Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



Gift of the Panama Canal Museum
?3sk .1


Tropic


Times


Vol. VII. No. 39


Ouarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Friday, Sept. 30, 1994


Panama's new

president tries to

woo Washington
PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - Panama's new president is
wooing Washington in a bid to change the ruling party's
image from a one-time nemesis of the United States to a key
ally in Latin America, analysts say.
Ernesto Perez Balladares, a stalwart of the party that
backed former dictator Manuel Noriega, has extended
several olive branches to the United States since taking
office on Sept. 1.
The day after his inauguration, Perez Balladares offered
to help the United States cope with an influx of Cuban boat
people by taking in up to 10,000 refugees for a limited time.
A few weeks later, he offered Haitian strongman Raoul
Cedras asylum in Panama if that would avert a U.S.
invasion.
Although Haiti's leaders may not need the haven after
striking a deal with U.S. negotiators, Panama has said its
offer still stands.
"We have come to the rescue of our friends twice in our
first 15 days of office," Gabriel Lewis, Panama's foreign
minister, recently told reporters.
Analysts say the U.S.-educated Perez Balladares hopes
to ease concerns in Washington about the return to power
of Noriega's party less than five years since the 1989 U.S.
invasion that toppled Noriega and sent him to aFloridajail.
"Perez Balladares wants the United States to know his
government will bear little resemblance to Noriega's,"
Ambler Moss, the director of the University of Miami's
North-South Center, told Reuters.
U.S. forces briefly detained Perez Balladares, then a
prominent party official, after the invasion. He had served
as the campaign manager o2'Noriega's hand-picked candi-
date in the fraud-marred 1988 elections that set the stage for
the U.S. intervention.
Perez Balladares tried to put the dark days behind him,
telling voters during the election campaign that the Demo-
cratic Revolutionary Party had been "reborn," and he
urged both Panamanians and Americans to forgive and
forget.
Analysts say Perez Balladares won on a campaign
platform promising more aid for Panama's poor who had
benefited little from a post-invasion economic boom.
Before his inauguration, Perez Balladares met with
President Clinton in the United States and pledged to crack
down on huge flows of drug profits being illegally laun-
dered in Panama's economy-a point of contention be-
tween both nations since the Noriega years.
U.S. officials have reacted warmly to Perez Balladares,
according to analysts, although one U.S. official told
Reuters that Washington is taking a "wait-and-see atti-
tude."
A former banker with an Ivy League education, Perez
Balladares is cut from the same fabric as recent Latin
American leaders who speak English and curry
Washington's and Wall Street's favor, analysts say.
"Perez Balladares could turn out to be more like (Argen-
tine President Carlos) Menem in his support for the United
States than any other Latin American leader right now,"
Moss said.
And like his Latin American counterparts, Perez Balla-
dares wants Panama to join in the North American Free
Trade Agreement between the United States, Canada and
Mexico.
Panama also needs U.S. help in winning fresh loans
from international lenders and in planning the handover of
the Panama Canal at the decade's end as called for under the
Panama Canal treaties of 1977.
The United States built the canal and has operated it
since 1914.
"We know we can count on the United States when we
need to," Lewis said.



Air Force units lend a hand to "Op-
eration Support Hope" with mis-
sions in Entebbe, Uganda.


Ji


r


I, ~ -


Sgt. Cass Purdum (Tropic Times)
Gen. Barry McCaffrey, U.S. Southern Command commander in chief, sits with Juan Francisco
Pardini, vice president of American Chamber of Commerce and Industry, at a luncheon held
Wednesday at the Union Club in Paitilla. McCaffrey was guest speaker and addressed the
drawdown of U.S. forces in Panama.

McCaffrey talks 'drawdown' at

chamber of commerce luncheon


by Sgt. Cass Purdum
Tropic Times staff
PANAMA CITY - The commander in chief of the U.S.
Southern Command told civic leaders here Wednesday that
the United States will withdraw more than 40 percent of
its forces from Panama during the next 18 months.
Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, addressing members of the
American Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Pana-
ma, touched on a number of subjects during his speech,
including the impact of SOUTHCOM's "Buy Panama"
program, the progress of the drawdown in Panama and
upcoming challenges of treaty implementation.
"Let me begin by telling you that today marks 1,920
days that remain until 1 January 2000," McCaffrey said.
"At that time we will have fully complied with, without
exception, the U.S. government responsibilities under the
Panama Canal Treaty.
"As we look toward the future, over the next two or
three generations, the future of North America is abso-
lutely included in the future of this hemisphere," he said.
"In terms of economics, by the turn of the century we be-
lieve trade with the Americas will exceed trade with Eu-
rope."
Closer to home, the United States and Panama are
charged with the enormous responsibility of carrying out
the treaty. McCaffrey said the drawdown of 10,000 U.S.
troops will not be difficult.
"We can draw down to zero with no difficulty," he said.
"We have taken more than 200,000 military personnel out
of Europe during the last three years. It's not a big chal-
lenge to take 10,000 out of Panama."
The major concern is the impact to civilian employees,
he said. There are 8,000 Panamanians working directly
for the United States or hired by Americans stationed here,
and another 8,000 Panamanian contract employees that
will be affected by the drawdown.
In addition, a projected $450 million in annual salaries



Soldiers from four nations join to-
gether in Arkansas for exercise
"Cabanas '94-11."


are paid to U.S. government employees and more than
$100 million are spent each year by the United States on
goods, services and contracts in Panama.
McCaffrey used graphs to show the 1994 spending in
the "Buy Panama" program. About $140 million was spent
in fiscal year 1994 alone.
"'Buy Panama' is a program we believe in," McCaffrey
said. "We buy roughly 20 percent of the things we use,
here in Panama."
However, as the drawdown continues, demand for prod-
ucts will decrease.
"We will get even more serious about the program in
the future, but clearly, 'Buy Panama' goals will decrease
dramatically over the next years," he said.
"In the next 18 months, we will take approximately 43
percent of military forces out of Panama," McCaffrey said.
"This transition started with the stand-down of the 193rd
Infantry Brigade."
There are still many challenges with the treaty imple-
mentation and drawdown, McCaffrey said. Creating con-
ditions for Panama's successful use of reverted areas,
which include 4,800 buildings and 77,000 acres of land,
attenuating the economic shock of the drawdown to Pan-
ama, and maintaining quality of life for assigned U.S. forc-
es and their family members, are some of the major issues
facing SOUTHCOM today.
The regional missions of the United States will also
continue until 1999. These include counterdrug operations,
air transportation, humanitarian aid and the Navy and Jun-
gle Operations Schools.
McCaffrey said as the U.S. forces continue to leave
Panama, there is a lot of work to be done. "Our agenda is
to move out and that's what we are doing.
"We will be judged by how we handle this important
transition," he said.
"As we look to the future, we recognize, so well, that
the story of the Americas is as much wrapped up in our
future as it was in our past," McCaffrey said.



*G.I. dies in Haiti, Page 4.
*Yale accepts SEAL, Page 12.
*Youth soccer begins, Page 13.


V ul. V A, 11 U. 07


_-- .











2 Tropic Times
Sept. 30, 1994


SBriefly


Suriname addresses for
Distant Haven provided
People in Panama interested in writing
or sending packages to soldiers in
Suriname should address the items as fol-
lows: rank, name and service; unit; JTF-
NS Distant Haven; APO AE 09360-0001.
Print MPS on the upper right comer of the
envelope and put return address. If mail-
ing from CONUS or other locations out-
side of Panama, address the same as above
but mail first class postage. Only letter mail
and small parcels may be mailed. Parcels
must be able to fit in a mailbag.

Families First looking for
volunteers to help out
The Family Advocacy Outreach Pro-
gram is starting a program called "Fami-
lies First" designed to assist new parents.
The program will be supported by volun-
teers working primarily by phone from
their homes. Volunteers must be at least
18 years old, have access to a phone and
be able to make one trip to Gorgas Army
Medical Center. For more information, call
284-6410/6457.


Howard support center
needs donations
The Howard Family Support Center is
taking donations for Cuban migrants com-
ing into Panama. Items needed include col-
oring books, crayons, children's games,
magazines, toys (no stuffed animals),
sports equipment and children's videos
(dubbed or subtitled in Spanish). For more
information, call 284-5650/5910.

Rodman Marina has
moorings for boaters
Rodman Marina has wet moorings.
Active duty military are given priority. To
sign up for a wet mooring, please contact
the Rodman Marina office at 283-3147.

Fewer mosquitoes alter
fumigation program
Because of the drop in mosquito popu-
lation throughout all east bank installa-
tions, the new fumigation schedule is
Monday and Thursdays on Fort Clayton,
Curundu and Corozal, and Tuesdays and
Friday at Albrook, Amador and Quarry
Heights. The fumigation is done 6-9 p.m.

Dental clinic will offer
dental exams to walk-ins
Beginning Monday, Clayton Dental
Clinic will offer routine dental examina-
tions to family members of active duty per-
sonnel on a walk-in basis Tuesdays
through Fridays 1-3 p.m. Family members
may still make appointments on a space-
available basis by calling after 1 p.m. on
Monday. For information or appoint-
ments, call 287-4308.

FSU announces term two
registration schedule
The Florida State University, Panama
Canal Branch, announces the following
registration dates for term two: 9:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m. Oct. 5 in Building 128, Fort
Clayton, for active duty; 12:30-3 p.m. Oct.


Temperature
High: 86
Low: 72

High: 87
Low: 72


Saturday
5:40am C-130 Howard AFB
Niagara Falls, NY (A)
1:45pm C-5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Dover AFB, DE
Sunday
7am B-757 Howard AFB (C,O)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Monday
5:40am C-130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa, Hondurus (CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB
8:40am B-757 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP, GA (C)


5 in Building 128, Fort Clayton for other
than active duty; 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 6
in Building 708, Howard AFB; 9 a.m.-5
p.m. Oct. 11-12 in Building 808, Albrook
AFS; and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 11-12 in
Building 235, Fort Davis. Late registration
will be noon-5 p.m. Oct. 17-18 in Build-
ing 808, Albrook AFS; and 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Oct. 17-18 in Building 235, Fort Davis.
For information, call 285-6922/5222.

Thousands still need to
submit for new COLA
The Fort Clayton Finance and Ac-
counting Office processed nearly 4,500
Cost of Living Allowance transactions in
August. There are still nearly 2,600 sol-
diers not receiving COLA. Unit com-
manders, first sergeants and personnel ser-
vices noncommissioned officers should
continue efforts to identify soldiers. Sol-
diers not receiving COLA must contact
their chain of command. For information,
call 287-4208.

'Just Passin' Through' -
Navy Ball set for Oct. 14
The 1994 Navy Ball will be held 6 p.m.
Oct. 14 at Club Amador. Tickets are $10
for E-6/GS-6 and below and $15 for E-7/
GS-7 and above. For information, call
Navy public affairs at 283-5641/5644.

Army education center
sets new testing hours
The Army education center announces
new testing hours. The new hours are 7:30
a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday in
Building 128, Fort Clayton. For informa-
tion, call 287-5702.

Hispanic heritage
observances scheduled
The following events are scheduled in
observance of National Hispanic Heritage
Month:
Today - Luncheon sponsored by the
92nd Personnel Services Company; Satur-
day - Dominoes tournament, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
at the Clayton bohio, sponsored by the
Puerto Rican community; Wednesday -
Luncheons at the 228th Aviation Regi-
ment and 536th Engineer Battalion dining
facilities; Thursday - Luncheon 11:30
a.m.-1 p.m. at the 92nd Personnel Servic-


Weekend weather
Forecast: Mostly cloudy with intermittent showers and thunderstorms.
Pacific Atlantic
Saturday Saturday
Tides Temperature Tides
12:27 p.m. at 13.1 feet High: 85 8:41 p.m. at 0.9 feet
6:43 p.m. at 3.7 feet Low: 70 2:58 a.m. at 0.0 feet
Sunday Sunday
1:21 p.m. at 14.2 feet High: 86 8:34 p.m. at 0.8 feet
7:39 p.m. at 2.6 feet Low: 71 3:27 a.m. at 0.1 feet


Charleston IAP, SC
Tuesday
5:40am C-141 Howard AFB
Brasilia, Brazil (V,O)
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (0)
Asuncion, Paraguay
Brasilia, Brazil
Wednesday
5:55am C-130 Howard, AFB
San Salvador, El Salvador
(V,CC)
Soto Cano AB (CC)
Howard AFB
5:40am C-141 Howard AFB
Kelly AFB, TX (M)
Jackson, MS


es Company dining facility; and Oct. 7 -
Puerto Rican Youth Festival 6-9 p.m. at
the Fort Clayton Youth Center.

24th Wing PAO sponsors
broadcast program
The 24th Wing Public Affairs Office is
sponsoring a program to help make the
holiday season a little brighter for relatives
in the United States. People can record an
audio holiday greeting to be broadcast on
a radio station in the relatives' home town.
The program is free and open to all U.S.
military and family members. For more
information about the program, call the
24th Wing Public Affairs office, 284-
5554.


New policy limits tuition
assistance for soldiers
Soldiers will now be authorized to take
a maximum of nine semester hours of col-
lege courses per fiscal year at 75 percent
tuition cost, according to a new policy con-
cerning Army tuition assistance effective
October. Tuition assistance will now be
centrally managed at U.S. Total Army Per-
sonnel Command. The intent of this poli-
cy is-to provide soldiers consistent fund-
ing of their education programs as they
move about the Army. The local education
center is available to help soldiers identify
other funding such as Pell Grants, Veter-
ans Education Assistance Program and
Montgomery GI Bill. For information, call
287-5703/3161.

Military clothing still
available on Rodman
During the transition of the Marine
Corps Exchange to the Army and Air
Force Exchange Service, today through
Jan. 31, military clothing will still be avail-
able. Store officials said uniform clothing
sales will be sold at the Marine Corps Ex-
change Country and Package Store, Build-
ing 4, Rodman NS and also through mail
order catalogs. Catalog orders will take
three to four weeks to process.

Spot bid sale, inspection
at Corozal announced
A local spot bid sale and inspection of
items will be held 7:30 a.m. Monday in
Building 745, Corozal. For information,
call 285-4754.

Howard education office
offers ACC course
The Howard Education Office will of-
fer an Air Combat Command course on
"Improving Study and Testing Skills" to
interested military members. The course is
designed to enhance ACC members' per-
formance in off-duty education, on-the-job
training, professional military education,
etc. The course will be taught in two hour


Thursday
5:45am C-5A Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Kelly AFB, TX
Oct. 7
5:40am C130 Howard AFB
Managua, Nicaragua
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
A- Active duty only
US- U.S. passport
O-Overnight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance


blocks, 8 to 10 a.m., Oct. 17-21 in the
Howard Education Center, Building 708.
For more information, call Linda Antoine
at 284-3263/4863.

Volunteers needed for
Women's History Month
Volunteers are needed to plan and or-
ganize activities for the 1995 Howard
AFB Women's History Month observance
scheduled for March. Officials are also
looking for someone - holding the rank
of master sergeant or above - to chair the
observance committee. Anyone interest-
ed may call Tech. Sgt. Jim Johnson at 284-
5358/5309.

WAPS/CDC program
changes explained
There have been a number of changes
to the Air Force Weighted Airman Promo-
tion System and the Career Development
Courses recently that may require a change
in the way airmen study for promotion.
One of the new changes calls for each
member to get their own, personal set of
study materials. For more information on
the new WAPS/CDC issues, members
should call their unit WAPS monitors.

Education center sets
many new test dates
The Army Education Center announc-
es new test dates for Graduate Record Ex-
ams, Graduate Management Admission
Tests, National Teachers' Exams and Au-
tomotive Service Excellence exams. The
new test dates are 7 a.m. Oct. 12, 18 and
25, and Nov. 8, 9 and 15. GRE and NTE
subject exams will be given-at 1 p.m. For
information, call 287-5856.

Commissary agency to
hold anniversary sale
The Defense Commissary Agency will
hold an anniversary sale at commissaries
throughout Panama in October. More than
900 items will be offered at savings of 20-
60 percent.

Area housing mayors'
elections wrapping up
Elections for housing area mayors and
vice-mayors must be completed by Oct.
20. Volunteers are needed to hold those
positions in their prospective areas on and
off post. Mayoral responsibilities include
helping in the administration of the quality
of life program, serving in the Mayoral
Congress, conducting town meetings at
least quarterly, attending quality of life
meetings, serving on congressional com-
mittees and coordinating community
projects with the sponsoring unit. Training
and child care is available. To volunteer,
call Master Sgt. Scott Carr at 287-3716.


All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for higher priority mission
requirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608/
4857.










S Feature


Tropic Times
Sept. 30, 1994 3


a
L~


Panama ganda

i


Senior Airman Steve Smith marshall in the special mission C-130 that deployed to Entebbe,

Senior Airman Steve Smith marshall in the special mission C-130 that deployed to Entebbe,


Pete Gonzalez (U.S. Air Force)
Uganda, in support of Operation Support Hope.


The skies over Entebbe


'Non-deployable' units aid humanitarian mission in Uganda


by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs Office


They said it couldn't be done, but the men and
women of the 310th Airlift Squadron went
ahead and did it anyway.
Responding to a short-notice request from the
Supreme Allied Commander Europe, Gen. George A.
Joulwan, members of the 310th AS, along with other
Howard units, picked up and relocated to distant
Entebbe, Uganda, about two months ago. The last of
those who deployed returned Monday.
During that time, the temporary duty contingent,
including members of the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron
and the 33rd Intelligence Squadron, participated in
Operation Support Hope, a humanitarian mission to
conduct relief operations for displaced people in Rwanda
and adjacent countries.
Uganda, located in eastern Africa near the equator, is
on Rwanda's northern border.
Howard's contribution to the operation were C-130
missions-known as Creek Breeze-through which
information on the status of lines of communication,
refugee camps and volcanic activity in the area were
provided to Support Hope officials.
"We also got very short notice about the deployment,"
said Maj. Jim Keffer, commander of the 24th AIS. "Our
people began preparing immediately to make the
deployment happen, and they did it, even though they
had no previous training and had never even planned for
this type of contingency."
"It was a very real challenge to pick up our operations
and move them 7,000 miles away," said 310th AS
commander Lt. Col. Curt Ross. "Deployable units do this
kind of thing all the time, but we're not set up to be
deployable."
"Deployable" units generally have Tables of Allow-
ances, which list things they'll need "on the road." They
also usually have War Readiness Spares Kits, ready-built
pallets containing most of the items listed on their TAs.
This was not the case with any of the Howard units that
participated in the Entebbe deployment.
"The squadron provided eight experts, including
operational intelligence officers, aerial observers, and a
photo processor, as well as almost a quarter of a million
dollars worth of sensor film and sensor processing
chemicals," said Capt. Mark Makowski, 24th AIS
operations officer.
In order to put it all together from scratch, Ross called
on the experience of Capt. John Philbin, Chief Master
Sgt. Gary Cole, Master Sgt. Jose Morales, and Tech. Sgt.


; ' . " *"* ' " r.

. ..




Pete Gonzalez (U.S. Air Force)
Adrianne puts on a happy face for dad, Senior
Airman Eddie Victorian upon his return from
Uganda as his wife LaShawn looks on.

Johnny Savage.
"These men have nearly 70 years of combined
deployment experience," Ross said. "In a single after-
noon, they came up with a list of everything they thought
we'd need in Entebbe."
'"The experts at the 640th Air Mobility Support
Squadron helped us prepare the pallets, and they said our
people did a better job of palletizing the load than a lot of
the Army people who do this on a regular basis," Cole
said.
On the 24th AIS side, it was primarily Tech. Sgt. Jerry
Walrath who decided the quantity of film and chemicals
that would be needed for "Support Hope," and Senior
Airman Dicki Freeland actually deployed to lend his
technical expertise to a mobile photo processing and
interpretation facility in Entebbe.
A crew of five aerial observers, led by Master Sgt. Jeff
Guay, also deployed to operate sensitive sensor equip-
ment, and to enhance the flight safety for the aircraft and
crew.
The 24th AIS is the only unit in the Air Force that uses
photo interpreters for aircrew duties, Keffer said. "In fact,
I sent more than half of all the aerial observers in the Air
Force to Africa."
The planners apparently did an outstanding job of
determining and compiling their mission requirements, as
the 310th maintained a 100 percent mission rate in
Uganda, and the 24th AIS shot and processed 41 rolls of
film.
"That isn't 35mm film we're talking about here,"
Keffer explained. "Our film comes in rolls five inches
wide and 2,000 feet long, which means we shot more than
15 1/2 miles of film in Entebbe."
Deploying such a large portion of a unit might have
had an adverse effect on some units, but officials say "not


so" for the 310th.
"I can't give enough credit to our maintenance
people..." Chief Cole said. "The C- 130 maintainers who
remained behind have been working seven days a week to
keep the operation going, with no relief crews and no
scheduled days off."
Many of the spares that are normally on hand, which
can make repairs easier for maintainers, were sent to
Entebbe with the deployed maintenance technicians, said
Master Sgt. Kevin Holden, production supervisor for the
310th AS.
"Having more than half of our personnel deployed has
meant we're putting in a lot of extra hours, but that comes
with the territory," Holden said. "We're doing the same
amount of work - or even a little more - with half the
people, so of course the job is more difficult."
The effort paid off: they had no mission cancellations
due to either maintenance or operations.
"We must remember though, that the success of this
unprecedented deployment was by no means a solitary
effort on the part of the 310th. Many other organizations
were vital to our being able to pull it off," Ross said.


F7 S


"itME-..- a
staff Sgt. Rian Clawson (U.S. Air Force)
Senior Airman Jerry Elliot, 310th Airlift Squad-
ron, works on a C-130 engine. Elliot was one who
remained behind and worked seven-day weeks
to make up for a 50 percent loss in personnel.


I









4Tropic Times
Sept. 30, 1994


SNews


--". .






No more helicopters


(U.. fArmy


HONDURAS (JTF-Bravo PAO) - CH-47 Chinook helicopters and their crews from Joint Task Force -
Bravo, Company C, 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment were deactivated here Sept. 15.
"We've carried more than 3,000 passengers and 1.4 million pounds of cargo during our time here," said
1st Lt. Stephen Breagy, Co. C. executive and operations officer. "We had an operational readiness rate of
about 95 percent - 25 percent above Army standard."
In addition Co. C logged monthly flying hours that were triple the Army average for CH-47s. Measured
in hour per aircraft, per month, the Army's flying hour average is 11. Co. C averaged 33 flying hours per
month, Breagy said.
Chinook helicopter support will no longer be so readily available at JTF-Bravo.




Last Vietnam POW declared dead


LOS ANGELES (AP) - In the end, the
five children of Col. Charles E. Shelton felt
driven to their decision by a relentless see-
saw-the dizzying up-and-down of hope
then despair, trust then suspicion, of ru-
mors that never came true but always came
back.
It took their mother, dragging her down
into alcoholism and depression.
When she shot herself four years ago,
with the black and white POW-MIA flag
flying outside the house, her rosary draped
over her husband's POW bracelet, they
decided it must end.
Hard as it was, guilty as it made them
feel, the time had come to declare that their
father, the nation's last Vietnam-era pris-
oner of war, whereabouts unknown for 29
years, was dead.
It was time to push the war out of their
lives.
"It was for our own sanity, for our own
futures," John Shelton, 38, says slowly,


staring at the photo of a young man who
looks just like him, the photo of his dad
climbing into a plane.
"It's hung over us for so long."
Last week, at the children's request, the
Air Force changed Shelton's status from
prisoner of war to killed in action. Next
Tuesday, his children will gather at Arling-
ton National Cemetery in Washington to
place his name on their mother's grave-
stone there.
None of this is easy, even now, three
decades after their dad was shot down over
Laos.
The Pentagon says it will continue to
push for a full accounting of all service-
men missing in Southeast Asia. But among,
the nation's POW-MIA activists, the chil-
dren say, their decision has left bitterness.
"We hope they understand that this is
not about politics, that this is very private,"
Shelton says.
But on his face, as he talks, are the same


confusion and guilt, the same feeling of
inadequacy, that bedeviled his mother for
25 years.
"There's one woman active in the POW
groups who I've been trying to reach, to
tell her why we've done this, to try to ex-
plain," he says.
"She's not been answering my calls. I
know she's upset, that she thinks because
we're doing this, that we're abandoning all
the men who might still be over there."
He looks up, and his face is twisted.
"Even if he was over there, even if he'd
been there all that time, do you think he'd
still be alive?" he asks, restating an argu-
ment he's clearly had with himself many
times before.
"I mean, we can't think we're deserting
him, anymore. He could have died of old
age."
Charles Shelton would now be 62. He
was shot down over Laos on his 33rd birth-
day, April 29, 1965.


Panamanw sm ary


Editor's note: The following summary of news is
taken from the Panamanian press. The translation
and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is made
by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of reporting
or statements made here. Selection of these stories
does not imply any emphasis, judgement or en-
dorsement by the U.S. government These synopses
are intended only to give non-Spanish speaking
people a flavor for news events in Panama.

Sept 23
Hoy, La Prensa: Papers report the Interoceanic Re-
gion Authority is studying a project to construct an eco-
logical road between Panama City and Colon at a cost
of about $50 million. University of Alabama experts
say the road could be a tourist attraction because of its
relation to the canal and the rain forest.

El Panama America, La Estrella: Papers cite a
group of Cuban migrants as saying they are tired of be-
ing held captive and will initiate actions, including a
hunger strike, to obtain freedom. The Cubans say they
are grateful for the attention received by the U.S. mili-


tary, but they feel uncomfortable confined in the camp.
The Panamanian government rejected a request for politi-
cal asylum by the Cubans.

El Siglo, El Panama America: Papers report Panama
Embassy Charge d' Affaires in Cuba explained alleged
illegal resident visas issued to 10 Cubans after the Panama
Immigration Director uncovered an operation allowing
Cubans to illegally enter Panama. Allegedly, Panamanian
and Cuban embassy officials are implicated in the opera-
tion carried out for profit.

Sept. 24
Critica Libre: Paper reports Panama customs
antinarcotics and airport personnel arrested U.S. citizen
Kenneth Leroy Burnann at Tocumen airport allegedly car-
rying 2.2 kilograms of cocaine.

La Prensa, El Siglo, Critica Libre, La Prensa, Hoy,
Panama America: Papers report that Panama President
Ernesto Perez Balladares approved pardons for 216 people
accused of crimes - including several high-level officials
from the regime of former dictator Manuel A. Noriega and


50 former Panamanian government legislators.

Sept 25
La Prensa: Paper reports Arrijan's Mayor Cristobal
Canizales decreed anyone illegally occupying reverted
canal area lands will be removed and sent to jail for 90
days. This decree is a result of the alarming rate in
which squatters are occupying the land and cutting
down national forest trees.

Sept 26
La Prensa: Paper reports marijuana plantations cov-
ering several hectares were found in Las Perlas Islands
by members of state security agencies, immigration of-
ficials and the office of the deputy district attorney dur-
ing an operation called "Combined Operation," that
lasted 48 hours. According to a police report, the Pana-
ma National Police, the National Air Service, the Mar-
itime Service and the Technical Judicial Police raided
several places in Las Perlas, after being identified as
possible drug centers. Also, the police arrested illegal
aliens. Names of the islands where the marijuana is
grown and the number of people arrested are unknown.


Traffic Command

says POVs now

ready for pick up
BALBOA (MTMC) - The following
customers.have privately owned vehicles
ready for pick up at the POV Processing
Center, Building 1501, Balboa, adjacent to
Pier 18:
Alexis M.; Anciaux L.N.; Barrett R.C.;
Breedlove S.E.; Clayton J.D.; Cooley S.E.;
Danner B.L.; Fluet J.E.; Garuz T.E.;
Hughes K.D.; Johnrson V.M.; Kemp T.H.;
Kinsey L.J.; Krisman E.K.; Lease J.V.;
Lewis L.J.; Lugardo M.A.; Marcelino
W.V.; Martini S.A.; Matthews T.E.; May
J.W.; Mejia-Rangel 0.; Miller J.T.; Moore
J.D.; Noles R.D.; Oconner M.L.; Popert
D.A.; Rico P.; Ruggles G.; Sanchez E.E.;
Schaul D.E.; Sola M.A.; Spears R.R.;
Squires E.; Testa J.A.; Thomas S.L.;
Thompson S.L.; Tregaskis K.; Vereen
T.A.; Wheritt J.T.; Williams A.C.; Wilson
M.; Wrencher C.T
Customers must have the following
documents for pick up of their POVs:
*ID card (current military, dependent or
civilian)
*Driver license (must have Panamanian
license for second POV)
*POV shipping document (DD Form
788)
*Vehicle registration or title
*Vehicle keys
*Power of Attorney and photo copies of
the sponsor's bilingual ID card and
driver's license (when the sponsor on or-
ders cannot be present for pick up)
The list is current as of Monday. For
updates, call customer service at 282-
4642/3853 or the POV arrival tape record-
ing at 282-4641. Customer service hours
are Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday hours are 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
People expecting POVs are reminded
to call customer service to leave a contact
phone number.

Security specialist

dies at Gorgas
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
Retired Maj. Carlos A. Poveda, 55, a lo-
gistics/training management specialist for
the office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for
Logistics, died of cancer at Gorgas Army
Community Hospital Sept. 23.
As a member of DCSLOG Security
Assistance Division, Poveda made numer-
ous contributions toward improving the
quality of life of servicemembers, civilians
and family members throughout the U.S.
Southern Command.
Poveda is survived by his wife, Ladys;
son, Carlos; and daughter, Ladys.










* News


Tropic Times
Sept. 30, 1994


G.I. dies in Haiti,

possible suicide
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) -
An American soldier was found shot to
death Tuesday in the northern part of the
capital, the first fatality among U.S.
troops since they intervened to restore
Haiti's elected government.
Pentagon officials in Washington
said that it appeared to be a suicide but
that the death was still being investi-
gated.
The soldier was not immediately
identified.
Pentagon spokesman Dennis Boxx
said the male soldier, who was part of
the 10th Mountain Division from Fort
Drum, N.Y., "died of an apparent gun-
shot." He called the death "an apparent
suicide" and said it was being investi-
gated as such.
Boxx said he could not discuss why
military officials came to that conclu-
sion.
However, a senior Pentagon official,
who spoke on condition of anonymity,
said indications were that the soldier's
own weapon was fired and that the
wound appeared to be self-inflicted. The
official also said the soldier was known
to have been upset recently because of
"domestic reasons."
Stanley Schrager, spokesman for the
U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince, said
the death happened at Villa d'Accueil,
Haiti's state guest house that American
soldiers were preparing to house Haitian
parliament members.
The soldiers were cleaning the man-
sion and making security arrangements
on the hillside estate above Port-au-
Prince.
Shortly after the death, U.S. Army
helicopters hovered over the area
around Villa d'Accueil. American sol-
diers at the scene would not comment.
Neighbors said the soldiers arrived at
the mansion Monday and had been re-
furbishing the building and the grounds.

Canadian tries

to sue U.S. Navy
VANCOUVER (Reuter) - A Cana-
dian sailor who was paralyzed while on
his way to the Gulf War is seeking $110
million in damages from the U.S. Navy,
his lawyer said Tuesday.
Kevin McNamara, 28, was paralyzed
from the neck down when he slipped on
the pool deck during a party at a U.S.
base in the former Panama Canal zone
in 1992, lawyer Aaron Gordon said.
McNamara's Canadian navy ship
had docked at the base to take on fuel
and supplies while en route to the Gulf.
McNamara filed a motion Saturday
asking Supreme Court Justice Antonin
Scalia, who oversees the circuit court for
the former canal zone, to appoint a judge
in the case. The motion will be heard
Oct. 17.
McNamara, who lives in Victoria,
British Columbia, contends the Navy
did not adequately mark a hazard on the
crowded pool deck and worsened his in-
juries with improper first aid.
The sailor's battle for compensation
has been stymied by difficulty in find-
ing a court with jurisdiction over the
case.
Foreigners are not allowed to sue the
U.S. government inside the United
States over incidents abroad and it is im-
mune from prosecution in Panamanian
courts until 1999 under an agreement on
handover of the canal to Panama.
The U.S. court for the former canal
zone still exists on paper but stopped
functioning in 1982. A previous attempt
to bring the lawsuit in a Virginia federal
court was rejected as premature.


1~


V.6'~




Af


Sgt. Rick Emert (U.S. Army)
Sergeant Major of the Army Richard A. Kidd addresses the final cycle of Primary Leadership Development
Course students at Fort Sherman about the role future noncommissioned officers will have in tomorrow's
army. Kidd visited the students Sept. 9.



Last graduation


NCO academy closes doors forever


FORT SHERMAN (USAR
PAO - Atlantic) - The Fort Sher
Noncommissioned Officers Acade
is no more.
In a Sept. 16 graduation
inactiviation ceremony, the academy
staff turned out its last group of ful
NCOs and cased its guidon.
In remarks after the ceremo
Command Sgt. Maj. Rolf Irtenk
said "Though there will never be
other U.S. Army South NCO Ac


Volunteers

by Martha K. Taylor
Tropic Times contributor
CHEPO, PANAMA - Trav-
eling over flooded roads in a
torrential downpour, several
volunteers arrived here Sunday
as part of a U.S. Southern Com-
mand humanitarian effort to
provide eye care to local resi-
dents.
The effort was headed by
Dr. (Maj.) Gordon Swayze,
24th Medical Squadron. Volun-
teers came from throughout the
military communities in
Panama, and some are bilingual
military and family members.
Swayze and his group do
this once a month, providing
needed eye care to residents
who otherwise wouldn't be
able to afford this service.
While SOUTHCOM funded
the first $2,000 for the year-
long effort, most of the costs are
born by volunteers and dona-
tions, Swayze said.
"We got a great deal on
reading glasses from a down-
town (Panama City) optics lab,"
Swayze said.
The monthly visit has be-
come so popular that people


SO
man
-my

and
ly's
ture

)ny,
auf
an-
-ad-


emy, the more than 10,000 soldiers who
were taught to lead through this school
will carry on the traditions this school
was based on. Their memories of what
they learned here will live on, be passed
on, and will not have been lost."
-Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas J.
Quinn Jr. thanked his NCO Academy 1st
Sgt. Robert M. Craig for "never drop-
ping the ball."
A highlight of the final cycle of Pri-
mary Leadership Development Course,


Clas
of th

Rich
Clas
Terrn
Hen
Tho
mas
Cla,
Fair
Whi


bring better vision
come for miles, even as far as
Panama City, to receive treat-
ment. There were 28 people
lining the halls when the volun- :
teers arrived at the Chepo '
school. More showed up as the ,
day progressed - nearly 70 in
all - and no one was turned
away.
The residents who came to
the clinic were screened for
cataracts, evidence of eye dis-
ease, injuries and vision prob-
lems. '1
This month's visit was or-
ganized with the help of the
Chepo Lions Club. President
Alicia Jimenez said it was very
important to the local people . f K
because they would not be able
to afford either eye glasses, or
a visit to an eye doctor. With-
out the help of SOUTHCOM,
most would have to do without,
she said.
Swayze, who was named
the Air Combat Command's ' ,
optometrist of the year, will re-
turn next month. "It is a privi- 4
lege to be given the opportunity
to serve others," he said.
People can donate eye
glasses to the Howard AFB with Segura Gume
medical clinic. is 53 and her last


;s 8-94, was a visit by Sergeant Major
ie Army Richard A. Kidd Sept. 9.
VLDC instructors were: Sgt. 1st Class
hard Stanley, chief instructor; Sgt. 1st
ss Norberto Osbourne and Staff Sgt.
ance Noel, Class IA; Sgt. 1st Class
minio Pabon and Staff Sgt. Mamie
mas, Class 1B; Sgt. First Class Tho-
Leake and Staff Sgt. Nestor Sanchez,
ss 2A; and Staff Sgt. Cordell
*weather and Staff Sgt. Wilbert
taker Jr., Class 2B.


to villagers


Q.
I .K







Martha K. Taylor (courtesy)
28th Aviation Regiment, helps
ercinda' eye exam. Gumercinda
visual exam was 26 years ago.










6Tropic Times
Sept. 30, 1994


SVoices


Mother wants hospital to stop child's pain


Dear Mayors' Corner,
Am I the only mother whose heart breaks when my
baby is screaming with pain? Am I the only mother who
would do anything in the world to prevent my child from
feeling pain? Am I the only mother furious that Gorgas
Army Community Hospital does not do everything possi-
ble to spare infants and children from unnecessary pain
and suffering?
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recently
approved an anesthetic cream that numbs the skin below
the surface. Once applied to the skin, it penetrates and
reaches the nerve endings, providing 2-3 hours of numb-
ness. That is plenty of time for doctors to perform proce-
dures such as giving shots or drawing blood. Procedures
that make our infants and children scream in pain can be
done pain-free. Why doesn't Gorgas use EMLA (a mix-
ture of lidocaine and prilocaine)?
Angry Mother

Dear Angry Mother,
I sent your letter to Col. M.A. McConnell, commander
of Gorgas Army Community Hospital who responded:
You are not the only mother who is very concerned about
medical procedures that cause pain to a child. It is even
more distressing to a health care provider who is directly
responsible for performing a necessary, but painful pro-
cedure.
The EMLA is now available for use at Gorgas Army
Community Hospital. It is useful for a number of proce-
dures, but not all. You can be assured that all of us in-
volved in the treatment of children are acutely sensitive to
your concern and will continue to provide care in as com-
passionate and painless a manner as possible.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
I'm really angry about the Corozal Transportation


Motor Pool car auctions. Every month, the government
auctions off the old vehicles no longer needed for one rea-
son or another. Many of these vehicles are in perfectly
good condition.
These auctions are held once a month from 9 a.m.-3
p.m. on a weekday when the majority of people work.
They are auctioned to U.S. citizens or Panamanians. These
vehicles have not been paid for by the Panamanian Gov-
ernment, but by U.S. tax dollars, yet U.S. servicemembers
are not given the opportunity to buy them.
The U.S. presence is leaving in six years and giving
Panama millions of dollars of property to do with as they
please. How can our government tell me I'm important
enough to live and work here, but not important enough
to be given an opportunity to do something as simple as
buy U.S. merchandise that we helped to buy in the first
place? What's the deal?
Papa Oscar

Dear Papa Oscar,
I sent your letter to John Stobie, fleet manager of gen-
eral services administration for the Fleet Management
Center, Panama. He responded: Your complaint with the
GSA auto sales is a familiar one, and we all need to un-
derstand and appreciate the economics of the situation.
The vehicles you believe are old and no longer needed
have been replaced with' many brand new vehicles, pur-
chased by GSA for your official use in Panama. A portion
of this cost is offset by selling the old fleet of "usable"
vehicles for "fair market value" according to the Law/Fed-
eral Code of Regulation which governs GSA's Fleet Man-
agement Program.
As a taxpayer and supporter of the U.S. government,


we are all expected to take every action possible to save
government money. Selling vehicles for less than what
they would otherwise bring is giving away government
money illegally.
Soldiers and government employees are duly compen-
sated with all the entitlements that are afforded them by
law and conscientious commanders. Buying vehicles at a
discounted rate is not an entitlement.
Dates and times for sales were carefully considered and
weekend sales were ruled out by the banking industry not
being available for customers or making deposits. Securi-
ty is an overriding consideration here.
We were able to establish a procedure to permit mili-
tary and government employees to pre-clear an auto loan
with the Merchants Bank and to pay for vehicles with a
personal check, accompanied by a letter of guarantee from
the bank.
Special efforts have been made to ensure sales are ad-
vertised to the military community with brochures, ads in
the Tropic Times and announcement to the chain of com-
mand. Commanders have been urged to permit soldiers
time off to attend sales.
Within the bounds of the law and GSA regulations we
cannot discriminate between individual buyers and we are
required to get the best possible price for the U.S. govern-
ment.

Editor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral
Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity
chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will
be granted upon request The Tropic Times reserves
the right to edit letters and responses for brevity.


Family member buys groceries - a lot!


Bad time at the commissary
While performing continued surveil-
lance at the commissary, contraband per-
sonnel saw a family member leave with 15
bags of groceries.
She later returned and bought 12 more
bags. The family member was detained
and later admitted to selling groceries to
non-privilege card holders since January.
For more information about such re-
strictions, see Southern Command Regu-
lation 1-19 or call 286-3303.

Flying bottles
While driving in Panama City, a soldier
was hit in the head by a bottle that had been
thrown by an unknown person.
The soldier was taken to Gorgas Army
Community Hospital where he received 13
stitches above the right eye.
When driving downtown, always re-
main alert and leave space between vehi-
cles for quick reactions.

Jewelry lover gets caught
A soldier was seen placing a pair of ear-
rings in her pocket at the Corozal post ex-
change.
The soldier left the store without pay-


ing for the merchandise before she was de-
tained by store security in the parking lot.
Shoplifting is a serious crime in which
everyone pays. The thief gets the criminal
charges, while the customer pays higher
prices.

Stolen vehicle
A service member recently had his pri-
vately owned vehicle stolen while it was
parked by the El Dorado Mall.
Though the vehicle was recovered, the
stereo, equalizer, amplifier, two speakers
and cassettes had been stolen.
Report suspicious activity to the mili-
tary police by calling 287-4401 or 289-
5133.

Found, but not yet returned
The following items have been turned
in to the military police: Casio watch, item
110-94; Homelite weedeater, item 128-94;
necklace, item 129-94; class ring, item 134-
94; wallet, item 135-94; wallet, item 141-
94; Spectrum stroller, item 149-94.

Housing area crimes
The following crimes occurred in on
and off post housing areas Sept. 3-9.


Fort Clayton
500 area - one larceny of unsecured pri-
vate property
Off post
Panama City - one larceny of secured pri-
vate property
Balboa - one larceny of secured private


property
El Dorado - one larceny of secured private
property

Atlantic
Fort Espinar - two larcenies of unsecured
private property and two larcenies of se-
cured private property


STropic Times


This authorized unofficial command information publica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pub-
lished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Pro-
gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of
the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the
U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002

Commander in Chief........................Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs..............................Col. James L. Fetig
Chief....................................... Senior M aster Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor................................. ........................ M aureen Sam pson
Sports Editor........................ ........................... Sgt. Lori Davis


Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666


Staff Editors...............................................Sgt. Cass Purdum
Spc. Tom Findtner
Rosemary Chong
Volunteer........................ ........................... Keisha Deering

Southern Command Public Affairs Office.................282-4278
Command Information Officer.....................Patrick Milton

U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic................................289-4312
NCOIC......................... ...................... Sgt. Richard Emert

U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office......................287-3007
Public Affairs Officer...................Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer........................Beth Taylor
Managing Editor.................................Staff Sgt. Jane Usero


Editor............................................... Sgt. Robin M antikoski
Journalist............................ ...................... Sgt. Eric Hortin

24th Wing Public Affairs Office...............................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer.......................Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.....Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists......................................Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush

U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..................283-5644
Public Affairs Officer.................................Diane Gonzalez
Assistant Public Affairs Officer...........................John Hall
Photographers.....Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays










Commentary


Tropic Times7
Sept. 30, 1994


New inspection focuses on quality criteria


by Capt. Tom Joyce
24th Wing Assistant Inspector General

T he Air Force has adopted a new
inspection procedure called
Quality Air Force Assessment.
A QAFA is exactly what the name
implies - an assessment to measure
where the unit stands in its quality
journey.
In the past seven years the Air Force
has gradually implemented a quality
approach where there is a leadership
commitment and operating style that
inspires trust, teamwork and continuous
improvement. Quality Air Force focuses
on strategic planning, teamwork,
empowerment and process improvement
to fulfill one common goal - total
customer focus and satisfaction.
In July 1992 the Air Force developed
a strategic roadmap for Quality. The


basis of this roadmap is the Quality Air
Force Criteria. The criteria were adopted
from the Malcolm Baldrige National
Quality Award for Air Force use.
The Baldrige Award was established
by Congress in 1987 to promote quality
awareness and to recognize and publicize
specific quality achievements.
It became clear to many U.S. govern-
ment and business leaders that adopting
quality improvement techniques was a
must if the United States was to remain
competitive in the growing world
economy.
The Air Force, in turn, adopted the
quality approach as a response to the
dynamic changes in the international
environment and ever-shrinking resourc-
es. The Quality Air Force Criteria form a
cultural framework and roadmap for
guiding Quality Air Force.
Like Quality Air Force, a QAFA is
entirely different from the traditional


military inspection that focuses on
specific behaviors and itemized taskings.
In the past, Inspector General teams
included up to 120 people who would
visit a base and delve into almost every
single action an organization does.
That is not the role of the QAFA team.
For one thing, the team only has about 30
people. This equates to approximately
one assessor per squadron. The assessor's
job is to validate the unit's self assess-
ment (USA), identifying strengths and
areas for improvement as they relate to
Quality Air Force Criteria.
Assessors try to determine senior
leaders' knowledge, understanding and
use of the Quality Air Force Criteria.
Assessors spend up to five hours
separately interviewing commanders and
flight chiefs.
While they work to validate the USA,
they also give commanders many ideas to
improve quality-to include process


design and analysis, data collection and
analysis, strategic planning, metrics, and
human resource development and
recognition.
After meeting with the leadership,
assessors branch out and visit work
centers; here their mission is to validate
what the leaders have told them about
quality in the unit.
Finally, the old five-tiered rating
system that we've all become used to is
not used in a QAFA since these "grades"
do not help a unit improve or show a
clear enough picture of where it stands on
its quest for quality.
The QAFA is indeed different; the IG
team's role isn't to find "write ups," but
to teach and motivate while they validate
the USA. They're as excited about
quality improvements as you are.
The 24th Wing's first Quality Air
Force Assessment is scheduled for early
January 1995. Aim High!


From our readers


The past can't change, but attitudes should


I knew I was home when I landed on the ground.
I could smell the jungle, the damp earth, the
ozone of a coming rain. The birds in the trees
were making their familiar sounds.
My eyes looked toward the towering hills and the dark
rain clouds. The slight sheen on my skin. The taste of salt
from the ocean.
Yes, I was home. Though it had been nine years, it felt
like 90. But, there was no fanfare, no parade, no familiar
face to greet me. The home I had returned to had changed,
but I had not realized how much. I came home as a member
of the military, prepared to do a job. But I also came as a
"zonian," to my home that had changed forever in history,
but not my heart.
Now, after three years, I've noticed something I wish to
share. I am one of the few left of a society whose families
came to live and work, to contribute to a way of life
different than most, to a place and a canal. It started in
1904, with a dream, an unrealistic venture come true. A
canal, one that would connect one ocean to another,
bringing commerce, people, nations, customs with a
difference together. The dream of a handful of men, with
an outcome that affected thousands of people, and contin-
ued that tradition for over 75 years.
But on Oct. 1, 1979, it changed, because of two
signatures on a piece of paper. "Zonians," who had never
lived anywhere else but the canal zone, some of us second


and third generation, who helped bring two oceans and
people together, were no longer welcomed.Our families,
who were canal workers and engineers, exhumed from
cemeteries and transferred to places unknown, our
privileges and pride taken roughly from us, leaving no
alternative but to accept it or leave. A society forcefully
shoved from their homes, as their pleas were ignored. But
that was 14 years ago. It is the past, over-unable to
change.
But there is something I would like see change. And that
is attitudes. I would like to the see the perception of
"zonians" as imperialistic colonials change, as not being as
good as Americans from the United States. No longer do I
want to be condemned for what I am or where I'm from. I
am not a colonist, nor did I exploit this country and its
people.
Yes, our way of life was different, and yes, we some-
times wish it had not changed, but damning us and treating
us like outsiders is just not right! These attitudes need to
change. But like any change, a tale needs to be told to
perhaps convince those who need convincing. Well, this is
mine-one of many hundreds that have never been heard.
In the late 1970s, after graduation, I tried to apply for an
apprenticeship program as a tugboat pilot. My dream was
to remain in the canal zone, and work for the canal like my
family before me.
At the time, I was a summer hire working as a plumber


apprentice on the Atlantic side. I applied for the program,
but it was denied due to my American citizenship.
Unbeknownst to me, the treaty stipulated that a Panamani-
an would have a better chance of certain jobs based on his
citizenship, not his skill. To be accepted I was to give up
my American citizenship. Not willing to do that, I then
tried to attend the Canal Zone College, now the PCC
College. Unfortunately, the tuition fee had gone up �o
much that I could not afford to go. After a year of unem-
ployment, I went to Howard AFB and joined the Air Force.
Eleven years later, I got stationed "home."
The bottom line is this. Military people who are
stationed in Panama come from places such as Kerville,
Texas; Toledo, Ohio; or Anyplace, U.S.A., and bring some
of their roots with them. I am no different. My home just
happened to be here. I just happen to have had a lifestyle
unlike yours. My climate is not similar to what you are
used to in the States. My forest happens to be a damp,
humid jungle and your fishing hole back home is my Gatun
Lake. But, the difference in all of this is, I do not condemn
you for where you call home. I do not speak of your home
town in words so harsh to bear. I too am asking the same.
So, when you speak of "us," the "zonies," we're not
asking to be treated different, just to remember us for
whom we are. Talking to someone like me could educate
you about what you now temporarily call home.
Lynnette Stokes


Direc Quot


How does Panama differ from your home town?


", ' . . :r, , .. . , , !
, ! . * � " *
... /',,: :


r ,


"They don't have good
bagels here. Butthe maids
are less expensive."
(Long Island)


Maj. Peter Devlin
SOUTHCOM J-2


"It's rainier and more
humid than in Texas. I
enjoy being able to go
to the beach and swim
all the time."


"Its not as congested
(in Greenville, N.C.)
The weather is better
here. "


Debbie Fogle Tech. Sgt. William Mackey
Air Force family member 24th Transportation
Squadron


"Panama is always so
crowded and busy. I
come from a small
town." (New Jersey)


Sgt. Hector Robles
3rd Special Operations
Command


"I'm from a little bit of
everywhere, but the
fishing is better here.
The countryside is
gorgeous."
Chief David May
Counseling Assistance
Center, Rodman NS


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.









8 Tropic Times
Sept. 30, 1994


Cabanas '94-


converge on


QUARRY HEIGHTS (SOUTHCOM
PAO) - While other U.S. troops were
preparing to go to Haiti, about 1,150
U.S. soldiers were training for coalition
operations of another sort at Fort
Chaffee, Ark., and Rodman NS in
Panama, in exercise Cabanas '94-1I.
The exercise ended Sept. 22, bringing
to a successful conclusion training
between U.S. Special Forces units from
the United States and Panama, and
military forces from Colombia, Venezue-
la and Ecuador.
Approximately 1,150 U.S. soldiers
from Panama and the United States
formed a coalition task force with
approximately 525 people from the three
Latin American countries.
Cabanas is an annual Special Opera-
tions Command South exercise designed
to train U.S. soldiers, promote regional
security cooperation and respect for
human rights, develop internal defense
techniques, and promote military-to-
military relations.
"The purpose of Cabanas 94-II was,
first, to train our soldiers, while also
learning how to work better with our
allies," said Capt. Jim Knotts, the
exercise spokesman.
The exercise scenario involved the
formation of a coalition under the
auspices of the Organization of Ameri-
can States, called on to counter narco-
guerrilla attempts to control the fictitious
island nation of Victoria off the west
coart of Colombia. Narco-guerrillas are
groups of armed insurgents who wanted
to overthrow their legitimate democrati-
cally-elected governments and finance


their activities
by providing
security for .
drug traffickers.
"The training in
how to form a coalition
was especially valuable,"
Knotts said. "More and more,
international coalitions are being
formed to handle problems. Militar-
ily, coalition operations bring a host of
challenges, the most obvious being
language, equipment and doctrine. This
exercise has made us all more aware of
how to overcome those challenges," he
said.
The coalition task force was com-
manded by Ecuadorian Col. Jaime
Cordova, with battalions from each of
the Latin American countries. The U.S.
Special Forces coalition supporters were
divided into 12-man teams, attached to
the allied commanders at battalion and
company level. A larger special forces
team was integrated into the task force
staff. The overall exercise was com-
manded by Brig. Gen. Kenneth Bowra,
commander of Special Operations
Command South.
"Having Colonel Cordova as com-
mander of the troops on the ground was
key to the success of this exercise,"
Knotts said. "Having a Latin American
in command helped bring together our
Latin American allies by demonstrating
how much they have in common. These
three countries interact on a daily basis in
real-world operations, so having them
integrated into a combined task force
will help them in the future as they battle


Four nations


as f r joint training












/ "--




the narco- _
guerrillas."
Although these
narco-guerrillas
were simulated,
many of the Latin
American soldiers
came from real-world
battles against real-world
narco-guerrillas, making
the training even more
valuable as U.S. soldiers
learned from their combat
veteran allies. U.S. military
members do not participate in
actual counterdrug field training in every aspec
operations, but do provide of the training events,
training assistance to allow according to. Knotts. He said that
their Latin American allies to conduct human rights training refers to specific
operations more successfully against skills like discriminating between
narco-guerrillas. civilians and combatants on the battle-
Another import aspect of Cabanas 94 - field, proper treatment of enemy prison
II was the concentration on human rights ers and enemy wounded, law of land


Combat Camera (co


Marksmanship with the M-16A1 was practiced by U.S. and Latin American soldiers during the exercise.









Tropic Times 9
Sept. 30, 1994 7


Combat Camera (courtesy)


Colombian soldiers become familiar with the U.S. M-16A1 rifle during the exercise at Fort Chaffee, Ark.


warfare, concern for local populations
and landmarks, respect for legal rights
and identification of areas that should be
restricted from combat operations.
As part of the scenario, exercise
participants encountered role player
;"civilians" on the battlefield in every
event. Observers from human rights
organizations and the U.S. government
visited the exercise Sept. 8-10 to observe
training.
"In the United States, we don't get our
soldiers on the first day of basic training
already knowing the law of land warfare
or the protocols of the Geneva Conven-
tions," Knotts said.
"We have to educate our troops
continually on human rights issues, and
give them an opportunity to practice
those skills just as they practice map
reading and marksmanship. Our soldiers
fight like they have been trained, so we
give them the opportunity to practice
making those tough judgment calls in
exercises like Cabanas," Knotts said.
Soldiers from Fort Bragg's 7th Special
Forces Group deployed Aug. 2 to
Colombia, Venezuela and Ecuador to
conduct pre-deployment training. The


troops arrived in Arkansas Sept. 6-7.
The exercise was administered by
cadre members of the U.S. Army Joint
Readiness Training Center, which
conducts training for U.S. units through-
out the year.
U.S. forces deployed to the Joint
Readiness Training Center facilities in
Arkansas include U.S. Southern Com-
mand's Special Operations Command
South from Panama, 7th Special Forces
Group at Fort Bragg, N.C., and U.S. Air
Force Special Operations Command at
Hurlburt Field, Fla.
The Panama-based Naval Special
Warfare Unit-8 and Special Boat Unit-26
conducted riverine training in Panama
with a small number of soldiers from
Colombia and Ecuador (approximately
100 U.S., 10 Ecuadorian and 10 Colom-
bian).
In addition to task force staffs from
each country, the Latin American forces
included: two infantry companies from
Colombia, one infantry company and one
National Guard company from Venezue-
la, and one infantry company from
Ecuador-- approximately 175 from each
country.


Combat Camera (courtesy)
A soldier from the 7th Special Forces conducts a class with U.S. and Latin
American soldiers. Observers from human rights groups and reporters look on.


S' --








S-- ... - " -






(U ..SNavy)
A patrol boat from Special Boat Unit 26, Rodman NS, participates in the local
portion of Cabanas '94 II.



.n I or, "P. . -,. . IW ,...T.' "

















Combat Camera (courtesy)
Brig. Gen. Kenneth Bowra (right), commander of Special Operations Command
South and exercise commander, greets Ecuadorian Col. Jaime Cordova,
commander of the Coalition Task Force.








10 Tropic Times
Sept. 30, 1994


S Milestones


1097th named


unit of the year
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) - The
1097th Transportation (Composite Boat) Company has
beat out active duty transportation units in nine different
U.S. Major Army Commands to win a prestigious trans-
portation award.
The National Defense Transportation Association se-
lected 1097th Trans. Co. as the Army-wide, active duty
Military Unit of the Year, according to a message from
Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Edward Honor, president of NDTA.
The unit's heavy- and medium boat platoons had
5,398 and 1,135 mission hours respectively in 1993.
The heavy boat platoon's missions spanned South and
Central America as well as the United States, said Capt.
Marshall A. Gutierrez, commander, 1097th Trans. Co.
The company's real-world missions played a key part
in its selection as the best in active Army transportation,
Gutierrez added.
"The 1097th (Trans. Co.) performs more missions
than any other (U.S. Army) waterborne transportation
unit in the world," he said.
Furthermore, the award illustrates that the unit per-
forms these missions well, Gutierrez said.
"It shows that our soldiers do their missions every day
and that they do them best," he said. "Our training is our
mission."
The unit's packet was judged at the U.S. Army South
level and the Office of the Chief of Transportation level
before making it to the Department of the Army level,
Gutierrez said. The MACOM submissions were evalu-
ated on mission, readiness, supply discipline, safety and
community/civic actions. This marks the first time the
1097th Trans. Co. has won the award.
The NDTA will officially present the award Monday
at the Military Units Award Luncheon in St. Louis, Mo.


Joint reJohn Hall (U.S. Navy)
Joint re-up
Capt. A.N. Rowley III, commander, Naval Forces Panama, re-enlists
Army Staff Sgt. Rick Gonzalez in front of Building 51, Rodman NS,
Monday. Gonzalez is a member of the 36th Explosive Ordnance
Disposal. Members from all services were present for the 'purple'-
ceremony.




The following U. S. Southern Command civilians have been recognized for their
accomplishments:
Special Act Award - Deborah L. Erhart, Center for Treaty Implementation.
Years of Service - 10 years: Donald L. Clapp and Kerry E. Turk, both from Intelli-
gence Directorate; Antonieta B. Suro, U.S. Military Group Bolivia; Michael J. Pugh,
U.S. Military Group Guatemala.
Promotion - Kimberly S. Quinn, Intelligence Directorate.


Eight deployments courtesy )
Capt. Thomas W. Steffans, Special Boat Squadron Two commander,
presents the Navy Achievement Medal to Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class
Dean C. Wells for exemplary and highly professional performance. Wells
deployed in eight counter-narcotics campaigns in Latin America.






















Acosta, Sylvia Jones, Harold Fergus, Mary Hunter and Wilhelmina
Manning end a combined total of 129 years of federal service in a
retirement ceremony at the clinic Sept. 23.


.



Cash bonus (c_.,
Capt. Thomas W. Steffens, Special Boat Squadron Two commander presents a $650 cash
award to Dalys L.Collins, Special Boat Unit 26's executive secretary/accounting technician.
Collins received the award for superior sustained performance











SFeatures


Tropic Times
Sept. 30, 1994


I _- '


,-.
:^ ~ n ' .
,� ' * m '*_s -.-


ve


:i~i~


[.VIM.


-V -~ -ILI

z -AF


Vessels belonging to the 1097th Transportation (Composite Boat) Company are docked at Pier 45 on Fort Davis.


Sgt. Rick Emert (U.S. Army)


Soldiers with sea legs


Waterborne transportation unit keeps Army missions afloat


by Sgt Rick Emert
USARSO Public Affairs Office - Atlantic
FORT DAVIS - The soldiers of the
1097th Transportation (Composite Boat)
Company know what it's like to spend
much of the year at sea. In fact, the sol-
diers spend an average two-thirds of each
year at sea.
The unit has two Landing Craft, Utility
2000s, three LCU 1600s, six Landing
Craft Mechanized 8s and a Pickett, or "J,"
Boat. These boats and their crews had a
combined total of 224 mission days last
year, said Capt. Marshall A. Gutierrez,
commander, 1097th Trans. Co.
Each of the unit's four platoons has a
distinct mission, and none is more impor-
tant than the others, said Zimmerman.
"Our mission is to support U.S. Army
South with waterborne operations," he
said. "I refuse to say that the soldiers oper-


eating the LCUs have a mission more im-
portant than the soldiers in the rear. For
each soldier in this unit, the most impor-
tant mission is the one he's doing right
now."
The diversity of missions among the
platoons illustrates how vital each mission
is to the unit's success, Zimmerman added.
The Headquarters Platoon logistically
supports the company in garrison and on
deployments. The platoon's missions in-
clude: supply, nuclear, biological and
chemical training, running the orderly
room and running the dining facility which
also includes manning the dining facilities
on the LCUs.
The Maintenance Platoon is respon-
sible for maintenance support; petroleum,
oil and lubrication support; stevedore sup-
port, hull maintenance; communications
equipment repair; and ramp preparation of
unimproved landing sites. The platoon has


a welding section, including a machine
shop, to accomplish the maintenance and
repair missions.
The Medium Boat Platoon, including
the operators ofLCM 8s and the "J" Boat,
provide waterborne transportation on the
coastal waters around Panama and the Ca-
nal Operating Area. The missions include
supporting the Jungle Operations Training
Battalion and rotational units. It supports
U.S. Southern Command by transporting
oversized trucks and equipment that can-
not be driven across the Gatun Locks. The
oversized vehicles are loaded onto LCM
8s at Dock 45, Fort Davis, and off-loaded
at Sturgis Landing. The platoon per-
formed 331 missions in 1993 moving
more than 2,891 tons of equipment and
9,872 passengers with more than 1,135
hours underway.
The Heavy Boat Platoon's LCU crews
provide long distance transportation of


oversized and bulky equipment that is un-
economical to be transported by commer-
cial means. The platoon completed 44 mis-
sions in 1993 carrying more than 3,912
tons of cargo more than 53,701 nautical
miles. The LCU missions have reached
much of South and Central America in-
cluding: Colombia, Costa Rica, Guate-
mala, Belize, Guyana and Honduras.
The successful completion of so many
missions can be credited to the ability of
each soldier in the company, Zimmerman
said.
"What is very unique about the 1097th
(Trans. Co.) is the pride our soldiers have
in being able to perform real-world mis-
sions in what must be considered a danger-
ous environment - the open sea,"
Zimmerman said. "Our people are very
good at what they do; the proof is in our
safety record and the number of successful
missions completed."


Information bureau updates world about Cuban camps


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
JTF-Safe Haven Public Affairs Office
CAMP ROUSSEAU - Operation Safe Haven has been
on television, in newspapers and on the radio all over the
world since the first Cuban stepped off the airplane at
Howard AFB several weeks ago.
Getting the information to the media and setting up in-
terviews with military leaders doesn't just happen by it-
self. It is the mission of the Joint Information Bureau to
ensure the accurate and timely release of information.
The JIB for Operation Safe Haven was set up here just
prior to the expected arrival of Cubans at the community
camps. Everything from chairs to computers and typewrit-
ers to telephones had to be moved in, set up and ready to
use within days.
Setting up and running the JIB fell on a joint military
public affairs staff. Maj. Debbie Haston-Hilger, the South-
erm Command Theater Support Element commander, was
a central figure in JIB operations from the beginning and
eventually became director of the JIB until returning to
her unit last week.
"Military from all branches of the service were in-
volved in setting up and running the JIB," Haston-Hilger
said. "There are civilians and servicemen from
SOUTHCOM and U.S. Army South Public Affairs offices


as well as Army and Air National Guard and Reserve
units.
"We have functioned as one big family," Haston-
Hilger said. 'There wasn't any of the normal inter-service
rivalry you might expect. We all came together and got
the job done."
The job they accomplished, however, involved much
more than what could be seen on the front pages of news-
papers or on the 10 o'clock broadcasts.
With media representatives from as close as Panama
City, as far away as China and as internationally known
as CNN, AP and UPI, the JIB has been kept busy.
Each of the 292 media representatives who came to
Panama had to be accredited and given identification
badges, given daily reports, statistics and updates and es-
corted to the community camps and the reception center,
Haston-Hilger said.
In addition, daily press conferences are set up and con-
ducted, telephonic media queries are answered, media
trends are tracked and analyzed and senior leadership is
helped with media encounters, she said.
With everything involved in running a JIB from the
media standpoint, there are also the mission requirements
of transportation, food, housing, supplies and various
other necessities of any operation. This, too, fell to the JIB
staff.


Servicemen from units such as the 361st Public Af-
fairs Detachment, U.S. Army Reserves of New York, and
the 77th Army Reserve Component of New York have
been helping the JIB run smoothly.
"The 361st was down here on their annual overseas
training and, once they finished, they helped at the JIB,"
Haston-Hilger said. "About half of those in the 77th vol-
unteered to stay and help for an additional week and three
of the officers extended for another 90 days.
"What makes this extraordinary is that these people
have jobs back home," she said. "Their employers have
supported them in this mission by giving them the extra
time off to be here helping us."
Though the mix of active soldiers, sailors and airmen,
Guard, Reserves, officers, enlisted and civilians from within
public affairs and from other fields made for a unique work-
ing environment, the JIB came together as one unit.
"We all worked many long, hard hours to meet the mis-
sion," Haston-Hilger said. "But the key to the success of the
JIB is teamwork - and that is what we had from everyone
involved from the very beginning."
Though she is quick to praise the JIB staff for meeting
their mission, Haston-Hilger looks elsewhere when talking
about the overall mission of Operation Safe Haven."Credit
goes to those in the mud for the success of the mission," she
said.


4


I










2 Tropic Times
Sept. 30, 1994


I Profile


Seabee selected to work


in the State Department


Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Taylor (U.S. Navy)
Petty Officer 2nd Class David Berry (front) and Petty Officer 3rd Class
Brian Dorsey from the Public Works Department help build camps for the
Cuban migrants at Empire Range.



Yale is calling


Navy SEAL leaves service


for Ivy League education


by John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office
RODMAN NS - A petty officer work-
ing with the Public Works Department here
was recently selected to work in the State
Department in Washington, D.C.
David Berry, a utilitiesman and Seabee,
comes from a family of government work-
ers. His parents are enlisted soldiers, his
brother a warrant officer. His sister is a
Department of the Army civilian and his
step-father's an Army officer.
In December, Berry will have a family
reunion of sorts when he leaves for the
nation's capitol where his brother and sister
work. His wife, Janet, is a petty officer third
class working at the base administration
office.
To be considered for the appointment,
Seabees must be an E-5 or above and put in
a request through their career counselor.
During the initial screening, officials con-
duct a special background investigation to
receive a top secret clearence. State Depart-
ment officials said only the top 1 percent to
2 percent in each rate are selected.
Berry, who likens the selection process
to that of the chief s board, said he chose the
move to enhance his career.
"This gives me the chance to set myself
from my peers," Berry said. "My higher-
ups said it's like moving up two rungs on
the career ladder and improves my chances
of making chief."
Berry's supervisor Chief Dale Cashman
said Berry's the man for the job.
"He's highly-motivated, very astute and
career-minded," Cashman said. "He's the
kind of person they're looking for."
As the 10-year veteran talks about why
he joined, Berry remembers he didn't want
to get involved in the things his friends were
doing in California.


"My friends were getting into drugs and
gangs, so I called my mother and told her I
had to get out of there," Berry said. The 18-
year-old moved to Aberdeen Proving
Grounds, Md., where his mother was sta-
tioned and worked in construction. Berry
eventually grew tired of working for some-
one who wouldn't show him everything he
wanted to know, so he followed the family
tradition and went to the Army recruiter.
"I wanted to get into medical, computers
or special forces, but the Army recruiter
was being real vague about what was avail-
able," Berry said. "I figured I didn't belong
to anyone, so I went to the Navy."
The Navy recruiter told him about the
job Seabees do. Because of his background
in construction, Berry signed on the dotted
line.
As a utilitiesman, his job is working with
air-conditioners, refrigerators and boilers
- as Berry puts it - he's a high-tech
plumber.
Berry is also a money-saver, to the tune
of $1.3 million. For a year, he stayed after
work sifting through paperwork on more
than 100 work requests. He pulled out jobs
that could be done by self help. He and the
commander decided what could wait and
what couldn't. Berry also revitalized the
unit's energy conservation program. HeT
said when the unit picks up the program it
will save $35,000 a year.
When he wasn't saving the Navy money
or stuffing the suggestion box with ideas,
Berry had time to win the recent sailor of the
quarter board.
. Berry said he will be "hopping around
the world" in his new job, going on tempo-
rary duty to U.S. embassies and consulates
around the world. Chances are sooner or
later his job could bring him back to Pana-
ma and he'll be able to say he's just passing
through.


by John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office
RODMAN NS - While attending the
U.S. Naval Academy in 1984, Lt. Harry
Wingo had his sights set on being a pilot,
but became a SEAL instead. Now he's
chosen another career change - becoming
a lawyer with an Ivy League education.


Wingo's family may have also influ-
enced his decision to study law. His father
was a warrant officer in the Army's Judge
Advocate General Corps.
Originally, Wingo narrowed his school
choices to Georgetown University and the
University of Virginia. He sent his tran-
scripts to the Ivy League schools "just to
give it a try," figuring he had a very small


Wingo,fromSpe-
cial Boat Unit 26
here, received news
he was selected this
May by two univer-
sities. His choice was
tough, Harvard or
Yale. Wingo picked
Yale, the most se-
lective school in the


"I wanted Yale


because it was


smaller. I'm used to working in
small groups ... and Yale isn't
a 'lawyer factory' like Harvard."
Lt. Harry Wingo
Special Boat Unit 26


chance.
At 5-feet, 9-inch-
es and 175 pounds,
Wingo may not be as
big as people think
SEALS usually are.
"SEALS come in all
shapes and sizes,"
Wingo said. "But no
matter what the size,


country, that takes only 175 students a year it's what's inside the SEAL that counts," he
from a pool of more than 5,000. said.
Size was a deciding factor for Wingo. Six years and 28 pounds ago, Wingo
"I wanted Yale because it is smaller. I'm was a national boxing champ at the Naval
used to working in small groups," Wingo Academy. The two-time All-American
said. "This way I'll know most of my doesn't get much time to box these days, but
classmates and Yale isn't a 'lawyer factory' says he still hits the heavy bag occasionally.
like Harvard." Wingo leaves Panama and the military
Location was also important for the 28- in December, but not before he had chance
year-old Annapolis,Md. native. Yale's cam- to use the Spanish he learned at the Defense
pus of New Haven, Conn., is a seven-hour Language Institute in Monterey, Calif.
drive to his home. Wingo said he wanted a "Foreign cultures fascinate me, but I'm
chance to set his roots because during his going to miss the weather the most. I'm
Navy career he'sseenhis family infrequenly. going to freeze at Yale."


John Hall (U.S. Navy)


Lt. Harry Wingo


A















Sept. 30, 1994


Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Youth soccer kicks off


by Spc. Tom Findtner
Tropic Times staff
HOWARD AFB - Kickers and Strikers,
Rockets and Rowdies, Comets and Lasers,
Pumas and Pirates... No, these were not
characters from a bizarre science fiction
movie, they were just a few of the teams
gathered for the start of the Howard/Al-
brook Youth Activities 1994 fall soccer
season Saturday.
A menagerie of youths, donning bright-
ly-colored uniforms, trotted onto the
Howard Parade Field for the opening cere-
mony.
After each team and its coach was intro-
duced to a crowd of family and friends, the


youngsters recited the "Athlete's Pledge"
of sportsmanship.
A short time later, the games began.
Energetic children sprinted up and down
the grassy fields, chasing elusive soccer
balls in an attempt to score a prized goal. As
coaches shouted instructions and strategy
to their players, the excited crowd cheered.
The league is comprised of five divi-
sions, 24 teams and 323 participants be-
tween the ages 6-18, according to Vincent
Duncan, youth activities sports director.
Before being assigned to a team, each
player undergoes a pre-season skills evalu-
ation test. This ensures that the teams are as
even as possible, Duncan said.
"In this program, all the kids are winners


so we don't bother keeping track of the wins
and losses," he said. "I get a big thrill seeing
the kids improve over the season."
Duncan emphasized that at this age lev-
el, children should just focus on sportsman-
ship and learning the game.
"Soccer promotes both competition and
friendship," Duncan said. "It's the only
game played in every country in the world
and provides a common bond between play-
ers that overcomes traditional barriers such
as language, customs and nationalism."
After several hours of play, a heavy rain
began to fall. However, it did not dampen
the action on the field. Judging from the
smiles on the faces of the young athletes, a
good time was had by all.


*UI TS


a~

.5


Ih


9 O


Spc. Tom Findtner (Tropic Times)
Several 6- and 7-year-old soccer players chase down a loose ball on opening day of the Howard/Albrook Youth
Activities fall soccer season. The Bullets defeated the G.I. Joes 2-0 in the game.


Maureen Sampson (Tropic Times)
Tourney winner
FORT AMADOR (Tropic
Times) - Lee Weigt putts at the
9th hole Saturday at the Fort
Amador Medal Play tourna-
ment. Nearly 50 golfers partic-
ipated in the tournament where
prizes were given for the best
net and gross score in four dif-
ferentflights. The winning golf-
ers each received a $45 gift
certificate from Amador Golf
Course. Golf course manager
Patricia Peart said these types
of tournaments are held twice
a year. Amador's next tourna-
ment will be the Columbus Day
tournament Oct. 10. It will be a
three-man Mexican best ball
format. Golfers may use only
three clubs, and one of them
must be a putter. Deadline for
signing-up is Oct. 7. Call 282-
4511/4838 for details. Here are
the results of Saturday's tour-
nament:

Championship flight
Gross - Clark Brandenberg, 74
Net- Al Solis, 67

First flight
Gross - Lee Weigt, 75
Net - David Leonard, 64

Second flight
Gross - Alberto Restrepo, 83
Net- Alan Gordon, 65

21 and over flight
Gross - Brent Barrett, 96
Net- Elijah Gordon, 67


High school football continues as
the Curundu Cougars claw Bal-
boa's Red Machine, 22-0.


John Hall reflects on historical week
four and makes predictions for this
week's games.


+SCN AM radio schedule
*Local sports standings
*Fishing tournament


Page 13










14 Tropic Times
4Sept. 30, 1994


SFootball


Cougars maul Red Machine


by Jack Miller
Tropic Times contributor
BALBOA - A sympathetic shoulder will
be provided to any soul not at Balboa Sta-
dium Sept. 23 to witness Buddy Martens'
second half heroics in a 20-0 stomping of
the Balboa Red Machine.
Martens is the first junior in 12 years to
start at quarterback for the Curundu Cou-
gars varsity football team, but his inexperi-
ence certainly did not look like it was con-
stricting him.
"I have complete confidence in my quar-
terback," Cougars Coach Fred Bales said.


"Although he is inexperienced, his devo-
tion to this team has made him a leader."
Before the game, Red Machine Coach
William Fahy commented on the defensive
strategy his team planned to use.
"We'll double team (wide receiver)
Robert Reyes, as all teams do, and hopeful-
ly hit him a few times in the process," he
said. "Our intention is to shake up the entire
Cougars offensive unit with physical play."
The game began just after 5:30 p.m. and
the aforementioned physical play accompa-
nied it. On fourth down and eight, at the
Cougars 30 yard line, the Machine was
called for roughing the kicker, which re-


suited in a first down for Curundu. As the
drive continued, a vicious hit was dealt by
Machine linebacker Sam McGuinness to
Cougars running back Raul Chang for a
seven-yard loss. The drive resulted in a
Lance Von Hollen missed field goal, and
the Cougars came away empty-handed.
The Red Machine's quarterback contro-
versy between junior Jared Holzworth and
sophomore Donnie Husted continued this
night. Holzworth started, but only complet-
ed one pass in the first half. His team's
running game was practically silent, with
the exception of Jason Lloyd's 43-yard
jaunt into Cougars territory late in the first


Spc. Tom Findtner (Tropic Times)
Cougars Jelani Jordan (34) takes a shot from Red Machine defensive end Jason Lloyd as pursuit closes in.


v


Spc. Tom Findtner (Tropic Times)
Machine wide receiver Tony Wrice
soars high above Curundu's Mike
Morales to haul in a catch.


., . ,,'. .





Spc. Tom Flndtner (Tropic Times)
Robert Reyes tries to escape from Machine defenders on a punt return.


half. This resulted in Shawn Scott's missed
field goal and both teams went into the
locker room at the half with zip to show on
the scoreboard.
All that changed when the Machine fum-
bled the opening kickoff and Martens
marched onto the field with his game face
on. Eight plays later, a 13-yard slant pattern
pass to wide receiver Mike Morales made it
6-0, Cougars. Curundu's two-point conver-
sion failed, but a sense of superiority could
be felt on the Cougars sidelines.
The Machine continued to squander their
precious possessions, while the Cougars
kept attacking. Early in the fourth quarter,
rookie running back Jelani Jordan ran an
eight-yard sweep into the end zone to make
it 12-0 Cougars. Once again, Curundu was
denied the two-point conversion, but the
Machine was digging its own grave.
Late in the game, and deep in its own
territory, the Red Machine decided to go for
it on fourth down. They were emphatically
stuffed by the awesome Cougars defense.
Three plays later, Martens hit Morales once
again in the scoring zone to push the Cou-
gars lead to 18-0.
Then Morales made the catch of the
night, a diving effort onto the running track
located along the back of the end zone, to
tack on two more points and seal the Cou-
gars victory at 20-0. That was all she wrote.
The game was marred in the third quarter
when Reyes had to be carried off the field.
He was blindsided by a Machine player,
while providing coverage on a punt. The
report was his left knee is hyperextended,
and he will be out for one to two weeks.
"We respect all opponents, and we feel
fortunate that we were able to come out and
control the tempo of this game," said Coach
Bales after the match.

Coach says 'thanks'
To all Jamboree participants,
At the Jamboree at Cristobal High
School, I was overwhelmed as you dedi-
cated the Jamboree to me. I really didn't
deserve the honor because it has always
been the football players who deserve the
praise. They make it happen. I was only
there to help.
To all Cristobal Tigers, I say a big
thanks and I'm glad to see that the Tiger
spirit is still there. Even in this last year, the
Tigers are still growling.
To the Pacific side, I was humbled by
your words and by your way of including
me in your lives. I felt my Tiger paws were
always so obvious, but you made me real-
ize that love of the game and tradition
speak louder than allegiance to any one
team. You were too good to me. My deep-
est thanks.
It was good to be back in Panama. You
know I've always loved Panama just as
I've always-loved the game of football.
Thank to everyone who helped make the
evening special to me.
Coach Luke Palumbo


League leaders


Rushing
Carries
W. Reese, Devils 43
J. Guerra, Tigers 45
C. Hall, Bulldogs 45
Scoring
TD


Yds.
388
347
169


W. Reese, Devils 5 0
J. Guerra, Tigers 3 0
J. Jordan, Cougars 3 0
Quarterbacks
PA PC %
C. Lampas, Devils 22 14 64
B. Martens, Cougars 45 19 42
A. Beach, Bulldogs 21 6 29
Interceptions
A. Beach, Bulldogs 4


Avg.
9.02
7.71
3.75

Total
30
18
18


Yds.
202
277
106


H. Cabrera, Devil


L. Von Hollen
C. Lampas, Devil
L.Sosa, Kolts


Kick offs
Kicks
9
s 14
4
Punts


Punts Yds.
G. Acosta, Bulldogs 1 52
R. Chang, Cougars 2 85
L.Sosa, Kolts 5 195
Team standings


Devils
Cougars
Bulldogs
Tigers
Kolts
Machine


Pct.
1.000
1.000
.667
.333
.000
.000


Team statistics


Yards Avg.
447 49.6
553 46.3
169 42.2


Avg.
52
42.5
39

PA
0
27
52
35
68
55


Yards rushing
L1.... L'c] fl,.. Dvs


Yards passing
EK 0 U |I


Source: Robert Best













Sports


Tropic Times 1
Sept. 30, 19941


Devils and Cougars
undefeated in football
Week three results:
Curundu Cougars 22, Red Machine 0
Green Devils 8, Cristobal Tigers 0
Balboa Bulldogs 15, Kiwanis Kolts 13
Last Night:
Machine vs. Kolts (BHS) -- game re-
sults determined after press time
Tonight's games:
Tigers at Bulldogs, 5:30 p.m. (BHS)
Devils vs. Cougars, 7:45 p.m. (BHS)


SCN AM Radio 790/1420
airs pro, college football
Saturday
2:30 p.m.: NCAA: Univ. of Colorado at
Univ. of Texas
Sunday
Noon.: NFL: Dallas Cowboys at Wash-
ington Redskins
3 p.m.: NFL: New York Giants at New
Orleans Saints
7 p.m.: NFL: Miami Dolphins at Cincin-
nati Bengals (broadcast on AFRTS televi-
sion audio sound, so watch the game down-
town and listen to English transmission).
Monday
8 p.m.: NFL: Houston Oilers at Pitts-
burgh Steelers
Thursday
7 p.m.: NCAA: Kansas State Univ. at
Univ. of Kansas


Team triathlon scheduled
from Howard Pool
A three-person team triathlon starts Oct.
22 at 6:30 a.m. at the Howard pool. Support
your community and cheer for the partici-
pants. Events include a 1,000-meter swim,
25K bike race, and 10K run. The event is
sponsored by the Howard/Albrook Sports
and Fitness Center, 284-3451.

Albrook Fitness Center
operates with new hours
Because of Operation Safe Haven, hours
at the Albrook Sports and Fitness Center
have been changed temporarily. The gym
will be open 8 a.m.- 1 p.m. and 4-7 p.m. on
weekdays, noon-6 p.m. Saturday, and 1-6
p.m. Sunday.

Amador hosts three-man,
best ball golf tourney
There will be a three-man, best ball golf
tournament with a shotgun start 7:30 a.m.
Oct. 10 at the Amador Golf Course. Regis-
tration closes Oct. 7. There is a $12 fee
covering lunch, prizes and gross and net
winners.

Register now for Army
intramural soccer
Registration for unit level soccer is un-
derway. A clinic is scheduled for 6 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth Services Confer-


ence Room, Building 155, Fort Clayton.
Register at the Directorate of Commu-
nity Activities Sport Division, Building 154,
Fort Clayton.

Bowling centers offer
various programs
The Atlantic Bowling Center has family
specials 6-10 p.m. Monday, Tuesdays and
Friday in October.
If interested in joining a mixed league
call the Curundu Bowling Center.
The Clayton Bowling Center has lunch-
time specials 11 a.m.-1 p.m. weekdays.
Games are 50 cents, shoes are free.
The Howard and Albrook Bowling Cen-
ters have sign ups for intramurals, mixed,
men, women and youth winter leagues.

Anglers go for the big one
in Atlantic tournament
The Club Nautico Caribe, Panama Ca-
nal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal
Yacht Club are sponsoring the second an-
nual Atlantic Interclub Fishing Tournament
through Nov. 30.
First, second and third place-place prizes
will be awarded in the barracuda, wahoo,
kingfish, jack, tuna, marlin, sailfish and
dorado categories. The minimum entry in
the tarpon category is 80 pounds; other
entries must be at least 10 pounds. Fishing
is restricted to Atlantic waters and the
Chagres River.
Call the Club Nautico Caribe at 241-
2220, the Panama Canal Tarpon Club at


243-5316 or the Panama Canal Yacht Club
at 241-5882 to register for the tournament.


Crossroads Tennis Club
sponsors tournament
The Crossroads Tennis Club will spon-
sor a tournament open to members and non-
members 8 a.m. Saturday. All Department
of Defense civilians and active duty mili-
tary are welcome to participate. The tourna-
ment will be held at the Cardenas Village
tennis courts. For more information call
Mike Goldstein at 264-5160 or Wally
Murdoch at 252-2969.

Aerobic workshop offers
certification testing
An aerobics workshop and certification
test is being organized in the Atlantic com-
munity. The testing will be given by the
American Aerobic Association International
and International Sports Medicine Associ-
ation from Pennsylvania. The certification
is valid for two years. A minimum of 15
people are required for the class. For infor-
mation, call Delinda May at 289-3163.


Fun run sponsored by
Rodman Fitness Center
A 5K fun run will be held 6:30 a.m. Oct.
7. The run is open to all active duty military,
Department of Defense civilians and fami-
ly members.Call the Rodman Fitness Cen-
ter to sign up.


Montana fails to generate



scoring drive for first time


John Hall
Rodman NS Public Affairs Office

RODMAN NS - In week four of the National Football
League, history was made on several counts. Joe Montana
was shut out for the first time in his illustrious career, losing
to the Rams 16-0. The Minnesota Vikings permitted a
quarterback to pass for 300 yards for the first time in 40
games, but beat Dan Marino's fish 38-35. The Falcons
won for the first time ever in Washington, stopping the
Redskins 27-20.
Here are my week five predictions:
Brown out - The Jets are reeling from a home loss to
the up-and-down Bears and with good reason. The Jets
were a touchdown favorite and could have moved into a tie
with the Dolphins on top of the AFC East. The Brownies
had trouble with a mediocre Colts squad and have had
problems with the Jets in recent history. The Jets have won
five of the last seven in this series, including three in
Cleveland. Jets 23, Brownies 16.
Giant loss- Although the Giants are the last undefeated
team in the NFC, they are by no means dominating anyone.
They beat the Eagles by five and the Cardinals by three.
Remember, the Buddy Ryan-led Cards were blanked 32-
0 by Cleveland. The Saints did lose to the Skins and edged
the Bucs by two, but looked tough against the 49ers last
week. The Giants must fall from the unbeatens. Saints 17,
Giants 13.


U.S. Air Force
Unit-level Baskteball
American League
Northern Division
W L GB
24th AIS/OSS 9 2 -
24th Trans. 6 7 4
24th AIRPS/SVS 7 6 4
24th Supply (B) 5 7 4.5
Co. A, 1-228th 3 7 5.5
Southern Division
24th SPS (A) 11 0 -
24th MSS 9 3 2.5


Ram slam - The Rams may still be glowing after their
historic win last week. It was extra sweet for many of the
Rams who faced Montana in his 49er days, but it's time for
a letdown. The Falcons are also flying high and actually
own the Rams in the '90s. Atlanta has taken six of the last
seven from its NFC West nemesis. Make it seven of eight.
Falcons 24, Rams 16.
Pop goes the Patsies - The Pats beat the mysterious
Lions who were fresh off a Monday night victory over the
Cowboys. Green Bay didn't have much of a challenge
against the Bucs in a 30-3 win These teams have only
played four times, the last of which was a 45-3 smashing
by the Pack in 1988. With the Pats' high-scoring offense
and porous defense, 45 points is possible, but not probable.
Pack 30, Pats 23.
Steelers drill Oilers - Granted, Pittsburgh is shaky
after a 17-point loss to Seattle, but Houston didn't exactly
stomp the Bengals last week. This is one of the most heated
rivalries in the league, but has lost much glimmer since the
1970s. Cody Carlson is back under centerfor Houston, but
could only muster 20 points on the Kitties. Steelers 24,
Oilers 13.
Bills 26, Bears 10; Cowboys 24, Redskins 10; Lions 16,
Bucs 9; Vikings 27, Cards 10; 49ers 24, Eagles 13;
Seahawks 20; Colts 14; Dolphins 27, Kitties 10. There are
open dates for Denver, Kansas City, San Diego and the
L.A. Raiders.
Last week 8-4, season 31-23, Monday night 3-1.


640th AMSS (B) 2 8 8.5
24th Comm. (B) 0 10 10.5
HHC, 1-228th 7 6 12
National League
Eastern Division
24th Supply (A) 10 1 -
640th AMSS (A) 9 2 1
24th Comm. (A) 6 5 4
24th Med. Grp. 1 10 9
Western Division
24th Maint. Sq. 8 3 -
HSC, 536th 7 4 1
24th CES 6 5 2


National Football League

week four standings
American Conference


Miami
Buffalo
New England
N.Y. Jets
Indianapolis

Cleveland
Pittsburgh
Houston
Cincinnati

San Diego
Kansas City
Seattle
LA Raiders
Denver



N.Y. Giants
Dallas
Philadelphia
Washington
Arizona

Minnesota
Chicago
Detroit
Green Bay
Tampa Bay

San Francisco
Atlanta
LA Rams
New Orleans


24th SPS (B) 2 9 6
U.S Army Unit-level Basketball
Green League
HHC, 5-87th 6 1
JOTB 6 1
Navy 6 3 1
549th 5 3 1.5
Co. B, 5-87th 5 1 1.5
Co. A, 5-87th 5 4 2
1097th 4 5 3
747th 2 6 4.5
Co. C, 5-87th 1 7 5.5
Marines 0 9 7


East
W L T Pct
3 1 0 .750
3 1 0 .750
2 2 0 .500
2 2 0 .500
1 3 0 .250
Central
3 1 0 .750
2 2 0 .500
1 3 0 .250
0 4 0 .000
West
4 0 0 1.000
3 1 0 .750
3 1 0 .750
1 3 0 .250
0 4 0 .000
National Conference


East
L T
0 0
1 0
1 0
3 0
3 0
Central
1 0
2 0
2 0
2 0
3 0
West
1 0
2 0
2 0
3 0


Pct
1.000
.667
.667
.250
.000

.750
.500
.500
.500
.250

.750
.500
.500
.250


PF
126
83
123
69
90

91
70
65
71

114
84
106
95
92


PF
79
63
66
88
29

100
76
71
67
43

119
96
62
63


U.S. Navy Unit-level
Basketball League
Roadrunners 13 1
SBU-26 12 2
IANTN 7 7
Port Svcs. 6 8
PWD 6 8
Marines 5 9
NSWU-8 5 9
SCIATTS 2 12


Top five advanced to play-offs, which
began Monday and ended Thursday.


AL


A


I Local standings I










S News


16 Tropic Times
1O Sept. 30, 1994


Environmental

team checks up

on 24th Wing

HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) - A team of
experts from throughout the Air Combat Command
came to Panama last week to help officials from the
24th Wing evaluate how well their organizations and
people are protecting the environment in which they
work and live.
The team also evaluated the base's compliance
with the Final Governing Standards for Environmen-
tal Compliance on Department of Defense installa-
tions in Panama. These are the "Environmental Pro-
tection Agency-type" regulations under which Howard
operates.
Members of this external Environmental Compli-
ance Assessment and Management Program team are
basically here to verify and confirm the findings an
internal ECAMP team made in January, said Lt. Col.
John Miller, chairman of the 24th Wing's pollution
prevention subcommittee.
"They'll also look for any other findings the inter-
nal team may have missed," Miller said.
Overall, Howard did quite well on the assessment,
said Col. Bruce Sutherland, vice wing commander at
Dyess AFB, Texas, and chief of the ECAMP team.
"Like all bases, you do have some problems, but
you know what they are, and you're being proactive
in your efforts to correct them," Sutherland said.
Stan Scott, an ECAMP coordinator from Head-
quarters Air Combat Command's oversight section,
agreed with the colonel's assessment.
"Howard has come a long way since the last time
we were here, back in February of '93," Scott said.
"You have a much larger environmental flight now
and that's helping you give increased attention to the
ECAMP protocols."
These "protocols" are the specific areas of concern
on which the ECAMP team members focus-prima-
rily hazardous waste, and hazardous materials, air
quality, water quality, and solid waste.
"We saw a lot of improvement in your compliance
efforts," Scott added, "especially in the areas of fuels
management and in your effective use of natural and
cultural resources."
There have been some shortfalls that tend to ham-
per Howard's compliance efforts, but base officials
have voiced the hope that the team's findings will help
get the funding needed to ensure all compliance issues
are closed. Actually, this is one of the principal
advantages that can be derived from the external
team's visi, officials said.
"A lot of people react with disbelief and say 'yeah,
right!' when we tell them we're just here to help
them," Scott said, "but it is true! Having findings
annotated on an ECAMP report can often speed up the
release of otherwise 'unavailable' funds."
Since Headquarters U. S. Air Force first put the
program into effect four years ago, the number of
external ECAMP findings has risen at a steady rate,
said Capt. Kathyleen Pare, program manager for the
Headquarters ACC. "There's also been a correspond-
ing increase in enforcement actions.
"This is not because of a decrease in compliance by
the bases," she said, "but rather because the program
is getting more 'picky' in response to stricter regula-
tors and more stringent laws. In fact, we have found
massive improvements in environmental compliance
at our bases."
In years gone by, assessments often found ex-
amples of "gross noncompliance," but these days
they're being replaced with smaller areas of noncom-
pliance, Pare said.
Still, regardless of the severity of noncompliance,
specific areas are subject to regulatory enforcement
actions. The internal and external teams' assessments
are meant to be management tools, but they may also
be used to help prevent (stateside) Air Force installa-
tions from receiving regulatory enforcement actions,
which include letters and notices of non-compliance,
notices of violations, warning letters, and even fines
and penalties.
"Their presence does tend to 'stir things up' a bit
when team members go through the process of iden-
tifying ECAMP discrepancies," Miller said. "Ulti-
mately, however, it is in our best interest to identify
and correct these problems, and that's what the team
helps us do."


Military police join forces



for Safe Haven mission


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
JTF-Safe Haven Public Affairs Office
EMPIRE BASE CAMP - Providing a safe and secure
environment for Cubans living in the community camps
here is one of the many jobs of 518 Army and Air Force
military police officers from throughout the United States.
"The military and security police have the mission to
provide security and protection for the Cubans at the
community camps," said Capt. David Chase, deputy Pro-
vost Marshal, Operation Safe Haven. "Additionally, we
have the missions of supporting a quick reactionary force,
escorting people visiting the camps, running the check-
points and providing security for the hospital, the military


working and living out here and the equipment
being used."
As part of the varied missions of the military
and security police, the 258th Military Police
Company of Fort Polk, La., provides security to
Camp No. 1.
"The MPs working at Camp No. 1 work the
gates, perimeters and within the community
camp itself," Chase said. "And, even though
they work 12-hour shifts and live on site, these
soldiers extended to stay here for two more
months."
The enthusiasm of the MPs at Camp No. 1
not only shows in their job, but in their free time.
Many spend off-duty time with the Cubans
playing sports or entertaining the children.
"I consider myself fortunate to be able to
contribute to the quality of life for the Cubans,"
said Spc. Davis Smith, 258th MP Co.
As for Spc. Kelly Mundt, also with the 258th
MP Co., his favorite part of the mission is being
able to play with the children of the community
camp. "I'm glad to be a part of this operation,
especially with thekids.Thekids are thecoolest."
In addition to the Army, the Air Force has
sent nine, 44-person elements, known as flights,
to Panama from throughout the states, said
Capt. John Brooker, Provost Marshal S-3 offic-


"Though this type of deployment is new to them, the
security police of the Air Force are doing a great job," he
said. 'The morale is high throughout the unit."
For one airman from Holloman AFB, N.M., being in
Panama is an experience he is enjoying.
"I like being down here, this type of operation doesn't
happen all the time," said Airman Kevin O'Harrow, 49th
Security Police Squadron. "I'm having a good time."
Working together is also a unique part of the operation
for both the Army and the Air Force, but they have found
more common ground than differences.
"Even though we have some differences in such things
as paperwork and terminology, our missions are the same,"
Brooker said. "We are all policemen."



1- . N.


. -. . ....
*.^ - ,f^:;-*t� . * : .. � .. .
John Hall (U.S. Navy)
A Cuban child gives "five" to military police Spc. J. David
Parker. Parker is assigned to Operation Safe Haven from
Fort Polk, La.


Maintenance excellence competition

Atlantic unit to represent MP battalion

FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO - Atlantic) - The 549th Company's leadership came into play, Fleschner said.
Military Police Company has been chosen to represent the "A good maintenance program starts with strong lead-
92nd Military Police Battalion in a U.S. Army South-level ership," he said. "You can have the best motor pool and
maintenance excellence competition. mechanics there are, but if it lacks good leadership or
The 549th MP Co. will represent the 92nd MPBn. against command emphasis, you won't have a good overall
154th Signal Battalion in the heavy density category of the maintenance program."
Army Award for Maintenance Of course, the soldiers are
Excellence. Whicheverunitwins important to the program's suc-
at this level will represent US- cess too, Fleschner added.
ARSO at the Department of the "'The operators and first-line
Army level. . supervisors have played a key
The 549th MP Co. was se- role in what the unit has accom-
lected to represent the battalion polished " he said. "If not for
based on the results of a com- them, we wouldn't be repre-
mand inspection in which the senting the battalion for this
unit received nine commendable award."
ratingsoutof 15 functional main- �. The 92nd MP Bn. soldiers
tenance areas, said Sgt. 1st Class from the 549th MP Co. are no
ClarenceS.Fleschner,motorser- strangers to the Army Award
geant, 549th MP Co. -.-. for Maintenance Excellence.
Making it this far in the main- 'i -.". The unit won the award at the
tenance competition didn't re- . USARSO level in 1992 and was
quire much extra preparation, runner-up in 1991, Fleschner
Fleschner said. -. said.
"We've worked hard to keep Additionally, the company's
a high standard throughout the sister unit, the 534th Military
year, so we don't have to work Police Company, won the award
hard to prepare for a command in 1993, Fleschner added.
inspection or for an award like Spec.Perry M. Thomas, pre-
this," Fleschner said. Sgt. Rick Emert (U.S.Army) scribed load list clerk, said the
Sustaining a good mainte- Pfc. Aubey Taylor, generator mechanic, judging was strict in 1992 when
nance level has more important performs maintenance on a HWWMV. the unit won the award.
benefit than good inspection results, however. "They inspected our daily operations and mainte-
"You have to have a top-notch maintenance operation to nance, the dispatch of vehicles and just about everything
sustain combat readiness," he said. "It's something you have that's supposed to happen in the motor pool," he said. "It
to do and keep up daily." was pretty strict."
In order to sustain a good maintenance level, first a good "Winning that year made us feel like all that hard work
level must be reached; that was where the 549th MP all year long was worth it."


a











1 Tropictivities
Sept 30, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page B1


-.4- -





- . r


n ". . -. -



Wind surf in Coronado
Coronado beach staffers help a would-be wind surfer get sailing. For more beach and resort activities, see Page B3.


Spc. Jeffrey Purdum (courtesy)


Atlantic Community Cub Scout
dens are gearing up for a new
year of fun activities.


STOMP instructors visit Panama
to talkto Exceptional Family Mem-
ber Program parents.


*Movies, Page B8
*TV, Page B9
*Potpourri, Page B12










B 2 Tropic Times
d Sept. 30, 1994


#Youth news


Atlantic Cub Scouts gear up for new year


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) - Pack 3 of
the Cub Scout Dens of the Atlantic Community are gear-
ing up for a new year of fun activities.
The year will begin with registration at a booth in the
Christmas Crafts Fair at the Fort Davis Community Club
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Applications will be taken for
all ages of Cub Scouts and adult volunteers. Fees for
membership for the 1994-1995 school year will be paid
by the pack activity fund. Scouts will receive a T-shirt
and handbook with their registration.
Dress uniforms, while desirable, will not be mandato-
ry. Memberships are good for one year and can be
transferred to anywhere in the United States at any time.


Meetings, starting in October, are as follows:
*Tiger Cubs - age 7/first grade, meet 2 p.m. second
Saturday of the month with parent at the Fort Espinar Li-
brary.
*Wolf Cubs - age 8/second grade, meet 2:15-3:15
p.m. Thursday at the Fort Davis School.
*Bear Cubs - age 9/third grade, meet 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday at the Fort Espinar youth center.
*Webelo Cubs - ages 10-1 l/fourth-fifth grades meet
3:45-5 p.m. Saturday at Quarters 522C, Fort Davis.
*Pack Meetings 5:30 p.m. fourth Thursday of each
month at the Espinar Youth Center. Call 289-3748 for in-
formation.


Scouts are back - active in community


COROZAL (Tropic Times) - Here is some of the latest
Scouting information:
*Pack 5 (Balboa, Amador and Quarry Heights area) is
looking for a Webelos leader for seven, fourth and fifth
grade boys. Anyone with scouting experience who would
like to lead this den, call Carolyn McAllister at 282-3490.
*Local Eagle Scout Larry Kemp, 13, needs communi-
ty participation in a project aimed at helping Cuban fami-
lies. The following items are needed:
Personal items such as towels, tennis shoes, sandals,
undergarments, grooming items, soap and toothbrush con-
tainers, hair accessories, sewing supplies, fabric, small
gym bags and writing materials.
Clothing items such as handbags, belts, wallets, shoe
laces, summer clothing, sun glasses and handkerchiefs.


Typico
Students from St.
Christoper's Episco-
pal School, Panama
City, entertained Fort
Clayton Elementary
School students with
typical Panamanian
dancing, Sept. 15.
Third grade "Conjunto
Tipico" students and
Junior High "LaCoral
Poetica" students
were present.


Recreational items such as baseball equipment, domi-
no sets, soccer balls, volleyball sets, playing cards, foot-
balls, horseshoe sets, badminton sets, Frisbees, various
board games, Spanish paperback books and magazines,
crayons and children's toys of all types.
If you have any items to donate, call your area coordi-
nator to arrange for convenient drop-off or pick-up. Coor-
dinators are:
Jerry Scott, Quarters 11 Albrook, 286-3336.
Laura McDill, Quarters 404B Amador, 282-3092.
Sherry or Ryan Hart, Quarters 516 Clayton, 287-5998.
Velma Reilly, Quarters 1980B Curundu, 286-4788.
Sherri or Mike Murray, Quarters 301 Kobbe, 284-5180.
Marian Merz Quarters 7 Quarry Heights, 282-3693.
Eva Liehr, 7304B Cardenas - PCC housing, 252-5985.


1 - ~ 43.,


I


-. A.. ;
Pat Milton (SOUTHCOM)
Save our World
Students from Fort Clayton and Diablo Elementary Schools' enrichment program were honored
Tuesday for donating their published writings on the flora and fauna of tropical rainforests to the
Metropolitan National Park. The project was sponsored by the Smithsonian Tropical Institute.
Their work took one year to complete and is now available at the park's ecological and educational
store for $1.50 each. The funds raised by the sale will help support the ecological programs at the
park. Pictured (left to right) in front are: Brooke Stringfellow, 4th grade at Fort Clayton; Leslie
Kattelmann, 4th grade at Fort Clayton; Christina Rivera, 5th grade at Diablo; Amanda Pacheco, 4th
grade at Diablo; Maureen O'Connor, 5th grade at Diablo; Callie Holland, 6th grade at Fort Clayton.
In back (left to right) are: Maria Bernal, park store sociologist; Denise Ellis, 5th grade at Diablo;
Shannon Kiekhoefer, 4th grade at Fort Clayton; Heather Downie, 6th grade at Fort Clayton; and
Betsy Imig, enrichment program teacher. Not pictured is Mary Sawdey, 2nd grade at Fort Clayton.


Youth centers to issue ID cards
The Fort Clayton Youth and Senior Teen Centers are
changing membership policies effective Oct. 15. In an ef-
fort to insure safety and security, the centers will issue
photo identification cards. These will be used to verify


that the card bearer is registered with Youth Services. The
card will also contain data necessary to contact parents in
the event of an emergency. Registration will take place 6-
8 p.m. Monday-Oct. 7 and Oct. 10-14 in Building 155.
Parents must accompany children through the registra-
tion process. For information, call 287-3506 or 287-6451.


r, Yot civte


Albrook/Howard
*Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Donations to the Cubans of toys, games, Span-
ish books and videos, underwear and clothes can
be made at the Howard Youth Center (284-5650).
Howard Preteen Dance, 7:30-10:30 p.m. to-
day. For ages 8-12.
Hideout Teen Council meeting 5 p.m. Tues-
day at the Albrook Youth Center teen lounge. Jun-
ior and Senior teens are needed to fill positions.
Transportation will be provided from Howard,
Kobbe and Farfan.
DJ face off and teen dance 8:30-11:30 p.m.
Oct. 8. Party at the Howard NCO Club with the
"Anthill Posse." Transportation is provided from
Albrook Youth Center and Fort Clayton Senior
Teen Center.
Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday eve-
nings. Classes for children, teens and adults.
The Hideout Teen Lounge is coming soon to
Albrook AFB.
Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for mem-
bers and $35 for non-members. Call to register.
Cheerleading lessons, Fridays at Albrook
Youth Center and Saturdays at Howard Youth Cen-
ter.
Guitar lessons, by appointment 1-6 p.m. Satur-
days.
Spanish lessons, for children and adults. Tues-
days and Thursdays at 4 and 5 p.m.
Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesday.
Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four
days a week. Special preschooler class Saturdays.
Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available
for ages four to adult.
*Child Development Center 284-6135:
Family Day Care Providers are needed in the
Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 for
information.

Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Dodgeball 3 p.m. Oct. 7.
Panama folklore fair noon-4 p.m. Oct. 8.
Junior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays Building 155.
The new school hours for the center are: ages
6-14, 2:30-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday; ages 6-11,
2:30-6 p.m. Friday; ages 12-14, 2:30-8 p.m. Fri-
day; ages 6-11, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday; ages 12-
14, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday.
Youth Services is looking for piano and gym-
nastics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at
287-3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton.
Arts and crafts, Mondays.
Cooking experiences, Tuesdays.
Outdoor games, Thursdays.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Popcorn and movies, Sundays.
Senior Teen Employment Program, year-
round program to develop job skills and earn mon-
ey for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are avail-
able at the center.
Two paddle table tennis tournament Satur-
day. Free Pizza for players.
Make-up Secrets and Hints I, by Revlon 6-7
p.m. Wednesday.
Bowling at the Clayton Bowling Center 3
p.m. Oct. 8. Meet at the center at 2 p.m.
*Child Development Center 287-3301:
CDC provides high quality, developmental
child care for children 6 weeks to 12 years old.
Full day care and hourly care available. Call
287-5657.

Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Piano classes, 4-6 p.m. for 30-minute lessons
Monday and Wednesdays. There is a fee of $20
per person each month.
Arts and crafts, 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Saturday sports, noon to 6 p.m.
Karate Shotokan 4-5 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday. The fee is $20 per person.
Teen splat master noon Saturday. The fee is
$50 for a six man team.
Scavenger hunt 3 p.m. Oct. 7.


A:
(courtesy)










* Travel


Tropic Times 9
Sept. 30, 1994 B J


'Sea' everything



there is to see ...



at Panama's



beautiful beaches


by Sgt. Cass Purdum
Tropic Times staff
ross the canal from Panama
City, over the Bridge of the
Americas, onto the Pan
American Highway, and you are
beachward bound.
From Punta Chame (Chame Point)
to Farrallon, stretch more than 40 miles
of sun-blessed Pacific beaches for
surfing, sunning, swimming, snorkeling
and more.
Punta Chame, Nueva Gorgona,
Coronado, San Carlos, Turiscentro San
Carlos, El Palmar, Rio Mar, Santa
Clara and other beaches in the area,
have overnight facilities and there are
many restaurants, cantinas and rest
stops along the way.
And now, nestled in 158 acres of
land at Coronado Beach 50 miles west
of Panama City is Panama's first five-
star hotel. The Club Suites De Golf
Playa Coronado has activities to please
almost anyone. There are restaurants
and bars for casual and formal dining,
plus conference rooms for business and
professional meetings or seminars.
Nearby, an 18-hole, par 72 champi-
onship golf course with 7,200 yards of
landscaped greens and fairways is
considered one of the best in Latin
America.
All up and down the coast are other,
less expensive, dwellings to while away
your time.
From small, simple hotel rooms near
the beaches, to cabins right on the
beaches, if you search, you'll find just


about anything that will fit your budget
Beach combers who don't want to
stay out of town overnight, might try one
of the many other beautiful beaches on
the Pacific side of Panama.
The fun is boundless. Explore
Panama's interior and find out what
you've been missing.


x


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lit. �.�-�,.,.


odm a


Spc. Jeffrey Purdum (Courtesy)
Visitors at Coronado beach prepare for a lazy afternoon sail. Boats and
winder surfers are available for rent in the area.


WI'�


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Spc. Jeffrey Purdum (Courtesy)
Families enjoy a lazy day at Coronado beach. Coronado does have a life guard on duty.


44 *4 .4.4
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Sgt. Cass Purdum (Tropic Times)


Coronado features a professional, 18-hole, par 72 golf course.


doommalmom- -








B4 Tropic Times
SSept. 30, 1994


# Focus on Panama


4'


Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Lewis (U.S. Navy)
The Iglesia del Carmen on Via Espana, with its
Gothic architecture, is both a religious and
tourist attraction.


Cathedrals


illustrate


architecture

T three things were left behind by the
Spanish conquerors when they left the
American continent: language, customs
and religion.
Aside from the Portuguese language spoken in
Brazil, English that is used in the United States and
Belize, and French spoken in some of the Caribbean
islands and Canada, the Spanish language prevails in
the rest of the continent known as Latin America.
When talking about religion, the conquistadoress"
were not only successful in establishing the- Catholic
Church as the dominant religion, but also made sure
that churches and missions were built so they would
not diminish in the years to come. Panama was no
exception to the rule and several of those first
religious structures still stand today, while others have
been built in more recent times.
Four centuries have already gone by, yet the basic
structure of what was the Cathedral of Old Panama
still defies time, sun and rain. What is left of it and the
rest of the city sacked and burned by the English
pirate Henry Morgan is now one of the country's
main tourist attractions. Its golden altar slipped away
from the hands of the invaders thanks to the daring
and intelligence of a layman, and now graces St.
Joseph's Church in the colonial section of Panama
City.
There, in that same area, is the Santo Domingo
Church, which happened to be a decisive factor in the
construction of the Panama Canal. The firmness of its
flat arch - still intact today - proved to those
interested in building the great waterway that Panama
was a place where earthquakes were practically non-
existent and therefore, the safest and best location for
a route uniting the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans.
Slowly fading away are the hand-carved wooden
images of the 17th century San Francisco Church in
the Province of Veraguas, and still sturdy is the
ancient colonial church in Nata.
However, changes take place as time marches on.
The temples of today are built along different and
more unusual architectural lines, such as the Virgen
del Carmen Church, just a step away from the El
Panama Hotel; the dome-shaped B'hai Temple on the
way to Las Cumbres; the San Antonio Church in the
Miraflores community; and the new Javier Church,


(Tropicn Tmes)
The impressive dome-shaped B'hai Temple can be seen from a distance while driving along the
Transisthmian Highway to Las Cumbres.


.*.~*%t ~**


U
U


a


I'


Petty Officer 2nd Class BIII Lewis (U.S. Navy)
The Metropolitan Cathedral colonial construction began in 1688 and was completed in 1796.
the main feature of which is its pulpit in the center of new tendency in the architectural design of places of
the congregation. worship in Panama, a far cry from what they were
These are but a few outstanding examples of the like in the days of the Spanish conquerers.


by Rosemary Chong, Tropic Times staff


- � *-*









LCoommunity news



STOMP gets attention


Instructors give specialized training to

parents of exceptional family members


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Some children
stomp their feet when they want your attention. Two
women who recently conducted a workshop for families
with special medical and educational needs however, didn' t
need to stomp their feet to get their audience's attention.
Heather Hebdon and Sandy Mitchell, professional in-
structors for Specialized Training of Military Parents,
visited Panama recently as guests of the Exceptional Fam-
ily Member Program. STOMP, a private, nonprofit, feder-
ally funded program, provides training and assistance to the
community - to parents, educators and fellow profes-
sionals of the Family Advocacy Program.
The workshop covered such things as rights and respon-
sibilities of family members with special needs in getting
appropriate special education services, testing and assess-
ment of children, and the Individual Education Program.
Instructions were also given on how to communicate with
schools and professionals, maintaining home records, tran-
sition back to the United States, wills and guardianship.
Hebdon, the mother of three children with disabilities
and the "Mother of STOMP," has dedicated the last 19
years of her life to helping members of the Department of
Defense community with special needs.
"These family members are still citizens with rights,"
she said. We must help them attempt to lead productive and
satisfying lives," Hebdon said.
"We're all people with a variety of points of view," she
said: "The special needs of children have rights in the
educational system. For adults with special needs, nothing
is mandatory; the provision of services is available to adults
only when funds are available."
Children who are school age must receive services, and
parents must be effective advocates in the educational
process, she said. Parents need to know how to approach


the system and talk to all the professionals in the field.
"Educate yourself on your child's disabilities. Know
your rights and responsibilities," Hebdon said. "Learn how
to go around brick walls - because you will run into these
walls. But know that federal mandates have given you
rights."
"View these mandates as tools, not weapons, to be
regarded. You are the only constant in your child's life,"
she said. "You must have open communication with your
school work as a team. Don't be afraid to be creative."
All children are eligible for a free education. There are
"zero rejects." Hebdon said that an appropriate education
can be negotiated between the school and parent. "Not the
Mercedes, not the bicycle, but the Ford," she said. "It will
be good enough to get you there so you can enjoy the trip,
but it won't be a luxurious trip."
In addition to Hebdon's points, Mitchell reviewed de-
velopment of Individual Education Plans for special needs
children, stating that communication is critical if the IEP is
to work.
"It's a collaboration of mutual respect for the child's
skills and knowledge, combined with understanding, em-
pathy, shared planning and decision making," she said. An
open two-way sharing of information between the school
and the family, absent of labeling and blaming.
"The teacher must provide a joint evaluation of the
child's progress, offering opinions but ensuring the family
knows these are suggestions and not the only options,"
Mitchell said.
"We're the only consistent piece of our children's
lives," Hebdon said. "We are ultimately responsible for the
habilitation level of any individual child."
For more information about the Exceptional Family
Member Program call Lakshmi Kumar at 287-49212.


Hospice Foundation reaches out to military families


The Hospice Foundation of America has begun an
information outreach program to military people and their
families. The new program is intended to inform military
personnel about hospice care for family members who are
suffering from terminal illness - to provide a caring, home
or home-like environment to those for whom cure and
recovery are no longer an option.
"The particularly difficult circumstances imposed on
military personnel by long family separations, frequent
moves and unpredictable deployments place a heavy bur-
den on military people," explained Capt. John Dewey, U.S.
Navy (retired), vice president of the Hospice Foundation.
"This new outreach program is intended to assist military
family members in coping with terminal illness and in















. .


finding the help they need, when they need it."
Hospice is a special kind of care designed to provide
comfort and support to patients and their families in the
final stages of terminal illness. It seeks to enable patients
to carry on their remaining days, weeks or months in an
alert and pain-free manner, with symptoms under control.
As part of the outreach program, the Hospice Founda-
tion is providing information to military chaplains, family
service centers and health care professional at military
bases, to assist them in helping military personnel under-
stand and arrange hospice care when needed.
For additional information on hospice care, write: Hos-
pice Foundation of America, 1334 G Street, NW, Suite
605, Washington, D.C. 20005, or call (202) 638-5419.



. -- . . - . .


* *1.


Transit certificates
"Order of the Ditch" certificates are available at the Rodman Public Affairs Office for people who
have transited the Panama Canal. The cost is $6 for a 12-by-18 inch and wallet-size cerfiificate.
For more information, call 283-5644/5461.


Tropic Times B 5
Sept. 30, 1994B


Clayton
The Protestant Women of the Chapel general
meeting will be held 9 a.m. Thursday at the Fort
Clayton Chapel. The program this month is "Easy as
ABC?" a discussion -of public, private and home
schooling. Refreshment and fellowship will be held
following the program. For child care information,
call Joyce Walker at 287-3247.
The Army Child Development Services an-
nounces a fee adjustment effective today for all
Army Child Development Centers. The adjustment
will affect full and part day programs. Though there
is a fee adjustment, the cost will remain under $2.55
an hour. For information, see your local center.
Spaces are available now in the CDS part-day
program at Fort Clayton for the afternoon session
that meets 1-3 p.m. Preschoolers must be 3 years old
by Oct. 31 and toddlers must be 2 years old by Oct.
31. Call 287-5507/5104 for information.
The Department of Defense Dependent
Schools in Panama, along with Army Communi-
ty Service are conducting "Child Find Activi-
ties" in an effort to locate all eligible children with
disabilities in need of special education services.
Newly arrived military and U.S. Government-spon-
sored families with dependents in need of special
education and medically related services should
contact their local DoD school for program planning
and enrollment. Contact any local DoD school or the
Exceptional Family Member Program manager at
287-4921/5073.
U.S. Army Public Affairs is coordinating the
1994 Joint Task Force-Panama Christmas Spon-
sorship Program. Units or community groups
wanting to participate this year should call USAR-
SO PAO at 287-3007/4109.
The 142nd Medical Battalion and 235th Sup-
port Battalion family support group will meet 7
p.m. Friday in the battalion dayroom. Meetings are
open to family members and unit soldiers.
The telephone number for the La Leche
League and mothers seeking help or information
about breastfeeding is 287-6592.

Howard/Albrook
The Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses' Club
is sponsoring its annual bazaar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct.
29 at the Howard Enlisted Members Club. The
bazaar will feature a bake sale and handicrafts from
Central and South America. For information, call
284-6874.
A list of teenagers who have successfully com-
pleted the Babysitting 101 course is available at
the Howard/Albrook Child Development Centers,
Howard/Albrook Youth Centers and the Howard
Family Support Center. Teenagers are qualified in
CPR, First Aid, and basic child care.
The Albrook Stables is offering trail rides and
pony rides by appointment only. Call 287-3333/
4411 for appointments.
The Howard Child Development Center is
looking for potential Family Day Care Providers
for the Albrook Area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/
6135 for more information.

Atlantic
For people transferring to new duty stations, the
Army Community Service Relocation Assistance
Office helps in the search for housing, employment
and educational possibilities for servicemembers
and their family members. Call 289-4021/4636 for
more information.

Miscellaneous
The Officers' and Civilians' Wives Club-Pa-
cific Pumpkin Patch Christmas Bazaar will be
held 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 22 at Club Amador. In
addition, individual and family professional Christ-
mas portrait photos will be taken in the La Concha
Room of Club Amador on the day of the bazaar.
Reasonably priced packages will be available in
plenty of time for Christmas. More than 100 vendors
will be showing goods of all nature. This is the
perfect opportunity to buy some special Christmas
gifts.









B 6 Tropic Times
0 Sept. 30, 1994


jLNo


// //


/


a 0 0


/ Rodman
*Information, Tour and Travel:
/ Moonlight cruise 6:30p.m. today and
Oct. 15, $21. Cruise out to Taboga Island
for cocktails and hors d'oeuvres by moon-
light, while viewing Panama City's dra-
matic skyline at night.
Downtown shopping 9 a.m. Wednes-
/ day and Oct. 27, $8. Shop Panama's
Central Avenue and Via Espana.
Bambito, Chiriqui, Oct. 7-10, $240
/ per person/double occupancy. Three days
and four nights at the Bambito resort.
Transportation, meals and tours included
in fee. Sign-up by Monday.
Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. Oct. 8
and 21, $65, two people needed. Visit the
tropical research island in the Panama
Canal's Gatun Lake.
Trolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. Oct. 8
and 22, $48/person. Fish Panama's prolif-
ic waters for marlin, sailfish, dolphin (fish),
bonita, Spanish mackeral and more. Fee
includes captain, gear, lures and iced cool-
ers.
El Valle 7 a.m. Oct. 9 and 23, $12.


Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits
and vegetables and visit a nature pre-
serve.
Panama City tour 9 a.m. Oct. 12 and
22, $8. Visit the Golden Altar, the French
Plaza and more.
Free Zone shopping 7 a.m. Oct. 10
and 26, $12.
San Bias Islands 6 a.m. Oct. 14-15,
$149 fee includes transportation, accom-
modations, food, island tours and activi-
ties.
Bottom-fishing on the Vargas, Oct.
16 and 30, $35 adults, $20 kids under 14.
A great outing forthe whole family. Catch
snapper, grouper and other bottom feed-
ing fish. Fee includes captain, gear, live
bait and iced coolers.

Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
ter:
Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fri-
days, $13.
El Valle shopping 6:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m. Oct. 9, 16 and 30, $13.
Beer Brewery & lock tour 9 a.m.-3


p.m. Oct. 12, $6.
Dining out Italian style 6-10 p.m.
Oct. 19, $3.
*Outdoor adventures:
Drakes Island scuba, snorkeling 5
a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, $22 snorkelers, $47
divers.
Gold panning in Bique, 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Tuesday, $12.
El Valle horseback riding, 7 a.m.-4
p.m. Oct. 15, $24.

Clayton
*Valent Recreation Center:
El Valle 6:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Sunday.
Panama City tour6:30a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Oct. 8.
Montego Bay, Jamaica Oct. 7-10.
Chiriqui mountain tour Oct. 7-10.
Panama City shopping 9a.m.-3 p.m.,
Oct. 15.
*Outdoor Recreation Center:
There is Contadora Island transit ser-
vice Friday through Monday. Fees are
$35 adults and $20 children 12 and under
round trip, $25 adults and $15 children
one way.


Whitewater rafting in Chiriqui Oct. 8-
10, $130 includes transportation, meals,
lodging, equipment and guide.
Ecotourism trip to a Chocoe Indian
Village Oct. 15, $30 adults, $20 children
under 12. Visitors can bring donations for
the school children.
Partial transits of the Panama Canal
7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, $35 adults, $15
children 12 years old and younger. A mini-
mum of 20 people is needed for a partial
transit any other day of the week.
Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel op-
portunity to Montego Bay any Sunday
through Wednesday. Packet includes air-
fare, three nights hotel accommodations,
and transfer. Prices vary from $300-$600
depending on the hotel. Optional tours can
be scheduled upon request.

Balboa
*Balboa Dive Club:
The club is organizing a trip to Isla
Iguana Oct. 8-10. The $140 fee covers
two-night accommodations, meals, transpor-
tation and three guided boat dives. Sign up
early, space is limited. Call 263-4998.


0 0


Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Center:
Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturday at
Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195.
Spanish lessons 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Thurs-
days at Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195.
Martial arts classes at Howard and Al-
brook Youth Centers, 284-4700.
Tae Kwon Do karate classes at Zodiac
Center for children and adults.
Beginner and advanced dog obedience
classes, $32 for 4 weeks.
Beginner and advanced English and Span-
ish classes offered monthly.
*Albrook Auto shop:
Air conditioning service and repair 12:30-
5 p.m. daily except Tuesday and Wednesday.
Wheel alignment diagnostic and service
classes are held 3-9 p.m. Monday, Thursdays
and Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday.
*Howard and Albrook pools
Intro to scuba, free, call for appointment.
Open water scuba class Saturday at
Howard, Oct. 15 at Albrook, $145.
Advanced scuba Oct. 19 at Howard
Water aerobics for advanced adult swim-
mers at Howard and Albrook.
*Howard Wood Skills Center, Bidg. 722
Qualification class 10 a.m.-noon Saturday,
free. Learn to use the equipment.
Clayton
*Fort Clayton Pool:
The pool is looking for qualified teachers
for swimming and water aerobics. Call 287-
6660.
Beginning and advanced swimming les-
sons 2:15-5:45 p.m. Monday through Thurs-


days for adults and children over 3 years. Fee:
$20 for 12 classes.
*Fort Clayton Boat/Scuba Shoo:
Open water scuba class meets first and
third Monday of each month, $125. Includes
five pool sessions, five theory sessions and
four open water dives.
Long set equipment rental $19 per day.
*Valent Recreation Center:
Private piano and guitar lessons available
weekday evenings.
Korean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday.
Rodman
*Navv Morale, Welfare and Recreation
Office:
The Navy MWR is seeking qualified in-
structors to teach Spanish and French lan-
guage courses. Applicants should have prior
experience in teaching elementary and con-
versational language courses. Call 283-4301.
Curundu
*Pacific Theatre Arts Centre:
Reservations for Christmas Village ta-
bles 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday Centre.
Piano lessons are held 3-7 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesdays and Fridays. Open to
students ages six and older.
Martial arts 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Open to all ages
Voice lessons are held 3-5:30 p.m. Wednes- -<
days and Thursdays.
Guitar lessons are held 3-6 p.m. Tuesday
Registration for all dance classes is under
way at Building 2060, Curundu. Jazz lessons
are available for teens and adults as follows:
I: 5-6 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays $32.
II: 6-7 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays,
$32.
Other classes: modem, ballet, tap, folklor-
ic, salsa, belly dancing and saxophone.
/4


- 1 ,

(Courtesy)
Saxophone lessons
Toby Knight, saxophone instructor, is teaching half hour lessons 5-8 p.m.
Monday and Thursdays at the Pacific Theatre Arts Center, Curundu. For
more information, call, 286-3814.


Tops In Blue
+Howard Base Theater:
The world famous group of active-
duty Air Force talent "Tops In Blue,"
will return to Panama for two
performances 7:30 p.m. Oct. 6 and 7 at
the Howard Base Theater. The talented
musical troupe has selected "Feel Like
Singing" as the theme for its "World


Tour '94." This year, Tops In Blue will
emphasize the importance of music to
the success of movies, presenting both
nostalgic and contemporary looks at
some of the greatest movie music ever
composed.

Caravana 1994
*Atlapa Convention Center:
The Caravana 1994 will be held


12:30-10 p.m. today at the Atlapa Con-
vention Center. The Caravana is an annu-
al event with displays of crafts, gifts,
native foods, prizes and entertainment.

Fun Fair
*Directorate of Community Activi-

The Fun Fair will take place 1-6 p.m.
Saturday at the Valent Recreation Center.


There will be demonstrations, exhibits,
entertainment, food samples and more.

Annual fall bazaar
*Howard/Albrook Officers Spouses'
Club:
The Howard/Albrook Officers Spous-
es' Club is holding the annual fall bazaar
at the Albrook Club 10 a.m-3 p.m. Oct.
15.


/ . //


/


93








Tropic Times 7
Sept. 30, 1994 A /


'~'*~9TH ANNUAL NATURE FAIR
Gariiboa Community



C.C


8c4 Fl C.yc.ToW
SummIN
8O.n~M O"' l,


, v~j


Nature Fair
The Gamboa Community Center and Our Lady of Good Counsel Church will host the 9th Annual Gamboa
Nature Fair 9 a.m. Saturday at the Gamboa Community Center. Vendors booths will be located in the Gamboa
Community Center Building and surrounding areas. This year's activities include an Eco-Tour of Barro Colorado;
nature bird walks along the pipeline road; educational lectures and exhibits by local conservation groups such as
Ancon/Eco-Tours and the Panama Audubon Society, as well as Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; live
demonstrations of Darien handcrafts to include Cocobolo wood sculpture, Tagua (the vegetable nut ivory) carving
and basket weaving. The Gamboa community invites the public. There is no admission fee.


A a S a


*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts
Center:
Sewing twice a week for two
hours.
Cake decorating twice a week
for two hours.
The Ceramic Center, Building
198, is located near the Crafts Shop.
*Canal Crafters:
Handmade arts and crafts are
available, consignments and vol-
unteers are welcome. The shop
hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday
through Saturday. The shop is now
accepting holiday consignments,
Building 804, Albrook.
Register for the following class-





*Valent Recreation Center:
Better Opportunities for
Single Soldiers will notmeet Thurs-
day. Next meeting Oct. 20.
The screening room offers free
movies. Call the 24-hour movie line,
287-4367 for days and times.
*Cocoli Community Center:
The center is showing videos


es at the shop.
Wall hanging quilts 10:15 a.m.-
12:15 p.m. Saturday, $20.
Baby quilts 10:15 a.m.-12:15
p.m. Tuesday, $22.
Tole-painting, Halloween items
10:15 a.m. Thursday, $15/$20.
Cross stitch demo, Christmas
stocking 10:15 a.m. Oct. 7, free.
Paper mold class, 10:15 a.m.
Oct. 12, $3, supplies included.
*Howard Skills Development
Center:
The center is having a 25 percent
off selected scribbles and fabric
paints, Oct. 7-8.
The center is looking for


crafters to sell items in the new
consignment boutique.
Instructors are needed to teach
classes on a contract basis for a
variety of crafts, decorative paint-
ing, calligraphy, watercolors, oil
painting,etc. Contact Margo Leslie
at 284-6361.
Beginning pottery class 10
a.m.- 1 p.m. Tuesday, $15 plus sup-
plies.
Ceramic pouring class noon-2
p.m. Thursday. Bring slip and tools.
Ongoing classes: stained glass,
framing, air brush, lamp assembly,
cross stitch, macrame, clay flower,
ceramic and 'how to videos.'


for children 4 p.m. Thursday. services are available. Phone or-
Laser disc movies 7 p.m. ders to 284-5848, fax to 284-6109.
Friday. Rent the activities room and
*Zodiac Community Center: the Big Tree Bohio for parties or
Subs on Top has new hours, 11 any other function.
a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays- Fridays, 11 October specials: family beach
a.m.- 3 p.m. Saturday. It is in the package. Rent a boogie board,
Zodiac Community Activities Cen- beach umbrella and 54 qt. cooler
ter. Take-out, eat-in and delivery for $8.50.


/''


Phone guide


Pacific
,24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989.
Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250-0075
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363
Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador, 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010
Corozal Thrift Shop, 285-5989
Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370
Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107
Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680
Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361
Howard Teen Center, 284-4700
Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
The Loop, 287-3035
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380
Rodman Annex, 283-5475
Rodman Club, 283-4498
Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150
Rodman Naval Station Information Tour
and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454
Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500
Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-6161

Atlantic
Aquativity Center, 289-4009
Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201
Davis Community Club, 289-5160
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402
Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077
Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313
Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300


/enter:


Rec center news
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6 p.m. Thurs-
days.
n Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednes-
dgys.
'-'Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays.


Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays.
Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. Monday.
Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and Fridays.
Piano lessons 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesday.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Center:
The center offers various of classes: Kara-
te, cake decorating, Spanish, English, piano,
country line-dancing and jazz. Call for sched-
ules and registration.


Atlantic tours
*Sundial Recreation C


Panama City 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday.
El Valle, 5:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. Sunday
Free Zone 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Center:
Isla Grande 7 a.m. Saturday.
El Valle 5:30 a.m. Sunday.


ices









B8 Tropic Times
SSept. 30, 1994


Movies


CoSmingB0on

Oct. 7


Howard AFB
7:30pm Tops in Blue will
be presented



Fort Clayton
7pm Black Beauty (G)
David Thewlis,
Sean Bean
9pm Airheads (PG-13)
Brendan Fraser,
Steve Buscemi



Fort Davis
7pm Lassie (PG)
Helen Slater,
Richard
Farnsworth
9pm The Client (PG-13)
Susan Sarandon,
Tommy Lee Jones



Fort Sherman
7:30pm Speed (R)
Keanu Reeves,
Dennis Hopper



Fort Amador
7pm Wolf (R)
Jack Nicholson,
Michelle Pfeiffer


I Nowshowing1


True Lies
Arnold Schwarzenegger,
Jamie Lee Curtis
Harry Tasker is a special agent for Ome-
ga Sector, a top secret agency charged
with nuclear terrorism intervention. Flu-
ent in six languages and skilled in all
forms of counter intelligence, Harry is an
international spy who has kept his
real profession secret from his wife. -
Arnold Schwarzenegger stars in
the reality action thriller which fea- T
tures Jamie Lee Curtis as the wife.R
(action, violence, language), 1 hr,
82 min.

Black Beauty
David Thewlis, Sean Bean
A heartwarming drama based on
the family classic novel by Anna
Sewell, tells the story of a time in
history when horses were essential
to men's lives. One horse named
Black Beauty has good and bad
owners, suffers misfortune then
finds friendship and is given a se-
cure home and loving caretaker.
G, 99 min.

Airheads No
Brendan Fraser, Steve Buscemi
Three metal heads desperate to get their
demo song played on the radio inadvert-
ently take a radio station hostage. PG- 13
(crude dialogue and some sexuality), 1
hr, 29 min.

The Little Rascals
Travis Tedford, Bug Hall
Steven Spielberg produces an appealing
update of the Hat Roach comedy series
from the '20s, '30s and '40s. The gang
has established a boy's only club; how-
ever, things change when Alfalfa falls
for Darla. PG (rude dialogue)

The Client
Susan Sarandon, Tommy Lee Jones
Set in New Orleans, this is the best adap-


station yet of a John Grisham novel. A
young boy witnesses the suicide of a
mob lawyer and hires Reggie Love (Su-
san Sarandon) a former addict, to protect
him from federal prosecutor Rev. Roy
Foltrigg (Tommy Lee Jones) and mob-
ster Barry Muldano, both of whom think
he knows where the body of a U.S.
senator is buried. PG- 13 (child injeopar-
dy, language), 2 hrs.


MOM THI DIRECTOR OF WWRNEV5 WORLD AND 1111 BmRLT NILLSILUI
MIischief loves conupanV


w showing at Howardand Amador theat4

Lassie
Helen Slater, Richard Farnsworth
Everybody's favorite collie Lassie is back
for her ninth film (the eighth generation
descendant of the original dog). Picked
up as a stray by the Turner family mov-
ing from Baltimore to Virginia's
Shenandoah Valley, Lassie leads her new
masters into sheep ranching, then helps
them in a land dispute with some ornery
neighbors. PG (language, suspense), 1
hr, 34 min.
Speed
Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper
LAPD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played
by Keanu Reeves, is known as a man
with an attitude caused by Dennis Hop-
per, a sociopath who nearly killed him in
an earlier encounter. Now Traven faces


the challenge of his career when Hop-
per wires a bomb to a city bus that will
explode as soon as the speed goes be-
low 50 mph. R (violence, language), 1
hr, 51 min.

North
Elijah Wood, Bruce Willis
An 11-year-old boy feeling unappreci-
ated by his mother and father
-- finds a lawyer and declares him-
"" self a free agent, then searches
rF the world for the perfect parents.
PG (a few words), 1 hr. 34 min.

Angels in the
Outfield
Danny Glover, Tony Danza
The losing major league baseball
team, the "Angels," doesn't have
a prayer of winning until an 8-
year-old boy claims to see angels
on the field providing divine in-
spiration. PG (language), 1 hr, 42
min.

The Shadow
Alec Baldwin, Penelope Miller
This film recreates the 1930s
ers. radio series about a mysterious
Manhattan playboy with mystical
hypnotic powers. PG-13 (fantasy ac-
tion, violence), 1 hr, 52 min.

Blown Away
Jeff Bridges, Tommy Lee Jones
A vengeful Irish bomber is on the loose
in Boston. He plays cat and mouse
while being hunted by his former best
friend, a Boston bomb squad expert
who has a secret past. R (violence,
language), 2 hrs.
Wolf
Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer
We all know what happens when you
get bit by a werewolf, right? But, do
you know what might happen if Jack
Nicholson gets bit? Director Mike
Nichols has the answer to that question.
R (language, werewolf attacks), 2 hrs.


Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Howard AFB 7pm: Black Beauty 2pm: The Little 2pm: Black Beauty 7pm: Airheads 7pm: The Little 7pm: True Lies 7:30pm: Tops in
284-3583 (G) Rascals (PG) (G) Daivd Thewlis, (PG-1 3) Rascals (PG) (R) Arnold Blue (Snack stand
284-3583 Daivd Thewlis, Travis Tedford, Sean Bean Brendan Fraser, Travis Tedford, Schwarzenegger, opened)
Sean Bean Bug Hall 7pm: The Little Steve Buscemi Bug Hall Jamie Lee Curtis
9pm: Airheads 7pm: Black Beauty Rascals (PG) 9pm: Blown Away (R) 9pm: Black Beauty 9:30pm: Wolf (R)
(PG-13) (G) Daivd Thewlis, Travis Tedford, Jeff Bridges, (G) Jack Nicholson,
Brendan Fraser, Sean Bean Bug Hall Tommy Lee Jones Daivd Thewlis, Michelle Pfeiffer
Steve Buscemi 9pm: Airheads 9pm: Black Beauty Sean Bean
(PG-13) (G)Daivd Thewlis,
Brendan Fraser, Sean Bean
Steve Buscemi

Fort Clayton 7pm: Lassie (PG) 2pm: Lassie (PG) 2pm: Lassie (PG) 7pm: Lassie (PG) 7pm: The Client 7pm: Airheads 7pm: The Little
287-3279 Helen Slater, Helen Slater, Helen Slater, Helen Slater, (PG-13) (PG-13) Rascals (PG)
Richard Famsworth Richard Farnsworth Richard Farnsworth Richard Farnsworth Susan Sarandon, Brendan Fraser, Travis Tedford,
9pm: The Client 7pm: The Client 7pm: Lassie (PG) 9pm: The Client Tommy Lee Jones Steve Buscemi Bug Hall
(PG-13) (PG-13) Helen Slater, (PG-13) 9pm: The Flintstones 9pm: Above the Rim 9pm: Above the Rim
Susan Sarandon, Susan Sarandon, Richard Farnsworth Susan Sarandon, (PG) John Goodman, (R) Duane Martin, (R) Duane Martin,
Tommy Lee Jones Tommy Lee Jones 9pm: The Client Tommy Lee Jones Rick Moranis Leon Leon
9pm: The Crow (R) (PG-13) ($1.50/$1)
Brandon Lee, Susan Sarandon,
Ernie Hudson Tommy Lee Jones

Fort Davis 7pm: Speed (R) 2pm: Angels in the 7pm: Speed (R) 7pm: North (PG) 7pm: Angels in the 7pm: Speed (R) 7pm: Lassie (PG)
289-5173 Keanu Reeves, Outfield (PG) Danny Keanu Reeves, Elijah Wood, Outfield (PG) Danny Keanu Reeves, Helen Slater,
Dennis Hopper Glover, Tony Danza Dennis Hopper Bruce Willis Glover, Tony Danza Dennis Hopper Richard Farnsworth
9:30pm: Angels ip 7pm: North (PG)
the Outfield (PG) Elijah Wood,
Danny Glover, Bruce Willis
Tony Danza 9pm: Speed (R)
Keanu Reeves,
Dennis Hopper

Fort Sherman 7:30pm: North (PG) 7:30pm: Angels in the 7:30pm: Maverick No show No show No show 7:30pm: The Client
Elijah Wood, Outfield (PG) (PG) Mel Gibson, (PG-13)
289-5173 Bruce Willis Danny Glover, Jodie Foster ($1.50/$1) Susan Sarandon,
Tony Danza Tommy Lee Jones

Fort Amador 7pm: The Little 7pm: The Shadow 7:30pm: Airheads No show No show 7pm: It Could Happen 7pm: Blown Away
Rascals (PG) (PG-13) (PG-13) to You (PG) (R)
284-3583 Travis Tedford, Alec Baldwin, Brendan Fraser, Nicholas Cage, Jeff Bridges,
Bug Hall Penolope Miller Steve Buscemi Bridget Fonda Tommy Lee Jones


I











* TV Schedule


Tropic Times B9
Sept. 30,1994B


C n l & 1 * Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30 Headline News 6:00 CCMTV 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America 7:00 Navy/Marine Corps News 6:30 Outreach of Love 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America
w/Panama Now (7:25) 7:30 Real News for Kids 7:00 Parliament of Souls w/Panama Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25)
8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Guts 7:30 Lifestyle Magazine 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Just for Kids! 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America Garfield & Friends 9:30 This Week w/Brinkley 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America
10:25 Guiding Light Teenage Mutant Ninja 10:30 Face the Nation 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital Turtles 11:00 Inside the NFL 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break Biker Mice from Mars 12:00 NFL Football: Green 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now Batman Cartoon Bay Packers vs. New 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sportscenter 10:30 Faerie Tale Theater England Patriots 12:30 Sports Machine 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World 11:30 Spies 3:00 Nova + 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey 12:00 Movie: "Huckleberry 4:00 Victory at Sea 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Donahue
3:00 Price is Right Finn" 4:30 "O'Hara" 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Think Fast! 1:30 College Football: 5:30 Entertainment this Week 4:00 Guts 4:00 Reading Rainbow 4:00 Shining Time Station 4:00 In the Mix
4:30 I Love Lucy Stanford Cardinals vs. 6:30 Hearts Afire 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud Notre Dame Fighting 7:00 Dr. Quinn: Medicine 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show Irish Woman 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report 4:30 Sould Train 8:00 L.A. Law 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break 5:30 Superman 9:00 ABC 20/20 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight 6:00 Paradise 10:00 Top Cops 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Rescue 911 11:00 Miami Vice 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:25 Panama Now 8:00 Walker: Texas Ranger 12:00 Movie: "The Nightman" 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now
7:30 Entertainment Tonight 9:00 Movie: "Presumed 2:00 Sports Latenight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment tonight
8:00 America's Funniest Innocent" 2:30 Frugal Gourmet 8:00 Mad About You ** 8:00 Beauty and The Beast 8:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 8:00 ALF
People 11:10 Saturday Night Live 3:00 Headline News 8:30 Cops 9:00 Northern Exposure 8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 8:25 Movie: "The Stand"
8:30 Evening Shade 12:40 WWF Superstars of 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 9:00 60 Minutes 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 Culture Clash (Part 3 of 4)
9:00 In the Heat of the Night Wrestling 4:00 Jeopardy 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:05 Cheers 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:00 SCN Late Edition 1:40 Videolinks 4:30 Videolinks 10:05 Cheers 10:30 David Letterman 10:05 Cheers 10:05 Cheers
10:05 Cheers 2:00 Movies: "Under Fire" 5:00 Headline News 10:30 David Letterman 11:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Letterman 10:30 David Letterman
10:30 David Letterman 2:10 "Cowboy" 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 11:30 Tonight Show 12:30 M*A*S*H 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show
11:30 Tonight Show 6:00 Headline News Break 5:30 Headline News 12:30 M*A*S*H 1:00 Movies: "Afterburn" 12:30 M*A*S*H 12:30 M*A*S*H
12:30 Ren and Stimpy 1:00 Movies:"The Comrades 2:35 "Cover Girl" 1:00 Movies: "Barabbas" 1:00 Movies: "Brighten
1:00 Movies: "Harry and of Summer" 5:00 Headline News Break 3:15 "Weird Science" Beach Memoirs"
Son" 2:35 "The Jackie Presser 5:00 Headline News Break 2;35 "My Name is Bill W."
3:00 "Breathless" Story" 5:00 Headline News Break
5:00 "Legend" 5:00 Headline News Break
5:30 Videolinks
6:30 Headline News



*C b*e channe 1 * Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:00 Shining Time Station 4:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:30 Young Adult Theater 6:30 The Sunshine Factory 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
9:00 Today "Teenage Mutant Ninja 7:00 Goof Troop 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek Turtles: The Movie" 7:25 Garfield and Friends *** 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break "Teenage Mutant Ninja 7:50 Disney's The Little 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now Turtles 2" Mermaid 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children Secret of the Ooze 8:15 Batman 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live 11:30 Real News for Kids 8:40 Where on Earth is Carmen 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless 12:00 Silver Spoons Sandiego? 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja 12:30 Movies: "A Big Hand for 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja 3:30 .Batman 3:30 Where on Earth is Carmen 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Garfield and Friends ***
Turtles a Little Lady" Turtles 4:00 Fraggle Rock Sandiego? 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:0 Fraggle Rainbowk 2:10 "Operation Pacific" 9:20 Movie: "The Great Race" 4:30 The Adventures of Pete 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Guts 4:30 Nick Arcade
5:00 Silver Spoons 4:00 21 Jump Street 12:00 Headline News & Pete ** 4:30 Think Fast 5:00 Beakman's World 5:00 Fact of Life **
5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 1993 National Rodeo 12:30 This Old House + 5:00 In the Mix 5:00 Disney's Raw Toonage ** 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report Finals 12.55 Movie: "Mister Roberts" 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News 6:00 Doctor, Doctor 3:00 NFL Football: 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News .Break
6:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 Dinosaurs Philadelphia Eagles vs. 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 CBS Evening News
7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 Christy San Francisco 49ers 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 CBS Evening News 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 Star Trek: The Next
Generation 8:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 6:00 Wonderful World of 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 Star Trek: The Next Generation Generation
7:55 Panama Now Nine Disney + Generation Generation 7:55 Panama Now 7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Roseanne 9:00 Herman's Head 7:00 NFL Football: Miami 7:55 Panama Now 7:55 Panama Now 8:00 Sinbad Show 8:00 Boy Meets World **
8:30 The Boys are Back ** 9:30 Married With Children Dolphins vs. Cincinnati 8:00 Monday Night Football: 8:00 Home Improvement 8:30 Family Matters 8:30 Living Single
(New Fall Series) 10:00 Movie: "Cocktail" Bengals Houston Oilers vs. 8:30 My So Called Life 9:00 Wise Guy 9:00 Turning Point
9:00 Primetime Live 12:00 Headline News 10:00 Buck James Pittsburgh Steelers (New Fall Series) 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:00 SCN Late Edition 12:30 Science and Technology 11:00 Eye to Eye w/C. Chung 11:00 Headline News Break 9:30 Frasier 10:05 Tour of Duty 10:05 L.A. Law
10:05 Renegade Week 12:00 Headline News 11:30 Nightline 10:00 SCN Late Edition 11:00 Headline News 11:00 Headline News Break
11:00 Headline News Break 1:00 The McLaughlin Group 12:30 Meet the Press 12:00 Cheers 10:05 McKenna (New Fall Series) 11:30 Nightline 11:30 Nightline
11:30 Nightline 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Sports Machine 12:30 M*A*S*H 11:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Cheers 12:00 Cheers
12:00 Cheers 2:00 Entertainment this week 2:00 Sports Latenight 1:00 Headline News ll:30Nightline 12:30 M*A*S*H 12:30 M*A*S*H
12:30 M*A*S*H 3:00 Headline News 2:30 Frugal Gourmet 1:30 Sports Latenight 12:00 Cheers 1:00 Headline News 1:00 Headline News
1:30 Sports Latenight 3:30 Saturday Night Live 3:00 Headline News 2:00 David Letterman 12:30 M*A*S*H 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 David Letterman 5:00 Videolinks 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 3:00 Headline News 1:00 Headline News 2:00 David Letterman 2:00 David Letterman
3:00 Headline News 5:30 Headline News Break 4:00 Jeopardy 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 1:30 Sports Latenight 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News
3:30 Military News 4:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10 4:00 Jeopardy 2:00 David Letterman 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 3:30 Wheel of Fortune
4:00 Tom & Jerry Kids 4:30 Videolinks 3:00 Headline News 4:00 Jeopardy 4:00 Jeopardy
4:30 Tiny Toons Adventures 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:30 Videolinks 4:30 Videolinks
5:00 CRO 4:00 Jeopardy 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10
5:30 Videolinks 4:30 Videolinks
6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10






Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14
Sports Sports
College Football NFL Football
Stanford Cardinals vs. Notre Dame Fighting Irish, 1:30 p.m. Satur- ' Philadelphia Eagles vs. San Francisco 49ers, 3 p.m. Sunday
day Miami Dolphins vs. Cincinnati Bengals, 7 p.m. Sunday
Houston Oilers vs. Pittsburgh Steelers, 8 p.m. Monday
NFL Football
Green Bay Packers vs. New England Patriots, noon Sunday Series starts
"The Boys are Back," 8:30 p.m. today.
Series starts Fred and Betty are about to enjoy the freedom of their "golden years."
Mad About You, 8 p.m. Monday. Jesse, their youngest son has just gone off the college, and Fred couldn't
The quest for connubial bliss continues as Paul Reiser and Helen Hunt return be happier. Now they can have the house to themselves and do as they please.
for another season of modern love in the heart of the Big Apple. - Stars Hal Linden and Suzanne Pleshette.

Mini series "Boy Meets World," 8 p.m. Thursday. (Replaces Full House)
"Stephen King's The Stand," 8:25 p.m. Thursday. Eleven-year-old Cory is having a tough time as he learns about life from his family,
Mother Abigail's followers set up a base of operations in Boulder, Colo. They begin friends and his persnickety neighbor and fifth-grade teacher. But even though the
their journey to fight the evil entity known as "Randall Flagg." whole thing can be confusing at times, there's still a lot to be laughed at as boy meets
world. Stars Ben Savage and Will Friedie.
Primetime movies
"Presumed Innocent," 9 p.m. Saturday. Primetime movies
Here's a solid, well-cast screen version of Scott Turow's crackling best seller about a "Cocktail," 10 p.m. Saturday.
prosecutor assigned to investigate the murder of a sexy assistant D.A. with whom A young hotshot comes to New York City to make his fortune, but winds up becom-
he'd had an affair. Soon he's charged with murder himself. Stars Harrison Ford and ing a "hot" bartender instead, under the tutelage of self-styled barman/philosopher.
Greta Scacchi. Stars Tom Cruise and Bryan Brown.













B O1 Tropic Times
B 10 - Sept. 30, 1994


_ Classified Ads


Cocker spaniels (Gold) 2 Females and
1 Male 7 wks old, have shots, tail clip
$200. 221-5066.

French poodle with clippers 4mths, all
shots $150. 286-4996.

French poodle mini toy 41/2 pounds,
white, for stud service. 226-7176.

4 yr old German shepherd free, fe-
male, neutered, watch dog.228-264

Chihuahua puppy, 6 wks old $150.
286-4097.

Bl/wh cat, 11/2 yrs. old, grey/wh cat,
11/2 yrs. old, tiger stripe cat, 6 mo old,
all spayed, declawed, Free. 282-3783.

Rottweiler, 3 mos old, female, over 25
pounds already. All shots, reg. Call
after 5pm, $500. 286-3197.

Boxer pups 5 wks, fawns brundles
4180. 261-7909.

French poodle puppies miniature,
strawberry blonde, 7 white $225.261-
3325.

Free gold kitten, female. 229-4471.

German shepherd, 11 mo old $200.
286-4190.

King doberman pinscher for stud ser-
vice. 283-3439.

5yr. old gelding. Gentle, trained
english, jumps, great on trails. Doesn't
shy or bolt $900obo. 284-6683.

Beautiful baby bunnies $5. 262-2665.

German shepherd puppies, 4 weeks
old, black/beige, $125. 250-0141, call
after 6:00 p.m.

Hamster with tall metal cage, exercise
ball and food $25. 286-6182.

Purebread German shepherd 3 yrs old,
going back to the states and can't take
him with us $50. 286-3378.

Spayed, mixHusky, perfect watch dog.
Loves kids, trained, free to gd home,
only 3 yrs. 232-4611.

CFA registered seal-point Himalay-
an-Persian available for stud service.
call John evenings 289-4354.

CFA reg purebred Himalayans kit-
tens, blue-point & flame-point. Stud
on premises. Free. 289-4354.

Free cats; one very fluffy and loving,
one fearless and brave and one very
shy. All neutered. 286-3773.

Rabbit with large outdoor cage $20.
287-5935.




1987 Ford tempo, AT, AC, AM/FM,
cass, 4 door, 75k miles, gd cond. Not
dty pd $3,700/obo. 286-6328.

1982 Chev Monte Carlo, gd cond,
$2,800. 266-0230.

1985 Isuzu Trooper II AM/FM cass
stereo, air cond, special wheels, runs
grt, $4,000 neg. 289-4250.

1986 Nissan Laurel- 4/door auto trans,
a/c, p/s,p/a, dty pd, p/b $5,500. 239-
3379.

93 Nissan Bluebird, dty pd, A/C, tint-
ed win, AM/FM, auto, alarm, low
mileage, $13,850.236-0984.

1973 SS Nova, 350 4BM, 373 R.E.
gears, gd cond, yellow w/black stripes,
$5,000. 284-5564.

85' Plymouth reliant SE, 2 door coupe,
2.2L EFI, auto trans, cruise control, no
A/C, dty free, $2,500. 226-2202.

1982 Honda Accord, gd cond, clean,
dependable, $2,750. 284-5355.

1988 Cavalier, auto, 4door, dry pd,
perfect cond, $4,950/obo. 260-8575.

83' Dodge needs painting. Ps, ph, ac,
radio cass player. Gd tires, $3,000/
obo. 228-2643.

1983 Volvo 240 station wagon all
extras, dty pd, $4,000/obo. 269-2989.


88' Dodge Dakota p/u with Topper,
ac, ps, pb, extras, clean, $6500/obo.
283-6499.

1975 Buick LeSabre, grey, needs tran
wk, dty pd, clean, $650. 286-6439.

1991 Ford Explorer 4x4 sport- exc
cond, $14,800/obo. 287-3627.

1991 Chev Suburban 4WD diesel V8
Silverado dual AC, rack, R-boards,
spec rims/tires, $18,300. 252-2622.

1987 Cougar, exc running cond, 8 cyl
motor 302, 2door, $1000. 286-6541.

Jaguar XJ-6 1978, U.S. specs, gd cond,
dty pd, $4,700. 252-2969.

Camaro, auto, 6 cylinder, A/C,
$18,000. 269-6738.

323 Mazda 1989 A/C, cass, speed,
exc cond, $5000. 284-4983.

1974 Mustang, V-6 standard, P/5, as-
is, where-is (spare parts), $450. 221-
4276.

1976 BMW 530; may need new parts.
Gd cond, U.S. specs, $2000.286-6398.

1989 CAD Sedan Deville, superclean
all the extras $11,995. 287-4836.

Suzuki- Samurai- dty pd 1991, new
tires, AM/FM radio cass, speed,
$8,200/neg. 220-5268.

1974 Ranchero pick-up, dtypd $1,180.
283-3487.

1975 Pinto dty pd, $800/firm. 283-
3487.

1987 Chevy Caprice Classic, gd cond.
260-6561.

'91 Ford Escort LX- 2 door, 40 MPG/
65KPG, exc cond, new tires, $7,500/
neg. 284-4125.

1990 Ford Tauras GL, PS, PB, 6 cyl-
inder, 36,000 miles, $9,500/obo. 287-
4689.

1987 Toyota convention van PS, auto,
4cyl, AM-FM cass, original owner.
Exc cond, $6,200. 232-4627.

1991 Ford Ranger XLT, white, w/
matching camper shell, 28k miles, AC,
PS, PB, not dty pd. 287-5536.

1987 Nissan Sentra speed, 2 dr, grey,
AM/FM cass, new tires. Exc cond
U.S. specs, $4,500/obo. 287-5737.

1984 Toyota Lite Ace, 4cyl, 5 speed,
PS, PB, A/C, body needs wk, dty free,
$3,000/firm. 286-6424.

88 Mustang GT 5.0L, A/C, PB, PLO,
PW, am/fm radio, 64,500 miles,
$7,000. 223-5609.

1989 Ford Tempo, exc cond, com-
plete car care records, one owner
$5,800. 284-6381.

1978 Mercury Monarch, exc cond,
auto, ac, pw, ps, anm/fm/cass, dty pd,
best offer. 232-6056.

1990 Ford Bronco II ps,pb,ac, am/fm/
cass, XLT package. Immaculate white
exterior, $15,000/ntieg. 260-3433.

1983 Chevy S-10, new brakes, tires
and paint. Alpine stereo, l00watt ma-
jestic amp, 10" subs w/woofers, tweet-
ers, $3,000. 286-4096 after 6pm.

1989 Honda Accord LX- grey 5-speed,
ac, cruise control am/fm/cass. $8,500.
260-4697.

1990 Nissan Sunny speed, a/c, low
miles. Great shape, $3,900.287-3895.

'85 Chev Cavalier, 4cyl, auto trans, 4
door, $2,000/obo. 284-6491.

1978 Ford T-bird, 2dr, ac, am/fm/cd,
302 engine, gd cond. Not dty pd,
$1,800/obo. 252-2838.

1991 Honda Civic 3 door, 16 valve,
fuel inject, booming system, runs exc,
ask for Derek. 284-6137.

1990 Geo Tracker LSI, 4x4, ac, exc
cond, 5sp, hard top, cass, $9,999.287-
5933.

1986 Taurus 5sp,new a/c, great cond,
dty pd, $6,000/obo. 269-5700.

1988 Montero, at, loaded, diesel, dty
pd, $12,000/obo. 269-5700.


84 Dodge Daytona turbo ps,pb, pw,
ac, new interior, $3,000obo. 261-2055.

1991 Ford Explorer, xlt, 4x4, 4dr,auto
radio cass, dty pd, $17,000.228-4061.

1986 Dodge Ram 50 pick-up. Exc
cond, 4cyl, low mileage, dty pd $4,500.
287-5935.

Isuzu Rodeo 1992 blue/gray fully load-
ed. 260-6429.

1987 Isuzu Trooper 4dr,4wd, red, a/c,
not dty pd $4,500/obo. 252-5567 after
5pm Sun.

323 Mazda 1989 a/c, cass,cc, excel-
lent condition $5,000. 284-4983.

1990 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 4dr, pw/
d, pb, ps, ac, cass, 27,000 miles, not
duty paid $12,500. 287-3814.

1992 Daihatsu Feroza, a/c, 5sp, ste-
reo, 4wd, not duty paid $8,500/obo.
232-4561.

'79 Plymouth Champ $1,500/obo, not
dty pd. 284-6388.

1987 white BMW 316i, automatic,
fully loaded, excellent condition
$8,900/obo. 263-4671.

1991 Plymouth Sundance, auto a/c,
bought new at Howard car sales. Exc
cond. $8,000/obo. 286-3171

1990 Chevrolet Cavalier 2dr, pb, at,
ps, ac, 4cyl, low-mi, am/fm cass, not
dty pd, $6,000. 284-5024.

Ford Telstar, 5spd, ac, am/fm cass, dty
pd, exc cond, new paint, $4,000. 252-
2414.

1989 Olds Cutlass Calais, quad 4, ps,
pb, pw, custom wheels, pl, $11,500.
261-3568.

1990 Chevy Cavalier, 2dr, cpe, air,
am/fm cass, ps, pb, low mi, $7,500/
obo. 264-3143 evenings.

91 Ford escort LX, 2dr, 5sp, am/fm
cass, excellent cond, original owner
price neg, $7,000. 284-4125.

1989 Geo Metro, 3cyl, est 50MPG,
exc cond, trailer hitch for Jon boat
$3,500. 250-0387.

1979 Volkswagen van good interior.
Runs great, $1,500. 282-3924.

1987 Chevy Suburban, R-101/2 ton,
4-wd, double a/c, new tires, low mile-
age, dty pd, $10,000. 252-5397.

89 Honda accord LX: red exterior-
beige interior, 56,000mi, loaded-
sunroof, exc cond. 284-3481.

79 Jeep Grand wagoner 4x4 loaded,
gd cond, $4,000. 285-4045.

1983 CJ-7 Jeep. Laredo package, very
gd cond, $6,000. 252-5024.

84 Ford flatbed, V-6, std, 4x4, p/s, p/
b, includes new spare, parts. Grt me-
chanic cond, $4,500/obo. 289-5942.

89 Olds Cutlas cailais ps, pb, tint,
custom wheels, 2dr am/fm cass, one
owner 58k, $6,000/neg. 287-5032.

87 Toyota Cressida at, ps, ac, loaded
$5,000. 256-6376.

91 Ford Escort GT black 1,400mi, air,
auto, ps, am/fm cass, $8,500. 252-
6822.

90 Nissan p/u exc cond, alarm and
much more. 287-5582.

82 BMW 528, gd cond, power pack-
age, U.S. specs, sun roof, $7,000/neg.
286-6699.

89 Ford Tempo GL 39,000mi, loaded
exc cond, $5,500/obo. 284-4932.

Volvo 1990, 740, auto, am/fm/cass, a/
c, p/w, exc cond $9,500. 226-6341.

88 FordTaurus, low mileage, exc cond,
$5,950. 252-5738.

77 Chevy Blazer 4 wheel 350cu-inch,
gd cond, many components, rebuilt/
replaced. Auburn color $3,400. Call
evenings 286-4030.

82 Ford Escort, sunroof, 4sp, ac, ps,
new paint, tires and battery. Excellent
cond, $3,000. Not dty pd. 286-6134.

88 Jeep Comanche 4x4 ac, pb, ps, am/
fm/cassette, new tires w/sport wheels.


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder,
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.


Make the best offer. 261-6418.

88 Chevy S10 Blazer Tahoe 4x4 V6
43k, Sony am/fm cass, exc cond
$8,900. 287-4790.

89 Pontiac Formula Firebird, red, load-
ed, 5.0 liter eng, ac, am/fm cass, great
cond, $8,500. 287-5782.

Chevy Celebrity s/w, ac, at, ps, pb,
am/fin cass, $4,000. 287-6136.

1993 BMW 325,4dr, 5spd, burgundy,
new tires, one owner, all extras, U.S.
spec, not dty pd, $23,000. 230-0392.

1978 Dodge Diplomat SW, dty pd,
transmission will need wk eventually,
$1,900/neg. 287-4885.

1988 Toyota 4x4 pu, custom paint/
mags. Beautiful truck, lifted. Lamb
284-5644.

1979 Chevy Nova- ac, ps, rebuilt, at,
overhauled brakes, runs great $1,300/
obo. 287-4877.

1991 Camaro, 5spd, 5.0L, V-8, low
miles, below blue book $9,950. 256-
6830.

1992 Chevy S-10 pick-up, ac, ps, pb,
5spd, am/fm-cass, exec cond, $8,395.
286-3695.

1983 Nissan pick-up white, 5spd, U.S.
spec, gas, new tires, good mec cond,
just painted, $4,500. 230-0392.

1983 Honda Accord ex, ac, loaded,
low mileage, runs grt, dty pd, $4,000/
obo. 287-4686.

1992 red Jeep Wrangler soft top, low
miles, exc cond. Leave message
$12,500/obo. 2844267.

1985 Nissan Patrol, 4x4, 4dr, as is,
$3,500. 252-6829.

1982 Honda civic. Call before noon,
$1,300. 287-4735.

Suzuki Samauri dty pd, hardtop 4x4
$2,700. 252-8183.

1980 Mitsubishi Galant 4dr, standard,
ask for Enrique $2,400. 235-9047.

1981 Ford Thunderbird, exc running
cond. Needs cosmetic work, reliable
transportation, $650/obo. 252-5100.

1990 Pontiac Grand Prix, ac, pw, pl,
ps, cruise control, never wrecked, tilt
steering, $10,000. 286-6298:

1967 VW Classic Beetle, $1,500.269-
5598.

1977 Buick Regal, air, ps, pb, stereo,
dependable, $1,500/obo. 260-2104.

1993 Dodge Dakota, ext cab V6 mag-
num, 27,000/mi, exc cond, $15,000.
282-3577.

1984 Plymouth Reliant, auto ac, am/
fm cd, w/o speakers, runs great, needs
body work, $2,400/obo. 287-3364.

1983 8cyl 302 engine Ford Van ac, ps,
auto. Not dty pd, $8,000. 261-9617.

1985 Jeep CJ-7 gd cond, $5,500. 284-
5510.

1988 Pontiac Lemans 4dr, ac, 5spd,am/
fm cass, low mileage, exc cond, not
dly pd, $6,000/obo. 286-4693.

1984 Audi 80 GL 4dr, auto, ps, gd car
for Panama, $2,500. 223-7980.

1987 Dodge Ram pick up, 58,000
miles, grt cond, $4,000/obo. 264-7779.

1980 Ford station wagon, white, needs
minor body work, runs good. Not dty
pd, $800/obo. 286-4693 after 5pm.

1989 Ford F-I150XLT Lariat super cab
new 351 eng, ps, auto, ac, 2 tanks,
$8,500. 284-4575.

Dty pd 1974 Ranchero, $800; Dty pd
1977 Pinto, $800. 283-3487.




Eng-spk maid, honest, reliable, hard-
working. Live-in/out. Pay neg. 221-
1131.

Span-spk housekeeper avail M-W-F.
Contact anytime. 287-6589.

Looking for a seamstress, call me.
284-3830.

Span-spk maid available now 225-
2221. Ask for Rosada.

Span-spk maid, live-out, honest, reli-
able, gd ref. 252-1035.

Hard working, Eng-spk lady seeks
employment 3 days. Ft. Clayton only.
287-4239 or 266-4208.

Eng-spk housekeeper, honest, reliable,
mature, live-in/out. References avail-
able. Gloria 224-9537.

Dependable babysitter for weekends
or evenings, prefer Albrook only. Ask
for Stacy. 286-3478.

Eng-spk day maid, 1-2 days a week,


mature, dependable, good worker.
260-9421.

Bilingual maid Mon-Fri, live out. 266-
7957.

English maid 3 days a week at Cocoli.
283-5228.

Dependable babysitter for eves and
wkends, Eng-spk, gd w/kids, prefer
Howard only, Becky. 284-4638.

Bilingual housekeeper, grt w/kids/
pets, exc cook, live-out. Available
Nov I. 284-3392.

Honest reliable Eng-spk maid 1-2 days
a week. No ironing. 224-7521.

Tutoring available for elementary
grades. Atlantic side only. 289-4350.

Bilingual live-in maidgrtw/kids,Mon-
Fri. 232-4620.

Booking now for holiday parties-vari-
ety band. References and demos avail-
able. Rip Maynard, 263-3420.

Cake decorating. 287-6222.

Bilingual mature maid, live-in. Lillia,
284-4089.

Bilingual maid, dependable, honest,
caretaker for elderly or children, day
work or weekly. 238-1361.

Reliable babysitter in my home any-
time, Eng spk only. 286-4294.

Honest, dependable housekeeper 3
days a week. 282-3128 MWF 8:30am-
5pm.

Babysitter, Eng-spk days. WorkThurs
and Fri, or 2-8pm daily. Suzie 229-
2045.

In home art instruction. Acrylic and
oil painting, watercolor, charcoal; free-
dom of express, creativity. 260-3433.

Honest, dependable live-out maid.
Fantistic w/children. Memy 262-1276.

Honest, reliable live-out maid. Gd w/
kids. Delmira 231-4350.

Honest, reliable, hdworking, Span-spk
maid/babysitter. Live-out, cooks, grt
w/kids, refs. 285-4734 after 5:30pm.

Honest, dependable Span-spk maid.
Live in or work MWF. Grt cleaning
and ironing. 287-5922.

Reupholster, refinish furniture, car
headliner, etc. Work in your home.
235-9047.

Span-spk day maid. Honest, reliable.
Evening and weekend babysitter. 286-
4724.

Span-spk housekeeper avail one day a
week. Honest, reliable and hard work-
ing. 286-3381.

Span-spk day maid. Honest, reliable,
references. Avail Tues andThurs only.
282-3580.




14' Boston Whaler- 40 H.P. Yamaha
electric start Fishfinder, trailer, load-
ed $4,195. 269-6738.

141/2 Abernathy Fiberglass, trailer,
no motor $1,700. 252-2969.

1994 Yamaha 9.9 Marine outboard
motor, long neck all ace, new in box,
$1,150. 252-6610.

Trailer-utility, 1/2 ton, steel frame,
fiber glassed, 3'x4' cargo area, spare
tire, wiring kit, $295. After 6pm 260-
9172.

Class H trailer hitch w/acc for fullsize
Blazer or Ford p/u. 70hp-88 outboard
motor, $150. 252-5853.

Camper shell for Toyota long bed,
$300. 256-6815.

21' Drummond w/150 hp Mercury
trailer, SS prop trim tabs and extras,
$9,700. 284-5921.

1991 Evin Rude70w/new power head.
Includes all controls. 252-4848.

Sea Doo '92 Jet ski, new cond, extras,
60 hp, trailer. Dty pd, high perfor-
mance, warranty, $3,999. 286-6333.

15 hp Force outboard motor, 21/2 years
old, runs grt, $600. 282-5630 after
5pm.

24' center console twin outboard en-
gines w/zero hours, outriggers, VHF
dual axle trailer. Many new items, dty
pd, $9,000/obo. 287-5178.

19' open fisherman. Yamaha 90 1994
w/30 hours. Fully loaded, $12,000.
252-5024.

21' Cabin Romery cruiser, 4 cyl.
Perkins diesel, sleeps two, ready for
fishing, $9,000/obo. 252-5100.

16' boat w/55hp Evin Rude, fish find-
er, trolling motor, and many extras,
$4,100/obo. 228-7924.


SNES with 5 games, 2 controllers:
Monopoly, Jeporady, Mario Paint,
Barts Nightmare. Super Mario World
$175/obo. 286-4998.

Multi media kit Dos/Windows
mitsums Cd player GX DSP 16 sound
card Labiec speakers, software, $375.
260-1580.

Panatronic TVNCR combo, $300.
260-5336.

Epson XT computer with monitor,
20mb, 51/4 disk drive, software in-
cluded, $275. 226-8626/226-3278.

Koss CM 1020 speakers, $200. 287-
3223.

Apple laser writer plus (printer) and
cable. Original price $4,900-asking
$3,500. 221-4276.

Notebook work organizer, Downew
& Creation word processing. Built-in
spreadsheets, $600. 266-5831.

Infinity speakers- 150 watts per chan-
nel, exc cond, $200. 287-3223.

IBM 386sx, 4mb Ram, 165mb hd,
dual floppy, PB SVGA monitor, Epson
printer, mouse, modem, game port and
joystick hook up, $875. 286-4428.

Sony color TV, 20", 4yrs old, $400.
269-2095.

SNES with Super Mario World like
new $110. Star Trek N.G. $45. Sim
City, Zelda, golf $40ea. 287-5536.

Carver CI3 preamplifier/tuner, DPL-
33 surround sound processor/ ampli-
fier, ask for Paul, $300. 287-5651.

Yorx sound speaker system $125, two
Fisher speakers $25ea. 286-4023.

New RCA 27" floor model swivel TV
remote, picture in picture remote con-
trol, $550. 283-5676.

27" Sony Trinitron TV w/remote and
stand $550, Panasonic VHS $175,
SE286 comp 40mb hd, dual floppy,
monitor, printer $760. 260-3433.

Commodore 64 comp, printer, disk
drive and software, $275/obo. 286-
4928.

486DX2-50 MHZ comp, 4mb Ram,
245mb drive, VGA color monitor,
$1,495. 252-5557.

VGA color monitor, $190. 252-5557.

Hard disk drives, 40mb: 7 Seagate, St
351 AX; 2 Western digital, WD
95044A. Exc cond, $60/neg. 269-
2095.

Jensen classic 4" 70 watt surround
sound woofer, set $30-nice bass. 287-
5776.

340mb hd, CD Rom, 14.4 FAX/mo-
dem, floppy drives, 10 bay tower, tape
backup. 284-5685.

Sega CD games $20ea, video disc
player movies $10ea. 284-6176.

Fisher VHS VCR, 2 head, remote con-
trol, $150. 286-6295.

Kenwood power amp 350w, control
amp $250; EQ 7 band $150; CD play-
er $150; tuner $75. Bryan 287-3357.

AST 386 SX25 140mb Ram, soft-
ware, printer and desk. All in gdcond,
$1,000. 284-4987.

Headstart comp, 286, 40mb hd, dual
floppies, software and more, $300.
283-5436.

Sega CD w/13 games and case. Exc
cond, $400/obo. 284-3326.

Sanyo CD, double cass player, like
new, portable, $150. Juan 285-5580.

IBM comp, 386SX dual drives, Imb
Ram, 50meg hd, VGA mouse, printer,
software, $1,500/obo. 287-4428.

Sanyo stereo music system, 2 cass
players, record player, synthesizer,
model GXT 848 remote control, $165.
263-4671.

GE VHS VCR with remote, good con-
dition, $100/obo. 284-4921.

JC Penny color TV 25", remote con-
trol, floor model. $300. 286-4378.

JVC video camera in perfect condi-
tion includes: carry bag, tripod and
tapes $700. 282-3924.

Apple 2E computer with games, best
offer. 287-6174.

CD-ROM drive, metsumi, includes
interface card, cables, installation and
other software. New & unused $225.
289-5942.

Full-size Panasonic VHS video cam-
era w/case. Left or right hand opera-
tion, $650. Call after 5pm 287-4620.

Kenwood 120w, KL-7070 5-way, 4


i

5-,-
- A














* Classified Ads


Tropic Times B 11
Sept. 30, 1994 Il


speakers, walnut: 161/2"x25"xl 11/2".
287-4182.

Older amplifier, turntable, tuner,
speakers, tape deck, $280. 223-4290
call evenings.

386sx 120mr hd VGA monitor, $900.
Call before noon 287-4735.

Nintendo with 5 games $75.284-3696.

Leading technology 386, 40mb hd,
2mb Ram, monitor, printer, mouse
and software $850/obo. 284-3696.

486DX 33, 8mb Ram, color printer,
SVGA monitor, over $1000 original
software, 1440 modem, tape backup
and more $2,700/obo. 251-8227.

13" TV/VCR combo w/ remote. New,
never used $400. 283-3694 6-9pm.

Technics Quartz turntable, directdrive;
$75. Kenwood a/v surround amp,
237watts, like new, $350. 252-5829.

JVC camcorder, case & battery $500.
Minolta x-7A camera with lens, flash
tripod, bag $150. Large window blinds
$100. 284-6784.

Panasonic KX-P1624 dot-matrix
printer, wide body $250. Logitech hand
scanner, 256 gray scale $200. 252-
5829.

Laptop computer w/WordPerfect 5.1,
Windows and Rightwriter installed 1
mo old, $1,600. 283-5617.

IBM PC comp, 40mg hd, 51/4 floppy,
monitor, joystick, mouse, word pro-
cessor, games, more, $350. 284-3184.

Samsung 29" color TV surround sys-
tem, remote, exc cond, $300. 232-
5419.

Computers, printers, fax machines,
IBM, Wang, Panasonic, great equip-
ment, great prices. 230-0008.

Technics CD player model SL-P102
w/remote, exc cond, $100/neg. 287-
5776.

Audiovox car stereo sys w/detachable
face, exc cond, $150/neg. 287-5776.

SNES, Super Metroid $125. Genesis
w/3 games $150. 285-6874 Rm 302.

Computer, dual disk drive, CPU, mon-
itor, printer, games and software in-
cluded, $400. 286-4378.

Tandy 1000RL comp, color monitor,
enhanced keyboard w/star NX-1001
multi-font printer $450. Kenwood
speakers set 800watt $80. 287-4281.

486 DX2/66, 8mb Ram, 420 mb hd,
mouse, fax/modem, software, SVGA
monitor, double CD Rom, 166 sound-
card, speakers $2,800/obo. 283-5391.




BR set, oak/antique pecan finish, tall
chest, 2 nightstands, dresser & mirror,
full/queen headboard, $1,800. Queen
mat/springs, like new, $400.283-3220.

Lazy-Boy recliner, blue velour, $450.
Beige 18" commercial carpet squares-
great for family room/maid's room/
work area/church, $1ea. 283-3220.

Baby crib, American made solid wood,
white, classic style, $150. 286-4589.

Maytag washer and dryer, extra large
capacity, like new $900. 287-5038.

Mauve sofa in good cond, 11/2 yrs old
$200. 286-4576.

Black couch with 2 matching chairs
$1,000. Wood entertainment center,
dresser, rolltop desk, more. 264-1697.

Small wood Canal Zone desk, good
cond, $100. 252-1174.

.Room divider $160. 260-5336.

Custom leather recliner, designed for
tall person, one leather lounge chair,
both brown, $400ea. 287-5038.

LR set w/4 tbls $450. LR set w/l tbl
$475. DR set w/4 chairs $400. Bar set
w/high chairs $380. 252-2883.

Man's mountain bike, 26" 18 speeds,
good cond, $65. 287-3223.

3 piece BR set, bench with weights,
toilet trainer, infant toys. 287-5870.

Oak cocktail table and 2 end table set,
exc cond $350. 287-3629.

Large Kenmore microwave oven $150.
233-6096.

3 Pax Aerostar van seat, gd cond,
$200/obo. 284-3392.

Q-size bed w/frame $200, BR dress-
ers solid wood $150, mirrors full length
door $10. 287-4888.

Sofa, exc cond, $750. 228-4514.

Computer desk $120, small entertain-
ment center $150, 2 matching blue
Queen Anne chairs $500. 287-5021.


Sofa, light blue, like new $600. 269-
5700.

GE washer $350, Whirlpool 21cu ft
refrigerator $650. 228-4061.

Kenmore washer/dryer set $750/obo.
284-5685.

GE XL44 gas range, like new, hook
ups included $350. 260- 2580.

China cabinet 21/2yrs old, gd cond,
$500. 284-5338.

Q-sz waterbed $150. 284-3528.

Curtains, 10 windows for Howard
AFB, officers' qtrs, due to PCS. Only
1 year old, $300/obo. 284-4394.

Four piece sectional sofa with recliner
and Q-sz sofa sleeper. Mauve, blue
and cream $900. 284-3578 after 6pm.

German leather couch and loveseat
$225. 287-4288.

Washer/dryer $500. Before noon 284-
4733.

DR couch multi color $800.287-5921.

New Kenmore Ig cap washer & dryer
white, heavy duty, $500. 286-6293.

Indoor/outdoor plants, cheap. 287-
4546.

Couch, loveseat, chair pastel, floral,
needs some cleaning, $400.287-4534.

Craft table w/chair $78. 223-4290
evenings.

Queen size bed w/6 built in drawers,
queen mattress $200. 287-4690

Trees, bushes, plants and cuttings. Fig
trees, small bushes $5-$15.286-4184.

3pc LR set, gray, great cond $500/
obo. 234-5419.

GE 19.6cu ft refrig w/inside ice maker
$750; 4pc BR, solid pine w/dresser,
lighted hutch $1,000. 252-1257.

DR set, 6 chairs $200; GE no frost
refrigerator $300. 230-1886.

Couch/built-in recliner, NES Desti-
nation Earthstar $10; SNES Mario
$10, Mortal Kombat $40 and Star Fox
$25. 286-4674.

Fans, 2 round and I square $10ea.
260-9303.

Blue curtains $15, Kenmore micro-
wave $175, swing set $50. 252-1257.

5 piece sectional with 2 recliners &
queen size hide-a-bed southwest de-
sign $600. Pacific Hills 100 MH 20A.

Sofa sleeper, queen size, inner spring
mattress, $690; oversized glider rock-
errecliner, looks new, $290.286-3223.

24,000 National a/c $375; 19,000
Freidricha/c $350; 6,000 GE a/c $165.
252-2287.

Antique upright grand piano, plays
but needs work $500; 3'x3' floor pil-
lows $5ea; used VHS, Beta tapes $.50
each. 252-2344.

Girls bedroom set, sofa bed, coffee
and side tables, wall unit, TV, bicycles
and stereo set. 287-4877.

Wall unit, curtain for trop qtrs, um-
brella for outdoor furniture, pioneer
150w speakers. 230-1927.

Coffee tble and 2 end tables, modern
(metal and glass) $200 set. 252-6844.

Black door refrigerator/freezer Whirl-
pool $600. 285-5601.

6,000 BTU a/c good condition $190.
256-6830.

Lg sofa and loveseat overstuffed
$1,100. 260-7025.

9x12 rugs one blue and one mauve
$30 each. 261-6492.

Light bl carpet 10xl 1 $40. 287-4234.

Refrig, stove, freezer set, $1,100. 283-
3487.

New blk laquer home entertainment
center with encyclopedia cabinets and
glass door $300/obo. 269-4064.

DR set w/4 chairs $200/obo, portable
dishwasher $150/obo. 284-3538.

2 bamboo settee seats, 2 person $80ea,
patio table $50. 261-3325.

Luxury solid oak DR set 4 chairs, 14
mos old, like new $850. 229-2916.




USMA '89 class ring. White gold w/
blue saphire and diamond. Reward.
263-9882.

Dog - German shepherd/Lab, female,
brown and tan. Reward. 252-2476.

Kitten on Fort Clayton near Reader
Fitness Center. answers to the name
Skipper. 285-6112.


Danish twin bed; Sony compact disk;
Sony Betamax; Danish entertainment
set; danish DR w/china; SC word Pro-
cessor 8001.T & printer. 236-0984.

Huffy 18 speed mountain bike, like
new cond, $140. 252-5792.

Water heater $75, wood table 80"x40"
$130, store display cabinet - wooden
$120, computer stand $80, air purifier
$150. 226-8626/3278.

Chevy parts, brake booster, alterna-
tor, like new $225/$175obo. 252-6956.

Tread-mill-Pro-Form5.0A, $350.223-
3645.

Olympic weight set & bench, like new
$250. 284-4381.

Orchids and misc plants. Call eve-
nings. Price varies. 252-1218.

Pioneer, mini-component stereo sys-
tem, turntable & dual cass $450. Epson
Action H laser printer, emulates HP
IIP, like new, $650/obo. 283-3220.

American Perfection 200 T round-
glass counter top hot air flow oven.
Low fat cooking, $90. AT&T 1507
phone/answer system, $65.283-3220.

Weider power stack, 2001bs, bench
press, 4 stations, new $375.260-3363.

Patricia - Where are you? 269-9622.

Personal weight system, gd cond,
$100. 287-3629.

2 cymbals, paiste 18" crash and 10"
splash, ask for Paul, $200. 287-5651.

Coupon for weekend at Las Sirenas
beach cabins in Santa Clara $100.
252-1257.

Fence 6'x125' with post & gate. You
take down $400/obo. 286-4933.

Scuba tank, BC, and misc gear, due to
PCS and no free time, neg. 284-4394.

Teenagers, young adults stlyish cloth-
ing ($10-$15), assorted baby items
and electric breast pump. 284-5197.

Hardwood bench type hanging swing,
like new, $85. 228-4514.

Mobile home, double wide, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 full baths, central a/c, burglar
bars throughout $30,000. 286-3773.

Lawn mower-4.0 litre engine 20in cut,
catch bag, adjustable wheels, Sears
Craftsman new, $200. 287-4428.

Army blues-female, sz 16R, jacket,
skirt, white blouse, $90, wore once.
287-5291.

5spd transmission 87-88 Ford Escort
250 & C-4 Ford transmission heads
andblock2.8LFordengine. 228-4061.

Craftsman router w/case, 11/2 HP,
micro depth adjustment, w/16 piece
bit set. One yr old, $100. 289-4082.

A large cage for sale, 5 feet tall 3 feet
wide 2 feet deep, $110. 284-4188.

Meade 10" telescope SCT, many ex-
tras. Exc cond, gd optics. Reasonable
offer. 284-3692.

Bench press with set of weights and
bar, $100/obo. 228-1334.

Briggs stratton lawnmower, 3.5HP 22
inches, $90. 260-7582.

Child's security gate, $15. 284-6199.

Sports cards and Desert Storm cards
for sale. Reasonable. 283-4349.

4 new tires 185/60R13 4160. 282-
3793.

FSU 1101 work in progress book. Gd
cond used only once. Neg. 287-4438.

Singer sewing machine, 32 stitch$150;
baby clothes/items vary. 284-4885.

Dinette with 3 chairs $75; toddler car
seat $20; bassinette $30; box of mater-
nity clothes $30; small dog kennel
$20. 286-4474.

PCC books, 500 Word Theme for Eng
Comp I $20, 10 Steps to Writing $5,
Intro to Computers $20. 287-3342.

Selling snap-on tool sets at half their
book price. Blue-point extractor set
$135. 2864184

For sale baby playpen $40; small Ze-
nith color TV $80; Zenith color TV
13" remote $140; Almiral vertical
freezer 16.7cf $500. 286-4023.

Whirlpool dishwasher, portable $200.
286-4023.

Tires 2-245/45zrx 16, 4-195/50x 15,4-
205/70x14 other size by order, $20
and up. 252-2792.

Whirlpool washer & dryer heavy duty
(sell as set only) exc cond; Pioneer


digital timer am/fm tuner. 287-4182.

FSU textbooks, ECO 2000 $20; LAH
1093 both books for $13. Avail for
term two. 284-4921.

Misc parts for small block Chevy; 2
BBL in-take manifold, 2 BBI carbs
(2ea), mirrors, brakes combination
valve for '84 Camaro. 283-3485.

Radiator (2 core) for small block
Chevy, fits many GM cars, $45; head
castings for small block Chevy, $20
set. g83-3485.

Chain link fence; 75ft x 5ft, includes
posts and gates best offer. 252-2093.

2 round tables $70ea or both for $100;
Majestic car radio/tapeplayer $50/obo;
mini trampoline $30. 286-4674.

1/3k diamond solitaire ring w/
apprasial, exc cond, $600/obo. 264-
3352.

3 tires P225 R75xl5 Goodyear Wran-
glers $150; 100 feet of fence 5' tall
$200. 252-5320.

2 new box springs, twin, $75ea. 252-
2314.

12x15 carpet $150; 3pc suitcase $50;
plants; baby bassinet $45. 287-6373.

Eng 1101 FSU, third edition, The
Bedford Handbook For Writers $15.
260-3270.

Woman's bike $100; woman's dress
boots size 81/2 $45. 287-6672.

Girl's Huffy 10spd, white, peach, light
green color, gd cond $65. 287-5678.

Bedroom blinds for Currundu flats, 1
dark red, I taupe; king size waterbed
sheets. 286-4222.

Women's shoes size 8, 81/2, 9, wom-
en's exercise clothes, win valances,
7pc, 6pc crib sheet sets. 287-4788.

61/2' artificial Christmas tree w/stand.
Non-flammable material, $65. 256-
6356.

5000BTU room a/c new $325. 283-
3694 6-9pm.

10-speed man's mountain bike w/
child's carrier $130; gas grill used
$55; obo for both items. 287-4527.

Yahama clarinet $175; Dave Dottos
Real Estate Course $200; Cable box
(Zenith) $300; Cable antennae & wire
$200. 252-2344.

4Goodyearl 1.50x31xl5wranglerAT
tires on Ford factory mags $450. 260-
9058.

Wedding gown, veil, 3 ring wedding
set, more extras. Paid $3,000 will sell
everything for $1,000. 286-6134.

Danish white lamp for comer table
$60; beautiful plants all sizes/prices.
236-0984.

Keyplayer, model Casio Tone MT-
105 $40. 260-3485.

Cleaning and repair for a/c's of houses
and cars, low prices. 228-0201.-

Lady's 3-tone 18k gold bracelet 48.2
grams, I inch wide, cartier design
$1,350/neg. 252-2370.

Aquarium- 20gal, w/black gravel,
undergravel filter, pump and filters.
Accessories available $50. 252-5872.

Carpet cleaning equipment - steamers
$550, shampoo machine $650. 230-
0008.

Portable car ramps $40; Radio Shack
electronic parts $80; Judo suit $10;
rattan wine rack $10; antique tools.
252-2042.

Parts for 1974 Grand Torino, ask for
Enrique. 235-9047.

Snorkeling equip used once- mask,


fins, gloves, boots 101/2, snorkel and
bag $150. 285-6874 Room 362.

Airless painter new condition $45.
After 4pm 252-5872.

Car seat, children's bed safety rails,
funtime infant seat $30; cowboy boots,
new auto bottle warmer. 252-2042.

MR2 car bra $40; one GoodyearWran-
gler tire P2257l5R15w/7,000mi $50;
Jeep round fog light $50. 287-4788.

Baby car seat, baby clothes girl 3-18
mos, white 4pc comforter set Q-size.
282-3776.

5 HP submersible water pump for well,
220 volts, 1 yr old $1,200. 252-3356.

WOH 1023 FSU book eigth edition
World Civilizations $30. 260-3270.




1993 Yahama DT 125, dty pd, $1,400.
252-5397.

89 Honda XL-600 Trans-ALP, 17k
mi, climb mountains. Gd cond, test
ride, $3,300/obo. 260-9899.

1978 Kawasaki 650 Bi needs little
work, dty pd, ask for Hill, leave mes-
sage, $900. 284-3669.

1981 Yamaha, 110000, gd cond,
$1,800/neg. 286-6699.

1993 Honda CB 250 Nighthawk
426mi, new bike helmet and gloves
incl, $2,000. 286-3399.

1990 Kawasaki ZR 550 new tires and
brakes, looks gd, 17,000 mi, $1,700.
287-3625.

1976 Montessa 348 Coda Trials bike.
Gd cond, spare parts $750/obo. 261-
2550.

Susuki trail hopper 50cc, $500. 285-
4690.

1987 Yamaha 200cc motorcycle (U.S.
spec) dty pd, gd cond, low mileage
$1,000. 286-4628.




Qtrs 129B, Albrook 7am-noon. Two
family sale.

Qtrs 264B Albrook. Saturday 8 till ?

Qtrs 2351A Balboa.

Qtrs 855A Clayton 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 686A Clayton 7-1 lam

Qtrs 309B Clayton 8am-noon. No ear-
ly birds.

Qtrs 643B Clayton multi family 7-
1 lam

Qtrs 684C Clayton.

Qtrs 248B Albrook 7am-noon.

Qtrs 288B Albrook 8am-noon, no ear-
ly birds.

6550 Los Rios 7-1 llam.

Qtrs 27A Amador 7-10am.

Qtrs770CBameby-Balboa7-9:30am.

Qtrs 541C Clayton 8am-noon.

Qtrs 219A Albrook 7am-noon.

Qtrs 1005E Clayton.

Qtrs 278B Albrook 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 843A Clayton 7am-noon.

Qtrs 451A Amador 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 1996B Curundu 2pm today and
7am Saturday.

Qtrs 1981A Curundu 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 5064A Diablo.


Qtrs 640B Howard 7am-noon.

Qtrs 149 Gamboa - all day.

Qtrs 2047 Curundu 8am.

Qtrs 133A Howard 7-llam.

1525C Howard 6am.

128B Howard 7am-lpm.

Qtrs 74B Howard 7-1 lam.

814B Farfan 7am-noon.

Qtrs 669A Howard 7am-noon.

Qtrs 264A Albrook 7am-noon.




1991 Chevy Blazer Bra, black in col-
or, reasonably priced. 286-6439.

Christian roommate to pay for cable &
maid. E-5 and up (civilian pref.). El
Dorado area $225. 260-9818.

MPOMC looking for mother and ex-
pecting mothers of twins for support
group, Angela. 287-5889.

Canal Zone stamps for collector. 287-
3680.

Seamstress to sew at my home. Must
have ref, exp in making clothes and
curtains. Lye msg. 287-6538.

Scooter, reliable trans, needed for PCS
transition, will rent $400/neg. 282-
4696.

Older woman for live-in maid to care
for one school age child & house)�eep-
ing w/refs. 269-9622.

Responsible female to share Ig apart-
ment 50th St, w/couple $268mo. 269-
0675 7:30-9pm

Interested in buying comic books from
1931-1961 call M-F after 6pm-ask for
Roy. 263-3906.

Bilingual shampoo girl, honest & reli-
able 3 days wk or more. 260-4857.

FT bilingual maid w/ref for housekeep
& childcare. Atlantic 289-3238.

Need used refrigerator in gd cond
(Atlantic side) 243-5269.

Beach house Gorgona or Coronado
for Nov 20-21. 223-4766 after 5pm.

Hockey players, street or rollerblade,
own stick a plus, Bob. 284-6281.

Bilingual maid w/ref, mature, house-
work, gd w/kids, $100/mo. 286-3690.

Swing-set in gd cond, will pay up to
$50. Ask fo Emili. 284-4821.

Stamp collectors, I buy & sell U.S.
stamps. 286-4875.

Gd cond sewing machine, color TV to
play Nintendo only. 286-4790.

Teenage American babysitters in the
Altos de Bethania area, occasional
babysitting for 2 &4yr olds. 261-6492.

Typewriter Eng or Span for student,
reasonably priced. 252-2355.

Hitch for Blazer type III 2,500-
3,5001bs. 226-2885.

Gardener/handyman. 226-5436.

Live-in maid Mon-Sat. Take care of 3
kids, cook, clean, $150mo. 252-5036.

Exp upholster and car customizer to
work with me, ask for SSG Ellison.
235-9047.

U.S. mail to Panama prior to 1925. I
pay cash or trade. 286-4875.

Responsible maid w/refs to cook, gen
house cleaning. 223-1069.

Seamstress w/own machine, my home
or yours, must speak Eng. 260-1958.


Tropic Times Ad Form


ANIMALS
AUTOMOBILES
AVAILABLE
BOATS & CAMPERS
ELECTRONICS
FOUND
HOUSEHOLD
LOST
MISCELLANEOUS
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WANTED


SPONSOR'S NAME


ORG.


PRICE


HOME PHONE


Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each
week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited
more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed
below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This
information will not be released to third parties. Deadline forthe receipt
of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are run on a space
available basis and the staff makes no guarantee of ads running. Ads must
include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times,
Unit 0936, APO AA 34002 ordeposited in adrop box at the Albrook Post
Office. Ads offering weapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not be
run.

RANK/GRADE


DUTY PHONE











B 12 Tropic Times
B12^ Sept. 30, 1994





HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if
claiming veteran preference, a copy of college tran-
scripts if claiming education and a copy of CASP no-
tice of rating if applicable. Submit a copy of latest SF-
50 if you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army vacancy an-
nouncements (forms required, job related criteria,
etc.), visit the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Build-
ing 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 285-5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should
be the first step in the job search.
SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at NM-
5 level and above require specialized experience. Spe-
. alized experience is either education above the high
school level or work experience directly related to the
position being filled. Example: Budget positions at or
above the NM-5 level required Budget experience or
equivalent education.
Vacancy announcements are also available at the
Sundial Recreation Center.
Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting ap-
plications on a continuous basis for the following posi-
tions. Registers established from these announcements
will be used to fill permanent and temporary positions.

VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most clerical
position).
VB# 001A * General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most clerical
position).
VB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk ach)
* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Cert + 6
mo recreation exp in the field.
IVB004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Requires 6 mos recreation exp
in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB00D5A Secretary (Stenography). NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5
VB o006A Secretary (Typg/Office Automation), NM-6
VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-S. Limited to
permanent status employees only.
VB 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM[-6 Limited to
permanent states employees only.
The following positions are Permitemp, Full-time, Part-time,
Intermltent.
Vl 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13114.
.VB# 008 CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license required), NM-9/10/
S VB 009 * PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required), NM-S.
VB#019 ** EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, NM-640-4/

* Selectees for nurse, medical officer and EMT positions required a
bacround check.

Worldwide and local announcement. OPEN: 09-30-94
WW483-94-JH PLANS AND PROGRAMS COORDINATOR, GS-301-
11. SENSITIVE. HQ, USSOUTHCOM, US Military Liaison Office,
Brasilia Sec., Brazil. NOTE: Security clearance is required. Applications
will be accepted from Federal employees and non-status applicants (to
appointed as an overseas limited appointment).
CLOSES: 10-25-94.

VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION. OPEN: 09-30-
94 CLOSE: 10-11-94
Pacific
443A-94-SS PLUMBER SUPERVISOR, MS-4206-10. USAG, DEH,
Oper Div., Corozal. NOTE: Driver's license required.
473-94-ES SPEECH PATHOLOGIST, NM-665-9. USA MEDDAC,
GACH, Dept of Pediatrics, EFMP Clinic, Ancon.
433A-94-NC INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECH, NM-895-7/8/9.
USAG-DEH, Resource Div, System Br., CorozaL
474-94-NC EMPLOYEE RELATIONS ASSISTANT (OA), NM-203-6
Dev 7. TEMP NTE: 1 YR. USAG, DCP, LED Div, Corozal. NOTE:
Bilingual. Position is developmental to NM-7, selection of temporary at
NM-6 will require competition for the NM-7.
475-94-NC PASSENGER RATE ASSISTANT (OA), NM-2133-5. DOL
TRANS Div., Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Qualified typist.
476-94-ES (8) DENTAL OFFICERS, NM-80-11. TEMP NTE: 6 Mos.
Joint Task Force, Safe Haven, Camp OneNOTE: Bilingual. Part-time.
Panamanian license required.
477-94-ES BIOLOGICAL SPECIMEN COLLECTOR, MG-5001-5.
TEMP NTE: 30 Sept 95. USA MEDDAC, Preventive Medicine Svc.,
Entomology Sec., Ancon.
478-94-JH INTELLIGENCE SPECIALIST (OPERATIONS), GS-132-
11. SENSITIVE. INSCOM, 470th Military Intel Brigade, Corozal.
NOTE: Security Clearance is required. Fully Bilingual. Driver's license
required. In addition to meeting the above requirements, applicants must
meet OPM standards for language specialist series GS-1040 (experience
in translating, interpreting both in English and Spanish.
479-94-JH SUPERVISORY MEDIA INFORMATION SPEC, NM-1011-
l1.SENSITIVE. SOUTHCOM, Directorate of Operations (SCJ3),
Quarry Heights. NOTE: Security clearance is required.
480-94-KF SECRETARY STENOO), NM-318-7. SENSITIVE.
USSOUTHCOM, Public Affairs Directorate, Quarry Heights. NOTE:
Top Secret clearance is required. Qualified typist. Bilingual.
481-94-JH SECRETARY (STENO/OA), NM-318-8. SENSITIVE.
USARSO, Deputy Commander for Support, Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Security
clearance is required. Qualified typist & stenographer.
482-94-EL INTELLIGENCE SPEC (OPNS SPT), GS-132-9.
SENSITIVE. USARSO, DCSINT, Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Security clearance
is required. Bilingual.
NOTE: DB-466-A-94-KF and DB467-A-94-JH are amended to delete
Temp NTE 09-3095.

Air Force Club
The Howard Enlisted Members' Club announces job openings. All
interested applicants must submit an Application for Nonapprorpriated
Employment, AF Form 1701, available at the Human Resources Office,
Building 708, Howard AFB, Panama.
WF-7405-I Bartender. Salary ranges from $3 to $7.25 an hour.
WF-4749-II Cook. Salary ranges from $5.44-$11.46 an hour.


* Potpourri


I I


Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club: 282-3439
The club will be closed to the public for renovations
through Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be
available 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Addition-
ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and
during lunch hours 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Amador
*Club Amador: 282-4334
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring
soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights.
Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno
at noon the first Sunday of each month.
All-you-can-eat spaghetti lunch Wednesdays, $3.95.
The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during
renovations of the Quarry Heights Officers' Club.
Clayton
*The Loop: 287-3035
CJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-l p.m.
Mondays-Fridays. The bar and grill now opens noon Satur-
days-Sundays for football game viewing and at 3:30 p.m.
Sunday pool tournaments.
Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or CJ's
Sports Bar, call 287-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343.
*NCO Club: 287-4716
The Forum Restaurant opens 5-9 p.m. daily.
Mexican buffet Mondays.
Steak night Tuesdays. A la carte menu is available.
Country buffet Wednesdays features barbecue pork ribs,
fried chicken, pork knuckles, collards greens, sweet potato,
rice, black-eyed peas and corn bread.
All-you-can-eat family buffet Thursdays.
Seafood buffet Fridays. Try the broiled lobster, garlic
shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab.
12-oz prime rib special Saturdays.
Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m.
Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Sun-
days and Mondays.
Disco 9 p.m. Wednesday, Fridays and Saturdays. There
will be a midnight buffet.
Albrook
*Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582
Club closes after lunch the first Tuesday of each month
for maintenance. .
Tonight's entertainment karaoke in the lounge and club
card drawing.
Steak night 6-9 p.m. Friday. Choose from rib eye, K.C.
strip, filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked
potato, French fries or rice.
Prime rib dinner, 6-9 p.m. Saturday. Menu also in-
cludes: Cream of broccoli soup, garden salad, 12 oz. prime
rib, baked potato, baby carrots, and sherbert.
Sunday saloon breakfast specials 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the
lounge. Choose from three menus.
Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-l p.m. in the din-
ing room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets,
French toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-and-eat
shrimp, desserts and ice cream bar.
Mongolian barbecue 5:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Choose
the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have chefs do the
job outside on the open grills. Enjoy live music.
Oriental night 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday includes
tacos, fajitas, taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. After din-
ner dance the night way to country western music.
Country western night Thursdays with free dance les-
sons at 7:30-10:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples
dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing.
Howard
*Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718
Weekday lunches includes buffet, salad and potato bar.
Friday and Saturday nights 6-8:30 p.m. order a la carte
in the dining room.


Friday's evenings in the lounge. Stop for beer specials,
music, games and club card drawings.
Tonight-genuine Italian cuisine 6-8:30 p.m. today.
Italian dinner special in the dining room.
Fajita junction 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday. Beef or chicken
fajitas in the dining room.
Dining room is closed Sunday through Thursday.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club - Dining Room:
284-4189
Sunday breakfast buffet 8-12:30 a.m.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30
a.m. Saturday.
New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade
roast beef, turkey, turkey salad arid tuna fish sandwiches with
all the tirmmings.
Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. Saturday.
Take someone special to dinner featuring tableside prepara-
tion with tuxedo service.
Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Select a
cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or filet. All steaks are
U.S. choice beef.
Family menu Tuesdays-Fridays featuring all the past fa-
vorites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand made 1/
2 pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more.
Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or
take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot
wings.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom : 284-
4189
Friday night disco 4:30 p.m.- 1 a.m. today.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove:
284-4189
Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays.
Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-l a.m.
Monday night football and mug special in the lounge.
Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcorn and nachos.
Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Free Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m.
Wednesday in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line danc-
ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until mid-
night.
Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with
your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills.
Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.-
midnight Thursdays.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday.
*Top Three Club; 284-4189
Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday.
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat and
complimentary taco bar.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. Members
must have a card and be present to win.
Club closed Saturdays.

Rodman
*Rodman Club - Open to all ranks: 283-4498
Social hour 3:30-11 p.m. Friday at the Laguna Lounge.
Complimentary hors d'oeuvres served 5-7 p.m.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Monday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with all-
you-can-eat taco bar at the Laguna Lounge.
Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
All-you-can-eat beef and burgundy 4:30-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Grill menu is also available.
Open Mike night 6-11 p.m. Thursday in the Laguna
Lounge.
Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Rodman Bohio.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 6-9
p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Dinner is served 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursday; 6-
9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays.
*Rodman Annex: 283-4498
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
The club is closed for evening and weekend service.


SNAM rdioschdul


The Southern Command Network's
AM Radio station features America's
most-listened to radio programs. Live
coverage of breaking news stories and
special events are provided.
SCN AM Radio AM 790 Pacific and
AM 1420 Atlantic are the news, sports
and information station.


Monday-Friday
5am National Public Radio Morning
Edition
9:54am Paul Harvey News
11am The Rush Limbaugh Show
12:05pm Paul Harvey News and Com-
mentary (Repeat 1:17 p.m.)
2:05pm Paul Harvey Rest of the Story
(Repeats 10:05pm)
4pm NPR's All Thing Considered
6:05pm American Public Radio's
Marketplace


11l:35pm KSFO Sports Byline USA

Monday
1:05am NPR's Cartalk
3:30am NPR's Living On Earth
7:30am What's the Story
8:05am On Computers
1:30am Robert/JamesExchange

Tuesday
1:35am KSFO Sports Byline USA
7:35am AP Portfolio
8:35am The Environment Show
1:30pm Soundings
8:35pm AP Special Assignment

Wednesday
1:35am KSFO Sports Byline USA
7:35am The Best of Our Knowledge
8:35am The Health Show
1:30pm Social Thought


1:35am
7:35am
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1:30pm


1:35am
7:35am
8:35am
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1:35am
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1:05am
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Thursday
KSFO Sports Byline USA
The Law Show
Technovation
A Matter of Health

Friday
KSFO Sports Byline USA
American Montage
The Book Show
Georgetown University Fo-
rum

Saturday
KSFO Sports Byline USA
On Computers
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Sunday
Focus on the Family
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Monitor radio
NPR's Weekend Edition


I




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PAGE 1

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum Tropic Times Vol. VII, No. 39 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Sept. 30, 1994 Panama's new president tries to woo Washington PANAMA CITY (Reuters)Panama's new president is wooing Washington in a bid to change the ruling party's 4N image from a one-time nemesis of the United States to a key ally in Latin America, analysts say. Ernesto Perez Balladares, a stalwart of the party that backed former dictator Manuel Noriega, has extended several olive branches to the United States since taking office on Sept. 1. The day after his inauguration, Perez Balladares offered to help the United States cope with an influx of Cuban boat people by taking in up to 10,000 refugees for a limited time. A few weeks later, he offered Haitian strongman Raoul Cedras asylum in Panama if that would avert a U.S. invasion. Although Haiti's leaders may not need the haven after striking a deal with U.S. negotiators, Panama has said its offer still stands. "We have come to the rescue of our friends twice in our first 15 days of office," Gabriel Lewis, Panama's foreign minister, recently told reporters. Analysts say the U.S.-educated Perez Balladares hopes Sg. Cass Purdum (Tropic Times) to ease concerns in Washington about the return to power of Noriega's party less than five years since the 1989 U.S. Gen. Barry McCaffrey, U.S. Southern Command commander in chief, sits with Juan Francisco invasionthattoppledNoriegaandsenthimtoaFloridajail. Pardini, vice president of American Chamber of Commerce and Industry, at a luncheon held "Perez Balladares wants the United States to know his Wednesday at the Union Club in Paitilla. McCaffrey was guest speaker and addressed the government will bear little resemblance to Noriega's," drawdown of U.S. forces in Panama. Ambler Moss, the director of the University of Miami's North-South Center, told Reuters. ~4~h r"i'4~~h U.S. forces briefly detained Perez Balladares, then aIV .McCaffrey ta ks 'd rawdown' at prominent party official, after the invasion. He had served as the campaign manager o'Noriega's hand-picked candic o m e c gChabro omreluncheon~ date in the fraud-marred 1988 elections that set the stage for .h m e o om e c u n h o the U.S. intervention, are paid to U.S. government employees and more than Perez Balladares tried to put the dark days behind him, by Sgt. Cass Purdum $100 million are spent each year by the United States on telling voters during the election campaign that the DemoTropic Times staff goods, services and contracts in Panama. cratic Revolutionary Party had been "reborn," and he PANAMA CITY -The commander in chief of the U.S. McCaffrey used graphs to show the 1994 spending in urged both Panamanians and Americans to forgive and Southern Command told civic leaders here Wednesday that the "Buy Panama" program. About $140 million was spent forget. the United States will withdraw more than 40 percent of in fiscal year 1994 alone. Analysts say Perez Balladares won on a campaign its forces from Panama during the next 18 months. "'Buy Panama' is a program we believe in," McCaffrey platform promising more aid for Panama's poor who had Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, addressing members of the said. "We buy roughly 20 percent of the things we use, benefited little from a post-invasion economic boom. American Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Panahere in Panama." Before his inauguration, Perez Balladares met with ma, touched on a number of subjects during his speech, However, as the drawdown continues, demand for prodPresident Clinton in the United States and pledged to crack including the impact of SOUTHCOM's "Buy Panama" ucts will decrease. down on huge flows of drug profits being illegally latnprogram, the progress of the drawdown in Panama and "We will get even more serious about the program in dered in Panama's economy-a point of contention beupcoming challenges of treaty implementation. the future, but clearly, 'Buy Panama' goals will decrease tween both nations since the Noriega years. "Let me begin by telling you that today marks 1,920 dramatically over the next years," he said. U.S. officials have reacted warmly to Perez Balladares, days that remain until 1 January 2000," McCaffrey said. "In the next 18 months, we will take approximately 43 according to analysts, although one U.S. official told "At that time we will have fully complied with, without percent of military forces out of Panama," McCaffrey said. Reuters that Washington is taking a "wait-and-see attiexception, the U.S. government responsibilities under the "This transition started with the stand-down of the 193rd tude." Panama Canal Treaty. Infantry Brigade." A former banker with an Ivy League education, Perez "As we look toward the future, over the next two or There are still many challenges with the treaty impleBalladares is cut from the same fabric as recent Latin three generations, the future of North America is absomentation and drawdown, McCaffrey said. Creating conAmerican leaders who speak English and curry lutely included in the future of this hemisphere," he said. ditions for Panama's successful use of reverted areas, Washington's and Wall Street's favor, analysts say. "In terms of economics, by the turn of the century we bewhich include 4,800 buildings and 77,000 acres of land, "Perez Balladares could turn out to be more like (Argenlieve trade with the Americas will exceed trade with Euattenuating the economic shock of the drawdown to Pantine President Carlos) Menem in his support for the United rope." ama, and maintaining quality of life for assigned U.S. forcStates than any other Latin American leader right now," Closer to home, the United States and Panama are es and their family members, are some of the major issues Moss said. charged with the enormous responsibility of carrying out facing SOUTHCOM today. And like his Latin American counterparts, Perez Ballathe treaty. McCaffrey said the drawdown of 10,000 U.S. The regional missions of the United States will also dares wants Panama to join in the North American Free troops will not be difficult. continue until 1999. These include counterdrug operations, Trade Agreement between the United States, Canada and "We can draw down to zero with no difficulty," he said. air transportation, humanitarian aid and the Navy and JunMexico. "We have taken more than 200,000 military personnel out gle Operations Schools. Panama also needs U.S. help in winning fresh loans of Europe during the last three years. It's not a big chalMcCaffrey said as the U.S. forces continue to leave from international lenders and in planning the handover of lenge to take 10,000 out of Panama." Panama, there is a lot of work to be done. "Our agenda is the Panama Canal at the decade's end as called for underthe The major concern is the impact to civilian employees, to move out and that's what we are doing. Panama Canal treaties of 1977. he said. There are 8,000 Panamanians working directly "We will be judged by how we handle this important The United States built the canal and has operated it for the United States or hired by Americans stationed here, transition," he said. since 1914. and another 8,000 Panamanian contract employees that "As we look to the future, we recognize, so well, that "We know we can count on the United States when we will be affected by the drawdown. the story of the Americas is as much wrapped up in our need to," Lewis said. In addition, a projected $450 million in annual salaries future as it was in our past," McCaffrey said. Air Force units lend a hand to "OpSoldiers from four nations join to*G.I. dies in Haiti, Page 4. eration Support Hope" with misgether in Arkansas for exercise *Yale accepts SEAL, Page 12. sions in Entebbe, Uganda. "Cabanas '94-Il." *Youth soccer begins, Page 13.

PAGE 2

2 Tropic Times Sept. 30, 1994 Suriname addresses for A g s Distant Haven provided People in Panama interested in writing All flights listed are subject to change because of cancellations, additions or for higher priority mission or sending packages to soldiers in requirements. Check with the passenger service section for updates on flights by calling 284-4306/3608/ Suriname should address the items as fol4857. lows: rank, name and service; unit; JTFNS Distant Haven; APO AE 09360-0001. Saturday Charleston IAP, SC Thursday Print MPS on the upper right corner of the 5:40am C-130 Howard AFB Tuesday 5:45am C-5A Howard AFB envelope and put return address. If mailNiagara Falls, NY (A) 5:40am C-141 Howard AFB Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) ing from CONUS or other locations out1:45pm C-5A Howard AFB Brasilia, Brazil (V,O) Charleston AFB, SC (0) side of Panama, address the same as above Charleston AFB, SC (0) Rio do Janeiro, Brazil (0) Kelly AFB, TX but mail first class postage. Only letter mail Dover AFB, DE Asuncion, Paraguay OcL 7 and small parcels may be mailed. Parcels Sunday Brasilia, Brazil 5:40am C130 Howard AFB 7am B-757 Howard AFB (C,O) Wednesday Managua, Nicaragua must be able to fit in a mailbag. Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) 5:55am C-130 Howard, AFB Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Monday San Salvador, El Salvador AActive duty only Families First looking for 5:40am C-130 Howard AFB (V,CC) USU.S. passport Tegucigalpa, Hondurus (CC) Soto Cano AB (CC) 0-Overnight volunteers to help out Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Howard AFB C-Commercial Contract The Family Advocacy Outreach ProHoward AFB 5:40am C-141 Howard AFB V-Visa 8:40am B-757 Howard AFB Kelly AFB, TX (M) M-Medevac gram is starting a program called "FamiAtlanta lAP, GA (C) Jackson, MS CC-Country Clearance lies First" designed to assist new parents. The program will be supported by volunteers working primarily by phone from 5 in Building 128, Fort Clayton for other es Company dining facility; and Oct. 7 -blocks, 8 to 10 a.m., Oct. 17-21 in the their homes. Volunteers must be at least than active duty; 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 6 Puerto Rican Youth Festival 6-9 p.m. at Howard Education Center, Building 708. 18 years old, have access to a phone and in Building 708, Howard AFB; 9 a.m.-5 the Fort Clayton Youth Center. For more information, call Linda Antoine be able to make one trip to Gorgas Army p.m. Oct. I1-.12 in Building 808, Albrook at 284-3263/4863. Medical Center. For more information, call AFS; and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct 11-12 in 24th Wing PAO sponsors 284-6410/6457 Building 235, Fort Davis. Late registration Volunteers needed for will be noon-5 p.m. Oct. 17-18 in Buildbroadcast program H toward support center ing 808, Albrook AFS; and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. The 24th Wing Public Affairs Office is Women's History Month Oct. 17-18 in Building 235, Fort Davis. sponsoring a program to help make the Volunteers are needed to plan and orneeds donations For information, call 285-6922/5222. holiday season a little brighter for relatives ganize activities for the 1995 Howard The Howard Family Support Center is in the United States. People can record an AFB Women's History Month observance taking donations for Cuban migrants comThousands still need to audio holiday greeting to be broadcast on scheduled for March. Officials are also ing into Panama. Items needed include cola radio station in the relatives' home town. looking for someone -holding the rank oring books, crayons, children's games, for new COLA The program is free and open to all U.S. of master sergeant or above -to chair the magazines, toys (no stuffed animals), The Fort Clayton Finance and Acmilitary and family members. For more observance committee. Anyone interestsports equipment and children's videos counting Office processed nearly 4,500 information about the program, call the ed may call Tech. Sgt. Jim Johnson at 284(dubbed or subtitled in Spanish). For more Cost of Living Allowance transactions in 24th Wing Public Affairs office, 2845358/5309. information, call 284-5650/5910. August. There are still nearly 2,600 sol5554. diers not receiving COLA. Unit comRodman Marina has manders, first sergeants and personnel serNew policy limits tuition WAPS/CDC program vices noncommissioned officers should changes explained moorings for boaters continue efforts to identify soldiers. Solassistance for soldiers There have been a number of changes Rodman Marina has wet moorings. diers not receiving COLA must contact Soldiers will now be authorized to take to the Air Force Weighted Airman PromoActive duty military are given priority. To their chain of command. For formation' a maximum of nine semester hours of coltion System and the Career Development sign up for a wet mooring, please contact call 287-4208. lege courses per fiscal year at 75 percent Courses recently that may require a change S Through tuition cost, according to a new policy conin the way airmen study for promotion. Just Passin Tcerning Army tuition assistance effective One of the new changes calls for each Fewer mosquitoes alter Navy Ball set for Oct. 14 October. Tuition assistance will now be member to get their own, personal set of fumigation program The 1994 Navy Ball will be held 6 p.m. centrally managed at U.S. Total Army Perstudy materials. For more information on Because of the drop in mosquito popuOct. 14 at Club Amador. Tickets are $10 sonnel Command. The intent of this polithe new WAPS/CDC issues, members lation throughout all east bank installafor E-6/GS-6 and below and $15 for E-7/ cy is to provide soldiers consistent fundshould call their unit WAPS monitors. tions, the new fumigation schedule is GS-7 and above. For information, call ing of their education programs as they Mondays and Thursdays on Fort Clayton, Navy public affairs at 283-5641/5644. move about the Army. The local education Education center sets Curundu and Corozal, and Tuesdays and center is available to help soldiers identify Fridays at Albrook, Amador and Quarry Army education center other funding such as Pell Grants, Vetermany new test dates Heights. The fumigation is done 6-9 p.m. new hours ans Education Assistance Program and The Army Education Center announcsets testing Montgomery GI Bill. For information, call es new test dates for Graduate Record ExDental clinic will offer The Army education center announces 287-5703/3161. ams, Graduate Management Admission .new testing hours. The new hours are 7:30 Tests, National Teachers' Exams and Audental exams to walk-ins a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday in Milita clothing still tomotive Service Excellence exams. The Beginning Monday, Clayton Dental Building 128, Fort Clayton. For informanew test dates are 7 a.m. Oct. 12, 18 and Clinic will offer routine dental examination, call 287-5702. available on Rodman 25, and Nov. 8, 9 and 15. GRE and NTE tions to family members of active duty perDuring the transition of the Marine subject exams will be given at 1 p.m. For sonnel on a walk-in basis Tuesdays Hispanic heritage Corps Exchange to the Army and Air information, call 287-5856. through Fridays 1-3 p.m. Family members Force Exchange Service, today through may still make appointments on a spaceobservances scheduled Jan. 31, military clothing will still be availavailable basis by calling after I p.m. on The following events are scheduled in able. Store officials said uniform clothing Mondays. For information or appointobservance of National Hispanic Heritage sales will be sold at the Marine Corps Exhold anniversary sale ments, call 287-4308. Month: change Country and Package Store, BuildThe Defense Commissary Agency will Today -Luncheon sponsored by the ing 4, Rodman NS and also through mail hold an anniversary sale at commissaries FSU announces term two 92nd Personnel Services Company; Saturorder catalogs. Catalog orders will take throughout Panama in October. More than registration schedule dayt -nomnoes touran 9 amby1th. three to foui weeks to process. 900 items will be offered at savings of 20The Florida State University, Panama Puerto Rican community; Wednesday -60 percent. Canal Branch, announces the following Luncheons at the 228th Aviation Regiale, inspection registration dates for term two: 9:30 a.m.meant and 536th Engineer Battalion dining at Corozal announced Area housing mayors 12:30 p.m. Oct. 5 in Building 128, Fort facilities; Thursday -Luncheon 11:30 A local spot bid sale and inspection of elections wrapping up Clayton, for active duty; 12:30-3 p.m. Oct. a.m.I p.m. at the 92nd Personnel Servicitems will be held 7:30 a m. Monday in Elections for housing area mayors and Building 745, Corozal. For information, vice-mayors must be completed by Oct. W eekend weather call285-4754 20. Volunteers are needed to hold those positions in their prospective areas on and Forecast: Mostly cloudy with intermittent showers and thunderstorms. Howard education office off post. Mayoral responsibilities include Pacific Atlantic offers ACC course helping in the administration of the quality Saturday Saturday The Howard Education Office will ofof life program, serving in the Mayoral Temperature Tides Temperature Tides ter an Air Combat Command course on Congress, conducting town meetings at High: 86 12:27 p.m. at 13.1 feet High: 85 8:41 p.m. at 0.9 feet "Improving Study and Testing Skills" to least quarterly, attending quality of life Low: 72 6:43 p.m. at 3.7 feet Low: 70 2:58 a.m. at 0 0 feet interested military members. The course is meetings, serving on congressional comSunday Sunday designed to enhance ACC members' permittees and coordinating community H igh: 87 1:21 p.m. at 14.2 feet High: 86 8:34 p.m. at 0.8 feet t ormance in off duty education, on-the-job projects with the sponsoring unit. Training Low: 72 7:39 p.m. at 2.6 ceci Low: 71 3:27 a.m. at 0.1 feet training, professional military education, and child care is available. To volunteer, etc. The course will be taught in twO hour call Master Sgt. Scott Carr at 287-371 (.

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~~ItU1~eTropic Times Feature 3et3,94% Pete Gonzelez (U.S. Air Force) Senior Airman Steve Smith marshalls in the special mission C-130 that deployed to Entebbe, Uganda, in support of Operation Support Hope. The skies over Entebbe 'Non-deployable' units aid humanitarian mission in Uganda so" for the 310th. by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson "I can't give enough credit to our maintenance people." Chief Cole said. "The C-130 maintainers who hey said it couldn't be done, but the men and remained behind have been working seven days a week to women of the 310th Airlift Squadron went keep the operation going, with no relief crews and no ahead and did it anyway. scheduled days off." Responding to a short-notice request from the Many of the spares that are normally on hand, which Supreme Allied Commander Europe, Gen. George A. can make repairs easier for maintainers, were sent to Joulwan, members of the 310th AS, along with other Entebbe with the deployed maintenance technicians, said Howard units, picked up and relocated to distant Master Sgt. Kevin Holden, production supervisor for the Entebbe, Uganda, about two months ago. The last of 310th AS. those who deployed returned Monday. Pole Gon 5 r Force "Having more than half of our personnel deployed has During that time, the temporary duty contingent, Adrianne puts on a happy face for dad, Senior meant we're putting in a lot of extra hours, but that comes including members of the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron Airman Eddie Victorian upon his return from with the territory," Holden said. "We're doing the same and the 33rd Intelligence Squadron, participated in Uganda as his wife LaShawn looks on. amount of work -or even a little more -with half the Operation Support Hope, a humanitarian mission to people, so of course the job is more difficult." conduct relief operations for displaced people in Rwanda Johnny Savage. The effort paid off: they had no mission cancellations and adjacent countries. "These men have nearly 70 years of combined due to either maintenance or operations. Uganda, located in eastern Africa near the equator, is deployment experience," Ross said. "In a single after"We must remember though, that the success of this on Rwanda's northern border. noon, they came up with a list of everything they thought unprecedented deployment was by no means a solitary Howard's contribution to the operation were C130 we'd need in Entebbe." effort on the part of the 310th. Many other organizations missions-known as Creek Breeze-through which 'The experts at the 640th Air Mobility Support were vital to our being able to pull it off," Ross said. information on the status of lines of communication, Squadron helped us prepare the pallets, and they said our refugee camps and volcanic activity in the area were people did a better job of palletizing the load than a lot of provided to Support Hope officials. the Army people who do this on a regular basis," Cole "We also got very short notice about the deployment," said. said Maj. Jim Keffer, commander of the 24th AIS. "Our On the 24th AIS side, it was primarily Tech. Sgt. Jerry people began preparing immediately to make the Walrath who decided the quantity of film and chemicals deployment happen, and they did it, even though they that would be needed for "Support Hope," and Senior had no previous training and had never even planned for Airman Dicki Freeland actually deployed to lend his this type of contingency." technical expertise to a mobile photo processing and "It was a very real challenge to pick up our operations interpretation facility in Entebbe. and move them 7,000 miles away," said 310th AS A crew of five aerial observers, led by Master Sgt. Jeff commander Lt. Col. Curt Ross. "Deployable units do this Guay, also deployed to operate sensitive sensor equipkind of thing all the time, but we're not set up to be ment, and to enhance the flight safety for the aircraft and deployable." crew. "Deployable" units generally have Tables of AllowThe 24th AIS is the only unit in the Air Force that uses ances, which list things they'll need "on the road." They photo interpreters for aircrew duties, Keffer said. "In fact, also usually have War Readiness Spares Kits, ready-built I sent more than half of all the aerial observers in the Air pallets containing most of the items listed on their TAs. Force to Africa." This was not the case with any of the Howard units that The planners apparently did an outstanding job of participated in the Entebbe deployment. determining and compiling their mission requirements, as "The squadron provided eight experts, including the 310th maintained a 100 percent mission rate in operational intelligence officers, aerial observers, and a Uganda, and the 24th AIS shot and processed 41 rolls of photo processor, as well as almost a quarter of a million film. dollars worth of sensor film and sensor processing "That isn't 35mm film we're talking about here," chemicals," said Capt. Mark Makowski, 24th AIS Keffer explained. "Our film comes in rolls five inches Staff Sgi. Rian Clawon (U S Ar Force) operations officer. wide and 2,000 feet long, which means we shot more than Senior Airman Jerry Elliot, 310th Airlift SquadIn order to put it all together from scratch, Ross called 15 1/2 miles of film in Entebbe." ron, works on a C-1 30 engine. Elliot was one who on the experience of Capt. John Philbin, Chief Master Deploying such a large portion of a unit might have remained behind and worked seven-day weeks Sgt. Gary Cole, Master Sgt. Jose Morales, and Tech. Sgt. had an adverse effect on some units, but officials say "not to make up for a 50 percent loss in personnel.

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4 Tropic TimesL 'Sept. 30, 194 News Traffic Command says POVs now ready for pick up BALBOA (MTMC) -The following customers.have privately owned vehicles ready for pick up at the POV Processing Center, Building 1501, Balboa, adjacent to Pier 18: Alexis M.; Anciaux L.N.; Barrett R.C.; Breedlove S.E.; Clayton J.D.; Cooley S.E.; Danner B.L.; Fluct J.E.; Garuz T.E.; Hughes K.D.; Johnison V.M.; Kemp T.H.; Kinsey L.J.; Krisman E.K.; Lease J.V.; Lewis L.J.; Lugardo M.A.; Marcelino W.V.; Martini S.A.; Matthews T.E.; May J.W.; Mejia-Rangel 0.; Miller J.T.; Moore J.D.; Noles R.D.; Oconner M.L.; Popert D.A.; Rico P.; Ruggles G.; Sanchez E.E.; Schaul D.E.; Sola M.A.; Spears R.R.; Squires E.; Testa J.A.; Thomas S.L.; ~. Thompson S.L.; Tregaskis K.; Vereen T.A.; Wheritt J.T.; Williams A.C.; Wilson M.; Wrencher C.T (U.S. Ar) Customers must have the following No m ore helicopters documents for pick up of their POVs: *ID card (current military, dependent or HONDURAS (JTF-Bravo PAO) -CH-47 Chinook helicopters and their crews from Joint Task Force -civilian) Bravo, Company C, 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment were deactivated here Sept. 15. *Driver license (must have Panamanian "We've carried more than 3,000 passengers and 1.4 million pounds of cargo during our time here," said license for second POV) 1st Lt. Stephen Breagy, Co. C. executive and operations officer. "We had an operational readiness rate of *POV shipping document (DD Form about 95 percent -25 percent above Army standard." 788) In addition Co. C logged monthly flying hours that were triple the Army average for CH-47s. Measured *Vehicle registration or title in hour per aircraft, per month, the Army's flying hour average is 11. Co. C averaged 33 flying hours per *Power of Attorney and photo copies of month, Breagy said. the sponsor's bilingual ID card and Chinook helicopter support will no longer be so readily available at JTF-Bravo. driver's license (when the sponsor on orders cannot be present for pick up) The list is current as of Monday. For updates, call customer service at 282Last Vietnam Udeclared dead4642/3853 or the POV arrival tape recording at 282-4641. Customer service hours LOS ANGELES (AP) -In the end, the staring at the photo of a young man who confusion and guilt, the same feeling of are Monday -Friday, 7:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m. five children of Col. Charles E. Shelton felt looks just like him, the photo of his dad inadequacy, that bedeviled his mother for Wednesday hours are 9 a.m. -2:30 p.m. driven to their decision by a relentless seeclimbing into a plane. 25 years. People expecting POVs are reminded saw-the dizzying up-and-down of hope "It's hung over us for so long." "There's one woman active in the POW to call customer service to leave a contact then despair, trust then suspicion, of ruLast week, at the children's request, the groups who I've been trying to reach, to phone number. mors that never came true but always came Air Force changed Shelton's status from tell her why we've done this, to try to exback. prisoner of war to killed in action. Next plain," he says. Security specialst It took their mother, dragging her down Tuesday, his children will gather at Arling"She's not been answering my calls. I into alcoholism and depression. ton National Cemetery in Washington to know she's upset, that she thinks because dies at Gorg as When she shot herself four years ago, place his name on their mother's gravewe're doing this, that we're abandoning all FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) with the black and white POW-MIA flag stone there. the men who might still be over there." flying outside the house, her rosary draped None of this is easy, even now, three He looks up, and his face is twisted. Retired Maj. Carlos A. Poveda, 55, a loover her husband's POW bracelet, they decades after their dad was shot down over "Even if he was over there, even if he'd gistics/training management specialist for decided it must end. Laos. been there all that time, do you think he'd the office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Hard as it was, guilty as it made them The Pentagon says it will continue to still be alive?" he asks, restating an arguLogistics, died of cancer at Gorgas Army feel, the time had come to declare that their push for a full accounting of all servicement he's clearly had with himself many Community Hospital Sept. 23. father, the nation's last Vietnam-era prismen missing in Southeast Asia. But among times before. As a member of DCSLOG Security oner of war, whereabouts unknown for 29 the nation's POW-MIA activists, the chil"I mean, we can't think we're deserting Assistance Division, Poveda made numeryears, was dead. dren say, their decision has left bitterness. him, anymore. He could have died of old ous contributions toward improving the It was time to push the war out of their "We hope they understand that this is age." quality of life of servicemembers, civilians lives. not about politics, that this is very private," Charles Shelton would now be 62. He and family members throughout the U.S. "It was for our own sanity, for our own Shelton says. was shot down over Laos on his 33rd birthSouthem s Command. futures," John Shelton, 38, says slowly, But on his face, as he talks, are the same day, April 29, 1965. son Ca os; ud dau h er wfe, Ladys; Editor's note: The following summary of news is tary, but they feel uncomfortable confined in the camp. 50 former Panamanian government legislators. taken from the Panamanian press. The translation The Panamanian government rejected a request for politiand reports are unofficial and no guarantee is made cal asylum by the Cubans. Sept. 25 by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of reporting La Prensa: Paper reports Arrijan's Mayor Cristobal or statements made here. Selection of these stories El Siglo, El Panama America: Papers report Panama Canizales decreed anyone illegally occupying reverted does not imply any emphasis, judgement or enEmbassy Charge d' Affaires in Cuba explained alleged canal area lands will be removed and sent to jail for 90 dorsement by the U.S. government. These synopses illegal resident visas issued to 10 Cubans after the Panama days. This decree is a result of the alarming rate in are intended only to give non-Spanish speaking Immigration Director uncovered an operation allowing which squatters are occupying the land and cutting people a flavor for news events in Panama. Cubans to illegally enter Panama. Allegedly, Panamanian down national forest trees. and Cuban embassy officials are implicated in the operaSept. 23 tion carried out for profit. Sept. 26 Hoy, La Prensa: Papers report the Interoceanic ReLi Prensa: Paper reports marijuana plantations covgion Authority is studying a project to construct an ecoSept. 24 ering several hectares were found in Las Perlas Islands logical road between Panama City and Colon at a cost Critica Libre: Paper reports Panama customs by inembrs of state security agencies, immigration ofof about $50 million. University of Alabama experts antinarcotics and airport personnel arrested U.S. citizen ficials and the office of the deputy district attomcy dursay the road could be a tourist attraction because of its Kenneth Leroy Burnann atTocumen airport allegedly caring an operation called "Combined Operation," that relation to the canal and the rain forest. trying 2.2 kilograms of cocainQ. lasted 48 hours. According to a police report, the Panama National Police, the National Air Service, the MarEl Panama America, La Estrella: Papers cite a La Prensa, El Siglo, Critica Libre, La Prensa, Hoy, time Service and the Technical Judicial Police raided group of Cuban migrants as saying they are tired of bePanama America: Papers report that Panama President several places in Las Perlas, after being identified as ing held captive and will initiate actions, including a Ernesto Perez Balladares approved pardons for 216 people possible drug centers. Also, the police arrested illegal hunger strike, to obtain freedom. The Cubans say they accused of crimes -including several high-level officials aliens. Names of the islands where the marijuana is are grateful for the attention received by the U.S. milifrom the regime of former dictator Manuel A. Noriega and grown and the number of people arrested are unknown.

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News Tropic Times5 G.I. dies in Haiti, possible suicide PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) An American soldier was found shot to death Tuesday in the northern part of the capital, the first fatality among U.S. troops since they intervened to restore Haiti's elected government. Pentagon officials in Washington said that it appeared to be a suicide but that the death was still being investigated. The soldier was not immediately identified. Pentagon spokesman Dennis Boxx said the male soldier, who was part of the 10th Mountain Division from Fort Drum, N.Y., "died of an apparent gunshot." He called the death "an apparent suicide" and said it was being investigated as such. Boxx said he could not discuss why military officials came to that conclusion. However, a senior Pentagon official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said indications were that the soldier's 4 own weapon was fired and that the wound appeared to be self-inflicted. The official also said the soldier was known to have been upset recently because of "domestic reasons." Sgt. Rick Emert (U.S. Army) Stanley Schrager, spokesman for the Sergeant Major of the Army Richard A. Kidd addresses the final cycle of Primary Leadership Development U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince, said Course students at Fort Sherman about the role future noncommissioned officers will have in tomorrow's the death happened at Villa d'Accueil, army. Kidd visited the students Sept. 9. Haiti's state guest house that American soldiers were preparing to house Haitian parliament members. The soldiers were cleaning the mansion and making security arrangements on the hillside estate above Port-auPrince. ShortlyNCO academy closes doors forever helicopters hovered over the area around Villa d'Accueil. American soldiers at the scene would not comment. FORT SHERMAN (USARSO emy, the more than 10,000 soldiers who Class 8-94, was a visit by Sergeant Major Neighbors said the soldiers arrived at PAO -Atlantic) -The Fort Sherman were taught to lead through this school of the Army Richard A. Kidd Sept. 9. the mansion Monday and had been reNoncommissioned Officers Academy will carry on the traditions this school PLDC instructors were: Sgt. Ist Class furbishing the building and the grounds. is no more. was based on. Their memories of what Richard Stanley, chief instructor; Sgt. Ist In a Sept. 16 graduation and they learned here will live on, be passed Class Norberto Osbourne and Staff Sgt. inactiviation ceremony, the academy's on, and will not have been lost." Terrance Noel, Class IA; Sgt. Ist Class Canadian tries staff turned out its last group of future Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas J. Herminio Pabon and Staff Sgt. Mamie NCOs and cased its guidon. Quinn Jr. thanked his NCO Academy 1st Thomas, Class 1B; Sgt. First Class Thoto sue U.S. Navy In remarks after the ceremony, Sgt. Robert M. Craig for "never dropmas Leake and Staff Sgt. Nestor Sanchez, VANCOUVER (Reuter) -A CanaCommand Sgt. Maj. Rolf Irtenkauf ping the bail." Class 2A; and Staff Sgt. Cordell dian sailor who was paralyzed while on said 'Though there will never be anA highlight of the final cycle of PriFairweather and Staff Sgt. Wilbert his way to the Gulf War is seeking $110 other U.S. Army South NCO Acadmary Leadership Development Course, Whitaker Jr., Class 2B. million in damages from the U.S. Navy, his lawyer said Tuesday.V o u t e so Kevin MeNamara, 28, was paralyzed Volunteers bring better vision to villagers from the neck down when he slipped on comefomilesevenafara the pool deck during a party at a U.S. by Martha K. Taylor Pnma Ciy, eve sra base in the former Panama Canal zone Tropic Times contributor Panama City, to receive treatin 1992, lawyer Aaron Gordon said. ment. There were 28 people MeNamara's Canadian navy ship CHEPO, PANAMA -Travlining the halls when the volunhad docked at the base to take on fuel eling over flooded roads in a teers arrived at the Chepo and supplies while en route to the Gulf. torrential downpour, several school. More showed up as the McNamara filed a motion Saturday volunteers arrived here Sunday day progressed -nearly 70 in asking Supreme Court Justice Antonin as part of a U.S. Southern Coinall -and no one was turned Scalia, who oversees the circuit court for mand humanitarian effort to away. the former canal zone, to appoint ajudge provide eye care to local resiThe residents who came to in the case. The motion will be heard dents. the clnic were screened for Oct. 17. The effort was headed by cataracts, evidence of eye disMcNamara, who lives in Victoria, Dr. (Maj.) Gordon Swayze, ease, injuries and vision probBritish Columbia, contends the Navy 24th Medical Squadron. Volunlems. did not adequately mark a hazard on the teers came fron throughout the This month's visit was orcrowded pool deck and worsened his inmilitary communities in ganized with the help of the juries with improper first aid. Panama, and some are bilingual Chepo Lions Club. President The sailor's battle for compensation military and family members. Alicia Jimenez said it was very has been stymied by difficulty in findSwayze and his group do important to the local people ing a court with jurisdiction over the this once a month, providing because they would not be able case. needed eye care to residents to afford either eye glasses, or Foreigners are not allowed to sue the who otherwise wouldn't be a visit to an eye doctor. WithU.S. government inside the United able to afford this service. out the help of SOUTHCOM, States over incidents abroad and it is imWhile SOUTHCOM funded most would have to do without, mune from prosecution in Panamanian the first $2,000 for the yearshe said. courts until 1999 under an agreement on long effort, most of the costs are Swayze, who was named handover of the canal to Panama. born by volunteers and donathe Air Combat Command's The U.S. court for the former canal tions, Swayze said. optometrist of the year, will rezone still exists on paper but stopped "We got a great deal on turn next month. "It is a privifunctioning in 1982. A previous attempt reading glasses from a downlege to be given the opportunity Mariha K. Taylor courtesy ) to bring the lawsuit in a Virginia federal town (Panama City) optics lab," to serve others," he said. Luis Zamudio, 128th Aviation Regiment, helps court was rej ected as premature. Swayze said. People can donate eye Li aui 2t vainRgmn ep The monthly visit has beglasses to the Howard AFB with Segura Gumercinda' eye exam. Gumercinda come so popular that people medical clinic. is 53 and her last visual exam was 26 years ago.

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Tropic Times Sept. 30, 1994 Voices Mother wants hospital to stop child's pain Dear Mayors' Corner, Am I the only mother whose heart breaks when my Mayors Corner baby is screaming with pain? Am I the only mother who would do anything in the world to prevent my child from Motor Pool car auctions. Every month, the government we are all expected to take every action possible to save feeling pain? Am I the only mother furious that Gorgas auctions off the old vehicles no longer needed for one reagovernment money. Selling vehicles for less than what Army Community Hospital does not do everything possison or another. Many of these vehicles are in perfectly they would otherwise bring is giving away government ble to spare infants and children from unnecessary pain good condition. money illegally. and suffering? These auctions are held once a month from 9 a.m.-3 Soldiers and government employees are duly compenThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recently p.m. on a weekday when the majority of people work. sated with all the entitlements that are afforded them by approved an anesthetic cream that numbs the skin below They are auctioned to U.S. citizens or Panamanians. These law and conscientious commanders. Buying vehicles at a the surface. Once applied to the skin, it penetrates and vehicles have not been paid for by the Panamanian Govdiscounted rate is not an entitlement. reaches the nerve endings, providing 2-3 hours of numbeminent, but by U.S. tax dollars, yet U.S. servicemembers Dates and times for sales were carefully considered and ness. That is plenty of time for doctors to perform proceare not given the opportunity to buy them. weekend sales were ruled out by the banking industry not dures such as giving shots or drawing blood. Procedures The U.S. presence is leaving in six years and giving being available for customers or making deposits. Securithat make our infants and children scream in pain can be Panama millions of dollars of property to do with as they ty is an overriding consideration here. done pain-free. Why doesn't Gorgas use EMLA (a mixplease. How can our government tell me I'm important We were able to establish a procedure to permit militure of lidocaine and prilocaine)? enough to live and work here, but not important enough tary and government employees to pre-clear an auto loan Angry Mother to be given an opportunity to do something as simple as with the Merchants Bank and to pay for vehicles with a buy U.S. merchandise that we helped to buy in the first personal check, accompanied by a letter of guarantee from Dear Angry Mother, place? What's the deal? the bank. I sent your letter to Col. M.A. McConnell, commander Papa Oscar Special efforts have been made to ensure sales are adof Gorgas Army Community Hospital who responded: vertised to the military community with brochures, ads in You are not the only mother who is very concerned about Dear Papa Oscar, the Tropic Times and announcement to the chain of commedical procedures that cause pain to a child. It is even I sent your letter to John Stobie, fleet manager of genmand. Commanders have been urged to permit soldiers more distressing to a health care provider who is directly eral services administration for the Fleet Management time off to attend sales. responsible for performing a necessary, but painful proCenter, Panama. He responded: Your complaint with the Within the bounds of the law and GSA regulations we cedure. GSA auto sales is a familiar one, and we all need to uncannot discriminate between individual buyers and we are The EMLA is now available for use at Gorgas Army derstand and appreciate the economics of the situation. required to get the best possible price for the U.S. governCommunity Hospital. It is useful for a number of proceThe vehicles you believe are old and no longer needed ment. dures, but not all. You can be assured that all of us inhave been replaced with, many brand new vehicles, purvolved in the treatment of children are acutely sensitive to chased by GSA for your official use in Panama. A portion Editor's note: To submit questions to the Mayoral your concern and will continue to provide care in as comof this cost is offset by selling the old fleet of "usable" Congress, send letters to: Mayors' Corner, publicity passionate and painless a manner as possible. vehicles for "fair market value" according to the Law/Fedchairperson, APO AA 34004 (MIPS). Anonymity will eral Code of Regulation which governs GSA's Fleet Manbe granted upon request. The Tropic Times reserves Dear Mayors' Corner, agement Program. the right to edit letters and responses for brevity. I'm really angry about the Corozal Transportation As a taxpayer and supporter of the U.S. government, Family member buys groceries a lot! Bad time at the commissary ing for the merchandise before she was deWhile performing continued surveiltained by store security in the parking lot. C S lance at the commissary, contraband perShoplifting is a serious crime in which sonnel saw a family member leave with 15 everyone pays. The thief gets the criminal bags of groceries. charges, while the customer pays higher She later returned and bought 12 more prices. bags. The family member was detained and later admitted to selling groceries to Stolen vehicle non-privilege card holders since January. A service member recently had his priFor more information about such revately owned vehicle stolen while it was strictions, see Southern Command Reguparked by the El Dorado Mall. lation 1-19 or call 286-3303. Though the vehicle was recovered, the stereo, equalizer, amplifier, two speakers Flying bottles and cassettes had been stolen. While driving in Panama City, a soldier Report suspicious activity to the miliwas hit in the head by a bottle that had been tary police by calling 287-4401 or 289thrown by an unknown person. 5133. The soldier was taken to Gorgas Army Community Hospital where he received 13 Found, but not yet returned stitches above the right eye. The following items have been turned When driving downtown, always rein to the military police: Casio watch, item main alert and leave space between vehi110-94; Homelite weedeater, item 128-94; Pacific property cles for quick reactions. necklace, item 129-94; class ring, item 134Fort Clayton El Dorado -one larceny of secured private 94; wallet, item 135-94; wallet, item 141500 area -one larceny of unsecured priproperty Jewelry lover gets caught 94; Spectrum stroller, item 149-94. vate property A soldier was seen placing a pair of earOff post Atlantic rings in her pocket at the Corozal post exHousing area crimes Panama City -one larceny of secured priFort Espinar -two larcenies of unsecured change. The following crimes occurred in on vate property private property and two larcenies of seThe soldier left the store without payand off post housing areas Sept. 3-9. Balboa -one larceny of secured private cured private property Tropic Times Bldg. 405, Corozal, Phone 285-4666 This authorized unofficial command information publicaStaff Editors.Sgt. Cass Purdum Editor.Sgt. Robin Mantikoski tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is pubSpc. Tom Findtner Journalist.Sgt. Eric Hortin lished in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information ProRosemary Chong gram of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of Volunteer.Keisha Deering 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Public Affairs Officer. .Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Tines are not necessarily the official Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Public Affairs Superintendent.Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Journalists.Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson U.S. Southern Command. Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 NCOIC.Sgt. Richard Emert U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office .283-5644 Commander in Chief .Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Public A ffairs Officer. .Diane Gonzalez Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Assistant Public Affairs Officer. John Hall Chief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Public Affairs Officer.Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder Photographers.Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Editor.Maureen Sampson Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays Sports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis Managing Editor.Staff Sgt. Jane Usero

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Tropic Times 7 Comment Sept. 30, 1994 1 New inspection focuses on quality criteria basis of this roadmap is the Quality Air military inspection that focuses on design and analysis, data collection and by Capt. Tom Joyce Force Criteria. The criteria were adopted specific behaviors and itemized taskings. analysis, strategic planning, metrics, and 24th Wing Assistant Inspector General from the Malcolm Baldrige National In the past, Inspector General teams human resource development and Quality Award for Air Force use. included up to 120 people who would recognition. he Air Force has adopted a new The Baldrige Award was established visit a base and delve into almost every After meeting with the leadership, inspection procedure called by Congress in 1987 to promote quality single action an organization does. assessors branch out and visit work Quality Air Force Assessment. awareness and to recognize and publicize That is not the role of the QAFA team. centers; here their mission is to validate A QAFA is exactly what the name specific quality achievements. For one thing, the team only has about 30 what the leaders have told them about implies -an assessment to measure It became clear to many U.S. governpeople. This equates to approximately quality in the unit. where the unit stands in its quality ment and business leaders that adopting one assessor per squadron. The assessor's Finally, the old five-tiered rating journey. quality improvement techniques was a job is to validate the unit's self assesssystem that we've all become used to is In the past seven years the Air Force must if the United States was to remain ment (USA), identifying strengths and not used in a QAFA since these "grades" has gradually implemented a quality competitive in the growing world areas for improvement as they relate to do not help a unit improve or show a approach where there is a leadership economy. Quality Air Force Criteria. clear enough picture of where it stands on commitment and operating style that The Air Force, in turn, adopted the Assessors try to determine senior its quest for quality. inspires trust, teamwork and continuous quality approach as a response to the leaders' knowledge, understanding and The QAFA is indeed different; the IG improvement. Quality Air Force focuses dynamic changes in the international use of the Quality Air Force Criteria. team's role isn't to find "write ups," but on strategic planning, teamwork, environment and ever-shrinking resourcAssessors spend up to five hours to teach and motivate while they validate empowerment and process improvement es. The Quality Air Force Criteria form a separately interviewing commanders and the USA. They're as excited about to fulfill one common goal -total cultural framework and roadmap for flight chiefs. quality improvements as you are. customer focus and satisfaction, guiding Quality Air Force. While they work to validate the USA, The 24th Wing's first Quality Air In July 1992 the Air Force developed Like Quality Air Force, a QAFA is they also give commanders many ideas to Force Assessment is scheduled for early a strategic roadmap for Quality. The entirely different from the traditional improve quality-to include process January 1995. Aim High! From our readers The past can't change, but attitudes should knew I was home when I landed on the ground. and third generation, who helped bring two oceans and apprentice on the Atlantic side. I applied for the program, I could smell the jungle, the damp earth, the people together, were no longer welcomed.Our families, but it was denied due to my American citizenship. ozone of a coming rain. The birds in the trees who were canal workers and engineers, exhumed from Unbeknownst to me, the treaty stipulated that a Panamaniwere making their familiar sounds. cemeteries and transferred to places unknown, our an would have a better chance of certain jobs based on his My eyes looked toward the towering hills and the dark privileges and pride taken roughly from us, leaving no citizenship, not his skill. To be accepted I was to give up rain clouds. The slight sheen on my skin. The taste of salt alternative but to accept it or leave. A society forcefully my American citizenship. Not willing to do that, I then from the ocean. shoved from their homes, as their pleas were ignored. But tried to attend the Canal Zone College, now the PCC Yes, I was home. Though it had been nine years, it felt that was 14 years ago. It is the past, over-unable to College. Unfortunately, the tuition fee had gone up *o like 90. But, there was no fanfare, no parade, no familiar change. much that I could not afford to go. After a year of unemface to greet me. The home I had returned to had changed, But there is something I would like see change. And that ployment, I went to Howard AFB and joined the Air Force. but I had not realized how much. I came home as a member is attitudes. I would like to the see the perception of Eleven years later, I got stationed "home." of the military, prepared to do a job. But I also came as a "zonians" as imperialistic colonials change, as not being as The bottom line is this. Military people who are "zonian," to my home that had changed forever in history, good as Americans from the United States. No longer do I stationed in Panama come from places such as Kerville, but not my heart. want to be condemned for what I am or where I'm from. I Texas; Toledo, Ohio; or Anyplace, U.S.A., and bring some Now, after three years, I've noticed something I wish to am not a colonist, nor did I exploit this country and its of their roots with them. I am no different. My home just share. I am one of the few left of a society whose families people. happened to be here. Ijust happen to have had a lifestyle came to live and work, to contribute to a way of life Yes, our way of life was different, and yes, we someunlike yours. My climate is not similar to what you are different than most, to a place and a canal. It started in times wish it had not changed, but damning us and treating used to in the States. My forest happens to be a damp, 1904, with a dream, an unrealistic venture come true. A us like outsiders is just not right! These attitudes need to humid jungle and your fishing hole back home is my Gatun canal, one that would connect one ocean to another, change. But like any change, a tale needs to be told to Lake. But, the difference in all of this is, I do not condemn bringing commerce, people, nations, customs with a perhaps convince those who need convincing. Well, this is you for where you call home. I do not speak of your home difference together. The dream of a handful of men, with mine-one of many hundreds that have never been heard. town in words so harsh to bear. I too am asking the same. an outcome that affected thousands of people, and continIn the late 1970s, after graduation, I tried to apply for an So, when you speak of "us," the "zonics," we're not ued that tradition for over 75 years. apprenticeship program as a tugboat pilot. My dream was asking to be treated different, just to remember us for But on Oct. 1, 1979, it changed, because of two to remain in the canal zone, and work for the canal like my whom we are. Talking to someone like me could educate signatures on a piece of paper. "Zonians," who had never family before me. you about what you now temporarily call home. lived anywhere else but the canal zone, some of us second At the time, I was a summer hire working as a plumber Lynnette Stokes Direct Quotes How does Panama differ from your home town? "They don't have good "It's rainier and more "Its not a.s congested "Panama is always so "I'm from a little bit of bagelshere.Butthemaids humid than in Texas. I (in Greenville, N.C.) crowded and busy. I everywhere, but the are less expensive." enjoy being able to go The weather is better come from a small fishing is better here. (Long Island) to the beach and swim here." town." (New Jersey) The countryside is all the time." gorgeous." Maj. Peter Devlin Debbie Fogle Tech. Sgt. William Mackey Sgt. Hector Robles Chief David May SOUTHCOM J-2 Air Force family member 24th Transportation 3rd Special Operations Counseling Assistance Squadron Command Center, Rodman NS The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8 Tropic Times Sept. 30, 1994 Cabanas '94: TrooP frc four nations converge on rkansas fdr joint training QUARRY HEIGHTS (SOUTHCOM their activities X PAO) -While other U.S. troops were by providing preparing to go to Haiti, about 1,150 security ftor U.S. soldiers were training for coalition drug traffickers. operations of another sort at Fort "The training in Chaffee, Ark., and Rodman NS in how to form a coalition Panama, in exercise Cabanas '94-I1. was especially valuable," The exercise ended Sept. 22, bringing Knotts said. "More and more, to a successful conclusion training international coalitions are being between U.S. Special Forces units from formed to handle problems. Militarthe United States and Panama, and ily, coalition operations bring a host of military forces from Colombia, Venezuechallenges, the most obvious being ]a and Ecuador. language, equipment and doctrine. This Approximately 1,150 U.S. soldiers exercise has made us all more aware of from Panama and the United States how to overcome those challenges," he formed a coalition task force with said. approximately 525 people from the three The coalition task force was comLatin American countries. manded by Ecuadorian Col. Jaime the narcoCabanas is an annual Special OperaCordova, with battalions from each of guerrillas." tions Command South exercise designed the Latin American countries. The U.S. Although these to train U.S. soldiers, promote regional Special Forces coalition supporters were narco-guerrillas security cooperation and respect for divided into 12-man teams, attached to were simulated, human rights, develop internal defense the allied commanders at battalion and many of the Latin techniques, and promote military-tocompany level. A larger special forces American soldiers military relations. team was integrated into the task force came from real-world "The purpose of Cabanas 94-II was, staff. The overall exercise was combattles against real-world first, to train our soldiers, while also manded by Brig. Gen. Kenneth Bowra, narco-guerrillas, making learning how to work better with our commander of Special Operations the training even more allies," said Capt. Jim Knotts, the Command South. valuable as U.S. soldiers exercise spokesman. "Having Colonel Cordova as comlearned from their combat The exercise scenario involved the mander of the troops on the ground was veteran allies. U.S. military formation of a coalition under the key to the success of this exercise," members do not participate in auspices of the Organization of AmeriKnotts said. "Having a Latin American actual counterdrug field training in every aspec can States, called on to counter narcoin command helped bring together our operations, but do provide of the training events, guerrilla attempts to control the fictitious Latin American allies by demonstrating training assistance to allow according to Knotts. He said that island nation of Victoria off the west how much they have in common. These their Latin American allies to conduct human rights training refers to specific coat of Colombia. Narco-guerrillas are three countries interact on a daily basis in operations more successfully against skills like discriminating between groups of armed insurgents who wanted real-world operations, so having them narco-guerrillas. civilians and combatants on the battleto overthrow their legitimate democratiintegrated into a combined task force Another import aspect of Cabanas 94 -field, proper treatment of enemy prison cally-elected governments and finance will help them in the future as they battle II was the concentration on human rights ers and enemy wounded, law of land 44 Combat Camera (m Marksmanship with the M-16A1 was practiced by U.S. and Latin American soldiers during the exercise.

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Tropic Times Sept. 30, 1994 7 Co Gcameaa (coaaesy Colombian soldiers become familiar with the U.S. M-16A1 rifle during the exercise at Fort Chaffee, Ark. warfare, concern for local populations troops arrived in Arkansas Sept. 6-7. and landmarks, respect for legal rights The exercise was administered by and identification of areas that should be cadre members of the U.S. Army Joint ~aa '-',ans. restricted from combat operations. Readiness Training Center, which As part of the scenario, exercise conducts training for U.S. units throughparticipants encountered role player out the year. "civilians" on the battlefield in every U.S. forces deployed to the Joint event. Observers from human rights Readiness Training Center facilities in-organizations and the U.S. government Arkansas include U.S. Southern Cornvisited the exercise Sept. 8-10 to observe mand's Special Operations Command training. South from Panama, 7th Special Forces "In the United States, we don't get our Group at Fort Bragg, N.C., and U.S. Air soldiers on the first day of basic training Force Special Operations Command at already knowing the law of land warare Hurlburt Field, Fla. or the protocols of the Geneva ConvenThe Panama-based Naval Special tions," Knotts said. Warfare Unit-8 and Special Boat Unit-26 "We have to educate our troops conducted riverine training in Panama continually on human rights issues, and with a small number of soldiers from give them an opportunity to practice Colombia and Ecuador (approximately those skills just as they practice map 100 U.S., 10 Ecuadorian and 10 Colomreading and marksmanship. Our soldiers bian). fight like they have been trained, so we In addition to task force staffs from give them the opportunity to practice each country, the Latin American forces -_ .--.<*.making those tough judgment calls in included: two infantry companies from .U.S. Navy exerise lie Cbans,"Knots aid Coomba, ne nfatrycomanyandoneA patrol boat from Special Boat Unit 26, Rodman NS, participates in the local Soldiers from Fort Bragg's 7th Special Nattonal Guard company I rom Venczuceto fCaaa 9 I Fores Group deployed Aug 2 to Ia, and one infantry company from Colombia, Venezuela and Ecuador to Ecuador -approximately 175 f rom e ich conduct pre-deployment trading I he country ~~M7 ay comosa Camma coasy> Brig. Gen. Kenneth Bowra (right), commander of Special Operations Command A soldier from the 7th Special Forces conducts a class with U.S and Latin South and exercise commander, greets Ecuadorian Col. Jaime Cordova, American soldiers. Observers from human rights groups and reporters look on commander of the Coalition Task Force.

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10 Tropic Times Miletones 10 Sp.30, 1994 ______________________________________ 1097th named unit of the year FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) -The 1097th Transportation (Composite Boat) Company has beat out active duty transportation units in nine different U.S. Major Army Commands to win a prestigious transportation award. The National Defense Transportation Association selected 1097th Trans. Co. as the Army-wide, active duty Military Unit of the Year, according to a message from Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Edward Honor, president of NDTA. The unit's heavyand medium boat platoons had 5,398 and 1,135 mission hours respectively in 1993. The heavy boat platoon's missions spanned South and Central America as well as the United States, said Capt. Marshall A. Gutierrez, commander, 1097th Trans. Co. The company's real-world missions played a key part in its selection as the best in active Army transportation, Gutierrez added. "The 1097th (Trans. Co.) performs more missions than any other (U.S. Army) waterborne transportation unit in the world," he said. Furthermore, the award illustrates that the unit performs these missions well, Gutierrez said. "It shows that our soldiers do their missions every day and that they do them best," he said. "Our training is our mission." The unit's packet was judged at the U.S. Army South level and the Office of the Chief of Transportation level before making it to the Department of the Army level, -(cousayi Gutierrez said. The MACOM submissions were evaluash bonUS ated on mission, readiness, supply discipline, safety and Capt. Thomas W. Steffens, Special Boat Squadron Two commander presents a $650 cash community/civic actions. This marks the first time the award to Dalys L.Collins, Special Boat Unit 26's executive secretary/accounting technician. The NDTA will officially present the award Monday Collins received the award for superior sustained performance at the Military Units Award Luncheon in St. Louis, Mo. Eight deployments Capt. Thomas W. Steffans, Special Boat Squadron Two commander, presents the Navy Achievement Medal to Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Dean C. Wells for exemplary and highly professional performance. Wells deployed in eight counter-narcotics campaigns in Latin America. John Hall (U.S. Navy) Joint re-up Capt. A.N. Rowley IllI, commander, Naval Forces Panama, re-enlists Army Staff Sgt. Rick Gonzalez in front of Building 51, Rodman NS, Monday. Gonzalez is a member of the 36th Explosive Ordnance Disposal. Members from all services were present for the 'purple' ceremony. 'Special achievement The following U. S. Southern Command civilians have been recognized for their .Sgt. Rlik Errt (U.S. Army) accomplishments: Ending 129 years of service Special Act Award -Deborah L. Erhart, Center for Treaty Implementation. Years of Service -10 years: Donald L. Clapp and Kerry E. Turk, both from IntelliFive Fort Sherman Health Clinic employees (from left to right), Rodrigo gence Directorate; Antonieta B. Suro, U.S. Military Group Bolivia; Michael J. Pugh, Acosta, Sylvia Jones, Harold Fergus, Mary Hunter and Wilhelmina U.S. Military Group Guatemala. Manning end a combined total of 129 years of federal service in a Promotion -Kimberly S. Quinn, Intelligence Directorate. retirement ceremony at the clinic Sept. 23.

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L~j' 4ILL ILTropic Times Features Sept. 30,1994 L Vessels belonging to the 1097th Transportation (Composite Boat) Company are docked at Pier 45 on Fort Davis. Sgt Rc Emeri (U.S Army) Soldiers with sea legs Waterborne transportation unit keeps Army missions afloat by Sgt Rick Emert acting the LCUs have a mission more ima welding section, including a machine oversized and bulky equipment that is unUSARSO PublicAffairs Office -Atlantic portant than the soldiers in the rear. For shop, to accomplish the maintenance and economical to be transported by commereach soldier in this unit, the most imporrepair missions. cial means. The platoon completed 44 misFORT DAVIS -The soldiers of the tant mission is the one he's doing right The Medium Boat Platoon, including sions in 1993 carrying more than 3,912 1097th Transportation (Composite Boat) now." the operators of LCM 8s and the "J" Boat, tons of cargo more than 53,701 nautical Company know what it's like to spend The diversity of missions among the provide waterborne transportation on the miles. The LCU missions have reached much of the year at sea. In fact, the solplatoons illustrates how vital each mission coastal waters around Panama and the Camuch of South and Central America indiers spend an average two-thirds of each is to the unit's success, Zimmerman added. nal Operating Area. The missions include eluding: Colombia, Costa Rica, Guateyear at sea. The Headquarters Platoon logistically supporting the Jungle Operations Training mala, Belize, Guyana and Honduras. The unit has two Landing Craft, Utility supports the company in garrison and on Battalion and rotational units. It supports The successful completion of so many 2000s, three LCU 1600s, six Landing deployments. The platoon's missions inU.S. Southern Command by transporting missions can be credited to the ability of Craft Mechanized 8s and a Pickett, or "J," clude: supply, nuclear, biological and oversized trucks and equipment that caneach soldier in the company, Zimmerman Boat. These boats and their crews had a chemical training, running the orderly not be driven across the Gatun Locks. The said. combined total of 224 mission days last room and running the dining facility which oversized vehicles are loaded onto LCM "What is very unique about the 1097th year, said Capt. Marshall A. Gutierrez, also includes manning the dining facilities 8s at Dock 45, Fort Davis, and off-loaded (Trans. Co.) is the pride our soldiers have commander, 1097th Trans. Co. on the LCUs. at Sturgis Landing. The platoon perin being able to perform real-world misEach of the unit's four platoons has a The Maintenance Platoon is responformed 331 missions in 1993 moving sions in what must be considered a dangerdistinct mission, and none is more imporsible for maintenance support; petroleum, more than 2,891 tons of equipment and ous environment -the open sea," tant than the others, said Zimmerman. oil and lubrication support; stevedore sup9,872 passengers with more than 1,135 Zimmerman said. "Our people are very "Our mission is to support U.S. Army port, hull maintenance; communications hours underway. good at what they do; the proof is in our South with waterborne operations," he equipment repair; and ramp preparation of The Heavy Boat Platoon's LCU crews safety record and the number of successful said. "I refuse to say that the soldiers operunimproved landing sites. The platoon has provide long distance transportation of missions completed." Information bureau updates world about Cuban camps as well as Army and Air National Guard and Reserve Servicemen from units such as the 361st Public AfJTF-Safe Haven Public Affairs Office units. fairs Detachment, U.S. Army Reserves of New York, and "We have functioned as one big family," Hastonthe 77th Army Reserve Component of New York have CAMP ROUSSEAU -Operation Safe Haven has been Hilger said. 'There wasn't any of the normal inter-service been helping the JIB run smoothly. on television, in newspapers and on the radio all over the rivalry you might expect. We all came together and got 'The 361st was down here on their annual overseas world since the first Cuban stepped off the airplane at the job done." training and, once they finished, they helped at the JIB," Howard AFB several weeks ago. The job they accomplished, however, involved much Haston-Hilger said. "About half of those in the 77th volGetting the information to the media and setting up inmore than what could be seen on the front pages of newsunteered to stay and help for an additional week and three terviews with military leaders doesn't just happen by itpapers or on the 10 o'clock broadcasts. of the officers extended for another 90 days. self. It is the mission of the Joint Information Bureau to With media representatives from as close as Panama "What makes this extraordinary is that these people ensure the accurate and timely release of information. City, as far away as China and as internationally known have jobs back home," she said. 'Their employers have The JIB for Operation Safe Haven was set up here just as CNN, AP and UPI, the JIB has been kept busy. supported them in this mission by giving them the extra prior to the expected arrival of Cubans at the community Each of the 292 media representatives who came to time off to be here helping us." camps. Everything from chairs to computers and typewritPanama had to be accredited and given identification Though the mix of active soldiers, sailors and airmen, ers to telephones had to be moved in, set up and ready to badges, given daily reports, statistics and updates and esGuard, Reserves, officers, enlisted and civilians from within use within days. corted to the community camps and the reception center, public affairs and from other fields made for a unique workSetting up and running the JIB fell on a joint military Haston-Hilger said. ing environment, the JIB came together as one unit. public affairs staff. Maj. Debbie Haston-Hilger, the SouthIn addition, daily press conferences are set up and con"We all worked many long, hard hours to meet the misern Command Theater Support Element commander, was ducted, telephonic media queries are answered, media sion," Haston-Hilger said. "But the key to the success of the a central figure in JIB operations from the beginning and trends are tracked and analyzed and senior leadership is JIB is teamwork -and that is what we had from everyone eventually became director of the JIB until returning to helped with media encounters, she said. involved from the very beginning." her unit last week. With everything involved in running a JIB from the Though she is quick to praise the JIB staff for meeting "Military from all branches of the service were inmedia standpoint, there are also the mission requirements their mission, Haston-Hilger looks elsewhere when talking volved in setting up and running the JIB," Haston-Hilger of transportation, food, housing, supplies and various about the overall mission of Opcration Safe Haven."Credit said. "There are civilians and servicemen from other necessities of any operation. This, too, fell to the JIB goes to those in the mud for the success of the mission," she SOUTHCOM and U.S. Army South Public Affairs offices staff. said.

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12 Sep P3,1994 roffle Seabee selected to work n the State Department by John Hall "My friends were getting into drugs and Rodman NS Public Affairs Office gangs, so I called my mother and told her I had to get out of there," Berry said. The 18RODMAN NS -A petty officer workyear-old moved to Aberdeen Proving ing with the Public Works Department here Grounds, Md., where his mother was stawas recently selected to work in the State tioned and worked in construction. Berry Department in Washington, D.C. eventually grew tired of working for someDavid Berry, a utilitiesman and Seabee, one who wouldn't show him everything he comes from a family of government workwanted to know, so he followed the family ers. His parents are enlisted soldiers, his tradition and went to the Army recruiter. brother a warrant officer. His sister is a "Iwantedtogetintomedical,computers Department of the Army civilian and his or special forces, but the Army recruiter step-father's an Army officer. was being real vague about what was availIn December, Berry will have a family able," Berry said. "I figured I didn't belong reunion of sorts when he leaves for the to anyone, so I went to the Navy." nation's capitol where his brother and sister The Navy recruiter told him about the work. His wife, Janet, is a petty officer third job Seabees do. Because of his background class working at the base administration in construction, Berry signed on the dotted office. line. To be considered for the appointment, As a utilitiesman, his job is working with Seabees must be an E-5 or above and put in air-conditioners, refrigerators and boilers a request through their career counselor. -as Berry puts it -he's a high-tech During the initial screening, officials conplumber. duct a special background investigation to Berry is also a money-saver, to the tune receive atop secret clearence. State Departof $1.3 million. For a year, he stayed after ment officials said only the top 1 percent to work sifting through paperwork on more 2 percent in each rate are selected. than 100 work requests. He pulled out jobs Berry, who likens the selection process that could be done by self help. He and the to that ofthe chief's board, saidhe chose the commander decided what could wait and move to enhance his career. what couldn't. Berry also revitalized the "This gives me the chance to set myself unit's energy conservation program. Hefrom my peers," Berry said. "My highersaid when the unit picks up the program it ups said it's like moving up two rungs on will save $35,000 a year. S the career ladder and improves my chances When he wasn't saving the Navy money of making chief." or stuffing the suggestion box with ideas, Berry's supervisor Chief Dale Cashman Berry had time to win the recent sailorof the said Berry's the man for the job. quarter board. "He's highly-motivated, very astute and Berry said he will be "hopping around career-minded," Cashman said. "He's the the world" in his new job, going on tempokind of person they're looking for." rary duty to U.S. embassies and consulates Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Taylor (U.S. Navy) As the 10-year veteran talks about why around the world. Chances are sooner or Petty Officer 2nd Class David Berry (front) and Petty Officer 3rd Class hejoined, Berry remembers he didn't want later his job could bring him back to PanaBrian Dorsey from the Public Works Department help build camps for the to get involved in the things his friends were ma and he'll be able to say he'sjust passing Cuban migrants at Empire Range. doing in California. through. Yale is calling Navy SEAL leaves service for Ivy League education by John Hall Wingo's family may have also influRodman NS Public Affairs Office enced his decision to study law. His father was a warrant officer in the Army's Judge RODMAN NS -While attending the Advocate General Corps. U.S. Naval Academy in 1984, Lt. Harry Originally, Wingo narrowed his school Wingo had his sights set on being a pilot, choices to Georgetown University and the but became a SEAL instead. Now he's University of Virginia. He sent his tran chosen another career change-becoming serpts to the Ivy League schools "just to a lawyer with an Ivy League education. give it a try," figuring he had a very small Wingo,from Spechance. cial Boat Unit 26 "I wanted Yale because it was At 5-fect, 9-inchhere, received news es and 175 pounds, he was selected this smaller. I'm used to working in Wingo may not be as May by two universmall groups ...and Yale isn't big as people think sities.Hischoicewas SEALS usually are. tough, Harvard or a 'lawyer factory' like Harvard." "SEALS come in all Yale. Wingo picked Lt. Harry Wingo shapes and sizes," Yale, the most seSpecial Boat Unit 26 Wingo said. "But no lective school in the matter what the size, coonrythat takes only 175 students a year it's what's inside the SEAL that counts," he from a pool of more than 5,000. said. Size was a deciding factor for Wingo. Six years and 28 pounds ago, Wingo "I wanted Yale because it is smaller. I'm was a national boxing champ at the Naval used to working in small groups," Wingo Academy. The two-time All-American said. "This way I'll know most of my doesn't get much time to box these days, but classmates and Yale isn't a 'lawyer factory' says he still hits the heavy bag occasionally. like Harvard." Wingo leaves Panama and the military Location was also important for the 28in December, but not before he had a chance year-old Annapolis, Md. native. Yale's camto use the Spanish he learned at the Defense -% pus of New Haven, Conn., is a seven-hour Language Institute in Monterey, Calif. drive to his home. Wingo said he wanted a "Foreign cultures fascinate me, but I'm chance to set his roots because during his going to miss the weather the most. I'm John Hall (U.S. Navy) Navy careerhe's seenhis familyinfrequenly. going to freeze at Yale." Lt. Harry Wingo

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Sports Sept. 30, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13 Youth soccer kicks off by Spc. Tom Findtner youngsters recited the "Athlete's Pledge" so we don't bother keeping track ofthe wins Tropic Times staff of sportsmanship. and losses," he said. "I get a big thrill seeing -A short time later, the games began. the kids improve over the season." HOWARD AFB -Kickers and Strikers, Energetic children sprinted up and down Duncan emphasized that at this age levRockets and Rowdies, Comets and Lasers, the grassy fields, chasing elusive soccer el, children should just focus on sportsmanPumas and Pirates. No, these were not balls in an attempt to score a prized goal. As ship and learning the game. characters from a bizarre science fiction coaches shouted instructions and strategy "Soccer promotes both competition and movie, they were just a few of the teams to their players, the excited crowd cheered. friendship," Duncan said. "It's the only gathered for the start of the Howard/AlThe league is comprised of five divigame played in every country in the world brook Youth Activities 1994 fall soccer sions, 24 teams and 323 participants beand provides acommon bond between playseason Saturday. tween the ages 6-18, according to Vincent ers that overcomes traditional barriers such A menagerie of youths, donning brightDuncan, youth activities sports director. as language, customs and nationalism." ly-colored uniforms, trotted onto the Before being assigned to a team, each After several hours of play, a heavy rain Howard Parade Field for the opening cereplayer undergoes a pre-season skills evalubegan to fall. However, it did not dampen mony. ation test. This ensures that the teams are as the action on the field. Judging from the After each team and its coach was introeven as possible, Duncan said. smiles on the faces of the young athletes, a duced to a crowd of family and friends, the "In this program, all the kids are winners good time was had by all. Maureen Sampson (Tropic Times) Tourney winner FORT AMADOR (Tropic Times) -Lee Weigt putts at the 9th hole Saturday at the' Fort Amador Medal Play tournament. Nearly 50 golfers participated in the tournament where prizes were given for the best net and gross score in four different flights. The winning golfers each received a $45 gift certificate from Amador Golf Course. Golf course manager Patricia Peart said these types of tournaments are held twice a year. Amador's next tournament will be the Columbus Day tournament Oct. 10. It will be a three-man Mexican best ball format. Golfers may use only three clubs, and one of them must be a putter. Deadline for signing-up is Oct. 7. Call 2824511/4838 for details. Here are the results of Saturday's tournament: Championship flight Gross -Clark Brandenberg, 74 Net -Al Solis, 67 First flight Gross -Lee Weigt, 75 Net -David Leonard, 64 Second flight Gross -Alberto Restrepo, 83 Net -Alan Gordon, 65 21 and over flight Spc. Tom Findtner (Tropic Times) Gross -Brent Barrett, 96 Several 6and 7-year-old soccer players chase down a loose ball on opening day of the Howard/Albrook Youth Net -Elijah Gordon, 67 Activities fall soccer season. The Bullets defeated the G.L. Joes 2-0 in the game. High school football continues as John Hall reflects on historical week *SCN AM radio schedule the Curundu Cougars claw Balfour and makes predictions for this *Local sports standings boa's Red Machine, 22-0. week's games. *Fishing tournament

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14 Tropic Times ept 30, 1994Fo tba Cougars maul Red Machine by Jack Miller "Although he is inexperienced, his devosuited in a first down for Curundu. As the half. This resulted in Shawn Scott's missed Times contributor tion to this team has made him a leader." drive continued, a vicious hit was dealt by field goal and both teams went into the Tropic Before the game, Red Machine Coach Machine linebacker Sam McGuinness to locker room at the half with zip to show on BALBOA -A sympathetic shoulder will William Fahy commented on the defensive Cougars running back Raul Chang for a the scoreboard. be provided to any soul not at Balboa Stastrategy his team planned to use. seven-yard loss. The drive resulted in a All that changed when the Machine fumdium Sept. 23 to witness Buddy Martens' "We'll double team (wide receiver) Lance Von Hollen missed field goal, and bled the opening kickoff and Martens second half heroics in a 20-0 stomping of Robert Reyes, as all teams do, and hopefulthe Cougars came away empty-handed. marched onto the field with his game face the Balboa Red Machine. ly hit him a few times in the process," he The Red Machine's quarterback controon. Eight plays later, a 13-yard slant pattern Martens is the first junior in 12 years to said. "Our intention is to shake up the entire versy between junior Jared Holzworth and pass to wide receiver Mike Morales made it start at quarterback for the Curundu CouCougars offensive unit with physical play." sophomore Donnie Husted continued this 6-0, Cougars. Curundu's two-point convergars varsity football team, but his inexperiThe game beganjust after 5:30 p.m. and night. Holzworth started, but only completsion failed, but a sense of superiority could ence certainly did not look like it was conthe lorementioned physical play accompaed one pass in the first half. His team's be felt on the Cougars sidelines. stricting him. nied it. On fourth down and eight, at the running game was practically silent, with TheMachinecontinuedtosquandertheir "IhavecompleteconfidenceinmyquarCougars 30 yard line, the Machine was the exception of Jason Lloyd's 43-yard precious possessions, while the Cougars terback," Cougars Coach Fred Bales said. called for roughing the kicker, which rejaunt into Cougars territory late in the first kept attacking. Early in the fourth quarter, rookie running back Jelani Jordan ran an eight-yard sweep into the end zone to make it 12-0 Cougars. Once again, Curundu was denied the two-point conversion, but the Machine was digging its own grave. Late in the game, and deep in its own territory, the Red Machine decided to go for it on fourth down. They were emphatically stuffed by the awesome Cougars defense. Three plays later, Martens hit Morales once again in the scoring zone to push the Cougars lead to 18-0. Then Morales made the catch of the night, a diving effort onto the running track located along tle back of the end zone, to tack on two more points and seal the Cougars victory at 20-0. That was all she wrote. The game was marred in the third quarter when Reyes had to be carried off the field. He was blindsided by a Machine player, while providing coverage on a punt. The report was his left knee is hyperextended, and he will be out for one to two weeks. "We respect all opponents, and we feel fortunate that we were able to come out and control the tempo of this game," said Coach Bales after the match. Sp. Tom Findiner (Tropic Times) Cougars Jelani Jordan (34) takes a shot from Red Machine defensive end Jason Lloyd as pursuit closes in. Coach says 'thanks' To all Jamboree participants, At the Jamboree at Cristobal High School, I was overwhelmed as you dedicated the Jamboree to me. I really didn't deserve the honor because it has always been the football players who derserve the praise. They make it happen. I was only there to help. To all Cristobal Tigers, I say a big thanks and I'm glad to see that the Tiger spirit is still there. Even in this last year, the Tigers are still growling. To the Pacific side, I was humbled by your words and by your way of including tme in your lives. I felt my Tiger paws were always so obvious, but you made me realize that love of the game and tradition speak louder than allegiance to any one team. You were too good to me. My deepest thanks. It was good to be back in Panama. You know I've always loved Panama just as Zpc Tom FIm'ner (Trpic Times) ,ve always loved the game of football. Machine wide receiver Tony Wrice Thank to everyone who helped make the soars high above Curundu's Mike Spc. Tom Findiner (Tropic Times) evening special to me. Morales to haul in a catch. Robert Reyes tries to escape from Machine defenders on a punt return. Coach Luke Palumbo League leaders H. Cabrera, Devils 2 Rushing Kick offs80 Scoring Kicks Yards Avg. Carries Yd s. Avg. L. Von Hollen 9 447 49.6 700 W. Reese, Devils 43 388 9.02 C. Lampas, Devils 14 553 46.3 J. Guerra, Tigers 45 347 7.71 L.Sosa, Kolts 4 169 42.2 600 I C. Hall, Bulldogs 45 169 3.75 Punts 500 Scoring Punts Ycls. Avg. TD XP Total G. Acosta, Bulldogs 1 52 52 400 W. Reese, Devils 5 0 30 R. Chang, Cougars 2 85 42.5 J. Guerra, Tigers 3 0 18 L.Sosa, Kolts 5 195 39 300 J. Jordan, Cougars 3 0 18 Team standings 200 Quarterbacks W L T Pct. PF PA 100 PA PC % Yds. Int. Devils 3 0 0 1.000 73 0 C. Lampas, Devils 22 14 64 202 1 Cougars 3 0 0 1.000 63 27 0 B. Martens, Cougars 45 19 42 277 2 Bulldogs 2 1 0 .667 21 52 Yards rushing Yards passing A. Beach, Bulldogs 21 6 29 106 3 Tigers 1 2 0 .333 30 35 .O c, ..* y Interceptions Kolts 0 3 0 .000 37 68 A. Beach, Bulldogs 4 Machine 0 3 0 .000 13 55 Source: Robert Best

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L S pTropic Times Sports_______ Sept. 30, 1994 Team triathlon scheduled ence Room, Building 155, Fort Clayton. 243-5316 or the Panama Canal Yacht Club Register at the Directorate of Com uat 241-5882 to register for the tournament. De il a dCo gas from Howard Pool nity Acti vities Sport Division, Building 154, undefeated in football A three-person team triathlon starts Oct. Fort Clayton. Week three results: 22 at 6:30 a.m. at the Howard pool. Support Crossroads Tennis Club Curundu Cougars 22, Red Machine 0 your community and cheer for the particiBowling centers offer sponsors tournament Green Devils 8, Cristobal Tigers 0 pants. Events include a 1,000-meter swim, various programs The Crossroads Tennis Club will sponBalboa Bulldogs 15, Kiwanis Kolts 13 25K bike race, and 10OK run. The event is .o oraetoe ommesadnn Last Night: sponsored by the Howard/Albrook Sports The Atlantic Bowling Center has family sor a tournament open to members and nonMachine vs. Kolts (BHS) -game reand Fitness Center, 284-3451. specials 6-10 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and mebDersse ci ilians ad a Ae d a mreFridays in October. o ees iiin n ciedt ii sults determined after press time If interested in joining a mixed league tary are welcome to participate. The tournaTonight's games: Albrook Fitness Center call the Curundu Bowling Center. ment will be held at the Cardenas Village Devils vs. Cougars, 7:45 p.m. (BHS) operates with new hours The Clayton Bowling Center has lunchtennis courts. For more information call time specials 11 a.m.-l p.m. weekdays. Mike Goldstein at 264-5160 or Wally Because of Operation Safe Haven, hours Games are 50 cents, shoes are free. Murdoch at 252-2969. at the Albrook Sports and Fitness Center The Howard and AlbrookBowling CenSCN AM Radio 790/1420 have been changed temporarily. The gym ters have sign ups for intramurals, mixed, Aerobic workshop offers will be open 8 a.m.-l p.m. and 4-7 p.m. on men women and youth winter leagues. airs pro, college football weekdays, noon-6 p.m. Satuday, and 1-6 certification testing Saturday p.m. Sunday. .An aerobics workshop and certification 2:30 p.m.: NCAA: Univ. of Colorado at Anglers go for the big one test is being organized in the Atlantic comUniv. of Texas in Atlantic tournament munity. The testing will be given by the Sunday Amador hosts three-man, The Club Nautico Caribe, Panama Ca American Aerobic AssociationIntemational Noon.: NFL: Dallas Cowboys at Washbest ball golf tourney nal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal and International Sports Medicine Associington Redskins There will be a three-man, best ball golf Yacht Club are sponsoring the second anation from Pennsylvania. The certification 3 p.m.: NFL: New York Giants at New tournament with a shotgun start 7:30 a.m. nual Atlantic InterclubFishingToumament is valid for two years. A minimum of 15 Orleans Saints Oct. 10 at the Amador Golf Course. Registhrough Nov. 30. people are required for the class. For infor7 p.m.: NFL: Miami Dolphins at Cincintration closes Oct. 7. There is a $12 fee First, second and third place-place prizes mation, call Delinda May at 289-3163. nati Bengals (broadcast on AFRTS televicovering lunch, prizes and gross and net will be awarded in the barracuda, wahoo, sion audio sound, so watch the game downwinners. kingfish, jack, tuna, marlin, sailfish and Fun run sponsored by town and listen to English transmission)dorado categories. The minimum entry in Monday Register now for Army the tarpon category is 80 pounds; other Rodman Fitness Center 8 p.m.: NFL: Houston Oilers at Pittsentries must be at least 10 pounds. Fishing A 5K fun run will be held 6:30 a.m. Oct. burgh Steelers intramural soccer is restricted to Atlantic waters and the 7. Therunis open toall active duty military, Thursday Registration for unit level soccer is unChagres River. Department of Defense civilians and fami7 p.m.: NCAA: Kansas State Univ. at derway. A clinic is scheduled for 6 p.m. Call the Club Nautico Caribe at 241ly members.Call the Rodman Fitness CenUniv. of Kansas Wednesday in the Youth Services Confer2220, the Panama Canal Tarpon Club at ter to sign up. Montana fails to generate National Football League week four standings American Conference East scoring drive for first time W L T Pet PF PA Miami 3 1 0 .750 126 101 Buffalo 3 1 0 .750 83 85 NFL week in review New England 2 2 0 .500 123 122 N.Y. Jets 2 2 0 .500 69 72 Indianapolis 1 3 0 .250 90 97 John Hall Ram slam -The Rams may still be glowing after their Central Rodman NS Public Affairs Office historic win last week. It was extra sweet for many of the Cleveland 3 1 0 .750 91 51 RamswhofacedMontanainhis49erdays,butit'stimefor Pittsburgh 2 2 0 .500 70 87 RODMAN NS -In week four of the National Football a letdown. The Falcons are also flying high and actually Houston 1 3 0 .250 65 93 League, history was made on several counts. Joe Montana own the Rams in the '90s. Atlanta has taken six of the last Cincinnati 0 4 0 .000 71 106 was shut outforthe first time in his illustrious career, losing seven from its NFC West nemesis. Make it seven of eight. West to the Rams 16-0. The Minnesota Vikings permitted a Falcons 24, Rams 16. San Diego 4 0 0 1.000 114 78 stros Kansas City 3 1 0 .750 84 60 quarterback to pass for 300 yards for the first time in 40 Pop goes the Patsies -The Pats beat the mysterious Seattle 3 1 0 .750 106 53 games, but beat Dan Marino's fish 38-35. The Falcons Lions who were fresh off a Monday night victory over the LA Raiders 1 3 0 .250 95 124 won for the first time ever in Washington, stopping the Cowboys. Green Bay didn't have much of a challenge Denver 0 4 0 .000 92 137 Redskins 27-20. against the Bucs in a 30-3 win These teams have only National Conference Here are my week five predictions: played four times, the last of which was a 45-3 smashing East Brown out -The Jets are reeling from a home loss to by the Pack in 1988. With the Pats' high-scoring offense W L T Pct PF PA the up-and-down Bears and with good reason. The Jets and porous defense,45 points is possible, butnotprobable. N.Y. Giants 3 0 0 1.000 79 63 were a touchdown favorite and could have moved into a tie Pack 30, Pats 23. Dallas 2 1 0 .667 63 46 with the Dolphins on top of the AFC East. The Brownies Steelers drill Oilers -Granted, Pittsburgh is shaky Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 66 57 had trouble with a mediocre Colts squad and have had after a 17-point loss to Seattle, but Houston didn't exactly Washington 1 3 0 .250 88 110 problems with the Jets in recent history. TheJets have won stompthe Bengals last week. This isoneofthe most heated Arizona 0 3 0 .000 29 66 five of the last seven in this series, including three in rivalries in the league, but has lost much glimmer since the Central Minnesota 3 1 0 .750 100 68 Cleveland. Jets 23, Brownies 16. 1970s.Cody Carlson is back undercenter for Houston, but Chicago 2 2 0 .500 76 88 Giantloss-Although theGiantsare thelastundefeated could only muster 20 points on the Kitties. Steelers 24, Detroit 2 2 0 .500 71 78 team in the NFC, they are by no means dominating anyone. Oilers 13. Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 67 50 They beat the Eagles by five and the Cardinals by three. Bills26,Bears 10; Cowboys 24, Redskins 10;Lions 16, Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 43 70 Remember, the Buddy Ryan-led Cards were blanked 32Bucs 9; Vikings 27, Cards 10; 49ers 24, Eagles 13; West 0 by Cleveland. The Saints did lose to the Skins and edged Seahawks 20; Colts 14; Dolphins 27, Kitties 10. There are San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 119 70 the Bucs by two, but looked tough against the 49ers last open dates for Denver, Kansas City, San Diego and the Atlanta 2 2 0 .500 96 94 week. The Giants must fall from the unbeatens. Saints 17, L.A. Raiders. LA Rams 2 2 0 .500 62 77 Giants 13. Last week 8-4, season 31-23, Monday night 3-1. New Orleans 1 3 0 .250 63 99 U.S. Air Force 640th AMSS (B) 2 8 8.5 24th SPS (B) 2 9 6 U.S. Navy Unit-level Unit-level Baskteball 24th Comm. (B) 0 10 10.5 U.S Army Unit-level Basketball Basketball League American League HHC, 1-228th 7 6 12 Green League Roadrunners 13 1 Northern Division National League HH C, 5-87th 6 1 SBU-26 12 2 1 W L GB Eastern Division JOTB 6 1 -IANTN 7 7 6 24th AIS/OSS 9 2 -24th Supply (A) 10 1 -Navy 6 3 1 Port Svcs. 6 8 7 24th Trans. 6 7 4 640th AMSS (A) 9 2 1 549th 5 3 1.5 PWD 6 8 7 24th AIRPS/SVS 7 6 4 24th Comm. (A) 6 5 4 Co. B, 5-87th 5 1 1.5 Marines 5 9 a 24th Supply (B) 5 7 4.5 24th Med. Grp. 1 10 9 Co. A, 5-87th 5 4 2 NSWU-8 5 9 8 Co. A, 1-228th 3 7 5.5 Western Division 1097th 4 5 3 SCiATTS 2 12 11 Southern Division 24th Maint. Sq. 8 3 -747th 2 6 4.5 24th SPS (A) 11 0 -HSC, 536th 7 4 1 Co. C, 5-87th 1 7 5.5 Top five advanced to play-offs, which 24th MSS 9 3 2.5 24th CES 6 5 2 Marines 0 9 7 began Monday and ended Thursday.

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16Tropic Times Ne s' 16Spt. 30, 14News Environmental Military police join forces team checks up for Safe Haven mission o n 24th W in g "Though this type of deployment is new to them, the by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero security police of the Air Force are doing a great job," he HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) -A team of JTF-Safe Haven Public Affairs Office said. "The morale is high throughout the unit." experts from throughout the Air Combat Command EMPIRE BASE CAMP -Providing a safe and secure For one airman from Holloman AFB, N.M., being in came to Panama last week to help officials from the environment for Cubans living in the community camps Panama is an experience he is enjoying. 24th Wing evaluate how well their organizations and here is one of the many jobs of 518 Army and Air Force "I like being down here, this type of operation doesn't people are protecting the environment in which they military police officers from throughout the United States. happen all the time," said Airman Kevin O'Harrow, 49th work and live. "The military and security police have the mission to Security Police Squadron. "I'm having a good time." The team also evaluated the base's compliance provide security and protection for the Cubans at the Working together is also a unique part of the operation with the Final Governing Standards for Environmencommunity camps," said Capt. David Chase, deputy Profor both the Army and the Air Force, but they have found tal Compliance on Department of Defense installavost Marshal, Operation Safe Haven. "Additionally, we more common ground than differences. tions in Panama. These are the "Environmental Prohave the missions of supporting a quick reactionary force, "Even though we have some differences in such things tection Agency-type"regulations under which Howard escorting people visiting the camps, running the checkas paperwork and terminology, our missions are the same," operates. points and providing security for the hospital, the military Brooker said. "We are all policemen." Members of this external Environmental Compliworking and living out here and the equipment ance Assessment and Management Program team are being used." basically here to verify and confirm the findings an As part of the varied missions of the military internal ECAMP team made in January, said Lt. Col. and security police, the 258th Military Police John Miller, chairman of the 24th Wing's pollution Company of Fort Polk, La., provides security to prevention subcommittee. Camp No. 1. "They'll also look for any other findings the inter"The MPs working at Camp No. I work the nal team may have missed," Miller said, gates, perimeters and within the community Overall, Howard did quite well on the assessment, camp itself," Chase said. "And, even though said Col. Bruce Sutherland, vice wing commander at they work 12-hour shifts and live on site, these Dyess AFB, Texas, and chief of the ECAMP team. soldiers extended to stay here for two more "Like all bases, you do have some problems, but months." you know what they are, and you're being proactive The enthusiasm of the MPs at Camp No. 1 in your efforts to correct them," Sutherland said. not only shows in theirjob, but in their free time. Stan Scott, an ECAMP coordinator from HeadMany spend off-duty time with the Cubans quarters Air Combat Command's oversight section, playing sports or entertaining the children. agreed with the colonel's assessment. "I consider myself fortunate to be able to "Howard has come a long way since the last time contribute to the quality of life for the Cubans, we were here, back in February of '93," Scott said. said Spc. Davis Smith, 258th MP Co. "You have a much larger environmental flight now AsforSpe. Kelly Mundt, also with the258th and that's helping you give increased attention to the MPCo., his favorite part of the mission is being ECAMP protocols." able to play with the children of the community These "protocols" are the specific areas of concern cam on wich he EAMP eam embes fcus-p. "I'm glad to be a part of this operation, on which the ECAMP team members focus-pnimaespecially with thekids.Thekids are thecoolest." rily hazardous waste, and hazardous materials, air In addition to the Army, the Air Force has quality, water quality, and solid waste. sent nine, 44-person elements, known as flights, John Hall (U.S. Navy) "We saw a lot of improvement in your compliance to Panama from throughout the states, said A Cuban child gives "five" to military police Spc. J. David efforts," Scott added, "especially in the areas of fuels Capt. John Brooker, Provost Marshal S-3officParker. Parker is assigned to Operation Safe Haven from management and in your effective use of natural and er. Fort Polk, La. cultural resources." There have been some shortfalls that tend to hamper Howard's compliance efforts, but base officials Maintenance excellence competition have voiced the hope that the team's findings will help get the funding needed to ensure all compliance issues are closed. Actually, this is one of the principal Atlantic unit to represent M P battalion advantages that can be derived from the external team's visi, officials said. FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO -Atlantic)'The 549th Company's leadership came into play, Fleschner said. "A lot of people react with disbelief and say 'yeah, Military Police Company has been chosen to represent the "A good maintenance program starts with strong leadright!' when we tell them we're just here to help 92nd Military Police Battalion in a U.S. Army South-level ership," he said. "You can have the best motor pool and them," Scott said, "but it is true! Having findings maintenance excellence competition. mechanics there are, but if it lacks good leadership or annotated on an ECAMP report can often speed up the The 549th MP Co. will represent the 92nd MP Bn. against command emphasis, you won't have a good overall release of otherwise 'unavailable' funds." 154th Signal Battalion in the heavy density category of the maintenance program." Since Headquarters U. S. Air Force first put the Army Award for Maintenance Of course, the soldiers are program into effect four years ago, the number of Excellence. Whicheverunit wins important to the program's sucexternal ECAMP findings has risen at a steady rate, at this level will represent UScess too, Fleschner added. said Capt. Kathyleen Pare, program manager for the ARSO at the Department of the 'The operators and first-line Headquarters ACC. "There's also been a correspondArmy level. supervisors have played a key ing increase in enforcement actions. The 549th MP Co. was serole in what the unit has accom"This is not because ofa decrease in compliance by leeted to represent the battalion plished," he said. "If not for the bases," she said, "but rather because the program based on the results of a comthem, we wouldn't be repreis getting more 'picky' in response to stricter regulamand inspection in which the senting the battalion for this tors and more stringent laws. In fact, we have found unit received nine commendable award." massive improvements in environmental compliance ratingsoutof 15 functional mainThe 92nd MP Bn. soldiers at our bases." tenance areas, said Sgt. Ist Class from the 549th MP Co. are no In years gone by, assessments often found exClarenceS.Fleschner,motorserstrangers to the Army Award samples of "gross noncompliance," but these days geant, 549th MP Co. for Maintenance Excellence. they're being replaced with smaller areas of noncomMaking it this far in the mainThe unit won the award at the pliance, Pare said. tenance competition didn't reUSARSOlevel in 1992 and was Still, regardless of the severity of noncompliance, quire much extra preparation, runner-up in 1991, Fleschner specific areas are subject to regulatory enforcement Fleschner said. said. actions. The internal and external teams' assessments 'We've worked hard to keep i Additionally, the company's are meant to be management tools, but they may also a high standard throughout the sister unit, the 534th Military be used to help prevent (stateside) Air Force installayear, so we don't have to work PoliceCompany, won the award tions from receiving regulatory enforcement actions, hard to prepare for a command in 1993, Fleschner added. which include letters and notices of non-compliance, inspection or for an award like -Spec. Perry M. Thomas, prenotices of violations, warning letters, and even fines this," Fleschner said. Sgt. Rick Emart (U.S.Army) ascribed load list clerk, said the and penalties. Sustaining a good maintePfc. Aubey Taylor, generator mechanic, judging was strict in 1992 when 'Their presence does tend to 'stir things up' a bit nance level has amore important performs maintenance on a HWWMV. the unit won the award. when team members go through the process of idenbenefit than good inspection results, however. "They inspected our daily operations and maintetifying ECAMP discrepancies," Miller said. "Ulti"You have to have a top-notch maintenance operation to nance, the dispatch of vehicles and just about everything mately, however, it is in our best interest to identify sustain combat readiness," he said. "It's something you have that's supposed to happen in the motor pool," he said. "It and correct these problems, and that's what the team to do and keep up daily." was pretty strict." helps us do." In order to sustain a good maintenance level, first a good "Winning that year made us feel like all that hard work level must be reached; that was where the 549th MP all year long was worth it."

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Tropictivities Sept. 30, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page B1 Ali 47 Wind surf in Coronado Spc Jeffrey Purdum (courtesy) Coronado beach staffers help a would-be wind surfer get sailing. For more beach and resort activities, see Page B3. Atlantic Community Cub Scout STOMP instructors visit Panama *Movies, Page B8 dens are gearing up for a new totalkto Exceptional Family Mem+TV, Page B9 year of fun activities. ber Program parents. *Potpourri, Page B12

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B2 Times Youth news BSept30, 1994 Atlantic Cub Scouts gear up for new year Yuhatvie FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) -Pack 3 of Meetings, starting in October, are as follows: the Cub Scout Dens of the Atlantic Community are gear*Tiger Cubs -age 7/first grade, meet 2 p.m. second ing up for a new year of fun activities. Saturday of the month with parent at the Fort Espinar LiThe year will begin with registration at a booth in the brary. *Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700: Christmas Crafts Fair at the Fort Davis Community Club *Wolf Cubs -age 8/second grade, meet 2:15-3:15 Donations to the Cubans of toys, games, Span9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Applications will be taken for p.m. Thursdays at the Fort Davis School. ish books and videos, underwear and clothes can all ages of Cub Scouts and adult volunteers. Fees for *Bear Cubs -age 9/third grade, meet 2:30 p.m. be made at the Howard Youth Center (284-5650). membership for the 1994-1995 school year will be paid Wednesdays at the Fort Espinar youth center. Howard Preteen Dance, 7:30-10:30 p.m. toby the pack activity fund. Scouts will receive a T-shirt *Webelo Cubs -ages 10-11/fourth-fifth grades meet day. For ages 8-12. and handbook with their registration. 3:45-5 p.m. Saturdays at Quarters 522C, Fort Davis. Hideout Teen Council meeting 5 p.m. TuesDress uniforms, while desirable, will not be mandato*Pack Meetings 5:30 p.m. fourth Thursday of each day at the Albrook Youth Center teen lounge. Junry. Memberships are good for one year and can be month at the Espinar Youth Center. Call 289-3748 for inior and Senior teens are needed to fill positions. transfered to anywhere in the United States at any time. formation. Transportation will be provided from Howard, Kobbe and Farfan. Scouts are back -active in community Di face off and teen dance 8:30-11:30 p.m. '3 Oct. 8. Party at the Howard NCO Club with the COROZAL (Tropic Times) -Here is some of the latest Recreational items such as baseball equipment, domi"Anthill Posse." Transportation is provided from Scouting information: no sets, soccer balls, volleyball sets, playing cards, footAlbrook Youth Center and Fort Clayton Senior *Pack 5 (Balboa, Amador and Quarry Heights area) is balls, horseshoe sets, badminton sets, Frisbees, various Teen Center. looking for a Webelos leader for seven, fourth and fifth board games, Spanish paperback books and magazines, Tae Kwon Do karate classes weekday evegrade boys. Anyone with scouting experience who would crayons and children's toys of all types. nings. Classes for children, teens and adults. like to lead this den, call Carolyn McAllister at 282-3490. If you have any items to donate, call your area coordiThe Hideout Teen Lounge is coming soon to +Local Eagle Scout Larry Kemp, 13, needs communinator to arrange for convenient drop-off or pick-up. CoorAlbrk AF -ty participation in a project aimed at helping Cuban famidinators are: Art classes, for ages 6-16. Cost is $25 for memlies. The following items are needed: Jerry Scott, Quarters 11 Albrook, 286-3336. bears and $35 for non-members. Call to register. Personal items such as towels, tennis shoes, sandals, Laura McDill, Quarters 404B Amador, 282-3092. Cheerleading lessons, Fridays at Albrook undergarments, grooming items, soap and toothbrush conSherry or Ryan Hart, Quarters 516 Clayton, 287-5998. Youth Center and Saturdays at Howard Youth Centainers, hair accessories, sewing supplies, fabric, small Velma Reilly, Quarters 1980B Curundu, 286-4788. ter. gym bags and writing materials. Sherri or Mike Murray, Quarters 301 Kobbe, 284-5180. Guitar lessons, by appointment 1-6 p.m. SaturClothing items such as handbags, belts, wallets, shoe Marian Merz Quarters 7 Quarry Heights, 282-3693. days. laces, summer clothing, sun glasses and handkerchiefs. Eva Liehr, 7304B Cardenas -PCC housing, 252-5985. Spanish lessons, for children and adults. Tues__________________________________________________________days__and___ThdaysandsTursdas at d andp pmm Arts and crafts, 3 p.m. Wednesdays. 'ypICO Gymnastics classes, for boys and girls four days a week. Special preschooler class Saturdays. Ballet, tap and jazz dance, lessons available Christoper's Episcofor ages four to adult. pal School, Panama *Child Development Center 284-6135: City, entertained Fort Family Day Care Providers are needed in the Clayton Elementary -Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 for School students with information. typical Panamanian dancing, Sept. 15. Clayton Third grade "Conjunto Tipico" students and +Youth Center 287-6451: Junior High "LaCoral Dodgeball 3 p.m. Oct. 7. Poetica" students Panama folklore fair noon-4 p.m. Oct. 8. Junior jazzercize for ages 6-12, 4-5 p.m. Tueswere present. t days and Thursdays Building 155. The new school hours for the center are: ages 6-14, 2:30-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday; ages 6-11, 2:30-6 p.m. Friday; ages 12-14, 2:30-8 p.m. Friday; ages 6-11, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday; ages 1214, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday. -Youth Services is looking for piano and gymnastics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at 287-3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton. Arts and crafts, Mondays. Cooking experiences, Tuesdays. Outdoor games, Thursdays. *Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: k Popcorn and movies, Sundays. Senior Teen Employment Program, yearround program to develop job skills and earn money for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are available at the center. Two paddle table tennis tournament Saturday. Free Pizza for players. Make-up Secrets and Hints I, by Revlon 6-7 p.m. Wednesday. Bowling at the Clayton Bowling Center 3 -p.m. Oct. S. Meet at the center at 2 p.m. Pat Mlton (SOUTHCOM) *Child Development Center 287-3301: Save our W orld CDC provides high quality, developmental Students from Fort Clayton and Diablo Elementary Schools' enrichment program were honored child care for children 6 weeks to 12 years old. Tuesday for donating their published writings on the flora and fauna of tropical rainforests to the Full day care and hourly care available. Call Metropolitan National Park. The project was sponsored by the Smithsonian Tropical Institute. 287-5657. Their work took one year to complete and is now available at the park's ecological and educational store for $1.50 each. The funds raised by the sale will help support the ecological programs at the Atlantic park. Pictured (left to right) in front are: Brooke Stringfellow, 4th grade at Fort Clayton; Leslie *Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: Kattelmann, 4th grade at Fort Clayton; Christina Rivera, 5th grade at Diablo; Amanda Pacheco, 4th Piano classes, 4-6 p.m. for 30-minute lessons grade at Diablo; Maureen O'Connor, 5th grade at Diablo; Callie Holland, 6th grade at Fort Clayton. Mondays and Wednesdays. There is a fee of $20 In back (left to right) are: Maria Bernal, park store sociologist; Denise Ellis, 5th grade at Diablo; per person each month. Shannon Kiekhoefer, 4th grade at Fort Clayton; Heather Downie, 6th grade at Fort Clayton; and Arts and crafts, 3-4:31 p.m. Wednesday. Betsy Imig, enrichment program teacher. Not pictured is Mary Sawdey, 2nd grade at Fort Clayton. Saturday sports, noon to 6 p.m. --_ Karate Shotokan 4-5 p.m. Monday and Youth centers to issue ID cards that the card bearer is registered with Youth Services. The Wednesday. The fee is $20 per person. card will also contain data necessary to contact parents in Teen splat master noon Saturday. The fee is The Fort Clayton Youth and Senior Teen Centers are the event of an emergency. Registration will take place 6$50 for a six man team. changing membership policies effective Oct. 15. In an ef8 p.M. Monday-Oct. 7 and Oct. 10-14 in Building 155. Scavenger hunt 3 p.m. Oct. 7. fort to insure safety and security, the centers will issue Parents must accompany children through the registraphoto identification cards. These will be used to verify tion process. For information, call 287-3506or287-645 1.

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Tropic Times D I ve Sept 30, 1994 'Sea' eve rything there is tosee. at Panama s beautiful beaches about anything that will fit your budget. by Sgt. Cass Purdum Beach combers who don't want to Tropic Times staff stay out of town overnight, might try one ross the canal from Panama of the many other beautiful beaches on City, over the Bridge of the the Pacific side of Panama. Americas, onto the Pan The fun is boundless. Explore Spc. Jeffrey Purdum (Courtesy) American Highway, and you are Panama's interior and find out what Visitors at Coronado beach prepare for a lazy afternoon sail. Boats and beachward bound. you've been missing. winder surfers are available for rent in the area. From Punta Chame (Chame Point) to Farrallon, stretch more than 40 miles of sun-blessed Pacific beaches for surfing, sunning, swimming, snorkeling and more. Punta Chame, Nueva Gorgona, Coronado, San Carlos, Turiscentro San Carlos, El Palmar, Rio Mar, Santa Clara and other beaches in the area, have overnight facilities and there are many restaurants, cantinas and rest stops along the way. And now, nestled in 158 acres of land at Coronado Beach 50 miles west of Panama City is Panama's first fivestar hotel. The Club Suites De Golf Playa Coronado has activities to please almost anyone. There are restaurants and bars for casual and formal dining, plus conference rooms for business and professional meetings or seminars. Nearby, an 18-hole, par 72 championship golf course with 7,200 yards of landscaped greens and fairways is considered one of the best in Latin America. All up and down the coast are other, less expensive, dwellings to while away your time. From small, simple hotel rooms near the beaches, to cabins right on the Spc Jeffrey Purdum (Courtesy) beaches, if you search, you'll find just Families enjoy a lazy day at Coronado beach Coronado does have a life guard on duty Sgt. Cass Purdum (Troplc Times) Coronado features a professional, 18-hole, par 72 golf course.

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B4Tropic Times #ics~Pnm B4 Sept.Focus on Panama Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Lewfs (U.S. Navy) The Iglesia del Carmen on Via Espana, with its Gothic architecture, is both a religious and tourist attraction. illustrate architecture hree things were left behind by the Spanish conquerors when they left the American continent: language, customs (Tropi.es) and religion. The impressive dome-shaped B'hai Temple can be seen from a distance while driving along the Aside from the Portuguese language spoken in Transisthmian Highway to Las Cumbres. Brazil, English that is used in the United States and Belize, and French spoken in some of the Caribbean islands and Canada, the Spanish language prevails in the rest of the continent known as Latin America. When talking about religion, the "conquistadores" were not only successful in establishing theCatholic Church as the dominant religion, but also made sure that churches and missions were built so they would not diminish in the years to come. Panama was no exception to the rule and several of those first religious structures still stand today, while others have been built in more recent times. Four centuries have already gone by, yet the basic structure of what was the Cathedral of Old Panama still defies time, sun and rain. What is left of it and the rest of the city sacked and burned by the English pirate Henry Morgan is now one of the country's main tourist attractions. Its golden altar slipped away from the hands of the invaders thanks to the daring and intelligence of a layman, and now graces St. Joseph's Church in the colonial section of Panama City. There, in that same area, is the Santo Domingo Church, which happened to be a decisive factor in the construction of the Panama Canal. The firmness of its flat arch -still intact today -proved to those interested in building the great waterway that Panama was a place where earthquakes were practically nonexistent and therefore, the safest and best location for t a route uniting the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans. Slowly fading away are the hand-carved wooden images of the 17th century San Francisco Church in the Province of Veraguas, and still sturdy is the Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill LewIs (U.S. Navy) ancient colonial church in Nata. The Metropolitan Cathedral colonial construction began in 1688 and was completed in 1796. However, changes take place as time marches on. The temples of today are built along different and the main feature of which is its pulpit in the center of new tendency in the architectural design of places of more unusual architectural lines, such as the Virgen the congregation. worshsip in Panama, a far cry from what they were del Carmen Church, just a step away from the El These are but a few outstanding examples of the like in the days of the Spanish conquerors. Panama Hotel; the dome-shaped B'hai Temple on the way to Las Cumbres; the San Antonio Church in the by Rosemary Chong, Tropic Times staff Miraflores community; and the new Javier Church,

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L#IX III-I~uIIL~ynewsTropic Times ______________________________ Sept. 30, 1994B5., C!.Communiy aestivitBe STOMP gets attention Instructors give specialized training to Clayton Theg wirlten Wheld 9f a.Therda Chae enrat parents of exceptional family members Can Cal ainth tE Fo ABC?" a discussion -of public, private and home FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Some children the system and talk to all the professionals in the field, schooling. Refreshment and fellowship will be held stomp their feet when they want your attention. Two "Educate yourself on your child's disabilities. Know following the program. For child care information, women who recently conducted a workshop for families your rights and responsibilities," Hebdon said. "Learn how call Joyce Walker at 287-3247. with special medical and educational needs however, didn't to go around brick walls -because you will run into these The Army Child Development Services anneed to stomp their feet to get their audience's attention. walls. But know that federal mandates have given you nounces a fee adjustment effective today for all Heather Hebdon and Sandy Mitchell, professional inrights." Army Child Development Centers. The adjustment structors for Specialized Training of Military Parents, "View these mandates as tools, not weapons, to be will affect full and part day programs. Though there visited Panama recently as guests of the Exceptional Famregarded. You are the only constant in your child's life," is a fee adjustment, the cost will remain under $2.55 ily Member Program. STOMP, a private, nonprofit, federshe said. "You must have open communication with your an hour. For information, see your local center. ally funded program, provides training and assistance to the school work as a team. Don't be afraid to be creative." Spaces are available now in the CDS part-day community -to parents, educators and fellow profesAll children are eligible for a free education. There are program at Fort Clayton for the afternoon session sionals of the Family Advocacy Program. "zero rejects." Hebdon said that an appropriate education that meets 1-3 p.m. Preschoolers must be 3 years old The workshop covered such things as rights and responcan be negotiated between the school and parent. "Not the by Oct. 31 and toddlers must be 2 years old by Oct. sibilities of family members with special needs in getting Mercedes, not the bicycle, but the Ford," she said. "It will 31. Call 287-5507/5104 for information. appropriate special education services, testing and assessbe good enough to get you there so you can enjoy the trip, The Department of Defense Dependent ment of children, and the Individual Education Program. but it won't be a luxurious trip." Schools in Panama, along with Army CommuniInstructions were also given on how to communicate with In addition to Hebdon's points, Mitchell reviewed dety Service are conducting "Child Find Activischools and professionals, maintaining home records, tranvelopment of Individual Education Plans for special needs ties" in an effort to locate all eligible children with sition back to the United States, wills and guardianship. children, stating that communication is critical if the IEP is disabilities in need of special education services. Hebdon, the mother of three children with disabilities to work. Newly arrived military and U.S. Government-sponand the "Mother of STOMP," has dedicated the last 19 "It's a collaboration of mutual respect for the child's sored families with dependents in need of special years of her life to helping members of the Department of skills and knowledge, combined with understanding, emeducation and medically related services should Defense community with special needs. pathy, shared planning and decision making," she said. An contact their local DoD school forprogram planning 'These family members are still citizens with rights," open two-way sharing of information between the school and enrollment. Contact any local DoD school or the she said. We must help them attempt to lead productive and and the family, absent of labeling and blaming. Exceptional Family Member Program manager at satisfying lives," Hebdon said. "The teacher must provide a joint evaluation of the 287-4921/5073. "We're all people with a variety of points of view," she child's progress, offering opinions but ensuring the family U.S. Army Public Affairs is coordinating the said. "The special needs of children have rights in the knows these are suggestions and not the only options," 1994JointTaskForce-PanamaChristmasSponeducational system. For adults with special needs, nothing Mitchell said. sorship Program. Units or community groups is mandatory; the provision of services is available to adults "We're the only consistent piece of our children's wanting to participate this year should call USARonly when funds are available." lives," Hebdon said. "We are ultimately responsible for the SO PAO at 287-3007/4109. Children who are school age must receive services, and habilitation level of any individual child." The 142nd Medical Battalion and 235th Supparents must be effective advocates in the educational For more information about the Exceptional Family port Battalion family support group will meet 7 process, she said. Parents need to know how to approach Member Program call Lakshmi Kumar at 287-49212. por B battalion y p roup Meet 7 p.m. Fridays in the battalion dayroom. Meetings are open to family members and unit soldiers. Hospice Foundation reaches out to military families The telephone number for the La Leche Thage telepher sknube p or he oratech The Hospice Foundation of America has begun an finding the help they need, when they need it." League and mothers seeking help or information information outreach program to military people and their Hospice is a special kind of care designed to provide about breastfeeding is 287-6592. families. The new program is intended to inform military comfort and support to patients and their families in the personnel about hospice care for family members who are final stages of terminal illness. It seeks to enable patients How ard/Albrook suffering from terminal illness -to provide a caring, home to carry on their remaining days, weeks or months in an or home-like environment to those for whom cure and alert and pain-free manner, with symptoms under control. The Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses' Club recovery are no longer an option. As part of the outreach program, the Hospice Foundais sponsoring its annual bazaar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 'The particularly difficult circumstances imposed on tion is providing information to military chaplains, family 29 at the Howard Enlisted Members Club. The military personnel by long family separations, frequent service centers and health care professional at military bazaar will feature a bake sale and handicrafts from moves and unpredictable deployments place a heavy burbases, to assist them in helping military personnel underCentral and South America. For information, call den on military people," explained Capt. John Dewey, U.S. stand and arrange hospice care when needed. 284-6874. Navy (retired), vice president of the Hospice Foundation. For additional information on hospice care, write: HosA list of teenagers who have successfully com'This new outreach program is intended to assist military pice Foundation of America, 1334 G Street, NW, Suite pleted the Babysitting 101 course is available at family members in coping with terminal illness and in 605, Washington, D.C. 20005, or call (202) 638-5419. the Howard/Albrook Child Development Centers, Howard/Albrook Youth Centers and the Howard Family Support Center. Teenagers are qualifed in CPR, First Aid, and basic child care. The Albrook Stables is offering trail rides and pony rides by appointment only. Call 287-3333/ ,4411 for appointments. The Howard Child Development Center is looking for potential Family Day Care Providers for the Albrook Area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/ 6135 for more information. Atlantic For people transferring to new duty stations, the Army Community Service Relocation Assistance Office helps in the search for housing, employment and educational possibilities for servicemembers and their family members. Call 289-4021/4636 for more information. Miscellaneous The Officers' and Civilians' Wives Club-Pacific Pumpkin Patch Christmas Bazaar will be held 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 22 at Club Amador. In addition, individual and family professional Christmas portrait photos will be taken in the La Concha Room of Club Amador on the day of the bazaar. Reasonably priced packages will be available in plenty of time forChristmas. More than 1X) vendors Tr it cte will be showing goods of all nature. This is the perfect opportunity to buy some special Christmas "Order of the Ditch" certificates are available at the Rodman Public Affairs Office for people who gifts. have transited the Panama Canal. The cost is $6 for a 12-by-18 inch and wallet-size cerfiificate. For more information, call 283-5644/5461.

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B 6 Sepl. 30, 1994 Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits p.m. Oct. 12, $6. Whitewater rafting in Chiriqui Oct. 8and vegetables and visit a nature preDining out Italian style 6-10 p.m. 10, $130 includes transportation, meals, Rodman serve. Oct. 19, $3. lodging, equipment and guide. informationn. Tour and Travel: Panama City tour 9 a.m. Oct. 12 and *Outdoor adventures: Ecotourism trip to a Chocoe Indian Moonlight cruise 6:30 p.m. today and 22, $8. Visit the Golden Altar, the French Drakes Island scuba, snorkeling 5 Village Oct. 15, $30 adults, $20 children Oct. 15, $21. Cruise out to Taboga Island Plaza and more. a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, $22 snorkelers, $47 under 12. Visitors can bring donations for forcocktails and hors d'oeuvres by moonFree Zone shopping 7 a.m. Oct. 10 divers. the school children. light, while viewing Panama City's draand 26, $12. Gold panning in Bique, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Partial transits of the Panama Canal matic skyline at night. San Blas Islands 6 a.m. Oct. 14-15, Tuesday, $12. 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays, $35 adults, $15 Downtown shopping 9 a.m. Wednes$149 fee includes transportation, accomEl Valle horseback riding, 7 a.m.-4 children 12 years old and younger. A miniday and Oct. 27, $8. Shop Panama's modations, food, island tours and activip.m. Oct. 15, $24. mum of 20 people is needed for a partial Central Avenue and Via Espana. ties. transit any other day of the week. Bambito, Chiriqui, Oct. 7-10, $240 Bottom-fishing on the Vargas, Oct. Clayto Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel opper person/double occupancy. Three days 16 and 30, $35 adults, $20 kids under 14. C lyt portunity to Montego Bay any Sunday and four nights at the Bambito resort. A great outing forthe whole family. Catch *Valent Recreation Center: through Wednesday. Packet includes airTransportation, meals and tours included snapper, grouper and other bottom feedEl Valle 6:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Sunday. fare, three nights hotel accommodations, in fee. Sign-up by Monday. ing fish. Fee includes captain, gear, live Panama City tour6:30 a.m.-3:30p.m. and transfer. Prices vary from $300-$600 Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. Oct. 8 bait and iced coolers. Oct. 8. depending on the hotel. Optional tours can and 21, $65, two people needed. Visit the Montego Bay, Jamaica Oct. 7-10. be scheduled upon request. tropical research island in the Panama Albrook/Howard Chiriqui mountain tour Oct. 7-10. Canal's Gatun Lake. Panama City shopping 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Balboa Trolling on the Vargas 6 a.m. Oct. 8 *Zodiac Community Activities CenOct. 15. and 22, $48/person. Fish Panama's proliftl-, *Outdoor Recreation Center: *Balboa Dive Club: ic waters for marlin, sailfish, dolphin (fish), Free Zone 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. FriThere is Contadora Island transit serThe club is organizing a trip to Isla bonita, Spanish mackeral and more. Fee days, $13. vice Friday through Monday. Fees are Iguana Oct. 8-10. The $140 fee covers includes captain, gear, lures and iced coolEl Valle shopping 6:30 a.m.-4:30 $35 adults and $20 children 12 and under two-night accomodations, meals, transporers. p.m. Oct. 9, 16 and 30, $13. round trip, $25 adults and $15 children tation and three guided boat dives. Sign up El Valle 7 a.m. Oct. 9 and 23, $12. Beer Brewery & lock tour 9 a.m.-3 one way. early, space is limited. Call 263-4998. days for adults and children over 3 years. Fee: $20 for 12 classes. Albrook/Howard *Fort Clayton Boat/Scuba Shop: *Zodac ommuityActiitis C~wrL Open water scuba class meets first and *Zodiac Community Activities Center: third Monday of each month, $125. Includes Guitar lessons 1-6 p.m. Saturdays at five pool sessions, five theory sessions and Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. four open water dives. Spanish lessons 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays-ThursLong set equipment rental $19 per day. days at Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. *Valent Recreation Center: Martial arts classes at Howard and AlPrivate piano and guitar lessons available brook Youth Centers, 284-4700. weekday evenings. Tae Kwon Do karate classes at Zodiac Korean karate 6-8 p.m. Tuesday and Center for children and adults. Thursdays. Beginner and advanced dog obedience classes, $32 for 4 weeks. Rodman Beginnerand advanced English and Span*Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation ish classes offered monthly. Office: *Albrook Auto shop: The Navy MWR is seeking qualified inAirconditioningserviceand repair 12:30structors to teach Spanish and French lan5 p.m. daily except Tuesday and Wednesday. guage courses. Applicants should have prior Wheel alignment diagnostic and service experience in teaching elementary and conclasses are held 3-9 p.m. Mondays, Thursdays versational language courses. Call 283-4301. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and Curund Sundays.V *Howard and Albrook 2 +Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: Intro to scuba, free, call for appointment. Reservations for Christmas Village taOpnt at scuba, cass Srat t bles 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday Centre. O ct. 5at Abrook, $14 arda Piano lessons are held 3-7 p.m. Mondays, Howard, .kTuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Open to Advanced scuba Oct. 19 at Howard Water aerobics for advanced adult swimMartial arts 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday and mers at Howard and Albrook. Thursdays. Open to all ages t *Howard Wood Skills Center, Bldg. 722 Voicelessonsarheld3-5:30p.m.Wednes Qualification class 10 a.m.-noon Saturday, days and Thursdays. free. Learn to use the equipment. Guitar lessons are held 3-6 p.m. Tuesdays Cla to Registration for all dance classes is under way at Building 2060, Curundu. Jazz lessons *Fort Clayton Pool: are available for teens and adults as follows: The pool is looking for qualified teachers I: 5-6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays $32. for swimming and water aerobics. Call 287II: 6-7 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, (CousyI 6660. $32. SaXOphon lessons Beginning and advanced swimming lesOther classes: modern, ballet, tap, folklorToby Knight, saxophone instructor, is teaching half hour lessons 5-8 p.m. sons 2:15-5:45 p.m. Mondays through Thursic, salsa, belly dancing and saxophone. Mondays and Thursdays at the Pacific Theatre Arts Center, Curundu. For / more information, call, 286-3814. Tour'94." This year, Tops In Blue will 12:30-10 p.m. today at the Atlapa ConThere will be demonstrations, exhibits, emphasize the importance of music to vention Center. The Caravana is an annuentertainment, food samples and more. Tops In Blue the success of movies, presenting both al event with displays of crafts, gifts, *Howard Base Theater; nostalgic and contemporary looks at native foods, prizes and entertainment. Annual fall bazaar The world famous group of activesome of the greatest movie music ever duty Air Force talent "Tops In Blue," composed. *Howard/Albrook Officers Spouses' will return to Panama for two Fun Fair Club: performances 7:30 p.m. Oct. 6 and 7 at *Directorate of Community ActiviThe Howard/Albrook Officers Spousthe Howard Base Theater. The talented taravana ie es' Club is holding the annual fall bazaar musical troupe has selected "Feel Like *Atlapa Convention Center: The Fun Fair will take place 1-6 p.m. at the Albrook Club 10 a.m-3 p.m. Oct. Singing" as the theme for its "World The Caravana 1994 will be held Saturday at the Valent Recreation Center. 15.

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Tropic Times 1D '7 ices Sept 30, 1994 B 9TH ANNUAL NATURE FAIR Gamiboa Community Phone guide Pacific 24th Services Squadron Sports and Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107 Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613 Nature Fair Albrook Club, 286-4128 The Gamboa Community Center and Our Lady of Good Counsel Church will host the 9th Annual Gamboa Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333 Nature Fair 9 a.m. Saturday at the Gamboa Community Center. Vendors booths will be located in the Gamboa Albrook Thrift Shop 285-5989. Community Center Building and surrounding areas. This year's activities include an Eco-Tourof Barro Colorado; Canal Crafters 286-4500 nature bird walks along the pipeline road; educational lectures and exhibits by local conservation groups such as Can rts a Cf ee2 5 Ancon/Eco-Tours and the Panama Audubon Society, as well as Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; live Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957 demonstrations of Darien handcrafts to include Cocobolo wood sculpture, Tagua (the vegetable nut ivory) carving Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 and basket weaving. The Gamboa community invites the public. There is no admission fee. Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586 Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355 A *Club Amador, 282-3534 Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010 *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts es at the shop. crafters to sell items in the new Corozal Thrift Shop, 285-5989 Center: Wallhanging quilts 10:15a.m.consignment boutique. Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 Sewing twice a week for two 12:15 p.m. Saturday, $20. Instructors are needed to teach Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 hours. Baby quilts 10:15 a.m.-12:15 classes on a contract basis for a Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680 Cake decorating twice a week p.m. Tuesday, $22. varity of crafts, decorative paintHoward Riding Stables 284-3770 for two hours. Tole-painting, Halloween items ing, calligraphy, watercolors, oil Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361 The Ceramic Center, Building 10:15 a.m. Thursday, $15/$20. painting,etc. Contact Margo Leslie Howard Teen Center, 284-4700 198, is located near the Crafts Shop. Cross stitch demo, Christmas at 284-6361. Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510 *Canal Crafters: stocking 10:15 a.m. Oct. 7, free. Beginning pottery class 10 The Loop, 287-3035 Handmade arts and crafts are Paper mold class, 10:15 a.m. a.m.-l p.m. Tuesday, $15 plus supPacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 available, consignments and volOct. 12, $3, supplies included. plies. Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380 unteers are welcome. The shop *Howard Skills Development Ceramic pouring class noon-2 Rodman Annex, 283-5475 hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday Center: p.m. Thursday. Bring slip and tools. Rodman Club, 283-4498 through Saturday. The shop is now The center is having a 25 percent Ongoing classes: stained glass, Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 accepting holiday consignments, off selected scribbles and fabric framing, air brush, lamp assembly, Rodman Naval Station Information Tour Building 804, Albrook. paints, Oct. 7-8. cross stitch, macrame, clay flower, and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454 Register for thefollowing classThe center is looking for ceramic and 'how to videos.' Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500 Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-6161 ---Atlantic Aquativity Center, 289-4009 *Valent Recreation Center: for children 4 p.m. Thursdays. services are available. Phone orDavis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201 Better Opportunities for Laser disc movies 7 p.m. ders to 284-5848, fax to 284-6109. Davis Community Club, 289-5160 Single Soldiers will notmeet ThursFridays. Rent the activities room and Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 day. Next meeting Oct. 20. *Zodiac Community Center: the Big Tree Bohio for parties or Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077 The screening room offers free Subs on Top has new hours, 11 any other function. Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313 movies. Call the 24-hour movie line, a.m.-5 p.m. MondaysFridays, 11 October specials: family beach Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104 287-4367 for days and times. a.m.3 p.m. Saturdays. It is in the package. Rent a boogie board, Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300 *Cocoli Community Center: Zodiac Community Activities Cenbeach umbrella and 54 qt. cooler The center is showing videos ter. Take-out, eat-in and delivery for $8.50. Rec center news Karate 6-7 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. Atlantic tours Beginning painting 6-8 p.m. Mondays. *Sundial Recreation Center: Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays. *Sundial Recreation Center: Gymnastics and ballet, 5:30-6 p.m. ThursPiano lessons 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesdays. Panama City 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. days. *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: El Valle, 5:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. Sunday Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. WednesThe center offers various of classes: KaraFree Zone 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday. days. te, cake decorating, Spanish, English, piano, *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: 'Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mondays, country line-dancing and jazz. Call for schedIsla Grande 7 a.m. Saturday. Wednesdays and Fridays. ules and registration. El Valle 5:30 a.m. Sunday.

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B8 Sept30 1994 Movies Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7pm: Black Beauty 2pm: The Little 2pm: Black Beauty 7pm: Airheads 7pm: The Little 7pm: True Lies 7:30pm: Tops in 284-3583 (G) Rascals (PG) (G) Daivd Thewlis, (PG-13) Rascals (PG) (R) Arnold Blue (Snack stand Daivd Thewlis, Travis Tedford, Sean Bean Brendan Fraser, Travis Tedford, Schwarzenegger, opened) Sean Bean Bug Hall 7pm: The Little Steve Buscemi Bug Hall Jamie Lee Curtis 9pm: Airheads 7pm: Black Beauty Rascals (PG) 9pm: Blown Away (R) 9pm: Black Beauty 9:30pm: Wolf (R) (PG-13) (G) Daivd Thewlis, Travis Tedford, Jeff Bridges, (G) Jack Nicholson, Brendan Fraser, Sean Bean Bug Hall Tommy Lee Jones Daivd Thewlis, Michelle Pfeiffer Steve Buscemi 9pm: Airheads 9pm: Black Beauty Sean Bean (P0 -13) (G)Daivd Thewlis, Brendan Fraser, Sean Bean Steve Buscemi Fort Clayton 7pm: Lassie (PG) 2pm: Lassie (PG) 2pm: Lassie (PG) 7pm: Lassie (PG) 7pm: The Client 7pm: Airheads 7pm: The Little Helen Slater, Helen Slater, Helen Slater, Helen Slater, (PG-13) (PG-13) Rascals (PG) 287-3279 Richard Farnsworth Richard Farnsworth Richard Farnsworth Richard Farnsworth Susan Sarandon, Brendan Fraser, Travis Tedford, 9pm: The Client 7pm: The Client 7pm: Lassie (PG) 9pm: The Client Tommy Lee Jones Steve Buscemi Bug Hall (PG-13) (PG-13) Helen Slater, (PG-13) 9pm: The Flintstones 9pm: Above the Rim 9pm: Above the Rim Susan Sarandon, Susan Sarandon, Richard Farnsworth Susan Sarandon, (PG) John Goodman, (R) Duane Martin, (R) Duane Martin, Tommy Lee Jones Tommy Lee Jones 9pm: The Client Tommy Lee Jones Rick Moranis Leon Leon 9pm: The Crow (R) (PG-13) ($1.50/$l) Brandon Lee, Susan Sarandon, Ernie Hudson Tommy Lee Jones Fort Davis 7pm: Speed (R) 2pm: Angels in the 7pm: Speed (R) 7pm: North (PG) 7pm: Angels in the 7pm: Speed (R) 7pm: Lassie (PG) Keanu Reeves, Outfield (PG) Danny Keanu Reeves, Elijah Wood, Outfield (PG) Danny Keanu Reeves, Helen Slater, 289-5173 Dennis Hopper Glover, Tony Danza Dennis Hopper Bruce Willis Glover, Tony Danza Dennis Hopper Richard Farnsworth 9:30pm: Angels it, 7pm: North (PG) the Outfield (PG) Elijah Wood, Danny Glover, Bruce Willis Tony Danza 9pm: Speed (R) Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper Fort Sherman 7:30pm: North (PG) 7:30pm: Angels in the 7:30pm: Maverick No show No show No show 7:30pm: The Client Elijah Wood, Outfield (PG) (PG) Mel Gibson, (P-13) 289-5173 Bruce Willis Danny Glover, Jodie Foster ($1.50/$1) Susan Sarandon, Tony Danza Tommy Lee Jones Fort Amador 7pm: The Little 7pm: The Shadow 7:30pm: Airheads No show No show 7pm: It Could Happen 7pm: Blown Away Rascals (PG) (PG-13) (PG-13) to You (PG) (R) 284-3583 Travis Tedford, Alec Baldwin, Brendan Fraser, Nicholas Cage, Jeff Bridges, Bug Hall Penolope Miller Steve Buscemi Bridget Fonda Tommy Lee Jones 7True Lies young boy witnesses the suicide of a per wires a bomb to a city bus that will Oct. 7 Tu Lesmob lawyer and hires Reggie Love (Suexplode as soon as the speed goes beArnold Schwarzenegger, san Sarandon) a former addict, to protect low 50 mph. R (violence, language), I Jamie Lee Curtis him from federal prosecutor Rev. Roy hr, 51 min. Howard AFB Harry Tasker is a special agent for OmeFoltrigg (Tommy Lee Jones) and mobHow rd FBga Sector, a top secret agency charged ster Barry Muldano, both of whom thinkN rh 7:30pm Tops in Blue will with nuclear terrorism intervention. Fluhe knows where the body of a U.S. ent in six languages and skilled in all senator is buried. PG13 (childinjeoparElijah Wood, Bruce Willis be presented forms of counter intelligence, Harry is an dy, language), 2 hrs. An 11-year-old boy feeling unappreciinternational spy who has kept his ated by his mother and father real profession secret from his wife. finds a lawyer and declares himArnold Schwarzenegger stars i 11T D E O WAYNIS WDW A3D "T1E ERLY LL self a free agent, then searches Fort Clayton the reality action thriller which fea M ishief lov S COMPany. the world for the perfect parents. 7pm Black Beauty (G) tures Jamie Lee Curtis as the wife.R PG (a few words), I hr. 34 min. (action, violence, language), I hr, David Thewlis, 82 min. Angels in the Sean Bean 'u i 9pm Airheads (PG-13) Black Beauty o Brendan Fraser, David Thewlis, Sean Bean .Danny Glover, Tony Danza A heartwarming drama based on The losing major league baseball Steve Buscemi the family classic novel by Anna team,the "Angels," doesn'thave Sewell, tells the story of a time in a prayer of winning until an 8history when horses were essential year-old boy claims to see angels to men's lives. One horse named on the field providing divine inFort Davis Black Beauty has good and bad spiration. PG (language), I hr, 42 owners, suffers misfortune then mm. 7pm Lassie (PG) finds friendship and is given a seHelen Slater, cure home and loving caretaker. The Shadow Richard G, 99 min. Alec Baldwin, Penelope Miller This film recreates the 1930s Farnsworth Airheads Now showing at Howardand Amador theaters. radio series about a mysterious 9pm The Client (PG-13) Brendan Fraser, Steve Busceni Manhattan playboy with mystical uhree eal headsdperte t get te hypnotic powers. PG13 (fantasy acSusan Sarandon, Three metal heads desperate to get their Lassie tion, violence), I hr, 52 min. Tommy Lee Jones demo song played on the radio inadvertHelen Slater, Richard Farnsworth ently take a radio station hostage. PG13 Everybody's favorite collie Lassie is back Blown Awa (crude dialogue and some sexuality), I for her ninth film (the eighth generation hr, 29 min. descendant of the original dog). Picked Jeff Bridges, Tommy Lee Jones up as a stray by the Turner family movA vengeful Irish bomber is on the loose FortThe Little Rascals ing from Baltimore to Virginia's in Boston. He plays cat and mouse 7:30pm Speed (R) Shenandoah Valley, Lassie leads hernew while being hunted by his former best Travis Tedford, Bug Hall masters into sheep ranching, then helps friend, a Boston bomb squad expert Keanu Reeves, Steven Spielberg produces an appealing them in a land dispute with some ornery who has a secret past. R (violence, Dennis Hopper update of the Hat Roach comedy series neighbors. PG (language, suspense), 1 language), 2 hrs. from the '20s, '30s and '40s. The gang hr, 34 min. Wolf has established a boy's only club; howSpeed Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer ever, things change when Alfalfa falls Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper We all know what happens when you Fort Amador for Darla. PL (rude dialogue) APD SWAT cop Jack Traven, played get bit by a werewolf, right? But, do 7pm Wolf (R) by Keanu Reeves, is known as a man you know what might happen if Jack Jack Nicholson, Sua The Client with an attitude caused by Dennis HopNicholson gets bit? Director Mike Susan Sarandon, Tommy Lee Jones per, a sociopath who ocarly killed him in Nichols has the answer to that question. Michelle Pfeiffer Set in New Orleans, this is the best adapan earlier encounter. Now Traven faces R (language, werewolf attacks), 2 hrs.

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LITV Leull Sept. 30, 1994B9 C ha n l 8 &* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30 Headline News 6:00 CCMTV 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 G Morning America 7:00 Navy/Mane Corps News 6:30 Outreach of Love 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America w/Panama Now (7:25) 7:30 Real News for Kids 7:00 Parliament of Souls w/Panama Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25) w/Panama Now (7:25) 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Gsts 7:30 Lifestyle Magazine 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Just foe Kids! 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Sreet 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 9:30 Portrait of America Gafield & Friends 9:30 This Week w/Brinkley 9:30 portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America 10:25 Guiding Light Teenage Mutant Ninja 10:30 Face the Nation 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 11:10 General Hospita Turtles 1:00 Ilsid the NFL 1:10 General Hospial 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital 1:10 General Hospital 12:00 Headline News Break Biker Mice from Mars 12:00 NFL Football: Green 12:00 Headline News 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:25 Panama Now Barman Cartoon Bay Packers vs. New 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:30 Sportscenter (0:30 Farie Tale Theater England Patriots 12:30 Sports Machine 12:30 Sporitscenter 12:30 Sportscenter 12:31 Sportscenter 1:00 Another World 11:30 Spins 3:00 Nova + 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 12:00 Movie: "Huckleberry 4:00 Victory at Sea 2:00 Gprah Winfrey 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Donahue 3:00 Price is Right Finn" 4:30 "O'Hara" 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 4:00 Think Fast, 1:30 College Football: 5:30 Entertainment this Week 4:00 Guts 4:00 Reading Rainbow 4:00 Shining Time Station 4:00 In the Mix 4:30 I Love Lucy Stanford Cardinals vs. 6:30 Hearts Alire 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy 5:00 Family Feud Notre Dante Fighting 7:00 Dr. Quinn: Medicine 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:30 The Cosby Show Irish Woman 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:00 SCN Evening Report 4:30 Sould Train 8:00 L.A. Law 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 5:30 Superman 9:00 ABC 20/20 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 World News Tonight 6:00 Paradise 10:00 Top Cops 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Rescue 911 11:00 Miami Vice 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:25 Panama Now 8:00 Walker: Texas Ranger 12:00 Movie: "The Nightman" 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 9:00 Movie: "Presumed 2:00 Sports Lotenight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment tonight 8:00 America's Funniest Innocent" 2:30 Frugal Gourmet 8:00 Mad About You an 8:00 Beauty and The Beast 8:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 8:00 ALF People I1:10 Saturday Night Live 3:00 Headline News 8:30 Cops 9:00 Northern Exposure 8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 8:25 Movie: "The Stand" 8:30 Evening Shade 12:40 WWF Superstars of 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 9:00 60 Minutes 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 Culture Clash (Part 3 of 4) 9:00 In the Heat of the Night Wrestling 4:00 Jeopardy 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:05 Cheers 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Lote Ediion 1:40 Videolinks 4:30 Videolinks 10:05 Cheers 10:30 David Lotterman 10:05 Cheers 10:05 Cheers 10:05 Cheers 2:00 Movies: "Under Fire" 5:00 Headline News 10:30 David Lotterman 11:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Ltterman 10:30 David Lotterman 10:30 David Lottertan 2:10 "Cowboy" 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 11:30 Tonight Show 12:30 M*A*S*H 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 6:00 Headline News Break 5:30 Headline News 12:30 MnA*S*H 1:00 Movies: "Afterburn" 12:30 M*A*S*H 12:30 M*A*S*H 12:30 Ren and Stimpy 1:00 Movies:"The Comrades 2:35 "Cover Girl" 1:00 Movies: ''Barahbbs" 1:00 Movies: "Brighten 1:00 Movies: "Harry and of Summer" 5:00 Headline News Break 3:15 "Weird Science" Beach Memoirs" Son" 2:35 "The Jackie Presser 5:00 Headline News Break 2:35 "My Name is Bill W." 3:00 "Breathless" Story" -5:00 Headline News Break 5:00 "Legend" 5:00 Headline News Break 5:30 Videolinks 6:30 Headline News 'C b* ch n Mature Theme an Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 6:00 Shining Time Station 4:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8 & 10 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:30 Young Adult Theater 6:30 The Sunshine Factory 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 9:00 Today "Teenage Mutant Ninja 7:00 Goof Troop 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today I 1:00 Star Trek Turtles: The Movie" 7:25 Garfield and Friends nun 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek I 1:00 Star Trek 12:00 Headline News Break "Te'enage Mutant Ninjo 7:50 Disiey's The Little 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:25 Panama Now Turtles 2" Mermaid 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:30 All My Children Secret of the One 8:15 Batman 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 1:30 One Life to Live 11:30 Real News for Kids 8:40 Where on Earth is Carmen 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 2:30 Young and the Restless 12:00 Silver Spoons Sandiego? 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja 12:30 Movies: "A Big Hand for 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja 3:30 Batman 3:30 Where on Earth is Carmen 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Garfield and Friends son (oTurtles0Frgg, 4 Fraggle R k a Little Lady" Turtles 4:00 Fraggle Rock Sandiego? 4:00 Fraggle ock 400 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Reading Rainhow 2:10 "Operation Pacific" 9:20 Movie: "The Great Race" 4:30 The Adventures of Pete 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Guts 4:30 Nick Arcade 5:00 Silver Spoons 4:00 21 Jump Street 12:00 Headline News & Pete 4:30 Think Fast 5:00 Beakman's World 520 Fact of Life ** 5:30 Sh bi Today 5:00 1993 National Rodeo 12:30 This Old House + 5:00 In the Mix 5:00 Disney's Raw Tonnage ** 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Eveaing Report Finals 12.55 Movie: "Mister Roherts" 5:30 Showhiz Today 5:30 Showbie Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News 6:00 Doctor, Doctor 3:00 NFL Football: 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 Dinosaurs Philadelphia Eagles vs. 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 CBS Evening News 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 Christy San Francisco 49ers 6:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 CBS Evening News 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 Star Trek: The Next Generation 8:00 Star Trek: Deep Space 6:00 Wonderful World of 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 Star Trek: The Next Generation Generation 7:55 Panama Now Nine Disney + Generation Generation 7:55 Panama Now 7:55 Pana a Now 8:00 Roseanne 9:00 Herman's Head 7:00 NFL Football: Miami 7:55 Panama Now 7:55 Panama Now 8:00 Sinbad Show 8:00 Boy Meecs World an 8:30 The Boys are Back-n 9:30 Married With Children Dolphins vs. Cincinnati 8:00 Monday Night Football: 8:00 Home Improvement 8:30 Family Matters 8:30 Living Single (New Fall Series) 10:00 Movie: "Cocktail" Bengals Houston Oilers vs. 8:30 My So Called Life 9:00 Wise Guy 900 Turning Point 9:00 Primetime Live 12:00 Headline News 10:00 Buck James Pittsburgh Steelers (New Fall Series) 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 12:30 Scierce and Technology 11:00 Eye to Eye w/C. Chung 11:00 Headline News Break 9:30 Frasier 10:05 Tor of Duty 10 05 L.A. Law 10:05 Renegade Week 12:00 Headline News 11:30 Nightline 10:00 SCN Late Edition 11:00 Headline News 11:00 Headline News Break 11:00 Headline News Break 1:00 The McLaughlin Group 12:30 Meet the Press 12:00 Cheers 10:05 McKenna (New Fall Series) 11:30 Nightline 1:30 Nightline 11:30 Nightline 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Sports Machine 12:30M*A*S*H ll:00Headline News Break 12:00 Cheers 00Cheers 12:00 Cheers0HalneNw ra 1:0Cer 1:0Cer 12:30 MA 2:00 Entertainment this week 2:00 Sports Latenighit 1:00 Headline News 11:30 Nightline 12:30 MA*S*H 12:30 M*A*S*H 1:00 Hea*l*H 3:00 Headline News 2:30 Frugal Gormet 1:30 Sports Lotenight 12:00 Cheers 1:00 Headline News 1:00 Headline News 1:30 Sports Late n 3:30 Saturday Night Live 3:00 Headline News 2:00 David Lotterman 12:30 M*A*S*H 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Sports Latenight 2:00 David Loemal 5:00 Videolinks 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 3:00 Headline News 1:00 Headline News 2:00 David Lotterman 2:00 David Lotterman 3:00 Headline News 5:30 Headline News Break 4:00 Jeopardy 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 1:30 Sports Latenight 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Military News 4:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10 4:00 Jeopardy 2:00 David Lotterman 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:00 Tom & Jerry Kids 4:30 Videolinks 3:00 Headline News 4:00 Jeopardy 4:00 Jeopardy 4:30 Tiny Toons Adventures 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10 3:30 Wheel of Fortune 4:30 Videolinks 4:30 Videolinks 5:00 CRO 4:00 Jeopardy 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10 5:30 Videoliaks 4:30 Videolinks 6:30 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&10 5:00 Simulcast w/Ch. 8&l0 Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Sports Sports College Football NFL Football Stanford Cardinals vs. Notre Dame Fighting Irish, 1:30 p.m. SaturPhiladelphia Eagles vs. San Francisco 49ers, 3 p.m. Sunday day Miami Dolphins vS. Cincinnati Bengals, 7 p.m. Sunday Houston Oilers vs. Pittsburgh Steelers, 8 p.m. Monday NFL Football Green Bay Packers vs. New England Patriots, noon Sunday Series starts "The Boys are Back," 8:30 p.m. today. Series starts Fred and Betty are about to enjoy the freedom of their "golden years." Mad About You, 8 p.m. Monday. Jesse, their youngest son has just gone off the college, and Fred couldn't The quest for connubial bliss continues as Paul Reiser and Helen Hunt return be happier. Now they can have the house to themselves and do as they please. for another season of modern love in the heart of the Big Apple. Stars Hal Linden and Suzanne Pleshette. Mini series "Boy Meets World," 8 p.m. Thursday. (Replaces Full House) "Stephen King's The Stand," 8:25 p.m. Thursday. Eleven-year-old Cory is having a tough time as he learns about life from his family, Mother Abigail's followers set up a base of operations in Boulder, Colo. They begin friends and his persnickety neighbor and fifth-grade teacher. But even though the their journey to fight the evil entity known as "Randall Flagg." whole thing can be confusing at times, there's still a lot to be laughed at as boy meets world. Stars Ben Savage and Will Friedie. Primetime movies "Presumed Innocent," 9 p.m. Saturday. Primetime movies Here's a solid, well-cast screen version of Scott Turow's crackling best seller about a "Cocktail," 10 p.m. Saturday. prosecutor assigned to investigate the murder of a sexy assistant D.A. with whom A young hotshot comes to New York City to make his fortune, but winds up becomhe'd had an affair. Soon he's charged with murder himself. Stars Harrison Ford and ing a "hot" bartender instead, under the tutelage of self-styled barman/philosopher. Greta Scacchi. Stars Tom Cruise and Bryan Brown.

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flTropic Times A s _ _ _ _ _B10 301994 Classified Ads Make the best offer. 261-6418. mature, dependable, good worker. yi 88 Chevy S10 Blazer Tahoe 4x4 V6 260-9421. Electronic s 43k, Sony am/fm cass, ex cond Bilingual maid Mon-Fi, live out. 26(FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) -As a reminder, 58,900. 287-4790. -_795T7-_ SNES with 5 games, 2 controllers: in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern 89PontiacFornulaFirebird,redtoadEnglishnaid3daysa weekatCocoli. Monopoly. eporady, Mario Print, ed, 50 fiter eng, ac, ant/f cass great 283-5228. Bais Nightmare. Super Mari World Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, cotd, $8,500. 287-5782. --$1751obo. 286-4998. -Dependable babysitter for eyes and cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege holdChevy Celebrity s/w, oc, at, ps, pb, wkends, Eng-spk, gd ekies, per M, ti media kit Ds/Winddw ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecuant/fn ast, $4,000. 287-6136. Howard only, Becky. 284-4638. ntitsnms Cd player GX DSP 16 sound card Lahiec speakers, sfotare. $375. tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes 1993 BMW325,4dr,5spd,burgundy, Bilingual housekeeper, grt w/kids/ 260-1580. permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. new tires, one owner, all extras, U.S. pets, eve cook, live-out. Available Panoi TV/VCR cumbo, $300. .pc, not dty pd, $23,080. 230-0392. Nov I. 284-3392.Patric VVC cob,$8 Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact 260-5336. the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117. 1978 Dodge Diplomat SW, dtp pd, Honest.rliable Eng-sp aid 1-2 days Epson XT computer with monitor, transtnission will need wk eventually, a week. No iron g. 224-752 1. Esn2femne ihmntr $t,900/neg. 287-4885. 20mb, 51/4 disk drive, software inTutoring available for elementary cluded, $275. 226-8626/226-3278. 88' Dodge Dakota p/n with Topper, 84 Dodge Daytona turbo ps,pb, pw, 1988 Toyota 4x4 pa, custom paint/ grades. Atlantic side only.289-4350. A ps, pb, extras, clean, $6500/obo. ac, new interior, $3,000obo.261-2055. mags. Beantifnl truck, lifted. Lamb Ross CM 1020 speakers, $280. 287283-6499. 284-5644. Bilinguallive-inmaidgrtw/kids,Mon3223. 1991 Ford Explorer, xt, 4x4, 4drauto Fri. 232-4620. Coker spaniels(Gold)2 Fe ales and 1975 Buick LeSabre, grey, needs tran radiocass, dly pd, $17,000.228-4061. 1979 Chevy Novaac, ps, rebuilt at Apple laser writer plus (printer) and I Mate 7 wks old, have sbos, ail lip ik, dty pd, clean, $650. 286-6439. overhauled brakes, runs great $1,30; Booking now for holiday parties-varicable. Original price $4,900-asking $200. 221-506 1986 Dodge Ram 50 pick-up. Exe obo. 287-4877. ety band. References and demos avail$3,500. 221-4276. 1991 Ford Explorer 4x4 sportexc cond,4eyl.,owmileage,dtypd$4,500. able. Rip Maynard, 263-3420. French poodle withelipperso4mths, all cond, $14,880/obo. 287-3627. 287-5935, 1991 Camaro, 5spd, 5.OL, V-8 low Notebook work organizer, Downew shots $150. 286-4996. miles, below blue book $9,950. 256Cake decorating. 287-6222. & Creation word processing. Built-in 1991 Chev Suburban 4WD diesel V8 IsnzuRodeo 1992blue/gray fullyload. 6830 spreadsheets, $600. 266-5831. French poodle mini toy 41/2 pounds, Silverado diat AC, rack, R-boards, ed. 260-6429. Bilingual maumre maid, live-in. Lillia, white, for stud service. 226-7176. spec rims/tires, $18,300. 252-2622. 1992 Chevy S-10 pick-up, ac, ps, pb, 284-4089. Infinity speakers150 watts per chan1987 Isuzu Trooper 4dr,4wd, red, a/c, 5spd, am/fm-eass, exec cond, $8,395. nel, exe cond, S200. 287-3223. 4 yr old German shepherd free, fe1987 Cougar, exe running cond, 8 cyl not dty pd $4,580/obo. 252-5567 after 286-3695 Birngual fr id, dependable, han4mst, mate, nentered, watch dog.228-264 motor 302, 2door, $1000. 286-6541. 5pm Sun. caretaker for elderly of children, day IBM 386sx, 4mb Ram, 165mb ld, 1983 Nissan pick-up white, 5spd, U.S. work or weekly. 238-1361. dual floppy, PB SVGA monitor, Epson Chihuahua puppy, 6 wks old $150. Jaguar XJ-6 1978, U.S.specs, gd cond, 323 Mazda 1989 a/c, cass,ce, excelspec, gas new tires, good mec cond, Reliable babysipter in my home ay rinter, mouse modem, game port and 286-4097. dty pd, $4,700. 252-2969. lent condition $5,000. 284-4983. just painted, $4,500. 230-0392. time, BEg spk only. 286-4294. joystick book up, $875. 286-4428. Bl/wh cat, 11/2 yes. old, grey/wh cat, Camaro, auto, 6 cylinder, A/C, 1990 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 4dr, pw/ 1983 Honda Accord ex, ac, loaded, Honest, dependable hosekeeperTV, 20, 4yrs old, $400. 11/2 yes. old, igerstripe cat, 6mo old, $18,000. 269-6738. d p, ib, ps, ac, cass, 27,000 miles, not low mileage, rans g, dty pd, $4000/ daysweek. 282-28MWF:pam269-2095. all spayed, declawed, Free. 282-3783. duty paid $12,500. 287-3814. obo. 287-4686. 5pm. SNES with Sper Mario World like 323 Mazda 1989 A/C. emss, speed, 5pm._SNESwthSuprMari__ord__ik new $110. Star Trek N.C. $45. Sim Rottweiler,3 mos old, female, over25 etc nond, $5000. 284-4983. 1992 Daihatsu Feroza, a/c, 5sp, ste1992 red Jeep Wrangler soft top low Babysitter.Eng-spkday. WorkThmr City, Zeld.a glfr$4Oe. 287-5536. pounds already. All shots, reg. Call ren, 4wd, not duty paid $8,500/nbo. miles, ex cond. Leave message and Fri. or 2-8pm daily. Suzie 229after 5pm, $500. 286-3197. 1974 Mustang, V-6 standard, P/S, as232-4561. $12,500/obo. 284-4267. 2C preampifier/lne, DPLis. where-is (spare parts), $450. 2212045. Carver C Boxer pups 5 wks, fawns brandles 4276. '79 Plymouth Champ $1,580/obo., n1 1985 Nissan Patrol 4x4, 4dr, as is, In home art instruction. Acrylic and 33esurround snund processor/ ampli4180. 261-7909. dty pd. 284-6388. $3,500. 252-6829. fiber, ask for Pant, $380. 287-5651. 1976 BMW 330; may need new parts. 'n it painting, watercolor, charenal; freeFrench poodle puppies minature, Gd cond, U.S.specs, $2000.286-6398. 1987 white BMW 316i, automatic, 1982 Honda civic. Call before noon, dom of express, creativity. 260-3433. Yorx sound speaker system $125, two strawberry blonde, 7 white $225. 261fully loaded, excellent condition $1,300. 287-4735. Fisher speakers $25ea. 286-4023. 3325. 1989CADSedan Deville,superclean $8,900/obo. 263-4671. Honest, dependable live-out maid. all the extras $11,995. 287-4836. Suzuki Samanuri dty pd, hrdlop 4x4 Fantistic w/children. Memy262-1276. New RCA 27" floor model swivel TV Free gold kinen., female. 229-4471. 1991 Plymouth Sundance, auto a/c, $2,780. 252-8183 remote, picture in picture remote cnSuzukiSamuraidty pd 1991, new bought new at Howard car sales. Exc -Honest, reliable live-out maid. Gd w/ tot. $550. 283-5676. German sheperd, 11 mo old $280. tires, AM/FM radio cass, speed, cond. $8,000/obo. 286-3171 1980 Mitsubishi Galant4dr, standard, kids. Delmira 231-4350. 286-4190. -$8,2001neg. 220-5268. ask for Enrique $2,400. 235-9047. 27" Sony Trinimron TV w/remote and 2 8 -4 9 0 $ 8,2 8 0/n e g. 2 2 0-5 2 6 8. r19 9 0 C h ev ro let C av alier 2 d r, pb at .-H o n e stre lia b le ,hd w ork in g ,S p a n-sp k stan d $ 5 5 0 P an aso ni c V H S $ 1 7 5 Ring duberman pinscher for stud see1974Rancheropick-up,dtypd$lt,180. ps, ac, 4cyl, low-mi, am/fm cass, not 1981 Ford Thunderbird, exe mmnning maid/babysitter. Live-out, cooks, get SE286 comp 40mb hd, dual floppy, vice. 283-3439. 283-3487. dty pd, $6,000. 284-5024. cond. Needs cosmetic work, reliable w/kids, refs. 285-4734 after 5:30pm. monitor, printer $760. 260-3433. dm pd0/b. $6,000.0 284-5024 dependbl Needssp coseti workor reial -~,pieds 5yr. old gelding. Gentle, trained 1975 Pinto dty pd, $800/firm. 283FordTelsta,5spdaca/fcss,dy transportation, $650/obo 252-510 Honest, dependable Span-spk maid. Commodore 64 mp, printer, disk english,jumps, great on trails. Doesn't 3487. pd, xe cond, new paint, S4,000. 2521990 Pontiac Grand Prix, ac, pw, pl, Live in or work MWF. Grt cleaning drive and software, $275/obo. 286shy or bolt $900bo. 24-6683 dcond 2414. ps, cruise control, never wrecked, tilt and ironing. 287-5922. 4928. Beautiful baby bunnies $5. 262-2665. 260-6561. 1989 Olds Cutlass Calais, quad 4, ps, steering, $10,000. 286-6298: Reupholster, refinish furniture, car 486DX2-50 MHZ comp, 4mb Ram, German shepherd puppies. 4 weeks '91 Ford Eseort LX2 door. 40 MPG/ pb, pw, custom wheels, pl, $11,500. 1967 VWClassic Beetle,$1,500.269headliner, etc. Work in your home. 245mb drive, VGA color monitor, Graseprdppis4wek 9 FdEsrtX-2dr,4MG/ 261-3568. 5598. 235-9047. $1,495. 252-5557. old, black/beige, $125. 250-0141, call 65KPG, etc cond, new tires, $7,500/ after 6:00 p.m. neg. 284-4125. -1990 Chevy Cavalier, 2dr, ape, air, 1977 Buick Regal, air, ps, pb stereo Span-spk day maid. Honest, reliable. VGA color monitor, $190. 252-5557. Hamster with tall metal cage, exercise 1990 Ford Tauras GL, PS, PB, 6 cylam/fm cass, ps, pb, low mi, $7,500/ dependable. $1,500/obo. 260-2104. Evening and weekend babysitter. 286ball and food $25. 286-6182. inder, 36,000 miles, $9,500/obo. 287obo. 264-3143 evenings. 1993 Dodge Dakota, ext cab V6 mag351 AX; 2 Western di gi tal, WD 4689. 91 Ford escort LX, 2dr, 5sp, am/fm num, 27,000/mi, exe cond, $15,000, Span-spk housekeeper avail one day a 95044A. Exc cond, $60/neg. 269Porebread German shepherd 3yes old, -as xeletcnorgn -ne 8-57 week. Honest, reliable and hard work2095. going back to the states and can't take 1987 Toyota convention van pS, auto, can. ce ent condo original owner 282-3577. H 2 ng. 286-3381. him with us $50. 286-3378. 4cyl, AM-FM cass, original owner. ' $ 1984 Plymouth Reliant, auto ac, a 2m/ Jeosen classic 4" 70 watt surround Etc cond, $6,280. 232-4627. 1989 Gen Metro, 3yt, est 50MPG, fin d, in/n speakers. ranks great, needs Span-spk day maid. Honest, reliable, sound woofer, set $30-nice bass. 287Spayed, mixHuskyperfectiwatchdog. xc cond, aier e tch for Jon b ell bd wok,0/obr.a2,7-3364 references.AvailTuesandThursonly. 5776. Loves kids, trained, free to gd home, 1991 Ford Ranger XLT white w/ e .nd, trailer hiteh for Jon beat body work. $2,400/ob. 287-334c A282-3580. only 3 yrs. 232-461 1. matchingcamper sell, 28k miles, AC, -1983 8cyl 302 engine Ford Van ac, s, 340mb lid, CD Row, 14.4 FAX/moPS, PB, not dty pd. 287-5536. 1979 Volkswagen van good interior. auto. Not dty pd, $8,000. 261-9617. dem, floppy drives, 10 bay tower, tape CFA registered seal-point HimalayRuns great. $1,580. 282-3924. & backup. 284-5685. an-Persian available for stud service. 1987 Nissan Sentra speed, 2 dr, grey, 1985 Jeep CJ-7 gd cond, $5,500. 284call John evenings 289-4354. AM/FM cass, new tires. Exe cond 1987 Chevy Suburban, R-101/2 ton 5510. 14Boston We 40 H.P Yah Sega CD games $2ea. video disc U.S. specs, $4,500/obo. 287-5737. 4-wd, double a/c. new tires. low mileec4 B" start Fishfinder, Ytaler, toadCFA reg purebred Himatayaos kit___edy __pd_$___,____252-5397t t98 omile~age. eveac5sd,am/ edeti $4,195 269-6738.r FtraiVHVCRS, dload-co teas, blue-point & flame-point. Stud 1984 Toyota Lite Ace, 4cyl, 5 speed, age, dlp pd, $10,000. 252-5397. 988PomithacLmasee, x s. d / on premises. Free. 289-4354. PS, PB, A/C. body needs nk, dty free, 89 Honda accord LX: red exterirdty pd, $6,000/obn. 286-4693. 141/2 Abernathy Fiberglass, trailer, trol, $150. 286-6295. Free as one very fluffy and loi,286-6424. beige interior, 56,000mi, loadedone fearless and brave and one very sunroof, e cond. 284-3481. 1984 Audi 80GL4dr, auto, ps, gd car no motor $1,700. 252-2969. Kenwood power amp 350w, control fu88 Mustang GT 5,0L, A/C, PB, PLO, fur Panama, $2,500. 223-7980. amp $250; EQ 7 band $150; CD playshy. All neutered. 286-3773. PW, ant/fi radio, 64,500 miles, 79 Jeep Grand wagoner 4x4 loaded, 1994 Yamaha 9.9 Marine oulbeard er $I5O tter $75. Bryan 287-3357. $7,(M. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Imoo toin meek allce, new1-69 i94Yra a n boxd at$5:inr$5 ra-8-37 $7.080. 223-5609. gd cond, $4,000. 285-4045. 1987 Dodge Ram pick up, 58,000 otor, A 3 4eck Rain-n box, Rabhi9 with large outdoor cage $20. a 'milesgrtcond,$4,000/ob.264-7779. $1150. 252-6610. AST 386 SX25 140mb Ra, soft2871989 Ford Temipo, eve coid, coi1983 CJ-7 Jeep. Laredo package, very ware, printer and desk. All in gd cond, plete car care records, one owner gd cond, $6,000. 252-5024. l980Fordstationwagon, white ,needs Trailer-utility, 1/2 mon, steel frame. $1,000. 284-4987. A $5,800. 284-6381. minor body work, runs good. Not dty fiber glassed, 3'4 cargo area, spare 84 Ford flabed, V-6, std, 4x4, p/s, p/ pd, $800/nbo. 286-4693 after 5pm. tire, sing kit, $295. After 6pm 260Headstart ansp, 286, 40mb, hd, dual 1978 Merenry Monarch, eve comd b, includes new spare, parts. Grt me9172. floppies, software and more. $300. 1987 Ford tempoo, AT, AC, AM/FM, mnto, ac, pw, ps, ast/fm/ess, dmy pd, chanic couid, $4,500/obo. 289-5942. 1989 Ford F-I 50XLT Lariat superemib Class I trailer hitch n/ace for fuc)size 283-5436. lbes offer. 232-6056. ----mew 351 eng, ps, auto, ac, 2 tanks, cats, 4 door, 75k ni2es, gd cotd. Not 89 Olds Cltlas cailais ps, ph, tint, $8,500. 284-4575. Blazer or Ford p/n. 7Ohp-88 outboard Sega CD w/13 gaies and ease. Eve dty ad $3,70/obO. 286-6328 1991 Fmrd BLotc It ps pbtca/ftt/ cstom weels, 2dr am/ftm ias, one motor, $150. 252-5853. cond, $400/o .284-3326. $982 Ctev Mmnte C.rto d cosd eats, XLf package. immeulIte ile owner 18k, $6,00h/eg. 287-5032. Dy pt 1974 Ranctero, $800: Dly pd C 2 exterior, $15,0(X/neg. 260-1433 1977 Pinto, $800. 283-3487. aumper shell for Toyota long bed, Sanyo CD. double cmtss player, like $285l. 2 r87 Tyota Cressida at, ps, ac. ksmded $300. 256-6815. new, portable, $150. Ja 285-5580. 1985 Isnzn Tdsoper It AM/fM russv 1 d hevy A -.Jw k. ,. a_ Drummid w/150 hp Merhery IBM-O cmhp, 386SX dual d.i0,1025 Imb get, $4,00 cng 2 w9425 jestianmp, 10"subsw/wotfers, twcee91 Ford Escot GT black l.400m. air, -ter. SS prop sism tabs and etras, Ramm, 50eg hd, VGA mouse, printer, 4rs. $3,000. 286-4096 after 6pm. act, ps, am11/fm1 eats, $8,581 252$9,710. 284-592. vsofmware, $5t0/obo. 287-4428. 1986NssaLarl-4/d nttais.g-spk mid, honest. reliable, h $9r24-5921, ---------a/c. p/ssp/a dp pd, pA/ $5,51Ns 2391989HondaAcordLX-grmy5-sipeed a82-2_ -working. Live-in/oam. Pay meg. 2211991 EvinRmde70w/tewpowerhead. Sanyo stereo music system. 2 cass 37 pac, craise control amt/fe/cavs. $8,500. 90 Nissan p/u etc coud, aland 1131. Imnludes all conmreos. 252-4848. players, record player, synthesizer, --_260-4697. mch more. 287-5582. .mode GXT 848 remioe control. $165. 9 268-4697. smelt mA/rC 287-558. -Span-spk lounsekeeper avail M-W-F. Sea too '92 Jet ski, iem cond, estras, 263-4671. ed win, AM/Flb, adtoy, ala/, .in 1990 Nissan Sunny speed, a/c, tow 82 BMW 528, gd cond, power packContact anytime. 287-6589. 60 hip, trailer. 9y pd, high pet-forw. ne 3,8/F,6-09K4, w niles. Great shape, $3,900.287-3895. age, U.S. specs, sun roof, $7,000/ieg. mnancearrnty, $3,999. 286-6333. GEVHSVCRwithremotegoodconmileage, $13,85a.236-0984. 286-6699. Looking for a seamstress, call me. -dition, $100/obo. 284-4921. 1973 SS Nova, 350 4BM, 373 R.E ,85 Che Cavalier. 4yl, auto leans, 4 284-5hpFrc ouardotor,21/2years g door, $2,000/obo. 284-6491. 89 Ford Tempo GL 39,000mi, loaded old runs grt, $600. 282-5630 after JC Penny color TV 25", remove cong gdcd,ye /backtipc cond, $5500/b. 284-4932 Spam-spk maid available now 225trot, floor model, $380. 286-4378. $5,000. 284-5564. 1978 Ford T-bird, 2dr, ac, am/fm/cd, -2221. Ask for Rosada. in. ___lo___$0.2-3 85'Pl 302 engine, gd condo. Not dty pd, Volvo 1990,740, auto, an/fm/cass, a/ .24' center console twin outboard enJVC video camera in perfect condi2 I outhreiatSE2dorope $1,800/obo. 252-2838. r, p/w, exe cond $9,500. 226-6341. Span-sk maid, live-out, honest, reli s Wzrohrs, triggers VHF ionincludes ca ag, tiod .auto trans. cruiseotro, no _able, gd ref. 252-1035.e tapes $7N0. 282-3924. A/C. dty free, $2,580. 226-22021991 Honda Civic 3 door, 16 valve, 88Ford Taurts, low mileage, exceond, da a, trai er. Macy new items, dty fuel inject, booming system, rant ex, $5,950. 252-5738. Hard working, Eng-spk lady seeks pd, $9,000/obo. 287-5178Apple 2E computer with games, best dependable, $2,750. 284-535. ask for Derek. 284-6137. employment 3 days F. Clayton only. 19' open fvsherman. Yamaha 90 1994 offer. 287-6174. ___ _____ _____ --77 Chevy Btiar4 wheel 350c.-itte, 287-4239 or 266-4280. -.w/30 hours. Fully loadd, $12,000. CD-ROM drive, mesmi, include, 1988 Cavalier, auto, 4door. dty pd 1990 Geo Tracker LSL, 4x4, ac, exa gd cord, many components, rebuilt/ intdface card, bes-m0, ainads perfect cond, $4,950/obo. 260-8575 cond,5sphardtop, cass,$9,999.287replaced. Auburn color $3,400. Call Eng-spkhousekeeper,honest,reliable, 5 -terface card, cables, installation and 5933 evenings 286-4030 mature, live-i/nout. References avail21' Cabin R mery cruiser 4 cyt other sofware. New & unused $225. --------------able. Gloria 224-9537. 289-5942 83' Ddge needs painmisig. Ft. pb, a2a Perkins diesel, sleeps two, ready for --radio cass player. Gd tires, $3,W0/ 1986 Tmurs 5spmew m/c, gemmi cod, 82 Ford E2scort, sunroof, 4sp, aV, ps, obo. 228-2643. dty pd, $6.000/oho. 269-5700. new paimit, tires and battery. Exeetlet Dependable babysitter for weekends fishing. $9,000/06o. 252-5180. Fall-ize Panasone VHS video cam-cond, $3,000. Not dty pd. 286-61 34. or evenings, prefer Albroek only. Ask era w/rae, Left or right hand opera1903 Volvo 240 stmtioc wagon all 1988 Moslero, at, loaded, diesel, dy for Stacy. 286-3478. 16' bo w/bp Evin Rude, sh findion., $6511. Call after Spin 287-4620. extras, dty pd, $4,000/obo. 269-2989. pd, $ 2,000/obo. 269-5700. 88 Jeep Comnanche 44 ac. ph, ps, am/_ er, roemling motor, and many extras, -----fm/cassette.m nw tires w/spo,[ wheels. Eng-sk day maid, 1-2 days a week. $4,t00/obo. 228-7924. Kenwood 120w. KL-7070 51-way, 4

PAGE 27

Tropic Times 2 1 -Classified Ads Sept.30 1994 BIL speakers, walnut: 161/2"x25"x111/2". Sofa, light blue, like new $600. 269digital timer an/fm iuner. 287-4182. fins, gloves, boots 101/2, snorkel and Qtrs 640B Howard 7am-noon. 287-4182. 5700. bag $150. 285-6874 Room 362. lMiscellaneous FSU textbooks, ECO 200) $,20; LA -s19Gmba-aldy Older amplifier, turntable, tuner. GE washer $350, Whirlpool 21cu ft 1093 both books for $13. Avail for Airless painter new condition $45. speakers, tape deck, $280. 223-4290 refrigerator $650. 228-4061. rU two. 2o4-4921. After 4p20 22-5872. Qtrs 2047 Curandu 8am. call evengs. -Kenmore washer/drye set $750/oba. Danish twin bed; Sony cmpart disk; Misc parts for small block Chevy; 2 Car seat, children's bed safety rails, Qurs 133A Howard 7-1 lam. 386sx 12flmr bd VGA monitor, $900. 284-5685. Sony Betamux; Danish entertainment BBL in-take manifold, 2 BBI curbs funtime infantseat $30;cowboy boots, 1525C Howurd 6am Call before noon 287-4735. set; danish DR w/china; SC word Pro(2ea), mirrors, brakes combination new auto bottle wanner. 252-2642. GE XL44 gas range, like new, hook cessor 80011T & printer. 236-0984. valve for '84 Cmao. 283-3485. 128B Howard 7ampm Nintendo with 5games$75.284-3696 ups included $350. 2602580. MR2car bra $40; oneGoodyearWranHuffy 18 speed mountain bike, like Radiator (2 core) for small block glertireP225/75R5wn,000mi $50; Qtrs 74B Howard 7-Ilam. Leading technology 386, 40mb hd. China cabinet 21/2yrs old, gd coud, new cond, $140. 252-5792. Chevy, fits many GM cars, $45; head Jeep round fog light $50. 287-4788. 2mb Ram, monitor, printer, mouse $500. 284-5338. castings for sI block Chevy, $20 814B Farfan 7am-noon. and software $850/obo. 284-3696. Water heater$75, wood table 80"x40 set. f-3485 Baby car seat, baby clothes girl 3-18 Q-sz waterbed $150. 284-3528. $130, store display cabinet -wooden s -mos, white 4pc comforter set Q-si. Qs 669A Howard 7am486DX 33, 8mb Ran, color printer, $120, computer stand $80, air purifier Chair link fence; 75ft x 5ft, includes 282-3776. SVGA monitor, over $1000 original Curtains, 10 windows for Howard $150. 226-8626/3278. posts and gates best offer. 252-2093. Qtrs 264A Abrook 7am-noon. software, 1440 modem, tape backup AFB, officers' qtrs, due to PCS. Only 5 HP submersible war pump for well and more $2,700/oba. 251-8227. I year old, $300/aba. 284-4394. Chevy pans, brake booster, alterna2 round tables $70ea or both for $100; 220 volts, I y old $1, 200 252-3356. for, likenew $225/$175obo. 252-6956Majesticcarradio/tapeplayer$50/obo; 13" TV/VCR combo w/ remote. New, Four piece sectional sofa with recliner mini trampoline $30. 286-4674. WOH 1023 FSU book eigth edition never used $400. 283-3694 6-9pnt. and Q-sz sofa sleeper. Mauve, blue Tread-mill-Pm-Fonn5.OA,$350.223World Civilizations $30. 260-3270. 1991 Cevy Blazer Bra, black in cotandeream $900. 284-3578 after6pm. 3645. 1/3k diamond solitaire ring w/ a a b c 6 TechnicsQuartzturnrable,directdrive; ..1ppkasia, ond $6li/abr .264 r, reasonably priced. 286-6439 $75. Kenwood a/v surround amp, German leather couch and lovescat Ofympic weight set & bench, like new aprasial, reMo rd $600/nba. 284237waths, like new, $350. 252-5829. $225. 287-4288. $250. 284-4381. m3d52. E-5orcycles I Cristian roommate topay forcible & 3 itIs 225R75x 5 oodearmad. El-S and up (civilian pref.). El JVC camcorder, case & battery $500. Washer/dryer $500. Before noon 284Orchids and misc plants. Call eve3 tires$ P5 R eetGoodyeuWran 1993 YabamaDT 125, dty pd,$,400. Dorado urea $223. 260-9818. Minolta x-7A camera with lens, flah 4 nings. Price varies. 232-1218. $50; 10. 252-5397. $200.n$152525320.bind MPOMC looking for muother and extripod,bag $130.Large wiudowblinds DRcoach multi color $800. 287-5921. Pioneer, mitni-compenent stereo sys2 new bus springs, tin, $S5ea 25289 Honda XL-600 Tram-ALP, 17k pecting mothers of twins for support $100. 284-6784. tem, rarntable & dual cass $450. Epson 2314 -mi, climb mountains. Gd cond, test group, Angela. 287-5889. Panasonic X-P1624 dot-matrix New enmore g cap washer & dryer Action U laser printer, emulates HP ride, $3,300/nba. 260-9899. priterwidebody $250. Logitcbatnd wbite, beavy duty, $500. 286-6293. IIP, like new, $650/obo. 283-3220. 12x15 carpet $150; 3pe suitcase $50; 1978 awasaki 650 Bi needs little an Zone stamps for collector. 287scanner, 256 gray scale $200. 252Indoor/outdoor plants, cheap. 287American Perfection 200 T round.plants; baby bassinet $45. 287-6373. work, dty pd, ask for Hill, leave mesglass9-369 Seamstress to sew at my bome. Must 5829. 4546. glass counter top hot air flow oven. Eng 1101 FSU, third edition, The sage, $900. 284-3669. Save ref. esp in making clothes and Lptp computer ./WordPerfect 5. 1, Couch, loveseLt, chair pastel, f L cooking $0. AT&T 1587 Bedford Handbook For Writers $15. 1981 Yamaha, 110000, gd cond, curtains. Lve msg. 287-6538. Windows and Rightwriter installed I needs some meaning, $400.287-4534. phone/answer system, $65. 283-3220. 260-3270. $1,800/neg. 286-6699. -mo old, $1,600. 283-5617. Scooter, reliable trms, needed for PCs Craft table w/chair $78. 223-4290 Weider power stack, 2001bs, benh Woman's bike $100; woman's dress 1993 Honda CB 250 Nighthawk transition, will ens $400/neg. 282IBM PC comp, 40mg hd, 51/4 floppy, evenings. press, 4 stations, new $375. 203363. boots size 81/2 $45. 287-6672. 426mi, new bike helmet and gloves 4696, monitor, joystick, mouse, word proPatricia -Where are you? 269-9622. Girl's Huffy s d whit h ight incl, $2,00. 286-3399. cessor, games, more, $350. 284-3184. Queen size bed w/6 built in drawers, ffy pd, e, pearb, e 8 Older woman far live-in maid to care Samsungqueen mattress $200. 287-4690 Personal weight system, gd cond, green color, gd cond $65. 287-5678. 1990 Kawasaki ZR 550 new tires and for ur. school age child& housekeeptems reue, ex cornd, $300. 232Trees, bushes, plants audcuttings. Pig $100. 287-3629. Bedroom blinds for Currundu flats 1 brakes, looks gd, 17,000 mi, $1,700. ing w/refs. 269-9622. tem, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ dr remde Ix tadu3pe3rebse, lnsadcttns i o urn as 5419. trees, smallbushes $5$15. 2864184. 2 cymbals, paiste 18" crash and 10" dark red, 8 taupe; king sire waterbed 287-3625. Responsible female to sbare Ig apartComputers, printers, far marines, ppe LR set, gsry, great rand $500/ staloh, ask for Paul, $200. 287-5651. sheets. 286-4222. d1976 Mnt a 3 CadaTrials bike. ment 50th St, w/ouple $268mo. 269gBM, Wang, Panasonic, great equipobo. 234-5419. Coupon for weekend at Las Sirenas Women's shes size 8, 81/2, 9, wowt 5 pre pors $555/obo. 2610075 :30-9pm ment, great prices. 230-8808. G beach cabins in Santa Clara $100. men's exercise clothes, win valances, -Interestedinbuyingcomibooks from GE 19.6cuftrefrigw/instdetce maker 252-1257. 7pe, 6pe crib steet sets. 287-4788. Susuki trait copper 50cc, $500. 2851931-1961 callM-Pafter6pm-askfor Teehnics CD player model SL-P102 $750; 4pe BR, solid pine w/dresser, 4690 RI 63-96 w/remote, exc cond, $100/neg. 287lighted hutch $1,000. 252-1257. Fence 6'x125' with post & gate. You 61/2' artificial Christmas tree w/stand. 4690. oy. 263-3906 5776. take down $400/obo. 2864933. Non-flammable material, $65. 2561987 Yamaba 200cr motorcycle (U.S. Bilingual shampoo girl, honest & retiDR set, 6 ebairs $200; GE no frost 6356. spec) dty pd, gd cond, low mileage able 3 days wk or more. 260-4857. Audiovox car stereo sys w/deachable refrigerator $300. 230-1886. Scuba tak, BC, and misc gear, due to 5OBTU rom a/c n $325. 283$1,000 286-4628. face, ex rand, $150/neg. 287-5776. PCS an no free .24-434. 369 T room /FT bilingual maid w/ref for housekeep Coneb/built-in recliner, NES DestiPSadn retmng 8-34 3694 6-9pm. -& ebildeare. Atlantic 289-3238. SNES, Super Metroid $125. Genesis nation Earthstar $10; SNES Mario Teenagers, young adults stlyish cloth0 Patio Sales w/3 games $150. 285-6874 Rio 302. $10, Mortal Kombat $40 and Star Fox ing ($10-$S), assorted baby items 0-speed man's mountain bike w/ Need used refrigerator in gd cond Computer,$dualdiskdri n 25. 286-4674. and electric breast pump. 284-3197. child's carrier $130; gas grill used (Atlantic side) 243-5269. Cadputeodta diskidriv, CPU, oound2and28squar-,$10a. Hardwoo beasb typ banging $55; nbe for both items. 287-4527. Qtrs 129B, Albrook 7am-noon. Two itor, printer, games and software inFans, 2 round and a square $lveaa Hardwood bench type hangingswing, family sale. Buebl house Gorgona or Coronado eluded, $400. 286-4378. 260-9303. like new, $85. 228-4514.Dave Drms for Nov 20-21. 223-4766 after 5pm. Real Estate Course $200; Cable box Qtrs 264B Abrook. Saturday 8 till ? Tandy OOORL comp, color monitor, Blue curtains $15, Kenmore micraMobile home, double wide, 3 bed(Zenith) $300; Cable antennae & wire Hockey players, street or rolerblade, enhanced keyboard w/star NX-1001 wave $175, swing set $50. 252-1237. rooms, 2 full bods,central a/c, burglar $200. 252-2344. Qtrs 2351A Balbax. own stick a plus, Bob. 284-6281. multi-font printer $450. Kenwood bus throughout $30,000 286-3773 speakers set 800watt $80. 287-4281. 5 piece sectional with 2 recliners & 4Goodyear 11.50x3x15wranglerAT Qus 855A Clayton 7-I lam. Bilingual maid w/ref, maWre, housequeen sine hide-a-bed southwest deLawn mower-4.0 litre engine 20in cut, tires on Ford factory mags $450. 260work, gd w/kids, $100/mo. 286-3690. 486 DX2/66, 8mb Ram, 420 rb bd, sign $600. Pacific Hills 100 MH 20A. catch bag, adjustable wheels, Sears 9058. Qtrs 686A Clayton 7-Itam mouse, fax/modem, software, SVGA ..Craftsman new, $200. 287-4428. Qurs 309B Clayton gam-non. No eaSwing-set in gd cnd, will pay up to monitor, double CD Ram, 166 soundSofa sleeper, queen size, mner spring Wedding gown, veil, 3 ring wedding $50. Ask fo Emili. 284-4821. card, speakers $2,800/oba. 283-5391. mattress, $690; oversized glider rockArmy blues-female, s 16R, jacket, set, more extras. Paid $3,000 will sell ly birds. errertiner,tooksnew,$290.286-3223. skirt, white blouse, $90, wore once. everything for $1,000. 286-6134. Qtrs 643B Clayton multi family 7 Stamp collectors, I buy & sell U.S. H 24,000 National a/c $375; 19,000 287-5291. Danish white lamp for comer table I tam stamps 286-4873. Freidricha/c $350;6, GE a/c $165 5spd trussimission 87-88 Ford Escort $60; beautiful plants all sizes/prices. Qrrs 684C Clayton Gd cond sewing machine, color TV to 252-2287. 250 & C-4 Ford transmission heads 236-0984. play Nintendo only. 286-4790_ BR set, oak/antique pecan finish, tall and btock2.8L Fordengine.228-4060. Qrs 248B Abrook 7am-noon. chest, 2nightstands, dresser& mirror, Antique upright grand piano, plays Keyplayer, model Casio Tone MTQtr 2489 Albrook am-non. Teenage American babysitters in (te full/queen beadboard, $1,800. Queen but needs work $500; 3'x3' floor pilCraftsman router w/case, 11/2 HP, 105 $40. 260-3485. Qtrs 288B Albrook 8am-noon,no earAltos de Betania area, occassional mat/springs,like new, $400.283-3220. lows $5ea; used VHS, Beta tapes $.50 micro depth adjustment, w/16 piece ly birds, babysitting fr 2&4yr.Ods. 261-6492. each. 232-2344. bit set. One yr old, $100. 289-4082. Cleaning and repair for a/ces of houses Lazy-Boy recliner, blue velour, $450. and cars, low prices. 228-0201. 6550 Los Rios 7-1lam. Typewrter Eng or Span for student, Beige 18" commercial carpet squaresGirls bedroom set, sofa bed, coffee A large cage for sale, 5 feet tall 3 feet reasonably priced. 252-2355. great for family room/maid's room/ and side tables, walt unit, TV, bicycles wide 2 feet deep, $110. 284-418. Lady's 3-tone 18k gold bracelet 48.2 Qrs 27A Amador 7-lOam. work area/church, $1a. 283-3220. and stereo set. 287-4877. grams, I inch wide, cartier design Hitch for Blazer type III 2,500Meade 10" telescope SCT, many e$1,350/ieg. 252-2370. Qtrs770C Brnceby-Balboa7-9:3am. 3,5001bs. 226-2885. Babycrib, Americanmadesolid wood, Wall unit, curtain for clop qtrs, umtras. Ee cornd, gd optics. Reasonable white, classic style, $150. 286-4589. brella for outdoor furniture, pionear offer. 284-3692. Aquarium20gal, w/black gravel, Qtrs 541C Clayton 8a-soon. Gardener/andyman. 226-5436. 150w speakers. 230-1927. --undcrgravel filter, ptip and filters, Maytag washer and dryer, extra large Bench press wilb set of weights and Accessories available $50. 252-5872 Qrs 219A Albrook 7am-noon. Live-in maid Mon-Sat. Take care of 3 capacity, like new $900. 287-5038. Coffee ible and 2 end tbles, modern bar, $100/nba. 228-1334. r kids, cook, clean, SI imo. 252-5036. (uetal and glass) $200 set. 252--6844. Carpet cleaning equipment -sieamers Exrp uph1ls0 and car custayiizer to Mauve sofa in good cond, 11/2 yrs old Briggs stratton lawnmower, 3.5HP 22 $550, shampoo machine $650. 230Qfr 278B Albrock 7-1lam. work with me, ask for SSG Ellison. $200. 286-4576. Black door refrigerator/freezer Whirlinches, $90. 260-7582. 0008. Q 28 235-904T pool $600. 285-5601. Qtrs 843A Clayton 7aui-noon. Black couch with 2 matching chairs Child's security gate, $15. 284-6199. Portable car ramps $40; Radio Shack U.S. mail to Panama prior to 1925, I $1,000. Wood entertainment renter, 6,000 BTU a/c good condition $190. electronic parts $80; Judo suit $10; Qtrs 451 A Amador 7-I lan.U dresser, rolltop desk, more. 264-1697. 256-6830. Sports cards and Desert Storm cards rattan wine rack $10; antique tools. --pay casb or trade. 286-4873.1 for sale. Reasonable. 283-4349. 252-2042. Qtrs 1996B Curnd 2pm today and Responsible smaid w/refs to cook. gn Small wood Canal Zone desk, good Lg sofa and loveet .erstuffed 7am Saturday. os lain 2-09 cand, $100. 252-1174. $1,100. 260-7025. 4 new tires 185/60RI3 4160. 282Paris for 1974 Grand Torino, ask a Stry.ouse cleaning. 223-1069. Room divider $160. 260-5336, 9x12 rags one blue and one mauve 39.__ Enriqle 235-9047. Qrs 1981A Cumudo 7-1 aw. $30 each. 261-0492. FSU 11011 work in progress book. Git Sitorkeling equip used oncemask, Qirs 5064A Diablo. or yours, must swak Eng. 260-1958. Custom leather recliner, designed for cnd used only once. Neg. 287-4438. tall person, one leather lounge chair, Light bi carpet t0xI I $40. 287-4234. both brown, $4OOea. 287-5038. Singrsewingimarhine,32siichi$l50; Refrig,stove, frezersrt,$1,100.283baby clothes/inis vary. 284-4885. LR set w/4 tbis $4%0 LR set w/I ffbl 3487. _--~_ Titopic Tim es Ad Form $475. DR set w/4 chairs $400. Bar set Dinette with 3 chairs $75; toddler car w/bigh chairs $380. 252-2883. New blk laquer home entertainment seat $20; bassinette $30;boxofmaserL ANIMALS center with encyclopediacabinets and y clothes $30; small dog kenel A MOL Man's mounlin bike, 26" 18 speeds, glass door $300/obo. 269-4084. $2. ot-4474. 3 AUTOMOBILES good rand, $65. 287-3223. -2 AVAILABLE DR set w/4 chairs $200/nba, portable PCC books, 500 Word Theme for Eug D BOATS & CAMPERS 3 piece BR set, bench with weights, dishwasher $150/obo. 284-3538. Cump I $20, 10 Steps to Writing $5, L ELECTRONICS PRICE HOME PHONE toilet trainer, infant toys. 287-587C 21 bamboosetteeseats, 2persuon$80a., Intro to Computers $20. 287-3342. D FOUND Oak cocktail table and 2 end table set, patio table $50. 261-3325. Selling snap-on tool sets at half their w HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each exu cond $350. 287-3629. book price. Blue-point extractor set w LOST week are allowed. Fach ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited Luxury solid oak DR set 4 chairs, 14 $135. 286-4184 E] MISCELLANEOUS more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed LargeKenmoremicrowaveoven$150. mos old, like new $850. 229-2916. -MOTORCYCLES below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This 233-6096. For sale baby playpen $40; small ZrD PATIO SALES information will not be released to third parties. Deadline forthe receipt Lost nith color TV $80; Zenith color TV D WANTED of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are ran on a space PaxA s13" remote $140; Almiral vertial availablebasisand thestaffmakes no guarantee ofads running. Adsmust $200/obo. 284-3392. USMA '89 class ring. White gold w/ freezer 16.7cf $500. 286-4023 -include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to Ibe Tropic Times. Q-size bed w/friam $200, BR dressblue saphire and diamond. Reward. Whirlpool dishwasher, portable $200. Unit0936, APOAA 34002ordepositrd in adrop box at the Albrook Post ers solid wood$150, mirrorsfull length 263-9882. 286-4023. Office. Ads offering weapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not be dour $10. 287-4888. rUn. -Dog -Germian shepherd/Lab, female, Tires 2-245/45zrx16, 4-195/50x15,4Sofa, exe cond, $750. 228-4514. brown and tan. Reward. 252-2476. 205f70x14 other size by order, $20 SPONSOR'S NA E RAN K/GRADE Computer desk $120, small entertainKitten on Fort Clayton tear Reader and up. 252-2792. ----------ment center $150, 2 matching blue Fitness Center. answers to the tate Whirlpool washtr& dryerheavy duty ORG. DUTY PHONE Queen Anne chairs $500. 287-5021. Skipper. 285-6112 (sell as set only) exc cand; Pionerrj

PAGE 28

1 Tropic Timesotpourri B12 Sept. 30, 1994 HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214f fsiry Hames and clu cardrawns. claiming veteran preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming education and a copy of CASP no*Officers' Club: 282-3439 Italian dinner special in the dining room. tice of rating if applicable. Submit a copy of latest SFThe club will be closed to the public for renovations Fajita junction 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday. Beef or chicken 50 if you are a Federal employee, through Nov. 20. Check cashing service for members will be fajitas in the dining room. For more information regarding Army vacancy anavailable 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday through Friday. AdditionDining room is closed Sunday through Thursday. nouncements (forms required, job related criteria, ally, a snack wagon will be available for short orders and *Howard Enlisted Members' Club -Dining Room: etc.), visit the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Buildduring lunch hours 11:30 a.m.-l:3p m Sunday breakfast buffet 8-12:30 a.m. ing 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 285-5201. Amador Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30 *Note: One-on-one employment counseling should a.m. Saturday. be the first step in the job search. *Club Amador: 2824334 New sandwich bar for lunch open daily. Homemade SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at NMAll-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring roast beef, turkey, turkey salad anid tuna fish sandwiches with 5 level and above require specialized experience. Spesoup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights. all the tirramings. cialized experience is either education above the high Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno Saturday night gourmet specials 5:30-9 p.m. Saturdays. school level or work experience directly related to the at noon the first Sunday of each month. Take someone special to dinner featuring tableside preparaposition being filled. Example: Budget positions at or All-you-can-eat spaghetti lunch Wednesdays, $3.95. tion with tuxedo service. above the NM-5 level required Budget experience or The club will open for lunch Mondays-Fridays during Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Select a equivalent education. renovations of the Quary Heights Officers' Club. cut and order a New York strip, ribeye or filet. All steaks are Vacancy announcements are also available at the Clayton U.S. choice beef. Sundial Recreation Center. *The Loop: 287-3035 Family menu Tuesdays-Fridays featuring all the past faDirectorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting apCJ's Sports Bar daily lunch specials 11:30 a m.-I p m. vorites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand made 1/ plications on a continuous basis for the following posiMondays-Fridays. The bar and grill now opens noon Satur2 pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more. tions. Registersestablished from theseannouncements days-Sundays for football game viewing and at 3:30 p.m. Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or will be used to fill permanent and temporary positions. Sundays pool tournaments. take-out. Try the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wedneswings. VIN 001 General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill mosI clerical days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sunday. *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom : 284position).yj p.uy.48 VB#00lA General Clerical, NM4 (Used to fil most clerical For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or CJ's 4189 ps tion)Sports Bar, call 2874716 or send a fax to 287-4343. Friday mght disco 4:30 p.m.1 a.m. today. VB# 002 *Sales Storw Clleker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch) *NCO Club: 287-4716 *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove: CASPExamination (CEO, noliceof rating) is require. The Forum Restaurant opens 5-9 p.m. daily. 284-4189 VIM 003 teereston Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Cut + 6 Mexican buffet Mondays. Country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays. aureereation ap itn fi erd. Steak night Tuesdays. A la carte menu is available. Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m-I a.m. VB#004 Recreatn AssintanlNM-4(quires6mooecrationexp Country buffet Wednesdays features barbecue pork ribs, Monday night football and mug special in the lounge. in the field. VB# 005 Secrciary (Stenography), NM-5 fried chicken, pork knuckles, collards greens, sweet potato, Snack on complimentary hot dogs, popcorn and nachos. VB#005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6 rice, black-eyed peas and corn bread. Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 8 p.m. Tuesdays. VB# 006 Secretary (rypinjgOffice Automation), NM-S All-you-can-eat family buffet Thursdays Free Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. VB# 006A Secretary (Typng Oflffcc Automation), NM4 Seafood buffet Fridays. Try the broiled lobster, garlic Wednesdays in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancVBN 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5. Limited to shrimp, deep fried corvina and stuffed crab. ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until mida0A A. m sitr services Aoyt, NM4. Linied to 12-oz prime rib special Saturdays. night. permanent status employees only. Sunday buffet 4-8 p.m. Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with -The following positions are Pemfemp, Fell-time, Part-time, Free country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Sunyour favorite draft beverage and go back for refills. Intermrtrent. days and Mondays. Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays; 5 p.m.Disco 9 p.m. Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. There midnight Thursdays. VU 007 CLINICAL NURSE, (N I2ens required), NM-91101 will be a midnight buffet. Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. IL AlBC Er, *Top Three Club: 2844189 VBN 009 PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required), NM-5. brook Karaoke 6 p.m. Fridays. 1VB0019 **EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, NM-640-41 *Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582 Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesdays. Free all-you-can-eat and Club closes after lunch the first Tuesday of each month complimentary taco bar. **Selectees for nuse, medical officer and EMT positions required a for maintenance. .Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. Members backgroml chedit. Tonight's entertainment karaoke in the lounge and club must have a card and be present to win. card drawing. Club closed Saturdays. WorIdwidte and lecal announcement. OPEN: 09-30-94 Steak night 6-9 p.m. Fridays. Choose from rib eye, K.C. WW483-94-MH PLANS AND PROGRAMS COORDINATOR, GS-301strip, filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked Rodman 11. SENSITIVE. gQ, USSOUTHCOM, US Military Linison Office, potato, French fries or rice. *Rodman Club -Open to all ranks: 283-4498 arasilia See, Brazil NOTE:. Secui-ty clerne 6s required. Applications will he accepted frn Federal employee and non-status applicants (to Prime rib dinner, 6-9 p.m. Saturday. Menu also inSocial hour 3:30-11 p.m. Fridays at the Laguna Lounge. appointed as an overseas limited appointment). eludes: Cream of broccoli soup, garden salad, 12 oz. prime Complimentary hors d'oeuvres served 5-7 p.m. CLOSES: 10-25-94. rib, baked potato, baby carrots, and sherbert. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 am.--Sunday saloon breakfast specials 10 am.-I p.m. in the p.m. Mondays-Fridays. VB# VACANCIES, TITLE AND LOCATION. OPEN: 09-30lounge. Choose from three menus. Monday night football 6 p.m. until game ends with all94 CLOSE: 10-11-94 Sunday champagne brunch 10 am.-I p.m. in the dinyou-can-eat taco bar at the Laguna Lounge. Paci Uing room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Grill menu 443A-94-SS PLUMBER SUPERVISOR, MS-4206-10. USAG, DEB, French toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-and-eat is also available. Oper Div., CorzaL NOTE: Driver's license required. shrimp, desserts and ice cream bar. All-you-can-eat beef and burgundy 4:30-8:30 p.m. 473-94-ES SPEECH PATHOLOGIST, NM-65-9. USA MEDDAC, Mongolian barbecue 5:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Choose Wednesdays. Grill menu is also available. GACH, Dept of Pedinlrics, EFMP C -inic,6Ancon. the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have chefs do the Open Mike night 6-11 p.m. Thursday in the Laguna job outside on the open grills. Enjoy live music. LOn e. 433A-94-NC INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECH, NM-995-7819. Oriental night 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Coung. USAG-DEH, Resou.e Div., System Br., CorozaL Mexican night buffet 6:30-8 p.m. Thursdaysook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday 474-94-NC EMPLOYEE RELATIONS ASSISTANT (OA), NM-203-6 tacos, fajitas, taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. After dinat the Rodman Bohin. Dev 7. TEMP NTE: 1 YR. USAG, DCP, LED Div, Corozal. NOTE: Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. Bilingual. Position is developmental to NM-7, selection of temporary at ner dance the night way to country western music. Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 6-9 NM-6 will require competition for the NM-7. Country western night Thursdays with free dance les475-94-NC PASSENGER RATE ASSISTANT (OA), NM-2133-5. DOL sons at 7:30-10:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples p~m. Fridays-Saturdays. TRANS Div, Ft. ClaytoSS .NOTE: Qualified typist. dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. 9 p.m. Fridays-Sundays. T~~~tANS~~ Divm, FFrlayon.NOT:SQaliiedtypst 476-94-ES (8) DENTAL OFFICERS, NM-68W-1-. TEMP NTE: 6 Mo. Howard *Rodman Annex: 283-4498 Joint Task Force, Safe Haven, Camp OneNOTE: Bilingual. Part-time' *Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718 Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays. Panamanian license required. Weekday lunches includes buffet, salad and potato bar. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu II a.m.47794-ES BIOLOGICAL SPECIMEN COLLECTOR, MG-5001-5. Friday and Saturday nights 6-8:30 p.m. order a la carte 1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. EmoNmlogy Sec, Ano. in the dining room. The club is closed for evening and weekend service. 478-943H INTELLIGENCE SPECIALIST (OPERATIONS), GS-13211. SENSITIVE. INSCOM, 470th Military Intel Brigade, Coronal. NOTE: Security Clearance is required. Fatty Bilingual Driver's license required. in addition to meeting the abov requirements applicants most A r sc ed l meet OPM standards for language specialist series GS-1040 (experience in translating, interpreting both in English and Spanish. 479-94-111 SUPERVISORY MEDIA INFORMATION SPEC, NM-1011The Southern Command Network's 11:35pm KSFO Spoits Byline USA 1:35am KSFO Sports Byline USA 1.SENSITIVE. SOUTHCOM, Directorate of Operations (SCJ3), AM Radio station features America's 7:35am The Law Show Quarry Heights. NOTE: Security clearance is required. most-listened to radio programs. Live Monday 8:35am Technovation 4R0-94-KF SECRETARY (STENO), NM-318-7. SENSITIVE, coverage of breaking news stories and 1:05am NPRs Canalk 1:30pm A Matter of Health USSOUTHCOM, Public Affairs Dirctorate, Quarry Height. NOTE: Top Secret clearance is required. Qualified typist. Bilingual. special events are provided. 3:30am NPR's Living On Earth Friday 481-94-31 SECRETARY (STENO/OA), NM-318-8. SENSITIVE. SCN AM Radio AM 790 Pacific and 7:30am Whas the Stoy 1:35am KSFO Sports Byline USA USARSO, DeputyCommanderforSupport,F.Clayton.NOTE: Security AM 1420 Atlantic are the news, sports 8:05a On Compuers 7:35am American Montage clearance is required. Qualified typist & stenographer. and information station. 1:30am Robert/JamesExchange 8:35am The Book Show 482-94-EL INTELLIGENCE SPEC (OPNS SPT), GS-132-9. 1:30pm Georgetown University FoSENSITIVE. USARSO, DCSINT,Ft. Clayton. NOTE: Securityclearance Tuesday in is requUd. Blngual. Monday-Friday 1:35am KSFO Sports Byline USA Saturday NOTE: DR-466-A-94-KF and DB467-A-944-H ar amended to delete 5am National Public Radio Morning 7:35am AP Portfolio 35am KSFO Sports Byline USA Temp NTE 09-3095. Edition 8:35am The Environment Show 3 O rs 9:54am Paul Harvey News 1:30pm Soundings 7a um NPR's Weekend Edition Air Force Club 11am The Rush Limbaugh Show 8:35pm AP Special Assignment 10:05am NPR's Cartalk Air orceClub12:05pm Paul Harvey News and ComThe Howard Eslisted Members' Club announces job openings. All 10 P Hay w nC interested applicants must submit an Application for Nonapprorprinted mentary (Repeal 1:17 p.m.) Sunday Employment, AF Form 1701, available at the Human Resources Offce, 2:05pm Paul Harvey Rest of the Stoy 1:05am Focus on the Family Building 708, Howard AFB, Panama. (Repeats 10:05pm) 1:35am KSFO Sports Byline USA 2:15am NPR's 51 Percent WF-7405-I Bartender. Salary ranges from $3 to $7.25 an hour. 4pm NPR's All Thing Considered 7:35am The Best of Our Knowledge 4 05am NPR's Cartalk 6:05pm American Public Radio's 8:35am The Health Show 5:05am Monitor radio WF-4749-I1 Cook. Salary ranges from $5.44-1L46 an hour. Marketplace 1:30pm Social Thought 7am NPR's Weekend Edition