Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



Gif of tanama Canal Museum


Tropic


Times


Vno VII No. 42


Ouarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Friday, Oct 21, 1994


Suriname troop;

Distant Haven on standby


QUARRY HEIGHTS (U.S. SOUTH-
COM PAO) - U.S. Southern Command has
put the temporary safe haven camp in
Suriname for Haitian migrants on standby.
The decision was made because of Op-
eration Uphold Democracy in Haiti and the
subsequent reduced need for immediate
safe havens for Haitian migrants outside
Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba, officials
said.
Following approval Oct. 15, the two-
week process of placing the camp and re-
lated facilities in "caretaker status" began
Monday.
Caretaker status calls for Joint Task
Force-Suriname to reduce staffing while
maintaining the ability to recall personnel
and equipment and be prepared to receive
Haitians within two weeks of notification.
To accomplish this, non-mission essen-
tial equipment and approximately 300 of
the original 450 U.S. military personnel at


Joint Task Force-Suriname will redeploy to
parent units in Panama and the United
States.
Two engineer units of approximately
150 U.S. military personnel left Suriname
beginning Oct. 5 for their home stations.
Remaining equipment will be stored at the
facilities and a small detachment of U.S.
and Surinamese forces will remain to main-
tain the sites and provide security.
The safe haven facilities include a tem-
porary migrant camp constructed adjacent
to Ayoko Surinamese army camp near the
Zanderij International Airport; a base camp
for U.S. personnel on Ayoko; and a recep-
tion facility to process Haitian migrants
upon arrival at the airport. The migrant
camp is located on a 28-acre area and
consists of about 240 general-purpose me-
dium tents, 40 four-person latrines and 14
dining tents.
The migrant camp was designed to pro-


s return
vide a temporary safe, secure, and sanitary
environment for up to 2,500 Haitian mi-
grants, including food, shelter, medical care,
and basic necessities.
Construction of the facilities began Aug.
28 as the initial phase of Operation Distant
Haven and was completed in early Septem-
ber. Approximately 500 U.S. military per-
sonnel deployed from Panama and the
United States to Suriname starting Aug. 25
to build the Suriname safe haven migrant
camp.
The first units to redeploy were the
536th Engineer Battalion from U.S. Army
South in Panama and Company B, 92nd
Engineer Battalion from Fort Stewart, Ga.-
the units that built the facilities. These units
redeployed because their mission was com-
plete, officials said.
JTF-Suriname included personnel from
the 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light), 536th
Engineer Battalion, 154th Signal Battalion,
534th Military Police, 1097th Medium Boat
Company, and other units from Panama
and the United States.


United Airlines to discontinue Panama service Dec. 1


PANAMA CITY (Tropic Times) -
United Airlines will discontinue service to
Panama City Dec. 1, according to airline
officials.
United announced route changes Oct.
11, which included the elimination of the
one daily flight between Panama City and
Miami.
This was the only flight United had in or


out of Panama City, according to Franklin
DeLeon of United's Panama City office.
DeLeon said that customers currently
holding tickets or reservations on United
flights for Dec. 1 or later will be guaranteed
flights on other airlines.
"We will maintain the ticket and make
arrangements with anothercarrier," DeLeon
said Thursday. Ticket holders will be able


to use their United tickets, he said.
United will also maintain an office in
Panama City indefinitely. United will be
contacting customers in the near future,
DeLeon said.
United's elimination of Panama City
service is part of a major restructuring of its
routes in the United States, according to a
company news release. The company plans


to increase flights at its Denver hub by
more than 250 percent and its west coast
shuttle operations by nine flights per day.
Other international flights to be elimi-
nated include Grand Cayman, Trinidad,
Cabo San Lucas, and Guadalajara, Mexico.
Those holding United tickets or reser-
vations can call 269-8555 for more infor-
mation.


Operation Safe Haven Camp No. 3
at Empire Range nears capacity in
only a few weeks.


The newest addition totheAir Force
fleet-the C-17A-stops by Howard
AFB.


*Haitian duty pay, Page 4
*Special operators, Page 11
*Army 10-miler team, Page 13


Work party Spc. Tom Findtner (Tropic Times)
Soldiers from the 41 st Area Support Group and local Panamanian residents work together to create a play
ground for a remote school near Chepo. See story and photos on Pages 8 and 9.


V ul. V 115 11U.


Drawdown continues


Navy, AF

consolidate

pass offices

HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PAO/Rod-
man NS PAO) - Navy personnel needing
security badges, Defense Department em-.
ployee installation access passes and base/
station vehicle registration will receive those
services at Building 710 here beginning
Monday.
The moving of these services to the
Howard Pass and Registration office is the
result of ongoing Treaty Implementation
Plan negotiations and agreements reached
by the Navy and Air Force.
"We are looking forward to working
with the Air Force in another step in con-
solidating services in support of the TIP
process," said Lt. Jim Jolliff, Rodam NS
security officer.
Several services will remain at the Naval
Station.
*Weapons registration will be done in
the arms room, second floor, Building 2,
Rodman, 283-4144.
*Bicycle registration will be done in.the
physical security office, Building 7B, Rod-
man, 283-4215.
*Bilingual identification cards and mili-
tary ID cards will remain a function of the
Personnel Support Department, 283-6315.
There will be no change in the tempo-
rary visitor policy at Rodman.They can be
processed at Gate I from 5-8 a.m. and 3-5
p.m. Monday - Friday, or 24 hours a day at
Gate 2.
"We look forward to serving our new
Navy customers," said Col. Jim Jones, 24th
Security Police Squadron commander.
"We've recently renovated our Pass and
Registration office and I think all our cus-
tomers will see it was designed to improve
our service to them.
"Our Air Force customers should also
understand that the small increase in
workload will not affect the quality of ser-
vice they receive," Jones added.
The Rodman and Howard Chapel wor-
ship services will also consolidate Monday.
"We are excited about the opportunity to
serve the Navy community and have them
worship with us and participate in our reli-
gious education programs," said Installa-
tion Chaplain (Lt. Col.) John Cusack.
Questions about worship services and
religious education programs may be di-
rected to the Howard Chapel at 284-3948/
4119.










Tropic Times
Oct. 21, 1994


1 Hiiefly


Tropic Times late?
Call 269-3220
People who live in quarters on a Pacific
area military installation and have not re-
ceived a Tropic Times by 6:30 a.m. Friday
should call 269-3220.

Future Community Bank
closings announced
The Community Bank will be closed
Nov. 3 to celebrate the separation of Pana-
ma from Colombia; Nov. 10 for the Primer
Grito Los Santos, and Dec. 3 in lieu of the
observation of Panama's independence
from Spain, Nov. 28.

Clayton Dental Clinic will
close for unit training
The Fort Clayton Dental Clinic will be
-closed Oct. 28 for mandatory unit training.
Patients may report to Gorgas Dental Clin-
ic for emergency treatment during normal
duty hours. After-duty emergency patients
may report to the Emergency Room.

Safety awareness
prompts Amnesty Day
In conjunction with U.S. Army South's
Safety Awareness Day, the 36th Ordnance
Detachment will conduct Amnesty Day 8
a.m.-1 p.m. Oct. 28 at the following areas:
Luzon Field, Fort Clayton; the softball
field, Fort Davis; Building 533, Corozal;
Building 734, Howard AFB; and Ammu-
nition Supply Point I at Rodman Naval
Station.

Ammunition supply point
to close for inventory
The Rodman Ammunition Supply
Point will be closed Sunday through
Thursday for inventory. All units with
scheduled training should call 283-5643/
5806 to reschedule issues and turn-ins.

New policy restricts
hours of college per year
Soldiers will now be authorized to take
a maximum of nine semester hours of col-
lege courses per fiscal year at 75 percent
tuition cost, according to a new policy con-
cerning Army Tuition Assistance. Tuition
assistance will now be centrally managed
at the U.S. Total Army Personnel Com-
mand. The intent of this policy is to pro-
vide soldiers consistent funding of their
education programs as they move about the
Army. The local education center is avail-
able to help soldiers identify other funding
such as Pell Grants, Veterans Education
Assistance Program and Montgomery GI
Bill. For information, call 287-5703/3161.

Clayton has job seminar
for family members
The Department of Defense Family
Member Job Information Seminar will be


All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for priority mission
requirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608.


Saturday
5:45am B-727 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP, GA (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
1:45prm C-5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Dover AFB, DE
Sunday
3:45pm B-757 Howard AFB (C,O)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Monday
5:40am C-130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa. Honduras (CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB
8:40am B-757 Howard AFB


held 9-11 a.m. Nov. 1 at the Corral room
of the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned
Officers Club. For reservations, call 285-
5201.

Commissaries hold
anniversary sales
The Defense Commissary Agency will
hold an anniversary sale at commissaries
throughout Panama in October. More than
900 items will be offered at savings of 20-
60 percent.

FSC needs volunteers
for relocation section
The Howard Family Support Center
needs volunteers who are interested in
learning about world-wide assignments
and those who enjoy creating graphic pre-
sentations to work in the FSC's relocation
division. There are a variety of positions
available for several different relocation
programs. For more information, stop by
the FSC, Building 707, or call 284-5650.

St. Andrew's Society
sets date for annual ball
The St. Andrew's Society of Panama
will hold its annual ball 7 p.m. Nov. 19 at
Las Tinajas Restaurant. For tickets or
more information, call Neil McColl at
226-8066 or 264-4211.


Health consumers
hold monthly meeting
The Pacific Health Consumers Com-
mittee will hold its monthly meeting 3
p.m. Wednesday at the headquarters con-
ference room of Gorgas Army Communi-
ty Hospital. For information, call Elsa
Bermudez at 282-5233/3805.

Effective resume writing
workshop for volunteers
Experts from the Howard Family Sup-
port Center will offer assistance to volun-
teers who want to reflect their volunteer


Atlanta IAP, GA (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
Tuesday
5:40am C-141 Howard AFB
Brasilia, Brazil (V,0)
Asuncion. Paraguay
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (V,0)
Brasilia, Brazil
Wednesday
5:40am C-130 Howard, AFB
San Salvador, El Salvador
(VCC)
Managua, Nicaragua (CC)
Howard, AFB
Thursday
5:45am C-5 Howard AFB


experiences on an effective and up-to-date
resume. The Resume Writing for Volun-
teers workshop is set for 10 a.m. Monday
in the FSC conference room, Building 707.
It will cover the basics of effective resume
writing and attendees will be able to make
a follow-up appointment to print out their
resume in a professional format from a la-
ser printer. For more information, call
Laila Yeager at 284-5010.

Servicemembers offered
pre-separation briefing
A career information team from
Charleston, SC, will give a pre-separation
briefing for anyone retiring or separating
from the military within the next six
months. The briefing will be held 8 a.m.-1
p.m. Nov. 9 at the Family Service Center,
Building 40, Rodman NS. For more infor-
mation, call 283-5749.

Incorrect hours for
Fort Davis stores printed
There were errors in the Sunday hours
of operation for the Auto Parts Store on
Fort Davis and Toyland on Fort Espinar in
the Oct. 7 issue of Tropic Times.
The correct hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
for the Auto Parts Store and noon-4 p.m.
for Toyland. Additionally, Burger King
hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday-Sun-
day.

Howard to measure for
mini blind installation
Measurements for the installation of
mini blinds in the Howard AFB tropical
housing area is as follows: Monday-Oct.
28, Qrts. 41-99; Nov. 1-4, Qrts. 100-154;
and Nov. 7-11, Qrts. 156-199. Workers
will stop by between 9 and 11 a.m. For
more information, call 285-5392.

Railroad modelers
display their art Saturday
A group of model railroading enthusi-
asts are looking for other interested mod-
elers. There will be a railroad models dis-
play behind Club Amador Saturday. For
more information, call Gary Nichols at
285-6232.

NCOA meeting slated for
today on Fort Clayton
There will be a Noncommissioned Of-
ficers Association general membership
meeting 3 p.m. today at the Fort Clayton
NCO Club. Members and nonmembers
may attend. For more information, call
Staff Sgt. Mary Jackson at 287-6251.

1994 competition for
Nick Hoge Award begins
The Deputy Chief of Staff for Person-
nel has announced competition for the


Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Dover AFB, DE
Oct. 29
6:40am C-130 Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
San Jose, C.osta Rica
Howard AFB

A- Active duty only
US- U.S. passport
O-Overnight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance

1994 Nick Hoge Award for Professional
Development, an annual essay program
dedicated to promoting excellence in civil-
ian personnel administration and manage-
ment.
Army military and civilian personnel
from all career fields, including local na-
tionals and nonappropriated fund employ-
ees, are encouraged to participate. Single
and group authorship is permitted. Dead-
line for submission is Dec. 1. Call Aichel
Tam at 285-5611 for more information.

Corozal cemetery
changes office hours
The American Battle Monuments
Commission announces that effective
Nov. 1, the Corozal American Cemetery
and Memorial will be open 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.
daily. The cemetery office will be open 7
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.
The office will be closed on weekends and
holidays.

STEP class for parents
of teens set at Albrook
The STEP class for parents of teenag-
ers has been rescheduled. This parenting
skills class will start 6-8 p.m. Thursday at
the Albrook Youth Center. There will be
six classes Tuesdays and Thursdays
through Nov. 15. For reservations or in-
formation, call 284-6410.

Conflict management
workshop slated
The Howard AFS Family Advocacy
Program is offering a conflict management
workshop 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
Howard Chapel Annex. Learn to solve dis-
agreements without arguing, throwing
things or hitting. Free child care is avail-
able. This workshop is open to all servic-
es. Call 284-6410 for information or res-
ervations.


'Trick or Treating' hours
established for Clayton
The established hours for "Trick or
Treating" at Fort Clayton are 5-8 p.m. Oct.
31. The age limit is 12 years old. Teens,
13 years and older are encouraged to par-
ticipate in the Directorate of Community
Activities events.
People who have a valid installation
pass can escort five immediate family
members only for Trick or Treating on
Fort Clayton. People with vehicles regis-
tered with the Provost Marshal Office can
drive their vehicles onto any installation to
an authorized parking area.
Sponsors are accountable for the be-
havior of their guests while on the installa-
tion. Failure to control guests will result in
action taken against the sponsor. All visi-
tors to Army installations must be off post
no later than 9 p.m. For information, call
Master Sgt. Scott Carr at 287-3716.


Weekend weather *
Factoid: So you think it rains a lot in Panama? Try having a picnic
on Evangelistas Island in southern Chile. It rains 305 days each year
there. Panama City averages 166 days with rain per year.

Pacific Atlantic
Saturday Saturday
Temperature Tides Temperature Tides
High: 86 5:10 a.m. at 16 feet High: 87 2:30 p.m.
Low: 73 11:23 a.m. at 1 feet Low: 74 10:55 a.m.
Sunday Sunday
High: 87 5:45 a.m. at 16 feet High: 88 3:09 p.m.
Low: 75 11:58 a.m. at 1 feet Low: 76 11:26 p.m.
Forecast: Partly to mostly cloudy with afternoon showers and isolated thunderstorms.
Send weather questions to 24th Weather Squadron AITN: Weather Wise, Howard AFB, Panama (MPS)











* News


Tropic Times 3
Oct. 21, 1994


Camp No. 3 near full


EMPIRE RANGE (Rodman NS
PAO) - Ranging in age from 6 weeks to
88 years, the Cuban population quickly
numbered in the thousands at Operation
Safe Haven Camp No. 3 here.
On the camp's fifth day of receiving


Cubans, there were 1,426 men, 153
women and 99 children. The camp had
received 2,011 Cubans as of Oct. 12 and
can take 2,500, said Camp No. 3 Opera-
tions Officer Lt. Liz Witthuhn.
Witthuhn said the Cubans have been


3'


John Hall (U.S. Navy)
Pfc. Brian Simerly, Marine Corps Security Force Company - Panama
helps civilian workers load cots for Cubans at Camp No. 3.


CINC awards

best in Army

transportation
DOCK 45 (USARSO PAO-Atlan-
tic) - The U.S. Southern Command com-
mander in chief presented an Army-
wide transportation award to the 1097th
Transportation (Composite Boat) Com-
pany here Oct. 12.
Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey,
SOUTHCOM CINC, presented Capt.
Marshall Guiterrez, commander, 1097th
Transportation (Composite Boat) Com-
pany, with the National Defense Trans-
portation Association's Army unit of
the year award.
McCaffrey commended the soldiers
of the 1097th Trans. Co. for the profes-
sionalism and commitment that earned
them the award.
During the visit, Guiterrez led Mc-
Caffrey and Maj. Gen. George A.
Crocker, commander, U.S. Army South
on tours of two of the unit's vessels: the
Landing Craft, Utility 2000 and Land-
ing Craft, Mechanized 8.
The 1097th Trans. Co. officially re-
ceived the award Oct. 3 at the NDTA
Logistics Forum and Exposition in St.
Louis, Mo.
The 1097th Trans. Co. beat out trans-
portation units in nine U.S. Major Army
Commands to win the award.


f



Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert


extremely helpful in providing ideas
and taking the initiative by volunteering
for many activities. Two of the main
services they offer are translation and
camp maintenance and improvement. A
group even built an outdoor theater and
placed gravel around their living areas
to cover the mud.
The camp staff of soldiers, sailors,
airmen, Marines and civilians received
and inprocessed up to 339 Cubans per
day. The operations staff coordinates
and schedules events, collects informa-
tion and disseminates it within the camp.
Army civil affairs personnel from
Fort Bragg, N.C. are helping Cubans
with information points, recreation and
education. The camp is organizing a
school facility and teachers within the
Cuban community will use donated
schoolbooks. The civil affairs personnel
are also helping the Cubans set up their
own governmentto assistthe commander
in administering the camp.
When not schooling or maintaining
their areas, the Cubans find time for
recreation. The most popular activities
are baseball, volleyball and soccer.
Movies are shown every three days and
cable is scheduled to be installed this
week.
The camp's public address system
not only puts out information, but also
plays music and news. "At their request
we play a mix of salsa, meringue and
American music," Witthuhn said. "They
really like American music and SCN
(Southern Command Network) news."
The future is a big concern for many
of the Cubans.
"They are concerned aboutwhat will
happen to them and are also requesting
help with locating families in the states,"
Witthuhn said. One request camp offi-
cials are looking into is getting tele-
phone directories from Miami.
Although they have been here only a
short time, the Cubans at Camp No. 3 are
feeling at home. Witthuhn said Camp
Commander Cmdr. R.W. Smith, is af-
fectionately known as "grandpa."


Let them

eat cake
Seaman Recruit
Shawna Dale,
Personnel Support
Activity Detachment
(left) and Capt.
LeRoy Sheehan,
Inspector General,
U.S. Southern
Command cut the
cake at the 219th
Navy Ball at Club
Amador Oct. 14.
Dale and Sheehan
were the youngest
and oldest sailors at
the ball-the
traditional cake
cutters.


Safe Haven

one of many

operations
WASHINGTON D.C. (AFIS) -
Operation Safe Haven is only one
of 18 ongoing military operations
involving U.S. servicemembers
around the world.
Regional commanders in chief
generally name the operations and
choose terms that mirror what the
operation is about, Joint Staff offi-
cials said. For example, when Iraq
invaded Kuwait and it looked as if
Saddam Hussein was threatening
Saudi Arabia, the United States
launched Operation Desert Shield.
But U.S. Central Command used
Operation Desert Storm for the at-
tack to take back Kuwait.
Here is a list of current military
operations and their objectives:
Able Manner - U.S. Coast
Guard Haitian migrant interdiction
operations with U.S. Navy assis-
tance.
Able Vigil - U.S. Coast Guard
Cuban interdiction operations with
U.S. Navy assistance.
Able Sentry-U.S. military par-
ticipation in the U.N. Protection
Force in Macedonia.
Deny Flight- NATO no-flyzone
enforcement, close air support and
air strikes over/in Bosnia.
Distant Haven - U.S. humani-
tarian operation for Haitian refu-
gees in Suriname.
Maritime Intercept Ops - Ge-
neric name for U.S. and coalition
enforcement of U.N. sanctions
against Iraq in the Persian Gulf.
Provide Comfort - U.S. and
allied no-fly zone enforcement over
northern Iraq and Kurdish relief
efforts;
Provide Hope - U.S. medical
supplies and equipment to Russia.
Provide Promise - U.S. and al-
lied airlift into Sarajevo and air-
drops over Bosnia.
Safe Haven - U.S. humanitarian
operation for Cuban migrants in
Panama.
Sea Signal - U.S. Navy support
of U.S. Coast Guard's operation
Able Vigil.
Sharp Guard - U.S. and allied
enforcement of U.N. sanctions
against Serbia and Montenegro in
the Adriatic Sea.
Southern Watch - U.S. and coa-
lition nofly zone over southern Iraq.
Support Democracy - U.S. and
allied at sea enforcement of U.N.
sanctions against Haiti.
Support Hope- U.S. support of
U.N. humanitarian operations in or
near Rwanda.
Sustain Democracy - U.S. sup-
port of U.N. Haitian border moni-
toring in the Dominican Republic.
UNOSOM 11 - U.N. Operations
in Somalia.
Uphold Democracy - U.S. mili-
tary forces in Haiti.


Atlantic dining facility best in USARSO


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO - At-
lantic) - 1097th Transportation (Com-
posite Boat) Company's dining facility
was named best small garrison facility
of the quarter in U.S. Army South.
Col. Silas Smalls, United States Army
Garrison commander, presented the
award to dining facility manager Sgt.
1st Class Paul T. Score during a cer-
emony Oct. 13.


A team from the Installation Food
Service Office judged the small garri-
son dining facilities on appearance and
quality of food, variety of food, cleanli-
ness, administration and accountability,
Score said.
Additionally, the team sampled the
meals in the day long judging of the
1097th Trans. Co. dining facility.
"We won because of our variety of


food," Score said. "We have a very nice
salad and ice cream bar, and people have
a positive attitude about our dining fa-
cility."
"It was a team effort," he added.
"Everybody took part in reaching the
high standards we have."
This marks the first time since sec-
ond quarter, 1993 that the 1097th Trans.
Co. has won the award.














Pay allowance for Haitian duty


POVs ready


for pick up
BALBOA (MTMC) - The follow-
ing customers have privately owned
vehicles ready for pick up at the POV
Processing Center, Building 1501,
Balboa, adjacent to Pier 18.

Aguilar G.; Anciaux L.N.; Anstey
R.L.; Belter M.S.; Bonivert C.;
Bradford P.E.; Bruce D.; Butler S.R.;
Cooley S.E.; Cunningham L.M.;
Desears R.N.; Johnson V.M.; Kenney
Y.M.; King T.D.; Layton M.M.;
Lerose N.J.; Lucas A.W.; Mandingo
J.D.; Marcelino W.V.; Martel C.J.;
Mejia-Rangel 0.; Moore J.D.; Mor-
gan T.C.; Oconner M.L.; Pardal M.;
Parker B.; Ramon R.; Range M.D.;
Schaul D.E.; Sorensen T.L.; Tregaskis
K.; Troxler D.; Williams L.D.; Wilson
R.T.

Customers must have the following
documents for pick up of their POVs:
*ID card (current military, dependent,
or civilian)
*Driver license (must have Panama-
nian license for second POV)
*POV shipping document (DD Form
788)
*Vehicle registration or title
*Vehicle keys
*Power of Attorney and photo copies
of the sponsor's bilingual ID card and
driver's license (when the sponsor on
orders cannot be present for pick up)

The list is current as of Monday.
For updates, call customer service at
282-4642/3853 or the POV arrival
tape recording at 282-4641. Customer
service hours are Monday - Friday,
7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Wednesday
hours are 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
People expecting POVs are re-
minded to call customer service to
leave a contact phone number.


Entitlements For Operation Uphold Democracy (1)
Entitlement Active Reserve Amount Remarks


WASHINGTON D.C. (AFIS) -
Servicemembers will receive additional
pay while in Haiti supporting Operation
Uphold Democracy. These allowances in-
clude imminent danger pay and a family
separation allowance, officials said.
Carl Witschonke, Department of De-
fense deputy director for compensation,
said servicemembers tabbed for Haitian
duty after Sept. 16 will receive imminent
danger pay, currently $150 per month.
"It's to provide additional payment to
personnel subject to hostile fire or the
threat of physical harm," he said.
The family separation allowance, $75 a
month, is paid to troops with family mem-
bers, provided the separation is more than
30 days.
Although DoD has set no tour length
for Haiti, tours are limited to six months,
according to Tom Smoot, also with DoD
compensation. However, services can ex-
tend members for bona fide reasons.
"If the situation in Haiti becomes
drawn out, commanders and services
could request members be assigned to
Haiti on permanent duty status," said
Smoot. "The request would ask DoD to ,
approve a 12-month, unaccompanied
tour."
Witschonke said DoD does not con-
template this happening. Besides immi-
nent danger and family separation pay,
enlisted members also receive a "certain
places pay," ranging from $8 to $22.50 per
month. This allowance is based on pay
grade.
Enlisted troops E-4 and above and war-
rant officers also receive sea duty pay.
Commissioned officers must have three


Y Y Current
Y Y(2) Current
Y Y 0: $142.46/month
E: $6.80/day
Y Y $21/day
Y Y $75/month

Y Y $150/month

Y Y $8-22.50/month
Y Y N/A


Basic Pay
BAQVNHA
BAS

Per Diem
FamilySeparaVon
Allowance-II
Imminent Danger
Pay
Foreign Duty Pay
SpecialLeave
Accrual
Sea Pay

MedicalSpecial
Pay
Special Temporary
Storage of Household
Goods


Varies by grade.
If drawing already.
Commander in chief sets policy-now TDY.
Not payable to enlisted subsisted on vessel.
Member keeps $3.50/day incidental pay.
If member has dependents.

Effective Sept. 16,1994; land,surrounding seas
and airspace of Haiti.
Enlisted only, if not drawing sea pay.
Can carry more than 60 days at end of fiscal
year.

Normal rulesfor Navy/Marines; payable to other
service enlistedTDY aboard ships.
Reserve component must be called to active
duty more than 12 months.
Service rules apply.


1. Does not include people performing relief operations in Panama/Guantanamo/Suriname.
2. Reserve draw BAQ and VHA at place called to active duty rate (usually residence); single reservists must
show proof of housing.
3. Sea pay paid to enlisted (E-4 and above), warrant officers and officers (officers must have three or more
years sea duty).


years aboard ship to receive sea pay.
Witschonke said because members are
placed on "field duty," upon deployment,
troops temporarily lost their basic allow-
ance for subsistence.
However, he said, the situation in Haiti
is stable enough that the task force com-
mander can place members on "regular


Former MEDDAC

employee dies

GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY
HOSPITAL (USA MEDDAC) - Retired
Department of Army employee, and U.S.
Army Reserve colonel, Jerry Huggins died
in Albany, New York Oct. 12 after a brief
illness. Mr. Huggins retired in 1992 as the
USA Medical Activity - Panama quality
assurance coordinator after more than 20
years of service. He is survived by his wife
Kae, son Darin, and daughter Megan.
Condolences may be sent to 23 Bob White
Drive, Glenmont, New York, 12077.
The family requests memorials be sent
to the American Cancer Society.


TDY," with subsistence payments resum-
ing effective Sept. 23.
During Desert Storm, most service
members received tax exemptions on their
income while fighting in Southwest Asia.
This is not true in Haiti. "A combat zone
designation has not and is not being con-
sidered for this operation," he said.


Sgt. Rick Emert (U.S. Army)


Slippery

mascot
Sgt. William
Blundell, 549th
Military Police
Company, Fort
Davis, shows off
"Alice," a 5-foot
boa constrictor.
She was adop-
ted as the new
549th MP Co.
mascot after
being discov-
ered by a land-
scaping crew on
post. "Alice"
takes part in the
unit's company
runs and is
compensated
with five baby
chickens a
month.


Paaanwssumr


Editor's note: The following summary of news is
taken from the Panamanian press. The translation
and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is made
by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of reporting
or statements made here. Selection of these stories
does not imply any emphasis, judgement or endorse-
ment by the U.S. government. These synopses are
intended only to give non-Spanish speaking people
a flavor for news events in Panama.

Oct. 16
El Panama America, El Siglo, Hoy, La Prensa: Pa-
pers report certain migrants in Panama and Guantanamo
will receive asylum in the United States. Eligibility in-
cludes Cubans over 70 years old, their relatives, and
unaccompanied minors. Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder is
quoted as saying only 19 of nearly 6,000 Cubans at the
camps qualify.


La Estrella, El Panama America: Papers print mes-
sages sent to Panama President Ernesto Perez Balladares
from President Bill Clinton and Organization of Ameri-
can States Secretary General Cesar Gaviria thanking
Panama for granting asylum to Gen. Raoul Cedras and
helping end the Haitian crisis.

El Panama America:-,Paper reports four Colombian
craft carrying drugs and illegal immigrants to the coast of
Colon were detected by Panama police authorities.
Oct. 17
El Panama America: Paper reports a CID/Gallup poll
revealed the majority of Panamanians (57%) believes the
country is little or not at all prepared technically to operate
the canal.
Oct.18
La Estrella, La Prensa: Papers report a pregnant
woman was the first Cuban migrant transferred to the


United States from Panama so she could receive special
medical treatment following complications related to
her pregnancy. Her case is not included in the asylum
plan recently announced by Pesident Bill Clinton. Her
husband was also transferred to the states.

La Estrella, El Panama America: Papers report
United Airlines will discontinue operations in Panama
beginning Dec. 1.

La Estrella: Paper runs a paid'ad from a Los Ange-
les-based immigration attorney saying the U.S. govern-
ment is offering 55,000 immigrant visas.

La Estrella: Paper reports that Panama will be in-
cluded in an extensive manual to promote tourism in
Central America. The manual will be distributed to
52,000 travel agencies throughout the states.


4 Tropic Times
Oct. 21, 1994


News


Y Y Varies (3)

Y Y Current

Y Y N/A


I










News


Tropic Times 5
Oct. 21, 1994


Senior Airman Steve McNalty (U.S. Air Force)


The C-17A sits poised on the Howard flightline.


New






'bird'


Air Force fleet's


latest addition


visits Howard

by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs

HOWARD AFB - The C-17A is the latest addition
to the Air Force fleet of cargo and transport aircraft,
and Oct. 12 a single bird from this unique flock made
a brief visit to the flightline here from Charleston AFB,
S.C.
In fact, this aircraft is so new it has yet to be
officially accepted into the Air Force inventory. It's
currently in production, testing and training stages and
is scheduled for initial operational capability in 1995.
"Actually, 'unique' is an excellent word to use to
describe the "Globemaster III," said the co-pilot of the
transient aircraft, Capt. Pat Tibbetts. "Unlike the C-5,
C-130 and C-141 transport aircraft, the C-17 can
perform both strategic and tactical missions, and it's
the only aircraft that can take outsized cargo into short,
austere airfields. It takes a lot of the best technology
from several different planes in the Air Force inven-
tory and combines them into one very versatile and


The cargo bay of the C-17A can hold 172,200 pounds of cargo.


user-friendly aircraft."
One of the bits of technology borrowed from
modem fighter aircraft is a "heads-up display." This
allows the pilot to see vital instrument data while
looking at an unobstructed view out the cockpit win-
dow.
"This means you don't have to keep bobbing your
head up and down between what's happening with the
instruments inside the cockpit and what's going on
outside the aircraft," Tibbetts explained. "That goes a
long way toward reducing fatigue."
Other reductions include the size of the crew
needed to operate the aircraft-it only requires two
pilots and one loadmaster, since four computers take
the place of human navigators and flight engineers.
The maintenance requirements and the life cycle costs
are also less when compared to C-141 and C-5 aircraft.
Although the Globemaster is only about 6 feet
longer than the C- 141, it can carry more than twice the
Starlifter's payload-and four times the lift capacity


of the C-130 Hercules, said loadmaster MSgt. Gary
Warner. This means the C-17A hold can contain 102
troops/paratroops, 48 litter and 54 ambulatory medical
patients and/or attendants, or 172,200 pounds ofcargo.
"We can load a single row of 11 pallets down the
center of the aircraft with plenty of room for space
available passengers on either side," Warner said, "or
we can load two rows of nine pallets with no space for
passengers. The C-17 can carry virtually all of the
Army's outsized combat equipment."
The aircraft also has "direct delivery" capability as
it can put that equipment down on runways only 90 feet
wide and 3,000 feet long. Even on such runways, the
pilots can use thrust reversers to turn the plane 180
degrees and take off again.
According to an Air Force fact sheet, the C-17
Globemaster III "delivers more cargo through a given
area in a given period of time than any other airlifter-
and does it with fewer resources."
"It's also a kick to fly," Tibbetts said with a smile.


Officers 'cap off' careers with SOUTHCOM visit


by Spc. Tom Findtner
Tropic Times staff
QUARRY HEIGHTS - Twelve
members of the National Defense
University's CAPSTONE class arrived
here Saturday from Washington, D.C.,
on the first stop of a 14-day tour of key
locations in the western hemisphere.
For the past 10 years, CAPSTONE
has served as the final requirement, and
thus the "capping stone," in a senior
officer's Professional Military Educa-
tion Program. It is reserved for officers
who have earned-or soon will be pro-
moted to-the rank of brigadier general
or rear admiral and is offered on a quar-
terly basis.
The six-week class emphasizes the
necessity for joint service operations.
CAPSTONE strives to provide a clear
perspective of its importance by allow-
ing students to apply what they have
learned in the classroom to real-life joint


training, planning and operations situa-
tions in the field.
"It's a trip that exposes our leaders
of tomorrow to places they haven't been
before, and gives them an opportunity to
get a better feel for the concerns of
people here and at other commands
throughout the world," said Navy Adm.
Wesley McDonald (Ret.), CAPSTONE
senior fellow and course advisor.
The 12 students began their three-
day field study of the U.S. Southern
Command with a general overview of
the SOUTHCOM area of responsibility
by Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, com-
mander in chief. Air Force Brig. Gen.
Rudolf Peksens, director of strategy,
policy and plans, hosted further brief-
ings by component commanders on the
regional issues involving SOUTHCOM
and its methods of dealing with them.
"We are very impressed with the
attitudes and embodiment of concern
SOUTHCOM has in dealing with the


problems that they face here in Panama
and in this whole region," said
McDonald, who served as CINC of the
U.S. Atlantic Command in Norfolk, Va.
during the mid-1980's.
Class members also met with Pana-
manian Foreign Minister Gabriel Lewis
Galindo and National Security Advisor
Jose Luis Sosa. In addition, a discussion
with U.S. Embassy Country Team in
Panama City was arranged.
Highlights of their stay in Panama
were a flight over the Panama Canal,
tour of the Miraflores Locks, and visit to
the Safe Haven Cuban migrant camps.
"We think it has been an outstand-
ing tour," McDonald said. "I think ev-
eryone is going to go away from here
with a tremendous understanding of the
problems the United States faces with
the canal changing over, withdrawal of
troops and families, and the continuing
responsibility of the U.S. to this whole
area.


"Whether we have any presence here
in the future or not, it's still going to be
SOUTHCOM's area of responsibility,
along with the rest of Latin America and
South America," McDonald said.
The CAPSTONE visits are Con-
gressionally mandated by the 1986
Goldwater-Nichols Defense Reorgani-
zation Act. During the next two weeks,
the group will travel to Honduras, Ven-
ezuela, Mexico, Canada and Key West.
The CAPSTONE class members
who visited SOUTHCOM were: Coast
Guard Rear Adm. Edward Barrett, Army
Brig. Gen. Joseph Cosumano, Marine
Brig. Gen. Earl Hailson, Air Force Brig.
Gen. Robert Hoffman, Army Brig. Gen.
John LeMoyne, Army Brig. Gen. Lon
Maggart, Army Brig. Gen. Leo Baxter,
Navy Capt. James Ferguson, Ms.
Ernestine Heck of the State Dept., Navy
Rear Adm. Edward Kristensen, Air Force
Brig. Gen. Robert Osterthaler, and Air
Force Brig. Gen. Leon Wilson.









6Tropic Times
Oct. 21, 1994


Voices


'Cubans should help themselves...


Dear Mayors' Corner,
This is not a letter to question why, but why not? As
Americans, we are continuously striving to aid anyone and
everyone. I have no problem with this. However, I do have
a problem with how it seems to keep turning out, but I
won't go into that.
My question is: Why not let the Cubans and Haitians
really help themselves? It seems to me that these people
are looking for a hand, if not a hand out.
We have totally disrupted thousands of lives unneces-
sarily. Now that a portion of the refugees are on station,
why not put them to work? I see no harm in them helping
to lay concrete pads, put up foundations or put on roofs.
This would put some of our people back to work with a
limited number of work hours lost. This would also give
the people in camp something to do to keep their minds
off their current plight, thus avoiding a situation like the
attempted suicide last week.
Kitchens can be set up and run by the women and/or
men who are able to cook. Food should be issued in order
to keep down food waste and avoid any confusion. If there
are enough people capable of doing both, they can work
shifts just as we would, but for fewer hours.
Every manpower hour costs us greatly. It costs us in
manpower hours because we have to cut back regular
work hours. It costs us in man-power medically because
of injuries to our people as well as their medical condi-
tions. It also costs us time with our families. Cutting into
our already fragile family lives causes further instability.
So I go back to my question: why not put them to work
for themselves.
Weary Worker

Dear Weary,
I forwarded your letter to Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder,
public affairs officer for the Operation Safe Haven Joint
Information Bureau. She provided the following response.
Not only do we agree it is a good idea to let the Cubans
help themselves, but we are doing many of the things you
mentioned. Giving them a role in their living conditions
has a positive effect on their morale.
The Cubans are willingly participating in camp im-
provements, both physical and procedural. Cuban repre-


sentatives from the camp community meet daily with mili-
tary camp cadre. In those meetings, ideas and problems
are brought up and solutions are offered.
In addition, we ask the Cuban representatives to give
their recommendations for disciplinary actions to the Op-
eration Safe Haven commander for those residents who
have violated camp rules.
More basically, the Cubans are actively forming work
crews, and side-by-side with military troops, are working
on drainage systems, laying recreational fields and assist-
ing in other camp improvements.
However, the food is provided and served by contrac-
tors. This provision for meals has proven to be the best
solution.
We've also made a great effort to provide the Cubans
with recreational and educational opportunities. Schools,
chapel services and other activities are up and running.
Thanks for your interest in this operation and please
follow the stories in the Tropic Times for more details.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
I would like to tell you my story about my dealings
with the Vet Clinic. My wife and I visited the facility with
the intention of adopting a pet. There was a dog there that
I asked about and was told that two other people were
also interested in the animal. I was told to put my name on
a waiting list, and call at 4:40 p.m. about the dog. When I
called, I was told that if no one called for the dog by 9
a.m. the next morning, I could have the dog.
When I called the next morning I was told that the dog
was gone. I assumed the dog was given to one of the
people on the waiting list. My wife found out the dog was
given to someone not even on the list.
I was upset. The personnel at the clinic were rude. I
asked to see the policy on adoption and was told a mistake
had been made. Another staff member apologized and of-
fered us another dog who had apparently been at the facil-
ity for some time. I paid $19.52 for the animal on Friday
and discovered over the weekend the dog was deaf.
When we contacted the clinic, they claimed they had
no knowledge of the problem, but were willing to exam-
ine the dog. Without examining the dog we were refunded
$14.52. We were then informed that to adopt another pet
a fee of $25 would have to be paid.
I would like to know what the policy on adoption is
and if the clinic personnel are required to attend a cus-


tomer service training class before they are hired.
In Search of Man's Best Friend
Dear Searcher,
I sent your issue to Capt. Russell Wiessinger, the Vet
Clinic officer in charge, who responded: Army Regula-
tion 40-905 governs our adoption policy in conjunction
with the Vet Clinic Standard Operating Procedures and
local regulations. Strays are impounded for three work-
ing days. People waiting to adopt the animal may sign up
with the reception desk for that particular animal.
On the fourth day, the animal may be adopted. If not
claimed by the rightful owner, the animal may be adopted
in order. Each person on the waiting list is given a spe-
cific time in which to go to the Vet Clinic-the first per-
son from 8-10 a.m.; the second person from 10 a.m.-noon;
the third person from noon-2 p.m. and the fourth and sub-
sequent persons from 2 p.m. until closing on a first-come,
first-serve basis.
Animals for adoption must be up-to-date on rabies and
appropriate distemper vaccinations before release. This
cost is paid by the adopting owner. We also recommend a
fecal exam for internal parasites and heartworm tests for
dogs. There is no adoption fee.
If an animal is not adopted by the fourth day, it will be
humanely euthanized by lethal injection.
Our goal is to try and adopt all adoptable animals that
come to our facility. The only fees that may be incurred
are those that have to be charged for the vaccinations.
We always have animals available for adoption. Over
the past 18 months we have had 1,115 stray animals ad-
mitted with 163 being reclaimed by their owners and 433
being adopted by new parents. We also have had 162 pets
brought in for adoption and we were able to place 135 in
new homes. These services are provided without any
adoption fee.
Requirements for employment at the Vet Clinic or
other government job do not require a customer service
training class as a prerequisite. However, our employees
have attended customer service training when offered..

Editor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral
Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity
chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will
be granted upon request The Tropic Times reserves
the right edit letters and responses for brevity.


$160 cash stolen from


unsecured briefcase


Stolen currency
The military police report that a man
had $160 stolen from his briefcase, which
was left unsecured in his Fort Clayton of-
fice last week. It is recommended that ev-
eryone secure their property and never
leave belongings unattended.
If you become a victim of a crime con-
tact the military police at 287-4401.

Another bike stolen
A service member had his bicycle sto-
len from his quarters on Fort Clayton last
week. An unknown thief cut the securing
cable lock which secured the bike to the
quarters.
The Provost Marshal's Crime Preven-
tion Section recommends securing bikes
indoors during the hours of darkness or
anytime you will be away from your quar-
ters. You are also encouraged to make sure


all bicycles in your household are regis-
tered.

Halloween safety
This year Halloween will be observed
on Monday Oct. 31. The hours for "trick
or treating" will be from 5 p.m.-8 p.m. The
military police encourage everyone to keep
safety in mind by carrying a flashlight and
wearing reflective clothing. Adults should
accompany young children-to ensure
safety. If a mask will be worn, make sure it
does not hamper vision. Always check
candy before allowing your children to eat
it. Following this advice should guarantee
a safe and happy Halloween.

Crime prevention tips
During the past quarter, there have
been numerous larcenies of private prop-
erty reported. According to reports, more


than 50 percent of the property stolen was
left unsecured.
To counteract this, always lock up your
valuables when they are left unattended.
Employing this tactic can remove the op-
portunity for a thief to strike.
For information on securing property,
call the Crime Prevention Section at 287-


6762 or 287-3261. Together, we can "take
a bite out of crime."

Panama Jack anonymous hotline
Anyone with information about drug
smuggling should call the Panama Jack
anonymous hotline immediately at 285-
4185.


ic Times


Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666


This authorized unofficial command information publica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pub-
lished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Pro-
gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of
the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the
U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002

Commander in Chief........................Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs..............................Col. James L. Fetig
Chief.......................................Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor.............................. ........................... M aureen Sam pson


Sports Editor......................................................Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editors................................................. Sgt. Cass Purdum
Spc. Tom Findtner
Rosemary Chong

Southern Command Public Affairs Office..................282-4278
Command Information Officer.....................Patrick Milton

U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.........................287-3007
Public Affairs Officer......................Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer.........................Beth Taylor
Managing Editor..................................Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Editor...............................................Sgt. Robin Shawlinski
Journalists.................................................... Sgt. Eric Hortin
Spc. Brian Thomas


U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic................................289-4312
NCOIC........................................................ Sgt. Rick Em ert

24th Wing Public Affairs Office...................................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer......................Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.......Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists......................................Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush

U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.....................283-5644
Public Affairs Officer....................................Diane Gonzalez
Assistant Public Affairs Officer..............................John Hall
Photographers.....Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays











*iCommentary


Tropic Times 7
Oct. 21, 1994 I


Domestic violence: when will it stop?


by Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Tropic Times chief
W e're now three weeks into Domestic Violence
Month. And yet, I haven't really heard much
about it. There's been a smattering here and
there, and some programs on Public Service Radio, but
we haven't been exactly loaded with new information.
There are seminars and workshops around the area,
though. But in my opinion they're failing for lack of
participants. Case in point: Thursday's seminar for
people who are having problems with domestic violence
only had two reservations by Tuesday. I guess we all
figure that these are for "someone else."
Maybe there's not a problem with violence in the
home. But I don't think that's true. Everything that I
read and hear tells me that domestic violence in the
military is as great or greater than in the civilian sector of
the United States.


One theory why the military has problems with it is
because we're trained for aggression and rewarded for
aggressive behavior.
It's how we've learned to handle conflict. Our
mission, after all, is the management of violence. But
what works well on the battlefield, or the behaviors that
work well in the trenches of the bureaucracy, don't
necessarily work well at home.
These are new behaviors that we're talking about:
How to settle differences without resorting to violence,
whether physical or emotional. It wasn't until 1980 that
spouse abuse was illegal in many New England states.
And just 200 years ago, in France, it was a criminal act
for a husband not to beat his wife if she misbehaved.
Our new social conscious now tells us that this type
of behavior is no longer acceptable. Now you can go to
jail if you beat your wife-or husband.
So, whatever our values might be, we're told it's a
good thing to leave the violence on the battlefield, or at


least at the front door. The saying about "not bringing
your work home" has never been more true.
But what can you--or anyone-do? Learn more
about it. That is the hard part. I don't know about you,
but I'd rather not think about it. But we've all heard
stories about the abused spouse who couldn't find help
and the whole situation blew up in everyone's face. The
result: shattered homes, traumatized children and more.
The more I learn about how to deal with conflict, the
harder it seems to get. But I guess the only answer is to
keep trying.
During the last three weeks, and again in this issue of
the Tropic Times, we have publicized opportunities to
help people deal with problems of this sort. And there
are a lot of people out there who's sole purpose is to
help.
So I hope you'll get the extra help or knowledge and
skills you need, whether you think you need it or not.
Because that's were it starts and ends: at home.


The bean counters


Quality starts and ends with customers


by Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
24th Wing Public Affairs
any customer service oriented organizations
have "embraced" quality concepts to improve
their daily operations and increase service and
customer satisfaction.
For the most part these changes are good, but some
are merely cosmetic.
Progressive thinking people have streamlined
operating procedures, implemented policies to cut down
on redundancy and waste.
Their efforts are aimed at maximizing output and
reducing effort while effectively satisfying their
customer's needs.
I don't know about you, but there several things that
ruffle my feathers about the quality approach to conduct-
ing business in a non-standardized environment such as
the Air Force.
Maybe I'm getting crotchety in my old age or just
plain cantankerous, but I believe that everything has a
point no matter how round it may be.
In an ideal environment, all procedures and custom-
ers need to fit neatly into the established policies and
procedures your organization has set up.
Whether or not the supplier wants to admit it or not,
there are customers out there who can't use the round
hole for their square peg.
Don't you find it very disturbing as a customer to
enter an establishment for service with your peg and be


told "We won't accept your peg because it doesn't fit
our hole?"
Quite often when you explain to the supplier why
your peg is shaped the way it is, and that the hole the
doesn't work for you, the supplier frequently reacts
defensively and stands firmly and aggressively behind
whatever policy or procedure. Nine times out of 10, the
supplier wasn't the originator of the policy or procedure,
but will blindly enforce it.
There have been "rare" occasions when the customer
was right and there was a flaw in the procedure or policy
in effect. Instead of keeping an open mind, stepping
back and weighing the individual case, the supplier
assumes an adversarial posture, "I'm sorry, but that's
our policy. If you want to use our hole, you must round
off your peg."
Once in a while the circumstances are so clear that
even Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder and Jose Feliciano
would have a hard time not seeing it.
Bean counting is a terrible trap that many people fall
into when trying to ensure they achieve their goals in
relations to quality performance measures. Quality
performance measures are the internal or external
standards organizations use to determine if they are
accomplishing their missions or satisfying customer
needs.
Sometimes I think I'm going to gag when I sit
through a meeting where standards are discussed and the
unit representative boasts about his organization's
quality prowess while I hear moans and grumbles of


discontent throughout the room with the service people
have received from that organization.
Statistics have an uniquely different quality. You can
make numbers say just about anything you want them to
by putting them in the right context. I know for a fact
that you can manipulate numbers to paint a picture as
rosy or bleak as you want-just look at a nomination
package or an after-action report.
Instead of simply exhaulting over the success of
reaching your goal, take time to find out why you had a
dissatisfied customer and how to avoid a similar
situation.
As they always say, "One 'aw shucks' wipes out a
1,000 'atta-boys."' First impressions are lasting ones.
Think about this for a second. How did you feel when
you walked up to a service counter or into a duty section
looking for service and were ignored by the people on
duty?
The individuals didn't stop working on what they
were doing, nor did they acknowledge your existence
until they were finished with their task.
And what about those individuals who stare right at
you while making a personal telephone call and act like
you are disturbing them because you came in for service.
From that point on, no matter how good the service is
you aren't going to be satisfied or happy because you
were ignored.
This may sound trite and cliche, but a good rule of
thumb is to treat people and customers as you want to be
treated, unless you're into sadomasochism.


Direc Quot- I


What should be done to solve the problem of domestic violence?


'U
a,...:


"It's a serious problem
that will continue if it's
not brought out into the
open. Families should
seek help."
Sgt. 1st Class Sharon
Hodges
HHD 56th Signal Battalion


"There are social
programs available to
help people find the
source of their prob-
lems."
Chief Warrant Officer 3
Jose Munoz
470th Military Intelligence


"People are responsible
for what they do and
they should be punished
when they hurt others."


Master Sgt. Jay Whiston
12th Security Police Sq.
Randolph AFB, Texas


"Families should be
aware of its impact and
the options for solving
it, such as counseling
and education."
Hector Cruz
Air Force family member


"Abusers should be
investigated and prose-
cuted. If found guilty,
they should get counsel-
ing or go to jail."
Rhonda Mathes
Army family member


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.







8 Tropic Times
Oct. 21, 1994


4


K'


41st Area Support Group soldiers build


playground for remote village near Che


story and photos by Spc. Tom Findtner
Tropic Times staff
An all-terrain vehicle packed with soldiers
scaled hills of red clay and crashed through
dense jungle before abruptly stopping at an
impassable stream, 40 miles from Panama City.
The soldiers-men and women-in red unit T-shirts,
jeans and combat boots, hopped out and continued their
journey on foot for another two miles in the sweltering
heat. On a hilltop, they set off signal flares, then wait.
At the same time, a UH-60D Blackhawk helicopter
hovered just above the rainforest canopy, as it followed
the serpentine path of the Panama Canal. Upon spotting
the ground crew's red smoke signal, the helicopter
descended. Cattle scrambled out of the way as the
Blackhawk landed, its landing gear sinking a foot into
black muck beneath lush grass.
On the hillside overlooking the meadow, a group of
about 30 Panamanian men, women and children were
gathered. Their friendly faces and warm smiles revealed
a sense of anticipation and building excitement as the
soldiers lugged construction tools up the muddy slope.
These soldiers weren't on a training mission, and the
people watching weren't spectators. Since December
1992, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 41st
Area Support Group, has backed a rustic, one-room
schoolhouse in Corpus Christi, Panama, as part of the
Joint Task Force-Panama School Sponsorship Program,
said Capt. Jose Espinoza, HHC 41st ASG company
commander. Eighteen students, ages 6 to 15 years old,
attend the school.
The tiny village is nestled in the rugged Panamanian
interior alongside a small, winding creek. The area is
home to approximately 30 families and 120 people
scattered across several miles of remote countryside
within the district of Chepo. The unit visits the village
every three months.
Over the years, they have helped renovate the school-
house, donated and refurbished desks, purchased school
books and supplies, and celebrated Christmas with the
townspeople by bringing gifts and preparing a feast.
On their visit to the village Oct. 14, unit volunteers
planned to construct a playground for the village's
children, their most demanding venture to date. The
project was the idea of Logistical Operations Sgt. Maj.
Mary Roberts.
"These people rely on us because they know we are
there for them," Roberts said. "They know us and look
forward to our visits: It's great for their morale, as well
,as our own."
Roberts went full-speed ahead with the playground
concept in June by seeking out the expertise of the unit's
sole construction engineer, Sgt. 1st Class Howard Eley.
Eley immediately started scavenger hunting.
"Lumber is hard to come by down here and I didn't
think we'd be able to get any," Eley said. "But when I
went around to different organizations and told them
what the materials were needed for, they bent over
backwards to help out by donating whatever surplus they
could spare." -
According to Roberts, the most challenging aspect of
the project was logistics and raising enough money for
the company fund to purchase additional supplies that
were needed. The 41st resorted to car washes, bake sales


and a flea market to accomplish the task
After gathering the necessary materials and borrowing
tools from other units, the 41st started building in July,
Operating out of a shop on Corozal, Eley supervised a
volunteer work party that hammered and sawed three days
a week on four-hour shifts.
Meanwhile, back at the village, the townspeople spent
three days preparing a site next to the schoolhouse for the
playground. Armed with picks and shovels, the men
laboriously cut into a hillside to clear out a level spot.
Then, using a large piece of leather as a wheelbarrow,
they hauled the dirt away.
The playground was completed in August and ready
for transport to Corpus Christi. However, the 41st hit a
snag when they approached the 1st Battalion, 228th
Aviation Regiment to assist in hauling the playground
structure by helicopter. The 1-228th was low on funds and
grounded until the new fiscal year, Roberts said. By the
time the helicopter could fly again, Operation Safe Haven
was in full swing and the playground project was put on
the back burner.
When the 228th finally gave the 41st the go-ahead, 18
soldiers volunteered a day of their time to set up the
playground.
The structure was airlifted in a cargo net and dropped
on a nearby hilltop. Soldiers and villagers climbed to the
top and carried each piece down to the playground
assembly site.
They then rolled up their sleeves and went to work.
The conditions certainly were not ideal, with mud
everywhere and no electricity for power tools. The
soldiers were forced to rely on sheer muscle and sweat.


As the unit divided the job up and began work,
curious onlookers jockeyed for the best spots to observe
the progress. The 41st worked dilligently through the
blistering heat of the day and ever-present thundershow-
ers. The hospitable villagers did their best to keep up the
soldiers' strength by supplying fresh coconut milk and
bananas; plus fried catfish and patacones cooked on an
open fire.
By 4 p.m., the playground was finished and teeming
with laughing children, who took turns crossing the
monkey bars. Of course, there also was a tire swing, and
the roped-in platforms that each offered a slightly higher
perch than the one just under it.
The scruffy village dogs, found the wooden planks of
the playground to offer just the right amount of shade
from the sweltering sun.
Manuel Acamarena, the Corpus Christi schoolhouse
teacher for the last 10 years, was pleased with the results
of the 4 st's efforts.
"Because of the soldiers' support, the quality of our
,children's education has improved a great deal," he said.
"Recreation is normally climbing tree, scaling hills and
playing in the creek. Now the children will have some-
thing tangible to play on."
For the soldiers, the opportunity to help the townspeo-
ple was a touching experience.
"I have a daughter back i", the states and everytime I
look at one of these kids, I see her face," Spc. Phyllis
Jordan said. "Corming out here, makes me think about
everything we take for granted and makes me appreciate
the basic essentials. It also makes you want to give more
--like the stuff in the back of your closet."


,IL



Soldiers from HHC 41st ASG work together with Panamanian villagers on a hilltop to separate
playground sections from a cargo net, before hauling the pieces to the building site.






Tropic Times 9
Oct. 21, 1994 .


"rst


I


A UH-60D Blackhawk helicopter, piloted by a crew from the 1-228th Aviation Regiment, airlits a cargo net containing playground equipment to the village
of Corpus Christi to assist Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 41st Area Support Group on a humanitarian mission.


9... .. .
r-'


4
4*
w. r~t


i4


a


ilk W


I,,


t


Sgt. 1 st Class Howard Eley secures a platform section to a support post
during construction of the playground.


Spc. Jason Welch steadies a support post into the hands of a local villager, who
carried it to the playground site.


-�--*^









1 O Tropic Times
SOct. 21, 1994


S Milestones


Meritorious Service Medal - Sgt.
James Farley, HHSC, 308th Miltary Intel-
ligence Battalion. Sgt. 1st Class Rhett
Neilson, Company A, 310th Military In-
telligence Battalion.
Army Commendation Medal - Staff
Sgt. Ronald Hurst, Headquarters Detach-
ment, 470th MI Bde. Spc. Sara Rosenfeld,
and Spc. Lisa Ward, Company A, 308th
MI Bn. Staff Sgt. Orlando Baez and Sgt.
Darren Kreitz, both of Company A, 310th
MI Bn. Sgt. Deborah Garcia, Sgt. Ernesto
Garcia and Spc. Dale Brown all of 747th
MI Bn.
Army Achievement Medal - Master
Sgt. Victor Palanca, Staff Sgt. Johnny Co-
lon, Sgt. Gregory Wilson, Spc. Freddie
Epting, Spc. Manuel Lopez and Sgt. Scott
Heathm Headquarters Detachment, 470th
MI Bde. Spc. Jesse Molinar ofHSC, 308th
MI Bn. Spc. Martin Hickey of Company
A, 308th MI Bn. Sgt. Gregory Hotchkiss
and Sgt. Jonathan Sheline, Company B,
MI Bn. Sgt. Lucianne Crumley, Spc.
Stephanie Cooper, Spc. Amy Hudson and
Spc. Jess Lewis all of the 747th MI Bn.
Certificates of Achievement - Sgt.
Kimberly Bizub of 747 MI Bn.
SOUTHCOM Letter of Apprecia-
tion - Sgt. Eddie Breeding, Company A,
310th MI Bn.




AUGHN, Geral; born to Sgt. George and
Maria Vaughn, Aug. 24.
ANWAY, Amanda Elizabeth; born to
Spc. Lonny and Elizabeth Anway, Sept.
18.
AYALA, Zackary; born to Pfc. Eric and
Dorianne Ayala, Sept. 17.
BROWN, Andrea; born to Pfc. Sophia
Brown, June 13.
BLANCHARD, Tabitha; born to Paul and
Sandra Blanchard, July 11.
BLOCK, Stephany; born to Spc. John and
Julissa Block, Sept. 6.
CARTER, Stanely; born to Stanley and
Cristina Carter, June 27.
COLLIER, Zachary; born to Bryan and
Claudia Collier, July 6.
DURONCELAY, Eric, born to Pvt. 2
Yashawna Duroncelay, June 19.
ESPINOSA, Janny; born to Capt. Jose and
Yvette Espinosa, July 10.
FARREL, Kodi; born to Sgt. Daniel and
Melissa Farrell, June 1.
FLORES, Kelly Ann; born to Sgt. Mario
and Milvia Flores, Aug. 16.
HUNT, Montana Alise; born to Capt.
Hans and Kimberly Hunt, Sept. 12.
HOUSER, Elizabeth Kristine; born to Spc.
Bradley Garrett and Libra Houser, Sept.
18.
JACKSON, Amira; born to Staff Sgt.
Charley and Mary Jackson, July 10.
JACKSON, Kayla Morgan; born to Sgt.
Marvin and Melissa Jackson, Sept. 15.
MAY, Samuel; born to Spc. Samuel and
Melinda May, Sept. 9.
MCMANUS, Alexis Marie; born to Sgt.
Barry and Donna McManus, Sept. 14.
NASH, Kiaira Elizabeth; born to Spc.
Todd and Michel Nash, Sept. 20.
OVARD, Logan; born to 1st Lt. Michael
and Kelly Ovard, July 19.
PENN, Nicole; born to Spc. John and Ma-
vis Penn, July 10.
PIERCE, Adam; born to Spc. Adam and
Paula Pierce, July 13.
PLEAS, Daniel Jeremiah; born to Sgt.
Derrick and Maria Pleas, July 10.
PETERSON, Michael Alexander; born to
Staff Sgt. Wayne and Lilia Peterson, Aug.
16.
SLATER, Alexanda; born to Staff Sgt.
Thomas and Itsia Slater, June 17.
VILLELA, Jesse; born to Evaristo and
Tricia Villela, July 19.
WHATLEY, Marshall Kristopher; to Staff
Sgt. Marshall and Lidia Whatley, Sept. 14.
YATES, Ashley Kate; born to Sgt. Will-
iam and Lisa Yates, Sept. 14.


Support Group top NCO retina
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - pany, 20th Support Group, 19th S
The 41st Area Support Group Command Command in Korea. He was later a
Sgt. Major Samuel to Fort Jacksor
Weddington retired as a senior ins
from active duty during of the supply
a ceremony, Sept. 30. and sergeant m,
Weddington retired the Directorate
after serving 27 years in gistics. He retu
the U.S. Army. Korea as the S
During his career, Plans and Ope
Weddington served as command se
a drill sergeant and first major at the 34
sergeant at Fort Jack- port Group, 19
son, S.C. He went on to port Comman
attend the U.S. Army went on to tl
Sergeants Major Acad- tional Training
emy and, upon gradua- at Fort Irwin
tion in Feb. 1987, he (courtesy) Weddington
became first sergeant Command Sgt. Maj. Samuel signed to 41st
for Headquarters Com- Weddington June, 1993.


National Guard

commander retires
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
The Theater Equipment and Maintenance
Site commander, Lt. Col. Charles E. Lloyd
retired Sept. 29 after 30 years of active
duty and National Guard service.
The Arkansas native enlisted in the Ar-
kansas Guard in 1964 and was commis-
sioned in the Infantry Corps in 1968.
Lloyd has been assigned as a mortar pla-
toon leader, executive officer and company
commander in Company C, 3rd Battalion,
153rd Infantry, at McGehee, Ark. He has
also served as Chemical Plans officer, Se-
curity Plans and Operations Officer and
executive officer in the 25th Rear Area Op-
erations Center at Camp Robinson, Ark.,
and operations officer for the Deputy Chief


Lt. Col. Charles E. Lloyd cu
cake at his retirement cerem
of Staff Reserve Affairs here.


APublic serv
Col. Daniel Mongeon
Area Support Group
S, mander presents
Ridriguez and Y
Espinosa with a 41s
workout bag, water
Mand baseball cap. TI
volunteers receive
Commander's Awa
Public Service.
Sgt. Robin Shawlinskl (U.S. Army)


".. .
-A , ._


(courtesy)
MPs honor civilians
The Military Police Command recog-
nized several MPC civilian employees
during a ceremony recently.
Bobby Poland, the chief of Military
Customs was awarded the
Commander's Award for civilian ser-
vice. Poland is retiring after seven years
of civilian service with the MPC (top
right).
Marilyn Carver, a secretary with the
command, was also recognized for 20
years of federal service. She received a
certificate and a 20-year service pin (top).
Melissa Flynn, the Treaty Affairs Offi-
cer was also promoted to GS-11 (right).
Lt. Col. Stephen Noble, Military Po-
lice deputy commander, presented the
awards.


I rauaios0


Support Primary Leadership Development
signed Course - Distinguished Honor Graduate:
n again Spc. Edward Tosado, Co. B, 4th Bn., 228th
structor Avn. Regiment; Honor Graduate: Spc.
school Stephen Woykewicz, 747th MI Bn.;
ajor for Commandant's List: Spc. Mick Madden,
of Lo- 549th MP Co.; Spc. Galen Wade, HHC,
rned to 4th Bn., 228th Avn. Regiment; Spc. Betty
security, Trandem, Co. A, 310th MI Bn.; Cpl. Rich-
,rations ard Rice, HHC, 1st Bn. (Airborne), 508th
sergeant Inf.; Spc. Matthew Clark, Co. A, 747th MI
th Sup- Bn.; Spc. Boyd Bingham, HSC, 308th MI
th Sup- Bn.; Spc. Aaron Partsafas, MEDDAC-
id, and Panama; Spc. Scott Balfour, Co. D, 160th
he Na- SOAR (Airborne); Spc. Julie Graham,
Center HHC, LEA; Spc. Thomas Ussery, Jr., Co.
n, Cal. B, 536th Eng. Bn.; Leadership Award:
was as- Spc. Humberto Bernard, Co. A, 1st Bn.
ASG in (Airborne), 508th Inf.; Spc. Jorge Rosende,
CID; Spc. James Armstrong, 534th MP
Co.; Spc. Michael Boyd, HHC, USARSO.
Army Physical Fitness Test: Spc. Michael
Boyd, HHC, USARSO. Commandant's In-
spection: Spc. Mick Madden, 549th MP
Co. Class Graduates: Spc. Galen Wade,
HHC, 4th Bn., 228th Avn. Regiment; Spc.
Robert Deloria, HHC, 1st Bn., 228th Avn.
Regiment; Spc. Mary Delores Booth,
HHC, 142nd Med. Bn.; Spc. Aaron
Partsafas, MEDDAC-Panama; Spc. Daniel
Beebe, 154th Signal Bn.; Spc. Paul Berthot,
79th Army Band; Cpl. Andrew Cooper,
HQ, SOUTHCOM; Spc. Humberto Ber-
nard, Co. A, 1st Bn. (Airborne), 508th Inf.;
Spc. Jack Allred, Co. C, 5th Bn., 87th Inf.
(Light); Spc. Michael Farmer, Co. A, MI
Bn. (L); Spc. French Reid, Panama MP
Co.; Spc. Christopher Hickox, 549th MP
(courtesy) Co.; Spc. Jose Diaz, HHC, JOTB; Spc.
its the Douglas Black, Company D, 160th SOAR
lony. (Airborne); Spc. Elizabeth Brown, Co. A,
193rd Spt. Bn.; Spc. Robert Purce, 1097th-
Trans. Co.; Spc. Mark Allen, HHC, 41st
ASG; Spc. Mark Galpin, HHC, 128th Avn.
'ice Bde.; Spc. Andre Edouard, Co. E, 1st Bn.,
i, 41st 228th Avn. Bn.; Spc. Casey Roberts, 214th
Med. Det.; Spc. Michael Goodson, HSC,
Scoom- 536th Eng. Bn.; Spc. Julie Graham, HHC,
Aurea LEA; Cpl. Ralph Sanchez, HHC, US-
rvette ARSO; Spc. James Hansen, HHC, USAG;
,t ASG Spc. Harris Dickerson, Co. A, 5th Bn., 87th
bottle Inf. (Light); Spc. Stephen Woytkewicz,
he two 747th MI Bn.; Cpl. Jason Edwards, HHD,
d the 470th MI Bde.; Spc. Israel Nero, HHC,
rd for 536th Eng. Bn.; Spc. Boyd Bingham, HSC,
308th MI Bn.; Spc. Christine Hunnicutt,
Company B, 310th MI Bn.; Spc. Paul
Dudas, HHC, 5th Bn., 87th Inf. (Light);
Spc. Jorge Rosende, CID; Spc. Teresa
Alexander, Co. D, 142nd Med. Bn.; Spc.
Edward Tosado, Co. B, 4th Bn., 228th
Avn. Regiment; Spc. Arnulfo Rodriguez,
Co. E, 228th Avn. Regiment; Spc. William
McGaffey, HHC, 154th Signal Bn.; Spc.
Leonard Hearne, MEDDAC-Panama; Spc.
Thomas Ussery, Co. B, 536th Eng. Bn.;
Spc. Steven Thompson, Co. A, 536th Eng.
Bn.;Spc. Gregory Pauch, U.S.
SOUTHCOM; Spc. Richard Bogle, HHC,
5th Bn., 87th Inf. (Light); Spc. Matthew
Clark, Co. A, 747th MI Bn.; Cpl. Jimmy
Stogner, 549th MP Co.; Spc. Subrina John-
son, 69th Sig. Co.; Spc. Reginald Bryant,
1097th Trans. Co.; Spc. Roger Schlough,
(courtesy)JOTB; Spc. James Armstrong, 534th MP
Co.; Spc. Jimmy Faddis, 549th MP Co.;
Spc. Robert Stevenson, HHC, 1st Bn.,
228th Avn. Regiment; Spc. Freddy
Urmeneta, Co. B, 154th Sig. Bn.; Spc.
Christopher Barnes, Company D, 4th Bn.,
228th Avn. Regiment; Spc. Jesus Lozano-
Anaya, DENTAC-Panama; Spc. Steven
llnicki, HHC, 128th Avn. Bde.; Spc.
Amelia Garcia, Co. D, USAG; Spc. Scott
Balfour, Co. D, 160th SOAR (Airborne);
Spc. Tony Whetstone, Co. A, 193rd Spt.
Bn.; Cpl. Richard Rice, HHC, 1st Bn.,
508th Inf. (Airborne); Spc. Milissa Hood,
154th Sig. Bn.; Spc. Mick Madden, 549th
MP Co.; Spc. Michael Boyd, HHC, US-
ARSO; Spc. Gerald Nino, Co. C, 5th Bn.
87th Inf. (Light); Spc. Betty Trandem,
Company A, 310th MI Bn.; Spc. Sean
(courtesy) Kelly, 1097th Trans. Co.


^-5-f


es










L~~'atures


Tropic Times 1
Oct. 21, 1994 I


Extraordinary operators on line


COROZAL (USARSO) - "Operator 12, how may I
help you sir or ma'am?"
So says the human voice on the other end of the
telephone after dialing operator assistance here in Pana-
ma. No name or face to put with the voice. It seems
everyone, at one point or another has wondered what the
person on the other end of the line looks like. Most of the
time, a "normal person" comes to mind.
For Luis Narimatsu and Richard Hayden, working at
the Joint Overseas Switching Section (JOSS) gives them
the opportunityto show people, despite their"disabilities,"
that they are just as "normal" as other people.
Narimatsu was diagnosed with infantile glaucoma when
he was 21 years old, and was completely blind by the age
of 26. Up to the time he lost his sight, Narimatsu was going
to school at Panama Canal College, where he earned an
associates degree.
"After that I was in rehab," Narimatsu said. "I had to
learn Braille (an alphabet of raised dots) and how to get
around by myself...and I had to get a job."
That turned out to be more difficult than expected. The







C&I


school taught Braille in Spanish. With English as his
primary language, he had to learn two "foreign" languages
at the same time. Getting a job was no easy feat, either.
Narimatsu called the JOSS consistently for nearly three
years before finally landing the job in October 1993.
Once hired, Narimatsu needed specialized equipment
to become an operator. The customized terminal he uses
gives him a verbal response after having the requested
information keyed in.
On the other hand, Hayden has been afflicted with
cerebral palsy all his life. The disease affects his nervous
system and affects his balance and ability to walk, but not
his ability to work.
"If I'm sitting down, no one notices," Hayden said.
"When I walk away, that's when they realize I have
(cerebral palsy)."
Hayden worked for the Panama Canal Commission as
a student hire and then on a permanent position for five
years until his position was cut. After that, he volunteered
at the Albrook AFS Post Office and the Southern Com-
mand Information Line. The experience he gained at the


information line helped him land a job at the JOSS in
January 1991. For both Hayden and Narimatsu, working at
the JOSS has been, for lack of a better word, normal -
which is the way they like it.
"It's good when people treat you normally," Narimatsu
said. "It makes you feel worse when people baby you."
"I've been known to trip over a dime," Hayden said.
"It's kind of embarrassing when you fall in public. People
freak out. They start running at you trying to help you up.
I have to tell them, 'It's OK, I can get up."'
Both agree that working at the JOSS'has been a real
boost to their self image. They state that since they've been
able to work around their disabilities and prove themselves
as capable individuals, they feel it has been an education for
those they work and talk with.
"I have always liked beirig around people," Narimatsu
said. "This job helps people deal with me and not treat me
any different than others."
So for people who do wonder what the person on the
other end of the phone line looks like, don't worry. A
normal person is answering their call.


Luis Narimatsu


(U.S. Army) Richard


--A










S2 Tropic Times
Oct. 21, 1994


Features


Aviator receives POW bracelet


After 20 years, woman turns over war keepsake


by Linda Christensen
Tropic Times contributor
When Robin Edward's son, Justin, was looking for
a treasure to play with from his mother's jewelry box,
he came across an old bracelet with a name and date
inscribed. Robin explained that the name was of a
soldier who was a prisoner of war in Vietnam.
When Justin asked, "Did the bad guys kill him?" his
mother could only say," I hope not, but I don't know."
She never guessed that only a few weeks later, she
would know his fate.
Robin and her husband, Lt. Col. James Edwards,
bought bracelets during the early '70s while attending
college in Georgia. Both kept them through the years,
not knowing whether either person ever made it home.
One night a few weeks ago, they were watching a
television documentary about Vietnam POWs. Her
husband mentioned that he was attending an Army
Aviation Association of America meeting and that a
former POW named Col. Reeder would be speaking.
"Normally I don't watch those shows because they
are so depressing ," Robin said. "But that night I did,
and when my husband said 'Col. Reeder and POW,' it
iust triggered my memory."
Edwards said she went upstairs and retrieved both
of their bracelets. They pondered whether it could
really be the same man. After a few phone calls the
next day, they realized that indeed it was.
"All I could think about was 'thank God, he is alive
and well,'" Robin said.
After twenty-odd years, she never gave up hope.
"You know, I never forgot about the bracelet or Capt.
Reeder," she said. "As far as I knew, he was still over
there. And every so often, I'd remember and say a
prayer."
Robin never guessed that the bracelet she kept for
so long was for a man many people consider the
modem day living hero of Army aviation, Col. Will-
iam Reeder, U.S. Southern Command deputy chief of
staff.
After entering the Army at Glendale, Calif., in
1965, Reeder served two tours in Vietnam as a helicop-


ter pilot. Both times, he was shot down. The second
time, he didn't make it back.
Reeder was captured in Cambodia and forced to
walk with a broken back, plus a list of other injuries
that would have forced most other men to give up. Yet,
he didn't. He hobbled many miles to a jungle camp and
then, after several more nights of walking, wound up
at the infamous 'Hanoi Hilton.'
He was rescued a year later. Back in the United
States, numerous surgeries and months of recovery
were required to heal his injuries.
Reeder is a survivor of all the things most of us only
see in the movies. For that reason, he is greatly respect-
ed, in not only the aviation field, but throughout the
Army. There is no trace of Reeder's tragic past on his
face. In fact, he looks much younger than many of his
contemporaries.
Out of the thousands of soldiers, airmen, Marines
and sailors that went to Vietnam, Robin finds it coin-
cidental the bracelet she received was for such a
famous aviator.
"My husband is an aviator and we had the bracelets
before he went in the Army," she said. " It's just that
so many people were considered POWs, and for my
bracelet to be for an aviator..."
Ironically, both families are stationed here in Pan-
ama. Their paths have probably crossed somewhere:
commissary, hospital or military functions.
Until a few weeks ago, Robin knew nothing except
Reeder's name and his date of capture. In her words, it
made it even harder not knowing anything about him,
or even if he had died. Learning the outcome of
Reeder's ordeal has been a relief to Robin and closes
a final chapter on Vietnam in her life.
"After the war was calming down, I thought about
trying to find out what happened to him," she said.
"But by that time, my husband was active-duty and we
were moving around and time just passed."
After Robin and her husband contacted AAAA
meeting organizer Maj. Jack Kendall and informed
him of their discovery, he arranged for Edwards to
present Reeder with his POW bracelet after his speech.
According to Reeder, it was an emotional moment.


"After all these years, for someone to still be hold-
ing onto this bracelet..." Reeder said, shaking his head.
"Normally, I give my POW speech at these meet-
ings, but this time, I had decided to give one on the
future of Army aviation. Luckily, I did because seeing
this bracelet was very emotional for me."
His POW speech recounts in detail his experiences
in Vietnam.
Seeing Reeder for the first time was also very
emotional for Robin. At the time of the presentation,
she was not aware of the pain he put up with in
captivity.
"I would have just cried, if I had to sit there and
listen to his suffering," she said.
And she nearly did cry when she presented him with
the bracelet, but held it together "in front all those
strangers." Yet, to Robin, Reeder will never be a
stranger. After twenty years, she finally had a face to
go with the name, except she still refers to him as Capt.
Reeder.
"For all these years, he's been Capt. Reeder and to
me, he will always be Capt. Reeder," she said with a
laugh.
Robin likened the bracelet to the relationship that a
person would have with a "pen pal," except she never
knew anything more than a name and date. After
meeting Reeder, she is proud she was able to at least
provide prayers for him throughout the years, even if
only a couple of those years were when he was in
captivity.
Reeder said that when he first came back to the
states, a few people contacted him and gave him their
bracelets, but he never expected someone to care
enough to hold onto one for so long.
"This one will always be very special," he said.
"I'm planning to put it in a case at home and it'll be a
good story to recall."
At home, Reeder and his wife, Lt. Col. Melanie
Reeder, have two grown children, a three-year-old,
and another baby on the way.
He will have plenty of time and receptive ears to
recount the story of the military wife who refused to
give up on him after twenty years.


Lightning poses safety threat



during Panama's rainy season


PANAMA (USAG-Panama Safety Office) -
The old saying, "Lightning never strikes the
same spot twice," may be true, but it won't really
matter if someone is standing there for the first
time.
According to the U.S. National Center for
Health Statistics, lightning kills about 150 Amer-
icans each year and injures some 250 more.
While statistics for lightning strikes in Panama
are not available, the news media has recorded
several incidents in recent years, said Roberto
Alleyne, USAG-Panama safety specialist.
In Panama, lightning events almost always
coincide with the rainy season thunderstorms
from May to mid-December, with the highest
frequency occurring between September and No-
vember, he said.
The U.S.Army Garrison-Panama Director-
ate of Community Activities Outdoor Recre-
ation Branch has a lightning strike avoidance
policy for all of its outdoor activities.
"The policy is that any time a thunderstorm is
near or imminent, swimming pools are cleared,
and football and youth soccer games are halted
until the lightning threat is over," Alleyne said.
When a person is struck by lightning, electri-
cal shock and burns usually result. When struck,
a person will be stunned or paralyzed, and often
can be revived through first aid measures.
"There is no danger in touching a person who
has been struck by lightning because the electri-
cal charges are not retained in the body,"Alleyne
said. "Prompt application of artificial resuscita-
tion and treatment of shock could be the differ-
ence between life and death."


The most common activities at the time a
lightning strike injury occurs are waiting under a
tree, participating in water sports, and golfing, he
said.
"Unlike many other causes of death and injury
that one can run away from, lightning strikes
before the warning thunder," Alleyne said.
People can help lower the chance of getting
struck by lightning, he said.
When possible, avoid open areas, bare hill
tops, lone or prominent trees, flagpoles, fences,
radio antennas, open-top vehicles and power and
telephone lines.
"When available, seek shelter in a building,"
he said. "Well-grounded metal buildings offer
protection, provided people don't touch the metal
inside of a building and stay away from stoves,
telephones, windows, metal equipment, water on
the floor, or other possible conductors of electric-
ity."
If caught outdoors, people should seek caves,
foxholes, deep ditches, the base of a steep cliff or
hill, or inside rubber tired vehicles with steel
bodies.
If on a lake as a storm is approaching, try to
reach the shore and seek shelter.
If a group is caught outside or on hilltops they
should disperse to minimize the electrical attrac-
tion offered by a massing of people.
"To the extent possible, avoid having any part
of your body in contact with water that may be
flooding the ground," Alleyne said. "If however,
you are caught in flat, open terrain or hilltop, lie
down in any depression available in order to
reduce your height above the terrain."
















Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Page 13


Lucky seven




Local athletes race in D.C.


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor
COROZAL - The men's and women's
teams representing U.S. Army South in the
Army 10-mile Run Sunday earned seventh
place in a field of 300 teams in Washington,
D.C.
The race is sponsored by the Associa-
tion of the U.S. Army, said Sue Bozgoz, a
team member.
The men competed against approximate-
ly 250 teams while the women ran against
approximately 50 teams, USARSO coach
Willie Moye said.
Bozgoz said 8,500 people participated
in the run.
A highlight ofthe race was the first place
finish in the 44-49 age group by Clinton
Davis, amemberofthe FortClayton Stirders,
who completed the run in 56 minutes. The


Striders accompanied the USARSO team
as a show of support, Moye said.
Starting and ending at the Pentagon, the
race wound past Potomac Park, Arlington
National Cemetary, the Lincoln Memorial
and crossed the Memorial Bridge, Moye
said.
Both teams turned in exceptional per-
formances, he said.
"Our community is so much smaller
than the teams coming from other places,"
he said. "Our people must be commended
for competing with these teams."
The USARSO teams faced runners from
U.S. Army installations from around the
world, he said.
Results from the men's competition are
as follows:
First place - Fort Carson, Colo., 52:18
Second place - FortCampbell, Ky., 52:22
Third place - Fort Sam Houston, Tx.,


53:27
The USARSO team's run time was 54:46
Results from the women's competition
are as follows:
First place - Fort Hood, Tx., 1:05:31
Second place - Hawaii, 1:06:00
Third place- Fort Carson, Colo., 1:08:19
The USARSO team's run time was
1:11:06.
Team scores are computed by averaging
the four fastest times of the six man teams,
Moye said.
The men'steam improved on theireighth
place showing in 1993. Robert Czech and
Corey Smallwood returned this year.
Smallwood shaved 2 minutes off his 1993
58:39 time.
"Some guys were completely surprised
by the level of competition," he said.
The women's team lost some ground on
the competition after finishing fourth last


year. However, with only Bozgoz return-
ing, the team was new and unaccustomed to
this level of competition, Moye said.
"There were a lot of new people on the
team, and for many of them it was the first
time they had competed at this level, but
they did a great job," he said.
The climate was anotherfactor USARSO
runners had to overcome. The temperature
in Washington, D.C. was 55 degrees
fahrenheit, a dramatic change for runners
coming from the tropics. In spite of the cold
the USARSO runners did very well, Moye
said.
Times for the Strider runners are as
follows:-
Scott Digruttolo 57:19, 43rd in 25-29
age group
Roberto Gotay 1:00:03
Willie Moye 1:0 1:00
Richard Thomas 1:03:00


USARSO runners make a winning team


1994 USARSO 10-miler Men's Team


Wilfredo Griego
Time - 52:41, 5th in 25-29 age
group
Unit- Headquarters and Headquar-
ters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th
Infantry
Experience - Recreational runner,
no formal competitions.
Comments on the team - Griego
was unavailable for comment.
Robert Czech
Time - 54:47, 25th in 25-29 age
group. Czech's time in last year's
Army 10-miler was 54:34.
Unit- Headquarters and Headquar- &
ters Company, U.S. Army South
Experience - Member of the 1993
USARSO 10-miler Team.
Comments on the team - "This will
be a competitive group."
Paul Stevenson
Time - 55:05, 16th in 30-34 age
group
Unit - Southern Command Net- ts
work N,
Experience- Three 10-mile events.
Comments on the team - "I love to
run, and any time I can be with
other runners it's a good experi-
ence."
Corey Smallwood
Time - 56:32, 36th in 25-29 age
group
Unit- Headquarters and Headquar-
ters Company, U.S. Army South
Experience - Three 10-mile events.
Comments on the team - "I am very
positive about it and have pride
within myself. I am proud to repre-
sent USARSO in the 10th annual W
10-miler in D.C."


Brian Coutch
Time - 56:46, 37th in 25-29 age
group
Unit - Company B, 536th Engineer
Battalion
Experience - Five 10-mile events,
two marathons, one 75-mile run.
Comments on the team - "Being on
the team is superb, the team mem-
bers are really supportive."
Jose Alberto Haro
Time - 57:03, 40th in 25-29 age
group
Unit- Headquarters and Headquar-
ters Comapny, U.S. Army Garri-
son
Experince- 1994 Transisthmian Re-
lay Race USARSO team member.
Comments on the team - "I'm ex-
cited to represent USARSO."


i~7I


1994 USARSO 10-miler Women's Team
Sue Bozgoz
Time- 1:05:40, fourth in 30-34 age
group
Unit - Company D, 142nd Medical
battalion
Experience - one- and two-mile
and five-kilometer events in high r
school, two-mile and 13-mileevents .o;,
in college, Army 10-mile race in
1989 and 1992.
Comments on the team - "It is outstanding."
Ethenia Torres
Time - 1:11:50, 33rd in 30-34 age
group
Unit- U.S. Army Medical Depart-
ment Activity
Experience - High school track and
five and ten-kilometer races in the .
Army.
Comments on the team - "It's been
my goal to be on the team."


Traci Beth Thompson
Time - 1:13:22, 43rd' in 25-29 age
group
Unit - Company B, 308th Military
Intelligence Battalion
Experience - Recreational runner.
Comments on the team-"I couldn't
have made it this far without my
husband's support and love and my
unit's six mile runs."
Heidi Pointer
Time - 1:14:30, 27th in 25-29 age
group
Unit- Headquarters and Headquar-
ters Company, 154th Signal Battal-
* ion
Experience - Unit track team at Fort
Ord, Calif.
Comments on the team - "Being on
the team is one of the greatest op-
portunities of my military career."
Michelle DiGruttolo
Time - 1:14:24, 25th in 20-24 age
group
Unit - Company A, 308th Military
Intelligence Battalion
Experience - Recreational road rac-
es.
Comments on the team - "I am
anxious to be a part of this winning
team."
Genoveva Esquivel-Ifill
Time - 1:16:31, 56th in 30-34 age
group
Unit- 92nd Personnel Services Cen-
ter
Experience - Transisthmian Relay
Race team member 1992-1994.
Comments on the team - "It didn't
occur to me that I could run 10
miles in one day. I amveryproud to
be part of the team."


Hot heads and cool plays make the
difference in the Dolphins and Raid-
ers matchup.


*SCN AM radio schedule
*Sports standings
*Basketball semi-finals


Oct. 21, 1994


Sports


I


Football Page 14 -

The Cougars take their unbeaten
record to 6-0 after pummeling the
Kolts 35-7.


Jm










14 Tropic Times
14Oct. 21, 1994


Football


Can't touch this



Cougars roll down




victory lane at 6-0


Sgt. Lori Davis (Tropic Times)
Big, bad saint
Arturo Del Busto helps the Kolts defensive
tackle Jaime St. Malo snap his chin strap.
Although the Kolts are 1-5 this season, it is
a big, physical team. St. Malo is 5'11" tall
and weighs 270 pounds.
Tigers 40-Machine 19
The Tigers' Jon Guerra saw Red, and again rushed
for over 200 yards. In his last outing against the
Machine, Guerra racked up 222 yards. This time he
piled on 242 yards and found the end zone three times.
Guerra trails the Devils' Wilbert Reese by 61 points
for the league rushing record.
-The Tigers' Ruben Rafalko spent his time in the
end zone as well, putting two more touchdowns on
the scoreboard on two short runs.
Tony Wrice scored for the Machine on a 40-yard
pass play from Jared Holzworth.
Devils 14-Bulldogs 6
The Bulldogs held the Devils' Wilbert Reese to
164 yards and one touchdown, scored on a 29-yard
run, his longest for the night. Juney Barnett tacked on
a touchdown to round out the Devils' scoring.
The Bulldogs offense played a game of slippery
fingers, fumbling the ball five times. In spite of
coughing up the ball twice, Cardova Hall boosted his
rushing record by 137 yards, securing third place.
Joe Novotny turned in the Bulldogs only score on
a fumble recovery in the end zone.


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor


Sgt. Lori Davis (Tropic 1
The Cougars' Buddy Martens fa
back to pass.


BALBOA - Fans started look-
ing for the fat lady to sing at half
time as the Cougars jumped out to
a 27-7 lead on the hapless Kolts, but
the game wasn't over until the end
of the grueling second half and the
35-7 Cougar win.
The Cougars dazzled the crowd
and baffled the Kolts, scoring on
their first play from scrimmage as the
game opened. Buddy Martens con-
nected with Michael Morales on a
short out pass. Morales turned a it
into big yardage as he sprinted 73
yards down the sideline into the end
zone.
The Cougars' Lance VonHollen
followed on Martens' heels by pick-
ing off the Kolts' Raul Ford and
running the ball back for a touch-
down.
The Cougars' Curtis Haynes also
turned a Kolts turnover into Cougar
points by scoring on a Ford fumble.
Times) The Kolts looked battered under
des a 20-point deficit, but they refused
to give up. Ricardo Thayer picked


offMarten on the five-yard line, and
the Kolts took over.
Ford went to Alberto Norte for
two passes, picking up 25 yards, but
the Kolts ground out the other 50
yards on tenacious running.
Ford orchestrated a drive that put
the Kolts one foot from the goal line
with seconds left on the clock. Just
as the half ran out, Ford dove in for
the Kolts' only score of the game.
The Cougars and Kolts had been
here before, the Kolts came back in
the second half to make the score
27-24, and had possession of the
ball and threatened to score. Cougar
coach Fred Bales said he was not
taking the lead for granted.
The second half became a tug of
war; both teams were tired and slug-
gish. Shouts from the Cougar side-
line went from demands on the of-
fense to cheers for the defense for
holding the Kolts scoreless.
The Cougars' defense held the
line, and with time running out the
offense got back into the game. With
18 seconds in the game Martens
threw a touchdown pass to Jelani
Jordan.


Sgt. Lori Davis (TropI
The Cougars' Lance VonHollen breaks to the outside to evade the Kolts' Abdiel Poveda.


I Scoeboard


1400

1200

1000

800

600

400

200


Yards rushing
SBulldogEs Cougars Devils


Yards passing
Kolts Machine TRiger
Source: Robert Best


League Leaders
Team standings
W L T Pct. PF
Cougars 6 0 0 1.000 95
Devils 5 1 0 .833 96
Bulldogs 3 3 0 .500 34
Tigers 3 3 0 .500 37
Kolts 1 5 0 .167 73
Machine 0 6 0 .000 13
Tonight's games
Cougars vs. Tigers, 6 p.m. (CHS)
Bulldogs vs. Machine, 5:30 p.m. (BHS)
Kolts vs. Devils, 7:30 p.m. (BHS)
Quarterbacks
PA PC % Yds TD Int
Martens, Cougars 108 46 43 866 8 5
Lampas, Devils 49 29 59 404 3 2
Beach, Bulldogs 49 15' 31 349 1 7
Interceptions
Beach, Bulldogs 5


Reese, Devils
Guerra, Tigers
Martens, Cougar


Reese, Devils
Guerra, Tigers
Hall, Bulldogs


VonHollen, Coug
Beach, Bulldogs
Lampas, Devils


Price, Tigers
Beach, Bulldogs
Bowman, Devils


Scoring
TD
10
7
rs 5
Rushing
Carries
115
103
95
Kick offs
Kicks
ars 23
14
21
Punts
Kicks
20
18
7


Team statistics


XP
3
1

Yds.
818
757
617

Yds.
1105
630
943

Yds.
642
522
196


Total
66
42
32

Avg.
7.1
6.4
6.5

Avg.
48
45
44.9

Avg.
32
29
28


I











Sports


Tropic Times 15
Oct. 21, 199415


Infantry shoots for title


by Sgt. James A. Rush uame two, neld uct. 17, saw me advance to the second round where
24th Wing Public Affairs 24th Mission Support Squadron chal- they lost to MSS 53-48 Oct. 13. AIS/
lenge the foot soldiers with only mar- OSS set back the other Special Boat
HOWARD AFB - Back-to-back ginally better success. The end score Unit 26 team 52-42 in their first-round
wins over the top teams from the Air was four points closer, 58-45, but ex- game before losing the Army.
Force earned the Army's best squad a cept for the opening minutes, the game The special boat unit redeemed it-
day off during the intramural was never close, self somewhat by topping the Medical
interservice basketball playoffs. Mission support managed to keep Activity 62-59 Oct. 14. This earned
Champions and runners-up from Davis'scoringto a modestseven points, them a rematch against a familiar foe
the services face each other for the but teammates Jeff Deuitch and on Monday however.
interservice title following regular Senador Hines picked up the slack. AIS/OSSmanagedtosinkthewhole
season play in their own communi- Deuitch tried his luck from long fleet. It beat Naval Station 59-56 Oct.
ties. The interservice tournaments are distance and came up with a pair of 14, and then pulled off the hat trick
sponsored through the combined ef- threes in the first half. Four more field against the seamen by beating special
forts of the sports office staffs from goals and four free throws in the sec- boat 42-35 Monday.
each service. ond half gave him a game-high 18 The losers' bracket finals were held
After a first round bye, Headquar- points. He was one point better than Tuesday as MSS faced AIS/OSS for
ters and Headquarters Company, 5th Hines who finished with 17, including the fourth time this season. Mission
Battalion, 87thInfantryfacedthecom- four three-pointers, support had won two of the teams'
bined team of the 24th Air Intelli- Pete Liljeholm was the only nota- three meetings during the season and
gence/Operations squadrons Oct. 13. ble scorer for MSS with 17 points, playoffs, but AIS/OSS would even the
Led by Norris Davis, they had The losers' bracket of the double score by notching a 61-48 whipping.
little trouble posting a 60-43 win. elimination tournament was populat-
Red-hot Davis dominated the game ed first by the Navy teams. Editor's note: In the champion-
with 31 points. Twenty-one of these The Army's second-seeded Medi- ship 5-87th beat AIS/OSS 60-49. See
came in the first half as he accounted cal Department Activity faced the U.S. next week's issue ofthe Tropic Times
for nearly two-thirds of his team's Naval Station team to open the tourney for the championship story.
scoring during the opening period. Oct. 12. A 73-47 win allowed them to


Hothead Hostetler gets benched


by John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office
RODMAN NS - Week seven of the NFL season started
off with a bore --Cleveland's 11-8 Thursday night win at
Houston - but rebounded with two overtime games and a
few upsets. In one of the overtime games, the Fish spotted
the Raiders a 10-0 lead, before rallying for a 20-17 win.
Raiders' fans have a legitimate gripe on the outcome,
because head coach Art Shell pulled quarterback Jeff
Hostetler for mouthing off. A rally was also needed in the
other overtime game. Buddy's Boys came back from a 14-
0 disadvantage to down the Skins 19-16. The Rams' upset
of the Giants wasn't much of a surprise, but the Dolts
downing the Bills was a shock and a half.
Here are the week eight predictions. Home teams are in
CAPS.
Lions and Bears, oh my! - The Bears are a surprise at
4-2 and the Lions are a complete mystery. Since handing
the Cowboys their only loss of the season, Detroit hasn't
won a game since. The Bears looked impressive in a win
over the Bills, but when Buffalo (4-3) loses to the likes of
Indianapolis, it takes away from the win. This series has a
unique trend going. Since 1989, the teams have split each
season with Chicago always winning the first game. Look
for that trend to change. LIONS 20, Bears 10.
Giants twist steel - The Giants are three up, three down;
and the Steelers are just down. Last week, not only did they
edge the Kitties by only four, but they also lost running back
Barry Foster for two to three weeks with a sprained knee.
The Giants' fall is no surprise. In their first three wins, two
were nailbiters over weaksisters Arizona and Washington.
The Steelers did have the league's best running game going
into the win over Cincy. They now must rely on a passing
game ranked in the lower half of the league. Rodney
Hampton is back in form and the Giants should eat up the
clock like the old days. GIANTS 23, Steelers 13.
Shattered Windshield Game - The Washington-Indi-
anapolis game is classic "Shattered Windshield Game."
That's a game where if you leave two tickets to this game
on your car dashboard, someone will smash your wind-
shield and leave four more. Granted the Colts beat Buffalo
- something they have done only once since 1988 - but
that was a fluke. The Redskins couldn't even beat Buddy's
Cards at home after jumping out to a two-TD lead. The


SCN AM Radio
790/1420
Saturday
2:30 p.m., NCAA: North Carolina at
Virginia
5:30 p.m., NCAA: California at U.S.C.
Sunday
Noon, NFL:Pittsburgh Steelersat N.Y.
Giants
3 p.m., NFL:Denver Broncos at N.Y.


Skins only victory was in a dome against New Orleans.
Heath Shuler will get his first win in a dome against the
Dolts. Skins 24, COLTS 20.
Saints march on Rams - L.A. just upset the Giants and
the Saints are fresh off a Bolt-beating so the Rams should
be a lock right? Not on a dry October day in Panama. The
Saints own the Rams, taking seven of the last eight and
showed the ability to come back last week. The Chargers
raced to a 24-0 lead, but New Orleans outscored them the
rest of the way, 22-12. The Rams are notorious for winning
games they shouldn't and vice versa. With a great running
back in Jerome Bettis and one of the league's best defensive
lines, the Rams should win. SAINTS 20, Rams 16.
Houston on Monday night? Again? - You can't blame
ABC for wanting the Oilers again. Last season, Houston
was 12-4, including an 11-game winning streak. This
season Houston's 1-5 record and history is on Philadel-
phia's side this Monday. The Oilers have never beaten the
Eagles in five tries. Houston is just the right medicine for
Philly, who lost to that "other" Texas team last week.
EAGLES 26, Oilers 10.
In other action: Minnesota makes it five out of six,
VIKES 16, Packers 10; Raiders rebound, RAIDERS 24,
Falcons 17; Brownies bash Bungals, BROWNS 19, Kitties
10; Boys bump Buddy, Cowpokes 27, CARDS 9; Bolts
bust Broncos, CHARGERS 30, Broncos 17; K.C. takes
seven in a row, CHIEFS 22, Seabirds 14; Young makes it
12 of 13; NINERS 34, Bucs 13.
There are open dates for Buffalo, (they need it) Miami,
New England and the New York Jets.
Last week 7-4, season 53-36, Monday night 6-1.
National Football League


American Conference
East
W L T % PF PA
Miami 5 2 0 .714 180 146
Buffalo 4 3 0 .571 134 143
Jets 4 3 0 .571 116 122
Indian. 3 4 0 .429 140 145
N.E. 3 4 0 .429 175 183
Central
Clev. 5 1 0 .833 129 66
Pitt. 4 2 0 .667 114 111
Houst. 1 5 0 .167 87 134
Cin. 0 6 0 .000 88 143
West
S.D. 6 0 0 1.000 70 106
K.C. 4 2 0 .667 121 108
Seattle 3 3 0 .500 130 86
Raiders 2 4 0 .333 133 161
Denver 1 5 0 .167 136 177


Giants
Monday
8 p.m., NFL: Houston Oilers at Phila-
delphia Eagles
Standings
Navy Intramural Volleyball
W L GB
PWD 2 0
NSWU 8 1 0 .5
NSCIATTS 1 0 .5


National Conference


Dallas 5
Phil. 4
Giants 3
Arizona 2
Wash. 1
Chic. 4
Minn. 4
G.B. 3
Detroit 2
Tampa 2
S.F. 5
Atlanta 4
Rams 3
N.O. 2


1 0 .833 159
2 0 .667 140
3 0 .500 121
4 0 .333 68
6 0 .143 128
Central
2 0 .667 113
2 0 .667 134
3 0 .500 107
4 0 .333 106
4 0 .333 80
West
2 0 .714 196
3 0 .571 141
4 0 .429 101
5 0 .286 119


Med. Dep. 0 2 2
Marines 0 2 2
*as of Oct.14
Schedule
Women's high school basketball
Today
4:30 p.m.: Devils vs. Machine (BHS)
5:30 p.m.: Bulldogs vs. Tigers (CHS)
Tuesday-Oct. 28
(TBA) Post-season tournament (TBA)


Locl spots gu


A


� I - - - /',- ,A n 1'7" - ., +I,


.A--. f- il'. --] --A -h-


Sprsbi

Special event
The Legion ofAbou Saad Temple will host their
annual fishing tournament Nov. 3 at Gatun Lake.
Prizes will be presented for largest fish, heaviest
stringer and most fish caught over 15 inches. All
proceeds will be donated to the Transportation
Fund that is used to send crippled and burned
children here in Panama to the United States
and return. A concession stand will be available to
the public. For information, call Terry Zittle at 261-
8018.
Amador
The Fort Amador Golf Course will have ladies
beginner lessons 3:30-4:30 p.m. and 4:30-5:30
p.m. Tuesday forsix-weeks. There isa$20 fee.Call
282-4511 for information.
The Fort Amador Nine-hole Ladies Golf
League starts Tuesday and will last seven weeks.
There is an $8 fee. Call 282-4511 for information.
The Amador Golf Course is sponsoring a two-
person, best ball Thanksgiving Turkey Shoot
7:30 a.m. Nov. 12, $8. Call 282-4511 to register by
Nov. 9.
Albrook/Howard
Registration for youth baseball for ages 5-18
years will run Oct. 31 to Dec. 3 at the Howard and
Albrook youth centers. A physical exam is required
before a child can be registered. There is a $25 fee
for family members of active duty card holders and
a $30 fee for other people.
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center is spon-
soring a tennis ladder tournament. Call 284-
3451 for information.
Because of Operation Safe Haven, hours at the
Albrook Sports and Fitness Center have been
changed temporarily. The gym will be open 8 a.m.-
1 p.m. and 4-7 p.m. on weekdays, noon-6 p.m.
Saturday, and 1-6 p.m. Sunday.
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center has a
TGIF 5-kilometer fun run, 5:15 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday. Register at the center to win a T-shirt in the
drawing following the run.
Clayton
I The Clayton Bowling Center has lunch-time
specials 11 a.m.-1 p.m. weekdays. Games are 50
cents and shoes are free. Call 287-6366 for more
information.
Reeder Physical Fitness Center has free
aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. Monday- Friday. Call
287-3861 for information.
Tang Soo Do is taught 6-8 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday at the Valent Recreation Center. Classes
are open to adults and children 4 years old and up.
Call 287-6500 for information.
Curundu
Tang Soo Do is taught 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays at the Pacific Theater Arts Center,
Building 2060 in the Curundu housing. Classes are
open to adults and children 4 years old and up. Call
286-3814 for information.
Anyone interested in joining a mixed bowling
league at the Curundu Bowling Center can call
286-3914 for information.
Rodman
The Rodman Marina will hold a bass fishing
tournament on Gatun Lake 5:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov.
11. The entry fee is $10 and cash awards will be
given for the largest and second largest fish caught.
Call the Rodman Marina at 283-3150 to register.
An intramural swim meet will be held at the
Rodman Pool 6:30 a.m. Nov. 18. The competition
is open to all Navy/Marine Corps military, Depart-
ment of Defense civilians and dependents 18 and
older. There is a limit of one team per unit. Register
by Nov. 10. Call Rodman Athletics at283-4222 for
information or to register.
The Rodman Fitness Center has weight-lifting
classes 4:30-6 p.m. Monday, Wednesdays and
Friday. There is a $20 fee for six weeks of classes.
Register for the class at the center.
Atlantic community
An aerobics workshop and certification test
is being organized in the Atlantic community. The
testing will be given by the American Aerobic
Association International and International Sports
Medicine Association from Pennsylvania. The cer-
tification is valid for two years. A minimum of 15
people are required for the class. For information,
call Delinda May at 289-3163.









16 Tropic Times News
Oct. 21, 1994 w




1 93rd d










colors


by Sgt. Eric Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The 193rd
Infantry Brigade (Light) officially cased its colors Oct.
14 at a short ceremony at Reeder Physical Fitness
Center.
Col. Luis Huddleston had the honor of casing the
colors of the 59th Engineer Battalion and the 1st
Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry.
Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker, U.S. Army South com-
mander, cased the 193rd's colors, putting to a close the
final chapter of the unit's history.
Only the commanders and guidon bearers were
present to represent the individual units since nearly all
of the 193rd soldiers have been reassigned elsewhere
in the Army.
"The 193rd is a unique unit," Crocker said. "The
Army has never seen one like it before, and may never
see one like it again."
The colors of the 193rd Inf. Bde. will be put into
storage until the unit is called upon again.
The colors of the Ist Bn., 508th Inf. will be sent to
the 82nd Airborne Division Museum in Fort Bragg,
N.C., where the unit traces its lineage back to during
World War II.
The 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry, once part of the
brigade, was restructured as a USARSO asset.


Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army)
Soldiers from the 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light) participate in a color-casing ceremony, ending
the brigade's colorful history.


Signal brigade soldiers keep


Safe Haven camps on line
"Initially, we had 10 phone lines to the Joint Task
by Spc. Brian Thomas Force office through a satellite that provided us with
USARSO Public Affairs Office the desk phones," Bishop said.


EMPIRE RANGE - Communication is a key ele-
ment to every military operation, and with the special
mission of Operation Safe Haven and its varied loca-
tions, reliable communication is critical.
The' 106th Signal Brigade,
with its subordinates, the 56th
Signal Battalion and the 154th
Signal Battalion, have taken on
the responsibility of keeping Safe
Haven on line.
"We're making sure people
are talking," said Capt. Todd
Bishop, deputy of communica-
tions, 56th Signal Bn.
To meet that mission, the sig-
nal soldiers have created a com- .
munications network that spans '
from hand-held radios and desk is
phones to pay phones for Cu- -#,0
bans.
Initially, hand-held, walkie-
talkie radios were issued between
the camps, because no perma-
nent communication setup ex-
isted at Empire Range.
The 154th did the initial setup,
which included the use of Mul-
tiple Subscriber Radio Tele- Spc. James He
phones, Bishop said. The MSRT, switchboard at
similar to a desk phone, began Battalion control
the transition from hand-held ra-
dios to a conventional phone system.
"The signal guys had the lines strung and waiting
for us," Bishop said. "We just had an empty building
with a phone hanging off the wall when we got here."
The initial setup started Aug. 29. Once communi-
cation was established through the MSRTs, Bishop
said the 56th began running lines and installing desk
phones.


He said currently the 56th and the 106th are in a
two-phase operation to provide phone service through-
out the camps.
The first phase, which is complete, provided 10


9
S;
es

li
II


piiunloines cn l tI LU LIIJ r nheau-
quarters, to each camp and to
. *the hospital.
S;g'. The second phase consists
r' * �of expanding the amount of
a phone lines to each location, as
B well as installing pay phones at
the community camps.
. The 56th will put in an addi-
tional 25 lines to each camp, 3 5
- lines to the JTF headquarters
and seven lines to the contain-
' L- - ment facility in the second phase,
. Bishop said.
The 106th is also coordinat-
ing with the local phone compa-
ny, Intel to provide the commu-
nity camps with pay phones.
"We're working through the
signal brigade to bring in Intel
so the Cubans can make credit
card calls," Bishop said.
pc. Brian Thomas (U.S. Army) Pay phones have already been
ath operates the installed at Community Camp
the 154th Signal No. 1 and No. 2 by Intel. Bishop
ing station, said the goal is to have four pay
phones at each camp.
The completion of the second phase is expected in
about two months. Once the two-phase operation is
completed, fewer soldiers will be needed to meet the
communication mission, Bishop said.
"The ultimate plan," he said, "is that once the
additional lines go in, to pull the 154th out and operate
solely off the microwave link and the office tele-
phones."


AMC fax numbers

listed for sign ups
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PAO) - An
article in last week's Tropic Times explained
how space-available travelers may sign up for
flights via fax or U.S. mail. Here is a list of
frequently used AMC terminals and their fax
numbers:
*437 APS/TRO; 113 Bates Street, Bldg. 178;
Charleston AFB, S.C., 29418-6911; fax: (803)
566-4300
*Det. 1 437 APS/TR; 5500 International Blvd.;
Suite 124, Charleston IAP; Charleston, S.C.,
29418-6911; fax: (803) 566-3845
*436 APS/TRO; 505 Atlantic Ave.; Bldg. 505,
Room 214; Dover AFB, Del., 19902-5501; fax:
(302) 677-2953
+438 APS/TRP; 1752 Vandenberg Ave.;
McGuire AFB, N.J., 08641-5507; fax: (609)
724-5026
*60 APS/TRO; 501 Hanger Ave., Bldg. 31,
Room 75; Travis AFB, Calif., 94535-2763; fax:
(707) 424-2048

Navy turns over

Amador assets
FORT AMADOR (Rodman NS PAO) -
U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal transferred its
administrative complex at Fort Amador to U.S.
Army South Oct. 1. The only remaining Navy
property at Amador is Navy housing units, said
Treaty Implementation Plan officials.
The complex was declared excess to the
needs of the Navy and offered to USARSO.
USARSO is the executive agent for U.S. South-
ern Command and current occupants of the
complex are the SOUTHCOM Comptroller,
SCJ8, SCJI, SCJ4 and SCJ6-all from the
SOUTHCOM staff.
The next scheduled property transfer for the
Navy is Summit Naval Radio Station. It be-
comes a canal operating area under the control
of the Panama Canal Commission in December.











Tropictivities
A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama


Page BI


Sister act
Reverend Mother, played by Diana Luz Parada, and Sister Hubert, played by Laura Adame, mistake a bottle of saki for water during Ancon Theater
Guild's production of Nunsense II. For story and photos, see Page B3.


Youths in the community are in-
vited to let the Tropic Times know
what's going on.


The U.S. Southern Command
commander in chief buys the first
boxes of Girl Scout cookies.


*Movies, Page B8
*TV, Page B9
*Potpourri, Page B12


Oct. 21. 1994


-I-- --I -I--


-111-


.... 7








B 2 Tropic Times
Oct. 21, 1994


'Youth news


Youths P


in action

Community
offers variety of
fun and exciting
activities for "
young people...

Youths from throughout
the community are out and
about enjoying the many
fall activities.
Scholastics, extracurricu-
lar activities, sports and
more - there are numerous <
events available to those
interested enough to go out
and find them.
Continue to check the
Tropic Times weekly for
upcoming events specific to
the young people in our
community.
Today, we feature Lo
special activities at the tea
Mc
Department of co
Defense Dependents the
Schools-Panama. are
Cc
The Tropic
Times always
looking for
events and
activities in-
volving the
youths in the .
community. If
you have pho-
tos or articles
you would like
to see printed
on the youth
page, call Sgt. Earl Ockenga, a
Falls, visited Cur
Cass Purdu at lessons in several
285-4666/6612. for the math dep


K) NN


(courtesy)
s Rios Elementary School students, under the direction of
acher Vilma Royo, recently celebrated Hispanic Heritage
)nth with a school-wide celebration of dancing, colorful
stumes and an exploration of fascinating information about
e foods and customs of Latin America. Shown here (from left)
e Genoyce Walton, Geneva Almengor, Stephanie Chase,
lleen Corrigan, Roger Gundin and Andrew Bacot.


(courtesy)
math professor at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar
rundu Junior High School recently. He gave demonstration
al math classrooms and held a graphing calculator workshop
artment.


Sgt. Lori Davis (Tropic Times)
Curundu Cougar cheerleaders root for yet another victory. The Cougars downed the Kiwanis Kolts
35-7 Oct. 13, maintaining their spot as the only undefeated team in local high school football.


I o t cSii


Albrook/Howard
Competitive swim team tryouts, 10 a.m. Nov.
12 at Howard and Albrook Pools for youths 8-18
years old. Call Lisa Nofi, 284-3569, or Rose Coville,
236-2035, for more information.
*Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Preteen Costume Dance, 7:30-10:30 p.m. today
at the Howard Youth Center, $2.50 entrance fee.
Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday evenings.
Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for mem-
bers and $35 for non-members.
Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturday.
Spanish lessons 4 and 5 pn. Tuesday and Thurs-
days.
Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesday.
Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four days a
week. Special preschooler class Saturdays.
Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available for
ages four to adult.
*Just for teens:
Free self defense demonstration for girls 5 p.m.
Saturday, Albrook.
HIV/AIDS awareness, 4-5 p.m. Thursday, Al-
brook. Deadline for registration is Monday. Call 284-
5650 to register. Permission slips required.
Falltime party 8:30-11:30 p.m. Oct. 28. Wear or-
ange and black and get in for half price. The 'Anthill
Posse' will be playing in the Albrook Club ballroom.
Transportation provided from Howard Youth Center.

Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Young Americans Bowling Association leagues
for ages 6-18 will begin Oct. 29 at the Fort Clayton
Bowling Center. Dues will be $4 per week and in-
cludes bowling, shoe rental, a trophy for each child
and a party upon completing the league.
Pool tournament, today.
Community services, Saturday. Bring a can of
food.
Video games tournament 3:30-5:30 p.mi.
Wednesday.
Not So Scary Halloween is a happy Halloween
activity for toddlers to 10 years old. It will be held 4-
7 p.m. Oct. 31. A $1 fee includes game prizes, candy
and a lot of fun.
Halloween costume dance Oct. 29. Pre-teens 6-9
p.m. and junior teens 8-11 p.m. Fee is $2.
Halloween party Oct. 31.
Junior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays Building 155.
Youth Services is looking for piano and gymnas-
tics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at 287-
3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Smithsonian marine environmental education-
al program, 8:30 am. Saturday. Free.
Halloween Senior Teen Dance, Saturday.
Spooktacular movie lock-in 8 p.m.-8 a.m. Oct.
28. All night horror movies.
Teen art exhibit all day Oct. 29.
Popcorn and movies, Sundays.
*Child Development Services 287-3301:
Spaces are available in the CDS part-day pro-
gram, Building 156 Fort Clayton, in the afternoon
session from 1-3 p.m. Preschoolers must be 3 years
old and toddlers must be 2 years old by Oct. 31. For
information, call 287-5507/5104.

Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Not so fright day movies, 3 p.m. Saturday.
Hand puppet show, 2 p.m. Saturday.
Shotokan Karate, 4-5 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday, $20 per person.
Volunteers are needed to help with the haunted
house. The haunted house will be open 6-10 p.m.
Oct. 28-30.
Halloween costume contest 5 p.m. Oct. 29.
Arts and crafts, 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Rodman
There will be ghoulish fun for kids 5-7 p.m. Oct.
28 at a Halloween bash in the Laguna Lounge, Rod-
man NS. Festivities include apple bobbing, a pinata
and "frightful" games. Prizes will be awarded for the
best costumes.











L Entertainment


Tropic Times B3
Oct. 21, 1994 B3


Sisters Amnesia, Robert Anne and Mary Leo perform a mime.


T he local theater season got off
to a sidesplitting start with the
Ancon Theater Guild's
production of Nunsense II Oct. 14.
Nunsense II is the continuing saga of
the Little Sisters of Hoboken. In the
original Nunsense, the nuns had to raise
money to bury 42 of their sisters who
were accidentally poisoned by the
convent cook, Sister Julia Child of God.
In the sequel, the nuns are putting on
a benefit to thank the community for
their support. The small but mighty cast
consists of five singing, dancing nuns
who try to catch the eye of a talent scout
they believe is in the audience.
Diana Luz Parada portrays Reverend
Mother. Rev was once a circus performer
and enjoys her time in the spotlight.
Second in command is Sister Hubert,
played by Laura Adame. Hubie is
Mistress of the Novices and the self-
proclaimed brains behind the whole
operation. Sister Robert Anne, played by
Heather Bro-Moroschak, works with the
troubled youths of the parish and fancies
herself as quite the performer. Robbie is
the Reverend Mother's understudy, but
yearns for her own shot at stardom.
Sister Mary Paul, known affectionately
as Sister Amnesia, is played by Melanie
Marcec. Amnesia has recently regained
her memory and is heading to Nashville


to become the biggest little sister act in
Tennessee. Sister Mary Leo, the novice
played by Maureen Sampson, wants to
become the first sister prima ballerina.
Leo is not allowed to wear her tutu, so
she praises the Lord through rollerskating
rather than dance.
The script and music, written by Dan
Goggin, is full of puns and innuendos
that kept the opening night audience
rolling with laughter. The audience
participates in the show and even plays
bingo.
Nunsense II, directed by DL Sima
with musical direction by Aurora
Brandaris and choreography by Ana
Linares, will run 8 p.m. Thursday through
Saturday until Nov. 5 at the Ancon
Theater. According to producer Gale
Cellucci and stage manager Anita Kerat,
most of the performances are close to
being sold out, so anyone interested in
witnessing the holy spectacle should
make reservations soon by calling 252-
6786.
Many opening night spectators said
the Guild's production of Nunsense II is
one of the most entertaining shows
they've ever seen.
"I don't go to many plays, but this one
was great," said audience member Sgt.
Leo Medina. "Those nuns were really
funny. I laughed my #*!*# off."


Sister Amnesia sings a country nun song with the help of her puppet,
Sister Mary Annette.



^H L'j^S~ wF^H Eliu^


The sisters end the first act with a hat and cane song.


is not amused by Robert Anne's habit humor.
is not amused by Robert Anne's habit humor.


Reverend Mother (left)







STropic Times
B4 Oct. 21, 1994


1Focus on Panama


14I


Martha K. Taylor (courtesy)



Getting' around


Travel in Panama isn't like what it is
in many places, like Germany with its
high-speed autobahns. Or the United
States, with its system of interstate
highways. But for the initiated, there
are many ways, and the family
passenger sedan may not be the best.
Here's some tips:
*Panama has several domestic
airlines that will take you just about
anyplace. They fly out of Patilla
airport, rather than Tocumen.


. _.- *6'^.'*
Marina K Taor(cours, y)
r



: |i-


- J,-


*Busses go anywhere and every-
where and are not expensive if you're not
in a hurry.
*If you want to drive yourself, stay on
main roads or buy a truck. Horses are a
good bet for visiting really out-of-the-way
places. Canoes and small boats are a
good way to explore the Chagres and
other rivers.
*Your military recreation and travel
agencies can provide helpful insight and
travel advice. Pay them a visit.


� . * *'
Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor (Tropic Times)


.11


01


Martha K Taylor (Courtesy)
lllaiZm Vllf-�


Maureen Sampson (Tropic Times)


*, '










Community news


First cookies in eight years Sgt. Cas Purdum (Tropic
Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, U.S. Southern Command Commander in Chief, buys the first boxes of Girl
Scout cookies from (left to right) Jessica Ingraham, Angela Brumbaugh, Girl Scout leader, and
Jennifer Brumbaugh. This year, Girl Scout cookies will be sold in Panama for the first time in eight
years. The sale of 13,800 boxes of cookies begins Nov. 19.


"Country USA" coming to Panama


FORT CLAYTON (SCN) - Southern Command Net-
work officials recently announced that SCN-AM Radio
will provide listeners with a live country music radio
program via satellite from the United States.
"Country USA" will be broadcast on SCN-AM Radio
week nights from 7 p.m. until 5 a.m. and 24 hours a day on
weekends and holidays starting Oct. 31.
The recently compiled SCN Survey showed country
music as the second most popular radio music format. SCN
officials said this matches survey results of the radio
industry in the United States.
Simultaneously, SCN will say good-bye to The Gene
Price Show and The Harry Newman Show that is broadcast


on Diamond FM from 9-11 a.m. weekdays. These pro-
grams are being canceled by the Armed Forces Radio and
Television Service in Los Angeles when all military net-
works worldwide receive the new country music network.
American Country Countdown with Bob Kingsley
remains on Diamond FM in its current Sunday noon time
slot while a sporting event is broadcast on SCN-AM Radio.
SCN-AM continues broadcasting major sporting events as
they occur. SCN installed a new satellite receiving system
for "Country USA" and other programs earlier this year.
SCN-AM radio is heard on 790 Khz in the Pacific area
and on 1420 Khz in the Atlantic Community. See Page B12
for the new AM schedule.


National Consumers Week facts, activities


FORT CLAYTON (ACS) - Na-
tional Consumers Week has become
an established annual tradition for state
and local consumer offices, business-
es, government agencies, voluntary
organizations and individual consum-
ers. The last week of October is annu-
ally dedicated to the ongoing need to
educate and inform consumers about
their rights and responsibilities in the
marketplace.
Army Community Service will be
presenting a series of briefs to enhance
the importance of this week to achieve
this goal. This year National Consum-
ers Week will be observed Sunday
through Oct. 29. For information, call
ACS at 287-6322.
*TheCommunityReinvestmentAct
requires federal agencies to encourage
depository financial institutions to help
meet the credit needs of their commu-
nities, including low- and moderate-
income neighborhoods. The regulato-
ry agencies assess the institutions'
records of meeting those credit needs
by preparing a written evaluation of
the institutions and assigning a rating
with facts supporting the conclusions.


Such ratings shall be disclosed to the
public forexaminations beginning July
1, 1990. The act also requires regula-
tory agencies to consider an institu-
tion's record of helping to meet com-
munity credit needs when evaluating
certain corporate applications, such as
permission to establish a branch, to
relocate a branch or home office, or to
merge.
*The Fair Credit Reporting Act
establishes procedures for correcting
mistakes on a person's credit record
and requires that a consumer's record
only be provided for legitimate busi-
ness needs. It also requires that the
record be kept confidential. A credit
record may be retained seven years for
judgments, liens, suits and other ad-
verse information except for bank-
ruptcies, which may be retained 10
years. If a consumer has been denied
credit, a cost-free credit report may be
requested within 30 days of denial.
*The Fair Housing Act prohibits
discrimination on the basis of race,
color, sex, religion, handicap, familial
status or national origin in the financ-
ing, sale or rental of housing.


ACS has planned the following
activities to further enhance the im-
portance of this week:
*Monday-Oct. 29- Corozal Com-
missary, local and stateside vendors
will display their products and give
away samples.
*Monday-Wednesday - There
will be daily drawings at ACS, Build-
ing 155, Fort Clayton, for prizes. The
drop boxes are located at ACS.
*Tuesday-Oct. 28 - U.S. South-
ern Command Health Promotion pro-
grams will be doing cholesterol test-
ing 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
*Thursday - A drawing will be
held at the Corozal Commissary to
give away three carts with assorted
products. Two carts will be given to
Corozal patrons and one to Howard
patrons. They carts will be presented
to the winners Oct. 28.
*Sunday-Oct. 29- The Fort Clay-
ton Library, Building 128, will host a
display concerning consumer rights
and responsibilities.
*Educational activities among the
Department of the Defense Depen-
dents Schools will be conducted.


Clayton
The Toastmaster International meeting will
be held 5 p.m. Nov. 2 at the PCC Training Center.
For information, call 287-5689.
U.S. Army South Public Affairs is coordinat-
ing the 1994 Joint Task Force-Panama Christ-
mas Sponsorship Program. Units or community
groups wanting to participate this year should call
USARSO PAO at 287-3007/4109.
The Protestant Women of the Chapel Bible
studies will be held Thursdays in Building 156, Fort
Clayton. The sessions will be 9-11 a.m. Child care
for infants is available and Bible activity classes for
pre-schoolers will be provided. For information,
call Diane Anderson at 285-4878.

Howard/Albrook
The Family Advocacy Outreach Program and
Howard AFB Child Development Center is spon-
soring a "Stress-free Holiday Shopping" event.
Free child care will be available at Howard CDC for
parents who want to shop without the stress of taking
their children. The service is available 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Nov. 1 and 15. Parents should register
children with the center at least one week prior to the
day they want to use the service. This is open to Air
Force personnel only. Call 284-3711/6135 to regis-
ter.
Family Advocacy is offering classes to teach
spouses how to deal with the stress involved in
being part of today's fast paced environment. Class-
es will be held at the Howard Family Support Center
conference room, Building 707 Howard AFB 8:30-
9:30 p.m. Tuesday. Call in advance for child care.
Call Laila Yeager at 284-5010 to sign-up.
The Howard Child Development Center is look-
ing for potential Family Day Care Providers for
the AlbrookArea. Call Jill Winterat284-3711/6135
for more information.
The family services section of the Family
Support Center needs volunteers to help with the
loan closet, base brochure library and the coupon
cabinet. Family services is open from 7:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. weekdays, and flexible hours are avail-
able. Limited child care is free for volunteers. Any-
one who is interested, call 284-5860.

Miscellaneous
An adoption orientation briefing will be held
1:30-3 p.m. Wednesday at the Gorgas Army Com-
munity Hospital, Headquarters Conference Room,
first floor. Any interested adoptive parents may
attend. To register, call 282-5139/5404.
The Howard/Albrook Officers Spouses Club
has an immediate opening for a part-time ac-
countant to keep the books at the OSC Thrift Shop,
located in Building 809 at Albrook. Anyone who is
interested in the position should call the Family
Support Center at 284-5010.
The Enlisted Spouses Club-Panama takes pride
in serving the community. The club meets 7 p.m. the
first Monday of the month at the Fort Clayton
Noncommissioned Officers Club. For information,
call Barb Johnson at284-4523 or AmyGross at287-
3071.
The Officers and Civilians Wives Club-Pacif-
ic Pumpkin Patch Christmas Bazaar will be held
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday at Club Amador. More than
100 vendors will be showing goods of all nature.
The Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses Club
is sponsoring its annual bazaar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct.
29 at the Howard Enlisted Members Club. For
information, call 284-6874.
The Enlisted Spouses Club-Panama will hold
its annual membership drive featuring a presenta-
tion of the whimsical "Basic Black Dress" Thursday
at the Fort Clayton NCO Club. Hors d'oeuvers and
membership table will begin at 6 p.m. and a presen-
tation at 7 p.m. For information, call 284-4523 or
284-4592.

Atlantic
The Army Community Service Relocation
Assistance Office helps in the search for housing,
employment and educational possibilities for ser-
vicemembers and their family members. Call 289-
4021/4636 for more information.


Tropic TimesB5
Oct. 21, 1994B









B6 ^Tropic Times
BDO Oct. 21, 1994


' Rodman
*Information. Tour and Travel:
Panama City tour 9 a.m. Saturday,
$8. Visit the Golden Altar, the French
Plaza and more.
Trolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. Satur-
x day, $48/person. Fish for marlin, sailfish,
/ dolphin (fish), bonita, Spanish mackeral
and more. Fee includes captain, gear, lures
and iced coolers.
El Valle 7 a.m. Sunday and Nov. 13,
$12. Shop for local handicrafts, plants,
fruits and vegetables and visit nature pre-
serve.
Free Zone shopping trip 7 a.m.
Wednesday and Nov. 9, $12.
Downtown Shopping Trip, 9 a.m.
Thursday and Nov. 10, $8. Shop Pana-
ma's Central Avenue and Via Espana.
Moonlight cruise 6:30 p.m. Oct. 29,
$21. Cruise out to Taboga Island for cock-
tails and hors d'oeuvres by moonlight,
while viewing Panama City's dramatic
skyline at night.
Bottom-fishing on the Vargas, Oct.
30, $35 adults, $20 children under 14.
Catch snapper, grouper and other bottom
feeding fish. Fee includes captain, gear,
live bait and iced coolers.
Two-day deep seas fishing trip, Nov.
5-6. Fish the fertile waters of Isla del Rey,


N


San Jose and Galera abord the 42' Vargas.
$220 fee includes captain, gear and bait.
San Bias Islands scuba safari, Nov.
3, $140/person includes roundtrip ground
transport to Portobelo, transport to San
Bias Islands, guide, lunch, and scuba gear.
Portabelo jungle tour, Nov. 4. $60/
person roundtrip transportation, guided
hike of local rainforest, meals.
Portabelo, Nov. 5, $70/person in-
cludes roundtrip transport, historic tours
by boat, trip to island beaches, lunch and
guide.
Chiriqui River rafting, Nov. 5-6,
$150 fee includes roundtrip transporta-
tion, meals, lodging, rafting and river
guides.
San Andres Island, Colombia, Nov.
11-14, $286 person includes roundtrip
airfare, 3 nights lodging at the Caribe
hotel, tours, and most meals.
Contadora, Nov. 25-27, $179/person
double occupancy, $219/person single
occupancy, $135/kids 2-11, includes
transportation, 2 nights lodging, all meals
and drinks, and use of all resort facilities.
Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
ter:
Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fri-
days, $13.


El Valle shopping 6:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m. Oct. 30, $13.
Colonial Panama & ruins tour 9
a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, $6.
Rio Mar Beach trip 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
Sunday, $12.
Panama museums tour 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Wednesday, $5. Bring money for en-
trance fee and lunch.
*Outdoor adventures:
Peacock bass fishing in Lake Gatun
5 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 29, $25. Bring fishing
gear and bags.
Drake's Island 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday,
$22 snorkelers, $47 scuba.
Gold Panning in Bique, 8 a.m.- 3
p.m. Oct. 25. $12.
Bocas Del Toro weekend trip, Nov.
S11-13, $280 divers, $260 snorkelers, $142
children under 12 based on double occu-
pancy. Trip includes transportation to air-
port, airfare, lodging, meals, five dives,
entertainment, airtanks and weights. Per-
sonal equipment and gratuities not in-
cluded. Sign-up in advance.
Clayton
*Valent Recreation Center:
Pacific beaches 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Satur-
day.
Adventures in nature jungle walk 8
a.m.-1 p.m. Oct. 29.


*Outdoor Recreation Center:
There is Contadora Island transit ser-
vice Friday through Monday. Fees are $35
adults and $20 children 1 2 and under round
trip, $25 adults and $15 children one way.
Ecotourism trip to Barro Colorado Is-
land 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 29, $35 fee. Wear
loose clothing, long pants, hiking shoes or
sneakers, raincoats, and a hat. Bring insect
repellant, drinking water, manila tape, and
a dry towel. Register by Monday.
Partial transits of the Panama Canal
7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, $35 adults, $15
children 12 years old and younger. A mini-
mum of 20 people is needed for a partial
transit any other day of the week.
Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel op-
portunity to Montego Bay any Sunday
through Wednesday. Packet includes air-
fare, three nights hotel accommodations,
and transfer. Prices vary from $3(X)-$6(X)
depending on the hotel.
Balboa
*Balboa Dive Club:
The club is accepting new members.
Divers must show a certification card to
join. Annual fee is $12. Members receive a
newsletter, use of the club tanks, library and
videos for loan, information and classes
and dive trips.Call 263-8077 or 260-(X)75
or write Unit 0967, APO AA 34(X)2.


//


0 0


/ Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Center:
Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturday at Albrook
Youth Center, 286-3195.
Spanish lessons 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Thurs-
days at Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195.
Martial arts classes at Howard and Albrook
Youth Centers, 284-47(X).
Tae Kwon Do karate classes at Zodiac Cen-
ter for children and adults.
Beginner and advanced dog obedience class-
es, $32 for 4 weeks.
Beginner and advanced English and Span-
ish classes offered monthly.
*Howard and Albrook pools
Intro to scuba, free, call for appointment.
Open water scuba class Saturday at Howard
at Albrook, $145.
Advanced scuba Wednesday at Howard.
Water aerobics for advanced adult swim-
mers at Howard and Albrook.
Amador
*Amador Pool:
Water aerobics starting Nov. 2, 5-6 p.m.
Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. Saturday, $16 for eight
sessions.
All swim classes are cancelled until Decem-
/ her.
Clayton
*Fort Clayton Pool:
All swimming classes will be discontinued
until December because of inclement weather.
*Fort Clayton Boat/Scuba Shop:


Open water scuba class meets first and third
Monday of each month, $125. Includes five pool
sessions, five theory sessions and four open water
dives.
Long set equipment rental $19 per day.
*Valent Recreation Center:
Private piano and guitar lessons available
weekday evenings.
Korean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
days.
Rodman
*Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation Of-
fice:
The Navy MWR is seeking qualified instruc-
tors to teach Spanish and French language
courses. Applicants should have prior experi-
ence in teaching elementary and conversational
language courses. Call 283-4301.
Curundu
*Twin Oceans Pro Shop:
Equipment available for scuba, snorkel, ten-
nis, camping and other outdoor recreation.
*Pacific Theatre Arts Centre:
The following classes are ongoing;
Jazz I, 5-6 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays,
$32.
Jazz II, 6-7 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays,
$32.
Voice, 3-5:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thurs-
days.
Guitar, 3-6 p.m. Tuesday.
Folkloric dance, 5-6 p.m. Tuesday and Fri-
days.
Salsa and Merengue, 7-8 p.m. Monday.
Classes are available for dance and music.


Rock star
Carlos Royo headlines the cast of Bye, Bye Birdie as
Conrad Birdie, the '50's rock star and teen idol. The
musical production opens 8 p.m. tonight at the Pacific ,
Theatre Arts Center. Tickets are $10, call 286-3814 for'
reservations. The show runs through Nov. 12.


/ / 4X// / ^


w/ /�////


Halloween bash
* Rodman Club:
There will be a Halloween bash 7-11
p.m. Oct. 28 in the Laguna Lounge. A DJ
will spin tunes for the "monster mash."
Prizes will be given for best the costume,
complimentary hors d'oeuvres will be
served. Come out and show your scary
side.


Pumpkin prize
* 24th Wing Services Sports and Rec-
reation Rental Center:
Turn in the top half of a reciept for any
items rented from the 24th Services Sports
and Recreation Rental Centerin the month
of October and you could be the winner
a candy filled pumpkin in a drawing
Oct. 31.


Stylin'
* Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
ter:
The Zodiac Community Activity Cen-
ter will present a hair and clothing show
6-11 p.m. Nov. 12 featuring fashions and
local stylists. Door prizes will be award-
ed. There is a $5 fee. For information call
284-6161.


Back in the saddle
* Howard Riding Stables:
The Howard Riding Stables is sponsor-
ing Harvest Festival pony rides, 9 a.m.-
Ip.m. Nov. 5 at the stables. There is a $1
fee for the pony rides. There will be a
baked goods sale and drinks available at
the stables. Come dressed as a cowpoke or
in any Halloween costume.


// 7 -' , /
/


/


/











tices

















4 p
/
. - ."

.. .. .... . . L 4"' /
/ '/ I


Center:
The Ceramic Center, Building
198. is located near the Crafts Shop.
*Canal Crafters:
Canal Crafters is a volunteer
organization providing scholar-
ships for the community. Hand-
made arts and crafts are avail-
able, consignments and volunteers
are welcome. The shop hours are 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Satur-
day. The shop is now accepting
holiday consignments, Building
804, Albrook.
Register for the following class-
es at the shop:
Cross-stitch demo 10:15 a.m.
today, free, bring supplies.
Stencil demo, 10:15 a.m. Thurs-
day. Bring stencil and paints.
Perorated paper, cross-stitch,


/ / /"
m - - -


Christmas card, 10:15 a.m. Nov.
I V ; , 11 .... i.. i . ... ,-h , ,d


$20 plus supplies'.


Tropic Times
Oct. 21, 1994 .


Phone guide

Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989.
Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-0075
Canal Crafters 286-45(X)
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363
Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador, 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010
Corozal Thrift Shop, 285-5989
Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370
Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107
Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680
Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361
Howard Teen Center, 284-47(X)
Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
The Loop, 287-3035
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380
Rovlman Annexv 283-5475


I, 4.->, da a uppliei s n iL uutcu. Ongoing classes, stained glass, R/ .. -....
Cross-stitchdemo,angel, 10:15 framing, air brush, lamp assembly, , Rodman Club, 283-4498
a.m. Nov. 11, free, bring supplies. potterywheelthrowing,crossstitch, / Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150
*Howard Skills Development macrame, clay flower, ceramic and / Rodman Naval Station Information Tour
Center: 'how to'videos. and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454
Oilpaintsale Saturday-Sunday. The center is looking for Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
Take 25 percent off of Alexander crafters to sell items in the new Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500
and Liquitex oil paints, consignment boutique. / Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-
Book sale Oct. 30-31. 25% off Instructorsareneeded to teach /
all Colorpoint books. classes on a contract basis for a / Atlantic
Clay flower class, I a.m.- 2 variety of crafts, decorative paint- / Aquativity Center, 289-4009
p.m. Saturday, $5 plus supplies. ing, calligraphy, watercolors, oil / Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201
For all levels, painting. Davis Community Club, 289-5160
Oil painting, 9a.m.-noon. *Fort Sherman MulticraftCen- / Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-640
Wednesday, $30plus supplies. Four ter:/ Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077
weeks. Woodworking qualification / Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-631
Paper Caper Basket, 1-3 p.m. classes Saturdays, free. Class cov- Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
Wednesday, $5 plus supplies. crs safe and correct use of wood / Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/33(X
Stamping Class, 6:30-8:30p.m. shop equipment. Qualification
Thursday, $5. cards will be issued after course /
Stained Glass, 4-7 p.m. Oct. 29, completion. /
- - -/


6161


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*Valent Recreation Center:
Effective Nov. 1 the center will be open 12:30-
10:30 p.m.
Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers meets
the first Thursday of every month.
The screening room offers free movies. Call the 24-
hour movie line, 287-4367 for days and times.
Volunteers are needed to perform as horror charac-


Atlantic tours
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Panama City shopping 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday.
Isla Grande 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.
El Valle 5:30 a.m. Oct. 30.
*Occan Breeze Recreation Center:
Panama City shopping 8 a.m. Saturday.
Remon Race Track 8 a.m. Oct. 29.
El Valle 5 a.m. Oct. 30.


ters for the Haunted House Oct 29. Interested people
must be age 18 and older.
Professional family portraits Saturday. By appoint-
ment only.
Women's beauty tips through Saturday.
Book swapping Tuesday.
*Cocoli Community Center:
Videos for children 4 p.m. Thursday.






Rec center news
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Rock, mineral and seashell exhibit, Oct. 29-30.
Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. Monday.
Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesdays
and Fridays.
Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and Fridays.
Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesday.
Piano 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesday.


Laser disc movies 7 p.m. Friday.
*Zodiac Community Center:
Subs on Top offers eat-in, take out service. Subs
on Top is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays- Fridays, 11
a.m.- 3 p.m. Saturday. It is in the Zodiac Community
Activities Center. Take-out, eat-in and delivery servic-
es are available. Phone orders to 284-5848, fax to 284-
6109.





Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6 p.m. Thursday.
*Ocean Brecee Recreation Center:
The center offers the following classes: cooking,
dance. arts and crafts, music, aerobics, first aid, CPR,
yoga, martial arts, various sports, English, Spanish and
dog obedience. The center is open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. daily.
The center offers deep sea fishing charters. Call
289-6402 for information.
People are needed to line handle transiting boats
from Cristobal to Balboa. Sign up now. Call for details.


/// 5 V


''^�-










SMovies


B8 Tropic Times
Oct. 21, 1994


_____________ r T T I


Oct. 28

Howard AFB
7pm The Little Rascals
(PG) Travis Tedford,
Bug Hall
9pm Natural Born
Killers (R)
Woody Harrelson,
Juliette Lewis


Fort Clayton
7pm Clear and Present
Danger (PG-13)
Harrison Ford,
Willem Dafoe
9:45pm Color of Night (R)
Bruce Willis,
Jane March


Fort Davis
7pm Andre (PG)
Keith Carradine,
Tina Majorino
9pm The Mask (PG-13)
Jim Carrey,
Richard Jeni


Fort Sherman
7pm True Lies (R) Arnold
Schwarzenegger,
Tommy Lee Curtis


Fort Amador
7pm Wagons East
(PG-13) John Candy,
Richard Lewis


The Mask
Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni
Nobody does super powers like Jim
Carrey. An ordinary, mild-mannered
bank clerk is transformed into the weird-
est super hero of all time when he dons
his mask. PG-13 (some stylized vio-
lence) 1 hr, 40 min.

Andre
Keith Carradine, Tina Majorino
An amazing true story of the seal that
became a living legend. An adorable
newborn seal is orphaned after his moth-
er is caught in a fisherman's net. The pup
is nursed back to health by the animal
loving Whitney family, who name him
Andre. PG (teen mischief, mild violence,
language) 1 hr, 34 min.

In the Army Now
Pauly Shore, Lori Petty
Pauly Shore is not the ideal troop. In fact,
he joined the Army Reserves for the
bennies and the regular salary. Reality
kicks in when he becomes a part of a
mission involving actual combat. PG
(some war action, mild language) I hr,
31 min.

It Could Happen
to You
Nicholas Cage, Bridget Fonda
A New York City cop lacking change
tips a waitress with a promise to split the
winnings from his lottery ticket if he
wins. When he wins and wants to make
good on the promise, it will be over
strong opposition from his wife. PG (mild
language, scene of cop action) 1 hr, 41
min.

True Lies
Arnold Schwarzenegger,
Jamie Lee Curtis
Harry Tasker is a special agent for Ome-
ga Sector, a top secret agency charged
with nuclear terrorism intervention. Flu-
ent in six languages and skilled in all


"CAMERON DIAZ . fUNNIlST MOVIE!"
ISAT RUEI .L


JiM CARREY


r f [tO OMZEROTOHERO










forms of counter intelligence, Harry is an
international spy who has kept his real
profession secret from his wife. R (ac-
tion, violence, language) 2 hr, 42 min.

Clear & Present Danger
Harrison Ford, Willem Dafoe
In this new movie adaptation of Tom
Clancy's novels, Harrison Ford as Jack
Ryan finds himself once again drawn
into global intrigue. This time he's up
against a Colombian drug cartel. Also
features Ann Archer and James Earl
Jones. PG-13 (action, violence, language)
2 hrs, 22 min.

Color of Night
Bruce Willis, Jane March
Haunted by the bizarre suicide of a pa-
tient, New York psychologist Dr. Bill
Capa (Bruce Willis) abandons his suc-
cessful practice and relocates to Los
Angeles. His encounters there prove as
shocking as the chilling event he has run
away from. He immediately finds him-
self entangled in an explosive sexual
relationship with a beautiful, but enig-


matic woman named Rose, and the in-
vestigation into the brutal stabbing mur-
der of a friend and colleague. R (sexu-
ality, violence, language) 2 hrs.

The Little Rascals
Travis Tedford, Bug Hall
Steven Spielberg produces an appeal-
ing update of the Hat Roach comedy
series from the '20s, '30s and '40s. The
gang has established a boy's only club;
however, things change when Alfalfa
falls for Darla. PG (language) 82 min.

Black Beauty
David Thewlis, Sean Bean
A heartwarming drama based on the
family classic novel by Anna Sewell
tells the story of a time in history when
horses were essential to men's lives. G,
99 min.

Natural Born Killers
Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis
This is a saga of Mickey and Mallory
Knox, two thrill-killers who truly enjoy
their work. They live in a interesting
zone. Pillowtalk and ultra-violence.
Insantiy and comedy. Demons and he-
roes. Murder and mirth set to music. R
(violence, shocking images, language,
sex) 2 hrs.

Speed
Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper
LAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played
by Keanu Reeves, is known as a man
with an attitude caused by Dennis Hop-
per, a sociopath who nearly killed him
in an earlier encounter. R (violence,
language) I hr, 51 min.

Wagons East
John Candy, Richard Lewis
Phil Taylor (Lewis) a frontiersman ral-
lies discontented neighbors to leave the
West and return East. James Harlow
(Candy) is the hard-drinking wagon
master hired to lead the convoy East.
PG-13 (off-color humor) I hr, 47 min.


Thursday


Wednesday


Tuesday


Monday


Sunday


Saturday


Today


Location


Howard AFB 7pm: Clear and 2pm: Clear and 2pm: Angels in the 7pm: Color of Night 7pm: Angels in the 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: Natural Born
284-3583 Present Danger Present Danger Outfield (PG) (R) Bruce Willis, Outfield (PG) (PG-13) Killers (R)
284-3583 (PG-13) (PG-13) Danny Glover, Jane March Danny Glover, John Candy, Woody Harrelson,
Harrison Ford, Harrison Ford, Tony Danza 9:15pm: Clear and Tony Danza Richard Lewis Juliette Lewis
Willem Dafoe Willem Dafoe 7pm: Clear and Present Danger 9pm: Clear and 9pm: Natural Born 9:15pm: Wagons
9:45pm: Color of 7pm: Clear and Present Danger (PG-13) Present Danger Killers (R) East (PG-13)
Night (R) Present Danger (PG-13) Harrison Ford, (PG-13) Woody Harrelson, John Candy,
Bruce Willis, (PG-13) Harrison Ford, Willem Dafoe Harrison Ford, Juliette Lewis Richard Lewis
Jane March 9:45pm: Speed (R) Willem Dafoe Willem Dafoe
Keanu Reeves, 9:30pm: Color of
Dennis Hopper Night (R) Bruce
(Reduced Admission) Willis, Jane March


Fort Clayton 7pm: Andre (PG) 2pm: Andre (PG) 2pm: The Mask 7pm: The Mask 7pm: In the Army 6:30pm: Clear and 6:30pm: Speed (R)
O -3279 KeithCarradine, Keith Carradine, (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (PG-13) Now (PG) Present Danger Keanu Reeves,
287-3279 Tina Majorino Tina Majorino Richard Jeni Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore, (PG-13) Dennis Hopper
9pm: The Mask 7pm: The Mask 7pm: The Mask Richard Jeni Lori Petty Harrison Ford, 9:30pm: Clear and
(PG-13) (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (PG-13) 9:30pm: In the Army 9pm: The Mask Willem Dafoe Present Danger
Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni Now (PG) (PG-13) 9:30pm: Color of (PG-13)
Richard Jeni 9:30pm: The Mask 9:30pm: In the Army Pauly Shore, Jim Carrey, Night (R) Harrison Ford,
(PG- 13) Now (PG)Pauly Shore, Lori Petty Richard Jeni Bruce Willis, Willem Dafoe
Lori Petty Jane March


Fort Davis 7pm: It Could 2pm: True Lies 7pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could Happen 7pm: True Lies 7pm: The Mask 7pm: In the Army
Happen to You (PG) (R) Arnold (R) Arnold to You (PG) (R) Arnold (PG-13) Now (PG)
289-5173 Nicolas Cage, Schwarzenegger, Schwarzenegger, Nicholas Cage, Schwarzenegger, Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore,
Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis Richard Jeni Lori Petty
9:30pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could Happen
(R) Arnold to You (PG) Nicholas
Schwarzenegger, Cage, Bridget Fonda
Jamie Lee Curtis 9:30pm: True Lies (R)
Fort Sherman 7pm: Wolf (R) 7pm: Blown Away (R) 7pm: It Could happen No show No show No show 7pm: The Mask
Jack Nicholson, Jeff Bridges, to You (PG) (PG-13)
289-5 173 Michelle Pfeiffer Tommy Lee Jones Nicholas Cage, Jim Carrey,
Bridget Fonda Richard Jeni


Fort Amador 7pm: In the Army 7pm: Color of Night 7:30pm: Black Beauty No show No show No show 7pm: The Little
(PG) Pauly Shore, (R) (G) David Thewlis, Rascals (PG)
284-3583 Lori Petty Bruce Willis, Sean Bean Travis Tedford,
Jane March Bug Hall











Tropic Times BD
Oct. 21, 1994 B


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Think Fast!
4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy
7:25 Panama Now
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 America's Funniest
People
8:30 Evening Shade
9:00 In the Heat of the Night
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Ren and Stimpy
1:00 Movies: "Around the
World in 80 Days"
3:30 "Broadway Danny
Rose"
4:55 "The Flamingo Kid"


6:30 Headline News
7:00 Navy/Marine Corps News
7:30 Channel One/Newsroom
8:00 Guts
8:30 Just for Kids!
Muppets Babies
Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
Biker Mice from Mars
Batman Cartoon
Cartoon Classics
10:30 Faerie Tale Theater
11:00 Spies
12:00 Headline news
12:30 Movies: "WiWdwalker"
2:30 "Cluhipmunk Adventure"
4:00 Special: Ken Bum's
"Baseball"
First Inning "Our Game"
6.00 Special: Ken Burn's
"Baseball"
Second hImngg
"Something Like a War"
8:00 Rescue 911 +
8:00 Walker: Texas Ranger
9:00 Special: Ken Bum's
"Baseball"
Third Inning "The
Faith of 50 Million"
11:00 Saturday Night Live
12:30 WWF Superstars of
Wrestling
1:30 Friday Night Videos
2:30 Movies: "The Amityville
Horror"
4:20 "Conrack"


Sunday


CCMTV
Outreach of Love
Parliament of Souls
Lifestyle Magazine
CBS Sunday Morning
Tlus Week w/Brinkley
Face the Nation
Inside the NFL
Headlie News
On Stage
Movies. "H lugo the
Hippo"
"The Care Bears Movie"
Special: Ken Burn's
"Baseball"
Fourth himnnig "A
National Heirloom"
Hearts Afire
Dr. Quiiu: Medicine
Woman
Minm series: "The Return
to Lonesome Dove"
(Part 2 of 4)
ABC 20/20
Top Cops
Miami Vice
Movies: "Child in the
Night"
"Long Road Home"
"The Jackie Presser
Story"
Headline News


Monday


5:30
6:00
8:00
8:30
o-an


NBC News at Sunrise
Good Monung America
Basic Trauing Workout
Sesame Street
Portrait of America
Guiding Light
General Hospital
Headline News
Sports Maclhine
Another World
Oprah Winfrey
Price is Right
Guts
1 Love Lucy
Family Feud
The Cosby Show
SCN Evening Report
Headline News Break
World News Tonight
Jeopardy
Panama Now
Entertaiunent Tonight
Mad About You
Cops
60 Minutes
SCN Late Edition
Cheers
David Letterman
Tonight Show
M*A*S*H
Movies:"Excalibur"
"The Road Warrior"
NBC News at Sunrise


Today Saturday


Wednesday


Tuesday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Reading Rainbow
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy
7:25 Panama Now
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 L.A. Law +
9:00 Northern Exposure
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Movies: "No Man's
Land"
3:00 "3:10 to Yuma"
5:00 Headline News Break


___________ .1 ____________ I. ________________________________________________


Thursday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sporiscenter
1:00 Another World
2.00 Donahue
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 In the Mix
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Famnily Fetid
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6.15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy
7:25 Panama Now
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 ALF
8:30 Touched by an Angel
9:30 Love and War
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Movies: "The Searchers"
3:00 "Rachel, Rachel"
5:00 Headline News Break


I Obi canei14


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today

5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Reading Rainbow
5:00 Silver Spoons
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening News
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Roseanne
8:30 The Boys are Back
(New Fall Series)
9:00 Primetime Live
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Renegade
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Nightline
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Lettennan
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Military News
4:00 Tom & Jerry Kids
4:30 Tiny Toons Adventures
5:00 CRO
5:30 Videolinks


Saturday

6:30 Sunulcast wiCh. 8 & 10
8:30 Young Adult Theater
"A Matter of Conscience"
'All that Glitters"
"Disney's Coyote Tales"
11:35 Channel One/Newsroom
12:05 Silver Spoons
12:30 Movies: "Return to Snowy
River"
2:10 "House Party"
4:00 21 Jump Street
5:00 Sports Specials
6:00 Movie: "Seaquest DSV"
8:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
9:00 Me and the Boys
(New Fall Series)
9:30 Married With Children
10:00 Movie: "The Dresser"
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Science and Technology
Week
1:00 The McLaughlin Group
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Entertainment this week
3-00 Headline News
3:30 Saturday Night Live
5:00 Videolmks
5:30 Headline News Break


________________________________ I _________________________________ .1


Sunday

6:00 Washington Week mi
Review
6:30 Shining Time Station **
7:00 The Sunshine Factory ***
7:25 Goof Troop
7:50 Muppet Babies
8:20 Disney's The Little
Mermaid
8:30 Bobby's World **
9:00 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
9:30 Movie: "Joe Panther"
11:30 This Old House
12 00 NFL Football: Chicago
Bears vs. Detroit Lions
3.00 NFL Football: Dallas
Cowboys vs. Arizona
Cardinals
6:00 Wonderful World of
Disney +
7:00 NFL Football: Denver
Broncos vs. San Diego
Chargers
10:00 Buck James
11:00 Eye to Eye w/C. Chung
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Meet the Press
1:30 Sports Machine
2:00 Sports Latenight
2:30 Frugal Gourmet
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Wheel of Fortune
4:00 Jeopardy


Monday

4:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:30 All My Cluldren
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3.30 Batman
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 The Adventures of Pete
& Pete
5:00 In the Mix
5.30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
8:00 Monday Night Football:
Houston Oilers vs.
Philadelphia Eagles
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Nightline
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Letterman
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Wheel of Fortunme
4:00 Jeopardy
4:30 Donahue


Tuesday


5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Donahue
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Bobby's World
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Think Fast ***
5:00 Disney's Raw Toonage
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Home Improvement
8:30 My So Called Life
(New Fall Series)
9:30 Frasier
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 McKenna (New Fall Series)
11:00 Headline News Break
11:30 Nigltlime
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight
2,00 David Letternnan
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Wheel of Fortune
4:00 Jeopardy
4:30 Oprah Winfrey


Wednesday


5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Goof Troop
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Guts
5:00 Beakinan's World
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Sinbad Show
8:30 Family Matters
9:00 Wise Guy
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Tour of Duty
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Nightline
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1.30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Lettennan
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Wheel of Fortune
4:00 Jeopardy
4:30 Sally Jesse Raphael


Thursday


5:30 Simnulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Muppet Babies
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Nick Arcade
5:00 Fact of Life
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8.00 Boy Meets World
8:30 John Larroquette **
9:00 Dateline
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 L.A. Law
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Nightlute
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Lettennan
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Wheel of Fortune
4:00 Jeopardy
4:30 Oprah Winfrey


OSpors ndspe6-a


Channels 8 & 10
Miniseries
"Return To Lonesome Dove" (Part 2 of 4)
8 p.m. Sunday
Almost losing his life, Woodrow Call desperately seeks help from the Indians on the
Great Plains. In Nebraska, Gus' lost love, Clara, battles to save her children and home
from a disastrous fire.


Cable Channel 14
Sports
NFL Football
Chicago Bears vs. Detroit Lions, noon Sunday
Dallas Cowboys vs. Arizona Cardinals, 3 p.m. Sunday
Denver Broncos vs. San Diego Chargers, 7 p.m. Sunday
Houston Oilers vs. Philadelphia Eagles, 8 p.m. Monday

Series starts
"The John Larroquette Show"
8:30 p.m. Thursday
John Larroquette stars as recovering alcoholic John Hemingway. Fresh into sobriety,
John's taken a job as night shift manager in one of St. Louis's seedier bus depots. It's
his last chance at a "normal" life, but being the "guy in charge" of a station full of wise
guys, wackos and working girls is enough to drive a person to drink.

Primetime movies
"Seaquest DSV"
6 p.m. Saturday
The year is 2018 and mankind is closer to utilizing the full bounty of the earth with
undersea farming and mining communities. These communities, however, are beset
with rivalries and territorial disputes. With these timeless problems, a huge super
submarine, the Seaquest, seems to be the planet's last, best hope for peace. Stars Roy
Scheider and Don Franklin.


5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America
10.25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Slining Time Station
4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy
7:25 Panama Now
7:30 Entertaimnent Tonight
8:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
8:30 Beverly Hills 90210
9:30 Culture Clash
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Movies: "Anatomy of a
Murder"
3:40 "The Littlest Victims"


Ar


"0* TV Schedule















Classified Ads


B10 Tropic Times
B l Oct. 21, 1994


Shepherd, black, pure, not registered,
parents avail, $200. 282-5494.
Dachshund puppies, 2 males, 4 fe-
males, $175. 266-7930.

Purebred white miniature poodle pup-
pies, $125. 286-4774.

Chihuahuas-male, 5yrs old, neutered,
white/tan; female, 4yrs old, fawn. Must
stay together, no kids, $neg. 282-3594.

French poodles, small miniatures, tails
docked, dewormed, 4 strawberry
blond, 3 white. 261-3325.

German shepherd male puppy, all
shots, CCP registered. 228-2643.
Female calico cat, fixed, litterbox
trained, free. 283-4086.
American pit bull terrier pups, 5 wks,
ADBA reg, dewormed, male $200,
female $175. 252-6167.

Six wks old chihuahua puppies, ador-
able, dewormed and sweet disposi-
tion, $150. 252-2577.
Pure bred poodles, white, toy, tail
docked, shots, $150. 261-0751.
Two female French poodles, 8 wks
old, shots, no papers, both very charm-
ing, $100. 260-3903.
18 mo old CCP registered male
Rottweiller, great w/kids, exc guard
dog, $400. 286-4625.

Two cats, Chicky-Monkey is neutered
and Wanda is spayed, looking for fam-
ily to adopt, free. 286-4972.

Doberman, 2 yrs old, neutered, gd w/
kids, $200. 252-5103.

7wk old Germanshepherdpups,cham-
pion line pedigree, $300. 252-5981.

8 wk old Doberman pups, champion
line. 231-6253.
Rottweiler, 7 males, 4 females, 22 wks
old, $500. 235-4190/4930.
Purebred samoyan puppies, dew-
onned, females for $350, males $400.
239-9803.
Light brown chihuahua puppies, 6 wks
old, $150. 224-1588.
55 gallon aquarium w/stand, all acces-
sories included, $650. 284-6323.

Toy French poodle puppies, tails
docked, dewormed, $250. 226-5395.
Beautiful rottweiler pups, 6 wks old,
all shots, registered AKC, $300. 278-
3434.

Pit bulls, 3 males, 4 females, 2 wks
old, $150. 233-1342.

Experienced large fawn and white
boxer, AKC/CCP registered, for stud
service. 287-3177.

Shephard puppies, black and beige, 6
wks old, 3 males, 2 females, $125.
250-0141.




1989 Ford Tempo, mint cond, auto, pl,
$5,750. 284-6381.

1979 VW Bug, new floor, needs body
wk, runs gd, $650/obo. 262-1262.

1974 Chevy Impala, runs gd, $800.
286-3245.
1991 Jeep Cherokee 4x4, 5 spd, 4.0
6cyl, ac, am/finm cass, tinted wind, exc
cond, $13,200/obo. 287-6492.

1988 Toyota 4x4 p/u, custom paint/
mags, lifted, looks and runs perfect,
$7,0C ). 263-2382 for Lamb.
1984 Volvo turbo GL, sun roof, ac,
pw, and mirrors, gd cond, $4,800.
260-7758.

1989 Hyundai Sonata, US specs, load-
ed, e cond, $5,775/neg. 252-6016.
1987 'hevy Suburban, R-10 1/2 ton,
4wd, double ac, new tires, low miles,
dty p. , exc cond, $9,800. 252-5397.

Mere dei Benz 280, 4 dr sedan, must


see to believe, sunroof, am/fin, many
extras, $8,500/obo. 284-5370.

1988 Toyota Corolla, am/fin cass, dty
pd, at, ac, $5,400. 261-6037.

1986 Chrysler Le Baron GTS loaded,
runs gd, grt on gas, $4,000. 284-3197.
1993 Dodge Dakota LE, 4x4, V8, ex-
tra cab, loaded, cruise, camper shell,
alum brush guard, 11K miles, 7 year/
70,000 warranty, $18,900. 268-3085.

1981 Mazda GLC, 4 dr, ac, standard,
gd cond, dty pd, $2,100. 252-6768.

1994 Daihatsu Charade, 5 spd, 4 dr,
air, am/fin cass, gd mpg, $5,400. 264-
4105.
1991 Honda CRX si, ac, am/fin pull-
out cass, bra, mint cond, 38Kmiles, gd
maint record, $16,275. 236-4601.
1992 Chevy Corsica, 15K miles, 6cyl,
ac, ps, pb, am/fin cass, $9,950. 284-
5073.

1988 Blue Blazer S-10 w/tahoe pack-
age, pw, ac, pb, st, tilt wheel, leather
interior, 65K miles, exc cond, $7,500/
obo. 287-4974.

1992 Chevy S-10 Tahoe, ext cab, w/
camper and liner, 4.3L V6, auto, ac,
ps, pb, am/fin cass, exc cond, 26K
miles, $11,500. 283-6785.

1992 Ford Ranger XLT, ps, pb, am/finm
cass, not dty pd, $7,000/neg. 284-
4634.
1983 Nissan Stanza, ac, am/fin cass,
$2,500. 286-4679.

1991 Ford Ranger XLT w/fiberglass
shell, 5 spd, ac, trailer hitch and light
hook-up, not dty pd. 287-5536.

1984 Toyota Corolla, spec edition, ac,
ps, pb, am/fin cass, vinyl top, exc
cond, one owner, $3,800. 286-4893.

1989 Honda Accord LXi, 5 spd, 4 dr,
ac, sunroof, loaded, 57K miles, exc
cond, $9,500. 284-3481.
1990 Isuzu p/u, dty pd, exc eond, ac,
cass, 2.3L 4 cyl, gas engine, $6,900/
neg. 239-6485.

1976 BMW 2002, rebuilt engine, new
stereo/ac, $3,500/obo. 283-3548.

1991 Honda Accord, 4 dr, 5 spd, pw,
pb, ac, low miles, dty free, $10,995.
264-6713.

1984 Ford LTD station wagon, exon-
erated, ac, am/fin radio, tinted wind, 6
cyl, new tires, $3,500. 264-8675.
1988 Pontiac LeMans, 5 spd, 4 dr, 4
cyl, 35mpg, low miles, ac, ps, pb,
tinted wind, am/fin cass, not dty pd,
mint, $3,900/neg. 286-4693.

1993 Ford Aerostar, exc cond, fully
loaded, under 20K miles, not dty pd,
$20,000. 287-4239.

1976 Caprice Classic, 350 eng, selling
for parts, best offer. 283-5983.

1988 Jeep Commanche 4x4, am/fin
cass Kenwood, ac, ps, pb, new tires,
sport wheels, best offer. 261-6418.

1989 Firebird, mint cond, ac, auto,
power everything, $8,000. 260-4964.
1992 Chevy stepside extended cab
4x4 Silverado, all power, extras, 61K
miles, $20,000/obo. 283-5596.

1992 BMW 325i,4 dr,blk, 5spd,leath-
er, ed, comp, not dty pd, exc cond,
$26,500. 224-7611.

1986 Nissan Sunny, ac,4 dr, gd cond,
dty pd, auto, $3,400. 236-3099.

1983 CJ-7 Jeep, Laredo package, gd
cond, $6,000. 252-5024.

1983 Honda Accord EX, ac, dty pd,
very depend, $3,700/obo. 287-4686.

1989 Pontiac Firebird, V6, ac, pw, pl,
am/fin, mint cond, one owner, $8,000/
obo. 260-4964.

1983 Dodge Charger Shelby, 1990
engine, best offer. 228-2643.
1993 Nissan Bluebird, dty pd, ac,
alarm, tinted wind, low miles, auto,
am/fm, exc cond, $13,300. 236-0984

1991 Nissan Sentra station wagon,
like new, dty pd, all extras, for quick


sale, $6,800. 261-8234.
1990 Pontiac Grand Prix, V6, ac,
cruise, am/fin cass, pw, pl, $9,200.
286-6298.
1985 Subaru, 4 dr, 5 spd, stick, US
specs, gd cond, dty pd, $3,250. 256-
6631.
1988 300ZX, Nissanturbo, t-tops, dig-
ital, leather, $11,000. 260-3275.

1989 Pontiac Grand Am, cpe, ac, ste-
reo, sun roof, pw, alarm, 4 cyl, 16
valve, red, $7,500/obo. 235-1316.

1988 VW p/u, 4 spd, 4 cyl, not dty pd,
$2,200. 252-6951.
1994 Chrysler LeBaron GTC, 6 cyl, 2
dr, cony, anti-lock brakes, auto trans,
very low miles, $15,500/obo. 284-
4991.
1985 Chevy Silverado truck, 305 V8,
auto, $5,500. 287-3895.

A/c condenser for Jeep Cherokee, fits
diesel, V6, or '84-'86 4 cyl engines.
New neverused, $200/obo. 263-8077.

1979 Mercedes 350SE, auto, ps, pb,
ac, pw, am/fin cass, sun roof, $3,000/
obo. 284-6699.

1989 Mazda 323, 1.6L engine, new
tires, ac, cass, 4 spd, exc cond, $5,000.
284-3481.

1989 Nissan Sentra, 2 dr, blk, 5 spd,
ac, tint wind, clean, grt cond, $7,500.
283-5020.

1984 S-10 Blazer, 4x4, auto, air, ste-
reo, theft alarm, perf cond, new paint,
no rust, $5,250/obo. 286-4734.
1980 Honda, 2 dr, $2,200/neg. 287-
4244.

1984 Isuzu Gemini, 4 cyl, 5 spd, 4 dr,
am/fin cass, $2,000. 230-1-412 after
5prm.

1984 Ford LTD, 49K miles, $4,900/
neg. 261-7085.
1988 Montero, auto, diesel, loaded,
dty pd, $12,000/obo. 269-5700.

1991 Ford Escort LX, 4 cyl, ac, ps, pb,
one owner, exc cond, $7,500/obo. 284-
4125.

1983 Volvo 240DL station wagon,
diesel, new engine, auto, ac, $5,000.
282-4337.

1976 Chev Suburban, new tires, dty
pd, ac, $4,000. 282-4337.

1984 300ZX, white, 5 spd, ac, ps, pb,
exc cond, alarm, $6,500. 260-0852.

1986 Isuzu Trooper II, 4 dr, 4wd,
make offer. 284-3793.

1976 BMW 530i, US specs, gd cond,
$2,000. 286-6398.

1994 Jeep Cherokee, 2 dr, at, ac, ps,
cass, 1,400 miles, one month old, not
dty pd. 287-4139.
1985 Olds Cutlass Supreme
Brougham, 5.0L, 307 ci w/all the ex-
tras, not dty pd, $4,000. 287-3931.

1977 Ford Bronco, 4x4, full and half
doors, 302 V8, ps, pb, $5,000/obo.
282-3326.
1987 Nissan Pathfinder, US specs,
V6, ps, pb, pw, ac, am/fin cass, 4x4,
$10,000/obo. 282-3326.

1993 Chevy Corsica, gray, 30K miles,
loaded, am/fin radio, 4 dr, $12,500.
283-6322.
1980 Volvo, 131K miles, runs grt, 2
dr, auto, ac, sunroof, not dty pd, $2,800/
obo. 282-3287.
1984 Pontiac Bonneville, 4 dr, ac, ps,
tint, grt shape, not dty pd, low miles,
$3,500. 284-6894._

1983 S-10 Blazer, V6 4x4, 5spd, new
tires, exc cond, pw, ps, pb, ac, $4,900.
252-1190.
1991 Jeep Commanche p/u, $2,800
and take over payments. 286-3732.

1989 Camaro RS, V6, auto, t-tops,
pw, new paint, $6,000/obo. 230-1926.

1979 Olds Delta 88, new susp, needs
work, extra parts, dty pd, $600. 285-
6705.


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder,
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.


1991 Plymouth Sundance, auto, ac,
bought new at Howard Car Sales,
$8,000. 286-3171.
1993 Honda Integra, 4 dr, 5 spd, ac,
sunroof, 18K miles, 4 cyl, pl, pw, fin
cass, fog lights. $18,000. 283-6425.
1992 Dodge Daytona, loaded, like
new, not dty pd, $10,300. 263-9814.
1977 Jeep Cherokee 4x4, ps, ac, pb,
needs work, $1,800. 251-8546.

1984 Chevy Blazer, 2.8L, 5 spd, ps,
pb, pw, tinted glass, runs grt, new
tires, $4,000. 289-4166.

1983 Ford 4x4 p/u, gd cond, $2,800.
289-4781.
1988 Ford Bronco XLT 4x4, 5.8L,
43K miles, auto, ps, pb, pw, am/fin
cass, exc cond, $12,500. 289-3234.
1987 Ford Tempo 4 cyl, 5 spd, am/fin
cass, gd mpg, $3,300. 287-4772.
1993 Hyundai Excel LS, low miles,
ac, 4 spd, neg, dty pd, $5,500. 261-
7035 after 6pm.

1981 Camaro $2,000/obo; 1979 Mon-
te Carlo, make an offer. 283-5088.

1989Nissanp/u, ac, am/fin cass, camp-
er, auto, 15" rims and tires, 44K miles,
not dty pd, $5,500/firmnn. 260-1948.

1991 Dodge Caravan, ac, ps, pb, 50K
miles, new tires, roof rack, am/fin cass,
not dty pd, $9,900. 284-6671.

1987 Dodge Shadow turbo, 2 dr, 5
spd, runs gd, front end damaged but
still drivable, $3,500/obo. 284-3586.
1992 Pontiac Sunbird LE, 2.0L w/
auto, ac, pl, am/fin cass, under 30K
miles, $10,000/obo. 289-3520.

1991 Eagle Summit, 4 dr, ps, ac, gd
cond, am/fin cd, duty free, $7,500/
obo. 289-4358.

1987 Hyundai Excel, 5 dr, sunroof, cd
player, ac, 5 spd, US specs, $3,500.
287-3872.

1990 Mazda p/u, ac, stand, not dty pd,
46K miles, alarm, am/fin cass. 287-
5728.
Parts for a 4-Runner, Toyota 1989, 4
cyl, 22RE engine, cyl head, assy crank
shaft. 287-5728.

1979 Datsun 280ZX black, ac, pb, exc
mech cond, reliable, $2,500.284-4292.
1993 Ford Explorer XLT 4wd, 4 dr,
4.0L, V6, auto, low miles, loaded, not
dty pd, $23,500. 284-6887.

1989 Buick Skylark, at, ac, tint, tilt,
cruise, not dty pd, $5,500. 284-3670.

1989 Jeep Cherokee, low miles,
$10,000/obo. 284-3012.
1982 Chevy Blazer 305ci, V8, ps, pb,
at, am/fin cass, $6,000/obo. 289-3400
for Scibek.

1987 Ford Festiva, 2 dr, stand, exc
cond, am/fin cass, new tires, tinted
wind, $3,400. 284-3739.

1989 Ford Festiva, ac, am/fin cass, at,
ps, pb, not dty pd, $4,800. 289-4982.

1990 Chevy Cavalier, low miles, ac,
ps,pb, am/fin cass, $7,000. 264-3143.
1990 Toyota 4x4 p/u, V6, 33" tires, 3"
body lift, 41K miles, $11,000. 285-
6743.

1985 Porsche 944, 5 spd, ac, all pow-
er, tint wind, cruise, ed player, alarm,
$11,000. 284-4227.

1983 Ford Bronco 4wd, full size, ps,
pb, ac, roll bar, nice stereo, $7,000.
284-4227.
1982 Chev Van-20 series, ac, cb radio,
seat folds to bed, $5,000. 287-4529.

1988 Olds Cutlass Ciera, 4 dr, 2.5L
engine, ps, pb, ac, white, $4,000. 287-
4529.




Bilingual housekeeper, live-in or out,
M-F, watch children and house clean-
ing. Prefer Albrook. 286-6171.

Bilingual babysitter for days, mature
w/exp and ref. 267-1780 for Lillian.
Babysitter, American housewife, de-
pendable, grt w/kids, hourly and week-
ly. 286-3331 for Angie.

Babysitter, gd w/kids, ref. 261-1236.
Housesit in exchange for accommo-
dations, German couple, honest, reli-
able, ref, speak some Span and Eng.
268-1194 7-9 am.

Exc bilingual, dependable, honest,
reliable, hard working housekeeper,
grt w/kids, Mon, Wed, and Fri, ref.
238-6145.

Comp tutor, trouble shooting, repair,
Span tutor, avail everyday. 252-2657
for Jerry.


Eng spk maid 1-2 days week, cook,
clean, iron, reliable, hard working.
260-9421 for Gloria.

Babysitter, Eng spk, ref, flexible hours.
263-4620.

Mature hard working maid, cleans,
cooks,irons, 1-2 daysweek. 223-5843.
Bilingual day maid 1-2 days week,
mature, dependable, honest, gd work-
er. 287-5928.

Bilingual maid, live-in, honest, reli-
able, grt w/kids, flexible, M-F. 262-
7278.

Reliable live-out maid, some Eng, grt
w/kids, 287-3878.

Bilingual housekeeper, reliable, M-F,
ref, gd w/kids. 284-3627.

Reliable babysitter in my home, any-
time, Eng spk only. 286-4294.

18 year old babysitter w/exp, work
nights, weekends. 230-1927.
Having trouble communicating in
Spanish? Will tutor. 228-2691.
Mature, dependable, trustworthy, bi-
lingual day maid for Albrook or
Howard. Ref provided 286-4399.

Exp babysitter, M-Sat evenings with
ref. 287-4546 leave message.

Professional stylist, family haircare,
top-line salon products, free consulta-
tions. 284-3686 for Max.

Professional massage therapist, mas-
sage for neck and back pain, etc.,
initial visit $5, reg $8. 287-5472.
Day maid 3 days week, bilingual, hon-
est, w/ref, reliable. 233-4616.

Bilingual day maid, honest reliable,
gd w/kids. 262-1276 for Memy.

Experienced day maid avail M-F for
general house work. 220-7409.

Span spring, live-out maid, depend-
able, honest, irons, gd ref. 252-1035.

Housewife to babysit children any age
from early morning until 2 pm. Gd w/
kids. 286-4285 for Marilyn.
Bilingual maid, live-in, honest, exc w/
kids, depend, M-F. 262-7278.

Exp bilingual person will register
American newborn w/Panama Tribu-
nal Electoral. Ref avail. 284-3875 for
Xenia.

Eng spk housekeeper, reliable, hon-
est, payneg,ref. 287-3891 for Tammy.

Bilingual maid wants to work Tues
and Fri. Gen housework and ironing.
220-7784.
Eng spk live-out maid, honest, re-
sponsible, ref, gd w/kids. 221-9762.

13 yr old babysitter, dependable, pre-
ferAlbrook, avail weekends. 286-3485
for Adrianne.

Cake decorating. 287-6222.

Honest, dependable, live-in house-
keeper, grt w/kids, flexible hours, pre-
fer Kobbe/Howard. 289-3243.

Tutoring avail for elementary grades,
Atlantic side only. 289-4350.
Reliable Eng spk maid w/ref, M-Thurs,
flexible, exc w/kids. 228-6545.




Tycoon Fin-Nor fishing reels, 71/2
and 9 w/2 matching rods, exc cond,
$1,800. 252-2080.

1994 Evinrude 100hp, new, still in
box, $3,300; 15hp outboard motor,
long leg, $385. 256-6830.

1993 Jet-ski, Sea-doo GTX, pd $6,600
asking $5,300/obo. 283-3548.
151/2 foot canoe, fiberglass and wood
striper, $500. 256-6376.

Wave runner, new engine, racing im-
peller, tuned exhaust, w/trailer, $3,300/
obo. 252-2029.

19' open fisherman, Yamaha 90, 1994
w/30 hours, fully loaded, $12,000.
252-5024.
1991 Evinrude 70 w/new 1994
powerhead, includes all controls,
$3,000. 252-5024._

Chris craft 23' cuddy mercruiser IBO,
260hp, exc, cond, $20,000. 226-1721.

Sailboat, 30', loaded w/equip, diesel
eng, $22,000. 252-5103.

Marine reduction gear, trans, last used
on GM3-110. 256-6816.

16' John boat w/ultra light aluminum
trailer, w/new trolling motor and other
accessories, $1,000/obo. 289-4358.


M W. ��^^


AST 386SX25 w/4mb Ram, 140m hd,
various programs installed, printer,
desk, accessories, $1,000. 284-4989.
Intel DX33 486 CPU chip $200/obo,
creative video blaster, like new, does
video capture, $125. 268-2973.

20MHZ JDR Oscope, dual channel, 2
probes and frequency counter flO-
600MHZ, both for $400. 229-1510.
Console TV in gd cond, $200; bike,
$150. 287-6735.
SC word processor, 3.5 drive, fax/
modem, rechargable battery, printer
avail, $290. 236-0984.

IBM 286, lm Ram, 130m hd, new in
box, $750; IBM PS-2, color monitor,
lots of games and educational soft-
ware, $275. 230-0008.

Teac X10R reel to reel, exc cond,
$300. 286-6343.
6"-100 watts, 2 Kenwood speakers,
new, $40. 287-5221.
19" Zenith color TV w/out remote
$135. 252-5185.

Cannon EOS 650 camera, autofocus
and manual, flash EZ300, 35-70 mac-
ro zoom lens, soft case, like new,
$700. 236-1256.

Mitsumi CD Rom, 16 bit sound card,
speakers and drivers for DOS or Win-
dows, $300. 260-1580.

Sony Handycam super 8 camera, grt
cond, has extra large padded case and
many extras, $550/obo. 269-2018.
Gateway 2000, 486DX33, CD Rom,
sound card, 240mb hd, 8m Ram, plus
software, $3,200/o.bo. 260-9489.

27" Sony Trintron cable ready, $375.
221-1181 after 6pm.

Yaesu FT 901 DM HF trans, $600.
287-5839.

Pioneer 6 disc CD player $100, 5 yr
old 14" color TV $100. 287-5634.

Dual Fisher spkers, air dyne 80 hms,
60 watt, $25ea; Yorxsound speaker,
$100. 286-4023.
Panasonic TV/VCR/Camcorder com-
bination, gd cond, $350. 286-3295.

Technics SH-AV22 surround proces-
sor, exc cond, $80. 263-8077.

486SX PB w/monitor $1,000, EP-7
digital comp $700, Pioneer stereo w/
speakers $500. 284-3481.

IBM compatible, 386/25, dual drives,
4m Ram, mouse, Windows 3.1,
Microsoft Office, DOS 6.2, $1,200/
obo. 286-4734.
Kenwood power amp 350w, $200;
equalizer $150; stereo rack $50. 235-
4096.

2 Kenwood MV-5D 450w speakers,
$325; tuner $100; Tandy color moni-
tor, $50. 235-4096.

386SX IBM Clone, 4mb Ram, dual
drives, 40mb hd, VGA monitor, 24
pin printer, software, modem, $1,200/
obo. 286-6277.

Atari 800 and 130XE comp, extras,
$375;Logitech hand scanner, 256 gray
scale, $225; Smith Corona memory
typewriter, extras, $125. 252-5829.
Comp AT 286, 20mb hd, 5.5, EGA,
monochromatic, 240K, software, $375.
261-7035 after 6pm.
Apple U ES PC, color printer, color
monitor, mouse and 2 drives, some
software, $600. 284-3993.

Electric Bass/case, amplifier, stand,
books, tuner. 284-4867 for Wilson.

Epson 9 pin printer w/tractor/single
feed, $80. 284-5930.

LXI series stereo rack system with
tape deck receiver, amp, tur2tble, 2
spkers, cab included, $275. 284-3977.
Amigo 500 w/software, 1802 video
monitor, two 3.5 drives, joysticks, star
color printer, $600/neg. 223-8280.
Speaker, Kenwood 400 watt, model
LS-P9200, impedance 80hms, never
used, $250. 284-4276.

Sound FX 8-bit soundcard, hardly used
$50, PC track ball mouse, $15. 287-
3271.

PB Legend 300, 386SX, 80mb hd,
dual drives, VGA, 3mb Ram, sound
blaster, 2400 int comdem, DOS 6.2,
$850/obo. 287-3051.
Packard Bell Legend 2015,486SX33,
170m hd, CD-Rom, 4m Ram,
soundcard, color printer, desk, $1,000.
287-3271.

Technics Quartz turntble, direct drive,
$100; Kenwood A/V surround amp,
237w, $375, Infiunty model 2.5 floor
standing speakers, $875.252-5829.
386SX20,8 Ram, 420hd, 2 drives, CD














SClassified Ads


Tropic Times
Oct. 21, 1994 B


Rom, 16 bit soundcard, 28.8 fax mo-
dem, printer, mouse, joystick, soft-
ware, more, $2,200. 283-5020.

Commodore 128/64, lots of software,
printer, $125/obo. 287-3697.

Packard Bell 286NT, modem, mouse,
windows 3.1, keyboard, $325/obo.
287-3697.

Sega Genesis cds, Mortal Kombat,
Stellar Fire, Rage in the Cage, $25-
$35. 260-9156.

Pair Q 31 series Bose black cabinet
speakers, $150/obo. 287-4173.

VCR, JVC,exccond, $100.282-4538.

Packard Bell 386SX20 w/monitor,
soundblaster and speakers, $600. 287-
4772 after 6pm.

Amigo 2000 lid, monitor and color
printer, lots of games and programs,
$550. 287-6372.

Sanyo stereo, 2 cassette players, record
player, synthesizer, model GXT 848
remote control, $165/obo. 263-4671.




Young male cat, neutered and
declawed, gray tabby with white paws
in Gateway housing. 284-6633.




Bunkbed, like new, $225; Whirlpool
4cf refrig, like new, $150; American
Star 4cf freezer $150. 268-2973 John.

Baby crib $70, high chair $20. 286-
6171.

Tiger 10 cup electric rice cooker, nev-
er used, $65. 284-4484.

Beautiful glass top and brass 6-seat
DR set, $450. 286-3380 after 5pm.
5000BTUacformaid's quarters,$145.
256-6830.

Whirlpool washer/dryer, almond col-
or, large capacity, multiple settings,
gd cond, $600 set. 287-5727.

Q-size waterbed w/solid wood head
and foot boards. Exc cond, w/every-
thing included, $500. 226-6851.

2 new twin box springs, $75ea. 252-
2314.

Large 6 seat glass table, LR suit-4
piece. 284-5472.

Sofa and loveseat, $600; micro stand,
$50; micro, $125; power wheel 12
volt battery, $160. 286-4893.

12x15 carpet, peach $75; 12x15, gray
carpet $25. 287-6173.

Curtains, blinds, micro $130, 13" col-
or TV/VCR $225, Amiga comp $300,
dinette set $800. 286-4679.

Light blue wing chair $150. 233-0974.

New 9x12 light blue carpet, almond
bar stools, CD/VHS solid oak rack,
new food processor. 229-2916.

Drapes, beige; mini blinds, white; for
Cutnmdu flats, see at 2001 A Curundu.
286-3137.

Tan 6x9 carpet, $10; 8x10 carpet $35;
wrought iron bench $35; white whicker
full size headboard $50. 282-3497.

Play pen, frame carrier, walker/sta-
tionary horse, gd cond, $30.287-5221.

Entertainment center, $150.287-5839.

Extra large sofa sectional, contempo-
rary style, biege/rose/mauve, like new,
$1,600/neg. 286-4299.

10,000 BTU GE ac $200, 14,000 BTU
ac Whirlpool $250, DR table set w/6
chairs, $250. 252-6323.

Couch and recliner, $300. 236-4865.

Sony 17" color TV, remote control,
$200; Whirlpool dishwasher, needs
repair. 262-1251.

Bedroom set $750, RCA camcorder
$500, Betamax and tapes $75, area
carpets $40-$70. 287-5928.

Black entertainment center, $30/obo.
286-6348.

Twin bed, mattress, box springs and
frame, like new, $200. 252-2676.

Lawnmower $80, vaccuum cleaner
$40, small chest of drawers $40, con-
crete pots for plants $10ea. 287-5237.

Like new extra large capacity Maytag
washer/dryer, $700. 287-5038.

Blue recliner, gd cond, $300; queen
size sofa bed $525. 286-4023.

Year old 4 burner stove with oven,
Magic Chef, w/clock and timer, $350.
286-3269.
10,000 BTU ac, $150. 252-5309.


Couch, newly reupholstered, $350;
queen mattress set, $400; 9x12 brown
rug, $50; comp desk, $100. 287-3878.

2 rattan rockers $125ea, book case
$75, shelves $75, sm kitchen drop leaf
table and chairs $150, entire drapes
for Howard tropical, $200. 284-5238.

Duinig room set, 4 chairs, square, wood
and glass, new, $300. 287-5394.

Refrig $300, washer$200, dryer $200,
dishwasher $150, exercise bike $100.
226-1721._

Sofa sleeper, queen size, exc cond,
$600. 284-3481.

Sofa w/built in recliner, dark Sante Fe
colors, $300. 286-4674.
Full size mattress and boxspring with
metal frame, $200. 286-6174.

Danish blk entertainment set, dining
room for 10 w/china cabinet, danish
wht comer lamp, plants all sizes/pric-
es, Nintendo games, $12ea. 236-0984.

LR set w/table, $475; DR set w/4
tables, $400; bar w/2 high chairs, $380.
252-2883.

Large sofa, white/gray/blue design,
like new, $600. 269-5700.

Car seat, double stroller, bassinette,
prom dress, baby bath, all for $200.
286-4129.

Universal weight set bar w/complete
set of weights, $100;Queen size brass
bed, grt cond, $300. 284-3924.

New GE heavy duty washer $450,
Large GE freezer $450. 283-6472.

Waterbed heater, $75; Mr. Coffee 12
cup w/24 hr timer. 286-4399.

Bassett BR set, solid wood, 7 piece, no
bed, white w/gold trim, $1,200/obo.
284-5833.

Ent center, glass DR table, VCR, blue
recliner, leave message. 287-4546.

Table lamps, black and gold w/orien-
tal style flowers and black shades,
make offer. 233-3410.

Blue curtains $15, Kenmore micro
$150, swing set $35, GE 19.6 cu ft
regrig w/inside ice maker $750, BR
set w/hutch and lights, solid pine,
$1,200. 252-2028.

Kenmore washer, used 2 yrs, dam-
aged moving, and older GE dryer for
repair, $60. 284-3896.

Hide-a-bed couch $100,3 rugs $20ea.
285-6705.

6 piece LR set, couch, chair, rocker, 3
tables, $350. 284-5680.

Gibson 14 cu ft upright freezer, 1 yr
old, $1,000; DP weight bench, 100lbs,
$50/obo. 283-6322.

23.7 GE refrig, GE washer, recliner,
queen size matt, twin matt/box springs.
252-2180.

White toddler bed w/waterproof matt,
side rails and toy/linen trays for under
bed, like new, $125. 287-5291.

Sofa w/3 cushions, exc cond, $500/
obo. 228-4514.

Porcelain dishes, white w/blue flow-
ers, service for 9 plus lots of extras,
$85. 284-6533.

Kenmore heavy duty, large capacity
washer/dryer, almost new, $700; key-
board; baby swing; down comforter.
284-6533.

40 gal electric water heater double
glass lined, $120. 223-4766.
21" sq GE refrig $400, king size sofa
bed $150, Fisher VCR $140. 262-
7278.

Whirlpool thin-twin wash/dry com-
bo. Used 1 yr, gd for apartment, $500.
236-0108.

Vacuum cleaner, Hoover elite 600,
$100. 252-5762 after 6pm.

Washer/dryer pair $350/obo, gas lawn
mower, $100/obo. 284-5930.

Misc fum, TVs, VCRs, DR set, big
bird cage, portable pool w/filter, kitch-
en stuff, comp and table, couches.
268-3085.

21" color TV $150, 5x9 onental rug
$50, early American hardwood rocker
$250. 287-5021.

A Soloflex type work-out machine,
$150; Nintendo $60; black sofa and
loveseat w/design, $600. 287-6485.

Toddler car seat, exc cond, $15; cur-
tams for Gateway housing. 284-6633.

Queen size sofa bed and queen Anne
chair, $850; Oster kitchen center$100,
all like new. 226-8516.

Brown sofa, burgandy recliner, oak
table w/leaf and 4 upholstered chairs,
infant car seat. 286-4439.


Wrought iron coffee table, heavy bev
glass top, $180; pedestal end table
glass top, $75; fold out love seat, black,
new, $185. 260-3168.




Gold chain w/2 charms at ReederGym.
269-7776 for Mark.

"Rams" hat at Los Rios playground,
had "Underwood" embroidered on
back. 252-2028.




SNES Pebble Beach Golf, $40;
Gameboy w/Tetris, Kirby's pinball,
Qix, Alleyways, $125; Sport's cards-
sets and singles. 287-5536.

Weider weight bench w/ll01b set,
Encyclopedia Britanica w/great books,
heritage binding. 260-1290.

4-11.50x31x15 Good year AT tires,
on Ford factory rims, $450. 260-9058.

Clothes, household. 284-3689.

Sports cards 1989-1994, baseball, bas-
ketball and football, single and sets.
284-3689.

Wood framed fence to go across car-
port, 12x3 w/gate, $25. 286-6179.

Car seat, crib, walker. 284-3300.

Patio table $50, dish set 36 piece, $40.
261-3325.

1/3ct diamond ring w/appraisal, exe
cond, $600/obo. 264-3352.

Sega Genesis games, NBA Jams, RBI
Baseball 94, Baseball 2020, Pebble
Beach Golf, $50. 236-4532.

Black velvet dresses size 7 and 5/6,
jumpsuit size 5/6, 2 night dresses size
5/6, small motherhood gold shirt, all
new. 252-2042.

Toddler car seat $15, finitime infant
seat $30, auto bottle wanner, new $8,
young children's red velvet dresses.
252-2042.
Body by Jake finnflex w/accys and
VHS tape, $75. 233-0974.

Blinds, maroon color, Curundu flats
BR size, $50; basketball backboard,
goal and post, best offer. 286-4222.

Star Trek tapes, 74 of the original TV
series VHS tapes, $6.50ea. 284-6183.

Ladie's sweaters, new cond, size small,
$15ea. 252-5185.

New propane tank, $18; lawn mower
w/shovelandgascan,$135.284-6497.

Vacuum cleaner, $95, new step lad-
der, $35. 284-6497.

2 telephones $10ea, boogie board, new
$50, skateboard, top-line, $15. 252-
5185.

Girl's 0lsp racing bike, gray, gd cond,
needs painting, $50. 260-1078.

Classical acoustic guitar, plus pick-up,
$130. 287-5592.

Piano $1,800, flute $120, violin $100.
236-4865.

.Depth finder, Hummingbird wide view
with temp, speed trip log, like new,
$225. 269-2018.

Beautiful diamond, ruby ring, l/2ct
total weight, hardly worn, $500. 287-
3898 Mon-Fri 8:30am-3pm.

Snorkel equip-mask, fins, boots (10)
and snorkel, $60; Officer'sAnmy green
uniform, 40L, $75. 287-4299.

Four new BMW runims w/lhub caps,
$150. 287-4299.

41 volumes ofEncy Britanica, plus 15
Britanica Junior, $200. 262-1251.

Air strider exercise bike $150/obo,
Gold's Gym weight bench set, $150/
obo. 286-6348.

Sega CD games, Dracula Unleashed,
Enforcer w/gun, Tomcat Alley, $25ea.
286-4884.

Frank Schafer activity books for pri-
mary grades and other school teach-
ing materials. 287-5237.

Blue rug 10x121/2, $50; 2 golden
brown nirugs 12xl4, $150ea, electric
typewriter, $80. 260-5266.

172 quart Igloo cooler, $200; 9" color
TV, $85. 252-2029.

65 feet of 4-foot tall cyclone fence,
full mattress. 287-5634.

Beautiful wedding gown, veil,
boquets, candle, cake top and decora-
tions, $500. 286-6134.

Women's shoes, size 8/81/2, $7-$10;
dive boots w/zipper, women's size 5,
$20. 287-4788.
Bike/ski rack combo-spare tire mount-


ed with security locks, $150; tire for
mtn bike,26x2.1 ATB,$25.287-4788.

Mini blinds for single and double wind,
Sound design stereo/twin cass, $25;
Graco baby stroller, $15. 282-4691.

Toddler car seat, $8; blue iron twin
bed, $125, couch and love seat, $375;
king size w/bed, 12 dr pedistal w/
mirrors etc, $1,800. 287-4271.

2 pairs of men's shoes size 13 never
worn, one Florsheims other Jarman,
$50ea. 260-3903.
3 ring wedding set, all rings have
diamonds total l/2ct, $500.286-6134.

3.5 Murray self-propelled mower, grt
cond, 22", $150. 287-3627.

Big air compressor like new, grt for
airbrush and airtools, $225.287-3627.

NFL Fball, Hardball 3, Hardball 3
deluxe, NHL Hockey, Superstar Bball,
originals, $80/obo. 286-4685.

10" table saw $250, 1/2" Plywood
$15/sheet, pipe for fence. 256-6376.

Nordic Track Pro, like new, $350.
284-4991.

Xmas tree $50, mixer $35, elec type-
writer $90, pet carrier $15, baritone
mouthpieces $5, plants. 252-2208.

Sharp B micro $75, Gracco DBI stroller
$45, Sharp color printer $175. 285-
4885.

Fan $12, weights $75, car battery $17,
Nintendo games $10ea, 4 blinds all
for $12, mil compass $27, large mil
ruckw/fiame/no straps$32.287-6289.

10 sp women's race bike, color gray,
gd cond, $50. 260-1078 for Raquel.

Barbie car, pink, gd cond, $100. 266-
0176.

Golfbag, cart, clubs, shoes 71/2, more,
gd cond, $400/obo. 263-2240.

Chevy parts: brake booster and alter-
nator, like new, $200/$175/obo. 252-
6956.

AC generator, 100kw, 3 phase, 240,
208, 120 volts and more, GE. Electri-
cal end only, needs diesel or prime
mover, $3,500. 256-6816.

Minolta weathermatic 350L 35mm,
waterproof, 2 lens, $95. 263-4671.

Home repair, additions, woodwork,
customized crafts, carpentry, plumb-
ing, electrical. 284-6629.

BBQ grill $25, med dog kennel $20,
VCR $125. 287-5190.

Toddler car seat $20, maternity clothes
sm to Ig sizes $30, blue stroller, gd
cond $15, children's pop-up picture
Christmas books, $10. 286-4474.

Yamaha portable piano, new, $300;
boy's coat $20; lady's coat $10. 262-
7278.

Large Fedders ac, $325; Rotech stan-
dard boat steering system9'cable, $50;
Mercury 40hp motor, needs rebuild,
$300; lawn mower $30. 284-5929.

Children's video tapes, $2/$5/$7;
youth bed; double size futon; toys, etc.
223-4678.

New American Ency set, 21 vol and
more, $125; shelf, $10. 284-5784.

New Taso lightning paintball gun,
vertical foregrip, 7oz, 140 round load-
er, $250. 289-4320.

Life styler treadmill, 3 yrs old, $100/
obo. 284-5379.

High chair $15, babycrib w/sheets and
blankets $100, car seat $15, Conunador
124/64K w/everything, $300. 287-
3671.


18K engagement ring. 232-4273 after
5pm or 8am-10pm weekends.

Bench w/set of weights, $100/obo.
228-1339.

Ladie's wet suit, size small, like new,
$75. 287-4692.

Scuba-Beauchat BCD, size M, like
new, $250; Dacorspgw/compass,new,
$150. 269-5180 ext 1093.

Ladie's 18K 3 tone gold necklace,
lovely, $800. 326-8516.

Parts for 1987 Chev Cavalier, engine
2.0L, trans, axle, fenders, bumpers,
rack and pinion, rotors and drums.
228-4061.

Men's golf clubs w/bag, 1-3-5 wood,
3-9 pw irons, $165. 287-6372.

Little tykes castle, $200; Little tykes
roadster tod bed, $125; trundle bed w/
2 twin matt, $210; overstuff couch,
loveseat, chair, $1,000. 260-3168.




1976 Montessa 348 Coda trials bike,
gd cond, runs grt, many spare parts,
$750/obo. 261-2550.

1978 Yamaha RD 400, gd cond, $650;
1978 Montessa 348 trail, $500 w/ex-
tra pans. 256-6323.

1979 Kawasaki KZ 1000 Z1R classic,
low miles, dty pd, $1,200. 252-5167.

1982 Honda CB-125-S, wind shield,
crash bar, luggage rack, helmet, cov-
er, rainsuit, trail-a-bike, runs grt, dty
pd, $600/obo. 287-3051.

Black Honda Elite scooter, electric
start, 370 miles, classy, peppy, grt gas
mileage, $1,800. 287-5680.

Cushman scooters body and engine
parts needed for labor of love. 241-
4339, leave message.

1978 Kawasaki KZ 650, dty pd, $850/
obo. 284-5458 for Paul Room 222.

1987 Yamaha 200cc, US slecs, dty
pd, low miles, $1,000. 287-4632.




Qtrs 610 Mindi, Balboa Heights, 6am-
noon.

Qtrs 33D Quarry Heights, 8am-no early
birds.

Qtrs 2240B Carr Street, Balboa.

Qtrs 48A Howard, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 858A Clayton, 7am-2pm.

Qtrs 828B Clayton, 7am-2pm.

Qtrs 339A Claylon, 8am-lpm.

Qtrs 7256B Cardenas, 7-lOam.

Qtrs 2538 Cocoli, multi-family, 7am-
noon.

Qtrs 75B Albrook, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 953B La Boca, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 7302A Cardenas, 7-9am.

Qtrs 10 Albrook, 8am.

Qtrs 106B Jadwin Ave, Gamboa, 8am-
noon.

Qtrs 416B Amador, 7am.

Qtrs 305B Albrook, 8am.

Qtrs 261 B Albrook, Sunday only, 8aim.

Qtrs 317A Albrook, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 855A Clayton, 7-10am.n

Qtrs 2611B Cocoli, 7-1 1:30am.

Qtrs 7256B Cardenas, 7-10ain.


Qtrs 6558A Corozal, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 1533B Howard, 8am.

Qirs 520 Fort Davis, 8am-2pm.

Qtrs 152A Howard, 7-1 lain.

Qtrs 2240B Carr Street, Balboa, 7am-
noon.

Qtrs 611 B Howard, three family, 8am-
3pm today and Saturday.




Babysitter two mornings a week on
Albrook, prefer someone who is flex-
ible and lives close. 286-3173.

Span spking, live-in maid, clean, iron,
2 children age 6,8, M-Sat. 286-4896.

Tansu or step tansu, Korean, Japanese
or other, antique or reproduction OK.
284-4484.

Convection oven, any size, any make.
263-3129 evenings.

Electric clothes dryer, reasonable
price. 252-2476.

Live-in bilingual maid, childcare,
cleaning, ironing, and cooking. Ref
required, honest and hdwk. 286-4573.

Shift workers looking for a flexible
Eng spk, honest, dependable house-
keeper/babysitter. 287-5893.,

SGI, VSA member. 282-3036.

Decorative/oriental folding screen and
10'xl0' carpet, brown or similar col-
or. 239-9656.

Work for a maid, 2 days a week, Eng
spk, honest, dep. 287-6438.

Someone to refinish table/chairs and
reupholster furniture and interior of
vehicle. Reasonably priced. 283-5983.

Dependable, honest, bilingual live-in
maid, refs reg. 287-3972.

Live-in/out maid, Eng spk, must love
children, w/refs. 282-3790.W

1955-1956 Cristobal High graduation/
remembrance book. 252-6989.

Replacement pieces for Franciscan
pattern stoneware, especially bowls.
252-1218.

Used comp, monitor, and printer. 260-
3505.

Gardener w/ref to cut grass, weed,.
trim, plant, minor jobs. 223-1069.

Live-in maid 6 days week, gd cook,
clean, wash, ref required. 223-1069.

Yoga instructor for private or group
lessons. 260-9768.

4oz baby food jars w/lids. 284-6894.

Eng spking sewing lady, clothes, drap-
eries, reasonable priced, reliable, my
home. 236-2070.

Babysitter, reliable, ref, for 1 yr old
and 3 yr old. Need own trans, Eng spk.
236-2070.

Mountain bike for man, pay up to
$100. 283-5088.

Books for Ant 2410X-hltro Cultural
Anth and PCB 2700-Human Physiol-
ogy, Term two. 289-3751.

Fenders and grill for 1991 Jeep Wran-
gler. 228-4061.

PCC book English Comp 11. If you
have one, come to Clayton Ed center,
Rmn 322, any day at 11:30am.

PCC book for English Comp II, Short
Story 6th Edition by David Madden,
need one fast. 287-4099.

Female roommunate to share Ig funislied
apartment, $268 per month. 269-0675.


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Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each
week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited
more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed
below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This
information will not be released to third parties. Deadline forth receipt
of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are run on a space
available basis and the staff makes no guarantee ofads running. Ads must
include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times.
Unit 0936, APO AA 34002 ordeposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post
Office. Ads offering weapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not be
run.


RANK/GRADE

DUTY PHONE











B12 Tropic Times
B12 Oct. 21, 1994




HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming
veteran preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming edu-
cation and a copy of CASP notice of rating if applicable. Sub-
mit a copy of latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army vacancy announce-
ments (forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Direc-
torate of Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal,
or call 285-5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should be the
first step in the job search.
SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at NM-5 level
and above require specialized experience. Specialized experi-
ence is either education above the high school level or work ex-
perience directly related to the position being filled. Example:
Budget positions at or above the NM-5 level required Budget
experience or equivalent education.
Vacancy announcements are also available at the Sundial
Recreation Center.
Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications
on a continuous basis for the following positions. Registers es-
tablished from these announcements will be used to fill perma-
nent and temporary positions.
VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most
clerical position).
VB# 001A * General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill
most clerical position).
VB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent
wk sch)
* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is
required.
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard)
Requires Cert + 6 mo recreation exp in the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Requires 6
mos recreation exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation),
NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation),
NM-6
VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5.
Limited to permanent status employees only.
VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6.
Limited to permanent status employees only.
The following positions are Perm/temp, Full-time,
Part-time, Intermittent.
VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14.
VB# 008 ** CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license
required), NM-9/10/11.
VB# 009 ** PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence
required), NM-5.
VB#019 ** EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECH-
NICIAN, NM-640-4/5/6.
** Selectees for nurse, medical officer and EMT
positions will undergo a background check.
Pacific
VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION
OPEN: 10-21-94 CLOSE: 11-01-94

042-95-JH BUDGET ANALYST, NM-560-11.
SENSITIVE. TEMPNTE: 1 YR..HQ, USSOUTHCOM,
Office of the Controller, SCJ8-CM, Ft. Amador.

043-95-NC PROCUREMENT TECHNICIAN, NM-
1106-5. USAG, DOC, Purchasing Div., Corozal.

044-95-SS CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
DIRECTOR, NM-1701-9. TEMP NTE: 30 Sep 95.
USA-DCA, Child Development Services, Ft. Clayton.
NOTE: Selectee will undergo a background check.

045-95-SS ELECTRICIAN (HIGH VOLTAGE),
MG-2810-10. HQ, USAG, DEll, Operations Div.,
Corozal. NOTE: Driver's license required.

046-95-SS SOCIAL SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE,
NM-187-9. USAG, DCA, Army Community Service, Ft.
Clayton. NOTE: Driver's license required. Selectee will
undergo a background check.

047-95-SS ELECTRICAL WORKER (HIGH
VOLTAGE), MG-2810-8. IIQ, USAG, DEH,
Operations Div., Corozal.

048-95-LA TELECOMMUNICATIONS MECH-
ANIC, MG-2502-8/10. SENSITIVE. U.S. Army Info
Syst Command. 106th Sig Bge, 56th Sig Battalion.
NOTE: Security clearance required. Requires lifting up to
50 lbs.

Atlantic
452A-94-SS CONSTRUCTION INSPECTOR, NM-
809-7. HQ , USAG, DEH-ATL, Ft. Davis. NOTE:
Driver's license required. Must have knowledge of A/C
equipment or kitchen equipment. Applications received
under VB# 452-94-SS, will be considered under this
announcement.
NOTE: Amendment to VB# 001-95-MW,
SUPERVISORY PRODUCTION CONTROLLER, NM-
1152-9, position is SENSITIVE.

Navy
The Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation Com-
munity Recreation Department is seeking a personnel
assistant. The position will remain open until filled.
Interested people can call Ricardo Torres, 283-4301/5341.


SPotpourri





Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club: 282-3439
The club will be closed to the public for renovations
through Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be
available 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Addition-
ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and
during lunch hours 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.


Amador
*ClubIAmador: 282-4334
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring
soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights.
Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno
at noon the first Sunday of each month.
The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during
renovations of the Quarry Heights Officers' Club.

Clayton
*The Loop: 287-3035
CJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments 3:30 p.m. every Sun-
day.
Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or CJ's
Sports Bar, call 287-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343. Special
menus for functions available. The club will make all ar-
rangements, including cakes, decorations or floral center
pieces.
*NCO Club: 287-4716
The Forum Restaurant open 5-9 p.m. daily.
Mexican buffet Mondays.
Steak night Tuesdays. A la carte menu is available.
Country buffet Wednesdays features barbecue pork ribs,
fried chicken, pork knuckles, collards greens, sweet potato,
rice, black-eyed peas and corn bread.
All-you-can-eat family buffet Thursdays.
Seafood buffet Fridays features broiled lobster, garlic
shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab.
12-oz prime rib special Saturdays.
Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m.
Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Sun-
days and Mondays.
Disco 9 p.m. Wednesday, Fridays and Saturdays. There
will be a midnight buffet.
International food fair/enlisted membership drive 5
p.m. Thursday includes food tasting, cooking demonstration,
wine tasting, recipes and door prizes.

Albrook
*Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582
Tonight's entertainment jazz it with Lowell Hopper in
the lounge.
Saturday afternoon football 2 p.m. in the lounge during
football season with bar service.
Prime rib dinner and seafood feast 6-9 p.m. Saturday.
Menu also includes: Cream of broccoli soup, garden salad,
12 oz. prime rib, baked potato, baby carrots, and sherbert.
Sunday saloon breakfast specials 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the
lounge. Choose from three menus.
Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-l p.m. in the din-
ing room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets,
roast beef, fresh fruits, breakfast and lunch items and ice
cream bar.
Mongolian barbecue 5:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Choose
the meat, vegetables, seasonings. oils and have chefs do the
job outside on the open grills.
Lombardi a la Italiana 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. A taste
of Italy at your favorite club dining room.
Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday includes
tacos, :,ii.i-.. taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. After din-
ner dance the night way to country western music.
Country western night Thursdays with free dance les-
sons at 7:30-10:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples
dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing.

Howard
*Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718
Weekday lunches includes bulTffet, salad and potato bar.
Order a la carte 6-8:30 p.m. in the dining room Fridays
and Saturdays.
Friday evenings in the lounge include beer specials,
music, games and club card drawings.
Barbecue plate special 6-8:30 p.m. today.


ISNAM raio6chedle-


The Southern Command
Network's -MNI Radio station features
America's most-listened to radio
programs. Live co, erage of breaking
news stories and special events are
prove ided.
SCN AM Radio AM 790 Pacific
and AM 1420 Atlantic are the news,
sports and information station.
Schedule goes into effect Oct. 31.


Couples night 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday. Beef or chicken for
two.
Fajitas junction 6-8:30 p.m. Oct. 28. Enjoy the Tex-Mex
favorite, beef or chicken fajitas in the dining room.
Masquerade ball Oct. 29.
Dining room is closed Sunday through Thursday.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club - Dining Room:
284-4189
Sunday breakfast buffet 8-12:30 a-m.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30
a.m. Saturday.
New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade
roast beef, turkey, turkey salad and tuna fish sandwiches with
all the trimmings.
Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. featuring
tableside preparation with tuxedo service.
Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Select a
cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or fillet. All steaks are
U.S. choice beef.
Family menu Tuesdays-Fridays featuring all the favor-
ites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand made 1/2
pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more.
Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or
take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot
wings.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom: 284-
4189
Friday night disco 4:30 p.m.- I a.m. tonight. Dance and
relax to the music.
Membership night 5 p.m. Saturday. Complimentary
Italian buffet for members and one guest; $6.95 for addition-
al guest. Children 6-12, $3 and children under 6, free.
Halloween all night disco 10 adm.-5 am. Oct. 29-30.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove:
284-4189
Live piano music weekday evenings.
Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays.
Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Monday night football and mug special in the lounge.
Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcorn and nachos.
Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Free Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m.
Wednesday in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line danc-
ing, the stomp, waltzand others. Music will be until mid-
night.
Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with
your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills.
Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.-
midnight Thursdays.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday.
*Top Three Club: 284-4189
Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday.
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat and
complimentary taco bar.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. Members
must have a card and be present to win.
Club closed Saturdays.

Rodman
*Rodman Club - Open to all ranks: 283-4498
Happy hour 4:30-11 p.m. in the Laguna Lounge with
complimentary hors d'oeuvres.
Halloween bash 7-11 p.m. Oct. 28 in the Laguna Lounge.
A disc jockey will spin great tunes for the "monster mash."
There will be prizes for the best costumes and complimentary
hors d'oeuvres will be served. Come out and show your scary
side.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Monday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with all-
you-can-eat taco bar 6-9 p.m. at the Laguna Lounge.
Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
All-you-can-eat beef and burgundy 4:30-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Grill menu is also available.
Open mike night 6-11 p.m. Thursday in the Laguna
Lounge.
Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Rodman Bohio.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays: 6-9
p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-
9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays.
*Rodman Annex: 283-4498
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
The club is closed for evening and weekend service.


5pm All Things Considered
6:30pm Country USA

Saturday
Midnight Country USA
10am NPR's Car Talk
1am Country USA

Sunday
All day Country USA


Monday-Friday
6am NPR Morning
Edition
8am News. commentary . fea-
tures, sports.
Noon Rush Limbaugh Show
1 pm News. commentary, fea-
tures, sports


-^y




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PAGE 1

Vol. V11, No. 42 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Oct. 21, 1994 Drawdown continues Navy AF Consolidate pass offices HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PAO/Rodman NS PAO) -Navy personnel needing security badges, Defense Department employee installation access passes and base/ stationvehicle registration will receivethose services at Building 710 here beginning T Monday. The moving of these services to the Howard Pass and Registration office is the result of ongoing Treaty Implementation Plan negotiations and agreements reached by the Navy and Air Force. "We are looking forward to working with the Air Force in another step in consolidating services in support of the TIP process," said Lt. Jim Jolliff, Rodam NS security officer. Several serviceswill remain at the Naval Station. Spc. Tom Finditner (Tropic Times) *Weapons registration will be done in W ork party the arms room, second floor, Building 2, Rodman, 283-4144. Soldiers from the 41st Area Support Group and local Panamanian residents work together to create a play *Bicycle registration will be done inthe ground for a remote school near Chepo. See story and photos on Pages 8 and 9 physical security office, Building 7B, Rodman, 2834215. *Bilingual identification cards and military ID cards will remain a function of the Personnel Support Department, 283-63 15. Surname troops return There will be no change in the temporary visitor policy at Rodman.They can be vide a temporary safe, secure, and sanitary processed at Gate I from 5-8 a.m. and 3-5 Distant H haven on standbyvenvironment for up to 2,500 Haitian mip.m. Monday -Friday, or 24 hours a day at grants, includingfood, shelter, medical care, Gate 2. QUARRY HEIGHTS (U.S. SOUTHJoint Task Force-Suriname will redeployto and basic necessities. "We look forward to serving our new COM PAO) -U.S. Southern Command has parent units in Panama and the United Construction ofthe facilities began Aug. Navy customers," said Col. Jim Jones, 24th put the temporary safe haven camp in States. 28 as the initial phase of Operation Distant Security Police Squadron commander. Suriname for Haitian migrants on standby. Two engineer units of approximately Haven and was completed in early Septem"We've recently renovated our Pass and The decision was made because of Op150 U.S. military personnel left Suriname ber. Approximately 500 U.S. military perRegistration office and I think all our cuseration Uphold Democracy in Haiti and the beginning Oct. 5 for their home stations. sonnel deployed from Panama and the tomers will see it was designed to improve subsequent reduced need for immediate Remaining equipment will be stored at the United States to Suriname starting Aug. 25 our service to them. safe havens for Haitian migrants outside facilities and a small detachment of U.S. to build the Suriname safe haven migrant "Our Air Force customers should also Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba, officials and Surinamese forces will remain to maincamp. understand that the small increase in said. tain the sites and provide security. The first units to redeploy were the workload will not affect the quality of serFollowing approval Oct. 15, the twoThe safe haven facilities include a tem536th Engineer Battalion from U.S. Army vice they receive," Jones added. week process of placing the camp and reporary migrant camp constructed adjacent South in Panama and Company B, 92nd The Rodman and Howard Chapel worlated facilities in "caretaker status" began to Ayoko Surinamese army camp near the Engineer BattalionfromFortStewart,Ga.ship services will also consolidate Monday. Monday. Zanderij International Airport; a base camp the units that built the facilities. These units "We are excited about the opportunity to Caretaker status calls for Joint Task for U.S. personnel on Ayoko; and a recepredeployed because their mission was comserve the Navy community and have them Force-Suriname to reduce staffing while tion facility to process Haitian migrants plete, officials said. worship with us and participate in our relimaintaining the ability to recall personnel upon arrival at the airport. The migrant JTF-Suriname included personnel from gious education programs," said Installaand equipment and be prepared to receive camp is located on a 28-acre area and the 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light), 536th tion Chaplain (Lt. Col.) John Cusack. Haitians within two weeks of notification. consists of about 240 general-purpose meEngineer Battalion, 154th Signal Battalion, Questions about worship services and To accomplish this, non-mission essendium tents, 40 four-person latrines and 14 534th Military Police, 1097th Medium Boat religious education programs may be ditial equipment and approximately 300 of dining tents. Company, and other units from Panama rected to the Howard Chapel at 284-3948/ the original 450 U.S. military personnel at The migrant camp was designed to proand the United States. 4119. United Airlines to discontinue Panama service Dec. 1 PANAMA CITY (Tropic Times) -out of Panama City, according to Franklin to use their United tickets, he said. to increase flights at its Denver hub by United Airlines will discontinue service to DeLeon of United's Panama City office. United will also maintain an office in more than 250 percent and its west coast Panama City Dec. 1, according to airline DeLeon said that customers currently Panama City indefinitely. United will be shuttle operations by nine flights per day. officials. holding tickets or reservations on United contacting customers in the near future, Other international flights to be elimiUnited announced route changes Oct. flights for Dec. I or later will be guaranteed DeLeon said. nated include Grand Cayman, Trinidad, I1, which included the elimination of the flights on other airlines. United's elimination of Panama City Cabo San Lucas, and Guadalajara, Mexico. one daily flight between Panama City and "We will maintain the ticket and make service is partofa major restructuring of its Those holding United tickets or reserMiami. arrangements withanothercarrier," DeLeon routes in the United States, according to a vations can call 269-8555 for more inforThis was the only flight United had in or said Thursday. Ticket holders will be able company news release. The company plans mation. News P Operation Safe Haven Camp No. 3 The newestaddition totheAir Force *Haitian duty pay, Page 4 at Empire Range nears capacity in fleet-the C-1 7A-stops by Howard *Special operators, Page 11 only a few weeks. AFB. +Army 10-miler team, Page 13

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Tropic Times Oct. 21, 1994 Tropic Times late? Call 269-3220 People who live in quarters on a Pacific All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for priority mission area military installation and have not rerequirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608. ceived a Tropic Times by 6:30 a.m. Friday Saturday Atlanta LAP, GA (C) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) should call 269-3220. 5:45am B-727 Howard AFB Charleston IAP, SC Charleston AFS, SC (0) Atlanta JAP, GA (C) Tuesday Dover AFB, DE Fuur C m untyBa kCharleston 1AP, SC s:40amn C-141 Howard AFB O1ct. 2) Future Community Bank 1:45pm C-5A Howard AFB Brasilia, Brazil (V,O) 6:40am C-130 Howard AFB closings announced Charleston AFB, SC (0) Asuncion, Paraguay Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) The Community Bank will be closed Dover AFB, DE Rio do Janeiro, Brazil (V,O) San Jose, Costa Rica Sunday Brasilia, Brazil Howard AFB Nov. 3 to celebrate the separation of Pana3:45pm B-757 Howard AFB (C,O) Wednesday ma from Colombia; Nov. 10 for the Primer Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) 5:40am C-130 Howard, AFB AActive duty only Grito Los Santos, and Dec. 3 in lieu of the Monday San Salvador, El Salvador USU.S. passport observation of Panama's independence 5:40am C-130 Howard AFB (V,CC) 0-overnight from Spain, Nov. 28. Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC) Managua, Nicaragua (CC) C-Commercial Contract Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Howard, AFS V-visa Howard AFB Thursday M-Medevac Clayton Dental Clinic will 8:40am B-757 Howard AFB 5:45am C-S Howard AFB CC-Country Clearance close for unit training The Fort Clayton Dental Clinic will be held 9-11 a.m. Nov. 1 at the Corral room experiences on an effective and up-to-date 1994 Nick Hoge Award for Professional -closed Oct. 28 for mandatory unit training. of the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned resume. The Resume Writing for VolunDevelopment, an annual essay program Patients may report to Gorgas Dental ClinOfficers Club. For reservations, call 285teers workshop is set for 10 a.m. Monday dedicated to promoting excellence in civilic for emergency treatment during normal 5201. in the FSC conference room, Building 707. ian personnel administration and manageduty hours. After-duty emergency patients It will cover the basics of effective resume ment. may report to the Emergency Room. Commissaries hold writing and attendees will be able to make Army military and civilian personnel a follow-up appointment to print out their from all career fields, including local naSafety awareness anniversary sales resume in a professional format from a Iationals and nonappropriated fund employprompts Amnesty Day The Defense Commissary Agency will ser printer. For more information, call ees, are encouraged to participate. Single In conjunction with U.S. Army South's hold an anniversary sale at commissaries Laila Yeager at 284-5010. and group authorship is permitted. DeadSafety Awareness Day, the 36th Ordnance throughout Panama in October. More than line for submission is Dec. 1. Call Aichel Detachment will conduct Amnesty Day 8 900 items will be offered at savings of20Servicemembers offered Tam at 285-561 1 for more information. a.m.1 p.m. Oct. 28 at the following areas: 60 percent. pre-separation briefing Luzon Field, Fort Clayton; the softball A career information team from cemetery field, Fort Davis; Building 533, Corozal; FSC needs volunteers Charleston, SC, will give a pre-separatio changes office hours Building 734, Howard AFB; and Ammufor relocation section briefing for anyone retiring or separating The American Battle Monuments nition Supply Point I at Rodman Naval The Howard Family Support Center from the military within the next six Commission announces that effective Station. needs volunteers who are interested in months. The briefing will be held 8 a.m.-I Nov. 1, the Corozal American Cemetery learning about world-wide assignments p.m. Nov. 9 at the Family Service Center, and Memorial will be open 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ammunition supply point and those who enjoy creating graphic preBuilding 40, Rodman NS. For more infordaily. The cemetery office will be open 7 to close for inventory sentations to work in the FSC's relocation mation, call 283-5749. a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Rodman Ammunition Supply division. There are a variety of positions The office will be closed on weekends and Point will be closed Sunday through available for several different relocation Incorrect hours for holidays. Thursday for inventory. All units with programs. For more information, stop by Fort Davis stores printed scheduled training should call 283-5643/ the FSC, Building 707, or call 284-5650. There were errors in the Sunday hours class for parents 5806Therereeceeerrersssueseandndayn-inss 5806 to reschedule issues and turn-ins.St. Andrew's Society of operation for the Auto Parts Store on of teens set at Albrook Fort Davis and Toyland on Fort Espinar in The STEP class for parents of teenagNew policy restricts sets date for annual ball the Oct. 7 issue of Tropic Times. ers has been rescheduled. This parenting hours of college per year The St. Andrew's Society of Panama The correct hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. skills class will start 6-8 p.m. Thursday at Soldiers will now be authorized to take will hold its annual ball 7 p.m. Nov. 19 at for the Auto Parts Store and noon-4 p.m. the Albrook Youth Center. There will be Sdies of nine semester hours of colLas Tinajas Restaurant. For tickets or for Toyland. Additionally, Burger King six classes Tuesdays and Thursdays a maximues pe semester at of conmore information, call Neil McColl at hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday-Sunthrough Nov. 15. For reservations or inlege courses per fiscal year at 75 percent 226-8066 or 2644211. day. formation, call 284-6410. tuition cost, according to a new policy concerning Army Tuition Assistance. Tuition assistance will now be centrally managed Health consumers Howard to measure for Conflict management at the U.S. Total Army Personnel Commini bind installation workshop slated mand. The intent of this policy is to proh l o tl etn iibidisalto okh psae vide soldiers consistent funding of their The Pacific Health Consumers CornMeasurements for the installation of The Howard AFS Family Advocacy education programs as they move about the mittee will hold its monthly meeting 3 mini blinds in the Howard AFB tropical Program is offering a conflict management Army. The local education center is availp.m. Wednesday at the headquarters conhousing area is as follows: Monday-Oct. workshop 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the able to help soldiers identify other funding ference room of Gorgas Army Communi28, Qrts. 41-99; Nov. 1-4, Qrts. 100-154; Howard Chapel Annex. Learn to solve dissuch as Pell Grants, Veterans Education ty Hospital. For information, call Elsa and Nov. 7-11, Qrts. 156-199. Workers agreements without arguing, throwing Asische Pr m an Mtgomns Ed tIn Bermudez at 282-5233/3805 will stop by between 9 and II a.m. For things or hitting. Free child care is availAssistance Program and Montgomery GI more information, call 285-5392. able. This workshop is open to all servicBill. For information, call 287-5703/3 161. es. Call 284-6410 for information or resg Railroad modelers ervations. Clayton has job seminar workshop for volunteers d for family members Experts from the Howard Family SupA group of model railroading aythusi'Trick or Treating'hours The Department of Defense Family port Center will offer assistance to volunMember Job Information Seminar will be teers who want to reflect their volunteer asts are looking for other interested modestablished for Clayton elers. There will be a railroad models disThe established hours for "Trick or play behind Club Amador Saturday. For Treating" at Fort Clayton are 5-8 p.m. Oct. Wore information, call Gary Nichols at 31. The age limit is 12 years old. Teens, 285-6232.13 years and older are encouraged to parFactoid: So you think it rains a lot in Panama? Try having a picnic ticipate in the Directorate of Community on Evangelistas Island in southern Chile. It rains 305 days each year NCOA meeting slated for Activities events. there. Panama City averages 166 days with rain per year. d on Fort Clayton People who have a valid installation d y pass can escort five immediate family Pacific Atlantic There will be a Noncommissioned Ofmembers only for Trick or Treating on Saturday Saturday ficers Association general membership Fort Clayton. People with vehicles regisTeiperature 'Tides Temperature Tides meeting 3 p.m. today at the Fort Clayton tered with the Provost Marshal Office can High: 86 5:10 a.m. at 16 feet High: 87 2:30 p.m. NCO Club. Members and nonmembers drive their vehicles onto any installation to Low: 73 11:23 a.m. at 1 feet Low: 74 10:55 a.m. may attend. For more information, call an authorized parking area. Sunday Sunday Staff Sgt. Mary Jackson at 287-625 1. Sponsors are accountable for the beHigh: 87 5:45 a.m. at 16 feet Iigh: 88 3:09 p.m. havior of their guests while on the installaLog: 75 1:58 am. at I feet Lowg: 76 11:26 p.m. 1994 competition for tion. Failure to control guests will result in compeitio for action taken against the sponsor. All vlsiForecast: Partly to mostly cloudy with afternoon showers and isolated thunderstorms. Nick Hoge Award begins tots to Army installations must be off post Send weattherquestions tuo24th Weather SquadronaATTN: Weather Wiseoward AFB, Panamua(M'S) The Deputy Chief of Staff for Personno later than 9 p.m. For information, call nel has announced competition for the Master Sgt. Scott Carr at 287-3716.

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Oct.21, 1994 3Camp No. 3 near full Safe Haven one of many EMPIRE RANGE (Rodman NS Cubans, there were 1,426 men, 153 extremely helpful in providing ideas PAO) -Ranging in age from 6 weeks to women and 99 children. The camp had and taking the initiative by volunteering operations 88 years, the Cuban population quickly received 2,011 Cubans as ofOct. 12 and for many activities. Two of the main numbered in the thousands at Operation can take 2,500, said Camp No. 3 Operaservices they offer are translation and WASHINGTON D.C. (AFIS) Safe Haven Camp No. 3 here. tions Officer Lt. Liz Witthuhn. camp maintenance and improvement. A Operation Safe Haven is only one On the camp's fifth day of receiving Witthuhn said the Cubans have been group even built an outdoor theater and of 18 ongoing military operations placed gravel around their living areas involving U.S. servicemembers to cover the mud. around the world. The camp staff of soldiers, sailors, Regional commanders in chief airmen, Marines and civilians received generally name the operations and and inprocessed up to 339 Cubans per choose terms that mirror what the day. The operations staff coordinates operation is about, Joint Staff offi-and schedules events, collects informacials said. For example, when Iraq tion and disseminates it within the camp. invaded Kuwait and it looked as if Army civil affairs personnel from Saddam Hussein was threatening Fort Bragg, N.C. are helping Cubans Saudi Arabia, the United States with information points, recreation and launched Operation Desert Shield. education. The camp is organizing a But U.S. Central Command used school facility and teachers within the Operation Desert Storm for the atCuban community will use donated tack to take back Kuwait. schoolbooks. The civil affairs personnel Here is a list of current military are also helping the Cubans set up their operations and their objectives: owngoverrnenttoassistthecommander Able Manner -U.S. Coast in administering the camp. Guard Haitian migrant interdiction When not schooling or maintaining operations with U.S. Navy assistheir areas, the Cubans find time for tance. recreation. The most popular activities Able Vigil -U.S. Coast Guard are baseball, volleyball and soccer. Cuban interdiction operations with Movies are shown every three days and U.S. Navy assistance. cable is scheduled to be installed this AbleSentry-U.S.militaryparweek. ticipation in the U.N. Protection The camp's public address system Force in Macedonia. not only puts out information, but also Deny Flight-NATOno-flyzone plays music and news. "At their request enforcement, close air support and we play a mix of salsa, meringue and air strikes over/in Bosnia. American music," Witthuhn said. "They Distant Haven -U.S. humanireally like American music and SCN tarian operation for Haitian refu(Southern Command Network) news." gees in Suriname. The future is a big concern for many Maritime Intercept Ops -Geof the Cubans. neric name for U.S. and coalition "Theyare concerned aboutwhat will enforcement of U.N. sanctions happen to them and are also requesting against Iraq in the Persian Gulf. help with locating families in the states," Provide Comfort -U.S. and Witthuhn said. One request camp offiallied no-fly zone enforcement over cials are looking into is getting telenorthern Iraq and Kurdish relief phone directories from Miami. efforts; Although they have been here only a Provide Hope -U.S. medical short time, the Cubans at Camp No. 3 are supplies and equipment to Russia. John Hall(U.S.Navy) feeling at home. Witthuhn said Camp Provide Promise -U.S. and alPfc. Brian Simerly, Marine Corps Security Force Company -Panama Commander Cmdr. R.W. Smith, is aflied airlift into Sarajevo and airhelps civilian workers load cots for Cubans at Camp No. 3. fectionately known as "grandpa." drops over Bosnia. Safe Haven -U.S. humanitarian C IN O aw yards operation for Cuban migrants in Let them Panama. Sea Signal -U.S. Navy support eat cake of U.S. Coast Guard's operation by Seaman Recruit Sharp Guard -U.S. and allied transportation Shawna Dale, enforcement of U.N. sanctions Personnel Support against Serbia and Montenegro in DOCK 45 (USARSO PAO-AtlanActivity Detachment the Adriatic Sea. tic) The U.S. Southern Command com(left) and Capt. Southern Watch -U.S. and coamander in chief presented an ArmyLeRoy Sheehan, lition nofly zone oversouthern Iraq. wide transportation award to the 1097th Inspector General, Support Democracy -U.S. and Transportation (Composite Boat) ComU.S. Southern allied at sea enforcement of U.N. pany here Oct. 12. Command cut the sanctions against Haiti. Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, cake at the 219th Support Hope -U.S. support of SOUTHCOM CINC, presented Capt. Navy Ball at Club U.N. humanitarian operations in or Marshall Guiterrez, commander, 1097th near Rwanda. Transportation (Composite Boat) Co-Oct. 14. Sustain Democracy -U.S. suppany, with the National Defense TransDale and Sheehan port of U.N. Haitian border moniportation Association's Army unit of were the youngest toring in the Dominican Republic. the year award. and oldest sailors at UNOSOM II -U.N. Operations McCaffrey commended the soldiers the ball-the in Somalia. of the 1097th Trans. Co. for the profes_ d. additional cake Uphold DemocracyU.S. milisionalism and commitment that earned Peiiy Officer 2nd Class Roberlo Taylor (U.S. Navy) cutters. tary forces in H aiti. them the award. During the visit, Guiterrez led McCaffrey and Maj. Gen. George A. Crocker, commander, U.S. Army South on tours of two of the unit's vessels: the FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO -AtA team from the Installation Food food," Score said. "We have a very nice Landing Craft, Utility 2000 and Landlantic) -1097th Transportation (ComService Office judged the small garrisalad and ice cream bar, and people have ing Craft, Mechanized 8. posite Boat) Company's dining facility son dining facilities on appearance and a positive attitude about our dining faThe 1097th Trans. Co. officially rewas named best small garrison facility quality of food, variety of food, cleanlic i I i ty." ceived the award Oct. 3 at the NDTA of the quarter in U.S. Army South. ness, administration and accountability, "It was a team effort," he added. Logistics Forum and Exposition in St. Col. Silas Smalls, United States Army Score said. "Everybody took part in reaching the Louis, Mo. Garrison commander, presented the Additionally, the team sampled the high standards we have.' The 1097th Trans. Co. beat outtransaward to dining facility manager Sgt. meals in the day long judging of the This marks the first time since seeportation units in nine U.S. Major Army Ist Class Paul T. Score during a cer1097th Trans. Co. dining facility. ond quarter, 1993 that the 1097th Trans. Commands to win the award. emony Oct. 13. "We won because of our variety of Co. has won the award.

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4 Tropic Times Oct. 21, 1994 N ew s POVs ready Pay allowance for Haitian duty WASHINGTON D.C. (AFIS) fo r p ick u p Servicemembers will receive additional Entitlements For Operation Uphold Democracy (1) pay while in Haiti supporting Operation Entitlement Active Reserve Amount Remarks BALBOA (MTMC) -The followUphold Democracy. These allowances ining customers have privately owned clude imminent danger pay and a family Basic Pay Y Y Current Varies by grade. vehicles ready for pick up at the POV separation allowance, officials said. BAQNHA Y Y(2) Current If drawing already. Processing Center, Building 1501, Carl Witschonke, Department of DeBalboa adjacent to Pier 18. BAS Y Y 0: $142.46/month Commander in chief sets policy-ow TDY. -afense deputy director for compensation, E: $6.80/day Not payable to enlisted subsisted on vessel. said servicemembers tabbed for Haitian Aguilar G.; Anciaux L.N.; Anstey duty after Sept. 16 will receive imminent Per Diem Y Y $21/day Member keeps $3.50/day incidental pay. R.L.; Belter M.S.; Bonivert C.; danger pay, currently $150 per month. FamilySeparaVon Y Y $75/month If member has dependents. Bradford P.E.; Bruce D.; Butler S.R.; "It's to provide additional payment to Allowance-ll Cooley S.F.; Cunningham L .M.; personnel subject to hostile fire or the Desears R.N.; Johnson V.M.; Kenney Imminent Danger Y Y $150/month Effective Sept.16, 1994; land,surrounding seas threat of physical harm," he said. Pay and airspace of Haiti. Y.M.; King T.D.; Layton M.M.; The family separation allowance, $75 a Lerose N.J.; Lucas A.W.; Mandingo month, is paid to troops with family memForeign Duty Pay Y Y $8-22.50/monfh Enlisted only, if not drawing sea pay. J.D.; Marcelino W.V.; Martel C.J.; bers, provided the separation is more than SpecialLeave Y Y N/A Can carry more than 60 days at end of fiscal Mejia-Rangel 0.; Moore J.D.; Mor30 days. year. gan T.C.; Oconner M.L.; Pardal M.; Although DoD has set no tour length Accrual Parker B.; Ramon R.; Range M.D.; for Haiti, tours are limited to six months, Sea Pay Y Y Varies (3) Normal rulesforNavy/Marines; payabletoother Schaul D.E.; Sorensen T.L.; Tregaskis according to Tom Smoot, also with DoD service enlistedTDY aboard ships. K.; Troxler D.; Williams L.D.; Wilson compensation. However, services can exMedicalSpecial Y Y Current Reserve component must be called to active R.T. tend members for bona fide reasons. Pay duty more than 12 months. "If the situation in Haiti becomes Customers must have the following drawn out, commanders and services Special Temporary Y Y N/A Service rules apply. draw ou, comanersand ervces Storage of Household documents for pick up of their POVs: could request members be assigned to Goods +ID card (current military, dependent, Haiti on permanent duty status," said 1. Does not include people performing relief operations in Panama/Guantanamo/Suriname. or civilian) Smoot. "The request would ask DoD to .2. Reservedraw BAQand VHAat place called toactive duty rate (usually residence); single reservists must *Driver license (must have Panamaapprove a 12-month, unaccompanied show proof of housing. nian license for second POV) ,, 3. Sea pay paid to enlisted (E-4 and above), warrant officers and officers (officers must have three or more tour." years sea duty). *POV shipping document (DD Form Witschonke said DoD does not con788) template this happening. Besides immi+Vehicle registration or title nent danger and family separation pay, years aboard ship to receive sea pay. TDY," with subsistence payments resum*Vehicle keys enlisted members also receive a "certain Witschonke said because members are ing effective Sept. 23. *Power of Attorney and photo copies places pay," ranging from $8 to $22.50 per placed on "field duty," upon deployment, During Desert Storm, most service of the sponsor's bilingual ID card and month. This allowance is based on pay troops temporarily lost their basic allowmembers received tax exemptions on their driver's license (when the sponsor on grade. ance for subsistence. income while fighting in Southwest Asia. orders cannot be present for pick up) Enlisted troops E4 and above and warHowever, he said, the situation in Haiti This is not true in Haiti. "A combat zone rant officers also receive sea duty pay. is stable enough that the task force comdesignation has not and is not being conThe list is current as of Monday. Commissioned officers must have three mander can place members on "regular sidered for this operation," he said. For updates, call customer service at 282-4642/3853 or the POV arrival tape recording at 2824641. Customer Slippery service hours are Monday -Friday, 7:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m. Wednesday hours are 9 a.m. -2:30 p.m. People expecting POVs are reSgt. William minded to call customer service to Blundell, 549th leave a contact phone number. Military Police Company, Fort Davis, shows off Former MEDDAC "Alice," a 5-foot boa constrictor. employee dies She was adopted as the new GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY 549th MP Co. HOSPITAL (USA MEDDAC) -Retired mascot after Department of Army employee, and U.S. being discovArmy Reserve colonel, Jerry Huggins died ered by a landin Albany, New York Oct. 12 after a brief escaping crew on illness. Mr. Huggins retired in 1992 as the pist "A ewco" USA Medical Activity -Panama quality assurance coordinator after more than 20 takes part in the years of service. He is survived by his wife unit's company Kae, son Darin, and daughter Megan. runs and is Condolences may be sent to 23 Bob White compensated Drive, Glenmont, New York, 12077. with five baby The family requests memorials be sent chickens a to the American Cancer Society. Sgt. Rick Emert (U.S. Army) month. Editor's note: The following summary of news is La Estrela, El Panamta America: Papers print mesUnited States from Panama so she could receive special taken from the Panamanian press. The translation sages sent to Panama President Ernesto Perez Balladares medical treatment following complications related to and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is made from President Bill Clinton and Organization of Amenriher pregnancy. Her case is not included in the asylum by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of reporting can States Secretary General Cesar Gaviria thanking plan recently announced by Pesident Bill Clinton. Her or statements made here. Selection of these stories Panama for granting asylum, to Gen. Raoul Cedras and husband was also transferred to the states. does not imply any emphasis, judgement or endorsehelping end the Haitian crisis. ment by the U.S. government. These synopses are La Estrella, El Panama lnerica: Papers report intended only to give non-Spanish speaking people El Panama America: Paper reports four Colombian United Airlines will discontinue operations in Panama a flavor for news events in Panama. craft carrying drugs and illegal immigrants to the coast of beginning Dec. 1. Colon were detected by Panama police authorities. Oct. 16 Oct. 17 La Esrella: Paper runs a paid-ad from a Los AngeEl Panama Anterica, El Siglo, Hoy, La Prensa: PaEl Panama America: Paper reports a CID/Gallup poll les-based immigration attorney saying the U.S. governpers report certain migrants in Panama and Guantanamo revealed the majority of Panamanians (57%) believes the ment is offering 55,000 immigrant visas. will receive asylum in the United States. Eligibility incountry is little or not at all prepared technically to operate eludes Cubans over 70 years old, their relatives, and the canal. La Estrella: Paper reports that Panama will be inunaccompanied minors. Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder is Oct. 18 cluded in an extensive manual to promote tourism in quoted as saying only 19 of nearly 6,000 Cubans at the La Estrella, La Prensa: Papers report a pregnant Central America. The manual will be distributed to camps qualify. woman was the first Cuban migrant transferred to the 52,000 travel agencies throughout the states.

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Tropic Times News Oct 21, 1994 The C-17A sits poised on the Howard flightline. Senior Airm-n Steve McNally (U.S. Air Force) New _7 'bird' Air Force fleet's latest addition visits Howard ___________________________________________Senior Airmean Steve McNally (U.S. Air Force)by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson The cargo bay of the C-17A can hold 172,200 pounds of cargo. 24th Wing Public Affairs user-friendly aircraft." of the C-130 Hercules, said loadmaster MSgt. Gary One of the bits of technology borrowed from Warner. This means the C-17A hold can contain 102 HOWARD AFB -The C-17A is the latest addition modern fighter aircraft is a "heads-up display." This troops/paratroops, 48 litter and 54 ambulatory medical to the Air Force fleet of cargo and transport aircraft, allows the pilot to see vital instrument data while patients and/orattendants, or 172,200 pounds ofcargo. and Oct. 12 a single bird from this unique flock made looking at an unobstructed view out the cockpit win"We can load a single row of 11 pallets down the a brief visit to the flightline here from Charleston AFB, dow. center of the aircraft with plenty of room for space S.C. "This means you don't have to keep bobbing your available passengers on either side," Warner said, "or In fact, this aircraft is so new it has yet to be head up and down between what's happening with the we can load two rows of nine pallets with no space for officially accepted into the Air Force inventory. It's instruments inside the cockpit and what's going on passengers. The C-17 can carry virtually all of the currently in production, testing and training stages and outside the aircraft," Tibbetts explained. "That goes a Army's outsized combat equipment." is scheduled for initial operational capability in 1995. long way toward reducing fatigue." The aircraft also has "direct delivery" capability as "Actually, 'unique' is an excellent word to use to Other reductions include the size of the crew it can put that equipment down on runways only 90 feet describe the "Globemaster III," said the co-pilot of the needed to operate the aircraft-it only requires two wide and 3,000 feet long. Even on such runways, the transient aircraft, Capt. Pat Tibbetts. "Unlike the C-5, pilots and one loadmaster, since four computers take pilots can use thrust reversers to turn the plane 180 C-130 and C-141 transport aircraft, the C-17 can the place of human navigators and flight engineers. degrees and take off again. perform both strategic and tactical missions, and it's The maintenance requirements and the life cycle costs According to an Air Force fact sheet, the C-17 the only aircraft that can take outsized cargo into short, are also less when compared to C141 and C-5 aircraft. Globemaster III "delivers more cargo through a given austere airfields. It takes a lot of the best technology Although the Globemaster is only about 6 feet area in a given period of time than any other airlifterfrom several different planes in the Air Force invenlonger than the C-14 1, it can carry more than twice the and does it with fewer resources." tory and combines them into one very versatile and Starlifter's payload-and four times the lift capacity "It's also a kick to fly," Tibbetts said with a smile. Officers 'cap off' careers with SOUTHCOM visit by Spc. Tom Findtner training, planning and operations situaproblems that they face here in Panama "Whetherwe have any presencehere Tropic Times staff tions in the field. and in this whole region," said in the future or not, it's still going to be Tpi T s"It's a trip that exposes our leaders McDonald, who served as CINC of the SOUTHCOM's area of responsibility, QUARRY HEIGHTS -Twelve of tomorrow to places they haven't been U.S. Atlantic Command in Norfolk, Va. along with the rest of Latin America and members of the National Defense before, and gives them an opportunity to during the mid-1980's. South America," McDonald said. University's CAPSTONE class arrived get a better feel for the concerns of Class members also met with PanaThe CAPSTONE visits are Conhere Saturday from Washington, D.C., people here and at other commands manian Foreign Minister Gabriel Lewis gressionally mandated by the 1986 on the first stop of a 14-day tour of key throughout the world," said Navy Adm. Galindo and National Security Advisor Goldwater-Nichols Defense Reorganilocations in the western hemisphere. Wesley McDonald (Ret.), CAPSTONE Jose Luis Sosa. In addition, a discussion zation Act. During the next two weeks, For the past 10 years, CAPSTONE senior fellow and course advisor. with U.S. Embassy Country Team in the group will travel to Honduras, Venhas served as the final requirement, and The 12 students began their threePanama City was arranged. ezuela, Mexico, Canada and Key West. thus the "capping stone," in a senior day field study of the U.S. Southern Highlights of their stay in Panama The CAPSTONE class members officer's Professional Military EducaCommand with a general overview of were a flight over the Panama Canal, who visited SOUTHCOM were: Coast tion Program. It is reserved for officers the SOUTHCOM area of responsibility tourofthe Miraflores Locks, and visit to Guard RearAdm. Edward Barrett, Army who have earned-or soon will be proby Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, comthe Safe Haven Cuban migrant camps. Brig. Gen. Joseph Cosumano, Marine moted to-the rank of brigadier general mander in chief. Air Force Brig. Gen. "We think it has been an outstandBrig. Gen. Earl Hailson, Air Force Brig. or rear admiral and is offered on a quarRudolf Peksens, director of strategy, ing tour," McDonald said. "I think evGen. Robert Hoffman, Army Brig. Gen. terly basis. policy and plans, hosted further brieferyone is going to go away from here John LeMoyne, Army Brig. Gen. Lon The six-week class emphasizes the ings by component commanders on the with a tremendous understanding of the Maggart, Army Brig. Gen. Leo Baxter, necessity for joint service operations. regional issues involving SOUTHCOM problems the United States faces with Navy Capt. James Ferguson, Ms. CAPSTONE strives to provide a clear and its methods of dealing with them. the canal changing over, withdrawl of Ernestine Heck ofthe State Dept., Navy perspective of its importance by allow"We are very impressed with the troops and families, and the continuing RearAdm. Edward Kristensen, Air Force ing students to apply what they have attitudes and embodiment of concern responsibility of the U.S. to this whole Brig. Gen. Robert Osterthaler, and Air learned in the classroom to real-life joint SOUTH COM has in dealing with the area. Force Brig. Gen. Leon Wilson.

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Tropic Times V oice Oct. 21, 1994 Voices 'Cubans should help themselves.' sentatives from the camp community meet daily with militomer service training class before they are hired. Mayors' Corner tary camp cadre. In those meetings, ideas and problems In Search of Man's Best Friend are brought up and solutions are offered. Dear Searcher, Dear Mayors' Corner, In addition, we ask the Cuban representatives to give I sent your issue to Capt. Russell Wiessinger, the Vet This is not a letter to question why, but why not? As their recommendations for disciplinary actions to the OpClinic officer in charge, who responded: Army RegulaAmericans, we are continuously striving to aid anyone and eration Safe Haven commander for those residents who tion 40-905 governs our adoption policy in conjunction everyone. I have no problem with this. However, I do have have violated camp rules. with the Vet Clinic Standard Operating Procedures and a problem with how it seems to keep turning out, but I More basically, the Cubans are actively forming work local regulations. Strays are impounded for three workwon't go into that. crews, and side-by-side with military troops, are working ing days. People waiting to adopt the animal may sign up My question is: Why not let the Cubans and Haitians on drainage systems, laying recreational fields and assistwith the reception desk for that particular animal. really help themselves? It seems to me that these people ing in other camp improvements. On the fourth day, the animal may be adopted. If not are looking for a hand, if not a hand out. However, the food is provided and served by contracclaimed by the rightful owner, the animal may be adopted We have totally disrupted thousands of lives unnecestors. This provision for meals has proven to be the best in order. Each person on the waiting list is given a spesarily. Now that a portion of the refugees are on station, solution. cific time in which to go to the Vet Clinic-the first perwhy not put them to work? I see no harm in them helping We've also made a great effort to provide the Cubans son from 8-10 a.m.; the second person from 10 a.m.-noon; to lay concrete pads, put up foundations or put on roofs. with recreational and educational opportunities. Schools, the third person from noon-2 p.m. and the fourth and subThis would put some of our people back to work with a chapel services and other activities are up and running. sequent persons from 2 p.m. until closing on a first-come, limited number of work hours lost. This would also give Thanks for your interest in this operation and please first-serve basis. the people in camp something to do to keep their minds follow the stories in the Tropic Times for more details. Animals for adoption must be up-to-date on rabies and off their current plight, thus avoiding a situation like the appropriate distemper vaccinations before release. This attempted suicide last week. Dear Mayors' Corner, cost is paid by the adopting owner. We also recommend a Kitchens can be set up and run by the women and/or I would like to tell you my story about my dealings fecal exam for internal parasites and heartworm tests for men who are able to cook. Food should be issued in order with the Vet Clinic. My wife and I visited the facility with dogs. There is no adoption fee. to keep down food waste and avoid any confusion. If there the intention of adopting a pet. There was a dog there that If an animal is not adopted by the fourth day, it will be are enough people capable of doing both, they can work I asked about and was told that two other people were humanely euthanized by lethal injection. shifts just as we would, but for fewer hours. also interested in the animal. I was told to put my name on Our goal is to try and adopt all adoptable animals that Every manpower hour costs us greatly. It costs us in a waiting list, and call at 4:40 p.m. about the dog. When I come to our facility. The only fees that may be incurred manpower hours because we have to cut back regular called, I was told that if no one called for the dog by 9 are those that have to be charged for the vaccinations. work hours. It costs us in man-power medically because a.m. the next morning, I could have the dog. We always have animals available for adoption. Over of injuries to our people as well as their medical condiWhen I called the next morning I was told that the dog the past 18 months we have had 1,115 stray animals adtions. It also costs us time with our families. Cutting into was gone. I assumed the dog was given to one of the mitted with 163 being reclaimed by their owners and 433 our already fragile family lives causes further instability. people on the waiting list. My wife found out the dog was being adopted by new parents. We also have had 162 pets So I go back to my question: why not put them to work given to someone not even on the list. brought in for adoption and we were able to place 135 in for themselves. I was upset. The personnel at the clinic were rude. I new homes. These services are provided without any Weary Worker asked to see the policy on adoption and was told a mistake adoption fee. had been made. Another staff member apologized and ofRequirements for employment at the Vet Clinic or Dear Weary, fered us another dog who had apparently been at the facilother government job do not require a customer service I forwarded your letter to Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder, ity for some time. I paid $19.52 for the animal on Friday training class as a prerequisite. However, our employees public affairs officer for the Operation Safe Haven Joint and discovered over the weekend the dog was deaf. have attended customer service training when offered. Information Bureau. She provided the following response. When we contacted the clinic, they claimed they had Not only do we agree it is a good idea to let the Cubans no knowledge of the problem, but were willing to examEditor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral help themselves, but we are doing many of the things you ine the dog. Without examining the dog we were refunded Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity mentioned. Giving them a role in their living conditions $14.52. We were then informed that to adopt another pet chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will has a positive effect on their morale. a fee of $25 would have to be paid. .be granted upon request. The Tropic Times reserves The Cubans are willingly participating in camp imI would like to know what the policy on adoption is the right edit letters and responses for brevity. provements, both physical and procedural. Cuban repreand if the clinic personnel are required to attend a cus$160 cash stolen from unsecured briefcase Stolen currency all bicycles in your household are regisThe military police report that a man tered. had $160 stolen from his briefcase, which was left unsecured in his Fort Clayton ofHalloween safety fice last week. It is recommended that evThis year Halloween will be observed eryone secure their property and never on Monday Oct. 31. The hours for "trick leave belongings unattended. or treating" will be from 5 p.m.-8 p.m. The If you become a victim of a crime conmilitary police encourage everyone to keep tact the military police at 287-440 1. safety in mind by carrying a flashlight and wearing reflective clothing. Adults should Another bike stolen accompany young children to ensure A service member had his bicycle stosafety. If a mask will be worn, make sure it len from his quarters on Fort Clayton last does not hamper vision. Always check week. An unknown thief cut the securing candy before allowing your children to eat than 50 percent of the property stolen was 6762 or 287-3261. Together, we can "take cable lock which secured the bike to the it. Following this advice should guarantee left unsecured. a bite out of crime." quarters. a safe and happy Halloween. To counteract this, always lock up your The Provost Marshal's Crime Prevenvaluables when they are left unattended. Panama Jack anonymous hotline tion Section recommends securing bikes Crime prevention tips Employing this tactic can remove the opAnyone with information about drug indoors during the hours of darkness or During the past quarter, there have portunity for a thief to strike. smuggling should call the Panama Jack anytime you will be away from your quarbeen numerous larcenies of private propFor information on securing property, anonymous hotline immediately at 285ters. You are also encouraged to make sure erty reported. According to reports, more call the Crime Prevention Section at 2874185. Trpic Times Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666 This authorized unofficial command information publicaSports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.2894312 tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pubStaff Editors.Sgt. Cass Purdum NCOIC.Sgt. Rick Emert lished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information ProSpc. Tom Findtner gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of Rosemary Chong 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Public AfTairs Superintendent.Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the Command Infornation Officer.Patrick Milton Journalists.Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson U.S. Southern Command. Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Public Affairs Officer.Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Commander in Chief .Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Director, Public Affairs. .Col. James L. Fetig Managing Editor .Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Assistant Public Affairs Officer.John Ilall Chief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Editor.Sgt. Robin Shawlinski Photographers.Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor. Editor. ...Maureen Sampson Journalists.Sgt. Eric Hortin Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays Spc. Brian Thomas

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C. ,1Tropic Times 7 ommentary Oct.21,194 Domestic violence: when will it stop? by Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor One theory why the military has problems with it is least at the front door. The saying about "not bringing Tropic Times chief because we're trained for aggression and rewarded for your work home" has never been more true. ----aggressive behavior. But what can you-or anyone-do? Learn more W e're now three weeks into Domestic Violence It's how we've learned to handle conflict. Our about it. That is the hard part. I don't know about you, Month. And yet, I haven't really heard much mission, after all, is the management of violence. But but I'd rather not think about it. But we've all heard about it. There's been a smattering here and what works well on the battlefield, or the behaviors that stories about the abused spouse who couldn't find help there, and some programs on Public Service Radio, but work well in the trenches of the bureaucracy, don't and the whole situation blew up in everyone's face. The we haven't been exactly loaded with new information. necessarily work well at home. result: shattered homes, traumatized children and more. There are seminars and workshops around the area, These are new behaviors that we're talking about: The more I learn about how to deal with conflict, the though. But in my opinion they're failing for lack of How to settle differences without resorting to violence, harder it seems to get. But I guess the only answer is to participants. Case in point: Thursday's seminar for whether physical or emotional. It wasn't until 1980 that keep trying. people who are having problems with domestic violence spouse abuse was illegal in many New England states. During the last three weeks, and again in this issue of only had two reservations by Tuesday. I guess we all And just 200 years ago, in France, it was a criminal act the Tropic Times, we have publicized opportunties to figure that these are for "someone else." for a husband not to beat his wife if she misbehaved. help people deal with problems of this sort. And there Maybe there's not a problem with violence in the Our new social conscious now tells us that this type are a lot of people out there who's sole purpose is to home. But I don't think that's true. Everything that I of behavior is no longer acceptable. Now you can go to help. read and hear tells me that domestic violence in the jail if you beat your wife-or husband. So I hope you'll get the extra help or knowledge and military is as great or greater than in the civilian sector of So, whatever our values might be, we're told it's a skills you need, whether you think you need it or not. the United States, good thing to leave the violence on the battlefield, or at Because that's were it starts and ends: at home. The bean counters Quality starts and ends with customers by Master Sgt._ Da Micham -told "We won't accept your peg because it doesn't fit discontent throughout the room with the service people by Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham our hole?" have received from that organization. 24th Wing Public Affairs Quite often when you explain to the supplier why Statistics have an uniquely different quality. You can any customer service oriented organizations your peg is shaped the way it is, and that the hole the make numbers say just about anything you want them to have "embraced" quality concepts to improve doesn't work for you, the supplier frequently reacts by putting them in the right context. I know for a fact their daily operations and increase service and defensively and stands firmly and aggressively behind that you can manipulate numbers to paint a picture as customer satisfaction. whatever policy or procedure. Nine times out of 10, the rosy or bleak as you want-just look at a nomination For the most part these changes are good, but some supplier wasn't the originator of the policy or procedure, package or an after-action report. are merely cosmetic. but will blindly enforce it. Instead of simply exhaulting over the success of Progressive thinking people have streamlined There have been "rare" occasions when the customer reaching your goal, take time to find out why you had a operating procedures, implemented policies to cut down was right and there was a flaw in the procedure or policy dissatisfied customer and how to avoid a similar on redundancy and waste. in effect. Instead of keeping an open mind, stepping situation. Their efforts are aimed at maximizing output and back and weighing the individual case, the supplier As they always say, "One 'aw shucks' wipes out a reducing effort while effectively satisfying their assumes an adversarial posture, "I'm sorry, but that's 1,000 'atta-boys."' First impressions are lasting ones. customer's needs. our policy. If you want to use our hole, you must round Think about this for a second. How did you feel when I don't know about you, but there several things that off your peg." you walked up to a service counter or into a duty section ruffle my feathers about the quality approach to conductOnce in a while the circumstances are so clear that looking for service and were ignored by the people on ing business in a non-standardized environment such as even Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder and Jose Feliciano duty? the Air Force. would have a hard time not seeing it. The individuals didn't stop working on what they Maybe I'm getting crotchety in my old age or just Bean counting is a terrible trap that many people fall were doing, nor did they acknowledge your existence plain cantankerous, but I believe that everything has a into when trying to ensure they achieve their goals in until they were finished with their task. point no matter how round it may be. relations to quality performance measures. Quality And what about those individuals who stare right at In an ideal environment, all procedures and customperformance measures are the intemal or external you while making a personal telephone call and act like ers need to fit neatly into the established policies and standards organizations use to determine if they are you are disturbing them because you came in for service. procedures your organization has set up. accomplishing their missions or satisfying customer From that point on, no matter how good the service is Whether or not the supplier wants to admit it or not, needs. you aren't going to be satisfied or happy because you there are customers out there who can't use the round Sometimes I think I'm going to gag when I sit were ignored. hole for their square peg. through a meeting where standards are discussed and the This may sound trite and cliche, but a good rule of Don't you find it very disturbing as a customer to unit representative boasts about his organization's thumb is to treat people and customers as you want to be enter an establishment for service with your peg and be quality prowess while I hear moans and grumbles of treated, unless you're into sadomasochism. Direct Quotes What should be done to solve the problem of domestic violence? "It's a serious problem "There are social "People are responsible "Families should be "Abusers should be that will continue if it's programs available to for what they do and aware of its impact and investigated and prosenot brought out into the help people find the they should be punished the options for solving cuted. If found guilty, open. Families should source of their probwhen they hurt others." it, such as counseling they should get counselseek help." lems." and education." ing or go to jail." Sgt. 1st Class Sharon Chief Warrant Officer 3 Master Sgt. Jay Whiston Hector Cruz Rhonda Mathes Hodges Jose Munoz 12th Security Police Sq. Air Force family member Army family member HHD 56th Signal Battalion 470th Military Intelligence Randolph AFB, Texas The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Tines. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8 Tropic Times Oct. 21, 1994 41st Area Support Group soldiers build playground for remote village near Che story and photos by Spc. Tom Findiner and a flea market to accomplish the task. As the unit divided the job up and began work, Tropic Times staff After gathering the necessary materials and borrowing curious onlookers jockeyed for the best spots to observe tools from other units, the 41st started building in July, the progress. The 41st worked dilligently through the n all-terrain vehicle packed with soldiers Operating out of a shop on Corozal, Eley supervised a blistering heat of the day and ever-present thundershowscaled hills of red clay and crashed through volunteer work party that hammered and sawed three days ers. The hospitable villagers did their best to keep up the dense jungle before abniptly stopping at an a week on four-hour shifts. soldiers' strength by supplyig fresh coconut milk and impassable stream, 40 miles from Panama City. Meanwhile, back at the village, the townspeople spent bananas; plus fried catfish and patacones cooked on an The soldiers-men and women-in red unit T-shirts, three days preparing a site next to the schoolhouse for the open fire. jeans and combat boots, hopped out and continued their playground. Armed with picks and shovels, the men By 4 p.m., the playground was finished and teeming jourey on foot for another two miles in the sweltering laborously cut into a hillside to clear out a level spot. with laughing children, who took turns crossing the heat. On a hilltop, they set off signal flares, then wait. Then, using a large piece of leather as a wheelbarrow, monkey bars. Of course, there also was a tire swing, and At the same time, a UH-60D Blackhawk helicopter they hauled the dirt away. the roped-in platforms that each offered a slightly higher hovered just above the rainforest canopy, as it followed The playground was completed in August and ready perch than the one just under it. the serpentine path of the Panama Canal. Upon spotting for transport to Corpus Christi. However, the 41st hit a The scruffy village dogs, found the wooden planks of the ground crew's red smoke signal, the helicopter snag when they approached the 1st Battalion, 228th the playground to offer just the night amount of shade descended. Cattle scrambled out of the way as the Aviation Regiment to assist in hauling the playground from the sweltering sun. Blackhawk landed, its landing gear sinking a foot into structure by helicopter. The 1-228th was low on funds and Manuel Acamarena, the Corpus Chnsti schoolhouse black muck beneath lush grass. grounded until the new fiscal year, Roberts said. By the teacher for the last 10 years, was pleased with the results On the hillside overlooking the meadow, a group of time the helicopter could fly again, Operation Safe Haven of the 4lst's efforts. about 30 Panamanian men, women and children were was in full swing and the playground project was put on "Because of the soldiers' support, the quality of our gathered. Their friendly faces and warm smiles revealed the back burner. children's education has improved a great deal," he said. a sense of anticipation and building excitement as the When the 228th finally gave the 41st the go-ahead, 18 "Recreation is normally climbing trees, scaling hills and soldiers lugged construction tools up the muddy slope. soldiers volunteered a day of their time to set up the playing in the creek. Now the children will have someThese soldiers weren't on a training mission, and the playground. thing tangible to play on." people watching weren't spectators. Since December The structure was airlifted in a cargo net and dropped For the soldiers, the opportunity to help the townspeo1992, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 41st on a nearby hilltop. Soldiers and villagers climbed to the ple was a touching experience. Area Support Group, has backed a rustic, one-room top and carried each piece down to the playground "I have a daughter back m the states and everytime I schoolhouse in Corpus Christi, Panama, as part of the assembly site. look at one of these kids, I see her face," Spc. Phyllis Joint Task Force-Panama School Sponsorship Program, They then rolled up their sleeves and went to work. Jordan said. "Coming out here, makes me think about said Capt. Jose Espinoza, HHC 41st ASG company The conditions certainly were not ideal, with mud everything we take for granted and makes me appreciate commander. Eighteen students, ages 6 to 15 years old, everywhere and no electricity for power tools. The the basic essentials. It also makes you want to give more attend the school. soldiers were forced to rely on sheer muscle and sweat. -like the stuff in the back of your closet." The tiny village is nestled in the rugged Panamanian interior alongside a small, winding creek. The area is home to approximately 30 families and 120 people scattered across several miles of remote countryside within the district of Chepo. The unit visits the village every three months. Over the years, they have helped renovate the schoolhouse, donated and refurbished desks, purchased school books and supplies, and celebrated Christmas with the townspeople by bringing gifts and preparing a feast. On their visit to the village Oct. 14, unit volunteers planned to construct a playground for the village's children, their most demanding venture to date. The project was the idea of Logistical Operations Sgt. Maj. Mary Roberts. "These people rely on us because they know we are there for them," Roberts said. "They know us and look forward to our visits. It's great for their morale, as well as our own. Roberts went full-speed ahead with the playground concept in June by seeking out the expertise of the unit's sole construction engineer. Sgt. Ist Class Howard Eley. Eley immediately started scavenger hunting. "Lumber is hard to come by down here and I didn't think we'd be able to get any," Eley said. "But when I went around to different organizations and told them what the materials were needed for, they bent over backwards to help out by donating whatever surplus they a could spare." According to Roberts, the most challenging aspect of the project was logistics and raising enough money for the company fund to purchase additional supplies that Soldiers from HHC 41st ASG work together with Panamanian villagers on a hilltop to separate were needed. The 41st resorted to car washes, bake sales playground sections from a cargo net, before hauling the pieces to the building site.

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Tropic Tunes Oct. 21, 1994 9 ist 0 A UH-60D Blackhawk helicopter, piloted by a crew from the 1-228th Aviation Regiment, airlifts a cargo net containing playground equipment to the village of Corpus Christi to assist Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 41st Area Support Group on a humanitarian mission. -444 <-'OW Sgt. 1st Class Howard Eley secures a platform section to a support post Spc. Jason Welch steadies a support post into the hands of a local villager, who during construction of the playground. carried it to the playground site.

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1QTropic Times 10 Oct 21,1994 Milestones A rSupport Group top NCO retires Graduations Meritorious Service Medal -Sgt. FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -pany, 20th Support Group, 19th Support Primary Leadership Development James Farley, HIHSC, 308th Miltary IntelThe 41st Area Support Group Command Command in Korea. He was later assigned Course -Distinguished Honor Graduate: ligence Battalion. Sgt. Ist Class Rhett Sgt. Major Samuel to Fort Jackson again Spc. Edward Tosado, Co. B, 4th Bn., 228th Neilson, Company A, 3 10th Military InWeddington retired as a senior instructor Avn. Regiment; Honor Graduate: Spc. telligence Battalion. from active duty during of the supply school Stephen Woykewicz, 747th MI Bn.; Army Commendation Medal -Staff a ceremony, Sept. 30. and sergeant major for Commandant's List: Spc. Mick Madden, Sgt. Ronald Hurst, Headquarters DetachWeddington retired the Directorate of LO549th MP Co.; Spc. Galen Wade, HHC, ment, 470th Ml Bde. Spc. Sara Rosenfeld, after serving 27 years in gistics. He returned to 4th Bn., 228th Avn. Regiment; Spc. Betty and Spc. Lisa Ward, Company A, 308th the U.S. Army. Korea as the Security, Trandem, Co. A, 310th MI Bn.; Cpl. RichMI Bn. Staff Sgt. Orlando Baez and Sgt. During his career, Plans and Operations ard Rice, HHC, 1st Bn. (Airborne), 508th Darren Kreitz, both of Company A, 310th Weddington served as command sergeant Inf.; Spc. Matthew Clark, Co. A, 747th MI MI Bn. Sgt. Deborah Garcia, Sgt. Ernesto a drill sergeant and first major at the 34th SupBn.; Spc. Boyd Bingham, HSC, 308th MI Garcia and Spc. Dale Brown all of 747th sergeant at Fort Jackport Group, 19th SupBn.; Spe. Aaron Partsafas, MEDDACMI Bn. son, S.C. He went on to port Command, and Panama; Spc. Scott Balfour, Co. D, 160th Army Achievement Medal -Master attend the U.S. Army went on to the NaSOAR (Airborne); Spc. Julie Graham, Sgt. Victor Palanca, Staff Sgt. Johnny CoSergeants Major Acadtional Training Center HHC, LEA; Spc. Thomas Ussery, Jr., Co. Ion, Sgt. Gregory Wilson, Spc. Freddie emy and, upon graduaat Fort Irwin, Cal. B, 536th Eng. Bn.; Leadership Award: Epting, Spc. Manuel Lopez and Sgt. Scott tion in Feb. 1987, he (courtesy) Weddington was asSpc. Humberto Bernard, Co. A, 1st Bn. Heathm Headquarters Detachment, 470th became first sergeant Command Sgt. Maj. Samuel signed to 41st ASG in (Airborne), 508th Inf.; Spc. Jorge Rosende, MI Bde. Spc. Jesse Molinar ofHSC, 308th for Headquarters ComWeddington June, 1993. CID; Spc. James Armstrong, 534th MP MI Bn. Spc. Martin Hickey of Company Co.; Spc. Michael Boyd, HHC, USARSO. A, 308th MI Bn. Sgt. Gregory Hotchkiss National Army Physical Fitness Test: Spc. Michael and Sgt. Jonathan Sheline, Company B, Guard Boyd, HHC, USARSO. Commandant's InMI Bn. Sgt. Lucianne Crumley, Spc. COm ander retires section: Spc. Mick Madden, 549th MP Stephanie Cooper, Spc. Amy Hudson and reCo. Class Graduates: Spc. Galen Wade, Spc. Jess Lewis all of the 747th MI Bn. FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -HHC, 4th Bn., 228th Avn. Regiment; Spe. Certificates of Achievement -Sgt. The Theater Equipment and Maintenance Robert Deloria, HHC, 1st Bn., 228th Avn. Kimberly Bizub of 747 MI Bn. Site commander, Lt. Col. Charles E. Lloyd Regiment; Spc. Mary Delores Booth, SOUTHCOM Letter of Appreciaretired Sept. 29 after 30 years of active HeHC, 142nd Med. Bn.; Spe. Aaron tion -Sgt. Eddie Breeding, Company A, duty and National Guard service. Partsafas, MEDDAC-Panama; Sp. Daniel 3 10th MI Bn. The Arkansas native enlisted in the ArBeebe, 154th Signal Bn.; Spe. Paul Berthot, kansas Guard in 1964 and was commis79th Army Band; Cpl. Andrew Cooper, sioned in the Infantry Corps in 1968. HQ, SOUTHCOM; Spc. Humberto BerLloyd has been assigned as a mortar planard, Co. A, 1st Bn. (Airborne), 508th Inf; toon leader, executive officer and company Spe. Jack Allred, Co. C, 5th Bn., 87th Inf. AUGHN, Geral; born to Sgt. George and commander in Company C, 3rd Battalion, (Light); Spc. Michael Farmer, Co. A, MI Maria Vaughn, Aug. 24. 153rd Infantry, at McGehee, Ark. He has Bn. (L); Spc. French Reid, Panama MP ANWAY, Amanda Elizabeth; born to also served as Chemical Plans officer, SeCo.; Spc. Christopher Hickox, 549th MP Spc. Lonny and Elizabeth Anway, Sept. curity Plans and Operations Officer and (couesy) Co.; Spc. Jose Diaz, HHC, JOTB; Spc. 18. executive officer in the 25th Rear Area OpLt. Col. Charles E. Lloyd cuts the Douglas Black, Company D, 160th SOAR AYALA, Zackary; born to Pfc. Eric and erations Center at Camp Robinson, Ark., cake at his retirement ceremony. (Airborne); Spc. Elizabeth Brown, Co. A, Dorianne Ayala, Sept. 17. and operations officer for the Deputy Chief of Staff Reserve Affairs here. 193rd Spt. Bn.; Spc. Robert Purce, 1097thBROWN, Andrea; born to Pfc. Sophia Trans. Co.; Spc. Mark Allen, HHC, 41st Brown, June 13. ASG; Spc. Mark Galpin, HHC, 128th Avn. BLANCHARD, Tabitha; born to Paul and U Public service Bde.; Spc. Andre Edouard, Co. E, 1 st Bn., Sandra Blanchard, July 11. Col Daniel Mongeon 41st 228th Avn. Bn.; Spc. Casey Roberts, 214th BLOCK, Stephany; born to Spc. John and Area Suppor Group comMed. Det.; Spc. Michael Goodson, HSC, Julissa Block, Sept. 6. 536th Eng. Bn.; Spc. Julie Graham, HHC, CARTER, Stanely; born to Stanley and meander presents Aurea LEA; Cpl. Ralph Sanchez, HHC, USCristina Carter, June 27. Ridriguez and Yvette ARSO; Spc. James Hansen, H HC, USAG; COLLIER, Zachary; born to Bryan and Espinosa with a 41st ASG Spc. Harris Dickerson, Co. A,5th Bn.,87th Claudia Collier, July 6. workout bag, water bottle Inf. (Light); Spc. Stephen Woytkewicz, DURONCELAY, Eric, born to Pvt. 2 and baseball cap. The two 747th MI Bn.; Cpl. Jason Edwards, HHD, Yashawna Duroncelay, June 19. volunteers received the 470th MI Bde.; Spe. Israel Nero, HHC, ESPINOSA, Janny; born to Capt. Jose and Commander's Award for 536th Eng. Bn.; Spc. Boyd Bingham, HSC, Yvette Espinosa, July 10. Public Service. 308th Ml Bn.; Spc. Christine Hunnicutt, FARREL, Kodi; born to Sgt. Daniel and Sgt. Robin Shawllnski(U.S. Army) Company B, 310th MI Bn.; Spc. Paul Melissa Farrell, June 1. Dudas, HHC, 5th Bn., 87th Inf. (Light); FLORES, Kelly Ann; born to Sgt. Mario Spc. Jorge Rosende, CID; Spc. Teresa and Milvia Flores, Aug. 16. Alexander, Co. D, 142nd Med. Bn.; Spc. HUNT, Montana Alise; born to Capt. Edward Tosado, Co. B, 4th Bn., 228th Hans and Kimberly Hunt, Sept. 12. Avn. Regiment; Spc. Arnulfo Rodriguez, HOUSER, Elizabeth Kristine; born to Spc. Co. E, 228th Avn. Regiment; Spc. William Bradley Garrett and Libra Houser, Sept. McGaffey, HHC, 154th Signal Bn.; Spc. 18. Leonard Hearne, MEDDAC-Panama; Spc. JACKSON, Amira; born to Staff Sgt. Thomas Ussery, Co. B, 536th Eng. Bn.; Charley and Mary Jackson, July 10. Spc. Steven Thompson, Co. A, 536th Eng. JACKSON, Kayla Morgan; born to Sgt. Bn.;Spc. Gregory Pauch, U.S. Marvin and Melissa Jackson, Sept. 15. SOUTHCOM; Spc. Richard Bogle, H HC, MAY, Samuel; born to Spc. Samuel and 5th Bn., 87th Inf. (Light); Spc. Matthew Melinda May, Sept. 9. Clark, Co. A, 747th MI Bn.; Cpl. Jimmy MCMANUS, Alexis Marie; born to Sgt. Stogner, 549th MP Co.; Spe. Subrina JohnBarry and Donna McManus, Sept. 14. (c""resy son, 69th Sig. Co.; Spc. Reginald Bryant, NASH, Kiaira Elizabeth; born to Spc. M Ps honor civilians 1097th Trans. Co.; Spc. Roger Schlough, Todd and Michel Nash, Sept. 20. JOTB; Spc. James Armstrong, 534th MP OVARD, Logan; born to 1st Lt. Michael The Military Police Command recogCo.; SpC. Jimmy Faddis, 549th MP Co.; and Kelly Ovard, July 19. nized several MPC civilian employees Spc. Robert Stevenson, HHC, 1st Bn., PENN, Nicole; born to Spc. John and Maduring a ceremony recently. 228th Avn. Regiment; Spc. Freddy vis Penn, July 10. Bobby Poland, the chief of Military Urmeneta, Co. B, 154th Sig. Bn.; Spc. PIERCE, Adam; born to Spc. Adam and Customs was awarded the Christopher Barnes, Company D, 4th Bn., Paula Pierce, July 13. Commander's Award for civilian ser228th Avn. Regiment; Spc. Jesus LozanoPLEAS, Daniel Jeremiah; born to Sgt. vice. Poland is retiring after seven years Anaya, DENTAC-Panama; Spc. Steven Derrick and Maria Pleas, July 10. of civilian service with the MPC (top lnicki, HHC, 128th Avn. Bde.; Spc. PETERSON, Michael Alexander; born to right). Amelia Garcia, Co. D, USAG; Spe. Scott StaffSgt. Wayne and Lilia Peterson, Aug. Marilyn Carver, a secretary with the Balfour, Co. D, 160th SOAR (Airborne); 16. command, was also recognized for 20 Spc. Tony Whetstone, Co. A, 193rd Spt. SLATER, Alexanda; born to Staff Sgt. years of federal service. She received a Bn.; Cpl. Richard Rice, HHC, 1st Bn., Thomas and Itsia Slater, June 17. y 508th Inf. (Airborne); Spc. Milissa Hood, VILLELA, Jesse; born to Evaristo and certificateanda2o-yearservicepin(top). 154th Sig. Bn.; Spc. Mick Madden, 549th Tricia Villela, July 19. Melissa Flynn, the Treaty Affairs OffiMP Co.; Spc. Michael Boyd, HHC, USWHATLEY, Marshall Kristopher; to Staff cer was also promoted to GS-1 1 (right). ARSO; Spc. Gerald Nino, Co. C, 5th Bn. Sgt. Marshall and Lidia Whatley, Sept. 14. Lt. Col. Stephen Noble, Military Po87th Inf. (Light); Spc. Betty Trandem, YATES, Ashley Kate; born to Sgt. Willlice deputy commander, presented the Company A, 3 10th MI Bn.; Spc. Sean iam and Lisa Yates, Sept. 14. awards. (courtesy) Kelly, 1097th Trans. Co.

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~ feature Tropic Times __________________* Featu res__________ Oct. 21, 199e4I Extraordinary operators on line COROZAL (USARSO) -"Operator 12, how may I school taught Braille in Spanish. With English as his information line helped him land a job at the JOSS in help you sir or ma'am?" primary language, he had to learn two "foreign" languages January 1991. For both Hayden and Narimatsu, working at So says the human voice on the other end of the at the same time. Getting a job was no easy feat, either. the JOSS has been, for lack of a better word, normal telephone after dialing operator assistance here in PanaNarimatsu called the JOSS consistently for nearly three which is the way they like it. ma. No name or face to put with the voice. It seems years before finally landing the job in October 1993. "It's good when people treat you normally," Narimatsu everyone, at one point or another has wondered what the Once hired, Narimatsu needed specialized equipment said. "It makes you feel worse when people baby you." person on the other end of the line looks like. Most of the to become an operator. The customized terminal he uses "I've been known to trip over a dime," Hayden said. time, a "normal person" comes to mind. gives him a verbal response after having the requested "It's kind of embarrassing when you fall in public. People For Luis Narimatsu and Richard Hayden, working at information keyed in. freak out. They start running at you trying to help you up. the Joint Overseas Switching Section (JOSS) gives them On the other hand, Hayden has been afflicted with I have to tell them, 'It's OK, I can get up."' the opportunityto show people, despite their"disabilities," cerebral palsy all his life. The disease affects his nervous Both agree that working at the JOSS'has been a real that they are just as "normal" as other people. system and affects his balance and ability to walk, but not boost to their self image. They state that since they've been Narimatsu was diagnosed with infantile glaucoma when his ability to work. able to work around their disabilities and prove themselves he was 21 years old, and was completely blind by the age "If I'm sitting down, no one notices," Hayden said. as capable individuals, theyfeel it has been an education for of 26. Up to the time he lost his sight, Narimatsu was going "When I walk away, that's when they realize I have those they work and talk with. to school at Panama Canal College, where he earned an (cerebral palsy)." "I have always liked being around people," Narimatsu associates degree. Hayden worked for the Panama Canal Commission as said. "This job helps people deal with me and not treat me "After that I was in rehab," Narimatsu said. "I had to a student hire and then on a permanent position for five any different than others." leam Braille (an alphabet of raised dots) and how to get years until his position was cut. After that, he volunteered So for people who do wonder what the person on the around by myself.and I had to get a job." at the Albrook AFS Post Office and the Southern Comother end of the phone line looks like, don't worry. A That turned out to be more difficult than expected. The mand Information Line. The experience he gained at the normal person is answering their call. Luis Narimatsu (U.S. Army) Richard Hayden (U.S. Army) Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) Hispanic month closing The closing ceremony for Hispanic Heritage Month took place at the Fort Clayton NCO Club Oct. 14. Luncheon participants were treated to the New Generation dancers performing traditional Latin American dance numbers (above) and a visit from Panama's reigning Miss Mundo, Carmen Ogando (right) and Panama's Miss Universe Marilyn Gonzalez, not shown. Sg. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army)

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12 Tropic Times 12Oct, Features Aviator receives POW bracelet After 20 years, woman turns over war keepsake by Linda Christensen ter pilot. Both times, he was shot down. The second "After all these years, for someone to still be holdTropic Times contributor time, he didn't make it back. ing onto this bracelet." Reeder said, shaking his head. Reeder was captured in Cambodia and forced to "Normally, I give my POW speech at these meetWhen Robin Edward's son, Justin, was looking for walk with a broken back, plus a list of other injuries ings, but this time, I had decided to give one on the a treasure to play with from his mother's jewelry box, that would have forced most other men to give up. Yet, future of Army aviation. Luckily, I did because seeing he came across an old bracelet with a name and date he didn't. He hobbled many miles to ajungle camp and this bracelet was very emotional for me." inscribed. Robin explained that the name was of a then, after several more nights of walking, wound up His POW speech recounts in detail his experiences soldier who was a prisoner of war in Vietnam. at the infamous 'Hanoi Hilton.' in Vietnam. When Justin asked, "Did the bad guys kill him?" his He was rescued a year later. Back in the United Seeing Reeder for the first time was also very mother could only say, I hope not, but I don't know." States, numerous surgeries and months of recovery emotional for Robin. At the time of the presentation, She never guessed that only a few weeks later, she were required to heal his injuries. she was not aware of the pain he put up with in would know his fate. Reeder is a survivor of all the things most of us only captivity. Robin and her husband, Lt. Col. James Edwards, see in the movies. Forthat reason, he is greatly respect"I would have just cried, if I had to sit there and bought bracelets during the early '70s while attending ed, in not only the aviation field, but throughout the listen to his suffering," she said. college in Georgia. Both kept them through the years, Army. There is no trace of Reeder's tragic past on his And she nearly did cry when she presented him with not knowing whether either person ever made it home. face. In fact, he looks much younger than many of his the bracelet, but held it together "in front all those One night a few weeks ago, they were watching a contemporaries. strangers." Yet, to Robin, Reeder will never be a television documentary about Vietnam POWs. Her Out of the thousands of soldiers, airmen, Marines stranger. After twenty years, she finally had a face to husband mentioned that he was attending an Army and sailors that went to Vietnam, Robin finds it coingo with the name, except she still refers to him as Capt. Aviation Association of America meeting and that a cidental the bracelet she received was for such a Reeder. former POW named Col. Reeder would be speaking. famous aviator. "For all these years, he's been Capt. Reeder and to "Normally I don't watch those shows because they "My husband is an aviator and we had the bracelets me, he will always be Capt. Reeder," she said with a are so depressing ," Robin said. "But that night I did, before he went in the Army," she said. It's just that laugh. and when my husband said 'Col. Reeder and POW,' it so many people were considered POWs, and for my Robin likened the bracelet to the relationship that a iust triggered my memory." bracelet to be for an aviator." person would have with a "pen pal," except she never Edwards said she went upstairs and retrieved both Ironically, both families are stationed here in Panknew anything more than a name and date. After of their bracelets. They pondered whether it could ama. Their paths have probably crossed somewhere: meeting Reeder, she is proud she was able to at least really be the same man. After a few phone calls the commissary, hospital or military functions. provide prayers for him throughout the years, even if next day, they realized that indeed it was. Until a few weeks ago, Robin knew nothing except only a couple of those years were when he was in "All I could think about was 'thank God, he is alive Reeder's name and his date of capture. In her words, it captivity. and well,"' Robin said. made it even harder not knowing anything about him, Reeder said that when he first came back to the After twenty-odd years, she never gave up hope. or even if he had died. Learning the outcome of states, a few people contacted him and gave him their "You know, I never forgot about the bracelet or Capt. Reeder's ordeal has been a relief to Robin and closes bracelets, but he never expected someone to care Reeder," she said. "As far as I knew, he was still over a final chapter on Vietnam in her life. enough to hold onto one for so long. there. And every so often, I'd remember and say a "After the war was calming down, I thought about "This one will always be very special," he said. prayer." trying to find out what happened to him," she said. "I'm planning to put it in a case at home and it'll be a Robin never guessed that the bracelet she kept for "But by that time, my husband was active-duty and we good story to recall." so long was for a man many people consider the were moving around and time just passed." At home, Reeder and his wife, Lt. Col. Melanie modem day living hero of Army aviation, Col. WillAfter Robin and her husband contacted AAAA Reeder, have two grown children, a three-year-old, iam Reeder, U.S. Southern Command deputy chief of meeting organizer Maj. Jack Kendall and informed and another baby on the way. staff. him of their discovery, he arranged for Edwards to He will have plenty of time and receptive ears to After entering the Army at Glendale, Calif., in present Reeder with his POW bracelet afterhis speech. recount the story of the military wife who refused to 1965, Reeder served two tours in Vietnam as a helicopAccording to Reeder, it was an emotional moment. give up on him after twenty years. Lightning poses safety threat during Panama's rainy season PANAMA (USAG-Panama Safety Office) -The most common activities at the time a The old saying, "Lightning never strikes the lightning strike injury occurs are waiting under a same spot twice," may be true, but it won't really tree, participating in water sports, and golfing, he matter if someone is standing there for the first said. time. "Unlike many other causes of death and injury According to the U.S. National Center for that one can run away from, lightning strikes Health Statistics, lightningkillsabout 150 Amerbefore the warning thunder," Alleyne said. icans each year and injures some 250 more. People can help lower the chance of getting While statistics for lightning strikes in Panama struck by lightning, he said. are not available, the news media has recorded When possible, avoid open areas, bare hill several incidents in recent years, said Roberto tops, lone or prominent trees, flagpoles, fences, Alleyne, USAG-Panama safety specialist. radio antennas, open-top vehicles and power and In Panama, lightning events almost always telephone lines. coincide with the rainy season thunderstorms "When available, seek shelter in a building," from May to mid-December, with the highest he said. "Well-grounded metal buildings offer frequency occuring between September and Noprotection, provided people don't touch the metal vember, he said. inside of a building and stay away from stoves, The U.S.Army Garrison-Panama Directortelephones, windows, metal equipment, water on ate of Community Activities Outdoor Recrethe floor, or other possible conductors of electrication Branch has a lightning strike avoidance ity. policy for all of its outdoor activities. If caught outdoors, people should seek caves, "The policy is that any time a thunderstorm is foxholes, deep ditches, the base of a steep cliff or near or imminent, swimming pools are cleared, hill, or inside rubber tired vehicles with steel and football and youth soccer games are halted bodies. until the lightning threat is over," Alleyne said. If on a lake as a storm is approaching, try to When a person is struck by lightning, electrireach the shore and seek shelter. cal shock and burns usually result. When struck, Ifa group is caught outside or on hilltops they a person will be stunned or paralyzed, and often should disperse to minimize the electrical attraccan be revived through first aid measures. tion offered by a massing of people. "There is no danger in touching a person who "To the extent possible, avoid having any part has been struck by lightning because the electriof your body in contact with water that may be cal charges ate not retained in the body,"Alleyne flooding the ground," Alleyne said. "If however, said. "Prompt application of artificial resuscitayou are caught in flat, open terrain or hilltop, lie tion and treatment of shock could be the differdown in any depression available in order to ence between life and death." reduce your height above the terrain."

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Sports Oct. 21, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13 Lucky seven Local athletes race in D.C. by Sgt. Lori Davis Striders accompanied the USARSO team 53:27 year. However, with only Bozgoz returnTropic Times sports editor as a show of support, Moye said. The USARSO team's runtime was54:46 ing, the team was newand unaccustomed to Starting and ending at the Pentagon, the Results from the women's competition this level of competition, Moye said. COROZAL -The men's and women's race wound past Potomac Park, Arlington are as follows: "There were a lot of new people on the teams representing U.S. Army South in the National Cemetary, the Lincoln Memorial First place -Fort Hood, Tx., 1:05:31 team, and for many of them it was the first Army 10-mile Run Sunday earned seventh and crossed the Memorial Bridge, Moye Second place -Hawaii, 1:06:00 time they had competed at this level, but place in a field of300 teams in Washington, said. Third place -Fort Carson, Colo., 1:08:19 they did a great job," he said. D.C. Both teams turned in exceptional perThe USARSO team's run time was TheclimatewasanotherfactorUSARSO The race is sponsored by the Associaformances, he said. 1:11:06. runners had to overcome. The temperature tion of the U.S. Army, said Sue Bozgoz, a "Our community is so much smaller Team scores are computed by averaging in Washington, D.C. was 55 degrees team member. than the teams coming from other places," the four fastest times of the six man teams, fahrenheit, a dramatic change for runners The men competed againstapproximatehe said. "Our people must be commended Moye said. coming from the tropics. In spite ofthe cold ly 250 teams while the women ran against for competing with these teams." Themen'steamimproved ontheireighth the USARSO runners did very well, Moye approximately 50 teams, USARSO coach The USARSO teams faced runners from place showing in 1993. Robert Czech and said. Willie Moye said. U.S. Army installations from around the Corey Smallwood returned this year. Times for the Strider runners are as Bozgoz said 8,500 people participated world, he said. Smallwood shaved 2 minutes off his 1993 follows: in the run. Results from the men's competition are 58:39 time. Scott Digruttolo 57:19, 43rd in 25-29 A highlight ofthe race was the first place as follows: "Some guys were completely surprised age group finish in the 44-49 age group by Clinton First place -Fort Carson, Colo., 52:18 by the level of competition," he said. Roberto Gotay 1:00:03 Davis, amemberofthe FortClayton Stirders, Secondplace-FortCampbell,Ky., 52:22 The women's team lost some ground on Willie Moye 1:01:00 who completed the run in 56 minutes. The Third place -Fort Sam Houston, Tx., the competition after finishing fourth last Richard Thomas 1:03:00 USARSO runners make a winning team 1994 USARSO 10-miler Men's Team Brian Coutch Traci Beth Thompson Wilfredo Griego Time -56:46, 37th in 25-29 age Time -1:13:22, 43rd in 25-29 age Time -52:41, 5th in 25-29 age group group group Unit -Company B, 536th Engineer Unit -Company B, 308th Military UnitHeadquarters and HeadquarBattalion Intelligence Battalion ters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Experience -Five 10-mile events, Experience -Recreational runner. Infantry two marathons, one 75-mile run. Comments on the team-"I couldn't Experience -Recreational runner, Comments on the team -"Being on .have made it this far without my no formal competitions. the team is superb, the team memhusband's support and love and my Comments on the team -Griego bers are really supportive." unit's six mile runs." was unavailable for comment. Jose Alberto Haro Heidi Pointer Robert Czech Time -57:03, 40th in 25-29 age Time -1:14:30, 27th in 25-29 age Time -54:47, 25th in 25-29 age group group group. Czech's time in last year's UnitHeadquarters and HeadquarUnit -Headquarters and HeadquarArmy I0-miler was 54:34. ters Comapny, U.S. Army Garriters Company, 154th Signal BattalUnitHeadquartersand Headquarson ion ters Company, U.S. Army South Experince1994TransisthmianReExperienceUnittrackteam atFort Experience -Member of the 1993 lay Race USARSO team member Ord, Calif. USARSO 10-miler Team. Comments oil the team -"I'm ex Comments on the team -"Being on Comments on the team -"This will cited to represent USARSO." the team is one of the greatest opbe a competitive group." 1994 USARSO 10-miler Women s Team portunities of my military career." Paul Stevenson Sue Bozgoz Michelle DiGruttolo Time -55:05, 16th in 30-34 age Time -1:05:40, fourth in 30-34 age Time -1:14:24, 25th in 20-24 age group group group Unit -Southern Command NetUnit -Company D, 142nd Medical Unit -Company A, 308th Military work battalion Intelligence Battalion Experience -Three I0-mile events. Experience -oneand two-mile Experience -Recreational road racComments on the team -"I love to and five-kilometer events in high es. run, and any time I can be with school,two-mileand 13-mileevents Comments on the team -"I am other runners it's a good experiin college, Army 10-mile race in anxious to be a part of this winning ence." 1989 and 1992. team." Corey Smallwood Comments on the team -"It is outstanding." Genoveva Esquivel-Ilfill Time -56:32, 36th in 25-29 age Ethenia Torres Time -1:16:31, 56th in 30-34 age group Time -1:11:50, 33rd in 30-34 age group UnitHeadquarters and Headquargroup Unit-92nd Pesonnel Services Centers Company, U.S. Army South Unit -U.S. Army Medical Departter Experience -Three 10-mile events. ment Activity Experience -Transisthmian Relay Comments on the team -"I am very Experience -High school track and Race team member 1992-1994. positive about it and have pride five and ten-kilometer races in the Comments on the team -"It didn't within myself. I am proud to repreArmy. occur to me that I could run 10 sent USARSO in the 10th annual Comments on the team -"It's been miles in one day. I am very proud to 10-miler in D.C." my goal to be on the team." be part of the team." The Cougars take their unbeaten Hot heads and cool plays make the +SCN AM radio schedule record to 6-0 after pummeling the difference in the Dolphins and Raid*Sports standings Kolts 35-7. ers matchup. *Basketball semi-finals

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14 Tropic Times L Oct. 21, 1994 Football Can't touch this Cougars roll down victory lane at 6-0 by Sgt. Lori Davis offMarten on the five-yard line, and Tropic Times sports editor the Kolts took over. Ford went to Alberto Norte for BALBOA -Fans started looktwo passes, picking up 25 yards, but ing for the fat lady to sing at half the Kolts ground out the other 50 time as the Cougars jumped out to yards on tenacious running. a 27-7 lead on the hapless Kolts, but Ford orchestrated a drive that put the game wasn't over until the end the Kolts one foot from the goal line of the grueling second half and the with seconds left on the clock. Just 35-7 Cougar win. as the half ran out, Ford dove in for The Cougars dazzled the crowd the Kolts' only score of the game. and baffled the Kolts, scoring on The Cougars and Kolts had been their first play from scrimage as the here before, the Kolts came back in game opened. Buddy Martens conthe second half to make the score nected with Michael Morales on a 27-24, and had possession of the short out pass. Morales turned a it ball and threatened to score. Cougar into big yardage as he sprinted 73 coach Fred Bales said he was not yards down the sideline into the end taking the lead for granted. zone. The second half became a tug of The Cougars' Lance VonHollen war; both teams were tired and slugfollowedon Martens'heels by pickgish. Shouts from the Cougar sideing off the Kolts' Raul Ford and line went from demands on the ofrunning the ball back for a touchfense to cheers for the defense for down. holding the Kolts scoreless. Sgt. Lor Davis (Tropic Tines) The Cougars'Curtis Haynesalso The Cougars' defense held the Big, bad saint turnedaKolts turnover into Cougar line, and with time running out the points by scoring on a Ford fumble. offense got back into the game. With Arturo Del Busto helps the Kolts defensive sg. Lor Davis (rropic Te The Kolts looked battered under 18 seconds in the game Martens tackle Jaime St. Malo snap his chin strap. The Cougars'Buddy Martensfades a 20-point deficit, but they refused threw a touchdown pass to Jelani Although the Kolts are 1-5 this season, it is back to pass. to give up. Ricardo Thayer picked Jordan. a big, physical team. St. Maio is 5'11" tall and weighs 270 pounds. Tigers 40-Machine 19 The Tigers' Jon Guerra saw Red, and again rushed for over 200 yards. In his last outing against the Machine, Guerra racked up 222 yards. This time he piled on 242 yards and found the end zone three times. Guerra trails the Devils' Wilbert Reese by 61 points for the league rushing record. The Tigers' Ruben Rafalko spent his time in the end zone as well, putting two more touchdowns on the scoreboard on two short runs. Tony Wrice scored for the Machine on a 40-yard pass play from Jared Holzworth. Devils 14-Bulldogs 6 The Bulldogs held the Devils' Wilbert Reese to 164 yards and one touchdown, scored on a 29-yard run, his longest for the night. Juney Bamett tacked on a touchdown to round out the Devils' scoring. The Bulldogs offense played a game of slippery fingers, fumbling the ball five times. In spite of coughing up the ball twice, Cardova Hall boosted his rushing record by 137 yards, securing third place. Joe Novotny turned in the Bulldogs only score on a fumble recovery in the end zone. Sgt. Lori Davis (Tropic Times) The Cougars' Lance VonHollen breaks to the outside to evade the Kolts' Abdiel Poveda. Team statistics League Leaders Scoring 1400 Team standings TD xp Total W L T Pct. PF PA Reese, Devils 10 3 66 1200 Cougars 6 0 0 1.000 95 50 Guerra, Tigers 7 42 Devils 5 1 0 .833 96 32 Martens, Cougars 5 1 32 Tigers 3 3 0 .500 37 48 Carries Yds. Avg. KoIns 1 5 0 .167 73 128 Reese, Devils 115 818 7.1 Machine 0 6 0 .000 13 62 Guerra, Tigers 103 757 6.4 Tonight's games Hall, Bulldogs 95 617 6.5 600 Cougars vs. Tigers, 6 p.m. (CHS) Kick offs Bulldogs vs. Machine, 5:30 p.m. (BHS) Kicks Yds. Avg. Kolts vs. Devils, 7:30 p.m. (BHS) VonHollen, Cougars 23 1105 48 Quarterbacks Beach, Bulldogs 14 630 45 200 ,PA PC % Yds TD Int Lampas, Devils 21 943 44.9 Martens, Cougars 108 46 43 866 8 5 Punts 0 rusin Yr Lampas, Devils 49 29 59 404 3 2 Kicks Yds. Avg. Yards rushing Yards passing Beach, Bulldogs 49 15 31 349 1 7 Price, Tigers 20 642 32 EBldogs [Coar s D Kolts E Machins -Interceptions Beach, Bulldogs 18 522 29 Beach, Bulldogs 5 Bowman, Devils 7 196 28 Source: Robert Best

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Tropic Times --lport Oct. 21, 199410 Infantry shoots for title Spobif Special event by Sgt. James A. Rush Game two, held Oct. 17, saw the advance to the second round where The Legion ofAbou Saad Temple will host their 24th Wing Public Affairs 24th Mission Support Squadron chalthey lost to MSS 53-48 Oct. 13. AIS/ annual fishing tournament Nov. 3 at Gatun Lake. -lenge the foot soldiers with only marOSS set back the other Special Boat Prizes will be presented for largest fish, heaviest HOWARD AFB -Back-to-back ginally better success. The end score Unit 26 team 52-42 in their first-round stringer and most fish caught over 15 inches. All wins over the top teams from the Air was four points closer, 5845, but exgame before losing the Army. proceeds will be donated to the Transportation Force earned the Army's best squad a cept for the opening minutes, the game The special boat unit redeemed itFund that is used to send crippled and burned day off during the intramural was never close. selfsomewhat by topping the Medical children here in Panama to the United States interservice basketball playoffs. Mission support managed to keep Activity 62-59 Oct. 14. This earned and return. A concession stand will be available to Champions and runners-up from Davis'scoringtoamodestseven points, them a rematch against a familiar foe the public.For information, call TerryZittle at261the services face each other for the but teammates Jeff Deuitch and on Monday however. 8018. interservice title following regular Senador Hines picked up the slack. AIS/OSSmanagedtosinkthe whole A0 d season play in their own communiDeuitch tried his luck from long fleet. It beat Naval Station 59-56 Oct. Amador ties. The interservice tournaments are distance and came up with a pair of 14, and then pulled off the hat trick The Fort Amador Golf Course will have ladies sponsored through the combined efthrees in the first half. Four more field against the seamen by beating special beginner lessons 3:30-4:30 p.m. and 4:30-5:30 forts of the sports office staffs from goals and four free throws in the secboat 42-35 Monday. p.m. Tuesdays forsix-weeks.There isa$20fee.Call each service. ond half gave him a game-high 18 The losers' bracket finals were held 282-4511 for information. After a first round bye, Headquarpoints. He was one point better than Tuesday as MSS faced AIS/OSS for The Fort Amador Nine-hole Ladies Golf ters and Headquarters Company, 5th Hines who finished with 17, including the fourth time this season. Mission League starts Tuesday and will last seven weeks. Battalion, 87th Infantry faced the comfour three-pointers. support had won two of the teams' There is an $8 fee. Call 282-4511 for information. bined team of the 24th Air IntelliPete Liljeholm was the only notathree meetings during the season and The Amador Golf Course is sponsoring a twogence/Operations squadrons Oct. 13. ble scorer for MSS with 17 points. playoffs, but AIS/OSS would even the person, best ball Thanksgiving Turkey Shoot Led by Norris Davis, they had The losers' bracket of the double score by notching a 61-48 whipping. 7:30 a.m. Nov. 12, $8. Call 282-4511 to register by little trouble posting a 6043 win, elimination tournament was populatNov. 9. Red-hot Davis dominated the game ed first by the Navy teams. Editor's note: In the championAlbrook/Howard with 31 points. Twenty-one of these The Army's second-seeded Mediship 5-87th beat AIS/OSS 60-49. See Registration for youth baseball for ages 5-18 came in the first half as he accounted cal Department Activity faced the U.S. next week's issue ofthe Tropic Times years will run Oct. 31 to Dec. 3 at the Howard and for nearly two-thirds of his team's Naval Station team to open the tourney for the championship story. Albrook youth centers. A physical exam is required scoring during the opening period. Oct. 12. A 7347 win allowed them to before a child can be registered. There is a $25 fee for family members of active duty card holders and H $30 fee for other people. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center is sponSkins only victory was in a dome against New Orleans. soring a tennis ladder tournament. Call 284NFL week in review Heath Shuler will get his first win in a dome against the 3451 for information. Dolts. Skins 24, COLTS 20. Because of Operation Safe Haven, hours at the Saints march on Rams -L.A. just upset the Giants and Albrook Sports and Fitness Center have been by John Hall the Saints are fresh off a Bolt-beating so the Rams should changed temporarily. The gym will be open 8 a.m.Rodman NS Public Affairs Office be a lock right? Not on a dry October day in Panama. The 1 p.m. and 4-7 p.m. on weekdays, noon-6 p.m. RODMAN NS -Week seven ofthe NFL season started Saints own the Rams, taking seven of the last eight and Satuday, and 1-6 p.m. Sunday. off with a bore --Cleveland's 11-8 Thursday night win at showed the ability to come back last week. The Chargers The Howard Sports and Fitness Center has a Houston -but rebounded with two overtime games and a raced to a 24-0 lead, but New Orleans outscored them the TGIF 5-kilometer fun run, 5:15 a.m.-6 p.m. few upsets. In one of the overtime games, the Fish spotted rest of the way, 22-12. The Rams are notorious forwinning Fridays. Register at the center to win a T-shirt in the the Raiders a 10-0 lead, before rallying for a 20-17 win. games they shouldn't and vice versa. With a great running drawing following the run. Raiders' fans have a legitimate gripe on the outcome, back in Jerome Bettis and one ofthe league's best defensive Clayton because head coach Art Shell pulled quarterback Jeff lines, the Rams should win. SAINTS 20, Rams 16. The Clayton Bowling Center has lunch-time Hostetler for mouthing off. A rally was also needed in the Houston on Monday night? Again?-Youcan't blame specials I I a.m.-I p.m. weekdays. Games are 50 other overtime game. Buddy's Boys came back from a 14ABC for wanting the Oilers again. Last season, Houston cents and shoes are free. Call 287-6366 for more 0 disadvantage to down the Skins 19-16. The Rams' upset was 12-4, including an Il-game winning streak. This information. of the Giants wasn't much of a surprise, but the Dolts season Houston's 1-5 record and history is on PhiladelReeder Physical Fitness Center has free downing the Bills was a shock and a half. phia's side this Monday. The Oilers have never beaten the aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. MondayFriday. Call Here are the week eight predictions. Home teams are in Eagles in five tries. Houston is just the right medicine for 287-3861 for information. CAPS. Philly, who lost to that "other" Texas team last week. Tang Soo Do is taught 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays and Lions and Bears, oh my! -The Bears are a surprise at EAGLES 26, Oilers 10. Thursdays at the Valent Recreation Center. Classes 4-2 and the Lions are a complete mystery. Since handing In other action: Minnesota makes it five out of six, are open to adults and children 4 years old and up. the Cowboys their only loss of the season, Detroit hasn't VIKES 16, Packers 10; Raiders rebound, RAIDERS 24, Call 287-6500 for information. won a game since. The Bears looked impressive in a win Falcons 17; Brownies bash Bungals, BROWNS 19, Kitties Curundu over the Bills, but when Buffalo (4-3) loses to the likes of 10; Boys bump Buddy, Cowpokes 27, CARDS 9; Bolts Indianapolis, it takes away from the win. This series has a bust Broncos, CHARGERS 30, Broncos 17; K.C. takes Tang Soo Do is taught 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday unique trend going. Since 1989, the teams have split each seven in a row, CHIEFS 22, Seabirds 14; Young makes it ndThursdays at the Pacific Theater Arts Center, season with Chicago always winning the first game. Look 12 of 13; NINERS 34, Bucs 13. Buidingu206s in the Curuindu housing. Classes are for that trend to change. LIONS 20, Bears 10. There are open dates for Buffalo, (they need it) Miami, open to adults and children 4 years old and up. Call Giants twist steelThe Giants are three up, three down; New England and the New York Jets. .Anyone interested in joining a mixed bowling and the Steelers arejust down. Last week, not only did they Last week 7-4, season 53-36, Monday night 6-1. league at the Curundu Bowling Center can call edge the Kitties by only four, but they also lost running back National Football League 286-39 14 for information. Barry Foster for two to three weeks with a sprained knee. American Conference National Conference The Giants' fall is no surprise. In their first three wins, two East East Rodman were nailbiters over weaksisters Arizona and Washington. W L T % PF PA Dalas 5 1 0 .833 159 69 The Rodman Marina will hold a bass fishing The Steelers did have the league's best running game going BMiai 4 3 0 .571 i34 143 Gia 3 3 0 .500 121 134 tournament on Gatun Lake 5:30 a.mi.-2 p.m. Nov. into the win over Cincy. They now must rely on a passing Jets 4 3 0 .57i 116 122 Arizona 2 4 0 .333 68 127 11. The entry fee is $10 and cash awards will be game ranked in the lower half of the league. Rodney indian. 3 4 0 .429 140 145 waesi. i 6 0 .143 128 184 given for the largest and second largest fish caught. Hampton is back in form and the Giants should eat up the N.h. 3 4 0 .429 175 183 Ceitral Call the Rodman Marina at 283-3 150 to register. clock like the old days. GIANTS 23, Steelers 13. .Cev. central Ci. 4 2 0 .667 113 108 An intramural swim meet will be held at the le.51 0 .833 129 66 Min. 4 2 0 .667 134 95 Shattered Windshield Game -The Washington-IndiPitt. 4 2 0 .667 114 111 G.B. 3 3 0 .500 107 84 Rodman Pool 6:30 a.m. Nov. 18. The competition anapolis game is classic "Shattered Windshield Game." Houst. 1 5 0 .167 87 134 Detroit 2 4 0 .333 106 129 is open to all Navy/Marine Corps military, DepartThat's a game where if you leave two tickets to this game Cin. 0 6 0 .000 88 143 Tampa 2 4 0 .333 80 118 ment of Defense civilians and dependents 18 and on your car dashboard, someone will smash your windWest West older. There is a limit of one team per unit. Register shield and leave four more. Granted the Colts beat Buffalo S.D. 6 0 0 1.000 70 106 S.F. 5 2 0 .714 196 134 b Nov. 10. Call Rodman Athletics at283-4222 for K.C. 4 2 0 .667 121 108 Atlanta 4 3 0 .571 141 154 ,yov10CalRdnAtetct2342fr something they have done only once since 1988 -but Seattle 3 3 0 .500 130 86 Rams 3 4 0 .429 101 119 information or to register. that was a fluke. The Redskins couldn't even beat Buddy's Raiders 2 4 0 .333 133 161 N.0. 2 5 0 .286 119 174 The Rodman Fitness Center has weight-lifting Cards at home after jumping out to a two-TD lead. The Denver 1 5 0 .167 136 177 classes 4:30-6 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. There is a $20 fee for six weeks ofelasses. Register for the class at the center. Atlantic community SCN AM Radio Giants Med. Dep. 0 2 2 iAn aerobics workshop and certification test MoCday AMrins 0d 2 2 i.s being organized in the Atlantic community. The 790/1420 8 p.m., NFL: Houston Oilers at Phila*as of Oct.14 testing will be given by the American Aerobic Saturday delphia Eagles Schedule Association International and International Sports 2:3i Standings Women's high school basketball Medicine Association from Pennsylvania. The cer5:30 p.m., NCAA: Calirornia at U.S.C. Navy Intramural Volleyball tification is valid for two years. A minimum of 15 Sunday .NC C4:30 p.m.: Devils vs. Machine (BHS) people are required for the class. For information, Noon, NFL:PittsburghSteelersatN.Y. PWD 2 0 -5:30 p.m.: Bulldogs vs. Tigers (CHS) call Delinda May at 289-3 163. Giant NSW 8 1 0 .5Tuesday-Oct. 28 Giants NSWU 8 1 0 .5 (TBA) Post-season tournament (TBA) 3 p.m., NFL:Denver Broncos at N.Y. NSC IATTS 1 0 .5

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16 Tropic Times 160ct. 21 94News 19Oft3rd by Sgt. Eric Hortin USARSO Public Affairs Office FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light) officially cased its colors Oct. 14 at a short ceremony at Reeder Physical Fitness Center. Col. Luis Huddleston had the honor of casing the colors of the 59th Engineer Battalion and the 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry. Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker, U.S. Army South commander, cased the 193rd's colors, putting to a close the final chapter of the unit's history. Only the commanders and guidon bearers were present to represent the individual units since nearly all of the 193rd soldiers have been reassigned elsewhere in the Army. "The 193rd is a unique unit," Crocker said. "The Army has never seen one like it before, and may never see one like it again." The colors of the 193rd Inf. Bde. will be put into storage until the unit is called upon again. The colors of the 1st Bn., 508th Inf. will be sent to the 82nd Airborne Division Museum in Fort Bragg, N.C., where the unit traces its lineage back to during Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) World War II. The 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry, once part of the Soldiers from the 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light) participate in a color-casing ceremony, ending brigade, was restructured as a USARSO asset. the brigade's colorful history. Signal brigade soldiers keep AMC fax numbers listed for sign ups Saf Ha en amp on ineHOWARD AFB (24th Wing PAO) -An Safe Haven cam ps on line article in last week's Tropic Times explained "Initially, we had 10 phone lines to the Joint Task how space-available travelers may sign up for by Spc. Brian Thomas Force office through a satellite that provided us with flights via fax or U.S. mail. Here is a list of USARSO PubicA ffairs Office the desk phones," Bishop said. frequently used AMC terminals and their fax EMPIRE RANGE -Communication is a key eleHe said currently the 56th and the 106th are in a numers/ men toevey mlitry pertio, ad wth he pecaltwo-phase operation to provide phone service through*437 APS/TRO; 113 Bates Street, Bldg. 178; ment to every military operation, and with the special w-paepraintprvdphesevetrogCharleston AFB, S.C., 29418-691 1; fax: (803) mission of Operation Safe Haven and its varied locaout the camps. tions, reliable communication is critical. The first phase, which is complete, provided 10 566-4300 The 106th Signal Brigade, phone lines eachto the JTF head*Det. 1437 APS/TR; 5500 Intemational Blvd.; with its subordinates, the 56th quarters, to each camp and to 29418-691; fax: (803) 566-3845 Signal Battalion and the 154th 12 4 the hospital. 2416911; 0566-3845 Signal Battalion, have taken on The second phase consists *436 APS/TRO; 505 Atlantic Ave.; Bldg. 505, the responsibilityof keeping Safe A of expanding the amount of (302) 677-2953 Haven on line. phone lines to each location, as (438 APS/TRP; 1752 Vandenberg Ave. "We're making sure people well as installing pay phones at McGuire AFB, N.J., 08641-5507; fax: (609) are talking," said Capt. Todd the community camps. M r B J 6 5 f 0 Bishop, deputy of communicaThe 56th will put in an addi724-50 6S/TRO; 501 Hanger Ave., Bldg. 3 1 tons, 56th Signal Bn. tonal 25 lines to each camp, 35 Room 75; Travis AFB, Calif., 94535-2763; fax: To meet that mission, the siglines to the JTF headquarters (707) 424-2048 nal soldiers have created a com-and seven lines to the containmunications network that spans -7 mentfacility in the second phase, from hand-held radios and desk Bishop said. Navy turns over phones to pay phones for CuThe 106th is also coordinatbans. ing with the local phone compaAm ador assets Initially, hand-held, walkieny, Intel to provide the commuFORT AMADOR (Rodman NS PAO) talkie radios were issued between nity camps with pay phones. U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal transferred its the camps, because no perma"We're working through the administrative complex at Fort Amador to U.S. nent communication setup exsignal brigade to bring in Intel Army South Oct. 1. The only'remaining Navy listed at Empire Range. so the Cubans can make credit property at Amador is Navy housing units, said The 154th didthe initialsetup, a sBishop said. treaty Implementation Plan officials. which included the use of MulSp. Brian Thomas (U.S. Army) Pay phones have already been The complex was declared excess to the tiple Subscriber Radio TeleSpc. James Heath operates the installed at Community Camp needs of the Navy and offered to USARSO. phones, Bishop said. The MSRT, switchboard at the 154th Signal No. I and No. 2 by Intel. Bishop USARSO is the executive agent for U.S. Southsimilar to a desk phone, began Battalion controlling station. said the goal is to have four pay ern Command and current occupants of the the transition from hand-held raphones at each camp. complex are the SOUTHCOM Comptroller, dios to a conventional phone system. The completion of the second phase is expected in SCJ8, SCJI, SCJ4 and SCJ6-all from the "The signal guys had the lines strung and waiting about two months. Once the two-phase operation is SOUTHCOM staff. for us," Bishop said. "We just had an empty building completed, fewer soldiers will be needed to meet the The next scheduled property transfer for the with a phone hanging off the wall when we got here." communication mission, Bishop said. Navy is Summit Naval Radio Station. It beThe initial setup started Aug. 29. Once communi"The ultimate plan," he said, "is that once the comes a canal operating area under the control cation was established through the MSRTs, Bishop additional lines go in, to pull the 154th out and operate ofthe Panama Canal Commission in December. said the 56th began running lines and installing desk solely off the microwave link and the office telephones. phones."

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OropiciviPes Oct. 21, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI John Hall (U.S. Navy) Sister act Reverend Mother, played by Diana Luz Parada, and Sister Hubert, played by Laura Adame, mistake a bottle of saki for water during Ancon Theater Guild's production of Nunsense .For story and photos, see Page B3. Youths in the community are inThe U.S. Southern Command *Movies, Page B8 vited to let the Tropic Times know commander in chief buys the first *TV, Page B9 what's going on. boxes of Girl Scout cookies. *Potpourri, Page B12

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B2Tropic Tims Youth news B2Oct. 21, 1994Yo t Youths ..Albrook/Howard Competitive swim team tryouts, 10 am. Nov. in 12 at Howard and Albrook Pools for youts 8-18 years old. Call Lisa Nofi, 284-3569, or Rose Coville, C~muni236-2035, for more irformittion. *Youth centers 286-3195/2844700: offers variety of Preteen Costume Dance, 7:30-10:30 p.m. today at the Howard Youth Center, $2.50 entrance fee. fun and exCiting Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday evenings. Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for memaCivities for bers and $35 for non-members. Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturdays. young people. d Spanish lessons 4 and 5 p.m. Tuesdays and ThursYouths from throughout Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesdays. Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four days a the community are out and week. Special preschooler class Saturdays. about enjoying the many Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available for ages four to adult. fall aCtivities. *Just for teens: Scholastics, extracurricuFree self defense demonstration for girls 5 p.m. Saturday, Albrook. Iar activities, sports and MV/AIDS awareness, 4-5 p.m. Thursday, Almore -there are numerous brook. Deadline for registration is Monday. Call 2845650 to register. Permission slips required. events available to those 4Falltime party 8:30-11:30 p.m. Oct. 28. Wear orinterested enough to go out ange and black and get in for half price. The 'Anthill and find them. Posse' will be playing in the Albrook Club ballroom. on thue tochecTrasportation provided from Howard Youth Center. Continue to check the Tropic Times weekly for Clayton upcoming events specific to *Youth Center 287-6451: the y people in our Young Americans Bowling Association leagues for ages 6-18 will begin Oct. 29 at the Fort Clayton community. countyy) Bowling Center. Dues will be $4 per week and inToday, we feature Los Rios Elementary School students, under the direction of eludes bowling, shoe rental, a trophy for each child s teacher Vilma Royo, recently celebrated Hispanic Heritage and a party upon completing the league. special activities at the Month with a school-wide celebration of dancing, colorful Pool tournament, today. Department of costumes and an exploration of fascinating information about Community services, Saturday. Bring a can of Defense Dependents the foods and customs of Latin America. Shown here (from left) Video games tournament 3:30-5:30 p.m. Schools-Panama. are Genoyce Walton, Geneva Almengor, Stephanie Chase, Wednesday. Colleen Corrigan, Roger Gundin and Andrew Bacot. Not So Scary Halloween is a happy Halloween The Tropic activity for toddlers to 10 years old. It will be held 4limes is always 7 p.m. Oct. 31. A $1 fee includes game prizes, candy and a lot of fun. looking for Halloween costume dance Oct. 29. Pre-teens 6-9 events and p.m. andjuniorteens 8-1 1p.m. Fee is $2. activities inHalloween party Oct. 31. Junior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. Tuesvolving the days and Thursdays Building 155. youths in the Youth Services is looking for piano and gymnast Iftics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at 287community. If 3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton. you have pho*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: Smithsonian marine environmental educationtos or articles al program, 8:30 a.m. Saturday. Free. you would like Halloween Senior Teen Dance, Saturday. Spooktacular movie lock-in 8 p.m.-8 a.m. Oct. to see printed 28. All night horror movies. on the youth Teen art exhibit all day Oct. 29. page, call Sgt. Earl Ockenga, a math professor at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Poporn and movie undays. Cass Purdum at Falls, visited Curundu Junior High School recently. He gave demonstration pChild Development Services 287-330 1: lessons in several math classrooms and held a graphing calculator workshop gram, Building 156 Fort Clayton, in e afternoon 285-4666/6612. for the math department. session from 1-3 p.m. Preschoolers must be 3 years old and toddlers must be 2 years old by Oct. 31. For information, call 287-5507/5104. Atlantic +Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: Not so fright day movies, 3 p.m. Saturday. Hand puppet show, 2 p.m. Saturday. Shotokan Karate, 4-5 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, $20 per person. volunteers are needed to help with the haunted house. The haunted house will be open 6-10 p.m. Oct. 28-30. Halloween costume contest 5 p.m. Oct. 29. Arts and crafts, 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Rodman There will be ghoulish fun for kids 5-7 p.m. Oct. 28 at a Halloween bash in the Laguna Lounge, Rodman NS. Festivities include apple bobbing, a pinata andgf.ightful" games. Prizes will be awarded for the Sgtl Lori Davis (Tropic Ti-e) best costumes. Curundu Cougar cheerleaders root for yet another victory. The Cougars downed the Kiwanis Kolts 35-7 Oct. 13, maintaining their spot as the only undefeated team in local high school football.

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Tropic Times Entetainment Oct 21 49B3 Sisters Amnesia, Robert Anne and Mary Leo perform a mime. he local theater season got off to become the biggest little sister act in to a sidesplitting start with the Tennessee. Sister Mary Leo, the novice Ancon Theater Guild's played by Maureen Sampson, wants to production of Nunsense I1 Oct. 14. become the first sister prima ballerina. Nonsense // is the continuing saga of Leo is not allowed to wear her tutu, so the Little Sisters of Hoboken. In the she praises the Lord through rollerskating original Nunsense, the nuns had to raise rather than dance. money to bury 42 of their sisters who The script and music, written by Dan were accidentally poisoned by the Goggin, is full of puns and innuendos convent cook, Sister Julia Child of God. that kept the opening night audience In the sequel, the nuins are putting on rolling with laughter. The audience a benefit to thank the community for participates in the show and even plays their support. The small but mighty cast bingo. consists of five singing, dancing nuns Nunsense 11, directed by DL Sima who try to catch the eye of a talent scout with musical direction by Aurora they believe is in the audience. Brandaris and choreography by Ana Diana Luz Parada portrays Reverend Linares, will run 8 p.m. Thursday through Mother. Rev was once a circus performer Saturday until Nov. 5 at the Ancon and enjoys her time in the spotlight. Theater. According to producer Gale Second in command is Sister Hubert, Cellucci and stage manager Anita Kerat, played by Laura Adame. Hubie is most of the performances are close to Mistress of the Novices and the selfbeing sold out, so anyone interested in proclaimed brains behind the whole witnessing the holy spectacle should operation. Sister Robert Anne, played by make reservations soon by calling 252Heather Bro-Moroschak, works with the 6786. troubled youths of the parish and fancies Many opening night spectators said herself as quite the performer. Robbie is the Guild's production of Nunsense 11 is the Reverend Mother's understudy, but one of the most entertaining shows yeans for her own shot at stardom. they've ever seen. Sister Mary Paul, known affectionately "I don't go to many plays, but this one as Sister Amnesia, is played by Melanie was great," said audience member Sgt. Marcec. Amnesia has recently regained Leo Medina. "Those nuns were really her memory and is heading to Nashville funny. I laughed my #*!*# off." Sister Amnesia sings a country nun song with the help of her puppet, Sister Mary Annette. Photos by John Hall Reverend Mother (left) is not amused by Robert Anne's habit humor. The sisters end the first act with a hat and cane song.

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B4 Tropic Times Focus on Panama Martha K. Taylor (Courtesy) Martha K Tayor (courtesy) Martha K. Taylor (courtesy) Geltin'around Travel in Panama isn't like what it is *Busses go anywhere and everyin many places, like Germany with its where and are not expensive if you're not high-speed autobahns. Or the United in a hurry. States, with its system of interstate *lf you want to drive yourself, stay on highways. But for the initiated, there main roads or buy a truck. Horses are a are many ways, and the family good bet for visiting really out-of-the-way passenger sedan may not be the best. places. Canoes and small boats are a Here's some tips: good way to explore the Chagres and +Panama has several domestic other rivers. airlines that will take you just about *Your military recreation and travel anyplace. They fly out of Patilla agencies can provide helpful insight and ii. airport, rather than Tocumen. travel advice. Pay them a visit. "Sampson (ropi masi Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor (Tropic Timas) Martha K. Taylor (courtesy)

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~#XommIupiy nesTropic Times news Oct. 21, 1994 _B CCommunity aewsvitiBs Clayton The Toastmaster International meeting will be held 5 p.m. Nov. 2 at the PCC Training Center. For information, call 287-5689. U.S. Army South Public Affairs is coordinating the 1994 Joint Task Force-Panama Christmas Sponsorship Program. Units or community groups wanting to participate this year should call USARSO PAO at 287-3007/4109. The Protestant Women of the Chapel Bible studies will be held Thursdays in Building 156, Fort Clayton. The sessions will be 9-11 a.m. Child care for infants is available and Bible activity classes for pre-schoolers will be provided. For information, call Diane Anderson at 285-4878. Howard/Albrook The Family Advocacy Outreach Program and Howard AFB Child Development Center is sponsoring a "Stress-free Holiday Shopping" event. Free child care will be available at Howard CDC for parents who wantto shop without the stress oftaking their children. The service is available 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Nov. 1 and 15. Parents should register children with the center at least one week prior to the day they want to use the service. This is open to Air Force personnel only. Call 284-3711/6135 to register. Family Advocacy is offering classes to teach spouses how to deal with the stress involved in being part oftoday's fast paced environment. Classes will be held at the Howard Family Support Center conference room, Building 707 Howard AFB 8:309:30 p.m. Tuesday. Call in advance for child care. Call Laila Yeager at 284-5010 to sign-up. First cookies in eight years Sgt. Cass Purdum (roplcrTmes) The Howard Child Development Center is looking for potential Family Day Care Providers for Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, U.S. Southern Command Commander in Chief, buys the first boxes of Girl the AlbrookArea. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 Scout cookies from (left to right) Jessica Ingraham, Angela Brumbaugh, Girl Scout leader, and for more information. Jennifer Brumbaugh. This year, Girl Scout cookies will be sold in Panama for the first time in eight The family services section of the Family years. The sale of 13,800 boxes of cookies begins Nov. 19. Support Center needs volunteers to help with the loan closet, base brochure library and the coupon cabinet. Family services is open from 7:30 a.m. to "C o untry U weekdays, and flexible hours are avail"Cou tryUSA"com ng t Pa ama able. Limited child care is free for volunteers. Anyone who is interested, call 284-5860. FORT CLAYTON (SCN) -Southern Command Neton Diamond FM from 9-11 a.m. weekdays. These prowork officials recently announced that SCN-AM Radio grams are being canceled by the Armed Forces Radio and will provide listeners with a live country music radio Television Service in Los Angeles when all military netM iscellaneous program via satellite from the United States. works worldwide receive the new country music network. An adoption orientation briefing will be held "Country USA" will be broadcast on SCN-AM Radio American Country Countdown with Bob Kingsley 1:30-3 p.m. Wednesday at the Gorgas Army Comweek nights from 7 p.m. until 5 a.m. and 24 hours a day on remains on Diamond FM in its current Sunday noon time munity Hospital, Headquarters Conference Room, weekends and holidays starting Oct. 31. slot while a sporting event is broadcast on SCN-AM Radio, first floor. Any interested adoptive parents may The recently compiled SCN Survey showed country SCN-AM continues broadcasting major sporting events as attend. To register, call 282-5139/5404. music as the second most popular radio music format. SCN they occur. SCN installed a new satellite receiving system The Howard/Albrook Officers Spouses Club officials said this matches survey results of the radio for "Country USA" and other programs earlier this year. has an immediate opening for a part-time acindustry in the United States. SCN-AM radio is heard on 790 Khz in the Pacific area countant to keep the books at the OSC Thrift Shop, Simultaneously, SCN will say good-bye to The Gene and on 1420 Khz in the Atlantic Community. See Page B12 located in Building 809 at Albrook. Anyone who is Price Show and The Harry Newman Showthat is broadcast for the new AM schedule. interested in the position should call the Family Support Center at 284-5010. National Consumers Week facts, activities TheEnlistedSpousesClub-Panamatakespride in serving the community. The club meets 7 p.m. the FORT CLAYTON (ACS) -NaSuch ratings shall be disclosed to the ACS has planned the following first Monday of the month at the Fort Clayton tional Consumers Week has become publicforexaminationsbeginning July activities to further enhance the imNoncommissioned Officers Club. For information, an established annual tradition for state 1, 1990. The act also requires regulaportance of this week: call Barb Johnson at 284-4523 or Amy Gross at287and local consumer offices, businesstory agencies to consider an institu*Monday-Oct. 29-Corozal Com3071. es, government agencies, voluntary tion's record of helping to meet commissary, local and stateside vendors The Officers and Civilians Wives Club-Paciforganizations and individual consummunity credit needs when evaluating will display their products and give ic Pumpkin Patch Christmas Bazaar will be held ers. The last week of October is annucertain corporate applications, such as away samples. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday at Club Amador. More than ally dedicated to the ongoing need to permission to establish a branch, to *Monday-Wednesday -There 100 vendors will be showing goods of all nature, educate and inform consumers about relocate a branch or home office, or to will be daily drawings at ACS, BuildThe Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses Club their rights and responsibilities in the merge. ing 155, Fort Clayton, for prizes. The is sponsoring its annual bazaar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. marketplace. *The Fair Credit Reporting Act drop boxes are located at ACS. 29 at the Howard Enlisted Members Club. For Army Community Service will be establishes procedures for correcting *Tuesday-Oct. 28 -U.S. Southinformation, call 284-6874. presenting a series of briefs to enhance mistakes on a person's credit record ern Command Health Promotion proThe Enlisted Spouses Club-Panama will hold the importance of this week to achieve and requires that a consumer's record grams will be doing cholesterol testits annual membership drive featuring a presentathis goal. This year National Consumonly be provided for legitimate busiing I I a.m. to 3 p.m. tion ofthe whimsical "Basic Black Dress" Thursday ers Week will be observed Sunday ness needs. It also requires that the *Thursday -A drawing will be at the Fort Clayton NCO Club. Hors d'oeuvers and through Oct. 29. For information, call record be kept confidential. A credit held at the Corozal Commissary to membership table will begin at 6 p.m. and a presenACS at 287-6322. record may be retained seven years for give away three carts with assorted tation at 7 p.m. For information, call 2844523 or *TheCommunityReinvestmentAct judgments, liens, suits and other adproducts. Two carts will be given to 284-4592. requires federal agencies to encourage verse information except for bankCorozal patrons and one to Howard depositoryfinancial institutions to help ruptcies, which may be retained 10 patrons. They carts will be presented A a meet the credit needs of their commuyears. If a consumer has been denied to the winners Oct. 28. tlantic nities, including lowand moderatecredit, a cost-free credit report may be *Sunday-Oct. 29 -The Fort ClayThe Army Community Service Relocation income neighborhoods. The regulatorequested within 30 days of denial. ton Library, Building 128, will host a Assistance Office helps in the search for housing, ry agencies assess the institutions' *The Fair Housing Act prohibits display concerning consumer rights employment and educational possibilities for serrecords of meeting those credit needs discrimination on the basis of race, and responsibilities. vicemembers and their family members. Call 289by preparing a written evaluation of color, sex, religion, handicap, familial *Educational activities among the 4021/4636 for more information. the institutions and assigning a rating status or national origin in the financDepartment of the Defense Depenwith facts supporting the conclusions. ing, sale or rental of housing. dents Schools will be conducted.

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1 6 Tropic TimesN B 6 21,1994 E MaFM// W/ M / El Valle shopping 6:30 a.m.-4:30 *Outdoor Recreation Center: R od man San Jose and Galera abord the 42 Vargas. p'.Ot 0 13 hr sCnaoaIsland transit serT and I $2201 fe includes captain, gear and hait. p.m. Oct. 30, $13. There is ContadoraIsadtniter *Information, Tour and Travel: San Bias Islands scuba safari, Nov. Colonial Panama & ruins tour 9 vice Friday through Monday. Fees are $35 Panama City tour 9 a.m. Saturday, 3 $l4o/personincludesroundtripground a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, $6. adults and $20 children 12 and under round $8. Visit the Golden Altar, the French transport to Portobelo, transport to San Rio Mar Beach trip 7 am.p.m. trip, $25 adults and $15 children one way. Plaza and more. Blas Islands,guide,lunch.and scubagear. Sunday, $12. Ecotourism trip to Barro Colorado IsTrolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. SaturPortabelo jungle tour, Nov. 4, $61/ Panama museums tour 9 a.m.-3 p.m. land 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 29, $35 fee. Wear day, $48/person. Fish for marlin, sailfish, person roundtrip transportation, guided Wednesday, $5. Bring money for enloose clothing, long pants, hiking shoes or dolphin (fish), bonita, Spanish mackerel hike of local rainforest, meals. trance fee and lunch. sneakers, raincoats, and a hat. Bring insect and more. Fee includes captain, gear, lures Portabelo, Nov. 5, $70/person in*Outdoor adventures: repellant, drinking water, manila tape, and and iced coolers. eludes roundtrip transport, historic tours Peacock bass fishing in Lake Gatun a dry towel. Register by Monday. El Valle 7 a.m. Sunday and Nov. 13, by boat, trip to island beaches, lunch and 5 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 29, $25. Bring fishing Partial transits of the Panama Canal $12. Shop for local handicrafts, plants, guide. gear and bags. 7:30-1 1:30 a.m. Saturdays, $35 adults, $15 fruits and vegetables and visit nature preChiriqui River rafting, Nov. 5-6, Drake's Island 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, children 12 years old and younger. A miniserve. $150 fee includes roundtrip transporta$22 snorkelers, $47 scuba. mum of 20 people is needed for a partial Free Zone shopping trip 7 a.m. tion, meals, lodging, rafting and river Gold Panning in Bique, 8 a.m.3 transit any other day of the week. Wednesday and Nov. 9, $12. guides. p.m. Oct. 25. $12. Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel opDowntown Shopping Trip, 9 a.m. San Andres Island, Colombia, Nov. Bocas Del Toro weekend trip, Nov. portunity to Montego Bay any Sunday Thursday and Nov. 10, $8. Shop Pana11-14, $286 person includes roundtrip I l-13,$280divers,$260snorkelers,$142 through Wednesday. Packet includes airma's Central Avenue and Via Espana. airfare, 3 nights lodging at the Caribe children under 12 based on double occufare, three nights hotel accommodations, Moonlight cruise 6:30 p.m. Oct. 29, hotel, tours, and most meals. pancy. Trip includes transportation to airand transfer. Prices vary from $3(X)-$6(X) $21. Cruise out to Taboga Island for cockContadora, Nov. 25-27, $179/person port, airfare, lodging, meals, live dives, depending on the hotel. tails and hors d'oeuvres by moonlight, double occupancy, $219/person single entertainment, airtanks and weights. Perwhile viewing Panama City's dramatic occupancy, $135/kids 2-11, includes sonal equipment and gratuities not inBalboa skyline at night. transportation, 2 nights lodging, all meals eluded. Sign-up in advance. *Balboa Dive Club: Bottom-fishing on the Vargas, Oct. and drinks, and use of all resort facilities. Clayton The club is accepting new members. 30, $35 adults, $20 children under 14. Albrook/Howad Divers must show a certification card to Catch snapper, grouper and other bottom +Valent Recreation Center: join. Annual fee is $12. Members receive a feeding fish. Fee includes captain, gear, *Zodiac Community Activities CenPacific beaches 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturnewsletter,use ofthe clubtanks,library and live bait and iced coolers. .terL day. videos for loan, information and classes Two-day deep seas fishing trip, Nov. Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. FriAdventures in nature jungle walk 8 and dive trips.Call 263-8077 or 260-0075 5-6. Fish the fertile waters of Isla del Rey, days, $13. a.m.-l p.m. Oct. 29. or write Unit 0967, APO AA 34(X)2. Open water scuba class meets first and third A r / rMonday of each month, $1 25. Includes five pool *Zodiac Community Activities Center: sessions, five theory sessions and four open water Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturdays at Albrook dives. Youth Center, 286-3195. Long set equipment rental $19 per day. Spanish lessons 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Thurs*Valent Recreation Center: days at Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. Private piano and guitar lessons available Martial arts classes at Howard and Albrook weekday evenings. Youth Centers, 284-47(X). Korean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays and ThursTae Kwon Do karate classes at Zodiac Cendays. ter for children and adults. Rodman Beginnerand advanced dogobedienceclass*Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation Ofes, $32 for 4 weeks. flee: Beginner and advanced English and SpanThe Navy MWR is seeking qualified instrucish classes offered monthly. tors to teach Spanish and French language *Howard and Albrook pools courses. Applicants should have prior experiIntro to scuba, free, call for appointment. ence in teaching elementary and conversational Open water scuba class Saturday at Howard language courses. Call 283-4301. at Albrook, $145. Advanced scuba Wednesday at Howard. C run Water aerobics for advanced adult swim*Twin Oceans Pro Shop: mers at Howard and Albrook. Equipment available for scuba. snorkel, tennis, camping and other outdoor recreation. Amador *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: *Amador Pool: The following classes are ongoing; Water aerobics starting Nov. 2, 5-6 p.m. Jazz I, 5-6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, Wednesdays, 9-10 a.m. Saturdays, $16 for eight $32. sessions. Jazz II, 6-7 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays All swim classes are cancelled until Decem$32. her. Voice. 3-5:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays. (coui.y Clayton Guitar, 3-6 p.m. Tuesdays. Rock star *Fort Clayton Pool: Folkloric dance, 5-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Fri Carlos Royo headlines the cast of Bye, Bye Birdie as All swimming classes will be discontinued days. Carrod rdie he'li s reckst o n B ee idie Th until December because of inclement weather. Salsa and Merengue, 7-8 p.m. Mondays. Conrad Birdie, the 50's rock star and teen Idol. The *Fort Clayton BoatSeuba Shop: Classes are available for dance and music. musical production opens 8 p.m. tonight at the Pacific Theatre Arts Center. Tickets are $10, call 286-3814 for' reservations. The show runs through Nov. 12. Halloween bash Pumpkin prize Stylin' Back in the saddle + Rodman Club: # 24th Wing Services Sports and Rec+ Zodiac Community Activities Cen* Howard Riding Stables: There will be a Halloween bash 7-11 reation Rental Center: ter: The Howard Riding Stables is sponsorp.m. Oct. 28 in the Laguna Lounge. A DJ Turn in the top half of a reciept for any The Zodiac Community Activity Cening Harvest Festival pony rides, 9 a.m.will spin tunes for the "monster mash." itemsrented from the 24thServicesSports ter will present a hair and clothing show I p.m. Nov. 5 at the stables. There is a $1 Prizes will be given for best the costume, and Recreation Rental Centerin the month 6-11 p.m. Nov. 12 featuring fashions and fee for the pony rides. There will be a complimentary hors d'oeuvres will be of October and you could be the winner local stylists. Door prizes will be awardbaked goods sale and drinks available at served. Come out and show your scary a candy filled pumpkin in a drawing ed. There is a $5 fee. For information call the stables. Come dressed as a cowpoke or side. Oct. 31. 284-6161. in any Halloween costume.

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Tropic Times tiCes Oct II 1994 B7 s Phone guide Pacific 24th Services Squadron Sports and Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107 Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613 Albrook Club, 286-4128 Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333 Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989. Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-(X)75 Canal Cralters 286-4500 Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957 Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 4 t Clayton NCO Club, 297-3586 449 Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 Get your motor running ClbAmnador,82-5347 Directorate of Community Activities staff members use an automotive engine analyzer to evaluate Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010 a car. The Albrook Auto Skills Center offers various car care classes. Pneumatic air machine Corozal Thrift Shop, 285-5989 operation, 1 p.m. Saturday, $5; oil change instruction, 1-3 p.m., $5; air conditioning service and Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 repair 12:30-5 p.m. daily, except Tuesday and Wednesday; wheel alignment diagnostic and Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 service classes are held 3-9 p.m. Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and HwrOfie,'Cub, 284-368 Sundays. Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361 e T ward Teen Cer, 284-47040 Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 *Fort Clayo Arsad Crafts Christmas card. 10: 15 a.m. Nov. $20 plus supplies Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380 Center: 1, $5, all supplies included. Ongoing classes, stained glass Rodman Annex, 283-5475 The Ceramic Center, Building Cross-stitch demo, angel, 10: 15 framing, air brush, lamp assemblyRda lb,2349 198. is located near the Crafts Shop. a.m. Nov. 1 1, free, bring supplies. otr he hoig rs tth Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 *Canal Crafters: *Howard Skills Development macrame, clay flower,ceramic and Rodman Naval Station Information Tour Canal Crafters is a volunteer Center: 'how to' videos. and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454 organization providing scholarOil paint sale Saturday-SundayThe center is looking for Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 ships for the community. HandTake 25 percent off of Alexander crafters to sell items in the new Valent Recreation Center, 287-65(X) made arts and crafts are availand Liquitex oil paints. consignment boutique. Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-6161 able, consignments and volunteers Book sale Oct. 30-31. 25%k off Instructors are needed to teach are welcome. The shop hours are 10 all Colorpoint books. classes on a contract basis for a Atlantic a.m--2 p.m. Monday through SaturClay flower class, I I a.m.2 variety of crafts, decorative paintAquativity Center, 289-4(X)9 day. The shop is now accepting p.m. Saturdays, $5 plus supplies. ing, calligraphy, watercolors, oil Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201 holiday consignments, Building For all levels. painting. DvsCmuiyCu,2956 80, lboo-Oil painting, 9a.m.-noon. +Fort Sherman Multicraft CenOcean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 Register for the following classWednesday, $30plus supplies. Four tedr:Rcetin 8947 es t heshp:weeks. Woodworking qualification Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313 Cross-stitch demo 10: 15 a.m. Paper Caper Basket, 1-3 p.m. classes Saturdays, free. Class cov2/ Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-61(4 today, free, bring supplies. Wednesday, $5 plus supplies. crs sale and correct use of wood Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3989/33(X) Stencildemo, 10: 15 a.m.ThursStampingClass, 6:30-8:30p.m. shop equipment. Qualification day. Bring stencil and paints. Thursday, $5. cards will be issued after course Perorated paper, cross-stitch, Stained Glass,4-7 p.m. Oct. 29. completion. /X / / *Valent Recreation Conter: ters for the Haunted House Oct 29. Interested people Laser disc movies 7 p.m. Fridays. Effective Nov. I the center will be open 12:30must be age 19 and older. +Zodiac Community Center: 10:30 p.m. Professional family portraits Saturday. By appointSubs on Top offers eat-in, take out service. Subs Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers meets ment only. on Top is open I I a.m.-5 p.m. MondaysFridays, I I the first Thursday of every month. Women's beauty tips through Saturday. a.m.3 p.m. Saturdays. It is in the Zodiac Community The screening room offers free movies. Call the 24Book swapping Tuesday. Activities Center. Take-out, eat-in and delivery servichour movie line, 287-4367 for days and times. +Cocoli Community Center: cs are available. Phone orders to 284-5848, fax to 284Volunteers are needed to perform as horror characVideos for children 4 p.m. Thursdays. 6109. A/// Atlantic tours Rec center news GOcen BreRcreaetionCena.t sdys *Sundial Recreation Center: +Sundial Recreation Center: The center offers the following classes: cooking, Panama City shopping 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Rock, mineral and seashell exhibit, Oct. 29-30. dance, arts and crafts, music, aerobics, first aid, CPR, Isla Grande 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. Mondays. yoga, martial arts, various sports, English, Spanish and El Valle 5:30 a.m. Oct. 30. Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays dog obedience. The center is open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. daily. *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: and Fridays. The center offers, deep sea fishing charters. Call Panama City shopping 8 a.m. Saturday. Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays. 289-6402 for information. Remon Race Track 8 a.m. Oct. 29. Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. People are needed to line handle transiting boats El Valle 5 a.m. Oct. 30. Piano 1():30-11 a.m. Wednesdays. from Cristobal to Balboa. Sign up now. Call for details.

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B8Tropic Times B8 ct. 21, 1994 Movies Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7pm: Clear and 2pm: Clear and 2pm: Angels in the 7pm: Color of Night 7pm: Angels in the 7pm: Wagons East 7pm: Natural Born Present Danger Present Danger Outfield (PG) (R) Bruce Willis, Outfield (PG) (PG-13) Killers (R) 284-3583 (PG-13) (PG-13) Danny Glover, Jane March Danny Glover, John Candy, Woody Harrelson, Harrison Ford, Harrison Ford, Tony Danza 9:15pm: Clear and Tony Danza Richard Lewis Juliette Lewis Willem Dafoe Willem Dafoe 7pm: Clear and Present Danger 9pm: Clear and 9pm: Natural Born 9:15pm: Wagons 9:45pm: Color of 7pm: Clear and Present Danger (PG-13) PresentDanger Killers (R) East (PG-13) Night (R) Present Danger (PG-13) Harrison Ford, (PG-13) Woody Harrelson, John Candy, Bruce Willis, (PG-13) Harrison Ford, Willem Dafoe Harrison Ford, Juliette Lewis Richard Lewis Jane March 9:45pm: Speed (R) Willem Dafoe Willem Dafoe Keanu Reeves, 9:30pm: Color of Dennis Hopper Night (R) Bruce (Reduced Admission) Willis, Jane March Fort Clayton 7pm: Andre (PG) 2pn: Andre (PG) 2pm: The Mask 7pm: The Mask 7pm: In the Army 6:30pm: Clear and 6:30pm: Speed (R) Keith Carradine, Keith Carradine, (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (PG-13) Now (PG) Present Danger Keanu Reeves, 287-3279 TinaMajorino TinaMajorino RichardJeni Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore, (PG-13) Dennis Hopper 9pm: The Mask 7pm: The Mask 7pm: The Mask Richard Jeni Lori Petty Harrison Ford, 9:30pm: Clear and (PG-13) (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (PG 13) 9:30pm: In the Army 9pm: The Mask Willem Dafoe Present Danger Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni Now (PG) (PG-13) 9:30pm: Color of (PG-13) Richard Jeni 9:30pm: The Mask 9:30pm: In the Army Pauly Shore, Jim Carrey, Night (R) Harrison Ford, (PG-13) Now (PG)Pauly Shore, Lori Petty Richard Jeni Bruce Willis, Willem Dafoe Lori Petty Jane March Fort Davis 7pm: It Could 2pm: True Lies 7pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could Happen 7pm: True Lies 7pm: The Mask 7pm: In the Army F957 Happen to You (PG) (R) Arnold (R) Arnold to You (PG) (R) Arnold (PG-13) Now (PG) 289-5173 Nicolas Cage, Schwarzenegger, Schwarzenegger, Nicholas Cage, Schwarzenegger, Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore, Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis Richard Jeni Lori Petty 9:30pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could Happen (R) Arnold to You (PG) Nicholas Schwarzenegger, Cage, Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis 9:30pm: True Lies (R) Fort Sherman 7pm: Wolf (R) 7pm: Blown Away (R) 7pm: It Could happen No show No show No show 7pm: The Mask Jack Nicholson, Jeff Bridges, to You (PG) (PG 13) 289-5173 Michelle Pfeiffer Tommy Lee Jones Nicholas Cage, Jim Carrey, Bridget Fonda Richard Jeni Fort Anador 7pm: In the Army 7pm: Color of Night 7:30pm: Black Beauty No show No show No show 7pm: The Little (PG) Pauly Shore, (R) (G) David Thewlis, Rascals (PG) 284-3583 Lori Petty Bruce Willis, Sean Bean Travis Tedford, Jane March Bug Hall The Mask matic woman named Rose, and the inOct. 28 investigation into the brutal stabbing murNoodimCarsi pw ie i MX AKS AS "REYO TLKN der of a friend and colleague. R (sexuHoward AFB Carrey. An ordinary, mild-mannered ABSOLUTRY TO ME." ality, violence, language) 2 hrs. 7pm The Little Rascals bank clerk is transformed into the weird"TH SUMER'S 7pm TheLitle ascls est super hero of all time when he dons "11R11 D A umwlsl MOV10" The Little R ascals (PG) Travis Tedford, his mask. PG-13 (some stylized vioY Travis Tedford, Bug Hall Bug Hall lence) I hr, 40 mi. Steven Spielberg produces an appeal9pm Natural Born 01 bas!, ing update of the Hat Roach comedy Killers (R) series from the '20s, '30s and '40s. The Woody Harrelson, Keith Carradine, Tina Majorino hoevrtgang has established a boy's only club; Juliette Lewis An amazing true story of the seal that FROMfZETOKER alls for Darla. PG (language) 82 min. became a living legend. An adorable f D G g newborn seal is orphaned after his mothBlack Beauty er is caught in a fisherman's net. The pup .B Fort Clayton is nursed back to health by the animal David Thewlis, Sean Bean loving Whitney family, who name him A heartwarming drama based on the 7pm Clear and Present Andre. PG (teen mischief mild violence, family classic novel by Anna Sewell Danger (PG-13) language) I hr, 34 min. tells the story of a time in history when Harrison Ford, 111M horses were essential to men's lives. G, Harrion Frd,, 99 min. Willem Dafoe In the Army Now 9:45pm Color of Night (R) Pauly Shore, Lori Petty Showing at the Clayton and Davis theaters. Natural Born Killers Bruce Willis, Pauly Shore is not the ideal troop. In fact, forms of counter intelligence, Harry is an Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis Jane March he joined the Army Reserves for the international spy who has kept his real This is a saga of Mickey and Mallory bennies and the regular salary. Reality profession secret from his wife. R (acKnox, two thrill-killers who truly enjoy kicks in when he becomes a part of a tion, violence, language) 2 hr, 42 min. their work. They live in a interesting mission involving actual combat. PG zone. Pillowtalk and ultra-violence. Fort Davis (some war action, mild language) I hr, Clear & Present Danger Insantiy and comedy. Demons and he7pm Andre (PG) 31 mi. Harrison Ford, Willem Dafoe roes. Murder and mirth set to music. R In this tiew movie adaptation of Tom (violence, shocking images, language, Keith Carradine, It Could Happen Clancy's novels, Harrison Ford as Jack sex) 2 hrs. Tina Majorino to You Ryan finds himself once again drawn 9pm The Mask (PG-13) Nicholas Cage, Bridget Fonda into global intrigue. This time he's up Speed Jim Carrey, A New York City cop lacking change against a Colombian drug cartel. Also Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper Richard Jeni tips a waitress with a promise to split the features Ann Archer and James Earl LAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played winnings from his lottery ticket if he Jones. PG-13 (action, violence, language) by Kcanu Reeves, is known as a man wins. When he wins and wants to make 2 hrs, 22 min. with an attitude caused by Dennis HopFort Sherman good on the promise, it will be over per, a sociopath who nearly killed him strongoppositionfromhiswife.PG(mild Color of Night in an earlier encounter. R (violence. 7pm True Lies (R) Arnold language, scene of cop action) I hr, 41 Bruce Willis, Jane Marchhr, 5 m. .S'hBrcezWenesgJre Mmr. Schwarzenegger, min. Haunted by the bizarre suicide of a paTommy Lee Curtis tient, New York psychologist Dr. Bill Wagons East True Lies Capa (Bruce Willis) abandons his sucJohn Candy, Richard Lewis Arnold Schwarzenegger, cessful practice and relocates to Los Phil Taylor (Lewis) a frontiersman ralFort Amador Jamie Lee Curtis Angeles. His encounters there prove as lies discontented neighbors to leave the 7pm Wagons East Harry Tasker is a special agent for Omeshocking as the chilling event he has run West and return East. James Harlow ga Sector, a top secret agency charged away from. He immediately finds him(Candy) is the hard-drinking wagon (PG-13)John Candy, with nuclear terrorism intervention. Fluself entangled in an explosive sexual master hired to lead the convoy East. Richard Lewis ent in six languages and skilled in all relationship with a beautiful, but enigPG-13 (off-color humor) I hr, 47 min.

PAGE 25

Tropic TimesB TV Schedule Oct. 21,1994B C channels 8 & 10 Mature Theme ** Series Begins '**Series Ends + Program time change because of live event *Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 NBC News at Snrise 6:30 Headline News 6.00 CCMTV 5:30 NBC News at Smirise 5:30 NBC News at Sturise 5.30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Good Morning Ateic 700 Nvy/Marine Corps News 6:30 Orceachl of Lose 6:00 Good Morning Amterica 6:00 Good Morning Aerica 6:00 Good Morniog Amerca 6.00 Good Monuig Aterica w/Paunau Nosw (7.25) 7:30 C:anel OneNewsroont 7:00 1'arliatent of Souls 8:00 Basic Training Workout w/Pamra Now (7.25) w/Panata Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25 8:00 Basic Training Workout 800 Guts 7:30 Lifestyle Magazie 8.30 Sesame Street 8.00 Bodyshapiug 8.00 Bosic Trainng Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 just for Kids! 8:00 CBS Sunday Motintg 9:30 Portrut of Aierica 0:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 9:30 Portrait of Aterica Moppets Babes 9:30 This Week w/Brinkley 10 25 GUiding Lightt 9:30 Portrait of Aterica 9:30 lPralt of America 9:30 Potrait of Amuerca 10:25 Guidigti Ligt 'eenage Mutnit Ninja 10:30 Face Otn Nation t .10 Genral llostital 10:25 Giding Light 10:25 Guiding Ligt 10:25 Guiding Light 11:10 Getteral tsp ritles I1 00 Inidc tL120 Headline News 1:10 Geuteral Hospitd I 10 Geieral Hospital I 1:l0 General Hosital 12.00 Headli e Nesws Beak Biker Mice front Mars 12 00 Iladli Nws Stpots Maciie 2.00 Hleadlitie News Break -P00 Headhe News Break 12:00 leadline Nes Break 2,25 Pnania Nott Battan Cantoon 12 30 On Sage 1:01) Atother World 12:25 Panuna Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 iansaa No, 1230 Sporscentet Ctroon Classics 1:0 Msties: 'It'go tir 2:00 Opih Winfrey 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sporiscenter 12:30 SporIsceter 1 00 Atuother World 10:30 Fa 'ic tle Theater Iptpo' 3:00 trice is Rignt 1:00 Another Worl I:00 Atiother World 1:00 Another World 00 Opralt Winfrey 1:00 Spies 230 "' eiCare Bas Movie" 400 Guts 2:00 Sally Jesse Rtphal 2:00 Oprali Winfrey 2:00 Doaliue 300 Price is Right 2 00 1 Headne news 400 Slecial: Ken Bitt's 4:30 I Love LtCy 3:00 Price is Riklt 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 4:00 Think Fast1 [2:30 Mosies: "Witdwalker" "Baseall" Fatily Fetd 4:00 Reading Rauibow 400 Shining Tite Station 4:00 ht lhe Mix 4:30 1 Love Licy 2:30 "Chipunik Advoentre" Iurh innin g "A 5:30 'Ie Cosby Stow 4:30 1 Love Lticy 4:30 1 Love Lticy 4:30 I Love Lucy 5:00 lattily Fetid 4:00 Special: Ket Bro's Nattonal tIrlooim" 6.00 SCN Eveting ReptoB 5:00 Fily Fend 5:00 Faily Feud 5:00 Faily Fetd 5:30 Ite Cosby Sih Baseball' 600 t1ario Ait 6:l5 Headline News Break 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cusby Slow 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:00 SCN Evening Rcpoe Irlst Itintg "Die Game' 630 Dr.Qutiu Medicirn 6:30 World News Tonight 6:00 SCN Eveing Rcpoi 6:00 SCN Evening Repor 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline Nes Break 6:00 Special: Ke Burn's WoIan 700 Jeopardy 6:15 Ieadline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headlite Nets Break 6:30 World Nets loilt "Baseball" 7:30 Mini series: "The Eturin 7,25 Pattanoa Nuts 6:30 World News Totigt 6:30 World News T oight 6:30 World News otiogi 7.00 Jeopardy Scond Itung to Lotesoite Dove" 7:30 Entitaiunent Toinght 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 jeopardy 7:00 Jeopardy 7:25 Panata Now 'Something Like a War" (Part 2 of4) 800 Mad Ahot You 7:25 Panamia Now, 7:25 Paama Now 7:25 Pantama Now 7:30 Entertaiment Tonight 8:00 Rescue 911 + 9:00 ABC 20/20 8:30 Cops 7:30 Entertaimeen Toiight 7:30 Entertainnent Toitight 7:30 Etlertaiineit Toiight 8:00 America's Fuinest 8:00 Walker. Texas Ranger 10:00 Top Cops 900 60 Mmitrtes 8:00 L.A. Law 8:00 Fresh Pritce of Bel-Air 8:00 ALF People 900 Special: Ken Burt's 11:00 Miaii Vice 1000 SCN Late Edition 9:00 Northern Exposure 8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 8:30 Totched by an Angel 8:30 Esening Shade Baseball" 12:00 Movies: "Clitld in the 10:05 Cheers 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 Culture Clash 9:30 Love and War 9:00 fi the Heat of the Night Third inning "The Night" 10:30 David Lettermua 10:05 Cheers 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Editi., Faith of 50 Milion" 1:40 "Long Road homi" I1 30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Letlenan 10:05 Cheers 10:05 Cheers 10:05 Cheers 11:00 Saturday Night Live 3:15 "The Jackie Presser 12:30 M*A*S*H 11:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Letteriatan 10:30 David Lettenman 10:30 David Lettertan 12:30 WWF Stperstars of Story" 1:00 Movies:''Excalibur" 12:30 M*A*S*H 11:30 Tonight Shot 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show Wrestling 5:00 Headline News 3:00 "The Road Warnor" 1:00 Movies: "No Man's 12:30 M*A*S*H 12:30 M*A*S1i 12:30 Ret and Stimpy 1:30 Friday Night Videos 4:40 NBC News at Sunrise Land" 1:00 Movies: "Anatomy of a 1:00 Movies: "the Searchers" 1:00 Movies: "Around the 2:30 Movies: "The Ainnyville 3:00 "3:10 10 Ynua" Murder" 3:00 "Rachel, Rcihel" World in 80 Days" forror" 5:00 Headlite News Break 3:40 "The Littlest Vintims" 5:00 Headline News Break 3:30 "Broadway Dainty 4:20 "Cotrack" Rose" 4:55 "The Flamingo Kid" C abl chau mature Theme Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event uProgram moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 Sniuls 1w/CIt. 8 & 10 6:30 Situlcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:00 Waslington Week i, 4:30 Siulcast w/Ct. 8 & 10 5:30 Sittcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:30 Simtlcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:30 Young Adult Theater Review 8.00 Oprah Witfrey 8:00 Donaue 8.00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sany Jesse Raphael 9:00 Today 'A Matter of Conscieice" 6:30 Shining Tittte Stuatiot 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9.00 Today 11:00 Star 'rek ''All that Glitters" 7:00 'Die Siite Factory* 1:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star T0 Slr Trek l :00 Star Trek 12:00 Headline News Bre 'Disttey's Coyote Tales" 7.25 Goof Troop 12:00 ileadline News. Break 12:00 Headlote News Break 12:00 Headline News' Brak 12:00 Feadlitne News Break 12:25 Panama Now 11:35 ChanIel Ome/Newsroom 7.50 M ppet Bahies 12:30 All My Children 12:25 Panana Notw 12:25 Panma Now 12:25 Panana Now 12:30 Au My Children 12:05 Silver Spoon 8:20 Disney's 'Fhe Little 1:30 One Life to Live 12:30 All My Clildremt 12:30 All My Children 12:30 Au My Chindrem 1:30 Ottn Life to Live 12:30 Movies: "Return to Snowy Mentaid 2:30 Yotng and ie Restless 1:30 Due Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 2:30 Yonug and te Restless River" 8:30 Bobby's World '3:30 Batnan 2:30 Yo-ng and tte Restless 2:30 Yotng mid dte Restless 2:30 Y oLung mtd ithe Restless 3:30 Teenage Motatt Nija 2:10 "Hloitse Party" 9:00 Teettage Mitant Nina 4:00 Frggle Rock 3:30 Bobby's World 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Muppet Bahtes 4:00 Fragle Rok 4:00 21 Jtuip Street TtIles 4:30 Te Adetttures of Pete 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 400 Fagle Rock 4:30 Reading Raibow 5:00 Sports Specials 9:30 Movie. "Joe Pathcr" & Fete 4.30 Think Fast *** 4.30 Gits 4 30 Nick Arcade 5:00 Rerd!v Rpons, 6:00 Movie: "Seauiest DSV" 11:30 Fis Old Hors 5,00 in the Mix 5:00 Disney's Rats Toonage 5:00 Beaktmn's World 5:00 Fact of Life 5:30 Sltowe Today 8.00 Star Trek: Deep Space 12:00 NFL Football: CIcago 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Shiowbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Shrowbiz Today 6:30 SCN Eeing Ne s Nine Demo vs. Dctroit Lions 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Eveniig Repot 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6: Headline News Break 9:00 Me and the Boys 3:00 NFL Football Dallas 6 15 Headline News Break 6:15 deadline News Break 6:15 Headlnte News Break 6:15 Ilealie News Break 6.30 CBS Eetnig Nest (New Fall Seres) Cowboys vs' Arieota 6:30 CBS Evening Ness 6:30 CBS Eveinig Ness 6:30 CBS Evening Neos 6:30 CBS Evening News 7:00 Star Trk: Deep Spice 9:30 Maried With Clidrein Cardinals 7 00 Star 'trek Deep Space 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Spate 700 St. Trek Deep Spae 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 10:00 Movie: "The Dresser" 6:00 Wonderful World of Nite Nte N. Nine 7:55 Panama Now 12:00 Ioeadlute News Disey + 8:00 Motday Niht Football 7:55 Paamta Now 7:55 ?t-una Now 7 55 Panima Now 8:00 Roseanne 12:30 Setne ad TocuImology 7:00 NFL FoOtball: Dcnver Hoiston Oilers vs. 8:00 lote mprovemntt 8:00 Siabad Show 8:00 oy Meets World 8:30 The Boys arc Back Week Broitos vs Sat Diego Philadelphia Eagles 8:30 My So Called Ltfe 8:30 Family Matters 8.30 John Larroquette (New Tal Series) 1:00 'Die McLatnililt Grotp Chargers 111:00 Headline News (Ne Fall Se:00 Wise Giy 9:00 Dateline 900 P9etttt Lice 1:30 Spors Lateaight 10:00 Btck Jate Nightlioe 9.30 Fraster 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edttin 10:00 SCN Late Edition 2:00 Entertainetnt this week I1:00 Eye to Eye w/C Chng 1200 Cleers 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:05 Tor of Duty 10.05 LA Ltw 10 05 Renegade 3:00 Headine News 12:00 Headline News 2 :30 M4*A*SH 10:05 McKenna (New Fall Scrics) 11:00 Headinie News 11:00 liadline New's 11 00 Headlic Ness 3:30 Sattrday Night Live 12:30 Meet the Pr.s 1:00 Headliae News 11:00 ieadmhie News Break 11:30 Nightline 1 1:30 Nigttline 1130 Ntghtlie 5:00 Videolinks 1:30 Sports Machine 1:30 Sports Latenight 11:30 Nightlite l2:00 Cheers 12.00 Ctcers 1:300 Cheers 5:30 Headline News Break 2:00 Sports Latenight 2:00 David Letternane 12:00 Cheers 1:30 M*A*S1l 12:30 M*A*S*I 1200 M'eAi*ne Nests 2:30 Frugal Gotnct 3:00 Headline News 12:30 M*A'S*H 1:00 Headline News 1:00 lHoadlite News 1 30 Sports Ladliglt 3:00 4eadhie News 3:30 Wheel of Forme 1:00 Itadline N-w 1:30 Sports Latettight 1:30 Sports Latenight 2,00 Davtd Lcatenit 3:30 Wheel of Fotne 4:00 Jeopardy 1:30 Sports Latenight 2:00 David Lettenian 2:00 Daid LetIenai 3 0 Headlnte Ncwa 4:00 Jeotardy 430 Donaahie 2:00 David Lettenn 3:00 1leadfime News 3:00 Iteadlite News 3 30 Military News 3:00 Headline News 330 Whteel of Forte 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 400 Toi & Jcrry Kids 3:30 Wheel of Forttte 4:00 Jeopardy 4:00 Jeopardy 4:30 Tiny Koots Advettes 4:00 Jeopardy 4:30 Sally Jesse Raphael 4:30 Dprah Winfrey 5400 CRO 4:30 Oir, infrey 5.30 Vidcoulnks Cable Channel 14 Sports NFL Football Chicago Bears vs. Detroit Lions, noon Sunday Dallas Cowboys vs. Arizona Cardinals, 3 p.m. Sunday Denver Broncos vs. San Diego Chargers, 7 p.m. Sunday Houston Oilers vs. Philadelphia Eagles, 8 p.m. Monday Series starts "The John Larroquette Show" 8:30 p.m. Thursday John Lan'oquette stars as recovering alcoholic John Hemingway. Fresh into sobriety, John's taken ajob as night shift manager in one of St. Louis's seedier bus depots. It's his last chance at a "normal" life, but being the "guy in charge" of a station full of wise guys, wackos and working girls is enough to drive a person to drink. Channels 8 & 10 "Sest DSV P"''o"'v" Miniseries 6 p.m. Saturday "Return To Lonesome Dove" (Part 2 of 4) The year is 2018 and mankind is closer to utilizing the full bounty of the earth with 8 p.m. Sunday undersea farming and mining communities. These communities, however, are beset Almost losing his life, Woodrow Call desperately seeks help from the Indians on the with rivalries and territorial disputes. With these timeless problems, a huge super Great Plains. In Nebraska, Gus' lost love, Clara, battles to save her children and home submarine, the Seaqtues, seems to be the planet's last, best hope for peace. Stars Roy from a disastrous fire. Scheider and Don Franklin.

PAGE 26

Tropic Times C a sfe B10 Oct 21 1994 Cassiied Ads 1991 Plyouith Sundance, auto, ae, Erg spk umad 1-2 days week, cook, AST 386SX25 w/4mb Ram, 140mhd, bought new at Howard Car Sales, clean, iron, reliable, hard working. various programs installed, printer, D uty-free m erchand i e $8,se -00.286-317 L 260-9421 for Gloria. desk, accessories, $1,000. 284-4989. 993 I da Integra, 4 d, 5 spd, ae, Babysitt,Engspkref, flexiblehurs. fintel DX33 486 CPU chip $200/obo; FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) -As a reminder, sutroof 18K tides, 4 I t fin 263-4620. creative video blasier, like new, does in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern rass, fog lights. $18,000. 283-6425. Mature ard working maid, cleas, video capture, $125. 268-2973. Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, 1992 Dodge Daytona, loaded, like cooks,irons, 1-2daysweek.223-5843. 20MHZ JDR scope, dual chanael, 2 cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to on-privilege holdttew, not liy pd, $10,300. 263-9814. probes and frequency counter f0g e, r gt no p g Bilingual day maid 1-2 days week, 600MHZ, both for $400. 229-1510. ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu1977 Jeep Cherokee 4x4, I,, no, ph, nature, dependable, honest, gd workneeds work, $1,800. 251-8546, er. 287.5928. Console TV in gd toudl, $200; bike, tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes $150. 287-6735. permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. 1984 Chevy Blazer, 2.8L, 5 spd, ps, Bilingual mind, live-in, honest, relixpb, pw, tinted glass, runs grt, new able, grt w/kids, flexible, M-F. 262SC word professor, 3.5 drive, fan/ Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact tires, $4,000. 289-4166. 7278 .modem, rechargable battery, printer anai, $200. 236-0984. the Contraband Control Section for advice at 280-3117. 1983 Ford 4x4 p/n, gd cond, $2,800. Reliable iVe-out maid, some Eng, g 289-4781. w/kids, 2873878 IBM 286, 1m Ram, 130. hd, new in box, $750; IBM PS-2, color monitor, see to believe, sntroof, at/fl, many sale, $6,800. 261-8234. 1988 Ford Brco XLT 4x4, 5.8L, Bilingual housekeeper, reliable, M-F, lots of games and educational softAnextras, $8,500/obo. 284-5370 43K miles, auto, ps, pb, pw, am/fin ref, gd w/kids. 284-3627. ware, $275. 230-0008. 1990 Pontiac Grand Prix, V6, an, cars, exc eond, $12,500. 289-3234. 1988 Toyota Corolla, am/lm cas, dty cruise, ann/f cass, pw, pt, $9,200. Reliable babysitter in my home, anyTeac XIOR reel to reel, exc cond, Shepherd, black, pure, not registered, pd, at, ac, $5,400. 261-6037. 286-6298. 1987 Ford Tempo 4 cyl, 5 spd, am/fin tie, Eng spk only. 286-4294. $300. 286-6343. parents avail, $200. 282-5494. cars, gd mpg, $3,300. 287-4772. 1986 Chrysler Le Baron GTS loaded, 1985 Subaru, 4 dr, 5 spd, stick, US 18 year old babysitter w/exp, work 6"-100 was, 2 Kenwood speakers, Dachshund puppies, 2 nales, 4 Feruns gd, get on gas, $4,000.284-3197. specs, gd coand, diy pd, $3,250. 2561993 Hyundai Excel LS, low miles, nights, weekends. 230-1927. new, $40. 287-5221. malies, $175. 266-7938. 6631. an, 4 sid, neg, dry pit, $5,500, 26 11993 Dodge Dakota LE, 4x4, V8, ex7035 after 6p. .Having trouble communicating in 19" Zenith color TV w/oui remoe Purebred white minature poodle puptra cab, loaded, cruise, camper shell, 1988 300ZX, Nissanturbo, t-tops,digSpanish? Will tutor. 228-2691. $135. 252-5185. pies, $125. 286-4774. alum brush guard, I1K miles, 7 year/ ital, leather, $11,000. 260-3275. 1981 Camaro $2,00/obo; 1979 MonChihahuas-muale, 5yrs old, neutered, 70,000 warranty, $18,900. 268-3085. te Carlo, make an offer. 283-5088. Mature, dependable, trustworthy, biCannon EGS 650 camera, autofocar 1989 Pontiac Grand Ant, cpe, ac, stelingual day maid for Abrook or and manual, flash EZ300, 35-70 macwhite/tan;femaie,4yrsold,fawnt.Mst 1981 Mazda GLC, 4 dr, ac, standard, rca, sun roof, pw, alarm, 4 cyl, 16 1989Nissanp/u,ac,am/fmcars,campHoward. Ref provided 286-4399. ro zoom lens, soft case, like new, staytogether,nokids,$neg.282-3594. gd cond, dty pd, $2,100. 252-6768. valve, red, $7,500/obo. 235-1316. er,auto, 15" rims and tires, 44K miles, $700. 236-1256. not dry pdl, $5,500/finn. 268-1948. -Exp babysitter, M-Sat evenings with French poodles, small miniatures, tails 1994 Daihatsu Charade, 5 spit, 4 dr, 1988 VW p/u, 4 spd, 4 ylnot dryrpd,,, ref 287-4546 leave message. Mitsmi CD Ram, 16 bit sound card, docked, dewormed, 4 strawberry air, am/fin cass, gd mpg, $5,400. 264$2,200. 252-6951. 1991 Dodge Caravan, ac, ps pb 50K speakers and drivers for DOS or Winblond, 3 white. 261-3325. 4105 mies,newtires, roofracka /fincas, Professional stylist, family haircare and d fr-1580. --1994 Chrysler LeBaron GTC, 6 cyl, 2 not dry pd, $9,900. 284-6671. top-ie salon products, free coualtaGeran shepherd e puppy, 1991 Honda CRX si, no, m/fin pulldr, conv, anti-lock brakes, auto a, tons. 284-3686 for Max. Sony Hadycam super 8 camera, gr shots, CCP registered. 228-2643. out cass, bra, mnt cond, 38K miles, gd very low miles, $15,500/obo. 2841987 Dodge Shadow turbo, 2 dr, 5 cond, has extra large padded case and maint record, $16,275. 236-4601. 4991. spd, runs gd, front end damaged bt Professional massage therapist, mar-ayeta,$50oo 6-08 Female calico cat, fixed, litterbox stm din, $3,500/o .284-3586. sage for neck and back pain, etc., many extras, $50/abe 2692018. trained, free. 283-4086. 1992 Chevy Corsica, 15K miles, 6cyl, 1985 Chevy Silverado nrck 305 V8, itial visit $5, reg $8. 287-5472. Gateway 2000, 486DX33, CD Rom, ac, ps, ph, am/fm cass, $9,950. 284auto, $5,500. 287-3895. 1992 Pontiac Sunbird LE, 2.0 w/ sound card, 240mb h, 8. Ram, pls American pit bull terrier pups, 5 wks, 5073. auto, ac, pl, am/fin cas, under 30K Day mind 3 days week, bilingual, honsounwar, 20mbh. 8 9. ADBA reg, dewormed, male $200, A/c condenser for Jeep Cherokee, fits miles, $10,000/obe. 289-3520. est, w/ref, reliable. 2334616. software, $3,200/abe. 260-9489. female $175. 252-6167. 1988 Blue Blazer S-10 w/tahoe packdiesel, V6, or '84-86 4 cyl engines. 27" Sony Trintron cable ready, $375. age, pw, no, pb, st, tilt wheel, leather New ever used, $200/abe. 263-8077. 1991 Eagle Sumnit, 4 dr, ps, ac, gd Bilingual day maid, honest reliable, 221-1181 after 6pm. Six wks old chihuahua puppies, adorinterior, 65K miles, exc condo, $7,500/ cond, am/flu cd, duty free, $7,500/ gd w/kids. 262-1276 for Memy. able, dewormed and sweet diposiabo. 2874974. 1979 Mercedes 350SE, auto, ps, ph, obo. 289-4358. Experienced day maid ava M-F for Yacsu FT 901 DM HF trans, $600. lion, $150. 252-2577. ac, pw, am/flu cass, sun roof, $3,000/ 287-5839. 1992 Chevy S-10 Tahoe, ext cab, w/ obe. 284-6699. 1987 Hyunai Excel, 5 dr, roof, general house work. 220-7499. Pocked os, i0. 21 camper and liner, 4.3L V6, auto, ac, player, ac, 5 spit, US specs, $3,500. SnPioneer 6 disc CD player $100, 5 yr ducked, shus, $150. 261-751. ps, ph, am/fi cas, exc coand, 26K 1989 Mazda 323, 1.6L cugine, new 287-3872. able, hones irons, gd ref 252-1035. old 14" color TV $100. 287-5634. Two female French poodles, 8 win miles, $11,500. 283-6785. tires, ac, cas, 4 spit, exccond, $5,000. 284-3481. 1990 Mazda p/u, an, stand, not dty pd, Housewifetobabyitchildrnayage Dual Fisher spkers, air dyne 80 hins, old, shots,no papers, both very chanu1992 Ford Ranger XLT pa, ph, ant/fin 46K miles, alarm, am/fi cass. 287Housewry to bytild any ge 60 watt, $25ea; Yorx,sound speaker, ing, $100. 260-3903. cans, not dry pd, $7,000/neg. 2841989 Nissan Sentra, 2 dr, bk 5 spd, 5728. from early m dg until. 2 Pmn Gd w2-4 cond, $7,00 dr d 7001624ide. 2864285 for Earoyn. $100. 2864023. 18 ma old CCP registered mule 4634. ac, tint wind, clean, grt cond, $7,P00. RotilleC, great i/de, cx guard 1 283-5020. Paris for a 4-Runner, Toyota 1989, 4 Bilingual maid, live-in, honest, exc w/ Panasonic TV/CR/C od58 co28 Rogellr grea. 29 /kis,exgur 1983 Nissan Stanza, so, an/fmn rcs, cyl, 22RE engine, cyl head, assy crank kids, dependl, M-F. 262-7278' binationt, gd cond, $350. 286-3295. dog, $400. 2864625 -$2,500. 286-4679. 1984 S-10 Blazer, 4x4, auto, air, steshaft. 287-5728. reo, theft alarm, perf cond, new paint, Exp biingal person will regierpTwocatsChicky-Monkey is neutered 1991 Ford Ranger XLT w/fiberglass no rust, $5,250/obo. 286-4734. 1979 Datsun2S0ZXbIack ac,p ex American new rn w/ Tribu sor, exc cond, $80. 263-8077. and W ndais spay e ,oo gforfamshell, 5 spd, ac, trailer hitch and light meehcondreiable,$2,500. 284-4292. nal Electoral. Ref avail. 284-3875 for 486SX PB wi/monitor $1,000, EP-7 ily to adopt, free. 286-4972 hook-up, not dry pd. 287-5536. 1980 Honda, 2 dr, $2,200/neg. 2874244. 1993 Ford Explorer XLT 4wd, 4 dr, Xenia. digital comp $700, Pioneer stereo w/ Doberman, 2 pen old, neutered, gd w/ 1984 Toyota Corolla, spec edition, ac, 4.0L, V6, auto, low miles, loaded, not Eng spk housekeeper, reliable, hanspeakers $500. 284-3481. kids, $200. 252-5103. ps, pb, am/fm cass, vinyl top, exc 1984 Iszu Gemini, 4 oy, 5 spd, 4 dr, dry pd, $23,500. 284-4887. est,pyneg,ref. 287-3891 frTammy. IBM compatible, 386/25, dai driver, cond, one owner, $3,800. 286-4893. am/fm cass, $2,000. 230-1412 after 7wkioldGer.anshepherdpupscham-5P. 1989 Buick Skylark, at, ac, tint, tilt, Bilingual maid wants to rk T 4m Ram, mouse, Windows 3.1, pion hiue pedigree, $300. 252-5981. 1989 Honda Accord LXi, 5 spit, 4 dr, 5p.coic, not dry pd, $5,500. 284-3670. Bigal aid watsew oorkd irueng Microsoft Office, DOS 6.2, $l,200/ aG, s-f, loaded, 57K miles, c 1984 Ford LTD, 49K miles, $4,900/ 2 4and Fri. Gen housework ad rmg. abo. 286-4734. 8he 231 253 cond, $9,500. 284-3481. neg. 261-7085. 1989 Jeep Cherokee, low miles, lie._23_-6253. ___-_$10,000/obo. 284-3012. Eng spk live-out amid, honest, reKeuwod power amp 35w, $200; Rattweder, 7 inaer,4 females, 22mwkr 1990 lauzu p/u, dry pit, csc cond, ac, 1988 Mantera, auto, diesel, loaded, equalizer_$150;_sereo_____$504996. oild, $500. 235-4190/4930. cars, 2.3 4 cyl, gas en gie, $6,900/ dry pd, $12,000/bo. 269-5700. 1982 Chevy Blazer 305ci, V8, ps, pb, sponsible, ref, gd w/kida. 221-9762 uir $150; stereo rack $50. 235negd 239-6485. at, ant/fm css, $6,000/obo. 289-3400 13 yr old babysitter, dependable, lre1991 Ford Escort LX, 4 cyl, ac, ps, pb, for Scibek. fer Albrook,availmweeketdas 286-3485 2 Kenwoo MV-5D 450w peakrs, armed, females for $350, ales $400. 1976 BMW 2002, rebuild engine, new oneownerexccond,$7,500/obo. 284far Adri $100; Tandy 5 2 35ni239-9803. stereo/ac, $3,500/obo. 283-3548. 4125. 1987 Ford Festiva, 2 dr, stand, exc Aine. to,, $50 235-4096. 239980. mcod, am/fmn cass, new tires, noted Cake decorating. 287-6222, 1991 Honda Accord, 4 dr, 5 spd, pm, 1983 Volvo 240DL station wagon, wind, $3,400, 284-3739, n C 386SX IBM Clone, 4mb Ram, dual old, $150. 224-1588. k p, ac, low miles, dty free, $10,995. diesel, new enghte, auto, ac, $5,000. -Honest, depenidable, live-in housedrives, 40mb hd, VGA monitor, 24 264-6713. 2824337. 1989 Ford Festiva, ac, m/fin cars, at, keeper gt w/kids, flexible hours, prepin printer, software, modem, $1,200/ 55 gallon aquarium w/stand, all accesps, pb, not dy pd, $4,800. 2894982. fee Kobbe/Hoard. 289-3243. ob. 286-6277. sofir included, $650. 2446323. 1984 Ford LTD station wagon, exon1976 Chev Suburban, new tires, dry crated, an, am/fm radio, tinted wind, 6 pd, ac, $4,000. 282-4337. 1990 Chevy Cavalier, low ies, an' Tutorig avail for elementary grader, Atari 800 mid 130XE comp, extras, Toy French poodle puppie, tails cyl, iem tires, $3,500. 264-8675. ps, ph, am/fm cars, $7,000. 264-3143. Atlantic side only. 2894350. $375; kogitechhand scauner, 256 gray docked, de armed, $250. 226-5395. 1984 300ZX, white, 5 spd, ac, ps, pb, -scale, $225; Smith Corona memory 1988 Pontiac LeMans, 5 spd, 4 dr, 4 exc cond, alann, $6,500.260-0852. l99OToyoa 4x4 p/u, V6, 33" tires, 3" ReliableEng spk maidw/ref, M-Thurs, typewriter, extras, $125. 252-5829. Beautiful roiweiler pups, 6 iks old, cyl, 35mpg, low mites, ac, ps, b body lift, 41K miles, $11,000. 285flexible, -xc w/kida. 228545. Camp AT 286, 20mb hd, 5.5, EGA, all shots, registered AKC, $300. 278tinted witd, mn/fm carss, It dry pd, 1986 Is-z Troper Ht, 4 dr, d, 6743. -Cm T26 0i i,55 (A 3434. mt, $3,900/neg. 2864693, make offer. 284-3793. monucromatic, 240K, software, $375. 3434. mmt, eg. -_ 1985 Porsche 944,5 spit, no. all porn.S 0 -f S 261-7035 after 6pm. Pit bulls, 3 males, 4 females, 2 wks 1993 Ford Aerostar, exe cond, fully 1976 BMW 530i, US specs, gd cond, er, tint wind, cruise, ed player, alami, old, $150. 233-1342. loaded, utder 20K ties, not dry $2,000. 286-6398. $11,000. 284-4227. Apple H1 ES PC, color printer, color $29,000. 28742s39. 1 e t e ,ayFid' Tycoon Fin-Nor fishing reels, 71/2 monitor, ms and 2 drives, same Experie$2ced 27-42 1994 Jeep Cherokee, 2 dr, at, ac, ps, 1983 Ford Bru itono 4wd, full si, ps, and 9 w/2 atchin g rods, exe cond, software, $600. 284-3993 boxer, AKC/CCP registered, for sid 1976 Caprice Classic, 350 dng, selling cass, 1,400 miles, one month old, not ph, no, roll bar, tdce stereo, $7,000. $1,800. 252-2080. service. 287-3177. for pars, bosh ofler. 283-5983. dy Pd. 2874139. __ 284-4227. Electric Bass/ease, amplifier, stand, 1994 Evntirude 100hp, new, still itt books, tuner. 284-4867 for Wilson. Shepmd puppies, black and beige, 6 1988 Jeep Cottmnche 4x4, nita/f 1985 Olds Cutlass Supreme 1982 Chev Van-20series,acbraiio, box, $3,300; 15hp ottboard motor, --wks old, 3 ales, 2 females, $125. cass Kenwood, ,e, p b, 1w, ite tires, Brotg'm, 5.0L, 307 ci will thi exscat folds to bed, $5,000. 287-4529bug leg, $385. 2564830. Epson 9 pin printer w/tractor/ingle 25001 Lsprtwhels bstofer.26 I, ras,, not dry pd, $4,000 287-393 1. -feced, $80. 284-5930 5 4. stpo wheels, best or. 261-6410. trts,988dip 28731ds Ctoss Ciera, 4 dr, 2.5k 1993 Jet-skiSea
PAGE 27

___ ~,ias1"e AdsTropic TimesBT11 #Classified Ads Bc.11119 Rom, 16 bit soundeard, 28.8 fax toCouch, newly reupholstered, $350; Wrought iron coffee table, heavy bev ed with security locks, $150; ire for 18K engagement ring. 232-4273 after Qtrs 6558A Corozal, 7amu-noon dem, printer, inouso, joystick, solquoene maltress set, $400; 9x12 brown glass top, $180; pedestal nd table intbike,26x2. ATB,$25.287-4788. 5pm or 8am-10ptm weekends. ware, more, $2,200. 283-5020. rug, $50; cottp desk, $100. 287-3878. glassop, $75; foldout love seat, black, Qtrs 1533B Howard, &am now, $185. 260-3168. Minlhtinds for single utd double wind, Bench w/set of weights, $100/obo. Commodore 128/64, lots ofsoflwae, 2 rattai rockers $125ea, book case Sound desgn sereo/twin cass, $25; 228-1339 Qtrs 520 Fort Davis, 8m-2pm. printer, $125/oba. 287-3697. $75, shelves $75, sm kitbcaey dropnlkf G h $15. 2824691. table mid chairs $150, entire drapes Ladies wet sit, size sall, like ew, Qirs Packard Bell 286NT, mitodem, it.s., for Howard trouical, $200. 284-5238 -Toddler car seat, $8; blue iron twin $75. 287-4692. Qtrs 2240B Car Street, Balboa, 7amwindows 3.1, keyboard, $325/ba. --bed, $125, couch mnd love seat, $375; 287-3697. Diningroomset,4clair;,sqiarewood Goldchaiiw/2charisatReederGym. king size win/bed, 12 dr pedistal w/ Scuba-Beaactiat BCD, size M, like noot. and glass, tem, $300. 287-5394. 269-7776 foe Mark -mirrors le, $1,800. 2874271. new,$250;acor spg w/compass,newv Qtrst6lBoward, tee family, 8a1Sega Genesis eds, Mortal Kombat, ---$150. 269-5180 ext 1093. 3 tod d Saturdy. Stellar Fire, Rage i the Cage, $25Refrig $300,wlasler $200,dyer$200, 'Rms" tat at Los Rios playground, 2 pas of men's shoes size 13 never $35. 260-9156. dishwasuer $150, exercise bike $100, had "Undeoood" embroidered on won, one torsheims other jana, Ladie's 18K 3 tne gold necklace, 226-1721. back. 252-2028. $50ea. 260-3903. lovely, $800. 326-8516. Palr Q 31 series Bose black cabitiel speakers, $150/obo. 287-4173. Sofa sleeper, queen siz, ese could, 3 ring wedding set, all riigs have Parts for 1987 Chev Cavalier, engie $600. 284-3481. dinmoids total l/2ct,$500.286-6134. 2.0L, trans, axle, fenders, bumpers, Babysitter two momings a week on VCR,JVC,ex cond,$l00.282-4538 -rack md pinion, rotors and dnits. Albrook, prefer someone who is flex-_ -_ Soli w/built in recliner, dark Sate Fe SNES Ptebble Beach Golf, $40; 3.5 Murray self-propelled mower, grt 228-4061. iblI and lives close. 286-3173. Packard Bell 386SX20 l/monumo, -I-or, $3100. 286-4674. 'al could, 22", $150. 287-3627. sPodblat 3andspeakersv,$600. 287c-s-Gmieboy wTetris, Kirby's pinba Men's golf clubs w/bag, 1-3-5 wood, Spn spring, Lve-m maid, clewi, iron, sotdlatean spaes $600.s 287-29-67 4772 after 6pm. Full sizn mattress mid boxsprmig with Qin, Alleyways, $125; Sports cardsBig air compressor like new, gil for 3-9 pw irons, $165. 2876372. 2 children age 6,8, M-Sat. 2864896. itetal frmue, $200. 286-6174. sets mid singles. 287_5536 airbrushandairtools,$225.287-3627. Amigo 2000 lid, monitor mid color .Litle tykes castle, $200; Little tykes Tansi or step tansu, Korean, Japanese printer, lots of gmes and programs, Dansi blk etiertainent set, dining Weider weigbl beich w/I10Ob set, NFL Fball, Hardball 3, Hardball 3 roadster tod bed, $125; truidle bed w/ or other, antique or reproduction OK. $550. 287-6372. room for 10 w/chinia cabinet, danish EnicyctopediaBrtuanw/grea books, deluxeNHL Hockey,SuperstarBball, 2 twin man, $210; overstuff couch, 284-4484. wht corner lamp, plaits all sizes/pricheritage binding. 260-1290. origtals, $80/obo. 286-4685. loveseat, ciir, $1,000. 260-3168. Sanyostero,2 cassetteplayers,record es, Nitedo games, $2ea. 236-0984. convectionoven,any si, any make. player, synthesizer, model GXT 848 4-tl.50x3lxl5 Good year AT tires, 10" table saw $250, 1/2" Plywood 263-3129 evenings. remote control, $165/obo. 2634671. LR set w/table, $475; DR set w/4 ott Ford factory rims, $450. 260-9058. $15/sheet, pipe for fence. 256-6376 Motorcycles tables,$400;barw/2lhighchairs, $380. Clothes, household. 284-3689. Electric clothes dryer, reasonable 252-2883. Nordic track Pro, like new, $350price 252-2476 F.~Iundt~ .284-4991 1976 Mottessa 348 coda trials bike Large sofa, white/gray/blIte design, Sportscards1989-1994,baseball,basgd cond, rims grt, many spare parts, Live-in bilingual maid, childeare, a like new, $600. 269-5700. ktball and football, single and sets. Xmas tree $50, mixer $35, elec type$750/obo. 261-2550. cleaning, friting, and cooking. Ref Young male cat, neutered atd 284-3689. writer $90, pet carrier $15, baritone required,honest and hdwk.2864573 dectaoed, gray tabby withwhiepaws Car seat, double stroller, bassinette, W mouthpieces $5, plants. 252-2208. t978 YnraathaRD400, gd cond, $650; in Gateway housing. 284-6633. prom dress, baby bath, all for $200. Wood w/gnte $25 ca -1978 Montessa 348 trail, $500 w/esShift workers looking for a flexible 2864129. porte, $25. 286-6179. Sharpifmicro$75,GraccoDBIstrollcr tra parts. 256-6323. Ebg spk, hoiest, dependable totse$45, Sharp color printer 5175. 285keeper/babysitter. 287-5893. H Ou seh!,L iLd Universal weight set bar /complete 4284-3300, 4 979 Kawasaki KZ 1000 ZIR classic, set of weights, $100;Qteen size brass Patio table $50, dish set 36 piece, $40. low miles, dty pdl, $1,200. 252.-5167. SG, VSA member. 282-3036. like nes, $225; Whirlpool bed, grt cotid, $300. 284-3924. 261-3325. Nnte12, weights $75, cr battery $17, 1982 Hnd CB-125-S, wind shcied, D-oive/orienal folding screenand 4cf refrig, like new, $150; Amerinm New GE heavy duty washer $450, 1/3ct diamond ring w/appraisal, ex for $12, nil compass $27, large mil crash bar, tnggage rack, liehet, coy10'10' carpet, brown or simular colStar4cffreezer $150. 268-2973 John. Large GE freezer $450. 283-6472. cotid, $600/obo. 264-3352. rckw/frame/nostrapsS32.287-6289. er, rainsuit, trai-a-bike, rns go, dty or. 239-9656. pd, $600/obo. 287-3051. Baby crib $70, high chair $20. 286Waterbed heater, $75; Mr. Coffee 12 Sega Genesis games, NBA Jams, RBI 10 sp women's race bike, color gray, Work for a maid, 2 days a week, Eng 6171, cup w/24 In' tuner. 286-4399. Baseball 94, Baseball 2020, Pebble gd cond, $50. 260-1078 for Raquel. Black Honda Elite scooter, electric spk, honest, dep. 287-6438. -ec-$start, 370 niles, classy, peppy, goL gas Tiger 10 cup) lch iac rice cooker, ev1Bassein BR set, solid wood, 7 piece, lo Beach Got, $50. 236-4532. Barbie car, pink, gd coud, $100. 266mileage, $1,800. 287-5680. Soueonte to refinish table/chairs md er used, $65. 2844484. bed, white w/gold tro, $1,200/oboBlack velvet dresses size 7 and 5/6, 0176. .reupholster future mid interior of Beautiful glass top mid brass 6-set 284-5833. jumpsuit size 5/6,2nght dresses size custan scooters body and eng'tue vehicle.Reasonablypriced. 283-5983. DR set, $450. 286-3380 afer Stint. Etptmcette 5/6, small motherhood gold shiri, a Gofbag,ari ,shs71/2,more, parts eeded for labor of hove. 241n.E center, glass DR table, VCR, blue $4w. 252-2i42 gd cond,$400/obo. 263-2240. 4339, leave message. Dependable, honest, bilingual live-im 500OBTU ac forad'sqiarters,$145 recliner, leave message. 287-4546. maid, refs reg. 287-3972. 256-6830. r mai s ql Toddler car seat $15, fantime infmat Chevy paris; brake booster and alter1978 Kawasaki KZ 650, dty pd, $850/ -Table lamps, black and gold w/oriet, nator, like new, $200/$175/obo. 252obo. 284-5458 for Paul Room 222. Live-in/out maid, Eng spk, must love WilolwsolyoarmII (astlflwradblcshd se at $30, auto bottle marner, ness $8 6956' cliildrei, w/iefs. 282-3790' WhirlpI washer/dryer, ahouid cotma style 3fo 3 3td black shades, young children's red velvet dresses. 1987 Yamaha 200cc, US specs, dty or, large capacity. multiple settings, 252-2042. AC generator, 100kw, 3 phase, 240, pd, low miles, $1,000. 2874632. 1955-1956 CristobalHighgraduatioin/ gd coud, $600 set. 287-5727. Blue curiahns $15, Kemunore ic BdY by Jake finnflex w/acys and 108, 120 volts and more, GE. Electrireumembrace book. 252-6989. Q-size waterbed w/solid wood ead $150, swing set $35 GE 19.6,c VHS tape, $75. 233-0974. cl etd ondy, eends diesel or prime and foot beards. Exc cond, in/eveyregrig winlide ice makcer $750, BR VIStmover, $3,500. 256-6816. i a i ae Rephacetneu Pieces for ""aIu.tscan thing included, $500. 226-6851. set w/hutch and lights, solid pine, Blinds, maroon color, Cumadu flats pallera shotteware, especially beols. $1,200. 251-2028. BR size, $50; basketball backboard, Mita wea2herls i 5 36 s, 252-1218. 2 new win box springs, $752a. 252goal and post, best offer. 286-4222. waterproof, 21cm, $95. 2634671. noonUsed cotp, monitor, mud prmter. 2602314. Kenimoe washer, .sed I yrs, daumsdcitrumanp-leMO aged moving, mid older GE dryer for Star Trek tapes, 74 of the original TV Home repair, additious, woodwork' Qts 33D Quarry Highn,8am-no early 3505. Large 6 seat glass table, LR suit4 repair, $60. 284-3896. series VHS tapes, $6.50ea. 284-6183. customized crafs, carpentry, plutbirds.Grdeneryw/eef tscuamgrassrwyed piece. 284-5472. i~ng, letrical. 284-6629. id.______ Gardeuter i/ref to emt grass, toned, pice. 284-5472. Hide-a-bed couch $100, 3 rags $20eaLadie'ssweaters,newcoud, sizesmall Qrs 2240B Carr Street, Balboa ru, plant, mitior jobs. 223-1069. Sofa and loveseat, $600; micro stand, 285-6705. $15ea. 252-5185. BBQ gill $25, tued dog kennel $20, Qivs 2 Coo S $50; micro, $125; power wheel 12 VCR $125. 287-5190 Qtrs 48AHoward, 7-am. Live-in tad 6 y equveekd 22 1069, volt battery, $160. 2864893. 6 piece LR set, couch, chain, rocker, 3 New propane twok, $18; lawn mower T l ca s2s, ref r ie 230 1x tables, $350. 284-5680. w/shovelandgascau,$135.284-6497. Toddercrseat $20,maersityclotles Qnrs 858A Clayton, 7au-2pm. Yoga instructor for private or group 12x1 caretpeac $75 1215, raysm to Ig sizes $30, blue stroller, gd c crpe $25 287-6173. Gibso 14 cn I upright freezer, 1 yr Vacuam cleaner, $95, new step adcod $15, childin's pop-ip picture QIrs 828B Clayton, 7au-2pm. 1essots. 260-9768. old, $1,000; DP weight beach, I001bs, dee, $35. 2,4-6497. Christmas books, $10. 286-4474. Citinus, blinds, micro $130, 13" col$50/obo. 283-6322. Qtrs 339A Clayton, 8ampm.baby food jars s/s 284-894 or TV/VCR $225, Amiga comp $300, 2telephiones$hea,boogleboardnew Yamala portable plano, new, $300; dinete set $800. 286-4679. 23.7 GE refrig, GE washer, reciumer, $50, skateboard, top-line, $15. 252boy's coat $20; lady's coat $10. 262Q etas, am. cr $1i0s 202aset ridyloltedmsiueen-matt, twiiimatt/box sprigs. 5185. 7278, "o cre, esauuble priced, reliable, toy queenm sz__a_,__wm___/bxsprmg-_5_85_ 7278 Qtrs 2538 Cocoli, mnuti-family', 7mtome. 236-2070. Light blue wing chair $150. 233-0974. 252-2180. Girl's lspraciig bike, gray, gdmcoud, Large Fedders ac, $325; Romech stanmail, _______________'n Babysitter, reliable, ref, for 1 yr old Ness 9x12 iglht blue carpet, ahnomd White toddler bed w/woaterproofumatt, ieeds painting, $50. 260-1078. dard boatmsmeerig systemn9'cable, $50; Qr 5 lro,7mno. ad3y l.Ne w rnEgsk bar stools, CD/VHS solid oak rack, side rais and toy/linen trays for under Mercury 4Oup moumtor, teeds rebuild,' 3Q7 75B Abook, 7.,1,-. mid 3 yld. Need ow. taits, Emg spk new food processor. 229-2916. bed, like new, $125. 287-5291. Classical acustic guitar, plus pick-up, $300; law towr $30. 284-5929. Qtrs 953B La Boca, 8am-noo ----$130. 287-5592. Mountain bike for tan, pay tip to Drapes, beige; mmi blinds, ,Ito; for Set. w/3 cshis, exv cond, $500/ Children's ideo tapes, $2/5/$7; Qtrs 73Q2A Cardenas, 7-9sm.S $100. 283-5088. Curumdu flats,se at 200lACCurautdiu. obo. 228-4514. Pimto$l,800, flute $120, violin$100. y'othbed;daible size fton; toys, etc. 286-3137, 236-4865. 223-4678. Qtrs 10 Albroak, Saot Books for Art 2410X-Intra Cultural Porcelaim dishes, white os/blue flow-AnhndCB70-umnhyiTau 6x9 carpet, $10; 8x10 carpet $35; ers, service for 9 plus lots of extras, .DepthufinderHummugbirdswideview New Amierican Eucy set, 21 vol nd Qtrs 106BJadwin Avc, Gaiboa,aimAyTe and PCB. 2700-h1 .urnau h'wroughtronbenct$35;whitcwhieker $85. 284-6533. with tenup, speed trip log, like new, more, $125; shelf, $10. 284-5784. "'o. Tajmmt 289-3751. full size headboard $50. 282-3497. $225. 269-2018. Fenders amid grill for 199 I Jeep WraitKenmore heavy duty, large capacity New Taso lightning paintball gun, Qtrs 4166 Amadar, 7am. glee 28-4061. Play pen, frame carrier, walker/stawasher/dryer, almost new, $700; keyBeautiful diamond, ruby ing, 1/2c' vertical foregrip, 7oz, 140 round loadQlrs 3 b28ok i ts I tionarylhorse,gdcond,$30.287-5221. board; baby swing; down comforter, total weight, hardly wont, $500. 287cr, $250. 289-4320. Qtrs 305B Albrook, 8ar. ?CC book Engsh C up 11 If you 284-6533. 3898 Mon-Fri 8:30am-pm. trs261BAbrk,Sundayily,8I have one, come to Clayton Ed center, E4btertaitnme't eenfter,$50.287-5839. Life style treadmill, 3 yrs old, $100/ -_ o -dRll 3 t, any dama at I d -:30a m Exta are of sctoual ciiett~o40 gal electric water heater double Sutorket equip-imask, fums, boots (10) abe. 284-5379. .Qtrs3 3l7A Abrook, 8ami-uoomi Extra large sofg sectional, contempglass lood, $120. 223-4766. and suorkel,$60; Officer's Anuy green 8-----F---------PCC book for Euglish Comp 11, Short rary style, biege/rose/muave,likenew, munifm, 40L, $75. 2874299 Higli clair $15, babycnb w/sheetsaud Qrs 855A Clayton, 7-10m. Stry 6th Editim by David Maddei, $1,600/neg 286-4299. 21" sq GE refrig $400, king size sofa blankets $100,crseatl $15Commado. need one fast. 287-4099. bed $150, Fisher VCR $140. 262Four new BMW nmts w/tub caps, ' QIs 26f lB Cacohi, 7-1 :30am. 10,OOOBTUGEac$200, 14,000BU 7278. $150. 2874299. 124/64K w/eeri.ng, $300. 287Fealer mtate toshareIgfmiuuisled ac Whirllol $250, DR table set w/6 --3671. Qis 7'56B Caridetas, 7-10am. apartmnt,m S268 per imoutth 269-0675. chairs, $250. 252-6323. Whirlpool thin-twin wash/dry com41 volumesofEmcy Brimanica, plus 15 --bo. Used I yr, gd for apartment, $500. Britaica Junior, $200. 262-1251. Cochi and reciuer, $300. 2364865. 236-0108. AI_ Air shrider exercise bike $150/abe, Sony 17" color TV, enate control, Vacuum cleaner, Hoover elite 600, Gold's Gymi weight beach set, S150/ $200; Whirlpool dishwasher, needs $100. 252-5762 after 6pm. abe. 286-6348. Tropie Tim es Ad Form repair 262-1251. r Washer/dryer pair $350/aba, gas ait Sega CD games, Dracula Unleashed, w ANIMALS Bedooom set $750, RCA can order mower, $100/obo. 284-5930. Etforcer w/ga, Tomcat Aley, $2ea. A M L $500, Betamix and tapes $75, area 286-4884. 0 AUTOMOBILES carpets $40-570. 287-5928. Misc fan, 'Vs, VCIls, DR set, big -" AVAILABLE --bird cage, portable pool w/filter, kitchFranik Scbalfer activity books for 1ri] BOATS & CAMPERS --Black entertaimnent center, $30/obo. en stuff, comp aid table, couches. imary grades amd other school testchK ELECTRONICS PRICE H(ME PHONE 286-6348. 268-3085. iug mtaerials. 287-5237E FOUND Twin bed, mattress, box springs amid 21" color TV $150, 59 oriental rug Blue rug 10sl21/2, $50; 2 golden ] HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ath form. Only two ads per person each frame, like new, $200. 252-2676. $50, early Anerican liar dwood rocker bruw rugs 12x14, $150oa, elelric LOST weck are alltwel. Each ad torni is hitied to 5 words, bUt mIay be edited $250. 287-5021. ypewriter, $80. 260-5266. K MISCELLANEOUS more because of space. Please type or print neatly. hno'rmation listed Lawnuower $80, vaccuums cheanuer ------_---K MOTORCYCLES below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This $40, small chest of drawers $40, coiA SolOflex type work-out mnacine, 172 quart Igloo cooler, $20. 9" rotor PATIO SALES infrr d other pl ,role pts for plain, $10,,287-5_237. $150; Huttond& S60; black sofa and T]V, S 252-0 WANTED of ads is 9 a. Monday lot Friday's edition. Ads are run on a space Like new extra large capacity Maytag haveseat w/design, $600. 287-6485 65 feet of 4-foot tall cyclone fence, avail]able hasis and the staff makes no gurantee of ads running. Ails tust ashSer/dryer, $700. 287-5038 toddler car seat, exc cond, $15; cunfull muattess. 287-5634. include a houe phone number. Ads tay be mai ld nt the Trupic Tie.t auls for Gameway htusiug. 284-6633. Unit 0936, AlPO AA 34002 urdeposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Blue rectiner, gd cod, $300; queen ------Beautiful wedding gown, veil. Office. Ads offeringxweapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not he size sofa bed $525. 286-4023 Qteen size sofa bed aud queen Atune boques, candle, cake top and decorarun, ----choair,$850;Osterkithescentue00, lios,$500. 286-6134. Year old 4 biucer stove witts 0veu, all like new. 226-8516. Magic Chef, i/clock ad timer, $350. ---Women's shoes, size 8/81/2, $7-SIO; SPONSOR'S NAME RANK/GRAIDE 286-3269. Brown s.fa, burgundy reclier, oak die boots w/zipper, womeu's si 5, --_-_-_--_table w/leaf aid 4 uphostered chairs, $20. 2874788 ORG. DUTY PHONE 10,000 BTU ie, $1 50. 252-5309. ianc2t car seat. 286-4439.

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B1~ Tropic Times j t o r __ _ B12 Oct 21, 1994 Potpourri Couples night 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday. Beef or chicken for vHi W an p APPLY: Subit aSF-71, DD 214 if claiming Quarry Heights Fajitas junction 6-8:30 p.m. Oct. 28. Enjoy the Tex-Mex veteran preference, a copy of college tnscripis if-claimning education and a copy of CASP notice of rating if applicable. Sub*Offieers' Clb; 282-3439 favorite, beef or chicken fajptas in the dining room. mit a copy of latest SF-50 if youare a Federal employee. The club will be closed to the public for renovations Masquerade ball Oct. 29. I-or more information rarding Army vacancy announcethrough Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be Dining room is closed Sunday through Thursday. ments (frms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Direcavailable 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Addition*Howard Enlisted Members' Club -Dining Room: torate ofCivilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, illy, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and 284-4189 or call28-5201 during lunch hours 11:30 am.-I:30 p.m. Sunday breakfast buffet 8-12:30 a-m. *Notc: Onc-on-one employment counseling shouk be the Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30 first step in the job search. a.m. Saturday. SPECIALIZED EXPFRIENCE: Positions at NM-5 level Amador New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. homemade and above require specialized experience. Spec ilized experiroast beef turkey. turkey salad and tuna lish sandwiches with ence is either education above the hiah school level or work ex*CIu b Amador; 2824334 ra be trmings. perience directly related to tile positio being titled. Oxaunple: Allyou-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, t.eatUring atudy niht gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. featuring Budget positions at or above the NM-5 level reqtuired Budget soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights. experience or equtMivalent education. Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno tableside preparation with tuxedo service. Vacancy announcements are also available at the Sundial at noon [lse first Soinday of each month. Steak night special 5:30-8:30 run. tuesday. Select a Recreation Centter. The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during cut and order aNew York strip, ribeye or filled. All steaks are Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications renovaUions of the Quarry Heights Officers' Club. Famiy beef. on a continuous basis for the following positions. Registers esFamiy menu Tuesdays-Fridays fearing all the favortablished firon these annotunceiments will be used to fill peniaites plus new items such an jerked chicken, hand made 1/2 nenand temporary positions. Clayton pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more. VB# 001 General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most *The Loop; 287-3035 Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or clerical position). CJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-I p.m. take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicy hot VB# 001A General Clericatl, NM-4 (Used to fill CJsSotBadallucspcas1:0am-pm. tk-u.Itthribikehpedeforpcyht most clerical NM-4 Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments 3:30 p.m. every Sunwings. most 002r*cal position).' da, *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom: 284VB# 002 Sales Store Checker. NM-3 (Intermsilenst day. wk sets) Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes4189 days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sundays. Friday night disco 4:30 p.m.I a.m. tonight. Dance and CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or CJ's relax to the music. required. Sports Bar, call 287-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343. Special Membership night 5 p.m. Saturday. Complimentary VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) menus for functions available. The club will make all arItalian buffet for members and one guest: $6.95 for additionRequires Cert + 6 mo recreation exp in the field. rangements, including cakes, decorations or floral center at guest. Children 6-12 $3 and children under 6, free. VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Requires 6 pieces. Halloween all night disco 10 am.-5 .m. Oct. 29-30. mos recreation exp in the field. *NCO Club: 287-4716 *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove: VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5 The Forum Restaurant open 5-9 p.m. daily. 2844189 VB# 005A Secretay (Stenography), NM-6 Mexican buffet Mondays. Live piano music weekday evenings. VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), Steak night Tuesdays. A la carte menu is available. Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays. NM-5 Country buffet Wednesdays features barbecue pork ribs, Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-l am. VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), fried chicken, pork knuckles, collards greens, sweet potato, Monday night football and mug special in the lounge. NM-6 rice, black-eyed peas and com bread. Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcom and nachos. VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5. All-you-can-eat family buffet Thursdays. Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 8 p.m. Tuesdays. Limited to permanent status employees only. Seafood buffet Fridays features broiled lobster, garlic Free Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant. NM-6. shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab. Wednesdays in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancLimited to permanent status employees otly. 12-oz prime rib special Saturdays. ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midThe following positions are Perm/temp, Full-time, Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m. night. Part-time, Intermittent. Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. SunNight mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug tilled with VB# 007 MEDICAE OFFICER NE 12/13/14. days and Mondays. your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills. VB# 008 ** CEINICAL NURSE, (RN license Disco 9 p.m. Wednesday. Fridays and Saturdays. There Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday: 5 p.m.required), N M-9/10/11. will be a midnight buffet. midnight Thursdays. VB# 009 M* PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence International food fair/enlisted membership drive 5 Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. required), NM-5. p.m. Thursday includes food tasting, cooking demonstration, *Top Three Club: 284-4189 VB#019 ** EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECH-lwine tasting, recipes and door prizes. Karaoke 6 p.m. Fridays. NICIAN, NM-640-4/5/6. Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesdays. Free all-you-can-eat and kaibrcomplimentary taco bar. *Selectees for nurse. medical officer and EMT Alrook Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. Members positions will undergo a background check. *Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582 must have a card and be present to win. Pacific Tonight's entertainment jazz it with Lowell Hopper in Club closed Saturdays. VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION the lounge. OPEN: 10-21-94 CLOSE: 11-01-94 Saturday afternoon football 2 p.m. in the lounge during football season with bar service. Rodman 042-95-JI BUDGET ANALYST, NM-560-11. Prime rib dinner and seafood feast 6-9 p.m. Saturday. *Rodman Club -Open to all ranks: 2834498 SENSITIVE. TEMP NTE: 1 YR. IQ, USSOUTHlCOM, Menu also includes: Crean of broccoli soup, garden salad, Happy hour 4:30-11 p.m. in the Laguna Lounge with Office of the Controller, SCJ8-CM, Ft. Amador. 12 oz. prime rib, baked potato. baby carrots, and sherbert. complimcintary hors d'oeuvres. Sunday saloon breakfast specials 10 am.-h p.m. in the Halloween bash 7-11 p.m. Oct. 28 in the Laguna Lounge. 043-95-NC PROCUREMENT TECHNICIAN, NMlounge. Choose trom three menus. A disc jockey will spin great Iunes for the "motsher mash." 1106-5. USAG, DOC, Purchasing Div., Corozal. Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-l p.m. itt the dinIlere Will be prizes for the best costumes and compimenstaty 044-95-SS CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ing room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, hors d'oeuvres will be served. Come out and show your sclry DIRECTOR, NM-1701-9. TEMP NFE: 30 Sep 95. roast beef, fresh fruits, breakfast and lunch iteis and ice side. USA-DCA, Child Development Services, Ft. Claytos. cream bar. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu II atm.-I NOTE: Selectee will undergo a background check. Mongolian barbecue 5:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Choose p.m. Mondays-Fridavs. (lte meaut. vegetables. sesssonings, oils and have chefs do the Monday night football 6 p.m. until ,aime ends with all045-95-SS ELECTRICIAN (HIGH VOLTAGE), job outside on the open grills. yOs-ca-eat taco bar 6-9 p.m. at tile Laguna Lounge. MG-2810-10. IQ, USAG. DElI, Operations Div., Lombardi a In Italiana 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. A taste Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Motdays. Grills mncu Corozal. NOTIE: Driver's license recUlireh. of Italy at yoUr favorite clb dining room. is also available. Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursdays iscsLuds All-you-can-eat beef and burgundy 4:30-8:30 p. 046-95-SS SOCIAL SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE, tacos, fajitas, aco salad anlsd sopapillas for dessert. Afler dinWedtsesdsS. Grill menusi is also available. NM-187-9. UISAG, DCA. Artmy Costnttmunity SersiCe, I t. ner dance bie sight Way t country western 1usic. Open mike night 6-11 p.m. Tlursdays in the Lagsnsas Claton. NOTE: Driver's license required. Selectee will Country western night Thursdays with free dance lesLosmnge. undergo a backgroUnd check. sons at 7:30-10:30 pu. Leaut the two-step, line and couples Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thtursdays 047-95-SS ELECTRICAL WORKER (IIGII dances, te waltz, the cha cha ad the swing. at the Rodmian Bohio. VOLTAGE), MG-2810-8. IIQ. USAG, DEll, Fine dining 6-9 p.pm. Mrids days-Thrss 69s. Operations Div. Corozal. Howard Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 pus. Mont-hsrsdays: 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. 048-95-LA TELECOMMU N ICATIONS MECH*Howard Officers' CIlb: 284-3718 Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-fhsursdays: 6ANIC, MG-2502-8/10. SENSITIVE. U.S. Army Into Weekday lunches includes buffet, salad and potato bar. 9 puss. tridays-Sunsdays. Syst Command. 106th Sig Bge, 56t1h Sig Battalion. Order a ia carte 6-8:30 p.m. in bite dining room Fridays *Rodman Annex; 2834498 NOTE: Security clearance required. Requires lilling up to and Saturdays. Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays. 50 lbs. Friday evenings in the lounge include beer specials, All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu It a.m.music, games and club card dravings. 1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. Atlantic Barbecue plate special 6-8:30 p.m. today. The club is closed for evening and weekend service. 452A-94-SS CONSTRUCTION INSPECTOR, NM809-7. HQ USAG, DEH-ATL, Ft. Davis. NOTE: Driver's license required. Must have knowledged of A/C equipment or kitchen equipment. Applications received -* under VB# 452-94-SS, will be considered under this 5pm All Things Considered announcement. p AlThnsC sied NOTE e it.9The Southern Command Monday-Friday 6:30pm Country USA NOTE: Amendment t o VB# 001-95-MW, Network's AM Radio station features SUIPERVISORY PRODUCTION CONTROLLER, NMAmerica's most-listened to radio 6am NPR Morning Saturday 1152-9, position is SENSlTIVE. programs. Live coverage of breaking Edition Midnight Country USA -------------news stories and special events are Sam News, commentary, fea10am NPR's Car Talk Navy provided. The Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation ComSCN AM Radio AM 790 Pacific tures, sports 11am Country USA unity Recreation Depatrtment is seeking a personci and AM 1420 Atlantic are the news, Noon Rush Limbaugh Show assistant. The position will remain open until filled. sports and information station. 1 pm News, commentary, feaInterested people can call Ricardo Teorrs, 283-4301/534. Schedule goes into effect Oct. 31. tures, sports All day Country USA