Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
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Full Text



.�gift, of the -Pa-nama (lanall Mi~scur


Tropic


Times


Vol. VIL No. 40


Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Friday, Oct. 7, 1994


Soldier dies on the
Bridge of Americas
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - A U.S.
Army South soldier was killed in an automobile
accident on the Bridge of the Americas Sunday
morning.
Sgt. David Brooks of Company A, 154th Signal
Battalion, was pronounced dead at Gorgas Army
Community Hospital.
Investigations have shown that Brooks' vehicle
collided with a Panamanian bus that was traveling
towards Howard AFB. Eight people on the bus
were slightly injured.
The incident is still under investigation by U.S.
and Panamanian authorities.

Empire Range road
plagued with wrecks
RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) - Because
of frequent accidents and speeding on Bruja Road
enroute to Empire Range, security officials here
are using radar equipment on vehicles using the
road.
Lt. Jim Jolliff, Rodman security officer, said 90
percent of the accidents on the road are because of
speeding.
"In the past week, we have stopped two vehicles
in excess of 80 miles per hour and one was clocked
at 98," he said.
The speed limit on the road is 40 mph, except
adjacent to the Cocoli housing area where the limit
is 25. There are speed limit signs posted in the area,
Jolliff said.
Jolliff said some of the accidents have involved
government vehicles and people have suffered
injuries.

Atlantic exchanges
announce hours
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO - Atlantic) -
The new or current hours of operation for Atlantic
Army and Air Force Exchange Service facilities
are as follows:
Fort Davis
*Post Exchange: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Saturday,
10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday.
*Shopette (Building 32): 8 a.m.- 11 p.m. Monday-
Sunday.
*Small Shopette and Gas Station: 7 a.m.-6 p.m.
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.
*Military Clothing Sales: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-
Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
*Cafeteria (grill only): 6:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-
Friday, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.
*Anthony's Pizza: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-Sun-
day.
*Auto Parts Store: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Fri-
day, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday.
Fort Sherman
*Post Exchange and Shopette: noon-6 p.m. Mon-
day-Sunday and 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Sunday
during Jungle Operations Training Battalion rota-
tions.
Fort Espinar
*Shopette: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Tuesday and
Thursday-Saturday, Closed Wednesday and Sun-
day.
+Toyland: noon-6 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday; and 10 a.m.-6
p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.





Army and Air Force Exchange Ser-
vice, commissaries set Columbus
Day holiday hours.


Cubans found

Camp residents discovered in Santiago


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
JTF-Safe Haven Public Affairs Office


EMPIRE RANGE - Two Cubans from Community
Camp No. 1 who were discovered missing from the camp
Tuesday were located and detained Wednesday in Santiago,
Panama, by Panamanian officials.
Ruben Brito Urra and Jorge Luis Morales Capiro were
discovered by Panamanian National Police and identified
by their camp ID cards which were still in their possession,
officials said. One other Cuban found with them hasn't
been identified, but was also detained
Once the two were discovered missing, Panamanian
government and U.S. Embassy officials were notified and
a search was immediately initiated.
It is not known for sure how the two left the camp, but
it is suspected that they climbed the fence, said Brig. Gen.
James Wilson, JTF-Safe Haven commander. It is known
that they left during the hours of darkness.


The two Cubans were returned to the camp Wednesday.
Panamanian and U.S. officials are determining what ac-
tions, if any, will be taken, officials said.
"We will review the circumstances behind why they left
and the risks to Panamanians, U.S. citizens and Cubans at
the camps if they are returned to the living area," Wilson
said. "Only after reviewing the situation will we make a
determination as to what actions will be taken."
Though this incident has resulted in U.S. servicemen
reviewing the security procedures at the community camps,
Wilson assures everyone that the U.S. military will not
create an atmosphere of a prison within the camps.
"We are continuing to work with the Cubans to improve
the quality of life within the community camps and will
continue to respect their human rights," he said. "The
Cubans here are not prisoners, but we expect them to
respect the dignity of the Panamanian people who have
offered them temporary shelter and humanitarian assis-
tance."


Senior Airman Tom Franz (JTF Safe Haven)
Cubans at Camp No. 1 display a sign that says "we will return to Cuba when our brothers rise from
the dead."



Hunger strike called off


PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - Thirty-eight Cuban refu-
gees staying at a camp in Panama have called off a hunger
strike, U.S. military officials said Wednesday.
U.S. military officials in charge of the Panama camps
said the Cubans called off their hunger strike late Tuesday
after they had refused to eat for four days to protest against
policy on Cuban migrants.
Dozens of migrants in the Panama camps, where the
United States holds about 4,000 Cubans near the Panama
Canal, launched a hunger strike over the weekend to
demand the United States grant them asylum.
As many as 96 refugees had stopped eating Saturday,
although only half remained on strike by Sunday, according
to U.S. military officials in charge of the camps.
The refugees said they were angry at President Clinton's
policy - aimed at discouraging future waves of Cuban boat
people - that the refugees must return to Cuba to apply for
legal emigration to the United States.
More than 30,000 Cuban refugees fled the communist
island nation on tiny rafts during August and September, a



Atlantic Community celebrates Lat-
in Culture during Hispanic Heritage
Month celebration.


move that forced the Clinton administration to change
long-standing U.S. policy granting asylum to Cubans.

Defense secretary

to visit Haiti, Cuba
WASHINGTON D.C. (Reuters) - Defense Secre-
tary William Perry plans to visit Haiti Saturday to meet
American troops and review U.S. military operations
there, the Defense Department said Thursday.
It would be Perry's second visit to Port-au-Prince
since thousands of U.S. troops began landing in Haiti
Sept. 19 to restore democracy to the Caribbean nation.
Pentagon spokesman Dennis Boxx also told re-
porters Thursday that tentative plans for the one-day
trip Saturday called for Perry to visit the U.S. Navy
Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba where some 40,000
Cuban and Haitian migrants are being housed.




*Postal limits expand, Page 4
+Entebbe, Page 10
*Hoops championship, Page 13










Tropic Times
Oct. 7, 1994


* llefly_


Tropic Times late?
Call 269-3220
People who live in quarters on a Pacific
area military installation and have not re-
ceived a Tropic Times by 6:30 a.m. Friday
should call 269-3220.


'Trick or Treating' hours
established for Clayton
The established hours for "Trick or
Treating" at Fort Clayton are 5-8 p.m. Oct.
31. The age limit is 12 years old. Teens, 13
years and older are encouraged to partici-
pate in the Directorate of Community Ac-
tivities events.
People who have a valid installation
pass can escort five immediate family
members only for Trick or Treating on
Fort Clayton. People with vehicles regis-
tered with the Provost Marshal Office can
drive their vehicles onto any installation to
an authorized parking area.
Sponsors are accountable for the be-
havior of their guests while on the installa-
tion. Failure to control guests will result in
action taken against the sponsor. All visi-
tors to Army installations must be off post
no later than 9 p.m. For information, call
Master Sgt. Scott Carr at 287-3716.

Navy MWR needs
program instructors
Rodman Morale Welfare and Recre-
ation needs instructors in various fields to
expand their programming. The MWR
Outdoor Recreation needs individuals
qualified to teach open water scuba. For
information, call Valerie Van Essen at
283-3150. The MWR Community Recre-
ation Department needs foreign language
instructors qualified to teach Spanish and
French. Instructors should have prior ex-
perience teaching elementary and conver-
sational courses. For information, call
Navy MWR at 283-4301.

Volunteers needed for
Black History Month
Rodman NS needs volunteers to help
plan activities for the 1995 Black History
Month observance scheduled for Febru-
ary. Committee members are also looking
for guest speakers, donations and facilities
for functions. People interested should call
Petty Officer Patricia Wallace or Petty Of-
ficer Angelia Huff at 283-4400/4300.
Howard AFB officials need volunteers
to plan and organize activities for
Howard's Black History Month obser-
vance. Two volunteers, in the grade of E-7
or above, are also needed to chair the com-
mittee and to act as alternate. Anyone in-
terested in volunteering to participate in or
chairing the committee, call Tech. Sgt. Jim
Johnson at 284-5358.

508th Infantry closes
Tuesday at Kobbe
The 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th In-
fantry, will inactivate Oct. 15. Building
812, the unit headquarters at Fort Kobbe,
will close Tuesday. Once closed, all peo-
ple who have unfinished business dealings


All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for higher priority mission
requirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608/
4857.


Saturday
5:40am C-130 Howard AFB
Maxwell, AL (A)
5:45am B727 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP, GA (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
Sunday
7am B-757 Howard AFB (C,O)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Monday
5:55am C130 Howard AFB
San Salvador, El Salvador
(V, CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB


with the battalion should direct their con-
cerns to Headquarters Company, 1st Bn.,
508th Inf., located in Building 805, Fort
Kobbe. For information, call 284-5439.

Enlisted Spouses' Club
active in Panama
The Enlisted Spouses' Club-Panama
meets 7 p.m. the first Monday of every
month at the Fort Clayton NCO Club. For
information, call Barb Johnson at 284-
4523 or Amy Gross at 287-3071.

Spot bid sale to be held
Oct. 19 at Corozal
A spot bid sale will be held 9 a.m. Oct.
19 at Building 308, Corozal. Inspection of
the items will be 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 18. For
information, call 285-5417.

Ammunition supply
point closes Oct. 23-27
The Rodman Ammunition Supply
Point will be closed Oct. 23-27 for inven-
tory. All units with scheduled training
should call 283-5643/5806 to reschedule
issues and turn-ins.

New policy sets stricter
guidelines at Rodman
Customers of Rodman Ammunition
Supply Point are required to update their
company access roster every 90 days or as
personnel changes dictate. Beginning Oct.
17, units will be denied access to the ASP
if rosters are not updated. For information,
call Staff Sgt. Juan Gomez at 283-5806.

Resource Management
Mentorship available
The Resource Management Mentor-
ship Program is available for any career ci-
vilian with civilian program- 11. It is a for-
mal mentoring program with an emphasis
on skill development and acquisition. Par-
ticipants are matched based on career in-
terests, goals and needs. All efforts will be
made to geographically co-locate partners.
Deadline for applications is Tuesday. For
information, call 287-3902.


8:40am B757 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP, GA (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
Tuesday
5:40am C-141 Howard AFB
Brasilia, Brazil (V,0)
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Montevideo, Uruguay (0)
Brasilia, Brazil
Wednesday
5:25am C-130 Howard. AFB
San Jose, Costa Rica
Howard AFB
Thursday
5:45am C-5A Howard AFB


DCA announces
20-60 percent savings
The Defense Commissary Agency will
hold an anniversary sale at commissaries
throughout Panama in October. More than
900 items will be offered at savings of 20-
60 percent.

Area housing mayors'
elections wrapping up
Elections for housing area mayors and
vice-mayors must be completed by Oct.
20. Volunteers are needed to hold those po-
sitions in their prospective areas on and off
post. Training and child care is available.
To volunteer, call Master Sgt. Scott Carr at
287-3716.

Sweet Adelines women's
chorus needs singers
The Crossroads Chapter of the Sweet
Adelines women's barbershop chorus
needs singers in tenor, baritone, bass, lead
and melody to participate in a variety of
community activities, including singing
Christmas cards. No experience is neces-
sary, but musical knowledge is helpful.
Rehearsals are held 7 p.m. Monday at the
Balboa Lutheran Church hall. For informa-
tion, call 252-6017 or 221-3874.

24th Wing, AAFES set
'no smoking' policy
All dining rooms in 24th Wing clubs
and AAFES facilities have been designat-
ed as "no-smoking areas" by the wing
commander, Brig. Gen. Richard E. Brown
III. After a three-month trial period, the
policy will be reviewed for its impact on
customers.

24th Wing PAO will
broadcast holiday cheer
The 24th Wing Public Affairs office is
sponsoring a program to help make the
holiday season a little brighter for relatives
in the United States. People can record an
audio holiday greeting to be broadcast on
a radio station in their relatives' home
town. The program is free and open to all
U.S. military and family members. For
more information about the program, call
the 24th Wing PAO at 284-5554.

Holiday season will
affect postal delivery
Post office officials remind members
stationed in Panama that the holiday "rush"
usually means the mail moves slower than
normal. As a result, they've noted the fol-
lowing recommended "mail by" dates, as
determined by the final destination of the
packages.
*To get holiday packages to the conti-
nental United States by Christmas, mem-
bers should mail them first class, priority,
or space available mail by Dec. 2. When
sending them 4th class, officials recom-


Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Charleston AFB, SC
Oct. 14
5:40am C-130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB

A- Active duty only
US- U.S. passport
O-Ovemight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance


mended mailing packages by Nov. 1. In-
ternational mail sent by air or air parcel
post to Africa, Australia, the Caribbean,
Central or South America, Europe, the Far
East, and others should also arrive on time
if sent by Dec. 1. Items sent by boat should
be mailed a month earlier, except those
sent to Africa and Southeast Asia, which
should be mailed immediately.
+With the advent of the 1994 holiday
season, postal officials need volunteers to
help with the tremendous influx of letters
and packages. Volunteers will help sort
and pitch mail, retrieve packages, and do
various other roles in local service centers.
Members 16 years and older who have au-
thorized postal privileges may apply.
*The best way to lose APO privileges
is to abuse them, and this includes sending
illegal or unauthorized items through the
system, or using it for personal ghin. Post-
al personnel are using a variety of means
to identify and report members misusing
their postal service privileges, and this in-
cludes X-raying all items that enter the sys-
tem. People who abuse the system may be
fined, permanently lose APO privileges
and may even spend time in jail.
For more information or answers.to any
postal questions, call 286-4214.

FSU announces term two
registration schedule
Florida State University, Panama Canal
Branch, will register students for term two:
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in
Building 808, Albrook AFS; and 9 a.m.-2
p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in Building
235, Fort Davis. Late registration will be
noon-5 p.m. Oct. 17-18 in Building 808,
Albrook AFS; and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 17-
18 in Building 235, Fort Davis. For infor-
mation, call 285-6922/5222.

'Just Passin' Thru' -
Navy Ball set for Oct. 14
The 1994 Navy Ball will be held 6 p.m.
Oct. 14 at Club Amador. Tickets are $10
for E-6/GS-6 and below and $15 for E-7/
GS-7 and above. For information, call
Navy public affairs at 283-5641/5644.

Education center sets
many new test dates
The Army Education Center announc-
es test dates for Graduate Record Exams,
Graduate Management Admission Tests,
National Teachers' Exams and Automo-
tive Service Excellence exams. The dates
are 7 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18 and 25, and
Nov. 8, 9 and 15. GRE and NTE subject
exams will be given at 1 p.m. For informa-
tion, call 287-5856;

24th Medical Group
announces two closer
The 24th Medical Group will close at
noon on Thursday for Medical Readiness
Training, and again at 2:30 p.m. Oct. 14
for Commander's call.


Weekend weather
** Factoid: Since 1976, several 5.0 or greater earthquakes have been reported
in Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru and have
caused more loss of life and property than any other natural phenomena.
Forecast: Partly cloudy with late afternoon showers and thunderstorms.
Pacific Atlantic
Saturday Saturday
Temperature Tides Temperature Tides
High: 87 5:35 a.m. at 18.3 feet High: 85 3:09 p.m. at 1.4 feet
Low: 75 11:52a.m. at 1.6 feet Low: 70 10:49 p.m. at 0.3 feet
Sunday Sunday
High: 86 6:24 a.m. at 17.8 feet High: 86 4:04 p.m. at 1.4 feet
Low: 76 12:40 p.m. at 0.8 feet Low: 71 11:38 p.m. at 0.3 feet
Send weather questions to 24th Weather Squadron ATTN: Weather Wise, Howard AFB, Panama (MPS)













News


Tropic Times
Oct. 7, 1994


Holiday hours set
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Here are
the hours of operation for the Army and Air Force
Exchange System - Panama Monday in observance
of Columbus Day:
Corozal
Main PX - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sweets Reflections - 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Frank's Franks - 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 10:30 .a.m.-6 p.m.
Wok Works - closed
Casa de Amigos - closed
Bakery - closed
Commissary Frank's Franks - closed

Fort Clayton
Shoppette (95) - closed
Frank's Franks (95) - closed
Anthony's Pizza - 4 p.m.-8 p.m.
Burger King - 6:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
Popeye's - 11 a.m.-10 p.m.
Frank's Franks (by Burger King) - closed
Clayton Plaza Shoppette - 7 a.m.-midnight
Shoppette (519) - 8 a.m.-10 p.m.
Snack bar (519) - closed
Auto parts store - 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Car Care Center - closed
Clothing Sales - closed

Amador
Shoppette - 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Albrook
Shoppette - 7 a.m.-10 p.m.
Snack bar - 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Frank's Franks - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Video rental - 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Furniture store - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Shoe store - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Toyland/Outdoor living - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Class Six - 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

Howard
Main PX - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Shopppette - open 24 hours
Class Six - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Cafeteria - 7 a.m.-2 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Clothing Sales - closed
Service station - 6:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.

Fort Kobbe
Shoppette/video rental - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Burger King - 8 a.m.-3 p.m.

Miscellaneous
Quarry Height shoppette - closed
Gorgas Hospital shoppette - closed
Curundu School cafeteria - closed
Cocoli shoppette - closed
Balboa school cafeteria - closed
Curundu Service Station - 6 a.m.-midnight

Fort Espinar
Shoppette - closed

Fort Davis
Main PX - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Auto parts store - 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Gas station - 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Cafeteria - 8 a.m.-l p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-10 p.m.
Burger King - 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Clothing Sales - closed
Shoppette - 10 a.m. -6 p.m.
Mini-shoppette - 8 a.m. -6 p.m.

Fort Sherman
Shoppette - noon-6 p.m.
Gas station - closed
Anthony's Pizza - noon-4 p.m.

CONCESSIONAIRES
The AAFES Pacific Concessionaires will be open
10 a.m.-4 p.m. The Atlantic Concessionaires will be
closed. Beauty and barber shops will be open 8:30
a.m.-2 p.m.

COMMISSARIES
Corozal and Fort Espinar - closed Monday and
Wednesday, open Tuesday.
Howard - closed Sunday and Tuesday, open
Monday.


w w


Snt Jane Usero (US Army)


Field trip
Maj. Tony Kazmierski, Camp No. 1 S-3, briefs a group of wives about the Operation Safe Haven
mission. The spouses went to Empire Range to visit their husbands who are working at the camps.



Abuse runs in the family


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Domestic vio-
lence affects about three million American homes each
year and touches the lives of men, women and children of
all ages, races, religions and incomes, statistics indicate.
Today, as part of the activities of Domestic Violence
Prevention Month, the focus will be on some of the effects
of domestic violence on children, said Clarita Riba, Army
Community Services' Family Advocacy Program man-
ager.
"It's a common belief that children are not affected by
domestic violence if they are not witness to it," she said.
"However, most of the children are aware of violence in
the home, even if they don't see the incidents."
Children can be affected, both physically and emotion-
ally, by the violence, Riba said. They can be severely in-
jured if they try to stop the abuse between their parents or
they may get hurt by objects thrown by one or both parents
during the confrontation.
"Children who grow up in families where there is vio-
lence suffer not only in their childhood, but also later in
life," she said. "They feel distrustful, confused, fearful, an-
gry, frustrated and helpless while the abuse is occurring,
and then they learn to be violent and abusive as well."
Riba also explained that other emotional reactions that
can occur as a result of violence in the home are feelings of
responsibility for the abuse, shame and embarrassment.
Some children may become withdrawn and others may act


aggressively by taking out their frustrations with other
children in ways that they have seen theirparents do.
Where domestic violence happens, children also fear
abandonment by one or both parents, she said. In cases
where couples separate as a result of the violence, chil-
dren fear the other parent may also leave or die.
"Domestic violence creates anxiety, poor doncentra-
tion, decreased school performance and frequently the
need for increased attention and reassurance," Riba said.
The childhood experiences with violence in the home
may become a barrier to establishing close adult relation-
ships, she said. Abuse is a learned behavior and children
who grow up in families where there is abuse also learn
abusive behavior.
"They often continue the abuse as adults," Riba said.
"So, whether a child sees the abusive behavior or hears it
from his room, the experience affects him and is poten-
tially damaging to his physical and emotional develop-
ment.
"Therefore, if you are interested in your child's future,
end abuse today," she said. "Seek professional help be-
cause, tomorrow may be too late."
For information, call the Clayton Family Advocacy
Program office at 287-6643 or the Social Work Services
at 282-5139. Air Force family advocacy can be reached
at 284-6410. Navy family advocacy can be reached at
283-5749.


Atlantic dining facility takes honors
FORT SHERMAN (USARSO PAO - Atlantic) - The
Jungle Operations Training Battalion's dining facility was
runner-up in a Department of the Army competition.
The JOTB dining facility, representing U.S. Army
South, won second place out of 12 other worldwide, small
category dining facilities in the Philip A. Connelly com-
petition.
A three-person, DA team judged the facility June 1.
The team looked at sanitation, troop accessibility, equip-
ment maintenance and administrative requirements, ac-
cording to Chief Warrant Officer 3 Frank Scherra, the
team's captain.
Additionally, the team interviewed soldiers to get their
overall opinion of the dining facility, he added.
"We asked them if they were getting enough to eat, if
there were many special programs like for Black History
Month and how well the staff interacted with them," he
said.
The staff of the JOTB dining facility had no idea how
they did in the judging until the winners were selected.
"We can't tell them anything about our judging," ..l . " .
Scherra said. "The only time we'll tell them anything is if
we spot a problem and it's a safety hazard."..
Still, the facility's manager had formed an opinion of Sgt. Rick Emert (U.S. Army)
their chances in the competition. Chief Warrant Officer 3 Frank Scherra, judging
"My personal opinion was that we didn't do very well team captain, left, looks overthe dining facility's
in the judging," said Sgt. 1st Class Godfry W. Miller, slicer with Sgt. Edward Colon, shift commander.
manager, JOTB dining facility. "When the judges were be runner-up was surprising and gratifying, he said.
leaving they told us that we did good, but I got the im- "We were shooting for the top, but we weren't really
pression they were saying: 'Maybe next year.'" expecting it," he said. "We're very happy and satisfied to
Learning his staff had beaten out 10 other facilities to be runner-up."


I


J









4Tropic Times
Oct. 7, 1994


News


A few good men


Marines fix up


Davis theater
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO.- Atlantic) - The the-
ater operations supervisor, Panama, and Atlantic commu-
nity Marines have found a way to get around the dwin-
dling budget for facility repairs and beautification.
Sixteen Marines from Company D, Marine Support
Battalion repainted the concession area of the Fort Davis
Theater in response to community complaints about the
theater's condition.
The idea stemmed from an Atlantic Army and Air
Force Exchange Service Advisory Council meeting. Alice ,
Rodriguez, theater operations supervisor, Panama ex- .
plained that the Directorate of Engineering and Housing
Atlantic budget cuts prevented DEH from doing the work
to the theater.
She suggested that the community members pitch in ,
and fix it up.
"I figured since the PACE (Panama Army Communi-
ties of Excellence) programs are successful, why not do
something like that with the theater," Rodriguez said. "In ,.
the meeting, I said all we really needed was some elbow .
grease." The Co. D Marines responded quickly-to her -
suggestion, she said. AAFES supplied some of the Cpl. Cable
brushes and the tape; the paint came from Self Help Battalion,
stores.
"It took a while to get everything together, but after operations,
they finished painting, it looked so nice," she said. "They base."
did a professional job." Rodrigue
The mission was a good opportunity for the Marines volvement s
to work as a team, said Chief Warrant Officer 4 Tom "It's goo
Lindenmayer, Co. D commander, to," she said
"We're a small unit, there are only 25 of us," he said. excellent. It
"I know it's tough trying to get things like this done, and this on Fort
it was a good chance for us to get together. The Mar
"We have a good working relationship with the Army wallpaper in


Postal limits raised

to $100 per day
PANAMA (USARSO PAO) - Postal customers can
now mail gifts through the APO not to exceed $100 per
person per day, without duty charges, officials said.
The previous limit allowed only $50 per person per
day.
The U.S. Southern Command Customs Program man-
ager, Roland Thompson, said there are many misconcep-
tions about mailing gifts through the APO.
"You can send multiple gifts in one package for mul-
tiple people," he said. "But it's important that you put that
on the customs tag."
Some other misconceptions include what can be
mailed through the APO.
Products that are manufactured in the United States
and purchased at the Army and Air Force Exchange, re-
gardless of value, can be mailed duty free. However, prod-
ucts made by foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies are
subject to duties, Thompson said.
Also, typicos of Panama are normally entered duty free
but should be listed on the customs form.
"If you have questions about what can be mailed, ask HorT
your post office clerk," Thompson said. Bunny L
Military post offices are located on Howard AFB, Al- Personn
brook AFS, Quarry Heights, Rodman NS, and Forts Clay- base bal
ton, Amador, Davis and Espinar.


Paam nessumr


i" i Traffic Command says

POVs ready for pick up
BALBOA (MTMC) - The following customers have
Stf privately owned vehicles ready for pick up at the POV
/ -- Processing Center, Building 1501, Balboa, adjacent to
SPier 18. The office will be closed Monday for Columbus
Day:


Sgt. Rick Emert (U.S. Army)
e Day, Company D, Marine Support
paints a wall in the theater.
and we wanted to do something to help the

;z said she'd like to see such community in-
pread.
d for the families to have nice facilities to go
d. "The command support on this project was
would be great if we could do something like
Clayton."
ines will return later this year to work on the
n the auditorium, Rodriguez said.


Alexis M.; Anciaux L.N; Avery I.B.; Baum A.D.; Best
G.; Bonaparte R.; Butler S.R.; Cantrall R.D.; Church S.E.;
Clayton J.D.; Coleman J.H.; Colon R.E.; Cooley S.E.;
Curschmann A.R.; Daniel T.E.; Fluet J.E.; Garuz T.E.;
Hickey M.J.; Johnson V.M.; Johnson G.; Johnson E.;
Knox J.L.; Krisman E.K.; Krist M.G.;'Lewis G.L.;
Mahomey P.L.; Marcelino W.V.; Martini S.A.; McIntosh
K.E.; Medina J.R.; Mejia-Rangel 0.; Melendez N.; Miller
J.T.; Montalvo W.A.; Moody J.E.; Moore J.D.;
Mudhenke V.C.; Oconner M.L.; Parker S.T.; Patton C.C.;
Pittman T.Z.; Row S.G.; Ruggles G.; Sanchez E.E.;
Schaul D.E.; smith C.M.; Sola M.A.; Squires E.; Stall
F.M.; Testa J.A.; Thomas S.L.; Thompson S.L.; Tregaskis
K.; Virant R.A.; Williams A.C.; Wilson J.A.; Witter D.C.;
Wrencher C.T.; Yeager W.; Zwiebel B.J.
Customers must have the following documents for
pick up of their POVs:
*ID card (current military, dependent, or civilian)
*Driver license (must have Panamanian license for sec-
ond POV)
*POV shipping document (DD Form 788)
*Vehicle registration or title
*Vehicle keys
*Power of Attorney and photo copies of the sponsor's
bilingual ID card and driver's license (when the sponsor
on orders cannot be present for pick up)
The list is current as of Tuesday. For updates, call cus-
tomer service at 282-4642/3853 or the POV arrival tape
receding at 282-4641. Customer service hours are Mon-
day - Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Wednesday hours are
9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
People expecting POVs are reminded to call customer
service to leave a contact phone number.


Editor's note: The following sum-
mary of news is taken from the Pana-
manian press. The translation and re-
ports are unofficial and no guarantee
is made by the Tropic Times as to the
accuracy of reporting or statements
made here. Selection of these stories
does not imply any emphasis, judge-
ment or endorsement by the U.S. gov-
ernment These synopses are intend-
ed only to give non-Spanish speaking
people a flavor for news events in
Panama.
Sept. 30
El Panama America: Paper reports
President Ernesto Perez Balladares
asked Democratic Revolutionary Party


(PRD) legislator Mario Miller to decline
filing charges of corruption against former
first lady Ana Mae Diaz de Endara. Miller
will meet with Balladares and announce
his withdrawal of charges in exchange for
the president considering a pardon for
mayor-elect Omaira Correa. Miller says
Correa is facing minor charges compared
to the former first lady.

Oct. 3
La Estrella: Paper says a large number
of Cuban migrants in Panama do not
agree with those who started a hunger
strike at Camp No. 1. They said they tried
a similar strike in Guantanamo and it did
not work.


Oct. 4
El Siglo, El Panama America, La
Prensa: Papers report that 131 cases of den-
gue have been reported in Panama and 71
percent of the victims are women.

La Prensa: Paper reports the situation
for Cuban migrants in Panama is desperate
and they risked their lives by defying
Castro's regime only to exchange Cuba for
a jail of more limited size.

La Estrella: Paper reports that Panama
ecology groups have criticized the ARI pro-
posal to build an ecological highway be-
tween Panama City and Colon because it
would harm the canal watershed.


Oct. 5
La Prensa, El Panama America: Pa-
pers report ratification last night by
Panama Legislative Assembly of re-
forms to the Panama Constitution that
eliminates the army from the Republic
of Panama. The new law provides for
special police services to be temporarily
organized to protect the borders and the
jurisdictional territory of Panama only in
case of foreign threat. The reform report-
edly establishes that the president of the
republic is chief of all services estab-
lished under the Public Force constitu-
tional section and that these, as agents of
authority, will be subordinate to civilian
rule.











I News


Tropic Times 5
ct "7 17QQ44


flct '7 100A


Polar Sea ...
The icebreaker Polar Sea made a transit through the Panama Canal Sept. 28. The Polar Sea
is the first U.S. vessel to reach the North Pole. The ship made the historic voyage Aug. 22.





E-mail users note


Electronic mail considered official records,

obtainable by Freedom of Information Act


WASHINGTON D.C. (AFIS) - A recent court deci-
sion on electronic mail is forcing federal archivists and
computer users into reviewing their records management
procedures.
The courts ruled electronic mail documents used in
conducting government business are official federal
records and obtainable under the Freedom of Information
Act. With this ruling, government records managers have
been busy documenting both hard copy and electronic
files for proper disposition. They are also warning co-
workers about deleting e-mail documents.
Jeryl Gegan, archives and records management chief
for the National Security Agency at Fort Meade, Md.,
published an article in the agency's June newsletter about
Scott Armstrong, an archivist with the National Security
Archive. On Jan. 19, 1989, he wrote, Armstrong filed sev-
eral Freedom of Information Act requests for electronic
data stored in backup files belonging to the Executive Of-
fice of the President and the National Security Council
under the Reagan administration.
According to Gegan's article, the system enabled em-
ployees to share appointment calendars, as well as trans-
fer and edit correspondence. However, it allowed 1,300
federal employees to exchange e-mail messages-includ-
ing some classified information.
"Paper backups to this system did not recreate a com-
plete record of the e-mail traffic," wrote Gegan. "How-
ever, backup tapes did contain all relevant communica-
tions data, including detailed distribution lists that would
appear on screen and on the paper printout."
Armstrong and the National Security Archive sued to
obtain these tapes.
The president's office and National Security Council
argued e-mail isn't a "record" as defined by the Federal
Records Act. However, both the trial and appellate courts
ruled in favor of Armstrong.
"What this means to an agency like NSA is that any e-
mail message not properly scheduled becomes a perma-
nent record," said Gegan. "It is subject to release under


FOIA once the classified material is removed. Therefore,
people should determine whether messages generated
through e-mail channels are official records and use dis-
position schedule accordingly."
By scheduling, records managers follow set govern-
ment guidelines for maintaining documents. Some sched-
uling requires managers to keep active files for a predeter-
mined period, followed by an inactive period and even-
tual records destruction. Other records are kept for perma-
nent file.
Gegan is now trying to educate his colleagues about
treating e-mail traffic and other computerized records the
same as paper files.
"Obviously, there are e-mail messages that won't ap-
ply to this," Gegan said. "There are too many people out
there flicking keyboards and sending e-mail for the sake
of sending e-mail. What we're trying to do is get these
people to think about what they're putting on the board."
Gegan suggests e-mail users take caution in deleting
their traffic and recommends printing messages before de-
leting.
"By printing, you have a hard copy of the message,"
said Gegan. "It can be used for follow-up reports, allow-
ing you to delete the e-mail."
He added that if it's obvious an e-mail message is just
a quick note-"Joe, your car lights are on"-go ahead and
delete it. But if you're not sure, print a hard copy first.
Gegan said NSA has been talking about electronic ar-
chives and archives management for a long time, but just
recently started compiling, reformating and duplicating
records into electronic form. "There is a lot to be done,"
Gegan said.
Meanwhile, he encourages office managers to review
their records disposition schedules. "Part of our education
process (at his agency) is to put our office phone number
everywhere a person can find it," said Gegan. "It's done
so our people can call, get their questions answered and
schedule their records, brochures and exhibits for proper
disposition."


PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - Panama's legislature has
voted to outlaw formally the nation's military, which
ruled for two decades until it was destroyed in 1989 by
the U.S. invasion to oust strongman Manuel Noriega.
Panama's National Assembly voted by a wide margin
late Tuesday to amend the 1972 Constitution and perma-
nently abolish the army, becoming the second country
after Costa Rica in Central America to ban its leaders
from raising armed forces.
The new law allows for the training of police forces
to defend Panama in the case of foreign aggression.
The move heartened many Panamanians who had
been concerned that the legislature, dominated by mem-
bers of Noriega's former political party, would reject the
measure.


"I'm delighted and pleasantly surprised," said Louis
Martinz, a prominent member of Panama's opposition to
military rule who was jailed four times under Noriega.
The step is likely to draw praise from the United States
for Panama's new President Ernesto Perez Balladares, who
led a remarkable return to power of Noriega's former party
in May's general elections by promising to do more for the
poor. Perez Balladares also pledged during his campaign
to support eliminating the armed forces.
Noriega's ouster by U.S. forces ended more than two
decades of military rule that began in 1968, when a mili-
tary coup overthrew democratically elected President
Arnulfo Arias.
U.S. forces captured Noriega and took him to Florida,
where he is serving a 40-year term on a drug conviction.


Mosquitoes at large...


Dengue Fever


still a threat
GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
(MEDDAC PAO) - Dengue Fever, a mosquito-transmit-
ted disease, continues to spread in Panama City, officials
said.
This mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, is regarded as a
sanitation mosquito because it breeds only in artificial
containers that have collected water. Therefore, any ob-
ject such as tires, plastic containers, jars or cans that are
thrown away and can collect water, serve as breeding sites
to produce hundreds of mosquitoes in a few days.
"In our fight against this mosquito, Preventive Medi-
cine Entomology is monitoring the housing areas on mili-
tary installations for the presence of the mosquito so that
corrective action may be taken immediately," said Maj.
Nelson Powers, chief of Entomology, Preventive Medi-
cine Services at Gorgas Army Community Hospital.
Powers said the plan involves the Department of De-
fense Pest Control Services and the residents.
Monitoring for this mosquito is done by using ovitraps
or black jars. These ovitraps are one-pint containers
painted black and filled with water. A red strip of paper is
placed in the water, and serves as a place for the female
mosquito to lay eggs. The trap serves to exploit the be-
havior of the female mosquito to lay eggs in water-filled
artificial containers.
The traps are placed in the yards of various residences
and checked by Entomology, Preventive Medicine
weekly. If eggs are found on the red strip, a notice is
placed at the resident's quarters. The notice informs the
resident of the findings and requests they check their yard
and their neighbors' yards for artificial containers, that
serve as breeding sites such as an uncovered trash can, a
child's wading pool or a tire swing.
It has also been found that roof gutters and pool water
help in breeding.
Residents should inspect their roof gutters, of less than
12 feet from the ground, or contact the Directorate of En-
gineering and Housing if higher.
Aside from notices, Pest Control is notified and the
resident's yard and adjoining yards are sprayed with in-
secticides.
Because the mosquito does not fly very far, its area of
infestation is limited and can be dealt with.
Preventive Medicine is asking for cooperation from
area residents.
"If you find an ovitrap or black jar in your yard, please
leave it alone as placement of the jar is very important for
detection of the mosquito's presence," Powers said.
In addition, if Preventive Medicine finds artificial con-
tainers that serve as breeding sites while conducting in-
spections of residents' yards, they will leave notices ask-
ing the resident to remove or drain the containers that
serve as breeding sites.
For information, call Powers at 282-5269/5440.



Agency buyout


info available
WASHINGTON D.C. (AFIS) - Federal employ-
ees interested in hearing the latest news about buyouts
can now call 1-202-606-2425.
The Office of Personnel Management sponsors
the 24-hour hot line providing the latest information
about agency buyout programs. The brainchild of
OPM's Federal Workforce Restructuring Office, the
hot line names the latest agencies to announce buyout
programs and gives eligibility and early retirement
information. It also gives information on topics such
as how accepting a buyout could affect tax status.
Staffers have fielded thousands of buyout-related
telephone calls since President Bill Clinton signed the
Workforce Restructuring Act March 30, 1994. The
act extended buyouts to non-DoD agencies. More
than 30,000 DoD workers have accepted buyouts
since DoD agencies began offering them in 1993.
Approximately 15,000 non-DoD workers have
voluntarily retired or resigned from government ser-
vice with a buyout in hand, and more are expected to
leave after the beginning of fiscal 1995. A buyout is
equal to $25,000 or the employee's earned severance
payment, whichever is less. The government deducts
taxes, so employees offered buyouts are advised to
consult agency retirement experts to calculate the
buyouts' real worth before deciding.


Panama amends constitution


to permanently abolish army


I












6 Tropic Times
Oct. 7, 1994


SVoices


Panama's Dengue Fever worries reader


Dear Mayors' Corner,
I am new to Panama and want to know what all the
fuss is about Dengue Fever.
New and Bugged

Dear New and Bugged,
Lately, there has been a lot of coverage in the local
military news about mosquitoes, spraying and Dengue Fe-
ver. The man responsible for this information is Maj.
Nelson Powers, chief of Entomology, Preventive Medi-
cine Service at Gorgas Army Community Hospital. Pow-
ers has diligently worked to inform the public about this
tropical ailment and provide up-to-date information about
this problem and its prevention. I forwarded this letter to
his office and received the following response:
Dengue Fever is a non-fatal virus, communicated only
by the bite of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. The disease is
transmitted by the mosquito after feeding on an infected
individual. The virus is not found in or transmitted by an-
imals.
The symptoms are high fever, intense pains of the
joints and muscles, intense headache and pain behind the
eyes. There are no immunizations available and those af-
fected are sick for several weeks, followed by a long con-
valescence period. A blood test is the only way to confirm
the fever.
Mosquito control is the key to reducing the risk of the
fever. The fever can only be transmitted by the mosquito,
which is active during the day. At night, it rests at in pro-
tected areas, inside houses if possible. The mosquito is a
hitchhiker and, if given the chance, will fly inside a car to
be carried and introduced into new areas. It flies only a
few hundred yards and lays its eggs in containers capable
of holding water. The eggs remain viable for several
months. When the container becomes filled with water


again, the eggs hatch.
You can prevent Dengue Fever by cleaning your yard
and neighborhood of discarded containers, which hold
water. This is accomplished by moving and inverting
buckets and water cans, covering water barrels and get-
ting rid of used tires, plus moving stored auto parts under
cover.
Other measures include keeping boats covered or in-
verted, inspecting tarps weekly, cleaning pet water and
food dishes, scrubbing permanent bird baths weekly, fill-
ing pipe fence posts and tree holes with sand or cement,
and cleaning or draining flower pot dishes weekly.
Residents also can drain wading pools every week.
When not in use, store them undercover or inverted. Fill
ornamental clay pots with sand or drill holes in the bottom
of the post. Cleaning roof gutters and air conditioner drains
will also help reduce mosquito popluations.
It is important that when cleaning containers, you scrub
them thoroughly to kill any mosquito eggs inside.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
A while ago, you published an letter stating that active-
duty sevicemembers can have family members stay with
them. In addition, it said that if the family members had
documentation which proved the soldier was supporting
them, they could receive an ID card with non-purchasing
privileges stamped on it.
I am 19 years old and a community volunteer with nu-
merous awards. I have lived here a year with my active
duty sister, whom I lived with before coming to Panama.
My father is a sergeant first class in the Army Reserves. I
know I am not entitled to privileges because of my dad's
reserve status, but I have an ID card that is useless in Pan-
ama. I need help. I don't want to buy anything, I just want
a little mobility.
Always Waiting in the Car
Dear Waiting,
Please roll down the window to hear what Warrant Of-


ficer Ellington of the Personnel Services Branch had to
say about your issue.
I am not sure if you are wanting to get a Uniformed
Services Identification Card (dependent ID card) or a Joint
Committee Bilingual Card, so I'll speak in both areas.
In order for you to become a dependent of your sister
and be issued the dependent ID card, your sister would
have to request custody through the court system. If grant-
ed, you would be a ward of the court. You would then be
eligible for a dependent ID card with limited privileges.
You would be entitled to these privileges until one day
prior to your 21st birthday. This would also entitle you to
a bilingual card, but with no purchasing or travel privileg-
es, since you are a non-command sponsored dependent.
If your sister does not want to go through the legal pro-
cess for you to get the dependent status, she can still re-
quest that you be issued a bilingual card. Your sister will
need to request a dependency determination. United States
servicemembers with relatives (parents, brothers or sisters)
who depend on them for over half of their sustenance and
habitually live with the servicemember under the same
roof, may apply for a depleting determination.
The application should be forwarded through your sis-
ter's component command to Commander, United States
Southern Command, A'ITN: SCJ1, APO AA 34003. Fi-
nal determination for dependency status and approval for
issuance of a bilingual ID card will be made by Headquar-
ters, U.S. Southern Command.
If any of this is unclear or you have other questions,
please call Adjutant General Customer Service at 287-
8406 or 287-3006.

Editor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral
Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity
chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will
be granted upon request The Tropic Times reserves
the right edit letters and responses for brevity.


Civilian caught having a few


too many... cases of beer


Going over the limit
The Contraband Control Office discov-
ered that a civilian employee bought 13
cases of beer over the course of one month.
The purchases exceeded his monthly
household allotment by three cases.
If you have any questions concerning
limitations on certain items, refer to South-
ern Command Regulation 1-19 or call the
Contraband Control Office at 286-3303.

Disrespect
During a recent raid by the Panamanian
National Police, a United States
servicemember tried to leave the scene in
his privately owned vehicle. When the
PNP stopped him along the Gaillard High-
way, the soldier became very belligerent
and used abusive language. He was taken
to the Balboa PNP Station where he re-
ceived a stiff fine.
It's unlawful to be disrespectful toward
PNP officers. If you have questions on this
subject, call the Military Police Liaison Of-
fice at 287-3808 or 289-5413.


Car break-ins
Two soldiers had their cars broken into
while they were at the Christian Service-
men's Center in Balboa recently. The un-
known person broke the passenger win-
dows out of both vehicles and stole one
radio.
Always be aware of the area where
your car is parked. If suspicious activity is
observed, report it to the military police by
calling 287-4401 or 289-5133.

Club Fight
Three soldiers were involved in a ver-
bal altercation that turned physical when
one soldier was struck by another at the
Community Club on Fort Davis last week.
The soldier was taken to the hospital and
treated for minor injuries.
Violent acts like this can ruin a career.
If you are a victim of crime, call the mili-
tary police immediately at 287-4401 or
289-5133.

Panama Jack anonymous hotline
If you have any information about drug
smuggling, call the Panama Jack anony-
mous hotline at 285-4185.


Dear Tropic Times Readers,
Are you one of those many people
who came to Panama, only to find out
that your InterNet, CompuServe, Prodi-
gy or America Online services were
completely unavailable? Well, rest easy.
InterNet E-Mail has finally made its
way into the local BBS community.
There are several of you out there
that have the advantage of E-Mail ser-
vice within your work environment, and
a few others who have access through
their local college networking. Howev-
er, there is an extremely large popula-
tion of computer users that would be
anxious for the opportunity to regain ac-
cess to their stateside E-Mail service.
PanamaNet is a local Bulletin Board
Network affiliated with FidoNet, which
has been serving local area computer
users for several years. Until now, the
offering of an E-Mail service has been
an impossibility. But through some vig-
ilant research, phone calls and "night
sweats," E-Mail has become a reality to
the BBS community.
E-Mail, for those unfamiliar with it,
is a Private Mail Network that allows
you to post and receive messages from
friends, family and business associates
worldwide. If a person or business has
access to an InterNet service, then you
are only a phone call away from them.


InterNet services are private. With
daily mail service in and out of the Re-
public of Panama, they are available to
anyone from the comfort of their own
home. The only requirement is a com-
puter, a modem, a few free minutes, and
an interest calling one of the local area
Bulletin Boards which offer this service.
There are currently three PanamaNet
Bulletin Board Systems that offer daily
InterNet service to the states. They are:
*Eternity, Fort Clayton, 287-6524,
system operator: David Dillard
*The Trash Can, Fort Clayton,
287-5272, system operator: Neil
Armani
*Fool's Paradise, Fort Davis, 289-
3760, system operator: Donald Haag
As local community interest grows in
this service, the Bulletin Boards that of-
fer E-Mail will undoubtedly grow with
the demand.
If you've been trying to find an av-
enue back to your InterNet,
CompuServe, America Online or
Prodigy mail box, this may be just what
you're looking for.
Give a PanamaNet 920 Bulletin
Board a call. It takes only a few minutes
to complete the New User procedure,
and the benefits return themselves with
each "you have mail waiting."
Neil Armani


S1Tropic Times


This authorized unofficial command information publica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pub-
lished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Pro-
gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of
the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the
U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002

Commander in Chief.......................Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs..............................Col. James L. Fetig
Chief.......................................Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor........................................................... M aureen Sam pson


Sports Editor....................................................Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editors..................................................Sgt. Cass Purdum
Spc. Tom Findtner
Rosemary Chong

Southern Command Public Affairs Office..................282-4278
Command Information Officer.....................Patrick Milton

U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office......................287-3007
Public Affairs Officer...................Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer.........................Beth Taylor
Managing Editor..................................Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Editor...............................................Sgt. Robin Shawlinski
Journalists....................................................Sgt. Eric Hortin


Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666


Spc. Brian Thomas
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic..............................289-4312
NCO IC............................................................. Sgt. Rick Em ert
24th Wing Public Affairs Office................................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer...................Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.......Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists......................................Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush

U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..................283-5644
Public Affairs Officer.................................Diane Gonzalez
Assistant Public Affairs Officer...........................John Hall
Photographers.....Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays


Letter











*Commentary


Tropic Times 7
Oct. 7, 1994


--_-----------------^- - -- ------ -- ----------------- %


Spouse deployed?


Family support centers can ease pain of family separation


by Chaplain Leon Kircher
USARSO Chaplain Family Life Center
o, your spouse is deployed. You're not sure
when he or she is returning and information to
this point has been sketchy. The political
climate in the world changes daily, further complicating
the return date. You've had some problems with the kids
and are not sure how to contact your spouse.
Money is getting tight because your spouse usually
takes care of the finances and didn't have enough time to
go over everything with you before leaving. Life is
rapidly becoming unmanageable.
What do you do?
Separation is a fact of military life. When spouses
deploy to foreign lands, it creates a strain on families
that, for some, is not easily overcome. It becomes more
difficult to go on with day-to-day activities without the
other person.
Some of the typical problems people experience
when a spouse is deployed are a loss of companionship,
behavior problems with children, loneliness, sexual
tension, social isolation, anger (why don't they just tell
me when he's coming home?), financial problems,
trouble with the car, lack of communication with the
deployed spouse and trouble with household routines.
All or some of these may arise, and it is up to the
family member to overcome them.


One of the key things to remember is that, although
your spouse may be deployed, you don't have to feel
they are absent. They are gone for a time, not forever.
Regular communication with your spouse is critical. I
recommend some form of communication take place
daily. That doesn't necessarily mean a phone call,
however. A few lines penned everyday is better than a
40-page letter once a month.
Cassettes or video tapes are a great way to keep the
lines of communication open. Send pictures in addition
to letters. Be sure that children write and send your
spouse copies of their school work. Smaller children can
color pictures to send. The key is to keep the flow of
communication going.
Another thing you can do is set milestones to help the
time pass. Handle one problem at a time and don't worry
about troubles that may never come.
Saturday, Sundays and holidays are often more
difficult to handle, so plan special activities or service to
others. The worst thing you can do is "hole" up in your
house until your spouse returns.
Lastly, (and we say this all the time), get involved
with your family support group. When operating
properly, these groups play a central role in sustaining
families by providing social and emotional support
before, during and after the deployment.
These groups benefit the command by helping
sustain the morale of deployed soldiers. They benefit
family members by helping them cope in the soldier's


absence and remove family feelings of isolation and
anxiety. They also serve as a conduit of information
about the soldier.
Family support groups should have direct communi-
cation with the deployed unit so that accurate informa-
tion is passed to family members.
Overall, the key to a successful family separation
period is the family. A deployment can either be a very
difficult time or can be a time of growth and enrichment.
This is your choice.
Problems will certainly arise and, if you feel you
cannot handle them, there are a lot of people out there
who will help you.
Unit chaplains are key players in family support
groups and can help you when difficulties arise. The
United States Army South Family Life Center and other
military family support programs at Howard AFB and
Rodman NS are also available to help you in case there
are needs you would like to address.
Remember, your family member is deployed... not
departed. Keep the lines of communication open, keep
busy, get involved in your family support group and get
help when you need it. All of these can help you through
this difficult time.
Feel free to call me at 287-5255/3497 if you would
like to talk. A 24-hour duty chaplain is also available to
help you at 282-5111. The Air Force Family Support
Center can be reached at 284-3153. Call the Navy's
family support group at 283-5749.


When it's time to 'stop the dying,' world turns to U.S. troops


by Jim Garamone
Senior Writer, American Forces Information Service
ne death is a tragedy; a million, a statistic. I've
never really grasped the significance of this
until I saw a photo from Zaire.
Like most Americans I clucked my tongue and
thought it was terrible when the reports of massacres
started coming out of Rwanda in April. Stories said
thousands were being killed throughout the country.
Hutus were killing Tutsis, and the Rwanda Patriotic
Front army, mostly Tutsis, was advancing on the capital
of Kigali.
When millions of Rwandans fled to Zaire, again I
clucked my tongue and thought it was terrible. See, it's
tough to envision a million people, and even if you could
see a million people at once, they would remain faceless.
Articles estimated between 500,000 and 750,000
people killed in the Rwandan civil war. Reporters tried
to put it in perspective. Some said it was as if everyone


in Indianapolis was killed. Other reporters tried to
describe the exodus of Rwandans by saying it was as if
everyone in San Francisco packed his belongings and
walked to Sacramento. But again, this is something I
have a hard time envisioning.
Once the refugees arrived in Zaire, cholera and
dysentery broke out. Reporters talked of thousands of
refugees dying in the epidemic.
President Bill Clinton called on the U.S. military to
"stop the dying." Airlift of critical water purification
units began immediately, and American service mem-
bers arrived in Zaire, Uganda and Rwanda.
Among the first to arrive was Air Force MSgt.
Michael J. Haggerty, a photographer. He sent photos
back to the Pentagon to the Joint Combat Camera
Center, and I went through them to accompany an article
on the humanitarian effort.
One of his photos hit me in a way that all the statistics
in the world couldn't. It was a picture of a small,
emaciated child in a fetal position lying dead by the side


of a road. This small child put a face on the tragedy. I
have two sons.
I can imagine the pain and helplessness the family
and friends must have felt when they brought the lifeless
little body to the road.
Since then, photographers have recorded the progress
of the U.S. humanitarian mission in Zaire and Rwanda.
While disease is still a problem, officials say a corner
has been turned.
Photos now show young Rwandan refugees waiting
for food and clean water provided by U.S. service
members.
Soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and DoD civilians
are working together to put an end to conditions where a
family has to stack a dead child by the road. The citizens
of the United States should be very proud of what these
service members and civilians have accomplished.
I know I am proud to play a small part in the organi-
zation the world turns to when it's time to "stop the
dying."


I Dret uoes,


What do you do to reduce the stress of family separation?

_ _ _ _ 4t


"Give them a call and let
themknow'mOK, write
letters telling them what's
going on. Don'ttakework
home with you."
Staff Sgt. Quirino Arzadon
1097th Transportation Co.


"Go to school, keep
busy."




Lynnette Hacker
Army family member


"Sit around the room
and think about things I
have to look forward to
at home. Just relax."


Sgt. Robert Robertson
HHC 4-228th Aviation


"Keep in contact. Call
and write as much as
possible."



Spc. Kara Edwards
308th Military Intelligence


"Go fishing. Enjoy the
local economy and see
what's out there."



Master Sgt. Gene Walker
120th Fighter Group,
Montana Air Nat. Guard


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


A










Tropic Times
Oct. 7, 1994


Air Force and Panama Canal Commission firefighters and local bombers participate in joint fire training at the Rodman NS training facility.




Events highlight need for fire safety


HOWARD AFB (24TH WING
PAO) - Members of the military
community in Panama have the
opportunity to participate in National
Fire Prevention Week Sunday through
Oct.15.
This year's theme is "Test Your
Detector for Life."
Howard's fire department officials
have planned a variety of activities for
the observance and encourage all
community members to participate.
Activities begin Saturday with a fire
truck parade that is scheduled to begin
at 9 a.m. in Balboa, ending at the
Howard AFB Crash Fire Department,
Building 250, about 10:30 a.m.
There, there will be an open house,
with a cake-cutting ceremony, home
cooking fire demonstrations, fire
fighting equipment and truck demon-
strations, showings of a "How To Be
Fire Safe" video, and tours of the fire
station.
There will also be a mini-fire muster
competition, where non-firefighters can
try their hand at doing what firefighters
do.
Local fire fighters and Sparky the
fire dog will all be on hand to act as
hosts and to answer any questions on
the fire fighting vehicles and equip-
ment, fire prevention, and the fire


fighting way of life.
Other events throughout the week
include a poster and essay contest for
elementary school students, fire
prevention booths at various dates and
locations, fire safety demonstrations
and handouts, question and answer
sessions with firefighters and Sparky
the fire dog, and several different tours
of the crash fire station. The week's
festivities will end Oct. 15 with the
Annual Firemen's Ball. See the
complete schedule for the week at the
top of Page 9. For more information,
call 284-3090/5646.
Although National Fire Prevention
Week is meant to be fun, officials
remind people that fire prevention is a
serious matter. The National Fire
Prevention Association compiled a
variety of 1993 fire loss information for
the United States. Although many
people feel that statistics are boring;
they can actually learn a lot from these
facts and figures.
As Dick Van Dyke says in his
"Learn Not To Burn" public service
announcements, "We don't want you to
become a statistic."
The most dangerous and hazardous
areas on base are the industrial and
commercial areas. But people at home
are actually more at risk for injury and


death from fires than in these hazardous
locations.
The reason for this, officials ex-
plained, is that people tend to let their
guard down when they're at home and
this increases the risk of having a fire.
This is one strong reason why fire
departments emphasize fire education
for children.
"Kids can even learn from television
shows like '911,' which enables them to
help or even save the lives of their
family members and friends," one
official said. "In many ways children
are wiser than adults because they listen
and learn from the tragedies of others.
As adults, we often seem to forget or
just refuse to change our habits and life-
styles."
The military ensures that every
military family housing unit is protected
with smoke sensitive fire detectors.
These early warning devices are
designed to save lives, and they do, but
they must be checked at least monthly.
Many families that don't live on base
often don't have smoke detectors to
protect them. Also, usually, no one
visits them when they move into their
quarters to brief them on fire prevention
measures.
Most fires start out small enough that
smoke detectors can give an early


warning and prevent them from
becoming deadly. If, however, a ho
is not protected with one of these life
saving devices, a fire can quickly
become a killer.
During Fire Prevention Week,
officials encourage parents to take ti
to listen to their children when they
want to talk about what they have
learned about fire prevention.
In addition, perform monthly test
smoke detectors during the week an
include the entire family in this test.
Families should also regularly practi
fire evacuation drills, and if they
haven't got one to practice, make on
People should make contingenci
for several different routes, depend
on where the fire is, another official
said.
"You can ask a child 'which way
we go if the fire's in the living room
or 'what if it's in the hallway?' Also
make sure there is a designated mee
place outside the home so you and y
loved ones can find refuge - and e
other - during a fire emergency."
The Fire Prevention Office is al
available to provide fire prevention
education or briefings to your office
shop or group.
For more information, call 284-
5645.








Tropic Times 9
Oct. 7, 1994


Kenneth Wampler (courtesy)


awareness
t y -g


Senior Airman Steve McNally (U.S. Air Force)
Sparky the Fire Dog visits children from the Howard Child Development
Center. See the schedule of events for Sparky's appearances this week.


Schedule


of events
Saturday
*9 a.m.- Parade of fire trucks
beginning at the PCC Balboa Fire
Station, then Los Rios, Cardenas,
Fort Clayton, Albrook AFB,
Rodman NS, Cocoli, Fort Kobbe,
Farfan, and ends at the Howard
AFB Crash Fire Department.
*10:30 a.m. (time approxi-
mate) - Open House at the
Howard Crash Fire Department:
Opening ceremony, cake cutting
with Sparky the Fire Dog,
children's life safety course, mini-
fire muster competition, food and
soda booth, awards presentation.
Saturday through Oct. 15
*Open House at Pedro Miguel
and Balboa Fire Stations.
Sunday
*Albrook Mall Fire Preven-
tion Booth: home cooking fire
demonstration, fire safety
awareness pamphlets, question
and answer session with Fire
Fighters, and Sparky the Fire
Dog.
Monday
*Howard Base Exchange Fire
Prevention Booth: See Sunday for
activities.
Tuesday
*Howard Child Care Fire
Station Tour: fire truck demon-
stration, "Learn Not to Bumrn"
video, cookies and punch, fire
safety handouts for students.
Wednesday
*Fort Kobbe Elementary Fire
Station Tour: See Tuesday for
activities.
Thursday
*Howard Elementary Fire
Station Tour: See Tuesday for
activities.
Oct. 14
*Poster contest winner
presentation at Howard and Fort
Kobbe elementary schools.
* Essay contest winner
presentation at Curundu Jr. High
School.
*Fire Fighters Ball at El
Panama Hotel: Guest speaker and
annual awards ceremony.


National Fire Prevention Week has
its roots in the Great Chicago Fire,
which occurred on Oct. 9, 1871. This
fire consumed more than 17,000
buildings, killed 300 people, and left
100,000 homeless.
The cause of the fire has generated a
great deal of speculation ever since it
happened, and fact and fiction have
gradually become blurred over the
years.
One popular legend has it that
Catherine O'Leary was milking her cow
when the animal kicked over a lamp,
setting the O'Leary's barn on fire and
starting the spectacular blaze.
Regardless how the fire began, it
swiftly took a huge toll, burning more
than 2,000 acres in only 27 hours. The
people quickly rebuilt Chicago,
however, and within a couple of years
residents began celebrating their
successful restoration by memorializing
the anniversary of the fire with festivi-
ties.
Intending to observe the fire's
anniversary with a more serious
commemoration, the Fire Marshals
Association of North America, the
oldest membership section of the
National Fire Protection Association,
decided that the 40th anniversary of the
Great Chicago Fire should be observed
in a different way. They decided to
commemorate the date, not with
festivities, but in a way that would keep


Fire facts: two
*Fire departments in the United
States responded to about two million
fires across the nation - about one
every 16 seconds.
*There was a structure fire every
51 seconds and a residential fire
every 67 seconds. Fires
occurred in a motor
vehicle every 75
seconds and in outside
property every 35 I ,
seconds.
*There were
about the same
losses from fires in
1993 and 1992.
*Of the 621,500
structural fires that "
occurred, 470,000 (75.6
percent) involved homes.
*A total of 4,635 people in the


the public informed about the impor-
tance of fire prevention.
As a result, on Oct. 9, 1911, the Fire
Marshals Association sponsored the
first National Fire Prevention Day. In
1920, President Woodrow Wilson
issued the first National Fire Prevention
Day proclamation.
For more than 70 years, the nonprof-
it NFPA has officially sponsored and
selected the theme for the national
commemoration of Fire Prevention
Week, honoring the anniversary of the
Great Chicago Fire and using the event
to increase awareness of the dangers of
fire. And every year since 1925, the
President of the United States has
signed a proclamation pronouncing the
Sunday-through-Saturday period in
which Oct. 9 falls as a national obser-
vance.
When President Calvin Coolidge
proclaimed the first National Fire
Prevention Week, Oct. 4-10, 1925, he
noted that, in the previous year, some
15,000 lives were lost to fire in the
United States. Calling the loss "star-
tling," President Coolidge's proclama-
tion stated, "This waste results from
conditions which justify a sense of
shame and horror; for the greater part of
it could and ought to be prevented ... It
is highly desirable that every effort be
made to reform the conditions which
have made possible so vast a destruc-
tion of the national wealth."


every minute
United States died in fires in 1993,
about two percent less than in 1992.
*About 80 percent of all fire
deaths occur in the home, and
nationwide, a fire death
. occurred every 113
P minutes. There were
30,475 reported fire
injuries in the civilian
community in 1993.
Officials say this estimate is
actually low because of
under-reporting of civilian
Injuries to the fire service.
^- *Property damage
resulting from fires increased
>' in 1993 to an estimated $8.5
. billion, an increase of
approximately 3 percent. Of
all damages, about 87 percent were
because of structure fires.


Senior Airman Steve McNally (U.S. Air Force)
Howard Child Development Center staff members evacuate toddlers
during a fire drill. Fire officials also recommend regular drills for military
family housing residents.

Fire week began with the

Great Chicago Fire of 1871








Sf Tropic Times
.07 Oct. 7, 1994


-uuAm


- . Ml I'


A C-5B brought the support troops, equipment and supplies (and Meals, Ready to Eat) people from Howard would need while in Entebbe.


F:.,. *~
43
K1



I,~H jlfl


\-ouftasy)
Entebbe airport's main terminal, the scene of an Israeli raid to free passengers from a terrorist
hijacking in 1976.


: . . -,, .. . , '.r . ....


(Courtesy)
Uganda still has a basic rural economy, with a Gross Domestic Product of $290 per person,
compared to $21,800 per person in the United States.


Entebbe!

Desolate, barren,

and so far away
HOWARD AFB (Tropic Times) - Members of the 24th
Wing spent 70 days in Entebbe, Uganda, nearly 7,000
miles from Panama. It will be remembered as a desolate,
out-of-the-way place.
It was here that the Israelis made the fight against ter-
rorism famous. So famous, in fact, that Hollywood made
a movie called Raid on Entebbe (and two others).
When terrorists hijack an Israeli jetliner and force it to
Entebbe, the Israeli commandos respond with military
force and free the passengers, kill the terrorists, and show
the world how it's done.
Not much has made the news since then, at least com-
ing from Entebbe. But the 310th Airlift Squadron, along
with the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron and 33rd Intelli-
gence Squadron, was sent there to support Operation Sup-
port Hope, a humanitarian mission to conduct relief oper-
ation for displaced people in Rwanda and adjacent coun-
tries.
"It was a very real challenge to pick up our operations
and move them 7,000 miles away," said 310th AS com-
mander Lt. Col. Curt Ross. "Deployable units do this all
the time, but we're not set up to be deployable."
During the aerial reconnaissance missions flown on the
unit's deployed C-130, more than 15 miles of film were
shot.
The last of the deployed troops returned last week after
70 days in Entebbe.


(Courtesy)
The forward supply area, where deployed air-
men built their own worktables.


M'L-.-- *.-


* -.


-- -a


(Courtesy)
A 310th Airlift Squadron C-130 aircraft (left) awaits its next mission, which was to fly over the refugee areas and provide information on lines of
communication, refugee camps and volcanic activities in the region.


(Courtesy)


A


. .o


* Feature












S Features


Fun fair

Valent event boasts

community activities

by Sgt. Robin A. Shawlinski
USARSO Public Affairs Office

FORT CLAYTON - Pacific Army community mem-
bers found a one-stop information center waiting for them
at the Valent Recreation Center, Oct. 1.
The Fun Fair offered people information about the
many activities and services available through the Direc-
torate of Community Activities and other services
throughout the military community.
The fair had information booths from Army Commu-
nity Service, American Red Cross, theater, Outdoor Rec-
reation, education, the library, travel, the clubs and other
services.
"No matter what we do...there are always people who
don't know about certain services or events," said
McDonald Kemp, chief of the Directorate of Community
Activities.
"This is just another effort to get the word out."
The fair gave people the chance to find out, in-depth,
what is offered, he said.
"We appealed to community leaders and unit com-
manders to see what they can do for their units, neighbor-
hoods and church groups," Kemp said.
He explained that many of the services can be custom-
ized to the needs of groups and units.
Many of the people present said they thought the con-
cept of the fair was a good idea.
"(The Fun Fair) is nice. We can learn what we can do
in the community," said family member Wanda Muniz. "I
knew about the services, but I learned a little more about
them here."
Tom Byrd, a staff member at the Army Continuing
Education Center booth agreed the fair was a good idea.
"I think it's a great idea. It's informative," he said. "The
people come up and ask general questions about what we
offer. They're like sponges, soaking up knowledge."


This telegram-singing gorilla was one of the many Fun Fair exhibits.


Sgt. Robin A. Shawllnski (U.S. Army)


ICamp unites Cuban father,

daughter separated 35 years


(courtesy)
Military Police Command members participate in a brigade-level run
to celebrate the anniversary of the Military Police Corps.

Deployments tone down

MP anniversary celebration


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
The Military Police Command, Panama
usually celebrates the anniversary of the
Military Police Corps by hosting a week-
long celebration culminating in a formal
military ball.
Initially, a week-long celebration was
planned, to include a fishing tournament,
golf tournament and a brigade-level run.
The celebration had to be toned down
because of other obligations of the com-
mand. Two MP companies are currently
deployed. The 534th MP Company is in
Suriname supporting Operation Distant
Haven and the 258th is at Empire Range


supporting Operation Safe Haven.
As a result of the two major deploy-
ments, the Military Police Command
conducted a brigade-level run and
hosted an informal picnic instead of a
formal ball.
Approximately 225 soldiers, fam-
ily members and guests attended. The
change to an informal celebration al-
lowed for a better turnout, officials
said. It also gave the soldiers a chance
to relax and spend time with their fam-
ilies and friends.
The picnic was held at the Rodman
NS and by all accounts was a success.


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
JTF-Safe Haven Public Affairs Office
CAMP ROUSSEAU - Though family
reunions are a time for rejoicing and meet-
ing family members not seen in perhaps a
couple of years, the reunion that took place
here last week was that and much more.
Tears fell and
embraces
abounded as
Reina Dalia

a Cuban housed
at Camp No. 1,
stood in the arms
of a father she 0 '
hadn't seen in 35 V
years. Joining in
the reunion was
also a sister she
hadn't seen in 30
years.
Castillo's fa-
ther, Enrique
Melian, flew in
from the United Reina Dalia Melian C
States to visit at Camp No. 1, embr
with his daugh- Melian, who flew fror
ter in an effort to They haven't seen ea
reunite his fam-
ily, possibly for the last time as he suffers
from a severe heart condition.
Though Castillo also suffers from heart
problems, the day was one of thankfulness,
warmth and tears of joy as she talked with
her father and sister about the family she
was separated from so many years ago.
"I also have two sons in the U.S.," she
said through an interpreter. "One I haven't


a
ac

ac


seen in 30 years and one I haven't seen in 14."
In addition to her father, sister and two
sons, Castillo also has a brother serving in the
U.S. Air Force as a pilot and four grandchil-
dren she has never seen.
With all the joy of seeing a side of her fam-
ily she was long ago separated from, it was
bitter sweet as she found out her mother had
passed away
three years ago.
Also, the choice
to try and join her
family in the
AI U.S., Castillo had
S. ' to make the deci-
sion to leave be-
hind another part
of her family in
Cuba.
Leaving Cuba
on a small, make-
shift boat wasn't
a choice she
S made lightly.
With heart prob-
Staff Sgt. Jane Usero (U.S. Army) lems and not be-
istillo, a Cuban staying ing able to swim,
ces her father, Enrique her decision was
the states to visit her. a dangerous one.
ch other in 35 years. Danger, how-
ever, was not
what tugged at her soul, she said. It was leav-
ing behind three other children and several
grandchildren, not knowing how many years
it would be - if ever - before she would see
them again.
But sitting on a couch between her father
and sister for the first time in more than three
decades, made her difficult choice a little
easier to deal with.


Tropic Ti 11es
Oct. 7, 1994











S2 Tropic Times
Oct. 7, 1994


S Features


Amcecy Ross stirred the audience with a
hispanic ballad and 4 Non Blondes' "What's
Up." Student models show off some original creations during the fashion portion of the program.


Hispanic


heritage


Atlantic community

celebrates diverse

Latin contributions

story and photos by Sgt. Rick Emert
USARSO PAO - Atlantic


FORT DAVIS - The Atlantic community's His-
panic Heritage program played out to a full house Sept.
24 at the Fort Davis Theater.
The "Partners for Progress" Atlantic Community
Hispanic Celebration featured various guest speakers
and entertainers that offered a representation of His-
panic culture, said Steve Parker, one of the event's
coordinators.
"We wanted to present a diversified cultural expe-
rience that showed the diverse culture of Latin
America," he said.
Guest speakers covered such areas as the war on
drugs, free trade and the programs theme: partners for
. progress. Entertainment included singers Amcecy Ross
and Ben Hur Santos; dance groups Kuna Yala and
Projecciones Del Atlantico; and a fashion show featur-
ing original creations.
Behind the spicy entertainment and the food tasting
that followed was an important message, Parker said.
"Latin American history is our history," he said.
"Our world is better off because of the contributions of
Traditional dancers from Projecciones Del Atlantico highlighted the program's entertainment. Latin Americans."


Top civilian retires after 25 years of DoD service


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office


FORT CLAYTON - After 40 years
in the work force, Mary Oliver has made
the choice of moving on to the slower
pace of a retiree.
A 25 year veteran of the Department
of Defense work force, Oliver spent the
past four years as the assistant director
of the Resource Management Office.
Oliver began her long career with the
Department of Defense as an adminis-
trative assistant to the Chief of Staff of


the Army National Guard at Fort Lewis,
Wash.
"I moved on and applied to the Civil-
ian Personnel Office Lab and Career
Program as an intern in 1974 at Forces
Command in Atlanta, Ga.," she said.
Also serving in distant places such as
Alaska and Korea, Oliver made the
choice of working for the U.S. govern-
ment when she travelled with her Army
husband.
"I got tired of quitting good jobs
every time my husband moved to an-
other duty station," she said. "So Ijoined
the Department of Defense workforce


and, once he retired from the Army, it
was his turn to follow me."
As one of the top civilians in Panama,
she strived to improve the management
of finance and manpower and manage-
ment functions throughout the com-
mand, she said.
"I feel I've met that goal through
sound and feasible programs which sup-
port U.S. Army South, Southern Com-
mand and regional missions in which
the Army participated," Oliver said.
"This has been accomplished despite
Army manpower and budget reductions.
It hasn't been easy."


The daily grind of a not-so-nine-to-
five job are behind her now, however, as
she takes to the mountains in Franklin,
N.C.
"I will retire and do what I want," she
said. "I will take some time to get settled
in to our home, do some remodeling and
then travel."
With all Oliver's plans for a quiet and
slow-paced retiree's life-style, she will
miss some of what she will leave be-
hind.
"Without the support of everyone in
USARSO, I couldn't have done my job,"
she said. "I will miss them."














Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13


MSSQ bombs AIS/OSS


by Senior Airman Joel Langton
Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau


HOWARD AFB - David whipped Goliath Sept. 28
when the 24th Mission Support Squadron slapped around
the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron/Operational Support
Squadron for 40 minutes to win the Howard AFB intramu-
ral basketball championship 54-41 here at the Howard gym.
The 24th MSSQ squad showed up with seven men,
while 24th AIS/OSS sported a roster of 18 players dressed
out. The 24th MSSQ team hit their first two-pointer and the
18-player AIS/OSS squad began trying to catch up.
A patient offense, laid-back defense, tough rebounding
and hitting more than half their free throws down the
stretch, gave the 24th MSSQ the edge they needed. The
AIS/OSS team used an aggressive defense that netted them
more fouls than turnovers. They never got within five
points after the 10 minute mark, while the 24th MSSQ's
lead bulged to as much as 16.
Even though AIS/OSS was outplayed, their coach
thought the officiating made a difference.
"I don't want to take anything away from MSSQ but the
refs weren't calling it both ways," said Glenn Richard, AIS/
OSS head coach. "Our game is down low and our big man
was getting fouled."
While AIS/OSS's big man couldn't get a shot in edge-
wise, MSSQ's ran wild, pacing all scorers with 18 points.
"We couldn't stop number 22 (Pete Liljeholm)," Rich-
ard said.
Liljeholm admitted AIS/OSS couldn't keep him from
scoring, but they weren't by themselves, he said.
"Nobody's been able to stop me this year. At base-level,
teams play a lot of zone defense and I can shoot over it. I just
took what they gave me," he said.


I


el--Cr 6 T .40
Tech. Sgt. Gary Williams (U.S. Air Force)
Frank Moon and AIS/OSS's James Brown battle for a rebound.


MSSQ coach Anthony Mitchell said, on this evening,
Liljeholm had the hot hand, but throughout the season, a
number of players had stepped up.
"We've had a lot of injuries this year. At one point, we
had to go with five players. But whenever we needed
someone to take some leadership, one or two of our players
would take the reins and do whatever was necessary,"
Mitchell said.
Minutes after AIS/OSS had dropped the game, Richards
was already looking towards the intra-service tournament


NI .


Tech. SgL Gary Williams (U.S. Air Force)
Frank Liljeholm tacks on an-
other point to MSSQ's score,
while canning a free throw.


in October, in which the top two teams from each service
compete for best team on the isthmus honors.
"They got us this time, but they've got to get by us
again," Richards said.
Mitchell wasn't quaking in his sneakers.
"Our seven players can match-up against anybody in
Panama," he said.
Mitchell added that no one expected his team to win the
first championship either.
"I guess they underestimated us," he said.


Roadrunners sink Special Boat Unit 26


Q-' I


..,~- :~


7

V I,


John Hall (U.S. Navy)
Special Boat Unit 26's Joshua
Halleland puts in a lay up off the
glass.


by John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office
RODMAN NS - The Roadrunners re-
bounded from a 60-39 loss in the opening
game of the Navy unit-level championship
basketball contest with a 55-44 victory over
Special Boat Unit 26 in the following game
here Sept. 29.
The Roadrunners, made up of military
and civilian workers from the base, took an
easier route to the title game of the double-
elimination tournament. The Roadrunners
beat Port Services 63-42 and the Inter-
American Naval Telecommunications Net-
work 58-55. SBU lost to IANTN in the first
round 62-50, but took three straight, 81-77
over Port Services, 74-37 over the Public
Works Department and revenged its loss to
IANTN 60-49.
In game one of the championship, SBU
set the stage on Steve Forte's finger roll for
a 5-2 lead. After both teams endured turn-
over barrages, the teams traded baskets for
the rest of the half.
SBU started to pull away when Joshua
Halleland nailed a three-pointer, making
the score 24-19. The Roadrunners' Terry
Rogers answered the three, cutting it to 24-
22 at halftime.
SBU started to pull away early in the
second half. Forte's jump shot off the glass
gave his team a 38-29 advantage. With 5:54
left in the game, SBU took an 11 -point lead
that forced the Roadrunners to call for time.


I


l'\


'- -
,'-- I :" , ' t

John Hall (U.S. Navy)
Roadrunners' coach Kenneth Simmons stresses a point to Archie Elam


(left).
SBU slowed the pace down and put the nail
in the coffin on another Halleland trey for a
49-36 lead and coasted to the 21-point win.
After a 30-minute rest, the teams began
the second and deciding game.
Werner helped the Roadrunners forge a
8-2 advantage on a jumper and layup fol-
lowing a steal. The Roadrunners led by as
much as seven before SBU got untracked.
With 7:10 left in the first half, Ephriam
Maxwell's three-pointer gave SBU a 21-20
lead and forced a Roadrunners' timeout.
The Roadrunners took the route of the
freethrow line and short jumpers to take


back the lead at the half, 35-29.
Aaron Jones gave the Roadrunners their
biggest lead of the night by scoring six
straight points. Jones scored on a fastbreak
layup and went to the line because SBU was
called for a technical foul for smacking the
backboard. He hit the two freethrows and
scored another deuce on a finger roll for a
50-39 lead. The Roadrunners held on for a
55-44 win.
The season isn't over for either team
because both will represent the Navy in the
upcoming inter-service basketball champi-
onship Oct 12-15 at Howard AFB.


In high school football's battle of
unbeatens, the Cougars move to
4-0 with a win over the Devils.


John Hall reviews the shocking
upsets of week five and picks this
week's winning teams.


ah more". Page 1


*SCN AM radio schedule
*Local sports standings
*Army Turkey Bowl tryouts


Oct. 7, 1994












14 Tropic Times
14Oct. 7, 1994


* Football


Cougars bury Devils, 32-23


by Spc. Tom Findtner
Tropic Times staff

BALBOA - The Curundu Cougars came dressed for a
funeral and began digging the Panama Canal College
Green Devils' grave on the first play of their opening drive,
in a rollercoaster 32-23 high school football victory here
Sept. 30.
After taking possession of the ball on their own 25-yard
line, the Cougars-sporting undertaker-black jerseys, pants,
socks and shoes-called a pass play against a Devil defense
that had not yielded a point all season. All good things must
come to an end. Junior quarterback Buddy Martens hit
wide receiver Mike Morales on a 10-yard slant route. With
the help of devastating block from fellow receiver Robert
Reyes, Morales broke a tackle and raced 65 yards for the
score as Curundu bolted to a 6-0 lead. The extra point
attempt was blocked.
"The Devils have a tough eight-man front, so we had to
pass to set up the run," Cougar Head Coach Fred Bales said.
"Our concept is to throw short and let the receiver make
something happen after the catch. We were just hoping to
get a first down, so we were fortunate to get the score. That
play set the tone for the game."
The battle matched the league's only two undefeated
teams which came into the game with 3-0 records.
The Devils quickly answered with a touchdown of their
own. Running back Lee Gibson took a handoff and crossed
the goal line for the score. Carlos Lampas booted the point
after and the Devils jumped in front 7-6.
The Cougars' second drive stalled, but Curundu line-
man Peter Norman gave his team the ball back at mid-field
when he recovered a PCC fumble on the punt return.
Several plays later, the Devils were flagged pass interfer-
ence, moving the Cougars to the PCC 10-yard line. Taking
advantage of the mishap, Martens lobbed a scoring strike
to wide receiver Robert Reyes, who was able to beat the
Devil man-to-man coverage. The two-point conversion
attempt failed after Reyes lined up at quarterback and his
pass fell incomplete. The Cougars regained the lead 12-7.
PCC's second drive sputtered and they were forced to
punt. Martens trotted onto the field and quickly marched
the Cougars to the Devil 24-yard line. Faced with a third
and 17 situation, Martens, hit a streaking Jelani Jordan on
a fly pattern down the center of the field for a touchdown.
Fullback Lance Von Hollen bulldogged his way in for the
two-point conversion and Curundu was on top 20-7 with
5:46 remaining in the first half.
For the Devils it was do or die. In a race against time,
quarterback Lampas finally went to the air in hopes of
generating a score before halftime. Bruce Chastain hauled
in catches of 18 and 22 yards to set up a seven-yard TD
scamper by the league's leading rusher, Wilbert Reese. On
the ensuing play, Reese plunged into the end zone again to
tack on another two points. The Devils were back in the
game and gaining momentum with the score 20-13.
Martens' arm was smoking. He had orchestrated three
scoring drives on the Cougars' first four possessions. As
the game clock ticked down to 1:10 left in the half, Martens
picked up where he left off. After connecting with Reyes
for 17 yards and Morales for 34, Martens had moved his
team into scoring range with 17 seconds remaining. How-
ever, the Devil defense rose to the occasion by rushing the
pocket with everything they had. As Martens dropped back
into the pocket and searched for a downfield receiver, the
Devils' Michael Haynes busted through the Cougar offen-
sive line for a sack. The Cougars were unable to get another
play off before time expired.
Following the kick off to start the second half, the Devils
immediately worked the football to the Cougar 30-yard


44

,V,
^ - ,. s . -". .,.., ,, . .







Spc. Tom Findner (Tropic Times)
Cougar Mike Morales (25) corrals the Devils' Bruce Chastain with an acrobatic tackle, as Curundu
teammate Francisco Gonzalez (52) moves in to assist on the play.


line. However, they turned the ball over on downs when the
Devils' Gibson was stuffed behind the line of scrimmage by
the Curundu defense on a fourth and five play.
After Curundu turned a loose ball over, the Devil offense
took the field at their own 44 and jumped on the fast track.
Reese, whose longest run of the first half had been for 15
yards, finally busted loose on a 26-yard jaunt to the Cougar
32. Then the Devils' Buddy Bottin snagged a Lampas pass
over the middle for a gain of 22. Reese crashed through the
Curundu defense for 7 yards and the touchdown to cap off
the drive. Lampas ran in the two-point conversion and the
Devils captured the lead 23-20.
The Cougars' Martens came out with guns blazing
again. Morales caught a short pass, broke a tackle and
sprinted 25 yards before being dragged down from behind.
Then Jordan made a diving 13-yard catch to the Devil 6.
Von Hollen got the Cougars back in front 27-23-adding
another nail to the Devil's coffin-when he hit pay dirt from
the 3-yard line. The PAT was blocked.
When the Cougars' potent offense got the ball back after
a Devil scoring drive failed to materialize, Martens wasted
no time going to the air. He launched a 54-yard rocket to
Morales, who was tackled inside the Devil 10 by Chastain.
On fourth down and one foot to go, Martens sneaked into
the end zone, sealing the Devils' coffin and clinching the
Cougars' win 32-23. The two-point conversion failed, but
by that time, Curundu had the game clock on their side.
PCC was forced to try a fake punt on fourth down, when
their next possession fizzled, but the Cougar defense
swarmed in and hit the Devils for a loss-tossing a little
more dirt on their casket.
At this point, Curundu opted to run out the clock. Using
"three yards and a cloud of dust" play calling, the Cougars
trusted the ball to the secure hands of Von Hollen to run out
the clock. The strategy of hammering the ball inside worked.


The Cougars pounded the ball to the Devil 5-yard line, but
a fourth down pass from Martens to Reyes was incomplete.
The Devils made one last gasp by moving the ball inside
the Curundu 10-yard line, but time ran out as they discov-
ered themselves buried six feet under.
Bales cited an emphasis on team play as the leading
factor in the Cougar win.
'Tonight we had a total team effort," he said. "Earlier in
the season, we've had outstanding individual efforts, but
this week we focused on unrealized potential and putting it
all together. We knew we would have to have our best game
of the season on offense, defense and special teams to win
this game."
The Cougars' Martens finished the game with 287 yards
passing-10 yards more than he had thrown the ball in the
previous three games combined--completing 10 of his 22
attempts. Big play receiver Morales had four catches for
188 yards, while Jordan caught two balls for 59 yards. Von
Hollen led the Curundu ground game with 77 hard-earned
yards on 17 carries against the stingy Devil defense.
Bales praised the performance of his offensive line.
"Our offensive line was outstanding in protecting Mar-
tens and run blocking ," he said. "They were the key to the
win."
For the Devils, Lampas connected on 10 of 15 passing
attempts for 149 yards. Bottin led his team with 99 yards on
five receptions and Chastain had two catches for 40 yards.
Reese was held to a season low 114 yards on 21 carries.
"Reese is a great back and we knew he'd get his yards,"
Bales said. "Our goal was to make him earn them over four
quarters. We felt that if we could hold him to 100 yards and
two TDs, we'd be satisfied."
The Cougars raised their record to 4-0 and now are alone
in first place, while the Devils dropped to 3-1 and into a
second place tie with the Balboa Bulldogs.


S coreborS


Team statistics


Cougars
Bulldogs
Devils
Kolts
Tigers
Machine


Yards rushing Yards passing
. [o . K Source: Robert Best
Source: Robert Best


Team standings
W L T Pct.
4 0 0 1.000
3 1 0 .750
3 1 0 .750
1 3 0 .250
1 3 0 .250
0 4 0 .000


Week four results
Balboa Bulldogs 13, Cristobal Tigers 7
Kiwanis Kolts 7, Red Machine 0
Curundu Cougars 32, Green Devils 23

Tonight's games
Cougars vs. Bulldogs, 5:30 p.m. (BHS)
Kiwanis vs. Tigers, 6:30 p.m. (CHS)
Devils vs. Machine, 7:30 p.m. (BHS)


Passing
PA PC %
Lampas, Devils 37 24 64
Martens, Cougars 67 29 43
Beach, Bulldogs 25 8 32
Rushing
Carries
Reese, Devils 64
Guerra, Tigers 68


Hall, Bulldogs
Re

Morales, Cougars
Bottin, Devils
Chastain, Devils
S

Reese, Devils
Jordan, Cougars
Morales, Cougars


YdsTD Int
351 3 1
5646 2
1481 5

Yds. Avg.
502 7.84
429 6.30


61 314 5.14


receiving
Catches Yds.
11 307
15 207
5 137


Scoring
TD
7
4
3


XP Total
1 44
0 24
1 20


Avg.
29.7
13.8
27.4


I













Sports


HHC, 5-87th wins USARSO
basketball championship
FORT DAVIS (Tropic Times)-
HHC, 5-87th defeated MEDDAC 47-
39 in an overtime thriller to capture the
U.S. Army South unit-level basketball
championship Oct. 1 here at Fronius
Gym..
Both teams will travel to Howard
AFB as representives of the Army in
the inter-service basketball champion-
ship Oct. 12-15.


Women's basketball
action continues
Tonight
4:30 p.m. Devils vs. Bulldogs (BHS)
5:30 p.m. Cougars vs. Tigers (CHS)
Oct. 11
4:30p.m. Red Machine vs. Cougars (CJHS)
5:30 p.m. Devils vs. Tigers (CHS)
Oct. 14
4:30 p.m. Cougars vs. Devils (PCC)
5:30p.m. Red Machine vs. Bulldogs (BHS)
Oct. 19
4:30 p.m. Bulldogs vs. Cougars (CJHS)
5:30 p.m. Tigers vs. Red Machine (BHS)
Oct. 21
4:30 p.m. Devils vs. Red Machine (BHS)
5:30 p.m. Bulldogs vs. Tigers (CHS)
Oct. 25-28
TBA: Post-season tournament (TBA)

SCN AM Radio 790/1420
airs pro, college football
Saturday
11 a.m. NCAA: Univ. of Notre Dame at
Boston College
2 p.m. NCAA: Navy at Air Force
6:30 p.m. NCAA: Florida State Univ. at
Univ. of Miami (Fla.)
Sunday
Noon. NFL: Miami Dolphins at Buffalo
Bills
3 p.m. NFL: Los Angeles Raiders at
New England Patriots
7 p.m. NFL: Washington Redskins at
Philadelphia Eagles


Army schedules Turkey
Bowl '94 football tryouts
Tryouts for the Army Turkey Bowl '94
team will be held at 6:30 p.m. Monday on
Fort Davis Field for the Atlantic communi-
ty. Tryouts for the Pacific community will
be held 6:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday at
Mother's Field on Fort Clayton. Players
must bring their own cleats. For informa-
tion, call the Fort Clayton Sports Branch at
287-4050.

Amador hosts three-man,
best ball golf tourney
There will be a three-man, best ball golf
tournament with a shotgun start 7:30 a.m.
Monday at the Amador Golf Course. Reg-
istration closes today. There is a $12 fee
covering lunch, prizes and gross and net
winners.

Fronius sponsors
holiday b-ball tourney
Fronius Fitness Center will host a Co-
lumbus Day three-on-three basketball tour-
nament Saturday through Monday. The
double-elimination, four-man roster event
costs $25 per team.


Bowling centers offer
various programs
The Atlantic Bowling Center has fam-
ily specials 6-10 p.m. Monday, Tuesdays
and Fridays in October.
If interested in joining a mixed league
call the Curundu Bowling Center. The
center is offering discounts all day Monday
in honor of Columbus Day. There will also
be a handicap no-tap tournament 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 15. Sign up at the door, fee is $10.
The Clayton Bowling Center has lunch-
time specials 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on weekdays.
Games are 50 cents and shoes are free of
charge.
The Howard and Albrook Bowling
Centers have sign ups for intramurals,
mixed, men, women and youth winter
leagues.


Team triathlon set to
begin at Howard Pool
A three-person team triathlon starts Oct.
22 at 6:30 a.m. at the Howard pool. Support
your community and cheer for the partici-
pants. Events include a 1,000-meter swim,
25K bike race, and 10K run. The event is
sponsored by the Howard/Albrook Sports
and Fitness Center, 284-3451.

Albrook Fitness Center
operates with new hours
Becauseof Operation Safe Haven, hours
at the Albrook Sports and Fitness Center
have been changed temporarily. The gym
will be open 8 a.m.-1 p.m. and 4-7 p.m. on
weekdays, noon-6 p.m. Saturday, and 1-6
p.m. Sunday.

Register now for Army
intramural soccer
Registration for unit level soccer is un-
derway. The deadline is Tuesday. Register
at the Directorate of Community Activities
Sport Division, Building 154, Fort Clayton.

Rodman athletics hosts
3-event competition
Rodman athletics will hold a three-event
competition Oct. 19-21 The competition is
open to all active-duty military personnel,
DoD civilians, and dependents 18 and old-
er. The events are as follows: tug o'war Oct.
19; freestyle swimming race, Oct. 20; and
5K run, Oct. 21. The competition will be
scored by points with the unit accumulating
the most points winning. For more infor-
mation, call Morise Conerly at 283-4222.


International Motorcycle
Championship Sunday
The Panamanian Motorcycle Union will
host the eighth race in International Motor-
cycle Championship 10 a.m. Sunday. The
race takes place on a brand new track--one
of the finest in Central America-behind


the tennis courts located across the street
from Curundu Junior High School. The
event is open to the public.

Anglers go for big one
in Atlantic tournament
The Club Nautico Caribe, Panama Ca-
nal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal
Yacht Club are sponsoring the second an-
nual Atlantic Interclub Fishing Tournament
through Nov. 30.
First, second and third place prizes will
be awarded in the barracuda, wahoo, king-
fish, jack, tuna, marlin, sailfish and dorado
categories. The minimum entry in the tar-
pon category is 80 pounds; other entries
must be at least 10 pounds. Fishing is re-
stricted to Atlantic waters and the Chagres
River.
Call the Club Nautico Caribe at 241-
2220, the Panama Canal Tarpon Club at
243-5316 or the Panama Canal Yacht Club
at 241-5882 to register for the tournament.


Aerobic workshop offers
certification testing
An aerobics workshop and certification
test is being organized in the Atlantic com-
munity. The testing will be given by the
American Aerobic Association International
and International Sports Medicine Associ-
ation from Pennsylvania. The certification
is valid for two years. A minimum of 15
people are required for the class. For infor-
mation, call Delinda May at 289-3163.


Howard, Albrook offer
various aerobic classes
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
offers step aerobics 8:45-9:45 a.m. Mon-
days, Wednesdays and Fridays. In addition,
step and high-low aerobics classes are of-
fered 4:45-5:45 p.m. Monday, Wednes-
days and Fridays. The Albrook Sports and
Fitness Center has aerobics 8-9 a.m. Mon-
days, Wednesdays and Fridays; and
jazzercise 5-6 p.m. Monday, Wednesdays
and Fridays.


Upsets stump forecaster


John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office
RODMAN NS - Any prognosticator who escaped week
five of the NFL season with a winning record has my
utmost respect. There were six upsets, four of which can be
considered major. The most shocking was probably the
Eagles' 40-8 rout of the 49ers. Tied for second-most
shocking was the Bills loss to the Bears and the Vikes' loss
to Buddy's Cards. And Detroit continues to leave handi-
cappers stammering after its loss to the bumbling Bucs.
Fish fillet - The Buffalo Bills showed how important
Thurman Thomas is to their offense after losing a game
they were supposed to win. The Dolphins won a game they
were supposed to, dumping the Kitties in Shula Bowl I. It's
funny that people placed a one after the Don vs. David Bowl
because everyone knows this is the younger Shula's last
season. The Fish "rallied" over Cincinnati who struck first
on a 51-yard bomb from David Kilngler. If the Bills have
Thomas in the lineup they should get back on track. If not,
Buffalo should still pull it out because of the Dolphins'
porous defense. Dating back to 1987, the Buffs have taken
13 o' 16 in this series. Bills 27, Fish 23.
L.A. raids Foxboro - The Raiders are coming off a
heart-breaking loss to the Chargers and had a week to heal
their wounds. The Raiders are probably the best sub-.500
team in the league and must win to stay in the AFC West
race. The Patsies are fresh off a "Colorado-type" win over
the Packers in which their defense looks improved. The
Pats must control the tempo of the game. If New England
turns the game into a track meet, the Raiders' fleet feet will
be hard to beat. Raiders 30, Pats 26.
Chiefs crunch Chargers - The Chiefs managed a
sweep of the Chargers last year, but not without pain. In
their second matchup, the Bolts not only built up a 17-0
lead, but also knocked Joe Montana out with a concussion.


Dave Kreig led the Chiefs back for a 28-24 win. Krieg is
gone, but K.C. has a capable Steve Bono in reserve. Anytime
a team faces a defense with hard hitters like Junior Seau must
keep backup QBs in mind. The Chiefs have taken eight of the
last nine meetings with the only loss coming during the 1992
playoffs. The last of the unbeatens must fall. Chiefs 19, Bolts
13.
Philly has Shuler steak - Redskins' head coach Norv
Turner probably made a mistake by starting his rookie QB
Heath Shuler last week against Dallas. That's in the past, but
the rook's job doesn't get any easier this week. The Eagles
pounded Steve Young and his beat-up line last week in a 40-
8 win. Washington's line looked in disarray after the Cow-
boys' Charles Haley put on a sack clinic. Philadelphia may
have peaked for the season last week, but can still hold off the
likes of the 'Skins. The Eagles have taken four of the last five,
but two came during Washington's 4-12 showing last year.
Eagles 20, 'Skins 10.
Monday night madness - The Giants and Vikings may
have looked past their week five opponents in anticipation of
this game. The Giants were dominated by a Saints team that
had not much going on. The Vikes made enemies around the
league by giving Buddy Ryan his first win of the season. The
Giants must do something to let the Cowboys take sole
possession of NFC East en route to running away with the
division title. Losing to the Vikes will be the start. Vikes 24,
Giants 20.
In other games: Cowboys make it eight straight over
Arizona, Cowboys 22, Cards 13; Denver gets first win,
Broncos 26, Seahawks 23; Esiason' s return lifts Jets; Jets 20,
Colts 13; Green Bay buries Bettis, Packers 19, Rams 9; Bears
are for real, Bears 20, Saints 17; Young rebounds, 49ers 27,
Lions 13; Bucs ground Falcons, Bucs 21, Falcons 13.
Open dates: Minnisota, Chicago, Detroit, Green Bay,
Tampa Bay.
Last week, 5-7; season 36-30, Monday night, 4-1.


National Football League

week five standings

American Conference


Miami
Buffalo
New England
N.Y. Jets
Indianapolis

Cleveland
Pittsburgh
Houston
Cincinnati

San Diego
Kansas City
Seattle
LA Raiders
Denver



N.Y. Giants
Dallas
Philadelphia
Washington
Arizona

Minnesota
Chicago
Detroit
Green Bay
Tampa Bay

San Francisco
Atlanta
LA Rams
New Orleans


East
W L T Pct
4 1 0 .750
3 2 0 .600
3 2 0 .600
2 3 0 .400
1 3 0 .250
Central
4 1 0 .800
3 2 0 .600
1 4 0 .200
0 5 0 .000
West
4 0 0 1.000
3 1 0 .750
3 2 0 .600
1 3 0 .250
0 4 0 .000
National Conference
East
W L T Pct
3 1 0 .750
3 1 0 .750
3 1 0 .750
1 4 0 .200
1 3 0 .250
Central
3 2 0 .600
3 2 0 .600
2 3 0 .400
2 3 0 .400
2 3 0 .400
West
3 2 0 .600
3 2 0 .600
2 3 0 .400
2 3 0 .400


Tropic Times 1
Oct. 7, 19941


PF
149
96
141
76
90

119
100
79
74

114
84
121
95
92


PF
101
97
106
95
46

107
96
85
83
67


127 110
104 99
67 85
90 121


-..NK





~e~6' (~)
of7


16 Tropic Times
Oct. 7, 1994


L News


Spc. Tad Browning
Gen. Barry McCaffrey, U.S. Southern Command commander in chief, talks to Cubans staying at
1 at Empire Range.




CINC visits camp


McCaffrey speaks to Cubans, troc


at Operation Safe Haven facilities


by Senior Airman Joel Langton
Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau
CAMP ROUSSEAU - U.S. South-
ern Command Commander in Chief Gen.
Barry R. McCaffrey said he was "im-
pressed" during a four-hour visit to Op-
eration Safe Haven facilities at Empire
Range Sept. 29.
"This is one of the most impressive
things I've seen since I came into the
Army at 17," McCaffrey told a group of
military members at Camp No. 1.
Referring to immigration to the Unit-
ed States in the 1900s, McCaffrey told
the troops many of them may have at one
time had grandparents in the same posi-
tion as the Cubans. "And I don't think
they were treated as well as the Cubans
in these camps," he said.
McCaffrey guaranteed the troops
their efforts had been recognized at the
highest levels.


"From the President of the United
States on down, people are aware of,
and impressed by what you are doing,"
McCaffrey said.
The CINC's visit started at the re-
ception center on Howard AFB. He saw
how the Cubans are welcomed, identifi-
cation cards are issued, and personal
data is gathered.
His next stop, the Cuban Family
Support Center, had a dual mission:
accommodating those visiting the Cu-
ban community camp members and
working with non-governmental relief
agencies headquartered there.
During his visit to the family sup-
port center, he checked living and work-
ing conditions of military members. He
asked supervisors to ensure people were
getting enough time off.
After his visit to the family support
center, he went to Community Camp
No. 1. He walked through the camp,


visited the Jose Marti Schoo
to Cubans and military mei
He commended the mi
bers on their "sacrifice" an
had "knocked everybody's
with their efforts.
Before a working lunch
the Air Force's air transport
tal located near the base can
Senior Airman Janet
played from Offutt AFB, N
photo taken with McCaffre'
with the CINC during his v
"I was very impressed
related to the people and ma
feel special. It was nice of hii
time out of his schedule and
what we were doing," Cast
McCaffrey was escort
Gen. George Crocker, U.S..
and Joint Task Force Pa
mander, and Brig. Gen. Jar
JTF Safe Haven commander


RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO)
- As part of its "Neighborhood of Excel-
lence" program, the Navy is improving
housing units and assets during the next
few months.
Most of the work will be done by a
local contractor with help from the base's
Seabees, said Noreen Ernest, Public
Works Department housing manager.
There will be installation of dish-
washers and garbage disposals, perma-
nent storage areas, playgrounds and bas-
ketball half courts.
The plumbing, electrical and kitchen
counter modifications to support dish-
washers and garbage disposals can be


done while quarters are occupied. All
housing units except those on Fort
Amador are scheduled for installation.
Concrete permanent storage areas
will be added to Rodman's 240 area
housing units. The areas will be in the
rear of quarters. Fourplex units that don't
have storage areas are slated to get them.
New toddler playground sets will be
installed at Rodman, Amador, Farfan
and Radio Farfan. Benches will be added
in some playground areas. New basket-
ball half courts will be put in the Marine
Barracks enlisted area and Farfan. The
basketball court on Amador will be re-


and nets installed.
A whole-house door l
includes standardizing loc
house to improve security
reduce the number of keys
maintenance, housing office
The housing office h
funds for more washers and d
there have been complaints
pants moving government
dryers from one area of ti
another.
Officials remind occupar
get permission from the ho
to move them and any dan


paired, striped and have new backboards charged to the occupant.


Cutbacks


stressful
"o SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Ger-
many (AP) - It was supposed to be the
standard slide presentation by the gen-
eral for the VIP from the Pentagon.
Instead, Defense Secretary William
4 Perry got an earful about the strains of
1. military life in an era of defense cut-
backs.
Pilots are overworked and
undertrained, he w,as told. Spouse and
alcohol abuse are increasing. Child
abuse, too.
"Should I be concerned, or deeply
concerned?" Perry asked Brig. Gen. John
Dallager Oct. 4 after being told that 21
of 23 air combat controllers had been
unable to meet training requirements
and needed waivers to remain on duty.
4. Perry, a mathematician and high-
. tech entrepreneur who has been in office
eight months, visited Spangdahlem dur-
ing a European tour undertaken in con-
nection with NATO meetings.
Dallager, commander of a fighter
(USSOUTHCOM) wing, told Perry that reports of spouse
Camp No. abuse among the base's 11,915 civilian
and military personnel are up nine per-
cent in the past year.
Child abuse is up 20 percent, he
S said; alcohol abuse is up 11 percent.
Pilot training, he said, has declined
sharply, and so has readiness to fight a
war.
Dallager showed slides, all right,
)ps but they involved the human strains of
0 meeting the base's commitments.
Dallager told the secretary -about
Tony and Louisa Clift, both senior air-
men. They are getting out of the Air
Force because they are so often apart.
He .told about Capt. Timothy J.
1 and talked Hogan, an A-10 fighter-bomber pilot
fibers. who spent nearly two-thirds of the past
litary mem- 22 months deployed away from the base
id said they and his family. Hogan's wife, Linda,
3 socks off' told an Air Force interviewer she feels
like a single parent.
h, he toured Dallager conceded that the increas-
table hospi- es in reported violence and other domes-
mp. tic problems could be the result of better
Castro, de- monitoring now that the base is "start-
eb., had her ing to take care of people."
y and talked "We've made this a priority," he
/isit. said.
with how he But the pressure that constant de-
de everyone ployments put on training is beyond
m to take the question, Dallager said.
see how and Air units from the base protect the
ro said. Kurdish population in northern Iraq,
ed by Maj. patrol the skies over Bosnia and provide
Army South logistics experts to the Rwanda relief
nama comrn- mission-all cutting into the time pilots
mes Wilson, and controllers need to keep up with
er. training, he said.
Poor weather in Germany frequent-
kW ly forces the pilots to go to bases in the
United States for a month or two to stay
current with the latest skills and technol-
* ogies, he said.
ji s Dallager said the crews are still ca-
ie s able but that the trend in training is in
the wrong direction.
Perry could offer no assurances of
ock project change.
cks in each "That trend will continue as long as
'. This will we have these operations," he said.
and simplify "Since we're not going to get an in-
ials said. creased force structure, there are two
as received options: We can reduce our operations
dryers. Also, tempo or we can use the Guard and
about occu- Reserves to supplement missions."
washers and For most of the past 40 years, this
he house to base has been on the front line of the
Cold War. If one of the nightmare sce-
nts they must narios of that era had developed-an
using office invasion of the West by Soviet forces-
nage will be pilots at Spangdahlem would have been
among the first into combat


Navy housing areas to get ne


appliances, recreational facility











Tropictivities
Oct. 7,1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page B1


-.o


.:.... . . ... .
.,..; ..,- �,


N,


Demonstrating the flute at Gamboa K Taylor (courtesy)
Renee Panca of Bolivia demonstrates the flute at the Gamboa Fair, the first fair of the season. For details, see the story and photos on page B3.


Bicycle registration at local
schools helps military police in
the fight against crime.


Canal Crafters get ready for
Christmas shoppers with class-
es, goods and more.


*Movies, Page B8
*TV, Page B9
+Potpourri, Page B12








B 2 Tropic Times
d Oct. 7, 1994


* Youth news


,=.^ i - ' '_"_ .


Staff Sgt. Jane Usero (U.S. Army)
Youths gather on Fort Clayton to register their bicycles with the military police.


Bicycle registration helps military


police in 'the fight against crime'


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Children at the
local Department of Defense Dependents Schools had a
chance to help themselves and the military police in the
fight against crime.
Last week, military police visited the local DoDDs
schools to help the children register their bicycles.
"We wanted to make sure the kids' bikes could get reg-
istered," said Sgt. Jeffery Sizemore, Crime Prevention
noncommissioned officer.
While this type of registration drive is only done occa-
sionally, children and adults can register their bicycles
anytime, he said.
Sizemore also said there are plans to possibly go door-
to-door to solicit bicycle registrations.
Those who haven't yet had the opportunity but would
like to register their bikes can do so at the Vehicle Regis-
tration Office at the pedestrian gate, Fort Clayton.
To register, bicycles do not have to be brought to the
registration office, he said. All bike owners have to bring
is information about the type of bike, manufacturer, serial

Teen wins national recognition
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - Tanya M. Bacot, a Bal-
boa High School senior, was selected as a semi-finalist in
a recent poetry contest. The National Library of Poetry of
Maryland will publish the 17-year-olds' work, "Now That
My Life Slips Into Sorrow," in the forthcoming antholo-
gy, "After the Storm." Her poem will also be entered in
the final competition to be held in the summer of 1995.
Bacot is the daughter of Robert and Maria Bacot of
Cardenas Village, and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs.
J.A. Lowe of McLeansville, N.C., and Mr. and Mrs. Ri-
chard Bacot Senior of Lamar, S.C.

Youth centers to issue ID cards
The Fort Clayton Youth and Senior Teen Centers
are changing membership policies effective Oct. 15.
In an effort to insure safety and security, the centers
will issue photo identification cards. These will be
used to verify that the card bearer is registered with
Youth Services. The card will also contain data nec-
essary to contact parents in the event of an emergen-
cy. Registration will take place 6-8 p.m. today and
Oct. 10-14 in Building 155. Parents must accompa-
ny children through the registration process. For in-
formation, call 287-3506 or 287-6451.


number and the color. The information will be taken and
put on permanent record and the owner will be given a
sticker to put on the bike.
"Registering your bike is such a simple process,"
Sizemore said. "Either people don't know how to or don't
care. Though registering a bike won't guarantee recovery
if stolen, it will guarantee that if the bike is found it will be
returned," he said.
While registration helps fight crime, other efforts
should be made to safeguard bikes.
Sizemore recommends that students lock their bikes
up on the bike racks when bringing their bikes to school,
and that while locking it up at night will help, residents
should bring their bikes inside.
"Locking up your bike is a deterrent; it will slow (a
bike thief) down," he said, "But bringing the bike inside
will help even more."
Sizemore said these efforts will help prevent bike
thefts. "Help your kids and yourself out and get your bi-
cycle registered," he said.


(courtesy)
Tanya M. Bacot, 17, is a national poetry contest
winner.


Albrook/Howard
*Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday eve-
nings. Classes for children, teens and adults.
Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for mem-
bers and $35 for non-members. 'Call to register.
Cheerleading lessons, Fridays at Albrook and
Saturday at Howard.
Guitar lessons, by appointment 1-6 p.m. Satur-
days.
Spanish lessons, for children and adults. Tues-
days and Thursdays at 4 and 5 p.m.
Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesday.
Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four
days a week. Special preschooler class Saturdays.
Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available
for ages four to adult.
*Just for teens:
DJ face off and dance 8:30-11:30 p.m. Satur-
day. Party at the Howard NCO Club with the "Ant-
hill Posse." Transportation is provided from Al-
brook Youth Center and Fort Clayton Senior Teen
Center.
Free self defense demonstration for girls 5
p.m. Oct. 22.
HIV/AIDS awareness, 4-5 p.m. Oct. 27. Call
284-5650 to register. Permission slips required.
Falltime party 8:30-11:30 p.m. Oct. 28. Wear
orange and black and get in free. The 'Anthill Pos-
se' will be playing in the Albrook Club ballroom.
Transportation is provided from Howard Youth
Center and Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center.
*Child Development Center 284-6135:
Family Day Care Providers are needed in the
Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 for
information.

Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Dodgeball 3 p.m. today.
Panama folklore fair noon-4 p.m. Saturday.
Shipped wrecked survival course Wednesday.
Treasure Hunt 3 p.m. Oct. 14.
Ping Pong tournament Oct. 15.
Not so scary Halloween is a happy Halloween
activity for toddlers to 10 years old. It will be held
4-7 p.m. Oct. 31. A $1 fee includes game prizes,
candy and a lot of fun.
Junior jazzercize for ages 6-12,4-5 p.m. Tutes-
days and Thursdays Building 155.
The new school hours for the center are: ages
6-14, 2:30-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday; ages 6-11,
2:30-6 p.m. Friday; ages 12-14, 2:30-8 p.m. Fri-
day; ages 6-11, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday; ages 12-
14, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday.
Youth Services is looking for piano and gym-
nastics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at
287-3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton.
Arts and crafts, Mondays.
Cooking experiences, Tuesdays.
Outdoor games, Thursdays.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Popcorn and movies, Sundays.
Senior Teen Employment Program, year-
round program to develop job skills and earn mon-
ey for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are avail-
able at the center.
Bowling at the Clayton Bowling Center 3
p.m. Saturday. Meet at the center at 2 p.m.
Medievel University 1-6 p.m. Oct. 15. Learn
about the dances and customs of the middle ages.
+Child Development Services 287-3301:
Spaces are available in the CDS part-day
program, Building 156 Fort Clayton, in the after-
noon session from 1-3 p.m. Preschoolers must be 3
years old and toddlers must be 2 years old by Oct.
31. For information, call 287-5507/5104.

Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Volunteers are needed to help with the haunt-
ed house.
Piano classes, 4-6 p.m. for 30-minute lessons
Monday and Wednesdays. There is a fee of $20
per person each month.
Arts and crafts, 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Saturday sports, noon to 6 p.m.
Scavenger hunt 3 p.m. today.


A�W FEMME=










SShopping


Tropic Tmes B3
Oct. 7, 1994B


Senor Garcia of Panama City stands in front of his collection of Mola art. If you don't find what you want, he'll get it custom made for you. Look for
him again at upcoming bazaars, and at his full-time booth in Balboa at Steven's Circle.


This fair begins the bazaar season,

just in time for Christmas shopping


Jeanne Shoemaker stops by a basket collection
at the Gamboa Fair.


"F1-
Rebekah Kilray (left) and Lauren Wolfe, stand in
front of the Cadette Girl Scout Troop 52 food
booth.


story and photos by Martha K. Taylor
Tropic Times contributor
his has become the fair that starts them
all each year, and Gamboa had
something for everyone.
Start with baskets. Baskets with lids, or baskets
without lids. Baskets that looked like armadillos,
baskets that looked like turtles. Huge baskets,
small baskets. Cheap baskets. And, of course,
baskets that will set you back a least next week's
paycheck.
The local fairs and bazaars are perfect places
to find those unique "no one in the states has
them" type of gifts. From molas to jewlery, this fair
had just about everything.
Jeanne Shoemaker, a 4th grade teacher at
Curundu Elementary School, said "I ended up
spending money and I just went to look."
If you think fairs of this sort are high-pressure
sales pitches, the you-can't-get-away type of
thing, then think again. I haven't found this to be
true, as long as you're willing to do some friendly
bargaining.
Shoemaker agreed. "The vendors were friendly
and pleasant," she said.
A mola is a gift that you can't get anywhere
else in the world from an original artist.
These pieces of cloth are wearable art. A $10
mola, framed in a shadow box, makes a perfect
gift and an attractive wall hanging. Craft shops in
the area will teach you how to make frames.
Many Mola artists, who are Cuna Indians,
will also custom make a mola shirt for you. You
provide the shirt, and they'll make a mola to
your request. Since most molas tell a story in
that art form, just about anything is possible.
Besides the molas, baskets and jewelry,
there are a wide-range of choices at these
bazaars. Want a 50-pound vase, or a tagua
carving no bigger than a 50-cent piece? You'll
find them.


Sometimes, hard-to-find items become
available, if you take the time to look. For several
months I had been looking for bird identification
books, and finally had to buy them from the
publisher in the United States.
But, the Audubon Society of Panama had the
same books at Gamboa, for less money!
Food and entertainment are usually provided
at bazaars, like at Gamboa. The food ranges
from the standard American hot dog to local
native dishes like bollos and rice. And flute
players will demonstrate the instruments they
have for sale.
There are several fairs and bazaars coming
up during the next month. Here's a list of the
one's I know about, but you might want to keep a
look out in the Tropic Times for more because
the lists are updated as new bazaars are sched-
uled. I've also added some alternative shopping
opportunities as well:
*Panama Folklore Fair, noon-4 p.m. Satur-
day, Clayton Youth Center.
*Howard and Albrook Officers Spouses Club
Bazaar, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 15, Albrook Club.
*Officers and Civilian Wives' Club-Panama
Bazaar, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 22, Club Amador.
*Howard and Albrook Enlisted Spouses' Club
Bazaar, 9 a.m.-3p.m. Oct. 29, Howard Enlisted
Members Club.
*EI Valle Shopping: Sunday, Oct. 16 and Oct.
30 through Howard's Zodiac Recreation Center;
Sunday and Oct. 23 through the Rodman ITT
office; and Sunday through Clayton's Valent
Recreation Center.
*Panama City Shopping through Rodman
ITT, Oct. 27.
*Free Zone Shopping, Monday and Oct. 26
through the Rodman ITT.
And finally, if there's anyone else interested in
birds or wildlife books, contact the Audubon
Society of Panama, Box 2026, Balboa, Panama,
phone 224-4740.










B 4 Tropic Times
Oct. 7, 1994


SFocus on Panama


Rosemary Chong (Tropic Times) (courtesy)
Juan Manuel Cedeno, renowned Panamanian painter, applies finishing touches to the portrait of one Juan Manuel Cedeno's painting of Vasco
of Panama's presidents. Nunez de Balboa at Balboa High School.



Renowned adfisf pains eminent men


W while visiting 80-year-old Juan
Manuel Cedeno, a renowned
Panamanian painter in his
atelier, he said "I am very pleased
because I can still see very well and my
pulse is steady. At my age, that in itself
is reason to believe there is a God."
Talking about the circumstances in
which he painted the Vasco Nunez de
Balboa portrait for the Balboa High
School students, he relates a curious
story.
"I painted that picture of Vasco
Nunez de Balboa, discoverer of the
Pacific Ocean, 33 years ago. Incidental-
ly, Balboa discovered the Pacific Ocean
Sept. 25, 1513, so it's almost an
anniversary of that event which took
place centuries ago.
"Normally every graduating class
wants to leave something in their
school to be remembered by. The Balboa
High School seniors of that year heard
that I was a Panamanian painter who
had studied art in the United States, so
they contacted me and asked if I could
do that painting for them.
"I had returned from Chicago about
10 years before, so I could still speak
English fluently-I have forgotten most
of it now. I realized that the kids did
not have a lot of money, so I suggested
that they take up a collection or make a
raffle. I did not know whether raffles
were allowed in the canal zone at that
time. I said, 'whatever you collect, that
is what I will charge for the painting.'
"I thought that maybe they could
raise around $500 or $600. At that time
that amount was enough for a down
payment on a new car. Six hundred
dollars then would be around $6,000
today.
"Anyway, I did the necessary
research, and painted the Balboa
picture. They liked it very much, but to
my surprise all they came up with was
$250. Well, I had given my word so I
accepted the payment.
"That is an interesting detail and part
of the story of that picture. I don't know
if a painter in this day and age would do
something like that just out of solidarity
with the students and without any
thought of making lots of money."
Cedeno was born in Los Santos and
he is very proud of this fact. He says
that he starts many of his paintings at


home in Los Santos and finishes them
in his atelier in Panama City.
Cedeno started his art studies in
Panama and then went to the School of
Fine Arts, Art Institute of Chicago, on a
scholarship.
"The school had a fine faculty body.
Most of them were Europeans, but there
were also very fine Americans profes-
sors." he said.


winners of the "University" award.
"This is a great honor," he said.
What type of artist is Cedeno?
'The question has been posed many
times. Since prehistoric times men have
painted. In the caves of Altamira, Spain
we can still see their paintings. Those
paintings had a useful purpose, they
conveyed messages concerning the
hunt. I feel that every painting should


Cedeno's supply box of paints, brushes.


"I learned anatomy, perspective, art
appreciation, history of the arts..." He
earned a bachelor's of fine arts degree,
but could not go on to get his master's
degree because his scholarship had run
out.
"A history of art cannot be written
without including the city of Chicago. It
is one of the most beautiful cities in the
United States. For example, its neo-
classical architecture is extremely
interesting. While I was there I met the
famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright.
He built the Rovin House at the
University of Chicago in 1892. I met
many famous personalities, movie stars,
and I saw Einstein, walking around the
campus with is hands behind his back. I
met Stefan Zweig. I met Ronald Reagan
when he was a young man," Cedeno
said.
Incidentally, Cedeno mentions that
he has just received a notification that
he has been chosen as one of two
professors that the National University
of Panama chooses every year as


send a message, aside from the obvious
one of form and color. Art is impossible
to define. It is mainly a matter of
individual preference, a matter of
culture."
During the last 50 or 60 years,
Cedeno has seen a lot of changes.
"Fifty years ago the American
people were largely unaware of Latin
America. I remember while living there
(in Chicago), Panama and the U.S. were
negotiating a treaty for U.S. bases in
Panama. The treaty came to be known
as the Filos-Hines treaty (of 1947) and
it was rejected by the National Assem-
bly.
"I remember reading the headlines in
the Chicago newspapers "Panama 51-0"
and thinking now the people are going
to realize Panama exists." Those were
the times of the "good neighbor
policy," sponsored by President Frankin
D. Roosevelt.
Cedeno said that he has earned a
living by teaching and by painting. He
was professor of arts at the National


University of Panama, until he retired.
"Today so many wonderful things
can be made with electronics, with
computers. I am learning how to use
computers. I do not want to feel
obsolete. One must keep up with the
times."
Keeing up with times, Cedeno
commented on modern art and painting.
"I feel very optimistic about the
future of painting in Panama. I know
many of the people who are painting
right now. There many art galleries,
many exhibits. We are progressing.
There are Panamanian painters who
have audacity and optimism and have
established contacts, especially with
New York, not in Europe, but in New
York and Miami. They have a goal, to
make Panamanian art known outside
the country. That is very good."
Cedeno normally paints by order,
seldom putting his work in galleries.
One such painting was of William
Gorgas.
'This picture was ordered by the
Director of Gorgas Hospital. I painted
Gorgas because I feel honored to have
painted eminent men who have played
a role in Panamanian history. Gorgas
did much good here in Panama,
together with Panamanians such as
Engineer Pedro J. Sosa. I have painted
the portraits of all of the heroes of
Panamanian independence. Many
portraits painted by me are in private
galleries in the states.
"What I do not do is to paint pictures
for the sole purpose of selling them. I
have not had many exhibits. I have
never had 25 or 30 paintings to ex-
hibit."
Cedeno had a parting comment for
the future. "At birth we all have
tendencies towards particular things.
Some are attracted to form and color.
Others are gifted with an ear for music
and so forth. I was born to paint and do
sculptures. I used to model things from
clay, sand, whatever came to my hands,
ever since I was a small child.
"A piece of advice for young
painters is to keep on striving and
progressing and never believe you
know everything there is to know."
by Rosemary Chong
Tropic Times staff











Community news


-S.

~a.
'


Staff SgL Jane Usero (U.S. Army)
Jamie Pool (left) and Brenda Wegner, family members, take part in a tolee painting" class at the
Canal Crafters Shoppe on Albrook AFS.


Canal Crafters ready for holidays


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
ALBROOK AFS - For the early Christmas shoppers,
the age-old dilemma of what to get for those on their
shopping lists is probably about to hit. Most shoppers will
be looking for gifts that are different, unique or something
specially made to fit a particular personality.
For those who find themselves in this dilemma, the
Canal Crafters Shoppe is already decked out in Christmas
cheer and ready for action.
In addition to the red and green Christmas decorations,
the shoppe carries hand-crafted items such as dolls, paint-
ings, woodworking, quilts and jewelry that, in most cases,
are one-of-a-kind, said Julie Konzelman, shoppe publicity
chairman.
"We also carry holiday specialty items such as Hallow-
een lawn ornaments and Thanksgiving table decorations,"
she said. "All items sold at the shoppe are hand made by
people in the military communities."
In addition to the items offered for sale through consign-
ment, the shoppe also offers craft supplies and classes such
as quilting, tole painting and cross stitching, said class
coordinator Margaret Gray.
"Anyone with a bilingual identification card can either
take or teach classes at the shoppe," she said. "Those
wanting to take a class can check the calendar at the shoppe
and those wanting to teach a class can get with me."
What is offered at the shoppe, both in items available for
purchase and classes, has increased drastically since the
shoppe first opened one year ago.
What has not changed, however, is the reason for the
shoppe.
"The shoppe is here not only to offer community
members a place to sell their hand crafted items and for
others to buy just the right gift," Konzelman said. "It also


helps the community by contributing profits back into the
community. With an all-volunteer staff, the profits earned
from the shoppe go to the Panama Region Interservice
Scholarship Fund."
About $2,000 has been earned since the shoppe opened
and it is expected to be much more this year, she said.
The monetary benefits to the community are also made
through those who consign their crafts to be displayed and
sold through the shoppe.
"When someone brings an item in to be sold, they set the
price," Konzelman said. "There is a 25 percent consignors
fee for those who don't volunteer at the shop and a 15
percent fee for those who do volunteer eight hours or two
days a month."
In addition to the monetary benefits of the shoppe,
crafters and wanna-be crafters have a convenient place to
go for supplies. The shop stocks supplies for such crafts as
stenciling, T-shirt decorating, tole painting and cross stitch-
ing as well as how-to books for various crafts.
"If we don't carry a certain supply item a shopper is
looking for, in most cases we can order it for them,"
Konzelman said. "If someone is looking for something in
particular, they can come by the shop and look through our
.catalogs. If it's there, we can order it for them."
Another way the shoppe helps those in the community
is through volunteerism.
"The shoppe is run totally by volunteers from through-
out the community," Konzelman said. "Through volun-
teering at the shoppe, not only does the shoppe and the
community benefit, but the individual as well."
Volunteers are always welcome as are new ideas com-
munity members may have for the shoppe, she said.
Anyone wanting to volunteer or needing more informa-
tion can call 286-4500 during operating hours or stop by the
shoppe in Building 804, Albrook AFS, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Monday-Saturday.


Consumers week honored


FORT CLAYTON (ACS) - Na-
tional Consumers Week has become
an established annual tradition for state
and local consumer offices, business-
es, government agencies, voluntary
organizations and individual consum-
ers. Each year, the last week of Octo-
ber is dedicated to the ongoing need to
educate and inform consumers about
their rights and responsibilities in the
marketplace.
To achieve this goal, Army Com-
munity Service will be presenting a
series of articles to enhance the impor-
tance of this week. This year National
Consumers Week will be observed
Oct. 23-29. For information, call ACS
at 287-6322.
Consumers' rights are protected by
federal and state laws and regulations
covering many services offered by fi-
nancial institutions. Thefollowing syn-


opsis may help if a problem arises.
The "Electronic Fund TransferAct"
provides consumer protection for all
transactions using a debit card or elec-
tronic means to debit or credit an ac-
count. It also limits a consumer's lia-
bility for unauthorized electronic fund
transfers.
The "Equal Credit Opportunity Act"
prohibits discrimination against an
applicant for credit because of age,
sex, marital status, religion, race, col-
or, national origin, or receipt of public
assistance. It also prohibits discrimi-
nation because of a good faith exercise
of any rights under the federal con-
sumer credit laws. If a consumer has
been denied credit, the law requires
notification of the denial in writing.
The consumer may request, within 60
days, that the reason for denial be
provided in writing.


A


Consumers' Bill of Rights
Right to choice - the right to
make an intelligent choice among
products and services.
Right to information- the right
to accurate information on which
to make a free choice.
Right to safety - the right to
expect the health and safety of the
buyer are taken into account by
those seeking patronage.
Right to be heard - the right to
register dissatisfaction and have a
complaint heard and weighed when
a buyer's interests are badly served.
Right to consumer education
- the right to consumer education
without which consumers cannot
gain the full benefit of the other
fourrights- will help all consum-
ers to maximize their resources,
become more effective in the mar-
ketplace and to achieve the great-
est personal satisfaction.


Tropic Times B5
Oct. 7, 1994B





Clayton
The Exceptional Family Member Program
Support Group meeting will be held 7:30-9 p.m.
Oct. 18 at the Valent Recreation Center. All active
duty military and Department of Defense personnel
with family members with disabilities are invited to
attend. If special services or accommodations are
needed because of a disability or for information,
call 287-5073/4921.
The Department of Defense Dependent
Schools in Panama, along with Army Communi-
ty Service are conducting "Child Find Activi-
ties" in an effort to locate all eligible children with
disabilities in need of special education services.
Newly arrived military and U.S. Government-spon-
sored families with dependents in need of special
education and medically related services should
contact their local DoD school for program planning
and enrollment. Contact any local DoD school or the
Exceptional Family Member Program manager at
287-4921/5073.
U.S. Army Public Affairs is coordinating the
1994 Joint Task Force-Panama Christmas Spon-
sorship Program. Units or community groups
wanting to participate this year should call USAR-
SO PAO at 287-3007/4109.
The 142nd Medical Battalion and 235th Sup-
port Battalion family support group will meet 7
p.m. Friday in the battalion dayroom. Meetings are
open to family members and unit soldiers.
The telephone number for the La Leche
League and mothers seeking help or information
about breastfeeding is 287-6592.


Howard/Albrook
The Howard Family Support Center will offer a
checkbook maintenanceworkshop 8-10 a.m. Oct.
14 at the FSC. For reservations, call 284-5010.
Family Advocacy is offering classes to teach
spouses how to deal with the stress involved in
being part of today's fast paced environment. Class-
es will be held at the Howard Family Support Center
conference room, Building 707 Howard AFB 5:30-
6:30 p.m.Wednesday and 8:30-9:30 p.m. Oct. 25.
Call in advance for child care. Call Laila Yeager at
284-5010 to sign-up.
The Howard Family Support Center will of-
fer a spouse orientation course in English 10-11
a.m. Oct. 20 at the FSC. This workshop is offered
twice a month to spouses who attend the Right Start
Orientation. For more information, call 284-5010.
The Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses Club
will be selling table spaces for its Annual Bazaar 10
a.m.-noon Tuesday in front of the Howard Post
Office. Non-privilege card holders can purchase
spaces from 10 a.m.-noon Wednesday at the Visi-
tor' s Center at the front gate of Howard AFB. Tables
are $20 and $30. The bazaar will be held Oct. 29 at
the Howard Enlisted Club. Call 284-6874 for infor-
mation. The club will also hold its monthly meeting
7 p.m. Monday at the club.


Miscellaneous
The Officers' and Civilians' Wives Club-Pa-
cific Pumpkin Patch Christmas Bazaar will be
held 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 22 at Club Amador. In
addition, individual and family professional Christ-
mas portrait photos will be taken in the La Concha
Room of Club Amador on the day of the bazaar.
Reasonably priced packages will be available in
plenty of time for Christmas. More than 100 vendors
will be showing goods of all nature. This is the
perfect opportunity to buy some special gifts.
Those expecting a new baby should ensure
birth registration information is obtained as ear-
ly as possible before the baby is born. The informa-
tion sheet, form 1080, is available through Gorgas
Army Community Hospital OB-GYN Clinic and
the Admissions and Dispositions Office. The form
is also available through the Fort Sherman U.S.
Army Health Clinic emergency room. Originals or
certified copies from the original registrar's office or
city court must be submitted with all legal docu-
ments. If, at the time of delivery, the mother is
referred to a civilian hospital in Panama City, call the
birth registrar at Gorgas for information. This regis-
tration is a long, but necessary, procedure. For
information, call 282-5242/5409.


h,..
t . '.
'^-










B 6 Tropic Times
00 Oct. 7, 1994


Rodman
*Information, Tour and Travel:
Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. Satur-
day and Oct. 21, $65, two people needed.
Visit the tropical research island in the
Panama Canal's Gatun Lake.
El Valle 7 a.m. Sunday and Oct. 23,
$12. Shop for local handicrafts, plants,
fruits and vegetables and visit nature pre-
serve.
Free Zone shopping trip 7 a.m.
Wednesday and Oct. 26, $12.
Panama City tour 9 a.m. Wednesday
and Oct. 22, $8. Visit the Golden Altar, the
French Plaza and more.
San Bias Islands 6 a.m. Oct. 14-15,
$149 fee includes transportation, accom-
modations, food, island tours and activi-
ties.
Trolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. Satur-
day and Oct. 22, $48/person. Fish Pana-
ma's prolific waters for marlin, sailfish,
dolphin (fish), bonita, Spanish mackeral
and more. Fee includes captain, gear,
lures and iced coolers.
Moonlight cruise 6:30 p.m. Oct. 15,


$21. Cruise out to Taboga Island for cock-
tails and hors d'oeuvres by moonlight,
while viewing Panama City's dramatic
skyline at night.
Bottom-fishing on the Vargas, Oct.
16 and 30, $35 adults, $20 kids under 14.
A great outing for the whole family. Catch
snapper, grouper and other bottom feed-
ing fish. Fee includes captain, gear, live
bait and iced coolers.
Downtown shopping 9 a.m. Oct. 27,
$8. Shop Panama's Central Avenue and
Via Espana.

Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
ter:
Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fri-
days, $13.
El Valle shopping 6:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m. Sunday and Oct. 16 and 30, $13.
Beer Brewery & lock tour 9 a.m.-3
p.m. Wednesday, $6.
Dining out Italian style 6-10 p.m.
Oct. 19, $3.
Colonial Panama & Ruins tour 9
a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 22, $6.


Rio Mar Beach trip 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
Oct. 23, $12.
Panama museums tour 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Oct. 26, $5. Bring money for entrance fee
and lunch.
*Outdoor adventures:
Drakes Island scuba, snorkeling 7
a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 22, $22 snorkelers, $47
scuba.
Gold panning in Bique, 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Oct. 21, $12.
Peacock bass fishing in Lake Gatun
5 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday and Oct. 14 and 29,
$25. Bring fishing gear and bags.
Nature tour to Barro Colorado Is-
land 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Thursday and Oct. 20,
$65, lunch is included.
El Valle horseback riding, 7 a.m.-4
p.m. Oct. 15, $24.

Clayton
*Valent Recreation Center:
Panama City tour 6:30 a.m.-3:30
p.m. Saturday.
Panama City shopping 9a.m.-3 p.m.,
Oct. 15.
Free Zone 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 18.


*Outdoor Recreation Center:
There is Contadora Island transit ser-
vice Friday through Monday. Fees are $35
adults and $20 children 12 and under round
trip, $25 adults and $15 children one way.
Ecotourism trip to a Chocoe Indian
Village Oct. 15, $30 adults, $20 children
under 12.
Partial transits of the Panama Canal
7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, $35 adults, $15
children 12 years old and younger. A mini-
mum of 20 people is needed for a partial
transit any other day of the week.
Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel op-
portunity to Montego Bay any Sunday
through Wednesday. Packet includes air-
fare, three nights hotel accommodations,
and transfer. Prices vary from $300-$600
depending on the hotel.

Balboa
*Balboa Dive Club:
The club is organizing a trip to Isla
Iguana Saturday-Monday. The $140 fee
covers two-night accommodations, meals, r'
transportation and three guided boat dives.
Space is limited. Call 263-4998.


* 0


Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Center:
Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturday a
Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195.
Spanish lessons 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Thurs-
days at Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195.
Martial arts classes at Howard and Al-
brook Youth Centers, 284-4700.
Tae Kwon Do karate classes at Zodiac
Center for children and adults.
Beginner and advanced dog obedience
classes, $32 for 4 weeks.
Beginner and advanced English and Span.
ish classes offered monthly.
*Albrook Auto shop:
Air conditioning service and repair 12:30-
5 p.m. daily except Tuesday and Wednesday.
Wheel alignment diagnostic and service
classes are held 3-9 p.m. Monday, Thursdays
and Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday anc
Sunday.
*Howard and Albrook pools
Intro to scuba, free, call for appointment.
Open water scuba class Saturday a
Howard, Oct. 15 at Albrook, $145.
Advanced scuba Oct. 19 at Howard
Water aerobics for advanced adult swim-
mers at Howard and Albrook.
*Howard Wood Skills Center, Bldg. 722
Lathe class 6-8 p.m. today, $15. Three
week class.

Clayton
/ *Fort Clayton Pool:
The pool is looking for qualified teacher'
for swimming and water aerobics. Call 287.
6660.
Beginning and advanced swimming les-
sons 2:15-5:45 p.m. Monday through Thurs


* - *


Tops in Blue
*Howard Base Theater:
Come and see a spectacular show fea-
turing a nostalgic and contemporary look at
the greatest movie themes ever written.
Performers are all Air Force active duty
military members. There will be two shows
starting at 5 and 8 p.m. today at the Howard
Base Theater.


days for adults and children over 3 years
$20 for 12 classes.
*Fort Clayton Boat/Scuba Shop:
Open water scuba class meets fir
third Monday of each month, $125. Inc
five pool sessions, five theory session
four open water dives.
Long set equipment rental $19 pe
*Valent Recreation Center:
Private piano and guitar lessons ava
weekday evenings.
Korean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesday
Thursday.
Rodman
*Navy Morale. Welfare and Recr
Office:
The Navy MWR is seeking qualify
structors to teach Spanish and Frenc
guage courses. Applicants should hav
e experience in teaching elementary an
s versational language courses. Call 283-
Curundu
*Pacific Theatre Arts Centre:
Reservations for Christmas Villa
bles is under way 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at the C
Piano lessons are held 3-7 p.m. Moi
Tuesday, Wednesdays and Fridays. 0
students ages six and older.
Martial arts 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday
Thursday. Open to all ages
Voice lessons are held 3-5:30p.m. We
days and Thursdays.
Guitar lessons are held 3-6 p.m. Tu(
Registration for all dance classes is
way at Building 2060, Curundu. Jazz li
are available for teens and adults as fo
s I: 5-6 p.m. Monday and Wednesday
- II: 6-7 p.m. Monday and Wedne
$32.
Other classes: modem, ballet, tap, fc
ic, salsa, belly dancing and saxophone





Auto safety contest
*Howard Auto Skills Center:
The center is sponsoring a Speed
with Safety Contest 10 a.m. Oct. 15.
This event is for couples to see how fast
they can work together to get a tire
changed using all safety procedures.
Winning couple will receive a free oil
change and tune-up, parts not included.
Sign up by calling 284-3370.


s.ree:

st and
cludes
ns and

r day.

ailable

es and


nation

ed in-
h lan-
e prior
d con-
-4301.


1ge ta-
entre. .
days,
)pen to

ys and

ednes-

esdays
under
lessons
allows:
ys $32.
says, San Bias
The Navy Morale, Welfare a
olklor- Office is sponsoring a San B
- Navy and visit the beautiful i
sand and its crystal waters.
77-7 .


Annua
*Zodiac
ter:
The cent
Volksmarch
Parade Field
will be awar


I Volksmarch
Community Activities Cen-

er is sponsoring this year's
7 a.m. Oct. 10 at the Howard
I. Bronze and silver medals
rded to the 10k and 20k walk


participants. Entry fees are $6 for prcreg-
istration and $7 at the starting gate. A
bazaar and food booths will be available.


(/ ropic limes)

nd Recreation Information, Tour and Travel
Blas Islands trip 6 a.m. Oct. 14-15. Join the
islands of San Blas and enjoy the hot sun, the


/*y//'// / /

For registration and information, call 84-
6161.

Fund tea
* Isthmian College Club:
The Isthmian College Club will spon-
sor a scholarship fund tea 4 p.m. Oct. 15
at the Panama Hotel. Cost is $15 and
includes door prizes and a jewelry fash-
ion show.


//


//_________________
5/


/


ILN


a


y










tices


Tropic Times
Oct. 7, 1994 B


iTli


i


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/
sI


C:'


'p


~. 9


(Tropc Times)


Hobbyists gather
The Howard Skills Development Center Is offering Intermediate ceramic painting classes 10:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m. Wednesday. Learn the application of multiple color coats, mother-of-pearl and
mask and peel. The arts and crafts centers offer classes on all phases of ceramics and other
hobbies.


A *


*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts

The Ceramic Center, Building
198, is located near the Crafts Shop.
*Canal Crafters:
Handmade arts and crafts are
available, consignments and vol-
unteers are welcome. The shop
hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. M.,nday
through Saturday. The shop i now
accepting holiday consignments,
Building 804, Albrook.
Register for the following class-
es at the shop.
Wall hanging quilts 10:15 a.m.-
12:15 p.m. Saturday, $20.
Baby quilts 10:15 a.m.-12:15





*Valent Recreation Center:
Better Opportunities for
Single Soldiers next meeting is Oct.
20.
The screening room offers free
movies. Call the 24-hourmovie line,
287-4367 for days and times.
Volunteers needed to perform
as horror characters for the Haunt-


p.m. Tuesday, $22.
Tole-painting, Halloween items
10:15 a.m. Thursday, $15/$20.
Cross stitch demo, Christmas
stocking 10:15 a.m. today, free.
Paper mold class, 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday, $3, supplies included.
*Howard Skills Development
Center:
The center is having a 25 percent
off selected scribbles and fabric
paints, today and Saturday.
Leather & wood sale Oct. 14-
15. 25 percent off unpainted wood
and leather items.
The center is looking for
crafters to sell items in the new


/ -


ed House Oct 29. Interest
must be age 18 and older
*Cocoli Community
Videos for children
Thursday.
Laser disc movies 7
Friday.
*Zodiac Community
Subs on Top has new


consignment boutique.
Instructors are needed to teach
classes on a contract basis for a
variety of crafts, decorative paint-
ing, calligraphy, watercolors, oil
painting. Call 284-6361.
Padded heart box 1-3 p.m.
Wednesday, $5 plus supplies.
Cake decorating 7-9 1, n.
Thursday, $25 plus supphes.
Intermediate ceramic painting
10:30 a.m.-l p.m. Thursday, $15,
three weeks.
Ongoing classes: stained glass,
framing, air brush, lamp assembly,
cross stitch, macrame, clay flower,
ceramic and 'how to videos.'


//

ed people a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays- Fridays, 11
r. a.m.- 3 p.m. Saturday. It is in the
Center: Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
4 p.m. ter. Take-out, eat-in and delivery /
services are available. Phone or-
7 p.m. ders to 284-5848, fax to 284-6109.
Rnf the a activities room and -


Center;
hours, 11


the Big Tree Bohio for parties or
any other function.


Phone guide

Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989.
Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-0075
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363
Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador, 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010
Corozal Thrift Shop, 285-5989
Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370
Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107
Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680
Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361
Howard Teen Center, 284-4700
Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
The Loop, 287-3035
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380
Rodman Annex, 283-5475
Rodman Club, 283-4498
Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150
Rodman Naval Station Information Tour
and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454
Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500
Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-6161

Atlantic
Aquativity Center, 289-4009
Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201
Davis Community Club, 289-5160
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402
Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077
Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313
Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300


Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays. Atlantic tours
BRe center nPews Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. Monday.
Rec center news Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and Fridays. *Sundial Recreation Center:
*Sundial Recreation Center: Piano lessons 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesday. Panama City 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday.
Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6 p.m. Thurs- *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Isla Grande 8 a.m. Sunday.
days. The center offers various of classes: Kara- El Valle, 5:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. Oct. 16.
Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednes- te, cake decorating, Spanish, English, piano, *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center;
days. country line-dancing and jazz. Call 289-6402 Rio Mar 7 a.m. Saturday.
Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Monday, for more information on schedules and registra- Portobelo & Isla Langosta 8 a.m. Sunday.
Wednesday and Fridays. tion. El Valle over night Oct. 15-16.


00,









B 8 Tropic Times
Oct. 7, 1994


SMovies


Oct. 14

Howard AFB
7pm Andre (PG)
Keith Carradine,
Tina Majorino
9pm The Mask (PG-13)
Jim Carrey,
Richard Jeni


Fort Clayton
6:30pm True Lies
(R) Arnold
Schwarzenegger
Jamie Lee Curtis
9:15pm City Slickers 2
(PG-13) Billy
Crystal, Daniel
Stern ($1.50/$1)

Fort Davis
7pm Black Beauty (G)
David Thewlis,
Sean Bean
9pm Airheads (PG-13)
Brendan Fraser,
Steve Buscemi


Fort Sherman
7pm Above the Rim
(R) Duane Martin.
Leon ($1.50/$1)


Fort Amador
7pm Speed (R)
Keanu Reeves,
Dennis Hopper


The Mask
Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni
Nobody does super powers like Jim
Carrey. An ordinary, mild-mannered
bank clerk is transformed into the weird-
est super hero of all time when he dons
his mask. PG-13 (some stylized vio-
lence), I hr, 40 min.

Andre
Keith Carradine, Tina Majorino
An amazing true story of the seal that
became a living legend. An adorable
newborn seal is orphaned after his moth-
er is caught in a fisherman's net. The pup
is nursed back to health by the animal
loving Whitney family, who name him
Andre. PG (teen mischief, mild violence,
language),1 hr, 34 min.

In the Army Now
Pauly Shore, Lori Petty
Pauly Shore is not the ideal troop. He in
fact, joined the Army Reserves for the
bennies and the regular salary. Reality
kicks in when he becomes a part of a
mission involving actual combat. PG
(some war action, mild language) 1 hr,
31 min.

It Could Happen
to You
Nicholas Cage, Bridget Fonda
A New York City cop lacking change
tips a waitress with a promise to split the
winnings from his lottery ticket if he
wins. When he wins and wants to make
good on the promise, it will be over
strong opposition from his wife. PG (mild
language, scene of cop action), I hr, 41
min.

True Lies
Arnold Schwarzenegger,
Jamie Lee Curtis
Harry Tasker is a special agent for Ome-
ga Sector, a top secret agency charged
with nuclear terrorism intervention. Flu-
ent in six languages and skilled in all


THE MOVIE EVENT ,

OF THE YEAR.'
-Mike Cidlon, NMN RADIO NETWORK N '

Schwarzenegger


*r** " " .


Now showing at Howard and Clayton theaters.
forms of counter intelligence, Harry is an station yet of a John Grisham novel. A
international spy who has kept his real young boy witnesses the suicide of a
profession secret from his wife. R (ac- mob lawyer and hires Susan Sarandon,
tion, violence, language), I hr, 82 min. a former addict, to protect him from
federal prosecutor Tommy Lee Jones
Black Beauty and mobster Barry Muldano, both of
David Thewlis, Sean Bean whom think he knows where the body
A heartwarming drama based on the fam- ofa U.S. senator is buried. PG- 13 (child
ily classic novel by Anna Sewell tells the in jeopardy, language), 2 hrs.
story of a time in history when horses
were essential to men's lives. One horse Lassie
named Black Beauty has good and bad Helen Slater, Richard Farnsworth
owners, suffers misfortune then finds Everybody's favorite collie Lassie is
friendship and is given a secure home back for her ninth film (the eighth gen-
and loving caretaker. G, 99 min. eration descendant of the original dog).
Picked up as a stray by the Turner
Airheads family moving from Baltimore to Vir-
Brendan Fraser, Steve Buscemi ginia's Shenandoah Valley, Lassie leads
Three metal heads desperate to get their her new masters nto sheep ranching
demo song played on the radio inadvert- PG (language, suspense), 1 hr 34 min.
ently take a radio station hostage. PG- 13 Speed
(crude dialogue and some sexuality), 1
hr, 29 min. Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper
LAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played
The ittl Rascals by Keanu Reeves, is known as a man
The Little Rascals with an attitude caused by Dennis Hop-
Travis Tedford, Bug Hall per, a sociopath who nearly killed him
Steven Spielberg produces an appealing in an earlier encounter. R (violence,
update of the Hat Roach comedy series language), 1 hr, 51 min.
from the '20s, '30s and '40s. The gang
has established a boy's only club; how- Wolf
ever, things change when Alfalfa falls Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer
for Darla. PG (rude dialogue) Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer
for Darla. PG (rude dialogue) We all know what happens when you
get bit by a werewolf, right? But, do
The Client you know what might happen if Jack
Susan Sarandon, Tommy Lee Jones Nicholson gets bit? R (language,
Set in New Orleans, this is the best adap- werewolf attacks), 2 hrs.


Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Howard AFB 5 and 8pm: Tops in 2pm: It Could Happen 2pm: True Lies 2pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could Happen 7pm: The Mask 7pm: In the Army
284-3583 Blue (Snack stand to You (PG) (R) Arnold (R) Arnold to You (PG) (PG-13) Now (PG)
opened) Nicolas Cage, Schwarzenegger, Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore,
Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Richard Jeni Lori Petty
6:30pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could 6:30pm: True Lies 9:30pm: True Lies 9:30pm: Speed (R) 9pm: The Mask
(R) Arnold Happen to You (PG) (R) (R) Arnold Keanu Reeves, (PG-13)
Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, 9:30pm: It Could Schwarzenegger, Dennis Hopper Jim Carrey,
Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Happen to You (PG) Jamie Lee Curtis Richard Jeni
9:30pm: True Lies Nicolas Cage,
) ( 9:30pm: True Lies Bridget Fonda
(R)

Fort Clayton 7pm: Black Beauty 2pm: The Little 2pm: Black Beauty 7pm: Airheads 7pm: The Little 7pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could
287-3279 (G) Rascals (PG) (G) David Thewlis, (PG-13) Rascals (PG) (R) Arnold Happen to You (PG)
David Thewlis, Travis Tedford, Sean Bean Brendan Fraser, Travis Tedford, Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage,
Sean Bean Bug Hall 7pm: The Little Steve Buscemi Bug Hall Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda
9pm: Airheads 7pm: Black Beauty (G) Rascals (PG) 9pm: Blown Away (R) 9pm: Black Beauty 9:30pm: Wolf (R) 9:30pm: True Lies
(PG- 13) David Thewlis, Travis Tedford, Jeff Bridges, (G) Jack Nicholson, (R) Arnold
Brendan Fraser, Sean Bean Bug Hall Tommy Lee Jones David Thewlis, Michelle Pfeiffer Schwarzenegger,
Steve Buscemi 9pm: Airheads (PG-13) 9pm: Black Beauty Sean Bean Jamie Lee Curtis
Brendan Fraser, (G) David Thewlis,
Steve Buscemi Sean Bean

Fort Davis 7pm: Lassie (PG) 2pm: Lassie (PG) 7pm: The Client 7pm: Lassie (PG) 7pm: Above the Rim 7pm: Airheads 7pm: The Little
289-5173 Helen Slater, Helen Slater, (PG-13) Helen Slater, (R) Duane Martin, (PG-13) Rascals (PG)
Richard Farnsworth Richard Farnsworth Susan Sarandon, Richard Farnsworth Leon Brendan Fraser, Travis Tedford,
9pm: The Client 7pm: The Client Tommy Lee Jones Steve Buscemi Bug Hall
(PG-13) ((PG-13)
(PG-13) Susan Sarandon,
Susan Sarandon, Tommy Lee Jones
Tommy Lee Jones 9pm: The Crow (R)
Brandon Lee,
Ernie Hudson
Fort Sherman 7pm: Speed (R) 7pm: Lassie (PG) 7pm: The Crow (R) No show No show No show 7pm: Airheads
Keanu Reeves, Helen Slater, Brandon Lee, (PG-13)
289-5173 Dennis Hopper Richard Farnsworth Ernie Hudson Brendan Fraser,
Steve Buscemi

Fort Amador 7pm: Wolf (R) 7pm: The Mask 7:30pm: In the No show No show 7pm: It Could Happen 7pm: Andre (PG)
Jack Nicholson, (PG-13) Army Now (PG) to You (PG) Keith Carradine,
284-3583 Michelle Pfeiffer Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore, Nicholas Cage, TinaMajorino
Richard Jeni Lori Petty Bridget Fonda













*TV Schedule


Tropic Times 1
Oct. 7, 1994B9


n * Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30 Headline News 6:00 CCMTV 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Moming America 7:00 Navy/Marine Corps News 6:30 Outreach of Love 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25) 7:30 Real News for Kids 7:00 Parliament of Souls 8:00 Basic Training Workout w/Panama Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25)
8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Guts 7:30 Lifestyle Magazine 8:30 Sesame Street 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Just for Kids! 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 9:30 Portrait of America 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America Garfield & Friends 9:30 This Week w/Brinkley 10:25 Guiding Light 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America
10:25 Guiding Light Teenage Mutant Ninja 10:30 Face the Nation 11:10 General Hospital 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital Turtles 11:00 Inside the NFL 12:00 Headline News 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break Biker Mice from Mars 12:00 NFL Football: 12:30 Sports Machine 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now Batman Cartoon Indianapolis Colts vs. 1:00 Another World 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sportscenter Cartoon Classics New York Jets 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World 10:30 Faerie Tale Theater 3:00 Paradise + 3:00 Price is Right 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey 11:00 Spies 4:30 Rescue 911+ 4:00 Guts 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Donahue
3:00 Price is Right 12:00 Headline News 5:30 In the Heat of the Night + 4:30 I Love Lucy 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Think Fast! 12:30 Movie: "Windwalker" 6:30 Hearts Afire 5:00 Family Feud 4:00 Reading Rainbow 4:00 Shining Time Station 4:00 In the Mix
4:30 I Love Lucy 2:30 College Football: 7:00 Dr. Quinn: Medicine 5:30 The Cosby Show 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud Oklahoma Sooners vs. Woman 6:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show Texas Longhorns 8:00 L.A. Law 6:30 World News Tonight 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 Headline News Break 5:30 Headline News 9:00 ABC 20/20 7:00 Jeopardy ** 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 World News Tonight 6:00 Evening Shade + 10:00 Top Cops 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break
7:00 28th Annual Country 6:30 College Football: 11:00 Miami Vice 8:00 Mad About You 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News 'tonight
Music Awards Florida State Seminoles 12:00 Movie: "Stalking Laura" 8:30 Cops 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 Wheel of Fortune
10:00 Panama Now vs. Miami Hurricanes 2:00 Sports Latenight 9:00 60 Minutes 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now
10:05 Cheers 9:30 Walker: Texas Ranger 2:30 Frugal Gourmet 10:00 Cheers 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment tonight
10:30 David Letterman 10:30 Saturday Night Live 3:00 Headline News 10:30 David Letterman 8:00 Answerline 8:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 8:00 ALF
11:30 Tonight Show 12:00 WWF Superstars of 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 11:30 Tonight Show 9:00 Northern Exposure 8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 8:25 Movie: "The Stand"
12:30 Ren and Stimpy Wrestling 4:00 Jeopardy 12:30 M*A*S*H 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 Culture Clash (Part 4 of 4)
1:00 Movies: "The Killing 1:00 Friday Night Videos 4:30 Videolinks 1:00 Movies:"Bless the Beast 10:05 Cheers 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition
Fields" 2:00 Movies: "Rio Bravo" 5:00 Headline News and Children" 10:30 David Letterman 10:05 Cheers 10:05 Cheers
3:30 "Shakedown" 4:300 "Run 'till You Fall" 2:45 "The Caine Mutiny" 11:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Letterman 10:30 David Letterman
5:00 "Harry and the 5:00 Headline News Break 12:30 M*A*S*H 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show
Hendersons" 1:00 Movies: "The Dresser" 12:30 M*A*S*H 12:30 M*A*S*H
3:00 "Ghostbusters" 1:00 Movies: "Murphy's 1:00 Movies: "Jubal"
5:00 Headline News Break Romance" 2:00 "Old Gringo"
2:50 "Madame Sousatzka" 5:00 Headline News Break
5:00 Headline News Break





g * -'I t * Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:00 Washington Week in 4:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:30 Young Adult Theater Review ** 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
9:00 Today "My Past is My Own" 6:30 Shining Time Station 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek "Mark Twain and Me" 7:00 The Sunshine Factory 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break "Private Affairs" 7:25 Goof Troop 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now 11:35 Channel One/Newsroom** 7:50 Muppet Babies ** 12:30 All My Children 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children 12:05 Silver Spoons 8:20 Disney's The Little 1:30 One Life to Live 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live 12:30 Movies: "The Ugly Mermaid 2:30 Young and the Restless 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless Dashchund" 8:30 Batman 3:30 Batman 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja 2:09 "Bonnie and Clyde" 8:40 Cartoon Classic 4:00 Fraggle Rock 3:30 Where on Earth is Carmen 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Muppet Babies **
4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 21 Jump Street 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja 4:30 The Adventures of Pete Sandiego? 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Reading Rainbow 5:00 1993 National Rodeo Turtles & Pete 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Guts 4:30 Nick Arcade
5:00 Silver Spoons Finals 9:30 Movie: "Walk Don't 5:00 In the Mix 4:30 Think Fast 5:00 Beakman's World 5:00 Fact of Life
5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 Doctor, Doctor Run" 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Disney's Raw Toonage 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 Headline News 6:30 Dinosaurs 11:30 This Old House 6:00 Headline News Break 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 CBS Evening News 7:00 Christy 11:55 Amish Cooking from 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break
7:00 Star Trek: The Next 8:00 Star Trek: Deep Space Quilt Country 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 CBS Evening News
Generation Nine 12.25 Movie: "A Star is Born" Generation 6:30 CBS Evening News 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 NFL Football:
7:55 Panama Now 9:00 Herman's Head *** 3:00 NFL Football: Kansas 8:00 Monday Night Football: 7:00 Star Trek: The Next Generation *** Cleveland Browns vs.
8:00 Roseanne 9:30 Married With Children City Chiefs vs. San Diego Minnesota Vikings vs. Generation 7:55 Panama Now Houston Oilers
8:30 The Boys are Back 10:00 Movie: "The Color of Chargers New York Giants 7:55 Panama Now 8:00 Sinbad Show w/Panama Now
(New Fall Series) Money" 6:00 Wonderful World of 11:00 Headline News 8:00 Home Improvement 8:30 Family Matters 10:00 SCN Late Edition
9:00 Primetime Live 12:00 Headline News Disney + 11:30 Nightline 8:30 My So Called Life 9:00 Wise Guy 10:05 Boys Meet World +
10:00 SCN Late Edition 12:30 Science and Technology 7:00 NFL Football: 12:00 Cheers (New Fall Series) 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:35 Living Single ***+
10:05 Renegade Week Washington Redskins vs. 12:30 M*A*S*H 9:30 Frasier 10:05 Tour of Duty 11:05 L.A. Law +
11:00 Headline News Break 1:00 The McLaughlin Group Philadelphia Eagles 1:00 Headline News 10:00 SCN Late Edition 11:00 Headline News 12:00 Cheers
11:30 Nightline 1:30 Sports Latenight 10:00 Buck James 1:30 Sports Latenight 10:05 McKenna (New Fall Series) 11:30 Nightline 12:30 M*A*S*H
12:00 Cheers*H 2:00 Entertainment this week 11:00 Eye to Eye w/C. Chung 2:00 David Letterman 11:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Cheers 1:00 Headline News
1:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 11:30 Nightline 12:30 M*A*S*H 1:30 Sports Latenight
1:30 Sports Latenight 3:30 Saturday Night Live 12:30 Meet the Press 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 12:00 Cheers 1:00 Headline News 2:00 David Letterman
2:00 David Letterman 5:00 Videolinks 1:30 Sports Machine 4:00 Jeopardy 12:30M*A*S*H 1:30 Sports Latenight 3:00 Headline News
3:00 Headline News 5:30 Headline News Break . 2:00 Sports Latenight 4:30 Donahue 1:00 Headline News 2:00 David Letterman 3:30 Wheel of Fortune
3:30 Military News 2:30 Frugal Gourmet 1:30 Sports Latenight 3:00 Headline News 4:00 Jeopardy
4:00 Tom & Jerry Kids 3:00 Headline News 2:00 David Letterman 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:30 Oprah Winfrey
4:30 Tiny Toons Adventures 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 3:00 Headline News 4:00 Jeopardy
5:00 CRO 4:00 Jeopardy 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:30 Sally Jesse Raphael
5:30 Videolinks 4:00 Jeopardy


Channels 8 & 10
Sports
College Football
Oklahoma Sooners vs. Texas Longhorns, 2:30 p.m. Saturday
Florida State Seminoles vs. Miami Hurricanes, 6:30 p.m. Sat-
urday
NFL Football
Indianapolis Colts vs. New York Jets, noon Sunday - ,


Cable Channel 14
Sports
NFL Football
k, Kansas City Chiefs vs. San Diego Chargers, 3 p.m. Sun-
day
Washington Redskins vs. Philadelphia Eagles, 7 p.m.
Sunday
Minnesota Vikings vs. New York Giants, 8 p.m. Monday
Cleveland Browns vs. Houston Oilers, 7 p.m. Thursday


Specials , I., .
28th Annual Country Music Awards, 7 p.m. today. Primetime movies
Answerline, 8 p.m. Tuesday. "The Color Of Money"
The subject for October's edition of Answerline is the commissary. Our guest, 10 p.m. Saturday
Lt. Col. William Taylor: commander, Panama Commissary District. Recording Twenty-five years after "The Hustler," Paul Newman gives an Oscar-winning
telephone calls begin 6:30 p.m. at 287 - 4460. performance as a now semi-retired "Fast Eddie" Felson. This time around, the
Mini series older, but wiser Eddie finds a hot young player who knows everything about
"Stephen King's The Stand," 8:25 p.m. Thursday. pool, but finds life confusing. The goal is to hit the big-time in Atlantic City,
As Mother Abigail's group of spies run afowl of Randall Flagg's forces in Las but as the youth's education progresses, he becomes unmanageable. In frustra-
Vegas, Flagg's mad minion, Trashcan man, delivers into his master's hand the tion, as Eddie is about to give up, he re-discovers his old self. Stars Tom Cruise
ultimate instrument of conquest. and Mary Elizabeth Mastriantonio.


r-.. "














Classified Ads


B10 Tropic Times
Bl Oct. 7, 1994


Pomeranian puppies, dewormed and
immunized, $250.287-6244.

Two hamsters w/cage, $20. 287-
6739.

Free black kitten, 6 wks old, has
shots. 286-4520.

5 yr old TB gelding. English, gen-
tle, jumps and trail rides. Native
Dancer descendant, USA born. 284-
6683.

Looking for purebred Pomaranian
male for stud service. 287-3686.

Male Peek-a-boo, 4 mos old, $80.
286-4199, ask for Cynthia.

Free 7 mos old female cat, has all
shots. Not neutered, lively person-
ality. 287-5536.

Brown Chihuahua puppies, 6 wks
old, $150. 224-1588.

Free adorable grey tiger male kit-
ten. Litter trained. 283-3031.

Three male German shepherds, 8
wks old, $75. 262-1698/0172 for
Judy.

Male Shar-pei, 8 mos old, all shots,
and kennel, $200. 260-8190.

French poodle puppies. 261-3325.

Two 10" white tiger oscars, $12ea
or $20 for both. 286-4777.

Free fat cat, declawed, pretty, white
w/some stripes, litter trained, sweet
disposition. 260-5220.

2 yr old male boxer w/lg kennel,
$200. 285-5681.

Parrot w/cage $65, male Peakinees
dog $30. 283-3843.

Blue Guami fish, $20. 287-6672.




1984 Ford LTD station wagon w/
luggage rack. A/C, AM/FM radio,
pw, tinted glass, new tires, dty free,
$3,500. 264-8675.

Car for sale, will consider trade for
boat, motor and trailer/obo. 287-
6244.

Diesel engine Perkins 4.236 and
transmission, $650.256-6816.

1983 Ford Ranger p/u, auto, a/c, ps,
pw, 6cyl, runsand looks gd, $3,200/
obo. 287-5330.

1987 Toyota Cressida hatchback,
standard, gd cond,$7,000/neg. 252-
6984.

1984 Dodge sport p/u, 4cyl, auto,
dty pd, $2,600/obo. 252-2287.

1992 Dodge Caravan, ps, pb, a/c,
am/fm, 42,000 miles, grt shape,
$13,800.284-5397.

1986 Audi 100cd, ps, pb, pl, pw,
auto, stereo w/cd, dty pd. Grt cond,
$6,100.252-1270.

1991 Aerostar, extended towing
package, am/fm cass, a/c needs re-
pair, $11,500.284-4695.

1993 Mazda 626 hatchback, 5spd,
a/c tinted wind, exc cond, dty pd,
$17,000/obo. 260-9700.

1987 4-Runner, 4x4, US spec, 4cyl,
not dty pd, needs work, $6,900.
252-2906.

1993 Nissan Bluebird, dty pd, a/c,
am/fm, tinted wind, alarm, auto,
low liles, $13,500. 236-0984.

Suzuki Samauri, RxR, hard top, dty
pd, $2,700. 252-8183.

1983 CJ-7 Jeep. Laredo package,


gd cond, $6,000. 252-5024.

1990 Dodge Shadow, 30,000 miles,
exccond, new tires/battery, $6,300.
287-4543.

1989 Pontiac Trans-Am, 5.0L TPI
305cu. Fully loaded, $1,500 stereo
equip, 16" rims, $9,500. 287-4970.

1994 Daihatsu Charade, 5spd, a/c,
am/fm cass, grt gas mil, auto alarm
system, $5,400. 264-4105.

1968 Fort Mustang fastback. V8,
auto, new tires, brakes and tune-up.
Dty pd, $3,500/obo. 287-3287.

1982 BMW 518, runs grt, Euro
specs, dty pd, $4,000/obo. 269-7585
for John.

Parts for a 4-Runner Toyota, 1989
4cyl, 22 RE engine, cylinder head
assy and crankshaft 287-5728 or
233-6096.

1983 Toyota Camry, a/c, 4dr, right
hand drive, $2,350. 284-4394.

1982 Corvette, restored. Black w/
gray leather interior. A/C dty pd,
$12,500/obo. 221-1428 for Anna.

1990 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 4dr,
pw/d, pb, ps, a/c, cass, 27,000mi,
not dty pd, $12,500. 287-4223.

1987 Porsche 944,5spd, ac, all pwr,
cruise, alarm, 63,000 miles, pwr
sunroof, $13,500. 284-3054.

1985 Toyota Tercel,- 4cyl, 4wd,
5spd, 4dr w/hatchback, am/fm cass,
not dty pd, $2,900/obo. 262-7278.

1991 Jeep Comanche $2,800 and
take over payments. Gd cond. 286-
3732.

1991 Plymouth Sundance, auto, ac.
Bought new at Howard Car Sales,
exc cond, $8,000. 286-3171.

1990 Chevy Cavalier, 2dr, 5spd,
air, ps, pb, am/fm cass, low miles,
$7,500/obo. 264-3143 evenings.

1992 Dodge Daytona, like new, all
extras, not dty pd, $10,500. 263-
9814.

1986 Buick Park Avenue, needs ac
compressor, $4,500.284-4708.

1987 Ford Temp, 4cyl, 5spd, am/fm
cass, economic, $3,300.287-4772.

1993 Toyota Corona 2.0i, fully load-
ed, 15" sport wheels, less than
10,000 km,$17,500/obo. 263-4671.

1989 Mazda 323, ac, cc, cass, 5spd,
$5,000.284-4983.

1988 Renault Medallion, 4dr, ac,
radio, 4cyl, US specs, dty free, wag-
on type, 7 passengers, $4,200. 287-
5397.

1993 Fort Explorer, Turquoise, 4dr,
ac, am/fm radio, standard, $16,000.
289-4142.

1985 Chev Blazer, ps, pb, 5spd, V6,
new tires, runs grt, $4,500. 289-
4166.

1984 Chev Cavalier, 5spd, ps, pb,
grt cond, $2,500. 284-6672.

1992CamaroRS,V8, 5spd, ac,am/
fm cass, 19K miles, cellular phone,
$11,950.289-4247.

1991 Mercury Capri convertible,
ac, pw, new breaks and tires, $8,400.
287-4692.

1991 Ford Ranger XLT w/match-
ing camper shell. 29K miles, 5spd,
ac, ps, pb, not dty pd. 287-5536.

1988 Ford Bronco XLT 4x4, 5.8L,
auto, ps, pb pw, am/fm cass, exc
cond, $12,500. 289-3234.

1992 Gran Am Pontiac, aqua, load-
ed, $10,900/neg. 1988 Chrysler Le
Baron, $4,500. Misc tires 13-15",


$15/up. 262-1204.

1981 GMC Van Dura, exc for fam-
ily, not dty pd, $3,850. 282-4182.

1983 Jeep Wagoneer, exc cond, a/c,
auto, $2,800/obo. 252-2845.

1990 Ford Taurus GL, 36K miles,
V6, auto, ps, pb, am/fm cass, $9,500.
287-4689.

1985 Chevy Blazer 4x4 w/stereo,
$6,200/obo. 260-9548.

1983 Ford Bronco, full size, ac, ps,
pb, 4spd, roll bar, nice stereo, off rd
pkg, $7,000. 284-4227.

1985 Porsche, 5spd, ac, cruise,
sunroof, cd stereo, all power, alarm,
exc cond, $12,000. 284-4227.

1984 Volvo 760 GLE, fm/cass, ac,
sunroof, exc cond, $5,000/obo. 252-
2031.

1986 Volvo 740, auto, am/fm, ps,
pw, pb, gd cond, $7,500/obo. 264-
4491.

1987 Mitsubishi Montero,4wd, die-
sel, ac, am/fm, ps, pb, pw, auto,
$7,500/obo. 264-4491.

1989 Olds Cutlass Calais, Quad 4
eng, ps, pb, am/fm cass, 69k miles,
$6,400/obo. 287-3534.

1990 Pontiac Grand Prix, fully load-
ed, V6, $9,500. 286-6298.

1987 Ford Escort 1.9, 5 spd, ps, pb,
rebuilt eng, new clutch and shocks,
a/c needs wk, $3,000. 286-4271.

1986 Toyotap/u long bed with shell,
auto, no ac, $4,000. 252-5428.

1979 Chevy Nova, ac, ps, rebuilt
engine and brakes, runs grt, $1,300/
obo. 287-4877.

1988 3181 BMW, 2dr, am/fm cass,
ac, not dty pd, Euro specs, $8,000.
261-6119.

1979 Buick Electra, clean,needs no
wk, gd trans, $2,500/obo. 283-6499.

1988 Dodge Dakota p/u w/topper,
ac, ps, pb, extras, clean, $6,500/
obo. 283-6499.

1988 Ford Escort GT, 5spd, am/fm
cass, ac, low miles, dty pd, $4,800/
neg. 264-2552.

1988 Chev Blazer, ac, stereo, auto,
$7,500/obo. 287-4974.

1979 Olds Cutlass Supreme, exc
cond, ac, 35k miles w/proof, $3,000/
obo. 285-4401.

1983 Dodge Shelby, am/fm cass,
ac, 1990 engine, $3,000/obo. 228-
2643.

1983 Honda Accord, 5spd, ac, load-
ed, dty pd, $3,800. 287-4686.

1983 Toyota Corolla, 2dr, ac, am/
fm cass, gd cond, $2,700/obo. 269-
3649.

1991 Dodge Shadow, 2.2L, $8,000.
Steel bumper for '90-'94 Dodge
Shadow. 287-3632.

1981 Chevy Monza, dty pd, runs
grt, pb, ps, ac, $2,250/neg. 286-
6181.

1988 Pontiac LeMans, 4dr, new
brakes, belts, 50K miles, ac, ps, pb,
am/fm cass, 35mpg, $6,000/obo.
286-4693 after 5pm.

1981 Olds Cutlass station wagon,
diesel, rebuilt fuel sys. 230-0387.

1990 Geo Tracker LSI, 4x4, ac, exc
cond, 5spd, hard top, cass, $9,500.
287-5933.

1982 BMW 528E, gd cond, power
package, US specs, sunroof, $7,000/
neg.286-6699.

1991 Mitsubishi Galant super sa-


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder.
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both. military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
Before such a sale. it is strongly recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.


loon, ac, alarm, $8,500. 252-2163
after 3:30pm.

1970 1600cc Datsun4dr, auto. 1962
Chrysler station wagon. Both neg.
252-5124.

1990 Ford Bronco Il, ps, pb, ac, am/
fm cass, XLT package, $15,000/
neg. 260-3433.

Chevy Celebrity station wagon, ac,
auto, ps, pb, am/fm cass, $3,950.
287-6136.

1989 Hyndai Sonata, US spec, load-
ed, sunroof, $5,775. 252-6016.

1990 Volvo 740, auto, am/fm cass,
ac, pw, exc cond, $9,300.226-6341.

1977 Blazer K-5,4w 350 cubic inch,
exc cond, many components rebuilt
or replaced, $3,400. 286-4030 eve-
nings.

1989 Ford Temp, exc cond, auto,
$5,800. 284-6381.

1992 Ford XLT Explorer, not dty
pd, $16,625.252-6929.

1988 Dodge Dakota, 56k miles, fair
cond, $4,000/obo. 260-3235.

1989 Mazda 323, 5spd, ac, cc, cass,
exc cond, $5,000. 284-3481.

1985 Mazda 626, gd cond, 5spd,
4cyl, ac, pb, ps, $3,395. 286-3692.

1975 Buick LeSabre, grey, needs
trans wk, dty pd, clean, $650. 286-
6439.

1992 Chevy S-10 p/u, ac, pb, ps,
5spd, 4cyl, am/fm cass, Tahao pack-
age, exc cond, $8,195. 286-3692.

1985 GMC Jimmy 4x4, 2.8L V6,
trans needs wk, $2,500. 285-6289.

1990 Toyota Camry wagon, V6,
37K miles, full extras, $10,000/neg.
252-2143.

1993 Ford Tempo, 2dr, ac, auto, tilt,
lots more, low miles, $9,900. 283-
3843.

1985 Plymouth Voyager van, 4cyl,
5spd, 5 passenger, am/fm cass, not
dty pd, $3,000/neg. 289-5744.

1994 Daihatsu Charade, 5spd, am/
fm cass, ac, auto alarm, grt mpg,
$5,400. 264-4105.

1978 Volvo 244DL, ac, am/fm cass,
gd cond, not dty pd, $2,300/obo.
285-6870 Room 210.

1980 Ford station wagon, runs gd,
body fair, 351 V8 eng, not dty pd,
$800/obo. 286-4693 after 5pm.

1986 Nissan Sunny, ac, am/fm ste-
reo, auto, 4dr, dty pd, $3,600/obo.
236'3099.

1988 Toyota4x4 p/u, runs grt, needs
wk, not dty pd, $5,000/obo. 284-
4355.

1989 Honda Accord LXI, 57K
miles, 4dr, 5spd, loaded, alarm,
sunroof. 284-3481.

1988 JeepCommanche4x4, am/fm
cass, ac, ps, pb, new tires, sport
wheels, best offer. 261-6418.

1990 Nissan 300ZX, loaded, dty
pd, $23,000. 226-0234.

1988 Dodge Daytona, runs grt, auto,
ac, ps, 52K miles, original owner,
$4,000/obo. 282-3778.

1992 GMC Safari van, tinted wind,
ps, pb, am/fm cass, ac, running
boards, 34K miles. 287-6898.

1991 Ford Taurus station wagon,
one owner, $8,600. 261-4872.

1988 Chrysler LeBaron coupe, tur-
bo, many new parts, looks and runs
grt, $5,750. 264-3191.




In home art instruction, acrylic and
oil painting, water, color, charcoal.
Freedom of expression and creativ-
ity. 260-3433.

House work, no iron, M-F 8am-
2pm. 286-3952.

Mother w/lOmo old watch your
child. M-F daytime. 283-6322.

Math tutor/teacher, $20per hour.
256-6888/6830.

Daytime maid or babysitter. 262-
16608am-3:30pm.


Span and Eng babysitter, no live in.
224-9052.

Teen willing to babysit weekends
anytime and week days 4-10pm.
Howard, Kobbe and Cocoli only,
w/exp, $3per hour. 284-6777.

Eng/Span spk maid, hard wking,
dependable, exc w/kids. 260-9404
for Alexis.

Dependable bilingual maid, live-in,
gd w/kids, cooks, cleans and irons.
262-9095 for Roxanne.

Bilingual maid, honest, reliable, ref,
avail Mon and Wed. 284-4072.

Reliable Eng-spk housekeeper w/
ref for weekends, exc w/kids, cooks,
cleans, very flexible, $15 daily. 283-
4626.

Private soccer lessons. 256-6260.

13 yr old will mow your lawn, de-
pendable. 284-3690 for Troy.

Home made white, wheat and cin-
namon raisin bread, sliced or
unsliced. Raisin $2.50/white or
wheat $2.287-3898.

Eng spk maid, gd w/kids, reliable,
avail Mon, Wed, Fri. 228-6545.

Mother of2 will babysit days, nights
and weekends. Weekly and hourly
rates. 283-6231.

Bilingual babysitter and live-in
maid, honest, reliable, $130 Mon-
Fri. 287-4389.

Bilingual housekeeper. Full or part
time. 284-4771 for Liliola.

Bilingual mature maid, live-in, gd
w/kids, dependable, hd wker, gen
housework. 286-6138.

House boy, clean, laundry, pet care,
w/ref, Mon-Fri. 261-7216.

Professional photography, family
portraits, sitting fee $15.284-4392.

British babysitter has trans, day or
night, gd w/kids any age. 286-4285.

Honest reliable bilingual maid, gd
w/kids, live-in or out. 261-3932 for
Janet.

Honest, reliable, Eng spk maid, 1-2
days per week. 287-6535.

Honest, dependable house keeper,
live-in or out, grt w/kids, ref avail,
prefer Howard. 284-6381.

Home care provider, full and part
time, drop-ins, CPR and first aid
cert. 283-6737 for Jill.

One day a wk bilingual hard wking
maid, gd ironing and cleaning, ref.
260-3235.

Babysitter, American housewife,
depend, grt w/kids, hourly and
weekly. 286-3331 for Angie.

Maid 2 days per wk, exc worker,
loyal and response, spks Eng. 236-
1256.

Bilingual, mature day maid/
babysitter, avail Tues and Fri, ref.
224-0587.

Will babysit your home or mine.
Daycare exp. 287-6187.

Family home day care, full or part
time openings, drop-ins. 284-3181.

Reliable babysitter in my homeany-
time, Eng spk only. 286-4294.




19' open fisherman, Yamaha 90
1994 w/30 hours. Fully loaded,
$12,000. 1991 Evinrude 70 w/new
1994 powerhead. Includes all con-
trols, $3,000. 252-5024.

Outboard motor bracket stainless
steel, 20hp, I151bs, new in the box,
$100. Outboard motor 15hp extras
$615.287-4020.

30'fbg sailboat dsl, loaded w/equip,
$22,500.252-5103.

1994 Yamaha 9.9 Marine outboard
engine, long leg w/ all acc, new in
box, $1,100. 232-6971.

Fin-nor Tycoon 4/o rod only for
trolling, 301bs test, all black, new,
$450. 229-1578.

Sea Doo 1992 Jet Ski, new cond,
many extras, 60hp high performance
w/trailer, dty pd, under warranty,


$3,899/obo. 286-6333.

23' fberg, 225 Johnson, radio, depth
finder, etc, $12,900. 252-5428.

Force 15hp outboard motor, almost
never used, 21/2 yrs old, $500.282-
5630.

16'boat, 60hp motor, trailer, 3 gas
tanks, gd running cond, extras,
$2,200.286-4981.

Camper shell for 7' Ford XLT, tint-
ed wind, gd cond, $600. 252-5143.

22' Falcon Mercury, max 200hp, 40
hours, ski equip include, $15,000.
232-5241.




Sony 20" Trinitron color TV w/
remote, $125. 260-2847.

Panasonic camcorder, orig price
$1,275, $635. 287-4020.

Audio source ss three surround
sound processor pro-logic w/amp
and remote, $250/obo. 252-1191.

Audio source EQ 10, computerized
graphic equalizer/spectrum analyz-
er w/auto EQ w/remote, $250/obo.
252-1191.

Portable VCR/video camera.
Panasonic $350.286-3295.

Yorx-Newave stereo, gd for kids,
$45, phone recorder, $20.260-2847.

VHS camcorder Panasonic, $250.
284-4708.

Sega CD and 5 games, $400. 284-
4082.

Yorx programable cd player stereo
w/2 cass decks, am/fm and remote
control, $225. 289-4065.

Amiga 2000 multimedia comp,
7meg Ram, 105meg hd, color mon-
itor, color printer, dual drives, soft-
ware, $2,000. 284-3338.

EQ $125, various speakers $50 pair.
289-4247.

Canon-bubble jet printer, compact
high quality, needs ac adapter, exc
cond, $175. 287-3898.

Epson XT comp w/monitor, 20mb,
51/4 drive, software included, $250.
226-8626/3278.

Pkrd Bell 386SX, 130mb hd, dual
drive, modem, SVGA, lots of soft-
ware. 284-6222.

Kenwood turntable, exc cond $50,
classic rock albums $.75ea. 286-
4677.

Sony 20" color TV w/stereo/SAP.
Exc cond $350.236-1256.

Samsung 19" TV w/remote, cable
ready, new cond, $150/obo. 284-
4921.

Fender squierheavy metal stratgui-
tar, Floyd Rose tremolo, hard case,
strap, extra string, $350.286-6384.

Sega Genesis w/9 games $250, RCA
25" color console $100. 287-4786.

Chip intel DX2 overdrive processor
to upgrade SX20/25 $275; Epson
action printer 5500, new $165;
Sanyo 19"color TV. 252-2664.

AST 486SX/25MHZ CPU, win-
dows, DOS 6.1, word perfect, print
shop programs. 252-2664.

Sega w/10 games, new; portable
stereo w/cd player; elec drum set.
282-4635.

Majestic car radio/tape player $30,
SNES Mortal Combat $35, Street
Fighter II $35, Star Fox $20, Mario
$10, INes $5. 286-4674.

2 Fisher speakers, air dyne 80hms,
60w, $25ea; Yorx sound speaker
$100.286-4023.

Laptop comp w/word perfect 5.1,
wind and Right writer, I mo old,
$1,300.283-5617.

Roland EP-7 digital piano w/midi
capability, $700. 284-3481.
Amigo 500 w/1084S monitor and
Star NX 1000 printer, some soft-
ware, $300/obo. 286-4899.

IBM compatible, 386SX dual drive,
Imb Ram, 50mhz, VGA monitor,
mouse, printer, software, $1,500/
neg. 287-4428.













#Classified Ads


Tropic Times Bl1
Oct. 7, 1994 11LJ


27" Sony Trinitron TV w/remote
and stand $550, Panasonic VCR
$175, SE286 comp 40mb hd, dual
floppy, monitor, printer $760.260-
3433.

386SX comp, CD Rom, 8mb Ram,
dual drives, software included,
Panasonic printer. 286-6522 after
5pm._




Kitten on Albrook in vicinity of
Bldg 809. Orange and gray striped.
252-2066.




Whirlpool dryer, cream colored,
5spd, 3 temp needs heating elem,
$50/obo. 283-6737.

Battery baby swing, grt cond, $45;
electric typewriter $35; baby walk-
er $15; upright freezer $50. 261-
1541.

Bunk bed and dresser. 286-6522
after 5pm.

Whirlpool washer/dryer $375;
18,000 BTU ac $250. 252-2421.

2 twin canopy beds, hutch,
nightstand and dresser, 12x18 rug,
drapes for 800 area livingroom w/
rods, couch. 287-6739.

24,000BTU ac $375; 10,000 BTU
ac $250; submersible 5hp pump for
water well, 220 volt $1,200. 252-
2207.

Luxury solid oak dining room set, 4
chairs, likenew $850,9x12carpets-
ligt blue, lamps. 229-2916.

5,000 BTU ac $75. baby stroller,
porta crib, weed eater, exercise bike.
286-6177.

Whirlpool freezer, standup $200.
252-2906.

Sony Betamax; Danish entertain-
ment set, Danish twin bed w/draw-
er; Danish d/r w/china; Danish wht
comer lamp; SC word processor,
3.5 drive. 236-0984.

Twin bed,'box spring and frame,
new-never used, $200. 252-2676.

Sofa bed and Queen Anne chair
$850, Oster kitchen center $100, all
like new. 226-8516.

21" color TV, round maple table w/
4 chairs; 12x15 blue rug w/pad.
287-5021.

Iron wrought terrace furniture, suit-
cases, misc items. 223-8159 after
5pm.

Curtains for Howard Tropics hous-
ing. Set of 10 for $250/obo. 284-
4394.

Crib w/matt like new $150, baby
comf set $25, mobile $10, other
baby items. 283-3470.
King size waterbed, sheets, pad,
rails, bookcase, head board, $350.
284-3979.

Kenmore heavy duty large capacity
washer/dryer, almost new, $700.
284-6533.

Nottingwood pine king size
waterbed. Many acc included $700.
284-3898.

Lg Kenmore washer used one year,
exc cond, $250.289-3360.

Longabergerbaskets, can be ordered
and shipped by Christmas. 260-3533
after 6pm.

German anniversary clock, 2 diff
chimes, moon dial, glass dome,
pednalum won't stay spinning, $20.
284-3338.

JVC speakers, 3 way 3 speakers
bass, 15wx35hx12d, 120-200watts,
$150.284-5629.

Sofa, love seat w/oak trim and
matching solid oak coffee table.
Southwest colors and 2 matching
lamps, $950/obo. 286-4127.

6pc girl's French bedroom set, Sony
betamax and 6 tapes, Nintendo w/3
games. 260-5947.

Overstuffed couch, love seat, chair,
blk leather, exc cond, $ 1,000/obo. 2
glass top coffee/end tables $175.
260-3168.


Smoked glass top dinette for 4, blk,
exc cond $250. Fold out blkloveseat,
new $165.260-3168.

Dinette set w/6 wicker chairs, glass
top, $300/obo. 269-7840.

Vertical blinds, white 14'x 82" long
and assorted colors 6x6. 252-5124.

Queen size waterbed, water tubes,
nice, $300. 264-4105.

Sofa w/3 cushions, exc cond, $700/
obo. 228-4514.

Girls bedroom set $300; coffee and
side table $60; tuner and speakers
$70, bycicles $80 and $75; box
spring $30. 287-4877.

2 bamboo sofas $80ea, patio table-
plastic $50. 261-3325.

Kingsizewaterbed w/6 drawers, un-
dercarriage and storage, dk wood,
exc cond, $175.260-4411 after4pm.

Extra large Maytag washer/dryer,
exc cond, $800. 287-5038.

Refrig General Electric, 19cu ft, gd
cond, $475; recliner, gd cond, $175.
226-2012.

3pc LR set, modem design, grt cond,
$475/obo. 232-5419.

Dresser$150, swing set $200.287-
6939.

Cuckoo clocks from the Black For-
est, hand carved, authentic. 287-
5897.

Twin bed w/matt, red metal frame,
like new, $100. 286-4677.

Blue curtains $15; Kenmore micro
$150; swing set $40; GE 19.6cu ft
refrig w/inside ice maker $750; BR
set w/hutch and lights, solid pine,
$1,100.252-2028.

Sentury safe 1250, like new. 252-
5143.

Sofa sleeper queen size, exc cond,
$450/obo. 282-4635.

GE dryer, 1 1/2 yrs old, like new,
$300/obo. 252-6016.

Six drawer dresser $30/obo. 284-
4787.
White wrought iron patio set, 2
lounges and table, $50.252-1218.

Q-size waterbed, exc cond, barely
used, $500. 226-6851.

Broyhill BR set 5pc $1,200; rocker
victorian $225; book shelves $55;
rocker Bentwood $190. 264-9228.

DR set carved mahogany w/10
chairs, $4,300.268-1253.

Danish LR set, 2 chairs, sofa, table,
$200. 260-5682.

5,000BTUac, 15 1/2x26x17,$125.
287-6597.

Tan sofa and loveseat $1,100, en-
tertainment center, coffee table, end
table, carpets, VCR, stepper exer-
cise machine. 282-3783.

Baby crib, walker and other baby
items. 286-4595.

Almost new stove and refrig. 260-
8528.

King size waterbed w/8 drawers
and storage cabinets, 12 speed bike,
clothes, shoes, Tupperware, Tandy
1000 comp, sofa w/double bed and
loveseat. 284-6688.

Floral sofa bed-queen size $600;
Bassett dining set w/6 chairs, 3
leaves, light wood $500.284-3481.

Dinette set w/4 chairs $200, Flex
Force w/stair stepper $125, type-
writer $75. 284-6184 for Denise.

Sofa w/recliner, dark Sante Fe col-
ors $400; 2 med size nice round
tables $50ea. 286-4674.

LR set w/4 tables $450; LR set w/1
table$475; DR setw/4 chairs $400;
barw/2highchairs$380.252-2883.

BR set, queen size, wall-to-wall
headboard, dresser $1,500/obo;
wedding dress $300/obo; high chair
$10. 287-3632.

Whirlpool 18' refrig/freezer w/ice
maker, perfect cond, $350/obo. 264-
1462.


At PCC complab - brown accordian-
style file envelope w/important data
diskettes, reward. 252-1035.

Long hairgrey cat in Curundu. Name
is Frank, pink flea collar, tags, re-
ward. 286-6487.




A/C generator, 100KW, 3 phase
240, 208, 120 volts and more, GE.
Electrical end only - needs diesel or
prime mover, $3,500.256-6816.

Weight bench w/weights, one long
bar, 2 dumb bell bars, approx 11 Olbs,
$125/obo. 287-6883.

27" Sony Trinitron color TV, $375;
queen size waterbed w/head board
frame $375.221-1181.

Side by side refrig/freezer $800;
18,000 BTU Whirlpool a/c $300;
16,000 BTU a/c $90. 287-3607/
3959.

Ladies' 18K Egyption-like neck-
lace, $800. 226-8516.

New Nintendo w/4 controllers, 7
games and gun, $65. 286-4272.

Technics SA-110 stereo receiver,
exc cond, $100; Alpine tracker cross
country skier $160. 264-7572.

Girl's stroller, like new, pink, Graco
top of the line, $80. 229-1578.

Chevy parts - brake booster and
alternator, like new, $200-$175/obo.
252-6956.

Scuba-Beauchat BCD like new
$250, Dacor SPG new w/compass
$150. 269-5180 ext 1093.

320 Olympic wt set w/multi-use
heavy bench, attachments,
dumbells, $800/obo. 289-5764.

Surfboard spectrum $100, Super
Nintendo games $40ea. 286-3732.

Cat travel cage $10, cane window
blind 84x60 $10. 284-4625.

18K diamond ring. 232-4273 after
5pm.

Wedding dresses Size 10, $85-$45.
284-5422.

Woman's dress shoes, new, various
colors satin cloth, size 7, $30. 284-
5422.

Albums, exc cond, $3ea. 284-5685.

Corcoran II jump boots, worn 3
times, 91/2D, $60; new video tape
rewinder $12; baby gate $7; 2 pairs
rose drapes $28. 284-6671.

10 Nintendo games $10ea;
Salvdorian hammock $60; men's
mola shirts $30. 260-5747.

Almond sofa$200/obo; girl's shoes
51/2-61/2,homemade clothes upto
3T, boys homemade clothes up to 6
mos. 283-6231.

Mountain bike, 10 speed bike, elec-
tric guitar w/amplifiers and all acc,
PCC business book. 252-2845.

3 Wrangler AT tires, 45-75R-15,
20K miles, $25ea. 261-4065.

Small block Ford cyl heads, 58CC
crossed chambers, will fit 289 or
302, make offer. 287-6484.

Trek mountain bike $400; littletykes
party kitchen $35; NX1000 star
printer $80; JBL LI00S speakers
$600. 286-4439.

Children's clothes, shoes and toys;
queen size comforter$20.287-4420.

Elec water heater $75, wood table
80x40 $100, store display cabinet
$100, computer cart $60, air purifi-
er $150. 226-8626/3278.

Wedding slip, full, $55. 252-6649.

Lawnmower, 3.5hp,20",$95; Huffy
18 speed 26" mountain bike, like
new cond, $130. 252-5792.

Entertainment center $150, Yaesu
2m transiever w/charger $200,
Huffy bikes $100ea, bunk beds
$200, Yaesu trans $600, 287-5839
after 5pm.

Casio tone keyboard w/stand $60,
Body by Jake w/accys $75. 233-
0974.

Lg 4 sectional swing set w/swings,
glider, slide, rings, monkey bars,
bench swing, $75.284-6395.


4 drawer chest $65, security gate
$6, baby clothes-neg. 286-3484.

Toddler car seat $15, children' s bed
safety rails $15, funtime infant seat
$30, new auto bottle warmer $8.
252-2042.

Rattan wine rack $10, portable car
ramps $40, maternity clothes, small/
med Judo suit $10, lady shoes size
3.252-2042.

Baby clothes, summer and winter,
nb-24 mos. 286-6489 after noon.

FSU gen Psychology book 4th edi-
tion, $45. 287-5897.

Golf clubs w/bag and pull cart $250;
recliner $100; misc baby items;
apartment size dryer $40.287-4786.
Porcelain doll in antique white bridal
gown $60; SNES Street Fighter II
Turbo cartridge $45.286-6196.

3/4k pear shaped diamond ring, 14k
gold, colour H, clarity SI 1, $3,800.
260-6199.

Wedding dress size 5/6 $75, wed-
ding ring set, white gold $100; 19"
color TV $80. 284-6222.

Blue recliner $325, 61/2' artificial
Christmas tree $50. 286-4023.

Women's shoes size 8-9, $7-$10;
exercise clothes size small; wind
valances. 287-4788.

Crib sheet sets, 7pc sleeping bears
design $50, 6pc baby Disney col-
lection $40. 287-4788.

Boogie board, new, $50; skate board
$20; phones $10; lady's sweaters-
small. 252-5185

English 1102, Little Brown Reader
book. 286-4776.

Jr Jobe spirit skis; skurfer. 252-
6929.

Power-walk plus treadmill, new.
264-9212.

Oak table/wine glass and bottle rack
$45, child care seat $25. 252-2143.

Bottle-huge glass $35, lamp base,
dresser long 12 drawer mahagony
$360, art easel. 264-9228.

Ac service and repair for any kind
of cars and houses, low prices. 228-
0201.

Century car seat, like new, $65;
Pentax 35mm w/2 lens, $125. 284-
3798.

Carpet, slate blue and tan, $60; wom-
en's bike, almost new, $100, wom-
en's boots never 'wom size 81/2
$45.287-6672.

Fence 6'x125' with gate and post,
you take down, $400/obo. 286-
4933.

12 BTU National ac, needs com-
pressor, 7 yrs old, $70. 236-0984.

Keepsafer wireless home alarm w/2
transmitters, $120. 260-9743.

Largecage,5x3x2,$100.284-4183.

CDplayer$125,14" colorTV$125,
VCR $100, double mattress $50,
toaster oven $20. 287-5634.

Garcia rod/reel $25; 75' hose $20;
small kennel $20; ax $15; leather


JL


ANIMALS
AUTOMOBILES
AVAILABLE
BOATS & CAMPERS
ELECTRONICS
FOUND
HOUSEHOLD
LOST
MISCELLANEOUS
MOTORCYCLES
PATIO SALES
WANTED


SPONSOR'S NAME


ORG.


saddlebag briefcase $75.286-3773.

Sears Craftsman 4.0L lawn mower,
20" cut, catch bag, adjustable wheels,
like new, $200/neg. 287-4428.
Small block Chevy 2 BBL intake
manifold, two 2BBLcarbs$20com-
plete. 283-3485.

Radiator (2 core) small blockChevy,
fits many GM cars $50; other misc
parts. 283-3485.

Iron tables 40"x30" glass tops $150;
63x39 formicatop$150; metal desk
30x60 new paint $150. 226-1158.

Bassinettew/matt, cover, and sheets
$35; box of maternity clothes sz
small $30; aerobic stepper w/ exer-
cise tape $22. 287-4938.

Whirlpool portable dishwasher
$200; Almiral freezer $475; sofa
sleeperqueen size $550.286-4023.

Fence, 100ftw/12poles$150asis;
10 plants, $1 each. 286-6179.




1976 Montessa 348Codatrialsbike.
Gd cond, many spare parts. $750/
obo. 261-2550.

1994 Suzuki GSX750F Katana, per-
fect cond, less than 1K miles. $7, 100/
obo. 263-4671.

1980 Honda Odyssey, 250cc, 4
wheel, completely rebuilt, ready to
break-in, $850. 252-2889.
1987 Yamaha 200cc, US specs, dty
pd, low mileage, $1,000.286-4628.

1989 Honda Trans-Alp, exc cond,
17K miles, on and off road cap,
$3,300.260-9899.

1982 Yamaha 750 Seca 4cyl, no
registration, runs well, needs paint,
$500. 287-4790 after 5pm.

Yamaha bike for parts, $80. 226-
1158.




2300A Las Cruces St, Balboa, 7-
10am.

Qtrs 403A Amador, 7am-2pm.

Qtrs 6 Clayton, 8-11 am.

Qtrs 613B Howard, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 1106D Clayton, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 656B Clayton, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 925B Clayton, 7am-2pm.

Qtrs 318A Albrook, 3-6pm today
and 8am-2pm Saturday.

Qtrs 97A Howard, 7am.

Qtrs 1993A Curundu, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 2002B Curundu, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 180 Norton St Howard, 6-9am.

Qtrs 1053D Clayton, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 2038A 3rd St Curundu, 7am-
noon.

Qtrs 506B Clayton, 7-llam.

Number 28 Calle 40, Bella Vista.

Qtrs 183 Howard, 7-11am.


Qtrs 666D, 7amr-noon.

Qtrs 254B Albrook, 7am.




Army NCO needs Army dress blues
coat. Will swap 42reg for 44 reg or
long, or will consider purchase if
price is right. 287-3929.

Certified physical therapist to come
to my home twice a week, Corozal
area. Gd hourly rate. 252-2034.

1955/56 Cristobal High School
graduation/remembrance book.
252-6989.

Camper shell for full size p/u truck,
Dodge 8'longx6'wide. 287-4020.

Ford F series 4x4 truck. Late model
preferred but will consider older in
good cond. 252-2906.

Size 7 or 8 pink frilly/fancy girls
dress to borrow, rent or purchase.
252-8654 for Charlotte.

Ham radio operator willing to help
Boy Scouts participate in 37th Jam-
boree-on-the-Air for several hours
on the weekend of Oct. 15. 284-
3335.

Baby food jars, 4oz size w/lids.
284-6894.

Used sewing machine in gd cond.
289-4037.

Little tikes jungle gym, $100. 289-
3234.

Army major's insigna, sew on, pin
on, subdued, non-subdued,shirt
tabs, etc. 284-6595.

People interested in Longaberger
baskets, Christmas brochure now
avail. 284-4239.

DM and players for AD&D and/or
other FRPGS in our family envi-
ronment. 284-3920.

Mechanic to repair electrical prob-
lem on 1985 Cadillac Fleetwood
gasoline. 260-3363.

Eng spking maid, live-in, Mon-Sat,
must have ref, gd w/kids and dogs.
287-5327.

Eng spking maid wanted, live-in,
care for 3 mo old, cook, and clean.
287-6961.

Maid live-in,refrequired. 226-5436.

Bassett hound puppy. 286-6338.

Roommate needed to share nice 3
bedroom house. Yard, quiet area,
$450.260-9899.

Barbies, Midge, Ken etc. From
1959-1970, also clothes and acc.
286-6196.

SGI U.S.A. member. 282-3036.

Tutor for college Algebra and Trig
weekdays. 260-7386.

Replacement pieces for Franciscan
pattern dinner ware, especially
bowls. 252-1298.

Horseback rides for trail rides at
Vera Cruz (near Kobbe), reason-
able rates. 252-2889.

Dependable, housekeeper to work
Mon-Fri. 269-7879.


Tropic Times Ad Form


PRICE HOME PHONE
Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each
week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited
more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed
below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This
information will not be released to third parties. Deadline for the receipt
of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are run on a space
available basis and the staff makes no guarantee of ads running. Ads must
include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times,
Unit0936, APO AA 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post
Office. Ads offering weapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not be
run.

RANK/GRADE


DUTY PHONE












B12 Tropic Times
B 2 Oct. 7, 1994





HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming vet-
eran preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming education
and a copy of CASP notice of rating if applicable. Submit a copy of
latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army vacancy announcements
(forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate of
Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 285-
5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should be the first
step in the job search.
Vacancy announcements are also available at the Sundial Rec-
reation Center.
Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications on a
continuous basis for the following positions. Registers established
from these announcements will be used to fill permanent and tem-
porary positions.
Army
VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most clerical position).
VB# 001A *General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most clerical position).
VB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch)
* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Cert + 6 mo
recreation exp in the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req 6 mos recreation exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6
VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5. Limited to permanent
status employees only.
VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6. Limited to permanent
status employees only.
The following positions are Perm-temp, Full-time/Part-time, Intermittent.
VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14.
VB# 008 ** CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license required), NM-9/10/11.
VB# 009 ** PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required), NM-5.
VB# 019 ** EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, NM-640-4/5/6.
** Selectees for nurse, medical officer and EMT positions required a
background check.
Pacific
VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION. OPEN: 10-07-94 CLOSE:
10-18-94
001-95-MW SUPERVISORY PRODUCTION CONTROLLER, NM-1152-9.
DOL, Maintenance Div. Production, Plant Control, Corozal.
002-95-LA MAINTENANCE WORKER, MG-4759-8. TSB, 106th Signal
Brigade, Corozal. NOTE: Driver's license required. Drive 3/4 ton to 9 ton vehicle.
003-95-LA COMMUNICATIONS CLERK (OA), NM-394-5. SENSITIVE.
106th Signal Brigade, Atlantic Area Detachment, Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Security
clearance is required.
004-95-MW CONTRACT SPECIALIST, NM-1102-5171/9. Directorate of
Contracting, Contract Admin. Div,. Corozal. NOTE: Candidate must have a
baccalaureate degree including or supplemented by at least 24 semester hours in
duty, economics business law, procurement, or management-related studies.
Position is developmental and may be filled at any intervening grade. If candidate
is selected on temp appt. candidate must re-compete for higher level.
005-95-LA MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (OA), NM-344-7. SENSITIVE.
106th Signal Brigade, DOIM, Installation Records Mgmt Office, Ft. Clayton.
NOTE: Security clearance is required. When working in the Records Holding
Area, some climbing and lifting up to 50 lbs. boxes may be required.
006-95-SS ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER, NM-341-9. SENSITIVE.
Directorate of Community Activities Office to the Director, Ft. Clayton. NOTE:
Security clearance is required.
007-95-ES ANIMAL HEALTH TECHNICIAN, NM-704-5. USA MEDDAC,
GACH, Veterinary Service, Corozal. NOTE: Knowledge Of English/Spanish.
Limited to MEDDAC/DENTAC permanent employees, however applications for
Temp Nte: 30 Sep 95, will be accepted from all sources.
009-95-NC ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT OPERATOR, NM-5716-8. HQ.
USAG, DEH, Operations Div., Pavement Sec., Corozal. NOTE: Driver's license
required.
010-95-NC AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT MECHANIC, MG-5306-8.
HQ, USAG, DEH Operation Div., Electromechanical Br., Ref& A/C Sec., Corozal.
011-95-NC EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT (OA), NM-203-5.
USAG, Directorate of Civilian Personnel, LER/T&D Div., Clayton. NOTE:
Qualified typist.
012-95-NC COMPUTER ASSISTANT, NM-335-5. Temp Nte: 09-30-95.
DODDS-Panama District, Balboa High School.
014-95-JH BUDGET ASSISTANT (OA), NM-561-6/7. USARSO, DCS.
Resource Mgmt Program, Budget Div., Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Position is
developmental to NM-7. If candidate is selected on temp appt, candidate must re-
compete for higher level.
015-95-JH COMPUTER PROGRAMER ANALYST, NM-334-11. Temp Nte:
09-30-95. DODDS-Panama District, Directors Office, Albrook. NOTE: Limited
to veterans preference eligibles only.
017-95-JH SECURITY CLERK (OA), NM-303-5. SENSITIVE. USAG, DCP,
TSD, Processing and Reports Br., Corozal. NOTE: Security clearance is required.
018-95-VL EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, NM-640-5. Temp Nte:
09-30-95. USA MEDDAC, GAGH, Department of Nursing, Ancon.
019-95-KF BUDGET ASSISTANT (OA), NM-561-5. DCSRM, Program Budget
Div.. Consolidated Budget Br., Ft. Clayton.
020-95-KF PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST, NM-1035-9. SENSITIVE.
USAG, Public Affairs Office, Public Information, Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Security
clearance is required. Bilingual.
021-95-SS CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES COORDINATOR, NM-
1701-12. USAG., Child Development Services, Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Selectee will
be required to undergo a background check. Limited to permanent employees only.
022-94-ES (2) PSYCHIATRIC NURSING ASSISTANT, NM-621-5. Temp Nte:
09-30-95. Intermittent. USA MEDDAC Dept of Nursing, Psychiatric Ward,
Ancon.
025-94-ES (24) Medical Officer (general practice), NE-602-12. Temp Nte: 6
months. Full time/part time, shift work. Panamanian license is required. Bilingual.
Note: 479-94-JH Supervisory Media Information Specialist, NM-1001-11 is
amended to read, Temp Nte: 4 months.
Atlantic
013-95-NC ELECTRICIAN, MG-2805-10. USAG/DEH, Oprns Div.,
Electrical Shop, Ft. Davis. NOTE: Driver's license required.
023-94-ES LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE, NM-620-5. Shift Work.
USA MEDDAC/DENTAC-Panama, Ft. Sherman. NOTE: Limited to MEDDAC/
DENTAC permanent employees, however applications for Temp Nte: 30 Sep 95,
will be accepted from all sources. U.S. license is required.
Air Force
The Howard Enlisted Members' Club announces job openings. All interested
applicants must submit an Application for Nonappropriated Employment, AF Form
1701, available at the Human Resources Office, Building 708, Howard AFB,
Panama.
WF-7405-I Bartender. ($3-$7.25)
WF-4749-11 Cook ($5.44-$11.46)


otpourri


Clb ew


Quarry Heights
qOfficers' Club: 282-3439
The club will be closed to the public for renovations
through Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be
available 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Addition-
ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and
during lunch hours 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Amador
*Club Amador: 282-4334
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring
soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights.
Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno
at noon the first Sunday of each month.
The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during
renovations of the Quarry Heights Officers' Club.
Clayton
*The Loon: 287-3035
CJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Mondays-Fridays. The bar and grill now opens noon Satur-
days-Sundays for football game viewing and at 3:30 p.m.
Sunday for pool tournaments.
Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or CJ's
Sports Bar, call 287-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343.
*NCO Club: 2874716
The Forum Restaurant opens 5-9 p.m. daily.
Mexican buffet Mondays.
Steak night Tuesdays. A la carte menu is available.
Country buffet Wednesdays features barbecue pork ribs,
fried chicken, pork knuckles, collards greens, sweet potato,
rice, black-eyed peas and corn bread.
All-you-can-eat family buffet Thursdays.
Seafood buffet Fridays features broiled lobster, garlic
shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab.
12-oz prime rib special Saturdays.
Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m.
Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Sun-
days and Mondays.
Disco 9 p.m. Wednesday, Fridays and Saturdays. There
will be a midnight buffet.
Albrook
*Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582
Tonight's entertainment rock & reggae with Rip
Maynard in the lounge and club card drawing.
Sunday saloon breakfast specials 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the
lounge. Choose from three menus.
Mini gourmet night 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday. Join us for a
romantic seven course dinner with elegant service and atmo-
sphere.
Howard/Albrook Officers Spouses' Club annual fall
bazaar 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 15. Free shuttle bus to and from
Albrook Post Office.
Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the din-
ing room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets,
roast beef, fresh fruits, breakfast and lunch items and ice
cream bar.
Mongolian barbecue 5:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Choose
the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have chefs do the
job outside on the open grills. Enjoy live music.
Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday includes
tacos, fajitas, taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. After din-
ner dance the night way to country western music.
Country western night Thursdays with free dance les-
sons at 7:30-10:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples
dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing.
Howard
*Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718
Weekday lunches includes buffet, salad and potato bar.
Friday and Saturday nights 6-8:30 p.m. order a la carte
in the dining room.
Friday evenings in the lounge include beer specials,
music, games and club card drawings.


SCNFMscedul


Southern Command Network
Diamond FM radio airs 91.5 Pa-
cific and 98.3 Atlantic on the FM
dial with live Diamond FM shows
at 5 and 11 am., 3 p.m. week-
days;9a.m.,4 and 9p.m. Satur-
days.


Weekdays
5-9am Diamond FM morning
crew, music and laughs
9:05-1 lam Country Music w Gene
Price, Harry Newman
11lam-lpm Diamond Cafe - oldies
request, 287-4512
l-3pm Unistar adult rock
3-6pm Diamond FM "After
noon Cartunes," music
& fun
6-7pm Charlie Tuna


Italian night 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday.
Bring your boss night with buffet 6-8:30 p.m. Sunday.
Couples night 6-8:30 p.m. Beef or chicken for two.
Dining room is closed Sunday through Thursday.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club - Dining Room:
284-4189
Sunday breakfast buffet 8-12:30 a.m.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30
a.m. Saturday.
New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade
roast beef, turkey, turkey salad and tuna fish sandwiches with
all the tirmmings.
Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. featuring
tableside preparation with tuxedo service.
Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Select a
cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or filet. All steaks are
U.S. choice beef.
Family menu Tuesdays-Fridays featuring all the past fa-
vorites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand made 1/
2 pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more.
Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or
take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot
wings.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom : 284-
4189
Friday night disco 4:30 p.m.- 1 a.m. today.
Columbus Day all night disco 8 am.-5 a.m. Sunday.
Party all night until Monday.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove:
284-4189
Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays.
Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Monday night football and mug special in the lounge.
Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcorn and nachos.
Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Free Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m.
Wednesday in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line danc-
ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until mid-
night.
Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with
your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills.
Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.-
midnight Thursdays.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday.
*Top Three Club: 2844189
Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday.
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat and
complimentary taco bar.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. Members
must have a card and be present to win.
Club closed Saturdays.

Rodman
*Rodman Club - Open to all ranks: 283-4498
Attitude Adjustment 4:30-11 p.m. with complimentary
hors d'oeuvres served 5-7 p.m. Live music 6:30-11 p.m.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-l
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Monday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with all-
you-can-eat taco bar at the Laguna Lounge.
Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
All-you-can-eat beef and burgundy 4:30-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Grill menu is also available.
Open Mike night 6-11 p.m. Thursday in the Laguna
Lounge.
Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Rodman Bohio.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 6-9
p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 6-
9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays.
*Rodman Annex: 283-4498
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
The club is closed for evening and weekend service.


8-9pm Diamond FM "Quiet
Storm" - mellow urban
music & lite jazz music
9pm- midnight Adult Rock


Sunday
12:05-2am Adult Rock
9-9:30am Cross Currents-
Christian Rock
930-10am Love On The Rock,
Father Harry
10-1 lam 20 the Countdown Maga-
zine - Christian music
countdown
I -noon All That Jazz
Noon-4pm American Country
Countdown w/Bob
Kingsey
4-7pm Dick Clark's Rock, Roll
and Remember. oldies
7-midnight Adult Contemporary
music


7-9pm Urban Music with Don
Tracy and LaRita
Shelby
9:-Ulpm Diamond FM Rock
Block - album rock
lIpm-Sam Unistar Adult Rock


Saturday
12,05-2am Adult Rock
2-9am Adult Contemporary
music
9am-Noon Diamond FM Weekend
Music Mix
Noon-4pm American top 40 w/
Shadoe Stevens
4-6pm Diamond FM "Canal
Country" (requests at
287-4514)
6-8pin The Countdown - Soul
countdown




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PAGE 1

jropic Ties Vol. VII, No. 40 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Oct. 7, 1994 Soldier dies on the FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -A U.S. Army South soldier was killed in an automobile accident on the Bridge of the Americas Sunday Camp residents discovered in Santiago morning. Sgt. David Brooks of Company A, 154th Signal ThewoCbanswerretrnedto__e__mp__edneday Battalion, was pronounced dead at Gorgas Army by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero ThetwoCubans wec retu ared to the camp Wednesday. Community Hospital. JTF-Safe Haven Public Affairs Office Panamanian and U.S. officials are determining what actions, if any, will be taken, officials said. Investigations have shown that Brooks'vehic EMPIRE RANGE -Two Cubans from Community "We will review the circumstances behind why they left collided with a Panamanian bus that was traveling Camp No. I who were discovered missing from the camp and the risks to Panamanians, U.S. citizens and Cubans at towards Howard AFB. Eight people on the bus Tuesday werelocated and detained Wednesday inSantiago, the camps if they are returned to the living area," Wilson were slightly injured. Panama, by Panamanian officials. said. "Only after reviewing the situation will we make a The incident is still under investigation by U.S. Ruben Brito Urra and Jorge Luis Morales Capiro were determination as to what actions will be taken." and Panamanian authorities. discovered by Panamanian National Police and identified Though this incident has resulted in U.S. servicemen by their camp ID cards which were still in their possession, reviewing the security procedures at the community camps, Em pire Range road officials said. One other Cuban found with them hasn't Wilson assures everyone that the U.S. military will not been identified, but was also detained create an atmosphere of a prison within the camps. plagued with wrecks Once the two were discovered missing, Panamanian "We are continuing to workwith the Cubans to improve government and U.S. Embassy officials were notified and the quality of life within the community camps and will RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) -Because a search was immediately initiated. continue to respect their human rights," he said. "The of frequent accidents and speeding on Bruja Road It is not known for sure how the two left the camp, but Cubans here are not prisoners, but we expect them to enroute to Empire Range, security officials here it is suspected that they climbed the fence, said Brig. Gen. respect the dignity of the Panamanian people who have are using radar equipment on vehicles using the James Wilson, JTF-Safe Haven commander. It is known offered them temporary shelter and humanitarian assisroad. that they left during the hours of darkness. tance." Lt. Jim Jolliff, Rodman security officer, said 90 percent of the accidents on the road are because of speeding. "In the past week, we have stopped two vehicles in excess of 80 miles per hour and one was clocked at 98," he said. The speed limit on the road is 40 mph, except adjacent to the Cocoli housing area where the limit is 25. There are speed limit signs posted in the area, Jolliff said. Jolliff said some of the accidents have involved government vehicles and people have suffered injuries. Atlantic exchanges announce hours FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO -Atlantic) The new or current hours of operation for Atlantic Army and Air Force Exchange Service facilities are as follows: Fort Davis Senior Airman Tom Franz (JTF Safe Haven) *Post Exchange: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Saturday, Cubans at Camp No. 1 display a sign that says "we will return to Cuba when our brothers rise from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. the dead." *Shopette (Building 32): 8 a.m.-l 1 p.m. MondaySunday. *Small Shopette and Gas Station: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. *Military Clothing Sales: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. TuesdayHsed Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday. *Cafeteria (grill only): 6:30 a.m.-2 p.m. MondayPANAMA CITY (Reuters) -Thirty-eight Cuban refumove that forced the Clinton administration to change Friday, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. gees staying at a camp in Panama have called off a hunger long-standing U.S. policy granting asylum to Cubans. *Anthony's Pizza: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-Sunstrike, U.S. military officials said Wednesday. day. U.S. military officials in charge of the Panama camps *Auto Parts Store: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Frisaid the Cubans called off their hunger strike late Tuesday Defense secretary day, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday. after they had refused to cat for four days to protest against v LI4 Fort Sherman policy on Cuban migrants. to visit H aiti, C uba *Post Exchange and Shopette: noon-6 p.m. MonDozens of migrants in the Panama camps, where the WASHINGTON D.C. (Reuters) -Defense Secreday-Sunday and 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Sunday United States holds about 4,000 Cubans near the Panama tary William Perry plans to visit Haiti Saturday to meet during Jungle Operations Training Battalion rotaCanal, launched a hunger strike over the weekend to Ariam Prnpans rvis Haiitay oet tions. demand the United States grant them asylum. American troops and review U.S. military operations Fort Espinar As many as 96 refugees had stopped eating Saturday, there the Defense Department said Thursday. *Shopette: I I a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Tuesday and although orly halfremained on strikeby Sunday, according since would be Peny's second visit to Port-au-Prince Thursday-Saturday, Closed Wednesday and Sunto U.S. military officials in charge of the camps. Sept. 19 to restore democracy to the Caribbean nation. day. The refugees said they were angry at President Clinton' Sento soesma sB tos re*Toyland: noon-6 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and policy-aimed at discouraging future wavesofCuban boat Pentagon spokesman Dennis Boxx also told reFriday; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday; and 10 a.m.-6 people -that the refugees must return to Cuba to apply for ptrs Thursday that tentative plans for ithe one-day p~.Study loe una n Mna. legal emigration to the United States. trip Saturday called for Perry to visit the U.S. Navy p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday. .ea mgaio oteUitdSae.Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba where some 40,000 More than 30,000 Cuban refugees fled the communist Ban an atina n s ar be houed. island nation on tiny rafts during August and September, a Cuban and Haitian migrants are being housed. Army and Air Force Exchange SerAtlantic Community celebrates Lat*Postal limits expand, Page 4 vice, commissaries set Columbus in Culture during Hispanic Heritage *Entebbe, Page 10 Day holiday hours. Month celebration. Hoops championship, Page 13

PAGE 2

2 Tropic Times _ __ _ _ _ _ Oct. 7, B994 briefly Tropic Times late? AMCflghtshedul Call 269-3220 People who live in quarters on a Pacific All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for higher priority mission area military installation and have not rerequirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608/ ceived a Tropic Times by 6:30 a.m. Friday 4857. should call 269-3220. Saturday 8:40am B757 Howard AFB Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) 5:40amn C-130 Howard AFS Atlanta 1AP, GA (C) Charleston AFB, SC 'Trick or Treating' hours Maxwell, AL (A) Charleston lAP, SC Oct.14 B:45am B727 Howard AFB Tuesday 5:40am C-130 Howard AF established for Clayton Atlanta IAP, GA (C) 5:40am C-141 Howard AFB Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC) The established hours for "Trick or Charleston 1AP, SC Brasilla, Brazil (VO) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Treating" at Fort Clayton are 5-8 p.m. Oct. Sunday Buenos Aires, Argentina Howard AFB 31. The age limit is 12 years old. Teens, 13 7am 8-757 Howard AFB (C,O) Montevideo, Uruguay (0) years and older are encouraged to particiSoto CanO AS, Honduras (CC) Brasilia, Brazil AActive duty only pate in the Directorate of Community AcMonday Wednesday USU.S. passport 5:55am C130 Howard AFB 5:25am C-130 Howard, AFB O-Overnght tivies events. San Salvador, El Salvador San Jose, Costa Rica C-Commercial Contract People who have a valid installation (VCCHoward AFB V-Vsa pass can escort five immediate family .Cano AS, Honduras(CC) Thursday M-Medevac members only for Trick or Treating on Howard AFB 5:45am CA Howard AFB CC-Country Clearance Fort Clayton. People with vehicles registered with the Provost Marshal Office can drive their vehicles onto any installation to with the battalion should direct their conDCA announces mended mailing packages by Nov. 1. Inan authorized parking area. cerns to Headquarters Company, 1st Bn., international mail sent by air or air parcel Sponsors are accountable for the be508th Inf., located in Building 805, Fort 20-60 percent savings post to Africa, Australia, the Caribbean, havior of their guests while on the installaKobbe. For information, call 284-5439. The Defense Commissary Agency will Central or South America, Europe, the Far tion. Failure to control guests will result in hold an anniversary sale at commissaries East, and others should also arrive on time action taken against the sponsor. All visiEnlisted Spouses'Club throughout Panama in October. More than if sent by Dec. 1. Items sent by boat should tors to Army installations must be off post 900 items will be offered at savings of 20be mailed a month earlier, except those no later than 9 p.m. For information, call active in Panama 60 percent. sent to Africa and Southeast Asia, which Master Sgt. Scott Carr at 287-3716. The Enlisted Spouses' Club-Panama should be mailed immediately. meets 7 p.m. the first Monday of every Area housing mayors' *With the advent of the 1994 holiday Navy MWR needs month at the Fort Clayton NCO Club. For elections wrapping up season, postal officials need volunteers to information, call Barb Johnson at 284help with the tremendous influx of letters program instructors 4523 or Amy Gross at 287-3071. Elections for housing area mayors and and packages. Volunteers will help sort Rodman Morale Welfare and Recrevice-mayors must be completed by Octand pitch mail, retrieve packages, and do ation needs instructors in various fields to 20. Volunteers are needed to hold those povarious other roles in local service centers. expand their programming. The MWR Spot bid sale to be held sitions in their prospective areas on and off Members 16 years and older who have auOutdoor Recreation needs individuals Oct. 19 at Corozal post. Training and child care is available. thorized postal privileges may apply. qualified to teach open water scuba. For A spot bid sale will be held 9 a.m. Oct. To volunteer, call Master Sgt. Scott Carr at *The best way to lose APO privileges information, call Valerie Van Essen at 19 at Building 308, Corozal. Inspection of 287-3716. is to abuse them, and this includes sending 283-3150. The MWR Community Recrethe items will be 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 18. For illegal or unauthorized items through the ation Department needs foreign language information, call 285-5417. Sweet Adelines women's system, or using it for personal ghin. Postinstructors qualified to teach Spanish and al personnel are using a variety of means French. Instructors should have prior exchorus needs singers to identify and report members misusing perience teaching elementary and converAmmunition supply The Crossroads Chapter of the Sweet their postal service privileges, and this insational courses. For information, call point closes Oct. 23-27 Adelines women's barbershop chorus eludes X-raying all items that enter the sysNavy MWR at 283-4301. The Roma A uti Suppl needs singers in tenor, baritone, bass, lead tem. People who abuse the system may be The Rodman Ammunition Supply and melody to participate in a variety of fined, permanently lose APO privileges Point will be closed Oct. 23-27 for invencommunity activities, including singing and may even spend time in jail. Volunteers needed for tory. All units with scheduled training Christmas cards. No experience is necesFor more information or answersto any Black History Month should call 283-5643/5806 to reschedule sary, but musical knowledge is helpful, postal questions, call 286-4214. Rodman NS needs volunteers to help issues and turn-ins. Rehearsals are held 7 p.m. Mondays at the plan activities for the 1995 Black History Balboa Lutheran Church hall. For informaFSU announces term two Month observance scheduled for FebruNew policy sets stricter tion, call 252-6017 or 221-3874. registration schedule ary. Committee members are also looking uidelines at Rodman r lgiStat it ahmdu na for guest speakers, donations and facilities g 24th Wing, AAFES set Flonda State University, Panaa Canal for functions. People interested should call Customers of Rodman Ammunition ' Branch, will register students for term two: Petty Officer Patricia Wallace or Petty OfSupply Point are required to update their 'n smoking policy 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in ficer Angelia Huff at 283-4400/4300. company access roster every 90 days or as All dining rooms in 24th Wing clubs Building 808, Albrook AFS; and 9 a.m.-2 Howard AFB officials need volunteers personnel changes dictate. Beginning Oct. and AAFES facilities have been designatp.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in Building to plan and organize activities for 17, units will be denied access to the ASP ed as "no-smoking areas" by the wing 235, Fort Davis. Late registration will be Howard's Black History Month obserif rosters are not updated. For information, commander, Brig. Gen. Richard E. Brown noon-5 p.m. Oct. 17-18 in Building 808, vance. Two volunteers, in the grade of E-7 call Staff Sgt. Juan Gomez at 283-5806. III. After a three-month trial period, the Albrook AFS; and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 17or above, are also needed to chair the compolicy will be reviewed for its impact on 18 in Building 235, Fort Davis. For informittee and to act as alternate. Anyone inResource Management customers. mation, call 285-6922/5222. terested in volunteering to participate in or .. chairing the committee, call Tech. Sgt. Jim Mentorship available 24th Wing PAO will 'Just Passin' Thru' Johnson at 284-5358. The Resource Management Mentorship Program is available for any career cibroadcast holiday cheer Navy Ball set for Oct. 14 508th Infantry closes vilian with civilian program-11. It is a forThe 24th Wing Public Affairs office is The 1994 Navy Ball will be held 6 p.m. mal mentoring program with an emphasis sponsoring a program to help make the Oct. 14 at Club Amador. Tickets are $10 Tuesday at Kobbe on skill development and acquisition. Parholiday season a little brighter for relatives for E-6/GS-6 and below and $15 for E-7/ The I st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Inticipants are matched based on career inin the United States. People can record an GS-7 and above. For information, call fantry, will inactivate Oct. 15. Building terests, goals and needs. All efforts will be audio holiday greeting to be broadcast on Navy public affairs at 283-5641/5644. 812, the unit headquarters at Fort Kobbe, made to geographically co-locate partners. a radio station in their relatives' home will close Tuesday. Once closed, all peoDeadline for applications is Tuesday. For town. The program is free and open to all Education center sets ple who have unfinished business dealings information, call 287-3902. U.S. military and family members. For many new test dates more information about the program, call The Army Education Center announche24th Wing PAO at 284-5554. TeAm dcto etranuc W eekend weather the es test dates for Graduate Record Exams, Graduate Management Admission Tests, ** Factoid: Since 1976, several 5.0 or greater e" quakes have been reported Holiday season will National Teachers' Exams and Automoin Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru and have postal caused more loss of life and property than any other natural phenomena. affect delivery ive Service Excellence exams. The dates Forecast: Partly cloudy with late afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Post office officials remind members are 7 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18 and 25, and stationed in Panama that the holiday "rush" Nov. 8, 9 and 15. GRE and NTE subject Pacific Atlantic usually means the mail moves slower than exams will be given at 1 p.m. For informaSaturday Saturday normal. As a result, they've noted the foltion, call 287-5856. Temperature Tides Temperature Tides lowing recommended "mail by" dates, as High: 87 5:35 a.m. at 18.3 feet High: 85 3:09 p.m. at 1.4 feet determined by the final destination of the 24th Medical Group Low: 75 11:52a.m. at 1.6 feet Low: 70 10:49 p.m. at 0.3 feet packages. Sunday Sunday *To get holiday packages to the contiannounces two closer High: 86 6:24 a.m. at 17.8 feet High: 86 4:04 p.m. at 1.4 feet nental United States by Christmas, memThe 24th Medical Group will close at Low: 76 12:40 p.m. at 0.8 feet Low: 71 11:38 p.m. at 0.3 feet bears should mail them first class, priority, noon on Thursday for Medical Readiness Send weather questions to 24th Weather Squadron ATrN: Weather Wise, Howaid AFB, Panama (MPS) or space available mail by Dec. 2. When Training, and again at 2:30 p.m. Oct. 14 sending them 4th class, officials recomfor Commander's call.

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Tropic Times News Oct. 7,1994 Holiday hours set FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Here are the hours of operation for the Army and Air Force Exchange System -Panama Monday in observance of Columbus Day: Corozal Main PX -10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sweets Reflections -9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Frank's Franks -10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Anthony's Pizza -10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Wok Works -closed Casa de Amigos -closed Bakery -closed Commissary Frank's Franks -closed Fort Clayton Shoppette (95) -closed Frank's Franks (95) -closed Anthony's Pizza -4 p.m.-8 p.m. Burger King -6:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Popeye's -11 a.m.-10 p.m. Frank's Franks (by Burger King) -closed Clayton Plaza Shoppette -7 a.m.-midnight Sgt. Jane Usero (U.S. Army) Shoppette (519) -8 a.m.-10 p.m. Field trip Snack bar (519) -closed Auto parts store -9 a.m.-2 p.m. Maj. Tony Kazmierski, Camp No. 1 S-3, briefs a group of wives about the Operation Safe Haven Car Care Center -closed mission. The spouses went to Empire Range to visit their husbands who are working at the camps. Clothing Sales -closed Amador Shoppette -9 a.m.-5 p.m. Abuse runs in the family Albrook FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Domestic vioaggressively by taking out their frustrations with other Shoppette -7 a.m.-10 p.m. lence affects about three million American homes each children in ways that they have seen their-parents do. Snack bar -8 a.m.-2 p.m. year and touches the lives of men, women and children of Where domestic violence happens, children also fear Anthony's Pizza -II a.m.-8 p.m. all ages, races, religions and incomes, statistics indicate. abandonment by one or both parents, she said. In cases Frank's Franks -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Today, as part of the activities of Domestic Violence where couples separate as a result of the violence, chilVideo rental -9 a.m.-9 p.m. Prevention Month, the focus will be on some of the effects dren fear the other parent may also leave or die. Furniture store -10 a.m.-4 p.m. of domestic violence on children, said Clarita Riba, Army "Domestic violence creates anxiety, poor 6oncentraShoe store -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Community Services' Family Advocacy Program mantion, decreased school performance and frequently the Toyland/Outdoor living -10 a.m.-4 p.m. ager. need for increased attention and reassurance," Riba said. Class Six -10 a.m.-9 p.m. "It's a common belief that children are not affected by The childhood experiences with violence in the home domestic violence if they are not witness to it," she said. may become a barrier to establishing close adult relationHoward "However, most of the children are aware of violence in ships, she said. Abuse is a learned behavior and children Main PX -10 a.m.-6 p.m. the home, even if they don't see the incidents." who grow up in families where there is abuse also learn Shopppette -open 24 hours Children can be affected, both physically and emotionabusive behavior. Class Six -10 a.m.-6 p.m. ally, by the violence, Riba said. They can be severely in"They often continue the abuse as adults," Riba said. Cafeteria -7 a.m.-2 p.m. jured if they try to stop the abuse between their parents or "So, whether a child sees the abusive behavior or hears it Anthony's Pizza -11 a.m.-8 p.m. they may get hurt by objects thrown by one or both parents from his room, the experience affects him and is potenClothing Sales -closed during the confrontation. tially damaging to his physical and emotional developService station -6:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. "Children who grow up in families where there is vioment. lence suffer not only in their childhood, but also later in 'Therefore, if you are interested in your child's future, Fort Kobbe life," she said. "They feel distrustful, confused, fearful, anend abuse today," she said. "Seek professional help beShoppette/video rental -10 a.m.-6 p.m. gry, frustrated and helpless while the abuse is occurring, cause, tomorrow may be too late." Burger King -8 a.m.-3 p.m. and then they learn to be violent and abusive as well." For information, call the Clayton Family Advocacy Riba also explained that other emotional reactions that Program office at 287-6643 or the Social Work Services Miscellaneous can occur as a result of violence in the home are feelings of at 282-5139. Air Force family advocacy can be reached Quarry Height shoppette -closed responsibility for the abuse, shame and embarrassment. at 284-6410. Navy famly advocacy can be reached at Gorgas Hospital shoppette -closed Some children may become withdrawn and others may act 283-5749. Curundu School cafeteria -closed Cocoli shoppette -closed Balboa school cafeteria -closed BabSevichea Station -6 am.-midnight Atlantic dining facility takes honors Fort Espinar FORT SHERMAN (USARSO PAO -Atlantic) -The Shoppette -closed Jungle Operations Training Battalion's dining facility was runner-up in a Department of the Army competition. Fort Davis The JOTB dining facility, representing U.S. Army South, won second place out of 12 other worldwide, small Auto parts store -10 a.m.-2 p.m. category dining facilities in the Philip A. Connelly comGas station -8 a.m.-6 p.m. petition. Gasfteran -8 a.m. I p.m. A three-person, DA team judged the facility June 1. Cafeteria -8 a.m.1 p.m. The team looked at sanitation, troop accessibility, equipAnthony's Pizza -11 a.m.p.m. ment maintenance and administrative requirements, acCB King aes -c m9 p.m. cordi ng to Chief Warrant Officer 3 Frank Scherra, the Clothinge S ales -6 losed team's captain. Shoppette -10 a.m. -6 p.m. Additionally, the team interviewed soldiers to get their Mii-shoppette -8 a.m. -6 p.m. overall opinion of the dining facility, he added. Fort Sherman "We asked them if they were getting enough to eat, if Shoppette -noon-6 p.m. there were many special programs like for Black History Gas station -closed Month and how well the staff interacted with them," he AstaonsPa-cosed ~m said. Anthony's Pizza -noon-4 p.m. saiThe staff of the JOTB dining facility had no idea how CONCESSIONAIRES they did in the judging until the winners were selected. "We can't tell them anything about our judging," TheaAA-4p P.cTficAConcessConaes will ope Scherra said. "The only time we'll tell them anything is if 10 a.m.-4 p.m. The Atlantic Concessionaires will be 4 closed. Beauty and barber shops will be open 8:30 we spot a problem and it's a safety hazard. Still, the facility's manager had formed an opinion of Sgt Rick Emert (U.,. Army) a.m.-2 p.m. their chances in the competition. Chief Warrant Officer 3 Frank Scherra, judging COMMSSARIES "My personal opinion was that we didn't do very well team captain, left, looks over the dining facility's Corozal and Fort Espinar -closed Monday and in the judging," said Sgt. Ist Class Godfry W. Miller, slicer with Sgt. Edward Colon, shift comander. Wednesday, open Tuesday. manager, JOTB dining facility. "When the judges were be runner-up was surprising and gratifying, he said. Howard -closed Sunday and Tuesday, open leaving they told us that we did good, but I got the im"We were shooting for the top, but we weren't really Monday pression they were saying: 'Maybe next year."' expecting it," he said. "We're very happy and satisfied to Learning his staff had beaten out 10 other facilities to be runner-up."

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4 Tropic Times Oct. 7, 1994 News A few good men Traffic Command says Marines fix up POVs ready for pick up BALBOA (MTMC) -The following customers have privately owned vehicles ready for pick up at the POV a v is Processing Center, Building 1501, Balboa, adjacent to Pier 18. The office will be closed Monday for Columbus FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO. Atlantic) -The theDay: ater operations supervisor, Panama, and Atlantic commuAlexis M.; Anciaux L.N; Avery LB.; Baum A.D.; Best nity Marines have found a way to get around the dwinG.; Bonaparte R.; Butler S.R.; Cantrall R.D.; Church S.E.; dling budget for facility repairs and beautification. Clayton J.D.; Coleman J.H.; Colon R.E.; Cooley S.E.; Sixteen Marines from Company D, Marine Support Curschmann A.R.; Daniel T.E.; Fluet J.E.; Garuz T.E.; Battalion repainted the concession area of the Fort Davis Hickey M.J.; Johnson V.M.; Johnson G.; Johnson E.; Theater in response to community complaints about the Knox J.L.; Krisman E.K.; Krist M.G.;'Lewis G.L.; theater's condition. Mahomey P.L.; Marcelino W.V.; Martini S.A.; McIntosh The idea stemmed from an Atlantic Army and Air K.E.; Medina J.R.; Mejia-Rangel 0.; Melendez N.; Miller Force Exchange Service Advisory Council meeting. Alice J.T.; Montalvo W.A.; Moody J.E.; Moore J.D.; Rodriguez, theater operations supervisor, Panama exMudhenke V.C.; Oconner M.L.; Parker S.T.; Patton C.C.; -planned that the Directorate of Engineering and Housing Pittman T.Z.; Row S.G.; Ruggles G.; Sanchez E.E.; Atlantic budget cuts prevented DEH from doing the work Schaul D.E.; smith C.M.; Sola M.A.; Squires E.; Stall to the theater. F.M.; Testa J.A.; Thomas S.L.; Thompson S.L.; Tregaskis She suggested that the community members pitch in K.; Virant R.A.; Williams A.C.; Wilson J.A.; Witter D.C.; and fix it up. Wrencher C.T.; Yeager W.; Zwiebel B.J. "I figured since the PACE (Panama Army CommuniCustomers must have the following documents for ties of Excellence) programs are successful, why not do pick up of their POVs: something like that with the theater," Rodriguez said. "In I *ID card (current military, dependent, or civilian) the meeting, I said all we really needed was some elbow *Driver license (must have Panamanian license for secgrease." The Co. D Marines responded quickly to her 5gi Rick Emer (U.S. Army) ond POV) suggestion, she said. AAFES supplied some of the Cpl. Cable Day, Company D, Marine Support *POV shipping document (DD Form 788) brushes and the tape; the paint came from Self Help Battalion, paints a wall in the theater. *Vehicle registration or title stores. *Vehicle keys "It took a while to get everything together, but after operations, and we wanted to do something to help the *Power of Attorney and photo copies of the sponsor's they finished painting, it looked so nice," she said. "They base." bilingual ID card and driver's license (when the sponsor did a professional job." Rodriguez said she'd like to see such community inon orders cannot be present for pick up) The mission was a good opportunity for the Marines volvement spread. The list is current as of Tuesday. For updates, call custo work as a team, said Chief Warrant Officer 4 Tom "It's good for the families to have nice facilities to go tomer service at 282-4642/3853 or the POV arrival tape Lindenmayer, Co. D commander. to," she said. "The command support on this project was rec. ;ding at 282-4641. Customer service hours are Mon"We're a small unit, there are only 25 of us," he said. excellent. It would be great if we could do something like day -Friday, 7:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m. Wednesday hours are "I know it's tough trying to get things like this done, and this on Fort Clayton." 9 a.m. -2:30 p.m. it was a good chance for us to get together. The Marines will return later this year to work on the People expecting POVs are reminded to call customer "We have a good working relationship with the Army wallpaper in the auditorium, Rodriguez said. service to leave a contact phone number. Postal limits raised to $100 per day PANAMA (USARSO PAO) -Postal customers can now mail gifts through the APO not to exceed $100 per person per day, without duty charges, officials said. The previous limit allowed only $50 per person per day. The U.S. Southern Command Customs Program manager, Roland Thompson, said there are many misconceptions about mailing gifts through the APO. "You can send multiple gifts in one package for multiple people," he said. "But it's important that you put that on the customs tag." Some other misconceptions include what can be mailed through the APO. Products that are manufactured in the United States and purchased at the Army and Air Force Exchange, regardless of value, can be mailed duty free. However, products made by foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies are subject to duties, Thompson said. Also, typicos of Panama are normally entered duty free but should be listed on the customs form. .o. eJohn Hall (U.S. Navy) "If you have questions about what can be mailed, ask me m ade your post office clerk," Thompson said. Bunny Lindsay (second from left) and Sandra Pinzon (right) from the Rodman NS Civilian Military post offices are located on Howard AFB, AlPersonnel Office hand out baked goods to the Seabees from Rodman. Volunteers from the brook AFS, Quarry Heights, Rodman NS, and Forts Claybase baked for the sailors working at the Cuban migrant camps. ton, Amador, Davis and Espinar. mary of news is taken from the Panafiling charges of corruption against former El Siglo, El Panama America, La La Prensa, El Panama America: Pamanian press. The translation and refirst lady Ana Mae Diaz de Endara. Miller Prensa: Papers report that 131 cases of denpers report ratification last night by ports are unofficial and no guarantee will meet with Balladares and announce gue have been reported in Panama and 71 Panama Legislative Assembly of reis made by the Tropic Times as to the his withdrawal of charges in exchange for percent of the victims are women. forms to the Panama Constitution that accuracy of reporting or statements the president considering a pardon for eliminates the army from the Republic made here. Selection of these stories mayor-elect Omaira Correa. Miller says La Prensa: Paper reports the situation of Panama. The new law provides for does not imply any emphasis, judgeCorrea is facing minor charges compared for Cuban migrants in Panama is desperate special police services to be temporarily ment or endorsement by the U.S. govto the former first lady. and they risked their lives by defying organized to protect the borders and the ernment. These synopses are intendCastro's regime only to exchange Cuba for jurisdictional territory of Panama only in ed only to give non-Spanish speaking Oct. 3 a jail of more limited size. case of foreign threat. The reform reportpeople a flavor for news events in La Estrella: Paper says a large number edly establishes that the president of the Panama. of Cuban migrants in Panama do not La Estrella: Paper reports that Panama republic is chief of all services estabSept. 30 agree with those who started a hunger ecology groups have criticized the ARI prolisted under the Public Force constituEl Panama America: Paper reports strike at Camp No. 1. They said they tried posal to build an ecological highway betional section and that these, as agents of President Ernesto Perez Balladares a similar strike in Guantanamo and it did tween Panama City and Colon because it authority, will be subordinate to civilian asked Democratic Revolutionary Party not work. would harm the canal watershed. rule.

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N NtTropic Times5 News Oct. 719945 Mosquitoes at large. Dengue Fever still a threat GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL (MEDDAC PAO) -Dengue Fever, a mosquito-transmitted disease, continues to spread in Panama City, officials This mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, is regarded as a sanitation mosquito because it breeds only in artificial containers that have collected water. Therefore, any object such as tires, plastic containers, jars or cans that are thrown away and can collect water, serve as breeding sites to produce hundreds of mosquitoes in a few days. "In our fight against this mosquito, Preventive MediThe icebreaker Polar Sea made a transit through the Panama Canal Sept. 28. The Polar Sea cine Entomology is monitoring the housing areas on miliis the first U.S. vessel to reach the North Pole. The ship made the historic voyage Aug. 22. tary installations for the presence of the mosquito so that corrective action may be taken immediately," said Maj. Nelson Powers, chief of Entomology, Preventive Medicine Services at Gorgas Army Community Hospital. SPowers said the plan involves the Department of Defense Pest Control Services and the residents. E mm a il u e rs o teMonitoring for this mosquito is done by using ovitraps or black jars. These ovitraps are one-pint containers painted black and filled with water. A red strip of paper is Eaced in the water, and serves as a place for the female Electronic mail considered -o cial records mosquito to lay eggs. The trap serves to exploit the behavior of the female mosquito to lay eggs in water-filled obtainable by Freedom of Information Act artfcilcontainers. The traps are placed in the yards of various residences WASHINGTON D.C. (AFIS) -A recent court deciFOIA once the classified material is removed. Therefore, and checked by Entomology, Preventive Medicine sion on electronic mail is forcing federal archivists and people should determine whether messages generated weekly. If eggs are found on the red strip, a notice is computer users into reviewing their records management through e-mail channels are official records and use displaced at the resident's quarters. The notice informs the procedures. position schedule accordingly." resident of the findings and requests they check their yard The courts ruled electronic mail documents used in By scheduling, records managers follow set governand their neighbors' yards for artificial containers that conducting government business are official federal ment guidelines for maintaining documents. Some schedserve as breeding sites such as an uncovered trash can, a records and obtainable under the Freedom of Information uling requires managers to keep active files for a predeterchild's wading pool or a tire swing. Act. With this ruling, government records managers have mined period, followed by an inactive period and evenIt has also been found that roof gutters and pool water been busy documenting both hard copy and electronic tual records destruction. Other records are kept for permahelp in breeding. files for proper disposition. They are also warning conent file. Residents should inspect their roof gutters, of less than workers about deleting e-mail documents. Gegan is now trying to educate his colleagues about 12 feet from the ground, or contact the Directorate of EnJeryl Gegan, archives and records management chief treating e-mail traffic and other computerized records the gineering and Housing if higher. for the National Security Agency at Fort Meade, Md., same as paper files. Aside from notices, Pest Control is notified and the published an article in the agency's June newsletter about "Obviously, there are e-mail messages that won't apresident's yard and adjoining yards are sprayed with inScott Armstrong, an archivist with the National Security ply to this," Gegan said. "There are too many people out secticides. Archive. On Jan. 19, 1989, he wrote, Armstrong filed sevthere flicking keyboards and sending e-mail for the sake Because the mosquito does not fly very far, its area of eral Freedom of Information Act requests for electronic of sending e-mail. What we're trying to do is get these infestation is limited and can be dealt with. data stored in backup files belonging to the Executive Ofpeople to think about what they're putting on the board." Preventive Medicine is asking for cooperation from fice of the President and the National Security Council Gegan suggests e-mail users take caution in deleting area residents. under the Reagan administration, their traffic and recommends printing messages before de"If you find an ovitrap or black jar in your yard, please According to Gegan's article, the system enabled emleting. leave it alone as placement of the jar is very important for ployees to share appointment calendars, as well as trans"By printing, you have a hard copy of the message," detection of the mosquito's presence," Powers said. fer and edit correspondence. However, it allowed 1,300 said Gegan. "It can be used for follow-up reports, allowIn addition, if Preventive Medicine finds artificial confederal employees to exchange e-mail messages-including you to delete the e-mail." tainers that serve as breeding sites while conducting ining some classified information He added that if it's obvious an e-mail message is just spections of residents' yards, they will leave notices ask"Paper backups to this system did not recreate a coma quick note-"Joe, your car lights are on"-go ahead and ing the resident to remove or drain the containers that plete record of the e-mail traffic," wrote Gegan. "Howdelete it. But if you're not sure, print a hard copy first. serve as breeding sites. ever, backup tapes did contain all relevant communicaGegan said NSA has been talking about electronic arFor information, call Powers at 282-5269/5440. tions data, including detailed distribution lists that would chives and archives management for a long time, but just appear on screen and on the paper printout." recently started compiling, reformating and duplicating Armstrong and the National Security Archive sued to records into electronic form. "There is a lot to be done," obtain these tapes. Gegan said. e n c uy o ut The president's office and National Security Council Meanwhile, he encourages office managers to review argued e-mail isn't a "record" as defined by the Federal their records disposition schedules. "Part of our education Records Act. However, both the trial and appellate courts process (at his agency) is to put our office phone number info a v a la ble ruled in favor of Armstrong. everywhere a person can find it," said Gegan. "It's done "What this means to an agency like NSA is that any eso our people can call, get their questions answered and WASHINGTON D.C. (AFIS) -Federal employmail message not properly scheduled becomes a permaschedule their records, brochures and exhibits for proper ees interested in hearing the latest news about buyouts nent record," said Gegan. "It is subject to release under disposition." can now call 1-202-606-2425. The Office of Personnel Management sponsors 3~the 24-hour hot line providing the latest information aotagency buyout programs. The brainchild of Panama am ends cositto out Pana a am ndsconsituton PM's Federal Workforce Restructuring Office, the hot line names the latest agencies to announce buyout programs and gives eligibility and early retirement information. It also gives information on topics such as how accepting a buyout could affect tax status. PANAMA CITY (Reuters) -Panama's legislature has "I'm delighted and pleasantly surprised," said Louis telephone cal since Presd ent Bil Clinton sne the voted to outlaw formally the nation's military, which Martinz, a prominent member of Panama's opposition to Workforce Restruturing Act March 30, 1994. The ruled for two decades until it was destroyed in 1989 by military rule who was jailed four times under Noriega. act extended buyouts to non-DoD agencies. More the U.S. invasion to oust strongman Manuel Noriega. The step is likely to draw praise from the United States than 30,000 DoD workers have accepted buyouts Panama's National Assembly voted by a wide margin for Panama's new President Ernesto Perez Balladares, who since DoD agencies began offering them in 1993. late Tuesday to amend the 1972 Constitution and permaled a remarkable return to power of Noriega's former party Approximately 15,000 non-DoD workers have nently abolish the army, becoming the second country in May's general elections by promising to do more for the voluntarily retired or resigned from government serafter Costa Rica in Central America to ban its leaders poor. Perez Balladares also pledged during his campaign vice with a buyout in hand, and more are expected to from raising armed forces. to support eliminating the armed forces. leave after the beginning of fiscal 1995. A buyout is The new law allows for the training of police forces Noriega's ouster by U.S. forces ended more than two equal to $25,000 or the employee's earned severance to defend Panama in the case of foreign aggression. decades of military rule that began in 1968, when a milieaymnt, whichever is less. Tle government deducts The move heartened many Panamanians who had tary coup overthrew democratically elected President taxes, so employees offered buyouts are advised to been concerned that the legislature, dominated by memArnulfo Arias. consult agency retirement experts to calculate the bers of Noriega's former political party, would reject the U.S. forces captured Noriega and took him to Florida, buyouts' real worth before deciding. measure. where he is serving a 40-year term on a drug conviction.

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Tropic Times t ic_ Oct. 7, 1994 Voices Panama's Dengue Fever worries reader again, the eggs hatch. ficer Ellington of the Personnel Services Branch had to Mayo s Cor er You can prevent Dengue Fever by cleaning your yard say about your issue. and neighborhood of discarded containers, which hold I am not sure if you are wanting to get a Uniformed Dear Mayors' Corner, water. This is accomplished by moving and inverting Services Identification Card (dependent ID card) or a Joint I am new to Panama and want to know what all the buckets and water cans, covering water barrels and getCommittee Bilingual Card, so I'll speak in both areas. fuss is about Dengue Fever. ting rid of used tires, plus moving stored auto parts under In order for you to become a dependent of your sister New and Bugged cover. and be issued the dependent ID card, your sister would Other measures include keeping boats covered or inhave to request custody through the court system. If grantDear New and Bugged, verted, inspecting tarps weekly, cleaning pet water and ed, you would be a ward of the court. You would then be Lately, there has been a lot of coverage in the local food dishes, scrubbing permanent bird baths weekly, filleligible for a dependent ID card with limited privileges. military news about mosquitoes, spraying and Dengue Feing pipe fence posts and tree holes with sand or cement, You would be entitled to these privileges until one day ver. The man responsible for this information is Maj. and cleaning or draining flower pot dishes weekly. prior to your 21st birthday. This would also entitle you to Nelson Powers, chief of Entomology, Preventive MediResidents also can drain wading pools every week. a bilingual card, but with no purchasing or travel privilegcine Service at Gorgas Army Community Hospital. PowWhen not in use, store them undercover or inverted. Fill es, since you are a non-command sponsored dependent. ers has diligently worked to inform the public about this ornamental clay pots with sand or drill holes in the bottom If your sister does not want to go through the legal protropical ailment and provide up-to-date information about of the post. Cleaning roof gutters and air conditioner drains cess for you to get the dependent status, she can still rethis problem and its prevention. I forwarded this letter to will also help reduce mosquito popluations. quest that you be issued a bilingual card. Your sister will his office and received the following response: It is important that when cleaning containers, you scrub need to request a dependency determination. United States Dengue Fever is a non-fatal virus, communicated only them thoroughly to kill any mosquito eggs inside. servicemembers with relatives (parents, brothers or sisters) by the bite of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. The disease is who depend on them for over half of their sustenance and transmitted by the mosquito after feeding on an infected Dear Mayors' Corner, habitually live with the servicemember under the same individual. The virus is not found in or transmitted by anA while ago, you published an letter stating that activeroof, may apply for a depleting detenrination. imals. duty sevicemembers can have family members stay with The application should be forwarded through your sisThe symptoms are high fever, intense pains of the them. In addition, it said that if the family members had ter's component command to Commander, United States joints and muscles, intense headache and pain behind the documentation which proved the soldier was supporting Southern Command, ATTN: SCJ 1, APO AA 34003. Fieyes. There are no immunizations available and those afthem, they could receive an ID card with non-purchasing nal determination for dependency status and approval for fected are sick for several weeks, followed by a long conprivileges stamped on it. issuance of a bilingual ID card will be made by Headquarvalescence period. A blood test is the only way to confirm I am 19 years old and a community volunteer with nuters, U.S. Southern Command. the fever. merous awards. I have lived here a year with my active If any of this is unclear or you have other questions, Mosquito control is the key to reducing the risk of the duty sister, whom I lived with before coming to Panama. please call Adjutant General Customer Service at 287fever. The fever can only be transmitted by the mosquito, My father is a sergeant first class in the Army Reserves. I 8406 or 287-3006. which is active during the day. At night, it rests at in proknow I am not entitled to privileges because of my dad's tected areas, inside houses if possible. The mosquito is a reserve status, but I have an ID card that is useless in PanEditor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral hitchhiker and, if given the chance, will fly inside a car to ama. I need help. I don't want to buy anything, I just want Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity be carried and introduced into new areas. It flies only a a little mobility. chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MIPS). Anonymity will few hundred yards and lays its eggs in containers capable Always Waiting in the Car be granted upon request. The Tropic Times reserves of holding water. The eggs remain viable for several Dear Waiting, the right edit letters and responses for brevity. months. When the container becomes filled with water Please roll down the window to hear what Warrant OfCivilian caught having a few Civilian caught havinCgSa few Dear Tropic Times Readers, InterNet services are private. With too rm an .cases of beer Are you one of those many people daily mail service in and out of the Rewho came to Panama, only to find out public of Panama, they are available to Car break-ins that your InterNet, CompuServe, Prodianyone from the comfort of their own Crme Scene Two soldiers had their cars broken into gy or America Online services were home. The only requirement is a comwhile they were at the Christian Servicecompletely unavailable? Well, rest easy. puter, a modem, a few free minutes, and Going over the limit men's Center in Balboa recently. The unInterNet E-Mail has finally made its an interest calling one of the local area The Contraband Control Office discovknown person broke the passenger winway into the local BBS community. Bulletin Boards which offer this service. ered that a civilian employee bought 13 dows out of both vehicles and stole one There are several of you out there There are currently three PanamaNet cases of beer over the course of one month. radio. that have the advantage of E-Mail serBulletin Board Systems that offer daily The purchases exceeded his monthly Always be aware of the area where vice within your work environment, and InterNet service to the states. They are: household allotment by three cases. your car is parked. If suspicious activity is a few others who have access through *Eternity, Fort Clayton, 287-6524, If you have any questions concerning observed, report it to the military police by their local college networking. Howevsystem operator: David Dillard limitations on certain items, refer to Southcalling 287-4401 or 289-5133. er, there is an extremely large popula*The Trash Can, Fort Clayton, ern Command Regulation 1-19 or call the tion of computer users that would be 287-5272, system operator: Neil Contraband Control Office at 286-3303. Club Fight anxious for the opportunity to regain acArmani Three soldiers were involved in a vercess to their stateside E-Mail service. *Fool's Paradise, Fort Davis, 289Disrespect bal altercation that turned physical when PanamaNet is a local Bulletin Board 3760, system operator: Donald Haag During a recent raid by the Panamanian one soldier was struck by another at the Network affiliated with FidoNet, which As local community interest grows in National Police, a United States Community Club on Fort Davis last week. has been serving local area computer this service, the Bulletin Boards that ofservicemember tried to leave the scene in The soldier was taken to the hospital and users for several years. Until now, the fer E-Mail will undoubtedly grow with his privately owned vehicle. When the treated for minor injuries. offering of an E-Mail service has been the demand. PNP stopped him along the Gaillard HighViolent acts like this can ruin a career, an impossibility. But through some vigIf you've been trying to find an avway, the soldier became very belligerent If you are a victim of crime, call the miliilant research, phone calls and "night enue back to your InterNet, and used abusive language. He was taken tary police immediately at 287-4401 or sweats," E-Mail has become a reality to CompuServe, America Online or to the Balboa PNP Station where he re289-5133. the BBS community. Prodigy mail box, this may be just what ceived a stiff fine. E-Mail, for those unfamiliar with it, you're looking for. It's unlawful to be disrespectful toward Panama Jack anonymous hotline is a Private Mail Network that allows Give a PanamaNet 920 Bulletin PNP officers. If you have questions on this If you have any information about drug you to post and receive messages from Board a call. It takes only a few minutes subject, call the Military Police Liaison Ofsmuggling, call the Panama Jack anonyfriends, family and business associates to complete the New User procedure, fice at 287-3808 or 289-5413. mouse hotline at 285-4185. worldwide. If a person or business has and the benefits return themselves with access to an InterNet service, then you each "you have mail waiting." are only a phone call away from them. Neil Armani ,jITropic Times Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666 This authorized unofficial command information publicaSports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis Spe. Brian Thomas tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pubStaff Editors. .Sgt. Cass Purdum U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.2894312 lished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information ProSpc. Tom Findtner NCOIC.Sgt. Rick Emert gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of Rosemary Chong 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Tinies are not necessarily the official Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Public Affairs Superintendent.Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Journalists.Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson U.S. Southern Command. Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Public Affairs Officer.Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office. 283-5644 Commander in Chief.Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig Managing Editor.Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Assistant Public Affairs Officer.John Hall Chief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Editor.Sgt. Robin Shawlinski Photographers.Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Editor.Maureen Sampson Journalists. .Sgt. Eric Horin Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays

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CeTropic Times 7 Com mentr Oct. 7, 1994 1 Spouse deployed? Family support centers can ease pain of family separation One of the key things to remember is that, although absence and remove family feelings of isolation and by Chaplain Leon Kircher your spouse may be deployed, you don't have to feel anxiety. They also serve as a conduit of information USARSO Chaplain Family Life Center they are absent. They are gone for a time, not forever, about the soldier. Regular communication with your spouse is critical. I Family support groups should have direct communio, your spouse is deployed. You're not sure recommend some form of communication take place cation with the deployed unit so that accurate informawhen he or she is returning and information to daily. That doesn't necessarily mean a phone call, tion is passed to family members. this point has been sketchy. The political however. A few lines penned everyday is better than a Overall, the key to a successful family separation climate in the world changes daily, further complicating 40-page letter once a month. period is the family. A deployment can either be a very the return date. You've had some problems with the kids Cassettes or video tapes are a great way to keep the difficult time or can be a time of growth and enrichment. and are not sure how to contact your spouse. lines of communication open. Send pictures in addition This is your choice. Money is getting tight because your spouse usually to letters. Be sure that children write and send your Problems will certainly arise and, if you feel you takes care of the finances and didn't have enough time to spouse copies of their school work. Smaller children can cannot handle them, there are a lot of people out there go over everything with you before leaving. Life is color pictures to send. The key is to keep the flow of who will help you. rapidly becoming unmanageable. communication going. Unit chaplains are key players in family support What do you do? Another thing you can do is set milestones to help the groups and can help you when difficulties arise. The Separation is a fact of military life. When spouses time pass. Handle one problem at a time and don't worry United States Army South Family Life Center and other deploy to foreign lands, it creates a strain on families about troubles that may never come. military family support programs at Howard AFB and that, for some, is not easily overcome. It becomes more Saturdays, Sundays and holidays are often more Rodman NS are also available to help you in case there difficult to go on with day-to-day activities without the difficult to handle, so plan special activities or service to are needs you would like to address. other person. others. The worst thing you can do is "hole" up in your Remember, your family member is deployed., not Some of the typical problems people experience house until your spouse returns. departed. Keep the lines of communication open, keep when a spouse is deployed are a loss of companionship, Lastly, (and we say this all the time), get involved busy, get involved in your family support group and get behavior problems with children, loneliness, sexual with your family support group. When operating help when you need it. All of these can help you through tension, social isolation, anger (why don't they just tell properly, these groups play a central role in sustaining this difficult time. me when he's coming home?), financial problems, families by providing social and emotional support Feel free to call me at 287-5255/3497 if you would trouble with the car, lack of communication with the before, during and after the deployment. like to talk. A 24-hour duty chaplain is also available to deployed spouse and trouble with household routines. These groups benefit the command by helping help you at 282-5111. The Air Force Family Support All or some of these may arise, and it is up to the sustain the morale of deployed soldiers. They benefit Center can be reached at 284-3153. Call the Navy's family member to overcome them. family members by helping them cope in the soldier's family support group at 283-5749. When it's time to 'stop the dying,' world turns to U.S. troops in Indianapolis was killed. Other reporters tried to of a road. This small child put a face on the tragedy. I by Jim Garamone .describe the exodus of Rwandans by saying it was as if have two sons. everyone in San Francisco packed his belongings and I can imagine the pain and helplessness the family O ne death is a tragedy; a million, a statistic. I've walked to Sacramento. But again, this is something I and friends must have felt when they brought the lifeless never really grasped the significance of this have a hard time envisioning. little body to the road. until I saw a photo from Zaire. Once the refugees arrived in Zaire, cholera and Since then, photographers have recorded the progress Like most Americans I clucked my tongue and dysentery broke out. Reporters talked of thousands of of the U.S. humanitarian mission in Zaire and Rwanda. thought it was terrible when the reports of massacres refugees dying in the epidemic. While disease is still a problem, officials say a corner started coming out of Rwanda in April. Stories said President Bill Clinton called on the U.S. military to has been turned. thousands were being killed throughout the country. "stop the dying." Airlift of critical water purification Photos now show young Rwandan refugees waiting Hutus were killing Tutsis, and the Rwanda Patriotic units began immediately, and American service memfor food and clean water provided by U.S. service Front army, mostly Tutsis, was advancing on the capital bers arrived in Zaire, Uganda and Rwanda. members. of Kigali. Among the first to arrive was Air Force MSgt. Soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and DoD civilians When millions of Rwandans fled to Zaire, again I Michael J. Haggerty, a photographer. He sent photos are working together to put an end to conditions where a clucked my tongue and thought it was terrible. See, it's back to the Pentagon to the Joint Combat Camera family has to stack a dead child by the road. The citizens tough to envision a million people, and even if you could Center, and I went through them to accompany an article of the United States should be very proud of what these see a million people at once, they would remain faceless. on the humanitarian effort. service members and civilians have accomplished. Articles estimated between 500,000 and 750,000 One of his photos hit me in a way that all the statistics I know I am proud to play a small part in the organipeople killed in the Rwandan civil war. Reporters tried in the world couldn't. It was a picture of a small, zation the world turns to when it's time to "stop the to put it in perspective. Some said it was as if everyone emaciated child in a fetal position lying dead by the side dying." DirectQuotes What do you do to reduce the stress of family separation? "Give them a call and let "Go to school, keep "Sit around the room "Keep in contact. Call "Go fishing. Enjoy the themknowI'mOK, write busy." and think about things I and write as much as local economy and see letters tellingthemwhat's have to look forward to possible." what's out there." goingon.Don'ttakework at home. Just relax." home with you." Staff Sgt. Quirino Arzadon Lynnette Hacker Sgt. Robert Robertson Spc. Kara Edwards Master Sgt. Gene Walker 1097th Transportation Co. Army family member HHC 4-228th Aviation 308th Military Intelligence 120th Fighter Group, Montana Air Nat. Guard The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right toedit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8 Tropic Times Oct. 7, 1994 Air Force and Panama Canal Commission firefighters and local bomberos participate in joint fire training at the Rodman NS training facility. Events highlight need for fire safety HOWARD AFB (24TH WING fighting way of life, death from fires than in these hazardous warning and prevent them from PAO) -Members of the military Other events throughout the week locations, becoming deadly. If, however, a ho community in Panama have the include a poster and essay contest for The reason for this, officials exis not protected with one of these life opportunity to participate in National elementary school students, fire plained, is that people tend to let their saving devices, a fire can quickly Fire Prevention Week Sunday through prevention booths at various dates and guard down when they're at home and become a killer. Oct.15. locations, fire safety demonstrations this increases the risk of having a fire. During Fire Prevention Week, This year's theme is "Test Your and handouts, question and answer This is one strong reason why fire officials encourage parents to take ti Detector for Life." sessions with firefighters and Sparky departments emphasize fire education to listen to their children when they Howard's fire department officials the fire dog, and several different tours for children, want to talk about what they have have planned a variety of activities for of the crash fire station. The week's "Kids can even learn from television learned about fire prevention. the observance and encourage all festivities will end Oct. 15 with the shows like '911,' which enables them to In addition, perform monthly test community members to participate. Annual Firemen's Ball. See the help or even save the lives of their smoke detectors during the week an Activities begin Saturday with a fire complete schedule for the week at the family members and friends," one include the entire family in this test. truck parade that is scheduled to begin top of Page 9. For more information, official said. "In many ways children Families should also regularly practi at 9 am, in Balboa, ending at the call 284-3090/5646. are wiser than adults because they listen fire evacuation drills, and if they Howard A.FB Crash Fire Department, Although National Fire Prevention and learn from the tragedies of others. haven't got one to practice, make on Building 250, about 10:30 a.m. Week is meant to be fun, officials As adults, we often seem to forget or People should make contingenci There, there will be an open house, remind people that fire prevention is a just refuse to change our habits and lifefor several different routes, dependi with a cake-cutting ceremony, home serious matter. The National Fire styles." on where the fire is, another official cooking fire demonstrations, fire Prevention Association compiled a The military ensures that every said. fighting equipment and truck demonvariety of 1993 fire loss information for military family housing unit is protected "You can ask a child 'which way strations, showings of a "How To Be the United States. Although many with smoke sensitive fire detectors. we go if the fire's in the living room -~Fire Safe" video, and tours of the fire people feel that statistics are boring; These early warning devices are or 'what if it's in the hallway?' Also station. they can actually learn a lot from these designed to save lives, and they do, but make sure there is a designated mee There will also be a mini-fire muster facts and figures. they must be checked at least monthly. place outside the home so you and y competition, where non-firefighters can As Dick Van Dyke says in his Many families that don't live on base loved ones can find refuge -and e try their hand at doing what firefighters "Learn Not To Burn" public service often don't have smoke detectors to other -during a fire emergency." do. anouncements, "We don't want you to protect them. Also, usually, no one The Fire Prevention Office is al Local fire fighters and Sparky the become a statistic." visits them when they move into their available to provide fire prevention fire dog will all be on hand to act as The most dangerous and hazardous quarters to brief them on fire prevention education or briefings to your office hosts and to answer any questions on areas on base are the industrial and measures. shop or group. the fire fighting vehicles and equipcommercial areas. But pople at home Most fires start out small enough that For more information, call 284ment, fire prevention, and the fire arc actually more at risk for injury and smoke detectors can give an early 5645.-

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Tropic Times Oct. 7, 1994 9 Schedule of events Saturday +9 a.m.Parade of fire trucks beginning at the PCC Balboa Fire Station, then Los Rios, Cardenas, Fort Clayton, Albrook AFB, Rodman NS, Cocoli, Fort Kobbe, Farfan, and ends at the Howard AFB Crash Fire Department. *10:30 a.m. (time approximate) -Open House at the Howard Crash Fire Department: Opening ceremony, cake cutting with Sparky the Fire Dog, children's life safety course, minifire muster competition, food and soda booth, awards presentation. Saturday through Oct. 15 *Open House at Pedro Miguel and Balboa Fire Stations. Sunday Senior Airman Steve McNiiy (U.S. Air Force) *Albrook Mall Fire PrevenHoward Child Development Center staff members evacuate toddlers tion Booth: home cooking fire during a fire drill. Fire officials also recommend regular drills for military demonstration, fire safety awareness pamphlets, question family housing residents. and answer session with Fire CatarFire week began with the Fighters, and Sparky the Fire F r e kb g nw t h Dog. Monday Great Chicago Fire of 1871 *oadBase Exchange Fire C ia o0 Prevention Booth: See Sunday for National Fire Prevention Week has the public informed about the imporTuesday.its roots in the Great Chicago Fire, tance of fire prevention. Tuesday .which occurred on Oct. 9, 1871. This As a result, on Oct. 9, 1911, the Fire Station Tour: fire truck demonfire consumed more than 17,000 Marshals Association sponsored the station, Tern No turn buildings, killed 300 people, and left first National Fire Prevention Day. In station, Learn Not to Burn 100,000 homeless. 1920, President Woodrow Wilson video, cookies and punch, fire The cause of the fire has generated a issued the first National Fire Prevention safety handouts for students, great deal of speculation ever since it Day proclamation. K ene ay happened, and fact and fiction have For more than 70 years, the nonprof*Fort Kobbe Elementary Fire gradually become blurred over the it NFPA has officially sponsored and Sattiies. Years. selected the theme for the national aiv Thursday One popular legend has it that commemoration of Fire Prevention Howard Eemetary Fire Catherine O'Leary was milking her cow Week, honoring the anniversary of the toTr: Eleetsay ir when the animal kicked over a lamp, Great Chicago Fire and using the event setting the O'Leary's barn on fire and to increase awareness of the dangers of activities. starting the spectacular blaze. fire. And every year since 1925, the ""APoster contt inner Regardless how the fire began, it President of the United States has swiftly took a huge toll, burning more signed a proclamation pronouncing the presentation at Howard and Fort than 2,000 acres in only 27 hours. The Sunday-through-Saturday period in Kobbe elementary schools people quickly rebuilt Chicago, which Oct. 9 falls as a national obserKenneth Wampler (courtesy) Essay contest winner however, and within a couple of years vance. presentation at Curundu Jr. High residents began celebrating their When President Calvin Coolidge School. successful restoration by memorializing proclaimed the first National Fire *Fire Fighters Ball at El the anniversary of the fire with festiviPrevention Week, Oct. 4-10, 1925, he Panaa Htel Gust seakr ad tes.noted that, in the previous year, some annual awards ceremone.y. Intending to observe the fire's 15,000 lives were lost to fire in the anniversary with a more serious United States. Calling the loss "starcommemoration, the Fire Marshals tling," President Coolidge's proclamaAssociation of North America, the tion stated, "This waste results from oldest membership section of the conditions which justify a sense of National Fire Protection Association, shame and horror; for the greater part of decided that the 40th anniversary of the it could and ought to be prevented .It Great Chicago Fire should be observed is highly desirable that every effort be in a different way. They decided to made to reform the conditions which commemorate the date, not with have made possible so vast a destrucfestivities, but in a way that would keep tion of the national wealth." Fire facts: two every minute *Fire departments in the United United States died in fires in 1993, 1 ~ States responded to about two million about two percent less than in 1992. fires across the nation -about one *About 80 percent of all fire every 16 seconds. deaths occur in the home, and *There was a structure fire every nationwide, a fire death 51 seconds and a residential fire occurred every 113 every 67 seconds. Fires minutes. There were occurred in a motor 30,475 reported fire vehicle every 75 injuries in the civilian seconds and in outside community in 1993. property every 35 Officials say this estimate is seconds. actually low because of *There were under-reporting of civilian about the same injuries to the fire service. losses from fires in *Property damage 1993 and 1992. resulting from fires increased *Of the 621,500 in 1993 to an estimated $8.5 structural fires that billion, an increase of occurred, 470,000 (75.6 approximately 3 percent. Of Senior Airman Steve McNily (U.S. Air Forc) percent) involved homes. all damages, about 87 percent were Sparky the Fire Dog visits children from the Howard Child Development *A total of 4,635 people in the because of structure fires. Center. See the schedule of events for Sparky's appearances this week.

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1OTropic Times t Fe ur 10 Oct. Fea7,19 A C-5B brought the support troops, equipment and supplies (and Meals, Ready to Eat) people from Howard would need while in Entebbe. Entebbe! Desolate, barren, and so far away HOWARD AFB (Tropic Times) -Members of the 24th Wing spent 70 days in Entebbe, Uganda, nearly 7,000 a miles from Panama. It will be remembered as a desolate, out-of-the-way place. It was here that the Israelis made the fight against teroil rorism famous. So famous, in fact, that Hollywood made a movie called Raid on Entebbe (and two others). ON When terrorists hijack an Israeli jetliner and force it to Entebbe, the Israeli commandos respond with military force and free the passengers, kill the terrorists, and show the world how it's done. -1 Not much has made the news since then, at least coming from Entebbe. But the 310th Airlift Squadron, along with the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron and 33rd Intelligence Squadron, was sent there to support Operation Sup(Co urtey) port Hope, a humanitarian mission to conduct relief operEntebbe airport's main terminal, the scene of an Israeli raid to free passengers from a terrorist action for displaced people in Rwanda and adjacent counhijacking in 1976. tries. "It was a very real challenge to pick up our operations and move them 7,000 miles away," said 310th AS commander Lt. Col. Curt Ross. "Deployable units do this all the time, but we're not set up to be deployable." During the aerial reconnaissance missions flown on the unit's deployed C-130, more than 15 miles of film were he last of the deployed troops returned last week after 70 days in Entebbe. (Courtesy) (Courtesy) Uganda still has a basic rural economy, with a Gross Domestic Product of $290 per person, The forward supply area, where deployed aircompared to $21,800 per person in the United States. men built their own worktables. A 310th Airlift Squadron C-130 aircraft (left) awaits its next mission, which was to fly over the refugee areas and provide information on lines of communication, refugee camps and volcanic activities in the region.

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Tropic Times FeaOtes 7,1994 -L Fun fair Valent event boasts community activities by Sgt. Robin A. Shawlinski USARSO Public Affairs Office FORT CLAYTON -Pacific Army community membrs found a one-stop information center waiting for them at the Valent Recreation Center, Oct. 1. The Fun Fair offered people information about the many activities and services available through the Directorate of Community Activities and other services throughout the military community. The fair had information booths from Army Community Service, American Red Cross, theater, Outdoor Recreation, education, the library, travel, the clubs and other services. "No matter what we do.there are always people who don't know about certain services or events," said McDonald Kemp, chief of the Directorate of Community Activities. "This is just another effort to get the word out." The fair gave people the chance to find out, in-depth, what is offered, he said. "We appealed to community leaders and unit commanders to see what they can do for their units, neighborhoods and church groups," Kemp said. He explained that many of the services can be customized to the needs of groups and units. Many of the people present said they thought the concept of the fair was a good idea. "(The Fun Fair) is nice. We can learn what we can do in the community," said family member Wanda Muniz. "I knew about the services, but I learned a little more about them here." Tom Byrd, a staff member at the Army Continuing Education Center booth agreed the fair was a good idea. "I think it's a great idea. It's informative," he said. "The people come up and ask general questions about what we Sgi Robin A. Shawinski (U.S. Army) offer. They're like sponges, soaking up knowledge." This telegram-singing gorilla was one of the many Fun Fair exhibits. Camp unites Cuban father, daughter separated 35 years seen in 30 years and one I haven't seen in 14." by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero In addition to her father, sister and two sons, Castillo also has a brother serving in the CAMP ROUSSEAU -Though family U.S. Air Force as a pilot and four grandchilreunions are a time for rejoicing and meetdren she has never seen. ing family members not seen in perhaps a With all the joy of seeing a side of her famcouple of years, the reunion that took place ily she was long ago separated from, it was here last week was that and much more. bitter sweet as she found out her mother had Tears fell and passed away e m b r a c e s three years ago. abounded as Also, the choice Reina Dalia to try and join her Melian Castillo, family in the a Cuban housed U.S., Castillo had at Camp No. 1, to make the decistood in the arms \sion to leave beof a father she hind another part Military Police Command members participate in a b(deeuy) hadn't seen in 35 of her family in Moclerary P te Cmandiv e mbars parofp thn M brgyears. Joining in Cuba. to celebrate the anniversary of the Military Police Corps. the reunion was Leaving Cuba also a sister she on a small, makeDeployments tone down hadn't seen in 30 Shift boat wasn't years. a choice she MP anniversary celebration ,astillo famadehtly ther, Enrique With heart probFORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -supporting Operation Safe Haven. Melian, flew in Staff Sgt. Jane User. (U.S. Army) lems and not beThe Military Police Command, Panama As a result of the two major deployfrom the United Reina Dalia Melian Castillo, a Cuban staying ing able to swim, usually celebrates the anniversary of the ments, the Military Police Command States to visit at Camp No. 1, embraces her father, Enrique her decision was Military Police Corps by hosting a weekconducted a brigade-level run and with his daughMelian, who flew from the states to visit her. a dangerous one. long celebration culminating in a formal hosted an informal picnic instead of a ter in an effort to They haven't seen each other in 35 years. Danger, howmilitary ball. formal ball. reunite his famever, was not Initially, a week-long celebration was Approximately 225 soldiers, fainily, possibly for the last time as he suffers what tugged at her soul, she said. It was leavplanned, to include a fishing tournament, ily members and guests attended. The from a severe heart condition. ing behind three other children and several golf toumaient and a brigade-level run. change to an informal celebration alThough Castillo also suffers from heart grandchildren, not knowing how many years The celebration had to be toned down lowed for a better turnout, officials problems, the day was one of thankfulness, it would be -if ever -before she would see because of other obligations of the comsaid. It also gave the soldiers a chance warmth and tears of joy as she talked with them again. mand. Two MP companies are currently to relax and spend time with their famher father and sister about the family she But sitting on a couch between her father deployed. The 534th MP Company is in ilies and friends. was separated from so many years ago. and sister for the first time in more than three Suriname supporting Operation Distant The picnic was held at the Rodman "I also have two sons in the U.S.," she decades, made her difficult choice a little Haven and the 258th is at Empire Range NS and by all accounts was a success. said through an interpreter. "One I haven't easier to deal with.

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12 Tropic Times 12Oct. 7,1994 Features Amcecy Ross stirred the audience with a hispanic ballad and 4 Non Blondes' "What's Up." Student models show off some original creations during the fashion portion of the program. span ic eritage Atlantic community celebrates diverse Latin contributions story and photos by Sgt. Rick Emert USARSO PAO -Atlantic FORT DAVIS -The Atlantic community's Hispanic Heritage program played out to a full house Sept. 24 at the Fort Davis Theater. The "Partners for Progress" Atlantic Community Hispanic Celebration featured various guest speakers and entertainers that offered a representation of Hispanic culture, said Steve Parker, one of the event's coordinators. "We wanted to present a diversified cultural experience that showed the diverse culture of Latin America," he said. Guest speakers covered such areas as the war on drugs, free trade and the programs theme: partners for progress. Entertainment included singers Amcecy Ross and Ben Hur Santos; dance groups Kuna Yala and Projecciones Del Atlantico; and a fashion show featuring original creations. Behind the spicy entertainment and the food tasting that followed was an important message, Parker said. "Latin American history is our history," he said. "Our world is better off because of the contributions of Traditional dancers from Projecciones Del Atlantico highlighted the program's entertainment. Latin Americans." Top civilian retires after 25 years of DoD service the Army National Guard at Fort Lewis, and, once he retired from the Army, it The daily grind of a not-so-nine-toby Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Wash. was his turn to follow me." fivejob are behind her now, however, as USARSO Public Affairs Office "I moved on and applied to the CivilAs one of the top civilians in Panama, she takes to the mountains in Franklin, ian Personnel Office Lab and Career she strived to improve the management N.C. FORT CLAYTON -After 40 years Program as an intern in 1974 at Forces of finance and manpower and manage"I will retire and do what I want," she in the work force, Mary Oliver has made Command in Atlanta, Ga.," she said. ment functions throughout the comsaid. "I will take some time to get settled the choice of moving on to the slower Also serving in distant places such as mand, she said. in to our home, do some remodeling and pace of a retiree. Alaska and Korea, Oliver made the "I feel I've met that goal through then travel." A 25 year veteran of the Department choice of working for the U.S. governsound and feasible programs which supWith all Oliver's plans for a quiet and of Defense work force, Oliver spent the ment when she travelled with her Army port U.S. Army South, Southern Comslow-paced retiree's life-style, she will past four years as the assistant director husband. mand and regional missions in which miss some of what she will leave beof the Resource Management Office. "I got tired of quitting good jobs the Army participated," Oliver said. hind. Oliver began her long career with the every time my husband moved to an"This has been accomplished despite "Without the support of everyone in Department of Defense as an adminisother duty station," she said. "So Ijoined Army manpower and budget reductions. USARSO, Icouldn't have done my job," trative assistant to the Chief of Staff of the Department of Defense workforce It hasn't been easy." she said. "I will miss them."

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Sports Oct. 7, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13 MSSQ bombs AIS/OSS by Senior Airman Joel Langton Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau HOWARD AFB -David whipped Goliath Sept. 28 when the 24th Mission Support Squadron slapped around the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron/Operational Support Squadron for 40 minutes to win the Howard AFB intramural basketball championship 54-41 here at the Howard gym. The 24th MSSQ squad showed up with seven men, while 24th AIS/OSS sported a roster of 18 players dressed out. The 24th MSSQ team hit their first two-pointer and the 18-player AIS/OSS squad began trying to catch up. A patient offense, laid-back defense, tough rebounding and hitting more than half their free throws down the stretch, gave the 24th MSSQ the edge they needed. The AIS/OSS team used an aggressive defense that netted them more fouls than turnovers. They never got within five points after the 10 minute mark, while the 24th MSSQ's lead bulged to as much as 16. Even though AIS/OSS was outplayed, their coach Tech. Sgt. Gary Williams (U.S. Air Farce) thought the officiating made a difference. Frank Liljeholm tacks on an"I don't want to take anything away from MSSQ but the Tech. Sgt. Gary Williams (U.S. Air Force) other point to MSSQ's score, refs weren't calling it both ways," said Glenn Richard, AIS/ Frank Moon and AIS/OSS's James Brown battle for a rebound. while canning a free throw. OSS head coach. "Our game is down low and our big man was getting fouled." MSSQ coach Anthony Mitchell said, on this evening, in October, in which the top two teams from each service While AIS/OSS's big man couldn't get a shot in edgeLiljeholm had the hot hand, but throughout the season, a compete for best team on the isthmus honors. wise, MSSQ's ran wild, pacing all scorers with 18 points. number of players had stepped up. "They got us this time, but they've got to get by us "We couldn't stop number 22 (Pete Liljeholm)," Rich"We've had a lot of injuries this year. At one point, we again," Richards said. ard said. had to go with five players. But whenever we needed Mitchell wasn't quaking in his sneakers. Liljeholm admitted AIS/OSS couldn't keep him from someone to take some leadership, one ortwo ofourplayers "Our seven players can match-up against anybody in scoring, but they weren't by themselves, he said. would take the reins and do whatever was necessary," Panama," he said. "Nobody's been able to stop me this year. At base-level, Mitchell said. Mitchell added that no one expected his team to win the teams play a lot of zone defense and I can shoot over it. Ijust Minutes after AIS/OSS had dropped the game, Richards first championship either. took what they gave me," he said. was already looking towards the intra-service tournament "I guess they underestimated us," he said. Roadrunners sink Special Boat Unit 26 by John Hall Rodman NS Public Affairs Office RODMAN NS -The Roadrunners rebounded from a 60-39 loss in the opening game of the Navy unit-level championship basketball contest with a 55-44 victory over Special Boat Unit 26 in the following game here Sept. 29. The Roadrunners, made up of military and civilian workers from the base, took an easier route to the title game of the doubleelimination tournament. The Roadrunners beat Port Services 63-42 and the InterAmerican NavalTelecommunications Network 58-55. SBU lost to IANTN in the first round 62-50, but took three straight, 81-77 over Port Services, 74-37 over the Public John Hall (U.S. Navy) Works Department and revenged its loss to Roadrunners' coach Kenneth Simmons stresses a point to Archie Elam IANTIN 60-49. In game one of the championship, SBU (left). set the stage on Steve Forte's finger roll for SBU slowed the pace down and put the nail back the lead at the half, 35-29. a 5-2 lead. After both teams endured turnin the coffin on another Halleland trey for a Aaron Jones gave the Roadrunners their over barrages, the teams traded baskets for 49-36 lead and coasted to the 21-point win. biggest lead of the night by scoring six the rest of the half. After a 30-minute rest, the teams began straight points. Jones scored on a fastbreak SBU started to pull away when Joshua the second and deciding game. layup and went to the line because SBU was Halleland nailed a three-pointer, making Werner helped the Roadrunners forge a called for a technical foul for smacking the the score 24-19. The Roadrunners' Terry 8-2 advantage on a jumper and layup folbackboard. He hit the two freethrows and Rogers answered the three, cutting it to 24lowing a steal. The Roadrunners led by as scored another deuce on a finger roll for a 22 at halftime. much as seven before SBU got untracked. 50-39 lead. The Roadrunners held on for a SBU started to pull away early in the With 7:10 left in the first half, Ephriam 55-44 win. John Half (U.S. Navy) second half. Forte'sjump shot off the glass Maxwell's three-pointer gave SBUa 21-20 The season isn't over for either team Special Boat Unit 26's Joshua gave histeam a38-29 advantage. With 5:54 lead and forced a Roadrunners' timeout. because both will represent the Navy in the Halleland puts in a lay up off the left in the game, SBU took an Il-point lead The Roadrunners took the route of the upcoming inter-service basketball champiglass. that forced the Roadrunners to call for time. freethrow line and short jumpers to take onship Oct 12-15 at Howard AFB. In high school football's battle of John Hall reviews the *hokin +SCN AM radio schedule unbeatens, the Cougars move to upsets of week five and picks this *Local sports standings 4-0 with a win over the Devils. week's winning teams. *Army Turkey Bowl tryouts

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14 Tropic Times ootba O4ct. 7, 1994 F t a Cougars bury Devils, 32-23 by Spc. Tom Findtner Tropic Times staff BALBOA -The Curundu Cougars came dressed for a funeral and began digging the Panama Canal College Green Devils' grave on the first play of their opening drive, in a rollercoaster 32-23 high school football victory here Sept. 30. After taking possession of the ball on their own 25-yard line, the Cougars-sporting undertaker-blackjerseys, pants, socks and shocs-called a pass play against a Devil defense that had not yielded a point all season. All good things must come to an end. Junior quarterback Buddy Martens hit wide receiver Mike Morales on a 10-yard slant route. With the help of devastating block from fellow receiver Robert Reyes, Morales broke a tackle and raced 65 yards for the score as Curundu bolted to a 6-0 lead. The extra point attempt was blocked. "The Devils have a tough eight-man front, so we had to pass to set up the run," Cougar Head Coach Fred Bales said. "Our concept is to throw short and let the receiver make A something happen after the catch. We were just hoping to get a first down, so we were fortunate to get the score. That play set the tone for the game." The battle matched the league's only two undefeated teams which came into the game with 3-0 records. The Devils quickly answered with a touchdown of their own. Running back Lee Gibson took a handoff and crossed the goal line for the score. Carlos Lampas booted the point after and the Devils jumped in front 7-6. The Cougars' second drive stalled, but Curundu line' man Peter Norman gave his team the ball back at mid-field Spc. Tom Findner (Tropic Times) when he recovered a PCC fumble on the punt return. Cougar Mike Morales (25) corrals the Devils' Bruce Chastain with an acrobatic tackle, as Curundu Several plays later, the Devils were flagged pass interferteammate Francisco Gonzalez (52) moves in to assist on the play. ence, moving the Cougars to the PCC 10-yard line. Taking advantage of the mishap, Martens lobbed a scoring strike line. However, they turned the ball over on downs when the The Cougars pounded the ball to the Devil 5-yard line, but to wide receiver Robert Reyes, who was able to beat the Devils' Gibson was stuffed behind the line of scrimmage by a fourth down pass from Martens to Reyes was incomplete. Devil man-to-man coverage. The two-point conversion the Curundu defense on a fourth and five play. The Devils made one last gasp by moving the ball inside attempt failed after Reyes lined up at quarterback and his AfterCurundu turned a loose ball over, the Devil offense the Curundu 10-yard line, but time ran out as they discovpass fell incomplete. The Cougars regained the lead 12-7. took the field at their own 44 and jumped on the fast track. ered themselves buried six feet under. PCC's second drve sputtered and they were forced to Reese, whose longest run of the first half had been for 15 Bales cited an emphasis on team play as the leading punt. Martens trotted onto the field and quickly marched yards, finally busted loose on a 26-yard jaunt to the Cougar factor in the Cougar win. the Cougars to the Devil 24-yard line. Faced with a third 32. Then the Devils' Buddy Bottin snagged a Lampas pass "Tonight we had a total team effort," he said. "Earlier in and 17 situation, Martens, hit a streaking Jelani Jordan on over the middle for a gain of 22. Reese crashed through the the season, we've had outstanding individual efforts, but a fly pattern down the center of the field for a touchdown. Curundu defense for 7 yards and the touchdown to cap off this week we focused on unrealized potential and putting it Fullback Lance Von Hollen bulldogged his way in for the the drive. Lampas ran in the two-point conversion and the all together. We knew we would have to have our bestgame two-point conversion and Curundu was on top 20-7 with Devils captured the lead 23-20. of the season on offense, defense and special teams to win 5:46 remaining in the first half. The Cougars' Martens came out with guns blazing this game." For the Devils it was do or die. In a race against time, again. Morales caught a short pass, broke a tackle and The Cougars' Martens finished the game with 287 yards quarterback Lampas finally went to the air in hopes of sprinted 25 yards before being dragged down from behind. passing-10 yards more than he had thrown the ball in the generating a score before halftime. Bruce Chastain hauled Then Jordan made a diving 13-yard catch to the Devil 6. previous three games combined--completing 10 of his 22 in catches of 18 and 22 yards to set up a seven-yard TD Von Hollen got the Cougars back in front 27-23-adding attempts. Big play receiver Morales had four catches for scamper by the league's leading rusher, Wilbert Reese. On anothernail to the Devil's coffin-when he hit pay dirt from 188 yards, while Jordan caught two balls for 59 yards. Von the ensuing play, Reese plunged into the end zone again to the 3-yard line. The PAT was blocked. Hollen led the Curundu ground game with 77 hard-eamed tack on another two points. The Devils were back in the When the Cougars' potent offense got the ball back after yards on 17 carries against the stingy Devil defense. game and gaining momentum with the score 20-13. a Devil scoring drive failed to materialize, Martens wasted Bales praised the performance of his offensive line. Martens' arm was smoking. He had orchestrated three no time going to the air. He launched a 54-yard rocket to "Our offensive line was outstanding in protecting Marscoring drives on the Cougars' first four possessions. As Morales, who was tackled inside the Devil 10 by Chastain. tens and run blocking ," he said. "They were the key to the the game clock ticked down to 1:10 leftin the half, Martens On fourth down and one foot to go, Martens sneaked into win." picked up where he left off. After connecting with Reyes the end zone, sealing the Devils' coffin and clinching the For the Devils, Lampas connected on 10 of 15 passing for 17 yards and Morales for 34, Martens had moved his Cougars' win 32-23. The two-point conversion failed, but attempts for 149 yards. Bottin led his team with 99 yards on team into scoring range with 17 seconds remaining. Howby that time, Curundu had the game clock on their side. five receptions and Chastain had two catches for 40 yards. ever, the Devil defense rose to the occasion by rushing the PCC was forced to try a fake punt on fourth down, when Reese was held to a season low 114 yards on 21 carries. pocket with everything they had. As Martens dropped back their next possession fizzled, but the Cougar defense "Reese is a great back and we knew he'd get his yards," into the pocket and searched for a downfield receiver, the swarmed in and hit the Devils for a loss-tossing a little Bales said. "Our goal was to make him earn them over four Devils' Michael Haynes busted through the Cougar offenmore dirt on their casket. quarters. We felt that if we could hold him to 100 yards and sive line for a sack. The Cougars were unable to get another At this point, Curundu opted to run out the clock. Using two TDs, we'd be satisfied." play off before time expired. "three yards and a cloud of dust" play calling, the Cougars The Cougars raised their record to 4-0 and now are alone Following the kick off to start the second half, the Devils trusted the ball to the secure hands of Von Hollen to run out in first place, while the Devils dropped to 3-1 and into a immediately worked the football to the Cougar 30-yard the clock.Thestrategy ofhammering the ball inside worked. second place tie with the Balboa Bulldogs. Passing Team statistics Team standings PA PC % Yds TD Int 1000 W L T Pct. PF PA Lampas, Devils 37 24 64 351 3 1 Cougars 4 0 0 1.000 95 50 Martens, Cougars 67 29 43 564 6 2 Bulldogs 3 1 0 .750 34 59 Beach, Bulldogs 25 8 32 148 1 5 800 -. -.-.-. -----Devils 3 1 0 .750 96 32 Rushing Kolts 1 3 0 .250 44 68 Carries Yds. Avg. Tigers 1 3 0 .250 37 48 Reese, Devils 64 502 7.84 600 -..-.Machine 0 4 0 .000 13 62 Guerra, Tigers 68 429 6.30 Hall, Bulldogs 61 314 5.14 400 Week four results Receiving Balboa Bulldogs 13, Cristobal Tigers 7 Morales, Cougars Catches Yds. Avg. Kiwanis Kolts 7, Red Machine 0 Bottin, Devils 15 207 13.8 Curundu Cougars 32, Green Devils 23 Chastain, Devils 5 137 27.4 Scoring Yards rushing Yards passing Tonight's games TD xP Total Cougars vs. Bulldogs, 5:30 p.m. (BHS) Reese, Devils 7 1 44 ElBk. Cog.t. .KE-t0 E M.chhn. TKiwanis vs. Tigers, 6:30 p.m. (CHS) Jordan, Cougars 4 0 24 Source: Robert Best Devils vs. Machine, 7:30 p.m. (BHS) Morales, Cougars 3 1 20

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S p Tropic Times Oct. 7, 1994 Army schedules Turkey Team triathlon set to the tennis courts located accross the street HHC, 5-87th wins USARSO As from Curundu Junior High School. The basketball championship Bowl '94 football tryouts begin at Howard Pool event is open to the public. FORT DAVIS (Tropic Times)Tryouts for the Army Turkey Bowl '94 A three-person team triathlon starts Oct. HHC, 5-87th defeated MEDDAC 47team will be held at 6:30 p.m. Monday on 22 at 6:30 a.m. at the Howard pool. Support 39 in an overtime thriller to capture the Fort Davis Field for the Atlantic communiyour community and cheer for the particiAnglers go for big one U.S. Army South unit-level basketball ty. Tryouts for the Pacific community will pants. Events include a 1,000-meter swim, in Atlantic tournament championship Oct. I here at Fronius be held 6:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday at 25K bike race, and 10K run. The event is The Club Nautico Caribe, Panama CaGym. Mother's Field on Fort Clayton. Players sponsored by the Howard/Albrook Sports nal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal Both teams will travel to Howard must bring their own cleats. For informaand Fitness Center, 284-3451. Yacht Club are sponsoring the second anAFB as representives of the Army in tion, call the Fort Clayton Sports Branch at nual Atlantic InterclubFishing Tournament the inter-service basketball champion287-4050. Albrook Fitness Center through Nov. 30. ship Oct. 12-15. operates with new hours First, second and third place prizes will Amador hosts three-man, bHaven, hours e awarded in the barracuda, wahoo, kingWomen's basketball best ball golf tourney at the Albrook Sports and Fitness Center fish, jack, tuna, marlin, sailfish and dorado There will be a three-man, best ball golf have been changed temporarily. The gym categories. The minimum entry in the taraction continues tournament with a shotgun start 7:30 a.m. will be open 8 a.m.-I p.m. and 4-7 p.m. on pon category is 80 pounds; other entries Tonight Monday at the Amador Golf Course. Regweekdays, noon-6 p.m. Satuday, and 1-6 must be at least 10 pounds. Fishing is re4:30 p.m. Devils vs. Bulldogs (BHS) istration closes today. There is a $12 fee p.m. Sunday. stricted to Atlantic waters and the Chagres 5:30 p.m. Cougars vs. Tigers (CHS) covering lunch, prizes and gross and net Call the Club Nautico Carihe at 2414:30 p.m.1Red winners. Register now for Army 2220, the Panama Canal Tarpon Club at 5:30 p.m.RDev~i vs.grs(CJHS) 243-5316 or the Panama Canal Yacht Club 5:30 p.m. Devils vs. Tigers (CHS) Fronius sponsors intramural soccer at 241-5882 to register for the tournament. Oct. 14 Registration for unit level soccer is un4:30 p.m. Cougars vs. Devils (PCC) holiday b-ball tourney derway. The deadline is Tuesday. Register 5:30p.m.Red Machinevs.Bulldogs(BHS) Fronius Fitness Center will host a Coat the Directorate of Community Activities Aerobic workshop offers Oct. 19 lumbus Day three-on-three basketball tourSport Division, Building 154, Fort Clayton. te stng 4:30 p.m. Bulldogs vs. Cougars (CJHS) nament Saturday through Monday. The c 5:30 p.m. Tigers vs. Red Machine (BHS) double-elimination, four-man roster event An aerobics workshop and certification Oct. 21 costs $25 per team. Rodman athletics hosts test is being organized in the Atlantic com4:30 p.m. Devils vs. Red Machine (BHS) 3-event competition munity. The testing will be given by the 5:30 p.m. Bulldogs vs. Tigers (CHS) Rodman athletics will hold a three-event American Aerobic Association International Oct. 25-28 Bowling centers offer competition Oct. 19 -21 Thecompetition is and International Sports Medicine AssociTBA: Post-season tournament (TBA) various programs open to all active-duty military personnel, ation from Pennsylvania. The certification The Atlantic Bowling Center has famDoD civilians, and dependents 18 and oldis valid for two years. A minimum of 15 SCN AM Radio 790/1420 ily specials 6-10 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays er.The eventsare as follows: tug o'war Oct. people are required for the class. For infora and Fridays in October. 19; freestyle swimming race, Oct. 20; and nation, call Delinda May at 289-3163. airs pro, college football If interested in joining a mixed league 5K run, Oct. 21. The competition will be Saturday call the Curundu Bowling Center. The scored by points with the unit accumulating Howard, Albrook offer S1 a.m. NCAA: Univ. of Notre Dame at center is offering discounts all day Monday the most points winning. For more inforBoston College in honor of Columbus Day. There will also mation, call Morise Conerly at 283-4222. various aerobic classes 2 p.m. NCAA: Navy at Air Force be a handicap no-tap tournament 7:30 p.m. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center 6:30 p.m. NCAA: Florida State Univ. at Oct. 15. Sign up at the door, fee is $10. offers step aerobics 8:45-9:45 a.m. MonUniv. of Miami (Fla.) The Clayton Bowling Center has lunchInternational Motorcycle days, Wednesdays and Fridays. In addition, Sunday time specials 11 a.m.-I p.m. on weekdays. Championship Sunday step and high-low aerobics classes are ofNoon. NFL: Miami Dolphins at Buffalo Games are 50 cents and shoes are free of fered 4:45-5:45 p.m. Mondays, WednesBills charge. The Panamanian Motorcycle Union will days and Fridays. The Albrook Sports and 3 p.m. NFL: Los Angeles Raiders at The Howard and Albrook Bowling host the eighth race in International MotorFitness Center has aerobics 8-9 a.m. MonNew England Patriots Centers have sign ups for intramurals, cycle Championship 10 a.m. Sunday. The days, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 7 p.m. NFL: Washington Redskins at mixed, men, women and youth winter race takes place on a brand new track-one jazzercise 5-6 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays Philadelphia Eagles leagues. of the finest in Central America-behind and Fridays. Upsets stump forecaster National Football League week five standings NFL week in revieW American Conference East Dave Kreig led the Chiefs back for a 28-24 win. Krieg is W L T Pct PF PA Jodman NS Public Affairs Office gone, but K.C. has a capable Steve Bono in reserve. Anytime Miami 4 1 0 .750 149 108 __d__n NSPub ____A ___airs__ ___c_ a team faces a defense with hard hitters like Junior Seau must Buffalo 3 2 0 .600 96 105 RODMAN NS -Any prognosticator who escaped week keep backup QBs in mind. The Chiefs have taken eight ofthe New England 3 2 0 .600 141 138 five of the NFL season with a winning record has my lastninemeetings withtheonlylosscoming during the 1992 N.Y. Jets 2 3 0 .400 76 99 utmost respect. There were six upsets, fourofwhichcan be playoffs. Thelastof theunbeatens mustfall. Chiefs 19, Bolts Indianapolis 1 3 0 .250 90 97 considered major. The most shocking was probably the 13. Central Eagles' 40-8 rout of the 49ers. Tied for second-most Philly has Shuler steak -Redskins' head coach Norv Cleveland 4 1 0 .800 119 58 shocking was the Bills loss to theBears and the Vikes' loss Turner probably made a mistake by starting his rookie QB Pittsburgh 3 2 0 .600 100 101 to Buddy's Cards. And Detroit continues to leave handiHeath Shuler last week against Dallas. That's in the past, but Houston 1 4 0 .200 79 123 cappers stammering after its loss to the bumbling Bucs. the rook's job doesn't get any easier this week. The Eagles Cincinnati 0 5 0 .000 74 129 Fish fillet -The Buffalo Bills showed how important pounded Steve Young and his beat-up line last week in a 40West Thurman Thomas is to their offense after losing a game 8 win. Washington's line looked in disarray after the CowSan Diego 4 0 0 1.000 114 78 they were supposed to win. The Dolphins won a game they boys' Charles Haley put on a sack clinic. Philadelphia may Kansas City 3 1 0 .750 84 60 were supposed to, dumping the Kitties in Shula Bowl I. It's have peaked for the season last week, but can still hold off the Seattle 3 2 0 .600 121 70 funny that people placed a one after the Don vs. David Bowl likes of the 'Skins. The Eagles have taken four of the last five, LA Raiders 1 3 0 .250 95 124 because everyone knows this is the younger Shula's last but two came during Washington's 4-12 showing last year. Denver 0 4 0 .000 92 137 season. The Fish "rallied" over Cincinnati who struck first Eagles 20, 'Skins 10. National Conference on a 51-yard bomb from David Kilngler. If the Bills have Monday night madness -The Giants and Vikings may W ast Thomas in the lineup they should get back on track. If not, have looked past their week five opponents in anticipation of W L T Pet PF PA Buffalo should still pull it out because of the Dolphins' this game. The Giants were dominated by a Saints team that N.Y. Giants 3 1 0 .750 101 90 porous defense. Dating back to 1987, the Buffs have taken had not much going on. The Vikes made enemies around the Dallas 3 1 0 .750 97 53 13 of 16 in this series. Bills 27, Fish 23. league by giving Buddy Ryan his first win of the season. The Philadelphia 3 1 0 .750 106 65 L.A. raids Foxboro -The Raiders are coming off a Giants must do something to let the Cowboys take sole Washington 1 4 0 .20 95 144 heart-breaking loss to the Chargers and had a week to heal possession of NEC East en route to running away with the Arizona 1 3 0 .250 46 73 their wounds. The Raiders are probably the best sub-.500 division title. Losing to the Vikes will be the start. Vikes 24, Central team in the league and must win to stay in the AFC West Giants 20. Minnesota 3 2 0 .600 10785 race. The Patsies are fresh off a "Colorado-type" win over In other games: Cowboys make it eight straight over hicago 3 2 0 .600 96 101 the Packers in which their defense looks improved. The Arizona, Cowboys 22, Cards 13; Denver gets first win, Detroit 2 3 ( .4(0 85 102 Pats must control the tempo of the game. If New England Broncos26,Seahawks 23; Esiason's return lifts Jets; Jets 20, Green Bay 2 3 0 .400 83 67 turns the game into a track meet, the Raiders' fleet feet will Colts 13; Green Bay buries Bttis, Packers 19, Rams 9; Bears Tampa Bay 2 3 0 .400 67 84 be hard to beat. Raiders 30, Pats 26. are for real, Bears 20, Saints 17; Young rebounds, 49ers 27, West Chiefs crunch Chargers -The Chiefs managed a Lions 13; Bucs ground Falcons, Bucs 21, Falcons 13. San Francisco 3 2 0 .6( 127 110 sweep of the Chargers last year, but not without pain. In Open dates: Minnisota, Chicago, Detroit, Green Bay, Atlanta 3 2 0 .600 104 99 their second matchup, the Bolts not only built up a 17-0 Tampa Bay. LA Rams 2 3 0 .0 67 85 lead, but also knocked Joe Montana out with a concussion. Last week, 5-7; season 36-30, Monday night, 4-1. New Orleans 2 3 0 .400 90 121

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16Tropic Timnes 16ct News SCutbacks l stressful SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany (AP) -It was supposed to be the 4 standard slide presentation by the general for the VIP from the Pentagon. Instead, Defense Secretary William Perry got an earful about the strains of military life in an era of defense cutPilots are overworked and undertrained, he was told. Spouse and alcohol abuse are increasing. Child abuse, too. "Should I be concerned, or deeply concerned?" Perry asked Brig. Gen. John Dallager Oct. 4 after being told that 21 of 23 air combat controllers had been unable to meet training requirements and needed waivers to remain on duty. Perry, a mathematician and hightech entrepreneur who has been in office eight months, visited Spangdahlem durA ing a European tour undertaken in connection with NATO meetings. Dallager, commander of a fighter Spc. Tad Browning (USSOUTHCOM) wing, told Perry that reports of spouse Gen. Barry McCaffrey, U.S. Southern Command commander in chief, talks to Cubans staying at Camp No. abuse among the base's 11,915 civilian 1 at Empire Range. and military personnel are up nine percent in the past year. Child abuse is up 20 percent, be Wsaid; alcohol abuse is up II percent. Pilot training, he said, has declined sharply, and so has readiness to fight a war. Dallager showed slides, all right, P but they involved the human strains of M cCaffreytmeting the base's commitments. Dallager told the secretary about Tony and Louisa Clift, both senior airat Operation Safe Haven men. They are getting Out Of the Air Force because they are so often apart. He told about Capt. Timothy J. by Senior Airman Joel Langton "From the President of the United visited the Jose Marti School and talked Hogan, an A-10 fighter-bomber pilot Safe Haven Joint Information Bureau States on down, people are aware of, to Cubans and military members. who spent nearly two-thirds of the past and impressed by what you are doing," He commended the military mem22 months deployed away from the base CAMP ROUSSEAU -U.S. SouthMcCaffrey said. hers on their "sacrifice" and said they and his family. Hogan's wife, Linda, ernCommandCommanderinChiefGen. The CINC's visit started at the rehad "knocked everybody's socks off" told an Air Force interviewer she feels Barry R. McCaffrey said he was "imception center on Howard AFB. He saw with their efforts. like a single parent. pressed" during a four-hour visit to Ophow the Cubans are welcomed, identifiBefore a working lunch, he toured Dallager conceded that the increaseration Safe Haven facilities at Empire cation cards are issued, and personal the Air Force's air transportable hospies in reported violence and otherdomesRange Sept. 29. data is gathered. tal located near the base camp. tic problems could be the result of better "This is one of the most impressive His next stop, the Cuban Family Senior Airman Janet Castro, demonitoring now that the base is "startthings I've seen since I came into the Support Center, had a dual mission: ployed from Offutt AFB, Neb., had her ing to take care of people." Army at 17," McCaffrey told a group of accommodating those visiting the Cuphoto taken with McCaffrey and talked "We've made this a priority," he military members at Camp No. 1. ban community camp members and with the CINC during his visit, said. ReferringtoimmigrationtothcUnitworking with non-governmental relief "I was very impressed with how he But the pressure that constant deed States in the 1900s, McCaffrey told agencies headquartered there. related to the people and made everyone ployments put on training is beyond the troops many of them may have at one During his visit to the family supfeel special. It was nice of him to take the question, Dallager said. time had grandparents in the same posiport center, he checked living and worktime out of his schedule and see how and Air units from the base protect the tion as the Cubans. "And I don't think ing conditions of military members. He what we were doing," Castro said. Kurdish population in northern Iraq, they were treated as well as the Cubans asked supervisors to ensure people were McCaffrey was escorted by Maj. patrol the skies over Bosnia and provide in these camps," he said. getting enough time off. Gen. George Crocker, U.S. Army South logistics experts to the Rwanda relief McCaffrey guaranteed the troops After his visit to the family support and Joint Task Force Panama commission-all cutting into the time pilots their efforts had been recognized at the center, he went to Community Camp mander, and Brig. Gen. James Wilson, and controllers need to keep up with highest levels. No. 1. He walked through the camp, JTF Safe Haven commander. training, he said. Poor weather in Germany frequent~r ~ ~ + (1 + n '~i ly forces the pilots to go to bases in thc Navy housing areas to get new United States fora month or two to stay current with the latest skills and technologies, he said. Dallager said the crews are still caappliances, recreational facilities te wog direin the wrong direction. RODMAN NS (Rodman NS PAO) done while quarters are occupied. All and nets installed. Perry could offer no assurances of -As part of its "Neighborhood of Excelhousing units except those on Fort A whole-house door lock project change. lence" program, the Navy is improving Amador are scheduled for installation. includes standardizing locks in each "That trend will continue as long as housing units and assets during the next Concrete permanent storage areas house to improve security. This will we have these operations," he said. few months. will be added to Rodman's 240 area reduce the number of keys and simplify "Since we're not going to get an inMost of the work will be done by a housing units. The areas will be in the maintenance, housing officials said. creased force structure, there are two local contractor with help from the base's rear ofquarters. Fourplex units that don't The housing office has received options: We can reduce our operations Seabees, said Noreen Ernest, Public have storage areas are slated to get them. funds formorewashers and dryers. Also, tempo or we can use the Guard and Works Department housing manager. New toddler playground sets will he there have been complaints about occuReserves to supplement missions." There will be installation of dishinstalled at Rodman, Amador, Farfan pants moving government washers and For most of the past 40 years, this washers and garbage disposals, permaand Radio Farfan. Benches will be added dryers from one area of the house to base has been on the front line of the nent storage areas, playgrounds and basin some playground areas. New basketanother. Cold War. If one of the nightmare seeketball half courts. ball half courts will be put in the Marine Officials remind occupants they must narios of that era had dcvcloped-an The plumbing, electrical andkitchen Barracks enlisted area and Farfan. The get permission from the housing office invasion of the West by Soviet forcescounter modifications to support dishbasketball court on Amador will be reto move them and any damage will be pilots at Spangdahlem would have been washers and garbage disposals can be paired, striped and havenewbackboards charged to the occupant. among the first into combat

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Tropictivities Oct. 7, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI Martha K. Taylor courtesyy) Demonstrating the flute at Gamboa Renee Panca of Bolivia demonstrates the flute at the Gamboa Fair, the first fair of the season. For details, see the story and photos on page B3. Bicycle registration at local Canal Crafters get ready for +Movies, Page B8 schools helps military police in Christmas shoppers with class*TV, Page B9 the fight against crime. es, g0ads ndmore +Potpourri, Page B12

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B2Trp. Times 4Youth news Albrook/Howard Tsa +Youth centers 286-3 195/284-47M0: Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday evenings. Classes for children, teens and adults. ro Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for members and $35 for non-members. Call to register. Cheerleading lessons, Fridays at Albrook and Saturdays at Howard. Guitar lessons, by appointment 1-6 p.m. Satur-days A Spanish lessons, for children and adults. Tuesdays and Thursdays at 4 and 5 p.m. Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesdays. Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four days a week. Special preschooler class Saturdays. Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available for ages four to adult. *Just for teens: DJ face off and dance 8:30-11:30 p.m. Saturday. Party at the Howard NCO Club with the "Anthill Posse." Transportation is provided from Albrook Youth Center and Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center. Free self defense demonstration for girls 5 ,a p.m. Oct. 22. HIV/ALDS awareness, 4-5 p.m. Oct. 27. Call 284-5650 to register. Permission slips required. Falltine party 8:30-11:30 p.m. Oct. 28. Wear orange and black and get in free. The 'Anthill Posse' will be playing in the Albrook Club ballroom. Trasportation is provided from Howard Youth Center and Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center. +Child Development Center 284-6135: -s(-r Family Day Care Providers are needed in the Stafl Sgt. Jne Userc (U.S. Army) Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 for Youths gather on Fort Clayton to register their bicycles with the military police. information. Bicycle registration helps military lyo *Youth Center 287-6451: anasnafllor fai n~. oondaym.atrdy police in 'the fight against crime' fa:rfooSa Shipped wrecked survival course Wednesday. FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Children at the number and the color. The information will be taken and Treasure Hunt 3 p.m. Oct. 14. local Department of Defense Dependents Schools had a put on permanent record and the owner will be given a Ping Pong tournament Oct. 15. chance to help themselves and the military police in the sticker to put on the bike. Not so scary Halloween is a happy Halloween fight against crime. "Registering your bike is such a simple process," activity for toddlers to 10 years old. It will be held Last week, military police visited the local DoDDs Sizemore said. "Either people don't know how to or don't 4-7 p.m. Oct. 31. A $1 fee includes game prizes, schools to help the children register their bicycles. care. Though registering a bike won't guarantee recovery candy and a lot of fun. "We wanted to make sure the kids' bikes could get regif stolen, it will guarantee that if the bike is found it will be Junior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. Tuesistered," said Sgt. Jeffery Sizemore, Crime Prevention returned," he said. days and Thursdays Building 155. noncommissioned officer. While registration helps fight crime, other efforts The new school hours for the center are: ages While this type of registration drive is only done occashould be made to safeguard bikes. 6-14, 2:30-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday; ages 6-11, sionally, children and adults can register their bicycles Sizemore recommends that students lock their bikes 2:30-6 p.m. Friday; ages 12-14, 2:30-8 p.m. Frianytime, he said. up on the bike racks when bringing their bikes to school, day; ages 6-11, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday; ages 12Sizemore also said there are plans to possibly go doorand that while locking it up at night will help, residents 14, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday. to-door to solicit bicycle registrations. should bring their bikes inside. Youth Services is looking for piano and gymThose who haven't yet had the opportunity but would "Locking up your bike is a deterrent; it will slow (a nastics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at like to register their bikes can do so at the Vehicle Regisbike thief) down," he said, "But bringing the bike inside 287-3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton. tration Office at the pedestrian gate, Fort Clayton. will help even more." Arts and crafts, Mondays. To register, bicycles do not have to be brought to the Sizemore said these efforts will help prevent bike Cooking experiences, Tuesdays. registration office, he said. All bike owners have to bring thefts. "Help your kids and yourself out and get your biOutdoor games, Thursdays. is information about the type of bike, manufacturer, serial cycle registered," he said. *Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: Popcorn and movies, Sundays. Senior Teen Employment Program, yearTeen wins national recognition round program to develop job skills and earn monCOROZAL (Tropic Times) -Tanya M. Bacot, a Baley for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are availboa High School senior, was selected as a semi-finalist in able at the center. a recent poetry contest. The National Library of Poetry of Bowling at the Clayton Bowling Center 3 Maryland will publish the 17-year-olds' work, "Now That p.m. Saturday. Meet at the center at 2 p.m. My Life Slips Into Sorrow," in the forthcoming antholoMedievel University 1-6 p.m. Oct. 15. Learn gy, "After the Storm." Her poem will also be entered in -about the dances and customs of the middle ages. the final competition to be held in the summer of 1995. *Child Development Services 287-3301: Bacot is the daughter of Robert and Maria Bacot of Spaces are available in the CDS part-day Cardenas Village, and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. program, Building 156 Fort Clayton, in the afterJ.A. Lowe of McLeansville, N.C., and Mr. and Mrs. Ri noon session from 1-3 p.m. Preschoolers must be 3 chard Bacot Senior of Lamar, S.C. years old and toddlers must be 2 years old by Oct. 31. For information, call 287-5507/5104. Youth centers to issue ID cards The Fort Clayton Youth and Senior Teen Centers Atlantic are changing membership policies effective Oct. 15. *Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: In an effort to insure safety and security, the centers -7 Volunteers are needed to help with the hauntwill issue photo identification cards. These will be A ed house. used to verify that the card bearer is registered with Piano classes, 4-6 p.m. for 30-minute lessons Youth Services. The card will also contain data nec~ Mondays and Wednesdays. There is a fee of $20 essary to contact parents in the event of an emergenper person each month. cy. Registration will take place 6-8 p.m. today and Arts and crafts, 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Oct. 10-14 in Building 155. Parents must accompaSaturday sports, noon to 6 p.m. ny children through the registration process. For in(coesy) Scavenger hunt 3 p.m. today. 2 .Tanya M. Bacot, 17, is a national poetry contest formation, call 287-3506 or 287-6451. winner.

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______~ffi~5~ppingTropic TimesB ShoppngOct. 7, 1994B3 Senor Garcia of Panama City stands in front of his collection of Mola art. If you don't find what you want, he'll get it custom made for you. Look for him again at upcoming bazaars, and at his full-time booth in Balboa at Steven's Circle. This fair begins the bazaar season, just in time for Christmas shopping story and photos by Martha K. Taylor Sometimes, hard-to-find items become stry Ta portobyMartor available, if you take the time to look. For several months I had been looking for bird identification his has become the fair that starts them books, and finally had to buy them from the all each year, and Gamboa had publisher in the United States. something for everyone. But, the Audubon Society of Panama had the Start with baskets. Baskets with lids, or baskets same books at Gamboa, for less money! without lids. Baskets that looked like armadillos, Food and entertainment are usually provided baskets that looked like turtles. Huge baskets, at bazaars, like at Gamboa. The food ranges small baskets. Cheap baskets. And, of course, from the standard American hot dog to local baskets that will set you back a least next week's native dishes like bollos and rice. And flute paycheck. players will demonstrate the instruments they The local fairs and bazaars are perfect places have for sale. to find those unique "no one in the states has There are several fairs and bazaars coming them" type of gifts. From molas to jewlery, this fair up during the next month. Here's a list of the had just about everything. one's I know about, but you might want to keep a Jeanne Shoemaker, a 4th grade teacher at look out in the Tropic Times for more because Curundu Elementary School, said "I ended up the lists are updated as new bazaars are schedspending money and I just went to look." uled. I've also added some alternative shopping If you think fairs of this sort are high-pressure opportunties as well: sales pitches, the you-can't-get-away type of *Panama Folklore Fair, noon-4 p.m. SaturJeanne Shoemaker stops by a basket collection thing, then think again. I haven't found this to be day, Clayton Youth Center. at the Gamboa Fair. true, as long as you're willing to do some friendly *Howard and Albrook Officers Spouses Club bargaining. Bazaar, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 15, Albrook Club. Shoemaker agreed. "The vendors were friendly *Officers and Civilian Wives' Club-Panama UT T and pleasant," she said. Bazaar, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 22, Club Amador. A mola is a gift that you can't get anywhere *Howard and Albrook Enlisted Spouses' Club else in the world from an original artist. Bazaar, 9 a.m.-3p.m. Oct. 29, Howard Enlisted These pieces of cloth are wearable art. A $10 Members Club. mola, framed in a shadow box, makes a perfect *EI Valle Shopping: Sunday, Oct. 16 and Oct. gift and an attractive wall hanging. Craft shops in 30 through Howard's Zodiac Recreation Center; the area will teach you how to make frames. Sunday and Oct. 23 through the Rodman ITT Many Mola artists, who are Cuna Indians, office; and Sunday through Clayton's Valent will also custom make a mola shirt for you. You Recreation Center. provide the shirt, and they'll make a mola to *Panama City Shopping through Rodman your request. Since most molas tell a story in ITT, Oct. 27. that art form, just about anything is possibe. *Free Zone Shopping, Monday and Oct. 26 Besides the molas, baskets and jewelry, through the Rodman ITT. there are a wide-range of choices at these And finally, if there's anyone else interested in bazaars. Want a 50-pound vase, or a tagua birds or wildlife books, contact the Audubon Rebekah Kilray (left) and Lauren Wolfe, stand in carving no bigger than a 50-cent piece? You'll Society of Panama, Box 2026, Balboa, Panama, front of the Cadette Girl Scout Troop 52 food find them. phone 224-4740. booth.

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B 4 F ies~ocus on Panama Rosemary Chong (Tropic Times) Juan Manuel Cedeno, renowned Panamanian painter, applies finishing touches to the portrait of one Juan Manuel Cedeno's painting of Vasc of Panama's presidents. Nunez de Balboa at Balboa High School. Renowned adtisf pains eminen# men hiue visiting 80-year-old Juan home in Los Santos and finishes them winners of the "University" award. University of Panama, until he retired. Manuel Cedeno, a renowned in his atelier in Panama City. "This is a great honor," he said. "Today so many wonderful things TV Panamanian painter in his Cedeno started his art studies in What type of artist is Cedeno? can be made with electronics, with atelier, he said "I am very pleased Panama and then went to the School of "The question has been posed many computers. I am learning how to use because I can still see very well and my Fine Arts, Art Institute of Chicago, on a times. Since prehistoric times men have computers. I do not want to feel pulse is steady. At my age, that in itself scholarship. painted. In the caves of Altamira, Spain obsolete. One must keep up with the is reason to believe there is a God." "The school had a fine faculty body. we can still see their paintings. Those times." Talking about the circumstances in Most of them were Europeans, but there paintings had a useful purpose, they Keeing up with times, Cedeno which he painted the Vasco Nunez de were also very fine Americans profesconveyed messages concerning the commented on modern art and painting. Balhoa portrait for the Balboa High sors." he said. hunt. I feel that every painting should "I feel very optimistic about the School students, he relates a curious future of painting in Panama. I know story. many of the people who are painting "I painted that picture of Vasco right now. There many art galleries, Nunez de Balboa, discoverer of the many exhibits. We are progressing. Pacific Ocean, 33 years ago. IncidentalThere are Panamanian painters who ly, Balboa discovered the Pacific Ocean have audacity and optimism and have Sept. 25, 1513, so it's almost an established contacts, especially with anniversary of that event which took New York, not in Europe, but in New place centuries ago. York and Miami. They have a goal, to "Normally every graduating class make Panamanian art known outside wants to leave something in their \ the country. That is very good." school to be rememered by. The Balboa Cedeno normally paints by order, High School seniors of that year heard seldom putting his work in galleries. that I was a Panamanian painter who One such painting was of William had studied art in the United States, so Gorgas. they contacted me and asked if I could 'This picture was ordered by the do that painting for them. -Director of Gorgas Hospital. I painted "I had returned from Chicago about Gorgas because I feel honored to have 10 years before, so I could still speak painted eminent men who have played English fluently-I have forgotten most a role in Panamanian history. Gorgas of it now. I realized that the kids did Cedeno's supply box of paints, brushes. Rosemary Chon(Trropicrmes did much good here in Panama, not have a lot of money, so I suggested together with Panamanians such as *that they take up a collection or make a "I learned anatomy, perspective, art send a message, aside from the obvious Engineer Pedro J. Sosa. I have painted raffle. I did not know whether raffles appreciation, history of the arts." He one of form and color. Art is impossible the portraits of all of the heroes of were allowed in the canal zone at that earned a bachelor's of fine arts degree, to define. It is mainly a matter of Panamanian independence. Many time. I said, 'whatever you collect, that but could not go on to get his master's individual preference, a matter of portraits painted by me are in private is what I will charge for the painting.' degree because his scholarship had run culture. galleries in the states. "I thought that maybe they could out. During the last 50 or 60 years, "What I do not do is to paint pictures raise around $500 or $600. At that time "A history of art cannot be written Cedeno has seen a lot of changes. for the sole purpose of selling them. I that amount was enough for a down without including the city of Chicago. It "Fifty years ago the American have not had many exhibits. I have payment on a new car. Six hundred is one of the most beautiful cities in the people were largely unaware of Latin never had 25 or 30 paintings to cxdollars then would be around $6,000 United States. For example, its neoAmerica. I remember while living there hibit." today. classical architecture is extremely (in Chicago), Panama and the U.S. were Cedeno had a parting comment for "Anyway, I did the necessary interesting. While I was there I met the negotiating a treaty for U.S. bases in the future. "At birth we all have research, and painted the Balboa famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Panama. The treaty came to be known tendencies towards particular things. picture. They liked it very much, but to He built the Rovin House at the as the Filos-Hines treaty (of 1947) and Some are attracted to form and color. my surprise all they came up with was University of Chicago in 1892. I met it was rejected by the National AssemOthers are gifted with an ear for music $250. Well, I had given my word so I many famous personalities, movie stars, bly. and so forth. I was born to paint and do accepted the payment. and I saw Einstein, walking around the "I remember reading the headlines in sculptures. I used to model things from 'That is an interesting detail and part campus with is hands behind his back. I the Chicago newspapers "Panama 5 1-0" clay, sand, whatever came to my hands, of the story of that picture. I don't know met Stefan Zweig. I met Ronald Reagan and thinking now the people are going ever since I was a small child. if a painter in this day and age would do when he was a young man," Cedeno to realize Panama exists." Those were "A piece of advice for young something like that just out of solidarity said. the times of the "good neighbor painters is to keep on striving and with the students and without any Incidentally, Cedeno mentions that policy," sponsored by President Frankin progressing and never believe you thought of making lots of money." he has just received a notification that D. Roosevelt. know everything there is to know." Cedeno was born in Los Santos and he has been chosen as one of two Cedeno said that he has earned a he is very proud of this fact. He says professors that the National University living by teaching and by painting. He by Rosemary Chong that he starts many of his paintings at of Panama chooses every year as was professor of arts at the National Tropic Times staff

PAGE 21

~#S ,Irn~uI L~y ewsTropic Times COct news 1994B,19 IN 9 Clayton The Exceptional Family Member Program Support Group meeting will be held 7:30-9 p.m. s Oct. 18 at the Valent Recreation Center. All active Xduty military and Department of Defense personnel with family members with disabilities are invited to attend. If special services or accommodations are needed because of a disability or for information, call 287-5073/4921. -4 The Department of Defense Dependent Schools in Panama, along with Army Community Service are conducting "Child Find Activities" in an effort to locate all eligible children with disabilities in need of special education services. Newly arrived military and U.S. Government-sponsored families with dependents in need of special education and medically related services should contact their local DoD school for program planning and enrollment. Contact any local DoD school or the Exceptional Family Member Program manager at 287-4921/5073. U.S. Army Public Affairs is coordinating the 102k1994Joint TaskForce-PanamaChristmasSponsorship Program. Units or community groups Staff Sgi. Jane Usero (U.S. Army) wanting to participate this year should call USARJamie Pool (left) and Brenda Wegner, family members, take part in a "tole painting" class at the SO PAO at 287-3007/4109. Canal Crafters Shoppe on Albrook AFS. The 142nd Medical Battalion and 235th Support Battalion family support group will meet 7 Cana Crafters ready for holidays p.m. Fridays in the battalion dayroom. Meetings are open to family members and unit soldiers. helps the community by contributing profits back into the The telephone number for the La Leche by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero community. With an all-volunteer staff, the profits eamed League and mothers seeking help or information USARS0 Public Affairs Office from the shoppe go to the Panama Region Interservice about breastfeeding is 287-6592. ALBROOK AFS -For the early Christmas shoppers, Scholarship Fund." the age-old dilemma of what to get for those on their About $2,000 has been earned since the shoppe opened Howard/Albrook shopping lists is probably about to hit. Most shoppers will and it is expected to be much more this year, she said. be looking for gifts that are different, unique or something The monetary benefits to the community are also made The Howard Family Support Center will offer a specially made to fit a particular personality. through those who consign their crafts to be displayed and checkbook maintenance workshop 8-10 a.m. Oct. For those who find themselves in this dilemma, the sold through the shoppe. 14 at the FSC. For reservations, call 284-5010. Canal Crafters Shoppe is already decked out in Christmas "When someone brings an item in to be sold, they set the Family Advocacy is offering classes to teach cheer and ready for action. price," Konzelman said. "There is a 25 percent consignors spouses how to deal with the stress involved in In addition to the red and green Christmas decorations, fee for those who don't volunteer at the shop and a 15 being part oftoday's fast paced environment. Classthe shoppe carries hand-crafted items such as dolls, paintpercent fee for those who do volunteer eight hours or two es will be held at the Howard Family Support Center ings, woodworking, quilts and jewelry that, in most cases, days a month." conference room, Building 707 Howard AFB 5:30are one-of-a-kind, said Julie Konzelman, shoppe publicity In addition to the monetary benefits of the shoppe, 6:30 p.m.Wednesday and 8:30-9:30 p.m. Oct. 25. chairman. crafters and wanna-be crafters have a convenient place to Call in advance for child care. Call Laila Yeager at "We also carry holiday specialty items such as Hallowgo for supplies. The shop stocks supplies for such crafts as 284-5010 to sign-up. een lawn ornaments and Thanksgiving table decorations," stenciling, T-shirt decorating, tole painting and cross stitchThe Howard Family Support Center will ofshe said. "All items sold at the shoppe are hand made by ing as well as how-to books for various crafts. fer a spouse orientation course in English 10-11 people in the military communities." "If we don't carry a certain supply item a shopper is a.m. Oct. 20 at the FSC. This workshop is offered In addition to the items offered for sale through consignlooking for, in most cases we can order it for them," twice a month to spouses who attend the Right Start ment, the shoppe also offers craft supplies and classes such Konzelman said. "If someone is looking for something in Orientation. For more information, call 284-5010. as quilting, tole painting and cross stitching, said class particular, they can come by the shop and look through our The Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses Club coordinator Margaret Gray. catalogs. If it's there, we can order it for them." will be selling table spaces for its Annual Bazaar 10 "Anyone with a bilingual identification card can either Another way the shoppe helps those in the community a.m.-noon Tuesday in front of the Howard Post take or teach classes at the shoppe," she said. "Those is through volunteerism. Office. Non-privilege card holders can purchase wanting to take a class can check the calendar at the shoppe "The shoppe is run totally by volunteers from throughspaces from 10 a.m.-noon Wednesday at the Visiand those wanting to teach a class can get with me." out the community," Konzelman said. "Through voluntor'sCenterat thefrontgate of Howard AFB.Tables What is offered at the shoppe, both in items available for teering at the shoppe, not only does the shoppe and the are $20 and $30. The bazaar will be held Oct. 29 at purchase and classes, has increased drastically since the community benefit, but the individual as well." the Howard Enlisted Club. Call 284-6874 for inforshoppe first opened one year ago. Volunteers are always welcome as are new ideas commation. The club will also hold its monthly meeting What has not changed, however, is the reason for the munity members may have for the shoppe, she said. 7 p.m. Monday at the club. shoppe. Anyone wanting to volunteer or needing more informa'The shoppe is here not only to offer community tion can call 286-4500 during operating hours or stop by the M iscellaneous members a place to sell their hand crafted items and for shoppe in Building 804, Albrook AFS, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. others to buy just the right gift," Konzelman said. "It also Monday-Saturday. The Officers' and Civilians' Wives Club-Pacific Pumpkin Patch Christmas Bazaar will be Cdw k honheld 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 22 at Club Amador. In onsum ers w ee onore Consumers' Bill of Rights addition, individual and family professional ChristFORT CLAYTON (ACS) -Naopsis may help if a problem arises. Right to choice -the right to mas portrait photos will be taken in the La Concha tonal Consumers Week has become The "EletronicFund TransferAct" make an intelligent choice among Room of Club Amador on the day of the bazaar. anesalise annual tradition feome provides mect irnfrt" a products and services. Reasonably priced packages will be available in an established annual tradition for state provides consumer protection for all Right to information -the right plenty of time for Christmas. More than 100 vendors and local consumer offices, businesstransactions using a debit card or electo accurate information on which will be showing goods of all nature. This is the es, government agencies, voluntary tronic means to debit or credit an acto make a free choice. perfect opportunity to buy some special gifts. organizations and individual consumcount. It also limits a consumer's liaRight to safety -the right to Those expecting a new baby should ensure ers. Each year, the last week of Octobility for unauthorized electronic fund expect the health and safety of the birth registration information is obtained as earber is dedicated to the ongoing need to transfers. buyer are taken into account by ly as possible before the baby is born. The informaeducate and inform consumers about The"EqualCreditOpportunity Act" those seeking patronage. tion sheet, form 1080, is available through Gorgas their rights and responsibilities in the prohibits discrimination against an Right to be heard -the right to Army Community Hospital OB-GYN Clinic and marketplace. applicant for credit because of age, register dissatisfaction and have a the Admissions and Dispositions Office. The form To achieve this goal, Army Comsex, marital status, religion, race, colcomplaintheardandweighed when is also available through the Fort Sherman U.S. munity Service will be presenting a or, national origin, or receipt of public a buyer's interests arebadly served. Army Health Clinic emergency room. Originals or series of articles to enhance the imporassistance. It also prohibits discrimiRight to consumer education certified copies from the original registrar's office or tance of this week. This year National nation because of a good faith exercise -the right to consumer education Consumers Week will be observed of any rights under the federal conwithout which consumers cannot city court must be submitted with all legal docuOct. 23-29. For information, call ACS sumer credit laws. If a consumer has gain the full benefit of the other e. If, at the time of delivery, the mother is at 287-6322. been denied credit, the law requires four rightswill help all consumreferred toacivilian hospital in PanamaCity, call the Consumers' rights are protected by notification of the denial in writing. ers to maximize their resources, rt registrar at Gorgas for informationdis recgisfederal and state laws and regulations The consumer may request, within 60 keome more effective in the marration is a long, but necessary, procedure. For covering many services offered by fidays, that the reason for denial be ketplace and to achieve the greatinformation, call 282-5242/5409. nancial institutions.The following synprovided in writing. est personal satisfaction.

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B 6 Tropic Times B6ct. 7, 1994 $21. Cruise out to Taboga Island for cockRio Mar Beach trip 7 a.m.-5 p.m. *Outdoor Recreation Center; Rod man tails and hors d'oeuvres by moonlight, Oct. 23, $12. There is Contadora Island transit serwhile viewing Panama City's dramatic Panama museums tour 9 a.m.-3 p.m. vice Friday through Monday. Fees are $35 *Information, Tour and Travel: skyline at night. Oct. 26, $5. Bring money for entrance fee adults and $20 children 12 and under round Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. SaturBottom-fishing on the Vargas, Oct. and lunch. trip, $25 adults and $15 children one way. day and Oct. 21, $65, two people needed. 16 and 30, $35 adults, $20 kids under 14. *Outdoor adventures: Ecotourism trip to a Chocoe Indian Visit the tropical research island in the A greatouting for the whole family.Catch Drakes Island scuba, snorkeling 7 Village Oct. 15, $30 adults, $20 children Panama Canal's Gatun Lake. snapper, grouper and other bottom feeda.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 22, $22 snorkelers, $47 under 12. El Valle 7 a.m. Sunday and Oct. 23, ing fish. Fee includes captain, gear, live scuba. Partial transits of the Panama Canal $12. Shop for local handicrafts, plants, bait and iced coolers. Gold panning in Bique, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays, $35 adults, $15 fruits and vegetables and visit nature preDowntown shopping 9 a.m. Oct. 27, Oct. 21, $12. children 12 years old and younger. A miniserve. $8. Shop Panama's Central Avenue and Peacock bass fishing in Lake Gatun mum of 20 people is needed for a partial Free Zone shopping trip 7 a.m. Via Espana. 5 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday and Oct. 14 and 29, transit any other day of the week. Wednesday and Oct. 26, $12. $25. Bring fishing gear and bags. Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel opPanama City tour 9 a.m. Wednesday Aibrook/Howad Nature tour to Barro Colorado Isportunity to Montego Bay any Sunday and Oct. 22, $8. Visit the Golden Altar, the land 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Thursday and Oct. 20, through Wednesday. Packet includes airFrench Plaza and more. *Zodiac Community Activities Cen$65, lunch is included. fare, three nights hotel accommodations, San Blas Islands 6 a.m. Oct. 14-15, e El Valle horseback riding, 7 a.m.-4 and transfer. Prices vary from $300-$600 $149 fee includes transportation, accomFree Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Frip.m. Oct. 15, $24. depending on the hotel. modations, food, island tours and actividays, $13. ties. El Valle shopping 6:30 a.m.-4:30 Cla ton Balboa Trolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. Saturp.m. Sunday and Oct. 16 and 30, $13. day and Oct. 22, $48/person. Fish PanaBeer Brewery & lock tour 9 a.m.-3 *Valent Recreation Center: *Balboa Dive Club: ma's prolific waters for marlin, sailfish, p.m. Wednesday, $6. Panama City tour 6:30 a.m.-3:30 The club is organzig a trip to Isla dolphin (fish), bonita, Spanish mackeral Dining out Italian style 6-10 p.m. p.m. Saturday. Iguana Saturday-Monday. The $140 fee and more. Fee includes captain, gear, Oct. 19, $3. Panama City shopping 9a.m.-3 p.m., covers two-night accommodations, meals, K lures and iced coolers. Colonial Panama & Ruins tour 9 Oct. 15. transportation and three guided boat dives. Moonlight cruise 6:30 p.m. Oct. 15, a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 22, $6. Free Zone 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 18. Space is limited. Call 263-4998. days for adults and children over 3 years. Fee: $20 for 12 classes. Albrook/Howard *Fort Clayton Boat/Scuba Shop: Open water scuba class meets first and *Zodiac Community Activities Center: third Monday of each month, $125. Includes Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturdays at five pool sessions, five theory sessions and Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. four open water dives. Spanish lessons 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays-ThursLong set equipment rental $19 per day. days at Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. Martial arts classes at Howard and AlIVateraton Cntr: brook Youth Centers, 284-4700. Private piano and guitar lessons available Tae Kwon Do karate classes at Zodiac weekday evenings. Korean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays and 4 Center for children and adults. Thursdays. Beginner and advanced dog obedience classes, $32 for 4 weeks. Rodman Beginner and advanced English and Span*Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation ish classes offered monthly. Office: *Albrook Auto shop: The Navy MWR is seeking qualified inAir conditioning service and repair 12:30structors to teach Spanish and French lan5 p.m. daily except Tuesday and Wednesday. guage courses. Applicants should have prior Wheel alignment diagnostic and service experience in teaching elementary and con/ classes are held 3-9 p.m. Mondays, Thursdays versational language courses. Call 283-4301. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and Curund Sundays. *Howard and Albrook pools *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: Intro to scuba, free, call for appointment. Reservations for Christmas Village ta Open water scuba class Saturday at bles is under way 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at the Centre. p Piano lessons are held 3-7 p.m. Mondays, Howard, Oct. 15 at Albrook, $145. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Open to Advanced scuba Oct. 19 at Howard suet gssxadodr Water aerobics for advanced adult swims tt as -7:an p. / Martial arts 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and mers at Howard and Albrook. Thursdays. Open to all ages *Howard Wood Skills Center, Bldg. 722 Voicelessonsareheld3-5:30p.m.WednesLathe class 6-8 p.m. today, $15. Three days and Thursdays. week class. Guitar lessons are held 3-6 p.m. Tuesday Clayton Registration for all dance classes is under way at Building 2060, Curundu. Jazz lessons / *Fort Clayton Pool: are available for teens and adults as follows: r The pool is looking for qualified teachers 1: 5-6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays $32. STpc Tme) for swimming and water aerobics. Call 287II: 6-7 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, San Blas 6660. $32. The Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation Information, Tour and Travel Beginning and advanced swimming lesOther classes: modern, ballet, tap, folklorOffice is sponsoring a San Blas Islands trip 6 a.m. Oct. 14-15. Join the sons 2:15-5:45 p.m. Mondays through Thursic, salsa, belly dancing and saxophone. Navy and visit the beautiful islands ofSan Blas and enjoy the hot sun, the sand and its crystal waters. Auto safety contest Annual Volksmarch Frregistration and information,call 84Tops in Blue *Howard Auto Skills Center: *Zodiac Community Activities Cen*Howard Base Theater. The center is sponsoring a Speed ter, 4W Come and see a spectacular show feawith Safety Contest 10 a.m. Oct. 15. The center is sponsoring this year's Fund tea turing a nostalgic and contemporary look at This event is for couples to see how fast Volksmarch 7 a.m. Oct. 10 at the Howard + Isthmian College Club: the greatest movie themes ever written. they can work together to get a tire Parade Field. Bronze and silver medals The Isthiuan College Club will sponPerformers are all Air Force active duty changed using all safety procedures. will be awarded to the 10k and 20k walk sor a scholarship fund tea 4 p.m. Oct. 15 military members. There will be two shows Winning couple will receive a free oil participants. Entry fees are $6 for preregat the Panama Hotel. Cost is $15 and starting at 5 and 8 p.m. today at the Howard change and tune-up, parts not included. istration and $7 at the starting gate. A includes door prizes and a jewelry fashBase Theater. Sign up by calling 284-3370. bazaar and food booths will be available. ion show.

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Tropic Times tices Oct. 7,1994 BI Phone guide -~ Pacific 24th Services Squadron Sports and Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107 Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613 Albrook Club, 286-4128 (Troc TMos) Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333 Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989. Hobbyists gather Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-0075 The Howard Skills Development Center Is offering intermediate ceramic painting classes 10:30 Canal Crafters 286-4500 Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Learn the application of multiple color coats, mother-of-pearl and Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 mask and peel. The arts and crafts centers offer classes on all phases of ceramics and other Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 hobbies. Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586 Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355 A *Club Amador, 282-3534 Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010 *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts p.m. Tuesday, $22. consignment boutique. Corozal Thrift Shop, 285-5989 Center: Tole-painting, Halloween items Instructors are needed to teach Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 The Ceramic Center, Building 10:15 a.m. Thursday, $15/$20. classes on a contract basis for a Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 198, is located near the Crafts Shop. Cross stitch demo, Christmas variety of crafts, decorative paintHoward Officers' Club, 284-4680 *Canal Crafters: stocking 10:15 a.m. today, free. ing, calligraphy, watercolors, oil Howard Riding Stables 284-3770 Handmade arts and crafts are Paper mold class, 10:15 a.m. painting. Call 284-6361. Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361 available, consignments and volWednesday, $3, supplies included. Padded heart box 1-3 p.m. Howard Teen Center, 284-4700 unteers are welcome. The shop *Howard Skills Development Wednesday, $5 plus supplies. Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510 hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday Center: Cake decorating 7-9 1. n. The Loop, 287-3035 through Saturday. The shop i now The center is having a25 percent Thursday, $25 plus supplies. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 accepting holiday consignments, off selected scribbles and fabric Intermediateceramicpainting Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380 Building 804, Albrook. paints, today and Saturday. 10:30 a.m.-l p.m. Thursday, $15, Rodman Annex, 283-5475 Register forthe following classLeather & wood sale Oct. 14three weeks. Rodman Club, 283-4498 es at the shop. 15. 25 percent off unpainted wood Ongoing classes: stained glass, Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 Wallhanging quilts 10:15 a.m.and leather items. framing, air brush, lamp assembly, Rodman Naval Station Information Tour 12:15 p.m. Saturday, $20. The center is looking for cross stitch, macrame, clay flower, and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454 Baby quilts 10:15 a.m.-12:15 crafters to sell items in the new ceramic and 'how to videos.' Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500 Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-6161 -----/-/-Atlantic Aquativity Center, 289-4009 *Valent Recreation Center: ed House Oct 29. Interested people a.m.-5 p.m. MondaysFridays, I1 Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201 Better Opportunities for must be age 18 and older. a.m.3 p.m. Saturdays. It is in the Davis Community Club, 289-5160 Single Soldiers next meeting is Oct. *Cocoli Community Center: Zodiac Community Activities CenOcean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 20. Videos for children 4 p.m. ter. Take-out, eat-in and delivery Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077 The screening room offers free Thursdays. services are available. Phone orSherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313 movies.Call the 24-hourmovie line, Laser disc movies 7 p.m. ders to 284-5848. fax to 284-6109. Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104 287-4367 for days and times. Fridays. Rent the activities room and Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300 Volunteers needed to perform *Zodiac Community Center; the Big Tree Bohio for parties or as horror characters for the HauntSubs on Top has new hours, I1 any other function. Karate 6-7 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. Mondays. Rec center news Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays. *Sundial Recreation Center: *Sundial Recreation Center: Piano lessons 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesdays. Panama City 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6 p.m. Thurs+Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Isla Grande 8 a.m. Sunday. days. The center offers various of classes: KaraEl Valle, 5:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. Oct. 16. Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wedneste, cake decorating, Spanish, English, piano, *Ocean Breeze Regcreation Center; days. country line-dancing and jazz. Call 289-6402 Rio Mar 7 a.m. Saturday. Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mondays, for more information on schedules and registraPortobelo & Isla Langosta 8 a.m. Sunday. Wednesdays and Fridays. tion. El Valle over night Oct. 15-16. / X

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Tropic Times __ _ ji J y i s_ _ _ __ _ B O, c Movies Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB S and 8pm: Tops in 2pm: i Could Happen 2pm: True Lies 2pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could Happen 7pm: The Mask 7pm: In the Army 284-3583 Blue (Snack stand to You (PG) (R) Arnold (R) Arnold to You (PG) (PG-13) Now (PG) opened) Nicolas Cage, Schwarzenegger, Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore, Bridget Fonda Jamie Lee Curtis Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Richard Jeni Lori Petty 6:30pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could 6:30pm: True Lies 9:30pm: True Lies 9:30pm: Speed (R) 9pm: The Mask (R) Arnold Happen to You (PG) (R) (R) Arnold Keanu Reeves, (PG-13) Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, 9:30pm: It Could Schwarzenegger, Dennis Hopper Jim Carrey, Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda Happen to You (PG) Jamie Lee Curtis Richard Jeni 9:30pm: True Lies Nicolas Cage, (R) 9:30pm: True Lies Bridge tFonda (R) Fort Clayton 7pm: Black Beauty 2pm: The Little 2pm: Black Beauty 7pm: Airheads 7pm: The Little 7pm: True Lies 7pm: It Could 287-3279 (G) Rascals (PG) (G) David Thewlis, (PG-13) Rascals (PG) (R) Arnold Happen to You (PG) David Thewlis, Travis Tedford, Sean Bean Brendan Fraser, Travis Tedford, Schwarzenegger, Nicolas Cage, Sean Bean Bug Hall 7pm: The Litile Steve Buscemi Bug Hall Jamie Lee Curtis Bridget Fonda 9pm: Airheads 7pm: Black Beauty (G) Rascals (PG) 9pm: Blown Away (R) 9pm: Black Beauty 9:30pm: Wolf(R) 9:30pm: True Lies (PG-13) David Thewlis, Travis Tedford, Jeff Bridges, (G) Jack Nicholson, (R) Arnold Brendan Fraser, Sean Bean Bug Hall Tommy Lee Jones David Thewlis, Michelle Pfeiffer Schwarzenegger, Steve Buscemi 9pm: Airheads (PG-13) 9pr: Black Beauty Sean Bean Jamie Lee Curtis Brendan Fraser, (G) David Thewlis, Steve Buscemi Sean Bean Fort Davis 7pm: Lassie (PG) 2pm: Lassie (PG) 7pm: The Client 7pm: Lassie (PG) 7pm: Above the Rim 7pm: Airheads 7pm: The Little 289-5173 Helen Slater, Helen Slater, (PG13) Helen Slater, (R) Duane Martin, (PG13) Rascals (PG) Richard Farnsworth Richard Farnsworth Susan Sarandon, Richard Farnsworth Leon Brendan Fraser, Travis Tedford, 9pm: The Client 7pm: The Client Tommy Lee Jones Steve Buscemi Bug Hall (PG13)(PU-13) (PU13) Susan Sarandon, Susan Sarandon, Tommy Lee Jones Tommy Lee Jones 9pm: The Crow (R) Brandon Lee, Ernie Hudson Fort Sherman 7pm: Speed (R) 7pm: Lassie (PG) 7pm: The Crow (R) No show No show No show 7pm: Airheads Keanu Reeves, Helen Slater, Brandon Lee, (PG-13) 289-5173 Dennis Hopper Richard Farnsworth Ernie Hudson Brendan Fraser, Steve Buscem Fort Amador 7pm: Wolf(R) 7pm: The Mask 7:30pm: In the No show No show 7pm: It Could Happen 7pm: Andre (PG) Jack Nicholson, (PG-13) Amy Now (PG) to You (PG) KeithCarradine, 284-3583 Michelle Pfeiffer Jim Carrey, Pauly Shore, Nicholas Cage, Tina Majorino Richard Jen Lori Petty Bridget Fonda Oct. 14 The Mask THE MOVIE EVENT Jim Carrey, Richard Jeni" Howard AFB Nobody does super powers like Jim O Carrey. An ordinary, mild-miannered -Nlke Cidoni, NM RADIO NETWORK 7pm Andre (PG) bank clerk is transformed into the weirdKeith Carradine, est super hero of all time when he dons rzenegger his mask. PG-13 (some stylized vioTinaMajoinolence), I hr, 40 min. 9pm The Mask (PG-13) Jim Carrey, Richard Je"i Keith Carradine, Tina Majorino An amazing true story of the seal that Fort Clayton became a living legend. An adorable Now showing at Howard and Clayton theaters. newborn seal is orphaned after his mothforms of counter intelligence, Harry is an tation yet of a John Grisham novel. A 6:30pm True Lies er is caught in a fisherman's net. The pup international spy who has kept his real young boy witnesses the suicide of a (R) Arnold is nursed back to health by the animal profession secret from his wife. R (acmob lawyer and hires Susan Sarandon, loving Whitney family, who name him tion, violence, language), I hr, 82 min. a former addict, to protect him from Schwiarzenegger Andre. PG (teen mischief, mild violence, federal prosecutor Tommy Lee Jones Jamie Lee Curtis language),I hr, 34 min. Black Beauty and mobster Barry Muldano, both of 9:15pm City Slickers 2 David Thewlis, Sean Bean whom think he knows where the body In the Army Now Aheartwarming drama based on the famofaU.S. senator is buried. PG-13 (child ( tG-13) Billy .ily classic novel by Anna Sewell tells the in jeopardy, language), 2 hrs. Ctrstal, Daniel Pauly Shore, Lor Pe t .story of a time in history when horses Str (1.50/ )fact, joined the Army Reserves for the were essential to men's lives. One horse Lassie .) c jnd the rgy Rsalryes fRthe named Black Beauty has good and bad Helen Slater, Richard Farnsworth bennies and the regular salary. Reality owners, suffers misfortune then finds Everybody's favorite collie Lassie is kicks in when he becomes a part of a friendship and is given a secure home back for her ninth film (the eighth genmission involving actual combat. PG and loving caretaker. G, 99 min. eration descendant of the original dog). 7pm Black Beauty (G) (some war action, mild language) I hr, Picked up as a stray by the Turner 31 min. David Thewlis, Airheads family moving from Baltimore to VirSean Bean It Could Happen Brendan Fraser, Steve Busceini ginia's Shenandoah Valley, Lassie leads Three metal heads desperate to get their her new masters into sheep ranching. 9pm Airheads (PG-13) to You demo song played on the radio inadvertPG (language, suspense), I hr, 34 min. Brendan Fraser, Nicholas Cage, Bridget Fonda ently take a radio station hostage. PG-13 Steve Buscemi A New York City cop lacking change (crude dialogue and some sexuality), I Speed tips a waitress with a promise to split the hr, 29 min. Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper winnings from his lottery ticket if he LAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played Fort Sherman wins When he wins and wants to make The Little Rascals by Kcanu Reeves, is known as a man good on the promise, it will be over with an attitude caused by Dennis Hop7pm Above the Rim strong opposition from his wife. PG (mild Travis Tedford, Bug Hall per, a sociopath who nearly killed him (R Duane Martin, language, scene of cop action), 1 hr, 41 Steven Spielberg produces an appealing in an earlier encounter. R (violence, min. update of the Hat Roach comedy series language), I hr, 51 min. Leon ($.5QI$1) from the '20s, '30s and '40s. The gang True Lies has established a boy's only club; howWolf ever, things change when Alfalfa falls Fort Amador Arnold Schwarzenegger, for Darla. PG (rude dialogue) Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer Jamie Lee Curtis We all know what happens when you 7pm Speed (R) Harry Tasker is a special agent for Omeget bit by a werewolf, right? But, do Keanu Reeves, ga Sector, a top secret agency charged The Client you know what might happen if Jack with nuclear terrorism intervention. FluSusan Sarandon, Tommy Lee Jones Nicholson gets bit'? R (language, Dennis nipper ent in six languages and skilled in all Set in New Orleans, this is the best adapwerewolf attacks), 2 hrs.

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TropicTie 9 TV Schedule ct B9 Mature Theme ** Series Begins **Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ** Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30 Headline News 6:00 CCM TV 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News as Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 God Mciming America 7:00 Navy/Marine Corps News 6:30 Ouatrech f Love 600 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning A-ea 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America w/Pana New (7:25) 7:30 Real News for Kids 7:00 Parliament of Seats 800 Bi Trainuig Workout w/Pawama Now (7:25) w/Panama New (7:25) w/Pa.awa Now (7:25) 8:00 Basic Treising Warkass 8:00 Gats 7:30 Lifestyle Magazine 8:30 Sesame Sneet 8:00 Badyshaping 0:00 Basic Training Workoet 8:00 Badyshaping 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Just for Kids! 8:00 CBS Sanday Morning 9:30 orerait of Awmeria 8 30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 9:30 Portrait of America Gulicd & Friends 9:30 This Week w/Brinkicy 10:25 Guiding Light 9:30 Pnrai of America 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America 10:25 Guiding Light Teenage Mutant Niaja 10:30 Face the Nation 11:10 General Hospital 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 1:10 General H-spital Turtles I t:00 Inside the NFL 12.00 Headline News t1:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital L1:10 General Hospital 12:00 Headline News Break Bikee Mice from Mars 12:00 NFL Foetball: 12:30 Sports Machine 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:25 Paama Now Batmean Cartoon Indianapolis Calls vs. 1:00 Another World 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Naw 12:25 Panama Naw 12:30 Spenscenter Carteos Classics New Yark Jets 2:00 Opra Winfrey 12:30 Spartsceter 12:30 Sporscenter 12:30 Sporscenter 1:00 Assather World 10:30 Faerie Tale Theater 3:00 Paradise + 3:00 Price is Right 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 2:00 OpZb Winfrey 11:00 Spies 4:30 Rescue 911 + 4:00 Guts 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Donahue 3:00 Price is Right 12:00 Headline News 5:30 In the Heat af the Night + 4:30 I Lase Lucy 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 4:00 Think Past! 12:30 Movie: "Windwalker" 6:30 Hearts Afire 5:00 Family Feud 4:00 Reading Rainbow 4:00 Shining Time Station 400 In the Mix 4:30 I Love Lucy 2:30 College Football: 7:00 Dr. Quinn: Medicine 5:30 The Cosby Show 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 I Le Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy 5:00 Fatmly Feud Oklahoma So aners vs. Woman 6:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Fend 5:00 Family Feud 5:30 The Cosby Show Texas Longhorns 0:00 L.A. Law 6:30 World News Tonight 5:30 The Cusby Shw 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:00 Headline News Break 5:30 Headline News 9:00 ABC 20/20 7:00 Jeopardy us 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:30 World News Tanight 6:00 Evening Shade + 10:00 Top Cops 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6A15 Headline News Break 7:00 28th Annual Country 6:30 College Featball: 11:00 Miami Vice 8:00 Mad About You 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Toight Masic Awards Florida State Seminoles 12:00 Movie: "Stalking Laura" 8:30 Cops 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 Jeopardy 700 Wheel of Fortune 10:00 Panama Now vs. Miami Hurricanes 2:00 Sports Latenight 9:00 60 Minus 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 10:05 Cheers 9:30 Walker: Texas Ranger 2:30 Frugal Gourmet 10:00 Cheers 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment tonight 10:30 David Lternman 10:30 Saturday Night Live 3:00 Headline News 10:30 David Latterman 8:00 Answerline 8:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Ae 8:00 ALF 11:30 Tonight Show 12:00 WWF Superstars of 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 11:30 Tonight Show 9:00 Northern Exposure 8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 8:25 Movie: "The Stand" 12:30 Ren and Stimpy Wrestling 4:00 Jeopardy 12:30 M*A*S*H 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 Culure Clash (Pat 4 of 4) 1:00 Movies: "The Killing 1:00 Friday Night Videas 4:30 Videolinks 1:00 Movies:"Bless the Beast 10:05 Cheers 10:00 SCN Late Editinn 10:00 SCN Late Edition Fields" 2:00 Movies: "Rie Brave" 5:00 Headline News and Children" 10:30 David Latterman 10:05 Cheers 10:05 Cheers 3:30 "Shakedown" 4:300 "Run 'till You Fall" 2:45 "The Caine Mnny" I1:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Latterman 10:30 David Leeertman 5:00 "Harry and the 5:00 Headline News Break 12:30 M*A*S*H 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tenight Show Hendersons" 1:00 Movies: "The Dresser" 12:30 M*A*S*H 12:30 M*A*S*H 3:00 "Ghostbusters" 1:00 Movies: "Murphy's 1:00 Movies: "Jinbk" 5:00 Headline News Break Romance" 2:00 "Old Gringo" 2:50 "Madame Sousatzka" 5:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Headline News Break C abl* c 1 Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:00 Wasihington Week in 4:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:30 Simulcast w/Ck. 8 & 10 5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:30 Young Adult Theater Review ** 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 9:00 Today "My Past is My Own" 6:30 Shining Time Stat.n 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 11:00 Star Trek "Mark Twain and Me" 7:00 The Sunshine Factory 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 12:00 Headline News Break "Private Affairs" 7:25 Goof Troop 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:25 Panama Now 11:35 Channel One/Newsram** 7:50 Muppet Babies ** 12:30 All My Children 12:25 Panama New 12:25 Paamesa Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:30 All My Children 12:05 Silver Spoons 8:20 Disney's The Little 1:30 One Life to Live 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children :30 On Life I stLe 12:30 Mvies: The Ugly Mermaid 2:30 Young and the Restless 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One fe to Live 1:38 One Life In Live 2 g an e RDashchund" 8:30 Batman 3:30 Batman 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 3:30 Tege tNi ja 2:09 "Bonnie and Clyde" 8:40 Cartoon Classic 4:00 Frggle Rock 3:30 Where on Earth is Carmen 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Muppet Babies ** 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 21 Jump Street 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja 4:30 'Te Adventures of Pete Sandiege? 4:00 Fraggle Rack 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Reading Rainbow 5:00 1993 National Rode Turtles & Pete 4:00 Fraggle Reck 4:30 Guts 4:30 Nick Arcade 5:00 Silver Sp ens Finals 9:30 Movie: "Walk Don't 5:00 In the Mix 4:30 Think Fast 5:00 Beakman's World 5:00 Fact of Life 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 Dactor, Doctor Run" 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Disney's Raw Teenage 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 Headline News 6:30 Dinosaurs 11:30 This Old House 6:00 Headline News Break 5:30 Shawbie Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:30 CBS Evening News 7:00 Christy 11:55 Amish Cooking from 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 7.00 Star Trek: The Next 8:00 Star Trek: Deep Space Quilt Country 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 CBS Evening News Generation Nine 12.25 Movie: "A Star is Bom" Generation 6:30 CBS Evening News 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 NFL Football: 7:55 Panana Now 9:00 Heran's Head nun 3:00 NFL Football: Kansas 8:00 Monday Night Football: 7:00 Star Trek: The Next Generation *** Clevetud Browns vs. 0:00 R.,asenu 9:30 Maeried With Children City Chiefs vs. San Diego Mianeseta Vikings vs. Generation 7:55 Panama Now Houston Oilers 8:30 The Boys are Back 10:00 Mavie: 'The Celac of Chargers New York Giants 7:55 Panama Now 0:00 Sinbad Show w/Panama Now (New Fall Series) Maney" 6:00 Wonderful World of 11:00 Headline News 8:00 Home Improvement 8:30 Family Matters 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:00 Primetime Live 12:00 Headline News Disney + 11:30 Nightline 8:30 My So Called Life 9:00 Wise Guy 10:05 Boys Meet World + 10:00 SCN Late Edition 12:30 Science and Technology 7:00 NFL Football 12:00 Cheers (New Fall Series) 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:35 Living Single ***+ 10:05 Renegade Week Washington Redaskins vs. 12:30 M*A*S*H 9:30 Frasier 10:05 Tour of Duty 11:05 L.A. Law + 11:00 Headline News Break 1:00 The McLaughlin Group Philadelphia Eagles 1:00 Headline News 10:00 SCN Late Edition 11:00 Headline News 12:00 Cheers 11:30 Nightline 1:30 Sports Latenight 10:00 Buck James 1:30 Sports Latenight 10:05 McKenna (New Fall Series) 11:301Nighline 12:30 M*A*S*H 12:00 Chers 200 Entertainment this week 11:00 Eye so Eye w/C. Chung 2:00 David Laerman 11:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Cheers 1:00 Headline News 1:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 11:30 Nightline 12:30 M*A*S*H 1:30 Spns Latenight 330 Sports Ltenight 3:30 Saturday Night Live 12:30 Meet the Press 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 12:00 Cheers 1:00 Headline News 2:00 David Lanersman 2 :00 David Letterman 5:00 Videliks 1:30 Sports Machine 4:00 Jeopardy 12:30 M*A*S*H 1:30 Sports Ltenight 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 5:30 Headline News Break .2:00 Sports Lalenight 4:30 Donahue 1:00 Headline News 2:00 David Lattertman 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 3 30 Military News 2:30 Frugal Goarmset 1:30 Spats Latenight 3:00 Headline News 4:00 Jeopardy 4:00 Ton & Jerry Kids 3:00 Headline News 2:00 David Laterman 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:30 Oprah Winfrey 4:30 Tiny Toons Adventures 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 3:00 Headline News 4:00 Jeopardy 5:00 CRO 4:00 Jeopardy 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:30 Sally Jesse Raphael 5:30 Videlinks 4:00 Jeopardy Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Sports sSports College Football NFL Footba Oklahoma Sooners vs. Texas Longhorns, 2:30 p.m. Saturday Kansas City Chiefs vs. San Diego Chargers, 3 p.m. SunFlorida State Seminoles vs. Miami Hurricanes, 6:30 p.m. Satday urday Washington Redskins vs. Philadelphia Eagles, 7 p.m. NFL Football Sunday Indianapolis Colts vs. New York Jets, noon Sunday Minnesota Vikings vs. New York Giants, 8 p.m. Monday Cleveland Browns vs. Houston Oilers, 7 p.m. Thursday Specials 28th Annual Country Music Awards, 7 p.m. today. Primetime movies Answerline,8 p.m. Tuesday. "The Color Of Money" The subject for October's edition of Answerline is the commissary. Our guest, 10 p.m. Saturday Lt. Col. William Taylor: commander, Panama Commissary District. Recording Twenty-five years after "The Hustler," Paul Newman gives an Oscar-winning telephone calls begin 6:30 p.m. at 287 -4460. performance as a now semi-retired "Fast Eddie" Felson. This time around, the Mini series older, but wiser Eddie finds a hot young player who knows everything about "Stephen King's The Stand," 8:25 p.m. Thursday. pool, but finds life confusing. The goal is to hit the big-time in Atlantic City, As Mother Abigail's group of spies run afowl of Randall Flagg's forces in Las but as the youth's education progresses, he becomes unmanageable. In frustraVegas, Flagg's mad minion, Trashcan man, delivers into his master's hand the tion, as Eddie is about to give up, he re-discovers his old self. Stars Tom Cruise ultimate instrument of conquest. and Mary Elizabeth Mastriantonio.

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B10 TOc 7, Classified Ads_ _ loon, ac, alarm, $8,500. 252-2163 Span and Eng babysiter, noIlie in. $3,899/obo. 286-6333. after 3:30pm. 224-9052. D U -f ee m e~ h nd~ e--------------23'fberg, 225 Johnson, radio, depth 1970 16()(r Datsun4d, ato. 1962 Teen willing to babysit weekends finder, etc, $12,900. 252-5428. FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) -As a reminder, Chrysler station wagon. Bothl neg. anytime and week days 4-10pm. in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern 25 14 Ho Kbbe a28 f6 l Fo 5hpotboardmtor n.st Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, 1990 Ftd Brosco1, Its, ph, ae, a84/-n--. -hon 28-6777. 5630. __ cannot be given, transferred or generally sold t non-privilege hold.inass, XT package, $15,00)! Ecg p1s2 Eng/Span spk maid, hard inking,, cano h ien rasiere o-geurd-,m~dit anpu dg h' t eg. ',t0343.3. tependabte, ene w/kids. 260-9404 16'hoal, 60hp motor, traiter, 3 gas ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecufor Alexis. tanks, ge running cond, extras, tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes vy Celebrity station wagon, ac, $2,200.286-4981. to ell ite ~. oto, PS, ph, am/fat cas, $3,950. Dependabtebilingualmaid, live-iin, permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. 287-6136. gd w/kids, cooks, cleans and irons. Camper shell for TFord XLT, tintBefore such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact 1989 Hyndai Sonata, USspltad 262-9095 for Roxanne. ed wind, gd cond, $600. 252-5143. the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117 edsnroof, $5,775. 252-6016. Bilingualmaid,honest,reliable,ref, 22Falron Mercury,mox200hp,40 avail Mon and Wed. 284-4072. hours, ski equip mclud, $15,000. 1990 Volvo 740, auto, am/fm cass, --232-5241. gd cond, $6,000.252-5024. $15/up. 262-1204. ac, pw,exccond, $9,300.226-6341. Reliable Eng-spk housekeeper w/ A i9DodgeSttdow,3(,000 iles, 1981 GMC Van Dur, exc for fat1977 BlazerK-5,4w 350cubic inch ref forweekends,excw/kids, cooks, 1990 cleans, very flexible, $15daily. 283Electronics .idwoedand exc cond, new tires/battery, $6,300. ity, not dty pd, $3,850. 282-4182. exccond,tmanycomponentsrebuilt 4626 Pomeranimtnpppiesd rd 287-4543. orreplaced, $3,400. 286-4030 evemtountzed,$250. 287-6244 1983Jeep Wagoneer, exc cond, a/C, nings. Private soccer lessons. 256-6260. Sony 20" Trinitron color TV w/ 1989 Pontiac Trans-Am, 5.0L TPI auto, $2,800/obo. 252-2845. remote, $125. 260-2847. Two hamsters w/cage, $20. 287305cu. Fully loaded, $1,500 stereo 1989 Ford Temp, exc cond, auto, 13 yr old will mow your lawn, de. 6739. equip, 16" rims, $9,500. 287-4970. 1990 Ford Taurus GL, 36K miles, $5,800.284-6381. pendable. 284-3690 for Troy. Panasonc camcorder, org price Free black kitten, 6 wks old, has V6, auto, ps, pb, am/fm cass, $9,500. -_$1,275, $635.287-4020. Fhots. 286-4520. 1994 Daihatsu Charade, 5spd, a/c, 287-4689. 1992 Ford XLT Explorer, not dty Home made white, wheat and cinAudio source ss three surround s ami/fm cass, grt gas mil, auto alarm pd, $16,625. 252-6929. namon raisin bread, sliced or Aud socess prg in/amp 5 yr old TB gelding. English, gensystemn,$5,400. 264-4105. 1985 Chevy Blazer 4x4 w/stereo, .unsliced. Raisin $2.50/white or sound processor pro-logic w/amp $6,200/obo. 260-9548. 1988 DodgeDakota, 56kmiles, fair and remote, $250/cbo. 252-1191. tDe, jumps and trail rides. Native 1968 Fort Mustang fastback. V8, cond, $4,000/obo. 260-3235. wheat $2. 287-3898. D66r auto, new tires, brakes and tune-up. 1983 Ford Bronco, full size, ac, ps, Eng spk maid, gd w/kids, reliable, AudiosourceEQ 10,computerized 6683. Dty pd, $3,500/obo. 287-3287. ph, 4spd, roll har, nice stereo, off rd 1989 Mazda 323, 5spd, ac, cc, cass, avail Mon, Wed, Fri. 228-6545. graphic equalizer/spectrum analyzpkg, $7,000. 284-4227. exr cond, $5,000. 284-3481. er w/auto EQ w/remote, $250/obo. Looking for purebred Pomaraniatt 1982 BMW 518, runs get, Euro Motherof2willbabysitdays,nighs 252-1191. male for stud service. 287-3686. specs,dlypd,$4,000/obo.269-7585 1985 Porsche, 5spd, ac, cruise, 1985 Mazda 626, gd coad, 5spd weekeads. tdkyndh 251y specsf, city spere a p2we9n 4dyl, ac, pb, ps, $3,9. .weekends. Weekly and hourly ble VCR/video camera. Male Peek-a-boo, 4 mons old, $80. forJohn. suroofd stereo, alpower,aar '92. rates. 283-6231. Panaronic$350. 286-3295. 286-4199, ask for Cynthia. Parts for a 4-Runner Toyota, 1989 1975 Buick LeSabre, grey, needs Bilingual babysiPter and live-in Free 7 mos old female cat, has all 4cyl, 22 RE engine, cylinder head 1984 Volvo 760 GLE, fcas, ac, trans k, dty pd clean, $650. 286 maid, honest, reliable, $130 Monsunmaidxhones,,5,eliable,2$230 Mon9.$45,phoaerecorder,$20.260-2847. shots. Not neutered, lively personassy and crankshaft. 287-5728 or su3fexccond,$5, 0/obo. 2526439 Fri. 287-4389. aly 287-5536. 233-6096. 20992 Chei 2874389. /, VHS camcorder Panasonic, $250. y 10 p/u, a, ph, pa, Bilingual housekeeper. Full or part Brown Chihuahua puppies, 6 wks 1983 Toyota Camty, a/c, 4dr, right 1986 Volvo 740, auto, amfm, ps, 5spd,4cyl, am/fm cass, Tahaopacktime. 284-4771 for Liliola. 284-4708. old, $150. 224-1588. hand drive, $2,350. 284-4394. pw, ph, gd cond, $7,500/obo. 284age, exc cond, $8,195. 286-3692 .Sega CD and 5 games, $400. 2844491. 1985 GMC Jimmy 4x4 2.8L V6 Bilingual mature maid, live-in, gd 4082. Free adorable grey tiger male kit1982 Corvette, restored. Black w/ w/kids dependable, hd wker, gn ten. Litter trained. 283-3031. gray leather interior. A/C d 1 pd, l987 Mitsubishi MonterA,4wd,dietrans needs wk, $2,500. 285-6289 housework. 286-6138. Yorx programable cd player stereo $12,500/obo. 221-1428 for Anna. sei, ac, am/fm, ps, ph, pw, auto, 1990 Toyota Camry wagon, V6, w/2cast decks, am/fm and remote Three male German shepherds, 8 $7,500/obo.264-4491. 7Kmiles fullextra$10,000/aneg Houseboy, cleanlaundry,petcare' cto $225.289-4065. wks old, $75. 262-1698/0172 for 1990 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 4de, w/ref, Mon-Fri. 261-7216. Judy. pw/d, ph, ps, a/c, cass, 27,000m, 1989 Olds Cutlass Calais, Quad 4 252-2143. Amiga 2000 multimedia romp, not dty pd, $12,500. 287-4223. g, p, p, am/fm ss, 69k miles, 1993 Ford T po, 2dr, ac, auto, tilt Professional photography, fantly 7meg Ram, 105meg hd, color monMale Shar-pei, 8 mos old, all shots, $6,400/obo. 287-3534. lots more, low miles, $9,900. 283portraits, sitting fee $15. 284-4392. oe, color printer, duai drives, softand kennel, $200. 260-8190. 1987 Porsche 944,5spd, ac, all pwr, -_____ _cruise, alaro, 63,000 miles, pw 1990PontiacGrandPrix,fullyload3843. British babysitter has trans, day or ware, $2,000.284-3338. French poodle puppies. 261 -3325. sunroof, $13,500. 284-3054. ed, V6, $9,500. 286-6298. 1985 Plymouth Voyager van, 4cyl, night, gd w/kids any age. 286-4285. EQ $125, various speaker $50 pair. Two 10" white tiger oscars, $12ea 1985 Toyota Tercel,4cyl, 4wd, 1987 Ford Escort 1.9, 5 spd, ps, ph, 5spd, 5 passenger, am/fm cass, not Honest reliable bilingual maid, gd 289-4247. or $20 for both. 286-4777. 5spd,4drw/hatchback, am/fntcass, rebuilt eag, new clutch and shocks, dty pd, $3,000/neg. 289-5744. w/kids, live-in orout. 261-3932 for Canon-bubble jet printer, compact Freefat cat,declawed, pretty, white not dty pd, $2,900/obo. 262-7278. a/c needs wk, $3,000. 286-4271. 1994 Daihatsu Charade, 5spd, am/ Janet. high quality, needs ac adapter, exc w/somestripes, littertrained, sweet 1991 Jeep Comanche $2,800 and 1986Toyotap/ulong bedwithshell, fn cass, ac, auto alarm, grt mpg, Honest, reliable, Eng spk maid, 1-2 cond, $175. 287-3898. disposition.260-5220. take over payments. Gd cond. 286auto, no ac, $4,000. 252-5428. $5,400. 264-4105. days per week. 287-6535. Epson XT comp w/monitor, 20mb, 2 yr old male boxer w/g kennel, 3732. 1979 Chevy Nova, ac, ps, rebuilt 1978Volvo244DL,ac,am/fmcass, Honest, dependable house keeper, 5 1/4drive,software included,$250. $200. 285-5681. 1991 Plymouth Sundance, auto, ac. engineand brakes,runs grt,$1,300/ gd cond, not dty pd, $2,300/obo. live-in or out, grt w/kids, ref avail, 226-8626/3278. Bought new at Howard Car Sales, obo. 287-4877. 285-6870Room210. prefer Howard. 284-6381. Pkrd Bell 386SX, 130mb h, dual Parrot w/cage $65, male Peakinees Pkr B dog $30. 283-3843. ea ond, $8,000. 286-3171. 1988 3181 BMW, 2dr, an/fm cass, 1980 Ford station wagon, runs gd, Home care provider, full and part drive, modem, SVGA, lots of soft1990 Chevy Cavalier, 2dr, 5spd, ac, not dty pd, Euro specs, $8,000. body fair, 351 V8 eng, not dty pd, time, drop-ins, CPR and first aid ware. 284-6222. Blue Guam fish, $20. 287-6672. ph, an/fm cas, low mes, 261-6119. $800/obo. 286-4693 after 5pm. cert. 283-6737 for Jill Kenwood turntable, ear road $50, Automob is L $7,500/obo. 264-3143 evenings. 1979 Buick Electra, clean, needs no 1986 Nissan Sunny, ac, am/fm steOne day a wk bilingual hard wking classic rock albums $.75ea. 2861992 Dodge Daytona, like new, all wk, gdtrans, $2,500/obo. 283-6499. reo, auto, 4dr, dty pd, $3,600/obo. maid, gd ironing and cleaning, ref. 4677. extras, not dty pd, $10,500. 2631988 Dodge Dakota p/u w/topper, 236-3099. 260-3235. Sony 20" color TV i/stereo/SAP. 1984 Ford LTD station wagon w/ 9814.198DdeDkt lwhprSn20corTV /semAP luggage ruk. A/C, AM/FM radio, ac, ps, ph, extras, clean, $6,500/ 1988Toyota4x4p/u,runsgrt,needs Babysitter, American housewife, Exc road $350. 236-1256. pw, tted glassnewtresdty free, 1986 Buick Park Avenue, needs ac obo. 283-6499. wk, not dty pd, $5,000/obo. 284depend, grt w/kids, hourly and Samsung 19' TV w/remote, cable $3,500. 264-8675. compressor, $4,500. 284-4708. 1988 Ford Escort GT, 5spd, mo/fm 45 weekly. 286-3331 for Angie. ready, new cond, $150/obo. 284Car for sale, will consider trade for 1987 Ford Temp, 4cyl,5spd, am/fm cass, ac, low miles, dty pd, $4,800/ 1989 Honda Accord LXI, 57K Maid 2 days per wk, exr worker, 4921. boat, motor and trailer/obo. 287cass, economic,$3,300. 287-4772. neg. 264-2552. miles, 4dr, 5spd, loaded, alarm, loyal and respoas, spks Eng: 236Fendersquierheavy metalstratguisunroof. 284-3481. 1256. 6244. -1993ToyotaCorona2.0i, fully load1988 Chev Blazer, ac, stereo, auto, tar, Floyd Rose tremolo, hard case, Diesel engine Perkins 4.236 and ed, 15" sport wheels, less than $7,500/obo. 287-4974. 1988JeepCommanche4x4, am/fm Bilingual, mature day maid/ strap, extrastring,$350.286-6384. transmission, $650. 256-6816. 10,000km,$17,500/obo. 263-4671. 1979 Olds Cutlass Supreme, exrcass, ac, ps, pb, new tires, sport babysitter, avail Tues and Fri, ref. SegaGenesisiw/9 games$250, RCA wheels, heal offer. 261-6418. 224-0587.25corcnsl$1028-76 1983 Ford Ranger p/u, auto, a/c, ps, 1989 Mazda 323, ac, cc, cass, 5spd, road, ac, 35k miles w/proof,$3,000/ 25" color console $100. 287-4786. pw,6cyl,ruansandlooksgd,$3,200/ $5,000.284-4983. obo. 285-4401. 1990 Nissan 300ZX, loaded, dty Will babysit your home or mine. ChipintelDtX2overdriveprocessor pd, $23,000. 226-0234. Daycare exp. 287-61871upad X/2$75Eso obo. 287-5330. 1988 Renault Medallion, 4dr, ac, 1983 Dodge Shelby, am/fm cass, -to upgrade SX20/25 $275; Epson 1987 Toyota Cressida hatchback, radio,4cyl, USspecs,dty free, wagac, 1990 engine, $3,000/obo. 2281988DodgeDaytona,runsgrtauto, Family home day care, full or part action printer 5500, new $165; standard, gdcoad,$7,000/neg.252on type,7 passengers, $4,200. 2872643. ac, ps, 52K miles, original owner, timeopenings, drop-ins.284-3181. Sanyo 19 "color TV. 252-2664. $4,000/oho. 282-3778. 6984. 5397. 1983HondaAccord,5spd,ac,loadReliablebabysitterintmyhomteanyAST 486SX/25MHZ CPU, win1984 Dodge sport p/u, 4cyl, auto, 1993 Fort Explorer,Turquoise, 4dr, ed, dty pd, $3,800. 287-4686. 1992 GMC Safari van, tinted wind, time, Eng spk only. 286-4294. dows, DOS 6.1, word perfect, print at$2,600/.b.fn radio, standard,$16,000. 1983 Toyota Corolla, 2dm, or, a paph antfm cars, ac, naming shop progratis. 252-2664. dty N., $2,600/obo. 252-2287. ac, hmf ai~tnad$600 93Tyt ool,2r c m oards, 34K miles. 287-6898. 289-4142. far cass. gd cond, $2,700/obo. 29, 34K milaes.T28-6898 Sega w/10 games, new; portable am9fm, 42,000 miles, grt shape, l9/c Chevlazepsp,5spdV6, 3649 1991 Ford Taurus station wagon, stereo w/rd player; eler drun set. amf,4,00mls rtsae 95 hvBaer s b 5pV, -one owiter, $8,600. 261-4872. 282-4635. $13,800. 284-5397. new tires, runs grt, $4,500. 2891991 DodgeShadow,2.2L,$8,000. -19' open fisherman, Yamaha 90 -4635_ 4166. Steel bumper for '90-'94 Dodge 1988 Chrysler LeBaron coupe, tur1994 w/30 hours. Fully loaded, Majestic car radio/tape player $30, 1986 Audi l00rd, pa, ph, Pl, pin' Shadow. 287-3632. bo, many new parts, looks and runs $12,000. 1991 Evinrude70w/new SNES Mortal Combat $35, Street auto, stereow/d,dtypd.Grtond, 1984 Chev Cavalier, 5spd, pa, ph, -grt, $5,750. 264-3191. 1994 powerhead. Includes all conFighter 1 $35, Star Fox $20, Mario $6,100.252-1270. grt road, $2,500. 284-6672. 1981 Chevy Monza, dty pd, runs --trols, $3,000. 252-5024. $10, 1 Nes $5. 286-4674. 1991 Aerostar, extended towing 1992CanmaroRS,V8,5spd,ac,am/ get, pb, ps, ac, $2,250/neg. 286Outboard motor bracket stainless 2Fisher speakers, air dyne 80hms, package, am/fm cuss, a/c needs mefm rats, 19K miles, cellular phone, steel, 20hp, I15lbs, new in the box, 60w, $25ea; Yorx sound speaker pair, $11,500. 284-4695. $11,950.289-4247. 1988 Pontiac LeMans, 4dr, new .$100. Outboard motor 15hp extras $100.286-4023. 1993Maza 66 hachbck sN 991 ercry apriroaeetble brakes, belts, 50K miles, ac, ps, ph Ia home art instruction, acrylic atnd $615. 287-4020 1993 Mazda 626 hatchback, 5spd, 1991 Mercury Capr convertible, an/fm cars, 5mpg, $6,000/obo' oil painting, water, color, charcoal. -2 ---Laptop comp w/word perfect 5.1, a/c tinted wind, ex cond, dty pd, ac, pw,newbreaksandtires,$8,400. 28-49 afte 5pm Freedom ofexpression and creativ30' fbg sailboat dsl,loadediw/equip, wind and Right writer, I mo old, $17,000/obo. 260-9700. 287-4692. 286-4693 after 5pm. ity._260-3433. $22,500. 252-5103. $1,300.283-5617. 19874-Runner,4x4, USspec,4cyl, 1991 Ford Ranger XLT w/match1981 Olds Cutlars station wagon, House work, no iron, M-F 8an1994 Yataha 9.9 Marineoutboard Roland EP-7 digital piano w/midi not dly pd, needs work, $6,900. ing camper shell. 29K miles, 5spd, diesel, rebuilt fuel -s 230-0387. 2pm. 286-3952. capability, $700. 284-3481. 252-2906. ar, ps, ph, not dty pd. 287-5536. 99GeoTrakerLSl,44,engine, long leg w/ all acc, new in 1993GessrnBkeebrI,4x4,pdexcMother w/1l0mo old watch your b, $1,100.232-6971. Amigo 500 w/1084S monitor and 1993 Nissan Bluebird, dip pd, u/c, 1988 Ford Bronco XLT4x4, 5.8L, cond, 5spd, hard top, cass, $9,500. child._M-Fdaytime._283-6322 Star NX 1000 printer, sote softam/fit, tinted wind, aarm, auto, auto, ps, ph pin, an/fm cas, ex 287-5933. -Fin-nor Tycoon 4/o rod only for ware,$300/obo.286-4899. low iles, $13,500. 236-0984. cond, $12,500. 289-3234. 1982 BMW 528E, gd cond, power Math tutor/teacher, $20per hour. trolling, 30ths test, all black, new, 1982BMW528Easgdondpowe 256-6888/6830. $450.229-1578. IBM compatible,386SXdualdrive. SdzukiSaauri,RxR,hardtop,dty 1992GranAmPontiac,aqua,loadpackage,USspecs,sunroof,$7,000/ -----------Imb Ram, 50mhz, VGA monitor, pd, $2.700.252-8183. ed,$l0,900/teg. 1988 Chrysler Le neg.286-6699. Daytime maid or babysitter. 262Sea Doo 1992 Jet Ski, tw rend, muse, printer, software, $1,500/ 1983 CJ-7 Jeep. Laredo package, Baron, $4,500. Misc tires 13-15", 1991 Mitsubishi Galant super sa1660 8am-3:30pm. many etras,60h h perform e neg. 287-4428. 1983CJ-7Jee. Laedopackge,intraler, iypdN under inarranty,

PAGE 27

Classified Ads roc T es 27" Sony Trinitron TV w/remote Smoked glass top dinette for4, blk, AtPCCcomplab-brownaccordian4 drawer chest $65, security gate saddlebag briefcase $75.286-3773. Qtrs 666D, 7an noon. and stand $550, Panasonic VCR exccond$250.Foldoutblkloveseat, stylefileenvelopew/importanldata $6, baby clothes-neg. 286-3484. $175, S"E]86 comp 40mb hdt, dual new $165. 260-31 68. diskettes, reward. 252-1035. Sears Craftsman 4.0L lawn mower, Qtrs 254B Aibrook, 7am. floppy, monitor, printer $760.260-Toddlercarseat $15, children's bed 20" cutcatchbag, adjustablewheels, 3433 Dinette set w/6 wicker chairs, glass Long hairgreyratin Cutndu. Nane safety rails $15, funtime infant seat like new, $200/neg. 287-4428. top, $300/obo. 269-7840. is Frank, pink flea collar, tags, re$30, new auto bottle warmer $8. 386SX comp, CD Rom, 8mb Ram, ward. 286-6487. 252-2042. Small block Cbevy 2 BBL intake dual drives, software inrlnde manifold, two2BBL carbts$20comArmy NCO needs Army dress blaes Panasonir printer. 286-6522 ter and assorted colors 6x6. 252-5124. Rattat wine rark$10, portable car plete. 283-3485. coat. Will sap 4 fr 44 re o misce~la ous rnp $40,. mateit clohes swatfoh4 ego 5pm. Queen size waterbed, water tubes, tted Judo suit $10, lady soes size Radiator(2core)smallblockChevy, long, or will consider Purchase if nice, $300. 264-4105. 3. 252-2042. fits many GM cars $50; other mis price is rig F undpasA/c generator, 100KW, 3 phase pars.283-3485. Certifiedphysicaltherapisttocome Sofa w/3 cushions, exe cond, $700/ 240, 208, 120 volts and more, GE. Baby clothes, summer and winter, to my home twice a week, Cor obo. 228-4514. Electrical end only -needs diesel or nb-24 mos. 286-6489 after noon. Iron tables40"x30" glass tops$150; a Gd hourly rate. 252-2034. Kitten on Albrook it vicinity of prime mover, $3,500. 256-6816. 63x39formicatop$150;imelaldesk Bldg 809. Orange and gray striped. Girls bedroom set $300; coffee mid FSU gen Psychology book 4th edi30x60 new paint $150. 226-1158. 1955/56 Cristobal High School 252-2066. side table $60; tuner and speakers Weight bench w/weights, one long lion, $45. 287-5897. gr1dCato bancook $70, bycicles $80 and $75; box bar,2dumbbellbars,approx I 101bs, Bassinettew/matt,cover,andsheets gradnalion/remembrance book. spring $30. 287-4877. $125/obo. 287-6883. Golfclubsw/bagandpullcart$250; $35; box of maternity clothes sz 252-699 H2 balba ofas $8ea, patio table27" Soty Trinitron colorTV $375; recliner $100; misc baby items; small$30;aerobicstepper w/exerCampershellforfullsizep/utruck, 2pabic s$f5s0$8. ep be27"3325 qeny iz w co T, $375; apartmentsizedryer$40. 287-4786. cise tape $22. 287-4938Dodge 8'longx6'wide. 287-4020. Whilpol tye, rea clord, plastic $50. 261-3325. qaeen size waterbed w/head board Whirlpool dryer, clean colored, fre$375. 221-1181. Porcelain doll inantiquewhitebridal Whirlpool portable dishwasher Ford Fseries 4x4 truck. Late model 5spd, 3 temp needs heating elem, Kingsizewaterbed w/6drawers,usigown $60; SNES Street Fighter II $200; Almiral freezer $475; sofa $50/obo. 283-6737. dercarriage and storage, dk wood, Side by side refrig/frezer $800; Tnrbocartridge$45. 286-6196. slee rqueensize$550.286-4023good road. 252-2906. exccond,$175.260-441Iafter4pm. 18,000 BTU Whirlpool a/c $300; Battery baby swing, grt cond, $45; 16,000 BTU a/c $90. 287-3607/ 3/4k pearshaped diamond ring, 14k Fence, 100 ftw/12 poles $150as is; Sire 7 or 8 pink frilly/fancy girls electrictypewriter $35;babywalkExtra large Mayag washer/dryer, 3959. gold, colour -, clarity SIl, $3,800. 10 plants, $1 each. 286-6179. dress to borrow, rent or purchase. er $15; upright freezer $50. 26 1exc cond, $800. 287-5038. 260-6199. 252-8654 for Charlotte 1541. Ladies' 18K Egyption-like neck2 f charotte Refrig General Electric, l9cu ft, gd lace, $800. 226-8516.Wedding dress size 5/6 $75, wedMotor C cles Ham radio operator willing to help Bunk bed and dresser. 286-6522 cond,$475;recliner,gdcond,$175. ding ring set, whitegold $100; 19" after 5pm. 226-2012. New Nintendo w/4 controllers, 7 color Boy Scouts participate in 37th Jamgames and gun, $65. 286-4272. 1976 Montessa348Codatrialsbike. boree-on-the-Air for several hours Whirlpool washer/dryer $375; 3pr LR set, modern design, gitcond, Blue recliner $325, 61/2' artificial Gd cond, many spare parts. $750/ on the weekend of Oct. 15. 28418,000 BTU ac $250. 252-2421. $475/aba. 232-5419. Technics SA-110 stereo receiver, Christmas tree $50. 286-4023. obo. 261-2550. 3335. exc cond, $100; Alpinetrackercross 2 twin canopy beds, hutch, Dresser$150, swingset $200.287country skier$160. 264-7572. Women's shoes size 8-9, $7-10; 1994SuzukiGSX75OFKalanaperBaby food jars, 4oz size w/lids. nightstand and dresser, 12x 18 mg, 6939. exercise clothes size small; wind fertcond,less than IKmiles.$7,100/ 284-6894. drapes for 800 area livingroom w/ Girl's stroller,likenew, pink,Gracr valances.287-4788. oba. 263-4671. rods, couch. 287-6739. Cuckoo clocks from the Black Fortop of the line, $80. 229-1578. est, hand carved, authentic. 287Crib sheet sets, 7pe sleeping bears 1980 Honda Odyssey, 250cr, 4 289-4037. 24,O00BTU ac $375; 10,000 BTU 5897. Chevy parts -brake booster and design $50, 6pc baby Disney colwheel, completely rebuilt, ready to ac $250; submersible 5hp pump for alternator,like new,$200-$175/obo. election $40. 2874788 break-in, $850. 252-2889. Little ikesjungle gym, $100289water well, 220 volt $1,200. 252Twi bed w/matt, red metal frae, 252-6956. 2207. like new, $100. 286-4677. Boogieboard, new,$50; skateboard 1987 Yamaha 200ce, USspecs,dty Scuba-Beauchat BCD like new $20; phones $10;lady's sweaterspd,lowmileage,$1,000.286-4628. Amy major's insignia, sew on, pin Luxurysolid oak dining twm set, Blue curtains $5; Kenmore micro $250, DacorSPG new w/compass sm p.252-5185 1989 Honda Trans-Alp, exc road, tabsetd. 284-6595. chairs, like new$850,9x12 carpets$150; swing set $40; GE 19.6cu It $150. 269-5180 exi 1003. ml.2259 17K od rn-leccod asec 8-55 Ligt blue, latnps. 229-2916. refrig w/inside ice maker $750; BR English 1102, Little Brown Reader 17K miles, on and off road cap, set w/hutch and lights, solid pine, 320 Olympic wt set w/multi-ase book. 286-4776. $3,300.260-9899. People interested in Lougaberger 5,000 BTU ac $75. baby stroller, $1,100.252-2028. heavy bench, attachments, baskets, Christmas brochure now portacrib,weedeater,exercisebike. dumbells, $800/obo. 289-5764. Jr Jobe spirit skis; skurfer. 2521982 Yamaha 750 Seca 4cyl, no avail. 284-4239. 286-6177. Sentury safe 1250, like new. 2526929. registration, runs well, needs paint, DM and players for AD&D and/or 5143. Surfboard spectrum $100, Super $500. 287-4790 after Spi. DM and py or aD&D and/o Whirlpool freezer, standup $200. Nintendo games $40ea. 286-3732. Power-walk plus treadmill, new. 252-2906. Sofa sleeper queen size, exc cond, 264-9212. Yamaha bike for parts, $80. 226ronment. 284-3920. $450/abo. 282-4635. Cat travel cage $10, cane window 1158. Sony Betman; Danish entertainblind 84x60 $10.284-4625. Oaktable/wineglassandboltlerack -lem on 1985 Cadillac Fieetwood meant set, Danish twin bed w/drawGE dryer, 1 1/2 yrs old, like new, -$45, childcareseat$25. 252-2143. n gasoine. 260-3363. -r; Danish d/rw/cbiaa; Danish wht $300/obo. 252-6016. 18K diamond ring. 232-4273 after Pati s gasoline.260-3363. corner lamp; SC word processor, Six drawer dresser $30/obo. 2845ps. s Bottle-huge glass $35, lamp base, C Eng spking maid, live-in, Mon-Sat, 3.5 drive. 236-0984. 4787. Wedding dresses Size 10, $85$45. dresser long 12 drawer iahagony 2300A Las Cruces St, Balboa, -must have ref, gd w/kids and dogs. 284-5422. $360, art easel. 264-9228. lOan 287-5327. Twin bed,bxu spring and frame, White wrought iron patio set, 2 -Ac service and repair for any kind Qtrs 403A Amador, 7am-2p new-never used, $200.252-2676. lounges and table, $50. 252-1218. Woman'sdressshoes,new,various ofcarsandhouses,low prices. 228Eng spring maid wanted, live-in, Sofa bed and Queen Anne chair colors satin cloth, size 7,$30. 2640201. Qtrs 6 Clayton, 8-11 am. care for 3 mo old, cook, and clean. Q-size waterbed, exc coand, barely 5422. 287-6961. $850,Osterkitchen center $100, all used, $500. 226-6851. Century car seat, like new, $65; Qtrs 613B Howard, 7am-noon. like new. 226-8516. Albums,exccond,$3ea.284-5685. Pentax 35mm w/2 lena, $125.264Maid live-in,refrequired.226-5436. Broyhill BR set 5pc $1,200; rocker 3798 Qrs 1106D Clayton, 7-1 l am. 21" colorTV, round maple table w/ victorian $225; book shelves $55; Corcoran II jump boots, worn 3 3798Bassett hound puppy. 286-6338. 4 chairs; 12x15 blue rug w/pad. rocker Bentwood $190. 264-9228. times, 91/2D, $60; new video tape Carpet, sIateblueandtan,$60;wonQtrs 656B Clayton, 7am-noon. 287-5021. -eidr1;bb ae$;2pis e' ie lotnwRoommate needed to share nice 3 DR set carved mahogany w/10 rewinder$12 by gate $7;2pairs men's bike, moat aew,$100, womQtrs 925B Clayton, 7am-2pm. bedroom house. Yard, quiet area, Ironwroughtterracefurniture, suitchairs $4 300 268-1253. -men's boots never worn size 81/2 $450.260-9899. cases, misc iteins. 223-8159 after 10 Nintendo games $10ea; $45.287-6672. Qtrs 318A Albrook, 3-6pm today 5pm. Danish LR set, 2 chairs, sofa, table, Savdorian hammock $60; men's Fenceand 8am-2pm Saturday. Babies, Midge, Ken etc. From Cne200.260-5682.m shirts $30. 260-5747. 1959-1970, also clothes d arc. Curtains for Howard Tropics housyou take down, $400/obo. 286Qtrs 97A Howard, 7am. 286-6196. ing. Set of 10 for $250/obo. 2845,000BTU ac, 15 1/2x26x17,$125. Almond sofa$200/obo;girl'sshoes 4933. Qrs 1993A Curndu, 7-1lam. SGI U.S.A. member. 282-3036. 4394. 287-6597. 51/2-61/2,homemade clothesupto 12 BTU National ac, needs camCrib w/matt like new $150, baby Tan sofa and loveseat $1,100, en3T, boys homemade clothes upto 6 pressor, 7 yrs old, $70. 236-0984. Qtrs 2002B Curunda, 7-1 lam. Tutor for college Algebra and Trig comf set $25, mobile $10, other tertainmentrenter, coffeetable, end mos. 283-6231. K. Weekdays.260-7386. baby items. 283-3470. table, carpets, VCR, stepper exerMonanie ~pehkeeKeepsaferwireleashome alsarmw/2 Qtrs 180 NortoaSt Howard, 6-9sam wekas26-3. ise machine. 2823783. r Mountair bike, 10speed bike, electransinitters, $120. 260-9743. Qtrs 1053D Clayton, 7am-noon. Replacement pieces for Franciscan King size wered, sheets, pad, triguitarw/amplifiesand allac, pattern dinner ware, especially rails, bookcase, head board, $350. Baby crib, walker and other baby PCC business book.252-2845. Largecage,5x3x2,$100.284-4183. Qtrs 2038A 3rd St Curundu, 7ambowls. 252-1298. 284-3979. items. 286-4595. 3 Wrangler AT tires, 45-75R-15, CDplayer$125,14" colorTV$125, noon Horseback rides fr trail rides at Kenmore heavy duty largecapacity Almost new stove and refrig. 26020K miles, $25ea. 261-4065. VCR $100, double mattress $50, Qtrs 5O6B Clayton, 7-lam. Vera Cruz (near Kobbe), reasoncoaster oven $20. 287-5634Qts0iblatn7-lm e ratCuzes. 52-2889. son washer/dryer, almost new, $700. 8528. Small block Ford cyl heads, 58CC Number 28 Calle 40, Bella Vista. rates. 252-2889. 284-6533. King size waterbed w/8 drawers crossed chambers, will fit 289 or Garcia rod/reel $25; 75' hose $20; Dependable, housekeeper to work Nottingwood pine kittg size andssoragemabine l2speed bike, 302, makeoffer. 287-6484. small kennel $20; ax $15; leather Qtrs 183 Howard, 7-1lam. Mon-Fri. 269-7879. waterbed. Many arc included $700. clothes, shoes, Tupperware, Tandy Trek mountain bike$400;littletykes 284-3898. 1000 comp, sofaw/double bed and party kitchen $35; NXI 00O star Lg Kenmore washer used oe loveseat. 284-6688. printer $80; JBL L100S speakers exc cond, $250. 289-3360. Floral sofa bed-queen size $600; $600. 286-4439. Bassett dining set w/6 chairs, 3 Children's clothes, shoes and toys; Tropic Times Ad Form Longabergerbaskets, canheordered leaves, light wood $500.284-3481. queensizecomforter$20.287-4420. and shipped byChristmas.260-3533 after 6pm. Dinette set w/4 chairs $200, Flex Elec water heater $75, wood table F ANIMALS Force w/stair stepper $125, type80x40 $100, store display cabinet [: AUTOMOBILES German anniversary clark, doif writer$75. 284-6184 for Denise. $100, computer cart $60, airpurifi] AVAILABLE pednalum won't stay spinning, $20. Sofa w/rerliner, dark Sante Fe coler $150.226-8626/3278. L BOATS & CAMPERS 264-3338. ors $400; 2 med size nice round Wedding slip, full, $55. 252-6649. L ELECTRONICS PRICE __HOME PHONE tables $50ea. 286-4674. -[] FOUND JVC speakers, 3 way 3 speakers Lawnmower, 3.5hp,20",$95; Huffy E HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each bass, 15wx35hxI2d, 120-200watts, LR set w/4 tables $450; LR set w/l 18 speed 26" mountain bike, like 0 LOST week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited $150.284-5629. table$475; DR set w/4rchairs $400; new cend, $130. 252-5792. O MISCELLANEOUS more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed barw/2highchairs$380.252-2883. E MOTORCYCLES below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This Sofa, love seat i/oak trim and Entertainment center $150, Yaesu D PATIO SALES information will not be released to third parties. Deadline forthereceipt matching solid oak coffee table. BR set, queen size, wall-to-wall 2w transiever w/charger $200, ] WANTED of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are un on a space Southwest colors and 2 matching headboard, dresser $1,500/obo; Huffy bikes $100ea, bunk beds availablebasisandthestaffrmakesnoguaranteeofadsrunning.Ads must lamps, $950/obo. 286-4127. wedding dress $300/obo;high chair $200, Yaesu trans $600, 287-5839 include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, 6p girl's Fnchbedroom $10. 287-3632 after 5pm. Unit 0936, A PO AA 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the A lbrook Post betainax and 6 tapes, Nintendo w/3 Whirlpool 18' refrig/freezer w/ice Casio tone keyboard w/stand $60, Office. Ads offering Weapons, real estate or sent by FAX Will not be games. 260-5947. maker,perfectcond,$350/obo. 264Body by Jake w/accys $75. 233Overstuffed roach, loveseat. chair, 1462 0974-SPONSOR'S NAME __ RANK/GRADE blk leather, xcr ond, $1,000/obo. 2 Lg 4 sectional swing set w/swings, glass top coffee/end tables $175. glider, slide, rings, monkey bars, ORG. DUTY PHONE 260-3168. bench swing, $75. 284-6395.

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B12 Tropic Times potpourri B1 .7,99 Brain rs nigh thbuet 6-8:30 p.m. Satu day. HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming vetBrirr Hous nigh t 6-8:30 p.m. unaw erao preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming education and a copy of CASP notice of rating if applicable. Submit a copy of *Officers' Club: 282-3439 Dining room is closed Sunday through Thursday. latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee. The club will be closed to the public for renovations *Howard Enlisted Members' Club -Dming Room: For more information regarding Army vacancy announcements (forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate of through Nov 20. Check cashing service for members will be 2844189 Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 285available 10am 2 pm Monday through Friday. AdditionSunday breakfast buffet 8-12:30 a.m. 5201 ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and *Note: One-on-one employment counseling should be the first during lunch hours 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. a.m. Sardays b step in the job search. New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade Vacancy announcements are also available at the Sundial RecAmador roast beef, turkey, turkey salad and tuna fish sandwiches with reaction Center. all the tirmmings. Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications on a *Club Amador: 2824334 Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. featuring continuous basis for the following positions. Registers established All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring tableside preparation with tuxedo service. from these announcements will be used to fill permanent and temsoup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights. Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Select a porary positions. Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or filet. All steaks are Airmy at noon the first Sunday of each month. .U.S. choice beef. VB# 001 *Genrl Clerial, NM-3 (Used 1 Fill M.s iiilel The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during VB# OA *eniFamily menu Tuesdays-Fridays featuring all the past faVB#002 sales Ssir Cheker, NM-3 (lreni wk sch) renovations of the Quarry Heights Officers' Club. vorites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand made 1/ CASP Examination (CEO, onoice foe ing) is reqird. C layton 2 pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more. VB# 003 Rceain Assisant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Reqoires Cer + 6 no -3035 Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or recr 04tion e n ni Ne iL take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot VB# 04 Recrin Assst, NM-4 (Req 6 mes rrtinxp in the field. CJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m-I p.m. wings. VB#005 seway (Stenography), NM-S Mondays-Fridays. The bar and grill now opens noon Saturwings. vB#005A Sereary (5senography), NM-S Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom : 284VB# 006 Seruy (Typing/Ofefic Aoimaion), NM-5 days-Sundays for football game viewing and at 3:30 p.m. 418l Vu# 006A Seenty (Typing/Office Auoatio), NM-6 Sundays for pool tournaments. rd. m VB# 017 Adminisive Serviees Aistan., NM-5. Limied to pennonenl Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music WednesFriday night disco 4:30 p.m.1 a.m. today. stasa employees only. days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sundays. Columbus Day all night disco 8 a.m.-5 a.m. Sunday. VB#a 7 dpeinsrSly. For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or CJ's Party all night until Monday. Ths foellowing potion n Pennip. F.S-tin-ie, i onot. Sports Bar, call 287-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343. *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove: VB# 007 MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 1213/14. *NCOtyClub: 287-4716 284g4189 VB#008 CLINICAL NURSE (RN lices niqied), NM-9/10/11. The Forum Restaurant opens 5-9 p.m. daily. Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays. VB 009 t* PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licen roqined), NM-5. Mexican buffet Mondays. Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-l am. vu 19iEMRENYMOiALTCHNIcIAN, NM-Meica bufe Moday. VB#019 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TE -640-4/5/6. Steak night Tuesdays. A la carte menu is available. Monday night football and mug special in the lounge. *Selectees for ure, medical office and EMT positions required 0 Country buffet Wednesdays features barbecue pork ribs, Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcorn and nachos. backgmound check.ConrbuftWdedyfetrsbbceprkis bkgudhhkfried chicken, pork knuckles, collards greens, sweet potato, Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesdays. vR# VAcANCIS, TITLE AND LOCATION. OPEN: is-u7-94 CLOSE: rie, black-eyed peas and com bread. Free Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. 10# ACAN All-you-cam-eat family buffet Thursdays. Wednesdays in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line danc001.95-MW SUPERVISORY PRODUCTION CONTROLLER, NM-n552-9. Seafood buffet Fridays features broiled lobster, garlic ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midDOL, Mainienince Din. Prouction, Plant Connol, Coal. shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab. night. 12-oz prime rib special Saturdays. Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with 002-95-LA MAINTENANCE WORKER, MG-47S9-8. TSB, 106 h Signal Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m. your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills. BrigadeComzal. NOTE: Drivr's license reqired. Driv 3/4 9 on ice. Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. SunRock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays; 5 p.m.003-95-LA COMMUNICATIONS CLERK (OA), NM-394-5. SENSITVE. days and Mondays. midnight Thursdays. 106th ignal Bigad, Alanic Ane Dnachtent Pt. Can. NOTE: Seuriy Disco 9 p.m. Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. There Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. will be a midnight buffet. *Top Three Club: 284-4189 004-95-MW CONTRACT SPECIALIST, NM-1102-5/7/9. Dirbcorate of Karaoke 6 p.m. Fridays. Coantracing, Contract Admin. Div,. C z. NOTE: Candidate -.s If.Alroo Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat and buccalaunate degien including on supplemented by at Ils 24 scmester hoas in duiy. economics business law, procurement. o mnuagntenl-relaed studies. *Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582 complimentary taco bar. Position is tdcelpetld may be fined a any inteig god. If cndidate Tonight's entertainment rock & reggae with Rip Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. Members is sected on tiup ap, candidates must rerompein for higher t1-l. Maynard in the lounge and club card drawing. must have a card and be present to win. 005-95-LA MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (OA), NM-344-7. SENSITIVE. Sunday saloon breakfast specials 10 am.-I p.m. in the Club closed Saturdays. 106th Signal Brigade, DOIM, Installion Records Mgmt Office, Ft. Clayton. lounge. Choose from three menus. NOTE: Security clearance is ",fired. when working in am Records Holding Rod6 pn Area, mne climbing and lifting p to 50 lbs. boxes may be required. Mini gourmet night 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday. Join us for a Rodman romantic seven course dinner with elegant service and atmo*Rodman Club -Open to all ranks: 283-4498 006-95-SS ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER, NM-341-9. SENSITIVE. shr.Attd dutet43-1.wt opietr Directorate of Conunmty Activities Office an tin Diretoa, Ft. Clayton. NOTE: sphere. Attitude Adjustment 4:30-11 p.m. with complimentary Security cleance is required. Howard/Albrook Officers Spouses' Club annual fall hors d'oeuvres served 5-7 p.m. Live music 6:30-11 p.m. 007-95-ES ANIMAL HEALTH TECHNICIA, N-. USA MEDAC, bazaar 10 am.-3 p.m. Oct. 15. Free shuttle bus to and from All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 am.-I GACH, Veaeinary Service, Co mal. NOTE: Knowledge of English/Spanish. Albrook Post Office. p.m. Mondays-Fridays. Limited a MEDDAC/DENTAC pnrmanen employee, however applications for Sunday champagne brunch 10 am-I p.m. in the dinMonday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with allTecp Nr: 30 Sep 95, will ho aereptod fromall snces. ing room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, you-can-eat taco bar at the Laguna Lounge. 009-95-NC ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT OPERATOR, NM-5716-8. HQ, roast beef, fresh fruits, breakfast and lunch items and ice Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu USAG. DEH, Operations Dio. Pasinol Soc., Conan. NOTE: Dinr's license cream bar. is also available. ronuined. Mongolian barbecue 5:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Choose Al-you-can-eat beef and burgundy 4:30-8:30 p.m. 010-95-NC AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT MECHANIC, MG-5306-8. the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have chefs do the Wednesdays. Grill menu is also available. HQ, USAG, DEH Oration Di., Elcochanical B, Ref&AIC Se., Coal-. job outside on the open grills. Enjoy live music. Open Mike night 6-11 p.m. Thursdays in the Laguna 011-95-NC EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT (OA), NM-203-5. Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursdays includes Lounge. USAG, Direclorate of Civilian Persoonel, LERIr&D Di,., Clayton. NOTE: tacos, fajitas, taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. After dinCook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday QOaifired "yit. ner dance the night way to country western music. at the Rodman n 4m. 0i2-95-NC COMPUTER ASSISTANT, NM-335-5. Temp Nb: 09-30-95. Country western night Thursdays with free dance lesas tie Rodman Boyo. DODDS-Panama Disrie, Blboa High School. sons at 7:30-10:30 p.m. Leam the two-step, line and couples Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. 014-95-in BUDGET ASSISTANT (OA), NM-561-6/7. USARSO, DCS, dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. p.m. Fridays.-Saturdays. Rsorce Mgnm Progoam, Budget Di,., Ft. Claylon. NOTE: Pstionis Howard Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays Thursdays; 6dvlopmesinl a NM-7. If mandidase is sliced soenyv appi, padidame nasil compete for higher le)e. *Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718 9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays. 015-95-JH COMPUTER PROGRAMER ANALYST, NM-334-1i. Tenp Nie: Weekday lunches includes buffet, salad and potato bar. *Rodman Annex: 283-4498 t9-30-95. DODDS-Pana Distlia. Dincears Offic, Albook. NOTE: Limited Friday and Saturday nights 6-8:30 p.m. order a la carte Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays. aospreference eligibhs only. in the dining room. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu I I a.m.017-95-IH SECURITY CLERK (OA), NM-303-5. SENSITIVE. USAG, DCP, Friday evenings in the lounge include beer specials, 1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. TSD, Proessing and Rpors B,., CorozA. NOTE: Ser.iy clerance is eqined. music, games and club card drawings. The club is closed for evening and weekend service. 018-95-VL EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, NM-640-5. Temp Ne: 09-30-95. USA MEDDAC. GAGH, Deparmno of Nosing, A-n. 01 9,5KF BDGET ASITANT (OA, NM-561-5. DCSRM, PngrnBudgel Di-, C-inrdoled Be/gel S31, Ft. Clnyli. C FM s h d l 020-95-K PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST, NM-1035-9. SENSITIVE. USAG, Pobnie Affais Of5c., Pohie Infontion, Fl. CIiylon. NOTE: Seouiy Southern Command Network 7-9min Urbati Music with Don Storm" -mellow urban etooe isreifd. Biiograt. Diamond F radio airs 91.5 PaTracy and LaRita music &tejarzmusic 021-95-SS CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES COORDINATOR, NMShelby 9pmmidnight Adult Rock 1701-12. USAG, Child Devlopmnt Sris, Ft. Clan. NOTE: Seot will F'fie k9 be equied a. andergooa backgrond check. Limited to pc ,entemloy enly. dial with live Diamond FM shows 9i-ilpli Diamond FvI Rock 022-94-ES (2) PSYCHIATRIC NURSINGASSISTANT,NM-621-5. Tonp Na: at F and A1 ajm., 3 p.m. weekB -B k album rck Sundays 0-30 95. Ianiiritoent. USA MEDDAC Dopi of Noising. Psychiatric wand. days;9at,,4 and 9Ip~ Satur. Ipmt-Sam Unistar Adult Rock : 025.94-ES (24) Meica Office (gnal poade).9-9:aM Cross Currentsmonth. 1d Ma e, Fl s (/pi1m.hift ,t. Pranmni hana in tquiniSan Roc Nose: 479-94-IH Saperisry Media lufomaiti Spemia6it., NM-1001-11 is W 12:dy5-2ans Adiolt Rock Fathe Ha R k amended to mad, Tenp Ne: 4 months. AdltocktPUSIM 0 3-95-NC5-9am Diamond FM morning -9am Adult Contemporary 1-11ai2OtheCountdownMagaEtec ical Shop. Ft. DaIsI. NOTE: Dmri Uice a os/Hid. crew, music and laughs music zinc Christiao mIic 9:05-11arn Country Music w/Gaen 9am-Noon Diamond FM Weekend ondw 023-94-ES LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE, NM-620-5. Shift work. Pr,&Har Newman coundiownI 1-FM tuTe tz USA MEDDAC/DENTAC-Pana,, Ft. Shmoan. NOTE: Liniaed t, MEDDAC/ Price, Harry Newinai Mic Mix Il-noon All That Jaz DENTAC poanoienmplye.s hwer appliions for Tenp Na: 30 Sep 95, 11am-lpm Diamond Cafe -oldies Noon4pn American top 40 w/ Noon4pmn American Country will hoccepsed fron aS slices. US. irce request, 287-4512 Shadoe, Stevens Conuntdowin w/Bob The Howard Enisted Members' Club announces jb openings. All inieresaed -3pm Unistar adult rock 4-6pm Diamond FM "Canal Kingsley 170)1. silhbml o' inan ReonOffN-a Bpridg 70 .Hloyrd Ar rmpm Diamond FM "After Country" (requests at 4-7pm Dick Clark's Rock, Roll 7b H, noon Cartunes," music 287-4514) and Remember, oldies wF-745-fl Ocleode,. ($347.25) & fun 6-8pin The Countdown -Soul 7-mnidnight Adult Contemporary WF-4749-i I Ce:k ($5.44-Sl 146) -'s Charlie Tuna countdown niusic