for his party members. In the past few months, disconOct. 20 country and obtained permission to remain in Panama for tent within the PRD has been very obvious. They are Critica Libre: Paper reports the PTJ confiscated 150 at least one year. Cedras reportedly said he wants to leave demanding employment in exchange for their past pokilos of cocaine from the Cali Cartel and arrested two Panama next week. Panama authorities said no such forlitical support. Colombians and a Panamanian during an anti-narcotics mal request has been received, but according to regulaoperation conducted in El Cangrejo neighborhood of tions, there is nothing the government can do to stop him. E/lSiglo: Paper reports according to the PRD politiPanama City. (Article repeated in all newspapers) Minister of Commerce Nitzia Villarreal is quoted as saycal party president Gerardo Gonzalez, PRD members ing that having Cedras stay in Panama attracts internawho were dismissed during the Endara administration Oct. 21 tional tourism and reminds other nations that Panama is will be reinstated into government positions within the La Prensa: Paper reports Panama's President still on the map. next three months.

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Tropic Times Training Oct. 28, 9945 Spc. Richard Bulnes ground guides a high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle driver. Sgi. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) On the road Military driving class teaches soldiers to be 'street-wise in Suriname, Honduras and up in Fort Chaffee, Ark. by Sgt. Eric Hortin "The training we're conducting is training every USARSO Public Affairs Office soldier in Panama should have. It's important because you never know when you'll be pulled to drive a piece ALBROOK AS -Driving in Panama. For some, of equipment," he said. that phrase brings a shiver and feelings of dread. The soldiers were trained on several vehicles, For those in the military who drive for a living, including the Humvee, two-and-a-halfton and five ton every day is a challenge. Driving the military vehicles trucks. The training covered everything from performon narrow streets, over the Bridge of the Americas and ing operator maintenance, maintenance checks and from one ocean to the other, soldiers are constantly services to familiarization with the vehicles and drivfaced with the hazards of driving in Panama. ing. The leaders believe this training will accomplish Soldiers of Company B, 193rd Support Battalion what is important.fewer accidents. went through a three-phase drivers training to help "If every unit in Panama had this type of training, them become safer drivers during their tour overseas. the accident rate would be a lot less for soldiers and Besides safety reasons, the unit's mission requires all civilians," Lopez-Santana said. "We can't wait for an soldiers to have the knowledge to operate several accident to start this training." different vehicles. As well as training safer drivers, the unit is practic"Our mission covers the Pacific to the Atlantic, 24 ing for the upcoming truck rodeo and preparing for the hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year," said judging for the Army Maintenance Excellence Award. Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) 2nd Lt. Samuel Lopez-Santana, Maintenance Platoon The unit took third place in the Army last year for Spc. Michael Backman uses his driver's side leader and unit motor officer. "Our unit put more than maintenance and are hoping to take the top spot this mirror, watching the ground guide, while 15,000 miles on vehicles last month. We have drivers time around. backing up a two-and-a-half-ton truck. U.S. troops, Panamanians learn rescue techniques by Sgt. James A. Rush Maritime Service, Civil Aeronautics lishing independent search and rescue munities." 24th Wing Public Affairs Directorate, and the Paitilla Aero Club. procedures in anticipation of the further Topics discussed included "How The course, taught by U.S. Coast drawdown ofthe U.S. military presence Not to Conduct a Search," "Lost Subject HOWARD AFB -The latest search Guard experts, is designed primarily for in the country, according to Zapata. The Behavior," and "Legal Aspects ofSAR." and rescue techniques were taught to U.S. state and county law enforcement/ government is trying to build its proAttendees also learned about various military members and local officials emergency services and Civil Air Patrol gram based on the United States model. highand low-tech SAR equipment; during a seminar Oct. 11-14 at the Zostudents, according to Master Sgt. Rene "This course will help them become from infrared vision, radar and sonar to diac Recreation Center here. Zapata ofthe Joint Rescue Coordination independent. They'll be able to run resdogs, pigeons, seals and dolphins. Local personnel from Joint Rescue Center here. Instructors are based at the cue missions on their own rather than The National SAR School offers 20 Coordination Center, Armyaviation and National Search and Rescue School, rely on SOUTHCOM (U.S. Southern courses each year at its Yorktown facilspecial operationsmade uphalfthe class. USCG Reserve Training Center, Command) to assume the responsibility ity. In addition, the five-day course is The remaining students represented Yorktown, Va. of providing SAR capability for the inheld at locations around the United States Panama's National Air Service, National Panama is in the process of estabternational aviation and maritime comsix times a year.

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6 Tropic Times Oct. 28,1"9 Voices Safe Haven still needs donations amples of late delivery to the 24th Postal Squadron, I am of delivery for each class of mail based on point of origin Mayors' Corner writing to the Mayors' Corner, hoping for a response. The and destination. For surface mail destined to Panama, the local postal clerks assure me the inquiries were forwarded USPS standard is 45-60 days. While that is a long wait for Dear Mayors' Corner, to the 24th Air Postal Squadron Operation section for recustomers, surface mail arriving within that time standard The Tropic Times had an article requesting donations view. (usually large parcels) is considered acceptable by the of clothing, games, magazines, videos and toys for OperI will cite a couple of my recent problems: Receiving a USPS. If the delivery date exceeds 75 days, a claim can ation Safe Haven. March issue of a magazine in July, a 4th class package be filed by the originator for the value of the price it was Please provide the community with additional inforthat took 52 days to arrive from Colorado, but the replaceinsured, or for the cost of postage if it was not. mation for those wishing to make donations to both Operment package took only six days. Recently the commander of the Joint Military Postal ation Safe Haven and Operation Distant Haven. I have done all that the 24th spokesperson initially told Activity-Atlantic and a USPS representative from the Information Seeker me to do in February: I checked with all magazine pubBulk Mail Center in New Jersey visited the 24th Air Postlishers to re-verify mailing addresses and informed the al Squadron to discuss transportation issues. This was a Dear Seeker, 24th about each instance of late delivery. result of the involvement of senior leadership from the I sent your letter to the non-commissioned officer in Christmas is almost upon us. What will the added strain 24th Wing and the U.S. Southern Command to help solve charge of the Safe Haven Family Support Center, Tech. of Christmas orders and packages do to an already ailing this problem. As a result, the port of departure for mail Sgt. Annette Henry, who provided the following response. system? destined to Panama was shifted from Lake Charles, La. Although Operation Safe Haven is up and running What is being done about the problem? It has been at back to Port Everglades, Fla. This should cut transit time strong, we have not advertised for donations for the wellleast 30 days since the 24th said they forwarded the probby several days. JMPA is also working to reduce dead being of Haitian refugees at Operation Distant Haven. The lems to the U.S. Postal Service. What is the latest update? time in the transit cycle from the BMC to Port Everglades, camps never received Haitian migrants and Operation Was the problem found? When can we expect prompt and the possibility of using non-U.S. flag ships to carry Distant Haven is now folding up, sending our troops mail delivery within the Postal Service's own 30-45 day the mail. home. delivery window. Until the problem is corrected, it would As for the 24th Air Postal Squadron, we will do a betTo volunteer for Operation Safe Haven, inquire about be a good idea if the 24th could update their APO customter job of keeping our customers updated on the status of donation points, or for more information call 284-3153. ers from time to time through the Tropic Times. these and other initiatives. To that end, we have assigned Is It In The Mail? an individual as community relations non-commissioned Dear Mayors' Corner, officer, who will keep the community abreast of changes, I take exception to the 24th Air Postal Squadron Dear In The Mail, and we will also post magazine advisories in all post of-spokesperson's statement about mail delivery to Panama Capt. Karen Jordan, 24th Air Postal Squadron comfices when we are notified of late arrivals to the Bulk Mail in the July article, "Troops: Panama Mail On Slow Boat" mander wrote: I sincerely apologize for not answering Centers. in the Army Times. In the article, the spokesperson stated, your complaints; however, I cannot answer what I do not "There is a perceived delay by the people in Panama." receive. Upon receiving your letter I contacted the postal Editor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral Perception? I can state in no uncertain terms that there is a clerk in question. She remembered "taking care" of two Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity problem with 2nd, 3rd and 4th class mail delivery from complaints. chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will the continental United States. Please let my clarify what was meant in the July article be granted upon request. The Tropic Times reserves After forwarding my fifth complaint citing specific exin the Army Times. The U.S. Postal Service sets standards the right edit letters and responses for brevity. Soldiers brawl in Howard NCO Club Crime Scene legs or is unable to get around without a and the loss of shopping privileges in Dear Editor, wheelchair or other mechanical device. AAFES stores. Quality child care comes from People who require a decal need to pick those who believe in each child as an Club fight up the request from the Vehicle RegistraChild neglect individual who can and who will do. Two soldiers were involved in a fight tion Office, Building 849, Fort Clayton, The military police want to remind parA big thank you to the staff at after one soldier threw a beer bottle at the and have it filled out by a medical officer ents not to leave young children unattendthe Howard Child Development Cenother in the Howard NCO Club. The first and returned before Nov. 30. After that ed at any time. According to U.S. Army ter. bottle hurled missed, but the second bottle date, people without the new handicapped Garrison Regulation 210-1, children 9 Also a word of thanks to a very hit the soldier in the head, causing severe decal who park in handicapped slots will years and younger, must be accompanied special lady who has taught me cuts. Another soldier was taken to Gorgas be cited with a DD Form 1408. by an adult or supervised by a responsible that a little tact and a lot of class will Army Community Hospital for reconstrucperson 13 years or older at all times. Peotake a military wife far. I owe you tive surgery to his hand. Recovered property ple caught violating this regulation will be one, Marie. I'll keep in touch Alcohol is the catalyst for many acts of A bicycle was found in the Fort Kobbe cited for child neglect. from Fitzsimmons, Colo. violence. Know your limit and never drive area, while a cooler was recovered from Apryl under the influence of alcohol the Curundu housing area between Sept. Bicycles stolen 23-28. A quarters at Fort Amador was broken Eye-struck If you have any information about this into and two bicycles were stolen from a Housing area crimes A servicemember reported he was property or are missing them and have not storeroom. The last time the occupant Pacific struck in the eye by another made a report, call the Fort Clayton Milichecked his storeroom was nine days beservicemember at the My Place Bar in tary Police Investigations Office at 287fore the theft. Fort Clayton 600 area -one larceny of sePanama City. The servicemember was tak3808/5252. cured private property en to Gorgas Army Community Hospital Bruja speeding Herrick Heights 200 area -one larcenyof and released after treatment. Stolen jewelry Many citations have been issued for secured pnvate property While performing routine security at speeding and reckless driving on Bruja Atlantic Decal abuse the main exchange, Army and Air Force Road. Exceeding the posted speed limit by Fort Espinar 100 area -one larceny of seBecause of the abuse of the current Exchange Services security observed a 25 mph is considered reckless driving and cured private property handicapped decals, the Fort Clayton Vefamily member take three necklaces from takes six points off a person's driver's liOff post hicle Registration Office will be issuing a a display and put them in her front pocket. cense. Los Angeles -one larceny of secured prihandicap placard. According to U.S. She left the store without paying and was vate property Southern Command regulation 190-5, stopped by security. Panama Jack anonymous hotline Veracruz -one larceny of secured private paragraph 6c, people authorized a handiThe military police remind shoppers Anyone with information about drug property capped decal are those who are permanentthat shoplifting is a crime which can result smuggling should contact the Panama Jack Margarita -one larceny of secured private ly disabled by the loss of use of one or both in Uniform Code of Military Justice action anonymous hotline at 2854185. property Tropic Times Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666 -This authorized unofficial command information publicaSports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic. ..289-4312 tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pubStaf Editors.Sgt. Cass Purdum NCOIC. Sgt. Rick Emen listed in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information ProSpc. Tom Findtner gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of Rosemary Chong 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official Southern Command Public Affairs Office. 2824278 Public Affairs Superintendent.Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Journalists.Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson U.S. Southern Command. Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Public Affairs Officer. t Col. Melanie Reeder U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Commander in Chief. .Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Director, Public Afiairs.Col. James L. Fetig Managing Editor.Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Assistant Public Affairs Officer.John H all Chief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Editor.Sgt. Robin Shawlinski Photographers.Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Editor. ..M aureen Sampson Journalists. Sgt. Eric Hortin Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays Spc. Brian Thomas

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# Com m n yTropic Times comment .Oct. 28, 1994 I Pet dumping Homes needed for stray animal population by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero still roam the streets in search of food, shelter and maybe USARSO Public Affairs just a little kindness and love. Most never find anything but the wheels of a passing car and lay unmourned along T hose eyes. Those big, brown innocent eyes. the side of a busy road. They look up with hurt and fear as if to ask, Cats and dogs are not wild animals, they are domesti"What have 1 done? I love you, I thought you cated. Just because they are animals, it doesn't mean loved me too." And as the car drives away, he runs a they can make it on their own. We domesticated them, it while trying to keep up, barking and crying as if is our responsibility to care for them. screaming, "Why are you leaving me here? I'm scared. If you have a pet of your own, remember that for Please come back and take me home!" every pooch that lays at your feet and every purring furAs night comes and a light rain begins to fall, he ball that curls up in your lap, there are thousands more crawls under a bush, shivering and whimpering quietly. that are laying in muddy ditches or curled up in damp Though he is hungry, he is afraid to leave this spot. His holes. Make sure your family pet doesn't end up the family might come back and he would miss them. same way. Surely they were coming back. He had done nothing For those who don't have pets but may one day want wrong. one, think it through BEFORE you take that cute and He spent his two years of life with his family. 'Il cuddly fur-ball home. It is a lifetime commitment that Playing with the children in the yard, protecting his not everyone is ready for. family's property when they were gone and loving them If you are absolutely positive you will be keeping this unconditionally. animal for the rest of its life, take him home and fill his But they don't come back that night-or ever. This life with love because that is what he will do for you. If little dog, who once lived well and secure in the warmth you are not sure, do yourself and the animal a favor and and love of a family he cherished, now spends his days don't take him. dodging fast moving cars, fighting other dogs for what If you do take the little fellow home, do him another little food he can scrounge from garbage cans and 4 favor and have him fixed as soon as he is old enough. A running from people who want nothing but to hurt him. big contributor to the stray population is unwanted litters He will never understand what happened to his This tabby kitten is one of many pets available from both family pets and those animals who were so family or why they hated him so much that they left him for adoption at the Corozal Veterinary Treatcruelly abandoned. to live as he does now. meant Facility. For information, call 285-5866. When you see an abandoned pet, report it to the To be quite honest, I don't understand how people military police or the nearest veterinary facility. If you can do this either. To adopt a pet, whether a cat or a dog, And for those who think that abandoned pets aren't a see someone or know of someone who has or is love it and take care of it and then, just dump it someserious problem and that I shouldn't be wasting my or planning to abandon a pet, report them as well. where and take off as if this is a normal part of life. their time, I have done a little research. Abandoning a pet is not only cruel, inhumane and I have heard the excuses-I didn't have the heart to According to the book, "Train Your Cat," by animal coldhearted, but it is also against Army regulations and, put him to sleep; I couldn't find a good home; I just psychologist Terry Jester, approximately seven million if stateside, it is against the law. There are many avenues couldn't take care of him anymore; I am going back to cats were destroyed in the U.S. in 1989 at animal shelters that can be taken if an emergency situation comes up the states and can't afford to take him with me; It's and pounds. This number doesn't even come remotely and you can no longer care for your pet. Advertise for a better this way, at least he has a chance for life. close to the number of animals that are killed each year good home, ask friends, ask the veterinary facility or I'm here to tell you, these or any other excuses, are by starvation, disease or injury after being abandoned by even board them until the situation is resolved-just nothing but lame, inexcusable, fool-hearted and asinine their owners. don't take them out and dump them. bull.puckey. Closer to home, the numbers aren't nearly as omiIf the reasons are actually lame excuses and you just Didn't they think before they took this living creature nous. But, comparing the population of the United States don't feel like keeping your pet, you can seek the same into their home that this was a lifetime deal? Didn't they to that of the military stationed here, the numbers are just avenues instead of abandoning them. Just because a think that one day they would be going back to the as painful. human can't make a responsible, mature decision and states? Didn't they think that dumping him off someThe Corozal Veterinary Treatment Facility received stick to it, doesn't mean the animal should suffer for it. where would make his life miserable and that he would 1,115 stray animals over the past 18 months. Of those, So, the next time you feel like cursing out that skinny suffer, be lonely and live a very short and painful life? 163 were reclaimed by their owners and 433 were little cat that rummages through your garbage at 3 a.m. That's the problem. People who are cruel and adopted-thankfully, but hopefully to homes where they or you feel like throwing a stick at that scrawny little uncaring enough to just dump a family pet off and drive won't end up back on the streets. pooch that always tries to follow you home, rememaway don't have the gray matter it takes to think. Still, this leaves 519 that either died of complications ber-it isn't their fault. Curse out those uncaring Whatever the reason, I personally think they are the to illness or injury, or that had to be humanely destroyed. individuals who dumped them and left them to fend for scum of the Earth. And these were the lucky ones. Many thousands more themselves. Direct Quotes What should happen to people who abandon their pets? "If they can find the "When people get a "I think they should be "I think they shouldn't "I don't really like pets. person, they should be pet, it's a commitment. fmed, if they can be be able to have pets. I don't have any. I don't fmed because it's aniThey should assume the found." They should be tracked really think there's that mal abuse." responsibility and find so they know who's kind of problem." someone to adopt it." bringing pets over." Tech. Sgt. David Santos Lt. Dan Durn Cinda Beach Cpl. Shushen Boone Staff Sgt. Jorge Garagate 24th Logistics Group USS Lewis B. Puller Family member 565th Ordnance Det. HHC, 106th Signal Brigade The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries-or responses to commentaries-to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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Tropic Times 8 Oct 28, 1994 story and photos by Sgt. James Rush stopped and returned to the camp within minutes. 24th Wing Public Affairs "The first couple of weeks were tough. We weren't used to the heat and humidity," Hersh, who is from on't call them bluesuiters while they're in Andrews AFB, said. "We've got a good crew here Panama. For the duration of their deployment in though and they've come through well. support of Operation Safe Haven, the Air Force "We modeled our security after programs used at members at Camp No. 2 will be dressed in green, black, bases in the U.S. Once we assessed our weaknesses and and brown camouflage. our strengths, we built an operating instruction so that More than 150 people are deployed to operate the the next team can step right in," Hersh said. camp. The majority are Air Force members from all While the security police work to ensure domestic corners of the United States: from Nellis AFB, Nev., and tranquility at the camp, others provide for the needs of Langley AFB, Va.; to Offutt AFB, Neb., and Barksdale both the immigrants and military members assigned AFB, Lathere. The team includes civil engineering NCOs on "We've got people from bases all over and they've temporary duty here to offer guidance for camp congelled as a team quickly to meet our objectives," said Lt. struction projects, a 24th Medical Squadron dentist with Col. Mario A. Valadez, Camp No. 2 commander. Valadez two assistants, and chaplains who see to the spiritual is from Headquarters 12th Air Force, Davis-Monthan welfare of Cubans and Americans alike. AFB, Ariz. Providing support for all of the camp's ainnen and Valadez also gave credit to the airnen of the 24th soldiers is the S-1 element that acts as a combined Wing and soldiers from U.S. Southern Command and military personnel flight and orderly room They track U.S. Army South who account for the rest of the Camp career issues like reenlistments and career-job-reservaNo. 2 crew. Together they have tackled what he calls a tions, process emergency leave requests, and provide most unusual assignment. other administrative support such as relaying informa"We are responsible for the humanitarian needs of tion from the joint task force headquarters. more than 2,000 people. There is a unique and challengWorking in the field environment and trying to meet ing mission here, but it's one we've been very successful the needs of people from so many different bases has at," Valadez said. "I often get stopped in the camp to be proven to be challenging for the personnel staff thanked (by Cubans) for there things: the facilities, the "When we got here, we had computers, but no way we treat them and the food." electricity for then," Senior Airnau Christine E. By Oct. 13, the camp's population had reached 2,156; Harwood an iffornation manager from Nellis AFB, however, up to 2,500 Cubans could eventually relocate said. "Now we've been moved inside a building, but here from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. before we had to go to JTF headquarters or Howard for "We treat this like it is a small town," said Master Sg. personnel jobs. William A. Schmidt, the Non Commissioned Officer in One key ally of Harwood and her co-workers has Charge of camp's tactical operations center. "We have to been the Personnel Support for Contingency Operations care for their medical needs, give them food and provide office here. shelter. We also lend the Cubans tools, concrete gravel "Our customers are from various bases throughout and help them build things for themselves." CONUS (continental United States) and we have to Schmidt, who is also the camp's signal officer, is from communicate with our base counterparts at these Tinker AFB, Okla., and sees this assignment as a change locations," Staff Sgt. Dave Gordon, NCOIC of personof pace for Air Force members. A former secunty nel, said. "To do this we go through PERSCO. They policeman, the NCO was used to keeping people out of have played a significant role in helping with Camp 2 installations. personnel jobs." "On the other hand, the SPs (security police) here keep Personnel's labors aren't limited to military mempeople in, but they have to handle it very carefully," he bers. They've drawn the Cuban immigrants under their said. wings as well. The section is responsible for maintainMore than 80 security police are deployed to the 20ing the Deployable Mass Population Identification and acre site from units at Andrews AFB, Md., and DavisTracking System, a computer program designed to Monthan. Despite not having a single bilingual person monitor the names and other personal information of the among them, the security police encourage the "protecCubans occupying the camp. tors" image by conducting unanned foot patrols within "Each of us had to get trained on the system when we the fence and manning a 24-hour precinct house and got here, but now it can tell us the occupation, age, Senior Airman Susan M. Santoro he ps 15-year-old informati6n booth in the middle of the camp. marital status and more about any of the Cubans in the "We try to show that we're there for them," said camp," Gordon, TDY from Barksdale AFB, La., said. Master Sgt. Steve Hersh, the SP day shift flight sergeant. "It's a lot of work, but when you look out there and "We stop and chit-chat, try to fit the image of a friend or see all those faces, it makes you feel like you're doing older brother, and as a result I think the majonty of the something worthwhile. They are glad to be in a safe public trusts us." and better life." Two-by-two, the foot patrols hike through the camp. More than one airman has picked up on this current For half of their 12-hour shift they wak, dodging mud of optimism that runs through the Cubans. Tech. Sg1t. puddles the blazing sun hasn't dried up, breaking up an Carlos F. Ruiz of the 24th Services Squadron monitors occasional disturbance, but more often pausing to the food contractor providing three meals a day to the challenge the language barner by swapping words. Their immigrants. goal, according to Hersh, is to develop a "beat cop" Ruiz and other services specialists must ensure the atmosphere where community members are familiar with food being served is of high quality and that proper their law enforcement officials and see them as friends. sanitary standards are being met. Camp attendance is During one of its frequent stops at the precinct house also taken at meal times as the Cubans file through the to refill canteens, a patrol is just as likely to sit down with chow line before sitting down to eat. a Cuban as it is with an American. Tech. Sgt. Richard T. The job is fast-paced and completed in military Kendall, of the 24th Security Police Squadron at Howard fashion. More than 2,000 people get their food, sit and AFB, recruited five community members to act as liaisons eat quickly before surrendering their seat to another by fielding questions and helping to man the desk. diner. Kendall speaks Spanish but admits his mastery of the Yet Ruiz always makes time to talk to the many language has "improved 100 percent" while teaching the friends he has made during deployment. During his liaisons English police phrases such as "this person wants rounds of the seven 100-person tents in the seating area, to report a theft," "There is an injury," and "Here is a the NCO is like that hometown bartender with a public address announcement." sympathetic ear. "And they've picked it up very quickly," he said. "in "Being able to communicate with them, I can share fact, they've done so well, it's been OK'd to keep them my experiences and listen to their stories in turn," he on full-time." said. "When you get to share with them, to know them, On the outside, police keep vigil at several guardposts it's great. It gives them hope. There are doctors, lawyers and patrol three-quarters of a mile of fence line on fourand people of all classes here who are now neighbors wheel all-terramn vehicles. To (late, only two immigrants and they've come together for one reason .the dream Staff Sgt. James R. Bruce helps Cubans at Camp N have successfully cimbed the fence and both were of freedom."

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Tropic Times Oct 28,19949 Capt. (Dr.) Darell J. Evans prepares Luis Manuel Farres Cespedes for a tooth extraction. Master Sgt. Raul G. Castro announces birthdays and anniversaries, among other announcements, arien P. Le jva 7xad 7 nglish vcablr over the camp public address system. .r.s 7 .2bidafaeokfrbtros imnitCasMli .Mri id h otr fhscnendrn arl

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Tropic Times __ _ i i s o e__ _ __ _ 10 Oct 28 1994M stones Top enlisted, NCO of the year selected COROZAL (Tropic COROZAL (Tropic Times) -Air Force Master Times) -Spc. Calvin B. Sgt. Charles E. Watts Jr. Merritt was selected as the was named the U.S. SouthU.S. Southern Command's ern Command's non-comservicemember of the year. missioned leader of the le is a travel clerk asyear. signed to Special Operations As SOUTHCOM IntelCommand South at Albrook ligence superintendant for AFS. He also produces the the Reconnaisance OperaSOCSOUTI quarterly tions Branch at Albrook newsletter. AFS, his duties include Merritt arrived in managing all recon assets Panama in 1992, after three and airbome platforms. years with the 5th Special Watts has received both Forces Group at Fort the Defense Meritorious Campbell, Ky. Service Medal and MeritoHe is studying sociology rious Service Medal. at Florida State University. He served three years at Merritt is the son of MasOffutt AFB, Neb., before ter Sgt. Patricia A. Merritt of coming to Panama in 1987. the Pennsylvania Air NaHe and his wife, tional Guard. He and his Cordula, have two chilwife, Dalys, have two dren, Joshua, 8, and daughters, Grethel, 8, and Tabitha, 4. Master Sgt. Charles E. Watts Jr. Jalle, 1 Spc. Calvin B. Merritt A!l!mVFW member Promotions F mThe following 24th Wing members a to 1 were selected for promotion by the CY ao t tot.I.~.~ 94A Major's Central Selection Board, convened in August: Michael R. Drake W and William S. Racho, 24th Air Support N a tio n ai Operations Squadron; Patrick J. Johnson, 24th Operations Group; Eric A. Pohland, 24th Security Police Squadron; Brenda M. lI t U om m Ittee Robinson, 24th Wing *; and Andrew M. Shoop, 310th Airlift Squadron (5351).' KANSAS CITY, Mo. (VFW Headquarters) -Dannie Congratulations, selectees. Cooper, a member of Veterans-of Foreign Wars Post 3822 (*Maj. Robinson is now chief of the in Ancon, Republic of Panama, has been appointed to serve 11th Supply Squadron's management sysas a member of the organization's National Prisoners of tems flight, Bolling AFB, Washington War/Missing in Action Committee, by the Commander in D.C.) Chief of the VFW of the United States Allen F. Kent. In announcing the appointment, Kent said Cooper's 1w, record of service and achievement to both the nation and A r the VFW were the key considerations in making the selection.The Deputy Chief of Staff of Resource The National POW/MIA Committee is responsible for Management gave out the following civilestablishing the goas and objectives for the VFW during ian awards: the 1994-95 administrative year. The over two-million member VFW is celebrating its Sustained Superior Performance 95th anniversary of service to the country's 28 million livAward -Irma Finocchiaro, David Reilly, ing veterans and their families. Isolina Norris, Omaira Castillo, Janet Lam Maureen Sampson (Tropic Tmes) Cooper is involved in many community activities and Ho, Magda Buchanan, Rina Cabrinha, VFW member Dannie Cooper is involved in many local social groups such as the Boy Scouts of America, the Abou Norma Chavoya, Yolanda Jimenez, groups, including the Abou Saad Shriners and the Road Saad Shriners and works in Panama as the administrator of Alberto Lombardo, Esmie McLaughlin, Knights motorcycle club. the Corozal memorial cemetery. Javier Oberto and Brinett Young. Special Act Award -Elizabeth Brown, Local AUSA Roberto Atherley and Lonnie Iglesias. Quality Step Increase -Sandra Goodman. re Certificate of Promotion -to grade 5, FP resid ent's Juan Wong, Paulina Camacho. To grade 6, Deborah Cornejo, Elida Samaniego, service m medal Brinett Young and Clara Deceno. To grade 7, Kathy Degroff, Victoria Steppy, ARLINGTON, VA (AUSA)William Charlene Ladd, Olga Abadia Kelson and Hinkle, the liaison for the corporate memTracy Grimberg. To grade 9, Iram Clunie, bership of the Isthmian Chapter of the As-Michael Lopez and Robert Rogers. To sociation of the United States Army was grade 11, Renee Nellis, Yvonne Walcott awarded the President's Medal for excepand Miguel Charris. To grade 12, Lisa tional service to AUSA Oct. 17 during the Samson. AUSA's 40th annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Years of Service -Five years -ChrisHinkle has served the U.S. Army and Capt. John Leggett (U.S. Army) tina Chial, Yenny Villalobos, Lucas AUSA for more than a decade. He has esU.S. Army South set up a display of the USARSO mission at the AssociaAngulo and Maria De Leon. Ten years tablished numerous programs that focused tion of the U.S. Army Annual Convention in Washington D.C. Oct. 17-20. Iram Clunie and Jonelle Hidreth. Fifteen on military and civilian understanding and He has also been instrumental in arter has been selected three times since years -May Neill, Genell Escala, Ailsa cooperation towards the U.S. Army. He ranging social events such as the annual 1991 as AUSA's best overseas chapter Mokillo, Maria Clara Guzman, Marily has also championed causes that directly AUSA Open House Christmas Ball and and has received numerous awards for Gordon and Elena Anderson. Twenty benefitted American soldiers, their famithe command Family Day program and best chapter overall, best corporate memyears -Raul Campbell, Sydney Richards, lies and the people of the Republic of Panpicnic. bership support and greatest percentage Roberto Atherley, Aixa Nunez, Arthur ama. With Hinkle's help, the Isthmian chapincrease of membership. Williams and Antonio Morena.

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Features Tropicimes Oct. 28, 19 Air Force people 'make a difference' by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson This is the fourth year the annual "Others really don't believe they can than 40 homeless men at the "Luz y 24th WingPublicAffairs "Make a Difference Day" event has make a significant difference by themVida" Men's home in Casco Viejo, been celebrated in the U.S. -and the selves." Panama. HOWARD AFB -Active duty memsecond year it has been celebrated in the "Make a Difference Day" addresses *People from the 24th Air Support bers, civilians and family members from Panama community, said Laila Yeager, both issues, letting people set aside a Operations Squadron put on a used clothseveral local military organizations project manager for this year's activispecific day to work out their schedules ing drive, and the Howard and Albrook baked cookies, clipped coupons, served ties. and get together with others, to combine youth centers and AAFES collected both meals, fingerprinted children, pounded "Many people would like to 'make a their efforts toward a common good. clothing and toys for donation to undernails and scraped and painted buildings, difference' every day, but with their Some of the people who pooled their privileged children. and even pricked fingers and blew air in jobs and their kids and all the things that efforts and those who benefited from "A lot of people got together to work people's eyes Saturday to try and "make are happening in their lives, they often them included: on our consolidated dorm," said Senior a difference" in the local community. simply run out of time," she explained. *People from the Family Support Airman Scott Reed, 24th Air Postal Center delivered home-baked cookies Squadron. "We did some cleaning and to unaccompanied airmen living in the painting, we replaced broken fixtures, dormitories, and also handed out couwe hung some pictures and generally pons at the Howard and Corozal comtried to make the dorm more livable. I missaries. expected dorm residents would partici*24th Security Police Squadron perpate, 'cause we live here, but it was great sonnel registered bicycles and fingerto see other people working on a project printed children for Project FIND at the that didn't benefit them. They were just Howard theater and the Albrook doing something nice for someone else Shoppette area while the 24th Civil En-us." gineer Squadron members performed "The bike registration program is a bicycle safety inspections at the same mandatory program which all commulocations. nity members must participate in," said +Members of the 24th Operation Staff Sgt. Jacqueline Wheeler, installaSupport Squadron worked to beautify tion crime prevention monitor. "UnforAlbrook AFS by planting young trees tunately, because of people's work along the road leading from the back schedules and other factors, it's somegate. times difficult for them to come to us. *24th Medical Group optometry speWe decided to 'make a difference' by cialists performed glaucoma screening setting up in a central location during and collected .used eyeglasses to "renon-duty hours and making it easier for cycle" among people who have none, them to find us." while health promotions specialists did As Make A Difference Day project cholesterol screening at the Howard manager, Yeager expressed her apprecommissary. ciation for the many volunteers' efforts, *The 310th Airlift Squadron spear"especially those active-duty members headed a project to paint and renovate who put in all those extra hours, in areas ofthe dormitory in Building 810 at addition to the already heavy loads Albrook AFS. Other dorm residents asthey're working." signed to other organizations also par"When communities get organized ticipated in "sprucing up" the place in and pool their efforts, more people can (U.S. Air Force) which they live. benefit from those efforts," she said. Staff Sgt. J.C. Wheeler, 24th Security Police Squadron, fingerprints 5*The Howard/Albrook Enlisted "People really can take a single day and year-old Casey Williams. Spouses' Club put on a dinner for more use it to make life better for others." Soldier shares common bond with Cuban migrants by Spc. Brian Thomas ing the last three years in Panama. His current assign"They ask me a lot ofquestions. They ask, 'What do bySp. Pbin Thairs ment appears to be one he was fated for. you think about us?' I tell them to have faith, patience USARSO Public Affirs Office His job at Camp No. 3 is critical to the Cubans: the and belief in God because they will have a better EMPIRE RANGE -Sgt. Danilo Delpino is magissue and resupply of the essential items needed for future." netic. The attraction people have to him is undeniable. daily life. Working in supply, he gave the Cubans their Delpino said he made his voyage for political As he walks through the compound of Community initial issue upon arrival at the camp: clothing, toiletreasons. Camp No. 3 he draws people from all angles. Some ries and other items needed by people who brought "When I was 20 years old I had my mind already have questions, some have complaints, others just nothing with them when they fled their country. made up," Delpino said. "Tourists were allowed to want to say hello to their friend. As Camp No. 3 took on over 300 Cubans a day in come to Cuba and they opened my eyes. When I talked The Cubans at Camp No. 3 flock to Delpino beearly October, Delpino was there to greet them. to foreigners, I saw the difference between the socialist cause in him, they see one of their very own. And not "When they arrived on the first day, I made a speech and capitalist systems. just because he is Cuban. as a welcome," he said. "In Cuba, there is no freedom of speech, there is no Delpino, assigned to Bravo Company, 193rd SupDelpino volunteered for this duty. He worked part opposition in the government. You cannot express port Battalion, shares a special kinship with these time for awhile at Camp No. 1, and has worked full your feelings. There is no freedom of religion." people because 14 years ago, he was one of them. He time at Camp No. 3. In 1980, before he sailed for the United States, not only shares a homeland with the Cuban population "It is very, very exciting for me, and they are happy Delpino said he jumped the fence to the Peruvian of Camp No. 3, he also shares an experience. to see me here," he said. "They are glad to see a Cuban Embassy in Havana and received asylum to Peru. He too took to the waters of the Caribbean Sea in here. "After I was granted asylum, the Cuban governsearch of freedom. Delpino was part of the Mariel ment offered for me to go to the United States," boatlift in 1980, and came to the United States on Delpino said. "I chose that because the United States May 22 of that year. is the best country in the world." Now, after becoming a U.S. citizen and spending Now, as he watches a repeat of the effort that nine years in the Army, Delpino is here to welcome -brought him his freedom, Delpino said he has had this generation of freedom-seekers. e mixed feelings. "I was dreaming about this," Delpino said. "When "I felt happy and sad at the same time," he said. I saw what was happening in Cuba I thought maybe "Happy because now they have freedom and make a there would be another Mariel boatlift." new life. They have a better future. I was sad because The key distinction between Delpino's experiI saw how they came, how they have nothing." ence and that of this new generation, however, is -Delpino, who is married and has two children, left this: Delpino went right to the United States in 1980, 's his parents and two sisters in Cuba in 1980. One these Cubans are in Panama. sister, who now lives in Miami, also was a part of the Delpino spent 71 days at Fort Indian Town Gap in Mariel Boatlift. He said his parents have visited Pennsylvania, arriving there the day after the boat he Panama but returned to Cuba. and I I others sailed in was towed to Key West by the "The reason they went back is because I have a U.SSpc Brian Thomas (US Army) nephew and niece and they would not be allowed to On July 31, 1980, he was given a plane ticket to -gt. n pn k C n T CUmp N. go'" Delpmo said. "I was expecting them i this Miami, $10 in cash and paperwork showing that he Sgt. Danilo Delpino talks with Cubans at Camp No group.,D was in the country legally. Four years later he be3. As a member of the Mariel boatlift in 1980, He said his remaining sisters and their children did came a U.S. citizen. Delpino shares a bond with this new generation of not make the voyage,however. A cousin did, Delpino Since then, Delpino has been in the Army, spendmigrants. said, and is currently at Guantanamo Bay.

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12 Tropic Times 12 ct. 28, 1994 T-II off -4'I (Courtesy) Fort Kobbe's Gun Emplacement No. 1, equipped with a 155mm Panama Mount artillery weapon, stands watch along the Panama Canal'at Bruja Point Jan. 31,1929. Panama gun mount plays key role in WWII lowed a wider scope of traverse than the By 1 December 1944, the U.S. Ordfrom four hundred thousand per month to US Army South Historian average for guns designed for field use, the nance Department was directed to step up six hundred thousand. U.S. Amy _out H r ___~-.~lateral movement was still insufficient for its production of light and medium artilThe 155mm proved to be particularly During World War I the French fire against moving targets. lery ammunition. The monthly rate of prouseful in the war zones and served as the 155mm gun, a heavy tractor-drawn weapAn experimental permanent mount in a duction for ammunition for the 155mm principal coast defense weapon on a numon, was put into production with slight concrete emplacement for the 155mm guns gun was to be increased by 50 percent, ber of Pacific islands. modifications by the United States as the was designed and built jointly by the DisModel 1918. The Grande Puissance trict Engineer force and the Coast Artillery Filloux, more commonly in the American troops to increase the rate of fire and to faservice as the GPF, was the most widely cilitate traversing. By replacing the trails used of the mobile artillery pieces adopted spades with small flanged wheels which for seacoast defense after WWI. ran on a permanently installed track encirIn the 1920's shortly after WWI, surcling the gun, it was possible to swing the plus 75mm guns (Models 1897 and 1917) weapon in a 360 degree traverse with great and 155mm GPF guns (Model 1918) were rapidity. assigned to the Canal Zone for beach deThe result was a simple and relatively fense use. Accordingly, 42 75mm and 46 inexpensive platform consisting essential155mm guns were sent to the Canal Zone. ly ofa segment of curved rail embedded in (This is notable since only 65 155mm concrete, along which the gun's twin trails guns had been produced prior to the attack could easily be moved. against Pearl Harbor). Several of the batteries in the Panama A project was prepared for their emCanal Zone were equipped with the circuplacement at key points to cover the beachlar track and a number with a semicircular es and for the construction of light magaadaptation which permitted a 180 degree zines to serve them. Strategically located, traverse. Because this type of emplacement the guns were intended to serve a threefold was initially developed and tested in the purpose: to provide close-in harbor dePanama Canal Zone, it came to be known fense, to deliver enfilading fire on landing as the "Panama Mount." However, in spite craft, and to protect the major harbor deof the demonstrated usefulness of the Panfense fortifications. The weapons were ama Mount, it was not until just before emplaced in the vicinity of the harbor deWWII that all the 155mm guns were so fense batteries and other key sites and were equipped. manned by Coast Artillery personnel. These 155mm GPF guns were The GPF was greatly improved beemplaced at Tortuguilla Point, Naranjitotween the two world wars, mainly to inPoint, Fort Sherman, Fort Randolph. crease its mobility by providing it with Palma Media Island, and Galeta Island on modern wheels and pneumatic tires in the Atlantic side and on Flamenco Island, place of the old cast-steel wheels. It was Culebra Island, Taboguilla Island, Urava used throughout the 1920s and 1930s to Island, Taboga Island, and Fort Kobbe on train thousands of reserve and National the Pacific side. Guard coast artillerymen, and after Pearl From the very start of WWII most ordHarbor was rushed in large numbers to nance officers were advocates ofheavy ar. guard unfortified positions along both tillery, a term that generally included coasts of the United, States, the Panama weapons ranging from the 155mm gun (or Canal and in the Pacific. the medium 155mm howitzer) to the Timber-r-r!" Although the carriage of the 155 al240mm howitzer.

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Sports Oct. 28, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13 Women selected for Grunts slam Air Force '94 AII-isthmian team COROZAL (Tropic Times) -Five women were half, he was hobbled. selected for the 1994 All-isthinian basketball team y"Everywhere I went, I had two people with me. It was Monday. Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau a lot harder. They forced us to make adjustments and then Coaches from the league vote for players to be HOWARD AFB -The dirty boots of infantry soldiers we couldn't keep up," he said. named to the team. The players selected are: stomped all over the fly boys in the Panama Interservice That was the game plan, 5-87th head coach Lewis Player Team School Basketball Championship at Howard AFB last week. Fergerson said. Abby Higley Cougars BHS The Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th "We took him out of the game. They try to live and die Karen Kemp Machine BHS Battalion 87th Infantry Regiment from Fort Davis whipped by their three-point shot and we took that away from them," Audrey Ernest Devils BHS Howard's 24th Air Intelligence Squadron/Operational Suphe said. Janelle Hauser Bulldogs BHS port Squadron 60-49. However, Air Force coach Glenn Richard called it a Joanna Diaz Machine BHS The grunts edged ahead by five points at the end of the mere breakdown in execution. The women's championship tournament consecondhalf. Three pointers byJeffireyDeuitch and Senordor "We took them out of their game in the first half but we cludes 5:30 p.m. today at Balboa High School. The Hines with a minute and a half left helped provide 5-87th had a breakdown in execution in the second half and they Green Devils take on the Bulldogs for the league the five-point cushion. A 13-point second-half scoring took advantage of it," he said. title. burst from Norris Davis gave it everything else it needed as A vital part of the Army game plan was 6-foot, 6-inch, their lead swelled to as much as 14-points. 203 pound center Davis. The former junior college stand Fishing event serves Championships were nothing new to the Army five; out blocked six shots in addition to his 18 points. they won the Fort Davis championship and the U.S. Army Davis and Fergerson said getting him the ball was part injured child funding South championship before taking the interservice title. of the game plan. Deuitch said the championships had given them plenty of "At first, we weren't in the game plan. In the first half, COROZAL (Tropic Times) -The Legion of confidence. I wasn't getting the ball (2 blocks, 5 points). In the second Abou Saad Temple will host their annual fishing "We were neverworried. We play together as ateamand half, they started getting me the ball and I started producing tournament Thursday at Gatun Lake. Prizes will be we knew that would make the difference," he said. (4 blocks, 13 points)," Davis said. presented forlargestfish, heaviest stringer and most However, the 5-87th coach had high praise for their Air The 5-87th players learned they didn't like losing early fish caught over 15 inches. All proceeds will be Force competitors from the Pacific side of the isthmus. in the season. Their only loss was their season opener. donated to the Transportation Fund that is used to "I thought they were the best team in the tournament, The Air Force club wasn't quite as dominating. They send crippled and burned children here in Panama otherthan us. Theyjust didn't have enough horses," he said. finished second in their base championship, but even then, to the United States and return. A concession stand The Air Force "horse" that kept them in the game was Richard optimistically predicted theirteam would end up in will be available to the public. For information, call guard Johnny Taylor, who managed to bomb the 5-87th for the intraservice championship. Terry Zittle at 261-8018. twenty-five points. Despite the loss, Richard's confidence in his club hadn't. Taylor nailed 14 ofhis points in the first half. Taylor said wavered. "I still think we had the best team in the tournawhen the grunt club tightened their defense in the second ment. We just didn't play together." Special Boat Unit 26 wins Navy three-event tourney RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) -Special Conerly said. "I couldn't believe it I guess some Boat Unit 26 combined its efforts to best Naval people can do stuff like that" Special Warfare Unit 8, compiling 110 points to NSWU's 81 in the Rodman 7 Intramural Three-Event Competition here Oct 19-2 1. The units were tied after the first two events, the tug-o-war and the 50-meter swim. In the 5-kilometer run, SBU had the edge, 42 runners to NSWU's 22, and took the lead in points, 70 to NSWU's 41, to earn the win Event coordinator Morise Conerly was surprised at some of the athletes' mettle. "Of the 150 people we had overall, a Petty Ofcer 2nd Class Delano Mays (US Navy) handful were competing in another Miguel Toyloy (left) and Morise Conerly look at triathlon at Howard the next day," their stopwatches during the 50-meter swim race. Petty Officer 2nd class Roberto Taylor (U.S Navy) Eric Skalski (front) and Carl Duerr IV close in on the finish line Office 2nd ca o .Nert in the 5-kilometer race. Skalski and Duerr finished first and Members of Naval Special Warfare Unit 8 combine efforts on the tug-o-war. second respectively. The mighty Cougars fall to the TiSpecial teams provided some of *SCN AM radio schedule gers off a Jon Guerra touchdown thebestplays,andoneofthestrang*NFL name game and a Ricky Alvarez interception. est, in last week's action. *Sports standings

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14 Tropic Times Oct. 28, 1994 FootbaIJ Tigers end Cougars'streak by Sgt. Rick Emert Alvarez threw a six-yard pass into the endzone into the "I have to congratulate the Tigers' for their great prepU.S. Army South Public Affairs-Atlantic hands ofNick Frank. The kick was no good, but the Tigers aration and for not giving up in the fourth quarter. They had edged closer, 16-13. have a lot of good kids and it was a great win," said Cougar CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL -The Curundu CouThe Cougars' next possession went nowhere, and they coach Fred Bales. gars' "roll down victory lane" led them into Tiger Country punted it into the end zone. The Tigers moved the ball I 1 "l'm still proud ofmy kids, and I expectthem to win. We Friday, and the Cougars hit a road block in the form of Jon yards to the 31-yard line. just made some mistakes we don't usually make, but we'll Guerra and a fourth quarter 69-yard run into the end zone The Tigers had 69 yards between themselves and the bounce back strong," he said. that put the Tigers over the top, 19-16. upset victory of the season. Ricky Alvarez opted for his One thing the Tigers won't be doing is savoring the The Tigers took an early lead in the first quarter with a league-leading rusher and handed off to Jon Guerra who victory, Elliott said. 50-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Ricky Alvarez went the distance for another fourth-quarter touchdown, "These victories are short lived," he said. "Monday at to Carlos Roman. Rob Bernhardt kicked in the extra point putting the Tigers in front, 19-16. practice we were at work on the (PCC) Green Devils. We and it was 7-0. In their final possession, the Cougars drove the ball to can think back about how we felt Friday night later on, but The Cougars also scored in the first quarter off a onethe Tigers'33-yard line, buttheirfinal play ofthe game was for now we have to forget it." yard punch into the end zone by Lance Vonlollen. a pass intercepted by Alvarez. And what's the Tigers' goal for the rest of the final VoniHollen took the ball in for the two-point conversion, Ironically, in their first year under coach Richard Elliott, season? putting the Cougars on top 8-7. That lead would take them the Tigers blemished an undefeated Cougars record in the "To finish at 7-3 is our goal," Elliott said. "Before, I into the second half. final game of the season. In this, the Tigers last year, they didn't want to think of it as the final season. Now, we're in The Cougars owned the ball in the third quarter. did it again. the second half of the season and playing everyone for the VonHollen charged into the end zone from the two-yard "It was thrilling," said Elliott. "To score two fourth final time. We're dedicating these last Tigers' games to the line for the Cougars' second touchdown. Another twoquarter touchdowns to beat an undefeated team shows a lot legacy of the past Tigers' players." point conversion off a Buddy Martens three-yard pass to of character. I can't remember, in 22 years of coaching, The Cougars, at 6-1, are tied for first place with the Frederik Adams took the score to 16-7, Cougars. anything more thrilling than coming from behind in the Devils, and theTigers have edged upto a third placetie with Just as it looked like the Cougars were home free, Ricky fourth quarter and beating an undefeated team." the Balboa Bulldogs at 4-3. Bulldogs break Red Machine, 20-7 by Sgt. Lori Davis vanced to 4-3 with their 19-16 upset of the mouthed Bulldog and advanced to the BullThe Bulldogs failed to score on it's next Tropic Times sports editor Cougars. The Machine owns sixth place, a dog 20-yard line following a cussing penalpossession, but took advantage of a short half-game back from the Kolts. The Kolts ty. punt and took over inside the Machine 20BALBOA -The Machine's quest for a owe it's sole win to the Machine. After advancing to the five-yard line, the yard line. win remains unanswered after falling to the Although the game stats show a team Machine opened the scoring with a touchThe Bulldogs moved to the Machine's Bulldogs 20-7 Oct. 21. dead last in the league, the Machine put up down by Jerry Smith. Donny Husted made goal line, where Adam Beach plowed in for The 4-3 Bulldogs maintained it's third a lively fight against the Bulldogs. good on the extra point kick, putting the a Bulldog touchdown. Beach nailed the place tie with the Tigers, who also adThe Machine got some help from a foulMachine in the lead 7-0. extra point to tie the score 7-7. The Bulldogs wrapped up the first half with a razzle-dazzle play when Beach connected with Julius Graham midfield. Graham snagged the ball and left the Machine in the dust on the a 60-yard play, dashing into the end zone. Beach hit the extra point, putting the Bulldogs ahead 14-7. Both teams spent the third quarter grinding up and down the field, neither scoring but mangling each other in the process. The Bulldogs' Cardova Hall went down for a few minutes, but was able to return the game after a break. The Machine's Roberto George turned into "the punisher," doling out hard-hitting tackles. George pegged Carlos Martinelli, sacked Beach and stuffed Hall all in the third quarter. In the closing quarter of the game Hall came back to drive past George. The Bulldogs moved the ball to the Machine's one-yard line where Hall went Sgt. Lorl Davis (Trpic Times) in for the final touchdown of the game. Bulldog defenders gun for the Machine's quarterback Jared Holzworth. Holzworth threw for 80 yards against Beachscoredon the extra point, makingthe the Dogs. final score 20-7. Team statistics League Leaders Smith, Machine 4 Team standings Scoring 1600 W L T Pct. PF PA TD XP Total Cougars 6 1 0 .857 111 69 Reese, Devils 12 3 78 Devils 6 1 0 .857 116 32 Guerra, Tigers 8 48 Bulldogs 4 3 0 .571 54 66 VonHollen, Cougars 5 6 38 1200 -Tigers 4 3 0 .571 56 64 Rushing Kolts 1 6 0 .142 73 148 Carr. Yds. Avg. 1000 --Machine 0 7 0 .000 20 82 Guerra, Tigers 123 926 7.5 Last weeks game Reese, Devils 134 920 6.8 800 Devils 20, Kolts 0 Hall, Bulldogs 118 646 5.4 Tonight's games Kick offs Devils vs. Tigers, 6 p.m. (CHS) Kicks Yds. Avg. Machine vs. Cougars, 5:30 p.m. (BHS) VonHollen, Cougars 26 1236 Kolts vs. Bulldogs, 7:30 p.m. (BHS) 47.5 Quarterbacks Lampas, Devils 25 1142 45.6 200 PA PC % Yds TD Int Beach, Bulldogs 18 798 44.3 0 Martens, Cg. 129 54 41 957 8 8 Punt Yards rushing Yards passing Lampas, Dev. 61 32 52 421 3 2 Kicks Yds. Avg. Beach, BD 61 20 32 477 2 7 Husted, Machine 11 355 32.2 Bulldogs cougars Devils Kols M Machine Tigers Interceptions Price, Tigers 26 795 30.5 Beach, Bulldogs 6 Beach, Bulldogs 18 522 29 Source: Robert Best Alvarez, Tigers 4

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Tropic Times5 orts t28 19945 Don't forget the rules S r bif Bailey's return shocks Saints Amado The Fort Amador Golf Course will have ladies Monday's Monsters of the Midway -The Packers beginner lessons 3:30-4:30 p.m. and 4:30-5:30 NFL week in review have had entirely too much time to stew after a Thursday p.m. Tuesdays for five weeks, registration is ongonight loss to the Vikes. The Bears welcomed back Erik ing. There is a $20 fee.Call 2824511 for informaKramer who responded for more than 300 yards in the loss tion. by John Hall to the Lions. Despite spotting Detroit a 14-0 lead, the Bears The Amador Golf Course is sponsoring a twoRodman NS Public Affairs Office were in the game until the final seconds. After losing Neal person, best ball Thanksgiving Turkey Shoot RODMAN NS -There was so much returning going on Anderson (retirement) and Merril Hoge (career-ending 7:30 a.m. Nov. 12, $8. Call 2824511 to register by last Sunday in the NFL, it looked like the exchange window injury) the Bears seem to have a running game to compleNov. 9. at the PX the day after Christmas. Not only did the Saints' ment Kramer. Lewis Tillman and Raymont Harris give the Albrook/Howard Tyrone Hughes return two kicks for touchdowns, but he Bears a one-two punch the Packers could only dream of. Registration for youth baseball for ages 5-18 also set the NFL record for return yards in a game. In the BEARS 24, Pack 13. years will run Monday to Dec. 3 at the Howard and same game, the Rams' Robert Bailey set another record In other games: No matter who's Q, Cowpokes 30, Albrook youth centers. A physical exam is required witha freaky 103-yard puntreturn.Cleveland's Eric Metcalf BUNGALS 10; N.Y. makes it five straight, GIANTS 20, before a child can be registered. There is a $25 fee did his usual deed, in the form of a 73-yard punt return. Lions 14; L.A. breaks losing streak to Houston, RAIDERS for all active duty card holders and a $30 fee for Hereare theweeknine picks. Hometeams are inCAPS. 21, Oilers 13; Tampa catches Minny napping, BUCS 16, other people. BuffselockK.C.-The BillsandChiefssplittheirgames Vikes 13; Faulk falters, Jets 19, COLTS 3; Gus, Heath, The Howard and Albrook Bowling Centers last year with K.C. winning the regular season game 23-7 whoever, Eagles 27, REDSKINS 10; Bolts are back, have sign ups for intramurals, mixed, men, women and Buffalo taking the AFC Championship game 30-13. In CHARGERS 22, Seahawks 13. and youth winter leagues. the title game, the Bills held Joe Montana to nine compleThere are open dates for Atlanta, New Orleans, San The Howard Sports and Fitness Center is spontions for 125 yards. The Chiefs seemto be back inthe saddle Francisco and the L.A. Rams. soring a tennis ladder tournament. Call 284with back-to-back division wins. The Bills had a week to Last week 10-2, season 63-38, Monday night 7-1. 3451 for information. recover from their loss to the Dolts. With Miami battling National Football League The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers New England, the Bills have first-place incentive and American Conference body fat analysis for a small fee. The test helps homefield-advantage. BILLS 26, Chiefs 16. East people monitor their work-out program success. Fish fry at Foxboro -The Dolphins have revenge on W L T Pct. PF PA The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers the brain. In week 18 lastyear, the Patsies knocked the Fish Miami 5 2 0 .714 180 146 the Fitness In Training class 5:30-6:30 a.m. Monoutofthe playoffrace witha 33-27 overtime winatthe Fox. Buffalo 4 3 0 .571 134 143 days, Wednesdays and Fridays. It consists of a That win was New England's first over Miami since 1988. N.Y. Jets 4 3 0 .571 116 122 calisthentic supercircuit work-out to improve musThe Pats would like a little revenge after they scored 35 New England 3 4 0 .429 175 183 c points on opening day, but lost by four to the Fish. The Pats Indianapolis 3 5 0 .375 167 186 ular endurance, the cardiovascular system and Central flexibility. are continuing to play it close to the vest this season, with Cleveland 6 1 0 .857 166 79 The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers no final score separated by more than seven points. Look Pittsburgh 5 2 0 .714 124 117 lunch bunch sports and fitness activities every for the late October Foxboro chill to put the Fish on ice. Houston 1 6 0 .143 93 155 week. Scheduled events are; aerobics noon-I p.m. PATS 30, Fish 26. Cincinnati 0 7 0 .000 101 180 Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, volleyball-I 1 Bumbling Browns -The Broncos have taken the last West a.m.1 p.m. Thursdays, basketball 11 a.m.1 p.m. three in their series with the Brownies, including a 29-14 San Diego 6 1 0 .857 185 126 Tuesdays. win last year. John Elway riddled the Brownies' secondary Kansas City 5 2 0 .714 159 131 with three scores in Cleveland. Denver may be due for a LA Raiders 3 4 0 .429 163 178 letdown after knocking the Bolts from the unbeaten ranks Seattle 3 4 0 .429 153 124 The Clayton Bowling Center has lunch-time lastweek, buthave homefield advantage. The Browns have Denver 2 5 0 .286 156 192 specials 11 a.m.-] p.m. weekdays. Games are 50 notbeatenateamwithawinningrecordthisyear.Although National Conference cents and shoes are free. Call 287-6366 for more notbate atarnithawinin recrd hisyea. Athogh information. the Broncos are 2-5, they're playing like a 5-2 team after Dallas 6 1 0 .857 187 90 EasrtPhysical Fitness Center has free losing a squeaker vs. K.C. and beating the Bolts. BRONPhiladelphia 5 2 0 .714 161 112 aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. MondayFriday. Call COS 23, Browns 16. N.Y. Giants 3 4 0 .429 127 144 287-3861 for information. Not in the Cards -The Steelers travel to valley of the Arizona 2 5 0 .286 89 155 sun for their second ofthree straight road games. Although Washington 2 6 0 .250 169 211 Curundu the boys of steel are 5-2, this is a must win. When the Central Tang Soo Do is taught 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays Steelers finally do get home, they play Buffalo and Miami Minnesota 5 2 0 .714 147 105 and Thursdays at the Pacific Theater Arts Center, back to back. After that, they play at the Raiders. Thank the Chicago 4 3 0 .571 129 129 Building 2060 in the Curundu housing. Classes are league for that second-place schedule. The Cards gave the DetroitBay 3 4 0 .429 17 145 open to adults and children 4 years old and up. Call Cowpokes a scare last week after knocking Troy Aikman Tampa Bay 2 5 0 .286 96 159 286-3814 for information. out early with a concussion. This inter-conference game West Anyone interested in joining a mixed bowling was sandwiched in between two division foes (Dallas and San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 237 150 league at the Curundu Bowling Center can call Philly) for Arizona. That, and Steelers rookie running back Atlanta 4 4 0 .500 158 184 286-3914 for information. Bam Morris, (140+ yards last week) will be too much. LA Rams 3 5 0 .375 135 156 Rodman Steelers 16, CARDS 10. New Orleans 3 5 0 .375 156 208 The Rodman Marina will hold a bass fishing tournament on Gatun Lake 5:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov. F o o tb a ll .The entry fee is $10 and cash awards will be given for the largest and second largest fish caught. (RODMAN NS) -Here's a cool mind teaser to try 13. Midnight snackers m. 49ers Call the Rodman Marina at 283-3150 to register. during those long commercial breaks during NFL games, 14. Mustangs n. Saints An intramural swim meet will be held at the provided by a big NFL fan, Naval Command Master Chief 15. Half bovine, half man o. Steelers Rodman Pool 6:30 a.m. Nov. 18. The competition John Myers. 16. Two under par p. Browns is open to all Navy/Marine Corps military, DepartMatch the NFL team with its nickname. 17. Dad's Army sister q. Bengals ment of Defense civilians and family members 18 I. Cody and Clinton a. Cowboys 18. Primary rules r. Oilers and older. There is a limit of one team per unit. 2. Girls' toy with fish arms b. Cardinals 19. Sun worshippers s. Colts Register by Nov. 10. Call Rodman Athletics at 3. Scud opponents c. Redskins 20. Yogi and Smokey t. Dolphins 283-4222 for information or to register. 4.747s d. Giants 21. Six rulers u. Patriots The 61-foot Black Stallion is available for Pinas 5. Equalizers of the old west e. Eagles 22. Movers v. Jets Bay Marlin fishing, deep-sea fishing, cruising or 6. James and Hash f. "VI" kings 23. Pontiac pumas w. Bills moonlight cruise charters for large or small groups. 7. Thieves g. Bears 24. Dollar for corn x. Broncos The 42-foot Vargas is also available for charter. 8. Lubricators h. Lions 25. One of Ford's better ideas y. Raiders Call the Rodman Marina at 283-3147. 9. India tabbys i. Packers 26. Gold miners z. Chargers Atlantic community 10. Credit card users j. Buccaneers 27. Ewe's mate A. Seahawks An aerobics workshop and certification test 11. Navy's senior NCOs k. Rams 28. Jude and Christopher B. Chiefs is being organized in the Atlantic community. The 12. Coastal birds 1. Falcons The answers will be in next week's issue. testing will be given by the American Aerobic Association International and International Sports Medicine Association from Pennsylvania. The certification is valid for two years. A minimum of 15 SCN AM Radio 8 p.m., NFL: Pintsburgh Steelers at Schedule people are required for the class. For information, SCN M Rdio p~., NL: ittsurg Steler at cheulecall Delinda May at 289-3 163. 790/1420 Arizona Cardinals Army unit-level soccer The Club Nautico Caribe, Panama Canal TarSaturday Standings Mother's Field, Fort Clayton Th Club a ti aribe anaa Canb arMondayPon Club and the Panamna Canal Yacht Club are 11 a.m., NCAA: Colorado at Nebraska Navy Intramural Volleyball 6 p.m.:470th MI vs. 128th Av. sponsoring the second annual Atlantic Interclub Mia m NSWU 8 3 0 G 7 p.m.: 142nd Med. vs. HHC, 536th Fishing Tournament through Nov. 30. Call the Sunday PWD 2 1 .5 Eng Club Nautico Caribe at 241-2220, the Panama 1 p.m., NFL:Philadelphia Eagles at NSC IATTS 2 1 .5 Tuesday C Washington Redskins Marines 1 3 2.5 6 p.m.: HHC, USAG vs. 142nd Med. Canal Tarpon Club at 243-5316 or the Panama 4 p.m., NFL:Miami Dolphins at New Med. Dep. 0 3 3 7 pm.: Co. C, 1-228th vs 128th Av. Canal Yacht Club at 241-5882 to register. England Patriots -as of Oct.19

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Tropic Times 16ct. 28, 1994 Air Force lists demograph ics RANDOLPH AFB, Texas (AFNS) -The Air Force Military Personnel Center here recently published a point paper containing information about Air Force demographics. The "Demographic One-Liners" paper provides statistics and trend comparisons on a variety of topics concerning the people who mAke up the active-duty Air Force.The latest version covers the period through Sept. 30. Unless otherwise noted, all data are for active duty-Air Force members. Total Force Strength *Approximately 422,300 individuals are on active duty-8 1,000 officers and 341,300 enlisted personnel. *The Air Force has approximately 15,700 pilots, 6,300 navigators and 32,800 non-rated line officers in the grades of lieutenant colonel and below. Age *The average age of the officer force is 35, for the enlisted force it's 29. *Of the total force, 37 percent are below the age of26 (43 percent of enlisted vs. 15 percent officer). Sex +16 percent of the force are women (15 percent of the officers and 16 percent of the enlisted). *The population of women has increased from 33,000 in 1975 to 65,800. *Currently there are 306 female pilots and 103 female navigators. -~Race/EthnicGroup *Racial minority representation has risen from 14 percent in 1975 to 22 percent. *78 percent of the force are Caucasian, 15 percent Black, 4 percent Hispanic, and 3 percent other (for officers-89 percent Caucasian, 6 percent Black, 2 percent Hispanic, and 3 percent Other; for enlisted76 percent Caucasian, 17 percent Black, 4 percent (courtey) Hispanic, and 3 percent other). The Pride of Baltimore Marital Status *69 percent of the current force are married (76 The tall ship, The Pride of Baltimore, will be in port at Rodman NS Sunday through Nov. percent of the officers and 67 percent of the enlisted). 4 The ship will conduct open house tours during its stay. For more information, call the *There are 20,119 military couples in the Air Force. Rodman Public Affairs Office at 283-5644. Family members *Active-duty members supported approximately 675,000 family members (over 562,000 are depenPopular Panamanian singer dents-in-household) Overseas *21 percent of the current force are assigned overseas S (approximately 11,300 officers and 77,300 enlisted performs for camp residents members) Total Active Federal Military Service EMPIRE RANGE (JTF -Safe Haven JIB) *The average total active federal military service is 11 -Popular Panamanian singer Leoni Herrera years for officers and nine for enlisted and her group entertained Cubans at ComnuAcademic Education nity Camp No. 2 during an hour-long concert *55 percent of the officers have advanced or profesSunday afternoon. sional degrees (42 percent have a master's, 9 percent "It was great to be able to bring a little have professional degrees, and I percent have doctorhappiness to them through music," said Herrera, ates) a native of the Darien Province. *3 1 percent of company grade officers have advanced However, according to Herrera, the Cudegrees (24 percent have a master's, 6 percent have bans weren't the only ones who benefited from professional degrees, and 4 percent have doctorates) the show that offered cumbia, salsa and boleros *87 percent of field grade officers have advanced music. degrees (70 percent have a master's, 14 percent have "It was a very exciting moment in my life. professional degrees, and 2 percent have doctorates) I won't forget this experience as long as I live," 3*99 percent of the enlisted force have at least a high Herrera said. school education (16 percent have an associate's de"It was very well-received by the camp gree or higher, 62 percent have some semester hours residents, said Brig. Gen. James Wilson, Joint (U.S. Al, Force) toward a degree) Task Force Safe Haven commander. "In fact, Popular Panamanian recording artist Leoni Herrera Component they loved her." performs for Cubans at Camp No. 2. +67 percent of the officers have a regular commission The female vocalist, who recently released (74 percent of line officers) a compact disc, was backed up by a set of bongos, an Coe, Camp No. 2 executive officer. "She could tell Professional Military Education electric guitar, a bass guitar and a set of drums. what the audience wanted and she had a wonderful +62 percent of the officers have completed one or Despite inclement conditions throughout the afstage presence." more PME courses (as their highest PME, about 7,800 ternoon, the majority of the camp residents turned out Herrera has offered to return and perform for the have completed at least one senior service school, for the show. other three camps in the future. Military officials said nearly 12,000 have completed an intermediate service "She was very good," said Air Force Maj. Beverly they look forward to having her back. school, while over 30,000 have completed Squadron Officer School) Cubans file suit against U.S government S-fC-son *18 percent ofthe officers were commissioned through MIAMI (Reuters) -A group of prominent Cubanthem migrants picked up at sea this summer, being the Air Force Academy, 42 percent through ROTC, American lawyers filed suit Monday against the U.S. held at U.S. military bases at Guantanamo Bay in and 23 percentthrough OTC orOCS (the remaining 17 government seeking an end to U.S. detention ofCuban Cuba and in Panama. percent were commissioned from other sources such as migrants at Guantanamo Bay and Panama. Though the Clinton administration has announced other service academies, direct appointment, aviation The attorneys, who included Xavier Suarez, a plans to allow some children and elderly Cuban cadet) former mayor of Miami, said they were seeking due migrants to enter the United States, the only options Term of Enlistment process for all migrants, an end to coerced repatriation now for the others are to remain at the U.S. bases *29 percent of the enlisted members are serving in back to Cuba, humane treatment for the migrants and indefinitely or return to Cuba and apply there forsome their first term of enlistment, 23 percent are on their an end to their indefinite detention. of the 20,000 visas per year the United States has second and 48 percentare on their third or greater term There currently are about 32,000 Cubans, all of agreed to grant Cuban migrants. of enlistment

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Tropictivities Oct. 28, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI Bye ye BrdieMaureen Sampson (Tropic Times) Devon Sprague, left, swoons as Conrad Birdie, played by Carlos Royo, sings about sincerity. Birdie is accompanied by Jeremy Middleton on guitar, right. These characters are part of the current Pacific Theatre Arts Center and Balboa High School production of "Bye Bye Birdie. For story and photos, see Page B3 National conference focuses on Find out how to celebrate this +Movies, Page B8 gang violence, youth employment Halloween with alisting of haunted *TV, Page B9 and teen activities. houses and trick-or-treating. *Potpourri, Page B12

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B 2 ropic Timesne s_ _ _ _ B2 Oct.28, 1994 south news Albrook/Howard A 'k -9 LCompetitive swim team tryouts, 10 a.m. Nov. 12 at Howard and Albrook Pools for youths 8-18 So~leyears old. Call Lisa Nofi, 284-3569, or Rose The Enlisted Spouses Club of Written on the paper angels Coville, 236-2035, for more information. U.S. Army South and Army Coinwill be the sex and age of a spe*Youth centers 286-3195/2844700: unity Service is sponsoring the second ancific child, along with a code number to identify Preteen Dance 7:30-10:30 p.m. Nov. 4 and 18 nual Angel Tree for all local military children the child from a master list. at Howard. in need. Exchange customers will be able to take an Baseball, softball and T-ball open registraThe trees will be set up at the Main Exangel and purchase a gift appropriate to the sex tion for the 1994-1995 baseball season until Dechange at Corozal, Howard Exchange and Fort and age of the child selected. cember 3. Davis Exchange, and will contain "Angels" Customers are asked to wrap the gift and tape Spanish lessons for children and adults 4 and 5 from all services. the angel to the outside. The gifts can then be p.m. .Tu esdays and Thursdays. The names of the children will remain condropped off at one of three location: ACS, Fort Cheereading lessons, Fridays at Albrook, Satfidential. Clayton; ACS, Atlantic; or the Howard Youth Center. urdays at Howard. Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday evenngs. Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for memGuitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturdays. Spanish lessons 4 and 5 p.m. Tuesdays and DoD, TRADOC conference will focus on teen issues Thursdays. asalyongsersbutfreqentreloatinsmyadtothe Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesdays. by Sgt. 1st Class Stephen Barrett as all youngsters, but frequent relocations may add to the Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four American Forces Information Service rebly with their parents are probably more vuineradays a week. Special preschooler class Saturdays. Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available WASHINGTON D.C. -Gang violence, youth employble to negative influences," he said. for ages four to adult. ment and teen activities will highlight discussions at the To help combat the problem, McGinn plans to suggest *Just for teens: Department of Defense Youth Action Conference Moncommanders design more comprehensive youth programs Falltime party 8:30-11:30 p.m. today. Wear day through Nov. 4 in Tampa, Fla. for their installations. "Programs should involve a variety orange and black and get in for half price. The Hosted jointly by DoD and the Army's Training and of installation programs and resources," she said. "The 'Anthill Posse' will be playing in the Albrook Club Doctrine Command, conference participants will identify transition program should include informing kids on serballroom. Trasportation provided from Howard approaches that may help youngsters resist joining gangs, vices and agencies available to them during their stay. Youth Center. resist engaging in violence and avoid using drugs. DoD Family member employment programs should provide Top Twenty Teen Dance 7:30-11:30 p.m Nov. expects about 750 participants. job information for those wanting to work after school." 19. Party with your friends at the Howard Enlisted "This is really the first time we've zeroed in on adolesCommanders should design programs where commuMembers Club Ballroom. cent issues," said Gail McGinn, DoD's family policy supnity leaders, health officials, military police and family Teen Turkey Splash Pool Party 6-9 p.m. Nov. port and services director. She intends to review DoD polservice centers listen to teen concerns. "We've spent a lot 25. Teens can have their own private pool party icies during the conference, focusing on programs that will our time and efforts with child development and family with friends. help teens become more active in communities. advocacy programs and haven't really focused on teen isMcGinn said commanders are concerned about gang sues," said McGinn. activity and gang violence. According to Army Col. RiListening to youngsters has been the keystone of an ClaytOn chard A. Pomager Jr., law enforcement and security diArmy program in existence since 1991. Teen Discovery *Youth Center 287-6451: rector for the TRADOC, the problem of youth violence is an annual gathering of youngsters from Army installaYoung Americans Bowling Association goes deeper than a social or an installation issue for the tions who offer advice about intervention methods. leagues for ages 6-18 will begin Saturday at the military. "We get realistic advice," said Lee Morrison, head of Fort Clayton Bowling Center. Dues will be $4 per "It is a readiness issue," he said. Pomager said military the Training and Doctrine Command's youth services and week and includes bowling, shoe rental, a trophy parents distracted because of family problems are less Teen Discovery manager. "Some of the kids who attend for each child and a party upon completing the likely to be able to effectively perform their duties. "The the conferences 'have been there.' They've been into league. perception that gangs are infiltrating installations is reinscrapes on Army posts and are trying to help keep other Not So Scary Halloween is a happy Halloween forced by the fact that there has been an increase in viokids from repeating their experiences." activity for toddlers to 10 years old. It will be held lence and crime among young family members." Civilian communities and military installations have 4-7 p.m. Monday. A $1 fee includes game prizes, Part of the problem is that "gang life" is intruding more programs in existence that will be examples during the candy and a lot of fun. on the military community. "In some areas, gangs are usconference. One highlighted program is Fort Sill's Wings Halloween costume dance Saturday. Pre-teens ing our installations as neutral turf," Pomager said, "and of Eagles in Oklahoma. 6-9 p.m. and junior teens 8-11 p.m. Fee is $2. sometimes their presence can lead to problems." "We target sixth graders who are about to move into Halloween party Monday. He explained one case involving a military youth who junior high school," said Army Maj. Randy Garibay, who Junior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. Tuesinvited local kids to a party at his on-post home. Unknowruns the Fort Sill program. "We want to instill in them the days and Thursdays Building 155. ingly, some kids he asked belonged to two rival gangs. confidence and independence to resist gang involvement, Video day, Wednesdays. When the two gangs met, a fight occurred prompting miland to show them the benefits of getting a good educaArts and crafts, Mondays. itary police assistance. tion." Cooking experiences, Tuesdays. The traditional military approach to dealing with Pomager said each service has programs to help youths Outdoor games, Thursdays. "problem kids" on installations is to remove families from to develop their potential, self-esteem, independence and *Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: post housing. "That only relocates the problem, it does values. The conference will highlight these programs. Spooktacular movie lock-in 8 pm.-8 a.m. tonot solve it," said Pomager. "We have to help youths, par"We want to identify possible solutions that commanders day. All night horror movies. ents and commanders to head off such crises." can use to immunize military kids against imutating the Gift wrapping workshop 9 a.m.-noon Nov. 5 Pomager added military youths face the same pressures gang culture," he said. at the Valent Recreation Center. Movie marathon in dolby surround sound 1-8 Local pathologist visits p.m. Nov. 6. DoDDS, ACS conduct Teen art exhibit all day Saturday. .' ..Curundu Jr. High classes Popcorn and movies, Sundays. 'Child Find Activities' CURUNDU (DoDDS) -"Wow, that was great. When The Department of Defense Dependent Schools can we do that again?" Atlantic in Panama, along with Army Community Service, This was asked by one of the 24 Curundu Junior High *Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: are conducting on-going "Child Find Activities" in School students who attended a slide show presentation Shotokan Karate, 4-5 p.m. Mondays and an effort to locate all eligible family members with given by Dr. Richard Wahl, a pathologist from Gorgas Wednesdays, $20 per person. disabilities in need of special educational or medical Community Hospital. Halloween costume contest 5 p.m. Saturday. services. The students, many of whom participate in the School Arts and crafts, 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Newly arrived military and U.S. governmentWide Enrichment Program, were entertained and educatSaturday sports, noon to 6 p.m. sponsored personnel with family members in need ed by Wahl's presentation. He shared facts ranging from Piano classes, 4-6 p.m. for 30-minute lessons of special education and special medically related how one may become a pathologist, a scientist who studMondays and Wednesdays. There is a fee of $20 services should contact their local DoDDS school for ies diseases, to the analysis of microscopic organisms to per person per month. program planning and enrollment. determine the cause of disease or death or the treatment of People who know of a child with a disability in disease. the community who is the family member of a U.S. "I felt the presentation was very educational because I Rodman government-sponsored or military person and is not want, someday, to be a forensic pathologist," Denise There will be ghoulish fun for kids 5-7 p.m. receiving services, should encourage the family to Holmes, an eighth grade student, said. "Doctor Wahl today at a Halloween bash in the Laguna Lounge, contact any local DoDDS school. People can also call helped me to be better prepared for the work I will be doRodman NS. Festivities include apple bobbing, a the Exceptional Family Member Program manager ing." pinata and "frightful" games. Prizes will be awardat 287-4921/5073 for assistance or for more inforThe junior high students look forward to many more ed for the best costumes. mation. educational visits from trained professionals in the community.

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~iA~ner~a menLTropic Times Entertainment t28 1994B3 Star-struck teenage girls sing "We Love You, Conrad" for the umpteenth time. Linda Dahlstrom, as Rosie, twirls during her dance solo. 4 Musical comedy soars on stage evening of thorough entertainment and laughs Albert Peterson, Conrad's agent, is portrayed by Richis in the works for anyone interested in the curard Koechlein. His secretary and soon-to-be-wife is rent Pacific Theatre Arts Centre's production of played by Linda Dahlstrom. Conrad is represented stuthe musical comedy "Bye Bye Birdie." The show opened pendously by Balboa High School senior Carlos Royo. Oct 21 and runs through Nov. 12. Performances start 8 The cast also includes countless citizens, ranging from p.m. Thursday through Saturday. the Conrad Birdie fan club, to manipulative reporters, to a The production is one for all ages. From Shriner serehoard ofjealous teenage guys. nades to the Ed Sullivan Show, Birdie has everything. The production is directed by Jerry Brees and JoAnne The play is centered around life in the late 1950s. It Mitchell-well-known stagemasters of the local commushows how one teen idol, namely Conrad Birdie, can have nity. Melanie Bales is the musical director and Barbara potent effects on the lives of people in a small Ohio town. Berger is the choreographer. The 79th Army Band is feaWhen Conrad's agent wants to retire from the music toured throughout the production, which is sure to be a business, go back to school and start a family, he takes memorable one. one more stab at raking in some cash. He encourages Tickets cost $10 and are on sale at the Pacific Theatre Conrad to venture to Sweet Apple, Ohio, where he will Arts Centre box office, or by contacting the theater at 286Bob Mitchell as Hugo Peabody is not too pleased broadcast his final song, kiss an adoring fan, and stir up a 3152. Tickets are selling fast, so don't miss your opportuabout his girl Kim MacAffee, played by Chrisruckus before the megastar is drafted in the Army. nity to witness this wonderful musical spectacle. tine Estill, having to kiss Conrad. story by Jack Miller photos by Maureen Sampson High school tough guys sing "We Hate You, Conrad."

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B4 T 2Times Focus on Panama Panama, part 1: The early days A history of a nation that helped shape the world (Editor's note: Panama celebrates its independence United States as the growing regional power, possessed from Colombia Thursday. This begins afive-part series the resources necessary to see a project of this magnitude on the history of Panama: Part I: The Early Days; Part through to completion. 2: Independence; Part 3: Canal Building; Part 4: The In the 19th century, diplomatic treaty making was the Canal Zone; and Part 5: A New Future. The history was essential ingredient in foreign policy making. As a result adaptedfrom an unpublished manuscript by Dr. Miguel there was a variety of agreements reached between the Antonio Bernal and Thomas J Hofer, Florida State leading powers and the Latin American states and even University and David McCullough's Path Between the among the three leading powers to insure their interests Seas.) were protected, even if they were only of marginal importance. S since the discovery of America, the importance During the 1800s, the United States entered into two of the Panama isthmus and its economic treaties that had a direct effect on Latin America: potential as a collection point for the riches of .*The Bidlack-Mallarino Treaty: President Andrew South America has been a focal point in the history of Jackson sent Charles Biddle in the 1830s to investigate this small strip of land. the feasability of a canal in Nicaragua and Panama. Panama was "put on the map" because of its Biddle negotiated with New Grenada (Colombia) over a importantance to the Spanish crown in the early 1500s. private concession to the United States. In 1846, The sighting of the South Sea (Pacific Ocean) by Vasco Benjamin A. Bidlack concluded a commercial treaty Nunez de Balboa signalled the beginning of the Panamawith M.M. Mallarino of New Grenada titled a "Treaty of nian colonial era. On behalf of the Spanish kings, Peace, Amity, Navigation and Commerce between the political power over the isthmus was exercised by the -United States and New Grenada." The treaty provisions royal governor and his staff. The governors established ran for 20 years and gave the United States the same royal courts (audiencias), with the Panamanian audiencia privileges and immunities regarding commerce and dating from 1563. Even when Panama was subordinated navigation that citizens of New Grenada enjoyed. to Peru for administration matters, the isthmus retained Furthermore, the United States guaranteed New its audiencia. Grenada's exercise of sovereignty in the isthmus and Beginning in the early 16th century, Nombre de Dios pledged to protect it. (Atlantic Coast, Panama); Veracruz (Mexico) and *The Clayton-Bulwer Treaty: This treaty was Cartagena (Colombia) were the only three authorized Martha K. Taylor (courtey) designed to reduce friction between the United States ports for trade with Spain. Indeed, Spain forbid the The cannons used 400 years ago to defend and Great Britain by forbidding either one from building colonies from trading with other nations, which was to Portobelo still overlook the Atlantic ocean. a canal at Tehuantepec, Mexico, or Panama without the lead to periodic invasions from English and Dutch active cooperation of the other. Both nations also agreed privateers. Annually, Spain sent a fleet loaded down 1799 to 1804 in the name of scientific progress. to the concept that any proposed canal would be neutral with shipments of gold and precious metals from the Humboldt's "Political Essay on New Spain" rekindland that both sides would respect its neutrality. The mines of Peru and Bolivia to Panama City, where it was ed interest in the Central American region and focused treaty was sufficiently open-ended to allow either side to transferred across the isthmus to Nombre de Dios, attention on Panama and Nicaragua. In his work, abrogate the treaty after prior notification. reloaded and then convoyed to Spain. Panama's Humboldt called for the building a transoceanic canal. In the context of United States-British relations, the prosperity depended on the frequency and amount of The dream was perhaps close to realization of uniting Clayton-Bulwer Treaty was another in a series of treaties these shipments. Asia with the Americas and Europe. defusing United States and British rivalry in the Western After the overthrow of Spanish dominion and the Hemisphere. Pirates and treaties independence of the new Latin American states, promoters, engineers and dreamers, all with the idea of a The Panama Railroad Panama suffered greatly from the English pirates transoceanic canal started to arrive in the capitals of under Sir Francis Drake and his colleagues. They began Latin America. A group of New York financiers organized the by raiding Nombre de Dios for its warehouses and Seeking autonomy or independence, Panama Panama Railroad Company in 1847. The railroad was riches, compelling the Spanish to move to a more declared independence from Spain on Nov. 28, 1821. completed in 1855. Between 1848-1869, about 375,000 defensible location at Portobelo. Almost immediately, Panama decided to affiliate itself persons crossed the isthmus from Pacific to Atlantic; The English establishment of colonies in the Caribbewith the province of New Granada, which would later be while about 255,000 crossed from Pacific side to an allowed English commerce raiders to more easily Colombia, and its charismatic leader Simon Bolivar. Atlantic side. prey on the Spanish trade and thus gave rise to English To show its loyalty to the cause of independence, Prices for food and services were greatly inflated, interests in this region. The culmination of the English Panama sent 700 soldiers to assist Bolivar in securing resulting in a resurgence of prosperity for Panama. effort was the destruction of Panama City in 1671 by the independence from Spain. Panama's historical links to Building the railroad created a new port and city on the English raider Sir Henry Morgan. Thereafter piracy and Colombia date from this period. And lacking any strong Atlantic side. United States investors named the new city commerce lost its importance as England came to adopt feelings of allegience to Colombia, Panama would seek Aspinwall after one of the owners of the railroad. a mercantilist policy toward its own colonies. either autonomy or independence from Colombia Panamanians named the town Colon. Gold miners Events in Europe were to shape the future of Panama several times during the next 80 years. heading to California continued to use the railroad to as the Bourbon kings ascended the Spanish throne in With the disappearance of Spain from the scene, the transit the isthmus until 1869, when the transcontinental 1713, following the Treaty of Utrecht. Although they newly independent states lacked stability in their railroad was completed in the United States. espoused a policy of trade liberalization, this came too political institutions and sufficient will to undertake or For the use of the concession, Panama received a late for Panama. protect a concessionaire in such a comprehensive project $25,000 annuity from Colombia from the royalties paid As the eighteenth century wore on, a combination of as building a canal through Central America. by the railroad. For a capital investment of $7 million Panamanian inadequacies in coastal defense and the Under such circumstances, it was clear that only one dollars, American investors received nearly $38 million actions of Peruvian merchants, tired of the corruption of the leading powers, France or Britain in Europe or the dollars in dividends between 1855 and 1903. and venality of their Panamanian counterparts, sought to establish alternate trade routes for their merchandise. The final blow came with the destruction of Portobelo in 1739. An idea for a canal The idea for a canal spanning the isthmus originated with Spanish King Charles V in 1523. He ordered that the Rio Bravo (Rio Grande) in Mexico and the Chagres (Panama) be explored to determine the feasibility of such a project. King Phillip II undertook another investigation, finally concluding that "Man should not frustrate the will of God. If He had wanted the two oceans to be joined, He would have done so." The project was revived again during the reign of King Phillip III. The Council of the Indies recommended against the idea, claiming that it would encourage attacks by other European nations, thus weakening Spain even more. Spain never undertook any serious efforts to explore the possibility of a canal project, being absorbed in its own domestic affairs. In a break from its protective past, the Spanish crown permitted the German geographer and explorer Marta K. Taylor (courtesy) Alexander von Humboldt to tour the Americas from In the 1500s, Portobelo was an important port because it was easier to defend than others.

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____ ___ ___ ___ __ X UIIII U UI~ y ew sTropic Times community news 1994B5 ALLOWED OClayton A special evening Protestant service, sponsored by the Clayton Warriors youth group, will be held 6 p.m. Sunday at Fort Clayton Chapel. Episcopal services will be held 10 a.m. Sundays at Amador Chapel instead of 10:30 a.m. The Protestant Women ofthe Chapel meeting will be held 9 a.m. Wednesday at the Fort Clayton Chapel. The program will be "Happy Holidays, Even in the Military." Sandi Holzwarth, a military wife with many years of experience in moving and celebrating the holidays in new places will share her ideas on how to get through the holiday season with minimum stress and maximum joy. Child care is provided. For information, call Joyce Walker at 282-3247. The Toastmaster International meeting will be held 5 p.m. Wednesday at the PCC Training Center. For information, call 287-5689. AL-ANON, a 12-step support group for family and friends ofalcoholics, meets 8 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays in Building6550, Corozal. AL-ATEENS may attend Fridays. For information, call 223-7193. U.S. Army South Public Affairs is coordinating the 1994 Joint Task Force-Panama Christmas Sponsorship Program. Units or community groups wanting to participate this year should call USARSO PAO at 287-3007/4109. John H 11(U.S. N.vy) H w r / l r o Devils, wolves and ghouls will "scare the pants" off children and adults at the Rodman's aUNavy Howard/Abrook house 6-10 p.m. tonight and Saturday at Building 73. The price for children 11 and under is $1. The The Family Advocacy Outreach Program and price for adults and children 12 and older is $2. Howard AFB Child Development Center is sponsoring a "Stress-free Holiday Shopping" event. Free child care will be available at Howard CDC for parents who want to shop without the stress oftaking 14 AU Nr W i ~their children. The service is available 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tuesday and Nov. 15. Parents should WONSTES S, DEVILS AND VITC14ES LOOSE ON RODWAN register children with the center at least three days prior to the day they want to use the service. This is RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) -Devils, monsters Screams and Halloween music will fill the air while people open to Air Force personnel only. Call 284-3711/ and witches will give guided tours of their haunted house anticipate their near 10-minute tour. 6135 to register. 6-10 p.m. tonight and Saturday at the old Anchorage Club Last year's haunted house at Building 40 here was The Howard Child Development Center is lookat Building 73, between the base gym and the chapel here. popular. ing for potential Family Day Care Providers for Highlightsofthe house include an electric chair, Dracula "My daughter liked it, she was scared and had a good the AlbrookArea. Call Jill Winter at 284-371 1/6135 in his coffin, an eerie disco, and a monster mash with time," said Petty Officer Ist Class Lynn Flores. "I liked the for more information. dancing ghouls. Also, members ofNaval Special Warfare way they did the blood and the people laying on the The family services section of the Family Unit 8 will "operate" on live people. gurney." Support Center needs volunteers to help with the While guides take groups through, hot dogs and soft The cost for the tour is $2 for adults and children 13 and loan closet, base brochure library and the coupon drinks will be sold in the lobby of the haunted house. up and $1 for children 12 and under. cabinet. Family services is open from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, and flexible hours are available. Limited child care is free for volunteers. AnyS P C one who is interested, call 284-5860. 'W1TH BAE The Albrook Stables is offering trail rides and pony rides by appointment only. Call 287-3333/ The community of Ada Nice Place is s nsoring a 4411 for appointments. haunted house 6-9 p.m. today through Monday in Building 695, Fort Clayton. The cost will be 50 cents for children and $I foradults Miscellaneous Sfor adults The Enlisted Spouses Club-Panama takes pride CPYPT N 1014TWAPUS in serving the community. The club meets 7 p.m. the Outriders Charity presents "Crypt Nightmares" 7-9 first Monday of the month at the Fort Clayton p.m. Saturday through Monday at the Valent Recreation Noncommissioned Ofcers Club. For information, Center. They promise lots of ghosts, goblins and various cal arb Johnson at 284-4523 or Amy Gross at 287monsters. They invite you to come and get scared. The Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses Club is sponsoring its annual bazaar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. AT AN c wivD D BY Saturday at the Howard Enlisted Members Club. For information, call 284-6874. The Atlantic Community monsters can be found at the -thaunted house 6-10 p.m. todayand Saturday, and 5-9 p.m. t" Sunday in Building 219, Fort Espinar. """ The Army Community Service Relocation Assistance Office helps in the search for housing, employment and educational possibilities for serviceinembers and their family members. Call 2894021/4636 for more information. *Air Force officials in the local military community Monday. The age limit is 12 years old. Teens, 13 years A Welcome to Panama orientation will be held have established guidelines for this year's "Trick or and olderare encouraged to participate in the Directorate 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Nov. 10 at the Fort Davis ConmnuTreat" activities. of Community Activities events. nity Club. The orientation will include an informaOn Howard AFB and Albrook AFS, FortKobbe and People who have a valid installation pass can escort tion fair, free lunch and child care and a tour of the Farfan, the established hours are 5 to 8 p.m. Monday, for five immediate family members only for Trick or TreatAtlantic community. For reservations, call Alina children 12 and younger. ing. People with vehicles registered with the Provost Shoy at 289-4955. People who welcome trick or treaters should leave Marshal Office can drive their vehicles onto any instalAtlantic Youth Services is sponsoring Haltheir porch lights on; all others should leave porch lights lation to an authorized parking area. loween activities Friday-Sunday. The haunted house off. Sponsors are accountable for the behavior of their will be open 6-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 5For more information, call Tech. Sgt. Brenda Graguests whileon the installations. Failureto control guests 9 p.m. Sunday in Building 219, Fort Espinar. A ham at 284-3754/9786. will result in appropriate action taken against the sponsor. children's Haunt treat will be held 3-5 p.m. Sunday All visitors to Army and Navy installations must be at the Fort Davis Club. Other activities will include *The Army and Navy's established hours for "Trick off post no later than 9 p.m. For information, call Master food, games, live entertainment and train rides. or Treating" in the Pacific community are 5-8 p.m Sgt. Scott Carr at 287-3716.

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Tropic Times B 6 Oct. 8. 1994 Rainforest adventure. Nov. 2 and S6 per person. S I5/lamilv. El Valle 6:30 am.-5 p.m. Nv. 5. Rod man 2. $65. 6 a.m. departure. Ex plore Barro Shopping in Panama City,8:30 a.m. Panama City shopping 9 a.m.1 p.m. informationn. TOur ind Trio is: Colorado Island. 3:3() p.m. Nov. 12, $6. Nov. 6. Free Zone shopping trip 7 a.m. No%. Trolling on the Vargas 6 aim. Nov. Vegetable and fruit market shopChiriqui highlands Nov. 10-13. 9, $12. 1-) and 26. 48/peirson. Fish ]or mriin, ping, S am.-1 p.m. Nov. 19. S. *()uidoor Recreation Center: Downtown shopping, 9 min. Nos. I(, I ailfish. dolphin (i Osh), ho $pit, Spanish Horse racing at the Hippodrome, Isla Iguana dive trip Thursday -Nov. 16 and 18 $8. Shop Pinam a' C toal mackeral and more. Fee includes cap noon-4:3)) p.m. Nov. 20. $5. 5, $ 125 for divers, 80 or non-divers. Fee Avenue and Via IEspan. U, linear. lures and it cd cool Thanksgiving in Chiriqui, Nov. 23covers transportation, rustic lodging, Moonlight cruise 0:15 6 .m. Saturday El Valle 7 an. Nov. 13 and 27 $ 12. 27. 8371 single. S245 double. S1 '39 third meals, boat service and three guided dives. and Nov. 12. $21. Cruise out to Ibga Shop lor local haidiCiafts, plants, 1i its Ptrson. Whitewater rafting in Chiriqui Nov. Island forcocktails and hours d otus re s bY ond vegeiabIes and visit niturC pIrserve. Christmas shopping on Central 11-13, $1 3(0/perstn covers transportation. moonlight svhilt v ie wing Panaima Cit 's Bird watching and nature trip, Nov. Avenue 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 28, $4. rustic lodging. meals.equipment and guide. dramatic skyline at nihit. 17, $42/person, includes transportation, *Outtdoor adventures: There is Contadora Island transit serBottomifishing on the Vargas, Sunroat 'guide. and binoculais. Bring Peacock bass fishing in Lake Gatun vice Friday through Monday. Fees are $35 day, Nov. 13 and 27 $S5 adults, $0 sw imsuit and take a dip in the water ll. 5 a.m.-2p.m. Saturday. Wednesday, Nov. adults and $20children 12 and under round children under 14. Fee includes captain, Contadora, Nov. 25-27, $1 79/per12, 15, 20 and 26, $25. Bring fishing gear trip, $25 adults and $15 children one way. gear. live hait and iced coolers. son double occupancy. $21 9/person sinand bags. Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel Two-day deep seas fishing trip, Nov. gle occupancy. $1 35/kids 2I1, includes El Valle horseback riding, 7 a.m.-4 opportunity to Montego Bay Sundays 5-6. Fish the fertile waters of Isla del Rey, transportation, 2nights lodging, all meals p.m. Nov. 6 and 25, $24. through Wednesdays. Packet includes airSanJose andGaleraaboard the42' Vorgas. and drinks, and use of all resort facilities. Gold Panning in Bique, 8 a.m.3 fare, three nights hotel accommodations, $220 fee includes captain, gear and hait. Albrook/Howard p.m. Nov. 9 and 22, $12. and transfer. Prices vary from $3(X)-$600 San Blas Islandsscuba safari, ThursBocas Del Toro weekend trip, Nov. depending on the hotel. day and Nov. 20. $140/person includes *Zodiac Community Activities Cen11-13, $280divers,$260snorkelers. $142 Partial transits of the Panama Canal roundtrip ground transportation. guide. for: children under 12 based on double occuare offered 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays. lunch and scuba gear. Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:3(0 p.m. Fripancy. Fee covers transportation to airThe fee is $35 for adults, $15 for children Portobelo jungle tour. Nov. 4, $60/ days, $13. port., airfare, lodging, meals, live dives, 12 years old and younger. A minimum of person roundtrip transportation, guided El Valle shopping 6:3( a.m.-4:3( entertainment, airtanks and weights. Per20 people is needed for a partial transit any hike of local rainforest, meals. p.m. Sunday. $13. sonal equipment and gratuities not inother day uf tht week. Portobelo. Nov. 5, $70/person inChitre Pottery Shopping, 7 a.i.-7 eluded. Sign-up in advance. Balboa cludes transportation, tours by boat, trip p.m. Tuesday. $20. Drake Island-Snorkeling and Scuto island beaches, lunch and guide. Pollera dancing and dining, 7-Il ba, 7 a.m.5 p.m. Nov. 13 and 27. $22 *Balboa Dive Club: Chiriqui River rafting, Nov. 5-6, p.m. Wednesday and Nov. 16, $6/persnorkelers. $47 divers. The club is accepting new members. $150 includes roundurip transportation, son $15/lamily. BarroColoradoIsland Tour,6a.m.Divers must show a certification card to meals, lodging, rafting and river 1uids. Colonial Panama and Locks Tour, 3p.m. Nov. 17, $65. join. Annual fec is $12. Members receive Panama City tour 9 a.m. Nov. 19 $8. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 5 and 30, $1/person, Clayton a newsletter, use of the club tanks, library San Andres Island, Colombia. Nov. $25/family. and videos for loan, information and class11-14, $286/person includes riundtrip El Valle shopping. 6:3( a*m. -4:3( *Valent RecreatiOn Center: es and dive trips. Call 263-8077 or 260airfare, three nights lodging at the Caribc p. m. No. 6, 813. Adventures in nature jungle walk 8 WX75 or wrtc the club at Unit 0967. APO hotel. tours and most meals. Dining at Tambal, 7-10 p.m. Nov. 9, a.m.-I p.m. Saturday. AA 3402. .I ...............ibr kH d $125. Open water scuba class meets first *Pacific Theatre Arus Centre: Water aerobics for advanced adult and third Monday of each month, $125. Reservations for Christmas Village *Zodiac Community Activities Censwimmers at Howard and Albrook. Includes five pool sessions, five theory tables is under way 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at the ter: *Albrook Auto Skills Center: sessions and four open water dives. Centre. Tae Kwon Do 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Air conditioning service and repair Long set equipment rental $19 per Volunteersand performersareneedThursdays and Fridays. 12:30-5 p.m. daily except Tuesday and day. ed for the upcoming Christmas Village. Beginner and advanced dog obediWednesday. *Valent Recreation Center: People interested in serving as emcee, or ence, Saturday 9-10:15 a.m. $32 for 4 Wheel alignment diagnostic and serPrivatepianoandguitarlessonsavailgroups. live music shows and dancers weeks. vice classes are held 3-9 p.m. Mondays, able weekday evenings. should call 286-3814 to sign up. Beginner and advanced English and Thursdays and Fridays, 10 am.-5 p.m. Korean karate6-8 p.m. Tuesdays and Piano lessons are held 3-7 p.m. MonSpanish is offered monthly. Saturday and Sundays. Thursdays. days, Tuesdays. Wednesdays and Fridays. *Howard and Albrook Youth CenRodman Open to students ages 6 and older. ters.Amador Martialarts6-7:30 p.m.Tuesdays and Gtar -.a ysa:Nav Morale, W fare and RecreThursdays. Open to all ages. Guitar 1-6 p.m. Saturdays at Abrook. *Amnadtr pootl: 5-6pt. edes 4hOffice: efr n h~~~~ lseseogig Spanish41-5 p.m. TluesdaysandI ThUrsWater aerobics 5-6 p.m. Wednesato fe:The following classs arc ongoing: S s 4k p The Navy MWR is seeking qualified Jazz 15-6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Albrook. days, 9-10 a.m. Saturday. $16 for eight instructorstoteach Spanish and French days $3 / Martial arts at H oward arid Albrook scssions.isrcosttehSpnhadFech ay 32 languagectiurses. Applicantsshouldhave Jazz II 6-7 p.m. Mondays and / 284-47(Y). Swim classes are cancelled until Dcprior experience in teaching elementary Wednesdyas. $32. *Howard and Albrook pools cemnber.adci esl ollrgu-oms Cl Intro to scuba, free, call for appoint-andonersatinallaiguaecurses Call Voice 3-5:30 p.m. Wednesdays and ment o Clayton 283-4301. Thursday. Open water scuba, Nov. 7 at Al*Fort Clayton Pool: Curundu ar6dance5 n. Tuesdys brook, Nov. 21 at Howard, $145. All swimming classes will be discon*Twin Oceans Pro Shop: and Fndas Advanced scuba, Nov. I6at Albrook. tinted until December because of inThe Pro Shop will soon be moved Salsa and Merengue 7-8 p.m. Mon$105. clement weather. next to the boat and scuba rental shop days. Rescue scuba, Nov. 29 at Howard, *Foit Clayton Biat/SCuba Shop: in Fort Clayton Dance and music are available. Showtim Tikletheivo iesThe H oward Riding Stables is sponsoring Harvest Showtim TikletheivoiesFestival pony rides, 9 a.m.-I p.m. Nov. 5 at the *Theatre Guild of Ancon: *National Thcatre of Panamna: stables. There is a $1 fee for the pony rides. There will The musical comedy Nunscnsc 11 runs through Nov. 5 at Israeli pianist, Amiram Rigai, will play works from he a baked goods sale and drinks available at the the Theatre Guild of Ancon. Curtain time is 8 p.m., tickets arc Such musicians as Bach, Tausig, Chopin and Beethoven stables. Come dressed as a cowpoke or in any halloween $8, call 252-6786 for reservations. during a concert at 8 p.m. Monday at the National costume. *Pacific Theatre Arts Center: Theatre of Panama. Those members holding tickets for The family musical Bye, bye Birdie opens 8 p.m. today at the 1 995 season arc eligible to get one free licket. For tln the Pacific'Thcatre Arts Center. The 7how runs through Nov. information, call 225-4951. Zodiac CommUnit Activity Center: 12. Tickets arc $10, call 286-3 152 to reservations. Ba ki h a eThe Zodiac Community Activity Centerwill present Editor's note: See page BI and B3 for story and Ba ki h a dea hair and clothing show 6-11l p~rm. Nov. 12. Door photos. HHoward Riding Stables prizes will he awarded. There is a $5 Hev. Sho ti e Tckl th ioris Fstial on ries,9 am.-p~t. uuv S t te7 *ThetreGuid mf Actun *NtitnalThetreof Pnam: sabls. hereis $1feeforthepuin ries.Thee 'viX Th ouscl uiey uneseIIrin trtuh mv.5 t saei initAirniRga, il la utrk rtntbeabaedgmus ae nddins vilbl t he5

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Tropic Times ties Oct 28 1994 Phone guide 0 AV Z7 Pacific 24th Services S iuadron Sports and Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107 Aibrook Auto Craft Shop, 280-3613 Aibrook Club 280-4 128 / Aibrook Riding Stables 297-44 11/3333/ I// Aibrook Thrift Shop _285-5989. (co"t*y ph*t*) Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-(X)75 Row, row, row your boat CanalCrafers2864500 A couple enjoy an afternoon of canoeing on a placid stream. A variety of boating trips are offered Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957 through recreation and travel offices. Check the Tropic Times and call the office in your Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 canClayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 community about upcoming events. CatnNOCu,2738 / Clayton NC() Club_ 287-3586 17 -7 Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 A -/ -~ ~/ -/ / / Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355/ // ,,~~// / /'/// ~ <'<~./~ / ./. /// Club Amador, 282-3534 Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010 *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Book sale Sunday and Monday. Nov. 17. $5, Learn many applica Coroial Thrift Shop, 285-5989 Centr: 25 percent offall Colorpoint books. tions for rubber stamps. Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 The Ceramic Center, Building Multi-colored floss and flower Clay Flower Classes, I I a.m.Howard Enlisted Members' Club. 284-4107 198, islocated near the Crafts Shop. thread sale Nov. 4 and 5. Take 25 2 p.m. Saturdays. $5 plus supplies Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680 *Canal Crafters: percent off. For all levels. Howard Riding Stables 284-3770 Canal Crafters is a volunteer Clay flower class. I I a.m.2 Ongoing classes, stained glass Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361 organization providing scholarp.m. Saturdays, $5 plus supplies. framing, air brush, lamp assembly > Howard Teen Center. 284--47 ships for the community. HandFor all levels. pottery wheel throwing,cross stitch Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-451(0 made arts and crafts are availOil painting class. 9 a.m.-noonmacrame, clay flower. ceramic and The Loop. 287-3035 able, consignments and volunteers Wednesday, $30plus supplies. Four "how to" videos. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 are welcome. The shop hours are 10 weeks. Anyone interested in forming a A Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-438 a.m.2 p.m. Monday through SaturStained glass class, 4-7 p.m. craft club to meet and share ideas, Rodman Annex 283-5475 day. The shop is now accepting Saturday, $20 plus supplies, patterns. socializing, and more call Rodman Club. 283-4498 holiday consignments, Building Beginningpottery, 10:30-12:30 84-6361 or leave your name and Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 804. Albrook. p.m., begins Tuesday,$15 plussupnumber at the Skills Development Rodman Naval Station Information Tour Register forthefollowing classplies. Class meets Tuesday and Center. and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454 es atthe shop: Thursday for three weeks. The center is looking for / Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 Perforatedpaper,cross-stitch, Photo album class, 10:30-1:30 crafters to sell items in the new Valent Recreation Center, 287-65(X) Christmas card, 10:15 a.m. Tucsp.m. Nov. 8. $5 plus supplies. Learn consignment boutique. Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-6161 day, $5, all supplies included, how to make beautiful covers for Instructorsareneeded totcach Cross-stitchdemo,angel, 10:15 great gifts. classes on a contract basis for a Atlantic a.m. Nov. 11, free, bring supplies. Drybrushing class, 1-4 p.m. variety of crafts, decorative paint*Howard Skills Development Nov. 8, $5. Prep work necessary ing, calligraphy, watercolors and Aquativity Center, 289-4(X)9 Center: before class. oil painting. Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201 TheHowardSkillsDevelopment Brushstroke class, 1-3 p.m. *FortShermanMulticraltCcn Davis Community Club, 289-5160 Center now accepts charges on Nov. 9, $5. Learn techniques used ter: Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 club cards from the Howard/Alfor ceramics or tole painting. Woodworking qualification Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077 brook Officers' and Enlisted Clubs. Paper caper basket class, classes Saturdays, free. Class covSherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313 Center will be closed Thursday 10:30-1:30 p.m. Nov. 12, $5 plus ers safe and correct use of wood Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104 in observance of Panamaian Indesupplies. Make baskets using boxshop equipment. Qualification Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/330 psndence Day and Nov. 11 in ob es and paper ribbon. cards will be issued after course servance of Veterans DStamping Class, 6:30-8:30 p.m. completion. '/xZ// +Valent Recreation Center: Haunted House Saturday. Veteran's Day weekend special, Nov. and delivery service. Open I1 a.m.-5 p.m. Effective Monday the center will be *Cocoli Community Center: 11-13, rent a three-man tent, sleeping bag, MondaysFridays. I I a.m.3 p.m. Saturopen 12:30-9:30 p.m. daily. Videos for children 4 p.m. Thursdays. and lantern for $6.25 a day. $9 for the days. It is in the Zodiac Community ActivThe screening room offers free movLaser disc movies 7 p.m. Fridays. weekend. itics Center. Phone in orders by calling ics. Call the 24-hour movie line, 287-4367 *Sports and Recreation Rental Center Nov. 7-12 special, rcntcooking utensils 284-5848, fax to 284-6109. for days and times. Panamanian Independence Day speat half price. Rent the activities room and the Big Volunteersage18and olderareneedcial, Wednesday-Nov. 4, free ice fill-up *Zodiac Community Center: Tree Bohio for parties or any other funeed to perform as horror characters for the with rental of a 16-quart cooler. Subs on Top offers eat-in, take out tion. /I E/ //1 M Atlantic news Portobello/ Playa Langosta Nov. 5. Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays and Friaid, CPR. yoga, martial arts, various Atlantic tours Rio Mar Nov. 6. days. sports, English. Spanish and dog obedi*Sundial Recreation Center: Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. ence. El Valle 5:30 am. Sunday. R center news Wednesdays. The center is open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Free Zone 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday. *Sundial Recreation Center Piano 10:30-1 1 a.m. Wednesdays. daily. Isla Grande 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 6. Rock, mineral and seashell exhibit, Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6 p.m. The center offers deep sea fishing Panama City historical tour 8 a.m.-5 Saturday-Sunday. Thursdays. charters. Call 289-6402 for more inforp.m. Nov. 7. Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. Mon*Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: mation. *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: days. The center is looking for instructors People areneeded tolinehandletranRemon Race Track 8 a.m. Saturday. Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mondays, to teach the following classes: cooking, siting boats from Cristobal to Balboa. El Valle 5 a.m. Sunday. Wednesdays and Fridays. dance, arts and crafts, music, aerobics, first Sign up now. Call for details. 77 / //

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Tropic Times B8 Oct. 28, 1994 Movies Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7pm: The Little 2pm: The Little 2pm: Wagons East 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: Natural Born 7pm: Milk Money 7pm: Blankman 284-3583 Rascals (PG) Rascals (PG) (PG-13) (PG-13) Killers (R) (PG-13)Melanie (PG-13) Damon Travis Tedford, Travis Tedford, John Candy, John Candy, Woody Harrelson, Griffith, Ed Harris Wayans, David Alan Bug Hall Bug Hall Richard Lewis Richard Lewis Juliette Lewis 9pm: A Good Man in Grier 9pm: Natural Born 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: Wagons East 9pm: Natural Born 9pm: True Lies A frica (R) Sean 9pm: A Good Man in Killers (R) (PG13) (PG-13) Killers (R) (R) Arnold Connery, Colin Friels Africa (R) Sean Woody Harrelson, John Candy, John Candy, Woody Harrelson, Schwarzenegger, Connery, Colin Friels Juliette Lewis Richard Lewis Richard Lewis Juliette Lewis Jamie Lee Curtis 9pm: Natural Born 9pm: Natural Born Killers (R) Killers (R) Woody Harrelson, Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis Juliette Lewis Fort Clayton 7pm: Clear and 2pm: Clear and 2pm: Angels in the 7pm: Color of Night 7pm: Angels in the 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: The Little Present Danger (PGPresent Danger (PGOutfield (PG) Danny (R) Bruce Willis, Jane Outfield (PG) Danny (PG13) John Candy, Rascals (PG) Travis 287-3279 13) Harrison Ford, 13) Harrison Ford Glover, Tony Danza March Glover, Tony Danza Richard Lewis Tedford, Bug Hall William Defoe 7pm: Clear and 7pm: Clear and 9:15pm: Clear and 9pm: Clear and Present 9pm: Natural Born 9:30pm: Wagons 9pm: Color of Night Present Danger (PGPresent Danger (PGPresent Danger (PGDanger (PG-13) Killers (R) Woody East, (PG13) John (R) Bruce Willis, Jane 13) Harrison Ford 13) Harrison Ford, 13) Harrison Ford, Harrison Ford, William HarrelsonJulliette Candy, Richard Lewis March 9:45pm: Speed (R) William Defoe William Defoe Defoe Lewis Keanu Reeves, Dennis 9:30pm: Color of Hopper (Reduced Night (R) Bruce Admission) Willis, Jane March Fort Davis 7pm: Andre (PG) 2pm: The Mask (PG7pm: Andre (PG) 7pm: In the Arrny Now 7pm: The Mask (PG7pm: Color of Night 7pm: Clear and Keith Carradine, Tina 13) Jim Carney, Keith Carradine, Tina (PG) Pauly Shore, Lori 13) Jim Carrey, (R) Bruce Willis, Present Danger (PG289-SI73 Mojoring Richard Jeni Majoring Petty Richard Jeni Jane March 13) Harrison Ford, 9pm: The Mask (PG7pm: In the Army 9pm: The Mask (PGWilliam Dafoe 13) Jim Carrey, Now (PG) Pauly Shore, 13) Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni Lori Petty Richard Jeni 9pm: The Mask (PG13) Fort Sherman 7pm: True Lies 7pm: Andre (PG) 7pm: In the Army No show No show No show 7pm: Color of Night 289-5173 (R) Arnold Kieth Carradine, Tina Now (PG) Pauly (R) Bruce Willis, Jane Schwarzenegger, Mojoring Shore, Lori Petty March Jamie Lee Curtis Fort Amador 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: A Good Man in 7:30pm: Milk Money No show No show No show 7pm: Natural Born 284-3583 (PG-13) John Candy, Africa (R) Sean (PG-13) Melanie Killer (R) Woody Richard Lewis Connery, Colin Friels Griffith, Ed Harris Harrelson, Julliette Lewis NoVA gso OVI$ Nov. 4 Andre Th Mask-k H d F ~ ~~~~~Keith Carradine, Tina Majorino JmCreRcadJn An amazing true story of the seal that became -Nobody does super powers like Jim Currey. Howard AFB a living legend. An adorable newborn seal is An ordinary, maild-mannered bank clerk is orphaned after his mother is caught in a fishtransformed into the weirdest super hero of 7pm Milk Money (PIG-13) e a'se.Teppisnsdbakthalhall time when he dons his mask. PG-13 Melanie Griffith by the animal loving Whitney family, who (some stylized violence) 1 hr, 40 min. Ed Harris name him Andre. PG (teen mischief, mild vi9 p T ueLis R)olence, language) I hr, 34 min. A O I NMilk Money 9 pm True Lies (R) -neagaeMelanie Griffith, Ed Harris Arnold Blankman Melanie Griffith is a streetwise woman who Schwarzenegger Damon Wayans, David Alan Grier AR IC A rescues lhree young boys. The boys drifted Tom Arnold He's got no super powers, no money and no into the city from rural locales in hopes of name. He's BLANKMAN, a self-appointed Deep in he heart of Ah iCa seeing a living, breathing, naked woman. super hero who's so broke he fights crime in tle Briti'l practice bizarre r als PG-13 (sexual themes) I hr, 42 min. Fort Cla ton his long johns. PG-13 (off-color humor) 1 Fr, 32 min. Natural Born Killers 7pm The Little Rascals Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis (PG) Travis Tedford, Clear & Present Danger This is the saga of Mickey and Mallory Bug Hall Harrison Ford, Willem Dafoe Knox, two thrill-killers who truly enjoy In this movie adaptation of the Tom Chay their work. They live in a interesting zone: 9pm Natural Born Killers novel, Jack Ryan (Harrison Ford) finds hcmpillowlalk and ultra-violence; insanity and (R) Woody self once again drawn into global intrigue. comedy: demons and heroes. R (violence. This time lie's up against a Colombian drug shocking images, language, sex) 2 hrs. Harrelson, Juliette cartel. Also features Ann Archer and James Lewis Earl Jones. PG-13 (action, violence, IanSpeed guage) 2 hrs, 22 min Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper LAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played by Fort Davis Color of Night Starts Saturday at Fort Amador and WednesKeanu Reeves, is known as a man with an Bruce Willis, Jane March day at the Howard AFB theater. attitude. Dennis Hopper, the sociopath who 7pm Clear and Present haunted by the bizarre suicide of a patient, story of a man assigned to a newly indepennearly killed him before, is back for an exDanger (PG-13) New York psychologist Dr. Bill Capa (Bruce dent African state. Hie wants out, but a coiplosive reunion. R (violence, language) RarrisonForit Willis) abandons his successful practice and plicated political situation inspires it to relocates to Los Angeles. lis encounters stay. R (language and sexuality) I r, 36 mii. Willem Dafoe there prove as shocking as the chilling event True Lies 9:45pm Color of Night (R) he has run away from. ie immediately finds In the Army Now Arnold Schwarzenegger riiself entangled in an explosive sexual reIHarry Fasker is a special agent for Omega Bruce Willis lationship with a beautiful and enigmtatic Pauly Shore, Lori Petty Sector, a top secret agency charged with Jane March woman named Rose, and the investigation Pauly Shore is not the ideal troop. i fact, lhe nuclear terrorism intervention. Fluent in six into the brutal stabbing murder of a friend joined the Army Reserves or the bennies and languages and skilled in all forms of counter and colleague. R (sexuality, violence, lanthe regular salary. Reality kicks in when he intelligence. Harry is an international spy Fort Sherm an gsuage) 2 rs becomes a part of a mission evolving actual who has kept his real profession secret from combat. PG (some war action, mild language) his wife. R (action, violence, language) 2 7pm The Mask (PG43) A Good Man in Africa 1 hr, 31 mim. hr 42 min. Ju Carrey Sean Connery, Colin Friels Scan Connery is a reluctant diplomat in this The Little Rascals Wagons East Travis Tedford, Bug Hall John Candy, Richard Lewis Fort Amador eginning saturday, admission Steven Spielberg produces an appealing upPhil taylor (Richard Lew is) is a FrontiersThe Mask PG-3) for first run movies will increase date of the Hat Roach comedy series troin man who rallies discontented neighbors to 7pm ( ) to S3 for adults, $1.50 for the '20s, '30s and '40s. The gang has estableave the West and return East. James Jim Carrey children. Second run movies will lished a boy's only club, but things change Ilarlow (John Candy) is the hard-drinking be $2.50 for adults, $1.25 for when Alfalfa falls for Darla. PG (language) wagon master hired to lead the convoy East. children. I hr, 22 min, PG-13 (off-color humor) I hr, 47 min.

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TV Schedule Oct. 28, 1994 C a e s* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30 Headline News 6:00 Real Videos 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 3:00 "Aliens" 5:00 Headline News 6.00 Good Morning America 7:00 Nvy/Marine Corps News 6:30 The Hour Of Power 6:00 Headline News 6:00 Headline News 5:30 NBC News at Surise 5:30 NBC News at Surise w/ Panama Now (7:25) 7:30 Channel One! Newsroom 7:00 Take 2 6:30 NBC News at Sun 6:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 tHeadtine News 6:00 Headlme News 8:(K Basic Training Workout 8:00 Gals 7:30 The 700 Club 7:00 Good Morning America 7:00 Good Morning America 6:30 NBC News at Sunrise 7:00 Good Morning America 8.30 Sesame Street 8:30 Just for Kids! 8:00 This Old House 9:00 Basic Training Workout .w/Paunana Now ( 7:25) 7:00 Good Morning America w/ Panama Now (7:25 ) 9:30 Portrait of America Mappet Babies 9:00 CBS Sunday Morning 9:30 Sesae Street 9:00 Bodysttaping w/ ParsNow (7:25) 9:00 Bodyshapig 10:25 Giding Light Teenage Mutant Nuija 10:30 Ttis Week With Brinkley 10:25 Guiding Light 9:30 Sesame Street 9:00 Basic Training Workout 9:30 Sesame Street 1110 General Hospital Turtles 11:30 Face the Nation 11:10 General Hospita 10:25 Guiding Light 9:30 Sesane Street 10:25 Guiding Light 12.00 Headline News Break Biker Mice Prom Mars 12:00 Inside the NFL 12:00 Headline News 11:10 General Hospital 10:25 Guiding Light 11:10 General Hospital 1225 Panaa Now Batun Cartoon 1:00 Movies:" A Disney 1230 Sports Machine 12:00 Headine News Break 11:10 General Hospital 12:00 Headline News Break 12:30 Sportsenter 10:30 -Faerie Tale Theater Halloween Treat" 1 00 Oprah Winfrey 12:25 Panana Now 12:00 Headline News Break 12:25 Panama Now 1:00 Another World 11:00 College Football: Colorado 2:00 "The Monster Squad" 2:00 Another World 12:30 Sportscenter 12:25 Pananma Now 12:30 Sportsecenter 2:00 Oprah Winfiey vs Nebraska 3:30 Ken Burn's "Baseball" 3:00 Price is Right 1:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 12:30 Sportscenter 1:00 Donahue 3:00 Price is Right 2:30 College Football: Ohio Sixth hating "The Nation 4:00 Guts 2:00 Another World 1:00 Oprah Winfiey 2:00 Another World 4:00 Think Fast! State vs Penn State al Past Time" 4:30 1 Love Lucy 3:00 Price is Right 2:00 Another World 3:00 Price is Right 4:30 1 Love Lucy 5:30 Headline News 6:00 Hearts Afir 5:00 Family Feud 4:00 Reading Rainbow 3:00 Price is Right 4:00 Mister Rogers 5:00 Family Feud 6:00 College Football: Georgia 6:30 Dr. Quinn: Medtcite 5:30 TIte Cosby Show 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:00 Shining Time Station Neighborhood 5:30 The Cosby Show vs Florida Wotma 600 SCN Evening Report 5:00 Family Feud 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lacy 6:00 SCN Evening Report 9:30 Ken Barn's "Baseball" 7:30 Mini Series: "The Return 615 Headline Break 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:00 Family Fend 5:00 Family Feud 6:15 Headline News Break Fiflh Inning "Shadow Ball' To Lotesome Dove P1 3 6:30 World News Tonight 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:30 World News Tonight 11:50 Saturday Night Live of 4" 7.00 Jeopardy 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 Headline News 7:00 Jeopardy 1:00 WWF Superstars of Wres 9:00 ABC 20/20 7:25 Panama Now 6:30 World News Tonight 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 World News Tonight 7:25 Pama Now tling 10:00 Top Cops 7:30 Entertainment Tonigit 7:00 Jeopardy 6:30 World News Tonight 7:00 Jeopardy 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 2:00 Movies:"Psycho" 11:00 Miami Vice 800 Mad About You 7:25 Panama Now 7:00 Jeopardy 7:25 Panama Now 8:00 America's Funniest 4:00 "Frenzy" 12:00 Movie:"De:verance 8:30 Cops 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:25 Panama Now 7:30 Entertainmaent Tonight People 2:00 "Magnum Force" 9:00 60 Minutes 8:00 L.A. Law + 7:30 Entertaimnent Tonight 8:00 ALF 8:30 Evening Shade 4:00 Videolinks 1000 SCN Late Edition 9:00 Northera Exposure 8:00 Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air 8:30 Touched By An Angel 9:00 I the Heal of the Night 5:00 Headline News 10:05 Cheers 10:00 SCN Late Edition 8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 9:30 Love and War 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:30 David Letteran 10:05 Cheers 9:30 Culture Clash 10:00 Cheers 10:05 Cheers 11:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Letterman 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:30 David Lonerman 10:30 David Letterman 12:30 Nightline 11:30 Tonight Show 10:05 Cheers 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 1:00 Movies:"The Unforgiven" 12:30 Nightline 10:30 David Letterman 12:30 Nightline 12:30 Ren and Stipy 3:05 "One, Two, Three" 1:00 Movies:"Wait Until Dark" 11:30 Tonight Show 1:00 Movies:"Warlock" 1:00 Movies:"Starflight One" 5:00 Headline News 12:30 Nightline 3:00 "The Fly" 3:00 "Conan the Barbarian" 1:00 Movies:"Iie Hard" 5:00 Headline News 4:40 "Conan the Destroyer" 3:00 "Predator" C e ce 1 Mature Theme an Series Begins **Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 Simulcast o/ Ch. 8 & 10 6:30 Siulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10 6:00 Waslington Week in Re 6:30 Simulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10 6:30 Simulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10 6:30 Simulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10 6:30 Simulcast w/ Ch. 8 & 10 8:00 Opmb Winfrey 8:30 Young Adult Theater view 9:00 Oprah Winfrey 9:00 Donahue 9:00 Oprah Wifry 9:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 9:00 Today "Bugs Bunny 6:30 Mister Roger's 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 11:00 Star Trek** Howl-O-Weet" Neighborhood ** 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headlie News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Head'e News Break 12:00 Headline News Break "Which Witch is Which?" 7:00 Quigley's Village 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Paama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now "The Haunting of 7:25 Goof Troop 12:30 All My Childre 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Clindren 12:30 All My Children Harrgton House" 7:45 Mappet Babies 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 Oe Life to Live 1:30 Be Life to Live 1:30 Be Life to Live "ThIe Peanaut Butfer 8:10 Disney's the Little Mer 2:30 Youatg and the Restless 2:30 Young atd the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless Solution" .,aid 3:30 Batttm 3:30 Bobby's World 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Muppet Babies 3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja 11:35 Chaunel One! Nesvsroott 8:30 Batmats 4:00 Fraggle'Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Reek Turtles 12:05 Silver Spoons 8:50 Bobby's World 4:30 TheAdventuresofPete& 4:30 Legends of the Hidden 4:30 Guts 4:30 Nick Arcade 4:00 Fraggle Reck 12:30 Movies: 9:10 Teenage Mutant Ninja Pete Temple-* 5:00 Beakman's World 5:00 The Facts of Life 4:30 Reading Raitbow "Midnight Madness" Tartles 5:00 In the Mix 5:00 Disney's Raw Toonage 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Silver Spoons "Pee Wee's Big 9:30 Movie: "Glhostbussers Bt" 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 Headhie News Break 5:30 Showbiz Today Adventure" 12:00 TIs Old Hoase 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 CBS Eveentg News 6:00 SCN Evening Report 4:00 21 Jump Street 12:30 NFL Pre-Game Show 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headlite News Break 6:30 CBS Eventg News 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 6:15 Headline News Break 5:00 Sports Special 1:00 NFL: Kanas City Chiefs 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 CBS Evening Nes 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:00 Doctor, Doctor vs Buffalo Bills 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 7:55 Panama Now 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 6:30 Dinosaars 4:00 NFL: Seattle Seahawks Nine Nite 7:55 Panana Now 8:00 Boy Meets World Nine 7:00 Seaquest DSV** vs San Diego Chargers 7:55 Panama Now 7:55 Panama Now 8:00 Sinbad Show 8:30 Johit Larroquette 7:55 Pana Now 8:00 Star Trek: "Deep Space 7:00 Halloween Special: "A 8:00 MacGyver** 8:00 Home Inprovementt 8:30 Family Matters 9:00 Dateline 8:00 Rosearne Nine" Disney H'lalloween" 9:00 Monday Night Football: 8:30 My So Called Life 9:00 Wise Guy 10:00 L A. Law 8:30 The Boys Are Back 9:00 Me and the Boys 8:00 NFL: Pittsburgh Steelers Green Bay Packers vs (New Fall Series) 10:00 SCN Late Edition 11:00 Headline News (New Fall Series) (New Fall Series) vs Arizona Cardials Chicago Bears 9:30 Frasier 10:05 Tomr of Duty 11:30 Ceers 9:00 Primetine Live 9:30 Married With Children 11:00 The Fresh Prince of 12:00 M*A*S*H* 10:00 SCN Late Edition 11:00 Headline News 12:00 M*A*S*H* 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 Movie:"Friglht Night" Bel Air-+ 12:30 Nigtline 10:05 Heartbeat 11:30 Cheers 12:30 Nightline 10:05 Renegade 12:00 Headline News 11:30 Pheuom + 1:00 CNN Presents 11:00 Headlite News 12:00 M*A*S*H* 1:00 Eye to Eye W/ Cotite 11:00 Headite News 12:30 Science and Technology 12:00 Eye To Eye W/ C. Chong 2:00 Headttise News 11:30 Clteers 12:30 Nightline Chung 11:30 Nighthise Week 1:00 Headlbe News 2:30 Sports Latenight 12:00 M*A*S*H* 1:00 NBC Now 2:00 Headline News 12:00 Cheers 1:00 The McLaughlin Group 1:30 Meet dte Press 3:00 David Lettenman 12:30 Nightline 2:00 Headline News 2:30 Sports Latenight 12:30 M*A*S*H 1:30 Sports Latenight 2:30 Sports Machie 4:00 Headline News 1:00 Dateline 2:30 Sports Latenight 3:00 David Leottrman 1:00 Headline News 2:00 Entertainment This week 3:00 Sports Latenight 4:30 Whsed 0 Fortne 2:00 Headline News 3:00 David Lotterfma 4:00 Headline News 1:30 Sports Latenight 3:00 Headlise News 3:30 Frugal Gourmet 5:00 Jeopardy 2:30 Sports Latesight 4:00 Heodlhie News 4:30 Wheel of Fort-se 2:00 David Letterman 3:30 Saturday Night Live 4:00 Headhite News 5:30 Dotalue 3:00 David Letterman 4:30 Wheel of Fortune 5:00 Jeopardy 3:00 Headlite News 5:00 Videoinks 4:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:00 Headline News 5:00 Jeopardy 3:30 Military News 5:30 Headline News Break 5:00 Jeopardy 4:30 Whel of Fortune 5:30 Sally Jesse Raphael 4:00 Tom & Jerry Kids 5:30 Oprah Winfrey 5:00 Jeopardy 4:30 Tiny Toons Adventures 5:30 Oprat Winfrey 5:00 CRO 5:30 Videol'iks Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Sports Sports College Football NFL football Colorado Buffalos vs Nebraska Cornhuskers 11 a.m. Saturday Kansas City Chiefs vs Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Sunday Ohio State Buckeyes vS Penn State Nittany Lions 2:30 p.m. Saturday Seattle Seahawks vs San Diego Chargers 4 p.m. Sunday Georgia Bulldogs vs Florida Gators 6 p.m. Saturday Pittsburgh Steelers vs Arizona Cardinals 8 pin. Sunday Miniseries Green Bay Packers vs Chicago Bears 9 p.m. Monday Return To Lonesome Dove (Part 3 of 4) 7:30 p.m. Sunday Series starts Clara Allen loses her ranch in a blazing fire, but all of her horses are saved. She teams "Heartbeat" up with Gideon Walker and heads for Montana where Woodrow Call waits to realize 10 p.m. Tuesday his vision of breeding horses in the Big Sky country. The physicians must deal with a Surrogate mother who refuses to give up the child she Late night movies was carrying for an infertile couple and Eve is threatened by a patient's boyfriend Saturday Tuesday when she discovers he carries the AIDS virus. "Conan the Barbarian" 3 a.m. "The Unforgiven" I a.m. Halloween specials Arnold Schwarzenegger is a swordClint Eastwood returns to his gunfighting "Bugs Bunny Howl-O-Ween" 8:30 a.m. Saturday wielding warrior seeking vengence. days after the death of his wife. "Which Witch is Which?" 9 a.m. Saturday Sunday Wednesday "A Disney Halloween" 7 p.m. Sunday "Psycho" 2 a.m. "Aliens" 3 a.m. Prime time movies Anthony Perkins stars in Alfred Sigourney Weaver returns to battle the "Fright Night" Hitchcock's classis thriller. fiercest aliens encountered by humans. 10 p.m. Saturday Monday Thursday It's Dracula-versus-the-teenagers time when an average kid named Charley begins to "Deliverance" midnight "Die Hard" I a.m. suspect the guy next door is actually tlie descendant of a certain thirsty count from Burt Reynolds gets more than he barBruce Willis is the "fly in the ointment" Transylvania. gained for on a weekend canoe trip. for a group off terrorists. Stars: William Ragsdale and Chris Sarandon.

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10 TropcTime_ ds_ _ B10 O8 i94 Classified Ads bodygd,ied,sheadgasket,$900bo lloward 204-638. prograis, printer and desk, St,000 284--5538 aller 5pm. 284-4989. Duty-free mnerc andIse 991 Hundu C c -1 E7s, da, we6cp'erqa FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office)-As a reminder, d 5 j Centiied FCC provider ot Cnrudii -..282-3030 in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern TCoOt Corolla. ii, ar low mi, am/!Ou/ lasopeiigsforlhoirly drop-ofls. 286RCA 20" color TV, S250; Kay ir cass,, dtypd. 2bI-u37. 3790 for Becky. 8088 CPU mo~mtor, EpsonFX8SprnnCommand regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, oes d$200 263 3280 ca ot be given, transferred or general Sold to non-privile CJ-7 e Laredo pkage, d Reiable ved, soe eng t rnd, $6,080. 252-5024. w/ kids, honest. 287-3878. Nintendo, gun, 2 controUers, 8 games, ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu1992 "ned meiL 1),, ib an/ Maid babysittr Moi, Wed Fri mid gane $115. 289-4249 tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes li/cass, 5 sted, 4 cyt, $7,000. 284weekends, ref asail. 286-3273 Epson XTid 11 laptop comps, $300 permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. 4634. I mue act ctassesa ater color, nl mid $20285-590t. Before such a sale,it is strongly recommended that the seller contact 1983 JeepCJ-7 4x4,ps,cass,rusgd, acrytirbitingualinstracter.260-3433. CD Ro inter active gaine the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117. $3,000. 287-6138. Ceig weinmi /o fmmiy 15 yr, L'asmtwer Man, iew, $25. 284I 988 VW trck, 4 spd, gas, tinot dty pd, avail Thrs, honest, self imontivator, $28 -7-small, $2,200. 252-2885. day. 283-6425 for Toni. Mitsumi CD ROn W/iiterface card css, alant, tnt ty pd, 46k tnt te. cmper sielt, $3,580 ieg 256.and cables, lots of software, never An i nabs d eimer, stand. 287-5728. 6407. _987 Ford Tempo, 2 dr, 5 spd, amn/fm/ Customized photography by appt, famnsed, $200. 289-5942. .oss,gd cond,econ,$3,380.2874772. idies, wedditigs, formats. 2844392. Rtiweiters, 2wks otd, ats docked, Jeep, 6 cyl, dty pd, new tires, brakes, 1991 Hymodai XL 4dr sedan, low it, -Kenwood CD player DP-M7740 w/ dewonied, $5s0 d 235-4t9. exhaust, paint, top, will trade for truck ac, cass, dty pd, $6,000. 252-61 10. 1977 VW bos, 2k cc etg, solid coid, Live-in maid, bilingual, clean, care remote, holds 7 eds, loaded, $215. dew____d,__5__._235-4_90. or car, $2,995. 283-5723. gri mpg, will finance to servicememforkids,laundry, ironhonesttdwker 287-5985. p994 Jeep Cherokee, $18,500. 194 her, $2,500 obo. 2824489 for Eric. 228-2909 for limeda. Toy French poodle puppies, 6 wk 1994 Subaru limpreza, 5 spd, not dty VW Quantum, at, radio/cass, 4dr, dty Nintendo Game Boy W/7 games, reold, dewormed, parents 4 lbs, CCP pd, 4 dr, ac, am/fi/cass, exc cond, pd, $3,000. 287-3335. 1988JeepCoimtmiche4x4,Kenwood To all Jewish persons interested in chargerpack,carryingcase,$t0/obo. registered, $225. 226-5395. $t),500. 230-1001. am/in/cass, ac, ps, pb, new tires, sport Hanukah party. 260-8008. 286-3t22 after 6pm. German, Shepard nix puppies, $401986 Ford Escort, 1.91 eng, 5 spd, ouns wheels, be 26 t-64 18,2632afe p. German Shepard tie puppies, $4C 1988 Ford Escort, 4 cyl, anto, new get, not diy pd, $2,200. 287-5288. t Trail rides, reasonable rates. 252-2889 SegaGenesis,2 wotrollers,laser gu, mle, $30 female, ready now. 283tires, gd coutd, will trade for truck, 1985 Mitsubishi Lmcer, 5 spd, mi/ after 6pm. t games, storage cabinet, $200/oho. 3499$2,995. 283-5723. 1978 Chevy Classic Supreme, new fm, dty pd, 4 di, exc cond, $2,700. 286 3t22 paint, auto, gd cond, dty pd. 264261-2525 Day maid, M-F, exc childcare, spk -312 Purebred Dalmations, 2 males, be"t1993 Ford Explorer Sport 4x4, 5 spd, 8720. Eng, ref. 287-4280, 6-9pm. tifnt qitabity, $200 c., 289-4t66. Tandy compt /motito, CM2, mode loaded w/ sut roof, extras, 12k i, 1980 Honda Accord, 2 dr, $2,000 neg. 1000, $700 267-6930 for Lizbethl. Akita female pnppy, white w/ gy like new, $21,500. 282-4473. 1994 Chrysler Lebaron GTC, 2 d 2854659 Honest, maturedependabe, get workkig 2.5a innppy, CCwrehiter t i cot, 3.01 mpi, v6, 4spd anto, etect er, grt w/ kids, Span spk maid, ref CD Rom drive, Plextor 2X, new, nmark gs, 2.5 mo old, CC860. gisered, 1991 Nissan Maxima, loaded, leather trms, al brakes, tilt steer, $15,50. 1984 SO Btazer 4x4, auto, stereo, avail, M-F. 282-3326 opened, I will help you install it, $275. $500. 29-560. _seats, spoiler, Bose stereo syst, 21k 284-4991. alarm, exc cond, new paint, no rust> 294-3132 pit Bnll, m ute, 8 mo old, $150. mi, like iem, $16,500. 286-6346. $5,250 obo. 2864734. Reliable live-in babysitter, housekeep233-1342. 1990 Ford Bronco 11, ps, ph, am/On! er, w/re. 286-4393 for Patricia. Typewriter, IBM correcting selectric -1989 Chevy Camaro RS, v6, auto, tcass, XLT pack, iinac wht ext, 1988 318i BMW, 2 dr, sun roof, am/ L in gd cond. 252-2506. 10 wk old kitteti free, loving, playful, tops, new paint, $6,000. 230-1926 $15,000. 260-3433. emcass, ac, 5 spd, not dty pd, Euro Eng spk live out maid, M-F, care for g w/ kids. 286-6175. eveig. 1989 VW Golf, 4d, 5 spo, uni., mit specs, $7,500. 261-6119. baby, off post. 228-8503. IBM PS12, full of games and gd softDuberman, 6 mo old, has shots, tail 1990 Chevy Cavalier, low nit, ps, pb, fm/cass, ac,lowmi, $5,200.252-1273. 1985 Chrysler Laser XT turbo, clean, Exc babysitter w/ ref, 17 yrs, M-S ware for kids, $275 230-0808. docked, ears cropped, housebroken, ac, an/fmo/cass, $6,900. 264-3143. ,ram grt, new tires, $4,500 obo or evemags. 2874546. New in box, IBM 286 i/new senate fr199 286-3gra LS, 4' dr, 5 spd, loaded, trae. 261-7788. -30 N hdn o, $75M 28x mahie, $e8. free. 286-3433. 1991 Plymouth Sundance, auto, ac, san roof, 18k mi, not dty pd, $17,900. t Span spk ive-out mind, reliable, exc 230lid, $750; fa 8nichine, $180. AKC registered Boston Terrier pupbought new at Howard car sales, 283-6425. 1986 Honda Prelude, 5 spd, an/fm/ worker, Tnes/Fri. 261-7939. pies, I male, I female, $350 ea. 287$8,000. 286-3171. 1992 not dty pd, ac needs comp, $2,800. Sat nad for cleaning or babysirting 27" TV Sony Trinitron stereo, 8400. 3627 Chevy $10 track, ity pd, ac, 1981 Ford Thuderird, gd condo, 260-3433. 1992 Ford Ranger, vb, 5 spd, am/fm/ spd, am/fm/css, $9,300 obo. 263$1,800. 252-2197. 252-2314. CCP reg Irish Serter puppies, 8 ma cass, camper shell, $9,500 obc. 2327919. Gilt baskets. 282-3673. Panasonic VCR w/program director old, champion father, exc mother. 232. 5419. Chevy parts, brake booster, altemaremote control, new, $200. 224-6689. 5622 c fte exc mh.3 51 1985 Mustang LX, ac, ps, arn!Ot>/cass, toe, like new, $200/S175 obo. 252Honest, dependable, live-in maid, grh 1988 Ford Bronco XLT 4x4, loaded tint win, iem paint, tires, inns grt, exc 6956. w/ kids, flex Irs. 289-3243. PB 486DX2, 250mb hd, 8mb R American Pit Bull Terrier pups, 6 wks 43k mi, exc cond, not dty pd, $11,580. cond, $4,000. 284-3798. -odrom, multimedia set, monitor, color old, ADBA reg, dewotned, I male, 1 289-3234. 1 .1988 Dodge Dakota, 65k mi, v6, 5 Span spk live-in maid, honest, M-F. printer, desk, chair, software, $2,900/ female, $200 252-6167. 1987 Blazer Sta vk fuel selj, ac, ps, spd, ac, extras, $5,900. 286-3744. 282-3790 for Benita. obo. 287-3871. 1989 Nissan truck, L-er hel, ac, ste$8,500, 286-4676. 2 yr old male Doberman, fixed, nice, reo cass, 15" tires, star is, 44k no, 1973 IHC Scot 11, 394 v8, at, rebuilt, Biligual day maid, Tues/Thurs. 286Commodore 64 w/modem, keyboard, get w/ kids, $175. 252-5103. $5,500 fot. 260-1948. 1989 Moitero, US specs, gas, exc spareeiig,mechperfect,dtypd,$3,000. 6376 M/W/F after 8 a.m. printer, disk drive, joysticks and cotod, $11,000. 252-5023. .286-4370. games, $100. 284-3798. Calico cat, fixed, shots upto date, free. 1991 Suzuki Samurai, soft top, 4wd, Eg spk maid, gd w/ kids. 221-2458. 287-4879. ac, 15k mi, $6,500. 289-5960. 1981 Cadillac Coupe deVile, diy pd, 1984 VW Westfalia camper, dieselw/ Smith Corona 8,000 WP, recharg batec cond, loaded, ac, cass, cb, pe, stove, sink, tables, sleeps 4, grt cond, Shaved ice mactune w/natural exotic tery, fax'modem. 3.5 drive, 1 yr old, Dachsnad puppies, 2 females, $175. 1985 GMC van, model vandura 2500, $8,500. 282-3580. $8,000. 252-2559. flavors for unit ftactions. 284-3338 $290. 236-0984. 266-7930. $7,500obo or will trade for boat w/ motor and trailer. 287-6244. 1991 Nissan Sentra, ac, stereo, clean, 1991 Hyundai Excel, at, ac, efi, US Cake decorating. 287-6222. Micron 486DX2/66, 8mb Ram, vesa Toy FrenchPoodles,6 wksold, $180. 22k mi, $5,250. 286-6188. specs, exc cond and mpg, It blue, lb video, 213mb hd, 15" monitor, 261-3325 1987 Ford Escor, 3,000obo. 289Sentra,2 d, gray, d d 4,500. 289-3243. Depend, hd-wker will babysit, clean, 2XCD-Rom, $2,500. 286-3736. 4267 Ford Eissan$Sentra,89 dr, gray, dty pd, ion,etc, refavail. 23 1-2276for Melida Mate cole puppy, 10 iks old, pure$3,400 230-1280. 1977 Ford Bronco, ps, pb, hard/soft Alley. Guitar, harmaony beginner electric, bed, t shots, $225. 261-7909. 1985Chevy S-10, 5 sd, 984Adi8GL,4datops, $2,500 tops, halfdrs, 302 v8, nums grt, 4,500. new, $90; harmonypo amplifier, $40. pw, ewis, nos g gd body, 282-3326. 252-6277 Kitteis freedog, all shots, fixed, neg. $4,000. 2894166. obo. 223-7780. 285-4394. 1979 Merces 350SLI aato, p, ph 1991 Nis Senr, US specs, nt/On! 1989 Buick Skylark, at, ac, tilt wheel, Camera zoom lenses, Kiron 80White Poodle puppies, purebred, deac, pw, am/fn/cass, san roof, $2,500. cs, 4 di, $6,000. 2M-5160. 10 Zdiac in$latab5 5e ith oodon 200m, wzoolock mid versaile 28wormed, shots, gentle and smart, last 284-6699. $5,500 284-3670. bottom, includes oars, pump and case, lO5irn, $50 ad $80. 2824598. hiter, $125. 286-4774. -1991 Merr Cr c p $2,500. 2864632. -1983 Toyota Supra, ac, new tires, 5 $650 260-7521. Sony speakers,50 wats$125/prSony 1991 Mercury Cap e3 t, $8 Ford Tm,tcdspd, sun roof, an/fO/cass, pw, pb, 16' Corsair Sunbird, 3.L inboard am/fOsteretuner$60;Kenwood THI20. 24-6777. dnb. 2874692 1989 Ford Tempo, mn cond, auto, $5,800 firm. 227-6306. Mercruiser, fish finder, M-radio, a/ 215A receiver, $100. 226-1158. my extras, i op p car carerecords, f cass, new trailer, rums gil, $6,500! Panasonic camcorder, VHS, Itiod, 3 2 Atigelfishi, I oge eater (5'), $5 ea, 1991 Hotda Civic, 3 di, 16 valve fuel $5,758 neg. 284-6381. nb. 282.4722 tts, cases, charger, AC adapter, 2AglihIalaeae(5)$5ecotid, bo, corside trade.2-1 10. _________________ 28os,2cae.4hrgr7A2datr 286-3143 aler 3 p.m. ij, nos g', booming music sys. 2841989 Honda Trans alp, 17ki, exe 26 w/22Si Johnsot oh. mit $499. 06-4589. Female Goldemi Lab, t0 in old, all 6137. 9c, dty $2,80. 260-9899 69 Firebird 350, lirst slitfer, for -otd, 4 FemtsDAseo La, g w/ kid, a ----Pd, dy Pri, ,8 989. ruicitig or street, dty pd. 252-2287. new trailer, $20,000. 2864676. 386SX IBM cloi, 4mb Rati, dual stints, otsebrokei, grwkids, $250. 1981 tintiac Grmid Pix, tew $2it' 1990 Pontiac Grand Prix, vb, loaded, I 71/2 nid 9 Tycoon Fin-Nor reels w/ drives, 40b lid, VGA monitor, 24 283-4295. tilted wiid, ruts gd, pw', v, $2,000. am/f/cass, $8,900. 286-6298. 1992 hyudma Exced, ac, 5 spd, matching Fii-Nor rods, ex conid, Pin prieter, snflware, inodent, $1,200. 235-9390. '-'-'ruadtn/coss, tnt dip pd, exc cotid, $1,800.77 Kitten free, white w/ calico imarkings, 1985 Ford Brnco It 4x4, a1, me $6,500. 228-6027. $1,800. 252-2080. sweet disposition. 287-4428 1985 Ford Ranger, flatbed, 4x4, on/ $3,500. 267-3793. 8 ibgs tr-h, n2h Gameb0 /g sads2x off road eqipped, Oill kit, roll cage, -'-p$3,500. -1980 Datsta 280 zx, 5 spd, ps, pw,pb 18 fiberglass tri-hplb, 2 shp Omneboy s/ guntes mid lots of exMale Shepard, 7 mo old, Reg, huseoversized tires, many spre pals, 1994 DaihatsuCharade, exccond, m! cc, new paint mid tires, exc cod, Meecruiser w/sOme extras, kicker tr>stiardly osed,$225/nb.2874596. broketo, $300, 5 tn old kitten, b&,, $4,000. 289-5942. f/cass, ac, 5 spd, pa gas mi, $5,400. $3,500 nbc. 286-6228. -u, lish fider, $2,000. 260-4385 Compecanplete,$750, TVradio, tape fesmale, free. 283-3031. 264-4105. Jet ski, Kawmaki, 440cc, $1 45/olbo ,e, VHlS camcorder. 282-3297. 1986 Pontiac Fier. SE, auto, ar, p., ---1984 Ford LTD, 49k i, $3,900 icg 2 boxerpIps,, tale,7 wksold, fawn / il, nuts gd. 285-6876. 1989 Honda Accord LKi, 57k mi, 5 261-7085. 252-2889 alter 6pn. Kenwood receiver mmd cass, mdets white mnarkings, taids docked, $175. spd,4 di, ac, loaded. $9,500. 28430' sailboat diesel d fo KR-V8540 and KX-W8040, pro log286-3775. 1987 VW Golf GT, 2 di, 5 spd, pb, 34 .1989 Dodge Conversion Van vS at, in f.-5 pe r c, dolby C mid sync recordig, $500. BMW ris, iew tires, $1,750. 289' --------2ac, low mi, extra ice, not dty p. ig $2500. 252-5103.2844135 Wanted, golden retriever or golden 3573 atler 5pm for Foming. 1985 SIO Tahoe, loaded, nons grt, 252-6815. 1991 Eviirtide 70 w/ew 1994 obp9 Dodgy C -n-5oe3. some nst w/camper, $3,600. 287T powerhead, includes all controls IBM -up, 20mb ld, monitor, key $9,3I, otee a9,670, 1993 Dodge 5225. 2i g 2.0, 4 fyr $50. 238$3,000. 252-4848 board, mid minre, $150. 269-9669. Automobiles after 1"984 cut; 10, 4 yl, $45"0 38Dakota LE extra catb 4x4, s, loaded, 1979 Grand Wagomeer, gd cond, load8015. 22' Wellcrall, 200lip marmer, 2 depth Sony 2 1 mimulti color IV, $220. 269catper shell, paid $25,000, owe ed, $3,900. 285-4045. -tiders. radio, muany extras, I5ip kick9669. a99 6 p ass su yofy 1988 StO Blazer, blue, ps, pb, pw, Available $400 -3-Pioneer stereo receiver w/donby siccond, $12 500 6 2 9 1993' yta Coromum 2.O, loae, c5" uto, leather seats, exc cond, $6,750. 19' openishernni, Yamaha 90 1994 round pro logic, double cs, cd player sporwhees, undr 10k, ni, 17,500 287-4974_ ofsical syi, family lair care, w/30 hours, folly loaded, $12,000. ad speakers, new, $1,000. 236-1256. 1978 Ford Thuiderird, 302 eng, ac, -b. 263-4671. '2-5024 am-n/''d ntdt d'$, 1974 Rnclieroinck,$800, 1977 Ford professional products, free cosuht. 252-5 Apple Il s comip, dual drives, color .bt. 252-2838truckS,00., 975dPon.,1984 'oyoa C2rola, sMe editc,ps, nick, $1,000, 1975 FordPinto, $800, 4-3 fomor, mouse, unge water, writer, b -pb, m/t!m/cass, vymad top, exc cornd, diy pd. 283-3487. Biligial dty maid. 261-9142 for tie/truiter, $1,100. wood/ibergass programs mmd itminuals, $750. 282198.1 otiac Bommevile, 4d, ac, mn/ $3,800. 286-4893. i8' sahig dit2g14y/truailer, $500. 224508. fpm, g, cond, not dy pd, $3,500,2841983 Chevy Cavalier, 2 dr, 4 spd, n, sabol .4688 __ LP-7 S500. pi2$ er i,4 .t1993 Ford Explorer XLT, 4tdr, 2wd, grt, $1,800 neg. 282-3694 aller 6pt Entg sIk imaid, live uto, gd w/kids ------7 digtal pian. $70, 1iuned, mt-posiactn, at, JBL am/fi/cass, 095 d cass stereo, $50. 284-3481 1987 Ford Esrort GT, white, 2.0L, loaded, lose ui, not diy pd, $22,300. 1986 Remnlt Encore, 4 dr, nuts gd, 5 Electronics am m/rss, em tires, titei glass, 252-5556. spd, 47k mi, $2,200 nbc. 251-0968. Cemificd public o Eng to Pioneer SR-60 reverb/miplifier, $60. $4.5 10. 281-5684. --1976 Chevy Nova, v8/305, auto, 4dr, 1978 Ford Gramada, ps, pb, aimo, a", Span/Spam n Emg. 269-3056, 6-9 p 386DX33 toter system,223-283 leave 1980 Toyu 4lxi nick, tled, ito mie, bcdy ieedswrk,runsgor,$1,000.252pw, new past, am/t!f/cass, $1,200 .-21lhd, SVGA, $850; Okidata Pioteer 6disr d tplayery ', Syr old ine dible lookmtg, $7,800. 263-2382, 6804. 242-4925 Bilingoal woman seeks pat-tinie ofmiicrolite 390 24 itt priter, $175. 14" RadioShackolor TV,$l00. 287ask o Lmnb 1992 Nissat Termo, ,. stereo, 44k 1983 Nissan Staza, or, 4 d, iatrhfice job, nights and weekends. 263comip desk w/huth, $75. $1,100 'or 5634. Im iur 1989 4-RunerToyta 4 cyl, mi,exccod,duty free,$13,000 226bark, $2,800. 286-1678. 3665 for Mitzm all. 223-7193. Alfa numerir beeper w/rcharger und 2 22 emig, cyl heiid assem aund crak l 135. -----'1990 Volvo 740, o, om/ass, is cake derortor, 13 yrs Cunol LOS/Eli rnersw/cuise, 28baits, $100. 287-3521 sium 233-6096 -1982 Chevy tk, ps, pb, ac, run gi, pb, exc cond,_$9,000 226-6341 284-5776 80 2 5ltrasomcemmsm /EW-62 hd, $600/ Casio m asiral keyboard, ex cend, 1990 Mazda 0-2,200, ac. pb, anit/lfm pow -11, nw brakes, tires. emig like Rel'b1 bysda ino ac, -ym 2 87--25 almost tew, 5390/obo. 286-3838 AS'f 386SX 25112, 4mb Ram, many

PAGE 27

Tropic Times : i Classified Ads Oct 281994 -DL1 Epson 9 pit pier, exc cond, w/new bedspread, CD case, hagmg irong Yasica FX3 camera, 80-200 zoom, $250. 252-2499. Qtrs 1998B Curundu, 6amr-2pm. ribbon, stand and cables, $70. 269board. 287-4280, 6-9p. Miscellaneous 135o,28mm,2x coaverter, bag and 5424 more. $225. 287-5177. Vacumcleoner,Christoasmametos, Qtrs 207 Albrook, 7am-ooon. 9x12 rusty red carpet, best offer. 260teasmiy clothes, child clothes, wonIBM compatible comp, 386SX, men9303. Sofa sleeper, refrig, sofrs, dishwash20" ostoms built BMX racing bike, cn shoes. 252-2228. Qirs 419A Kobbe, 7-1 Iam. ior, printer,software,$1,100,gosgrill or, twin beds, and more. 223-8159 cro-tioly frnie, $150. 286-6431 Qtrs 1516E Howard. w/2 lanks, $45. 287-4428. 2 King sr/bed mot, new $150, used ofler pts. Materisy pa.s,size 14-16,snpsides;$110; wterbed heater $60.233-2410. .dHouse plants, different types, $4 mtd deni skirt, $10; 3 dresses and Qtrs 263B Corozal, 8tam-noon. -New, 8k gold, $aphi-o/dlumond 5/ca. 286-6196. jumpsuit, $5 ea 287-493L. H s d Kids estosim mode race-car bed s eorisgs/ring set valued at $1,800 for Qtis 961A La Boca, 7at-oot. ma seldott used, solid mahogany, $1,600. 230-1001. Portable gyt/solo flex type, new nev$600. 233-2410. er used, $150. 2864488. motorcycles Qrs 43 Albrook, 730mo-2pm. Keckoo clerks, gne, handcrafted, ----Zetitt stereo console TV, $400/obofrom the Black Forest, Genrtany. 287New 9xl2 light blue carpet, ahlttond Q size bookcase w/tirror and light Sitger sewing mclone $100, ied 5897. bar/counser stools, CD/VHS solid oak diboard, $200/obo. 284-3722. mmal canrier $25, MXT motivationHonda Alpine star motorcross racing WY n-1 d rock, new food processor, lamsps. 229ol exercise trainer, $250. 287-3799. boots, size 8-9, exc cond, $50. 252Lg sofa bed, coup s/desk and access, 2916 Men's right hand golf clubs w/bog; 5260. 3 TVs, 2 VCRs, 5 beds, stereo, po-r FSU books. 232-5419 for Chis. FSU Clhemissty Stli edition, FSU EnOld bottles, old coiss, old books on pool s/filter, bikes, DR set, and more. Baby crib w/matt, solid wood, white, gush grammissar, pCC Comp 1, PCC 1978 Kawasaki KZ 650 Bl, dity pd, w/ Pattama. 264-8809 after 6p. 268-3085. classic, $100. 286-4589. Almost iew Sega gsise system, 2 Sociology, mid child development. helmet, extra parts, $800/obo. 284Sof, games, $70. 223-6105 before Ip 260-9303. 5458 for Hill, Room 222. Japanese WWII items, gd prices pd. Sofa, loseseat aid coftiee table w/hiard Wrought irots beiscs $30, white --264-8809 after 6pm. wood is gd cond. 284-3692. wicker htdbmud, lull size, $45. 282Electric water heater, $70; air purifier Tap shoes size 7 and 11/2, $10; roller 1979 Kawasaki KZ 1000 ZIR classic, 3497. $125; store display cabinet, wood/ blades, uerer used, size 7 mas mid 9 low iles, dty pd, $1,200. 252-5167. Car washer/gardener. 252-2108. Hdwood rock chair w/pads, small site, glass, $100. 226-8626. womas, $50; sew 2-moo raf w/oars, Harle Daridsot Sprtsler 1200.252Artists seeded, people isseresied in re system w/speakers, match sofa Old wood desk, sns d deskdsti7l, gcod, $75. $30 252-6829. 1130 fovike. 1taiss a c omic book, a 1 and love seat. 287-5021. 252-1174. Breast pump $10, Graco baby swing S. -1130 for Mike. making a comic book, ges 12-17, $20; 80 f feisce, wooden poles and 11,500 BTU ac, $180; Wilson baseAtlantic side only. 289-4249 or 24213" GE color TV. 2864399. 18csL ft Hotpoisnl refrig, l7cu ft adingate, $40. 284-4879. ball glove for left handed person $45; 1982 Yatialta 400 special, ex trans, 4804. rat freezer, 4 biasser GB store. 264$1 00 26475 Queen size brass bed, solid oak dining 9522. ENC 1102 The Little Brown Reader Lady's Huffy 10 spd towrig bike, 000. 2864675. FSU SYG 1000, Socialogy book, wts room table, $300. 284-3924. $25, MAC 1101 College Algebra $45. $95. 284-3437. 1994 Suzuki GSX750F Katan, perEdition, gd cond preferred, $40. 284Genmi schrank $800, desk and chair 284-6690. Golf bag, Wilson levitator w/o strap, fedt cond, almost stew, less than 1K 3338. Basset bedroom set, 7 pieces, io bed, $170, dressers $130, book shelves $65. 252-6277 smiles, $7,100/obo. 2634671. white s/gold trsn. 284-5833. isetal shelves, stroller mid more. 282Sirboard, Malt Kechele design 6'8" Live-ont Eng spkng maid, reliable, 3297 wills rcks, $195. 284-4276. -JC Penuey color TV, 25" w/retoe, honest, god w/kids and able to do little Chetese KR iss black laqner, exc costd' 327fl________ __ oor model, $250. 286-4378. -P tO ae girl's hair 287-4771. $1,500. 252-3395. --Recliner, large size, $350; full size 8" gold bracelet, 22k1; 12" boy's bicy/ail tw/box spring,$195; bothgd cond. c1e w/new tires. 284-3692.1 3 bike, Marne detroil dieseltnechaiscIo work King size BR wilsdboard, 2 risght ta -----5.tr' ie 12" boy's bike, gd Qurs 146A Howard, (oam-noon. otn tyipnbat. 252-2066. bles, dresser, exc cond, $1,800. 252Home protection system, like new, uQtrs 313A Abrook, 8lan 3395. GE refrig 24cii If $925, GE washer $35; cds and videos, large selection. Cantondale M600 Mountain bike, 1Live-i tid, mtst spk Eng, must be Monitor $30, r seat $30, ba tte $425, malt queen unsed $175, bmnk 287-3230 for Ken. almost new, triple-butted frame, all Qtrs 463A Clayton, 7m-lpm. flexible, shift worker. 82-4310 aer $50, baby badi $5, prom drs $30 bed tubular, new sal queen and twit. Corsco toddler car seat, $10; access, $670. 287-5897. Trader 2047 Csrmadn, 7am. 6pm. camera $30, auto guitar $80. 286252-2180. stairclimbeer w/moinior, $110; 96x48 Voit SCX-l00 stair climber, $ Bicycle built for two, gd cosud, reason4129. Sofa and lore seat $500, micro siaid pair beige cortats, $18. 2844133. 286-6277. Qfrs 541C Clayton, am-lpm. ably priced. 252-2541. Sharp mir. ad hdxe carn, S100 or $50, micro $125. 2864893. Ladies golf clubs w/bag, 1,3w, Ist edition Great Books s/walnut case, Qtrs 575A Clayton, 7am-noon. Woman to teach sewring; used patselsep; 14000BTU ac, I 10volt, $225; Whirlpool ig capacity wasier/dryer, 2,3,5,7,9 mid P Northwestern, exc mint cosid, $1,358/neg. 2864421. ters, gsrls size 12 and 14. 260-6791. car stereo box, $50. 283-3739exc cord, $800/finn. 284-6738. cond, $100/obo. 286-4797. Qtrs 557A Clayton, 7am-lpso. 4Dolet & Co figurine FPalstaell" $ Qir 306BMarsugBaraks,8aff-,"$75. Maid, M-P days or lire-is, clean, io, 4 ceding fans w/light figures, $2Oea9 drawer dresser w/sirror, shees o Backpack carrier/stroller $15, wood286-3773. Qrs 3026B Marne Barracks, 8 -care for 2 yr old. 287-5177. 284-6382. side, men's 5 draswer dresser, wood, ea high chair/desk $50, baby wonior noon.Barbiedolls, clolg mid access, s Pramecnrrier,walker/sionary like tew, sian, sater msd scraich re$15, while crib w/complete beddings 65' of 4 tall cyclone fence; full sisalQtrs 2541C Cocoli, 9am-lpm. be 20 years or older. 286-6196. Frame carieaksistant, $450. 287-5678. $50. 284-6671. -tess. 287-5634. 2 rattat sfas $600, coffee table W Whirlpool 14' refrig, 9d cod white Corcor j p boots worn twice, Toddler slices for boys size 8, $15; i653D and B Clayton, 7amP ie-n l mavidg Pimi carecmd 2 rrora $108, BRs$00, ctas w $395. 252-2476 91/20, $60; 2 pnirs rose drapes tropiwomtes's slices size 51/2, $15; new pm. their live-in maid, infant care, clean, mirror $100, BR set $700, crains cal, $28; aduli toe kwado suit, $25. typewriter SC $100. 264-7730. Qirs 6590B Corozal. -. 2874280, 6-9pm only. $30, Barbie bike $50, and more. 287Brown Hospoint rcfig/frcezer l8cu 284-6671. Housekeeper w/refs, cook, clear 6793. 0, gd cond, $375/obo. 263-2830 afher it Wedding dress, size 5/6, white, new Qirs 5513B Diablo Heights, lam-2pm. watch chuldre live-i, M-P. 252 N S i 6:30Bridal dress, white, size 9, $800; cosd; typewriter SC $100. 264-7730 New .6ci ft fig $150, 8-iqne di-g weight benchw/wts, long bar, duobell for Ndda. Qirs 410A Clayton, 8am-lpmn. 6328. set w/6 cliics, $250. 2846382. 24 drser dressers, cluna cabinet w/ bars, approx 3601bs, $350. 2614702. Ne 2vtatr$5 kle 1, table sits 6, sen blinds, Q sid/ft board -Weigiht betic, w/l 1011, set, swisg set, QIrs 100 Airook, 7am. Depend, honest, biitg ise-it wnnid, used 220v coffee shaker w/extra pot, solid wood, 2 bluelsead pionus birds. Light gray vert blinds w/rod for 12' cordless weed eater, Eucy Britamca 1055A Claytoove ys o t y. 284-4487. wind, $275; baby cribbed w/5 draww/go books. 260-t290. Dresser w/miror or chester drawer in $40. 269-8583. ers, $450; baby car seat, $50. 223Qr 910B Ciayton, 6:30-11am. gd coud and inexpensive. 260-3270. King size w-bed w/solid wood 7829. Gof metal driverw/grafie shaft, $35, Electric home food slicer $50, gas ldboard, fiboard, and side rads, exc pitchimg wedge $5; 27 and 30" girls' Qirs 413A Kobbe, multi-family, lansStiorkelig equipment mid spear guts, pob ered leaf acum and blower w cond, $500. 226-6851. FSU book SYG 1000 6th ed, new, bikes, $5ea. 282-3497. noon. gd cold, and gd price. 252-7400. bag, $70. 2698583. lease message. 287-3547. Sofa bed, blue mid pisk, cxc cosd. 2 air condititoners, lawn mower, leathQtrs 1993A Curundu. House to rent at least 3 BR, 2BA, Sofa bed wani Iat w/o k ti m 284-3481. Flex machine, 1801bs legs and loss, er jacket, $75. 287-3159. $900, crib w/mart, white $125, comf stepper $200; FSU Bin 1005 book, 1/ Qtrs 321B Morgan A re,Bloal8am' plentyofpkiig.Norealtors. 268-0575. set$35,chevaltmirror$00. 2614702. 40x30 glasstopironttable$100,30x60 2 price; bikes for male and fesmale, 5 yr old, 14" Radio Shack color TV, noon. Dog lover to babysit our 4mo old Kenmore wasier/dtyer, exc cost, metal desk $125, 40x62 utility table $50. 289-5860. $100/obo; fullmat; singerjuicer.287Dalmaiion for 2wks. 287-5634. em rewse/yrxccd' $100. 226-1158. 5634. Qirs 401A Amaador, 7-1l1am. -_____________ $700. 284-5685. S 2 Metal detector, case, recharge batterFemale husky puppy, no papers ec, Baby bed w/walerprooutmiddcressKemnore washing mache, exc cond, ies, Pisher 128ox, aquaaut, 101/2" Daish corner wht lamp $60; DR v'/ Qrs 26 1 B Albrook, 7-1 hawill pay $200. 283-3031. Be w/ waterproo200, ta8ddress-_ while color, 5 yrs old, $395. 252coil, use in water/land, $450. 227chinacabinet,planits,NinteindogamnOs, er in/sheres, $200. 287-6790. 2476. 1777. $l2ea. 236-0984. Qurs 115 Aibrook, lam-noo. SGI, U.S.A member. 282-3036. Kemniorc washser/dryer, $600/smog. 287-5r6 s6pc dinner set, wood, gd cond; peach Roman md Greek cois, 2,000 years Large concrete pots, some w/plaits. Qtrs 2027A Curundu, 7-1 lam. Someone for tenis on weekdays, 2287-5586 recliner, gd cond. 261-2525. old. All 20 for $50. 264-8809 after 269-2972. QIrs 7273A Cardenas. 8pm. Canal area, intensediate skills. Floor model TV, Zenith, one year old. 6p. s t $200 287-6939252-222 fr Aaro. 260-2782. Love seat and chair $400; diunog room Swing s., .0 _ Qts 2123 Cun u, 6-10am. Li-i Spa pkw mid, general table $500; gas grill $55. 2874527. Les Paul guitar $950, Fender amep Naiioal IBTU ac compressoreedsa GE dryer for parts, noor, imer, as is, $500, nnuerous guitar effects, wmake N B Lot 5, Find Ave, Walker Diablo. cleaning, ir, 2 children, M-Sa. 286$40/obo. 252-2476. Color TV, $50; portable radio $50; offer. 2874650. hecked, $70 236-0984. 4896. Trek racig bike, $600; drafting table Qtrs 600 area, cormnaity sale, 7anBlu 3cuhin of, xccod,$501Child craft Chaildren s, books fknwl211bndMhl Blue 3 cnsiom sofo, oxc cosud, $5O/ $50; AD&D books; solid wood DR Sears 2.5 hp gas edger, cxc co'ur, Cd $25/eb'. ok6 5 2pm. Live-out bilig maid, M-P, no child obo. 2284514, table w/4 chairs, $150. 286-4520. $175. 284-3326. eae, clean, care f., 2 dogs, reforGi_'_2"_-seebke$5;me' Qrs 213B Albrook, 7am-noon, quiredlionesandltdwker. 284-4791. Overstuffed modern chair wi/Otmn Ping poug table, exc coud, $190/obo. Variety ofSega cds, $30ea. 284-3326. Girl's 24" 3-speed bike, $65; exi s4B w -.R D _F__H__ng"___a $50 wn are 2,mdsics 86-3833, 26" 1 0-spceed, $85; $148 for both, exc Qirs 549B ilosard, lla-nom Royal Ooaliou "Pox hlminisg" cliss, $500, swing carrier $20, med suitcase 2 sew twin box springs, $75ea. 252cond. 282-3624. asy pieces. 269-2972. $10, Cesnry baby walker $20, misc 13000 BTU Goldsr GA-1320LC ac, 2314. QMbs 82A Aibrlsk, 8a_ lems. 286-6521. Misc baby items, stroller, walker, patio cover for gateway housing, pre$35e 283 3177 Leather belt mid holster for revolver swing, clothes. 2864675. Qrs 16B Howard, 8am-oon. fer end usn, reasonable price. 284Blue curtains $15, Kemumore mnicro Wssrdyr et ut,$5;ho$0 obybos9/ 6,tdlr $150, swing set $35, BR set wduci Washer/dyer, heavy ity, $550 hor$60, cowboy o 91/2 $60, todere Birdcage Parrott, cots, Betamax-Sony, Qrs 1557B Howard, 7-lam. 6838. and lights, solid pine, $1,100. 252izsmalfreezer,$375;4pesoase$500. and oini car seats, mechanic's car DR set 9 pc, Bamboo DR set tble, 4 Professio_74l usolsue cLeaner to 2028. 263-7919. ramps. 252-2042. cha, u 4-6713Qrs 2327 Los Cruces, Balboa. cle fad p er 2_.---_hairs._2_4-_7_3 _clean sof,, and love seat, will pay rcaCouch, receusty reupholstered $350, GE heavy duty dryer, gd cond, $80. Lismogc porcelain flower vase, France 250 feet of fece w/3 gates and poles, Qirs 224B Albrook, 7amu-noom. sociable price. 286-3484. queen mattress set, $300. 287-3878. 252-2368. $200, soldering torch amd reg $60, a oyota iercel repair anuul md ptos, Twbnted,lieadboard,boxspring, mat, Daybed, white /)arts mati and ladies shoes size 6. 252-2042. frame, like new, $250. 286-3541. sh esexccond, $200. 284-3670. ---Oauk OR iblo w/4 uphmolstered chasirs T o i i e d F r Q/ size sleeper sofa, maicling love Washer/dryer $600, TV $120, VCR $600, siidt car seat $20. 2864439. Tropic Tim es Ad Form seat, 2 esd tables, 2 lamps, all beige or $100, micro $100, office desk $25. brow, $3ta. 2 2844884 after Spit. Baby and maternity clothes, baby El ANIMALS brown, $300. 287-3534. ioems, sisc toys and more. 284-6386. E AUTOMOBILES Sofa and love seat, gd cosud, suf board 2-12000 BTU window oc, es, stiI i s s AVAILABLE w/board bag. 256-6407 9-1ipm. box, $695 ea. 287-5676. Susap ou extractor set $135, AT&T L AVAIL AE cordless phone, $50. 286-4184, BOATS & CAMPERS AC, patio enclosure, freezer, fndge, Freezer, large, $350; 18000 WluI.-. D ELECTRONICS PRICE HOME PHONE __ mise. 252-2033. pool ac, $325; 10000 Freidrich ac, Stepper exercise machine, $85/obo. O FOUND $225. 252-2287. 282-3783. HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ad forum. Only two ads per person each Krups 10 cup ao g $200, 2 Body LOST week are allowed. Each ad forra is linited to 15 words, but may be edited patio chairs sla, frass .amp $3 Baby crib w a gd cod, org $250s clue d MISCELLANEOUS iore because of space. Please type or print neatly. Infornaion listed 50. 252-2621 d MOTORCYCLES below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This Euntauand bids.2864679. Liked tables r coffee table $60, sizr---; PATIO SALES information will no1 be released to third parties. Deadline forthe receipt ga ab 7.s CNcins and blind 2864679E of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are ran on a space -$Sega Geesis w/3 ga.es, 2 conrols, available basis and the saffimakes no guarantee ofads running. Ads nusi Hot point electric range, $50. 286$100. 286-3325. include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Tisses, 6431 --Cape ceain ecin__________ Unit 0936, APO AA 34002ordeposited it a drop boat the Aibrook Post Carpet cleaning eqaipmens, seassers Ofc.Asofrn epnra saeo etb A ilntb Sofa w/buit in redlimer, dark satua fe Religious 2-sided gold medallion w/ $550, shaspo achine $550. 230Office. Ads offering weapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not be colors, $300. 2864674. -ncklace, dropped am Bldg 519 Oct. 0008. Almond side-by-side rfog, 25.7cu A, 17. Sest ralue. 287-6470. Exercise static annual bicycle, 3yrs SPONSOR'S NAME RANK/GRADE ice/water dispensers, $750; gas grill, Rans sat at Los Rios playground, has old, $45. 287-3521. -------------$35. 286-6188. "Underood" embroidered on back. Treaduill, gd coid, speed up to 8 ORG. DUTY PHONE Security system, priter stand, full 252-2028. miles per sour, $200. 260-2317.

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12 Tropic Timesotpourri B 2Oct. 28, 1994 P u r 284-4189 HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming Sunday breakfast buffet 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. veteran preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming eduBreakfast is served 6-9:30 am. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30 cation and a copy of CASP notice of rating if applicable. Sub+Officers' Club: 282-3439 .am. Saturdays. mit a copy of latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee. The club will be closed to the public for renovations New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade For more information regarding Army vacancy announcethrough Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be roast beef, turkey, turkey salad and tuna fish sandwiches with ments (forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Direcavailable 10 am.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Additionall the trimmings. torate ofCivilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. featuring or call285-5201. during lunch hours 11:30 acm.-l:30 p.m tableside preparation with tuxedo service. *Note: One-on-o employment courtselinig should be the .a. Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Select a first step in thejobsearchI APma or cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or fillet. All steaks are SPECIALIZED EXPERIlENCE: Positions at NM-5 level +lbAao:2243 .coc ef and above require speialized texperience. Specialized experi*Club Amador;j 282-4334 U.S. choice beef cnee is either education above the high school level or work exAll-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway. dine-in or perience directly related to the position being tilled. Example: soup, salad, selection of entree, special retum rights, take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot Budget positions at or above the NM-5 level required Budget Sunday brunch features the Jazz Junction noon Sunday. wings. experience or equivalent education. The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom: 284Vacancy announcements are also available at the Sundial renovations of the Quarry Heights Officers' Club. 4189 Recreation Center. Clayton Friday night disco 4:30 p.m.1 a.m. Dance and relax to Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications the music. on a continuous basis for the following positions. Registers es*The Loop 287-3035 New Thursday night disco 8:30 p.m. until closing. lablished from these announcemeitts will be used to till pennaCJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Halloween all night disco 10 p.m. Saturday -5 a.m. S'unneat and temporary positions. Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments 3:30 p.m. Sundays. day. VB# 001 General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes#Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove; clerical position). days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sundays. 284-4189 VB# 001A General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most 1NCO Club: 2874716 Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays. clerical position). All-you-can-eat family buffet Thursdays. Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-I am. VB# 002 Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk Seafood buffet Fridays features broiled lobster, garlic Monday night football and mug special in the lounge. sch) shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab. Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcom and nachos. CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required. 12-oz prime rib special Saturdays. Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 8 p.m. Tuesdays. VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m. Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Cent + 6 mos recreation exp in the field. Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. SunWednesdays in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancVB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Requires 6 mos days and Mondays. ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be played until recreation exp in the field. Disco 9 p.m. Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. There midnight. VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5 will be a midnight buffet. Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6 Al your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills. VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5 brook Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays; 5 p.m.VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6 *Albrook Club; 286-3557/3582 midnight Thursdays. VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5. Limited Friday night flambe 6-8 p.m. Tableside cooking. Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. to permanent status employees only. Tonight's entertainment: Karaoke in the lounge and *Top Three Club: 2844189 VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6. club card drawings. Closed on Saturdays. For special funtions. call 284Limited to permanent status employees only. Saturday afternoon football 2 p.m. in the lounge during 4189. football season with bar service. Karauke 6 p.m. Fridays. The following positions ae Perm/temp Full-time, Pan-lime, Prime rib dinner and seafood feast 6-9 p.m. Saturday. Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesdays. Free all-you-can-eat comIntermittent. Menu also includes: Cream of broccoli soup, garden salad, plimentary taco bar. 12 oz. prime rib, baked potato, baby carrots, and sherbert. Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. Members VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14Mongolian barbecue 5:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Choose must have a card and be present to win. VB# 008 CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license required)' the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have chefs do the NM-9110/1 1. R d a VB# 009 PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required), job outside on the open grills. NM-. Oriental night 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. ChefTong Lau's *Rodman Club -Open to all ranks: 283-4498 VB#019 ** EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, special cuisine. Won Ton soup, Oriental Spice salad, Pork Happy hour 4:30-11 p.m. in the Laguna Lounge with NM-640-4/5/6. Moo Gal Pan or Sweet & Sour chicken, fried rice, eggroll, complimentary hors d'oeuvres. and fortune cookies. Halloween bash 7-11 p.m. today in the Laguna Lounge. Selectees for nurse, medical officer and EMT positions Seafood Feast 6-9 p.m. Nov. 5 & 12. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 am.1 will undergo a background check. Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursdays. p.m. Mondays-Fridays. Country western night Thursdays with free dance lesMonday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with allPacific sons 7:30-10:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples you-can-eat taco bar 6-9 p.m. at the Laguna Lounge. OPEN: 10-28-94 CLOSE: 11-08-94 dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Grill menu 049-95-LA (2) ELECTRONICS MECHANICS, MG-2604( .rgndg is also available. 10. SENSITIVE (SCI). 106th Sig Bde., Corozal. NOTE: ReAll-you-can-eat spaghetti 4:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays. quires Certificate of Training verified by DD1435 COMSEC *$TRACiCLUb: 286-3511 Grill menu is also available. Equipment Training of reach equip needed to be repaired and Celebrate Panama's Independence Day 6 p.m. Open mike night 6-11 p.m. Thursdays in the Laguna annual voluntary polygraph examination. Top Secret SCI is reWednesday. Music and free snacks. Lounge. quired. Driver's license required. Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays 050-95-LA ELECTRONIC TECHNICIAN, NM-0856-11. owar at the Rodman Bohio. SENSITIVE. 106th Sig Bde., Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Work re*Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718 Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-9 quires some physical exertion such as long periods of standing, Weekday lunch includes buffet, salad and potato bar. p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. recurring bending, crouching, and stooping. Security clearance Order a [a carte 6-8:30 p.m. in the dining room Fridays Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays: 6is required. Driver's license is required. and Saturdays. 9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays. 051-95-LA INFORMATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT Friday evenings in the lounge include beer specials,

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