Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
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Full Text




Gift Panama Canal Museum


T ropic

Quarry Heights, Rep


T times

public of Panama Friday, Aug. 12,1994


'My Place' off limits Helping out in emergencies
FORT CLAYTON(USARSOPAO)-The club Red Cross direct
"My Place" in Panama City has been added to the
list of establishments off limits to military members FORT CLAYTON (USARSO
and their families, officials said. PAO) - Kay Walton, the director of
Off limits areas andestablishments are identified Service Armed Forces Operations .* '1'.5 4
to help maintain discipline and an appropriate level of the American Red Cross visited ,:,
of health, morale and safety for U.S. military sta- the Red Cross offices on U.S. mili-
tioned or visiting here, officials said. These restric- tary installations this week.
tions help prevent military members from being During an interview with the lo-
exposed to crime or becoming victims of criminal cal media, she explained the reason
activity, for her visit.
All U.S. military are prohibited from entering "My purpose is to visit the Red
these areas or establishments by regulation and are Cross paid staff and volunteers
subject to disciplinary action for violation of the off here...to get a better feel for the kind
limits policy, officials said. of programs and services we are
For more information about off limits areas or offering to the members of the mili-
establishments, call 287-3402. tary and their families in Panama
and to meet with the senior com-
Shooting clarified mands to find out about the draw- Walton
down plans, so we can ensure that
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - In the RedCrossservicesareherethroughoutthetimethemilitary
July 29 issue of Tropic Times, it was reported that remains in Panama."
a U.S. soldier from the 193rd Infantry Brigade Walton also talked about the Red Cross mission in
(Light) had been shot in the leg by a Panamanian Panama and how the drawdown will affect it.
window washer on TumbaMuerto. The soldier was "It's very important that we remain constant in our
treated and released from Gorgas Army Commu- services," she said.
nity Hospital. Walton said the primary services of the Red Cross are
Further investigation has revealed that the Pana- the delivery of emergency communications to members of
manian, contrary to initial information, was not the the military and their families involving death or serious
person who caused the injury. illness of a family member, verification of an emergency in
The incident is still under investigation, order to assist the military command in emergency leave
____decisions related to the servicemembers, and financial


Army forms new council for

labor-management issues


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
COROZAL - The U.S. Army Panama
Labor - Management Partnership Council,
a new approach to problem solving and
addressing issues between management and
unions representing the civilian work force
in U.S. Army South, is now up and running,
officials said.
Through this new council, labor and
management meet and discuss issues and
make recommendations to decision makers
so the mission can be met in the most
efficient and effective mannerpossible, said
Samuel McGuinness, Labor Relations offi-
cer.
"We want to promote the partnership
concept, improve communication skills,
team spirit and understanding between la-
bor and management," he said. "The coun-
cil will use an interest-based decision mak-
ing process which involves all participants.
"Communication is the essential ingre-
dient in the partnership," McGuinness said.
"Communication must be comprehensive,
all inclusive and free-flowing."
The council, which includes 10 man-
agement representatives and 10 labor rep-
resentatives, meets once each month to
discuss the needs, problems and issues con-
cerning both. Through this forum, the groups
work together to find solutions and com-
mon ground that benefits and represents
both labor and management, McGuinness
said.
"The council includes people from U.S.
Army activities, the Panama Department of


Air Force marksmen compete for
coveted bronze badge during pis-
tol match.


Defense Employee's Coalition and the Dis-
trictNumberFour, Marine Engineers' Ben-
eficial Association," he said. "By working
together on issues, we can provide informa-
tion to the commander to help him make
informed decisions that are agreeable to all
concerned."
With all parties being involved from the
very beginning, the solutions agreed upon
through the council will ensure maintaining
a high quality of life for the civilian work
force while continuing to meet the mission,
McGuinness said.
"This will be especially important as the
work force gets smaller," he said. "We are
all going to zero, that's a fact. But now, the
unions can see from the ground up how the
workforce reduction works."
Also, through the council, both manage-
ment and labor representatives are getting
the same information at the same time,
McGuinness said. In this way, time and
effort is saved and everyone concerned
knows from the start what's going on.
In addition to the council, organizations
within USARSO can set up Functional
Partnership Teams with both union and
management representatives that can make
decisions and do what is needed to accom-
plish the mission, he said.
"Problems should be solved at the low-
est level possible," McGuinness said.
Through these teams, many.issues and prob-
lems may be solved at the organizational
level.
"The bottom line is that we are one
committee with. one goal," he said. "We
will accomplish the mission as a team."


The 1994 Soldiers Show wows au-
dience with high energy song and
dance routines.


tor visits Panama
assistance to allow them return
home if they have to, on emer-
gency leave.
Walton said the mission of
- the Red Cross affects the quality
of life for people stationed in
Panama.
"I think quality of life is cer-
.tainly an issue that is important to
any major command and I know
that it is here. I believe that the
services be provided helping en-
sure that service members' mo-
rale is high and that they feel con-
fidenttheycan have effective com-
' munications with members of their
family when they're in an area
separated like this physically and when there is not as
adequate, sometimes, communications as we get back
home... plus, the morale is better for service members and
families who feel more comfortable - that assists them to
hopefully focus on the mission."
After reviewing the Red Cross services in Panama, and
the reactions from servicemembers and their commanders,
Walton is pleased with the performance of the offices here.
"Everything that I am hearing is that the Red Cross
services are highly valued and they're being provided very
well and there's a very strong desire that we remain here as
long as we have military and their families stationed here.
It's been very positive."


*Briefly, Page 2.
*Military pay raise, Page 5.
+USARSO hoops, Page 13.


I


Happy anniversary Tropic Times file photo

The La Gallega passes through the Pedro Miguel Locks. This vessel
is one of more than 700,000 that have passed through the Panama
Canal since its first official transit in 1914. The Panama Canal
celebrates its 80th anniversary Monday. See story and photo on
Page 11.









Tropic Times
Aug. 12, 1994


Tropic Times late?
Call 269-3220
People who live in quarters on a Pacific
area military installation and have not re-
ceived a Tropic Times by 8 a.m. Friday
should call 269-3220.

Payment drop boxes for
Miami Herald available
Drop boxes for Miami Herald subscrip-
tion payments have been placed in the post
offices on Quarry Heights, Albrook,
Howard and Fort Clayton.

Adoption orientation
briefing slated
Social Work Services at Gorgas Army
Community Hospital will hold an adoption
orientation briefing 1:30-3:30 p.m. Aug.
24 in the Gorgas headquarters conference
room, first floor. For more information,
call Patricia Thomas at 282-5139/5404.

Mentors for Youth 2000
needed at local schools
The Howard Family Support Center is
launching Youth 2000, a mentoring pro-
gram designed to assist and motivate 6th-
to 12th-grade students in local Department
of Defense Dependents Schools. The FSC
is actively seeking officers, noncommis-
sioned officers and civilians who would
like to become positive, inspirational role
models to students.
Mentors must commit a minimum of
one hour per week to the Youth 2000 pro-
gram. Mentors may help with assignments,
explain their work processes or just talk
and listen to the students. Locally, school
begins Aug. 25 and Youth 2000 officials
would like to have as many mentors as
possible available to interact with eager
young students. To volunteer, or for more
information, call 284-5650.

Needy children ask for
early Christmas blessing
The Panama Chief Master Sergeant's
Group is sponsoring a clothing and toy
drive on behalf of the Kuna Indian or-
phans. The Chiefs and some of the Kuna
children will be in front of the Howard
Post Office from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 20
accepting donations.
The chiefs will clean and repair all gifts
(as needed) and give them as presents from
Santa Claus during the Kuna Children's
Christmas Party at the Howard Enlisted
Club in December.


Jam '94 celebration
seeks booth vendors
Booth rentals for vendors or for organi-
zations are available at the Rodman NS La-
bor Day celebration Jam '94. Jam '94 will
take place 9 a.m.-l 1 p.m. Sept. 3. Cost is
$50 for a 10' x 10' space. Call 283-4334 or
283-4314 for information. Sign-up at
Building 65 from 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.


L Briefly
-- *-. e


Puerto Rico has been removed
from the Environmental Morale
Leave Program. For more Infor-
mation, call 284-5758.
Saturday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB
Savannah, GA (A)
1:55pm C5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC
Sunday
7am B727 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP, GA
Charleston IAP, SC (C)
Monday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa, Honduras(CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)


FSC offers transition
seminar to members
The Howard Family Support Center is
offering a transition seminar 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Aug. 31-Sept. 2 at the FSC.
The three-day training program helps
separating military members and their
families make the transition from the mili-
tary to a civilian career. For more infor-
mation or to register, call 284-5650. For
more personalized, individual assistance,
members may make an appointment by
calling 284-3865/4347.

DoDDS urges immediate
registration for children
All newly arriving personnel are en-
couraged to enroll their school age family
members immediately. Take immuniza-
tion records, letter of sponsorship or per-
manent change of station orders and iden-
tification cards to the school.
Kindergarten children who will be 5
years old by Oct. 31 will need a birth cer-
tificate or passport in addition to the above
documents.

Panama Canal College
opens fall registration
Registration for Panama Canal college
is set for 9 a.m.-I p.m. and 2:30-5 p.m.
Aug. 22-24. Registration will be in the au-
ditorium. For information, call 252-3304.

First aid, safety course
offered to community
A community first aid and safety
course will be held 6-10 p.m. Tuesday-
Thursday. Learn adult, infant, child CPR,
first aid and safety. For information, call
Abbe Lester at 287-5509.

Materials ordered for
Air Force colleges are in
Officials at the Howard Education Of-
fice advise military members enrolled in
the Air Command and Staff College or the
Air War College that previously-ordered
course materials have arrived. Seminar
students may stop by the education office
and pick up their materials as soon as pos-


Weekend weather
Factoid: In a belt along the equator (between 35 N and
35 S), there are 3,200 thunderstorms each night, some of
which can be heard 18 miles away.
Weather questions can be sent to 24th Weather Squad-
ron ATTN: Weather Wise, Howard AFB, Panama.

Pacific Atlantic
Saturday Saturday
Temperature Tides Temperature Tides
High: 90 7:50 a.m. at 16.4 feet High: 88 6:02 p.m. at 1.2 feet
Low: 72 1:38 p.m. at .7 feet Low: 70 10:49 a.m. at 0.1 feet
Sunday Sunday
High: 89 8:42 a.m. at 15.6 feet High: 87 6:48 p.m. at 1.3 feet
Low: 72 2:32 a.m. at 1.6 feet Low: 70 11:31 p.m. at 0.1 feet
Forecast: Mostly cloudy skies, with afternoon thunderstorms and showers.


Howard AFB
3:45pm B727 Howard AFB (C,0)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Tuesday
5:40am C141 Howard AFB
Lima, Peru (CC)
Santiago, Chile (0)
La Paz, Bolivia
8:40am B727 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP,GA (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
Wednesday
6:10am C130 Howard AFB
Bogota, Colombia
Howard AFB
Thursday
7:45am C5A Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)


sible. For more information, call 284-
3263.

Bank will open Monday
for military payday
The Merchants National Bank will be
open Monday for military payday and
closed Aug. 20.

Spot bid sale for used
automobiles slated
A spot bid sale on used U.S. govern-
ment cars, trucks and buses will be held 9
a.m. Wednesday at Building 308, Corozal.
Inspection time will be 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tues-
day at the same location. For information,
call 285-5417.

Fort Clayton shoppette
announces new hours
The Fort Clayton shoppette, Building
95 has new hours of operation effective
Aug. 21. The shoppette will be open, 9
a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5
p.m. Saturday and closed Sunday. For in-
formation, call 287-5694.

PACE now opening
6 days for better service
The PACE Improvement Center,
Building 340, Corozal will be open six
days a week. The center is open Monday-
Friday 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m.-
1 p.m. For information, call 285-6213.

IPMA seeks outstanding
employees for awards
The federal section of the International
Personnel Management Association is ac-
cepting nominations for its All-Star Team,
Linda Trunzo awards.
Nominees must be federal employees
in the personnel administration field or in
other occupation, such as health care, if the
person is assigned to a personnel function.
Nominees must be submitted to the Di-
rectorate of Civilian Personnel by
Wednesday. For information, call 285-
5611.

Pre-separation briefing
smooths transition
A pre-separation briefing will be held 1
p.m. Aug. 26 at the Replacement Detach-
ment classroom, Building 520, Fort Clay-
ton. The briefing is designed to help all sol-
diers, within 120 days from separation,
transition smoothly to civilian life. For in-
formation, call 287-4753/4155.

Mini-Immersion Spanish
class begins Monday
The next Mini-Immersion Spanish
class will be held 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon-
day-Aug. 26. The classes are held Mon-
day-Friday in Building 128, Fort Clayton.
Soldiers can earn four promotions points


Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Friday
5:55 am C130 Howard AFB
San Salvador, El Salvador
(V,CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB
10:40am C141 Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC

A- Active duty only
US- U.S. passport
O-Overnight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance


upon completion of the course. For infor-
mation, call 287-5412/3960.

Last chance to register
for FSU fall semester
Florida State University, Panama Canal
Branch will hold late registration Monday
and Tuesday at Albrook and Fort Davis.
For information, call 285-6922.

Japanese destroyers
open to visitors
The four ships of the Japanese Train-
ing Squadron, destroyers JDS Nagatsuki,
JDS Takatsuki, JDS Mochizuki and JDS
Shirayuki, will be open for visitors 1-4
p.m. Saturday and Sunday. They are
berthed at Pier 2, Rodman NS.

Panamanian meal
celebrates anniversary
Celebrate the anniversary of the Pana-
ma Canal with a traditional meal at the
Trade Winds Dining Facility, Building
712, Howard AFB 11 a.m.-l p.m. Thurs-
day. All military and Department of De-
fense privilege card holders may attend.

Thrift Savings Plan
announces funds returns
The Federal Retirement Thrift Invest-
ment Board has announced the latest re-
turns for the three funds in the Thrift Sav-
ings Plan as follows:
Fund June Last 12 months
C (Stock) -2.47% +1.40%
F (Bond) -.24% +1.39%
G (Gov't
Securities) +.59% +6.24%
The next open season will be Nov. 15,
1994-Jan. 31, 1995. Employees are re-
minded that they may make up to four TSP
interfund transfers each year.
For information, to get interfund trans-
fer request forms or to submit an open sea-
son election form, call the Benefits Branch
at 285-5941/5745.

USARSO recognizes
departing soldiers
The Deputy Commander, U.S. Army
South Hasta Luego Reception will be held
2:45 p.m. Thursday at the Fort Clayton
Noncommissioned Officers Club. The re-
ception is in honor of soldiers leaving the
command in August and September. Fam-
ily members may attend. For information,
call 287-5073.

PACE Center offers
training opportunity
The self-help training class Electrical
will be held 9-11 a.m. Tuesday at the
PACE Improvement Center, Directorate
of Engineering and Housing complex,
Building 340, Corozal.
For reservations or more information,
call 285-6213.












Ir~hung


Tropic Times 3
Aug. 12, 1994


,~


-I'I


k; . . ..�
&' "-^.





� ., " ^ " .* ..


A competitor takes aim during the elementary level excellence in competition pistol match held July 29.



12 shooters earn bronze



at pistol competition 11


U.S. Air Force photos by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson


by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - More than 140 Air Force men and
women signed up to compete in the 24th Security Police
Squadron's Elementary Level Excellence in Competition
Pistol Match held July 29 and 30 at the firing range here.
Of these, 127 members actually competed for the chance
to win and wear the bronze badge that was given as a
prize, and 12 of those shot well enough to earn the presti-
gious bit of metal.
"Actually, we could have given away one more medal
if somebody else had quali-
fied," said Tech. Sgt. Don
Bridge, the chief of combat "Every person w
arms training and mainte- shoot at the come
nance. Bridge has more than
11 years of experience with to do so, even thosi
the Excellence in Competi- people showed up i
tion program, both as a com-
petitor and as an official, and and we had to turn
he said this turnout was "ex- were all given the o
cellent."
To qualify for the medal, later in proper militia
shooters had to shoot 30 Tech
rounds from a 9mm hand- chief of
gun at a standard, scoreable and ma
target set up 25 yards away.
They needed a minimum
score of 270, and had to be in the top 10 percent of all
shooters.
"Every person who showed up to shoot at the compe-
tition got the chance to do so, even those on standby,"
Bridge said. "A few people showed up in civilian clothes,
and we had to turn them away, but they were all given the
opportunity to return later in proper military uniform."
Under most circumstances, the CATM chief explained,
Air Force regulations require all military members shoot-
ing at official Air Force ranges to be in uniform.
"We had some very good shooters competing out
there," said CATM member,. ,,'T Sgt. Carmelo
Vizcarronio. Since shooting is a regular pa11t of security


h
til
e
in
ti
p
ir

C(
in


police training, 'Vic' said he was not really surprised
when seven of the 12 medal winners were from the 24th
SPS. "The captain from the 310th really surprised me
though - he got the third highest score, and he's a pilot."
Actually, Vic said, he was impressed at the overall per-
formance of all the competitors, since he really hadn't ex-
pected more than six or seven medals to be awarded.
There were only 10 women competing in the pistol
match and, although none actually won a medal, several
came close. Sgt. Jacqueline White, of the 24th SPS,
scored a 251, the top score for women. The average score
for all competitors was 195.4 - ranging from a low of 27
to a high of 280.
"The competition was
io showed up to tough, but it was a lot of fun
tion got the chance too," White said. "It was re-
ally close, and going into the
on standby. A few last round I still had a good
i civilian clothes, chance to get the medal."
She needed to score a 92
hem away, but they with her last 10 bullets to
)portunity to return score a 270 total, but said
she "got very tense," and
y uniform." just couldn't pull it off.
Sgt. Don Bridge "It was a learning experi-
ba ars raining ence," she added. "The key
atenance is concentration, but you
tenance
also have to relax. If I can
figure out how to do both of
those things at the same time, I'll make it next year."
"I believe we had a very good showing this time
around, and we do plan to make this competition an annu-
al event," Bridge said. "When I got to Panama I found the
Excellence in Competition program had never been here
and I decided I'd like to try and get it started. With this
kind of response, I'm glad I did."
The competitor's general enthusiasm seems to indicate
- they're glad too.
The top shooters at the competition and their respec-
tive scores are shown below:
1. Senior Airm.an Allan-Rey 28lanem r, 24th Sc.nr,
ty Police "qu;dror, 280


/ -" ,.







Tech Sgt. Steve Burke, 24th Communications
Squadron, sets up his target. Burke missed the
bronze badge by one point and still had one
round in his weapon.
2. Senior Airman Ashley B. McDowell, 24th SPS,
279
3. Capt. Andrew B. Fontaine, 310 Airlift Squadron,
277
4. Staff Sgt. Scott E. Noble, 24th SPS, 276
5. Master Sgt. William L. Clouston, 24th Civil Engi-
neering Squadron, 276
6. Staff Sgt. Gary L. Miles, Jr., 24th SPS, 276
7. Staff Sgt. Artie F. Pearson, 24th SPS, 274
8. Senior Master Sgt. Richard W. Hackney, 24th SPS,
270
9. Capt. Kevin D. Brown, 310 AS, 270
10 Tech. Sgt. Robert M. Farnsworth, 24th Communi-
cations Squadron, 270
11. Master Set. James M. Denny, Det. 2, 270
12. Senior Air ;; S. ep :.n I Martin. 21iht Security
f lic'- 2_70


I '
I ff
^ (










4 Tropic Times
Aug. 12, 1994



1994



Soldiers



Show

Talented troops

dazzle audience

by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office

FORT CLAYTON - The 1994 Sol-
diers Show opened with a high energy
routine of song and dance that told a little
about each of the entertainers - and the
energy never stopped for the next hour
and a half.
Though the tempo slowed a few times
for ballads, the mood didn't last long as
the performers jumped into the next rou-
tine.
There was music for all tastes. Rock,
country, pop, gospel, oldies and even
older oldies kept the audience rocking to
the beat.
From the sizzling modern dance rou-
tine to the toe-tapping, foot-stomping
country music segment, the show had the
audience jamming. If there had been room
in the theater, most in the audience would
have been out of their seats two-stepping
with the performers.
The program also had a light-hearted
side sprinkled in with a fun-filled Reggae
routine where performers hit the stage
with dreadlocks to their waists.
The fun continued later in the show
with a comedy routine about Army dining
facilities to the tune of "Be Our Guest."
With pots and pans, wooden spoons and
wire whisks, the performers brought
laughter from the audience during this
light-hearted look at dining facilities and
a new recruit.
The talent of the performers was end-
less from start to finish, but it truly shined
through when the women sang in har-
mony without instrumental accompani-
ment. Not to be outdone, the men belted
out their own harmony to the finger-snap-
ping delight of the audience.
Though the audience was involved
from the beginning, the Motown medley
nearly brought them to their feet. With
songs from the 1960s, such as "My Girl,"
"Heat Wave," and "Ain't No Mountain
High Enough," it seemed the entire audi-
ence was clapping and moving to the
tunes.
Going even further into the past, the
performers paid tribute to World War H


Features



.. ,', , ..






























U.S. Army photos by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Spc. Kathryn Kent, Cpl. Yolandria Dixon and Sgt. 1st Class Linda Sanborn perform 1940's music.
1 -3 :.T
.]:

'g


Soldiers Show performers start the
number.
entertainment by singing and dancing to
the tunes popular during the 1940s.
In dress blues and sharing the stage with
Old Glory and fireworks, the troupe ended
the show by bringing out the patriotic side
in all of us when they sang "America the
Beautiful."
Though the talent of these performers
was nothing short of perfection, the pure
enjoyment would not have been the same
without the technicians behind the scenes.
Behind each song or dance, the light-


show with a high-energy opening

ing, special effects, costumes and choreog-
raphy was also exceptional.
From the laser light displays through-
out the program, to the set design, to the
stage smoke, to the many varied costumes,
the talent behind the scenes equalled that
on stage.
As performers and technicians, those
involved with the 1994 Soldiers Show
could hold their own on any professional
stage. And from the standing ovation they
received at the end of the show, it seems


Capt. Carla Cain and Sgt. Michael
Garcia sing a duet during the coun-
try medley of the 1994 Soldiers
Show.
the audience fully agreed.
Maj. Gen. George Crocker, U.S. Army
South commander, said it perfectly when
he thanked the soldiers for their perfor-
mance at the end of the program.
"You reached out and touched our
hearts," he said. "This is the secret weapon
of our country - the energy, talent and en-
thusiasm of our young people."


Atlantic soldiers' garrison mission important for combat


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) - Although
they are not the first on the front lines in combat, the sol-
diers of Company D, U.S. Army Garrison have a mission
that may be just as important to the success of any combat
situation.
Company D has two basic missions: garrison support
and noncombatant evacuation operations, but the missions
are not as simple as they sound, said I st Lt. Charles H.
May, Company D commander.
Its evacuation mission involves evacuating noncom-
batants, such as family members and civilian employees,
from the Atlantic community if the area becomes unsafe,
May said.
"We would process all noncombatants and transfer
them from this arena to a safe arena - out of the country
if necessary," he said.
While that mission is a reactionary one, garrison sup-
port is an every day mission that keeps post operations
running smoothly, May said.
In the Atlantic community, Company D soldiers run or


have a hand in running: the Directorate of Engineering
and Housing, Finance and Accounting Office, Adjutant
General's Office, Staff Judge Advocate's Office, Trans-
portation Motor Pool, Commissary, Atlantic chapels,
Range Control and Central Issue Facility.
In one way or another, these facilities reach every
member of the community, May said.
"We're here to ensure that the needs of the soldiers
and their families are met," he said. "The family members
are equally as important as the soldiers."
Additionally, garrison support can have a direct affect
on soldier readiness, May said.
"We make sure that when a soldier is out doing a tacti-
cal mission, he doesn't have to worry about pay problems
or his family," he said.
"The soldiers of Company D accomplish this mis-
sion," May said.
"The officers and (noncommissioned officers) who
run these sections all run very good operations," he said.
"The personnel under them do an outstanding job as well.


They all work well together and accomplish their goals."
The Company D soldiers also support community
events like the recent Directorate of Community Activi-
ties Fair and the Independence Day activities, he said.
The unit's family support group, named best of the
year in the Atlantic community, lends a hand with the
community events as well, May added.
"No one person makes everything work," he said.
"The family support group has supported the unit and
the soldiers and has received support from them in re-
turn."
Whether conducting its garrison support operations
or assisting with community activities, the soldiers' ef-
forts don't go unnoticed, May said. "We don't have a
behind-the-scenes mission," he said. "Imagine closing
the Finance and Accounting Office or DEH for just one
week. The affect on the community would be tremen-
dous.
"I think the community knows what we do, and I
think they're glad we're here doing it."











Military News


Tropic Times 5
Aug. 12,1994


. ',















U.S. Navy
New commander
Naval Security Group Activity, Galeta
Cmdr. Sharon A. Peyronel speaks to he
change of command ceremony. Cmdr. M
command on to Peyronel here July 22.


I. ,I


photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sean Hughes


Island's new commander,
er sailors during the July 22
Melvyn K. McDonald passed


Haiti invasion


U.S. troops prepare for


possible military move


WASHINGTON (AP) - The Marines
say they're ready to go in. The Navy's
ships are poised off shore. The Army's
special commandoes have drilled thou-
sands of troops in assault maneuvers.
All summer long, the U.S. military has
been rehearsing in anticipation of an order
to invade Haiti.
Haiti Army commander Raoul Cedras
says an invasion is inevitable and his coun-
try must be prepared. Asked over the
weekend about Cedras' comments, White
House chief of staff Leon Panetta said,
"I'd recommend he not test us."
But the American military has been do-
ing plenty of testing of its own capabili-
ties.
Pentagon spokesman Dennis Boxx said
of the U.S. maneuvers in anticipation of a
possible order from President Clinton:
"We obviously have contingency plans
in place should he order the use of force
and therefore, we exercise and train in a
variety of ways and locations, to be ready
should we be called upon."
The intense and highly visible prepara-
tions go on despite defense intelligence re-
ports that describe the Haitian military as
hardly capable of organized resistance.
The Haitian army has only a handful of
lightly armed vehicles, no warplanes to
speak of, and World War II-vintage rifles.
Some military planners say the country
could be invaded, the government over-


thrown and the capital of Port-au-Prince
secured in a matter of hours. There are
fears, however, that Haitian military ele-
ments would wage guerilla warfare, strik-
ing at U.S. troops and then disappearing
into the countryside, and that the U.S. oc-
cupation of Haiti could drag on into
months and even years.
In mid-May, some 44,000 troops took
part in an annual exercise along the East
Coast dubbed "Agile Provider," in which
Marines Corps and Army forces stormed
the shores of North Carolina and Puerto
Rico.
Pentagon officials said maneuvers us-
ing fighter jets and amphibious landing
craft had been planned for more than a year
using a Middle Eastern scenario. But the
possible Haiti connection was also clear.
Then came the news that the amphibi-
ous assault ship USS Wasp would conduct
"refresher training" in the Caribbean for a
few weeks with 650 Marines on board.
And, a few weeks later, headlines
pointed to a drill by a battalion of Army
Rangers that seized an airfield in Florida
in a mock version of an attack on the Port-
au-Prince airport.
In all, thousands of troops participated
directly or as support units in rehearsals in
late May that took place in several states in
the Southeast - part of the military's
preparations for a potential strike against
Haiti's military government.


CHAMPUS continuation

will replace U.S. VIP
WASHINGTON (AFIS) - The Continued Health Care
Benefit Program will become separating servicemembers'
optional temporary health insurance plan starting Oct. 1.
The plan replaces Mutual of Omaha's U.S. VIP and
provides medical care through standard CHAMPUS, us-
ing CHAMPUS provider networks. Enrollees will pay the
entire premium, which will be equal to a comparable plan
for former federal employees under the Federal Employ-
ees Health Benefit Program. Officials expect the premi-
um to be $450 for self-only coverage and $900 for a fam-
ily. There are no adjustments for age or size of family.
The Continued Health Care Benefit Program will be
open to an expanded population. Eligible to enroll are
members of the armed forces discharged or released from
active duty and their family members, unremarried former
spouses and unmarried children under age 21 if not in
school or 23 if in school.
Former members can buy coverage for up to 18
months. Unremarried former spouses will be able to buy
coverage for 36 months. The program is open to all
unremarried former spouses regardless of the length of
the marriage to a servicemember. Emancipated children
can be covered up to 36 months as well. The program
covers pre-existing conditions for all enrollees.
No U.S. VIP policy will be sold after Sept. 30, 1994.
Policies sold before then will remain in effect their full
length. Beneficiaries enrolled in U.S. VIP have the option
of converting their policies; people eligible will have 60
days from the loss of their entitlement to military health
care to elect coverage in the new program.
Coverage under the program is in 90-day increments.
Initially, interested beneficiaries will submit an applica-
tion and a check for the first 90-day premium to a third-
party administrator. The administrator will verify eligibil-
ity, update the Defense Enrollment and Eligibility Report-
ing System and notify applicants in writing of their ac-
ceptance. Beneficiaries will seek care and have bills pro-
cessed in the same way as do standard CHAMPUS bene-
ficiaries. They should bring their acceptance letters when
they seek care as proof of enrollment.
Members of the uniformed services who leave the ser-
vice before the new program begins have a 60-day enroll-
ment period. They must lose transitional health benefits
after Aug. 2, to enroll during this 60-day window. DoD is
selecting a contractor to collect premiums, verify eligibil-
ity and perform other administrative tasks. The process is
scheduled to be complete by late August


Clinton administration discusses


next 5 years of military pay raises
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Clinton administra- cal 1996 as early as this week. But as yet, according to
tion is embroiled in a debate over whether the govern- one White House official, "the current budget policy
ment should invest nearly $30 billion in military pay on the pay raise has not changed."
raises over the next five years. Perry argues his case on military grounds. Pay, he
On one side is Defense Secretary William Perry, says, relates directly to the military's readiness for bat-
who not only wants the raise for purposes of morale tle in terms of the quality of recruits, the duration of
and military readiness but insists that the extra cost enlistments and morale. The Pentagon was embar-
should not come out of other portions of the Pentagon rassed by recent reports of troops relying on food
budget. stamps to feed their families and estimates that as many
Arrayed against Perry are White House staffers as 16,000 enlistees may be using the stamps to supple-
and budget officials who view the proposal as a raid ment their food budgets.
on President Clinton's cherished domestic priorities. "My best judgment today is that the morale and
Accepting Perry's proposal threatens Clinton's spirit and readiness of our fighting forces are very
agenda of deficit reduction but offers the president an good," Perry said. "I am now immersed in prepara-
opportunity to shore up his reputation with the mili- tion of our 1996 budget and that is front and center" in
tary. Rejecting the pay raise eases a major budget those deliberations.
headache for Clinton but could lead to a widening pay Perry said in an interview that he has not yet raised
gap between the military and the private sector. An al- the issue with Clinton. But he noted that when Con-
ready difficult recruiting situation, aggravated by re- gress made it clear it wanted full cost-of-living raises
ports of soldiers on food stamps, could worsen. for the military last year, Clinton allowed him to add
"It is the single biggest-dollar issue we're going to $11.4 billion to the defense budget over the next five
face," said an administration official familiar with the years to pay for those higher levels.
debate. Cabinet officers of other agencies groused that
Under Perry's plan, military and civilian Defense Clinton was giving the Pentagon special treatment
Department employees would get a raise pegged to the while they had to cut their budgets.
increase in the cost of living in each of the next five White House Chief of Staff Leon Panetta, Clin-
years. The proposal comes after two years in which ton's former budget director, has been skeptical of past
Clinton proposed no raise or a raise below the cost-of- Pentagon pay increase proposals and is among those
living increase, only to see Congress approve the full questioning Perry's long-term plan, according to ad-
pay increases for the military, ministration officials.
"This is the dilemma," said the official, who spoke A typical Army sergeant at the E-5 pay scale makes
on condition of anonymity. "Since Congress is put- $16,800 per year. The 2.6 percent cost-of-living raise
ting the raise in anyway, instead of getting a black eye for fiscal 1995 expected to win final congressional ap-
from the military he ought to just put the pay raise in." proval would add $436 to the sergeant's salary. For a
But unless Clinton slashes other Pentagon pro- typical colonel with 24 years of service, the current
grams or finds a pot of money in some domestic pro- $66,432 salary would go up by $1,727.
gram, the military pay raise could make it difficult for These modest sums grow huge, however, when ap-
him to submit a budget below previously established plied to some 1.5 million uniformed military and com-
spending caps. pounded annually over five years, as Perry's proposal
Among White House national security advisers would do. And the raise would also cover the roughly
and budget planners, the debate is intensifying as plan- 900,000 civilians on the Department of Defense pay-
ning proceeds on the administration's fiscal 1996 bud- roll. The civilians also get extra "locality pay," which
get proposal to be submitted next January. One budget supplements income in expensive areas such as New
planner said Clinton could decide the question for fis- York and Washington.









Tropic Times
Aug. 12,1994


* VVoices


Resident finds 'Self Help' shelves bare


Dear Editor:
I am writing this letter because I can't stand it anymore.
I have just finished reading a recent issue of the Tropic
Times, and it contains another in a series of articles about
the crunch in family housing funds, and the increased em-
phasis on "do it yourself' maintenance. I truly believe that
there is an extreme shortage of funds to perform repairs/
improvements to family housing, and as a homeowner in
the states, I fully understand the savings of doing home
repairs/maintenance. The part I have a hard time with is
how poor the self help program really is here. I have nev-
er lived in government quarters before, and I don't know'
what other installations do or don't have, but the self help
program here needs help.
I have been to the PACE Self Help store on numerous
occasions, and I have always found the staff to be helpful
and courteous. The problem is, that the shelves are quite
bare. Let me cite several examples.
A pipe under the sink was rusted through and broke. I
removed the pipe and took it to self help. The response I
received was,"The plumbing shop has to do those re-
pairs." Result: an emergency work order on a Saturday
afternoon that I know wasn't cheap.
The kitchen faucet would not operate correctly; I knew
it would not last much longer. I again went to the self help
store, but no faucets were available. Result: the faucet
broke on a Sunday morning, and another emergency work
order was called in. Again, I know it was not cheap.
My yard is infested with ants. Not just a little bit; there
are 10 to 15 mounds, all of which are 10 to 12 inches tall.
My wife called housing, and they recommended Self
Help. I went to the self help store, and guess what? No ant
killer. We went back to housing, and they sent someone
out to spray the ants.
I could name several things that I could do myself if I
had access to the needed supplies. I think the program is a
great idea. I am sure that there are a lot of us who can fix
many of the of the little things in our quarters if we just
had access to the supplies we need. One last thing, the
classes given at the PACE center are probably very good


for people who whant to learn about home repair, but you
can't fix much without the tools and parts to do the job.
I believe it is important to take advantage of the talents
of the people living in government quarters who can make
their own repairs . This saves money that can be used else-
where in the family housing budget. In order to capitalize
on this, a viable means of providing the necessary items
has to exist.
Family Housing Resident

Dear Family Housing Resident:
Thank you for taking the time to write about your con-
cerns regarding the PACE Improvement Center. The Di-
rectorate of Engineering and Housing sincerely appre-
ciates and admires your firm commitment to self help
measures.
Because this is your first experience in living in gov-
ernment quarters, you might find it interesting to know
that most stateside and European Command installations
offer "over-the counter" service, have a very limited in-
ventory, and require mandatory self-help training before
residents can be registered to use their self help facilities.
The PACE Improvement Center in Panama is one of
the largest, most well-stocked stores in the world with hun-
dreds of self help items. Residents are free to wander
around the store and choose the merchandise directly from
the shelves. Additionally, although we strongly recom-
mend self help training, the classes we offer are strictly
the customer's preogative.
Several CONUS Installations have requested assis-
tance in reshaping their self help programs and facilities
to meet our world class standards of quality.
Your concern about the PACE Improvement Center
not having all the supplies needed to perform home re-
pairs by residents is a valid one. Despite the severe Fam-
ily Housing Budget crunch, it has never been the intent of
the DEH to place the burden of major household repairs


on the residents.
Under the self help program, we furnish items required
to maintain and repair the permanent fixtures in your
home. If a permanent fixture is damaged, DEH profes-
sional tradesmen will continue going to your home to per-
form the repair.
It is extremely difficult for the PACE Improvement
Center to carry all the items needed because of the many
different styles of quarters which were built during differ-
ent timeframes, some dating back to the early 1900s.
Many of the fixtures in the older homes are either obso-
lete or no longer manufactured. In the case of faucets, it is
more cost effective to send a professional to perform the
repair versus having all types of faucets available at the
store in sufficient quantities.
In addition, sometimes the supply system experiences
delays at shipment or at production. To overcome this sit-
uation, we purchase the supplies on the local economy.
Unfortunately, the local sources are sometimes not as reli-
able as U.S. hardware stores or do not carry sufficient
quantities of the items we need. At the time (when the
letter was written), our local source for the ant killer had
exhausted his supply, and we were unable to stock in suf-
ficient quantities. However, we have plenty available
now.
The store does offer a "Tool-for-Loan" program that
includes tools not normally found in the regular handy-
man's tool box and we are constantly reordering. Unfor-
tunately, many customers borrow the tools and do not re-
turn them on a timely basis. However, we have taken mea-
sures to increase the number and variety of tools.
We apologize for any inconveniences we may have
inadvertently caused, and urge everybody to send their
ideas and suggestions so we can continue to improve our
service. If there is a part or a tool considered a self help
requirement that you need, we will be glad to get it for
you. I'm available at the store, Monday thru Saturday,
and my phone numbers are 285-6213 and 285-4636.
Ganesan Deva
Manager, PACE Improvement Center


Woman's anger over


hairstyle spurs arrest


Bad hair day
A disgruntled customer was charged
after an incident at the Fort Clayton beauty
salon last week.
The woman was apparently dissatisfied
with a hair styling that she received, and
voiced her objection in a profrane manner.
While leaving, she told the manager she
wanted to assault the employee. The mili-
tary police were summoned, and the wom-
an was arrested and charged with provok-
ing speeches and gestures, communicating
a threat and disorderly conduct.
If unsatisfied with on-post services, re-
port it to store management. If results are
still not seen, call Robert Peart, Army and
Air Force Exchange Service business man-
ager, at 286-3102/3906.

ID card scam discovered
A person was arrested by the Contra-
band Control section for trying to give
duty-free merchandise to a non-privileged
card holder. During the investigation, it
was found that the person's ID card had


been altered and was not entitled to have it
at all. The original card owner never re-
ported his ID card lost or stolen. If the al-
teration had not been found in a timely
manner, the original owner could have
been charged.
If an ID card is missing, report it to the
MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133.

High wire act
Unknown persons-removed approxi-
mately 40 rolls of concertina wire off the
fence at Araijan Tank Farm. Naval Secu-
rity Forces searched the surrounding
jungle and recovered all the missing rolls.

Pain in the neck
A person was stabbed during an argu-
ment behind quarters on Rodman NS. The
victim was rushed to Gorgas Army Com-
munity Hospital and treated for a stab
wound to the neck. He was reported as be-
ing in stable condition. The suspect was
charged with aggravated assault and
placed under military apprehension.


a il
Caught red-handed
During an attempt to retrieve a candy
bar, the display glass on an Army and Air
Force Exchange Service vending machine
was broken. The person was treated at
Gorgas Hospital, charged with wrongful
destruction of government property, and
released to his command.

Housing area crimes
Pacific
Fort Clayton 300 area - one larceny of se-


cured private property
Curundu - two larcenies of secured private
property
Rodman NS- three cases of wrongful de-
struction of personal property
Fort Amador- one larceny of personal
property
Atlantic
Fort Sherman - two larcenies of secured
private property
Fort Espinar - four larcenies of secured pri-
vate property


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Commander in Chief.............Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs....................Col. James L. Fetig

S'ropic Tim
T** Trop


Chief..............................Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor...................................................Maureen Sampson
Sports Editor..............................................Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editors...........................................Sgt. Cass Purdum
Spc. John Hall
Spc. Tom Findtner
Rosemary Chong
Student hires................................................... Floyd A ble
Nishawne Moran
Charlotte Souffront
Southern Command Public Affairs Office...........282-4278
Command Information Officer.............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer.............Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder


Command Information Officer.................Beth Taylor
Managing Editor..........................Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Editor........................................Sgt. Robin Mantikoski
Journalist.............................................. Sgt. Eric Hortin
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.........................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent..............................
Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists................................Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer...........................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers....................... ...................................
Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic..........................289-4312
NCOIC............................................Sgt. Richard Emert









SC commentary




Getting up there



Being in the 30-something crowd
by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero one says, "She has more wrinkles than you, Sergeant
USARSO Public Affairs Office Usero." You run to the mirror and, to your horror, those
nasty little lines have crept up on you. They weren't
Recently celebrated my 30-shmphfm birthday there yesterday!
and came to the realization that I am no longer It's then when you are talking to friends about
"as young as I feel." To tell you the truth, I something from your teenage years and most of them
don't "feel" all that young anyway. look at you as if they're on their way through a museum.
Every single one of us has or will reach this point in It's that point when people you consider adults can't o
our lives when this realization hits. Some take it with a remember John, Paul, George and Ringo's group or why
grain of salt - others take it like the sinking of the it's so important to find out if Elvis is really dead.
Titanic. One thing is for sure, however. If it hasn't hit It's that point when you wear a new outfit or a new
yet - it will. hairstyle and someone tells you that you look like you
It's that point when men may notice their hair are from the 60s or 70s - and you don't care.
beginning to migrate. What used to be on the top of your It's that point when your child wants to know if you
head has moved to your back and shoulders. To top it ever saw a dinosaur or if you fought in the Civil War.
off - so to speak - the trip has taken its toll and the It's also when they laugh at your "record player" and
migrated hair has turned gray by the time it gets there. your collection of eight-track tapes.
It's that point when, in general conversation, some- It's that point when you think you are being "cool"


Tropic Times
Aug.12,1994


can be traumatic
by using the "in" language -just to find out that it isn't
"cool," "fad" or "far out" anymore, its' "bad." Or is it?
It's that point when you hear yourself saying those
words you heard from your parents. "How can you listen
to that stuff?" And promptly go listen to your Joan Baez,
Jim Croce and Jimi Hendrix eight-tracks.
It's that point when your birthday comes around and
you tell people you were born in 19-something and you
feel the urge to alert the fire department when it's time to
light the candles on your cake.
It's that point when, being the physically fit person
you are, instead of using a stop watch to time your run,
you use a calendar.
It's also the point in your life when you find yourself
rambling on and on and beating a dead horse, so to
speak. So, I will leave that poor horse alone and go
bother one of the few people older than me - the old
geezer across the hall.


The bad apple - dealing with difficult people


by Capt. Edward J. Daes
Tropic Times contributor


I f you have experienced the
frustration of dealing with a
stubborn, negative, opinionated,
argumentative, arrogant, emotional, or
unproductive co-worker, boss or subordi-
nate, you're not alone. These are individ-
uals who communication experts label as
"difficult people." Difficult people are
the kind who, can affect the entire team
in the work place, thus affecting produc-
tivity, and ultimately mission accomplish-
ment.
Yet interestingly enough, communica-
tion experts have found that the difficult
person is not necessarily the threat to
team unity and mission accomplishment.
Rather it is the team's reaction to the
behavior which sparks morale problems
and leads to severe communication
problems. In simple terms, instead of


Direct Quot


saying - the person is difficult, say-
the behavior is difficult. When we say
that a person is difficult, we are really
talking about a difference in style.
Many people will define their
behavior as caused by others. "She made
me do this," or "he's so negative that he
is dragging down the organization." Not
so. Each and every one of us have the
power to act and control almost all
situations in the way we respond. We
even inadvertently control others'
behaviors by branding them as being
always negative (a dirt bag), then the
behavior we expect is always negative
and we unconsciously trigger and
encourage this behavior, even if that
individual is not really what we perceive.
Rather than encouraging positive
behavior, once a person is labeled a dirt
bag, we treat him or her in such a way
that they continue negative and unpro-
ductive behavior. Simply stated, we reap


what we sow and get what we expect. It
is a vicious circle, which may be broken
by changing the way we react to such
behavior.
Team effectiveness models show that
only 10 percent of problems in the work
place rest with personality clashes, while
over 40 percent of problems are goal
oriented. First impressions are very
powerful - we form our perception of
someone new in 10 seconds. The
challenge is to know that you never know
everything there is to know about a
person.
Only when individuals in the team
begin to focus on the positive aspects of
the difficult behavior does it change the
teams view of that person, and the
person's view of his or herself. Every
office must have a negative person, a bad
apple, a devil's advocate, in order to keep
the team honest. Negative can be
positive.


What makes you feel old?


"Now I'm buying baby
things. My mom told
me my hair's thinking "


Staff Sgt. Julio O'Valle
Company A, 310th Military
Intelligence Battalion


d r




, ... . / : _



"When I start seeing
my students teach my
classes - they grow up
and have children."


William Monlonis
Department of Defense
Dependents Schools


"When people tell you
you're gaining weight
and your hair's falling
out."


Airman 1st Class
Jose Mazid
640th Air Mobility Support
Squadron


"Sitting at home all
day."


Airman 1st Class
Jarvis Mister
640th Air Mobility Support
Squadron


"Being in college.


Pfc. Yvonne Redd
343rd Public Affairs
Detachment


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.






Tropic Times
Aug. 12, 1994


Mobilization


Exercise


'94


Joint venture puts diving resources,


communication abilities to the test


RODMAN NS - The concept of
conducting a joint venture takes
countless hours of site preparation,
telephone calls, follow ups, contacts
and more. A recent task of mobilizing
16 Navy Reserve Detachments meant
more research, more contacts and
most importantly, constant communi-
cation with Army, Navy, Air Force,
Panama Canal Commission officials
and the Smithsonian Institute.
This unusual joint venture started with a research
project by Naval Sea Systems Command in June
1993. It planned to contact all commanders in chief
and determine if Navy Diving and Salvage resources
were adequately identified in each of their operation-
al plans. The Southern Command was identified as a
strong potential for performing a realistic exercise in
mobilizing reserve diving resources.
In October 1993, Lt. Cmdr. Neil Bundo, com-
manding officer of Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit
One, Det. 319 from Long Beach, Calif., visited
SOUTHCOM to make a preliminary assessment of
the opportunities for diving projects with the U.S.
Navy, Panama Canal Commission and the
Smithsonian Tropical Research Facility. By Feb.
1994, during a week-long planning conference,
Bundo was introduced to Cmdr. Jerry Rovner,
commanding officer of Mobile Diving and Salvage
Unit 2 Det 304, Philadelphia, and Mobilization
Exercise 1994 was born.
Both units arrived here in late July, shipping with
them a full suite of diving systems including the new
MK3 Surface Supplied Diving Systems and SCUBA.
This was the first joint exercise performed by
Reserve units from the Atlantic Fleet and the Pacific
Fleet, and the first time an operation like this had
been conducted outside the continental United States.
The group then divided into four operational
groups and began diving operations July 26 at
Rodman NS, Fort Davis, and Barro Colorado Island.
While at Rodman, the divers completed and
contributed to more than 21 operations, including
patching piers, inspecting fuel lines and hull inspec-
tions. At Davis, divers completed nine operations,
including emergency propeller repairs. At Barro
Colorado, they assisted the Smithsonian in the
salvage of a 40 foot steel hull boat weighing about 10
tons. Divers also assisted the PCC by using the
remote operating vehicle to inspect the locks at the
Miraflores Spillway and the Gatun and Madden
Dams. All projects were completed within the
reserve unit's two week schedule.
Bundo and Rovner agreed that Panama afforded
their units the opportunity to perform a fully mobi-
lized "Mission Ready" exercise.
"It gave us a challenge," Rovner said, "With the
heat, humidity and insects, we wondered at times if
we would be able to keep with the hectic schedule,
but we did."
Bundo was quick to comment on the untiring
efforts of the 79 divers who gave more than 100
percent during the exercise.
"Most of these guys are police officers, doctors
and business men, but first they are divers and great
ones at that. They know their jobs well and proved it
by meeting deadlines, schedule changes, coping with
high temperatures and humidity. It is a trip we will
never forget," he said.
Both Bundo and Rovner hope to join forces on
another mission soon. For a west coast/east coast first
endeavor, "It was great" they both said. "We'd do it
again in a heart beat. "


,







.'
"!


.-. -

-' ,2 .,,
.. 9.


Courtesy photo
Divers got an inside view of the decompression chamber at the Panama Canal Salvage Facility.


ht$j j


ME"


~%-


Courtesy photo
Divers don gear before repairing a Landing Craft Mechanized propeller at Fort Sherman.


Machini
Calif., d






Tropic Times f
Aug. 12, 1994 9


2I


Ski


and sailors get the ballast ready to place under the submerged vessel.


U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays


iN
~


U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays
t Mate 3rd Class Nelson Molina, Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One, Det. 319 from Long Beach,
es a communications check on a diver mask.


story by Diane Gonzalez
USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO


Courtesy photo
Chief Warrant Officer 3 Richard Pompizzi prepares to hit the
water.









1 Tropic Times
J10 Aug. 12, 1994


Milestones


R.A 0 m -j - -- - - 0 - - - I- - -


iviiitary police enaure


11 hours of competition

v Sat. Rick Emert could earn a maximum of 100 points fol


USARSO Public Affairs Office - Atlantic

FORT DAVIS - For soldiers in the
549th Military Police Company, appearing
before the soldier and noncommissioned
officer of the month boards means up to
11 hours of competition.
By the time the candidates reported to
the president of the board, they were
roughly 45 minutes from the end of an en-
tire day of proving themselves as soldiers.
During the latest competition, the day
began with a 6 a.m. Army Physical Fitness
Test that gave the competitors their first
round of points. Each soldier's APFT
score was divided by three with a maxi-
mum 100 points available for the event,
according to Sgt. 1st Class Rickey P.
Donkel, 3rd Platoon sergeant
Next, the soldiers demonstrated their
abilities in Common Task Testing. They
earned two points for each correctly per-
formed task, and could score up to 24
points for the event.
The final event was possibly the most
dreaded - facing the board. The soldiers


the board - 50 for appearance and 50 foi
knowledge.
The demanding board and strict judg-
ing seem to have paid off with 20 of the
last 28 549th soldiers winning the 92nd
MilitaryPolice Battalion soldier and NCO
boards, according to 1 st Sgt. Roy K. Lintz,
549th MP Company.
The first two events are graded by the
book. During the oral board, anything -
or any question - goes. That's what wor-
ried Sgt. Harold G. Hill, who was the first
to appear before the July 28 board.
"The oral board is the most challenging
part of the day," Hill said. "You have no
way of knowing what they're going to ask,
you just have to be able to think fast and
try to remember everything off the top of
your head."
The members of the board take advan-
tage of the freedom they have in develop-
ing their questions.
"It gives us, and the soldiers compet-
ing, a plus," Donkel said. "We try to shoot
for our board to be a lot harder so they'll
be better prepared for the higher boards."


U.S. Army photo
Sgt. Harold G. Mill reports to the president of the board. Hill won the 549th
Military Police Company Noncommissioned Officer of the Month compe-
tition.


Although the unit has a 70 percent suc-
cess rate at the battalion level boards, Lintz
is more concerned about how his soldiers
do on their promotion boards.
"Our primary objective is not to win the
battalion board," Lintz said. "The objec-
tive is to prepare the soldiers and NCOs to
do well for the promotion board. It will


help them get as many of the 200 points as
possible.
"I think our boards bring out the total
soldier," he added. "Anyone can recite an-
swers they learned from a book, but hav-
ing to perform the CTT tasks and take an
APFT brings out the total leader and fu-
ture leader."


The 24th Supply Squadron has a new commander, Maj. Kevin D.
Illsley. The major accepted leadership of the supply squadron from
the former commander, Maj. Michael A. Giroux, in a July 19 cere-
mony held in front of the 24th Supply Squadron warehouse.



Army Commendation Medal - Sgt. 1st Class Rogelio McLean,
Spc. Ronald Edwards, Sgt. John Looney and Spc. Brett Martin, all
of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama.

Army Achievement Medal - Sgt. 1st Class Patricia Allen, Spc.
Alan Burgos, Sgt. Jose Rojas and Spc. Donald Barnhill all of U.S.
Army Medical Activity-Panama.



Certificate of Appreciation - Ruben Orillac of U.S. Army Medi-
cal Activity-Panama.

Superior Civilian Award - Jeannette Bishop, Amalia Rivera and
Grace Shadeck all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama.

Achievement Medal - Mary Hunter of U.S. Army Medical Activ-
ity-Panama.

Years of Service - 25 years: Ruben Orillac, Urith Ashby and
Marva Pringle all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. 20
years: Jose Sterling, Andrew Watson and Patricia Thomas all of
U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. 15 years: Sibyl Calabria,
Nancy Cuthbert and Abdiel Goytia all of U.S. Army Medical Ac-
tivity-Panama. 10 years: Carlos Cruz of U.S. Army Medical Ac-
tivity-Panama. 5 years: Aurora Antadillas, Francisco Donadio and
Tammie Williams all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama.

On-The-Spot Award - Miriam Clarke of U.S Army Medical Ac-
tivity-Panama.

Promotion - Rex Rasberry and Susan Richards both U.S. Army
Medical Activity-Panama.

Retirement - Ruben Orillac of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Pana-
ma.



Primary Leadership Development Class - Distinguished Honor
Graduate: Spc. Timothy Spitzer of Company B, Military Intelli-
gence. Honor Graduate: Spc. Andrew Plumbtree of U.S. Army
Medical Activity-Panama. Commandant's List: Spc. Peter Fenton
of Company A, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion; Spc. Chris
Soneson of Headquarters Company, U.S. Army South; Spc. Regina
Jenkins of 549th Military Police Company; Spc. Whitney
Grayroyer of Headquarters Company, 310th Military Intelligence
Battalion; Spc. Daniel King of 214th Medical Detachment; Spc.
Ruben Brown of 549th Military Police Company; Spc. Robert
Ramsey of Company B, Military Intelligence Battalion (LI); Spc.
Richard Sugg of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne),
508th Infantry; Spc. Paul Good of Company D,
MilitaryIntelligence (LI); Spc. Fernando Romo of Company A,
193rd Support Battalion. Leadership Award: Spc. Brian Sapp of
536th Engineer Battalion; Spc. Ramon Manabul of Company B,
5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light); Spc. Peter Fenton of Compa-
ny A, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion; Spc. Richard Sugg of
Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry.
Army Physical Fitness Test winner Spc. David Rhoden of Com-


pany C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Commandant's In-
spection Winner: Spc. Linda Staples. Spc. Jacelyn Hahn of Head-
quarters Company, Law Enforcement Activity. Spc. Paul Good of
Company D, Military Intelligence (LI). Spc. Andrea Marshall of
92nd Personnel Services Company. Spc. Jeffrey Garza of U.S.
Army Medical Activity-Panama. Spc. Fernando Romo of Compa-
ny A, 193rd Support Battalion Spc. Robert Myrick of 1097th
Transportation Company (CB). Spc. David Russell of 536th Engi-
neer Battalion. Spc. Brian Sapp of 536th Engineer Battalion. Cpl.
Richard Lichtwardt of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th
Infantry (Light). Spc. Pascal Blake of Company B, 5th Battalion,
87th Infantry (Light). Cpl. Michael Griffin of Company C, 5th Bat-
talion, 87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Gerald Gilsdorf of 195th Air
Traffic Control Platoon. Spc. Andre Singleton.of Headquarters
Company, 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spc. Michael Aldridge of
Company B, 193rd Support Battalion. Spc. Whitney Grayroyer of
Headquarters Company, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion. Spc.
Carlos Herazo of 3rd Special Operations Support Command (Air-
borne). Cpl. Mark Dean of Headquarters Company, Jungle Opera-
tion Training Battalion. Spc. Robert Ramsey of Company B, Mili-
tary Intelligence Battalion (LI). Spc. Daniel King of 214th Medical
Detachment. Spc. James Hogan of Headquarters Company, 154th
Signal Battalion. Spc. Ramon Manapul of Company B, 5th Battal-
ion, 87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Linda Staples of Company E,
228thAviation. Spc. Marion Wade of Headquarters Company, 5th
Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Ronald Weimer of U.S. Army
Dental Activity-Panama. Spc. Reco Calhoun of Southern Com-
mand Network. Spc. David Rhoden of Company C, 5th Battalion,
87th Infantry (Light). Spc. David Robles of Headquarters Compa-
ny, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry. Spc. Gerardo Ramos
of Company D, U.S. Army Garrison-Atlantic. Spc. La Keshia


Payton of Headquarters Company, U.S. Army South. Spc. Micha-
el Brewer of Military Police Company. Spc. Timothy Spitzer of
Company B, Military Intelligence. Spc. Peter Fenton of Company
A, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion Spc. Rubin Brown of 549th
Military Police Company. Spc. Andrew Plumbtree of U.S. Army
Medical Activity-Panama. Spc. Michelle McDaniel of 1097th
Transportation Company (CB). Spc. Thomas Irvin of 565th Ord-
nance Detachment. Spc. Misti Ledford of 3rd Military Police Com-
pany, Criminal Investigations Division. Spc. Steven Jenkins of
Company B, 536th Engineer Battalion. Cpl. David Brown of Head-
quarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Byron
McNeil of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Spc.
David Edmond of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light).
Spc. Arthur Lewis of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Air-
borne), 508th Infantry. Spc. Luis Ramos of Headquarters Compa-
ny, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spc. Antonio Hagans of Head-
quarters Detachment, 470th Military Intelligence Brigade. Spc.
Anthony Grambruno of 408th Military Intelligence Company. Spc.
Regina Jenkins of 549th Military Police Company. Spc. Jimmy
Scott of 617th Special Operations Aviation Detachment. Spc.
Patrick Fernholz of Company C, Military Intelligence Battalion.
Spc. Linda Diaz of Headquarters Company, U.S. Army Garrison.
Spc. Sergio Vazquez of Company A, 193rd Support Battalion. Spc.
David Moore of Headquarters Company, 154th Signal Battalion.
Spc. Mark McEndree of Company B, 536th Engineer Battalion.
Spc. Antonio Cason of Company B, 536th Engineer Battalion. Spc.
Richard Sugg of Headquarters Company, Ist Battalion (Airborne),
508th Infantry. Spc. Edward Orena of Company C, 5th Battalion,
87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Daniel Kemp of Company D, Military
Intelligence Battalion. Spc. Kenneth Hall, Jr. of 79th Army Band.
Spc. Chris Soneson of Headquarters Company, U.S. Army South.


Legal excellence U.S.Armyphoto
Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker, (second from right) U.S. Army South commander, presents awards to
legal assistance attorneys Capts. Joseph Keeler (second from left) John Lavorato (right) and
T. Michael Guiffre of the Staff Judge Advocate Office July 14. Crocker presented the Army
Chief of Staff Award for Excellence in Legal Assistance and the American Bar Association
Public Service Award for Law Day 1993.


!"


I











* Features


Tropic Times 1
Aug. 12,1994.


Courtesy photo from Panama Canal Commission


The S.S. Ancon passes through the Gaillard Cut on Aug. 15, 1914, the first official transit of the Panama Canal.


Panama Canal



Monday marks 80 years of service to the world


A s early as 8000 B.C., the Isthmus of Panama
was used as a transit route by prehistoric man
migrating through Central America to settle in
South America. It wasn't until 1502, on his fourth
voyage of exploration, that Christopher Columbus,
sailing under the Spanish flag, arrived on the Isthmus.
Spain began settlement of the Isthmus in 1510, and in
1534, Spanish King Charles V ordered the first survey
for a proposed canal across the 50-mile-wide isthmus. A
canal was beyond their capabilities, but the Spanish did
pave mule trails with cobblestones to carry tons of gold
moving back to Spain from the conquest of Peru
Vestiges of the Las Cruces trail can still be seen today.
In 1850, U.S. interests began construction of the
Panama Railroad, just in time to make a fortune carrying
goldseekers on their way to California. They came to the
isthmus by boat, crossed the isthmus, and continued on
by boat.
In 1880, Ferdinand de Lesseps, fresh from his triumph
building the Suez Canal, sold stock to millions of
Frenchmen to finance the building of a canal in Panama.


But the considerable skill
of the French engineers
was not enough to
overcome the climate,
disease or geography they
found on the isthmus or
make up for the misman-
agement in France that
brought the enterprise to
financial ruin before the
end of the century.
In 1903, following
Panama's declaration of
independence from
Colombia, Panama and


the United States entered into a treaty which allowed the
United States to construct an interoceanic ship canal
across the isthmus. The following year the United States
purchased the rights and equipment of the French "Canal
Interoceanique" for $40 million and took over the
construction.
It took 10 years, the labor of more than 75,000 men
and women, and almost $400 million to complete the
job. The builders of the canal faced unprecedented
problems: tropical disease; the unusual geology of the
Isthmus that made land slides a constant hazard; the


enormous size of the locks and volume of the excava-
tion needed; and the need to establish whole new
communities, to import every last nail, and to organize
work on a scale never before seen.
Most of the names of the men and women who
worked on the canal are forgotten today, but their
legacy lives on. Of those most well remembered, Col.
William Gorgas, and his medical team are credited with
eradicating yellow fever and bringing malaria under
control. One of the first chief engineers, John F.
Stevens, and other railroad men set up the towns and the
supply system and organized the all-important train
system to haul dirt out of Gaillard Cut, and Col. George
Goethals and his staff deserve the credit for the final
engineering designs and for pushing through the
construction of the locks and Gatun Dam and excava-
tion of the cut.
The canal opened to traffic Aug. 15, 1914; since that
time, there have been more than 700,000 transits
through the waterway. An aggressive program of
maintenance has kept the canal in top operating


condition, and
although the basic
design remains as
good as ever, the
channel has been
straightened,
widened and
deepened, and
improvements over
the years have
speeded operations
and cut overhaul
time at the locks.
Over the past 10
years, approximately


$100 million per year has been spent in streamlining
and improving canal facilities and operations.
Since 1979, the canal has operated under the terms of
a treaty between the United States and the Republic of
Panama signed in 1977, providing for the
disestablishment of the Canal Zone, the growing
participation of Panamanians at all levels of the canal
organization, and the turnover of the operation of the
canal to Panama on Dec. 31, 1999.
Under the treaty, the canal is operated by a United
States government agency, the Panama Canal Commis-


sion. The commission is headed by an administrator and
a deputy administrator and will operate through 1999
under the supervision of a board of directors comprised
of five United States citizens and four Panamanian
citizens. As provided in the treaty, the post of adminis-
trator was held until Dec. 31, 1989, by a United States
citizen, and the post of deputy administrator by a
Panamanian citizen. After that period, the situation
reversed, and for the remaining ten years of the treaty
the administrator post is held by a Panamanian and a
United States citizen serves as the deputy administrator.
Long-range plans and programs for a variety of canal
maintenance and improvement projects are being
constantly developed and updated. These include
deepening, widening, or straightening selected portions
of the channel; replacing worn out or outdated equip-
ment with new and improved designs; scheduling
regular overhauls for canal locks and equipment; and
maintaining a program of continual dredging throughout
the waterway. These measures are meant to ensure that
the Panama Canal will continue to be an economically
viable route for world shipping for many decades.-
Article written by The Panama Canal Commission.

Panama Canal factoid
*The canal is 50 miles long from deep water in At-
lantic to deep water in the Pacific.
*The canal runs northwest to southeast, with the At-
lantic entrance 33.5 miles north and 27 miles west of the
Pacific entrance.
*Ships transiting the canal are raised and lowered 85
feet, from sea level to sea level, by a system of three
locks: Miraflores, Pedro Miguel, and Gatun.
*The SSAcon made the first official transit Aug. 15,
1914.
*In fiscal year 1993 there were 13,720 transits. Dur-
ing the year these ships carried nearly 157.9 million tons
of cargo and paid $400.8 million in tolls.
*The highest canal toll, as of May 1994, is
$141,344.97 paid by the Crown Princess May 2, 1993.
The average toll paid during 1993 was $32,949.
*The longest ship to transit was the San Juan
Propsector, an ore-bulk-oil carrier at 973 feet. The wid-
est ship was the USS New Jersey and its sister ships,
which have a beam of 108 feet. At 804 feet, the Crown
Princess is the largest passenger ship to transit the canal.


Special Canal Commemorative Postage
Post offices at Albrook AFS, Howard AFB, Rodman
NS, Quarry Heights, and Forts Amador, Clayton and
Davis are providing a special postal cancellation to com-
memorate the 80th anniversary of the Panama Canal on
Monday. Immediate service will be available during slow-
er periods, according to postal officials. Otherwise, self-
addressed envelopes can be picked up later in the day.
For letters addressed to the United States or other over-
seas locations, mail as normal and they will be cancelled
with the special cancellation mark and sent out


\









2 Tropic Times
Aug.12,1994


SFeatures


* '


I'.


P
-F
'C


i's.


U.S. Army photos by Maj. Larry Wright
Spc. Jason Leon (left) and Sgt. Gerald Burton of the Theater Equipment and Maintenance Site,
install an oil cooler.



Top National Guard



officer visits troops


General tours


equipment,


theater assets


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - National Guard
soldiers on rotation here were visited last week by the top
troop of the National Guard Bureau.
While in Panama, the acting chief, National Guard
Bureau Maj. Gen. John D'Araujo also met with Maj. Gen.
G.A. Crocker, U.S. Army South commander, to sign a
memorandum of understanding for the Theater Equip-
ment and Maintenance Site.
The TEAMS is run by and for National Guard units
rotating through Central and South America and is respon-
sible for all equipment, supplies and maintenance these
units may need while here, D'Araujo said.
Though the unit has been in operation here since the
early 1980s, the memorandum of understanding formal-
izes relations and responsibilities because TEAMS falls
under the 41st Area Support Group, he said.
Even though visiting with Crocker and signing the
memorandum was a high priority for D'Araujo's visit, his
main mission was that of visiting his soldiers, he said.
"This visit gave me an opportunity to visit various sites
such as the school building projects of the South Carolina
National Guard," he said. "I also had the chance to visit
with Guard soldiers at the Jungle Operations Training
Battalion."
After seeing the training sites and visiting with the sol-
diers, D'Araujo said he was very impressed with what he
saw.
"These soldiers are superb, highly motivated soldiers
and (they) are making a hell of a contribution to the com-
munities here," he said. "What these soldiers get in return
for their work, though, is just as beneficial.
"Through engineering exercises, such as building
roads, schools and clinics, and medical readiness training
exercises, the training we get here is unique and of great
value," D'Araujo said. "It gives these soldiers an oppor-
tunity to train away from familiar surroundings and pre-
pares us for actual deployments."
Another benefit of deploying to Panama is that of


Sgt. Michael Davenport (left) and Spc. Dianne
Harris of the Theter Equipment and Mainte-
nance Site, conduct and inventory of repair
parts.
working as one team with active duty soldiers, he said.
"With the drawdowns and fewer dollars, the Guard
forces and active Army will be working more and more
closely," D'Araujo said. "Rotations to Panama give both
Guard and active Army soldiers an opportunity to work
side-by-side. There are more opportunities for integration
here."
Though rotations to Panama may be fewer and smaller
in the coming years because of the Treaty Implementa-
tion Plan and U.S. forces moving out, D'Araujo said the
Guard is ready to support the Southern Command com-
mander in chief no matter where or when.
"We serve all over Central and South America -
wherever we are needed in the SOUTHCOM theater," he
said. "This won't change, no matter where the
SOUTHCOM headquarters may be."
D'Araujo, who said he was thoroughly impressed with
the soldiers he met, and the training he witnessed during
his visit here, said training in Panama is truly a win-win
situation.
"What I saw was good, quality training and the sol-
diers really felt good about what they were doing," he said.
"I really enjoyed my visit and I am very pleased and proud
of the Guardsmen who are serving here."


South Carolina

engineers say

goodbye to

Pedasi people

PEDASI, LOS SANTOS PROVINCE,
PANAMA (USARSO PAO) - The 122nd
Engineer Battalion from the South Carolina
Army National Guard, recently said goodbye
to the small and friendly town of Pedasi,
located in the Panamanian Azuero Peninsula.
The engineers spent more than six weeks
building the eight-classroom, two-bathroom
school, which will serve the seventh and ninth
grades.
A separate building for the middle high
schoolers was very necessary, said Manuel de
Jesus Paz Ulloa, the elementary school princi-
paL
The current school in Pedasi has 13 class-
rooms for nearly 200 elementary school
children and 125 junior high students who go
there.
"The population is constantly growing and
there was need for a separate school building
for a middle high school," he said.
Paz said the present school has two shifts;
one in the morning for elementary grades and
one in the afternoon for seventh, eighth, and
ninth grades.
Paz added that Pedasi has no high school
(for students in grades 10-12) and the children
must travel 42 kilometers to the nearest one in
Las Tablas.
Traveling every day to another town is a
financial burden on many families and some
children drop out as a result, he said. Building
a high school is another hope for Pedasi
residents.
The community's support and participation
were overwhelming during the construction,
said Capt. Tim Miller, Company B, 122nd
Engineer Battalion. Miller said the local
residents made the soldiers feel welcome at all
times.
"Every night we had basketball games with
the kids...they're good ball players too. They
beat us pretty badly several times," Miller
said.
Miller said the benefit of an additional
school is significant, but this is not the only
gain for the community. The building materi-
als were locally bought and the soldiers
contributed to the local economy by buying
food and other items.
Manuel Gonzalez, the middle high school
principal, said some of the local residents
helped the soldiers by mixing cement and
carrying blocks. The residents will also paint
the school and provide final touch-ups.
The community went so far as to tempo-
rarily suspend classes so the soldiers could be
housed in the school building. Gonzalez said
the students, teachers and parents agreed on a
special schedule of classes so the soldiers could
use the school building as a base camp.
"We will reconvene classes next week and
work longer hours to make up for the seven
weeks. This was done with the consent of the
students, teachers and parents," Gonzalez
said.
2nd Lt. James Syms said the soldiers like
participating in humanitarian projects of this
nature.
"You're giving a bit of yourself to the
children of the world. They are the ones who
are going to benefit the most.. that's why we
like to do jobs like this," he said.


'' J� 4 !


ANEW.















j Sports
fl~--,B -- b* . . .-..... -_.._... .


Aug. 12.1994


Ouarry Heights, Reoublic of Panama


...........


. .. .- ". . - -
I'.-,, ,..' - .4.,-i +:.
.......,.^ ,. -.


Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lori Davis
Robert Hunter, 69th Signal Company, darts between Sean McEachin (left) Stormy Helm (middle) and Tony Lambert, Headquarters and Headquarters
Company, 128th Aviation Brigade.



Crash and burn


Signal shoots down aviation, 60-49


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor
FORT CLAYTON - They fought a valiant
battle, but the benchless aviation team did a
tailspin in the second half, plummeting to a 60-49
loss to their signal opponents.
The 69th Signal Company chalked up another
win after defeating Headquarters and Headquar-
ters Company, 128th Aviation Brigade.
Things looked good for the five-man Aviation
in the first half. The Roy "Googie" Allen Jr. and
Stormy Helm combination fed several balls into
the hoop. Short on height but long on speed, Helm
darted into the paint for five baskets in the first
half, Allen backing him up with two hoops and a
three-pointer.


Two baskets by Tony Lambert and a
bucket each by Kenny Smith and Sean
McEachin supported Aviation's offen-
sive effort in the first half.
Signal stayed a step ahead of Avia-
tion, splitting its offense to run up the
score.
Leading the way for Signal was Den-
nis Williams, racking up five baskets.
Following up on offense was Lloyd
Gaither with two baskets and a three-
pointer, Keith Huntley and Tyron
Generette with two baskets each and a
basket by Robert Hunter.
Adding to the Signal side of the
scoreboard was the father-son combina-
tion of Julius Graham Jr. and Julius


Graham III. The Grahams each scored
two points, but it would be the younger
Graham finding his way to the basket in
the second half.
A three-pointer by Gaither in the
closing seconds of the half gave Signal
the go-ahead score, 33-30.
The Aviation players began to show
signs of fatigue after a half of playing
ironman ball. The Storm continued into
the second half, scoring four more bas-
kets, but the Signal defense held Allen,
Smith and Lambert to a basket each.
The Aviation defense shut down Wil-
liams, but Generette's three baskets and
Gaither and Graham III's five points
each kept Signal in the game.


What began as a close game turned into
an easy win for Signal, which advanced to
2-3.
"We started slow, but we always do,"
Signal coach Dorsey Cooper said.
The 69th Signal Co. will be contenders
forthe championship because they are a fast
paced, high pressure team, he said.
The lack of players hurt Aviation, Helm
said.
"We don't have a bench so we got tired,
but we played them as long as we could," he
said.
Although they never have more than six
players come out for their games, Allen said
the loss was the biggest point gap for HHC,
128th Av. Bde.


Young riders compete for honors in
the National Crime Night Out bicy-
cle race at Howard AFB.


Dirc -or' chir 6-e


I~~ an mr Pg


The U.S. Army South Sports Direc- *SCN AM radio schedule
tor explains how units can get more *Local sports schedule


*U.S. Army 10-Miler trials


Pare 13


out of intramural leagues.










14 Tropic Times
Aug. 12, 1994


L~ports


Tykes on bikes




Race encourages theft prevention


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor
HOWARD AFB - The smallest compet-
itors looked like hamsters spinning out of
control in one of those rickety, metal wheels
- their little legs pedaling furiously on
bikes with tires the size of large bagels.
From tots to teenagers, everyone was a
winner in the National Crime Night Out
Bicycle Race here Aug. 5. Representatives
from the U.S. Naval Station Security De-
tachment and the 24th Security Police
Squadron registered more than 50 bicycles
as part of race entry requirements.
"Registration is a good way of tracking
stolen bikes as well as deterrent for thieves,"
Staff Sgt. Jackie White, 24th SPS said.


Cyclists raced individually on a one-
mile course along the bike path across from
the Farfan housing area. The winners were
presented with medals during an award
ceremony as part of the evening festivities.
Race results:
, Girls Boys
Ages 5-7
Sophia Hursey 4:48 Blake Henton 4:10
Wendy Cook 5:08 JosephDooley4:24 *1:10
Kyra Jardine 5:11 Alex Price 4:24 * 1:11
*denotes result of 1/2 mile tie-breaker race
Ages 8-10
Kimberly Ansell 3:57 Gilbert Desroches 3:41
Shakira Crockett 4:03 Justin Hillard 3:43
Marie Gonzalez 4:09 Tramon Lacy 3:47
Ages 11-13
Amanda Barnes 3:52 Bobby Gonzalez 3:49
Laurel Cadorette 4:13 Frank Magnetico 3:49
Chanae Lacy 4:21 Cody Howard 4:19
�-TO . .-.S


Wendy Cook watches her competition during the 5-7 age group race.


Department
Kyra Jardine pedals uphill to the finish line.


j


From the director's chair,

U.S. Army South Sports Director, Bill Hambay


Getting the most out of unit-level sports


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor
FORT CLAYTON - Some people get tired of looking
at the same ugly mugs all day at work, but a brave few
gather after retreat for play.
Various types of leagues are offered for several sports,
such as over-30 leagues for older players and 5' 10" and
under and 5'11" and over leagues for tall and short
basketball players. But no intramural league is watched
as closely as unit-level competition.
Soldiers proudly wear their unit jersey with slogans
like the 56th Signal Battalion's "No Mercy" and names
like "Mad Dawg" and "Bad Luck." Commanders not on
the team root for their troops from the side lines, puffing
out their chests with pride.
Unit-level competition can reach a frenzy similar to a
school of piranhas on the attack. But gnashing teeth on the
sidelines doesn't do any good if the team isn't ready
before the first game. The best way to strive for the
championship trophy is to plan strategy before the season
starts, said Bill Hambay, sports director for U.S. Army
South.
Sports calendar
A sports calendar is published every November forthe
upcoming year with dates for each intramural sport and
special athletic events, Hambay said.
Five intramural sports are offered for unit-level com-
petition. Softball season stanIs in January, foo ball in
April, basketball in July and volleyball and soccer in


October. The sports calendar has estimated starting and
ending dates for each season. These dates may change as
time for that sport approaches, but the starting date will
never be made earlier than what is posted on the original
calendar, Hambay said.
"The coach should become familiar with the sports
calendar so he knows when the program starts," he said.
Knowing when he needs to have his team ready gives
the coach time to prepare. There are several things
coaches and players can do before the season starts,
starting with the reading the Memorandum of Instruc-
tion.
Memorandum of Instruction
The USARSO sports office provides a Memorandum
of Instruction for each unit-level intramural sport. A copy
of the MOI is hand-carried by a member of the sports
office staff to each unit, Hambay said.
Soldiers interested in playing or coaching can contact
their chain of command about reading the MOI to get
ready for their sport. The MOI covers everything from
rules of play to contesting games to players and coaches
responsibilities.
For small units that may not be able to field a team, the
MOI provides guidelines for combining with other units.
The goal of the sports office is maximum participation.
Every soldier who wants to play will be able to, as long
as the rules of play are followed, he said.
The MOI also requests each commander appoint an
tiihletic and recreation reprcsenataive ior ihe unit to help
pass inrmaii.i firom 'he sports ol ice suitf to saoldhers.


Hambay said. Representatives whoarefamiliarwith league
rules can help players and coaches through the season.
Sports clinic
As the season approaches the sports office schedules a
sports clinic, a meeting between their staff and the players,
coaches and referees.
Soldiers can have questions answered at the clinic. The
clinic also gives soldiers an opportunity to discuss plans
for league management, Hambay said.
Many of the rules are carved in stone, such as reporting
scores. The coach or a player from the winning team is
responsible for calling in game scores to the sports office,
Hambay said.
However, soldiers can have an impact on some league
guidelines, such as how games will be scheduled, he said.
Useful information is also put out at these clinics, such
as submitting rosters. Units should turn in a list of every-
one assigned to the unit as the team roster so anyone who
wants to play through the season will be eligible, Hambay
said.
Unit-level intramural sports should be a chance for
soldiers to have fun representing their unit while pursuing
the trophy. The road to victory will be smoother for units
taking time to learn the ins and outs of league play.
Editors note: "From the directors chair" is a new
monthly feature designed to provide sports informa-
tion from each services sports directors to the commu-
nity. Send questions to the Tropic Times. Unit 0936,
APO AA 34002.


4',. . .


~4'.











s..ports


Tropic Times 1
Aug. 12,1994 .1


SCN AM Radio 790/1420
airs football, basketball
Tonight
6 p.m.: Football: Buffalo Bills at Atlanta
Falcons
Saturday
5 p.m.: Football: Los Angeles Raiders at
Pittsburgh Steelers
Sunday
3 p.m.: 1994 Goodwill Games: World
Championship Basketball
Thursday
6 p.m.: Football: Washington Redskins
at New England Patriots
Friday
6:30 p.m.: Football: Arizona Cardinals
at Detroit Lions
Editor's note: Broadcast of baseball
games is tentative ofthe possible player's
strike. Listen to SCN for changes to the
sports schedule.

Unit level basketball on
local sports schedule
*U.S. Air Force Basketball
Howard Sports and Fitness Center
Today
6:05 p.m.: 24th AIS/OSS vs. 24th Comm.
(B)
7:05 p.m.: 604th AMSS (A) vs. 310th
ALS
8:05 p.m.: 24th SPS (B) vs. 24th MS
Monday
6:05 p.m.: 24th AIS/OSS vs. 640th
AMSS (B)
7:05 p.m.: 24th Supply (A) vs. Co. B,
536th
8:05 p.m.: HSC, 536th vs. 24th MS
Tuesday
6:05 p.m.: 310th ALS vs. 24th SPS (B)
7:05 p.m.: 24th AIRPS/SVS vs. 24th
Trans-
8:05 p.m.: 24th Supply (A) vs. 24th
Med. Grp.
Wednesday
6:05 p.m.: HSC, 536th vs. 24th Comm.
(A)
7:05 p.m.: 24th Trans. vs. 24th Supply
(B)
8:05 p.m.: 640th AMSS (B) vs. HHC, 1-
228th
Thursday
6:05 p.m.: 24th SPS (B) vs. 24th CES
7:05 p.m.: 24th Comm. (A) vs. 310th
ALS
8:05 p.m.: Co. B, 536th vs. 24th Med.
Grp.
Aug. 19
6:05 p.m.: 24th CES vs. Co. B, 536th
7:05 p.m.: 24th AIS/OSS vs. 24th Trans.
8:05 p.m.: Co. A, 1-228th vs. 24th MSS
*U.S. Army Basketball
Reeder Physical Fitness Center
Red League
Today
6 p.m.: Co. B, 154th vs. 106th Sig.
7 p.m.: HHC, 128th vs. Co. A, 154th
8 p.m.: SCN vs. Co. E, 1-228th
Monday
6 p.m.: Co. A, 154th vs. HHC, LEA (2)
7 p.m.: MEDDAC vs. Co. B, 154th


8 p.m.: HHC, 128th vs. SCN
Wednesday
6p.m.:HHC,LEA(1)vs.Co.E, 1-228th
7 p.m.: 69th Sig. vs. 214th Med.
8 p.m.: 106th Sig. vs. 534th MP
Aug. 19
6 p.m.: Co. A, 154th vs. Co. E, 1-228th
7 p.m.: Co. B, 154th vs. SCN
8 p.m.: HHC, LEA (2) vs. 534th MP
White League
Tuesday
6 p.m.: Co. A, 308th vs. USAG
7 p.m.: Co. B, 193rd Spt.
Thursday
6 p.m.: HHD, 470th vs. HHC, 142nd
7 p.m.: HHC, 193rd Inf. vs. Co. B, 193rd
Spt.
*U.S. Navy Basketball
Tuesday
6 p.m. IANTN vs. Roadrunners
7 p.m. SCIATTS vs. Port Services
Wednesday
6 p.m. NSWU-8 vs. PWD
7 p.m. SBU-26 vs. Roadrunners
Thursday
6 p.m. Port Services vs. Marines
7 p.m. SCIATTS vs. IANTN
*Summer Slam
Pony Basketball League
Albrook AFS
Saturday
8 a.m.: Pacers vs. Jazz
9:15 a.m.: Sonics vs. Rockets
10:30 a.m.: Suns vs. Knicks
Tuesday
6 p.m: Pacers vs. Rockets
7:15 p.m.: Jazz vs. Knicks
Thursday
5 p.m.: Suns vs. Sonics
*Summer Slam
3-on-3 Basketball League
Fort Clayton
Monday
7 p.m.: Team 2 vs. Team 7
7:30 p.m.: Team 3 vs. Team 6
8 p.m.: Team 4 vs. Team 5
Aug. 19
7 p.m.: Team 5 vs. Team 3
7:30 p.m.: Team 6 vs. Team 2
8 p.m.: Team 7 vs. Team 1

Running association,
10-miler trial races set
The Panama Armed Forces Running
Association will conduct a five-mile run in
conjunction with the U.S. Army South 10-
Miler Team trials 6 a.m. Saturday at Reeder
Physical Fitness Center.
This will be the second trial date for the
USARSO 10-Miler Team. The final trial is
set for Aug. 27.
The 10-mile and five-mile runs are open
to all runners, however only active duty
soldiers assigned or attached to U.S. Army
South are eligible for the USARSO 10-
Miler Team.
The following is the Panama Armed
Forces Running Association schedule for
August:
Saturday - 10-mile and five-mile run 6
a.m. at Reeder Physical Fitness Center.
Aug. 21 - 15-kilometer run, 6:30 a.m.


Panama Canal College. Sponsored by the
Isthmus Road Runners.
Aug. 27 - 10-mile and five-mile run, 6
a.m. at Reeder Physical Fitness Center.
For information, call Allen Jones at 287-
5444 or Willie Moye at 287-6441.

School athletes can get
preseason physical
The Departmentof Defense Dependants
Schools will hold Interscholastic Athletic
Physicals at various locations in August.
College students can get forms at Panama
Canal College, high school students at
Balboa High School and junior high school
students at Curundu Junior High School
before the date of the physical exam.
Family members of active duty
servicemembers. can get physical at
Cristobal High School 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon-
day and the Adolescent Clinic (located next
to BHS in Building 711) 3-6 p.m. Wednes-
days and Thursdays.
Family members of civilians can go to
the following places:
CHS 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday
CJHS 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 19
BHS 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 26
For information call BHS at 282-7896,
CHS at 289-3690 and CJHS at 286-6254.

Rodman NS announces
fishing tournament
As part of the Jam '94 Labor Day festiv-
ities, Rodman NS will hold a bass fishing
tournament Sept. 3. Entry fee is $12 before
Aug. 30, and $15 thereafter. Cash prizes
will be awarded for the heaviest fish, the
heaviest stringer of three, and the heaviest
stringer of five. Register at the Marina
Office or at the Gamboa Ramp the day of
the tournament. Call 283-3147/3150 for
more information.

Rodman Marina
sponsors shark fishing
There will be a shark fishing trip aboard
the 42' Vargas 6 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 13 and
27. The boat departs from Rodman Marina,
there is a $38 fee. Maximum of eight peo-
ple. For more information call Rodman
Marina at 283-3147.

Sailing lessons offered at
Pedro Miguel Boat Club
Beginning sailing lessons are being of-
fered 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
and Aug. 20-21 at the Pedro Miguel Boat
Club. Cost is $75 per person. Graduates
will receive a certification card. For more
information call 287-5968.

Air Force sponsors
soccer tournament
An intramural soccer tournament is
scheduled for 5 p.m. Sept. 9-1 lat the Al-
brook Field. Registration is open through
Sept. 2 at the Howard Sports and Fitness
Center.


Air Force scouting for
Turkey Bowl coaches
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
is accepting coaching applications for the
1994 USAF Turkey Bowl Flag Football
Team. Applications are available at Howard
SFC and must be submitted by 4 p.m.
Monday.

Howard center offers
lunch bunch sports daily
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
offers various lunch bunch sports and fit-
ness activities every week. Scheduled events
are; Aerobics noon-I p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays, volleyball-11
a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, basketball 11 a.m.-
1 p.m. Tuesday.


Sports directory

Sports Offices
U.S. Air Force 284-3451
U.S. Army 287-4050
U.S. Navy 283-4061
Bowling centers
Albrook AFS 286-4260
Fort Clayton 287-6366
Curundu 286-3914
Fort Espinar 289-4100
Howard AFB 284-4190
Scuba diving
Albrook AFS 286-4090
Fort Davis 289-3208
Fort Kobbe 284-4854
Howard AFB 284-5766
Balboa Dive Club 263-8077
Golf courses


Fort Amador
Horoko


282-4511
283-6346


Fitness centers


Albrook AFS
Fort Clayton
Fort Davis
Howard AFB
Rodman NS
Swimming
Albrook AFS
Balboa
Curundu
Farfan
Fort Clayton
Fort Davis
Fort Espinar
Gamboa
Gatun
Howard
Los Rios
Margarita
Rodman NS


286-3307
287-3861
289-3496
284-3451
283-4222
pools
286-3555
252-5493
286-6260
284-4252
287-6660
289-3272
289-4189
256-6425
243-5233
284-3569
252-6417
243-7229
283-4253


Standings


U.S Army Unit-level Basketball
Green League
W L GB
97th 4 1 -
IC, 5-87th 3 1 .5
vy 2 0 .5
TB 1 1 1.5
9th 1 1 1.5
7th 2 2 1.5
.B, 5-87th 0 1 2
.C, 5-87th 0 2 2.5
SA, 5-87th 1 3 2.5
rines 0 3 3


SBU-26
Roadrunn
IANTN
PWD
SCIATTF


*as of Wednesday
U.S. Navy Unit-level
Basketball League
5 0
hers 4 1 1
3 2 2
2 3 3
S 2 3 3


Marines
NSWU-8


Por


2 3
2 3


tSvcs. 0 5 5
*as of Monday
U.S. Air Force Unit-levelBaskteball


American League
Northern Division
24th AIS/OSS 3 2
24th Supply (B) 4 4
24th Trans. 3 3
24th AIRPS/SVS 3 3
Co. A, 1-228th 1 4
Southern Division
24th SPS (A) 6 0
24th MSS 5 1
HHC, 1-228th 1 3
640th AMSS (B) 2 4
24th Comm. (B) 0 4
National League
Eastern Division
24th Supply (A) 4 0


640th AMSS (A) 3 0
24th Comm. (A) 1 2
24th Med. Grp. 0 6
Western Division


HSC, 5:
24th CE
24th Ma
310th A
24th SP



Knicks
Rockets
Pacers
Suns
Jazz
Sonics


Team 5


Teai
Teai
Teai
Teai
Teai
Teai



Plac
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10


36th 4 2 -
S 4 3 .5
paint. Sq. 3 3 1
LS 3 4 1.5
S (B) 0 2 2
Summer Slam
Youth Basketball Program
Pony League
6 0 -
4 2 2
4 2 2
3 3 3


1 4 4.5
0 6 6
3-on-3 League
6 1 -


m 4 4 2 1.5
m 1 3 3 2.5
nm 2 3 3 2.5
m 3 3 3 2.5
m6 2 3 3
m7 0 6 5.5
*as of Thursday
Panama Armed Forces Running
Association Championship
e Points Name
851 Ricardo Roman
842 Miguel Campos
828 Clint Davis
797 Sue Bozgoz
789 Willie Moye
784 Richard Downie
705 Leovigildo Castillo
638 Stephen Kupec
618 Enrique Gordon
613 Pablo Cercenia
*as of July 31


109
HH
Na
JO
54S
74C
"Co
Co
Co
Ma


I




c~q - ~4~~9& -c-I
~2f/~2


*News


First transit U.S. Navy photo by Petty Offtticer 2nd UClass Roberto Taylor
Fresh from the shipyards in Mississippi, the USS Squallmade its first
Panama Canal transit last week. The Cyclone class coastal patrol
craft stopped off at Rodman NS while on its way to commissioning in
San Diego.



21 Atlantic students


learning DEH job skills


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlan-
tic) - More than 20 students are spending
their summer vacations picking up valu-
able job skills and training from the Di-
rectorate of Engineering and Housing
here.
The Atlantic community's summer hire
program has put the 21 young people to
work in the directorate's offices and shops,
or on the road with maintenance crews, ac-
cording to Maj. Perry A. Colvin, director,
Directorate of Engineering and Housing,
Atlantic.
The summer hires who were placed in
the various maintenance shops or with
maintenance crews are working at the ap-
prentice level, Colvin said.
"They are physically learning a trade,"
Colvin said. "This experience is a re-
sume-builder for them. It gives them skills
they could use later on, either profession-
ally or just to make repairs around the
house."
Additionally, the summer hires can use
the experience as career guidance.
"Right now, they may not really know
what they're interested in." he said. "At the
end of the summer, they may know if this
is the right career field for them or if they'd
like to try something else."
At least one of the summer hires, Raul
Fung, is convinced he's found his niche
while working at DEH.
Fung, who works in the electrical shop,
has completed two years of college at the


University of Texas at San Antonio major-
ing in engineering, he said.
Working at DEH during the summer
has given him valuable hands-on experi-
ence to reinforce what he's learning in col-
lege, Fung said.
"I'm glad I've had the opportunity to
work here," he said. "In a very short time
I've learned many things from DEH em-
ployees that I may not have learned other-
wise."
While the experience may help him to
earn his degree in engineering, seeing the
results of his work is rewarding as well,
Fung said.
"Most of the things we do here every
day are necessities for people - for the
families and soldiers," he said.
The summer hires have helped more
than just the soldiers and families howev-
er, Colvin said.
"With the shortfall of the budget for
DEH, some of our employees were offered
early retirement; 13 employees took the
offer," he said. "Those positions won't get
filled, so the students have really helped us
out this summer."
"We've had some problems with some
of the summer hires in the past, but this is
the best group we've had," he added.
"They only get paid for working 7:30
(a.m.) to 11:30 (a.m.), but a lot of them
stick around after that, without getting
paid, to help out and learn more. They're
very eager to work," Colvin said.


Recycling



Military, civilian communities


beefing up local programs


-~ - U
a



1' x
I


involved in the recycling program."
Some items that are being recycled
back in the United States are not recycled
here in Panama, Gifford said. "Among
these are glass, plastics, toner cartridges,
and newspapers. Were trying to stimulate
a local market for some of these items and,
in the case of the toner cartridges, we're
working on ways of getting them back to
the states."
Other members of the recycling QIT
had more ideas for conserving and recy-
cling resources.
Locally, there is not a viable market for
recycling newspapers, said Sandra
Murdoch, chief, 24th Services Squadron's
recreation support flight, "But that doesn't
mean people have to just dump them in the
garbage. A lot of different organizations
can use your old newspapers.
"DoDDS, the child development cen-
ters and even the arts and crafts shops can
use newspapers to protect furniture and
floors during art class or other 'messy' ac-
tivities," she explained. "The thrift shop at
Albrook, and the various military arts and
crafts shops, can use newspapers as pack-
ing material, or they can be used at
Corozal's veterinary clinic.
"People can also re-use the brown pa-
per bags in which their groceries are
packed. They can be used to wrap packag-
es for mailing, or parents can recruit their


by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - Recycling? Uh,
...no, we don't do that here. There just isn't
a market for recycling in Panama. Ehh!
Wrong answer! The truth of the matter is,
the American military community - both
active duty and civilian employees - has
a wide variety of recycling efforts going
on right now and there are several new
programs "in the works."
"When they talk about recycling, most
people think of highly visible programs
such as aluminum cans and newspapers,
or maybe computer and bond paper," said
Wayne Gifford, chief, 24th Civil Engineer
Squadron's environmental flight. "We
don't have those programs in place right
now, so a lot of people think we don't
have any recycling program at all.
"Actually, we have a very active recy-
cling program in place, it's just that most
community members don't know about
it," he said. Items being recycled under the
current program include rubber tires, lead
acid batteries, scrap metal, waste oil, and
cardboard.
"Many of these programs are not actu-
ally bringing in revenue," Gifford said,
"but they do allow us to dispose of items
in an 'environmentally-friendly' way -
they don't go to the
landfill - and we
get it done at no cost
to the government." Last year
In the past, as community al
much as 100 tons of $8 million in e
garbage have been
taken daily from all thinking aboul
the local military in- lights, word pi
stallations and de-
posited in the Red typewriters ar
Tank landfill. Con- when they're i
centrated efforts to
use the "3 Rs" - can cut a lot c
reduce, re-use, and electricity bill.'
recycle - are con-
stantly working to Waync
decrease those num- chief of th
bers, Gifford said. Squadron
"Actually, right
now we're working on two of the more
familiar and popular aspects of a recycling
program - paper and aluminum," said
Jennifer Putz, a 24th CES environmental
engineer. "We've come up with several
very workable solutions, and now we're
just trying to get them implemented."
About 10 months ago, former vice
wing commander Col. Craig A. Bernhard
signed a charter establishing a recycling
Quality Improvement Team and present-
ed it to the 24th Wing Quality Improve-
ment Board. The QIT is made up of active
duty and civilian members of the Army,
Navy, and Air Force, as well as represen-
tatives from the Panama Canal Commis-
sion, Army and Air Force Exchange Ser-
vice, Defense Reutilization and Marketing
Office and Department of Defense Depen-
dents Schools. It has gathered information
on the many different kinds of recycling
programs currently being used by the var-
ious organizations, and is exploring how
the programs were implemented, what
kinds of difficulties were encountered, and
how they were overcome.
"Several different organizations al-
ready have effective programs in place,"
Gifford said. "We're hoping to be able to
benefit from their experiences, so we
don't have to go back and re-invent the
wheel every time a new organization gets


children to deco-
rate the bags with
crayons, markers
and stickers to
create a unique
wrapping paper
for personal
gifts.
"Speaking of
kids," Putz said,
"most of them
love to draw and
old papers (non-
classified, of
course) generally
have a blank side
that can be a
cheap venue for
their artistic ex-


pression. In our office we also use the
backs of used papers for notes and for draft
copies of documents," she added.
Besides making an effort to re-use
items, people can reduce use.
"A perfect example of this is disposable
cups, either paper, plastic or styrofoam,"
Putz said. "Last year, Howard's base ser-
vice store alone sold about a half million
disposable cups. When you think of all the
resources used to make these cups and all
the space they take in the landfill, bringing
a regular ceramic or plastic coffee mug to
work and rinsing it out at the end of the
day seems like a simple and logical solu-
tion."
Electricity use is another area that can
be cut back dramatically, Gifford said.
"Last year the Air Force community alone
used nearly $8 million in electricity," he
explained. "Simply thinking about it and
turning off lights, word processors, elec-
tric typewriters and computers when
they're not being used can cut a lot off the
base's electricity bill."
"These are just a few ideas that demon-
strate how easy it is to reduce, re-use and
recycle," Putz said. "It also shows how,
with a little initiative and creativity, mem-
bers of the military and DoD community
can get personally involved with the recy-
cling and conservation programs."


1 Tropic Times
1 Aug. 12,1994


the Air Force
one used nearly
electricity. Simply
t it and turning off
processors, electric
id computers
not being used
>ff the base's


e Gifford
e 24th Civil Engineer
's environmental flight










Tropictivities
A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama


Aug. 12. 1994


Page BI


Sleeping beauty? Department of Defense photo by Maureen Sampson
Not exactly. Erika Simpson and Taya Castro rehearse a scene from "Happily Ever After," a children's theater production that will be performed this
weekend at the Pacific Theatre Arts Centre. See story and photos on Page B3.


I YothNe s ag B


High school students participate
in week-long Junior Reserve Offi-
cer Training Corps exercise.


I o m ni yP g e B


Motorcycle safety class helps bik-
ers avoid accidents while on the
road.


*Movies, Page B8
*TV, Page B9
*Potpourri, Page B12


,406 1









B 2 ITropic Times
d Aug. 12, 1994


* Youth news


JROTC cadets find exercise


more than 'a walk in the park'


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT KOBBE - Students from
Cristobal and Balboa High Schools
found summer camp to be more
than hiking, swimming and meeting
new people. They went through a
week-long Junior Reserve Officers
Training Corps exercise last week.
Instead of the usual hike through
the woods, these campers negotiat-
ed a land navigation course and took
on the challenges of the Green Hell
obstacle course at Fort Sherman,
said Sgt. Maj. (Ret.) Richard
Martinez, Army JROTC instructor.
"During this summer camp, we
have taken the students through sev-
eral confidence-building events," he
said. "We have gone through adven-
ture training, rope bridge crossing,
waterborne training and rappeling."
Though the camp was a constant
challenge for the students, the in-
structors felt there was more to it
than that.
"There is nothing better than to
mold young minds," Martinez said.
"It is part of our responsibility as in-
structors to teach these students to
take on responsibilities, to build self
confidence and, more than anything,
coach them to become high school
graduates."
For the students, the camp held
different interests and different high
points for each.
"My favorite part of the training
was the waterborne training," said
Kathia Forde, a senior at Cristobal
High School. 'Through the camp I
was able to meet a lot of new people
and did new things that helped boost
my self confidence."
Leadership was another learning
experience for the students as they
held various positions within the
"company."
"I learned a lot of leadership
skills that will help me in other
things and with my future in


Department of Defense Dependents' Schools
require interscholastic athletic physical for all
students participating in any school sporting activi-
ty. See Page 15 for dates and times physical will
be given for specific schools.

Albrook/Howard
*Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Arts and crafts 3 p.m. Wednesday at both cen-
ters. There is a $1 fee for supplies.
Gymnastics classes Saturdays. Ages 3-5 meet
noon-1 p.m.; ages 6-12 meet 1-2 p.m.; intermedi-
ate classes meet 2-3 p.m. The cost is $13 per month.
Summer Day Camp Carnival 1:30-4:30 p.m.
today, ages 6-12. Admission is $2.
Pre-teen dance 7:30-10:30 p.m. today. For ages
8-13.
Air hockey tournament, 3 p.m. Tuesday.
A Personal Safety for Kids Workshop will be
held 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursday.
Bicycle rodeo 9-11 a.m. Aug. 20.
Register for youth (ages 5-18) fall soccer sea-
son before Aug. 27.
Hideout Senior Teen Dance for ages 15-18,
7:30-11:30 p.m. Aug. 20 at the Howard NCO Club
ballroom. Admission is $2. Transportation will be
provided from Albrook Youth Center and Clayton
Youth Activities. Pick-up at 6:30 p.m. and return
at 11:45 p.m. Sign up in advance.
Babysitting 101, 1 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday at
the Zodiac community Activities Center. Training
in first aid, CPR and much more. Each person will
be charged $2 for the class.
Snorkeling at Drake Island 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Aug. 19. A $20 fee covers transportation, equip-
ment, boat and guide. Participants must be certi-
fied swimmers.
Captain T-Bird and Captain KC Youth
Summer Bowling Special allows children to bowl
three games during open bowling and receive a free
sports bottle filled with fountain soda.
*Child Development Center 284-6135:
Family Day Care Providers are needed in the
Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135
for information.

Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Back to school shopping trip to downtown
Panama City 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday.
Back to school mini camp 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Monday-Aug. 19. Fee is $5 per day or $20 for the
week. Call the center for information on camp ac-
tivities.
Arts and crafts Mondays.
Cooking experiences Tuesdays.
Outdoor Games Thursdays.
Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednes-
days. The fee is $30 for four half-hour lessons per
month.
Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30 p.m.
and 3:30-4:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays.
Youth Services is looking for piano and gym-
nastics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at
287-3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Volleyball 3-5 p.m. today and Saturday.
Surfing beach tour Sunday. Call for details.
Scale model clinic 7-8 p.m. Thursday.
Golf demonstration at the golf range by the
teen center 3-5 p.m. Aug. 19.
Popcorn and movies Sundays.
Senior Teen Employment Program is a year-
round program to develop job skills and earn mon-
ey for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are avail-
able at the center.
*Child Development Center 287-3301:
Child development center provides high qual-
ity, developmental child care for children 6 weeks
to 12 years old. Full day care and hourly care avail-
able. Call 287-5657.

Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Just for kids pizza and bowling 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Saturday. The fee is $3.
Saturday sports, noon to 6 p.m.
Flag football and cheerleader registration is
under way through August. Coaches are needed.
A mandatory parents meeting will be held Sept. 8.


ROTC," said Ethan Corsbie, a junior
at Balboa High School. "My favorite
training, however, was going through
Green Hell. It was tough, but fun."
The final challenge for JROTC ca-
dets was taking on the 30-foot rappel
tower at Fort Kobbe. Though most of
the students had never rappeled be-
fore, they were up to the challenge.


They were excited and scared,
Martinez said. But, after the first cou-
ple of times, it became fun for them.
Most of the students went back up
the tower several times to try various
rappel styles. With fear in their eyes
and smiles on their faces, student af-
ter student went out over the edge and
took the plunge.


. i


" . . . ... i- " ' . * ""-
U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Richard Emert
Lourdes Craft colors in one of the Atlantic Vacation Bible School's kindergarten classes.


More than 100 attend Bible school


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) - Sitting in a
classroom seems like the last thing students would want
to do during summer vacation, but more than 100 did just
that Aug. 1-5.
The 100-plus elementary school students attended the
week-long Atlantic community's Vacation Bible School
at Fort Davis Elementary School.
The Bible school was offered to children in kindergar-
ten through sixth grade; and the children were placed in
the grade they had just completed, said Mary E. Ortiz, di-


rector of the Bible school.
Activities ranged from classroom discussions and role
playing to music and arts and crafts, Ortiz said.
"After school's out, there is really nothing for the kids
to do," she said. "We try to show them some fun."
While they're having that fun, the children are learn-
ing about the bible, Ortiz said.
"I think they'll have a better understanding of Jesus
Christ than they did before they began," she said. '"This
offers them a path for future understanding of the Bible."


-~
U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Staff Sgt. Samuel Oglesby, 1st Bn. (Airborne), 508th Inf., helps
Balboa High School student Patricia DeLeon over the edge of the
30-foot rappel tower during JROTC summer camp.


Off"









_Entertainment




Happily Ever After...


Children's play culminates


seven-week theater workshop


Tropic Times B
Aug. 12, 1994B


Fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm come to life
this weekend as the Pacific Theatre Arts
Centre's Children's Summer Theatre Camp
presents "Happily Ever After."
The production is the culmina-
tion of seven weeks of rehearsing
scenes, memorizing lines, and "It's inter
building sets. The cast includes 28
children, ages 7-13. cause you
The Pacific Theatre Arts how it was
Centre sponsors the workshops
twice a year to give the youths a people live
better knowledge of the theater, tales and it
said director DL Sima. you're in a
Putting on a play might seem
like a simple task to the non- yourself."
thespian, but the youths put a lot Maure
of effort into making this show actress
come together.
"At home I practiced and
practiced for this scene, and I finally got the lines right,"
said Cheryl Castro, 10, who plays Berta the Cook.
Their dedication seems to be paying off. Most of the
young performers are enjoying their spot in the lime-
light.
"You feel important because you're out there and
everyone's watching you," said Sonya Simpson, 9, who
plays the giant's grandmother. Simpson admits she'll
probably be nervous opening night.
Aspiring actress Kate Bowra, 10, hopes this experi-
ence will be a stepping stone on her road to stardom.
"It's not professional, but its practically almost like it,
but you're not a grown-up and this isn't Hollywood."


Bowra says she would like to make acting a career.
Other young actors, like 10-year-old Maureen
O'Connor, think the play has been sort of a history
lesson.


sting be-
can see
when


d
S f
fa

er


"It's interesting because you can
see how it was when people lived
in fairy tales and it feels like you're
in a fairy tale yourself," O'Connor
said, "They have real neat cloth-
ing."


... The show is broken down into
in fai ry three fairy tales - Prince
eels like Bristlebeard, Luck Child and One
airy tale Eyes, Two Eyes, Three Eyes.
James Brumbaugh and Lilli Davis
portray the Grimm brothers and
n O'Connor provide a short narrative between
each tale. There is a brief intermis-
sion between each act.
The production is geared toward
the younger viewer, but adults may also enjoy the
performance, Sima said.
"They're good little actors. They're fun to watch
and fun to work with," Sima said. "People might be
surprised to see the kid next door on stage doing a
believable job recreating these fairy tales."
"Happily Ever After" will be performed 7:30 p.m.
tonight and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the theater,
Building 2060 Curundu. Call 286-3814 for reservations.
"I think the community will be impressed with the
strength of the children's performance," Sima said.
"Everyone should come see it and support the kids.
Clap really loud because they deserve it."


Jeffrey Townsend portrays the fearsome Giant
Gold Hair.


Taya Castro and Brooke Stringfellow rehearse a scene from the third act.


Sarah Stringfellow, Lilli Davis, Katrina Michie and Kerrigan
Davis perform "Luck Child" during dress rehearsal.

story and photos
\ . _ I by Maureen Sampson
.--.. Tropic Times editor


Cheryl Castro, Robert Trisler and
Lisa Sproul prepare a royal feast.









SFIocus on Panama


Balboa



Conquistador 's



legacy remains

T he Republic of Panama's From this key location, Balboa
monetary unit, the Balboa organized gold and slave hunting
coin, honors him by bearing expeditions into the dense jungle of the
his portrait and name. A monument interior. In 1511, Indians in the area
dedicated to his accomplishments rests told Balboa about the gold-filled land of
at the edge of the Pacific Ocean in Tubanama, located on the other side of
downtown Panama City. Local street the region's mountains, near a great sea.
signs and buildings display his name. A On Sept. 1, 1513, Balboa led an
terminal port along the banks of the expedition by ship from Darien to Acla,
famous Panama Canal also pays the narrowest strip of land on the
homage to him. Yet, most visitors to isthmus. From this spot, the troop
this country know almost nothing about traveled inward on foot, in hopes of
the man. finding the mythical region and its
Vasco Nunez de Balboa was a riches. The group consisted of 190
Spanish conquistador and explorer. He Spanish soldiers - including Francisco
is credited with discovering the Pacific Pizzaro, eventual conquerer of the
Ocean, serving as the first governor of golden Incan Empire in Peru - 1,000
Panama, and being the first advocator Indian slaves, and a pack of dogs.
of a canal route between the Atlantic In the third week of the trip, Indian
and Pacific oceans. guides told Balboa that a vast ocean
Born in 1475, Balboa was the son of was visible from a nearby mountain
a low-ranking nobleman. At the age of top. He ordered his men to wait for him
25, he joined an expedition sailing to as he climbed to the summit. From this
South America. Thus, he left his vantage point, Balboa became the first
hometown of Jerez de los Caballeros, European to see the Pacific Ocean,
Spain, in search of fame and fortune in which he named the South Sea.
the New World. On Sept. 29, 1513, St. Michael's
After two years of exploration on the Day, Balboa and his entourage reached
high seas, the ship found its way to the the shores of the South Sea and the Gulf
island of Hispaniola (Haiti), the primary of San Miguel, which he named for that
Spanish command center in America at reason. Carrying a banner and dawning
the time. a full suit of armor, Balboa waded into
Enchanted by the fertile island, the ocean and claimed the new found
Balboa decided to give up the wayward, waters and its shores for the king of
nautical lifestyle of the open ocean and Spain.
try his luck at farming and raising Balboa returned to Darien from his
livestock. By 1510, Balboa found excursion to the Pacific with gold,
himself heavily in debt and possessing a pearls and cotton cloth in January,
strong distaste for working the soil. He 1515. However, during his time away,
decided to escape his creditors by he was replaced as governor of the
heading to Uraba (Colombia) as a region by Pedro Arias de Avila, who
stowaway aboard a ship carrying later became known as "Pedrarias the
supplies and reinforcements to an Cruel." Yet, as a reward for his success-
isolated Spanish colony. ful mission, King Ferdinand made
Upon his arrival, Balboa suggested Balboa governor of the provinces he
the colonists move to the less hostile discovered -- Panama and the lands of
coastline of Panama. At Darien, he the South Sea. Balboa was expected to
helped to establish the town of Santa take on a subordinate role to Pedrarias.
Maria de la Antigua, the first stable The relationship between the two men
settlement on the continent. One year was strained by jealousy and distrust.
later, King Ferdinand of Spain appoint- During the next two years, Balboa
ed Balboa governor of Darien. undertook the tedious task of transport-


1


Tropic Times file photo
The Balboa Monument, standing along the Panama City waterfront,
commemorates the explorer's discovery of the Pacific Ocean and the
moment he waded into the surf to claim it for the king of Spain.



.










The 1904 Balboa 50 centesimos, Panama's first monetary unit, was
named in honor of the explorer after the country gained its independence
from Colombia. To this day, Panamanian coins are referred to as Balboas.

Compiled by Spc. Tom Findtner
Tropic Times staff


ing ship building materials across the
isthmus from Acla, in order to construct
a fleet to explore the mysteries of the
South Sea. By 1517, two ships had been
assembled and Balboa had sailed
throughout the Gulf of Miguel.


As Balboa planned an expedition to
Peru with Pizzaro, Pedrarias had him
unjustly arrested for rebellion, high
treason, and mistreatment of Indians. In
a hasty trial, Balboa was found guilty
and beheaded in January 1519.


0 aaanw u mr


Editor's note: The following summary of news
is taken from the Panamanian press. The transla-
tion and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is
made by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of
reporting or statements made here. Selection of
these stories does not imply any emphasis, judge-
ment or endorsement by the U.S. government.
These synopsises are intended only to give non-
Spanish speaking people a flavor for events in
Aug. 5-10
El Panama America:
Paper quotes authorities saying they have no infor-
mation supporting reports that terrorist members of
the pro-Iranian Hizbolah group are in Panama. Ac-
cording to U.S. and Argentine experts, members of
this group were responsible for the July 19 bombing of
the "Alas" airplane.

Critica Libre, La Prensa, El Panama America,
La Estrella, El Siglo:
Papers report on the closure of the Inter-American
Highway in the Chame area by a group of truck drivers


protesting a ban on the removal of sand from Pacific
side beaches. The protest reportedly started at 9 a.m.
and ended seven hours later when Panamanian riot
police intervened.

Hoy, La Estrella:
Papers cite a report prepared by the Inter-Amer-
ican Commission Against Drug Abuse, in consulta-
tion with the Pan-American Health Organ-
ization,which states that Panama, at 13.2 percent, has
the highest rate of cocaine use in all of Latin America.

Critica Libre, La Prensa, El Siglo:
Papers quote the director of Hydrocarbons at the
Panama Ministry of Commerce and Industry as say-
ing tests conducted in a United States laboratory
showed gasoline used in Panama last month con-
tained no toxic elements.

El Panama America:
Paper reports taxi drivers will restrict their trips to
certain communities in the Province of Colon be-
cause of a lack of security in the streets and a high


level of crime and violence from which they have
suffered. The taxis will curtail trips to Puerto
Escondido, Cativa, Rio Alejandro and Villa Alondra
in Colon.

La Prensa:
Paper states a group of Panamanian lawyers
presented President-elect Ernesto Perez Balladares
with a draft bill containing measures to prevent
anonymous societies from laundering money ob-
tained through drug trafficking. U.S. drug enforce-
ment authorities have stated that Panama's banking
center, the system for anonymous societies, in addi-
tion to the Colon Free Zone are used for
"Narcolaundering."

La Prensa:
Paper reports that Alberto Aleman, an engineer
for the construction company that widened the high-
way between Arraijan and the Bridge of Americas,
recommended that a new bridge with full lighting be
built over the Panama Canal. It is estimated that
25,000 cars cross the bridge each day.


B 4 Tropic Times
SAug. 12, 1994










iC community news


Tropic Times B 5
Aug. 12, 1994 B 5


� ,_










U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Motorcycle riders practice what they learned in the classroom. Eight people took part in a four
hour riding session as part of the experienced motorcycle riders course.


Riders learn to safely
ALBROOK AFS (USARSO PAO) - Eight motorcycle
owners, both military and Department of Defense civilians
in Panama, had a chance to practice some necessary riding
skills Saturday, here.
The four-hour riding session is part of the requirement
for people attending the experienced motorcycle riders
course offered through the U.S. Army Garrison Safety
Office.
The course is required for motorcycle owners driving on
military installations, said course instructor, Keith Olive.
"This course is necessary in order for motorcycle own-
ers to have their temporary post passes extended," he said.
Before going through the riding portion of the course,
students must complete four hours of classroom training. In
the classroom, students learn about cornering, breaking
and swerving, Olive said.
"Throughout the course, they go through 12 exercises,"
he said. "The course revolves around areas which have

Nova accepting .

applications for

September class
DIABLO (Tropic Times) - Nova
Southeastern University is accepting
applications for a new Masters of
Business Administration degree J
group that will start in September.
Nova has the only U.S. accredited
M.B.A. program in Panama, said
university dean Martin C. Taylor.
The two-year, weekend program
in the executive format is designed to
strengthen managerial and leader-
ship skills through its 13 courses in
quantitative and qualitative compe-
tencies, Martin said.
Anyone interested in enrolling in
the program should call 252-2071/
2494 or visit the administrative of-
fice in the Diablo Clubhouse, Build-
ing 5051, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-
Friday.
Applicants must hold a baccalau-
reate degree in any major from an
accredited college or university. At
least three semester hours of under-
graduate work are required in statis-
tics, economics, accounting, market-
ing and finance.
Applicants must also score 450 or
higher on the Graduate Management
Admission Test; or 1000orhigheron Nationa
the Graduate Record Examination,
Taylor said. McGruff the (
Tuition assistance and Veterans Annual Natio
Affairsbenefitscanbediscussedwith Night Out is d
local military education officers. awareness, g
Nova has been in Panama since crime efforts
1977. It has graduated almost 900 community r
professionals at the doctoral, masters letting them
and bachelors levels, Taylor said. letting them k
back. More th


corner, break, swerve
been found lacking in accidents."
Throughout the riding portion, the riders go through the
evaluation course so the instructor can see what they have
learned. Olive suggests riders continue to practice these
skills after the course is over.
"Just riding isn't practicing," he said. "If you don't
practice, you lose some of your skills."
Bill Collier, a student in the class, has been riding
motorcycles for 30 years.
"I hope to pick up afew pointers to help with my survival
on the road," he said. "This class teaches techniques that
can help you get more control and provide more safety."
The class is offered at 6 p.m. on the first Thursday of
each month at the Defensive Driving Course training room,
Corozal. The evaluation is held at 7:30 a.m. on the first
Saturday of every month at the parking lot next to the Auto
Mechanic Shop on Albrook AFS.
For information, call the safety office at 287-4051.


Clayton
A La Leche League meeting will be held 7p.m.
Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center. Women
who are pregnant or breastfeeding are invited and
babies are also welcome. The meeting topic will be
"nutrition andweaning."Forinformation, call Debbie
Owens at 287-6592.
A cross-cultural workshop will be held 8 a.m.-
2:30 p.m. Aug. 25 Building 155, Fort Clayton. The
workshop is designed to enable newcomers to adapt
culturally to Panama. For reservations, call 287-
5073. For free child care, call 287-5657.
The annual missionary picnic will be held
11:30 a.m. Saturday at the large bohio on Fort
Clayton. For information, call Michelle Swistak at
287-3390.
The Exceptional Family Member Program
support group meeting will be held 7:30-9 p.m.
Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center. All active
duty, retirees and Department of Defense civilians
who have family members who have disabilities are
invited to attend. For special services or accommo-
dations because of a disability or for more informa-
tion, call the EFMP manager at 287-5073/4921.
The Enlisted Spouses Club - Panama holds
meetings 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month at
the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Club.
For information, call 287-3587.
For Clayton Guest House La Mola restau-
rant will have new hours effective Monday:
*Breakfast: 6:30-9:30 a.m. Weekends/holi-
days 7-11 a.m.
*Lunch: 11 a.m.-l:30p.m..Weekends/holidays
11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
*Dinner: 5-8 p.m. every day.

Howard/Albrook
The Family Support Center Relocation Assis-
tance Program will hold a Welcome to Panama
orientation and tour Thursday. Tour buses depart
the Howard Enlisted Club at 7:30 a.m. and return at
3:30 p.m. Parents may call the Child Development
Center (Howard 284-6135 or Albrook 285-6882)
for free child care. To sign up, or for more informa-
tion, call 284-5010.
The Howard Family Support Center offers tran-
sition assistance counseling by appointment from
7:30 a.m. to4:30 p.m. weekdays. Formore informa-
tion, call 284-3865/4347.
The family services division of the Howard
Family Support Center needs volunteers to help
operate the loan closet, the base brochure library,
and the coupon program.
Family services is open from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. weekdays, and free child care is available for
all volunteers. To volunteer, or for more informa-
tion, call 284-5860.

Miscellaneous
The Officers' and Civilians' Wives Club-Pacific
is organizing the 1994 Spouses Inter-Service Wel-
come, Information and Sign-Up Coffee 10 a.m.-
noon Sept. 14 at Club Amador. Qualified instruc-
tors are needed to teach arts, crafts, sports and
hobbies. Care givers are also needed.
No vendors' fees will be charged. Registration
deadline is Aug. 31. For information, call Jane
Greenwood at 287-5120.
The Consolidated Chaplains' Fund is con-
ducting interviews for the following Fiscal Year 95
contract positions:
*Clayton Chapel General Protestant: seven
watchcareproviders-ProtestantWomen ofthe Chap-
el; two watch care providers for chapel services; one
music director and one pianist. The point of contact
is Chaplain Robert Scruggs at 287-5859.
*Clayton Chapel - Gospel pianist, music coordi-
nator, drummer, watch care provider. The POC is
Chaplain Paul O'Neil at 287-5877.
*Amador Chapel - Episcopal one pianist or
organist and one watch care provider. The POC is
Chaplain Robert Neske at 287-3532.
*Corozal Chapel: two watch care providers.
The POC is Chaplain Paul Bolton at 287-5859.
*Atlantic Chapel Center: three musicians, four
watch care providers. The POC is Chaplain Neil
Frey at 289-3319.
Contact the appropriate POC for an appoint-
ments.


U.S. Navy photo
al Night out fun for all
Crime Dog hands out balloons during the 11th
nal Crime Night Out at Farfan Aug. 5. National
designed to heighten crime and drug prevention
generate support and participation in local anti-
, strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-
elations, and send a message to criminals,
now neighborhoods are organized and fighting
ian 500 people attended.


I








S Tropic Times
B 6 Aug. 12, 1994




/^/ ~ ~ S * ///////////////>S//////////////


, Rodman
S Information. Tour and Travel:
Free Zone shopping trip, Aug. 31,
/ $12, 7 a.m. departure, minimum of 12
people needed.
El Valle shopping trip, Aug. 21, $12,
7 a.m., minimum of 12 people needed.
Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits &
vegetables and visit nature preserve.
Panama City tour, Monday and Aug.
24, $8, 9 a.m., minimum of 10 people
needed. Visit the Church of the Golden
Altar, French Plaza and more.
Barro Colorado Island, Saturday,
Thursday and Aug. 27, $65, 6 a.m. depar-
ture, two people needed. Visit the tropical
research island in the Panama Canal's
Gatun Lake.
Dinner in Panama, 6 p.m. Sunday and
Tuesday. Take the opportunity to dine on
Via Argentina, location of many of Pana-
ma City's restaurants, $4 covers roundtrip
transportation, cost of dinner is not includ-
ed.
Downtown shopping trip, 9 a.m. Aug.
19, $8. Shop Panama City's department
stores.
Moonlight Cruise, 6:30 p.m. Aug. 20,
$21 fee covers hors d'oeuvres. Cruise to
Taboga Island by moonlight, while view-
ing Panama City's skyline.
Labor Day weekend special tours:


Contadora Island, Sept. 2-5, $220/
person double occupancy, $265/person
single occupancy, transportation aboard
the Black Stalliort to and from island, 3
nights accommodation, all meals and na-
tional drinks, use of all facilities included
in the fee.
Cartagena, Columbia, Sept. 2-5, $325/
person (Decameron Hotel), $359/person
(Caribe Hotel). Fee includes airfare, three
nights accommodation, hotel transfers, city
tour, use of facilities and all meals, drinks,
and snacks (Decameron) or breakfast and
dinner(Caribe).
Bambito, Chiriqui, Sept. 2-5, $240/
person double occupancy, $215 triple oc-
cupancy. Fee includes transportation, three
nights accommodation, breakfast and din-
ners, tours of Boquete, Volcan and Cerro
Punta, coffee and banana plantations.
Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Center:
Free Zone Shopping Tour- 8:30 a.m.-
4:30p.m., $13 fee. Every Friday in Au-
gust.
Family trip to Summit Park and Zoo-
9a.m.- 2 p.m. Saturday, $15 fee.
Isla Grande Beach Trip- 7a.m.-6 p.m.
Sunday, $20 fee.
Beer Brewery and Locks Tour- 9
a.m.- 4 p.m. Tuesday, $8 fee.
Newcomer's Vista Panama- 7a.m.-9


p.m. Thursday, $1 fee. Learn about the
city and country.
*Outdoor adventures:
El Valle horseback riding trip 7 a.m.-
4 p.m. Aug. 20, $24 fee.
Peacock bass fishing in Gatun Lake 5
a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, $25 fee. Trip in-
cludes boat, guide and gear, bring your
own lunch.
Barro Colorado Nature Preserve
Tour- 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Aug. 19, $65 per
person. A must see island overflowing
with tropical plants, and animals.
Clayton
*Valent Recreation Center:
Shimmey Beach 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Satur-
day.
El Valle 6:30 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.
"ExpoMujer" exhibition 2-6 p.m. Sat-
urday at the Atlapa Convention Center,
bus departs at 2 p.m. The $8 fee includes
entrance price and a raffle. Call for reser-
vations.
*Outdoor Recreation Center:
Partial transits of the Panama Ca-
nal 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, $40. A
minimum of 20 people is needed for a
partial transit any other day of the week.
There is Contadora Island transit ser-
vice Mondays and Fridays. Fees are $35
adults and $20 children 12 and under
round trip, $25 adults and $15 children


one way.
Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel
opportunity to Montego Bay any Sunday
through Wednesday. Packet includes air-
fare, three nights hotel accommodations,
and transfer. Prices vary from $300-$600
depending on the hotel.
There will be a whitewater rafting
trip in Chiriqui Aug. 20-21. The $160 fee
covers transportation, lodging, guides and
meals. All participants must be 12 years
old or older and be able to swim.
Balboa
*Balboa Dive Club:
The club is now accepting new
members. Divers must show a diving
certification card to join, membership is
$12 per diver per year.
The club will hold its next meeting
7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Curundu
Restaurant. The guest speaker will be
Richard Peralta of Asocacion Oceana de
Panama. Information on upcoming dives
will be available.
The club is organizing a trip to Bocas
del Toro Sept. 3-5. The trip is $275 per
person and includes roundtrip airfare,
accommodations, meals, entertainment,
tanks, weights and five guided boat dives.
A $100 deposit is required. Contact the
club about reservations and send your
check to Unit 0967, APO AA 34002.


**


Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activi-
ties Center:
Tae Kwon Do at Zodiac Cen-
ter for children and adults.
Beginner and advanced dog
obedience, $32 for 4 weeks.
Beginner and advanced
english and spanish offered
monthly.
Martial arts, at Howard and
Albrook Youth Centers, 284-
4700.
*Albrook Auto shop:
Air conditioning service and
repair 12:30-5 p.m. every day
except Tuesday and Wednesday.
Wheel alignment diagnostic
and service classes are held 3-9
p.m. Monday, Thursdays and Fri-
days, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday
and Sundays.
*Howard and Albrook Pools
Intro to scuba, Free, call for
appointment. -
Open water scuba, Monday,
Albrook Pool, $145 fee.
Advanced scuba, Aug. 22, Al-
brook Pool. $105 fee.


Water exercise, for begi
to advanced adult swimmer
Dive master scuba, ava
Monday at the Howard Poo
Clayton
*Fort Clayton Boat Sho
Beginning and adva
swimming lessons are ava
at the Clayton Pool 2:15-5:4'
Mondays-Thursdays.
*Valent Recreation Cen
Basic/intermediate En
Monday-Thursday, one hour

Intermediate Spanish, 1
day-Sept. 10. Class meets
p.m. Tuesday and Thursday
fee.
Eight-week Spi
headstart meets 5-7
Wednesday and Fridays,
Wednesday. Register today
+Fort Clayton Scuba Sh
The phone is temporary
of order. Call 287-6453/58(
information.
Basic open-water sc
$115.
Advanced open-water s


/ //// /////




entertainmentt
*Valent Recreation Center:
Local talent is needed for t
T&T Countdown to Stardom 'S
low." The show will be 7 p.m.
Valent Recreation Center. The
will advance to compete with
ives from other post for a r
ssion with Sony Records .
*Atlapa Convention Center:
The National Concert Associa
sent the original chamber o
France - La Follia, 8 p.m. Wt


inning $140. 1 .
rs. Underwater photography,
liable $99.
l. Curundu
*Twin Oceans Pro Shop:
Equipment available for scu-
nced ba, snorkel, tennis, camping and
filable other outdoor recreation.
5 p.m. *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre:
Monthly classes are available
enter: ranging from various dance les-
glish sons, guitar and martial arts. Call .
reach. 286-3814 for information.
Rodman
rhurs- *Rodman Marina:
5-6- A two week open-water scu- .
s, $30 ba class will begin on Tuesday at
the Rodman Pool. All equipment,
anish textbooks, and certification will
p.m. provided for the $125 fee. Call
starts 283-5307 or 283-4454 to register. courtesy pt
A boating safety class will be IModel diver
op: held 6-9 p.m. Monday and Sandra Muggier blows bubbles for the ca
lyout Wednesday, $35 fee includes era. The Balboa Dive Club is taking entri
07 for materialsandtestdrive.Thecourse for the 1994 photography contest until Se
uba, b oats. Payment and reservations 14. Submit two entries in each catego

must be madebefore thefirst class. close up/macro, marine life, above water a
cuba, Call 283-3147 for information., diver portrait. Entries should be in color sli
format. Send to Unit 0967, APO AA 34002


he "USO
94 Talent
Saturday
top final-
represen-
recording


nation will
orchestraa
wednesday


in the La Huaca Theater, Atlapa Conven-
tion Center. For information or tickets, call
225-4951.
Baskets
*Albrook Club:
Basket Bazaar, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Aug. 28.
Once again, the largest basket, tagua, and
cocobolo wood carving sales will be hap-
pening at the Albrook Club Patio.
Theatre
*Pacific Theatre Arts Center:
The Children's Summer Theatre


hoto

m
ies
pt.
ry;
nd
d


Camp production "Happilly Ever After"
runs 7:30 p.m. today, and 2 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday. See story on page B3.
Social
*Club Amador:
The St. Andrews Society is holding its
annual Summer Ceilidh 7-10 p.m. Satur-
day at Club Amador. There will be a buffet
dinner, Scottish music, and folk dancing.
Neil McColl will speak on the "Darien
Expedition." Call Lorri Gilchrest at 260-
8228 or Violet Icaza at 230-1683 for infor-
mation.


............. -









notices


Tropic Times
Aug. 12, 1994 J


Nuns on the run
The Theatre Guild of Ancon will hold auditions for Nunsense II 7 p.m. Monday and Tuesday at
the Ancon theater. The musical comedy calls for five singing women. Performances will be Oct.
14-Nov. 8. The theater is located on Gaillard Highway, next to the Panamanian police station in
Ancon. Call 252-6786 for information.


S. *


*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts
Center:
Sewing twice a week for two
hours.
Cake decorating twice a week
for two hours.
The Ceramic Center, Building
198, is located near the Crafts Shop.
*Canal Crafters:
Handmade arts and crafts are
available. Consignment and volun-
teers are welcome by the shop staff.
The shop is open 10 a.m. -2 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursdays and Satur-
days, Building 804, Albrook. Call
286-4500. Classes are available.


Sign up at the shop.
Tole-painting, Santa tray 10:15
a.m. Tuesday.
Stencil demonstration 10:15
a.m. Aug. 23.
*Howard Skills Development
Center:
All classes must be preregis-
tered and prepaid. Classes will be
cancelled 24 hours prior if mini-
mum participation is not met.
Free Airbrushing Demonstra-
tion, noon-12:30 p.m. Friday, 2-
2:30 p.m. Thursday.
Framing Class, 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.
Saturday, $20 fee.


Free Porcelain Pouring Class,
2-4 p.m. Aug. 19. Need to buy slip
and tools.
Stained Glass Classes, 5-7 p.m.
Thursday.
Clay Flower Class, 11 a.m.- 1
p.m. Saturday.
Ongoing classes, stained glass,
framing, lamp assembly, pottery
wheel throwing, cross stitch, mac-
rame, clay flower and ceramics.

+Fort Sherman Multicraft Cen-
ter:
Air brush painting class Satur-
day, $2 fee.


// / /


0 .


*Valent Recreation Center:
Better Opportunities for
Single Soldiers forum meets the
first Thursday of every month and
is open to all barracks residents.
The center is looking for judges
for the second Scale Model Exhi-
bition and Expo '94. You must
know how to build models to qual-
ify. The event will be 2-5 p.m. Sept.
17-18. Call Johnny Tate at 287-
5057 for more information.
Live bird show Saturday.
Geological exhibit and sale of

/




Rec center news
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mon-
day, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and
Friday.
Beginning Painting 6-8 p.m.
Monday and Wednesdays.
Piano 10:30 a.m.-11 p.m.
Wednesday.
Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m.


gems, rocks, mineral stone and
jewelry, Aug. 20-21. Geological
experience and shopping opportu-
nity.
Gloria's Bazaar, 1-9 p.m. to-
day through Sunday.
Local dart tournament Oct. 8,
mandatory clinic Aug. 24. Register
now.
Slides, videos and photo show
today and Saturday commemorat-
ing the Panama Canal
Inaugeration.
*Cocoli Community Center:


7, / 7'//


////Mz�/


Wednesday.
Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday
and Wednesdays.
Gymnastics/ballet 6-8 p.m.
Thursday.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation
Center:
The center offers a variety
of classes such as karate, cake
decorating, Spanish, english, pi-
ano, country line-dancing and
jazz.


Arts and crafts for children
3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
*Zodiac Community Center:
Subs on Top has new hours, 11
a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays- Fridays, 11
a.m.- 3 p.m. Saturday. Subs on
Top is in the Zodiac Community
Activities Center. Take out, eat in
and delivery services are available.
Phone orders to 284-5848, fax to
284-6109.
Rent the activities room and
the Big Tree Bohio for private func-
tions.


I


Phone guide
Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250---75
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363
Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador, 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010
Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370
Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107
Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680
Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Howard Skills Development Center, 284-
6361
Howard Teen Center, 284-4700
Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
The Loop, 287-3035
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380
Rodman Annex, 283-5475
Rodman Club, 283-4498
Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150
Rodman Naval Station Information Tour
and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454
Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500
Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-
6161
Atlantic
Aquativity Center, 289-4009
Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201
Davis Community Club, 289-5160
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402
Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077
Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313
Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300


/7


Atlantic tours
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Isla Grande overnight, 8 a.m.
Saturday.
Portobello treasure hunt, 9 a.m.
Aug. 20.
El Valle 5:30 a.m. Aug. 21.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Cen-
ter:
El Valle 5:30 a.m. Sunday.
Panama City shopping, 8 a.m.
Aug. 20.










BD8 Tropic Times
Aug. 12, 1994


* Movies


Location

Howard AFB
284-3583


Fort Clayton
287-3279


Fort Davis
289-5173


Today


7pm: The Cowboy
Way (PG-13) Woody
Harrelson, Kiefer
Sutherland
9pm: Maverick (PG)
Mel Gibson, Jodie
Foster


7pm: Endless Summer
II (PG) Robert Weaver,
Patrick O'Connell
9pm: Beverly Hills
Cop III (R) Eddie
Murphy, Hector
Elizondo




7pm: The Crow (R)
Brandon Lee, Ernie
Hudson


Saturday


2pm: The Princess
and the Goblin (G)
Animated
7pm: Maverick (PG)
Mel Gibson, Jodie
Foster
9:30pm The Cowboy
Way (PG-13) Woody
Harrelson, Kiefer
Sutherland


2pm: Renaissance
Man (PG-13) Danny
Devito, Gregory Hines
7pm: Endless Summer
II (PG) Robert Weaver,
Patrick O'Connell
9pm: Renaissance Man
(PG- 13) Danny Devito,
Gregory Hines


Sunday


Monday


2pm: The Princess and 7pm: The Cowboy
the Goblin (G) Way (PG-13) Woody
Animated Harrelson, Kiefer
7pm: The Princess Sutherland
and the Goblin (G) 9pm: Maverick (PG)
Animated Mel Gibson, Jodie
9pm: Maverick (PG) Foster
Mel Gibson, Jodie
Foster


Tuesday Wednesday


7pm: Maverick (PG)
Mel Gibson, Jodie
Foster
9:30pm: The Cowboy
Way (PG-13) Woody
Harrelson, Kiefer
Sutherland


2pm: The Flintstones
(PG) John Goodman,
Rick Moranis
7pm: Getting Even
With Dad (PG) Ted
Danson, Macaulay
Culkin
9pm: The Flintstones
(PG) John Goodman,
Rick Moranis


-I I- T


2pm: Endless
Summer II (PG)
Robert Weaver,
Patrick O'Connell
7pm: Renaissance
Man (PG-13) Danny
Devito, Gregory Hines
9:30pm: No Escape
(R) Ray Liotta, Lance
Henriksen


7pm: Renaissance
Man (PG-13) Danny
Devito, Gregory Hines
9:30pm: Endless
Summer II (PG)
Robert Weaver,
Patrick O'Connell


7pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Nelson, Ben
Kingsley


i -i- .


2pm: Beethoven's 2nd
(PG) Charles Grodin,
Bonnie Hunt
7pm: Beverly Hills
Cop III (R) Eddie
Murphy
9pm: The Crow (R)
Brandon Lee, Ernie
Hudson


7pm: Four Weddings
and a Funeral (R)
Andie MacDowell,
Hugh Grant


7pm: Beverly Hills
Cop III (R) Eddie
Murphy


7pm: Serial Mom (R)
Kathleen Turner, Sam
Waterson


7pm: Maverick (PG)
Mel Gibson, Jodie
Foster
9:30pm: The Cowboy
Way (PG-13) Woody
Harrelson, Kiefer
Sutherland


7pm: Endless Summer
II (PG) Robert Weaver,
Patrick O'Connell


Thursday
7pm: The Flintstones
i (PG) John Goodman,
Rick Moranis
9pm: Naked Gun 33
1/3 (PG-13) Leslie
Nielson, Priscilla
Presley ($1.50 adult,
$1 children admission)


7pm: The Cowboy
Way (PG-13) Woody
Harrelson, Kiefer
Sutherland
9pm: Maverick (PG)
Mel Gibson, Jodie
Foster


7pm: Serial Mom (R)
Kathleen Turner, Sam
Waterson


Fort Sherman 7:30pm: Four 7:30pm: White Fang II 7:30pm:Beverly Hills No show No show No show 7:30pm: Endless
289-5173 Weddings and a (PG) $1.50 adults, $1 Cop IlH (R) Eddie Summer II (PG)
289-5173 Funeral (R) Andie children admission Murphy Robert Weaver,
MacDowell, Hugh Patrick O'Connell
Grant

Fort Amador 7pm: Princess and 7pm: When a Man 7pm: The Cowboy No show No show 7pm: Renaissance Man 7pm: Getting Even
284-3583 the Goblin (G) Loves a Woman (R) Way (PG-13) Woody (PG-13) Danny Devito, With Dad (PG) Ted
Animated Andy Garcia, Meg Harrelson, Kiefer Gregory Hines Danson, Macaulay,
Ryan Sutherland Culkin

M-I I=I- - m


Aug. 19



Howard AFB
7pm Gettin Even With
Dad (PG) Ted
Danson, Macaulay
Culkin
9pm The Flintstones (PG)
John Goodman, Rick
Moranis

Fort Clayton
7pm The Cowboy Way
(PG-13) Woody
Harrelson, Kiefer
Sutherland
9pm Maverick (PG) Mel
Gibson, Jodie Foster



Fort Davis
7pm Endless Summer II
(PG) Robert Weaver,
Patrick O'Connell
9pm Bevery Hills Cop III
(R) Eddie Murphy



Fort Sherman
7:30pm Renaissance Man
(PG-13) Danny Devito,
Gregory Hines



Fort Amador
7pm Naked Gun 33 1/3
(PG-13) Leslie
Nielsen, Priscilla
Presley $1.50 adults,
$1 children admission


The Flintstones
John Goodman, Rick Moranis
Steven "Spielrock" brings the mod-
em Stone Age family to the silver screen.
Elizabeth Perkins is Wilma and Rosie
O'Donnell is Betty. Liz Taylor is Fred's
mother in law. PG. 1 hr, 31 min.

Getting Even With Dad
Ted Danson, Macaulay Culkin
Timmy, an attention-starved 11 -year-
old boy blackmails his ex-con dad into
going straight PG (mild language) 1 hr
48 min.

Naked Gun 33 1/3
Leslie Nielsen, Priscilla Presley
Nielsen is now retired police lieuten-
ant Frank Drebin who is drawn back into
undercover duty. PG-13 (off color hu-
mor) 1 hr 23 min)

Maverick
Mel Gibson, Jodie Foster
A con man gambler becomes entan-
gled with a high-spirited young woman
and a law man who plan to challenge him
at a high-stakes poker game. PG (mild
sensuality, western action) 2 hr, 9 min.

The Cowboy Way


Woody Harrleson, Kiefer Sutherland
Two rodeo stars who never have been
east of Tulsa trek to New York to inves-
tigate the disappearance of a friend. PG-
13 (violence, some language, comic sen-
suality) 1 hr, 47 min.

Endless Summer II
Robert Weaver, Patrick O'Connell
Two surfers journey around the world,
catching the biggest and best waves. PG
(brief nudity, some mild language)

The Crow
Brandon Lee, Ernie Hudson
A musician rises from the grave to


Now showing at Howard and Amador theaters.


avenge his and his fiancee's murders.
The performance of the late Brandon Lee
fits. R (strong violence, language, drug
use, some sexuality), I hr, 40 min.

Beethoven's 2nd
Charles Grodin, Bonnie Hunt
America's favorite canine star,
Beethoven, the king-sized St. Bernard is
back in an all-new adventure. This time
he's fallen in love. PG (mild language,
unapt teen behavior), 1 hr, 29 min.

No Escape
Ray Liotta, Lance Henriksen
Ray Liotta is sent to a high security
prison and assigned to an isolated island
colony where two groups of desperate
criminals battle for control. He organiz-
es the troops to battle for freedom against
the highly mechanzied security forces. R
(strong violence, language), 1 hr, 58 min.

Schindler's List
Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley
Steven Spielberg's powerful film ac-
count of how a Jewish businessman saved
thousands of WWII Jews from death is a


chilling and realistic recreation of one
of recent history's most horrifying chap-
ters. R (language, actuality violence,
some sexuality), 3 hrs, 15 min.

Beverly Hills Cop III
Eddie Murphy, Hector Elizondo
Detroit police detective Axel Foley
returns to southern California to inves-
tigate a crime ring at Wonder World
amusement park. R (language, some
mild language) 1 hr, 45 min.

The Princess and
the Goblin
Animated
Animated version of the George
MacDonald children's classic. G 1 hr,
24 min.

Renaissance Man
Danny DeVito, Gregory Hines
An out-of-work advertising execu-
tive ends up as teaching Army recruits.
When his style doesn't blend with the
military's principles, Devito butts heads
with the Army's upper brass. PG-13
(some language) 2 hrs, 8 min.


7--














TV Schedule


Tropic Times B
Aug. 12, 1994 B 9


Channels 8 1


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning
America w/ Panama
Now
8:00 Basic Training
Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait Of America
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News
Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Think Fast!
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 NFL: Denver vs San
Francisco
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Rocko's Modem Worl
12:55 All Night Movies:
"Angel At My Table"
Part 2
2:20 "Spartacus"
5:25 Videolinks


Saturday Sunday

6:30 Headline News 6:00 CCMTV
7:00 Navy/Marine Corps News 6:30 Outreach of Love
7:30 Real News For Kids 7:00 Parliament of Souls
8:00 Guts 7:30 Lifestyle Magazine
8:30 Just for Kids! 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning
-Garfield & Friends 9:30 Face The Nation
-Teenage Mutant Ninja 10:00 Washington Week In
Turtles Review
-Wild West C.O.W. 10:30 This Week w/ Brinkley
Boys Of Moo Mesa 11:30 America's Black Forum
-Batman Cartoon 12:00 Headline News
- Cartoon Classics 12:30 On Stage
-Faerie Tale Theater 12:55 Afternoon Movies:
I 1:00 The New Explorers "The Swimmer"
12:00 Headline News 2:30 Victory At Sea
12:30 NFL: NY Giants vs 3:00 World Championship
San Diego Basketball Game
3:30 America's Funniest 5:00 Headline News
People 5:30 Entertainment This Week
4:00 Nova 6:30 Grace Under Fire
5:00 Soul Train ** 6:55 Murphy Brown ****
6:00 The Adventures of 7:20 Evening Movie:
Superman "Ghostbusters"
6:30 Rescue 911 9:10 L.A. Law
7:25 China Beach 10:00 ABC 20/20
8:25 Evening Movie: 11:00 Miami Vice**
"It's My Tumrn" 12:00 Headline News
10:00 Dave's World 12:30 Meet the Press
10:30 Saturday Night Live 1:30 Headline News
12:00 WWF Superstars of 2:00 Sports Latenight
d Wrestling 2:30 ABC World News Now
12:45 Friday Night Videolinks 3:00 Headline News
1:45 All Night Movies: "The 3:30 Sports Machine
Maria Hanson Story" 4:00 ABC World News Now
3:25 "Young Man With A 5:00 Headline News Break
Horn"


_________________________________________________ J


Monday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
w/ Panama Now
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sports Machine
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Guts
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:25 Panama Now
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 NFL Monday Night
Football:
Dallas vs Houston
11:00 David Letterman
12:00 Tonight Show
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


Tuesday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
w/ Panama Now
8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Ghostwriter
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel Of Fortune
7:25 Panama Now
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 Answerline: DoDDS
9:00 Northern Exposure
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


Wednesday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
w/ Panama Now
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panima Now
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Shining Time Station
4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:25 Panama Now
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
8:30 Beverly Hills 90210
9:30 COPS
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


*a b e c n4 * Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
..,


5:30 Simulcast with
Channels 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and Restless
3:30 Mutant Ninja Turtles
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Ghost Writer
5:00 Silver Spoons
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 The Next Generation
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Frasier **
8:30 Street Match **
9:00 Primetime Live ****
10:00 Renegade ****
11:00 Headline News Break
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Larry King Live
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 David Letterman
5:30 Simulcast with 8 & 10


6:30 Simulcast with 8 & 10
8:30 Young Adult Theater
-"From Disney with
Love"
-"Malcolm Takes a
Shot"
-"Lies of the Heart"
11:30 Real News For Kids
12:00 Silver Spoons
12:30 Movie: "Absent-
Minded Professor"
2:10 "Son of Flubber"
4:00 21 Jump Street
5:00 American Gladiators
6:00 fhe Honeymooners
6:30 The Simpsons
7:00 Lois & Clark: The
Adventures of
Superman
8:00 "Deep Space Nine"
9:00 Herman's Head
9:30 Married With Children
10:00 Movie:
"Shoot To Kill"
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Science And
Technology Week
1:00 The McLaughlin
Group
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Entertainment This
Week
.3:00 Headline News
3:30 Saturday Night Live
5:00 Videolinks
5:30 Headline News Break


6:00 Shining Time Station
6:30 The Sunshine Factory
7:00 GoofTroop
7:25 Garfield and Friends
7:55 Darkwing Duck
8:20 Batman
8:40 Where On Earth Is
Carmen Sandiego?
9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
9:30 Science & Technology
Week
10:00 Motor Week
10:30 Sports Closeup
11:00 This Week In Baseball
11:30 This Old House
12:00 Mary Tyler Moore
Show ***
12:30 Amish Cooking From
Quilt Country
1:00 Movie:"No Deposit,
No Return"
3:10 "The New Adventures
OfPippi Longstocking"
5:00 Quantum Leap
6:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
6:30 Wonderful World of
Disney
7:30 Golden Girls
8:00 Sunday Night Movie:
"Ladyhawk"
10:00 Buck James
11:00 Turning Point
12:00 Simulcast with 8 & 10


5:30 Simulcast with 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life To Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Batman
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Are You Afraid Of The
Dark?
5:00 Club Connect
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Star Trek: The Next
Generation
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 MacGyver
9:00 Monday Night Movie:
"Casualties Of War"
10:35 SCIMED Health Test
"The Genetics And
Heredity Test"
11:00 Headline News Break
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


5:30 Simulcast with 8 & 10
8:00 Donahue
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Where on Earth is
Carmen Sandiego?
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Think Fast
5:00 Mickey & Donald
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Star Trek: The Next
Generation
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Home Improvement
8:30 Martin
9:00 Tuesday Night Movie:
"Hudson Hawk"
11:00 Headline News Break
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


5:30 Simulcastwith 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 GoofTroop
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Guts
5:00 Beakman's World
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Star Trek: The Next
Generation
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 ALF
8:30 Family Matters
9:00 Tour of Duty
10:00 Murder She Wrote ***
11:00 Headline News Break
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


5:30 Simulcast with 8 & 10
8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Garfield and Friends
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Nick Arcade
5:00 The Wonder Years
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Star Trek: The Next
Generation
7:55 Panama Now
8:00 Full House
8:30 Living Single
9:00 Dateline NBC
10:00 L.A. Law
11:00 Headline News Break
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


Channels 8 & 10
Sports
NFL football: Denver vs San Francisco 7 p.m. tonight , '
NY Giants vs San Diego 12:30 p.m. Saturday
NFL Monday Night Football: Dallas vs Houston 8 p.m.
Monday
NFL: San Francisco vs San Diego 7 p.m. Thursday


Basketball
World Basketball Championship Game 3 p.m. Sunday "


Specials 1
Answerline 8 p.m. Tuesday
The subject for the August edition of Answerline is Department of Defense Depen-
dents Schools. Our guest, Dr. James Wolf, superintendent, Panama District
Schools, will answer questions about the upcoming school year. SCN will begin re-
cording phone calls at 6:30 p.m. at 287-4460.


Prime time movies
"Ghostbusters" (Comedy, 1984, ***, Rated PG) 7:20 p.m. Sunday
A trio of screwy university parapsychologists lose their research grant and decide to
open their own business rounding up rowdy spirits. Stars: Bill Murray and Dan
Akroyd.


Cable Channel 14
Series starts
.';. v "Frasier" 8 p.m. tonight
After "last call" at Cheers, Dr. Frasier Crane packed up his
belongings and left Boston for his hometown of Seattle and a
new job as a radio talk show shrink. Now America's funniest
Freudian highbrow has a hit on his hands. He's set up in a luxury
S condo and finally has somebody as pretentious as himself to pal
i l ' around with...his own little brother, Miles. In fact, everything is com-
^~ ing up well-cultivated roses for Crane...until his irascible ex-cop father
and his loony live-in nurse move in. The resulting hectic hilarity is driving
Frasier nuts...and sending audiences into hysterics. Stars: Kelsey Grammer.


"Street Match" 8:30 p.m. tonight
There's love in store for the X Generation as host Rickey Paul Goldin brings to-
gether strangers and arranges dates between them. Each episode follows two couples
"before, during and after" their first date.


Primetime movies
"Shoot to Kill" (Action Drama, 1988, **1/2, Rated R) 10 p.m. Saturday
Sidney Poitier is a big city cop who's forced to team up with a stubborn mountain
guide to go into the wilds of the Pacific Northwest after a hunting party that's been
infiltrated by a ruthless killer. Stars: Tom Berenger and Kirstie Alley


L-


n


Thursday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
w/ Panama Now
8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Portrait of America
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:25 Panama Now
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Donahue
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Club Connect
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 NFL Football: San
Francisco vs San Diego
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break













B1O Tropic Times
BO Aug. 12, 1994


Classified Ads


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder,
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.
- - - _ ... .-------..... -- -- -- --- - - ------ -- -- -- -


Hamster, cage, food, $20. 284-5434.

Need male Siamese cat for stud ser-
vice. 286-6439.

lyr old female Calico cat, gentle,
declawed, w/litter box. 284-5938.

Free, 2 cats, neutered, litter trained, all
shots. 223-4290.

Shepard/Lab puppies, $35.287-4885.

AKC Stafforshire Terrier, UKC Pit
Bull pups, shots, dewormed, $275.
284-5670.

Doberman, female, 6 mos, ears & tail
docked, all shots, $250. 286-4677.

Free, wht male puppy, 4 wks. 285-
5866.

German Shepard male, 10 mos od,
CCP reg, $400. 256-6378.

6 mo old Brindle boxer, all shots, tail
done, $200. 252-2710.

8 wk old female Calico kitten, cute &
loveable, litter trained, I st shots. 287-
5475.

7 wk old male Rottweiler, pedigree,
$800. 226-2967.

2 yellowheads, I male, 1 female. 287-
6830.

German Sheperd pups, CCP reg. 228-
2643.

Free Bik female tortoise shell Calico,
4 yr old, declawed, spayed. 282-3136.

4 yr old Yorkshire, male, free. 287-
4244._

Chihuahua, 6 wk old male, $150.252-
5022.

Black male Chihuahua for stud ser-
vice. 284-6774.

Want female Pekingese, 18 mo old or
younger. 286-4893.

Pitbull/Rottweilermix, 3 mo old, $100.
250-0311.

22 mo old, male neutered Cocker Span-
iel, gd w/kids, $150. 284-6339._

Free kittens, litter trained. 284-4490.

Free kitten, 9 wk old, very loveable.
284-5176.

Male Boxer pup, 12 wks, all shots,
$150. 286-4096.

Cocker/Poodle mix male & female,
aquarium w/acc. 230-0523.




1989 Sonata Hyundai, loaded, $6,000.
252-6016.

1992 Chevy S- 10 p/u, loaded, $8,275.
286-3692.

1984 VW, 4 cyl, 4 spd, ac, exc cond,
$4,500/obo. 286-4828.

1988 Jeep Commanche, loaded, new
tires. 261 6418.

1975 Buick LeSabre, needs transmis-
sion, runs gd, $650/obo. 286-4339.

1988 Pontiac Grand Am, ac, 5 spd, ps,
$4,000.260-4111.

1994 Pontiac Sunbird, loaded,
$11,500. 260-4111.

Mallory Promaster Coil, 50,000 volts,
p/n 28720, $40. 252-6831.-

1983 Ford Thunderbird, wht, $2,000/
obo. 250-0060.

1978 Honda Accord hatchback, gd
cond. 260-4463.

1982 Buick, $800. 260-3446.

Toyota Corolla Tercel, loaded, exc
cond, $2,200. 287-4524.

1987 Dodge Charger, loaded, $3,500/
obo. 284-4705.

1980 Ford Granada, gd family car,
$1,000. 287-4481.

1988 Ford Escort, loaded. $5,000).284-


2180.

1976 Chevrolet Suburban, ac, new
tires, runs gd, $4,000/obo. 282-4337.

1978 Mercury Monarch, exc cond, ac,
pw, ps. 232-6056.-

1980 Jeep CJ-7, new tires, $4,000.
286-6541.

1976 Triumph tr-7, hard top, new bat-
tery, gd cond, $1,500. 287-4392.

1984 Dodge Rampage p/u, auto, 4 cyl,
dty pd, $2,700. 252-2287.

1979 4x4 GMC, new motor, $3,200.
260-9630.

K-5 Blazer, as is, $1,100. 251-3904.

1989 Ford Taurus LX station wagon,
extras, exc cond, $8,500. 223-0280.

1987 Plymouth Reliant, loaded, 73,000
miles, $2,500. 236-4090.

1987 Jeep Wagoneer, loaded, low
miles, exc cond, $8,400. 282-4538.

1986 Ford Taurus, loaded, new ac, exc
cond, $6,800. 269-5700.

1989 Ford Mustang 2dr Sedan, load-
ed, new tires, $5,500. 284-4381.

1985 Mercury Marquis, ac, ps, pb, am/
fm/cass, dty pd, $3,800. 256-6457.

1985 Nissan 300zx, right side
smashed, sale for parts, can be re-
paired, $1,000. 286-4874.

1989 Pontiac Lemans, 4 dr, ac, gd
cond, $5,500. 287-6198.

1972 Chevy Nova 307, grt cond, ac,
ps, new tires & rims, $2,100. 260-
3270.

1982 Olds Cutlass, needs transmission,
$500. 282-4133.

1986 Dodge 600 conv, ps, ac, 2 dr, not
dty pd, $1,200. 226-5644.

1988 Toyota 4x4, custom paint,
$7,000. 284-5644.

1988 Ford Taurus-station wagon, ac,
ps, pb, am/fm/cass, exc cond, $8,500.
287-3980.

1990 Chevy 4x4, exc cond, 5 spd,
31,000 miles, $13,500. 287-6486.

1992 Jeep Wrangler, 4.0 L, 6 cyl, 21 k/
exc cond, $13,000/obo. 263-5111 ext
226.

1987 Chevy Iroc Z-28, loaded,
$11,000/obo. 287-3999._

1988 Chrysler LeBaron, new cv joints,
needs gaskets, ac parts, clutch assy,
runs grt, $6,000. 264-3191.

1977 Volare, am/fm/cass, runs gd,
$850/obo. 287-4836.

1993 Jeep Wrangler, low miles, new
cond, $11,900. 264-9817.

1987 Ford Tempo, loaded, not dty pd,
$5,000. 287-5237.

1982ToyotaCelica GT,5spd,am/fm/
cass, exc cond, $3,500. 287-5486.

1992 Nissan Pathfinder, loaded,
$20,000. 269-6829.

1990 Ford Tempo, loaded, exc cond,
$6,800. 226-8626.

1983 Buick Skyhawk, loaded, new
tires, runs gd, $800. 260-3446.

1990 Saab 900, 4 dr, $18,500. 285-
4381.

1991 Camaro, t-top, ac. am/fm, 25,000
miles, $10,500. 252-2065. ____

1988 Nissan Bluebird, loaded, $6,500.
252-2253.

1985 Nissan Bluebird, 2.0, dty pd,
runs gd, $4,000. 261-6830.

1989 Hyundai Sonata, loaded, $5,500.
252-6016.

1992 Jeep Wrangler, 18k miles, sport
wheels, am/fm/cass, 6 cyl, $10,500.
284-4276.

Jeep CJ-7 4x4, new tires, exhaust,
brakes, clutch, dty pd, $3,000. 283-
5273.

1989 Chevy Caprice. 4dr, ps, at, ac,


-


ps, exc cond, $3,000. 283-5273.

1979 Mercedes 450, ac, sunroof, am/
fm/cass, exc cond, $9,000/obo. 287-
3887.

1992 Jeep Wrangler, soft/bikini tops,
exc cond, $12,000. 284-5430.

1988 Jeep Comanche, loaded, camper
top, bed liner, $7,500. 284-5430.

1993 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo, at,
17,000 miles, many extras, $23,000/
obo.

1989 Toyota 4-runner, exc cond,
$14,000. 260-6151.

1989 Honda Accord, loaded, $9,500/
obo. 260-6151.

1982 Toyota Landcruiser 4x4, ps, ac,
new tires, interior, am/fm/cass, dty pd,
$8,800. 286-3381.

1990 Nissan 300 z, loaded, 250-0166.

1989 Plymouth Sundance, ac, stereo,
tint, 5 spd, cruise, gd cond, $5,000.
287-6281.

1991 Ford Explorer 4x4, 2dr,JBL ste-
reo, 49,000 miles, $12,900.252-2694.

1962 Chevy station wagon, gd cond.
252-5124.

1991 Jeep Cherokee Laredo 4x4, 2dr,
5 spd, 41, sun roof, pl, pw, loaded, best
offer by Aug. 14. 286-4372.

1990 Ford Aerostar, 4.51, low miles.
287-6182.

1991 Cutlass Supreme, loaded,
sunroof, $11,500/obo. 286-6136.

1988 Eagle Premier, 6 cyl, 3.01, ac,
cruise, ps, pb, pl, $5,000. 287-5129.

1990 Toyota Camry wagon, loaded,
$11,000. 252-2143.

1988 300zx Nissan, turbo, t-top, leath-
er, digital, $13,500. 260-3275.

1987 Toyota 4-runner, radio, ac,
$9,000. 236-2365.

1986 Jeep Cherokee 4x4, 2 dr, at, gd
cond, $8,900. 236-2365.

1991 Camaro Z-28, ps, pb, am/fm/
cass, exc cond, $10,900. 256-6830.

1987 Chevy Spectrum, runs gd, needs
body work, $1,800/obo. 284-4625.

1992 Nissan Sentra, loaded, $11,000/
obo. 286-4986.

1988 Toyota 4-runner, 5 spd, 2dr, ac,
$12,000. 284-4907.

1989 Ford Tempo, 5 spd, loaded, am/
fm/cass, $6,000. 284-4900.

1974 Jaguar xj6, exc cond, $6,000.
284-6390.

1970 Datsun Sedan, 4 dr, auto, 1600
cc, extra parts. 252-5124.

1992 Toyota King Cab 4x4, bedliner,
stereo, $16,000 or take pymnts. 260-
5494.

1993 Ford Splash, am/fm/cass, pw,
low miles, $14,000. 287-4661.

1987 Ford Bronco, loaded, $11,000/
obo. 287-5024.

1989 Eagle Premier, gd cond, ac, am/
fm/cass, $10,000. 264-0372.

1989 Chevy Cavalier, ac, am/fm/cass,
sun roof, pwreverything, $6,900.287-
3423._____

323 Mazda, ac, cass, cruise, alarm,
exc cond, $5,000. 264-8278.

1983 Toyota Celica, exc cond, ac,
radio, alarm, $4,000. 223-0327.

1985 Dodge Caravan, 4 cyl, ac, am/
fm/cass w/cd, tow bar, $7,000/obo.
287-3834.

1989 Honda Accord, ps, ac, 5 spd, sun
roof, pw, exc cond, $11,500. 284-
3481.

4 Toyota tires and rims, $125/obo.
284-5376.

1984 Volvo 760 GLE, fm/cass, ac,
automatic, leather, $5,000/obo. 252-
2031.

1983 Nissan Sentra, ac, 4 cyl, auto-


matic, not dty pd, $3,500. 284-6491.

1984 Chevy Citation, 4 cyl, at, ac, am/
fm/cass, dty pd, $2,700/obo. 262-7278.

1984 Dodge Daytona, 5 spd, ac, gd
cond, $2,700. 287-3789.

1988 Suzuki Samari, new tires, 4x4,
exc cond, $4,500. 284-4525.

1984 Ford Bronco 4x4, needs work.
284-4525.

1988 Dodge Aries, at, ps, pc, cc, lots
of new stuff, $3,800. 286-4347.

1973 Ford F100, at, camper shell, lots
of new parts, $1,900. 285-4528.

1987 Ford Taurus, V6, at, ac, am/fm/
cass, $4,000. 252-5436.

1990 Dodge Daytona, not dty pd, 6
cyl, $8,750. 286-3527.

1986 Toyota Corolla, 4 dr, std, ac, am/
fm, reliable, $3,200. 282-4598.

1987 Hyundai Excel, ac, 5 spd, $3,600.
284-6692.

1981 Toyota Celica, gd cond, 5 spd,
radio, am/fm/cass, $2,500. 261-7693.

1983 Volvo GLT, std, ac. 260-9824.

1976 K-5 Chevy Blazer, std, runs grt.
252-2871.

1991 Ford Ranger, fully loaded, exc
cond, $12,000. 824-6683.

1990 Dodge Spirit, 6cyl, at, ac, $6,000.
260-6688.

1987 FordTempo,4cyl, ac, at, am/fm/
cass, not dty pd, $3,900. 286-6328.

1991 Chevy S-10 p/u, gd cond. 287-
3270.

1986 Ford Taurus, 5 spd, pwr every-
thing, new ac, dty pd, beautiful cond,
$6,700/obo. 269-5700.

1990 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 4 dr, pd,
pb, ps, ac, cass, not dty pd, $12,500.
287-4223.

1981 CJ-7 Jeep, 4 cyl, hard/bikini
tops, $3,200. 269-5762.

1986 Ford Escort, gd cond, runs grt,
$3,000. 287-5288._

1992 Honda V-tec, all extras, exc cond,
not dty pd, $14,500. 224-4027.

1987 VW GoIfGT, 4 cyl;3 dr, pb, am/
fm/cass, new tires, runs gd, $3,000/
obo. 289-3573.

1986 Ford Aerostar, at, cc, am/fm/
cass, exc cond, $6,000. 287-3330.




Live in maid, Span spk, gd w/kids.
252-2832.

Babysitter, 18 yrs, bilingual, reliable.
252-2756..

Bilingual maid, honest, reliable. 284-
8471.

Bilingual maid, live-in, gd w/kids. 287-
4196.

Honest, reliable, Span spk. 267-6093.

4000 watt gas generator, like new,
$600/obo. 250-0060.

Babysitter, gd w/kids, ref. 261-1236.

18 yr old babsitter w/ expereince. 230-
1927.

Honest, reliable, live-in maid, gd w/
kids. 286-6189.

Span spk live-out maid, gen house
work. 283-5671. __ _

Bilingual maid, ref. 260-3235.

Honest reliable babysitter, w/exp,
some eng. 266-5797.

Bilingual maid, mature, honest, reli-
able, gd w/kids. 228-4655.

Reliable, exc worker. 261 -7939.

Bilingual day maid. 226-8316.

Cake creations. 287-6222.

Home care provider, full time open-
ings. 285-4381 Donna.

Honest, dependable, gd w/kids. 287-
4481.

Honest, reliable maid, avail 3 days a
wk, w/ ref. 224-7521.

Span spk maid, gd w/kids. 287-3095.

Live-out bilingual maid, honest. 224-
0086.

Bilingual live-out maid, grt w/kids.
286-3889.

Bilingual maid. 287-6491.

Housekeeper, honest, reliable. 260-
6151.

Bilingual live-in reliable maid, gd w/
kids. 286-6171.


Eng spk day maid, gd w/kids, w/ref.
284-3476.

Honest, hard working live-out maid.
286-4381.

Mature, hard working maid, exc w/
kids. 261-2995.

Bilingual translator. 264-0372.

Bilingual maid, reliable, gd w/kids.
224-2996.

Wkly play group for kids 1-5 yrs, in
Kobbe area. 284-5580.

Bilingual day maid, reliable nanny
also. 282-4385.

Upholstery, carpets, auto interior
cleaning. 260-5112.

Honest, reliable, Eng spk. 224-7765.

Nintendo games, $20. 236-0984.

Span spk maid, exc housekeeper, w/
ref. 286-3381.

Honest, mature, Eng spk. 221-3054.

Honest, hard working, Span spk maid,
w/ref. 287-3677.

Honest, reliable, Eng spk maid, gd w/
kids. 221-9845.




Fish/ski boat w/90 hp Mercury fish
finder, SS prop, extras, current Pana-
ma registration, $4,500. 228-4514.




Wedding ring in Bldg. 519 Health
Clinic, call to identify. 287-3534.




Apple IIL, 2dd monitor, printer, lots
of software, joystick & books, $800.
283-5020.

19" Emerson TV, $200, Kenwood ste-
reo sys, amp, tuner, EQ, dual cass,
turutbl, spkers, CD, $575. 287-5995.

Teac V900X tape deck. $85, JVC
turntbl $65, Kenwood tuner $85,
Kenwood 7 disk CD $250. 282-3375.

Goldstar 14" color TV, channels for
cable $150, 24" Kenwood spkers, gd
cond $300. 236-0984.

Fax machines, printer, 286 wang w/
new 130mg hd. 230-0008.

Betamax Sony exc cond w/over 60
movies, $350/obo. 284-3995.

Pioneer stereo sys, tuner, receiver, tape
deck, graphic EQ, grt power, w/out
spkers, $195. 260-3270.

Hitachi 14" color TV, w/remote, al-
most new, $225/obo. 236-0984.

Sega game gear w/3 games, wall ex-
tension & cigarette lighterextension,
gd cond, $100. 287-3271.

ASAP TF 555 automatic telephone/
fax/modem switch, switches incom-
ing calls to any device you select, 4
outputs, $100. 256-6356.

IBM PS/2, exc cond, or Zenith laptop,
$295. 230-0008.

Fisher stereo, phonograph, tuner, re-
ceiver, dual cass, EQ, spkers, cabinet,
5 disk CD, $500. 284-4973 after 5pm.

Amiga 2000 hd, 1084S monitor, mo-
dem, 2mg Ram, lots of software &
manuals, $600. 287-6125.

Minolta X-700 35mm SLR, 2 telepho-
to lenses, flash attachment, carrying
case, neg. 286-3121.

Unused Kenwood tuner $100, EQ
$150, spkers MV-5D,450w $350/pair,
Bose AM5 spkers $550. 235-4096.

Chrysler, Dodge & Plymouth elec-
tronic ctrl unit, new in box Hi perfor-
mance, $40. 252-6831.

Toshiba Beta, $100. 233-1043.

486 DX2/66 comp w/color SVGA
monitor& color inkjet printer, $3,500,
Sony stereo w/CD $275. 286-4828.

286 Packard Bell comp w/5 1/4 & 3 1/
2 drvs installed, color monitor, exc
cond, $800. 226-8626 after 5pm.

Ambios 80386SX 14" Packard Bell
SVGA monitor, Epson LX86 9 pin
printer & other ace. $950. 286-4428.

Gameboy, 7 games, light boy, magni-
fier, case, rechargeable battery, 4 play-
er adaptor, $250/obo. 287-4546.

WP-75 Brother, $200/neg. 284-5082.

Drums, elec digital percussion,
Yamaha DD-14,75 instrument sounds,
$175. 252-6831.

600w Kenwood home stereo sys, 3110w
5-wayspkers $1,000,micro $100.250-


0389.

1695 Panasonic printer, 81 OXL Epson
printer, FX Epson comp, 20mb w/
monitor $375, stereo $140.226-8626.

Canon T-80 autofocus camera, 35-
70mm, 50mm, 70-200mm zoom, case,
speedlite 299T flash, $475.256-6356.

JVC tuner, surround processor, tumrtbl,
tower spkers, grt cond, make offer,
still boxed. 283-3275.

SNES, Street Fighter II Turbo, like
new, $50. 286-6196.

Sega Genesis, 2 controllers, 4 games,
$100. 284-5777.

SC WP 8000LT 3.5 disk drv, fax/
modem cap, rechargeable battery,
printer avail, $300. 236-0984.

Sony stereo equipment, almost new,
exc cond $235. 236-0984.

Reg Nintendo games $20/ea, SNES
games $50/ea. 287-5475 between 9am
& 3pm.

Sega Genesis games, Sega CD,
Sherlock Holmes Vol II, $40/ea. 287-
5475 between 9 am & 3 pm.

Nintendo & 9 games, $130.287-6591.

AST 386SX25 w/monitor, printer &
assorted software, $800..289-3580 Sgt.
Hassell.

Kenwood KL-7070, 5-way stereo
spkers, 120w, walnut cabinet,
16x24xl1I (4ea). 287-4182.

WP-75 (Brother), $200. 252-6722.

386comp, 105mbhd,4mb Ram, mon-
itor, sound/game cards, joy sticks,
DOS 6.0, Win 3.1, $950. 223-8010.

ITT comp/printer w/desk, works gd,
grt for student, $250. 260-9578.

Hummingbird fish finder TCRID,
$250. 236-2365.

Pioneer 12" subwoofers in box, new,
$150. 283-5676.
DJ equipment, 2 Genesis tumtbls, Pre-
amp mixer, amplifier, $500/obo. 282-
3237.

Pioneer A/V amp, VSX-7300, EQ,
expander, reverb, dual cass player,
$999. 284-5543.

Kenwood CD player $100, Sharp VHS
jet zoom camcorder $600. 252-6929.

Game Gear, battery pack, 2 games,
charger & more, exc cond, $150 for
all. 287-6694.

Amstrad WP, PCW 8256, software,
keyboard, monitor w/drv & printer,
$500. 287-4726.

Fisher receiver $150, Fisher cass $85,
Fisher turntbl $50, two 100w spkers
$100/ea, stereo cabinet $75.284-6192.

Commodore 64/128D color monitor,
software, 512k Ram expansion $200/
obo, 2 megs Ram $50. 287-3534.

Kenwood stereo, 300w amp, tuner, 6
disk CD, ctrl amp, surround process,
turntbl, remote, $1,095. 223-8010.

20" GoldstarTV w/built-in VCR $350,
Fisher port radio/cass/CD player$ 150.
286-3773.

Scott am/fm component stereo receiv-
er, almost new, instruction book, $115/
obo. 286-3381.

Hitachi Hi8 camcorder, every feature
imaginable, $575/obo. 260-9548 af-
ter 7pm.___




LR furn for sale. 233-1676.

Bedrm sets, wall-to-wall dark gr car-
pet, GE 15.8 freezer, K-sz bed. 252-
1257.

Beige wall-to-wall carpet w/pad,
downstairs field grade qtr, 1000 area,
$300. 287-5271.

Whirlpool washer/dryer, grt cond,
hand wash cycle, $750. 284-5082.

DR set w/hutch, bik laquer, Q-szbedrm
set, blk laquer. 285-5935.

Whirlpool port dishwasher, $175.287-
5271.

Sharp micro w/caroussel $175, AC
12,000 BTU $200. 223-6024.

Gas range like new, 30" Whirlpool
$300, GE washer /dryer set, like new,
$600/set. 223-6024.

Crib, $190. 252-2717, between 5:30-
7:30 pm.

Couch $125, 2 dehumidifiers $80/ea,
misc plants, Xerox copier $425, 19"
Sony Trinitron TV $225. 286-4828.

Twin bed w/matt. 2 drawers $200,
rattan sofa set, 2 chairs & 2 stools
$400, misc items. 23011-1409.















Whirlpool washer/dryer, Ig cap, runs
grt, exc cond, $600. 282-3497.

20x35x30 wood sewing mach tbl $60,
petcarrier crate $15, elec talking scale
$30. 252-5678.

LR fum, rugs, misc. 286-3686.

LR items, 2 dinette sets, 25" & 19"
TV, matt/box spring. 284-6491.

Bedrm set, dresser w/mirror, chest,
night tbl, Q-headboard, exc cond,
$1,100. 286-3541.

Sofa, love seat, chair, ottoman & car-
pet (9x 12, pastel colors), $775. 284-
6824.

Bunk beds w/matt $250, bench/toy
box $40, Sony stereo sys $200, rock-
er/recliner, sofa sleeper. 284-4932.

6 drawer chest $70, upholstered re-
cliner rocker $250. 285-4831.

Hanging bamboo swing, 23.6 refrig
w/ice & water dispenser, blue & pink
drapes, Q-sz bed. 252-1257.

Bar, walnut, like new $500,5-pc bedrm
set, walnut $355. 252-5531.

LR set $750, Casio synthisizer $550.
260-7341.

DR set, tbi -6, cabinet, $3,000/obo.
252-1104.

AC 18,000 BTU, whirlpool, new,
$450. 256-6720.

Refrig, TV, stereo combo. 252-1104.

Danish LR set, sofa, 2 chairs & tbl,
best offer. 260-5682.

7-pc rattan style LR furn $450, K-sz
bed $375, DR tbl, 4 chairs $500. 256-
6457.

Swedish sofa/Q-sz sleeper, classic red
& yellow striped design, never used,
$760. 287-5897.

Lg, one-seater sofa chair w/ottoman,
practically new, wht, modem, com-
fortable, $525. 287-5897.

Couch/chair, floor lamp, brass bed,
dinette, window shutters, cabinet
formica top. 260-4463. -

RCA console 25" TV $300, Samsung
sm refrig $150, AC parts Kitchen Aid,
toaster, patio fum. 252-2730.

19,000 BTU Friedrich AC $350,
12,000 BTU Friedrich AC $275,8,000
BTU Whirlpool AC $190. 252-2287.

Sofa & chair w/ottoman, lots of pil-
lows, best offer. 260-6561.

Carpets, mini-blinds, outdoor plants,
Frigidaire refrig w/icemaker. 284-
5434.

Oak tbI & chairs, grt shape, Seagate
107 meg hd, new. 287-6830.

California K-sz waterbed w/air matt,
mirror, headboard, 6 drawers bottom,
$600. 287-4043.

Entertainment center $95, deluxe vac-
uum cleaner $145. 269-2095.

Country blue couch & love seat $400,
oak dining tbl w/6 chairs $250, oak
coffee tbl, 2 end this, $300. 287-5124.

Folding artwork tbl w/lamp $85, sm
floor lamp $10. 252-2211.

Overstuffed blue chair & ottoman
$150, Q-sz waterbed $100.284-4674.

Dyed rattan LR & DR sets $800/obo,
ceiling fan w/lamp $70/obo, elec range
$300. 226-8116.

Rattan DR & LR sets, $500/ea neg.
260-2901.

Whirlpool frost free refrig, $400. 252-
2616.

Recliner/rockerw/massagesys,$325/
obo. 252-2211.

Fumrn, sm refrig $225, dinette w/8
chairs, wood $550. 282-5494.

Brass floor lamp w/round glass tbl, gd
cond, $45. 287-3420.

GE washer/dryerset, $450.286-4889.

3 oak audio/video TV cabinets, all
match, exc cond, $275. 283-5723.

Whirlpool washer/dryer, super cap, 6
mos old, $850. 284-6323.

GE 18cu ft, top/bottom, almond-col-
ored refrig/freezer, like new, still on
warranty, $670. 232-5622.

Pure maple crib, converts to baby bed,
full sz, all parts avail, $300/obo. 287-
6396.

Highchair $40, Disney comforter,
bumper pad, bed-skirt, pillowcase,
mobile & other toys. 282-4474.

Couch, chair, 2 end tbis, I coffee tbl,
2 lamps & acc, will deliver, $600.
286-3399.

Sofa $350,2 end & I coffee tbl, $1 10.
284-6670.


German entertainment center, oak, gd
cond, $300/obo. 284-4628.

Bedrm set, 5-pc. 260-8501.

20cu ft refrig w/automatic ice maker,
exc cond, $850. 286-3381.

Daybed(walnut) exc cond, w/matt &
box spring $300, baby carrier $10,
playpen $20. 284-3881.

Washer/dryer $550, baby items. 260-
1953.

K-sz matt, box spring, frame $175,
maroon/beige blinds forCurundu qtrs
$150, bookcase $40. 286-3527.

Glass DR tbl w/6 chairs $200, tubular
desk w/shelves $60, 2 tbl lamps $60.
286-3773.

Appliances, furn, shades, diving
equipment, console organ, sz- 10 wed-
ding gown w/acc -never used. 252-
2253.

Comp desk, mini bar, carpets, patio
tbl, bedrm fum w/waterbed & more.
2864238.

New K-sz waterbed, mahogany wood
headboard w/mirrors, 6 drawers, $650/
obo. 269-4064.

GE wht/blk elec oven/range, used 7
weeks, priveledge card holder only,
$400. 284-4593.

Washer/dryer, gd cond, $515. 232-
5622.

Baby lock sewing mach $200,3 string
serger, Singer $300, Hitachi VCR
$150. 286-4986.

Frigidaire refrig, wht, 22cu ft, exc
cond, $250. 224-9846.

Round oak tbl & 2 chairs, $50. 282-
4232.

220Vtoaster$25,elec skillet $35, cof-
fee maker w/extra pot $40, timers $5,
box misc ext cords $25. 269-8583.

Amana radar range micro, $100.282-
4232.

8 pc, LR set w/lamps, end tbl & center
tbl w/cushions, $700/obo. 284-4989.

Kitchen items galore. 282-4232.

GE refrig, Ig, 22cu ft cap, ice maker in
door, almond color, exc cond, $500.
284-6328.

Blk sofa sleeper & chair $550, freezer
$400, dryer $150. 261-6503.

Kitchen tbl w/4 chairs, teakwood, fold
out bar, little tykes pool, misc. 250-
0363.

K-sz matt, box spring & frame, $600.
289-6564.

GE hotpoint dryer Ig cap, $300. 284-
3398.

5,000 BTU AC like new, only used 2
weeks, $200. 287-6391 after 6pm.

Wall-to-wall carpeting & pad for 3
bedrm tropical, steps incl, tan/beige
$400, bar set $200. 286-3895.

Lgsofa, wht/blue/gray, like new, $600.
269-5700.

Full sz headboard $15, bedrails $15.
286-6196.

9 pc DR, solid $1,800/obo, LR w/sofa
sleeper $500/obo, stove, port dish-
washer, more. 260-6151.

3 ACs, metal shelving, many rugs,
patio fum. 260-9824.




Ginecologyc/obstetric check bed for
clinicorhospital, $800/obo. 251-0189.

Golf club set w/cart, 2 bags, irons 2
thru 9, woods 1, 3, 4, 5, $100. 252-
6831 M/T.

Sega Genesis games $25ea, golf bag
w/headcovers $30, men's etonic golf
shoes 8 1/2, $35. 287-4428 after 5pm.

Pwr wheels Barbie Corvette w/extra
battery, $80. 284-3670.

AF men's bl mess dress wall accou-
trements captains shoulder boards,
$150. 286-3121.

Persa carpet 6x81/2, $75. 233-1043,

BMX bike. 252-1104.

Picnic table w/benches $30, battery
powered baby swing, $30. 284-4881.

Free Ft Knox, Ky welcome packets,
287-4527.

Bird cage w/toys. 287-6830.

Executive chair lined w/gray cloth
material, $180/neg. 223-3542.

Girls 12" bike 4 mos $40, German
trike w/adult pushbar $40, car seat,
$40. 282-3375.
Nintendo gun 8 games $100, Ford


Explorer blk front brace, $60. 236-
3247.

FSU bks, World History, Humanities,
People of the World, $25ea. 287-4733.

2 patio chairs w/waterproof cushions
& end tbl $100, stud desk/chair $100,
chest/nightstand, $100. 236-3247.

USAF female blues service jacket,
skirt, s/s shirt, 3 pants, 4 maternity
shirts, slacks. 284-4881.

Exersise bike $50, baby monitor $25,
wicker coffee tbl $10, Rader scanner,
hand held police scanner. 286-4378.

Huffy 12" speed ladies bike, $75/obo.
287-5994.

3 pc couch $300/obo, gas grill $80/
obo, car seat, play pen. 287-3782.

Antique LR set 5 pc exc cond, $750.
260-7025.

Tires,5 Gdyear Wrangler radials p235/
75r15, $300. 282-4133.

1993 Ency Britanica Great Bks $1,600,
rims sz 15" w/tires Fredrich $24, ac,
$250. 252-2730.

Printer, Kaypro, daisy wheels, IBM
Compatable exc cond, $75.282-4538.

Lafayette Tuner, transition Sony ra-
dio, booster car seat, Korean mink
blanket. 287-4182.

Sm dog cage $15, GE dryer, exc cond,
$275. 252-2541.

Old washer for parts $50, chargrill w/
gas tank, $75. 223-2164.

2 class A uniforms, jackets sz 40 &
pants Ig $30ea set, 2 FSU bk math &
refresher math, $15ea. 284-6331.

6 roll up shades light bl, $10ea 287-
6591.

Q sz comforter, 4 pillow cases, skirt 2
sets sheets polyester, $100/obo. 287-
3999.

Little tykes tbl & chairs 2 mos old
great shape, $40. 287-6830.

Travel crib $50, infant car seat $35,
baby carrier, $5. 252-2541.

Custom tailored class A uniforms,
jacket 40 long $25, 6 prs slacks 33 &
34, $5ea. 269-6828.

2 20" boys Huffy USA bikes $35ea,
one 12" boy bike, $25. All three in gd
cond. 287-4195.

Ford 302 cylinder heads 58cc. cham-
bers, $175. 287-6484.

Danish bedrm in wht, 2 sm tbls includ-
ed & bed sheets, $400/obo. 236-0984.

Carseat $30, toilet trainer $10, buster
seat, $15. Baby tub seat & some new
born items. 287-4195.

Little tykes castle, executive desk
chair. 252-1257.

Dart board w/wood case & darts, alum
lawn & breach chairs , 4 wood deck
chairs. 252-6223.

Ency Britanica set, $200/neg. 252-
6722.

Carseat $40, Patio swing set, $80.
226-8116.

Conference tbI 80" x 40" $200, 3 dis-
play cabinets for offices $170ea, step-
per machine like new, $200.226-8626.

Complete slam dunk "lifetime" bas-
ketball goal, $150. 269-6829.

Vari-kennels used once, 1 sm mauve
$30, 1 med bl, $45. 269-6829.

GolfclubsTitlest DCI, 2-w, 1-3 woods
$275 set, irons $200, Hogans ginds 3-
pw $175, tagler FO, $100. 236-0744.

Brake booster & alternator like new
Chevy 2.8L V6, $270/obo. 252-6956.

End lamp $40, 2 bar stools $30, verti-
cal blinds, pink, $70. 287-6480.

Class A uniforms,44L, $50.287-3420.

2Surfboards $100ea, Nintendogames,
$45ea. 286-3732.

Jr Girl scout uniform 2 shirts, I shorts
sz 12, 2 bks & extras, $15. 252-2080.

Coins, duplicate US mint & proof set
1964-1994. 228-4648.

Full sz comforter, baby stroller, baby
bath, baby dressing tbl. 286-4023.

Fisher Price car seat adjustable infant/
toddler, machine wash, $40.287-6838.

Webergrill, Cannondale bike-Shimaro
component $400, Morey boogie board
$20, Hitachi VCR, $100. 263-5111.

B-ball goal, backboard, pole in ground
you remove $150, 5 tiger paw used
tires 205x75x15, $10-$25. 286-4222.

Sm ac, gd cond, $225. 256-6830.

2 danish desk, wht w/red legs gd sz, gd
cond, $35ea. 236-0984.


2 sets of 4, p205R75-15 M&S or
P225R75-15 M&S, $50ea. 285-4528.

FSU bks Gen Bio text & lab, wet suits
long & short. 283-4472.

MR2 car bra $40, Goodyear wrangler
tire p225/75RI5 w/7,000mi, $50,
Univega 12 spd bike, $100.287-4788.

Pioneer stereo w/speakers $275, wash-
er & dryer $450, Mucking lawn mow-
er, $150. 284-3585.

Cosco deluxe stroller, like new, $75/
neg. 282-4474.

Ladies 10spd bike, like new, $75.
284-3398.

Deluxe Graco double stroller, unfant
car seat. 284-4027.

FSU bks for Span & Pos 1041, $45 &
$30. 286-3391.

Skurfer $100, Jr jobe ski, $80. 252-
6929.

Adult/child clothes, shoes & toys. 284-
3276.

Whirlpool dehumidfier, $100. 286-
6684.

Portable baby crib $30, lamps $10-
$15, juice extractor $15, capuccino
coffee maker, $20. 260-6159.

Fine wall pictures w/frames $20 to
$100, Hindu bronze table $80, rock-
ing chair set, $175/obo. 260-6159.

Guaymi dresses for child/preteen,
blue/yellow & red/gold, $14 & $16.
282-4598.

Young boys Roadmaster bike w/train-
ing wheels, gd cond, $30. 286-6171.

FSU bks SYG 1000 $45, Span 1120/
1121, $45. 286-3441.

Porcelain dolls 45 to choose from, $8
to $35, exc cond. 286-6196.

Metal desk $115, crib bumper $10,
micro $85, training potty $5, 100
wedding cards $100. 236-2365.

Giant Perigee 15 spd bike new, $250.
284-5188.

Like new Trio wedding set 1/2kt total
weight $500, engagement ring l/4kt,
$150. 286-6134.
Gasleaf vacuum & blower w/bag $75,
electric typewriter w/dictionary, mem-
ory & word erase, $100. 269-8583.

4 GoodyearEagle GT p235 60 rs14 w/
4 mag rims 6 lugs package deal, $400/
obo. 260-1948.

Clothes & shoes men, women & in-
fants. 284-6190.

Broadcast Beta tapes new, camera
batteries & rechargers. 282-4232.

Two golf bags Spalding & Macgregor,
complete w/umbrella exc cond. 252-
6566.

Wedding ring 5/8k total wt, $700.
287-6728.

2 sets of dishes wht/gold $35ea, Bel-
gian carpet, $200. 282-3297.

Elec guitar w/amp exc cond $200/
obo, baby monitors hardly used, $30/
obo. 283-3881.

PB 386/25mhz 107mbram VGA mon-
itormanyextras, $800/obo. 285-4734.

Computer desk $130, Supra2400baud
external modem $40/obo, radar de-
tector, $50. 284-6327.

Ten mini blinds, kitchen curtains, pink
valences also baby items. 286-6533.

Hot water heater, gas, 30gal $200,
70cl motorcycle needs work, $150.
284-6690.

Wedding/anniversary ring wht gold
w/7 diamond chips. $350. 252-2871.

FSU SYG 1000, BSG 1005, Ant2410,


Tropic Times

Ad Form

0 ANIMALS
F- AUTOMOBILES
F- AVAILABLE
El BOATS & CAMPERS
Q ELECTRONICS
[ FOUND
[] HOUSEHOLD
E[ LOST
L[] MISCELLANEOUS
-] MOTORCYCLES
E] PATIO SALES
[] WANTED


SPONSOR'S NAME


ORG.


PHI 2010, ARH 2000. 252-2863.

Ency 200 World Bk child act set new
$75, car /booster seat 35-15, Sega
sysw/l con game, $100. 284-3137.

Army enlisted dress blues worn twice
sz 38/40, $75. 284 5223.

New Ninja Sw ,)rd, 440 steel & wood
seaboard, shai opened, $70. 263-5316.

Wedding dress off wht, pearled small
used months ago, includes veil, head
piece, gloves & shoes. 252-3260.

Blk sofa $550, Blk loveseat $325, 2
end tables $50ea, Dining Rm table w/
chairs, $125. 284-6192.

1 ac Fedders 24,000 VTU, $325. 252-
2797.




1987 Riva 200cc bike US specs low
miles, dty pd. 285-5935.

1986 Honda CB-700 Nighthawk-S
battery tires & mufflers dty pd, $3,300/
obo. 251-0189.

850cc Susuki driveshaft 15,000 orig-
inal miles dty paid, $850/obo. 250-
0060.
1983 Yamaha 750cc runs grt extra
parts, tires & helmets, $1,500. 266-
5797.

1994 Kawasaki KX250 includes met-
al work stand and book, $5,000/obo.
260-4516.

1983 Kawasaki LTD 550 Looks &
runs grt, $900/obo. 284-6210.




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Qtrs. 852A Clayton.

Qtrs. 245B Albrook 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 504A Clayton 8am.

Qtrs. 245B Albrook 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 1027 Lassiter 8am.

Qtrs. 264A Corozal 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 265B Albrook 6am-noon.

Qtrs. 20BF, Calle 74F Altos Del Chase.

Qtrs. 1164A Clayton 7am-lpm.

Qtrs. 1527B Howard 7am.

Qtrs. 2410A Cocoli 8am.

Qrts. 613 Clayton.

Qtrs. 303B Clayton.




Info on brown & tan Chevy Suburban
at Post Office, Albrook license # 8-
70177. 252-2577.

Paralegal services w/experience in
California law. 261-7231.

Live in maid, span spk ref required.
226-5436.

FSU bks forElementary Span & Amer-
ican Government National/pos 1041.
284-4492.

GEO Tracker/Suziki Sidekick, auto
trans. 264-0643.

Work for Eng spk maid 2 days a week,
honest & dependable. 287-6438.

Carpet for tropical housing at Albrook,
LR, DR, bedrm mini blinds. 264-7779.

Chilton repair manual for 1986 Jeep
Cherokee. 287-6395.

Maid live-out cook, clean, laundry,
iron ref, $130 a month. 260-3485.

Misc parts for BMW car compatible to
79. 261-7231.

Royal Doulton Fox Hunting pattern
china. 269-2972.

Anyone seriously interested in play-
ingMB's Axos & Allies (WWII board
game), exp not necessary. 236-4090.

Dependent spouse/family member to
drive an adult from Corozal to Clay-
ton, M-F at 8:45. 252-2034.

Live-in maid, dependable, Eng spk
care for I child ref. 269-9622.

Maid live out general housework, no
children flexable hours, $130. 252-
6276.

Military couple looking for nice, ma-
ture lady to care for family. 284-5476.

FSU bks, The Legal Env of Business.
264-3229.

Bilingual housekeeper, cook, occa-
sional childcare, live in, honest reli-
ablew/exp& ref. 287-3990 after 10am.

Live in, fluent Eng preferable, honest
reliable to care for 18 mos girl, light
houskeeping. 286-3484.

MPOMC looking for parents & ex-
pecting parents of twins or other mul-
tiple birth. 287-5889.

Span spk, live in housekeeper, to do
housework gd w/kids ref. 287-6229.

Customers to reupholsler your furni-
ture, refinishing, car interior etc. 235-
9047 after 6pm.

Need somebody to teach cooking,
baking. 247-1780. - -

Mature gardener maintenance man live
in/out, Veracruz. 250-0192.

Full time orlive in maid general house-
keeping ref. 260-3275 after 5pm.











B12


Tropic Times
Aug. 12,1994


HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming
veteran preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming edu-
cation and a copy of CASP notice of rating if applicable. Submit
a copy of latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army vacancy announce-
ments (forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Direc-
torate of Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal,
or call 285-5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should be the
first step in the job search.
SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at NM-5 level and
above require specialized experience. Specialized experience is
either education above the high school level or work experience
directly related to the position being filled. Example: Budget
positions at or above the NM-5 level required Budget experience
or equivalent education.
Vacancy announcements are also available at the Sundial
Recreation Center.
Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications
on a continuous basis for the following positions. Registers es-
tablished from these announcements will be used to fill perma-
nent and temporary positions.
VB#001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most cleri-
cal position).
VB#001A * General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most cler-
ical position).
VB#002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch)
* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires
Cert + 6 mo recreation exp in the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req 6 mos recreation
exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6
*The following positions are Perm/Temp, Full-time, Part-
time, Intermittent.
VB# 007 ** Medical Officer, NE 12/13/14.
VB# 008 ** Clinical Nurse, (RN license required), NM-9/
10/11.
VB# 009 ** Practical Nurse, (LPN licence required), NM-5
** Selectees for nurse and medical officer position will be
required to undergo a background check.
VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2. Closed until further no-
tice.
VB# 011 Manual Positions, MG-3. Closed until further no-
tice.
VB# 012 Manual Positions, MG-4. Closed until further no-
tice.
VB# 013 Manual Positions, MG-5. Closed until further no-
tice.
VB# 014 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-6. Closed until fur-
ther notice.
VB# 015 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7. Closed until fur-
ther notice.
VB# 016 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-8. Closed until fur-
ther notice.
VB# 018 Supply Technician, NM-5. Closed until further
notice.
VB# 018A Supply Technician, NM-6. Closed until further
notice.
VB#017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5. Limited
to permanent status employees only.
VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6. Lim-
ited to permanent status employees only.
VB# Vacancies Title and location open today and close Aug.
16.

Pacific
409-94-MW Management Assistant (Office Automation),
NM-344-5. DOL, Transportation Div., Admin office Ft. Clay-
ton. Note: Bilingual (Fluent English/Spanish).
411-94-LA Computer Specialist, NM-334-9/DEV 11. Sen-
sitive. US Army, ISC, HHD, 106th Sig Bgde, Ft. Clayton. Note:
Security clearance is required. If candidate is selected on temp
appt, candidate must re-compete for higher level.
412-94-LA Writer-Editor, NM- 1082-9. Sensitive. 106th Sig
Brigade, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, Ft. Clayton. Note:
Security clearance is required.
414-94-JH Budget Analyst, GS-560-11. Sensitive. 470th
Military Intelligence Brigade. Corozal. Note: Position is under
the Excepted service (CIPMIS). Top secret/Special Intelligence
security is required.
415-94-LA Computer Specialist, NM-334-12. Sensitive.
106th Sig Brigade, DOIM, Info Center, Ft. Clayton. Note: Se-
curity clearance is required.
416-94-JH Wire Communications Cable Splicer, MG-2504-
10. US Army Info Systemt Command, 56th Sig Battalion. Ft.
Clayton. Note: Driver's license is required. Must be able to
satisfactory complete the physical exam.
417-94-LA Lead Mail & File Clerk (Office Automation),
NM-305-5. Sensitive-Top Secret. Mail & Distribution Br.,
DOIM, 106th Sig Bgde, Ft. Clayton. Note: Top secret clearance
is required. Driver's license is required.
418-94-ES Medical Records Tehcnician (Office Automa-
tion), NM-675-5. USA MEDDAC-Panama, GACH, Dept of Ra-
diology, Ancon. Note: Limited to MEDDAC/DENTAC perma-
nent employees, however applications for Temp Nte: 30 Sep 95,
will be accepted from all sources.
420-94-ES Physical Therapist, NM-633-9. Temp Nte: 30
Sep 95. Part-time. USA MEDDAC-Panama, GACH, Dept of
Pediatrics. Ancon. Note: Candidate must be licensed and have
completed successfully the clinical affiliation requirements.
Background check is required.
Atlantic
410-94-SS Housing Maintenance Inspector, NM-303-5. HQ,
USAG, DEH-ATL, Family Housing Branch, Ft. Davis. Note:
Driver's license required.
419-94-ES Licensed Practical Nurse, NM-620-5. Shift work.
USA MEDDAC/DENTAC-Panama, Ft. Sherman Health Clinic,
Ft. Sherman. Limited to MEDDAC/DENTAC permanent em-
ployees, however applications for Temp Nte: 30 Sep 95, will be
accepted from all sources.


#RPotpourri





Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club: 282-3439
A la carte breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-
Fridays and 8-10 a.m. Saturday.
Old fashioned steak night 6-10 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Choose cut of beef to be charbroiled.

Amador
*Club Amador: 282-4334
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring
soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights.
Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico
Panameno at noon the first Sunday of each month.

Clayton
*The Loop: 287-3035
CJ's Sports Bar offers daily lunch specials 11:30
a.m.-1 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments are held
3:30 p.m. Sunday.
Prizrnz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or CJ's
Sports Bar, call 287-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343.
*NCO Club: 287-4716
Casa Maria special through Monday: tortilla, two
flautas, rice, frijoles, sour cream and guacamole, $5.50 per
person.

Aibrook
*Albrook Club: 286-3557/3582
Tonight's entertainment, 5-9 p.m. Rock and Reggae
with Rip Maynard.
Steak night 6-9 p.m. Friday. Choose from rib eye, K.C.
strip, filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked
potato, French fries or rice.
Fiesta de mariscos 6-9 p.m. Saturday. The seafood
feast platter features broiled corvina, stuffed crab, calamari
rings, peel-and-eat shrimp, a choice of potato or rice, cole
slaw and vegetables du jour. A la carte menu available.
Prime rib dinner, 6-9 p.m. Saturday. Menu also in-
cludes: Cream of broccoli soup, garden salad, baked potato,
baby carrots, french fries or rice.
Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-l p.m. in the din-
ing room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets,
French toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-and-eat
shrimp, desserts and ice cream bar.
Italian night special 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Steak-by-the-ounce, 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Choose
from Rib Eye, Filet Mignon, NY Strip or Prime Rib.
Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Monday. Prepare
your plate, choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and
have chefs do the job outside on the open grills.
Mexican night buffet Thursdays includes tacos, fajitas,
taco salad and sopapillas for dessert.
Country western night Thursdays with free dance
lessons at 7:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples
dances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. Country west-
ern music 9-11 p.m.

Howard
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club - Dining Room:
284-4189
Sunday breakfast buffet 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. An assort-
ment of breakfast foods are available in the dining room.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30
a.m. Saturday.
Mexican night and Texas barbecue 5:30-9 p.m.
Wednesday. Enjoy all-you-can-eat soft tacos. Fajitas, ribs
and fish are also available.
Saturday night gourmet specials, 5:30 - 9 p.m. Satur-



Chapl scedul


Pacific
Amador Chapel
Building 108, Phone: 282-3610
8:30am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
9:30am CCD Catholic. Building 109
(Sunday)
10:30am Episcopal Worship Service
(Sunday)
Clayton Chapel
Building 64, Phone: 287-5859
1 1:30am Daily Catholic Mass
5pm Catholk Mass (Saturday)
8:45am Collective Protestant Service
(Sunday)
10:30am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
10:30am Protestant Sunday School (Sun-
day,Building 156,287-3497)
12:30pm Cospel Service (Sunday)
5:30pm CCD Catholic, Building. 156
(Sunday)
6pm Evening Service (Sunday)
Corozal Chapel
Building 112, Phone: 285-6717
7:30pm Jewish first Friday of month)
10am h.bpanic Catholic Mass (Sunday)
Ipm Peniecostal Worihip (Sunday)
7pm Sunday School (Friday)


days. Take someone special to dinner featuring tableside prep-
aration with Tuxedo Service.
Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday in the dining
room. Select a cut and order a New York strip, rib eye or filet.
For poeple who prefer to eat lighter, meals of chicken marinata,
pasta, shrimp vin blanc or shrimp Taboga are also available.
Seafood lover's special 5:30-9 p.m. Friday and Satur-
days. Enjoy an array of appetizers and main entrees.
Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or take-
out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot wings.
New family menu Tuesdays and Fridays featuring all the
past favorites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand
made 1/2 pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom : 284-
4189
Disco Jet, 4:30 p.m.- 1 a.m. Tonight. Dance and relax to
the sounds of DeFay.
All-night disco, 8 p.m.- 5 a.m. Saturday. Party all night
long to Disco Jet.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove: 284-
4189
All night hoe-down to your country favorites, 10 p.m.-5
a.m. Saturday.
New country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays.
Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Wednes-
days in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancing, the
stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midnight.
Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with
your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills.
Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-I a.m.
Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday: 5 p.m.-
midnight Thursdays.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. Members
must have a card and be present to win.
*Top Three Club: 284-4189
Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday.
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Club closed Saturdays.
*Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718
It's prime time 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays. Enjoy the
prime rib special.
Super social hours 5 p.m. Friday. Come and eat at the
complimentary buffet and enjoy music and dancing all night
long.
Game nights and progressive club card drawing 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Play pool or darts with a $2 entry fee, winner
takes all, club matches pot.
Dining room is closed Sunday and Wednesday nights. The
club is closed Sundays.
New lounge menu available Mondays-Saturdays.

Rodman
*Rodman Club - open to all ranks: 283-4498
Social hour & hors d'oeuvres, 3:30-11 p.m. Friday at
the Laguna Lounge and Rodman Bohio.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
All-you-can-eat homestyle fried chicken, 4:30-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Grill menu also available.
All-you-can-eat beef and burgundy, 4:30-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Grill menu is also available.
Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday at
the Rodman Bohio.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 6-9 p.m.
Fridays-Saturdays.
Dinner is served 6-9 p.m. Mondays-Sundays.
*Rodman Annex: 283-4498
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays.


Tradition)
I-2pm Prolestant Confirmation

Atlantic
Davis Chapel
Building 32, Phone: 289-3319
1 :30am Catholic Mass (Tuesday-Friday)
Noon Catholic Spanish Mass (Sunday)
1:30pm Protestant Hispanic Service
(Sunday)
Sherman Chapel
Building 152, Phone: 289-6481
8:30am Collective Protestant Worship
(Sunday)
10am Protestant Sunday School
Espinar Chapel
Building 224, Phone: 289-4616
9am Catholic English Mass (Sunday)
9am Protestant Sunday School at
Espinar Elementary
10:15am CCD Catholic Sunday School at
Espinar Elementary
10:15am Collective Protestant Worship
(Sunday)
l1:30pmGospel Sunday School
12:20pm Gospel Sen ice (Sunday)
6:30pm Gospel Bible Study (Sunday)
Islamic Praver Senices 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Friday, Fort Clayton ChapeL 287-5859.


Gorgas Hospital
Building 254. Phone: 282-5507
12:15pm Daily Catholic Mass (2nd floor
Weekday worship (As an-
nounced)
Albrook Chapel
Building 860, Phone: 284-3948
Bam Spanish Catholic Mass (Sunday)
9am Confessions (Sunday)
9:15am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
9:45am Protestant Sunday School
1 am General Protestant Service
Howard Chapel
Building 500, Phone: 284-3948
I :30am Daily Catholic Mass
4:30pm Confessions (Saturday)
5pm Catholic Mass (Saturday)
9:30am General Protestant Service (Sun-
day!
11am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
12L30pm Gospel Service (Sunday)
Rodman Chapel
Building 40, Phone: 283-4148
8-9am Catholic Massi
10-1 lam General Prott-tanI Sern ice t(un-
day)
S1:15am ProtestantCommunion(Luthern




Full Text

PAGE 1

Tropc us Vol. VII, No. 32 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Aug. 12, 1994 o l t Helping out in emergencies 'My Place' off limits FORTCLAYTON(USARSOPAO)-Theclub Red Cross director visits Panama "My Place" in Panama City has been added to the list of establishments off limits to military members FORT CLAYTON (USARSO assistance to allow them return and their families, officials said. PAO) -Kay Walton, the director of home if they have to, on emerOfflimits areas and establishments are identified Service Armed Forces Operations gency leave. to help maintain discipline and an appropriate level of the American Red Cross visited Walton said the mission of of health, morale and safety for U.S. military stathe Red Cross offices on U.S. milithe Red Cross affects the quality tioned or visiting here, officials said. These restrictary installations this week. of life for people stationed in tions help prevent military members from being During an interview with the loPanama. exposed to crime or becoming victims of criminal cal media, she explained the reason "I think quality of life is ceractivity. for her visit. tainly an issue that is important to All U.S. military are prohibited from entering "My purpose is to visit the Red any major command and I know these areas or establishments by regulation and are Cross paid staff and volunteers that it is here. I believe that the subject to disciplinary action forviolation of the off here.to get abetter feel for the kind services be provided helping enlimits policy, officials said. of programs and services we are sure that service members' moFor more information about off limits areas or offering to the members of the milirale is high and that they feel conestablishments, call 287-3402. tary and their families in Panama fidenttheycanhaveeffectivecomand to meet with the senior communications with membersoftheir Shooting clarified mands to find out about the drawWalton family when they're in an area down plans, so we can ensure that separated like this physically and when there is not as FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -In the RedCross services areherethroughoutthetimethemilitary adequate, sometimes, communications as we get back July 29 issue of Tropic Times, it was reported that remains in Panama." home. plus, the morale is better for service members and a U.S. soldier from the 193rd Infantry Brigade Walton also talked about the Red Cross mission in families who feel more comfortable -that assists them to (Light) had been shot in the leg by a Panamanian Panama and how the drawdown will affect it. hopefully focus on the mission." window washeron Tumba Muerto. The soldier was "It's very important that we remain constant in our After reviewing the Red Cross services in Panama, and treated and released from Gorgas Army Commuservices," she said. the reactions from servicemembers and their commanders, nity Hospital. Walton said the primary services of the Red Cross are Walton is pleased with the performance of the offices here. Further investigation has revealed that the Panathe delivery of emergency communications to members of "Everything that I am hearing is that the Red Cross manian, contrary to initial information, was not the the military and their families involving death or serious services are highly valued and they're being provided very person who caused the injury, illness of a family member, verification of an emergency in well and there's a very strong desire that we remain here as The incident is still under investigation. order to assist the military command in emergency leave long as we have military and their families stationed here. _ _ __ decisions related to the servicemembers, and financial It's been very positive." Army forms new council for labor-management issues Defense Employee's Coalition and the Disby Staff Sgt. Jane Usero trictNumberFour,MarineEngineers' Beneficial Association," he said. "By working COROZAL -The U.S. Army Panama together on issues, we can provide informaLabor -Management Partnership Council, tion to the commander to help him make a new approach to problem solving and informed decisions that are agreeable to all addressing issues betweenmanagementand concerned." unions representing the civilian work force With all parties being involved from the in U.S. Army South, is now up and running, very beginning, the solutions agreed upon officials said. through thecouncil willensuremaintaining Through this new council, labor and a high quality of life for the civilian work management meet and discuss issues and force while continuing to meet the mission, make recommendations to decision makers McGuinness said. so the mission can be met in the most "This will be especially important as the efficient andeffective manner possible, said work force gets smaller," he said. "We are Samuel McGuinness, Labor Relations offiall going to zero, that's a fact. But now, the cer. unions can see from the ground up how the "We want to promote the partnership workforce reduction works." concept, improve communication skills, Also,through the council, both manageteam spirit and understanding between lament and labor representatives are getting bor and management," he said. "The counthe same information at the same time, cil will use an interest-based decision makMcGuinness said. In this way, time and ing process which involves all participants. effort is saved and everyone concerned "Communication is the essential ingreknows from the start what's going on. dient in the partnership," McGuinness said. In addition to the council, organizations "Communication must be comprehensive, within USARSO can set up Functional all inclusive and free-flowing." Partnership Teams with both union and The council, which includes 10 manmanagement representatives thatcan make agement representatives and 10 labor repdecisions and do what is needed to accomresentatives, meets once each month to plish the mission, he said. Tropic Times file photo discuss the needs, problems and issues con"Problems should be solved at the lowHappy anniversary cerningboth.Throughthisforum,thegroups est level possible," McGuinness said. work together to find solutions and comThroughthese teams, manyissuesandprobThe La Gallega passes through the Pedro Miguel Locks. This vessel mon ground that benefits and represents lems may be solved at the organizational is one of more than 700,000 that have passed through the Panama both labor and management, McGuinness level. Canal since its first official transit in 1914. The Panama Canal said. 'The bottom line is that we are one celebrates its 80th anniversary Monday. See story and photo on 'The council includes people from U.S. committee with one goal," he said. "We Page 11. Army activities, the Panama Department of will accomplish the mission as a team." raining~~~an more:7atr Pg 4, Air Force marksmen compete for The 1994 Soldiers Show wows au*Briefly, Page 2. coveted bronze badge during pisdience with high energy song and *Military pay raise, Page 5. tol match. dance routines. +USARSO hoops, Page 13.

PAGE 2

Tropic Times iI L y Aug. 12, 1994 Tropic Times late? A fg s aaCall 269-3220 People who live in quarters on a Pacific Puerto Rico has been removed Howard AFB Charleston AFB, SC (0) area military installation and have not refrom the Environmental Morale 3:45pm B727 Howard AFB (C,O) Friday aea Topiay is ad hae. FrLeavePrograSoto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) 5:55 am C130 Howard AFB ceived a Tropic Times by 8 am. Friday Leave Program. For more InforTuesday San Salvador, El Salvador should call 269-3220. mation, call 284-5758. 5:40am C141 Howard AFB (VCC) Saturday Lima, Peru (CC) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Payment drop boxes for 5:40am C130 Howard AFB Santiago, Chile (0) Howard AFB Savannah, GA (A) La Paz, Bolivia 10:40am C141 Howard AFB Miami Herald available 1:55pm C5A Howard AFB 8:40am B727 Howard AFB Charleston AFB, SC Drop boxes for Miami Herald subscripCharleston AFB, SC Atlanta IAP,GA (C) Sunday Charleston IAP, SC tion payments have been placed in the post 7am B727 Howard AFB Wednesday AActive duty only offices on Quarry Heights, Albrook, Atlanta IAP, GA 6:10am C130 Howard AFB USU.S. passport Howard and Fort Clayton. Charleston IAP, SC (C) Bogota, Colombia O-Overnight Monday Howard AFB C-Commercial Contract Adoption orientation 5:40am C130 Howard AFB Thursday V-visa Tegucigalpa, Honduras(CC) 7:45am C5A Howard AFB M-Medevac beefing slated Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) CC-Country Clearance Social Work Services at Gorgas Army Community Hospital will hold an adoption orientation briefing 1:30-3:30 p.admAug. FSC offers transition sible. For more information, call 284upon completion of the course. For infor24 in the Gorgas headquarters conference seminar to members room, first floor. For more information, The Howard Family Support Center is Bank will open Monday Last chance to register call Patricia Thomas at 282-5t39/5404. offering a transition seminar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. for military payday for FSU fall semester Aug. 31 -Sept. 2 at the FSC. Mentors for Youth 2000 The three-day training program helps The Merchants National Bank will be Florida State University, Panama Canal needed at local schools separating military members and their open Monday for military payday and Branch will hold late registration Monday The Howard Family Support Center is families make the transition from the miliclosed Aug. 20. and Tuesday at Albrook and Fort Davis. Tchen Hor F ai ppor Cetrotary .to a civilian career. For more inforFor information, call 285-6922. gram designed to assist and motivate 6thmation or to register, call 284-5650. For Spot bid sale for used to 12th-grade students in local Department more personalized, individual assistance, automobiles slated Japanese destroyers of Defense Dependents Schools. The FSC may make an appointment by A spot bid sale on used U.S. governopen to visitors is actively seeking officers, noncommisment cars, trucks and buses will be held 9 The four ships of the Japanese Trainsioned officers and civilians who would a.m. Wednesday at Building 308, Corozal. ing Squadron, destroyers JDS Nagarsuki, like to become positive, inspirational role DoDDS urges immediate Inspection time will be 9 a.m.-3 p.m. TuesJDS Takatsuki, JDS Mochizuki and JDS models to students. registration for children day at the same location. For information, Shirayuki, will be open for visitors 1-4 Mentors must commit a minimum of All newly arriving personnel are encall 285-5417. p.m. Saturday and Sunday. They are one hour per week to the Youth 2000 procouraged to enroll their school age family berthed at Pier 2, Rodman NS. gram. Mentors may help with assignments, members immediately. Take immunizaFort Clayton shoppette explain their work processes or just talk tion records, letter of sponsorship or announces new hours Panamanian meal and listen to the students. Locally, school manent change of station orders and idenbegins Aug. 25 and Youth 2000 officials tification cards to the school. The Fort Clayton shoppette, Building celebrates anniversary would like to have as many mentors as Kindergarten children who will be 5 95 has new hours of operation effective Celebrate the anniversary of the Panapossible available to interact with eager years old by Oct. 31 will need a birth cerAug. 21. The shoppette will be open, 9 ma Canal with a traditional meal at the young students. To volunteer, or for more tificate or passport in addition to the above a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 Trade Winds Dining Facility, Building information, call 284-5650. documents. p.m. Saturday and closed Sunday. For in712, Howard AFB 11 a.m.-I p.m. Thursformation, call 287-5694. day. All military and Department of DeNeedy children ask for Panama Canal College fense privilege card holders may attend. Need chldre as fo Panma analColege PACE now opening early Christmas blessing opens fall registration PAt n Pn The Panama Chief Master Sergeant's Registration for Panama Canal college 6 days for better service Thrift Savings Plan Group is sponsoring a clothing and toy is set for 9 a.m.-l p.m. and 2:30-5 p.m. The PACE Improvement Center, announces funds returns drive on behalf of the Kuna Indian orAug. 22-24. Registration will be in the auBuilding 340, Corozal will be open six The Federal Retirement Thrift Investphans. The Chiefs and some of the Kuna ditorium. For information, call 252-3304. days a week. The center is open Mondayment Board has announced the latest rechildren will be in front of the Howard Friday 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m.turns for the three funds in the Thrift SavPost Office from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 20 First aid, safety course 1 p.m. For information, call 285-6213. ings Plan as follows: accepting donations. Fund June Last 12 months The chiefs will clean and repair all gifts offered to community IPMA seeks outstanding C (Stock) -2.47% +1.40% (as needed) and give them as presents from A community first aid and safety F (Bond) -.24% +1.39% Santa Claus during the Kuna Children's course will be held 6-10 p.m. Tuesdayemployees for awards G (Gov't Christmas Party at the Howard Enlisted Thursday. Learn adult, infant, child CPR, The federal section of the International Securities) +.59% +6.24% Club in December. first aid and safety. For information, call Personnel Management Association is acThe next open season will be Nov. 15, Abbe Lester at 287-5509. cepting nominations for its All-Star Team, 1994-Jan. 31, 1995. Employees are reLinda Trunzo awards. minded that they may make up to four TSP Jam '94 celebration Materials ordered for Nominees must be federal employees interfund transfers each year. in the personnel administration field or in For information, to get interfund transseeks booth vendors Air Force colleges are in other occupation, such as health care, if the fer request forms or to submit an open seaBooth rentals for vendors or for organiOfficials at the Howard Education Ofperson is assigned to a personnel function. son election form, call the Benefits Branch zations are available at the Rodman NS Lafice advise military members enrolled in Nominees must be submitted to the Diat 285 5941/5745a bor Day celebration Jam '94. Jam '94 will the Air Command and Staff College or the rectorate of Civilian Personnel by take place 9 a.m.-I 1 p.m. Sept. 3. Cost is Air War College that previously-ordered Wednesday. For information, call 285USARSO recognizes $50 for a 10' x 10' space. Call 283-4334 or course materials have arrived. Seminar 5611. 283-4314 for information. Sign-up at students may stop by the education office departing soldiers Building 65 from 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. and pick up their materials as soon as posPre-separation briefing The Deputy Commander, U.S. Army smooths transition South Hasta Luego Reception will be held W weekend weather smnen2:45 p.m. Thursday at the Fort Clayton A pre-separation briefing will be held I Noncommissioned Officers Club. The reFactoid: In a belt along the equator (between 35 N and p.m. Aug. 26 at the Replacement Detachception is in honor of soldiers leaving the 35 S), there are 3,200 thunderstorms each night, some of ment classroom, Building 520, Fort Claycommand in August and September. Famwhich can be heard 18 miles away. ton. The briefing is designed to help all solily members may attend. For information, Weather questions can be sent to 24th Weather Squaddiers, within 120 days from separation, call 287-5073. ron ATT'N: Weather Wise, Howard AFB, Panama. transition smoothly to civilian life. For inPacific Atlantic formation, call 287-4753/4155. PACE Center offers Saturday Saturday Mini-Immersion training opportunity Temperature Tides Temperature Tides Spanish The self-help training class Electrical High: 90 7:50 a.m. at 16.4 feet High: 88 6:02 p.m. at 1.2 feet class begins Monday will be held 9 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Low: 72 1:38 p.m. at .7 feet Low: 70 10:49 a.m. at 0.1 feet The next Mini-Immersion Spanish PACE Improvement Center, Directorate Sunday Sunday class will be held 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monof Engineering and Housing complex, High: 89 8:42 a.m. at 15.6 feet High: 87 6:48 p.m. at 1.3 feet day-Aug. 26. The classes are held MonBuilding 340, Corozal. Low: 72 2:32 a.m. at 1.6 feet Low: 70 11:31 p.m. at 0.1 feet day-Friday in Building 128, Fort Clayton. For reservations or more information, Forecast: Mostly cloudy skies, with afternoon thunderstorms and showers. Soldiers can eam four promotions points call 285-6213.

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T i ai gTropic Times a n g Aug. 12, 1994 A competitor takes aim during the elementary level excellence in competition pistol match held July 29 US A FocephoosbySaffSg RanCawson 12 shooters earn bronze at pistol competition police training, 'Vic' said he was not really surprised by Staff Sgt Rian Clawson when seven of the 12 medal winners were from the 24th SPS. 'The captain from the 310th really surprised me HOWARD AFB -More than 140 Air Force men and though -he got the third highest score, and he's a pilot." women signed up to compete in the 24th Security Police Actually, Vic said, he was impressed at the overall perP Squadron's Elementary Level Excellence in Competition formance of all the competitors, since he really hadn't exPistol Match held July 29 and 30 at the firing range here. pected more than six or seven medals to be awarded. Of these, 127 members actually competed for the chance There were only 10 women competing in the pistol to win and wear the bronze badge that was given as a match and, although none actually won a medal, several prize, and 12 of those shot well enough to earn the presticame close. Sgt. Jacqueline White, of the 24th SPS, gious bit of metal. scored a 251, the top score for women. The average score "Actually, we could have given away one more medal for all competitors was 195.4 -ranging from a low of 27 if somebody else had qualito a high of 280. fied," said Tech. Sgt. Don "The competition was Bridge, the chief of combat "Every person who showed up to tough, but it was a lot of fun arms training and mainteshoot at the competition got the chance too," White said. "It was renance. Bridge has more than ally close, and going into the 11 years of experience with to do so, even those on standby. A few last round I still had a good the Excellence in Competipeople showed up in civilian clothes, chance to get the medal." tion program, both as a comShe needed to score a 92 petitor and as an official, and and we had to turn them away, but they with her last 10 bullets to Tech Sgt. Steve Burke, 24th Communications he said this turnout was "exwere all given the opportunity to return score a 270 total, but said Squadron, sets up his target. Burke missed the cellent." she "got very tense," and bronze badge by one point and still had one To qualify for the medal, later in proper military uniform." just couldn't pull it off. .round in his weapon. shooters had to shoot 30 Tech. Sgt. Don Bridge "It was a learning expenrounds from a 9mm handence," she added. "The key 2. Senior Airman Ashley B. McDowell, 24th SPS, chief of combat arms trainingiscnetaobuyu 27 gun at a standard, scoreable and maintenance is concentration, but you 279 target set up 25 yards away. also have to relax. If I can 3. Capt. Andrew B. Fontaine, 310 Airlift Squadron, They needed a minimum figure out how to do both of 277 score of 270, and had to be in the top 10 percent of all those things at the same time, I'll make it next year." 4. Staff Sgt. Scott E. Noble, 24th SPS, 276 shooters. "I believe we had a very good showing this time 5. Master Sgt. William L. Clouston, 24th Civil Engi"Every person who showed up to shoot at the compearound, and we do plan to make this competition an annuneering Squadron, 276 tition got the chance to do so, even those on standby," al event," Bridge said. "When I got to Panama I found the 6. Staff Sgt. Gary L. Miles, Jr., 24th SPS, 276 Bridge said. "A few people showed up in civilian clothes, Excellence in Competition program had never been here 7. Staff Sgt. Artie F. Pearson, 24th SPS, 274 and we had to turn them away, but they were all given the and I decided I'd like to try and get it started. With this 8. Senior Master Sgt. Richard W. Hackney, 24th SPS, opportunity to return later in proper military uniform." kind of response, I'm glad I did." 270 Under most circumstances, the CATM chief explained, The competitor's general enthusiasm seems to indicate 9. Capt. Kevin D. Brown, 310 AS, 270 Air Force regulations require all military members shoot-they're glad too. 10 Tech. Sgt. Robert M. Farnsworth, 24th CommuniMn at official Air Force ranges to he in uniform. The top shooters at the competition and their respecnations Squadron, 270 aolme s ery good shottern :om ee n ti\' ir n ncn: >4mM. Denny, Dt. 2, 270

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Tropic Times i Features Aug. 12, 1994 e t m 1994 Soldiers Show Talented troops dazzle audience by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero USARSO Public Affairs Office FORT CLAYTON -The 1994 Soldiers Show opened with a high energy routine of song and dance that told a little about each of the entertainers -and the energy never stopped for the next hour and a half. Though the tempo slowed a few times for ballads, the mood didn't last long as the performers jumped into the next routine. There was music for all tastes. Rock, country, pop, gospel, oldies and even older oldies kept the audience rocking to the beat. From the sizzling modem dance rous Army Kent, Cy staff six. and Sgt C tine to the toe-tapping, foot-stomping SpC. Kathryn Kent, Cp. Yolandria Dixon and Sgt. 1st Class Linda Sanborn perform 1940's music. country music segment, the show had the audience jamming. If there had been room in the theater, most in the audience would have been out of their seats two-stepping with the performers. The program also had a light-hearted side sprinkled in with a fun-filled Reggae routine where performers hit the stage with dreadlocks to their waists. The fun continued later in the show with a comedy routine about Army dining facilities to the tune of "Be Our Guest." With pots and pans, wooden spoons and wire whisks, the performers brought laughter from the audience during this light-hearted look at dining facilities and a new recruit. The talent of the performers was endless from start to finish, but it truly shined through when the women sang in harmony without instrumental accompaniSoldiers Show performers start the show with a high-energy opening ment. Not to be outdone, the men belted number. Cepr. Cpeding out their own harmony to the finger-snapentertainment by singing and dancing to ing, special effects, costumes and choreogGarcia sing a duet during the counping delight of the audience. the tunes popular during the 1940s. raphy was also exceptional. try medley of the 1994 Soldiers Though the audience was involved In dress blues and sharing the stage with From the laser light displays throughShow. from the beginning, the Motown medley Old Glory and fireworks, the troupe ended out the program, to the set design, to the the audience fully agreed. nearly brought them to their feet. With the show by bringing out the patriotic side stage smoke, to the many varied costumes, Maj. Gen. George Crocker, U.S. Army songs from the 1960s, such as "My Girl," in all of us when they sang "America the the talent behind the scenes equalled that South commander, said it perfectly when "Heat Wave," and "Ain't No Mountain Beautiful." on stage. he thanked the soldiers for their perforHigh Enough," it seemed the entire audiThough the talent of these performers As performers and technicians, those mance at the end of the program. ence was clapping and moving to the was nothing short of perfection, the pure involved with the 1994 Soldiers Show "You reached out and touched our tunes. enjoyment would not have been the same could hold their own on any professional hearts," he said. "This is the secret weapon Going even further into the past, the without the technicians behind the scenes. stage. And from the standing ovation they of our country -the energy, talent and enperformers paid tribute to World War II Behind each song or dance, the lightreceived at the end of the show, it seems thusiasm of our young people." Atlantic soldiers' garrison mission important for combat FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) -Although have a hand in running: the Directorate of Engineering They all work well together and accomplish their goals." they are not the first on the front lines in combat, the soland Housing, Finance and Accounting Office, Adjutant The Company D soldiers also support community diers of Company D, U.S. Army Garrison have a mission General's Office, Staff Judge Advocate's Office, Transevents like the recent Directorate of Community Activithat may bejust as important to the success of any combat portation Motor Pool, Commissary, Atlantic chapels, ties Fair and the Independence Day activities, he said. situation. Range Control and Central Issue Facility. The unit's family support group, named best of the Company D has two basic missions: garrison support In one way or another, these facilities reach every year in the Atlantic community, lends a hand with the and noncombatant evacuation operations, but the missions member of the community, May said. community events as well, May added. are not as simple as they sound, said Ist Lt. Charles H. "We're here to ensure that the needs of the soldiers "No one person makes everything work," he said. May, Company D commander. and their families are met," he said. "The family members "The family support group has supported the unit and Its evacuation mission involves evacuating noncomare equally as important as the soldiers." the soldiers and has received support from them in rebatants, such as family members and civilian employees, Additionally, garrison support can have a direct affect turn." from the Atlantic community if the area becomes unsafe, on soldier readiness, May said. Whether conducting its garrison support operations May said. "We make sure that when a soldier is out doing a tactior assisting with community activities, the soldLrs, of"We would process all noncombatants and transfer cal mission, he doesn't have to worry about pay problems Forts don't go unnoticed, May said. "We dnh't have a them from this arena to a safe arena -out of the country or his family," he said. behind-the-scenes mission," he said. "Imagine closing if necessary," he said. "The soldiers of Company D accomplish this misthe Finance and Accounting Office or DEH for just one While that mission is a reactionary one, garrison supsion," May said. week. The affect on the community would he tremenport is an every day mission that keeps post operations "The officers and (noncommissioned officers) who dous. running smoothly, May said. run these sections all run very good operations," he said. "I think the community knows what we do, and I In the Atlantic community, Company D soldiers run or "The personnel under them do an outstanding job as well. think they're glad we're here doing it."

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Tropic Timesas ____ __ _ ___ _ ~ A ~ ~ I ~ 1 W V ~ _ Aug. 12,1l9945 Haiti invasion U.S. troops prepare for possible military move WASHINGTON (AP) -The Marines thrown and the capital of Port au-Prince say they're ready to go in. The Navy's secured in a matter of hours. There are ships are poised off shore. The Army's fears, however, that Haitian military elespecial commandoes have drilled thouments would wage guerilla warfare, striksands of troops in assault maneuvers. ing at U.S. troops and then disappearing All summer long, the U.S. military has into the countryside, and that the U.S. ocbeen rehearsing in anticipation of an order cupation of Haiti could drag on into to invade Haiti. months and even years. Haiti Army commander Raoul Cedras In mid-May, some 44,000 troops took says an invasion is inevitable and his counpart in an annual exercise along the East try must be prepared. Asked over the Coast dubbed "Agile Provider," in which weekend about Cedras' comments, White Marines Corps and Army forces stormed House chief of staff Leon Panetta said, the shores of North Carolina and Puerto "I'd recommend he not test us." Rico. But the American military has been doPentagon officials said maneuvers using plenty of testing of its own capabiliing fighter jets and amphibious landing ties. craft had been planned for more than a year Pentagon spokesman Dennis Boxx said using a Middle Eastern scenario. But the of the U.S. maneuvers in anticipation of a possible Haiti connection was also clear. possible order from President Clinton: Then came the news that the amphibi"We obviously have contingency plans ous assault ship USS Wasp would conduct in place should he order the use of force "refresher training" in the Caribbean for a and therefore, we exercise and train in a few weeks with 650 Marines on board. variety of ways and locations, to be ready And, a few weeks later, headlines -should we be called upon." pointed to a drill by a battalion of Army The intense and highly visible preparaRangers that seized an airfield in Florida tions go on despite defense intelligence rein a mock version of an attack on the PortU.S. Navy photo by Peity Officer 3rd Class Sean Hughes ports that describe the Haitian military as au-Prince airport. New com m ander hardly capable of organized resistance. In all, thousands of troops participated The Haitian army has only a handful of directly or as support units in rehearsals in Naval Security Group Activity, Galeta Island's new commander' lightly armed vehicles, no warplanes to late May that took place in several states in Cmdr. Sharon A. Peyronel speaks to her sailors during the July 22 speak of, and World War II-vintage rifles. the Southeast -part of the military's change of command ceremony. Cmdr. Melvyn K. McDonald passed Some military planners say the country preparations for a potential strike against command on to Peyronel here July 22. could be invaded, the government overHaiti's military government. CHAMPUS continuation will replace U.S. VIP Clinton administration discusses WASHINGTON (AFIS) -The Continued Health Care Benefit Program will become separating servicemembers ne xt optional temporary health insurance plan starting Oct. 1. WASHINGTON (AP) -The Clinton administracal 1996 as early as this week. But as yet, according to providesmadiep are trouah ofaa s ution is embroiled in a debate over whether the governone White House official, "the current budget policy ing CHAMPUS provider networks. Enrollees will pay the ment should invest nearly $30 billion in military pay on the pay raise has not changed." entire premium, which will be equal to a comparable plan raises over the next five years. Perry argues his case on military grounds. Pay, he for former federal employees under the Federal EmployOn one side is Defense Secretary William Perry, says, relates directly to the military's readiness for batees Health Benefit Program. Officials expect the premiwho not only wants the raise for purposes of morale tle in terms of the quality of recruits, the duration of um to be $450 for self-only coverage and $900 for a famand military readiness but insists that the -extra cost enlistments and morale. The Pentagon was embarily. There are no adjustments for age or size of family. should not come out of other portions of the Pentagon rassed by recent reports of troops relying on food The Continued Health Care Benefit Program will be budget. stamps to feed their families and estimates that as many open to an expanded population. Eligible to enroll are Arrayed against Perry are White House staffers as 16,000 enlistees may be using the stamps to supplemembers of the armed forces discharged or released from and budget officials who view the proposal as a raid ment their food budgets. active duty and their family members, unremarried former on President Clinton's cherished domestic priorities. "My best judgment today is that the morale and spouses and unmarried children under age 21 if not in Accepting Perry's proposal threatens Clinton's spirit and readiness of our fighting forces are very school or 23 if in school. agenda of deficit reduction but offers the president an good," Perry said. "I am now immersed in preparaFormer members can buy coverage for up to 18 opportunity to shore up his reputation with the milition of our 1996 budget and that is front and center" in months. Unremarried former spouses will be able to buy tary. Rejecting the pay raise eases a major budget those deliberations. coverage for 36 months. The program is open to all headache for Clinton but could lead to a widening pay Perry said in an interview that he has not yet raised unremarried former spouses regardless of the length of gap between the military and the private sector. An althe issue with Clinton. But he noted that when Conthe marriage to a servicemember. Emancipated children ready difficult recruiting situation, aggravated by regress made it clear it wanted full cost-of-living raises can be covered up to 36 months as well. The program ports of soldiers on food stamps, could worsen. for the military last year, Clinton allowed him to add covers pre-existing conditions for all enrollees. "It is the single biggest-dollar issue we're going to $11.4 billion to the defense budget over the next five No U.S. VIP policy will be sold after Sept. 30, 1994. face," said an administration official familiar with the years to pay for those higher levels. Policies sold before then will remain in effect their full debate. Cabinet officers of other agencies groused that length. Beneficiaries enrolled in U.S. VIP have the option Under Perry's plan, military and civilian Defense Clinton was giving the Pentagon special treatment of converting their policies; people eligible will have 60 Department employees would get a raise pegged to the while they had to cut their budgets. days from the loss of their entitlement to military health increase in the cost of living in each of the next five White House Chief of Staff Leon Panetta, Clincare to elect coverage in the new program. years. The proposal comes after two years in which ton's former budget director, has been skeptical of past Coverage under the program is in 90-day increments. Clinton proposed no raise or a raise below the cost-ofPentagon pay increase proposals and is among those Initially, interested beneficiaries will submit an applicaliving increase, only to see Congress approve the full questioning Perry's long-term plan, according to adtion and a check for the first 90-day premium to a thirdpay increases for the military. ministration officials. party administrator. The administrator will verify eligibil"This is the dilemma," said the official, who spoke A typical Army sergeant at the E-5 pay scale makes ity, update the Defense Enrollment and Eligibility Reporton condition of anonymity. "Since Congress is put$16,800 per year. The 2.6 percent cost-of-living raise ing System and notify applicants in writing of their acting the raise in anyway, instead of getting a black eye for fiscal 1995 expected to win final congressional apceptance. Beneficiaries will seek care and have bills profrom the military he ought to just put the pay raise in." proval would add $436 to the sergeant's salary. For a cessed in the same way as do standard CHAMPUS beneBut unless Clinton slashes other Pentagon protypical colonel with 24 years of service, the current ficiaries. They should bring their acceptance letters when grams or finds a pot of money in some domestic pro$66,432 salary would go up by $1,727. they seek care as proof of enrollment. gram, the military pay raise could make it difficult for These modest sums grow huge, however, when apMembers of the uniformed services who leave the serhim to submit a budget below previously established plied to some 1.5 million uniformed military and comvice before the new program begins have a 60-day enrollspending caps. pounded annually over five years, as Perry's proposal ment period. They must lose transitional health benefits Among White House national security advisers would do. And the raise would also cover the roughly after Aug. 2, to enroll during this 60-day window. DoD is and budget planners, the debate is intensifying as plan900,000 civilians on the Department of Defense pay.selecting a contractor to collect premiums, verify eligibilning proceeds on the administration's fiscal 1996 budroll. The civilians also get extra "locality pay," which ity and perform other administrative tasks, The process is get proposal to be submitted next January. One budget supplements income in expensive areas such as New scheduled to be complete by late August planner said Clinton could decide the question for fisYork and Washington.

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6 Tropices Aug. 12, 1994 Voices Resident finds 'Self Help' shelves bare Dear Editor: on the residents. I am writing this letter because I can't stand it anymore. Under the self help program, we furnish items required I have just finished reading a recent issue of the Tropic to maintain and repair the permanent fixtures in your Times, and it contains another in a series of articles about for people who whant to leam about home repair, but you home. If a permanent fixture is damaged, DEH profesthe crunch in family housing funds, and the increased emcan't fix much without the tools and parts to do the job. sional tradesmen will continue going to your home to perphasis on "do it yourself" maintenance. I truly believe that I believe it is important to take advantage of the talents form the repair. there is an extreme shoitage of funds to perform repairs/ of the people living in government quarters who can make It is extremely difficult for the PACE Improvement improvements to family housing, and as a homeowner in theirown repairs .This saves money that can be used elseCenter to carry all the items needed because of the many the states, I fully understand the savings of doing home where in the family housing budget. In order to capitalize different styles of quarters which were built during differrepairs/aintenance. The part I have a hard time with is on this, a viable means of providing the necessary items ent timeframes, some dating back to the early 1900s. how poor the self help program eally is here. I have evhas to exis: Many of the fixtures in the older homes are either obsoer lived in government quarters before, and I don't kow Famiy housing Resident lete or no longer manufactured. In the case of faucets. it;,, what other instalatiois Mio or don'T Ihve, hot ti1e sel' ihc more cost effective to send a professional to perform the program here needs he Dear Family housing Resident: repair versus having all types of faucets available at the I have been to the PACE Sell heip store on numerous Thank you for taking the time to write about your constore in sufficient quantities. occasions, and i have always found the staff to be helpful cerns regarding the PACE Improvement Center. The DiIn addition, sometimes the supply system experienceand courteous. The problem is, that the shelves are quite rectorate of Engineering and Housing sincerely appredelays at shipment or at production. To overcome this slthare. L.et me cite several exatpies. ciates and admires your firm commitment to self help nation, we purchase the supplies on the local economy. A pipe under the sink was rusted through and broke. I measures. Unfortunately, the local sources are sometimes not as retiremoved the pipe and took it to self help. The response I Because this is your first experience in living in govable as U.S. hardware stores or do not carry sufficient' received was,"The plumbing shop has to do those reeminent quarters, you might find it interesting to know quantities of the items we need. At the time (when the pairs." Result: an emergency work order on a Saturday that most stateside and European Command installations letter was written), our local source for the ant killer had afternoon that I know wasn't cheap. offer "over-the counter" service, have a very limited inexhausted his supply, and we were unable to stock in sufThe kitchen faucet would not operate correctly; f knew ventory, and require mandatory self-help training before ficient quantities. However, we have plenty available it would not last much longer. I again went to the self help residents can be registered to use their self help facilities. now. store, but no faucets were available. Result: the faucet The PACE Improvement Center in Panama is one of The store does offer a "Tool-for-Loan" program that broke on a Sunday morning, and another emergency work1 the largest, most well-stocked stores in the world with hunincludes tools not normally found in the regular handyorder was called in. Again, I know it was not cheap. dreds of self help items. Residents are free to wander man's tool box and we are constantly reordering. UnforMy yard is infested with ants. Not just a little bit; there around the store and choose the merchandise directly from tunately, many customers borrow the tools and do not reare 10 to 15 mounds, all of which are 10 to 12 inches tall. the shelves. Additionally, although we strongly recomturn them on a timely basis. However, we have taken meaMy wife called housing, and they recommended Self mend self help training, the classes we offer are strictly sures to increase the number and variety of tools. Help. I went to the self help store, and guess what? No ant the customer's preogative. We apologize for any inconveniences we may have killer. We went back to housing, and they sent someone Several CONUS Installations have requested assisinadvertently caused, and urge everybody to send their out to spray the ants. tance in reshaping their self help programs and facilities ideas and suggestions so we can continue to improve our I could name several things that I could do myself if I to meet our world class standards of quality. service. If there is a part or a tool considered a self help had access to the needed supplies. I think the program is a Your concern about the PACE Improvement Center requirement that you need, we will be glad to get it for great idea. I am sure that there are a lot of us who can fix not having all the supplies needed to perform home reyou. I'm available at the store, Monday thru Saturday, many of the of the little things in our quarters if we just pairs by residents is a valid one. Despite the severe Famand my phone numbers are 285-6213 and 285-4636. had access to the supplies we need. One last thing, the ily Housing Budget crunch, it has never been the intent of Ganesan Deva classes given at the PACE center are probably very good the DEH to place the burden of major household repairs Manager, PACE Improvement Center Woman's anger over P hairstyle spurs arrest Bad hair day been altered and was not entitled to have it A disgruntled customer was charged at all. The original card owner never reafter an incident at the Fort Clayton beauty ported his ID card lost or stolen. If the alsalon last week. teration had not been found in a timely The woman was apparently dissatisfied manner, the original owner could have with a hair styling that she received, and been charged. voiced her objection in a profrane manner. If an ID card is missing, report it to the While leaving, she told the manager she MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133. wanted to assault the employee. The military police were summoned, and the womHigh wire act an was arrested and charged with provokUnknown persons removed approxiing speeches and gestures, communicating mately 40 rolls of concertina wire off the a threat and disorderly conduct. fence at Araijan Tank Farm. Naval SecuIf unsatisfied with on-post services, rerity Forces searched the surrounding Caught red-handed cured private property port it to store management. If results are jungle and recovered all the missing rolls. During an attempt to retrieve a candy Curundu -two larcenies of secured private still not seen, call Robert Peart, Army and bar, the display glass on an Army and Air property Air Force Exchange Service business manPain in the neck Force Exchange Service vending machine Rodman NSthree cases of wrongful deager, at 286-310213906. A person was stabbed during an arguwas broken. The person was treated at struction of personal property ment behind quarters on Rodman NS. The Gorgas Hospital, charged with wrongful Fort Amadorone larceny of personal ID card scam discovered victim was rushed to Gorgas Army Comdestruction of government property, and property A person was arrested by the Contramunity Hospital and treated for a stab released to his command. Atlantic band Control section for trying to give wound to the neck. He was reported as beFort Sherman -two larcenies of secured duty-free merchandise to a non-privileged ing in stable condition. The suspect was Housing area crimes private property card holder. During the investigation, it charged with aggravated assault and Pacific Fort Espinar -four larcenies of secured priwas found that the person's ID card had placed under military apprehension. Fort Clayton 300 area -one larceny of sevate property This authorized unofficial command information pubChief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor.Maureen Sampson Managing Editor.Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Sports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis Editor.Sgt. Robin Mantikoski Information Program of the Department of Defense, unStaff Editors. .Sgt. Cass Purdum Journalist.Sgt. Eric Hortin der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Spc. John Hall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Southern Command. Spe. Tom Findtner Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Rosemary Chong Public Affairs Superintendent. official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Student hires.Floyd Able Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Nishawne Moran Journalists.Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Charlotte Souffront Sgt. James A. Rush Telephone 285-6612. Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Commander in Chief.Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Photographers. Public Affairs Officer.Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 NCOIC .Sgt. Richard Emert

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__ .#. 2mmentary -Tropic Times 7 ey Aug. 12,1994 1 Getting up there Being in the 30-something crowd can be traumatic by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero one says, "She has more wrinkles than you, Sergeant by using the "in" language -just to find out that it isn't USARSO Public Affairs Office Usero." You run to the mirror and, to your horror, those "cool," "fad" or "far out" anymore, its' "bad." Or is it? nasty little lines have crept up on you. They weren't It's that point when you hear yourself saying those recently celebrated my 30-shmphfm birthday there yesterday! words you heard from your parents. "How can you listen and came to the realization that I am no longer It's then when you are talking to friends about to that stuff?" And promptly go listen to your Joan Baez, "as young as I feel." To tell you the truth, I something from your teenage years and most of them Jim Croce and Jimi Hendrix eight-tracks. don't "feel" all that young anyway. look at you as if they're on their way through a museum. It's that point when your birthday comes around and Every single one of us has or will reach this point in It's that point when people you consider adults can't .you tell people you were born in 19-something and you our lives when this realization hits. Some take it with a remember John, Paul, George and Ringo's group or why feel the urge to alert the fire department when it's time to grain of salt -others take it like the sinking of the it's so important to find out if Elvis is really dead. light the candles on your cake. Titanic. One thing is for sure, however. If it hasn't hit It's that point when you wear a new outfit or a new It's that point when, being the physically fit person yet -it will. hairstyle and someone tells you that you look like you you are, instead of using a stop watch to time your run, It's that point when men may notice their hair are from the 60s or 70s -and you don't care. you use a calendar. beginning to migrate. What used to be on the top of your It's that point when your child wants to know if you It's also the point in your life when you find yourself head has moved to your back and shoulders. To top it ever saw a dinosaur or if you fought in the Civil War. rambling on and on and beating a dead horse, so to off -so to speak -the trip has taken its toll and the It's also when they laugh at your "record player" and speak. So, I will leave that poor horse alone and go migrated hair has turned gray by the time it gets there. your collection of eight-track tapes. bother one of the few people older than me -the old It's that point when, in general conversation, someIt's that point when you think you are being "cool" geezer across the hall. The bad apple -dealing with difficult people by Capt. Edward J. Daes saying -the person is difficult, saywhat we sow and get what we expect. It Tropic Times contributor the behavior is difficult. When we say is a vicious circle, which may be broken that a person is difficult, we are really by changing the way we react to such fyou have experienced the talking about a difference in style. behavior. .frustration of dealing with a Many people will define their Team effectiveness models show that stubborn, negative, opinionated, behavior as caused by others. "She made only 10 percent of problems in the work argumentative, arrogant, emotional, or me do this," or "he's so negative that he place rest with personality clashes, while 4 unproductive co-worker, boss or subordiis dragging down the organization." Not over 40 percent of problems are goal nate, you're not alone. These are individso. Each and every one of us have the oriented. First impressions are very uals who communication experts label as power to act and control almost all powerful -we form our perception of "difficult people." Difficult people are situations in the way we respond. We someone new in 10 seconds. The the kind who, can affect the entire team even inadvertently control others' challenge is to know that you never know in the work place, thus affecting producbehaviors by branding them as being everything there is to know about a tivity, and ultimately mission accomplishalways negative (a dirt bag), then the person. ment. behavior we expect is always negative Only when individuals in the team Yet interestingly enough, communicaand we unconsciously trigger and begin to focus on the positive aspects of tion experts have found that the difficult encourage this behavior, even if that the difficult behavior does it change the person is not necessarily the threat to individual is not really what we perceive. teams view of that person, and the team unity and mission accomplishment. Rather than encouraging positive person's view of his or herself. Every Rather it is the team's reaction to the behavior, once a person is labeled a dirt office must have a negative person, a bad behavior which sparks morale problems bag, we treat him or her in such a way apple, a devil's advocate, in order to keep and leads to severe communication that they continue negative and unprothe team honest. Negative can be problems. In simple terms, instead of ductive behavior. Simply stated, we reap positive. Direct Quotes What makes you feel old? "Now I'm buying baby "When I start seeing "When people tell you "Sitting at home all "Being in college." things. My mom told my students teach my you're gaining weight day." me my hair's thining." classes -they grow up and your hair's falling and have children." out." Staff Sgt. Julio O'Valle William Monlonis Airman 1st Class Airman 1st Class Pfc. Yvonne Redd Company A, 310th Military Department of Defense Jose Mazid Jarvis Mister 343rd Public Affairs Intelligence Battalion Dependents Schools 640th Air Mobility Support 640th Air Mobility Support Detachment Squadron Squadron The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8 Tropic Times Aug. 12, 1994 Mubilization1 Exercise '94 Joint venture puts diving resources, communication abilities to the test RODMAN NS -The concept of conducting a joint venture takes countless hours of site preparation, telephone calls, follow ups, contacts and more. A recent task of mobilizing 16 Navy Reserve Detachments meant more research, more contacts and most importantly, constant communication with Army, Navy, Air Force, Panama Canal Commission officials and the Smithsonian Institute. This unusual joint venture started with a research project by Naval Sea Systems Command in June 1993. It planned to contact all commanders in chief and determine if Navy Diving and Salvage resources were adequately identified in each of their operational plans. The Southern Command was identified as a strong potential for performing a realistic exercise in T mobilizing reserve diving resources. In October 1993, Lt. Cmdr. Neil Bundo, commanding officer of Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One, Det. 319 from Long Beach, Calif., visited Marines SOUTHCOM to make a preliminary assessment of the opportunities for diving projects with the U.S. Navy, Panama Canal Commission and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Facility. By Feb. 1994, during a week-long planning conference, Bundo was introduced to Cmdr. Jerry Rovner, commanding officer of Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2 Det 304, Philadelphia, and Mobilization Exercise 1994 was born. Both units arrived here in late July, shipping with them a full suite of diving systems including the new MK3 Surface Supplied Diving Systems and SCUBA. This was the first joint exercise performed by Reserve units from the Atlantic Fleet and the Pacific Fleet, and the first time an operation like this had been conducted outside the continental United States. The group then divided into four operational groups and began diving operations July 26 at Rodman NS, Fort Davis, and Barro Colorado Island. While at Rodman, the divers completed and contributed to more than 21 operations, including patching piers, inspecting fuel lines and hull inspeccourtesy poto. tions. At Davis, divers completed nine operations, Divers got an inside view of the decompression chamber at the Panama Canal Salvage Facility. including emergency propeller repairs. At Barro Colorado, they assisted the Smithsonian in the salvage of a 40 foot steel hull boat weighing about 10 tons. Divers also assisted the PCC by using the remote operating vehicle to inspect the locks at the Miraflores Spillway and the Gatun and Madden Dams. All projects were completed within the k Bundo and Rovner agreed that Panama afforded J their units the opportunity to perform a fully mobilized "Mission Ready" exercise. "It gave us a challenge," Rovner said, "With the heat, humidity and insects, we wondered at times if we would be able to keep with the hectic schedule, but we did." Machini Bundo was quick to comment on the untiring Calif., d efforts of the 79 divers who gave more than 100 percent during the exercise. "Most of these guys are police officers, doctors and business men, but first they are divers and great ones at that. They know their jobs well and proved it by meeting deadlines, schedule changes, coping with high temperatures and humidity. It is a trip we will never forget." he said. Both Bundo and Rovner hope to join forces on another mission soon. For a west coast/east coast first endeavor, "It was great" they both said. "We'd do it corosy pm again in a heart beat. Divers don gear before repairing a Landing Craft Mechanized propeller at Fort Sherman.

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Tropic Times Aug. 12, 1994 9 and sailors get the ballast ready to place under the submerged vessel. U.S. Navy photo by Peny Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays U S Navy photo by Pony On-er 2nd Class Delano Mays t Mate 3rd Class Nelson Molina, Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One, Det. 319 from Long Beach, es a communications check on a diver mask. story by Diane Gonzalez Coutesy Chief Warrant Officer 3 Richard Pompizzi prepares to hit the USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO water.

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10Tropic Times__ ~ M lso e 10 A:; 12;99 Milestones Military police endure 11 hours of competiton by Sgt. Rick Emert could earn a maximum of 100 points fot USARSO Public Affairs Office -Atlantic the board -50 for appearance and 50 fot knowledge. FORT DAVIS -For soldiers in the The demanding board and strict judg549th Military Police Company, appearing ing seem to have paid off with 20 of the before the soldier and noncommissioned last 28 549th soldiers winning the 92nd officer of the month boards means up to MilitaryPolice Battalion soldier and NCO 11 hours of competition. boards, according to 1st Sgt. Roy K. Lintz < By the time the candidates reported to 549th MP Company. the president of the board, they were The first two events are graded by the roughly 45 minutes from the end of an enbook. During the oral board, anything tire day of proving themselves as soldiers. or any question -goes. That's what worDuring the latest competition, the day tried Sgt. Harold G. Hill, who was the first began with a 6 a.m. Army Physical Fitness to appear before the July 28 board. Test that gave the competitors their first "The oral board is the most challenging us. Army photo round of points. Each soldier's APFT part of the day," Hill said. "You have no Sgt. Harold G. Mill reports to the president ofthe board. Hill won the 549th score was divided by three with a maxiway of knowing what they're going to ask, Military Police Company Noncommissioned Officer of the Month compemum 100 points available for the event, you just have to be able to think fast and tition according to Sgt. Ist Class Rickey P. try to remember everything off the top of Donkel, 3rd Platoon sergeant your head." Although the unit has a 70 percent suchelp them get as many of the 200 points as Next, the soldiers demonstrated their The members of the board take advancess rate at the battalion level boards, Lintz possible. abilities in Common Task Testing. They tage of the freedom they have in developis more concerned about how his soldiers "I think our boards bring out the total earned two points for each correctly pering their questions. do on their promotion boards. soldier," he added. "Anyone can recite anformed task, and could score up to 24 "It gives us, and the soldiers compet"Our primary objective is not to win the swers they learned from a book, but havpoints for the event. ing, a plus," Donkel said. "We try to shoot battalion board," Lintz said. "The objecing to perform the C'T tasks and take an The final event was possibly the most for our board to be a lot harder so they'll tive is to prepare the soldiers and NCOs to APFT brings out the total leader and fudreaded -facing the board. The soldiers be better prepared for the higher boards." do well for the promotion board. It will ture leader." New commander The 24th Supply Squadron has a new commander, Maj. Kevin D. Illsley. The major accepted leadership of the supply squadron from the former commander, Maj. Michael A. Giroux, in a July 19 ceremony held in front of the 24th Supply Squadron warehouse. Military awards Army Commendation Medal -Sgt. Ist Class Rogelio McLean, Spc. Ronald Edwards, Sgt. John Looney and Spe. Brett Martin, all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Army Achievement Medal -Sgt. Ist Class Patricia Allen, Spc. Alan Burgos, Sgt. Jose Rojas and Spc. Donald Barnhill all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Civilian awards Certificate of Appreciation -Ruben Orillac of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Superior Civilian Award -Jeannette Bishop, Amalia Rivera and Grace Shadeck all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Achievement Medal -Mary Hunter of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Years of Service -25 years: Ruben Orillac, Urith Ashby and Legal excellence U.S. Army photo Marva Pringle all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. 20 Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker, (second from right) U.S. Army South commander, presents awards to years: Jose Sterling, Andrew Watson and Patricia Thomas all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. 15 years: Sibyl Calabria, legal assistance attorneys Capts. Joseph Keeler (second from left) John Lavorato (right) and Nancy Cuthbert and Abdiel Goytia all of U.S. Army Medical AcT. Michael Guiffre of the Staff Judge Advocate Office July 14. Crocker presented the Army tivity-Panama. 10 years: Carlos Cruz of U.S. Army Medical AcChief of Staff Award for Excellence in Legal Assistance and the American Bar Association tivity-Panama. 5 years: Aurora Antadillas, Francisco Donadio and Public Service Award for Law Day 1993. Tammie Williams all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. On-The-Spot Award -Miriam Clarke of U.S Army Medical Acpany C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Commandant's InPayton of Headquarters Company, U.S. Army South. Spc. Michativity-Panama. spection Winner: Spc. Linda Staples. Spc. Jacelyn Hahn of Headel Brewer of Military Police Company. Spc. Timothy Spitzer of quarters Company, Law Enforcement Activity. Spc. Paul Good of Company B, Military Intelligence. Spe. Peter Fenton of Company Promotion -Rex Rasberry and Susan Richards both U.S. Army Company D, Military Intelligence (LI). Spc. Andrea Marshall of A, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion Spc. Rubin Brown of549th Medical Activity-Panama. 92nd Personnel Services Company. Spe. Jeffrey Garza of U.S. Military Police Company. Spc. Andrew Plumbtree of U.S. Army Army Medical Activity-Panama. Spc. Fernando Romo of CompaMedical Activity-Panama. Spc. Michelle McDaniel of 1097th Retirement -Ruben Orillac of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panany A, 193rd Support Battalion Spc. Robert Myrick of 1097th Transportation Company (CB). Spc. Thomas Irvin of 565th Ordma. Transportation Company (CB). Spc. David Russell of 536th Enginance Detachment. Spc. Misti Ledford of 3rd Military Police Comneer Battalion. Spe. Brian Sapp of 536th Engineer Battalion. Cpl. pany, Criminal Investigations Division. Spc. Steven Jenkins of Graduation Richard Lichtwardt of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Company B, 536th Engineer Battalion. Cpl. David Brown of HeadInfantry (Light). Spc. Pascal Blake of Company B, 5th Battalion, quarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Byron Primary Leadership Development Class -Distinguished Honor 87th Infantry (Light). Cpl. Michael Griffin of Company C, 5th BatMcNeil of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Graduate: Spc. Timothy Spitzer of Company B, Military Intellitalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Gerald Gilsdorf of 195th Air David Edmond of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). gence. Honor Graduate: Spc. Andrew Plumbiree of U.S. Army Traffic Control Platoon. Spc. Andre Singleton of Headquarters Spc. Arthur Lewis of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (AirMedical Activity-Panama. Commandant's List: Spc. Peter Fenton Company, 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spc. Michael Aldridge of home), 508th Infantry. Spc. Luis Ramos of Headquarters Compaof Company A, 3 10th Military Intelligence Battalion; Spc. Chris Company B, 193rd Support Battalion. Spc. Whitney Grayroyer of ny, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spc. Antonio Hagans of HeadSoneson of Headquarers Company, U.S. Army South; Spe. Regina Headquarters Company, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion. Spc. quarters Detachment, 470th Military Intelligence Brigade. Spc. Jenkins of 549th Military Police Company; Spc. Whitney Carlos Herazo of 3rd Special Operations Support Command (AirAnthony Grambruno of 408th Military Intelligence Company. Spc. Grayroyer of Headquarters Company, 310th Military Intelligence home). Cpl. Mark Dean of Headquarters Company, Jungle OperaRegina Jenkins of 549th Military Police Company. Spc. Jimmy Battalion; Spc. Daniel King of 214th Medical Detachment; Spc. tion Training Battalion. Spc. Robert Ramsey of Company B, MiliScott of 617th Special Operations Aviation Detachment. Spc. Ruben Brown of 549th Military Police Company; Spc. Robert tary Intelligence Battalion (LI). Spc. Daniel King of2t4th Medical Patrick Femholz of Company C, Military Intelligence Battalion. Ramsey of Company B, Military Intelligence Battalion (LI); Spc. Detachment. Spc. James Hogan of Headquarters Company, 154th Spc. Linda Diaz of Headquarters Company, U.S. Army Garrison. Richard Sugg of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), Signal Battalion. Spc. Ramon Manapul of Company B, 5th BattalSpc. Sergio Vazquez ofCompany A, 193rd Support Battalion. Spc. 508th Infantry; Spc. Paul Good of Company D, ion, 87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Linda Staples of Company E, David Moore of Headquarters Company, 154th Signal Battalion. MilitaryIntelligence (LI); Spc. Fernando Romo of Company A, 228thAviation. Spe. Marion Wade of Headquarters Company, 5th Spc. Mark MeEndree of Company B, 536th Engineer Battalion. 193rd Support Battalion. Leadership Award: Spc. Brian Sapp of Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Ronald Weimer of U.S. Army Spc. Antonio Cason of Company B, 536th Engineer Battalion. Spc. 536th Engineer Battalion; Spe. Ramon Manabul of Company B, Dental Activity-Panama. Spc. Reco Calhoun of Southern ComRichard Sugg of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light); Spc. Peter Fenton of Compamand Network. Spe. David Rhoden of Company C, 5th Battalion, 508th Infantry. Spc. Edward Orena of Company C, 5th Battalion, ny A, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion; Spc. Richard Sugg of 87th Infantry (Light). Spc. David Robles of Headquarters Compa87th Infantry (Light). Spc. Daniel Kemp of Company D, Military Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry. ny, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry. Spc. Gerardo Ramos Intelligence Battalion. Spc. Kenneth Hall, Jr. of 79th Army Band. Army Physical Fitness Test winner: Spc. David Rhoden of Comof Company D, U.S. Army Garrison-Atlantic. Spc. La Keshia Spc. Chris Soneson of Headquarters Company, U.S. Army South.

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Tropic Times uFeatures 12,14 The S.S. Ancon passes through the Gaillard Cut on Aug. 15, 1914, the first official transit of the Panama Canal. Couresy photo from Panama Canal Commisson Panama Canal Monday marks 80 years of service to the world early as 8000 B.C., the Isthmus of Panama enormous size of the locks and volume of the excavasion. The commission is headed by an administrator and was used as a transit route by prehistoric man tion needed; and the need to establish whole new a deputy administrator and will operate through 1999 migrating through Central America to settle in communities, to import every last nail, and to organize under the supervision of a board of directors comprised South America. It wasn't until 1502, on his fourth work on a scale never before seen. of five United States citizens and four Panamanian voyage of exploration, that Christopher Columbus, Most of the names of the men and women who citizens. As provided in the treaty, the post of adminissailing under the Spanish flag, arrived on the Isthmus. worked on the canal are forgotten today, but their trator was held until Dec. 31, 1989, by a United States Spain began settlement of the Isthmus in 1510, and in legacy lives on. Of those most well remembered, Col. citizen, and the post of deputy administrator by a 1534, Spanish King Charles V ordered the first survey William Gorgas, and his medical team are credited with Panamanian citizen. After that period, the situation for a proposed canal across the 50-mile-wide isthmus. A eradicating yellow fever and bringing malaria under reversed, and for the remaining ten years of the treaty canal was beyond their capabilities, but the Spanish did control. One of the first chief engineers, John F. the administrator post is held by a Panamanian and a pave mule trails with cobblestones to carry tons of gold Stevens, and other railroad men set up the towns and the United States citizen serves as the deputy administrator. moving back to Spain from the conquest of Peru supply system and organized the all-important train Long-range plans and programs for a variety of canal Vestiges of the Las Cruces trail can still be seen today. system to haul dirt out of Gaillard Cut, and Col. George maintenance and improvement projects are being In 1850, U.S. interests began construction of the Goethals and his staff deserve the credit for the final constantly developed and updated. These include Panama Railroad, just in time to make a fortune carrying engineering designs and for pushing through the deepening, widening, or straightening selected portions goldseekers on their way to California. They came to the construction of the locks and Gatun Dam and excavaof the channel; replacing worn out or outdated equipisthmus by boat, crossed the isthmus, and continued on tion of the cut. ment with new and improved designs; scheduling by boat. The canal opened to traffic Aug. 15, 1914; since that regular overhauls for canal locks and equipment; and In 1880, Ferdinand de Lesseps, fresh from his triumph time, there have been more than 700,000 transits maintaining a program of continual dredging throughout building the Suez Canal, sold stock to millions of through the waterway. An aggressive program of the waterway. These measures are meant to ensure that Frenchmen to finance the building of a canal in Panama. maintenance has kept the canal in top operating the Panama Canal will continue to be an economically But the considerable skill condition, and viable route for world shipping for many decades.of the French engineers .peci Canal Commemorative P although the basic Article written by The Panama Canal Commission. was not enough to design remains as overcome the climate, Post offices at Albrook AFS, Howard AFB, Rodman good as ever, the Panama Canal factoid disease or geography they NS, Quarry Heights, and Forts Amador, Clayton and channel has been found on the isthmus or Davis are providing a special postal cancellation to comstraightened, *The canal is 50 miles long from deep water in Atmake up for the mismanmemorate the 80th anniversary ofthe Panama Canal on widened and lantic to deep water in the Pacific. agement in France that Monday. Immediate service will be available during slowdeepened, and *The canal runs northwest to southeast, with the Atbrought the enterprise to er periods, according to postal officials. Otherwise, selfimprovements over lantic entrance 33.5 miles north and 27 miles west of the financial ruin before the addressed envelopes can be picked up later in the day. the years have Pacific entrance. end of the century. For letters addressed to the United States or other overspeeded operations *Ships transiting the canal are raised and lowered 85 In 1903, following seas locations, mail as normal and they will be cancelled and cut overhaul feet, from sea level to sea level, by a system of three Panama's declaration of with the special cancellation mark and sent out. time at the locks. locks: Mirflores, Pedro Miguel, and Gatun. independence from Over the past 10 *The SSAeon made the first official transit Aug. 15, 1914. Colombia, Panama and years, approximately *In fiscal year 1993 there were 13,720 transits. Durthe United States entered into a treaty which allowed the $100 million per year has been spent in streamlining ing the year these ships carried nearly 157.9 millon tons United States to construct an interoceanic ship canal and improving canal facilities and operations. of cargo and paid $400.8 million in tolls. across the isthmus. The following year the United States Since 1979, the canal has operated under the terms of *The highest canal toll, as of May 1994, is purchased the rights and equipment of the French "Canal a treaty between the United States and the Republic of $141,344.97 paid by the Crown Princess May 2, 1993. Interoceanique" for $40 million and took over the Panama signed in 1977, providing for the The average toll paid during 1993 was $32,949. construction. disestablishment of the Canal Zone, the growing *The longest ship to transit was the San Juan It took 10 years, the labor of more than 75,000 men participation of Panamanians at all levels of the canal Propsector, an ore-bulk-oil carrier at 973 feet. The widand women, and almost $400 million to complete the organization, and the turnover of the operation of the est ship was the USS New Jersey and its sister ships, job. The builders of the canal faced unprecedented canal to Panama on Dec. 31, 1999. which have a beam of 108 feet. At 804 feet, the Crown problems: tropical disease; the unusual geology of the Under the treaty, the canal is operated by a United Princess is the largest passenger ship to transit the canal. Isthmus that made land slides a constant hazard; the States government agency, the Panama Canal Commis-

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Tropic Times ___ Aug. 12, 1994 e t m South Carolina engineers say goodbye to Pedasi people PEDASL LOS SANTOS PROVINCE, PANAMA (USARSO PAO) -The 122nd Engineer Battalion from the South Carolina Army National Guard, recently said goodbye to the small and friendly town of Pedasi, located in the Panamanian Azuero Peninsula. The engineers spent more than six weeks building the eight-classroom, two-bathroom school, which will serve the seventh and ninth -grades. A separate building for the middle high schoolers was very necessary, said Manuel de Jesus Paz Ulloa, the elementary school principal. U.S. Ary photos by Maj. Larry Wright The current school in Pedasi has 13 classSpc. Jason Leon (left) and Sgt. Gerald Burton of the Theater Equipment and Maintenance Site, rooms for nearly 200 elementary school install an oil cooler. children and 125 junior high students who go there. "The population is constantly growing and, there was need for a separate school building for a middle high school," he said. Paz said the present school has two shifts; one in the morning for elementary grades and VS one in the afternoon for seventh, eighth, and ninth grades. (for students in grades 10-12) and the children must travel 42 kilometers to the nearest one in Las Tablas. General tours T every day to another town is a financial burden on many families and some sP children drop out as a result, he said. Building a high school is another hope for Pedasi residents. The community's support and participation were overwhehing during the construction, theater assets t said Capt. Tim Miller, Company B, 122nd FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -National Guard Engineer Battalion. Miller said the local soldiers on rotation here were visited last week by the top residents made the soldiers feel welcome at all troop of the National Guard Bureau. times. While in Panama, the acting chief, National Guard "Every night we had basketball games with Bureau Maj. Gen. John D'Araujo also met with Maj. Gen. the kids.they're good ball players too. They G.A. Crocker, U.S. Army South commander, to sign a beat us pretty badly several times," Miller memorandum of understanding for the Theater Equipsaid. ment and Maintenance Site. Miller said the benefit of an additional The TEAMS is run by and for National Guard units school is significant, but this is not the only rotating through Central and South America and is respongain for the community. The building materiSSn Sgt. Michael Davenport (left) and Spc. Dianne sible for all equipment, supplies and maintenance these Harris of the Theter Equipment and Mainteals were locally bought and the soldiers units may need while here, D'Araujo said. nd inmen an contributed to the local economy by buying Though the unit has been in operation here since the nact e, food and other items. early 1980s, the memorandum of understanding formalManuel Gonzalez, the middle high school izes relations and responsibilities because TEAMS falls working as one team with active duty soldiers, he said. principal, said some of the local residents under the 41st Area Support Group, he said. "With the drawdowns and fewer dollars, the Guard helped the soldiers by mixing cement and Even though visiting with Crocker and signing the forces and active Army will be working more and more carrying blocks. The residents will also paint memorandum was a high priority for D'Araujo's visit, his closely," D'Araujo said. "Rotations to Panama give both the school and provide final touch-ups. main mission was that of visiting his soldiers, he said. Guard and active Army soldiers an opportunity to work The community went so far as to tempo"This visit gave me an opportunity to visit various sites side-by-side. There are more opportunities for integration rarily suspend classes so the soldiers could be such as the school building projects of the South Carolina here." housed in the school building. Gonzalez said National Guard," he said. "I also had the chance to visit Though rotations to Panama may be fewer and smaller the students, teachers and parents agreed on a with Guard soldiers at the Jungle Operations Training in the coming years because of the Treaty Implementaspecial schedule of classes so the soldiers could Battalion." tion Plan and U.S. forces moving out, D'Araujo said the use the school building as a base camp. After seeing the training sites and visiting with the solGuard is ready to support the Southern Command com"We will reconvene classes next week and diers, D'Araujo said he was very impressed with what he mander in chief no matter where or when. work longer hours to make up for the seven saw. "We serve all over Central and South America -weeks. This was done with the consent of the "These soldiers are superb, highly motivated soldiers wherever we are needed in the SOUTHCOM theater," he students, teachers and parents," Gonzalez and (they) are making a hell of a contribution to the comsaid. "This won't change, no matter where the said. munities here," he said. "What these soldiers get in return SOUTHCOM headquarters may be." 2nd Lt. James Syms said the soldiers like for their work, though, is just as beneficial. D'Araujo, who said he was thoroughly impressed with participating in humanitarian projects of this "Through engineering exercises, such as building the soldiers he met, and the training he witnessed during nature. roads, schools and clinics, and medical readiness training his visit here, said training in Panama is truly a win-win "You're giving a bit of yourself to the exercises, the training we get here is unique and of great situation. children of the world. They are the ones who value," D'Araujo said. "It gives these soldiers an oppor"What I saw was good, quality training and the solare going to benefit the most. that's why we unity to train away from familiar surroundings and prediers really felt good about what they were doing," he said. like to do jobs like this," he said. pares us for actual deployments." "I really enjoyed my visit and I am very pleased and proud Another benefit of deploying to Panama is that of of the Guardsmen who are serving here."

PAGE 13

Sports Aug. 12, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13 Department of Defense photo by Sgt Lori Daois Robert Hunter, 69th Signal Company, darts between Sean McEachin (left) Stormy Helm (middle) and Tony Lambert, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 128th Aviation Brigade. Crash and burn Signal shoots down aviation, 60-49 by Sgt. Lori Davis Two baskets by Tony Lambert and a Graham III. The Grahams each scored What began as a close game turned into Tropic Times sports editor bucket each by Kenny Smith and Sean two points, but it would be the younger an easy win for Signal, which advanced to McEachin supported Aviation's offenGraham finding his way to the basket in 2-3. FORT CLAYTON -They fought a valiant sive effort in the first half, the second half. "We started slow, but we always do," battle, but the benchless aviation team did a Signal stayed a step ahead of AviaA three-pointer by Gaither in the Signal coach Dorsey Cooper said. tailspin in the second half, plummeting to a 60-49 tion, splitting its offense to run up the closing seconds of the half gave Signal The 69th Signal Co. will be contenders loss to their signal opponents. score. the go-ahead score, 33-30. for the championship because they are a fast The 69th Signal Company chalked up another Leading the way for Signal was DenThe Aviation players began to show paced, high pressure team, he said. win after defeating Headquarters and Headquarnis Williams, racking up five baskets. signs of fatigue after a half of playing The lack of players hurt Aviation, Helm ters Company, 128th Aviation Brigade. Following up on offense was Lloyd ironman ball. The Storm continued into said. Things looked good for the five-man Aviation Gaither with two baskets and a threethe second half, scoring four more bas"We don't have a bench so we got tired, in the first half. The Roy "Googie" Allen Jr. and pointer, Keith Huntley and Tyron kets, but the Signal defense held Allen, but we played them as long as we could,"he Stormy Helm combination fed several balls into Generette with two baskets each and a Smith and Lambert to a basket each. said. the hoop. Short on height but long on speed, Helm basket by Robert Hunter. The Aviation defense shut down WilAlthough they never have more than six darted into the paint for five baskets in the first Adding to the Signal side of the liams, but Generette's three baskets and players come out for theirgames, Allen said half, Allen backing him up with two hoops and a scoreboard was the father-son combinaGaither and Graham Ill's five points the loss was the biggest point gap for HHC, three-pointer. tion of Julius Graham Jr. and Julius each kept Signal in the game. 128th Av. Bde. Cycling [age 14 Da P-d m -Page 15 Young riders compete for honors in The U.S. Army South Sports Direc*SCN AM radio schedule the National Crime Night Out bicytor explains how units can get more *Local sports schedule cle race at Howard AFB. out of intramural leagues. *U.S. Army 1 0-Miler trials

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___4_ __lSports _______ 14Tropic Ti mes it& Au.12, 1994 ____ ___________________ _____________________ Tykes on bikes Race encourages the revention by Sgt. Lori Davis Cyclists raced individually on a oneTropic Times sports editor mile course along the bike path across from the Farfan housing area. The winners were HOWARDAFB-Thesmallestcompetpresented with medals during an award itors looked like hamsters spinning out of ceremony as part of the evening festivities. control in one ofthose rickety, metal wheels Race results: -their little legs pedaling furiously on Girls Boys bikes with tires the size of large bagels. Ages 5-7 From tots to teenagers, everyone was a Sophia Hursey 4:48 Blake Henton 4:10 winner in the National Crime Night Out Knya JaCkne 5:01 Alex Price 4:24 : 1 Bicycle Race here Aug. 5. Representatives denotes result of 1/2 mile tie-breaker race from the U.S. Naval Station Security DeAges 8-10 tachment and the 24th Security Police Kimberly Ansel 3:57 Gilbert Desroches 3:41 Squadron registered more than 50 bicycles Shakira Crockett 403 Justin Hillard 343 as part of race entry requirements. alez 4 09 Tramon Lacy 3 4 "Registration is a good way of tracking \mada Barnes 3:52 Bobby Gonzalez 349 stolenbikes swell asadeterrentforthieves,' Laurel Cadorette 4 13 Frank Magneuco 3:49 Staff Sgt. Jackie White, 24th SPS said Chanae Lacy 4:21 Cody Howard 4 19 SDepartment of Defense phot0s by Sgi. Lor Davis Wendy Cook watches her competition during the 5-7 age group race. Kyra Jardine pedals uphill to the finish line. From the director's chair, U.S. Army South Sports Director, Bill Hambay Getting the most out of unit-level sports by Sgt. Lori Davis October. The sports calendar has estimated starting and Hambay said. Representatives who are familiar withleague Tropic Times sports editor ending dates for each season. These dates may change as rules can help players and coaches through the season. Tropc Times sprsdr --------time for that sport approaches, but the starting date will Sports clinic FORT CLAYTON -Some people get tired of looking never be made earlier than what is posted on the original As the season approaches the sports office schedules a at the same ugly mugs all day at work, but a brave few calendar, Hambay said. sports clinic, armeeting between their staffand the players, gather after retreat for play. 'The coach should become familiar with the sports coaches and referees. Various types of leagues are offered for several sports, calendar so he knows when the program starts," he said. Soldiers can have questions answered at the clinic. The such as over-30 leagues for older players and 5'10" and Knowing when he needs to have his team ready gives clinic also gives soldiers an opportunity to discuss plans under and 5'l 1" and over leagues for tall and short the coach time to prepare. There are several things for league management, Hambay said. basketball players. But no intramural league is watched coaches and players can do before the season starts, Many of the rules are carved in stone, such as reporting as closely as unit-level competition. starting with the reading the Memorandum of Instrucscores. The coach or a player from the winning team is Soldiers proudly wear their unit jersey with slogans tion. responsible for calling in game scores to the sports office, like the 56th Signal Battalion's "No Mercy" and names Memorandum of Instruction Hambay said. like "Mad Dawg" and "Bad Luck." Commanders not on The USARSO sports office provides a Memorandum However, soldiers can have an impact on some league the team root for their troops from the side lines, puffing of Instruction for each unit-level intramural sport. A copy guidelines, such as how games will be scheduled, he said. out their chests with pride. of the MOI is hand-carried by a member of the sports Useful information is also put out at these clinics, such Unit-level competition can reach a frenzy similar to a office staff to each unit, Hambay said. as submitting rosters. Units should turn in a list of everyschool ofpiranhas on theattack. But gnashing teeth onthe Soldiers interested in playing or coaching can contact one assigned to the unit as the team roster so anyone who sidelines doesn't do any good if the team isn't ready their chain of command about reading the MOI to get wants to play through the season will be eligible, Hambay before the first game. The best way to strive for the ready for their sport. The MOI covers everything from said. championship trophy is to plan strategy before the season rules of play to contesting games to players and coaches Unit-level intramural sports should be a chance for starts, said Bill Hambay, sports director for U.S. Army responsibilities. soldiers to have fun representing their unit while pursuing South. For small units that may not be able to field a team, the the trophy. The road to victory will be smoother for units Sports calendar MOI provides guidelines forcombining with other units. taking time to Iearn the ins and outs of league play. A sports calendar is publishedeverv Novemberforthe The goal of the sports office is maximum participation. upcoming year with dates foi each intraimural Soirt and Every soldier who wants to piay will be able to, as long Editors note: "From the directors chair" is a new special athletic events Hambay Said. h ne uIav r ioIod, 1, i.ntly feature designed to provide sports informako,1I~i:1 ';)(I I a 0 L~ld ~l llii IOM-.[' a) -nor F roc sn/ie sports dir cto. s to the corm rrimis: Sil [ /0 on '' .'i ~' ::'-y' o

PAGE 15

_ _ _ _ _ __ __ __-~ __ ___ Tropic Times 1 Spots Aug. 12,1994 1 SCN AM Radio 790/1420 8 p.m.: HHC, 128th vs. SCN Panama Canal College. Sponsored by the Air Force scouting for Wednesday Isthmus Road Runners. airs football, basketball 6 p.m.: HHC, LEA (1) vs. Co. E, 1-228th Aug. 27 -10-mile and five-mile run, 6 Turkey Bowl coaches Tonight 7 p.m.: 69th Sig. vs. 214th Med. a.m. at Reeder Physical Fitness Center. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center 6 p.m.: Football: Buffalo Bills atAtlanta 8 p.m.: 106th Sig. vs. 534th MP Forinformation, call Allen Jones at287is accepting coaching applications for the Falcons Aug. 19 5444 or Willie Moye at 287-6441. 1994 USAF Turkey Bowl Flag Football Saturday 6 p.m.: Co. A, 154th vs. Co. E, 1-228th Team. ApplicationsareavailableatHoward 5 p.m.: Football: Los Angeles Raiders at 7 p.m.: Co. B, 154th vs. SCN School athletes can get SFC and must be submitted by 4 p.m. Pittsburgh Steelers 8 p.m.: HHC, LEA (2) vs. 534th MP -Monday. Sunday White League preseason physicals 3 p.m.: 1994 Goodwill Games: World Tuesday The Departmentof Defense Dependants Howard center offers Championship Basketball 6 p.m.: Co. A, 308th vs. USAG Schools will hold Interscholastic Athletic Thursday 7 p.m.: Co. B, 193rd Spt. Physicals at various locations in August. lunch bunch sports daily 6 p.m.: Football: Washington Redskins Thursday College students can get forms at Panama The Howard Sports and Fitness Center at New England Patriots 6 p.m.: HHD, 470th vs. HHC, 142nd Canal College, high school students at offers various lunch bunch sports and fitFriday 7 p.m.: HHC, 193rd Inf. vs. Co. B, 193rd Balboa High School and junior high school nessactivitiesevery week.Scheduledevents 6:30 p.m.: Football: Arizona Cardinals Spt. students at Curundu Junior High School are; Aerobics noon-1 p.m. Mondays, at Detroit Lions *U.S. Navy Basketball before the date of the physical exam. Wednesdays and Fridays, volleyball-l 1 Editor's note: Broadcast of baseball Tuesday Family members of active duty a.m.-I p.m. Thursdays, basketball 11 a.m.-. games is tentative ofthe possible player's 6 p.m. IANTN vs. Roadrunners servicemembers. can get physicals at 1 p.m. Tuesdays. strike. Listen to SCN for changes to the 7 p.m. SCIATTS vs. Port Services Cristobal High School 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monsports schedule. Wednesday day and the Adolescent Clinic (located next 6 p.m. NSWU-8 vs. PvD to BHS in Building 711) 3-6 p.m. WednesSports directory Unit level basketball on 7 p.m. SBU-26 vs. Roadrunners days and Thursdays. Thursday Family members of civilians can go to Sports Offices local sports schedule 6 p.m. Port Services vs. Marines the following places: U.S. Air Force 284-3451 *U.S. Air Force Basketball 7 p.m. SCIATTS vs. IANTN CHS 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday U.S. Army 287-4050 Howard Sports and Fitness Center *Summer Slam CJHS 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 19 U.S. Navy 2834061 Today Pony Basketball League BHS 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 26 6:05p.m.:24thAIS/OSS vs.24thComm. Albrook AFS For information call BHS at 282-7896, Bowling centers (B) Saturday CHS at 289-3690 and CJHS at 286-6254. Albrook AFS 2864260 7:05 p.m.: 604th AMSS (A) vs. 310th 8 a.m.: Pacers vs. Jazz Curundu 286-3914 ALS 9:15 a.m.: Sonics vs. Rockets Rodman NS announces Fort Espinar 289-4100 8:05 p.m.: 24th SPS (B) vs. 24th MS 10:30 a.m.: Suns vs. Knicks fishing tournament Howard AFB 2844190 Monday Tuesday 6:05 p.m.: 24th AIS/OSS vs. 640th 6 p.m: Pacers vs. Rockets As part ofthe Jam '94 LaborDay festivScuba diving AMSS (B) 7:15 p.m.: Jazz vs. Knicks ities, Rodman NS will hold a bass fishing Albrook AFS 2864090 7:05 p.m.: 24th Supply (A) vs. Co. B, Thursday tournment Sept. 3. Entry fee is $12 before Fort Davis 289-3208 536th 5 p.m.: Suns vs. Sonics Aug. 30, and $15 thereafter. Cash prizes Fort Kobbe 284-4854 8:05 p.m.: HSC, 536th vs. 24th MS *Summer Slam will be awarded for the heaviest fish, the Howard AFB 284-5766 Tuesday 3-on-3 Basketball League heaviest stringer of three, and the heaviest Balboa Dive Club 263-8077 6:05 p.m.: 3 10th ALS vs. 24th SPS (B) Fort Clayton stringer of five. Register at the Marina Golf courses 7:05 p.m.: 24sh AIRPS/SVS vs. 24th Monday Office or at the Gamboa Ramp the day of Trans. 7 p.m.: Team 2 vs. Team 7 the tournament. Call 283-3147/3150 for Fort Amador 2824511 8:05 p.m.: 24th Supply (A) vs. 24th 7:30 p.m.: Team 3 vs. Team 6 more information. FitneS 28n-6r 4 Med. Grp. 8 p.m.: Team 4 vs. Team Fitness centers Wednesday Aug. 19 Rodman Marina Albrook AFS 286-3307 6:05 p.m.: HSC, 536th vs. 24th Comm. 7 p.m.: Team 5 vs. Team 3 sponsors shark fishing Fort Clayton 287-3861 (A) 7:30 p.m.: Team 6 vs. Team 2 Fort Davis 289-3496 7:05 p.m.: 24th Trans. vs. 24th Supply 8 p.m.: Team 7 vs. Team 1 There will be a shark fishing trip aboard Howard AFB 284-3451 (B) the 42 Vargas 6 a.m.-l p.m. Aug. 13 and Rodman NS 283-4222 8:05 p.m.: 640th AMSS (B)vs. HHC, -n association, The boatdepas from Rodman Mana, Swimming pools 228th Running aso ito there is a $38 fee. Maximum of eight peoThursday 1 0-miler trial races set pie. For more information call Rodman Albrook AFS 286-3555 Mrnat2334.Balboa 252-5493 6:05 p.m.: 24th SPS (B) vs. 24th CES The Panama Armed Forces Running Curundu 286-6260 7:05 p.m.: 24th Comm. (A) vs. 310th Association will conduct a five-mile run in Farfan 2844252 ALS conjunction with the U.S. Army South 10Sailing lessons offered at Farfan 2844252 8:5 ~m: o.B,53thvs 2thMe.Fort Clayton 287-6660 8:05 p.m.: Co. B, 536th vs. 24th Med. MilerTeam trials 6 a.m.Saturday atReeder Pedro Miguel Boat Club Fort Davis 289-3272 Grp. Physical Fitness Center. Beginning sailing lessons are being ofFort Espinar 289-4189 Aug. 19 This will be the second trial date for the fered 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday Gamboa 256-6425 6:05 p.m.: 24th CES vs. Co. B, 536th USARSO 10-Miler Team. The final trial is and Aug. 20-21 at the Pedro Miguel Boat Gatun 243-5233 7:05p.m.: 24th AIS/OSS vs. 24thTrans. set for Aug. 27. Club. Cost is $75 per person. Graduates Howard 284-3569 8:05 p.m.: Co. A, 1-228th vs. 24th MSS The I0-mile and five-mile runs are open will receive a certification card. For more Los Rios 252-6417 *U.S. Army Basketball to all runners, however only active duty information call 287-5968. Margarita 243-7229 Reeder Physical Fitness Center soldiers assigned or attached to U.S. Army Rodman NS 283-4253 Red League South are eligible for the USARSO 10Air Force sponsors Today Miler Team. 6 p.m.: Co. B, 154th vs. 106th Sig. The following is the Panama Armed soccer tournament 7 p.m.: HHC, 128th vs. Co. A, 154th Forces Running Association schedule for An intramural soccer tournament is 8 p.m.: SCN vs. Co. E, 1-228th August: scheduled for 5 p.m. Sept. 9-1 lat the AlMonday Saturday -10-mile and five-mile run 6 brook Field. Registration is open through 6 p.m.: Co. A, 154th vs. HHC, LEA (2) a.m. at Reeder Physical Fitness Center. Sept. 2 at the Howard Sports and Fitness 7 p.m.: MEDDAC vs. Co. B, 154th Aug. 21 -15-kilometer run, 6:30 a.m. Center. U.S Army Unit-level Basketball Marines 2 3 3 640th AMSS (A) 3 0 .5 Team 4 4 2 1.5 Green League NSWU-8 2 3 3 24th Comm. (A) 1 2 2.5 Team 1 3 3 2.5 W L GB Port Svcs. 0 5 5 24th Med. Grp. 0 6 5 Team 2 3 3 2.5 1097th 4 1 *as of Monday Western Division Team 3 3 3 2.5 HHC, 5-87th 3 1 .5 U.S. Air Force Unit-leve[Baskteball Team 6 2 3 3 Navy 2 0 .5 American League HSC, 536th 4 2 -Team 7 0 6 5.5 JOTB 1 1 1.5 Northern Division 24th CES 4 3 .5 *as of Thursday 549th 1 1 1.5 24th AIS/OSS 3 2 -24th Maint. Sq. 3 3 1 Panama Armed Forces Running 747th 2 2 1.5 24th Supply (B) 4 4 .5 310th ALS 3 4 1.5 Association Championship o. B, 5-87th 0 1 2 24th Trans. 3 3 .5 24th SPS (B) 0 2 2 Place Points Name Co. C, 5-87th 0 2 2.5 24th AIRPS/SVS 3 3 .5 Summer Slam 1 851 Ricardo Roman Co. A, 5-87th 1 3 2.5 Co. A, 1-228th 1 4 2 Youth Basketball Program 2 842 Miguel Campos Marines 0 3 3 Southern Division Pony League 3 828 Clint Davis *as of Wednesday 24th SPS (A) 6 0 -Knicks 6 0 -4 797 Sue Bozgoz U.S. Navy Unit-level 24th MSS 5 1 1 Rockets 4 2 2 5 789 Willie Moye Basketball League HHC, 1-228th 1 3 4 Pacers 4 2 2 6 784 Richard Downie SBU-26 5 0 -640th AMSS (B) 2 4 4 Suns 3 3 3 7 705 Leovigildo Castillo Roadrunners 4 1 1 24th Comm. (B) 0 4 5 Jazz 1 4 4.5 8 638 Stephen Kupec IANTN 3 2 2 National League Sonics 0 6 6 9 618 Enrique Gordon PWD 2 3 3 Eastern Division 3-on-3 League 10 613 Pablo Cercenia SCIATTS 2 3 3 24th Supply (A) 4 0 -Team 5 6 1 -*as of July 31

PAGE 16

16 Tropic Times N ews ____ Aug. 12, 1994 Military, civilian communities beefing up local programs by Staff Sgt Ri Claw involved in the recycling program." 24th Wing Public Affairs Some items that are being recycled back in the United States are not recycled HOWARD AFB -Recycling? Uh, here in Panama, Gifford said. "Among .no, we don't do that here. There just isn't these are glass, plastics, toner cartridges, a market for recycling in Panama. Ehh! and newspapers. Were trying to stimulate Wrong answer! The truth of the matter is, a local market for some of these items and, the American military community -both in the case of the toner cartridges, we're active duty and civilian employees -has working on ways of getting them back to a wide variety of recycling efforts going the states." on right now and there are several new Other members of the recycling QIT programs "in the works." had more ideas for conserving and recy"When they talk about recycling, most cling resources. people think of highly visible programs Locally, there is not a viable market for such as aluminum cans and newspapers, recycling newspapers, said Sandra or maybe computer and bond paper," said Murdoch, chief, 24th Services Squadron's Wayne Gifford, chief, 24th Civil Engineer recreation support flight, "But that doesn't Squadron's environmental flight. "We mean people have to just dump them in the don't have those programs in place right garbage. A lot of different organizations 41 !now, so a lot of people think we don't can use your old newspapers. have any recycling program at all. "DoDDS, the child development cen"Actually, we have a very active recyters and even the arts and crafts shops can cling program in place, it's just that most use newspapers to protect furniture and community members don't know about floors during art class or other 'messy' acit," he said. Items being recycled under the tivities," she explained. "The thrift shop at current program include rubber tires, lead Albrook, and the various military arts and acid batteries, scrap metal, waste oil, and crafts shops, can use newspapers as packcardboard. ing material, or they can be used at "Many of these programs are not actuCorozal's veterinary clinic. ally bringing in revenue," Gifford said, "People can also re-use the brown pa"but they do allow us to dispose of items per bags in which their groceries are in an 'environmentally-friendly' way -packed. They can be used to wrap packaguNy psob et they don't go to the es for mailing, or parents can recruit their First transit U. Navy ph. bY Petty oicer 2nd Class Robrto Taylor landfill -and we children to decoget it done at no cost rate the bags with Fresh from the shipyards in Mississippi, the USSSquallmade its first to the government." "Last year the Air ForCe crayons, markers Panama Canal transit last week. The Cyclone class coastal patrol In the past, as community alone used nearly and stickers to craft stopped off at Rodman NS while on its way to commissioning in much as 100 tons of create a unique San Diego. garbage have been $8 million in electricity. Simply wrapping paper taken daily from all thinking about it and turning off for personal A thelocal military inlights, word processors, electric gif stallations and de"Speaking of 21 A lantic stuU posited in the Red typewriters and computers kids," Putz said, Tank landfill. Conwhen they're not being used "most of them centrated efforts to love to draw and learning DEH job skills use the "3 Rs" -can cut a lot off the base's old papers (nonreduce, re-use, and electricity bill." classified, of FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO AtlanUniversity of Texas at San Antonio majorrecycle -are concourse) generally tic) -More than 20 students are spending ing in engineering, he said. stantly working to Wayne Gifford have a blank side decrease those numchief of the 24th Civil Engineer that can be a their summer vacations picking up valuWorking at DEH during the summer bers, Gifford said. Squadron's environmental flight cheap venue for able job skills and training from the Dihas given him valuable hands-on expen"Actually, right their artistic exrectorate of Engineering and Housing ence to reinforce what he's learning in colnow we're working on two of the more pression. In our office we also use the here. lege, Fung said. familiar and popular aspects of a recycling backs of used papers for notes and for draft The Atlantic community's summer hire "I'm glad I've had the opportunity to program -paper and aluminum," said copies of documents," she added. program has put the 21 young people to work here," he said. "In a very short time Jennifer Putz, a 24th CES environmental Besides making an effort to re-use work in the directorate's offices and shops, I've learned many things from DEH emengineer. "We've come up with several items, people can reduce use. or on the road with maintenance crews, acployees that I may not have learned othervery workable solutions, and now we're "A perfect example of this is disposable cording to Maj. Perry A. Colvin, director, wise." just trying to get them implemented." cups, either paper, plastic or styrofoam," Directorate of Engineering and Housing, While the experience may help him to About 10 months ago, former vice Putz said. "Last year, Howard's base serAtlantic. earn his degree in engineering, seeing the wing commander Col. Craig A. Bernhard vice store alone sold about a half million The summer hires who were placed in results of his work is rewarding as well, signed a charter establishing a recycling disposable cups. When you think of all the the various maintenance shops or with Fung said. Quality Improvement Team and presentresources used to make these cups and all maintenance crews are working at the ap"Most of the things we do here every ed it to the 24th Wing Quality Improvethe space they take in the landfill, bringing prentice level, Colvin said. day are necessities for people -for the ment Board. The QIT is made up of active a regular ceramic or plastic coffee mug to "They are physically leading a trade," families and soldiers," he said. duty and civilian members of the Army, work and rinsing it out at the end of the Colvin said. "This experience is a reThe summer hires have helped more Navy, and Air Force, as well as represenday seems like a simple and logical solusume-builder for them. It gives them skills than just the soldiers and families howevtatives from the Panama Canal Commistion." they could use later on, either professioner, Colvin said. sion, Army and Air Force Exchange SerElectricity use is another area that can ally or just to make repairs around the "With the shortfall of the budget for vice, Defense Reutilization and Marketing be cut back dramatically, Gifford said. house." DEH, some of our employees were offered Office and Department of Defense Depen"Last year the Air Force community alone Additionally, the summer hires can use early retirement; 13 employees took th dents Schools. It has gathered information used nearly $8 million in electricity," he Addexpeiencay caeser i san. ose ery eaid.m oent 3empoys wok t on the many different kinds of recycling explained. "Simply thinking about it and the experience as career guidance. offer," he said. Those positions won't get programs currently being used by the varturning off lights, word processors, elec"Right now, they may not really know filled, so the students have really helped us ious organizations, and is exploring how tric typewriters and computers when what they're interested in." he said. "At the out this summer." the programs were implemented, what they're not being used can cut a lot off the end of the summer, they may know if this "We've had some problems with some kinds of difficulties were encountered, and base's electricity bill." is the right career field for them or if they'd of the summer hires in the past, but this is how they were overcome. 'These are just a few ideas that demonlike to try something else." the best group we've had," he added. "Several different organizations alstrate how easy it is to reduce, re-use and At least one of the summer hires, Raul "They only get paid for working 7:30 ready have effective programs in place," recycle," Putz said. "It also shows how, Fung, is convinced lie's found his niche (a.m.) to 11:30 (a.m.), but a lot of them Gifford said. "We're hoping to be able to with a little initiative and creativity, memwhile working at DEH. stick around after that, without getting benefit from their experiences, so we hers of the military and DoD community Fung, who works in the electrical shop, paid, to help out and learn more. They're don't have to go back and re-invent the can get personally involved with the recyhas completed two years of college at the very eager to work," Colvin said. wheel every time a new organization gets cling and conservation programs."

PAGE 17

Tropictivities Aug. 12, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI 4~IA Department of Defense photo by Maureen Sampson Sleeping beauty? Not exactly. Erika Simpson and Taya Castro rehearse a scene from "Happily Ever After," a children's theater production that will be performed this weekend at the Pacific Theatre Arts Centre. See story and photos on Page B3. High school students participate Motorcycle safety class helps bik+Movies, Page B8 in week-long Junior Reserve Offiers avoid accidents while on the +TV, Page B9 cer Training Corps exercise. road. *Potpourri, Page B12

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-AA Tropic Times news Aug. 12, 1994 Youth JROTC cadets find exericise Department of Defense Dependents' Schools require interscholastic athletic physicals for all rm cre than 'a w aIk iIn the park students participating in any school sporting activity. See Page 15 for dates and imres physicals will by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero be given for specific schools. USARSO Public Affairs Office ; FORT KOBBE -Students fromY Cristobal and Balboa High Schools *Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700: found summer camp to be more Arts and crafts 3 p.m. Wednesdays at both centhan i n meeting ters. There is a $1 fee for supplies. new people, They went through a Gymnastics classes Saturdays. Ages 3-5 meet week-long Junior Reserve Officers noon-l p.m.; ages 6-12 meet 1-2 p.m.; intermediTraining Corps exercise last week. ate classes meet 2-3 p.m. The cost is $13 per month. Instead of the usual hike through Summer Day Camp Carnival 1:30-4:30 p.m. the woods, these campers negotiat today, ages 6-12. Admission is $2. ed a land navigation course and took Pre-teen dance 7:30-10:30 p.m. today. For ages on the challenges of the Green Hell 8-13. obstacle curse at Fort Sherman Air hockey tournament, 3 p.m. Tuesday. osacle coure Ma Frt Siheman A Personal Safety for Kids Workshop will be said Sgt. Maj. (Ret.) Richard -hed536:0pmTuray Martinez, Army JROTC instructor. held 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursday. "During this summer camp, we Bicycle rodeo 9-11 a.m. Aug. 20. "Duriakng ths sumer ch e Register for youth (ages 5-18) fall soccer seahave taken the students through sev-sobereAg27 eral confidence-building events,," he son before Aug. 27. said. "We have gone through advenHideout Senior Teen Dance for ages 15-18, si.e avge be throhsaeng 7:30-11:30 p.m. Aug. 20 at the Howard NCO Club waterborne training and rappeing." ballroom. Admission is $2. Transportation will be Though the camp was a constant provided from Albrook Youth Center and Clayton Thoungehf the am senstaint Youth Activities. Pick-up at 6:30 p.m. and return challenge for the students, the in-at1:5pmSinuindvce structors felt there was more to it -at 11:45 p.m. Sign up in advance. than that. Babysitting 101, 1 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday at "There is nothing better than to the Zodiac community Activities Center. Training mold young minds," Martinez said in first aid, CPR and much more. Each person will "It is part of our responsibility as inbe charged $2 for the class. structors to teach these students to Snorkeling at Drake Island 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. trutorsoseachithesestud to buidsefAug. 19. A $20 fee covers transportation, equipconfidence and, more than anything, ment, boat and guide. Participants must be certicoach them to become high school fied swimmers. graduates." Captain T-Blrd and Captain KC Youth For the students, the camp held Summer Bowling Special allows children to bowl different interests and different high -three games during open bowling and receive a free dint iresa n sports bottle filled with fountain soda. points for each. -*CidDvlpetCnr28615 "My favorite part of the training U S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero *Child Develpment Center 284-6135: was the waterborne training," said Staff Sgt. Samuel Oglesby, 1st Bn. (Airborne), 508th Inf., helps Family Day Care Providers are needed in the Kathia Forde, a senior at Cristobal Balboa High School student Patricia DeLeon over the edge of the Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 High School. "Through the camp I 30-foot rappel tower during JROTC summer camp. for formation. was able to meet a lot of new people and did new things that helped boost ROTC," said Ethan Corsbie, a junior They were excited and scared, Clayton my self confidence." at Balboa High School. "My favorite Martinez said. But, after the first cou*Youth Center 287-6451: Leadership was another leading training, however, was going through ple of times, it became fun for them. Back to school shopping trip to downtown experience for the students as they Green Hell. It was tough, but fun." Most of the students went back up Pa k ty 9caom.-3hpp. trday. held various positions within the The final challenge for JROTC cathe tower several times to try various Panama City 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. "company." dets was taking on the 30-foot rappel rappel styles. With fear in their eyes Back to school mini camp 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. "I learned a lot of leadership tower at Fort Kobbe. Though most of and smiles on their faces, student afMonday-Aug. 19. Fee is $5 per day or $20 for the week. Call the center for information on camp acskills that will help me in other the students had never rappeled beter student went out over the edge and tivities. things and with my future in fore, they were up to the challenge. took the plunge. Arts and crafts Mondays. Cooking experiences Tuesdays. Outdoor Games Thursdays. Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The fee is $30 for four half-hour lessons per month. Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30 p.m. and 3:30-4:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. Youth Services is looking for piano and gymnastics instructors. Contact George Wheeler at 287-3506, or stop by Building 155, Fort Clayton. *Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: Volleyball 3-5 p.m. today and Saturday. Surfing beach tour Sunday. Call for details. Scale model clinic 7-8 p.m. Thursday. Golf demonstration at the golf range by the teen center 3-5 p.m. Aug. 19. J Popcorn and movies Sundays. SJ Senior Teen Employment Program is a yearround program to develop job skills and earn money for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are available at the center. -*Child Development Center 287-3301: Us .Army photo by Sgt. Richard Emrt .Child development center provides high qualLourdes Craft colors in one of the Atlantic Vacation Bible School's kindergarten classes. ity, developmental child care for children 6 weeks to 12 years old. Full day care and hourly care availMore than 100 attend Bible school able. Call 287-5657. FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) -Sitting in a rector of the Bible school. Atlantic classroom seems like the last thing students would want Activities ranged from classroom discussions and role to do during summer vacation, but more than 100 did just playing to music and arts and crafts, Ortiz said. *Espin Youth Center 289-465: that Aug. 1-5. "After school's out, there is really nothing for the kids Just for kids pizza and bowling 9 a.m.-3 p.m. The 100-plus elementary school students attended the to do," she said. "We try to show them some fun." Saturday. The fee is $3. week-long Atlantic community's Vacation Bible School While they're having that fun, the children are learnSaturday sports, noon to 6 p.m. at Fort Davis Elementary School. ing about the bible, Ortiz said. Flag football and cheerleader registration is The Bible school was offered to children in kindergar"I think they'll have a better understanding of Jesus under way through August. Coaches are needed. ten through sixth grade; and the children were placed in Christ than they did before they began," she said. 'This A mandatory parents meeting will be held Sept. 8. the grade they had just completed, said Mary E. Ortiz, dioffers them a path for future understanding of the Bible."

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~jj~ertanme t __ _Tropic Times Entetaiment 12,1994 Happily Ever After. Children's play culminates seven-week theater workshop F airy tales from the Brothers Grimm come to life Bowra says she would like to make acting a career. this weekend as the Pacific Theatre Arts Other young actors, like 10-year-old Maureen Centre's Children's Summer Theatre Camp O'Connor, think the play has been sort of a history presents "Happily Ever After." lesson. The production is the culmina"It's interesting because you can tion of seven weeks of rehearsing see how it was when people lived scenes, memorizing lines, and "It's bein fairy tales and it feels like you're building sets. The cast includes 28 in a fairy tale yourself, O'Connor children, ages 7-13. cause you can see said, "They have real neat clothThe Pacific Theatre Ars how it was when ing." Centre sponsors the workshops The show is broken down into twice a year to give the youths a people lived in fairy three fairy tales -Prince better knowledge of the theater, tales and it feels like Bristlebeard, Luck Child and One said director DL Sima. you're in a fairy tale Eyes, Two Eyes, Three Eyes. Putting on a play might seem James Brumbaugh and Lilli Davis like a simple task to the nonyourself. portray the Grimm brothers and thespian, but the youths put a lot Maureen O'Connor provide a short narrative between of effort into making this show actress each tale. There is a brief intermiscome together. ___ sion between each act. "At home I practiced and The production is geared toward practiced for this scene, and I finally got the lines right," the younger viewer, but adults may also enjoy the said Cheryl Castro, 10, who plays Berta the Cook. performance, Sima said. Their dedication seems to be paying off. Most of the "They're good little actors. They're fun to watch young performers are enjoying their spot in the limeand fun to work with," Sima said. "People might be light. surprised to see the kid next door on stage doing a "You feel important because you're out there and believable job recreating these fairy tales." everyone's watching you," said Sonya Simpson, 9, who "Happily Ever After" will be performed 7:30 p.m. K plays the giant's grandmother. Simpson admits she'll tonight and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the theater, probably be nervous opening night. Building 2060 Curundu. Call 286-3814 for reservations. Aspiring actress Kate Bowra, 10, hopes this experi"I think the community will be impressed with the ence will be a stepping stone on her road to stardom. strength of the children's performance," Sima said. "It's not professional, but its practically almost like it, "Everyone should come see it and support the kids. Jeffrey Townsend portrays the fearsome Giant but you're not a grown-up and this isn't Hollywood." Clap really loud because they deserve it." Gold Hair. Sarah Stringfellow, Lilli Davis, Katrina Michie and Kerrigan Davis perform "Luck Child" during dress rehearsal. story and photos by Maureen Sampson Tropic Times editor Cheryl Castro, Robert Trisler and Lisa Sproul prepare a royal feast. Taya Castro and Brooke Stringfellow rehearse a scene from the third act.

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B4 Aug.12A994 #FocUs on Panama Balboa Conquistador's legacy remams he Republic of Panama's From this key location, Balboa monetary unit, the Balboa organized gold and slave hunting coin, honors him by bearing expeditions into the dense jungle of the his portrait and name. A monument interior. In 1511, Indians in the area dedicated to his accomplishments rests told Balboa about the gold-filled land of at the edge of the Pacific Ocean in Tubanama, located on the other side of downtown Panama City. Local street the region's mountains, near a great sea. signs and buildings display his name. A On Sept. 1, 1513, Balboa led an terminal port along the banks of the expedition by ship from Darien to Acla, famous Panama Canal also pays the narrowest strip of land on the homage to him. Yet, most visitors to isthmus. From this spot, the troop this country know almost nothing about traveled inward on foot, in hopes of the man. finding the mythical region and its Vasco Nunez de Balboa was a riches. The group consisted of 190 Spanish conquistador and explorer. He Spanish soldiers -including Francisco is credited with discovering the Pacific Pizzaro, eventual conquerer of the Ocean, serving as the first governor of golden Incan Empire in Peru -1,000 Panama, and being the first advocator Indian slaves, and a pack of dogs. of a canal route between the Atlantic In the third week of the trip, Indian and Pacific oceans. guides told Balboa that a vast ocean The Balboa Monument, standing along the Panama City waterfront, Born in 1475, Balboa was the son of was visible from a nearby mountain commemorates the explorer's discovery of the Pacific Ocean and the a low-ranking nobleman. At the age of top. He ordered his men to wait for him moment he waded into the surf to claim it for the king of Spain. 25, he joined an expedition sailing to as he climbed to the summit. From this South America. Thus, he left his vantage point, Balboa became the first hometown of Jerez de los Caballeros, European to see the Pacific Ocean, Spain, in search of fame and fortune in which he named the South Sea. the New World. On Sept. 29, 1513, St. Michael's After two years of exploration on the Day, Balboa and his entourage reached high seas, the ship found its way to the the shores of the South Sea and the Gulf Q island of Hispaniola (Haiti), the primary of San Miguel, which he named for that Spanish command cen-er in America at reason. Carrying a banner and dawning the time. a full suit of armor, Balboa waded into Enchanted by the fertile island, the ocean and claimed the new found Balboa decided to give up the wayward, waters and its shores for the king of > nautical lifestyle of the open ocean and Spain. try his luck at farming and raising Balboa returned to Darien from his livestock. By 1510, Balboa found excursion to the Pacific with gold, himself heavily in debt and possessing a pearls and cotton cloth in January, strong distaste for working the soil. He 1515. However, during his time away, The 1904 Balboa 50 centesimos, Panama's first monetary unit, was decided to escape his creditors by he was replaced as governor of the named in honor of the explorer after the country gained its independence heading to Uraba (Colombia) as a region by Pedro Arias de Avila, who from Colombia. To this day, Panamanian coins are referred to as Balboas. stowaway aboard a ship carrying later became known as "Pedrarias the supplies and reinforcements to an Cruel." Yet, as a reward for his successCompiled by Spc. Tom Findtner isolated Spanish colony. ful mission, King Ferdinand made Upon his arrival, Balboa suggested Balboa governor of the provinces he Tropic Times staff the colonists move to the less hostile discovered -Panama and the lands of coastline of Panama. At Darien, he the South Sea. Balboa was expected to ing ship building materials across the As Balboa planned an expedition to helped to establish the town of Santa take on a subordinate role to Pedrarias. isthmus from Acla, in order to construct Peru with Pizzaro, Pedrarias had him Maria de la Antigua, the first stable The relationship between the two men a fleet to explore the mysteries of the unjustly arrested for rebellion, high settlement on the continent. One year was strained by jealousy and distrust. South Sea. By 1517, two ships had been treason, and mistreatment of Indians. In later, King Ferdinand of Spain appointDuring the next two years, Balboa assembled and Balboa had sailed a hasty trial, Balboa was found guilty ed Balboa governor of Darien. undertook the tedious task of transportthroughout the Gulf of Miguel. and beheaded in January 1519. Editor's note: The following summary of news protesting a ban on the removal of sand from Pacific level of crime and violence from which they have is taken from the Panamanian press. The translaside beaches. The protest reportedly started at 9 a.m. suffered. The taxis will curtail trips to Puerto tion and reports are unofficial and no guarantee is and ended seven hours later when Panamanian riot Escondido, Cativa, Rio Alejandro and Villa Alondra made by the Tropic Times as to the accuracy of police intervened. in Colon. reporting or statements made here. Selection of these stories does not imply any emphasis, judgeHoy, La Estrella: La Prensa: ment or endorsement by the U.S. government. Papers cite a report prepared by the Inter-AmerPaper states a group of Panamanian lawyers These synopsises are intended only to give nonican Commission Against Drug Abuse, in consultapresented President-elect Ernesto Perez Balladares Spanish speaking people a flavor for events in tion with the Pan-American Health Organwith a draft bill containing measures to prevent ization,which states that Panama, at 13.2 percent, has anonymous societies from laundering money obthe highest rate ofcocaine use in all of Latin America. tained through drug trafficking. U.S. drug enforceEl Panama America: ment authorities have stated that Panama's banking Paper quotes authorities saying they have no inforCritica Libre, La Prensa, El Siglo: center, the system for anonymous societies, in addimation supporting reports that terrorist members of Papers quote the director of Hydrocarbons at the tion to the Colon Free Zone are used for the pro-Iranian Hizbolah group are in Panama. AcPanama Ministry of Commerce and Industry as sayNarcolaundering." cording to U.S. and Argentine experts, members of ing tests conducted in a United States laboratory this group were responsible for the July 19bombingof showed gasoline used in Panama last month conLa Prensa: the "Alas" airplane. tained no toxic elements. Paper reports that Alberto Aleman, an engineer for the construction company that widened the highCritica Libre, La Prensa, El Panama America, El Panama America: way between Arraijan and the Bridge of Americas, La Estrella, El Siglo: Paper reports taxi drivers will restrict their trips to recommended that a new bridge with full lighting be Papers report on the closure ofthe Inter-American certain communities in the Province of Colon bebuilt over the Panama Canal. It is estimated that Highway in the Chame areaby a group oftruck drivers cause of a lack of security in the streets and a high 25,000 cars cross the bridge each day.

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___ ___ __ ~~~n~m rI~y__Tropic Times J ________ new s --Aug. 12, 1994 Je CoCommuniy aewsi2itiBs Clayton A La Leche League meeting will be held7 p.m. Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding are invited and babies are also welcome. The meeting topic will be "nutritionand weaning." Forinformation, call Debbie Owens at 287-6592. A cross-cultural workshop will be held 8 a.m.2:30 p.m. Aug. 25 Building 155, Fort Clayton. The workshop is designed to enable newcomers to adapt culturally to Panama. For reservations, call 2875073. For free child care, call 287-5657. The annual missionary picnic will be held 11:30 a.m. Saturday at the large bohio on Fort S Clayton. For information, call Michelle Swistak at 287-3390. The Exceptional Family Member Program -A support group meeting will be held 7:30-9 p.m. Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center. All active duty, retirees and Department of Defense civilians --Jwho have family members who have disabilities are Motorcdcle rides practe hatf the leaein t y c o ig o p took p s a f invited to attend. For special services or accommoMotocyce rder pratic wht tey earnd i th clssrom. igh p pieltl-o-klpat i a our dations because of a disability or for more informahour riding session as part of the experienced motorcycle riders course. lion, call the EFMP manager at 287-5073/492 1. The Enlisted Spouses Club -Panama holds Riders learn to safely corner, break, swerve meetings 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month at the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Club. ALBROOK AFS (USARSO PAO) -Eight motorcycle been found lacking in accidents." For information, call 287-3587. owners, both military and Department of Defense civilians Throughout the riding portion, the riders go through the For Clayton Guest House La Mola restauin Panama, had a chance to practice some necessary riding evaluation course so the instructor can see what they have rant will have new hours effective Monday: skills Saturday, here. learned. Olive suggests riders continue to practice these *Breakfast: 6:30-9:30 a.m. Weekends/holiThe four-hour riding session is part of the requirement skills after the course is over. days 7-11 a.m. for people attending the experienced motorcycle riders "Just riding isn't practicing," he said. "If you don't *Lunch: 11 a.m.-l :30p.m. Weekends/holidays course offered through the U.S. Army Garrison Safety practice, you lose some of your skills." 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Office. Bill Collier, a student in the class, has been riding *Dinner: 5-8 p.m. every day. Thecourse is required for motorcycle owners drivingon motorcycles for 30 years. military installations, said course instructor, Keith Olive. "Ihope topick up a few pointers tohelp with my survival Howard/AIbrook 'This course is necessary in order for motorcycle ownon the road," he said. "This class teaches techniques that ers to have their temporary post passes extended," he said. can help you get more control and provide more safety." TheFamilySupport CenterRelocation AssisBefore going through the riding portion of the course, The class is offered at 6 p.m. on the first Thursday of tance Program will hold a Welcome to Panama students mustcomplete four hours ofclassroom training. In each month at the Defensive Driving Course training room, orientation and tour Thursday. Tour buses depart the classroom, students learn about cornering, breaking Corozal. The evaluation is held at 7:30 a.m. on the first the Howard Enlisted Club at 7:30 a.m. and return at and swerving, Olive said. Saturday of every month at the parking lot next to the Auto 3:30 p.m. Parents may call the Child Development "Throughout the course, they go through 12 exercises," Mechanic Shop on Albrook AFS. Center (Howard 284-6135 or Albrook 285-6882) he said. "The course revolves around areas which have For information, call the safety office at 287-4051. for free child care. To sign up, or for more information, call 284-5010. The Howard Family Support Centeroffers tranNova accepting sition assistance counseling by appointment from 7:30am.to4:30 p.m. weekdays. Formoreinformaapplications for 0tion, call 284-3865/4347. rThe family services division of the Howard September class 4 Family Support Center needs volunteers to help DIABLO (Tropic Times) -Nova operate the loan closet, the base brochure library, Southeastern University is accepting and the coupon program. applications for a new Masters of Family services is open from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 Business Administration degree p.m. weekdays, and free child care is available for group that will start in September. all volunteers. To volunteer, or for more informaNova has the only U.S. accredited tion, call 284-5860. M.B.A. program in Panama, said university dean Martin C. Taylor. M miscellaneous The two-year, weekend program in the executive format is designed to The Officers' and Civilians'Wives Club-Pacific strengthen managerial and leaderis organizing the 1994 Spouses Inter-Service Welship skills through its 13 courses in come, Information and Sign-Up Coffee 10 a.m.quantitative and qualitative compenoon Sept. 14 at Club Amador. Qualified instructencies, Martin said. tors are needed to teach arts, crafts, sports and Anyone interested in enrolling in hobbies. Care givers are also needed. the program should call 252-2071/ No vendors' fees will be charged. Registration 2494 or visit the administrative ofdeadline is Aug. 31. For information, call Jane fice in the Diablo Clubhouse, BuildGreenwood at 287-5120. ing 5051, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. MondayThe Consolidated Chaplains' Fund is conFriday. ducting interviews for the following Fiscal Year 95 Applicants must hold a baccalaucontract positions: reate degree in any major from an *Clayton Chapel General Protestant: seven accredited college or university. At watch care providers-Protestant Women ofthe Chapleast three semester hours of underel; two watch care providers for chapel services; one graduate work are required in statismusic director and one pianist. The point of contact tics, economics, accounting, marketis Chaplain Robert Scruggs at 287-5859. ing and finance. *Clayton Chapel-Gospel pianist, music coordiApplicants must also score450 or nator, drummer, watch care provider. The POC is higher on the Graduate Management U.s Navy photo Chaplain Paul O'Neil at 287-5877. AdmissionTest; or 000orhigheron National out for *Amador Chapel -Episcopal one pianist or the Graduate Record Examination, Na i n lNight o tfun f rall organist and one watch care provider. The POC is Taylor said. McGruff the Crime Dog hands out balloons during the 11th Chaplain Robert Neske at 287-3532. Tuition assistance and Veterans Annual National Crime Night Out at Farfan Aug. 5. National *Corozal Chapel: two watch care providers. Affairs benefitscan bediscussed with Night Out is designed to heighten crime and drug prevention The POC is Chaplain Paul Bolton at 287-5859. local military education officers. aaeesgeeaeupotnd ariptonnlcal anti*Atlantic Chapel Center: three musicians, four oa a e in ice awareness, generate support and participation in loc watch care providers. The POC is Chaplain Neil Nova has been u Panama since crime efforts, strengthen neighborhood spirit and policeFre at 289-3319 1977. It has graduated almost 900 Fry a28 -339 professionals at the doctoral, masters community relations, and send a message to criminals, Contact the appropriate POC for an appointand bachelors levels, Taylor said. letting them know neighborhoods are organized and fighting ments. back. More than 500 people attended.

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Tropic Times B6FAug. 12, 1994 Contadora Island, Sept. 2-5, $220/ p.m. Thursday, $1 fee. Learn about the one way. Rodman person double occupancy, $265/person city and country. Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel *Information, Tour and Travel: single occupancy, transportation aboard *Outdoor adventures: opportunity to Montego Bay any Sunday Free Zone shopping trip, Aug. 31, the Black Stallior' to and from island, 3 ElValle horseback riding trip 7 a.m.through Wednesday. Packet includes air$12, 7 a.m. departure, minimum of 12 nights accommodation, all meals and na4 p.m. Aug. 20, $24 fee. fare, three nights hotel accomodations, people needed. tional drinks, use of all facilities included Peacock bass fishing in Gatun Lake 5 and transfer. Prices vary from $300-$600 El Valle shopping trip, Aug. 21, $12, in the fee. a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, $25 fee. Trip independing on the hotel. 7 a.m., minimum of 12 people needed. Cartagena,Columbia,Sept. 2-5,$325/ cludes boat, guide and gear, bring your There will be a whitewater rafting Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits & person (Decameron Hotel), $359/person own lunch. trip in Chiriqui Aug. 20-21. The $160 fee vegetables and visit nature preserve. (Caribe Hotel). Fee includes airfare, three Barro Colorado Nature Preserve covers transportation, lodging, guides and Panama City tour, Monday and Aug. nights accomodation, hotel transfers, city Tour6 a.m.-3 p.m. Aug. 19, $65 per meals. All participants must be 12 years 24, $8, 9 a.m., minimum of 10 people tour, use of facilities and all meals, drinks, person. A must see island overflowing old or older and be able to swim. needed. Visit the Church of the Golden and snacks (Decameron) or breakfast and with tropical plants, and animals. Balboa Altar, French Plaza and more. dinner(Caribe). Barro Colorado Island, Saturday, Bambito, Chiriqui, Sept. 2-5, $240/ ayton *Balboa Dive Club: Thursday and Aug. 27, $65, 6 a.m. deparperson double occupancy, $215 triple oc*Valent Recreation Center: The club is now accepting new ture, two people needed. Visit the tropical cupancy. Fee includes transportation, three Shimmey Beach 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturmembers. Divers must show a diving research island in the Panama Canal's nights accommodation, breakfast and dinday. certification card to join, membership is Gatun Lake. ners, tours of Boquete, Volcan and Cerro El Valle 6:30 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. $12 per diver per year. Dinner in Panama, 6p.m. Sunday and Punta, coffee and banana plantations. "ExpoMujer"exhibition2-6p.m. SatThe club will hold its next meeting Tuesday. Take the opportunity to dine on Albrook/Howad urday at the Atlapa Convention Center, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Curundu Via Argentina, location of many of Panabus departs at 2 p.m. The $8 fee includes Restaurant. The guest speaker will be ma City's restaurants, $4 covers roundtrip *Zodiac Community Activities Center: entrance price and a raffle. Call for reserRichard Peralta of Asocacion Oceana de transportation, cost of dinner is not includFree Zone Shopping Tour8:30 a.m.vations. Panama. Information on upcoming dives ed. 4:30p.m., $13 fee. Every Friday in Au*Outdoor Recreation Center: will be available. Downtown shopping trip, 9 a.m. Aug. gust. Partial transits of the Panama CaThe club is organizing a trip to Bocas 19, $8. Shop Panama City's department Family tripto Summit Park and Zoonal 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays, $40. A del Toro Sept. 3-5. The trip is $275 per stores. 9a.m.2 p.m. Saturday, $15 fee. minimum of 20 people is needed for a person and includes roundtrip airfare, Moonlight Cruise, 6:30 p.m. Aug. 20, Isla Grande Beach Trip7a.m.-6 p.m. partial transit any other day of the week. accomodations, meals, entertainment, $21 fee covers hors d'oeuvres. Cruise to Sunday, $20 fee. There is Contadora Island transit sertanks, weights and five guided boat dives. Taboga Island by moonlight, while viewBeer Brewery and Locks Tour9 vice Mondays and Fridays. Fees are $35 A $100 deposit is required. Contact the ing Panama City's skyline. a.m.4 p.m. Tuesday, $8 fee. adults and $20 children 12 and under club about reservations and send your Labor Day weekend special tours: Newcomer's Vista Panama7a.m.-9 round trip, $25 adults and $15 children check to Unit 0967, APO AA 34002. Water exercise, for-beginning $140. to advanced adult swimmers. Underwater photography, *Zodiac Community ActiviDive master scuba, available $99. ties Center: Monday at the Howard Pool. Curundu Tae Kwon Do at Zodiac Cen*Twin Oceans Pro Shop: ter for children and adults. Clayton Beginner and advanced dog *Fort Clayton Boat Shop: Equipment available for scuobedience, $32 for 4 weeks. Beginning and advanced ba, snorkel, tennis, camping and Beginner and advanced swimming lessons are available other outdoor recreation. english and spanish offered at the Clayton Pool 2:15-5:45 p.m. *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: monthly. Mondays-Thursdays. Monthly classes are available Martial arts, at Howard and *Valent Recreation Center: ranging from various dance lesAlbrook Youth Centers, 284Basic/intermediate English sons, guitar and martial arts. Call 4700. Monday-Thursday, one houreach. 286-3814 for information. *Albrook Auto shop: Rodman Air conditioning service and Intermediate Spanish, Thurs*Rodman Marina: repair 12:30-5 p.m. every day day-Sept. 10. Class meets 5-6A two week open-water scuexcept Tuesday and Wednesday. p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, $30 ba class will begin on Tuesday at Wheel alignment diagnostic fee. the Rodman Pool. All equipment, and service classes are held 3-9 Eight-week Spanish textbooks, and certification will p.m. Mondays, Thursdaysand Friheadstart meets 5-7 p.m. provided for the $125 fee. Call days, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays Wednesdays and Fridays, starts 283-5307 or 283-4454 to register. Cr-y phto and Sundays. Wednesday. Register today. A boating safety class will be Model diver *Howard and Albrook Pools *Fort Clayton Scuba Shop: held 6-9 p.m. Monday and Sandra Muggier blows bubbles for the cam Intro to scuba, Free, call for The phone is temporarily out Wednesday, $35 fee includes Sra The B low Cubbls fkr t e s appointment. -of order. Call 287-6453/5807 for materials and test drive. The course era. The Balboa Dive Club is taking entries Open water scuba, Monday, information, qualifies people to rent marina for the 1994 photography contest until Sept. Albrook Pool, $145 fee. Basic open-water scuba, boats. Payment and reservations 14. Submit two entries in each category; Advanced scuba, Aug. 22, Al$115. must be made before the first class. close up/macro, marine life, above water and brook Pool. $105 fee. Advanced open-water scuba, Call 283-3147 for information. diver portrait. Entries should be In color slid format. Send to Unit 0967, APO AA 34002. in the La Huaca Theater, Atlapa ConvenCamp production "Happilly Ever After" Entertainment tion Center. For information or tickets, call runs 7:30 p.m. today, and 2 p.m. Saturday *Valent Recreation Center: 225-4951. and Sunday. See story on page B3. Local talent is needed for the "USO Baskets Social AT&T Countdown to Stardom '94 Talent Show." The show will be 7 p.m. Saturday *Albrook Club: *Club Amador: at Valent Recreation Center. The top finalBasket Bazaar, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Aug. 28. The St. Andrews Society is holding its ist will advance to compete with represenOnce again, the largest basket, tagua, and annual Summer Ceilidh 7-10 p.m. Saturtatives from other post for a recording cocobolo wood carving sales will be hapday at Club Amador. There will be a buffet session with Sony Records .pening at the Albrook Club Patio. dinner, Scottish music, and folk dancing. *Atlapa Convention Center: Neil McColl will speak on the "Darien The National Concert Association will Expedition." Call Lorri Gilchrest at 260present the original chamber orchestra *Pacific Theatre Arts Center: 8228 or Violet Icaza at 230-1683 for inforof France -La Follia, 8 p.m. Wednesday The Children's Summer Theatre mation.

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Tropic Times otiCes Aug.2,1994B Phone guide Nuns on the run ,ah ide The Theatre Guild of Ancon will hold auditions for Nunsense II 7 p.m. Monday and Tuesday at 24th Services Squadron Sports and the Ancon theater. The musical comedy calls for five singing women. Performances will be Oct. Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107 14-Nov. 8. The theater is located on Gaillard Highway, next to the Panamanian police station in Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613 Ancon. Call 252-6786 for information. Albrook Club, 286-4128 Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333 Balboa Dive Club 263-8077/250---75 Canal Crafters 286-4500 Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957 *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Sign up at the shop. Free Porcelain Pouring Class, Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 Center: Tole-painting, Santa tray 10:15 2-4 p.m. Aug. 19. Need to buy slip Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 Sewing twice a week for two a.m. Tuesday. and tools. Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586 hours. Stencil demonstration 10:15 Stained Glass Classes, 5-7 p.m. Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 Cake decorating twice a week a.m. Aug. 23. Thursdays. Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355 for two hours. *Howard Skills Development Clay Flower Class, 11 a.m.1 Club Amador, 282-3534 The Ceramic Center, Building Center: p.m. Saturdays. Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-3010 198, is located near the Crafts Shop. All classes must be preregisOngoing classes, stained glass, Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 *Canal Crafters: tered and prepaid. Classes will be framing, lamp assembly, pottery Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 Handmade arts and crafts are cancelled 24 hours prior if miniwheel throwing, cross stitch, macHoward Officers' Club, 284-4680 available. Consignment and volunmum participation is not met. rame, clay flower and ceramics. Howard Riding Stables 284-3770 teers are welcome by the shop staff. Free Airbrushing DemonstraHoward Skills Development Center, 284The shop is open 10 a.m. -2 p.m. tion, noon-12:30 p.m. Friday, 2*Fort Sherman Multicraft Cen6361 Tuesdays, Thursdays and Satur2:30 p.m. Thursday. ter. Howard Teen Center, 284-4700 days, Building 804, Albrook. Call Framing Class, 10 a.m.2 p.m. Air brush painting class SaturHoward Wood Craft Shop 284-4510 286-4500. Classes are available. Saturday, $20 fee. day, $2 fee. The Loop, 287-3035 Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380 Rodman Annex, 283-5475 Rodman Club, 283-4498 Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 Rodman Naval Station Information Tour +Valent Recreation Center: gems, rocks, mineral stone and Arts and crafts for children and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454 Better Opportunities for jewelry, Aug. 20-21. Geological 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 Single Soldiers forum meets the experience and shopping opportu*Zodiac Community Center: Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500 first Thursday of every month and nity. Subs on Top has new hours, 1 Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284is open to all barracks residents. Gloria's Bazaar, 1-9 p.m. toa.m.-5 p.m. MondaysFridays, 11 6161 The center is looking for judges day through Sunday. a.m.3 p.m. Saturdays. Subs on Atlantic for the second Scale Model ExhiLocal dart tournament Oct. 8, Top is in the Zodiac Community Aquativity Center, 289-4009 bition and Expo '94. You must mandatory clinic Aug. 24. Register Activities Center. Take out, eat in Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201 know how to build models to qualnow. and delivery services are available. Davis Community Club, 289-5160 ify. The event will be 2-5 p.m. Sept. Slides, videos and photo show Phone orders to 284-5848, fax to Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 17-18. Call Johnny Tate at 287today and Saturday commemorat284-6109. Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077 5057 for more information. ing the Panama Canal Rent the activities room and Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313 Live bird show Saturday. Inaugeration. the Big Tree BohioforprivatefuncSherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104 Geological exhibit and sale of +Cocoli Community Center: tions. Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300 news Wednesdays. p~.MnasAtlantic tours/ Rec center news Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday *Sundial Recreation Center: and Wednesdays. *Sundial Recreation Center: Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. MonGymnasticsballet 6-8 p.m. Sara overght, 8 a.m. day, Wednesdays and Fridays. Thursdays. Satu obello treasure hunt, 9a.m. Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays and *Ocean Breeze Recreation Aug. 20. Fridays. Center: Ag 0 FrBeginning Painting 6-8 p.m. The center offers a variety El Valle 5:30 a.m. Aug. 21. Mondays and Wednesdays. of classes such as karate, cake t Br. Piano 10:30 a.m.1 p.m. decorating, Spanish, english, piWednesdays. ano, country line-dancing and El Valle 5:30 a.m. Sunday. Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. jazz. Panama City shopping, 8a.m. Aug. 20.

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QTropic Times B8 Ag1,94Movies Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7pm: The Cowboy 2pm: The Princess 2pm: The Princess and 7pm: The Cowboy 7pm: Maverick (PG) 2pm: The Flintstones 7pm The Flintstones Way (PG-13) Woody and the Goblin (G) the Goblin (G) Way (PG-13) Woody Mel Gibson, Jodie (PG) John Goodman, (PG) John Goodman, 284-3583 Harrelson, Kiefer Animated Animated Harrelson, Kiefer Foster Rick Moranis Rick Moranis Sutherland 7pm: Maverick (PG) 7pm: The Princess Sutherland 9:30pm: The Cowboy 7pm: Getting Even 9pm: Naked Gun 33 9pm: Maverick (PG) Mel Gibson Jodie and the Goblin (G) 9pm: Maverick (PG) Way (PG-13) Woody With Dad (PG) Ted 1/3 (PG-13) Leslie Mel Gibson, Jodie Foster Animated Mel Gibson, Jodie Harrelson, Kiefer Danson, Macaulay Nielson, Priscilla Foster 9:30pm The Cowboy 9pm: Maverick (PG) Foster Sutherland Culkin Presley ($1.50 adult, Way (PG-13) Woody Mel Gibson, Jodie 9pm: The Flintstones $1 children admission) Harrelson, Kiefer Foster (PG) John Goodman, Sutherland Rick Moranis Fort Clayton 7pm: Endless Summer 2pm: Renaissance 2pm: Endless 7pm: Renaissance 7pm: Schindler's List 7pm: Maverick (PG) 7pm: The Cowboy 287-3279 II (PG) Robert Weaver. Man (PG-13) Danny Summer II (PG) Man (PG-13) Danny (R) Liam Nelson, Ben Mel Gibson, Jodie Way (PG-13) Woody Patrick O'Connell Devito, Gregory Hines Robert Weaver, Devito, Gregory Hines Kingsley Foster Harrelson, Kiefer 9pm: Beverly Hills 7pm: Endless Summer Patrick O'Connell 9:30pm: Endless 9:30pm: The Cowboy I Sutherland Cop III (R) Eddie II (PG) Robert Weaver, 7pm: Renaissance Summer II (PG) Way (PG-13) Woody 9pm: Maverick (PG) Murphy, Hector Patrick O'Connell Man (PG-13) Danny Robert Weaver, Harrelson, Kiefer Mel Gibson, Jodie Elizondo 9pm: Renaissance Man Devito, Gregory Hines Patrick O'Connell Sutherland Poster (PG-13) Danny Devito, 9:30pm: No Escape Gregory Hines (R) Ray Liotta, Lance Henriksen Fort Davis 7pm: The Crow (R) 2pm: Beethoven's 2nd 7pm: Four Weddings 7pm: Beverly Hills 7pm: Serial Mom (R) 7pm: Endless Summer 7pm: Serial Mom (R) Brandon Lee, Ernie (PG) Charles Grodin, and a Funeral (R) Cop Ill (R) Eddie Kathleen Turner, Sam II (PG) Robert Weaver, Kathleen Turner, Sam 289-5173 Hudson Bonnie Hunt Andie MacDowell, Murphy Waterson Patrick O'Connell Waterson 7pm: Beverly Hills Hugh Grant Cop III (R) Eddie Murphy 9pm: The Crow (R) Brandon Lee, Ernie Hudson Fort Sherman 7:30pm: Four 7:30pm: White Fang II 7:30pm:Beverly Hills No show No show No show 7:30pm: Endless Weddings and a (PG) $1.50 adults, $1 Cop III (R) Eddie Summer II (PG) 289-5173 Funeral (R) Andie children admission Murphy Robert Weaver, MacDowell, Hugh Patrick O'Connell Grant Fort Amador 7pm: Princess and 7pm: When a Man 7pm: The Cowboy No show No show 7pm: Renaissance Man 7pm: Getting Even 284-3583 the Goblin (G) Loves a Woman (R) Way (PG-13) Woody (PG-13) Danny Devito, With Dad (PG) Ted Animated Andy Garcia, Meg Harrelson, Kiefer Gregory Hines Danson, Macaulay, Ryan Sutherland Culkin I1011111 I I I Aug. 19 The Flintstones John Goodman, Rick Moranis. Steven "Spielrock" brings the modern Stone Age family to the silver screen. Howard AFB Elizabeth Perkins is Wilma and Rosti.e A NO T L 7pm Gettin Even With O'Donnell is Betty. Liz Taylor is Fred's Dad (PG) Ted mother in law. PG. I hr, 31 min. Danson, Macaulay Getting Even With Dad Culkin Ted Danson, Macaulay Culkin 9pm The Flintstones (PG) Timmy, an attention-starved 11-yearJohn Goodman, Rick old boy blackmails his ex-con dad into Moranis going straight PG (mild language) 1 hr Fort Clayton 7pm The Cowboy Way Naked Gun 33 1/3 1 (PG-13) Woody Leslie Nielsen, Priscilla Presley Harrelson, Kiefer Nielsen is now reired police lieutenSutherland ant Frank Drebin who is drawn back into Now showing at Howard and Amador theaters. undercover duty. PG-13 (off color hu9pm Maverick (PG) Mel mor) I hr 23 min) avenge his and his fiancee's murders. chilling and realistic recreation of one Gibson, Jodie Foster The performance of the late Brandon Lee ofrecent history's most horrifying chapMaverick fits. R (strong violence, language, drug ters. R (language, actuality violence, Mel Gibson, Jodie Foster use, some sexuality), 1 hr, 40 min. some sexuality), 3 hrs, 15 min. Fort Davis A con man gambler becomes entan7pm Endless Summer 1 gled with a high-spirited young woman Beethoven's 2nd Beverly Hills Cop III and a law man who plan to challenge him Charles Grodin, Bonnie Hunt Eddie Murphy, Hector Elizondo (PG) Robert Weaver, at a high-stakes poker game. PG (mild America's favorite canine star, Detroit police detective Axel Foley Patrick O'Connell sensuality, western action) 2 hr, 9 min. Beethoven, the king-sized St. Bernard is returns to southern California to inves9pm Bevery Hills Cop II back in an all-new adventure. This time tigate a crime ring at Wonder World he's fallen in love. PG (mild language, amusement park. R (language, some (R) Eddie Murphy The Cowboy Way unapt teen behavior), 1 hr, 29 min. mild language) 1 hr, 45 min. Woody Harrleson, Kiefer Sutherland Two rodeostars who never have been No Escape The Princess and Fort Sherman east of Tulsa trek to New York to invesRayLiona,the Goblin tigate the disappearance of a friend. PGRay Liotta is sent to a high security Ae mobed 7:30pm Renaissance Man 13 (violence, some language, comic senprison and assigned to an isolated island Animated version of the George (PG-13) Danny Devito, quality) I hr, 47 mm. colony where two groups of desperate MacDonald children's classic. G I hr, Gregory Hines criminals battle for control. He organiz24 min. Endless Summer I esthe troopstobattle forfreedom against Robert Weaver, Patrick O'Connell the highly mechanzied security forces. R Renaissance Man Fort Amador Two surfersjourney around the world, (strong violence, language), I hr, 58 mm. Danny DeVito, Gregory Hines catching the biggest and best waves. PG An out-of-work advertising execu7pm Naked Gun 33 1/3 (brief nudity, some mild language) Schindler's List tive ends up as teaching Army recruits. (PG-13) Leslie Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley When his style doesn't blend with the Nielsen, Priscilla The Crow Steven Spielberg's powerful film acmilitary's principles, Devito butts heads Presley $1.50 adults, Brandon Lee, Ernie Hudson count ofhowaJewish businessman saved with the Army's upper brass. PG-13 $1 children admission A musician rises from the grave to thousands of WWII Jews from death is a (some language) 2 hrs, 8 min.

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Tropic Times _T_ Schedule Aug 12,B1994 C channels 8 & 10 Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of iive event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30 Headline News 6:00 CCMTV 5:30 NB3C News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Good Morning 7:00 Navy/Marine Corps News 6:30 Outreach of Love 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America America w/ Panama 7:30 Real News For Kids 7:00 Parliament of Sools w/ Panama Now w/ Panama Nw Panama Now w/ Panama Now Now 8:00 Guts 7:30 Lifestyle Magazine 0:00 Basic Trainitg Workout 6:00 Bodyshaping 6:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:00 Basic Training 8:30 Just for Kidst 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 8:30 Sesame Street 6:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street Sesame Street Workout Garfield & Friends 9:30 Face The Nation 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Portrait of America 9:30 Purtrait of America 8:30 Sesame Street -Teenage Mutant Nitja 10:00 Washington Week In 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Ligh 10:25 Guiding Light 9:30 Portrait Of America Turtles Review 11:1 o Gettral Hospital l 1:n Ceneral I hospital 1:10 General I hospital 1 110 General I Hospital 10:25 Guiding Light -Wild West COW. 10:30 Ttis Week w/ Brinkley 12:0 IHeadline News 12:00 Iteadline News Break 12:00 Hteadline News Break 1200 1teadline News Break S1:10 General Hospital Boys OfMoo Mesa l1:311 Aterica's Black Fum 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panaima Now 12:25 Panrma Now 1225 Panama Now 12:00 Headline News -Butman Cartoon 12:0 11 deadline News 12:30 Sports Machine 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscenter 1230 Sportscenter Break Ca.rtot Classics 12:30 On Stage 1:00 Atother World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 12:25 Panama Now 1 n-Faei Tale Theater 12:55 ASfernoon Movies: 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Donahue 12:30 Sportscenter 11:00 he New Explorers "The Switmer" 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 1:00 Another World 12:00 leadine News 2:30 Victory At Sea 4:00 Guts 1 4:00 Ghostwriter 4:00 Shining Time Station 4:00 Club Connect 2:00 Oprh Winfrey 12:30 NFL: NY Giants vs 3:00 World Chiampionship 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:30 I Love Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lucy 3:00 Price is Right San Diego .Basketball Gae 5:00 Family Peud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 4:00 ThinkFt! 3:30 Anerica's Funniest 5:00 tIeadlite News 5:30 The Coshy Show 5-30 The Coshy 30 The C0 The Cushy Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 4:30 1 Love Luc People 5:30 Entertainient This Week 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:00 Family Feu 400 Nova 6:30 Grace Under Fire 6:15 Hteadline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Iteadline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:00 Soul Train ** 6:55 Murphy BrownS* 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 The Adventures of 7:20 Evening Movie: 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Wheel Of Fortune 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 NFL Football: San 6:30 Headline News Break Superman "Ghostbusters" 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now 7:25 Panama Now Francisco vs San Diego 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 Rescue 911 9:10 L.A. Law 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 10:00 SCN Late Edition 7:00 NFL: Deiverss San 7:25 China Beach 10:00 ABC 20/20 8:00 NFL Monday Night 8:00 Answerline: DooDS 0:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 10:05 Cheers Francisco 8:25 Evening Movie: 11:00 Miami Vice** Football: 9:00 Northern Exposure 8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 10:30 David Letterman 10:00 SCN Late Edition "it's My Tur" 12:00 Headline News Dallas vs Inston 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 COPS 11:30 Tonight Show 10:05 Cheers 10:00 Dave's World 12:30 Meet the Press 11:00 David Letterman 10:05 Cheers 10:00 SCN Late Edition 12:30 Headline News 10:30 David Letterman 10:30 Saturday Night Live 1:30 Headline News 12:00 Tonight Show 10:30 David Lerterman 10:05 Cheers 1:00 Nightline 11:30 Tonight Show 12:00 WWF Supertars of 2:00 Sports Latenight 1:00 Nightline 1:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Letterman 1:30 Sports Latenight 12:30 Ruck's Modern World Wrestling 2:30 ABC World News Now 1:30 Sports Latenight 12:30 Headline News 11:30 Tonight Show 2:00 Arsenio Hall 12:55 All Night Movies: 12:45 Friday Night Videolinks 3:00 Headline News 2:00 Arseio I hall 1:00 Nightline 12-JO Headline News 3:00 Headline News "Angel AtMy Table" 1:45 All Night Movies: "The 3:30 Sports Machine 3:00 IeadlineNews 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:00 Nightline 3:30 Tonight Show Part 2 Marta Hanson Story" 4:00 ABC World News Now 3:30 Tonight Show 2:00 Arsenio Hall 1:30 Sports Lateight 4:30 Headline News 2:20 "Sparacus" 3:25 "Young Man With A 5:00 Headline News Break 4:30 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 2:00 Arsenio Hall 5:00 Headline News Break 5:25 Videolinks Horn" 5:00 Headline News Break 3:30 Tonight Show 3:00 Headline News 4:30 tieadline News 3:30 Tonight Show 5:00 Headline News Break 4:30 Headline News 5:00 Headline News Break C able channel 14 Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday 'Thursday 5:30 Simulcast with 6:30 Simalast with 8 & t0 6:00 Shining Time Station 530 Simulcast with 8 & 10 5:30 Simulcast with 8 & tO 5:30 Simulcast with 0 & 10 530 Simulcast uth 8 & 10 Channels 8 & 10 8:30 Young Adult Theater 6:30 The Sunshine Factory 8:00 Oprah Winfrey :00 Donahue 0:00 Oprab Winfry 0:00 Salty Jesse Raphael 8:00 Oprah Winfrey --"From Disney with 7:00 Goof Troop 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Toda Love" 7:25 Garfield and Friends 1:00 Star Trek 1:00 Star Trek i 1:00 Star Trek 1 1:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek -"Malcolm Takes a 7:55 Darkwing Duck 12:00 1teadline News Break 12:00 1 deadline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 deadline News Break Shot" 8:20 Batman 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panama Now 12:25 Panuma Now -"Lies oflthe Heart" 8:40 Where On Earth Is 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 11:30 Real News For Kids Carmen Sandiego? 1:30 One Life To Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life Io Live 1:30 One Life to Live 12:00 Silver Spoons 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja 2:30 Young Hud the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and Restless 12:30 Movie: "AbsentTurtles 3:30 Batman 3:30 Where on Earth is 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Garfield and Friends 3:30 Mutant Ninja Turtles Minded Professor" 9:30 Science & Technology 4:00 Fruggle Rock Carmen Sandiega? 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 2:10 "Son of Flubber" Week 4:30 Are You Afraid Of The 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Guts 430 Nick Arcade 4:30 Ghost Writer 4:00 21 Jump Street 10:00 Motor Week Dark'? 4:30 Think Fast 5:00 Beakman's World 5:00 The Wonder Years 5:00 Silver Spoons 5:00 American Gladiators 10:30 Spots Closeup 5:00 Club Connect 5:00 M'ickey & Donald 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Shuwhiz Today 6:00 fOe Honeymooners i 1:00 This Week In Baseball 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6A00 SCN Eveing Repor 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:30 The Simpsons 11:30 This Old louse 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline N:rk I deadline News Break 6:15 deadline News Break 7:00 Lois & Clark: The 12:00 Mary Tyler Moore 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Hleadline News Break 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News Adventures of 'Show *** 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 The Next Generation Superman 12:30 Amish Cooking From 7:00 Star Trek: The Next 7:00 Star Trek: The Next Generation Generation 7:55 Panama Now 8:00 "Deep Space Nine" Quilt Country Generation Generation 7:55 Panama Now 7:55 Panama Now 0:00 Frasier ** 9:00 Herman's Head 1:00 Movie:"No Deposit, 7:55 Panama Now 7:55 Panama Now 8:00 ALF 8.00 Full House 8:30 Street Match ** 9:30 Married With Children No Return" 0:00 MacGyver 8:00 Home Improvement 8:30 Family Matters 8:30 Living Single 9:00 Primetime Live **** 10:00 Movie: 3:10 "The New Advent.res 9:00 Monday Night Movie: 8:30 Martin 9:00 Tour of Duty 9:00 Dateline NBC 10:00 Renegade **** "Shoot To Kill" Of Pippi Longstocking" "Casualties Of War" 9:00 Tuesday Night Movie: 10:00 Murder She Wrote ann 10:00 L.A. Law 1 1:00 Headline News Break 12:00 deadline News 5:00 Quantum Leap 10:35 SCIMED Health Test "Hudson Hawk" 11:00 Headline News Break : 1:00 Headline News Break S1:25 SCN Late Edition 12:30 Science And 6:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air "The Genetics And 11:00 Headline News Break 1 1:25 SCN Late Edition 11:25 SCN Late Edition 11:30 Nightline Technology Week 6:30 Wonderful World of Iteredity Test" 1:25 SCN Late Edition 11:30 Nightline I 1:30 Nightline 12:00 M*AnS*H 1:00 The McLaughlin Disney 11:00 Headline News Break 11:30 Nightli2e 12:00 M*A*SH 12:00 M*A*S*H 12:30 Larry King Live Group 7:30 Golden Girls 11:25 SCN Late Edition 12:00 M*A*S*H 12:30 Simulcast with 8&10 12:30 Simulcast with 8&t0 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Sports Latenight 0:00 Sunday Night Movie: 11:30 Nightline 12:30 Simulcast with 8& 10 2:00 Arsenio Hall 2:00 Entertainment This "Ladyhawk" 12:00 M*A*S*H 3:00 Headline News Week 10:00 Buck James 12:30 Simulcast with 8&10 3:30 Tonight Show 3:00 Headline News 11:00 Turning Point 4:30 David Letterman 3:30 Saturday Night Live 12:00 Simulcast with 8 & 10 5:30 Simulcast with 8 & 10 5:00 Videolinks 5:30 Headline News Break Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Sports Series starts NFL football: Denver vs San Francisco 7 p.M. tonight "Frasier" 8 p.m. tonight NY Giants vs San Diego 12:30 p.m. Saturday After "last call" at Cheers, Dr. Frasier Crane packed tp his NFL Monday Night Football: Dallas vs Houston 8 p.m. belongings and left Boston for his hometown of Seattle and a Monday new job as a radio talk show shrink. Now America's funniest NFL: San Francisco vS San Diego 7 p.m. Thursday Freudian highbrow has a hit on his hands. He's set up in a luxury condo and finally has somebody as pretentious as himself to pal Basketball A around with.his own little brother, Miles. In fact, everything is comWorld Basketball Championship Game 3 p.m. Sunday ing up well-cultivated roses for Crane.until his irascible ex-cop father and his loony live-in nurse move in. The resulting hectic hilarity is driving Specials Frasier nuts and sending audiences into hysterics. Stars: Kelsey Grammer. Answerline 8 p.m. Tuesday The subject for the August edition of Answerline is Department of Defense Depen"Street Match" 8:30 p.m. tonight dents Schools. Our guest, Dr. James Wolf, superintendent, Panama District There's love in store for the X Generation as host Rickey Paul Goldin brings toSchools, will answer questions about the upcoming school year. SCN will begin regether strangers and arranges dates between them. Each episode follows two couples cording phone calls at 6:30 p.m. at 287-4460. "before, during and after" their first date. Prime time movies Primetime movies "Ghostbusters" (Comedy, 1984, ***, Rated PG) 7:20 p.m. Sunday "Shoot to Kill" (Action Drama, 1988, **l/2, Rated R) 10 p.m. Saturday A trio of screwy university parapsychologists lose their research grant and decide to Sidney Poitier is a big city cop who's forced to team up with a stubborn mountain open their own business rounding up rowdy spirits. Stars: Bill Murray and Dan guide to go into the wilds of the Pacific Northwest after a hunting party that's been Akroyd. infiltrated by a ruthless killer. Stars: Tom Berenger and Kirstie Alley

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flTropic Times j I h ir LA s B10 C aAugs12,1994 __siied Ads matic, aot dty pd, $3,500. 284-6491. Eng spk day maid, gd w/kids, w/ref. 0389. 284-3476. l984 Chevy Citation, 4 cyl, at, acam/ 695Panasonicprinter8XLEpson D uty-free m erchand ise fn/cassdtypd,$2,7(8/obo.262-7278. Honest, hard working live-out maid, printer. FX Epson camp, 20mb w/ 286-4381. monitor $375, siereo $140. 226-8626. FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) -As a reminder, 1984 Dodge Daytona, 5 spd, ac. gd -e with t Panama C Treaty and U.S. S he cond, $2,700. 287-3789. Mature, hard working maid, exc w/ Canon T-80 autofocus camera, 35in accordance w the P Canal TSouter skid 261-2995. 7mm,50mm,70200nmmoom,case, Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, 1988 Suuki Sanari, new tires. 4s4, peedie299Tflash,$475 256-6356 xc emd, $4,5(8). 284-4525. Bilingual translator. 264-0372. cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-prilege holders. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu1984 Ford 13 nco 44, needs work. Bilingual ,,td, reliable, gd w/kids. tower spkers, go cond, take offer, 284 4525 224-2996. tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes 1988 Dodge Aries, at, ps, pc, cc, lots Wkly play group for kids 1-5 yrs, in SNES, Street Fighter II Turbo, like permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. of new stuff, $3,800. 286-4347 KRbbe area. 284 5580. NE, $5 e 286 11 new. $58. 286)-6196. Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact 1973 Ford F100, at, canper shell, ltts Bilingual day maid, reliable nanny $ega Genesis, 2 trollers, 4 games, the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117. of new parts, $1,900. 285-4528. also. 282-4385. $100. 284-5777 1987 Ford Taunrus, V6, at, ac, am/fm/ Upholstery, carpets, auto interior SC WP 800OLT 3.5 disk drv, fax/ 180. ps, exc cond, $3,000. 283-5273. cass, $4,000. 2525436 leaning. 260-51 modem cap, rechargeable battery, A976 Chevrolet Suburba, ac, trw 1979 Mercedes 450, ac, sunroof am/ 1990 Dodge Daytona, not dty pd, 6 Honest, reliable, Eng spk. 224-7765. printer avail,_$300. 236-8984. tires, ruts gd, $4,11/obo. 282-4337. fnt/cass, exc cond, $9,000/obo. 287cyl, $8,758. 286-3527. Nintendo games, $20. 236-0984. Sony stereo equipment, almost new, Hamster, cage, food. $20. 284-5434. 3887. Mr y_______37 _ 1986Toyota Corolla, 4 dr, stda aam! exc cond $235. 236-0984. 1 978 Mercury Monarcht, exc cotsd, ac, Spnsp aie__oseepew Need male Siamese cat for stud serpw, ps. 232-6056. 1992 Jeep Wrangler, soft/bikini tops, fin, reliable, $3,200. 282-4598. Span 2 .Reg Nimendo games $20/a, SNES vice. 286-6439. ex cond, $12,00. 284-5430. games $50/na. 2875475 between 9am 1980 Jeep CJ-7, new res, $4,M. 2 2 Honest, mature, Eng spk. 221-3854. & 3pm. ___ lyr old female Calico cat, gentle, 286-6541. 1988JeepComanche,loadedcamper 284-6692, declawed, w/litter bus. 284-5938. top, bed liner, $7,500. 284-5430. 1981 Toyota Celica, gd cond, 5 spd Honesthard working, Span spk maid, Sega Genesis games, Sega CD, -l-976 Trnumph tr-7, hard top, new ba' 91Tyt elcg od S /rf p7-d7 Sherlock Holmes Vol ii, $40/ca. 287Free,2cats, neutered, litter trained. all tery, gd cond, $1,500. 287-4392. l993lJeepGrandCherokce Laredo,at, radio, am/fm/cass, $2,500. 261-7693. wef. 287-3877. 5475 between 9am & 3 pm. shots. 223-4298. 17,008 miles, many extras, $23,00/ 1983 Volvo GLT, std, a. 268-9824. Honest, reliable, Eng spk maid, gd w/ -----------984DodgeRampagep/uanto,4cyl, obo. --kids. 221-9845. Nintendo&9games,$130.287-6591. Shepard/Lab pnppies, $35. 287-4885. dty pd, $2.700. 252-2287 976 K5 Chevy Blaze, std, ins, gt. 1989 Toyota 4-runner, exc cond, AST 38SX25 w/monitor, printer & AKC Stafforshire Terrier, UKC Pit 1979 4x4 GMC, new motor, $3,200. $14,000. 260-6151. 252-2871. &a.ssredsolbware, $800.289-3580Sgt. Bull pnps, shots, dewoermed, $275. 260-9630. 1991 Ford Ranger, fully loaded, exc Hassell. 284-567l. I99HnaAcrlae,$,0/ d$2008468 -K-S lrf). 1989 Honda Accord, loaded, $9,500 cond $12,008. 824-6683. Fish/ski boat w/90 hp Mercury fish Kenwood KL-7070, 5-way stereo Douberman, female, 6 nos, ears & tail 1990DodgeSpirit,6cyl,at,ac,$6,000. finder, SS prop, extras, current Panaspkers, 120w, walnut cabinet, docked, all shots, $250. 286-4677. 1989 Ford Taurus LX station wagon, 1982 Toyota Landcruiser 4x4, p, ac' 260-6688. ma egist action, $4,500. 228-4514. 16x24xl1 (4ea). 287-4182. extras, exc cond, $8,518). 223-0280. newtires,interior, am/fm/cans, dty pd, Free, wht male puppy, 4 wks. 285$8,800. 286-3381 l987FordTemp,4 y a a am/fm! WP-75 (Brother), $208. 252-6722. 586 1987 Plymouth Reliant, loaded,73,000 -Found miles, $2,500. 236-4090. 1990 Nissan 300 z, loaded, 250-0166. cass, not dity pd, $3,900. 286-6328. 386comp, 105mbhd,4mbRam,monGerman Shepard male, 10 nos od, W d 1991 Chevy S-10 p/u, gd cond. 287Wnor, sound/game cards, joy slicks, CCP reg, $41. 256-6378. 1987 Jeep Wagoneer., loaded, low 1989 Plymouth Sundance, ac, stereo, 3278 Wedding ring in Bldg. 519 Health DOS 6.0, Win 3.1, $950. 223-8010. xc cond, $8,400. 282-4538. tint, 5 spd, cruise, gd cond, $5,00. -Clinic, call to identify. 287-3534. 6 mo old Brindle boSer, all ubots. tail 287-6281 9 ry ITT comp/pinter w/desk, works gd, done, $200,.252-2710. l996FordTanr,loaded, new ac,ec -_____________ 1986 Ford Taus, 5spd pwr evcry-ITcm/ntrwds, g coe $o d aums $, ded 2 ew570 ex_ 1991 Ford Explorer4x4,r,JBL stething, new ac, ty pd beautiful cond, Electronics I for student,$250.260-9578. 8 wk old female Calico kitten, cute & -reneeda 991 o, dd49, sles ds,$12,900 252 2694265Hummingbird fish finder TCRID, loveable, litter Irained, st shots. 2071989 Ford Mustangv 2s4 S n load1990 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 4 dr, pd, Apple ILL, 2dd monitor, printer, lots $250. 236-2365. 5475. $ 2 -2 Chevy station wagon, gdcond. ph, ps, ac, cuss, not dty pd, $12,500. of software, joystick & books, $800. Pioneer 12" snbwsofers in box, new, 7 wk old tale Rottweiler, pedigree, 298-Merc2ryMarqnisacps, pb, am/ ~ .--287-4223. 283-5020. .$150. 283-5676. $800. 226-2967. ft/cass, dt y pd, $3,800. 256-6457. 1991 Jeep Cherokee Laredo 4x4, 2dr, 1981 CJ-7 Jeep, 4 cyl, hard/bikini 19" Emerson TV, $200, Kenwood steDequipment,2GenesistnrubsPre2yellowheads, 1 male, I female.2871985 Nissan 300z, right sid fspd 41Au .f,pwloaded, bet tops, $3,200. 269-5762. reo sys, amp, tuner, EQ, dual cass, ampmixer,amplifier,$500/obo.282s830. smtsashed, sale for parts, can be re-brby Aug. s.p286-4372. CD, $x75.28 Pa6830-00 26494 1916 Ford Escont, gd cond, rmun grt, P"ER,_$727_95 3237. pired, $1,000. 286-487 1990 Ford Aerostar, 4.51, low miles .F German Sheperd pups, CCP reg. 228287-6182 $3,000.287-5288.Teac V900X tape deck $85, JVC Pioneer A/V amp. VSX.7300, EQ, 2643. 1989 Pontiac Lemans, 4 dr, ac, gd -_ -9 -s turutbl $65, Kenwood tuner $85, expander, reverb, dual cass player, Fr-e -_femalecond, $5,500. 287-6198. 1991 Cutlass Supreme, loaded, n o n dy $ 44,00. 224-4n27.a' Kenwood 7 diskCD $250. 282-3375. $999. 2 r4-5543, Free B1k female tortoise shell Calico, sunundtyPd, 14,50. 24/407. .$28962845533 4yrold, declawed, spayed.282-3136. 1972 Chevy Nova 307, gr cond, ac, suroo9, $11,500/1b.GT86-6136 Goldstar 14" color TV, channels for KenwoodCDplayer$100,SharpVHS 1,__ nw ie rims, $2,100. 26018 uh ici 6dy,30,n 1987 VW1IfGTI,4cyl,3dr,ph. am! al s,1988 Eagle Premier, 6 cyl, 3.1, a fm/cas, new tires, runs gd c $3 )31 able $150, 24" Kenwood spkers, gd jet room camcorder $600. 252-6929. 4 yr old Yorkshire, male, free. 2873270 cruise, ps, pb, P1, $5,000. 287-5129. obo. 283573. cond $300. 236-0984. 4244. Game Gear, battery pack, 2 gaes, -1982 DIdsCutlass, needs traunsmisson, 1990 Toyota Camry wagon, loaded, 1986 Ford Acrostar at am/fm/ Fax machines, printer, 286 wang w/ charger & more, exc cond, $150 for Chihuahua, 6 wk old male, $150. 252$500. 282-4133. $11,000. 252-2143. '_ssaeceoud $6,000 287-3330. new 130mg hd. 230-0008. all. 287-6694. 5022. --_____ _____________ -3-_ -1986Dodge600cons,psac,2dr,not 1988 300s Nissan, trbo,-top, leath Benanmas Sony exc cond w/over 60 Amstrad WP, PCW 8256, software, Black male Chihuahua for stud sedy pd, $1,200. 226-5644. er, digital, $13,500. 260-3275 Available $35/ob. 24-3995. keyboard, monitor i/dr & printer, vice. 284-6774. $500. 287-4726. 1988 Toyota 4x4, custom paint, 1987 Toyota 4-runner, radio, ac, Pi oneese eosys,tuner,receiver,tape Want female Pekingese, 10 uSo old or $7,000. 284-5644. $9,000. 236-2365. Live in maid, Span spk, gd w/kids. deck, graphic EQ, grt power, w/out Fisherreceiver $I5O, Fishercass $85, younger. 286-4893. 252-2832 spkers, $195. 260-3270. Fisher turntbl $50, two 100w spkers 1988 Ford Taurus-station wagon, ac' 1986 Jeep Cherokee 4x4, 2 dr, at, gd $100/et stereocabinet$75.284-6l92 Pitbull/Rottweiler mix, 3 moold, $101. ps, pb, tm/fm/css, exc cond, $8,500. cond, $8,900. 236-2365. Babysitter, 18 yrs, bilingual, reliable. Hitachi 14" color TV, w/remote, al250-0311. 287-3980. 252-2756. -nost new, $225/obo. 236-0984. Commodore 64/128D color monitor, 1991 Camaro Z-28, ps, pb, am/fn-/ software 512kR 22moold,male neutered CockerSpan1990 Chevy 4x4, exc cond, 5 spd' cass, exc cond, $10,900. 256-6830. Bilingual maid, honest, reliable. 284Sega game gear w/3 games, wall enso 2 a Rm ep5 n 27$2181 iel. gd w/kids. $150. 284-6339 3 100 niles, $13,500. 287-6486. 8471. tension & ceig ghtrt gter tension, obo, 2 megs Rant $58. 287-3534. 1987 Chevy Spectrum, runs gd, needs -gd cond, $100. 287-327 1. Kenwocd stereo, 318w amp, tner, 6 Free kittens, litter trained. 284-4490. l992JeepWrangler, 4.0 L,b6cyl, 21k/ body work, $1,800/obo. 284-4625. Bilinguaimaidlive-in,gdw/kids.287ASAP CF,555ranareusurioutelephonss exc cd, $3,000/b. 263-51 ext iASAPkTF 555 automatic telephon/amp d proce, Free kitten, 9 wk old, very loveable o 226. 1992 Nissan Sentra, loaded, $11381 4-96fax/moderit sch wishes incomturntbl, remote, $,095. 223-8 284-51761-C-----obo. 286-4986. Honest, reliable, Span spk. 267-6093. ing calls to any device you select, 4 20"GldsarTVwbuilt-inVCR $350, 1987 Chevy hroe Z-28, loaded, utm $100, 256-6356 Mule Boner pup, 12 wks, all shols, $11,000/obo. 287-3999. 1988 Toyota 4-runner, 5 spd, 2dr, ac, 4000 watt gas generator. like new, -s-tts, __0 _____-__5: Fisherpnradio/cass/CDplayer$515. $150. 286-4096 $12,000 2N4-4907. $600/obo 250-0060. BMPS/2exccondrenithrptop 286-3773. l988ChryslerLeBaron. nrwcvjtrmts, ------------252000 Cocker/Poodle tis .'ale & 1emtale needs gaskets, ac parts, clutcl ssy, 1989 Ford Temtpo, 5 spd, Iraded, ant/ Babysitter, gd w/kids. ref. 261 -1236. $295. 23--00 Scttatrm/fmctompsnentsereoreceivaquar nrnw/acc 2310-0523. res get, $6,000. 264-3191. fru/cass, $6,000. 284-4900 Fisher stereo. phonograph, I c, -, alms uew, instruction ook, $15/ -8yroldbabsiterw/lexpereice 230ceiver, dual cassEQs pr 8cab''e o280-338i 1977 Volare atrcss, runs gd, 1974 Jaguar sj c rd, $6 1 1927. ---S $isk C 284149731 uter I hii c feature Auticlr~o~biles $8011,,b, 287-4836. 284-03901. ___ nial,$7/,o2094 Htsest, reliable, live in maid. gd w/ Amiga 2000 hd. 1084S m ib $ b 6948 a l989Sonat .yndai, loaded, $6,000. 1993 Jeep Wraogler, low miles, new 1970 Dartsun Sedan, 4 dr, auto, 1600 kids. 286-6189. demrt, 2mg Rm, lots of obwao, & le 7pm 252-6016. cod, $11,900. 264-9917 cc, estr prts 252-5124S60. 287-6125.Span spk live-out maid, geo house 1992ChevyO-lllp/olrraded,$8,275. l987 Ford Tempo, loaded, nldty Pd, 1992 Toyota King Cab 4x4, bedliner, work. 283-5671. Minolta X -70035mSLR,2telephoHousehold 286-3692, $5,001). 287-5237. stereo, $16,(W or take pymnits. 260to lenses, flash uttlchn carrying --5494. Bilingual naid, ref. 268-3235 -lttse, 6-121, LR fur or ac. 33-1676. 1982 Toytrta CelicaGDT,5 sptd,am/fnr/ cas,------2.-R-fm orsac-23---6 1984 VW, 4 cy, 4 spd. tc, exc crd, cass e cond, $3,580. 287-5486. 1993 Ftrd Splash, an/f/cass, pw, Hrnest reliable babysitter, w/exp, Unused Kenwood Itner $110 EQ Bedru vets, wall-o-wall dark gr car1992 Nissat Pttfinder, raded, rlow miles, $14,100. 297-4661. some eng. 266-5797. $150, spkers MV-5D450w $3501/pair, pet, GE 15.8 freezer, K-se bed. 2521988 Jeep Ctmantce, loeIded. new $2(1,11. 269-6829. 1987 Ford Brrnct, loaded. $I11l/ Bilirgurl rrid, mature, honest, reliBrse AlMd spkers $550. 235-4096. 1257. iee,. 261l 6418. obJ. 20 ot 9 7-5024Bni., odd 11no ble.n' gd i' i w/ktds 228-dS .e127 ire.6 .1990 Frd Temp, loaded, -ex n, -h287-5024. able, gd w/kids. 28-4C55 -CryslerD, Dodge & Plymrulth elecBeige wall-to-wall erpet w/pad, 1975 Buick LeSubreneeds tnms $6,800. 226-8626. 1989 Eagle Premier, gd ,oul, ac, ad/ Relrable, exc worker. 261-7939. tronic crl unit. new in box Hi perfrdownstairs field grade qIr, 11981 area, s u, rus gd, $650/obo. 286 4339. fm/cuss, $18,00. 264-8372. mance, $40. 252-6831. 53181. 287-527 1 1983 Buick Skyhawk, loaded, new -Bilingual day mid. 22h-83 16. lt988 PuntiecfiernAm, c,S5spd, ps' tires, runs gd, $8111. 2611-3446. l989 Chevy Cavalier, acamfnt/carss, Trshriber Beter, $11. 233-1143. Wirlpeul w aser/dryer, grr condl, $4,188). 2614111. .f 6 $6 0c 87. Cake creations. 287-6222. hand wesh cycle, $750. 284-5082. 990 Sa,ab 9, 40 d0 $ ) 2 sunfro opwreverything,.$6,900.287--486 DX2/66 ctmp w/clor SVGA 1994 ~1990 Saabl 9fX), 4 dr, $19,500. 28532 S1994 Prnicc Sunbird, traded. 4381. 3423. Home care provider, Full time openmoitor& crltrinkjet printer,$3,500, DR set w/hutchblk laquerQ-szbdrm $11,51). 260-4111. 323 Mazda, ac, cas, cruise, alarm, ings. 285-4381 Donna. Sony sreo u/CD $275. 286-4828. ye, blk laquer. 285-5935. Mallory Proeaster Coil, 50,000 s 1991 rr-tpaanr,25, exccond, $5,000. 264 8278. Honest,PackaI Bell mp w/5 1/4 & 3 1/ Whirlpool port dishwashe, $175. 287i les. $10,5S(M1. 252-2865.Hoetdpnabgowkd28 p/n 28720, $40. 252-6831. 1983 Toyota Celica, exc cond, ac, 44811 2 drs installed, coltr mnittr. exc 5271. 1988 Nissan Bluebird, loaded, $6,5181 radio, alaru, $4,000 223-0327 H ra .co3t I' $8181. 226-8626 after 5pot. 1983 Ford Thun2ebird, wh2, $2,'M)/ 2'2-2253. Hrnest, reliable nato, arnir 3 dtys a Sharp icro w/caroussrl $175, AC ob1. 250-006i. ~985 Dodge Caravan, 4 cyl, ac. a/ wk, w/ ref. 224 7521. Ambils 80386SX 14" Pckard Bell 12,1881 BTU $200, 223-6024. 1985 Nissau Bltebird 2.8, dry pd, 10/b SVGA monitor, Fsntt LX86 9 In 1978 Honida Ac ord hachback, g ng $4, ebi. 2-0 /cs w/ed, iow bar, $7,0(01bk. Span spk gaid, gd wkids. 2h7-3095' pinr & other 4,-, $9. 286 4428.ne crrnd 26114463.eucc $950 286-428. Geas rmree like ness .30" Wlrilpreur d. 60-4463. d40000187-3834._ _$318, FE wser /lryer set, like new. 1982 Buick, $8N. 260-3446, 1989 Hyundai Sonata, leaded,$5,581. 1989 Honde Accord, ps, ac, S spd. sa Live-our bilingual red, honest 224Gaueby, 7 gres, light boy. magni$68/set. 223 (/24. -902Bck.(81.26f 252-616 ref pw, exc cond, $11,51K. 284.-0 -cr.cave,rc7rgeable ery.4ptyr 15-717. ew n 5:30 Toyt Crellet fercel, loaded. ex. 1992 Jeep Wrangler, 18k miles, sport 3481. Biligutal live-out mard, gre w/kids. verrldaptr. $250/obo 287 4546. 7:i0 pmt. -7 b crend, $2,2181. 287-4524. 286-3889. wheels, am/fm/cass. 6 cyl, $10,500. 4 Toyota tires and rims, $125/obb. WP-75 rretlher. $2191/neg. 284-082. 1987 Ddgeha.rger., loaded. $3,5 / 284-4276 --284-5376. Bilingual med. 287-6491. obo. 284-4705. Drutrs. ee digital perctssrn, nusc plants, Xerex cepire $425, 1I Jeep CJ 7 4x4, new teres, esxheust 1984 Voil 760 GLE, fm/cass, hc. Heusekeeger. honest, reliable. 260Yanaha DD 14.75 insetrmntsouds, Sony TrIntrn IV $225 21861-828. 19811 lord rranrda, gd fcrmily c1r, brakes. clutch, dty pd, 93.000 283uttromtic, leather, 65,081/ob. 2526151. $175. 252-6831. $1,11. 287-4481. 5273. 2031. Twir fee w/mret. 2 erwers $2181, Blingtuial live-in reliableemidl ge w/ 6eXw Kr-wutd hle stereesys,319w r erel se. 2 cirs & 2 d;X c uh I9O8FttrtlEsterOltruded,$5,188.2841989 Chevy Ceric. 4dr, ps p, ut, nc, 1983 Nissan S-erra, a, 4 cylt. MtOkids. 256-617 1. 5-y spkrrsI (1,0,i$cr$1i).250$41X1, misr itms. 21 t14o

PAGE 27

~iE~ssifed_____Tropic Timnes B~11 _Cassified Ads _Aug 2 194B11 Whirlpool washer/dryer, Ig cap, inns German entertainment renter. oak, gd Explorer blk front brace, $60. 2362 sets of 4, p205R75-15 M&S or PHI 2010, ARH 200. 252-2063. Qts. 852A Clayton. git, exc rood. $600. 282-3497. cood, $300/ob. 284-4628. 3247 P225R75-15M&S,$50ea.285-4528. Ency 200 World Bk child act set new Qtrs. 245B Albrook Sam-noon. 20x35x30 wood sewing mach tl $60, Bedrset, 5-pr. 260-8501. FSUbks,Word History, Humanities, FSU hks Gen Bio text & lab, wet suits $75, car /booster seat 35-15, Sega petcarrier crae5$5. elec2c1 tefig waomati ice maker, PeopleoftheWortd, $25ea. 287-4733. long & short. 283-4472. sysw/l con game, $100. 284-3137. Qtr. 504A Clayton Sam. --excod, $850. 286-3381. 2 patio chairs w/waterproof cushions MR2 carbra $O, Goodyear wrangler Armyenisteddes bloes worn twice Qtrs. 245B Albrook Sam-noon LR fuin, rugs, misr. 286-5686. & end tbi $100, stud desk/chair $1011. tire p225/75R15 w/7,000mi, $50, sz 38/40, $75. 284 5223. Qtrs. 1027 Lassiter 8am. -Daybedl(watiut) exc rood, w/natt & s/g d $027 L36-3te7 U s 2 LR items, 2 dinette sets, 25 & 19" box spring $30, baby carrier $10, chst/nigstadw Ninj S d, 440 steel & wood Qpds. 264A Crozal 7-Ia. TV, nattbox spring 284-6491. playpen$20.24 388 1. USAF fmle blues service jacket, Pioneerssereow/speakes $275, washseaboard, shprened, $70. 263-5316. skirt, s/s shirt, 3 patts, 4 maternity er&dryerS450,MuckinglawnmowQ1rs. 265B Albrok 6m-nomn. Bedi set, dressed w/hirr, ctesi, Washer/dryer $550, baby itetts. 261stirs, slacks. 24-4881. cr, $151. 204-3505. Wedding dress off wht, pearled small Qo tigtt hl, Q-eadboard, xc cod, 1953. --------5--,used3monthsago,includesveil,head Qtrs.20BF,Calle74FAltsDelChase. $1,10. 286-3541. Exersisebike $50. baby monitor $25, Cosco deluxe stroller, like oew,$75/ piece, gloves & shoes. 252-3260. K-sz man, bs spring, fratte $175, wicker coffetbl $0,Rader scanner, neg. 292 4474. Qtrs. I164A Clayton 7am-lpm. Sofa, tore seat, chair, ottoman & carmaront/beige blinds forCurundu qtrs hand teld police saner. 286-4378. Blk sofa $550, Bilk loveseat $325, 2 pet (9x12, pastel colors), $775. 284$150, bookcase $40. 286-3527. Ladies 10spd bike, like new, $75. end tables $5Gea, Dining Rm table w/ Qtrs. 1527B Howard 7am. 6824. Glass DR tht w/6 hair $210, hi Huffy 12" speed ladies bike, $75/obo. 284-3398. chairs, $125. 284-6192. Qtr,. 241OA Cocoli 8a. .-s D b / car 2 2tblr 87-5994.Qr.21A ooi8m Bunk beds w/matt $250, bench/toy desk w/shelves $60, 2 tl lamps $60. 28 -------Deltxe Graco double stroller, unfant I ac Fedders 24,000 VTU, $325. 252box $40, Sony stereo sys $200, rock286-3773. 3 pc oIuch $300/obo, gas grill $01 car seat. 24-4027. 2797 Qrns. 613 Clayton er/recliner, sofa stee er 284-4932. obo, car seat, play pen. 287-3782 -U b __ p __ Appliatices, fare. shades. iittg -FSUhfixfor Span&P., 1041 $45 & 1 Qt, 3038 Ckiyou 6 drawer chest $70, upholstered reequipiet, cotisole orgatsz-wedAntique LR set 5 pr Ie cond, $750. $30. 206-3391 cliner rocker $250. 285-4831. ding gown w/ac -never used. 252260-7025. W$ntId 223.-. ..-Skurfer $118) Jr jobe sk, $80 5Hanging banboo swing, 23.6 refrig .253 -------Tires,5GdyearWranglermdialsp235/ 6929. .1987 Ria 200c, bike US peos low /ice & water dispetsr, blue & pink Comp desk, mtini bar, carpets, patio 75r15, $300. 2824133. mtles, dty pd. 285-5935. -Info on rown&tan Chevy Suburban drapes, Q-sz bed. 252-1257. tbl, bedr furn w/waterbed & more. Adul/idothes,shos&toy.2849 H a o n Alr lin 2864238 1993 EncyBritanicaGreat Bks$1,600, 3276. 1986 Honda CB-700 Nighthawk-S at Post Office, A2l52 7 k license 8 8Bar, walnut, likenew$500,5-pc bedrm rims c 1I5 w/tires Fredrich $24, ac, batterytires&mufflersdtypd,$3,300/ 70177. 252-2577. set, walnut $355. 252-5531. New K-s waterbed, mahogany wood $250. 252-2730. Whirlpool dehumidfier, $100. 286obo. 251-0189. -Paralegal series experience in headboard w/nirrors,6drawers, $650/ -6684. 850cr Susuki driveshaft 15,800 orig_ California law. 261-7231. LR set $750, Casio synthisizer $550. obo. 269-4064. Printer, Kaypro, daisy wheels, IBM Portable 260-7341. Computable exrcond,$75.282-4538. Portable baby crib $30, lamps $10inal miles di paid, $850/obo. 250Live in maid, span spk ref required. GE whtlblk fec oxen/ronge, used 7 $L5, juice extractor $15, capuccino 0060. -226-5436. __sn _r____ DR set, tbl -6, cabinet, $3,000/obo. weeks, priveledge card holder only, Lafayette Tuner, transitior Sony racoffee maker, $20. 260-6159. 252-1104. $400. 284-4593. din, looser car seat, Korean mink 1983 Yamaha 750cc runs grt extra FSUbksforElementarySpan&Amer---84 --__ blanket. 2874182. Fine wall pictures w/frames $20 to parts, tires & 2helmets, $1,50. 266AC 18,000 BTU, whirlpool, new, Washer/dryer, gd cond, $515. 232$100, Hindu bronze table $80, rock5797. 284-4492. $450. 256-6720. 5622. Sm dog cage $15, GE dryer, exc cond, ing chair set, $175/obo. 260-6159. $275. 252-2541. 1 1994 Kuwasaki KX250 includes metGEO Tracker/Suziki Sidekick, aut Refrig, TV, stereo combo. 252-1104. Baby lack sewing rach $200, string --Guaymi dresses for child/preteen, ul work stand and book, $5,000/ob. trans. 264-0643 Danish LR set,soaerger, Singer $300, Hitachi VCR Old washerforparts $50, chargrill w/ blue/yellow & red/gold, $14 & $16. 260-4516. Das-Rst oa his&tl $l58.286-4986. gas tank, $75. 223-2164. 282-4598. --Work for Eng spk maid?2 days week, best offer. 260-5682. --_ --1983 Kawasaki LTD 550 Looks & hone & & dependable. 287-6438. Frigidaire refrig, whi, 22c ft, exc 2 class A uniforms, jackets sz 40 & Young boysRoadmasterbikew/Irainruns get, $900/obo. 284-6210. sRod, $250. 224-9846. pants Ig $30ea set, 2 FSU bk math & ing wheels, gd rood, $30. 286-6171. Cpe1rpcosg Abro bed $375, DR IbI, 4 chairs $500. 256refresher math, $1 Sea. 284-6331. 10$ Sa1 /LR, DR, bedru mini blinds. 264-7779. 6457. Round oak b & 2 chairs, $50. 28-FSU bks SYG 1000 $45, Span 1120& 2ac s $. 22 4232. 6 roll up shades light bl, $I0ea 2871121, $45. 286-3441. Chilton repair manual for 1986 Jeep Swedish sofa/Q-sz steeper, classicred ----6591.PreandlsSthoefom$8 Qr.58ACyun7. Cherokee. 287-6395. & yellow striped design, never used, 220Vtoaster$25,elerskillet$35,cof659. Porcelain dols45 tochoose from, $8 Qtrs. 558 A Clayton 7a_. $760. 287-5897. fee maker w/etapot $40, timers $5, Q sz comforter, 4 pillow case, skirt 2 to $35, exc cond. 286-6196. Qtrs. 851 AClayton7am-noon. Maid live-out rook, clean, laundry, box misc ext curds $25. 269-8583. sets sheets polyester, $100/obO. 287-iron ref, $130 a month. 260-3485. Lg, one-seater sofa chair w/otman, ------3999. Metal desk $115, crib bumper $10, Qmrs 374A & B 7um-noon. practically new, wh. modern, comAmana radarrange micro, $100.282micro $85, training pOtty $5, 100 -_______ --o MiscpartsforBMWcarcompatibleto fortuble, $525. 287-5897. 4232. Little tykes tbl & chairs 2 mos old wedding cards $100. 236-2365. Qirs. 149B Amador 7:30am-2pm. 79. 261-7231. _______for[mbrssbd__c__st ___-,dtt&cne great shape, $40. 287-6838. Giant Perigee 15.spd hike new, $250. Conch/chair, oor lamp, brass bed, 8 p LR set w/lamps, end Ib & renter QIrs, 1526C Howard 8-I lam. Royal Doulion Fox Hunting pattern dinette, window shutters, cabinet tb w/cushions, $700/obo. 284-4989. Travel crib $50, infant rar seat $35, 284-5188. china. 269-2972. formica top. 260-4463. -baby carrier, $5. 252-2541. _-rs. Like new Trio wedding set l/2kllttal Qr. 72 Howard 7am. --Kitchen items galore. 28-22 -Lk e rowdigst12tttl. Any one seriously interested in playRCA console 25" TV $300, Samsung Custom tailored class A uniforms, weight $500, engagment ring 1/4kt, 535 Calle Chagres, Ancon 7am-noon ing MB' seAosl& Alliest(WWi board sm refrig $150, AC parts Kitchen Aid, GE refrig, Ig, 22cu fit cap, ice maker in jacket 40 long $25, 6 prs slacks 33 & $150. 286-6134. Qrs I I5B Clayon 7amm game), exp nut necessary. 236-4090. toaster, patio fom. 252-2730. door, almond color, exc cond, $500. 34, $5ea. 269-6828. fl 24-638. -Gasleafvacuum& blower w/bag $75, 284-6328. Q.s. 5CC.ytn --amDepndensouse/family member to 19,000 BTU Friedrich AC $350, 2 20" boys Huffy USA bikes $35ea, eletrnlypewrnterw/dictionary,memQr 5C Cayn -_de a d 12,00 BTUFriedrichAC$275,8,000 Blk sofasieeper&rhair$55, freezer one 12" boy bike, $25. All three in gd ory & word erase, $100. 269-8583. Qirs. 85 IA Ciaytun -. drive an adult from Coroal to ClayBTU Whirlpool AC $i90. 252-2287. $400, dryer $150. 261-6503. cond. 287-4195. 7am-Ipa. ton, M-F 018:45.252-2834. 4Goodyear EagleGT p235 60ns14w/ i Sofa & chair w/uttoman, lots of pilKitchentblw/4chairs, teakwood, fold Ford 302 cylinder heads 58cc. cham4 magrims6lugspackageeal,$400/ Qis 644C Clayton 7am. Live-in maid, dependable, Eng spk lows, best offer. 260-6561. out bar, little tykes pool, misc. 250hers, $175. 287-6484. obo. 260-1948. Qrs. 26lCCocoli Ram-ipm. rare for I child ref. 269-9622. 0363. t 21CCcl8.-Ipo Carpets, mini-blinds, nodoorplooas, Danishlbedrm inwht,2smtbls includClothes & shoes men, women & in Qirs. 1556C Howard 7-h am. Maid live out general housework, no Frigidaire re frig w/iemaker. 284K-sz matt, box spring & frame, $600. ed & bedshets, $400/oo. 236-0984. facts. 284-6190. children flexable hours, $ 130. 2525434. 289-6564. Qtrs. 6548 Los Rios 7am. 6276. Carseat $30, toilet trainer $10, buster Broadcast Beta tapes new, camera Oak t & chairs, grt shape, Seagate GE holpoint dryer Ig cap, $300. 284seal, $15. Baby tub seat & some new batteries & rechargers. 282-4232. Qtrs. 2488 Albrook 7am-noon. Military couple looking for nice, ma107 meg hd, new. 287-6830. 3398. born items. 287-4195. ture lady to care for family. 284-5476. _____________________ -TwogoifbagsSpalding&Maeregor9, Qtrs. 1552B Howard. California K-se waterbed w/air mat, 5,00 BTU AC like new, only used 2 Little tykes castle, executive desk complete w/umbrella exc cond. 252FSU bks, The Legal Boo of Business. mirror, headboard, 6 drawers bottom, weeks, $200. 287-6391 after 6pm. chair. 252-1257. 6566. QLrs. 1042B Clayton 7am-noonf 264-3229. $600. 287-4043. Wall-to-wall carpeting & pad for 3 Dartboardw/woodcase&darts, alum Wedding ring 5/8k total wt, $700. Casa #4 Via Las Tablas Vercruz Bilingual housekeeper, cook, occaEntertainmenrenter $95,deluxevacbedrm tropical, steps burl, lan/beige lawn & breach chair .4 wood dck 287-6728. sm a childcare, live in, honest rliuo cleaner $145. 269-2095. $400, bar set $200. 286-3895. chairs. 252-6223. Q2 s dishes wht/grld 35ea BelQrs. I 103A Clayton 7-11 am. able w/ixd&re,.2l7-3990ftr, 0han Country blue couch & love seat $400, Lgsofa, wht/blue/gray,likenew,$600. Ecy Britanica soc, $200/neg. 252gian carpet, $200. 282-3297. Qtrs. 303A Clayton Sam-noon. Live in, fluent Eng preferable, honest oak dining ff 1 w/6 chairs $258, oak 269-5700. 6722. Elec guitar wi/amp exc cond $200/ Qtrs. 1988A Curundu Sam, reliable to care for 1I mos girl, light Full sz headboard $15, bedraiJs $15. Carseat $40, Patio swing set, $80. obo, baby moniters hardly used, $30/ hooskeeping. 286-3484. Folding artwork I61 w/lamp $85, sm 286-6196. 2268116. obo. 283-3881. Calle H Los Angeles Duplex 1O B. floor lamp $10. 252-2211. MPGMC looking for parents & cx--9 pc DR,solid $1,800/obo, LR w/sofu Conference tb ll0" x 40" $200, 3 disPB 386/25mhzo 107mb am VGA monQirs. 219A Albrook am-noon. pecting parents of twins or other mulOverstuffed blo chair & ottoman sleeper $500/obo, stove, port dishplaycabinetsforoffices$170ea.,tepitormanyextras,$800/obo.285-4734.tiple birth. 287-5889. $150,Q-szwaterbed$100.284-4674. washer, more. 260-6151. per machine like new, $200. 226-8626. Qtr. 618 Clayton 7am-oon. S Compterdesk$ 130,Supras2400 bad Span vpk, live in housekeeper, to do Dyed rattan LR & DR sets $800/obo, 3 ACs, metal shelving, many rugs, Complete slam dunk "lifeitme" hasexternal modemt $40/obo, radar deQrs. 201 IA Cumndu 7-1 Ian. housesork gd i/kids ref. 287-6229. ceiling "an w/amp$70/obo,elecronge patio furn. 260-9824. ketball goal, $150. 269-6829. tector, $50. 284-6327. Qrs. 20278 Curunds 7-h am. $300._226-8116. -Casomers .reuphls1er your farm-Vari-kennels used once, I sm mauve Ten mini blinds. kitchen curtains, pink ture, refinishing, car interior etc. 235Rattan DR & LR sets, $500/ca neg. -ISCOH anOOUS $30, I med b, $45. 269-6829. valences also baby items. 286-6533. Ctytoi 7 9047 after hpi. 260-2901. Qtr. 366B Kobbie 7-1 leGolfclubsTitlesDCl,2-w, h-3woods Hot water heter, gas, 30gal $20, NQirssomebdyKobbiea7-Itktn. Whclpl lrborta,$efrig, $400.252Gi2echgyc/9.tear$i7 check bed for $275 set, irons $200, Hogans ginds 370c] "r'ds work, $150. Qt65s. 61158 Howard 7amtIp baking. 247 1780. 2616. chmei I corhiosplital,$800)/()bo.-251-01p89. Pm $175, tager Fh, $100. 236-0744. 284 6690. ---ReGiner/rocker w/massagesys,$325/ Guf club set i/cart, 2 bags, irons 2 Brake booster & ahniator like new Wdding/anniversary ring sht gold --------.p Mat----g in/o ar, Vener ai a m 250-0192. ob. 252.2211. than 9, woods 1, 3, 4, S, $k 252Chevy 2.8L V6,$2701/obo. 252-6956. w/7 diamondrlhips,$350. 252-2871. Qirs. 150A Howard 7-11a"m. 6831 MIT. Full timeorlive in maidgeneralhouseFun, sm reIg $225, dinette w/8 Endtanp$40,2bar stoos$30, vertiFSUSYG 1000,1BSG 1005,Antt2410, Qtrs.1 998 Curund 6am-I ptm keeping ref. 260-3275 after 5pm. chairs, wood $550. 282-5494. Sega Genesis games $25ea, gulf bag cal blinds, pink, $70. 287-648. .------nw/headrovers $30, men's etonic golf Brass floor lamp w/round glass tb, gd shoes 8 l/2, $35. 287-4428 after 5pm. Class A unionis,44L, $50.287-3420. ,.ad, $45. 287-3420. T o i i e Pwr wheels Barbie Corvette w/extra 2Surfboards $100ea, Nintendogames, TrOpiC Times -GEwasher/dryerset,$450. 286-4889. battery, $80. 284-3670. $45ea._286-3732. -Ad Form 3 oak audio/video TV cabinets, all AF men's bl mess dress w/all accouJr Girl scout uniforn 2 shirts 1 shorts match, exc rond, $275. 283-5723. trements captains shoulder boards, se 12,2 bks & extras. $15. 252 2080. F ANIMALS Whirlpool washer/dryer, super cap, 6 $150. 286-3121 -Coins, duplicate US mint & proof set El AUTOMOBILES PRICE HOME PHONE ins old, $850. 284-6323. Persa carpet 6x81/2, $75. 23310143. 1964-1994. 228-4648. AVAILABLE Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each GE 18,u It, lop/bottom, almond-colBMX bike. 252-1104. Full sz comforter, baby stroller, baby EC BOATS & CAMPERS week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words, but may be edited ored refrig/freezer, like new, still on bath, baby dressing 161. 286-4023. F ELECTRONICS more because of space. Please type or print neatly. Information listed warranty, $670. 232-5622. Picnic table wIn/benes $30, battery ---FOUND below is not included in the ad, but is required for publication. This powered baby swing, $30. 284-4881. Fisher Price carseat adjustable infant/ J HOUSEHOLD information will not be released to third parties. Deadline for the receipt Puremaplecrib, covers haby bed. -todder,machitewash,$40.287-683. LOST of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. Ads are run on a space full sz, sill parts avail, $3013/obo. 287Free Ft Knox. Ky welcome packets, MIC LAEU 6396. 287-4527. Webergri, Coonondahe bikeShimaro MISCELLANEOUS available basis and the staff makes no guarantee of ads running. Ads must component $400. Morey boogie board [: MOTORCYCLES include a home phone number. Ads may be mailed to the Tropis Tnes, Highchair $40, Disney comforter, Bird cage i/hoys. 287-6030. $20, Hitachi VCR, $100. 2631ill. 1 PATIO SALES Unit0936,APOAA34002ordepositedinadropboxat [heAlbrook Post bumper pad, bed-skirt, pillowcase, WANTED 'ice. Ads offering weapons, real estate or sent by FAX will not be mobile & othertoys. 282-4474. Executive chair lined in/gray cloth B-hall goal, backboard, pole in ground Wel -_--material, $180/neg. 223-3542. you remove $150, 5 tiger paw used run. Couch, chair, 2 end ibis. I coffee bl tires 205x75x15, $10-$25. 286 4222. 2 lamps & arc, will deliver, $600. Girls 12" bike 4 ms $40. German SPONSOR'S NAME RANK/GRADE 286-3399. trike w/adult pusihar $40, car seat, Sm ac, gd cond, $225. 256-6830. ---$40. 282-3375 Sofa$350,2end& I cofieetbh,$l II. 2danishtdesk, wh10w/redegsgdszgd ORG. DUTY PHONI! 284-6670. Ninteido gun 8 games $101, Ford rood, $35ea. 236-0984.

PAGE 28

B ) Tropic Times B12 AugP 12,1994i SEmployment days. Take someone special to dinner featuring tableside preparation with Tuxedo Service. HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming QH hSteak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the dining veteran preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming eduQuam. e dr N s it cation and a copy of CASP notice of rating if applicable. Submit *Officers' Club: 282-3439 roo ele a prner a Ner, rib ee orilt. a copy of latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee. A la carte breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. MondaysForpoeple who prefer t cat lighter, meals of chicken marinata, For more information regarding Army vacancy announceFridays and 8-10 .m. Saturdays.in blanc or shrimp Taboga are also available. mcnts (forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the DirecOld fashioned steak night 6-10 p.m. Tuesday and Seafood lover's special 5:30-9 p.m. Fridays and Saturtorate of Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, T ldashoe staf bigft be pharrTed days. Enjoy an array of appetizers and main entrees. or call 285-5201. Thursday Choose cut of eef to be charbroiled. Haug up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or take*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should be the out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or spicey hot wings. first step in the job search. A New family menu Tuesdays and Fridays featuring all the SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at NM-5 levcl and <,Club Amador: 282-4334 past favorites plus new items such as jerked chicken, band above require specialized experience. Specialized experience is A.i-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring made 1/2 pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more. either education above thie high school level or work cetercoce directly related to bthe position liitg tilled. lwpl Bxpdget soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights. f'Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom : 284positions at or above the NM-5 level required Budget experience Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico 4189 or eqtivaletnt education. Panamteno at noon the first Sunday of each month. Disco Jet, 4:30 p.m.1 a.m. Tonight. Dance and relax to Vacancy annotuncements are also available at the Sundial the sounds of DeFay. Recreation Center. Clayton Ahi-night disco, 8 p.m.5 a.m. Saturday. Party all night Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications 4The Loop: 287-3035 long to Disco Jet. ot a contiusttt basis for tie following positions Registers esCJ's Sports Bar offers daily iunch specials I 1:30 -ftoward Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove: 284tablished from these atnottncemsests Will be used t till ptermt Ipro. Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments are seld 14189 tent ad tehtorarv posittous. vls# (Ali -generall Clerical NM-3 (Used to is r SundS.vo a 1w-down to your country favoites, (0 p.mcal position). Pr-' lright CDub features a variety of music W.ednest. csgurday. 73#001A IlGtneral Clerical.,ysi vM-i (Ued tt fil nst r s-Curdays and jzz p.m. Sundays. i .ounry 5 p.m. to closing Fridays. ral position .onvets or parties at Inc Prizmz Night Club or C7's aruoke 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 11 p.m. Tuesday. B# 002 Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Iitcrnittent wk sch) Sorts bar, call 237-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343. C inury and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Wednes*CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is requiredONCO Cub: 287-4716 dtys in te Casual Cove. Lean the latest in line dancing, the /B# 003 Recreatitn Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requtres Csa Maria special through Monday: tortilla, two stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midnight. Cert + 6 mo recreation exp in the field. lautas, rice, frijoles, sour cream and guacamole, $5.50 per Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a nug filled with B i s (Ret tt ts recrei, teson. your favorite draft beverage and go back for refills. exp tn the feld. Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m-i a.m. VB#OOA Secretary (Stenography), NM-6 1, o o Rock 'n' roil golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays: 5 p.m.VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5 gAfbrook Club: 286-3557/3582 midnight Thursdays. VB#006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6 Tonight's entertainment, 5-9 p.m. Rock and Reggae Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. Members 'The following positions are Perm/Temp, Full-time, Partwith Rip Maynard. must have a card and be present to win. Lime, Intermittent. &TopThree_ lub:_2__ 18 VB# 007 -Medical Officer, NE 12/13/14. Steak night 6-9 p.m. Fridays. Choose from rib eye, K.C. Too Three Club: 284-4189 VB# 008 ** Clinical Nufrse, NE li/ce .strip, filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked Karaoke 6 p.m. Fridays. VB# 008 **Clinical Nurse, (RN license requiredd, NM-9/Taobr5p.Wensy.Feea-y-a-e. 10/11. potato, French fries or rice. Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat. VB# 009 s* Practical Nurse, (LPN licence required), NM-S Fiesta de mariscos 6-9 p.m. Saturdays. The seafood Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. ** Selectees for nurse and medical officer position will be feast platter features broiled corvina, stuffed crab, calamari Club closed Saturdays. required to undergo a background check. rings, peel-and-nat shrimp, a choice of potato or rice, cole *Howard Officers' Club: 284-3718 VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2. Closed until further noslaw and vegetables do jour. A la carte menu available. It's prime time 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays. Enjoy the tice. Prime rib dinner, 6-9 p.m. Saturday. Menu also inprime rib special. VB# 011 Manual Positions, MG-3. Closed until further noeludes: Cream of broccoli soup, garden salad, baked potato, Super social hours 5 p.m. Fridays. Come and eat at the twice. baby carrots, french fries or rice. complimentary buffet and enjoy music and dancing all night VB# 012 Manual Positions, MsG-4. Closed stil further nobaycrosfec ne rnc Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-l p.m. in the dinlong. e 013 Manual Positions, MG-S. Closed until furthernoing room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, Game nights and progressive club card drawing 7 p.m. tice. French toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-and-eat Wednesdays. Play pool or darts with a $2 entry fee, winner VB# 014 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-6. Closed until furshrimp, desserts and ice cream bar. takes all, club matches pot. ther notice. Italian night special 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Dining room is closed Sunday and Wednesday nights. The VB# 015 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7. Closed until furSteak-by-the-ounce, 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Choose club is closed Sundays. ther notice. from Rib Eye, Filet Mignon, NY Strip or Prime Rib. New lounge menu available Mondays-Saturdays. their 016 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-8. Closed until furMongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Prepare Rodman thrnotice. R d a VB# 018 Supply Technician. NM-S. Closed until further your plate, choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and notice, have chefs do the job outside on the open grills. *Rodman Club -oen to all ranks: 283-4498 VB# 018A Supply Technician, NM-6. Closed until further Mexican night buffet Tmursdays includes tacos, fajitas, Social hour & hors d'oeuvres, 3:30-11 p.m. Fridays at notice. taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. the Laguna Lounge and Rodman Bohio. VB#017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-S. Limited Country western night Thursdays with free dance All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu II a.m.-I to permanent status employees only. lessons at 7:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples p.m. Mondays-Fridays. VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6. Limdances, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. Country westSoup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Grill menu cited to permanent status employees only. ern music 9-11 p.m. is also available. VB# Vacancies Title and location open today and close Aug. All-you-can-eat homestyle fried chicken, 4:30-8:30 p.m. 16. Howard Wednesday. Grill menu also available. Pacific *Howard Enlisted Members' Club -Dining Room: All-you-can-eat beef and burgundy, 4:30-8:30 p.m. 409-94-MW Management Assistant (Office Automation). 2844189 Wednesdays. Grill menu is also available. NM-344-5. DOL, Transportation Div., Admin office Ft. ClaySunday breakfast buffet 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. An assortCook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays at ton. Note: Bilingual (Fluent English/Spanish). ment of breakfast foods are available in the dining room. the Rodman Bohio. 411-94-LA Computer Specialist, NM-334-9/DEV 11. SenBreakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30 Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. sitive. US Army, ISC, HHD, 106th Sig Bgde, Ft. Clayton. Note: a.m. Saturdays. Upstairs Bar4:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 6-9 p.m. Security clearance is required. If candidate is selected on temp Mexican night and Texas barbecue 5:30-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. appt, candidate must re-compete for higher level. Wednesday. Enjoy all-you-can-eat soft tacos. Fajitas, ribs Dinner is served 6-9 p.m. Mondays-Sundays. 412-94-LA Writer-Editor, NM-1082-9. Sensitive. 106th Sig and fish are also available. *Rodman Annex: 283-4498 security e Oe o it eu eChief of Staff, Ft. Clayton. Note: Saturday night gourmet specials, 5:30 -9 p.m. SaturBreakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays. 414-94-JH Budget Analyst, GS-560-1 1. Sensitive. 470th Military Intelligence Brigade. Corozal. Note: Position is under the Excepted service (CIPMIS). Top secret/Special Intelligence Chape__schedu security is required. Ch p ls ed e 415-94-LA Computer Specialist, NM-334-12. Sensitive. Tradition) 106th Sig Brigade, DOIM, Info Center, Ft. Clayton. Note: SePacific Gorgas Hospital I-2pm Protestant Confirmation unity clearance is required. Building 254, Phone: 282-5507 416-94-JH Wire Communications Cable Splicer, MG-2504Amador Chapel 12:l5pmDaily Catholic Mass (2nd floor) 10. US Army Info Systemt Command, 56th Sig Battalion. Ft. Building 108, Phone: 282-3610 Weekday worship (As anDavis Chapel Clayton. Note: Driver's license is required. Must be able to 8:30am Catholic Mass (Sunday) nunc) Building 32, Phone: 289-3319 satisfactory comtptlete the physical exam. 9:30am CCD Catholic, BuIlding 109 11:30am Catholc Mass(Tesday-Fiday) 417-94-LA Lead Mail & File Clerk (Office Automation), (Sunday) Albrook Chapel Noon CatholicSpanirhMass(Suaday) NM-305-5. Sensitive-Top Secret. Mail & Distribution Br., 10:30snEpliscopal Worship Service Building 860, Phone: 284-3948 1:30pm Protestant Hispanic Service DOIM, 106th Sig Bgde, Ft. Clayton. Note: Top secret clearance (Sunday) 8am Spanish Catholic Mass (Sunday) (Sunday) is required. Driver's license is required. 9am Confessions (Sunday) 418-94-ES Medical Records Tehenician (Office AutomaClayton Chapel -9:15am Catholic Mass (Sunday) Sherman Chapel tion), NM-675-5. USA MEDDAC-Panama, GACH, Dept of RaBuilding 64, Phone: 287-5859 9:45am Protesoat Sunday School Building 152, Phone: 289-6481 diology, Ancon. Note: Limited to MEDDAC/DENTAC perma11:30am Daily Catholic Mass 11am General Protestant Service 8:30am Collective Protestant Worship nent employees, however applications for Temp Nie: 30 Sep 95, 5pm Catholic Mass (Saturday) (Sunday) will be accepted from all sources. 8:45am Collective Protestant Service Howard Chapel l0am Protestant Sunday School 420-94-ES Physical Therapist, NM-633-9. Temp Nte: 30 (Sunday) Building 500, Phone: 284-3948 Espinar Chapel Sep 95. Part-time. USA MEDDAC-Panama, GACH, Dept of 10:30am Catholic Mass (Sunday) 11:3Oam Daily Catholic Mass Buidg 224, Phone: 289-4616 Pediatrics. Ancon. Note: Candidate must be licensed and have 10:30am Protestant Sunday School (Sun4:30pm Confessions (Saturday) 9am Catholic English Mass (Sunday) completed successfully the clinical affiliation requirements. day,Building 156, 287--3497) 5pm Catholic Mass (Saturday) Background check is required. 12:30puaGospl Service (Sunday) 9:30am GeneralProtestantService (Sun9am Protestant Sunday School at Atlantic 5:30pm CCD Catholic, Building. 156 day) s0:15a pCCD Catholic Sunday Schoolat 410-94-SS Housing Maintenance Inspector, NM-303-5. HQ, (Sunday) 11am Catholic Mass (Sunday) Espinar Elementary USAG, DEH-ATL, Family Housing Branch, Ft. Davis. Note: 6pm Evening Service (Sunday) I230MuaGospel Service (Sunday) 10:15am Collective Protestant Worship Driver's license required. Corozal Chapel Rodman Chapel (Sunday) 419-94-ES Licensed Practical Nurse, NM-620-5. Shift workBuilding 112, Phone: 285-6717 Building 40, Phone: 283-4148 11:30pmGospel Sunday School USA MEDDAC/DENTAC-Panama, Ft. Sherman Health Clinic, 7:30pm Jewish (first Friday of month) 8-9am Catholic Mass 12:20pmGospel Service (Sunday) Ft. Sherman. Limited to MEDDAC/DENTAC permanent em10am ilinpanicCatholicMass(Sunday) 10-TlamGeneral ProtestantService (Sun6:30pm Gospel Bible Study (Sunday) ployees, however applications for Temp Nte: 30 Sep 95, will be 1pm Pentecostal Worship (Sunday) day) Islamic Prayer Services 12:30-1:30 p.m. accepted front all sources. 7pm Sunday School (Friday) 11:15am Protestant Communion (Luthern Fridays, Fort Clayton Chapel. 287-5859.


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