Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text





Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


Sropic


Times


Ouarry Heights. Republic of Panama


Friday, Oct. 14, 1994


Soldiers from the 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry Regiment train in Honduras.


Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army)


508th to case colors


Units pitch in for smooth inactivation as

Treaty Implementation Plan materializes


by Maj. Ira Watkins
1st Bn., 508th Inf., Commander
FORT CLAYTON - Saturday marks
the official casing of the colors for the 1st
Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry - a
big step toward the drawdown of U.S.
troops in Panama.
The official ceremony will close an-
other chapter of the 508th's historical lin-
eage that began in October 1942 at Camp
Blanding, Fla.
The Red Devils of the 508th, which was
activated in Panama in July 1987, partici-
pated in many significant conflicts, such as
the Normandy invasion, Dominican Re-
public, Vietnam, Grenada and most re-
cently, operation "Just Cause," here.
For the past seven months, however, the
508th's focus has not been war fighting,
but inactivating. The mission sounds simple
-pack up and go home-but in all actual-
ity it's very complex and requires the sup-
port of many outside agencies.
The effort began with a 620-plus man
infantry battalion, complete with all the
equipment required to go to war. Before
reassigning any soldier, the chain of com-
mand realized all the paratroopers had cer-
tain needs and some required special atten-
tion with unique situations.
Soldiers with families were moved to
follow-on assignments during the summer
months so their children could settle in to a
new school at the beginning of the semes-


ter. From there, the remaining soldiers were
scheduled to leave, prioritized by job posi-
tions and special assignment instructions.
Officer and Enlisted Strength Manage-
ment catered to the 508th's overall person-
nel plan.
In addition to soldiers moving on to new
assignments, soldiers completing their time
in service were aided in many ways by the
Separations Section ofUSARSO's Person-
nel Action Center. They also processed an
onslaught of PCS awards and evaluation
reports in a very timely manner.
The Transportation Division, where sol-
diers received their port calls and also coor-
dinated for household goods pick-up, sup-
ported the 508th by adapting to an increase
of 100 out-processing soldiers per month.
The Air Mobility Command, located on
Howard AFB, provided professional mode
of transportation back to the states for many
of the Red Devils and their families.
In addition to the men of the battalion
moving on, all equipment and property of
the 508th had to be turned in or transferred
to other agencies or units.
More than 4,000 pieces of furniture were
either turned over to the Defense
Reutilization and Market Officer or later-
ally transferred to units such as the 536th
Engineers and 5th Battalion (Light), 87th
Infantry.
Instrumental in these transactions was
the Furniture Management Office who con-
ducted pre-inventories, and classified and


coordinated for the movement of the furni-
ture. The Materiel Movements Section
served as the link between the 508th and the
civilian contractors who actually moved
nearly 400,000 pounds of furniture to new
locations.
The 508th property books were filled
with close to 2,000 major end items such as
vehicles, weapon systems, communication
and automation equipment and tactical field
gear.
The 93rd Materiel Management Center,
located on Corozal, directed the transfer or
turn-in of all items, while the 167th MMC,
Army Reservists out of Homewood, Ala.,
physically moved the equipment back to
the states.
The buildings the 508th called home
during its seven-year stay at Fort Kobbe
were turned over one by one to the Director-
ate of Engineering and Housing, for resto-
ration in order to allow new units to take
over the structures.
Throughout the inactivation process,
many items and soldiers were transported
from one place to another. The 142nd Medi-
cal Battalion and the Transportation Motor
Pool provided external transportation which
enabled the soldiers of the 508th to get the
job done.
As the 508th cases its colors Saturday,
the Red Devils will keep in mind many
others who contributed to this inactivation
mission just as in many training and real
world missions in the years prior.


Medical team performs eye surgery
on Hondurans as part of Exercise
Southern Hope II.


Naval Small Craft Instruction and
Technical Training School enlight-
ens Latin American sailors.


*Camp concerts, Page 3
*Festival winners, Page 7
*Cristobal Tigers, Page 11


-11

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Vnl- VYL Na- 40


Vol. V 11, IN 0. 4v j -- - -- 7


I


Faxes speed

AMC sign-ups
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA)
- Space available travelers now may
place their names on sign-up lists be-
fore they even reach an Air Mobility
Command terminal. In fact, they can
even make their reservation from an-
other country.
Remote sign-up is possible through
electronic transmission of the neces-
sary documents via fax machine. The
documents may be sent via U.S. mail
as well.
Travelers need to send their leave
form, authentication of travel eligibil-
ity (or letter of request for retirees),
and selected destinations) to a port of
origin or other terminal of departure.
First names of family members desir-
ing travel should be included also.
Authentication of travel eligibility
is defined as a statement from the
traveler that he or she has all the docu-
ments needed to travel to a desired
country. It may be typed or written on
leave forms.
Telefaxes cannot be sent before the
effective date of leave; therefore, the
telefax data header will establish the
basis for date/time sign-up.
For mail-in sign-up, the day the
documents are received will deter-
mine the date/time.
For more information, call the
AMC passenger terminal at Howard,
284-4306/3608.

Cedras arrives

in Panama
PANAMA CITY (Reuters) -
Haiti's deposed military leader Lt.
Gen. Raoul Cedras arrived in Panama
early Thursday to begin his life in
exile from the nation he ruled brutally
for three years.
Cedras and Brig. Gen. Phillipe
Biamby-two of the three leaders who
toppled exiled Haitian President Jean-
Bertrand Aristide in a 1991 coup-
and their families arrived in Panama
City at4:10a.m. from Haiti aboard an
American Trans Air Boeing 757 char-
tered by the U.S. military.
Panama agreed to take in the former
coup leaders after Aristide asked
Panama's government to give them
asylum, paving the way for Aristide's
imminent return to Haiti three weeks
after U.S. forces occupied the nation
to restore democracy.
Cedras arrived at Panama City's
Tocumen airport wearing a dark blue
suit instead of his traditional military
uniform.
"We thank the President of Panama
and the Panamanian people. We are a
family that is passing through a diffi-
cult time. We hope to live here in
Panama in pure peace and tranquil-
ity," Cedras said.













2Tropic Times
Oct. 14, 1994


LBriefly


Tropic Times late?
Call 269-3220
People who live in quarters on a Pacific
area military installation and have not re-
ceived a Tropic Times by 6:30 a.m. Friday
should call 269-3220.

'Trick or Treating' hours
established for Clayton
The established hours for "Trick or
Treating" at Fort Clayton are 5-8 p.m. Oct.
31. The age limit is 12 years old. Teens, 13
years and older are encouraged to partici-
pate in the Directorate of Community Ac-
tivities events.
People who have a valid installation
pass can escort five immediate family
members only for Trick or Treating on
Fort Clayton. People with vehicles regis-
tered with the Provost Marshal Office can
drive their vehicles onto any installation to
an authorized parking area.
Sponsors are accountable for the be-
havior of their guests while on the installa-
tion. Failure to control guests will result in
action taken against the sponsor. All visi-
tors to Army installations must be off post
no later than 9 p.m. For information, call
Master Sgt. Scott Carr at 287-3716.

Howard to measure for
mini blind installation
Measurements for the installation of
mini blinds in the Howard AFB tropical
housing area is as follows: Monday-Oct.
21, Qrts. 651-675, 12-39 and 191-199;
Oct. 24-28, Qrts. 41-99; Nov. 1-4, Qrts.
100-154; and Nov. 7-11, Qrts. 156-199.
Workers will stop by between 9 and 11
a.m. For more information, call 185-5392.

'Fiesta night' celebrates
Hispanic heritage
A fiesta night will be held Oct. 15 to
recognize Hispanic heritage. The event
will be from 5-10 p.m. at the Hotel Plaza
Paitilla in Panama City. Cost will be $5
and door prizes and two-for-one drinks
will be offered. For more information, call
1st Lt. Jaime Adames, 284-5663, or Staff
Sgt. Miguel Villanueva, 284-4837.

Workshop targets
parents of teenagers
A STEP class for parents of teenagers
will be held Tuesday from 6-7:30 p.m. at
the Chapel Annex on Howard AFB. Free
child care is available. For more informa-
tion, call 284-6410/6457.

Navy MWR needs
program instructors
Rodman Morale Welfare and Recre-
ation needs instructors in various fields to
expand their programming. The MWR
Outdoor Recreation needs individuals
qualified to teach open water scuba. For
information, call Valerie Van Essen at
283-3150. The MWR Community Recre-
ation Department needs foreign language
instructors qualified to teach Spanish and
French. Instructors should have prior ex-
perience teaching elementary and conver-
sational courses. For information, call
Navy MWR at 283-4301.


Temperature
High: 89
Low: 73

High: 88
Low: 73


Pacific
Saturday
Tides
12:57 p.m. at 14 feet
6:58 p.m. at 3 feet
Sunday
1:50 p.m. at 14.5 feet
7:52 p.m. at 2.6 feet


All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for priority mission
requirements, Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608.


Saturday
5:45am 8727 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP, GA (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
1:45pm C-5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Kelly AFB, TX
Sunday
3:45pm B-757 Howard AFB (C,O)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
(CC)
Monday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB
8:40am B757 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP, GA (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
Tuesday


Volunteers needed for
Black History Month
Rodman NS needs volunteers to help
plan activities for the 1995 Black History
Month observance in February. Commit-
tee members are also looking for guest
speakers, donations and facilities for func-
tions. People interested should call Petty
Officer Patricia Wallace or Petty Officer
Angelia Huff at 283-4400/4300.
Howard AFB officials need volunteers
to plan and organize activities for
Howard's Black History Month obser-
vance. Two volunteers, in the grade of E-
7 or above, are also needed to chair the
committee and to act as alternate. Anyone
interested in volunteering to participate in
or chairing the committee, call Tech. Sgt.
Jim Johnson at 284-5358.

Spot bid sale to be held
Wednesday at Corozal
A spot bid sale will be held 9 a.m.
Wednesday at Building 308, Corozal. In-
spection of the items will be 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Tuesday. For information, call 285-5417.

Ammunition point
closed for one week
The Rodman Ammunition Supply
Point will be closed Oct. 23-27 for inven-
tory. All units with scheduled training
should call 283-5643/5806 to reschedule
issues and turn-ins.

Sweet Adelines women's
chorus needs singers
The Crossroads Chapter of the Sweet
Adelines women's barbershop chorus
needs singers in tenor, baritone, bass, lead
and melody to participate in a variety of
community activities. Rehearsals are held
7 p.m. Monday at the Balboa Lutheran
Church hall. For information, call 252-
6017 or 221-3874.

24th Wing, AAFES set
'no smoking' policy
All dining rooms in 24th Wing clubs
and AAFES facilities have been designat-
ed as "no-smoking areas" by the wing


5:40am C-141 Howard AFB
Lima, Peru (CC)
Santiago, Chile (0)
La Paz, Bolivia
Wednesday
6:10am C-130 Howard, AFB
Bogota, Colombia (CC)
Howard AFB
5:40am C-141 Howard, AFB
Kelly AFB, TX (M)
Charleston AFB, SC
Thursday
5:45am C-SA Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Dover AFB, DE
11:40am C-141 Howard AFB
San Jose, Costa Rica
Guatemala City, Guatemala
(CC,0)


commander, Brig. Gen. Richard E. Brown
IE. After three-month, the policy will be
reviewed for its impact on customers.

24th Wing PAO will
broadcast holiday cheer
The 24th Wing Public Affairs office is
sponsoring a program to help make the
holiday season a little brighter for relatives
in the United States. People can record an
audio holiday greeting to be broadcast on
a radio station in their relatives' home
town. The program is free and open to all
U.S. military and family members. For
more information about the program, call
the 24th Wing PAO at 284-5554.

Education center sets
many new test dates
The Army Education Center announc-
es test dates for Graduate Record Exams,
Graduate Management Admission Tests,
National Teachers' Exams and Automo-
tive Service Excellence exams. The dates
are 7 a.m. Tuesday and Oct. 25, and Nov.
8, 9 and 15. GRE and NTE subject exams
will be given at 1 p.m. For information, call
287-5856.

Holiday season will
-affect postal delivery
Post office officials remind members
stationed in Panama that the holiday "rush"
usually means the mail moves slower than
normal. As a result, they've noted the fol-
lowing recommended "mail by" dates, as
determined by the final destination of the
packages.
*To get holiday packages to the conti-
nental United States by Christmas, mem-
bers should mail them first class, priority,
or space available mail by Dec. 2. When
sending them 4th class, officials recom-
mended mailing packages by Nov. 1. In-
ternational mail sent by air or air parcel
post to Africa, Australia, the Caribbean,
Central or South America, Europe, the Far
East, and others should also arrive on time
if sent by Dec. 1. Items sent by boat should
be mailed a month earlier, except those
sent to Africa and Southeast Asia, which
should be mailed immediately.
*With the advent of the 1994 holiday
season, postal officials need volunteers to
help with the tremendous influx of letters
and packages. People 16 years and older
who have authorized postal privileges may
apply.
*The best way to lose APO privileges
is to abuse them, and this includes sending
illegal or unauthorized items through the
system, or using it for personal gain. Post-
al personnel are using a variety of means
to identify and report members misusing
their postal service privileges, and this in-
cludes X-raying all items that enter the sys-
tem. People who abuse the system may be


Belize City, Belize
Howard AFB
Oct. 21
5:55am C-130 Howard AFB
San Salvador, El Salvador
(V,CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB
5:40pm C-141 Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
McGuire AFB, NJ

A- Active duty only
US- U.S. passport
O-Ovemight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance


fined, permanently lose APO privileges
and may even spend time in jail.
For more information or answers to any
postal questions, call 286-4214.

Clayton Dental Clinic
closes for training
The Fort Clayton Dental Clinic will be
closed Oct. 28 for mandatory unit training.
Patients may report to Gorgas Dental Clin-
ic for emergency treatment during normal
duty hours. After-duty emergency patients
may report to the Emergency Room.

Amnesty Day supports
Safety Awareness Day
In conjunction with USARSO Safety
Awareness Day, the 36th Ordnance De-
tachment will conduct Amnesty Day 8
a.m.-1 p.m. Oct. 28 at the following areas:
Luzon, Field, Fort Clayton; the softball
field, Fort Davis; Building 533, Corozal;
Building 734, Howard AFB; and Ammu-
nition Supply Point 1 at Rodman Naval
Station.

Rodman ammunition
supply enforces policy
Customers of Rodman Ammunition
Supply Point are required to update com-
pany access rosters every 90 days or as
personnel changes dictate. Starting Mon-
day, units will be denied access to ASP if
rosters are not updated. For information,
call Staff Sgt. Juan Gomez at 283-5806.

Florida State offers late
registration for term two
The Florida State University, Panama
Canal Branch, will hold late registration
for term two noon-5 p.m. Monday-
Wednesday in Building 808, Albrook
AFS; and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday and Tues-
day in Building 235, Fort Davis. For in-
formation, call 285-6922/5222.

Rodman Marina has wet
moorings available
Rodman Marina has wet moorings
available. Active duty military will be giv-
en priority. For information, call the Rod-
man Marina office at 283-3147.

Command stresses
prompt return of surveys
If you were mailed the U.S. Air Force
Services Market Survey, fill out the sur-
vey and return it promptly. Military mem-
bers are encouraged to seek family input
on the survey. The survey is an informa-
tion tool that will help the Services Squad-
ron on your base focus on the communi-
ty's specific needs. For more information,
contact Cynthia Ritchie at 285-5991.


Temperature
High: 91
Low: 71

High: 89
Low: 71


Atlantic
Saturday
Tides
3:09 p.m. at 1.4 feet
10:49 p.m. at 0.3 feet
Sunday
4:04 p.m. at 1.4 feet
11:38 p.m. at 0.3 feet


Forecast: Partly to mostly cloudy with afternoon showers and isolated thunderstorms.


Weekend weather












L News


Tropic Times 3
Oct. 14, 1994 *


Troops



restore



sight


Team performs

eye surgery

on Hondurans


by Staff Sgt. Robin Brown
JTF-Bravo Public Affairs Office


SOTO CANO AB, Honduras - The
old saying that eyes are the window to
the heart has taken on a new meaning in
Comayagua, Honduras. With the help
of surgery, a team of military specialists
can see hearts rejoicing through the eyes
of some locals.
As part of Exercise Southern Hope
II, a team of two anesthesiologists, four
ophthalmologists, two technicians and
an optometrist came to Joint Task Force-
Bravo to perform eye surgeries on Hon-
durans.
Composed of servicemembers from
Wilford Hall Medical Center, San Anto-
nio, Texas and the U.S. Air Force Acad-
emy and Fitzsimons Army Medical Cen-
ter, Denver, Colo., the team treated 300
patients Sept. 14 - 26. The first two days
were spent screening patients, followed
by six and one-half days of surgery and
a day for follow-ups.
The populace of 35,000 increased as
people arrived daily by horse, donkey,
foot and buggy in hopes of being seen by
the doctors. Some who weren't treated
on the day they arrived often slept out-
side on the streets and in nearby churches
waiting for clinic doors to open again
the next day.
"The leading cause of blindness in
most developing countries is cataracts,"
according to Maj. (Dr.) Wendall
Bauman, a U.S. Air Force ophthalmol-
ogist. "Without a nearby eye doctor,
these cases go untreated. Most couldn't
afford the treatment even if it was avail-
able."
"I am grateful for the North Ameri-
can doctors," said Maria Castro, a 24-
year-old diabetic. "I was blind for four
months and now I can see out of both my
eyes."
Like so many others treated, Castro
came in to have her cataracts removed.


- V, .


An ophthalmologist removes cataract substance from a Honduran patient's eye.


.N,


Staff SgtRobin Brown (JTF-Bravo)


Military specialists prepare a
Honduran patient for eye surgery.
"Castro never smiled," Bauman said,
"until after the surgery."
Cataract is the Greek word for water-
fall. The pupils appear white, the same
way it looks when water rushes over a
fall.
Surgeons numb and stabilize the eye
with a local anesthesia before perform-
ing the delicate operation. The cataract
is removed by incision and replaced
with an internal contact lens, enabling
the patient to see.
Most patients would squirm if some-
one put a needle behind their eye, but
some of these patients are strong. They
lie still until it's over without any com-
plaints of discomfort.
"One 84-year-old woman came in


with cataracts in both eyes," said Maj.
(Dr.) Jack Gillis, a U.S. Air Force oph-
thalmologist. "With her left eye she could
not tell if it was day or night. The right
eye could not see anything in front of it.
After her surgery and the bandages were
removed, Teresa Hernandez Galco was
crying for joy," Gillis said. "She was so
thankful, she kept repeating that God
had blessed my hands with this talent.
The feeling I got from her reaction to
sight makes this assignment worth the
working conditions."
Working in a small room without air-
conditioning for nine or 10 hours daily
is quite different from working in the
United States. The team had to adjust to
power outages in the middle of surgery,
water shortages and old equipment.
"It is a challenge using portable equip-
ment because it doesn't have good qual-
ity," said Maj. (Dr.) Stuart Ferris, a U.S.
Army ophthalmologist. "But, this is typi-
cal for a developing country. Every-
thing may not be as comfortable as home,
but they try to give us workable condi-
tions."
"At home we'd have gowns, drapes
and constant sterilizing. So, we brought
everything we anticipated needing. Ex-
cept sweat bands-those we bought here
to help keep the sweat from running
down our arms and onto the patients or
equipment," Gillis said. "We put rubber
gloves or plastic on the handles of the
microscopes used during surgery to
maintain our sterility."
The team averaged 12 surgical pa-
tients per day with a one-day high of 14.
Most were cataract removals, and others
were strabismus, eye injuries and con-
genital birth defects that sometimes cause


Staff Sgt.Robin Brown (JTF-Bravo)


blindness.
The eyes of 7-month-old Josue
Hernandez were crossed. To correct what
doctors call strabismus, Gillis "tight-
ened the muscle around his eyes to im-
prove the balance so they could see
straight, as opposed to an eye turning in
or out."
Unlike the adults, the children are put
to sleep before to surgery. "A local
anesthetic would not work in these
cases," said Bauman. "Children
wouldn't tolerate the discomfort or lie
still long enough."
Even under these unconventional
conditions, these doctors continue to
work.
"One day the power went out, but we
couldn't stop working," said Gillis, "so
we used flashlights to perform the sur-
geries."
With limited space, the team per-
formed all the surgeries in the same
room, two at a time. One of the opera-
tions took seven hours, all done without
air conditioning.
"The 12-year-old girl had congenital
birth defects that prevented her eyes
from closing properly," Ferris said. "The
bigger she gets, the less her eyelids
cover her eyes. Without correction, in-
fection would set in, causing her to go
blind."
"What we do here helps prepare us
for our wartime mission. The working
conditions may be similar and surgeries
the same. The appreciation of what we
are doing here is felt by all of us,"
Baumen said. "By providing the hu-
manitarian medical assistance needed,
we also strengthen the bond of friend-
ship and trust between our countries."


Popular musicians visit Safe Haven camps


by Staff Sgt. Scott Elliott
JTF- Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau

EMPIRE RANGE - Latin Salsa sing-
er Willy Chirino performed several of
his biggest hits and had encouraging
words for members of Cuban Commu-
nity Camp 1 Monday.
Some 2,300 community members
were present when Lt. Col. Jim Green-
wood, camp commander, welcomed
Chirino and officially named the camp
in his honor. In addition to Camp Chirino
residents, several hundred American
military members moved to the rhythm
of the Chirino band.
"I've come here to sing to the
'balseros' (rafters), but more than just
sing to them, I'm here to assure them


that there is a group in exile (Cubans in
the United States) who are supporting
them," Chirino told reporters in a press
conference prior to the concert.
"Considering their lack of freedom
and within the limits, they're happy -
especially when their conditions in
Panama are compared with those in
Guantanamo. I thank the U.S. Southern
Command for the good treatment they're
giving to the balseros," he said.
Residents of Community Camp 2
welcomed an entertainer of their own,
Cuban-American pop singer Jon Secada,
Tuesday. Secada toured the camp,joined
residents in an a cappella version of one
of his hits and donated school supplies.
Secada and his band were on tour in
Panama City in support of his latest
album.


(Safe Haven JIB)
Salsa star Willie Chirino performs for Cubans at Camp No. 1.


/










4 Tropic Times
Oct. 14, 1994

Cubans assault MPs;

no one seriously hurt
EMPIRE RANGE (Safe Haven JIB) - Cubans as-
saulted four military police and one Cuban at Operation
Safe Have Camp Willie Chirino Tuesday during an at-
tempt to move the Cuban to another camp after he was
threatened by other camp residents.
While heading towards the camp administration area,
a group of Cubans confronted and assaulted the Cuban
national. Five people were apprehended. Two Cubans re-
ceived minor scratches. There were no injuries to U.S per-
sonnel. All involved were examined by medical person-
nel and no one required hospitalization. Camp representa-
tives were briefed about the incident by the commander
and cooperated in determining the facts and turning over
the Cubans involved.
Officials said the incident is very disappointing be-
cause a small group of emotional Cubans targeted one
camp member along with the unarmed MPs attempting to
protect him. Officials said an investigation is going on and
some form of disciplinary action will be taken.

AF master sergeant

busted for cocaine use
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PAO) - Master Sgt.
Charles Whitted of the 24th Maintenance Squadron was
convicted by a court-martial Sept. 29 for two uses of co-
caine.
Whitted was sentenced to six months at the Fort Clay-
ton Confinement Facility, a bad conduct discharge, reduc-
tion to E-3 and forfeiture of $550 per month for six
months.
Whitted was identified as a result of a random urinaly-
sis test taken in March. Results proved positive and in
April he was asked to consent to a second test which also
came back positive. The samples were analyzed at
Armstrong Laboratory, Brooks AFB, Texas.
Whitted enlisted Sept. 17, 1974, and was scheduled to
retire Oct. 31. Air Force Secretary Sheila E. Widnall will
decide whether or not to allow him to retire.

Traffic Command says

POVs ready for pick up
BALBOA (MTMC) - The following customers have
privately owned vehicles ready for pick up at the POV
Processing Center, Building 1501, Balboa, adjacent to
Pier 18:
Anciaux L.N.; Belter M.S.; Borchelt D.W.; Butler
S.R.; Cooley S.E.; Daniel T.E.; Fluet J.E.; Garuz T.E.;
Gonzalez B.; Griffin S.D.; Johnson V.M.; Krist M.G.;
Lerose N.J.; Lewis A.W.; Lucas A.W.; Marcelino W.V.;
McIntosh K.E.; Mejia-Rangel 0.; Miller J.T.; Moore J.D.;
Newberry J.D.; Oconner M.L.; Parker B.; Pittman T.Z.;
Ruggles G.; Sanchez E.E.; Schaul D.E.; Schmidt C.E.;
Smith C.M.; Squires E.; Stall F.M.; Stockdale R.J.; Tay-
lor T.; Testa J.A.; Thomas S.L.; Tregaskis K.
Customers must have the following documents for
pick up of their POVs:
*ID card (current military, dependent, or civilian)
*Driver license (must have Panamanian license for sec-
ond POV)
*POV shipping document (DD Form 788)
*Vehicle registration or title
*Vehicle keys
*Power of Attorney and photo copies of the sponsor's
bilingual ID card and driver's license (when the sponsor
on orders cannot be present for pick up)
The list is current as of Tuesday. For updates, call cus-
tomer service at 282-4642/3853 or the POV arrival tape
recording at 282-4641. Customer service hours are 7:30
a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Monday - Friday and 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday. People expecting POVs are reminded to call
customer service to leave a contact phone number.

Purchasing service

offices consolidate
RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) - The U.S. Naval
Station Panama Canal Purchasing Services Office con-
solidated with the Air Force Purchasing Contracts Office
Oct. 3.
During negotiation and purchasing phases, the Air
Force and Navy Treaty Implementation Plan offices
stressed quality of service as the foundation of successful
consolidation of base operations support services.
The Air Force will now provide full acquisition and
contract administration services for procurement of equip-
ment, services, supplies and subsistence as requested by
the Navy. Under the "Buy Panama Program," local pro-
curement will be used if the product is readily available
and comparatively priced. Items not available will con-
tinue to be purchased from the continental United States.


W News


(U.S. Army)
Christmas sponsorship time
Santa, normally an employee of Headquarters, Directorate of Logistics, visits children at
Centro de Orientacion Infantil de Farallon, Rio Hato, Panama, during the 1993 Joint Task Force-
Panama Christmas Sponsorship Program. Organizations interested in getting involved in this
year's program should call U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office at 287-3007/3058.




Controlled item list revised


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The revised list
of controlled items has been approved and is effective im-
mediately. In addition, a new form will have to be filled
out by customers purchasing designated controlled items.
The new form was developed to record the identity of
persons purchasing controlled items. It will be used in an
effort to anticipate current, or monitor possible criminal
activity involving U.S. Armed Forces or authorized pa-
trons.
Any questions concerning contraband items may be
answered by reading SC Regulation 1-19, or call the Con-
traband Control Section at 286-3303/3304.

Alcohol
Beer - 10 cases per month per household
Liquor - 8 bottles per month: in addition, 50 miniatures
per month per household may be purchased
Note: SC Form 55A must be filled out if more than one
case of beer or two bottles of liquor or 16 miniatures per
day is purchased.
Cigarettes
3 cartons per week or 12 cartons per month per household
Food
Cooking oil - 5 gallons per month
Hams - One packaged or canned per week; in addition, 2
packages of sliced per week
Pork shoulder - One per week
Turkey - One whole turkey or 6 packages of parts per
week
Bacon - 4 pounds per person per week
Hot dogs - 4 pounds per person per month
Sandwich meat - 80 ounces per person per month
Household items
Laundry soap - 25 pounds per household per month


Disposable diapers - 120 per week per child
High value items
(Quantities are per household per tour)
Air conditioner - 4
Bicycle - 1 per household member
Cameras - 2 more than $100
Car radio/tape deck - 1 per registered vehicle
CD player - 2
Clothes dryer - 1
Computers - 2 CPU/keyboards, 4 single disk drives, 2
printers
Dishwashers - 1
Electric typewriters - 2
Freezer - 1
Golf club sets - 2
Household furniture - 1 living room set, 1 dining room
set, 3 bedroom sets, I crib per child
Microwave ovens - 1
Piano/organs - 1
Power lawn mower - 1
Ranges - 1
Refrigerators (<4 cu.ft.) - 1
Refrigerators (>4 cu.ft.) - 1
Sewing machines - 1
Silverware - 2 sets more than $50
Stereo sets - 2
Tape deck/recorder - 2
Television set - 3
Tuner/amplifier/receiver - 2
Vacuum cleaner - 2
Video camera - 1
Video recorder - 2
Washing machine - 1
Weed eater (gas operated) - 1


Panaa nesumar


Editor's note: The following summary of news is
taken from the Panamanian press. The translation
and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is made
by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of reporting
or statements made here. Selection of these stories
does not imply any emphasis, judgement or endorse-
ment by the U.S. government. These synopses are
intended only to give non-Spanish speaking people a
flavor for news events in Panama.

Oct. 7
El Siglo, La Prensa: Papers report that the U.S.
Southern Command is considering repatriation of the
two Cuban refugees captured in Santiago following
their escape from the migrant camp.

El Panama America: Paper reports a recent poll


shows that the majority of Panamanians favor keeping
U.S. troops in Panama.
Oct. 12
El Panama America: Paper reports Panamanian po-
lice are trying to locate 500 AK-47 rifles in Coco Solo
that were allegedly shipped to Panama to be sent to Co-
lombian guerrillas. The report says Colombian authori-
ties have provided a list of 22 people allegedly involved
in an arms trafficking ring in Panama.

El Siglo, El Panama America La Prensa Critica
Libre, Hoy, La Estrella: Papers report political asylum
of Haitian Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras is subject to public
acceptance and approval by Haitian President Jean
Bertrand Aristide. La Prensa reports that Panama's
Arnulfista Party disagrees to taking Cedras and says
Panama should not be turned into a haven for guerrillas.











, Feature


Tropic Times
Oct. 14, 1994


4!
".-** _ _'^ .__-_ .-- :,J ^ ";


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John Hall (U.S. Navy)
Petty Officer 2nd Class Greg Alexander shows students the components of a refrigeration system at the Naval Small Craft Instruction and
Technical Training School.

NAVSCIA'I-rS. Leading Latin navies


NAVSL IAITSo to smoother sailing


by John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office
RODMAN NS - Serving as the
primary center for patrol craft opera-
tions and maintenance training in
Latin America, the Naval Small Craft
Instruction and Technical Training
School here educates hundreds of
students annually.
The NAVSCIATTS staff of 40
enlisted, four officers and four
civilians teach 13 courses ranging
from weapons maintenance to coastal
operations. The courses fall into three
functional categories; management,
maintenance, and operations training.
The majority of courses are eight
weeks long.
The staff consists of bilingual
native Spanish-speakers for students
who come from 28 Latin American
and Caribbean nations, said Cmdr.
Dave Landis, NAVSCIATTS com-
manding officer.
"Not only do our students use
these technical trades in the service,
but they can also use them after they
get out," Landis said. "It's good for
their community, country and our
national defense."
In 1961, NAVSCIATTS was
established as a U.S. Coast Guard
Mobile Training Team under Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy's Latin Ameri-
can "Alliance for Progress." The U.S.
Navy took over training in 1969 and
formally commissioned the unit as a
training command in 1983. Since the
commission, more than 4,000 students
have enrolled in the school.
"Two of the most popular classes
with students are the Patrol Craft
Commander's Course and Patrol Craft
Weapons Maintenance Course," said
Senior Chief Robert Tokarek,
NAVSCIATTS senior instructor. In


John Hall (U.S. Navy)
Petty Officer 2nd Class Roy Salano (right) gives welding instructions
to Joel Hernandez of El Salvador.


the weapons course, students work
with handguns, M203 grenade
launchers, M-16 rifles, and M60 and
.50 caliber machine guns. For groups
like the Colombian Anti-Narcotics
Police, instructors bring in special
weapons like AK-47s and uzis.
In the Patrol Craft Commander's
Course, students plot and navigate
voyages. In April, a group planned a
700-mile navigation exercise to
Cartagena, Colombia.
A student who is attached to a
Bolivian riverine group said he will
use what he has learned here soon.
"I'll be going back to the special
operations group there," said Lt.
Gerado Thellaeche. "The riverine
training here is the basic foundation to
apply what I've learned and the
weapons course is the perfect comple-
ment to it."
Modern technology aids instruc-


tors in courses like air conditioning
and refrigeration maintenance.
Teachers can program mechanical
problems into machines for students to
apply troubleshooting steps. In these
machines, they can see Freon running
through the system. Tokarek said the
classes learn about recycling Freon-
something new to many of them.
Most of the training at
NAVSCIATTS is done inside the
classroom, however, some students
work on the water as well. In the
Riverine Operations Planning Course
students learn navigation, patrol
tactics, emergency drills, combat first
aid and maritime law enforcement. In
the last week of training, the students
are on the water 24 hours a day
preparing for aggressors. Members of
Naval Special Warfare Unit 8 provide
realistic ambushes by using blanks
and pop flares.


Instructors aren't confined to the
classrooms either. Teams of instruc-
tors often travel to other countries to
help with training. In February, a team
went to West Africa to help its sailors
with swift boats the country received
from the U.S. government. In March,
a team went to Venezuela to help with
its Boston Whalers.
Although all courses are open to
women, the Supply System Manage-
ment Course has been the only one
with their participation. Panama and
Colombia have sent women to this
course to learn how microfiche can
speed up orders. Landis said he has
the best supply system in the Navy
because students conduct its inventory
three times a year.
Buying craft from the U.S.
military is becoming commonplace for
Latin American and Caribbean
nations, Tokarek said. "They like our
craft because they are more stable.
When countries buy commercial craft,
it's often difficult for them to buy
parts," Tokarek said.
To place a greater emphasis on
human rights training, NAVSCIATTS
will extend two of the courses to
address this issue. In January, the
Riverine Operations Planning Course
and the Patrol Craft Commander's
Course will incorporate Human Rights
and Military Operations into the
curricula.
Although most courses are eight
weeks long, some students stay as
long as five months after taking
multiple courses. Despite being in a
new country students don't become
"barracks rats." Many spend their off-
time forming soccer teams to take on
locals. Landis and Tokarek agree that
NAVSCIATTS teams don't lose often
because many world-class players
come through the school.


'4,J


1 0,









6 Tropic Times
Oct. 14,1994


S Voices


Reader wants facts about morale calls


Dear Mayors' Corner,
I have heard endless rumors about morale calls (autho-
rized Defense Switched Network calls) for active duty
military members here. Supposedly each active duty
member is authorized one 10-minute call, once a week to
a continental United States post. I have not found anyone
here in Panama who knows anything for sure, but a lot of
people have heard that it is authorized.
I've called a continental United States operator to ask
about this and was told that, yes, one 10-minute call was
authorized, once a week. The operator also stated that I
could be connected by her to a local outside line or that I
could be connected to a long distance operator. I was told
that if the party I was calling was long distance from post
I would only be charged as if I were actually calling from
that CONUS post instead of from Panama.
The problem that I have encountered is the availability
of a DSN line after 4 p.m. Because of different time zones
in the states and the fact that operators will only connect
morale calls after 6 p.m., I find myself out of luck. I was
told that I could call anytime if I had a control number. I


would like to know who is authorized what, when and
how.
Bad Connection

Dear Bad Connection,
First of all, I would like to explain the delay in answer-
ing your letter. When I received your inquiry, I sent it to
106th Signal Brigade, who informed me that the regula-
tion governing this question was being updated and was
about to be released for public access. So, after waiting
for two months until the information in U.S. Southern
Command Regulation 25-13 became official, I now feel
reasonably sure that the information that I'm about to pass
on to you is the best, most up-to-date word available on
the Morale, Welfare, Support call question.
The regulation states that the DSN service may be used
to place morale calls from U.S. military installations with-
in Panama and Joint Task Force Bravo, Soto Cano Air
Base, Honduras, to the continental United States and
Puerto Rico.
Calls may only be placed from a Class AA line under
Department of Defense control or through a local installa-
tion operator at the installation commander's discretion.
Calls will be placed during normal off-duty hours (5 p.m.-


6 a.m.) at the originating location and, when possible, an
attempt should be made at times which avoid the normal
duty period at the terminating location.
Callers are limited to one call per week. All morale
calls will be made to a CONUS DSN operator at routine
precedence and should not exceed 10 minutes. Off-net-
ting at the distant end is at the discretion of the local com-
mander.
No morale call will incura toll charge to the govern-
ment, even if the intent is to reimburse the government.
All morale calls will be made on a non-interference basis.
Because of my lack of government-ease, I hope that I
have answered your question. However, if you feel that
you need more information, please contact me at 287-
3191 and I will print off a copy of the new regulation.
Francine Phillips


Editor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral
Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity
chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will
be granted upon request. The Tropic Times reserves
the right edit letters and responses for brevity.


Soldier drives over MP's


foot at pedestrian gate


Hot foot at the gate
At the pedestrian gate last week, a sol-
dier became belligerent toward on-duty
military police. During the incident, the
soldier was told to pull his vehicle to the
side of the road to allow others to pass. The
soldier moved his vehicle forward, but ran
over an MP's foot in the process. After re-
turning to the gate on foot, the soldier be-
came belligerent and falsely identified
himself as an MP. He was apprehended
and charged with assault, impersonation of
an MP, failure to obey orders and disor-
derly conduct.
When entering an installation, follow
the directions of the MPs on duty.

Passing it on
Contraband Control saw a family mem-
ber buy 15 bags of groceries during sur-
veillance at the commissary. Then the fam-
ily member drove to San Felipe, where she
gave the groceries to two non-privileged
card holders. She was arrested and charged
with wrongful transfer of merchandise.
If you have questions or concerns about
this matter, refer to U.S. Southern Com-
mand Regulation 1-19 or call the Contra-
band Control Office at 286-3303.

Club fight
While at the Fort Clayton NCO Club
last week, two family members and two
civilians were involved in an altercation
which turned into a physical fight. Each
was apprehended and charged with assault
and communicating a threat.
The military police remind you to not
let alcohol ruin a good time out at the club.


Physical altercations result in apprehen-
sions.

Go speed racer
Recently, a civilian was charged with
reckless driving when he was clocked trav-
eling 39 miles per hour on Clayton-
Curundu Road in a 15 MPH zone.
The military police would like to re-
mind you, that between the hours of 7:30
a.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays, the speed
limit is 15 MPH on Clayton-Curundu
Road in front of Curundu Grade School.

Over the limit
A soldier was arrested for driving his
vehicle while intoxicated last week. When
military police stopped him at Fort Clay-
ton's main gate for a routine identification
check, the scent of alcohol was detected on
his breath. Although he declined a field so-
briety test, a Blood Alcohol Test per-
formed on the soldier revealed a .11 per-
cent alcohol rating.
If you plan to drink, know your limits.
If you have had a few drinks, call a taxi or
use the designated driver program, rather
than getting behind the wheel of a vehicle.
Remember, do not drink and drive. For in-
formation, call the Military Police Traffic
Section at 287-3203.

Unsecured money
The unsecured desk of a Fort Clayton
auto parts store employee was stripped of
$53 last week.
The military police remind you to se-
cure money and valuables at all times.
Don't become a victim.


Bike registration
The military police encourage resi-
dents to register bicycles on post. Regis-
tration helps deter thieves and makes it eas-
ier to recover a bicycle when stolen. Reg-
istration can be done at the Vehicle Regis-
tration Office, Building 849, Fort Clayton.
For more information, call 287-4545.

Recovered property
The following property was found re-
cently:
*leather pouch with money
*baby stroller
*adult bicycle
*lady's Casio watch
*Comell class ring
*U.S. passport (Verville)
*bankcard
*men's Casio watch
*travelers' checks
To claim your property, call the found
property custodian at 287-4401.

Panama Jack Anonymous Hotline
Anyone with information concerning
drug smuggling should contact the Pana-


ma Jack Anonymous Hotline at 285-4185.

Housing area crimes
The following housing area crimes oc-
curred during the week of Sept. 17-23.
Pacific
Fort Clayton
400 area - one larceny of secured private
property
600 area - one larceny of secured private
property
800 area - one larceny unsecured private
property
1000 area - two larcenies of secured pri-
vate property
1100 area - one larceny of secured private
property
Curundu
1900 area - one larceny unsecured private
property
Off post
Balboa - one larceny of secured private
property
Bethania - one larceny of secured private
property
Lajas - one larceny of secured private
property


STropic Times


Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666


This authorized unofficial command information publica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pub-
lished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Pro-
gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of
the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the
U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002

Commander in Chief........................Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs............................Col. James L. Fetig
Chief..... .......................... Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor........................... ............................. M aureen Sam pson


Sports Editor.................................................... Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editors..................................................Sgt. Cass Purdum
Spc. Tom Findtner
Rosemary Chong
Southern Command Public Affairs Office..............2...282-4278
Command Information Officer.......................Patrick Milton

U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office..................2...287-3007
Public Affairs Officer...................Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer..... .. ............Beth Taylor
Managing Editor..............................S...Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Editor................................. ........Sgt. Robin Shawlinski
Journalists.............................. ............ Sgt. Eric Hortin
Spc. Brian Thomas


U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic................................289-4312
NCOIC............................................. Sgt. Rick Emert

24th Wing Public Affairs Office................................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer...................Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.......Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists..................................S...Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............2...283-5644
Public Affairs Officer.................................Diane Gonzalez
Assistant Public Affairs Officer...........................John Hall
Photographers.....Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays











__ Features


Tropic Times
Oct. 14, 1994


how


Maureen Sampson (Tropic Times)
Linda Dahlstrom and John Bennett perform in "Opera Comique."
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre won many awards for the show, including
"Best Supporting Actress" for Dahlstrom.


ers


Local talents sweep festival


COROZAL (Tropic Times) - For
the sixth year in a row, local performers
have swept the 1994 Forces Command
Festival of Performing Arts and Recre-
ation Center Programming Competition.
U.S. Army South's Pacific Theatre
Arts Centre, Music and Theater (Atlan-
tic) and Valent Recreation Center won
16 awards in the "Best of Festival" cat-
egory and eight awards in other catego-
ries.
Experts in music and theater and
recreation visit each of the competing
installations and judge the programs in a
variety of categories. This year's judges
were Mary Alice Hodges and Phillip
Wayne, both former Army entertain-
ment and recreation directors with vast
experience in the performing arts and
recreation, according to Jerry Brees,
chief of entertainment for the Director-
ate of Community Activities.
FORSCOM judges rate the produc-
tions on originality, quality of acting,
musical talent, direction, lighting, sets,
creativity and choreography. Individual
cast members are evaluated on talent,
stage presence, singing/acting/dancing
ability, appearance, stage movement and
enthusiasm, Brees said.
The productions entered in this year's
competition were "Encore - a Valent
Retrospective" - Valent Recreation Cen-
ter; "Opera Comique" - Pacific Theatre
Arts Centre; "Annie" - Music and The-
ater (Atlantic).
The recipients of this year's awards
will be honored with plaques and certifi-
cates as well as command recognition,
Brees said.
Here is a list of local winners from
the festival:


Best of.Festival
*Recreation Center Programming,
Encore - a Valent Retrospective
*Best Production - Play, Opera
Comique
*Best Costume Design of a Play -
Barbara and Rachel Berger, Opera
Comique
*Best Direction of a Play - JoAnn
Mitchell and Jerry Brees, Opera
Comique
*Best Set Design of a Play - Jerry
Brees, Opera Comique
*Best Supporting Actress in a Play -
Linda Dahlstrom, Opera Comique
*Best Musical Production, Annie
*Best Musical Director - Jim
Hashman, Annie
*Best Leading Actress in a Musical -
Peggy Barrett, Annie
*Best Supporting Actress in a
Musical (tie) - Roxanne Woodlard and
Stephanie Kluts, Annie
*Best Supporting Actor in a Musical
- Randy Grubbs, Annie
*Best Installation - U. S. Army South
Award of Excellence
*Publicity and Promotion, Opera
Comique
*Best Leading Actress in a Play.-
Melanie Bales, Opera Comique
*Best Leading Actor in a Play - Lt.
William Keltner, Opera Comique
Honorable Mention
*Best Lighting Design for a Play, Op-
era Comique - Jerry Brees
Special Citation
*Orphans, Annie
*Bert Healy and the Boylan Sisters,
Annie
*Heidi Fye, Annie
*Orchestra work, Annie


New garrison commander mayor of sorts


by Sgt. Eric Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO) - Coming in confi-
dent, with a good attitude, Col. Silas Smalls, the new
U.S. Army Garrison-Panamacommander, doesn't pull
punches when it comes to running his command.
"USAG-Panama is a very interesting organiza-
tion," Smalls said. "Fort Clayton is the center of
gravity for base operations on the Pacific and Atlantic
side of the isthmus.
"As the garrison commander, I'm responsible for
providing quality mission support from 11 defense
sites for some 37,000 customers. What that means is
that the Garrison is like a small, modern U.S. city,"
Smalls said. "It's a great challenge."
In fact, Smalls considers himself to be a mayor of
sorts. He deals in all manner of logistics areas that a
"normal" city mayor would. Everything from person-
nel management, budgeting, education and public
works to garbage collection, day care, utilities and
housing sees Smalls' desk at some point.
Quality of life is a major area of concern for
Smalls. As straightforward and tactful as he can be,
Smalls wants to give a heads-up to the soldiers, civil-
ians and families this covers: "We can't continue to do
business as usual due to limited budgeting."
"As we go into the out years, I see a major chal-
lenge. The declining base operations funds are going
to impact quality of life in Garrison," Smalls said. "My
focus will be to provide a high quality of life for the


"As we go into the out years, I see a
major challenge. The declining base
operations funds are going to impact
quality of life in Garrison ... My focus
will be to provide a high quality of life
for the community."
Col. Silas Smalls
U.S. Army Garrison - Panama
Commander

community." Those in the community-specifically,
those in family housing-have Smalls' particular at-
tention.
The shortages in funding and manpower have
affected housing severely, and Smalls' cannot pretend
or promise those in housing that it is going to get any
better.
"We had a shortage in family housing funds in
fiscal year '94. We're coming up even shorter in FY
'95," Smalls said. "We're going to make sure DEH
(Directorate of Engineering and Housing) provides
critical repairs to family housing units, and we've
asked occupants to take the initiative and fix the
smaller things.
"I think the families occupying quarters have been
extremely cooperative in that area and I applaud them
for that," he said.


Other areas will be affected by the drawdown,
declining funds and implementation of the Panama
Canal Treaty. Not least of those is the decline in the
civilian workforce, consolidation of community pro-
grams and even streamlining of Garrison operations.
"We have to come to grips with this because it will
impact significantly on day-to-day operations," Smalls
said. "It may be that we cut certain functions out - those
not too critical - in order to keep those that are critical
to mission accomplishment."
But on the flip side, Smalls points out that troop
billeting that is to be kept is going to be improved. An
example of that is the billets on Fort Kobbe that are
being renovated. It will be the soldiers here, though,
that will have the greatest impact on the operations
over the coming years. So far, Smalls' initial impres-
sion of the soldiers has been a positive one.
"I'm very impressed with the professionalism of
USARSO soldiers and civilians," Smalls said. "There
are a lot of young soldiers here, but the soldier quality
is the best I've seen in years. Garrison's civilian
workforce are hard working employees committed to
providing quality service for our customers."
But in the coming years, much of his attention is
going to be focused on the community and trying to
keep quality of life as high as possible. He has no
illusions about his tenure and is ready to face the
challenges head-on.
"It's going to be a challenging two years for me.
We're going to have some tough times but we're also
going to have a lot of fun," he said.









Tropic Times
Oct. 14, 1994





World


tH~istory


War


II


Local pilot helps blast Japanese convoy


FORT CLAYTON - The following
are significant World War II events that
took place during October 1944:

Oct. 2
The promotion of one officer (2nd
Lt. Bruno H. Bettini) from Chemical
Warfare and eight enlisted men from
the Engineer Topographical Com-
pany and the Harbor Craft organiza-
tion is announced by Headquarters,
Post of Corozal.

Oct. 3
Following services at the Cristo-
bal Union Church, some 450 Atlantic
side Protestant servicemen march
down Bolivar Avenue to the USO for
a Sunday Communion breakfast of-
fered to them by USOA women of all
faiths.

Oct. 5
During a special ceremony held at
the Panama Union Club, Mr. Samuel
Lewis Arango, Minister of Foreign
Relations, awards the order of Vasco
Nunez de Balboa to the following U.S.
military officers: Maj. Gen. Joseph
C. Mehaffey, Canal Zone Governor;
Gen. Douglas Weam, Chief of Staff,
Caribbean Command; Gen. William
C. Christym, Chief of Staff of the
Panama Canal Department; Lt. Cdr.
Ellis J. Stone, Chief of the Panama
Sea Frontier Command; and Lt. Col.
R. D. Prescott.

Enrique A. Jimenez, Panamanian
Ambassador to the United States, re-
turns to Panama with his family for a
month's visit in his homeland.

Promotions of ten enlisted men
from the Engineer Depot Company
and the Quartermaster Car unit are
announced by Headquarters, Post of
Corozal.

Oct. 6
Brig. Gen. Edgar H. Underwood,
one of the original Jungle Mudders
who helped forge and fortress Panama
out of the trackless terrain flanking
the Allied lifeline between the Atlan-
tic and Pacific, returned to the scene
of his pioneering days as command-
ing general of the Atlantic anti-air-
craft defenses of the Coast Artillery
Command. Upon assuming his new
duties he warns against the possibility
of a suicide raid."

Oct. 7
Panamanian President Ricardo
Adolfo de la Guardia and Chancellor
Samuel Lewis Arango present official
condolences to the U.S. Embassy on
the occasion of the demise of U.S.
Presidential candidate Wendell
Wilkie.

Oct. 13
Germans launch first V-bomb
against Antwerp, which, next to Lon-
don, proves to be the primary target for
these weapons.


Oct. 19
In an announcement by District
Headquarters it is learned that Lt.
John T. McGroarty, USNR, of An-
con, was the pilot of one of 12 Navy
search planes which blasted a Japa-
nese convoy near Satawan in the Caro-
linas, destroying four of the five ships
in the formation during a two-day
action. McGroarty's plane, a PV
Lockheed Ventura, straddled a 400-
ton cargo ship with its bombs during
the first day of combat.

Ex-President Gen. Fulgencio
Batista y Zaldivar of Cuba, arrives in
Panama and is invited to visit the U.S.
military installations in the Canal
Zone by Gen. George H. Brett,
Panama Canal Department com-
mander.

Oct. 20
The Panama Canal Department
Chaplain announces that Catholic
men stationed at Fort Davis will cel-
ebrate the Forty Hours Devotion, a
series of services in honor of the
Blessed Sacrament (an annual obser-
vance by Catholics).

In a ceremony held on the
rainswept Fort Clayton parade
grounds, 125 soldiers of Col. Monro's
Jungle Infantry are awarded the
Army's Good conduct Medal by Brig.
Gen. Philip E. Gallagher, Commander
of the Mobile Force.

Maj. S. H. Bargman, of Head-
quarters, Sixth Air Force Service
Command, is named chairman of the
Army's War Fund Drive by Lt. Gen.
George H. Brett.

Seventy-six enlisted men serving
with the Sixth Air Force Fighter Com-
mand throughout the Caribbean Area
are promoted according to orders
published at Fighter Command Head-
quarters.

Lt. Col. Ernesto Medina, Military
Attache for the Republic of Chile to
the United States visits the Panama
Canal Department en route to Wash-
ington on official business.

Americans land at Leyte, Philippine
Islands, fulfilling Gen. Douglas
MacArthur's promise to return. It is
during the Leyte campaign that the ka-
mikaze, or suicide plane, is first used by
the Japanese.

Herbert Lehman, Director-Gen-
eral of the United Nations Rehabilita-
tion Administration announces that
Brazil signed an agreement creating a
mixed commission for the procure-
ment of relief supplies to make effec-
tive that country's contribution to the
UN.

Lt. Col. Ernesto Medina, Military
Attache for the Republic of Chile to
the United States visits the Panama


Canal Department en route to Wash-
ington on official business.

Oct. 23
Gen. George H. Brett, pilots his
personal B-17 Superfortress
"Swoosse" to offer a canal overflight
to Maj. Gen. Batista.

Oct. 23-26
In the Battle of Leyte Gulf the
Japanese fleet, which had been unable
to halt U.S. invasion of the Philip-
pines, suffers heavy losses. This was
the largest naval battle of the war.

Oct. 24
U.S. P-40 planes effect live target
practice by erroron the Island ofOtoque
with .50 cal machine guns.

Oct. 25
The Coast Artillery Command
announces forty-eight promotions.

Panamanian Chancellor, Samuel
Lewis, announces that the Panama-
nian Government has recognized the


Provisional Government of Liberated
France presided by Gen. Charles de
Gaulle.

Oct. 26
Upon returning from an inspection
visit of the Mediterranean theater with
Brazilian War Minister Gen. Eurico
Gaspar Dutra, Maj. Gen. Ralph
Wooton, commanding the U.S. group
forces in the South Atlantic, reports
that Brazilian airmen who underwent
preliminary training in Florida and
Panama are now in Italy preparing to
enter action "equipped with one of the
latest model fighter planes."

Oct. 28
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower issues
directive for November offensive, calling
for destruction of enemy West of the
Rhine, establishment of bridgeheads
across the river, and drive into Germany.

Editor's note: This timeline was
compiled by Dolores De Mena, U.S.
Army South historian, in commemora-
tion of the 50th Anniversary of WWII.


"uFF
WIE &JOE




























" Try to say sumpin'funnry Joe."


SBill Mauldin achieved international fame as the
youngest person ever to win a Pulitzer Prize with
his famous World War I editorial cartoons.
50h Though Willie and Joe were soldiers, service
Ireo members of all branches could see themselves in
tRLO WAR I t their cartoons. Now 50 years after Mauldin brought
Willie and Joe to the pages of the Stars and Stripes
newspaper, they speak again to a new generation.















Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Oct. 14, 1994


Page 9


Golfers eek narrow win in


Amador Mexican tourney


Baseball epic airs on

SCN channels 8, 10
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - Baseball returns to
television despite a lengthy baseball strike, no play-
offs and no World Series.
Southern Command Network television chan-
nel 8 will air the epic miniseries "Baseball" begin-
ning at 4 p.m. Oct. 22, officials said.
The miniseries traces the history of the Ameri-
can pasttime and reflects on it's contribution to our
culture. The miniseries covers the clash of labor and
management, the search for heroes and the quest for
racial justice.
The miniseries is divided into nine episodes
which will air the weekends of Oct. 22,23 and Oct.
29, 30. Consult the television schedule on page B9
for times of each episode.
The miniseries will also be aired in November
on nine consecutive nights during the all night
movie blockat 1 a.m. on channels 8 and 10, officials
said.

Sailors duke it out

in volleyball contest
RODMAN (Morale, Welfare and Recreation) -
The Navy volleyball pre-season tournament was
held Oct. 3-6. Results are as follows:
Match 1: Marines defeated Public Works Dept.(15-
11)(15-11)
Match 2: Naval Special Warfare Unit-8 defeated Med-
ical Dept. (15-3)(15-11)
Match 3: Navy Small Craft & Technical Training
School defeated Marines (15-6)(15-13)
Match 4: PWD defeated Medical (15-0)(15-9)
Match 5: SCIATTS defeated NSWU-8 (15-3)(16-14)
Match 6: PWD defeated Marines (15-3)(16-14)
Match 7: NSWU-8 defeated PWD (15-12)(15-9)
Championship Match: SCIATTS defeated NSWU-8
(15-9)(15-8)


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor
AMADOR - A two-stroke spread separated first froir
fourth place in the tightly contested Amador Golf Coursc
Columbus Day Mexican Best Ball Tournament.
Taking the win in the 51-team field were Ramon Ubben,
Monty McDaniel and Joseph Siltz with a 60.5 net score.
Hot on their heels was the team of Eddie Myers, Lee
Weigt and Pat Williams. Their 61.5 net score pulled them
close, but the third place team of David Konawicz, John
Haines and John Haines Jr. was knocking on their door with
a 62.
Bringing up the rear was the team of Abilio Philides,
Jorge Monroy and Alberto Restrepo with a 62.5 net score.
The winner of the "closest to the pin" contest on the 10th
hole was Al George.
The Mexican Best Ball format teamed three players.
Each player was limited to a putter and two clubs of his or
her choice, said Patricia Peart course manager.
Each player tees off. From there, the team selects the
best lay, and each player again shoots from that point.
Following this process the players shoot from the best
vantage point, calculating their score by the first player
hitting the hole.
The Mexican format is also referred to as the scramble
format in the United States, she said.
Each of the four teams and George won gift certificates
for merchandise at the Amador Pro Shop.
The Amador and Horoko golf courses sponsor tourna-
ments on a monthly basis, as well as offer clinics and
instructional support by the course pros.
A women's instructional class will open Oct. 25 at the
Amador Golf Course.
Call the Amador Pro Shop at 282-4511 and the Horoko
Pro Shop at 283-6346 for information.


Soldiers kick up fun in Distant Haven


by Pvt. 2 Melinda Dezern
JTF-Suriname PAO
SURINAME - The referee stood center
field with a whistle in his mouth. A member
of Joint Task Force-Suriname reached over
to exchange a quick handshake from his
opponent.
The whistle sounded, and the kicking
began. Dutch and English words collided in
the air as fans from both teams cheered on
their players.
Surinamese and U.S. military police,
along with some other JTF members, had


begun a friendly game of soccer.
Operation Distant Haven has brought
together two different forces and taught
them the importance of cohesion.
For the past three weeks, task force
members have worked hand-in-hand with
the Surinamese, especially U.S. and
Surinamese MPs who patrol the migrant
and base camps together.
Capt. Alberto Rivera, commander of the
534th Military Police Co., saw how well
both forces worked together and decided to
set up soccer games to help further the good
relations.


Pvt 2 Melinda Dezern (JTF Suriname)
534th Military Police Company's Carl Montovani dives for a shot on goal.


"It was a game of bonding," Rivera said.
"It was a way of letting them know we
accept them not only as co-workers, but
also as friends.
"I rely on the Surinamese MPs to protect
my soldiers," he said, referring to the fact
that U.S. Army MPs aren't allowed to carry
weapons.
Besides the Surinamese MPs, the other
Surinamese soldiers are a great asset to
Operation Distant Haven. The contractors
helped in constructing the camps and the
kitchen staff help prepare and serve meals
for JTF members.
"It was a plus to have them working with
us. We proved that it is possible for two
totally different armies to come together,"
Rivera said.
The MPs have developed a good work-
ing relationship with the Surinamese and
have also had a chance to get to know them
and their customs.
The game was a good way for the two
armies to communicate and have fun, Rivera
said.
Although both teams were hoping to
win, the players looked out for one another.
"They (Surinamese) picked us up when
they knocked us down - he helped me up


earlier in the game," said Pfc. Charles
Fassinger, 534th MP Co., as he pointed to
the guy who knocked him down.
The respect and knowledge gained by
the two forces working and playing side-
by-side was mutual.
"This is the first time I've worked with
an army of another country," said Suriname
Army Cpl. Kenneth Zaalman.
"I learned discipline. You guys come to
a foreign place without your husbands and
wives - I wouldn't survive," he said.
Zaalman was amazed at how the U.S.
military is able to deploy, be away from
friends and family, and still remain focused
on the mission at hand.
"Most young people don't understand
what we do as an American military...we
serve as an example," said Col. Louis
Huddleston, JTF commander.
"You can't always see the impact you're
having on people. We're exposing people
to our values," he said.
With a pat on the back and a firm hand-
shake, JTF members congratulated the
Surinamese players on their 1-0 victory.
Zaalman shook Rivera's hand, and as
Rivera turned to walk away, he said, "Next
time we play American football."


The Tigers squeak out a victory
against the Kolts in a 25-22 game at
Cristobal Stadium.


NF 0ik-,Pg~l


1 6 .0I


John Hall recovers from upset syn- *SCN AM radio schedule
drome and picks this week's win- *Local sports standings
ning teams. *Fishing philanthropy event


SLo...I. uavi. \i ..m i iimWs
Clark Brandenburg sinks a putt on the 8th hole.


V *41w












1 Tropic Times
S Oct. 14, 1994


Football


Tigers fend off Kolts, 25-22

By Sgt. Rick Emert
USARSO Public Affairs Office - Atlantic
CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL - The
Cristobal Tigers roared past the Kiwanis
Kolts 25-22 here Oct. 7. -,
The Tigers outscored and outplayed theL
Kolts in the first half, preventing the Kolts
second half rally from upsetting the game.
The first quarter was scoreless on both
sides. The Tigers' Jon Guerra ran in the first
touchdown of the game in the second quar-
ter, and with the two-point conversion Ti-
gers led, 8-0.
The Kolts did the same, tying it up 8-8.
The Tigers Rob Bernhardt kicked a 34-
yard field goal with less than a minute left in
the half, jacking the Tigers lead to 11-8.
The Kolts last possession of the half
ended with an interception by the Tigers'
Christian Lopez. Lopez scored on a 34-
yard run with only seconds left to put the
Tigers up 18-8.
The Kolts' tumovers continued into their
first possession in the second half. The Sgt Rick Emert (U.S. Army)
turnover led to another Tigers touchdown The Tiger's Jon Guerra outdistances his Kolt pursuers in a midfield run.
this time by Tigers running back Ruben Kolt quarterback Raul Ford's 25-yard pass without moving the ball. edging closer to the Tigers, 25-20. A two
Rafalko. Guerra kicked for the extra point, into the endzone took the score to 25-14. The Kolts recovered a Tiger fumble on point conversion took the score to 25-22.
and the score was 25-8. The Tigers next possession ended in a the Tiger 8-yard line with nine seconds left The clock ran out on the Tigers final
With one second left in the third quarter, turnover, but the Koltshad fourquickdowns in the game and ran it in on the next play, possession, giving them a 25-22 win.


1994 season marks Cristobal Tiger's final roar


By Sgt. Rick Emert
USARSO Public Affairs Office - Atlantic

CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL - As the 1994 season
ends, the Cristobal Tigers' roar will fade to an echo in
Panama's closely watched high school football play.
-�*igw - saai. .


. '.


Sgt. Rick Emert (U.S. Army)
Carlos Roman (20) and Jose Alvarez stretch
during practice.


1200

1000

800

600

400

200

0


The Tigers are well into their final season, and Coach
Richard Elliott is not treating it any differently than the past
five seasons he's coached the team.
"I don't look ahead enough to think of this as the last
season," he said. "We have a game Friday, a game next
Friday and a game the following Friday. Pretty soon, it will
be over."
"The players are oriented toward the game we're getting
ready for. We won't worry about the end of the season until
it's here."
The 1994 Tigers are 1-3 now, but Cristobal fans have
cheered their team through good and bad seasons.
"In the 60s, the Tigers were a powerhousee" Elliott said.
"They had 10 down years in the 70s and 80s and were at the
lowest point they could be."
Elliott came aboard in 1989 and noticed that only a few
of the players were ready to play, he said.
"When I got here, there were seven players that were
ready," he said. 'There was not a whole lot of emphasis
placed on the right things."
After some work, the Tigers had their first good season
in a decade.
"Our first victory was a big one," he said. "We had a
touchdown pass as the final play of the game and won the
game because of it."
"The people (watching) were shocked; it was the first
game the Tigers had won after all those down seasons."
The last game of that same season was also memorable,
he said.
"We upset the (Curundu) Cougars," he said. "They
were 7-0, and we prevented them from ending the season
undefeated."


Team statistics


Cougars
Bulldogs
Devils
Kolts
Tigers
Machine


Team standings
W L T Pct.
4 0 0 1.000
3 1 0 .750
3 1 0 .750
1 3 0 .250
1 3 0 .250
0 4 0 .000


Week four results
Curundu Cougars 21, Balboa Bulldogs 6
Cristobal Tigers 25, Kiwanis Kolts 22
Green Devils 26, Balboa Red Machine 7
Tonight's games
Tigers vs. Machine, 5:30 p.m. (BHS)
Devils vs. Bulldogs, 7:30 p.m. (BHS)


Yards rushing
S Bulldogs Cougars Devils


Yards passing
Kolts 0 Machine 1 Tigers


Reese, Devils
Martens, Cougars


Scoring
TD XP Total
9 2 58
5 1 32


The Tigers ended the season at 5-3. Following another
5-3 season, Elliott's Tigers struggled through couple of
bad years.
"The (two) years that we were 1-8, we were just
physically beaten," he said. "The other teams had bigger
and older players."
Even in those seasons, supportfrom the Atlantic com-
munity never waned, he said.
"The Atlantic community supports you even if you
lose," he said. "We have our own identity here. They stuck
with us through those bad seasons, and we were able to
keep our pride and dignity even in losing."
And the Tigers paid them back last year, ending the
season at 7-3 and tying for first place.
Although the team seemed to turn around under his
coaching, Elliott said how the season goes depends on the
players.
"We're stronger now," he said. "We have a good
quarterback, a good middle linebacker and a strong defen-
sive line."
With three winning seasons out of five, Elliott's future
in coaching football is not clear, he said.
"I'll still be working in (Department of Defense Depen-
dents Schools), but I don't know if I'll be coaching," he
said.
Although he was a quarterback for Southern California
University and has coached teams in California and Virgin-
ia, his future in coaching in Panama may be based on his
work with the Tigers, he said.
"I think our (Cristobal Tigers) program is pretty well
respected, and that the (Pacific community) thinks enough
of our program to have me involved over there."


Rushing
Carries Yds. Avg.
Reese, Devils 92 654 7.1
Guerra, Tigers 68 429 6.4
Hall, Bulldogs 68 314 6.7
Kick offs
Kicks Yds. Avg.
VonHollen, Cougars 17 813 47
Lampas, Devils 18 820 45
Beach, Bulldogs 12 530 44
Punts
Kicks Yds. Avg.
Husted, Machine 6 208 34
Price, Tigers 20 642 32
Beach, Bulldogs 16 502 31
Quarterbacks
PA PC % Yds TD Int
Lampas, Devils 43 26 60 370 3 1
Martens, Cougars 80 35 43 657 6 4
Beach, Bulldogs 34 11 32 242 1 5


Source: Robert Best
















SCN AM Radio 790/1420
airs pro, college football
Saturday
Noon: NCAA: Auburn at Florida
5:30p.m.: NCAA: Arizona at Washing-
ton State
Sunday
Noon: NFL: San Francisco 49ers at At-
lanta Falcons
3 p.m.: NFL: Philadelphia Eagles at
Dallas Cowboys
Monday
8 p.m.: NFL: Kansas City Chiefs at
Denver Broncos
Thursday
7 p.m.: NFL: Green Bay Packers at
Minnesota Vikings

Women's basketball
action continues
Tonight
4:30 p.m. Cougars vs. Devils (PCC)
5:30 p.m. Red Machine vs. Bulldogs (BHS)
Oct. 19
4:30 p.m. Bulldogs vs. Cougars (CJHS)
5:30 p.m. Tigers vs. Red Machine (BHS)

Angling event supports
crippled, burned children
The Legion of Abou Saad Temple will
host their annual fishing tournament Nov. 3
at Gatun Lake. Prizes will be presented for
largest fish, heaviest stringer and most fish
caught over 15 inches. All proceeds will be
donated to the Transportation Fund that is
used to send crippled and burned children
here in Panama to the United States and
return. A concession stand will be available
to the public. For information, call Terry
Zittle at 261-8018.

Crossroads club hosts
doubles tennis tourney
The Crossroads Tennis Club is sponsor-
ing a men's and women's pick your partner
doubles tournament starting at 8 a.m. Oct.


Ls pOrts


22 and 23 at the Cardenas Tennis Courts.
The event is open to all active duty
servicemembers and Department of De-
fense civilians. Call Mike Goldstein at 264-
5160 or Enrique Sanchez at 250-0274 for
more information about joining the club
and registering for the tournament. Regis-
tration deadline is 6 p.m. Oct. 19.

Horoko, Amador Golf
Courses sponsor events
The Horoko Golf Course is sponsoring
a four-man Captain's Choice Mexican Best
Ball Golf Tournament Oct. 22. There is a
$10 entry fee for members. Players will be
drawn on handicap. All entry fees will be
given back as prizes. Sign up at the Horoko
Pro Shop by Oct. 20.
The Amador Golf Course is sponsoring
a Thanksgiving Turkey Shoot with a 7:30
a.m. shotgun start Nov. 12. The tournament
is two-person best ball, flights will be deter-
mined by sign ups. There is an $8 entry fee.
Turkeys will be given as prizes. Call the
course to register by Nov. 9.

Get physical now for
youth baseball sign ups
Registration for youth baseball ages 5-
18 years will run Oct. 31 to Dec. 3 at the
Howard and Albrook youth centers. A phys-
ical exam is required for registration. There
is a $25 fee for active duty card holders and
a $30 fee for other people.
Youth services operates five leagues for
community youths. The leagues are: tee
ball (ages 5-6), minor league (ages 7-9),
little league (ages 10-12), pony league (ages
13-15) and senior league (ages 16-18).

Team triathlon set to
begin at Howard Pool
A three-person team triathlon starts 6:30
a.m. Oct. 22 at the Howard pool. Support
your community and cheer for the partici-
pants. Events include a 1,000-meter swim,


Tropic Times
Oct. 14, 1994


25K bike race, and 10K run. The event is
sponsored by the Howard/Albrook Sports
and Fitness Center, 284-3451.

Register now for Army
intramural soccer
Registration for unit level soccer is un-
derway. The deadline is Tuesday. Register
at the Directorate of Community Activities
Sport Division, Building 154, Fort Clayton.

Rodman athletics host
3-event competition
Rodman athletics will hold a three-event
competition Oct. 19-21 The competition is
open to all active-duty military personnel,
Department of Defense civilians, and de-
pendents 18 and older. The events are as
follows: tug o'war Oct. 19; freestyle swim-
ming race, Oct. 20; and 5K run, Oct. 21. The
competition will be scored by points with
the unit accumulating the most points win-
ning. For more information, call Morise
Conerly at 283-4222.


Climb tennis ladder in
Howard tournament
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
is sponsoring a tennis ladder tournament.
Challenge your opponents on your own
schedule and improve your game while
climbing the ladder.

Fitness centers offer
various aerobic classes
The Howard Sports and Fitness Cen-
teroffers step aerobics 8:45-9:45 a.m. Mon-
days, Wednesdays and Fridays. In addition,
step and high-low aerobics classes are of-
fered 4:45-5:45 p.m. Monday, Wednes-
days and Fridays.
The Albrook Sports and Fitness Cen-
terhas aerobics 8-9 a.m. Monday, Wednes-
days and Fridays; and jazzercise 5-6 p.m.
Monday, Wednesdays and Fridays.


Favorites bounce back


John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office
RODMAN NS - Week six of the NFL season was the "Week
of the Favorites." Nine of the 12 favorites won outright and seven
covered the point spread. Unlike last week, there were no major
upsets. Top three highlights: 1. The Denver Broncos left the
Cincinnati Kitties as the only team without a victory. 2. The
Chargers remain undefeated, despite allowing 37 completions by
Joe Montana. 3. Warren Moon (299 yards) and the Vikings ruined
Lawrence Taylor Day at Giants Stadium with a 27- 10 stomping
of the New York Giants.
Here are the week seven picks:
Raiders mash Miami - The Raiders' offense is licking its
chops for the second straight week. Last week L.A. faced the 28th-
ranked defense; this week the Raiders take on the league's worst
pass defense. The Raiders lead the overall series 14-4- 1. On the
negative side, the Raiders face the league's number two offense
after facing number one. L.A.'s Terry McDaniel ripped Drew
Bledsoe for three interceptions and has a chance for more against
the pass-happy Fish. Raiders 26, Dolphins 19.
Cowpokes ground Eagles - The Cowboys have swept their
NFC East rival the past two years and made history last year.
Emmitt Smith set a club record with 237 yards in a 23-10 win at
Veterans Stadium. Smith added 172 yards in the second match-up
for an average of 204.5 yards against one of the league's better
defenses. After trashing the Niners, the Eagles had a letdown of
sorts, edging the Redskins 21 - 17 Sunday night. The Cowpokes
had no such trouble, smacking the Cardinals 38-3. Look for Dallas
to get wideout Michael Irvin more involved on first down to set up
delays by Smith. Cowpokes 23, Eagles 17.
Niners find gold - The 49ers have won three of the last four
against the Falcons, but the one they dropped is memorable. In
week 15 last year, San Francisco had a 24-7 lead going into the
fourth quarter and watched the Falcons reel off 20 unanswered
points. That game was at the Georgia Dome as this week's is. The
49ers had to rally from a 14-0 deficit against Detroit last week
while the Falcons bashed the Bucs 34-13. Shockingly, the Falcons
have put up better offensive stats than the Niners this year. Look


for a seesaw scoring duel. 49ers 30, Falcons 28.
Browns bash Oilers - Although Houston has taken seven of
the last eight with Cleveland; this year's Oilers are a strange crew.
One good sign for Houston is that last year's team also started 1-
4 before taking 11 straight. One major difference is that team had
Warren Moon, William Fuller, Sean Jones...you get the picture.
The Oilers are still stinging from a Monday-night spanking by the
Steelers and the Brownies are high after grounding the Jets.
Cleveland's Eric Metcalfmay outscore the Oilers on just returning
kicks. Browns 27, Oilers 10.
Bustin'Broncos- Chiefs'coach Marty Schottenheimerdoesn't
have much luck against the Denver Broncos. He lost three AFC
Championships to them while coaching the Cleveland Browns.
He's fared better as K.C.'s coach, but not much. After starting 3-
0 and dropping two straight, the Chiefs should break out of their
slump. The Broncos are the right medicine after squeaking out a
16-9 win over Seattle. Although Denver got five turnovers, the
outcome was in question until the end. Chiefs 26, Broncos 13.
Other scores: Bye, bye Buddy, Redskins 20, Cardinals 16; Pitt
makes it seven straight over Cincy, Steelers 26, Kitties 14; Buffalo
makes it nine of 10, Bills 31, Dolts 13; Bledsoe's back, Patsies 22,
Jets 16; Bettis rolls, Rams 19, Giants 15; Bolts survive scare, Bolts
18, Saints 16.
There are open dates for Chicago, Detroit, Green Bay, Minne-
sota, Seattle and Tampa Bay.
Last week 10-2, overall 46-32, Monday night 5-1.


American Conference
East


Buffalo
Miami
N.E.
N.Y. Jets
Ind.
Cleveland
Pittsburgh
Houston
Cincinnati
San Diego
K.C.
Seattle
Raiders
Denver


W L T Pct.PF
4 2 0 .667 117
4 2 0 .667 160
3 3 0 .500 158
3 3 0 .500 92
2 4 0 .333 113
Central
4 1 0 .800 118
3 2 0 .600 100
1 4 0 .200 79
0 5 0 .000 78
West
5 0 0 1.000 134
2 0 .600 90
3 3 0 .500 130
2 3 0 .400 116
1 4 0 .200 108


Dallas
Phil.
Giants
Arizona
Wash.
Chicago
Minn.
Green Bay
Detroit
Tampa
Atlanta
S.F.
LA Rams
N. O.


National Conference
East
W L T Pct. PF


1 0 .800
1 0 .800
2 0 .600
4 0 .200
5 0 .167
Central
2 0 .667
2 0 .667
3 0 .500
4 0 .333
4 0 .333
West
2 0 .667
2 0 .667
4 0 .333
4 0 .333


Reeder Physical Fitness Center has
free aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. Monday-
Friday. Call 287-3861 for more informa-
tion.


Black Stallion, Vargas
charters now available
The 61-foot Black Stallion is available
for Pinas Bay Marlin fishing, deep-sea fish-
ing, cruising or moonlight cruise charters
forlargeorsmall groups.The42-foot Vargas
is also available for charter. Call the Rod-
man Marina at 283-3147.


Howard center offers
lunch bunch sports daily
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
offers various lunch bunch sports and fit-
ness activities every week. Scheduled events
are; Aerobics noon-1 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays, volleyball-11
a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, basketball 11 a.m.-
1 p.m. Tuesday.


Aerobic workshop offers
certification testing
An aerobics workshop and certification
test is being organized in the Atlantic com-
munity. The testing will be given by the
American Aerobic Association International
and International Sports Medicine Associ-
ation from Pennsylvania. The certification
is valid for two years. A minimum of 15
people are required for the class. For infor-
mation, call Delinda May at 289-3163.

Tang Soo Do taught
at Curundu, Clayton
Tang Soo Do is taught 6-7:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays at the Pacific The-
ater Arts Center, Building 2060 in the Cu-
rundu housing area and 6-8 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays at the Valent Recreation
Center. Classes are open to adults and chil-


Sports directory


Sports offices
U.S. Air Force
U.S. Army
U.S. Navy
Bowling centers
Albrook AFS
Fort Clayton
Curundu
Fort Espinar
Howard AFB
Scuba diving
Albrook AFS
Fort Clayton
Fort Davis
Fort Kobbe
Howard AFB
Balboa Dive Club
Rodman NS
Golf courses


284-3451
287-4050
283-4061

286-4260
287-6366
286-3914
289-4100
284-4190

286-4090
287-3355
289-3208
284-4854
284-5766
263-8077
283-5307


Fort Amador 282-4511
Horoko 283-6346
Fitness centers
Albrook AFS 286-3307
Fort Clayton 287-3861
Fort Davis 289-3496
Howard AFB 284-3451
Rodman NS 283-4222
Swimming pools
Albrook AFS 286-3555
Balboa 252-5493
Curundu 286-6260
Farfan 284-4252
Fort Clayton 287-6660
Fort Davis 289-3272
Fort Espinar 289-4189
Gamboa 256-6425
Gatun 243-5233
Howard AFB 284-3569
Los Rios 252-6417
Margarita 243-7229
Rodman NS 283-4253













12 Tropic TimesNews
Oct. 14, 1994


Spc. Tad Browning (SOUTHC
Ambassador Myles Frechette (left) and Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey discuss regional secur
issues with Colombian President Ernesto Samper (right).


SOUTHCOM committed to


support fight
QUARRY HEIGHTS (U.S. SOUTHCOM PAO) -
The U.S. military has an absolute commitment to
helping the Colombian military and police in their
struggle against narcoguerrillas.
This was the message carried to Colombian Presi-
dent Ernesto Samper last week by Gen. Barry R.
McCaffrey, Commander in Chief of the U.S. Southern
Command. McCaffrey reaffirmed the commitment of
the U.S. military to help Colombia, recognizing the
price Colombians have paid to drug and guerrilla-
related violence.
McCaffrey noted that more than 25,000 Colom-
bian civilians, military and police were killed last year.
Some 3,000 police have been killed in the last five
years, and 250 soldiers have died in the past six months
alone. During 1994, the United States will provide
more than $21.79 million to Colombia to aid in the
counterdrug effort.
In Colombia, there are active guerrilla groups that
want to overthrow the democratically-elected govern-
ment. In recent years, the guerrilla groups have joined


against drugs
forces with the narcotraffickers, who pay the guerrillas
to provide security for their illegal activities. The
guerrillas use the payments to finance their own illegal
activities against the government, officials said.
"U.S. policy prohibits our military from becoming
directly involved in actual counterdrug field opera-
tions," said Capt. Jim Knotts, a Southern Command
spokesman. "However, U.S. soldiers routinely deploy
to train with Colombian soldiers and police. The
deployments provide training for our service mem-
bers, while developing the skills the Colombians need
to then conduct counterdrug field operations."
The narcoguerrillas are well financed and well
armed, so the military and police must count on skill,
patience and courage to counter the threat. The U.S.
Special Operations Command South, headquartered
in Panama, sponsored an exercise in Arkansas in
September to train to fight the narcoguerrillas. The
exercise used a scenario to counter a fictional group of
narcoguerrillas who took over a fictional island called
Victoria off the coast of Colombia. The Organization


of American States asked its member nations to form
a coalition to assist Victoria. The United States, Co-
lombia, Ecuador and Venezuela formed a coalition
task force that deployed to Victoria, where they raided
drug labs and captured the narcoguerrilla's base camp.
Although mutual counterdrug efforts were a major
topic of discussion, McCaffrey visited the South Ameri-
can ally to learn how Colombians view regional secu-
rity issues. On his first official visit to Colombia since
he took command in February, McCaffrey arrived in
the Colombian capital of Bogota Oct. 6, where he was
greeted by U.S. Ambassador to Colombia Myles
Frechette; Commander of the U.S. Military Group
Col. Thomas Carstens; and General Hernan Jose
Guzman, Commander of the Colombian Army.
After discussing regional security issues with
Samper and Frechette, McCaffrey took part in a wreath
laying ceremony at Plaza Bolivar to honor the Colom-
bian veterans who fought alongside the U.S. in the
Korean War. In total, Colombia sent 3,089 soldiers
and sailors to Korea, and suffered more than 600
casualties. The Colombians earned two U.S. Presiden-
tial Unit Citations for valor in combat. Approximately
30 Colombian veterans of the Korean War attended the
ceremony, which also was attended by representatives
from the Korean Embassy in Colombia.
The ceremony was very emotional. According to
Col. Ben Harvey, the trip officer in charge, McCaffrey
recounted that the Colombian Battalion served in
Korea under the 7th Division, 31 Regiment, which was
commanded by his father, Lt. Gen. (ret.) William J.
McCaffrey. The unit also served under the 24th Infan-
try Division, which McCaffrey later commanded dur-
ing Operation Desert Storm. He passed on his father's
personal greeting and remembrances of the courage
and valor of the Colombians during the Korean War.
He also presented each veteran at the ceremony a copy
of a personal letter from Maj. Gen. Joseph E.
DeFrancisco, current commander of the 24th Infantry
Division, who recognized their past service with the
unit and thanked them as an inspiration to two genera-
tions of U.S. and Colombian soldiers.
McCaffrey later .met with the Colombian equiva-
lents of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the
Service Chiefs, and the Director of the National Police.
He visited the Escuela Superior de Guerra (Senior War
College), where he presented a briefing on the U.S.
Southern Command and joint operations. In the north-
ern coastal city of Cartagena, McCaffrey visited the
Colombian Navy, Marines and Coast Guard.
Another highlight of the trip was a visit to the 10th
Brigade Lancero Training School and NCO Academy.
The Lanceros, equivalent to the U.S. Army Rangers,
are highly trained infantry soldiers who conduct spe-
cial operations missions. They are recognized world-
wide for their skill and valor. McCaffrey met with
Capt. Sean Mulholland, a U.S. Army exchange officer
who is an instructor at the school. Mulholland escorted
McCaffrey during his visit to the school, explaining
the differences and similarities in the Lancero training
compared to Ranger school.


Multi-service medical team keeps Cubans healthy


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
JTF Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau
GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY
HOSPITAL - Ensuring the good health
of the Cubans at the Operation Safe
Haven community camps is a combined
effort between specialists at the Preven-
tive Medicine Services here and a U.S.
Navy Preventive Medicine team at the
5th Air Transportable Hospital at Em-
pire Range.
Since the arrival of the Navy team,
the mission of the specialists from Gorgas
has been that of making sure the meals
served at the community camps are safe
and sanitary. Before that time, however,
their mission was vast and varied.
"Since the very beginning we have
been involved in everything from the
planning stages to choosing the sites to
locating a safe water source," said Lt.
Col. Wilfredo Souffront, chief of Pre-
ventive Medicine Services at Gorgas.
"My entire staff, including environmen-
tal sanitation, community health and
many technicians, were heavily in-
volved."


Also heavily involved in the begin-
ning was the entomology department. It
was their job to survey the sites for
insects that could cause illnesses such as
dengue, he said. The entomologists from
Gorgas continued to monitor the sites
until the Navy team arrived to the field
hospital and took over the job of moni-
toring.
"We also surveyed the sites for wa-
ter safety and helped with the number
and locations for shower and latrine
facilities," Souffront said. "Continuous
monitoring of the water and checking
the sites for cleanliness now falls under
the control of the Navy team."
Though much of the original mis-
sion now falls to the Navy team, the
Gorgas specialists continue to monitor
and survey the meals served at the com-
munity camps, he said.
"This part of the mission remained
with us because we are familiar with the
area and visiting the places where the
food is prepared is easier for us,"
Souffront said. "Because frequent visits
to these areas as early as 4 a.m. are
necessary, it just made good sense that


we continue with this part of the mis-
sion."
Technicians from the Gorgas office
regularly visit the companies contracted
to supply meals to the community camps.
Through these visits, it is ensured that
the food is properly handled, stored,
prepared, transported and served, he said.
In addition to monitoring the food
contractors, the Gorgas team is also con-
ducts classes instructing food service
workers about food handling.
The Gorgas team is also working
with Cubans at the community camps to
coordinate field sanitation and classes
for camp leaders on field sanitation,
Souffront said.
"We are working with Cuban physi-
cians living in the community camps to
ensure sanitation is kept at a high level
within the camps," he said. "This in-
cludes classes on personal hygiene, ways
to keep the areas and latrines clean and
the trash picked up between contrac-
tors' visits, and training on the dengue
mosquito."
The Gorgas office also acts as a
liaison for the Navy team and the 5th Air


Trans. Hospital as consultants and is in
constant touch with Preventive Medi-
cine offices from throughout Panama in
an effort to ensure a high quality of life
is maintained at the community camps.
Though the mission to ensure this
high quality of life is, in itself, a massive
undertaking, finding a safe and depend-
able water source has been a "mega-
job," he said.
"The water source was not only the
most important, but the hardest mis-
sion," Souffront said. "We are still work-
ing it out and, while we are working it
out, the water is still being transported
from a garrison source."
With the Preventive Medicine mis-
sion being of many facets, Souffront has
been impressed with the level of profes-
sionalism and cooperation between all
of the teams, the contractors and the
Cubans within the community camps.
"This is a daily, on-going, joint ef-
fort to help in Operation Safe Haven,"
Souffront said. "Everyone involved is
100 percent committed to help the resi-
dents of the community camps keep a
high quality of life."












Tropictivities

A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama


Page B1


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.'4*. 4


Senior Airman Steve McNally (U.S. Air Force)


Tops in Blue world tour '94
The Air Force entertainment traveling troupe, Tops in Blue, puts on a high-energy performance Oct. 7for members of the Panama military community.
For story and photos, see Page B3.


Children celebrate the Puerto
Rican Youth Festival in honor of
National Hispanic Heritage Month.


Atlantic Comr
Club raises m
final year of or


imunity Women's
lore than $9,000 in
operation.


*Movies, Page B8
*TV, Page B9
*Potpourri, Page B12


-*6-4


nt I4 I ()()d


uJl. 14 1,2, Y


I


I. Co muiy Pg B


lr L. J_=tq J. 7"t


* At:










B2 Tropic Times
SOct. 14, 1994


# Youth news


Staff Sgt Jane Usero (U.S. Army)
Joe Colon (left) and Efraim Ramos play a Latin tune for those attending the Puerto Rican Youth
Festival at the Fort Clayton Youth Center to honor one of the many Hispanic cultures.


Fort Clayton's youth experience


Puerto Rican culture at festival


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office

FORT CLAYTON - Everyone was in colorful, tradi-
tional dress. The drums and guitars filled the room with
Latin sounds.
Small children danced with excitement and clapped
their tiny hands in time to the music. Adults greeted long-
time friends and met new ones, engaging in conversation
in their native tongue.
The room in the upstairs of the youth center here was
decked out in Puerto Rican flags and decor as the Puerto
Rican Festival kicked off Friday with the Puerto Rican
National Anthem and a poetry reading by some children.
In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, Puerto
Ricans from throughout the military community gathered
to celebrate their heritage with music, dance, poetry, food
and friends.
"We are taking this opportunity to celebrate our cul-
ture and to educate others," said Maj. Gustavo Ortiz-Ortiz,


committee member and master of ceremonies for the cel-
ebration.
"Most people are familiar with the Mexican culture and
traditions and we all love it, but there is so much more to
Hispanic heritage. We hope to make the community aware
of these many different cultures of which Puerto Rico is
just one," Ortiz-Ortiz said.
Through the months of planning, recruiting and prac-
ticing, the all-volunteer program did just.that.
"The program took a lot of effort, coordination and
hours, but you get out of a program such as this whatever
you put into it," said Alameda Awilda, program coordina-
tor. "Everything from planning the performances to deco-
rating the room was done by community members volun-
teering their time and talents."
It is the committee that plans this type of event, but the
volunteers are the ones who make it happen, she said.
And happen it did as the standing-room-only crowd
cheered the young dancers, saig with the musical groups
and shared in a pride of Hispanic heritage and Puerto
Rican culture and traditions.


Staff Sgt. Jane Usero (U.S. Army) Staff Sgt Jane Usero (U.S. Army)
Angelina Ortiz dances for the audience at the Alexis Ortiz performs a traditional dance during
Puerto Rican Youth Festival at the Fort Clayton the Puerto Rican Youth Festival at the Fort
Youth Center. Clayton Youth Center.


-Yuhatvt


Albrook/Howard
Competitive Swim Team Tryouts, 10 a.m. Sat-
urday at Howard and Albrook Pools for youths 8-18
years old. Fee will be $15 per month. Call Lisa Nofi,
284-3569, or Rose Coville, 236-2035, for more infor-
mation.
*Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Preteen Costume Dance, 7:30-10:30 p.m. at the
Howard Youth Center Oct. 21, $2.50 entrance fee.
Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday evenings.
Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for mem-
bers and $35 for non-members.
Guitar lessons, by appointment 1-6 p.m. Satur-
days.
Spanish lessons 4 and 5 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
days.
Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesday.
Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four days a
week. Special preschooler class Saturdays.
Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available for
ages four to adult.
*Just for teens:
Free self defense demonstration for girls 5 p.m.
Oct. 22, Albrook.
HIV/AIDS awareness, 4-5 p.m. Oct. 27, Albrook.
Call 284-5650 to register. Permission slips required.
Falltime party 8:30-11:30 p.m. Oct. 28. Wear or-
ange and black and get in free. The 'Anthill Posse'
will be playing in the Albrook Club ballroom.
Transportation is provided from Howard Youth Center
and Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center.
*Child Development Center 284-6135:
Family Day Care Providers are needed in the
Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 for
information.

Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Treasure Hunt 3 p.m. today.
Ping Pong tournament Saturday.
Pool tournament, Oct. 21.
Community services, Oct. 22. Bring a can of
food.
Not So Scary Halloween is a happy Halloween
activity for toddlers to 10 years old. It will be held 4-
7 p.m. Oct. 31. A $1 fee includes game prizes, candy
and a lot of fun.
Junior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays Building 155.
Youth Services is looking for piano and gymnas-
tics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at 287-
3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton.
Video day, Wednesdays.
Arts and crafts, Mondays.
Cooking experiences, Tuesdays.
Outdoor games, Thursdays.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Popcorn and movies, Sundays.
Friday specials sponsored by AAFES. Call for
details.
Senior Teen Employment Program, year- round
program to develop job skills and earn money for
teens 15-18 years old. Applications are available at
the center.
Bowling at the Clayton Bowling Center 3 p.m.
Saturday. Meet at the center at 2 p.m.
Medievel University scheduled for Saturday has
been postponed. Look for announcement of new date.
Smithsonian marine environmental education-
al program, 8:30 a.m., Oct. 22. Free.
Halloween Senior Teen Dance, Oct. 22.
*Child Development Services 287-3301:
Spaces are available in the CDS part-day pro-
gram, Building 156 Fort Clayton, in the afternoon
session from 1-3 p.m. Preschoolers must be 3 years
old and toddlers must be 2 years old by Oct. 31. For
information, call 287-5507/5104.

Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Not so fright day movies, 3 p.m. Oct. 22.
Hand puppet show, 2 p.m. Oct. 22.
Shotokan Karate, 4-5 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday, $20 per person.
Volunteers are needed to help with the haunted
house.
Arts and crafts, 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Saturday sports, noon to 6 p.m.










L Entertainment


Tropic Times B3
Oct. 14, 1994 B3


'..... . . ...



Aim a n 1 " I




Airman 1st Class Sheila Cousins (left) and Sgt. Cassondra Collins entertain the audience with a "swing tune," during the Oct. 7 performance of the
Air Force entertainment troupe, Tops in Blue.


The Tops in Blue cast sings the Disney inspired
tune, "Never had a Friend Like Me."


Tops in Blue crew members Staff Sgt. Joseph
Adkinson (left) and Airman 1st Class Sheila
Cousins, assemble the aluminum framework
for the program's set at a feverish pace-finish-
ing in record time of less than three hours.


After the show, base officials displayed the
community's appreciation by providing a buffet
banquet for the Tops in Blue staff and crew.


Tops in Blue '94



Air Force show goes on


despite last-minute arrival


f" 4 better late than never." "The difficult we do
immediately, the impossible takes a little
longer." "The show must go on."
These are familiar phrases, and any one of them
could apply to the regular operations of the Air Force
"Tops in Blue" troupe of entertainers. This time,
however, all three are appropriate.
The world-renown group performed its 90-minute
show of song and dance, music and comedy for a near-
capacity audience Oct. 7 at the base theater here, despite
circumstances that might have stopped a less-dedicated
troupe of men and women.
The 24th Wing commander, Brig. Gen. Richard
"Tex" Brown, addressed the audience just before the
show began. "You don't know what these people have
gone through to make sure you all enjoy tonight's
show," he said. "I think they set a world record setting
up their stage and hooking up their sound and lighting
equipment, doing it in something less than three hours."
Normally, this process takes between four and six
hours, said Master Sgt. Bob Brech, tour director for the
1994 Tops In Blue.
"But we do what we have to do to get the job done,"
he added. 'This is the most self-sacrificing group of
people I've ever worked with and they really wanted to
put on this show."
Senior Airman Rick Hayden, band leader and
trumpet player and the only returning member from last
year's Tops in Blue cast, agreed with Brech's analysis.
"Participating in Tops in Blue is always an incredible
experience, but I'm enjoying this tour even more than
last year's," he said. "Whether it's participating in
rehearsals, tearing down and packing up the equipment,
or filling in for someone during a performance, every
member of this group really pitches in for the benefit of
the show."
The Tops in Blue team was preparing to depart for
Panama from Charleston AFB, S.C.- and had already
boarded the aircraft - when the C-5 suddenly decided it
didn't want to fly.
First a hydraulic problem forced the troupe to


deplane and delayed the departure for several hours.
Later, after they'd re-boarded the plane, some sort of
fuel problem cropped up, further delaying departure and
once again causing the entertainers to exit the aircraft.
Because of the delays, officials had to cancel the first,
Oct. 6 performance, but planned to make up for it with
two, back-to-back performances Oct. 7. Unfortunately,
maintenance and logistics problems continued to plague
the team and its arrival in Panama was again delayed
until after 3 p.m. Oct. 7. By the time their equipment
started arriving at the base theater, it was nearly 5:30
p.m. and the team had to really scramble to get things set
up for just one show.
Still, audience members said that it was an incredible
show and was well worth the wait. The high-energy
performers went into number after musical number,
combining country, rock, gospel and swing-type music
with dance and humor, explaining the link between
music and movies, and describing the importance of
movies to the people who watch them.
With music from the Wizard of Oz, The Wiz,. Leap of
Faith, and several animated Disney features, audience
members agreed the show was a success.
"I can't believe everything they went through to put
on this show for us," one man said afterward. "You
know if it had been some big name concert band they
would've sent a cable and just canceled out on us.
'Sorry, we couldn't make it, maybe next time.' Tops in
Blue didn't do that."
"Putting on a show like Tops in Blue is a lot of hard
work and everyone has to put forward 100 percent
effort-especially when we're scrambling like this,"
Brech concluded. "Still, as long as the audience enjoys
itself, it's all worth the effort. After all, they're the
reason we are here."

story by
Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
photos by
Senior Airman Steven McNally










B04 Tropic Times
SOct. 14, 1994


SFocus on Panama


mcal landmarL





ill remains


by Rosemary Chong
Tropic Times staff
he National Theatre, located in
the heart of the old section of
. Panama City facing the sea, is a
building representing the neo-classic
architectural influence of the first two
decades of the 19th century.
The theatre was first occupied by the
Convent of the Cloistered Nuns. Public
presentations took place there until 1862
when it was chosen by Gen. Tomas
Cipriano de Mosquera for his military
headquarters.
In 1904, Italian architect Guisseppe
Ruggieri was recruited to design the
drawings for the National Theatre, as well
as the Government Palace. The contract
was awarded to Duque & Arias Co. and
the supervisor of the project was engineer
Florencio Harmodio Arosemena. The
inauguration of the theatre took place Oct.
1, 1908 to coincide with the taking of
office of Don Jose Domingo de Obaldia,
as President of the Republic. The total cost
of both projects was $597,635.
Decorative elements of the neo-classical
era makeup the facade of the building. Six
crowned arches frame the upper windows,
as well as the principal doors leading to the
lobby. In the lateral wings stand two
magnificent statues of the muses, and
above them, four embossed medallions
offer homage to Wagner, Shakespeare,
Moliere and Rossini.
Two wide halls at the sides give access
to the lateral entrances and their half-point
arches support the upper terraces, which
lead to the foyer. This architectural
disposition offers ample open space,
contributing to the equilibrium and
distribution of the volume of the building.
A lobby that can accommodate up to
853 people welcomes the visitor and
facilitates access to the various areas. The
stage's ground floor has enough space to
accommodate many activities at once and
the basement has been modified to meet
the dimensions of today's modern orches-
tras. The orchestra pit and the two areas of
the amphitheater form a moon-shaped
area, with comfortable seats and a wonder-
ful view of the stage.
The first and second floors display
elegant boxes, with polished railings in
which the rich, bright colors of the seats
and carpets give splendor to the garlands
and supports that adorn the balconies. The
upper part of the gallery affords a pan-
oramic view of the performance.
The foyer, located on the first floor,
provides ample space for intermissions,
and shows paintings of exquisite fantasies
by the Panamanian master Robert Lewis.
The ceiling of the theater, also a work of
Lewis, is an extraordinary fable of the
majesty of this country.
It displays the best techniques and
styles of the neo-classical influence that
made its statement in the isthmus. Its form
and coloring are examples of the achieve-
ments of the Panamanian plastic arts of the
period.


Since its inauguration, the
National Theatre has played
host to the best American and
European artists and compa-
nies. Its first presentation was
Verdi's opera "Aida," followed
by "Carmen" and "Lucia de
Lammermour," after which .
followed a great number of
operas and operettas, such as
"Fausto," "Tosca" and "The
Magic Flute."
The National Theatre was
also host to great artists like - . ,
Tito Shipa, Tamara Touranova,
Amalia Galligurci, Pastora
Imperio and performers Claude
Arrau, Gaspar Cassado,
Gregory Piatigorosky, Alex-
ander Brrailousky; as well as
Vienna Boys Choir and The
Don's Cossacks.
Personalities such as Jose
Santos Chocano, Luis
Alberto Sanchez, Jacinto
Benavente, gave samples of
their literary richness and
inspired works. The ampi
The National Theatre in comfort
1915, under the direction of display e
Don Narciso Garay created give sple
the Symphony Orchestra and
the National Poliphony Chorus,
executing the Ninth Symphony
of Beethoven at its first public presenta-
tion.
Many improvements have been made to
the building itself, first in 1941, then in
1950 and finally in 1970 when a great
restoration project was started under the
initiative of Jaime Ingram, then general
manager of the National Institute of
Culture.
With the support of cultural committees
and artistic groups, the backing of Gen.
Omar Torrijos Herrera was obtained for
the execution of the project. The architec-
tural restoration and the outfitting of new
spaces was done by architect Rene Brenes
and architect Guillermo De Roux, who
designed the doors.
The restoration of the plastic arts of the
foyer and ceiling of Roberto Lewis, was
executed by professor Juan Manuel
Cedeno, disciple of Lewis and Roberto
Lewis Jr., son of the artist.
One of the most important
contributions to future generations
is the conservation of this important
building. Thanks to the creation
of this first house dedicated to the arts in
Panama, the country has been visited by
outstanding artists and honored by their
presentations, offering the maximum
expressions of contemporary dance,
theater and music.
International figures such as Dame
Margot Fonteyn, Alicia Alonso and
Panamanian musicians Mr. and Mrs.
Ingram, Alfredo de Saint Malo, Roque
Cordcro, Herbert De Castro, Eduardo
Charpentier, Carmen Cedeno are
unquestionable expressions of the force of
this first house of arts in Panama.


Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Lewis (U S Navy)
hitheater forms a moon-shaped area, with an excellent disposition of
ble seats and a wonderful view of the stage.The first and second floors
elegant boxes, with polished railings in which the rich, bright colors
ndor to the garlands and supports that adorn the balconies.


Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Lewis (U.S. Navy)
The foyer provides ample space for intermissions.









_Community news


ACWC members raise more than


$9,000 in last year of operation


by Sgt. Rick Emert
USARSO Public Affairs Office - Atlantic

FORT DAVIS - With barely a third of its peak member-
ship still around, board members from the Atlantic Com-
munity Women's Club met for the last time Oct. 4.
The club rewrote its bylaws and constitution last year
with Tina Dodson as president and reopened the Thrift
Store. The Thrift Store will close down Monday.
In the one year, club members raised about $9,000
which they donated to various on and off-post organiza-
tions.
The ACWC was unique in that it brought women of all
ranks-officers, enlisted and civilian-together in one
group.
"Our board was made up mainly of enlisted wives," said
final ACWC president Tina Dodson. "It was good for our
community to have all wives as equals. It's such a small
community that we could interact well with one another."
With the means that got them together gone, a new
means will keep them together-friendship.
"We see each other all the time," Dodson said. "We all
do a lot of things together and we're very involved with the
community."


At its high point during the last year, the ACWC had 62
members and a 14-woman board. At the time of the Oct. 4
meeting, there were seven board members and 20 mem-
bers.
"It's hard to let it go," Dodson said. "I'm very proud of
what we accomplished in such a short time. There has to be
a lot of heart in an organization to work as hard as these
ladies have."
That hard work enabled the club to give $7,000 to the
community from September 1993 to September 1994,
Dodson said.
An additional $1,790 was raised from clearance sales
before the Thrift Store closed and from money remaining
in the club's bank accounts. The recipients of that money
will be: American Heart Association-$190, Cristobal High
School's senior class-$300, CHS junior class-$300, CHS
yearbook-$300, Davis Elementary School-$200, Gulick
Elementary School-$200 and Child Development Servic-
es' preschool scholarship program-$300.
Money left over when all ACWC bank accounts are
closed will go to the Sisters of Mercy Center for Women in
Colon. "We fought right down to the end to put as much
back into the community as we could," said LuAnne G.
Grant, Thrift Store manager.


WIN1


-i


-


Sgt. Rick Emert (U.S. Army)
The Atlantic Community Women's Club Thrift Store will close Monday. During the last year of club
activities, members raised $9,000 that they returned to the community through charities and
donations.


Facts for National Consumers Week


FORT CLAYTON (ACS) - Na-
tional Consumers Week has become
an established annual tradition for state
and local consumer offices, business-
es, government agencies, voluntary
organizations and individual consum-
ers.
The last week of October is annual-
ly dedicated to the ongoing need to
educate and inform consumers about
their rights and responsibilities in the
marketplace.
Army Community Service will be
presenting a series of briefs to enhance
the importance of this week, to achieve
this goal. This year National Consum-
ers Week will be observed Oct. 23-29.
For information, call ACS at287-6322.
* The Expedited Funds Availabil-
ity Act requires all banks, savings and
loan associations, savings banks and
credit unions to make funds deposited


into checking, share draft and NOW
accounts available according to spec-
ified time schedules and to disclose
their funds availability policies to their
customers. The law does not require
an institution to delay the customer's
use of deposited funds but instead
limits how long any delay may last.
The regulation also establishes rules
designed to speed the return of unpaid
checks.
* The Fair Credit and Charge
Disclosure Act requires new disclo-
sures on credit and charge cards, wheth-
er issued by financial institutions, re-
tail stores or private companies. Infor-
mation such as APRs, annual fees and
grace periods must be provided in
tabular form along with applications
and preapproved solicitations forcards.
The regulations also require card issu-
ers that impose an annual fee to pro-


vide disclosures before annual re-
newal.
Card issuers that offer credit in-
surance must inform customers of
any increase in rate or substantial
decrease in coverage should the issu-
er decide to change insurance provid-
ers.
* The Fair Credit Billing Act es-
tablishes procedures for the prompt
correction of errors on open-end credit
accounts. It also protects a consum-
er's credit rating while the consumer
is settling a dispute.
* The Truth in Lending Act re-
quires disclosure of the "finance
charge" and the "annual percentage
rate" - and certain other costs and
terms of credit- so that a consumer
can compare the prices of credit from
different sources. It also limits liabil-
ity on lost or stolen credit cards.


Tropic TimesB5
Oct. 14, 1994 B


Clayton
The Curundu Junior High School will hold a
School Advisory Committee meeting for parents 4
p.m. Monday in the school library.
The Episcopal worship service at Fort Ama-
dor Chapel will change from 10:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.
beginning Sunday. The Episcopal Sunday School
will begin at 9 a.m. in the Fort Amador Chapel
Annex. For information, call 287-3532.
The La Leche League meeting will be held 7
p.m. Tuesday at the Curundu Elementary School
Playshelter, Fort Clayton. The meeting topic will be
"There's a New Baby in Your Life." La Leche
League offers mothers-to-be encouragement and
support for breastfeeding. All interested pregnant
and breastfeeding women and their babies are wel-
come. For information, call 287-6592 or 260-6682.
The Exceptional Family Member Program
Support Group meeting will be held 7:30-9 p.m.
Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center. All active
duty military and Department of Defense personnel
with family members with disabilities are invited to
attend. If special services or accommodations are
needed because of a disability or for information,
call 287-5073/4921.
U.S. Army Public Affairs is coordinating the
1994 Joint Task Force-Panama Christmas Spon-
sorship Program. Units or community groups
wanting to participate this year should call USAR-
SO PAO at 287-3007/4109.

Howard/Albrook
Cookie baking volunteers are needed for the
Family Support Centers' "Make a Difference Day"
observation. The treats will be delivered to single
airmen who live in the dormitories Oct. 22. To find
out where to deliver cookies or how to get more
involved with the project, call Mindy Gutierrez at
284-5010.
Family Advocacy is offering classes to teach
spouses how to deal with the stress involved in
being part of today's fast paced environment. Class-
es will be held at the Howard Family Support Center
conference room, Building 707 Howard AFB 8:30-
9:30 p.m. Oct. 25. Call in advance forchild care. Call
Laila Yeager at 284-5010 to sign-up.
The Howard Family Support Center will of-
fer a spouse orientation course in English 10-11
a.m. Thursday at the FSC. This workshop is offered
twice a month to spouses who attend the Right Start
Orientation. For more information, call 284-5010.

Miscellaneous
The Officers' and Civilians' Wives Club-Pa-
cific Pumpkin Patch Christmas Bazaar will be
held 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 22 at Club Amador. More
than 100 vendors will be showing goods of all
nature.
The Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses Club
is sponsoring its annual bazaar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct.
29 at the Howard Enlisted Members Club. The
bazaar will feature a bake sale and handicrafts from
Central and South America. For information, call
284-6874.
The Howard/Albrook Officer Spouses Club
will hold its annual fall bazaar 10 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Saturday. Free shuttle service will be provided to
and from the Albrook Post Office.
The Enlisted Spouses Club-Panama will hold
its annual membership drive featuring a presenta-
tion of the whimsical "Basic Black Dress" Oct. 27 at
the Fort Clayton NCO Club. Hors d'oeuvers and
membership table will begin at 6 p.m. and a presen-
tation at 7 p.m. For information, call 284-4523 or
284-4592.
Call to report domestic violence or get more
information on services that are available. Service
began Wednesday and is available 8 a.m.- 4 p.m.
For more information, call 284-6457.

Atlantic
A breastfeeding support group meeting will
be held 7 p.m. Thursday at Quarters 529B on Fort
Davis. The meeting is entitled "Needs as Your Baby
Grows." All persons interested in learning about
breastfeeding are invited to attend. For more infor-
mation, call Martha Vaughn at 289-3234.


4









B 6 sTropic Times
Oct. 14, 1994




er bottom feeding fish. Fee includes cap- 5 a.m.-2 p.m. today and Oct. 29, $25. Wear loose clothing, long pants, hiking
Rodman tain, gear, live bait and iced coolers. Bring fishing gear and bags. shoes or sneakers, raincoats, and a hat.
*Information, Tour and Travel: Downtown shopping 9 a.m. Oct. 27, El Valle horseback riding, 7 a.m.-4 Bring insect repellant, drinking water, ma-
Moonlight cruise 6:30 p.m. Saturday $8. Shop Panama's Central Avenue and p.m. Saturday, $24. nila tape, and a dry towel. Register by
and Oct. 29, $21. Cruise out to Taboga Via Espana. Nature tour to Barro Colorado Is- Monday.
Island for cocktails and hors d'oeuvres by Two-day deep seas fishing trip, Nov. land 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Thursday, $65, lunch Partial transits of the Panama Canal
moonlight, while viewing Panama City's 5-6. Fish the fertile waters of Isladel Rey, is included. 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, $35 adults, $15
dramatic skyline at night. San Jose and Galera abord the 42' Vargas. Gold panning in Bique, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. children 12 years old and younger. A mini-
Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. Oct. $220 fee includes captain, gear and bait. Oct. 21, $12. mum of 20 people is needed for a partial
21, $65, two people needed. Visit the Albrook/Howard Drake's Island 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 22, transit any other day of the week.
/ tropical research island in the Panama $22 snorkelers, $47 scuba. Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel op-
/ Canal's Gatun Lake. *Zodiac Community Activities Cen- portunity to Montego Bay any Sunday
// Panama City tour 9 a.m. Oct. 22, $8. ter: Clayton through Wednesday. Packet includes air-
Visit the Golden Altar the French Plaza Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fri- *Valent Recreation Center: fare three nights hotel accommodations,


and more.
Trolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. Oct. 22,
$48/person. Fish for marlin, sailfish, dol-
phin (fish), bonita, Spanish mackeral and
more. Fee includes captain, gear, lures and
iced coolers.
El Valle 7 a.m. Oct. 23, $12. Shop for
local handicrafts, plants, fruits and vege-
tables and visit nature preserve.
Free Zone shopping trip 7 a.m. Oct.
26, $12.
Bottom-fishing on the Vargas, Sun-
day and Oct. 30, $35 adults, $20 kids
under 14. Catch snapper, grouper and oth-


days, $13.
El Valle shopping 6:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m. Sunday and Oct. 30, $13.
Dining out Italian style 6-10 p.m.
Oct. Wednesday, $3.
Colonial Panama & ruins tour 9
a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 22, $6.
Rio Mar Beach trip 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
Oct. 23, $12.
Panama museums tour 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Oct. 26, $5. Bring money for entrance fee
and lunch.
*Outdoor adventures:
Peacock bass fishing in Lake Gatun


Panama City shopping 9a.m.-3p.m.
Saturday.
Free Zone 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday.
*Outdoor Recreation Center:
There is Contadora Island transit ser-
vice Friday through Monday. Fees are
$35 adults and $20 children 12 and under
round trip, $25 adults and $15 children
one way.
Ecotourism trip to a Chocoe Indian
Village Saturday, $30 adults, $20 chil-
dren under 12.
Ecotourism trip to Barro Colorado
Island 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 29, $35 fee.


and transfer. Prices vary from $300-$600
depending on the hotel.
Balboa
*Balboa Dive Club:
The club is now accepting new mem-
bers. Divers must show a diving certifica-
tion card to join. Annual membership fee is
$12. Members receive a monthly newslet-
ter, free use of the club tanks, free library
and videos for loan, information and class-
es on diving topics, guest speakers and dive
trips.Call 263-8077 or 260-0075 or write
Unit 0967, APO AA 34002.


Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Center:
Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturday at Albrook Youth
Center, 286-3195.
Spanish lessons 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays at
Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195.
Martial arts classes at Howard and Albrook Youth
Centers, 284-4700.
Tae Kwon Do karate classes at Zodiac Center for
children and adults.
Beginner and advanced dog obedience classes,
$32 for 4 weeks.
Beginner and advanced English and Spanish class-
es offered monthly.
*Albrook Auto Skills Center:
Brake pad replacement, 1-3p.m. Sunday, $5.
Pneumatic air machine operation, 1:00 p.m. Oct.
22, $5.
Air conditioning service and repair 12:30-5 p.m.
daily except Tuesday and Wednesday.
Wheel alignment diagnostic and service classes
are held 3-9 p.m. Monday, Thursdays and Fridays, 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sundays.
*Howard and Albrook pools
Intro to scuba, free, call for appointment.
Open water scuba class Saturday at Howard at
Albrook, $145.
Advanced scuba Wednesday at Howard.
Water aerobics for advanced adult swimmers at
Howard and Albrook.
*Howard Wood Skills Center, Bldg. 722
Free qualification class, 10 a.m.-noon Oct. 15.
Learn how to use the woodcutting machines to do
personal projects.
Drawer construction, 6-7:30 p.m. Oct. 17, $5.
Make a basic drawer using rabbet and dado.


Clayton
*Fort Clayton Pool:
All swimming classes will be discontinued until
December because of inclement weather.
*Fort Clayton Boat/Scuba Shop:
Open water scuba class meets first and third Monday
of each month, $125. Includes five pool sessions, five
theory sessions and four open water dives.
*Valent Recreation Center:
Private piano and guitar lessons available weekday
evenings.
Korean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Rodman
*Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation Office:
The Navy MWR is seeking qualified instructors to
teach Spanish and French language courses. Applicants
should have prior experience in teaching elementary and
conversational language courses. Call 283-4301.
Curundu
*Pacific Theatre Arts Centre:
Reservations for Christmas Village tables is under
way 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at the Centre.Volunteers and perform-
ers are needed. Call 286-3814 to sign up.
Piano lessons are held 3-7 p.m. Monday, Tuesdays,
Wednesday and Fridays. Open to students ages 6 and
older.
Martial arts 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Open to all ages.
Registration for all dance classes is under way at
Building 2060, Curundu. Jazz lessons are available for
teens and adults as follows:
1: 5-6 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays, $32.
1: 6-7 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays, $32.
Other classes: modem, ballet, tap, folkloric, salsa,
belly dancing and saxophone.


Shaggy
As part of Reggae Fest '94, Shaggy, Rayvon,
Rap Machine will perform at Gim Nuevo
Panama (Juan Diaz Arena) 8 p.m. Oct. 22.
Tickets are $9-$15. Call the Zodiac, Valent
and Sundial recreation centers for informa-
tion.


**










tices


Tropic Times
Oct. 14, 1994 /


Phone guide


Kick the habit. John Hall (U.S. Navy)
Kick the habit
Melanie Marcec, Laura Adame and Diana Luz Parada perform a song from Nunsense II, a musical
comedy presented by the Theatre Guild of Ancon. The show runs 8 p.m. Oct. 14-Nov. 5. Gala
opening tickets are $5 for members and $15 for nonmembers, other performances cost $8. For
reservations call 252-6786.


A 0


*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts
Center:
The Ceramic Center, Building
198, is located near the Crafts Shop.
*Canal Crafters:
Handmade arts and crafts are
available, consignments and vol-
unteers are welcome. The shop
hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday
through Saturday. The shop is now
accepting holiday consignments,
Building 804, Albrook.
Register for the following class-
es at the shop:
Tole-painting, witch 10:15 a.m.
Monday.
Stencil demo, 10:15 a.m. Oct.
27. Bring stencil and paints.
*Howard Skills Development
Center:
Framing class, 10:30a.m.-2:30
p.m. Saturday, $20 plus supplies.
Learn how to make your own mats
and frames.
Beginning ceramic painting


/ - / /


class, 12:30-3:30p.m. Monday, $15
plus supplies. Learn how to use
covercoats, glaze and stain in this
three week class.
Photo album class, time TBA,
Wednesday, $5 plus supplies. Learn
how to make padded photo albums
for Christmas gifts, baby showers,
weddings.
Ceramic pouring class, 5-7 p.m.
Thursday, $15. Bring supplies.
Clay flower class, 11 a.m.- 2
p.m. Saturday, $5 plus supplies.
For all levels.
Oil paint sale Oct. 21-22. Take
25percent off of Alexander and
Liquitex oil paints.
Ongoing classes, stained glass,
framing, air brush, lamp assembly,
pottery wheel throwing, cross stitch,
macrame, clay flower, ceramic and
'how to videos'.
Leather & wood sale today and
Saturday. Take 25 percent off un-
painted wood and leather items.


The center is looking for
crafters to sell items in the new
consignment boutique.
Instructors are needed to teach
classes on a contract basis for a
variety of crafts, decorative paint-
ing, calligraphy, watercolors, oil
painting.
Padded heart box 1-3 p.m.
Wednesday, $5 plus supplies.
Cake decorating 7-9 p.m.
Thursday, $25 plus supplies.
Intermediate ceramic painting
10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, $15,
three weeks.
Ongoing classes: stained glass,
framing, air brush, lamp assembly,
cross stitch, macrame, clay flower,
ceramic and 'how to videos.'
*Fort Sherman Multicraft Cen-
ter:
Woodworking qualification
class. Class covers safe use of equip-
ment. Qualification cards will be
issued after course completion.


Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989.
Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-0075
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363
/ Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador, 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010
Corozal Thrift Shop, 285-5989
Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370
Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107
Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680
Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361
/ Howard Teen Center, 284-4700
/ Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
The Loop, 287-3035
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380
Rodman Annex, 283-5475
Rodman Club, 283-4498
Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150
/ Rodman Naval Station Information Tour
and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454
Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
/ Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500
// Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-6161


a - N


* p: A


*Valent Recreation Center:
Better Opportunities for
Single Soldiers next meeting is
Thursday.
The screening room offers free


Volunteers needed to perform
as horror characters for the Haunt-
ed House Oct 29. Interested people
must be age 18 and older.
Professional family portraits


Beauty tip demonstration Mon-
day Oct. 21.
*Cocoli Community Center:
Videos for children 4 p.m.
Thursday.


Atlantic
Aquativity Center, 289-4009
Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201
Davis Community Club, 289-5160
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402
Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077
Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313
Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300


/


movies. Call the 24-hour movie line, Sunday and Oct. 22. By appoint- Laser disc movies 7 p.m.
287-4367 for days and times. ment only. Friday.





OAtlanti tcean Breeze Recreation Center:
Atlantic tours Rec center news The center offers the following classes: cooking,
*Sundial Recreation Center: *Sundial Recreation Center: dance, arts and crafts, music, aerobics, first aid, CPR,
El Valle, 5:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. Sunday. Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6 p.m. Thursday. yoga, martial arts, various sports, English, Spanish and
Free Zone 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday. Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesday. dog obedience.
Panama City shopping 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 22. Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesdays The center now offers deep sea fishing charters.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: and Fridays. Call 289-6402 for information.
El Valle overnight Saturday and Sunday. Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays. People are needed to line handle transiting boats
Panama City shopping 8 a.m. Oct. 22. Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. Monday. from Cristobal to Balboa. Sign up now. Call for details.








B Tropic Times
0 Oct. 14, 1994


Movies


Oct. 21

Howard AFB
7pm Clear and Present
Danger (PG-13)
Harrison Ford,
Willem Dafoe
9:45pm Color of Night (R)
Bruce Willis,
Jane March


Fort Clayton
7pm Andre (PG)
Keith Carradine,
Tina Majorino
9pm The Mask (PG-13)
Jim Carrey,
Richard Jeni


Fort Davis
7pm It Could Happen
To You (PG)
Nicholas Cage,
Bridget Fonda
9pm True Lies (R)
Arnold
Schwarzenegger,
Jamie Lee Curtis


Fort Sherman
7pm Wolf (R)
Jack Nicholson,
Michelle Pfeiffer


Fort Amador
7pm In the Army Now
(PG) Paul Shore,
Lori Petty


The Mask
Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni
Nobody does super powers like Jim
Carrey. An ordinary, mild-mannered
bank clerk is transformed into the weird-
est super hero of all time when he dons
his mask. PG-13 (some stylized vio-
lence), 1 hr, 40 min.

Andre
Keith Carradine, Tina Majorino
An amazing true story of the seal that
became a living legend. An adorable
newborn seal is orphaned after his moth-
er is caught in a fisherman's net. The pup
is nursed back to health by the animal
loving Whitney family, who name him
Andre. PG (teen mischief, mild violence,
language),1 hr, 34 min.

In the Army Now
Pauly Shore, Lori Petty
Pauly Shore is not the ideal troop. In fact,
he joined the Army Reserves for the
bennies and the regular salary. Reality
kicks in when he becomes a part of a
mission involving actual combat. PG
(some war action, mild language) 1 hr,
31 min.

It Could Happen
to You
Nicholas Cage, Bridget Fonda
A New York City cop lacking change
tips a waitress with a promise to split the
winnings from his lottery ticket if he
wins. When he wins and wants to make
good on the promise, it will be over
strong opposition from his wife. PG (mild
language, scene of cop action), 1 hr, 41
mmin.

True Lies
Arnold Schwarzenegger,
Jamie Lee Curtis
Harry Tasker is a special agent for Ome-
ga Sector, a top secret agency charged
with nuclear terrorism intervention. Flu-
ent in six languages and skilled in all


Now showing at the Howard Theater.


forms of counter intelligence, Harry is an
international spy who has kept his real
profession secret from his wife. R (ac-
tion, violence, language), I hr, 82 min.

City Slickers 2
Billy Crystal, Daniel Stern
Our urban cowboys are ready for another
adventure. Although Mitch is enjoying
the serenity of his suburban New York
life with is family and Norman the cow,
the discovery of a treasure map sets things
back in motion. PG-13 (comic scene and
off-color humor) 1 hr, 48 min.

Airheads
Brendan Fraser, Steve Buscemi
Three metal heads desperate to get their
demo song played on the radio inadvert-
ently take a radio station hostage. PG- 13
(crude dialogue and some sexuality), 1
hr, 29 min.

The Little Rascals
Travis Tedford, Bug Hall
Steven Spielberg produces an appealing
update of the Hat Roach comedy series
from the '20s, '30s and '40s. The gang
has established a boy's only club; how-
ever, things change when Alfalfa falls
for Darla. PG (rude dialogue)


Black Beauty
David Thewlis, Sean Bean
A heartwarming drama based on the
family classic novel by Anna Sewell
tells the story of a time in history when
horses were essential to men's lives. G,
99 min.

The Client
Susan Sarandon, Tommy Lee Jones
Set in New Orleans, this is an adapta-
tion of a the John Grisham best selling
novel. PG-13 (child in jeopardy, lan-
guage), 2 hrs.

Speed
Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper
LAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played
by Keanu Reeves, is known as a man
with an attitude caused by Dennis Hop-
per, a sociopath who nearly killed him
in an earlier encounter. R (violence,
language), 1 hr, 51 min.

Wolf
Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer
We all know what happens when you
get bit by a werewolf, right? But, do
you know what might happen if Jack
Nicholson gets bit? R (language,
werewolf attacks), 2 hrs.


Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Howard AFB 7pm: Andre (PG) 2pm: Andre (PG) 2pm: The Mask 7pm: The Mask 7pm: In the Army 6:30pm: Clear and 6:30pm: Speed (R)
284-3583 Keith Carradine, Keith Carradine, (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (PG-13) Now (PG) Present Danger Keanu Reeves,
Tina Majorino Tina Majorino Richard Jeni Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore, (PG-13) Dennis Hopper
9pm: The Mask 4pm: In the Army 4pm: Andre (PG) Richard Jeni Lori Petty Harrison Ford, 9:30pm: Clear and
(PG-13) Now (PG) Pauly Shore, Keith Carradine, 9:30pm: In the Army 9pm: The Mask Willem Dafoe Present Danger
Jim Carrey, Lori Petty Tina Majorino Now (PG) (PG-13) 9:30pm: Color of (PG-13)
Richard Jeni 7pm: The Mask 7pm: The Mask Pauly Shore, Jim Carrey, Night (R) Harrison Ford,
(PG-13) Jim Carrey, (PG-13) Lori Petty Richard Jeni Bruce Willis, Willem Dafoe
Richard Jeni Jane March
9:30pm: The Mask 9:30pm: In the Army
(PG-13) Now (PG)Pauly Shore,
Lori Petty

Fort Clayton 6:30pm: True Lies 2pm: It Could Happen 2pm: True Lies 6:30pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could Happen 7pm: The Mask 7pm: In the Army
287-3279 (R) Arnold to You (PG) (R) Arnold (R) Arnold to You (PG) (PG-13) Now (PG)
Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, Schwarzenegger, Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore,
Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Richard Jeni Lori Petty
9:30pm: City Slickers 6:30pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could 9:30pm: It Could 9:30pm: True Lies 9:30pm: Speed (R) 9pm: The Mask
2 (PG-13) (R) Arnold Happen to You (PG) Happen to You (PG) (R) Arnold Keanu Reeves, (PG-13)
BIlly Crystal, Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, Nicolas Cage, Schwarzenegger, Dennis Hopper Jim Carrey,
Daniel Stern Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis Richard Jeni
($1.50/$1) 9:30pm: True Lies (R) 9:30pr: True Lies
9:30pm: True Lies
(R)

Fort Davis 7pm: Black Beauty 7pm: The Little 7pm: Black Beauty 7pm: Airheads 7pm: The Little 7pm: Wolf (R) 7pm: It Could
289-5173 (G) David Thewlis, Rascals (PG) Travis (G) David Thewlis, (PG-13) Rascals (PG) Jack Nicholson, Happen to You (PG)
Sean Bean Tedford, Bug Hall Sean Bean Brendan Fraser, Travis Tedford, Michelle Pfeiffer Nicolas Cage,
9pm: Airheads 9pm: Airheads (PG-13) Steve Buscemi Bug Hall Bridget Fonda
(PG-13) Brendan Fraser,
Brendan Fraser, Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Fort Sherman 7pm: Above the Rim 4pm: Black Beauty 7pm: The Little No show No show No show
(R) Duane Martin, (G) David Thewlis, Rascals (PG) Travis
289-5173 Leon ($1.50/$1) Sean Bean Tedford, Bug Hall 7pm: True Lies
7pm: The Cowboy (R) Arnold
Way (PG-13) Woody Schwarzenegger,
Harrelson, Kiefer Jamie Lee Curtis
Suherland
Fort Amador 7pm: Speed (R) 7pm: Angels in the 7:30pm: The Client No show No show 7pm: True Lies 7pm: Color of Night
284-3583 Keanu Reeves, Outfield (PG) (GP-13) (R) Arnold (R)
Dennis Hopper Danny Glover, Susan Sarandon, Schwarzenegger, Bruce Willis,
Tony Danza Tommy Lee Jones Jamie Lee Curtis Jane March















# TV Schedule


Tropic Times
Oct. 14, 1994B


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today


5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Think Fast!
4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy
7:25 Panama Now
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 America's Funniest
People
8:30 Evening Shade
9:00 In the Heat of the Night
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Ren and Stimpy
1:00 Movies: "The Harder
They Fall"
3:00 "Mr. Deed Goes to
Town"
5:00 "Seven Little Foys"


Saturday


Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


1 1 5 I- I-


6:30 Headline News
7:00 Navy/Marine Corps News
7:30 Real News for Kids
8:00 Guts
8:30 Just for Kids!
Garfield & Friends
Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
Biker Mice from Mars
Batman Cartoon
10:30 Faerie Tale Theater
11:00 College Football:
Auburn Tigers vs.
Florida Gators
2:30 College Football:
Penn State Nittany Lions
vs. Michigan Wolverines
5:30 Headline News
6:00 Paradise
7:00 Rescue 911
8:00 Walker: Texas Ranger
9:00 Movie: "The Best Little
Girl in the World"
10:40 Saturday Night Live
12:10 WWF Superstars of
Wrestling
1:00 Friday Night Videos
2:00 Movies: "Fright Night"
4:00 "Man from Laramie"


6:00 CCMTV
6:30 Outreach of Love
7:00 Parliament of Souls
7:30 Lifestyle Magazine
8:00 CBS Sunday Morning
9:30 This Week w/Brinkley
10:30 Face the Nation
11:00 Inside the NFL
12:00 Headline News
12:30 On Stage
1:00 Movies: "Great Land of
the Small"
2:30 Sesame Street Presents:
"Follow that Bird"
4:00 Victory at Sea
4:30 O'Hara
5:30 Entertainment This Week
6:30 Hearts Afire
7:00 Dr. Quinn: Medicine
Woman
8:00 Mini series: "The Return
to Lonesome Dove"
(Part I of 4)
9:35 ABC 20/20
10:35 Top Cops
11:30 Miami Vice
12:00 Movies: "Hollywood
Shuffle"
1:30 "Double Edge"
2:35 "Razor's Edge".
4:35 NBC at Sunrise
5:00 Headline News


NBC News at Sunrise
Good Morning America
Basic Training Workout
Sesame Street
Portrait of America
Guiding Light
General Hospital
Headline News
Sports Machine
Another World
Oprah Winfrey
Price is Right
Guts
I Love Lucy
Family Feud
The Cosby Show
SCN Evening Report
Headline News Break
World News Tonight
Jeopardy
Entertainment Tonight
Mad About You
Cops
60 Minutes
SCN Late Edition
Cheers
David Letterman
Tonight Show
M*A*S*H
Movies:"Hail! Hail!
Rock 'n Roll"
"The Big Chill"
Headline News Break


NBC News at Sunrise
Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
Bodyshaping
Sesame Street
Portrait of America
Guiding Light
General Hospital
Headline News Break
Panama Now
Sportscenter
Another World
Sally Jesse Raphael
Price is Right
Reading Rainbow
I Love Lucy
Family Feud
The Cosby Show
SCN Evening Report
Headline News Break
World News Tonight
Jeopardy
Panama Now
Entertainment Tonight
L.A. Law +
Northern Exposure
SCN Late Edition
Cheers
David Letterman
Tonight Show
M*A*S*H
Movies: "Canterville
Ghost"
"PT 109"
Headline News Break


NBC News at Sunrise
Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
Basic Training Workout
Sesame Street
Portrait of America
Guiding Light
General Hospital
Headline News Break
Panama Now
Sportscenter
Another World
Oprah Winfrey
Price is Right
Shining Time Station
I Love Lucy
Family Feud
The Cosby Show
SCN Evening Report
Headline News Break
World News Tonight
Jeopardy
Panama Now
Entertainment Tonight
Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
Beverly Hills 90210
Culture Clash
SCN Late Edition
Cheers
David Letterman
Tonight Show
M*A*S*H
Movies: "The
Sundowners"
"Them"
Headline News Break


1 1 1 1__ _ __ _ __- _ _ _ __ _ __ _ __ _ 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


5:30
6:00

8:00
8:30
9:30
10:25
11:10
:12:00
12:25
12:30
1:00
2:00
3:00
4:00
4:30
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:15
6:30
7:00
7:25
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:30
10:00
10:05
10:30
11:30
12:30
! 1:00

3:15


NBC News at Sunrise
Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25)
Bodyshaping
Sesame Street
Portrait of America
Guiding Light
General Hospital
Headline News Break
Panama Now
Sportscenter
Another World
Donahue
Price is Right
In the Mix
I Love Lucy
Family Feud
The Cosby Show
SCN Evening Report
Headline News Break
World News Tonight
Jeopardy
Panama Now
Entertainment tonight
ALF
Touched by an Angel **
Love and War **
SCN Late Edition
Cheers
David Letterman
Tonight Show
M*A*S*H
Movies: "The Green
Berets"
"Who's Afraid of
Virginia Wolf'


I Cbl cannl 4


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today

5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Reading Rainbow
5:00 Silver Spoons
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 Headline News
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine ** (Pilot movie)
8:35 Panama Now +
8:40 Roseanne +
9:10 The Boys are Back
(New Fall Series)
9:35 SCN Late Edition +
10:40 Renegade +
11:30 Nightline
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Letterman
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Military News
4:00 Tom & Jerry Kids
4:30 Tiny Toons Adventures
5:00 CRO
5:30 Videolinks


I Saturday


6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:30 Young Adult Theater
"Don't Touch"
"American Eyes"
"Ernest: Sacred Stupid"
11:35 Channel One/Newsroom
12:05 Silver Spoons
12:30 Movies: "Popeye"
2:10 "The Harder They Fall"
4:00 21 Jump Street
5:00 Westcom Sports
Specials**
6:00 Doctor, Doctor
6:30 Dinosaurs
7:00 Christy ***
8:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
9:00 Me and the Boys **
(New Fall Series)
9:30 Married With Children
10:00 Movie: "A Few Good
Men"
12:30 Science and Technology
Week
1:00 The McLaughlin Group
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Entertainment this week
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Saturday Night Live
5:00 Videolinks
5:30 Headline News Break


Sunday


6:00 Washington Week in
Review
6:30 Shining Time Station
7:00 The Sunshine Factory
7:25 Goof Troop
7:50 Muppet Babies
8:20 Disney's The Little
Mermaid
8:30 Where on Earth is Carmen
San Diego ***
9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
9:30 Movie: "Hans Christian
Andersen"
11:30 NFL Pre-Game Show
12:00 NFL Football: Los
Angeles Raiders vs.
Miami Dolphins
3:00 NFL Football: New York
Giants vs. Los Angeles
Rams
6:00 Wonderful World of
Disney +
7:00 Phenom
7:30 Fresh Prince of Bel-air
8:00 Movie: "The Player"
10:00 Buck James
11:00 Eye to Eye w/C. Chung
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Meet the Press
1:30 Sports Machine
2:00 Sports Latenight
2:30 Frugal Gourmet
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Wheel of Fortune
4:00 Jeopardy


Monday


-, -i


4:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Batman
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 The Adventures of Pete
& Pete
5:00 In the Mix
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
8:00 Monday Night Football:
Kansas City Chiefs vs.
Denver Broncos
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Nightline
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Letterman
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Wheel of Fortune
4:00 Jeopardy
4:30 Donahue


Tuesday


5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Donahue
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Where on Earth is Carmen
San Diego?
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Think Fast
5:00 Disney's Raw Toonage
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Home Improvement
8:30 My So Called Life
(New Fall Series)
9:30 Frasier
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 McKenna (New Fall Series)
11:00 Headline News Break
11:30 Nightline
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Letterman
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Wheel of Fortune
4:00 Jeopardy
4:30 Oprah Winfrey


Wednesday Thursday


5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Goof Troop
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Guts
5:00 Beakman's World
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Sinbad Show
8:30 Family Matters
9:00 Wise Guy
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Tour of Duty
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Nightline
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Letterman
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Wheel of Fortune
4:00 Jeopardy
4:30 Sally Jesse Raphael


5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Muppet Babies
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Nick Arcade
5:00 Fact of Life
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 NFL Football: Green Bay
Packers vs. Minnesota
Vikings
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 L.A. Law
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Nightline
12:00 Cheers
12:30 M*A*S*H
1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Letterman
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Wheel of Fortune
i 4:00 Jeopardy
4:30 Oprah Winfrey


Channels 8 & 10
Sports
College football . :4
Auburn Tigers vs. Florida Gators, 11 a.m. Saturday
Penn State Nittany Lions vs. Michigan Wolverines, 2:30 p.m. Sat-
urday
Series starts
"Touched by an Angel," 8:30 p.m. Thursday. r ,,
Monica is a guardian angel who plummets through the sky like
a fireball and makes her dramatic entrance on Earth by belly flopping
directly into Santa Monica Bay. Monica has been sent to protect "Destiny
Tots," children who are fated for greatness. '*
"Love and War," 9:30 p.m. Thursday.
Jack is testing his friend's patience by continually moping over Wally's departure.
Jay Thomas and Annie Potts return for another hilarious season of "Love and War."
Mini -series
"Return to Lonesome Dove," 8 p.m. Sunday.
Academy Award-winner John Voight takes over the role made famous by Tommy
Lee Jones as Larry McMurtry's "Lonesome Dove" saga resumes in this sweeping
sequel to the history-making 1989 mini-series.
Movies
"The Best Little Girl in the World," 9 p.m. Saturday.
A model teenager from a middle class family suffers from anorexia nervosa while her
family and friends see her as "The Best Little Girl in the World." Stars Jennifer Jason
Leigh and Ally Sheedy.


Cable Channel 14
Sports
NFL football
Los Angeles Raiders vs. Miami Dolphins, noon Sunday
New York Giants vs. Los Angeles Rams, 3 p.m. Sunday
Kansas City Chiefs vs. Denver Broncos, 8 p.m. Monday
Green Bay Packers vs. Minnesota Vikings, 7 p.m. Thursday
Series starts
"Me and the Boys," 9 p.m. Saturday.
Steve Hayes is a proud, hard-working widower who is determined to
.' f give his three sons the best possible shot at a bright future. Adding a ten-
.!l der and nurturing touch to this all-male household is Mary, Steve's mother-
in-law.
Primetime movies
"A Few Good Men," 10 p.m. Saturday.
A young, inexperienced Navy lawyer is assigned to prosecute a case involving the
death of a Marine. While his senior finally gets him to take things seriously, his big-
gest problem is a belligerent Marine colonel who is used to having his way. Finally, in
the courtroom, the young lawyer faces the old Marine in a dramatic showdown of
wills. Stars Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson.
"The Player," 8 p.m. Sunday.
In this too-close-for-comfort insider's look at Hollywood, a "typical" film producer
receives threatening notes on picture post cards from a disgruntled writer. He finds
the man he thinks is doing it, "polishes him off," and then finds out he murdered the
wrong guy. Stars Tim Robbins and Whoopi Goldberg.


[Channels 8&*0


!


[












1 10 Tropic Times
B1.J Oct. 14, 1994


L Classified Ads


Male Irish setter, all shots, gd watch
dog, very affectionate, $85.287-4338.

Mixed breed male puppy, house
trained, $20. 286-3371.

Pitbull/rotweiler mix, female, 4 mos
old, gd watch dog, $100. Call collect
from base, 281-0101 for 50-0311.

Doberman, black, female, all shots,
CCP registered. Gd watch dog, $200.
Collect from base, 281-0101 for 50-
0311.

Cocker spanial pup, 6 mos old, fe-
male, tan, $150/obo. 289-6431.

Dalmations for sale, male and female,
$150 each. 2894166.

Pit bull for stud service, ADBA regis-
tered. 239-4311.

Male cat, 2 yrs old, declawed and
fixed. 260-9303.

Pekipoo puppies, 6 wks, dewormed,
$75. 264-0460 after 5pm.

Seal Point Himalayan-Persian male
for stud service, CFA reg, proven.
289-4354 evenings.

CFA reg Himalayan-Persian kittens
avail; flame-point and blue-point. 289-
4354 evenings.

Chubby calico kitten, neutered,
litterbox trained, free. 283-4086.

Freshwater aquarium angel fish, dif-
ferent sizes, $1.50 each. 252-1269.

Female 6 mos old pup, mixed breed w/
shots, grt w/kids, free. 283-6375.

Black and white kitten free. 287-3136.

Female doberman, 2 yrs old, $50.287-
5782.

Collie puppy, male, pure breed but no
papers, first shots, 81/2 wks old, $250.
261-3325.

English bull terrier (Spud McKensie)
puppies male and female, white w/
black eyes, brindle, red. 261-2994 af-
ter 6pm.

Catahoula stud ready for breeding,
beautiful markings, 2 yrs old. 261-
1224.

Gray tabby kitten, 8 wks old, free.
286-6179.





1992 GSI Daewoo, 5 spd, am/fm, ac,
car alarm, gd mpg, 5 passenger, not
dty pd, $5,600/obo. 286-3273.

1987 Dodge Ram p/u, 59K miles, runs
like new, well maintained, $4,000.
264-7779.

1975 Mercedes 230.6, ac, ps, new
paint and body work, new tires and
rims, dual carbs, dry pd, not US specs,
$3,000. 261-1415.

1991 Mazda Miata cony w/hard top,
ac, at, low milaege, exc cond, alarm
system, $17,000. 287-6233.

1988 Montero, at, diesel, loaded, dty
pd, $12,000/obo. 269-5700.

1986 Taurus, 5 spd, new ac, dty pd, grt
cond, $6,000/obo. 269-5700.

1991 Ford Explorer XLT. 4x4,4dr, ac,
radio cass, dty pd, $16,900. 228-4061.

Parts for 1987 Chevy cavalier, engine
and trans for standard, fenders,
bumpers, windows, rack and pinion,
discs and drums. 228-4061.

1984 Dodge Daytona turbo, pb, pw,
ps, ac, new interior, $3,000/obo. 261-
2053.

1991 Ford Escort LX, air, ps, ph,
40m, g, new tires, exc cond, original
owns , $7,500/neg. 284-4125.

1979 Chevy Nova, ac, ps, rebuilt en-
gine and breaks, grt tires, runs grt,


$1,100/obo. 287-4877.

1987 Dodge Shadow turbo 2 dr, 5 spd,
runs gd, front end damaged, but still
drivable, $3,500. 284-3586.

1989 Buick Skyhawk, 2 dr, at, ac, tint,
tilt, cruise, $5,500. 284-3670.

1991 Buick Regal limited, fully load-
ed, new tires, exc cond, $12,000. 287-
3682.

1991 Suzuki Samurai, soft top, 4wd,
ac, 15,000 miles, 5 spd, $6,600. 289-
5960.

1989 Eagle premier 3.0 V6, 4spd, at,
clean, sharp, tinted wind, loaded,
$6,000. 289-3531.

1987 BMW 316i, white, auto, exc
cond, fully loaded, $8,900/obo. 263-
4671.

1985 Ranger XL, on/off road equipped,
4x4, lift kit, one of a kind, trick, trk,
$4,250/obo. 289-5942.

1985 Chevy Blazer, 5 spd, ps, pb, pw,
new tires, runs grt, gd body, $4,500.
289-4166.

1990 Chevy Cavalier, 2 dr coupe, 5
spd, am/fm cass, air, ps, pb, low miles,
$7,500/obo. 264-3143.

1983 Honda Accord, ps, ac, dty pd,
stand trans, exc cond, $3,700/obo. 233-
0744.

1987 Caravan, ac, pb, ps, clean, exc
cond, $6,200. 284-4183.

1980 Volvo, 131K miles, runs grt, 2
dr, auto trans, ac, not dty pd, $2,800/
obo. 282-3287.

1993 Honda Integra, 4dr, 5spd, ac,
sunroof, 18K miles, 4 cyl, pl, pw, fm
cass, fog lights, $18,600. 283-6425.

1986 Pontiac Fiero SE, V6, auto, pb,
ac, performance suspension, many new
parts, looks and runs grt, $6,700. 284-
3996.

1990 Nissan truck, 84K miles, exc
cond, competition stereo, talking
alarm, 5-star wheels, custom exhaust.
287-5582.

1987 Chevy Suburban R-10 1/2 ton,
4wd, double ac, new tires, 55K miles,
dty pd, exc cond, $11,000. 252-5397.

1981 Mazda GLC, stand, ac, dty pd,
$2,100. 252-6768.

1989 Ford tempo, exc cond, auto, com-
plete car care record, $5,800. 284-
6381.

Suzuki Samaury, hard top, dty pd,
4x4, $2,500. 252-8183.

1987 Dodge Ram p/u, not dty pd, no
ac, low milage, exc cond, runs grt,
$4,000. 264-7779.

1993 Nissan Bluebird, ac, auto, tinted
wind, am/fm, alarm, low miles, dty pd,
$13,500. 236-0984.

1978 Volvo 244DL, ac, am/fm cass,
gd cond, not dty pd, $2,300/obo. 285-
6870 Room 210.

1981 Camaro, manual trans, $2,000;
1979 Monte Carlo, needs work, make
offer. 283-5088.

1993 Ford Ranger p/u, ac, am/fm
cass, power side mirrors, $12,000.220-
1121.

1985 truck D-100 w/camper shell,
$2,500/obo. 287-6739.

1988 Toyota Corolla, 1.3cc, at, ac,
am/fm cass, low miles, dty pd, $5,400.
261-6037.

1992 Volvo wagon 240, seats 7, tinted
wind, pl, pw, ac, am/fm cass, exc cond
$20,000/obo. 260-7094.

1994 Daihatsu Charade, 5 spd, am/fm
cass. ac, alarm, grtgas mileage, $5,400.
264-4105.

1988 318i BMW, 2 dr, Euro spec, ac,
am/fm cass, shadow line, not dty pd,
$8,000. 261-6119.

1988 Pontiac LeMans, mint cond, ac,


am/fm cass, low miles, 35mpg, clean,
nice, $3,900/obo. 286-4693.

1988 Montero, at, diesel, loaded, dty
pd, $12,000/obo. 269-5700.

1984 S-10 Blazer, 4x4, auto, air, ste-
reo, alarm, perf cond, new paint, no
rust, $5,250/obo. 286-4734.

1990 Toyota Corolla GTS, sports
coupe, red, ac, gd cond, $7,000. 286-
3339.

1989 Honda Accord LXi, 57K miles,
5 spd, loaded, ac, 4 dr, exc cond,
$10,000/obo. 284-3481.

323 Mazda 1989, 5 spd, ac, exc cond,
2 dr hatchback, $5,000. 284-3481.

1982 Chevy p/u, exc cond, dty pd,
$4,000; 1987 Volkswagen Jetta,
$5,000. 252-2730.

1979 Mercedes 350SE, auto, ps, pb,
ac, pw, am/fm cass, sun roof, $4,000.
284-6699.

1989 Maxima, 5 spd, loaded, leather,
US specs, onr owner, dty pd, $14,500.
261-1224.

1987 Mitsubishi Montero, 4wd, die-
sel, auto, ac, am/fm, ps, pb, pw, $7,500/
obo. 264-4491.

1986 Volvo 740 auto, am/fm, ps, pw,
pb, gdcond, ac, $7,500/obo. 264-4491.

1992 Chev Blazer S 10, white, ps, pb,
5 spd, ac, Tahoe interior, low miles,
$16,000. 286-4676.

1974 Ranchero p/u, dty pd, $1,180;
1975 Pinto, dty pd, $800; 1972 p/u,
not dty pd. 283-3487.

1987 Ford Escort GT, 5 spd, HBK,
am/fm cass, new tires, 69K miles, gd
cond, $3,500/obo. 284-4839.

1975 Buick LeSabre, grey, needs trans
wk, dty pd, clean, $550/obo. 286-6439.

1978 Toyota Celica, ac, not dty pd,
runs gd, $1,300. 286-6326.

1987 Chev Blazer S10, fully loaded,
4x4, Tahoe package, $9,000. 286-
4676.

1990 Geo Tracker LSI, 4x4, ac, exc
cond, 5spd, hard top, cass, split rear
seat, $8,800. 287-5933.

1986 Nissan Pulsar NX, pb, ac, am/fm
stereo, runs gd, $3,000/obo. 286-4595.

1993 Ford Probe GT, 13K miles, dty
not pd, loaded, $18,000. 287-6247.

1983 Olds Cutlass Supreme, fully load-
ed, V6, auto, 2 dr, not dty pd, gd cond,
stereo, $1,900/obo. 269-7770 ext
1114.

1993 Mitsubishi Eclipse, at, one own-
er, 26K miles, runs grt, GE warranty,
$15,000/$17,000 duty. 287-5967.

1992 Honda Civic CX, 26K miles, air,
stick, Alpine stereo, $7,700.269-7669.

1985 Dodge Ram Charger, 4wd, off-
road extras, ac, exc cond, $5,000.287-
4475.

1987 Chev Van, ac and auto, $6,000.
287-3497.

1990 Ford Taurus GL, 36K miles, V6,
auto, ps, pb, am/fm cass, $9,500/obo.
287-4689.

BMW 530i, US specs, gd cond, many
new parts, $2,000. 286-6398.

1985 Renault conv, ps, pb, 5 spd, 4
cyl, ac, $2,300. 285-4793.

1987 VW GTi, 1.814 cyl, ac, ps, pb, 5
spd, sunroof, $4,000. 285-4793.

1985 Porsche 944, 5 spd, ac, sunroof,
all power, cd stereo, cruise, alarm,
$11,000/obo. 284-4227.

1983 Ford Bronco, full size, ac, 4 spd,
roll bar, off-road kit, hitch, nice ste-
reo, $7,000. 284-4227.

1982 Ford Escort, exc cond, 4 spd, ac,
ps, sunroof, new paint, tires and bat-
tery, 4 drs, $2,900/obo. 286-6134.

1986 Chrysler LeBaron GTS, loaded,


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder,
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.


runs grt, gd gas miiaege, $4,500/obo.
284-3197.

1990 Pontiac Gran Prix. V6, fully load-
ed, never wrecked, $9.500/obo. 286-
6298.

1989 Olds Cutlass Calaise Quad 4
eng, 4 dr, ac, ps, pbh, am/fIo cass, 69K
miles, $6,400/obo. 287-3534.

1984 Ford LTD station wagon, ac, am/
fm radio, tinted wind, 6cyl, new tires,
dty free, $3,500. 264-8675.

1994 Chrysler LeBaron conv, stand,
ac, anti lock brakes, am/fm cass, King
blue book. 284-4991.

1992 Toyota p/u, like new, 30K miles,
5 spd, am/fm cass, for quick sale,
$7,800. 286-4375.

1984 Toyota Land Cruiser, not dty pd,
$4,500 firm. 260-8154.

1983 CJ-7 Jeep, laredo package, gd
cond, $6,000. 252-5024.

1990 Ford Festiva L-plus, ps, at, am/
fm stereo, new tires, grt cond, $7,500/
obo. 284-3590.

1986 Nissan Sunny, exc cond, 4 dr, ac,
am/fm stereo, dty pd, $3,500/obo. 236-
3099.

1988 Jeep Commanche, 4x4, am/fm
cass Kenwood, ac, ps, pb, new tires,
sport wheels, best offer. 261-6418.

1985 Subaru GL, 4 dr, 5 spd, stick, US
specs, gd cond, dty pd, $3,250. 256-
6631.

1993 S-10 Blazer, 4x4, pl, pw, 5 spd
automatic, 2,8 liter, $4,900.252-1190.

1992 Chevy S10 Tahoe, ext cab, w/
camper liner, V6/4.31, auto, ac, ps, pb,
am/fm cass, exc cond, 26K miles,
$11,500. 283-6785.

1991 Camaro RS, 5 spd, am/fm cass,
ps, pb, low miles, new tires, $9,950.
256-6830.

1990 Volvo 740, ac, am/fm cass, pb,
exc cond, $9,000. 226-6341.

1972 Plymouth Duster, $800. 287-
6174.

1991 Nissan Maxima, loaded, leather
seats, spoiler, 35K miles, Bose stereo
system, etc, $16,500. 286-6346.

1978 Mercury Monarch, exc cond,
auto, ac, pw, ps, am/fm cass, dty pd,
best offer. 232-6056.





Bilingual woman seeks part time work
as maid, babysitter, or office worker.
263-3665 for Mitzia after 6pm.

Mature dependable, trustworthy, bi-
lingual day maid for Albrook or
Howard. Ref provided. 286-4399.

Bilingual maid, live-out, 3 days week.
Exc w/kids. 284-3670.

Experienced worker to fix or clea air
conditioning and other appliances 24
hours. Work guaranteed. 221-2834.

Home repair, additions, woodwork,
save money on PCS repairs, carpen-
try, plumbing, electrical. 284-6629.

Mature bilingual housekeeper, de-
pendable, reliable, honest, grt w/kids,
live-out, M-F, refs. 284-5629.

Haircare, back from the US with latest
perms, colors, blonding and cuts, 284-
4339.

Bilingual maid, honest, dependable,
ref avail. 229-1098 for Maria.

Honest, dependable maid, live-out.
283-6393 for Zuleika.

Bilingual day maid, Mon, Wed, and
Fri, reliable, honest. 266-8662.

Span-spking live-in maid, honest, grt
w/kids, general house work. 284-5024
for Genera.

Day maid, Span-spking, grt w/kids,
reliable. 284-3971.

Teenage babysitter, responsible, grt
w/kids, reliable and honest. Avail M-
F after 3pm and anytime on weekends.
252-2543 for Tameka.

Math tutor/teacher. 256-6830.

Eng-spking maid, gd w/kids, reliable,
honest. Live-in. 266-3649.

Will babysit your home or mine, day
care exp. 287-6187._

Bilingual maid, M-F, 7am-3pm. Gd
w/kids, reliable, refs avail. 284-3627.

Home care provider, full and part time.
Drop-ins welcome, first-aid, CPR cer-
tified. 283-6737 for Jill.


Reliable babysitter in my home any
time. Eng-spk only. 286-4294.

Honest, reliable Eng-spking day maid,
3 days open. $10 per day. 287-5121.

Art instructor in home, acrylic paint,
oil, charcoal, and water color. Free-
dom of creativity. 260-3433.

Bilingual day maid, Mon, Wed, Fri,
gd w/kids, reliable. 266-8662.

Span-spking live-out maid, reliable,
exc worker, two days a week Tues and
Fri. 261-7939.

Cake decorating. 287-6222.

Dependable bilingual maid, ref avail,
Mon, Wed and Fri, cook, clean, iron.
224-0199.

Eng-spking day maid, child care, hon-
est, reliable, no iron, avail M-S. 284-
4595 for Marianela.

Good Eng-spking maid grt w/kids.
Live-out, days or weekends, 224-9479.

Eng-spk maid, grt w/kids, references.
224-8775.

Reliable babysitter in my home. 286-
4378.

Span-spking day maid, honest reli-
able, two-three days a week. 286-4724.

Bilingual maid, live-out, M-F, good
w/kids, honest reliable. 224-3887.

Power music mobile disco, unlimited
music for all ages and events. 252-
5124 for Gabe.

Babysitter gd w/kids, references. 261-
1236.





20' Mako center console w/trailer, 140
hpJohnson, outriggers and 90 gal fuel
tank, best offer. 287-3492.

1991 21' Drummond w/150 hp Black
Max, trailer and extras, $9,300. 284-
5921.

16' Corsair Sunbird w/3.0L inboard
Mercruiser, fishfinder, m-radio, am/
fm cass, new trailer, runs grt, $6,500.
282-4722.

22' Molinari Falcon w/200 hp Mercu-
ry Black Max (40 hrs use), bimini top,
etc., $15,000. 232-5241.

19' open fisherman w/1994 90 hp
Yamaha (30 hrs use), fully loaded,
$12,000. 252-5024.

18' fish & ski boat w/120 hp Mercruiser
IB motor, good shape, extras incl,
$2,000. 260-4385, after 6 p.m.

21' deep sea fishing boat, cabin sleeps
2, 4 cyl Perkins diesel, good cond,
$8,500/obo. 252-5100.

15 hp outboard motor w/extras, $615.
287-4020.

1991 Evinrude 70 hp w/new 1994
power head, all controls incl, $3,000.
252-4848.

Trailer-utility, 1/2 ton, steel frame,
fiberglassed, 3'x4' cargo area, spare
tire, wiring kit, $295. 260-9172, after
6p.m.

Outboard motor bracket, stainless
steel, 20 hp/l115 lbs, brand new & still
in box, paid $119.95, but sell for $100.
287-4020.

Boat gas tanks: 12 gal aluminum $70,
6 gal portable $40, & Bennett trim
tabs $325. 256-6816.





Smith Corona word processor w/
8,000LT, 256K RAM, modem & 3.5"
disk drive, requires printer, $200.287-
5392.

5-pc Tech stereo system: cd, pwr amp,
dbl cass, eq & tuner w/custom furn &
400 watt spkrs, best offer. 228-4294.

Apple 2E computer, best offer. 287-
6174.

PCS-ing & must sell various items by
Denon, Rockford, Fosgate &
Nintendo. 287-3622.

Quasar VHS video camera, incl bat-
tery, recharger, hook-ups & hard carry
case, exc cond, $625. 287-3682.

Zenith 284 computer & keyboard w/2
3.5" disk drives, mouse, disks, manu-
als, MS Word, Student Ed, Lotus 1-2-
3, misc., $70/obo. 223-0685.

Metsumi CD-ROM drive w/interface
card & lots of software, $225. 289-
5942.

Kenwood dual truck spkrs, $150 &


15" woofers (The Crunch) $70. 287-
5131.

Motherboard & desktop case w/
Packard Bell 386 SX, goodcond. $100.
282-3030.

60' antenna tower, aluminum, 6-10
sections, S350. 256-6816.

IBM PC comp w/40 mg hd, 5.25"
floppy, monitor,joystick, mouse, word
process, games & more, $300. 284-
3184.

JVC compu-link stereo system: amp,
cd, dual cass, turntable, surround & 4
spkrs, $875. 289-3454.

JVC 4-head VCR w/remote, hi-fi, duet
editing & 8-event/I-month program-
mable, $195. 289-3454.

Two Gemini turntables & Gemini
Scratch Master Mixer, $300. 252-
5124, Gabe.

AST386SX25 w/4mb RAM, 140 md,
various programs installed, printer,
desk, accessories, $1,000. 284-4985.

LXI series stereo rack system w/tape
deck, receiver, amp, turntable, 2 spkrs
(3'x 1.5'), cabinetincl, $325.284-3977.

19" color tv w/remote & cable ready,
vacuum. 260-2169.

IBM comp video games, too many to
list, inexpensive. 284-3495.

Sony Diskman, still in box, goodcond,
$160. 284-5777.

21" Sony color tv, $75 & 21" Phillips
color tv, $75. 264-8427.

486 DX33 8 RAM, colorprinter, scan-
ner, SUGA monitor, software, tape
backup & track ball, $2,500/obo. 286-
4877.

Panasonic radio & cd player w/re-
mote, digital, good cond, $175. 284-
5777.

New Samsung 13" color tv w/remote,
cable ready & antenna, $140/obo. 284-
4921.

AST 486/25 6mb, RAM, 85 mb hd,
mouse, sound blaster, joystick hook-
up, star printer, various games & soft-
ware, $1,100. 283-3470.

Sony CDP-35 cd player, exc cond,
$80. 287-3536.

Panasonic camcorder, paid $1,275, but
sell for $635. 287-4020.

DSP 16 sound card, Mitsumi cd rom,
Lab Tec spkrs, dos & windows soft-
ware & drivers, $300. 260-1580.

Panasonic component system w/tum-
table, cass recorder & radio, $250.
261-9008.

Kenwood HT-215A transceiver w/
ham & marine bands, $140; standard
HX200 marine radio, needs battery,
$60. 226-1158.

Commodore Colt computer, IBM
compat, exc cond, $300. 286-6477.

Reverb, receiver, integrated receiver
& dual cass, call fordetails. 223-2483.

IBM compat, 386/25, dual floppies,
4meg ram, svga, mouse, Windows 3.1,
Microsoft Office, DOS 6.2, $1,200/
obo. 286-4734.

Dual Fisher spkrs, air dyne 80 hms, 60
watt, $25 each; Yorx sound speaker,
$100. 286-4023.

IBM comp, 386 sx dual drive, Imb
ram, 50mhz, VGA monitor, mouse
printer, software, $1,100. 287-4428.

Sega Genesis World Series Baseball,
like new, $50. 252-1222, Carlos.

Computers $225, printers $45, fax
machines $200, refurbished w/guar-
antee. 230-0008.

386 sxl6 computer, 130mb hd, mo-
dem, 3.5" & 5.25" floppies, svga,
mouse, lots of software, $1,000. 284-
6222.

New IBM ps2 w/new 130mg Seagate
hd, $750. 230-0008.

Kenwood tuner $100, 450 watt MU-
5D spkrs (2) $325 pair, brown stereo
rack $50. 235-4096.

Commadore 64 w/modem, keyboard,
printer, mouse, disk drive, 2 joysticks
&_games, $100. 284-3798.

Canon EOS 650 auto focus camera w/
35-75 macro zoom auto lens, 300 ez
flash, soft case, black body. 236-1256.

EP-7 digital keyboard w/seat, exc
cond, $700(X). 284-3481.

Kenwood stereo rack system, full-size
w/amp, tuner. eq, dual cass, turntable,
cd, spkrs, $675. 287-5995.


















New Sega Genesis w/10 games, $250.
282-4635.

IBM 386sx/25mhz, pb suga monitor,
game/joystick hookup, Epson lx-86
printer & more, $875/obo. 286-4428.

Kenwood 350 watt pwr amp $200,
equalizer $150, Tandy tv monitor $50.
235-4096.

New Sega games: Streets of Rage,
Castlevania II, Altered Beast,
Spiderman, Snes Super Chase HQ,
$30 each. 287-3074.





Young, orange, male cat on Fort Espi-
nar. 289-4834.





King mattress in good cond, $75.286-
6477.

Misc furniture, good quality,exccond;
book shelves; dinette sets; electric pi-
ano; & more. 287-6233.

7-pc Bassett bedroom set, solid wood,
white w/gold trim, no bed, $1,200/
obo. 284-5833.

Sofa, lightblue design, like new, $600.
269-5700.

Wrought iron terrace furniture, suit-
cases, sofas, more. 223-8159, after 5
p.m.

Bedroom set, real oak/antique pecan
finish w/chest, 2 ns, triple dresser &
mirror, F/Q headboard, $1,500 firm;
Q matt/springs, like new, $395. 283-
3220.

Oak & glass living room tables (1
coffee & 2 ends), less than 1 yr old,
$140. 286-4882.

King size Blackwood waterbed w/
waveless matt, dresser & mirror, like
new, $750/obo. 284-5269.Brand new
GE gas stove $525; Roper heavy duty
washer $425; prices neg. 283-3485.

3-pc mirror set 15"x35" & oak golf
ball display case for 25 balls. 286-
4935.

Whirlpool 25.7 cubic ft refrigerator/
freezer, ice maker, water/ice dispens-
er, serva-door, beige, $550.252-6869.

4-tier bookcase w/glass shelves, black
& gold, new, $90. 286-6124.

Country blue Barclay sofa w/4 match-
ing pillows, 4 mos old, scotchguard
fabric protector, paid $600, will ac-
cept $500. 283-3825.

9'x12' blue carpet w/rubber backing,
good cond, $50. 223-5843.

Mini-blinds, 3-sets, new, never used,
fit tropical 2-story base housing win-
dows, $30 each. 286-4935.

Kitchen table w/2 bench-style seats,
$150. 284-6489.

Girls bedroom set $250; matt & box
$350; coffee & side tables $50; boy's
bike $70; girl bike $75; Q box spring
$30. 287-4877.

Simmons light brown baby crib w/
Simmons baby supreme interspring
matt, $150. 286-6132.

Queen size sofa sleeper & Queen Anne
chair $850; Oster kitchen center $S100,
all like new. 226-8516.

Custom-made bedroom furn, solid
mahogany, incl triple dresser, 2 mir-
rors, 2 ns, F/Q headboard, chest,
$2,400; Queen matt/springs, firm, like
new, $395. 283-3220.

29 cu Amana refrig/freezer $1,000;
teak ent cntr w/ hutch $1,700; dinette
set $700; more. 287-6233.

Sofa, love seat, chair & 2 end tables
$1,200; Full size bed & dresser/mirror
$100. 287-3531.

Country blue recliner in good cond,
$150. 284-5777.

Sofas (2), coffee table & queen size
waterbed. 260-2169.

Carpets, never used: medium teal;
mauve/white, $7.50 per sq ft. 260-
5220.

Recliner; queen size matt; full size
matt & box spring; GE refrig 24 cu ft;
washing machine. 252-2180.

6' spruce art Christmas tree $100; red-
wood picnic table $ 100; small ent cntr
$150. 287-5021.

Rattan fum, carpets, drapes, more, all
like new, at Howard. 284-5238.

Bedroom set: black lacquer w/gold


trim $750; queen size bed set w/frame,
box spring & matt $450, all exc cond.
264-5160, Mike after 7 p.m.

Sofa/love seat w/dark flowered pat-
tern in mint cond $1,000/obo; baby
bath $4; toddler clothes. 287-6187.

Mother pearl end tables $300; Korean
detailed chess set $35. 283-4483.

GE XL44 gas range, like new, hook-
ups incl, $350. 282-3030.

7,000 btu a/c $225; 6,000 btu a/c $165.
256-6830.

GE refrigerator, 19 cu ft, almond, exc
cond, $450. 226-2012.

6-pc den set, like new, $350. 252-
3260.

Dinette set, $200/obo. 284-6184.

Kenmoredryer, large cap, white, heavy
duty, $150. 286-6293.

GE 23.5 cu ft refrigerator, white, good
cond, $525; sofa bed & love seat w/
oak trim, $900. 261-4702.

Blue 9x12 carpet $45; Hitachi console
tv $400; microwave stand $50. 286-
4893.

Whirlpool dryer, 5 temp/3 speed,
cream, needs heating element. 283-
6737.

Dishwasher, portable, good cond, $90.
282-3580.

Heavy duty, lrg cap washer, like new,
$350. 236-3099.

White toddler bed w/waterproof matt,
side rails & toy/linen trays for under
bed, like new, $i50. 287-5291.

Like new matching sofa $800 & love
seat $600; full size matt & box spring
w/frame $200. 287-5021.

Carpets: 12x22 & tan $70; 7x 12 & tan
$40;7xl 12 & white $35; stepperexer-
cise machine $100/obo; plants. 282-
3783.

Recliner, good cond, $150.226-2012.

Matching tan sofa & love seat w/oak
trim, oak coffee table, end table, floor
lamp & tan carpet 12x22, $1,200/obo.
282-3783.

9x 12 rusty red carpet, must sell before
Nov. 1, $70. 260-9303.

Danish entertainment set, Danish
white corner lamp, Danish dresser w/
China, sc word processor & printer.
236-0984.

2 twin beds $150ea, chest of drawers
$100, freezer $250, stove $350, BW
TV $50, all in superb cond. 223-3645
after 6pm.

Beta VCR w/100 tapes, 19" color TV,
2 girls bikes, German bar/hutch, 3
person rubber boat, Panasonic stereo
w/speakers and CD player. 287-3685.

Whirlpool refrigerator, white, 14 feet,
exc cond, 5yrs old, $425. 269-3538.

Sofa, light blue design, like new, $600.
269-5700.

King size waterbed, $210/obo. 223-
2483.

Sofa, 3 cushion, like new, $500/obo;
small glass cube table, $50; storage
box cube w/drawers, $35. 228-4514.

Large Whirlpool washer/dryer, exc
cond, sold as a set, $450. 236-3099.

Sofa sleeper, queen size, exc cond,
$600. 284-3481.

Sofa, chair, lamp and curtains. 252-
2568.

Twin bookcase, headboard and mat-
tresses, $250; dresser $100, exc cond..
286-3541.

Blue curtains $15, Kenmore micro
$150, swing set $35. 252-2028.

GE 19.6 CU FT refrig w/ inside ice
maker $750, bedroom set w/ hutch
and lights, solid pine, $1,100. 252-
2028.

Full size white whicker headboard,
$50. 282-3497.

2 sofas brown and gray, $200 and
$400; coffee table $150; queen size
waterbed, $175; 19" color TV, $175.
260-2169.

Sofa and love seat exc cond, $500;
almost new boys 20" bike, $65. 282-
3228.

30x60 metal desk $130, 30x40 glass
top dinette table $150, 40x60 table
$120. 226-1158.

4 yr old couch, loveseat, $600 for
both; blue recliner l yr old, $270. 284-
6239.


24,000 Fedders a/c, $350; 21,000
Freidrich ac, $350; 9,000 Westing-
house ac, $195. 252-2287.

Window ac, exc for maid's qtrs, $100.
284-4595.

Blue recliner $300, Whirlpool porta-
ble dishwasher $200, Almiral freezer
$450, queen size sofa bed, $525. 286-
4023.

3 pc glass coffee table set, brass and
wood, $250. 287-5595.





Checkbook, brown cover, Air Acade-
my Federal Credit Union, at Clayton
or Howard. 260-8239.





Waterbed heater, $75, Mr. Coffee 12
cup coffeemaker w/24 hr timer. 286-
4399.

Toro self-propelled mower, grt cond,
$350; edger 3.5 Briggs/Stratton, grt
cond, $125; weedeater, hvy dty, $95;
2 Briggs/Statton engs, $90ea. 283-
3220.

Ladies 18k 3 colorgold necklace, $800.
226-8576.

Huffy 18 spd mt bike, 4 mos old, like
new, $175. 286-3371.

Baby crib/bed, w/5 drawers, $450,
baby car seat, $50. 223-7829.

Four new tires 185/60R13 w/rims,
$160. 282-3793.

FSU books, BSC 1005m, enc 1101
Bedford&enc 1101 work in progress,
used once. 287-4438.

Official size ping pong tbl, $50. 284-
4733.

Snapper lawn mower, 3.5hp self-pro-
pelled w/bag, $275. 284-4733.

Sharp VCR, $150, Kennex super wide
racquetball racquet, $15.284-3356 Rm
322.

Boy's bike, good cond, $25.284-3184.

Two P205fl5R15 tires w/rim, 1 spare.
223-6105.

Men's wedding band, sz 10w/nuggets
& 5 shot diamonds, 6 mos, new, neg.
287-3088 Rm 308.

7 1/2 & 9 tycoon Fin-nor reels w/
match Fin-nor rods, exc cond, $1,800.
252-2080.

Force outboard motor, new, $500.282-
5630.

10 gal fish tank w/light & complete
set, $30. 284-5777.

Kenmore refrig/frzer, 26 cuft, ice/wa-
ter dispenser, $950; washer/dryer,
$400; baby stroller, $35; car seat, $40,
encyclopedia sets, all $40. 260-7094.

Weight bench w/wts, one long bar,
dumb ell bars, approx 360 lbs, $350.
261-4702.

Men's 27" bike, exc cond, 18 spd,
$125. 286-4981.

Surfboards, 7' 10, 6' 10, 6'6, all new.
243-5777.

Yamaha electrone HX-3 electric or-
gan all functions & tones, 2 spkers,
music disk recorder, $12,000. 264-
8427.

Transmission, auto, 5 spd, '84 Toyota,
$250/obo. 289-4984.

Ladies Huffy 10 spd touring bike,
$95, men's 10 spd Huffy bike, $65,
11,500 but ac, $180. 284-3437.

Plants, all sizes & prices, Nintendo
games $12 ea. 236-0984.

2 Mickey Mouse twin comforter &
curtains, Nintendo & games, game
Genie, 10 spe bike, boy's bike, baby
stroller. 261-1638.

Tandy TX computer & software, $250,
scanner, $100, games programs for
sale or trade, obo. 252-5430.

Specialty baskets, can be ordered in
time for the holidays. 260-3533 after
6pm.

Fisher Price baby tub, Criterion 30watt
spkers, NEC micro computer keybd,
drafting chr. 287-4182.

Westone guitar, crate G 15 amp, $350.
284-5355 West.

Air conditioning service and repair
for houses and any kind of cars, low
prices. 228-0201.

FSU basic college algebra, mac 1102


book, almost new, $45. 226-7168.

Brand new football visor, clear color,
$20. 286-3630.

Elec water heater, $70, air purifier,
$150, store display cabinet, wood/
glass, $100. 226-8626.

Portable craft center, $15, tbl saw,
$45, printer stand, $15, rattan wine
rack, $10, spot light lamp, new, $40.
252-2042.

Victoria Secret bathrobe, new, $30,
velvet dress, sz 7, maternity clothes sz
sm, new ladies shoes, sz 3. 252-2042.

Baby car seat, $45, high chair, $29,
gm rug 9x12, $30, umbrella stroller,
$15. 260-5386.

Surfboards 6'8, 6'3, exc cond, custom
bds, $250-$300. 252-5026.

Radiator, 2 core, will fit 6 or 8 cyl GM
cars, trucks, $50. 283-3485.

Wilson fielderbaseball glove for right
hand, $35. 252-2211.

Yonex adx 300 woods 1, 3, 5, new,
$500. 252-3260 8-4pm.

Rock cds, $6-$5. 221-4977.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 39 vols,
Comptons encyclopedia, 35 vols, exc
cond. 252-6566.

Sm block Chevy parts, intake mani-
fold 2bbl, bare cast iron head castings,
$20 set. 283-3485.

2 new box springs, $75 ea. 252-2314.

2pc LR sect, $600/obo, 12 volts pwr
wheel, 4-wheeler, $150. 286-4893.

Dinette tbl, 4 chrs, $175, clothes and
other misc items. 286-4481.

Golf equip, bag, clubs, cart, more,
good cond, best offer. 263-2240.

Sportscards sets, 20% off Beckett
guide, superstars, rookies. 287-3097.

RCA consoel color 25" TV, $300,
parts, 4 tires w/rims sz 15", lamp,
curtains. 252-2730.

Wedding dress sx 7/8, 32B cup, $75,
wht/gold wedding ring set, $100, dog
traveling kennel, $20. 284-6222.

Little Tykes gym, teeter totter, artifi-
cial Christmas, Army boots, rocking
horse & child's pool. 287-4478.

Boy's 20" bike, almost new, $65.282-
3228.

Video card w/IMB memory/windows,
$100, 19" color TV, $150, oak desk,
$80. 252-2955.

Wedding gown, veil, 3-ring wedding
set, cake top, flowers, candle, all
$1,000 or separate. 286-6134.

Washer/dryer, $100, refrig,$500, frzer,
$500, IBM XT, printer, sw, $200.252-
2033.

Carpet shampoo machine, equip w/
dry cleaning sys. 230-0008.

WOH 1023 FSU history book, $30.
260-3270.

Word processor, $100, mini blinds for
single & dbl wide windows. 282-4691.

Men's pro western flyer mt bike, new,
12 spd, $100. 236-5145.

Ibanez elec guitar, $300. 236-5145.

JC Penney 25" color TV w/remote,
$300. 286-4378.

Bedfords handbook for writing enc
1101 FSU, $15. 260-3270.


Little Tykes toys. 252-2343.

Carpet pad, 700 sq ft, $50, fence to fit
across carport, wood framed 12x3 w/
gate, $25. 286-6179.

3 formal dresses for rent, peach, pearl,
sm & med szs. 286-6384.

'84 Toyota auto transmission, 5 spd,
$250/obo. 289-4984.

FordT-bird carcover, $15. 287-4428.

Ford cyl heads will fit 289 & 302,
make offer. 287-6484.

Seed spreader, pots & planters, TV,
reel to reel tape deck w/2 spkers, all
exc cond. 223-7437 after 5pm.

Ladies/men clothing, curtains, misc
items, all exc cond. 223-7437.





Harley Davidson motorcycles' riding
jacket w/fringes, all leather, best offer.
284-4294.

1993 Honda Shadow deluxe, backrest,
windshield, helmet, vest, low mi, exc
cond, $3,800. 284-6327.

1985 Honda Elite 80cc, good cond,
new parts, $500, car cover 19-20'.
252-2145.

1993 Honda CB250 Nighthawk,
430mi, new bike, helmet incl, $2,000/
obo. 286-3399.

Blk Honda elite scooter, elec start, 370
mi, $1,800. 287-5680.

1987 Yamaha 200cc, US specs, duty
pd, low mi, $1,000. 286-4628.

1976 Montessa 348 Coda trials bike,
good cond, runs grt, many spare parts,
$750/obo. 261-2550.

1981 Honda CB750K, helmet, saddle
bags, runs good, $750. 287-6173.

1982 Yamaha Maxim 1100cc, needs
TCI, $600 firm. 287-4498.





Qtrs 1028B Clayton, 7am-?

Qtrs 1995B Curundu, 7am-6pm.

Qtrs 1532D Howard, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 541C Clayton, 7am-l 1pm.

Qtrs 1337B Amador, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 607A Clayton.

Qtrs 824 Farfan, 7am-noon

Qtrs 6306C Farfan, 8am-?

Qtrs 45A Albrook, 8am.

Qtrs 317A Kobbe, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 73A Howard, 7am.

Qtrs 1536F Howard, 8am.

Qtrs 315A Albrook, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 149 Gamboa, all day.

Qtrs 575B Howard.

Qtrs 1337B Amador, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 280B Albrook, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 550B Howard, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 723A Clayton.

Qtrs 801 Clayton, 7am.

Qtrs 206A Albrook, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 333B Clayton, 8-1 lam.


*Classified Ads


Tropic Times Ad Form


ANIMALS
AUTOMOBILES
AVAILABLE
BOATS & CAMPERS
ELECTRONICS
FOUND
HOUSEHOLD
LOST
MISCELLANEOUS
MOTORCYCLES
PATIO SALES
WANTED


SPONSOR'S NAME

ORG.


PRICE HOME PHONE

Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each
week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited
more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed
below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This
information will not be released to third parties. Deadline for the receipt
of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are run on a space
available basis and the staff makes no guarantee of ads running. Ads must
include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times,
Unit 0936, APO AA 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post
Office. Ads offering weapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not be
run.


RANK/GRADE

DUTY PHONE


Tropic Times B ll
Oct. 14, 1994B 11


Qtrs 609A Howard, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 102B Albrook, 6:30am.

Qtrs 628A Clayton, 7am-noon

Qtrs 6239 Los Rios, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 610 Balboa.

Qtrs 1545C Howard.

Qtrs 116B Howard, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 46B Howard, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 429C Kobbe, 8-11am.

Qtrs 953 La Boca, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 667A Howard, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 6406A Los Rios, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 409A Clayton, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 424B Clayton, 7am.

Qtrs 6322 Los rios, 8am-2pm.





Baby bed, playpen, good upright vac-
uum, reasonable price. 283-3220.

Day maid, 3 days a week, bilingual,
cleaning, cooks, honest w/refs. 233-
4616.

Bilingual day maid, full time, reliable,
honest, good w/kids, hard working,
refs. 260-3815.

FSUBSC 1005 labbook not written in
please. 287-4438.

Lg outdoor picnic tbl, benches, mod-
erately priced, will pick up. 287-5489.

Special dog for toddler & cats, house-
broken & trained. 283-5631.

Day maid, $15 day, M-F, house clean-
ing or babysitting, flex hrs or days.
284-6381.

Gardener for planting, weeding, cut-
ting rass, minor repairs w/refs. 261-
7769.

1955-56 Cristobal High School grad-
uation/remembrance book. 252-6989.

Air conditioners for tarts, any sz or
cond. 252-2287.

Refrig, med sz, in good cond, reason-
able price. 261-7140.

Camper shell for full sz Dodge p/u
truk, 8x6. 287-4020.

Mature Christian woman seeking fum
room near canal area, up to $200 mo.
286-3773.

Weekend maid, Sat-Sun eves, take car
of 3 boys. 252-5853.

Members of Beta Sigma Phi interest-
ed in joining an active chapter in Pan-
ama. 228-4514 Mary.

People interested in longaberger bas-
kets. Christmas brochure now avail-
able. 284-4239.

Typewriter, elec for student Eng-Span.
252-2355.

Someone for racquetball on weekday,
4-5pm, Clayton/Howard, intermedi-
ate skills, female pref. 261-2550 Nicki.

Span-spk live-in maid, Ig house, 2
kids, cook, clean, iron, M-Sat. 286-
4896.

Eng-spk live-in maid, care for 7 yr old
boy, cook, clean, iron, 5 days a wk,
incl wkends. 286-4692.

Live-in maid, cook, clean, iron, 5 1/2
days a wk, refs req. 252-6046.











12 | Tropic Times
B12 Oct. 14, 1994





HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming
veteran preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming edu-
cation and a copy of CASP notice of rating if applicable. Sub-
mit a copy of latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army vacancy announce-
ments (forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Direc-
torate of Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal,
or call 285-5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should be the
first step in the job search.
SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at NM-5 level
and above require specialized experience. Specialized experi-
ence is either education above the high school level or work ex-
perience directly related to the position being filled. Example:
Budget positions at or above the NM-5 level required Budget
experience or equivalent education.
Vacancy announcements are also available at the Sundial
Recreation Center.
Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications
on a continuous basis for the following positions. Registers es-
tablished from these announcements will be used to fill perma-
nent and temporary positions.
VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most clerical
position).
VB# 001A * General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most clerical
position).
VB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch)

* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.

VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Cert
+ 6 mo recreation exp in the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Requires 6 mos
recreation exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6
VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5. Limited to
permanent status employees only.
VB#017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6. Limited
to permanent status employees only.

The following positions are Perm/temp, Full-time, Part-time,
Intermittent.

VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14.
VB# 008 ** CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license required), NM-
9/10/11.
VB# 009 ** PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required),
NM-5.
VB# 019 ** EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, NM-
640-4/5/6.

** Selectees for nurse, medical officer and EMT positions will
undergo a background check.

Pacific
VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 10-14-
94 CLOSE: 10-25-94

024-95-MW METAL TANK AND RADIATOR REPAIRER,
MG-03858-9. DOL, Maintenance Div., Shop Ops, Allied Trades,
Corozal. NOTE: Driver's license required.
027-95-LA TELECOMMUNICATION SPECIALIST, NM-
391-9/11. SENSITIVE. 106th Signal Brigade S-3, Operation Div.,
Network Br., Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Security clearance is required.

028-95-JH SUPPLY TECHNICIAN, NM-2005-6. Temp Nte: 1
Year. TOBYHANNA Army Depot, Corozal.

384A-94-JH COMPUTER SPECIALIST, NM-334-11.
SENSITIVE. HQ, SOCSOUTH, Albrook.NOTE: Top Secret
clearance is required. Shift Work. Travel in support of exercises is
required. Incumbent is subject to receive and respond to
unannounced calls to report to work. Those who applied under VB#
384-94-JH, need not reapply.

030-95-JH MANAGEMENT'ANALYST, NM-343-7. Temp Nte:
09-30-95. DODDS-Panama District, Director's Office, Albrook.

031-95-JH BUDGET ANALYST, NM-560-11. SENSITIVE.
DCS, Resource Management Program, Budget Div., Ft. Clayton.

032-95-ES (8) DENTAL ASSISTANTS, NM-681-4. Temp Nte:
6 Months. Joint Task Force, Safe Haven, Camp One. NOTE:
Knowledge of English/Spanish. Shift Work.

033-95-ES LIBRARY TECHNICIAN, NM-1411-6. USA-
MEDDAC, GACH, Ancon. NOTE: Limited to MEDDAC/
DENTAC permanent employees; however applications for Temp
Nte: 30 Sep 95, will be accepted from all sources.

034-95-ES SANITARIAN, NM-688-9. USA-MEDDAC, GACH,
Preventive Medicine Svc., Environmental Health Sec., Ancon.
Note: Bilingual

035-95-ES OPERATING ROOM NURSE, NM-610-9. Shift
Work. USA-MEDDAC, GACH, Dept of Nursing Operating Room,
Nursing Svc., Ancon. NOTE: U.S. license required. Limited to
MEDDAC/DENTAC permanent employees; however applications
for Temp appointment Nte: 30 Sep 95, will be accepted from all
sources.

036-95-NC ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT ASSISTANT
(OFFICE AUTOMATION), NM-303-6. USAG, DEH, Contracts
Div., Corozal. NOTE: Qualified Typist. Limited to permanent
employees only.

037-95-NC PURCHASING AGENT (OFFICE AUTOMA-
TION), NM-1105-6. USAG, Directorate of Contracting, Purchasing
Div., Corozal.

038-95-NC CONSTRUCTION INSPECTOR, NM-809-7. HQ,
USAG, DEH, Contracts Div., Contract Svc. Br., Quality Assurance
Sec., Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Driver's license required.

040-95-KF COMPUTER ASSISTANT, NM-335-6. SENSITIVE.
Temp Nte: 1 yr. HQ, SOUTHCOM, SCJ6, Automated Systems
Div., Ft. Amador.
Atlantic
039-95-ES PHARMACY TECHNICIAN, NM-661-5. Temp
Nte: 30 Sep 95. USA MEDDAC-Panama, GACH, Sherman Health
Clinic, Ft. Sherman.


Potpourri





Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club: 282-3439
The club will be closed to the public for renovations
through Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be
available 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Addition-
ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and
during lunch hours 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Amador
*Club Amador: 282-4334
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring
soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights.
Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno
at noon the first Sunday of each month.
The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during
renovations of the Quarry Heights Officers' Club.
Clayton
*The Loop: 287-3035
CJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Mondays-Fridays. At 3:30 p.m. Sunday pool tournaments.
Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or CJ's
Sports Bar, call 287-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343.
*NCO Club: 287-4716
The Forum Restaurant opens 5-9 p.m. daily.
Mexican buffet Mondays.
Steak night Tuesdays. A la carte menu is available.
Country buffet Wednesdays features barbecue pork ribs,
fried chicken, pork knuckles, collards greens, sweet potato,
rice, black-eyed peas and corn bread.
All-you-can-eat family buffet Thursdays.
Seafood buffet Fridays features broiled lobster, garlic
shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab.
12-oz prime rib special Saturdays.
Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m.
Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Sun-
days and Mondays.
Disco 9 p.m. Wednesday, Fridays and Saturdays. There
will be a midnight buffet.
International food fair/enlisted membership drive 5
p.m. Oct. 27 includes food tasting, cooking demonstration,
wine tasting, recipes and door prizes.
Albrook
*Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582
Tonight's entertainment karaoke in the lounge and club
card drawing.
Howard/Albrook Officers Spouses' Club annual fall
bazaar 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday.
Saturday afternoon football 2 p.m. in the lounge with
bar service.
Sunday saloon breakfast specials 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the
lounge. Choose from three menus.
Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-l p.m. in the din-
ing room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets,
roast beef, fresh fruits, breakfast and lunch items and ice
cream bar.
Mongolian barbecue & The Caribbean Connection
5:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Choose the meat, vegetables, sea-
sonings, oils and have chefs do the job outside on the open
grills. Enjoy the sounds of the tropics by a steel drum band.
Lombardi a la Italiana 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. A taste
of Italy at your favorite club dining room.
Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday includes
tacos, fajitas, taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. After din-
ner dance the night way to country western music.
Country western night Thursdays with free dance les-
sons at 7:30-10:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples
dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing.
Howard
*Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718
Weekday lunches includes buffet, salad and potato bar.
Friday and Saturday nights 6-8:30 p.m. order a la carte


in the dining room.
Friday evenings in the lounge include beer specials,
music, games and club card drawings.
Oriental night 6-8:30 p.m. today.
Barbecue plate special 6-8:30 p.m. Oct. 21.
Dining room is closed Sunday through Thursday.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club - Dining Room:
2844189
Sunday breakfast buffet 8-12:30 a.m.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30
a.m. Saturday.
New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade
roast beef, turkey, turkey salad and tuna fish sandwiches.
Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m.
Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Select a
cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or fillet. All steaks are
U.S. choice beef.
Family menu Tuesdays-Fridays featuring all the favor-
ites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand made 1/2
pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more.
Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or
take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or hot wings.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom : 284-
4189
Friday night disco 4:30 p.m.- 1 a.m. today.
Membership night 5 p.m. Oct. 22. Complimentary Ital-
ian buffet for members and one guest; $6.95 for additional
guest. Children 6-12 , $3 and children under 6, free.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove:
284-4189
Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays.
Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Monday night football and mug special in the lounge.
Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcorn and nachos.
Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Free Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m.
Wednesday in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line danc-
ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until mid-
night.
Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with
your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills.
Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.-
midnight Thursdays.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday.
*Top Three Club: 284-4189
Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday.
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat and
complimentary taco bar.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. Members
must have a card and be present to win.
Club closed Saturdays.

Rodman
*Rodman Club - Open to all ranks: 283-4498
Bring your boss nite 6-9 p.m. with complimentary hors
d'oeuvres served 5-7 p.m. D.J. music 6:30-11 p.m.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-l
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Monday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with all-
you-can-eat taco bar 6-9 p.m. at the Laguna Lounge.
Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
All-you-can-eat fried chicken 4:30-8:30 p.m. Wed-
nesdays. Grill menu is also available.
Open Mike night 6-11 p.m. Thursday in the Laguna
Lounge.
Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Rodman Bohio.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-9
p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-
9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays.
*Rodman Annex: 283-4498
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
The club is closed for evening and weekend service.


rCaplschedue .-


Pacific
Amador Chapel
Building 108, Phone: 282-3610
8:30am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
9:30am CCD Catholic, Building 109
(Sunday)
10am -Episcopal Worship Service
(Sunday)

Clayton Chapel
Building 64, Phone: 287-5859
11:30am Daily Catholic Mass
5pm Catholic Mass (Saturday)
8:45am Collective Protestant Service
(Sunday)
10:30am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
10:30am Protestant Sunday School (Sun-
dayBuilding 156,287-3497)
12:30pm Gospel Service (Sunday)
5:30pm CCD Catholic, Building. 156
(Sunday)
6pm Evening Service (Sunday)
Corozal Chapel
Building 112, Phone: 285-6717
7:30pm Jewish (first Friday of month)
10am Hispanic Catholic Mass (Sunday)
1pm Pentecostal Worship (Sunday)
7pm Sunday School (Friday)


1-2pm Protestant Confirmation

Atlantic
Davis Chapel
Building 32, Phone: 289-3319
11:30am Catholic Mass (Tuesday-Friday)
Noon Catholic Spanish Mass (Sunday)
l:30pm Protestant Hispanic Service
(Sunday)
Sherman Chapel
Building 152, Phone: 289-6481
8;30am Collective Protestant Worship
(Sunday)
10am Protestant Sunday School
Espinar Chapel
Building 224, Phone: 289-4616
9am Catholic English Mass (Sunday)
9am Protestant Sunday School at
Espinar Elementary
10:15am CCD Catholic Sunday School at
Espinar Elementary
10:15am Collective Protestant Worship
(Sunday)
11:30pm Gospel Sunday School
12:20pm Gospel Service (Sunday)
6:30pm Gospel Bible Study (Sunday)


Islamic Prayer Services 12:30-1:30 p.m. Fri-
days, Fort Clayton Chapel. 287-5859.


Gorgas Hospital
Building 254, Phone: 282-5507
12:15pm Daily Catholic Mass (2nd floor)
Weekday worship (As an-
nounced)
Albrook Chapel
Building 860, Phone: 284-3948
8am Spanish Catholic Mass (Sunday)
9am Confessions (Sunday)
9:15am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
9:45am Protestant Sunday School
11am General Protestant Service
Howard Chapel
Building 500, Phone: 284-3948
11:30am Daily Catholic Mass
4:30pm Confessions (Saturday)
5pm Catholic Mass (Saturday)
9:30am General Protestant Service (Sun-
day)
11am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
12:30pm Gospel Service (Sunday)
Rodman Chapel
Building 40, Phone: 283-4148
8-9am Catholic Mass
10-11am General Protestant Service (Sun-
day)
11:15am Protestant Communion (Luthern
Tradition)




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091C, __mesVol. VII, No. 40 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Oct. 14, 1994 Faxes speed AMC sign-ups HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) Space available travelers now may place their names on sign-up lists before they even reach an Air Mobility Command terminal. In fact, they can even make their reservation from another country. Remotesign-up is possible through electronic transmission of the necessary documents via fax machine. The documents may be sent via U.S. mail as well. Travelers need to send their leave form, authentication of travel eligibility (or letter of request for retirees), and selected destination(s) to a port of origin or other terminal of departure. First names of family members desiring travel should be included also. Authentication of travel eligibility is defined as a statement from the traveler that he or she has all the documents needed to travel to a desired country. It may be typed or written on leave forms. Soldiers from the 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry Regiment train in Honduras. Sgt. Eric Hortin (U.S. Army) Telefaxes cannot be sent before the I effective date of leave; therefore, the Amfi l A01ilL=Amtelefax data header will establish the basis for date/time sign-up. IFor mail-in sign-up, the day the documents are received will determine the date/time. For more information, call the Units pitch in for sr ooth inactivation as AMCpassengerterminalatHoward, 284-4306/3608. Treaty Implementation Plan materializes Cedras arrives by Maj. Ira Watkins ter. From there, the remaining soldiers were coordinated for the movement of the fumi1st Bn., 508th inf., Commander scheduled to leave, prioritized by job positure. The Materiel Movements Section in Pana m a tions and special assignment instructions. served as the link between the 508th and the PANAMA CITY (Reuters) FORT CLAYTON -Saturday marks Officer and Enlisted Strength Managecivilian contractors who actually moved Haiti's deposed military leader Lt. the official casing of the colors for the 1st ment catered to the 508th's overall personnearly 400,000 pounds of furniture to new Gen. Raoul Cedras arrived in Panama Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry -a nel plan. locations. early Thursday to begin his life in big step toward the drawdown of U.S. In addition to soldiers moving on to new The 508th property books were filled exile from the nation he ruled brutally troops in Panama. assignments, soldiers completing theirtime with close to 2,000 major end items such as for three years. The official ceremony will close anin service were aided in many ways by the vehicles, weapon systems, communication Ce ar . other chapter of the 508th's historical linSeparations Section ofUSARSO's Personand automation equipmentand tactical field Cedras and Brig. Genr. Phillipe eage that began in October 1942 at Camp nel Action Center. They also processed an gear. Biamby-two ofthe three leaders who Blanding, Fla. onslaught of PCS awards and evaluation The93rd Materiel Management Center, toppled exiedHaitian President eanThe Red Devils of the 508th, which was reports in a very timely manner. located on Corozal, directed the transfer or Bertrand Aristide in a 1991 coupactivated in Panama in July 1987, particiThe Transportation Division, where soltum-in of all items, while the 167th MMC, ity and their families arrived in Panama pated in many significant conflicts, such as diers received their port calls and also coorArmy Reservists out of Homewood, Ala., City at 4:10 am. from Haiti aboard an the Normandy invasion, Dominican Redinated for household goods pick-up, supphysically moved the equipment back to American Trans AirBoeing757 charpublic, Vietnam, Grenada and most reported the 508th by adapting to an increase the states. termed by the U.S. mili cently, operation "Just Cause," here. of 100 out-processing soldiers per month. The buildings the 508th called home Panamaagreed totake in theformer For the past seven months, however, the The Air Mobility Command, located on during its seven-year stay at Fort Kobbe coup leaders after Aristide asked 508th's focus has not been war fighting, HowardAFB, provided aprofessional mode were turned over one by onetothe DirectorPanama's government to give them butinactivating. The mission sounds simple oftransportation back to the states for many ate of Engineering and Housing, for restoasylum, paving the way for Aristide's -pack up and go home-but in all actualof the Red Devils and their families. ration in order to allow new units to take imminent return to Haiti three weeks ity it's very complex and requires the supIn addition to the men of the battalion over the structures. after U.S. forces occupied the nation port of many outside agencies. moving on, all equipment and property of Throughout the inactivation process, to restore democracy. The effort began with a 620-plus man the 508th had to be turned in or transferred many items and soldiers were transported Cedras arrived at Panama City's infantry battalion, complete with all the to other agencies or units. from one place to another. The 142nd MediTocumen airport wearing a dark blue equipment required to go to war. Before More than4,000 pieces offurniture were cal Battalion and the Transportation Motor suit instead of his traditional military reassigning any soldier, the chain of comeither turned over to the Defense Poolprovidedexternal transportation which uniform. mand realized all the paratroopers had cerReutilization and Market Officer or laterenabled the soldiers of the 508th to get the "We thank the President of Panama tain needs and some required special attenally transferred to units such as the 536th job done. and the Panamanian people. We are a tion with unique situations. Engineers and 5th Battalion (Light), 87th As the 508th cases its colors Saturday, family that is passing through a diffiSoldiers with families were moved to Infantry. the Red Devils will keep in mind many cult time. We hope to live here in follow-on assignments during the summer Instrumental in these transactions was others who contributed to this inactivation Panama in pure peace and tranquilmonths so their children could settle in to a the Fumiture Management Office whoconmission just as in many training and real ity," Cedras said. new school at the beginning of the semesducted pre-inventories, and classified and world missions in the years prior. Medicalteam performs eye surgery Naval Small Craft Instruction and *Camp concerts, Page 3 on Hondurans as part of Exercise Technical Training School enlight*Festival winners, Page 7 Southern Hope II. ens Latin American sailors. *Cristobal Tigers, Page 11

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Tropic Times Oct. 14, 1994 Briefly Tropic Times late? Call 269-3220 People who live in quarters on a Pacific All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for priority mission area military installation and have not rerequirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608. ceived a Tropic Times by 6:30 a.m. Friday Saturday 5:40am C-141 Howard AFB Belize City, Belize should call 269-3220. 5:45am 8727 Howard AFB Lima, Peru (CC) Howard AFB Atlanta 1AP, GA (C) Santiago, Chile (0) Oct. 21 S .Charleston 1AP, SC -La Paz, Bolivia 5:55am C-130 Howard AFS 'Trick or Treating' hours 1:45pm C-5A Howard AFB Wednesday San Salvador, El Salvador established for Clayton Charleston AFB, SC (0) 6:10am C-130 Howard, AFB (VCC) Kelly AFB, TX Bogota, Colombia (CC) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) The established hours for "Trick or Sunday Howard AFB Howard AFB Treating" at Fort Clayton are 5-8 p.m. Oct. 3:45pm B-757 Howard AFB (C,O) 5:40am C-141 Howard, AFB 5:40pm C-141 Howard AFB 31. The age limit is 12 years old. Teens, 13 Soto Cano AB, Honduras Kelly AFB, TX (M) Charleston AFB, SC (0) years and older are encouraged to partici(CC) Charleston AFB, SC McGuire AFB, NJ pate in the Directorate of Community AcMonday Thursday tivities events. 5:40am C130 Howard AFB 5:45am C-5A Howard AFB People who have a valid installation Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) AActive duty only pass can escort five immediate family Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Charleston AFB, SC (0) USU.S. passport members only for Trick or Treating on Howard AFB Dover AFB, DE 0-Overnight 8:40am 8757 Howard AFB 11:40am C-1 41 Howard AFB C-Commercial Contract Fort Clayton. People with vehicles regisAtlanta IAP, GA (C) San Jose, Costa Rica V-Visa termed with the Provost Marshal Office can Charleston lAP, SC Guatemala City, Guatemala M-Medevac drive their vehicles onto any installation to Tuesday (CCO) CC-Country Clearance an authorized parking area. Sponsors are accountable for the behavior of their guests while on the installaVolunteers needed for commander, Brig. Gen. Richard E. Brown fined, permanently lose APO privileges tion. Failure to control guests will result in III. After three-month, the policy will be and may even spend time in jail. action taken against the sponsor. All visiBlack H history Month reviewed for its impact on customers. For more information or answers to any tors to Army installations must be off post Rodman NS needs volunteers to help postal questions, call 286-4214. no later than 9 p.m. For information, call plan activities for the 1995 Black History 24th Wing PAO will Master Sgt. Scott Carr at 287-3716. Month observance in February. CommitClayton Dental Clinic tee members are also looking for guest broadcast holiday cheer clayto talini Howard to measure for speakers, donations and facilities for funcThe 24th Wing Public Affairs office is closes for training mini blind installation tions. People interested should call Petty sponsoring a program to help make the The Fort Clayton Dental Clinic will be Officer Patricia Wallace or Petty Officer holiday season a little brighter for relatives closed Oct. 28 for mandatory unit training. Measurements for the installation of Angelia Huff at 283-4400/4300. in the United States. People can record an Patients may report to Gorgas Dental Clinmini blinds in the Howard AFB tropical Howard AFB officials need volunteers audio holiday greeting to be broadcast on ic for emergency treatment during normal housing area is as follows: Monday-Oct. to plan and organize activities for a radio station in their relatives' home duty hours. After-duty emergency patients 21, Qrts. 651-675, 12-39 and 191-199; Howard's Black History Month obsertown. The program is free and open to all may report to the Emergency Room. Oct. 24-28, Qrts. 41-99; Nov. 1-4, Qrts. vance. Two volunteers, in the grade of EU.S. military and family members. For 100-154; and Nov. 7-11, Qrts. 156-199. 7 or above, are also needed to chair the more information about the program, call Amnesty Day supports Workers will stop by between 9 and 11 committee and to act as alternate. Anyone the 24th Wing PAO at 284-5554. a.m. For more information, call 185-5392. interested in volunteering to participate in Safety Awareness Day or chairing the committee, call Tech. Sgt. In conjunction with USARSO Safety 'Fiesta night' celebrates Jim Johnson at 284-5358. Education center sets Awareness Day, the 36th Ordnance DeHispanic heritage Smany new test dates tachment will conduct Amnesty Day 8 isanigh tgbe o Spot bid sale to be held The Army Education Center announca.m.-l p.m. Oct. 28 at the following areas: recognize Hispanic heritage. The event Wednesday at Corozal es test dates for Graduate Record Exams, Luzon. Field, Fort Clayton; the softball will be from 5-10 p.m. at the Hotel Plaza A spot bid sale will be held 9 a.m. Graduate Management Admission Tests, field, Fort Davis; Building 533, Corozal; will be Pam-p.a t e ostePaza will be he5d 9ednesday atBuilding308 za.m National Teachers' Exams and AutomoBuilding 734, Howard AFB; and AmmuPaitilla in Panama City. Cost will be 5 Wednesday at Buildig 308, Corozal. Intive Service Excellence exams. The dates nition Supply Point 1 at Rodman Naval and door prizes and two-for-one drinks spection of the items will be 9 a.m.-3 p.m. are 7 a m Tuesday and Oct. 25, and Nov. Station. will be offered. For more information, call Tuesday. For information, call 285-5417. a .Tue and Nt. 25, a S I1st Lt. Jaime Adames, 284-5663, or Saf8, 9 and 15. GRE and NTE subject exams will be given at 1 p.m. For information, call Rodman ammunition Sgt. Miguel Villanueva, 284-4837. Ammunition point 287-5856. supply enforces policy closed for one week Workshop targets Customers of Rodman Ammunition rns op tdages osed for o nte ek Holiday season will Supply Point are required to update comparents of teenagers Point will be closed Oct. 23-27 for invenaffect postal delivery pany access rosters every 90 days or as A STEP class for parents of teenagers tory. All units with scheduled training Post office officials remind members personnel changes dictate. Starting Monwill be held Tuesday from 6-7:30 p.m. at should call 283-5643/5806 to reschedule stationed in Panama that the holiday "rush" day, units will be denied access to ASP if the Chapel Annex on Howard AFB. Free issues and turn-ins. usually means the mail moves slower than rosters are not updated. For information, child care is available. For more informanormal. As a result, they've noted the folcall Staff Sgt. Juan Gomez at 283-5806. tion, call 284-6410/6457. Sweet Adelines women's lowing recommended "mail by" dates, as chorus needs singers determined by the final destination of the Florida State offers late Navy MWR needs The Crossroads Chapter of the Sweet packages. i_ registration for term two program instructors Adelines women's barbershop chorus *To get holiday packages to the conti eitainfrtr w Rodman Morale Welfare and Recreneeds singers in tenor, baritone, bass, lead nental United States by Christmas, memThe Florida State University, Panama Rodmn Mral Wefar an Rere-nees siger winter, arione bas, ead bers should mail them first class, priority, Canal Branch, will hold late registration ation needs instructors in various fields to and melody to participate in a variety of hr se l mail b hen ranh, wi ollat. M on expand their programming. The MWR community activities. Rehearsals are held or space available mail by Dec. 2. When for term two noon-S p.m. Mondaysending them 4th class, officials recomWednesday in Building 808, Albrook Outdoor Recreation needs individuals 7 p.m. Mondays at the Balboa Lutheran mended mailing packages by Nov. 1. InAFS; and 9 a.m.-2p.m.Monday andTuesqualified to teach open water scuba. For Church hall. For information, call 252ternational mail sent by air or air parcel day in Building 235, Fort Davis. For ininformation, call Valerie Van Essen at 6017 or 221-3874. post to Africa, Australia, the Caribbean, formation, call 285-6922/5222. 283-3150. The MWR Community RecreCentral or South America, Europe, the Far ation Department needs foreign language 24th Wing, AAFES set East, and others should also arrive on time Rodman Marina has wet instructors qualified to teach Spanish and , if sent by Dec. 1. Items sent by boat should French. Instructors should have prior exno smoking' policy be mailed a month earlier, except those moorings available perience teaching elementary and converAll dining rooms in 24th Wing clubs sent to Africa and Southeast Asia, which Rodman Marina has wet moorings sational courses. For information, call and AAFES facilities have been designatshould be mailed immediately. available. Active duty military will be givNavy MWR at 283-4301. ed as "no-smoking areas" by the wing *With the advent of the 1994 holiday en priority. For information, call the Rodseason, postal officials need volunteers to man Marina office at 283-3147. help with the tremendous influx of letters W weekend weather and packages. People 16 years and older Command stresses who have authorized postal privileges may Pacific Atlantic apply. prompt return of surveys Saturday Saturday *The best way to lose APO privileges If you were mailed the U.S. Air Force Temperature Tides Temperature Tides is to abuse them, and this includes sending Services Market Survey, fill out the surHigh: 89 12:57 p.m. at 14 feet High: 91 3:09 p.m. at 1.4 feet illegal or unauthorized items through the vey and return it promptly. Military memLow: 73 6:58 p.m. at 3 feet Low: 71 10:49 p.m. at 0.3 feet system, or using it for personal gain. Postbers are encouraged to seek family input Sunday Sunday al personnel are using a variety of means on the survey. The survey is an informaHigh: 88 1:50 p.m. at 14.5 feet High: 89 4:04 p.m. at 1.4 feet to identify and report members misusing tion tool that will help the Services SquadLow: 73 7:52 p.m. at 2.6 feet Low: 71 11:38 p.m. at 0.3 feet their postal service privileges, and this inron on your base focus on the communiForecast: Partly to mostly cloudy with afternoon showers and isolated thunderstorms. eludes X-raying all items that enter the systy's specific needs. For more information, tem. People who abuse the system may be contact Cynthia Ritchie at 285-5991.

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N__Tropic Times Tr oews Oct. 14, 19943 sight Team performs eye surgery on Hondurans by Staff Sgt. Robin Brown JTF-Bravo Public Affairs Office SOTO CANO AB, Honduras -The old saying that eyes are the window to An ophthalmologist removes cataract substance from a Honduran patient's eye. Staff SgL.Robin Brown (JTF-BraVo) the heart has taken on anew meaning in Comayagua, Honduras. With the help with cataracts in both eyes," said Maj. blindness. of surgery, a team of military specialists (Dr.) Jack Gillis, a U.S. Air Force ophThe eyes of 7-month-old Josue can see hearts rejoicing through the eyes thalmologist. "With her lefteye she could Hernandez were crossed. To correct what of some locals. not tell if it was day or night. The right doctors call strabismus, Gillis "tightAs part of Exercise Southern Hope eye could not see anything in front of it. ened the muscle around his eyes to imII, a team of two anesthesiologists, four After her surgery and the bandages were prove the balance so they could see ophthalmologists, two technicians and removed, Teresa Hernandez Galco was straight, as opposed to an eye turning in an optometrist came to Joint Task Forcecrying for joy," Gillis said. "She was so or out." Bravo to perform eye surgeries on Honthankful, she kept repeating that God Unlike the adults, the children are put durans. had blessed my hands with this talent. to sleep before to surgery. "A local Composed of servicemembers from The feeling I got from her reaction to anesthetic would not work in these Wilford HallMedicalCenter, San Antosight makes this assignment worth the cases," said Bauman. "Children nio, Texas and the U.S. Air Force Acadworking conditions." wouldn't tolerate the discomfort or lie emy and Fitzsimons Army Medical CenWorking in a small room without airstill long enough." ter, Denver, Colo., the team treated 300 conditioning for nine or 10 hours daily Even under these unconventional patients Sept. 14 -26. The first two days is quite different from working in the conditions, these doctors continue to were spent screening patients, followed United States. The team had to adjust to work. by six and one-half days of surgery and power outages in the middle of surgery, "One day the power went out, but we a day for follow-ups. water shortages and old equipment. couldn't stop working," said Gillis, "so The populace of 35,000 increased as "It is achallenge using portable equipwe used flashlights to perform the surpeople arrived daily by horse, donkey, Staff Sgt .Robin Brown (JTF-Bravo) ment because it doesn't have good qualgenies." foot and buggy in hopes of being seen by Military specialists prepare a ity," said Maj. (Dr.) Stuart Ferris, a U.S. With limited space, the team perthe doctors. Some who weren't treated .Armyophthalmologist. "But,thisistypiformed all the surgeries in the same on the day they arrived often slept outHonduran patientfor eye surgery. cal for a developing country. Everyroom, two at a time. One of the operaside on the streets and in nearby churches "Castro never smiled," Bauman said, thing may not be as comfortable as home, tions took seven hours, all done without waiting for clinic doors to open again "until after the surgery." but they try to give us workable condiair conditioning. the next day. Cataract is the Greek word for watertions." "The 12-year-old girl had congenital "The leading cause of blindness in fall. The pupils appear white, the same "At home we'd have gowns, drapes birth defects that prevented her eyes most developing countries is cataracts," way it looks when water rushes over a and constant sterilizing. So, we brought from closing properly," Ferris said. "The according to Maj. (Dr.) Wendall fall. everything we anticipated needing. Exbigger she gets, the less her eyelids Bauman, a U.S. Air Force ophthalmolSurgeons numb and stabilize the eye cept sweat bands-those we bought here cover her eyes. Without correction, inogist. "Without a nearby eye doctor, with a local anesthesia before performto help keep the sweat from running fection would set in, causing her to go these cases go untreated. Most couldn't ing the delicate operation. The cataract down our arms and onto the patients or blind." afford the treatment even if it was availis removed by incision and replaced equipment," Gillis said. "We put rubber "What we do here helps prepare us able." with an internal contact lens, enabling gloves or plastic on the handles of the for our wartime mission. The working "I am grateful for the North Ameithe patient to see. microscopes used during surgery to conditions may be similar and surgeries can doctors," said Maria Castro, a 24Most patients would squirm if somemaintain our sterility." the same. The appreciation of what we year-old diabetic. "I was blind for four one put a needle behind their eye, but The team averaged 12 surgical paare doing here is felt by all of us," months and now I can see out of both my some of these patients are strong. They tients per day with a one-day high of 14. Baumen said. "By providing the hueyes." lie still until it's over without any comMost were cataract removals, and others manitarian medical assistance needed, Like so many others treated, Castro plaints of discomfort. were strabismus, eye injuries and conwe also strengthen the bond of friendcame in to have her cataracts removed. "One 84-year-old woman came in genital birthdefects that sometimes cause ship and trust between our countries." Popular musicians visit Safe Haven camps -----that there is a group in exile (Cubans in by Staff Sgt. Scott Elliott the United States) who are supporting JTFSafe Haven Joint Information Bureau them," Chirino told reporters in a press conference prior to the concert. EMPIRE RANGE -Latin Salsa sing"Considering their lack of freedom er Willy Chirino performed several of and within the limits, they're happy his biggest hits and had encouraging especially when their conditions in words for members of Cuban CommuPanama are compared with those in nity Camp 1 Monday. Guantanamo. I thank the U.S. Southern Some 2,300 community members Commandforthegoodtreatmentthey're were present when Lt. Col. Jim Greengiving to the balseros," he said. wood, camp commander, welcomed Residents of Community Camp 2 Chirino and officially named the camp welcomed an entertainer of their own, in his honor. In addition to Camp Chirino Cuban-American pop singer Jon Secada, residents, several hundred American Tuesday. Secadatouredthecamp,joined military members moved to the rhythm residents in an a cappella version of one of the Chirino band. of his hits and donated school supplies. "I've come here to sing to the Secada and his band were on tour in 'balseros' (rafters), but more than just Panama City in support of his latest (Soae Havn JIB) sing to them, I'm here to assure them album. Salsa star Willie Chirino performs for Cubans at Camp No. 1.

PAGE 4

o TropicTNese * Oct. 14, 1994 N ew s__________ ________ Cubans assault MPs; I no one seriously hurt EMPIRE RANGE (Safe Haven JIB) -Cubans assaulted four military police and one Cuban at Operation Safe Have Camp Willie Chirino Tuesday during an attempt to move the Cuban to another camp after he was threatened by other camp residents. While heading towards the camp administration area, a group of Cubans confronted and assaulted the Cuban national. Five people were apprehended. Two Cubans received minor scratches. There were no injuries to U.S personnel. All involved were examined by medical personnel and no one required hospitalization. Camp representatives were briefed about the incident by the commander and cooperated in determining the facts and turning over the Cubans involved. Officials said the incident is very disappointing because a small group of emotional Cubans targeted one camp member along with the unarmed MPs attempting to protect him. Officials said an investigation is going on and some form of disciplinary action will be taken. AF master sergeant busted for cocaine use HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PAO) -Master Sgt. U.S.Ary) Charles Whirred of the 24th Maintenance Squadron was Christm as sponsorship tim e convicted by a court-martial Sept. 29 for two uses of cocaine. Santa, normally an employee of Headquarters, Directorate of Logistics, visits children at Whitted was sentenced to six months at the Fort ClayCentro de Orientacion Infantil de Farallon, Rio Hato, Panama, during the 1993 JointTask Forceton Confinement Facility, a bad conduct discharge, reducPanama Christmas Sponsorship Program. Organizations interested in getting involved in this tion to E-3 and forfeiture of $550 per month for six year's program should call U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office at 287-3007/3058. months. Whitted was identified as a result of a random urinalysis test taken in March. Results proved positive and in April he was asked to consent to a second test which also came back positive. The samples were analyzed at C n r le t m ls e i e Armstrong Laboratory, Brooks AFB, Texas. Whitted enlisted Sept. 17, 1974, and was scheduled to FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The revised list Disposable diapers -120 per week per child retire Oct. 31. Air Force Secretary Sheila E. Widnall will of controlled items has been approved and is effective imHigh value items decide whether or not to allow him to retire. mediately. In addition, a new form will have to be filled (Quantities are per household per tour) out by customers purchasing designated controlled items. Air conditioner -4 Traffic Com m and says The new form was developed to record the identity of Bicycle -1 per household member ersons purchasing controlled items. It will be used in an Cameras -2 more than $100 POVs ready for pick up effort to anticipate current, or monitor possible criminal Car radio/tape deck -1 per registered vehicle BALBOA (MTMC) -The following customers have activity involving U.S. Armed Forces or authorized paCD player -2 trons. Clothes dryer -1 privately owned vehicles ready for pick up at the POV Any questions concerning contraband items may be Computers -2 CPU/keyboards, 4 single disk drives, 2 Processing Center, Building 1501, Balboa, adjacent to answered by reading SC Regulation 1-19, or call the Conprinters Anciaux L.N.; Belter M.S.; Borchelt D.W.; Butler traband Control Section at 286-3303/3304. Dishwashers -1 S.R.; Cooley S.E.; Daniel T.E.; Fluet J.E.; Garuz T.E.; Electric typewriters -2 Gonzalez B.; Griffin S.D.; Johnson V.M.; Krist M.G.; Alcohol FreezerLerose N.J.; Lewis AW.; Lucas A.W.; Marcelino W.V.; Beer -10 cases per month per household Golf club sets -2 McIntosh K.E.; Mejia-Rangel 0.; Miller J.T.; Moore J.D.; Liquor -8 bottles per month: in addition, 50 miniatures Household furniture -1 living room set, 1 dining room Newberry J.D.; Oconner M.L.; Parker B.; Pittman T.Z.; per month per household may be purchased set, 3 bedroom sets, 1 crib per child Ruggles G.; Sanchez E.E.; Schaul D.E.; Schmidt C.E.; Note: SC Form 55A must be filled out if more than one Microwave ovens -I Smith C.M.; Squires E.; Stall F.M.; Stockdale R.J.; Taycase of beer or two bottles of liquor or 16 miniatures per Piano/organs -1 lor T.; Testa J.A.; Thomas S.L.; Tregaskis K. day is purchased. Power lawn mower -I Customers must have the following documents for Cigarettes Ranges -I ckupter Ps hete ig mn 3 cartons per week or 12 cartons per month per household Refrigerators (<4 cu.ft.) -I pic upof hei POs.Food Refrigerators (>4 cu.ft.) -I *ID card (current military, dependent, or civilian) Cooking oil -5 gallons per month Sewing machines *Driver license (must have Panamanian license for secCoknoi 5galspemntSwngacnsond POV) Hams -One packaged or canned per week; in addition, 2 Silverware -2 sets more than $50 *PoV shipping document (DD Form 788) packages of sliced per week Stereo sets -2 P*Vehicle registration or title Pork shoulder -One per week Tape deck/recorder -2 *Vehicle keys Turkey -One whole turkey or 6 packages of parts per Television set -3 *Power of Attomey and photo copies of the sponsor's week Tuner/amplifier/receiver -2 bilingual ID card and driver's license (when the sponsor Hotd -4 pounds per person per week Vacuum cleaner -2 on orders cannot be present for pick up) an i dogs -4 pounds per person per month Video camera Telsiscurrent as of Tuesday. For updates, call cusSandwich meat -80 ounces per person per month Video recorder-2 The list iscet s2-40T2 sday. or pde ar l tas Household items Washing machine -I tomer service at 282-4642/3853 or the POV arrival tape Laundry soap -25 pounds per household per month Weed eater (gas operated) -I recording at 282-4641. Customer service hours are 7:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m. Monday -Friday and 9 a.m. -2:30 p.m. Wednesday. People expecting POVs are reminded to call .a Wcustomer service to leave a contact phone number. Purchasing service Editor's note: The following summary of news is shows that the majority of Panamanians favor keeping taken from the Panamanian press. The translation U.S. troops in Panama. offices consolidate and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is made. Oct. 12 RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) -The U.S. Naval by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of reporting El Panama America: Paper reports Panamanian poStation Panama Canal Purchasing Services Office conor statements made here. Selection of these stories lice are trying to locate 500 AK-47 rifles in Coco Solo solidated with the Air Force Purchasing Contracts Office does not imply any emphasis, judgement or endorsethat were allegedly shipped to Panama to be sent to CoOct. 3. ment by the U.S. government. These synopses are lombian guerrillas. The report says Colombian authoriDuring negotiation and purchasing phases, the Air intended only to give non-Spanish speaking people a ties have provided a list of 22 people allegedly involved Force and Navy Treaty Implementation Plan offices flavor for news events in Panama. in an arms trafficking ring in Panama. stressed quality of service as the foundation of successful consolidation of base operations support services. Oct. 7 El Sigl, El Panama America Li Prensa Critica The Air Force will now provide full acquisition and El Siglo, La Prensa: Papers report that the U.S. Libre, Hoy, La Estrella: Papers report political asylum contract administration services for procurement of equipSouthern Command is considering repatriation of the of Haitian Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras is subject to public meant, services, supplies and subsistence as requested by two Cuban refugees captured in Santiago following acceptance and approval by Haitian President Jean the Navy. Under the "Buy Panama Program, local protheir escape frothehe migrant camp. Bertrand Aristide. La Prensa reports that Panama's curement will be used if the product is readily available Arnulfista Party disagrees to taking Cedras and says and comparatively priced. Items not available will con_ El Panama America: Paper reports a recent poll Panama should not be turned into a haven for guerrillas. tinue to be purchased from the continental United States. -

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___ _ _ T ro ic Times Feature Oct. 14,19945 John Hall (U.S. Navy) Petty Officer 2nd Class Greg Alexander shows students the components of a refrigeration system at the Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School. CNAVCILeading Latin navies .to smoother sailing Instructors aren't confined to the by John Hall ssrooms either. Teams of instrucRodman NS Public Affairs Office casom ihr em fisrc tors often travel to other countries to RODMAN NS -Serving as the help with training. In February, a team primary center for patrol craft operawent to West Africa to help its sailors tions and maintenance training in with swift boats the country received Latin America, the Naval Small Craft from the U.S. government. In March, Instruction and Technical Training a team went to Venezuela to help with School here educates hundreds of its Boston Whalers. students annually. Although all courses are open to The NAVSCIATTS staff of 40 women, the Supply System Manageenlisted, four officers and four ment Course has been the only one civilians teach 13 courses ranging with their participation. Panama and from weapons maintenance to coastal -Colombia have sent women to this operations. The courses fall into three course to learn how microfiche can functional categories; management, speed up orders. Landis said he has maintenance, and operations training. the best supply system in the Navy The majority of courses are eight because students conduct its inventory weeks long, three times a year. The staff consists of bilingual SBuying craft from the U.S. native Spanish-speakers for students military is becoming commonplace for who come from 28 Latin American John Hall (U.S. Navy) Latin American and Caribbean and Caribbean nations, said Cmdr. Petty Officer 2nd Class Roy Salano (right) gives welding instructions nations, Tokarek said. "They like our Dave Landis, NAVSCIATTS comto Joel Hernandez of El Salvador. craft because they are more stable. manding officer. the weapons course, students work tors in courses like air conditioning When countries buy commercial craft, "Not only do our students use with handguns, M203 grenade and refrigeration maintenance. it's often difficult for them to buy these technical trades in the service, launchers, M16 rifles, and M60 and Teachers can program mechanical parts," Tokarek said. but they can also use them after they .50 caliber machine guns. For groups problems into machines for students to To place a greater emphasis on get out," Landis said. "It's good for like the Colombian Anti-Narcotics apply troubleshooting steps. In these human rights training, NAVSCIATTS their community, country and our Police, instructors bring in special machines, they can see Freon running will extend two of the courses to national defense." weapons like AK-47s and uzis. through the system. Tokarek said the address this issue. In January, the In 1961, NAVSCIATTS was In the Patrol Craft Commander's classes learn about recycling FreonRiverine Operations Planning Course established as a U.S. Coast Guard Course, students plot and navigate something new to many of them. and the Patrol Craft Commander's Mobile Training Team under Presivoyages. In April, a group planned a Most of the training at Course will incorporate Human Rights dent John F. Kennedy's Latin Ameri700-mile navigation exercise to NAVSCIATTS is done inside the and Military Operations into the can "Alliance for Progress." The U.S. Cartagena, Colombia. classroom, however, some students curricula. Navy took over training in 1969 and A student who is attached to a work on the water as well. In the Although most courses are eight formally commissioned the unit as a Bolivian riverine group said he will Riverine Operations Planning Course weeks long, some students stay as training command in 1983. Since the use what he has learned here soon. students learn navigation, patrol long as five months after taking commission, more than 4,000 students "I'll be going back to the special tactics, emergency drills, combat first multiple courses. Despite being in a have enrolled in the school. operations group there," said Lt. aid and maritime law enforcement. In new country students don't become "Two of the most popular classes Gerado Thellaeche. "The riverine the last week of training, the students "barracks rats." Many spend their offwith students are the Patrol Craft training here is the basic foundation to are on the water 24 hours a day time forming soccer teams to take on Commander's Course and Patrol Craft apply what I've learned and the preparing for aggressors. Members of locals. Landis and Tokarek agree that Weapons Maintenance Course," said weapons course is the perfect compleNaval Special Warfare Unit 8 provide NAVSCIATTS teams don't lose often Senior Chief Robert Tokarek, ment to it." realistic ambushes by using blanks because many world-class players NAVSCIATTS senior instructor. In Modern technology aids instrucand pop flares. come through the school.

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6Tropic Times Oct. 14, 1994 Voices Reader wants facts about morale calls would like to know who is authorized what, when and 6 a.m.) at the originating location and, when possible, an MayOr -orner how. attempt should be made at times which avoid the normal Bad Connection duty period at the terminating location. Dear Mayors' Corner, Callers are limited to one call per week. All morale I have heard endless rumors about morale calls (authoDear Bad Connection, calls will be made to a CONUS DSN operator at routine prized Defense Switched Network calls) for active duty First of all, I would like to explain the delay in answerprecedence and should not exceed 10 minutes. Off-netmilitary members here. Supposedly each active duty ing your letter. When I received your inquiry, I sent it to ting at the distant end is at the discretion of the local commember is authorized one 10-minute call, once a week to 106th Signal Brigade, who informed me that the regulamander. a continental United States post. I have not found anyone tion governing this question was being updated and was No morale call will incur-a toll charge to the governhere in Panama who knows anything for sure, but a lot of about to be released for public access. So, after waiting ment, even if the intent is to reimburse the government. people have heard that it is authorized. for two months until the information in U.S. Southern All morale calls will be made on a non-interference basis. I've called a continental United States operator to ask Command Regulation 25-13 became official, I now feel Because of my lack of government-ease, I hope that I about this and was told that, yes, one 10-minute call was reasonably sure that the information that I'm about to pass have answered your question. However, if you feel that authorized, once a week. The operator also stated that I on to you is the best, most up-to-date word available on you need more information, please contact me at 287could be connected by her to a local outside line or that I the Morale, Welfare, Support call question. 3191 and I will print off a copy of the new regulation. could be connected to a long distance operator. I was told The regulation states that the DSN service may be used Francine Phillips that if the party I was calling was long distance from post to place morale calls from U.S. military installations withI would only be charged as if I were actually calling from in Panama and Joint Task Force Bravo, Soto Cano Air that CONUS post instead of from Panama. Base, Honduras, to the continental United States and Editor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral The problem that I have encountered is the availability Puerto Rico. Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity of a DSN line after 4 p.m. Because of different time zones Calls may only be placed from a Class AA line under chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MIPS). Anonymity will in the states and the fact that operators will only connect Department of Defense control or through a local installabe granted upon request. The Tropic Times reserves morale calls after 6 p.m., I find myself out of luck. I was tion operator at the installation commander's discretion. the right edit letters and responses for brevity. told that I could call anytime if I had a control number. I Calls will be placed during normal off-duty hours (5 p.m.Soldier drives over MP's foot at pedestrian gate Hot foot at the gate Physical altercations result in apprehenAt the pedestrian gate last week, a solsions. dier became belligerent toward on-duty military police. During the incident, the Go speed racer soldier was told to pull his vehicle to the Recently, a civilian was charged with Im side of the road to allow others to pass. The reckless driving when he was clocked travsoldier moved his vehicle forward, but ran cling 39 miles per hour on Claytonover an MP's foot in the process. After reCurundu Road in a 15 MPH zone. turning to the gate on foot, the soldier beThe military police would like to recame belligerent and falsely identified mind you, that between the hours of 7:30 himself as an MP. He was apprehended a.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays, the speed and charged with assault, impersonation of limit is 15 MPH on Clayton-Curundu an MP, failure to obey orders and disorRoad in front of Curundu Grade School. Bike registration ma Jack Anonymous Hotline at 285-4185. derly conduct. The military police encourage resiWhen entering an installation, follow Over the limit dents to register bicycles on post. RegisHousing area crimes the directions of the MPs on duty. A soldier was arrested for driving his tration helps deter thieves and makes it easThe following housing area crimes ocvehicle while intoxicated last week. When ier to recover a bicycle when stolen. Regcured during the week of Sept. 17-23. Passing it on military police stopped him at Fort Clayistration can be done at the Vehicle RegisPacific Contraband Control saw a family memton's main gate for a routine identification tration Office, Building 849, Fort Clayton. Fort Clayton ber buy 15 bags of groceries during surcheck, the scent of alcohol was detected on For more information, call 287-4545. 400 area -one larceny of secured private veillance at the commissary. Then the famhis breath. Although he declined a field soproperty ily member drove to San Felipe, where she briety test, a Blood Alcohol Test perRecovered property 600 area -one larceny of secured private gave the groceries to two non-privileged formed on the soldier revealed a .11 perThe following property was found reproperty card holders. She was arrested and charged cent alcohol rating. cently: 800 area -one larceny unsecured private with wrongful transfer of merchandise. If you plan to drink, know your limits. *leather pouch with money property If you have questions or concerns about If you have had a few drinks, call a taxi or *baby stroller 1000 area -two larcenies of secured prithis matter, refer to U.S. Southern Comuse the designated driver program, rather *adult bicycle vate property mand Regulation 1-19 or call the Contrathan getting behind the wheel of a vehicle. *lady's Casio watch 1100 area -one larceny of secured private band Control Office at 286-3303. Remember, do not drink and drive. For in*Cornell class ring property formation, call the Military Police Traffic *U.S. passport (Verville) Curundu Club fight Section at 287-3203. *bankcard 1900 area -one larceny unsecured private While at the Fort Clayton NCO Club *men's Casio watch property last week, two family members and two Unsecured money *travelers' checks Off post civilians were involved in an altercation The unsecured desk of a Fort Clayton To claim your property, call the found Balboa -one larceny of secured private which turned into a physical fight. Each auto parts store employee was stripped of property custodian at 287-4401. property was apprehended and charged with assault $53 last week. Bethania -one larceny of secured private and communicating a threat. The military police remind you to sePanama Jack Anonymous Hotline property The military police remind you to not cure money and valuables at all times. Anyone with information concerning Lajas -one larceny of secured private let alcohol ruin a good time out at the club. Don't become a victim. drug smuggling should contact the Panaproperty #jTropic Times Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666 This authorized unofficial command information publicaSports Editor .Sgt. Lori Davis U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic .289-4312 tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas The Tropic Times is pubStaff Editors .Sgt. Cass Purdum NCOIC .Sgt. Rick Emert lished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information ProSpc. Tom Findtner gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of Rosemary Chong 24th Wing Public Affairs Office .284-5459 the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Public Affairs Superintendent.Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Journalists.Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson U.S. Southern Command. Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Public Affairs Officer.Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Commander in Chief.Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig Managing Editor.Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Assistant Public Affairs Officer.John Hall Chief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Editor.Sgt. Robin Shawlinski Photographers.Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Editor.Maureen Sampson Journalists.Sgt. Eric Hortin Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays Spc. Brian Thomas

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L Tropic Times Features Oct. 14,19947 how toppers Local talents sweep festival COROZAL (Tropic Times) For Best of Festival the sixth year in a row, local performers *Recreation Center Programming, have swept the 1994 Forces Command Encore a Valent Retrospective Festival of Performing Arts and Recre*Best Production -Play, Opera ation Center Programming Competition. Conique U.S. Army South's Pacific Theatre *Best Costume Design of a Play Arts Centre, Music and Theater (AtlanBarbara and Rachel Berger, Opera tic) and Valent Recreation Center won Comique 16 awards in the "Best of Festival" cat*Best Direction of a Play -JoAnn egory and eight awards in other categoMitchell and Jerry Brees, Opera ries. Comique Experts in music and theater and *Best Set Design of a Play -Jerry recreation visit each of the competing Brees, Opera Comique installations andjudge the programs in a *Best Supporting Actress in a Play variety of categories. This year'sjudges Linda Dahlstrom, Opera Comique were Mary Alice Hodges and Phillip *Best Musical Production, Annie Wayne, both former Army entertain*Best Musical Director -Jim ment and recreation directors with vast Hashman, Annie experience in the performing arts and *Best Leading Actress in a Musical recreation, according to Jerry Brees, Peggy Barrett, Annie chief of entertainment for the Director*Best Supporting Actress in a ate of Community Activities. Musical (tie) -Roxanne Woodlard and FORSCOM judges rate the producStephanie Kluts, Annie tions on originality, quality of acting, *Best Supporting Actor in a Musical musical talent, direction, lighting, sets, -Randy Grubbs, Annie creativity and choreography. Individual *Best Installation -U. S. Army South cast members are evaluated on talent, Award of Excellence stage presence, singing/acting/dancing *Publicity and Promotion, Opera ability, appearance, stage movement and Conique enthusiasm, Brees said. *Best Leading Actress in a PlayTheproductions entered in this year's Melanie Bales, Opera Comique competition were "Encore -a Valent *Best Leading Actor in a Play -Lt. Retrospective"-Valent Recreation CenWilliam Keltner, Opera Comique ter; "Opera Comique" -Pacific Theatre Honorable Mention Arts Centre; "Annie" -Music and The*Best Lighting Design for a Play, Opater (Atlantic). era Comique -Jerry Brees The recipients of this year's awards Special Citation will be honored with plaques and certifi*Orphans, Annie Maureen Sampson (Tropic Times) cates as well as command recognition, *Bert Healy and the Boylan Sisters, Linda Dahlstrom and John Bennett perform in "Opera Comique." Brees said. Annie Pacific Theatre Arts Centre won many awards for the show, including Here is a list of local winners from *Heidi Fye, Annie "Best Supporting Actress" for Dahlstrom. the festival: *Orchestra work, Annie New garrison commander mayor of sorts by Sgt. Eric Hortin Other areas will be affected by the drawdown, USARSO Public Affairs Office "As we go into the out years, I see a declining funds and implementation of the Panama major challenge. The declining base Canal Treaty. Not least of those is the decline in the FORT CLAYTON (USARSO) -Coming in conficivilian workforce, consolidation of community prodent, with a good attitude, Col. Silas Smalls, the new operations funds are going to impact grams and even streamlining of Garrison operations. U.S. Army Garrison-Panama commander, doesn't pull quality of life in Garrison ...My focus "We have to come to grips with this because it will punches when it comes to running his command. impact significantly on day-to-day operations,"Smalls "USAG-Panama is a very interesting organizawill be to provide a high quality of life said. "It may be that we cut certain functions out -those tion," Smalls said. "Fort Clayton is the center of for the community." not too critical -in order to keep those that are critical gravity for base operations on the Pacific and Atlantic to mission accomplishment." side of the isthmus. Col. Silas Smalls But on the flip side, Smalls points out that troop "As the garrison commander, I'm responsible for U.S. Army Garrison -Panama billeting that is to be kept is going to be improved. An providing quality mission support from 11 defense commander example of that is the billets on Fort Kobbe that are sites for some 37,000 customers. What that means is being renovated. It will be the soldiers here, though, that the Garrison is like a small, modern U.S. city," community." Those in the community-specifically, that will have the greatest impact on the operations Smalls said. "It's a great challenge." those in family housing-have Smalls' particular atover the coming years. So far, Smalls' initial impresIn fact, Smalls considers himself to be a mayor of tention. sion of the soldiers has been a positive one. sorts. He deals in all manner of logistics areas that a The shortages in funding and manpower have "I'm very impressed with the professionalism of "normal" city mayor would. Everything from personaffected housing severely, and Smalls' cannot pretend USARSO soldiers and civilians," Smalls said. "There nel management, budgeting, education and public or promise those in housing that it is going to get any are a lot of young soldiers here, but the soldier quality works to garbage collection, day care, utilities and better, is the best I've seen in years. Garrison's civilian housing sees Smalls' desk at some point. "We had a shortage in family housing funds in workforce are hard working employees committed to Quality of life is a major area of concern for fiscal year '94. We're coming up even shorter in FY providing quality service for our customers." Smalls. As straightforward and tactful as he can be, '95," Smalls said. "We're going to make sure DEH But in the coming years, much of his attention is Smalls wants to give a heads-up to the soldiers, civil(Directorate of Engineering and Housing) provides going to be focused on the community and trying to ians and families this covers: "We can't continue to do critical repairs to family housing units, and we've keep quality of life as high as possible. He has no business as usual due to limited budgeting." asked occupants to take the initiative and fix the illusions about his tenure and is ready to face the "As we go into the out years, I see a major chalsmaller things. challenges head-on. lenge. The declining base operations funds are going "I think the families occupying quarters have been "It's going to be a challenging two years for me. to impact quality of life in Garrison," Smalls said. "My extremely cooperative in that area and I applaud them We're going to have some tough times but we're also focus will be to provide a high quality of life for the for that," he said, going to have a lot of fun," he said.

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8Tropic Time 08_1___ History World War II Local pilot helps blast Japanese convoy FORT CLAYTON -The following Oct. 19 Canal Department en route to WashProvisional Government of Liberated are significant World War II events that In an announcement by District ington on official business. France presided by Gen. Charles de took place during October 1944: Headquarters it is learned that Lt. Gaulle. John T. McGroarty, USNR, of AnOct.23 Oct. 2 con, was the pilot of one of 12 Navy Gen. George H. Brett, pilots his Oct. 26 The promotion of one officer (2nd search planes which blasted a Japapersonal B-17 Superfortress Upon returning from an inspection Lt. Bruno H. Bettini) from Chemical nese convoy near Satawan in the Caro"Swoosse" to offer a canal overflight visit of the Mediterranean theater with Warfare and eight enlisted men from linas, destroying four of the five ships to Maj. Gen. Batista. Brazilian War Minister Gen. Eurico the Engineer Topographical Comin the formation during a two-day Gaspar Dutra, Maj. Gen. Ralph pany and the Harbor Craft organizaaction. McGroarty's plane, a PV Oct. 23-26 Wooton, commanding the U.S. group tion is announced by Headquarters, Lockheed Ventura, straddled a 400In the Battle of Leyte Gulf the forces in the South Atlantic, reports Post of Corozal. ton cargo ship with its bombs during Japanese fleet, which had been unable that Brazilian airmen who underwent the first day of combat. to halt U.S. invasion of the Philippreliminary training in Florida and Oct. 3 pines, suffers heavy losses. This was Panama are now in Italy preparing to Following services at the CristoEx-President Gen. Fulgencio the largest naval battle of the war. enter action "equipped with one of the bal Union Church, some 450 Atlantic Batista y Zaldivar of Cuba, arrives in latest model fighter planes." side Protestant servicemen march Panama and is invited to visit the U.S. Oct. 24 down Bolivar Avenue to the USO for military installations in the Canal U.S. P-40 planes effect live target Oct. 28 a Sunday Communion breakfast ofZone by Gen. George H. Brett, practice byerrorontheIslandofOtoque Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower issues fered to them by USOA women of all Panama Canal Department comwith .50 cal machine guns. directive for November offensive, calling faiths. mander. for destruction of enemy West of the Oct.25 Rhine, establishment of bridgeheads Oct. 5 Oct. 20 The Coast Artillery Command across the river, and drive into Germany. During a special ceremony held at The Panama Canal Department announces forty-eight promotions. the Panama Union Club, Mr. Samuel Chaplain announces that Catholic Editor's note: This timeline was Lewis Arango, Minister of Foreign men stationed at Fort Davis will celPanamanian Chancellor, Samuel compiled by Dolores De Mena, U.S. Relations, awards the order of Vasco ebrate the Forty Hours Devotion, a Lewis, announces that the PanamaArmy South historian, in commemoraNunez de Balboa to the following U.S. series of services in honor of the nian Government has recognized the tion of the 50th Anniversary of WWI. military officers: Maj. Gen. Joseph Blessed Sacrament (an annual obserC. Mehaffey, Canal Zone Governor; vance by Catholics). Gen. Douglas Weam, Chief of Staff, Caribbean Command; Gen. William In a ceremony held on the C. Christym, Chief of Staff of the rainswept Fort Clayton parade W ILL1l &6 JO E Panama Canal Department; Lt. Cdr. grounds, 125 soldiers of Col. Monro's Ellis J. Stone, Chief of the Panama Jungle Infantry are awarded the Sea Frontier Command; and Lt. Col. Army's Good conduct Medal by Brig. R. D. Prescott. Gen. Philip E. Gallagher, Commander of the Mobile Force. Enrique A. Jimenez, Panamanian Ambassador to the United States, reMaj. S. H. Bargman, of Headturns to Panama with his family for a quarters, Sixth Air Force Service month's visit in his homeland. Command, is named chairman of the Army's War Fund Drive by Lt. Gen. Promotions of ten enlisted men George H. Brett. from the Engineer Depot Company and the Quartermaster Car unit are Seventy-six enlisted men serving announced by Headquarters, Post of withthe Sixth Air Force FighterComCorozal. mandthroughout theCaribbean Area are promoted according to orders Oct. 6 published at Fighter Command HeadBrig. Gen. Edgar H. Underwood, quarters. one of the original Jungle Mudders who helped forge and fortress Panama Lt. Col. Ernesto Medina, Military out of the trackless terrain flanking Attache for the Republic of Chile to the Allied lifeline between the Atlanthe United States visits the Panama tic and Pacific, returned to the scene Canal Department en route to Washof his pioneering days as commandington on official business. ing general of the Atlantic anti-aircraft defenses of the Coast Artillery Americans land at Leyte, Philippine Command. Upon assuming his new Islands, fulfilling Gen. Douglas duties he warns against the possibility MacArthur's promise to return. It is of a suicide raid." during the Leyte campaign that the kamikaze, or suicide plane, is first used by Oct. 7 the Japanese. 7ry to say sumpinfinny, Joe." Panamanian President Ricardo Adolfo de la Guardia and Chancellor Herbert Lehman, Director-GenSamuel Lewis Arango present official eral of the United Nations RehabilitaBill Mauldin achieved International ferns as the condolences to the U.S. Embassy on tion Administration announces that , ungaein ruon ever o win a runtiaer Pri.e with the occasion of the demise of U.S. Brazil signed an agreement creating a hous Wrld eeditoria cartoos. Presidential candidate Wendell mixed commission for the procureh Though WIllie and Joe were sodiers, .r-I" Wilkie. ment of relief supplies to make effecof all ranc s could setemevIn tivetha country cotriutio tothememb.rs of all branches could see themseve. In tive that country's contribution to the their cartoons. Now 50 year. after Mauldin brought Oct. 13 UN. wire and Joe to the pages of the stars and Stripes Germans launch first V-bomb they speak again to a new generation. against Antwerp, which, next to LonLt. Col. Ernesto Medina, Military don, proves to be the primary target for Attache for the Republic of Chile to these weapons. the United States visits the Panama

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Oct. 14, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 9 Baseball epic airs on Golfers eek narrow win in SCN channels 8, 10 COROZAL (Tropic Times) -Baseball returns to offs and no World Series. Southern Command Network television chanby Sgt. Lori Davis nel 8 will air the epic miniseries "Baseball" begin Tropic Times sports editor ning at 4 p.m. Oct. 22, officials said. The miniseries traces the history of the AmeriAMADOR -A two-stroke spread separated first frorr can pasttime and reflects on it's contribution to our fourth place in the tightly contested Amador Golf Courst culture. The miniseries covers the clash of labor and Columbus Day Mexican Best Ball Tournament. management, the search for heroes and the quest for Taking the win in the 51 -team field were Ramon Ubben, racial justice. Monty McDaniel and Joseph Siltz with a 60.5 net score. The miniseries is divided into nine episodes Hot on their heels was the team of Eddie Myers, Lee which will air the weekends of Oct. 22, 23 and Oct. Weigt and Pat Williams. Their 61.5 net score pulled them 29, 30. Consult the television schedule on page B9 close, but the third place team of David Konawicz, John for times of each episode. Haines and John HainesJr. was knocking on theirdoor with The miniseries will also be aired in November a 62. on nine consecutive nights during the all night Bringing up the rear was the team of Abilio Philides, movieblock at 1 a.m. onchannels 8 and 10, officials Jorge Monroy and Alberto Restrepo with a 62.5 net score. said. The winner of the "closest to the pin" contest on the 10th hole was Al George. Sailors duke it out The Mexican Best Ball format teamed three players. Each player was limited to a putter and two clubs of his or in volleyball contest her choice, said Patricia Peart course manager. Each player tees off. From there, the team selects the RODMAN (Morale, Welfare and Recreation) -best lay, and each player again shoots from that point. The Navy volleyball pre-season tournament was Following this process the players shoot from the best held Oct. 3-6. Results are as follows: vantage point, calculating their score by the first player Match 1: Marines defeated Public Works Dept.(15hitting the hole. 11)(15-11) The Mexican format is also referred to as the scramble Match 2: Naval Special Warfare Unit-8 defeated Medformat in the United States, she said. ical Dept. (15-3)(15-1 1) Match 3: Navy Small Craft & Technical Training Each of the four teams and George won gift certificates School defeated Marines (15-6)(15-13) for merchandise at the Amador Pro Shop. Match 4: PWD defeated Medical (15-0)(15-9) The Amador and Horoko golf courses sponsor tournaMatch5: SCIATSdefeatedNSWU-8(15-3)(16-14) ments on a monthly basis, as well as offer clinics and Match 6: PWD defeated Marines (15-3)(16-14) instructional support by the course pros. Match 7: NSWU-8 defeated PWD (15-12)(15-9) A women's instructional class will open Oct. 25 at the Championship Match: SCIATS defeated NSWU-8 Amador Golf Course. (15-9)(15-8) Call the Amador Pro Shop at 282-4511 and the Horoke Sgi. Lod Davis Tropl Times) Pro Shop at 283-6346 for information. Clark Brandenburg sinks a putt on the 8th hole. Soldiers kick up fun in Distant Haven by Pvt. 2 Melinda Dezern begun a friendly game of soccer. "Itwasagame ofbonding," Rivera said. earlier in the game," said Pfc. Charles JTF-Suriname PAO Operation Distant Haven has brought "It was a way of letting them know we Fassinger, 534th MP Co., as he pointed to together two different forces and taught accept them not only as co-workers, but the guy who knocked him down. SURINAME -The referee stood center them the importance of cohesion. also as friends. The respect and knowledge gained by field with a whistle in his mouth. A member For the past three weeks, task force "I rely on the Surinamese MPs to protect the two forces working and playing sideofJoint Task Force-Suriname reached over members have worked hand-in-hand with my soldiers," he said, referring to the fact by-side was mutual. to exchange a quick handshake from his the Surinamese, especially U.S. and that U.S. Army MPs aren't allowed to carry "This is the first time I've worked with opponent. Surinamese MPs who patrol the migrant weapons. an army ofanother country," said Suriname The whistle sounded, and the kicking and base camps together. Besides the Surinamese MPs, the other Army Cpl. Kenneth Zaalman. began. Dutch and English wordscollided in Capt. Alberto Rivera, comnmanderofthe Surinamese soldiers are a great asset to "I learned discipline. You guys come to the air as fans from both teams cheered on 534th Military Police Co., saw how well Operation Distant Haven. The contractors a foreign place without your husbands and their players. both forces worked together and decided to helped in constructing the camps and the wives -I wouldn't survive," he said. Surinamese and U.S. military police, set up soccer games to help further the good kitchen staff help prepare and serve meals Zaalman was amazed at how the U.S. along with some other JTF members, had relations. for JTF members. military is able to deploy, be away from "It was a plus to have them working with friends and family, and still remain focused us. We proved that it is possible for two on the mission at hand. totally different armies to come together," "Most young people don't understand Rivera said. what we do as an American military.we The MPs have developed a good workserve as an example," said Col. Louis ing relationship with the Surinamese and Huddleston, JTF commander. have also had a chance to get to know them "You can't always see the impact you're and their customs. having on people. We're exposing people The game was a good way for the two to our values," he said. armies tocommunicate and have fun,Rivera With a pat on the back and a firm handsaid. shake, JTF members congratulated the Although both teams were hoping to Surinamese players on their 1-0 victory. win, the players looked out for one another. Zaalman shook Rivera's hand, and as Pvi. 2 Melinda Dezern (JTF Suriname) "They (Surinamese) picked us up when Rivera turned to walk away, he said, "Next 534th Military Police Company s Carl Montovani dives for a shot on goal. they knocked us down -he helped me up time we play American football." o 0 NFL picks Pag 17 S 1 The Tigers squeak out a victory John Hall recovers from upset syn*SCN AM radio schedule againstthe Kolts in a25-22 game at drome and picks this week's win*Local sports standings Cristobal Stadium. ning teams. *Fishing philanthropy event

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1OTropic Times 10 Oct. 14,1994tba Tigers fend off K ts, 25-22 By Sgt. Rick Emert USARSO Public Affairs Office -Atlantic CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL -The Cristobal Tigers roared past the Kiwanis Kolts 25-22 here Oct. 7. The Tigers outscored and outplayed the Kolts in the first half, preventing the Kolts second half rally from upsetting the game. The first quarter was scoreless on both sides. The Tigers' Jon Guerra ran in the first touchdown of the game in the second quarter, and with the two-point conversion Tigers led, 8-0. The Kolts did the same, tying it up 8-8. The Tigers Rob Bernhardt kicked a 34yard field goal with less than aminute left in the half, jacking the Tigers lead to 11-8. The Kolts last possession of the half ended with an interception by the Tigers' Christian Lopez. Lopez scored on a 34yard run with only seconds left to put the Tigers up 18-8. TheKolts' turnovers continuedintotheir first possession in the second half. The turnover led to another Tigers touchdown The Tiger's Jon Guerra outdistances his Kolt pursuers in a midfield run. Sgt Rick Emeri (U.S. Army) this time by Tigers running back Ruben Kolt quarterback Raul Ford's 25-yard pass without moving the ball. edging closer to the Tigers, 25-20. A two Rafalko. Guerra kicked for the extra point, into the endzone took the score to 25-14. The Kolts recovered a Tiger fumble on point conversion took the score to 25-22. and the score was 25-8. The Tigers next possesion ended in a the Tiger 8-yard line with nine seconds left The clock ran out on the Tigers final With one second left in the third quarter, turnover, but the Koltshad fourquick downs in the game and ran it in on the next play, possession, giving them a 25-22 win. 1994 season marks Cristobal Tiger's final roar By Sgt. Rick Emert The Tigers are well into their final season, and Coach The Tigers ended the season at 5-3. Following another USARSO Public Affairs Office -Atlantic Richard Elliott is not treating it any differently than the past 5-3 season, Elliott's Tigers struggled througha couple of five seasons he's coached the team. bad years. CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL -As the 1994 season "I don't look ahead enough to think of this as the last "The (two) years that we were 1-8, we were just ends, the Cristobal Tigers' roar will fade to an echo in season," he said. "We have a game Friday, a game next physically beaten," he said. "The other teams had bigger Panama's closely watched high school football play. Friday and a game the following Friday. Pretty soon, it will and older players." be over." Even in those seasons, supportfrom the Atlantic com"The players are oriented toward the game we're getting munity never waned, he said. ready for. We won't worry about the end ofthe season until "The Atlantic community supports you even if you it's here." lose," he said. "We have our own identity here. They stuck The 1994 Tigers are 1-3 now, but Cristobal fans have with us through those bad seasons, and we were able to cheered their team through good and bad seasons. keep our pride and dignity even in losing." "Inthe60s,the Tigers wereapowerhourse,"Elliottsaid. And the Tigers paid them back last year, ending the "They had 10 down years in the 70s and 80s and were at the season at 7-3 and tying for first place. lowest point they could be." Although the team seemed to turn around under his Elliott came aboard in 1989 and noticed that only a few coaching, Elliott said how the season goes depends on the of the players were ready to play, he said. players. "When I got here, there were seven players that were "We're stronger now," he said. "We have a good ready," he said. 'There was not a whole lot of emphasis quarterback, a good middle linebacker and a strong defenplaced on the right things." sive line." After some work, the Tigers had their first good season With three winning seasons out of five, Elliott's future in a decade. in coaching football is not clear, he said. "Our first victory was a big one," he said. "We had a "I'll still be working in (Department of Defense Depentouchdown pass as the final play of the game and won the dents Schools), but I don't know if I'll be coaching," he , game because of it." said. 'The people (watching) were shocked; it was the first Although he was a quarterback for Southern California game the Tigers had won after all those down seasons." University andhas coachedteams in Californiaand VirginThe last game of that same season was also memorable, ia, his future in coaching in Panama may be based on his he said. work with the Tigers, he said. Sgt. Rick Emer (U.S. Army) "We upset the (Curundu) Cougars," he said. "They "I think our (Cristobal Tigers) program is pretty well Carlos Roman (20) and Jose Alvarez stretch were 7-0, and we prevented them from ending the season respected, and that the (Pacific community) thinks enough during practice. undefeated." of our program to have me involved over there." Team statistics Team standings Rushing W L T Pct. PF PA Carries Yds. Avg. Cougars 4 0 0 1.000 95 50 Reese, Devils 92 654 7.1 Bulldogs 3 1 0 .750 34 59 Guerra, Tigers 68 429 6.4 1000 Devils 3 1 0 .750 96 32 Hall, Bulldogs 68 314 6.7 Kolts 1 3 0 .250 44 68 Kick offs Tigers 1 3 0 .250 37 48 800 ----Machine 0 4 0 .000 13 62 Kicks Yds. Avg. VonHollen, Cougars 17 813 47 Week four results Lampas, Devils 18 820 45 600 Curundu Cougars 21, Balboa Bulldogs 6 Beach, Bulldogs 12 530 44 Cristobal Tigers 25, Kiwanis Kolts 22 Punts Green Devils 26, Balboa Red Machine 7 Kicks Yds. Avg. Tonight's games Husted, Machine 6 208 34 200 ----Tigers vs. Machine, 5:30 p.m. (BHS) Price, Tigers 20 642 32 Devils vs. Bulldogs, 7:30 p.m. (BHS) QBulldobs 6 k 2 0 -----Scoring PA PC % Yds TD Int Yards rushing Yards passing TD XP Total Lampas, Devils 43 26 60 370 3 1 BD,,ldg Cugar. Dev Is KIt MchinE Tigrm Reese, Devils 9 2 58 Martens, Cougars 80 35 43 657 6 4 Martens, Cougars 5 1 32 Beach, Bulldogs 34 11 32 242 1 5 Source: Robert Best

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s___ Oct 14,1994 1 SCN AM Radio 790/1420 22 and 23 at the Cardenas Tennis Courts. 25K bike race, and 10K run. The event is Reeder Physical Fitness Center has airs pro, college football The event is open to all active duty sponsored by the Howard/Albrook Sports free aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. MondaySaturday servicemembers and Department of Deand Fitness Center, 284-3451. Friday. Call 287-3861 for more informaNoon: NCAA: Aubur at Florda fense civilians. Call Mike Goldstein at 264tion. 5:30p.m.: NCAA: Arizona at Washing5160 or Enrique Sanchez at 250-0274 for Register now for Army more information about joining the club . ton State and registering for the tournament. Regisintramural soccer Black Stallion, Vargas Sunday ration deadline is 6 p.m. Oct. 19. Registration for unit level soccer is uncharters now available Noon: NFL: San Francisco 49ers at Atderway. The deadline is Tuesday. Register The 61-foot Black Stallion is available lanta Falcons at the Directorate of.Community Activities 3 p.m.: NFL: Philadelphia Eagles at Horoko, Amador Golf forPinasBay Marlinfishing, deep-seafishD wsoSportDivision, Building 154, FortClayton. ing, cruising or moonlight cruise charters Monday y Rodman athltic host forlarge orsmall groups. The42-foot Vargas 8 The Horoko Golf Course is sponsoring Rodman athletics host is also available for charter. Call the Rod8 p.m.: NFL: Kansas City Chiefs at afour-man Captain's Choice Mexican Best M 283-3147 Denver Broncos Ball Golf Tournament Oct. 22. There is a Thursday $10 entry fee for members. Players will be Rodman athletics will hold a three-event 7 p.m.: NFL: Green Bay Packers at drawn on handicap. All entry fees will be competition Oct. 19 -21 The competition is Howard center offers Minnesota Vikings given back as prizes. Sign up at the Horoko open to all active-duty military personnel, lunch bunch sports daily Pro Shop by Oct. 20. Department of Defense civilians, and deWomen's basketball The Amador Golf Course is sponsoring pendents 18 and older. The events are as The Howard Sports and Fitness Center action continues a Thanksgiving Turkey Shoot with a 7:30 follows: tug o'war Oct. 19; freestyle swimoffers various lunch bunch sports and fita.m. shotgun start Nov. 12. The tournament ming race, Oct. 20; and 5K run, Oct.21. The ness activities every week. Scheduledevents Tonmght is two-person best ball, flights will be detercompetition will be scored by points with are; Aerobics noon-1 p.m. Mondays, 4:30 p.m. Cougars vs. Devils (PCC) mined by sign ups. There is an $8 entry fee. the unit accumulating the most points winWednesdays and Fridays, volleyball-Il 1 5:30p.m. Red Machine vs. Bulldogs(BHS) Turkeys will be given as prizes. Call the ning. For more information, call Morise a.m.1 p.m. Thursdays, basketball 11 a.m.Oct. 19 course to register by Nov. 9. Conerly at 283-4222. 1 p.m. Tuesday. 4:30 p.m. Bulldogs vs. Cougars (CJHS) 5:30 p.m. Tigers vs. Red Machine (BHS) Get physicals now for Climb tennis ladder in Aerobic workshop offers Angling event supports youth baseball sign ups Howard tournament certification testing crippled, burned children Registration for youth baseball ages 5The Howard Sports and Fitness Center An aerobics workshop and certification The Legion of Abou Saad Temple will 18 years will run Oct. 31 to Dec. 3 at the is sponsoring a tennis ladder tournament. test is being organized in the Atlantic camhost their annual fishing tournament Nov. 3 HowardandAlbrookyouthcenters. AphysChallenge your opponents on your own munity. The testing will be given by the at Gatun Lake. Prizes will be presented for ical exam is required for registration. There schedule and improve your game while American Aerobic Association International largest fish, heaviest stringer and most fish is a $25 fee for active duty card holders and climbing the ladder, and International Sports Medicine Associcaught over 15 inches. All proceeds will be a $30 fee for other people. ation from Pennsylvania. The certification donated to the Transportation Fund that is Youth services operates five leagues for Fitness centers offer is valid for two years. A minimum of 15 used to send crippled and burned children community youths. The leagues are. tee here in Panama to the United States and ball (ages 5-6), minor league (ages 7-9), various aerobic classes people are required for the class. For inforreturn. A concession stand will be available little league (ages 10-12), pony league (ages The Howard Sports and Fitness Cento the public. For information, call Terry 13-15) and senior league (ages 16-18). teroffersstepaerobics8:45-9:45a.m.MonTang Soo Do taught Zittle at 261-8018. days, Wednesdays andFridays. In addition, t Team triathlon set to step and high-low aerobics classes are ofat Curundu, Clayton club hosts begin at Howard Pool fered 4:45-5:45 p.m. Mondays, WednesTang Soo Do is taught 6-7:30 p.m. Crossroads days and Fridays. Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Pacific Thedoubles tennis tourney Athree-person team triathlon starts 6:30 The Albrook Sports and Fitness Cenater Arts Center, Building 2060 in the CuThe Crossroads Tennis Club is sponsora.m. Oct. 22 at the Howard pool. Support terhas aerobics 8-9 a.m. Mondays, Wednesrundu housing area and 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays ing a men's and women's pick your partner your community and cheer for the particidays and Fridays; and jazzercise 5-6 p.m. and Thursdays at the Valent Recreation doubles tournament starting at 8 a.m. Oct. pants. Events include a 1,000-meter swim, Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Center. Classes are open to adults and chilFavorites bounce back Sports ofrfico for a seesaw scoring duel. 49ers 30, Falcons 28. U.S. Air Force 284-3451 Browns bash Oilers -Although Houston has taken seven of .5. Army 287-4050 the last eight with Cleveland; this year's Oilers are a strange crew. U.S. Navy 283-4061 John Hall One good sign for Houston is that last year's team also started IBowling centers Rodman NS Public Affairs Office 4 before taking 11 straight. One major difference is that team had Albrook AFS 286-4260 Warren Moon, William Fuller, Sean Jones.you get the picture. Fort Clayton 287-6366 Curundu 286-3914 RODMAN NS -Week six of the NFL season was the "Week The Oilers are still stinging from a Monday-night spanking by the Fort Espinar 289-4100 ofthe Favorites." Nine ofthe 12 favorites won outright and seven Steelers and the Brownies are high after grounding the Jets. Howard AFB 284-4190 covered the point spread. Unlike last week, there were no major Cleveland's Eric Metcalf may outscore the Oilers onjustreturning upsets. Top three highlights: 1. The Denver Broncos left the kicks. Browns 27, Oilers 10. Scuba diving Cincinnati Kitties as the only team without a victory. 2. The Bustin'Broncos-Chiefs'coachMartySchottenheimerdoesn't Fo ao 287Chargers remain undefeated, despite allowing 37 completions by have much luck against the Denver Broncos. He lost three AFC Fort Davis 289-3208 Joe Montana. 3. Warren Moon (299 yards) and the Vikings ruined Championships to them while coaching the Cleveland Browns. Fort Kobbe 284-4854 Lawrence Taylor Day at Giants Stadium with a 2710 stomping He's fared better as K.C.'s coach, but not much. After starting 3. Howard AFB 284-5766 of the New York Giants. 0 and dropping two straight, the Chiefs should break out of their Balboa Dive Club 263-8077 Here are the week seven picks: slump. The Broncos are the right medicine after squeaking out a Rodman NS 283-5307 Raiders mash Miami -The Raiders' offense is licking its 16-9 win over Seattle. Although Denver got five turnovers, the Golf courses chops forthe second straight week. Last week L.A. faced the 28thoutcome was in question until the end. Chiefs 26, Broncos 13. Fort Amador 282-4511 ranked defense; this week the Raiders take on the league's worst Otherscores: Bye, bye Buddy, Rdskins 20, Cardinals 16; Pitt Horoko 283-6346 pass defense. The Raiders lead the overall series 14-41. On the makes it seven straight over Cincy, Steelers 26, Kitties 14; Buffalo Fitness centers negative side, the Raiders face the league's number two offense makes it nine of 10, Bills 31, Dolts 13; Bledsoe's back, Patsies 22, Albrook AFS 286-3307 after facing number one. L.A.'s Terry McDaniel ripped Drew Jets 16; Bettis rolls, Rams 19, Giants 15; Bolts survive scare, Bolts Fort Clayton 287-3861 Bledsoe for three interceptions and has a chance for more against 18, Saints 16. Fort Davis 289-3496 the pass-happy Fish. Raiders 26, Dolphins 19. There are open dates forChicago, Detroit, Green Bay, MinneHoward AFB 284-3451 Cowpokes ground Eagles -The Cowboys have swept their sota, Seattle and Tampa Bay. Rodman NS 283-4222 NFC East rival the past two years and made history last year. Last week 10-2, overall 46-32, Monday night 5-1. Swimming pools Emmitt Smith set a club record with 237 yards in a 23-10 win at American Conference National Conference Albrook AFS 286-3555 Veterans Stadium. Smith added 172 yards in the second match-up East East Balboa 252-5493 for an average of 204.5 yards against one of the league's better W L T Pct. PF PA W L T Pc[. PF PA Curundu 286-6260 defenses. After trashing the Niners, the Eagles had a letdown of Buffalo 4 2 0 .667 117 116 Dallas 4 1 0 .800 135 56 Farfan 234-4252 Miami 4 2 0 .667 160 129 Phil. 4 1 0 .800 127 82 Fort Clayton 287-6660 sorts, edging the Redskins 21 -17 Sunday night. The Cowpokes N. E. 3 3 0 .500 158 159 Giants 3 2 0 .600 ]II 117 Fort Davis 289-3272 hadnosuch trouble, smacking the Cardinals 38-3. LookforDallas N.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 92 105 Arizona 1 4 0 .200 49 111 Fort Espinar 289-4189 togetwideoutMichael Irvin more involved on first down to set up Ind. 2 4 0 .333 113 128 Wash. 1 5 0 .167 112 165 Gamboa 256-6425 delays by Smith. Cowpokes 23, Eagles 17. Central Central Gatun 243-5233 Niners find gold -The 49ers have won there of the last four veland 4 1 0 .800 118 58 Chicago 4 2 0 .667 113 t11 Howard AFB1 35 Ngins ind galold, bu the 49e thae wronptee of teoalast fou Pittsburgh 3 2 0 .600 100 101 Minn. 4 2 0 .667 134 95 Los FRios 252-6417 against the Falcons, but the one they dropped is memorable. In Houston I 4 0 .200 79 123 Green Bay 3 3 0 .500 107 84 Margarita 243-7229 week 15 last year, San Francisco had a 24-7 lead going into the Cincinnati 0 5 0 .000 78 129 Detroit 2 4 0 .333 106 129 Rodman NS 283-4253 fourth quarter and watched the Falcons reel off 20 unanswered West Tampa 2 4 0 .333 80 118 points. That game was at the Georgia Dome as this week's is. The San Diego 5 0 0 1.000 134 8 West. 49 a orlyfo 4K.C. 2 0 .600 90 80 Atlanta 4 2 (1 .667 138 112l 49ers had to rally from a 14-0 deficit against Detroit last week Seattle 3 3 0 .500 130 86 S. F. 4 2 0 .667 154 131 while the Falcons bashed the Bucs 34-13. Shockingly, theFalcons Raiders 2 3 0 .400 116 141 LA Rants 2 4 0 .333 84 109 have put up better offensive stats than the Niners this year. Look Denver 1 4 0 .200 108 146 N. 0. 2 4 0 .333 97 138

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12 Tropic Times 12 t 14,1994News of American States asked its member nations to form a coalition to assist Victoria. The United States, Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela formed a coalition task force that deployed to Victoria, where they raided drug labs and captured the narcoguerrilla's base camp. Although mutual counterdrug efforts were a major topic of discussion, McCaffrey visited the South American ally to learn how Colombians view regional security issues. On his first official visit to Colombia since he took command in February, McCaffrey arrived in the Colombian capital of Bogota Oct. 6, where he was greeted by U.S. Ambassador to Colombia Myles Frechette; Commander of the U.S. Military Group Col. Thomas Carstens; and General Hernan Jose Z 'Guzman, Commander of the Colombian Army. After discussing regional security issues with Samper and Frechette, McCaffrey took part in a wreath laying ceremony at Plaza Bolivar to honor the Colombian veterans who fought alongside the U.S. in the Korean War. In total, Colombia sent 3,089 soldiers and sailors to Korea, and suffered more than 600 casualties. The Colombians earned two U.S. Presidential Unit Citations for valor in combat. Approximately 30 Colombian veterans of the Korean War attended the ceremony, which also was attended by representatives < from the Korean Embassy in Colombia. The ceremony was very emotional. According to Col. Ben Harvey, the trip officer in charge, McCaffrey recounted that the Colombian Battalion served in .ad Browning (SOUTHCOM) Korea under the 7th Division, 31 Regiment, which was Ambassador Myles Frechette (left) and Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey discuss regional security commanded by his father, Lt. Gen. (ret.) William J. issues with Colombian President Ernesto Sardper (right). McCaffrey. The unit also served under the 24th Infantry Division, which McCaffrey later commanded during Operation Desert Storm. He passed on his father's 'O'h0 0 H O'"hM m m ofte to personal greeting and remembrances of the courage and valor of the Colombians during the Korean War. He also presented each veteran at the ceremony a copy % O U 41% of a personal letter from Maj. Gen. Joseph E. DeFrancisco, current commander of the 24th Infantry Division, who recognized their past service with the QUARRY HEIGHTS (U.S. SOUTHCOM PAO) -forces with the narcotraffickers, who pay the guerrillas unit and thanked them as an inspiration to two generaThe U.S. military has an absolute commitment to to provide security for their illegal activities. The tions of U.S. and Colombian soldiers. helping the Colombian military and police in their guerrillas use the payments to finance their own illegal McCaffrey later met with the Colombian equivastruggle against narcoguerrillas. activities against the-government, officials said. lents of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the This was the message carried to Colombian Presi"U.S. policy prohibits our military from becoming Service Chiefs, and the Director of the National Police. dent Ernesto Samper last week by Gen. Barry R. directly involved in actual counterdrug field operaHe visited the Escuela Superiorde Guerra (SeniorWar McCaffrey, Commander in Chief of the U.S. Southern tions," said Capt. Jim Knotts, a Southern Command College), where he presented a briefing on the U.S. Command. McCaffrey reaffirmed the commitment of spokesman. "However, U.S. soldiers routinely deploy Southern Command and joint operations. In the norththe U.S. military to help Colombia, recognizing the to train with Colombian soldiers and police. The ern coastal city of Cartagena, McCaffrey visited the price Colombians have paid to drug and guerrilladeployments provide training for our service memColombian Navy, Marines and Coast Guard. related violence. bers, while developing the skills the Colombians need Another highlight of the trip was a visit to the 10th McCaffrey noted that more than 25,000 Colomto then conduct counterdrug field operations." Brigade Lancero Training School and NCO Academy. bian civilians, military and police were killed last year. The narcoguerrillas are well financed and well The Lanceros, equivalent to the U.S. Army Rangers, Some 3,000 police have been killed in the last five armed, so the military and police must count on skill, are highly trained infantry soldiers who conduct speyears, and 250 soldiers have died in the past six months patience and courage to counter the threat. The U.S. cial operations missions. They are recognized worldalone. During 1994, the United States will provide Special Operations Command South, headquartered wide for their skill and valor. McCaffrey met with more than $21.79 million to Colombia to aid in the in Panama, sponsored an exercise in Arkansas in Capt. Sean Mulholland, a U.S. Army exchange officer counterdrug effort. September to train to fight the narcoguerrillas. The whois an instructoratthe school. Mulholland escorted In Colombia, there are active guerrilla groups that exercise used a scenario to counter a fictional group of McCaffrey during his visit to the school, explaining want to overthrow the democratically-elected governnarcoguerrillas who took over a fictional island called the differences and similarities in the Lancero training ment. In recent years, the guerrilla groups have joined Victoria off the coast of Colombia. The Organization compared to Ranger school. Multi-service medical team keeps Cubans healthy by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Also heavily involved in the beginwe continue with this part of the misTrans. Hospital as consultants and is in JTF Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau ning was the entomology department. It sion." constant touch with Preventive Medi--__ was their job to survey the sites for Technicians from the Gorgas office cine offices from throughout Panama in GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY insects that could cause illnesses such as regularly visit the companies contracted an effort to ensure a high quality of life HOSPITAL -Ensuring the good health dengue, he said. Theentomologists from to supply meals tothecommunity camps. is maintained at the community camps. of the Cubans at the Operation Safe Gorgas continued to monitor the sites Through these visits, it is ensured that Though the mission to ensure this Haven community camps is a combined until the Navy team arrived to the field the food is properly handled, stored, high quality of life is, in itself, a massive effort between specialists at the Prevenhospital and took over the job of moniprepared, transported and served, he said. undertaking, finding a safe and dependtive Medicine Services here and a U.S. toring. In addition to monitoring the food able water source has been a "megaNavy Preventive Medicine team at the "We also surveyed the sites for wacontractors, the Gorgas teani is alsoconjob," he said. 5th Air Transportable Hospital at Emter safety and helped with the number ducts classes instructing food service "The water source was not only the pire Range. and locations for shower and latrine workers about food handling. most important, but the hardest misSince the arrival of the Navy team, facilities," Souffront said. "Continuous The Gorgas team is also working sion,"Souffront said."Wearestill workthemissionofthespecialists fromGorgas monitoring of the water and checking with Cubans at thecommunity camps to ing it out and, while we are working it has been that of making sure the meals the sites for cleanliness now falls under coordinate field sanitation and classes out, the water is still being transported served at the community camps are safe the control of the Navy team." for camp leaders on field sanitation, from a garrison source." and sanitary. Before that time, however, Though much of the original misSouffront said. With the Preventive Medicine mistheir mission was vast and varied. sion now falls to the Navy team, the "We are working with Cuban physision being ofmany facets, Souffront has "Since the very beginning we have Gorgas specialists continue to monitor cians living in the community camps to been impressed with the level of profesbeen involved in everything from the and survey the meals served at the comensure sanitation is kept at a high level sionalism and cooperation between all planning stages to choosing the sites to unity camps, he said. within the camps," he said. "This inof the teams, the contractors and the Ir locating a safe water source," said Lt. "This part of the mission remained cludesclasses on personal hygiene, ways Cubans within the community camps. Col. Wilfredo Souffront, chief of Prewith us because we are familiar with the to keep the areas and latrines clean and "This is a daily, on-going, joint efventive Medicine Services at Gorgas. area and visiting the places where the the trash picked up between contracfort to help in Operation Safe Haven," "Myentire staff, includingenvironmenfood is prepared is easier for us," tors' visits, and training on the dengue Souffront said. "Everyone involved is tal sanitation, community health and Souffront said. "Because frequent visits mosquito." 100 percent committed to help the resimany technicians, were heavily into these areas as early as 4 a.m. are The Gorgas office also acts as a dents of the community camps keep a volved." necessary, it just made good sense that liaison forthe Navy team and the 5th Air high quality of life."

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0 Tro ictivities Oct. 14, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI Tops in Blue world tour '94 The Air Force entertainment traveling troupe, Tops in Blue, puts on a high-energy performance Oct. 7 for members of the Panama military community. For story and photos, see Page B3. Children celebrate the Puerto Atlantic Community Women's +Movies, Page B8 Rican Youth Festival in honor of Club raises more than $9,000 in +TV, Page B9 SNational Hispanic Heritage Month. final year of operation. *Potpourri, Page B12

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B2Tropic Times nw *Youth cetr 26312-0 Youth news Y Albrook/Howard Competitive Swim Team Tryouts, 10 a.m. Saturday at Howard and Albrook Pools for youths 8-18 years old. Fee will be $15 per month. Call Lisa Nofi, 284-3569, or Rose Coville, 236-2035, for more information. $Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700: uPreteen Costume Dance, 7:30-10:30 p.m. at the Howard Youth Center Oct. 21, $2.50 entrance fee. Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday evenings. Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for members and $35 for non-members. "W Guitar lessons, by appointment 1-6 p.m. Saturdays. \ Spanish lessons 4 and 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. 7 Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesdays. Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four days a week. Special preschooler class Saturdays. Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available for ages four to adult. *Just for teens: Free self defense demonstration for girls 5 p.m. Oct. 22, Albrook. siaff sg. Jane Usero (U.S. Army) HIV/AIDS awareness, 4-5 p.m. Oct. 27, Albrook. Joe Colon (left) and Efraim Ramos play a Latin tune for those attending the Puerto Rican Youth Call 284-5650 to register. Permission slips required. Festival at the Fort Clayton Youth Center to honor one of the many Hispanic cultures. Falltime party 8:30-11:30 p.m. Oct. 28. Wear orange and black and get in free. The 'Anthill Posse' will be playing in the Albrook Club ballroom. i-C~u 1I~I~rI fl~~IC~I~n~yn ri~r'~ Trasportation is provided from Howard Youth Center Fort Claytons youth and Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center. +Child Development Center 284-6135: Puerto Rican culture at festival Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 for information. committee member and master of ceremonies for the celby Staff Sgt. Jane Usero ebration. USARSO Public Affairs Office "Most people are familiar with the Mexican culture and Clayton traditions and we all love it, but there is so much more to *Youth Center 287-6451: FORT CLAYTON -Everyone was in colorful, tradiHispanic heritage. We hope to make the community aware Treasure Hunt 3 p.m. today. tional dress. The drums and guitars filled the room with of these many different cultures of which Puerto Rico is Ping Pong tournament Saturday. Latin sounds. just one," Ortiz-Ortiz said. Pool tournament, Oct. 21. Small children danced with excitement and clapped Through the months of planning, recruiting and pracCommunity services, Oct. 22. Bring a can of their tiny hands in time to the music. Adults greeted longticing, the all-volunteer program did just.that. food. time friends and met new ones, engaging in conversation "The program took a lot of effort, coordination and Not So Scary Halloween is a happy Halloween in their native tongue. hours, but you get out of a program such as this whatever activity for toddlers to 10 years old. It will be held 4The room in the upstairs of the youth center here was you put into it," said Alameda Awilda, program coordina7 p.m. Oct. 31. A $1 fee includes game prizes, candy decked out in Puerto Rican flags and decor as the Puerto tor. "Everything from planning the performances to decoand a lot of fun. Rican Festival kicked off Friday with the Puerto Rican rating the room was done by community members volunJunior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. TuesNational Anthem and a poetry reading by some children. steering their time and talents." days and Thursdays Building 155. In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, Puerto It is the committee that plans this type of event, but the Youth Services is looking for piano and gymnasRicans from throughout the military community gathered volunteers are the ones who make it happen, she said. tics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at 287to celebrate their heritage with music, dance, poetry, food And happen it did as the standing-room-only crowd 3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton. and friends. cheered the young dancers, saog with the musical groups Video day, Wednesdays. "We are taking this opportunity to celebrate our culand shared in a pride of Hispanic heritage and Puerto Arts and crafts, Mondays. ture and to educate others," said Maj. Gustavo Ortiz-Ortiz, Rican culture and traditions. Cooking experiences, Tuesdays. Outdoor games, Thursdays. *Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: Popcorn and movies, Sundays. Friday specials sponsored by AAFES. Call for details. Senior Teen Employment Program, yearround program to develop job skills and earn money for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are available at the center. Bowling at the Clayton Bowling Center 3 p.m. Saturday. Meet at the center at 2 p.m. Medievel University scheduled for Saturday has been postponed. Look for announcement of new date. Smithsonian marine environmental educational program, 8:30 a.m., Oct. 22. Free. Halloween Senior Teen Dance, Oct. 22. *Child Development Services 287-3301: Spaces are available in the CDS part-day program, Building 156 Fort Clayton, in the afternoon session from 1-3 p.m. Preschoolers must be 3 years old and toddlers must be 2 years old by Oct. 31. For information, call 287-5507/5104. Atlantic *Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: Not so fright day movies, 3 p.m. Oct. 22. Hand puppet show, 2 p.m. Oct. 22. Shotokan Karate, 4-5 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, $20 per person. Volunteers are needed to help with the haunted house. Stanf Sgt. Jane Usero (U.S. Army) Staff Sgt. Jane Usero (U.S. Army) Arts and crafts, 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Angelina Ortiz dances for the audience at the Alexis Ortiz performs a traditional dance during Saturday sports, noon to 6 p.m. Puerto Rican Youth Festival at the Fort Clayton the Puerto Rican Youth Festival at the Fort Youth Center. Clayton Youth Center.

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Tropic Time Oct. 14,1994 Entertainment tie B3 Airman 1st Class Sheila Cousins (left) and Sgt. Cassondra Collins entertain the audience with a "swing tune," during the Oct. 7 performance of the Air Force entertainment troupe, Tops in Blue. Tops In Blue '94 Air Force show goes on despite last-minute arrival The Tops in Blue cast sings the Disney inspired tune, "Never had a Friend Like Me." better late than never." "The difficult we do deplane and delayed the departure for several hours. immediately, the impossible takes a little Later, after they'd re-boarded the plane, some sort of longer." "The show must go on." fuel problem cropped up, further delaying departure and These are familiar phrases, and any one of them once again causing the entertainers to exit the aircraft. could apply to the regular operations of the Air Force Because of the delays, officials had to cancel the first, "Tops in Blue" troupe of entertainers. This time, Oct. 6 performance, but planned to make up for it with however, all three are appropriate. two, back-to-back performances Oct. 7. Unfortunately, The world-renown group performed its 90-minute maintenance and logistics problems continued to plague show of song and dance, music and comedy for a nearthe team and its arrival in Panama was again delayed capacity audience Oct. 7 at the base theater here, despite until after 3 p.m. Oct. 7. By the time their equipment circumstances that might have stopped a less-dedicated started arriving at the base theater, it was nearly 5:30 troupe of men and women. p.m. and the team had to really scramble to get things set The 24th Wing commander, Brig. Gen. Richard up for just one show. "Tex" Brown, addressed the audience just before the Still, audience members said that it was an incredible show began. "You don't know what these people have show and was well worth the wait. The high-energy gone through to make sure you all enjoy tonight's performers went into number after musical number, show," he said. "I think they set a world record setting combining country, rock, gospel and swing-type music up their stage and hooking up their sound and lighting with dance and humor, explaining the link between V equipment, doing it in something less than three hours." music and movies, and describing the importance of INormally, this process takes between four and six movies to the people who watch them. Tops in Blue crew Staff Sgt. Joseph said Master Sgt. Bob Brech, tour director for the With music from the Wizard of Oz, The Wiz, Leap of Adkinson (left) and Airman 1st Class Sheila 1994 Tops In Blue. Faith, and several animated Disney features, audience Cousins, assemble the aluminum framework "But we do what we have to do to get the job done," members agreed the show was a success. for the program's set at a feverish pace-finishhe added. 'This is the most self-sacrificing group of "I can't believe everything they went through to put ing in record time of less than three hours. people I've ever worked with and they really wanted to on this show for us," one man said afterward. "You put on this show." know if it had been some big name concert band they Y. Senior Airman Rick Hayden, band leader and would've sent a cable and just canceled out on us. trumpet player and the only returning member from last 'Sorry, we couldn't make it, maybe next time.' Tops in year's Tops in Blue cast, agreed with Brech's analysis. Blue didn't do that." "Participating in Tops in Blue is always an incredible "Putting on a show like Tops in Blue is a lot of hard experience, but I'm enjoying this tour even more than work and everyone has to put forward 100 percent last year's," he said. "Whether it's participating in effort-especially when we're scrambling like this," rehearsals, tearing down and packing up the equipment, Brech concluded. "Still, as long as the audience enjoys or filling in for someone during a performance, every itself, it's all worth the effort. After all, they're the member of this group really pitches in for the benefit of reason we are here." the show. The Tops in Blue team was preparing to depart for story by Panama from Charleston AFB, S.C.and had already Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson After the show, base officials displayed the boarded the aircraft -when the C-5 suddenly decided it photos by community's appreciation by providing a buffet didn't want to fly. Senior Airman Steven McNally banquet for the Tops in Blue staff and crew. First a hydraulic problem forced the troupe to

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Tropic Times o B4Oct. 14, 1994 Focus on Panama ritiiI ieiiuaans Since its inauguration, the by Rosemary Chong National Theatre has played Tropic Times staff host to the best American and European artists and compahe National Theatre, located in nies. Its first presentation was the heart of the old section of Verdi's opera "Aida," followed Panama City facing the sea, is a by "Carmen" and "Lucia de building representing the neo-classic Lammermour," after which architectural influence of the first two followed a great number of decades of the 19th century. operas and operettas, such as The theatre was first occupied by the "Fausto," "Tosca" and "The Convent of the Cloistered Nuns. Public Magic Flute." presentations took place there until 1862 The National Theatre was when it was chosen by Gen. Tomas also host to great artists like Cipriano de Mosquera for his military Tito Shipa, Tamara Touranova, headquarters. Amalia Galligurci, Pastora In 1904, Italian architect Guisseppe Imperio and performers Claude Ruggieri was recruited to design the Arrau, Gaspar Cassado, drawings for the National Theatre, as well Gregory Piatigorosky, Alexas the Government Palace. The contract ander Brrailousky; as well as was awarded to Duque & Arias Co. and Vienna Boys Choir and The the supervisor of the project was engineer Don's Cossacks. Florencio Harmodio Arosemena. The Personalities such as Jose inauguration of the theatre took place Oct. Santos Chocano, Luis 1, 1908 to coincide with the taking of Alberto Sanchez, Jacinto office of Don Jose Domingo de Obaldia, Benavente, gave samples of as President of the Republic. The total cost their literary richness and Peiiy Officer 2nd C ass Bill Lewis (U.S. Navy) of both projects was $597,635. inspired works. The amphitheater forms a moon-shaped area, with an excellent disposition of Decorative elements of the neo-classical The National Theatre in comfortable seats and a wonderful view of the stage.The first and second floors era makeup the facade of the building. Six 1915, under the direction of display elegant boxes, with polished railings in which the rich, bright colors crowned arches frame the upper windows, Don Narciso Garay created give splendor to the garlands and supports that adorn the balconies. as well as the principal doors leading to the the Symphony Orchestra and lobby. In the lateral wings stand two the National Poliphony Chorus, magnificent statues of the muses, and executing the Ninth Symphony above them, four embossed medallions of Beethoven at its first public presentaoffer homage to Wagner, Shakespeare, tion. Moliere and Rossini. Many improvements have been made to Two wide halls at the sides give access the building itself, first in 1941, then in to the lateral entrances and their half-point 1950 and finally in 1970 when a great arches support the upper terraces, which restoration project was started under the lead to the foyer. This architectural initiative of Jaime Ingram, then general disposition offers ample open space, manager of the National Institute of contributing to the equilibrium and Culture. distribution of the volume of the building. With the support of cultural committees A lobby that can accommodate up to and artistic groups, the backing of Gen. 853 people welcomes the visitor and Omar Torrijos Herrera was obtained for facilitates access to the various areas. The the execution of the project. The architecstage's ground floor has enough space to tural restoration and the outfitting of new accommodate many activities at once and spaces was done by architect Rene Brenes the basement has been modified to meet and architect Guillermo De Roux, who the dimensions of today's modern orchesdesigned the doors. tras. The orchestra pit and the two areas of The restoration of the plastic arts of the the amphitheater form a moon-shaped foyer and ceiling of Roberto Lewis, was area, with comfortable seats and a wonderexecuted by professor Juan Manuel ful view of the stage. Cedeno, disciple of Lewis and Roberto The first and second floors display Lewis Jr., son of the artist. elegant boxes, with polished railings in One of the most important which the rich, bright colors of the seats contributions to future generations and carpets give splendor to the garlands is the conservation of this important and supports that adorn the balconies. The building. Thanks to the creation upper part of the gallery affords a panof this first house dedicated to the arts in oramic view of the performance. Panama, the country has been visited by The foyer, located on the first floor, outstanding artists and honored by their provides ample space for intermissions, presentations, offering the maximum and shows paintings of exquisite fantasies expressions of contemporary dance, by the Panamanian master Robert Lewis. theater and music. The ceiling of the theater, also a work of International figures such as Dame Lewis, is an extraordinary fable of the Margot Fonteyn, Alicia Alonso and majesty of this country. Panamanian musicians Mr. and Mrs. It displays the best techniques and Ingram, Alfredo de Saint Malo, Roque styles of the neo-classical influence that Cordero, Herbert Dc Castro, Eduardo made its statement in the isthmus. Its form Charpentier, Carmen Cedeno are and coloring are examples of the achieveunquestionable expressions of the force of ments of the Panamanian plastic arts of the this first house of arts in Panama. Peiiy Officer 2nd Class Bill Lewis (U.S. Navy) period. The foyer provides ample space for intermissions.

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_______ # ~9!~!4IUIIL~y1hzVV~Tropic Times Community news Oct 14,B1994 ACWC members raise more than $9,000 in last year of operation Clayton The Curundu Junior High School will hold a by Sgt. Rick Emert At its high point during the last year, the ACWC had 62 School Advisory Committee meeting for parents 4 USA RSO Public Affairs Office -Atlantic members and a 14-woman board. At the time of the Oct. 4 p.m. Monday in the school library. meeting, there were seven board members and 20 memThe Episcopal worship service at Fort AmaFORT DAVIS -With barely a third ofits peak memberbers. dor Chapel will change from 10:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. ship still around, board members from the Atlantic Com"It's hard to let it go," Dodson said. "I'm very proud of beginning Sunday. The Episcopal Sunday School munity Women's Club met for the last time Oct. 4. what we accomplished in such a short time. There has to be will begin at 9 a.m. in the Fort Amador Chapel The club rewrote its bylaws and constitution last year a lot of heart in an organization to work as hard as these Annex. For information, call 287-3532. with Tina Dodson as president and reopened the Thrift ladies have." The La Leche League meeting will be held 7 Store. The Thrift Store will close down Monday. That hard work enabled the club to give $7,000 to the p.m. Tuesday at the Curundu Elementary School In the one year, club members raised about $9,000 community from September 1993 to September 1994, Playshelter, Fort Clayton. The meeting topic will be which they donated to various on and off-post organizaDodson said. "There's a New Baby in Your Life." La Leche tions. An additional $1,790 was raised from clearance sales League offers mothers-to-be encouragement and The ACWC was unique in that it brought women of all before the Thrift Store closed and from money remaining support for breastfeeding. All interested pregnant ranks-officers, enlisted and civilian-together in one in the club's bank accounts. The recipients of that money and breastfeeding women and their babies are welgroup. will be: American Heart Association-$190, Cristobal High come. For information, call 287-6592 or 260-6682. "Our board was made up mainly of enlisted wives," said School's senior class-$300, CHS junior class-$300, CHS The Exceptional Family Member Program final ACWC president Tina Dodson. "It was good for our yearbook-$300, Davis Elementary School-$200, Gulick Support Group meeting will be held 7:30-9 p.m. community to have all wives as equals. It's such a small Elementary School-$200 and Child Development ServicTuesday at the Valent Recreation Center. All active community that we could interact well with one another." es' preschool scholarship program-$300. duty military and Department of Defense personnel With the means that got them together gone, a new Money left over when all ACWC bank accounts are with family members with disabilities are invited to means will keep them together-friendship. closed will go to the Sisters of Mercy Center for Women in attend. If special services or accommodations are "We see each other all the time," Dodson said. "We all Colon. "We fought right down to the end to put as much needed because of a disability or for information, do a lot of things togetherand we're very involved with the back into the community as we could," said LuAnne G. call 287-5073/4921. community." Grant, Thrift Store manager. U.S. Army Public Affairs is coordinating the 1994JointTaskForce-PanamaChristmasSponsorship Program. Units or community groups wanting to participate this year should call USARSO PAO at 287-3007/4109. Howard/Albrook Cookie baking volunteers are needed for the Family Support Centers' "Make a Difference Day" observation. The treats will be delivered to single airmen who live in the dormitories Oct. 22. To find out where to deliver cookies or how to get more involved with the project, call Mindy Gutierrez at 284-5010. Family Advocacy is offering classes to teach spouses how to deal with the stress involved in being part oftoday's fast paced environment. Classes will be held at the Howard Family Support Center conference room, Building 707 Howard AFB 8:309:30p.m. Oct.25. Call in advance forchild care. Call Laila Yeager at 284-5010 to sign-up. The Howard Family Support Center will offer a spouse orientation course in English 10-11 a.m. Thursday at the FSC. This workshop is offered twice a month to spouses who attend the Right Start Orientation. For more information, call 284-5010. SMiscellaneous The Officers' and Civilians' Wives Club-Pacific Pumpkin Patch Christmas Bazaar will be held 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 22 at Club Amador. More than 100 vendors will be showing goods of all nature. The Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses Club is sponsoring its annual bazaar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. Sgt. Rick Emer (U.S. Army) 29 at the Howard Enlisted Members Club. The The Atlantic Community Women's Club Thrift Store will close Monday. During the last year of club bazaar will feature a bake sale and handicrafts from activities, members raised $9,000 that they returned to the community through charities and Central and South America. For information, call donations. 284-6874. The Howard/Albrook Officer Spouses Club wifl hold its annual fall bazaar 10 a.m.3 p.m. Saturday. Free shuttle service will be provided to Facts for Nationali Consum r W~\\eeks hodiwana albza 0~. pm and from the Albrook Post Office. FORT CLAYTON (ACS) -Nainto checking, share draft and NOW vide disclosures before annual reTheEnlisted Spouses Club-Panama will hold tional Consumers Week has become accounts available according to specnewal. its annual membership drive featuring apresentaan established annual tradition for state ified time schedules and to disclose Card issuers that offer credit intion of the whimsical "Basic Black Dress" Oct. 27 at and local consumer offices, businesstheirfunds availability policies totheir surance must inform customers of the Fort Clayton NCO Club. Hors d'oeuvers and es, government agencies, voluntary customers. The law does not require any increase in rate or substantial membership table will begin at 6 p.m. and a presenorganizations and individual consuman institution to delay the customer's decrease in coverage should the issutation at 7 p.m. For information, call 284-4523 or ers. use of deposited funds but instead erdecidetochangeinsuranceprovid284-4592. The last week of October is annuallimits how long any delay may last. ers. Call to report domestic violence or get more ly dedicated to the ongoing need to The regulation also establishes rules * The Fair Credit Billing Act esinformation on services that are available. Service educate and inform consumers about designed to speed the return of unpaid tablishes procedures for the prompt began Wednesday and is available 8 a.m.4 p.m. their rights and responsibilities in the checks. correctionoferrorsonopen-enderedit For more information, call 284-6457. marketplace. * The Fair Credit and Charge accounts. It also protects a consumArmy Community Service will be Disclosure Act requires new discloer's credit rating while the consumer presenting a series of briefs to enhance suresoncreditandchargecards, whethis settling a dispute. Atlantic theimportance ofthis week, toachieve er issued by financial institutions, re* The Truth in Lending Act reA breastfeeding support group meeting will this goal. This yearNationalConsumtail stores or private companies. Inforquires disclosure of the "finance be held 7 p.m. Thursday at Quarters 529B on Fort ers Week will be observed Oct. 23-29. mation such as APRs, annual fees and charge" and the "annual percentage Davis. The meeting is entitled "Needs as Your Baby Forinformation,callACSat287-6322. grace periods must be provided in rate" -and certain other costs and Grows." All persons interested in learning about * The Expedited Funds Availabiltabular form along with applications terms of creditso that a consumer breastfeeding are invited to attend. For more infority Act requires all banks, savings and and preapprovedsolicitationsforcards. can compare the prices of credit from mation, call Martha Vaughn at 289-3234. loan associations, savings banks and The regulations also require card issudifferent sources. It also limits liabilcredit unions to make funds deposited ers that impose an annual fee to proity on lost or stolen credit cards.

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Tropic TimesN B 6 Oct 14 1994 * e a er bottom feeding fish. Fee includes cap5 a.m.-2 p.m. today and Oct. 29, $25. Wear loose clothing, long pants, hiking Rodman tai, gear, live bait and iced coolers. Bring fishing gear and bags. shoes or sneakers, raincoats, and a hat. 4'Information Tour and Travel: Downtown shopping 9 a.m. Oct. 27, El Valle horseback riding, 7 a.m.-4 Bring insect repellant, drinking water, maMoonlight cruise 6:30 p.m. Saturday $8. Shop Panama's Central Avenue and p.m. Saturday, $24. nila tape, and a dry towel. Register by and Oct. 29, $21. Cruise out to Taboga Via Espana. Nature tour to Barro Colorado IsMonday. Island for cocktails and hors d'oeuvres by Two-day deep seas fishing trip, Nov. land 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Thursday, $65, lunch Partial transits of the Panama Canal moonlight, while viewing Panama City's 5-6. Fish the fertile waters ofIsla del Rey, is included. 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays, $35 adults, $15 dramatic skyline at night. San Jose and Galera abord the 42' Vargas. Gold panning in Bique, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. children 12 years old and younger. A miniBarro Colorado Island 6 a.m. Oct. $220 fee includes captain, gear and bait. Oct. 21, $12. mum of 20 people is needed for a partial 21, $65, two people needed. Visit t Aibrook/Howard Drake's Island 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 22, transit any other day of the week. tropical research island in the Panama $22 snorkelers, $47 scuba. Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel opCanal's Gatun Lake. *Zodiac Community Activities Cenportunity to Montego Bay any Sunday Panama City tour 9 a.m. Oct. 22, $8. ter Clayton through Wednesday. Packet includes airVisit the Golden Altar, the French Plaza Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fri*Valent Recreation Center: fare, three nights hotel accommodations, and more. days, $13. Panama City shopping 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and transfer. Prices vary from $300-$600 Trolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. Oct. 22, El Valle shopping 6:30 a.m.-4:30 Saturday. depending on the hotel. $48/person. Fish for marlin, sailfish, dolp.m. Sunday and Oct. 30, $13. Free Zone 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday. Balboa phin (fish), bonita, Spanish mackeral and Dining out Italian style 6-10 p.m. *Outdoor Recreation Center: more. Fee includes captain, gear, lures and Oct. Wednesday, $3. There is Contadora Island transit ser*Balboa Dive Club: iced coolers. Colonial Panama & ruins tour 9 vice Friday through Monday. Fees are The club is now accepting new memEl Valle 7 a.m. Oct. 23, $12. Shop for a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 22, $6. $35 adults and $20 children 12 and under bers. Divers must show a diving certificalocal handicrafts, plants, fruits and vegeRio Mar Beach trip 7 a.m.-5 p.m. round trip, $25 adults and $15 children tion card to join. Annual membership fee is tables and visit nature preserve. Oct. 23, $12. one way. $12. Members receive a monthly newsletFree Zone shopping trip 7 a.m. Oct. Panama museums tour 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Ecotourism trip to a Chocoe Indian ter, free use of the club tanks, free library 26, $12. Oct. 26, $5. Bring money for entrance fee Village Saturday, $30 adults, $20 chiland videos for loan, information and classBottom-fishing on the Vargas, Sunand lunch. dren under 12. es on diving topics, guest speakers and dive day and Oct. 30, $35 adults, $20 kids *Outdoor adventures: Ecotourism trip to Barro Colorado trips.Call 263-8077 or 260-0075 or write under 14. Catch snapper, grouper and othPeacock bass fishing in Lake Gatun Island 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 29, $35 fee. Unit 0967, APO AA 34002. Albrook/Howard Clayton *Zodiac Community Activities Center: *Fort Clayton Pool: Guitarlessons l-6p.m. Saturdays atAlbrookYouth All swimming classes will be discontinued until Center, 286-3195. December because of inclement weather. Spanish lessons 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays at *Fort Clayton Boat/Scuba Shop: Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. Open water scuba class meets first and third Monday Martial arts classes at Howard and Albrook Youth of each month, $125. Includes five pool sessions, five Centers, 284-4700. theory sessions and four open water dives. Tae Kwon Do karate classes at Zodiac Center for *Valent Recreation Center: children and adults. Private piano and guitar lessons available weekday Beginner and advanced dog obedience classes, evenings. $32 for 4 weeks. Korean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Beginnerand advanced English and Spanish classRodman es offered monthly. *Albrook Auto Skills Center: *Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation Office: Brake pad replacement, l-3p.m. Sunday, $5. The Navy MWR is seeking qualified instructors to Pneumatic air machine operation, 1:00 p.m. Oct. teach Spanish and French language courses. Applicants 22, $5. should have prior experience in teaching elementary and Air conditioning service and repair 12:30-5 p.m. conversational language courses. Call 283-4301. daily except Tuesday and Wednesday. Curundu Wheel alignment diagnostic and service classes *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: are held 3-9 p.m. Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays, 10 Reservations for Christmas Village tables is under a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. way 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at the Centre.Volunteers and perform*Howard and Albrook pools ers are needed. Call 286-3814 to sign up. Intro to scuba, free, call for appointment. Piano lessons are held 3-7 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Open water scuba class Saturday at Howard at Wednesdays and Fridays. Open to students ages 6 and Albrook, $145. older. Advanced scuba Wednesday at Howard. Martial arts 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Water aerobics for advanced adult swimmers at Open to all ages. Shcuey) Howard and Albrook. Registration for all dance classes is under way at aggy +Howard Wood Skills Center, Bldg. 722 Building 2060, Curundu. Jazz lessons are available for As part of Reggae Fest'94, Shaggy, Rayvon, Free qualification class, 10 a.m.-noon Oct. 15. teens and adults as follows: Learn how to use the woodcutting machines to do 1: 5-6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, $32. Rap Machine will perform at Gim Nuevo personal projects. II: 6-7 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, $32. Panama (Juan Diaz Arena) 8 p.m. Oct. 22. Drawer construction, 6-7:30 p.m. Oct. 17, $5. Other classes: modern, ballet, tap, folkloric, salsa, Tickets are $9-$15. Call the Zodiac, Valent Make a basic drawer using rabbet and dado. belly dancing and saxophone. and Sundial recreation centers for information. Dinner with the boss recognize your boss' help and support. School. Tickets are $10, and are available Park fund at the park or the theatre box office Oct. _Launa Lounge: 20. They show you the ropes, why not * Metroplitan National Park: Showlime show your boss or supervisor your appreClear and Present Danger, starring ciation tonite at Rodman's Laguna Harrison Ford, will be shown at the Bal* Pacific Theatre Arts Center: Lounge. "Bring Your Boss" Nite will boa Theatre 7 p.m. Oct. 20. All funds The musical productionBye, ByeBirdhave complimentary hors d'oeuvres and a earned at the gala event will go to support ie will open 8 p.m. Oct. 21 at the center. DJ spinning tunes. The evening runs from the Metropolitan Natural Park in Juan Tickets are $10, call 286-3814 for reser6:30 to 11 p.m. This is your opportunity to Pablo 11 Avenue off Curundu Junior High vations. The show runs through Nov. 12. /71

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ticTropic Times Ces Oct. 14,1994xB7 Phone guide Pacific John Hall(U.S. Navy) 24th Services Squadron Sports and Kick the habit Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107 Melanie Marcec, Laura Adame and Diana Luz Parada perform a song from Nunsense 11, a musical Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613 comedy presented by the Theatre Guild of Ancon. The show runs 8 p.m. Oct. 14-Nov. 5. Gala Albrook Club, 286-4128 opening tickets are $5 for members and $15 for nonmembers, other performances cost $8. For Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333 call252-786.Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989. reservations call 252-6786. Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-0075 Canal Crafters 286-4500 Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957 A g *, Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts class, 12:30-3:30p.m.Monday,$15 The center is looking for Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586 Center: plus supplies. Learn how to use crafters to sell items in the new Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 The Ceramic Center, Building covercoats, glaze and stain in this consignment boutique. / Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355 198, is located near the Crafts Shop. three week class. Instructors are needed to teach Club Amador, 282-3534 *Canal Crafters: Photo album class, time TBA, classes on a contract basis for a Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010 Handmade arts and crafts are Wednesday, $5 plus supplies. Learn variety of crafts, decorative paintCorozal Thrift Shop, 285-5989 available, consignments and volhow to make padded photo albums ing, calligraphy, watercolors, oil Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 unteers are welcome. The shop for Christmas gifts, baby showers, painting. Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday weddings. Padded heart box 1-3 p.m. Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680 through Saturday. The shop is now Ceramic pouring class, 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, $5 plus supplies. Howard Riding Stables 284-3770 accepting holiday consignments, Thursday, $15. Bring supplies. Cake decorating 7-9 p.m. Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361 Building 804, Albrook. Clay flower class, I 1 a.m.2 Thursday, $25 plus supplies. Howard Teen Center, 284-4700 Register for the following classp.m. Saturdays, $5 plus supplies. Intermediate ceramic painting / Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510 es at the shop: For all levels. 10:30 a.m.-l p.m. Thursday, $15, The Loop, 287-3035 Tole-painting, witch 10:15 a.m. Oil paint sale Oct. 21-22. Take three weeks. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 Monday. 25percent off of Alexander and Ongoing classes: stained glass, Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380 Stencil demo, 10:15 a.m. Oct. Liquitex oil paints. framing, air brush, lamp assembly, Rodman Annex, 283-5475 27. Bring stencil and paints. Ongoing classes, stained glass, cross stitch, macrame, clay flower, / Rodman Club, 283-4498 *Howard Skills Development framing, air brush, lamp assembly, ceramic and 'how to videos.' / Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 Center: pottery wheel throwing, cross stitch, *Fort Sherman Multicraft CenRodman Naval Station Information Tour Framing class, 10:30a.m.-2:30 macrame, clay flower, ceramic and ter. / and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454 p.m. Saturday, $20 plus supplies. 'how to videos'. Woodworking qualification Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 Learn how to make your own mats Leather & wood sale today and class. Class covers safe use ofequip/ Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500 and frames. Saturday. Take 25 percent off unment. Qualification cards will be Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-6161 Beginning ceramic painting painted wood and leather items. issued after course completion. Atlantic Aquativity Center, 289-4009 * ,7 7 Davis Art and Crafts Center, 289-5201 Davis Community Club, 289-5160 Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 *Valent Recreation Center: Volunteers needed to perform Beauty tip demonstration MonOutdoor Recreation, 289-4077 Better Opportunities for as horror characters for the Hauntday Oct. 21. Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313 Single Soldiers next meeting is ed House Oct 29. Interested people *Cocoli Community Center: Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104 Thursday. must be age 18 and older. Videos for children 4 p.m. Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300 The screening room offers free Professional family portraits Thursdays. movies.Callthe24-hourmovieline, Sunday and Oct. 22. By appointLaser disc movies 7 p.m. 287-4367 for days and times. ment only. Fridays. i t*Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Atlantic tours Rec center news The center offers the following classes: cooking, *Sundial Recreation Center: *Sundial Recreation Center: dance, arts and crafts, music, aerobics, first aid, CPR, El Valle, 5:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. Sunday. Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6 p.m. Thursdays. yoga, martial arts, various sports, English, Spanish and Free Zone 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday. Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. dog obedience. Panama City shopping 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 22. Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays The center now offers deep sea fishing charters. *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: and Fridays. Call 289-6402 for information. El Valle overnight Saturday and Sunday. Karate 6-7 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. People are needed to line handle transiting boats Panama City shopping 8 a.m. Oct. 22. Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. Mondays. from Cristobal to Balboa. Sign up now. Call for details.

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Tropic Movies Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7pm: Andre (PG) 2pm: Andre (PG) 2pm: The Mask 7pm: The Mask 7pm: In the Army 6:30pm: Clear and 6:30pm: Speed (R) 284-3583 Keith Carradine, Keith Carradine, (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (PG-13) Now (PG) Present Danger Keanu Reeves, Tina Majorino Tina Majorino Richard Jeni Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore, (PG-13) Dennis Hopper 9pm: The Mask 4pm: In the Army 4pm: Andre (PG) Richard Jeni Lori Petty Harrison Ford, 9:30pm: Clear and (PG-13) Now (PG) Pauly Shore, Keith Carradine, 9:30pm: In the Army 9pm: The Mask Willem Dafoe Present Danger Jim Carrey, Lori Petty Tina Majorino Now (PG) (PG-13) 9:30pm: Color of (PG-13) Richard Jeni 7pm: The Mask 7pm: The Mask Pauly Shore, Jim Carrey, Night (R) Harrison Ford, (PG-13) Jim Carrey, (PG-13) Lori Petty Richard Jeni Bruce Willis, Willem Dafoe Richard Jeni Jane March 9:30pm: The Mask 9:30pm: In the Army (PG-13) Now (PG)Pauly Shore, Lori Petty Fort Clayton 6:30pm: True Lies 2pm: It Could Happen 2pm: True Lies 6:30pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could Happen 7pm: The Mask 7pm: In the Army 287-3279 (R) Arnold to You (PG) (R) Arnold (R) Arnold to You (PG) (PG-13) Now (PG) Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, Schwarzenegger, Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore, Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Richard Jeni Lori Petty 9:30pm: City Slickers 6:30pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could 9:30pm: It Could 9:30pm: Trne Lies 9:30pm: Speed (R) 9pm: The Mask 2 (PG-13) (R) Arnold Happen to You (PG) Happen to You (PG) (R) Arnold Keaun Reeves, (PG-13) BIlly Crystal, Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, Nicolas Cage, Schwarzenegger, Dennis Hopper Jim Carrey, Daniel Stern Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis Richard Jeni ($1.50/$) 9:30pm: True Lies (R) 9:30pm: True Lies (R) Fort Davis 7pm: Black Beauty 7pm: The Little 7pm: Black Beauty 7pm: Airheads 7pm: The Little 7pm: Wolf (R) 7pm: It Could 289-5173 (G) David Thewlis, Rascals (PG) Travis (G) David Thewlis, (PG-13) Rascals (PG) Jack Nicholson, Happen to You (PG) Sean Bean Tedford, Bug Hall Sean Bean Brendan Fraser, Travis Tedford, Michelle Pfeiffer Nicolas Cage, 9pm: Airheads 9pm: Airheads (PG-13) Steve Buscemi Bug Hall Bridget Fonda (PG-13) Brendan Fraser, Brendan Fraser, Steve Buscemi Steve Buscemi Fort Sherman 7pm: Above the Rim 4pm: Black Beauty 7pm: The Little No show No show No show (R) Duane Martin, (G) David Thewlis, Rascals (PG) Travis 289-5173 Leon ($1.50/$1) Sean Bean Tedford, Bug Hall 7pm: True Lies 7pm: The Cowboy (R) Arnold I Way (PG-13) Woody Schwarzenegger, Harrelson, Kiefer Jamie Lee Curtis Suherland Fort Amador 7pm: Speed (R) 7pm: Angels in the 7:30pm: The Client No show No show 7pm: True Lies 7pm: Color of Night 284-3583 Keanu Reeves, Outfield (PG) (GP-13) (R) Arnold (R) Dennis Hopper Danny Glover, Susan Sarandon, Schwarzenegger, Bruce Willis, Tony Danza Tommy Lee Jones Jamie Lee Curtis Jane March AI om n o p1,T I I I Oct. 21 The Mask Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni Howard AFB Nobody does super powers like Jim Howar AFBCarrey. An ordinary, mild-mannered 7pm Clear and Present bank clerk is transformed into the weirdest super hero of all time when lie dons Danger (PG-13) his mask. PG-13 (some stylized vioHarrison Ford, lence), 1 hr, 40 min. Willem Dafoe 9:45pm Color of Night (R) Andre Bruce Willis, Keith Carradine, Tina Majorino Jane March An amazing true story of the seal that became a living legend. An adorable AEONATUST Y newborn seal is orphaned after his mothFort Clayton er is caught in a fisherman's net. The pup is nursed back to health by the animal G 7pm Andre (PG) loving Whitney family, who name him Keith Carradine, Andre. PG (teen mischief, mild violence, Now showing at the Howard Theater. Tina Majorino language),l hr, 34 min. forms ofcounter intelligence, Harry is an Black Beauty 9pm The Mask (PG-13) international spy who has kept his real David Thewlis, Sean Bean Jim Carrey In the Army Now profession secret from his wife. R (acA heartwarming drama based on the Richard Je Pauly Shore, Lori Petty tion, violence, language), I hr, 82 min. family classic novel by Anna Sewell Pauly Shore is not the ideal troop. In fact, tells the story of a time in history when he joined the Army Reserves for the City Slickers 2 horses were essential to men's lives. G, Fort Davis bennies and the regular salary. Reality Billy Crystal, Daniel Stern 99 min. kicks in when he becomes a part of a Oururbancowboysarereadyforanother 7pm It Could Happen mission involving actual combat. PG adventure. Although Mitch is enjoying The Client To You (PG) (some war action, mild language) I hr, the serenity of his suburban New York Susan Sarandon, Tommy Lee Jones Nicholas Cage, 31 min. life with is family and Norman the cow, Set in New Orleans, this is an adaptathe discovery ofa treasure map sets things tion of a the John Grisham best selling Bp ruedges F(d It Could H happen back in motion. PG-13 (comic scene and novel. PG-13 (child in jeopardy, lanTridge F ) It off-color humor) 1 hr, 48 mm. ) 2 hrs. 9pm Tre ie ~to You guage), rs Arnold Schwarzenegger, A Nicholas Cage, Bridget Fonda Airheads a ze eer, A New York City cop lacking change Brendan Fraser, Steve Buscemi K R eed Jamie Lee Curtis tips a waitress with a promise to split the remal heaserate tg hei L Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper winnings from his lottery ticket if he Three metal heads desperate to get their LAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played wins. When he wins and wants to make demo song played on the radio inadvertby Keanu Reeves, is known as a man Fort Sherman good on the promise, it will be over ently take a radio station hostage. PG13 with an attitude caused by Dennis Hopstrong opposition fromhis wife.PG (mild (crude dialogue and some sexuality), 1 per, a sociopath who nearly killed him 7pm Wolf (R) language, scene of cop action), 1 hr, 41 hr, 29 min. in an earlier encounter. R (violence, Jack Nicholson, mn. language), I hr, 51 min. Michelle Pfeiffer The Little Rascals True Lies Travis Tedford, Bug Hall Wolf Arnold Schwarzenegger, Steven Spielberg produces an appealing Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer Fort Amador Jamie Lee Curtis update of the Hat Roach comedy series We all know what happens when you 7pm In the Army Now Harry Tasker is a special agent for Omefrom the '20s, '30s and '40s. The gang get bit by a werewolf, right? But, do (PG) Paul Shore, ga Sector, a top secret agency charged has established a boy's only club; howyou know what might happen if Jack with nuclear terrorism intervention. Fluever, things change when Alfalfa falls Nicholson gets bit? R (language, Lori Petty ent in six languages and skilled in all for Darla. PG (rude dialogue) werewolf attacks), 2 hrs.

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TV Schedule 9Oct 14,1994 C * Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event **Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 NBC News at Sunise 630 Headline News 6:00 CCMTV 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Good Morning America :00 Navy/Marine Corps News 6:30 Outreach of Love 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Mooting America 6:00 Good Morning Ameria 6:00 G Moring America w/Panama Now (7:25) 7:30 Real News for Kids 7:00 Parliament of Souls 0:00 Basic Training Workout [ /Panama Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25') 6:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Guts 7:30 Lifestyle Magazine 8:30 Sesane Street 0:00 Bodyshaping 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:31 Sesate Street 8:30 Jttst for Kids! 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 9:30 Portrait of Aterica 0:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 9:3(1 Portrait of Atterica Gareld & Friends 9.30 This Week w/Brinkley 10:25 Guiding Light 9:30 Portrait tif America 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of Aterica 10:25 Guiding Light Teetage Mutant Ninja 1(:30 Face Otn Nation .11:10 General Hospital 10:25 Guiding Lightt 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 11 :10 General Hospital Turtles 11:00 Inside ite NFL 12:00 Headline News 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital 12:00 Headline News Break Biker Mice frnt Mars 12:00 Headline News 12:30 Sports Machine 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:25 Panama Now Battan Cartoon 12:30 On Stage 1:00 Anitter World 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:30 Sportscenter 10:30 Faerie Tale Theater 1:00 Movies: "Great Land of 2:00 Gprah Winfrey 12:30 Spotscenter 12:30 Sportscete 12:30 Sportscenter 1:00 Another World ;1:00 College FIttball: the Small" 3:00 Price is Right 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 2:00 Opralt Wittfrey Auburn Tigers vs. 2:30 Sesaite Street Presents: 4:00 Guts 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Donahue 3:00 Price is Right Florida Gators "Follow that Bird" 4:30 1 Love Lucy 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 4:00 Think Fast! 2:30 College Football: 4:00 Victory at Sea 5:00 Family Feud 4:00 Reading Rainbow 4:00 Shining Time Station 4:00 in the Mix 4:30 1 Love Lucy Penn State Nitiany Lions 4:30 G'Hara 5:30 The Cusby Show 1 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lucy 5:00 Family Fetd vs. Michigan Wolserines 5:30 Entertainment This Week 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:00 Family Fend 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:30 The Cosby Shaw 5:30 Headline News 6:30 Hearts Are 6: 15 Headline News Break 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:10 Paradise 7:00 Dr. Quinn: Medicine 6:30 World News Tonight 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 7:00 Rescue 911 Woman 7:00 Jeopardy 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6.30 World News Tonight 8:00 Walker: Texas Ranger 8:00 Mini series: "The Remrn 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 7:00 Jeopardy 9:00 Movie: "The Best Little to Lonesome Dove" 8:00 Mad Ahout You 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 Jeopardy 7:25 Panama Nom Girl in the World" (Part 1 of 4) 8:30 Cops 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 7:30 Entertainment Tonight Em:40 Saturday Night Live 9:35 ABC 20/20 9:00 60 Minutes 7:30 Etertainment Tonight 730 Etertainmen Tonight 7:30 Entertainment tonight 8:00 America's Funniest 112:10 WWF Superstars of 10:35 Top Cops 10:00 SCN Lai Edition 8:00 L.A. Law + 8:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 8:00 ALF People Wrestling :1:30 Miami Vice 10:05 Cheers 9:00 Northern Exposure 8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 8:30 Touched by an Angel 8:30 Evening Shade 1:00 Friday Night Videos 12:00 Movies: "Hollywood 10:30 David Letterman 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 Culture Clash 930 Lone and War us 9:00 In the Heat of the Night 2:00 Movies: "Fright Night" Shuffle" :11:30 Tonight Shaw 10:05 Cheers 10:00 SCN Late Edition 1000 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Editi"n 2frm Larai 1:35 "Double Edge" 12:30 M*A*S*H 10:30 David Letterman 10:05 Cheers 10:05 Cheers 10:05 Cheers 1:00 Monies:"Haill Hail) 11:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Letterman 10:30 David Letierman 10:30 David Leterman 4:35 NBC at Sunrise Rock ' Roll" 12:30 M*A*S*H 1:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Sham 5:00 Headline News 3:00 "The Big Chill" 1:00 Movies: "Canierville 12:30 M*A*S*H 12:30 M*A*S*H 1:0 Reu ad stimpy, 1:00 es and Haider 5:00 Headline News Break Ghost" 1:00 Movies: "The 1:00 Movies: "The Green 1:00 Movies: "The Harder 2:40 "PT 100" Sundowners" Berets" They Fall" 5:00 Headline News Break 3:15 "Them" 3:15 "Who's Afraid of 3:00 "Mr. Deed Goes to 5:00 Headline News Break Virginia WoF' Town" 5:00 "Seven Little Fys' F in * Mature Theme *Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event *-*Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 Simulcast ./Ch. 8 & 10 6: 0 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:00 Washington Week in 4:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5 30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:30 Sinmulcast /Ch. 8 & 10 5 :30 Stmulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:30 Young Adult 'Theater Revies 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 9:00 Today "Don't TouCh" 6:30 Shining Tie Station 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 11:00 Star Trek "American Eyes" 7:00 The Sunshine Factory 11:00 Star Trek :11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 12:00 Headline News Break "Eriest: Sacred Stupid" 7:25 Goof Troop 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:25 Panama Now 11:35 Channel One/Newsroom 7:50 Muppet Babies 12:30 All My Children 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:30 All My Chilre [12:05 Silver Spoons 8:20 Disney's The Little 1:30 Onr Life to Lise 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 1:30 One Life to line 12:30 Monies: "Pupeyr" Mermaid 2:30 Young and the Restless 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 0 e o a t hitless 2:1 "The Harder They Fall" 8:30 Whereon Earth is Carmen 3:30 Batman 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:310 Young and the Restless Tre Mat 4:00 21 Jump Street San Diego nun 4:00 Fraggle Rock 3:30 Where on Earth is Canen 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Moppet Babies 4:00 Frtle Rock 5:00 Westcunt Sports 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja 4:30 The Adventures of Pete San Diego? 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:1)0 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Reading Rainhow Specials** Turles & Pete 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Guts 4:30 Nick Arcade 5:00 Silver Spoons 6:00 Doctar, Doctor 9:30 Movie: "Hans Christian 5:00 In the Mix 4:30 Think Fast 5:00 Beakman's World 5:00 Fact of Life 5:30 Shuwbiz Today 6:30 Dinosaurs Andersen" 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Disney's Raw Toonage 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 Headline News 7:00 Christy n** .11:30 NFL Pee-Game Show 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:30 CBS Evening News 8:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 12:00 NFL Football: Los 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Angeles Raiders vs. 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 CBS Evening News Nine ** (Pilot movie) 9:00 Me and the Boys ** Miami Dolphins 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 6:30 CBS Evening News 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 7:00 NFL FPioball: Green Bay 8:35 Panama Now + (New Fall Series) 3:00 NFL Football: New York Nine 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Packers vs. Minnesota 8:40 Ruseatne + 9:30 Married With Children Giants vs. Los Angeles 8:00 Monday Night Football: Nine 7:55 Panama Now Vikings 9:10 The Boys are Back 10:00 Movie: "A Few Good Rams Kansas City Chiefs vs. 7:55 Panama Now 8:00 Sinbad Show 10:00 SCN Late Edititn (New Fall Series) Men" 6:00 Wonderful World of Denver Broncos 8:00 Home Improvement 8:30 Family Matters 10:05 L.A. Law 9:35 SCN Late Edition + 12:1 Science and Trechnology Disney + 11:00 Headline News 8:30 My So Called Life 9:00 Wise Guy '11:00 Headline News 10:40 Renegade +Week 7:00 Phenom 1:30 Nightline (New Fall Series) 10:00 SCN Late Edition 11:30 Nightline I 1:30 Nightline 1:00 The McLaughlin Group 7:30 Fresh Prince of Bel-air 12:00 Cheers 9:30 Frasier 10:85 Toe of Duty 12:00 Cheers 12:00 Cheers1:30 Sports Latenight 8:00 Movie: "The Player" ,12:30 MuA*SnH [10:00 SCN Late Edition :11:00 Headline News 12:30 M*A*S*H 12:30 M*A*S*H -2:0 Enteraimeni this week 10:00 Buck James 1:00 Headline News 10:05 McKenna (New FallSeris) 1 1:30 Nightline 1:00 Headline News p:00 Headl n Nest 3:00 Headline News 1:00 Eye to Eye w/C. Chung 1:30 Sports Latenight I 1:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Cheers 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Sports Laterigh 3:30 Saturday Night Live 12:00 Headline News 2:00 David Letterman 1:30 Nightline 12:30 M*A*S*H 2:00 David Letterman 3:00 Daid LinN : 12:30 Mee the Press 3:00 Headline News 12:00 Cheers 1 00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 300 HieadlineNw 5M 00Videaik MetIh 3:30 Military News 5:30 Headline News Break 1:30 Sports Machine 3:30 Wheel of Fornme 12:30 M*A*S*H 1 30 Sports Latenight 3:30 Wheel of Fortute 4:00 Tom & Jerry Kids 2:00 Sports Latenight 4:00 Jeopardy 1:00 Headline News 2:00 David Letterman 4:00 Jeopardy 4:30 Tiny Toons Adventures 2:30 Frngal Gourmet 4 30 Dunahur 1:30 Sports Laiuight 3:00 Headline News 4:30 Oprah Winfrey 5:00 CR0 3:00 Headline News :200 David Leterman 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 5:30 Videolinks 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 3:00 Headline News 4:00 Jeopardy 4:00 Jeopardy 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:30 Sally Jesse Raphael 4:00 Jeopardy 4:30 Oprah Winfrey Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Sports Sports College football NFL football Auburn Tigers vs. Florida Gators, I 1 a.m. Saturday Los Angeles Raiders vs. Miami Dolphins, noon Sunday Penn State Nittany Lions vs. Michigan Wolverines, 2:30 p.m. SatNew York Giants VS. Los Angeles Rams, 3 p.m. Sunday urday Kansas City Chiefs vs. Denver Broncos, 8 p.m. Monday Series starts Green Bay Packers vs. Minnesota Vikings, 7 p.m. Thursday "Touched by an Angel," 8:30 p.m. Thursday. Series starts Monica is a guardian angel who plummets through the sky like "Me and the Boys," 9 p.m. Saturday. a fireball and makes her dramatic entrance on Earth by belly flopping Steve Hayes is a proud, hard-working widower who is determined to directly into Santa Monica Bay. Monica has been sent to protect "Destiny 'Z give his three sons the best possible shot at a bright future. Adding a tenTots," children who are fated for greatness. der and nurturing touch to this all-male household is Mary, Steve's mother"Love and War," 9:30 p.m. Thursday. in-la Jack is testing his friend's patience by continually moping over Wally's departure. Primetime movies Jay Thomas and Annie Potts return for another hilarious season of "Love and War." "A Few Good Men," 10 p.m. Saturday. Mini -series A young, inexperienced Navy lawyer is assigned to prosecute a case involving the "Return to Lonesome Dove," 8 p.m. Sunday. death of a Marine. While his senior finally gets him to take things seriously, his bigAcademy Award-winner John Voight takes over the role made famous by Tommy gest problem is a belligerent Marine colonel who is used to having his way. Finally, in Lee Jones as Larry McMurtry's "Lonesome Dove" saga resumes in this sweeping the courtroom, the young lawyer faces the old Marine in a dramatic showdown of sequel to the history-making 1989 mini-series. wills. Stars Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson. Movies "The Player," 8 p.m. Sunday. "The Best Little Girl in the World," 9 p.m. Saturday. In this too-close-for-comfort insider's look at Hollywood, a "typical" film producer A model teenager from a middle class family suffers from anorexia nervosa while her receives threatening notes on picture post cards from a disgruntled writer. He finds family and friends see her as "The Best Little Girl in the World." Stars Jennifer Jason the man he thinks is doing it, "polishes him off." and then finds out he murdered [hc Leigh and Ally Sheedy. wrong guy. Stars Tim Robbins artd Whoopi Goldberg.

PAGE 22

B O Tropic Times C s~ B10 Oct 14 C94 lassified Ads u r, 5d g.as iae , 00)/cbo. Reliable ;hbyinin my home -y twcfers (The Crnwch, $70. 2572'4 3)97. im. pkccl. 286-4294. 2 31. Duty-free mnerdhand,_ ]38 U y ~ ~ ~ 303Pecntiacrcccrix.Vclllycccdlcmes,ili6eng-kiedymadN vtcherbccrd & de p , 3,e FORT CLAYTON (Contraband ConlbtrcsI Office) -Asa re8 inder8 .i10. -"" d" 287 5 " 38 SXs"d" o " in accordance with the Panama Canail TFreaty and U.S. Southern A"Inlor In hom. cyli, "ImCommand regulations, duty free merchandi whether new or used, 1989 Od, Cul, UaIc O/coo I oil h an,,al, ;,y w-4 oc F'60 antenna s w. I~ -auin m. 6-Il en, dac,p pcc 'olch, ~ a OO iy 260-3433. 30010355(_256-6816, cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege holdmnIC!, $6,4101,bo.287-3534 Biliguial day cmid, Men, Wed,. Fri, IBM PC comp w/40 mg id. 5.25" ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu1984 Forid LTDsiariii wigcnc,;/ gd w/kid, reliable. 266-8662. Iloppy.ionior~joystick, mouserd tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes fr ,di, iinted wid, y 6, new fire, in kngocsgame & mitre, $3118. 204permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. y o 5, 4-o work, wodayvaw kTuC I 4 Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact 1994 Chryler LoBaron con, scnd, Fri. 261 7939. JVC copne-link stereo system: amp, tc, ati luck brake, am/fm cas, King Cake d-oring. 287-6222, cd, dual Cass, turntable, suround & 4 the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117. h , 4-499, spks, $875.289-3454. 992 Toyoia p/n, liknw, 3K milos, Dependable bilingual maid, ref anail, JVC4-hoadVCRw/remoliduoi $1,111/o. 287-4877. cm/fin cass, liw miles, 35mpg, clean, 5 spd, ot/fm cass, fr quick vole, Men, Wed and Fri. cook, clean, iron. editing & 8-event/I -montb programc nice, $3,900/obo. 286-4693. $7,800, 286-4375. 224-0199 a able, $195. 289-3454. 1987 Dodge Shadow turbo 2 dr. 5 spd, -Eng-,pkigday md,cbildcare.bnun gd, frout end damaged, but till 1988 M ontero, at, dill"y maid, "1 1911 Tr iTwo Gemini turntables & Gemini Male Irish setter, all shots, gd watch drinable, $3,588. 284-3586. pd, $12,0001/obo. 269-5708. $4,580 firm. 260-8154. et, reliable, no iron, avail M-S. 284Scratch Master Mixer, $300. 252dog, very affectionate, $85, 287-4338. ---4595 for Marianola. 5124, Gabe. M 989 Buick Skyhawk, 2dr,t, ac, tint, 1984 S-10 Blazer, 4x4, auto, air, te1983 CJ-7 Jeep, laredo package, gd .. Mixed breed ma], poppy, house tilt, cruise, $5,500. 284-3670. reo, alamn, perf cond, new paint, no could, $6,000. 252-5024. Good Eng-spkmg maid gr w/kids AST386SX25w/4mbRAM,140md, trained, $20.286-3371. -rust, $5,250/obo. 286-4734. Line-out,daysormeekends,224-9479various programs installed, printer, 1991 Buick Regal limited, fully load1990 Ford Festiva L-plus, ps, at, at/ desk, acesories, $1,08. 284-4985. Pitbull/rotweiler mix, female, 4 rion ed,new tires, exccond, $12,000. 2871990 Toyota Corolla GTS, sports fmstereonewtiresgrtcond,$7,50/ Eng-spk maid, grt w/kids, references. old, gd watch dog, $100. Call collect 3682. coupe, red, ac, gd cond, $7,080. 286obo. 284-3590. 224-8775 LXI series stereo rack system w/tape fr19 base, 281a-0m101 fr 50-0311. n3 -------ft top, 4,d, 3986NinvanSun Reliable babysitter in my home. 286deck, receiver, amp, turntable, 2 spkrs 4993 Suzuk ,y, ex -d, 4 dr, ac (3'1.5'),cabinetincl,$325.284-3977. Doberman, black, female, alt shots, ac, 15,80 mile,, 5 npd, $6,600. 2891989 Honda Accord LXi, 57K miles, am/fmstereo, dtypd,$3,500/obo.2364 CCP registered. Gd watch dog, $20. 5960, 5 spd, loaded, ac, 4 dr, xc cond, 3099. Span-spking day maid, honest reli19" color tv w/remote & cable ready, Collect from base, 281-0101 for 50$10,00/obo. 284-3481. vacuum. 260-2169. 0311. 1989 Eagle premier 3.0 V6, 4spd, at, 1988 Jeep Commanche, 4x4, am/fm able, Two-three days awk. 286-4724. clean, sbarp, tinted wind, loaded, 323 Mazda 1989, 5 spd, ac, exc cond, cass Kenwood, ac, ps, pb, new tires, Bilingual maid, live-out, M-F, good IBM camp nideo game,, ton many to Cocker spanan pep, 6 .s old, fe$6,800. 289-3531. 2 dr hatchback, $5,10W. 284-3481. sport wheels, best offer. 261-6418 w/kid,, bonent reliable. 224-3887. list,_inenpenive. 284-3495. male, tan, $150/obo. 289-6431. 1987 BMW 316i, white, auto, exc 1982 Chvy p/u, exc cond, dty pd, l985SubamGL,4dr,5spd,tick,US Power music mobile disco, unlimited Sony Diskman,stillinbox,goodcond, Dalmations forsale, maleand female, cond, fully loaded, $8,900/obo. 263$4,000; 1987 Volkswagen Jetta, specs, gd cond, dry pd, $3,250. 256music for alt ages and events. 252$160. 284-5777. $150 C rh. 289-4166467i. $5,or .1-231 jv663 52 28 4671. $5,80. 252-2738. 6631. 5124 for Gabe. _ 21" Sony color tv, $75 & 21" Phillips Pit bull forstud service, ADBA regis1985 RaugerXL,on/offraadequipted, 1979 Mercedes 350SE, auto, ps, pb, 1993 S-10 Blazer, 4n4, pI, pw, 5 spd Babysitter gd w/kids, references.261 coor t, $75. 264-8427. tered. 239-4311. 4x4, lift kit, one of a kind, trick, Irk, ac, pw, am/fm cass, sun roof, $4000. automatic, 2,8 liter, $4,900.252-1190. 1236. Malc,2 d, nd $4,250/b.289-5942. 284-6699.---486DX338RAM,colorprinter,scanMale cat, 2 yrv old, declawed and -425/ob. 29 -5 .21992 Chevy S10 Tahoe, ext cab, w/ ner, SUGA monitor, software, tape fixed. 260-9303. 1985 Chevy Blazer, 5 spd, ps, pb, pw, 1989 Maxima, 5 spd, loaded, leather, camper liner, V6/4.31, auto, ac, ppb, -s&ckp & rack ball, 2,50/obo.286new tires, runs grt, gd body, $4,500. US Specs, onrowner, dty pd, $14,500. am/fm cass, exc cond, 26K miles, 4877. Pekipon puppies, 6 inks, dewnonmed' 289-4166. 261-1224. $1 1,580. 283-6785. $75. 264-0460 after 5pm. _ 283 -20'Makocenterconsolerw/trailer, 140 Panasonic radio & cd player w/reSeal Point Himalayan-Persian al 1990 Chevy Cavalier, 2 dr coupe, 5 1987 Mitsubishi Montero, 4wd, die1991 Camaro RS, 5 spd, am/fm cass, hpJohnson, outriggersand 90gal fuel mote, digital, good cond, $175. 284for stud service, CPA reg, proven. pd,an/fmcass, air, ps, pb, low miles, selatoac,am/fmpspb,pw,$7,50/ p, pb, low miles, new tires, $9,950. tank, best offer. 287-3492. 5777. fo tdsrie CArg rvn 7,500/obo. 264-3143. aba. 264-4491. 256-6838. 289-4354 eve1ngs. 1991 21' Drummond w/150 bp Black New Samsung 13" color tv r/remote, CPA -k 1983 Honda Accord, ps, ac, dty pd, 1986 Volvo 740 auto, am/fm, ps, pw, 1990 Volvo 740, ac, am/fm cass, p, Man, trailer and extra, $9,380. 284cable ready & antenna,$140/obo.284Areg Htmaayan-Persm ktttens standtraus,exccond,$3,700/.bo.233pb,gdcond,ac,$7,580/obo.264-4491. enc cond, $9,000. 226-6341. 5921. 4921. avail; flame-point and blue-point. 2890744, 4354 evening,. -------1992 Chev Blazer S10, white, ps, pb, 1972 Plymuth Duster, $800. 28716' Corsair Sunbird w/3.0L inboard AST 486/25 6mb, RAM, 85 mb hd, 1987 Caravan, ac, pb, ps, clean, oe 5 spd, ac, Tahoe interior, low nles, 6174. Mercruiser, fishfinder, m-radio, am/ mouse, sound blaster, joystick hookCbbby calico kit ten, neutered' cond, $6,200. 284-4183. $16,000. 286-4676. -fm cass, new trailer, runs gel, $6,500. up, star printer, various games & softitterbon trained, free. 283-4086. -_ ----1991 Nissan Maxima, loaded, leather 282-4722. ware, $1,100. 283-!470. Penbrter aquarium angel 0, dif1980 Volvo, 131K miles, runs gr, 2 1974 Ranchero p/u, dty pd, $1,180; seats, spoiler, 35K miles, Bose stereo Fereshwize $1.58 eag 25sh, difdr, auto trans, ac, not dty pd, $2,800/ 1975 Pinto, dy pd, $880; 1972 p/u, system, etc, $16,500.286-6346. 22'Molinan Patron w/20bpMercuSony CDP-35 cd player, exe cond, s nba. 282-3287. not dty pd. 283-3487. ry Black Man (40 rs use), bikini top, $80. 287-3536. 1978 Mercury Monarch, exc cond, etc., $15,000. 232-5241. 1993 Honda Integra, 4dr, 5spd, ac, 1987 Ford Escort GT, 5 spd, HBK, auto, ac, pm, ps, am/fm cass, dy pd, Panasoniccamcorder,paid$1,275,but shots, gor w/kid,, free, 283-6375. sunroof, 18K miles, 4 cyl, pl, pw, fm am/fm cass, new tires, 69K miles, gd bent offer. 232-6056. 19' open fisherman w/1994 90 hp sell for $635. 287-4020. Black and whitekittenfree. 287-3136. cass, fog lights, $18,600. 283-6425. cond, $3,580/obo. 284-4839. Yamaha (30 his use) fully loaded, DSP 6somad card, Milvumi dom, Fematedobermau,2yrsold,$50.2871986 Pontiac Fiero SE, V6, auto, pb, 1975 Buick LeSabre,grey, needs trans Available Lab Tec npkr, dos & window, soft5782. ac, performancesuspention, many ne w ik, dtypd,clean,$550/obe. 286-6439. 18' fish & ski boatw/120hpMercruiser ware & drivers, $300. 260-1580. parts, looks and uns grt, $6,700. 284lB motor, good shape, extras inel, Collie puppy, male, pare breed but ao 3996. 1978 Toyota Celica, ac, not dty pd, Bilingual woman seeks part time work $2,000. '60-4385, after 6 p.m. Panasonic component system w/turpapers, firstshots,81/2 wks old, $250. run, gd, $1,300. 286-6326. an maid, babysitter, or nffie worker. table, cs recorder & radio, $250. 261-3325. 1990 Nissan truck, 84K miles, exe 263-3665 for Mizia after 6pnm. 21'deep sea fishing bat, cabin sleeps 261-9808. cond, competition stereo, talking 1987 Chev Blazer S10, fully loaded, .2 4 cyl Perkins diesel, gaod cond, English bull terrier (Spud McKensie) alarmt, 5-star wheels, custom exhaust. 44, Tahoe package, $9,000. 286Mature dependable, trutrhy, bi-T-215A transceiver w puppies mate and female, white w/ 287-5582. 4676. lingual day maid for Albrook or ' ham & marine bands, $140; standard black eye,, brindle, red. 261-2994 afHoward. Ref provided. 286-4399. 15 hp outboard motor w/etras, $615. HX200 marine radio, needs battery, ter 6pm. 1987 Chevy Suburban R-tO 1/2 ton, 1990 Geo Tracker LSI, 4x4, ac, exe .287-4020. $60. 226-1158. 4wd, double ac, new tires, 55K miles, cond, 5spd, hard top, cass, split rear Bilngual maid,tive-nut,3daysarweek. Catabonla stud ready for breeding, dly pd, ex cond, $1 1,00. 252-5397. seat, $8,800. 287-5933. Exc w/kids. 204-3678. 1991 Eviurude 70 hp w/new 1994 Commodore Colt computer, IBM beautiful markings, 2 rs old. 261power head, all controls incl, $3,000. compact, exc cod, $300. 286-6477. 1224 1981 Mazda GLC, stand, ac, day pd, l986Nis4san8P4ar8NXpbaC, am/fm Experienced worker to fix or clea 'ir $2,100. 252-6768. eeeo, run, gd,$3,000/nbo. 286-4595. conditioning and other appliances 24 -----Reverb, receiver, integrated receiver Gray tabby kitten, 8 wks old, free. ours. Work guaranteed. 221-2834. Trailer-utility, 1/2 ton, steel frame, &dualcass,callfordetails.223-2483. 286-6179. 89 rd po ex ond o o d ade 1 000 7 ty Home repair, additions, woodwork, brglased 3x4 Cango aco sp1993aFordrProbeGT5,13K ieppids, ____a aercod 580 8o d odd $800 8 27 tire, wiring kit, $295. 268-9172, after IBM cenipat. 386/25, dual floppie, save money on PCS repairs, carpen64megram, svga, tuue, Windows 3.1, Automobiles -983 OldsCutn.sSupreme u oad try, plumbing, electric 284-6629. --.-Microsoft Office DOS 6.2, $1,280/ Suzuki Samaury, hard top, dy pd, ed, V6, auto, 2 dr, not diy pd, gd cond, Outboard tomr bracket, stainless obo. 286-4734. 4x4, $2,580. 252-8183. -stereo, $1,900/obo. 269-7770 ext Mature bilingual housekeeper, do sie, Ohp 1992 GSI Daewoo, 5 spd, am/fm, ac, ---1114. peudable, reliable, o gr d pI $11 , bn sem1 2r $ D/11srpkbrdd.h ,6tils live-out, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o. -Pre.28-69 ' ibnpaid $119.95, batsettfor$180. DualFsonkv iryelb ,6 car alar, gd mpg, I passenger, not 1907 Dodge Ram p/u, not dty pd, no live-ou, M-F, refs. 24-5629' 287-4020. wati, $25 each; Yorx sound speaker, diy pd, $5,600/obo. 286-3273. ac, low milage, exc cond, runs grt, 1993 Mitsubishi Eclipse, at, one own--$100. 286-4023. $4,000. 264-7779. or, 26K mites, runs go, GE rnarrnty, Iaircare, back from the US will, latest B 1987 Dodge Ram p/u, 59K miles, runs $15,0130/$17,000 duty. 287-5967. perms, colors, blondingand cats, 2846 galable $, & Benneti trim IBM comp, 386 sx dual drive, 1mb like new, well maintained, $4,000 1993 Nissan Bluebird, ac, auto, tined 4339. 6 g p $am, 50mhz, VGA oio, mouse 264-7779, wind,am/fm,alarmol 1992 HondaCivicCX, 26K tile,, air, --a ---66-16 printmr, s VA $mi0t. 28 u48 $13,2-7. 236-98. s rtick,Alpinestereo,$7,7(0.269-7669. Bilingual maid, honest, dependable, ---1975 Mercedes 230.6, ac, ps, new $------2 -984. ref avail. 229-1098 for Maria. Sga Genesis World Series Baseball, paint and body work, new tires and 1978 Volvo 244DL, ac, amt/frn cass, 1985 Dodge Ram Charger, 4wd, off--lIke new, $50. 252-1222, Carlos. rimsdualcarbs, diy pd, not US specs, gd cond, not diy pd, $2,300/obo. 285roadextras,ac,exccntd,$5,000.287Honesi, dependabe maid, live-on -e -$3,000. 261-1415. 6870 Room 218. 4475. 283-6393 for Ztleika Smith Corona wood procesornw Coipalers $225, priners $45, fan 8,000)LT,' 256K RA M, modem. & 3.5" machirnes $200, refurbished w/g.a1991 Maeda Miata cony w/hard top , manual trans' $2,000 1987 Chev Van, ac and auto, $6,0M. Bilingual day maid, Mon, Wed', a ds 2d5, 6 R M, pm de, $200. 287ntcef 230-0009. ac, at, low milaege, exc cond, alarm 1979 Monte Carlo, needs work, make 287-3497. Fri, reliable, honest. 266-8662. 5392. system , $17,000. 287-6233. offer. 283-5088. --.__ -1990 Ford Taurus GL, 36K m iles, V6, Spa -nspking tine-in m ai , honest, get 3-p T e s6 somupd , " .25 " l ids so1988 Montero, at, diesel, loaded, dty 1993 Ford Ranger p/u, ac, am/fm auto, ps, pb, am/fm can, $9,510/ob .w/kids, generalhousmork. 204-5024 d -pe cstereo sysem:c'dlramp, dem, 3.5" & 5.25" Of ppies, .4vga, pd, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ r $1,0,/ln 26-70 car aenrd roe $10020 8-4689. for Gnr.dbl Cacs, eq & tuner r/custom furn & muse, loin of siohrnare. $1,080. 284pd, $12,000/obo. 265700. Cass, powerside irros, $2,000.220287401 walt spkrs, best offer. 228-4294. 6222. 1986 Taurus,5spd,newac,dtypd, grt 1121. BMW 530i, US specs, gd cond, many Day maid, Span-spking, grt w/kids, Apple 20 computer, bent offer. 287New IBM ps2 m/new 131mg Seagate cond, $6,080/obo. 269-5780. 1985 truck D-100 w/camper shelt, new parts, $2,080. 286-6398. reliable. 284-3971. 6174. bd, $750. 230-X(8. 1991 Ford Explorer XLT, 4x4,4dr, ac, $2,50/b. 287-6739. 1985 Renault cony, ps, pb, 5 spd, 4 Teenage babysitter responsible r g stKenwood hinr $I00. 450 wat MUradio cass, dIty pd,$16.900.228-4061. 1988 Toyota Corolla, 1.3ce, at, ac, cyt,_ac, $2,380. 2854793. w/kid,, reliable and 1nest Avail MDen, Rock ford, Fse a ios & 5D pkrs (2) $325 air, brow stereo am/fm cass, low miles, dip pd, $5,480. 1987VWG 1.84cylcppb252ffter3pm a me k Ninendo. 287-3622. rack $50. 235-4096. Parts for 1987 Chevy cavalier,engine 261 6037 197 VW GTi, 81 4 Cyl, a. , ps, p, 5 25-2543 for T, N. C and trans for standard, fenders, spd, snroof $4,000. 285-4793. Matorea-2566838 Quasar VHS video camera, mel batCommadore 64 w/modem, keyboard, bumpers, window,, rack and pinion, 1992 Volvowagon 240,seats7, tinted 1985 Porsche 944, 5 spd, ac, sunroof, M -.-tery,rechargerhook-ups& hardcarry printer, mouse, disk drive, 2joysticks disCs and drums. 228-4061. wind, pl, pw, ac, am/fm cass, exccend all power, cd stereo, cruise, alarm, Eng-spkig maid, gd w/kid, reliable, Case, exC cnd, $625. 287-3682. & ganes, $1118. 284 3798. 1984 Dodge Daylona trebo, pb. pw, $2-.b. -.-260-7094. ----$11,000/obo. 284-4227. honest. Live-in. 266-3649. --Zenith 284 computer & keyboard w/2 Canon EOS 650 actic fa.cus camera ps, ac, new interior, $3,000/ob. 2611994 Daihatsu Charade, 5 spd, am/fn l983 Ford Bronco, fall size, ac, 4spd, Will babycit your home r min, day 3.5" disk drives, mouse,disks, n uo35-75 macro zoo, aii lens, 3001c 2053. cass. c,alarmgrtgastmileag,$5,40. roll bar, off-road kit, hitch, nice stecare oxp. 287-6187. als,MS Word, Student Ed, Lotus 1-2flashsoficaseblackbcdy.236-1256. 264-4105. 1991 Fcrd Escort LX, air, ps, pb, -o $7000 284-4227. Bilingual maid, M-F, 7am-3pm. Gd -2 -8 -,E1 digital keyboard /seai, 7x40n, ,ew tires, exe cord. original 1988 318i BMW, 2 dr, Eari spec, ac, 1982 Ford Escort, ex cnd, 4spd, ac, w/kidc, reliable, refcavail. 284-3627. Meisnui CD-ROM drive w/interface conid, $70. 284 348 1 own$7.50f/neg. 284 4125. a/fn Cass, shadow ire, vol dty pd, p--ner paint, lire, and batcard & lots of sCftware, $225. 289$8,801. 261-6119, 1s, snr. , d. pa29 i/n. r 2866h4. 1-Home care provider, full and par time. 5942. ,enwvldts ck yscemfull-scze 1979 L-vy Nova, ac, pscerebuilt en-Drp firs, CR I ccerw/ap, tuner e, dulccl ccpsn, i'ura" able. gino and breaks, gt cec, runs g.rt 1988 Pontic leMans, mint cond ac, 1986 Chrysler LeBarou GTS. loaded, cifrd. 283-6737 fcr Jill. Keoc dual truck spkes, $150 & cd. spks. $679. 287-5995.

PAGE 23

Tropic Time *Classified Ads ___ _B NewSegaGenesisw/1ogames,$250. Lrm$750;queensizebedsetw/framee, 24,000 Fedders a/c, $350; 21,000 book, almost new, $45. 226-7168. Little Tykes oys.252-2343. Qrrs 609A Howard, Sam-noon. 282-4635. box spring & mat $450, all exc coed. Freidrich oC, $350; 9,000 Westing264-5t60, Mikeafter7 p.m. oe ac, $t95. 252-2287. Brand new football visor, clear color, Carpet pad, 700sqft,$50, fencetoft Qrs 102B Albrook, 6:30am. IBM 386sx/25mhz, pb sugar monitor, $20. 286-3630. across carport, wood framed 12x3 w/ Qtrs 62EA Clayton, 7amgame/joystick hookup, Epson lx-86 Sofa/love seat wi/dark flowered patWindow ac,esc formaid'sqtrs, $100. gate, $25. 286-6179. printer & more, $875/obo. 286-4428. tern in mint coed $1,000/obo; baby 284-4595. Elec water eater, $70, air purifier,Rios, 7-1 m. tbarh $4; toddler clothes. 287-6187. $150, store display cabinet, wood/ 3 formal dresses for rent, peach, pearl, Keewood 350 wal pwr amp $200, Blue neliner $300, Whirlpool porng1.ss $100. 226-8626. sm & med szs. 286-6384. Qtrs 610 Balboa equalizr$150, Tdy tv monitor $51. Mother pearl end tables $300; Ko ran be dish w er $200, Almia fereazir 235-4096 detailed Cces set $35. 283-4483. $450, quen sizeofa bed, $525. 296Portble Craft center, $15, IN saw,. '84'Toymo auto transission, 5spd, Qtrs 1545C Howard. -----t 3 23 -4023. $45, printer stand, $15, rattan wine $250/obo. 289-4984. ----New Sega games: Streets of Rage. GE XL44 gas range, like new, hook rack, $10, spot light lamp, new, $40 -Qtrs I 16B Howard, 7-I1 am. Castleania II, Altered Beas , ups inel, $350. 282-3030. 3 pc glass Coffee table set, brss ad 252-2042. Ford T-bird car cover, $15. 287-4428. Spider Snies Super Chas HQ mood $ 287 5595 Qtrs 46B Howard, 7am-ooon. ea7,00bta/c$225;6,0btu/c$ Victoria Secret bathrobe, new. $30, Ford cyl heads will fit 289 & 302, $30 ah b873074. 256-6830. , mtaernity clothes sz make offer. 287-6484. Qtrs 429C Kobbe, 8-I10w. -ew ladies shoes, sz 3.252-2042. GE refrigerator, 19 c Itd,ao e ____ ___x----Seed spreader, pots & planters, TV, Qrs 953 La Boco, 8am-noon. cond, $450. 226-2012. Baby ca, s, $45, high chair, $29, reel to reel tape deck w/2 spkers, all Ch ekbook, brown cover, Air Acade grn rg 9x12, $30, umbrella stroller, exc cond. 223-7437 after 5pur. Qtrs 667A Howard, 7am-eooe. Young, oange, nale cat on Fort Espi6-pc den set, like new, $350. 252ny Federal Credit Union, at Clayton $15. 260 5386. Qtrs 6406A Los Rios, 7-I et. nar. 289-4834. 3260. Ir Howard. 260-8239 ----Ladies/ee Clothng, cortas, mis, 6406ALosRios,7-1 Slr1boa d6', 6'3, sn ondcstm items, all e cod. 223-7437. Qtrs49A Clayton,7-Ilaw. Dirette set, $2001/ob. 284-6184 d $250$300 25250264 Clayton, 7a. MisCe ine us Kennoredryer,largecap,whrite,h y Radiaor,2Core,wIl fit6or8cyGM otorcycls duty, $150. 286-6293. cars, truCks, $50 283-3485. Qtrs 6322 Los ris, 8aw-2pm, King mattress in good cund, $75. 286-Waterbed heater, $75, Mr. Coffee 12 6477. GE23.5 cu ft refrigerator, white, good cup coffeemaker w/24 hr timer. 286Wilson fielder baseball glove forright Harley avidsonnoocycles ideg cond. $525; sofa bed & love seat w/ 4399. hand, $35. 252-2211. jacket w/frge, all weather, bstoffe. W Mise fnreiture,goodquality, exc cond; oak trim, $900. 261-4702. -------284-4294. book shelves; dinette sets; electric piToro self-propelled mower, get cond, Yonx adx 300 woods 1, 3, 5, new, an; & more. 287-6233. Blue 9x12 carpet $45; Hitachi console $350; edger 3.5 Briggs/Sratto, grt $500. 252-3260 8-4pm. 993 Honda Shadow deluxe, backrest, Baby bed, playpen, good upright vactv $400; mirowave stand $50. 286cond, $125; weedeater, hvy dty, $95; widshield, helmet, vest, low m, exc Lim, reasonable price. 283-3220. 7-pc Bassett bedroom set, solid wood, 4893. 2 Briggs/Statton rugs, $90ea. 283Rock cds, $6-$5. 221-4977. coed, $3,800. 284-6327. white n/gold trim, no bed, $1,200/ 3220. Day maid 3 days C week, bilingual, obo. 284-5833. Whirlpool dryer, 5 temp/3 speed, --Ecyclopedia Britannica, 39 vols, 1985 Honda Elite 80cc, good cond, cleaning, cooks, honest w/refs. 233cream, needs heating element. 283LadiesI8k3colorgoldnecklace,$800. Comptons encyclopedia, 35 vols, exc new parts, $500, car cover 19-20'. 4616. Sofa,light bledesign, likenew, $600. 6737. 226-8576. cond. 252-6566. 252-2145. 269-5700. Bilingual day maid, full time, reliable, Dishwasher,portable,goodcond,$90. Huffy 18 spd mt bike, 4 mos old, like Sm block Chevy parts, intake maei1993 Honda CB250 Nighthawk, honest, good w/kids, hard working, Wrought iron terrace furniture, suit282-3580. new, $175. 286-3371. fold2bbl,bare cast iron head castings, 430mi, new bike, helmet incl, $2,000/ refs. 260-38 15. cases, sofas, wore. 223-8159, after 5 $20 set. 283-3485. obo. 286-3399. p.w Heavy duty, lrg cap washer, like new, Baby crib/bed, w/5 drawers, $450, FSU BSC 1005 lab book no written in $350. 236-3099. baby car seal, $50. 223-7829. 2 new box springs, $75 ca. 252-2314. Blk Hondaelite scooter, elec start, 370 please. 287-4438. Bedroom set, real oak/antique pecan mi, $1,800. 287-5680. finish w/chest. 2 ns, triple dresser & White toddler bed w/waterproof matt, Four new tires 185/60R13 w/rims, 2pC LR sect, $600/nba, 12 volts pwr Lg outdoor picnic tl, benches, mtdmirror, F/Q headboard, $1,500 firm; side rails & toy/linen trays for under $160. 282-3793. wheel, 4-wheeler, $150. 286-4893. 1987 Yamaha 200cc, US specs, duty erately pricedwillpicknp.287-5489. Q matsprings, like new, $395. 283bed, like new, $150. 287-5291. pd, low mi, $1,000. 286-4628. 32.FSU books, BSC 1005w, enc 1101 Dinette flit,4chrs. $175, Clothes anrd Special dogforteddler& cats, house3220. Like new matching sofa $800 & love Bedford&enc 1101 workinprogress, other misc items. 286-4481. 1976 Montessa 348 Coda trials bike, broken & trained. 283-5631. Oak & glass living room tables ( seat $600; full sie mnatt & box spring used once. 287-4438. -good coed, grbs grt, many spare parts, Coffee & 2 ends), lessithan I yr old, w/frnne $200. 287-502L1. Golf equip, hag, Clubs, cuirt, moare, $750/abe. 261-2550. Day maid, $15day, M-F,housectean$14 & 2 Official size ping pong tbl, $50. 284good cond, best offe 2632240. Ing or babysitting, fle hrs or days. $140. 286-4882. -Carpets: 12x22 & tan$70; 7xi2& tan 4733. 1981 Honda CB750K, helmet, saddle 284-6381. King sire Blackwood waterbed w/ W;7xI 12&white$35; stepper exer Sportscards sets, 20% off Beckett bags rns good, $750 287-6173 waveles att, dresser & mir, Like cise machine $100/b; plants 282 Snapper lawn mower, 3.5hp self-proguide, superstar, rookies. 287-3097. Gardener for panting, weeding, Cutews$750/n, 284-5269.Bra rw 3783. pelled w/bag, $275. 284-4733. 1982 Yamaha Maxim 100c, needs uing grass, minor repairs w/refs. 261$ /7RCA csl Color 25" TV, $300, TCI, $600 firm.287-98. 7769. GE gasstove$525;Roperheavyduty Recriner,goodcoud,$158.226-2012. SharpVCR,$150,Kennexsuperwide parts, 4 tires w/ims sz 15", lamp, washer $425; prices neg. 283-3485. racquetbatlr$cque5,$65. 284-3356Rm curtains. 252-2730. 1955-56 Cristobal High School gradMatching tan sofa & love seat w/oak 322. Wedin dres suationremembrancebook.252-6989. 3-pc mirror set 15"x35" & oak golf trim, oak coffee table, Car table, 11oor Wedding dress sx 7/8, 32B cup, $75, -imri ------5 689 hail display case for 25 balls. 286tiokcfe aledtbe lo b5 lamp&tancarpet s2r22,$L220b/sbo. Boy'sbikegoodcond,$25.284-3184. wht/gold wedding ring set, $100, dog Air conditioners for parts, any sz or 4935. 2amp & -aro 12x22, $5,200/obp. traveling kennel, $20. 284-6222. Qtrs 1028B Clayton, 7am-? cond. 252-2287. __________________282-3783. Two P2O5/75Rl15tires w/rim, I spare. Whirlpool 25.7 cubic ft refrigeraror/ 9x 2 rusty red carpet, must sell before 223-6105. Little Tykes gym, teeter totter, arfiQtrs 1995B Curnndu, 7am-6pm. Refrig, med sz, in good cond, reasonfreezer, ice maker, maser/ice dispensNov. 1 $70 260-9303 cial Christmas, Army boots, rocking Qrs 1532D Howard, 7-1I am. able prce. 261-7140. erserva-door, beige, $550.252-6869. ' $ -9 Men's wedding band, sz 10 w/nuggets horse & child's pool. 287-4478. Danish entertainment set, Danish & 5 shot diamonds, 6 mos, new, neg. Qnrs 541C Clayton, 7am-lpm. Camper shell for full se Dodge p/n 4-tier bookcase in/glass shelves, hick lin~i-$528-ok, Ms6. 87-4020. 4 oksew /gs.she6 esbk white corner lamp, Danish dresser w/ 287-3088 Rm 308. Boy's 20" bike, almost new, $65.282& gold, new, $00. 286-6124. 3228. Qt-s 133711 Amador, 7am-noon. China, s word processor & printer. 7 1/2 & 9 tycoon Fin-nor reels w/ MatureChristianwomanseekingfurn Country blue Barclaysofa w/4 match236-0984. match Fin-norrods, exc cond, $1,800. Video card w/IMB memory/windows, Qtes 607A Clayton. room near canal area, up to $200 io. i pillw 4 ms old, scotchguard eds $1 a, chest of ers 252-2080. $100, 19" color TV, $150, oak desk, 286-3773. fabric protector, paid $600, will ac$80. 252-2955. Qtrs 824 Farfan, 7am-noon V $100, areez er stove $ W Force outboard motor, new, $500.282Weekendmaid, Sat-Sunneves, takeear TV $50, all in superbpcond. 223-3645 5630. Wedding gown, veil, 3-ring wedding QIrs 6306C Farfan, 8am-? of 3 boys. 252-5853. 9'x12' blue carpet w/rnbber hacking, after 6pm. set. cake sop, flowers, candle, all good cond, $50. 223-5843. , 10 gal fish tank w/light & complete $1,000 orseparmte. 286-6134. Qts 45A Albrak, 8amMembersof Beta Sigma Pi interestBea VCR w/00 tapes, 9' colar TV, set, $30. 284-5777. Qtrs 317A Kobbe, 7am-noon. ed in joining an active chapter in PanMini-blinds, 3-sets, new, never used, 2 girls bikes, Germtan ao/utch, 3 Washer/dryer,$100, refrig, $500, freer. ama. 228-4514 Mary. fir tropical 2-story base housing winperson rnber boat, Panasonic stereo Kenmre refrig/fzer, 26 cuf, ice/wa$500, IBM XT, printer, sn, $200. 252Qts 73A Howard, 7am. P dows, $30 each. 286-4935. speakers and CDplayer. 287-3685. ter dispenser, $950; washer/dryer, 2033. People interested in 1oguberger has$400; babystroller,$35;carseat, $40, Qtrs 1536F Howard, 8am. hers. Christmas brochure now availKitchen table w/2 bench-style sears, Whirlpool refrigerator, white, 14 feet' y able. 284-4239. $150. 284-6489. execond, Syrs old, $425. 269-3538. encyclopedia sets, all $4. 260-7084. Carpet shamupoo machine, equip w/ a_2443 _ _ $ 75'. 28-49_x dys ,$2.2933dry cleaning sys. 230-0008. Qtrs 315A Albrook, 7am-noon. Weight bench w/ms, one long bar, -Typewriterelec forstudentfEng-Spa. Girls bedroom set $250; wart & has Sofa, ligh bluedesigelikenew,$600. dumb ell bars, approx 360 lbs, $350. WOH 1023 FSU history book, $30. Qrs 149 Gamboa, all day. 252-2355. $350; coffee & side tables $50; boy's 269-5700. 261-4702. 260-3270. bike $70; girl bike $75; Q box spring Kis 575B Howard. _$ S27e"e f .acquetballo weekday, $30. 287-4877 King size waterbed, $210/-bo. 223Me3' 27"p bike, exr Cold, IS Pd, Wordprocesso,$100, miniblindfr 4-5pm, Claytstn/Howard, internedi2483. $125. 286-4981. single&dblwidewindows.282-4691 Qtrs1337BAm r,7am-noon ateskills,femalepef.261-2 Nicki. Simmons light brown baby crib .w/ Sofa, Q3 cushAirokonw-oo Simmons h r baby ner Sofa, 3 cushion, like new, $500/obo; Surfboards, 7'50, 6'10, 6'6, all new. Men'spro western fByerrmrsbike, new, Qtrs 280B Albrk, &-noon. Span-spk live-in maid, Ig house, 2 ."it, $150 286-6 32. small glass cube table, $50; storage 243-5777. 12 spd, $100. 236-5145. Qes 5500 Howard, 7am-noon. kids, cook, clean, iron, M-Sat. 286box cube w/drawers, $35. 228-4514. --___ _550BHoward,__-c _ 4896. Queen sizesofasleeper& Queen Anne Yamtaha electrone HX-3 electric orIbanez elec guitar, $300. 236-5145. Qis 723A Clayton. chair$850; Oster kitchencenter S100, 1Large Whirlpool washer/dryer, exc gan all functions & foes., 2 spkCrs, Eng-spk live-in maid, care for 7 yrold randl, sold as a set, 450. 236-3099). gas allne fucton &oo toes 2 vpkers, all like new. 226-8516. 'cod, oldas se, 45. 2 .musi disk recorder, $12,000. 264IC Penney 25" color TV /remote Qtrs 801 Clayton, 7am. boy, cook, clean, iron, 5 days a wk, -8427. $300. 286-4378. inceel wkends. 286-4692. Custom-made bedroom furn, solid Sofa sleeper, queen srze, etc cond, .7Qirs 206A Albrook,7-Ilam. ----------. -6 ----mahogany, ind triple dresser, 2 mir$600. 284-3481. Transmrission, auto, 5 spd,'84Toyota, Bedfords handbook for wriig en, Live-in maid, cook, clean, iron, 5 1/2 roes, 2 es, F/Q headhbard. chest, Sofa, Chair, lamrp and curtains. 252$250/obo 289-4984 1101 FSU, $15.260-3270. Ques 3331 Clayton, 8-I ltam days a wk, refs req. 252-6146. $2,400; Queenma/springs, firu, like 2568. new, $395. 283-3220 -----------Ladies Huffy Il spd touring hike, Twin bukcase, headlruard and uat$95, ren's 10 spd Huffy bike, $65, 29 cu Amana refrig/freezer $1,18)0; tresses, $250; esser $100, excc. urtd 21,500 but an, $ 80. 24-3437. teak ent Cutr w/ hutch $1,70; dinette 286-354L set $700; more. 287-6233. ----Plants, all sizes & prices, Nintendo Tropic Times Ad Form Blue curaius $15, Kenwore micr games $12 e. 236-P984. Sofa, love seat, Chair & 2 end tablet $150, swing set $35. 252-2028. 2---ckey--------c---f-rt-r-& ----N---L--_---_ -_ $1,200; Full size bed& dresser/mirror 2 Mickey Mouse twin Comforer & ANIMALS $100. 287-3531. GE 19.6 CU FT refrig w/ inside ice curtains, Nintendo & games, gamte [] AUTOMOBILES maker $750, bedroom set w/ hutch Genie, 10 spe bike, boy's bike, baby Li AVAILABLECountry blue recliner in good cmud, and lights, solid pine, $1,100. 252_ stroller. 261-1638. F BOATS & CAMPERS -_ ----. . $150. 284-5777. 2128. _ya ELECTRONICS PRICE HOME PHONE --.TadyTXcomIputer&softwaire,$250' E] FOUND ofas (2), coffee table & queen sie Full size white whicker headboard, scanner, $100, games progas r HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person ech waterbed. 260-2169. $50. 282-3497. sale or trade, obo. 252-5430. [ ] LOST week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited Carpets, never used: medium teal; 2 sofas brown and gray, $200 and Specialty baskets, can be ourderd in ] MISCELLANEOUS more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed manve/whire, $7.50 per sq ft. 260$400; coffee table $150; queen size rime for the holidays. 260-3533 after ] MOTORCYCLES below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This 5220. --waterbed, $175; 19" color TV, $175. 6pm ] PATIO SALES information will not be released to third parties. Deadline for the receipt Recline; queen sire rears; full size 260-2169 Fisher Price baby tub, Cottoon 30m tt WANTED of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are run ott a space R available basis and the staff makes no guarantee of ads running. Ads mast matt & box spring; GE refrig 24 cu ft; Sofa and love seat excond, $500; spkers, NEC micro computer keybd, include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Tie.v, washing machine. 252-2180, almost new boys 20" hike, $65. 282drafting chr. 287-4182. Unit 0936, APO AA 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrok Pst 6'sprce art Christmastee$100;red3_2__ 12-_ _ Westone guitar, crate G15 amp, $350. Office. Ads offering weapons, reel estate or sent by FAX will not be woodpinic table$100;small entense 30x60 meeal desk $130, 30x40 glass 284-5355 West. run. $50. 287-502L. top dinette table $150, 40x,60 able Ai.odtoig ~-olopl $15. 27-021 tup$in2tntale26I, 0x05tbl Air conditioning service and repair SPONSOR'S NAME RN!RD Rattan furn, carpets, drapes, more, all $120. 226-1158----for houses and any kind of cars, low. .........M RANKIGRADE like new, at Howard. 284-5238. 4 yr old couch, loveseat, $600 for prices. 228-0201. ORG DUTY PHONE brth; blur decline lyr old, $270. 284F basic C ORG. DUTY 110N Bedroom set: black lacquer w/gold 6239. FSU basic college algebra, war 1112

PAGE 24

B1~ Tropic Times ~p u r _ _ _ _ B12 Oct 14,1994otpou = i~llilllililn-in the dining room. HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming Friday evenings in the lounge include beer specials, veteran preference, a copy ofcollege transcripts ifclaiming eduQuarry Heights music, games and club card drawings. cation and a copy of CASP notice of rating if applicable. Sub*Officers' Club: 282-3439 Oriental night 6-8:30 p.m. today. mit a copy of latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee. The club will be closed to the public for renovations Barbecue plate special 6-8:30 p.m. Oct. 21. For more information regarding Army vacancy announcethrough Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be Dining room is closed Sunday through Thursday. ments (forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Direcavailable 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Addition*Howard Enlisted Members' Club -Dining Room: torane of Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and 284-4189 or call 285 5201. during lunch hours 11:30 am.-1:30 p.m. Sunday breakfast buffet 8-12:30 a.m. *Note: One-on-onc employment counseling should be the Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30 first step in the job search. Am ador a.m. Saturdays. SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at NM-5 level New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade and above require specialized experience. Specialized experi*Club Amador: 2824334 roast beef, turkey, turkey salad and tuna fish sandwiches. ence is either education above the high school level or work exAll-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. perience directly related to the position being filled. Example: soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights. Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Select a Budget positions at or above the NM-5 level required Budget Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or fillet. All steaks are experience or equivalent education at noon the first Sunday of each month. U.S. choice beef. Vacancy announcements are also available at the Sundial The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during Family menu Tuesdays-Fridays featuring all the favorRec cationrateo.Civilian Personnet is accepting applications renovations of the Quarry Heights Officers' Club. ites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand made 1/2 on a continuous basis for the following positions. Registers esClayton pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more. tablished from these announcements will be used to fill permaBang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or nent and temporary positions. *The Loop: 287-3035 take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or hot wings. CJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom : 284VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most clerical Mondays-Fridays. At 3:30 p.m. Sundays pool tournaments. 4189 position). Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music WednesFriday night disco 4:30 p.m.I a.m. today. position). days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sunday. Membership night 5 p.m. Oct. 22. Complimentary ItalVB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk srh) For events or parties at the Pizmz Night Club or CJ's ian buffet for members and one guest; $6.95 for additional Sports Bar, call 287-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343. guest. Children 6-12 , $3 and children under 6, free. CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required. *NCO Club: 2874716 *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove: The Forum Restaurant opens 5-9 p.m. daily. 284-4189 VB#003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Cert Mexican buffet Mondays. + 6 mu recreation exp in the field. Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays. VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Requires 6 mos Steak night Tuesdays. A la carte menu is available. Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m-I a.m. recreation exp in the field. Country buffet Wednesdays features barbecue pork ribs, Monday night football and mug special in the lounge. VB# 005 Secretary (Sienography), NM-5 fried chicken, pork knuckles, collards greens, sweet potato, Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcorn and nachos. VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6 rice, black-eyed peas and com bread. Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 8 p.m. Tuesdays. VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5 All-you-can-eat family buffet Thursdays. Free Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-S Seafood buffet Fridays features broiled lobster, garlic Wednesdays in the Casual Cove. Lear the latest in line danepermanent status employers only. shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab. ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midVB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6. Limited 12-oz prime rib special Saturdays. night. to permanent status employees only. Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m. Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with The following positions are Penn/temp. Putt-time, Part-time, Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Sunyour favorite draft beverage and go back for refills. Te e n days and Mondays. Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays; 5 p.m.Disco 9 p.m. Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. There midnight Thursdays. VB# 007 MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14. will be a midnight buffet. Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. VB# 008 CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license required), NMInternational food fair/enlisted membership drive 5 *Top Three Club: 2844189 9/101E. p.m. Oct. 27 includes food tasting, cooking demonstration, Karaoke 6 p.m. Fridays. N I 009 M5 PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required), wine tasting, recipes and door prizes. Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesdays. Free all-you-can-eat and VB# 019 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, NMAlbrook complimentary taco bar. 640-4/5/6. Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. Members *Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582 must have a card and be present to win. Selectees for nurse, medical officer and EMT positions will Tonight's entertainment karaoke in the lounge and club Club closed Saturdays. undergo a background check, card drawing. Howard/Albrook Officers Spouses' Club annual fall Rodman Pacific baar1 m.3pmStudy VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 10-14azaar 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Rodman Club -Open to all ranks: 2834498 94 CLOSE: 10-25-94 Saturday afternoon football 2 p.m. in the lounge with bar service. Bring your boss nite 6-9 p.m. with complimentary hors 024-95-MW METAL TANK AND RADIATOR REPAIRER, Sunday saloon breakfast specials 10 am-i p.m. in the d'oeuvres served 5-7 p.m. DJ. music 6:30-11 p.m. MG-03858-9. DOL, Maintenance Div., Shop Ops, Allied Trades, lounge. Choose from three menus. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 1 a.m.-I Corozal. NOTE: Driver's license required. Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-l p.m. in the dinp.m. Mondays-Fridays. 027-95-LA TELECOMMUNICATION SPECIALIST, NMing room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, Monday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with all391-9/11. SENSITIVE. 106th Signal Brigade S-3, Operation Div., roast beef, fresh fruits, breakfast and lunch items and ice you-can-eat taco bar 6-9 p.m. at the Laguna Lounge. Network Br., Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Security clearance is required. cream bar. Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Grill menu Mongolian barbecue & The Caribbean Connection is also available. 028-95-JH SUPPLY TECHNICIAN, NM-2005-6. Temp Nre: 1 5:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Choose the meat, vegetables, seaAll-you-can-eat fried chicken 4:30-8:30 p.m. WedYear. TOBYHANNA Army Depot, Corozal. sonings, oils and have chefs do the job outside on the open nesdays. Grill menu is also available. 384A-94-JH COMPUTER SPECIALIST, NM-334-11. grills. Enjoy the sounds of the tropics by a steel drum band. Open Mike night 6-11 p.m. Thursdays in the Laguna SENSITIVE. HQ, SOCSOUTH, Albrook.NOTE: Top Secret Lombardi a la Italiana 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. A taste Lounge. clearance is required. Shift Work. Travel in support of exercises is of Italy at your favorite club dining room. Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays required. Incumbent is subject to receive and respond to Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursdays includes at the Rodman Bohio. unannounced calls to report to work. Those who applied under VB# tacos, fajitas, taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. After dinFine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. 394-94-JH,.need not .,apply. ner dance the night way to country western music. Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-9 030-95-JH MANAGEMENT'ANALYST, NM-343-7. Trump Ne: Country western night Thursdays with free dance lesp.m. Fridays-Saturdays. 09-30-95. DODDS-Panama District, Director's Office, Albrook. sons at 7:30-10:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. 9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays. 031-95-JH BUDGET ANALYST, NM-560-11. SENSITIVE. * Rodman Annex: 283-4498 DCS, Resource Management Program, Budget Div., Ft. Clayton. Howard Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays. 032-95-ES (8) DENTAL ASSISTANTS, NM-681-4. Tetmp Nte: *Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718 All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu I1 a.m.6 Months. Joint Task Force, Safe Hiaven, Camunp One. NOTE: Weekday lunches includes buffet, salad and potato bar. 1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. Knowledge of English/Spanish. Shift Work. Friday and Saturday nights 6-8:30 p.m. order a la carte The club is closed for evening and weekend service. 033-95-ES LIBRARY TECHNICIAN, NM-1411-6. USAMEDDAC, GACH, Ancon. NOTE: Limited to MEDDAC/ DENTAC permanent eptloyees; however applications for Tenmp Nue: 30 Sep 95, will be accepted from all sources. 1-2pm Protestant Confirmation 034-95-ES SANITARIAN, NM-688-9. USA-MEDDAC, GACH, Pacific Gorgas Hospital Preventive Medicine Svc., Environmental Health Sec., Ancon. B n , e -5507t Note: Bilingual Building 254, P'hone: At2-ntic Amador Chapel 12:15pm Daily Catholic Mass (2nd floor) Davis Chapel 035-95-ES OPERATING ROOM NURSE, NM-610-9. Shift Building 108, Phone: 282-3610 Weekday worslhip (As anBuilding 32, Phone: 289-3319 Work. USA-MEDDAC, GACH, Dept of Nursing Operating Room, 8:30a Catholic Mass (Sunday) bounced) 11:30am Catholic Mass (Tuesday-Friday) Nursing Svc., Ancon. NOTE: U.S. license required. Limited to 9:30am CCD Catholic, Building 109 Albrook Chapel Noun Catholic Spanish Mass (Sunday) MEDDAC/DENTAC permanent employees; however applications (Sunday) Building 860, Phone:1284-3948 l:30pt Protestant Hispanic Service for Temp appointment Nie: 30 Sep 95, will be accepted from alt oam Episcal Worhip Service am Spnis Catholic Mass (Sunday) (Sunday) "uorc(Sunday) 8a pans ahlcMs Sna)(ud 9am Confessions (Sunday) Sherman Chapel 036-95-NC ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT ASSISTANT Clayton Chapel 9:15am Catholic Mass (Sunday) Building 152, Phone: 289-6481 (OFFICE AUTOMATION), NM-303-6. USAG, DEE, Contracts Building 64, Phone: 287-5859 9:45am Protestant Sunday School 8:30am Collective Protestant Worship Div., Corozal. NOTE: Qualified Typist. Limited to permanent 11:30amDaily Catholic Mass 11am General Protestant Service (Sunday) employees only. spun Catholic Mass (Saturday) Howard Chapel loam Protestant Sunday School 8:45am Collective Protestant Service Building 500, Phone: 284-3948 037-95-NC PURCHASING AGENT (OFFICE AUTOMA(Sunday) 11:3kam Daily Catholic Mass Espinar Chapel TION), NM-1105-6. USAG, Directorate of Contracting, Purchasing 11:30au Catholic Mass (Sunday) 4:30pm Confessinus (Saturday) Building 224, Phone: 289-4616 Div., Corozal. 10:30am Protestant Sunday School (Sun5pm Catholic Mann (Saturday) 9am Catholic English Mass (Sunday) dayBudlding 156, 287-347) 9:30am General Protestant Service (Sun9am Protestant Sunday School at 038-95-NC CONSTRUCTION INSPECTOR, NM-809-7. HQ, 12:30pm Gospel Service (Sunday) day) Espinar Elementary USAG, DEE, Conuracus Div., Contract Svc. Br., Quality Assurance 5:30pm CCD Catholic, Building. 156 11am Catholic Mass (Sunday) 10:15am CCD Catholic Sunday School at Sec., Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Driver's license required. (Sunday) 12:30pm Gospel Service (Sunday) Espinar Elementary 6pm Evening Service (Sunday) 10: l5am Collective Protestant Worship 040-95-KF COMPUTER ASSISTANT, NM-335-6. SENSITIVE. Rodman Chapel (Sunday) Temp Nie: 1 yr. IQ, SOUTHCOM, SCJ6, Aulomaued Systems Corozal Chapel Building 40, Phone: 283-4148 1130pm Gospel Sunday School Div., Ft. Anador. Building 112, Phone: 285-6717 8-9am Catholic Mass 12:20p. Gospel Service (Sunday) Atlantic 7:30pm Jewish (first Friday of month) 10-11am General Protestant Service (Sun6:30pm Gospel Bible Study (Sunday) 039-95-ES PHARMACY TECHNICIAN, NM-661-5. Temp lam Hispanic Catholic Mass (Sunday) day) Nie: 30 Sep 95. USA MEDDAC-Panamua, GACIL Sherman Hteall 1pm Pentecostal Worship (Sunday) 11:15am Protestant Communion (Luthern Islamic Prayer Services 12:30-1:30 p.m. FriClinic, Ft. Sherman. 7pm Sunday School (Friday) Tradition) days, Furt Clayton Chapel. 287-5859.